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Full text of "The McKendrean : being the year book of McKendree College"

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Aieae 1943 



ALMA MATER 

A college 'mid plains is standing, 

Standing there from olden days . . . 
A pioneer of learning, 

First in untrodden ways . . . 
For service and Christian culture. 

For efficiency she stands . . . 
Her bons and daughters praise her 

With voices, hearts and hands . . . 

Chorus- 
hiail to thee our dear old McKendree 

May v^e always loyal be . . . 
It's a song of praise we raise to thee 

Alma Mater dear old M-C . . . 
May we ever hold thee true and wise and right 

hlonor purple and the white . . . 
And for victory we'll always fight 

Till we win for old Mc-K . . . 

Enduring and strong she stands there, 

Stands upon our College Hill . . . 
Tho' others may out-number 

She holds the first place still, 
For beauty, truth and knowledge. 

And for service without bound . . . 
Then let us raise our voices 

Until the plains resound . . . 



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ROSS HORTIN . Editor 

NOBLE WRIGHT Associate Editor 

ETHEL DEWHIRST. Business Manager 

JANE HACKMANN Ass't Business Mgr. 

ALVIN LOPINOT Photography 

BEATRICE ATTEY. Organizations Editor 

PAUL SALMON Sports Editor 

GLORIA STEPHENS Feotures 

WILBERT CANNON Advertising 

LYMAN COOK Advertising 

JAMES AGLES Circulation Manager 

DR. DOROTHY I. WEST Faculty Adviser 




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Our record of days of McKendree during a year 
when this college, which has actively stood for 
Christian education and love of country during 
the Mexican War, the Civil War, the Spanish- 
American War and the trying days of the first 
World War, is once again devoting itself whole- 
heartedly to securing victory for the ideals upon 
which our country was founded — the right of 
mankind to realize the great inalienable human 
rights of Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of hlop- 
piness. 



liLin/iL II 

In this — Volume XI, Mew Series — 
The 1943 Edition of the McKendreon 




IIHl 




CARNEGIE 
HALL 



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have been called to go and defend their homes and free- 
doms on the battle fields of the world, in Africa, India, 
Australia and on the islands of the sea. 



It is to those sons of our Alma Mater who have so courage- 
ously gone forth to defend, with their lives if need be, the 
liberties of all free men everywhere — to those who hove 
given most and asked least in return — 

WE DEDICATE THIS VOLUME. 




cppiotiaHt 



It is inevitable that in every college changes should 
occur in the teaching staff. These vacancies are filled 
and the work goes on as before. The administration is 
satisfied if the work is maintained at the desired standard 
of efficiency. 

When Doctor James Cloy Dolley requested that he be 
granted the retired status, last June the College sustained a 
loss for which there was no compensation. Provision was 
made for the work of his department, but a landmark hod 
been removed. When, on February 6th, he departed from 
among the living the loss was made absolute. 

For forty-three years Doctor Dolley gave generously of his 
scholarship, counsel and friendship to hundreds whose lives 
were enriched, inspired and stabilized by his ministrations. 
Kindly and urbane by nature, his unaffected sincerity built 
for him o secure place in the affections of students and 
colleagues. hHe v/os loyal to his high ideals in every depart- 
ment of his service. Hie served faithfully, uncomplainingly in 
some of the most difficult years of the life of the College. 
His services, his personality, his character have branded 
themselves on the memory of oil who love McKendree Col- 
lege. 



DR. JAMES CLAY 
DOLLEY 





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FACULTY 

Administration 
Teaching Staff 

CLASSES 

Senior 
Junior 
Sophomore 
Freshman 

ACTIVITIES 

hlonorory Societies 

Clubs 

Literary Societies 

Musical Organizations 

SPORTS 

Bosketboll 
Lettermen 

FEATURES 

Ploys and Theatre 

hlomecoming Queen 

Senior Class hiistory 

Uncle Sam's Boys — Roll 
of hlonor 

Pictures of Boys in Service 

Snap Shots 

May Queen 

Who's Who 

PATRONS 

ADVERTISERS 




"Kit" Carson Taxi? Workers All 

Ted Forbes Vernon Elless 

Barbara Woolard Chambers 

Grant Hartman Edward Wright 

Dorothy Turrentine Lindsey 

Print Shop First Floor Gang 

Paging Ronneo Sitting Pretty 



With the hope that as you leaf these pages, fond memories 
will crowd your thoughts and old friends will be with you 
again. If these memories instill you with determination 
and energy to better serve and defend our country with 
all her noble principles, we shall have the satisfaction of 
a worthwhile achievement. The staff wishes to thank the 
faculty, students, administration, patrons, advertisers, 
and all who helped in any way to make this book possible. 




HIE ADMIIINISTRATION 




CLARK R. YOST, A.B., D.D., L.L.D. 
President 




CHARLES J. STOWELL, Ph.D. 
Dean 



If we work upon marble it will perish, if 
we work upon brass, time will efface it, 
if we rear temples they will crumble Into 
dust, but if we work upon immortal minds, 
if we imbue them with principles, with the 
just fear of God and love of our fellow 
man, we engrave on these tables some- 
thing that will brighten all eternity. 

• — Author unknown. 



It is nothing to give pension and cottage 
to the widow who has lost her son; it is 
nothing to give food and medicine to the 
workman who has broken his arm, or the 
decrepit woman wasting in sickness. But 
it is something to use your time and 
strength to war with the waywardness and 
thoughtlessness of mankind; to keep the 
erring workman in your service till you 
hove made him on unerring one, and to 
direct your fellow-merchant to the op- 
portunity which his judgement would have 
lost. 

— John Ruskin. 



IFACU 



EDWIN PERCY BAKER, Dean Emeritus, 
LL.D., M. A. 
German 

ALLEEN WILSON, B.A., B.S. in L.S. 

Librarian 

WILLIAM CLARENCE WALTON, Ph.D., D.D. 
Philosophy and Religion 

OLIVER HENRY KLEINSCHMIDT, A.A.G.O. 
Organ, Piano, and Thecry 

NELL GRISWOLD OPPITZ, M.A. 
Sociology, History and Latin 

ELIZA J. DONALDSON, M.A. 
Comptroller, Commerce 

REINHOLD BARRETT HOHN, M.A. 

Registrar, Education and Psychology 

RUTH McDANIEL, M.A. 

French, Spanish and Latin 

MARION LANE CONROW, M.A. 
Dean of Women, English 

DOROTHY IRENE WEST, Ph. D. 

English 



NEVA I. CHARLES, A. M. 
Biology 

HELMUT C. GUTEKUNST, M.S. 
Chemistry and Physics 

MILDRED KRUGHOFF, B.A. 

Speech, Dramatics and Social Science 

JEAN HILLIS RIDGWAY, B. Mus. 
Voice and Public School Music 

BERTHA WARD GUTEKUNST, A.B. 
French, Spanish and Journalism 

GLADYS HARRIS LESHER, M. Mus. 
Voice and Public School Music 

LEON CHURCH, A.B. 

Director of Physical Education and Athletics. 

GRACE RENNER WELCH, M.S. 
Speech and Dramatics 

CLIFFORD C. BROWN, A.B. 
Executive Secretary 

BLANCH HERTENSTEIN 
Dietician 




Mrs. Oppitz, Miss McDaniei, Professor Gutekunst, Professor Hohn, Mr. Brown, Miss Donaldson, Mrs. Hertenstein, Ur 

Walton, Mr. Church, Professor Kleinschmidt, Dr. V/est. Miss Charles, Miss Ridgway 

Dean Baker, Miss Wilson, Miss Conrow, Mrs. Gutekunst, Miss Krughoff, Dean Stowell, Dr. Yost. 




Four of a kind. 



Officers: Loy, Robinson, Hortin, 
Agles — President. 



Cookin' 



ROSS R. HORTIN, A.B. 
Albion 

Mathematics 

Nature Club, ■39-'40; Review staff, 
'39-'40; Football, '39-'40; Basketball, 
'40-'43; Philo, '40-'43; President. '42; 
McKendrean staff, '40-'43; Faculty 
Student Council, '42; Vice-Presideni 
of Senior Class; Sigma Zeto; Who's 
Who in American Universities and 
Colleges 



JAMES HERBERT AGLES. B.S. 
E. St. Louis 

Chemistry 

Freshman class President; Mole 
Quartette, '39-'43; Glee Club, '39- 
'43; Band, '43; Philo; Senior class 
President; Student Council repre- 
sentative; Business Manager Review; 
Circulation Manager McKendrean; 
Blue Book of College Men 



JAMES HAROLD ODOM, A.B. 
Lebanon 

Religion 

Chicago Evangelistic Institute, '34- 

'38; President Gospel Team; Philo; 

Y.M.C.A.: Beta Beta Beta; Si^ma 
Beta Rho '4l-'42 



PAUL MARK BAKER, A.B. 
Lebanon 

Philosophy and Religion 

Unlve-sltv of Illinois, '35-'36; Trinity 
Choir (Wesley Foundation), '36; 
Student Council (Wesley Founda- 
tion), '36; Plato, ''42-'43, Chaplain, 
'42, Secretary, '43; Sigma Beta Rho, 
'42-'43, President, '43; Y.M.C.A., 
'42-'43, Vice-President, '43; Gospel 
Quartet, '43; Chairman, Witnessing 
Bond, '42; Chairman, Morning 
prayer group, '42; Student President, 
'43; Student Council, '43; Who's 
who in American Universities and 
Colleges 



CYRIL DEAN CURTIS, B.S. 
Albion 

Mathematics 

Nature Club, '39-'40; Pianist for 
Y.M.C.A., '39-'43; Presidenf of Car- 
negie Hall, '42; Philo, '40-'43, Presi- 
dent, '43; President of Student Asso- 
ciation, '43; Sigma Zeto; Cabinet, 
Youth Fellowship; Who's Who in 
American Universities and Colleges. 



PAUL MATTHEW GRIFrlN, 
B.S. 

East St. Louis 

Chemistry and Mathematics 

Cheerleader, '39; Basketball, '39-'40; 
Manager of Homecoming Ploy, '39; 
Class Treasurer, '39-'40; Football, 
■40-'4l; Track, '40-'42; Faculty Stu- 
dent Council, ■4l-'42; "M" Club; 
Plato; Radio Club; Sigma Zeto, 
Vice-Choirman; Chemistry and 

Physic Assistant; Who's Who in 
American Universities and Colleges 



GERALD EVAN GULLEY 



Religion 

Y.M.C.A., '39-'4l; Prayer Bond, '39- 
'41; Sigma Beta Rho, '39-'42; Review 
staff, '42-'43; "She Stoops to Con 
quer" 



MALCOLM EUGENE MYRES, 
A.B. 

Belleville 

Mathematics 

Blackburn Junior College, '39-'4l; 
Washington U. Night School, '41; 
Sigma Zeto, Beta Chapter, '43; 
Philo, '42-'43; Delegate to Principia 
Conference on Public Affairs, 42; 
Bond; Basketball, '42-'43; "M" Club, 
'42-'43 



LAVERNE BOOK, A.B. 
Lockport 

Religion 

Sigma Beta Rho, ■40-'43; Clio, '41- 
'43; Y.W.C.A. Cabinet, '40-'43; As- 
sistant in College Kitchen, '39-'42; 
Program Choirman of Sigma Beta 
Rho, '41 -'42; Vice-President of 
r.W.C.A., ■42-'43; Student Faculty 
Council, '42; President of Clio, '42; 
Chairman of Y.W.C.A. and Y.M.C.A. 
Tiorning Prayer Meel'ing, '42-'43; 
lA^ho's Who in American Universities 
3nd Colleges, '42 



^ CLASS 



Ross R. Hortin 



James Harold Odom Cyril Dean Curtis 



James Herbert Agles Paul Mark Baker 



Paul Matthew Griffin 



Gerald Evan Gulley 



Malcolm Eugene Myres LaVerne Dorothy Book 





Frances Eveline Robinson 
Russel Truman Drennan 



Harry Ward Barter 
Lester Dale Winter 



Charles Wesley Chadwell 
James Lowden Loy 



Ethel Miriam Dewhirst 
Ralph Oliver Monken 



Lewis Alfred Winterrowd 
Donald Louis Hartman 



FRANCES EVALINE ROBIN- 
SON, A.B. 

Woodstock 

Speech 

Glee Club, '39-'43, Social Chairman, 
■42-'43; W.A.A., ■39-'43, Point-keeper, 
'42-'43; Little Theater, '39-'43; Alpha 
Psi Omega, '43; Vice-President Stu- 
dent Body, '43; Student Facultv 
Council, '43; Secretory-Treasurer, 
Senior Class, '42-'43 



HARRY WARD BARTER, A.B. 
Freeburg 

Philosophy and Religion 



CHARLES WESLEY CHAD- 
WELL, A.B. 

E. St. Louis 

Religion 

Philo, '4l-'43, President, '42; Sigmo 
Beta Rho, '40-'43, President, '42; 
Y.M.C.A., ■39-'43, President, '4l-'42; 
Student Representative to Faculty- 
Student Council, '42; McKendrean, 
'40-'42, Editor, '41 -'42; Debate 
Squad, '40-'4l; Who's Who in 
American Universities and Colleges; 
Band, '4l-'42 



ETHEL MIRIAM DEWHIRST, 
A.B. 

Dana 

Piano 

Illinois State Normal University, '38- 
'39; University Woman's Chorus, '39; 
University Concert Orchestra, '39; 
Concert Band, '39; Lowell Mason 
Club, '39; W.A.A., '38-'39; Chorus, 
'42-'43; Band, '42-'43; Sextette, '43; 
Clio, '42-'43, President, '42; McKen- 
drean Staff, '42-'43, Business Man- 
ager, '43; W.A.A., '43; Little The- 
ater, '43; "What a Life," '42; Kitty 
Kubs, '42-'43; President of Clark 
hloll, '43; Student Body Song Leader; 
Y.W.C.A., '42-'43; May Queen, '43 



LEWIS ALFRED WINTER- 
ROWD, A.B. 

Louisville 

Chemistry 

Plato, '40-'43, President, '42-'43; 
"M' Club, '41-'43; President, Car- 
negie hiall, '43; Varsity Basketball, 
'39-'43, Co-Captain, '4l-'42, Cap- 
tain, '43; Review Staff, '42-'43, 
Sports Editor; Football Manoger, 
'40-'4l; Varsity Softball Manager, 
'40-'43 



RUSSELL TRUMAN DREN- 
NAN, B.S. 

E. St. Louis 

Chemistry 

Sigma Zeta, Secretary-Treasurer, '43 



DALE WINTER, A.B. 
Rose Hill 

Economics 

Plato, '40-'42, President, '42-'43; 
Basketball Manager, '40-'43; Soft- 
ball, '39-'43; Vice-President of Car- 
negie Hall, '43, II Semester; Glee 
Club, '42-'43 



JAMES LOWDEN LOY, A.B. 
Effingham 

Biology 

Nature Club, '39-'40; Varsity Bas- 
ketball, '39-'43; Varsity Football, 
'39-'40; Plato, '40-'43, President, '42; 
McKendrean Staff, '41 -'42: "M" 
Club, '4l-'43, President, '42-'43; Rep- 
resentative from Carnegie Hall in 
Faculty-Student Council, '43; Sigma 
Zeta. Beta Chapter, '42-'43 



RALPH OLIVER MONKEN, 
A.B. 

Summerfield 

Biology 

Philo, '42-'43; Beta Beta Beta, '43 



DONALD LOUIS HARTMAN. 
A.B. 

O'Fallon 

Biology 

Glee Club, '39-'43, Vice-President, 
'42, President, '42-'43; Boys' Quar- 
tet, '40-'43; Soloist for Glee Club, 
'40-'43; Plato Literary Society; Foot- 
boN lettermon, '40-'43; Track letter- 
men, '4l-'43; Beta Beta Seta, Presi- 
dent, '43: "M" Club, '40-'43 




Ace of hoboes. 



Some fun- 




JUN 
CLA 



Ernest Smith 
Maxine Ball 
Donald Harmon 



Alvin Whittemore 
Edith Pritchard 
Calvin Ryan 



Robert Dannenbrink 
Bernard Logan 
Margaret Harshbarger 



Gehl Devore 
George Kennedy 
Beatrice Attey 



Arthur Hinson 
Jane Hackmann 
James Owens 



JUNIOR CLASS HISTORY 

The Class of '44 was able to keep up its renown because of its active social life. Beginning with 
its Freshman year the present Junior class has been outstanding. Through careful maneuvering, 
they were able to enjov the annual Freshman Feed without interruption by the upper-classmen. As 
Sophomores this class ' a hay-ride, an unusual activity on the campus. The Friday night All-College 
parties v/ere begun in e spirits with the Class of '44 sponsoring one of their genuine hoy-rides, with 
hay, horses, chaperons, et cl. 

Time passes on, and so it seems that students do also. The Class of '44 began its career with 
an enrollment of fifty-seven for the Freshman year. After the Freshman thinning, there were thirty- 
five the second year. This year there were nmeteen in the class. From all appearances the number 
will decrease proportionately next year. 

The class of '44 has a good spirit of service In its attitude toward life. A number of the men 
who once answered to the roll coll of the Class of '44 ore now answering the Roll Call of the 
Colors. Of lost year's thirty-five students, six did not return because of service to the government; 
two because of teaching; two because of marriage; and two because of nurse's training. Among the 
numbers of the present class there ore five men In the Reserves, seven men serving as Student Min- 
isters, two women training for Deaconesses. Two men have left school for the Navy since September. 
McKendree Is proud of the service rendered by this class. 

Though, In number, the Class of '44 Is dlmlnlsnlng, the spirit of the class and its loyalty to McKen- 
dree Is ever the same. 




Waiting for the bell. 
Of-ficers: Ball, Oannenbrink, Hinson, Kennedy — President, Harshbarger. 



Easy basket. 
Midnight rendezvous. 




OIPHOMORiE CLASS 



SOPHOMORE CLASS HISTORY 

Last year's Freshman class of fifty husky lads and iimid 
lassies has dwindled down to a Sophomore class of twenty- 
four. To moke up for the decrease in numbers, the class 
has put forth twice as much effort as it might have ex- 
hibited in normal times. 

With their own successful picnic of last year, the hair- 
cuts, and the night rides in mind, the group initiated this 
year's "greenies" in proper style. 

The majority of the members of the class participate 
in the organizations and the out-side activities of the 
campus. Many of its members hold executive positions in 
the literary societies, the Y's, and on the staff of the Re- 
view. Sophomores are well-represented in sports, too. 

Just this year some of the boys hove been called into 
the armed services; others have enlisted in the reserves. 
Take notice of this class! 




You can tell the serious Senior 
By his grave and lordly airs 
You can always tell a Freshman 
By the colors which he weors 
You can tell the ardent Junior 
By his academic touch 
And you can tell o Sophomore 
But — you can not tell him much. 



Officers: Northdurft, Kean, Cooper — President. 

Trebling with the trio. 

Nice shot, Sammy. 

Dorm doings. 




Virginia Conklin, Frank Harris, Louise Karroker, Edith Rittenhouse, Thomas Gordon, Eunice Bivins, Warren Beckemeyer, 
hlorold Nothdurft, Ruth Houser, Robert Winning, Wanda Barger, Daniel Martin, Puth Cooper, Noble Wright, Dole Turner, 
Paul Salmon, Wilbert Cannon, Louise Beaty, Gwendolen Veatch, Keith Bruning, Jesse Sieber, Joyce Ann Kean, MyrI Kuhn. 




FRESHMAN 
CLASS HISTORY 



Last fall we, the Class of '46, enrolled as mem- 
bers of McKendree, just as our predecessors have 
done for the last one hundred and fifteen years. 
Like any other Freshman class, we were green 
about college life. We did not know what to ex- 
pect, or how we would fit into the college scene, 
but it was not long until we caught the spirit from 
our upperclass friends, and became a happy port 
of the college family. 

As we fell into step, McKendree traditions be- 
came our standards. Memories handed down 
through the years became our memories. Among 
them lies our initiation week durmg which many of 
us became personally acquainted with Lake Beau- 
tiful and the chapel belfry. Just as inspiring were 
our moonlight hikes. 

In our serious moods we selected our officers, 
and settled down to be worthwhile Freshmen. We 
were proud to take on active port in celebratmg 
the annual hHomecoming and in sponsoring an All- 
School play night. 

Our country has called a few of us to its de- 
fense, but we who remain hope, as our first year 
draws to a close, that McKendree has benefited 
by our having lived within her walls. 

To those who will soon take our places, we give 
our welcome as we pass on as upperclassmen to do 
greater service for the school we love, our Alma 
Mater. McK. 




"How green you ore and fresh in this old world." 
Shakespeare, King John Act III, Sc. 4, 1 , 145. 



Officers: Buroe, Searles — President, Kirk, Manwaring. 

Oueen to Queen. 

Aloha Looie. 



FRESHMAN 



Thomas Schwarzlose 
Shirley Miller 
Charles Manwaring 



Alvin Lopinot 
Gloria Stephens 
Fletcher Burge 



Estil Ellis 
Stephen Angle 
James Brooks 



Robert Kruh 
Ida Barter 
Max Apple 



Roger Matthews 
Warren Clark 
Donald Lowe 



Ward Boyd 
William Stallings 
Lyman Cook 





Freshman 
Homecoming Program 



When a new tradition is begun on an old 
campus, then it is time to pay attention, and 
apparently the All-Freshman Program held on the 
Friday evening of hHomecoming week end will 
become an annual event. On that night the 
Freshmen removed their green caps for the last 
time. Then, with talent selected from thier own 
ranks, they presented the following program: 

Address of Welcome William Seorles 

Vocal Solo Wilma Bonney 

Trombone Solo Ruth Koerber 

Piano Solo Thelmo Young 

Vocal Solo Shirley Bergman 

Songs by Girls' Sextette 

Ruth Koerber, Thelma Young, Shirley Miller, 
Betty Kirk, Shirley Bergman, Edna Kampmeyer 

Skit, "Just A Love Nest", 

Betty Kirk, James Brooks, Marie Lueking. 

Address Paul Baker 

Loyalty Freshmen 




Help in our platform building! 

Let it be never-yielding. 
Keep Americans chanting this song. , , . 

We've a good foundation. 

For Personality's non-ration 
Keep Americans smiling along! 

— Gloria Stephens. 



Winter evening. 

Panda and the Princess. 

Old Reliable. 



20 



iESHMAN 
CLASS 



Marie Lueking 
Virginia Phillips 
Norman Baker 



Mildred Joseph 
Thelma Young 
Robert Stadge 



Betty Kirk 
Wilma Bonney 
William Seorles 



Shirley Bergman 
William Freshour 
Archie Porter 



Ruth Koerber 
Arthur Kleinschmidt 
William Scheese 



Robert Osborn 
Edna Kampmeyer 
Cyril Jackson 





CLIONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

An outstanding spirit of loyalty and co-opera- 
tion instilled in the nnembers of our society has 
made this past year one to be remembered. 
Former Clionians joined with the society in the 
redecoration program of the hall. 

Each program has been prepared by the 
critics to give a wide variety in the display of 
talents. Most of the programs have a central 
theme around which a unification of thoughts 
is possible. Several well attended open sessions 
were held during the year. 

Nine members were pledged this year and 
Miss Conrow again was sponsor to our society. 

The year can be ended with a backward 
look of satisfaction, for Clio has again proved 
its right to niche on our hiill. 

PHILOSOPHIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

In this, Philo's 106th year, many changes have 
occurred. Philo gave three men; Bernard 
Logan, James Oppitz, and Cyril Curtis to the 
services of our country and took six new mem- 
bers under its wing. 

Open sessions, the pledge banquet, and the 
regular weekly meetings have won Philo a dis- 
tinguished place on the campus again this year. 

We are proud to give men to the service of 
our country and feel that the training received 
in Philo will help them be of more value to 
the U. S. A. 

PLATONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

Plato this year, as was true in the past, was 
a literary society containing many athletes. 
Six of the seven basketball lettermen were 
Plotonians. Plato met Philo on the basketball 
floor as the feature of hHomecoming. Plato 
emerged victorious by a 50-33 score. 

Plato started the year with ten members. 
Four were pledged the first semester, and four 
more the second semester. Only six of these 
eighteen will be lost by graduation. 

This year, Plato hall was completely redec- 
orated. With the contributions of many old 
Plotonians, a new floor was laid and walls and 
ceiling were refinished. 

As long as there is a McKendree, Plato will 
be in there pitching. 



Relaxed. 
Stout-hearted men. 
Dripped-on dabblers 




Presidents: 

LaVerne Book 

Ethel Dewhirst 

Joyce Ann Kean 

Jane Hacknnann 



Presidents: 

Charles Chadwell 

Ross Hor+in 

Cyril Curtis 

James Agles 

Gehl Devore 



Presidents: 

James Loy 

Dole Winters 

Lewis Winterrowd 

Paul Baker 



Veatch, Conrow, RIttenhouse, Book, Hackmann, Dewhirst, Bivlns, Keen, Korraker, Harstibarger, Hauser, Attey 
Kennedy, Nothdurft, Wright, Devore, Logon, Chodvveli, Whittemore, Agles, Myres, hHortin, Smith, Curtis 
'Hlnson, Salmon, Donnenbrlnk, Winter, Harmon, Loy, Cannon. Schroeder, Baker, Hartmon, Griffin, Winter- 
rowd, Keck, Ryan- 



23 




"Challenge of the Cross" 
Two little morons 
Valuable factors 



SIGMA BETA RHO 

Sigma Beta Rho was organized to bring those 
students going into full-tinne Christian service 
into closer fellowship, in order that student 
religious activities might be correlated into one 
organization, and that weekly meetings might 
be held for worship and inspiration. 

Many of the students of the campus feel the 
need of meditation before the hurry of the day 
begins, and they hove found the morning prayer 
meetings the answer to their needs. These 
have been inspirational and helpful to the cam- 
pus life. 

The Witnessing Bond has been active this 
year, although handicapped by gas rationing. 
Members hove held services in ten churches. 

This year Sigma Beta Rho has had a new 
activity In its program, the Gospel Quartet, 
which sang or conducted services in twenty-one 
churches where they were given a fine welcome. 

SIGMA TAU DELTA 

This is the seventh year of the Sigma Tou 
Delta chapter on the campus. The meetings 
ore held at the home of Dr. West and consist 
of reports on current books of lasting interest. 

The induction ceremony for four new mem- 
bers was held April 12. 

The purpose of the society is to enjoy litera- 
ture and to create the desire to write. 

SIGMA ZETA 

The Sigma Zeto honorary science society is 
a national organization whose purpose is to 
encourage scientific study and to recognize stu- 
dents of high scholorship in the natural sciences 
and mathematics. The Beta Chapter at 
McKendree College was organized in 1926. 

The Chapter opened the school year 1942- 
1943 with four active members: J. Frank Glot- 
felty, Paul Griffin, Russel Drennon, and Dr. 
Stowell. During the year the following new 
pledges were initiated: Cyril Curtis, Robert 
Donnebrink, Ross Hortin, James Loy, Malcolm 
Myres, and Earnest Smith. 

Dr. E. R. Spencer and Professor S. M. McClure 
have retained their membership in the Beta 
Chapter. Dr. Spencer's work on "Just Weeds" 
has become widely known. Professor McClure 
has devised a system for the classification of 
geological specimens, which was used in organi- 
zing the Waggoner Collection at McKendree 
College, and has since been used to classify a 
similar collection at Boll State Teachers' 
College, Muncie, Indiana. 

The Chapter has revived the Waggoner 
Memorial Award, which is given each year to 
some student in recognition of outstanding 
scientific work. The winner of the award will 
be announced at the Commencement exercises. 




°. Baker, Bruning, N. Baker, Harmon, Osborn, Searles, Barter, Odum, Stadge, Turner, Kennedy, Stadge, 

Gannon, Stalllngs, Gulley, Ryan, Devore, Owens, Whittemore, Lowe, Book, Dr. Yost, Deon Conrow, Dr. Brown, 

Chadwell, Dr. Walton, Rev. Williams, Attey 

Hauser, Karraker, Cannon, Harshborger, Dr. Yost, Dr. West, Kean. 
Smith, Hortln, Curtis, Dean Stowell, Drennon. Donnenbrink, Loy 



Presidents: 

Charles Chadwell (I] 

Paul Baker (2) 

Vice-President: 
Donald Harmon 

Secretaries: 

George Kennedy 

Beatrice Attey 

Program Chairmen: 

Beatrice Attey 

Wilbert Cannon 



President: 
Joyce Ann Kean 

Vice-President: 
Barbara Channbers 

Secretary-Treasurer: 
Wilbert Cannon 



President: 
J. Frank Glotfelty 

Vice-President: 
Paul Griffin 

Recorder-Treasurers: 

Russel Drennan (I) 

Robert Donnenbrink (2) 



25 




Y. W. C. A. 



Dreaming o^ a white campus 

Funnies fans 

Stage Stooges 



The goals of the Association: 

1. To understand the work of the area, and of 

the Y. W. in general 

2. To promote an interest In world citizenship. 
These were studied and well carried out 

through the regular meetings held each 
Wednesday night. The association fulfilled its 
requirements to become a participating "Y" in 
the National Organization. Several of the offi- 
cers attended a conference in November at 
Macomb. They also plan to send a represen- 
tative to the Loke Geneva Conference during 
the Summer. 

The Y. W. porticlpated with the Y. M. and 
the Administration In the sacrificial meal for 
the W.S.S.F. Many of Its members were blood 
donors for the Red Cross. For the children in 
the mountain districts of the South, it sent a box 
of toys from the "Y" Christmas party and 
later a box of Children's books. For war work 
a few of its members knitted for Red Cross. It 
also co-operated with the Y. M. In planning 
social activities for the campus. 

Y. M. C. A. 

Early in the school year Dr. hiarold Colvin, 
regional secretary of the Y.M.C.A. visited our 
campus, and after talking with him our "Y" 
voted to become affiliated with the national 
student "Y" group. 

They were instrumental in getting for a chapel 
speaker. Dr. Wilhelm Solzbocher, a represen- 
tative of the World Student Service Fund. After 
hearing his presentation of the work and of the 
urgent need for funds to corry on, the Y.M. 
in co-operation with the Y. W. and the college 
administration, arranged for the students and 
faculty members to observe a sacrificial meal. 
Income of which was $21.00, which was sent into 
the national headquarters of W.S.S.F. 

UTTLE THEATRE 

The dramatics organization, Little Theatre, 
grew to be a large group by the second 
semester for its membership increased from four 
to twenty-five. The regular meeting programs 
were well planned and well attended throughout 
the year. The open sessions revealed talent and 
the party sponsored in March was a huge 
success. 

It was on active organization, for it worked 
with the play-production class in sponsoring the 
Homecoming play, "What A Life," the Christ- 
mas ploy, "No Room In The hHotel," "The Chal- 
lenge Of The Cross," and the one-act spring 
plays. It took time, effort, and talent, but It was 
worth it all, from the viewpoints of participants 
and audiences. 



26 




Ball, Harshbarger, Koerber, Bcnney, Mrs. Hetenstein, Hauser, Slephens, Miss Charles, Kampmeyer, Miss 
Conrow, Kirk, Barger, Miller, Veotch. Rittenhouse, Young. Bergman, Pritchard, Beaty, Hacknnann, Book, 

Attey, Keen, Karroker, Dewhirct 

Chodwell, Cannon, Smith, Bcker, Curtis. Devore 

Kirk. Young, Devore, Kennedy, Bruning, Baker, Searles, Phillips, Beaty, Dewhirst, Apple, Kruh, Koerber, 
Cooper, Barger, Veach, Ryan, Stadge, Miss Krughoff, Horshborger, Lueking, Smith, Cannon, Robinson, 

Nothdurft, Miller, Stephens, Attey 



President: 

Beatrice Attey 

Vice-President: 

Laverne Book 

Program Chairman: 

Joyce Ann Kean 

Secretary-Treasurer: 

Jane Hackmann 

Social Chairman: 

Louise Karraker 

Pianist: 

Ethel Dewhirst 

Sponsors: 

Miss Marion Conrow 

Mrs. C. J. Stowell 



President: 

Gehl Devore 

Vice-President: 

Pcul Baker 

Secretary-Treasurer: 

Earnest Snnith 

Chaplain: 

Wilbert Cannon 

Pianist: 

Cyril Curtis (I) 

James Agles (2) 

Social Chairman: 

Charles Chodwell (I) 

Calvin Ryan (2) 

Sponsors: 
H. C. Gutekunst 
Prof. R. B. Hohn 



Presidents: 

Frances Robinson (I) 

Frank Glotfelty (2) 

Vice-Presidents: 

Wilbert Cannon (I) 

Norman Baker (2) 

Secretary -Treasurers: 

Harold Nothdurft (I) 

Louise Beaty (2) 



27 




American Beauty — roses! 

Review Staff 

Printer's dummies 



"M" CLUB 

The "M" Club is an organization of all men 
who have earned a letter. Membership is 
granted to only the highest type of athlete who 
stands for pure sportsmanship. Five new mem- 
bers were added to the "M" Club roll this 
year. 

The senior members who will receive valuable 
emblems ore Ross hlortin, Lewis Winterrowd, 
James Loy, Malcolm Myres, Donald Hartman 
and Paul Griffin. 

The election and the crowning of the hHome- 
coming Queen was sponsored by the club. The 
queen was elected by popular vote instead of 
the money vote as formerly done. Shirley 
Bergman, o Freshman from Belleville, reigned as 
queen of hHomecoming activities. 

REVIEW STAFF 

The McKendree Review has been serving the 
college for twenty-two years. The Review is 
published every two weeks of the school year 
except during vacations. 

The staff, which has been quite active this 
year, is composed of the members of the classes 
in journalism. The editorial positions are open 
only to those students who hove completed the 
course in elementary journalism. hHowever, 
anyone interested in journalistic writing may 
serve as a reporter. 

REVIFW STAFF 
EDITOR: 

Ruth Hauser (I) 
CO-EDITORS: 

Joyce Ann Kean (2) , Edith Rittenhouse 
BUSINESS MANAGER: 

Calvin Ryan (I), Estil Ellis (2) 
FEATURE EDITOR: 

Louise Korraker 
FEATURE WRITERS: 

William Searles, Gerald Gulley 
COPY READERS: 

Morie Leuking, Ruth Koerber 
CIRCULATION MANAGER: 

Maxine Boll 
ASST. CIRCULATION MANAGERS: 

Betty Kirk, Bill Carson 
SPORTS MANAGER: 

Lewis Winterrowd 
SPORTS WRITERS: 

Jim Loy, Arthur hHInson, Robert Dannenbrlnk 

TYPIST: 

Gwendolen Veatch 

SPONSOR: 

Mrs. hi. C. Gutekunst 



28 




President: 
James Loy 

Vice-President: 
Ross Hor+in 

Secretory-Treasurer: 
George Kennedy 



McKENDREAN STAFF 

They've corned out rheir 
purpose of presenting a 
year book of which you 
can always be proud. They 
hove worked under more 
than usual difficulties, but 
they did it willingly and 
cheerfully. Ross hlortin 
with his easy-going man- 
ner, and Dr. West with her 
friendly urge have won the 
full cooperation of the 
staff members who gave 
their time for the love 
of it. 



BOYS' QUARTET 

This fine group of men's 
voices sang at various 
churches and gatherings 
throughout the school 
year. They were also wel- 
comed at entertoinmenls 
on the Hill many times. 



Keck, Hortin, Myres, Winterrowd, Hortman, Griffin, Schroeder, Donnenbrink, Logan, Hinson, Loy, Kennedy 

Cannon, Stephens, Agles, Wright, Miller, Hortin, Salmon, Cook, Dewhirst, Hackmonn, Lopinot, Attey, 

Dr. West 

First Tenor, Nothdurft; Second Tenor, Agles; Baritone, Glotfelty; Bass, hfartmon 




GLEE CLUB 

Another school year has passed, and once 
again the chorus of fine young voices has been 
lifted in song. The members were very sorry 
to see Miss Ridgway leave, but they were 
happy to welcome Mrs. Lesher who has been a 
charming and capable director. 

The Glee Club this year has visited the 
Methodist Churches in East St. Louis, Granite 
City, and Centralia. The members also song 
at our own Methodist College Church in 
Lebanon, and at chapel services. Six concerts 
were scheduled for April, and on May 26, the 
Glee Club presented on oratorio by Mendel- 
ssohn, "The hHymn of Praise." A public recital 
of piano and voice students was also held in 
May. One of the highlights of our social func- 
tions was the moonight skating party at Troy, 
Illinois. Another entertainment was the tea 
which the music department gave the first of 
May. 

GIRLS' SEXTETTE 

Six interesting personalities blend into a 
group of lovely voices chosen from the Glee 
Club to make up the sextette. This chorus sang 
at Edwordsville, Wood River, and East Alton 
on April II. They also toured numerous high 
schools, and they song at Scott Field one night. 

STUDENT-FACULTY COUNCIL 

The Student-Faculty council has served this 
year in the capacity of "Go-between". Prob- 
lems of facul+y and students were presented, 
considered, and acted upon. At Homecoming, 
plans for the occasion were delegated to com- 
petent committees that did their port in making 
it a grand success. A petition from the stu- 
dent body fcr changing the spring vacation 
period was presented. After passing the 
council, the administration approved, and the 
new dote was set. 

Members of the council were chosen with 
representatives from the two halls, the student 
body, the commuters, and those living in 
Lebanon. These met with selected faculty 
members to discuss problems, needs and im- 
provements. The council is a means of demo- 
cratic thinking and living on the campus. 



"Yes, George?" 

Library Labor 

Gathering in the Sheaves 



30 





Har+man 

President: 
Donald Hartman 

Vice-President: 
Earnest Smith 

Social Chairman: 
Frances Robinson 



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Boyd, Cook, Martin, Kruh, Burge, Baker, No*hdurf+, Schwarzlose, Ryan, Dewhirst, Young, Smith, Agles, 

Winter, Kennedy, Phillips, Kean, Kampmeyer, Kirk, Bergman, Korraker, Blvens, Beaty, Prlchord, Rittenhouse, 

Luekmg, Robinson, Koerber, Miss Ridgway, Cooper, Boll, Miller 

Young, Dewhirst, Bergmon, Karroker, Miller, Cooper 

Chadv/ell, Harmon, Griffin, Dean Baker, Professor Hohn. Devore. Miss Conrow, Miss Wilson, Baker, Dr. Yost, 

Book, Dr. Walton 



First Sopranos: 
Thelma Youncj 
Shirley Bergman 

Second Sopranos: 

Ethel Dewhirst 

Louise Karraker 

Contraltos: 
Shirley Miller 
Ruth Cooper 



Chairman: 
Dr. C. R. Yost 

Secretaries: 

Paul Baker (I) 

Cyril Curtis (2) 

Frances Robinson (2) 




ALPHA PSI OMEGA 

The local cast of the honorary dramatic 
fraternity, Alpha Psi Omega, began the school 
year with a small membership, but several 
students became eligible through the hlome- 
coming play, "What A Life." Three of these, 
Shirley Miller, Gehl Devore and Earnest Smith, 
were initiated into the Alpha Theto cast at an 
initiation service held at the home of Mrs. 
Grace Renner Welch on February 24th. Miss 
Marion Conrow and Frances Robinson were also 
inltioted ot the some time, both having become 
eligible at an earlier date. A social evening 
followed this Initiation. 

There was a program and social meeting held 
at the home of Miss Alleen Wilson In April and 
the May meeting took the form of a garden 
party to which members brought guests. 

BETA BETA BETA 

Tri Beta Is an honorary biological fraternity, 
established in colleges granting the Bachelor 
of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degrees. 
Students who ore definitely interested in ad- 
vancing science and In studying the natural or 
biological and allied sciences, compose its 
membership. 

The McKendree College chapter at the time 
of the printing of the McKendreon, has just 
been established. Four meetings have been 
held. Two sessions per month ore being 
planned at which interesting scientific facts will 
be presented and discussed, or field trips taken 
to Shaw's Gardens in St. Louis, to visit the large 
St. Louis hospitals, to see their equipment and 
to other scientific places. 

A party was given by Miss Charles, at which 
Dr. E. Spencer was the guest speaker. 



BAND 



Among the outstanding social activities on 
the campus, Cannon's band has a hand. It 
helped to create on Interest and did much to 
develop school spirit. The monthly "pop con- 
certs" were entertaining and the social hours 
following were fun. 

Both the Homecoming and the Spring con- 
certs were successful in their presentations. The 
reed sextette within the band is "the something 
new that has been added." A great deal of 
new music was purchased and forced extra 
hours of practice, but the practice was not in 
vain, for all who heard the bond appreciated 
the talent displayed, and Mr. Cannon's inter- 
pretations. 



The Youngest McKendreon 

Mrs. Welch, Mrs. Lesher 

Strike up the Bond! 




Director: 
J. Frank Glo+felty 

Sub-Director: 
Frances Robinson 

Secretary -Tree surer: 
Gehl Devore 

Faculty Director: 
Mrs. Grace Welch 



President: 
Donald Hartnnan 

Secretary: 
Arthur hiinson 

K'/orlon: 
M" '-^-i Joseph 

Faculty Sponsor: 
Miss Neva I. Charles 



President: 
Gehl Devore 

Secretory-Treasurer: 
Cyril Curtis 

Librarian: 
Ruth Koerber 



Devore. Glotfelty, Smith, Miss Wilson, Miss Conrow, Mrs. Welch, Robinson, Miller 

Angle, Odum, D. Hortmon, Freshcur, Monken, Miss Charles, Joseph, Hinson 

Hesse, Konnpmeyer, Grodeon, Grown, Glctfelty, Dewhirst, Agles, Kruh, Swindle, Cannon, Nolan, Myres, 

Boker, Shofer, Brasel, Cook, Hubbard. Dannenbrink, Koerber 




BASKETBALL SQUAD 

Curtailed by the war, the Bearcats played 
only seven games this season. Inexperience 
and height were the factors that kept the 
Purple and White from having a winning com- 
bination. The squad trained hard and fought 
valiantly all season, and there has never been a 
team on the campus that has known more 
companionship and mutual-dependence than 
the war-time Purple and Whites. 



THE KITTYCUBS 

That hord-fightlng bunch of girls that scrap 
on the hardwood under the banner of the 
Kittycubs have chalked up another successful 
year. 

Because of gas and tire rationing the team 
was unable to leave the campus. The town girls 
afforded many a moment of play. 

Only one member of the varsity will graduate 
in June, so the '43-'44 team should hit the 
hardwood In tip-top shape. 



W. A. A. 

The Women's Athletic Association raised its 
membership from eight to thirteen. Initiations 
were fun and the programs were interesting. 
The after Christmas gift exchange party was 
novel, to soy the least. We all enjoyed the 
skating party that W.A.A. sponsored at Troy, 
and the "splash" party was refreshing after the 
final semester exams and just before the old 
school bell dismissed activities for the year. 



Two points 
Waiting patiently 
Graceful gaielles 



34 




:oach Church, Salmon, Lowe, Devore, Porter, Bu-ge, Hortin. Wright, Hinson, Loy, Harmon, Win+errowd, 

Myres, Donnenbrink 
/each. Kirk, Dewhirst, Young, Blvens, Hacltmann, Kean, Barger, Bonney, Stephens, Cooper, Koerber, Beaty, 

Hauser, Harshbarger, Ball, Lueking 

Robinson, Stephens, Hauser, Dr. West, Lueklng. Cooper, Koerber, Veach, Harshbarger, Dewhirst, Hackmann, 

Beaty, Bivens, At+ey, Kirk, Barger, Ball, Prichord, Young 



SCHEDULE 






Mc.K. 


Opp. 


Scott Field 


30 


32 


Centralia Jr. 


33 


63 


Blackburn 


33 


53 


Centralia Jr. 


23 


42 


Lebanon Ind. 


37 


25 



TOURNAMENT AT 
BLACKBURN 

Blackburn 37 50 

Harris Teachers 43 49 



Co-Captains: 

Ruth Hauser 
Eunice Bivins 



President: 
Maxine Ball 

Vice-President: 
Wanda Barger 

Secretory: 
Eunice Bivins 

Treasurer: 
Jane Hackmann 



35 




—■"^p:^^ 



Porter 


Winterrowd 


Salmon 


Harmon 


Burge 


Hinson 



Ley 



BASKETBALL LETTERMEN 

Archie Porter, Freshman, 

Rosiclare, Forward, First-year letterman. 

Archie was short, but he was fast and cagey. He was a vicious 
fighter and had good scoring ability, hie played brilliant boll in 
the Blackburn game. Archie still hos plenty of time to show the 
basketball world his abilities. He has 3 more years of basketball 
aheod of him. 

Captain Lewis Winterrowd, Senior, 

Bible Grove, Center, Third-year letterman. 

Again the squad was led by Lewie. He set an excellent example 
for the rest of the squad to follow. He played under the handicap 
of two bad ankles all season, but he never gave up or complained. 
No matter what the score might be, Lewie drove hard and did 
his best to win. He was the leading scorer and key-man of the 
Bearcats. Lewie played brilliantly in the tournament at Blackburn. 
It will be very hard to replace Lewie next year at the center position. 
Although he leaves, we know he will always be bock of the Mc- 
Kendree team. Lewie's spirit, fight and ability will live on in the 
minds of his teammates. 

Paul Salmon, Sophomore, 

Mound City, Guard, First-year letterman. 

As a first-year letterman "Jock" played exceptionally good 
boll. He ployed a consistent gome at guard and could always be 
counted upon to bring the boll across the line. "Jock" played his 
best game against Centralia Junior College. He has two more 
years with the cagers and should be an essential man in building 
the future teams. 

Don Harmon, Junior, 

Louisville, Guard, First-year letterman. 

Don was one of the most dependable men on the Bearcats. He 
always played a cool, steady gome and he always deposited his 
share of points and played good defensive boll of all times. He 
will be back next year and should be the nucleus around which the 
team can be built. 

Fletcher Burge, Freshman, 

Eldorado, Forword, First-year letterman. 

Fletch was one of the high scorers of the "Cats." He was 
consistent in his ploy, both on offense and defense. He was on 
artist on one-hand shots. He was even-tempered and always took 
things in stride. He still has three years and will undoubtedly 
prove himself a valuable asset to the McKendree cagers in years 
to come. 

Arthur hiinson. Junior, 

Madison, Guard, First-year letterman 

"Stinky" was short, but fast and aggressive. He played to 
win and gave the game all he hod. He started' off as manager and 
then turned in tiis first-aid kit for a suit. He sow quite a bit of 
action, and proved himself on essential port of the team. He was 
always In good physical condition and ready to go. He still has 
another year and should go places In basketball. 

James Loy, Senior, 

Effingham, Guard, First-year letterman. 

Jim was a key man In the "Cots" defense. He was always 
alert and fighting. He played to win and always gave all he hod. 
He played exceptionally well in the tournament at Blackburn in 
February. He will be sadly missed by his teammates when the 
season rolls around next year. 



36 



INTRAMURAL 
BASKETBALL 



Two intramural basketball tournaments 
have been held this year. The first was won 
by Don Harmon's team. In the second 
tournament, Surge's and Myres' teams are 

tied for the lead. 

Intramurals this year have brought good 
spirit to the campus, many fellows played 
basketball in the tournameni- that never 
played before. Intramurals are valuable in 
many ways and should continue on the 
campus in years to come. 

As part of the Homecoming program, the 
traditional rivalry between the literary so- 
cieties was meted out in the form of a 
basketbal game. Plato defeated their arch- 
rivals, Philo, in the game played on Novem- 
ber 14, 1942, the score being 50-33. Plato 
jumped into on early lead and was never 
threatened by Philo. Myres was the big gun 
for Philo with 16 points. Salmon, Winter- 
rowd, and Keck each collected 12 points for 
Plato. Plato's basketball team had every- 
thing including a water-girl in the form of 
"Bugs" Bergman. 

Box Score: 

PLATO 

Player— Pos. Fg. Ft. TP. 

Ryan F 

Keck F 6 12 

Griffin F 2 I 5 

Harmon F 2 4 

Wmterrowd C 5 2 12 

Loy G I 2 

Salmon G 6 12 

Donnenbrink G I I 3 

Hartman G 



Totals— 23 



PHILO 

Player — Pos. 

Agles F 

Kennedy F 

Curtis F 

Nothdurft F 

Myres C 

Smith G 

Devore G 

Hortin G 

—Totals— 12 



50 



Fq. 


Ft. 


TP. 











1 





2 


1 





2 











8 





16 











2 


8 


12 





1 


1 




33 



37 




WHAT A LIFE 

"Enter to learn — Go forth to serve" is more or less the appropriate motto which is 
placed over the door of the principal's office where the scenes in our hiomecoming play, 
"What A Life", take place. Of course our hero, hHenry Aldrich, tries to set a shining 
example for his classmates! The example which he actually succeeds in setting, results in 
numerous bench-warmings In Mr. Bradley's office. Because of Barbara Pearson, Hlenry has 
a misunderstanding with his history teacher. Finally, heart-rending problems are solved, but 
not until his escapades have led to such complications that the audience has hod many 
good laughs. The cost was well-chosen, and we agree that this play truly deserves its 
title, "What A Life." 



CAST 

Miss Shea BEATRICE ATTEY 

Mr. Nelson NORMAN BAKER 

A Student RUTH COOPER 

Mr. Patterson hHAROLD NOTHDURFT 

Miss Pike LOUISE BEATY 

Bill CALVIN RYAN 

Miss Eggleston ETHEL DEWHIRST 

Miss Johnson MARGARET HARSHBARGER 

Mr. Vecchitto ROBERT KRUGH 

Henry Aldrich EARNEST SMITH 

Barbara Pearson SHIRLEY MILLER 

Gertie FRANCES ROBINSON 

Mr. Bradley GEHL DEVORE 

Miss Wheeler MARIE LUEKING 

George Bigelow MAX APPLE 

Mrs. Aldrich GLORIA STEPHENS 

Mr. Gerguson GEORGE T. KENNEDY 

Mary VIRGINIA PHILLIPS 

Students BETTY KIRK, ROBERT STADGE 



38 



NO ROOM IN THE HOTEL 

This modern Christmas play is full of humor, yet it carries with it an undercurrent of 
pathos and inspiration. It portrays a hard-boiled newspaper reporter as the only one of a 
varied gathering in o small hotel whose character is changed by the appearance of a poor 
couple strangely similar to another pair who were once refused admittance to an inn 
many centuries ago. 

CAST 

A Man NORMAN BAKER 

A Woman BETTY KIRK 

A Clerk WANDA BARGER 

A Reporter EARNEST SMITH 

A Traveling Man WILLIAM SEARLES 

A Scrub Woman SHIRLEY MILLER 

A Bell Boy CALVIN RYAN 

A Poetess GLORIA STEPHENS 

A Senator GEHL DEVORE 

A Senator's Wife THELMA YOUNG 

This ploy, produced by the Play Production class was under the able direction of Miss 
Mildred Krughoff, was enacted of the Methodist Church and college chapel during 
Christmas week. 



CHALLENGE OF THE CROSS 

At the beginning of the school year, college members of the young Peoples' League 
at the Methodist Church presented an interesting pageant entitled, "The Challenge of 
the Cross". 

The message of this ploy is: "If any man would come after me, let him deny him- 
self and take up his cross daily, and follow me." Luke 9:23. 

CAST 

The Evangel . BEATRICE ATTEY 

Disciples FRANCES ROBINSON, EDITH PRICHARD, GLORIA STEPHENS, 

DONALD LOWE, WILLIAM SEARLES, WILLIAM STALLINGS 



SPRING PLAYS 

Because of war-time pressure on McKendree campus no Spring ploy was given, but 
at the time the Annual went to press, a group of one-act ploys sponsored by Little 
Theatre were being prepared. Costs were not yet selected. 



39 




Hi 



ECOMIING 
U 



Miss Shirley Bergman, a quiet dignified Freshman, has 
captivated many a heart on this Old hiill, and she reigns 
supreme as our Homecoming Queen of October, 1942. 

Her popularity was proved by the fact that her 
election, which was sponsored by the "M" Club, was the 
result of popular vote. 

As Dr. Yost presented the bouquet of roses to our 
lovely Queen at the informal ceremony in Eisenmier, he 
paid a worthy compliment to the Queens of both this 
yeor and last v/hen he said: 

"Lost year our Queen had hair radiant as if distilled 
of a thousand sunsets. This year our Queen has beauty 
with the darker shades like a painting from the Old Dutch 
Masters, and a voice lovely as the sound of many waters 
— our Minne-ha-ha, Shirley Bergman." 



SENIORS HAVING NO PICTURES 



BARARA WOOLARD CHAMBERS. A. B. 
East St. Louis. 

English 

President of Sigma Tou Delto, '42; President, W.A.A., '41; 
Member of Review Staff, '38-'40; Plays: "She Stoops to 
Conquer," "Trojan Women," "Quality Street" 



DOROTHY MAY TURRENTINE LINDSEY, A. B. 
East St. Louis. 
Music 

William Woods Junior College, Chorus, ■39-'40: Y.W.C.A. 



•38-'40; Triata Club 
43; Kitty Cubs, '41 



■40; Glee Club, ■4l-'43; Y.W.C.A., '41 



JAMES AARON CONNETT, A. B. 
Marissa. 
Religion 

Sigma Beta P.ho; Little Theatre; Tennis, '36; Y.M.C.A. Cab- 
inet, '36; Glee Club, •35-'36; "Dollars to Doughnuts," "Little 
Women" 



JUNE MILLER, A. B. 
Lebonon. 
Music 

Glee Club, ■39-'4l, Secretary-Treasurer. '40- 
tet1e, '40-'4l; Girls' Basketball, '39-'4l; 
W.A.A., '39-'M; President of Clio, ■40-'4l; 
39-'40 



41; Girls' Sex- 
Clio, '40-'42; 
Little Theater, 



JOHN FRANK GLOTFELTY. B. S. 
O'Fallon, 

Mathematics 
Philo, '40-'43; Faculty-Student Council, '40-'42; McKendrean, 
'42; Alpha PsI Omega, ■4l-'43; Director, '43; Sigma Zeta, 
'42-'43, President, '43; Little Theater, '41 -'43, President, '43; 
Band, '4l-'43, Business Manager, '41; Treasurer of Glee 
Club, '4I'43; Men's Quartet, '43; "Saturday Evening 
Ghost." "Our Town" 

THADDEUS J. FORBES, B. S. 
East St. Louis 
Chemistry 

University of Missouri, Extension, '34-'35; Washington Uni- 
versity, '37-'38 



40 



SENIOR CLASS HIISTOiR.Y 



By JAMES OPPITZ 




Oppitz 



THE FIGHTING FORTY THIRD! 

So a buck sergeant wearing a moldy old Bearcat T-shirt says to his almost constant 
companion, a Model-T corporal who has a crooked nose from the Shurtleff gome in 1941, "I 
wonder what the gang is doing at the Coke 'N' Smoke about now!" They ore lying in a muddy 
fox hole on Guadoconol, but they might just as well be crawling on their bellies in Lake Beautiful 
— certainly the mosquitoes, couldn't be any worse! 

You see, these boys ore McKendreons too, but they don't have to worry about taking more 
than their quota of chapel cuts nor getting up for those miserable 7:40's — we have a guy with a 
brass horn who takes core of getting the boys u p on time. 

For every degree that is handed out when our class marches into the Chapel for the last 
time, there is at least another member of that rough and tough "fightin' forty-third" out there some- 
where — maybe flying a PBY on coastal patrol, maybe jeeping along the African desert, maybe 
holding hands with some WAAC in the service club. His job is not confined to such tasks as 
raking leaves, sweeping out the halls over in Old Main, or washing up the pots and pons in 
MeKendree's "mess hall" — there's no Clifford Cotes to spur him on to the higher things in life nor 
a Liza Jane to haggle with over time sheets. 

His job is far from completion; he's counting on our V-7 and ERC boys to carry on with 
the work he has already started. How con you beat a bunch of guys who used to sing "My 
Gal Sol" out on the football field when the going got a little rough? The same spirit that mode 
our McK'ers stand up on their hind legs and bellow for their rights although miserably outclassed 
and out numbered is now at work for Uncle Sam. How can we lose? 

This class of '43 might well be termed the "War Class." Less than a week after Hitler's 
goose-stepping divisions marched unexpectedly into Poland, this class was going through the tedious 
ordeal of registering for its first semester in college. Yes, it's been almost four years. We saw 
the Finns and the Russians fight, we stood by as Japan plundered and raped innocent China, we 
learned of the treachery of the fifth column in Norway, we saw the blitzkreig overwhelm bewildered 
France, we sweated through Dunkirk, we withstood the terrific pounding of the Luftwaffe on the tight 
little island, our blood boiled at Coventry and later at Lidice, we welcomed the occupation of 
Iceland, and we started buying defense stamps. With o personal interest we experienced the first 
peace-time draft in the history of our country, we argued pro and con on lend-lease, we approved 
Pan-Americanism, we voted for Wendell Wilkie and elected Roosevelt for a third term, we 
watched Hitler knife Joe Stalin in the back only to become mired down in Napoleon's foot- 
steps — we cussed and raved and ranted over Japanese treachery and the ruthless ossult on Pearl 
Harbor. Even Dean Stowell dismissed his class to listen to the Congress declare war. You all 
know the rest of the story. 



ENIIOR CLA 



TORY 




ASHBY 



MITCHELL 



BRAUER 



MILLER 



Not so long ago these things were rather far away from us: other things were of more 
Importance. If, however, we were to approach our sergeant in the Guadaconal fox hole, he could 
tell us far more about Herb Gould's stall system of basketball thon he could about the weaknesses 
of the Maglnot Line. Do you think those guys bull about the Italian navy, or do they talk about the 
good old days back on the hiill when broads were broads and men were not 4-F? So before we 
forget about this forty-third let's go back to do a little reminiscing — because after all, isn't one 
of the four freedoms the right to hold bull sessions whenever one pleases. 

Do you remember that siege of registration we went through — tests, orientation, inter- 
views, the Y-mixer, the President's reception, and the free show, down at the Alamo — "Good Bye, 
Mr. Chips," If we recall correctly. It was all so confusing, but we didn't mind. We were new 
at this game, and eoger to learn. And do you remember our election of bashful Jungle Jim Agles 
as our president and how they'd always kidnap him when we were going to have a meeting? And 
what about that miserably rainy Monday night we gathered in that tiny garage right off Lebanon's 
great white way and went out to the overhead to hold what was conceded to be the least success- 
ful Freshman party in the history of the school? We'll never forget how Worry Wart Ashby, our 
custodian of the Bear, got three rides that night because he beat the upperclassmen back to school 
every time they took him out. And do you remember Ray Brouer, our ex-bartender, Johnnie Rawlin- 
son. Mace Petty, Big Don Mohan, Moggie hHursey, "that pleasing personality," and all the rest of our 
colorful greenies. htow proud we were of those green cops we paid o buck for, and we tipped them 
too, more diligently than has any class that has followed us. And soy, what about that Chapel pro- 
gram we presented starring "Wang de Gong" Griffin and "Meece" (half moose — half mouse) Tim- 
mons, Timmons and Braeutlgam and the motorcycles they later traded for Gl aircraft, the winter 
it got so cold we had to wear pajamos under our slacks, and the death of the social fraternities? 
And didn't we hold the first celebration of Sadie HIawkins Week? Of course, things we will not soon 
forget were Al Johnpeter and his Mudcats, the Bearcat Special Bus, the first celebration of the 
Happy Founders' Day, our siege of rots, and not two-legged ones either, the way Helen Mitchell 
used to faint In class and how we'd cover her up and just go on as though nothing had happened 
— the thrill of living beneath the canopy of green that first spring of ours on the beautiful Mc- 
Kendree campus. We were a fresh bunch, but McKendree soon felt our presence — without Cor- 
zine, Griffin, Hortin, the Timmons boys. Petty, Hartman, Braeutigom, and the rest of our athletes 
the Review's sports page might just as well hove been edged In black; we won the Dorris Oratori- 
cal contest that first year; and we soon took over positions of leodership in all of the organizations 
and activities. 



42 



ENIIOR CLA 




And then came our second year with Paul Griffin as our president. We recall the way 
"My Gal Sol" helped us lick Mission House end LaSolle-Peru and how Sol became the sweet- 
heart of the campus, the hayride our class sponsored, how Prof. Hardy and the boys used to go 
out for on afternoon of Nub Nub, the game in which Don Hortmon lost fourteen pounds and still 
weighed more than two-hundred, the new McKendree Bookstore now carrying the largest stock in 
history, those Mondoy mornings after glee club trips, the night Oakland City scored I I I points 
ogainst the "hungry five," the Bowler-Bowler-Bowier romance, Philo, Plato, and Clio's invasion of 
Hotel Melbourne in St. Louis for a formal banquet, Louis Winterrowd's great struggle to put on 
weight, those dormitory hair-cuts we used to get for fifteen cents with a worn-out shirt thrown in, 
and the many other things that make college life so interesting. 

With Griffin once again at the helm we literally took over the campus our Junior year — 
the Seniors were too busy planting trees and picking out graduation announcements. More of the 
members of our class were literary society members than was true of any of the other classes in 
school and we held important positions in these organizations, too. We hod several fingers, and 
in some cases even a thumb, in every pie that formed the McKendree activity picture. We 
weren't too busy leading the glee clubs and quartettes, captaining the basketball team, editing the 
Review, compiling the annual, serving on the Focuolty-Student council, and doing the million and 
one things that send one's grades to the depths — we weren't too busy to hove fun. Do you remem- 
ber how we used to get a gong up and go downtown for a PC, and how we used to cut Religion 
on Wednesday mornings so we could listen to the new selections, on the "vie" down at the grill, 
that night Philo served cider and vitamin pills for open session? Thot was the year Salmon's 
Freshmen pulled a fast one by holding their party in the middle of the night. It was our lost 
season of football — we had sixteen on the team and that included the coach, Mrs. Scholl, the 
woter-boy, and Frank Harris. The team was kicked around all yeor but did plenty of kicking in 
return. And what about that Screwy Whiskey Shoots lingo. Gay and Debbon forced Into the 
McKendrean's venacular. After December 7th we found McKendreons one-by-one dropping out of 
school or enlisting, in various reserve corps. The Forty-third answered with Timmons, Record, and 
Broeutlgam to the Naval Air Corps, Myres and Curtis to the Army Air Force, and Hortin, Hartmon, 
Loy and Agles to the Naval Reserve. In addition, we already hod men serving from Australia to 
Cairo, from Icelond to Shongrl-Lo. 

Even by stretching our imagination, this past year could hardly be compared with Custer's 
lost stand, but things hove been different what v/ith V-moil, rotioning — and no Tepatti. We mode 
it through, however, and with the proverbial flying colors, too. Paul Baker and Cyril Curtis were 
elected as presidents of the McKendree Association. Our class officers were Jim Agles, Presi- 
dent; Ross Hortin, Vice-President; Frankie Robinson, Secretory-Treasurer; with Jim Loy, a third- 
termer capably filling the post of Sergeont-at-orms. Ethel Dewhirst was our lovely Queen of the 
May. Our Homecoming was still a gay affair and the Forty-third led the way In the fashion 
parade the day before. 



HISTORY 




n 
^^^ji 




BRAEUTIGAM 



TIMMONS 



TEPATTI 



REGARD 



Our little bull session has been sketchy to soy the least. We might toss orchids to Curtis and 
Chadwell on their scholarship, to LaVerne for her sincerity, to Winterrowd for his basketball 
record, to Fronkie for her spirit, to Griffin for being an all-around good guy, to Myres for his nose 
— but this could go on indefinitely. We lost ogood friend ond another "good guy" In Dr. Dolley. 

Of course, we weren't always a bunch of angels. hHow about that fight we had In the Chapel 
when footlights were popping like a machine gun, or that sign we out up on the girls' dorm that 
night, or the time spontoneous combustion burst forth in the Review office, those victory hair-cuts 
the Freshmen asked us to give them, the night the football team was locked out of the dining hall, 
the formation of the ITK's — the Intelligence, Temperance, the Kindness boys, or the time Coach 
Gould ordered us to get the referee on the next play, or the way we used to steal over to classes 
after cutting a 7:40 or 8:35 for fear we would meet the teacher face to face, or the ofternons we 
used to hitch over to St. Louis to visit the legitmate theatre, or all those songs we used to sing 
on football trips, how we used to go out for those early morning swims out at the Country Club, 
or the night we serenaded the girls from atop the dining hall, the day Braeutlgam dive-bombed 
the Chapel, our first good-night kiss beneath those bright lights over at Clark Hall, and all the 
time we were yelling for a dim-out, and those many dates that were kept over at the library and 
not downtown or out beneath the moon because of study hours. Undoubtedly, we put our shore 
of grey hairs in Dr. Yost's head! 

The Fighting Forty-third has been a great class — few could boast of having so many mem- 
bers carrying on extra-curricular activities in so many parts of the world. She has been important to 
McKendree because she is McKendree herself — a group of hearty youngsters fighting on against 
tremendous odds, fighting for their very existence, but ever confident of the victory in sight — and 
always cheered on by their "Comrades in Arms." 



UNC 



AMI'S BOY 



McKENDREE ROLL OF HONOR 



Charles E. Long, AA 
Delmar Beckemeyer, NA 
Arthur Baum, M 
George Edwards, NA 
Leiand Grieve, A 
Carrol Lowe, N 
Hugh Miles 
Harry Word, AA 
Earl Braeu+igam, NA 
An+one Tepatti, A 
Royce Timmons, NA 
Roy Griebel, A 
Richard Snyder, A 
Bernard Logan, N 
Kenneth Stegall 
Albert Johnpeter, N 
Marvin Butler, A 
John Harmon, A 
Milton Soger, A 
Joe Fizzell, A 
Cicero Burns, A 
Francis Martin 
James Oppitz, A 
Richard Record, NA 
Boyd Anderson, NA 
Roy Harris 
Walter Pimlott, NA 
Leslie Purdy, A 
Harold Todd, A 
Arthur Werle, A 
Robert Davis 
Don Davis 
MyrI Herman, AA 
Dale E. Hortin, A 
James Lyerlo 
William Ashby, A 
Warren Foeth, A 
Mason Petty, A 
Harry Grothjahn, N 
Bartley Greenwood, A 
Malcolm Randall, N 
Wayne Bise, NA 
Paul Correll 
Sol Ernst, AA 



Charles Hortin, A 
Glenn Sappington, A 
John Oppitz, A 
Wendell Phillips 
Russell Unverzagt 
Byron Baldridge 
Cecile Albright 
Kenneth Atkins 
George Breitwieser CG 
Charles Brinner 
Allen Cast 
Donald Cramer, A 
Ted Gibson 
Scott Gier, AA 
Calvin Johnson 
Leslie Lee 
Charles Mueth 
Curtis Taylor 
Gustov Kriezek 
Bernard Baldridge 
Robert Rucker 
Henry Harper 
Andrew Patterson, CG 
Lowell Pennell 
William Sanders 
Kenneth Wilson, NA 
Donald Woodburn, A 
Lawrence Fox 
Howard Williams, A 
Raymond Howe 
Arthur Huffman 
Harold Whitlock, A 
Josiah Cooper, Jr., A 
Gordon Huff, A 
Cyril Curtis, AA 
Alvin Lopinot, N 
Thomas Schwarzlose, A 
Roy Waggoner, A 
Robert Longenwolter, AA 
Harold Barrow, AA 
Raymond Hayes, N 
John Perry, A 
Harold Popelko, AA 
John Villaroso, AA 



Richard Wohlschlag, AA 
Arnold Eddings, A 
Curtis Burns, A 
Robert Kercher, AA 
Allen Scheffield, AA 
Robert Stoffel, A 
Joe Boer, AA 
Paul Buegel, AA 
Ernest Cook, AA 
Arthur Cotts, AA 
Charles Fenner, AA 
Robert Myers, AA 
Morris Paul, A 
Walton Russ, A 
Mouritz Sorensen, AA 
Frank Souder, AA 
Melvin Krummerich, A 
Milton Dressel, A 
Dean Kirkpatrick, A 
Paul Seibert, A 
John Bowler, A 
Paul Vanotta, A 
Raymond Fory, A 
Owen Williams, N 
Boyce Garvin, A 
Hubert Smith, A 
Paul Flesher, A 
Herbert Simons, N 
Ralph Logan 
Russell Gullett, AA 
Wayne Brewer, N 
Edgar Allen Agles, M 
Roy Joeckel, A 
Fred Doerner, A 
Charles Manwaring, A 
Robert Wining, A 
Holt Gay, AA 
Jorden Debbon, A 
Dr. H. E. Wallace, N 
Coach Lewis Scholl, N 
Coach A. K. Henderson, N 
James Pinkston, A 
James Grove, NA 



45 




Timmons* Anderson* Pimlo+t* 

Braeutigam Logan Henderson 

Word Scholl Tepatti Huff 

Above, Jonnes Oppifz 

Below, Dr. Wallace 

♦Official U. S. Navy Photograph. 



K!ENDIflEA\NS ALL 



Siesta 

See Here, Dr. Yost 

Burning the midnight annperes 

Ready and waiting 
The flowers that bloonn in the Spring, 

Tra-la 
Watch the birdie 
Try it yourself 
Huddle 
Steadies 
Know thyself 
Just we three 
Maypole 





SENIOR CLASS DAY PROGRAM 

May 14, 1943 

PRELUDE Mrs. Lindsey 

INVOCATION Charles Chadwell 

WELCOME Frances Robinson 

MUSIC Mole Quartet 

POEMS Barbara Woolard Chonnbers 

HISTORY Dale Winter 

TRUMPET DUET Ethel Dewhirst, Frank Glotfelty 

WILL Mo! Myres 

SOLO Donald hHartmon 

PRESENTATION OF GAVEL James Agles 

RESPONSE George Kennedy 

PROPhHECY Lewis Winterrowd 

HYMN "Blest Be The Tie That Binds" 

BENEDICTION Paul Baker 

ALMA MATER 



A GAY SPRING DAY 

FOR OUR QUEEN OF THE MAY 

We hove but to recall "Dewey's" smile and 
cheerful words, and we hove found an appropriate 
embodiment for this verse. 

True worth is in being, not seeming, — 
In doing, each day that goes by. 

Some little good — not in dreaming 
Of great things to do by and by. 

— Alice Corey. 

Our Queen was elected from the Senior class of 
1943 to reign as royalty at the annual May Day 
celebration. May 14. 

In the morning the Seniors presented a program 
in the Chape!, representative of the talent and 
ability of their group. Following the Class Day 
program they were accorded the usual Senior 
privilege of a "free day". 

Early in the afternoon, the student body as- 
sembled on the campus for the Senior Tree dedica- 
tion and the presentation of the Senior gift. 

Later in the afternoon, the Queen, Ethel 
Dewhirst, together with her train, wended her way 
to the throne on the front campus where the Queen 
was crowned by her Maid of Honor, Frances 
Robinson. 

Then followed special entertainment for the 
Queen and her following, together with the assem- 
bled spectators. This consisted of the traditional 
winding of the Maypole, and morris dances by 
girls of the various classes. A one-act play, a 
fontosy, by Rachel Field entitled "The Londonderry 
Air," was then enacted by a cost of four students. 

At six o'clock the faculty and students attended 
the Senior dinner in Pearson's Hall. 

May Day on McKendree's campus is a day for 
remembrance. 



TREE DEDICATION 

INVOCATION LoVerne Book 

MUSIC Sextette 

REMARKS Professor Hohn 

PRESENTATION OF TREE Ross Hortin 

RESPONSE Dr. Yost 

ALMA MATER 



WHO'S WHO 



Who's Who Among Students In American Universities, 
and Colleges, is a publication sponsored by six hundred 
colleges and universities to give national recognition to 
graduates of unusual potentialities for leadership. 



LaVERNE BOOK 

LaVerne's unflinching adherence to the highest Ideals of 
Christianity is the quality which above all, gives her a 
place of leadership at McKendree. in a day when moral 
standards are often shifty, she has remained steadfast. 



PAUL M. GRIFFIN 

When, lost year, "Wang" was hurt In an explosion in 
the Chemistry lab, then did we realize how much he is 
loved by everyone. We tried to take stock on his value, 
and we decided that above good scholarship, and above 
good sportsmanship, the fact that each of us felt him to 
be our special friend meant that he is about as companion- 
able as a person can be. 



PAUL BAKER 

During the two years that Paul has been among us he 
has assumed a very natural position of influence, because 
he was more widely read and more experienced than many 
students who are just out of high school. Any campus 
would be lucky to have such a man as Paul, and his record 
on McKendree campus gives evidence that we know his 
worth. 



CYRIL CURTIS 

Cyril Curtis was on almost letter perfect student who 
literally did everything right, and that, in anybody's esti- 
mation, might have made him into a bore, but instead, it 
makes him Into one of the finest fellows who has ever gone 
to school on our Old Hill. Now he Is working for Uncle 
Sam, and we know that McKendree can send no finer man 
to the army. 

CHARLES CHADWELL 

McKendree expects big things of "Chad," for here on 
the campus, he has proved that brains and leadership go 
hand in hand. His formula seems to be to tackle big jobs 
that demand all sorts of Initiative, and then admit of no 
fizzle, but simply make a success. 



lit ^M 




F 







Mr. Donald Nothdurft Boston, Massachusetts 

Miss Myra Jeanes Staunton, Illinois 

Mr. H. G. Schmidt Belleville, Illinois 

Rev. Frederick C. Stelzriede Cairo, Illinois 

Mr. Charles Carroll St. Louis, Missouri 

Rev. J. W. A. Kinison Belleville, Illinois 

Miss Isabel Shaffer Albion, Illinois 

Mr. G. G. Dorrow Joplin, Missouri 

Miss Magdalena Willis Lebanon, Illinois 

Miss Marion Kleinschmidt Lebanon, Illinois 

Mr. Paul Yost , Lebanon, Illinois 

Miss Rose Mersinger Lebanon, Illinois 

Mr. T. A. Wilson Lebanon, Illinois 

Mr. Philip R. Glotfelty, Jr Battle Creek, Michigan 

Mrs. A. E. Brooks Nutley, New Jersey 

Miss Vera Jenne Carlyle, Illinois 

Mr. B. E. Gum Salem, Illinois 

Mr. Cyrus Gentry Pleosantville, New York 

Miss Dolores Cooper East St. Louis, Illinois 

Mrs. Etta Root Edward Pinckneyville, Illinois 

Mrs. William T. Gordley Lebanon, Illinois 

Mr. Henry B. Eaton Wood River, Illinois 

Mrs. Grace Harmon McGary Oak Park, Illinois 

Mr. John L. Dickson Woodstock, Illinois 

Mr. H. P. Barnes Harrisburg, Illinois 

Mrs. Robert Welch Lebanon, Illinois 

Mr. Harold F. Hecker St. Louis, Missouri 

Mr. Claude C. Dowdy Metropolis, Illinois 

Mr. M. L. Carson St. Louis, Missouri 

Mr. George G. Flesor Tuscola, Illinois 

Mr. Willard J. Friedrich Urbona, Illinois 

Mr. W. L. Honbaum Alton, Illinois 

Miss Hattle Horner Lebanon, Illinois 

Rev. Roy N. Keon Mt. Vernon, Illinois 

Rev. Paul R. Hortin , St. Petersburg, Florida 

Miss Emma Bergmann OIney, Illinois 

Mrs. F. A. Behymer Lebanon, Illinois 

Mr. Robert Herman Lebanon, Illinois 

Rev. Farrell D. Jenkins Salem, Illinois 

Dr. Franz Hohn Tuscon, Arizona 

Rev. H. C. Brown Granite City, Illinois 

Mrs. H. C. Brown Granite City, Illinois 

Mr. Ernest R. Britton Effingham, Illinois 

Mrs. Ernest R. Britton Effingham, Illinois 

Mr. Pfeffer Lebanon, Illinois 

Mrs. Pfeffer Lebanon, Illinois 

Mr. Ralph Edwards East St. Louis, Illinois 

Miss Anno Lois Gann Grantsburg, Illinois 

Dr. Van T. McKee Lebanon, Illinois 

Mr. Harry L. Pate Tuscola, Illinois 

Miss Stella Mae Steidel Lebanon, Illinois 

Miss Madeline Yost Taylorville, Illinois 

Dr. A. L. Weber Upland, California 

Mrs. A. L. Weber Upland, California 

Miss Dorothy Hertenstein Dixon, Illinois 



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53 



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PRINTING AND BINDING 
by 

WILLIAMSON 

PRINTING & PUBLISHING 
COMPANY 

219 South Fourth St. 
Springfield, Illinois 



55 



SPIETH PHOTO STUDIO 

222 North Popular Streef CENTRALIA, ILLINOIS « 



PHOTOGRAPHS 
FOR HIGH SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 
OUR SPECIALTY 



High Grade Portraits 

Enlarging .... Kodak Finishing 

Application Pictures 

Write Us for Prices 



Connpliments of 



THE 



COLLEGE 



BOOKSTORE 



BLUMENSTEIN 
BROS. 

FRESH AND SMOKED 
MEATS 



Phone I 13 
Lebanon, Illinois 






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