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Full text of "The McKendrean : being the year book of McKendree College"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/mckendreanbeingy41mcke 



EN ID RE AN 




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McKendree's original building was erected in 
1828 and destroyed by fire in 1856. As chapel, office, 
dormitory, dining hall, and recitation building, it 
served the school adequately until Old Main made 
its appearance in 1851, after which it was used prin- 
cipally for a chapel. Construction of the present 
chapel began within a year after the burning of the 
original building. 



NDREAN 



A 



Yearbook published by the students 
of McKendree College, Lebanon, Illinois. 
Volume IX, New Series. 




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APR. 5 th 



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FAFF 



PAUL YOST 
Editor-in-Chief 



HELEN MITCHELL 
Organizations 



CHARLES CHADWELL 
Associate Editor 



MARGARET HURSEY 
Features 



RAY FARY 

Business Manager 



ROSS HORTIN 
Sports 



JAMES LOY 

Advertising 



PAUL GRIFFIN 



GEORGE EDWARDS 
Advertising 



.MISS ALLEEN W'TLSON 
Faculty Adviser 



MARVIN FORTEL 

Circulation 




OFtD 



To revive McKendree tradition, to link 
the past with the present, to help us 
realize McKendree's possibilities for the 
future — these are our aims in presenting 
the 1941 McKendrean. 

Before proceeding further, we take 
this opportunity to thank all those who 
have aided the staff in compiling this 
book, especially Mr. F. A. Behymer, 
Miss Laura Ford, and Mr. Clifford 
Brown. 




Peter Cartwright, circuit 
riding preacher and friend of 
McKendree College. The sad- 
dle-bags that he used on his 
pastoral travels are in the Mc- 
Kendree museum. 






ONTEN' 



COLLEGE 

Administration 

Faculty 

Classes 

CAMPUS 

Organizations 

Athletics 

Features 



No college in America is more richly 
endowed with tradition than is McKen- 
dree. Nor are these traditions merely 
faded memories ; they live, even today, 
upon The Hill. The glories and accom- 
plishments of McKendree's past speak 
to us out of her mellowed brick walls 
and ancient oaks. They make us feel 
the indomitable spirit of her great men 
and women, who have gone before, urg- 
ing us on to greater effort. 

To these sacred traditions, this book 
is sincerely dedicated. 





EDICATIO 






A D 



» 



*& 




The treasure trove of ages' gulden store, 
Dons winter's newest garb. 



MINISTRATION 




ALWAYS understanding, and eager 
to ease the burdens of modern 
youth, yet, steadfastly living in 
the finest of McKendree traditions; cap- 
able, efficient, gracious and willing, their 
greatest reward — the gift to us of our 
happiest memories. 



CHARLES T. STOWELL, Ph.D. 
Dean 



CLARK R. YOST, A.B., D.D., LL.D. 

President 





EDWIN P. BAKER 

M.A., LL.D. 
German 



ALLEEN WILSON 
B.A., B.S. in L. S. 
Librarian 



WILLIAM T. 

SCARBOROUGH 

Ph.D. 
Philosophy and Religion 



HAROLD N. 
HERTENSTEIN 

M.S. 
Chemistry and 
Mathematics. 



ARTHUR K. 
HENDERSON 
A.B. 

Director of Physica 
Education 



MRS. BLANCHE 
HERTENSTEIN 

Matron of Carnegie Hal 
and Dietitian 




I'.akr 



Alleen Wilson 

W. J. Scarborough 

Harold X. Hertenste 

Arthur K. Henderso 

Blanche- Hertenste. 



I'lhcr II. KIeinschim.lt 

Webster R. Schmidt 

Ruth Mc Daniel 

Laura Ford 

Herbert D. Gould 

Bertha Wease 



Mary H. Wright 
C. DeWiit Hardy 

Rcinhold 11. Holm 

Grace Welch 
Eliza Donaldson 
Clifford C. Brown 

Page Ten 




FACULTY 



James C. Dolley 



Harold E. Wal 



S. M. McCliir 



OLIVER H. 
KLEINSCHMIDT 

A.A.G.O. 
Piano, Organ, Theory 



WEBSTER R. 

SCHMIDT 

M.S. 
Chemistry and Physics 



RUTH McDANIEL 
M.A. 
Romance Language 



LAURA N. FORD 
M.Mus. 
Voice and Public School 
Music 



HERBERT D. GOULD 
B.S. 
Football and Basketball 
Coach 



MRS. BERTHA WEASE 
Matron of Clark Ha 



MARY H.WRIGHT 
Ph.D. 
English 

C. DeWITT HARDY 
M.A. 
I 'istory 

REINHOLD B. HOHN 
M.A. 
Education 



MRS. ROBERT WELCH 

M.S. 
Speech and Dramatics 

ELIZA J. DONALDSON 
M.A. 
Commerce 
Comptroller 

CLIFFORD C. BROWN 
A.B. 
Executive Secretary 



MRS. NELL G. OPPITZ 
M.A. 
History 



JAMES C. DOLLEY 

M.A., Litt.D. 

Latin and Greek 



HAROLD E. WALLACE 
Ph.D. 
Biology 



S. M. McCLURE 
M.S. 

Geology 

( No Picture) 
WILLARD J. 
FRIEDERICH 

M.A. 
Speech and Dramatics 
( Second semester) 



"Oh, no man knows 
Through what wild cen- 
turies 
Roves back the rose." 

Walter de la Mare, 
All That's Past. 





Time Passes 




Things are not what they used to be 



Fashions Come and Go 




And so do we 




P«vl-<JA."<« 



S E M I O R 




Donald Nothdurft 



Isabel Shaffer 



DONALD NOTHDURFT, A.B. 

Lebanon 
History 
Though a transfer student from Central Wesleyan, Donald Nothdurft has 
become a true son of McKendree. Don has been one of the busiest men on the 
campus this year. The students indicated their confidence in him when lie was 
elected president of the student association for the first semester. He was 
president, also, of Y.M.C.A., and held the same office for one term in Philo. 
He was selected to appear in "Who's Who Among American Colleges and Uni- 
versities". Don is musically inclined, too, as evidenced by his being chosen to 
sing bass in the McKendree quartet. 

[SABEL SHAFFER 

Sumner 
Much to the regret of all on McKenrlree's campus, Isabel was forced to 
withdraw from school during the second semester on account of illness. Appar- 
ently "absence" only "made the heart grow fonder" for she was elected May 
Queen after she left the campus. Unfortunately she was not able to participate 
in this joyous spring event. She was chosen for "Who's Who Among American 
Colleges and Universities" during her junior year. We are hoping for your 
return, Isabel, for we miss you on The Hill. 



CARL HEARD. B.S. 

East St. Louis 

Chemistry 

Many of Carl Heard's waking hours are spent on highway fifty between 
East St. Louis and Lebanon. Otherwise he is occupied with work as chemist at 
The Aluminum Ore Company. Domestic duties come in for a share of his 
time as well. 



Page Fourteen 



CLASS 




Marvin Fortel 



Dolores Cooper 



Stella -Mae Steiilcl 



MARVIN FORTEL, A.B. 
St. Louis, Missouri 
History 
No McKendree party would be complete without Marvin Fortel to lead 
it. He seems to have a never-ending store of ideas to make each party a suc- 
cess. You must not get the idea, however, that Marvin is purelv sociallv minded. 
Quite the contrary is true. Although he came, as a junior, from Central Wes- 
levan College, he lost no time in getting into the swing of McKendree's activ- 
ities. He was president of Philo tor one term, social chairman of Y.M.C.A., 
a member of the Sigma Beta Rho Quartet, and circulation manager of the 1941 
McKendrean. Last, but no means least, Marvin was president of the Student 
Association during his last semester in school. 

DOLORES COOPER, A.B. 
East St. Louis 
French 
Dolores Cooper has been especially outstanding in girls' athletics during her 
four years at McKendree. Her ability in basketball and as a tumbler will long 
be remembered. She has been secretary-treasurer and president of W.A.A. 
Dolores' popularity on the campus is clearly shown when we consider that during 
her senior year, she was chosen football queen, and held the office of secretary- 
treasurer of both her class and the student body. She has also been a member 
of the Glee Club and the Review Staff. 

STELLA MAE STE1DEL. A.B. 

Lebanon 

Piano 

To think of Stella Mae Steidel is to think of music. Stella Mae and her 

piano are one and inseparable. Her musical activities are not limited to the piano, 

however, since she plays also the clarinet and saxophone and was a member 

of the Clee Club. Stella Mae was secretary-treasurer of her class during her 

sophomore year. 



S E M I O P 




Oliver Keiser 



George Pimlott 



Raymond Switzer 



OLIVER KEISER. A.B. 

Benld 
Philosophy and Religion 

That the life of a commuter is no bed of roses might be the testimony of 
Oliver Keiser as he treks daily between home and campus, where lie spends 
long hours in recitation room and library. Pastoral duties are his chief concern. 
but he finds time to participate actively in Sigma Beta Rho, having been presi- 
dent and secretary-treasurer of that organization. His name appeared in the 
latest edition of "Who's Who Among American Colleges and Universities". 



Erratum. 1-' 
class in the 1942 McKendrean 



GEORGE PIMLOTT 

si semester senior whose record wi 



ippear with the senior 



RAYMOND SWITZER. A.B. 

( )live Branch 

Philosophy and Religion 

Raymond Switzer's genial presence will be missed from this campus next 
year. His pastorate at Troy is a thing dear to his heart. Sigma Beta Rho claims 
him for her own ; and — last but not least — if any information is desired con- 
cerning his working qualifications, just inquire of Mrs. I lertenstein. 



CLASS 




Roger Tappmeye 



Charles Long 



ROGER TAPPMEYER, A.B. 
Sparta 
History 

A photographer, a salesman, a preacher, a confirmed bachelor — combine 
all these personalities and you have Roger Tappmeyer. Roger spends the better 
part of his spare moments in furthering his photographic interests; but he 
found time to be an active Philosophian, serving as president in '41. He was 
vice-president of Y.M.C.A. in '41, and 
Club, Sigma Beta Rho 



m addition, he was a member of the Glee 
and the 1940 McKendrean Staff. 



CHARLES LONG, A.B. 

Granite City 

English 

The name of Charles Long is well known to every one on The Hill. This 
is easilv understood when we consider that his activities were not limited to 
one or two fields. Charles' most outstanding achievements were in dramatics, 
having acted leading roles in a number of plays. He was interested in athletics, 
and letters in football and track permitted him to become a member of the "M" 
Club. He put his creative writing ability to use as a member of Sigma Tau 
Delta and the Review staff. Charles, a Platoman, was vice-president of his 
sophomore class and was president of both his junior and senior classes. 



[■'age Seventeen 



JUNIOR CLASS 



ilSrll 


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P5 ~ '- 


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WKBBM ^ or B 191 m^^ 



Anna Lois Gann, Leland Grieve, George Edwards, Ralph Edwards, Harry Ward, 
Robert Allen. 

OFFICERS Ralph Edwards 

_ , ... Carlus Basinger 

President Robert Allen Barbara Woolard 

Vice-President Harry Ward Paul Yost 

Anna Lois Gann 

Secretary. Anna Lois Gann 

Jorden Debban 
Treasurer „ George Edwards Mary Ruth Shelton 

Chaplain Ralph Edwards Kuss ^ Drennan 

Bonnye Broadus 
Sgt.-at-Arms Leland Grieve Leland Grieve 

Dorothy Turrentine 
NO PICTURES Charks Haigh 

Harry Ward 
Thomas Brown Flossine Rule 

Myrl Merman J ose P h Fizze11 

Robert Herman A]herl Jondro 

Arthur Baum 
Earl Meyers Robert Allen 

ir- o , ,. Raymond Farv 

\ lrgnna ^chulte ■ ,,.., n /. , 

* \\ lima Ditzler 

Mabel Smith . ,, r , r 

Arnold Eddmgs 

Dale Winter 

Eugene Leckrone 

Llarold Ore 

George Edwards 

Marion Kleinschmidt 
Carrol Lowe 



Pane Eighteen 




Page Nineteen 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 




Mary Presley, Don Hartman, Earl Braeutigam, Jim Oppitz, Jean Miller, I'; 



OFFICERS 

President Paul Griffin 

Vice-President Alary Presley 

Secretary Jean Miller 

Treasurer Earl Braeutigam 

Importer James Oppitz 

Sergeant-al-Arms Don Hartman 

NO PICTURES 
Cicero Burns 

Donald Hartman 
Francis Martin 

Ralph Monken 

Robert Stoffel 
Ralph Walsh 



Ray Wieland 
Viola Pitch ford 
Ross Hortin 
Adina Young 
Paul Yanatta 

Mary Elizabeth Presley 
LaVerne Book 
James Agles 

Juanita Zinchlog 
Helen Mitchell 
Wayne Timmons 
June Miller 
Richard Recard 
Frances Robinson 
Royce Timmons 
Earl Braeutigam 
Helen Utterback 
Frank Glotfelty 
Paul Griffin 

Charles Chadwell 
Mary Ellen Glotfelty 
Waj ne Stevenson 
Antone Tepatti 
Jean Miller 
James Oppitz 

Margaret Hursey 
Gerald Gulley 
George Tuttle 

Lewis Winterrowd 
Mary Matthews 
Cyril Curtis 
James Loy 
Kav McLeod 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



nk 


mJm 11 



Bonnie Bell, Boyd Anderson, Robert Matthews, Alberta Younj; 



OFFICERS 

President Boyd Anderson 

Vice-President Rob Matthews 

Secretary Alberta Young 

Treasurer Ronnie Rell 

NO PICTURES 

Joanne Moore 

Mrs. Harold Ore 
Harry Barter 
Curtis Burns 

Ivan Donaldson 
Donalcl Harmon 

John Kahn 

Rernard Logan 

Robert Matthews 
Andrew Patterson 
William Plato 
Leslie Purdv 

Richard Sheppard 
Richard Snyder 
Tack Spiller 
Harold Todd 

Clifford Wade 
Roy Waggoner 

Murray Harrison 

Robert Kercher 
Clair Yilliger 

Alvin Whittemore 
Howard Williams 
Maxine Rail 



Margaret Harshbarger 
Walter Pimlott 
Edna Wray 

Herbert Schroeder 

Virginia McCollum 
Donald Woodburn 
Robert Just 

Alice Bradshaw 

Robert Dannenbrink 

Kathleen Weidler 

James Owens 

Marion Jackson 
Arthur Werle 

Wesley Merrit 
Doris Hooks 
Clifford Keck 
Realrice Atty 

Edward Cavins 
Wilber Wiley 

Alberta Young 
Donald Teaney 
Betty Stelzreide 
Royd Anderson 
Jane Hackmann 
Margaret Saxe 

Arthur Hinson 
Bonnie Bell 

Paul Seibert 
Carol Heer 

Ernest Smith 
Gehl Devore 

John Rowler 

Benjamin Hamm 

Calvin Ryan 



v-p F**\ t-j £*\ 








HL J 




&££££$ 














Pact- Twenty-three 



ALPHA PSI OMEGA 




Marion Kleinschmidt, Margaret Hursey, Arnold Eddings, Miss Alleen Wilson, James Oppitz, 

Prof. Harold Hertenstein, Arthur Werle, Frank Glotfelty, Miss Laura Ford, Prof. Willard 

Friederich, Jean Miller. 



Alpha Psi ( )nu^a, in its thirteenth year at 
McKendree, has manifested new life and enthusi- 
asm. ( >pening the year with an entire member- 
ship of faculty members, we began plans for more 
definite activity. A party was given at the home 
of Mrs. Grace Welch in honor of the pledges-elect 
made eligible by the Homecoming and earlier plays. 
After a pledge period, eight new members were 
inducted into our organization. A second pledge 
period added two new members. 

Alpha Psi has accepted the sponsorship of the 
faculty play, an activity which is anticipated to 
become an annual event, as of former years. This 
year the play presented was Pinero's "The Enchant- 
ed Cottage" with Mrs. Harold Hertenstein and 
Professor C. DeWitt Hardy playing the leads. 

Members of Alpha Psi met regularly to read 
and discuss drama. The meetings were held off 
the campus in the homes of the resident members 
and combined social pleasure with business. 



PROF. WILLARD 
FRIEDERICH 
Cast-Director 



.MISS ALLEEN 
WILSON 
Cast-Secretary 



ARNOLD EDDINGS 
Stage-Manager 



SIGMA TAU DELTA 




Charles Long, Mary Ruth Shelton, Dr. Mary H. Wright, Ralph Edward 
Barbara Woolard, Helen Waggoner (alumna member). 



Dr. C. R. Yost, 



CHARLES LONG 
President 

BARBARA WOOLARD 
Vice-President 



MARY RUTH 
SHELTOX 
Secretary-Treasurer 



DR. M. H. WRIGHT 

Sponsor 



A chapter of Sigma Tau Delta was organized 
on our campus in 1936. We are the Jota chapter 
of this national honorary professional literary fra- 
ternity. 

We had six members at the beginning of the 
year. After a pledge period in the second semes- 
ter, we inducted one new member, Helen Mitchell, 
into our organization. 

Sigma Tau meetings are held for the purpose 
of reading and evaluating current literary pro- 
ductions. Our aim is to promote creative writing. We 
submit material to our national magazine, "The 
Rectangle". Several of our selections have been 
printed this year. 



T V 



Page Twenty-five 



SIGMA BETA RHO 




Gerald Gulley, Earl Meyers, Raymond Switzer, LaVerne Book, Wilma Ditzler, Helen 

Mitchell, Mary Shelton, Oliver Keiser, Dr. W. C. Walton, Dr. W. 1. Scarborough, Charles 

Haigh, Roger Tappmeyer, Ralph Edwards, Calvin Ryan. Charles Chadwell. 



Service. Brotherhood, and Religion have long 
been the key-words to a successful Christian min- 
istry. ( )ur Sigma Beta Rho organization endeavors 
to uphold and maintain these Christian virtues in 
the lives of its student ministers. 

Tin- traditional "men only" set-up was over- 
thrown last year when the first woman was taken 
into the organization. Now Sigma I'.eta Rho boasts 
a membership of five women and nineteen men. 

We sponsored a caroling party before Christ- 
mas vacation which terminated in a chili supper 
served around the lighted Christmas tree in Pear- 
son's Hall. 

Devotional programs were presented each. Mon- 
day afternoon this year. The organization also 
sponsored Gospel Teams which contacted many of 
the churches in Southern Illinois. 



RAYMOND SWITZER 
President 



CHARLES HAIGH 
Vice-President 



OLIVER KEISER 

Secretary-treasurer 

HELEX MITCHELL 
Program Chairman 



CLIONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 




lean Miller, Frances Robinson, Isabel Shaffer, Adina Young, Margaret Hursev, Mary Ruth 

Shelton, Helen Mitchell, Viola Pitchford, Mary E. Presley, Mary Ellen Glotfelty, June Miller, 

Flossine Rule, Helen Utterback. 



Presidents for the ^ear 



MARY RUTH 
SHELTON 



ISABEL SHAFFER 
FLOSSINE RULE 



From 1868, the day of bonnets and bustles, to 
1941 with its ankle socks and cardigans the Clion- 
uin Literary Society has been a favorite among 
McKendree co-eds. 

Clio has just completed another successful year. 
Two pledge periods have increased our active mem- 
bership to a total of twenty. We presented several 
open session programs. Philo entertained us with 
a skating party at the Sionilli roller rink in East 
St. Louis. 

The traditional spring banquet at the Melbourne 
Hotel in St. Louis was a gala affair. The colorful 
formals worn by the girls on that Friday night of 
April 18 did much toward carrying out the floral 
theme of the occasion. 

Rut that is only half of the story. Clio is not 
merely a frolicsome group lacking a serious side. 
We have literary programs each Monday night. 
These programs help us develop stage presence 
and speaking ability. 

Altogether Clio does much toward producing 
that well-balanced personality which every girl 
desires. 



PHILOSOPHIAN LITERAR Y SOCIETY 




Charles Haigh, Cyril Curtis, James Agles, Ross Hortin, Carrol Lowe, Roger Tappmeyer, 

Donald Nothdurft, Jim Oppitz, Marvin Fortel, Ralph Edwards, Paul Yost, Joe Fizzell, 

George Pimlott, Arnold Eddings, Arthur Baum, Paul Griffin. 



has 
the 
yea 



"P-H-I-L-O! Phi- 
rung in Philo h; 
hearts of many 1 



o!" tin 

II since 



age old cheer \ 
1837 served t( 
losophians this 



past 



Philo, with Plato's competition as a stimulus, 
has had a very active year. Some events might be 
said to have proved almost too active for the Phil- 
osophians and their guests when one recalls those 
stiffened grumblers the day after the Philo-Clio 
skating party at the Sionilli roller rink in East St. 
Louis. 

Philo entertained with two skating parties, two 
pledge banquets, a stag wiener roast, and several 
open sessions. An addition of six new members 
gives us twenty-one active members. 

Since the days of long and oratorical discourse, 
Philo and Plato have been rivals. Many pranks, 
too numerous to mention, have been played by both 
societies, but the combined spring banquet proved 
that the two men's societies are not as hostile as one 
might suppose. 

Despite Plato's accusations, we Philosophians 
evaluate our organization as "the best on the hill". 
May that cry, "P-H-I-L-O" continue to ring down 
through the years. 



Presidents for the Year 

PAUL GRIFFIN 
ROGER TAPPMEYER 
MARVIN FORTEL 
DON NOTHDURFT 

II.M ( >PPITZ 



Page Twenty-eight 



PLATONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 




front row— Charles Long, Bob Allen, Harry Ward, Antone Tepatti, Dale Winter. 
Back row— George Edwards, Lewis Winterrowd, Richard Recard, Ray Wieland, Leland 
Grieve. 



Presidents for the Year 
CHARLES LONG 

GEORGE EDWARDS 

HOB ALLEN 

LELAND GRIEVE 



The traditional Philo-Plato rivalry was revived 
on the hill this year with the reorganization of the 
Platonian Literary Society. 

We began the year with an outstanding open 
session which was attended by many Platonian 
alumni. These men, among them those whose whit- 
ened hair denoted age, expressed their loyalty to 
Plato in a program which was thoroughly remin- 
iscent. 

This year Plato has ten active members, eight 
of whom have joined our organization since Sep- 
tember. We are proud of our rapid increase. Plato, 
when compared with Philo, claims "quality rather 
than quantity". 

The Plato-Clio-Philo banquet this year indicated 
that the three literary societies are just "one big 
happy family". This affair was called the "Fiesta 
of the Flowers". Gay decorations accentuated the 
flower theme. The Colonial Room of Hotel Mel- 
bourne in St. Louis was a perfect setting for the 
occasion. An interesting program was presented, 
and in addition there was that menu of delicious 
food which included roast young turkey, potatoes 
au Gratin, lemon sherbet and many other delectable 
edibles too numerous too mention. 

We are proud of our progress this year. May 
Plato continue to uphold her many fine traditions. 



Y. W. C. A 




hell. Wi 



Ruth Shel- 



All) 



ninu. 



Bonnye 



Third Rozv—Adira Young, UVerne Book, Helen Mi 

ton, Margaret Hursey, Mary Presley, Helen Utterback. 
Second Row — Dorothy Turrentine, Beatrice Atty, Kay McLeod, 

Broadus, Mary Matthews, Mary Glotfelty, Lois Kinison. 
First Rozv— Alice Bradshaw, Margaret Saxe, Kathleen Weidler, June Miller, Viola Pitchford, 

Flossine Rule. 



The Y.W.C.A. was made dear to the hearts of 
many of our girls, several weeks before we actually 
met on the hill, through the traditional "big-sister- 
little-sister" activity. 

The annual "Y" Mixer on September 12 helped 
all of us to become better acquainted and provided a 
very delightful social event to which every McKen- 
drean was invited. 

The Y.W.C.A. has been an asset to our school 
in many ways. Every student at McKendree is 
regarded as a member of the Y.W. or Y.M. The 
Y.W. meets every Wednesday evening for an inter- 
esting program which has been planned in a cab- 
inet meeting at the first of the year. Among out- 
standing programs this year we have had : Miss 
Lillie Sheffer from the East St. Louis Neighbor- 
hood House; Prof. Hardy's musical program; dra- 
matic readings by Mrs. Grace Welch and Mr. Wil- 
lard Friederich; a Professor ( )uiz program; a party 
at Phyllis Brown's; and the Faculty-Student Ama- 
teur Hour. 

Heart Sister week in February, another tradi- 
tion, aroused the dormant good-fairy spirit in the 
hearts of the McKendree co-eds and added interest 
to a successful year. 



MARY RUTH 
SHELTON 
President 

ISABEL SHAFFER 
Vice-President 

HELEN UTTERBACK 
Secretary-Treasurer 

LA VERNE B( >< >K 

Chaplain 
VDINA YOUNG 

Publicity Manager 
MARY ELIZABETH 
PRESLEY 

Pianist 
WILMA D1TZLER 

Program Chairman 

HELEN MITCHELL 

Social Chairman 
MARGARET HURSEY 

Room Chairman 
MRS. C. T. STOWELL 
MRS. C. C. BROWN 

Advisers 



Y. M. C. A. 




tel, Paul Yost, Dr. W. J. Scarborough, Prof. C. U. Hardy, Charles Haigh, Donal 
Nothdurft, Roger Tappmeyer, Cyril Curtis, Ralph Edwards. 



DONALD 

NOTHDURFT 
President 

ROGER TAPPMEYER 
Vice-President 

RALPH EDWARDS 
Secretary-Treasurer 

MARVIN FORTEL 
Social Chairman 

CHARLES HAIGH 
Chaplain 

CYRIL CURTIS 
Pianist 

PAUL YOST 

Publicity Chairman 

PROF. C. D. HARDY 

Adviser 



The Y.M.C.A. meets every Wednesday evening 
for devotional programs. This year we engaged 
in several open forums which were always lively 
and interesting. We have had talks by several of 
our professors as well as fire-side chats with A. K. 
Henderson. Frequently we had joint sessions with 
the Y.W.C.A. 

We assisted with the "Y" Mixer as our opening 
activity this year. Pearson's Hall was gaily dec- 
orated with the school colors. The students coupled 
oft" in seven fifteen-minute "dates" during the eve- 
ning. We all became better acquainted through 
this first social event of the year. 

The two "Y's" sponsored the annual Valentine 
partv. Again Pearson's Hall became the scene of 
a festive celebration. Hearts and valentines dec- 
orated the room. "Sweetheart games" were played 
and the party was climaxed with refreshments 
served, by candle-light, from a table bearing a well- 
filled punch bowl and two large heart-shaped cakes. 



DEBATE SQUAD 




C. D. Hardy, James Op 



Debate activities at McKendree were limited this 
year because a number of the members of the squad 
had conflicting activities. 

On February 13, four men debaters went to 
Greenville College, at Greenville, for the only inter- 
collegiate affair of the year. The two debates on 
the national Pi Kappa Delta question, Resolved : 
That the Nations of the Western Hemisphere 
Should Form a Permanent Union, were of non- 
decision variety. Arthur Baum and Jim Oppitz 
debated the affirmative ; Charles Haigh and Charles 
Chadwell, the negative. 

Marvin Fortel, Rose Hortin, Jim Oppitz, and 
Arthur Baum, together with Professor Hardy, par- 
ticipated in the third annual Public Affairs Con- 
ference held at the Principia College, in Elsah, on 
May 3-4. 



MEMBERS 
Arthur Baum 
James Oppitz 
Charles Haigh 
Arnold Eddings 
Charles Chadwell 

ADVISER 

Prof. C. D. Hardy 



T T 



FACULTY-STUDENT COUNCIL 




Dean C. J. Stowell, Carlus Basinger, Dr. W. J. Scarborough, James Oppitz, Dean E. P. Baker, 
Dr. C. R. Yost, Donald Nothdurft, Miss Alleen Wilson, Ralph Edwards, Isabel Shaffer. 



OFFICERS 

Dr. C. R. Yost 
Chairman 

Don Nothdurft 
Secretary 
(First semester) 

Marvin Fortel 

(Second semester) 



The Faculty-Student Council, the youngest or- 
ganization on our campus, has served again this 
year as a connecting link between the administra- 
tion, the faculty, and the student bodv. 

The meetings of this group take the form of 
discussions relative to the major problems which 
arise "on the hill". 

Representatives are selected from the faculty, 
each of the dormitories, the commuters, the Leban- 
onites, and the student association. Dr. Yost is the 
president of the organization, and the student presi- 
dent serves as secretary. 



Page Thirty-three 



REVIEW STAFF 




Helen Utterhack, Helen Mitchell, I 
Jim Oppit 



Ward, Bob Allen, Dolores Cooper, 
im Agles. 



Students who are interested in the journalistic 
field and who have completed the basic journalism 
course are chosen to be members of the Review- 
staff. 

The McKENDREE REVIEW is a bi-weekly 

publication. This is the first year that the RE- 
VIEW has been published without a faculty spon- 
sor. Members of an advisory committee, appoint- 
ed by the administration, acted as critics of the 
literary qualities of our publication. For twenty 
years the REVIEW has brought news of local 
interest to McKendreans and their friends. 

Our editor, Jim Oppitz, attended the Illinois 
College Press Association convention at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois in March. At this convention, 
the REVIEW received honorable mention for gen- 
eral excellence of the paper as a whole, for a gen- 
eral feature story by Jim Oppitz, and for general 
improvement of our editorial staff. 



JAMES OPPITZ 
Editor 

HELEN MITCHELL 
HELEN UTTERRACK 
Assistant Editors 

JAMES AGLES 
Business Manager 

HARRY WARD 
ROBERT ALLEN 
DOLORES COOPER 
Sports Editors 

ROBERT MATTHEWS 
Circulation Manager 

ALICE BRADSHAW 

Typist 



McKENDREAN STAFF 




Marvin Fortel, Charles Chadwell, George Edwards, Ray Fary, Ross Hortin, Paul Yost, 
Paul Griffin, James Loy, Miss Alleen Wilson, Helen Mitchell, Margaret Hursey. 



PAUL YOST 
Editor-in-Chief 

CHARLES CHADWELL 
Associate Editor 

RAYMOND FARY 
Business Manager 

JAMES LOY 
GEORGE EDWARDS 
Advertising 

MARVIN FORTEL 
Circulation 

HELEN MITCHELL 
Organizations 

MARGARET HURSEY 
Features 

ROSS HORTIN 

Sports 

PAUL GRIFFIN 
Art 

MISS ALLEEN 
WILSON 
Faculty Adviser 



'i he McKendrean staff claims only one tradi- 
tion. This tradition, synonymous with the aim of 
the staff, to produce a yearbook that will become the 
valued possession of every loyal McKendrean, is 
passed down to each new staff with best wishes 
for success and improvement wherever possible. 

It all began in 1905 when a few energetic stu- 
dents produced the "PIGSKIN", a one-hundred 
forty-three page book with a paper binding, and 
shaped like a football. 

The McKENDREAN was first published in 
1913. After this there were publications in 1919, 
1920, 1921, 1925. 192b, 1927, "and 1929. Most of 
these issues were sponsored by the junior class. 
The 1928 edition was combined with the centennial 
history. 

Financial conditions prevented the publication 
of a yearbook in 1930. The junior class, acting 
on its own initiative, published an annual in 1931 
without college backing. This proved to be some- 
thing of a financial disaster. 

In 1933 the McKENDREAN was placed on a 
new monetary basis. An appropriation from each 
student's incidental fee creates a fund which, with 
the assistance of organization fees, patrons, and 
advertisers, has made the McKENDREAN self- 
supporting. 

The student members of the staff are chosen 
from the entire student body. The members give 
their services gratis and, despite the responsibility 
attached, consider it a privilege and an honor to 
be selected as members of the McKendrean staff. 



Page Thirty /iY, 



CHORUS 




Once again, the McKendree Chorus has un- 
selfishly devoted its time to the interests of the 
school. The Chorus has presented programs in 
many of the churches of this conference. We 
appeared before the District conference of the 
Centralia district in April. We practice two eve- 
nings each week. We presented a program over 
radio station KSD as well as the Harrisburg and 
Herrin radio stations. 

We were sorry to lose Mrs. Van Leer but Miss 
Ford, our new director, is also one with whom 
it is a pleasure to work. 

This year we had two social functions. Our 
first party took place on February 6 in Pearson's 
Hall. The room was cleverly and elaborately dec- 
orated with musical symbols and pictures. Our 
skating party was given in the early spring at the 
Moonlight Rink in Troy, Illinois. 

Our annual presentation of an oratorio was 
our last public appearance. This year we present- 
ed "Ruth" on Baccalaureate Sunday evening with 
the assistance of several local singers. 



OFFICERS 



RUBY ELLIS 
MYRL HERMAN 
Presidents 



MARY E. PRESLEY 
ROGER TAPPMEYER 
Vice-Presidents 



TUNE MILLER 
RALPH EDWARDS 
Secretary-Treasurers 



DOUBLE-TRIO AND QUARTET 




MARY MATTHEWS 
ALBERTA YOUNG 
First Sopranos 

JUNE MILLER 

MARY ELLEN 
^ GLOTFELTY 
Second Sopranos 

P.ONNYE BROADUS 
KAY McLEOD 
Contraltos 



The women's double-trio and the men's quartet are chosen from the Glee 
Club. Only two of last year's members continued with these two groups this 
year. 

We sang regularly on the glee club programs and made several trips to 
Southern Illinois churches to present McKendree programs on various nights 
during the week. The women's double trio sang at the district conferences at 
Johnson City, Mascoutah, Bridgeport, and Centralia. 

The second semester brought a change in personnel in the men's quartet, 
with Dr. Harold Wallace singing first tenor in place of Carlus Basinger. Other 
substitutions on various occasions were Wesley Merritt and Don Hartman in 
the baritone and bass parts. 




CARLUS BASINGER 
First Tenor 



"ALL YOST 
Second Tenor 



ROBERT HERMAN 
Baritone 



)ONALD 

NOTHDURFT 
Bass 



Page Thirty-seven 



WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 




Front ro'a? — Juanita Zinchlog, Barbara Woolard, Anna Lois Gann, Helen Mitchell, Frankie 

Robinson, June Miller, Lois Kinison. 
Back row — Margaret Hursey, Bonnie Bell, Jane Hackmann, Marian Jackson, Jean Miller, 

Margaret Saxe, Kathleen Weidler. 



The Women's Athletic Association, though not 
so old as some organizations on our campus, lias 
one established tradition. This is the annual skat- 
ing party given between semesters. This year this 
enjoyable social event took place at the Crystal 
Roller Rink in St. Louis. 

Pledge week increased our membership by 
twelve new members. We played our tournaments 
in the spring' and several girls gained points for 
their v M's". 

A theater party was given at the Alamo in 
December. After seeing Wallace Berry in "Twen- 
ty Mule Team" the partv was served refreshments 
at the Hi-Way Cafe. 

Considering the fact that co-eds were not ath- 
letically inclined during their earlier connection 
with McKendree College we are proud of the 
achievements of this organization, despite the fact 
that it may not have to its credit a lengthy list 
of traditions. 



JUNE MILLER 
President 



JEAN MILLER 
Secretary-Treasurer 



<M" CLUB 



Ut M« M* M< 



Back row — Cicero Burns, Donald Hartman, Herbert Schroeder, Earl Braeutigam, 

Seibert, Paul Griffin, Ross Hortin, Charles Long. 
Front row — George Edwards, Harry Ward, Ray Fary, Bob Allen, Royce Timmons. 



ROBERT ALLEN 
President 



GEORGE EDWARDS 
Vice-President 



HARRY WARD 
Secretary-Treasurer 



The "M" Club is composed of McKendree let- 
termen. This year we increased our membership 
by fourteen new members. 

The traditional football queen contest was under 
our sponsorship. Votes are bought at one cent per 
hundred, and the candidates are chosen from each 
class. Dolores Cooper, a senior, was this year's 
queen. The "M" Club sold programs for the Home- 
coming football game again this year. 

We gave a wiener roast in the early fatf. We 
have awarded three senior medals in football and 
track. 




FOOTBALL TEAM OF 1892 
Top roin—R. Gustin, E. Pfeffer, Hampton, N. Crosby, D. Wallace, O. Wallace. 
— W. Trautmann, J. Webb, Edwards, W. Harding, R. Harding. 
-P. Carter, S. Porter, H. Gadeky, O. Laird. 



Second ro\ 
Third Ron 



Football at McKendree began in 1892, when a team, with lean F. Webb 
as captain, was organized. Only one game was played that year. Smith Academy 
of St. Louis winning this by the score of 66 to 0. The next few years saw little 
improvement. The teams depended entirely, for financial aid, upon voluntary 
contributions of students and the citizens of Lebanon. 

It was not until the season of 1901 that football became firmly established. 
Out of the eight games plaved that season, five were won by McKendree, who 
scored 109 points against her opponents' 58. Financially, too, the season was a 
success. After the entire team had been outfitted, the season ended with $75.00 
in the treasury. During the years following, football has been maintained rather 
consistently at McKendree except for a period when it was officially prohibited 
by the Hoard of Trustees. 

Since 1923, the football game has been an outstanding feature of every 
McKendree Homecoming celebration. McKendree has been the victor in ten 
of these eighteen games. 




„, Coach Herbert Gould, Dick Kahr^Jjohn Bowler, Cujtis 
Burns, Jorden Debban, Harry Ward, Paul 'Seibert, Walter P 



Back rou— Prof. Harold Wall 



minis, jonien uennan, nariy vvaiu, i am juuui, ,,.*».._--- --, -- 

Herbert &chroeder, Boyd Anderson, Andy Earterson^Arthur Hinson, Paul Yost. 
Front row— Cicero Burns, George^Edwards, Ray Fary, Jim Loy, Don Hartman, Earl Braeu- 
tigam, Royce Timmons, Ross Hortin, Lewis Winterrowd. 



The Bearcats finished the 1940 season on the gridiron with two wins and 
six losses, but at least two of these defeats might have been turned into victories 
had a few more reserves been available. Injuries were a serious handicap be- 
cause of the lack of reserve strength. 

Everyone had hopes of a good year after the Bearcats had shown both 
fire and fight in edging out Mission House 7-6 and had taken LaSalle-Peru to 
camp 7-0; but Eureka came along and gave McK. its worst trouncing of the 
year, 32-0 The scores for the remainder of the season were: Burlington Junior 
College 32, McK. 13; Shurtleff 12, McK. 0; Chillicothe Business College 12, 
McK. 7; The Principia 19, McK. 0; and Illinois College 26, McK. 0. 

Highlights of the season were: The goal line stands with Mission House 
which resulted in the slender marginal victory ; George Edward's taking a blocked 
try for point after touchdown and running it over for the point in the Burling- 
ton game; the hard play in the first half of the Homecoming game with Shurt- 
leff- the good percentage of passes completed bv Bearcat passers all season; 
and' coming back to outplay a strong Illinois College team in the last half after 
they had scored 26 points in the first period. 



rage Forty- 




'^** «scf \r* ^* 



HSy t A Fa 










Edwards 



Farv 



Hortin 




Ward 



Debban 

Griffin 



Curtis Burns 



Seibert 



Schroeder 



Braeutigam 



TIartnian 



Lov 



Cicero Burns 



CO-CAPTAIN GEORGE EDWARDS. Junior. 
East St. Louis. Quarterback; Three Year Letterman. 
"Buddy" was the most versatile of the Bearcat backs, 
punting, plunging, running the end sweeps, and tossing 
and receiving passes. George had the confidence of the 
whole team as a signal caller and proved himself a 
spirited and smart leader on the gridiron. "Buddy" was 
one of the best all-round offensive and defensive backs 
McKendree has produced in recent years. 

' CO-CAPTAIN RAYMOND FARY, Junior 

Seabright, New Jersey. Tackle ; Three Year Letter- 
man. 

A vicious tackier, and an inspiring leader, Ray played 
the end and center positions with no little success. Al- 
though he returned to school too late for the first game 
of the season and was injured at the start of the second 
game, Ray was the only man on the team picked fur the 
Ivy League All-Star team. As a line-backer, Ray had 
no superior. 



ROSS HORTIN, Sophomore. 

Albion. Center; One Year Letterman. 
After riding the bench one season, "Rosie" saw action 
in ever}' quarter played all season, excepting three when 
he was forced out with a shoulder injury. 



ANDY PATTERSON, Freshman. 

West Frankfort. Halfback; One Year Letterman. 

Andy, the fastest man on the squad, came to McKendree 
with a good reputation as a ball "toter" and lived up to 
it. Andy could also pass, punt, and place-kick with 
more than average ability. 

ROYCE TIMMONS, Sophomore. 

Granite City. Halfback; One Year Letterman. 
Playing both guard and halfback, "Miece" was in there 
trying almost every minute of the season. In addition 
to being one of the best passers on the team, Royce was 
a hard runner and a jarring tackier. 



HARRY WARD, Junior. 

Granite City. End ; Three Year Letterman. 
"Roz" had the speed and football intelligence necessary 
to fill almost any position, and demonstrated this fact 
by playing center, end, and halfback during the 1940 sea- 
son. 

WALTER PIMLOTT, Freshman 
Carmi. Tackle; One Year Letterman. 
Good-sized and nicely built, "Red" was a regular front 
line performer from the start. They just didn't come 
too big nor too tough for "Red". 

JORDEN DEBBAN, Junior. 

Bondwell, Wisconsin. Guard; One Year Letterman. 
Torden, who played football at Mercer University and 
Presbyterian Junior College before coming to the Bear- 
cats, was right at home in the forward wall. 



PAUL GRIFFIN, Sophomore. 

East St. Louis. Halfback; One Year Letterman. 

"Whang" was the Bearcats' most consistent ground- 
gainer until he was injured in the Chillicothe game. Big 
and fast, he was hard to stop when he had the ball. 

BOYD ANDERSON, Freshman. 
Albion. End; One Year Letterman. 

"Tex" was a reserve most of the season and saw action 
in several positions, even going into the backfield and 
tossing some good passes. "Tex" did more than his 
share to keep the team pepped up. 

CURTIS BURNS, Freshman. 

Lebanon. Tackle; One Year Letterman. 

"Curt" was used as a reserve both in the line and in the 
backfield. His perfect block in the LaSalle-Peru game 
gave Cicero an open field for his long touchdown run. 

PAUL SEIP.ERT, Freshman. 

East St. Louis. End; One Year Letterman. 

Paul was one of the hardest fighting men on the squad, 
always getting his share of the tackles when he was in 
the game. Tough and wiry, Paul was a thorn in the 
enemy's side whenever he was in the game. 

HERBERT SCHROEDER, Freshman. 
Mascoutah. Tackle; One Year Letterman. 
After riding the bench during the first games of the 
season, "Herb" displayed some real football when he got 
into the game. Schroeder was the most improved player 
on the squad at the end of the season. 



EARL BRAEUTIGAM. Sophomore. 
Mascoutah. Fullback; Two Year Letterman. 

"Kraut's" specialty was hitting the line, but he was no 
slouch as a pass receiver. Playing in the line of defense, 
he was a rock of granite in the forward wall. He was 
the iron man of the team, playing every minute of the 
entire season. 



DONALD HARTMAN, Sophomore. 
O'Fallon. Tackle; Two Year Letterman. 

The heaviest linesman on the team, "Duck" opened the 
way on offense and plugged those holes on defense. 
When Don hit 'em, they knew they had been hit. 



JAMES LOY, Sophomore. 

Effingham. Guard ; One Year Letterman. 

"Goat" was a hard-blocking guard and a sturdy defen- 
sive man. He spent very little time on the bench. Loy 
was an aggressive guard, and was especially adept at 
pulling out of the line and leading a play around end. 

CICERO BURNS, Sophomore. 

Lebanon. End ; One Year Letterman. 
"Cis" was a pass-snagger and a hard man for the oppo- 
sition to circle on an end run. He made the longest 
Bearcat run of the season, running sixty yards for a 
touchdown after catching a pass in the LaSalle-Peru 
game. 



Page Forty-three 



Football Queen 



Miss Dolores Cooper, our 1940 Football Queen, was 
selected from eleven candidates in the annual voting contest 
which preceded Homecoming Day. This activity is sponsored 
by the "M" Club. 

Dolores, a popular senior, is a French major. During her 
tour years at McKendree she has manifested her interest and 
ability in the athletic tiekl in a splendid way. She was captain 
of the Kittycubs this year. Dolores is the fifth succeeding 
Homecoming Queen. 

At the informal ceremony which preceded the game. Dr. 
Yost presented the incoming queen with a bouquet of red 
roses on behalf of the student body, after which the retiring 
queen, Miss Gloria Raer, declared Miss Cooper the reigning 
gridiron queen for the 1940-41 season. 




FOOTBALL SONG 

When old McKendree College falls in 

line, 
We're going to win that game another 

time, 
For the varsity we'll yell, yell, yell, 
And for the football team we love so 

well, so well. 
Then we'll tight, tight, fight for every 

score ; 
We'll circle ends and then we'll win 

some more, 
And we'll roll old Shurtleff in the sod, 

in the sod, 
Rah ! Rah ! Rah ! 



OYFR HILL 

Over hill, over dale, we will hit the 

homeward trail, 
As the Bearcats go rolling along. 
Up and down, in and out. 
Though we're groggy, we're not out 
As the Bearcats go rolling along. 
For it's hi, hi, he, 
McKendree for me, 
Shout out her name loud and strong, 

M-C-K! 
And where e'er we go the folks will 

.always know 
That the Bearcats keep rolling along. 



THE KITTYCUBS 




BASKETBALL TEAM OF 1903-04 
Top row left to right — Mabel Duncan, Lulu Large, 
Dora Dougherty, Florence Reinhardt, Myrtle 
Duncan, Lvdia Malernee. 



The Kittycubs have come a lung way in the 
thirty-seven years since 1904. The games of the 
1940-41 team were much more appealing to the 
spectators than those of the heavily clad 1903-04 
McKendreans. 

They failed to win a game; nevertheless, this 
season was successful in that the team improved 
rapidly as the season progressed. Home and 
home games were played with Blackburn and The 
Principia. The alumni also furnished some good 
competition. 

Athletic Director A. K. Henderson, coach 
of the Kittycubs, succeeded Miss Cora Marie 
Thomas, who was on leave of absence for the 
year 1940-41. 



Coach A. K. Henderson 
Dorothy Turrentine 
Dolores Cooper 
Viola Pitchford 
June Miller 
Mary Matthews 
Jean Miller 
Betty Stelzriede 
Margaret Saxe 
Bonnie Bell 
Lois Kinison 




BASKETBALL SQUAD 




fw <^ 




.TiTM 



Back roir— Herbert Schroeder, Jorden Debbai, Clifford Keck, Ross Hortin, Paul Vanatta, 

Harold Todd, Boyd Anderson, Coach Herbert Gould. 
Front row — Ernest Smith, Lewis Winterrowd, George Edwards, Carrol Lowe, Walter 

Pimlott. 



Shortage of experienced material and lack of height describe the 1940-1941 
Bearcats of the hardwood all too accurately. Not one of last year's lettermen 
found his way back to this year's team, and six-footers were as scarce as McKen- 
dree Latin students. 

Coach Gould started the season with a large squad composed mostly of fresh- 
men, but lost most of them either through ineligibility or because of withdrawal 
from school soon after the season opened. 

All six Ivy League games were lost by wide margins as were also the two 
games with Oakland City. The Bearcats battled on even terms with Centralia 
Junior College and Parks Air College. They defeated Jefferson College twice 
and Central Wesleyan once to complete a season of rive victories and ten de- 
feats. 

The most encouraging fact about this rather discouraging season was the 
great improvement shown by the squad as the season progressed. All members 
of the squad, with the exception of Lowe and Edwards, who are juniors, hav.e 
at least two more full years to go. 



LEWIS WINTERROWD, Sophomore. 

Louisville. Forward ; One Year Letterman. 

"Lewie" was captain in the majority of the games 
and also led the entire squad in the scoring col- 
umn. After playing on the reserve squad last 
year he proved the mainstay of this year's team 
from the opening game to the end of the season. 
He was a good ball-handler and very few of his 
passes failed to reach their mark. "Lewie" is the 
type of player who inspires others to do their best 
by his spirit and fight, and was always in there 
giving his best, no matter what odds were against 
him. He will be a big cog in the Bearcat basket- 
ball machine for the next two vears. 



GEORGE EDWARDS, Junior. 

East St. Louis. Guard ; One Year Letterman. 

"Buddy" has shown rapid improvement since he 
graduated from the intramural ranks in his fresh- 
man year. Seldom starting but usually finishing, 
"Bud" saw about as much action as any man on 
the squad and ranked fourth in scoring. He was 
also one of the best rebounders on the team despite 
his five feet, nine inches. 




HAROLD TODD, Freshman. 

Greenville. Forward; One Year Letterman. 

Todd came down from Greenville with a good 
knowledge of the game and a basketball com- 
plex which made him a valuable man from the 
first game on. "Deacon" had the habit of making 
a spectacular shot just when it was most needed. 
He clinched two games with one-hand shots from 
the corner, in the last minute of plav at Parks 
Air College, and in an overtime period at the 
YMCA gymnasium in St. Louis against Jefferson 
College. 



ERNEST SMITH, Freshman. 

Hartford. Guard ; One Year Letterman. 

"Ernie" improved greatly as the season pro- 
gressed, playing his best games against The Prin- 
cipia. Smith was a willing worker on whom the 
coach could depend for full cooperation. Lack 
of size and experience were his main handicaps 
but "Ernie" was rapidly overcoming the latter 
at the end of the season. With three years to 
go, a lot can be expected from this Hartford 
"son of the hardwood". 



WALTER P1MLOTT, Freshman. 

Carmi. Center ; One Year Letterman. 

"Red" was the best rebounder on the team. At 
the same time he had an eye for the basket. 
He was usualhy unfortunate in having to guard 
a man taller than himself, but his man seldom 
garnered many baskets. He was always well 
represented in the scoring column but he was 
strictly a team man. A hard worker, he has the 
size and ability which will enable him to do his 
share for the Bearcats in the next three vears. 



CARROL LOWE, Junior. 

Oblong. Guard ; One Year Letterman. 

The only man to start every game for the Bear- 
cats, Lowe displayed the fight and ability worthy 
of the confidence his coach had in him. Carrol 
made up for his lack of height with lightning 
speed, often intercepting enemy passes and "tying 
up" the ball on numerous other occasions. Lowe 
was Co-Captain of the team, and proved him- 
self an efficient leader on the floor. He had 
good spirit, desire to win, the fight of a real 
leader, and displayed a thorough knowledge of 
the game. 



Page Forty-seven 



TRACK SQUAD 




Back row— Herb Schroeder, Myrl Herman, Paul Vanatta, Jorden Debban, Clifford Keck. 

Walter Pimlott, Boyd Anderson, Dick Snyder, Leland Grieve, Art Werle, George 

Edwards, Paul Griffin, Wayne Stevenson, Paul Seihert, Clair Villiger, Coach A. K. 

Henderson. 
Front rou — Arnold Eddings, Antone Tepatti, Bob Dannenhrink, Carrol Lowe, Boh Allen, 

Ernest Smith, Bob Matthews, Art Hinson, Andy Patterson. 



Coach Henderson scheduled six track meets for the 1941 track team which 
was built around Captain Allen, Griffin, Stevenson, Lowe, Edwards, and Grieve, 
but freshmen also played a prominent part in this year's meets. Some of the more 
promising freshmen were: Werle, Dannenbrink, Snyder, Todd, Anderson, and 
Keck. 

McK. has been much stronger in the held than in the track events the past 
few years. This year was no different since Vanatta and Hartman were able to 
give Griffin the needed help with shot and discus; but it was also hard to till the 
gap left bv John Harmon, the javelin thrower of last year's team. On the other 
hand we still had Lowe to pole vault. Allen to broad jump, and Stevenson to 
high jump. These men gave a good account of themselves. 

TRACK SCHEDULES 

April 26 — Dual Meet: The Principia. Here 

April 30— Dual Meet: Harris Teachers College Here 

May 3— Dual Meet: Blackburn Here 

yj av 10 — Dual Meet: Washington University Freshmen St. Louis 

May 17 — Quadrangular Meet: Blackburn, Eureka, The 

Principia, and McKendree Elsah 

May 2-1 — Dual Meet : Concordia Springfield 



Paiie Forty-eight 



Intramural Sports 

T 



The 1940-1941 intramural sports season at old McK. was successful in that 
a large part of the student body took part and all who participated were rewarded 
with the joy that comes only from active sports. 

Several tournaments were arranged, one of the first of which was the table 
tennis tournament which was won bv Robert "Flash" Allen. The runner-up 
was Arnold Eddings. 

The intramural basketball season is always a center of interest on the hill 
and this year was no exception. The "Skeletons", captained by Tepatti and com- 
posed of Hamm, Cavins, Vanatta, Eddings, Mvrl Herman, and Matthews, were 
the "Champs". The less successful teams included the "Roughnecks", "Scrubs", 
"Ulcers", and "Vipers". 

The volley ball tournament was a real success, having even more partici- 
pants than basketball. Several faculty members, with the help of a student or 
two, formed a team and gave a good account of themselves. The "Ulcers", 
composed of Grieve, Edwards, Allen, Long, Griffin, Recard, Patterson, and 
Pimlott, were the "Champs"; but the "Faculty" ; "Glotfeltyans", "Wonder Boys" 
and "Indians" made a good showing. 

Softball promises to be the biggest thing in intramurals for the whole year. 
The "Ulcers", known as the "Bar Flies" last year, are the defending champions; 
and the other three entries have long been planning ways and means of beating 
"Da Champs". 

A tennis tournament is planned for this spring. Tepatti is the defending 
champion. 




A fair tackle" 
'Sleepy heads" 
Bowl 'er over' 



"Pioneer Paul" 

"Hoy with the broom' 

"School Daze" 

"Had boy bags a 
bum" 



"Ugh" 
"Watch the birdie' 
"I )awn departure" 



"Runners-up to the 
Quints" 

"Annuals 

autographed here" 

( Signed ) Noby 

"The pause that 
refreshes" 

"Goon but not for- 
gotten" 

"That day in June" 



"Eves on the road, 
A. K." 

"Avoid tangles" 

'Huck had nothing 
on us" 

"On foreign soil" 

"Annual affair" 



Easter Parade?" 

'A bonnie belle" 

"All aboard" 



"Each a queen in her 
own right" 

"The Original" 





M 



K 



O 



N 







M 



B 



M 



15 



N 



R 



RETROSPECT 



As the leaves began to fall 

There was heard the well-known call. 

Came the sound of chapel bell 

From this old hill we love so well. 

Freshmen then began to rove 

In from every nook and cove, 

On that day — September nine, 

Wide-eyed Freshmen, all in line 

Started again matriculation, 

Striving for further education. 

Tradition started again next day, 

When Frosh and Faculty had their play. 

To the "Overhead" they did go 

And back again for their free show. 

Then Upperclassmen did arrive, 

Setting old M-c-K alive, 

With a college picnic, first of all, 

On Hypes Field, (we played dodge ball) 

Then off to classes all did trot, 

'Though more unwillingly than not. 

On Thursday evening all were spry 

At the "Mixer"' given by the "V". 

So ended this first glorious week, 

Fun for all — yes, even the meek. 

Socially speaking, that is to say, 

September seventeenth was an eventful day 

For on that eve Doc Yost did say 

To his house we should come to play? 

No, a reception, eats and all. 

Plato, Philo, Clio next did call 

To Open Sessions, as of yore, 

Recalling memories that are no more. 

Romance on the football field began 

When "Our Gal Sal" did get her man 

Among our Gridders who slashed through 

Both Mission House and La Salle-Peru. 

October's a month of much tradition 

Which should be placed in this edition. 

Beginning, the second was the date 

Of the Freshman Picnic — How they ate! 

And broke traditions when they came 

Looking for Upperclassman brain 

Which couldn't discover their hiding place. 

(Isn't that an amusing disgrace?) 

Still, many a little Freshie's feet 

Were sore from his walk — a yearly treat. 



Vayc Fifty-thr 



RETROSPECT 



Then came to our chape] stage, Don Bate, 

Who many an idea did relate. 

Meanwhile, the Bearcats wished they'd won 

Games from Eureka and Burlington. 

October eighteenth brought "Hobo Day" 

And "Open House" with formals gay. 

It was the season of the year 

In which alumni did appear 

For McKendree's yearly Homecoming Game. 

Shurtleff won. At eight there came 

A ghostly play on the chapel stage, 

Ending another traditional page, 

'Til came a happy and gala event 

To which both students and Faculty went. 

Eisenmeyer gymnasium was the scene 

Of the party enjoyed on Hallowe'en. 

November next did coming peek 

hirst upon National Book Week. 

When "Benson Wood" did have it's Ming 

And to the students it's call did ring. 

The sophomores opened the social side 

November eighth with a grand hayride. 

About this time there came the test 

In which each tried to do his best, 

For "Mid-Semester's" usually see 

If we're "to be or not to be" 

With the best students in the class 

Or if we're barely going to pass. 

Thanksgiving vacation came at last, 

Setting McKendree's campus ablast, 

With hurrying students homeward bound 

To enjoy the taste of a turkey browned. 

But that vacation was barely a start 

With home and family we soon had to part. 

And then returning to tasks undone 

We heard a musical concert which won 

Vera Pearl Kemp and her group much praise, 

Through favorable comment it did raise. 

December's activities, as you might suppose 
Were conducted mostly in winter clothes. 
On went the winter with Kittycub games, 
As well as parties for Faculty Dames. 
Each new activity brought much comment. 
Both from "stay-at-homes' and those who went. 



RETROSPECT 



Two important events stand out — 

When all the fellows the girls did rout 

To the "Alamo" for one last try 

Before to Leap Year they said good-bye. 

Then followed some food down at "Highway", 

After this party by W. A. A. 

The second event of joyful renown, 

To which most girls wore a formal gown, 

Was the Christmas party in Pearson's Hall, 

Warmly received by one and all. 

Two days after — to be exact, 

'Twas on the twentieth, — we packed, 

And left the campus with expectation 

Of all we'd do during Christmas vacation. 

The New Year began while we were away. 
Since our returning was on the sixth day. 
'Twas great to come back and talk over the fun 
Of Christmas vacation and all we had done. 
But soon one fact was emphatically clear, 
The semester's end was drawing near. 
So on with books and pens we tore. 
Studying, studying — (playing more) 
To pass "semester's", then have fun 
After our work was nobly (?) done. 
Between the old and new semesters 
We showed our joy with songs and gestures, 
The first of which was truly hearty ; 
'Twas W. A. A.'s big Skating Party. 
Next night was set for Miss Ford's recital 
And we were assured, — this fact is vital — 
That she was accepted, as well as some others 
Who've now grown to be our sisters and brothers. 
For those who entered at last registration, 
Were gladly received with expectation. 



Page I', fly-fire 




u 



M 



R 



H 



M 



IT 



N 



R 



RETROSPECT 



February came and so did new faces. 

Our Bearcats played at various places, 

At Parks Air College and Jefferson, too, 

With spirit determined to see it through. 

February thirteenth was Cupid's delight. 

Pearson's Hall was a "lovely" sight, 

With hearts strung around on every hook 

And even adorning "Neckers' Nook". 

In finishing up a very good start 

The Virginia Reel played a happy part. 

Glee Club trips became common features 

Providing fun ( ? ) for students and teachers. 

Clio held pledge initiation 

Down at Bill's, where emancipation 

From silly costumes and comical story 

Set the pledges free from worry. 

Traditionally, "Sadie Hawkin's Week" 

To our college campus then did sneak. 

Girls asked for dates and escorted the boys ; 

Few lacked courtesy and dignified poise 

Showing those chosen the way to have fun, 

So most were sorry when it was done. 

A student recital about ended things 

For February which famous birthdays brings. 

The winds of March at first did sway 

All thoughts to "happy" Founder's Day. 

Dr. Rice made the main address ; 

From our classes we had a recess. 

March the fifth was the chosen date 

Of Philo's party to Troy to skate. 

And as the winds continued to howl, 

Our campus trees began to growl. 

Down came a huge one behind Pearson's Hall 

Causing some damage in it's fall. 

Student Chapel much change did lend 

Through variation from the general trend. 

Outside of these things above related, 

Not very much more need here be stated, 

Excepting, of course, though needless to say, 

"She Stoops to Conquer" was our Spring Play, 

Tradition says that April showers. 

Surely bring us bright May flowers. 

And since the saying never fails, 

We need not furnish further details 

Of beauty which sprang by leap and bound, 



I'agc Fifty-seven 



RETROSPECT 



From otherwise seemingly barren ground. 

Now the track squad each day did try, 

(Providing that the track was dry), 

To keep on hoping, working, training. 

Despite the fact that it kept raining. 

Even during Spring Vacation 

They kept working with expectation. 

On returning all did unite 

In looking forward to the night 

When Clio, Philo and Plato would dine 

At Hotel Melbourne from eight 'til nine, 

Then enjoy a program sponsored by all 

Three organizations which heeded the call. 

The closing event on the very last day, 

Was "Enchanted Cottage", the Faculty Play, 

The month of May is almost the last ; 
After June comes, the semester has passed. 
When blooming flowers and bird songs gay 
Greeted each morning, as if to say, 
"Hello" to all nature, we stopped to note 
That Radio Dramas which students wrote 
Concluded the series of broadcasts done 
On W-T-M-V, with sponsors none. 
Another play from the college stage, 
Closed the brilliant dramatic page. 
It was entitled, "The Trojan Women", 
Following which attention was given 
To Senior Class Day and Tree Dedication, 
Followed by much deep meditation 
On final exams, and the hope at last 
That difficult subjects had been passed. 
The Literary Societies' program was joint 
And speakers tried to prove the point 
That their contributions were the best 
In the Dorris Oratorical Contest. 

Of Tune's events there is little to say, 
Of course, there was Baccalaureate day, 
An alumni dinner, and legislation 
By the college board ; then graduation. 

May you long remember events of the year, 
Especially those appearing here. 



Page Fifty-eighi 



TRADITIONS 



Hawthorne declares that "Nobody can make a tradition; it takes a century 
to make it." Traditions are like trees ; they grow. Like character they indicate 
qualities in the object with which they are identified. They contribute much to 
the reputation which that object bears — for good or ill. 

Historic facts afford but the skeleton of a life's story; tradition provides 
the flesh and blood, the life-giving elements. Recorded history may remain for 
a thousand years neglected, unloved, but safe in the archives. Tradition is a 
more delicate thing which requires the constant care and active ministry of living 
human beings. Without such faithful attention tradition dies. 

The power of law may engender respect but the power of tradition is greater 
than that of law because it rests on sentiment, and sentiment is made up largely 
of affection. Hence the tenacity of traditions in the face of any concerted effort 
to destroy them. The older the tradition, the deeper its roots sink into the soil 
of human consciousness. To eradicate it is like plucking out the heart. 

McKendree College is rich in traditions. Many of these have, no doubt, 
passed into oblivion, others are cherished by the ever diminishing circle of "old- 
timers", while still others are living, potent factors in the present busy "life upon 
the hill". How coidd it be otherwise with such men in the background as Abra- 
ham Lincoln, Peter Cartwright, and William McKendree, not to mention a score 
of others of local fame. These men were in earnest about providing opportunities 
for "higher learning" for the youth of their own and succeeding generations. 

Space forbids mentioning in detail the traditions handed down from these 
early days, but an analysis of college life in the McKendree of today readily 
reveals the wealth of influence which are daily contributing to the enrichment 
of experiences and to the encouragement of spiritual forces which are essential to 
all true education. These influences are due in large part to the sacred traditions 
of Religion, Democracy, Honor, Courtesy, Integrity, Responsibility and Truth. 

E. P. BAKER 




The Curtain s Going Up 



From the dramatic standpoint, it may be said that McKendree has enjoyed 
an unusually fruitful year. Besides the traditional Homecoming and Spring plays, 
radio dramas assumed an important rule. These thirty minute plays were written 
and produced by the students in Radio Drama 49, and were presented each Friday 
over Station WTMV. 



"The Saturday Evening Ghost", presented as the climax to Homecoming 
activities, revealed the previously unknown talent of students who were already 
familiar figures on the campus as well as that of some of the newly-arrived 
freshmen. 

The cast of this three-act comedy included : 

Lord Canterville i . . ,,, , 

> Arthur Werle 

Sir Simon ' 

Mr. Hiram Otis Franfc Glotfelty 

Lucretia Otis Jean Miller 

Virginia Margaret Hursey 

Sonny-boy Calvin Ryan 

Pet Carol Heer 

Mrs. Umney Joanne Moore 

Lord Archibald Archibald. Arnold Eddings 



The local cast of Alpha I 'si ( >mega set a precedent, which it hopes to main- 
tain in future years, by sponsoring a "faculty play". "The Enchanted Cottage", 
a three-act fantasy by Sir Arthur Wing Pinero was chosen with casting as fol- 
lows : 

Oliver Bashforth.. C. De Witt Hardy 

Mrs. Smallwood Mrs. W. J. Friederich 

Rupert Smallwood H. N. Hertenstein 

Mrs. Minnett Miss Laura Ford 

Major Murray Hillgrove W. J. Friederich 

Rigg A. K. Henderson 

The Rev. Mr. Chas. Corsellis H. E. Wallace 

Mrs. Corsellis._ Mrs. Nell G. Oppitz 

Laura Pennington Mrs. H. N. Hertenstein 




M. Hursey, C. Long, B. Friederich, A. Werle. 



"She Stoops to Conquer", the five-act comedy of Oliver Goldsmith, adapted 
by the speech director, Professor W. J. Friederich, was selected as the "Spring 
Play". Costuming and the particularly outstanding set added much to the presen- 
tation of this eighteenth century comedy. 



THE CAST 



Mrs. Hardcastle. .Marion Kleinschmidt 

Squire Hardcastle.. Arthur Baum 

Tony Lumpkin James Oppitz 

Kate Hardcastle. Margaret Hursey 

Constance Neville 

Betty Phillips Friederich 



Landlady Barbara Woolard 

Charles Marlow Charles E. Long 

George Hastings Arthur Werle 

Diggory.. Carol Heer 

Roger Gerald Gulley 

Sir Charles Marlow.... Arnold Eddings 



To the Play Production Class goes much of the credit for the outstanding 
productions seen on McKendree's campus this year. Besides constructing sets, 
managing the stage and business, as well as attending to numerous minor de- 
tails, this group diverged from its usual procedure and presented the play, "The 
Trojan Women", instead of several shorter plays. 

Thus was concluded a really brilliant dramatic season. 



Page Sixty-or 



After Four Years 

T 

CLASS DAY PROGRAM 

Charles E. Long 
Chairman 

Invocation- Raymond Switzer 

Welcome Charles E. Long 

Music Roger Tappmeyer 

Class History Dolores Cooper 

Music Donald Nothdurft 

Talk Marvin Eortel 

Presentation of the Gavel. Charles E. Long 

Response by Junior President Robert M. Allen 

Class Prophecy.... Roger Tappmeyer 

Class Will Charles E. Long 

"Alma Mater" Assembly 



r=] 



1 RKK I JUDICATION 

Invocation Raymond Switzer 

Remarks Mrs. Xell G. Oppitz 

Dedication Charles E. Long 

benediction Roger Tappmeyer 

"Alma Mater" Assembly 




Isabel Shaffer, senior from Sumner, 
was elected May Queen by the student 
body, but illness forced her to leave 
school earlv in the second semester. 



MAY 




DAY 



Dolores Cooper, an East St. Louis 
senior, was chosen to replace Isabel and 
reign over the day's festivities. To as- 
sume royal duties was no new thing to 
Dolores, since she was Football Queen 
at the 1940 Homecoming. 




I'at/e Sixty three 



Patron List 



DR. AND MRS. ROY BERRY 

Livingston, Illinois 

SUPT. ERNEST R. BRITTON 

Effingham, Illinois 

MRS. ERNEST R. BRITTON 

Effingham, Illinois 

DR. HARRY C. BROWN 

Granite City, Illinois 

MR. A. W. EiCHER 

St. Louis, Missouri 



MR. ROBERT HERMAN 

Lebanon, Illinois 

MISS DOROTHY HERTENSTEIN 

New Baden, Illinois 

MISS MYRA JEANES 

Urbana, Illinois 

MRS. C. B. PEACH 

Lebanon, Illinois 

MRS. RUBY RICE SMITH 

Newman, Illinois 



MISS RUBY ELLIS 

St. Jacob, Illinois 



MRS. GRACE RENNER WELCH 

Lebanon, Illinois 



MR. CYRUS GENTRY 

New York, New York 



DR. CLARK R. YOST 

Lebanon, Illinois 



MR. D. M. HARDY 

St. Louis, Missour 



MRS. CLARK R. YOST 

Lebanon, Illinois 



MR. MYRL HERMAN 

Lebanon, Illinois 



MISS GWENDOLYN YOST 

Eldorado, Illinois 



Index of Advertisers 

Alamo Theatre 

Blumenstein Bros 67 

Buscher Hotel 66 



Call Printing Co 

Cook Paint and Varnish Co. 



Daumueller's 69 

Dot's Beauty Shop 68 

Feltrop Auto Service bb 

General Grocer Co 

C. Heer 6 ° 

Home Bakery 

Interstate Printing Co 

Kohler Manufacturing Co 

Kroger Store 

Lebanon Advertiser 

Lebanon Drug Company 

Lincoln Theatre 

Meyer Furniture and Undertaking Co 

Moonlight Restaurant 

Moonlight Roller Rink 

n . ~, 70 

Pans Cleaners 

I. Peskind and Sons 

Pfeffer Milling Co 69 

Elmer C. Reed 

Rogers Clothing Co 

Sayre Motor Company 

Schwarz Furniture and Undertaking Co 

~ 68 

Shattinger Music Co 

66 
Weber's Recreation 

Wehrle Jewelry Co 

Weygandt Florist 



Page Sixti'-fivi 



BOWLING — ROLLER SKATING 

THE NEW 
MOONLIGHT RESTAURANT 

O'FALLON, ILL 
O'Fallon's Leading Amusement Center 
Chicken and Steak Dinners Our Specialty 

FLORENCE AND "AL" HARTMAN 
Phone 126 



KOHLER 
MANUFACTURING CO. 

DOUBLE LIFE MILK BOTTLE CASES 

T 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



PHONE 33 



EST. 1894 



SCHWARZ BROS. 

FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

223 Westfront Street 
O'FALLON, ILL. 



L. E. Schwarz 



M. K. Schwarz 



College Supplies and Fountain Pens 

Try Our Soda Fountain 

We Serve DeLuxe Ice Cream 
and Toasted Sandwiches 



LEBANON DRUG CO. 

O. C. FRESHOUR, R.Ph. 



WEBER'S RECREATION 



BOWLING 



POCKET BILLIARDS 



Lebanon, 



SALES CHEVROLET SERVICE 
GENERAL AUTO REPAIRING 

T 

FELTROP AUTO SERVICE 

BUSCHER HOTEL 
) K 

CAFE 
> f 



LEBANON, ILL 



Phone 60 



THE LEBANON 
ADVERTISER 



LEON H. CHURCH 
Editor and Publisher 



Page Sixty-six 



WEYGANDT FLORIST 

FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

PHONE 127 

315 E. Adams Street 

O'FALLON, ILLINOIS 

MEYER 



FURNITURE 
UNDERTAKING 



LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



BLUMENSTEIN BROS. 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 

T 

Phone I 13 
LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



IT PAYS TO BE ON TIME 

ELGIN . . GRUEN 
HAMILTON WATCHES 

FINE DIAMONDS 

F. G. WEHRLE & SON 

16 East Main Belleville, 

Since 1859 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

MOONLIGHT ROLLER RINK 

• 

TROY, ILLINOIS 



GAS OIL TIRES 

BATTERIES ACCESSORIES 

STORAGE 



SAYRE MOTOR CO. 

BUICK 



PHONE 35 



LEBANON, ILL. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



LINCOLN THEATRE 



BELLEVILLE, ILLINOIS 



SHATTINGER 

MUSIC AND PIANO 

COMPANY 



331-339 Arcade Bldg. 

Eighth and Olive 
ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 



Congratulations to the Class of '41 ! 

T 
I. PESKIND & SONS 

OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND WOMEN 

116-118 East Main Street 
BELLEVILLE, ILLINOIS 



ALAMO 
THEATRE 



T 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

DOT'S BEAUTY SHOP 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



THE CALL ' '"' 



Company 



DAN A. THROOP, Mgr. 




Printing Service Since 1904 



'Talent to Originate 
. . Skill to Produce" 



PHONE EAST 4204 

BROADWAY AT THIRD EAST ST. LOUIS, ILL 



Page Sixty eight 



Daily capacity 1,000 Barrels 
Elevator capacity 200,000 Bushels 



PFEFFER MILLING COMPANY 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 
Inc. 1899 



Manufacturers of 

MAR'S PATENT HARD WINTER WHEAT FLOUR 

FLUFFY RUFFLES SELF-RISING FLOUR 

LEBANON BELLE CAKE FLOUR 



Dealers in 

LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIALS 





A MOST PLEASANT WELCOME 




Awaits you at all times at 


C. HEER 


▲ 


* 


BILL'S 


* * 


T 




For Good Fountain Service 


GENERAL 


Gifts for All Occasions 


MERCHANDISE 


Confectionery 


* * 


Jewelry 


* 

THE QUALITY STORE 


DAUMUELLER'S 
MUSIC AND GIFT SHOP 

215-217 West St. Louis St. 




LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



Page Sixty nun 



Why Not Have Quality Work for the 
Same Price? 

PARIS 
CLEANING & DYEING 

CLEANING by the MODERN METHOD 

T 

PHONE LEBANON 136 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

HOME BAKERY 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

ELMER C. REED 

401 South High St. Phone 1771 



BELLEVILLE, ILLINOIS 


fsssm 


Something 
DIFFERENT 






— not 


Decorating and Painting Contractor 
for 


>3p2^n3i^^ 


Just as 
Good! 


The Methodist Church of Lebanon, III. 


VACUU 

In Glc 


M PACKED 

ss or Tin 







COOK PAINT AND VARNISH 
COMPANY 

Materials Used Throughout 



ROGERS CLOTHING CO. 

"WHERE THEY ALL GO" 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



COMPLIMENTS 

KROGER GROCERY 

and 

BAKING CO. 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



Manhattan 

Radiant Roasted 

COFFEE 



COBCUT CORN— AMERICAN LADY 
OR TOPMOST FOODS 

Distributed by 

GENERAL GROCER CO. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 



Page Seventy 



T T 

T 



TIME... 



Hours spent on various operations 

are major factors in the cost of printing. Through 

our careful planning and advanced production 

methods, we have reduced the time 

element to a minimum 



Quality... Our First Consideration 



THE INTERSTATE PRINTING COMPANY 

1 9-21 North Jackson Street Danville, Illinois 



A ▲ 



Page Seventy-on 



AuVogra|plis 



Page Seventy-twt