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Full text of "The McKendrean : being the year book of McKendree College"

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3141 
.M37 
1970 
2 




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2 College 
Lebanon, IL 62254 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/mckendreanbein1970mcke 




McKENDREAN 1970 



McKENDREE COLLEGE 
LEBANON, ILLINOIS 




CONTENTS 




INTRODUCTION 


4 


FEATURES 


14 


SPORTS 


82 | 


CREEKS 


706 


ORGANIZATIONS 


116 


ADMINISTRATION 




AND FACULTY 


128 


SENIORS 


144 


UNDERCLASSMEN 


160 


IN MEMORIAM 


173 


DEDICATION 


174 


STAFF 


175 


EDITOR 


176 




CANNOT 




LOOK 






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music sounding electric pulses 
floating 
exploding 
fluctuating 
dancing to rhythmic life in motion 
on throbbing 

pounding waves 






THINK 






People — 

put together by choice 

or other — 

to share, to take, to love, to learn. 

We're here and now and tomorrow too. 
All breathing, all living. 
Somehow together 
We hope We pray 




From left: Marna Rutledge, Freshman Maid;. Queen Jacqueline Svanda; Vara Best, Junior 
Maid; Maureen Florek, Senior Candidate; Linda Everett, Sophomore Maid; Lauren Fowl- 
er, Senior Candidate. 




The traditional homecoming weekend was again 
celebrated at McKendree with a succession of 
events including a bonfire, a parade, the game, 
and a homecoming dinner-dance, where Miss 
Jackie Svanda was crowned queen. Impressions? 
Giant Snowball Mums . . . Autumn leaves under 
the feet of visiting alums . . . purple and white 
streamers on decorated convertibles . . . mam- 
moth bear cats guarding the victory of the team 
. . . the smell of smoke and a nip of the chill in 
the air . . . candlelight shining on your girl's face. 
This was Homecoming, November, 1969. 




Stanley Elkin, author of "Boswell," and "A 
Bad Man," professor at Washington Univer- 
sity, was one of the speakers in the library 
dedication series this year. Following a read- 
ing from "The Dick Gibson Show," he ans- 
wered questions and gave opinions on liter- 
ature for a substantial crowd of listeners. 



5 ; A ,■ »3 /SI SS ; 




LUCUBRATING 




THE MEDIUM 





Under the direction of Professor Glenn H. 
Freiner, Gian-Carlo Mennotti's contempo- 
rary opera "The Medium," was presented 
November 7 and 8 in Eisenmayer Auditori- 
um. Menotti's music was a reinforcement 
of the dramatic action in which Lauren 
Lowler, Joy Etherton, Dave Sherbondy, 
Anna McNeely, Peggy Lauth, and Marc 
Benders unfolded a gripping power of 
human emotions. 






A busted pipe — 

"Hey you guys, this thing's sprung a leak." 
"Get back, good things like this don't happen much 
around here." 

"Grab my mug — or heck — my waste basket." 
"It won't get us where we want, but then, even Ron- 
nie doesn't give free drinks." 
BABY 







The recently renovated Marion Bothwell Chapel 
was reded icated on Friday, March 13, along 
with activities marking the 142nd anniversary of 
McKendree College. This rededication was the 
result of a will of $1 million from the late Miss 
Marion Bothwell in 1967. 





More recognition for McK as Charlotte Peters 
chose us to grace her stage for a day. It was fun 
to be in and fun to watch. You might even say 
that it was a real learning experience — like — did 
you know that someday McKendree will have 
10,000 students? 







McKendree students Valeria Burton and John Streb 
joined with students from Monticello College to "Tell It 
Like It Is," on St. Louis television. They ran the gamut 
from student protests to drugs, while some 400 students 
sat on campus with their eyes glued to the "boob tube" 
in awe and wonder. Get it on John! 



t-g'stcftstett^ 






rean 



The McKENDREAN Yearbook Staff is composed of interested stu- 
dents who are chosen by the editor and the advisor. Work begins 
in the summer and continues long after school is out in June. 
This year editor Jane Templeton, Bob Koch, and Dr. Stockton 
attended the Associated Collegiate Press convention in Miami 
Beach, Florida where staff members from all over the United 
States learned different ways of bringing better yearbooks to the 
campus. The opportunity of working on the 1969-70 McKEN- 
DREAN has been a challenge of creativity and inspiration. 




THIS SPACE 
DEDICATED TO THE 
McKENDREE REVIEW 




The McKENDREE REVIEW was laid to rest on Tuesday the thirty-first of 
March, 1970. It had served its purpose and its patrons well in its life. 
Some may even say that it went out of its way. It suffered a strange 
death, a very short but severe illness, followed by a merciless killing. 
Now we may only think back and sigh and remember the times we 
anxiously pored over the pages of our ne'er forgotten friend. The 
REVIEW is dead, but its spirit lives on. Let this be its epitaph: "You 
have not converted a man because you have silenced him." 




JUDE. McK's new newspaper has taken that sad song and made it better. 
One day in May he appeared up from the depths and a new spirit was born. 
Editor-in-Chief, Bob Koch and his expert staff helped in the delivery and 
proudly, but professionally of course, displayed that twinkle in their eyes. 
Jude is in the shape of things to come, yet many say that he resembles his 
ancestor a great deal. In any case, Jude is cool. Jude gets it on. Jude comes 
up clean. Hey Jude! — think tall! 



Studanta S p a a k Out 



STUDENTS SPEAK OUT 

STUDENTS SPEAK OUT was born 
shortly after the discontinuation of 
the REVIEW. It was not meant as a 
replacement for the Review, but 
arose as a collection of articles 
written on an assortment of topics 
by a variety of students. Perry R. 
Martz was the collaborator for the 
publication. 





"the walrus" is a unique literary facet of 
McKendree College making possible the 
publication of literary creativity as well as 
maintaining the anonymity of the author 
if such is desired. The purpose of "the 
walrus" is to give vent to an expression, 
CORPE DIEM, of a time and a mood 
known only to those people living in it. 
"the walrus" was edited by Wesley Berg. 

"THE WALRUS" 



Phi Beta Lambda, national business fraternity, spon- 
sored a Careers Week in Deneed Upper Lounge for the 
benefit of the majority of us who will one of these days 
want a job or will have to find a job after graduation— 
whether we like it or not. Many businesses were repre- 
sented, and were busy with interviews throughout the 
week. Good 'ole Uncle Sam was present as well, and 
smugly sat back knowing that he would pull the big- 
gest crowd one way or the other. 














Christmas at McK is: 

snow perhaps 

(probably rain) 

a concert 

a reception 

a shopping trip to Santa 

a feeling in the air 

a prayer for peace on earth 

a hope that good will for men 

isn't a second hand store. 

It's a universal Christmas 

which lights up McKendree as wel 

Front campus is a fairyland 

and lower campus seems in 

a maze of snow paths. 

Christmas at McK shows up 

dressed in white goodness. 




Were you part of the group 
who cared enough to show . 




-:*"*" 


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when the "Rotary" connected? 





Faces — 

These are our happy times 

our sad times 

love and hate hand in hand 

and faced with the realityt? 

that is college — 

on any campus. 

The Prophet said, "A Tear 

and a smile." 
These are our faces. 






%4L 




FINE ARTS PROGRAM 

March 4 — CONTEMPO PLAYERS 
in Jean-Paul Sartre's "NO EXIT" 

Eisenmayer Auditorium, 8:15 p.m. 

Celia Stetson, Carl Latcham, and Jean Gordon are 
three versatile and talented artists presenting a 
thought-provoking drama. Two women and a man 
locked in eternal torment in a room in Hell set 
the action. 



March 8 



PIANO RECITAL 



Dr. Stephanie Owen, Faculty 
Bothwell Chapel. 3:00 p.m. 

A program of Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, and 
Bartok is performed by an artist who has con- 
certized widely in the St. Louis area, Canada, 
and Europe. 



March 10 



GUITARIST 



Gene Bertoncini Trio 
Bothwell Chapel, 8:15 •p.m. 

Involved with the many faces of guitar, Gene 
Bertoncini's experiences have brought him in con- 
tact with a wide area of the musical world, en- 
compassing recording, night club, and television, 
appearing on Merv Griffin and Johnny Carson 
shows, working with Tony Bennett, the Benny 
Goodman sextet, performing with the Metropoli- 
tan Opera orchestra. Here is a program that ex- 
plores the spectrum of musical color. 

April 13 — PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND 

Deneen Center, upper lounge, 8:15 p.m. 

Kid Thomas, with trumpet, brings jazz from the 
cradle of jazz, New Orleans. The audience is ex- 
posed to the intimacy of great jazz music with the 
character of excellence. These musicians, work- 
ing together for an extended period of time, bring 
to their concert a special esprit de corps that can- 
not help but shine through to the listeners. 





Miss McCambridge 






Preservation Jazz 



April 19 — MERCEDES McCAMBRIDGE 
Deneen Center, upper lounge, 8:15 p.m. 

Presenting a "living portrait of Sarah Siddons," 
one of the world's greatest actresses, Miss Mc- 
Cambridge thus brings insight and entertainment 
to an audience. Having appeared in many motion 
pictures, "Farewell to Arms," "Johnny Guitar," 
"Suddenly Last Summer," and "All the King's 
Men," winning an Academy Award for this per- 
formance, and appearing as featured player in 
"Studio One," "Toast of the Town," and Attorney 
for the Defense," here is a personality well known 
in the acting world* 



April 21 — JOHN MILES. Tenor 

Bothwell Chapel, 8:15 p.m. 

Mr. Miles is the winner of the New York Singing 
Teacher's Town Hall Award. "Everything he pre- 
sents is a musical and dramatic entity and com- 
municated with intelligence. The voice is firm 
and penetrating, and it is what he does that 
counts. He has a knack of drawing the listener 
with him, wide awake and full of anticipation." 
(New York Times) 



May 17 — McKENDREE COLLEGE CHOIR * 

Professor Glenn H. Freiner, Conductor 
McKendree Gymnasium, 3:00 p.m. 

Featured on the concert will be American music, 
Pilgrim songs, early church hymns, Moravian 
church music, folk songs, and songs from "Porgy 
and Bess." 



Sponsored by the Division of Fine Arts 




McKENDREE COLLEGE 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 
WM970 

CAMPUS PROGRAM 
ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT — MARCO RUTLEOGE 
ADVISER— -MRS. SHERI SMITH 

Committee Chairmen 

Social — Chip Murray 
Films — Brian Finn 

i,ious Life — Clete Davis 
Coffee House — Allen D'Hauleourt 
Lissa Loy 
.'core 

— Pat G' 




Often a guest on Johnny Carson's Tonight Show, Dr. Montague is 
an anthropologist, writer, and lecturer. Author of "The Fallacy of 
Race," "On Being Human," "Man in Process," and dozens of pub- 
lished papers, Dr. Montague's best seller, "The Natural Superiority 
of Women," was the topic of his lecture when he appeared on 
campus. 




Bernard Eismann has served as news correspondent for ABC and 
CBS in such places as Viet Nam, the Middle East, and Central and 
South America. Since August of 1967, he has been with the Na- 
tional Education Television program "Inquiry." As moderator, he 
leads discussions concerning the contemporary scene with "in- 
depth" approaches to the issues and problems of our time. 





Known for his great defensive ability, Bill Russell has 
been the leader of the best pro basketball team in 
the past decade, the Boston Celtics. Since his gradua- 
tion from the University of San Francisco in 1956, he 
has been a part of pro championship teams in Boston. 
In 1967, Russell became Boston's first player-coach, 
thus becoming the first Negro to manage on a full- 
time basis in a major league sport. 



Mr. Bond has become one of the bright new stars in the political arena. 
In 1960 he helped form the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Commit- 
tee (SNCC). Since 1965 he has been elected to the Georgia House of 
Representatives three times, but his views on Viet Nam kept him from 
being seated until the United States Supreme Court ruled in his favor in 
January of 1967. At the 1968 Democratic National Convention he was the 
co-chairman of the Georgia Loyal Democratic Delegation that unseated 
the hand-picked Georgia delegation. He was also nominated for Vice- 
President but withdrew his name because of age. 




Judy Herrin 



David Bailey 




Steve Crews 




Paul Funkhouser 



Greg Snyder 




Lauren Fowler 



Dennis Korte 




TMEY MAKE 
TWtGS I 



T MW* 




uL ^mttoJF 




Student Congress consists of members selected from the student body at large, 
the academic classes, the residence units, and the commuting students. A campus 
wide election is held each May to select representatives for the Student Congress. 
The purposes of the Student Congress are to initiate and integrate student govern- 
ment activities, inform the student body of the aims, policies, and ideals of the 
College, and assume responsibility and authority for student self-government. It 
is considered and referred to as an advisory group to the administration in all 
functions directly affecting the student body. 




General Residence Rules 

Your residence is y 
place for you while you 
success! 



home away from home. l 'J 
here at McKendree, but 



ant to make it a pleasant 
need your cooperation for 



10 



11 



1. Please keep doors closed during study hours. 

2. No running, or horseplay is permitted in halls. 

3. Observe telephone restrictions of hall. 

4. It is common courtesy to knock before entering another person's room. 
d. No firearms are allowed on campus, (i.e. residence, autos, etc.) 

6. Musical instruments may not be played during quiet hours. 

7. No smoking in bed. 

8. Fire equipment should not be handled by anyone. 

9. Gambling is prohibited. 
Alcoholic beverages are not permitted on campus. 
Tape, nails, or anything else which Wi.ll damage the walls are not to be used. 

in the residence without prior permission of the 



12. No one may chang 
Head Resident. 



13. No furniture exchanging is permitted. 

14. T.V.'s, corn poppers, and hot plates are not permitted. Coffee pots and irons 
should be used with the utmost caution. 






Although the Women's Judicial Board is not a part of 
the College Student Congress, it does serve as the 
governing and disciplining body in the women's res- 
idence halls. Membership to J-Board is through 
election by the women, and members serve for a one 
year term. 




/** 









April 8, 1970. 

And the beat went on. The world won't remem- 
ber, but we won't forget. Many who know say 
that it was a long hard run and a tough struggle 
to keep our heads above water, but then, it 
wasn't in vain. North Central has us on its' list 
now, and feathers are worn in several tall black 
hats all the way down to frosh beanies. What 
does this mean? Well, we have made a giant 
step forward to becoming a "real-people's 
school." We are acknowledged and proud of it, 
and we would like to feel a little bit self satis- 
fied. We're on our way to more recognition 
and with a little more "help from our friends" 
we may reach more goals than ever before. We 
have arrived. 




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NA/ANTED DEAP-Auv 






Our Conversation 

I could have said that loneliness 
is just your heart telling you 
that it's 

five-hundred miles away. 
Or that it is part of what makes 
us 

special. 

I could have said too, 
that loneliness 

only happens for a good reason- 
Love — and that it is just a way 
of saying 
"You belong with me." 

I should have said so much, 

but couldn't. 

So I swallowed, made a silly face, 

and said, 

"I love you." 

by lag 






Just as a play cannot go successfully on without stagehands, we too, 
could not function as well as we do without these, and many more, 
people behind the scenes. They keep our record, cook our meals, 
and help to keep some of the underlying parts of the school to- 
gether. They do not always get the recognition that they deserve, 
and so, we would just like to let them know that we know they are 
there. 



otjeWA. kooeaes 




B JlIU 





for rn.forma.ilon. Uadin.g to tke. 

D Ct.rre.vl: and COnv'vctian. of" 
•person, guilty of breakmq 
a w\n.dow and defacmq 
OlA r\air\ Hall 





How does one who is about to lose 
one's mind from one's hard stren- 
uous journey into the never-never- 
land of college try to keep one's 
head, let alone one's grades? One 
looks to diversion — of any sort. 
Among a few of the more healthy 
forms of diversion are joining so- 
cial groups, attending coffee house, 
getting together with the faculty 
for fun and games, or playing 
bridge. And then . . . there are 
others . . . 



^tecevs roAr 



The Unit System replaces the Semester Hour 

The following breakdown may ba helpful In underatandlng tha 
unit system which goes in affect September 1970. 

1 unit - I4. semester hours 

Classification of students: 

less than 8 units - Freshman 
8 through 15 units - Sophomore 
16 through 23 units - Junior 
2^ units and over - Senior 

Requirement for graduation 32 units 



The 1970 schedule and catalog is 
something new and different, and 
for anyone who can, it is advanta- 
geous to look into its benefits. The 
new unit system where 4 hours 
equals 1 unit has many good points. 
Among these are more diversity of 
classes, and the abolishment of 
numerous general requirements 
(UGH). The necessity to have a 
minor is no more — the choice is 
left up to the student, in order to 
give him a chance at a greater field 
in his major and a wider scope of 
general academics. Coming along 
with the new catalog are several 
new instructors, and so it looks like 
things will be happening in 1970- 
71. 



OF 



On Monday, Wednesday & Friday the language lab will be open from 
9 a.m. until noon to those students who cannot make the scheduled 
Tuesday-Thursday sessions because of class conflict, class size, 
chapel, etc. At tha discration of the lab director, furthermore, 
students unable to attend tha lab scheduled for their course may, 
on any day be admitted during another session. 

Students registering for a language must also register for 2 hours 
of lab per week, specifying exact hours and days. 



CODE TO CLASSROOMS CHB 
" KH 

VSH 



FIRS 

Clark Hall Basemen 
Eisenmayer Hall 
Volgt Science Hall 



The "eglstrar's Office reserves the right to withdraw any course 
in which sufficient numbers do not enroll. 



Dapt 4 No 


Course Title 


Art 111 


Survey of Art History 




(Western Art-Beg. to End 




of Gothic) 


Scl 103 


Biological Science 


Bio 151 


General Zoology 


B/E 308 


Financing Bus. Enterpr. 


Ed 256 


Educational Psychology 


Ed 31+9 


Hist «c Phil of Am Pub Ed 


En* 111 


Freshman English 


Hist 261 


U.S. Hist. 1787 to Present 


Math 111 


Basic Mod. M a th 


PEW 101 


badminton. Tennis 


Phil 201 


Intro to Philosophy 


Phy 211b 


College Physica 



Soc 150 



Dn 



Prin. of Sociology 
Reading & Study Skills 



Mus 101-201 Class Piano 









9 a. 


.m. 






Page 2 


Dept & No 


Course Title 


Units 


Prerequisites 


Instructor 


Days 


Room 


B/E 309 


Money 4 Banking 


1 




Rogers 


MWF 


VSH 122 


Chem 201 


Gen. 


Organic Chemistry 


1 


Chem 102 


Reese 


MWF 

Lab W 1-5 

Disc M 2- 


VSH 220 
5 


Bng 111 


Fresl 


iman English 


1 




Hopkins 


MTWF 


EH 201+ 


Eng 309 


World Lit. 


1 




Best 


MTWF 


OM 8 


FA 102 


Man % Fine Arts 


i 




Schanz 


TTh 


EH 106 


Hist 161 


Hist 


of Early Civ. 


1 




Stockton 


MTWF 


PH 101 


Math 381 


Advanced Calculus I 


1 


Math 212 


CJummersheimer MTThF 


VSH 123 


Mus 120 


Musi< 


: Theory 


1 


Mus 120-121 


S. Owen 


MWF 
Lab T-l 


EH 225 


Mus 35*4- 


Fund 


. of Conducting 


1 


Mus 120-121 


Schanz 


MW 


EH 106 


Mus 359 


Musli 


: History 




S . Owen 


TTh 


EH 225 














Lab W-9 




PE 303 


Baski 


stball Theory & Athl 














Trng, 




1 




Stathain 


MWF 


CHB 1 


Phil 3^4- 


Hist 


of Modern Philosophy 


1 


Phil 201 


Benson 


MTWF 


PH 102 


p.s. 3B8 


Compi 


aratlve Govt. 


1 


Const, of Instr. 


Cole 


MTThF 


OM 6 


Psy/Ed 262 


Adolescent Psych. 


i 




Mlnnlgerode 


TTh 


VSH 122 


Sci 101 


Physl 


leal Science 


1 




Porter 


MWF 

Lab M 1-3 
T 1-3 


VSH 227 


' THE REGISTRAR 




Page 1 








Th 3-5 




Ires College 






1 




Fleming 


MWF 


VSH 129 


>n, Illinois 












Lab M 1-3 

T 10-: 


L2 


ITER SCHEDULE - 1970-71 












Th 1-3 
W 3-5 




Gym - Gymnasium 




BW - Benson Wood 


1 




Baber 


MWF 


CHB k 


PH - Pearsons Hall 




OM - Old Main 
BWB - Benson Wood 








Lab TTh 11-12 
MWF 10-11 






Basemen-e 


1 




Welch 


MTThF 


BWB 1 













Sturm 


TTh 


CHB 1 


S a.m. 


ictor 


Days Room 




•rerequialtes Instrv 












Schanz 




TTb. EH 106 












Fleming 


MWF VSH 129 
















Lab M 1-3 
















T 10-12 
















Th 1-3 
















w 3-5 












Wllloughb; 


MW VSH IQI4. 
















Lab MT 3-5 












Strelf 




MTWF PH 102 












Trainer 


MWF EH 204 












Staff 




MWF EH 106 












Best 




MTWF BWB 1 












Scharr 


tau 


TTh OM 8 












VanDanElzen 


MTWThF VSH 122 












Klrts 




MW Gym 












Bens or 


1 


MTWF VSH 227 












lath 131 Porter 




MWF VSH 223 
Lab Th 1-3 












Brown 




MTThF CHB k 












Sturm 




TTh CHB 1 













):30 a.m. 



S.Owen 



EH 225 




r 

m 
na 

h 





Occasionally (most likely around final exams) students remem- 
ber that college means hard work, sleeplessness, fractured 
minds, and strained nerves. In other words — STUDY. However, 
some work can be more than pouring over a book by candle- 
light in the wee hours of the morning. Take for example the 
new experimental seminar for freshmen, "Alienation and 
Commitment" which made several field trips, among which 
was one to the St. Louis Metropolitan Art Museum. 




r #n lilt i • y- 
iiJC 7TTT77 ■■ 







June 7, and the class of 1970 proudly 
received that piece of parchment 
which signifies their graduation and 
degree. What thoughts run through a 
graduate's mind? Nursery school? 
That first date? Cheat sheets? The fu- 
ture? Probably all these and more 
fill their thoughts as they realize they 
have made it through what is sup- 
posed to be the "best days of our 
lives." 



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McKENDREE BEARCATS 
BOUNCE TO A 79—6 
RECORD 




Someone once said that 
there was more to sports 
than just who won. There 
are many unexpected 
and bizarre incidents that 
can break any game wide 
open. For in Basketball 
the winner is usually de- 
termined by the team 
that breaks away in the 
first three minutes of 
play, the first three min- 
utes of the second half, 
or the final three min- 
utes of the game. 

The Bearcats won most 
of their games in the 
very first three minutes 
of the contest. Which 
meant that good defense 
and hard hitting team- 
work proved to be the 
deciding factor in the 
Bearcats' victorious sea- 
son this year. 




Although Dennis Korte scored over 1500 points in his college career, he was only out done by his fine shooting 
teammate Paul Funkhouser who had 2000 points. 

Both men displayed this, their senior year, as well as previous years, the hustle, drive, and desire that made the 
home games a joy and a treasureable moment that we will always remember. 





Above one sees a shot in the dark. Paul is scoring one 
of his many hard earned points. 



At the right, one can see why Max Hook was con- 
sidered to be one of McKendree's finest players. 



Below, on and off the court Max is number one. Here 
Max Hook is receiving the annual Vesley Award. 






Under the brilliant leadership of Coach Statham the Bearcats catch their breath and get needed instructions 
before putting the icing on another game. Looking on is Assistant Coach Dutler. 





NAIA Bid Fails but... 
McKendree Captures Christmas 
Tourney 




Throughout the season the Bearcats fought strong and earned every victory. But their 19 — 6 record did not 
prove good enough to gain an Independent bid to the N.A.I. A. tournament. However . . . 

McK's competitive spirit proved too fierce in their Christmas Tournament. They won both games going away. 





Our cheerleaders: Sue, Vera, Jackie, 
Maggie, Bernice, and Sally Verton, 
and Sally Gillespie lead our team to 
victory. 




FEEKEH SPEAKS .~ BYL 

| ; pj Ccncern over the issue of wheth- This is frightening if one thinl 
by M. PRYZBYL | ; rB er or not independent players may about it for a moment. For how 

v . . , IS play on Greek teams has reached any organization going to improi 

wbilp 1 was oatin a dinner two strength to overcome an opponent. ■■ '",,.,, r , ., ,, .;. .. 

wnne i was edun B umuci i»» & " . H its peak. We do not see Greek itself if it cannot get together, st; 

ppIcs s"n after a crucial ball same They never gave up until the job I r , , * = 

eeKS a = o aiier a ciuuai uaii ainc j <, r j ■ — teams playing Greek teams any together, and function together . 

■tu-ppn Arielnhi and Ferox an in- was completed and done to their Iff T j j. T « j 

?tween aaeipni anu rem.., an r , — m0 re; we see Independent teams a team. And quitting one orgamz 

pendent player came up to me to satisfaction. , ■ M p , aving with Greek names j^ is tion tQ jcin another or stay ind 

;press his congratulations for the With the football season -tcaw- til not right This only shows people penclent will not solve the proble 

ae performance. In doing so he m g to a close, some teams r \^ that anyone can play on a frater- that lies in the roots of the exec 

issed the remark that first place feeling that the All Sport? JQjl p -itv's name. live structure. 

emed to be sewed up. is lost. But let me remind ^«ZO#L# v. u- _, .u- u tu t .u- 

... . ., , fc *Dn * Jw "*asoning behind this prob- The reason I wrote this artic 

I do not believe that any posi- J nis ls only lne De g innln ' fa - i**lt T» lies in the fraterni- was net that Ferox lost to Plato, 

there are manv event c Mm » J 4%^~ 

sns now are final, but this seems ' " « $£)*• "Dt 1 v cannot § en " s me of mv readers might thin 

be the general opinion of every- w ° n - " tn ^ ™r:* t1 fy *wfe/» " toward work- but that I feel the unity of all c 

le concerned. I think people are p y p ^tfe/ e &*•$? somehow ac- ganizaiions on this campus is mo 

rgetting that there are a few ot a ™' no even 4-o.j ?*/ $* t>] 9 ike their roles, ing into a new phase of individ 

imes left to be played and that ™ a ^ has river / <? ^ e </ /? W ^ o -^o '" crumblin S of a alit y- An "" this new individual! 

ost anything can happen. In stat- 8 v /? e , ■"?/■/ ej " t/ 1 / i ' i '^'g I} / ls ^ is case, an organ- can be harmful, not only to orgai 

g a recent example in baseball, ftas > d ° wn t0 n ' *W^*tf e /*»**<!* ***!■ 'W* fe zation, but to mankind in general 

is past year we saw the Chicago strength. s fi e y c e /g ^ o^ 

jbs'lead the Eastern Division of My final poi «4tf u^ fi ^gf y , <ty, W __ 

,e National League, only to lose concern toward Ss *s °ft ^^tj^^it/, Mi L M ' BOWLING 

Septet to the New Vo. P^son, ^V^'o S^ Won Lost Pet. Total Pins Ave 

"sing can happen to any team — £ /^jfg?*^ *<S? " ! « ^ ™ 

. any sport, and things taken for Keeping t 4^7,^^ "tf 9 7 .563 9130 760 

•anted usually end up in an upset. l™*yov H/^ "ijfc 8.5 7.5 .531 9043 753 

Another point that I wish to ex- ™ ng ^ ' ^ 8 8 - 500 9132 761 

ress is one on the behavior of the Jooks Afy^ A 6 9 .400 8875 737 

Jreek" teams in their events, that S C £*£>2 C Cj>^ 5.5 10.5 .343 8752 729 

;ing that they remember that they J A - ^j5 e ^- C -£^ ^Os** 

-e Greeks and not just any group t h f ^ ? **V<S* INDIVIDUAL LEADERS 

E guys getting together to play a ar ^fo + ^ ^ ^4to 

;rub game Every game counts. Ev- p />^*% ■-.."" 5 ° / A? Total Pins Games Ave. 

rybody counts. fi^o 3 J * * ^ Hogoveen> AKT 2128 12 177 

Looking back in Greek history, can „ ... ... j s ? ?hil Schwab, Adelphi 2099 12 174 

ne finds that the Greeks were My ma. t j / Jim Zamrazil, Adelphi 1996 12 166 

roud of their ancestry, and every sportsmanship .. $ 5 - r .trj-Axr'p iqq- 

me they did something in which means to play the B j 2 Don Kording, A.K.T 199o 12 166 

leir name was going to represent rules and do so to the besi . i \ Mark Davis, Plato 1971 12 164 

lem, they gave everything they ability. I Glenn Sudol, Ferox 1966 12 163 

ad so that they might achieve the If you keep everything I have Mjk e Rutledge Philo 1935 12 161 

ighest goal — and that was being said in mind the next time you s ' ,. 

umber one. They worked hard in enter a game, I am sure the game Nick Passomato, Adelphi 1927 12 160 

heir athletic events and used their will end with the satisfaction of Ken Koste, Plato 1895 12 157 

linds as well as their physical everyone's having done his best. | Tony Musso, AKT 1879 12 156 



CROSS COUNTRY RESULTS 




lace 



Name 
Markwell, Dave 
Swick, Dnnis 
Huffmon, Don 
Ramsey, Jim 
Stewart, Dan 
Hoyt, Brad 
Smith, Tim 
Howie, Mike 
Melton, Bill 
Hill Derek 
Crlson, Stf »« 
Davis, CI Jq 
Zauf, Ga 
Crter, Bi,. 
Gentry, Mark 
Hogoveen, Jim 
Koste, Ken 
Myers, Pat 
Schulz, Jim 




PEEKER CONFUSED 



By M. PRZYBYL 

Every time I sit down to write its place 
column I have the toughest this. 
f he world. I mean tough ii 



But there is more than 



" f I have to make pre- 

'he progress of 

=»nd make 

jf each 



£s. vas made 
JO 'Ote about 
g id a story 

8 
7 

6 

5 fuses me. For 
j . campus used to 



jut because 
out competi- 



between two so- 
two players. But 
11-sports trophy at 
taking a different 



This campus is approaching a re- 
birth. It is giving in to a new free- 
dom, that being the freedom of the 
individual, and uncovering this new 
world will not be easy. It can be 
understood only through a consid- 
erable amount of thought. 

This is what is so confusing to 
me — the rise of individualism and 
the decline of group participation 
or competition. 

Competition is found throughout 
life in every field that can be 
thought of. We find it on all levels 
of society and in everything we do. 
It is something that one cannot run 
away from. 

My final point is that competi- 
tion is the greatest experience any- 



learty congratulations from the 
;rts Department go out to the 
.ers for their 7-1 record and fine 
m effort in basketball this year. 



:ramural Basketball League 
Results 

Plato 70, Ferox 64 
Adelphi 71, G.D.I. 50 
B.S.ers 74, A.K.T. 49 
Walton 49, Philo 37 
A.K.T. 77, Plato 73 
Ferox 57, Faculty-Staff 50 
B.E.ers 62, Adelphi 60 



I.M. BASKETBALL 
FINAL STANDINGS 



Won 
- 7 
6 



lphi 


5 


« 


.T 


4 




o 


3 


5 


-Staff 


2 


6 


lo 


2 


6 


.1. 


2 


6 




The flag football title went to 
Ferox this year with a 12-0 record. 
The final game was played in the 
dark against Walton Hall, but the 
score was clear: 34-0. 

Although Ferox has an impres- 
sive record, it was not as easily 
achieved as some might think. 
There were many injuries that 
caused line-up adjustments, and 
that included three different quar- 
terbacks. 

The sports department sincerely 
congratulates Ferox on its victori- 
ous season. 



by MIKE PRZYBYL 



The soccer season this year is 
going to have a few changes in 
number of players, games, and 
rules. 

The number of players has been 
changed from nine to eight, and a 
team can still play with six men. 
This is to eliminate ^ -id re- 



duce the possibility L 1 , 

t\ •*■ C 



tecii^k 



Intramural Basketball 
Tournament Results 

B.S.ers 75, A.K.T. 55 
Walton 64, Philo 46 
Ferox 91, Plato 64 
G.D.I. 55, Adelphi 42 
A.K.T. 59, Philo 58 
Phato 94, Adelphi 80 
B.S.ers 84, Walton 58 
Ferox 60, G.D.I 50 



Flag Football 
Season Results 



Team 


Won Lost 


Pet 


Scd Agnst 


Ferox 


12 





1.000 


447 83 


Adelphi 


9 


3 


.750 


413 216 


Walton 


7 


5 


.583 


212 227 


GDI 


6 


6 


.500 


268 243 


AKT 


5 


7 


.417 


1M^^ 


Philo 


3 


9 


.25ft, 


^^* 1 


Plato 





12 




«ttl 



*& 



*<*■ 



£5f 



mgPong-l^jv r 
ourney Resi 






,s> 



as well as to make 
with more chances 
The season has 
from 12 games and a dou 
robin to six games or playing t 
team once. This change was made 
because the Intramural Council 
stated that the football season was 
too long, With early darkness and 
with probable weather changes, the 
soccer season might run into De- 
cember if the schedule were not 
revised. 

The only change in the rules 

from last year is in the off-sides 

his year, if a player k> off- 

'at is, one player on team A 

of his teammate who has 

n front of the opponent's 

all the player needs to 

his hand to show the 

mjV players that he knows 

['ve ,},, \e ^ >s ar, d that he is re- 

e* artv es. The referee will 

a lay. But if a goal is 

fe*^ "a& the player returns 

-f et °.« s<i .» o* 1 will not count. 



which has the best-balanced ta 
and has many players with ex< 
lent experience. 

Adelphi will have a close seco 
This team has good strength, I 
needs endurance and teamwork 
order to win the close games. 

Third place team Ferox will hi 
to work in order to maintain 
*o win. It needs strength 
this will tell 
erox will win 









a \i* e 



£*:*£<>* 






7fi x 






^ciO&ZK&l 



&^*!&&e5*. 



nes- 



vȴ* 






■A* 















iccer predictions 
he season by co- 
the coaches and 



trong, but, as 
io<S7S?C(/£ need to field 

team in ot>- „o deserve a hig! 
rating. Its strong points are spe 
endurance, and desire to win. 

The men of AKT are going to 
tough. They show a true hustle ; 
desire in football and will contii 
to show this spirit in soccer. T! 
will tie for fourth because of th 
backfield. It will have to be sh, 
as well as quick in order to m; 
tain an equilibrium with the 
posing team. 

Plato will finish fifth because 
a loss of seniors and valuable 
perience. Plato, like AKT, \ 
need a strong balance of power 
its backfield. 

Anything can happen, and 
this reason I am placing PI 
sixth. There has been a ma 
break-up in personnel from 1 
year's squad and a great loss 
teamwork. If Philo can work 
gether and keep its backfield > 
of trouble, I firmly believe it ( 
be considered the dark horse of 



t& 






^ s^ ve : e d a ^: «w 



7*» 




&* , ^ c 




10° 



uciuo. iu C hol *^i ™... »• .- c v»v~ e ev «&"* \ W \i ° "* 
Dean Jackson, senior; Ch. o^ ^e ' ^ » l e s v X>& ■#&■ \j.o* 
1, senior; Barney Calvei \ . C A & . cS e * . 0< i °* \>ee* ^ ^ 



so 



TS SOLUTION 



ell 

)r; and Mike Beasley, 



the pool tournament, great 
ers participated. First place 
t to Dennis Russell. The follow- 
three places went to Denny 
:k, John Mule, and Glen Sudol. 



fresh <v*:j<: 

<& ° ot *°V» e 



* oV > * 



<JjW 



e*» 




^ 



MIKE PRZYBYL 



*% 



PEEKER CONCLUSIVE 






justice in 

can be 

p ree- 



ed in order to have a well balai 
system. 

Now, I am not going to leave 
matter without a solution. My i 
: in for this problem is very 

fore the start of eacl 

made of the p 

ferees. Th< 

wh te 



By M. PRZYBYL 

In bringing the world of sports 
a close, one can say that there 
is not been a dull moment or a 
orts that developed interest by 
ar in the intramural program. We 
ive had full seasons of football, 
isketball, and baseball, and along 
.th them many intermediate 
orts that expressed an interest to 
any students. We have also seen 
:en roiriDetition and russeri activ- 



make on the sports scene, nair 






% 



that perhaps this sports prr /?? ' u -f. ^ Jeu 
too vigorous, especially at t T °fety ^4, ' 

of the year when finals are fasV 
proaching. While Softball teams are 
playing a double round robin 
dividuals are playing badminton, 
tennis, and horseshoes. This pro- 
gram would tend to keep everyone 
busy, weather permitting or not. 

The Sports Department acknow- 
ledges the great vvOrk along with 



At* 



^s 



"fie, 










'^ 






















^« 



f °r* 






e. 



divi 
who 






"0/7 






this p 
.al of frii 
jras, and 
^ wish that 




The Intramural program played a leading role in 
extra-curricular activities on campus. It was under 
the direction of Mr. David Dutler. 

Individuals competed in all areas of interest. From 
Football to Basketball, and Soccer to Softball; not to 
mention Cross Country, Tennis, Badminton, and the 
Bicycle Relay. 

So as anyone can see a rigorous schedule of events 
was planned. But it can be said that it was worth 
every exhausting moment. 




i 




The Intramural Basketball League 
was the only outlet for extra energy 
during the winter months. It was a 
very close race between the top 
four teams. Unfortunately there are 
more memories than pictures. 








""H^v* Iff 










I.M.'s show strength and ability of all players. 



Each event proved what men are made of. 









WT- 1 




',-, -T.f - - '' 


■mV^Iu 


• , Tiit^^^H 


JRI 


t : '^ j ■'''■* " : B My$ 


^r M 




il 




Everybody has his own 
tricks. 



GOLF RETURNS TO McKENDREE 
AS A LETTERED SPORT BRINGING 
A FINE YEAR. 









SPRING 



BRINGS 



BASEBALL 






On the Ballfield McK had an average season. They lost a few close ones and were crippled by injured players. 
Their record was 12 — 15. 

But C'est la Vie; after a rough schedule and rainy weather the squad is looking towards a better season next year. 



V. 




/ V 



INTER-SOCIETY 
COUNCIL 





C. Stockton 10. N. Svanda 

J. Zamrazil 11. J. White 

H. Porter 12. V. Coleman, Advisor 

C. Davis 13. R. Greene 

R. Deterding 14. M. Howie 

M.Gentry 15. A. McNeely 

J. Hogeveen 16. S. Carlson 

M. Reich 17. E. Willoughby, Faculty Advisor 



'••N 




A 




I 





I 



V. 



I 



X 



*v» 



V/i 



■'--■ ': : ' %a *.*-~<?*~- 





O 3 



DELTA PHI 
SIGMA 




1. D. Swick 

2. T. Subers 

3. J. Farrow 

4. D. Stewart 

5. P. Bowling 
6.J.Streb 

7. R. Koch 

8. R. Drews 

9. C. Fox 
10. D. Vest 



11. N. Passomato 

12. P. Sabin 

13. N. Hassakis 

14. M. Beenders 

15. S. McKenzie 

16. R. Hodgson 

17. J. Watson 
18.T. Pollick 

19. L.Carter 

20. B. Finn 



21. R. Greene 

22. C. Zauf 

23. B. DeWolf 

24. F. Schutta 

25. A. d'Hautecourt 

26. M. Kenny 

27. S. Pearson 

28. P. Schwab 

29. J. Ramsey 



W M 






■:&&?$*&■ 



ALPHA 

KAPPA 

TAXJ 




-:^-'- 



ALPHA KAPPA TAU 





1. R. Copeland 

2. M. Reich 

3. M. Gentry 

4. R. Kotras 

5. R. Sturm, Advisor 

6. C. Beck 

7. C. Rudiger 

8. P. Myers 

9. R. Eichkorn 

10. J. Hogeveen 

11. D. Musso 

12. D. Kording 

13. T. Franzen 

14. T. Musso 

15. D. Bossier 




KAPPA 

LAMBDA 

IOTA 







J. Etherton 
M. Lorentzen 
D. Berg 
V. Buchanon 

C. Jacolick 

D. Anderson 
L. Goetz 

8. I. Houston 

9. J.Templeton 

10. P. Kuttin 

11. D. Upchurch 

12. M. Loy 

13. E. McWard 

14. A. McNeely 

15. B. Svanda 

16. R. Upchurch 

17. M. Hicks 

18. D. Payne 



J3J -■ 






* » 



PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 





PHI RHO CHI 





1. M. Fenton 

2. C. Alexy 

3. L. Wright 

4. M. Pryzbyl 

5. M. Howie 

6. C. Stockton, Advisor 

7. B. Hoyt 

8. D. Hampleman 

9. S. Carlson 

10. J. Hodges 

11. C. Farrell 

12. G. Sudol 

13. B. Hogan 



PI LAMBDA TAU 




Mm*. 

gtfc -*r^^ /^ir. 




1.T. Montgomery 

2. T.Schmidt 

3. D. Sherbondy 

4. C. Weintz 

5. G.Taylor 

6. R. Deterding 

7. D. Berry 

8. G. Coates 

9. F. Minnigerode, Advisor 

10. W. Melton 

11. J. White 

12. S. Merrit 

13. P. Grieme 













.Jfe*.; 



JCL 



A ' 5* 



•<**' 




SIGMA KAPPA TAU 





1. N.Svanda 

2. M. Kloth 

3. B. Broeckling 

4. L. Rezba 




oKQ/rMwwoits 




STUDENT 

EDUCATION 

ASSOCIATION 




1. M. Gentry 


12. G. Baver 


23. M. Rutledge 


2.]. Hodges 


13. D. Bailey 


24. S. Newbury 


3. D. Stepp 


14. D. Rhodes 


25. L. Shawver 


4. D. Williams 


15. V. Brown 


26. R. Statham 


5. C. Davis 


16. J. Meyer 


27. L. Rezba 


6. L. Mooney 


17. J. Herrin 


28. R. Brutto 


7. F. Schaubert 


18. S. Merritt 


29. J.Svanda 


8. M. Hook 


19. B. Finn 


30. G. Mannz 


9. M. Rutledge 


20. M. Baldwin 


31. B. Laff 


10. W. Roeschmann 


21. G. Coleman 


32. B. Bailey 


11. P.Georg 


22. V. Wegner 


33. B. Svanda 






SIGMA 
ZETA 



1. L. Genge 

2. D. McKenzie 

3. S.Smith 

4. D. Utz 

5. W. Minton 

6. B. Finn 

7. R. Deterding 

8. B. DeWolf 

9. L. Mooney 

10. F. Fleming, Advisor 



(/ 





SYCHOLOGY CLUB 




1.T. Schmidt 

2. P. Grieme 

3. A. Ruyle 

4. K. Koste 

5. F. Minnigerode (Advisor) 

6. M. Howie 

7. M. Skinner 
8. ). Herrin 

9. P. Widicus 

10. G.Taylor 

11. R. Steinmann 






PHI 

BETA 

LAMBDA 






1. B. Hoyt 

2. D. Bossier 

3. H. Rogers, Adviser 

4. T. Hagnauer 

5. L. Nalevac 

6. D. Philip 

7. P. Belobraydic 

8. S. Carlson 

9. F. Eversman 

10. S. McKenzie 

11. S. Hamilton 

12. j.Watson 




INVESTMENT 
CLUB 




HISTORY 
CLUB 




1. R. Deterding 

2. M. Reich 

3. S. Carlson 

4. C. Stockton (Advisor) 

5. D. Clinard 

6. J. Hogeveen 

7. M. Brock 

8. B. Laff 





CHESS 
CLUB 




1. R. Bonk 

2. D. Goetz 

3. D. Hassenflug 

4. A. D'Hautecourt 

5. F.Rudy 

6. C.King 

7. F. Washington 

8. H. Porter, Advisor 

9. L.Hopkins 

10. J.Hodges 

11. L.Wright 



ASSOCIATION 

OF BLACK 
COLLEGIATES 






PUBLIC 

AFFAIRS 

FORUM 




1.R. Berg 

2. M. McLenna 

3. G. Novich 

4. C. Davis 

5. J. Richardson 

6. R. Brown, Advisor 

7. R. Pratt 




YOUNG 
REPUBLICANS 




1. R. Steinmann 

2. M. Gentry 

3. W. Decker 

4. M. Comissiong 



5. D. Vest 

6. K. Koste 

7. D.Mueller 




CHAPEL 
CHOIR 



1. D. Price 


7. D. Sherbondy 


2.J.Jahn 


8. M. Brawley 


3. B. Dirks 


9. J. Etherton 


4. D. Hill 


10. M. Hicks 


5. R. Crawford 


11. A. McNeely 


6. I.Jahn 


12. I.Mitchell 



McKENDREE CHOIR 




1. G. Freiner, 


10. R. DeBoer 


19. M. Zeisset 


28. M. Hicks 


Director 


11. D. Price 


20. B. Smoltz 


29. P. Marlin 


2. L. Hauschild 


12. D. Hill 


21.G. Vogler 


30. J. Etherton 


3. D. Devor 


13. M. Beenders 


22. C. Davis 


31. A. McNeely 


4. G. Baver 


14. T. Kingsman 


23. D. McKenzie 


32. P. Georg 


5. P. Fietsam 


15. L. Fowler 


24. M. Brawley 


33. P.Smoltz 


6. E. Queen 


16. B. Dirks 


25. S. Newbury 


34. C. King 


7. M. Lorentzen 


17. M. Rann 


26. I.Jahn 


35. C.Allen 


8. J. Rothwell 


18. D. Sherbondy 


27. P. Zutter 


36. P. Kuttin 


9. I.Jahn 














\ \ C\rQiC^ 


\m^Q 


j vTT 1^1 ^\ 


xvr 


\ w c 

\ 


1. M. Brawley 


2. J. McCovey 


3. K. Littel 


4. L. Shawver 


5. M. Brock 


6. D. Schwartz 


7. D. Payne 


8. L. Gray (Advisor) 


9. J. Stiritz 


10. S. Newbury 


11.C. Vogler 


12. D. Utz 



WOMEN'S SOCIETY OF CHRISTIAN 

SERVICE 






, 




I " 






jk 1 




1 ■ J 




^V 1 


I w/r i 


k or 


T^> H 




\ Tffv»r«l 


■& 








I/, ^^ 






jHfl 


3 ' 








WD 

?* entity 



/ v. 



m s &m» 




Eric N. Rackham 
President 



ADMINISTRATION 




Emerial Owen 
Dean of the College 



Larry A. Schmalenberger 
Dean of Students 



Vernon O. Snead 
Business Mgr. 



Kenneth O. laeger 
Director of Development 




Victor Kapetanovic 
Director of Admissions 




NWRM%$ 




lone K. Pence 
Registrar 



Louis A. Youngs 
Chaplain 




Lynn A. Grove 
Head Librarian 




Sheri L. Smith 
Director of Women's 
Residence Halls and 
Director of Deneen Center 



Vickie L. Coleman 

Asst. to Dean of Students 



Fred K. Robinson 
Asst. Business Mgr. 




Warren Barty 

Coordinator of Public Information Services 



Patricia H. Troy 
Assistant Librarian 



WTSWIMG 
HMKESSatt 




These three men were chosen by 
the student body as favorite pro- 
fessors. They were selected because 
of their interest in the student, and 
in a larger scope, the school in 
general. They were considered to 
be friendly, helpful, and capable 
of those qualities which help the 
student to enjoy his classroom ex- 
perience as well as the experience 
of the student-faculty relationship 
outside of class. They were asked 
to submit for publication, a para- 
graph on a matter which they be- 
lieve is pertinent to today's world. 
Each paragraph is a small part of 
themselves, and therefore is ex- 
ampletory of the personality which 
makes them outstanding professors 
and our favorites. 






"Alle anderen Dinge muessen; der 
Mensch ist das Wesen, welches will. 
Eben deswegen ist des Menschen 
nichts so unwuerdig, als Gewalt zu 
erleiden, denn Gewalt hebt ihn auf. 
Wer sie uns antut, macht uns nichts 
Geringeres als die Menschheit 
streitig; wer sie feigerweise erlei- 
det, wirft seine Menschheit hin- 
weg." 

SCHILLER 



-3 fVACS ZAMRAZtl 



McKendree is a "special place" insofar as it allows us 
to relate to each other as persons in the educational 
enterprise. It is not smallness that makes this possible. 
Buildings do not insure it. Even the academic prepara- 
tion of the faculty cannot guarantee it; nor can the 
ACT scores of students. Geographical location has 
nothing at all to do with it. It is rather a basic accept- 
ance of each other as human beings, and a genuine 
humility which is a prerequisite for listening, under- 
standing and learning. It makes the difference be- 
tween "training" and "education"; a "factory" and an 
"educational community." Without this dimension of 
community, McKendree would be nothing "special"; 
it would merely be "a place." 



CA'I StbcJOoK 




•*:•;■'■>■;>-■>. - 




"Science's task is to serve man by mastering 
nature, and not to become man's master. In 
serving man, science must close ranks with 
other servants of humanity, the creative 
arts, philosophy, religion, and all others 
striving for a new integrated humanism. 
Science, which has helped to de-throne 
man from the self-appropriated station as 
the center of the universe can help him now 
grow in his rightful stature." 

PAUL A. WEISS 



Fred FUntNi 




Evelyn Best 

Asst. Professor of English 



Robert H. Brown 

Associate Professor of Sociology 



David C. Dutler 

Instructor, Director of Intramurals, Director of 

Physical Education, and Baseball Coach 




Fred A. Fleming 

Professor of Biology 

Chairman of Science and Mathematics 



Victor H. Gummersheimer 
Instructor of Mathematics 




Elizabeth A. Hopkins 
Instructor of English 



Dr. Ralph E. Marty 

Professor of Education 

Director of Teacher Preparation Division 





Fred A. Minnigerode 
Instructor of Psychology 



Howard L. Porter 
Instructor of Physics 



Myron C. Reese 

Asst. Professor of Chemistry 




Howard L. Rogers 

Asst. Professor of Political Science and Econ. 



OrvilleH. Schanz 

Asst. Professor of Music Education 




Ralph W. Scharnau 
Associate Professor of History 



Margurite Skaar 
Instructor of French 



Harry M. Statham 
Basketball Coach 





Blanche B. Tibbetts 

Asst. Professor of Elementary Education 



Curtis L. Trainer 

Professor of Education Teacher Preparation 



Roy A. Sturm 

Associate Professor of Sociology 





Grace R. Welch 

Instructor of English and Speech 



Ernest J. Willoughby 
Asst. Professor of Biology 



"s /• 



SSWOKS 





Peggy Abernathy 
Springfield, III. 
Major: Speech 
Minor: Business 





Richard L. Aubuchon 
E. St. Louis, Mo. 
Major: Business 
Minor: Sociology 



Mary Lou Anders 
Mascoutah, III. 
Major: English 
Minor: Psychology 



David B. Bailey 
Christopher, III. 
Major: History 
Minor: Political Science 




David A. Bergin 
Decatur, III. 
Major: Business 
Minor: Math 




Charles Black 
Centralia, III. 
Major: Social Studies Div. 
Minor: History 



George W. Braden 
Maplewood, Mo. 
Major: Social Studies Div. 
Minor: Psychology 



Robert L. Bower 
llliopolis, III. 
Major: Business 
Minor: Sociology 




Michael P. Brethauer 


Virginia A. Brown 


RitaM. Brutto 


Belleville, III. 


St. Jacob, III. 


Belleville, III. 


Major: History 


Major: Physical Ed. 


Major: Elementary Ed 


Minor: Sociology 


Minor: Sociology 


Minor: History 






Byron R. Calvert 
Martinsville, III. 
Major: Business 
Minor: Sociology 



Steven O. Buescher 
Okawville, III. 
Major: Sociology 
Minor: Philosophy 





Cletus L. Davis 
Okawville, III. 
Major: Mathematics 
Minor: Physics 




Harriet Chappie 
Caseyville, III. 
Major: Elementary Ed. 
Minor: History 




Steven T. Crews 
Fairfield, III. 
Major: Business 
Minor: History 



Mark Davis 

O'Fallon, III. 

Major: Business-Economics 

Minor: Sociology 





Brian T. Finn 
Peoria, 

Major: Bus. Adm. 
Minor: Math: Econ 



Charles L. Dollar 
Collinsville, III. 
Major: Business 
Minor: Religion 



Wesley Decker 
South Pasadena, Calif 
Major: Business 
Minor: Sociology 




Ronald A. Foster 
O'Fallon, III 
Major: Sociology 
Minor: Biology 



Maureen E. Florek 
Belleville, III. 
Major: Physical Ed. 
Minor: Sociology 



Lauren T. Fowler 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Major: Voice 
Minor: Piano 





Paul S. Funkhouser 
Mount Vernon, III. 
Major: Chemistry 
Minor: Math 



Sonja A. Funkhouser 
Belleville, III. 
Major: English 
Minor: Sociology 



Lawrence J. Genge 
Chicago, III. 
Major: Math 
Minor: Business 




Mark R.Gentry 
Rosewood Heights 
Major: Elementary Ed. 
Minor: Chemistry 



Patricia A. Georg 
New Athens, III. 
Major: Music 
Minor: Music 



Linda S. Gohmert 
Miami, Florida 
Major: Art 
Minor: Sociology 




Robert Greene 

Mt. Vernon, III. 

Major: Business-Economics 

Minor: History 





James L. Hagemann 
Lebanon, III. 
Major: Elementary Ed. 
Minor: History 




David ). Gross 
St. Jacob, III. 
Major: Speech 
Minor: Sociology 



Stephen R. Hamilton 
Lebanon, III. 
Major: Business 
Minor: Music 




Paul L. Havenar 

Lisle, 

Major: Physical Ed. 

Minor: Mathematics 



David Hampleman 
Centralia, III. 
Major: Psychology 
Minor: Sociology 






Dean E. Heer 
Lebanon, III. 
Major: Social Studies 
Minor: Psychology 



Delores A. Hayer 
Sparta, III. 

Major: Elementary Ed. 
Minor: Psychology 





Judith L. Herrin 
Herrin, III. 

Major: Elementary Ed. 
Minor: Psychology 



James W. Hogeveen 
Chicago, III. 
Major: Social Studies 
Minor: History 




Max D. Hook 
Vienna, III. 
Major: Mathematics 
Minor: Physical Ed. 



Jay Hodges 

Girard, III. 

Major: Soc. Studies Div. 





Larry L. Hopkins 
Patoka, III. 
Major: History 
Minor: Biology 





Lester D. Jackson 
Wayne City, III. 
Major: Mathematics 
Minor: Physical Ed. 



Donald L. Kording 
Tallula, III. 
Major: Physical Ed. 
Minor: Sociology 




Alfred A. Johnson 
E. St. Louis, Mo. 
Major: Psychology 
Minor: Sociology 



Dennis L. Korte 
Lebanon, III. 
Major: Physical Ed. 
Minor: Biology 




Lee J. Ladinsky 
CreveCoeur, Mo. 
Major: Business 
Minor: Sociology 






Sandra F. McDuffie 
McGuireA.F.B., N.J. 
Major: Business 
Minor: Art 



William H.Lirely 
Marion, III. 
Major: Psychology 
Minor: Sociology 



Jeanne K. McClynn 
Lebanon, III. 
Major: Elementary Ed. 
Minor: Sociology 





Clarence E. Merritt 
Marion, III. 
Major: History 
Minor: Sociology 



Robert R. McKinley 
Bridgeport, III. 
Major: Physical Ed. 
Minor: Business 





Anthony J. Musso 
Belleville, III. 
Major: Psychology & 
Physical Ed. 



Perry R. Newbury 
DuQuoin, 
Major: History 
Minor: Sociology 




Barbara M. Niemeier 
Tallula, III. 

Major: Social Studies 
Minor: Psychology 



AttWfc I 





Steven Pearson 
Mt. Vernon, III. 
Major: Social Studies 
Minor: Business 



David R. Philip 
Belleville, III. 
Major: Business/Econ 
Minor: Psychology 



Marc K.Reich 
Mt. Vernon, N.Y. 
Major: History 
Minor: Sociology 



Linda S. Rezba 
Sparta, III. 

Major: Elementary Ed. 
Minor: English 



lames A. Ragus 
Wood River, III. 
Major: Business 
Minor: Sociology 




Dereatha A. Rhoades 
Sullivan, III. 
Major: Elementary Ed. 
Minor: Bus. Adm. 



SENIORS 

,oK4-o*6 MOW t 





Wieland Roeschmann 


Michael A. Rutledge 


Frank S. Schaubert 


Middleville, N.J. 


Arthur, III. 


Mt. Vernon, III. 


Major: Speech-Drama 


Major: Physical Ed. 


Major: Elementary Ed. 


Minor: English 


Minor: Sociology 







Floyd R.Schutta 


Philip R.Schwab 


Linda A. Shawver 


Lancaster, N.Y. 


Litchfield, III. 


Smithfield, III. 


Major: Sociology 


Major: Business 


Major: Elementary Ed 


Minor: Art 


Minor: Econ. 


Minor: English 



GET TH£ whole 

picture ANb 





David Sherbondy 
Cleveland Hts., Ohio 
Major: Sociology 
Minor: English 



Robert L. Shook 
Belleville, III. 
Major: Soc. Studies 
Minor: Philosophy 



William J. Smoltz 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Major: Speech 
Minor: Art 





Gregory A. Snyder 
Calumet City, III. 
Major: Bus. Adm. 
Minor: Econ. 



Rickey R.Stahl 
Smithton, III. 
Major: Math 
Minor: Physics 




ONI 





John P. Stanton 
Robinson, III. 
Major: Business 
Minor: Sociology 



Rose A. Statham 
Lebanon, III. 
Major: Physical Ed. 
Minor: Psychology 



Audrey A. Steinkamp 
Okawville, III. 
Major: Soc. Studies 
Minor: Sociology 




% * * 






«• 




David L. Stepp 
Carondelet, III. 
Major: Art Ed. 
Minor: Sociology 



John P. Streb 
Dobbo Ferry, N.Y. 
Major: Bus. Adm. 
Minor: Econ. 



Cynthia A. Strobo 
Dupo, III. 
Major: History 
Minor": English 





Helen I. Stroup 
Carbondale, III. 
Major: Business 
Minor: Speech 



Jacqueline A. Svanda 
Steeleville, III. 
Major: Physical Ed. 
Minor: Sociology 



Nancy C. Svanda 
Sparta, III. 
Major: Bus. Adm. 
Minor: Sociology 





George A. Taylor 
Alton, III. 

Major: Psychology 
Minor: Sociology 



Marjorie A. Tebbe 
Highland, III. 

Major: Physical Education 
Minor: Sociology 



Jane I. Templeton 
Pinckneyville, III. 
Major: Business Adm. 
Minor: Psychology 








Beverly ). Terry 
Venice, III. 
Major: Bus. Adm. 
Minor: Sociology 



Howard A. Thomas 
Lebanon, III. 
Major: Bus. Adm. 
Minor: Sociology 



William D. Truty 
Ottawa, III. 
Major: Physical Ed. 
Minor: Psychology 




Debbie). Upchurch 
Cahokia, III. 
Major: Elementary Ed. 
Minor: Physical Ed. 



Wilmar J. Upton 
Lebanon, III. 
Major: Soc. Studies 
Minor: Sociology 



Vicki J. Wegner 
Lebanon, III. 
Major: Physical Ed. 
Minor: Psychology 




Robert M. Wenderoth 
Milford, Ohio 
Major: Biology 
Minor: Chemistry 



John E. White 
Decatur, III 
Major: Business 
Minor: Math 




Paul W. Widicus 
St. Jacob, III. 
Major: History 
Minor: Psychology 



Lavick C. Williams 
E. St. Louis, Mo. 
Major: Bus. Adm. 
Minor: Economics 




David E. Williams 
Litchfield, III. 
Major: Physical Ed. 
Minor: History 



Herbert L. Winemiller 
Whittington, III. 
Major: Business 
Minor: Sociology 



Tt'H'DS'ReJMSS'ntS'n 



\ 





Class 



of 1971 







Barbara Bailey 
W. Frankfort, III. 



Mark L. Baldwin 
Pana, III. 



Paul M. Beenders 
Roanoke, III. 



Vara L. Best 
Livingston, III. 



Stephen Carlson 
Galesburg, III. 






Mary K. Carlton 
Godfrey, III. 



Don Clinard 
Butler, III. 



Cynthia De Hart 
Taylorville, III. 



Brain DeWolf 
Wheaton, III. 



Alain d'Hautecourt 
Yonkers, N.Y. 




Joy Etherton 
Belleville, III. 




William Goshen 
Dupo, III. 




James R. Heaney 
Mt. Vernon, III. 





Sally Gillespey 

Collinsville, III. 




Lynn Harris 
DuQuoin, II 




Bruce Hogan 
Pleasant Plains, 





Bradley Hoyt 
Mt. Prospect, III, 



Stephen Keene 
Lewistown, III. 



Carol Klopmeyer 
Mascoutah, III 




Melissa Loy 
Kinmundy, II 



Gloria Mannz 
Troy, III. 






Scott McKenzie 
Decatur, III. 



Betty McKinzie 
Venedy, III. 



Ellen McWard 
Taylorville, III. 



Walt Minton 
Anna, III. 



Thomas Montgomery 
Rosemont, Pa. 




David L. Muelle 
Chester, III. 



Bethel Murray 
Louisville, Ky. 



George Myers 
Wolf Lake, III. 



Lester Nalevac 
Bellwood, III. 



Deborah Nevois 
Collinsville, III. 






Jeff O'Neill 
Belleville, II 



Ernest Queen 
DuQuoin, III. 



Gaylan Rosenberger 
Jacksonville, III. 



Margo Rutledge 
Arthur, III. 



Ann Ruyle 
Godfrey, III. 





James Schulz 
New Athens, I 



Suzanne Sobol 
Lebanon, III. 



Dan Stewart 
Robinson, III. 



BerniceSvanda 
Steeleville, III. 



Sheila Swyear 
Benton, III. 




^f m 




Mary Beth Thompkins 
Leroy, III. 



Sandra Ward 
Newton, III. 



John L. Watson 
Pensacola, Fla. 



Clifton Wells 
Elgin, III. 



Miles D.Wright 
Decatur, III. 










Thomas Beaird 
Belleville, III. 



Edward Belva 
McLeansboro, II 



Cathi Boyer 
Bethalto, III. 



Janet Brand 
Piscataway, N.J. 



Mary Ellen Brock 
DuQuoin, III. 




Ron Coleman 
Percy, III. 




Peggy Kuttin 
New Douglas, III. 



Wayne Loehring 
Summerfield, III 



Perry R. Martz 
Shelbyville, III. 



Mark McKenna 
Mystic, Conn. 



David McKenzie 
Vienna, III. 




Anna McNeely 
Tower Hill, III. 





William Melton 
West York, III. 



Dave Musso 
Belleville, III. 




Gary Weinlz 
Christopher, 



Gary Zauf 

Evanston, II 




Debra Berg 


William Biggerstaff 


William Brave 


Melody Brawley 


Vicki Buchanan 


Fairfield, III. 


Mounds, III. 


Wood River, III. 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Fairfield, III. 




Bryan Carson 
Lombard, III. 



Bill Carter 
Toledo, III. 




Robert Castellani 
Paramus, N.J. 



Rodney Cooley 

Jacksonville, III. 



Donna Davis 
Fairfield, III. 




Class of 1973 




Robert DeBoer 
Belleville, III. 



Joe Frisina 
Meadville, Pa. 




i > * 






Thomas Gaddy 


George Galeener 


Charlie Grojean 


Edward Groth 


David B. Harper 


Olney, Ml. 


Vienna, III. 


Jacksonville, III. 


Freeburg, III. 


Paducah, Ky. 






)an D. Heiens 
Edwardsville, I 



Luanne Holper 
Petersburg, III. 



Iris Jahn 
Caseyville, 



Frank Jennings 
Paget, Bermuda 



Lorraine Jones 
Silver Spring, Md. 




Paul Kettwich 
Minonk, III. 



Emma Kinder 
Boles, III. 



Carol Koglin 
Granite City, II 









Thomas Lehnen 
Bethalto, III. 



Jacquelyn Lorick 
St. Louis, Mo. 



Virginia Macovey 
E.St. Louis, III. 



Dave Markwel 
Greenup, III. 



Joanna Mitchel 
Marion, III. 







Mary Ann Moeller 
Nashville, III. 



Duane Mounts 
Jacksonville, III. 



Jerry Muller 
Freeburg, III. 



Donald Murbarger 
Wood River, III. 



James Newman 
Jacksonville, III. 








George Noeth 
Granite City, III 



Carol O'Guinn 
Cahokia, III. 



Dennis Price 
Rockbridge, III 



Kathy Reed 
Salem, III. 



Alan Rhein 
Carmi, III. 





Marna Rutledge 
Arthur, III. 



Deborah Schwartz 
Bethany, III. 






Richard Sharp 


Mitchell Silverstein 


Rodney Simonds 


Cherie Skaggs 


Bernice 


Patoka, III. 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Jacksonville, III. 


Salem, III. 


Stambaugh 
Norwood, N.J. 




Rebecca Upchurch 
Dupo, III. 



DanettUtz 
Tonawanda, N.Y. 



Gail Vogeler 
Granite City, III. 




Barbara Wanless 
Chatham, III. 





Kenneth Zeisset 
Edwardsville, III. 




■ IN MEMORIAM 



MILBURN P. AKERS 

1900-1970 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Milburn P. Akers, President of the Board 
of Trustees, graduated from McKendree 
with the class of 1925. As a professional, 
Mr. Akers spent 42 years as a journalist 
and newspaperman, and in 1968 retired 
as Editor of the Chicago Sun-Times. Fol- 
lowing his retirement he became presi- 
dent of Shimer College, a position he 
held until his death. As an "Editor and 
Educator" Milburn P. Akers always ac- 
cepted the responsibilities and challeng- 
es presented to him. As President of the 
Board of Trustees, Milburn P. Akers 
efforts will long be remembered. 



ELDON DITTEMORE 

1894-1970 

PROFESSOR OF BUSINESS 

Eldon Dittemore, Assistant Professor of 
Business and Economics, came to Mc- 
Kendree in 1957 from Shurtleff College. 
During his professional career Mr. Ditte- 
more served as a high school instructor, 
sehool superintendent, church pastor, 
and college professor. His life was spent 
interested in people — his students and 
his vast community of friends. Eldon 
Dittemore will be missed by the students 
of McKendree, but his service will long 
be remembered. 



This book is not necessarily dedi- 
cated to any one person, but on this 
page we, the staff of the McKen- 
drean, as well as various other 
members of our campus commu- 
nity would like to recognize the 
many outstanding contributions of 
Sheri Smith who has fulfilled not 
only the duties of her office with 
great competence but has as well 
devoted many personal hours to 
establishing a higher quality of 
community living. 

To Sheri Smith we give many thanks. 



I 



| ;;*** 








editor 


jane templeton 


assistant editors 


linda goetz 




chip murray 


art editor 


scott mc kenzie 


faculty advisor 


elizabeth hopkins 


features 


linda goetz 


sports 


mike pryzbyl 


greeks 


wesley decker 


organizations 


sonja funkhouser 


seniors 


mark gentry 


underclassmen 


gary tydus 


typist 


mick branson 


photography 


dave philip 




rich aubuchon 




mick brown field 


inspiration and acknowledgements 


j. combs 


r. green e 


c. Stockton 


j. svanda 


s. smith 


g. rosenberger 


j. whinnery 


e. mc ward 


j. zamrazil 


i. houston 


h. rogers 


m. wright 


w. decker 


v. burton 


v. buchanon 


s. macieiski 


c. skaggs 


r. koch 


c. penn 


j. watson 


a. ruyle 


j. streb 


m. mc kenna 


ron 


r. evans 


misc. sports editors 


j. Wallace 


god 




IT CAME TO PASS 



It is the final page of the book and 1 truly don't be- 
lieve it. As it has been said, "an editor doesn't edit 
his book, he lives it," and this is most assuredly true. 
This has been one wildly different year for all of us. 
We have watched the apathy of students all over the 
United States change to oceans of concern and un- 
rest as well as to violence. It has, as well, touched 
those of us here at McKendree. We have found that 
our small private Methodist college is not an island 
unto itself or a haven where one can attain an edu- 
cation unhampered by the problems of other cam- 
puses. Our problems have not been unique but have 
at least unleashed greater interest in the movement 
of our college community though the question still 
arises in different circles as to what direction we are 
moving. Personally, I feel that we are moving forward, 
a point which may be proven by the gain of our 
major asset of the year: accreditation. We are accred- 
ited! For many of us that day seemed an unreachable 
dream turned into reality. We made it at last but not 
alone and, at this point, we should thank those who 
went before us who made it possible: the administra- 
tors, faculty, students, and particularly Dr. Edwin 
Voigt who gave so much of his vitality for life to Mc- 
Kendree; without the contributions of each of them 
we could not have ascended as we have today. 
As an editor, I must say it has been a difficult year. Different factions have affected my personal attitude toward 
the yearbook and somehow, a hint of the editor manages to touch every page. At this point I am pleased with 
the book in the sense that we, the staff of the 1970 McKendrean, have dared to make our small contributions to 
the huge yearbook world of big colleges and universities; we have attempted to try things that only "the big 
kids" do. We have tried to create a creative, modern yearbook that will capture for us what the 1969-70 school 
year at McKendree really was. 

Parts of this yearbook may bring questions to certain eyes but it is to be made clear at this point that no part of 
this yearbook is meant to be derogatory, to hurt, anger, or tear anyone down. We have mentioned certain 
"touchy" subjects but only in the hope that we can possibly open eyes and look at the events of the past year 
with a sense of awareness as well as to see our problems on both sides with a touch of humor. 

In the end the amount of gratitude to the staff of the yearbook can never be expressed fully. It takes a great 
deal of "togetherness" to put a book together and being "together" was an understatement for all of us. It 
takes a lot of work and, when everyone tries, a lot of enjoyment as well as a finished product can be the result. 
It is people like those who worked together to whom I owe a great deal of gratitude. At this point it is too 
much to list and thank everyone who helped create and put together this book, but I would like to mention a 
few particular people who, without them, this book would not be possible. I would especially like to thank 
Linda and Scott for many long hours, for putting up with a lot and for producing a lot. I would like to thank 
each of the section editors for carrying his share of the load — especially those like Mark who, at the last min- 
ute, found himself suddenly an essential member of the staff. At the last minute we found ourselves the best 
typists on campus, Mick Branson and Ann Ruyle, as well as a "girl Friday," Jackie Svanda who produced won- 
ders. The photographers somehow pulled through and they deserve medals for it — we didn't quite understand 
their problems and they didn't quite understand ours but we finally worked things out. In this department spe- 
cial thanks go to Joe Whinnery who, although not a student, devoted more hours to this campus in one month 
than many students have given in four years. 

Finally, a special thanks should go to Wesley Decker who gathered a last minute gang together when I messed 
myself up in an automobile accident during the last weeks of production. Wesley's tireless help with produc- 
tion during the final days is the actual reason this book exists as it is in its entirety; without someone with a clear 
mind to guide us along we probably would have floundered over our heads. 

I would also like to thank those people behind the scenes such as Mrs. Hopkins, our advisor, and Jim Combs, 
our yearbook consultant. Extra special thanks too go to Walt Minton and Bob Greene who somehow listened 
when I needed someone and pushed me through when I was ready to quit. It takes a lot of special people to 
make a yearbook and I would like to thank them all for helping me make this yearbook possible. 

jit