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Full text of "The McKendrean : being the year book of McKendree College"

va'-i; 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2010 with funding from 
CARL!: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in 



inois 



http://www.archive.org/details/mckendreanbeingy66mcke 



MCKENDREE COLLEGE 



A/IC KENDREAN 




1966 



LEBANON, ILLINOIS 




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ADMINISTRATION 

AND FACULTY 7 

GRADUATES 29 

UNDERGRADUATES 55 

WHO'S WHO 89 

ORGANIZATIONS 99 

SPECIAL EVENTS 127 

ATHLETICS 159 

ACTIVITIES 179 



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^^^^^^^^^^^ '^•'J^^^k 







ADMINISTRATION 

AND 

FACULTY 




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LD MA. IN 
850 







When President Mark Hopkins wa^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^B^ucof/on, 

said "A college is Mark Hoplc^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^K But now 
Mark Hopkins has to hollow out the wfPflHP^PIP^PIHBiP^BPPiP^l^orafed in 
modern tempera, and supplied with innumerable gadgets. And Mark has to get 
the money, rather than sit down face to face with a student. 

And a pity! Most presidents are of course glad to help get funds for brick and 
mortar, better educational facilities, and decent faculty salaries. However, so often 
such responsibility becomes their major occupation, and the students, who after 
all are the only reason for a college, remain perfect strangers to them. The con- 
dition has not been true at McKendree, and it must never be allowed to come 
true. We hope the president will always be far more than the great money-getter, 
the caustic vetoer, the perfunctory diploma distributor to unknown seniors. Rather, 
may he always be a fellow student among students, a friend among mutual friends, 
and a true representative of all the best in learning, in the arts and in the good 
life. 



EDWIN EDGAR VOIGT 
President 



The door of opportunity is opened to 
young people of tfiis age tlirough higher 
education. This beginsinpersonalgrowth 
as one comes into vital contact with the 
great ideas of mankind. It continues as 
the college graduate moves into the 
professional and industrial life of a com- 
plex society. Opportunities at a lower 
level may be diminishing but at a higher 
level they are expanding rapidly. The 
future of our society requires large num- 
bers of able youth who are prepared to 
undertake demanding tasks. 

DR. WENDELL S. DYSINCER 
Academic Dean 




ADMINISTRATION . 




The value of on education is the sense ' 
of direction it gives to life. This para- • 
phrase of Plato may well describe the 
McKendree College spirit. Classrooms \ 
and laboratories offer exposure to new 
and often great ideas, together with a ; 
challenge to explore frontiers of under- :| 
standing. What takes place in the class- ' 
room, however, is not all there is to an ] 
educational venture. In a growing and ■ 
going McKendree a dynamic setting is 
being created in which interesting and 
exciting experiences are inherent. New 
understandings from the classroom put 
to work in student life activities emerge 
as new purposes for life and a sense 
of direction are born. 



DR. W. N. CRANDY 
Dean of Students 




Hours and quality points measure progress in the intellectual 
development of students who live in the most highly educated 
society the world has known. The Registrar's office not only keeps 
a formal record of such progress, but also offers to students the 
opportunity for systematic planning of future college years and 
transform the college opportunity into significant personal achieve- 
ment. It can provide a sound basis for a student's life work and 
for the fulfillment of goals. 

MRS. VIRGINIA GILLESPIE 
■ Registrar 





The Church affirms that Jesus Christ is Lord. The Religious 
Life Program of the College, planned by the Religious Life Cam- 
mission of the Student Congress with the advice and counsel of l 
the Director of Religious Life, is aimed toward making this af- 
firmation relevant to a broken world. We are dedicated to an 
inquiry into the nature of truth— truth, not as factual knowledge, 
but as the meaning of knowledge. We are interested in truth, ; 
not as disinterested, objective discovery, but as profound personal] 
experience. To wed "knowledge and vital piety"~-to take copti 
the minds of men to the "mind of Christ"— is our purpose. We are 
concerned not with acceptance of belief or an interpretation but 
with a religious encounter. 

REV. JOHN R. CURTIS, JR. ' 
Director of Religious Life ^m 



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ROBERT PAUL FITCH 
Head Librarian 




VERNON SNEAD 
Business Manager 



GEORGE PENCE 
Director of Admissions 







lONE PENCE 
Admissions Counsellor 



DORIS SNEAD 

Director of Development 



EUGENE E. SEUBERT 
Assistant to fhe President 




SHEILA HUFFMAN 
Secretary 




DENVER HAMMONDS 
Assistant Business Manage 





HAROLD OPPITZ 
Cashier 



ADMINISTRATIVE 
STAFF . 



PAT DAVIS 
Receptionist 



ERMA MURPHY 
Bookkeeper 



ELIZABETH SHEPPARD 
Secretary 






CUSTODIANS: Gottlieb Haock, Ronald Anheuser Bob Holt and Albert Fon, 



BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS SUPERINTENDENT 



BOOKSTORE MANAGER-. Mrs. Marcella Keel 
SHOP: Duone Schroer, Bill Harman, Bi// Gross, Roy Ward, Tom Walker, Hugh Campbell, Bill Sluarl, Chord 





COOKS- Virginia Mauck, Thelma Voruz, hy Volrain, Marcella Iberg, Frances Burns, Mildred Riemann, Harr 



DIRECTOR OF FOOD SERVICES 
Mrs. Donelda Jacolick 





CARTWRIGHT: 
Waldemar Tyndorf 



DORM 

DIRECTORS 



PHILO: CLIO: 

Corl Pogles Mrs. Ella Walt 








• - ^. 






SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 




FRED FLEMING 

S.S„ Indono Central Co/leg, 

A.B., Indiana Cential Colleg 

M.S., Universily of Wyoming 

Divisian Chai 

Biology 




LESTER WICKS 
B.S-. St. lou.s Umversily 
M.A., St. Louis U™vers/(y 
Ph.D., Woshinglon University 




RONALD W BRANDENBURG 
B.A., Moncliester College 
M.S.. Purdue Umversily 
Physks 



17 



GRACE WELCH 

A.B. McKendree College 

MS.. Norlhwesfem Univ 





ANNETTEM MULVANY 

BS. Southern Illinois Umversily 

M A., Southern Illinois Universily 



MARY ELLEN WILLIAMS 
B S.S„ Northwestern Unn 
M.A.. University of Itlinoi 
Speech 




RICHARD N. THOMPSON 

A.B., Cornell University 

B.S. m Sec. Ed, Muhlenberg College 

M.A., Lehigh University 

B-D , Condler School of Theology, Emory Unive 

LLB., University of Son Francisco 

Dr-lng., Technische Universilat 

French 

German 



MARINO GARCIA 

B.A., McKendree College 

M.A., University of Missou 

Spanish 



ALICE FILLER 

Director of (he tonguoge loborofor 

Special Tutoring in French and Gen 



20 






RALPH MARTY 
B.S., Bradley Un 
M.S.. UniVer: 
Ed.D., Un,ve 
Division Cha 



tyoflllinoi: 



JOHN GODWIN 
B.S.. Indiana Slate Un 
M.A., Washmglon Un, 




TEACHER 



The teacher education program of Mc- 
(endree College is based uponthefollowing 
fassumptions: education is a process of con- 
tinuous growth; all persons are believed 
Icopofa/e of making gains toward desirabh 
{personal and social goals; effective living 
'now is the best possible preparation f or fu-i 
ture living, physical, mental, social, 
Jional, and spiritual growth are equal 
^t; and improvement of the 
oated. Given these assumptioi 
education curriculum proposi 
jccomplish the following objectives 
Jo help the prospective teacher discover as 
possible the vocation of teaching, 
wrage the student in developing a 
3/ philosophy of education, 
supply opportunities for the use of a 
[variety of teaching techniques. 
Jo familiarize the student with current codes 
lof professional ethics. 

■ To provide an introduction to the prof ession- 
lal literature 

'•To create an experimental attitude toward 
teaching 

Ho develop competence in the subject areas 
tougjrt. 

jiate the desireforcontinuousgrowth 
personal use of such professional 
OS meetings, literature, workshops, 
iting, and graduate study. 
Ijo encouroge the prospective teacher to 
^become o sens/five and participating mem- 
iber of the local, national, and world com- 
imunity. 



I 



PREPARATION 



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JOSEPH McKEf 

B S -n Ed., Southern llhnoiS U 

MS m Ed.. Southern l/l.no.s L 

Psyc/iology 

CHARLES L. ALCORN 

A 8,, Canon-Newman College 

M.A.. MacMurray College 

Piychology 




MARY RENFRO 

B,S., Wilson Teachers College 

M.A., George Washington University 




WILLIAM T. WRIGHT 
B,S., McKendree College 



\.S.. University ollllir 




JOHN SCHOON 
B.A.. Central College 
M.S., Indiana University 
H. & S. Dir., Indiana Un 
Physical Education 






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\ 



LOUIS VESLEY 
B.S., Washington University 
M.S., Washington University 
Director ol Athletics 
Physical Education 



ALICE VESLEY 

B.S.. Soufhern Illinois University 

Physical Education 






FINE ARTS 




of the fine arts and its literature is a vital part of a liberal 
education. It is the purpose of the Division of Fine Arts, 
therefore, to serve those who wish to make an intensive 
study of music and art so that they may become men and 
women of high ideals and usefulness as artists and teach- 
ers. The Division of Fine Arts attempts not only to develop 
those professionally interested in music and art, but also 
to contribute to the general education in the life of every 
student in the college. 




GLENN FREINER 

A.B, McKendree College 



Drake Un 
ion Chann- 



STEPHANIE OWEN 

A.R.C J , Royal Conservatory of Music of Ton 
Mus. G- Paed.. University of Western Ontor,( 
B.A., University of Western Ontario 
Lic.Mus., Western Conservatory of Music 
iiscense Libre, Ecote Normale de Musique 
M.M-, Southern Illinois University 




24 





GEORGE TUERCK 
Music 



ORVILLE SCHANZ 

A.B.. McKendree College 

MM£.. Drake Universily 



WILLIAM C. HODGE 

B.S. Ed., Southern Illinois Unn 

M.FA.. University of Iowa 




25 



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■ 



The objectives of the Division of So- 
cial Studies are: the acquisition of 
needed knowledge and skills to pre- 
pare students for graduate studies or 
public school teaching; the stimulation 
of personal and social responsibility: 
the generation of a spirit of racial and 
international understanding; and the 
promotion of a democratic philosophy 
of life rooted in the Judeo-Christian 
tradition. 

Special attention is given to the de- 
velopment of ethical patterns of 
thought and practice, v/ith emphasis 
on both moral and intellectual hon- 
esty in the classroom, on the campus, 
and the community at large. 



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ELDONDITTEMORE 

A.B., Central Normal College 




ROLAND P RICE 
A.B., Homlme Unn 
S.J-B, Harvard Ur^ 

Ph. D . Boston Uni 
Div,Mon Cha.rmor 



OTHA LIONEL CLARK 

6.S.. Arlonsos Polylechnico) College 

8,D., McCormick Senvnary 

Fellowship Student, American School of Oriental 

Research of Jerusalem. University of Marburg. 

University of Berlin, University of Germany 

Ph. D . University of Chicago 

History 





ROBERT BROWN 

A.B.. McXendree College 

M.A-. George Peobody College 

Sociology 

JUDGE JAMES GRAY 
LL.D.. SL Louis UniversitY 



CAROL F. LEAS 

M.B.A.. Inshtule of Technology of 1 

Business 



gbl-Polerson An Force Bos 






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r /^"SEN/OiTCLAl 



LEFT TO RIGIM^ Bill '^Cari 
Hubert,. Viice §ge.si(J'enf%Nff1 



3es,j|®crefory, was a£ 






LYNN ACKERMANN 
Belleville, Illinois 
MAJOR: Elementary Education 
MINOR: Psychology 



CATHERINE ALLEN 
Sidell, Illinois 

MAJOR: Elementary Educatit 
MINOR: English 



JOHN ANN ABLE 
Noble, Illinois 
MAJOR: History 
MINOR: Religion 





LU ANN BARNES 
Cronite City, Illinois 
MAJOR: English 
MINOR: Psychology 



ROBERT BEAIRD 
Highland, Illinois 
MAJOR: Psychology 
MINOR: Sociology 



ROBERT BILUG 
New York, New York 
MAJOR: English 
MINOR: Psychology 



VIRGINIA BLAIR 




32 



RILEY BILL BLUE 
Bellev,lle. Illmois 
MAJOR: Psychology 
MINOR: History 



RICHARD BOYD 





MARY BRANDENBURG 

Lebanon, Illinois 
MAJOR: Arl 
MINOR: Education 



WILLIAM CARL 
Belleville. Illinois 
MAJOR: History 
MINOR: Political Sen 



33 



CHRISTINE CASTER 
Ann Arbor, Michigan 
MAJOR: Sociology 
MINOR: Psychology 



JANET CHILDRESS 
Beecher City, /(/mo, 
MAJOR: English 
MINOR: History 





CHARLES CLAXTON 



LODEAN CURTIS 



34 



m^'^ 




HENRY DAVIS 
McLeansboro. Illinois 
MAJOR Sociology 
MINOR: Philosophy 



DAVID DAWSON 
Evanston. Illinois 
MAJOR: Sociology 
MINOR: Psychology 



DEOLA DEAN 
East St Louis, Illinois 
MAJOR: Elementary Educotic 
MINOR: Psychology 



KENNETH DILLINGHAM 
Ml. Vernon, Illinois 
MAJOR: Physical Education 
MINOR: History 





ANTOINE DIMANDJA 
Lebanon, Illinois 
MAJOR: History 
MINOR: Chemisfry 



JANET DUSKO 

O'Follon, Illinois 

MAJOR: Elementary Educalii 

MINOR History 



HARRY FALLON 
Wotervliet, New Yorl 
MAJOR: Business 
MINOR: Economics 



KAY FLORES 
Lebanon, Illinois 
MAJOR: Elementary £c/u. 
MINOR: Music 




36 



DENNIS FRANKE 



PATRICIA FUCHS 
Belleville. Illinois 
MAJOR: Education 
MINOR: History 





CAROL GAGNON 



MAJOR: Physical Educatn 
MINOR: Biology 



MICHAEL GAUBLE 
Guard. Illinois 
MAJOR: Mathematic 
MINOR: Business 



37 



JAMES GRANATO 
Pitman, New Jersey 
MAJOR Physical Education 
MINOR: Sociology 





EDWARD HOCK 



38 




NORMAN HOFMANN 
Normal, Illinois 
MAJOR: Histori/ 
MINOR: Business 



THOMAS HOLDERBY 
tebanon, Illinois 
MAJOR: Chemistry 
MINOR: Sio/ogy 



JO ANNE HOVATTER 
Lebanon, Illinois 
MAJOR: Elementary Educatk 
MINOR: Art 




/ 



lONA HUBBARD 
O'Follon, lllino.s 
MAJOR; Elementary Educalic 
MINOR: History 



I 






CAROLE HUBERT 
East St. Louis, lllino 
MAJOR: English 
MINOR: Mothemalic 



JOSEPH HUFFMAN 



MAJOR: Physical Educalii 
MINOR: English 



pW- 



LYLE JENSEN 
Celoron. New York 
MAJOR: English 
MINOR: Biology 



JUDY KALBERKAMP 
Centralia, Illinois 
MAJOR: Psychology 
MINOR: Sociology 




40 



BOB KARNES 
Harrisburg, Illinois 
MAJOR: Physical Educatio 
MINOR: History 



MIKE KEASLER 
Omaha, Illinois 
MAJOR: Physical Educolic 
MINOR: History 





JAMES KEITH 
Centraha. Illinois 
MAJOR: Social Studies 



I5SUN KIM 
Carbondale, Illinois 
MAJOR: MalhemalH 
MINOR: Psychology 



JUANITA KIMBLE 
Cahohia, Illinois 
MAJOR: English 
MINOR: History 



PAUL KULICK 
Mayfield, Pennsyhai 
MAJOR: Psychology 
MINOR: History 





EVERETT LEAR 

MAJOR: Psychology 
MINOR: Sociology 



CLYDE LIMESTALL 
Waterloo. Illinois 
MAJOR: Business 
MINOR: Economics 



42 




LESTER LONG 
North Chicogo. Illmois 
MAJOR: Elemenlory Educ 
MINOR: Physical Educalk 



EARLENE LUCY 
Cohotia, lll,no:s 
MAJOR: Social Stud,e 



KATHRYN LUKE 
Bellev,lle, Illinois 
MAJOR: English 
MINOR: History 



MARY LUND 
O'Fallon, Illinois 
MAJOR: Educatio 
MINOR: History 




43 




ELLIOTT MC DANIEL 



TERRY MC KEAN 
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 
MAJOR: Sociology 
MINOR: Polilicol Science 



MARY MARTIN 
Mor)ticello, Iowa 
MAJOR: Elementary Educotic 
MINOR: Psychology 



ROSE MEISTER 

Belleville. Illinois 

MAJOR: Elementary Educatic 

MINOR: History 




MAJOR: History 
MINOR: Political Science 



VIRGIL MILLER 



MINOR: Mathematic 





DELORES MINICOZZI 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
MAJOR: Elementary Educoti 
MINOR: Psychology 



NINA MI5EGADE5 
East St. Lows, Illinois 
MAJOR: Elementary Educata 
MINOR: Psychology 



JAMES MORBY 



MAJOR: Physical Educalic 
MINOR: History 



BARBARA MUELLER 
Mascoulah, Illinois 
MAJOR: Soaal Studie 





CLARENCE OLIVER 
Mound City. Illinois 
MAJOR: Elementary Edu 
MINOR: History 



MARY PHILIP 

MAJOR: English 
MINOR: History 




DONALD PRICE 
iebonon, Illinois 
MAJOR: Sociology 
MINOR: Political Science 



ANNA RHODES 
O'Fallon, Illinois 
MAJOR: Education 
MINOR: Sociology 



LARRY RICHARDSON 
Indianapolis, Indiana 
MAJOR: Business 
MINOR: History 



CHARLES ROGERS. JR. 
Cartsville. South Carol: 
MAJOR: Business 
MINOR: Economics 





RHODA ROSENHAUER 



JANICE 5CANLAN 



PArRIClA SCHAEFER 

Belleville. Illinois 

MAJOR: Elementary EducolK 

MINOR: Psychology 



DALE SCHWERDTFEGER 
Glen Ellyn, Illinois 
MAJOR: Sociology 
MINOR: Ph/losoph/ 



48 




EDNA SHECOG 
East SI. Louis. Illinois 
MAJOR: Elementary Educat 
MINOR: History 




49 



GENE SWANSON 
Chicago, KImo/s 
MAJOR: Business 
MINOR: Psychology 



ROBERT TANGO 
Union, New Jersey 
MAJOR: Psychology 
MINOR: Sociology 





JACE TELFORD 
Cenlroha. Illinois 
MAJOR: History 
MINOR: Pu/ihcol Scii 



EARL THOMAS 
Belleville, lllmoi 
MAJOR: Busines 
MINOR: EconoiT 




KAY TREAT 
Bible Grove. lUinois 
MAJOR: Elementary Educatk 
MINOR: Psychology 



WALLY TYNDORF 
East Chicago, Itlinois 
MAJOR: Psychology 
MINOR Sociology and History 



T05HIK0 UERA 
Tokyo, Japan 
MAJOR: Mothem 
MINOR: Biology 



CAROL VOGEL 
Millstadt, Illinois 
MAJOR: English 
MINOR: Sociology 






JUDY VOGT 
East SI. Louis. Illmois 
MAJOR: Elementary Educalic 
MINOR: English 



STEVE WATTS 
Decolur, Illinois 
MAJOR: History 
MINOR: English 



MAJOR: Business 
MINOR: Psychology 



TOM WHEELER 
McLeansboro, Illinois 
MAJOR: Physical Educoli 
MINOR: History 




52 



ANNA WINELAND 

Hamburg. Illinois 

MAJOR: Elemenlory Education 

MINOR: Psychology 



JOHN YOUNKER 
Cenlraho. Illinois 
MAJOR: Mathemalic 
MINOR: Soc/o/ogy 





RICHARD ZEISSET 
Lebanon, Illinois 
MAJOR: Mathematics 
MINOR: Biology 



KAY ELDRIDGE 
Cutler, Illinois 
MAJOR: History 
MINOR: Physical Edu 



53 



UNDERGRADUATES 



rv 


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I 








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F 




1 






1 



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<^:' 



.^1 







Harlan Best 
Livingston, tilin 





in 



Jomes Brefeld 
Trenton, Illinois 




Steve Bntko 
Nabnasseit. Mass. 



57 










Clifton Dav 
Vergennes, Ilii 







Cfoten, New \ 




\^>^ 
.\\\'* 




ill mi ~ n 







Keilh Freemar 
Belleville, III. 





"^ -VO 






Bofnel Freedma 
tewisburg, Ohic 






Dolly Gruei 
Pana, Hi 








-%' 




ih 



Jerry Horfmonn 
Suffield, Conn. 






John Hamilton 




i i 



Talmage Hillman 
60 Gran,leOlY,lll. 








Daniel Keene 
Pinckneyville. III. 



Chuck I 
Coiro, 









Jerry Lohman 
Avisfon, ///. 



V"^* 



Karen McC.-.ncchi'. 





Patrick Moot 
Centraha, lllin 



A 

^ 




Gerald MoHer 
Thayer, III. 







Pat Phillips 
^2 Coll.nsv.Ke, III. 




1» c^ 








¥t 


If Mir 




Joe Sco/o 
Posso.c, NJ. 








t^ 




Charles Jhaxton 
Greenfield, III. 



63 




mlM 



Herschel Thomas 





Thomas Thompson 
Bellevilie. III. 





'^y I 



Terry Tucke 
E. St- Louis. 




mi/. 




Scott TucI 
Oneida, 









Peggy Wehrenben 

Mounds, III. 




G^en Holsapple 
Newton, III. 



65 



c 



I 



O 

If 




'pm 



9 
8 



:^J, 



■•<■. * 



4: 





i 



m^- 



'^^^ir«.-._. i!^' 




Jeanette Anderson 
Belleville, III. 







Carroll Barlle 
'irickneyville. III. 





Betty Brammeier 
Oakdote, III. 







Louis Capozzoii 
Norwich, N.J. 



L J 



W^^W"' 



Ens Carter 
n/den, ///. 








Denise Dimond/a 
69 tebonon. III. 




Lance Donatello 
Up Monlclair. NJ. 






Sandy EIIk 
St. Louis. /V 






Lance Cauble 



^fs fc:^^. 



il 



Cienda Goforth 
Decatur. Hi 



Richard Crogiio 
Hawthorne, NJ. 



69 






?s 



/ 



D.one Hedrich 
Co»msv./le, Hi 







:iovidHohma, 
Red Bud, l». 





Jean Hinchciiffe 
O'Follon, III. 



'^ '^ **^ 




4i^ 












Gary Lawrence 
E. Alton, III. 




Tina McCallis 
Carm. til. 





Judy L 
Pinckneyv 




Edward McClynn 
N. Caldwell. NJ. 




w 




Alison Mueller 
tewislown, III. 




Barbara N:ei 
Tallula, 







Glenn OhphanI 
W. Caldwell. NJ. 





PhilllD Oestre.ch 
Mascoutah, III. 




MM 



Aar~/ Paiek 
ashville, III. 



Grand Blane. Mich. 









R.chardPhd/ips 
Weslheld. Mass. 





Dan-ei Strcbo 
Hazel Cresl. III. 




Philadelphia. Pa. 










W, Reading, Pa. 



V 



tfl 



^^^;?"^^^"'*^'' "^^^^'M 

B 




80 b W/a//ace 
Corbonda/e, , 




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McLeonsboro. III. 



Virgi/uo Wonders 
74 Sireotor, )/(. 




'Esta Bien Maricho 



s 
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F 
] 

6 
'-9 



.-.^ 






u- ->, 




Carbondo/e, /I/if 






tr 



Ir 



Nancy Anderson 



\iddlesey. New, 




George Bodhus ^^^ I^^^B ^'ndo £ 

G/en Gardner, New Jersey ^fiB^>«i^^^^^^^B Cahokio, 





Dav,dBricker .jir.e- ^jn.ion 

Howe, Indiana *"°''- '"'™'== 77 





f3 

Ray Cullurn ^^^^^^^^^^^ 





Ken Cook 
I Oak, Rhode Island 




North Coldwell, New Jersey 




78 Collinsv.lle, llln 



James Etherton 
Carbondate, llhnoi. 





Robert Foy 
Webster Graves, A 





Janet Foder 
West Frankfort, tl 






Lawrence Goldasich 
W,lsonv,lle. Illinois 




Folakemi Fadase 
Ondo, Niqena, West Afri 




iS'k 







Thomas Gnggs 
Lebanon. Illinois 



79 




>f 



^,M 



Lou Hagenhruch 




^4 



i'i 



East St. Louis, (//in 




T. 



Chnlon, lllmo.s ^7 /^ ^ ^^Kt New Baden, llh 




Janice Harpsin 



™ 



Rebecca Hams 






^g^ 




§^ 








Sandra Hurst Brad Kane 

gQ Jilden, lllmo's Edwardsville, llln 







Pal Knop 
Campbell Hill. Ill 



Downers Grove, lllir 



W ^^''T^ 

^ 





Frances Layfield 
Collinsville. llhna,s 




Dwayne Lewellen 




31 ! 



^7m 



Gordon Link 
Frankfort, lltinc 




OIney, K/inois 











Dorothy Moss 

nckneyviiie. iUir 






Joyce Newman 









1 ^ 



7/ 



Barbara North , ^i^ MIIC^Bi Johanno Pashoif 

Lebanon, Illinois "WV Cramie Cily. Illinoi 




Richard Quarrels 
West Frankfort, Illinois i^^ „_ i^^W West Frankfort, lllin 







Gen Robin 
East St. Louis, 






Hazelcrest, lltin 



Marcia Scanlan 
Noibv, lie. Illinois 





Alva Schemehon 
Elizobelh, Illinois 




Poul Russell 
Allan, Illinois 






^M 



^ 



Ed Schoeffer 
Webster Graves, Mis 






James Sha 
84 Culler. Ill.n 



Dean Sieffen 
Trov. Iltino 




\-:^ ^ 





"1 ^" 






William Strasburg 
Sf. Louis, Missouri 



85 








Linda Wall 
Carlyle, lllinoi 








86 Beihallo. 



Edwordsvi/le, lllino 



-J^& 



f\m^ 



i\ 



Wd* 



1 


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H^^KL^V. 




5F^ W\i^ K' ]W?^J - 



'4^' 





r ;w 




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HENRY DAVIS, A.B. 



90 



Henry, a pre-theological student, has majored in botli sociology and philosophy. 
He has been an active Philosophian all four years, serving as executive councilman 
and president. He has been a Student Congress member for three years, has been 
M.S.M. president, and has been a member of Public Affairs Forum. In addition, he 
has been on the McKendrean staff two years, has sung in the McKendree Choir, and 
has been on tennis team all four years. An outstanding scholar, Henry received two 
years the Honors for Outstanding Work in Sociology. 

As one is, so is his God; Therefore, 
Cod often becomes an object of rid- 
icule. 

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 




MICHAEL F. CAUBLE, A 



Mike, Director of Clark Hall, has been very active in Student Congress. During 
his last two years, he served as Representative at Large, Sr., and Ex-Officio member 
of the Social Commission and Discipline and Ethics Commission. A mathematics ma- 
jor and business minor, Mike is a member of Sigma Zeta and the Public Affairs Fo- 
rum. He has also served on the New Student Union Planning Committee. At the 1965 
Honors' Day, he received the Mathematics, Political Science, and Latin American His- 
tory Awards. 

Future plans consist of doing graduate work in mathematics and eventually securing 
a position in research management. 



The business of Ar 



Colvn Coolidge 




JOSEPH HALL, A 



A member of the Philosophian Literary Society, Joe has served as 
Critic, Vice President, and Sergeant at Arms. He has also been active 
in the Methodist Student Movement, the Student Association, and Stu- 
dent Congress, serving as President in all three organizations. With a 
major in Social Studies, Joe plans to do graduate studies in a Methodist 
seminary and eventually be a Methodist minister. 

The happy people are those who are 
producing something; the bored peo- 
ple are those who are consuming much 
and producing nothing. 



92 



Dean W.R. Inge 



JAMES MANEKE, A.B. 



A speech major and English 
minor, Jim has been Presiden 
of Alpha Psi Omega, Presiden 
of Pi Kappa Delta for three 
years, and a member of Stage 
crafters. He has also been a 
member of the Student Edu 
cation Association and has sung 
in the McKendree Choir foi 
three years (serving as Presi 
dent for two years). Active tr 
the Platonian Social Society 
Jim v/as president this year 



Speech is a mirror of the soul; 
as a man speaks, so is he. 

Publilius Syrus 




Dale, a sociology major and philosophy and psychology minor, is a member of the Pla- 
tonian Social Society. He was president of the organization in the fall of 1964. He also was 
president of the Public Affairs Forum and served on the Student Conduct Committee for 
two years. After graduation, Dale plans to do graduate work in the field of anthropology. 



In the end, one experier 
self. 



Friedrich Nietzsche 




DALE WILLIAM SCHWERDTFECER, A 




A history maior and English minor, Ed, has spent a large part of his time in Stu- 
dent Congress and has served as Junior class representative and vice president. This 
year he was class treasurer, and has been a member of the Lewis and Clark History 
Club. He received the "Studies in American History Award" at the 1965 Honors' Day 
Assembly. 

Ed plans to do graduate work in the future and then possibly teach history. 



If we are to preserve civilization, 
must first remain civilized. 



Louis St. Laurent 



95 




I. SUZANNE MILLER, A 



Suzy, a speech major and English minor, has been very active on campus. She 
has acted in the plays "Teahouse of the Auguest Moon," "Antigone," "John Brown's 
Body," and directed and acted in "Saddle Bag Religion." She is a member of Alpha 
Psi Omega and served as secretary for fwo years. She was also a member of Stage- 
crofters (secretary, president). Student Educational Association, Student Congress, 
McKendrean (business manager two years), and McKendree Choir (three years) 
While a resident in Clark hiall, she was third floor proctor and assistant dorm direc- 
tor. Suzy was a maid to the 1965 Homecoming queen, and received the Bhiss Pup- 
pet Award, Acting Award, Directing Award, and Technical Assistance at t-iunors' Day 
Assembly. 

A January graduate, Suzy is teaching Speech and English at Rossville High 
School. 



96 



Work is love made visible. 
Kahlil Gibran 



An English major and history minor. Mary was a cheerleader and Homecoming attendant durmg her 
Freshman year. She was also a member of Stagecrafters, McKendree Choir and Chapel Choir. She was trea- 
surer of her Freshman class and treasurer of the Sophomore class. A member of the Clionian Literary So- 
ciety, she served as critic, vice president, and house president. She has been active m school publications— 
editor of the McKendree Review during 1964-65 and editor of the 1966 McKendrean. As a member of the 
Lewis and Clark History Club, Mary was treasurer and corresponding secretary. She held membership in 
S.E.A., and is a member of the McKendree Writers' Association (current secretary) and Sigma Jau Delta (pres- 
ident). 

After graduation, Mary plans to teach English in high school and do graduate work during the summer. 

For all knowledge and wonder (which is (he seed of knowledge} 
IS on impression of pleasure in itself. 

Francis Bacon 
MARY REINHARDT PHILIP, A.B. 




1 



^ 






N- 





ORGANIZATIONS 




ALPHA OMEGA 




FIRST ROW L 



zm, Joan EUioll. Nancy Davis. SECOND ROW: Randy Hor- 
lenna Jieal, Judy Lunnomann, Kalhy Edwards. Joyce Mason, Ruth Ann 
THIRD ROW: Judy Beasley, Bartaio Smith, June BarUe, Tammy Wmfree, 



Molly S 


auffer, D, 


neBau 


mann. G 


vyn 


Holsapple 


FOURTH ROW: Peggy 


Weh- 


renberg. 


Ginger H 


Zanders 


Pal 


Ph, 


ips, 


Geraldme 


Robinson, Folakema Fadase, 


Sandra E 


rock, Deola Dean. 















The Alpha Omega Society was insfa//ed on 
campus on November 23, 1954. There were 
sixteen charter members at that time. The so- 
ciety at present consists of 25 members. 

The members of Alpha Omega pledge to 
uphold the heritage of comradeship and joy- 
ous activity that has been bequeathed to 
them. They pledge that they will forget the 
trivial acts that are passed and will fix their 
thoughts on achievements that will be for the 
betterment of the Alpha Omega Society and 
tor McKendree. 




00 



OFFICERS. Glenno Treat, 
President; Gingei Wonders 
Mason. Parliamentarian. 



les, Secretary, Pat Phil/ips, 
Ho/sapp/e, Chaplain; Joyce 



ALPHA PSI 
OMEGA 



McKendree College maintains the Alpha Theta 
cast of Alpha Psi Onnega, a national honorary 
dramatic fraternity. The expressed purpose of 
the fraternity is to develop dramatic talent 
and the art of casting, to cultivate a taste for 
the best in the drama, and to foster the cul- 
tural values. 

Membership in Alpha Psi Omega is open to 
all who have achieved at least thirty points 
in various dramatic productions, provided they 
have had at least one acting part and have 
served on one crew. Points can be earned in 
such varying areas as: scenery, costuming, 
make-up, lighting, sound, publicity, directing, 
acting, stage management, production and 
other ways. 




OFFICERS: Leonaid F.ofe, President: James Monetae. Sec h. 
Judith W:lte, Vice-Presidenl. 




FIRST ROW: Mrs 
Mrs. Welcli. 



, Cart Ragles. Mr Schonz. Ch,cl(:e Rosenhauer. SECOND ROW: Kathi Meggs. 



FIRST ROW: Joan Elliott, 



Gwynn Holsapple. Judy Brt 



Kennedy. Linda Barnes. Janice Harpstnle. Jean- 
3arbara Smith. SECOND ROW: Marion Zeisset. 
}utigan. Cetaldine Robinson, Eris Carter. Dorothy 



Heuman, June Bartle. Brenda Reynolds. THIRD ROW: Barbara North. Kalhy 
Edwards, Linda Wall, Karen McConachie, Jean Hinchcliffe, Frances Layfield, 
Vicki Andricks. 



McKENDREE CHOIR 




The McKendree College Choir presented its 
annual Christmas Concert on December 19, 
1965. They sang in April for the Methodist 
Bi-Centennial, Convention in Baltimore, Mary- 
land. The Choir's Spring Concert was given in 
May with a performance of the Mass in G 
Major by Franz Schubert. 



OFFICERS: FIRST ROW. Dick Boyd. President. SECOND ROW: Jeanette Anderso 
Librarian. Jean Idinchclille, Robester THIRD ROW: Cwynn Holsapple, Librario 
Dennis Franke, Vice President. FOURTH ROW: Gary Dollinger. Secretary^Treasur 
and Charles Darll. Robe Steward 



102 




F/f?Sr ROW; Marcia Scanlon, Sandra Elliott, Randy Horman, Larry Lee, Rich- 
ard Boyd. Dennis Fronke. Henry Davis, SECOND ROW: Sue Smith, Charles 
Claxlon, Gary Mulkins, John Hanvllon, Charles Koen, Romsae Strieker, Roger 



Russell. THIRD ROW: Gory Dollinger. Scott Tucker. Bob Dart 



c 

H 
A 
P 
£ 
L 

C 
H 
O 
I 
R 




FIRST ROW Jean 



•rson, Sandra Elliott. Dick Boyd. Pal 
Pierce. Larry Lee. SECOND ROW: Karen McConachie, Jean 
Hinchdilfe (Organist), Gwynn Holsapple. Vicki Andricks THIRD 



ROW: Charles Claxlr 
Gary Dollinger 



Russell. Scott Tucke 




» # « 



• «t tc IJ S 



FIRST ROW: Barbara Niemeier, Lmda Harris, Betsy Doerwald, Lmdo 
Barnes, Ten Kennedy. SECOND ROW. Eartene Lucy, Ens Carter, Doro- 
thy Heuman, Gail Scbemehorn, Judite Wille, Judy Braeutigan. THIRD 



Ella Wall, Pot Pierce, Sandrc 



CLIONIAN LITERARY 
SOCIETY 




One result of the admission of women to Mc- 
Kendree College in September, 1869 was thie or- 
ganization of a Women's Literary Society on De- 
cember 6, 1869. At this meeting the constitution 
and by-laws were adopted and officers were 
elected. 

The name selected for the organization was "The 
Clionian Literary Society" or "Clio". Thus it was 
named for the first nine Muses of Greek Mythol- 
ogy. This was the Muse of history. 

The purpose of the organization /s to promote 
literary and social development of its members. 

The motto selected is "Virtute et Labore." A 
pin was designed in the form of an arrow with 
a scroll on which the motto is inscribed. This was 
first made in the form of a silver pin, later a 
smaller design in gold took the place of the orig- 
inal one. 

On October 13, 1963, Clio established their 
present home In Whitefield Idall with Mrs. Ella 
Watt as dormitory director and named the house 
"Clio House." 




CARNEGIE, 
WESLEY, 
AND CLARK 
HALL DORM 
OFFICERS 



CARNEGIE HALL Jell Corlmg, Larry R.chordson, Rofaerl fongo, Ralph 8/eck. 





WESLEY HALL: Roger Russell, PresidenI; Gory Lawrence. Sec-Treas 



CLARK HALL: Peggy Wehrenberg, V,ce P, 
lelary. Pal Phillips. Treasurer. G/^nno Treat, 



es.. Ginger Wonders, Sec- 
Presidenl, 



105 




FIRST ROW: John Schieppe. Bob B^lhg, Nick Tropiono. Ted Mihula. T, 
Higgms, SECOND ROW: Sieve Bntko. Sieve Goldforb, Joe Scolo, £ 
Homillon, Ken Frazier. George Fur, (en THIRD ROW- Monnre Formo 



Terry Harlmarin, John f 
Dicl< Hayes, Barry Berkov. 



Elliott McDaniek. Larry Richardsc 




FEROX 



Ferox was founded in the fall of 1963. Ferox 
IS an organization of men whose purpose is to 
promote service and social activities. 

Membership is acquired by invitation and elec- 



OFFICERS: FIRST ROW: Ker^ Frazier, Treasurer: Ted Mmuli 
OND ROW: Terry Harlmarrn, Secretary: Elliott McDan 
Formosa, Sergeant-at-Arms. 



President: Monnie 



106 



LEWIS AND 
CLARK 
HISTORY CLUB 



The Lewis and Clark History was organized 
in honor of Dr. Otha Clark and Mr. Donald Lewis, 
in the fall of 1964. The club meets once a month, 
and either features a speaker or takes a field trip 
to promote interest in and about some phase of 
history. 





FIRST ROW: Wall Kudelo. Ted , 
Scriarnau, Steve Goidfarb. 



3w. SECOND ROW: Joe Scola. Ed Si^e 



107 



McKENDREAN 




The McKendrean staff strives to compile a year- 
book of the highlights, in pictures and words, of 
the school year. The editor of the McKendrean is 
selected by the Publications Board, and the editor, 
in turn, chooses his staff. 



LEFT TO RIGHT: Albe,l Allen. Business Manage,. Mary PhiUp, Edit 
Judy Wllle. Assistant Business Manager.- Mr. Or^itle Schonz, Advis 



© 



^ 



a <^ 




FIRST ROW Elizabeth GriHin. Randy Herman. Ctiick,e Rosenhauer. 
I 08 Tammy Wmfree. Mary Philip. SECOND ROW: Terry Tucker. Carol Gag- 



Steve Britko. Dorofhy Heumon, Earlene Lucy THIRD ROW: Ralph 
. Frank Hagen. Robert Jiaconia, Carl Ragles. 




FIRST ROW: Linda Meredith, Ruth Ann Hones, Molly Slouffer, Joyce Mason, 
Linda Wall, June Bartle, Marcia Scanlon. SECOND ROW: Dove Eadie, John 
Hamilton, Barbara Smith, Gwynn Holsapple, Judy Beastey, Henry Davis, 



METHODIST 
STUDENT 
MOVEMENT 



Norr.s Fnclley THIRD ROW: Arthur KnechI, Roger Russell, James Slone, 
Harold Bibby, Michael McDuffy, Scott Tucker. 




OFFICERS: Dave Eadie, Stale Represe 
man: Henry Davis, President, 



Linda Meredith, Program Chair 



The MethocJist Student Movement is an organization dedicated to stimulating religious emphasis in the 
students' lives. 

One of the purposes of M.S.M, is to bring McKendree into closer contact with the people of Southern 
Illinois. In order to do this, M.S.M. has conducted services in various churches of the Southern Illinois Con- 
ference. Another purpose of the organization is to g/ve the student ministers a chance to speak to a guest 
congregation. 



09 




PHI BETA 
LAMBDA 



Phi Beta Lambda is the newest organization on 
campus, organized the first semester of this year. The 
members are interested in business or business admin- 
istration and plan their meetings to stimulate this in- 
terest. 



OFFICERS—FRONT ROW; Norman Holmonn, President: Mr. Eldon Dillemo, 
Adv/sor SECOND ROW-. David rhomas, Treasurer: Nict Rogers, Reporh 



^^ ^^ 




FIRST ROW: Raymond Koca. L. 
man Hofniann. SECOND ROW; 



Eldon Ditte 



'S, Norris Fridley, Nor- 
David Thomas, Harry 



Fallon, Terry Lohman, Carl Ethinglon. THIRD ROW: ^ 
Gauble, Michael Couble, iarry Richardson, Edward Hock. 



FIRST ROW Mr Alcorn, Roger Tmcy, Scot! Tuder, Did PhilUps, Louis Capoz- Robert 

zoh, Larry Lee. SECOND ROW Barry Sosso, Henry Davis. Paul Rice, Dan Hamill 

Strobo. David Eadie. Alien Fleming. Jim Sampson. THIRD ROW: Joe Hall. 



Glenn Ohphanl, Carl Ragles, Wall 



PHILOSOPHIAN LITERARY 
SOCIETY 



The Philosophian Literary Society, (Philo), was 
formed in 1837, at McKendree College by J.H. 
Tarn, Johnson Pierson, H.C. Lesley, Samuel Casey, 
Elihu Peters, Asaheal Brown and Jeremiah John- 
son. Philo has the distinction of being the oldest 
literary society west of the Alleghenies. 

Philosophians come from all walks of life and 
have gone on to various careers of life. Charles 
Deneen, former Governor of Illinois, William M. 
Farmer, former chief justice of the supreme court 
of Illinois, W.E. Trautman, former United States 
District Attorney, Charles Zone, former chief jus- 
tice of the state of Utah, the famous William Jenn- 
ings Bryan and the present Governor of Illinois 
were all Philo members. 

Philo IS active on and around the McKendree 
campus. Members participate in the student gov- 
ernment, on the school newspaper, and on var- 
ious commissions of student life. Philo has been 
active in relations with the citizens of Lebanon, 
aiding in the planting of approximately 250 trees 
in Lebanon on Arbor Day. 




OFFICERS: FIRST ROW: Lorry Lee. Recording Secretory, r> , : r 
ding Secretary; Louis Copozzoli, First Cr.tic. SECOND ROW, 
President: Henry Davis. President; Dov.cJ Eadie, Treasurer. 



PI KAPPA DELTA 




Jeff Corling, Elizabeth Gnff/n, Di 



The purpose of this organi- 
zation is fo sfimulafe progress 
in and further the interests 
of intercollegiate speech ac- 
tivities and communication in 
an effort fo provide functional 
leadership training for life and 
at the same time encourage a 
spirit of fellowship, brotherly 
co-operation and incentive for 
achievement. 




deni: Judilti Wille. 



12 



PLATONIAN SOCIAL SOCIETY 




Plalo, founded in 1849, was originally known as 
the Platonian Literary Society, and was organized 
for students who wanted help in the art of public 
speaking. The Society held many debates with the 
Philosophian Literary Society, and created great 
competitive spirit. 

Plato originally had its Hall on the third floor oi 
Old Main, now the history room. Presently, thf. 
organization has its own house off campus. 

In the fall of 1962, Plato rechartered as a socio 
society and strives now to promote social activ 
iiies for its members and other McKendree students 



OFFICERS: Robert Tbaxlon, President; Carl Elhmgt, 
Secretary; David Slieahan, President; i. J l-iarms. Vice 







! 

o 


^ 


i 






^R^v^ 




^^^L: H 


j^ 






dl 




p.'^^^H 







F/RST ROW; Wile Sffosburg. lance Donotello. Robert Thaxton, Robert Smit 
Brad Martin, Leonard Fiore. Tom MottershaM. SECOND ROW: L. J. Harm 
Carl Ethinglon, Dale Scbwerdtfeger. Robert Bea.rd, A( (.ocorm, David Br.cte 



ip FoY. Gary 


Dotmger 


Edward Weggoner. THIRD ROW: Robert Moor 


Image Hlltmar 


. Guy La 


r, Richard Zeissel. Harold e.bfa/. Dovid Sheaha, 


mZeisset. 







■^x^ 




POETRY 
CIRCLE 



The McKendree Poetry Circle, one of the most re- 
cent organizations on campus, was organized the first 
semester of this year. It grew out of the realization that 
there were students writing poetry who were too 
modest to have their efforts made public but who were 
willing to have their poems read anonymously and 
criticized by members. In addition, there were those 
on campus who liked to listen to poetry read by others 
or who liked to read aloud their favorite poetry. This 
is the basis on which the Circle came into being. 

The Poetry Circle meets every other week on Mon- 
day. It held a dinner-installation at Scott Oficers' Club 
on St. Valentine's Day. 



OFFICERS: Df, Richard Thompson, Advisor,- Gerald MoKershow, Pres- 
iden( (lop). Mary Palely, Secretary: Roberl Monley, Vice Presideril. 




FIRST ROW- Alison 



SECOND ROW Gerald Mollershow, Don Knecht, Dr. Richard Thompso 



• ^ n O fN r> #'^ 




FIRST ROW: Sen Gn 


ff:n. Waller Kudela, 


Kathy Edwards. D/one Bau- 


Pionn, Elizabeth Gn 


l:n. George Bacl.hu 


s, Robert Brown, SECOND 



ROW: Harold Bibby, B:lly Hahs, Henry Davis, Dole Schwerdlleger, 
Gerald Motlershaw, Norris Fndley, Ralph Bled, Gory Mock 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS FORUM 



In the fall of 1947, a group of studer^ts inter- 
ested in the mature discussion of national and inter- 
national problems organized the Public Affairs Fo- 
rum. For several years it has been one of the most 
active organizations on campus. In 1958 the Forum 
became an affiliate member of the Collegiate Coun- 
cil far the United Nations. McKendree membershave 
been delegates to a Model United Nations Assem- 
bly. For a number of years members of the Public 
Affairs Forum have participated in the Annual Pub- 
lic Affairs Conference held at Principia College. 

Locally the organization has sponsored the Great 
Decisions Discussion Series and an International 
Film Series. 




OFFICERS: Harold Bifaby, Sec-rreos; Dole Schwerdlleger. Sec-General-. Dion 
Saumonn, Assistant Sec-Genei ol. 



115 




FIRST ROW- Walter Kudela. Chicliie Rosenhauer, Elizabeth Gnffm, Rob- 
ert Billig SECOND ROW: Lance Couble, Jim Thompson, David Eadie. 



THIRD ROW: Ralph Blecic, Robert Jiaconia. Glenn Oliphanl. Waller 



McKENDREE REVIEW 




The campus newspaper, published twice a month 
by McKendree students, was first issued in October 
1927 and has been in continuous operation since. 
The editor is chosen each year by the Board of 
Publication. One of the most distinguished edi- 
tors of the Review was Mr. Milburn P. Akers. Any 
student who is interested in the newspaper can 
join the staff. 



OFFICERS Chic 


kie Rosenh 


ouer, Busmess 


and Circulo 


ond Glenn Otip 


lont, Make- 


p Editors. Dov 


e Eadie, Ed.fo 



STUDENT EDUCATION ASSOCIATION 



^ kO^ 




FIRST ROW: Nancy Dov.s. Lora Venezzia. Chick, e Rosenhouef. 
Ann Hones, Clenna Treat, Marca Scon/on. SECOND ROW. G 
Hotsapple, Jane Sn^udrick, Diane Baumann, Pol Phillips, Anna I 



/er, THIRD ROW: 
Apgof, Peggy Wehrenber 






'IBMP' 




The S\udeni Education Association was orga- 
nized during the \963-64 school year with the 
help of Dr. Ralph Marty. The members are in- 
terested in education, and many of them will 
become teachers after graduation. Members are 
kept abreast of current educational trends. 



OFFICERS: Do 



Treasurer: Clenna Treat, Vice-President; Ted Mthuta, 



SIGMA TAU DELTA 




The lota Delta Chapter of Sigma Tau Delta was 
granted a charter on March 3, 1936. The national hon- 
orary Errglish Fraternity must limit its membership to 
twentz-five students who show outstanding scholarship 
/n English. 

The fraternity endeavors to advance the study of 
chief literary masterpieces, encourage worth-while read- 
ing, promote the masterz of written expression, and 
foster a spirit of fellowship among students specializing 
in the English language and literature. 



OFFICERS: Corole Hubert, V,ce President; Janice Sconlon, Secretory; 
Pot Phillips, Historian; Mary PhWip, President. 




FIRST ROW 


Moiy Phil,;.; 


Mary Helen Cr 


one. Pal Phillips 


Carol 


Miller. Elizabeth Griltin. A 


Ars. Mary Chester 


miRD ROW M 


Vogel. Judy 


Lunnenrorrn. 


Lindo Meredith 


Carole Hubert 


SEC- 


David Pocdord, Lyle Jense 


, J/ni tucci. Tom K 


ottershaw, Robe 


OND ROW: 


LuAnn Barnc 


s, Judy Wille, 


or„ce Scar,/on, 


Martho 


Billig. Joe Huffman. 








fIRSr ROW: Elizabeth Gr 



Fred Fleming, Carol Hubert SECOND fOW Carol Gagnon. Lyie Jensen 




The national Sigma Zeta Honorary Sci- 
ence Society is represenfed on ffie Mc- 
Kendree College campus by the Beta chap- 
ter. It IS fhe oldest existing chapter in the 
organization. It was founded in 1926. 

Sigma Zeta's purposes are to promote 
and recognize the attainment of high schol- 
arship on the part of the students of sci- 
ence and mathematics, to encourage con- 
tinued advancement in scientific knowledge 
on the part of its members, and to foster 
a spirit of friendship and help among them. 



s 
I 

G 

M 
A 

Z 
E 
T 



OFFICERS: Carol Gagnon, Vice President; LyIe Jensen. President; Elizabeth Cn 
fin. Treasurer; Carol Hubert, Secretory. 



STAGECRAFTERS 




FIRST ROW M,ss Muhany, Diana Hednd, Judith Wille, Kathi Meggs. Chick: 
Roienhauer, Robert Billig. Bill Apgar, Larry Lee, Mr. Orville Schanz, M 
Eldon Ditlemore. SECOND ROW: Elizabeth Criflin. Linda Horns, Mr. Robe 



Filch, Cinqer Wondeti Norma i Hofmann, Michael Sirasburg, Bob Reid, Ca 
Pogles, Dr. Richard rhompsoii THIRD ROW teonord Fiore, Barbara Norll 
Jeff Carling, Jim Maneke, Skip Fay, Robert Smith. 



m 

/ ^Hk^ 


B 


m 



OFFICERS: Jim Maneke, Sec-Treas; ieo 
idenl, Michael Strosburg, Publicilz Chairn 



Stagecrafters is an organization open to everyone on campus. It is, essentially, a very active organization 
and requires active participation of every member. The talents needed ore varied so thiat students majoring 
in any subject area con find a real outlet for their talents. Stagecrafters is responsible for every type of 
dramatic endeavor. 



20 




STUDENT 
CONGRESS 



The Student Association functions through 
elected representatives to the Student Congress 
which is its governing body. The purposes are-, to 
initiate and integrate student activities; to inform 
the student body of the aims, policies, and ideals 
of the College insofar as these pertain to or af- 
fect students; to serve as an advisory group to 
the faculty administration in all functions directly 
affecting student life; to budget and administer 
all expenditures of the Student Activity Fee. 

The Student Congress operates on a Commis- 
sion basis in conjunction with faculty advisers from 
the Faculty Committee on Student Life. The Aca- 
demic Commission is concerned with academic 
policies and procedures which affect students. The Ethics and Discipline Commission has responsibilities re- 
lating to codes of student conduct appropriate to McKendree. The Religious Life Commission works in con- 
junction with the Director of Religious Life. The Social Commission promotes and coordinates campus social 
activities. 



OFFICER^FIRST ROW:D,ane 
President; Carole Huberl, Seci 
Vice President: Michoel Gaul 



Corresponding Secretary; Joe Idoll. 
SECOND ROW: Edward Shermon, 
'eosurer; Top: David Eadie. Parha- 



ft c 







FIRST ROW: Sieve Bnlko, Sandra Hurs(. Linda Horns, Carole Huberl, 
Ken Frozer. SECOND ROW; Terry Hortmann. Dovrd Eodie, Joe Hall, 



Edward Sherman, Charles Koen, Robe'l B-llig THIRD ROW- Ralph Bled. 

Bill Hohs, Richard Zeisset. Michael Goub/e, Tolnioge Hillmon. 1 I I 



STUDENT CONGRESS 



S 







ACADEMIC COMMISSION 

FRONT ROW: Kothy Edwaids. Mr Roberl Brow,-,, Jean Hmclicl/ffe, SECOND ROW: Bob Snvth. Billy Has, Ralph Bleck, David Hohmann. 



(--I. J?' P^Tf- 




ETHICS COMMISSION 

22 FIRST ROW; Carole Hubert, Mr. David Padard. Mary Bailie. SECOND ROW: Nofns Fndley, Talmage Hi(/mon, Mike Gauble. John Ham, lion 



COMMISSIONS 




FRONT ROW: Joyce Mason. 



RELIGIOUS COMMISSION 

Dr, Richard Thompson, Rulh Ann Hones. SECOND ROW: Scolt Tucker, John Honvllon, Norni Fndley 




SOCIAL COMMISSION 

FRONT ROW: Sieve Bnlko. Dione Tharp, Terry McKeon SECOND ROW: Roymond Koco 



/ Gauble, Lance Gau 



23 



WOMEN'S SOCIETY OF 
CHRISTIAN SERVICE 




Members of the Women's Society of Ctiristion Service on the campus work with the local 
Methodist Church to further the Christian spirit and to help needy persons in the United 
States and foreign missions. 




FIRST ROW: Ruth Ann Hones, Linda Mered.th. Joan EltioH, Judy Lun nemonn, Joyce Mason. SECOND ROW: Mrs. Louis Gray. Earlene Lu 
24 Smilh. Gwynn Ho/sopp/e, Judy Beosley. 




PHOTOGRAPHERS: Mahlon Hillord, 



PHOTO SERVICES 



Photo Services was formulated this school year to supply anyone on campus with pic- 
lures. The photographers take pictures especially for the McKendrean, McKendree Review, 
Development, and Admissions. In orior years, these groups secured their own photographers; 
now each utilizes Photo Services. 



125 



SPECIAL EVENTS 




'65 PRODUCTION 




Producer and Director Annette A/I. Mulvany 

Assistant Director Marie Wise 

Techinical Director Frank DeWerff 

Set Design Orville H. Schanz 

Costumes Peggy Powers 

Properties Juditli Wille 

&Virginia Wonders 

CAST 

Becket, Thonnas James Moneke 

King Henry it Leonard M. Fiore 

King Louis Vltl Carl A. Pagles 

Bishop Folliot of London James N. Schuetz 

Archbishop of Canterbury Eldon P. Dittemore 

Queen Matilda Marie Wise 

Gwendolen Lauren Thomas 

Queen Eleanor Lynda Turner 

Brotherjohn Joe Lamont 




hAedieval n: 
Strasburgj 




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129 




AMERICAN DREAM 

Producer and Director Anr\ette Mulvany 

CAST 

Mommy Marie Wise 

Daddy Leonard Fiore 

Grandma Judith Wille 

Mrs. Barker Kathi Meggs 

/ ^^^1 Young Man Robert Smith 

"American Dream" was presented by McKendree at the first 
Annual One-Act Play Festival at Monticello College. 



Bob Snv 




ABOVE^ Judy Wille lells a pla 


lo o society woman, Kathi Meggs 


who IS surprised al the immen 


ily of the idea. RIGHJ: Mane Wis 


atlempst to hug Lennie Fiore as 


she totlcs of their "happy morriage 


but succeeds only in choking him. 







^ iiiU- 




Ilj 



K H 1 




nth ANNUAL 
McKENDREE 

WRITERS' 
CONFERENCE 



JUNE 20-26,1965 



WORKSHOP LEADERS 
ABOVE: LEFT JO RICHT-. Harry Edv/atd Neo/, Non-Fiction: David M. 
Packard, Director of the Conference; Harry Mark Petrakis, Fiction; 
Charles Guenther. Poetry. JQ RIGHT: Mrs. Martha Desper, Teaching 
Creative Writing to Children; Mrs. Gertrude B. Meyers, Juveniles; Mrs. 
Berniece Roer Neal, High School. 





Packard accompanies Mr. Lionel Wic 
n, the Saturday Luncheon speaket 



131 




1965 

G 
R 
A 
D 
U 
A 
T 
/ 

O 
N 



Commencement Exercises were held at 3:00, 
June 6, 1965, in the Gymnasium. After the 
invocation by Dr. Edwin Vaigt, The Reverend 
Dr. Myron Forest Wicke from Nashville, Tennes- 
see delivered the commencement address. Hon- 
orary degrees were conferred to Rev. Vernie 
T. Barnett, Rev. Dr. Joseph B. Webb, Mr. Rollo 
C. Sayre, and Rev. Dr. Myron F. Wicke. Follow- 
ing the induction of graduating seniors in the 
Alumni Association, the benediction was given 
by the Rev. Dr. Barnett. 



32 





TEN LITTLE INDIANS 

STAFF 

Producer-Director Annette M. Mutvany 

Assistant Director Leonard Fiore 

Set Design Drama Workshop 

Orville H. Schanz 

CAST 

Rogers James Man eke 

Mrs. Rogers Betty Brammier 

Fred Narracott Warren Huffman 

Vera Claythorne Judy Wille 

Philip Lombard Leonard Fiore 

Anthony Marston Robert Biltig 

William Blore James Schuetz 

General Mackenzie James Cope 

Emily Brent Kathi Meggs 

Eleanor Wargrave Marie Wise 

Dr. Armstrong Larry Stack 



identifies herse/f OS the murdere 



133 



of the Board ol Trustees, has 
the honor of cutting the ribbon 
and officially opening the Ed- 
win £ Voigt Science Hall, Sep- 
tember 12, 1965, as Dr. Lester 
Wicks, Mr. RonoldBrondenburg, 
and Professor Fred Fleming look 




VOIGT SCIENCE HALL OPENING 




slalen-ient of purpose was delivered by Mr. Akers, who was preceded to the 
mm by Dr. Clyde Funkhouser. (left) Superintendent of the East St. Louis 
net, and Dr. Edwin E. Voigt. Dr. Lance Webb, Bishop of Ihe Illinois Area of 
Methodist Church, also helped lead the service 




FAR LEFT: Mr W,ll,om X Miller, mstructor ,s As 
history of 51. touis University, LEFT: Dr. WilUarr 
Hams, professor of philosophy at Soutf^err^ lllir 
University. 



VIETNAM DEBATE 



"Is the Present American Policy in Vietnam in the 
Best Interest of the United States" was the topic de- 
hated by Mr. Miller and Dr. Harris. Mr. Miller took 
the positive position; Dr. Harris the negative. The de- 
bate took place in the Voigt Science Hall lecture room 
December W at 7:30. A coffee hour followed. The 
event was sponsored by the Public Affairs Forum and 
Student Congress. 





fl 


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NEW STUDENT 




Mr. Ml/burn Akers and Dr. and Mrs, Wendsll Dys/nger en|Oy fhe dinner in Pearson's Hall. 



136 



j*lirj 


lU 






^ 



ORIENTATION SCENES 







PRESIDENTS 
RECEPTION 



President Voigt welcomes new students to 
McKendree College by holding a reception at 
his home the end of New Student Orientation 
Week. This is his way of meeting each stu- 
dent personally and making each feel at home 
in his new environment. 








38 




JOSEPH'S 
SWITCHBOARD 

by 
James Maneke 

Director James Maneke 

CAST 

Tharsus Leonard Fiore 

Switchboard Operator Judith Wille 

Mary Goldenwings Virginia Wonders 



THEY SEE 

ONLY THEIR 

SHADOWS 

by 
James Schuetz 

Director James Schuetz 

CAST 

Alexander James Schuetz 

Idorace Carl Pagles 

Isadore Frank DeWerff 

Louise Lynda Turner 

Roxana Virginia Wonders 

Alfred Frank DeWerff 





JAY AND THE 

AMERICANS' 

CONCERT 



One of the highlights of the year was the Jay 
and the Americans' concert on November 21. Mem- 
bers of the group are Jay Black, SancJy Dean, Howie 
Kane, Marty Sanders, and Kenny Vance. Organized 
in 1961, they are a popular recording group under 
contract with United Artists Records. 








CHEERLEADER'S UGLY MAN CONTEST 



The cheerleaders sponsored the Ugly Man Contest to raise money for their uniforms and away games. 
The Ugly Man candidate who collected the most money was the winner. Cheerleaders in above picture are 
Judy Braeutigem, Vickie Coleman, Eris Carter, Betsy Dorwald, and Randy hforman, who pose with their spon- 
sor Mrs. Lou Vesley. 




Guy iohr — Plato 





POLITIGAN-IN-RESIDENCE 




Dnsored by the Public Affairs Forum and the Academic Commission of Studen 
m Troy was the politician-in-residence during November l7-i9and 23. Durmg 
} theme "Morals m Politics." Besides being active m the Senate. Senator Simo 
coin's Preparolion for Greatness and Lovejoy, Martyr to Freedom. 



Congress, Illinois State Senator Paul Sin 
hat time, he delivered several speeches 
publishes the Troy Tribune and has wrtt 



42 




WRITER-IN- 
RESIDENCE 



Mr, Harry Mark Petrakis. popular Chicagoauthor, 
was the writer-in-residence during March 24 and 
25. A vibrant and dynamic speaker. Mr. Pet- 
rakis spoke before Sigma Tau Delta. Assembly. 
McKendree Writers' Association, and other ar 
ranged meetings. He is the author of Lion at 
My Heart, The Odyssey of Kosbs Volakis, The 
Founder's Touch, and Pericles on 31st Street. 
Pericles on 3Ist Street, a best seller ,n the 
Chicago area in 1965, has been nominated for 
the National Book Award in 1966. 



CLIO'S 
HOOTENANNY 



The Clionian Literofy Society sponsored a hootenanny. the first 
of the Homecoming festivities. The Dusty-Rood Boys from Car- 
bondale were featured- 





CHEERLEADER'S 
BONFIRE 



A blazing time was had by everyone a) ll 
bonfire which helped gel the Homecoming gan 
off to a roaring start. 



43 







Firs! prize in the float conies 
Chonion Literary Society. 







HOA/IECOM/NG PARADE 



rhe Pbtonian Socio/ Society with scholar Rich Zeissel took second 



Third place winner— Clort Hal/. 




V 







. Snead and Dr. Voigt bnng back the "good o/e day 






Harpo Marx /Mr. Sneod) ndes the running boord of 'Top 




"Hey. fellows. I already took a bath'' 



Cheerleaders Betsy Dorwold, Judy Breauligem. and 
Randy Horman smile and wave to the photographer. 





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MISS 

McKENDREE 

OF 

1965-66 



PatSrhaefei, MissMcKendreeof 1965-66, comes 
from Belleville, Illinois. Pal feels of home be- 
fiind fhe microscope as well as behind the 
wheel of her "Tiger". Being o ma|or in ele- 
menlary educotion and a minor in psychology 
fceeps Pof occupied. 





QUEEN 
CANDIDATES 



One of o|f Northern students. Chns Cast> 

Michigan. Chris is interested in / 
that exp/^s her major in sociology and hei 
psychok 





Schwerdtfeger spends a iarge '.:ort of her 

litding where she works towar i her major 

Tosi^j^ame from Tokyo, Japan to t.tudy at Mc- 




147 





JUNIOR MAID 



FRESHMAN MAID 



Freshman Moid M s Sandy Hur^f is from Ti/den Illinois. Sn 

H 

SOPHOMORE 
MAID 



M,ss Ens camT:''^-op^mm''mm^wfim-^ j<iden. nin 

Education is her ma/or and psychology her minor. 




Relmng Queen, Miss Pom Pal- 
mer, crowns Miss McKendree 
of 1966 




Karen Baker and Jim Morby help themselv 
at the buffet table. 



HOMECOMING 
DANCE 




Queen Pat dana 
escort Ralph Will. 




and Mrs. Snead (above) ai 
indenburg (below) enjoy dan 




STUDENT 
RECITAL 



Professor Fremer and Jeon Hinchcliffe 




50 




OPEN HOUSE 
FOR NEW OFFICES 



Open house was held in Old Main Nov. 22 
for students, faculty, and friends to visit the 
President's new office. Dean Dysinger's office, 
and the new reception area. Mrs. Dysinger, 
Mrs. Snead, Mrs. Curtis, and Mrs. Crandy 
served refreshments to the guests. 



Mary Ph//ip and Cliid Rosenhauer 5top by ofter doss (o admire Dr. Vo/gCs office. ABOVE: Dr. Voigl bean 
pride at his new office. 




NORTH CENTRAL 

ASSOCIATION VISITS 

McKENDREE 




LEFT TO RIGHT: President John N Stauffer, W,ltenberg Un- 
iversity; President l-larry F. Bongsberg, Bemidti Slate Col- 



lege; Dean John A Fl 

of Music; Dean J. GaiLei Dn 



January 18 and 19 were tension filled days for McKen- 
dreans, because that was vvfien representatives of the North 
Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools visited 
the campus to determine whether McKendree would receive 
membership into the Association for accreditation. The repre- 
sentatives talked to various members of the student body, as 
well as faculty, to gain a true perspective of the college. 



152 




Dr. Otho Clark leads the faculty procession to the speaker's platform 



FOUNDERS' DAY 





Father Paul Reinert. President of St. Louis Univ., speaks before the congregation at the Founders' Day Convocation , 
in the gymnasium February 18. 



133 



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7 






Students take advantage of the cha 



sident Voigt at his Christmas receptic 




Christmas cards and memories of home for iora 

Venezro and John Hamilton. 





k'^m^' 



■■III III • tm uiYi 



Old Science Hall 



157 



ATHLETICS 



•1^ 




BASKETBALL 1965-66 



The McKendree Bearcats played one of their hardest schedules this year. They proved 
to be too tough for such mentionables as Western Illinois University, William Penn Univer- 
sity, John Brown University and Iowa Wesleyan. Even though the court men are losing three 
starting seniors, these spots will be filled by some up-and-coming underclassmen who will 
undoubtedly prove to bring the court men of 1966-67 a victorious season. 



161 




Wende 
Beaver 



for a toy up. Watching are iestef long and two "eager" 



Lester Long drives for anottter two pointer. 



62 



WmM 



yi'^wi 



\^ 



163 



SEASON'S RESULTS 



i 



54 









McK BEARCATS 65-66 




STANDING Left (o R . W,y„e Sloes, V,c Esk,o. Wendell too Vesely Lester 

Johnson Ron Matikihs Jeny Boner Bob Lrnlon Bob Elter. SITTING: Coach Bobby Joe Karnes. 



165 



4 



mm 




1 




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r 


n 


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Ife^ 




Tom Wheeler, a Mcieons- 

quorterback. He can pass 
and defend with the best. 
iikes to drive, and always 
gives that 100%. 



Lester Long is a former all- 
area performer from North 
Chicago High. He has ter- 
rific spring and his attitude 
and desire are tops. He is 
the key to the team's suc- 





Ken Dillingham rs a Mt. 

proved to be an asset to 
fhis year's team. He has 
good eye. good speed, and 
is good off the boards. 



Clarence Oliver from Mound 
City. Illmois. has all the 

hands and good speed— and 
IS a very good rebounder 
for Size. He played guard 
and forward. 



opponent. 





Ron Matikitis is a transfer student from Western Wyoming Junior 
College. An extremely hard worker, Ron has led the NAIA in field 
goals per centage. He entered the second half of the season with 
a 54 plus per centage. hie is an important asset to the ball club. 



169 



YEA YEA TEAM! 




RANDY HORMAN 



JUDY BRAEUJtGEM 




BETSY DORWALD 



VICKI COLEMAN 




1965-66 CHEERLEADERS 




^^ ^w^^ M '^ 



LEFnORIGHl:PalP,erce. Et,s Carter. Victie Andncko. Judy Braeuligem, V,d: Co/eman, Betsy Dorwald Rondy Horn 



GO, GO, GO, 





LEFT TO RIGHT: Betsy Dorwald, Ens Carter, Judy Breautigem, Vicki Coleman, Randy Horman. 





The McKendree Bearcat (Scott Tucker) receives t 
Er,s Carter. 



BEARCAT BASEBALL '66 






Coach John Schieppe signs up prospec 


ve baseball players. 






BASEBALL SCHEDULE 




March 23 


Ripon College 


(W:sc.) 


Here 


March 26 


Washington Uni 


versify 


There 


April 2 


Rolla 




There 


April 19 


Concordia 




There 


April 23 


Greenville 




Here 


April 26 


Harris Teachers 




There 


April 30 


Concordia 




Here 


May 7 


Quincy 




Here 


May 1 1 


Harris Teachers 




Here 


May 14 


Parsons 




There 


May 20 


Parsons 




Here 


May 21 


Harris Teachers 




Here 



173 



INTRAMURALS 




Do:,Sliobocuine:,usU 



uble geli, leady lo block the chaiguig . 
result: Philo lb— Plato 6 



PHILO-PLATO FOOTBALL GAME 




Tom Engler looks foi a receiver as Charles Koen and 
Dave Sheahan prepare to break up the play. 



INTRAMURAL BOWLING CHAMPIONS 




BACK ROW, Leil (o Righf Bob Wallace. James Breleld FRONT ROW. 
Culium. Bob Snvlh. 



WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 




Nancy Gardner guardsLindaHorrii 
OS Ens Carter and Johanna Posh 
oil wofch_ 



175 




%^ --^ 









tEFT TO RIGHT: tou.s Capozzo)., B.» Hayes, Riley 6/ue, Dicl Hoys, Eorl Thomas, and Kay Eldndge. 



GOLF 

AND 

TENNIS 



76 





. DOV,! 



ACTIVITIES 



i^. 





toH^P' 



New specimens are checked bv Prof. 



'rot Fleming helps Bruce McNeil gam a better undersfancfing of the sciences. 



180 





J 







-.-. I- 












Latest project — Girls' Dorm 




Henry Dav,s appr 



of electricity to his physical 



•^.^^^B 






^^ lihi" 



iormal discussion at the end 
' the period is one basis of 



4jh. 




The language lab students relax for a Chn^lmos party and gathei aiound foe folksmgn 



182 




Many students find abstract pamtmg a valuable activity 



rbara Smith is engrossed durir 




I &A .^ 



Roy Word decoroles at Chr, 




f>'^^^ 




Benson Wood library offers a quiet place to study. 



Students ore absorbed in the lotesi 
issue of the McKendree Review. 




185 





Dove Smith is intrigued by the old conleclionary, one of the lotest acquisitions of (he / 





, ^ 


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V..'' ■■"' 


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: campus parking lot wil 



• hall in background. 



Terry McKean tries his hand at the growing sport of cycling. 







187 




During Registrution, students are busy pondering over their class schedules and filling out numerous cards. 




; anything like Old Maid'^ 




Terry Hartmann and Joe Scoh are so busy they don't have time to look up. 




Music majors labor over then harmony studu 



The old campus adds its charm to young though 



JiL 



s^» 



Mtnt 



Prof. Fremer's group delive 




Hey, K>d> You st,ll using fhat greasy kid stuff?-?-? 



^^ . % 



P^ ^ 



^ of the foil semester in Eisenmayer Audit 




Balcorty view of students during Wednesday Chapel serv 



190 




vm^ 


mwR^^^^ fT^ 


Itt 


■-f- 


"X]] 





Lake Beautiful rests serenely at Autumn lime. 




student. Bob e.//.q. Dove Eodie. Mary Phil,p, Judy Vogt, and Corl Pagles attend 



Jacksonville, tllir 




Worm sun, genlle breezes. . .bring people logethe 





Students m the Spanish class must hsten carefuily to take 



Culture on campus includes demonstrations and lectures by visit\ng < 




^■::^^^^iS^.:^ii^^ikMt 




Dione Tharp wekcmes guests of Presidenf Voigt's Chnstmas conceri receplic 



W^-^ i 


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t 


BHif '^ ' ■ ^ 


/^ 



The McKendree Choir pre 



Dean Grondy is assisted of hts birthday 
parly by Kay Treat, Kay Gauble, orrd 
Earlene Lucy. 



94 





"Ohio Slim" (Jed Mihutaj lines up o long shot. 



195 



\ 




1 




1 


1 


u 


( 
( 


' 




Our own "Joy and (he Americans" performed 
during o Friday Assembly (lo Brendo Reyn- 
old's deligh I). 



;.rii»wi'w'**^. 




\ 



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.^. 





cond semester mixer drew new and aid sludenfs alike 





Jeff Carlmg and Brenda Reynolds (at the mixer} jom the group m 



McKENDREAN STAFF 
1966 

Editor Mary Philip 

Assistant Editors Judy Vogt 

Dorothy Gruen 

Business Manager Albert Allen 

Assistant Business Manager Judy Wille 

Administration/Faculty Editor Ralph Bleck 

Senior Editor Judy Vogt 

Junior Editor Carl Pagles 

Sophomore Editor Tammy Winfree 

Freshman Editor Randy Horman 

Organization Editor Leonard Fiore 

Assistant Organization Editor Elizabeth Griffin 

Special Events Editor Chick ie Rosenhauer 

Assistant Special Events Editor Earlene Lucy 

Athletics Editor Carl Pagles 

Activities Editor Terry Tucker 

Assistant Activities Editor Brenda Reynolds 

Art Editor Steve Britko 

Assistant Art Editor Frank Hagen 

Photographers Mahlon Hillard 

Bob Jiaconia 

Morris Uhles 

Advisor Mr. Orville Schanz 



198 



EDITOR'S PAGE 




^% 



THE ROAD NOT TAKEN 

Two roads diverged m a yellow wood, 
And sorry I could not travel both 
And be one traveler, long I stood 
And looked down one as far as I could 
To where it bent in the undergrowth; 
Then took the other, as just as fair, 
And having perhaps the better claim. 
Because it was grassy and wanted wear; 
Though as for that the passing there 
Had worn them really about the same, 
And both that morning equally lay 
In leaves no step had trodden block. 
Oh, I kept the first for another day! 
Yet knowing how way leads on to way, 
I doubted if i should ever come back. 

Robert Frost 

When we who graduate came to McKendree, we chose one "road;" now the road we selected branches as 
we find it will do many times throughout our lives. With mixed emotions we leave McKendree and pursue 
other endeavors. We are anxious to select another "road" and meet and undertake new challenges, but we 
are sorry we will not be here to further utilize the many achievements accomplished this year. 

For this has been an exciting year at McKendree! A senior who has spent all four years at McKendree, 
I have delighted in seeing the tremendous progress that has taken place since I first arrived on campus, the 
particular progress that has taken place this year. The many social and worthwhile cultural events, the new 
buildings, the increased enrollment, the highly qualified faculty, the inspection by North Centra! for accred- 
itation—this is progress, and there is evidence more is to come. 

Speaking on behalf of my staff, we have enjoyed sorting and fitting all the highlights from this year 
together; it has been an exhausting but rewarding experience. It is our hope that the time we spent in com- 
piling and editing this book will be minute in comparison to the enjoyment you receive when reading the 
book now and in years to come. 

As Editor, t thank my staff who put forth the effort to meet deadlines and who cooperated so well, and 
I thank all those who helped, especially those who gave us needed answers to last minute questions. I ex- 
tend special thanks to Mr. Orville Schanz and to David R. Philip; without their help and cooperation, I could 
not have edited this book. 



%^ La 



-itc^ 



■LJ^) 



MARY R. PHILIP 
Editor 




INTER-COLLEGIATE PRESS 

Kansas City — Winnipeg 
Yearbool<s — Yearbook Covers 
Diplomas — Graduation Announcements 
USA 



siii« 



I I