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Full text of "The McKendrean : being the year book of McKendree College"

& 








Nolman Library 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/mckendreanbein40mcke 



THE 1940 
McKENDREAN 




THEIR 
STORY 

a 5 ^y 'old o 



ISABEL SHAFFER 

lulilor-in-Chief 

PAUL YOST 
Associate Editor 

ROBERT HERMAN 
Business Manager 

RALPH EDWARDS 

Assistant Business Manager 

CECILE ALBRIGHT 
Advertising 

ALBERT JOHNPETER 
Advertising 

JOHN HENDERSON 
Circulation 

KETURAH STELZRIEDE 

Organisations 

MARY RUTH SHELTON 
Features 

ARTHUR BAUM 
Sports 

GEORGE FLESOR 

Photography 

ROGER TAPPMEYER 

Photography 

MISS ALLEEN WILSON 
Faculty Adviser 




1 





VJ e PORTRAY 

the rf/c^J\ enavee 

BOY and GIRL 



In the McKENDREAN- 
Yearbook published by the 
students of McKendree 
College at Lebanon, Illinois. 
Volume VIII, New Series. 






HER LIFE and HIS 




LIFE 



are corvee, 



tlu portrayed 



this account of "McKendree day by day" will have ac- 
complished its purpose. As you leaf from page to page 
you may determine our class standing and who made 
up the basketball, football, and track squads. We would 
be disappointed if you did not notice the honorary so- 
ciety which has pledged us this year. Stop just for a 
moment and take cognizance of our literary and dra- 
matic achievements. Did you know that we have taken 
a forward step in the form of a Faculty-Student Coun- 
cil? If you peruse this hook carefully, you will see all 
these things — and more. We hope that each page will 
serve as a piece of the entire pattern of our campus life. 



" ft 



w —r 



Vo iL FACULT 




"1 am not a teacher; only a fellow-trav- 
eller of whom yen asked the way. 1 
fainted ahead — ahead of myself as well 
as of you." 

— Bernard Shaw. 




COLLEGE wL 



have been the greatest influence for good which 
has entered their lives during their entire college 
career, the McKendree Boy and Girl, today, pay 
tribute. 

Is it the teacher of Science? It is. Do we list 
the teacher of Languages? History? Dramatics? 
We do. Are the Coaches, the Librarian, the Ex- 
ecutives there? Again we answer: "They are." 
If we are well-integrated individuals, we can 
point to this splendid group of men and women, 
each of whom has contributed his part, and to 
them this book is dedicated in the hope that 
thereby a small part of our appreciation may be 
expressed. 





SCHOOL LIFE </ HER 




We introduce our book with 
Staff 
Dedication 



We are guided by 

Administration 
Faculty 



We give our best effort to 
Classes 
Organizations 



We recreate through 
Sports 
Features 



r 




an 



d of HIM u DIVIDED 




CHARLES J. STOWELL, Ph.D. 
Dean 



WE ARE GUIDED BY 



CLARK ROIXAND YOST, A.B, D.D 
President 




For four of the best years of our lives we have been glad to submit to the 
kindly, friendly guidance of the President, the Dean, and the Teacher who is a 
specialist in our particular field. No day too tilled with oilier duties, hut that they 
found lime for our problems. No problems so big hut that they wen- willing to 
help us solve them. They, ever willing and able, found the extremity of US— The 
Boy and Girl — their opportunity. 



EDWIN P. BAKER 

M.A., LL.D. 
German 



JAMES C. DOLLEY 

MA., Litt.D. 
Latin and Greek 



ALLEEN WILSON 

B.A., B.S. in L.S. 
Librarian 



S. M. McCLURE 

M.S. 
Geology 



MRS NELL G. OPPITZ 
MA. 

History 

MRS. M. B. VAN LEER 

Voice 

Public School Music 



MRS. AILEEN SPENCER 

BA. 
Biology 

EDWIN R. SPENCER 

Ph.D. 
Biology 



OLIVER H. KLEINSCHM1DT 

AA.G.O. 
Piano, Organ, Theory 

ELIZA J. DONALDSON 

M.A. 
Commerce 

Comptroller 



CORA M. THOMAS 

B.S. 
Speech 

C. DeWITT HARDY 

M.A. 
History 





"We require from buildings, as from men, two kinds 
of (loudness: first, the doing their practical duty well, 
then that they be graceful and pleasing in doing it, 
which last is itself another form of duty." 

John Ruskin — Stones of Venice. 



AND THESE TOO ARE- 

"More to guide than spur" 



WEBSTER R. SCHMIDT 

M.S. 
Chemistry and Physics 


MARY H. WRIGHT 
Ph.D. 

English 


AIRS. BLANCHE HERTEN 

STEIN 
Matron of Carnegie Hall and 
Dietician 


ARTHUR K. HENDERSON 

A.B. 
Director of Physical Education 


RE IN HOLD B. HOHN 

M.A. 
Education 
Registrar 


RUTH McDANTEL 

M.A. 
Romance Language 


MRS. BERTHA WEASE 
Matron of Clark Hall 


HAROLD HERTENSTETN 

B.S. 
Chemistry and Mathematics 


WILLIAM J. SCARBOR- 
OUGH, l'h. 1). 
Philosophy and Religion 




THE BOY AND GIRL EDITION 




SENIOR 



Dorothy rlertenstein 
Everette I [ayden 



Owen William 
Lucille Floetm; 



DOROTHY HERTENSTEIN, A.B. 
New Baden 

Mathematics 

Sigma Zeta, Vice Master-Scientist '40; 
Alpha I'm ( (mega; Clio; \\ .A. V Sports 
Mgr. '38; Pres. '39: Little Theatre; Glee 
Club '37-'40, Vice Pres. '40; Quartet '38- 
'40; Y.W.C.A. Cabinet '39-'40; Tennis '38; 
Pits. Clark Hall '40; Cheer Leader '37; 
Co-Capt. Girls' Basketball '39-'40; Maid in 
W.A.A. Queen '37; "Jane, the Queen"; 
"Fresh Fields." 



CHARLES OWEX WI1 
B.S. 



Chemistry 



AMS. 



Mast 



40; 



Sigma X< 
Nature Club, Pres. '38-'39; Waggoner Sci- 
ence Society, Vice Pres. '40; "Who's Who 
in American Colleges and Universities 
'40; Track '38, '39; Plat", Sec.-Treas. 'i7 ; 
"M" Club '40. 



GEORCxE EVERETTE HAYDEN, 

A.B. 

Lebanon 



Philosophy and Religion 

Con! 

10. 



3d; Dorris Ora 
ema Beta Rho, 1 



LUCILLE FLOETMAN, A.B. 
East St. Louis 

Voice 



Univei 
Pies ' 

I (mega 



American Colleges and 
('dee Club '36-'40, Vice 
'39-'40; Women's Quar- 
Fields" '39; Alpha Psi 



OF THE McKENDREAN 



CLASS 




John Henderson 
Madeleine Yost 



Helen Waggoner 
Marvin Butler 



JOHN HENDERSON, A.R. 
Thebes 

Philosophy and Religion 

Sigma Beta Rho '38, '39, '40, Cabinet 'W, 
'39; Student Association Cabinet '39, '40; 
"M" Club '38, '39, '40; Faculty- Student 
Council '39-'40; Y.M.C.A. Cabinet '40; 
Basketball '38, '39, '40, Capt. '40; Sec. Sen- 
ior Class; Who's Who in American Col- 
leges and Universities '40; Blue Hook of 
American University Men '40. 



HELEN WAGGONER, A.B. 
Lebanon 

English 

Review Staff '38, Assistant Ed. '39; Mc- 
Kendrean Staff '39; Little Theater '38, '39, 
'40, Pres. '40 ; Sigma Tau Delta '38, '39, 
40, Sec. '39, Pres. '40; "lane the Queen", 
"The Pitcher", "Pink and Patches"; "Fresh 
Fields." 



MADELETNE DOROTHEA YOST. 

A.R. 

Lebanon 

English 

Glee Club '36- '40; Little Theater '36-'40, 
Vice Pres. '38-'39 ; W.A.A. '36-'40, Vice 
Pres. '39-'40; French Club '36-'38, Pres. 
'37-'38; Y.W.C.A. Pres. '38-'39, '39-'40; 
Beta Phi Theta, Vice Pres.; Alpha Psi 
Omega, Sec.-Trcas. '39-'40; Nature Club, 
Sec.-Treas. '39; Clio '36-'40, Pres. '39; 
Who's Who in American Colleges and 
Universities '39; 111. University Scholar- 
ship '40; "New hires;" "Quality Street;" 
"The Cradle Song;" "Pink and Patches;" 
"The Pearls"; "The Vagrants." 



MARVIN BUTLER, A.B. 
East St. Louis 

Economics 

Football '36-'38, Letterman 'i7, '38: Track 
'37-'39, Letterman '38; Glee Club '37-'40; 
Pi Kappa Delta, Pres. '39-'40 ; Debate 
Squad '38-'40; French Club '37-'38. 



THE BOY AND GIRL EDITION 




SENIOR 



Harvey Pister 
Delmont Beckemeyei 



Magdalena Willis 
Orlando Brakemeyei 



HARVEY ERVIN PISTER, A.B. 
Lebanon 

Economics 



MAGDALENA WILLIS, A.I',. 
Lebanon 

English 

Wlm's Who in American Colleges and 
Universities '39; Director Children's 
Chorus; Review Staff '38-'39; Basketball 
'36-'37. 



DELMONT BECKEMEYER, B.S. 
Beckemeyer 

Chemistry 

Waggoner Science Society; Nature Clul 



ORLANDO W. BRAKEMEYER, 

A.B. 

Warrenton, Mo. 

History 

Central Weslevau College '36-'38; I'lnlo. 
Pres. '39; V.M.C.A., Pres. '40; Sigma Beta 
Rho; Sigma Beta Rho Quartet '39-'40; 
Bluebook of American University Men '40. 



OF THE McKENDREAN 



CLASS 




Pearl Dick 


Robert Cruuse 


Ralph Koch 


Dorothy Reed 


PEARL DICK, A.B. 


ROBERT E. GROUSE, B.S. 


Mascoutah 


Olney 


Voice 


Mathematics 


Alpha Psi Omega '35, '36, '40, Pres. '40; 


Glee Club '35-'3o; Plato: "Cradle Song 


Glee Club '34, '35, '36, '40, Pres. '35; 


Pres. of Carnegie Hall '40 ; Basketball M 


Women's Quartet '55; Vice Pres. Senior 


•38-*39. 


Class; Vice Pres. Student Assoc. '40; 




Who's Who in American Universities and 




Colleges '40; Little Theatre; McKendrean 




Staff '36; Asst. Pub. School Music Dept. 




'39, '40; "The Doctor in Spite of Himself"; 




"On Vengeance Height"; "Marriage of 




Nannette" ; "Taming of the Shrew"; "Lit- 




tle Women"; "Life Is a Song"; "Not Quite 




Such a Goose"; "Fresh Fields"; "Wuth- 




ering Heights." 




RALPH KOCH, A.B. 


DOROTHY REED, B.S. 


Treloar, Mo. 


Lebanon 



History 

Central Wesleyan College '36-'37; Glee Club 
'39-'40; Sigma Beta Rho '38, '39, '40, Vice 
Pres '40; Philo '40; Y.M.C.A. '38-'40 ; 
Sigma Beta Rho Quartet '39- '40 ; "Fresh 
Fields." 



Biology 

First Winner of Waggoner Memorial 
Trophy sjiven by Sigma Zeta Society '37; 
Glee Club, Treas. '39; Nature Club. 



THE BOY AND GIRL EDITION 




SENIOR 



Carl Beard 



BERTIE BAUER. 
Bunker Hill 

Biol 



<"jy 

Clin; W.A.A.; Little Theatre; Co-Capt. 
Girls' Basketball '40; May Queen '40; 
Football Queen '38; Nature Club; Sigma 
Zeta; Glee Club, Sec.-Treas. '39; Faculty- 
Student Council; "The Cradle Song"; 
"New Fires." 



.MILTON SAGER, A.B. 
Alt. Vernon 

Biology 

Sigma Zeta '39, '40, Asst. Rec.-Treas. '40; 
Waggoner Science Society '38, '39; Nature 
Club '38, '39, Vice Pres. '39; Radio Club 
'40; Plato '37, '38; "M" Club '38-40, Sec.- 
Treas. 40; Football '37-'39; Glee Club \U- 
40, Pres. 40; Quartet '38-40; McKen- 
drean Stall '37; Y.M.C.A. Cabinet '38; 
Student Assoc. Cabinet '38, 40; Senior 
Class Pres.; Faculty- Student Council 40; 
Who's Who in American Universities and 
Colleges 40 ; Bluebook of American Col- 
lege Men 40; Little Theatre '38, '39, Sec.- 
Treas. '39; Asst. in Biology Dept. '38, '30; 
Asst. in Philosophy and Religion Dept. 40; 
"Adam and Eva." 



CECIL C LOWE, A.B. 
Beaucoup 

Philosophy ami Religion 

Sigma Beta Rho, Pres. '30; Philo, Pres. 
'39; Nature Club, Program Chairman '39. 



CARL X. BEARD. B.S. 
East St. Louis 

Chonistry 



H 



M 



N 



N 



CLASS 




William Fischei 



George Flesor 



WILLIAM FISCHER, U.S. 
Mt. Olive 

Geology 

Pres. Student Assoc. '39-'40; Pres. Junior 
Class '38-'39; Waggoner Science Society, 
Pres. '39; Sec. Faculty-Student Council 
'39-'40 ; Who's Who in American Col- 
leges and Universities '40; Asst. in Depts. 
of Geology and Advanced Chemistry; 
Tennis Trophy '39; "Five Minutes." 



GEORGE G. FLESOR 
Tuscola 

History 

Withdrew to accept banking position, Jan- 
uary, 1940. 



"And must we part" Well — if we must, zee must — and 
in that case the less said the better." 

■ — Richard Sheridan. 




Page Nineteen 



THE BOY AND GIRL EDITION 



JUNIOR CLASS 




C. Long, D. Cooper, D. Nothdurft 

OFFICERS 

1 'resident Charles E. I ,ong 

Vice- 1 "resident Donald Nothdurft 

Secretary-Treasurer ..] )olores Cooper 



NO PICTURES 
Bartley Greenwood 
Charles Hill 

W. A. Robinson 

Marvin Trimble 



Donald Nothdurft 

Isabel Shaffer 

Leonard Stoecklm 



Raymond Switzer 

Amos Reed 

Stella Mae Steidel 



Oliver Reiser 

Roger Tappmeyer 

Charles Long 



Albert Jondro 

Marvin Fortel 

Dolores Cooper 



OF THE McKENDREAN 




THE 



OY AND GIRL EDITION 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 




W. Brewer, A. Gann, R. Allen 

OFFICERS 

President - Robert Allen 

Vice-President Anna Lois Gann 

Secretary-Treasurer Wayne Brewer 

NO PICTURES 
Carlus Basinger 

Thomas Brown 

Thaddeus Forbes 
Ralph Logan 

Earl E. Meyers 

Gene Van Krannenburgh 

Ethel Mae Hirslein 
Marion Kleinschmidt 

Carmen Raffaelle 

Bernice Rongey 

Wayne Brewer 



Cecil Albright 
Inez Carr 

Arnold Eddings 

Herbert Simons 
Gloria Baer 

Tames I.verla 



Doris Miller 

Robert Allen 

Albert Johnpeter 
John McLain 

Wilma Ditzler 
Edgar Agles 

Russell Gullett 

Daisy Bickett 

Raymond Fary 

Dorothy Schumacher 
Paul Yost 

Carrol Lowe 

Arthur Baum 
Vera Jenne 

Robert Herman 

Barbara Woolard 

George Edwards 

Anna Lois Gann 



Ralph Edwards 

Donald Cramer 

Russell Drennan 
Helen Buesch 

Harry Ward 
Harold Ore 



George Pimlott 

Mary Ruth Shelton 
I larry Grothjahn 
Marie Scates 

Joseph Fizzell 

Keturah Stelzriede 



Dorothy Miller 
1 >ale Winter 

I lei en Kriege 

Leland Grieve 
Scott Gier 



Page Twenty-two 



OF THE McKENDREAN 




Page Twenty-tin 



THE 



BOY AND GIRL 



EDITION 



FRESHMAN CLASS 
IMJ 




H. .Mitchell, M. Hursev, P. Griffin 
.1. Agles, R. Henderson, C. Chadwell 

OFFICERS 

President - James Agles 

Vice- 1 'resident Ruth 1 Ienderson 

Secretary Margaret Hursev 

Treasurer ..Paul Griffin 

Sergeant-at-Arms Charles Chadwell 

Reporter Helen Mitchell 

NO PICTURES 
Cicero I '.urns 

Marvin Corzine 

Warren Faeth 

.Maurice Jasper 

Donald Mahon 

Ralph Monken 
Robert O'Brien 

1 [ubert Smith 

Robert Stoffel 

Antone Tepatti 

Royce Timmons 

William Woods 
Wayne Timmons 

Carol Mae Aemisegger 
Mrs. Ruth Hill 

Vivian Raffaele 

Juanita Zinchlag 



Mason Petty 
June Miller 

James ( )ppitz 

Helen Utterback 
Cvril Curtis 

Mary Ellen Glotfelty 



La Verne Book 
Paul Griffin 

Adina Young 

Richard Recard 
George Tuttle 
Ross Hortin 



Dean Kirkpatrick 
Ray Wieland 

Donald Harmon 

Margaret Hursev 
Ray Rrauer 

Mary Elizabeth Presley 



Ruth Henderson 
Don Hartman 
Jean Miller 

Frank Glotfelty 
Gerald Gulley 

John Rawlinson 



James Loy 

Helen Mitchell 

Charles Haigh 

Frances Robinson 
William Ashby 

Wayne Stevenson 



lames Agles 

Viola Pitchford 

Lewis Winterrowd 
Edith Pritchard 

Earl Braeutigam 
James Owens 

fames Tuttle 



I'ayc Twenty-ton 



OF THE 



M 



KENDREAN 










Pose Twenty-fiv 



THE BOY AND GIRL EDITION 



B 


^ H B 




|J«|- MIIJI^ 


d*i 








fej 








H> 


9B ^^f^ 






D. Hertenstein, H. Hertenstein, P. Dick, M. Yost, 

Mrs. Van Leer, L. Floetman, .Miss Wilson, Miss Thomas. 



Alpha Psi Omega 



Alpha Psi officially began its year with a tea in 
the home of Betty Mae Phillips, to which prospec- 
tive members were invited. An enjoyable feature 
of tine afternoon was the informal sing after the tea. 

< >ur purpose is to foster dramatics on our own 
campus as well as to develop an interest in drama 
in general. 

We have attempted this year to acquaint ourselves 
with the best plays and with the most important 
stage personalities. 

( >ur trip to the American to see Paul Muni in 
"Key Largo" and the dinner following represented 
perhaps the highlight in our year of memories. 



Pearl Dick 

President 



George Flesor 
Vice-President 



Madeleine Yost 
Secretary-Treasurer 



Miss Cora M. Thomas 
Faculty Adzriser 



H 



M 



N 



N 



Sigma Zeta 



Owen Williams 

Master-Scientist 



Dorothy Hertenstein 
J 'ice Master-Scientist 



Prof. S. M. McClure 
Recording Secretary 

Milton Sager 
Asst. Recording Secretary 



Our organization is an honorary fraternity for 
the recognition of scholarship in science and mathe- 
matics. This vear we sponsored a series of pro- 
grams presented by the Waggoner Science Society. 
We also sponsor Waggoner Memorial activities and 
an annual award to a student of outstanding science 
scholarship. 

This year our big project is the arranging and classi- 
fication of rocks and minerals left us by Professor 
Wag-goner. 




0. Williams, Dr. C. J. Stowell, B. Bauer, Prof. McClure, 
1). Hertenstein, Mr. H. Hertenstein, M. Sager. 



Page Twenty-sevt 



THE 



BOY 



AND 



GIRL 



EDITION 




Back Rozv—C. Lung, Dr. Wright, Dr. Yost, H. Waggoner 
Front Rozv—M.. R. Shelton, R. Edwards, B. Woolard. 



Sigma Tau Delta 



Sigma Tau is an English writing fraternity and 
the words Sigma Tau Delta are the initial letters of 
the Creek words symbolizing sincerity, truth, and 

design. 

( )ur purpose is die study of literary masterpieces, 
the encouragement of worthwhile reading, the pro- 
motion of expression, as well as the fostering of a 
spirit of fellowship among students of English and 
literature. 

We meet every two weeks to evaluate current lit- 
erature of all kinds in order that we may gain ex- 
perience in creative writing. We also submit ap- 
propriate material for the Rectangle, the official 
publication of our organization. 



Iklkn Waggonkr 
President 



Barbara Woolard 
Secretary-Treasurer 



Dr. Mary 1!. Wright 
Faculty Adviser 



Page Twenty-eight 



H 



M 



N 



N 



Sigma Beta Rho 



EvERETTE HaYDEN 

President 



Ralph Koch 
Vice-President 



Marie Scates 
Secretary-Treasure 



Raymond Switzer 
Program Chairman 



Sigma Beta Rho is an organization composed of 
ministerial students who meet every week for song, 
prayer, and inspirational talks. 

This year we boast the addition of the first 
women ever to lie admitted to our circle. 

The activities of one of the two weeks of special 
religious emphasis as well as the special threediour 
service on Good Friday, in our local church, was 
sponsored by our organization. 

Gospel teams from our group have appeared in 
various Southern Illinois churches, not only to 
"bring McKendree" to the people but to share some- 
thing of our Christian experience with them. 




Third Row-Vr. W. J. Scarborough, Dr. W. C. Walton. Dr. C. I, Peterson, Rev. M. B. 

SeJndRo^-C. Haigh, E. Meyers, R. Switzer R. Koch, O. Reiser, R. Edwards, O. Brake- 

meyer W A Robinson, D. Harmon, R. Tappmeyer. 
First Ro^-C. Lowe, L. Book, Marie Scates, H. .Mitchell. W. Ditzler, J. Henderson. 



Page Twenty- 



THE 



BOY 



AND 



GIRL 



EDITION 




W. Brewer, Carrol Lowe, R. Tappmeyer, C. All-right, R. Herman 
O. Brakemeyer, H. Ore, P. Yost, K. Edwards, S. Gier, C. Lowe. 



Philosophian Literary Society 



( >ur men's literary society has been growing dur- 
ing this, its one hundred and third year. Weekly 
meetings are held and open sessions, open to any- 
one, are held once a month, with refreshments. 

An especially interesting feature of one of our 
regular programs was Dr. Walton's history of Philo. 
We are redecorating Philo hall this year. 

The usual Philo program is composed of devo- 
tions, an essay, a declamation, an assigned address, 
an impromptu, current events, music, and a debate. 
( >ur purpose is to encourage literary achievement 
and debate. 



New officers are elected ev- 
ery six weeks. President; 
for the year were : 



Cecil Lowe 



Orlando Brakemeyer 



Paul Yost 



Carlus Basinger 



H 



M 



N 



N 



Clionian Literary Society 



Officers are elected every 
nine weeks. Presidents for 
the year were : 



Madeleine Yost 



Dorothy Herten stein 



Bertie Bauer 



Isabel Shaffer 



Clio is our women's literary society wherein we 
strive to gain more self-confidence in public speak- 
ing and to help uphold the literary and musical 
standards of the college. 

( )ur programs are made up of a song by the so- 
ciety, scripture and prayer, roll call, a declamation, 
an assigned address, an impromptu, an essay, cur- 
rent events, parliamentary drill, and music. We 
have open sessions once a month to which everyone 
is invited. 

The reunion of our society on Homecoming Day 
was a great success. Several former Clio members 
gave the program. 

The Clio-Philo banquet in April constitutes one 
of the fondest memories of Clio. It was unani- 
mously decided to make a banquet of the two soci- 
eties an annual event. 




I. Shaffer, D. Hertenstein, B. Bauer, D. Miller, M. Yost. 

M. R. Shelton, M. Kleinschmidt, D. Schumacher, V. Jenne, K. Stelzriede, H. Kriege. 



THE 



BOY 



AND 



GIRL 



EDITION 




Platform— l. Shaffer, D. Schumacher, M. Yost, K. Stelzricde. 

Front Rozv—R. Henderson, M. Hursey, M. Presley, H. Mitchell, H. Utterback, 



H. Kriege, D( 





M. 


Sh 


elti 


n, D. 


Herten 


stein. 






Ba 


■k Roz 


■-I 


)orotl 


v Mill 


'r, M 


Kl 


einschm 




Bo 


ok, 


W 


Dit/ 


er, V. 


enne, 


M. 


Scates. 



A. Young, 
Miller, L. 



Y. W. C. A 



The girls' "Y" this year has been very active. We 
invite all college girls to join us. 

The cabinet had as much fun planning the meet- 
ings as the other girls did in attending them every 
Wednesday night. Especially welcome was the din- 
ner and cabinet meeting with Mrs. Stowell. Our 
advisers, Mrs. Stowell and Mrs. Scarborough, have 
been the source of much inspiration this year. 

( >ur meetings included discussions as well as ad- 
dresses. Among the highlights of the year were a 
visit to the home of Mrs. Virgil Church, where we 
were inducted into the mysteries of "antiquing" ; Dr. 
Wright's Mexican travelogue; Professor Hardy's 
talk on Art, which prefaced the art exhibit held in 
Benson Wood Library; and Professor Scarbor- 
ough's ever-inspiring messages. We had song fests 
and favorite poems and just before Easter several 
members led discussions in which we talked over 
problems both spiritual and social. These discus- 
sions led to a better understanding among us. 

We began our year as usual with the "Big and 
Little Sister" idea. Heart Sister Week was observed 
in February. 



Madeleine Yost: 

President 
Is\i:i:i. Shaffer 
Vice-President 

DOROT 1 1 V SCHUM ACHKR 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Marie Scates 

Chaplain 

Mary Kith Shelton 

Publicity Manager 

Keturah Steezriede 

Pianist 

Vera Jenne 

Program Chairman 

1 >OROTHY I IKKTKNSTKIN 

Social Chair in a n 

Hi-:u:x Kriege 

Room Chairman 

Mrs. C. J. StowEEE 

Mrs. W. J. Scarborough 

Sponsors 

Page Thirty-, 



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Y. M. C. A. 



Orlando Brakemeyer 

President 

John Henderson 
Vice-President 

Ralph Edwards 
Secretary-Treasurer 

Robert Herman 

Social Chairman 

(1st Sent.) 

Paul Griffin 

Social Chairman 

(2nd Son.) 

Prof. C. D. Hardy 

Sponsor 



1 he Y. M. tries to promote religion and social 
fellowship among the men on the campus. We meet 
every Wednesday night. Combined Y.W.C.A. and 
Y.M.C.A. programs are held each month. 

The Y. M. programs this year have been planned 
by special committees and we feel that this method 
ot arranging our meetings has proved very success- 
ful. 

Among the most interesting of our meetings 
might be mentioned the ones in which Prof. Hardy 
talked on "The Possibility of the United States En- 
tering Another War" and "Enjoyment of Music and 
Poetry"; "Science and Religion" by Prof. Herten- 
stein; "Easter Thoughts"; and the address by Rev. 
Koch of Trenton on "Youthful Interpretations of 
the Bible." 




W. Rrcwer, R. Fdwards, R. Tappmeyer, Carrol Lowe, P. Yost, C. 
meyer, C. Albright, H. Ore, R. Herman, C. Curtis. 



Page Thirty-three 



THE BOY AND GIRL EDITION 




W. Brewer, C. Lowe, A. Keel, Carrol Lowe, D. Reed, P. Yost, Dr. Spencer, H. Utterback, 
V. Pitchford, A. Young, \ . Jenne, R. Brauer, J. Lyerla, R. Herman. 



Nature Club 



The aim of the Nature Club is to acquaint its 
members with a few interesting common forms of 
Nature, for — 

"To him who in the lore of Nature 
Holds communion with her visible forms, 
She speaks a various language." 

Through our programs and field trips we come to 
know a few birds, a few trees and shrubs, a few 
heavenly bodies, and to acquire knowledge relating 
to other phases of nature. 

We plant trees and shrubs on the campus. This 
year we contributed two pin oaks. We also did 
some work on Lake Beautiful, 



Amos Kkko 
President 



Carrol Lowe 
Vice-President 



Paul Yost 
Secretary-Treasurer 



Dr. E. R. Spencer 
Faculty Adviser 



H 



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Little Theatre 



Helen* Waggon] 
President 



Isabel Shaffer 
Vice-President 



Robert Herman 
Secretary-Treasure 



- all students interested in 
whether it be acting, cos- 
3r make-up. 



nes were to 
pring play. 



i »ur organization is t 
any phase of dramatics 
turning, scenery-making 

Results of our efforts along cert; 
be seen in the presentation of t 
"Wuthering Heights". 

We also sponsored the presentation of the one- 
act plays : "Hearts Enduring", "The Man Who Died 
at Twelve o'Clock", "Not Quite Such a Goose" and 
"The House on Piccadilly Street". These were di- 
rected by Barbara Woolard, Harry Ward, Dorothy 
Miller, and Janet Barklev. 




D. .Miller, Miss Thomas, P. Yost, R. Koch, I. L 
M. Yost, U. Schumacher, I. Shaffer, D. Her 



rla, R. Herman, P. Griffin, R. Henderson, 
istein, June Miller, Jean Miller, B. Bauer. 



Page Thirty- fit 



THE 



BOY 



AND 



GIRL 



EDITION 




M. Shdto 

r. i:« 



(1, A. Johnpet 



Review Staff 



The Review Staff is made up of students who arc 
interested in Journalism. 

This group is responsible for the publication of 
the McKendree Review, which is issued every two 
weeks during the regular school year. The Review 
is in its nineteenth year of continuous service and, 
as advertised, is "devoted to the interests of Mc- 
Kendree College", 



Bartley Green wood 
t.arbara woolard 
Associate Editors 

Carets Basinger 

James Oppitz 
Assistant Editors 

Albert Johnpeter 

Sports Editor 

Ralph Edwards 
Business Manager 

Ross Hurt in 
Circulation Manager 

Mary Ruth Sheeton 
Typist 

Dr. Mary II. Wright 
Faculty Adviser 



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Debate Squad 



Mem 



Marvin Butler 
James Oppitz 
Albert Johnpeter 
Charles Haigh 
Arthur Baum 
Arnold Eddings 
Carlus Basineer 



sponsor : 

Prof. C. D. Harch 



The Debate Squad engaged in debates with Green- 
ville College, Illinois College, Concordia Seminary, 
Millikin University and St. Olaf College. We had 
two return debates with Greenville College. Dele- 
gates to the National Pi Kappa Delta Convention at 
Knoxville, Tennessee, were Marvin Butler, Albert 
Johnpeter, and James Oppitz. 

The same three men appeared before the Lebanon 
Rotary Club April 18, 1940. Later in the year Mar- 
vin Putter and James Oppitz broadcasted over 
WTMV in East St. Louis. 

The Pi Kappa Delta question for the year was, 
"Resolved : That the LTuted States should embark- 
on a policy of strict isolation toward all belligerent 
nations outside the Western Hemisphere". 




C. Basinger, C. Haigh, Prof. C. D. Hardy, A. Johnpeter, J. Oppitz. 



Page Thirty-seven 



THE 



BOY 



AND 



GIRL 



EDITION 




M. Sager, P. Yost, W. B 



S. Gier, C. Albright, P. Griffin, 



Radio Club 



(W9BEJ) 



The Radio Club is one of our newer organiza- 
tions. It was organized in the Fall of 1938. Our 
club tries to promote fellowship and individual effi- 
ciency as well as an interest in radio at McKendree. 

We offer an opportunity to obtain enough radio 
knowledge so that an individual may become a li- 
censed operator. In our weekly meetings we pre- 
sent talks on radio and general electricity. 

We have added a fifty-watt phone transmitter and 
a new Sky-Buddy four-band receiver to our equip- 
ment so that we may contact amateur stations in 
neighboring cities. 



Cecile Albright 

President 



Scott Gier 

Trustee and Treasurer 



Wayne Brewer 
Secretary 



Prof. W. R. Schmidt 
Faculty Adviser 



Pacjc Thirtyeiyht 



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Faculty— Student Council 



Dr. C. R. Yost 
Chairman 



Kklley Simmons 
Secretary 



We are one of the new organizations on the 
campus. Our membership is made up of faculty 
representatives appointed by the Administration and 
students elected by the Student Association and 
other smaller groups representing all phases of stu- 
dent interest. 

We desire to promote better understanding and 
cooperation between faculty and students 'Ibis or- 
ganization is off to a good start in that direction, it 
would seem, as indicated by the interest manifested 
by the members of the Council during this first year 
of its activity. 




Dean Baker, Prof. Hohn, K. Simmons, M. Sager, C. Basinger, Dean 
J. Henderson, R. Fary, Miss Wilson, B. Bauer. 



Yost, 



Page Thirty-nine 



THE 



BOY 



AND 



GIRL 



EDITION 




Back Roiv—R. Herman, R. Edwards, C. Basinger, M. Herman, H. Ore, M. Butler, 

L. Stoecklin. 
Third Roiv—R. Tappmever. E. Phillips, T. Agles, R. Gullet, R. Koch, J. Fizzell, D. Hartman, 

C. Haigh, M. Sager. 
Second Ron.~—G P.aer. D. Miller. D. Dausman, M. Glotfelty, I. Frcy, D. Schumacher, 

P. Dick, K. Stelzriede, M. Shelton, M. Presley. 
First Rozo—h. Floetman, S Steidel, M. Yost, A. Gann, Mrs. Van Leer, D. Cooper, J. Miller. 

1 1, Hertenstein, R. Henderson. 



McKendree Chorus 



Again this year the men's and women's clubs were 
combined, except that each group elected its own 
officers. As usual, we gave programs in many 
Southern Illinois churches on Sundays from Febru 
arv through April. We also broadcasted from Har- 
risburg, KSD, and KMOX. 

We are very proud of our new robes which we 
purchased this year. 

On the evening of Baccalaureate Sunday we pre- 
sented the oratorio "Elijah" with the help of some 
of the local singers. 



Milton Sager 
President 

Lucille Floetman 

President 

Paul Yost 
Vice-President 

Dorothy Hertenstein 
Vice-President 

Myrl Herman 
Secretary 

Stella Mae Steidel 
Secretary 



Pa.je Forty 



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II * 







Lucille Floetman 
First Soprano 



Kcturah Stelzriede 
Second Soprano 



I )orothy Schumacher 

First Alto 



I >orothy Hertenstein 
Second Alto 



McKendree Quartets 

This year there was a change of only one member in the women's quarter 
while the men's group had two new faces and voices. 

Besides singing regularly on the glee club trips, we also made trips with Mr. 
Brown to churches in Southern Illinois to present McKendree programs. The 
women's quartet appeared before clubs in Lebanon and East St. Louis, and the 
men made an interesting trip to Chester for a County Teachers' Convention. They 
also appeared in the First Methodist Church of Chester. High school appear- 
ances were a part of our year's activities. 



Carlus 


Basinger 


First 


Tenor 


James 


Agles 


Second Tenor 


Robert 


Herman 


Baritone 


Milton 


Sager 


Bass 






Paye Forty-one 



THE 



BOY 



AND 



GIRL 



EDITION 




B. Bauer, H. Mitchell, H. Kriege, M. Yost, Miss Thomas, D. Miller, 1). Hertenstein, 
R. Henderson, L). Schumacher 



Women's Athletic Association 



The W.A.A. promotes athletics and social inter- 
ests among the women. 

The Kittycubs, our basketball team, again played 
several games at home and on rival floors. We also 
play tennis, soccer, volleyball, badminton, Softball, 
and engage in tumbling. 

The memories of the skating parly at Crystal 
Roller Rink will remain among the most pleasant of 
our college days. 



I )olores Cooper 

President 



Madeleine Yost 
Vice-President 



I Iki.kx Kriege 
Secretary-Treasurer 



Ptu/e Fort\<-ti 



O F 



THE 



M 



N 



U" Club 



John Harmon 

President 



John Henderson 
Vice-President 



Milton Sager 
Secretary- Treasurer 



The "M" Club is an organization of letter men 
whose purpose is the promotion of good sportsman- 
ship and athletic fellowship. 

We dispense the green caps to the freshmen in 
the fall and sponsor the election of the football 
queen. Gloria Baer won the closely-contested elec- 
tion this year and presided as football queen at the 
Homecoming game. 



.•f' 



.* ** 









Back Row—W. Timmons, D. Hartman, M. Corzine, D. Kirkpatrick, R. Allen. 
Middle Row—G. Edwards, C. Albright, R. Fary, H. Ward, H. Grothjahn, H. Simons. 
Front Roic — A. Johnpeter, C. Long, M. Sager, J. Harmon, J. Henderson, B. Greenwood. 



Fagc Forty-three 



THE 



BOY 



AND 



GIRL 



EDITION 









Fourth Rozif—G. Handlon, W. Timmons, K. Simmons, E. Braeutigam, J. Lyerla. 
Third Ro-w—P. Yost, M. Sager, B. Greenwood, H. Smith, C. Burns. 
Second Roiu — R. Hortin, 1). Hartman, E. Agles, D. Kirkpatrick, A. Baum, J. Low 
First Rozv—R. Timmons, H. Simons. R. Farv, Coach Gould, A. fohnpeter, 1L G 
Cant. J. Harmon. 



thjahi 



Football Squad 



Willi eight returning lettermen, the 1939 season saw a decidedly improved 
McKendree grid squad over that of the previous year. 

A heart-breaking start was made by losing to Shurtleff in the last few minutes 
of play. This discouraging defeat at the hands of McKendree's traditional rival 
may. in part, account for the dropping of the next two games. After these three 
losses, however, the Bearcats snapped out of their complex to hand the plucky 
Eureka gridders a decisive defeat. 

By far the most satisfying game of the season was the Homecoming game 
against Chillicothe Business College. Spurred on by the spirit of the day and the 
victory of the week before, the Purple and While let loose a brilliant aerial attack 
which netted them two touchdowns in the first half. Although failing to score in 
the second period, McKendree held the Missouri eleven to two touchdowns. At 
the end. McKendree was on top — 14 to 12. 

Injuries suffered by a number of the men in the Homecoming game, and the 
withdrawal of George Handlon from school, greatly weakened the Bearcats For 
their meeting with Illinois College. The "Cats" emerged badly bruised from this 
game; but they closed the season successfully, the following week, with a 2? to 12 
victor\- over Moberly College. 

Although the number of games won was not favorable to McKendree, no 
game was lust by an overwhelming margin. 

Captain John "Ace" Harmon. Milton Sager. and Kelly Simmons will leave us 
via the sheepskin route. The going of these three veterans will be keenly fell; 
but with the return of some eleven lettermen and the addition of several new men. 
the 1940 team can be expected to be one of the best that McKendree lias produced 
in recent years. 



Page Forty-four 



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Football Queen 

Out of twelve candidates. Miss Gloria Baer was 
elected 1939 Football Queen in the voting contest held 
previous to Homecoming Day. 

Gloria, who is a student in the Fine Arts Depart- 
ment, majoring in piano, and a sophomore, was chosen 
as the fourth succeeding Homecoming Queen. 

At the annual Homecoming game, Dr. C. R. Yost 
presented Miss Baer with a bouquet on behalf of the 
student body, after which she was formally declared 
queen by Miss P>ertie Bauer, retiring queen. 




GLORIA BAER 



Football Days 



About that time in autumn 
When leaves begin to fall, 
Some men upon the campus 
Are searching for the ball. 

After days of gruelling practice, 
And weeks of strenuous drill, 
The coach picks out the "huskies' 
Whom he thinks will till the bill. 



Between the twilight practices 
And educational toil. 
The more ambitious players 
Will be burning midnight oil. 

Then through the days of injuries 
And scholastic lack of sense, 
The puzzled coach has to admit 
They have him on the fence. 



About the time the choice is made, 
And all is well in line, 
The Profs will say, "Let's study hard, 
It's mid-semester time." 



With all the trials there seems to be 
A fair star in our heaven, 
For we ended up the season's scores 
With three games out of seven. 

— A. Baum. 



Page Forty-five 




Corziru 



Grothjahn 



Johnpeter 



Kirkpatrick 



SECOND ROW 



THIRD ROW 



Hartman 



FOURTH ROW 



Greenwood 



FIFTH ROW 



Timmons 



War. 



iraeutiffam 



Sager 




Coach Herbert Gould, in his second year as McKen- 
dree football coach, lias developed a decided improve- 
ment in the football standing. His plays and football 
technique is comparable to that of the coaches of much 
larger schools. With the proper support and backing 
of McKendreans, Coach Gould should he able to pro- 
duce a winning team next year. 



CAPTAIN JOHN HARMON, Senior 

Lebanon. Center; Three Year Letterman. 
"Ace" will be remembered as the hard-working, quiet 
captain of the m39 McKendree football squad. Though 
seldom heard, he made his presence on the field felt by 
his hard tackling and his continual drive while in the 
game. "Ace" was listed as a center with the team, but 
he seldom snapped a ball, his best work being done in 
the tackle position. He played his best game against 
the Burlington College team, gaining more tackles 
than any other player. Next year's Bearcats will sorely 
miss this strong, silent tackle. 

DEAN KIRKPATRICK, Freshman 

Sesser. End; First Year Letterman. 
"Barney" rendered a great service to the 1939 Mc- 
Kendree grid squad by his consistent "booting" of the 
extra point. He was also a valuable man for receiv- 
ing passes. His services should be of great value in 
forming next year's team. 

WAYNE TIMMONS, Freshman 

Granite City. Guard ; First Year Letterman. 
Wayne began the season as a substitute left guard, 
playing in practically every game in the early part of 
the season. With the loss of George Handlon as regu- 
lar guard, Wayne stepped in and took over the regu- 
lar position. 



RAYMOND FARY, Sophomore 

Seabright, New Jersey. 

Tackle ; Two Year Letterman. 
"Ray" came back and this year proved himself one of 
the hardest tacklers on the squad. His abiliiy to cen- 
ter the ball on offense, and to back up the line of 
defense, made him an important link in the McKendree 
chain. Because of a leg and shoulder injury he was 
compelled to miss two of the season's games. 

HERBERT SIMONS, Sophomore 

Edwardsville. End; Two Year Letterman. 
"Herb" earned his first letter last year at the end posi- 
tion. This year he held the same position. While he 
did not play any outstanding games he was fighting 
every minute he was in. With his two years of var- 
sity experience "Herb" will be a great asset to the 
1940 team. 

HARRY GROTHJAHN, Sophomore 

Granite City. Halfback; First Year Letterman. 
Starting out his freshman year as a substitute back- 
field-man "Tige" returned this year to take over a reg- 
ular position and win his letter. A hard-playing, 
dependable back, he would be an asset to any college 
team. "Tige's" ball-handling was above average. 



MARVIN CORZINE, Freshman 

Centralia. Halfback; First Year Letterman. 
Fresh from four years of high school competition, 
"Cuz" won his place on the Bearcat eleven by his 
broken field running and ability to evade the opponent. 
Flis dazzling display of speed and shiftiness contrib- 
uted a great deal to the McKendree scoring. He was 
forced to miss several of the games because of a head 
injury suffered in the Homecoming game. 

HARRY WARD, Sophomore 

Granite City. End; Two Year Letterman. 
"Roz," a halfback on last }'ear's squad, was put on the 
line this year because of his speed and ability to catch 
passes. With two years to go he is expected to add 
considerably to the strength of the 1940 team. Besides 
being an outstanding player, "Roz" has done a lot to 
build up the morale of the team through his sense of 
humor. 

GEORGE EDWARDS, Sophomore 

East St. Louis. Quarterback ; Two Year Letterman. 
An outstanding blocker and backfield man was the dis- 
tinction given to "Buddy" in his second year as a Mc- 
Kendree gridder. His kicking made him a valuable 
man to the McKendree team, and the nineteen-forty 
grid season will undoubtedly sec him in his same back 
row position. 

BARTLEY GREENWOOD, Junior 

West Frankfort. End ; Three Year Letterman. 
To complete a good passing attack, it is necessary to 
have a good receiver as well as passer. Bart's ability 
to snag passes and get down the field fast under the 
punts made him one of the best ends of the 1939 team. 

EARL BRAEUTIGAM, Freshman 

Mascoutah. Fullback; First Year Letterman. 
One of the biggest men on the team, Earl used his 
height and weight to advantage when blocking fur the 
McKendree team. When a few extra yards were 
needed to gain a first down, Earl could be depended 
upon to carry the ball over. 

Page Forty-seven 



DONALD HARTMAN, Freshman 

O'Fallon. Fullback; First Year Letterman. 
Starting out on the line, Don was shifted into the back- 
field where he spent the remainder of the season. His 
weight, combined with his hard blocking and tackling, 
made a lasting impression on the McKendree oppon- 
ents. With three years remaining of his college grid 
career, Don will lie a great asset to future McKendree 
teams. 

ALBERT JOHNPETER, Sophomore 

Posey. Guard; First Year Letterman. 
"Al," having spent his first year as a substitute Bear- 
cat guard, returned to the guard position and, by vir- 
tue of his hard tackling and good blocking, earned his 
letter. His outstanding game was played against the 
Principia team. A small man with a strong heart, 
"Al" will undoubtedly fill the gu 1 position again next 



KELLY SIMMONS, Sen, 

Woodriver. Halfback; . : Letterman. 

Kelly, although one of the Iigl . on the McKen- 

dree squad, was one of the i tost ^gressive backfield 
men to don the Purple and White. "Kels" pulled the 
"Cats" out of the hole several times with his accurate 
passing and his dazzling running. Besides being a 
valuable runner and passer Kelly was also the "brains" 
of the team, calling most of the plays. 

MILTON SAGER, Senior 

Mt. Vernon. Tackle; Three Year Letterman. 
In evaluating a player's worth a great deal of empha- 
sis is placed upon his ability to work in several posi- 
tions, if needed. "Milt" has done a great deal to prove 
his worth to the team by filling in at tackle, center, 
guard, or wherever he was needed most. By virtue 
of his hard tackling, good blocking, and smooth cen- 
tering, he was looked upon as one of the most valuable 
players on the McKendree team. 



THE 



BOY 



AND 



GIRL 



EDITION 




Back Rotv—R. Recard, C. Lowe, G. Tut 
Allen, L. Grieve, J. Loy, D. Winter. 

Front Row—]. Harmon, C. Burns, M. C 
wood, G. Edwards, At. Petty. 



All. right 
Capt. J. 



P. Griff i 



Ward, R. 
B. Green- 



Basketball Squad 



\\ hat, at the beginning, bade fair to be a banner season for the I'.earcat Cagers 
ended on a somewhat sour note for MeKendree. Of the seventeen games played, 
McKendree lost twelve and won five. While the total game score appeared rather 
one-sided, the individual game scores showed up quite differently, a number of 
games being lost by a very narrow margin. The game with Washington Univer- 
sity appeared to be a Piearcat victory at the half, but the Washington Hears came 
through in the last half to defeat the Bearcats by a two-point margin. 

The seven lettermen were the ones who were "on deck" for every game and 
carried the heavy end of the load. 

A great loss will be felt by the 1940-41 Bearcat Cagers this June since both 
John "Jumbo" Henderson and John "Ace" Harmon are to be graduated. A strong 
reserve team will greatly aid Coach Henderson in the formation of his 19-10-41 
team. 



Page Flirty fli/ht 



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M 



KENDREAN 



CAPTAIN IOHN "JUMBO" 
HENDERSON, Senior 
Thebes. Guard; Three Year Letterman. 

'•Jumbo" was one of the three returning lettermen 
on the Bearcat team. A consistent player, he showed 
outstanding ability in the position (if guard. Although 
not leading in the scoring division, his ball-handling 
and occasional long shots helped pull the "Cats" out 
of many a tight spot. His game performance, plus 
his dependability, made him one of the outstanding 
McKendree basketball captains. 

PAUL "WHANG" GRIFFIN, Freshman 

East St. Louis. Forward; One Year 
Letterman. 
Prom the first the "blushing violet" of the squad. 
"Whang" showed himself to be a hard scrapper and 
an asset to the Bearcat scoring machine. "Whang's" 
outstanding game was played against Springfield Col- 
lege on the McKendree floor. Although a newcomer 
to the team, McKendree's rivals have recognized in 
him a power with which to reckon. 

CICERO BURNS, Sophomore 

Lebanon. Forward ; One Year Letterman. 

Missing only two McKendree games this season, 
Cicero p.oved himself to be verv valuable to Coach 
Henderson's Cagers. Cicero's clever ball-handling 
and passing enabled the Bearcats to score a great 
number of their points. With two years remaining, 
he will undoubtedly be one of the key men on future 
McKendree teams. 

JOHN "ACE" HARMON, Senior 

Lebanon. Center; Four Year Letterman. 

"Ace," the tall, handsome individual on the team 
always conspicuous by his silence, has served Mc- 
Kendree for four years in every varsity sport. 
Although he was outstanding in every sport, "Ace" 
excelled in his ability to "hit the hoop." A steady 
defensive player and an aggressive offensive player, 
he has earned the distinction of being one of the 
best McKendree cagers. Out of 557 points scored 
for the McKendree team "Ace" scored 161. He will 
long be remembered for his work on McKendree 
cage teams. 

MASON PETTY, Freshman 

Homer. Guard; One Year Letterman. 

Mason played his initial college game against the 
Washington University Bears. With this introduc- 
tion into college basketball he continued to play a 
hard game the rest of the season. A shoulder injury- 
caused him to retire from the squad for a short time 
but he finished the season with the team. With three 
years ahead of him, we will undoubtedly see Mason 
on future McKendree teams. 



MARVIN "CUZ" CORZINEj Freshman 
Centralia. Forward; One Year Lette 
man. 

"Cuz," fresh from Coach Bozart's Centralia ia; 
team, was outstanding in every game. His "qui. 
break" and ability to handle the ball with 
hand caused the opposition a great deal of c< 
"Cuz," in his scoring, was second to "Ace" H 
scoring a total of 119 points out of the 557. 
a great deal to speed up and give 
Kendree games with his fast and ro 



her 



did 

Mc- 

gh type of play. 



BART GREENWOOD, Junior 
West Frankfort. Guard ; Twi 



Let- 



terman. 
Bart was one of the strong spots in the Bearcats' 
defensive machine. His ability to pass and work 
with the rest of the team was responsible for a large 
percentage of McKendree baskets. Although never 
the high point gainer, Bart consistently gained points 
for the Bearcats. He has one more year with the 
McKendree squad. 




Page Forty-nine 



THE BOY AND GIRL EDITION 




Third Row— A. Baum, R. Hortin, P. Griffin, A. Aglcs, Coach Henderson, C. Albright, J. 

Harmon, W. Stephenson, A. Eddings. 
Second Row—C. Curtis, M. Corzine, H. Grothjahn, C. Long, B. Greenwood, R. Crouse, C. 

Burns, J. Agles. 
First Row—U. Petty, R. Allen, J. Loy, G. Tuttle, J. Lyerla, C. Lowe, G Edwards. 



Track Squad 



Coach A. K. Henderson built his 1940 track squad about the four lettermen 
returning from last year's squad. The four men are : Charles Long, shot putter 
and javelin thrower; Cecile Albright, shot putter; Harry Grothjahn, pole vaulter; 
and Rob Allen, broad-jumper. 

Giving additional strength to this unit were: "Ace" Harmon, Senior; "Bud" 
Edwards, James Lyerla, Albert Johnpeter, Carol Lowe, Edgar Allen Agles, 
Sophomores ; and "Cuz" Corzine, "Jim" Agles, George Tuttle, Ross Hortin, Cyril 
Curtis, Earl Braeutigam, Wayne Stevenson, Paul Griffin, Freshmen. 



1940 TRACK SCHEDULE 
April 27 — Triangular Meet: l'rincipia, Concordia, and McKendree. 
May A — Dual Meet: Millikin and McKendree. 

May 11 — Dual Meet: Washington University Freshmen and McKendree. 
May 18 — Triangular Meet: Principia, Blackburn, and McKendree. 



HE McKENDREAN 



Minor Sports 



INTRAMURALS 



One of the outstanding points of interest in our athletic program for this year 
has been the intramural competition in basketball and softball. 

The Lu-Helens came out victorious in the basketball tournament with compe- 
tition being furnished by the Termites, the Bar-flies and the Scrubs. 

Five softball teams answered the initial call for intramural competition. They 
are the Cyclops, Scrubs, Diamonds, Bar-flies and Woodpeckers. 

Two teams have aspired to semi-professional aid, inviting several of the pro- 
fessors to supplement their playing forces. 

The softball intramural program involved sixty men, thereby offering them 
entertainment three nights a week. 



EXTRA-MURAL SOFTBALL 

In addition to our intramural program, Coach Henderson is promoting an 
extra-mural softball program which will place the best players of our intramural 
teams in competition with the softball squads of other schools. 

Last year the inter-school competition was a varsity sport. The returning 
members of last year's varsitv team have helped greatly in the formation of a 
strong McKendree team for this year. 



RECREATION PROGRAM 

A great deal of progress, during the 1939-40 semester, has been made in the 
McKendree recreational program, largely through the efforts of Athletic Director 
A. K. Henderson. 

Additional gvmnastic classes have been added and a greater opportunitv has 
oeen given to each individual to participate in some form of activity. Additions 
to the program include volley ball, tumbling, tennis, golf, basketball, and bad- 
minton. 

The creation of a recreation room providing facilities for shuffleboard, ping 
pong, checkers, and chess, has afforded an opportunity for student recreation dur 
ing leisure moments. 



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"Yost Rusty" 

"That Kitty Cub line" 

"Ore was it a Press I ley ling dale 

"Bench in the Park" 

"We 'Oppitz Hursey" 

"That Homecoming Formation" 

"Monarchs of all we survey" 



8. "It can't be ... a book!" 

9. "Why so pale and wan, fond lover 

10. "No place like home" 

11. "Shine, Mr. Sim" 

12. "Good night ! - - ladies!" 

13. "Overall's the same sun beaming' 

14. "Gather ye rosebuds while ve ma 

15. "Atlas" 



SNAPS 



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Guttersnipes !" 8. 

'Snow Joke" 9, 

Wiping up Shurtleff" 10. 

Little Bit Independent" 11. 

Herr Baker" 12. 

High, wide, and handsome" 13. 
Cooped up" 



'Nor iron bars a cage" 

'Cluck's wrong" 

'Three little maids from school" 

'Happy little motor, but, but. but 

'No Chapel Belles?" 

'Posin' " 




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Presenting: 

The McKendree Revue! 



(Music Up — McKendree "Loyalty") 
(Fade Out) 

From station MCK we bring you the McKendree 
Revue, sponsored by McKendree College, Lebanon, 
Illinois. 



(Fade out 



(Music up) 

"It's a song of praise we raise to 
thee") 




From two hundred homes, the history of the world 
is moving forward — in East St. Louis, Belleville, Gran- 
ite City ; in Sumner, Mascoutah, and Posey tonight 
there is a lingering sadness. For school has begin 
again and with luggage in tow, McKendreans began the grand trek Lebanonward. 

Beginning Monday, September 11, with freshman registration and the ap- 
pearance of "Worry Wart" Ashby on the campus, the spirit of 1939-40 manifested 
itself among green and seasoned students alike. 

Two picnics were held, one of which took place on Hypes Field. . . After 
facing a strenuous day of separating "snaps" from 7 :40's, even the upperclass- 
men were ready for this picnic, which consisted of enough doughnuts and apples 
for even a husky freshman named Griffin. 

Leap year begins early at McKendree, if the "Y Mixer" is any indication. 
Recreation leaders Hertenstein and Herman urged the girls to make the advances 
as well as the fellows when a game which was a series of "dates" was presented 
to the group. And did they heed the advice? Well, judging from some of the 
surprising couples, we believe they did. And time alone can tell what chips have 
fallen where they otherwise might not. 

In the cool of the evening of Tuesday, September 19, there was racing and 
chasing a-plenty on the second and third floors of both dorms, not to speak of that 
among students living off-campus. If everyone didn't go to the President's Re- 
ception, it certainly wasn't from the lack of an invitation. In the candle-lighted 
rooms of the Yost home, while Madeleine Yost and Dorothy Hertenstein presided 
over the punch bowl and Marion Kleinschmidt and the lately-returned Pearl Dick- 
rivaled the Muses, guests wandered from room to room, from group to group. 
nibbling, sipping, chatting, sometimes on the arms of chairs, hemmed in a corner. 



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or barred by fellow guests. Again, one of the major events of the season has 
come and gone. 

I was driving along the road between Lebanon and Edwardsville last Sat- 
urday morning when, upon making a sudden turn, I saw, pulled to one side of the 
highway, the McKendree College bus. Upon investigation I found that the Timken 
bearings in the rear axle had broken down. While the boys gave the bus a check- 
up, I engaged in conversation with the driver, Mr. Clifford Brown. The group, he 
said, was on its way to Youth Day at the annual Methodist Conference, where 
the night before, McKendree students had given a program. "Too bad, but we're 
making that conference today," he shouted, as he succeeded in starting the motor 
and driving away. And, perhaps, if I don't shut off my motor and go away, my 
bearings, too, will break down. 



(Music Up — "Loyalty") 

You have just been listening to the McKendree Revue, brought to you from 
station MCK, Lebanon, Illinois. This program is to be heard the last Monday of 
every month at this same time. 

(Music Up — "Loyalty") 
(Fade Out) 

This is station MCK bringing you the McKendree 
Revue, a series of events in the history of McKendree 
College. 

Good morning, radio fans, listeners-in, and patrons 
of McKendree. 

Everything here has plunged madly, daringly, and 
headlong into school life. The football season opened 
with a sss — boom ! at Shurtleff . McKendree fans 
loaded the bus and went up to show Shurtleff what 
they could do. And, despite their defeat, McKendreans 
always maintain their pride, their integrity, — and Cicero! 

Last year, at McKendree, a Faculty-Student council was organized for a 
mutual understanding of problems on the campus. That body had hardly closed 
its secretary's book when those freshmen let chaos loose. The evening began with 
a drizzle of rain and ended with sophs and frosh, alike, looking like Huckleberry 
Finns. Yes, I do mean the Freshman Fight. Even with Brown and Henderson 
aiding and abetting the crime, the young ones got it ! Failing to receive the right 
message, the group got separated — and met its downfall. Plastered with mud. the 
fellows were "loaded up" for their annual "ride" to Summerfield, Shiloh, and 
points South; and even the girls met a similar fate! So, tired, bedraggled, but 
undaunted, the frosh found themselves with the worst end of the deal — and no 
food ! Could there have been a happier ending ? 

"Is this Leopold Stokowski or Ren Bernie?" . . . "Who is that fellow that 
looks like Jimmy Durante?" ... "I would swear that's Robert Taylor, but it might 




t'age Fifty-five 



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be Bob Montgomery." No, it's not a Hollywood masquerade, but a party at the 
Methodist Church, and the game was to identity pictures. Ralph Edwards was 
the winner, missing only the Dionne quints' first name. Such a part}- you never 
saw! The guests were enchanted with the "cobwebs", at the ends of which hung 
innumerable toys. And they proceeded to shed their dignity and play jacks on 
the stone basement Moor. But such, my friends, is human nature; and for a re- 
instating of McKendree's dignity in your own minds, go look at those long- 
lamented Philo records that returned last week to solve a mystery of half a 
century. 

I Music Up) 
(Fade Out) 

This is station MCK, studios in Lebanon, Illinois. The McKendree Revue 

has come to you through the courtesy of McKendree College. 

This program will be heard again, over the same station, at this same time. 
November 27. 



(Music Up — "Loyalty") 
(Fade with verse) 

Good morning, radio listeners. This is station MCK, 
Lebanon, Illinois, bringing you another series of thrilling 
adventures on McKendree College Campus — The McKen- 
dree Revue. 







If you had been on McKendree's campus one Friday 
morning a few weeks ago, you would have thought, with 
horror, that the world was in its last stages of degrada- 
tion. Ranging from Robin Hood to Adolf Hitler, the 

crowd gathered around the Chapel steps might easily have been collecting for a 
raid on the local bank. But, "what's college life coming to if we can't have a Hobo 
Day in peace?" asked McKendree's student body. Peace? Somebody had brought 
an alarm clock — and that version of "Chopsticks"! 

Don't think for a moment that McKendree let off all her steam on Friday. 
Saturday brought a red-letter day to the campus, also. Homecoming day, dawn- 
ing cold and cloud}', brought its reunions, its memories, Gloria I'.aer for football 
queen, victory over Chillicothe, and a triumphant Mrs. Pidgeon in a combat called 
"Fresh Fields". 

Tempus has quit fugiting; it sneaks up. Mid-semester exams have come, 
leaving a trail of nervous, sleepy-eyed students in their wake. Results later in 
the month revealed that some students became unduly alarmed and that others 
well, some people didn't believe Vesuvius would erupt, either. 

Dr. Mary H. Wright has had the position of chaperon thrust on her twice this 
month — first, when the Children's Literature class toured the Belleville Public 
Library; and again, when the Review staff celebrated the birthday of the Hill's 



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oldest publication by going to East St. Louis for the gala occasion. Eighteen 
years old this month, the Review has never ceased to be the delight of students 
during the time of "Maryhads" down through the current "Owl". 

Again McK's campus takes on dignity! Open House at Clark Hall last 
Thursday evening was dignified from the greeting of the receiving line to the last 
glimpse of a certain sedate senior chatting over her punch glass. And if one or 
two young men did arrive in sweaters and slacks, sans ties, and if two others did 
try to crash the paner guards at the west end of third floor, that was no reflection 
on Clark Hall. 

After much debate concerning the choice of a day upon which Thanksgiving 
might be celebrated, McKendree's population favored the newly-established date : 
so. on November 21 began the annual Thanksgiving vacation. And now, with 
your permission and hearty approval, I avail myself of the same opportunity. 

(Music Up) 

This is station MCK. Lebanon, Illinois. You have just been listening to the 
McKendree Revue, brought to you once each month through the courtesy of Mc- 
Kendree College. This program will be heard the last Monday in December at 
this same time. 

(Music Up — "Loyalty") 
(Music Fade) 

(Music Up — "Loyalty") 



This is station MCK, Lebanon, Illinois, bringing you 
e monthly McKendree Revue. 

(Music Fade Out) 

December, 1939, has seen few activities to record. 

The "Y's" and the literary societies have met and the 

^ basketball team has won two games ; the ( )wl lias 

tayed awake, and the Football Banquet was a success. 

£A But the honors go to the Y.M. and Y.W. in a joint 

Christmas party. 

Formal was the word, they said. And as formal as 
McKendree can be, it was, with even two sets of hosts 
and hostesses. Entertainment varied from folk games. 

with skirts swinging, to Van Dyke's "The First Christmas Tree" as jNIrs. Oppitz 

faced a dim roomful of intent faces. 

Thus, with the glow of candle light on Yuletide decorations and pretty for- 
mals, with a blast of ten-cent horns, and a crash of toys on wheels, McKendree's 
year 1939 virtually ended. 




T H E 



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EDITION 



(Music Up) 
(Fade) 

This is station MCK, studios in McKendree College, Lebanon, Illinois. You 
have just heard the McKendree Revue, a monthly broadcast of the news at Mc- 
Kendree College. McKendree will be with you again on this same station, at the 
same hour, next month, January 29. 

(Music Up — "Loyalty") 




This is station MCK, Lebanon, Illinois, bringing you 
the latest events in the history of McKendree College. 

(Music Fade with verse) 

With the arrival of 1940 on McKendree's campus, 
come also a rush of returning students. "Being snowed 
under at home isn't much fun any more. It's more ex- 
citing to be where you can at least tell someone down 
the hall all about what somebody gave you for Christ- 
mas — " . . . Thus remark residents of Clark Hall. . . . 
The men, however, are less committal, preferring to 
cover their intimacies with an appearance of sophistry. 

Nevertheless, we do hear that the Fdwards brothers had guests over the holidays ; 
that Mr. Sager escaped to Florida ; that numerous others defied the sub-zero 
weather to visit friends and make the most of the holidays. 

I was walking down the dark hall on second in the men's dorm a few nights 
ago when T saw three or four slumped figures seated around a table. Quiet per- 
vaded the hall. T watched these fellows closely, trying to detect their intentions. 
In terror, I turned to see someone slinking down the hall to his room. I motioned 
for him to come and asked him why the awful silence and if, perhaps, it would be 
wise to call Mr. Rauschkolb. Whereupon, I was informed that semester exams 
were looming before the student body, and that these culprits were preparing for 
the awful days ahead. 

If exams slowed down somewhat the tempo of McKendree's activity, the 
members of the College a capella choir were not daunted. Doing the unusual 
with new* purple and white robes and programs, the Glee Club began its annual 
series of programs at Trenton. Friday, January 26. The long grind of trips is 
upon us until April. 

Isn't it amusing to watch second-semester "frosh" register? It usually takes 
about fifteen minutes — until they come face-to- face with the waiting list in the 
office and see number 121 staring at them brazenly. When will they learn that 
registration day is the time to figure out their schedules — not a week beforhand? 
It's cold as — , but Nita is here, so why worrv? 



(Music Up — "Loyalty") 

This is station MCK. The McKendree Revue is brought to you the last Mon- 
day in every month at this same hour. 



Page Fifty cujht 



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8-14, you might have noticed anybody sneaking into an) 
you could have gone inside one of those rooms, you ~" 



(Music Up) 
(Fade) 

(Music Up — "Loyalty") 

This is station MCK, Lebanon. Illinois, bringing you 
the latest events in the history of McKendree College. 

(Music Fade with verse) 

Good morning, radio listeners. February has been 
an eventful, exciting month here at McKendree. Tt all 
began with the converting of the old Science Hall lec- 
ture room into a recreation room. Although conditions 
now existing are said to be temporary, there seems to 
be a new slant given to education on our campus : that 

of ping pong and chess. And if there be those students among us who have that 
lean and hungry look-well, far be it from us to criticize! Have a look at their 

^IfTou ^happened in" at Clark Hall any day during the week February 

anybody else's room. And it 
would have found, probably, 
not gripe sessions, not a pop-corn party on the sly, but someone making someone 
else's bed, mopping the floor, or hiding a package with a heart on it. Yes, the 
coeds were having a "heart-sister" week with plenty of fun, thrills, and narrow 

eSCa The Faculty Dames' Reception came at a happy time for the Clio pledges, 
since it made a nice occasion to which they might escort their pledge dates 

Besides the Fast St. Louis Federal Band and Clarissa Start, from the Post- 
Dishatch making red-letter Chapels, and the coming of Valentine Day and Sigma 
? u Delia securing four pledges, the most racing, chasing, primitive event was 
'•Sadie Hawkins Week". The women literally "got their men . And for all the 
hea t throbbh g and secret-revealing on the part of the leap-year-crazed women 
wasn't it the fellows who were pleased enough to petition a prolongation of the 

a8 ° n Yes, I take my cue from those words and wish you "good morning". 
(Music Up— "Loyalty") 

This is station MCK, Lebanon, Illinois. You have just heard the monthly 
broadcast of the McKendree Revue, a series of events on McKendree College 
campus. 

(Music Fade) 
(Music Up— "Loyalty") 
This is station MCK, bringing you the McKendree Revue a series of events 
in the history of McKendree College and the lives ot its students. 
(Music Fade Out) 
Who was it that said, "The stormy March has come at last"? At any rate, 

March, to comitate something toward calendar reform. Bnt, alas, the weather ,s 



Page Fifty-nine 



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not my subject — lest 1 grow more eloquent than becomes a 

news-vendor. 

It" March has been hypocritical about the weather, it 
has brought some new and interesting events to McKen- 
dree. The year's first evening recital was given during a 
regime of flu; but the up and able students contributed to 
its success — And then, for variety, there were mid-semes- 
ter exams — McKendree's a capella Choir asserted itself 
with a broadcast over KSD to remind us that long, tiring 
trips have need of a recompense somewhere. . . And debate 
has llourished again where it originally blossomed and 
died : in Philo and Pi Kappa Delta. . . But by far the most 
which the old campus has arisen since Homecoming 
was her Founders' Day. Scrubbed and polished, both buildings and student body 
woke on March 14 to greet the gloomiest day in a week — but soon forgot its gray- 
ness in welcoming the crowd which gathered to learn about McKendree's age, her 
problems, and her talents . . . Then as suddenly as it had come, the rush was over 
and Glee Club practice and tomorrow's tests became realities once more. 




Mo/tch. 



illustrious occasion 



(Music Up) 

This is station MCK. We have just brought you a quarter of an hour's 
broadcast. The McKendree Revue, a monthly report of events on McKendree Col- 
lege's campus. 

(Music Fade) 




(Music Up — "Loyalty") 
(Fade Out) 

Once again station MCK brings you the McKen- 
dree Revue, a series of events in the history of Mc- 
Kendree College. 

April has brought to the campus the April Fool 
edition of the Review carrying an announcement of 
Coach Henderson's selection for the part of Rhett 
I hitler in "Gone With the Wind", an account of the 
Utterback-Harmon trial, and plans for the Lake 
Beautiful summer resort. 

This month, however, the most-talked-of event on 
the campus was the spring play. "Wuthering 

Heights", with Marion Kleinschmidt and "Scud" Long as the diabolical Cathy 
and Heathcliff . The members of the cast were unusually well-suited to their parts ; 
the sound effects were good; and the scenes, which shifted from the crude room 
at Wuthering to an elegant drawing room at The Grange, were carefully done. 

After ten days of silent dorms and quiet town the all-too-brief spring vacation 
is past. The Faculty Dames and guests make merry at a house-warming affair 
with Dr. and Mrs. Spencer on April 19. 
hearted faculty folk ? 



0^ v 



What's a cardboard walk to stout- 



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Before and after — that's the phrase for two outstanding recitals given shortly 
before and after spring vacation in McK's chapel. Mrs. Becker, St. Louis, gave 
us a taste of music from the outside and Lucille Floetman, one of our own so- 
pranos, reminded us of what can still be done on our own campus. 

"Hurry! Hurry!" No one knows the significance of those words as do Mc- 
Kendrean staff members. Editor I. Shaffer and her force have been doing some 
scatter-brained thinking and spasmodic work since Spring vacation. But now that 
the McKendrean has gone to press, they could rest — if it weren't for term papers. 

Alpha Psi Omega has been one of those organizations suffering from a lack 
of membership. But all it needed was the spring tonic of seeing Paul Muni in 
"Key Largo" and a dinner afterward to give it a new zest for life. 

And that, my friends, is precisely what I need now — lazy days and warm 
nights are upon us. 

(Music Up) 



again to th 




This is station MCK signing off and reminding you to listen in 
McKendree Revue on Monday, May 27. 

( Music Up — "Lovalty", College Choir humming) 
' (F'ade Out) 

Good morning, radio fans. This is station MCK 
bringing you the last program in the McKendree Revue 
series. 

I'm not very good at coaxing, but I wheedled a cer- 
tain McKendree co-ed out of her most valued posses- 
sion : a dairy. From which we read these words : 

"May, the month of college romance ! It is upon us. 
Y.W. cabinet began it right with a May day breakfast 
and hike. Ruined my May basket by dropping and let- 
ting a car run over it. Oh ! My feet ! May Fete today. Ah, memories of my 
freshman days — gone so soon. Time is so fleeting. The past two weeks are 
as a dream: exams, (how I always work those five days!), the Dorris oratorical 
contest, Clio-Philo exhibition, with the girls in their summery dresses ; caps and 
gowns flying on Baccalaureate Sunday; music from "Elijah" ringing out across 
the Hill;' the last senior recital, and again the infinite array of caps and gowns in 
the long procession up the President's walk. . . . But a few days, even hours, ago 
we prated and hid from ourselves what was gripping us. This empty feeling that 
keeps haunting me . . And summer coming; and another September! Must such 
beginnings always come with these inevitable ends stored away to deceive the 
heart?" 

Truly, we regret another year is ended and we must be gone — but only to re- 
turn again. And until next September McKendree College wishes you the best of 
success and a pleasant vacation. 

(Music Up — "Loyalty", with McKendree Choir) 
(Humming) 
(Fade Out) 
This is the last of a series of broadcasts of the McKendree Revue. This pro- 
gram will be heard again, beginning next September, over this same station, MCK. 

(Music Up — "Loyalty" — Choir Humming) 
(Fade Out) 



THE 



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EDITION 



Dramatically Speaking 



Periodically, it seems, someone among McKendree's student body decides to 
try out for a play and succeeds remarkably well, or some old stars make a come- 
back. Roth cases have occurred on our campus this year. 

Especially was this true of the Homecoming play, "Fresh Fields", by Ivor 
Novello. Delicate Lady Lillian and frank Mrs. Pidgeon made a sharp contrast of 
character throughout the play. Vivacious, rollicking, surprising, "Fresh Fields" 
deserved the acclaim it was given by our own and other newspapers. 



i THE CAST 

Lady Lillian __ Helen Waggoner 

Lady Mary Lucille Floetman 

Mrs. Pidgeon Pearl Dick 

Tom Pidgeon __ Ralph Koch 

Una Pidgeon Dorothy Hertenstein 

Ludlow Robert Herman 

Lady Strome __ Dorothy Schumacher 

Swaine Ruth Henderson 

Tim, Lady Mary's son James Oppitz 

Four members of the Play Production Class — Dorothy Miller, Barbara Wool- 
ard, Janet Barkley, and I lany Ward, directed one-act plays during April and May. 




DAjOjTrujdLi-Gh, ^^ 



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"Wuthering Heights", adapted by Randolph Carter from the book by Emily 
Bronte, was outstanding in all its phases — from the pewter dishes and crude 
broom on the hearth to the eerie sound-effects backstage. 

The scenery, rough and melancholy in the first and third acts, contrasting 
strongly with the refined, cheerful effects of the second act, lent much to the at- 
mosphere of the play. Lacking in superficial humor, "Wuthering Heights" is pos- 
sibly the heaviest drama McKendree players have ever produced. The actors 
showed an unusual keenness for studying and adapting themselves to the charac- 
ters of a truly dramatic production. 



THE CAST 

Cathy- __ Marion Kleinschmidt 

Heathcliffe Charles E. Long 

Edgar Linton Robert Herman 

Ellen Pearl Dick 

Isabel Linton Isabel Shaffer 

Joseph James Oppitz 

Hindley__ Joseph Fizzell 




M. Kleinschmidt, C. Long, P. Dick 



THE BOY AND GIRL EDITION 



SENIOR CLASS DAY PROGRAM 



Robert Crouse — Chairman 

Prelude Madeleine Yost 

Invocation Orlando Brakemeyer 

Welcome.— Dorothy Hertenstein 

Class History William Fischer 

Reading Betty Mae Phillips 

Music Men's Quartet 

Poem Bertie Bauer 

Talk - John Henderson 

Solo - Pearl Dick 

Presentation of the Gavel Milton Sager 

Response by Junior President. Charles Long 

Class Prophecy Lucille Floetman 

Class Will Marvin Butler 

"Alma Mater" Assembly 




TREE DEDICATION 

Invocation.. Cecil Lowe 

Reading Everette Hayden 

Music Women's Quartet 

Remarks Dr. E. R. Spencer 

Address Dr. W. J. Scarborough 

Dedication Milton Sager 

Benediction Ralph Koch 

"Alma Mater" Assembly 



Page Sixty -f out 



OF THE McKENDREAN 



May 
Queen 




BERTIE BAUER 
Bunker Hill 

Bertie, our May Queen, is an active member of Clio, Sigma Zeta, and the 
Women's Athletic Association. We need not mention her popularity with the Boy 
and Girl on the campus since she has been Football Queen as well as having been 
elected by the girls of Clark Hall to be their first representative to the Faculty- 
Student Council. 

We have recognized in Bertie the unassuming beauty of character which so 
eloquentlv compliments the beauty of her features and which adds so greatly to 
the charm of her personality. 

Pearl Dick of Mascoutah served as Maid of Honor. Dorothy Hertenstein, 
Madeleine Yost, Helen Waggoner, and Lucille Floetman were the Queen's other 
attendants. 



Page Sixty-five 



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Patron List 



MISS RUBY ELLIS 
Teacher 
St. Jacob. Illinois 

MISS HELEN HANDEL 
Teacher 

Crossville, Illinois 

MISS k< M'-ERTA HEYER 
Teacher 
Clay City, Illinois 

MISS MARY TENNEY KNAPP 
Teacher 

East St. Louis, Illinois 



MR. MALCOM RANDALL 
.Iss't. Dist. Supervisor for 
WPA Recreation, Dist. No. 5 
Herrin, Illinois 

MR. WILLIAM D. SANDERS 
Teacher 
Crossville, Illinois 

MR. S. ALLEN SEIBERT 
Belleville, Illinois 

MR. S. P. SHAW 
Avondale, Colorado 



MR. JOHN OPPITZ 

Wayne County Examiner 
Fairfield, Illinois 



MISS GWENDOLYN YOST 
Teacher 

Eldorado, Illinois 








HE McKENDREAN 



...INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 

Alamo Theatre 69 

Belleville Advocate 68 

Belleville Hotel 68 

Belleville Laundry 68 

Blumenstein Bros 70 

Bunge's 68 

Daumueller's 71 

Dot's Beauty Shop 70 

General Grocer Co 72 

C. Heer 71 

Home Bakery 69 

Interstate Printing Co 73 

Lebanon Advertiser. ... 68 

Lebanon Drug Co 69 

Lincoln Theatre 68 

Lu Helen Luncheonette 69 

Meyer Furniture and Undertaking Co. . . 70 

Moonlight Restaurant 72 

Paris Cleaners 63 

Parkway Inn 72 

Pfeffer Milling Co 71 

Roger's Clothing Co 70 

Sayre Motor Co 69 

Schwarz Furniture and Undertaking Co 69 

Eugene Seibert 70 

Shattinger Music Co 70 

Spieth Photo Studio 72 

Wehrle Jewelry Co 69 



Weygandt Florist 68 



BELLEVILLE LAUNDRY 
fc DRY CLEANING CO. 

"YOUR BOSOM FRIEND" 
Belleville, Illinois 



WEYGANDT FLORIST 

FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

PHONE 127 

315 E. Adams St. 
OFALLON, ILLINOIS 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

BUNGE'S BAKERY AND 
CONFECTIONERY 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



THE LEBANON 
ADVERTISER 

LEON H. CHURCH 
Editor and Publisher 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

LINCOLN TH EATR E 

BELLEVILLE, ILLINOIS 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

HOTEL BELLEVILLE 

'JUST THE PLACE FOR YOUR 
NEXT PARTY" 



S. J. Fowler A. M. Fowler S. R. Fowler 
Props. 



Why Not Have Quality Work for the 
Same Price? 

CLEANING by the MODERN METHOD 

PARIS 
CLEANING AND DYEING 

Phone Lebanon I 36 



THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE HOME' 

BELLEVILLE 
DAILY ADVOCATE 

Established in 1839 



Page Sixty-eight 











Believe it or not . . . 


BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 

Try Our Soda Fountain 

We Serve the Best Deluxe Ice Cream 

and Toasted Sandwiches 


THE NEW GRUEN VERITHIN 
WRIST WATCH 

is different!!! 
Streamlined to fit your wrist 


LEBANON DRUG CO. 

O. C. FRESHOUR, Prop. 


FINE DIAMONDS — JEWELRY 

F. G. WEHRLE & SON 

At 16 East Main, Belleville, III. 
Since 1859 




U HELEN 

UNCHEONETTE 


• 








ebanon, III. 


ALAMO 
THEATRE 




PHONE IR4 




• 


• 


Lucille Schmidt 




COMPLIMENTS 


SINCLAIR GAS EXIDE & DELCO 
AND OILS BATTERIES 


OF 






TIRES AND 




ACCESSORIES 


HOME BAKERY 




LEBANON, ILLINOIS 


SAYRE MOTOR 


Phone 33 Est. 1894 


COMPANY 


SCHWARZ BROS. 


Phone 35 Lebanon, II!. 


FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 






223 West Front Street 


BUICK 
• • 



O'Fallon, III. 
L. E. Schwarz M. K. Schwarz 



General Repair and Storage 



MEYER 



FURNITURE 

. . and . . 

UNDERTAKING 



Lebanon, Illinois 



ROGERS CLOTHING CO. 



WHERE THEY ALL GO' 



Lebanon, Illinois 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Eugene Seibert 

Distributor of 

MARATHON GASOLINE 
ENDURANCE MOTOR OIL 



IRES, BATTERIES and ACCESSORIES 



1000 Lebanon Ave. 
BELLEVILLE, ILL. 



SHATTINGER 

MUSIC AND PIANO 

COMPANY 



331-335 Arcade Bldg. 

Eighth and Olive 
ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

DOT'S BEAUTY SHOP 

Lebanon, Illinois 



BLUMENSTEIN BROS. 

FRESH AND SMOKED 
MEATS 



Phone I 13 
Lebanon, Illinois 



Daily Capacity 1,000 Barrels 
Elevator Capacity 200,000 Bushels 



PFEFFER MILLING COMPANY 



LEBANON, ILLINOIS 
Inc. 1899 



Manufacturers of 



MAR'S PATENT HARD WINTER WHEAT FLOUR 

FLUFFY RUFFLES SELF-RISING FLOUR 

LEBANON BELLE CAKE FLOUR 



Dealers in 
LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIALS 





A MOST PLEASANT 




WELCOME 




Awaits you at all times 


C. HEER 


at 


• 


BILL'S 


• • 






For Good Fountain Service, 


GENERAL 


Your College Needs, etc. 


MERCHANDISE 


VISIT 


• • 




• 


DAUMUELLER'S 
MUSIC AND GIFT SHOP 


The Quality Store 


215-217 West St. Louis St. 
Lebanon, Illinois 



Fuge Seventy-one 



MANHATTAN 


THE NEW 
MOONLIGHT RESTAURANT 


COFFEE 


O FALLON, ILL. 


Something Different, 
Not something just as good 


O'Fallon's Leading Amusement Center 
* BOWLING — ROLLER SKATING * 


F=^ 


Chicken and Steak Dinners Our Specialty 


VACUUM-PACKED IN 


Florence and "Al" Hartman Phone 126 


GLASS OR TIN 




Distributed by 


HELMS' 
PARKWAY INN 


GENERAL GROCER 
COMPANY 


FAMOUS FOR FINE FOOD 
25th and Lynch Avenue 


ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 


EAST ST. LOUIS 




Phone East 2009 



SPIETH PHOTO STUDIO 

222 North Popular Street CENTRALIA, ILLINOIS 






PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR HIGH SCHOOLS AND COl LEGES 

OUR SPECIALTY 

High Grade Portraits 

Enlarging .... Kodak Finishing 

. . . Application Pictures 



Write Us for Pri 



ces 



Page Seventy-two 



COMPLIMENTS 
. . . of . . . 



THE INTERSTATE PRINTING CO. 



Printers and Publishers 
DANVILLE, ILL 



This Book is a Product of the Interstate 



Page Seventy-three 



We, the Staff of the 1940 McKendrean, extend our 
sincere appreciation to those individuals and companies 
who have so generously advertised in the previous pages. 
The publication of this Annual was possible only through 
their cooperation and the contributions to our Patrons' 
List. 

The Students, Faculty, and many friends of the col- 
lege can return the favor by patronizing these advertisers. 




Autographs 



Autographs 



H °lrrian i ih 

' L 6 2254 



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