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Full text of "The McKendrean : being the year book of McKendree College"

Lebanon, IL 62254 



The 3te Kendrean 
1949 



/ M COLLEGE grows as the result of someone's dreams and plans. McKendree has 
•■ "■ plans and dreams for expansion in the future including several new buildings. 

Some dreams of a better McKendree began to be realized this year as several projects 
were completed. The library was redecorated and a new lighting system was installed. 
The business offices were redecorated and refurnished, and extensive improvements were 
made in the heating system. Largest single improvement was the redecoration and re- 
furnishing of the dining hall, the installation of new lights, and the addition of a new 
piano and I lammond organ there. 

Two new buildings have been proposed and sketches and blueprints have been 
drawn up. These are the new science hall and the gymnasium-auditorium. Bevond these 
there are dreams of more new buildings to follow a long range expansion plan that will 
once more make McKendree "the best in the Middle West". 



McKENDREAN STAFF 

Jerry Podesva - - - Editor 

Jack Floro - - - - Assistant Editor 

flowARD Hursey Business Manager 

Paul Purdy - - - Assistant Business Manager 

Pat Ladas Advertising Manager 

Richard Walton - - Assistant Advertising Manager 
Arleen Arter ______ Activities Editor 

Bill Togias - - - Assistant Activities Editor 

Mabel Cozart -------- Class Editor 

Mason Holmes Sports Editor 

Robert Nelson Feature Editor 

Don Brown - - Make-up Editor 

Burnell Heinecke Assistant Make-up Editor 

Robert Steen --------- Art Editor 

Dorothy Hinson Circulation Manager 

Mrs. H. C. Gutekunst - - Faculty Adviser 



VOLUME XVII New Series 



Pictures by Spieth's Studio, Centralia, III. 
Engraving by Central Engraving Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
Printing by Record Printing Co., Belleville, III. 
Covers by Becktold, St. Louis, Mo. 
Drawings by Robert Steen 




Mrs. Florence ThomU>u 



To the lady in the apron, to the Fine Christian woman who listens 
to our troubles, lends us money, gives us advice, keeps us well Fed; to 
the Fine Friend of McKendree who gives untiringly oF her time and energy 
For the Forwarding oF our school— we, the 1949 McKendrean StafF, proudly 
dedicate this hook to you, Mrs. Thornley. 



administration and staff 



As McKendree slowly assumes the "New Look", we must not forget 
that the man responsible for most of the transformation is President Carl 
C. Bracy. Since his arrival here four years ago, he has become well known 
by, and endeared to the hearts of, all the students. That he has worked 
diligently and untiringly for the betterment of the school is evidenced by 
the progress made. With such an able leader the future cannot help but he 
more rich and full than the past has been glorious. 

/Ml those who have come into contact with Dean Lewis B. Van Winkle, 
who is also our registrar, have found him to be a just and wise man. 
Although many students do not fully understand the functions ot his 
office, it is one of importance in the administration of the college. It is 
.1 position filled with conflicts that only students can create. Since coming 
to McKendree Dean Van Winkle has introduced many progressive ideas. 




Carl C. Bracy, A.B., Th.M., D.D. 

President 



Lewis B. VanWinkle, A.B., B.I). M.A. 
Dean and Registrar 



staff 

BUSINESS 
Eliza J. Donaldson, B.S., A.M. 

Comptroller, Business Law 

William C. Walton, A.B., A.M., 
Ph.D., D.D. 

Treasurer, Greek and Latin 

PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

Meredith Eller, A. B., S. T. B., 
Ph. D. 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 
James B. Jennings, B.Sc.Ed., M.Se. 
Ed. 

Economics and Political Science 

Nell G. Oppitz, A.B., A.M. 
History and Sociology 

SPEECH AND DRAMATICS 
Elizabeth W. Parks, A.B., M.A. 
Radio Speaking and Journalism 

Carol Caldwell, B.A., B. Ed. 
Speech 
Dean of Women 

LIBRARY 
Gertrude C. Bos, Ph.B., Lib. Cert. 
Librarian 

PSYCHOLOGY & EDUCATION 
R. C. Sayre, B.S., A.B., A.M. 
Practice Teaching 

Earl Dawes, B. Ed., A.M. 
Psychology and Education 
Dean of Men 



KITCHEN 
Florence Thornley 

Lillian Toles 

HOUSEMOTHERS 
Marjorie Warner 
Carnegie Hall 

Blanche Hertenstein 
Clark Hall 





staff 



ENGLISH • 
Dede Ann Shull, A.B., M.A. 

Lelah Allison, B. Ed., A.M. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 
Bertha W. Gutekunst, A.B 

French and Spanish 

Edwin P. Baker, A.B., A.M., LL.D. 
German 
Dean Hmeritus 

PROCTOR 
Lewis A. Winterrowd, A.B. 

Carnegie Hall 
SCIENCE AND MATI IEMATICS 
Burton Goldstein, A.B. 

Physics 
Fred Fleming, B.S., A.M. 

Biology 
FIelmut C. Gutekunst, B.S., M.S. 

Chemistry 
Charles J. Stowell, B.S., M.A., 
Ph. D. ' 

Mathematics 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Ralph E. Barclay, B. Ed., M.A. 

Football and Track 
Bill Mauzy, B.S., A.M. 

Basketball and Baseball 
Janelle Kleinschmidt, A.B. 

Women's Physical Education 

MUSIC 
Oliver H. Kleinschmidt, A.A.G.O. 
Piano, Theory, Organ 

(Not in picture) 
Gerald Nielsen, Mus. B., Mus. M. 

Public School Music 
Chester Bagg, B.M., M.M. 

Voice and Chorus 

OFFICE 
Fern Lamb 

Secretary to the President 
Jeanne Floro 

Secretary to the Dean 
MAINTENANCE 
John Massie 

Superintendent Buildings and 
( i rounds 








elass officers 




SENIOR 




Mason Holmes president 




Dorothy Hinson secretary-treasurer 




Kenneth Walters vice president 




JUNIOR 




Richard Walton vice-president 




Alice Bollinger secretary-treasurer 




Eugene Briggs president 








SOPHOMORE 




Dean Cox vice-president 




Brainard Miller president 




1 Ielen OI Iaka secretary-treasure) 




FRESHMAN 




Emerial Owen president 




Evelyn Beats vice-president 




Ruth Althoff secretary treasurer 






Dreams of More 
Classrooms Take Shape 



classes 



seniors 



Ed Cockrel, Pocahontas, A.B. Religion, Kappa Chi 
'46-'49 . . . Melvin Crouch, Moran, Kansas, A.B. 
History, Public Affairs Forum, Review Staff, Ex-G.l. 
Club . . . Masaichi Katayama, Unity, A.B. Philos 
ophv and Religion, Basketball '46-'47; Philo, President 



'48; Kappa Chi '47-'49; S.C.A.. President '47'48; 
Student Faculty Council '48'49; President, Student 
Association, '48-'49; "M" Club '47 . . . Marion Farm- 
er. Maplewood, A.B. Philosoph) and Religion; Kappa 
Chi '46-'49; Ex-G.I. Club. 



Katayama 




Adams 



Lagow 



Victor Donaldson, Shobonier, A.B. Mathematics, 
Intramural Softball '46-'49; President, Carnegie I [all 
'49; Plato; Ex-G.I. Club '46 '48; President, "M" Club, 
'48 '49 ; Basketball '43, '46-'49 . . . Edward Adams. 
( entralia, A.B. Fnglish . . . Ed Kimmle, O'Fallon, 
A.B. Economics, Managing Editor, McKendree Review 



'46'47; Public Affairs Forum; Editor, McKendree 

Review, '47'48 . . . Cleason Lagow, luka. A.B. 

Philosophy and Religion, S.C.A. '46-'49; Kappa Chi 

'46-'49; Plato '44-'46; Basketball '44 '46; "M"' Club 
'44 '46; Y.M.C.A. '44-'45; Chorus '45. 



sentors 



Frances Eckert, O'Fallon, A.B. English . . . 
Robert Lamb, Lebanon, A.B. Philosophy and Re 
l.'gion, Kappa Chi: Secretary General, Public Affairs 
Forum; "Which is the Way to Boston," Assistant 
Director . . . Dorothy Hinson, Madison, A.B. Eng- 
lish, Y.W.C.A. '45; S.C.A. '46-'49; W.A.A. '45-'49; 
Clio '46-'49, President, '48; Secretary-treasurer, Chor- 



us '48; Cheerleader '46-'47; "Brother Goose" '48; Presi- 
dent, Clark Hall, '47, Summer '48; Secretary, Student 
Association, '46; Secretary-treasurer, Sophomore Class, 
Secretary-treasurer, Senior Class; Kittycuhs '47-'49; 
McKendrean '48-'49; May Queen Court '49; Student 
Faculty Council '49 . . . Worden W. Mann, East 
St. Louis, A.B. History, S.C.A. 



Hinson 



Mann 




Carl L. Dillow, Tanims, A.B. Physical Educa- 
tion . . . Louise Beaty, Centralia, A.B. English, 
Stage Manager, Alpha Psi Omega Cast, '48-'49; Presi- 
dent, Clark I fall '48; First Place, Amanda Glenn Con- 
test, '48; W.A.A. '43-'48; S.C.A. '48-'49; Y.W.C.A. 
Chaplain '43; Kittyeubs '43, '48'49; "Our Town" '43; 
"What A Life" '44; Clio '48-'49, Alumni Secretary; 
Director, "Which Is The Way to Boston" '48: Chorus 
'43, '48; Secretary-treasurer, Little Theater, '43; May 



Queen . . . Leslie Alrus, Trenton, A.B. English 
Journalism, Assistant Editor, Student Handbook, '48; 
Bradley Speech Tournament; Editor, McKendree Re- 
view, '49; Dorris Oratorical . . . Glenn Freiner, 
Belleville, A.B. Voice, Chorus '46-'49; Chapel Choir, 
'47'48; S.C.A. '47; Y. M. C. A.; Philo '47-'49; Who's 
Who '49; Organist, Friday Chapel '47-'49; Sextette 
Accompanist '46-'47; Piano Quartette '47-'49. 



11 



sentors 



Frederick Rutherman, Olmsted, A.B. Mathe 
matics, University of The South '40-'46; Public Affair 
Forum '48-'49 . . . Floyd Seibert, East St. Louis 
A.B. Economics, I ransferred from Missouri School o 



Mines . . . Harm Smith, Lebanon, A.B. Sociology, 
Philo . . . Kenneth Wai rERS, East St. Louis, A.B. 
Biology. 



Seibert 




Sleeper 



Podesva 



Clark 



Mary Ruth Sleeper, St. Louis, Mo., A.B. Piano, 
Chorus Accompanist '46-'47; Clio '46-'48; Sextette '47; 
Vice-President Sophomore Class; Piano Duo '47-'49; 
Piano Quartette '47; President junior Class; I lomc 
coming Attendant '48; l.S.S. '48; May Queen Court 
. . . Richard C. Townsend, Anna, A.B. I listorv, 
Philo '46-'49, Recording Secretary '47, Vice-President 
'47-'48; Sigma I au Helta '47-'49, Secretary-treasurer 



'48; Ex-G.I. Club '46-'47, Secretar) '46; Chorus '46 
. . . Jerome Podesva, Lebanon, A.B. History, Plato 

'4(»; •'Here Come, Charlie" '47; McKendrean '47 '4 ( >, 
Editor '4'); Alpha Psi Omega; l.S.S. '47-'49, President 
'48-'49; Student Faculty Council '47'48; Public Al 
lairs Forum '48 . . . Herbert Ci auk. Marissa, A. 11. 
Philosophj and Religion, Kappa Chi. 



seniors 



Ralph Mason Holmes, East St. Louis, B.S. Chem 
istry, Sigma Zeta, President '48-'49; Student Faculty 
Council '47-'48,-'49; President Senior Class, President 
Student Association '49; Philo President '48; Football 
'46-'48, Captain '48. All Conference '48, Most Valu- 
able Player '48; Basketball '46-'49; "M" Club; Sports 
Editor, McKcndrcv.n '48, -'49; Who's Who '48-'49 . . . 

Holmes Markarian 



Anthony Markarian, Oak Park, B.S. Chemistry . . • 
Charles Ceorge Davis, East St. Louis, A.B. Philos- 
ophy and Religion, Kappa Chi . . . Jean Smith, Van- 
Mia, A.B. Voice, Chorus '46-'49; W.A.A. '46-'47; 
Sextette '46-'48; Chapel Choir '47-'49; Clio '47-'49; 
Homecoming Attendant '48; Trio '48; Amanda Glenn 
Contest; Mixed Quartette '48. 



Davis 



Smith 




Arleen Arter, Mattoon, A.B. English, Clio '46- 
'49, President '49; W.A.A. '46-'49; Sigma Tau Delta 
'46-'49, Vice-President '48-'49; McKendrean '47-'49; 
I.S.S. '48'49; Secretary-treasurer, Junior Class; May 
Queen Court; Amanda Glenn Contest '47-'49, Second 
Prize '49; "Night of January 16th" . . . Jack Floro, 
Lebanon, A.B. History, University of Illinois '46; Sig- 
ma Phi Delta '44; Kappa Chi '47; Public Affairs For- 
um '47'48; I.S.S. '48; Assistant Editor McKendrean 



'48; James Clav Dollev Award '48; Religion Assistant 
'47-'48; Who's Who '48'49 . . . Alice Runkwitz 
Dunn, Lebanon, A.B. Voice, Clio Sextette '23-'24; 
Glee Club '24-'25; Illinois Weslevan University, Sum- 
mer; Chorus '48-'49; Chapel Choir '48-'49; General 
Chairman Homecoming '48; Clio, Treasurer '48; Clio 
President '49; Student Faculty Council '48-'49 . . . 
Samuel W. Simpson, Centerville Station, B.S. 
Chemistry. 

13 




1- fe v 



Francis 
Fisher 



Marshall 
Koebel 
Harkins 



Togias 
Pitts 
Meyer 



juniors 



Charles Francis - - - - Caseyville 

James Marshall - Carlinville 

William Togias - East St. Louis 

Dona) Fisher / ebanon 

Delmai koebel Lebanon 

William Pitts Freeburg 

Lowell Grissom Belleville 

Ralph Harkins West Frankfort 

George Meyer - - Kinmundy 



Elvis Rosenberger ( 'entralia 

Alfred Dalrymple Bridgeport 

Donald Zimmerlee East St. I ouis 

Eugene Scruggs DuQuoin 

John Ditterline - - Lebanon 

Richard Walton Vernon 

Marion Ruth Trenton 

Dean Eisenmayer Trenton 
John Curtis --------- Ridgway 



14 



juniors 



Donald Brown Sumner 

Robert Berry Beaver (reck 
Richard Ashal - - Lebanon 

Nelson Bunnage Albion 

Eugene Black Freeburg 

Lavem Ballard Caseyville 

Oliver Voelkel Belleville 

Paul Beaty - - Centralia 

Barbara Bailey Okawvillc 



Ancel Arnold Alma 

Mabel Cozart Harrisburg 

Kenneth Young Sorento 

Kenneth Austin Evansville 

Arthur Werle East St. Louis 

Marite Zareotf Trenton 

James Weiss Shobonier 
Roy Katayama --------- Unity 

Alice Bollinger Millersville, Mo. 



brown 
Bunnage 
Voelkel 



Berry 
Black 
Beaty 



Ashal 
Ballard 
Bailey 



Arnold 
Austin 
Weiss 



Cozart 

Werle 

Katayama 



Young 
Zarcoff 
Bollinger 












Freisner 
Strain 



3 ttn i or s 



Robert Brann 
William Nagel 
Burnell Heinecke 
Granville Anderson 
Benjamin Andersoi 
Harold Hinckley 
Clair Clark 
Richard Pittenger 



Harvard 
Lebanon 
Freeburg 
Hillsboro 

Lust St. Louis 

East St. Louis 

\ 'enice 

Vandalia 



Frank Finkbiner 
Robert Nelson 
Marvin Freisnei 
Darrell Sample 



Palestine 

Lebanon 

Patoku 

1 ebanon 



William Gregory Lebanon 

I ee Strain Collinsville 

Joseph Harrelson Eldorado 

Elizabeth Phillips Olney 



\b 



juniors 



Robert Reizer Caseyville 

Dennis Ramsey - - - - Ellery 

Kathryn Ruth Trenton 

Harvey Ritchie Springfield 

Newnam Thompson ------ Collinsville 

Harold Oppitz - - - - - - Lebanon 

Bill Russell ---------- Lebanon 

Delores Nubv -------- Pocahontas 



Monty Hull Champaign 

Robert Egan East St. Louis 

Pat Ladas -------- East St. Louis 

Eugene McCormack - - - Harrisburg 

Howard Hursey - - East St. Louis 

Robert Steen ------- East St. Louis 

Orville Schanz -------- Smithton 



Reizer 
Ritchie 



Ramsey 
Thompson 



Ruth 

Oppitz 



Hull 

McCormack 



Egan 
Hursey 



Ladas 
Steen 




CJHi ft (ft ft ft 





Nuby 



17 




Cox 

Curtis 

Johnston 


Childress 
Brown 
Krousz 


Kaufman 
Austin 
Davis 


Maddox 

Leiber 

Leckrone 


Seng 
Miller 
Worley 


sophontores 










I heodore Cox 
Edmund Childress 
John Kaufman 


Olucv 
Goldengate 

junction 




l,„. I ,.,!,!',• 






|ol Leibei 

I' ,|„,... Mill,., 






1 ioih it ,\ 1 1 nei 
Stanley Johnston 


\\ ayne ( ity 

- - Suletii 


Edward Maddox 


West Frankfort 




Wilmer Krausz 


- - - New Baden 


Charles Seng 


St. Louis, Mo. 




Clyde Davis 


Edwardsville 


i\ I'll caret Curtis - 


p.j 




William Leckrone 


Granite ( it) 




niagu m 


Robert Brown 


Sumner 




Donald Worley 


Breese 


Nathan Austin 


Norwich, ( onn. 









18 



&&& 




intt 

Sheets 
Austin 



Barton 
Sanders 
Rhodes 




Ray Cox ---------- Lebanon 

Zelma Britt Granite City 

Eloise Barton OTallov 

Virginia Smith - - - - Worden 

Gerald Weiss - - Mwphysboro 

Melvin Byrd - - Centralia 

Leota Sheets -------- Granite City 

Robert Sanders -------- Centralia 



sophomores 



Allan Kean East St. Louis 

Joyce Crews --------- Fairfield 

Roy Baugh East St. Louis 

Len Austin - - - - - - Collinsville 

William Rhodes Granite City 

Rose Ellen Townsend - - - Anna 

Mary Cox ---------- Lebanon 




Purdy Widdows 

Pitt Walker 

Seibert Weber 

sophomores 

Paul Purdy Joppa 

Donald Widdows Granite City 

Allied Crays Dieterich 

Raymond Sackett East St. Louis 

John Crutcher Millstadi 

I [arvey Pitt Mascoutah 

Janus Walker - - - - Madison 

Gerald Warton Chicago 



Crays 
Warton 
Miller 



Sackett 
Lemons 
Richars 



Crutcher 
Williams 
Wooden 



Lynn Lemons Mound City 

Lodean Williams West Frankfort 

Ronald Seibert Ashley 
William Weber - - East St. I ouis 

Brainard Miller Metropolis 

Duane Richars Flora 

Natalie Wooden Mi. Vernon 



20 




Helen O'Hara St. Louis, Mo. 

Dorothy Lowe East St. Louis 

Stanley Meador Vernon 

Bettv Moore - Caseyville 

Peggy Perkins - Lebanon 

Carlos Kersh Ml. Vernon 



Moore Perkins 

Ord Brown 
len 

sophomores 

Dorris Lagow - Lebanon 

Ina Mitchell Ellery 

Charles Orel - - Trenton 

George Brown - Lebanon 

Dean Cox ....... Lebanon 

Conrad Allen - Wayne City 



21 



£f©i 




Evelyn Beaty 

Bernadine Springe 

Richard Oglesby 



Anna Richardson 

Patricia Ensley 

Harold Davis 

Joseph Dickerson 



Robert Cates 

Elsie Crisp 
John Courtney 
Harold Sheets 



freshmvn 



Hail to thee, our dear old McKenclree, 

Mar we always loyal be; 

It's a sons, of praise we'll raise to thee. 

Alma Mater, dear old MC. 

Mar we ever hold thee true and wise and right, 

Honor Purple and the White, 

And for Victory we'll always fight 

Til we win for old McK. 




June Render 
Melvin Phillips 
Bob Obermiller 

Hazel Moore 



Paul Martin 

Joy Luman 

Ruth Johnston 

Diane Houseman 



Marigem Steven: 
Dinah Tanner 
Patsy Tedder 
Lois Hockett 



Herbert Hertenstein 

Paul Brown 

Calvin Vandiver 

Mary Wotherspoon 



A College mid plains is standing. 

Standing there from olden days: 

A pioneer of learning; 

First in untrodden ways. 

For service and Christian culture, 

For efficiency she stands; 

Her suns and daughters praise hei 

With voices, hearts, and hands. 



Irvshmni 



2 s 








David Davis 
Robert Burg 
Allen Vancil 
Jennie Stein 



Earl Stover 
Leonard Smith 
Harold Zeeb 
Fred Widicus 



James Townsend 

Paul Dove 

Daphene Coston 

Jane Pownoll 



Emerial Owen 

Merle LeFevre 

Paul Vise 

Carol Hess 



freshmen 



Hail to thee, our dear old McKendree, 
\hn we always loyal be; 
It's a song of praise we'll raise to thee, 
Alma Mater, dear old Mc. 

Ma) we ever hold thee true and wise and right, 
Honor Purple and the White, 
And for Victor) we'll always fight 
Id we win for old McK. 



^ 



■j O. C) .O 





Pi ^ 



flf pi c^ C^. 

James Hamilton Lester Dewhirst Robert Schubert Wi.liam Powell 

Ronald Herrin Delores Crouch Ruth Althoff Marvin Rull 

Leroy George William Chaney Melvin Rull Betty Brammeier 

Donald Cassidy Samuel Carlton Edward Opperman Delmar Sample 



freshmen 



Enduring and strong she stands there. 
Stands upon our College Hill: 
Tho' others may outnumber, 
She holds the first place still. 
For beauty, truth, and knowledge. 
And for service without hound; 
Then let us raise our voices 
Until the plains resound. 



25 



students whose pictures do not uppvav 
in this annual 



seniors 

Gene Genres 
Jack Holt 
1 larold Wisnewski 
I larvey Hoover 
Robert Watson 



juniors 



Eugene Briggs 
Richard Butler 
Louis Crouch 
Ronald Driggers 
Roberto 1 lcrnan 
lack Larson 
Dale Hirsch 



Robert McCabe 
Ennis McGee 
Eugene Sanders 
Edgar Schaerer 
Milo Wadsworth 
William Wright 



8 itphomorvs 



Robert Anderson 
Edward Bogard 
John Bridick 
Marvin Crowe 
Marjorie Dawes 
Robert Gilcrest 
Charles Launcr 
Jo McGraw 



Robert McKinney 
Joseph Naglich 
Warren Peters 
John Rainbolt 
Robert Rogier 
Arlyn Schaake 
Robert Yarber 



ti'1'shnn'it 



I larold Berrv 
Clifford Brothers 
Don F. Brown 
Kenneth Rurchett 
Cloyce Burns 
Elsie Corday 
Jess Dawson 
Glen Fisher 
Jack Frosl 



Carl Golf 
Arthur l lartman 
Art ! lessler 
Robert I lout 
George King 
David Mayes 
Audrey Maze 
William McRaven 
Janus Midyette 



Ray Molitor 
Pat Nagel 
Richard Packard 
Roosevelt Randolph 
Roger Schoen 
|n Ann Simpson 
La Vem Smith 
Robert Sweeney 
Todd Wendler 



26 




Dreams of A 

JJttle Theater As 
An Activities Center 



activities 




FIRST ROW Heft to right! : L. Austin, D. Brown, D. Cox, J. Marshall, E. Bogard. SECOND ROW: F. Fink- 
biner, T. Cox, R. Brown, E. McCormack, R. Sanders, D. Richars, J. Crutcher, P. Beaty, G. Brown. THIRD ROW. 
W Krausz, H. Hursey, N. Austin, A. Dalrymple. 



plato 



Plato, founded in 1849, is one of the most active 
organizations on the campus. For the past one hun- 
dred years, it has had a very colorful and eventful 
history- It aims to advance the knowledge of literary 
ideas, and to promote good fellowship among its mem- 
bers. This, its centennial year, has been one ol the 
best years in the organization's history. 



philo 



In its one-hundred and twelfth year Philo con- 
tinued as an outstanding organization. A number of 
open sessions, as well as the Glenn McCormack ora- 
torical contest, were the features of this year's activ- 
ities. Philo, with the promotion of fellowship and 
literary skill as its aim. looks forward to a bright 
future. 



FIRST ROW (left to right! : B. Heinecke, N. Bunnage, F. Rutherman, G. Freiner, M. Byrd. SECOND ROW • 
W. Rhodes, R. Townsend, H. Oppitz, J. Curtis, J. Kaufman, E. Rosenberger, R. Walton. THIRD ROW: R. Ka- 
tayama, M. Katayama, C. Seng, D. Ramsey, M. Holmes, L. Lemons, D. Sample, D. Worlsy, S. Johnston, 
B. Miller, H. Smith. 





FIRST ROW (left to right) : D. Hinson, B. Gutekunst, A. Artsr, M. Cozart. SECOND ROW: J. Podesva, 
Heinecke, R. Nelson, H. Hursey, M. Holmes, J. Floro, R. Walton, P. Ladas, R. Stesn, D. Brown. 



mv kendrean staff 

All finished for another year! This is the thought 
that brings a look of contentment to the eyes of the 
McKendrean staff. 1 he publishing of this yearbook 
has seemed a nightmare to some, a lark to others, 
but to all it has definitely been a challenge to ac- 
complish something that at times seemed utterly im- 
possible. 



clio 



The only women's literary organization on the 
campus, Clio, was founded in 1869. Clio aims to 
develop in its members, through cultural and intel- 
lectual training, a poise that will carry them through 
any situation. Open sessions, including the annual 
Sadie Hawkins Day open session and the Amanda 
Glenn Declamation contest, are special highlights on 
the Clionian calendar. 



FIRST ROW (left to right) 
ROW: Z. Britt, E. Phillips, E. 
L. Beaty, D. Lagow. 



R Townsend, D. Hinson, J. Smith, A. Dunn, A. Arter 
3arton, J. Crews, D. Lowe, A. Bollinger, H. O'Hara, L. 



M. Cozart. SECOND 
Williams, I. Mitchell, 




29 




FIRST ROW Heft to right): Z. Britt, R. Townsend, H. O'Hara, D. Lowe, 
ROW: E. Parks. J. Crews, R. Brown, W. Togios, R. Townsend, N. Austin, E 
Ladas, R. Steen, N. Bunnage, D. Lagow. 



. Mitchell, A. Arter. SECOND 
Heinecke, D. Eisenmayer, P. 



sigma tau delta 

Enlarged bv the admission of new members, the 
Iota Delta Chapter of Sigma Tau Delta sponsored a 
literary supplement to the McKendree Review. An- 
other attempt to encourage creative writing on the 
campus was made in the spring when a creative 
writing workshop was sponsored by the society. 



sigma zvla 



Sigma Zeta is a national honorary science society 
whose purpose is to encourage scientific study and 
to recognize students of high scholarship in the natu- 
ral sciences and mathematics. The Beta Chapter at 
McKendree College was organized in 1926. Officers 
for the year were: R. Mason Holmes, president: Dr. 
C. J. Stowell, recorder-treasurer. 



FIRST ROW Heft to right i : H. Gutekunst, C. Stowell, M. Holmes, F. Fleming. SECOND ROW: R. Mc- 
Cabe, R. Nelson, R. Egan, R. Walton, R. Reizer, B. Anderson, D. Fisher, A. Markarian. 









30 




FIRST ROW (left to right): I. Mitchell, P. Tedde 
Katayama, M. Eller, M. Katayama, N. Bunnage. 



E. Scruggs, D. Lagow. SECOND ROW: G. Meyer, R. 



*. #•. a. 

Organized in 1946 as a result of the merger of the 
YMCA and the YWCA the Student Christian Asso- 
ciation meets eaeh Wednesday evening at 7:30 p.m. 
1 he purpose of the organization is to promote Christ- 
ian life among the students. 



kappa chi 



Kappa Chi is a national honorary society for the 
purpose of enlisting members who are entering full- 
time Christian work. The Eta Chapter of Kappa Chi 
was organized in 1944 on the McKendree College 
campus. Since the time of its organization the fellow- 
ship has been active in sponsoring improvement pro- 
jects. It has had charge of assembly and chapel pro- 
grams as well as other religious activities of the college. 



FIRST ROW (left to right) : G. Lagow, D. Nuby, N. Wooden, A. Richardson, J. Curtis, M. Eller, E. Cockrel, 
D. Coston, A. Maze, L Sheets, R. Berry. SECOND ROW: N. Bunnage, E. Owen, E. Scruggs, R. Katayama, 
C. Davis, E. Black, D. Zimmerlee, T. Cox, R. Seibert, H. Clark, J. Townsend, M. Katayama, M. Farmer, 
J. Walker, M. Friesner, E. Stover. THIRD ROW: M. Byrd, G. Meyer, D. Sample, P. Brown, A. Dalrymple, R. 
Lamb, C. Clark, A. Arnold. 




31 




FIRST ROW Heft to right). J. Podesvo, B. Gutekunst, A. Arter, P. Ladas. SECOND ROW: R. Nelson, 
Heinecke, J. Floro, R. Hernandez. 



I. .V. s. 

The International Student Society, no longer an 
infant, now holds a place or honor and distinction 
among the older organizations on the campus. Since 
its introduction six years ago, it has gone a long way, 
through the efforts of its members, toward promoting 
international good will and friendship between the 
United States and foreign countries. 



alpha psi omega 

The Alpha Theta Chapter of Alpha Psi Omega, 
a national honorary fraternity, is on this campus to 
encourage dramatics. It elects as members those who 
distinguish themselves in college dramatics. 



FIRST ROW (left to right): H. O'Horo, L. Beaty, L. Allison. SECOND ROW: J. Podesva, D. Eisenmayer, 
Heinecke. 




32 




FIRST ROW (left to right) : E. Donaldson, E. Parks, A. Dunn. SECOND ROW: M. Katayama, D. Sample, 
M. Holmes, B. Miller, B. Heinecke. 

student f acuity council public affairs forum 



The Student-Faculty Council was organized in or- 
der to provide an opportunity for discussion of interests 
common to both the student body and the faculty. 
It initiates and develops projects growing out of the 
general college program. The council also serves as 
a clearing house for problems, ideas, and promotion 
of social and extra-curricular activities. 

FIRST ROW (left to right) : J. Jennings, N. Oppitz, 
Podesva, R. Lamb, B. Heinecke, J. Floro, D. Fisher, J. 



The McKendree College Public Affairs Forum, 
now in its second year on the campus, was organized 
For the purpose of bringing speakers on important 
current topics to the campus and promoting an interest 
in international relations. The Forum is an accredited 
member of the International Relations Clubs of Amer- 
ica, and has been represented at the district meetings 
at Lindenwood College and Webster College. 

Mrs. Nell G. Oppitz, Dr. Meredith F. Eller, and 
Prof. James W. Jennings are the faculty sponsors. 

M. Eller. SECOND ROW: N. Bunnage, D. Brown, J. 
Harrelson, M. Crouch, F. Rutherman, G. Lagow. 




fit? I I i 




33 




Left to right: L. Hockett, J. Render, J. Simpson, E. Bsaty, J. Pownall, E. Crisp, E. Barton. 



irimn>ii\s sextette 

I he Women's Sextette is a group of young women 
singers chosen from the Mekentlrec chorus. "I he pur- 
pose of the sextette is to sing at school functions and 
out of town programs where such an ensemble is 
suitable. 



mvn's quartvtiv 

\ he Men's Quartette has in the past played an im- 
portant part on the Mekendree campus. This year's 
quartette was no exception and again fulfilled its 
purpose of acquainting the public with McKendree 
and its music department. 



Left to right: M. Rull, C. Brothers, E. Childress, R. Seibert. 





FIRST ROW (left to right) : A. Dunn, R. Althoff, J. Luman, B. Springer, J. Smith, E. Barton. SECOND 
ROW: C. Brothers, M. Rull, O. Schanz, T. Cox, E. Childress, R. Seibert. SEATED: G. Freiner. 



the chapel choir 



ie Chapel Choir, composed of twelve voices under 
capable leadership of Prof. Chester Bagg, fur- 
id responsive and special music for the Friday 
ing chapel services throughout the school year. 



the chorus 

One of the most outstanding groups on the campus 
is the chorus which meets thrice weekly under the 
direction of Prof. Chester Bagg. An extensive season, 
including the presentation of the Messiah at Christ- 
mas and a concert tour in the spring in addition to 
numerous appearances in the St. Louis area, was 
carried through by the members of the group and 
their leader. 



FIRST ROW (left to right) : L. Hockett, P. Tedder, J. Render, J. Luman, M. Stevens, A. Dunn, R. Alt- 
hoff, B. Springer, J. Smith, D. Coston, E. Barton, D. Tanner, D. Hinson. SECOND ROW: M. Cox, P. Perkins, 
D. Houseman, L. Williams, I. Mitchell, J. Simpson, M. Cozart, E. Beaty, J. Stein, E. Crisp, A. Richardson, L. 
Beaty, J. Pownall, G. Freinsr. THIRD ROW: N. Bunnage, W. Rhodes, J. Curtis, R. Seibert, C. Brothers, L. 
Dewhirst, T. Cox,' D. Ramsey, M. Phillips, E. Childress, E. Adams, C. Bagg. FOURTH ROW: O. Schanz, M. 
Rull, J. Townsend, B. Miller, D. Sample, D. Cox, R. Brann, R. Baugh, G. Brown, L George, L. Smith. 





FIRST ROW (left to right) : P. Perkins, E. Parks, E. Phillips, M. Cozart, P. Ladas. SECOND ROW: B. Hein- 
ecke, M. Crowe, C. Francis, D. Sample, H. Hursey, O. Voelkel, R. Yarber, L. Albus, D. Eisenmayer, M. 
Crouch, L. Ballard. 



##i<- hendree review staff 



I he McKendree Review, awarded the first prize for the best newspaper in Class 
3 Division A in 1947-48, published Fifteen issues this year, eight of which were six 
page editions. 

Visions of the editors tearing their hair over deadlines not met, compete with pleas- 
ant memories of those rare times when everything went perfectly, 1 he Review Stall 
is proud oi the progress made in the past, and is looking forward to future achievement 



with ar 



.nticip; 



REVIEW STAFF 



First Semester 



Burnell Heinecke 
Darrell Sample 
Ennis McGee 
Pat Ladas 
Leslie Albus 
Marvin Crowe 
Mabel Cozart 
Donald Brown 
David Davis 
Elizabeth White Parks 



Editor 

Managing Editor 

Feature Editor 

Sports Editor 

Assistant Managing Editor 

Assistant Feature Editor 

Business Manager 

Staff Photographers 

Adviser 



Second Semester 

Leslie Albus 
Darrell Sample 
Enms McGee 
Burnell Heinecke 
Mabel Cozart 
Dean Eisenmayer 
Mabel Cozart 
Donald Brown 
David Davis 
Elizabeth White Parks 



1 he reporters and feature writers were Peggy Perkins, Robert Yarber, Dean Eisen- 
mayer, Laveme Ballard. Melvm Crouch, Elizabeth Phillips. Barbara Bailey. Oliver Voel- 
kel, Charles Francis, J. Ditterline, and Howard Hursey. 



36 




Dreams of A New 
Gymnasium Materialize 



sports 



cheerleaders 



Great enthusiasm was shown by six vivacious cheerleaders during the football and 
basketball seasons under the capable leadership of Gene Scruggs. 

Working with Gene were "Deena" Lee Tanner, "Pat" Tedder, "Mel" Britt, "Junie" 
Render, and "Roving Reporter" Heinecke. 

The time spent in preparation prior to each game was evidenced by the teamwork 
shown among them. 

The large attendance at the games and the cooperation with the cheerleaders helped 
to make these seasons the greatest that McKendree has experienced in manv years. 

The McKendree students proved their pep bv welcoming the victorious football team 
at four o'clock in the morning. The great send-off by the band, cheerleaders, and students 
which was given the squad when they left for Chillicothe prior to that victory will long 
be remembered by all. 

In the hearts of all will always remain a great "Hurrah" for our cheerleaders. 



FIRST ROW: B. Heinecke, E. Scruggs. SECOND ROW: J. Render, Z. Britt, P. Tedder, 
D. Tanner. 




<S 



football 



Kenneth Austin Evansville 

Junior 

Tackle - 190 lbs. 

T hree letterman 



Captain 

Mason I lolmes East St. Louis 

Senior 

Center - 200 lbs. 

Three letterman 

First Team All-Conference 



Roy Katayama Unity 

junior 

Guard - 180 lbs. 

Two letterman 

I lonorable Mention All-Conference 



Gene Briggs Granite City 

junior 

Halfback - 170 lbs. 
I hree letterman 



Bill Nagel Lebanon 

Junior 

Quarterback - 168 lbs. 

Three letterman 



Dick Pittenger Vanda 

Junior 

Guard - 185 lbs. 
1 hree letterman 



Ehis Rosenberger Centralia 

junior 

Halfback - 155 lbs. 

Three letterman 



Bob McCabe 

Juniot 

Tackle - 195 lb 

Two letterman 



Oak Park 




44 



football 




Bill Wright 

Junior 

Tackle - 202 lbs 



Lebanon 



Ed Maddox West Frankfort 

Sophomore 
Fullback - 175 lbs. 
Two letterman 



Charles Orel 
Sophomore 
Guard - 190 lbs. 
Two letterman 



Summerfield 



Lebanon 



Ed Schaefer 

Junior 

Halfback - 155 lbs. 

1 lonorable Mention All-Conference 



John Crutcher 
Sophomore 
End - 170 lbs 
Two letterman 



Millstadr 



St. Louis 



Charles Seng 

Freshman 

Guard - 180 lbs. 

I lonorable Mention All-Conference 



Paul Beatv Centralia 

junior 

End - 170 lbs. 

1 lonorable Mention All-Conference 



Ray Sackett East St. Louis 

Junior 

End - 180 lbs. 



40 



football 



Marino Garcia East St. Louis 

Freshman 

Guard — 177 lbs. 



Al Dalrymple Bridgeport 

Junior 

Tackle - 263 lbs. 



Bob Hout 
Freshman 
Guard - 175 lbs. 



Flora 



Ron Herrin Bridgeport 

Freshman 

Fullback - 185 lbs. 



Calvin Vandiver Wood River 

Freshman 

Quarterback — 160 lbs. 

Harold Berry Roxan; 

Freshman 

Halfback - 150 lbs. 



Harold Davis Effingham 

Freshman 

Halfback - 175 lbs. 



Monty Hull 

}un\or 

End - 170 lbs. 



Champaign 




41 




FIRST ROW (left to right) : M. Garcia, K. Austin, M. Holmes, E. Rosenberger, J. Crutcher, M. Hull, R. Ka- 
tayama P Beaty, E. Maddox, R. Pittenger, R. McCabe, C. Ord, W. Wright, G. Briggs, E. Schaefer, W. Nagel, 
C Seng SECOND ROW: Coach Barclay, N. Austin, L. George, R. Hout, C. Vandiver, G. Warton, R. Bough, 
D. Richars, R. Sackett, A. Dalrymple, R. Herrm, D. Sample, E. Stover, H. Berry, H. Davis, J. Dawson, R. Har- 
kins, J. Curtis (manager), D. Brown (assistant manager). 



### club 



football 



I he "M" Club is an organization which has as its 
purpose the promotion of good sportsmanship and 
athletic Fellowship. The club has been active on the 
campus and sponsored the festivities which accom- 
panied the election and crowning of the football queen. 
The club organized and supervised the intramural 
basketball and Softball leagi 
dents on the campus. 



the nun 



Sept 


24 


Rose Polv 


Oct. 


2 


Quincv 


Oct. 


9 


Principia 


Oct. 


16 


Anderson 


Oct. 


23 


Scott Field 


Oct. 


30 


Chillicothe 


Nov 


6 


Shurtleff 


Nov 


13 


Eureka 



pp. 


McK. 





12 


C> 


53 





17 





80 





(.0 


18 


7 


6 


33 


12 


19 



FIRST ROW (left to right) : R. McCabe, R. Katayama, V. Donaldson, E. Maddox, E. Rosenberger. SECOND ROW: 
G. Briggs, J. Curtiss, H. Hursev, L. Lemons, W. Gregory, M. Holmes, R. Pittenger, D. Richars, J. Crutcher, 
K. Austin. ' 




basketball 



Bill Gregory 




Lebanon 


Junior 


Three 


letterman 


6' 3" 




200 lbs. 



Mason Holmes 


East St. Loins 


Senior 


Four letterman 


6' 3" 


195 lbs. 



Paul Beaty Centralia 

junior 

6' 1" 168 lbs. 

Honorary Captain Most Valuable Player 



Ed Maddox 

Sophomore 
5' 10- 



VVest Frankfort 

Two letterman 

175 lbs. 



Ed Schaefer 
Sophomore 
6' 1" 



Ralph Harkins 
Junior 

6' 2" 



Lebanon 



155 



West Frankfort 



195 lbs. 




43 




hasLvlball 



l)c 


we) 


Hi 


chars 




Flora 


So 


pho 


mort 




1 wo 


lettermnn 


6' 


r 








175 lbs. 



I larold Sheets 
Freshman 
5' 9" 



Bob Miller 
Freshman 
5' 6" 



Ron Herrin 
Freshman 

5' 1 I" 



Lebanon 



Wayne City 



140 lbs. 



Bridgeport 



I ,ynn Lemons 




Mounds 


Sophomore 




Two letterman 


5' 11" 




160 lbs. 




not 


pivturvd 


|nn Hamilton 




McLeansboro 


Freshman 

6' 4" 




[60 lbs. 


John Curtis 
5' 9" 




Ridgway 

165 lbs. 


Junior 




Three letterman 




Left to right: H. Sheets, E. Maddox, L. Lemons, P. Beaty, W. Gregory, M. Holmes, R. Harkins, E. Schaefer, 
D. Richars, R. Hernn, R. Miller. Center: B. Mauzy. 



basketball schedule 



Central 


- 69 


McKendree - 


- 40 


Shurtleff - 


- 40 


A IcKendrec - 


- 39 


Eden Seminary 


- 48 


McKendree 


- 71 


Quincy 


67 


McKendree 


- 54 


Eureka - - 


- 74 


McKendree - 


- 51 


Blackburn - - 


47 


McKendree - 


- 54 


Belleville J. C. 


- 45 


McKendree 


- 44 


Principia 


57 


McKendree - 


- 55 


Quincy - - 


- 34 


McKendree - 


- 29 


Shurtleff - 


- 67 


McKendree 


- - 51 


Scott Air Base 


- 45 


McKendree - 


- 48 


Scott Air Base 


45 


McKendree - 


- 54 


Belleville J. C. 


- 41 


McKendree - 


- 64 


Eden Seminary 


- 46 


McKendree - 


- 62 


Central 


- 56 


McKendree - 


- 38 


Ccntralia J. C. 


- 58 


McKendree - 


- 60 


Principia - - 


- 53 


McKendree 


- 52 


Blackburn 


53 


McKendree - 


- 51 


Centra lia J. C. 


- 58 


McKendree - 


- 60 


Eureka 


50 


McKendree - 


- 47 



FIRST ROW (left to right): H. Sheets, R. Miller, E. Maddox, M. Holmes, R. Harkins. SECOND ROW: P. 

Beaty, D. Richars, E. Schaefer, L. Lemons, W. Gregory, R. Herrin. THIRD ROW: V. Donaldson, H. Zeeb, J. 

Curtis, J. Hamilton, J. Crutcher, R. Obermiller, R. Pittenger, R. Packard. FOURTH ROW: G. Warton, B. 
Mauzy, R. Barclay. 



.... ^Ylfc. -aw * " 



* « 



45 




FIRST ROW 'left to right): E. Phillips, D. Hinson, I. Mitchell, D. Lowe, R. Townsend, Z. Bntt. SECOND 
ROW: B. Moore, D. Tanner, H. O'Hara, P. Perkins, L. Beaty, E. Beaty, H. Moore, E. Crisp, J. Crews, M. 
Cozart. 



##•• a. ##. 

The Women's Athletic Association began with a 
small representation, hut soon grew to a larger number. 

I he purpose of this organization is to encourage 
healthful living, goodwill, and fellowship among the 
women. 

Among its many activities was an all-school skating 
party. 

Letters are awarded lor participation in various ath- 
letic activities. Manx girls earned letters which were 
presented at the annual banquet held at the close ol 
the year. 



kittyeubs 



The roughest basketball team at Mckendree Col- 
lege was organized and called the Kittycubs. 

Under the capable leadership of Coach Klein- 
schmidt the team played seven games, winning several. 

The flashy speed of the forwards, and the determi- 
nation of the guards, plus many practices, led to a 
scrapping, victorious team. 

With the experience that the underclass girls have 
received this year, we are anticipating a perfect record 
next year. 



FIRST ROW: D. 


Hi 


nson, Z. Bntt, B. Moore, J. Crews 


, D. Lowe 


, H. Moore, D. Crouch, P. Per 


kin 


s, J. Klein- 


schmidt. SECOND 


ROW: D. Tanner, M. Weiss, L. Bea 


ty, B. Brammeier, 1. Mitchell 


, E. Beaty, 


R. 


Townsend, 


t. Phillips. 




















A jj^^iiirw 










m I 


l||^"vj 








«*v ■ 1 








BL ^ieffy ^ 








I [,•>-- 






- JE 






T^|i* ■ m j f \tep 


f~ ~ W J 


)f\ /Sjj. 
























Wk : ^ 






• i ! 










W " 




1 J M 




- ii> \ 








B, y 4 




' tm kl H 


V m 


■rtf^^J 









4n 




A Student's Dream 
Of A Student Union 



features 




19411 hitmvviiming queen 



Reigning over the Homecoming festivities of 1948 was Miss Helen O'Hara, a 
lovely and gracious sophomore student at MeKendree. Escorted to the throne by Mason 
Holmes, captain of the football team. Miss O'Hara was crowned queen by the retiring 
queen of 1947, Miss Ella Ruth Jones. This ceremony on Friday evening, Noycmber 12, 
officially opened the celebrations of the Homecoming weekend. 

An active member of many ol the organizations on the campus, including the Ch 
onian Literary Society, Alpha Psi Omega, Sigma Tau Delta and the Women's Athletu 
Association, Miss O'Hara was also secretary-treasurer of the sophomore class. 



48 




194B homce0nning 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11 
Bonfire, Snake Dance, 8:30 p.m. 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12 

Hobo Day, 7:40 a.m. 

Hobo Day Convention 1 1 :20 a.m. 

Crowning of the Homecoming Queen, 8:00 p.m. 

Formal Freshman Program, 8:15 p.m. 



Open House, Carnegie and Clark Hall, 9:15 p. 
Reception in Clark Hall, 9:30 p.m. 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13 

Football Game, McKendree vs. Eureka, 2:00 p. 
Football recognition-Alumni Banquet, 6:00 p.rr 
Homecoming Plays, 8:15 p.m. 




49 




MISS LOUISE BEATY 



iiliU may quvvn 



Reigning over the Maytime Festivities this year of 1944, Miss Louise Beaty, was 
crowned queen by her Maid of Honor, Mrs. Mary Ruth Sleeper. 

During her years here on the Old Hill, Louise has been an active member of many 
organizations on the campus. Included in these organizations are Alpha Psi Omega, Clio, 
and the W.A.A. 

Miss Beaty, who was president of Clark Hal) during the First semester, also bad one 
of the lead parts as "Karen" in the performance of the play production class "The Nighf 
of January 16th." 



50 



senior chapel program 



Organ Prelude Glenn Freiner 

Invocation - Masaichi Katayama 

Hymn 

Scripture Lesson Herbert Clark 

Vocal Solo Glenn Freiner 

Class History --------- Dorothy Hinson 

Piano Solo - - - Mary Ruth Sleeper 

Class Will ---------- - - Louise Beaty 

Vocal Solo J can Smith 

Class Prophecy Leslie Alhus 

Piano Solo - - Alil -' L ' Dunn 

Presentation of Gavel Mason Holmes 

Response Gene Bri 8^ 

Presentation of Gift Victor Donaldson 
Hymn 

Alma Mater 

Benediction Marion Farmer 

Postlude --------- Glenn Freiner 



tree dedication 



( /,„„-„„„, Masaichi Katayama 

Invocation Harr Y Smith 
Miisia ---------------- Men's Quartet 

Remarks Prof. Earl Dawes 

Presentation of Tree ------------ Robert Lamb 

Response - - - Dr. Carl C. Bracy 
Alma Mater 



51 













^~1 


rm 






i^J 


^^" 


^^*^ 


1 jj 




i 



Left to right: M. Katayama, G. Freiner, L. Beaty, M. Holmes, J. Floro. 



trho's ff'Ao 



We are justly proud to add to the list of distinguished students in "Who's Who" 
the names of five outstanding McKendreans. Not only have they shown themselves to 
be exeeptional students in their particular fields of endeavor, hut they have proved 
to rank high in citizenship, extra-curricular activities, and leadership. Their lives and 
services are evidence that a future of constructive living lies ahead ol them. 

"Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges" is a standard 
directory and index of information containing biographies of distinguished students through 
out America. The students are selected from approximately six hundred colleges and 
universities in the United States and Canada. 



52 



patrom 



Maxine Ball Litchfield, Illinois 

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Pfeffer Lebanon, Illinois 

F. A. Behymer Lebanon, Illinois 

T. B. Sowers Mt. Vernon, Illinois 

Ruth Koerber Ra >'' Arizona 

II. P. Barnes I Iarrisburg, Illinois 

Gehl Devore Westmont, Illinois 

Man Ellen Glotfelty Ra Y> Arizonl 

Jean Hams Evanston, Illinois 

E. C. Phillips Flo ™< Illinois 

O. F. Whitloek - " Harrisburg, Illinois 

H. G. Hurley - - - Lebanon, Illinois 

Peter Notaras DuQuoin, Illinois 

Dr. and Mrs. A. L. Weber Upland, California 

Warren Clark St. Louis, Missouri 

David Brink Freeburg, Illinois 

Ralph Grote Ro Y al > Iowa 

William D. Sanders - Crossville, Illinois 

Ralph and Helen Whitson Caseyville, Illinois 
Elizabeth Crisp University City, Missouri 

Frances Eckert O'Fallon, Illinois 

Dr. R. C. Berry Livingston, Illinois 

Dorothy Faulkner Vandalia, Illinois 

Mr. and Mrs. Newell Davis Nashville, Tennessee 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Dannenbrink State College, Pennsvlvania 

Grant Hartman Freeburg, Illinois 

Dr. Frank Harris Lebanon. Illinois 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Hursey East St. Louis, Illinois 

Miss Helen June Hursey East St. Louis, Illinois 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Howard Hursey East St. Louis, Illinois 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur L. Werle East St. Louis, Illinois 

L. B. Winter ----- ' Batavia, Illinois 

Margaret Harshbarger Fairfield, Illinois 

N. C. Henderson Lawrenceville, Illinois 

Lewis Winterrowd Lebanon, Illinois 

Clyde Funkhouser Caseyville. Illinois 

Laverne Book Carlyle, Illinois 



53 



dramatifs 



McKendree this past year revived the traditional Homecoming and Spring 
plays. Three one act plays were presented to climax the Homecoming 
activities. 



•WHO GETS THE CAR TONIGHT?" 

Characters: 

Mr. Jones, the rather Nelson Bunnage 

Mrs. Jones, the mother Patti Ann Ensley 

Paul Jones, the son David Davis 

Mary Jones, the daughter Dinah Tannei 

Jack, her boy friend Lester Dewhirsl 

"WHICH IS THE WAY TO BOSTON?" 

Characters: 

John Harvey, a retired New England farmer Edward Adams 

Martha Harvey, his wife - June Rendei 

Chris Harvey, his nephew James Townsend 

Mary Harvey, Chris's wife ------ - - - Zeh>ia Britt 



"CURSE YOU, JACK DAI ION'' 

Characters: 

Mrs. Donna Dalton, an aristocratic matron Lois Hockett 

Eloise Dalton, her daughter Margaret Curtis 

Jack Dalton, our manly hero - - - Edward B. Opperniaini 

Anna Alvarado, who has a heart of granite Bernadine Springer 

Egbert Van Horn, a deep-eyed villain - - - Joseph D. Dickerson 

Bertha Blair, poor but honest Betty Brammeiei 

Richard Blair, her brother La Verne Ballard 



THE NIGHT OF JANUARY 16111' 



Characters: 



Prison Matron 

Judge Heath 

District Attorney Flint 

Defense Attorney Stevens 

Clerk of Court 

Karen Andree 



JoAnn Simpson 

Richard Townsend 

John Crutcher 

Eugene Scruggs 

David Davis 

Louise Beaty 



Dr. Kirkland Stanley Johnston 

Mrs. John Hutchins Lois Hockett 

I Iomer Van Fleet - - - 



Elmer Sweeney 
Nancy Lee Faulkner 
Magda Svenson 
John Graham Whitfield 



Edward Ojrpermann 

Xelma Britt 

Arleen Arter 

Edward Adams 



Robert Krause 



Jane Chandler Patricia Ensley 

Sigurd Jungquist Roy Bough 

Larry Regan Burnett Heinecke 

Roberta Van Rensselaer Peggy Perkins 

Court Stenographer Dinah I anna 



The Spring play 



^4 




This Too Was Once 
Only A Dream 



histories 



history of 



class of '1U 

I he first group ol freshmen to enter school in peacetime was the group oi 1945. 

World \\ ar II had ended and we were launching into a new era. We were all eager for 

a college education combined with a little tun to make our studying a little mure in- 
teresting. With our coming, a new president. Dr. C. C. Bracy, came. 

We began our social lite with the "Y" mixer which proved to be quite a success, 
although there were several who had sore arms from shaking hands. 

Let us turn the pages ol' our memory book to the night of October 8, 1945 at the 
stroke of midnight. The freshman class successfully and tactfully accomplished the tra- 
ditional feat of ringing the famous old chapel bell. This was accomplished in spite of 
guards posted behind each tree, and one freshman captured as a hostage. 

You ask about the Homecoming? Of course, we participated. We presented our 
beautiful freshman program in honor of a member of our class, Tanelle Klcinschmidt, 
who was queen. The next day. Shurtleff and McKendrce played the Homecoming basket- 
ball game which McKendree won in the last five seconds by a free throw made by I omim 
Lusch, a member ol our class. 

During this year, there are many memories for the students to recall, such as Virginia 
Drennan's "Oh, no!" as she toppled off her chair and the platform during the presentation 
of the Messiah. 

We had our regular trips uptown for irregular meals. We were initiated into bull 
sessions, and many other traditions of college life. 

Our class has done its bit to feed the students, the hordes of "Instituters" who swarm 
over our campus, and the preachers who regularly leave their parishes behind and, relaxing, 
become boys again. We have furnished waitresses, cooks, and many dish-room workers to 
add to the chaos in the kitchen. 

Our second year at McKendree saw an increase in our ranks. With more students 
came more activities, such as the trip to the Showboat, "The Golden Rod", in St. Louis. 
We revived Hobo Day with George Troutt reigning as the King of the Hoboes timing 
his next two years. 

Will the organ ever be the same after Little Joe fell into it. breaking one of the 
pipes? Ibis year again our choice for Homecoming Queen, Doris Phillips Brown, won 
the election. 

I here were not many ol us left to begin our junior year, but we managed to forge 
ahead. The college chorus once more began presenting concerts at churches in Southern 
Illinois, lo add to the daily concert trips a ten day tour of Southern Illinois churches 
was suggested and accomplished. This tour was to help the Million Dollar Campaign 
toward its goal. 

The junior class, as tradition has it, presented the senior class with a banquet the 
evening of May Day. 

Now we are seniors and. looking back, we see the years slipping bv as the sand in 

. 1 1 o . 

an hour glass. 

The improvements at the college have been many. We have seen the re- 
decorating of the reception halls in both dormitories, Clark and Carnegie Halls; the 
complete renovation of the dining hall. Pearsons Hall; the cleaning up of Benson Wood 
Library; the redecorating of the Chapel. In time we hope all of the buildings on the 
campus may be redecorated, and the new proposed buildings erected to make McKendree 
a bigger and better college. 

Our class has been the first graduating class since 1942 to witness a victor) on the 
football field. Our team won from Chillicothe and when the players returned to the 
campus at lour o'clock in the morning they were met and greeted by the college hand, 
cheerleaders, and .ill students present that week-end. There was a feed and eel 
ebration in the dining hall. 

On leaf-raking day, an astonished young fellow. Dewey Richars, was carried b\ 
force I rean his snug bed and dumped into a huge pile of leaves bv some fellows who 
didn't believe in sleeping late on that memorable day. 

Our class officers for the senior year were: Mason Holmes, president; Kenneth 
Walters, vice-president; Dorothy Llinson, secretary-treasurer. 

As we look back on our journey through McKendree. these and many more mem- 
ories crowd into our minds. As we venture forth into the future, we hone that the 
years will be as eventful, interesting, and well spent as those here at McKendree. 



5b 



our classes 



vhiss of *50 

With only a year to complete before graduation, we have come to realize fully 
the responsibility of our positions. The rank of seniorship and of authority has been 
justly earned by our group. 

Many of our original group have left us— proceeded to higher education more rap- 
idly. We do claim the distinction of having a few members with the diligence to remain 
throughout the tribulations as well as the joyous happenings. 

We are completely realistic in our outlook for the future as we are in the view 
of the past. Our accomplishments have not been outstanding, but we have matured into 
seniorship with a record as rich as any previous junior class. 

As freshmen, we rang the chapel bell and were very proud to be victorious in that 
age old tradition. When we were sophomores our pride was inflated just a bit more 
when Ella, our candidate, was chosen Queen. 

We have no doubt as to our new position. The previous three years experience 
will be added to the varied abilities of the group to bring prestige and renown to our 
numbers. 



elans of 9 5t 

Time has a way of escaping us. Our second year at McKendree fled by us faster 
than the first, if possible. As 'gay voung sophomores' we etched new memories into the 
sands of time. 

Our class was not as strong in membership as it had been the previous year; but 
among .those who remained and those we gained, the bonds of friendship strengthened. 
Our members took part in all campus activities, sports, societies, and dramatics. 

The highlight of the year was the election of our candidate, Helen O'Hara, as 
football queen. "Dewey's Ride" now replaces that of Paul Revere in our minds and the 
barbershop melody of "Sweet Helen O'Hara" climaxed our campaign. The queen reigned 
over one of the finest Homecomings the school has seen. 

The halfway point has been reached in our stay at McKendree. We have had a 
great many wonderful days here and are looking forward to many more. With hopes 
of the past and the promise of the future we shall continue our higher education. 



class of 9 52 

When the class of '52 set foot on the Old Hill, new life was added to the college. 
The freshman class has, by its scholastic records and participation in campus organiza- 
tions and sports, proved to be outstanding. 

For days the "talk" of the campus was the secluded picnic (minus all upperclassmen, 
by the way) which we held. By successfully evading the upper classes and returning 
to the campus victorious, we proved our mentality did not correlate with our green hats. 
The tolling of the old chapel bell announced a successful climax to our party. 

Another highlight of the year was the Formal Freshman Program held in the chapel 
at Homecoming time. The plaudits of the audience revealed their appreciation and ap- 
proval of the talent displayed in our program. In the coronation of the Queen, which 
preceded the formal program. Miss Ruth Althoff, first maid of honor, represented the 
freshman class. 

Another item worthy of mention is that a number of freshmen are members of the 
college chorus. In the presentation of Handel's Messiah, Ruth Althoff was one of the 
leading vocal soloists. Miss June Render, another freshman, presented a superb inter- 
pretation of the Pastoral Symphony on the violin. 

Like all underclassmen, we are looking to the future with great enthusiasm, antici- 
pating the day when we will occupy the seats of the mighty upperclassmen. 



57 



the year 



SEPTEMBER 

I he little town of Lebanon, Illinois, goes along day bv day Following very nearly the 
same old routine. The same familiar ears are parked along the main street, the same Faces 
are seen here and there and— but wait!— say, isn't that a stranger over there standing in 
front of Doe's?— and look over there, across the street,— yes, sir, two more coming out or 
Bill's. Well, say, they're just everywhere— people we've never seen before! What has hap- 
pened? Have we been invaded? Then it comes to us— of course, we've been invaded— it's 
the first of September and these are McKendree College freshmen. However, if we look a 
little further, we see that all faces are not strange. Some are slightly familiar. Oh, yes, 
they were here last year. They're back as sophomores and juniors. Will you look at that 
proud gentleman?— Of course he's a SENIOR! 

The school term at McKendree starts with the usual, faculty meetings, freshman orien- 
tation, registration, and organization of classes. When classes start it's the same old story, 
rreshmen in the 7:40 classes, the upperclassmen in those which meet later. 

After all this come the important things, social events! First, "Comes a pause in the 
day's occupation that is known as the woman's hour." Here they come— it's defintely one 
of the most unglamorous conglomerations ever seen for they're all be-decked in pajamas, 
face cream, and hair pins. However, when the whole thing is over each girl goes back 
to her room knowing more about the school and dorm life. Then, bang! Those poor fresh- 
man girls are dragged out of the dorm in the middle of the night and what rough treat- 
ment thev get! For further details on this subject ask any of the gals. 

Freshman impromptu is next and you may believe us when we say it really brought 
out hidden talents. Thank goodness they had enough sense to hide them! 

Events such as the "all school get-together" and the president's reception will Forevei 
hold fond memories for some. 

A new constitution was the next project to emerge and it held such clauses as the 
"freshies" wearing green beanies, how they must be ever so careful not to walk on the 
grass or Centennial Walk, and how the green hats must be tipped to the upperclassmen. 
Onlv one thought is predominant in the freshmen minds "Wait 'till next year!" 



OCT OBER 

Here comes October, which is filled with oh, so mam events. "College Haze." the well 
known movie, directed and produced bv Brainard Miller, is made famous. A hay-ride 
comes along to end all hay-rides, and those incomparable freshmen pull one of the most 
amazing bell-ringing fetes ever seen bv McKendree. Since the rope was detached from 
the bell, a few freshmen muscle-men climbed to the belfry and triumphantly ended the 
freshmen picnic. Last, but not least, McKendree wins the first football game since 1941. 
WE DEFEAT CHILL1COTHE! ! ! ! 



NOVEMBER 

November breaks forth in all its splendor and the greatest event of the season is about 
to take place. November brings Homecoming— with the banquet, hobo daw sack lunch 
football game, and the crowning of a Football Queen. This year it is a lovely sophomore 
who leads I Iomecoming festivities. She is honored guest at the football game and reigns 
over the banquet, where we all honor both her and our fine football team who, although 
the game was lost, played a wonderful game for the school and their queen. 

The month draws to a halt as Thanksgiving holidays come along and are greeted with 
the usual enthusiasm. 



58 



in retrospect 



DECEMBER 

Next is December with the start of the basketball season, rehearsal of the Messiah and 
the gala atmosphere of Christmas. Soon all the school festivities are over and it is again 
time to leave McKendree and trudge homeward for the holidays. 



JANUARY 

January brings with it, not only a New Year, but, perish the thought— EXAMS! 
Everyone intended to study over the holidays, but just didn't get around to it. Conse- 
quently, the midnight oil burns for nights and nights. After it's all over and to the surprise 
of many, we find that all survived. 

January of 1949 also will live in our memories as the month the dearly beloved Owl 
passed away, rest his inquisitive soul. 



FEBRUARY 

February passes in a hurry with play practice, studying, and those inevitable nine to 
ten dates. Heart Sister Week and the end of the basketball season took place this month. 



MARCH 

Talent blooms on the Old Hill in March as the most brilliant play of the season is 
presented. In March, also, the "Communications Workshop" comes into being providing 
us with something different on the educational side. March affords one more important 
attraction when our well known chorus goes on tour and they are greeted with enthusiasm 
at every stop. The first public music recital of the year was presented during this month. 



APRIL 

April starts us on the right foot with the presentation of this year's dynamic stunt show. 
Next comes another welcomed feature, Easter vacation, our last vacation until the end 
of school. 

High School Day comes along and, as usual, it proves interesting, especially for the 
unattached on the campus. 



MAY 

But here we are it's May and we finally realize how close we are to the end. The May 
Day and Senior Day activities are the first events to be held on the newly green clad 
campus. Then exams, baccalaureate, alumni dinner, and, finally, Commencement with 
all its glory. 

As we leave dear old McKendree it seems that she lifts a leafy branch to brush away 
a tear. The breezes cause her to sigh a sigh of pride— the pride she shows in her achieve- 
ment of her newly made graduates. But the sigh is one of relief, too, as she settles down 
comfortably for her short summer rest in the serenity of the Hill. 



59 




snaps of 




campus life 



booster club 



Carl C. Bracy 
Lewis Van Winkle 
Eliza Donaldson 
Gertrude C. Bos 
Elizabeth White Parks 
Meredith F. Eller 
Lelah Allison 
Bertha W. Gutekunst 
Helmut C. Gutekunst 
Carol Caldwell 
Marjorie Dawes 
Roy Katayama 
Arleen Arter 
Darrell D. Sample 
Gene Scruggs 
John R. Curtis, Jr. 
Mabel Cozart 
Jane Pownall 
Hazel Moore 
Jean Smith 
Mike Katayama 
Delores Nuby 
George Meyer 
Helen O'Hara 
Marvin L. Crowe 
James Weiss 
Melvin Crouch 
O. M. Voelkel 
Florence Bailey 
Barbara Bailey 
Vern Ballard 
Luella Ballard 
Alice Dunn 



Minnie Niess 
Ellene Ogle 
Dede Ann Shull 
R. C. Sayre 
Edward L. Woods 
Aida Haverkamp 
Patti Ann Ensley 
Stanley Meador 
Donald Worley 
Victor Donaldson 
Jerry Weiss 
Stanley Johnston 
Delmar Sample 
Paul Dove 
Dennis Ramsey 
Nelson Bunnage 
Leonard Smith 
Edward Adams 
1 larold Davis 
Marigem Stevens 
Mary Etta Hertenstein 
Harold I lertenstein 
Carl Brock 
Mrs. Carl Brock 
J. W. A. Kinison 
Flovd Seibert 
Mary Gerstnecker 
Dan \ lertenstein 
Lois Hockett 
Emerial Owen 
Jim Townsend 
Paul Brown 



Eugene Black 
Glen Fisher 
J. M. Ditterline. Jr. 
Margaret Ann Curtis 
Gerald Nielsen 
Edmund Childress 
Marvin Pull 
Lester Dewhirst 
Ina Lee Mitchell 
Joyce Crews 
Dorothy Lowe 
Earl Dawes 
Ralph Barclay 
Durothv 1 linson 
Kenneth Young 
Al Dalrvmple 
Gene McCormack 
Bill Gregory 
Ralph 1 larkins 
Nathan Austin 
Cliff Brothers 
Don Widdows 
Joe Naglich 
Bill Chancy 
Charles Seng 
Bettv Brammeier 
Marion Farmer 
1). J. Zimmerlee 
Charles Davis 
Monty Hull 
Calvin Yandiver 
William W. Rhodes 
Robert E. Gates 



62 



our advertisers 



helped make the publication of this yearbook 
possible. The McKendrean Staff appreciates their cooperation. 
Please patronize them. 



C. & L. Motors, Inc. 

DEALERS IN 
KAISER & FRAZER CARS 

Lebanon, Illinois Carlyle, Illinois 



Johnny & Carl's 
Service Station 

WE GIVE EAGLE STAMPS 



Compliments 
of 

Service Cleaners 

Phone 18 
LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



C. D. Marshall Inc. 
CHEVROLET 

Sales Service 

CARLINVILLE, ILLINOIS 

Phones: 146 — 217 



63 



Ed Poole Ice & Fuel Company 

Ed Poole and George E. Koessel Owners 



Phone 114 



We Specialize in High Grade Coal 

SOUTH FOURTH STREET LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



Kennedy Heating & Service, Inc. 

Steam, Hot Water, Vapor and Warm Air Heating 

Welding — Plumbing — Air Conditioning 

Gas Equipment — Oil Burner and Stoker Sales and Service 

4900 Manchester Ave. — FRanklin 5900 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 



Flowers For All Occasions 

G. W. Grossart and Sons 



FLORISTS 



Phone 637 



Belleville, Illinois 



Kapp's 
Auto Parts 

Genuine and Replacement Parts 

208 North Illinois Street 
BELLEVILLE, ILLINOIS 

Phone 1700 



Roy H. Gerstenecker 

Inc. 

Dealers In 

Ford Motor Cars 

Firestone Tires — Ford Parts 
Repairing — Gasoline and Oils 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



Compliments 
of 

Eldon E. Miles 

DISTRIBUTORS 

Curtis Candy Co. 



Wfl° tS 

GOES 
FOR ••• 



L 



coecy: 



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Best Wishes 
from 

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Distributor of 

Tom's Toasted Peanuts 

Cheese Crisp 

and 

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Try Them 



Always Fresh 



65 



Industrial 
O'Fallon 



Caseyville 
Belleville 



Bus Lines 



O'Fallon 



Phone 45 



Collinsville 



Phone 1273 



We Specialize in Short Trips 



Flowers For All Occasions 

Weddings, Anniversaries, Funerals 

Fitch Florist 

O'Fallon Phone 127 

Lebanon Agent 

EDNA FRIERDICH 

Phone 176 



Compliments 
of 

Alamo Theater 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



IT PAYS TO PLAY 



East 4446 Bridge 1647 

Haun & Menges 

Flowers 

516-518 Missouri Avenue 
E. V. Menges East St. Louis, III. 



Brede's IGA Market 

Finer Foods at Lower Prices 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



Harry Liberstein 

The Busy Jeweler 

146 Collinsville Avenue 
EAST ST. LOUIS, ILLINOIS 

Bridge 7414 



OPEN ALL NIGHT 

For the Finest in 

STEAKS — CHOPS — SEA FOODS 

Peterson's Restaurant 

10th and Trendly East St. Louis 

Hemlock 4378 East 9534 



£ 



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COLA 

BEST BY TASTE-TEST " 



Bottled by 

Nehi Bottling Co. 

400 East "B" Street 
BELLEVILLE, ILLINOIS 



STANLEY'S 



EAST ST. LOUIS, ILLINOIS 



HI-WAY CAFE 



Conveniently Located 



Meals and Short Orders 



Trenton Drug Co. 

Phone 40 
TRENTON, ILLINOIS 



KING RADIO 

Radio and Television 
Sales and Service 



224 West St. Louis Street 
LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



BOYS' AND MENS' APPAREL 

Union Clothing Co. 

138-40 Collinsville Avenue 
EAST ST. LOUIS, ILLINOIS 



L. Allen & Sons 



Since 1901 



COMPLETE OUTFITTERS FOR 
MEN, WOMEN and CHILDREN 



Phone 166 
O'FALLON, ILLINOIS 



Daily Capacity, 600 Barrels 
Elevator Capacity, 200,000 Bushels 



Pfeffer Milling Company 

INC. 1899 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



Manufacturers <>\ 

MAR'S PATENT HARD WINTER WHEAT FLOUfl 

FLUFFY RUFFLES SELF-RISING FLOUR 

LEBANON BELLE CAKE FLOUR 



Dealers in 
LUMBER and BUILDING MATERIALS 



68 



PARIS 

Cleaning and Dyeing 

CLEANING BY THE 
MODERN METHOD 

Phone 136 
LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



Schwarz Furniture 



Established 1894 



225 West First Street Phone 33 

O'FALLON, ILLINOIS 



To McKendree College . . . 
MAY IT EVER GROW 

COMPLIMENTS 
of the 

First National Bank 

of 

Lebanon 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



Member of the Federal Deposi 
Insurance Corporation 



Klein's Clothing and 
Dry Goods 

CLOTHING FOR EVERY MEMBER 
OF THE FAMILY 

117 West St. Louis Street 
LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



Compliments 

of 

HOME BAKERY 

Phone 118 
LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



The Lebanon 
Advertiser 

MR. AND MRS. LEON H. CHURCH 
LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



BUSCHER HOTEL 
CAFE 



Phone 60 
LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



69 



LEBANON 
ELECTRIC 



Joe Brewer Jack Webb 

Proprietors 



-^ 



GENERAL ELECTRIC 
APPLIANCES 



REFRIGERATION SALES 

and 

SERVICE 



Davis 
Clothing Co. 

MEN'S — BOYS' CLOTHING 

"If It's NEW, We Have It" 
TRENTON, ILLINOIS 



KROGER GROCERY 

and 

BAKING COMPANY 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



THE CALL 
PRINTING 
COMPANY 

DAN A. & A. J. THROOP, Mgrs. • PRINTING SERVICE SINCE 1 904 

"Talent to Originate 
. . . Skill to Produce" 



-«m» 



EAST ST. LOUIS, ILLINOIS 
Broadway at Third Phone East 4204 



70 



A Most Pleasant Welcome 

Awaits You at All Times at 

BILL'S 

For Good Fountain Service 
GIFTS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

CONFECTIONERY, 

JEWELRY, 

ETC. 

DAUMUELLER'S 
Music and Gift Shop 

215-217 West St. Louis Street 
LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



ST. LOUIS DAIRY CO. 

Established 80 Years Ago to 

Promote Better Health 
In the Community We Serve 



Serving McKendree College With 

GRADE "A" DAIRY PRODUCTS 

'From the World's Finest Dairy Plant" 



-«eU ; >- 



BELLEVILLE BRANCH 
Phone Belleville 2480 
BELLEVILLE, ILLINOIS 



Monken 
Mercantile Co. 

"The Store of Service" 

GROCERIES . . . DRY GOODS 
HARDWARE . . . SHOES 

Phone 117 
LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



COLLEGE SUPPLIES AND 
FOUNTAIN PENS 

Try Our Soda Fountain 

We Serve DeLuxe Ice Cream 
and Toasted Sandwiches 



Lebanon Drug Co. 

O. C. FRESHOUR, R. Ph. 



BLUMENSTEIN 
BROS. 

FRESH and SMOKED 
MEATS 



-4*- 



Phone 113 
LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



71 



C. HEER 

General Merchandise 



<\\> 



The Quality Store 



Compliments 
of 

KOCH'S 

5c to $1.00 Store 



MEYER 

Furniture and Undertaking 



Established 1894 



LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



Belle's Beauty Shop 

Complete Beauty Service 



Phone 126 
LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



Compliments 
of 

FOX and KARCH 

The Lebanon Shaving Parlor 
LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



Compliments 

of 

Freeman W. Wolfe 

Manager 

COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. 
Warehouse 

BELLEVILLE, ILLINOIS 



J M& 




72 



-on. a 622 H