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Full text of "The McKendrean : being the year book of McKendree College"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 






http://www.archive.org/details/mckendreanbein1942mcke 



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Of Editors: 

CHARLES CHADWELL 
Editor-in-Chief 

ROSS HORTIN 

Associate Editor 

CYRIL CURTIS 

Business Manager 

ETHEL DEWHIRST 

Assistant Business Manager 

FRANK GLOTFELTY 
Advertising 

CAROL HEER 
Advertising 

CARROL LOWE 

Circulation Manager 

ISABEL SHAFFER 
Organizations 

MARY RUTH SHELTON 
Features 

LELAND GRIEVE 
Sports 

BOYD ANDERSON 
Photography 

EDITH PRITCHARD 
Art 

DR. DOROTHY I. WEST 
Faculty Adviser 



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as seen through the eyes 
of the McKendrean — the annual 
publication of the students of 
McKendree College at 
Lebanon, Illinois 
Volume X, New Series 



1942 




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o the keeper of the keys, the light bulbs, and 
the time; to the wielder of the sarcastic witticism; to the 
woman without a heart, yet who somehow uncannily lays 
hold of our own — to Miss Donaldson, "Liza Jane." 



THIS VOLUME 




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CLASSES 

Campus 
Students 

ACTIVITIES 

Organizations 
Athletics 






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been busily engaged in the process of de- 
veloping integrated personalities. As you 
leaf from page to page and from section 
to section of this book, you will be brought 
face to face with the various factors that 
have had their part in this ever-expanding 
program. If we can impart to you a por- 
tion of the spirit and atmosphere of the 
"Old Hill," this book will have accomp- 
lished its purpose. 





CLARK R. YOST.A.B., D.D., L.LD. 

President 

His whole philosophy of life is built 
around the twin themes of loyalty to the 
highest and of service to his fellowmen; 
his only reward: the satisfaction in helping 
mankind reach a higher degree of per- 
fection. 



CHARLES J. STOWELL, Ph.D. 

Dean 

His tenacity of purpose is exceeded 
only by his insistence upon minute details; 
his love of wisdom only by his interest in 
his students. He is a true Christian gentle- 
man who skillfully directs us in our pursuit 
of knowledge. 




JAMES C. DOLLEY, M.A., Litt.D. 

Latin and Greek 

MRS. BLANCHE 
HERTENSTEIN 

Dietician 

LAURA N. FORD, M.Mus. 

Voice and Public School Music 

EDWIN PERCY BAKER, LL.D., 
M.A. 

Dean Emeritus, German 

NELL GRISWOLD OPPITZ, 
M.A. 

History 

DOROTHY I. WEST, Ph.D. 

English 

MARION LANE CONROW, 
M.A. 

Dean of Women, English 

OLIVER H. KLEINSCHMIDT, 
A.A.G.O. 

Organ, Piano, Theory 

REINHOLD BARRETT 
HOHN, M.A. 

Registrar, Education and 
Psychology 

LEWIS SCHOLL, M.A. 

Coach and Director of Athletics 

ALLEEN WILSON, B.A., B.S. 
in L.S. 

Librcrian 

CORA MARIE THOMAS, 
M.A. 

Speech and Dramatics 

C. DeWITT HARDY, M.A. 

History and Political Science 

MRS. HAROLD E. WALLACF 
B.S. 

Dietician 

HAROLD N. 

HERTENSTEIN, M.S. 

Mathematics and Chemistry 

CLIFFORD C. BROWN, A.B. 

Executive Secretary 

ELIZA JANE DONALDSON, 
M.A. 

Comptroller, Commerce 

RUTH McDANIEL, M.A. 

French and Spanish 



J. CARLYLE HACKNEY, M.A. 

Physics and Chemistry 

WILLIAM JOHN 

SCARBOROUGH, Ph.D. 

Philosophy and Religion 

HAROLD E. WALLACE, 
Ph.D. 

Biology 




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asses 



The forward look, and high, divine resolve; 
The will to learn in true humility. 

Charles Ballard 



SENIORS 

Ralph Aubrey Edwards 

Jane Upchurch Hardy 



Wilma Eleanor Ditzler 

George E. Edwards 



Carlus O. Basinger 

Barbara Woolard 



Jorden Lynn Debban 

Mary Ruth Sheltor 




RALPH AUBREY EDWARDS, A.B. 

East St. Louis 
History 

Philo '39-'42; Glee Club '39-'42; Treasurer, 
Librarian; Sigma Tau Delta; Little Theatre; 
Faculty-Student Council; "Your Uncle Dud- 
ley", "Our Town"; Band; Who's Who 
Among Students in American Colleges and 
Universities; Y.M.C.A.; Student Proctor, 
Carnegie Hall. 



WILMA ELEANOR DITZLER, A.B. 

Sparta 
Religion 

Taylor University, '38-'39; Sigma Beta Rho, 
'39-'42; Vice-President, '41; Y.W.C.A.; Pro- 
gram Chairman, '39-'40, Secretary, '4 I -'42 ; 
Glee Club, '40-'42; Leader Prayer Band, 
'40-42; Assistant, Philosophy and Religion 
40-'42. 



JANE UPCHURCH HARDY, A.B. 

Lebanon 
English 

William and Mary '36-'37, '37-'38, Kappa 
Alpha Theta; Glee Club, '38-'39; "Adam 
and Eva"; "Trojan Women"; "Ruth." 



GEORGE E. EDWARDS, JR. 

East St. Louis 
Biology 

President Student Body, '42; Biology Assist- 
ant, 40-42; Basketball, '39-42; Football, 
'38-41; Co-Captain, 40, Captain, 41; Ipy 
League All-State left halfback, 41; Track, 
'39-42; Varsity Softball, '39-42; President, 
"M" Club, 41-42; President, Plato, 41; 
President, Carnegie Hall, 41; McKendrean 
Staff, 41; Treasurer, Junior Class; Glee 
Club, 41-42; Nature Club, '39-40; "Our 
Town." 



CARLUS O. BASINGER, A.B. 

Summerfiela 1 

Economics and Sociology 

Glee Club, '38-41; Men's Ouartet, '38-41; 
Debate Squad, '38-40; Assistant Editor, Re- 
view, '39-41; Delegate to Principia Confer- 
ence on Public Affairs, '38; Student Faculty 
Council, '39-40; 41-42; Who's Who Among 
Students in American Colleges and Univer- 
sities, 40-42; Philo, '38-42; President, '39- 
40; Winner, Dorris Oratorical Contest, '38- 
'39; Winner, McCormack Oratorical Con- 
test, '38-'39; Senior Class President, 41-42. 



JORDEN LYNN DEBBAN, A.B. 

Bonduel, Wisconsin 
Economics and Sociology 

Football, '39-42: Track, 40-42; Basketball 
Manager, 40-41; "M" Club; Y.M.C.A.; Phi 
Eta Sigma, Mercer University; Lambda Chi 
Alpha, Cumberland University. 



BARBARA WOOLARD 

McLeansboro 
English 

Withdrew to accept p 
phone Company. 



MARY RUTH SHELTON, A.B. 

Vienna 
English 

Clio, '39-42; President, 40; Publicity, 
Y.W.C.A., '39; President Y.W.C.A., 41-42; 
McKendrean Staff, 40-42; Review Staff, '39; 
Sigma Beta Rho; Vice-President, Sigma Tau 
Delta, 42; Debate Squad, 42; Who's Who 
Among Students in American Colleges and 
Universities, 40-42; Glee Club; Secretary, 
Senior Class, 42; "Our Town"; English 
Assistant, 40-42; Band. 




SENIOR OFFICERS 

Mary Ruth Shelton 
Carlus Basinger 
Flossine Rule 



SENIORS 

Arthur Leon Baum 

Lloyd George Pimlott 



Bonnye Lee Broadus 



lye 



Carrol Cecil Lowe 



Kay McLeod 

Charles Frederick Haigh 



T. Allen Brown, Jr. 

Dorothy Alice Reader 




ARTHUR LEON BAUM, A.B. 

Belleville 

Economics and Sociology 

Track Manager, '40; Third place, Dorris 
Oratorical Contest, '41; Philo; President, 
'41; Review Staff, '39; Business Manager, 
'41; McKendrean; Sports Editor, '40; Band, 
'39-'40; "Quality Street"; "She Stoops to 
Conquer"; "Your Uncle Dudley"; Debate, 
'40- '4 1. 



BONNYE LEE BROADUS, A. 



Philadelphia, Mississippi 
English 



Perkinston Junior College, '38-'39, '39-'40; 
Glee Club, '40-'42; Sextet, '40-'42; Y. W. 
A.; Clio. '40-'42; Siqma Tau Delta; 



LLOYD GEORGE PIMLOTT, A.B. 

Lebanon 
Religion 

Track, '38; Y. M. C. A., '38-42; Intra- 
mural Basketball, '38-'42; Intramural Soft- 



CARROL CECIL LOWE, A. 



Oblong 
History 



Student-Faculty Council. 



President, Student Body, '4 1 -'42; Philo, '39- 
'42; President, 42; Secretary, Faculty-Stu- 
dent Council, '4l-'42; Who's Who in Amer- 
ican Colleges and Universities, '42; Nature 
Club, '38-'40; McKendrean Staff, '42; "M" 
Club; Basketball, '39-'4l ; Track, '38-'4l; 
President, Carnegie Hall, '40; Varsity Soft- 
ball, '41. 



KAY McLEOD, A.B. 

Trenton, Missouri 
English 

Central Wesleyan College, '38-'39; Sextet, 
'40-'42; Glee Club, '40- '42; Soloist, '4l-'42; 
Clio, '40-'42; President, '41; Social Chair- 
man, Methodist Youth Fellowship, '4l-'42; 
Social Chairman, Glee Club, '4l-'42; Y. W. 
C. A.; Assistant Registrar, '40-'42. 



CHARLES FREDERICK HAIGH, A.B. 

Chicago 
Philosophy 

Illinois Institute of Technology, '35-'36; 
Sigma Beta Rho, '39-'42; President, '42; 
Debate Squad, '39-'42; Philo, '42; Glee 
Club, '39-'42; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, '39-'42; 
Winner McCormick Oratorical Contest, 
'42. 



THOMAS ALLEN BROWN, JR., A.E 

Lebanon 
History 



DOROTHY ALICE READER, A. 

Lebanon 
English 

Nature Club, '29-'30, '30-'3l. 



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The Student Body 



SENIORS 

Vernita Flossine Rule 

Earl Eugene Myers 



Russel Drennan 

Robert Marion Allen 



Leland Eugene Grieve 

Paul Wesley Yost 



Morion Kleinschmidt 

Anna Lois Gann 




VERNITA FLOSSINE RULE, A.B. 

Pinckneyville 
Enqlish 



Little Theater, '37-'38; French Club, '37-'38; 
Treasurer, '38; "The Cradle Song"; "Jane, 
The Queen"; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, '37-'38, 
'4 1 -'42 ; League Cabinet, '38-'39; President 
of Clark Hall. 41-42; Student-Faculty 
Council, 41-42; Clio, '38-'39, '41-42; Presi- 
dent, 41-42; Vice-President Senior Class; 
Program Committee of Student Associa- 
tion, '42; Sigma Tau Delta, '42; Debate 
Squad, '42; Review Staff, '38; Who's Who 
Among Students in American Colleges and 
Universities, 41. 



RUSSELL T. DRENNAN, B.S. 
East St. Louis 
Chemistry 

Sigma Zeta, Beta Chapter, 40-' 



EARL EUGENE MYERS, A.B. 

Venice 

Philosophy and Religion 

Greenville College, '38-'39; Sigma Beta 
Rho, '39-'42, President, '41-42. 



ROBERT MARION ALLEN, A.B. 

Granite City 
English 

President of Freshman Class, '38-39; Presi- 
dent of Sophomore Class, '39-40; Presi- 
dent of Junior Class, 40-41; Platonian 
Literary Society, President, 40; President 
of Carnegie Hall, 40; Track, '38-'39, 40- 
41; Captain, 41; Varsity Basketball, 40- 
41; "M" Club, '38-41, President, 41; 
Varsity Softball, '39-41; Intramural Ath- 
letic Director, 40-41; Student-Faculty 
Council, 40-41; Football Manager, '39-40. 



LELAND EUGENE GRIEVE, A.B. 

Belleville 
Economics 



Track, '39-42; Basketball, '39-40; Varsity 

Softball, '39-42; "M" Club, 41-42; Presi- 
dent, Carnegie Hall, 41-42; Plato, Presi- 
dent, 42; McKendree Review, Sports Edi- 
tor, '39-40, Editor, 40-41; McKendrean 
Staff, 41-42; Sergeant-at-Arms, Junior 
Class; Public Affairs Conference, 40-42; 
Debate Squad, 42; Student-Faculty Coun- 
cil, 41; Chairman Student Chapel Program 
Committee, 42; "Our Town"; "Not Quite 
Such a Goose." 



PAUL WESLEY YOST, B.S. 

Lebanon 
Biology 

Philo, '39-42; McKendrean Staff, '39-41, 
Editor, 41; Glee Club, '38-42, Vice-Presi- 
dent, '39-40, Treasurer, 41-42; Football 
Manager, '39-40; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 
40; Sigma Zeta Vice Master Scientist, 41- 
42; Little Theater, '39-40; Quartet, 40-42; 
Vice-President Student Association, 42; 
Waggoner Science Society; Nature Club 
Secretary, 40; Student Instructor in Mc- 
Kendree Summer School, 41; Radio Club, 
'38-40. 



MARION KLEINSCHMIDT, A.B. 

Lebanon 
Piano 

Glee Club, '38-'39, 40-41; Clio, '39-40; 
Kittycubs, '39-42; Alpha Psi Omega; 
"Adam and Eva"; "Quality Street"; "With- 
ering Heights"; Doris Oratorical Contest, 
'39; Who's Who in American Colleges 
and Universities, 41-42. 



ANNA LOIS GANN, A.B. 

West Frankfort 
English 

Glee Club, '39-40; Secretary Sophomore 
and Junior Class; President W. A. A., 42; 
Student-Faculty Council, 41-42; "Quality 
Street"; "Trojan Women"; Secretary Stu- 
dent Body, 41-42. 




DORM LIFE— CLARK HALL 

Eunice Bivins 
Joyce Ann Kean 
Betty Stelzreide 



SENIORS 

Harry C. Walker 

Mary Isabel Shaffer 



Viola Virginia Lauer 

Albert Thomas Jondro 



Raymond Clodfelder 




NO PICTURES 



EMMA ELIZABETH FISHER, A.B. 

O'Fallon 
History 

Degree conferred September 26, 1941. 

ROLAND MERNITZ, A.B. 

St. Jacob 
Philosophy 



ROBERT DAVID SORRELLS, A.B. 

East St. Louis 
Voice 



EUGENE M. LECKRONE, A.B. 

Centralia 

Philosophy and Religion 

Degree conferred September 26, 1941 



GLENN N. SAPPINGTON, A.E 

Trenton 
English 



HARRY C. WALKER, A.B. 

Olmstead 
History 

Philo, '35, '36, '42; Nature Club, '35, '36; 
French Club, '35-'36; Pi Kappa Delta, '36, 
'42; Track, '35, '42; Little Theatre, '35, '42. 



VIOLA VIRGINIA LAUER, A. 

Lebanon 
History 

Nature Club, '31. 



MARY ISABEL SHAFFER, A.B. 

Albion 
English 

Student-Faculty Council; Editor of Mc- 
Kendrean, '40; President of Clio, '40; Dor- 
ris Oratorical Contest; Who's Who in 
American Colleges and Universities, '40- 
'41; "Quality Street"; "Wuthering 

Heights"; "Jane, the Queen." 



RAYMOND CLODFELDER 

Granite City 
Religion 

Withdrawn from school at end of first 
semester because of national emergency. 



ALBERT THOMAS JONDRO, B.S. 

Belleville 
Chemistry 



Master Scientist, Beta Chapter 
Zeta, '40-'4l, '41 -'42; Who's 
American Colleges and Universit 



of Sigma 

Who in 

es, '4 1 -'42. 



THIS LAST DAY 



My heart is numbed. 
My brain is in a trance. 
For once I do not look forward. 
I look back to yesterdays; one last chance 
Is mine, this last day 
To make it burn within my soul 
Never to forget. 

It is a pensive sadness that enshrouds me. 
Slowly, quietly, memories float 
Thru the years, and fleetingly blur 
In one moment. 

Friends I leave behind — cherished friends — 
Who have made my life a daily joy and 
heartache. 



Smiles I shall no longer see, of those 

Departed on the way. Gone forever. 

Yet lingering in the heart thru all eternity. 

Cool, calm nights in spiced rose gardens 

Will loom before me always. 

Nights crisp with fallen snow, are only 

memories. 
First acquaintances, first loves 
Overfill these years. 
And they are the best. 

The best years of my life — I realize now — 
On commencement. 

— Marion Kleinschmidt. 




IN THE LIBRARY 

Robert Herman 
Mary Ellen Glotfelty 
Carol Heer 
Robert Dannenbrink 



JUNIORS 



OFFICERS 

President PAUL GRIFFEN 

Vice-President JAMES OPPITZ 

Serg't-at-Arms. . ROYCE TIMMONS 

Reporter JAMES LOY 

Secretary 

... MARY ELIZABETH PRESLEY 

Treasurer ROBERT HERMAN 







James Opp 



Uncle Sam is beckoning, and unhesi- 
tatingly the boys are answering his call 
to service. This class unreservedly 
enters into the activities of the college, 
and its personnel includes many of the 
campus leaders. 



"Friends given by God in mercy and in love; 
My counsellors, my comforters, and guides; 
My joy in grief, my second bliss in joy; 
Companions of my young desires; in doubt 
My oracles; my wings in high pursuit. 
Oh! I remember, and will ne'er forget 
Our meeting spots, our chosen sacred hours; 
Our burning words, that utter'd all the soul, 
Our faces beaming with unearthly love; — 
Sorrow with sorrow sighing, hope with hope 
Exulting, heart embracing, heart entire. 



Pollock — Course of Ti 




Antone Tepatti 

Ethel Dewhirst 

Ross Hortin 

Mary Elizabeth Presley 



Frank Glotfelty 
Grace Phillippo 
Charles Chadwell 
Earl Braeutigam 



Mary Ellen Glotfelty 
Paul Griffin 
Royce Timmons 
LaVerne Book 



Paul Baker 
Barbara Boggess 
Ralph Monken 
Donald Hartman 



Mary Matthews 
Gerald Gulley 
Keith Brunning 
James Oppitz 



Frances Robinson 
Lewis Winterrowd 
James Loy 
Dale Turner 



Robert Herman 
Walton Russ 
Cyril Curtis 



SOPHOMORES 



OFFICERS 

President GEHL DEVORE 

Vice-President... MARGARET SAXE 
Secretary. .. ROBERT MATTHEWS 
Treasurer ROBERT DANNENBRINK 
Serg't-at-Arms. BOYD ANDERSON 




3oyd Anderson, Robert Dannenbrink, Margaret Saxe, Robert 
Matthews, Gehl Devore. 



SOPHOMORE'S PHILOSOPHY 

'Plato, Euripides, Socrates, Diogenes, 
Are known for their philosophies. 
Philosophies of modern Greek, 
Makes ancient logic very weak, 
A sophomore, the might speaks: 

The more you study, the more you know; 
The more you know, the more you forget; 
The more you forget, the less you know. 
So why study? 

The less you study, the less you forget; 
The less you forget, the more you know; 
The more you know, the more you forget. 
So why study? 



Our "intellectual wizards" enthusi- 
astically expound their theories and 
doctrines to all listeners. What their 
philosophy lacks in quality is more than 
compensated for by its quantity. Their 
social program was climaxed by a hay 
ride on which real hay was used. 




Ernie Smith 
Carol Heer 
Arthur Hinson 
Margaret Saxe 



Emma Jane Hackmann 
Gordon Huff 
Alberta Pimlott 
Calvin Ryan 



Donald Harmon 
Beatrice Attey 
Clifford Keck 
Margaret Hcrshbarger 



Edith Pritchard 
Maxine Ball 
Betty Stelzriede 
Boyd Anderson 



Robert Matthews 
Kathleen Weidler 
Leslie Purdy 
Roy Waggoner 



Robert Dannenbrink 
Dottie Moore 
George Kennedy 
Bonnie Bell 



Gehi Devore 
Bernard Logan 
Lois Kinison 
Alvin Whittemore 



FRESHMEN 



OFFICERS 

President PAUL SALMON 

Vice-President RUTH HAUSER 

Secretary DON SMITH 




£isM 






Don Smith, Joyce Ann Kean, Ri 



'A little learning is a dangerous 

thing; 
Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian 

spring: 
There shallow draughts intoxicate 

the brain, 
And drinking largely sobers us 

again." 
POPE — Essay on Criticism 



This year's freshmen are by no means 
the "Green hats" of a decade ago. 
Many of them ore, in fact, seasoned 
officers in Uncle Sam's Armed Forces. 

Their prize accomplishment of the 
year was their early morning party 
which occurred at the un-earthly hour 
of four o'clock in the morning. The old 
bell certainly had a workout. 

The culprits were overjoyed at their 
success, but many of them looked with 
disdain upon the hair-dos which were 
presented to them for such outstand- 
ing originality. 




jp &* C^ O o 

JUL 

^ ID ft o 





Richard Snyder 
Gwendolen Veatch 
Charles Montgomery 
Frank Harris 
Norman Baker 



Ruth Cooper 
Herman Talbert 
Florene Broadus 
James Grove 

Edith Rittenhouse 



Harold Popelka 
Mounts Sorensen 
Joyce Ann Kean 
Warren Beckemeyer 
Virginia Conklin 



Harold Barrow 
Louise Karraker 
Donald Smith 
Ruth Hauser 
John Villarosa 



Jeanne Beatty 
Wyatt Rowlings 
Hirrel Daudermar 
Ralph Sleight 
Robert Winning 



Robert Tenney 
Kenneth Stegall 
Holt Gay 
William Carson 
Orval Wiley 



Daniel Martin 
Richard Wohlschlag 
Jessie Seiber 
Harry Buzzard 
Walter Pimlott 



Raymond Suggs 
Myrl Kuhn 
Paul Salmon 
Raymond Hayes 
Daniel Williamson 



Noble Wright 
James Pinkston 
Thomas Gordon 
Donald Edwards 
Wilbert Cannon 



Harold Nothdurft 
Wanda Barger 
Charles Fenner 
Eunice Bivins 
W. Robert Meyer 




'What revels are in hand? Is there no play 
To ease the anguish of a torturing hour?" 



Shak 



espeare 



ALPHA PSI OMEGA 




Miss Laura Ford, Miss Alleen Wilson, 

Miss Cora Marie Thomas, Robert Herman, James Oppitz, Carol Heer, Mr. Harold Hertenstei 

Frank Giotfelty. 



The dramatic fraternity has followed a very 
interesting and helpful program this year. At 
each monthly meeting two or three current plays 
were discussed. 

Meetings were held at the homes of Miss 
Alleen Wilson, and of Professor and Mrs. Harold 
Hertenstein. 

A trip to the American Theater to see "The 
Doctor's Dilemna" during the first semester was 
a highlight of the season. 

Two initiations were held during the year. A 
successful season was climaxed by a banquet 
in St. Louis. 



Director: 



ROBERT HERMAN 



Stage Manager: 
MARION KLEINSCHMIDT 



Business Manager: 

JAMES OPPITZ 



Faculty Sponsor: 



MISS CORA MARIE 
THOMAS 



SIGMA TAU DELTA 




inye Broadus, Barbara Eoggess, Barbara Woolard, Dr. West 
Ralph Edwards, Mary Elizabeth Presley, Mary Ruth Shelton. 



President: 

BARBARA WOOLARD 



Vice-President: 

MARY RUTH SHELTON 



Secretary-Treasurer: 

RALPH A. EDWARDS 



Sigma Tau Delta is in its sixth year on Mc- 
Kendree's Campus. The meetings are helpful, 
for through them we learn to read and evaluate 
current literary productions. 

During the first semester, four members were 
pledged to our fraternity. They are Mary Eliza- 
beth Presley, Flossine Rule, Barbara Boggess, and 
Bonnye Broadus. 

Early in the second semester, the members of 
our society attended the production of Noel 
Coward's play, "Blithe Spirit," at the American 
Theater in St. Louis. A poem by Mary Ruth 
Shelton, "Evensong," appeared in our national 
magazine, "The Rectangle," for Winter, 1941. 

The fraternity met this spring at the home 
cf Dr. West for an out-of-door picnic supper. 



SIGMA BETA RHO 




Calvin Ryan, Norman Baker, Gehl Devore, Miss Conrow, Rev. Van Leer, Dr. C. R. Yost, Dr. Walton, 

Beatrice Attey, Mary Ruth Shelton, Donald Harmon, Keith Brunning, Charles Haigh. 

Robert Herman, Gerald Gulley, Wilbert Cannon, Charles Chadwell, LaVerne Book, Wilma Ditzler, 

Earl Myers, Dr. Scarborough, George Kennedy, Paul Baker. 



It is the purpose of our fraternity to uphold 
a worthy standard of religion, service and 
brotherhood in the lives of our student ministers. 

Devotional programs were presented on each 
Monday afternoon. Our Witnessing Band, 
which is a continuation of the Gospel Teams, 
appeared in many southern Illinois churches. A 
trip to St. Louis to visit important churches and 
social service organizations was helpful in broad- 
ening our outlook. 

The members enjoyed a banquet as a fitting 
climax to a profitable year. 



Presidents: 

EARL MYERS 
CHARLES HAIGH 



Vice-Presidents: 

WILMA DITZLER 
GEHL DEVORE 



Secretaries: 

CHARLES CHADWELL 
DONALD HARMON 



Program Chairman: 

LaVERNE BOOK 



CLIONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 




Alberta Pimlo+t, 
Kathleen Weidle 



rbara Eoggess, Mary Elizabeth Presley, Bonnie Bell, Bonnye Broac 
Conrow, Lois Kinison, Mary Ruth Shelton, LaVerne Book. 
Margaret Saxe, Dottie Moore, Betty Stelzriede, Kay McLeod, Car 
Mary Matthews, Flossine Rule, Mary Ellen Glotfelty. 



Presidents: 

BARBARA BOGGESS 

KAY McLEOD 

FLOSSINE RULE 

BONNYE BROADUS 



An outstanding trend in the last two years 
has been toward making more helpful programs 
a rule in our society. Each program has a cen- 
tral theme, which, when followed, unifies and 
integrates our thoughts. The constitution has 
been studied and Robert's Rules of Order finds 
a place on each program during parliamentary 
drill. 

Miss Conrow graciously accepted the role of 
sponsor to our group. Eight members were 
pledged during the course of the year. Four 
open sessions were held which proved our con- 
tention that Clio is one of the most useful or- 
ganizations on our Hill. 



PHILOSOPHIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 




Ross Hortin, Charles Haigh, Frank Glotfelty, Paul Yost, Ralph Edwards. 

Ernest Smith, Robert Herman, Gehl Devore, Charles Chadwell, Robert Dannenbrink, Carlus Bassinge 

James Oppitz, Carrol Lowe, Arthur Baum, George Kennedy, Cyril Curtis. 



The society which boasts of being one of the 
oldest literary societies on the campus and in 
the United States is in its one hundred and fifth 
year. Twelve new members were added to the 
roll, bringing the total to twenty-one active 
members. Two pledge banquets were held at 
the Lebanon Hotel, a wiener roast was given on 
March 13, and the Philo-Plato basketball ban- 
quet was held December 4. 

During the current year, Philo created the 
new office of athletic chairman, placing empha- 
sis on the building of strong bodies as well as 
good minds. At the end of the year, the society 
placed on the hardwood, a team almost equal 
in brilliance to the varsity which composed 
Plato's team. On Founders' Day, Philo was 
nosed out by a small five point lead. 



Presidents: 

PAUL YOST 

CARROL LOWE 

CHARLES HAIGH 

RALPH EDWARDS 



PLATONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 




Jesse Seib 

Boyd Ande 



Calvin Ryan 
n, Georg 



Paul Baker, Herbert Schroeder, Donald Hartma 
Raymond Suggs, Wilbert Cannon. 
Edwards, Dr. James C. Dolley, Leland Grieve, Antone Tepatti, James Loy, 
Lewis Winterrowd. 



Presidents: 



LEWIS WINTERROWD 
ANTONE TEPATTI 



That "There'll always be a Plato" was never 
more evident than when Plato met Philo, to test 
by brawn and ready wit the respective merits 
of the two societies in a basketball game on 
Founders' Day. The Platonians point with pride 
to a score 35-29 in their favor. 

This year Plato began the year with seven 
members and pledged thirteen. This is a one 
hundred per cent increase in membership over 
last year. Any organization could be proud of 
such progress — and we are. 

On April 2 an American Flag was presented 
to the college in an impressive service during 
which a former Platonian, Rev. John Glotfelty, 
spoke. 

The season ended its special events with a 
banquet in which Plato cooperated with Philo 
and Clio. Dr. Harold E. Wallace consented to 
act as sponsor in the absence of Coach Lewis 
Scholl. 



Y. W. C. A 




Joyce Ann Keon, Jame Hackmann, Ethel Dewhirst, Kay McLeod, Dottie Moore, Edith Rittenhouse. 

Edith Pritchard, Margaret Harshbarger, Florene Broadus, Maxine Ball, Gwendolen Veotch, Margaret 

Saxe, Alberta Pimlott, Beatrice Attey, Bonnie Bell, Wanda Barger, Hlrrel Dauderman, Miss Conrow. 

LaVerne Book, Bonnye Broadus, Mary Matthews, Flossine Rule, Mory Ruth Shelton, Wilma Ditzler, 

Kathleen Weidler, Lois Kinison, B-etty Stelzriede. 



President: 

MARY RUTH SHELTON 



As is our custom, we tried to make every new 
girl feel that she was a part of our school be- 
fore she came by providing each girl with a 
"big sister" from our organization which in- 
cludes all the girls on the campus. The "Y" 
Mixer, which we give in connection with our 
brother organization, is another traditional part 
of our year's program. 

The Y. W. C. A. provides a spiritual expres- 
sion found in no other organization. One of our 
outstanding programs was a European travel 
lecture by Dr. Pritchard. 

The Y. W. held a "taffy pull" for the entire 
school in Pearson's Hall. Heart Sister Week was 
observed again this year in traditional manner. 



Vice-President: 

FLOSSINE RULE 

Program Chairman: 

BONNYE BROADUS 
Secretary-Treasurer: 

WILMA DITZLER (I) 
ETHEL DEWHIRST (2) 

Social Chairman: 

BETTY STELZRIEDE 

Room Chairmen: 

BEATRICE ATTEY 
KATHLEEN WEIDLER 

Publicity Chairman: 

LOIS KINISON 
Sponsors: 

MRS. C. C. BROWN 
MRS. C. J. STOWELL 



Y. M. C. A 




Calvin Ryan, Charles Haigh, Norman Baker, George Kennedy 
Gehl Devore, Charles Chadwell, Ralph Edwards, Dr. Yost, Cyril Curtis, Donald 
Harmon, Wilbert Cannon, Raymond Suggs. 



President: 

CHARLES CHADWELL 

Vice-President: 

DONALD HARMON 

Secretary-Treasurer: 

GEHL DEVORE 

Social Chairman: 

CHARLES HAIGH 



Chaplain: 



Religious and social fellowship among the 
men on our campus has been successfully pro- 
moted by the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion. The religious emphasis is mode every 
Wednesday evening in our devotional pro- 
grams. Open forums are sometimes held. Among 
the most interesting meetings were Professor R. 
B. Hohn's talk on "Mental Hygiene," Miss 
Marion Conrow's speech about "A Trip to Ko- 
rea," and Dr. J. C. Dolley's resume of "A 
Grecian Trip I Made." 

The social side of our program was rounded 
out by a "Y" Mixer, which was held September 
I I , and by a St. Valentine Party. 



CALVIN RYAN 



Pianist: 



CYRIL CURTIS 



Sponsors: 

DR. W.J.SCARBOROUGH 
PROF. C. D. HARDY 



FACULTY-STUDENT COUNCIL 




Gehl Devore, Dr. Wallace, Frank Glotfelty, Professor Hohn. Dr. Scarborough, Robert Allen 
Ralph Edwards, Miss Wilson, Carroll Lowe, Dr. Yost, Anna Lois Gann, Dean Baker. 



The council to foster better government on 
the Hill is in its third year of service. Students 
elected from the residence halls, the student 
body and those living in town meet with some 
selected faculty members to discuss problems 
and possible improvements in government. This 
year the need for a McKendree sign at the 
intersection of the main highways was discussed 
and became a reality. New library hours were 
experimented with as a result of council discus- 
sion. Cooperation was pledged by this group 
to the Activities Committee in its attempt to 
revive and foster a more colorful May Fete. 

Remarkable progress has been shown in an 
organization which makes suggestions that do 
not necessarily become laws. 



Chairman: 



DR. C. R. YOST 



Secretaries: 

CARROL LOWE (I) 
GEORGE EDWARDS (2) 



DEBATE SQUAD 

!_ 




Harold Nothdurft, Car 



Flossin 
Baker 



: Rule, Mary Ruth Shelton, Charles Haigh, Leland Gr 
James Oppitz, Arthur Baum. 



Illinois Theta Chapter 
Pi Kappa Delta 



President: 



AL JOHNPETER 



Vice-President: 

HARRY WALKER 



The national emergency has curtailed the in- 
tercollegiate itinerary for this year, but the 
intra-squad debates helped to make this as 
profitable a season as we have ever enjoyed. 
A group from the squad attended the fourth 
annual Principia College Public Affairs Confer- 
ence at Elsah, Illinois. 

The national subject for debate was "Re- 
solved that Great Britain and the United States 
should form a federation based upon the eight 
principles of the Churchill-Roosevelt Pact." 

The two intercollegiate debates were held at 
Greenville and Concordia Colleges. 



Secretary: 



JIM OPPITZ 



REVIEW STAFF 




Ryon, Louise Karraker, Joyce Ann Kean, Edith Rittenhouse, Maxine Ball, Gwendolen Veatch. 
Robert Matthews, Robert Allen, James Oppitz, Arthur Baum, Ruth Hauser. 



Editor: 



JAMES OPPITZ 



Competing in the class with other papers 
which are printed at the same frequency and 
from schools which enroll under 400, the Mc- 
Kendree Review came off with third honors in 
the state. 

Jim Oppitz received an honorable mention 
in the Best Story class. 

Bob Matthews, Edith Rittenhouse, Jim Oppitz 
and Mrs. Nell G. Oppitz attended the Illinois 
College Press Association convention in Ma- 
comb, Illinois, on October 4. These members of 
the Review staff participated in round table 
discussions concerning the college newspaper. 

A clever April Fool edition of the paper was 
notable. 



Assistant Editors: 

ROBERT MATTHEWS 
CALVIN RYAN 

Business Manager: 

ARTHUR BAUM 

Circulation Manager: 

RUTH HAUSER 

Typist: 

GWENDOLEN VEATCH 

Sports Editors: 

BOB ALLEN 
AL JOHNPETER 



Reporters: 

Maxine Ball, William Car- 
son, Ruth Hauser, Louise 
Karraker, Edith Ritten- 
house, Joyce Ann Kean. 



McKENDREAN STAFF 




Carol Heer, Leland Griev 

Mary Elizabeth Presley, Dr. Dorothy 



Editor-in-Chief: 

CHARLES CHADWELL 

Associate Editor: 

ROSS HORTIM 

Business Manager: 

CYRIL CURTIS 

Assistant Business Manager: 
ETHEL DEWHIRST 

Advertising: 

FRANK GLOTFELTY 
CAROL HEER 

Circulation Manager: 

CARROL LOWE 

Organizations: 

ISABEL SHAFFER 

Features: 

MARY RUTH SHELTON 



Sports: 



LELAND GRIEVE 



Photography: 

BOYD ANDERSON 

Art: 

EDITH PRITCHARD 

Faculty Adviser: 

DR. DOROTHY I. WEST 



With their customary cheerfulness and self 
sacrifice the annual staff labored up to the 
dead line in order to produce the best book 
possible. Charles Chadwell and his assistants 
spared no effort to produce an annual which 
they hoped would be better than any before. 
This is always the aim of a truly competent staff 
and this group has been no exception. 

If they have, in a small measure, attained 
the standard set for themselves, their effort has 
not been in vain. 



CHORUS 




Raymond Suggs, Ralph Edwards, Orvil Wiley, Richard Snyder, Frank Glotfelty, Don Hartman, 

George Edwards. 
Arthur Hinson, Harold Nothdurft, Paul Yost, Robert Herman, George Kennedy, Antone Tepatti, 

Robert Matthews, Ernest Smith. 
Virginia Conklin, Alberta Pimlott, Barbara Boggess, Ethel Dewhirst, Kay McLeod, Edith Pritchard, 

Dorothy Moore, Lois Kinison, Flossine Rule. 

Miss Laura Ford, Frances Robinson, Mary Matthews, Louise Karraker, Mary R. Shelton, Mary E. 

Glotfelty, Bonnye Broadus, Eunice Bivens, Betty Stelzreide, Florence Broadus. 



This season the chorus can boast that they 
have appeared before more people than in 
year's past. These appearances have been 
made in many of Southern Illinois churches and 
over radio stations in Harrisburg, Herrin, and 
St. Louis. In the latter instance, they sang over 
both KMOX and KSD. Founders' Day and the 
District Conference held at Bethalto were made 
more worthwhile by the songs of this group. 

A party welcoming the new members was 
held during the first semester. A more formal 
and elaborate social event climaxed the year's 
efforts. 

Miss Ford has been tireless in her efforts to 
produce a singing unit. She has been ably as- 
sisted by Robert Herman, a senior member of 
the chorus, who has been soloist, member of the 
chorus, member of the quartet, and composer 
as well. 

As a fitting conclusion to a successful season, 
we presented the oratorio, "The Redemption," 
by Gounod. 



Presidents: 

STELLA MAE STEIDEL 
ROBERT HERMAN 

Vice-Presidents: 
MARY ELLEN GLOTFELTY 
DONALD HARTMAN 

Secretaries: 

BETTY STELZRIEDE 
PAUL YOST 



Ch 



ocial Chairman: 



KAY McLEOD 



Librarian: 



RALPH EDWARDS 



SEXTET AND QUARTET 




B'Onnye Broadus 
Mary Matthews 
Eunice Bivins 
Kay McLeod 
Mary Ellen Glotfelty 
Alberta Pimlott 



Each year the women's sextet and the men's quartet are chosen from the chorus. 
There has been only one change in the group since last year: Eunice Bivins has filled 
June Miller's place as second soprano, and Harold Nothdurft fills the first tenor spot 
in the men's quartet. Ethel Dewhirst has substituted on every occasion when she was 
needed either as a first or second soprano. 

The sextet has sung at the Scott Field Chapel services, at Centralia Youth Fel- 
lowship, for the Men's Club at Granite City, at Central City, at Alma, and for 
the New Baden Women's Club. 



The quartet has appeared in a vesper service at Alton, 
Mascoutah High School, at Scott Field, and in East St. Louis. 



Centralia, at the 




Harold Nothdurft 



Robert Herman 
Donald Hartman 



BAND 




Osbc 



Wilbert Cannon, Director, Paul Yost, Frank Glotfelty, Ethel Dewhirst, George Brown, Willie 

Delores Swindle, Robert Matthews, Gehl Devore, Marcella Siegel. 
Esther Dewhirst, Betty Newsome, Virginia Noland, Cyril Curtis, June Shaffer, Lois Kinison, Alvin 
Whittemore, Benjamin Brown, Clifford Keck, Robert Dannenbrink, Charles Chadwell, James Pinkston. 



Too much cannot be said in praise for the 
revival of one of the most useful and entertain- 
ing organizations here at McKendree. The work 
of the members and of the director, Wilbert 
Cannon, has been untiring. 

What has this organization accomplished? It 
has lent spirited atmosphere to the intercollegi- 
ate games and contests. It has provided inter- 
esting programs and selections for programs. 
Notable was the Founders' Day concert. Not 
only has the band entertained others; it has 
given, also, a wholesome outlet for the latent 
musical ability which so many McKendreans 
possess. 

At the annual McKendree Band Clinic, held 
on the campus this spring, a group of three 
hundred picked musicians from Southern Illinois 
high schools was coached; and in the evening 
of the same day, a mass band was formed 
under the direction of Mr. Barton, of the Leb- 
anon High School, and Mr. Cannon. 

A baby symphony orchestra of twenty-five 
pieces was organized on our campus this year. 
This group was also under the leadership of Mr. 
Cannon. 



Presided 



PAUL YOST 



Librarian: 

VIRGINIA NOLAN 



Secretary-Treasurer: 

CYRIL CURTIS 



W. A. A. 




Jane Hackmann, Hirrel Dauderman, Edith Pritchard, Ruth Hauser, Frances Robinso 
Gann, Mary E. Presley, Miss Thomas, Kathleen Weidler, Ruth Cooper, Jeanne Beatty, 
Bonnie Bell, Wanda Barger, Barbara Woolard, Lois Kinison. 



, An 
Maxi 



Lois 
Ball, 



President: 

ANNA LOIS GANN 



Secretary-Treasurer: 

BONNIE BELL 



The outstanding events sponsored by the 
Women's Athletic Association this year were 
the basketball and ping pong tournaments. The 
basketball tournament was won by the team 
which Lois Kinison coached. Anna Lois Gann 
was the champion of the ping pong tournament. 

The mid-semester social event — a skating 
party — W a S held at the Crystal Roller Rink in 
St. Louis. 

Pledged to the society were eight members. 



Point-Keeper: 

JANE HACKMANN 



LITTLE THEATER 




STANDING: Orvol Wiley, Robert Herman, Miss Cora Marie Thomas, Harold Nothdurft, 

Ralph Edwards, Wilbert Cannon. 

SEATED: Frances Robinson, Mary Ellen Glotfelty, Carol Heer, Virginia Canklin, Frank Glotfelty, 

Betty Stelzriede, Mary Elizabeth Presley. 



The Drama Society was reorganized this year 
under a new plan. All those at the first meet- 
ing became charter members while those who 
entered later in the year passed through a six 
weeks pledgeship. 

Interesting programs were given each month 
and the first open session in the history of the 
group was held during the second semester. 

A theater party to the American Theater at 
St. Louis to see "Macbeth" was one of the out- 
standing events of the year. 

As usual the Little Theater helped the Play 
Production Class produce their one-act plays. 



President: 

FRANCES ROBINSON 



Vice-President: 

ROBERT HERMAN 



Secretary-Treasurer: 

MARY E. PRESLEY 




Leland Grieve, Jorde 
Donald Hartman, H 



Debban, George Edwards, Ross Hor+in, 
bert Schroeder, Boyd Anderson, Lewis 
Wyatt Rowlings. 
Loy, George Kennedy, Royce Timmons, Robert Alle 
Robert Dannenbrink. 



Earl Braeutigam, Richard Snyder 
Winterrowd, Andrew Patterson 



Arthur Hinson, Carrol Lowe, 



President: 

GEORGE EDWARDS 



Vice-President: 

PAUL GRIFFIN 



Secretary-Treasurer: 



ROSS HORTIN 



Our club has a unique membership — admit- 
tance is granted to only the highest type of 
athlete who stands for pure sportsmanship and 
all other qualities that the word implies. Fif- 
teen such members were added to the "M" 
Club roll this year. 

The gala festivities which attend the election 
and crowning of the football queen were spon- 
sored by us. This year Bonnie Bell, a sophomore 
from Flora, reigned as Queen of the Homecom- 
ing activities. 

Graduating seniors who will receive valuable 
emblems are George Edwards, Leland Grieve, 
Carrol Lowe, and Jorden Debben. 



FOOTBALL SQUAD 



/ .47 <4I <^ 1 44 | 31 



Manager Lewis Winterrowd, Frank Harris, Herbert Schroeder, Walte 

Don Hartman, Paul Griffin, Earl Braeutigam, Coach Lewis Scholl, Ros 

Royce Timmons, Captain George Edwards, Arthur Hinson, Harold E 



Pimlott, Richard Snyder, 
; Hortin, Wyatt Rowlings, 
arrow, George Kennedy. 



Under the generalship of Coach Lewis Scholl and Captain "Buddy" Edwards, 
this "big" little team wound up the season with two wins, a tie, and four setbacks; 
but this record, discouraging as it may be, doesn't tell the story. 

The spirit with which the team played, when each member knew that there was 
very little chance of a substitution being made for him, was tremendous. Sixteen 
men was the greatest number of players used in any one game, and the fight put 
up by those few was and will be hard to beat. 

More men and fewer injuries would have told a different story about the 1941 
edition of the McKendree Bearcats. 



FOOTBALL QUEEN 



Miss Bonnie Bell, a sophomore, won the 
coveted honor of presiding as Queen over 
the Homecoming football contest. She was 
a Maid of Honor during her first year. 

A diversity of interests claims the attention 
of her Majesty: Bonnie is an active member 
of the Clionian Literary Society and took 
part in the Homecoming play "Your Uncle 
Dudley" and the May Day play. Our Queen 
has actively participated in the Women's 
Athletic Association and has been a mem- 
ber of the basketball team. 

It is needless to tell those on our campus 
of her pieasant smile and lovable disposition; 
but for you who do not know, Bonnie is one 
of the most admired women on our Hill. 





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Our college 'mid plains is standing, 

Standing there from olden days — 

A pioneer of learning, 

First in untrodden ways. 

For service and Christian culture, 

For efficiency she stands. 

Her sons and daughters praise her 

With voices, hearts, and hands. 



Chorus 

Hail to thee, our dear old McKendree! 

May we always loyal be. 

It's a song of praise we raise to thee, 

Alma Mater, dear old M C. 

May we ever hold thee true and wise and right. 

Honor purple and the white; 

And for victory we'll always fight 

Till we win for old M C K. 




Scholl 

Edwards 



Griffin 

Snyder 
Horti 



Kennedy 
Schroeder 
Pimlott 



Rowlings 
Hinson 



Harris 



Barrow 

Hartman 
Timmons 



CAPTAIN GEORGE EDWARDS, Senior 

East St. Louis, Quarterback, four-year let- 
terman. 
The Purple's retiring captain, the ever-popular "Buddy," 
closed a gridiron career which will long be remembered 
by McKendree's football friends. Edwards threw 
passes, caught passes, punted, place-kicked, called sig- 
nals and carried the ball — and performed all functions 
with plenty of scrap for his team and his school. 
"Buddy" was picked as a halfback on the Ivy League 
all-star team, and really deserved the honoring of his 
outstanding offensive and defensive play, and smart 
generalship. 

CAPTAIN-ELECT EARL BRAEUTIGAM, Junior 
Mascoutah, Fullback, three-year letterman. 
"Meathead," who has been accepted by the U. S. Naval 
Air Corps, will not be around to hit the line for Mc- 
Kendree next year, and those teams listed on the 
Purple's schedule will be glad of it. Earl was a 
bruiser, and moved fast enough that it hurt to get 
in front of him. Twenty-four of McKendree's thirty- 
eight points were scored by this 212-pound smasher, 
all on line plunges. His never-give-up spirit, his drive, 
and defensive ability will be missed by the 1942 team. 

CO-CAPTAIN ELECT PAUL GRIFFIN, Junior 
East St. Louis, Halfback, two-year letter- 
man. 
Tall, rangy, powerful, and fast, Griffin was a mighty 
good ball-carrier, and very ably took over the duties 
after an injured wrist healed. His best game was un- 
doubtedly the mud-fest at LaSalle-Peru, in which he 
handled almost all the running assignments, due to 
the fact that Braeutigam was injured. Griffin toted 
the ball to the one-yard line, to set up Braeutigam's 
touchdown. He again carried to the yard-stripe, only 
to have the slippery oval squirt from his arms just as 
he was about to score in the closing minutes of the 
game. "Wang" will be back with the Purple next 
year. 

CO-CAPTAIN ELECT RICHARD SNYDER, 
Freshman 

East St. Louis, End, one-year letterman. 
A big, tough, hard-hitting, pass-catching end is some- 
thing a coach desires very much, and Mentor Lewis 
Scholl wo- blessed with Dick Snyder to fill the bill. 
Dick was a good man, and will be a big factor in the 
building of the 1942 eleven. His aggressiveness and 
fight meant a lot to the small squad. 

DONALD HARTMAN, Junior 

O'Fallon, End, three-year letterman. 
Big Don opened the holes on offense, closed them 
on defense, and plugged all the time against fresh 
tackles, although he could hardly drag himself into 
position. "Duck" will be back for his fourth season 
next year, and his ability will again be in demand. 

ROYCE TIMMONS, Junior 

Granite City, Halfback, two-year letter- 
man. 
"Meece" was stubby and fast, and was a nice, little 
pass-tosser, and will be sorely missed next year. He 
is flying in Uncle Sam's Air Corps, and if he "puts out" 
as much up there as he did here, Coach Sam will be 
well-satisfied. 



ROSS HORTIN, Junior 

Albion, Center, two-year letterman. 
Ross was regular center this year, after having under- 
studied Ray Fary for two seasons. And believe it, he 
really went to town in the pivot spot. He's a mighty 
good man to have around, and he will be around 
next year. 

ARTHUR HINSON, Sophomore 

Madison, Guard, one-year letterman. 
Here's the hard-charging, football-playing boy from 
Modison, who was laid up as a freshman with a bum 
knee and couldn't show his stuff then. But when he took 
off the wraps this season, he proved that underneath 
them there was 185 pounds of gridiron stuff which 
could last any sixty-minute game. Arty will be back 
for two years more. 

GEORGE KENNEDY, Sophomore 

Mound City, Tackle, one-year letterman. 
George was a hard-blocking tackle and a rugged man 
on defense. He asked no quarter, and gave none, 
always scrapping his way into the enemy backfield. He 



>t his share of the tackles, and sometimes 



few 



HERBERT SCHROEDER, Sophomore 

Mascoutah, Tackle, two-year letterman. 

Schroeder came here two years ago with no gridiron 
experience, but he improved much, and was one of 
the men who rated a nod in the Purple forward wall. 
He was hard to get out of the way when enemy inter- 
ference moved in his direction, and he was among 
the first through the line to break up plays. 

WYATT RAWLINGS, Freshman 

East St. Louis, Guard, one-year letterman. 

Rowlings was a rough-looking boy in a football suit, 
and he was mighty rough, too. He came to school 
with a rep of being a good player, and lived up to 
it, fighting all the time. Rowlings was strictly a team 
man, and fought to win. He took a lot of beatings, 
as did everyone, and strained up to the final gun. 

WALTER PIMLOTT, Sophomore 

Carmi, Tackle, two-year letterman. 
When it came to playing against odds, "Red" didn't 
mind, but he'd just dig in and put out that much 
more. Tall and well-built, weighing 180, this titan- 
haired sophomore was just too good for most of the 
guys he ran against. 

FRANK HARRIS, Freshman 

East St. Louis, Tackle, one-year letterman. 
After Frank got a chance to show his stuff, he proved 
that he was a much better player than he was given 
credit for being. His size made him mighty handy to 
have around. Big things are expected of Frank on 
the gridiron. 

HAROLD BARROW, Freshman 

Belleville, End, one-year letterman. 

Here's a little man, weighing only 140, who stuck 
thiough thick and thin, and was always ready when 
he was called. He's in the U. S. Army now, and his 
determination will help him to go places there. 



BASKETBALL SQUAD 




Herbert Schroeder, Malcolm h 
Smith, Antone Tepatti, Co 



res, Co-captain Andy Patterson, James Gr 
jptain Lev/Is Winterrowd, Boyd Anderson. 



The Bearcat cagers opened the season with a victory over Jefferson College, 
but added to that a string of nine straight defeats, to finish half the season 'way 
on the short end of the "won and lost" score. 

But under the smart tutelage of Coach Lewis Scholl and the leadership of 
their co-captains, Lewis Winterrowd and Andy Patterson, the McKendreans poured 
it on down the back stretch and all the way home, as they emerged victors in seven 
of their last ten games. 

In this "win" streak, the Schollmen added another conquest over Jefferson, and 
avenged setbacks by Centralia, Harris, Conccrdia, and Blackburn, and picked up a 
pair of wins over Parks Air College. 

Two of the losses were to St. Louis and Washington Universities, and two more 
to Austin Peay College, of Clarksville, Tennessee, and Lambeth College, at Jack 
son, Tennessee. 



CO-CAPTAIN LEWIS WINTERROWD 
Junior 

Bible Grove, Forward, two-year-let- 

terman. 
As a captain should, Louie set an excellent 
example for the rest of the squad to -follow. 
He played hard, never giving up, ond he 
played to win. He kept himself in good 
physical trim, and he was always striving to 
better himself os a basketball player. He 
was one of the high scorers on the Purple, 
his best game being against Concordia when 
he laid in eighteen points. 

CO-CAPTAIN ANDY PATTERSON, 
Sophomore 

West Frankfort, Forward, one-year 

letterman. 
Andy was short, but he was fast and had a 
dead eye; and consequently he was one of the 
kingpins of the Bearcat quintet. Patterson 
led the entire squad in scoring, and he could 
always be counted on to net a goodly num- 
ber of points. His scrappiness enabled him 
to break up enemy plays, and one of his 
favorite tricks was to steal the ball from 
an opponent and dribble unmolested down 
the floor for an easy setup shot. 

BOYD ANDERSON, Sophomore 

Albion, Guard, one-year letterman. 
"Tex" had height and knew how to use it; 
consequently he was the best rebounder, both 
on offense and defense. He counted a 
number of points that way, and added a 
few more with his under-handed long shot. 
One of his greatest assets was his pep, and 
he was always sharing it with the rest of the 
team. He was also one of the best foul-shot 
artists on the squad. 

ANTONE TEPATTI, Junior 

Pocahontas, Guard, one-year let- 
terman. 
This dark, little, smiling boy was the hardesr- 
fighting guy on the squad; and although he 
had more than his share of the fouls, he 
was putting out all the time. "Tony's" best 
game was the Shurtleff fracas, in which he 
was outstand ng defensively and offensively, 
sinking five long shots from the center of 
the floor. 

GORDON HUFF, Junior 
Owensville, Forward, one-year letter- 
man. 
"Tuffy" is with Uncle Sam now, serving as a 
second lieutenant in the Army. He was in 
school long enough to finish the basketbcll 
season, and it was good that he was. His 
ability to fill in for anybody on the floor 
made him very valuable. 

JAMES GROVE, Freshman 

Batchtown, Forward, one-year let- 
terman. 
Jim could always be counted on to hold up 
his end of the load when he was in the 
game. This good-looking, dark-haired fresh- 
man played heads-up ball all the time, and 
will be expected to show more, as he has 
three years of school to go. 




V 10 ', 



I 





\ 1 *\ I 




MALCOLM MYRES, Junior 

Belleville, Center, one-year letter- 
man. 
Entering school at the beginning of the sec- 
ond semester, as a transfer student from 
Blackburn, Mai helped pull the Purple out 
of a slump. His height ond scoring ability 
made him one of the standouts. One sports 
writer coined the term, A.M., indicating the 
season "after Myres," to show the improve- 
ment the addition of Myres made in the 

EARNEST SMITH, Sophomore 

Woodriver, Forward, two-year let- 
terman. 
Ernie was a good man to have around, and 
when he was in there he was very steady. 
Ernie started out two years ago as an in- 
experienced freshman, but he has gradually 
developed into a dandy little ball-player. 
He is young, and will be a valuable man to 
the team for the next two years. 



KITTYCUBS 




Eunice Bivins, Ethel Dewhirst, Virginia Conklin, Miss Cora Marie Thomas, Joyce Ann Kean, Jane 

Hackmann, Margaret Harshbarger, Betty Stelzriede, Ruth Hauser, Lois Kinison, Bonnie Bell, 

Margaret Saxe. 



Co-Captains: Lois Kinison 

Mary Matthews 



The girls' basketball team played a heavier schedule this year than last year. 
This organization of athletically-minded girls played a total of nine games, a cir- 
cumstance which gave them more chance to perfect their game. 

Two games were played with Blackburn, Harris Teachers' College and Shurtleff 
each. Three games were scheduled with an independent team from town. Three of 
the nine games were won, and there was a prevailing good sportsmanship in spite of 
the fact that the losses were close. 

Marion Kleinschmidt is finishing four years as a Kittycub guard. Ruth Hauser 
was the high-scoring member of the team for this season, though she played part 
of one game with a sprained ankle. 



TRACK SQUAD 




Manager Herbert Schroeder, Holt Gay, Boyd Anderson, Calvin Ryan, Don Hartman, Frank Harris 

Carrol Lowe, Clifford Keck, James Pinkston, Bernard Logan, Leland Grieve, George Edwards 

Jorden Debban, Harry Walker. 



There are nine returning lettermen on the track and field squad this year, and a 
number of promising freshmen, which all adds up to what should be a fair season. 

The Purple thinclads have two dual meets with both Shurtleff and Harris, and 
will entertain Shurtleff, Principia, Harris and Eureka, at a five-sided event on Hypes 
Field. There is also a possibility of a pair of meets with Concordia Seminary. 

The returning lettermen are Carrol Lowe, poie vault; Paul Griffin, weights 
and dashes; Boyd Anderson, hurdles, javelin, and pole vault; Don Hartman, shot 
and discus; Dick Snyder, dashes; Bob Dannenbrink, middle distances; Cliff Keck, 
distances; George Edwards, weights and half-mile; and Leland Grieve, hurdles and 
broad jump. 



YOUR UNCLE DUDLEY" 













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Betty Stelzriede, Ralph Edwards, Bob Herman, Wilbert Cannon, Virginia Conkli 
Bonnie Bell, Carol Heer. 



"Your Uncle Dudley," by Howard Lindsey and Bertrand Robinson, proved to 
be much more entertaining than it sounded from hearing "Good-bye forever, good- 
bye forever" shouted double forte about ten-thirty every evening. In spite of slap- 
stick in the part of young Cyril Church, melodrama in the parts of Robert and 
Ethelyn, and realism in the part of Mrs. Church, the play keeps its balance by means 
of the title-character, Uncle Dudley, whose desire to make everyone happy keeps 
him with his back to the proverbial wall throughout the three acts. 



CAST 

Mabel Dixon Church Bonnie Bell 

Ethelyn Church Betty Stelzriede 

Janet Dixon Carol Heer 

Cyril Church Wilbert Cannon 

Dudley Dixon Arthur Baum 

Christine Sederholm Virginia Conklin 

Charlie Post Ralph Edwards 

Robert Kirby Robert Herman 



"OUR TOWN'' 

Thornton Wilder's "Our Town," sans props, sans physical perspective in gen- 
eral, was a definite swing towards the ultra-modern in drama. The philosophizing, 
pipe-smoking stage manager is, without a doubt, the pivot about which the homely, 
day-by-day events in the lives of ordinary people turn; and the dead perched up- 
right on chairs in the closing scene make a profound impression of serene contem- 
plation of the eternal. 



CAST 

Stage Manager James Oppitz 

Dr. Gibbs Orval Wiley 

Joe Crowell Bill Carson 

Howie Newsome George Kennedy 

Mrs. Gibbs Kay McLeod 

Mrs. Webb Louise Beaty 

George Gibbs Boyd Anderson 

Rebecca Gibbs Frances Robinson 

Wally Webb Earnest Smith 

Emily Webb Betty Stelzriede 

Prof. Willard Wilbert Cannon 

Simon Stimson Robert Matthews 

Mrs. Soames Caro1 Heer 

Constable Albert Johnpeter 

Si Crowell Earnest Smith 

Sam Craig Harold Nothdurft 

Joe Stoddard Frank Glotfelty 

Woman in Balcony Virginia Conklin 

Lady in Box Mary Ruth Shelton 

Baseball Players Leland Grieve 

George Edwards 



CHEERS FOR MISS DONALDSON 

It is about ten o'clock the morning of Freshman registration. The hall of Old 
Main is churning with people we've never seen before. The door to the south 
office is shut; but through the door of the business office, we can see Miss Donald- 
son doing nothing. A freshman enters from the hall, but he goes unnoticed 
because of his minute size. He stands awhile and finally says in a voice full of 
anything but proper freshman meekness, 

"I wanna pay you some money!" 

Miss Donaldson jumps out of her chair and grabs her receipt book on the 
run. Looking down over the desk, she sees a small gentleman whom we shall later 
know as "Oklahoma's gift to the women," or none other than William Carson, 
Esquire. He says, 

"Am I supposed to pay you some money?" 

"I don't know. Are you?" 

"You don't know? Look here, you're Miss Donaldson; you admit that, don't 

you?" 

"Yes." 

"Well, them guys where I live said I'se supposed to pay my money to you." 

"Um-hum. Let me see your cards." 

"Cards? What kinda cards? I haven't got any cards." 

"Well, you can't pay me anything until you register and see Mr. Brown." 

"Mr. Brown? Whatta I have to see him for? What's registerin' got to do 

with payin' you, anyhow?" 

"You go across the hall and get a long white card like everyone else's got. 
Then find a teacher to help you decide what to take. When you get an approval 
of your schedule, go to the south office door and see Mr. Brown. Then you can 
bring me all your cards and your money and we'll see what I can do." 

"How long 'N that take?" 

"Depends on how much trouble you have deciding what to take and how 
many people are ahead of you in getting to see Mr. Brown. By now, I'd say there 
ought to be fifteen people ahead of you." 

"Fifteen people! Looka here! I ain't got time to hang around here all 
mornin' waitin' to see a guy when all I need to do is pay you. I'm not gonna 
work, anyhow." 

By this time, a line of freshmen has formed at the end of the desk. 

"You'd better run along and begin registering. That line's going to be longer 
than ever if you don't hurry. — Kay, come here and take these people's cards." 




Miss Donaldson is busily sorting registration cards. Dr. Wallace is in Prof. 
Hohn's office checking a senior schedule; at the typewriter near the vault we see 
Ralph Edwards typing book orders. Jorden Debban saunters in and asks for a 
time sheet. Miss Donaldson says, 

"Haven't got any time sheets run off yet. Besides, you can't start working 
till Mr. Brown tells you to." 

"Well, now, he told me to start puttin' in time this afternoon. Several things 
needin' to be done, Miss Donaldson. Forced to work today." 

"I imagine that's the only way you'll ever work, too — is when somebody forces 
you to." 

"Now, look, Miss Donaldson, I'll be forced to ask you to go to the show with 
me if you don't be more amiable. Forced to take you out tonight." 

"What's this? Don't tell me you're not going to the 'Y' Mixer tonight? Just 
think of all the little freshman girls you'll be depriving of a lovely time!" 

"Well, now that you put it that way — forced to change my plans, Miss Donald- 
son; forced to go to the party instead." 

"Yeah—" 

"How about goin' to the show next Wednesday, Miss Donaldson?" 

" 'Fraid not. The President's reception is going to be next Wednesday. 
Where's your school spirit, Mr. Debban?" 

Ralph jumps up and knocks his chair over backwards as he becomes enthusiastic: 

"Hey, 'Liza, I just got an idea! Why doesn't the bookstore sell green caps 
this year?" 

"I don't know! Why?" 

"Now, look, Miss Donaldson, the bookstore might as well make that money." 

"I don't care who sells caps. I'm not going to buy any. Why don't you go 
see Clifford if you want to sell caps? He probably knows some place you could 
buy them three for a dime. Might be a good idea if you inquired about a good 
second-hand furniture store, too." 

Dr. Wallace comes out of the vault just in time to see a trail of flying papers 
left by the departing whirlwind, and Eliza observes: 

"Ooooh, that crazy boy! If he didn't go so fast, I'd make him come back and 
pick them every one up." 

"Never mind; I'll get them." 

"Never mind, nothing! I wouldn't pick up his old papers. He can pick 'em 
up himself when he gets back." 

"Look, 'Liza, I've been trying to find the hectograph roll for fifteen minutes. 
Will you please tell me where it is?" 

"I can't keep on track of that ditto roll. Go look on the ditto machine in 
there. Someone used it this morning. If it's not there, I'm sure I don't know 
where it is." 

She sits down at the adding machine and starts to tabulate. 

" 'Liza, will you type these instructions for me? I want them tomorrow for 
my zoology class." 



"This is a fine time to ask me to do your zoology instructions for you. I 
haven't got time. Besides, you're making me make mistakes. Do 'em yourself." 

"Well, why don't you furnish me a secretary? It takes me forever to peck out 
these things myself." 

"What do you think your wife'd say if I got you the kind of secretary you 
want? Now, you quit bothering me or you'll have to have a secretary. — There! it's 
four-thirty, and I've got to go to town before five o'clock. Don't go away with- 
out throwing the lock." 

• * * * 




It is the day before Homecoming. 'Liza is typing the chapel program. Clifford 
Cates comes in and picks up the time sheets. 

"Who's signed out to work, 'Liza? I need someone to carry chairs from Clio 
to the dining hall." 

"Well, I don't know who's signed out, Clifford. I think George Pimlott and 
Charles Haigh — and, oh, yes, Dick Snyder — " 

"Yeah, I saw Snyder coming from town about half an hour ago. Didn't look 
like he was raking many leaves to me. Here he's signed out till five o'clock, too. 
I don't know what I'm going to do about fellows signing in before they're finished 
working. . . . Say, 'Liza, will you call up Snyder and tell him I want him to come 
over here? Tell him I want him to do something." 

"Well, Clifford, I'm busy. Now, you call him yourself." 

"I've gotta go get the key to Clio from Barbara Boggess. You call Snyder 
and tell him to get — No, you'd better call Tepatti, too. Tell them both to come 
over here and see me." 

"Clifford, I'm not going to make your telephone calls for you. If you want 
those boys, you sit right down and call 'em yourself!" 

"I've gotta go get that key." Door slams. 

"Clifford Oh, me!" 

Tepatti comes in. 

"Where's Clifford?" 

"Oh, he's gone over to the women's dormitory." 

"He said he wanted to see me." 

"Well, you'll have to wait till he comes back. He wants you to wash dishes 
in Mr. Hinson's place tomorrow." 

"Shoot, no, I'm not goin' to wash dishes tomorrow. Think I wantta spend all 
afternoon in that dish-room? Man, that old dishwasher won't even get 'em clean 
when we've got regular dishes 10 do. Them old dishes stacked clear to th' ceil- 
ing — we never would get 'em clean." 



"Well, you'l! hove to see Mr. Brown about that." 

"Well, I don't aim to wash dishes tomorrow. No, sir! Ycu tell him I said so." 

"You'd better tell him yourself." Door slams again. "I wish that man would 

stay here and tend to his own business." 

Flossine Rule enters; she is obviously not in a good humor: 

"What's Clifford going to do with the key to Clio Hall?" 

"Said he's going to have the chairs carried to the dining hall for tomorrow." 

"He's got his nerve! Did he ask anyone if he could borrow Clio's chairs?" 

"Oh, I don't know. He went to borrow the key from Barbara. I suppose he'll 
ask her." 

"I'd like to know who he thinks he is! He uses the Hall all fall for chapel 
and doesn't ask us and gets our rug muddy and never offers to have it cleaned up. 
Now he's helping himself to our chairs. Some of these days he's going to make 
me so mad! I'm going to tell him off. I sure won't be afraid to, either." 

"Um-hum." 

"Just wait till I see him! I'm going to give him a piece of my mind!" She 
bangs the door after her. 

"I wish that Clifford would stay here and take care of his own business!" 




Cannon is talking to Clifford in the south office. 'Liza is working over her 
account book. Kennedy has just come in brandishing an N. Y. A. check. 

"Hello, Miss D. Is Mr. Broon around? Heh! heh! Did you notice how funny 
that sounded? 'Mr Broon aroun'?" 

"He's talking to Mr. Cannon." 

"Are you in a good mood today, Miss D?" 

"Well, I'm not; and if you don't hush, I'm going to be in an awfully bad 
one shortly." 

"Now, look Miss D., I was goin' to pay you some money. But if you don't 
want it — 

"How much're you going to pay me?" 

"$12.95. That's all I got — Just think how you're breakin' me up!" 
"Yea — I'm so sorry. Bet I'm breakin' your heart up, too!" 

"You know it! Oh, say, Miss D., that makes me think: I've got somethin' for 
the office gals — see — kisses!" 



"Well, Isn't that just wonderful! How much did you say you're going to 
pay me?" 

"$12.95." 

While 'Liza is writing out the receipt, Cannon comes in from the south office 
and asks for the key to Clio Hall. Miss Donaldson replies, 

"I don't give out keys just because someone wants them. What are you going 
to do with the key to Clio?" 

"The band's going to Dlay at the game tonight, and we need the chairs." 

"Well, I guess. But don't be surprised if Miss Rule pulls about half your 
hair out." 

"Oh, I can handle Sugar-plum all right. Why, I'll just pin her ears back and 
be done with her. She's a brat." 

Miss Thomas enters: 

"You about ready to go to town, 'Lizc?" 

"Oh, I was until Mr. Kennedy paid me some money. Now, I've got to go over 
a whole page here again." 

P. Wesley Yost opens the door and inquires, 

"Prexy here?" 

"Oh, he took Clifford's car and went down town, and Clifford's been trying 
to find him all afternoon. I don't know where the man is." 

"Well, Miss Donaldson, I need a haircut — need it badly." 

"Um-hum." 

"Look 'Liza, my spending money's all gone; could you loan me fifty cents so 
I can get it done now? You don't know how much I'd appreciate it." 

"I'm sure you would. Oh, all right; get it out of my drawer there." 

"Oh, thank you, Miss Donaldson; good-bye." 

"Good-bye; and don't forget you owe me fifty cents!" 




'Liza Jane is typing at the typewriter by the vault. Clifford is working at his 
desk. Miss Thomas appears in the door. 

"Is Clifford here? I want to see him about getting Tex Anderson to work on 
the stage for 'Our Town.' S'ppose he'd lei him turn in time for it? He's put in 
his hours for play production already." 

"Well, you can see him. I'm sure I don't know what he'll do." 



Dr. Wallace enters with one arm full of carrots with tops showing and with one 
arm full of coffee. He looks over 'Liza's shoulder and remarks, 

"Hello. What's this?" 

"Check for some money I owe you." 

"2.86? What do you owe me $2.86 for?" 

"Well, if I don't I'll be glad to take it back. You said I owed you $2.86." 

"I remember, now, the $2.00; but what's the 86c for?" 

"Oh, I don't know. Something you bought at Heers'. Say — are you the person 
who's been buying dog food?" 

"Yes, I bought some." 

"Well, help us! We've been trying for two weeks to find out about that 
dog food. I asked Clifford, and he didn't know; and Mrs. Hertenstein didn't know 
anything about it, either. If you don't quit buying things without telling us about it, 
we're going to shoot you." 

From the south office: "Amen!" 

"Why 'Liza, I told you." 

"You certainly did not." 

"I did, too!" 

"Nooo, you didn't." 

The door blows checks al 



the office floor as it is slammed. 





1. Tine Awkonsaw Travelers 

2. We're in the Navy now 

3. Sun-spots 

4. A Bonnie Pigskin Queen 

5. Paul's a-roamun 

6. Nix, she's Dick's 



7. That beat up buck from Texas 

8. The Faculty Fans 

9. Autograph 

10. Call to Worship 
I I . Brown's E'Oys 

12. Wildcat 

13. Personality Kid 




4. Pig-skin Heroes 

5. We Three Queens 

6. Snake Charmer 

7. Here I stand — open 

8. Fire-bug 

9. Hey! Hello 
20. Typical 

2 I . Sunbonnet Babies 



22. A Rare Mood 

23. Bag and Baggage 

24. High Noon 

25. School Haze 

26. Hairless Dan 

27. McK. Express 

28. Economic Setup 

29. The Flash 



LI 



SENIOR CLASS DAY PROGRAM 
MAY 14, 1942 

Chairman — Carlus Basinger 

Prelude: Marion Kleinschmidt. 

Invocation: George Pimlott. 

Welcome: Flossine Rule. 

Trumpet Solo: Paul Yost. 

Original Poems: Mary Ruth Shelton. 

Vocal Solo: Jane Hardy. 

Class History: Leland Grieve. 

Violin Solo: Ralph Edwards. 

Sketches: Isabel Shaffer. 

Spirituals: Thomas Brown. 

Class Will: Jorden Debban. 

Mixed Quartet: Anna Lois Gann; Bonnye Broadus; Paul Yost; George Edwards. 

Presentation of Gavel: Carlus Basinger. 

Response: Paul Griffin, President, Junior Class. 

Hymn: No. 153, "Blest Be the Tie That Binds." 

Benediction: Earl Myers. 

"Alma Mater": In unison. 



TREE DEDICATION 

Invocation: Charles Haigh. 

Girls' Sextette: "Trees," Joyce Kilmer. 

Remarks: "Trees, for Example," Dean E. P. Baker. 

Presentation of Tree and Senior Gift: Paul Yost. 

Response: President C. R. Yost. 

"Alma Mater": In unison. 



MAY QUEEN 



The South gave us our charming May 
Queen this year in the person of Bonnye 
Broadus, from Philadelphia, Mississippi. 

Bonnye has shewn versatility characteristic 
of a McKendree co-ed and May Queen. She 
has sung in the chorus and in the sextet, 
acted in an official capacity for the Y. W. 
C. A., has been elected to membership in 
Sigma Tau Delta, end has served as vice- 
president of Clio. By making the honcr roll, 
our May Queen has disproved the idea that 
brains and beauty cannot exist in the same 
place at the same time. Very graciously 
Bonnye presided over the Spring Fete. 



r 




MAY FETE 



The May Fete, an event so long traditional on McKendree's campus, but somewhat on the 
wane during the past few years, was observed with renewed emphasis this year, on May 14. 

Following the Senior Class Day program, held in the chapel in the morning, and the Tree 
Dedication and presentation of the Senior Class Gift to the college on the campus in the early 
afternoon, the Queen and her cortege marched to the music of the college band to the royal dais 
on the back campus at four o'clock, where the Queen, Bonnye Broadus, was crowned by her Moid 
of Honor, Anna Lois Gann. 

After the coronation, there was held, for the entertcinment of the Queen, her attendants, and 
the assembled audience, folk games and the winding of the May pole by groups of college girls. 
The one-act fantasy, "A Penny a Flower," by Katherine Kester was then presented by a mixed cast 
of college students. 

A dinner, honoring the Seniors, was held in Pearson's Hall at six o'clock, attended by faculty 
and students, followed by a concert by the college band. 

Thus terminated a day not soon to be forgotten, particularly by the Class of '42. 



PATRON LIST 



MISS JUNE MILLER 

Lebanon, Illinois 

MR. G. G. FLESOR 

Tuscola, Illinois 

MRS. ETTA ROOT EDWARDS 

Pinckneyville, Illinois 

H. LIBRRSTEIN 

East St. Louis, Illinois 

MISS VERA JENNE 

Carlyle, Illinois 

MR. G. G. DARROW 

Joplin, Missouri 

MR. & MRS. MALCOLM RANDALL 

Herrin, Illinois 

DR. C. C. HALL 

Harrisburg, Illinois 

MR. AND MRS. F. A. BEHMER 

Lebanon, Illinois 

MRS. P. R. GLOTFELTY 

Lebanon, Illinois 

MR. ROLLA C. SAYRE 

Decatur, Illinois 

MRS. ROLLA C. SAYRE 

Decatur, Illinois 

DR. AND MRS. ROY C. BERRY 

Livingston, Illinois 

DR. C. L. PETERSON 

Lawrenceville, Illinois 

MR. WILLIAM P. HINKEL 

Chicago, Illinois 

MR. C. F. KOCH 

Chicago, Illinois 

MISS MYRA JEANNES 

Urbana, Illinois 

JUDGE PAUL FARTHING 

Belleville, Illinois 

KOERTGE ICE CREAM 

Collinsville, Illinois 

DR. W. M. BROWN 

Lebanon, Illinois 

MRS. W. M. BROWN 

Lebanon, Illinois 



DR. AND MRS. GOULD 

DeKalb, Illinois 

MRS. HARRIET H. FARTHING 

Belleville, Illinois 

JACK FLECK, JR. 

St. Louis, Missouri 

MRS. L S. BEELER 

East St. Louis, Illinois 

MR. IRA BROWN 

Fairfield, Illinois 

DR. ARTHUR L WEBER 

Upland, California 

MRS. ARTHUR L WEBER 

Upland, California 

MR. CLARENCE BOHM 

Edwardsville, Illinois 

MR. W. C. PFEFFER 

Lebanon, Illinois 

MRS. W. C. PFEFFER 

Lebanon, Illinois 

DR. PAUL R. HORTIN 

St. Petersburg, Florida 

MR. C. JACK PFEFFER 

Lebanon, Illinois 

MRS. C. JACK PFEFFER 

Lebanon, Illinois 

SUPT. BERT E. GUM 

Salem, Illinois 

J. G. FLECK 

St. Louis, Missouri 

MISS ROSE MERSINGER 

Lebanon, Illinois 

MR. L S. BEELER 

East St. Louis, Illinois 

A. S. ALOE COMPANY 

St. Louis, Missouri 

LIBERSTEIN JEWELERS 

East St. Louis, Illinois 

MRS. GRACE HARMON McGARY 

Louisville, Illinois 

DR. VAN T. McKEE 

Lebanon, Illinois 

MISS MADELINE D. YOST 

Pawnee, Illinois 



4— BOWLING ALLEYS— 4 

THE NEW 
MOONLIGHT RESTAURANT 

O'FALLON, ILL. 

O'Fallon's Leading Amusement Center 

Chicken and Steak Dinners 

Our Specialty 

FLORENCE AND "AL" HARTMAN 

Phone 126 



SCHWARZ BROS. 

FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

223 Westfront Street 
O'FALLON, ILL. 



L. E. Schwarz 



M. K. Schwarz 



STRECK BROS. 

SUPERIOR BRAND 

HAMS BACON 

And 

HOME MADE SAUSAGES 

Are Sold at Your 
Neighborhood Markets 



Ask for These Products Daily 



WEBER'S RECREATION 

BOWLING 
POCKET BILLIARDS 



Lebanon, 



BUSCHER HOTEL 
CAFE 



LEBANON, ILL. 



Phone 60 



College Supplies and Fountain Pens 

Try Our Soda Fountain 

We Serve DeLuxe Ice Cream 
and Toasted Sandwiches 

LEBANON DRUG CO. 

O. C. FRESHOUR, R.Ph. 



THE LEBANON 
ADVERTISER 



LEON H. CHURCH 
Editor and Publisher 




BLUMENSTEIN BROS. 
FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 

Phone I 13 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 




Congratulations and Best Wishes 

to the McKendree Students 

on Their Graduation 



Mrs. Swann (Mor 
Alamo Grill 



ALAMO GRILL" 



MONKEN MERCANTILE CO. 

"The Store of Service" 



GROCERIES 
HARDWARE 



Lebanon, 



DRY GOODS 
SHOES 



Phone I 17 



IT PAYS TO BE ON TIME 

ELGIN — GRUEN 
HAMILTON WATCHES 

FINE DIAMONDS 
F. G. WEHRLE & SON 

6 East Main Belleville, 

Since 1859 



GAS OIL TIRES 

BATTERIES ACCESSORIES 

STORAGE 

SAYRE MOTOR CO. 

BUICK 



PHONE 35 



LEBANON, ILL. 



ST. LOUIS DAIRY CO. 

Established 74 Years Ago to Promote 

Better Health 

in the Community We Serve 



Serving McKendree College with 

Grade "A" Dairy Products 

From the World's Finest Dairy Plant 



BELLEVILLE BRANCH 

Phone Belleville 2480 Belleville, II 



SHATTINGER 




PIANO AND MUSIC 
COMPANY 


ALAMO 




THEATRE 


331-339 Arcade Bldg. 




Eighth and Olive 




ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 




COVERS 




for the 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


1942 McKENDREAN 


DOT'S BEAUTY SHOP 


by 


LEBANON, ILLINOIS 


BECKTOLD COMPANY 




ST. LOUIS, MO. 





Printing 
HE CALL Company 



DAN A. THROOP, Mgr. 




Printing Service Since 1904 



'Talent to Originate 
, . Skill to Produce" 



PHONE EAST 4204 



BROADWAY AT THIRD 



EAST ST. LOUIS, ILL 



Why Not Have Quality Work for the 
Same Price? 



PARIS 
CLEANING AND DYEING 



CLEANING by the MODERN METHOD 
PHONE LEBANON 136 



RALPH E. MARTIN 
FRUITS AND PRODUCE 

Phones BRidge 7502 
EX. 807 



No. 15 N. 3rd St. 



E. St. Louis, 



COMPLIMENTS OF 
ELMER C. REED 

401 South High St. Phone 1771 

BELLEVILLE, ILLINOIS 

Decorating and Painting Contractor 

for 

McKendree Chapel 



COOK PAINT AND VARNISH 
COMPANY 

Materials Used Throughout 



COMPLIMENTS 
COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



MEYER 

FURNITURE 

and 

UNDERTAKING 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



Manhattan 
Radiant Roasted 

COFFEE 




Something 

DIFFERENT 

— not 
Just as 
Good 



VACUUM PACKED 

In Glass or Tin 

COBCUT CORN— AMERICAN LADY 
OR TOPMOST FOODS 

Distributed by 

GENERAL GROCER CO. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 



Daily capacity 1,000 Barrels 
Elevator capacity 200,000 Bushels 



PFEFFER MILLING COMPANY 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 

Inc. 1899 



Manufacturers of 

MAR'S PATENT HARD WINTER WHEAT FLOUR 

FLUFFY RUFFLES SELF-RISING FLOUR 

LEBANON BELLE CAKE FLOUR 



Dealers in 
LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIALS 





A MOST PLEASANT WELCOME 




Awaits You at All Times at 


C . H E E R 


A 


BILL'S 




V 


GENERAL 




MERCHANDISE 


For Good Fountain Service 
Gifts for All Occasions 




Confectionery 




Jewelry 




DAUMUELLER'S 




MUSIC AND GIFT SHOP 


THE QUALITY STORE 


215-217 West St. Louis St. 




LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



Another 




Good 




Book 


PRINTING AND BINDING 


by 




SID 


by 


WHITING 




STUDIO 


WILLIAMSON 


ST. LOUIS 


PRINTING & PUBLISHING 


© 


COMPANY 




219 South Fourth St. 




Springfield, Illinois 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 1942 McKENDREAN STAFF 
From 

McKendree College 

FOUNDED 1828 

* Bachelor of Arts Degree * Bachelor of Science Degree 

if Courses for Teachers ~k Courses Related to National Defense 

* Athletic Opportunities 



McKendree's Department of Music is famous for its "product' 
— proficient piano and vocal musicians. 



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