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Full text of "McKendree College history 1928-1978"

HoFman Llbrar^f 
McKendree College 

Lebanon. IL 627~4 



MC KENDREE 



McKendree College 

History 

1928 - 1978 



r^z^^^^^^^^MC KENDREE" 




Turner Publishing Company 
Publishers of America's History 

P.O. Box 3101 
Paducah, Kentucky 42002-3101 

Co-published by Turner Publishing Company 
and Mark A. Thompson, Associate Publisher 

Copyright ©1996 McKendree College 

The materials were compiled and produced using 
available information; Turner Publishing Company, 
Mark A. Thompson and McKendree College 
regret they cannot assume liability for errors or 
omissions. 



This book or any part thereof may not be 
reproduced without the written consent of 
McKendree College and Publishers. 

Graphic Designer: Elizabeth A. Dennis 

Library of Congress Catalog 
Card No. 96-61042 

ISBN: 1-56311-314-7 

Printed in the United States of America 

Limited Edition Printing of 600 copies 



Contents 

Acknowledgments 4 

Dedication 5 

McKendree College: The First 100 Years 6 

The Administration of President Cameron Harmon 12 

The Administration of President Clark R. Yost 28 

McKendreans in World War II 48 

The Administration of President Carl C. Bracy 76 

The Administration of President Russell Grow 90 

The Administration of President Webb B. Garrison 106 

The McKendree Chapel 116 

The Administration of President Max P. Allen 130 

The Administration of President Edwin E. Voigt 162 

The Administration of President Eric Rackham 178 

The Administration of President Julian H. Murphy 192 

The Kentucky Centers 200 

Church and College 206 

McKendree Athletics 214 

McKendree College: 1978-1996 264 

Appendix 

I. Trustees and Years Served 269 

II. Administrators and Staff 271 

III. Faculty and Years of Service 276 

IV. Presidents of McKendree College Alumni Association 279 

V. Honorary Degrees Conferred By McKendree College 279 

VI. Academy of Science ^ 281 

VH. Sports Hall of Fame 281 

Index 282 



MC KENDREE~Kr~ 



Acknowledgments 



In June of 1992 the Alumni Board of the 
McKendree College Alumni Association adopted a goal 
to "Encourage the college to make the drafting of a his- 
tory of the college from 1928-78 a priority, and pledge 
the cooperation of the Alumni Association in the comple- 
tion of this task." With the enthusiastic backing of the 
college administration, the alumni accepted the chal- 
lenge. 

Carmett 'Corky' Helms '59, a member of the 
Alumni Board, agreed to chair the History Committee 
and at the first meeting on November 22, 1992, pre- 
dicted that the ". . . committee will be active for several 
years." Now, nearly four years later, the work of the 
committee — along with that of scores of others — is 
finished. Completion of the work would not have been 
possible, however, without the dedicated commitment 
of five people, listed alphabetically below. 
Rebecca Giles Brewer '47 was the driving force behind 
the committee structure, the overall organization of the 
project, contacts with the authors, realistic editing guide- 
lines and the proofreading of the copy. Robert H. 
Campbell '61, who became Director of Alumni Rela- 
tions during the final year of the project, entered data 
and made the editing changes in the computer to pre- 
pare the final version of the manuscript for the publisher. 
Steve Keller, McKendree College Research Librarian, 
was the volunteer editor for the entire manuscript who 
read every word of every chapter at least twice to en- 
sure uniform usage and continuity from chapter to chap- 
ter. Jane Weingartner, McKendree College Director of 
Development and Alumni Relations when the project 
began, convinced others of the importance of the project 
to the college and guided the work for the first three 
years. Dorothy Faulkner Winterrowd '47 personified 
commitment to the project, personally researching nearly 
every source of information, coordinating the selection 
and placement of pictures, compiling the lists that ap- 
pear in the appendix and volunteering for every diffi- 
cult job no one else wanted to do. 

Authors of the chapters devoted hundreds of hours 
to researching, recording and reviewing the informa- 
tion ultimately reported in the chapters. Since they 
worked with only the barest of outlines, each incorpo- 
rated his or her own personality and style into the writ- 
ing. Therein lies much of the charm of this volume of 



McKendree's hi.story from 1928 to 1978. Authors in- 
clude: alumni Wayne Bise '38, Rebecca Giles Brewer 
'47, Robert H. Campbell '61, Bartley J. Greenwood, Jr. 
'41 , Darrell H. Kohlmiller '54, Kathi Nolan Meggs '69, 
R. James Oppitz '47, Miley E. Palmer '58, Paul W. 
Widicus '7 1 ; faculty/staff Patrick Folk, Irwin Halfond 
and Jo Anne Montague. 

The members of the History Committee spent 
much time in guiding the project, as well as assisting in 
the collection of information. Members, in addition to 
those listed above, include: alumni Helen Church '34, 
Clyde Funkhouser '48, and Orville Schanz '50; fac- 
ulty/staff Helen Gilbert and Anthony Vitale. 

Several other people contributed in a variety of 
ways towards the completion of the project by conduct- 
ing research, compiling information, entering data into 
the computer, proofreading, handling advance sales, 
keeping records, depositing moneys received and work- 
ing on a host of other small but necessary tasks. Included 
are: alumni Robert H. Edwards '57, Constance Parrish 
Grob '53, Patrick McGarrity '91, Michael D. Shirley 
'72, Vivian Knott Thomas '83, Anne Meyer Thomure 
'80, Robert J. Treat '87 and Vita Viviano '90; faculty/ 
staff Sally Bamett, Thomas Darrah, James M. Dennis, 
Edward Glowatski, Elva Hines, Annette Hug, Kim 
Lobring, Jenny Minelli, Mary Ann Newcomb, Stanley 
Osterhage, Thomas Sparhawk, Gerrit TenBrink, Jill M. 
Weil; students Michael Lester '96, Monica Quinn '93, 
Tim Meeker '94, Chris Nitsch '95, and Carolyn Swanson 
'93; friends Harrison Church, Estelle Greenwood and 
John Sims. 

Too numerous to mention, but so very important 
to the success of the project, are the hundreds of alumni, 
faculty and trustees who responded to the questionnaires, 
sat for interviews and provided much of the informa- 
tion and many of the pictures included in this book. The 
committee is also indebted to those who have been in- 
advertently omitted in the compilation of the above lists. 
Even though their names may go unmentioned, their 
contributions have also been much appreciated. 

Finally, this book could not have been completed 
without the cooperation of Mark Thompson and Turner 
Publishing Company, who.se advice and encouragement 
has been important in bringing this project to fruition 
with volunteers. 



MC KENDREE~ 



Dedication 





! 



William Clarence Walton 
1866-1958 

Dr. William C. Walton graduated from McKendree College as 
valedictorian of the class of 1892. After two years as a pastor in the 
Southern Illinois Conference of the Methodist Church, he joined the 
McKendree College faculty in 1894, serving continuously until 1957. 
He received four degrees from the college, A. B. in 1 892, A. M. in 1 894, 
Ph. D. in 1897 and D. D. in 1928. One of his greatest services to his 
alma mater occurred in 1928, when he acted as historian, editor and 
author of the Centennial McKendree College History, a monumental 
work which catalogued the first century of McKendree's achievements. 
Since this volume seeks to carry his work forward fifty years to 1978, it 
is only fitting that it be dedicated to the "Father of McKendree History," 
Dr. W. C. Walton. 



UI^'mc^ KENDREE~^r 



McKendree College: The First 100 Years 

By Patrick H. Folk, Ph. D. (Faculty) 



Near the tree-shaded front campus in Lebanon, 
Illinois, an unpretentious sign reads, "McKendree Col- 
lege Founded 1 828." Few visitors to the beautiful cam- 
pus, viewing its mixture of majestic old buildings and 
modem educational facilities, realize that the present 
college represents nearly 170 years of dreams, struggles, 
and sacrifice. For over 1 6 decades, McKendree has con- 
quered overwhelming obstacles to continue its mission 
of service to church, region, state, and nation. The col- 
lege has produced at least three U.S. senators, two state 
governors, five Illinois Supreme Court justices, four 
territorial governors, two commandants of West Point, 
and uncounted teachers, ministers, bishops, lawyers, 
judges, congressmen, state legislators, scientists, medi- 
cal doctors, business leaders, military officers, editors, 
scientists, and other community and national leaders. 
At least 10 colleges, universities, and medical schools, 
both here and abroad (including four in Illinois) count 
individuals with McKendree connections among their 
founders. Theodore Roosevelt once called McKendree 
College "the oldest and best in the Middle West." The 
contributions of this small college to the region, state, 
and nation are simply incalculable, and it continues to 
provide an outstanding education to its students. Yet 
throughout its history this oldest college in Illinois has 
led a precarious existence, with its survival often threat- 
ened and never assured. Often during its first century, 
the college seemed doomed to failure. 

The founding of most early American colleges re- 
sulted from a combination of religious and secular mo- 
tivations among Western pioneers. Frontier settlements 
saw the establishment of a college both as an agency of 
Christian civilization and moral regeneration in a sav- 
age land, and as a boost to local property values, busi- 
ness, and hopes for development. Most early attempts 
at creating institutions of higher education failed for lack 



of money or popular support, and few pioneer colleges 
survive today. McKendree College is one of those sur- 
vivors. 

McKendree's origins can be traced to the fourth 
annual meeting of the Illinois Conference of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church at Mt. Carmel in September 

1827. Fifty-five delegates from Illinois and Indiana 
heard Peter Cartwright read a petition from Greene 
County Methodists concerning the establishment of a 
conference seminary. No action was taken beyond ap- 
pointing a committee to obtain information. 

The possibility of a Methodist seminary undoubt- 
edly led to discussions in many communities, but it led 
to action in Lebanon. Residents of this tiny village of 
fewer than 200 saw a chance to make their little stop on 
the stage route between Vincennes, Indiana, and St. 
Louis, Missouri, into a major metropolis. A college 
would attract settlers, commerce, and a reputation as a 
cultural center. At a public meeting on February 20, 

1828, 105 subscribers pledged a total of $1,385 to cre- 
ate the "Lebanon Seminary." The "Articles of Organi- 
zation" they drew up sought to promote "mental im- 
provement" by establishing "a seminary of learning, to 
be conducted as nearly as may be, on the plan of Au- 
gusta College, Kentucky. . ." The most recent issue of 
the Christian Advocate had just been received in Leba- 
non, and it lauded five-year-old Augusta as an ideal 
Methodist college, ". . . not only the nursery of learning 
but of morals and religion as well." The Lebanon Semi- 
nary was to be deeded to the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, and the Illinois and Missouri annual confer- 
ences were invited to adopt the college as their offi- 
cial seminary. The stockholders resolved to meet again 
in the spring to select a committee to build a structure 
". . . not less than 36 by 48 feet, with two wings of suit- 
able dimensions for convenience . . ." to be used as a 



college and ". . . as a house of public worship, when this 
will not interfere with the design and object of the insti- 
tution, and on the Sabbath day." 

In March, another meeting selected a building 
comminee and authorized purchase of eight acres of land 
for $24. That spring and summer, work began on the 
building. It proved to be a staggering undertaking for a 
village consisting of fewer than 30 scattered buildings. 
The final structure would not actually be completed until 
1836. 

In October 1 828, the Illinois Conference again met, 
but some delegates tried to block any mention of Leba- 
non Seminary. Although the "Articles of Organization" 
were finally read to the meeting, delegates refused to 
accept the Lebanon enterprise as the conference semi- 
nary, though they did request clarification on the selec- 
tion of trustees for the college. On November 8, the 
Lebanon Seminary stockholders met and wrote a for- 
mal constitution for the school. They elected a board of 
managers which consisted of 33 Methodists; 13 from 
St. Clair County, five from Missouri, and the rest from 
throughout south and central Illinois. The managers 
quickly decided that the school must be opened even 
without conference acceptance. They rented two small 
buildings in Lebanon that had earlier served as subscrip- 
tion schools, and hired two teachers. Edward R. Ames 
served as both principal and teacher, receiving $1 15 the 
first year and $ 1 25 the second. Miss McMurphy (whose 
first name never appeared in any of the records) received 
$83.33 and $125 for two years of teaching. On Novem- 
ber 24, 1 828, the Lebanon Seminary opened with 72 
students, 67 males and five females. 

In September 1829, the Illinois annual conference 
met in Edwardsville and accepted a report from a joint 
committee to establish an official seminary to serve both 
the Illinois and Missouri conferences. After consider- 
ing a petition from Mt. Carmel, the conference settled 
on either Lebanon, Illinois, or Mt. Salubria, Missouri. 
On a ballot vote, the delegates chose the Mt. Salubria 
site, about a mile west of St. Louis. On a later vote that 
decision was rescinded, so no site was chosen. Leba- 
non Seminary was again left to its own devices. 

The struggling little school found a powerful ally 
when William McKendree, the first American-born 
bishop of the Methodist Church, took a personal inter- 
est in Lebanon Seminary and promised a bequest of land 
in the Shiloh valley. In March 1 830, the board of man- 
agers accepted the suggestion of their chairman, Peter 
Cartwright, and renamed the school "the McKendrian 
College." Finally, on October 6, 1830, the Illinois an- 
nual conference accepted the McKendrian College as 



their official seminary and authorized Methodist minis- 
ters to accept donations for the two-year-old school. 

The institution operated under the control of local 
Methodist pastors until 1833, when Peter Akers was 
elected its first president by the annual conference. 
Akers believed the college needed to be incorporated 
under a state charter to ensure its financial stability and 
future development. His efforts toward this end were 
complemented by those of three other colleges in Illi- 
nois, but the question of corporate charters for private 
colleges was a hot issue in American politics. In 1819, 
the Supreme Court had declared in the Dartmouth Col- 
lege case that such a charter was a contract a state could 
not later revise unless the college trustees agreed. Demo- 
crats opposed such charters, fearing they might create a 
permanent aristocracy with unassailable corporate privi- 
leges. Whigs generally favored such charters as neces- 
sary to guarantee the financial and educational indepen- 
dence of collegiate institutions. After a lengthy and 
heated debate, the Illinois legislature in Vandalia passed 
a charter bill for four colleges on February 9, 1835. The 
new law granted corporate charters to the McKendrean 
College, Alton College (later Shurtleff), Illinois College, 
and Jonesboro College (which apparently never actu- 
ally opened). 

The new charter secured McKendree's legal ex- 
istence, but only at a terrible cost. Women, who had 
attended the Lebanon institution since its inception, were 
excluded by the state charter from all four Illinois pri- 
vate colleges. They were finally removed from 
McKendree in 1 836. Oberlin College, founded in Ohio 
in 1836, has, therefore, laid claim to being America's 
first co-educational institution of higher learning. 

Under their new charter, McKendree's trustees 
began to try to solve the serious financial problems that 
plagued the school. The original "Articles of Organiza- 
tion" had allowed each subscriber to send one student 
tuition-free for each 1 dollars pledged. This meant that 
the only continuing income for the college came from 
tuition from non-stockholders, fees, and donations. Early 
donor lists show that Illinois governors and senators, as 
well as such notables as Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. 
Douglas, and John A. Logan, all donated to McKendree 
College. But these sources of money proved inadequate, 
and in 1 836 the trustees instituted several schemes to 
create an endowment fund for the college. College fi- 
nancial agents were empowered to sell scholarships. A 
gift of $500 bought the right to send a student tuition- 
free to McKendree, while $1000 purchased the right to 
send one student free of tuition, room, or board costs. 
These scholarships were perpetual, so that a purchaser 



Eiglu 



<=s^^^^^^^SZ0Mc^K^iB^^EK^ 



and his heirs could use them forever! Since money was 
scarce in the West, scholarships could be purchased on 
credit, at 10 percent interest per year, with the principal 
due only at the end of 10 years. Thus $50 in interest 
payments could buy a purchaser one year of tuition and 
fees, which cost the college $62.50! One hundred of 
the $500 scholarships were "sold," and the college had 
to borrow the shortfall to finance its operations. In es- 
sence, McKendree was lending money at 1 percent that 
it had to borrow at 12 1/2 percent. 

A second scheme adopted in 1 836 seemed much 
more promising. McKendree sought to capitalize on the 
fact that Western land values were appreciating at an 
unprecedented rate and Eastern investors desperately 
wanted to purchase real estate in booming regions like 
Illinois. But who could they trust in the wild West, 
swarming as it was with crooks, liars, and thieves? 
McKendree's trustees provided an answer. They adver- 
tised a breathtaking offer in papers in Philadelphia, 
Boston, and other cities. Investors could buy land 
through the trustees of a Methodist college. One-half 
of the land would go to the college, and one-half to the 
investor. If the investor preferred title to all the land, 
the college would receive all appreciation in value for 
the first five years. In a market where land could rise 
over 100 percent in value in less than a year, the appeal 
was obvious. After all, if you can't trust a Methodist 
college trustee, whom can you trust? 

Those trustees soon gained expanded privileges. 
In 1839, the state legislature granted a new charter to 
"McKENDREE COLLEGE." This charter gave the 
college the legal right to grant all undergraduate or 
graduate degrees. It also raised the maximum landhold- 
ing allowed to the college from 640 to 3000 acres, un- 
doubtedly a concession to the land investment schemes 
for building up its endowment fund. 

But disaster was already on the horizon. Andrew 
Jackson's "Bank War" and "Specie Circular" led to a 
major financial panic. Money disappeared and land 
values plummeted. By the time McKendree College 
graduated its first class of seven seniors in 1841, the 
college's resources had evaporated in a cloud of deep- 
ening debt. All the lands outside of the original campus 
had to be practically given away. By 1845, the college 
had exhausted all sources of income and credit. The 
trustees met and agreed that they could not complete 
the school year. But, despite their desperate straits, they 
absolutely refused to let McKendree College die. They 
agreed to "suspend" operations in November of 1845 
but vowed to reopen classes the following fall. In 1 846 
McKendree College reopened, although new president 



Erasmus Wentworth described it as "thatched over with 
mortgages." Income continued to fall below expenses, 
and the president and faculty were paid by allowances 
from Methodist churches, rather than by the college. 
These payments were often in kind, as professors re- 
ceived grain, garden vegetables, livestock, firewood, and 
services instead of money. 

Despite these problems, the college soon outgrew 
its deteriorating original building, which one minister 
said "looked like a superannuated distillery." In 1849, 
Professor William Goodfellow led a building campaign 
that raised $10,000. In 1850 construction of the brick 
building, now called "Old Main," was completed. When 
the original wood building burned to the ground in 1 856, 
the insurance money and donated funds allowed the 
construction of a new chapel building completed in 1 858 
and still in service today. President Nelson E. Cobleigh 
obtained a 1000-year-old bell for the new steeple. The 
McKendree College bell, which still rings out the hours, 
and rings during graduation ceremonies, is the oldest 
bell in America. The bell was originally cast in the eighth 
century in Spain, where it was recast during the 14th 
century. The bell was first shipped to Jesuit missions in 
Spanish Florida, then to Mexico. It was discovered at 
an abandoned mission in Sante Fe and brought to St. 
Louis in the eariy 19th century, where it was again re- 
cast by David Caughlin. In 1858, it was purchased for 
$60 for the new chapel at McKendree College. 

Meanwhile, college trustees had developed another 
questionable scheme for raising money to pay bills. In 
1854, they decided once again to sell scholarships to 
McKendree College. These would be valid only for 
limited periods of time. Fifty dollars would buy seven 
years of free tuition, while $100 would purchase 20 
years. At that time, tuition was $25 per annum, .so $50 
bought $175 worth of tuition, and $100 was actually 
worth $500. The immediate income allowed the col- 
lege to pay off some long-standing debts, but in the long 
run, these scholarships only increased the school's fi- 
nancial troubles. Finally in 1 858, the trustees established 
an endowment fund. Though it promised no privileges 
for donors, it slowly grew over the years. 

The Methodist character of McKendree College 
had always been manifested in an unyielding hostility 
to the institution of slavery. When the Civil War broke 
out in 1861, McKendreans rushed to defend the Union. 
One-hundred-fifty of the 200 students at the college vol- 
unteered for Federal service. An approximate list of 
McKendree's contributions to Northern ranks includes 
at least six generals, 30 other officers, and 500 enlisted 
men. The 1 1 7th Illinois Volunteer Infantry had so many 



MC KENDREE~gr^ 



McKendree officers and men in its ranks that it was 
called the "McKendree Regiment." This unit played a 
prominent role in about 35 major engagements. The fin- 
est hour of the 1 17th came at the Battle of Nashville, 
when the McKendree Regiment led the decisive charge 
that broke Hood's line and destroyed his army. On April 
8, 1865, the 1 1 7th led the final infantry assault of the 
Civil War when they captured Fort Blakely, Alabama. 
Late in the war, a McKendrean even led the troops who 
captured Jefferson Davis. 

While McKendree can be justly proud of her role 
in saving the Union, the departure of so many students 
almost led to the closing of the college. In the summer 
of 1 863, McKendree had reached such a low point that 
circulars had to be sent assuring the public that the col- 
lege would be open in September. The return of many 
veterans to the campus after the war did not fully allevi- 
ate the problem of low enrollment. 

Some trustees believed that the answer lay in re- 
admitting women, banned from McKendree since 1 836. 
In 1868, college trustees first refused to admit women 
as students but later voted to create a Normal (teacher 
education) department open to both sexes. The teach- 
ing program was not implemented that year. Finally, on 
June 9, 1869, the board voted 14-7 to admit women to 
all classes at McKendree College on the .same terms as 
men. In 1871, Edith Flint became the first woman to 
earn a McKendree degree. 

By the 1870s, athletic teams had also been added 
to student life at McKendree College. A number of 
student-organized outdoor sports activities had 
been played on an intramural level throughout 
McKendree's history. In 1 868, students raised money 
to build a single-story building called the "Athleteon" 
for indoor gymnastics training. The first intercolle- 
giate athletic team at McKendree was in baseball. 
The sport started on a club basis as early as 1 868 and 
seems to have been played continuously since that 
time. A form of soccer was played at McKendree as 
early as 1888 but then disappeared, to be replaced 
by American football in 1892. The college generally 
continued to field a football team until the 1950s. 
McKendree's first tennis court appeared in 1 890, and 
intercollegiate matches began in 1897. McKendree 
also had a track team and competed in intercollegiate 
men'.s basketball by the early 1900s. Women's sports 
general!) did not exist at McKendree before 1928, 
although a picture of a "girl's basketball team, 1903- 
04" exists in the college archives. 

Although enrollments rose to over 250 students 
by the mid- 1 870s, McKendree suffered annual deficits. 



Unpaid bills piled up, and faculty salaries were several 
years in arrears. In the early 1880s, the financial situa- 
tion led to a serious deterioration of physical facilities 
and a decline in student enrollments. By 1 886, with only 
35 students at McKendree, the trustees discussed clos- 
ing the college. They offered the presidency to Isaiah 
Villars, and when he refused, one board member la- 
mented that "the only thing to do is close the institution 
and let this be the end of its history." Faced with that 
reality, Villars finally accepted. He personally scoured 
Southern Illinois for students and made basic repairs on 
the physical plant. Although Villars never overcame the 
problems of annual deficits, one trustee report noted 
"rumors are afloat that 'Old McKendree' is still alive 
and getting better." 

This optimism was short lived. By 1894, the col- 
lege was $5,500 in debt. Mrs. Rebecca Foreman of 
O'Fallon held the mortgage and had indicated her in- 
tention to foreclose when the note fell due on July 19. 
On the day before the threatened foreclosure, the trust- 
ees elected a new president, and Mrs. Foreman agreed 
to grant him a little time to turn things around. The 
election of McKendree Hypes Chamberlin was a turn- 
ing point in college history. Chamberlin was descended 
from two founders and had been bom and raised on the 
campus, where his father served as director of board- 
ing. He graduated from McKendree and Harvard Law 
School. 

McKendree Hypes Chamberlin was determined to 
liquidate the debt through Lebanon donations alone. 
Despite hard times and the failure of the local bank, 
Chamberlin's emotional appeals raised $4,550 in 10 
months. Still $1,000 short, he took the money to Mrs. 
Foreman and made such a heartrending presentation that 
she donated the remaining sum herself. "Old Mac" later 
raised $2,300 more in Lebanon to refurbish college 
buildings and $2,000 from Mrs. Foreman for a new heat- 
ing plant. He also convinced Andrew Eisenmayer to 
donate money for a new gymnasium, built in 1903 and 
named for the donor. 

Having amply demonstrated strong local support 
for the college, Chamberlin began approaching poten- 
tial major donors with great success. By 1905, he had 
raised an endowment fund of $100,000 and had prom- 
ises of some $60,000 for buildings if he could reach 
$200,000. But despite his financial successes, the 
board of trustees accepted Chamberlin's resignation 
in 1908 because of his opposition to McKendree's 
growing emphasis on its intercollegiate football pro- 
gram. Chamberlin's donor contacts continued their sup- 
port, and by 191 1 the college reached its $200,000 en- 



UZ^MC KEN PRE E~^^ 



dowment goal. Carnegie Hall, Pearsons Hall, and 
Benson Wood Library were all constructed in the seven 
years before World War I. In addition, two stories 
were added to the "Athleteon," and the enlarged struc- 
ture became the science building. In 1918, the Gary 
Loan Fund was established, which set up an endowed 
revolving loan fund to help students pay for their col- 
lege education. 

In 1922, the trustees abolished the McKendree 
Academy, largely because the spread of public high 
schools had eliminated most of the demand for private 
secondary education. During its 94-year history, the 



academy had given thousands of Illinois students a solid 
high school education. 

The 1 920s saw many improvements in the college 
physical plant, especially in those facilities connected 
with intercollegiate athletics. When McKendree Col- 
lege celebrated its centennial in 1 928, the college seemed 
to be in excellent physical and financial shape. Profes- 
sor William C. Walton authored The Centennial History 
of McKendree College, which traced the school's 100 
years of struggles and accomplishments. The centen- 
nial history pointed towards a bright future for 
McKendree College. 




Centennial Gate presented by the class of 1923. 



MC KEN D RE E^T; 



The Administration of President Cameron Harmon 

(1923-1935) 

By R. James Oppitz ('47) 



In 1928, McKendree College observed the cen- 
tennial of its founding on an especially high note. 
Records were set in a number of important categories: 
total student enrollment, freshman students enrolled, and 
the number of students qualifying for graduation. The 
college had attracted a respectable amount of endow- 
ment. McKendree had strengthened its faculty, both in 
number and in their academic qualifications. The col- 
lege appeared to be making progress in its long-term 
goal to secure regional accreditation. 

In the five years of his presidency, Cameron 
Harmon had been popular on campus and generally re- 
spected by people throughout the Southern Illinois Con- 
ference of the Methodist Church. Still called 'Cap' from 
his days as captain of the McKendree football team, he 
was about as colorful as one should expect a Methodist 
minister to be. There were abundant reasons to celebrate 
and to anticipate the future with great optimism. 

It seems remarkable, under these circumstances, 
that four or five years later the ability of the college 
even to survive was by no means certain. This was not 
the first time in its long history that the college had to 
deal with this type of crisis, nor would it be the last. 
The situation was by no means unique to McKendree, 
but there was scant comfort found in the realization that 
most other small colleges faced similar problems. 

To a considerable degree, the emergency of the 
early 1930s resulted from factors over which the col- 
lege had no immediate control. The stock market had 
collapsed in October 1929, and by the second quarter of 
1930, it was apparent that the entire world was experi- 
encing a business depression. No one knew at the time 
how severe the depression would prove to be, or how 



extended its duration. Facing economic adversity was 
nothing new for McKendree College. Over a period of 
more than 100 years, the college had had its share of 
hard times. 

Although President Herbert Hoover had assured 
the nation that "prosperity is just around the comer," 
the nation's economy gave little evidence of being able 
to correct itself. Many banks proved to be insolvent and 
were forced to close their doors. Fully 25 percent of the 
nation's work force was unemployed. Those people who 
were fortunate enough to have jobs were working at 
substantially reduced wages or salaries and may not even 
have been paid regularly. The ability to buy such things 
as gasoline for 1 3 cents a gallon and a loaf of bread for 
a dime provided little consolation. 

With little or no prospect for immediate employ- 
ment, large numbers of young people were available 
for enrollment in college, but few families were in the 
position to pay tuition or room and board. Moreover, 
there was little confidence that, upon graduation, stu- 
dents would be able to secure employment in the ca- 
reers for which they had prepared. 

There was some modest recovery in the economy 
by the mid- 1930s, but depressed conditions actually 
continued until the end of the decade. At that time, in 
anticipation of our involvement in World War II, the 
economy was stimulated by large federal government 
expenditures for defense. 

There is little doubt that these were difficult times. 
To develop actual statistics documenting the status of 
the college, 60 years later, is difficult at best. There were 
no formal reports issued by the college. In fact, as the 
situation continued to worsen, there was some natural 



MC KENDREE' 



reluctance on the part of college officials to reveal to 
the public the severity of its crisis. The belief appar- 
ently was that such information would convince sup- 
porters that McKendree was a lost cause and that, rather 
than increasing their contributions, people would do 
exactly the opposite. There is, furthermore, some con- 
fusion in the financial data. The people responsible for 
accounting and finance were loyal, honest, and conscien- 
tious, but without professional training in these areas. 

With the full recognition that some of these fig- 
ures may represent approximations, an examination of 
several areas is appropriate. 



Student Enrollment 

Except as noted, these figures are based upon re- 
ports made to the board of trustees, meeting annually in 
May or June. Total enrollment in 1922-23 had been 
116; by 1928-29 this figure had grown to 413. The ef- 
fects of the depression were apparent in the figures for 
subsequent years: 1931-32 — 287 students; 1932-33 
— 271 students; 1933-34 "— 299 students. 

In a rather monumental study of this period, alum- 
nus Paul Widicus, writing in 1 970, claims that there were 
451 students enrolled in 1930, which would represent 
an enrollment record which was to stand for many years 



to come. Widicus also indicates that there were 209 
students enrolled in 1935, the final year of the Harmon 
presidency. 

McKendree at the time had little in the way of 
endowment income and was heavily dependent upon 
the revenues generated by student tuition and fees. The 
decline in student enrollment therefore had an especially 
devastating effect upon college finances. The situation 
was even worse when one recognizes that the students 
of this era typically arrived on campus with a limited abil- 
ity to meet their expenses. Virtually all students required 
some type of financial assistance/scholarships, loans, work 
assignments, or some other arrangement. In this environ- 
ment, it would be interesting to know what, if any, effect 
a decision by the board of trustees in 1932 may have 
had. The board "reluctantly" voted to increase tuition 
from $45.00 to S70.00 per semester. How much addi- 
tional revenue would likely be collected from students, 
most of whom did not have the original $45.00? 



College Finances 

Prior to 1930, McKendree had an endowment of 
$225,000. The college in that year received $240,000 
from the Methodist Church and was therefore moving 
toward the $550,000 minimum endowment believed to 




Old Main, built m 1850. 




Members of Band, 1931. 



be necessary for regional accreditation. McKendree in 
June of 1931 declared that it had $665,000 in endow- 
ment with no indebtedness. 

An examination of annual deficits as reported to 
the board of trustees paints a less cheerful picture. Some 
of the figures being given may have been annual defi- 
cits and some may represent an accumulation of defi- 
cits over a number of years. There was apparently a 
deficit of $15,000 in 1928, $3,000 in 1929, and $7,800 
in 1931. The board in 1931 learned that "the deficit 
had grown to $79,227." An additional deficit of $28,417 
was recorded for 1932. In that year, the college secured 
a mortgage of $30,000 on its property and found it nec- 
essary to borrow an additional $ 1 0,000 on an unsecured 
basis. 



These amounts may ap- 
pear to be modest by the 
standards to which Ameri- 
cans had become accustomed 
toward the end of the 20th 
century. They were, however, 
quite substantial in terms of 
price levels in the 1920s and 
1930s. 

The best available sum- 
mary of the situation may 
very well come from a letter 
from Clark Yost to Bernard 
Isselhardt, an alumnus, on 
April 14, 1945. Dr. Yost had 
succeeded Dr. Harmon as 
president in 1935. The letter, 
written several months after 
Yost left the college, reflects 
his firm grasp of the problems 
and unusual candor in the 
frustrations he had experi- 
enced. 

For fifteen years pre- 
ceding my coming to 
McKendree there 
was a deficit each 
year. It averaged 
$20,000 a year for 
the ten years im- 
mediately preced- 
ing my presidency. 
Much of this was 
taken out of the 
Endowment- i n 
fact more than $200,000 because securities 
were selling below cost. The best securities 
were sold and only the almost worthless 
were left when I arrived. The real estate all 
had back taxes. We paid $2,200 in back 
taxes to save one farm of 100 acres for 
which 1 was offered $3,000 a few months 
ago. The Endowment did not yield enough 
to pay the taxes. Moreover there were debts 
of $80,000: $36,000 of which were current 
expense debts. 

The decline in the situation at McKendree is 
probably best demonstrated by what happened to fac- 
ulty salaries. 




Factiln Play "Neighbors " 



Faculty Salaries 

McKendree had been told by representatives of 
the North Central Association of Colleges and Second- 
ary Schools that its faculty salaries would have to be 
increased before the college could be considered a seri- 
ous candidate for accreditation. 

At its meeting in June 1928, the board of trustees 
responded to this advice by increasing the president's 
salary to $4,000 per year and faculty salaries to a range 
of $2,250 to $2,550. These figures were thought to be 
at a minimum level necessary to secure accreditation. 

In the June 1932 meeting, faculty salaries were 
formally cut, and the board was told that "faculty had 
been paid only $50.00 per month for three months." 

An additional 10 percent cut was authorized at the 
June 1933 meeting, and "faculty members were also 
asked to donate a month's salary in May." 

There was an additional reduction in faculty sala- 
ries approved at the June 1934 meeting. The cumula- 
tive effect of this action, along with the adjustments of 
prior years, meant that salaries were then 55 percent 
below their 1928-29 level. An application of this figure 
would mean a salary range of $ 1 ,0 1 3 to $ 1 , 1 48 for fac- 
ulty members for the 1934-35 school year. 

The personal recollections of the children of fac- 
ulty members who served the college during this pe- 
riod are even more grim. The descendants of one 
faculty member believe that there was one year in 
which their father received no salary at all. One other 
person's recollection is that 1932-33 was especially 
difficult. The school year began with no actual prom- 
ise of compensation. The arrangement for the fall 
semester was that as soon as income was determined 
and "all necessary expenses" had been met, the re- 



sulting salary pool would be divided into equal shares 
for individual faculty members. Under this system, a 
single check for $350-400 was paid to each faculty 
member in November for the fall semester. A some- 
what smaller check for the spring semester was is- 
sued in March or April. 




MC KENDREE~^^ 



Whether one relies upon the minutes of board 
meetings or upon anecdotal accounts, the situation was 
indeed bleak and called for sacrifice of heroic propor- 
tions for faculty members and their families. Their situ- 
ation was even worse when one recognizes that each 
time the college embarked upon a campaign to raise 
external funds, a further contribution from faculty mem- 
bers was assumed to be necessary. The logic was that 
the college would have to demonstrate a full participa- 
tion by its employees if any appeal to alumni and other 
potential supporters were to succeed. 

It may seem remarkable, under these circum- 
stances, that McKendree was able to retain a capable 
faculty. With no attempt to disparage in any way their 
loyalty and faithfulness, college faculty members had 
few opportunities in the early 1930s to secure alterna- 
tive employment. There was little choice but to cooper- 
ate. 

Faculty salaries had been substantially reduced and 
the college had found it necessary to eliminate several 
teaching positions. At the same time, a valiant effort 
was made to secure financial help from alumni and other 
supporters. 



Fund-Raising Efforts 

The McKendree Review indicates that the college 
in 1932 attempted to sell $30,000 in McKendree Col- 
lege bonds. At a special meeting of the trustees, held in 
Flora in connection with the annual conference. Presi- 
dent Harmon reported that only $10,000 in bonds had 
been sold. The board authorized a continuation of the 
effort. 

The student newspaper also reports that the South- 
em Illinois Conference of the church was in October 
1933 attempting to raise $40,000 for various church in- 
stitutions. Of this amount, $10,000 was to go to 
McKendree for current expenses and for payment of 
debts. 

A special meeting of the trustees was held in No- 
vember 1933 at a church conference in Mt. Vernon. The 
McKendree Review described a plan under which alumni 
were to be asked to contribute $2,500 per year, which 
was thought to be the equivalent of the income that might 
normally be produced from a $50,000 endowment. This 
arrangement is known in the trade as "living endow- 
ment." The college was aware that, in view of economic 
conditions, it could not raise $50,000 in one lump sum. 




It also had come to the painful realization that the in- 
vestment of endowment funds was difficult and was not 
producing much in the way of income. 

Reports of victory celebrations were conspicuous 
by their absence in the newspapers of the period. There 
were no public ceremonies in which mortgages or simi- 
lar debt instruments were joyfully burned. One must 
conclude that these efforts were, therefore, only mar- 
ginally successful. With depressed economic conditions, 
the 1930s simply were not good years in which to raise 
money. 

One rather interesting ceremony did take place on 
campus. The event was consistent with the declaration 
by Franklin D. Roosevelt in his inaugural address as 
president in March of 1 933 that "the only thing we have 
to fear is fear itself." It was Roosevelt's belief that the 
nation's problems were rooted in psychology, as well 
as in economics. 

McKendree students, presumably with the full 
support of the faculty and the administration, in chapel 
one morning conducted a mock funeral for Mr. 
Jonah Hoodoo Jinx. The ceremony was followed by a 
procession to what was then called the back campus for 
a suitable burial. The ceremony was interesting but pro- 
duced no long lasting effects. 



Drilling for Oil 

For a few months early in 1935, a potential solu- 
tion to McKendree's financial problems appeared to be 
at hand. Oil had been discovered near Bakersfield, Cali- 
fornia. The college had years earlier been given the deed 
to 320 acres in this region by Jennie Wood of Effingham, 
Illinois. In 1918, Mrs. Wood had also contributed the 
funds for the construction of the college library, in memory 
of her late husband, the Honorable Benson Wood. 

All indications were that the region around 
McKendree's property in California would become a ma- 
jor oil field. There were 15 producing wells within a ra- 
dius of one mile of the college property and four others 
were in the process of drilling. A total of 49 wells had 
begun producing in the general area within the past year. 
Oil was reported to be flowing at the rate of 3,000 bar- 
rels per day on land adjoining McKendree's property. 

With a realization that a miracle might indeed be 
at hand, the executive committee of McKendree's board 
of trustees in late February asked Cameron Harmon to 
go to California to investigate the situation and, if ap- 
propriate, to negotiate a new lease. The college in 1930 



had negotiated a drilling lease that was about to expire. 
McKendree had already been offered a cash bonus of 
$8,000 by a new potential leasee, with an agreement to 
commence drilling within one month. 

In November 1935, McKendree received the dis- 
appointing news that its well had been abandoned. Af- 
ter drilling to a depth of 6,606 feet, the contractor de- 
cided that the oil was so deep and of such poor quality 
that further drilling could not be justified. 

This final disappointment may very well have 
sealed the fate of the Harmon presidency. One month 
earlier, the resignation of Cameron Harmon had been 
accepted by the trustees. Dr. Harmon had offered to re- 
sign two years earlier, in 1933, but was persuaded by 
the board to withdraw the offer. 



The Harmon Administration: 
A Perspective 

Cameron Harmon had served as president of his 
alma mater from 1 923 to 1 935. The period had initially 
been one of remarkable growth, but it ended in disap- 
pointment as the college desperately struggled for sur- 
vival. 

One year earlier, in 1 934, various constituents had 
made an unsuccessful attempt to unseat Harmon. The 
argument was that Harmon had allowed the financial 
position of the college to deteriorate with a devastating 
effect upon its programs. This was thought to have been 
the result, in part, of the unrealistic generosity that 
Harmon had extended to students. 

Harmon's open support for intercollegiate athlet- 
ics was also a point of controversy. Many American 
college presidents, over the years, have believed that 
success on the playing field and in the gymnasium rep- 
resents an excellent opportunity to attract students and 
financial support for their institutions as a whole. 

Many critics believed that playing football was the 
only thing McKendree had been able to do well in the 
1930s and that this success provided evidence of an 
improper emphasis upon sports. There are, however, no 
"won and lost" records maintained for academic activi- 
ties and an equally objective measurement of their suc- 
cess is not readily available. 

Critics found additional support for their position 
in the fact that the most conspicuous improvements to 
the campus had been in its athletic facilities. Additional 
seating had been constructed for Eisenmayer Gymna- 



<^s^^cs;g<^?^^^5dyMC KENDREE~^^ 



sium. With the generous support of the Benjamin Hypes 
family, the football field had been provided with a field 
house, permanent concrete seating, a masonry wall on the 
west border, and lighting to permit night football games. 

During the same period, a brick vault for the safe- 
keeping of student records was constructed on the first 
floor of Old Main, the heating system was improved, 
and new seating was provided for the chapel. As im- 
portant and as necessary as these improvements may 
have been, they paled by comparison with what had been 
done for athletics. 

Most people are aware that Harmon served in the 
army for 1 8 months during the Spanish-American War. 
Less well known is that he was selected as a delegate to 
the 1920 Democratic National Convention to nominate 
candidates for president and vice president. He was 
urged at that time to run for Congress but chose not to 
make the race. 

Cameron Harmon had made some interesting and 
prominent friends, including Branch Rickey, then vice 
president and general manager of the St. Louis Cardinals 
baseball team. A life-long Methodist, Rickey served a 
number of terms on the McKendree Board of Trustees. 

Harmon also knew Robert Wadlow sufficiently 
well that Wadlow frequently traveled with the 
McKendree president on automobile trips around South- 
em Illinois. Described as "the Alton giant," Wadlow at 
the age of 16 was seven feet, ten and one-half inches 
tall and weighed 375 pounds. By the 
standards of the 1 930s, he was a very 
large young man. Harmon explained 
that "Robert pretty well takes up the back 
seat, all by himself." 

It had been assumed that Robert, 
born into a strong Methodist family, 
would likely enroll as a student at 
McKendree. Perhaps this might have 
happened, had Harmon continued as 
president. It was recognized that his en- 
rollment could have been a mixed bless- 
ing. He would have required a special 
bed and classroom chairs. Robert also 
consumed 8,000 calories on a daily ba- 
sis, which would likely have set some 
kind of Pearsons Hall record. 

Robert Wadlow was enrolled for a 
time at Shurtleff College, in his home 
city, but he did not graduate. He died 
tragically at the age of 22 from a foot 
infection, which would not have been 
life-threatening for a person of normal 



size. At the time of his death, he was eight feet, eleven 
inches tall and had weighed as much as 491 pounds. He 
is thought to have been the tallest person who ever lived. 

It is generally assumed that as a senior member of 
the conference, Harmon was given some choice in his 
reassignment to the Methodist ministry. His decision to 
go to the First Methodist Church in Carbondale was 
logical. The church was large enough to provide a com- 
fortable salary for its minister. Carbondale was a col- 
lege town, keeping Harmon in an environment he ap- 
parently had enjoyed. Most importantly, as Harmon ob- 
served at the time, the church had no current indebted- 
ness, thereby lifting from Harmon a burden that had 
been onerous during his Lebanon days. 

The years at McKendree had taken their toll, but 
Cameron Harmon was able to move on with his life, 
with an understandable sense of freedom and relief. 

Cap Harmon died in 1966 at the age of 90. 



Regional Accreditation 

It seems strange that in the midst of all of these 
problems, McKendree was actually able to secure ac- 
creditation by the North Central Association in March 
of 1931. President Harmon and Dean E. P. Baker had 
gone to Chicago with the full expectation of being re- 
quired to argue the case for McKendree. Upon their 




MC KENDREE 



arrival, they were pleasantly surprised to receive the 
message, 'Tell Cap we do not need him. His school has 
already been admitted." 

In the same year, the college received a Class A 
rating from the Illinois Department of Education, en- 
hancing the opportunity of graduates to teach in the 
public schools. 

Even after being accredited, McKendree was to 
be subject to an annual review by the North Central As- 
sociation. This arrangement was thought to be unusual. 
It is not known whether it reflected the belief that 
McKendree's qualifications were thought to be marginal 
or simply that the association was aware that the De- 
pression would prove to be especially detrimental to the 
quality of programs of small church-related colleges. 

At any rate. North Central Association accredi- 
tation was withdrawn in April 1934 as the result of 
the substantial deterioration, which was becoming in- 



^^^^^V 


■niitik A iib^ 





Ihc Biii hour - Waggoner, Dolley, Walton, and Baker. 



creasingly evident. It would be many years before 
McKendree would comfortably regain regional ac- 
creditation. 

Accreditation had been a goal for the college with 
the expectation that this recognition would enhance the 
ability of the college to attract and retain qualified stu- 
dents and faculty and to secure funding support. For 
students wishing to transfer credits or to qualify for ad- 
mission to graduate programs, the lack of accreditation 
probably meant that their choices were limited to col- 
leges and universities in the immediate region. Such 
schools would likely have had previous, recent ex- 
perience with students from McKendree and, on that 
basis, were likely to be sympathetic. About the only 
problem that most students reported was that their 
credits for Bible-related courses were not usually ac- 
cepted by state-supported institutions. This decision re- 
flected the fact that such courses were not a part of their 
own curricula, rather than any sug- 
gestion that the universities believed 
that the McKendree courses were not 
of academic quality. 



Distinguished 
Service 

McKendree in 1934 acknowl- 
edged the significant contributions 
of four of its senior professors. The 
1934 McKendrean yearbook pro- 
vides the following tribute: 

To our quartet of profes- 
sors — Dr. Waggoner, 
Dean Baker, Dr. Walton, 
Dr. Dolley — for their 
long and distinguished 
service to the college 
covering, collectively, 
one-hundred and sixty- 
nine years; for their true 
McKendree spirit, mak- 
ing us grateful for the 
past and brightly hopeful 
for the future, in admira- 
tion and appreciation, 
the 1 934 McKendrean is 
dedicated. 



MC KENDREE 



Edward Baker Waggoner had graduated from 
McKendree in 1875 and later completed requirements 
for a master of arts degree. Except for one year on leave, 
he served as professor of science at McKendree from 
1881 to 1922, a total of 40 years. He was then 70 years 
of age. After teaching science at Lebanon Community 
High School for five years, Waggoner returned to 
McKendree on an informal basis to develop a college 
museum. He died in 1935, one year after the 
McKendrean tribute, at the age of 83. 

Edwin Percy Baker was graduated from Ohio 
Wesleyan University in 1893 and later that year 
joined the McKendree faculty, teaching Latin and 
German. He retired at the age of 85 in 1953, after 
providing 60 years of service to the college. He was 
secretary of the faculty for many years. In 1917, he 
was appointed dean and served in that capacity until 
1937. He was also acting president of the college 
for two years during World War I. Dean Baker died 
in 1963, at the age of 95. 

William Clarence Walton served McKendree in 
various capacities from 1 894 to 1 946, a total of 52 years. 
He was the valedictorian of his 1892 McKendree gradu- 
ating class and qualified for an A.M. degree in 1894 
and a Ph.D. degree from McKendree in 1 897. His origi- 
nal appointment was in Greek and Latin; students 
would later take his courses in philosophy and reli- 
gion. He was admitted to the Southern Illinois Meth- 
odist Conference in 1892. His contributions include 
10 years of service as fiscal agent and many years as 
director of the summer school. He was McKendree's 
vice president for 12 years, under McKendree Presi- 
dent McKendree Hypes Chamberlin. He acted as trea- 
surer of the college for more years than most folks 
can remember. People who are interested in 








]930 Homecoming Parade Award Winning Float. 

McKendree's history will be eternally grateful for his 
work in compiling a massive centennial history in 1 928. 
Dr. Walton, despite failing eyesight, remained active 
until his retirement in 1946 at the age of 80. He died in 
1958, just two months short of what would have been 
his 92nd birthday. 

James Clay Dolley was graduated from 
Randolph-Macon College in 1 888 and received a mas- 
ter of arts degree from the same institution, one year 
later. He taught Latin and Greek for McKendree from 
1899 to 1942, a total of 42 years. He was vice president 
for four years, served as registrar during the 1920s, and 
edited the college catalog for many years. In failing 
health, he retired in 1942 and died less than a year 
later at the age of 77. 

Beyond their impres- 
sive longevity and their loy- 
alty to the college, these 
men had other things in 
common. Each had been 
trained in the classics, a cur- 
riculum that preceded the 
present day study of liberal 
arts. Baker and Dolley were 
sons of Methodist ministers. 
Baker, Walton, and Dolley 
1 served terms on the 
Lebanon city council with 
the service of Dolley espe- 
cially noteworthy, extend- 
ing from 1919 until 1941. 



MC KENDREE^MT^ 



Together, they embodied the heart of McKendree tradi- 
tion, a legacy McKendreans still enjoy to this very 
day. Their philosophy is probably best represented 
by Dean Baker's statement in 1953 on the occasion of 
his retirement: 

/ never had any ambition to leave McKendree 
for larger or better paying fields. With 
enough to eat and a place to sleep and a 
little comfort, I was satisfied. I have been 
far happier than any teacher receiving a 
salary two or three times larger than mine. 
As far as my work and my life are con- 
cerned, I am well satisfied. I would do the 
same thing again. 



Mary Had . . . 
An Unlikely Poet 

From 1932 until 1938, the McKendree Review 
regularly featured a series of anonymous four-line po- 
ems that dealt humorously with various aspects of col- 
lege life. They were probably inspired by Sarah Joseph 
Hale's nursery rhyme, "Mary had a little lamb," which 
had been published early in the 19th century, but with 
which most people are familiar. The following examples 
are provided: 

On being a freshman: 

Mary had a fit of blues 
Oh my, but she was sad, 
Cause she was just a little frosh 
Homesick for mom and dad. 
(September 13, 1932) 

Mary had a new green cap, 
Upon her head it sat. 
Of Mary all the people asked, 
" Where did you get that hat ? " 
(September 20, 1932) 



Mary had a chapel seat. 

To sit in twice a week. 

And even if the talks were good. 

She always went to sleep. 

(October'31, 1934) 

On going to a football game: 

Mary had a football game, 
The Bearcats sure did roar. 
And when the game ended, 
We had the biggest score. 
(October 6, 1937) 

On surviving the winter: 

Mary had two little feet; 
She went out in the snow. 
And on the icy walk, these feet. 
From under her did go. 
(December 13, 1932) 

On attending class: 

Mary had an eas}' course. 

But never worked a lick; 

And when the si.x- week's grades came out, 

She surely did feel sick. 

(October 18, 1932) 

Mary had a little grade. 

Well below a D. 

She dated the night before the test. 

And that is why, you see. 

(November 2, 1932) 

Mary had some te.xt books; 
She never even read 'em. 
Exams are fast approaching. 
And boy, does Mary dread 'em. 
(Novembers, 1933) 

On being May Queen: 

Mary had a May Fete, 
She was to wear the crown. 
But when they put it on her head. 
They got it upside down. 
(May 6. 1933) 



On attending chapel: 

Mary had a chapel cut. 
It filled her with dismay. 
She fixed it up with Little Joe, 
And now it 's all okay. 
(October 4, 1932) 



On graduating from college: 

Mary had a cap and gown; 
She donned them with a sob. 
For college days are over. 
And she now must hunt a job. 
(June 5, 1934) 



MC KENDRE E~^^ 




A page from Dean Srowell 's diary: 

There was no widespread speculation as to the 
source of this poetry. The fact that the poems appeared 
over a period of six years suggests that if students were 
involved, the work would have been the contribution of 
more than just one single student. Perhaps at the time, 
students were more interested in the authorship of "The 
Campus Owl." This column, which also appeared 
anonymously in the McKendree Review, dealt with cam- 
pus romances, clearly a matter of more immediate con- 
cern to most students. 

Months after the last "Mary Had" poem had ap- 
peared. Dean Charles J. Stowell delivered a chapel talk in 
which he read some of his original poetry. He mentioned, 
simply in passing, that it was he who had been respon- 
sible for the "Mary Had" series. 



Most people were shocked. 
Dean Stowell was a kind, compas- 
sionate man but did not have the ob- 
vious warmth of personality that his 
predecessor as dean, Edwin P. 
Baker, had abundantly displayed. 
Dr. Stowell was an effective college 
teacher, thorough and methodical, 
but with a sober demeanor. Any 
sense of humor that he may have 
had was rarely evident in his 
classes. In fairness, it should be 
pointed out that the courses he 
taught in mathematics and econom- 
ics do not readily lend themselves 
to humor. Even those students who 
recognize that a background in 
mathematics is necessary often re- 
gard the subject matter as dry and 
unexciting. Economics is no bet- 
ter; it has long been called "the dis- 
mal science." 

Charles Jacob Stowell was 
graduated from Illinois Wesleyan 
University in 1911 and completed 
a Ph.D. degree at the University of 
Illinois in 1917. 

He was a member of the 
McKendree faculty from 1920 to 
1955, a total of 35 years. During 
most of his career, his teaching was 
in the field of mathematics. When 
Professor Clayton Watts resigned in 
1939, McKendree found that it had 
no one who was qualified to teach 
economics. Dr. Stowell indicated 
to President Yost that he was willing to assume this ad- 
ditional responsibility. Most people were unaware that 
Dr. Stowell's doctorate had actually been in economics, 
with a background in mathematics appropriate to that 
discipline. To strengthen his qualifications in mathemat- 
ics, he returned to the University of Illinois for post- 
doctoral study in 1923-24. 

In his willingness to teach economics, relatively 
late in his career. Dr. Stowell demonstrated the coop- 
eration and versatility that had characterized the 
McKendree faculty over the years and which would lie- 
come especially important to the survival of the college 
and its programs, a few years later during World War II. 
Harold Hertenstein, who graduated from 
McKendree in 1938 and then went on to the University 




of Illinois for graduate study, was appointed to the col- 
lege faculty to teach the introductory courses in math- 
ematics, which would otherwise have been taught by 
Dr. Stowell. 

When Dean E. P. Baker in 1937 indicated his de- 
sire to be reassigned to full-time teaching, Dr. Stowell 
was named as his successor. He served as dean of the 
college until 1947. 

Dean Stowell died in 1966 at the college at the 
age of 82. 



Anheuser-Busch Gymnashjm 

This story is repeated despite the fact that there is 
no evidence that it is at all factual. It represents a part 
of the mythology that sustained McKendree students 
during the 1930s at a time when people had to create 
their own entertainment. 

A rumor spread that officials of the Anheuser- 
Busch Brewery had offered $20,000 to McKendree to- 
ward the construction of a new gymnasium, with the 
stipulation that the building be named for a member of 
the Busch family. This offer would have been made 
sometime after 1933, when repeal of the 18th amend- 
ment, legalizing the sale of alcoholic beverages, became 
effective. 



The story persisted for several years, even though 
there was no evidence to believe that an offer was ever 
made. It was subject to debate by each of the three lit- 
erary societies, probably on more than one occasion. It 
showed up regularly in the topic of themes which stu- 
dents wrote for freshman English courses. 

Contemplation of the proposal offered more than 
just a pleasant diversion. The discussion provided an 
opportunity for people to work toward some kind of 
understanding as to why McKendree was founded and 
why it was important that she should continue to exist. 

Some students believed that a new gymnasium was 
so urgently needed that the gift should be accepted. Old 
Eisenmayer had been designed before basketball became 
a popular sport and was barely adequate for that pur- 
pose. There had been no new construction on the 
McKendree campus for almost 20 years, and any new 
building would have provided a beneficial psychologi- 
cal lift. 

The case against accepting the gift was based upon 
moral principle. Some people believed that the brew- 
ery, in making the offer, was diabolically attempting to 
compromise McKendree's Christian integrity. "It is bet- 
ter to be poor but proud" was the essential argument. 

It is easy to understand why the slogan never ap- 
peared on the college letterhead nor on highway signs 
at the edge of Lebanon, but "Poor but Proud" appropri- 
ately describes the McKendree College of the 1930s. 




Original Eisenmayer Gymnasium, built in 1 903. 



MC KENDREE 



The Administration of President Cameron Harmon 
Faculty List 



1928-29 




Claude E. Vick** 


Education 


Edwin P. Baker 


German, Dean 


William C. Walton 


Philosophy 


Christopher J. Bittner 


Social Science 


Alleen Wilson 


Librarian 


James C. Dolley 


Latin, Greek, Registrar 


Exean Woodward 


English 


Glen F. FiUey 


Dir. of Athletics, Coach 






W.B. Garvin 


Psychology.Coach 






Pauline Harper 


Public School Music 


1930-31 




Joseph M. Harrell 


English 


Edwin P Baker 


German, Dean 


Wesley C. Kettlekamp 


History 


Christopher J. Bittner 


Social Science 


John William Andrew Kinison 


Religion 


Eli Crouse 


Bible 


Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 


Piano, Organ, Theory 


James C. Dolley 


Latin, Greek 


J. Max Kruwell 


Piano, Organ, Theory 


Arthur H. Doolen 


Physical Education, Coach 


Standleigh M. McClure** 


Chemistry 


Wiley B. Garvin 


Psychology 


Evelyn E. McNeely 


English 


Pauline Harper 


Voice 


Irwin R. Nelson 


History 


Frank Hirth 


Band 


Mrs. Emma Noss 


History 


Agnes Howe 


Expression 


Sophy D. Parker 


French, Spanish 


Wesley C. Kettlekamp 


History 


Olive E. Patmore 


English, Expression 


Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 


Piano, Organ, Theory 


Martha Schmucker 


Voice 


Aedythe Mange 


History 


Eugene Shaffer 


Violin 


Standleigh M. McClure 


Chemistry 


Edwin R. Spencer 


Biology 


Evelyn McNeely 


English 


Charles Jacob Stowell 


Mathematics 


Walter Morse 


Mechanical Drawing, 


Claude E. Vick 


Education 




Mathematics 


William C. Walton 


Philosophy 


Louis K. Oppitz 


Physics 


Alleen Wilson 


Librarian 


Nell Oppitz 


History 


Exean Woodward 


English 


Juha W. Osling 


Public School Music 


Otis B. Young 


Physics 


Sophy D. Parker 


French, Spanish 






Robert Roloff 


Violin 






Aileen Spencer 


Biology 


1929-30 




Edwin R. Spencer 


Biology 


Edwin P Baker 


German, Dean 


Charles J. Stowell 


Mathematics 


Christopher J. Bittner 


Social Science 


Claude E. Vick 


Education, Registrar 


Walter Couch 


Physics 


William C. Walton 


Philosophy 


Eli Crouse 


Bible 


Alleen Wilson 


Librarian 


James C. Dolley 


Latin, Greek, Registrar 


Exean Woodward 


English 


Glen F. Filley 


Dir. of Athletics, Coach 






Wiley B. Garvin 


Psychology 






Pauline Harper 


Public School Music 


1931-32 




Joseph M. Harrell 


English, Religious 


Edwin P Baker 


German, Dean 




Education 


Emma Bergmann 


Assistant Librarian 


Wesley C. Kettlekamp** 


History 


Christopher J. Bittner 


Social Science 


Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 


Piano, Organ, Theory 


Josephine Bittner 


Physiology 


Standleigh M. McClure 


Chemistry 


James C. Dolley 


Latin, Greek 


Wilbur McKee 


History 


Arthur H. Doolen 


Dir. of Athletics, Coach 


Evelyn E. McNeely 


English 


Wiley B. Garvin 


Psychology 


Julia W. Osling 


Public School Music 


Pauline Harper 


Voice 


Sophy D. Parker 


French, Spanish 


Gottlieb Hohn 


German 


Eugene Shaffer 


Violin 


Agnes Howe 


Expression 


Aileen Spencer 


Biology 


Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 


Piano. Organ, Theory 


Edwin R. Spencer 


Biology 


Harold Lawson 


History 


Charles Jacob Stowell 


Mathematics 


Standleigh M. McClure 


Chemistry 




^^^^ 




<^^^^g:r^ 


^^^S^^ 



MC KENDREE^KT 



Evelyn E. McNeely 
Walter Morse 

Louis K. Oppitz 
Nell Oppitz 
Julia W. Osling 
Sophy D. Parker 
Robert Roloff 
C. J. Roberts 
Aileen Spencer 
Edwin R. Spencer 
Charles J. Stowell 
Claude E. Vick 
William C. Walton 
Aileen Wilson 
Exean Woodward 



1932-33 

Edwin R Baker 
Emma Bergmann 
Christopher J. Bittner 
Josephine Bittner 
James C. Dolley 
Arthur H. Doolen 
Pauline Harper 

Arthur E . Hortin 
Agnes Howe 
Raymond Huck 
Carolyn Kennedy 
Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 
Standleigh M. McClure 
Evelyn E. McNeely 
Nell Oppitz 
Aileen Spencer 
Edwin R. Spencer 
Charles J. Stowell 
Clyde H. Todd 
Claude E. Vick 
Nell B. Waldron 
William C. Walton 
Edward Weatherly 
Vera E. Whitlock 
Aileen Wilson 



1933-34 

Edwin P. Baker 
Christopher J. Bittner 
Josephine Bittner 
James C. Dolley 
Darrell Doolen 

**0n Leave 



English 

Mechanical Drawing, 

Mathematics 

Physics 

History 

Public School Music 

French, Spanish 

Violin 

Assistant Coach 

Biology 

Biology 

Mathematics 

Education, Registrar 

Philosophy, Religion 

Librarian 

English 



German. Dean 

Assistant Librarian 

Social Science 

Physiology 

Latin, Greek 

Dir. of Athletics, Coach 

Public School Music, 

Voice 

Assistant Coach 

Expression 

Physics 

French, Spanish 

Piano, Organ, Theory 

Chemistry 

English 

History 

Biology 

Biology 

Mathematics 

Bible 

Education, Registrar 

History 

Philosophy, Religion 

English 

Assistant in Music 

Librarian 



German, Dean 
Social Science 
Physiology 
Latin, Greek 
Mechanical Drawing 



Pauline Harper 

Robert Hartley 
Rosalind M. Hohn 
Agnes Howe 
Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 
Standleigh M. McClure 
Nell Oppitz 
J. Frank Reed 
Leone C. Reed 
Eugene Schaffer 
Webster R. Schmidt 
Aileen Spencer 
Edwin R. Spencer 
Charles J. Stowell 
Clyde H. Todd 
Claude E. Vick 
Paul D. Waldorf 
Nell B. Waldron 
William C. Walton 
Victor White 
Aileen Wilson 



1934-35 

Edwin P. Baker 
Christopher J. Bittner 
Josephine Bittner 
James C. Dolley 
Eliza J. Donaldson 
Darrell Doolen 
Pauline Harper 

Robert Hartley 
Earl W. Hayter 
Rosalind M. Hohn 
Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 
Standleigh M. McClure* 
Nell G. Oppitz 
Eugene Schaffer 
George A. Scherer 
Webster R. Schmidt 
Aileen Spencer 
Edwin R. Spencer 
Lillian L. Steckman 
Charles J. Stowell 
Clyde H. Todd 
Elsa M. Tyndall 
Paul D. Waldorf 
William C. Walton 
Aileen Wilson 
Benton Wood 



Voice, Public School 

Music 

Assistant Coach 

English 

Expression 

Piano, Organ, Theory 

Chemistry 

History 

English, French 

English 

Violin 

Physics 

Biology 

Biology 

Mathematics 

Bible 

Education, Registrar 

Dir. of Athletics, Coach 

History, Political Science 

Philosophy, Religion 

History 

Librarian 



German, Dean 

Social Science 

Physiology 

Latin, Greek 

Commerce, Fiscal Agent 

Mechanical Drawing 

Voice, Public School 

Music 

Assistant Coach 

History 

Expression 

Piano, Organ, Theory 

Chemistry 

History 

Violin 

Chemistry 

Physics 

Biology 

Biology 

English 

Mathematics 

Bible 

French 

Dir. of Athletics, Coach 

Philosophy, Religion 

Librarian 

Education, Registrar 



<:s^.fCS^'^^?^^^^^^MC KENDREE 




MC KENDREE 



The Administration of President Clark R. Yost 
(1935-1945) 

By R. James Oppitz ('47) 



Dr. Clark R. Yost became president of McKendree 
College on October 29, 1935. He was returning to a 
college from which he had been graduated in 1913 and 
to a city where he had been minister of the First 
Methodist Church from 1924 to 1928. His wife of many 
years, the former Madeleine Foulk, was a member of 
the 1912 graduating class. A daughter, Gwendolyn, in 
1935 was a sophomore at McKendree and was graduated 
in 1938. Their other children, Madeleine and Paul, 
earned McKendree degrees in 1940 and 1942, 
respectively. 

Dr. Yost had served as minister of a number of 
Methodist churches in the Southern Illinois Conference 
since 1911 and also had been superintendent of the Olney 
District. His long and distinguished .service to the church 
was recognized in 1928 when McKendree awarded him 
the honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity. 

Dr. Yost had an interest in McKendree throughout 
his adult life. He was associated with a group of trustees 
concerned with the deteriorating position of the college 
in the early 1930s and had recommended that Dr. 
Harmon be asked to resign. 

There is, however, no evidence to suggest that in 
his participation in this movement. Dr. Yost had any 
personal ambition for the job, nor an expectation that 
he would be named as McKendree's next president. 
There is, furthermore, nothing to indicate that Cameron 
Harmon left the college with any bitterness or 
resentment. Dr. Harmon, in fact, had recommended to 
the board of trustees that Clark Yost be named his 
successor. It was simply time for a change in leadership. 

Years later, in 1963, in an address to an alumni 
reunion at which the 50th anniversary of his graduating 
class was being observed. Dr. Yost was generous in 
describing his predecessor: 



Cameron Harmon, 1924-1935, was a 
popular leader. He was captain of the 
McKendree football team and had serx'ed in 
the Spanish American War, where typhoid 
fever came close to ending his life. He was 
and is one of the most generous and unselfish 
of men. Many took advantage of his 
generosity. He literally spent himself and all 
he had for McKendree and her students. . . . 

Dr. Yost did not inherit a happy situation. 
McKendree was still reeling from the effects of the 
nation's worst business depression. It is also fortunate 




1936-1937 Faculty and Staff. 



MC KENDREE 



in 1935 that he could not possibly have anticipated that 
World War II, with an equally demanding set of 
challenges, would also occur on his watch. Had that 
been the case, it would be reasonable to assume that 
Clark Yost might not have accepted McKendree's call. 
The period was not a good time to be president of a 
small, church-related college. In a speech accepting the 
presidency, as reported by the McKendree Review, 
October 2, 1935, Dr. Yost outlined his challenges, as 
follows: 

My first objective will be to remove any 
question relative to scholastic recognition. 
The next objective will be to strengthen the 
financial situation. 

One month later, in announcing the initiation of a 
McKendree Forward Movement to raise $120,000 in 
cash by October 1 , 1938, Dr. Yost expressed the needs 
of the college in slightly different terms. The campaign 
was to be a three-pronged attack aimed at upgrading 
"the financial, academic, and cultural atmosphere of the 
college." In its summary of the effort, the Review on 
November 20, 1935, indicated that McKendree was-to 
upgrade the financial, academic, and cultural atmosphere 
of the college. McKendree was to move forward 
culturally in the areas of Christian ideals, social life, 
and personal habits. Scholastically, McKendree had to 
maintain its standards and regain the accreditation it had 
lost. 

President Yost quickly recognized the key role 
which an improvement in finances would play in making 
progress toward any of the other objectives. In the 
presentation in 1 963 at the 50th reunion of his graduating 
class, to which reference has already been made. Dr. 
Yost provided paragraph-length summaries of each of 
the presidential administrations with which he had been 
familiar. It is significant that the following analysis of 
his own presidency dealt only with finances: 

/ had seven years of depression when the 
students had little money and three years of 
war when nearly all the students, even the 
young women, went into the armed services. 
No one could go through those ten years of 
trials and come out entirely sane. Now you 
can understand the cause of some of my 
strange behavior I inherited a debt of 
$80,000. the equivalent of one of $800,000 
today, an empty treasury, an unpaid faculty, 
and depression days when 90% of the 




Eliza Jane Donald. 



students had little or no money. But 
eventually all current debts were paid — 150 
of them, such as $4,600 for groceries, $4,400 
for meat, $4,000 for coal, $3,600 for athletic 
equipment. Mr Will Pfeffer wrote to me that 
for the first time on record the college owed 
nothing to the Pfeffer Milling Company. How 
were the debts paid? Not by "deficit 
financing " but by sacrifice and hard work. 
One thing I did was to require some alumni 
to pay what they owed before we would 
release their credits so that they could secure 
commissions in the military ser\'ices. This 
action made me very popular with the 150 
creditors. 

Policies of the Yost administration were 
appropriate in view of the precarious condition of the 
college, but were quite austere and sometimes 
controversial. Dr. Yost found a willing helpmate in 
Eliza Jane Donaldson, who had arrived at McKendree 
as comptroller one year earlier. Whatever the item — 
whether it be light bulb, a fuse plug, or a piece of chalk 
— Miss Donaldson issued them, one at a time, always 
with grace and with a touch of sarcastic humor. The 
two of them managed to make every dollar count. 



^-2S5eS55^^|!^S^glNDRE^^^^|3g3^^^ 



Each year the students who worked on the 
McKendrean yearbook became aware of how limited 
the resources of the college actually were. These students 
were anxious to deliver their product before classes were 
dismissed for the summer. Bumping up against their 
deadline, they had trouble getting any sort of 
commitment from the firms responsible for engraving, 
printing, and binding. The firms had not yet been paid 
for their previous year's work and were clearly justified 
in their reluctance in doing any more work for the 
college. Each year, miraculously. Miss Donaldson 
managed to put together sufficient funds to keep these 
creditors at bay. The yearbooks arrived just in time for 
students to solicit the autographs and comments of the 
people with whom they had shared the year's experience. 
It was a tight schedule; there is no record of the number 
of aspirin and antacid preparations consumed by the 
parties concerned. Experience regarding the yearbook 
is cited as an example of the creative way in which 
McKendree was able to keep things going. 

One of the major challenges of the Yost 
administration was that of maintaining student 
enrollments. There were apparently 209 students 
enrolled at the time that Dr. Yost assumed the presidency. 
In ensuing years, the figure may have been as low as 
186 and as high as 243. Even that higher figure was 
considerably below what the college could have 
reasonably accommodated. There were apparently 210 
students enrolled in 1 940-4 1 . The figure was apparently 
somewhat smaller one year later when the United States 
entered World War II. Some help had been provided in 
connection with the federal government's National 




College bus in the '30s. 



Youth Administration program, which financed a portion 
of McKendree's student payroll. For help in recruiting 
students and for various other activities, Clifford C. 
Brown, a 1938 McKendree graduate, was retained as 
an executive secretary. He served in that capacity for 
four years. 

There were two activities of the Yost administration 
that proved to be especially controversial. Dr. Yost 
believed that McKendree should suspend its 
intercollegiate football program. He also withdrew 
college recognition from the social fraternities and 
sororities that then existed on campus. 



The Football Question 

Clark Yost felt that McKendree's student 
enrollment was too small to justify the playing of 
football. With its need for specialized equipment, this 
was an expensive activity the college could ill afford, in 
view of its other financial problems. He frequently 
observed that the alumni who were most vocal in their 
support of football rarely offered to help in its funding. 
"They haven't given us enough to buy a pair of sweat 
SOX," he once noted. 

President Yost also believed that football was 
physically brutal and that it tended to attract, as 
participants and fans, students whose attitudes and 
personal behavior were inconsistent with McKendree's 
Christian ideals. This attitude may have reflected the 
state of the sport at the time that Dr. Yost attended 
McKendree as a student. Serious thought was given, 
early in the century, to the banning of football by all 
colleges and universities for the reasons cited here. It 
was blamed for a number of fatalities each year. It was 
not until the rules were dra.stically changed that football 
was retained as a legitimate college sport. 

The Bearcats had enjoyed some artistic success in 
football during the 1920s and early 1930s. 
McKendreans took justifiable pride in the 13-7 upset 
victory over a much larger Washington University in 
1932. The program was much less successful at the end 
of the decade. 

Dr. Yost never convinced the board of trustees to 
discontinue football. The program was suspended in the 
fall of 1942, however, because its coach, Lewis Scholl, 
had entered the service. The male student population 
was also declining because of the war. Even the ability 
of the college to provide transportation for road games 
became questionable, with the prospect for the rationing 
of gasoline looming on the horizon. 




Studt'nts enjoy Sadie Hawkins Day at their favorite "hangout, " Biinge Bakery. 



It is remarkable that the program had even survived 
during the previous fail. Only 12 or 13 players "came 
out" for football in 1941. Even playing only seven or 
eight games, there was little room for possible injuries. 
Regardless of its won and lost record, the 1941 squad 
made its own kind of history. 



Social Fraternities and 
Sororities 

When President Yost came to McKendree, he 
found two social fraternities and two or three social 
sororities. None of these groups had any national affiliation, 
nor did they occupy separate housing. His objection to 
them was two-fold: 

Such groups might conceivably serve some useful 
purpose on the campuses of large state universities, where 
students might be in need of some kind of group identifi- 
cation. Dr. Yost believed that they were clearly out of 
place on the campus of a small college. Students should 
be encouraged to identify with the college itself. The 
presence of social organizations in those circumstances 
tended to divide, rather than to unify a student body. 



Dr. Yost was especially critical of the off-cam- 
pus social affairs sponsored by these groups. At 
these parties, there was tobacco smoking, the con- 
sumption of alcohol, and dancing, all of which were 
prohibited on the McKendree campus. People who 
were attracted to such activities were not believed to 
be the type of students McKendree was intended to 
serve. 

A Committee on Literary Societies and Student 
Activities in 1 938 reported, as follows, to the entire board 
of trustees: 

We thoroughly oppose the activity of any of 
our college societies off the campus in ways 
which are derogatory to the highest ideals 
and traditions of McKendree College. We 
recommend that all societies, fraternities, 
and sororities which are not helpful in the 
realization of the finer ideals and culture of 
the school be eliminated as soon as possible, 
and that an effort be made to consummate 
this step by 1940. 

The McKendree faculty reacted quickly to the de- 
cision by the trustees. On November 1 , 1 938, it voted to 



Thirty-Two 



recommend that recognition be withdrawn from the fol- 
lowing organizations: Alpha Mu Omega, Bachelors, 
and Phi Lambda Tau. The recommendation became ef- 
fective that same semester. 

At least one group resisted the action. On an ille- 
gal basis, the Bachelors attempted to function for an- 
other year or two. The group even took advantage of 
the fact that there was a blank page, reserved for auto- 
graphs, at the back of the 1 940 yearbook. That page 
was removed from members' copies and taken to a sepa- 
rate printer for a group picture and the customary de- 
scription of activities. After the group lost its official 
recognition, it could not be mentioned either in the year- 
book or the campus newspaper 

There was an infamous party in Highland, which 
was raided by the police, presumably in the belief that 
underage drinking might be involved. The primary of- 
fenders were identified and punished. Some were re- 
quired to move out of the residence hall; others were 
either dismissed from school or were not permitted to 
re-enroll beyond the current semester 

What may have been left of these social organiza- 
tions had pretty well disappeared by the time America 
entered World War II. There was no attempt to reorga- 
nize them after that. 

Dr. Yost was not very happy with certain aspects 
of the Lebanon community, as an environment for young 
people away from home for the first time. On inore than 
one occasion, he observed, "There are ten dens of iniq- 
uity on St. Louis Street alone." Some students consid- 
ered it good sport to try to name all 10 establishments. 
First of all, there were the taverns, actually a surpris- 
ingly large number for the size of the community. There 
were two poolrooms and the Bunge Bakery. Bunge's 
may have produced and sold bakery goods by day, but 
it became a swinging youth center at night. There was a 
soda fountain, a jukebox, and a decent-sized, unob- 
structed floor, for those who were interested in danc- 
ing. 

Another familiar student haunt. Bill Daumueller's, 
across the street, offered a much quieter place for a 
fellow to take his date. If the movie at the Alamo 
Theatre didn't run too long, going to Bill's for a Coke 
and some conversation represented a good way to end 
the evening. 

Although their buildings still stand, none of the 
three businesses mentioned here still exists. In the old 
Alamo Theatre building, the Looking Glass Playhouse 
offers stage plays several times a year, featuring local 
talent. 



War Comes to McKendree 

December 7, 1 94 1 , began as a quiet, peaceful Sun- 
day — unusually warm for the time of the year. The 
calm was quickly shattered by the radio news, shortly 
after lunch, of the Japanese air attack on Peari Harbor. 
Even though the official declaration was not to come 
until the following day, America was at war 

The war had already had some impact on the col- 
lege. The Selective Service program had gone into ef- 
fect, more than a year eariier, and potential students had 
been lost to the draft. Male students were to become a 
comparatively .scarce commodity. As mobilization for 
war became more obvious, McKendree was left with 
its ministerial students, a few students who were not 
physically qualified for service, and a dwindling num- 
ber of students who had enlisted in Navy and Army re- 
serve programs. 

The enrollment, which would eventually fall be- 
low 100 students, became predominantly female. For 
as long as anyone remembered, ringing the chapel bell 
to mark the beginning and ending of class periods, had 
been a "man's job." Ruth Koerber Miller inherited that 
responsibility. In his exhaustive study of the period, Paul 
Widicus observed that, "Even the Student-Faculty Coun- 
cil had to elect a woman as president for two years." 




Flag flies during war. 




MC KENDREE' 



■eesee 
■eiB 



McKendree Stalwarts plaques. 

Faculty members were lost, either to the service 
or to better-paying positions. Those who remained 
assumed the responsibility for additional classes and 
taught courses in unfamiliar areas. Their dedication 
was recognized in a ceremony that was held in 
connection with the 1991 commencement. They were 
identified as the McKendree Stalwarts. A plaque, 
placed in the chapel foyer in that ceremony, reads as 
follows: 

The years 1941-45, the World War 11 period, 
found McKendree College with at least one 
semester with fewer than 90 students 
enrolled, not enough to support the staff and 
facilities; still the doors remained open that 
semester and throughout the war This was 
possible through the effort, sacrifice and 
dedication of the total college staff. The 
faculty taught heavy loads, alumni in 
Lebanon taught, the office was staffed by one 
comptroller, the kitchen was managed by one 
person, the facilities were maintained by one 
employee, the library remained functional 
with one librarian. The hours were long, and 
salaries were not competitive in the larger 
academic world. Still the faculty stayed, the 
staff remained and McKendree continued to 
function as a four-year liberal arts college. 

It is to honor the McKendree College staff of 
that period that this citation has been placed 
by the alumni who had the privilege of work- 
ing and studying under them. 



H.P.K. Agersborg 
Edwin P. Baker 
Leon Church 

James C. Dolley 
Eliza Jane Donaldson 

P. R. Glotfelty 
Bertha W. Gutekunst 

Helmut C. Gutekunst 
Blanche Hertenstein 
Dorothy West Hohn 
Reinhold B. Hohn 

Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 
S.M. McClure 
Nell G. Oppitz 
Eula R. Smith 

Frederick C. Stelzriede 
Charles J. Stowell 

W. C. Walton 

Alleen Wilson 
Clark R. Yost 



Biology 

Dean Emeritus and German 

Director of Athletics and 

Physical Education 

Latin and Greek 

Comptroller, Accounting and 

Commerce 

Maintenance 

French, Spanish and 

Journalism 

Chemistry and Physics 

Dietitian and House Mother 

English 

Registrar, Education and 

Psychology 

Piano, Theory and Organ 

Geology 

History and Sociology 

Voice and Public School 

Music 

Speech and Dramatics 

Dean, Mathematics and 

Economics 

Philosophy, Religion, Greek 

and Latin 

Librarian 

President 



Carnegie Hall, which had been a men's dormitory, 
was closed and rented as housing for Scott Field 
personnel during 1942-43. Male students were moved 
to Clark Hall. Men were housed on the east end of the 
building and women were on the west. Wooden 








Communicating around "the wall. 



%1C KENDREE^^^^gg^^^^ 



partitions were erected in the hallways, arranged in such 
a way that the bathroom on the second floor was for 
women and the facility on the third floor was for men. 
There were separate stairs on either end of the building. 
It made for a cozy arrangement and was representative 
of the cost saving believed to be necessary if the college 
was to survive. 

Travel was severely curtailed because of the cost 
and the rationing of gasoline. Chapel services were held 
only once a week and attendance was made optional 
because of the need for some students to work at off- 
campus jobs. In addition to the sons and daughters who 
were given to the war effort, members of the McKendree 
community purchased $1,500 in War Bonds, to provide 
thecost of a Jeep. 



The Yost Presidency; 
A Perspective 

The years had been controversial and at times, 
stormy. In the face of mounting criticism, Clark Yost 
tendered his resignation on September 20, 1944. 
Because no successor could be found, he agreed to stay 
until the end of the 1944-45 school year World War II, 
ironically, was about to end. Without bitterness, he would 
later observe that the college received more in tuition 
and fees during the first two years from the GI Bill of 
Rights, in behalf of returning veterans, than his 
administration had collected from all students during 
the entire 10 years of his presidency. 

Dr Yost returned to the ministry, as pastor of the 
First Methodist Church in West Frankfort, Illinois. He 
retired from the ministry in 1 952 and, in failing health, 
died at the age of 75, on November 30, 1964. 

Even those people who were able to recall things 
about the Yost presidency they did not like readily 
concede that he undoubtedly saved McKendree College. 
Had it not been for his dedication and his persistence, it 
seems likely that McKendree would have been forced 
to close its doors, either during the Great Depression or 
the equally demanding years of World War II. A lesser 
man could not have met such challenges. He left 
McKendree College considerably better off than he had 
found her He was clearly the right man for the job. 

Clark Yost was a man of strong convictions. He 
was a political and economic conservative, many years 
before it would again become popular for people to hold 
such opinions. Dr Yost did not openly engage in partisan 



politics, but most folks knew where he stood. Few people 
are aware that in 1940 he was invited to board the 
Wendell Willkie campaign train in eastern Illinois and 
ride with the Republican presidential nominee on the 
way to the St. Louis Arena for a major political address. 



Chapel Services 

Regular chapel services for students and faculty 
had been a tradition at McKendree for as long as anyone 
could remember In the 1920s and early 1930s, these 
sessions were scheduled daily between 10:00 and 10:30 
AM. The service typically consisted of an opening hymn, 
announcements, a scripture reading, a brief devotional 
message, and a dismissal march. 

Students were required to attend, and Cameron 
Harmon was insistent that faculty members join him on 
the platform. When he noticed that some faculty 
members preferred seating themselves in the rear of the 
room, Dr Harmon suggested that, in retribution, students 
"should sit on the teacher's desk" in regular classes. 

One persistent complaint was that faculty 
announcements frequently consumed fully half of the 
allotted time. Minutes of the March 1, 1933, faculty 
meeting acknowledged receipt of the following petition 
from an organization of students who were planning 
careers in the ministry: 

We, the members of Sigma Beta Rho, com- 
mend the faculty for the devotional talks 
which have been delivered, but believe that 
the chapel should be used entirely for devo- 
tional purposes. 

In a practice that continued until after World War 
II, male and female students were seated separately — 
males on the west side of the chapel and females on the 
east. Because there were no female students at 
McKendree in the 1850s when the chapel was designed, 
it is doubtful that the provision for two sets of stairs 
leading to the second floor anticipated a need for 
segregated seating. Men, however, used the west 
staircase and women used the staircase to the east. 

Students were given seat assignments on an 
alphabetical basis. Freshmen were seated in the outside 
sections. Seniors were assigned seats in the front of the 
center section; behind them were the juniors, and finally 
the sophomores. At least one seat in the middle of each 
row was left vacant, to maintain a separation of the sexes. 



Thirty-Five 













avMM 


I 


ink^ 


1 






^§. 



Faculty and students gather for Chapel in 1 942. 

The faculty voted in 1934 to have chapel exercises 
on Tuesdays and Thursdays for the equivalent of a full 
class period, 50 minutes. The plan also allowed the 
students to be in complete charge of one chapel service 
each month. 

President Yost and the trustees, according to the 
McKendree Review, wrote an order of worship which 
had to be used for all services, beginning in 1937. The 
service was to consist of "just scripture, prayer, and 
inspirational talks." Attendance was taken and students 
"cutting chapel," except for reasons such as illness, had 
to answer to the president. 

There were few McKendree students at this time 
who were Roman Catholics. Because of the attitude of 
their own church and because the chapel services were 
religious in character, these students were not 
required to attend chapel. Many people may 
remember an occasional student who would actually 
go through the motions of taking instruction in the 
Catholic church to avoid what was apparently 
believed to be an onerous requirement. History does 
not record whether any of these students eventually 
embraced the Catholic faith. 



^ m^'< 



Men's Glee Club practice in 1937. 



An arrangement was developed under which 
students could submit an acceptable essay on the 
speaker's topic for that morning's talk to avoid any 
penalty for not having attended. Attendance was later 
enforced by a provision that offending students were 
assessed negative semester hour credits. In other words, 
these students would have to take additional course work 
to qualify for graduation. By the 1940s, one of the 
weekly .sessions was officially recognized as being 
secular in character. 

Regular chapel services were later discontinued 
altogether. This may have been the result of a growth 
in student body size to the point that there was inadequate 
space to seat all students in the old chapel. It may also 
have been a recognition by the college of the need to 
use these two morning hours to accommodate a greatly 
expanded schedule of class offerings. 



Campus Improvements 

McKendree during this period was able to make a 
number of modest improvements in its physical 
facilities. Fire escapes were provided for the chapel and 
for the science building, which was later to be known 
as Wildy Hall. Funding for the fire escape at the rear of 
the chapel came from the net proceeds of plays that had 
been sponsored by the Faculty Dames Club. This was 
an organization of faculty wives and female faculty 
members. Among its various activities, each year this 
group staged a play, featuring faculty members and their 
spouses in acting roles. The Faculty Dames, in 
purchasing a used fire escape, admitted that their 
motivation was .selfish in one respect. There was fear 
that if a fire should occur in the chapel during a large 
convocation, such as commencement, people in the front 
of the room, including faculty members, would likely 
have difficulty in leaving the building alive. 

The fire escape proved to be a real convenience 
for people performing in plays. They were able to change 
their costumes in the speech studio downstairs and 
make their way backstage, without disturbing the 
audience. 

The fire escapnes that were installed on either side of 
the science building were salvaged from the old Lebanon 
grade school in 1 938. The science building previously had 
just the one wooden staircase in the center of the structure. 
With the chemistry laboratories on the third floor, the 
building involved an obvious fire hazard. The three fire 
escapes mentioned here were subsequently replaced. 



l92 8if1^^^N/igL78 

Thirp,-Si.x 




Science Building 




The old Lebanon school building also provided 
brick used in the construction of a drainage ditch that 
runs parallel to the walk between the chapel and the 
president's home. 

Old Main, the chapel, and the science building 
were also tuck pointed. This involved removing from 
the brick exterior a red paint that had been applied years 
earlier and replacing mortar and any damaged bricks. 
Workmen were appalled by what they found. It was 
observed that the bricks had apparently been secured 
by "little more than wet sand which had had almost one- 
hundred years in which to dry out." 

The pride the college had in these old structures 
was confirmed by a study from the U.S. Department of 
the Interior that designated Old Main and the chapel as 
"buildings of historical importance which are worthy 
of preservation." The science hall, which is almost as old 
as the other buildings, was not so recognized. The decision 
was presumably based on the fact that its architectural 
integrity had been compromised, early in this century, when 
the second and third floors were added. The building 
originally had one floor and served as a gymnasium. 

In 1941, there was a much-needed renovation of 
the auditorium on the second floor of the chapel. The 
last public event in this room, prior to the initiation of 
work, was the marriage of Gwendolyn Yost to Von 
Baker, in the middle of the summer. 

Renovation proved to be a rather ambitious project. 
A ceiling that had been damaged by a roof leak was 
repaired. All of the woodwork was repainted and new 
wallpaper was hung. A new random-width floor was 
installed. A giant velvet curtain that stretched across the 
north end of the room was removed. It had seen better 
days but was salvaged for use in Eisenmayer gymnasium. 




Dean Charles J. Stowell 



A pipe organ that had originally occupied the 
northeast comer of the auditorium was repaired and 
carefully moved to a room at the rear. This room had 
not been used recently, but at one time was used for 
student housing, including presumably the student who 
rang the chapel bell to signal the time for classes to 
change. Among its occupants had been Paul and Chester 
Farthing. Chester went on to a distinguished career as 
an attorney in East St. Louis. Paul, despite being blind, 
served as chief justice of the Illinois Supreme Court in 
the late 1930s. 

This room had been vacant for a number of years. 
One alumna reports that in the late 1920s, students would 
gather there to dance to piano music provided by Charles 
Nichols, who was later elected as mayor of the city of 
Belleville, Illinois. 

Ford and Ruth Chamberlin Mautz contributed 
funds for a new chandelier for the chapel. It was a re- 
production of a fixture they had admired in Williamsburg, 
Virginia. Mrs. Mautz had earlier made it possible to re- 
place the windows of the entire building, with windows 
with small panes, which were thought to be more consis- 
tent with the building's architecture. Mr. Mautz served as 
a McKendree trustee for a number of years. 

As a part of this project, temporary partitions under 
the stairwells on the first floor of the chapel were 
removed. A small office under the west stairwell had 
been used for many years in the production of the 
McKendree Review. Its office was moved to the lower 
level of Pearsons Hall. 

The work also included construction of a stage in 
the west wing of Eisenmayer Gymnasium. The bleachers 
that were removed to make this possible had rarely been 
needed to accommodate basketball crowds. By this time, 
many of McKendree's basketball games were actually 
being played in the gymnasium of the new Lebanon 
grade school. This action also had the effect of moving 
college production of plays out of the chapel building. 
Mrs. Madeleine Yost, the president's wife, had little 
enthusiasm for the content of some of these plays and 
was quite uncomfortable with the idea that they were 
being staged in a room in which religious services were 
regularly held. The work on renovation of the chapel 
and the installation of a stage in Eisenmayer was 
completed, barely in time for the homecoming 
observance in the fall of 1941. 

Theater buffs may be interested in the fact that the 
final drama on the chapel stage was Euripides' "the 
Trojan Women," offered as part of the May Fete 
celebration. Eisenmayer's initial production was "Your 
Uncle Dudley." 



Thim-Eight 



.^^o^^<^^^:^^tSfMc KENDREE~yte^^:^^3^^^^^^^__ 




^l}e\ il»}jarlmpnt of Srama 
ifltSfniirpp CHuUpgp 



g>l|? §>loDyfi to fflpngugr 



Comedy in Five Acts by 
Oliver Goldsmith 



Produced under the direction of 
W. J. Friederich 



(finllpgp Olliajipl 

March 26. 1941 
8:00 P. M. 





aiaat 






( 


as you meet 


them) 








M 


irion Kleinschmidt 
Arthur Baum 


Squire Hardcastle ._ 






Tony Lumpkin 






James Oppitz 


Kute Hurdcaatle 






.Margaret Hiirsey 






...Betty 


Phillips Friederich 








.Barbara Woolard 








-Charles E. Long 


George Hastinga 






Arthur Werle 








Carol Heer 








.Ceroid Gulley 


Sir Charles Marlow . 






...Arnold Eddinga 









"She Stoops To Conquer" program. 




'She Stoops To Conquer" cast. 



-^^S^E^^^^^E^ENDREE^^^^gg^^^ 




-Mi^ni" IhrlcnULiiion U'ciJ nikiii_K Ju 

Among a number of minor projects completed 
during the period, one is mentioned here simply because 
of the sentimental value it had for McKendree students. 
Many college administrators believe that concrete walks 
should not be poured arbitrarily, but that students should 
be asked to demonstrate their need by the paths they 
wear in grassy areas. Such a path had developed out in 
front of the chapel, presumably by students from Clark 
Hall headed for town, by way of the centennial walk. 
The shortcut enabled students to save a few steps. 

In the fall of 1938 or 1939, Russell Gullett, a stu- 
dent employee, was asked to build a primitive stone walk 
near the southeast comer of the chapel. Working the 10 
or 15 hours per week normally allocated to students, 
Gullett consumed the entire fall semester in building a 
walk that probably stretched for no more than 20 or 25 
feet. It came to be known as Gullett Walk! Many stu- 
dents, at least subconsciously, hope that in some fash- 
ion they may achieve a measure of immortality during 
their college years. Rather than making the decisive field 
goal in a basketball game or some similar accomplish- 
ment, Russell Gullett was to be 
remembered for his walk. 

Alumni of this era who 
return to campus will be disap- 
pointed to learn that Gullett 
Walk no longer exists. Some 
McKendree official, unaware 
of the walk's sentimental 
value, had it removed as an 
eyesore. There is no historical 
record of when the walk was 
removed, nor the amount of 
time that was required. With 
reasonable certainty, one might 
speculate that it was removed 



more quickly and with less effort than had been required 
for its original construction. 

Alumni may also be disappointed to learn that Lake 
Beautiful has disappeared from the McKendree campus. 
This was a small pond, created by erecting an earthen 
dam, along Alton Street between Clark Hall and the 
cemetery. It was originally part of a water system the 
college developed to serve Carnegie, Clark and Pearsons 
Halls, before water service became available from the 
City of Lebanon. For years it had been referred to as 
the college pond; someone facetiously renamed it Lake 
Beautiful. Despite valiant efforts by Dr. Edwin R. 
Spencer and students from the Nature Club to maintain 
and improve it, the lake was little more than a stagnant 
pool of water, overgrown with weeds and algae. It 
disappeared in connection with the construction of 
Bearcat Gym, in the same general location. 

Those same returning students may find some 
comfort in the knowledge that the College Hill 
Cemetery still has the cross-eyed angel and the 
tombstone bearing the epitaph, "She was more to me 
than I expected." 



A Pair of Queens 

McKendree had a long-standing tradition of 
selecting a May Queen. By popular vote of the student 
body, a senior coed was selected for this honor. Other 
senior women comprised the queen's court, which also 
included the children of faculty members. A procession 
moved to a spot, north of Pearsons Hall, for the 
coronation and a traditional winding of the Maypole. 
The "dance" was to appropriate music and was 
performed by other female students. 




Nature Club 



-^^^^^s2^^E-^^^m^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



Of more recent origin is the election 
of a Football Queen, with the crowning 
being a part of the half-time ceremonies 
at the homecoming football game. The 
practice started in the mid- 1930s and was 
sponsored originally by the M Club, a 
lettermen's organization. Three candidates 
were nominated by each of the four classes. 
Voting involved the purchase of 100 votes 
for a penny, with the proceeds going to the 
M Club. The organization was especially 
fortunate one year, when one of the 
nominees was dating a male student who 
had considerably more money than most 
of the students of that era. Legend holds 
that he had to invest $35.00, then a rather large sum, to 
get his girlfriend elected. The two later married but were 
subsequently divorced. 

On the belief that the process lent itself to possible 
abuse, the college administration later changed the rules. 
Each class selected a single candidate; the winner was 
selected by popular vote of the student assembly. Under 
this arrangement, the winner was most often a freshman 
or a sophomore, because these classes had larger 
enrollments. With the suspension of the football 
program, the title was changed to Homecoming Queen. 



A College Bookstore — 
But No Juke Box 

With the opening of the 1940 spring semester, a 
recreation room was established in what had been a large 
classroom at the rear of the first floor of the Science 
Hall. The room's equipment included a ping-pong table. 





•,///;,V rlw May Pol 

In Ralph Edwards' article in the McKendree Review 
outlining plans for the room, a partition was to be 
constructed, separating the game room from a space for 
reading and quiet conversation. The room was eventually 
to have a fireplace for the roasting of marshmallows. 
These features were to be added as funds became 
available. 

By the fall of 1940, and well before any of the 
improvements outlined by Edwards materialized, the 
college decided to open a bookstore in this room. Most 
textbooks, prior to this time, had been ordered through 
the Freshour drugstore in the Lebanon business district. 
The bookstore also offered school supplies, soft 
drinks, candy, and other confections. The room quickly 
became a popular gathering place for students between 
classes and during the evening hours. 

By coincidence, Ralph Edwards became the first 
student manager of the bookstore, assisted by James 
Agles and James Loy. It was not long before students 
expressed an interest in installing a juke box in the fa- 
cility. The proposal was offered to the Student-Faculty 
Council, for possible approval. 
Its discussion resulted in some 
interesting by-play. Mature 
faculty members on the coun- 
cil had trouble understanding 
why any student would be 
willing to spend a nickel sim- 
ply to hear a phonograph 
record being played. "Why not 
buy the record, or, better still, 
listen to the radio?" was the 
argument. Students tried their 
best to explain the unique 
sound produced by the juke 
box and how the effect was 



MC KENDREE 



different from that of ordinary phonographs of the pe- 
riod. They also attempted to explain the salutary effect 
of listening to such music with friends. It would have 
been helpful, in retrospect, had the expression 
"schmoozing" then been a part of the English language. 
The possibility of dancing to the music was not dis- 
cussed. 

Eliza Jane Donaldson, the comptroller, expressed 
doubt that any vendor of juke boxes would be at all in- 
terested. For fear of disturbing classes elsewhere in the 
building, the device could be played only during late 
afternoon and evening hours. It would therefore not pro- 
duce sufficient revenue to justify the vendor's invest- 
ment. 

President Yost's reaction was along different lines. 
He indicated that he would support the installation of a 
juke box, provided the student members would go on 
record as condemning the practice of freshman initia- 
tion which then existed on campus. 

It is likely that he was opposed, in principle, to the 
idea of freshman initiation, as well as to the abuses likely 
to occur in connection with the activity. President Yost 
was aware of the need for McKendree to increase its 
student enrollment. He had no interest in any activity 
that would tend to make new students feel they were 
not welcome. 

The rules for freshman initiation were fairly 
simple. Each freshman was required to purchase a green 
cap; the cost in 1939 was one dollar. The caps had been 
sold traditionally by members of the M Club. Proceeds 
of the sale presumably went toward the cost of athletic 
letter sweaters and other awards. The green caps were 
later sold through the college bookstore. The caps were 
to be worn at all times, on and off campus, until Thanks- 
giving day. By tradition, if McKendree won its home- 
coming football game, the requirement came to an end. 
The caps were not to be folded when worn, nor could 
they be decorated. Freshmen were required to tip their 
caps upon encountering a senior student. 

Freshmen were required to attend all pep rallies. 
At the end of chapel exercises, freshmen were required 
to wait until all upperclassmen had left before attempt- 
ing to leave themselves. A similar arrangement existed 
for entering and leaving the dining hall. 

In departing from and entering the campus, fresh- 
men were required to use the President's Walk. They 
were specifically prohibited from using either Centen- 
nial Walk or the campus driveway for this purpose. 
Freshmen "were not to step on the campus for any rea- 
son." This meant presumably that they were to keep off 
the grass. 




Freshman Class gathers wood for Homecoming bonfire. 

Enforcement of the rules was in the hands of mem- 
bers of the M Club, seniors, and "a committee of three," 
consisting of the president of the student association and 
a representative of each of the junior and sophomore 
classes. Upon learning of a violation, the Committee of 
Three was to meet, decide on an appropriate punish- 
ment, and "to inflict the punishment immediately." Dr. 
Yost believed, with considerable justification, that the 
arrangement lent itself to considerable abuse. 

History does not record when the practice of fresh- 
man initiation at McKendree actually started, nor when 
it may have been discontinued. The practice took at least 
a hiatus in the fall of 1946, at the end of World War II, 
when 185 freshman students were enrolled. Freshmen 
outnumbered upperclassmen by at least two to one. 
Many of the freshmen were World War II veterans, older 
and with no interest in repeating the indignities which 
they had earlier experienced in army basic training or 
navy boot camp. At any rate and for whatever reasons 
they may have had, student members of the Student- 
Faculty Council in the late 1930s did not accept the of- 
fer from President Yost. The bookstore did not get its 
juke box. 



Race at McKendree 

Most of the students who attended McKendree 
through the years were Caucasian. There were some 
exceptions. During the 1920s and 1930s, several Na- 
tive Americans enrolled, one or two at a time. They came 
from North Carolina. Included were Clifton Oxendine, 
James Sampson, and John Paul Sampson. Evidence sug- 
gests that they were well accepted into the McKendree 
community. In fact, James Sampson, an outstanding ath- 
lete, was married to Dorothy Harmon, daughter of 
McKendree's president. 



MC KENDREE 



An Oriental student named Edward Woo was en- 
rolled as a junior in 1927-28. 

Among African Americans, there was at least one 
older student — someone who later would be called a 
non-traditional student — who commuted to McKendree 
from his home in East St. Louis. More numerous were 
the young people from Lebanon who enrolled in the 
college. Lebanon is unique among smaller towns in the 
area in that it has had a sizable black community. In- 
cluded were Marvin Trimble, Magdalena Willis, Lester 
Hickman, Thomas Brown, Cicero Bums and Curtis 
Bums. Marvin, Magdalena, Thomas and Cicero all 
graduated from McKendree and went on to productive 
careers. 

The policy on African American students may not 
have been spelled out, but it was evident to all concemed. 
Such students were welcome to enroll in the college, 
but they should not expect to live in the residence halls. 
Lester Hickman's story is especially tragic. He had en- 
rolled in January 1938, and was working on campus 
during the following summer. Early in the day, on Sep- 
tember 9, he and Paul Correll had been in the chapel 
belfry and noticed a large nest of bees. After complet- 



ing their work for the day, they retumed to the chapel, 
with the hope of smoking out the bees and securing some 
honey. They ignored the fact that a thunderstorm was in 
progress. A large bolt of lightning struck the bell, glanced 
off, and struck Lester in the chest. Paul was momen- 
tarily stunned but not seriously injured. A unit from the 
Belleville fire department attempted to revive Lester but 
was not successful. 

An article in the McKendree Review, later in the 
month, described the incident. The writer was gener- 
ous in referring to Lester's "friendly disposition, his 
perseverance, and his universal interest in things about 
him." Lester was described as "a gentleman whose am- 
bition to develop himself would bear creditable com- 
parison with that of anyone. . . ." The writer did not 
mention Lester's race, even though such references were 
customary in the newspapers of the period. The impor- 
tant thing was the life of a young American had ended 
much too soon. 

Considerably less enlightenment was reflected by 
a resolution by the faculty in its meeting on April 22, 
1942, that "No American-bom Japanese were to be ad- 
mitted to McKendree." The decision was not widely 



m 






.^ 



Pearsons Dining Hall 




Suidenis lined up for lunch in Pearsons Hall. 



publicized and was largely symbolic. In fact, it was not 
until Mike and Roy Katayama enrolled in McKendree. 
after World War II, that anyone thought of there being 
any students of Japanese ancestry residing in the area 
from which the college attracted its students. These 
two young men were, incidentally, readily accepted 
into the McKendree community. The process of heal- 
ing had already begun. The faculty decision that would 
have barred their enrollment was simply a part of an 
anti-Japanese sentiment that spread throughout the na- 
tion following the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 
7 of the previous year. The incident brought the United 
States into a war that had then been raging for more 
than two years. As a part of that sentiment, the federal 
government relocated several thousand Japanese-Ameri- 
cans from the Pacific coast to internment camps in the 
interior of the country. The period reflected little in the 
way of cultural enlightenment and is painful. e\en now, 
to recall. 



What if a McKendrean of this period had had a 
Rip Van Winkle experience, dropping off into a sleep 
that would last for 50 years? Upon awakening, he would 
be amazed by the changes he would observe. He would 
find a McKendree College with a greatly expanded cam- 
pus and a large, diverse student body. He would be as- 
tonished by how well America is getting along with its 
former enemies. The differences that drove Japan and 
the United States into war with each other have either 
disappeared or are no longer thought to be important. 
The two nations, at peace, have experienced a mutually 
beneficial economic and cultural bonding. For 
McKendree College this has meant, among other things, 
an active exchange of students and faculty and the highly 
productive Dr. Kenji Tanaka Scholars Program. Dr. 
Tanaka was subsequently elected to the McKendree 
College Board of Trustees. 

Among man's most precious gifts is the ability to 
make peace. 



\MC KENDREE fil: 



The Administration of President Clark R. Yost 
Faculty List 



1935-36 

Edwin P. Baker 
Christopher J. Bittner 
Josephine Bittner 
James C. Doiley 
Eliza J. Donaldson 
Pauline Harper 
Earl W. Hayter 
Clifford Hertenstein 
Reinhold B. Hohn 

OHver H. Kleinschmidt 
Standleigh M. McClure* 
Lx)uis K. Oppitz 
Nell G. Oppitz 
George A. Scherer 
Aileen Spencer 
Iidwin R. Spencer 
Lillian L. Steckman 
Charles J. Stowell 
Cora M. Thomas 
Elsa M. Tyndall 
Paul D. Waldorf 
William C. Walton 
Aileen Wilson 



1936-37 

Edwin P. Baker 
Christopher J. Bittner 
Josephine Bittner 
Birdsall E. Blanchard 
James C. Doiley 
Eliza J. Donaldson 
CD. Hardy 
Pauline Harper 
Earl W. Hayter 
Reinhold B. Hohn 

Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 
Standleigh M. McClure 
Louis K. Oppitz 
Nell G. Oppitz 
Aileen Spencer 
Edwin R. Spencer 
Lillian L. Steckman 
Charles J. Stowell 
Cora M. Thomas 
Elsa M. Tyndall 
William C. Walton 
Aileen Wilson 



German, Dean 

Social Science 

Physiology 

Latin, Greek 

Commerce 

Voice, Public School Music 

History 

Mathematics 

Education, Psychology, 

Registrar 

Piano, Organ, Theory 

Chemistry 

Physics 

History 

Chemistry 

Biology 

Biology 

English 

Mathematics 

Speech, Dramatics 

French 

Dir. of Athletics, Coach 

Philosophy, Religion 

Librarian 



German, Dean 

Social Science 

Physiology 

Dir. of Athletics, Coach 

Latin, Greek 

Commerce, Comptroller 

History, Political Science 

Voice, Public School Music 

History 

Education, Psychology, 

Registrar 

Piano, Organ, Theory 

Chemistry 

Physics 

History 

Biology 

Biology 

English 

Mathematics 

Speech, Dramatics 

French 

Philosophy, Religion 

Librarian 



1937-38 

Edwin R Baker 
Birdsall E. Blanchard 
James C. Doiley 
Eliza J. Donaldson 
C. DeWitt Hardy 
Pauline Harper 
Reinhold B. Hohn 

Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 
Charles R Kraft 
Standleigh M. McClure 
Ruth McDaniel 
Louis K. Oppitz 
Nell G. Oppitz 
Aileen Spencer 
Edwin R. Spencer 
Lillian L. Steckman 
Charles J. Stowell 
Cora M. Thomas 
William C. Walton 

Clayton R. Watts 
Aileen Wilson 



1938-39 

Edwin P. Baker 
James C. Doiley 
Eliza J. Donaldson 
H. D. Gould 
C. DeWitt Hardy 

Pauline Harper 
Arthur K. Henderson 
Reinhold B. Hohn 

Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 

Charles R Kraft 

Standleigh M. McClure 

Ruth McDaniel 

Nell G. Oppitz 

Webster R. Schmidt 

Aileen Spencer 
I Edwin R. Spencer 
i Charles J. Stowell 

Cora M. Thomas 

William C. Walton 

Clayton R. Watts 
Aileen Wilson 
Mary H. Wright 



German, Dean Emeritus 

Dir. of Athletics. Coach 

Latin, Greek 

Commerce, Comptroller 

History, Political Science 

Voice, Public School Music 

Education, Psychology, 

Registrar 

Piano, Organ, Theory 

Philosophy, Religion 

Geology 

French, Spanish, Dean of Women 

Physics 

History 

Biology 

Biology 

English 

Mathematics, Dean 

Speech, Dramatics 

Prof. Emeritus Philosophy and 

Religion, Treasurer 

Economics, Sociology 

Librarian 



German, Dean Emeritus 

Latin, Greek 

Commerce, Comptroller 

Football Coach 

History, Political Science, 

Dean of Men 

Voice, Public School Music 

Dir. of Athletics, Coach 

Education. Psychology, 

Registrar 

Piano, Organ, Theory 

Philosophy, Religion 

Geology 

French, Spanish, Dean of Women 

History 

Physics, Chemistry 

Biology 

Biology 

Mathematics, Dean 

Speech, Dramatics 

Prof. Emeritus Philosophy and 

Religion, Treasurer 

Iiconomics, Sociology 

Librarian 

English 



MC KENDREE 



1939-40 

Edwin P. Baker 
James C. Dolley 
Eliza J. Donaldson 
H. D. Gould 
C. DeWitt Hardy 

Arthur K. Henderson 
Harold N. Hertenstein 
Reinhold B. Hohn 

Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 
Standleigh M. McClure 
Ruth McDaniel 
Nell G. Oppitz 
William J. Scarborough 
Webster R. Schmidt 
Aileen Spencer 
Edwin R. Spencer 
Charles J. Stowell 
Cora M. Thomas 
Pauline Harper Van Leer 
William C. Walton 

Aileen Wilson 
Mary H. Wright 



1940-41 

Edwin P. Baker 
James C. Dolley 
Eliza J. Donaldson 
Laura N. Ford 
William J. Frederich 
H. D. Gould 
C. DeWitt Hardy 
Arthur K. Henderson 
Harold N. Hertenstein 
Reinhold B. Hohn 

Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 
Standleigh M. McClure 
Ruth McDaniel 
Nell G. Oppitz 
William J. Scarborough 
Webster R. Schmidt 
Charles J. Stowell 
Cora M. Thomas** 
Harold E. Wallace 
William C. Walton 

Grace R. Welch 
Aileen Wilson 
Mary H. Wright 



German, Dean Emeritus 

Latin, Greek 

Commerce, Comptroller 

Football Coach 

History, Political Science, 

Dean of Men 

Dir. of Athletics, Coach 

Mathematics, Chemistry 

Education, Psychology, 

Registrar 

Piano, Organ, Theory 

Geology 

French, Spanish 

History 

Philosophy, Religion 

Physics, Chemistry 

Biology 

Biology 

Mathematics, Dean 

Speech, Dramatics 

Voice, Public School Music 

Prof. Emeritus Philosophy, 

Religion, Treasurer 

Librarian 

English 



German, Dean Emeritus 

Latin, Greek 

Commerce, Comptroller 

Voice, Public School Music 

Speech, Dramatics 

Football Coach 

History, Political Science 

Dir. of Athletics, Coach 

Mathematics, Chemistry 

Education, Psychology, 

Registrar 

Piano, Organ, Theory 

Geology 

French, Spanish 

History 

Philosophy, Religion 

Physics, Chemistry 

Mathematics, Economics, Dean 

Speech, Dramatics 

Biology 

Prof. Emeritus Philosophy, 

Religion, Treasurer 

Speech, Dramatics 

Librarian 

English 



1941-42 

Edwin P. Baker 
Marion L. Conrow 
James C. Dolley 
Eliza J. Donaldson 
Laura N. Ford 
J. Carlyle Hackney 
C. DeWitt Hardy 
Harold N. Hertenstein 
Reinhold B. Hohn 

Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 
Ruth McDaniel 
Nell G. Oppitz 
William J. Scarborough 
Lewis Scholl 
Charies J. Stowell 
Cora M. Thomas 
Harold E. Wallace 
William C. Walton 

Dorothy L West 
Aileen Wilson 



1942-43 

Edwin P. Baker 
George Barton 
Neva Charies 
Leon H. Church 
Marion L. Conrow 
Eliza J. Donaldson 
Bertha W. Gutekunst 
Helmut C. Gutekunst 
Reinhold B. Hohn 

Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 
Mildred Krughoff 
Gladys Lesher 
Ruth McDaniel 
Nell G. Oppitz 
Jean Ridgeway 
Eula R. Smith 
Charles J. Stowell 
William C. Walton 
Grace R. Welch 
Dorothy L West 
Aileen Wilson 



1943-44 

H.P.K. Agersborg 
Edwin P. Baker 
George H. Barton 
Leon H. Church 



German, Dean Emeritus 

English, Dean of Women 

Latin, Greek 

Commerce, Comptroller 

Voice, Public School Music 

Chemistry, Physics 

History, Political Science 

Mathematics, Chemistry 

Education, Psychology, 

Registrar 

Piano, Organ, Theory 

French, Spanish 

History 

Philosophy, Religion 

Dir. of Athletics, Coach 

Mathematics, Economics, Dean 

Speech, Dramatics 

Biology 

Prof. Emeritus Philosophy, 

Religion, Treasurer 

English 

Librarian 



German, Dean Emeritus 

Music 

Biology 

Dir. of Athletics, Coach 

English, Dean of Women 

Commerce, Comptroller 

French, Spanish 

Chemistry, Physics 

Education, Psychology, 

Registrar 

Piano, Organ, Theory 

Speech, Dramatics 

Voice, Public School Music 

French, Spanish 

History 

Voice, Public School Music 

Voice 

Mathematics, Economics, Dean 

Philosophy, Religion, Treasurer 

Speech, Dramatics 

English 

Librarian 



Biology 

German, Dean Emeritus 

Music 

Dir. of Athletics, Coach 




Students in front of Benson Wood Library: 




Debaters at work in the librarw 



Eliza J. Donaldson 
Bertha W. Gutekunst 
Helmut C. Gutekunst 
Reinhold B. Hohn 

Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 
Elizabeth McClintock 
Nell G. Oppitz 
Eula R. Smith 
Frederick C. Stelzriede 
Charles J. Stowell 
William C. Walton 
Dorothy I. West 



1944-45 

H.RK. Agersborg 



Commerce, Comptroller 

French, Spanish 

Chemistry, Physics 

Education, Psychology, 

Registrar 

Piano, Organ, Theory 

English, Latin, Dean of Women 

History 

Voice, Public School Music 

Speech, Dramatics 

Mathematics, Economics, Dean 

Philosophy, Religion, Treasurer 

English, Librarian 



Biology 



Edwin P. Baker 
George H. Barton 
Leon H. Church 
Eliza J. Donaldson 
Beatrice Godwin 
Bertha W. Gutekunst 
Helmut C. Gutekunst 
Reinhold B. Hohn 

Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 
Nell G. Oppitz 
Eula R. Smith 
Frederick C. Stelzriede 
Charies J. Stowell 
William C, Walton 
Grace R. Welch 
Dorothy L West 



German, Dean Emeritus 

Music 

Dir. of Athletics, Coach 

Commerce, Comptroller 

Librarian, Dean of Women 

French, Spanish 

Chemistry, Physics 

Education, Psychology, 

Registrar 

Piano, Organ, Theory 

History 

Voice, Public School Music 

Speech, Dramatics 

Mathematics, Economics, Dean 

Philosophy, Religion, Treasurer 

Speech, Dramatics 

English 




Service Flag in Chapel 



MC KENDREE g^ 



McKendreans in World War II 

By Hartley J. Greenwood, Jr. ('41) 



Prologue 

By 1919, the general attitude of Americans was 
not unlike that of the English some 250 years earlier, as 
noted by some unknown soldier in this bit of verse: 

God and the soldier we adore. 

In time of danger, not before. 

The danger gone, and all things righted, 

God is forgotten, the soldier slighted. 

In 1919, people worldwide were returning to their 
homes to pick up their lives as students or members of 
the work force. McKendreans, along with the rest of 
America, put the war behind them and quickly returned 
to the status quo. Most went through the "Roaring Twen- 
ties" and entered the "Great Depression" with little 
thought or concern as to what was going on outside their 
sphere of influence. 

But all was not well in the world. The victory in 
the "War to End All Wars," followed by the Versailles 
Treaty, attempted to force France, Great Britain, and 
the United States to accept the burden of collective and 
national security. The countries would not (or could not) 
pay the price in preparedness and joint action, the only 
way in which peace could be maintained. Consequently, 
the forces of totalitarianism quickly took root, spread, 
and were left unchecked for too long. As a result, there 
were widespread military operations, 'The Little Wars," 
which flared up all over the world during the period 
from 1919 to 1939. These became testing grounds for 
new weapons and techniques. The United States put 
some of its military people "in harm's way," but it was 
generally in the form of police and control operations. 

The possibility that some McKendreans may 
have taken part in any of these actions is remote, and 
no such evidence has been reported to date. A few 



times and places where McKendrean participation was 
possible included: 

May 1919 to June 1924: 
Dominican Republic, U.S. Marines 

June 1918 to August 1919: 

Russia (Murmansk), one U.S. Infantry Regiment 

(Reinforced) 

August 1918 to April 1920: 

Siberia (Vladivostok) two U.S. Infantry Regiments 

July 1919 to August 1934: 
Haiti (third time) U.S. Marines 

November 1925 to January 1933: 
Nicaraugua, U.S. Marines 

December 12, 1937: 

Yangtze River, China, USS Panay sunk by Japanese 

planes 

July 1936 to March 1939: 

Spanish Civil War — Lincoln Brigade 

By the mid- 1930s, McKendreans were becoming 
more aware of the dangerous forces that were loose in 
the world and started wondering about our military ca- 
pability; this led to some early military enlistments by a 
few McKendreans. Our military forces in the 1930s were 
appallingly weak in most areas. The Navy was in excel- 
lent condition, while the Army was only a skeleton in 
comparison to its responsibilities. Cuts in personnel and 
pay further reduced the ability of the military to be a 
force for world peace. Consider that by 1939, the entire 
Army numbered only about 180,000 officers and en- 
listed men, and the Army Air Corps had fewer than 2,000 
training and tactical planes, 1600 officers, and 18,000 
enlisted men. 



MC KENDREE~ 



Discussions on the McKendree College campus 
during the fall of 1937 to the spring of 1939 centered on 
whether the sinking of the Panay and the Spanish Civil 
War should be a major concern of our government. The 
activation and build up of the Lincoln Brigade boosted 
awareness and interest in what was going on in Spain. 
However, no enlistments of McKendreans in the Span- 
ish Civil War had been reported to date. That situation 
would change dramatically in the ensuing months and 
years, making a significant impact on the life of 
McKendree College. 

The chapter entitled 'The Administration of Presi- 
dent Clark R. Yost" discusses the impact of World War 
II on the college, while the chapter entitled "The Ad- 
ministration of President Carl C. Bracy" indicates the 
impact of the post-war era. This chapter focuses on the 
individual McKendreans who were involved in the con- 
flict that forever changed the world. 

For purposes of definition, anyone who was reg- 
istered as a regular student, a fine arts student, a special 
student, or a summer school student prior to August 15, 
1945, and who could be identified as having served in 
the military was considered a McKendrean in World War 
II. Information on these men and women was gleaned 
from surveys, word of mouth, direct interviews, and 
various publications including McKendree College Bul- 
letin, McKendree College Alumni Bulletin, McKendree 
Review, and Lebanon Advertiser. 

From these sources, the most complete list pos- 
sible of the McKendreans who were involved in World 
War II has been compiled. 



McKendreans Who Served in 
World War II 

Incomplete information in the records of the Of- 
fice of Alumni Relations at McKendree College is evi- 
dent in the fact that only 1 25 surveys were sent to alumni 
known to have been involved in the military. The small 
percentage of completed returns, deaths, and/or forgot- 
ten details by the responders resulted in minimal infor- 
mation about many of the following McKendreans who 
served in World War II. Where possible, more complete 
profile sketches were developed, as indicated in the list- 
ing. The data obtained is presented in the following or- 
der: Rank, Name, Class (graduation date, based on en- 
try year); Branch of Service; Where Stationed; Details; 
Awards. An * indicates information for that item could 
not be found. 



Tech. Sgt. Edgar A. Agles '40; Marine Air Corps; 
finished basic training at U.S. Marine Base. San Diego, 
California, August 3, 1942; consecutively assigned to 
Naval Air Training Center, Corpus Christi, Texas, Janu- 
ary 16, 1943; EWO Air Station, Hawaii; Marine Air 
Squadron, Midway; and Marine base, Guam. 

Lt. (jg) James Agles '43; Navy; Southwest Pa- 
cific; on an LCT. 

Capt. Cecil R. Albright '42; Army; Fort Belvoir, 
Virginia; on the staff and faculty of the U.S. Engineers 
School. 

1st Lt. Boyd Anderson '44; Marine Air Corps; 
South Pacific. 

Pvt. Merlin Anderson '35; Army; Camp Wolters, 
Texas; wounded in France in October 1944. 

Corp. William Ashby '43; Marines; Cherry Point, 
North Carolina; transportation with the permanent per- 
sonnel. 

1st Lt. Kenneth Atkins '40; Army; Battle Creek, 
Michigan; infantry; disabling foot injury; after months 
of hospitalization in Percy Jones Hospital, received 
medical separation; European Campaign Ribbon with 
Two Stars, Purple Heart, Presidential Citation, Silver 
Star. 

Maj. Bernard Baldridge '37; Army Air Corps; 
ETO, England; Headquarters 5th AACS AAF, Radar 
Technician; [See Profile]. 

ARTC2C Byron Baldridge '40; Navy; New York. 

* Lloyd Barnard '40; Navy; CONUS. 

* Marvin Barnes '30; Army; Pacific, Japan; In- 
fantry; in Luzon, then wounded in action on Leyte; 
Purple Heart. 

Sgt. Harold Barrow '45; Army Air Corps; Polk 
Field, North Carolina; with First Troop Carrier Com- 
mand; served in the ETO for nine months. 

M. Tech. Sgt. Arthur Baum '42; Marine Air 
Corps; Pacific; participated in the fighting for Archi- 
pelago, Munda, and Bougainville; after serving over a 
year in the Pacific, returned to CONUS; killed in a 
plane crash at Cherry Point, North Carolina, August 
16, 1944. 

Maj. Whitmore Beardsley '31; Army; ETO, 
Sardinia and Italy; combat units; entered service well 
prior to WWII; continued after war's end. 

Ens. Delmont Beckemeyer '41; Navy Air Corps; 
Atlanta, Georgia; instructor; licensed to make cross 
country flights for civilians. 

RT2c Warren Beckemeyer '48; Navy Air Corps; 
Philippines; radio repairman. 

PhM3c Gordon Beers '35; Navy Medical Corps; 
South Pacific; on receiving ship. 



MC KENDREE~Er 



Lt. James T. Beers '38; Navy; Pacific; commu- 
nications officer in charge of Subron Base; was in Ma- 
nila with General MacArthur's first invasion fleet; in 
7th Fleet as member of General Kinkaid's staff. 

S. Sgt. Paul Belcher '40; Army Air Corps; Sioux 
Falls, South Dakota; Radio Operations School. 

Capt. William Bennett '35; Army; ETO, Ger- 
many. 

Maj. Clyde Berry '33; Public Health; CONUS; 
served from August 1941 until 1948; responsible for 
health and safety of war production personnel; first as- 
signment was assisting in promotion of health and safety 
in North Carolina industries connected with the war ef- 
fort; assigned to Safety and Security Branch of Army 
Ordnance to inspect ammunition manufacturing plants; 
Good Conduct Medal. 

Lt. Wayne R. Bise '38; Navy Air Corps; Pacific, 
Saipan; PBM Squadron #21 ; previously assigned to U.S. 
Atlantic Fleet and light cruiser USS Marblehead; lo- 
cated German surface ships and blockade runners be- 
tween Japan and Germany; served on submarine patrols; 
remained in the service until 1962. 

* Wallace Blackburn '38; Army; Infantry, from 
1943-1946. 

* John Bowler '44; Army Air Corps; Drew Field, 
Tampa, Florida; Celestial Navigation trainer 

C WO Ivan Bowles '41 ; Army Air Corps; Pacific; 
556th Air Service Group; in the service five years in 
September 1945. 

Lt. Earl Braeutigam '43; Navy Air Corps; 
Panama Canal Zone. 

Lt. George Breitwieser '42; Coast Guard; Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts; attended MIT, advanced elec- 
tronics; [See Profile]. 

S.Sgt. Arthur Brewer '32; Army Air Corps; 
Saipan; Bombardier Group, gunner on a B-29; flew sev- 
eral missions over Japan; Air Medal for meritorious ser- 
vice. 

1st Lt. Wayne Brewer '42; Marine Air Corps; 
Deland, Florida; LSO instructor; completed overseas 
missions; prior to arrival in CONUS, was a member of 
a squadron in the South Pacific with 1 35 planes to its 
credit. 

S.Sgt. Charles Briner '42; Army; near Kunming, 
China; in CBI Theatre for 23 months; Official Com- 
mendation, Bronze Star. 

S.Sgt. George S. Brines '36; Army; ETO, En- 
gland. 

Lt. (jg) Carrol Brissenden '35; Navy Air Corps; 
Patuxent River, Maryland; Naval Air Station; served in 
Pacific area 16 months. 



Lt (jg) Eugene Brissenden '35; Navy; in Pacific 
area over 16 months. 

S. Sgt. Dale Broom '41; Army Air Corps; returned 
from 34 months in the CBI Theater. 

Pvt. Donald Brown '50; Army; Fort Knox, Ken- 
tucky; Armored Division; was to take amphibious train- 
ing. 

*Harold Brown '37; Navy; Pacific, New 
Caledonia; station hospital. 

SFlc Wilson Brown '35; Navy; Pacific; on a de- 
stroyer. 

*Fletcher Burge '46; Navy; St. Louis, Missouri; 
Washington University Dental School. 

S. Sgt. Cicero C. Burns '42; Army; ETO, France. 

Pvt. Curtis Burns '44; Army; ETO, Germany. 

Capt. Marvin H. Butler '40; Army; ETO, South- 
em France; 7th Army, AAA (AW) Battalion. 

Sgt. Harry Buzzard '45; Marines; Pacific, 
Marianas Islands; Amphibious Tractor Battalion; made 
initial landing on Iwo Jima with 5th Marines Division. 

Capt. Myron Carlisle '38; Army; ETO, Germany; 
Special Services Company. 

Capt. Paul Carson *; Army; ETO, France; moved 
from Camp Wardem, Washington to Fort Douglas, Utah; 
to Fort Lewis, Washington; to England with General 
Hospital; then to France. 

S. Sgt. Richard Carson '41; Army; ETO, Ger- 
many; in the service for 4 1/2 years. 

Pvt. William Carson '45; Army; Pacific, Philip- 
pines; engineering company; experienced five major 
campaigns in 19 months overseas; was stationed in New 
Guinea. 

T. Sgt. Allen Cast '42; Army; somewhere in Italy 
in service for 34 months (17 overseas); two Presiden 
tial Citations, Bronze Star, Good Conduct Award. 

S2c Edward Cavins '48; Navy Air Corps; Pacific 
aircraft carrier. 

Cpl. Robert Chapman '40; Army; northern Italy 
Fifth Army, Engineers' Section; in message center of 
fice decoding messages. 

Pfc. H. B. Church '30; Army Air Corps; Pacific 
air service. Headquarters and Base Service Squadron. 

Capt. Thomas H. Clare '30; Army Air Corps 
CBI Theater; 341st Bombardment Group; chaplain 
joined unit in CONUS and remained with it throughout 
its deployment to the CBI Theater; wrote book, Lookin 
Eastward, (Macmillan Publishing Company, 1945) cov 
ering his military experiences from departure from CO- 
NUS through experiences in India; missing after his 
plane traveling between India and China suffered a mis- 
hap; later declared killed. 



Fifty-One 



1st Sgt. Glen Coles '38; Army; ETO, Holland; 
82nd Airborne Division — first division to enter France 
on D-Day; very specialized assignment: Glider Infantry. 

* William Collins '39; Army; Camp Polk, Loui- 
siana. 

Capt. James Connett '42; Army; Fort Gruber, 
Oklahoma; 222d Infantry Regiment; Army; ETO; 42d 
Infantry; director of 222d Infantry glee club; in famous 
"Rainbow" unit of WWI, which was heavily engaged 
in combat, especially in the Battle of the Bulge; remained 
in the service until January 1969; Bronze Star, Legion 
of Merit with Oak Leaf Cluster 

S. Sgt. Xon Connett '45; Army Air Corps; ETO, 
Holland; Paratroop Unit; radio operator; participated in 
the British operation "Market Garden," which proved a 
failure (it was made into a movie, A Bridge Too Far); 
missing after action over Holland; declared killed Sep- 
tember 18, 1944. 

Ens. George Cook '38; Navy; Pacific; skipper on 
a motor torpedo boat. 

Sic Lymon Cook '46; Navy Air Corps; Langley 
Barracks, Athens, Georgia. 

* Josiah Cooper '39; Navy; Gulfport, Mississippi; 
radio school. 

Sgt. Paul Correll '38; Army; ETO, Germany; 
Medical Battalion. 

P03c Harold Corrie '45; Navy; Pacific; radio op- 
erator aboard a destroyer, part of Admiral Halsey's Fleet; 
was in four major engagements. 

RM2c Beryl Corris *; Navy Air Corps; Atlantic; 
radioman, patrol duty on B-24. 

Pfc. Marvin Corzine '43; Army; ETO, France; 
Railroad Battalion. 

T. Sgt. Donald Cramer '48; Army Air Corps; Pa- 
cific; Depot Supply Squadron. 

PFC Joe Crawford '38; Marines; Pacific; Engi- 
neering Section. 

Pfc. James L. Cremeens '41; Army Air Corps; 
Drew Field; in a hospital. 

Cdr. Edward M. Curry '31; Navy; Pacific. 

1st Lt. Cyril D. Curtis '43; Army; attended 35th 
Technical School Squadron, electronic and radar school, 
AETC, Cambridge, Massachusetts; [See Epilogue]. 

MMlc Raymond Daniel '38; Navy; San Bruno, 
California; Advanced Base Personnel Depot. 

Ens. Robert Dannenbrink '46; Navy; Pacific; 
Engineering officer on LSM. 

Ens. Robert Joe Davis '40; Navy Air Corps; Drew 
Field Naval Air Station, Tampa, Florida. 

Pvt. Fred Doerner, Jr. '39; Marines; Camp 
Lejeune, North Carolina; Infantry Training Regiment. 



* Ivan Donaldson '45; Navy; received a V-12 
scholarship; attended UCLA and Harvard. 

S2c Victor Donaldson '49; Navy; Fort Worth, 
Texas; Naval Unit of the U.S. Public Health Service 
Hospital; storekeeper striker keeping account of all sup- 
plies going on and off an LST to a large hospital ship in 
the South Pacific. 

S2c Clyde D. Donham '38; Navy; South Pacific, 
COB III Unit. 

1st Lt. Samuel Donham '41; Army Air Corps; 
East Indies; C46 flight leader for the AA Corps pilot 
troop carriers; had seen service in the CBI. 

Capt. Arthur Doolen (Faculty) '34; Army; 
Mattoon, Illinois; teaching ROTC at the high school; 
was coach at McKendree College during 1932-1934. 

2d Lt. Harry Douhitt '39; Army Air Corps; ETO; 
glider pilot and glider pilot instructor; overseas a year; 
Air Medal for invasion of Holland. 

S.Sgt. Elton Dressel '41; Army; Opelika, Ala- 
bama; spent 31 months overseas; left U.S. by way of 
the Atlantic, returned by way of the Pacific. 

Cpl. Lavern Dressel '38; Army; ETO, somewhere 
in France. 

Lt. Larry East '21; Navy; Oleathe, Kansas; in 
charge of civilian personnel. 

1st Lt. William Eaton '36; Army Air Corps; Pope 
Field, North Carolina. 

Aviation Cadet Arnold Eddings '42; Army Air 
Corps; Chickasha, Oklahoma. 

Ens. George E. Edwards '42; Navy Air Corps; 
Africa; pilot of a torpedo bomber; completed a mission 
off the coast of Africa in November 1943; departed from 
CONUS in March 1 944, for a second sea duty tour; par- 
ents last heard from him in a letter dated May 23, 1944; 
shot down by anti-aircraft fire when attacking enemy sub- 
marine; reported missing June 1 944; later declared killed. 

*Ralph A. Edwards '42; Navy; Great Lakes, Il- 
linois; military career ended after debilitating injury in 
a touch football game at pre-flight training school; be- 
came very successful as a minister. 

Sic Vernon Elless '46; Coast Guard; Atlantic City, 
New Jersey; training station; was member of the 
Southwind crew that captured the German trawler 
Externsteine in the Arctic Ocean 500 miles from the 
North Pole. 

Pfc. Estil Ellis '46; Army; ETO; 39th Regimental 
Combat Team of the 9th Infantry Division; Combat 
Infantryman's Badge and European, African, Middle 
East Campaign Ribbon with one Battle Star 

Maj. Sol Ernst '38; Army Air Corps; Orlando, 
Florida. 



Fifty-Two 



<^s^^^r^^^^^32S; 



Sgt. Raymond Fary '42; Army; ETO, Southern 
Germany; Radio Platoon, 100th Signal Battalion of the 
100th Infantry Division; participated in the final defeat 
of Germany; vividly remembers providing, in the rain 
and mud, foot pedal power for a dentist to drill his tooth; 
Victory Medal, Good Conduct Medal, American De- 
fense Medal, American Theater Ribbon, European-Af- 
rican Middle East Ribbon. 

Sic Bruce Fiegenbaum '31; Navy; Pacific, 
Kerma Relto, Okinawa; on a destroyer tender. 

Pfc. James Finley '48; Army; South Pacific; Post 
battalion office; clerk typist. 

T. Sgt. Robert O. Finley '36; Army Air Corps; 
ETO, Italy; heavy bomber group; radio operator and 
gunner on a B-24 missing over Czechoslovakia; later 
declared killed; Air Medal with three Bronze Oak Leaf 
Clusters. 

Ens. William A. Fischer '40; Navy; Pacific; photo 
interpreter in the U. S. Naval Photographic Interpreta- 
tion Squadron Two; was on Guam and Japan. 

Cpl. John Fizzell '46; Marianas Islands; 11th 
Heavy Bomb Group of 7th AAF; primary MOS was 
communications clerk; was also director of the band and 
orchestra. [See Profile]. 

Sgt. Forrest Flamuth '42; Army; Pacific, Manila, 
Philippines; Engineering Corps; after 5 1 12 years of ser- 
vice, was discharged at Fort Lewis, Washington. 

Sgt. Paul Flesor '40; Army; ETO, Germany; Sig- 
nal Unit; Bronze Star Medal. 

Cpl. Lawrence Fox '39; Army Air Corps; 
Coffey ville, Kansas; spent 31 months in the Panama 
Canal Zone. 

Sgt. WilHam Freshour '46; Army; Philippines; 
AAA (AW) Battalion. 

Corp. Junealda Frey (Jackson) '34; Marines; 
Mohave, California; Marine Corps Air Station; CONUS; 
entered service June 9, 1943, in St. Louis, Missouri; 
spent 2 1/2 years at various Marine air stations, ei- 
ther training Marine pilots, or attending school to in- 
crease skills; basic training at Camp Lejeune, New 
River, North Carolina; honorably discharged from 
MCAS, El Toro, California, October 25, 1945. [See Pro- 
file]. 

1st Lt. Herbert Fritz '40; Army; City Hospital, 
St. Louis, Missouri; on leave of absence as resident doc- 
tor. 

WO Howard Gaddy '37; Navy; Navy Pier, Chi- 
cago, Illinois; Navy Redistribution Center; had 54- 
month tour of duty in the Southwest Pacific. 

T. Sgt. Oren Gammon '35; Army; India; Signal 
Corps Unit. 



Lt. Boyce Garvin '41; Navy; CONUS (while his 
ship underwent needed repairs); destroyer escort duty 
in the Central Pacific. 

1st Lt. Holt Gay '49; Marines; Balboa, Califor- 
nia; suffered broken back in an accident. 

Capt. Orville Geiger '32; Army; ETO, France; 
in ETO for two years. 

MM2c Stanley Gibson '34; Navy; Pacific; on a 
destroyer. 

T. Sgt. Ted Gibson '42; Army Air Corps; Lowry 
Field, Colorado. 

Maj. Scott Gier '42; Marine Air Corps; El Toro 
Marine Air Station, Santa Ana, California; Executive 
officer in charge of Squadron 217; Air Medal. 

HA2c Frank Glotfelty '43; Navy; Newport, 
Rhode Island; Naval Hospital staff. 

Lt. Col. Andrew Jackson Goodpaster '35; Army; 
ETO Northern Italy; CO, 48th Engineer Combat Divi- 
sion; wounded in action, but soon returned to duty; re- 
assigned to CONUS. 

Lt. Walter Grauel '32; Navy; Norfolk, Virginia. 

1st Lt. Bartley J. Greenwood, Jr. '41; Army; 
Finschafen, New Guinea; 478th AAAW Battalion; af- 
ter one year of enlisted duty. Sergeant Greenwood at- 
tended OCS and became a second lieutenant in Novem- 
ber 1942; a ruptured ear drum, followed by infection 
and loss of 2/3 of the ear drum, led to medical separa- 
tion January 12, 1945. 

S. Sgt. Leland Grieve '42; Army Air Corps; Pa- 
cific, APO unknown; reassigned from Redistribution 
Center in Miami Beach, Florida. 

Lt. Harry Grothjahn '44; Navy Air Corps; Pa- 
cific; flight officer for Vice Admiral HilFs staff Sep- 
tember 1945; had been flying instructor at Daytona 
Beach, Florida. 

AOM3c James Grove '45; Navy Air Corps; Cen- 
tral Pacific, Guam; Photographic Air Squadron. 

Cpl. James Gruchalla '38; Army; Camp See, Vir- 
ginia; Quartermaster Corps. 

Sgt. Charles Hall '30; Army; ETO; Special Service 
group in the Division of Entertainment and Education. 

Sgt. Benjamin Hamm '44; Army; Southwest Pa- 
cific; 593d Amphibious Engineer Battalion; New Guinea 
landings included Aitape, Wewak, and Noemfoor from 
April to July 1 944; in campaigns in the Philippines from 
March to August 1945; Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal 
with Two Stars. 

Capt. Robert N. Hamm '35; Army; Camp Ellis, 
Illinois; dental surgeon. 

Sgt. George Handlon '40; Army; ETO, Germany; 
Tank Battalion; [See Profile]. 



Fifty-Three 



MC KENDREE 



1st. Lt. John A. Harmon '40; Army Air Corps; 
ETO, England; navigator, B-24 Heavy Bomber; [See 
Profile]. 

Maj. Henry Harper '40; Army Air Corps; 
Carlsbad Army Air Field, New Mexico; commanding 
officer of a training section. 

Lt. Marshall Harris '34; Navy; USS Franklin. 

Capt. Roy D. Harris '36; Army; Italy; 5th Army; 
Bronze Star Medal. 

M. Sgt. Saline Harris '39; Army Air Corps; 
Fighter Group based out of New York. 

Lt. (jg) Donald Hartman '43; Navy; Pacific; As- 
sistant Gunnery officer and Welfare and Recreation of- 
ficer for an APA; served nine months in the Mediterra- 
nean. 

Pfc. Leroy Haseman '36; Army; Pacific, 
Okinawa. 

Capt. George Everette Hayden '40; Army; Fort 
Dix, New Jersey; ETO, Germany; chaplain for combat 
unit; severely injured on December 22, 1944, during 
the Battle of the Bulge; medically separated from the 
service after a long period of hospitalization in Percy 
Jones Hospital, Battle Creek, Michigan, and Walter Reed 
Hospital, Washington, D. C. 

S2c Raymond Hayes '45; Navy; Pacific; radar 
instructor 

PhMlc John Hearst '35; Navy; Philippines; on 
a submarine chaser 

Sgt. Frank Hedger '34; Army; San Francisco, 
California; Transportation Corps Group. 

Pvt. Charles Heeley '39; Army; Camp Sutton, 
North Carolina. 

* Eldon Heer '35; *; released from Armed Forces 
as of May 1945. 

Lt. (jg) A. K. Henderson (Faculty) '41; Navy; 
Little Creek, Virginia; Pacific, Okinawa; commander 
of LSM5; served as chaplain (none available at base); 
in Armed Guard for the European African Area Am- 
phibious Forces; saw action off Algiers at Bizerte No- 
vember 6, 1943; Battle Ribbons, two Battle Stars; re- 
leased from active duty in Chicago, Illinois, January 
1946; was coach and athletic director at McKendree 
College 1938-1941. 

S. Sgt. Myrl Herman '46; Army; Camp Maxey, 
Texas; Infantry Unit. 

* Gail Hines '31; Army; ETO, Germany; Ord- 
nance. 

1st Lt. Arthur Hinson '47; Marines; Okinawa, 
Pacific; D Battery, 2d Artillery Battalion; llth Regi- 
ment, 1st Marine Division; injured by mortar fragments 
in his right shoulder, arm, and lung during the invasion 



of Okinawa on April 15,1945; excellent medical care 
from the field corpsman to the 103d U.S. Field Hospital 
on Guam enabled him to make a fast recovery; returned 
to duty and completed his tour in the Pacific; placed on 
inactive list April 22.1946. 

Lt. Harrison A. Hoffmann '34; Navy; Pacific; 
on an APA. 

Maj. Arthur Hoppe '30; Army; Fort Worth, 
Texas; AA Command Headquarters. 

1st Lt. Charles L. Hortin '38; Army Air Corps; 
Southwest Pacific. 

T. Sgt. Dale E. Hortin '39; Army; South Pacific, 
New Guinea; 210th FA Battalion; [See Profile]. 

1st Lt. James Hortin '30; Navy; Corpus Christi, 
Texas. 

Maj. Paul Hortin '28; Army Air Corps; Colorado 
Springs, Colorado; Hqs. 2d AF. 

RM3c Ross Hortin '43; Navy; Philippines; war 
ended shortly after his arrival at that station. 

* Gaylon Howe '34; Navy; Pacific, Great Lakes, 
Illinois; held services in "the Chapel of the Keep" at 
Dutch Harbor in Alaska. 

M.Sgt. Raymond Howe '40; Army Air Corps; 
Italy; Technical Supply Service in the Mediterranean. 

Pvt. Richard Howe '56; Army; Philippines; Quar- 
termaster Corps; diploma in recognition of special work 
in the personnel and administration areas (prior to leav- 
ing CONUS). 

1st Lt. Gordon Huff '44; Army; ETO, Germany; 
I02d Infantry Division; wounded at Aachen, Germany; 
reassigned after recovery. 

* Arthur V. Huffman '35; Afghanistan. 

SKlc Marion B. Jackson '36; Navy; Philippines; 
Chief Storekeeper. 

CPO Max E. Jackson '36; Navy; near Okinawa; 
disbursor; second overseas tour; previously posted in 
the Pacific with the First Construction Battalion; served 
seven years, with 23 months spent in Guadalcanal area; 
was at the Kaneoki Air Station when the Japanese at- 
tacked it eight minutes before the attack on Pearl Harbor 

1st Lt. Robert G. Jackson '38; Army Air Corps; 
Midland, Texas; Air Base School; was in both ETO and 
African Theaters; completed 30-mission tour in Italy as 
a bombardier on a B-24; Air Medal with two Oak Leaf 
Clusters. 

Pvt. William Jackson '31; Army; ETO, England; 
General Hospital Division. 

Lt. (jg) Roy Jaeckel '39; Navy; Pacific; five-inch 
gunnery officer. Battleship USS Alabama; [See Profile]. 

Lt. (jg) Albert Johnpeter '42; Navy; Pacific; on 
an APA; six Campaign Stars. 



Fifn-Four 



mckendreeW^T 



2nd Lt. Charles Jones *; Marines; Camp Lejeune, 
North Carolina; platoon leader 

* Edward Jones '40; Marines; Pacific. 

Cpl. Robert Just '44; Army; Philippines; Signal 
Corps; served in Australia and New Guinea. 

Lt. Wallace Karstens '35; Navy; Oakland Air- 
port, California; dental services; entered service in Sep- 
tember 1943. 

S2c Clifford Keck '44; Navy; Pacific; ship 
radioman. 

* George Kennedy '43; volunteer ambulance 
driver attached to the British Navy. 

* Robert Kercher '44; Army Air Corps; Pacific, 
New Guinea; air base. 

SK2c Dean Kirkpatrick '43; Navy; Great Lakes, 
Illinois. 

Capt. Gustave Krizek '37; Army; ETO, Ger- 
many; 90th Chemical Mortar Battalion; Bronze Star 
Medal for achievement in combat, awarded in ceremony 
at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, by Brigadier General 
J. A. Cranston, Chief of Staff. V Corps. 

Cpl. Robert Kruh '46; Army; ETO, Germany; 
Engineering Battalion; unit received a commendation 
from General Hodges' 1st Army for putting a bridge 
across the Rhine in 10 days. 

Capt. Robert Kurrus '33; Army Air Corps; ETO, 
Germany; [See Profile]. 

* Delbert Lacquement '28; Army; ETO, France, 
Camp Maxey, Texas; Armored Unit, only chaplain for 
the 14th Cavalry Group; reported the 91st Armored Di- 
vision wiped out at Luxembourg; medically discharged. 

S.Sgt. Harry Lang '33; Army; Pacific. Philip- 
pines; finance section; had been in New Guinea. 

Sgt. Robert Langenwalter '46; Army; Assam, In- 
dia; chemical laboratory; overseas for 18 months. 

* Wallace Leaf '43; Navy; Pacific. 

Sgt. Harry Leckrone '41; Army Air Corps; Truax 
Field, Madison, Wisconsin; was slowly recovering from 
typhus fever in a hospital at Scott Field, Illinois. 

PhMlc Bernard Logan '47; Navy; Northern Pa- 
cific, Aleutian Islands; medical department. 

MM3c Ralph Logan '42; Seabees; Pacific; in the 
service for three years, one year of which he spent in 
Iceland; returned to CONUS to be an instructor at Camp 
Endicott, Rhode Island; spent 1 1 months in Hawaii. 

Capt. Charles E. Long '41; Army Air Corps; Oak- 
land Airfield, California; flight control center. 

CPhMic Alvin Lopinot '46; Navy; Pacific; in 
charge of his division on an LST. 

Lt. (jg) Carrol Lowe '42; Navy; South Pacific; 
USS Brownsoir, action off New Britain [See Profile]. 



Capt. Cecil Lowe '40; Army; ETO, England; was 
the first and only chaplain for the hospital at Camp 
Chafee, Arkansas; had two sons in the service. 

Pfc. Donald Lowe '48; Army; ETO, Germany; 
Engineering Battalion, 7th Army. 

Col. Earl C. Lowry '28; Army; ETO, France; CO, 
195th General Hospital; served in hospital from 1944 
to the end of the war; remained in service until 1967; 
after one year at McKendree College, transferred to the 
University of Chattanooga, Tennessee, and received a 
B.S. in Science in 1 927; earned M.D. at Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity, Nashville, Tennessee, in 1933; entered the Army 
in 1933 as M.D. with rank of lieutenant. [See Profile]. 

Lt. (jg) James L. Loy '43; Navy; Pacific; Assis- 
tant Operations officer with the combined 7th Amphibi- 
ous Staff. 

* Don Mahan '43; Army Air Corps; New Guinea; 
had accrued 138 points toward discharge. 

Pfc. M. Alfred Manis '39; Army Air Corps; ETO, 
Germany; supply clerk, 464th AA Corps Base Unit. 

Pvt. Albert Manwaring '35; Army; Camp Van 
Dom, Mississippi. 

Sgt. Charles JVIanwaring '46; Army; ETO, 
France, Germany; Tank Destroyer Battalion attached to 
General Patton's Third Army; wounded in July 1944, 
and placed in military hospital in England; rejoined his 
unit. 

1st Lt. Daniel B. Martin '45; Army Air Corps; 
CBI; flying troop transport in Burma; transferred from 
Fort Gardner Field, California, where he was in train- 
ing as an aviation cadet; reported killed in March 1945; 
shortly before his death, wrote a letter to Dr. Dorothy 
West, which in part read, "...the war here is like 
McKendree playing football against Missouri Univer- 
sity. We have enough spirit, but lack the backing." 

Pfc. Francis Martin '43; Army; APO New York; 
Signal Service Battalion. 

2d Lt. Harry A. Martindale '42; Army Air Corps. 

S.Sgt. Kenneth V. Mason '36; Army; ETO, Ger- 
many; Engineering Battalion. 

Pfc. Charles R. Matthews '46; Army Air Corps; 
Galveston, Texas; inspector of B-24s. 

1st Lt. John V. McLain '42; Army; Fort George 
Meade, Maryland; 15-month tour of duty in the South 
Pacific. 

Capt. Elmo T. McClay '31; Army Air Corps; 
Scott Field, Illinois; Medical Corps; CONUS. 

A3c John W. McNelly '47; Navy; Pacific; fire- 
man on an LST. 

PFC Donald Mercer '42; Marines; Southwest Pa- 
cific; Infantry Unit. 



Fifty-Five 



* EmUe Mignery '35: Army; CONUS. 

Lt. (jg) Hugh Miles '38; Navy; Little Creek, Vir- 
ginia. 

Sgt. Maxine Miller (Finley) '39; Army Air Corps; 
Webb Air Field, Big Springs, Texas; bombardier school, 
radio and code training; teacher; released from the 
Armed Forces soon after the war's end. 

Sgt. Lee Mockler '33; Army; South Pacific, Dutch 
New Guinea; Headquarters 33rd Infantry Division G-2 
Section, MOS 631; assisted in collecting, evaluating, 
interpreting, and disseminating enemy intelligence and 
counter-intelligence operations; landed in Finschafen 
area. New Guinea, during monsoon season May 1944; 
served from April 27, 1942 to November 19, 1945; 
American Campaign Medal, Pacific Medal with 2 Cam- 
paign Stars, Philippines Liberation Ribbon, World War 
II Victory Medal. 

Cpl. Ralph Monken '43; Army Air Corps; Pa- 
cific, Tarawa; AACS Squadron. 

Sic Lee Mooney '41; Navy; Ward Island, Corpus 
Christi, Texas; Aviation Radio Technician in the Navy 
Air Technical Training Center 

S. Sgt, Walter Morse '32; Army Air Corps; Army 
Air Field, Waco, Texas; weather forecaster 

Capt. Charles Mueth '42; Army Air Corps; CBI; 
flew 'The Hump" in B-24; [See Profile]. 

Pfc. Raymond Musgrove '35; Army; Brooklyn, 
New York; Medical Detachment. 

Pvt. Malcolm Myers '43; Army Air Corps; Pa- 
cific, Marianas Islands; Depot Repair Squadron. 

Cpl. Albert Nattsas '34; Army; San Antonio, 
Texas; M.P. Detachment. 

Maj. Harry Nesmith '34; Army; ETO; completed 
39 months of duty in hospitals in England, Scotland, 
North Ireland, France, Austria, Czechoslovakia, Lux- 
embourg, and Germany; neuro-psychiatrist. 

Cpl. Clair Norris '37; Army; Philippines; Am- 
phibious Truck Company; overseas 20 months in Aus- 
tralia, New Guinea, and the Philippines. 

AS Harold Nothdurft '45; Navy; Fort Schuyler, 
New York; USNR; medical service. 

Sgt. George Nugent '37; Army; ETO, France; 
Ordnance Depot Section. 

Mus2c Robert F. O'Brien '43; Navy; Pacific; 
USS Dixie Band Division; member of band that was 
famous across entire Pacific; played at all friendly - 
and sometimes unfriendly - ports. The Dixie Band was 
performing at a Marine base in the Solomons when a 
shot rang out from the top of a nearby coconut tree. 
O'Brien quipped, "I didn't know we were that bad." 
[See Profile]. 



S. Sgt. Marion E. Officer '50: Army: ETO, 
France; MVD Company. 

1st Lt. John Oppitz '38; Army Air Corps; 
Ellington Field, Texas; associate editor of monthly maga- 
zine. Log of Navigation; after graduating from naviga- 
tion school at Selman Field, Monroe, Louisiana, became 
navigator on a lead bomber at an air base in England; 
completed 30 bombing missions over Germany; Air 
Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, Distinguished Flying 
Cross; [See Profile]. 

Sgt. James Oppitz '47; Army Air Corps; ETO, 
England; Administrative NCO for the 388th Bomb 
Group (H) of the 8th Air Force. 

2d Lt. Harold Ore '42; Army; Camp Robinson, 
Arkansas; graduated from Infantry OCS at Fort Benning, 
Georgia. 

Pvt. Robert Lee Osborn '46; Army Air Corps; 
ETO, Germany; AAA Gun Battalion, 7th Army; 
wounded in Germany; sent to a general hospital in En- 
gland; returned to his unit. 

Capt. Herbert Oxendine '38; Army Air Corps, 
CONUS; tour in Southwest Pacific. 

Sic Andrew Patterson '44; Coast Guard; tours 
along West Coast and radio school in Atlantic City, 
New Jersey, ended in February 1945; assigned to a 
ship being refitted as a rocket launcher vessel, but 
the "bomb" stopped the LST from completing its mis- 
sion. 

Cpl. Robert H. Peach '28; Army; ETO, En- 
gland and France; 5th General Hospital; optometrist; 
participated in Normandy, northern France, and 
Rhineland campaigns; Europe-Africa-Middle East 
Ribbon with three Battle Stars, Certificate of Merit 
with Citation: "For superior services as optometrist 
Fifth General Hospital, England and France, 1 Au- 
gust 1943 to 25 July 1945." 

Ylc Wilfred A. Pemberton '32; Navy; Fleet Post 
Office. 

Pvt. Anial Pennell '42; Army; Pacific, Philippines; 
F.A. Battalion: wounded in action; recovered and later 
rotated to CONUS. 

Lt. Cdr. Lowell Pennell '36; Navy Air Corps; Bur- 
ton, South Carolina; in school; transferred to West Coast 
to command his own squadron. 

Maj. Lewis V. Peterson '27; Army Air Corps; 
Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio; Air Technical Service Com- 
mand; granted leave of absence from University of Illi- 
nois where he was supervisor of visual aids. 

* Mason Petty '43; *; released from Armed Forces 
as of May 1945. 

Capt. Morris Phillips '31; Army; Italy. 



WMc KENDRE ^^^^^gg^,^^^^^ 



1st Lt. Wendell Phillips '38; Army; ETO Rome, 
Italy; overseas 30 months as infantryman in Africa, Sic- 
ily, Italy, and France; Silver Star. 

T. Sgt. Raymond Pike '41; Army Air Corps; 
Carlsbad, New Mexico; Squadron A CAAF; returned 
from 36 months overseas. 

1st Lt. Walter Pimlott '44; Marine Air Corps; Pa- 
cific; Corsair Squadron pilot attacking Gilbert Islands; 
during operations in the Marshall Islands, his plane failed 
to rendezvous with the rest of his flight and was never 
located; Air Medal and Victory Medal WWII; his name 
is inscribed on the "Court of Honor" at the Honolulu 
Memorial National Cemetery for the Pacific; missing 
since June 20, 1944; later declared killed. 

Ens. James Pinkston '45; Navy; out of New York; 
on USS Sturdy Beggar. 

Sic Howard Pistor '51; Navy; Great Lakes, Illi- 
nois; Selection Office; interviewed and classified re- 
cruits; graduated from Classification Interviewers 
School at Farragut, Idaho. 

Cdr. J. Rue Plater '26; Navy; San Bruno, Cali- 
fornia; Fleet Hospital Division; dental surgeon; also in 
Pacific Theater as dental surgeon. 

Pvt. William Plato '44; Marines; San Francisco, 
California; was in Naval Hospital, recovering from 
wounds suffered in action in the Philippines. 

Capt. William Podesta '33; Army; Pacific The- 
ater; entertainment officer in San Francisco, California; 
ran a dental clinic; made and fitted artificial eyes for 
casualties on Christmas Island; received Bronze Star. 

Capt. William H. Poe '35; Army Medical Corps; 
ETO, France; hospital unit since February 27, 1944; 
landed on "D" Day with a combat unit. 

Cpl. Archie Porter '46; Army; ETO, France; AAA 
(AW) Battalion. 

* Edward Posage '41; Army Air Corps; ETO, Ger- 
many; prisoner of war but circumstances unknown; sur- 
vived; returned home after the war. 

Lt. Charles E. Pruett '33; Navy Medical Corps; 
Pacific; aboard ship. 

1st Lt. Walter Pruett '38; Army; Dallas, Texas; 
Headquarters 8th Signal Corps; moved from Fort 
Devens, Massachusetts; was awaiting overseas orders. 

Sgt. Leslie Purdy '47; Army; Pacific; advanced 
element of a supply depot; previously in Australia, New 
Guinea, and the Netherlands East Indies. 

Pvt. Edward Quick '40; Army Air Corps; AAF 
Base Unit; had served three years. 

Lt. Malcolm Randall '39; Navy; Pacific; battle- 
ship; in two years of sea duty, had participated in seven 
actions. 



CPhM Allen Rapinot *; Navy; Pacific. 

Ens. Wyatt Rawlings '45; Navy Air Corps; Ba- 
nana River, Florida; Naval Air School. 

Lt. Richard Recard '43; Navy Air Corps; ended 
CONUS-bound flying career at USNAS, Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts, September 6, 1945. 

Pvt. Amos Reed '40; Army Air Corps; completed 
radio training course at Scott Field, Illinois. 

Pfc. Ralph Ritchey '31; Army; Pacific; Infantry 
Division Band; Amphibious Battalion from Philippines 
to Japan, attached to Admiral Halsey's 3d Fleet; band 
member. 

PFC Frances Robinson (Bailey) '43; Marines 
Cherry Point, North Carolina; "Sergeant of the Guards" 
special services: recreation and dramatics director 
worked in bowling alley, planned baseball tournaments, 
parties and dances, taught ballroom dancing, escort for 
entertainers who came to the base, and produced weekly 
locally-broadcast radio show; entered Marines in March 
1944, basic training at Camp Lejuene, North Carolina; 
promoted to sergeant prior to her release in January 1 946. 

* Albert Rode '32; Army; ETO, France; killed 
somewhere in France. 

Sgt. Bernice Rongey (Douglas) '42; Army 
(WAC); North African Theater; only female 
McKendrean stationed overseas; unit was in General 
Eisenhower's camp; discharged October 1945. 

* Walton Russ '42; *; released from Armed Forces 
as of May 1945. 

Sgt. Allen Sager '48; Army; ETO, France; Engi- 
neering Regiment. 

1st. Lt. Milton Sager '40; Army; ETO, Germany; 
9th Armored Division; Headquarters Battery Com- 
mander and Battalion Communications officer [See Pro- 
file]. 

* Phillip St. Martin *; Navy; Bend, Oregon; of- 
ficer in charge of Personnel Section. 

RM3c Paul Salmon '48; Navy; Pacific; destroyer; 
crossed the equator 1 1 times; traveled by sea over 90,000 
miles; had been to almo.st every important island in the 
Pacific, and landed troops on 1 1 of them. 

Lt. James T. Sampson '37; Navy. 

* John Sanders '35; Army. 

Maj. William Sanders '36; Army Air Corps; 
Memphis, Tennessee; Municipal Airport, Headquarters, 
4th Ferrying Division of the Air Transport Command; 
Personnel Affairs officer; had been assigned to the Mu- 
nitions Building, Washington, D. C, in charge of casu- 
alty notification; was on terminal leave in General Hos- 
pital, Memphis, Tennessee; Army Commendation Rib- 
bon. 



Fifry-Seven 



MC KENDREE 



CWO Glen Sappington '42; Army; ETO, France; 
administrative work. 

Lt. Albert Schmedake '38; Navy; returned from 
10-month overseas tour 

CSp Lewis Scholl (Faculty) '41; Navy; Great 
Lakes, Illinois; physical therapist; served primarily in 
San Diego, California area; physical education; coach 
at McKendree College in 1941. 

Ens. Herbert Schroeder '44, Navy; Pacific; En- 
gineering officer on a patrol gun boat. 

Sgt. Thomas Schwarzlose '46; Army Air Corps; 
ETO, Italy; Bombardier Squadron; ball turret gunner 
on a B-17; completed several of required 50 missions 
before being declared missing; actually was imprisoned 
until the end of the war 

* Frank Scott '34; *; released from Armed Forces 
a.s of May, 1945. 

PhM3c Kenneth Scott '35; Navy; Farragut, Idaho. 

S2c William Searles '46; Navy; departed San 
Francisco, California to become ship repairman at a 
Pacific base. 

Pfc. Paul Seibert '44; Army; Pacific. 

Cpl. Ernest Sheese '46; Army Air Corps; Charles- 
ton, South Carolina; airplane mechanic. 

Cpl. Richard Shepherd '44; Army Air Corps; 
CBI Theater, Assam, India; Air Transport Command; at 
base for two years. 

Ens. Harold Shipp '40; Navy; Pacific; Executive 
officer. Squadron Navigator, and Communications of- 
ficer on a motor torpedo boat. 

1st Lt. Herbert Simons '42; Army; ETO, Ger- 
many; Infantry Platoon Leader during and after Battle 
of the Bulge; wounded and sent to general hospital in 
England; after recovery, rejoined unit; Purple Heart, 
Combat Infantry Badge, Bronze Star 

Capt. H. Y. Slaten '26; Army; ETO, England; 
228th Station Hospital; held services in a hospital ward 
and a chapel used exclusively for religious services of 
all denominations. He stated, "There were men of al- 
most every sect, and those who declared they had no 
faith at all." 

2nd Lt. Ralph Sleight '45; Marines; went home 
on leave after completing officers' training. 

Ens. C. Earnest Smith '44; Navy Air Corps; CO- 
NUS, was awaiting reassignment. 

Cpl. Edwin Smith '38; Army; ETO, France; Gen- 
eral Hospital; stationed for a year in North Africa. 

S. Sgt. Jonas Smith '43; Marine Air Corps; CO- 
NUS, returned after 1 8-month tour in the South Pacific; 
after a 30-day leave, reported to Cherry Point, North 
Carolina. 



* Richard Snyder '44; Army; ETO, France. 
Sgt. John Spiller '44; Army; Germany; 1 7th Cav- 
alry Division. 

S.Sgt. Kenneth Stegall '45; Army Air Corps; 
ETO, Italy; turret gunner on B-24; missing since De- 
cember 1944; later declared killed. 

Pvt. Wesley Stelzriede '49; Army; Camp 
Robinson, Arkansas. 

Pvt. Leonard Stoecklin '38; Army; ETO, Germany. 

1st Lt. Eddie Stroehlein '38; Army; New Orieans, 
Louisiana. 

Ens. Raymond Suggs '45; Navy; Pacific; on an 
LCS. 

Capt. Curtis Taylor '42; Army; ETO, Italy; 88th 
Infantry Division; twice wounded; multiple shell frag- 
ments in the back; received surgical treatment in Italy; 
upon recovery, rejoined unit. [See Profile]. 

Y2c Stephen L. Tedor '31; Navy; Pacific, 
Marianas Islands; Seabees. 

Ens. Robert Tenney '45; Navy; South Pacific. 

Sgt. Antone Tepatti '48; Army Air Corps; Pacific, 
Philippines; 600th AAF Band; trumpet player; enter- 
tained troops at every opportunity and for all special 
occasions; played reveille every morning and retreat 
parades every night; returned home at end of war. 

T. Sgt. Edgar Thilman '48; Army; ETO, Ger- 
many. 

Lt. Royce Timmons '43; Navy Air Corps; South 
Pacific, Guadalcanal; VB-102 Unit; [See Profile]. 

* Thomas Jefferson Tippett '39; Army; ETO; 
killed in .service. 

Pfc. Harold Todd '44; Army; ETO, Germany; In- 
fantry. 

Cpl. Claude Tritt '41; Army; ETO, France; small 
arms mechanic with 9th Armored Division. 

* Billy "Ricker '34; Army. 

1st Lt. George Ttittle '43; Army Air Corps; Napier 
Field, Dothan, Alabama. 

1st Lt. James Tuttle '43; Army Air Corps; 
Mitchell Field, New York; First AAF Fighter Command; 
instructed pilots for overseas replacement; completed 
his missions abroad. 

S.Sgt. Russell Ungerzagt '38; Army Air Corps; 
ETO, Germany; imprisoned from October 11,1 944, until 
the end of the war 

2d Lt. Paul Vanatta '43; Army Air Corps; Pa- 
cific; fiying B-29 Super Fortress. 

Pfc. Harold Vernor '42; Army Air Corps; Morris 
Field, Charlotte. North Carolina; AAF Band. 

S.Sgt. Clair Villiger '44; Army; ETO, France; 
Troop Transport Unit. 



Fi/ry-Eighi 



c:s^3^c^r^^^?::^^^XSfrMc KENDREE" 



Pfc. Roy Waggoner '44; Army Air Corps; Camp 
Murphy, Florida. 

Pfc. Richard Wagner '46; Army Air Corps; 
Barksdale Field, Louisiana. 

Cpl. Harry Walker '42; Army; CBI Theater, 
Burma; 1304th Construction Battalion; worked two 
years on the Ledo Road. 

Lt. Harold E. Wallace (Faculty) '41; Navy; South 
Pacific; hospital division, responsible for malaria con- 
trol; remained in service for duration; Ph.D., taught bi- 
ology at McKendree College in 1941. 

Capt. Clarence H. Walton '35; Army Medical 
Corps; Pacific; during early 1944 served in northern Italy 
with 329th FA Battalion of the 85th Infantry Division; 
returned to CONUS May 1945, took refresher courses, 
sent to Pacific Theater; service ended after V-J Day. [His 
father is Dr. William C. Walton, who was a much-ad- 
mired faculty member at McKendree College.] 

PFC Donald Ward '41; Marines; Pacific; infan- 
try; killed in action fighting the Japanese on Berico Is- 
land during the Battle for Tarawa on November 22, 1943; 
his gold star was the first one placed on McKendree 
College's service flag. 

1st Lt. Harry Ward '42; Army Air Corps; ETO; 
8th AF; Bombardier on a B- 17; 25 missions over Ger- 
many; Air Medal with additional Oak Leaf Cluster. 

AS John C. Watson '42; Navy; served aboard a 
liberty ship in Africa and the Solomons. 

Lt. (jg) Arthur Wehmeier '37; Navy; Pacific, 
Philippines; on a seaplane tender. 

SK2c Kathleen Weidler (Griswold) '44; Coast 
Guard; Norfolk, Virginia; member of SPAR chorus, 
which sang on a Coast Guard-manned transport back 
from combat action in the Mediterranean Sea; took ba- 
sic training at Palm Beach, Florida; discharged in Octo- 
ber 1945. 

1st Lt. G. B. Welborn '38; Army Air Corps; ETO, 
Italy; bombardier and navigator; flew number of mis- 
sions over Germany. 

1st Lt. Arthur Werle '50; Army; Pacific, 
Okinawa; Engineering Battalion; [See Profile]. 

MaM2c Gaylon Whiteside '34; Navy; Pacific, 
Honolulu; postal service; expected to be moved. 

* Harold Whitlock '35; Army; North Africa and 
Italy; sponsored Christmas party for the Italian children. 

Sgt. Gerald Whittington '37; Army; assigned 
consecutively to Special Services, Transportation Ser- 
vices, and Signal Corps School; expected departure for 
the ETO canceled due to the end the of war in Europe. 

Ens. Orval Wiley '44; Navy; Pacific. 

Pvt. Wilbur Wiley '44; Army; CBI Theater. 



Lt. Charles O. Williams '40; Navy; Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania; advanced train [See Profile]. 

* Howard Williams '44; Marine Air Corps; Pa- 
cific; met Walter Pimlott while in the Gilbert Islands. 

ART3c Daniel S. Williamson '45; Navy; Min 
neapolis, Minnesota. 

Lt. Kenneth Wilson '36; USNR; Little Creek, Vir- 
ginia; Amphibious Training Base. 

Pvt. Robert Winning '45; Army; Little Rock, Ar- 
kansas; Camp Robinson; attended Army Dental School 
at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Cpl. Karl Wittlinger '34; Army; ETO, Italy; 35th 
Field Hospital. 

S.Sgt. Warren Wolfe '35; Army; ETO, Germany; 
overseas for 24 months. 

Sgt. Byrl Woodard '39; Army; ETO, Belgium; 
Railroad Operating Battalion; conductor. 

Cpl. Donald Woodburn '44; Army; San 
Bemadino, California; Sub-Depot Repair Facility, Quar- 
termaster Branch. 

S. Sgt. Merrill H. Wright '33; Army; Fort 
Sheridan, Illinois; reception center. Army Ground 
Forces; one of the three enlisted liaison representatives. 

Ens. Noble Wright '45; Navy; Norfolk, Virginia; 
Submarine Lacker. 

Ens. Paul Yost '42; Navy; Pacific; APA, Com- 
munications officer; received commission after complet- 
ing Midshipman's School; formeriy Executive officer 
on an LCI. 

Lt. Loren Young '33; Navy; Pacific; on a de- 
stroyer tender. 

Maj. Roger Zeller '38; Army Air Corps; Wash- 
ington, D. C; North Africa; administration officer; trans- 
ferred to nearby unit as pilot for 319th Bomb Group on 
a Marauder B-26, called "the Widow-Maker" because 
of operational difficulties encountered by pilots; plane 
was shot down, and he was captured during bombing 
run over Sardinia; held in POW camp in Chiete, Italy; 
escaped with three others as they were being readied to 
move to Germany; Distinguished Flying Cross, Bronze 
Star, Purple Heart. 

The names that follow were listed on the "Armed 
Service Roll" in issues of the McKendree Review from 
1941 to 1946, but no additional information was avail- 
able. 

Don Davis * 
Warren Faeth '43 
William Gillespie '30 
Roy Griebel '39 




Russell Gullett '42 
Raymond Harms '38 
Elbert Isaac '33 
David Jackson '36 
Leslie Lee '42 
James Lyerla '42 
John Perry '45 
Robert Rucker '39 
Robert Stoffel '43 
Dale Whitehurst '35 
Burdette Williams '40 
Lester Wilson '39 



GIs Matriculating After 
World War II 

In the years following the war, there were also 54 
veterans who came to McKendree College as students 
with no prior connection to the college. They came on 
the GI Bill of Rights following the ending of hostilities 
on August 15, 1945. Nevertheless, in recording the his- 
tory of McKendree College, their impact on the cur- 
riculum, finances, campus life, and the future of the col- 
lege qualifies them to be listed as McKendreans in World 
War II. Their names follow: 



Harold E. Affsprung '49 
Rocjard Ashall '50 
Kenneth L. Austin '50 
Franklin Babb '51 
Dale Bailey '49 
Don Benitone '49 
Lauren Berger '50 
Edward Benny Bogard '51 
Kenneth Bowker '50 
Don Brown '50 
Tony Bruno '50 
Edward Gavins '49 
David Cummins '50 
John Curtis '50 
Charles Fox '51 
Wade Gee '47 
Andrew P. Geist '49 
Jayhew Halcomb '49 
Burnell Heinecke '50 
John Hei.ser '49 
Thomas Hemmer '49 
Stanley Holzhauser '50 
Gene Lowell Houser '50 



Richard Howe '48 
Dale Huff '49 
Howard Hursey '50 
William Johnston '51 
Sherman Lyle Jones '51 
Ralph Juda '51 
Roy Katayama '50 
Blaine Kennedy '50 
John K. Krumeich '49 
Pat Ladas '50 
Anthony Markarian '49 
Robert McCable '50 
Brainard Miller '51 
George Pathenos '51 
John Rainholt '51 
James Reizer '47 
William J. Rhodes '51 
John Richichi '49 
Elvis Rosenberger '50 
Elmer A. Rouland '49 
Orville Schanz '50 
Robert E. Simpson '51 
Samuel W. Simpson '49 
Theodore Sleeper '49 
Thomas B. Sowers '49 
Lee I. Strain '50 
Newman Thompson '50 
William Togias '50 
Richard Townsend '49 
Milo Wadsworth '50 
Kenneth William Walters '49 



Profiles 



The sources reviewed and, in some cases, the in- 
dividuals themselves, provided additional information 
on the McKendreans listed below. It is hoped that the 
information related here will provide the reader with an 
understanding of the widespread, and sometimes tragic, 
results the war had on McKendreans and their families. 

Bernard H. Baldridge '37 entered McKendree 
College from Gillespie, Illinois, in September 1 933, and 
graduated in June 1937. In his senior year, he became 
master scientist in the campus national honorary science 
and mathematics fraternity, Sigma Theta, Beta chapter. 

He entered the Army Air Corps in November 1 94 1 , 
as a civilian instructor member of a small cadre of engi- 
neers organizing the Army Air Corps Radar School at 



^^'^m^Mm^^^^^s^sssms^ 



Scott Field, Illinois. He moved with the school to 
Morrison Field, West Palm Beach, Florida, in January 
1942; he later moved to the base constructed for the 
school at Boca Raton, Florida. He was commissioned 
directly as a second lieutenant with a radar officer's MOS 
in October 1942 and continued with the same duty and 
assignment of the Radar School Technical and Supervi- 
sion staff. From April 1942, to March 1944, he served 
as a liaison with industry for operator/maintenance train- 
ing on new and advanced radars. 

From March through December of 1944, 
Baldridge was assigned to Headquarters AACS, AAF 
in the ETO, to provide maintenance and operational 
services to the 8th and 9th Air Forces during the in- 
troduction of ground-controUed-approach instrument 
landing systems. 

He was decorated with the American Campaign 
Medal; European, African, Middle Eastern Campaign 
Medal with one Battle Star; WW II Victory Medal; and 
the Army of Occupation Medal (Germany). 

Baldridge was discharged September 1946 with 
the rank of major. 



After a year of this duty, Breitwieser went to anti- 
submarine advanced training; then to gunnery school; 
then to HoustonyCalveston, Texas, to commission a new 
destroyer escort vessel, USS Vance, DE 387. On this 
ship he was Electronics and Communications officer, 
and later became Executive officer. It was again con- 
voy escort duty from Norfolk, Virginia, or New York 
City, to the Mediterranean, North Africa, and Sicily. 
These convoys were in support of the invasion forces 
that were already in North Africa. The most dangerous 
routes were through the Mediterranean, from Algiers to 
Tunis. Attacks came from German aircraft flying out of 
southern France, as well as German submarines lying 
in wait for the convoys. Occasionally, they lost a ship 
or two; occasionally, they filled the sky with AAA fire. 
Once they picked up a downed German airman and de- 
livered him to Allied Forces in Tunis. This tour of duty 
ended in September 1944, and he returned to school for 
graduate work at MIT in Electrical Engineering. 

Lieutenant Breitweiser was awarded the Ameri- 
can Theater Campaign Medal, the North African Cam- 
paign Medal, and the Victory Medal. 



George F. Breitwieser '42 entered McKendree 
College in September 1938, from East St. Louis, Illi- 
nois. He attended only one year, but many of his peers 
still recall the help he gave them in academics. While at 
McKendree, he took a competitive examination for an 
appointment to the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, and won 
admittance to the school in July 1939. 

After graduating from the Academy in June 1 942, 
he was assigned to convoy escort duty on board the cut- 
ter Pandora running from Key West, Florida, to New 
York City, and back again. This route crossed what was 
known as "Torpedo Junction," a favorite area for Ger- 
man submarine attacks against coastal shipping. Con- 
voys totaled up to 100 ships, with about six to eight 
escort vessels patrolling forward, aft, and at the sides of 
the array of merchant ships. 

Submarines would lie in wait ahead of the con- 
voy, and fire torpedoes as the broadside of the ships 
was presented. The escort vessels searched the area 
ahead and to the side with the then-available sonar, 
which had very limited range. Frequently, sonar con- 
tacts turned out to be fish or some other kind of target; 
nevertheless, every contact was pursued and attacked if 
it persisted. The attack consisted of dropping a pattern 
of depth charges, which seemed to be as much danger 
to the patrolling escort vessel as to the submarines. At- 
tacks could come at any time of day or night; they were 
"not conducive to a good night's sleep!" 



John J. Fizzell '46 entered McKendree College 
in the fall of 1 938; due to his service in World War II, he 
did not graduate until September 1946. A music major 
with a .specialty in voice, he was in the chorus and was 
also becoming familiar with instrumental music. 

He was drafted into the Army Air Corps at Scott 
Field, Illinois, in July 1942. After basic training, he 
joined the 1 1th Heavy Bombardment Group (B-24) of 
the 7th AAF at Hickam Field, Hawaii. As a communi- 
cations corporal, he handled the IFF signals. In addi- 
tion to his communication duties, he was the director of 
the unit's band and orchestra. 

His unit was in the central Pacific campaign un- 
der the overall command of Admiral Nimitz throughout 
the entire time they were in combat. The Uth Group 
was awarded four Campaign Stars. 

Fizzell's most notable non-combat experience oc- 
curred on his way back home, on board a bomber headed 
for Clark Field in the Philippines: the bomb doors would 
not close, and they were in a heavy storm most of the 
way. After landing, he was soon aboard the Dutch liner 
Japara, and running through a formidable typhoon. 

He was discharged at Fort Logan, Colorado, Oc- 
tober 31, 1945. 

Junealda Frey (Jackson) '34 was enrolled in 
McKendree College in September 1 930 and in the sum- 
mer session of 1 93 1 . She then entered the fine arts cur- 



riculum for five years, where she studied voice under 
Pauline Harper, became a member of the Glee Club, 
sang first soprano in the quartet, and performed as a 
soloist. During her freshman year, she was active in 
dramatics, notably as "Yum Yum" in "The Mikado,' and 
played the lead with Jack Pfeffer in "Martha" - training 
that proved invaluable during the latter part of her mili- 
tary career. 

She enlisted in the Women's Reserve Unit of the 
U.S. Marine Corps^t St. Louis, Missouri, on June 9, 
1943. After four weeks of basic training at Camp 
Lejuene, New River, North Carolina, she spent 10 weeks 
at NAS Atlanta, Georgia, for training as a Link Trainer 
Ground School Instructor of Navigation and Instrument 
Flying. She was then assigned to Marine Corps Air Sta- 
tion, Mojave, California; C Company 13th Battalion, 
where she was a ground school instructor to Fleet Ma- 
rine Air Squadrons. 

When Celestial Navigation was added to the cur- 
riculum in April 1945, Frey was sent to NAS San Diego, 
California, for the six-week course. She then returned to 
her home base in Mojave, where she was able to use much 
of the fine arts training she had received at McKendree 
College. She sang in the chapel choir, with an occasional 
solo, and was called on for weddings and recitals that be- 
came more frequent as the war neared its end. 

She was honorably discharged from MCAS at El 
Toro, California, on October 25, 1945, as a Corp. FWA 
Avn (Fixed Wing Aviation corporal). 

Frey is a life member of the Women Marines As- 
sociation and a charter member of "Women in Military 
Service for America Memorial Foundation, Inc." in 
Washington, D.C. (the memorial is to be at the gate of 
Arlington Cemetery). She stated, "The years at 
McKendree and years as a Marine were periods of un- 
forgettable pleasures and pride." 

George W. Handlon '40 was always a competitor; 
he won his honors on the Hypes football field during his 
years at McKendree College. He entered the Army in De- 
cember 1943, in Chicago, Illinois, and served until April 
1946, when he was discharged in St. Louis, Missouri. 

His service in the ETO in D Company 20th TK 
Battalion of the 20th Armored Division was anything 
but rear echelon - he was a gunner on an M-24 (light 
tank) and mostly ran reconnaissance. George was cer- 
tainly "in harm's way": His unit was attached at various 
times to the 9th, I st, 7th, and 3rd Armies. This was nor- 
mal, as armored units were invaluable to the fighting 
effort. He was at Salzburg, Austria, when Germany sur- 
rendered. 



Handlon and his unit were returned to the states 
early, as they were scheduled to play a major role in the 
attack on Japan. But, as Handlon said, "President 
Truman dropped the atom bomb - praise the Lord and 
thanks." 

As a combat sergeant, Handlon trained and led men 
during most of his career. Without combat sergeants, no 
army would be very effective. 

When he arrived at Camp Shanks, New York, he 
had what he termed his most outstanding non-combat 
experience: They were served "steak, real potatoes, and 
ice cream; after 10-1 rations, this was unbelievable." 

Handlon lists one award, the Presidential Unit Ci- 
tation, presented in Munich, Germany. 

John A. Harmon '40 was a leader on the 
McKendree College campus, as evidenced by his four 
years in sports. He was elected captain of the 1939 foot- 
ball team and the 1940 track team. At East St. Louis, 
Illinois, on May 22, 1 942, he enlisted in the Army, where 
he continued to display his leadership abilities. 

After basic training at Camp Wallace, Texas, in 
the summer of 1942, Harmon transferred to the Army 
Air Corps. He completed his training as a navigator in 
August 1943, and joined a squadron of the 445th Bomb 
Group. After training, he flew to the ETO in England 
via the southern route in November and December 1 943. 

Harmon was assigned as navigator in the B-24 
heavy bombers that were in the 3d Division of the 8th 
AF and flew 29 bombing missions over Europe, mainly 
Germany. His squadron was directly involved in the air 
offensive in Europe and in the Normandy Campaign. 
He returned home in August 1944, after logging 230 
combat hours in eight months over enemy territory. 

He taught in the navigation school in Selman, Loui- 
siana, in the winter of 1944 and the spring of 1945. He 
was transferred to the Air Corps base at Walla Walla, 
Washington, and became an Information/Education of- 
ficer MOS 5004. He worked in the USAFI program to 
help military personnel receive their high school degrees 
until November 7, 1 945, when he was discharged at Scott 
Field, Illinois. 

Harmon was awarded the Air Medal with three 
Oak Leaf Clusters and the Distinguished Flying Cross 
for his participation in the air operations while with the 
8th Air Force. 

Dale E. Hortin '39 was sworn into the Army at 
Chicago, Illinois, on September 29, 1942, three years 
after graduating from McKendree College and entering 
the work force. 



MC KENDREE ~gL 



After basic training, he received additional ad- 
vanced training in an artillery unit. He was assigned to 
an administrative position (MOS 502) in Headquarters 
Battery 210th F.A. Battalion of the 33rd Infantry Divi- 
sion (Illinois), with which he spent time in many of the 
garden spots of the South Pacific. 

On board a Matson lu.xury liner, the Monterey, he 
and some 5,000 members of the 33rd Division landed 
in the Finschafen area in May 1944. The monsoon was 
almost overwhelming as the men disembarked, and as 
they formed ranks ashore, they were standing in mud 
halfway to their knees. Fortunately, Hortin missed all 
the misery; he had to stay on board until all the required 
paper work was completed. However, when he got 
ashore, he found his cot set up in a tent, deep in mud. 
He was intrigued by the use of peroxide by the natives 
of Finschafen to bleach streaks in their hair. 

His unit was involved in several landings, includ- 
ing the one on Morotai Island in late September 1944. 
On Morotai, a Catholic chaplain regularly conducted 
Protestant services. Hortin was also involved in the Phil- 
ippine Operations and spent a 30-day tour of duty in the 
Army of Occupation of Japan before returning to CO- 
NUS on December 21, 1945. 

Hortin was awarded the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign 
Medal with two Bronze Stars, the Philippine Liberation 
Ribbon with one Bronze Service Star, the Philippine 
Presidential Unit Citation, and four Overseas Bars. 

Sergeant Hortin left the military service at 
Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, on December 21, 1945. 

Roy Jaeckel '39 constantly displayed his leader- 
ship qualities on the McKendree College campus, par- 
ticularly on the basketball court. He entered the Navy 
in August 1942, at Atlanta, Georgia. 

He attended midshipman school at Notre Dame 
University, South Bend, Indiana. His duty in the Navy 
took place on the Pacific Ocean, where he was a gun- 
nery officer aboard the USS Alabama, which carried 20 
five-inch 38 caliber guns in 1 closed mounts. The ship 
was a part of the 7th Fleet for a short time during the 
landings at Hollandia in New Guinea in April 1 944, but 
was with the 5th Fleet for most of the Pacific Opera- 
tions. The ship was awarded nine Battle Stars on the 
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, as well as being cred- 
ited with shooting down 22 enemy aircraft. It was also 
involved in 10 bombardments of Japanese strongholds. 
Jaeckel and his ship were present at the peace treaty 
signing in Tokyo Bay. 

Lieutenant Commander Jaeckel was discharged 
October 1948, at Jacksonville, Florida. 



Robert F. Kurrus '33 was a star guard on the foot- 
ball team who helped McKendree College to a valued 
win over Washington University and a tie for the cham- 
pionship of the "Little Nineteen" with Illinois Wesleyan 
University in the 1932 season. 

He entered the Army Air Corps in 1940, expect- 
ing one year of training but, like many older draftees, 
was discharged four months later. He was then recalled 
on December 17, 1941 just 10 days after Pearl Harbor, 
and served for the duration. 

Kurrus attended OCS after basic training, became 
a second lieutenant, and served in the Armed Forces 
training program until November 1942. He was sent 
overseas to the ETO as the Commanding officer of 
the 45th Reclamation & Repair Squadron of the 9th 
Air Force, a service squadron that reclaimed and re- 
paired damaged aircraft. The speed and excellence of 
their work was a vital part of the success of the 9th Air 
Force. At the end of the war in Europe he was the com- 
manding officer of maintenance for the entire 9th Air 
Force. 

Kurrus" last base was in Berlin, at Templehof Air- 
port. After six months of occupation duty, he was ro- 
tated to CONUS and discharged in February 1946. 

Carrol C. Lowe '42 demonstrated his leadership 
abilities for four years on the McKendree College cam- 
pus, culminating in his election as president of the stu- 
dent body. These abilities were carried forward into 
World War II. 

Lowe entered the Navy in July 1942 at St. Louis, 
Missouri. He served first on the destroyer USS 
Brownson, which operated in the North and South At- 
lantic Oceans, the North Pacific (Aleutian Islands), and 
in the South Pacific. His ship carried out attacks on sub- 
marines during convoy duty to Africa and the ETO 
and was engaged in the Attu-Kiska Campaign. On 
December 26, 1943, while supporting the landings 
of the 1st and 7th Marine Divisions in the Arawe- 
Gloucester areas, the Brownson was sunk by dive bomb- 
ers off the coast of New Britain in the Southwest Pa- 
cific area. 

After recovery, Lowe was assigned duty on a sub- 
marine chaser during 1945 and performed anti-subma- 
rine warfare duties from the Panama Canal north along 
the eastern coast of the United States. 

Some of his outstanding non-combat experiences 
included the celebrations following the announcements 
of the end of the war in Europe and in the Pacific (the 
ships coming into the harbor with horns blowing and 
men waving); working with Pee Wee Reese in San Fran- 



MC KENDRE E~ 



Cisco, California; meetings with Bob Feller in Norfolk, 
Virginia; seeing Gibralter and the Golden Gate Bridge; 
and visiting with families whose homes overlooked Pearl 
Harbor in Hawaii. 

Chaplains were available in most areas, but his 
greatest chaplain support came via mail from his father. 
Chaplain Cecil Lowe, who was stationed in Europe. 

Lowe received various awards and honors for his 
participation in two particular combat operations: New 
Britain, and the Kiska-Attu Aleutian Campaign. He is 
also entitled to the American Theater of Operations 
Ribbon. 

Lieutenant (jg) Lowe was discharged December 
7, 1945, in Chicago, Illinois, exactly four years after 
the attack on Pearl Harbor. 

Earl Cranston Lowry '28 attended McKendree 
College for only one year, but reiterated many times the 
worth of that year, claiming that while at McKendree 
he "learned the value of tact, truth, character, and true 
accomplishment." 

He attended the University of Chattanooga, and 
received a B. S. degree in 1927. He entered the military 
service in 1929 but was allowed to continue his educa- 
tion; he received a medical degree from Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity in 1933. 

Shortly after graduation, Lowry was placed on 
active duty in the medical branch of the U.S. Army. 
From his entry rank of first lieutenant in 1933, he ad- 
vanced to colonel in 1944. He served as Chief of Sur- 
gery at Lawson General Hospital in Atlanta from 1940 
until 1943. His ETO assignment found him in com- 
mand of the 1 95th General Hospital at Mourmolon le 
Grande, France, in 1945. 

Lowry supervised and assisted in the daily admit- 
tance of wounded - directly and from combat medical 
units. He was responsible for the routine medical care 
of U. S. soldiers and the POWs. He saw to the transfer 
of the wounded to U.S. hospitals (CONUS) for more 
complete long-term care; he wrote to the families of 
wounded patients; and he notified the families of the 
deceased. Even a fractured right wrist did not result in 
a loss of duty. 

Lowry was the doctor for four presidents: Hoover, 
Roosevelt, Truman, and Eisenhower. He made 84 trips 
to attend Roosevelt and was with General Patton the 
last nine days of Patton's life, performing surgery on 
and caring for him following his terrible accident. This 
marked an outstanding, but sad, event of Lowry's tour. 

Colonel Lowry praised the work of the chaplains 
as an essential part of the team in the care of the sick 



and wounded. The chaplains kept the patients in com- 
munication with their loved ones. 

Different posts and positions to which Colonel 
Lowry was assigned from 1940 to 1945 included: Chief 
of Surgery at Lawson General Hospital in Atlanta, Geor- 
gia, from 1940 until 1943; Chief of the Professional 
Services Division; and Chief Consultant in Surgery for 
the U. S. Forces in the European Theater from 1945 to 
1946. He was awarded 10 medals: European Theatre 
and U.S.A. World War II. 

Lowry was the first director of the medical de- 
partment now called Champus and is the author of the 
word "Medicare," for which the President awarded him 
the Legion of Merit. He is a Fellow of the American 
College of Surgeons; a member of the Royal Society of 
Medicine in London; and a member of the Pan-Ameri- 
can Medical Society. 

Charles J. Mueth '42 entered McKendree Col- 
lege in September, 1938. He was a fine athlete, excel- 
ling in basketball and track. His leadership was equal to 
his skill, and definitely carried over into his career in 
the Armed Forces. He entered the service at Camp Grant, 
Illinois, on September 21, 1941. 

Mueth became a Heavy Bomber Pilot in the Army 
Air Corps. While in the CBI, he flew 55 combat mis- 
sions in a B-24, varying from high altitude night mis- 
sions to low level (300 feet) day missions (when he dropped 
mines in the Gulf of Siam near Bangkok). During the 
monsoon season his B-24 was converted to a tanker, and 
he hauled gas from India over the Hump to China. 

Mueth shared this tale of how he and a chaplain 
solved a very serious problem: 

On a mission over the Hump, we had on 
board a Catholic priest by the name of 
O'Reilly. We took off from India, climbed 
to 29,000 feet, leveled off, and settled back 
for a long boring flight to Chungking, 
China. We were in the soup and the weather 
was deteriorating; we were experiencing 
strong and gusty winds, and rain was beat- 
ing on us something fierce. About that time, 
I experienced a vibration of the control col- 
umn which steadily got worse. I had the tail- 
gunner check, and he informed me that the 
trim tab on the rudder had broken loose and 
was flapping in the wind. I slowed the air- 
craft and this seemed to help a little. The vi- 
bration still continued and it felt as if the tail 
section was going to drop off. 




Wfe were told there was no need to bail out 
over the Hump because even if you sur\'ived 
the landing, the dense underbrush made sur- 
vival almost impossible. I informed the crew 
of the problem and the possible conse- 
quences; I told them I was going to remain 
with the aircraft. I turned around to Father 
O'Reilly, who was sitting behind me in the 
jump seat, and saw him praying his rosary. 
I assured him that with his help we would 
make it to our destination. Finally, we were 
out of the weather and started a gradual let- 
down to Kunming, where we landed safely. 
After the landing, I turned to Father O 'Reilly 
and said, "Fm sure glad you and HE were 
flying with us today." He replied, "Fmglad 
we were, too. " 

This account from a St. Louis newspaper clearly 
emphasizes the very real and present danger encoun- 
tered in the skies over India: 

How Lt. Charles J. Mueth of Mascoutah, Il- 
linois, pilot of a Liberator Bomber, nursed 
his sputtering engines after all four had failed 
once, and then gave out a second time over 
enemy territory in Burma, to land safely at 
base, was told in a delayed dispatch yester- 
day from Tenth Air Force Headquarters in 
India. Related also was the manner in which 
crew members prepared themselves with 
equipment, with all the comforts of home, as 
they prepared to follow orders and bail out 
in enemy territory. 

With all men at their stations as they swung 
over Japanese lines in the mountains and 
jungles of Burma on what had been consid- 
ered a routine mission, without warning and 
in typical monsoon weather, the heavily- 
loaded plane began to shake violently. The 
navigator looked out and began speaking 
over the inter-phone. His report: "Naviga- 
tor to pilot. Number 3 engine is smoking, 
number 4 is losing oil rapidly, number 2 is 
on fire, and number 1 is also acting up. " 

It was a billion-to-one series of engine mis- 
haps that had never occurred before in their 
mentenance [sic]-wise command. Mueth 
punched the alarm bell instantly. The turret 



gunner came to help the pilots and the 
radioman began reporting position and dif- 
ficult}' to the base. The others began helping 
each other into their chutes. Then came 
Mueth's voice over the inter-phone: "When 
I ring the bell again, bail out. Don 't wait for 
any other signal - Fm going to be busy. " 

Mueth feathered the prop on number 2 en- 
gine and got the fire out; got number 3 to 
stop smoking; number 4 still lost oil but 
droned along; number 1 got over its tantrum. 
Things looked better for a while, and the 
plane headed for home. Some time later the 
ship begem to vibrate again. Number 4 was 
going bad and Mueth was forced to feather 
its prop. With only two engines and still over 
the jungle, the outlook was bad, but they were 
still flying. "With consummate skill, Mueth 
nursed the crippled plane in to a perfect land- 
ing, " said his co-pilot, telling how the crew 
surrounded him with congratulations. 

Mueth asked the bombardier, whose pockets 
were bulging, to unload. "I want to see what 
you put in when you thought you had to 
jump. " And out came chocolate bars, K ra- 
tions, toothbrush and paste, dental floss, 
flashlight, towel, a pocket-size magazine, 
soap, a deck of cards, pocket knife, handker- 
chiefs, first-aid kit, and sunglasses. In addi- 
tion, draped in various places on his person, 
were his automatic pistol, canteen, binocu- 
lars, and a cartridge pouch. "They're just a 
few of the things I thought I'd need, " said 
the bombardier, "that jungle looked mighty 
tough. " 

With all of that, Mueth reported he was on a cham- 
pionship basketball squad in Calcutta, India; how he 
found the time is hard to imagine. He loved the game, 
and it was a way to relax. [It must have been between 
take-offs and landings.] 

Mueth was awarded the Silver Star, the Distin- 
guished Flying Cross with two Clusters, the Air Medal 
with two Clusters, Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters for nu- 
merous missions, and a Citation for Meritorious Ser- 
vice. 

At the end of World War II, Mueth remained with 
the Active Reserves and finally retired in 1974 as a 
colonel. 



MC KENDREE" 



Robert O'Brien '43 entered McKendree College 
from Breese, Illinois, in September 1939. The only trom- 
bone player in the small, enthusiastic, and very loud, 
band, he claimed he "sounded like a trumpet with a bad 
cold." He has many fond memories of this band; it was 
an experience that stood him in good stead for the rest 
of his military and working career. 

After an interview in St. Louis, Missouri, where 
he applied for admission to the Navy, he was sent to 
Washington, D.C., for a performance audition to deter- 
mine if he would be accepted into their music school. 
He was accepted, swom-in, and sent to Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia, for basic training. He then attended the Navy School 
of Music, at the Navy Yard in Anacostia, Maryland. On 
November 16, 1943, upon completing his studies, he be- 
came a member of Band 41 and was assigned to replace 
the band on the repair ship USS Dixie, which serviced the 
ships throughout the South Pacific. He was sent to San 
Francisco, California, to await transportation to his ship. 

On December 20, 1 943, he departed on the Dutch 
transport HMS Bloemfontein for Espirito Santos, New 
Hebrides Island, arriving on January 4, 1 944. On March 
1 he was made a musician second class, his last promo- 
tion in the Navy. 

O'Brien's band, in addition to providing entertain- 
ment, labored on various work parties. The Dixie Band 
gave concerts and performed at dances; it played at base 
hospitals, before movies, for professional entertainers 
who visited the ship, and for all official functions - 
commissionings, funerals, etc. The band received many 
commendations for its production and presentation of 
Asiatic Antics throughout the South Pacific. 

On March 27, 1944, the ship left the New Hebrides 
and sailed for Guadalcanal, then to Hawthorne Sound 
in the New Georgia Islands, where they played over the 
Munda Radio Station, and visited Kolombangara Island. 
The USS Dixie took O'Brien to every Navy base in the 
Pacific before the war ended and they headed for CO- 
NUS. He returned to Seattle, Washington, via Portland, 
Oregon, and was discharged on April 30, 1946. 

O'Brien was unsure about honors or awards, but 
it is very likely that he received the Good Conduct Medal 
and the Philippine Liberation Ribbon. 

Some 40 years later, in 1 986, he was made Emeri- 
tus Director of Bands and an emeritus faculty member 
at the University of Notre Dame. 

John Oppitz '38 was an intellectual leader on 
the McKendree College campus. As president of Pi 
Kappa Delta (national honorary forensics fraternity), 
he led by example, and 1 937- 1 938 was a banner year 



for the group. He entered the Army Air Corps in 1 943, 
and graduated in December from the navigation 
school at Selman Field, Monroe, Louisiana, as a sec- 
ond lieutenant. 

Oppitz was transferred to North Africa in April 
1943, then ordered to the ETO in January 1944, where 
he was assigned to a bomber squadron in England. As 
navigator on the lead plane, he completed 30 bombing 
missions over Germany. 

He was next assigned to Ellington Field, Texas, as 
associate editor of the monthly magazine. Log of Navi- 
gation. His article "Happy Warrior" appeared in the 
August 1945 issue. 

He received the Air Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, 
and the Distinguished Flying Cross. The DEC citation 
reads in part, "For extraordinary achievement while serv- 
ing as navigator on many high altitude heavy bombard- 
ment missions against the enemy over continental Eu- 
rope, during a period ending September 1 9, 1 944. Lieu- 
tenant Oppitz, expertly navigating his aircraft, has con- 
tributed materially to the successful destruction of 
targets highly important to the enemy's war effort. 
The skill, energy, and resourcefulness displayed by Lieu- 
tenant Oppitz on all these occasions reflect the highest 
credit upon himself and the United States Military 
Forces." 

Milton Sager '40 had many interests at 
McKendree College. He was very active in athletics, 
science, drama, and singing. Yet, in spite of a busy sched- 
ule, all his endeavors were done in a superlative man- 
ner. His service in the Army began on June 17, 1941 at 
Fort Sheridan, Illinois. 

After basic and advanced training, he was selected 
for OCS at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Lieutenant Sager be- 
came the Battalion Communications officer of the 16th 
Armored Field Artillery Battalion in the 94th Armored 
Division. Along with some 1 5,000 other troops, he went 
to Europe aboard the Queen Man'. He arrived in the 
ETO in July 1944, and with his parent unit, moved 
across France, generally with the 3rd Army under 
Patton. During the relief of Bastogne at the Battle of 
the Bulge, the 9th AD was on the left flank of the 4th 
AD. On March 7, 1945, Combat Command B, led by 
Brigadier General Hoge, was notified that the Ludendorf 
Bridge at Remagan was still standing. This notification 
was sent by the first military person on the ground to 
know that the bridge still stood, Lt. Milton Sager, who 
was in constant communication with his aerial ob- 
server. The news was immediately relayed to higher 
headquarters, and quick action by CCB resulted in 



^^s:^::^^ 



'^^^^^^^S^S^MC KENDREE^^^ 



their seizing control of the bridge. Sgt. Alex Drabik was 
the first American fighting man to step on to the right 
bank of the Rhine; behind him came Combat Engineer 
Lt. Hugh B. Mott and his squad. By March 17, 1945, 
four U.S. divisions had crossed into Germany over the 
captured bridge. 

Sager ended his combat tour May 1 , 1 945, when 
the link-up with the USSR troops took place at the 
Elbe River. He had the honor of being the first sol- 
dier admitted to Switzerland as a tourist in August 
1945. 

He reported very positive experiences with the 
chaplains, who located and informed him of the birth of 
his daughter, Carol, in January 1944. 

The only award or honor he reported was the 
Bronze Star Medal for his role in the capture of the bridge 
at Remagan. 

Lt. Milton Sager was released from the Army De- 
cember 21, 1945. He registered in the graduate school 
at Wisconsin University in January 1946. 

Curtis E. Taylor '42 was a farm boy from the 
small village of Burnt Prairie, Illinois. At Crossville High 
School, he had played ball for a former McKendrean, 
Bill Sanders '36. Although Taylor attended McKendree 
College for only one year, he was well remembered 
for his vitality and drive in all sports. He entered the 
Army October 17, 1941, and was discharged in Febru- 
ary 1946. 

Taylor was an Infantryman and went through all 
the basic and advanced training. He was assigned to the 
North African Theater and later to the Italian Theater. 
He served with E, F, and G Companies in the 350th 
Infantry of the 88th Division. 

He was an Infantry Platoon Leader and Company 
Commander throughout the campaign in Italy. He par- 
ticipated in the bloody battles at the Amo River cross- 
ing and the drive through Cassino on May 11,1 944, when 
he was wounded. After his surgery and release from the 
hospital, he received a 10-day R&R in the Naples area, 
a welcome surprise after his many weeks in close com- 
bat and the ensuing potential for battle fatigue. He re- 
joined his unit on July 4. 

He was again wounded in the attack on the Gothic 
Line just south of Bologna in October 1944. More seri- 
ous and prolonged care was needed for his recovery, so 
he was medically shipped to CONUS in December 
1944; he had several surgical procedures to remove 
shrapnel from his back. 

Captain Taylor earned the Purple Heart with Clus- 
ters, the Bronze Star, and the Silver Star. 



Royce C. Timnions '43 entered McKendree Col- 
lege from Granite City, Illinois, in September 1939. 
From football on McKendree's Hypes Field (and his 
ever-ready motorcycle), he had developed the fighting 
spirit that held him in good stead as he went from col- 
lege into the air over the Southwest Pacific Theater He 
enlisted in the Armed Forces December 1 2, 1 94 1 , in St. 
Louis, Missouri. 

Timmons served in the Navy Air Corps in the 
Southwest Pacific Theater as a pilot in the VB-1 02 from 
March to November of 1943. He flew patrol (PB4Y-1) 
aircraft based on Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, flying 
10 to 12 hour patrols every two to three days. 

He reported that on July 20, 1943, they attacked 
and strafed eight enemy supply boats, leaving three on 
fire and li.sting. On August 3, he reported tracking eight 
enemy destroyers off Buka Straits and being attacked 
by 14 Zero Fighters; three were shot down, with two 
probables. He reported that on August 6, they attacked 
and shot down an enemy patrol plane - a Betty. He 
stated, "One of our four engines was shot out, but we 
were able to return to base on the others." He further 
reported that on September 14, they attacked Kehili Air 
Field on Bouganville; and that on November 4, they 
strafed and destroyed eight planes on the airfield at 
Kapingamaringa Atoll south of Truk Island. 

He is still in awe of the sight that greeted him in 
Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1942, one year after the 
Japanese attack: the battleship USS Oklahoma was cap- 
sized, the USS Arizona sunk, and the USS West Vir- 
ginia in dry dock undergoing repairs. Because he had 
not as yet seen combat, he found it difficult to visualize 
what had happened to these ships and their crews. 

Upon his return to the states in January 1944, 
Timmons spent time in San Diego, California, and Nor- 
folk, Virginia. He was at Lambert Field, St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, when the war ended. He remained in the service 
until he retired with the rank of commander. 

Lieutenant Timmons reported that he received five 
Air Medals, the Distinguished Flying Cross, and a Na- 
val Reserve Medal. 

Arthur Werle '50 spent the McKendree College 
school year 1940-1941 studying chemistry and having 
the best college year of his life. He met his true love, 
Peg (who is still by his side), in the 1940 Homecom- 
ing play, "The Saturday Night Ghost." They were 
featured in the school "Owl" (gossip) columns at least 
four times. In his second year, he encountered finan- 
cial problems and started working full time in St. Louis, 
Missouri. 



<::s^yc^;^^?:^^^^^frMC KENDREE"^y 



He was inducted into the Army in July 1942. Af- 
ter basic training, he attended Engineer Officer Candi- 
date School from November 1942 until February 1943 
and was commissioned a second lieutenant. He was as- 
signed to the 152d Engineer Battalion from April 1943 
until August 1945. 

In the Central Pacific, Werle was in the shore party 
during the invasion of Makin Island in the Gilbert Is- 
land Campaign. He was also in the shore party during 
the invasion of Saipan in the Marianna Island Campaign; 
his battalion unloaded 90 percent of supplies in the first 
three weeks of the invasion. The battalion was then con- 
verted to Special Services Engineers and his job was to 
build a quonset hut hospital on Saipan. 

From April to August 1945, he was in the shore 
party for the 89th Infantry Division during the invasion 
of Okinawa, constructing ammunition dump bunkers. 

He sustained an eye injury in Okinawa July 31, 
1945, and was in the hospital until February 1946 with 
embedded glass in the lower eyelid. Fortunately, an oph- 
thalmologist was on the staff and an iridectomy was 
performed in an Army Field Hospital tent. 

Werle reported a rather strange and funny thing 
that happened on his first trip overseas. About 375 en- 
listed men, and 375 second lieutenants who were to be 
replacements, left San Francisco aboard a very small 
ship, the Ernest J. Mines. Everyone, crew and passen- 
gers, became seasick, because the water evaporator had 
sprung an oil leak, causing all food and water to taste of 
oil. The third day out, the transportation officer in charge 
of the troops put out the following order in the ship's 
communications: "By order of Major Erwin E. 
Farrington, all seasickness will cease as of today; the 
pallid look, the hand-to-mouth dash to the rail will not 
be tolerated by the ship's company." Immediately be- 
low, in capital letters: "OBSERVE CONVOY REGU- 
LATIONS — NOTHING TO BE THROWN OVER- 
BOARD." 

Werle was separated from the Army Corps of En- 
gineers as a first lieutenant at Camp Campbell, Ken- 
tucky, December 1946. 

Charles O. Williams '40 was a leader in many 
areas, including science. In his senior year at McKendree 
College, he became the president of Sigma Zeta, the 
honorary fraternity for the recognition of scholarship in 
science and mathematics. 

In January 1942, he was employed by the U.S. 
Navy as a civilian working on a program to protect mili- 
tary and commercial shipping from German magnetic 
mines. Prior to our entry into Worid War II, the Ger- 



mans were sinking vast amounts of shipping in Euro- 
pean waters and then quickly spread that threat to our 
Atlantic Coast, which was soon littered with wrecked 
ships. 

Ships, being made of metal and subjected to the 
continual pounding of the waves, eventually functioned 
as giant magnets, sunrounded by their own magnetic fields. 
The Germans anchored mines, which were set to be deto- 
nated by these magnetic fields, to the sea floor in areas 
frequented by Allied shipping. The only answer to this 
problem was to reduce or eliminate the magnetic fields, 
and because the unit of measure of the magnetic field was 
the gauss, the unit to which Williams was assigned was 
called "The Degaussing Unit." 

He was trained in Washington, D.C., and the sub- 
marine base in New London, Connecticut, then trans- 
ferred to the Panama Canal Zone, where he was soon 
commissioned as an Ensign USNR, doing the same 
work. 

There were two methods used in protecting ship- 
ping from magnetic mines: "deperming" (breaking up 
the magnetic field) and "signature" (controlling the 
magnetic field). Deperming broke up the ship's mag- 
netic field by wrapping large electric cables around the 
ship (similar to wrapping a string around your finger), 
and then hitting the ship with a very powerful electric 
charge - 10,000 to 15,000 amps - using barge loads of 
submarine batteries as the power source. However, de- 
perming was temporary, since wave action would even- 
tually return the ship to its original condition. Signa- 
ture was accomplished by surrounding the ship from 
bow to stem, plus inter-connecting, with heavy elec- 
tric cables (500,000 circular mils), and then pushing 
varying amounts of electrical energy through these 
cables. Once the proper current was determined, the 
crews were instructed on how to maintain it for their 
protection. 

Early on, the U.S. was woefully unprepared, both 
in trained personnel and materials of war. Williams was 
in charge of a group of deep-sea divers and their sup- 
porting personnel, who were installing a field of 
magnotometers in about 90 feet of water, when one of 
our light cruisers was torpedoed off Aruba, then beached 
to save her from sinking. The U.S. was so short of naval 
vessels that the deep-sea divers were pulled off the job 
and flown to Aruba to repair the damaged ship, which 
meant halting the critical project at a time it was really 
needed. 

Williams volunteered to learn diving and was given 
fewer than 24 hours of training, but it enabled them to 
immediately resume and complete the project. 



Sixn-Eiglu 



MC KENDREE 



As an "unofficial diver" (because he never at- 
tended diver training school), he was called upon to do 
various other underwater tasks not associated with de- 
gaussing, although this work was never entered into the 
official records. 

During his diving experiences and subsequent as- 
signments, he was injured and lost the vision in his left 
eye. While in the ho.spitai in the Panama Canal Zone, 
he met Eleanor Roosevelt; although he could not see 
her, she held his hand while they talked. On May 1, 
1946, after 18 months of hospitalization, he retired with 
a physical disability incurred in the line of duty. 

Williams stated: "My efforts during the war were 
so insignificant in view of those thousands who either 
lost their lives or limbs, I have been reluctant to even 
mention it." However, as a result of the degaussing 
project, thousands of lives were saved, and millions of 
tons of supplies reached their destinations. They fired 
no guns, but the officers and men responsible for de- 
feating the German magnetic mine threat assured the 
success of the Allies' operations in Europe. 



Chaplains 

Even though McKendree is a small Methodist- 
based college, it has always had vigorous men leaving 
the school with a determination to spread the Word and 
to lend support to their fellow man. Prior to and during 
World War II, some of these ministers recognized a need 
for their profession in the Armed Forces. According to 
available records, there were 19 McKendree College 
graduates who were chaplains on active duty in all 
branches of the services, and in all comers of the world. 

How much "good" did the chaplains do in this war? 
In such situations, it is difficult, if not impossible, to 
measure success. Many a teacher has wondered, "How 
do I know if I accomplished anything worthwhile?" 
However, as many a combat veteran has been heard to 
echo, "There are no atheists in foxholes." Col. Earl C. 
Lowry, prominent McKendrean who was commander 
of the 195th General Hospital in Europe, said, "The 
chaplains were an essential part in the team taking care 
of the sick and wounded in communicating with fami- 
lies of the patients. Their contribution was notable." 

Robert O'Brien was lavish in his praise of the mili- 
tary chaplains. "My experiences with our chaplains 
were always positive. I found them to be helpful and 
encouraging; the religious support we received was 
always important to us. Reverend Cook was our chap- 
lain on the USS Dixie. His services were non-denomi- 



national and inter-denominational; everyone attended. 
His sermons were inspirational and did much to keep 
our spirits and morale high on our world, which was the 
USS Dixie." He also admired the missionaries he met 
throughout the South Pacific, in the Philippines, and in 
China. He stated, "I have very fond memories of the 
work of these good people, men and women, who ran 
and maintained their churches, missions, schools, and 
orphanages in Shanghai in spite of the war and the Japa- 
nese occupation." 

Following are the McKendreans who served as 
chaplains. Complete information about each is found 
in the listing of McKendreans who served in World 
War II. 

* Lloyd Barnard '40 

Col. Whitmore Beardsley '31 
Capt. William Bennett '35 

* Harold Brown '37 
Capt. Paul Carson * 
Capt. Thomas H. Clare '30 

* William Collins '39 
Col. James Connett '42 
Capt. Everette Hayden '40 
Capt. Gail Hines '31 
Maj. Arthur Hoppe '30 
Maj. Paul Hortin '28 

* Gaylon Howe '34 

* Delbert Lacquement '28 
Capt. Cecil C. Lowe '40 

* Emile Mignery '35 
Lt. Walter Pruett '38 
Capt. Harold Slaten '26 

* Harold Whitlock '35 



Faculty 

Faculty members at McKendree College re- 
sponded to America's call for help. Although informa- 
tion about their participation was sparse, their record in 
World War II is a source of pride for the school. 

Following are the McKendree faculty members 
who served during the war. Complete information about 
each is found in the listing of McKendreans who served 
in Worid War II. 

Capt. Arthur Doolen (Faculty) '34 
Lt. Cdr. A. K. Henderson (Faculty) '41 
CSp Lewis Scholl (Faculty) '41 
Lt. Harold E. Wallace (Faculty) '41 



MC KENDREE 



Medics 



Records from ancient wars reveal that there has 
always been some form of assistance for the sick and 
wounded. Although often inadequate, it did offer some 
help to those in need. America in World War II devel- 
oped a system of medical support that was outstanding. 

A good example is the statistic that came out of 
the campaign for New Guinea in what was called a 
"green hell" of a jungle in one of the worst climates in 
the world: some areas in New Guinea receive as much 
as 240 inches of rain in a year (20 feet). 

From the landings in the Arawe-Gloucester areas 
on December 26, 1943, to some 1500 miles east and 
nine landings later, at Sansapor July 20, 1944, the Ameri- 
can-Japanese casualty ratio was 1:15. Further, the death 
rate in American military hospitals was only 3 percent, 
while the Japanese rates ran as high as 45 percent, due to 
the appallingly unsanitary conditions of their facilities. 

Other theaters of operation experienced equally 
favorable statistics, and the U.S. military medical pro- 
fession has continued to grow, develop, and improve in 
all areas of medical care. 

McKendree College provided its share of military 
and government medical personnel: from public health in 
CONUS, dental surgeons, M.D.s, hospital administrators, 
to students attending medical school while in the service. 

Following are the McKendreans who served as 
medics. Complete information about each is found in the 
listing of McKendreans who served in World War 11. 

Maj. Clyde M. Berry '33 
* Fletcher Burge '46 
Lt. Herbert Fritz '40 
Capt. Robert N. Hamm '35 
Lt. Wallace Karstens '35 
Col. Earl C. Lowry '28 
Capt. Elmo T, McClay '31 
Maj. Harry Nesmith '34 
T4 Robert H. Peach '38 
Cdr. J. Rue Plater '26 
Capt. William Podesta '33 
Capt. William H. Poe '35 
Lt. Charles E. Pruett '33 
Capt. Clarence H. Walton '35 
Pfc. Robert Winning '45 



Musicians 



It would be difficult to imagine an event like World 
War II occurring without some musical participation 
from McKendreans - and, indeed, records revealed that 



five men had primary or secondary duty in bands while 
in the service. All of them had been exposed to excel- 
lent instructor (and peer) talent while in attendance at 
McKendree College. Antone Tepatti's fame as a musi- 
cian began in the dishwashing area of the Pearson Hall 
kitchen. From there it was but a short step to becoming 
a member of Al Johnpeter's "Swing Cats," which played 
their opening show in the dining area. The number 
sounded like the "Star-Spangled Banner," but Johnpeter 
swore it was "Mexicali Rose." 

Following are the McKendreans who served as 
musicians. Complete information about each is found in 
the listing of McKendreans who served in World War II. 

Cpl. John J. Fizzell '46 
MUS2c Robert O'Brien '43 
Pfc. Ralph Ritchey '31 
Sgt. Antone Tepatti '48 
Pvt. Harold Vernor '42 



Women 

Before World War II, women had mostly served 
as nurses or American Red Cross volunteers. However, 
Worid War II was different: More than 30,000 women 
volunteered to serve their country — to be placed in 
harm's way — in many different jobs that previously 
were not available to them. Five McKendree College 
women entered various branches of the Armed Forces 
in Worid War II. 

Following are the McKendree women who served 
in the war. Complete information about each is found 
in the listing of McKendreans who served in World 
War II. 

Cpl. Junealda Frey (Jackson) '34 
Sgt. Maxine Miller (Finley) '39 
Sgt. Frances Robinson (Bailey) '43 
T.5 Bernice Rongey (Douglas) '42 
SK2c Kathleen Weidler (Griswold) '44 



Friends 

When you are in a strange environment, far from 
home and your loved ones, an encounter with a friend 
can be a real pleasure to all concerned. Such a meeting 
was reported by James Oppitz. His account of the event 
follows: 



Seventy 



It was the day before Christmas in 1943. I 
was doing some routine record keeping in 
the personnel section of an 8th Air Force sta- 
tion in East Anglia. I ran across the name of 
Harry R. Ward, a bombardier assigned to the 
561st Bomb Squadron. On the chance that 
this could be a name from my past, I checked 
his Form 20 and found that Ward was from 
Granite City, Illinois, and that he had at- 
tended McKendree College — Roz Ward! 

Feeling pretty good about my discovery, but 
aware that it was too late in the day to do 
anything about it, I headed back to the bar- 
racks area. 1 encountered an officer and de- 
cided to salute; after all, it was close to 
Christmas. He smiled, saluted back, and said, 
"Good evening. " We each walked three or 
four paces, turned around, and identified 
each other by nicknames from our 
McKendree College days [ 'Schnapps ' and 
'Roz']. 



Harry had been therefor several months and 
was about halfway through his tour of duty. 
It is remarkable that we had not encountered 
each other previously. There were about 
3,000 men on our base and Harry would liave 
been processed through our office upon his 
arrival, but I guess that I simply missed him. 
At a point in the war when control of the skies 
over Western Europe was being hotly con- 
tested, Harry's crew managed to complete 
its tour of duty - 25 missions. I recall one 
mission on which their aircraft had sustained 
considerable damage and had to drop out of 
the formation. We initially reported them as 
missing but were relieved after several hours 
to learn that they had managed to limp back 
to England for an emergency landing at an- 
other air base. 

Needless to say, we never did catch up on all 
that needed to be said, but it was a nice 
Christmas present for both of us. 



y . ,^n.^- \ 




James Oppitz "Schnapps" {left ) and Harry Ward "Roz" reminisced about their days at McKendree during a 
chance meeting at an air base in England in 1943. 



MC KENDREE 



Ships Sunk at Sea 

Amoving target attracts the eye; ships without air 
cover in the Pacific, prior to the conquest of Iwo Jima 
and Okinawa, were definitely in harm's way. Available 
records revealed that two McKendreans, on two differ- 
ent ships, lived through the experience of a ship aban- 
doning them. One ship, the USS Brownson, was a fairly 
new destroyer — less than a year old; the other, was an 
escort aircraft carrier, the USS Bismarck Sea, age un- 
known. 

Ens. Carrol Lowe '44 reports on the low crew 
morale on the USS Brownson and of the bad luck that 
had followed the ship since she was commissioned 1 1 
months earlier. The Brownson was sailing on the north 
coast of New Guinea between Finschafen and Capes 
Arawe and Gloucester in New Britain. His report reads 
in part: 

With Marines and Army personnel on the 
nearby beach depending on us to take them 
home at the end of the battle; with our 
friends, the Army Air Corps, failing to ar- 
rive in time to help us; with the sun sink- 
ing rapidly in the heavens and with noplace 
to hide on a broad and serene ocean, we 
turned broadside and brought our anti-air- 
craft guns to bear Well, we flunked our first 
big test! Within a few minutes, Japanese dive 
bombers had sent our home below the sur- 
face, in two equal pieces. Within six minutes, 
the two tilted ends slid ignominiously to the 
depths below. I remember the sharks, but I 
was fortunate, for I had no oozing blood 
to attract them. My first thought was to get 
clear of the ship so as not to be sucked down 
with it; my second thought pertained to the 
planes which were expected to return and 
strafe us. I had seen the plane, which had 
apparently hit us, crash on our starboard 
bow. I remembered for a long time the 
goggled face of the pilot as he flew by and 
close [sic] overhead. I remember the bat- 
tered old four-stack destroyer which picked 
us up, and the wounded and dead stretched 
out on deck. I remember planes falling from 
the sky, and almost all appeared to be en- 
emy planes. The sky seemed to be full of 
the strange-looking P-38s, which were 
then the workhorses of the U.S Army Air 
Force. 



Lowe was shipped home, enjoyed survival leave, 
and finished the war on duty at sea. 

Ens. Earnest Smith '42 was the recognition officer 
aboard the USS Bismarck Sea; a ship attacked and sunk 
off Iwo Jima by the 3d Air Fleet, Tokyo, on February 
21, 1945, in what was the only Kamikaze attack during 
that operation. No record is available to chronicle 
Smith's rescue and return home. However, he appeared 
on campus some two months later, and then served un- 
til the war ended. 



Missing In Action 

On May 30, 1945, the McKendree Review stated 
that only six of the 330 men and women serving in the 
Armed Forces had been listed as missing in action, all 
of whom were later reported killed. 

Following are the McKendreans who were listed 
as Missing In Action. Complete information about each 
is found in the listing of McKendreans who served in 
World War II. 

Capt. Thomas H, Clare '30 
S. Sgt. Xon Connett '45 
Lt. George Edwards '42 
T. Sgt. Robert O. Finley '36 
1st. Lt. Walter Pimlott '40 
Sgt. Thomas Schwarzlose '46 
S. Sgt. Kenneth Stegall '45 



Prisoners of War 

Information is limited, but there are striking simi- 
larities among the four McKendreans who were prison- 
ers of war. All were members of the Army Air Corps 
when captured; all were in the ETO; two were in the 
same class at McKendree College and came from the 
same rural background. 

Following are the McKendreans who were listed 
as Prisoners of War. Complete information about each 
is found in the listing of McKendreans who served in 
WWII. 

* Edward Posage '41 
Sgt. Thomas Schwarzlose '46 
S. Sgt. Russell Ungerzagt '38 
Maj. Roger Zeller '38 



MC KENDREE ET 



Wounded In Action 

It is inevitable in war that there will be those who 
are wounded, missing in action, captured, or killed. 
Available records show that 13 McKendreans who 
served in World War II were wounded: nine in the ETO 
(two in France, five in Germany, two in Italy); and four 
in the Pacific (three in the Philippines, and one in 
Okinawa). While these 13 represent an extremely low 
percentage (.035 percent) of the total who served, it is 
probable that the number of wounded is much greater 
than this. Although these men knew they were in harm's 
way, they were steadfast in their duty. 

Following are the McKendreans who were listed 
as Wounded In Action. Complete information about each 
is found in the listing of McKendreans who served in 
World War II. 

Pvt. Merlin Anderson '35 
Lt. Kenneth Atkins '40 
* Marvin Barnes '30 
Lt. Col. Andrew Goodpaster '35 
Capt. Everette Hayden '40 
Lt. Arthur D. Hinson '47 
Capt. Gordon Huff '44 
Sgt. Charles Manwaring '46 
Pfc. Robert L. Osborn '46 
Pvt. Anial Pennell '42 
Pvt. William Plato '44 
Lt. Herbert E. Simons '42 
Capt. Curtis Taylor '42 



Killed In Service 

Those who give "the last full measure of devotion" 
and never return are those killed in service. These 
McKendreans gave their lives so that our nation might 
live; they range from the class of 1 932 to the class of 1 945. 

M. Sgt. Arthur Baum '42 
Capt. Thomas H. Clare '30 
S. Sgt. Xon Connett '45 
Ens. George E. Edwards '42 
T. Sgt. Robert O. Finley '36 
Lt. Daniel B. Martin '45 
1st Lt. Walter F. Pimlott '44 
*AIbert B. Rode '32 
S. Sgt. Kenneth Stegall '45 
*Thomas Jefferson Tippett '39 
Pfc. Donald E. Ward '41 



The Last Week of the War 

The week of August 6, 1 945 had been one of swift 
and sudden disaster to the nation that had fired the first 
shot in the series of conflicts leading to World War II. 
McKendreans had served in each branch of the Armed 
Forces and were represented in every combat theater of 
the war. They suffered many cruel blows, as evidenced 
by our list of killed and wounded, but they helped to 
determine the final outcome of the war. Japan was 
being forced to pay in full for Shanghai, Nanking, 
Pearl Harbor, and Bataan. On August 15, 1945, the 
Japanese government sued for peace on the general 
terms listed by the Allied Powers at the Potsdam Con- 
ference. 

The birth of a new method of warfare forced a 
quick and final decision from an enemy whose fighting 
grew more aggressive and suicidal as an invasion of 
their homeland became a certainty. When the atom bomb 
exploded on the Trinity test site in the New Mexico 
desert at 5:30 AM on July 16, 1945, we were assured 
that victory in the Pacific would come with an excla- 
mation point. One of our very own was there: Cyril 
Curtis '43 was a participant in the testing of the first 
atomic bomb. The following account is a part of his 
report of that awesome, never-to-be-forgotten experi- 
ence, written in response to the survey request to "de- 
scribe the most outstanding non-combat event [you] 
experienced while in the service." 

/// was my] Participation in the testing of 
the first atomic bomb. . . . The spectacular 
display was obsen'ed and monitored at a dis- 
tance ofsi.x miles from ground zero "the day 
the sun rose twice. " 

. . . The arrival of the atomic age, already 
underway, was now dramatically an- 
nounced, and the world would never be the 
same. Immediately following the blast (the 
equivalent of 20,000 tons of TNT), 
J. Robert Oppenheimer, director of Los 
Alamos Laboratory (which designed and 
built the bomb), recalled lines from the 
Hindu classic, the Bhagavad Gita: "Now 
I am become death, the destroyer of 
worlds. " 

. . . On August 6, 1945, a uranium bomb (gun 
type) was dropped on Hiroshima; on August 
9, a plutonium bomb (implosion type, simi- 



MC KENDREE 



lar to the one tested at Trinity) was dropped 
on Nagasaki; the next day, Japan began 
peace negotiations. A high level committee 
of military and civilian members, after de- 
liberations on the most practical among al- 
ternative uses of the bomb, had made its rec- 
ommendation to President Harry Truman, 
and he had acted. 

Controversy over use of the bomb persists to 
this day, as evidenced by the recent attempt 
of the Smithsonian Institution at an appar- 
ently revisionist history of the war with Ja- 
pan. The great majority of Pacific war vet- 
erans, who saw their comrades sacrificed in 
the war, and who, themselves, were poised 
for invasion of the Japanese mainland, have 
no argument against the Truman decision. 
Even with Japan already losing, continued 
prosecution of the war without "the bomb" 
was estimated to cost the lives of an addi- 
tional one million U.S. and nvo million Japa- 
nese soldiers. In an interview with a high 
level Japanese Intelligence official in the 
1950s, by Karl T. Compton, President of 
M.I.T, the official confirmed the belief that 
the Japanese would have defended their 
homeland "to the last man. " 

Some of the physicists who developed the 
bomb, realizing that it would make war in- 
tolerable, fervently hoped that it would pro- 
vide the impetus in a search for an alterna- 
tive to war, and therefore lent their support 
to such an endeavor 



Epilogue 

The war over, would we, like our forefathers after 
World War I, lay down the weapons of war and ignore all 
that history had so plainly explained? Was it again to be: 

God and the soldier we adore. 

In time of danger, not before. 

The danger gone, and all things righted, 

God is forgotten, the soldier slighted? 

On September 2, 1945 (VJ Day), the United States 
was possessed of a military machine with striking power 
unmatched in all of history: an Army of 89 divisions, 
six Marine divisions, eight Air Forces, and three great 
and nearly independent navies - a force that was em- 
ployed in all theaters of the world. Our Armed Forces 
at this time numbered 1 , 1 92,803 officers and 1 2,729, 1 90 
enlisted personnel. 

By June of 1946, there was not a single Army di- 
vision that could be called combat-ready, even in the 
Occupation Forces in Germany, Austria, Japan, and 
Korea. As after World War I, our society did not want to 
maintain a viable military force. In fewer than four years, 
our leaders would see the folly of such a wasteful re- 
duction in force that the military had to sustain. Once 
again, an uncertain future faced our young men and 
women as events worldwide began to fester. ["History 
repeats itself because nobody listens." Anonymous.] 

We hope this treatise will serve to enlighten the 
public about the extent of McKendreans' dedication to 
their country. They were numbered among those who 
gave of their time, interrupted their lives, put careers 
and families on hold, and, in some instances, gave their 
lives that the United States of America and democracy 
would live on. 



fTffl 
jjji. 


BL 



Plaque honoring those who sen'cd in the Armed Forces during WWII. 




General Andrew J. Goodpaster 



Master Chief Petty Ojficer John Hagan 



Top Ranking McKendreans in Military Service 

Two McKendree alumni 
from the 1928-1978 era 
reached the pinnacle of suc- 
cess in their respective mili- 
tary careers. One, Andrew J. 
Goodpaster '35, attained the 
highest rank among commis- 
sioned officers in the United 
States Army. The other, John 
Hagan '78, was named the 
U.S. Navy's highest ranking 
enlisted person. Master Chief 
Petty Officer of the Navy. 

Andrew Jackson 
Goodpaster, a native of Gran- 
ite City, Illinois, attended 
McKendree College for two 
years and received an ap- 
pointment to the U.S. Mili- 
tary Academy. Graduating second in his West Point class 
of 1 939, he saw World War II duty as commander of the 
48th Engineer Combat Battalion in Italy and North Af- 
rica. After the war he earned three graduate degrees from 
Princeton University and became a part of General 
Eisenhower's staff at NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Or- 
ganization.) He stayed with "Ike" through eight years 
in the White House after the 1952 election. He also 
served as a key aide to three other presidents, 
Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon. Other duty assign- 
ments included Commander of the U.S. 8th Infantry 
Division in Germany, Deputy Commander in Chief 
in Viet Nam and with the Joint Chiefs of Staff in 
Washington, D.C. before returning to Europe as the 
Supreme Allied Commander of NATO. Retiring from 
that post in 1974, he entered the teaching ranks at 
The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. He was 
later recalled to active duty for a four year stint as Su- 
perintendent of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, 
New York. 

In the words of General Goodpaster, "It has been a 
long path from McKendree, and no one can be more 
surprised than I at what it has involved; but through all 
the twists and turns I have remembered with deep af- 
fection the days spent at McKendree, and have been 
more grateful than I can express for the help the 
McKendree years have given in my later life in trying 
to meet the challenges and opportunities that have come 
my way. The friendships of those happy days there have 
been and remain a warm and vivid memory." 



John Hagan was bom in Luton, England in 1946 
and spent his youth in Asheville, North Carolina. He 
began his illustrious Navy career in 1964 at the San 
Diego, California Recruit Training Center. He moved 
through a series of training schools after that and be- 
came the leading petty officer for the Maintenance Di- 
vision at the Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash- 
ington, where he also earned an associate of arts de- 
gree. After serving aboard the USS Lester in Naples, 
Italy, he returned to Little Creek, Virginia, where he was 
maintenance technician for Underwater Demolition Team 
2 1 . It was here that he was promoted to Chief Petty Of- 
ficer While assigned to shore duty at the Naval and Ma- 
rine Corps Reserve Center in Louisville, Kentucky, he 
earned his bachelor of business administration degree from 
McKendree College in 1978. He later served duty assign- 
ments and moved up in rank at: Charleston, South Caro- 
lina; Memphis, Tennessee; Norfolk, Virginia; Mayport, 
Horida; and with Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm 
in the Middle East. While at Helicopter Anti-Submarine 
Squadron (Light) 48 at Mayport, Florida, he was se- 
lected as Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy. 

"I've tried to leave each place better than I found 
it," said Hagan. ". . . my degree from McKendree Col- 
lege, achieved during off duty, has been particularly 
useful in my job as Master Chief Petty Officer of the 
Navy, where I've had to interface with many who have 
read widely. I've made it a high priority to accelerate 
the expansion of voluntary education programs for sail- 
ors. ... on every ship in the Navy." 




M928»2Hn978 



The Administration of President Carl C. Bracy 

(1945-1949) 

by Rebecca Giles Brewer, Ph. D. ('47) 



The year 1945 brought changes to the world, its 
peoples, and to Lebanon, Illinois, and McKendree Col- 
lege. The war in Europe came to a close, the war in the 
Pacific was exploded to a close, and the servicemen and 
women came home. The threat of war took on a new 
meaning with the dropping of the atomic bomb on the 
cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. 

Changes on the McKendree campus were directly 
related to the end of the war: an increased enrollment 
with veterans returning home to study under the GI Bill 
of Rights, a face-lifting of the physical plant when mate- 
rials and labor both became available, growth in the fac- 
ulty to meet the needs of more classes, and a broader 
curriculum. 

To all of this was added the election of Carl Clus- 
ter Bracy to the presidency by the McKendree College 
Board of Trustees on June 25, 1945. 
President Clark Yost had requested a 
replacement after serving the college 
for ten years. 

Carl Bracy's arrival on campus 
was a returning to home territory and 
to his alma mater. Anativeof Herrin, 
Illinois, President Bracy came back 
to the college as president at the age 
of 33. A 1936 graduate, he com- 
mented that "ten years after receiv- 
ing my diploma, I was handing them 
out from the same rostrum." 

As a student, he received his 
diploma from the hands of President 
Yost, then the "new president." 
Bracy graduated magna cum laiide 
and had a college career that included 
being editor of the school yearbook. 



being elected president of the YMCA, and being se- 
lected for Who's Who in American Colleges and Uni- 
versities. He was active in many campus organizations 
as well as being president of the Student Association, 
oratorical contest winner, and a dramatist. 

His continued education included a master's de- 
gree in theology from Iliff School of Theology and con- 
tinued graduate studies at Iliff toward a ThD and at 
Colorado State Teachers College. In 1939 he was ap- 
pointed pastor of the Methodist Church in Faulkner, 
South Dakota. In 1941 his appointment was to Madi- 
son, South Dakota. In the Dakota Conference he also 
served as conference counselor of youth work, dean of 
the summer institute and chair of the Conference Com- 
mission on Evangelism. Prior to his election to the presi- 
dency, the board of trustees voted to present him with 




The President's Home in 1945. 



the honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity at a ceremony 
on January 14, 1946, which immediately preceded his 
inauguration as the 24th president of the college. 

The inevitable changes that would come with the 
end of World War II led President Bracy to outline a 
"Six Point Plan" to the Southern Illinois Conference of 
the Methodist Church, the college board of trustees, and 
to the faculty. These six points were: 

1. Increase enrollment 

2. Improve the physical education of the students 

3. Raise more funds and secure the $10,000 gift 
offered by the Board of Edu- 
cation of the Methodist Church 

4. Achieve accreditation 

5. Emphasize the Christian way 
of life 

6. Increase the financial stand- 
ing of the college 



He saw his own task to be an 
administrator, financial agent, and 
publicity agent. 

During the war years, 
McKendree had suffered from the 
same difficulties that faced other 
institutions of higher education. 
The enrollment had decreased so 
that the graduating class of June 
1945, numbered only 12. The 
physical plant, while not neglected 
by intent, was in poor condition 
because of the lack of manpower 
and the lack of availability of ma- 
terial and equipment. In addition, 
the decreased enrollment meant 
less income than would normally 
have been expected. The curricu- 
lum and faculty also suffered. The 
number of faculty members was 
down to 13, according to the col- 
lege yearbook, the McKendrean. 

In order to meet these needs, 
two large financial campaigns were 
conducted during the Bracy years. 
In 1 945-46 a crusade was launched 
to raise $38,000 in order to 
qualify for a gift of $ 1 0,000 from 
the Board of Education of the 
Methodist Church in Nashville, 
Tennessee. 



The churches of the Southern Illinois Conference, 
along with friends and alumni, contributed over $47,000, 
which made $59,000 available for improvements when 
the crusade ended in June 1947. This amount made it 
possible to repair, replace, and repaint; however, much 
more was required to upgrade the faculty and expand 
the campus facilities. 

In June 1946, a Million Dollar Campaign was an- 
nounced by the board of trustees. Approximately one- 
half of this amount was to be raised by the churches in 
Southern Illinois and the other one-half was to come 
from alumni, friends, and other donors. Since funds from 




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■51 



Carnegie Hall 




Seveiiry-Eigli 



-^^^S52=355^^S^M£KENDRE^^^^|2gj^^^^ 



the endowment fund had been used to meet 
expenses at the end of the war period, it 
was proposed that $500,000 of the funds 
raised by the campaign would be placed 
in the endowment fund. The other half- 
million would be used for rehabilitation of 
the existing plant and the addition of two 
new buildings: a gymnasium-auditorium 
and a science hall. In addition to these 
plans there was the need to provide better 
paid faculty with guaranteed retirement se- 
curity. 

A three-year campaign, it was met 
with enthusiasm by the churches of the 
conference. In the February 5, 1948, issue 
of the Centralia Sentinel, it was reported 
that at a special session of the annual con- 
ference meeting in Centralia, each of the 
four districts pledged $150,000. Additional support was 
pledged by the conference laymen's association, headed 
by President Arthur Knapp (a college trustee), the Meth- 
odist Youth Fellowship represented by Rev. Paul Sims 
('48), and the Women's Society of Christian Service, 
led by Mrs. O. E. Connett. 

The Lebanon church, the college's "home church," 
pledged more than twice its quota by the spring of 1 948. 
One of the first churches to meet its pledge was 
Donnellson, which was the first church President Bracy 
served as a student pastor and, at the time of the cam- 
paign, was served by another McKendree ministerial 
student. Rev. Billy G. Hahs('48), later a member of the 
board of trustees. 

F. A. Behymer, Lebanon resident, McKendree sup- 
porter, and feature writer for the St. Louis Post Dispatch, 
noted in the March 22, 1948, issue that the campaign 
was launched on the original eight-acre campus, which 
had cost $24.00 in 1828. Behymer quoted President 
Bracy as saying: 

Church-related colleges such as McKendree, 
because they are tax exempt, have, I believe, 
a definite responsibility for civic education 
or education for democracy. We are con- 
vinced that our American heritage of democ- 
racy is not merely a form of government (as 
valuable and significant as that may be), but 
democracy is 'a way of life, ' and as such it 
furnishes or provides man with the best way 
of living his life. That way must be preserved. 
. . . McKendree is a Christian college. It has 
as its purpose to surround its students with 




College Sextette trip to Harrisburg in 1946. 

an influence and an atmosphere conducive 
to the development of Christian character, 
conduct, and citizenship, to give to them a 
liberal education and to provide in some 
measure specific foundational training for an 
occupational career 

For the president, these financial campaigns meant 
much traveling and speaking. He was often accompa- 
nied by students. Howard Hursey ('50) recalled that as 
members of the men's quartet, he, Charles Fox ('51), 
Ed Thilman ('48), and Bob Sager ('50), termed them- 
selves the Million Dollar Quartet. He recalls singing all 
over the state, estimating they had about 100 engage- 
ments. While they did not get the million, they did raise 
"a sizable amount." 

Also in his reminiscences, Hursey commented that 
the football team had leather helmets, no face masks, 
no mouthpieces, and the schools they played were much 
larger, resulting in being beaten a lot in the last quarter. 
Still a small pool to draw from, assignments often meant 
both offense and defense positions. 

Hursey was a roommate of the first Mexican stu- 
dent to attend McKendree, Roberto Hernandez. He com- 
ments that it was a fun experience to help Roberto with 
his language problems. 

Frequently, alumni comment on their accompany- 
ing President Bracy and the significance it had in their 
lives. Dr. Bracy was often heard to refer to 
McKendree as "Christian without apology and Meth- 
odist with pride." 

One alumnus recalled traveling with Bracy in the 
fall when the Methodist Youth Fellowship held district 



MC KENDREE" 




aWj^ 



The Philosophian, Clionian. and Plaionian Societies 

of McKendree College 



Commencement Exhibition 





PROGRAM 


Invocation 


Don Benitone 


Scripture 

Declamation 


Francesca Shaffer 

Joanne Bare 
•■No Room Witiiin" (original) 


Essay 


Bernard Loean 




•McKendree, 1940 and 1947" 


ImDromotu 


Mary Ellen Glotfelty 


Piano Duo 


Dorothy Lee Faulkner, Mary Ellen Glotfelty 
•■Stardust- — Carmichael 




T n t 




"Memories" 















Chairman — Leslie Purdy 

USHERS 

Elizabeth Crisp Eunice Hanbaum 

Donald Lowe Louis Walker 



Joint program of Philosophian, Clionian and Platonian 
Literary Societies. 



booth festivals. It was the practice for each youth 
group from the churches of the district to bring home- 
canned goods to be on display as evidence of the fail 
harvest. The goods were divided among the confer- 
ence institutions, McKendree being one. The alum- 
nus spoke of Dr. Bracy helping to bring the canned 
goods back to the college kitchen and indicated he 
thought the task was beneath the president's posi- 
tion. It was representative of Dr. Bracy's commit- 
ment to the college, from his itineration over the con- 
ference presenting the cause and needs of the col- 
lege, to raking leaves on campus and transporting 
canned goods. 

With these two financial campaigns focusing at- 
tention on the physical and academic needs of the cam- 
pus, McKendree began an era of rehabilitation, expan- 
sion, and academic growth. 



The students who attended during the last years of 
the war were more than pleased when sufficient funds 
were received to replace the boiler. Those days of cold 
library, cold dormitory rooms, and cold classrooms came 
to an end. In November 1 948, it was reported that more 
work had been done on the heating system, including a 
new plant for the gymnasium. Also included in the up- 
grading were funds for additional lab equipment, class- 
room renovations, and long-neglected repair and main- 
tenance on Benson Wood Library. 

As the moneys came in from the Million Dollar Cam- 
paign, plans were made for a new gymnasium-auditorium 
that would seat 1,500, a new science hall, and the remod- 
eling of Eisenmayer gymnasium into a little theater. 

Apparently there were still equipment shortages, 
however. In the March 29, 1949, McKendree Review 
there is a short item that indicates Professor Fred 
Fleming, head of the biology department, passed a milk 
bottle among the students, saying, "Put anything in, but 
be sure it's under a quarter." The milk bottle filled and 
the fund was used to purchase a new stapler for the class- 
room. 

Other student participation in the renovation pro- 
gram is indicated in an October 7, 1947, article in the 
McKendree Review. Plans were being made to redeco- 
rate and refurnish Philo Hall. The Philosophians turned 
to the alumni of the literary society for financial help in 
the project. 

A tuition and fee increase in 1 947 was inevitable. 
It was the first raise in many years. 

Toward the end of President Bracy's tenure, there 
were many articles in the McKendree Review that indi- 
cated the physical changes taking place. In January 1948, 
the renovation of Pearsons Hall, the college dining hall, 
was completed. Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Pfeffer, both 
Lebanonites and McKendree graduates, started the drive 
for funds for this renovation with a large donation and, 
after work was started, contributed heavily to the new 
furniture in the dining hall. Other gifts for furnishings 
were new lights by Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Knapp; a George 
Steck baby grand piano from Miss Mayme Griffith, a 
trustee; and a Hammond electric organ from Mrs. N. G. 
Stevenson, also a trustee. 

Mrs. Stevenson was concerned about the condi- 
tion of the president's home and contributed $15,000 
for redecorating both inside and outside the house. As a 
result of this gift, the president's home became known 
as the Stevenson House. Others contributed to the reno- 
vation; among these gifts was the Swedish cut-glass 
chandelier in the dining room, which was given by Mr. 
and Mrs. Virgil Church. 



MC KENDREE 







iW"' 



^ ... 






May Few in 1947. 

At the November 24, 1948, board of trustees meet- 
ing, architect's drawings of the proposed gymnasium 
and science building were presented. At the same meet- 
ing it was announced that $103,000 had been paid in 



cash on the Million Dollar Campaign. By January 1, 
1949, $1 14.693.39 had been received and reports were 
made at the February 24, 1949, board meeting on the 
renovation of the dining hall, the repairing of the heat- 
ing plant, new plumbing in the science hall, and a hot 
air furnace in the gym. By the May 23, 1949, meeting, 
work on Stevenson House was completed. The minutes 
of each board of trustees meeting brought more news of 
progress. 

During the renovation of buildings, the sills in Old 
Main were replaced. In March 1949, President Bracy pre- 
sented a gavel to Bishop J. Ralph Magee which was made 
from a floor sill from what Bracy termed "the oldest build- 
ing in the oldest Methodist college in the United States." 
In the midst of all this activity, the chapel stood 
as a symbol of the Christian commitment of the col- 
lege. In April 1947, the chapel bell rang the background 
accompaniment for the singing of "The Bell," a French 
folk song, as the choir presented its spring concert. 



PROGRAM 




■y^ 



McKendree College 

Lebanon, Illinois 



— 1948 — 

COLLEGE CHORUS 



Sun Of My Soul Peter Ritter 

O Sacred Head Now Wounded Bach 1601 

Panis Angelicus Palestrina 1524-1594 

Wake, Awake, For Night Is Flying -- Bach 1599 

Hear My Cry, O God Kopyloff 

The Chorus 

O Lord, Most Holy Caesar Franck 

Corinne Mooneyham, Soprano 

Open Our Eyes MacFarlane 

Go Not Far From Me, O Lord Zingarelli 

(Motet from "Christus e Miserere") 
The Chapel Choir 

My Redeemer And My Lord Dudley Buck 

Glenn Freiner, Tenor 

Shine On Me Arr. by Odom 

Softly And Tenderly, Jesus Is Calling Thompson 

Abide With Me W. H. Monk 

The Mens Quartet 

Theme In D From Symphonic Pathetique Tschaikowsky 

Glenn Freiner 

God So Loved The World John Stainer 

Go To Dark Gethsemane T. Tertius Noble 

Ifs Me, O Lord (Negro Spiritual) Arr. by Cain 

Hallelujah (The Messiah) Handel 

The Chorus 



College Chorus Program. 



Faculty 

With increasing enrollment, the faculty expanded. 
The year before President Bracy arrived ( 1 944-45 ), there 
were 1 3 teaching faculty; in 1 945-46 there were 1 8 teach- 
ing faculty; and in 1 948-49, Bracy's last year, there were 
23 staff in that category. 

As a liberal arts college, McKendree had a core 
curriculum that changed little during the Bracy era. 
Notable additions between 1945 and 1949 were the of- 
fering of courses in political science, engineering draw- 
ing, and public relations. Also, a pre-engineering pro- 
gram was developed in collaboration with Washington 
University in St. Louis. There were additional courses 
or sections in history, physics, economics, English, and 
physical education, which reflected a larger student body. 
These new courses and additions also indicated the grow- 
ing need for business and for science and engineering 
courses that would lead the college into the age of tech- 
nology. A counseling and guidance service was estab- 
lished in 1947 but were short-lived, and the faculty ad- 
visor system returned. 

Every endeavor was made to obtain well-qualified 
faculty who could work within the changing curricu- 
lum. The upgrading of the physical campus and the quali- 
fied faculty was all part of the process of preparing for 
evaluation and accreditation by the North Central Asso- 
ciation and the University Senate of the Methodist 
Church. 

Faculty salaries were a major concern of the presi- 
dent who realized "the faculty are more interested in the 
school and the welfare of the students than their own 
welfare." This spirit is what kept the college morale 
high in the years following these low periods. In 1 948 
the first salary schedule that would eliminate individual 
salary negotiations was presented to the faculty. The 
scale was as follows: 



Head of a department 
Professor 

Associate Professor 
Assistant Professor 
Instructor 



$3600 - 3900 
$3000 - 3600 
$2700 - 3000 
$2400 - 2700 
$2000 - 2400 



A superintendent of buildings and grounds was 
hired in 1948. On January 27, 1948, the board of trust- 
ees approved the appointment of an assistant to the presi- 
dent and a new physical education major. There is no 
indication that anyone was hired under the title of assis- 
tant to the president at that time. However, in the late 
1940's there were several secretaries added to the staff: 




Oliver H. Kleinschmidt, Professor of Music. 



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flag un-furl«l. 



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Whose p.lhs of for- 1( ■ lurte a 
help us hold Ihe torch 


d prayer The 5.0- 
^^d^oir T,^,-I1.7h' 
a h[gh,Wheo night 






'America's Processional" by Professor Kleinschmidt. 



Eighty-Two 



MC KENDREE El 



secretary to the president (1947), secretary to the dean 
(1949), and assistant registrar (1949). These positions 
began to replace the competent but limited contribution 
of the student assistants who were hired to such posi- 
tions. In 1 948 the Office of Public Relations was added 
to the administrative staff. Throughout the campus the 
student assistant positions became more traditional in the 
work that was assigned them as part-time personnel. 

While the students spent happy hours on trips to 
St. Louis and in evening excursions to downtown Leba- 
non at Freshour's (sodas), Dave's Cafe (guys only), 
Daumueller's (ice cream sundaes), Bunge's Bakery (juke 
box), and Battoes Cafe (hamburgers), the alumni re- 
sponding to the 1995 survey repeatedly spoke of the 
commitment of the faculty and their excellence in lead- 
ing students into the world of academia and into the 
world beyond their high school horizons. Some spoke 
of confronting and coming to an understanding of other 
religions and cultures. One respondent, who did not 
graduate from McKendree but transferred to the U. S. 
Naval Academy, stated that his year at McKendree "gave 
me an enormous head start when I entered the Acad- 
emy." 

Especially noted in the 1995 survey of the alumni's 
reminiscences of those who helped them most were pro- 
fessors Helmut Gutekunst, Oliver Kleinschmidt, Fred 
Fleming, Meredith Eller, Charles Stowell, Chester Bagg, 
Reinhold Hohn, and Clarence Walton. 



Dr. Walton Retires 

May 1 949, marked an end of the teaching career 
of William Clarence Walton who came to McKendree 
in 1894. He taught Greek, philosophy, Bible, and reli- 
gion and founded the Education Department, in which 
he was the first teacher. He was the author of the Cen- 
tennial History of McKendree College, which traced the 
history of the college and St. Clair County from 1 828 to 
1928. The task took several years and has been the pro- 
totype for this volume. Many an argument and discus- 
sion has moved on with authority since 1928 as "Dr. 
Walton's History" has been cited. 

Dr. Walton had attended 63 commencements when 
he left his teaching position. The year 1949 did not end 
his service to the college, however; he continued as trea- 
surer until 1958. 



Veterans 

Several references have been made to the enroll- 
ment increase during the Bracy administration. The 
United States turned to a post-war period that, among 
other consequences, found the veterans wanting to re- 
turn to college after an interruption for military service. 
McKendree College received approval from the Veter- 
ans Administration on March 19, 1945, as an institution 




where servicemen and women 
could attend college under the 
Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 
1 944, or, as it was popularly known, 
the "GI Bill of Rights." The imme- 
diate impact of this action meant a 
growing student body. 

In the same issue of the 
McKendree Review ( May 30, 1 945 ) 
that the announcement was made of 
McKendree's approval to accept stu- 
dents under the GI Bill, six 
McKendree servicemen were re- 
ported missing in action and the 
total reported killed in action dur- 
ing the War was 1 1 . 

The men and women coming on campus from 
military service changed student life and changed some 
college regulations. For example, smoking was pro- 
hibited on the campus; however, smoking in the men's 
dorm rooms was a concession to the vets and a break 
with a 117-year campus regulation. 

In 1947 it was reported that 52 percent of the stu- 
dents on the campus were veterans. These years saw 
continued increases in enrollment from 184 in 1945-46 
to 416 in 1947-48. In 1949 the spring term enrollment 
dropped to 393 as the first veterans who entered the 
college as freshmen were graduated. In the fall of 1949 
the student body numbered 326. 




The veterans found the senices of the Ex GI Club valuable in orientation to civilian 
and student status, a source of fellowship and camaraderie, and an opportunity to 
sponsor campus social and athletic activities. 



The administrative staff members found them- 
selves inundated with government forms. In Septem- 
ber 1946, it was reported that Dean Stowell and his sec- 
retary were working into the night on paper work. The 
comptroller, Eliza Jane Donaldson, was also putting in 
long hours with the adjustment to veterans' checks and 
the attendant paperwork. 

Liza Jane, as she was fondly called by the students, 
was commended at the August 4, 1949, board of trust- 
ees meeting by President Bracy, who credited her with 
maintaining a stable educational institution during the 
war and on into the changing post-war campus. One 
alumna, Dorothy Faulkner Winterrowd ('47) recalled 
Miss D's daily walk to the 
Post Office and the bank, 
regardless of the weather. 
Campus activities 
changed. A "regular" 
homecoming was ob- 
served in 1 945, and the re- 
turning veterans were hon- 
ored. The organizations on 
campus changed with the 
dropping of the science, 
drama, and theater clubs 
and the addition of more 
politically grounded orga- 
nizations such as the Pub- 
lic Affairs Forum. The 
YMCA and YWCA were 
combined into the Student 
Christian Association, 
which became affiliated 
with the Illinois Method- 
ist Student Movement. 




i5LI8j 



UI^MC KENDREE^^^ 



Significant to the times was the organizing of the 
GI Club. The Club charged a $1.00 initiation fee and 
dues of 15 cents per week. The GIs could defer pay- 
ment with an lOU until their government checks arrived. 
The veterans were a mature group. Among the club's 
activities was the 1946 purchase of a loving cup to be 
presented to the member w ith the highest scholastic rank. 
Mandatory attendance at chapel twice a week met 
with protests from the non-Protestant students, and it 
was finally determined that non-Protestants were ex- 
cused from McKendree chapel services as long as they 
attended their own churches. 

The Student-Faculty Council was criticized be- 
cause the students had a minority vote. Again changes 
were made. Instead of the chair being the college presi- 
dent, a student became president of the re-named Stu- 
dent Association, with the college president and dean 
being ex-officio members. Changes in representation 
gave the students a greater voice in decisions; the stu- 
dents had six votes to five for the faculty and college. 
Social life on the campus changed radically. One 
coed was quoted as saying, "If I don't have a matrimo- 
nial opportunity at McKendree College, I'll never have 
it." There were 158 men on campus at the time (Octo- 
ber 1946) and 57 women. 

Even the language changed, according to two fea- 
ture stories in the McKendree Review. In the October 
22, 1946, issue. Mason Holmes ('49) wrote of his frus- 
trations as a high school graduate coming to college at 
18 and not knowing what to pass when a vet called for 
"red lead" (catsup) or following the conversation about 
"stove lids" (pancakes) and "joe" (coffee). He concluded 
that "we are grateful for what they have done; now it is 
our job to understand their talk." 

Two years later, March 9, 1948, Richard Townsend 
('50) was still contending with a language that included 
"chow" and "mess gear." His philosophical conclusion 
was "the salient point is that our language has never yet 
failed to extend itself to meet any requirements, whether 
constant or tentative, unequivocal or universal." 

With a larger student body and the men returning, 
sports came into focus. Football, basketball, track, and 
baseball teams began the climb back to the prestige of 
earlier years, and the "keeper of the bear" was reinstated. 
The election of the keeper of the bear in 1947 was 
to a token position; no bear was on campus. The tradi- 
tion of a bear mascot, primarily for the football team, 
dated back to the twenties and thirties. Early in the tra- 
dition, a bear cub was brought from Canada and trav- 
eled with the team in the back seat of a car In later 
years, a bear was borrowed only for the football season 



from the St. Louis Zoo. The practice probably stopped 
when the college could no longer field a football team. 

During the early years of this resurgence of sports, 
transportation for the teams was supplied by alumni and 
faculty using their own cars. Al Rosenberger ('50) com- 
mented that "McKendree had one of the first quarter- 
mile curbed cinder tracks in southern Illinois. It was six 
lanes and had a 220-yard straight-away." He recalled 
that he almost ruined his 1 934 Ford V-8 pick-up by pull- 
ing tree stumps and hauling dirt to the football field and 
cinders to the track. For this he received an allowance 
for gasoline and oil. 

Rosenberger also noted that, although McKendree 
was not accredited when he graduated, he had no prob- 
lems being accepted for graduate studies at Illinois State 
University. 

A tradition that continued into the post-war years 
was that of the freshman class ringing, or not ringing, 
the chapel bell. The rules were simple: If the freshmen 
succeeded in having a class picnic, returned to the cam- 
pus, and rang the chapel bell, they could remove their 
"beanies" (green skull caps) and did not have to un- 
dergo freshman initiation. Ringing the bell was com- 
plicated by the upperclassmen tying the bell where it 
could not be reached or removing the clapper. 

The annual leaf-raking day continued into the 
Bracy era. As one alumnus said, it was "a useful money- 
saving work"; it was also a day of fun as students and 
faculty joined in a project that spelled camaraderie. Even 
President Bracy joined in. 




Leaf raking day 



Eighu-Five 




MC KENDREE 



"Mom " Thornley 

No discussion of campus life would be complete 
without reference to Pearsons Hall, the dining hall, and 
food. There was no disagreement in the response from 
the alumni survey taken in 1995: Mom Thornley was a 
good cook. However, the memories of Florence 
Thornley had a much broader basis than the food she 
served. Richard Ashal ('50) said she "was The God- 
send' to the entire campus right after the end of WWII." 
Others remembered her as a good friend of the students, 
a person who helped solve their problems. One alumna 
recalled that Mom Thornley loaned her money when 
she was in need. Jean Smith Wil- 
son ('49) held the job of bugler in 
the morning for breakfast. She 
commented that blowing the 
bugle at 6:00 AM in the boys' 
dorm from 1 945 to 1 949 after the 
war wasn't all that popular with 
the veterans. She also mentioned 
gaining access to Clark Hall by 
climbing a ladder at 1 :30 AM af- 
ter missing the last bus from St. 
Louis. 

When President Bracy came 
to the campus in 1 945, there were 
only two dormitories, and a few 
commuters lived at home or, in 
the case of the ministerial stu- 
dents, in parsonages where they 
were serving. Beginning in 1946, 



trailer homes were moved to the north campus, behind 
Clark Hall. In October, 1947, there were three families 
living in trailers. Included in the $6.00 (or $10.00 de- 
pending on which record is accurate) per month rent were 
electricity and the privilege of using the laundry facili- 
ties in Clark Hall. Water for use in the trailers had to be 
carried from the dormitory at the outset, though water 
was piped in later. Small vegetable gardens north of 
Carnegie Hall helped these families, according to Al 
Rosenberger who, with his wife and daughter, was the 
first family to have a trailer. 



End of an Era 

In July, 1949, Carl Bracy submitted his resigna- 
tion as McKendree College president. He accepted the 
position of Chancellor of Nebraska Wesleyan Univer- 
sity in Lincoln. The trustees of both institutions agreed 
that Dr. Bracy would remain at McKendree until the 
end of the calendar year. During the six-month period, 
a search was made and Dr. Russell Grow was selected 
as Bracy's successor. President Bracy 's last months con- 
tinued to be filled with plans for new buildings, the 
Million Dollar Campaign, improvements in the physi- 
cal plant, and guiding the faculty as it worked with a 
different student body than had been present when he 
arrived on the campus. 

Dr. Bracy later left Nebraska Wesleyan to become 
the sixth president of Mount Union College in Alliance, 
Ohio. He retired in 1967 and died at Lake Side, Ohio, 
August 22, 1977. 




First north campus trailer. 



MC KEN PRE Eg!! 



The Administration of President Carl C. Bracy 
Faculty List 



1945-46 

H.P.K. Agersborg 
Edwin P. Baker 
George H. Barton 
Leon H. Church 
Eliza J. Donaldson 
Mrs. Donald Gee 
Beatrice A. Godwin 
Bertha W. Gutekunst 
Helmut C. Gutekunst 
Dorothy West Hohn 
Reinhold B. Hohn 

Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 
Nell G. Oppitz 
Roland P. Rice 
R. C. Sayre 
Eula R. Smith 
Frederick C. Stelzriede 
Charles J. Stowell 
William C. Walton 
Grace R. Welch 



1946-47 

Edwin P. Baker 
Carla Caldwell 
Eliza J. Donaldson 
Lawrence K. Fox 
Lee R. Glover 
Beatrice A. Godwin 
Marvin A. Govro 
Bertha W Gutekunst 
Helmut C. Gutekunst 
Dorothy West Hohn 
Reinhold B. Hohn 

Wesley W. Jonah 
Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 
Mary E. Metz 
Nell G. Oppitz 
Elizabeth W. Parks 
Roland P Rice 
Herbert D. Roy 
R. C. Sayre 
Eula R. Smith 
Frederick C. Stelzriede 
Charles J. Stowell 
William C. Walton 
Mrs. Grace R. Welch 



Biology 

German, Dean Emeritus 

Music 

Dir. of Athletics, Coach 

Commerce, Comptroller 

Assistant in Social Science 

Librarian, Dean of Women 

French, Spanish 

Chemistry, Physics 

English 

Education, Psychology, 

Registrar, Dean of Admissions 

Piano, Organ, Theory 

History 

Philosophy, Religion 

Practice Teaching 

Voice, Public School Music 

Speech, Dramatics 

Mathematics, Eiconomics, Dean 

Greek, Latin, Treasurer 

Speech, Dramatics 



German, Dean Emeritus 

Chorus, Band, Sextette 

Comptroller, Commerce 

Economics, Political Science 

Assistant in Education 

Librarian 

Engineering Drawing 

French, Spanish 

Chemistry, Physics 

English 

Education, Psychology, 

Registrar, Dean of Admissions 

Dir. of Athletics, Coach 

Piano, Organ, Theory 

Biology 

History 

English, Public Relations 

Philosophy, Religion 

Descriptive Geometry 

Practice Teaching 

Voice, Public School Music 

Speech, Drama 

Mathematics, Economics, Dean 

Greek, Latin, Treasurer 

English 



1947-48 

Lelah Allison 
Chester S. Bagg 
Edwin P Baker 
Ewing Baskette 
Earl Dawes 

Eliza J. Donaldson 
Meredith R Filer 
Fred A. Fleming 
Lawrence K. Fox 
Burton Goldstein 
Marvin A. Govro 
Bertha W, Gutekunst 
Helmut C. Gutekunst 
Wesley W. Jonah 
Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 
Mary Blanche Lientz 
Nell G. Oppitz 
Elizabeth W. Parks 

Margaret Sapp 
R. C. Sayre 
Willie Stivender 
Charles J. Stowell 

Lewis R. Van Winkle 

William C. Walton 



1948-49 

Lelah Allison 
Chester S. Bagg 
Edwin R Baker 
Ralph E. Barclay 
Gertrude Bos 
Carol Cardwell 

Earl Dawes 
Eliza J. Donaldson 

Meredith Eller 
Fred A. Fleming 
Burton Goldstein 
Bertha W. Gutekunst 
Helmut C. Gutekunst 
James Jennings 
Janelle Kleinschmidt 
Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 
William J. Mauzy 
Gerald Nielsen 



English, Drama 

Voice 

German, Dean Emeritus 

Librarian 

liducation. Dean of Men, 

Director of Night School 

Business Officer, Commerce 

Philosophy, Religion 

Biology 

Economics, Political Science 

Physics 

Descriptive Drawing 

French, Spanish 

Chemistry, Physics 

Dir. of Athletics, Coach 

Piano, Organ, Theory 

Physical Ekiucation 

History 

Journalism Speech, English, 

Director of Public Relations 

Public School Music 

Practice Teaching 

English, Dean of Women 

Mathematics, Veteran's 

Counselor, Dean Emeritus 

Education, Psychology, Dean, 

Registrar 

Greek, Latin, Treasurer 



English 

Voice 

German, Dean Emeritus 

Dir. of Athletics, Coach 

Librarian 

Speech, Drama, Dean of 

Women 

Education, Dean of Men 

Commerce, Business Officer, 

Veteran's Counselor 

Philosophy, Religion 

Biology 

Physics 

French, Spanish 

Chemistry 

Economics, Political Science 

Women's Physical Education 

Piano, Organ, Theory 

Physical Education, Coach 

Public School Music 




Eighn-Se^ 




Enjoying a friendly game of ping pong in the bookstore. 



Nell G. Oppitz 
Elizabeth W. Parks 

R. C. Say re 
Dede Ann Shull 
Charles J. Stowell 
Lewis B. Van Winkle 



William C. Walton 



1949-50 

Lelah Allison 
Chester S. Bagg 
Edwin P. Baker 
Ralph E. Barclay 
Dorothy Harnett 
Gertrude Box 
Lawrence Boyer 
Vivian Burton 
Earl Dawes 

Beth Dolan 



History, Sociology 

Journalism, Director of Public 

Relations 

Practice Teaching 

English 

Mathematics, Dean Emeritus 

Education, Psychology, Dean, 

Dir. of Placement Service, 

Registrar 

Greek, Latin, Treasurer 



English 

Voice 

German, Dean Emeritus 

Dir. of Athletics, Coach 

Women's Physical Education 

Librarian 

Economics, Political Science 

Speech, Drama 

Education, Psychology, Dean 

of Men 

English 



Eliza J. Donaldson 

Fred A. Fleming 
Glenn H. Freiner 
Bertha W. Gutekunst 
Helmut C. Gutekunst 
Frank E. Harris 
Harold Hertenstein 
Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 
William J. Mauzy 
Gerald Nielsen 
Albert Ogent 
Nell G. Oppitz 
Elizabeth W. Parks 

Leslie Purdy 
R. C. Sayre 
Charles J. Stowell 
Evelyn Troutman 
Lewis B. Van Winkle 



William C. Walton 
Thiemo Wolf 



Commerce, Business Officer, 

Veteran's Counselor 

Biology 

Voice, Piano, Organ 

French, Spanish 

Chemistry 

Religion 

Mathematics 

Piano, Organ, Theory 

Physical Education, Coach 

Public School Music 

Mechanical Drawing 

History, Sociology 

Journalism, Director of Public 

Relations 

American Government 

Practice Teaching 

Mathematics, Dean Emeritus 

Philosophy. Religion 

Eiducation, Psychology, Dean, 

Registrar, Dir. of Placement 

Service 

Greek, Latin, Treasurer 

Physics 



Eighly-Eighl 




Women's Sextette in 1946. 




Men's Quartette in 1949. 



The Administration of President Russell Grow 
(1950 - 1957) 

by Darrell H. Kohlmiller, Ph.D. ('54) 



Although many of us today view the fifties as a 
quiet time in our history, for those historically astute it 
was recognized as a seedbed for the upheavals of the 
sixties and seventies: black protests and civil rights ac- 
tivities, the beginnings of Vietnam, and the conquest 
of space, to name a few. Not many of us remember that 
the portrait of America served up by the popular press 
of the fifties painted a picture that ignored many of the 
problems of that day; involvement in a foreign war, the 
Cold War, a teenage birth rate higher than today, a third 
of marriages ending in divorce, and racial polarization, 
among many others. 

On June 25, 1950, less than six months after the 
decade began. North Korean troops poured into South 
Korea. When General MacArthur reported to President 
Truman that a South Korean collapse was inevitable, 
the President immediately ordered full scale Ameri- 
can military support for South Korea. An Allied vic- 
tory seemed certain when, in November of 1950, 
hundreds of thousands of Chinese Communist "vol- 
unteers" crossed the border into South Korea, extend- 
ing the war until July of 1953, when a negotiated 
settlement was reached. During the Korean War, over 
200,000 Americans served in Korea, and nearly 
25,000 were killed and over 100,000 wounded. Al- 
though the President's move to send troops to aid 
the South Koreans had initial overwhelming public 
support, later, as the casualties increased, the war 
became unpopular. 

The Korean War more than likely cost the Demo- 
crats the presidency in 1952 as the Republicans ran 
former General of the Army Dwight D. Eisenhower 
against Illinois Governor Adiai Stevenson, whom the 
Republicans were able to paint effectively, but falsely, 
as being soft on communism. 



The threat of communism to American interests 
became known universally as a "world-wide monolithic 
conspiracy," and Americans became involved in what 
would be called "The Cold War" until the collapse of 
the Soviet Union in the i980s. Over the years of the 
Cold War the United States spent nearly a quarter of its 
federal budget for military purposes. In the fifties Ameri- 
can administrations became party to military alliances with 
countries all over the world and signed bilateral treaties 
with Nationalist China, South Korea, and others. 

The fifties was essentially a period for holding the 
line in government and other domestic matters. Critics 
of the administration argued that Eisenhower was a pawn 
to big business interests in the country, although in fair- 
ness it must be said that labor flourished and labor man- 
agement relations were relatively tranquil. 

Economic developments in the fifties were signifi- 
cant and deserve mention. The majority of American 
families enjoyed an unprecedented prosperity history 
had never before shown for any people. Americans 
owned more new homes, cars, televisions, and other 
material things than perhaps the rest of the wodd com- 
bined. Suburbs sprang up everywhere. 

While the majority of Americans experienced the 
good life, there were, however, those groups left be- 
hind. Small farmers suffered greatly, and racial minori- 
ties were left behind in both education and employment 
under the laws and court rulings of "separate but equal." 
The first school integration in the south did not occur 
until late in the fifties, at Little Rock, Arkansas, where 
federal troops were needed to allow nine black children 
to enter the previously all-white school. Throughout the 
fifties, minorities struggled to gain a fair share of the 
advantages, both economic and social, enjoyed by the 
majority of Americans. 




MC KENDREE~gr 



Stevenson House - Home of the President. 

Other social issues of the fifties centered around 
conformity, the growing impact of the mass media, the 
evolution of rock and roll, the fine arts, and advances in 
medicine and other sciences. 



Having briefly reviewed the impact of the fifties 
on American life in general, the focus now turns to the 
life of McKendreans who were a part of that time, 
including Dr. Russell Grow, who was president of 
McKendree College from 1950 to 1957. Grow, dean 
of the College of Liberal Arts, Oklahoma City Uni- 
versity, was elected president of the college at a spe- 
cial board of trustees meeting on Nov. 22, 1949, and 
assumed his duties as McKendree president on January 
1, 1950. 

Dr. Grow was a native of Nebraska who received 
a master's degree in psychology and a Ph.D. in edu- 
cational administration from the University of Ne- 
braska. He held teaching and administration posts 
at several Oklahoma colleges and public schools be- 
fore his assignment at Oklahoma City University. 
From 1942 to 1945, Dr. Grow worked as a civilian for 
the federal government. He returned to education at the 
end of the war. Dr. Grow also served as a local preacher 




Bishop Charles C. Selecman. Bishop Ralph Magee, President Russell Grow at Inauguration April 26, 1950. 



in the Methodist Church in Oklahoma and became a 
speaker of some renown. He and his family were life- 
long Methodists. 

In response to a mail interview with Dr. Grow that 
appeared in the McKendree Review of December 13, 
1949, Dr. Grow stated: 



. . . / was discouraged and wanted to leave. 
I told my intention to President Grow. He en- 
couraged me to t)-y it for awhile {maybe one 
semester). 1 did. I stayed for three years 
and graduated magna cum laude in May 
of 1956. 



The changes that will come in McKendree 's 
curriculum and plant are those that growth 
and progress require. Changes of this sort 
have a habit of developing out of necessity. 

No doubt McKendree 's growth will require 
a plant and equipment in keeping with the 
traditions and ideals that have contributed 
to its great usefulness in the past. 



We are eager to begin out 
McKendree College. 



I'ork at 



Dr. Grow gave his first address to the entire stu- 
dent body on January 6, 1950, in the chapel. He chose 
as his topic Genesis 1:1, "In the beginning God created. 
. . ." Dr. Grow pointed out that a scientist has faith, "a 
religious approach . . . because he has faith that he will 
discover what he is looking for." Dr. Grow used 
George W. Carver, who discovered more than 300 uses 
for the peanut, as a scientist who had faith. (McKendree 
Review, January 24, 1950) 

Dr. Grow was officially inaugurated as president 
of McKendree College on the afternoon of April 26, 
1950, as its 24th president. Among those in atten- 
dance were the official representatives of 54 colleges 
and universities nationwide. The main inaugural 
speaker was Dr. Charles C. Selecman, a retired bishop 
of the Methodist Church. (McKendree Review, April 1 8, 
1950). 

One of Dr. Grow's personal fond moments at 
McKendree occurred at the 1952 commencement exer- 
cises. It was the first outdoor commencement celebrated 
since the centennial year of 1 928. The commencement 
speaker was Illinois Governor Adlai Stevenson, who was 
to be the Democratic candidate for president in the fall 
election of 1952. Altogether, it was a glorious day for 
McKendree and especially the 50 who received their 
degrees that day. 

Dr. Grow and his family dearly loved McKendree. 
Several anecdotes related in the responses to the Alumni 
Questionnaire sent to alumni of the era to gather infor- 
mation for this history add credence to this. One stu- 
dent wrote as follows: 



Another student wrote in her questionnaire: 

Dr and Mrs. Russell Grow lived in the man- 
sion [Stevenson House] during my t^vo years 
at McKendree. My first opportunity to wear 
a formal was at their home. I made the for- 
mal in my dorm room because my mother 
managed to sell enough eggs and cream back 
home to purchase the fabric but coiddn 't af- 
ford a ready-made dress. [The Grows] told 
me over and over how lovely I looked — just 
what I needed. . . . 

From anecdotes such as these it seems apparent 
that Dr. Grow and Mrs. Grow shared a mutual respect 
and admiration for the students they served at 
McKendree and received like measure from the stu- 
dents. 

In the McKendree Review of February 7, 1 950, Dr. 
Grow announced his goals for McKendree. Foremost 
were plans for a new gymnasium-auditorium (what 
would become Bearcat Gym) with an auditorium ca- 
pacity of 2,500 and a game capacity of 1,500. Ac- 
cording to Dr. Grow over half of the necessary funds 
were already available, and the balance was pledged. 
Building the new gym would be a significant step 
toward re-accreditation by the North Central Asso- 
ciation. 

Additional goals included the renovation of 
Eisenmayer gym into offices, a snack bar, a bookstore, 
student and faculty lounges, and a large recreation area. 
Also, the library, the dormitories, and other campus 
buildings were to be redecorated and repaired. 

Other goals Dr. Grow hoped to achieve were a 
larger, more up-to-date library and an increase in the 
number of faculty with Ph. D.'s. Both of these goals 
were in line with North Central recommendations. The 
board minutes of May 22, 1950, indicated that these 
goals had board support and cooperation. 

After looking briefly at the goals of Dr. Grow and 
the college board, it follows that we should next look at 
how these goals were accomplished, when they were 
accomplished, and to what degree they were accom- 
plished. 



MC KENDREE~Rr 




President and Mrs. Crow's reception for students andfacult 



By early 1951 the accreditation plan for 
McKendree had been channeled into three definite steps. 
The McKendree Review of Februnry 13, 1951, outlined 
them as follows: 

1. More stringent requirements for faculty 
would be put in place, and faculty members 
hired in the future would hold Ph.D.'s, 

if at all possible; 

2. The student center would be completed; 

3. Improvements would be made in the library, 
laboratories, other buildings, and grounds. 

In addition, renovation of the physical plant, in- 
creasing academic programs, expanding enrollment, and 
enlarging the endowment would be emphasized. Yet 
another move to bring the college in line with other North 
Central requirements was the formation of an adminis- 
tration council. The council was to serve as a "clearing 
house" for matters not requiring faculty attention and 
be responsible for directing administrative policies, in- 
cluding religious activities such as chapel services 
(McKendree Review, June 6, 1954). 

A front-page article in the September 1951 issue 
of the McKendree College Bulletin described delight 
expressed about campus improvements by students re- 
turning for the fall semester. Renovation of Clark Hall 
had been completed; Pearsons Hall, including the 



^[^^^^■^^ kitchen, had been renovated. 

^^^^J Work continued on the sci- 

^^^^H ence hall, Old Main, the li- 

^ I^I^^^H brary, and Carnegie Hall, and 

J t ^^1 the former bookstore was be- 

■b^V ^B ing converted into a physics 

laboratory. 

In the rebuilding of a 
great institution, there are 
many small but important 
tasks that must be done. 
Generally the doers of the 
"little jobs" go overlooked. 
Such was the case with Mrs. 
Grow. Working behind the 
scenes, she accomplished 
many things through the 
Methodist Women's Society 
of Christian Service, Faculty 
Dames, other groups, and by 
herself at times. What she did 
went generally unnoticed except by the few, but she de- 
serves accolades for her work for McKendree. She was 
truly a helpmate and contributor to Dr. Grow and his 
work at McKendree. One of the little things she did was 
to acquire lamps for the desks in the dormitories 
{McKendree Review, December 5, 1950). 

The goal of improving the faculty to comply with 
North Central's recommendation was accomplished in 
a somewhat dramatic fashion from 1950 through 1956, 
as the number of faculty holding doctorates increased 
from three to 10 over that period of time and the per- 
centage improved from 12 percent to 33 percent. An 
examination of the percentage of faculty with Ph. D.'s 
at other institutions of higher learning shows that 
McKendree compared quite favorably to them on this 
matter. 

Dr. Grow hoped to see McKendree enrollment in- 
crease significantly during his tenure, and he did see 
improvement. Records indicate that McKendree re- 
ceived a great boost in this critical area from the Air 
Force. The Air Force had introduced a five-year plan, 
to become permanent if successful, to rai.se the educa- 
tional level of its officers and men in order to increase 
their efficiency and qualify them for higher rank. In 
fact, the McKendree College Evening School started 
during the spring semester of 1950 in direct response 
to Air Force needs. This more than negated the de- 
crease in traditional enrollment caused by students 
leaving college and entering military service for the Ko- 
rean War. 




MC KEN DREE fe: 



Although the actual full-time day-student enroll- 
ment averaged only about 230 during the Grow years, 
the total number of persons to whom services were be- 
ing provided increased dramatically from 1949 to 1957. 
When the figures for seminars, clinics, workshops and 
especially the influx of Air Force personnel in the 
evening school classes are added to those of "regular" 
students, the total number served increased from 600 to 
over 1600 in those eight years. 

The peak enrollment in the all-important evening 
school programs occurred in the 1950-51 year, when 
239 were enrolled. Classes held in off campus "resi- 
dence centers" reached a high mark of 368 in the 1 954- 
55 year. This latter figure was impacted by enrollees 
representing McKendree's fourth generation of military 
veterans. The postwar era definitely brought McKendree 
some economic relief because of 
the enrollment of veterans return- 
ing to college under the GI Bill. 

McKendree was also able 
to improve its endowment fund 
significantly while Dr. Grow was 
its president. Although complete 
figures are not available, minutes 
of the board of trustees and the 
McKendree College Bulletin of 
June 1954, reported that endow- 
ment doubled from $95,000 in 
1949-50 to $190,000 in 1954. 

Improvement and expan- 
sion of the physical plant, al- 
though somewhat delayed during 
the Korean War, began to move 
forward again in the middle years 
of Dr. Grow's administration. In 
a meeting of the college board on 
January 31, 1955, plans were 
made to raise funds for a new 
gymnasium. In addidon, other 
plans for expansion and recon- 
ditioning of existing buildings 
were approved. These included, 
in addition to the gymnasium, an 
addition to the library, a new 
men's dormitory, continuing 
renovation to Eisenmayer gym, 
and a new science hall 
(McKendree College Bulletin, 
February?, 1955). More defini- 
tive action toward the above 
plans was taken in the board 



meeting of May 28, 1955, when the board approved 
borrowing $160,000 for building the new gym. As re- 
ported in the May 1955 McKendree College Bulletin, 
the actual groundbreaking ceremonies for the new gym 
occurred April 13, 1955. 

At this point, the impact of Dr. Grow in expand- 
ing and strengthening McKendree College in its attempts 
to achieve full North Central accreditation cannot be 
overlooked. Increased enrollment, increased endow- 
ment, improvement in faculty preparation, and improve- 
ments in buildings and grounds — all requirements for 
North Central's re-consideration — were accomplished 
during his tenure. 

At the inauguration ceremonies for Dr. Grow, 
Bishop Ralph Magee had reaffirmed McKendree's be- 
lief in academic freedom for its faculty: 




Students at work in Biology Lab. 



MC KENDREE 



WTi 







Crowning of the Homecoming Queen in 1950. 



An honest college must . . . [declare] that a 
well-established truth cannot, and must not, 
be held in silence just for tradition 's sake. 
. . . a college is not a real college unless there 

is genuine academic freedom efforts 

at regimentation will be urged by certain out- 
side influences, and sometimes by well mean- 
ing alumni . . . to follow them would mean 
the ultimate death of the college. 

President Grow and the faculty, respectful of this 
commitment to academic freedom, worked together in 
a spirit of collegiality throughout his presidency. The 
faculty put students first, taught well, published well, 
and received numerous academic honors. 

Students of the era, in their responses to the Alumni 
Association Questionnaire, singled out nearly every fac- 
ulty member as having students' best interests at heart. 
The following quotes are typical of the responses re- 
ceived: 

. . . small classes and one on one instruction . . . 

. . . instilled an interest . . . 

. . . had an effect on how I conducted myself in 

my life and my career. 
. . . took pride in their students 

Several respondents went into greater detail about 
favorite faculty members. Included among the many 
received were these stories about 'Prof" Fred Fleming, 
Raymond Daniel, Dr. W. Norman Grandy, and Dr. 
Mildred Silver. . 



The night before final exam in botany, 1 had 
stayed up most of the night studying. I had to 
be ready for the exam at 8:35. At 8:45 1 was 
still sleeping when there was a knock at my 
dorm door It was Prof. Fleming, saying, 
'Aren't you coming to take the exam? It's 
8:45. ' I came to life, dressed, and at 8:50 
was taking the exam. From that time on Prof. 
Fleming could do no wrong. Other teachers 
cared about us too. (Lester Gar\>er '52) 




Homecoming skit in 1951. 



MC KENDREE" 



Raymond Daniel was the business officer at 
McKendree. After Bob Mollis, Ray Porter, 
and I applied to attend seminary at Drew 
University, in New Jersey, Mr Daniel showed 
his generosity by telling us he needed to make 
a trip to New York and we could go along to 
visit our prospective school. We visited the 
Drew campus, interviewed with a New York 
conference about sen'ing student charges, 
and went to the Ringling Brothers circus at 
Madison Square Garden. (J. Grob '53) 

I always thought of Dr Grandy as the 'Mr 
Chips' of McKendree. . . . We had a farewell 
party and gave him a memento; I do not re- 
call what it was. He said, 'They gave me a 
momentum! ' Ours was not a gift to give him 
momentum to go. We were sorry to say, 
'Good-bye, Mr Chips. ' (Martin Roper '54) 

Dr Mildred Silver saying to me, 'You can't 
go to college, work, play sports, and com- 
mute two hours driving time. If you are go- 
ing to do well in college, you can 't do every- 
thing. ' No one supported me more nor has 
been a better friend than Dr Silver after she 
got me to be a student first and an athlete 
second. (Dale Cruse '55) 

Dr Silver was much more to me than an in- 
spiring teacher She was also my advisor and 
friend . . . I always felt welcome to drop by 
her home for some friendly advice, a listen- 
ing ear, even an occasional meal. . . . She 
encouraged me to keep my major in English 
while acquiring all requirements for an el- 
ementary teaching certificate. . . . 'You just 
need it sometimes, ' she advised. . . . By the 
way, she was matron of honor at our wed- 
ding. (Bette Ridgeway Wadsack '56) 

In addition to teaching well, and being loved and 
loving their students, the McKendree faculty still found 
time for other activities. Frequently they received rec- 
ognition for their professional publications and wide 
attention for their academic work. Honorary degrees and 
other professional recognition was accorded them for 
their accomplishments. Several faculty members re- 
ceived attention in various "Who's Who" publications. 

Evidence of progress toward Dr. Grow's stated goal 
of increasing academic preparation of the faculty is 



shown through the increasing number of Ph.D.s on the 
teaching staff. From 1950 to 1956, the percentage of 
full time faculty with this terminal degree rose from 12 
percent to 33 percent, not an insignificant increase in 
any situation, but especially so, since the number of fac- 
ulty members was also increasing to accommodate the 
increasing enrollment. 

And now we come to a discussion of that most 
important part of any institution of learning — the stu- 
dents. As any good educator would. Dr. Grow placed 
educating and nurturing students as his top priority. 
Following is a brief look back in time to the McKendree 
students during the Grow years; how McKendree influ- 
enced them, some of their favorite stories, the social 
climate during their McKendree years, and some of their 
accomplishments, both individual and as a group. 

Some mention should be made of the impact of 
the Korean War on McKendree and its students. Some 
McKendreans dropped out of school to volunteer in 
various branches of the military service. Those who re- 
mained generally received student deferments that re- 
mained in effect as long as the student maintained a sat- 
isfactory grade average or until his graduation, at which 
time he became eligible for the military draft. 

It is interesting to note that there were no draft 
protests by the college students of that day. As in the 
case with all wars, some of those who went into mili- 
tary service did not come back. Most students who 
thought about the war remembered the time as being 
"scary." Only five years after the end of World War II 
was hastened by the atomic bomb, many students won- 
dered if the bomb would be used again in Korea. A 
number of McKendreans served as chaplains in the 
military. One of them remembered serving at Arling- 
ton National Cemetery where he participated in many 
funerals. 

A number of McKendreans serving in the military 
during the Korean War were awarded medals of honor 
for their service, just as had McKendreans in the 
country's other wars from the Civil War to date. 

Various things impress us during our lifetimes, 
some in positive ways, some in negative ways. Most of 
us would agree that among them are family, friends, 
church, and school. It is interesting therefore to peruse 
the responses to the Alumni Questionnaire concerning 
the influence of McKendree on their lives. Following 
are some representative remembrances: 

/ now have a great respect for all religions 
and cultures and why they believe [what they 
do]. . . (R. Ashal '50) 



Ninety-Seven 



We thought enough of this small college at- 
mosphere to send our daughter (and she met 
her husband there). (L Anderson '50) 

. . . The Christian ideals and moral values 1 
found there still guide me. The small col- 
lege atmosphere can never be overstated. 
(L. E. Anderson '51) 

The small classes and student-teacher ratio 
[were] important. (B. Campbell '51) 

McKendree's influence was the foundation 
for active leadership in the local church. . . . 
I have been able to serve in many capaci- 
ties. . . . (D. Tanner '52) 

. . . The terms 'integrity, ' 'honor, '[and] 'mo- 
rality ' are just a few [influences] ingrained 
in those years. (J. Davidson '54) 

McKendree uplifted me and my entire life was 
on the upgrade. . . (J. Jackson '54) 

Wonderful friendships . . . opportunity for 
growth . . . opportunity to meet and marry 
my husband. (M. Jenkins '55) 

. . . make some very good friends. . . . met 
my [future] wife. . . . coached by a very fine 
gentleman, Dr Jim Collie. . . . 
Christian influence was impor- 
tant. (V. Mot singer '56) 

I have had a love affair with 
McKendree from the first day I 
stepped on campus. The edu- 
cation 1 received at McKendree 
and the influence on my life from 
faculty, staff, and students gave 
me a solid foundation for think- 
ing, growing, and developing. 
(D. Cruse '55) 

1 credit McKendree for giving 
me the opportunity and confi- 
dence to become a successful 
lawyer and judge, a better fa- 
ther and grandfather My un- 
dergraduate e.xperience gave me 
a wonderful background. (D. 
McGrew '57) 



My degree has enabled me to obtain a stan- 
dard of living beyond my expectations. . . . 
revealed to me the limitations of depending 
on self and the necessity for God's interx'en- 
tion to obtain unexpected benefits in accor- 
dance with his will and purpose for my life. 
(C. Malone '57) 

As one who reads the above can clearly see, the 
influence of McKendree in the lives of its students tran- 
scends academic accomplishments and impacts on their 
lives in terms of family, friends, and life work. 

The telling of a story and the human experiences 
shared therein has few rivals in lasting fascination. 
People enjoy telling the story of what happened to them 
or somebody they knew. Jesus told parables to link 
abstract truths to the experiences of his listeners; 
Aesop's fables used animal characters to make a 
point. Following are some stories from McKendree 
students during the fifties, and they may tell the story 
at that time more eloquently than the more objective 
data presented in this chapter up to this point. To pro- 
tect the innocent rather than to implicate the guilty, 
no names have been attached to the following anec- 
dotes, which former students provided in the Alumni 
Questionnaire. 

McKendree accidentally participated in coed dorm 
life long before it became popular at more liberal insti- 
tutions. 




Dedication of Little Chapel in Eisenmayer Gym in 1955. 



Ninen-Eighl 



-^^s^ssssss^^S^EI^lHDal^^^^^ss^s^^^ 




Students in Pearsons Hall cafeteria line. 



Many of the respondents re- 
called their days as student work- 
ers at McKendree. One student said, 
"It was the only way I could attend 
McKendree or any college!" Many 
other students echoed this state- 
ment. Students worked in the din- 
ing hall, the library, in various fac- 
ulty offices — all over the campus. 

Several student jobs were al- 
ways available in maintenance, and 
some delightful stories about stu- 
dent workers in the maintenance de- 
partment appeared in the question- 
naire responses. It should be noted 
that these were told about other stu- 
dents. The following are examples: 



One summer all the girls lived in the boys ' 
dorm because the girls ' dorm was being re- 
modeled. 

The girls' dorm seemed to be the center of much 
other social activity as well. One student recalled: 

Mom Hertenstein was a wonderful person, 
but she could be conned by her girls. She 
wouldn 't have believed how many {or who) 
went out the back windows and into town 
after the dorm was locked. Some of the best 
{and most religious students). 

I had a room on the first floor — back side of 
the dorm. It became the 'escape route 'for too 
many girls to be tuimed. . . . 

One winter it was so cold we used a popcorn 
popper to try to keep warm. When we went 
to sleep, the popper shorted out and set our 
room on fire! 

Many students recalled events connected with 
freshman initiation, especially the women. All the rec- 
ollections mentioned the freshmen being taken far out 
into the country, dropped off in groups, and then find- 
ing their back way to the campus. Most of the stories 
hinted that the freshmen usually outsmarted their up- 
perclassmen tormentors and returned to ring the col- 
lege bell. In 1952 the upperclassmen removed the bell 
clapper, "so [several freshmen] climbed up and rang the 
bell with a Coke bottle." 



Once EdSlagle, the maintenance man, asked 
a student helper to bring him some 220 wire. 
The helper got two rolls of 110 wire and asked 
[Mr. Slagle] if they could be combined! 

. . . also got a job (carpenter) doing the same 
thing. His first job was to build a bookcase 
for an office in Eisenmayer. . . . when he 
started to take it up to the office, it was too 
big to go out the shop door He had to take it 
apart and carry it up to Eisenmayer one piece 
at a time. 

Many responses mentioned College Hill Cemetery 
and its famed "cross-eyed angel," but the cemetery was 
famous for other reasons as well. One student had read 




4 



McKendree co-ed by cross-eyed angel 
statue in College Hill Cemetery. 



a story in Reader 's Digest magazine about a tomb- 
stone in the cemetery inscribed originally "Lord, 
She Was Thine," which time had partially erased 
to read, "Lord, She Was Thin." The student and 
her friends were able to find this tombstone. Many 
students remembered the cemetery with fondness 
as "a great place for necking." 

Students at McKendree did not have frater- 
nities or sororities but enjoyed viable alternatives 
called literary societies, Plato and Philo for men, 
and Clio for women. These organizations had been 
present at McKendree since the mid- 1 800s. In fact, 
an article in the December 11, 1957, edition of 
the McKendree Review mentioned that Clio had 
been organized on December 6, 1 869. 

And that great monument to the McKendree 
scene, the chapel bell, was mentioned by many 
students of the Grow years in their responses to 
the questionnaire. The bell was cast in Sth-cen- 
tury Spain and is reportedly the oldest bell in America. 
Since 1 858 it has become perhaps the best-known rep- 
resentative of the college. In fact, it was rung all night 
in 1931 when McKendree received notification of its 
accreditation by the North Central Association. Perhaps 
the finest quotation about the bell came from a 1956 
graduate who said, "The sound still lingers in my mind 
as it called us to Friday morning chapel." 

Although the civil rights movement was still a few 
years in the future, some of the events of that move- 
ment were coming into focus in the fifties. McKendree 
was caught up in that. An African American student re- 
membered: 

Eisenmayer Gym was the gathering place for 
the black students at that time (1953 - 1957); 
the dormitories and cafeteria were off lim- 
its. The bookstore [was] only available for 
purchasing of cold sandwiches, etc., and, of 
course, books. 

McKendree did seem, however, to treat minority 
students with considerably more equality and respect 
than did the general public. One such student reported 
the following: 

Because we as blacks were so well received 
in our science courses, we were amazed at 
the difficulty we had in obtaining jobs in 
chemistry after receiving our degrees. This 
although some of our fellow white students 
were working in these fields prior to receiv- 
ing their degrees. 




Chapel Choir under direction of Professor Glenn Freiner in 1956. 

Another student reported that on a choir trip. Pro- 
fessor Bagg and the choir stopped for lunch at a restau- 
rant in Central Illinois. Most of the choir had ordered 
when two black students in the group were told they 
would have to eat in the kitchen. Dr. Bagg said, "No," 
and the whole choir got up and left the restaurant. The 
student added, 

I've admired Professor Bagg, my fellow choir 
members, and McKendree for standing up 
for what God knows was the only thing we 
could do. 

McKendreans can take justifiable pride for being 
in the forefront of one of the great social movements of 
the century. 

Students accomplished some very impressive 
things during the Grow years at McKendree. In gover- 
nance, for example, a new constitution and by-laws were 
put into effect for the Alumni Association according to 
the June 1950, McKendree College Bulletin. The liter- 
ary societies could claim members of renown. The Feb- 
ruary 25, 1953, McKendree Review reported that Philo 
membership included former governors, a chief justice, 
and prominent political figures. 

McKendree students from the fifties received na- 
tional recognition in politics, journalism, literature, mili- 
tary service (both wartime and peacetime), education 
and coaching, inventing, research, and other fields. All 
of these notable people had kind words about the per- 
sonal, effective education they had received at 
McKendree. 



MC KENDRE E^El 



McKendree College 

Lebanon, Illinois 



The 
McKendree Choir 

PROF. GLENN H. FREINER, Director 



1^ 



SEASON -1953-54 



Programme 




THE RrNGING OF THE BELLS 


Ludwlg Senfl 


iar .dea thai ■■proEramme" music is a con^arat.vely mode 


rn development, there 


PLANETS, STAES AND AIRS OF SPACE Johann Sebastian Bach | 


parts added by Franz Wullner to Bachs lieured bass. 




TENEBRAE FACTAE SUNT 


Marc Ingegneri 


^f:^^^^^^^'^^^^^^^ 


'^TS^:7r^^^- 


ALL BREATHING LIFE Job 


ann Sebastian Bach 


F,„a,e from the motet, ■■Sin, v., otbc Lord- 




II 












CHILDREN OF THE HEAVENLY FATHER 


Arr. Francis Pyle 


,,r..ZTX''Z i?n=vrsS.=D«° irel, Swa"'" " ^^ 




ALLELUIA 


Randall Thompson 


rhythmic f.sures. melodic lines, and dynamics. He displa 




^™ssio/ 





WELCOME SWEET PLEASURE 






'■j::^:j.^:::z 


THE LITTLE WHITE HEN 


Antonio Scandello 




Pa 1 H d th 


IN WINTER 




Chapel Choir 


IV 




FOUR WHITMAN SKETCHES 




A FARM PICTURE 




THOUGHT 












THE KEYS OF MY HEART 

North Country Folk Sons 


Arr. Arthur Warrell 


SOON AH WILL BE DONE 


Arr. William Dawson 


Between GrouDS II and HI. Dr Theodore Pittenge 
instruments at McKendree College, will play the f 


. professor of stringed 






ROMANCE FROM 2nd CONCERTO 


Henri Wicniawski 


'""•'■ "'"''■ *"»"■'""' 





McKendree College Choir spring concert tour 



One Hundred and One 



MC KENDREE" 



Although data on every graduate was unavailable, 
the responses to the Alumni Questionnaire reveal that 
35.9 percent worked in education, 19.7 percent worked 
in business, 17.3 percent worked in the church, 11.9 
percent were in civil service and the military, 2.6 per- 
cent were in the legal professions, and other categories 
totaled 12.6 percent. This distribution of careers for 
McKendreans is typical of that of students from other 
eras in the history of the college. 

Dr. Grow had stated on one of his earliest visits to 
McKendree, "The church-related college has a definite 
and important mission to fulfill. . ." {McKendree Col- 
lege Bulletin, November 11, 1949). Evidence shows 
that Dr Grow was indeed able to enhance that mission 
during his tenure as president of McKendree College. 
The January 28, 1957, issue of the McKendree Review 
enthusiastically endorsed Grow: 



who smiles and has a kind word for us when 
we meet him on campus. He is an adminis- 
trator with a firm but understanding hand. 
We students at McKendree realize constantly 
that we have one of the finest men in the coun- 
try for our president. 

We also realize that to find another college 
president with the tact, scholarship, execu- 
tive ability, and high religious principles that 
Dr Grow maintains would be difficult - if 
not impossible. 

Only recently under the competent supervi- 
sion ofDn Grow has the college come within 
the reaches ofaccreditation and under his con- 
tinued guidance we will reach accreditation. 



To many people a college president is one 
who presides over an education institution 
by appointment. But to the students of 
McKendree, a college president is a man of 
scholarship, tact, and insight. We speak, of 
course, of our own Dr Russell Grow. 

Dr. Grow has accomplished many things 
while he has been at McKendree. Some of 
them are the remodeling of both Clark and 
Carnegie halls, complete remodeling of the 
main administration office, the building of a 
student lounge and bookstore, new journal- 
ism offices, a band room, and an increase in 
Ph.D. 's among the college faculty. These are 
but a few of the material things which our 
president has done to make McKendree a 
greater place to receive an education. 

Because ofDr Grow's complete confidence 
in this school and to the students who attend 
it, the school has received greater strength 
from within. In the past there was a bit of 
hesitancy on the part of a student to say he 
attended McKendree, but thanks to the dig- 
nity which Dr Grow and his family have 
given to the school and the many improve- 
ments which they have been instrumental in 
bringing about, we now speak with pride in 
reference to McKendree. 

To too many people a college president is 
only a figurehead, but to us he is a person 



The difficulty for a small school to survive 
has been proved to us by the fact that one of 
our smaller neighboring colleges has been 
forced to close her doors to those seeking 
higher education. Whether or not this was 
due to incompetence of the executive who 
headed this school is not known. But we 
McKendreans do know that with Dr Grow 
heading our school we will not succumb to 
any of the pitfalls which are now engulfing 
other small schools. 

We would like you, Dr Grow, to know that 
the student body of McKendree College is 
behind you in any enterprise you may wish 
to undertake concerning McKendree. WE 
SALUTE YOU! 

Ironically, at the very next college board meeting, 
on February 7, 1957, Dr Grow submitted his resigna- 
tion. The board accepted with regrets (Board Minutes). 
Dn Grow accepted a position at Culver-Stockton Col- 
lege in Missouri to begin in September 1957. All 
McKendree would come to miss him and his family. 

Dr Grow died on May 7, 1974. The following 
tribute appeared in The Tulsa World: 

Dk Grow was a rare tutor He was a 
man who would have ended Diogenes' 
search. He always gave more than he took, 
and he never required anything of anyone 
that he himself had not once done. His ro- 
mance with life was vivid. 



One Hundred and Two 



MC KENDREE 



The Administration of President Russell Grow 



Faculty List 



1950-51 

Chester S. Bagg 
Edwin P. Baker 
Dorothy Bamett* 
J. R. Blankenship* 
Gertrude Bos 
Lawrence Boyer 
Earl Dawes 
Katherine Daniel 
Eliza J. Donaldson 
Beth R. Dolan 
Fred A. Fleming 
Tommy Lou Fox 
Wiley B. Garvin 
Dorah Grow* 
Bertha W. Gutekunst 
Helmut C. Gutekunst 
Harold Hertenstein 
Edward L. Hoffman 
Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 
Avis Leilich* 
Jean Lougeay 
Elmer Murray 
Gerald Nielsen 
Nell G. Oppitz 
Elizabeth White Parks 

Leslie Purdy* 
Hugh Redden 
R. C. Sayre 
Mildred Silver 
Charles J. Stowell 
Evelyn Troutman 
Lewis B. Van Winkle 



1951-52 

Robert C. Ashby* 
Chester S. Bagg 
Edwin P. Baker 
Eva Burkett 
Samuel Carter 
Cyclone Covey 
Earl Dawes 
Thomas D. Evans* 
Fred A. Fleming 
R. C. Fox* 
Tommy Lou Fox 
Beatrice Godwin 
William N. Grandy 



Voice 

German, Dean Emeritus 

Physical Education, Science 

Music 

Librarian 

Economics, Political Science 

Education, Psychology 

English 

Commerce 

English 

Biology 

Business Education 

Eiducation 

Business Education 

French, Spanish 

Chemistry, Physics 

Mathematics 

Philosophy, Religion 

Piano, Organ, Theory 

Physical Education 

Art 

Education 

Public School Music 

History, Sociology 

Journalism, Director of 

Public Relations 

American Government 

Dir. of Athletics, Coach 

Practice Teaching 

English 

Mathematics, Dean Emeritus 

Philosophy, Religion 

Education, Psychology, 

Registrar, Director of 

Placement Service 



Education 

Voice 

German, Dean Emeritus 

English 

Physics, Coach 

History 

Education 

Sociology 

Biology 

English 

Business Education 

Librarian 

Philosophy, Religion 



Dorah Grow 
Helmut C. Gutekunst 

Edward L. Hoffman 
W. Howard Ketring* 
William M.King* 
Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 
D. W. Lewis 
Jean Lougeay* 
Lew W. Mason* 
Wilson L. Miser 
Elmer D. Murray* 
Gerald Nielsen 
Inez H. Neal* 
Nell G. Oppitz 
Elizabeth White Parks 

Robert PuUiam* 
Leslie Purdy* 
Hugh Redden 
Francis L. Richardson 

R. C. Sayre* 
Mildred Silver 
Charles J. Stowell 
Evelyn Troutman 
Lewis B. Van Winkle** 



i 1952-53 

Robert C. Ashby* 
Robert Baeder* 
Chester S. Bagg 
Edwin P. Baker 
Samuel Carter 
James D. Collie 
Cyclone Covey 
John Dustin 
Thomas D. Evans* 
Fred A. Fleming 
Beatrice Godwin 
Marguerite Grandy 
William N. Grandy 
Dorah Grow 
Helmut C. Gutekunst 
W. Howard Ketring* 
Jean Fisher King 
Oliver H. Kleinschmidt 
D. W. Lewis 
Jean Lougeay 
Lew W. Mason* 
Wilson L. Miser 



Business Education 

Chemistry, Director of 

Evening and Summer School 

Philosophy, Religion 

Sociology, Psychology 

English 

Music 

Speech 

Art 

Business Law 

Mathematics 

Education 

Public School Music 

Business Education 

History, Sociology 

Journalism, Director of 

Public Relations 

English 

Sociology 

Dir. of Athletics, Coach 

Education. Director of 

Student Personnel 

Education 

English 

Mathematics, Dean 

Religion 

Education, Psychology 



Education 

Social Studies 

Voice 

German, Dean Emeritus 

Physics 

Dir. of Athletics, Coach 

History 

Librarian 

Sociology 

Biology 

Assistant Librarian 

Literature 

Philosophy, Religion 

Business Education 

Chemistry 

Sociology, Psychology 

Language, Literature 

Music 

Speech 

Art 

Business Law 

Mathematics 



One Hundred and Three 



MC KENDREE~^r 



L 


^^ 












n*., 




4^'"* 



W£'eA:/>' Chapel Service. 



Elmer D. Murray* 


Education 


Marguerite Grandy 


Librarian 


Nell G. Oppitz 


History, Sociology 


William N. Grandy 


Philosophy, Dean 


Emerial Owen, Jr. 


Language, Literature 


Dorah Grow 


Business Education 


Edgar B. Purdy* 




Helmut C. Gutekunst 


Chemistry 


Leslie Purdy* 


Sociology 


Richard Howe* 




Francis L. Richardson 


Eiducation, Director of 


Delmar Koebel* 


Business Law 




Student Personnel 


Joseph Leiber* 




R. C. Sayre 


Education 


Jean Lougeay 


Art 


Virgil Seymour* 


Social Studies 


Wilson L. Miser 


Mathematics 


Mildred Silver 


English 


Nell G. Oppitz 


History 


Stimson Smalley 


Greek, Religion 


Emerial Owen, Jr. 


Language, Literature 


Charles J. Stowell 


Mathematics, Dean Emeritus 


T. M. Pearson 


English, Journalism 


John Strange* 




Theodore Pittenger 


Music 


Vetta Jean Tayor* 


Social Studies 


Francis L. Richardson 


Education, Director of 


Lewis B. VanWinkle 


Education, Psychology, Dean 




Student Personnel 






Martin Roper 


Art 






R. C. Sayre 


Education 


1953-54 




Virgil Seymour* 


Social Studies 


Robert Ashby* 


Education 


Mildred Silver 


English 


Robert Baeder* 


Social Studies 


James Simms* 


Religion 


William Bailey* 
Howard Bundy* 




Stimson Smalley 


Religion 




Robert Stanley* 




Wayne Burkey* 
Samuel Carter 


Physics 


Charles J. Stowell 
Paul Woods* 


Mathematics, Dean Err 


James D. Collie 


Dir. of Athletics, Coach 






Cyclone Covey** 


History 






Thomas D. Evans* 


Sociology 


1954-55 




Fred A. Fleming 


Biology 


Wayne Artis 


Religious Education 


Glenn Freiner 


Music 


Norman Beck* 


Education 


Mary Givens 


French, Spanish 


Talbert Belcher* 




Beatrice Godwin 


Librarian 


Howard Bundy* 




<— y^.— > ;^s-'^-' 


One Himdr 


d and Four 


,-^ 


^~-==<s^^s. 


S^ 



MC KEN D R E E^g;: 



Wayne Burkey* 




Helmut C. Gutekunst 


Chemistry 


James D. Collie 


Dir. of Athletics, Coach 


Edward Hoffman* 


Religion 


Cyclone Covey 


Government, History 


Richard Howe* 




Thomas D. Evans* 


Sociology 


Ethel Kaump 


Speech, Drama 


Velma Fairbum* 


Physical Education 


Wilson L. Miser 


Mathematics 


Fred A. Fleming 


Biology 


James Nettleton 


Religion 


Glenn Freiner 


Music 


Nell G. Oppitz* 


History, Sociology 


Mary Givens 


Foreign Language 


Emerial Owen, Jr. 


Business Education, Registrar 


Beatrice Godwin 


Librarian 


Elizabeth White Parks 


English 


John Godwin* 




T. M. Pearson 


English 


Marguerite Grandy 


Librarian 


Theodore Pittenger 


Music 


William N. Grandy 


Philosophy, Dean. Registrar 


F J. Reynolds 


Social Slidues 


Dorah Grow 


Business Education 


T. H. Reynolds 
Francis L. Richardson 


History 


Helmut C. Gutekunst 


Chemistry 


Education 


Laum Jopin* 




R. C. Sayre 


Education, Psychology 


Ethel Kaump 


Speech, Dramatics 


Mildred Silver 


English 


Delmar Koebel* 


Business Law 


James Simms* 


Religion 


Murray Kovner* 




Stimson R. Smalley 


Religion 


Jean Lougeay 
Wilson L. Miser 


Art 
Mathematics 


Hope Stumpf* 
Joan Warner 


Spanish 

Journalism, Dir. of Public 


James Nettleton* 


Religion 




Information 


Nell G. Oppitz 
Emerial Owen, Jr. 


History, Sociology 
Language, Literature 


David Weaver 


Education, Sociology 


R. A. Patterson* 








T. M. Pearson 


English, Journalism 






Theodore Pittenger 


Music 


1956-57 




Francis L. Richardson 


Education, Director of 


Wayne Artis 


Religious Education 




Student Personnel 


Louis Butts 


Education 


Martin Roper* 


Art 


James D. Collie 


Dir. of Athletics, Coach 


R. C. Sayre 


Education, Psychology 


Katherine Daniel 


Librarian 


Virgil Seymour* 


Social Studies 


Zada Dickson 


Art 


Mildred Silver 


English 


Fred A. Heming 


Biology 


James Simms* 


Religion 


Glenn Freiner 


Music 


Stimson R. Smalley 


Religion 


William N. Grandy 


Dean, Philosophy 


Charles J. Stowell 


Mathematics, Dean Emeritus 


Dorah Grow 


Business Education 


Joan Warner 


Journalism, Dir. of Public 


Helmut C. Gutekunst 


Chemistry 




Information 


Edward Hoffman* 


Religion 






Ethel Kaump 


Speech, Drama 






Wilson L. Miser 


Mathematics 


1955-56 




James Nettleton* 


Fine Arts 


Wayne Artis 


Religious Education, Golf 


Richard Olmstead 






Coach 


Nell G. Oppitz* 


History, Sociology 


Louis Butts 


Education 


Emerial Owen, Jr. 


Business Education, Registrar 


James Collie 


Dir. of Athletics, Coach 


Elizabeth White Parks 


English 


Cyclone Covey 


History, Government 


T M. Pearson 


English 


Katherine Daniel 


Librarian 


F J. Reynolds 


Social Studies 


Zada Dickson 


Art 


T H. Reynolds 


History 


Velma Fairbum* 


Physical Education 


Francis L. Richardson 


Education 


Fred Fleming 


Biology 


Charlotte Ryker 




Glenn Freiner 


Music 


R. C. Sayre 


Education 


Wiley Garvin 


Education 


Mildred Silver 


English 


William N. Grandy 


Philosophy. Dean 


James Simms 


Religion 


Dorah Grow 


Business Education 


Hope Stumpf* 


Spanish 



''Part time 
''*0n Leave 



One Hundred and Five 




One Hundred and Six 



MC KENDREE" 



The Administration of President Webb B. Garrison 

(1957-1960) 

By Miley Palmer, D. Min. ('58) 



On May 15, 1957, the McKendree board of trust- 
ees in a special called meeting elected The Rev. Mr. 
Webb B. Garrison president, to take office on June 3. 
The interim was short because his predecessor. Dr. 
Russell Grow, was to join the staff of Culver-Stockton 
College by the first of September. The Garrison tenure 
would be as brief as it was quickly begun, yet it would 
be tremendously important in changing the direction of 
the college. It would be a time of great creativity at 
McKendree, and more than a little controversy would 
be generated in the process. 

Prior to coming to McKendree, Webb Garrison 
served as director of press and publishing for the Meth- 
odist Church's General Board of Education in Nash- 
ville, Tennessee. A native of Covington, Georgia, he 
had degrees from both Emory University and Candler 
School of Theology. After serving pastorates for nine 
years in South Carolina, he became assistant dean at 
Candler for a brief time. He then moved to Nashville, 
where for a year he taught at Scarritt College and 
Vanderbilt University, before joining the General Board 
of Education of the Methodist Church. He had been on 
that staff three years when he came to McKendree, at 
the age of 39. With him to the president's house came 
his wife, Mary Elizabeth (nee Thompson), and three 
children: Carol, 16; Webb, 13; and William, 7. One 
alumna speaks warmly of Dr. and Mrs. Garrison as "a 
wonderful (gentleman) and lady!" 

Garrison had already made a name for himself 
across Methodism as a frequent contributor to religious 
and secular magazines. Under the pen name of Gary 
Webster he had written a number of articles on science 
and nature. Under his own name he had written more 
than a million words in the denomination's Bible Les- 
sons For Youth and published two books. Why You Say 



It and The Preacher And His Audience. The latter was 
a Pulpit Book Club feature selection and made a text in 
the courses of study for all beginning Methodist minis- 
ters. 

The new president immediately set a vigorous 
course of action. He called for the Executive Commit- 
tee on September 17 to work on keeping McKendree in 
the news and to improve relations between the college 
and the churches; he also announced that the Methodist 
Church's General Board of Education, his former em- 
ployer, had just contributed $ 1 0,000 toward a new gym- 
nasium for the campus. On October 1 1 , the full board 
voted to press ahead with the building of the gym, a 
project for which ground had been broken at least twice 
before but then abandoned. Within two weeks a con- 
tract for $95,074.10 to build the gym had been given to 
the Ken Evans Construction Co. of St. Louis, with con- 
struction expected to be completed in 103 days. 




President and Mrs. Garrison 's reception for students and 
facult}'. 



One Hundred and Seven 



There was to be no formal ground-breaking cer- 
emony, just a lightning-fast start. The school at that 
point had only $30,000 on hand for the project. The 
board had voted to invest up to $70,000 more of per- 
manent funds in the project but warned that it had to 
be repaid. There had not yet been a fund-raising cam- 
paign because the college's administration felt that 
"something tangible" had to be done first. Construc- 
tion began in January 1958, after soil problems were 
discovered and the footings for the building re-de- 
signed. 

Funding for the new building, the first for 
McKendree in over 40 years, remained a struggle. 
Alumnus-trustee Charles P. Hamill in January 1 958 dis- 
covered a long-dormant account at Belleville's St. Clair 
National Bank, containing $700 and listed in the name 
of "The McKendree Improvement Association." It had 
been set up by the classes of 1 937 and 1 938 for "repairs 
and improvements of McKendree buildings and 
grounds" but was not to be disbursed until it had reached 
at least $ 1 ,000. Discovery of the account set off a round 




Bearcat Gymnasium 

of contacts with officers and members of both classes, 
asking for permission to apply the account to the new 
gym. By May, Administrative Assistant Charles 
Leckrone announced the launching of a program to sell 
$100,000 of bonds to finance completion of the build- 
ing. They were to be offered in denominations of $ 1 00, 
$500, and $1 ,000, for 10 years at 4.5 interest. Yet even 
when the gymnasium, still unnamed, was consecrated 



CONSECRATION OF NI^'' GVliNASIUM 

Ifaster of Ceremony: Don Metzger, areslf'ent of 
Mc'/endree College Student 
Body. 



Introductions 



Dr. i''ebb B. Garrison, oresl 
College. 



t McKendree 
aieiiber McKendree Eoaro 



Dr. Eugene Leckrone, class of 41, secretary 
McKendree College Board of Trustees. 

Dr. W. L. Cun^mlns. District Sunrrlntendent , 
Sast St. Louis District of the' Southern 
Illinois Conference, The Methodist Church. 

Act of Presentation; (Board Representative to 
District Superintendent) 

■'Wc present this building to be consecrated to 
t;he glory of jod and to the pur-ooses for vhich 
It was erected." 

Minister: Dearly beloved, it is risht and pro- 
per that all buildinrs erected by the church 
in its ministry for Christ and the service of 
mankind be formally and devoutly set ^apart and 
consecrated to the cause for which it was 
planned. Conforming to this practice and -be- 
lieving that a sound nnd I'holesome athletic 
program Is essential In the development of 
Christian character and as a means of teaching 
and demonstrating practical Christian living, 
we turn now to this act of solemn consecration. 



Let us now give ourselves to the ser- 
vice of God that our souls may be renewed after 
the image of Christ, that our bodies may be fit 
temples of the Holy Spirit and our labor .and 
recreation may be according to God's holy will. 

In the name of the Father and of the 
Son and of the Holy Spirit; to Christian sports- 
manship and to the recreation of mind and body, 

Reaponae: (By Audience) We consecrate this 
building. 



Respons 



ite this building. 



Minister: To the cause of Christian citizenship 
and the broad field of social relations, 

Response: We consecrate this building. 

Minister: With sincere gratitude to all those 

whose faith and gifts brought us to this Joyful 

hour, and with supplication for all who vUl 
turn this way in years to come, 

Response: We consecrate this building. 

Minister and People: We the people of the church 
and this Christian College, compassed about with 
a great cloud of witnesses, grateful for our 
heritage, sensible of the sacrifices of many who 
have gone before us, do consecrate ourselves 
anew to the continued service of God and man, 
as we consecrate this gymnasium in the name of 
the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit. 
Am.en. 

Dr. K- R. Spenoer, former McKendree faculty 
member, v^tll toss out basketb = ll to start second 
half of play. 



Presentation and Consecration of new gymnasium. 



One Hundred and Eight 



MC KENDREE 



on December 12, President Garrison offered to name it 
for anyone willing to donate the final $65,000 to wipe 
clean the debt. The ceremony, done during the half- 
time of the Homecoming basketball game, was presided 
over by Don Metzger, student body president. 

In the process of creating the gymnasium, a 
McKendree landmark disappeared. Lake Beautiful, 
source of student lore and mosquitoes for generations, 
was drained in August 1958. It was soon filled with dirt 
and sowed with grass seed. Several students who 
worked during the summer of 1 956 to clean Lake Beau- 
tiful recalled pulling all kinds of trash from its depths, 
including a set of rusty bed springs, which caused much 
speculation. 

While this major building initiative moved ahead. 
President Garrison also set in motion an even more far- 
reaching initiative: He pushed for changes in the struc- 
ture of the college's board of trustees, broadening its 
balance and scope. Half of the trustees and all of the 
board of visitors, who had voting rights among the trust- 
ees, were Methodist clergy. In the December 1957, 
board of trustees meeting. Garrison proposed abol- 
ishing the board of visitors and changing the ratio of 
trustees so that no more than one-third could be drawn 
from any one profession. He also urged drawing trust- 
ees from a wider area, particularly seeking represen- 
tation from across the Mississippi in St. Louis. The bal- 
ance of power on the board would be considerably al- 
tered. 

New faculty members were also attracted to the 
school under the new young president. In September 
1957, Dr. John Walker McCain, Jr., came to the English 
Department from the University of Dubuque, Dr. 
Roland Preston Rice returned to McKendree from Wil- 
liams College to be professor of religion and director of 
religious activities. Earl H. Dawes became head of the 
adult education program, and Eldon Dittemore came 
from Shurtleff College to head the business department. 
For the second semester, it was noted that 30 new stu- 
dents enrolled, 10 of them freshmen and the rest upper- 
classmen. By August 1959, 295 seniors had graduated 
for the year, half of them in the field of education. 

In accordance with his concern to increase the ties 
of the school to the church. Garrison scheduled 
Founder's Day in 1958 on February 28 instead of the 
traditional February 20 so that Methodist Bishop 
Charles Wesley Brashares could be present. At that cel- 
ebration, it was announced that the college was being 
"rededicated to the Church." At the same time. Bishop 
Brashares called a special session of the Southern Illi- 
nois Conference of the Methodist Church, to be held in 




Mrs. Goodpaster receives "Alumni Mother of the Year" award 
from Dean Grandy. 

Centralia, to consider a request to give an additional 
$65,000 a year to McKendree. That meeting attracted 
national attention and was reported in Time magazine. 
Speakers at the conference, which did accept the request, 
included student Lynn Grove, trustee Milbum P. Akers, 
and the former president of the National Education As- 
sociation, J. Lester Buford. 

Another initiative of President Garrison was to 
move McKendree toward becoming a strong liberal arts 
college. He first proposed to eliminate the extension 
programs, which the trustees agreed to do after May 
1960. At that point, McKendree was offering 42 off- 
campus courses over the southern third of the state. His 
second step was to have the school accepted into the 
Council of Small Colleges, which approval was an- 
nounced on May 31, 1958; it was not the same as full 
accreditation but was a step towards academic respect. 
At the board of trustees meeting of Oct. 23, 1959, he 
announced that he aimed for fewer students through the 
tightening of academic requirements. 




1978 



One Hundred and Nine 



The St. Louis Globe-Democrat Magazine of Nov. 
23. 1958, featured an article about the dynamic young 
president of McKendree, reporting that when he had 
been brought to the school in June 1957, "McKendree 
had one foot in the grave. Its treasury was almost empty, 
its enrollment far too low, its buildings badly in repair. 
He was told to cure the patient or bury him." The ar- 
ticle went on to report that in the months since, support 
from the Southern Illinois Conference of the Methodist 
Church had increased from $33,000 to $99,000 annu- 
ally; enrollment of full-time students had risen 22 per- 
cent to nearly 300 (a figure Garrison hoped to double 
within the next decade); and the new gymnasium had 
been completed. The president revealed that he had 
proposed a master plan for a $2,500,000 building pro- 
gram to cover the next 25 years and that a leading St. 
Louis architectural firm had been hired to draw blue- 
prints. In a caption of a photo of Dr. Garrison, the maga- 
zine commented that "The future of McKendree is pretty 
much in the hands of its progressive new president ... To 
survive, the old school is making revolutionary changes." 

One of those changes kicked off the most contro- 
versial period in memory at McKendree and perhaps 
contributed to the shortened tenure of Webb Garrison 
as president. The chapel had deteriorated so badly that 
a proposal was made to demolish it and build another, 
which caused such a storm of protest that the decision 
was finally made to restore the old building. 

Student memories from that period are relatively 
free of such controversy, however; in fact, they recount 
warm relationships, good learning, fun 
activities in art, drama, and music — and 
pranks. One alumna remembers beginning 
her student years at McKendree shortly 
after her father had died and being too far 
from home to be with her mother on week- 
ends; McKendree gave her "all the sup- 
port of a caring family." Another recalls 
being married in the Little Chapel over 
Eisenmayer Gym by Rev. Dittemore, 
when it was over 100 degrees in the room 
and there was no air conditioning — then 
a year later walking in the graduation cer- 
emony the day after her first child had 
been bom. The male students made a pact 
to carry her if she fainted and passed her 
a pillow to sit on during the ceremony! 

An alumnus mentions gathering for 
prayer and praise services around a birch 
tree in front of Clark Hall, hearing Stan 
'The Man" Musial lecture on campus, and 



organizing the first formal dance on campus, in 
Eisenmayer Gym in December 1960. Another alumna 
recalls that the "Distinguished Leaders Series" of lec- 
tures on campus included such luminaries as Senator 
Stuart Symington, Governor William Stratton, and pub- 
lisher Richard Amberg, among others. 

One alumnus remembers being chased on Sadie 
Hawkins Day and not being caught, and as a freshman 
being taken out into the country for a late night walk, a 
favorite feature of "Hell Week." His tormentors were 
Miley Palmer and Milton Hart, two childhood friends 
of his, and it was those two who afterwards went to 
President Garrison and proposed that the "Hell Week" 
initiation be changed to "Help Week." With his help, 
they then organized freshman teams under the guidance 
of upperclass students to clean up the campus and rake 
yards in the Lebanon community, wash windows, and 
do other such menial labors for elderly folk. 

The same student remembers that several fresh- 
men, among them Raydean Davis and Carl Manier, tried 
to "return the favor" by taking a senior, Charlie (Bear) 
McKnelly, for a snipe hunt in the woods near Homer 
Park. They left him with a bag to catch the snipe, but 
when they got back to their car, they found the keys 
gone! After pushing the car all the way back to cam- 
pus, they decided to retum to Homer Park to rescue 
Charlie - but could not find him. They spent the rest of 
the night searching the woods, while Charlie, who had 
pocketed the car keys, slept peacefully back in the men's 
dorm. 




One Hundred and Ten 



MC KENDREE 



In many ways it was an innocent time, when art 
students painted a mural on the basement wail under 
the dining hall depicting, among other things, a female 
pushing a lawn mower, only to be told by Zada Dickson, 
the art teacher, to change the figure to a male, for "la- 
dies don't mow grass!" When the same group had an 
art show, one student dropped a metal spike into the 
punch bowl, so that those present could have "spiked 
punch." Women students being initiated into Clio had 
to attend a basketball game in formals and walk the 
length of the gym cheering! It was also a time when 
dating habits seemed a little more complicated: Fe- 
male students on campus had to be in the residence 
hall by 10:30 PM, and the dorm director, Mrs. Hanbaum, 
flicked lights on and off to remind couples on the porch 
of the time. When the men's dorm became crowded, 
part of the women's residence hall was partitioned off 
so men could share it; one alumna laughs that she 
and Emerial Owen teased each other about being 
"room-mates," a daring concept in the fifties! One 
alumna recalls that she came to college thinking that 
if anyone kissed her, she'd become pregnant; when 
someone did kiss her (without permission), she cried 
because she feared that she had disgraced her family. 
But then Prof. Fleming walked by and invited her to his 
class on human anatomy, and she "learned about sex 
very clinically"! 

On the other hand, there was a dark side to the era 
as well. When asked about the diversity of the student 
body, one alumna replies. "Very little in the '50s. Life 
was simple." There were few black students at 
McKendree, none living on campus, and no black 
faculty. An alumna tells of going regularly with several 
classmates to a downtown restaurant for cream pie each 
day. One day, a dark-skinned classmate went with them, 
and the manager of the restaurant told the group, "Never 
bring that guy in here again." She said that the student 
was Spanish, but the manager growled, "He looks like 

an East St. Louis n to me!" She says, "I was so sorry 

for the boy. He never went with us again." One of the 
black students of that time, however, speaks gratefully 
of McKendree for giving him the education that enabled 
him to rise from the rank of private to three-star general ! 
One alumnus remembers that two male students were 
driven from campus for being "gay," and the "religious" 
people in the Methodist Student Movement group were 
especially abusive of the two, even though one of them 
had been an active member of the group. He said it 
made him more tolerant of diversity in later years. 

The state of Illinois had begun to push teachers to 
get a B. A., so many of them crowded into courses at 




Benson Wood Libran- 




Student Librarian and students hard at work. 

McKendree, often taking more than four years to finish 
the degree. One such student says she could never have 
done the required work for her profession, because of 
her roles as mother of two small children and pastor's 
wife, had not McKendree offered off-campus and 
summer courses of study. Another remembers being 
reassured by a faculty member's comment that "a degree 
does not make you smarter, but it is a tail-light which 
keeps others from running over you." At least one 
student began college during World War II and did not 
finish her degree at McKendree until 1 96 1 ; she went on 




One Hundred and Elev 



^s:^.fZ^^'^?^:^^^^^MC KENDREE"^CTg 



to finish a master's degree in 1964 and retired in 1968. 
Another student took 17 summers to graduate. There 
were still some veterans of the Korean War taking 
courses at McKendree as well; one student remembered 
being regularly awakened at night by the screams caused 
by one such "vet's" nightmares. 

There were lesser traumas remembered by some 
students. One recalls seeing a "cute little cat" wander- 
ing around campus and later finding the same cat the 
subject of a dissection in science class; and how those 
who had lab just before lunch entered the dining hall 
smelling strongly of formaldehyde. Another recalled the 
pranks played on Mrs. Hanbaum, director of the 
women's residence, which included a cat shut in her 
room over a weekend, and a mouse delivered to her in a 
nicely-wrapped box. 

When asked about faculty members who had a sig- 
nificant influence on their development, students often 
mentioned Prof. Fred Fleming in biology, Dr Mildred 
Silver in English, Emerial Owen and Charles Cox as 
counselors, Drs. Roland Rice and Stimson Smalley in 
the Religion Department, Coach Jim Collie, and Glenn 
Freiner and Orville Schanz in music. One remembered 
that Prof. Fleming said he spent two to four hours each 
night preparing and rehearsing the next day's lecture, 
even though he had 30 years' experience; and that stu- 
dents had to remember what Prof. Fleming said because 
whole sentences from the lecture would be on the test 
that he gave each week. One alumna remembers Prof. 
Fleming for teaching morals as well as biology and be- 
ing a great friend as well as teacher Another remem- 
bers his "teaching religion" in his biology classes and 
calling cigarettes "the weed of iniquity." Once in a class 
discussion on the scientific definition of life, a class 
member asked Fleming what his definition would be; 
he thought a moment and replied, "I believe life is the 
breath of God breathed into every creature." Still an- 
other tells of his sending a student over to the men's 
residence hall to get two class members out of bed for 
an 8:00 AM class, and doing it several times during the 
semester. Her husband recalls that Fleming would lean 
out his office window to inform smokers on the steps of 
the science building that, in the slightly changed words 
of an old hymn, "when the roll is called up here, you'd 
better be here." 

Another alumnus remembers Dr John McCain's 
falling asleep during his own lectures in his room on 
the second fioor of Old Main, and students escaping out 
the window and .shinnying down a drainpipe to avoid 
waking him. One recalls that Prof. Helmut Gutekunst, 
chemistry professor, in spite of his handicapped condi- 



tion struggled each day up three flights of stairs to his 
laboratory. Another remembers Ethel Homer having 
fallen but still managing to make all her classes while 
using a cane; "She maintained dignity in her profes- 
sion," she says. An alumna tells of Prof. Freiner taking 
her in hand as a freshman and giving her a chance to 
develop her musical skills and comments that this kind 
of attention is the advantage a small college can offer. 
Others remember the fun of choir tours, and the leader- 
ship Prof. Freiner gave the group. 

Nor were faculty members the only ones remem- 
bered with fondness. One alumna speaks warmly of 
"Mom" Florence Thomley, chief cook, as having great 
influence on several generations of students. She lived 
with her daughter in rooms above the dining hall and 
was always available as counselor and confidante. Sto- 
ries are also recalled about off-campus figures, such as 
"Dirty Dave," who reportedly made hamburger patties 
for his popular cafe by squeezing them under his arm 
pit, and 'Dopey' Lehman, the local constable, who was 
looking through a key hole just as a potential "panty 
raider" slammed the door open, leaving him with an 
impressive "shiner." 

Some alumni memories concern tragedies that 
occurred later to fellow students. One remembers that 
"Butch" Baum, '59, was a legend in international insur- 
ance sales, becoming a millionaire twice, and then was 
killed when his own airplane crashed. Another recalls 
alumnus Ken Frazier dying in Vietnam when he, a medic 
tending the wounded, threw himself on an enemy gre- 
nade to save his comrades; he had only about 30 days 
left on his tour of duty. 

Sports remained an important part of the 
McKendree story. One student recalls misjudging a short 
fly ball, which led to the baseball team's only loss of 
the season (it ended with a 24-1 record), and marveling 
that Coach Loy Dale Cruse would still speak to him. 
Another remembers the naming of Lloyd Castillo, a 
practicing Roman Catholic, to the "U.S. All Methodist 
Basketball Squad." However, one remembered how the 
1954-55 track and field record was almost ruined be- 
cause that year's freshman class, placed on the track 
field all night as part of "Hell Week," burned the school's 
hurdles in order to keep warm! One basketball player 
of the era recalls that their win over Illinois State one 
year was probably the team's greatest up to that time — 
and the following year I.S.U. hired McKendree's coach, 
Dr James Collie. 

Though many alumni speak warmly of the quality 
of education received at McKendree as well as the fine 
relationships, at least one former student demurs. He 



One Hundred and Twelve 




Mc KENDREE~Er 



/)/ Webb Ganiwn wtiirns as speaker at I960 
Commencement. 



thinks the school had low morale because of its 
unaccredited status and classes were very easy, "more 
like a glorified high school." To this day, he says, he 
cannot understand why he stayed; perhaps he "fell into 
the easy role of being a taker rather than a giver," and 
"extracted a very easy B. S. degree." His first class in 
graduate school changed all that, he says. Nonetheless, 
he speaks highly of the "good work ethic" taught him 
by Prof. Fleming and says, "Much of what I am today I 
owe to him." 

America was in a time of change during the Gar- 
rison years. The McCarthy era with its hatred and fear- 
mongering seemed at an end, but fresh tensions were 



rising. An exciting young president soon would take 
the reins of government, offer a vision of new opportu- 
nities, and within three years be shot down on the streets 
of Dallas. The nation was formally at peace, but in a 
small, far-off Asian country America's longest war was 
waiting to begin. It had taken federal troops to integrate 
Little Rock schools, and a dynamic young pastor named 
Martin Luther King, Jr., was organizing his parishioners 
to demonstrate for their civil rights. Americans would 
soon walk on the moon but would tlnd some of their 
own city streets less negotiable. All of the nation's in- 
stitutions would become increasingly suspect in the 
minds of a number of its citizens, and America would 
soon find itself needing to recognize and work in a dif- 
ferent global economy and political reality. 

Whether or not the student body realized it, 
McKendree was also in a time of significant change, 
led in no small part by Webb Garrison. He was not to 
lead the school through the revolutionary transforma- 
tion he envisioned, however. On Jan. 30, 1960, in the 
midst of an enormous controversy over whether the 
college's chapel should be razed or restored, he an- 
nounced his resignation effective as of February 1 to 
become pastor of the Roberts Park Methodist Church 
in Indianapolis, Indiana. Dean W. Norman Grandy was 
named as interim president while a search was in pro- 
cess. In the meantime. Dr. Garrison was to be retained 
by the board of trustees as consultant and had been asked 
to return as commencement speaker in June of that year, 
when he would be given an honorary doctor of litera- 
ture degree in appreciation for his work. 

In a statement for the press. Garrison pointed out 
that "any family that has spent 10 years in Methodist 
parsonages is never quite at home anywhere else. My 
wife and I have for several years looked forward to pas- 
toral service." He expressed appreciation for the accep- 
tance he had received in Southern Illinois religious and 
educational circles and looked forward to a continued 
relationship with McKendree. But at a chapel service 
filled with students, he pointed out that he had not been 
able to raise funds "as a president should," although 
some $800,000 was currently promised to the school. 
At the end of his speech, the students rose in spontane- 
ous applause for the young president who had dreamed 
of a new future for McKendree. 

The board of trustees minutes of June 10, 1960. 
approved the hiring of Dr. Max P. Allen as the next presi- 
dent of McKendree at an annual salary of $1 5,000; the 
minutes also noted a need for "an increased sense of 
responsibility on the part of trustees to support the new 
president." 



One Hundred and Thirteen 



MC KENDREE~Rr 



The Administration of President Webb B. Garrison 
Faculty List 



1957-58 

J. Adams* 
Harold Adolphson* 
C. Barton* 
Norman Beck* 
H. Boyd* 
Mrs. H. Brown* 
Robert Brown 
Louis Butts 
Otha Clark 
H. Crenshaw* 
Lx)y Dale Cruse 
Katherine Daniel 
Zada Dickson 
Audrey Dittemore 
Eldon Dittemore 
Elizabeth Parks Dixon 
Fred A. Fleming 
Loren K. Freeman 



Religion 

Mathematics 

Education 

Education 

Education 

Physical Education 

Sociology 

Education 

History. German 

Mathematics 

Physical Education, Coach 

Librarian 

Art 

French, Spanish 

Business Education 

English, Journalism 

Biology 

Chemistry 



Glenn Freiner 
Marino Garcia* 
John Godwin 
William N. Grandy 
K. Harden* 
W. Higgenbothan* 
Richard Kraucovic 
John W. McCain 
Charles Miller* 
James Nettleton* 
Inez Neal* 
Kenneth Norris 
James Oldfield 
Emerial Owen, Jr. 
Frank Pierce* 
Roland Rice 
T. H. Reynolds 
R. C. Sayre 
Orville Schanz 



Music 

Languages 

Mathematics, Physics 

Philosophy, Dean 

Education 

Business 

Music 

English 

Education, Speech 

Art 

Business 

Science 

Psychology, Coach 

Business Education, Registrar 

History 

Religion 

History 

Education, Psychology 

Music 




One Hundred and Fourteen 



MC KENDREE~H^ 



Mildred Silver 


English 


Felix Williams* 


Education 


James Simms* 


Religion 


Mary Ellen Williams 


Speech 


John Stewart* 


Education 






W. Trimpe* 


Education 






P. Vise* 
Kent Werner 
Suzanne Wicks* 
G. Wilkins* 
R Williams* 
William Wright* 


Religion 

Music 

Science 

Mathematics 

History 

Education 


1959-60 

L. D. Bauersachs* 
Norman Beck* 
Robert Brown 
Louis Butts 
Marita Clark 


Eiducation 
Education 
Sociology 
Education 
German 






Otha Clark 


History 






Jennie Cox* 


Business Education 


1958-59 




Lx)y Dale Cruse 


Physical Education. Coach 


Norman Beck* 


Education 


Katherine Daniel 


Librarian 


Robert Brown 


Sociology 


Zada Dickson 


Art 


Louis Butts 


Education 


Eldon Dittemore 


Business Education 


Marita Clark* 


German 


Elizabeth Parks Dixon 


English, Journalism 


Otha Clark 


History, German 


Mary Donham 


Business Education 


Jennie Cox* 


Business Education 


Fred A. Fleming 


Biology 


Loy Dale Cruse 


Physical Education, Coach 


Loren Freeman 


Chemistry 


Katherine Daniel 


Librarian 


Glenn Freiner 


Music 


Zada Dickson 


Art 


John Godwin 


Physics 


Audrey Dittemore 


French, Spanish 


William N. Grandy 


Philosophy, Dean 


Eldon Dittemore 


Business Education 


Freeman Greer* 


English 


Elizabeth Parks Dixon 


English, Journalism 


Lawrence Horsch* 


Speech 


Fred A. Fleming 


Biology 


Arthur Hortin* 


Education 


Loren K. Freeman 


Chemistry 


Loren Jung* 


Education 


Glenn Freiner 


Music 


Philip Kennedy 


History 


John Godwin 


Mathematics, Physics 


Delmar Koebel* 


Business Law 


William N. Grandy 


Philosophy, Dean 


Mariella Ken- 


French 


Philip Kennedy 


History, Philosophy 


John W. McCain 


English 


Delmar Koebel* 


Business Law 


Charles Miller* 


Education 


John W. McCain 


English 


James Nettleton* 


Fine Arts 


Charles Miller* 


Education 


Charles Nichols* 




James Nettleton* 


Fine Arts 


Paul Nugent 


Mathematics 


Patricia Nickell* 


Physical Education 


James Oldfield 


Psychology, Dir of Athletics 


Paul Nugent 


Mathematics 




Coach 


James Oldfield 


Psychology, Dir. of Athletics, 


Emerial Owen, Jr 


Business, Registrar 




Coach 


Frank Pierce* 


History 


Emerial Owen, Jn 


Business Education, 


Roland Rice 


Religion 




Registrar 


R. C. Sayre 


Education 


Frank Pierce* 


History 


Orville Schanz 


Music 


Roland Rice 


Religion 


Mildred Silver 


English 


R. C. Sayre* 


Education 


Marvin Stanley* 




Orville Schanz 


Music 


Ellice Simmonds 


English 


Mildred Silver 


English 


Curtis Trainer* 


Education 


EUice Simmonds* 


English 


Wilbur Trimpe* 


Education 


John Stewart* 


Education 


George Tuerck 


Music 


Curtis Trainer* 


Education 


Kent Werner 


Music 


George Tuerck 


Music 


Lester Wicks 


Chemistry 


Kent Werner 


Music 


Suzanne Wicks* 


Biology 


Lester Wicks 


Chemistry 


Felix Williams* 


Education 


Suzanne Wicks* 


Biology 


Mary Ellen Williams 


Speech 


*Part time 









One Hundred and Fifteen 




r 









Mary Knapp ( '36) 



McKendree Chapel 



One Hundred and Sixteen 



MC KENDREE ET 



The McKendree Chapel 



By Miley Palmer, D. Min. ('58) 



The heart and symbol of McKendree College has 
long been considered the chapel with its spire reaching 
above the campus. The sound of its bell wafting over the 
town has been one of the most enduring and treasured tra- 
ditions for both college and community. It's therefore 
startling to realize that the old chapel almost went 
out of existence in the latter part of the 20th century. 

The history of the chapel reaches back to the ear- 
liest days of the college. But the chapel bell is even older 
According to Dorothy C. LaRose, a noted authority on 
bells, the McKendree chapel bell has "a valid claim to 
being the oldest bell in the United States." while others 
claim it may be the oldest in the western hemisphere. 
According to observers who saw it before it was recast 
in the 1 850s, names and dates molded in the bell showed 
that it was first cast in Spain in the eighth century and 
recast in the 14th century. In the 16th century, accord- 
ing to a date carved on it, the bell w as brought to Florida 
by Jesuit missionaries. After conflict with natives and 
English settlers, the Jesuits moved westward to Mexico, 
taking the bell with them. 

Early in the 1 9th century, the bell was discovered 
in an abandoned mission near Santa Fe in the New 
Mexico Territory. Brought to St. Louis, it was recast by 
the David Caughlin Foundry, apparently to its original 
design of 25 inches in height and 31 .5 inches in diam- 
eter; the 1 6-inch yoke was not recast and remains a part 
of the bell, retaining its original markings and a classic 
Greek design of a lady with a lyre. Taken for a display 
at the Illinois State Fair in Centralia in 1858, the bell 
was seen and heard by Dr. Nelson Cobleigh, the second 
president of McKendree, and Prof. R. M. Moore, trea- 
surer of the college, who admired the rich tone of the 
bell and arranged for its purchase. The women of Leba- 
non raised $60 for the bell, and it was hung in the belfry 
of the chapel, where it remained until the steeple was 
removed in 1 959. It first rang for the graduation exer- 
cises of the class of 1 859. 



For 100 years the bell was used to call students to 
class and chapel services, and in later years it was one 
of the few left in the nation to use bell ringers, who 
tugged on a long rope attached to a wheel to ring the 
bell. Various customs arose around the bell; for instance, 
each year the freshman class attempted to slip away from 
campus for a secret picnic. If they successfully eluded 
both faculty and upperclassmen, they returned to ring 
the bell in victory. It also signaled other celebrations: 
When the first $100,000 was raised for the college's 
endowment during the presidency of Dr. Chamberlin, 
the bell was rung by students all night. 

The first known article about the bell was run in 
the Methodist Episcopal Church's Central Advocate in 
the early 1870s. In 1951 the college yearbook used the 
bell as its theme, centering its division pages around 
different shots of the bell, the tower, and chapel. Vari- 
ous magazines ran articles about the bell in the 1940s 
and 1950s. Jim Oppitz ('47) once wrote an extended 
article personalizing the bell, pointing out that "He, rusty, 
scarred old mass of iron," shows up at chapel every 
morning, knows more history than Dr. Walton, and could 
tell better stories than all the bishops in captivity. In- 
stead, he had been a prisoner in a nine-foot-square cell 
for many years. At the annual spring concert in 1947, 
the bell was used to accompany a French folk song, 
entitled "The Bell," sung by the McKendree chorus. In 
1952 D. W. Caughlin, grandson of the man who had 
first shown the bell at the Illinois State Fair, showed up 
on campus. Asking to see the bell, he was taken to the 
tower, led up the series of ladders in the dark interior, 
and was allowed to touch the bell. Before he left, he 
gave the rope two tugs "for Grandfather." 

Such affection for the bell, however, still lay in 
the future; first, there had to be a chapel. The first build- 
ing used for worship services was constructed in 1 828, 
the year of the college's founding; it contained 1 3 lodg- 
ing rooms as well as a place for worship. In January 




One Hundred and Se 



1856, it was destroyed by a fire, reportedly started at 
night by "some unprincipled students." On March 19, 
1856, the board of trustees began considering a new 
building, and on April 2 agreed to "build a house of two 
stories 50x70 or such dimensions as the committee 
should agree upon." At the June 1857, meeting of the 
board, then-president Peter Akers proposed that the 
building be enlarged to 50x75 feet, still two stories tall, 
with space for classrooms and library. 

Later that same year, Peter Akers resigned as presi- 
dent and Nelson Cobleigh was chosen to lead the school. 
One of his first tasks was to press forward in building the 
new chapel, which many felt necessary not only to the 
academic functions of the college but also for its religious 
commitment. Insurance money from the burning of the 
old building, along with a $6,000 loan, was used for the 
construction, and the graduating class of 1858 held its 
commencement exercises in the new facility. Seating 
more than 400 persons, the chapel was pronounced at 
the time to be "the largest hall of its kind in the state." 

The first seats in the building were long, movable 
benches, and the auditorium was heated by two large 
stoves, which were removed in 1898 when the three 
buildings on the hill were connected to a steam plant. 
The class of 1 890 gave opera chairs for the center of the 
room, and President Chamberlin secured a donation of 
different chairs to finish seating the room. Later there 
was a new set of matching chairs put in, given by an 
anonymous former student from Detroit. Sometimes 
the seating was moved out, as when the chapel was used 
as a drill hall during the Spanish-American War. 

The spire atop the building rose 140 feet above 
the front walk and was surmounted by a gilded globe 
three feet in diameter and a weather vane nine feet in 
length. Several generations of trigonometry students 
measured the height of the spire as a problem for class. 
It was also popular to see which class could hang its 
colors highest on the steeple and for students to steal 
the clapper of the bell in the tower. 

In 1917, the college purchased a pipe organ for 
the chapel. First built in 1851 by the Gratian Organ Co. 
of Alton for a Roman Catholic Church, the instrument 
had been sold to a Methodist Episcopal Church and then 
brought to McKendree. Operating by tracker action, 
which required ropes, wires, and leather straps, the or- 
gan contained 1 1 ranks of pipes ranging from two and 
three-quarters inches to sixteen feet high, and had two 
manuals and eleven stops. It continued to operate until 
1957. Another organ was presented to the chapel in 1971; 
on it is a plaque acknowledging the generosity of Otilla M. 
Baltz, Faith F Baver, M.D., and Marion Bothwell. 




Student examines bell in steeple. 

A clock was placed in the steeple in the 1930s, a 
gift of the Lebanon community under the leadership of 
the Ladies' Aid Society. It had huge weights on wires 
that led through wooden tubes to the ground. The clock 
was wound once a week by the turning of a windlass. 

The chapel sometimes was the focus of discus- 
sion and disagreement. In 1 937, the McKendree Review 's 
"Inquiring Reporter" asked, "If the school were offered 
a new chapel to take the place of the old one, would you 
consider tearing down our historical old building and 
putting up a modem chapel in its place?" The results of 
the poll were not published, for before the Review went 
to press it was announced that the Historic American 
Building Survey had pronounced Old Main and the 
chapel "historical buildings in Illinois." At the same time, 
Dr. C. R. Yost found the original blueprints for both 
buildings. Complete measurements of the buildings were 
placed in the state archives in Springfield and in the 
Library of Congress. 

Unfortunately, however, McKendree College faced 
a period of decline. The most important issue for the 
institution was the question of accreditation. By 1 957 
it was the main item on the agenda for a new presi- 
dent, Webb B. Garrison. In addition to changing the 
structure of the board of trustees and gathering a new 
faculty, he instituted a long-range plan that included 
a $2.5 million building fund. The first building 
erected was Bearcat Gymnasium, but it was also ob- 
vious that something would have to be done about 
the old chapel. 

In 1957, Miss Marion Bothwell of Fairileld, Illi- 
nois, announced a gift to restore and refurnish the 101- 
year-old chapel and endow the departments of religion 
and fine arts. The gift, the largest in the history of the 




One Hundred and Eigh 



MC KENDREE' 



school up to that time, was in honor of her father, 
James Cioyd Bothwell, who had attended McKendree 
with his brother, Henry Clay Bothwell, in 1863-64. He 
left after one year to fight in the Civil War. Accord- 
ingly, the facility was formally named the Marion 
Bothwell Chapel on the same day that Webb Garrison 
was installed as president of the college. The kerosene 
lamp used by James Bothwell as a student was used in 
the ceremony (it was pointed out that whale oil or lard 
was commonly used in such lamps at the time). In an 
interview two years later. Miss Bothwell recalled that, 
"My father was a small man and not too strong. He went 
twice to Springfield to enlist but was rejected. The third 
time an Army man said, Tf he wants to enlist so badly, 
let's let him in.' They decided he was too frail to carry 
one of those heavy Civil War rifles, so they gave him a 
bugle and he was a bugler throughout his service." 

While many rejoiced over the prospect of refur- 
bishing the chapel, in actual fact the days of the old 
building seemed numbered. On October 15, 1958, Dr. 
Garrison received an evaluation of campus facilities 
from King Graf, architect with the firm of Hellmuth, 
Obata, and Kassebaum. Graf reported that the exterior 
wall of the chapel was badly buckled and warped be- 
cause the building had settled four to six inches unevenly, 
interior supports were failing, and therefore "the build- 
ing should be replaced at the earliest opportunity." 




Then, on Nov. 3, 1 958, Jack Tharp, a student, rang 
the bell calling all to their classes, and plaster fell from 
the ceiling in Prof Glenn Freiner's fir.st floor music stu- 
dio. The center beam holding the bell was also dislodged. 
Over the next two weeks, workers re-plastered the dam- 
aged areas, but it was soon obvious that there were seri- 
ous structural flaws in the building. According to a struc- 
tural engineer's report, the damage was caused by the 
vibration of the bell and the sway of the 60-foot spire 
that topped the 145 foot-high chapel. By Nov. 20, chapel 
services had been moved to First Methodist Church in 
Lebanon, and the chapel was declared unsafe for use. 
Engineers told President Garrison that the life of the 
building was nearing its end, but it might be extended 
for a short time by taking down the tower and spire. 

Over the winter break. Dr. Garrison began to plan 
the removal of the old chapel and researching the cost 
of a new one. A letter dated Dec. 12, 1958, written by 
Graf in response to conversations with the president, 
reported that a new chapel seating 400 people would 
run between $240,000 and $280,000; it also referred to 
a comment apparently made by Dr. Garrison that he 
might have two sources for $125,000 of the money. 

Then on Jan. 20, 1959, President Garrison received 
a telegram from Mr. Earl H. Reed of the Committee on 
Preservation of Historic Buildings, urging him to re- 
consider his "decision to mutilate your nationally fa- 
mous early chapel," to seek a professional review, and 
to keep the society informed on progress of the chapel's 
preservation. On Jan. 23, the Lebanon Advertiser an- 
nounced that the steeple would be removed because it 
had been condemned by an insurance examiner, and the 
Building Committee of the board of trustees had autho- 
rized Bauer Bros, of Belleville to proceed with the dis- 
mantling, which was estimated to cost around $3,000. 
A campus master plan had also been ordered from Ri- 
chard Weinel & Associates of Belleville at a cost of 
$1 ,350, to be presented to the trustees on Feb. 20. The 
article noted that removal of the steeple was to have 
begun the week of publication but had been delayed 
because of bad weather. This delay gave time to arouse 
public sentiment to save the chapel. 

On January 27, the McKendree Review published 
a front-page interview with Dr. Garrison, in which he 
said, "The steeple of the chapel will be taken off in the 
immediate future. We hope that the foundation will be 
strong enough after that to hold classes on the first floor 
until a new chapel or educational building is constructed. 
If this does not prove correct, we shall have to dispose 
of the chapel sooner than planned." Ignoring the 
president's option of an educational building being put 



1978 



One Hundred and Nineteen 




Steeple clock is lowered. 

up rather than a chapel, the news story said that plans 
for the chapel were incomplete, an architectural style 
for a new chapel had not yet been established, nor had a 
construction date been set. 

At 1:31 PM on Feb. 5, 1959, a crowd of 
McKendreans, reporters, and townspeople watched as 
the steeple was pulled to the ground. One student re- 
porter commented, "Everyone stood around waiting for 
the steeple to fall and then acted as a group of sharks 
closing in on a wounded man." The inside of the spire 
revealed names of many former students. The wood at 
the top was charred, prompting some to remember when 
one of the first black students at McKendree was killed 
when struck by a lightning bolt that glanced off the bell. 
Many were surprised that the steeple stayed in one piece 
even after it hit the ground. Prof. R.C. Sayre, a 
McKendree grad, remarked that "without the steeple on 
the chapel, it leaves a lonely spot in the sky." Twenty- 
four hours later, the 400-pound bell was lowered to the 
ground; a few days later the base of the bell tower itself 
was brought down. 

In an effort to determine the condition of the 
chapel, bricks were removed from sections of the outer 
walls so that the inner walls could be inspected. It was 
revealed that both the inner and outer walls had .settled 
and budged far out of place. Mortar between the bricks 
was found to be "very crumbly ... in some instances 
merely creek sand mixed with a little water and mud." 
Clas.ses had already been ordered out of the building. 
Space was converted under the "girl's dorm" and the 
basement of the library into classrooms. The annex of 



the Lebanon Methodist Church was leased for use by 
the music department, and Pearsons Hall was designated 
as a practice space for piano students. 

The same day that the steeple was taken down, an 
article entitled "McKendree College To Raze Chapel" 
appeared in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, quoting Presi- 
dent Garrison that he had persuaded Miss Bothwell to 
give a large amount to construct a new chapel. It also 
reported that demolition of the building would not be- 
gin until after the trustees' meeting on Feb. 20 but added 
that this approval was "considered a formality." Leon 
Church, president of the Alumni Association, was quoted 
as saying that alumni had more feeling than money when 
it came to saving the chapel, but they would try to save 
the bell. A letter from William J. Murtagh, an official 
of the National Trust, was quoted: "As the oldest col- 
lege in the United States under the continuous supervi- 
sion of the Methodist Church, you have an obligation 
to the church, college, and the citizens of the United 
States to preserve such a venerated historic structure 
and not adopt the short-sighted solution of its destruc- 
tion." Dr. Garrison admitted that he had received other 




Workmen lower bell. 






Workmen guide hell to ground. 




Chapel aftt 



telegrams and telephone calls urging reconsideration, 
but he said, "Frankly, I have ignored the communica- 
tions. The fellows who sent them without any money 
weren't helping solve any problems." He went on to say, 
"We considered restoring the chapel, but when we learned 
the cost of restoration would be more than the cost of con- 
structing a new building, the plans had to be dropped." 

An editorial in the same issue of the Post-Dispatch 
said, "If workmen began to tear down Faneuil Hall in 
Boston because it was built in 1740 and was thus too 
old to repair, a protest would go up all over the country. 
. . . The century-old chapel at McKendree College . . . 
is a building both historical and lovely. Dear to many 
generations of . . . students, it has known the presence 
of governors, senators, and . . . men who rose in legal 

and civic life of St. Louis The responsibility for the 

building rests with the college trustees ... in a larger 
sense it is the responsibility of the Methodist Church 
throughout Southern Illinois. But this handsome build- 
ing actually belongs to the Mississippi Valley so much 
of whose history it has seen. Surely it can be preserved." 

After the two pieces appeared in the St. Louis pa- 
per, opposition began to mount against demolishing the 
chapel. Yet not everyone joined the protest. An inter- 
view with Miss Marion Bothwell, the generous donor 
for the chapel, appeared in the Wayne County Record 
dated Feb. 9, 1959. Nearly 86 years of age, she told the 



reporter that she approved of the destruction of the old 
chapel. "I am not devoid of sentiment," .she said pleas- 
antly but firmly. "However, we must be practical. That 
lovely building was made of soft brick. It could only 
have been repaired at great cost, and even then would 
have remained an old structure. I am thinking not only 
of the past 100 years it has served, but also of the com- 
ing hundred years . . ." 

Ironically on that same day, Feb. 9, the college 
faculty presented a protest to the trustees, terming re- 
moval of the old chapel an "utter destruction." They 
recommended that a committee made up of trustees. 
President Garrison's representatives, alumni, and towns- 
people be created to work toward a more satisfactory 
solution, and urged that participation be solicited from 
the National Trust for Historical Preservation, the Na- 
tional Institute of Architects, and the Illinois Historical 
Association. This apparently convinced the president to 
reconsider the possibility of renovation, for on Feb. 19 he 
received a report from King Graf, architect, entitled "Pre- 
liminary Specifications for the Structural Restoration of 
the McKendree College Chapel," which included a de- 
tailed examination of renovation costs, estimated to be 
$80,850. Graf also recommended that if the chapel were 
not renovated, then it should be torn down. The report, 
however, was not released to the public, and the next day 
proved to be a tough one for President Garrison. 

Feb. 20, 1959, was Founder's Day, an important 
tradition for the college. It also was a meeting day for 
the board of trustees, when a new president of the board 
was to be elected. As it turned out, the man elected was 




Marion Bothwell. benefactor of restored chapel. 



One Hundred and Twenn'-One 



Milbum P. Akers, managing editor of the Chicago Sun- 
Times, and great-grandson of Peter Akers, the 
McKendree president who had proposed the construc- 
tion of the chapel Dr. Garrison now proposed be torn 
down. Whatever the discussion was at that board meet- 
ing, at the end the trustees issued a statement applaud- 
ing the sentiments of those who wanted to restore the 
chapel, committed itself to cooperate in that effort, and 
ordered that the decision on demolition be postponed 
for a year in the hope that $ 1 00,000 could be raised for 
renovation - though the board also noted that no money 
was currently available nor were there prospects of im- 
mediately finding the funds, since the priority needed to 
be on obtaining accreditation through higher faculty sala- 
ries, better classrooms, and better laboratory facilities. 
News reports of the statement also noted that "a member 
of the architectural firm in St. Louis that surveyed the 
chapel made possible suggestions for restoring the build- 
ing. . . When asked if a new building similar to the present 
one could be built, the architect simply said that the 
charm and grace of the building would be lost." 

Two days before the trustees' report was released 
to the press. President Garrison wrote Congressman 
Melvin Price concerning the meeting. He stated that he 
felt there had been considerable misinformation in the 
press and expressed a hope that "perhaps now that the 
somewhat emotional atmosphere about (the chapel) is 
being dissipated by this one year's reprieve, things will 
quiten (sic) down a bit." But that was not to happen 
easily. The Lebanon Advertiser on Feb. 27 published a 
call for those favoring chapel restoration to meet at 2:00 
on Sunday, March 1 . It noted that members of the Alumni 
Association were divided on the issue of restoration 
versus replacement, and therefore a new organization 
committed to preserving the chapel had to be created. 

Dr. Garrison's letter to Representative Price was 
apparently prompted by a previous letter to Price from 
Elizabeth Parks Dixon. Director of Public Relations for 
McKendree in the late 1940s and early 1950s, she had 
maintained close ties with the college. An undated note 
from Mrs. Dixon indicated that she had written Repre- 
sentative Price and Adlai Stevenson. She also said that 
she had been informed by Cleve Weyenberg, president 
of the Lebanon Chamber of Commerce, that Miss 
Marion Bothwell had set aside $350,000 for the col- 
lege, more than originally believed. On March 3, Mrs. 
Dixon received a reply from Congressman Price, stat- 
ing that he was "extremely pleased that this action (the 
board's reprieve for the chapel) was taken. It is my feel- 
ing that the public interested in the preservation of his- 
torical edifices will respond to make it possible to keep 



the old chapel." He also sent her a copy of President 
Garrison's letter to him, received on Feb. 23. 

In the March 1959, issue of The Chimes, published 
by the Southern Illinois Conference Woman's Society 
of Christian Service, President Garrison wrote an ar- 
ticle which began "Change or perish!" It went on to say 
that "too long, (McKendree's) constituents have loved 
her more than they cared for her." He pointed out that 
insurance engineers had pronounced the chapel steeple 
unsafe and that there was no cement in the mortar used 
between bricks, commenting that any "gentle member 
of the Woman's Society of Christian Service could push 
mortar out with her finger." He finished by claiming 
that the cost of restoring a building with 17-inch brick 
walls that are totally lacking in cement would be pro- 
hibitive, and "the only sensible and Christian" solution 
is "to remember and revere the past, but go on into the 
future by cutting new cloth to fit the changed patterns 
of our present age." 

In another text. President Garrison argued that the 
college administration would make a mistake in letting 
itself". . . become champions of the . . . view (that) the 
fate of the chapel is equated with the future of the insti- 
tution that it symbolizes but does not include." He con- 
cluded by saying that the chapel was not as big as the 
institution of which it was a part. 

Others did not feel that way. Over the summer of 
1959, the Chapel Renovation Committee was organized. 
Dr. Roland P. Rice, head of McKendree's Religion De- 
partment, was selected as chairman, with Elizabeth 
Dixon, Leon Church (president of the Alumni Associa- 
tion), and Mrs. E. Seubert as vice-chairs. Dr R. C. Berry 
was elected treasurer, Robert Brown secretary; other 
officers were Mrs. Church, Mrs. Ruth Chamberlin, D. M. 
Hardy, and Irving Dilliard. It was agreed that their term 
of office would expire in October I960 "on completion 
of work and realization of purpose." The purpose was 
defined as raising funds needed to restore the chapel as 
the setting for strengthening the religious values of 
Methodism, restoring the exterior of Old Main, and con- 
tributing whatever funds remained after restoration to 
the accreditation program. The committee also resolved 
to have the trustees push the one-year deadline from 
February 1960. to June 1960. A list of honorary spon- 
sors was compiled, which would eventually include a num- 
ber of prominent religious, civic, and political leaders. 
Among them were Senator Paul Douglas, Representa- 
tive Melvin Price, Governor William G. Stratton, former 
governor Adlai Stevenson, Bishop Richard C. Raines 
of Indiana, and Dr John O. Gross, general secretary of 
the board of Education of the Methodist Church. 



One Hundred and Tnenn-Two 



MC KENDRE 



By April, Dr. Roland Rice on behalf of the com- 
mittee, announced as its goals for the restored chapel, 
"(1) headquarters for the Religion Department offices 
and classrooms; (2) a lounge for visitors to the campus; 
(3) a museum; (4) an auditorium for general use; (5) 
location in the new steeple for the old chapel bell, which 
will be rung for classes as it has ... for many years in 
the past. The building will be as strong and durable as it 
was when first constructed. It will continue to serve as 
McKendree's chief symbol and as one of Methodism's 
most famous buildings." Dr. Rice said that the "old 
chapel building will serve as a functioning chapel in 
just the way as indicated. Anew chapel building, which 
will be known as the Marion Bothwell Chapel, will be 
constructed sometime in the future. A clear distinction 
must be made between the old chapel, which will be 
used as head-quarters for the Religion Department, and 
the new Marion Bothwell Chapel, which will be used 
for religious services." 

In a separate statement. Dr. Rice said that plans 
were to replace the present opera chairs with seats of 
the 1850s, reconstruct the belfry and steeple, and build 
an easy-access stairway to the tower for visitors to view 
the bell. He indicated that the present assembly hall 
would become a museum, where the organ would re- 
main and other articles would be displayed in glass cases; 
this area would be open to the public for informal wor- 
ship services and recitals. The first floor would quarter 
the philosophy and religion departments. He also com- 
mented that the restored chapel would in no way hinder 
construction of a new sanctuary on campus large enough 
to accommodate a growing student body. By the year 
2000 or before, he predicted, thousands of people would 
make the pilgrimage to Lebanon to see the chapel and 
hear the bell ring. It would rank second only to the 
Wesley Chapel in London, England. 

Plans were laid for a fund-raising campaign. Funds 
were to be raised initially through direct solicitation, 
alumni gifts, sale of miniatures of the chapel bell, and 
proceeds from the fall and spring Lebanon pilgrimages 
and the commencement historical pageant. By July, a 
list of 2, 1 00 prospective donors had been compiled, and 
by September 7,000 brochures mailed. About $8,000 
had been raised toward a goal of $100,000. 

On Nov. 28, 1959, President Garrison received a 
letter from Dr. Henry M. Merkel of Wiley, Colorado, 
an alumnus, Methodist minister, and a recipient of the 
Peter Akers Award in 1 956. Dr. Merkel said he was dis- 
turbed by news that the chapel might be razed, and that 
if this were done the college might as well be moved. 
He sent a check for the chapel restoration. In his re- 




Elizabeth Parks Dixon who pressed jar chapel 
restoration. 



sponse Dr. Garrison thanked Dr. Merkel, said he would 
deliver the contribution to the treasurer for the Com- 
mittee to Restore the Chapel but pointed out that the 
drive had only two months to go. 

On Dec. 9, the day Dr. Merkel received this reply 
from the president, Mrs. Elizabeth Dixon received a let- 
ter from Dr. Garrison in which he wrote that razing the 
old chapel was "really a trivial" matter. Mrs. Dixon wrote 
on the president's note that Dr. Garrison had signed his 
own "professional death sentence." It was a prophetic 
statement. On Jan. 30, 1960, President Garrison an- 
nounced his resignation, effective Feb. 1, stating that 
he had enjoyed his time at McKendree and wished the 
school well, but he wanted to go back to parish minis- 
try. Edwin Baker, for 60 years a faculty member at 
McKendree, former dean, and interim president, wrote 
Mrs. Dixon, "... this one (Dr. Garrison's resignation) 
is a mystery. Perhaps the less I know, the better." 

With Dr. Garrison's resignation, the chances of the 
Chapel Restoration Committee to win more time was 
increased. The treasurer's report filed with the board of 
trustees on March 1 , 1 960, showed a balance of slightly 
less than $15,000. However, the mailing list for pos- 
sible contributors had increased to 10,000 names, and 
Dean Edwin Baker had announced the creation of the 
Dean Baker Fund, with himself as first contributor of 
$1,000, provided that 49 others pledged the same 
amount. The committee requested an extension of the 
trustee's February deadline, and at its March 4 meeting 
the board of trustees extended the time limit indefinitely. 




One Hundred and T\ 



MC KENDR E E^E? 



As the college began a search for a new president, 
the Chapel Renovation Committee prepared for a sum- 
mer drive. It was thought this could be helped if the 
chapel were declared a Methodist Shrine. On May 2, 
Dr Paul W. Yost wrote Roland Rice that a petition would 
be presented to the American Association of Methodist 
Historical Societies, asking the group to advocate the 
declaration of the chapel as a Shrine of Methodism by 
the General Conference of the Methodist Church. Dr. 
Yost indicated that "stalwarts such as Peter Cartwright 
con.secrated this chapel by exhortation from its pulpit," 
an interesting event, considering that Cartwright, one 
of the leading circuit riders of early Methodism and the 
founder of many Illinois congregations, had died be- 
fore the present chapel was constructed. 

Accordingly, Dr. Rice delivered a message before 
the Historical Society of the North Central Jurisdiction 
of the Methodist Church, meeting in Chicago July 13. 
He admitted that the chapel had to be closed because it 
was unsafe but questioned whether "certain values (had 
been) set in perspective." He told of "his visit to the old 
bell tower at the precise moment that (a) workman was 
applying his sledge hammer with violence to the old 
clock works. Although much of the mechanism was 
ruined, the destruction was forthwith stopped. A sec- 
ond experience which brought to the fore the certain 
knowledge that values of worth to the college were be- 
ing thrown away in our haste to 'dethrone an ancient 
monarch' of our campus was the discovery that an open 
roof over the bell tower was allowing potential tons of 
rain water to pour down into a century-old tracker ac- 
tion pipe organ. It was then that popular feeling began 
to rise in support of the condemned building." He ad- 
mitted that "feelings for and against restoration blew 
like a fierce storm over the generally sedate campus," 
and that "the president bore the brunt of their thrust, yet 
he did so with good grace." But he argued the impor- 
tance of symbols, ending with, "It is our duty ... to lay 
down the challenge to a too 'practical' and utilitarian 
world that the items belonging to the heart must be taken 
aboard the ship of reason, lest reason itself become the 
.sheerest of madness!" 

The Committee for the Restoration of the 
McKendree College Chapel also proceeded to sell min- 
iature replicas of the chapel bell for $2 each and circu- 
lated a new song it had published in 1959, "McKendree 
Bell." Its lyrics were by Dr. Mildred Silver, who occu- 
pied the Hamill Chair of English and was director of 
the McKendree Writers' Conference. The composer was 
Dr. Maurits Kcsnar, professor of music at Southern Illi- 
nois University and director of the Southern Illinois 



Symphony Orchestra. Kesnar, a concert violinist and 
composer of note, unfortunately died in 1 957, two years 
before the composition was officially published. 

Dr. Silver's lyrics give some idea of the symbol- 
ism of the bell for many supporters of the college: 

//; boist'rousfim. for vict'ries won, we've 
heard you ring, McKendree Bell; 
Your urgent note from deep bronze throat 
plucks each heart string, McKendree Bell. 

(chorus) 

Old Bell, honored Bell, 'Work, worship, play,' 

prompt us anew. 

Wise Bell, hallowed Bell, Keep us loyal, keep 



Your call to work we dare not shirk, though 
hours stretch long, McKendree Bell; 
Your stern command we understand helps 
minds grow strong, McKendree Bell. 

(chorus) 

Let worship peal this truth reveal, 'God's love 
rules all, ' McKendree Bell; 
The will impart to ev 'ry heart to heed His call, 
McKendree Bell, (chorus) 

(chorus) 

When echoed chimes recall good times on col- 
lege hill. McKendree Bell; 
With joy, with tears, throughout the years we 'II 
answer still, McKendree Bell. 

(chorus) 

Then Dr. Merkel. the alumnus/pastor from Colo- 
rado, again came on the scene. The general conference 
of the Methodist Church was to be hosted by Denver in 
that spring of 1 960; an estimated 1 2,000 Methodist rep- 
resentatives from all over the world were scheduled to 
be present. Dr. Merkel offered, therefore, to take the 
bell to Colorado, make presentations at the general con- 
ference, and then display it in some of the churches of 
Colorado; he would be responsible for logistics and 
making public speeches about the need to restore the 
chapel. The Chapel Restoration Committee enthusias- 
tically concurred, and plans were made to send audio 
tapes of the bell's ringing and a message about its his- 
tory to be made available to the delegates. 



One Hundred and Twenn-Four 






i^ 





Dr. Mildred Silver 



MiKENDREE HELL 



nn. MiLHREn siivet! 



DR. MAI KITS 




Miniature replica of McKeiidree's hell. 





. f t f i-^f c r I 

I r r^ H ' ^ r I 



"McKendree Bell" lyrics written b\ Dr Mildred Silver 




One Hundred and T»enn-Fi 



MC KENDREE 



On May 3, Dr. Rice and his daughter Priscilla set 
out with the bell and a supply of audio tapes for Den- 
ver, a journey which took over 30 hours of driving. To 
get the bell into the trunk of his car, he had to have the 
trunk lid removed. Meeting Dr. Merkel in Denver, the 
trio took the bell to the Civic Auditorium, site of the 
conference, where they parked the car in front of the 
only entrance so that everyone entering or leaving would 
be sure to see it. They stayed until after midnight, show- 
ing the venerable instrument and speaking to whom- 
ever they could about the plight of the chapel. Much 
interest was shown, and appointments made to display 
the bell in various churches after the conference. The 
next afternoon, the three McKendreans went shopping, 
and Dr. Merkel bought a pickup truck to carry the 1 ,200 
pound bell. The transfer of the precious cargo was made, 
and Dr. Rice and his daughter started for home — the 
trunk lid of his car still missing. 

Dr. Merkel wrote Mrs. Dixon, "I got home yester- 
day at noon with the bell. At 2:00 PM I had the pickup 
and bell at the mayor's office. Then we went to the of- 
fice of the Daily News, where we had our picture made. 
The high school band will play for us on the street; then 
the mayor will make an address, and I will tell the story 
of McKendree and of the financial needs of the Chapel 
... the bell in the pickup commands interest, and my 
gun and badge, as a deputy sheriff, command respect." 

An article written by the gun-toting preacher gives 
some indication of what he might have said in his trav- 
els with the bell. After rehearsing the situation of the 
McKendree chapel, he wrote: "Standing before the 
chapel one is reminded of the cry of the weeping prophet 
standing among the ruins of King Solomon's Temple 
saying, Ts it nothing to you, all ye who pass by? Be- 
hold and see if there be any sorrow like unto my sor- 
row.' . . . Who is left among you that saw this CHAPEL 
in her first glory? And how do you see it now? Is it 
nothing to you alumni? Is it nothing to all you lovers of 
historical shrines? Is it nothing to you Methodists that 
McKendree College is facing a most critical period in 
her one hundred thirty years service to the youth of 
America?" 

On June 4, at the college's annual alumni banquet. 
Dr. Merkel reported on his activities in Colorado to ad- 
vocate interest in McKendree and of his adventures with 
the bell. He then received his second Peter Akers award 
in recognition of his services. The Chapel Restoration 
Committee also made him a member of the group. 

Then, on June 1 5, tragedy struck. Dr. Merkel, back 
in Colorado, was speaking to a church group gathered 
at the front of the Denver University chapel. He had 




Alumnus Henry M. Merkel and Professor Roland Rice, join 
in escortini^ hell to General Conference in I960. 




Truck with bell in back. 

just concluded his remarks when he suddenly collapsed 
and died of a heart attack on the chapel steps. Com- 
pounding his widow's shock and grief was that she now 
had sole responsibility of a white pickup truck with 
purple lettering and a historic 1 ,200-pound bell. She was 
apparently equal to the task; a week after her husband's 
death, she drove the truck with the bell to the annual 
meeting of the American Bell Society, meeting at the 
Continental-Denver Hotel. A few days later. Dr. Rice 
arrived to bring the bell home. 

At first, the bell and truck were simply locked away 
because Mrs. Merkel had stopped the insurance. She 
offered to sell the pickup to the college for $1600, and 
eventually the school did acquire it. The truck was used 
for advertisement and promotional purposes, but there 
seemed to be no plan at first for the bell. One idea that 
surfaced was to exhibit an oil portrait of the bell, along 
with a full tone recording. A Dr. Merkel memorial fund 




One Hundred and Tw 



MC KENDREE' 



was set up, and it was hoped that the Rocky Mountain 
Conference (Dr. Mericel's conference) would also set 
up a $10,000 memorial fund that could be used for re- 
storing the steeple and hanging the bell. Proposals over 
time would be made to dedicate the steeple of the re- 
stored chapel to Henry Merkel, but apparently there has 
never been any action. 

Back in Lebanon, the Chapel Restoration Com- 
mittee met to plan its next strategy. Dr. Max P. Allen, 
McKendree's new president, had reversed his 
predecessor's stand and was firmly behind saving the 
chapel; to show that commitment, he attended the Chapel 
Restoration Committee's meetings. At the group's July 
24 session, much discussion centered on the continua- 
tion of Hellmuth, Obata, and Kassebaum, the architec- 
tural firm that had been working on the chapel situa- 
tion. It was decided that there should be no further in- 
volvement with this firm, and that Gerhardt Kraemer of 
St. Louis should be engaged as architect. It was also 
agreed by consensus that Dr. Rice, as chairman of the 
Chapel Restoration Committee, should seek to be liai- 
son with the board of trustees and its Executive Com- 
mittee, in order to recommend that chapel restoration 
begin as soon as possible. It was stressed that contin- 
ued contact should be kept also with "the people in Colo- 
rado carrying on for Dr. Merkel" and with the "South- 
em Illinois oil people." 

Architect Kraemer soon had surprising informa- 
tion: The chapel was not as badly deteriorated as had 
been suspected. He had found that the upper floor was 
solidly supported by interior masonry walls. The big- 
gest surprise was the lack of a foundation under the front 
wall, although a rock base supported the rear of the build- 
ing. The most serious damage, he believed, was caused 
by the outer wall pulling away from the inner wall, 
caused by strain imposed when two extra windows had 
been cut in; he felt this could be economically handled. 
(In actual fact, closing the two windows, pouring a new 
foundation, relaying the walls, and re-plastering the in- 
terior was done for about $25,000.) With this informa- 
tion in hand, the Chapel Restoration Committee, which 
had begun as a group outside the structure of the col- 
lege, found itself formally charged by the Executive 
Committee of the board of trustees to "procure a 
working plan for the chapel restoration 'with the 
blessings and good will of the Executive Committee 
of the board of trustees.'" On Nov. 22, the Restora- 
tion Committee met with Robert Stewart, planning 
consultant of the St. Louis County Historical Build- 
ings Commission, to develop a "restoration plan for the 
chapel," not a "repair job." 



On Feb. 28, 1961, the McKendree Review an- 
nounced that two phases of reconstructing the old chapel 
were to begin as soon as weather permitted: strengthen- 
ing the foundation and replacing part of the front wall, 
after which the chapel could again be used. By March 
14, such excitement had built on campus that an edito- 
rial in the McKendree Review began, "The Chapel is to 
be reconstructed! . . . those are the sweetest words in 
the world ... the best morale booster that could take 
place ... a step forward to our ultimate goal - accredi- 
tation." The student author continued, "To this reporter, 
the old Chapel is McKendree. God's love of 
McKendree. If it weren't, why would He keep up 
(sic) struggling to raise money to restore it." In a more 
worldly vein, the writer opined, "McKendree will get 
more publicity by restoring the Chapel than by building 
a new one." 

Work began on the chapel July 7, 1961. The gen- 
eral contractor was W. W. Mautz. Concentrating on the 
building portion of the chapel, these repairs were com- 
pleted by the middle of September. This marked the 
beginning of the full restoration of the chapel, a signal 
victory for the proponents of the Chapel Restoration 
Committee. That month, the McKendree Review an- 
nounced that the chapel had been saved, but $50,000 
was still needed. According to a later story, that $50,000 
was needed for the third, fourth, and fifth phases, which 
would include new electrical wiring, refurbishing of 
interior woodwork, redecorating stairways and the bal- 
cony, replacing the tower and steeple, and re-installing 
the clock and the bell. It was stated that the chapel should 
then last for another 100 years with only minor repairs. 
Long range plans for the chapel included a hope that 
the building would be chosen as the repository for his- 
torical materials of the North Central Jurisdiction of the 
Methodist Church, which covered the entire upper Mid- 
west. A list of donors was published that fall as well; it 
included names of many individuals, churches, Sunday 
School classes, banks - and Dr. Webb B. Garrison. 

On Nov. 26, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, whose 
original editorial in February 1959 had been a major 
impetus toward arousing opposition to President 
Garrison's plan to tear down the chapel, echoed the Sep- 
tember article in the Review by announcing that the 
chapel had been saved. President Allen was quoted as 
saying that the total cost of renovation would be some 
$100,000, whereas constructing a new chapel would 
have been around $225,000. The article also mentioned 
Mrs. Dixon, who had made the renovation a personal 
project. 

Work proceeded on the chapel through the 1961- 
62 academic year. On May 1 , 1962, the building (dubbed 




One Hundred and Twenty-Seven 



MCKENDREE^Er 



"Queen of the Prairie" by one enthusiast) was opened 
for tourists, and on June 9, 1962, the Chape! Restora- 
tion Committee, having overcome formidable odds, ter- 
minated its services. In its short tenure, one adminis- 
tration had suddenly ended, another begun, and a his- 
toric building, which many felt represented the sym- 
bolic heart of McKendree College, had once more taken 
its place on the hill. 

One more dilemma remained unsolved for many 
people, however: the placement of the bell. Locked 
away, then set up in Ames dining hall in November 
1968, the bell seemed, for some, out of place; yet there 
was no consensus to again place it in the tower of the 
chapel, where its houriy ringing might again weaken 
the ancient structure. Furthermore, the restoration of 
the chapel had not been completed. Not until 1969 was 
it announced that the board of trustees had authorized 
up to $250,000, part of a large inheritance recently left 
the college by Miss Marion Bothwell of Fairfield, to be 
used to refurbish the upstairs sanctuary. This restora- 
tion included new lighting, floors, windows, woodwork, 
plaster, remodeling of the stairway and entrance, recon- 
struction of the bell tower, and other improvements. 
Business Manager Vernon Snead said that the college 
would attempt to incorporate the chapel's original char- 
acteristics into the facility, which when finished would 
seat about 200 people. 

On May 13, 1969, the McKendree Review pub- 
lished a remarkably long letter to the editor (in unusu- 
ally large type), signed by Robert F. White, Trustee and 
attorney for the college. In response to accusations made 
by Jay Hodges, a candidate for president of the Student 
Association that year, Mr. White defended the decision 
of the board of trustees to rehabilitate the old chapel 
building rather than build a new auditorium for con- 
certs, plays, and other programs. He quoted the will of 
Miss Bothwell. that the gift from her estate to 
McKendree "be u.sed in repairing the old Chapel Build- 
ing or the building of a new Chapel Building (to take its 
place) . . . Any fund remaining after the chapel is built, 
equipped throughout and permanently endowed in an 
amount sufficient to keep the Marion Bothwell Chapel 
in a perpetual state of good repair and maintenance shall 
be added to the Bothwell Scholarship Fund for the pur- 
pose of aiding deserving male students studying for the 
ministry and working their way through school . . . ." 

Mr. White then stated that the trustees had obtained 
preliminary plans and costs for a 600-seat auditorium 
(which would cost 1-1.2 million dollars) and a 1,000- 
seat auditorium (1.5-2 million dollars), and said that a 
bequest of one million dollars would not cover either 



proposal. Nor did he think that the terms of Miss 
Bothwell's will could stretch to cover a large audito- 
rium for such purposes as plays and concerts. He pointed 
out that the chapel attendance was about 35, and had 
not for several years exceeded 100. 

Whether or not Mr. White's letter put to rest the 
controversy over restoring the old chapel, the new hot 
issue was over the placement of the bell. On June 16, 
1969, the newest McKendree president, Eric N. 
Rackham, wrote a letter to members of the board of trust- 
ees in which he pleaded for guidance on the disposition 
of the bell - whether to keep it in Ames Hall cafeteria, 
return it to "its former resting place," or mount it at some 
location "where it will be quite visible." He reported 
that he had received several verbal unsolicited sugges- 
tions and two written ones: The Alumni Executive Com- 
mittee recommended that the bell be displayed at a cen- 
tral location, preferably in front of the Old Science Build- 
ing; and Mrs. Helen D. Bullock of the National Trust 
for Historic Preservation urged reinstallation of the bell 
in the tower. 

Responses from trustees revealed much division. 
One sent the president's letter back with a simple hand- 
written line: "Hang the bell in the .steeple." His senti- 
ment was echoed less forcefully by several others, rep- 
resenting different professions, some of whom who said 




Steeple 




One Huiulred imd 7 



EigUl 



MCKENDREE^E: 



that they'd prefer to put the bell in the tower if 
it was financially feasible. On the other hand, 
some trustees felt that, as one put it, "If the bell 
is replaced in the steeple, only the McKendree 
maintenance men will be aware of its presence." 
Another said that to place the bell in the tower 
would be for all practical purposes to bury it, 
and its history would be lost. A hint of another 
kind of division within the board is found in 
the letter of one trustee who wrote, "I have 
sensed a feeling on the part of the clergy wing 
of our board to hold to a bare minimum the ex- 
penditures to be allocated to restoring the old 
chapel so that a new and probably costly chapel 
could be built and located on the campus. This 
would of course minimize the funds from the be- 
quest that would be available for maintenance of 
these facilities and for ministerial scholarships." 

President Rackham resolved the discussion 
with a letter to trustees dated July 1 0, 1 969. Stat- 
ing that there was a "slight leaning" in favor of 
placing the bell in the tower, with a considerable 
number saying they had "no feelings either way," 
he announced that he cast his vote in favor of re- 
turning the bell to the steeple, with certain under- 
standings: ( 1 ) the bell would be mounted in a fixed 
position to eliminate swaying and vibration, and 
the clapper would be the only moving part, con- 
trolled by an electronic device rather than human 
"ringers"; (2) a stairway would be constructed to 
the belfry to more easily permit visitors to see the 
bell; (3) the total cost of the renovation to not ex- 
ceed one-half of the sum authorized by the board 
for that purpose. He also reported that Gerhardt Kraemer, 
the architect for the decade-long project, favored return- 
ing the bell to the steeple. 

A news release dated August 4, 1969, said that 
carpenters had begun the task of rebuilding the belfry, 
and that the bell had been hoisted in place on July 29. 
Finally, on Friday, March 13, 1970, dignitaries and 
friends gathered with faculty and students for Founders' 
Day, and the ceremony of rededication of the Marion 
Bothwell Chapel. It was reported that $750,000 of Miss 
Bothwell's $1,000,000 gift to the college had been set 
aside as an endowment for scholarships for male minis- 
terial students studying in their third and fourth years at 
McKendree. Milbum P. Akers closed his remarks in the 
ceremony by criticizing the student staff of the 
McKendree Review, who had earlier in the week pub- 
lished articles critical of the college administration. "Dr. 
Rackham and Dean (Emerial) Owen have the confidence 




Interior of Chapel. 

and respect of the board of trustees," Mr. Akers said. 
"You cannot divide us . . . you cannot cause us to lose 
confidence in our leaders." 

At 1 1 :30 AM on April 8, 1970, The North Central 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, meet- 
ing in Chicago, Illinois, announced that McKendree 
College, in its 142nd year, had qualified for accredita- 
tion, having shown "dramatic improvement since its last 
examination in 1966." Listed among the improvements 
were seven new buildings, including the library; a 
streamlined curriculum; an upgraded faculty and staff; 
and a substantially strengthened operating budget; not 
mentioned in the college's account later was the reno- 
vation of the chapel. President Rackham, attending the 
meeting, immediately telephoned the news back to cam- 
pus, where it was anxiously awaited by students, trust- 
ees, and personnel. The McKendree bell, in the chapel 
tower, was rung for a half hour. 




One Hundred and Twenty-Nine 




One Hundred and Tin 



MC KENDREE 



The Administration of President Max P. Allen 
(1960-1964) 

By Robert H. Campbell ('61) 



Introduction 

The turn of the decade from 1959 to 1960 found 
much turmoil and unrest in the nation and the world. 
The contrast between the old order, represented by Presi- 
dent Dwight D. Eisenhower, and the new order, typi- 
fied by the young and stylish John F. Kennedy, played 
itself out in numerous facets of American life. The 
United States was experiencing a number of serious in- 
cidents as a result of ever- increasing racial tensions. The 
economy was flat at best. Politicians argued over 
whether or not a Roman Catholic could be elected presi- 
dent. Political theorists debated the relative merits of 
conservatism vs. liberalism. Women were just begin- 
ning to enter the work force in large numbers, and in- 
creasing feminism was not a popular concept with most 
males. Three out of four adults smoked cigarettes, oblivi- 
ous to the health hazards yet to be revealed. The nuclear 
race was in high gear, with smaller nations striving to 
catch up and the super-powers engaging in an enor- 
mously expensive race to build such a gigantic retalia- 
tory strike force that neither side would risk initiating 
world conflagration by attacking the other The Cold 
War continued unabated as the propaganda mills of both 
the communist and free worlds generated ample fodder 
for the ever-expanding news capabilities of television. 

The turn of the decade from 1959 to 1960 found 
much turmoil and unrest on the campus of McKendree 
College as well. President Webb Garrison had different 
ideas from other campus leaders and members of the 
board of trustees about the fate of the old chapel build- 
ing, which, even after having the steeple removed, was 
not available for use because of its deteriorated condi- 
tion. Garrison favored razing the building completely 
and using money donated by Miss Marion Bothwell in 



1957 for a new chapel building instead of restoring the 
old facility. Others wanted the chapel restored, claim- 
ing it would become the symbol of the resilience of the 
school when faced with hard times. In fact, Bothwell 
had given the money to restore the chapel in honor of 
her father, a former McKendree student. Indeed, the 
chapel had been renamed "Bothwell Chapel" when 
Webb Garrison was installed as president of McKendree 
College in 1958. 

Garrison's viewpoint was supported by the col- 
lege architectural firm, Hellmuth, Obata and Kassabaum. 
A 1958 report on the condition of all campus buildings 
stated that the chapel was in very bad condition and 
should be replaced as soon as possible. Falling plaster 
and other problems soon caused Garrison to conclude 
that razing and replacing the chapel was the only option 
available. In January of 1959, after the chapel's histori- 
cal value had rallied ardent support for its repair and 
renovation. Garrison announced that the steeple and bell 
would be removed in February in hopes of still being 
able to use the rest of the facility until a replacement 
could be built. Editorials and news articles in the 5/. 
Louis Post Dispatch garnered more opposition to 
Garrison's plan to demolish the building, including key 
faculty members and important alumni, as well as the 
new chairman of the board of trustees, Milbum P. Akers, 
the great grandson of Peter Akers. The elder Akers had 
been the president of McKendree College who had origi- 
nally proposed the construction of the building. Faced 
with ever-increasing opposition to his plan. Garrison 
resigned effective February 1, 1960, to take over the 
pastorate of a large Methodist church in Indianapolis, 
Indiana. Into the breach stepped Dn W. Norman Grandy, 
the dean of the college, who was appointed acting presi- 
dent until a search committee could choose a new presi- 



One Hundred and Thim-One 



dent. Their work was completed on 
June 10, 1960, with the naming of 52- 
year-old Dr. Max P. Allen as the 26th 
President of McKendree College. 



Allen's Background 

Allen came to Lebanon on Au- 
gust 1, 1960, and moved into 
Stevenson House with his wife and 
their two sons. He moved to Lebanon 
after a 1 5-year stint as history profes- 
sor and director of instruction at 
Northern Michigan College in 
Marquette, Michigan. Previously he 
had taught and was an administrator 
in the public schools of Indiana, as well as having served 
on the faculty of Indiana University in Bloomington, 
Indiana. A native of Salem, Illinois, Allen and his fam- 
ily had moved to Indiana while Max was still in elemen- 
tary school. He subsequently earned both bachelor's and 
master's degrees at Indiana State Teachers College in 
Terre Haute and a Ph. D. in history in 1943 from Indi- 
ana University. 

Allen was active in community affairs wherever 
his career took him. He dabbled in politics in Marquette, 
Michigan, where he served on the County Board of Su- 
pervisors. His community and professional service af- 
filiations included the American Association of Univer- 
sity Professors, the Foreign Policy Association, the Na- 
tional Council for the Social Studies, Rotary Interna- 
tional, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, the Ameri- 
can Red Cross, the Tuberculosis Association, and the 
March of Dimes. He was also an active layperson in the 
Methodist Church wherever he lived. 

One of Allen's first official duties was to repre- 
sent McKendree at the installation ceremony for the new 
Methodist bishop of the Illinois Area, Edwin E. Voigt, 
in September 1960. Ironically, that bishop, who occu- 
pied a seat on the board of trustees by virtue of his posi- 
tion, would be the man who succeeded Allen in the fall 
of 1964. Voigt was deeply interested in the future of 
higher education in the Illinois Area, which included 
the Southern Illinois and the Central Illinois Confer- 
ences of the Methodist Church. In November 1960, Voigt 
appointed Allen, the presidents of MacMurray College 
in JacLsonville, Illinois, and Illinois Wesleyan Univer- 
sity in Bloomington, Illinois, and seven others to a spe- 
cial study committee to make plans and recommenda- 




McKendreans around chapel steeple soon after it hit the ground. 



tions for the enhancement of opportunities in higher 
education in the Illinois Area. Their first meeting was 
on the McKendree campus where Voigt urged them to 
"join efforts to strengthen their respective higher edu- 
cation programs." 



Goals of the Allen 
Administration 

Two items in the September 27, 1 960, issue of the 
student newspaper identified issues that would become 
the defining marks of the Allen presidency, one related 




President and Mrs. Allen 's reception for faculty and 
students. 



One Hundred and Thirn-Two 



\Xi^NlC KENDREE~S: 



to academic accreditation and the other to improving 
facilities. One article outlined a new lecture series, 
"Problems and Perspective for the '60s," and announced 
participation by noted individuals of the region in a cam- 
pus dialogue series designed to acquaint students with 
the realities of the political world. Included on the agenda 
to make presentations during the year were then Illinois 
Representative Alan J. Dixon, Judge James Monroe, Jr. 
and Irving Dilliard, head of the editorial department of 
the St. Louis Post Dispatch. Dilliard, a trustee of the 
college, was a leader in the campaign to restore the 
chapel rather than replace it and was probably the im- 
petus behind the editorial that signaled the end of the 
Garrison presidency. This series was part of the attempt 
to upgrade the academic experience of students at 
McKendree. 

The second article defining the Allen administra- 
tion reported on the more than three dozen campus re- 
pair projects completed during the previous year. Al- 
though those projects were in the works long before 
Allen arrived on the scene, they typified his efforts to 
upgrade campus facilities as part of the two-pronged 
offensive (the other was to upgrade the educational pro- 
gram) to regain accreditation for the college from the 
North Central Association of Schools and Colleges, the 
regional accrediting agency for the Midwest. Accredi- 
tation had been the goal of several presidents, but Allen, 
energized by the increasing support of the Southern Il- 
linois Conference and its bishop, jumped into the fray 
with enthusiasm. An interesting observation on the mag- 
nitude of the work to be done can be imagined when a 
news article in the student paper reported such mun- 
dane improvements as "spreading gravel on the park- 
ing lot, renovating closets, and making 56 new screens 



for the dorms." It also pointed out that a summer storm 
had destroyed some two dozen trees on the campus, re- 
quiring two weeks for four workers to cut up and dis- 
pose of the debris. 

Mrs. Allen signed on early with the campus im- 
provement team and began making her mark almost 
immediately. She was especially concerned about the 
deplorable condition of the Clark Hall lounge and en- 
listed the aid of the McKendree Dames, a group of fac- 
ulty/staff wives and Lebanon residents who were com- 
mitted to assisting in making improvements at the col- 
lege. They succeeded, with very little cash outlay, in 
completely redecorating this favorite student gathering 
place on the first floor of the women's dormitory. 



Campus Improvements 

Of course, the major campus renovation project 
early in Allen's presidency was Bothwell Chapel. Once 
the strongest opposition to restoration was removed by 
Garrison's resignation, the Chapel Renovation Commit- 
tee began in earnest the formidable task of raising money 
for the project. Membership of the committee included 
faculty members Roland Rice, Elizabeth White Dixon, 
and Robert Brown, as well as influential Lebanonites 
such as Leon Church (president of the McKendree Col- 
lege Alumni As.sociation), Dr. R. C. Berry, and Ruth 
Chamberlin. The announced goal of the committee was 
to raise $100,000 by October 1960. Max P Allen was 
an ardent supporter of the effort to restore and renovate 
the chapel and even sat in on the committee's meetings. 
By February 1 96 1 , a scant half- year into his term, Allen 




One Hundred and Tliirn-Three 



announced that fund raising was go- 
ing well and that work would begin as 
soon as the weather permitted. He also 
reminded people that an additional 
$50,000 would be needed to complete 
the last three phases of the project. The 
work actually did begin in the summer 
of 1 961 , and the college was once again 
able to use a part of the facility with 
the opening of the fall semester in 
1961. By May 1962, full use of the 
building had been regained, ahhough 
it was nearly a decade before the old 
chapel bell was once again in its fa- 
miliar home in a steeple atop the front 
of the building. 

The success of the chapel resto- 
ration engendered more optimism. Dr. 
George Hand, a member of the board 
of trustees and a consultant on loan 
from Southern Illinois University at 
Carbondale to assist the college to pre- 
pare for regaining accreditation, was 
even reservedly enthusiastic in his 
February 20, 1961, Founders Day ad- 
dress: "The most encouraging thing 
of all is the gradual replacement of a 
negative spirit of gloom and doom with 
a positive spirit of optimism and con- 
fidence." 

By the spring of 1961, two more 
campus improvement projects were 
ready - one for dedication and one for 
initiation. A student drama organiza- 
tion on the campus, StageCrafters, had 
responded to faculty/staff urgings to 
make the old Eisenmayer Gymna- 
sium a more usable facility. The 
small band of dedicated thespians, 
along with several other students, 
faculty members, and administrators, 
worked for weeks to scrape, patch, 
and paint the brick walls of 
Eisenmayer. The maintenance staff designed and 
built a stage along one wall, complete with perma- 
nent wing walls extending to both doors in the west 
wall of the building, thereby providing access to the 
rooms on the west side of the building. New light- 
ing was installed and the stairwell/hallway to the 
practice rooms over the east third of the building was 
boxed in at the south entrance to the gym. On April 




Fashion show held in renovated Eisenmaxer Auditorium. 




Faculty and students gather in bookstore in Eisenmayer 

17, 1961, the renovation was complete and the build- 
ing was renamed Eisenmayer Auditorium in a dedi- 
cation presided over by Chaplain Roland P. Rice. The 
dedication address was given by Adolph Unruh, a 
member of the board of trustees and faculty member 
at Washington University in St. Louis. 

The initiation of another project to improve the 
campus was announced on the heels of the Eisenmayer 



One Hundred and Tlurn-Four 



MC KENDREE^g:: 



refurbishing. Project Achievement was the brain child 
of 1928 alumna Mrs. Harry (Vi) Mueller, an interior 
decorator for a St. Louis department store, and a close 
friend of Mrs. Allen. The plan was to commit work par- 
ties from area churches and/or student groups who would 
fund and provide the labor for a planned face-lift of 
dormitory rooms in Clark Hall. Mueller provided her 
consulting services at no cost and arranged for some of 
the material to be obtained through her employer at a 
discount. Both Mueller and Allen exhorted potential vol- 
unteers to become involved by urging them to recap- 
ture the pioneer spirit of those early Methodists who 
founded the college. Their slogan was evidence of their 
commitment: "McKendree — She is ours, and we are 
proud of her!" 

That "can-do" spirit seemed to be contagious on 
the campus, even though enrollments were still small 
and times were still hard for the college. The art depart- 
ment, under the direction of faculty member William 
Hodge, also was involved in an effort to improve its 
facilities. With the help of the maintenance staff, a "gen- 
eral rejuvenation" of Hypes Field House took place. A 
new floor, replacement of termite weakened joists and 
defective wiring, replacement of doors, and installation 
of a ramp to expedite movement of heavy equipment 
was all completed during the fall of 1 96 1 and the winter 
of 1962. The art department moved into the renovated 
facility in the spring of 1962. 

The fall of 1962 brought good news in the 
McKendree Review of more improvements made over 
the summer as part of President Allen's continuing ef- 
forts to upgrade the physical facilities on the campus. 
By current standards the improvements were little more 
than ongoing maintenance, but they represented major 
strides on a campus that had languished through too 
many years of lack of funds for even the barest upkeep 
of buildings. Tile floors and ceilings, coats of paint and 
sealer, new roofs and sidewalks were of scant impor- 
tance to returning students who were more interested in 
the newly installed air conditioning units in Pearsons 
Dining Hall and Benson Wood Library. 

Allen delivered both good news and bad news 
when he announced that the increase in new students 
for the 1962-63 year would overcrowd the limited stu- 
dent housing available on campus. An enrollment in- 
crease of 150 students, many from Northern Illinois and 
various eastern seaboard states (New York and New 
Jersey were especially well represented), would force 
the college to expand housing. The need to provide cam- 
pus housing for 60 women and at least double that num- 
ber of men meant Clark and Carnegie Residence Halls 



would have to be supplemented. The buildings on the 
north edge of the campus (originally built for housing 
Youth Institute participants by the East St. Louis Dis- 
trict of the Southern Illinois Conference) were acquired 
and renovated to make them suitable for student hous- 
ing. The college bought the buildings from the district 
for $45,000, payable over nine years with no interest. 
Another part of the agreement permitted the district to 
house up to 350 institute participants in college facili- 
ties during the summer at no charge. 

One of the buildings, Cartwright Hall, was imme- 
diately redecorated and equipped with dormitory-style 
bunk beds to provide space until more permanent ar- 
rangements could be made. The other building, Wesley 
Hall, first had to be winterized and was then renovated 
to create 14 two-person rooms. Students were then 
shifted to Wesley so that the same thing could be done 
in Cartwright. 



The Role of Fund Raising 

The student housing crisis prompted President 
Allen and the board of trustees to embark upon a fund 
drive to raise cash for needed capital improvements, 
specifically plant rehabilitation, improvement of labo- 
ratory facilities, and additions to the library. Charles H. 
Percy, the "boy wonder" chairman of the board of Bell 
and Howell Company, was chosen to speak at the kick- 
off dinner on October 1 , 1 962, at which a $ 1 00,000 Cir- 
cuit Riders Campaign was launched. Bishop Edwin E. 
Voigt, bishop of the Illinois Area, and a member of the 
college's board of trustees, was instrumental in the en- 
suing campaign. A new McKendree College publica- 
tion called The Circuit Rider made its initial appear- 
ance with the start of this drive. It was mailed to all 
members of the Methodist Church in the Southern Illi- 
nois Conference and opened with a plea from the bishop 
himself to help McKendree face the financial challenge 
of a new era. He reviewed McKendree's storied past, 
reflected upon her current problems, and rallied Meth- 
odists to help her respond to the challenge. He said that 
it was the "firm conviction of the Circuit Riders that 
McKendree can, and must, be restored to all her ancient 
glory." 

Political and business clout was also brought on 
board for the campaign. Illinois Governor Otto Kemer 
was persuaded to proclaim October "McKendree Col- 
lege Month" in Illinois. The Circuit Rider announced 
the action: 



One Hundred and Thirn-Five 



In an unprecedent (sic) move of signal rec- 
ognition of the outstanding value and dis- 
proportionate accomplishments of an Illinois 
institution of higher education. Governor 
Otto Kerner has issued a proclamation set- 
ting aside the entire month of October, 1962, 
as McKendree College Month throughout 
Illinois. The proclamation notes that the value 
of McKendree College lies in her contribution 
to the cause of educational excellence. . . . 

Such cooperation from the state continued when 
McKendree's colors were chosen for the 1964 license 
plates. The plates had a purple background with white 
letters and were quite distinctive. 

Business entered the scene with "A Statement of 
Conviction" signed on December 2, 1 96 1 , by represen- 
tatives of 44 major American business corporations urg- 
ing support by business of the nation's private and 
church-related colleges. This document was also utilized 
by the leadership of the Circuit Riders campaign as it 
urged business: 




Rev. LeRoy Pittman and Dr. Max Allen present certificate to 
Etta Root Edwards, oldest alumna in 1962, naming her "first 
founder of the New McKendree. " 



. . . to help spread the base of voluntary sup- 
port of higher education as a necessary 
supplement to the extensive support which 
business now provides to education through 
taxes. We urge responsible management to 
think through its opportunities and obliga- 
tion to adopt meaningful programs of volun- 
tary corporate support to those colleges and 
universities whose service and quality they 
wish to encourage and nurture. . . . 

The board of trustees did its part to encourage the 
success of the Circuit Riders Campaign with a resolution 
to establish "the New McKendree - a Methodist church 
related, academically distinguished, college of liberal arts 
... in which the facilities and standards required today are 
blended with the traditions and Christian environment 
which have characterized the Old McKendree." A simple 
yet profound statement summed up the situation: "Money 
is needed." Those who gave that money by June 30, 
1963, would, by resolution, be considered founders of 
the New McKendree. Those giving $ 1 000 or more were 
to be named Founders, while those who gave between 
$500 and $999 were to be called Associate Founders. 

Dynamic and driving board of tru.stees Chairman 
Milbum Akers took an active role in management of the 
Circuit Riders Campaign. He established county and area 
units with district supervisors to oversee the fund rais- 



ing. He set up, with the cooperation of Bishop Voigt and 
the district superintendents of the Methodist Church, a 
series of meetings throughout the Southern Illinois Con- 
ference that involved alumni and friends of the college. 

A linchpin in the program was the favorable re- 
port of the North Central Association of Schools and 
Colleges relative to the other important issue of Allen's 
presidency, the status of McKendree's re-application for 
membership in that all-important regional accrediting 
agency. The college had been visited in the summer of 
1962, and anticipation was high. The report, although 
not as favorable as had been hoped, was good news in 
that it said that McKendree had been accepted as a can- 
didate for membership. Dr. George H. Hand, the NCA 
consultant assigned to shepherd McKendree through the 
remaining hills and valleys of the process said, 
"McKendree College can and will be fully accredited 
in the near future - how near depends mainly on the 
loyalty and the vision of those of you who have or should 
have an interest in the institution." 

The feeling abounded that McKendree was indeed 
on the move. As early as November 1 962 the McKendree 
Review reported that the half-way mark had been 
reached: 

At 9:15 PM classes were dismissed and stu- 
dents quickly assembled on the old football 
field. . . . There they awaited the announce- 



One Hundred and Thirn-SLx 



iiulffMC KENDREE^ 



ment . . . that the campaign has thus far taken 
in $50,870. President Allen said, "We are 
thrilled by the news. . . . Many persons have 
ser\'edas volunteers in this campaign, which 
will be conducted for about six more weeks. 
When it has been completed successfidly, it 
should open doors now closed to us for much 
larger amounts that are equally needed. " 

Allen's bold prediction soon came true. The Janu- 
ary 15, 1963, issue of the McKendree Review reported 
that the $ 1 00,000 goal had been met the previous week. 
Mrs. Doris Snead, the office manager for the Circuit 
Riders Development Fund Campaign, speculated that 
well over the goal would be received. Even the students 
were caught up in the excitement of the effort. Student 
groups challenged one another to see which one could 
raise the most money, and some ingenious fund raising 
schemes were conducted by enterprising groups. The 
January 1963, issue of the McKendree College Bidletin 
headlined the good news: "Circuit Riders Campaign 
Raises $100,000." An accompanying article by Presi- 
dent Allen outlined the specific campus improvements 
to be undertaken as a result of the success of the cam- 
paign; tile floors for the student center, Clark Hall plumb- 
ing repair, academic equipment, heating system repairs, 
completion of renovations to Cartwright and Wesley 
Halls, new kitchen equipment, renovation of the first 
floor of the chapel, library books and equipment, class- 
rooms and offices in Clark Hall basement, a foreign lan- 
guage laboratory, and even a few dollars to go with oth- 
ers that had been raised to repair the tennis courts. Col- 
lege staff member and Bulletin editor Robert E. Cates 
editorialized as follows: 

McKendree Moves Ahead 
McKendree is, for the first time in many 
years, now facing a year full of hope for a 
bright and prosperous fiiture. The year 1963 
truly promises to be a year of advancement 
for McKendree. 

The $100,000 campaign, under the in- 
spired leadership of Board Chairman and 
distinguished alumnus Milburn P. Akers, 
has been an outstanding success. The self- 
study reports and campus improvements 
that have been made over the past few 
years as well as the additions that the new 
funds will make possible, all present a 
hopeful picture of the college. If this pic- 



ture is bright enough, the North Central 
Association may well find it feasible to ad- 
vance McKendree, already an official can- 
didate for membership, to full membership. 

Enrollment this year is the highest in 
McKendree history and dormitory space is 
now at a premium. If enrollments continue 
to climb, as it is expected they will, new dor- 
mitories will be needed in the near future. 
All of which just goes to prove that 
McKendree is now on the move. It 's a whole- 
some sign and one that many of us have been 
looking forward to for many years. Now that 
it's started let's all get behind the college 
administration and keep up the momentum. 
This year is the year in which we can all take 
pride in helping make McKendree the kind 
of school we can truly be proud of. The goal 
is at last within reach. It is within the power 
of the Alumni Association to build a better 
and a lasting McKendree in 1963. 

By the end of March of that year board Chairman 
Akers announced that the campaign was officially over 
with proceeds of $120,848.29. He also noted that the 
goal had been exceeded in cash, with nearly $20,000 
still to come in the form of pledges to be paid by June 
30. More than 3000 donors responded to the largely mail 
solicitation, with the average gift about $40. Only 8 
percent of the proceeds were committed to pay expenses 
of the effort, a point noted with pride by Akers: "This 
campaign was conducted entirely, from start to finish, 
by a group of dedicated amateurs. There wasn't a pro- 
fessional fund raiser in the lot." 

The importance of fund raising was not lost on the 
members of the class of 1963. As their graduation gift 
to the college, 42 of the 54 seniors pledged to contrib- 
ute $5.00 a year for life to the college. A plaque com- 
memorating this commitment still hangs in Bothwell 
Chapel, and gifts regularly come to the college marked 
for payment of the senior pledge of the class of 1963. 



Campus Activities 

In the midst of the euphoria about McKendree's 
fund raising prowess, other activities continued to take 
place on campus. Plato, long a rival to Philo as a liter- 
ary society for men on the campus, had been changing 
its image ever since acquiring (with the blessings of 



One Hundred and Thirty-Seven 



MC KENDREE 











McKendree College 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS • FEBRUARY 22, 1963 












0v^^ Programme — ^ 

THE PRELUDE: "Chant Heroique" Gordon Young 
Professor Glenn Freiner 

THE PROCESSIONAL: "Trumpet Voluntary" Henry Purcell 

THE CHORAL CALL TO WORSHIP 

THE HYMN: Page 77 

THE INVOCATION Dr H G Hurley '29 




District Superintendent 
Carbondale District 
THE CHORAL AMEN 

THE ANTHEM: "Benedictus Es, Domine" Richard Purvis 
The McKendree Chapel Choir 

THE CALL TO PRAYER 

THE MORNING PRAYER Dr. H. G. Hurley 

THE CHORAL RESPONSE 

INTRODUCTION OF SPEAKER Dr. Ernest R. Britton, '24 
Superintendent of Midland, Michigan, Schools 

FOUNDERS' DAY ADDRESS Mrs. Leon Church 

PRESENTATIONS Dr. Max P. Allen 
President of the College 

THE BENEDICTION Dr H G Hurley 


THE RECESSIONAL 

THE POSTLUDE: "Trumpet Tune" Henry Purcell 




Founders Day 1963 





college officials) the old Glotfelty house near 
campus. The members had organized them- 
selves more along the lines of a social orga- 
nization and had transformed their literary 
meetings into business meetings - in effect 
emulating the social fraternities on other 
campuses. The long-time rivalry between the 
two groups continued, but even the staid Philo 
members moved as a group into one of the re- 
conditioned dorms on the back campus. Al- 
though only Philo members lived in Wesley 
Hall, they continued to use Philo Hall in Old 
Main for the meetings of their group, which 
was still proudly called a literary society. 

An issue that caused some campus tur- 
moil during this time was the ouster of 
McKendree College as a member of the Prai- 
rie College Conference by the other member 
schools. The vote came in a meeting on 
March 4, 1963, at which the other schools 
leveled the charge that McKendree had an 
unfair advantage because of McKendree's 
practice of giving grants-in-aid to athletes 
where they did not. The dominance of the 
PCC by McKendree in practically every 
competitive sport would seem to support their 
contention. Athletic Director James "Barney" 
Oldfield shrugged it off by saying that 
McKendree would henceforth compete as an 
independent school. 

The role of McKendree and 
McKendreans as founders of colleges was 
the topic of a Founders Day presentation on 
February 22, 1 963, by alumna Helen Church, 
who, with her alumnus husband, Leon, pub- 
lished the Lebanon Advertiser. She related 
that McKendreans had been prominent in the 
founding of several other colleges and uni- 
versities, including Central Methodist and 
Howard Paine in Missouri, Southwestern 
College in Kansas, and Southern Illinois Nor- 
mal University in Carbondale, Illinois. She 
related a story that the founders of both 
Vassar and Wellesley, elite colleges for 
women, had been greatly influenced in their 
thinking by brothers Wes and Will Jones, who 
founded the North Western Female College 
in Evan.ston, Illinois. This college was later 
merged with a smaller school for men down 
the street and became known as Northwest- 
em University. 



One Hundred and Thirty-Eight 



Alumni Remembrances 

Alumni from the Allen era who responded to the 
questionnaire prepared by the Alumni Association His- 
tory Committee had fond memories of several campus 
personalities. Those faculty and staff members whose 
names were mentioned many times in the interesting 
and entertaining responses included Dean W. Norman 
Grandy; Professor Fred Fleming; Drs. Mildred Silver, 
Otha Clark, Roland Rice, and John McCain; instructors 
Emerial Owen, Robert Brown, Orville Schanz, 
Mary Ellen Williams, Elizabeth Dixon, Glenn Freiner, 
William Hodge, David Packard, Kent Werner, Grace 
Welch, and John Godwin; coaches Dale Cruse and 
James "Barney" Oldfield; and staff members Charlie 
Cox, Vernon Snead, Virgil Church, Katherine Daniel, 
Joe Boner, Florence "'Mom" Thomley, and Marcella 
"Mom" Keck. 

Numerous incidents were also remembered by the 
respondents. Although too many to mention all (and 
some not appropriate to be printed in a publication that 
might be read by children of those who were in school 
in the early '60s), several bear brief mention. 

Prof. Fleming was a favorite of everyone. One stu- 
dent remembered that Prof, had sent a messenger from 
the 8 AM class to the boys dorm to awaken two re- 
calcitrant classmates and get them to class immedi- 
ately. Another was dismayed that Prof, could stop a 




lecture in mid-sentence at the end of one class period 
and begin it at precisely the next word when the class 
met again. 

Dr. John McCain, a rotund, deep-voiced giant who 
apparently suffered from a sleep disorder, was remem- 
bered for a memory trait similar to that of Fleming. 
McCain often dozed off to sleep as he sat at his desk 
and lectured to a classroom full of passive students. His 
lecture would also stop in mid-sentence, and he would 
lapse into a heavy-breathing form of sleep. Finally some- 
one would feign a loud cough or scrape a chair across 
the floor or raise one of the old noisy windows to awaken 
him. McCain, too, would pick up the lecture in mid- 
sentence as if nothing had interrupted his train of 
thought. 

Several alumni respondents noted the quality of 
the people who were students at this time in the college's 
history. Many public school teachers who were often 
much older than the traditional college student came to 
the campus for night and summer classes to obtain de- 
grees that the state now said they needed in lieu of the 
two years of college that had been adequate when they 
started teaching. Likewise, military personnel came from 
nearby Scott Air Force Base to pursue the degree they 
had foregone immediately after high school. Among 
the traditional students were many who were the first 
members of their families to be able to afford college. 
Yet many respon- 
dents reported that there 
was something about the 
mix of students, the mas- 
terful teaching, and the 
mystique of the campus 
that prompted people to be 
"good people." This con- 
cept was reiterated many 
times in the references to 
the "values learned by 
watching others," in the 
feelings of "friendliness 
and camaraderie" on the 
campus, and in the "coop- 
eration rather than con- 
frontation" that came with 
the meshing of conflicting 
cultures. 

One student, who 
had come to McKendree 
amidst an influx of stu- 
dents from New York and 
New Jersey, told about get- 



One Hundred and TItim-Nine 



ting off a bus, walking to the campus, and being sur- 
prised that passersby actually greeted and talked to him! 
Another was impressed when the dean of the college 
met him at the bus station in St. Louis and drove him to 
Lebanon to enroll. 

Student activities and events, both on and off cam- 
pus, also brought back fond memories to those who 
completed the alumni questionnaire. Debates of liberal 
vs. conservative principles in the Public Affairs Forum 
meetings; reactions to the Distinguished Leader Lec- 
ture Series that brought local celebrities to the campus; 
the significance of the annual McKendree Writers' Con- 
ference; the bald appearance of the steepleless chapel; 
the chapel bell mounted on the back of a white pick-up 
truck with Dr. Rice at the wheel; the student trips, often 
interrupted by mechanical breakdowns, in the white bus 
emblazoned with purple; the first-ever Homecoming 
dance to be held on the campus; the serenity and beauty 
of the front campus — a memory that seems to be typi- 
cal of McKendreans of every era. All these scenes were 
remembered as important to McKendreans during the 
Allen presidency. 

Off-campus gatherings in the modest homes of 
faculty and staff members to watch TV, eat popcorn, 
and discuss the world situation vied with trips to Dirty 
Dave's, Stelle's, and other local entertainment establish- 
ments as remembrances that provided hours of enjoy- 
ment for those responding to the questionnaire. 

Responses of several Allen-era alumni related to 
the impact of the college experience on the individual. 
Others described a special introduction to a student who 
later became a spouse. Some told about the dawning of 
consciousness about life's complexities. A few yearned 




McKendree College Writers' Conference, started by Dr Mildred Silver, offered an 
opportunity for those in the Lebanon area to appreciate, critique and explore material they 
have produced. 



for the security they had known as students. But one 
respondent distilled the feelings of so many others: 
"McKendree changed my life." 



Continuing Growth 

Late in the spring of 1 963, board Chairman Akers 
proposed another improvement project for the campus. 
To honor the efforts of the successful Circuit Riders 
Campaign, Akers suggested that Clio Hall, located on 
the first floor of Bothwell Chapel, be renovated and re- 
named Circuit Riders Hall. He enlisted the aid of Mrs. 
W. R Mautz, wife of the Lebanon trustee and contrac- 
tor who had overseen the restoration of the chapel . Mrs. 
Mautz and her committee worked throughout the sum- 
mer and fall, and the "new" Circuit Riders Hall was 
ready for formal dedication at the December 7, 1963, 
meeting of the board of trustees. Ironically, that was the 
date of the funeral of 95-year-old Dean Edwin P. Baker, 
long an institution at the college. It was also the date 
that Emerial Owen was first appointed acting dean. 
Owen, a 1951 alumnus of McKendree, was destined to 
become an institution at the college as well, serving in a 
variety of roles until his untimely death in 1991. 

In June 1 963 the Bulletin hinted of more fund rais- 
ing to come now that McKendree had proven that she 
could raise money. A half million dollar campaign for 
capital funds would be announced in the fall to build a 
new science hall and make other improvements needed 
to comply with North Central Association requirements. 
The article also suggested 
that a new dormitory could 
be the goal of yet another 
campaign in the fall of 1 964. 
More student housing was 
necessary to alleviate the 
crowded conditions brought 
about by the largest full-time 
day-student enrollment in 
the college's history, 389 
students. This represented a 
30 percent increase in just 
two years. 

The promised drive 
was initiated on October 
24, 1963, when an initial 
gifts meeting was held in 
Eisenmayer Auditorium. Dr. 



One Hundred and Fom 




Reception following dedication of Circuit Riders Halt (formerly Clio Hall). 



H. G. Hurley, the campaign chairman, and alumnus 
Charles Chapman, who had been hired as the college's 
first director of development in March 1963, both lauded 
the progress that had been made in preceding years and 
reveled in the prospects for the future. Chapman reported 
that once again the churches of the Southern Illinois 
Conference, prodded anew by Bishop Voigt, were re- 
sponding beautifully and that more than 800 people had 
attended informational meetings throughout Southern 
Illinois. His slogan, "McKendree College is on the 
go, and growing," became the rallying cry for this 
new fund raising campaign. Board of trustees mem- 
ber Richard H. Amberg, publisher of the St. Louis Globe 
Democrat, arranged for a full-page feature to appear in 
the weekend edition of his newspaper entitled, "Old 
McKendree Looks to the Future." It coincided with the 
formal announcement of the campaign. 

In marked contrast to the high profile Circuit Rid- 
ers Campaign, there was little ongoing news about the 
progress of this second fund raising effort. Perhaps that 
was because the goal was reached so quickly. In Janu- 
ary 1 964 the Bulletin stated matter of factly that the 
$500,000 goal had been topped with cash and pledges 
to be paid over a three-year period, the latter primarily 
from churches. A new building would be erected soon. 
W. R Mautz was appointed to chair a special committee 
of the board of trustees to oversee preliminary planning 
for the proposed facility. 



Even the McKendree 
Review, which had bannered 
news of the beginning of the 
campaign in inch-high let- 
ters over five columns, was 
subdued in its announce- 
ment of the success of the 
McKendree College Expan- 
sion Fund Campaign. The 
paper's sole bit of ebullience 
at the successful conclusion 
of the campaign was an ex- 
clamation point at the end of 
the second line of a two col- 
umn heading, "$500,000 
Expansion Goal is Sur- 
passed; Cash and Pledges 
Exceed $658,000!" The ac- 
companying story related 
that more that $558,000 had 
come from churches and in- 
dividuals and that a 
$100,000 grant was ex- 
pected from the General board of Education of the Meth- 
odist Church. 

President Max P. Allen even tempered his previ- 
ous enthusiasm but did say that the success of the fund 
drive would allow the college to ". . . educate [students] 
in the finest McKendree traditions of quality that led 
Theodore Roosevelt to refer to McKendree as 'the old- 
e.st and best in the Middle West"." The St. Louis Globe 
Democrat, which had featured the beginning of the cam- 
paign over most of a page, noted the passing of this 
significant event with an article of less than eight col- 
umn inches. It included the same information, even to 
the Allen quote of Roosevelt, so it was obviously printed 
verbatim from the college's news release. 

Even with the seeming lack of enthusiasm that had 
marked the campaign of a year earlier, it was nonethe- 
less evident that McKendree was indeed "on the go and 
growing," The heady success of raising nearly three- 
quarters of a million dollars in little over a year prompted 
the board of trustees to further action. In March 1964, 
the Executive Committee released drawings for the new 
Science Building and decided that it would be named in 
honor of Bi.shop Edwin E. Voigt, the man who had played 
such an important role in securing the funding for the 
half-million-dollar-plus facility. They also announced 
that McKendree's application for a $500,000 federal 
government loan to build a new dormitory and student 
center had been approved, meaning that more than a 



One Hundred and Fnm-One 



-^^^s^ss^^^SmM^msm^^^^^s^^^^:^^ 



million dollars worth of new stnictures would soon be 
going up on a campus that had seen but one building 
constructed since celebrating its centennial in 1928. 
Alien, again somewhat restrained, said, "McKendree has 
been making notable progress in many areas during the 
past few years. The Faculty has been upgraded, much 
new equipment of all kinds has been purchased, its older 
buildings have been repaired and modernized and now 
we have embarked on our building program." 



The End of the Allen Era 

The remainder of the spring of 1 964 was unevent- 
ful. However, the June 6 meeting of the board of trust- 
ees was not. The minutes of that meeting reported sev- 
eral routine actions concerning campus activities, a reso- 
lution to accept a gift of mineral rights, a resolution to 
authorize execution of the loan agreement with the fed- 
eral government — and acceptance of the resignation of 
President Max P. Allen, to become effective September 
1, 1964. The letter of resignation included no details of 
the reason or reasons for the decision. The minutes note 
that the resignation was accepted "with regret" and that 
"considerable progress had been made during his four 
years." The board offered Allen "continued friendship 
and good wishes." Allen returned to Terre Haute, Indi- 
ana, where he became visiting professor of history at 
Indiana State College. 

A little over six weeks later, on July 24, 1964, 
Edwin E. Voigt, having just retired as Bishop of the Illi- 
nois Area of the Methodist Church, was selected to re- 
place Allen as president of McKendree College. Both 
the Faculty Advisory Committee and the Presidential 
Search Committee had recommended that Voigt be of- 
fered the position. Chairman Akers and others pre- 
vailed upon Voigt by phone until he gave his verbal 
approval, subject to his being released from a planned 
teaching position at Perkins School of Theology in Dal- 
las, Texas, and the approval of the person to succeed 
him as bishop. Further stipulations placed on his accep- 
tance were: 

/. He expected the full cooperation of the 
board, the faculty; and the Southern Illinois 
Conference of the Methodist Church. 

2. The president, academic dean, and busi- 
ness manager would be given full authority to 
act on the day-to-day operation of the college. 



3. The college would pursue closer coopera- 
tion with the Board of Education of the Meth- 
odist Church. 



Summary of the Allen 
Presidency 

Growth is the key word in summarizing the years 
Max P. Allen served as president of McKendree Col- 
lege. There was growth in the amount of money that was 
raised for the college; there was growth in the number of 
full-time students enrolled; there was growth in the school's 
academic reputation; and there was growth in the good 
feelings of all people concerning the future of the college. 

Although the growth of the fund-raising capabili- 
ties of the college was detailed earlier, suffice it to say 
that progress from campaigns raising less than $100,000 
annually to drives netting over a million dollars in an 
18-month period is remarkable. 

Growth in the number of full-time day-students 
was also impressive. In 1960-61, Allen's first year as 
president, the enrollment of such students totaled 264. 
By the end of his presidency, the 1963-64 year showed 
388 full-time day-students registered, a 30 percent in- 
crease. The number of night school and summer school 
students stayed essentially the same during this period, 
although there was a decrease in those numbers from 
the years when Webb Garrison was president. 

Even more significant was the growth of 
McKendree College as an academic institution. The 
administration, faculty, and staff of the college had long 
since embarked upon the arduous task of regaining ac- 
creditation by the North Central Association. This had 
been one of the two goals that Allen had set for himself 
upon assuming the presidency in 1 96 1 . Progress toward 
this goal was slow and difficult, but it was persistent. 
Although accreditation was not fully achieved until sev- 
eral years later, the foundation for its accomplishment 
was laid during the Allen presidency. 

Perhaps the most significant growth occurred in 
the hearts and minds of McKendreans - those who 
dreamed of what McKendree could become and worked 
to see that it came to pass. Once again, they rallied to 
her support, as had been done so many times in the past. 
The alumni, the friends, the faculty, and the staff were 
all on board; but now, so were the churches and the in- 
dividual Methodists in Southern Illinois. They all re- 
sponded to the poignant peal of the old chapel bell at 
their beloved "college on the hill." 



One Humired and Forty-Two 



MC KENDREE~E^ 



The Administration of President Max P. Allen 
Faculty List 



1960-61 

Joseph Austell* 
L. D. Bauersachs* 
Norman Beck* 
Robert Brown 
Louis Butts* 
Otha Clark 
Jennie Cox 
Ralph Cox* 
Loy Dale Cruse 
Katherine Daniel 
Zada Dickson 
Eldon Dittemore 
Fred A. Fleming 
Loren K. Freeman* 
Glenn Freiner 
Marino Garcia* 
John Godwin 
William N. Grandy 
Freeman Greer* 
Wilma Hargis* 
Ethel Horner* 
Lawrence Horsch* 
Whitney Kerr* 
John W. McCain 
Charles Miller* 
Daniel Moore* 
Inez Neal* 
James Oldfield 

Emerial Owen, Jr. 
Dwight Putt* 
Orpha Reeder* 
Roland Rice 
Edward Sakurai 
R. C. Sayre* 
Orville Schanz 
Mildred Silver 
Ellice Simmonds* 
Clyde Smith* 
Dinah Tanner* 
George Tuerck* 
Grace R. Welch* 
Kent Werner 
Lester Wicks 
Felix Williams* 
Mary Ellen Williams 



1961-62 

Gordon Aldrich* 
L. D. Bauersachs* 
Alma Biagi* 



Fine Arts 

Speech 

Education 

Sociology 

Education 

History 

Business Education 

Psychology 

Physical Education, Coach 

Librarian 

Art 

Business Education 

Biology 

Psychology, Mathematics 

Music 

Spanish 

Physics 

Philosophy, Dean 

History 

Fine Arts 

Social Studies 

Social Studies 

Business Education 

English 

Education 

French 

English 

Psychology, Director of 

Athletics, Coach 

Education, Registrar 

Physics 

Mathematics 

Religion 

Mathematics 

Education 

Music 

English 

English 

Sociology 

Physical Education 

Music 

English 

Music 

Chemistry 

Education 

Speech 



Philosophy, Religion 
Speech 



Norman Beck* 


Education 


Robert Brown 


Sociology 


Louis Butts* 


Education 


Otha Clark 


History 


Nell Cox* 




Ralph Cox* 




Robert Cox 


History 


Loy Dale Cruse 


Physical Education, Coach 


Allen Dickerman* 




Eldon Dittemore 


Business, Economics 


Velma Fairbum* 


Physical Education 


Fred A. Fleming 


Biology 


Loren K. Freeman 


Education 


Glenn Freiner 


Music 


Marino Garcia* 


Spanish 


Beatrice Godwin 


Librarian 


John Godwin 


Education, Physical Science, 




Director of Evening School 


William N. Grandy 


Philosophy, Dean 


Freeman Greer* 


History 


Sidney Hirons* 




William Hodge 


Art 


Ethel Homer* 


Social Studies 


Whitney Kerr* 


Business Education 


William Kestly* 


German 


John W. McCain 


English 


Charles Miller* 


Education, Psychology 


Daniel Moore* 


French 


Inez Neal* 


English 


Phyllis Nies* 


Physical Education 


James Oldfield 


Psychology, Director of 




Athletics,Coach 


Emerial Owen, Jr 


Business Education, Registrar 


Helen Park* 


Business 


Dwight Putt* 


Physics 


Orpha Reeder* 


Mathematics 


Roland Rice 


Religion 


Edward Sakurai 


Mathematics 


Orville Schanz 


Music 


Mildred Silver 


English 


Ellice Simmonds* 


English 


Clyde Smith* 


Sociology 


Curtis Trainer* 


Education 


George Tuerck* 


Music 


Kent Werner 


Music 


Lester Wicks 


Chemistry 


Mary Ellen Williams 


Speech 


1962-63 




Gordon Aldrich* 


Philosophy, Religion 


L. D. Bauersachs* 


Education 


Norman Beck* 


Education 


Robert Brown 


Sociology 


^m^^^53SS=- 



One Hundred and Forty-Three 



^^-^e^OSgr<^??w 


^^r^X^'^NiC KENDREE W^^ 


fe^fe^^>^.^=.-^,_ 


Louis Butts* 


Education 


1963-64 


-^^^^=^^$^^£:^::S> 


Otha Clark 


History 


Gordon Aldrich* 


Philosophy, Religion 


Nell Cox* 




Robert Brown 


Sociology 


Robert Cox 


History 


John Budina 


Business Education 


Loy Dale Cruse 


Physical Education, Coach 


Howard Bundy* 


Mathematics 


Eldon Dittemore 


Business, Economics 


Jarvis Burner 


Librarian 


Velma Fairbum 


Physical Education 


Otha Clark 


History 


Fred A. Fleming 


Biology 


Loy Dale Cruse 


Physical Education, Coach 


Robert Fortado* 




John Curtis 


Applied Christianity, Director 


Loren K. Freeman 


Education 




or Religious Life 


Glenn Freiner 


Music 


Earl Dawes 
Eldon Dittemore* 


Psychology 
Business, Economics 


Roger Gafke* 




Sam Donham* 


Education 


Marino Garcia* 


Spanish 


Herman Einsman 


German, French 


Beatrice Godwin 


Librarian 


Velma Fairbum 


Physical Education 


John Godwin 


Education, Physical Science, 


Fred A. Fleming 


Biology 




Dir. of Summer and Evening 


Loren K. Freeman* 


Education 




School 


Glenn Freiner 


Music 


William N. Grandy 


Philosophy, Dean 


Robert Cantrell* 


Education 


Freeman Greer* 


History 


Marino Garcia* 


Spanish 


Leslie Harper* 




Beatrice Godwin 


Assistant Librarian 


Stephanie Hill 
William Hodge 


Music 


John Godwin 


Physics 


Art 


William N. Grandy 
Freeman Greer* 


Philosophy 
History 


Ethel Homer* 


Social Studies 


William Hodge 


Art 


William Kestly* 


German 


Ethel Homer* 


History 


Robert Mabry* 




Maude Keldermanns* 


French 


John W. McCain 


English 


William Kestly* 


German 


Opal Mercer* 




Donald Lewis 


History 


Charles Miller* 


Education, Psychology 


Ralph Marty 


Education. Director of 


Inez Neal* 


English 




Summer and Evening School 


James Oldfield 


Dean of Students, Dir. of 


John W. McCain 


English 




Athletics Coach 


Charles Miller* 


Education, Psychology 


Emerial Owen, Jr. 


Business Education, 


Inez Neal* 


English 




Registrar 


James Oldfield 


Dean of Students 




Emerial Owen, Jr. 


Education, Business, Registrar, 


David Packard 


English 




Acting Dean 


Helen Park 


Business 


Stephanie Hill Owen 


Music 


Dan Peterson 


Physical Education 


David Packard 


English 


Dwight Putt* 


Physics 


Helen Park 


Business Education 


Orpha Reeder* 


Mathematics 


Dan Peterson 


Golf Coach 


Roland Rice 


Religion 


Orpha Reeder* 


Education 


Edward Sakurai 


Mathematics 


Roland Rice 


Religion 


R. C. Sayre* 


Education 


Edward Sakurai 


Mathematics 


Orville Schanz 


Music 


Orville Schanz 


Music 


Mildred Silver 


English 


John Schoon 


Physical Education, Ass't. 

Coach 

English 


Kelly Simmons* 


English 


Mildred Silver 


Clyde Smith 


Sociology 


Kelly Simmons* 


Education 


Judith Smith* 




Clyde Smith* 


Sociology 


Curtis Trainer* 


Education 


George Tuerck* 


Instrumental Music 


George Tuerck 


Instrumental Music 


Louis Vesely 


Physical Education, Coach 


Lester Wicks 


Chemistry, Biology 


Lester Wicks 


Chemistry, Biology 


William Wright* 


Education 


Mary Ellen Williams 


Speech 


Mary Ellen Williams 


Speech, Dean of Women 


William Wright* 


Education 


*Part Time 









One Hundred and Forn-Foiir 







McKendree College Chapel 
Declared a Landmark House in 1964 by St. Clair County Historical Society. 



One Hundred and Forry-Five 







Centennial Gate and walk 




One Hundred and Fom-Six 




^a^^^u'Mim^' 



Centennial Gait 




One Hundred and Forn-Seven 




Old Main, built in 1850 
Declared a Landmark House in 1979 by St. Clair Counts' Historical Society. 




One Hundred and Forty-Eight 




Built as a one story gymnasium in 1867, it became the Science Hall in 1893. The two upper floors were added later 
{note the different colored bricks above original roof line). 





















,^;g^ 


^^^ ^^^^^rr-:;: -^ 


ML 


ik.^ 


1 


---- 


Kit. 


_£_;T: 


9 


'*'••!/ 




i; 


I": 


- i i^l. :.*..-■ r -•: . 




— , 


^^i^HHW bS^I^ 








^ 



Voigt Science Hall, built in 1965. 



One Hundred and Forn-Nine 




i\inu-i,' Hull, luiilr ill 1911. 



^.;I^^A^|^ 


Jtiiiiiii iiffi 


'^^t^^'^ 



Pearsons Hall, hiiilr in 1911. 



Clark Hall, built in 1911. 



<^s::gyc5^^^?:^^^^^MC KENDREE"^S^ 




Deneen Student Center and Helen Barnett Residence Hall built in 1966. 




One Hundred and Fifry-One 



MC KENDREE" 







•^ ^ 






Si 






-4t * 





i^ 

^ 



^ 



-A- ■* J- 






iH 









i ^#ll^/^- ^ 



r^"*; 



^V""" 4 



^ 




^ « ^ 



Onf Hundred and Fifty-Two 



1 BOTHWELL CHAPEL 

2. WILDY HALL 

3 OLD MAIN 

4 BENSON WOOD 



1 1 HOLWAN LIBRARY 

12 DENEEN CENTER & THE LAIR 

13 BARNETT HALL 

14 BAKER HALL 






5 EISENMAYER AUDITORIUM 15 AMES DINING HALL 

6 CLARK HALL 16. WALTON HALL 

7 PEARSONS HALL 17, SUITES 
^j 8. CARNEGIE HALL 18, MELVIN PRICE CONVOCATION CENTER 

.*y. ^^0 9. BJ/\RCAT CENTER 19 STEVENSON HOUSE 

*^ . ''^JO apai)IGT SCIENCE HALL 20 ALUMNI HOUSE 



;m HYPES SOCCER FIELD 

22 TENNIS COURTS 

23, SOFTBALL FIELD 

24 BASEBALL FIELD 

25. ATHLETIC/FOOTBALL FIELD 

26 TRAINING/FITNESS CENTER 



<^* . '• *i^''W- ^ 9. ^RCAT CENTER 19 STi 

/J^*^".- • ''"JO gMjpiGT SCIENCE HALL 20 ALI 



If^^ilStTEDT^' 















One Hundred and Fifty-Three 




Benson Wood Library 
erected in 1917 in memory of 
Honorable Benson Wood of 
Effingham, Illinois, by his 
wife, Jennie Jewett Wood. 




One Hundred and Fifty-Four 



^iuSff^^ KENDREE^^^ 




William McKendree Window in Holman Library given by Leslie McKendree Milholin. Jr.. a descendant of Bishop McKendree. 



One Hundred and Fifty-Fiv, 




Eisenmayer Gymnasium, showing additions on either side. 



m. ■■ «^i 


J. ' 




Vffl-y^ 


'— ' ■ 1 . ■ T" 


tr^ 


=«=-™ 






-4 --'- ' 


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m 


^^^^^'y ^^^^ 


— ■» 




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s 


l£r: '^ c^^ 


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Bearcat Gxmnasiiim, built in 1 959. 



One Hundred and Fifn-Si.x 




Circuit Riders Hall in BoihweU Chapel. 




One Hundred and Fifty-Seven 




Stevenson House - Home of the President 
Declared a Lcmdmark House in 1977 b\ St. Clair Countx Historical Socien'. 




One of the many oak trees on the front campus. 



C KENDREE 



I Ei irm i ' 








One Hundred and Fifty -Nine 




A portrait of Bothwell Chapel by David Ottinger. Associate Professor of Art. McKendree College. 



One Hundred and Sixty 



MC KEN DREE 




Looking through the Chapel wimkm at a Commemeiiuiu p 



One Hundred and Sim-One 



MC KENDREE~ 













1 


1 






Edwin E. Voigt 





0«p Hundred and Si.w-Two 



\Xi3^Mc KEN dree" 



The Administration of President Edwin E. Voigt 

(1964-1968) 

by Kathi Meggs ('69) 



Dr. Edwin E. Voigt was named McKendree's 28th 
president by the board of trustees at a meeting held July 
24, 1964. Prior to coming to McKendree, Dr. Voigt 
served as president of Simpson College, Indianola, Iowa, 
and as bishop of the Illinois Area of the Methodist 
Church. Dr. Voigt was the first retired bishop to be hon- 
ored with the college presidency. 

Bom near Kankakee, Illinois, Dr. Voigt received 
his B.S. degree from Northwestern University and 
his Ph.D. from Yale University. He held degrees from 
Garrett Biblical Institute, Dakota Wesleyan Univer- 
sity, Simpson College, and Illinois Wesleyan Univer- 
sity. 

During World War I, Dr. Voigt served as a pilot. 
He was ordained a Methodist deacon in 1920. In 1924 
he became an elder in the Rock River Conference of the 
Methodist Church. 

He served as pastor in Evanston, Illinois, and in 
Iowa City, Iowa; as instructor in biblical literature at 
Northwestern University; as professor at Garrett Theo- 
logical Seminary; as bishop of the Methodist Church in 
the Dakota area, and as the first bishop of the Illinois 
Area when it was formed in 1 960. 

Perhaps the most brilliant accomplishment of his 
long career in the Methodist Church was the role he 
played in the revision of the Methodist Hymnal and the 
Methodist Book of Worship. Dr. Voigt was selected by 
the General Conference of the Methodist Church to serve 
as chairman of the Hymnal Revision Committee in the 
long and arduous process of updating these important 
books for the denomination. 

Dr. Voigt was honored by the Baldwin Moys High 
School in Banglalore, India, when the school dedicated 
a new academic building as the Bishop Edwin E. Voigt 
Building and Lincoln Hall. The school had constructed 



the building from $57,000 received as a result of Bishop 
Voigt's proposing such a project to Methodists as an 
advance special project of the Methodist Church. 

The building was dedicated by Bishop John A. 
Subhan of the Methodist Church in Southern Asia. One 
section of the building featured an original oil paint- 
ing of Abraham Lincoln with his son Tad. The paint- 
ing, by artist Warner Sallman, was commissioned by 
Bishop Voigt as a gift to the school from the Land of 
Lincoln. 

Dr. Voigt was honored by the Southern Illinois 
Conference of the Methodist Church when they estab- 
lished the $25,000 Edwin E. Voigt Lectureship at 
McKendree College. The Illinois Conference of the 
Methodist Church also honored Dr. Voigt when they 
named their worship center in Bloomington The 
Edwin Edgar Voigt Memorial Chapel. 

Milbum P. Akers, chairman of the board of trust- 
ees at McKendree, stated that the election of Dr. Voigt 
as president was another step toward their goal of com- 
plete restoration of McKendree to her place of leader- 
ship in American education. 

To those not directly associated with the Meth- 
odist Church, the name of Dr. Edwin E. Voigt was 
not unfamiliar. The Executive Committee of the 
board of trustees of McKendree College had an- 
nounced that the new science building to be con- 
structed beginning in early 1 964, would be named in 
honor of Bishop Edwin E. Voigt, who had played a 
major role in the McKendree Expansion Fund Cam- 
paign. It was this campaign that raised more than 
$700,000 from churches in the Southern Illinois Con- 
ference of the Methodist Church, alumni, former stu- 
dents, corporations, and friends, which made the new 
construction possible. 



One Hundred and Sixty-Three 




MC KENDREE" 



idbreaking for Voigt Science Hall, May 27, 1964. 

In so honoring Bishop Voigt, the Executive Com- 
mittee stated that it was seeking to recognize the par- 
ticipation of the Southern Illinois Conference of the 
Methodist Church, which had responded so generously 
to McKendree's needs. 

The summer of 1964 was a time of change at 
McKendree. President Voigt was 
joined by a new business manager, 
Vernon Snead. Mr. Snead had re- 
ceived his bachelor's degree from 
Southern Illinois University and 
his master's in education from In- 
diana University. He had served in 
the United States Air Force as a 
meteorologist and received train- 
ing at the University of Chicago. 
Mr. Snead was strong on organiza- 
tion and his major goal for 
McKendree was to organize her 
business affairs. During the years 
that followed, President Voigt and 
Mr. Snead proved to be a formi- 
dable and progressive team. They 
received commendations from the 
board of trustees on many occa- 
sions for their efforts in 
McKendree's behalf. 



In August 1964, the general contract for the Edwin E. 
Voigt Science Building was awarded to the Wimmer Con- 
struction Company of Belleville, Illinois. The completion 
date for the building was scheduled for September 1965, 
with a construction cost of $5 1 3,827.29. At that time other 
contracts in the amount of $232,000 were awarded for 
various aspects of the construction. 

In early September 1964, the first assembly of the 
new school year, which was held in Eisenmayer Audi- 
torium, gave students the opportunity to meet the new 
president of the college. It was during this assembly that 
students received a glimpse of Dr. Voigt's jovial, yet 
serious, personality. Dr. Voigt expressed a warm wel- 
come to all students and stated, 'The doors to my house 
will always be open to students ... but at my house 
curfew is at 10:30." On a more serious note, in his clos- 
ing remarks he suggested, "Give me a chance . . . and 
may this be a good year for all of us." 

Dr Voigt indeed enjoyed his contact with students. 
One student recalled an afternoon when Dr. Voigt came 
and sat with him as he was finishing his lunch. The 
president watched with interest as the student took a 
large piece of chocolate cake, placed it into a deep bowl, 
poured milk over the cake, and began to eat. Noting 
President Voigt's interest, the student offered to make 
the president a similar concoction. Dr. Voigt replied in 
his most dignified manner, "Oh, no! A president of a 
college and a bishop of the church couldn't eat like that 
in public!" With a twinkle in his eye. Dr. Voigt quickly 
added, "But I'll try it when I get home." 




President 's reception in 1 965. 



Site 



One Hundred and Si.xn-Four 




Excitement filled the air on the McKendree cam- 
pus during September and October 1964, as the new 
science building gradually became a reality. Contrac- 
tors began grading dirt, the foundation was laid, con- 
crete poured, and steel arrived for the framework. Fac- 
ulty, staff, students, and various interested parties 
watched with excitement and eagerness as the facility 
took shape. Faculty member Fred A. Fleming, affection- 
ately referred to as Prof. Fleming or Prof. Biology, was 
frequently seen viewing the construction site that would 
house his new teaching station. 

Construction of the new science facility, located 
north of Carnegie Hall, necessitated the closing of a 
private street that ran from Alton to Stanton Streets. As 
a result, a new parking lot was provided for students 
along the east side of the gymnasium. President Voigt 
regularly posted "construction progress reports." The 
unofficial motto of McKendree had become 
"McKendree is on the go . . . and growing" and ap- 
peared on many construction progress reports and other 
publications. 

Further evidence that McKendree was on the go 
and growing appeared in March 1965. Dr. Voigt an- 
nounced during an assembly that McKendree would 
receive $216,395 in federal grants under the Higher 



Education Facilities Act (P. L. 804). Specifically, 
McKendree received $2 1 0,822 for science hall construc- 
tion and $5,573 for library improvements. 

The grants brought the total gifts, grants, and 
pledges since October 1962 to the $1,778,564 mark. 
President Voigt voiced optimism that a $2 million total 
would be reached by June 1965. He also noted that a 
$2 million total would be an admirable close to the 
first phase of a three-phase program leading toward 
the sesquicentennial celebration for McKendree in 1978 
and the intended goal of $10 million in capital gains 
and improvements by that date. 

At this point, the college had begun construction 
of the science hall, laid plans to start construction of a 
dormitory/student center project, started work on library 
renovation, and from the estate of the late Dr. Neva 
Skelton of Eldorado added $75,000 to its endowment. 
The balance of funds earmarked for future development 
totaled over $550,000. 

The second phase of the improvement program 
envisioned removal of all indebtedness, renovation 
of the physical plant, a new dormitory for men, a din- 
ing hall, an addition to the student center, and a class- 
room building. The proposed new buildings were to 
be located at the north end of the campus, situated to 



One Hundred and Sixty-Five 



MC KENDREE 



McKendree College 

OPENING CEREMONIES 

OF THE 

SCIENCE BUILDING 




3:30 P.M. 
SEPTEMBER 12. 1965 
LEBANON. ILLINOIS 



Order of Service 

President Edwin E. Voigl. Presiding 



LITANY OF THANKSGIVING 



People: We give Ihee our hearly thanks. 

Leader: For our forefathers who envisioned an institution of 
higher learning in this place, and for their sacrifices 
to realize a college where knowledge and piety do 

People; We give thee our hearty thanks. 

Leader: For those who struggled to found these first halls, 
and for those who generously made possible this 

People: We give thee our hearty thanks. 

Leader: That now we do not enter into these benefits indif- 



SCIENCE AND RELIGION ... Bishop 

Presiding Bishop 
Illinois Area of The Methodist Church 



The Lord our God alone is strong; 

His hands build not for one brief da 
His wondrous works, through ages long. 

His wisdom and His power display. 
And let those learn, who here shall meet 

True wisdom is with reverence crow 
And Science walks with humble feet 

To seek the God that faith has found. 



Lance Webb 



BENEDICTION 

THE CUTTING OF THE RIBBON 



lilburn P, Akers 



RECEPTION AND TOUR OF THE BUILDING 



Program for the Opening Ceremonies of the Voigt Science Hall. 



One Hundred and Sixts-Six 




Milburn F Akers, Chairman of Board of Trustees, cutting the ribbon to officially open Voigt 
Science Hall September 12. 1965. 



create a north-south quadrangle, with the gymnasium 
that had been constructed in the late fifties as one of the 
comer points. 

It is not clear when the college had come to own 
the land upon which these buildings would be buiU. It 
was obviously not included in the original eight acres 
of land "on the hill," but no record of its acquisition 
date or cost appears in any of the minutes of the trust- 
ees during the 50-year period covered in this history 
of the college. No matter how and when the college 
obtained the land, it is evidence of some farsighted 
planning on the part of the trustees and administrators 
of that era. It gave the college the opportunity to ex- 
pand on land already owned and thus stretch the dollars 
that were raised to obtain more square footage in the 
buildings, since none of the money had to be spent on 
land purchase. 

The total estimated costs were $1 ,325,000. With a 
planned $1,500,000 to be added to the endowment by 
1969-70, the goal for Phase II of the sesqui-centennial 
program was set at $3,030,000. 

The final phase would see an addition of 
$3,000,000 to the endowment and $2,350,000 in con- 
struction for two new dormitories, an assembly hall, and 
a fine arts building. 



At the June 5, 1965, meeting of the board of trust- 
ees, they approved the plan to borrow $550,000 to build 
a women's dormitory and a student activity center. The 
board approved the purchase of the Snellman and Welch 
properties for housing faculty and students. The need 
for additional housing for men was noted. The board 
adopted a Master Plan for Development of McKendree 
and anticipated favorable action on application for ac- 
creditation by the North Central Association. At this 
point in its history, the college was in good financial 
condition. The board commended Vernon Snead, busi- 
ness manager, for expenditures that were less than al- 
lowed in the budget. 

McKendree College witnessed on Sunday after- 
noon, September 12, 1965, the formal opening of the 
first new academic building on the campus in almost 50 
years. The old science hall had been dedicated in 1910 
and the library had been opened in 1918. Although in- 
complete, the new science hall became an official part 
of the college community of buildings. 

The service was led by Dr. Edwin Voigt with the 
aid of Milburn P. Akers, chairman of the McKendree board 
of trustees; Dr Lance Webb, bishop of the Illinois Area of 
the Methodist Church; and Dr. Clyde Funkhouser, su- 
perintendent of the East St. Louis District. 



One Hundred and Si.xr\-Seven 




Prof. Fred Fleming. Professor of Biology, in new laboratory 

Milbum P. Akers, retired editor of the Chicago Sun- 
Times, gave the statement of purpose, and the building 
was officially named The Edwin E. Voigt Science Hall. 
The theme of Mr. Akers' speech was: "Brick and mor- 
tar do not a college make." He emphasized that a col- 



lege is made of students and faculty work- 
ing together for the purpose of learning. 
He reminded the audience that even with 
modem buildings, it is students and fac- 
ulty who determine the caliber and future 
of the college. 

Mr. Akers had predicted two years 
prior to this ceremony that McKendree 
would see an expanded building program 
that would include at least two new build- 
ings either finished or under construction. 
On this occasion, Mr. Akers predicted that 
by 1 970, four or five new buildings would 
be up or under construction and that by 
978, the campus would be completely 
rebuilt and the land east of the campus 
would be a complete recreation area. Mr. 
Akers concluded with the statement, "The 
McKendree renaissance is well on the 
way." 

Bishop Webb was the featured 
speaker of the afternoon. His subject was 
"Science and Religion." and the bishop 
stated that the supreme concern of mod- 
em man is science. He added that one must 
realistically recognize the limits of both 
the "physical and the so-called social sciences." Bishop 
Webb stated that the primary limitation of science is 
that it cannot give one the concern and love to use its 
powers constmctively. The bishop noted that it was sig- 
nificant that the first modem building on campus was a 







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Students at work in new Biologx lab. 



One Hundred and Si.\n-Eigli 




Construcrion of Deneen Campus Center and Bamett Hall. 



science hall. Discussing the matter of science and reli- 
gion, the bishop stated that the two complement rather 
than hinder each other. He made the point that scien- 
tists, and science without faith and conviction, are the 
enemies of man. He stated that education opens rather 
than shuts the door to Christian faith, and the liberal 
spirit of mind is open to all ideas and yet is directed to 
and rooted in faith. After the formal ceremonies, Mr. 
Akers performed the traditional cutting of the ribbon. 
A tour of the building was held for those in attendance. 

Less than one month later, at the October 2, 1965, 
board of trustees meeting, preliminary plans for a men's 
dorm (200 students) and dining room (for 500) were 
presented. The design of the buildings would conform 
to the Georgian style of architecture. Board President 
Akers paid tribute to Dr. Voigt and Mr. Snead for their 
successful effort during the past year. Mr. Akers said, 
"We had a place, now we have a college." 

Amid the excitement of dedicating a new build- 
ing and making plans for new ones, renovation of the 
first floor of Old Main was under way. The renovated 



facilities doubled the office space for the president, the 
academic dean, and their staffs. On November 22, 1965, 
an open house was held to allow faculty, staff, and stu- 
dents to tour the new offices. 

The board of trustees met January 29, 1966, and 
noted that the structural condition of the old Science 
Hall was still sound. It was noted, however, that one 
comer of Old Main had begun to settle. Gifts of the 
Mautz and Adair families for refurbishing Circuit Rid- 
ers Hall were recognized. 

The McKendree Choir participated in the celebra- 
tion of the bi-centennial of the Methodist Church, held 
in Baltimore, Maryland, April 21-24, 1966. The choir, 
directed by Professor Glenn Freiner, took part in three 
sessions on Friday, April 22, 1966. The first performance 
by the choir was at a luncheon and the second at an 
afternoon symposium at which Dr. Martin Luther 
King, Jr., was the featured speaker. At the Friday evening 
session, the McKendree Choir was the featured "solo 
choir." President Lyndon B. Johnson was the speaker 
for the session. 



One Hundred and Sixn-Nine 



MC KENDREE" 



Plans for the expansion of McKendree College 
moved forward rapidly. A special meeting of the board 
of trustees was held August 21, 1966. The board ap- 
proved the plan to secure a 51,200,000 self-liquidating 
loan for two dorms and a dining hall. Mr. Akers ex- 
pressed sentiments of the board about the enhanced 
position of the college and her growing status and in- 
creasing prestige among institutions of learning. 

At the October 1 , 1 966, board of trustees meeting, 
it was noted that the college had applied for federal funds 
for a new library. The trustees instructed Dr. Voigt to 
proceed with plans for construction of the library to 








begin in late 1967 or early 1968. It was also noted that 
the Voigt Science Building was debt free and that ex- 
cess funds from the Conference campaign would be 
applied to the library building. Repairs and improve- 
ments to the century-old chapel were authorized by the 
board as a part of an extensive rehabilitation and im- 
provement of the college. 

Five new buildings were named at this same board 
meeting (October 1, 1966). The new campus cultural 
and social center was named the Charles Samuel Deneen 
Campus Center, in honor of one of McKendree's most 
distinguished graduates and benefactors. United States 
senator from Illinois and twice governor 
of the state, Mr. Deneen served as a 
McKendree trustee for 28 years, 10 of 
which were as president of the board. 
Members of the Deneen family estab- 
lished an endowment trust of $150,000 
to support a Chair of Early American His- 
tory at McKendree. 

The new women's residence was 
named Helen T. Bamett Hall in honor of 
Mrs. Bamett. A member of a prominent 
West Frankfort family, her bequest of 
$1 80,000 was the largest single gift ever 
received by the college, up to that time. 
The trustees also named three other 
structures, a dining hall, and two men's 
residences. Construction of these build- 
ngs would begin within weeks. The din- 
ing hall was named Ames Hall in honor 
of the Reverend Edward R Ames, first 
principal of Lebanon Seminary, founded 
in 1 828 and later named McKendree Col- 
lege. The two residences were named 
Walton Hall and Baker Hall in memory 
of two revered McKendree professors. 
Dr. William C. Walton was a professor 
of religion and McKendree historian, 
and Dr. Edwin R Baker, language pro- 
fessor and dean of the college. The two 
men had served McKendree a total of 
122 years. 

Dedication of Charles S. Deneen 
Campus Center and Helen T. Bamett Hall, 
scheduled for December 3, 1966, high- 
lighted homecoming weekend. Under the 
leadership of President Edwin E. Voigt 
and tmstee Milbum P. Akers, the program 
celebrated two significant symbols of 
progress at McKendree. 



One Hundred and Seve 




President Voii^! and Business Maiuiiier Vernon Snecid iit tin 
1965 groundbreaking for Walton, Ames and Baker Halls. 



Charles S. Deneen Campus Center, which opened 
in September 1966, was built at a cost exceeding 
$250,000. The building contained a snack bar, recre- 
ation room, offices, conference room, and utilities on 
the first floor. A beautiful and commodious lounge area 
was located on the second floor. 

Helen T. Bamett Hall was the first of a series of 
new residence halls on the McKendree north campus. 
The hall, which opened in September 1966, provided 
modem, comfortable rooms for 1 00 women and an apart- 
ment for the dean of women. The hall was built at a 
cost exceeding $250,000. 

McKendree was undergoing a renaissance, which 
brought a new look to the campus. When alumni and 
friends arrived for homecoming weekend, December 
1966, they witnessed several changes. Old Main had 
been improved with new wood paneling on the walls of 
the entrance corridor and two newly installed restrooms 
on the first floor. The visitor's parking lot and drive- 
way areas near Eisenmayer and Pearsons had been re- 
surfaced with blacktop and rock. Clark Hall had been 
placed in service as a men's residence. Pearsons Hall 
had a new and improved campus bookstore on the 
ground level. Three new faculty offices had been built, 
and a new faculty lounge was under construction. 
Benson Wood Library staff members were struggling 
to find space for several thousand new volumes made 
possible by a federal grant ($5,000). The library staff 
was changing to the more modem Library of Congress 





Dr. Clark N. Stokes, speaker for the 1966 Commencement 




Faculty and graduates at the 1966 Commencement. 

Classification system of cataloging books. Carnegie 
Hall had received a face lift: Its trim had been painted 
and renewed; new showers had been installed on all 
floors; and new furnishings had been placed in the re- 
ception lounge. Wesley Health Center occupied the 
building on the north campus formerly used as a men's 
residence and provided a needed campus infirmary. The 
Pothouse, a new campus coffee house, was opened in 
the old Glotfelty house on Hunter Street. The coffee 
house was under the auspices of the Studefttlfeligious 
Life Commission and was open on weelcettilili TUll 
Pothouse savored the contemporary scene and offered 
opportunity for folk-singing, and poetic and dialogical 



expression of Christian faith. 
Renovation work on the Marion 
Bothwell Chapel had begun. 
Lake Beautiful was now only a 
memory, since the area had been 
dredged of all sludge and filled 
with clay dirt to provide the site 
for a new complex of buildings. 
Meeting December 3, 1966, 
the McKendree trustees awarded 
contracts that amounted to 
$ 1 ,300,000 for the construction of 
three new buildings on the north 
campus. The action cleared the 
way for the construction of Ames 
Hall, a food service facility that 
would serve 600 students, and for 
Baker Hall and Walton Hall, two 
residences that would house 200 
men. These buildings would be 
located north of the gymnasium 
in the area formeriy covered by 
Lake Beautiful. Occupancy was 
expected in the spring of 1968. 

The board of trustees also 
approved the plans for erection of 
a new library on a site just north 
of the Edwin E. Voigt Science 
Hall. The trustees acted to modify 
the campus master building plan 
to change this site from a desig- 
nated classroom building to the 
library site. The plans called for 
a 22,000-square-foot structure 
with three floors in the Georgian 
style. The library would house 
70,000 volumes and provide 
study space for 500 students. The 
new structure would be air-conditioned and would con- 
tain audio-visual and microfilm facilities. 

At this historic moment in the life of McKendree 
College, President Voigt announced that the college had 
received a large gift to be used for the new library struc- 
ture. Dr and Mrs. Clarence C. Holman of Effingham, 
Illinois, gave $250,000 to be used for the new library. 
The building would bear the Holman name in honor of 
Dr and Mrs. Clarence C. Holman. At that point, the 
Holman gift was the largest ever received by McKendree 
OMdpk' !k, and Mrs. Holman were life-long residents 
of Illinois, and several of Mrs. Holman's relatives had 
attended McKendree. 




One Hundred and Se 



Amid the excitement of new 
buildings being constructed, the 
board of trustees launched a $16 
Million Decade of Progress Program 
for McKendree College. At a spe- 
cial meeting of the board of trust- 
ees held September 14, 1967, the 
specifics of the program were out- 
lined. The plan included a $7.5 mil- 
lion physical improvement and en- 
largement of the campus and called 
for construction of new buildings 
and modernization of existing cam- 
pus buildings. The Decade of 
Progress Program also included $3.5 
million for academic growth and im- 
provement and an additional $5 mil- 
lion to be secured for the college en- 
dowment fund. 

With these plans complete. Dr. 
Edwin E. Voigt, who had been at the 
helm of McKendree College for 
three years, announced his plans for 
retirement. In a release dated Octo- 
ber 1967, Dr. Voigt explained to stu- 
dents and faculty that he had taken 
the initiative in requesting that the 
trustees of the college (February 4, 
1967) begin to search for the next 
president. Dr. Voigt stated that most 
colleges and businesses made retire- 
ment mandatory at age 65, and he 
felt that to continue carrying heavy 
responsibility much beyond that age 
carried too many risks for the col- 
lege. He indicated that the college 
needed young, creative, and dy- 
namic leadership. Dr. Voigt felt that 
when the examiners for accreditation 
visited the campus in 1968-69, they 
would have better chances of esti- 
mating McKendree's qualifications 
if new leadership was in action. Dr. 
Voigt indicated he had asked that the 
Trustee-Faculty-Student Committee 
on Selection proceed with the results 
of the search anticipated at the end 
of the 1 967-68 academic year. 

At this point in McKendree's 
history, with so many changes and 
plans in place, the board of trustees 




Art studio in Hypes Field House in 1965. 



'^. 






fill % 






m 






T '""^iai'/ 




Tiie 1964 annual college picnic on Hypes Field. 




Faculty and staff picnic on the President's lawn in 1967. 



One Hundred and Sevenn-Tliree 




Alumni Banquet after Graduation. 



took Steps to improve the intellectual climate on cam- 
pus. At the January 22, 1968, meeting they approved 
the upgrading of admission requirements. 

Continuing their concern for upgrading the col- 
lege in various areas, the trustees suggested the by-laws 
be changed to provide representation by three members 
of the Alumni Association on the board of trustees. This 
action gave voice to alumni in the governing of 
McKendree College. This action was taken at the Feb- 
ruary 10, 1968, board of trustees meeting. 

Events continued to move forward on campus. 
President Voigt celebrated the end of his 75th year with 
an open house at Stevenson House on Monday, Febru- 
ary 12, 1968. Continuing his tradition of keeping his 
doors open to students, all students were invited to join 
him in his celebration. An open invitation to all stu- 
dents appeared in the McKendree Review. Students 
chuckled as they noted the ending of the open house 
was well within the limits of Dr. Voigt's curfew — 8:30 
PM 

One month later, March 14, 1968, Dr. Voigt an- 
nounced his retirement date of July 15, 1968. At that 
point. Dr. Voigt would have served McKendree College 
for four years as her president. 

A sense of change could be felt on campus as new, 
progressive ideas presented themselves. McKendree was 
moving toward current trends in policy governing resi- 
dence halls. The Faculty Committee on Student Life, 
meeting March 4, 1 968, approved the open lounge policy 
for men's residence halls. The open lounge policy was 
begun on a trial basis and would be reviewed in May of 
1968. Certain criteria had to be fulfilled by the residence 
halls staff, including such things as a schedule of hours 



and lists of standards gov- 
erning the open lounge. 

The Faculty Commit- 
tee on Student Life also 
modified rules governing 
women's dress during 
weekend hours in Deneen 
Lounge. Women would be al- 
lowed to wear dress slacks 
after 5:30 PM on Fridays 
and continuing Saturdays 
and Sundays. Rules were 
changed to limit attendance 
at dances on campus to 
McKendree students and 
their guests. 

The board of trustees 
met March 9, 1 968, and sub- 
mitted the name of a candidate for the new president of 
McKendree College. At this meeting, the trustees made 
known that the Pioneer's Room in the new library would 
be the depository of history materials of the Southern 
Illinois Conference of the Methodist Church. 

Just prior to Dr. Voigt's retirement, Ames, Baker, 
and Walton Halls were dedicated. The ceremonies were 
held June 2, 1968, with Milbum P. Akers, chairman of 
the board of trustees. Dr. Lee R. Baker, Dr. Clarence H. 
Walton, and others officiating. All the buildings in the 
complex were comfortable, modern, and air-condi- 
tioned. Total construction cost of the complex was 
$1,294,800. Ames, Baker, and Walton Halls were a part 
of McKendree's "Decade of Progress" expansion pro- 
gram. 

Events continued to move forward as the 
McKendree College Choir prepared to make its first 
appearance on national television. The choir was fea- 
tured on NBC-TV June 30 and July 7, 1 968, when KSD- 
TV in St. Louis, Missouri, presented its regular Sunday 
morning program, "The Protestant Hour." 

As noted by trustees Chairman Milbum P. Akers, 
on the occasion of the dedication of the Voigt Science 
Hall, September 1965, students and faculty determine 
the caliber of a college. Students who were on campus 
during Dr. Voigt's presidency recalled administrators, 
faculty, and staff members who were particularly influ- 
ential in their lives: President Voigt, Dean of Students 
W. Norman Grandy, Registrar Emerial L. Owen, Busi- 
ness Manager Vernon Snead. faculty members Robert 
Brown, Otha Clark, Eldon Dittimore, Fred Fleming, 
Glenn Freiner, William Hodge, Roland Rice, Orville 
Schanz, Blanche Tibbetts, Grace Welch, and Lester 



Wicks, and support staff members Joe Boner, Marcel la 
Keck, Ruthellen Pegg, and LaDoris Weber One con- 
stant throughout McKendree's history seems to have 
been its dedicated and concerned administration, fac- 
ulty, and staff members. 

As McKendree continued to move into its 15th 
decade, the campus had taken on an atmosphere of posi- 
tiveness and optimism. Persons of note who were perti- 
nent to the times appeared on campus. Dick Gregory, 
civil rights activist, appeared in May 1 968, and held the 
audience captive with his dynamic hour-and-a-half 
speech. Veteran actor John Carradine appeared in May 
1968, and presented dramatic readings. Authors Alex 
Haley and James Drought appeared in October 1967, and 
discus.sed their craft. Phyllis Schlatly, political activist, 
spoke before an assembly. May 1966. Many of these visi- 
tors met with students and answered questions following 
their presentations. A wide spectrum of personalities and 
subjects offered the campus family the opportunity to 
be more informed as the world changed rapidly. 

Dn Voigt's tenure at McKendree College drew to 
a close. His administration had been marked by the 
"McKendree Renaissance," a time when the college 
moved into the 15th decade of its history with a $16 
million program for growth and development. 

Dr Voigt had begun his presidency with a three- 
point program: 



/ . to increase enrollment and student serx'ices 

2. to improve and enlarge the faculty 

3. to expand the campus. 

In each of these areas he was notably successful. 

During Dr Voigt's administration enrollment 
had climbed by 50 percent (since 1964). An ex- 
panded student services program had been 
implemented. 

The faculty had been improved and enlarged 
until 38 percent had doctoral level degrees, 
a figure in line with national averages at that 
time. 

Beginning with the construction of Voigt Sci- 
ence Hall in 1964, the campus had expanded 
rapidly. A campus center, a women's resi- 
dence hall, a cafeteria, and two men 's resi- 
dence halls had been completed. A new li- 
brary was under construction. 

Dr Edwin E. Voigt, 28th president of McKendree 
College, retired to live near his daughter in Seattle, 
Washington, where he lived until his death on August 
31, 1977. 




Ferox Fraternity's depiction of future Holman Library during Homecoming. 1967. 




One Hundred and Sevenn-Fiv 



The Administration of President Edwin E. Voigt 
Faculty List 



1964-65 




Grace R. Welch* 


English, Speech 


Gordon Aldrich* 


Education, Philosophy 


Lester Wicks 


Chemistry 


Robert Brown 


Sociology 


Thelma Wilkinson* 


English 


John Budina 


Business, Economics 


Mary Ellen Williams 


Speech 


Howard Bundy* 


Mathematics 


William Wright* 


Education 


Jarvis Burner 


Librarian 






Olha Clark 


History 






John Curtis 


Applied Christianity, Director of 


1965-66 






Religious Life 


Charles Alcorn 


Psychology 


Earl Dawes 


Psychology 


Gordon Aldrich* 


Education, Philosophy 


Eldon Dittemore 


Business, Economics 


Ronald Brandenburg 


Physics 


Sam Donham* 


liducation 


Robert Brown 


Sociology 


Herman Einsman 


Foreign Languages 


Otha Clark 


History 


Velma Fairbum* 


Physical Education 


Mary Carol Chester 


English 


Fred A. Fleming 


Biology 


John Curtis 


Applied Christianity, Director of 


Loren Freeman* 


Education 




Religious Life 


Glenn Freiner 


Music 


Eldon Dittemore* 


Business, Economics 


Marino Garcia* 


Spanish 


Sam Donham* 


Education 


Robert Cantrell* 


Education 


Wendell Dysinger 


Psychology, Dean 


Beatrice Godwin 


Assistant Librarian 


Robert Fitch 


Librarian 


John Godwin 


Physical Science 


Fred A. Fleming 


Biology 


William N. Grandy 


Philosophy, Dean of Students 


Loren Freeman* 


Education 


Freeman Greer* 


History 


Glenn Freiner 


Music 


William Hodge 


Art 


Robert Cantrell* 


Education 


Ethel Homer* 


History 


Marino Garcia* 


Spanish 


Maude Keldermanns* 


French 


John Godwin 


Education 


William Kestly* 


German 


William N. Grandy 


Philosophy, Dean of Students 


Donald L^wis 


History 


James Gray* 


Business 


Ralph Marty 


Education, Director of Evening 


William Hodge 


Art 




School 


Carroll Leas 


Business Administration 


Ann McCann* 


English 


Ralph Marty 


Education 


Joseph McKee* 


Psychology 


Joseph McKee* 


Psychology 


Charles Miller* 


Education, Psychology 


Charles Miller* 


Education 


Annette Mulvaney 


Speech 


June Miller* 


Education 


Inez Neal* 


English 


Annette Mulvaney 


Speech 


Emerial Owen, Jr. 


Education, Acting Dean, 


Inez Neal* 


Education 




Registrar 


Emerial Owen, Jr.** 


Education 


Stephanie Hill Owen 


Music 


Stephanie Hill Owen 


Music 


David Packard 


English 


David Packard 


English 


Helen Parks* 


Business Education 


Robert Proost* 


Political Science 


Dwight Putt* 


Physics 


Orpha Reeder* 


Education 


Orpha Reeder* 


Education 


Mary Renfro* 


Education 


Roland Rice 


Religion 


Roland Rice 


Religion 


Orville Schanz 


Music Education 


Orville Schanz 


Music Education 


John Schoon 


Physical Education 


Ralph Schamau 


History 


Kelly Simmons* 


Education 


John Schoon 


Physical Education 


Clyde Smith* 


Sociology 


Kelly Simmons* 


Education 


Vernon Snead* 


Education 


Richard Thompson 


Foreign Languages 


George Tuerck* 


Instrumental Music 


George Tuerck* 


Music 


Robert VanDanElzen 


Mathematics 


Naida Upchurch* 


French 


Louis Vesely 


Dir. of Athletics, Physical 


Robert VanDanElzen 


Mathematics 




Education, Coach 


Alice Vesely* 


Physical Education 




^-fW=^^ ^1f 


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One Hundred 


md Seventy Six 





\X^MC KENDREE^^S 



Louis Vesely 
Grace R. Welch* 
Lester Wicks 
Mary Ellen Williams 
William Wright* 



1966-67 

Charles Alcorn** 
Mary Alcorn 
Ronald Brandenburg 
Robert Brown 
Mary C. Chester 
Otha Clark 
Gail Delente 
Glenn Diseth 
Eldon Dittemore* 
Wendell Dysinger 
Robert Fitch 
Fred A. Fleming 
Glenn Freiner 
Marino Garcia* 
William N. Grandy 
James Gray* 
Cecil Harris 
William Hodge** 
Richard Hopkins 
Carroll Leas 
Ralph Marty 
Annette Mulvaney 
Emerial Owen, Jr.** 
Stephanie Hill Owen*^ 
David Packard** 
Roland Rice 
Mary Renfro* 
Howard Rogers 
Ralph Schamau 
Orville Schanz 
John Schoon 
Eugene Seubert* 
Harry Statham 
Richard Thompson 
Blanche Tibbetts 
Curtis Trainer 
George Tuerck* 
Robert VanDanElzen 
Grace R. Welch* 
Lester Wicks 
Mary Ellen Williams* 



Director of Athletics, Coach 

English 

Chemistry 

Speech 

Education 



Psychology 

Physical Education 

Physics 

Sociology 

English 

History 

Music Theory, Piano 

Art 

Business, Economics 

Psychology, Dean 

Librarian 

Biology 

Music 

Spanish 

Philosophy 

Business 

Biology 

Art 

English 

Business Administration 

Education 

Speech 

Education 

Music 

English 

Religion 

Education 

Economics 

History 

Music 

Physical Eiducation 

English 

Director of Athletics, Coach 

Foreign Languages 

Education 

Education 

Instrumental Music 

Mathematics 

English 

Chemistry 

Speech 



1967-68 

Charles Alcorn** 
Robert Brown** 
Mary C. Chester 
Otha Clark 
Dwayne Cole 
Gail Delente 
Glenn Diseth 
Eldon Dittemore* 
Sam Donham* 
Wendell Dysinger 
Fred A. Fleming 
Glenn Freiner 
Beatriz Garcia* 
Marino Garcia* 
William N. Grandy 
James Gray* 
Victor Gummersheimer 
Cecil Harris 
William Hodge** 
Leonard Janes 
Bemice Kamm 
Carroll Leas 
Esther Manuel* 

Ralph Marty 

Gordon Miller 

Annette Mulvaney 

Emerial Owen, Jr. ** 

Stephanie Hill Owen** 

David Packard** 

Abby Potter 

Mary Renfro* 

Roland Rice 

Howard Rogers 

Orville Schanz 

Ralph Schamau** 

John Schoon 

Sara Schoon* 

Eugene Seubert* 

Marguerite Skaar* 

Harry Statham 

Carl Stockton 

Roy Sturm 

Blanche Tibbetts 

Harris ToUefson* 

Curtis Trainer 

George Tuerck* 

Robert VanDanElzen 

Grace R. Welch* 

Lester Wicks 



Psychology 

Sociology 

English 

History 

History 

Music 

Art 

Business, Economics 

History 

Psychology 

Biology 

Music 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Philosophy 

Business 

Mathematics 

Biology 

Art 

Physics 

Physical Education 

Business Administration 

Physical Education 

Education 

Education 

Speech 

Education 

Music 

English 

English 

Education 

Religion 

Political Science 

Music Education 

History 

Physical liducation 

English 

English 

French 

Director of Athletics, Coach 

History 

Sociology 

Education 

Mathematics 

Education 

Instrumental Music 

Mathematics 

English 

Chemistry 



•■Part Time 
'=*0n Leave 




One Hundred and Se 



MC KENDREE 











^^^^. \ 


i 


1 






Eric Rackham 





One Hundred and Seventy-Eight 



MC KENDREE 



The Administration of President Eric Rackham 

(1968-1975) 

By Paul W. Widicus ('71) 



A new era for McKendree College began on May 
4, 1 968, as the board of trustees, under the leadership of 
Milbum P. Akers, selected Dr. Eric N. Rackham to be- 
come the 29th president of McKendree College. Dr. 
Rackham was the son of a Canadian Methodist minis- 
ter. He earned his master of arts degree in English and 
his doctor of philosophy degree in student personnel 
services from the University of Michigan. His career 
started at the University of Colorado where he stayed 
for 15 years, serving in various positions and becoming 
assistant dean of arts and sciences. He then moved to 
Kent State University in Ohio, where he served for 16 
years and became executive dean. Dr. Rackham arrived 
at McKendree on July 15, 1968, just after the dedica- 
tion of three new buildings on campus. Ames Hall Caf- 
eteria, Baker Residence Hall, and Walton Residence Hall 
were dedicated on June 2, 1968. They joined with the 
other two new buildings on campus, the Charles S. 
Deneen Campus Center and the Helen T. Bamett Resi- 
dence Hall, to provide the much needed space for the 
rapid growth McKendree was to undergo. Plans were 
also underway to build a much-needed new library. 

McKendree's future depended upon much more 
than just buildings. President Rackham saw the chal- 
lenges and discussed them in an interview with the Leba- 
non Advertiser. Accreditation by the North Central As- 
sociation for Colleges and Secondary Schools was one 
of his first goals, and he immediately began to work 
toward that end. To achieve accreditation, he set in mo- 
tion changes in the curriculum, the faculty, the staff, 
and the finances, among other things. With all these 
changes, the college had to constantly remember the goal 
of preparing students for "the business of living in ad- 
dition to the business of making a living." Dr. Emerial 
Owen became dean of academic affairs and began the 



work of upgrading the curriculum and faculty. With these 
goals, McKendree began to blend career orientation 
activities with the traditional liberal arts experience - a 
process that has continued to the present. To achieve 
this end, McKendree used its small size of 500 students 
to its advantage. A student staff ratio of 1 5 to 1 made for a 
closeness that has been a factor in McKendree's success 
through the years. 

Upon his arrival in the summer of 1968, Dr. 
Rackham did not find everyone at McKendree in agree- 
ment and harmony. Student demonstrations were oc- 
curring on campuses across the United States in the fall 
of 1968, and even McKendree was not spared. Because 
of its small size and the direct lines of communications 
from president to staff to faculty to student body, law 
and order were maintained and Dr. Rackham gained the 
respect of many. Financial problems continued to plague 
the college, affecting payments on loans for new build- 
ings, construction of the library, remodeling of older 
buildings, and even maintenance. However, the board 
of trustees and Dr. Rackham agreed on plans to raise 
the needed funds, construction of the library continued, 
plans were completed to renovate the old chapel, and 
McKendree moved forward. To begin, tuition was raised 
as staff and faculty salaries were increased. Enrollment 
was increased by an influx of new persons. The level of 
instruction increased as students took more hours of classes. 
Residents increased as students moved into the new 
dorms. By the end of 1968, McKendree was moving and 
growing. Dr. Rackham summarized the time by saying, 

The days have had their moments which were 
in turn stimulating and sobering, encourag- 
ing and discouraging, happy and sad. We 
have had our share of resignations and ap- 




One Hundred and Se 



MC KENDREE" 



pointments, hospital visits and campus re- 
ceptions, budgetary worries and generous 
college gifts. Through it all, however, there 
has been evident a spirit of confidence in the 
future which shows itself among the many 
faculty and staff members, students, alumni, 
trustees, and friends of McKendree. This 
feeling undergirds the action of many of us 
and provides a forward thrust which speaks 
well for our future. 

As 1968 ended, McKendree celebrated its recent 
accomplishments. New buildings were in use, Holman 
Library was nearing completion, plans were underway 
to renovate the Bothwell Chapel, and physical growth 
could be seen daily. In academics, the faculty grew, 
younger and better trained professors were hired, the 
James M. Hamill Chair of English was established, and 
the student body expanded. Students began to become 
more involved in the decisions affecting their lives at 
McKendree with the acceptance of new social policies, 
the organization of a new Bearcat Booster Club, stu- 
dent voices on college committees and boards, student 
input into all phases of the college self-study, and even 
the raising of money to support McKendree. 



McKendree continued to grow in 1969 as the col- 
lege worked to prepare itself to seek accreditation by 
the North Central Association of Colleges and Second- 
ary Schools. The year began with celebration as over 
$200,000 was raised for the Holman Library Fund. The 
Holman Trust Fund required this amount in order for 
the $250,000 gift to be given from the estate of Dr. C. C. 
Holman of Effmgham, Illinois. This assured the con- 
tinuation of the construction of the Holman Library and 
the equipment necessary for the furnishing of the inte- 
rior. With the successful completion of the first year of 
fund raising in the "New Decade of Progress," the sec- 
ond year's goal was to raise the $463,000 needed to pay 
off debts and continue the growth of McKendree. In 
February, the trustees agreed to use $250,000 from a 
large inheritance left to the college by the late Miss 
Marion Bothwell of Fairfield, Illinois, to renovate the 
111-year-old chapel. Work would include new light- 
ing, floors, windows, woodwork, plaster, stairway, en- 
trance, and bell tower, with the rest of the building be- 
ing restored. Work on the library and chapel continued 
through most of 1969. 

The construction of Holman Library was a much 
needed asset to the college. There was a large space for 
books and periodicals as well as microfilm and audio- 




One Hundred and Eighty 



<^:s^^^^'^g?g^^^P^MC KENDREE"^^^ 



PSKMMMMrilBHHHHHr^ 



m r f r r 
I li i ii ,. 




Holinan Libran' 




The foyer ofHolman Libran: 

visuals. The three-story Georgian-style building seated 
250 students with 75 student study carrels. Lynn Grove 
('60), the head librarian, described the library with 
praise. Also included was a faculty reading room, three 
seating rooms, a late study room, and a typing room. 
The Pioneer Room was designed to house the records 
of the Southern Illinois Conference of the United Meth- 
odist Church. Funding for construction consisted of 
$250,000 from the estate of Dr. Clarence C. Holman, 
$200,000 raised by the college, and $200,000 from the 
Higher Education Facilities Act. To save money, vol- 



unteers of students, faculty, 
staff, and friends of the col- 
lege, carried 20,000 books 
from the old Benson Wood 
Library to the new library on 
June 16, 1969, during a "Book 
Walk." One of the students in- 
volved in the "Book Walk" 
tells how even Dr. and Mrs. 
Rackham helped. To the 
student's embarrassment, a 
stack of books she was mov- 
ing fell, hitting Mrs. Rackham 
on the head. She graciously re- 
assured the student that she 
was not hurt. Eventually, all 
the materials were moved, or- 
ganized, and placed on new 
shelves, and the day of dedi- 
cation drew near. Dedication 
occurred on Friday, October 
17, 1969. With faculty, staff, 
trustees, students and guests 
present. Dr. James Holderman, 
the executive director of the Il- 
linois State Board of Higher 
Education, spoke at the dedi- 
cation ceremony. 

Much time in 1969 was 
spent in conducting a self- 
study of all aspects of 
McKendree College and pre- 
paring a report for the North 
Central Accreditation Com- 
mittee. Committees were es- 
tablished to study every area 
of the college, evaluate the 
current condition of the col- 
lege, make recommendations 
for changes, and plan for the 
future. Each committee consisted of staff, faculty, stu- 
dents, and other interested persons. Self-study com- 
mittees looked into financial resources, human re- 
sources, physical facilities, programs of instruction, 
and extracurricular programs. The reports on each of 
these areas was completed, and a formal report was 
prepared and sent to the North Central Association 
for Colleges and Secondary Schools in the spring of 
1969. A North Central Association Visitation Team 
visited McKendree in December 1969, and prepared 
its report. 



One Hundred and Eighty-One 



Even though McKendree had grown and pros- 
pered, not everyone agreed on the future direction of 
the college. Controversy began to surface over deci- 
sions made by the board of trustees and the college ad- 
ministration. Because of the shortage of funds, some 
students and faculty protested the decision to restore 
the old chapel. Added to this controversy were other 
protests about the spending of funds by the administra- 
tion. After several months of heated debates at 
McKendree Student Association meetings and scathing 
articles in the McKendree Review, the administration 
stopped funding for the Review. An attempt was made 



Dr. Eric N. Rackham, President 

McKendree College 

701 College 

Lebanon, Illinois 62254 

Dear President Rackham; 

It is a pleasure to inform you offic 
of Colleges and Secondary Schools, a 
to accredit McKendree College as a B 
This action was effective as of Apr! 
added to the published list of accre 
the Summer, 1970 issue of the North 



The action of the Associ; 
discussions held by the ( 
College for membership, 
been made in developing 1 
wishes to call attention 
which were cited In 



Joseph Semrow of 



regarding the application of McKendre 
iation recognized the progress that ha 
jtion. However, the Association also 
Df concern needing further improvement 



'f7- 



^/iu^^^, 



ent Elmer Jagow 
sor David L. Anderso 
sor Orin M. Lofthus 
Graham Waring 



to continue the paper using donations, but when funds 
dwindled, a protest was held and the last issue of the 
Review was placed in a casket. A funeral procession car- 
ried it across campus to Stevenson House. The 
McKendree Review was not published again until No- 
vember 1970. 

Student life was not all protests. The McKendree 
choir toured Illinois in May 1969. Sports grew as 
McKendree won many basketball games. The Clionian 
Literary Society celebrated its 100th anniversary with 
many activities. Sigma Kappa Gamma girls' society 
was started in October 1969. Because of the increase in 
enrollment in 1969, class- 
rooms were fashioned in ev- 
ery available room on cam- 
pus. The Benson Wood 
Building was made into 
classrooms, Pearsons Hall 
was partitioned off, the 
bookstore was moved and 
enlarged, the basement of the 
old dorms became class- 
rooms, and even the old Sci- 
ence Building, which was 
scheduled for demolition, 
was spared and put into use 
as classroom space on a lim- 
ited basis. 

Many exciting projects 
came to fruition during 1970 
for McKendree College. The 
building frenzy culminated 
with the completion of the 
remodeling of the chapel, ac- 
creditation was finally 
achieved, and evening and 
extension classes were pro- 
posed to attract even more 
students. The first project at 
McKendree to be completed 
in 1970 was the renovation 
of the Marion Bothwell 
Chapel. Begun a year earlier, 
the entire building was made 
structurally sound and re- 
paired. A new steeple and 
bell tower were built, and the 
bell was reinstalled. The 
McKendree bell had a his- 
toric past. Original records 



North Central Association letter accrediting McKendree College. on the yoke indicate that it 



One Hundred and Eighty-Two 



was cast in the 8th century in 
Spain, recast in the 14th cen- 
tury, and moved to Florida with 
several other bells by Jesuit 
missionaries in the 16th cen- 
tury. The bell was eventually 
moved to a mission in New 
Mexico. In the 1 9th century, a 
trader found several bells aban- 
doned at the mission and trans- 
ported them to St. Louis. The 
bell was recast and put on dis- 
play at a fair in Centralia, Illi- 
nois. Dr. N. E. Cobleigh, presi- 
dent of McKendree in 1858, 
saw and heard the bell and pur- 
chased it for $60. It was in- 
stalled in the old chapel where 
it was used until 1959, when 
the steeple housing the bell had 
to be removed for safety pur- 
poses. The bell had been 
mounted on a temporary stand 
in the cafeteria. On July 29, 

1969, the bell was hoisted into place in the new 140- 
foot steeple. The bell was installed in a stationary posi- 
tion so it would no longer swing free. Instead, the clap- 
per was connected to an electrical device that swings 
the clapper striking the bell. Mrs. Milbum P. Akers wrote 
this about the bell. 

VERSE ABOUT THE BELL 
Deep silence reigned. No sound, no merry note 
was heard on campus, Iwll, nor in the street. 
The sky was gray. The birds on silent wings 
Soared o'er this land so cheerless in defeat. 
The chapel bell was mute. 

Time passes. Hope begins to burst anew. 
Discouraged hearts now see a glimmering ray. 
The sky grows brighter with each passing 

morn. 
Full-throated birds greet merrily each day. 
Our chapel bell is raised. 

The air is charged with peals of gladsome 

sounds. 
Mankind looks up and offers to his God 
His deepest thanks for on this sod the feet 
Of men on learning bent shall ever trod. 
Forever may the chapel bell ring out! 




Students celebrate accreditation. 

The bell had been in place in the chapel for only a 
short time when it was put to special use. The final visit 
by the North Central Association of Colleges and Sec- 
ondary Schools was completed in January 1970. They 
found McKendree had "upgraded its academic program, 
modernized its campus, and recruited a more capable 
student body." In February, an updated self-study docu- 
ment was begun. The document was presented to the 
North Central Association on April 5, 1970. Of great 
concern was the underwriting of the 1970 annual fund 
goal of $205,000. However, with the support of many 
friends, the college was able to underwrite the required 
amount. On April 8, 1970, the North Central Associa- 
tion "... voted to accredit McKendree College as a 
Bachelor's degree granting institution. The association 
recognizes the progress that has been made in develop- 
ing the institution. However, the association also wishes 
to call attention to areas of concern needing further im- 
provement which were cited in the examiner's report." 
Dr Rackham "telephoned the good news at 1 1 :45 AM 
to anxious students, trustees, and personnel. The 
McKendree bell rang steadily for a half hour following 
the disclosure." Dr. Robert C. Bartlett, assistant execu- 
tive secretary of the North Central Association, told Dr. 
Rackham that "the favorable nod by the association is 
based upon 'dramatic improvements' at the college since 
its last examination in 1966." Upon his return on the 



One Hundred and Eighty-Three 



MC KENDREE 



evening of April 8, Dr. Rackham said, "It is with a deep 
sense of satisfaction that we have achieved a goal that 
has eluded us for so long. This could have come about 
only because of the concerted efforts, the patience, the 
understanding, the prayers of hundreds of members of 
our McKendree family." 

Summary of Report of Examination 
of McKendree College 
January 18-20, 1970 
The brevity of this report prevents mention 
in more detail other obser\'ations of the ex- 
aminers during their visit. It should be said 
that both the people and the program in its 
various parts demonstrated vitality and for- 
ward movement. 

To summarize some of its strengths and weak- 
nesses, we would point out for particular at- 
tention and commendation the following: 

1. The administrative staff: The President, 
the Dean of the College, the Business 
Manager, and the Dean of Students. 

2. The library and the Librarian. An assis- 
tant librarian is to be added in 1970-1971. 

3. New Student Center 

4. New Residence Halls and Dining Room. 

5. Improved Faculty Preparation and 
Selection. 

6. General confidence by the Faculty in the 
administration and the success of the 
College. 

7. Students are happy, enthusiastic about the 
College, and feel they are developing and 
learning at a good rate. 

8. Program for probationary students. 

9. Understanding by the students of the 
problems of the College as they develop 
suggestions for changes in the social 
regulations. 

10. The financial program. 

11. The board of trustees. 

Particular Weaknesses: 

1. The student body needs to be increased 
for a variety' of reasons. 

2. Solidity needs to be established in the 
Development and Admissions Staff. 

3. Solidity needs to be developed in the 
Financial Support over the long run. 



4. Placement activities need to be increased 
and made more usefid beyond the area of 
teacher preparation. 

5. Thefacult}' needs more doctorates. 

From the fall of 1970, McKendree continued to 
look to the future. New proposals were submitted to the 
trustees to offer classes at unusual hours and places. 
Night classes were to be offered in hopes of attracting 
working people and persons from Scott Air Force Base. 
In addition, it was suggested that extension classes be 
considered the coming year at Scott itself. 

Unrest among McKendree students died down af- 
ter the news of the horrible events at Kent State Univer- 
sity in Ohio reached McKendree campus. Dr. Rackham 
had been a dean at Kent State University for 16 years, 
and news of the protests and deaths of the students sad- 
dened the entire campus. A group composed of student 
leaders, faculty representatives, and staff members met 
and decided to draft a letter to the staff, faculty, and 
students at Kent State. This letter was carefully worded 
and given to Dr. Rackham, who added his signature and 
forwarded it to friends at Kent State. With the decrease 
in student protests, the college trustees voted to rein- 
state the McKendree Review with a new faculty advisor 
and new student staff. The year ended with Professor 
Fleming receiving an honorary doctorate. 

In the fall of 1970, McKendree changed its aca- 
demic requirements from semester hours to units under 
Dean Emerial L. Owen. Instead of students taking 
classes offering one, two, three or four semester hours, 
they took classes offering one-quarter, one-half, or one 
unit. To graduate, 32 units were required, which meant 
a student had to complete four units a semester to gradu- 
ate in four years. Of major concern at the beginning of 
1971 was the financial condition of the operating bud- 
get. So much emphasis had been placed upon the con- 
struction and renovation of buildings, the regular oper- 
ating budget fell $300,000 short. The chair of the Fi- 
nance Committee during the construction period was 
W. R (Ford) Mautz. With the same care he exercised in 
guiding the contractors, he guided Vernon Snead, the 
business manager, through the difficult times. A new 
fund raising effort for McKendree College was again 
mounted using the same title, "McKendree Faces the 
Future." This 1971 version set the goal of $300,000 for 
operating expenses. A kickoff dinner was held on March 
22, 1971, with Lt. Governor Paul Simon as the honor- 
ary chair and guest speaker. By the end of the evening, 
the 200 persons in attendance already had gathered 86 
percent of the needed funds. It looked like the $42,000 



One Hundred and Eighty-Four 



lill^MC KEN PRE E~^ 



still needed could be raised quickly, but it came very 
slowly. Finally, on July 15, 1971, it was announced by 
Duane W. Amburn, director of development, that 
McKendree had exceeded its goal. A total of $323,332 
was collected, and the debt in the operating fund was 
paid. 

Additional good news was also received in the 
summer of 1971. The Southern Illinois Conference of 
the United Methodist Church voted to begin holding its 
annual conference on the McKendree campus. To pro- 
vide for a place large enough for the delegates to meet, 
the conference offered to pay for the installation of air 
conditioning in the gym. This was completed before 
Annual Conference in 1972. In addition, the Bearcat 
Booster Club agreed to construct a Bearcat Den in the 
northwest comer of the gym to enhance the support of 
the sports program. 

In the fall of 1971, enrollment stood at 468, and 
McKendree faced new challenges. To meet the goals 
of the college, more students were needed. Classes 
meeting at night and extension classes at Scott Air Force 
Base had been proposed earlier. This agreement with 
Scott Air Force Base proved fruitful for McKendree and 
the military. Even a shipment of 4,000 pounds of mod- 
eling clay for the art department was moved by heli- 
copter during flight training. During the new school 
year McKendree succeeded in increasing part-time stu- 
dent enrollment. The problem was that fewer full-time 
students enrolled and the residence halls had vacancies. 
Added to the lower occupancy was a problem created 



by strict residence hall policies. Students began pro- 
testing these policies, wrote new proposals calling for 
open residence policies, and presented these policies to 
the board of trustees on November 3, 1 97 1 . The trust- 
ees took the proposals under advisement and decided to 
try some of the suggested policies on a limited basis. In 
January 1972, they allowed open visitation on week- 
ends for one month. This worked well and in March 
1972, the trustees allowed the open-visitation policy to 
continue. 

Many campus organizations were functioning dur- 
ing the late 1960's. and early 1970's. On November 12, 
1971, the McKendree Review highlighted the activities 
of the yearbook staff, the Student Education Associa- 
tion, the Investment Club, Phi Beta Lambda, the Public 
Affairs Forum, the Psychology Club, Alpha Psi Omega, 
and the Association of Black Collegians. Each group 
listed many members, trips, special events, and active 
programs, which added much to the social and to the 
intellectual atmosphere at McKendree. 

In January 1972, the first interim term began at 
McKendree. This innovative idea allowed students to 
concentrate on one subject full-time during January. 
Classes were presented in creative and unusual ways 
that allowed for everything from experimentation to 
travel. Mr. Porter's Fortran Programming students 
learned how to use computers. Mr. Streif 's Seminar in 
Sales Management got first hand experience on the road 
visiting businesses. Fine Arts 225 studied in St. Louis 
and Chicago. Dr. Stephanie Owen and her students trav- 




One Hundred and Eighty-Five 



MC KENDREE 



eled to London, England. Mr. Brown's Counter Cul- 
ture class traveled to Greenwich Village in New York. 
Dr. Irving Dilliard, a visiting professor from Princeton, 
taught a class on the Bill of Rights. These interim courses 
were very popular with students as well as faculty. 

By the fall of 1972, the board of trustees realized 
that the number of students living in student housing 
would continue to be below capacity. The old wooden 
dormitories were still standing on the north end of the 
campus. It was decided that these were no longer of 
use. They were sold, dismantled by the purchasers, and 
disappeared from the campus by the summer of 1973. 
This area became parking for the increasing number of 
commuters and the students living on campus who had 
cars. Even with this, the other dorms were not full, and 
financial problems arose because of the low occupancy. 
Tuition was increased again in the fall of 1972 to $1,800 
to offset these losses. 

In order to improve the financial condition of the 
college even more, a new fund drive was launched for 
the 1972-1973 school year. Club memberships were 
given for contributions to McKendree. Century Club 
members gave $100 to $299; Tower Club members gave 
$300 to $599; Associate Club members gave $600 to 
$999; President's Club members gave $1,000 to 
$10,000. To accomplish this drive and to manage funds 
at McKendree in a more efficient manner, two new vice 



presidents were named: vice president of academic af- 
fairs was Emerial Owen, and vice president of financial 
affairs was Vernon Snead. 

Professor Fred Fleming was honored on Novem- 
ber 18, 1972, by the unveiling of a portrait, which was 
placed in Voigt Science Hall. James Drake, art instruc- 
tor at McKendree, had painted the portrait. Professor 
Fleming was affectionately called 'Prof by his students 
and had taught science for 26 years at McKendree. Dr. 
Rackham stated, 'Through the years at McKendree, he 
has guided many students, both science and non-sci- 
ence oriented, toward reaching a goal as a responsible 
student, graduate, and citizen with honor for himself 
and God. Who can measure the influence which Fred 
Fleming has had upon the life and times of McKendree, 
and of the State of Illinois." 

McKendree began 1973 with enthusiasm and op- 
timism. The college was operating in the black, accord- 
ing to vice president of development, Raymond F. 
Devery. Enrollment grew to almost 600 with an increase 
of 100 in two years. A goal was set of 700 to 800 en- 
rollment in future years, and David H. Wilkey was ap- 
pointed director of admissions in order to meet this goal. 
Dr. Emerial Owen worked to " . . . streamline the cur- 
riculum, upgrade the faculty and staff, improve sala- 
ries, and iron out any other difficulties." His message 
was that McKendree "... is a teaching college. Stu- 




One Hundred and Eighn-SLx 



<cs:^^c-^^<^:^c^^5l^^MC KENDREE""^^ 




Marine presents flag flow n o\er U.S. Embassy in Brussels. 



dents here will never find themselves taught by a gradu- 
ate assistant while the professor does his research." To 
advance growth a new bachelor of science degree in 
medical technology was begun with St. Elizabeth Hos- 
pital in Belleville. The only work on physical facilities 
was the addition of air conditioning to Circuit Rider Hall 
in the chapel and the moving of the coffee house to 
Hypes Field House. 

The first session of McKendree Model United 
Nations was called to order on the campus during April 
1973. Dr. Kovac, the political science instructor, took a 
group of McKendree students to Ann Arbor, Michigan, 
to visit a Model United Nations program held there. 
Close to 200 persons participated in the first McKendree 
Model United Nations and represented over 30 nations. 
Students from area high schools and colleges joined to 
debate many international issues of the day. To add to 
the reality, war broke out in the Middle East, and terror- 
ists invaded the General Assembly and kidnapped the 
president, taking her to Hardee's in O'Fallon. In spite 
of these events, the delegates passed several resolutions 
intended to solve many world problems. The delega- 
tion from Mascoutah High School took first place and 
was given a trophy. Because of its success, the Model 
United Nations continued and became a permanent fix- 
ture at McKendree. 



Of special significance in 1973 was the recovery 
of a long-lost part of the McKendree history. Harry H. 
Pope, who was the owner of Pope's catering. Pope's 
cafeterias, as well as Round Table, Seven Kitchens, 
Beefeaters, and El Rancho restaurants in the St. Louis 
area, discovered a composition called "The College 
Bells." This piece was written by F. L. Marshall and 
dedicated to the class of 1873 of McKendree College. 
Mr. Pope donated the music to McKendree, and Dr. 
Rackham turned it over to the history and fine arts de- 
partments for research and preservation. F. L. Marshall 
attended McKendree from 1869 until graduation in 
1873. He was an educator and later superintendent of 
schools in Shelbyville and Alton, both in Illinois. He 
worked for the St. Louis Post Dispatch and later the 
Presbyterian Board of Publication. After 100 years, the 
sound of "The College Bells" was once again heard as 
it was performed by Professor Glenn H. Freiner at a spe- 
cial concert. 

In 1974, growth for McKendree College came 
through the opening of extension centers at Alton, Scott 
Air Force Base, and Louisville, Kentucky. Enrollment 
continued to climb at McKendree and neared 700. To 
aid in this growth, McKendree also expanded an agree- 
ment with Belleville Area College which allowed stu- 
dents majoring in business, economics, nursing, medi- 




0)ie Hundred and Eighry-Se 



<:s:^.^c^g<^:^C^^^E^MC KENDREE' 




Phi Lamda Sigma in 1974 (formerly Pliilo Literary Society). 



cal technology, and law enforcement to transfer credits 
toward a four-year degree. Other cooperative agreements 
were also established with Southern Illinois University 
at Edwardsville in physics and ROTC, with the Univer- 
sity of Illinois in engineering, and with the St. Louis 
School of Pharmacy. 

Many new faces were seen on the McKendree cam- 
pus as growth continued with four new faculty added in 
1974. Growth among the student population diversified 
as people came from all over the world to take classes 
at McKendree, including two from Ethiopia. Social life 
at McKendree also grew as a new sorority was char- 
tered. Epsilon Gamma Chapter of Gamma Sigma Sigma 



was chartered on October 15, 1974. 
Charter members consisted of 15 
women students who had worked 
for over two years to make the new 
sorority a reality. 

The debt at McKendree de- 
creased to less than $90,000 in 
1974, with a budget of over 
$2,720,000. The number of stu- 
dents living on campus continued 
to decline, leaving Clark Hall 
empty. It was decided by the board 
of trustees that this building should 
not sit empty. The trustees saw a 
need for more classrooms and of- 
fices and in September 1974 they 
voted to seek funds to remodel the 
building. 

At the end of 1974, a three- 
year memorial grant of $140,000 
was given to McKendree by the 
Fellheimer Trust of the Wesley 
United Methodist Church of 
Macomb, Illinois. An additional 
$90,000 in matching funds was 
pledged and the refurbishing of 
Clark Hall began. Since Clark Hall 
was no longer in use as a dormitory, 
its space was changed into class- 
rooms, psychology laboratory, au- 
diovisual center, computer labora- 
tory, and offices. Many persons 
caught the vision of what Clark Hall 
could become and underwrote vari- 
ous projects. When contributions 
were completed, $110,000 in gifts 
were added to the $140,000 
Fellheimer Trust. 
Enrollment at McKendree climbed to 711 in the 
spring of 1 975 and the budget rose to almost $3,000,000. 
With his dreams for McKendree now realized. Dr. 
Rackham announced at the end of 1974 that he would 
retire for personal and family reasons on June 30, 1975. 
Building on the work of his predecessors. Dr. Rackham's 
leadership produced a modem, efficient, accredited, re- 
spected institution of higher education. Upon submit- 
ting his intention to retire. Dr. Rackham said, 'The thing 
most satisfying to me during my term at McKendree 
was the wonderful spirit of cooperation among the fac- 
ulty, staff, and students. McKendree is a happy place 
and it is a joy to me to belong to such a family." 



One Hundred and Eiglin-Eiglu 



MC KENDREE 

The Administration of President Eric N. Rackham 
Faculty List 



1968-69 




Otha Clark 


History 


Charles Alcorn 


Psychology 


Dwayne Cole 


History, Political Science 


Robert Brown 


Sociology 


Sam Donham* 


History 


Olha Clark 


History 


David Dutler 


Physical Education, Director 


Dwayne Cole 


History 




of Intramurals, Baseball 
Coach 


Eldon Dittemore* 


Business, Economics 




Sam Donham* 


History 


Wendell Dysinger 


Psychology 


David Duller 


Physical Education, Baseball 


Fred A. Fleming 


Biology 




Coach 


Glenn Freiner 


Music 


Wendell Dysinger 


Psychology 


Lynn Grove 


Librarian 


Fred A. Fleming 


Biology 


Victor Gummersheimer 


Mathematics 


Glenn Freiner 


Music 


William Hodge 


Art 


Marino Garcia* 


Spanish 


Elizabeth Hopkins 


English 


Lynn Grove 


Librarian 


Jean Kirts 


Physical Education 


Victor Gummersheimer 


Mathematics 


Ralph Marty 


Education 


William Hodge 


Art 


Frederick Minnegerode 


Psychology 


Elizabeth Hopkins 


English 


Emerial Owen, Jr. 


Education, Academic Dean 


Harold Huck 


Spanish 


Stephanie Hill Owen 


Music 


Grace Husted 


Sociology, Psychology 


Howard Porter 


Physics, Physical Science 


Jean Kirts 


Physical Education 


Myron Reese 


Chemistry 


Carroll Leas 


Business Administration 


Roland Rice 


Religion 


Ralph Marty 


Education 


Howard Rogers 


Economics, Political Science 


Emerial Owen, Jr. 


Education, Academic Dean 


Orville Schanz 


Music 


Stephanie Hill Owen 


Music 


Ralph Schamau 


History 


David Packard 


English 


Marguerite Skaar 


French 


Myron Reese 


Chemistry 


Harry Statham 


Director of Athletics, Coach 


Roland Rice 


Religion 


Carl Stockton 


History 


Howard Rogers 


Economics, Political Science 


Roy Sturm 


Sociology 


Ralph Schamau 


History 


Blanche Tibbetts 


Education 


Orville Schanz 


Music, Art 


Curtis Trainer 


Education 


Eugene Seubert* 


English 


Patricia Troy 


Assistant Librarian 


Marguerite Skaar* 


French 


George Tuerck* 


Music 


Harry Statham 


Director of Athletics, Coach 


Robert VanDanElzen 


Mathematics 


Carl Stockton 


History 


Grace R. Welch 


English 


Roy Sturm 


Sociology, Director of 


Ernest Willoughby 


Biology 




Special Students 


James Zamrazil 


German 


Blanche Tibbetts 


Education 






Terry Thomlinson 


Speech 






Curtis Trainer 


Education 


1970-71 




George Tuerck* 


Music 


Yvon Baber 


Spanish 


Joanne Tusov 


Chemistry, Biology 


Ronald Benson 


Philosophy 


Robert VanDanElzen 


Mathematics 


Evelyn Best 


English 


Toby Ward 


Physics 


Robert Brown 


Sociology 


Grace R. Welch* 


English 


Lowell Burger* 


Business, Economics 


James Zamrazil 


German 


Dwayne Cole 


History, Political Science 






Frances Dixon 


French, Spanish 






James Drake* 


Art 


1969-70 




David Dutler 


Physical Education 


Yvon Baber 


Spanish 


Fred A. Fleming 


Biology 


Evelyn Best 


English 


Glenn Freiner 


Music 


Robert Brown 


Sociology 


James Gray* 


Business 




^_,«rzi<?^dS^^l Q O R ^Pp 


1^197^^^^ 


^-i<:s:^22 


r;^;^^^,^3==H=! i 1 V ^ o ij^ 


^4^^^^§s,^^SC^ 



One Hundred and Eighty-Nine 



MfMC KENDREE 



Lynn Grove 
Victor Gummersheimer 
William Hodge 
Edward Hock* 
Elizabeth Hopkins 
Joan Kelly* 
Jean Kirts 
John Kovac 
Helen Lefler* 
Ralph Marty 
Joseph McKee* 
Frederick Minnigerode 
Emerial Owen, Jr. 
Stephanie Hill Owen 
Howard Porter 
Myron Reese 
Fred Robinson* 
Orville Schanz 
Dale Schwerdtfeger 
Harry Statham 
Edward Streif 
Roy Sturm 
Terry Thomlinson 
Blanche Tibbetts* 
Curtis Trainer 
George Tuerck* 
Robert VanDanElzen 
Grace R. Welch 
Ernest Willoughby 
James Zamrazil 



1971-72 

Yvon Baber 
Robert Brown 
Evelyn Best 
Lowell Burger* 
James Clayton 
Dwayne Cole 
Margaret Demick 
James Drake* 
David Dutler 
Fred A. Fleming 
Glenn Freiner 
James Gray* 
Lynn Grove 
William Hodge 
Naomi House* 
Douglas Jones 
Joan Kelly* 
Philip Kennedy 
Jean Kirts 
John Kovac 
Helen Lefler* 
Joseph McKee* 
George Mitchum 



Librarian 

Mathematics 

Art 

Business, Economics 

English 

English 

Physical Education 

Political Science 

Art 

Education 

Education 

Psychology 

Education, Dean 

Music 

Physics, Physical Science 

Chemistry 

Business, Economics 

Music 

Sociology 

Director of Athletics, Coach 

Business, Economics 

Sociology 

Speech 

Education 

Education 

Music 

Mathematics 

Speech 

Biology 

German 



Spanish 

Sociology 

English 

Business, Economics 

Religion 

History 

Education 

Art 

Physical Education 

Biology 

Music 

Business Law 

Librarian 

Art 

English 

Mathematics 

English 

Philosophy 

Physical Education 

Political Science 

Art 

Education 

Social Studies 



Francine Morris 
Emerial Owen, Jr. 
Stephanie Hill Owen 
Howard Porter 
Myron Reese 
Fred Robinson* 
Orville Schanz 
Harry Statham 
Frank Stiers 
Edward Streif 
Roy Sturm 
Terry Thomlinson** 
Blanche Tibbetts* 
Curtis Trainer 
George Tuerck 
Grace R. Welch 
Ernest Willoughby 
James Zamrazil 



1972-73 

Ted Anderson 
Yvon Baber 
Evelyn Best 
Wanda Bickel 
Robert Brown 
Lowell Burger* 
Robert Cass* 
James Clayton 
Dwayne Cole 
David Dutler** 
Fred A. Fleming 
Glenn Freiner 
James Gray* 
Lynn Grove 
William Hodge 
Naomi House* 
Douglas Jones 
Joan Kelly* 
Philip Kennedy 
Jean Kirts 
John Kovac 
Ik- Whan Kwon* 
Ann Mandolini* 
Janet McReynolds 
Francine Morris 
Charles Neblock* 
Kenneth Norris* 
Emerial Owen, Jr. 

Stephanie Hill Owen 
Howard Porter 

Myron Reese 
Orville Schanz 
Karen Stanfield 



Psychology 

Education, Dean 

Music 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Business, Economics 

Music 

Director of Athletics, Coach 

History 

Business, Economics 

Sociology 

Speech 

Education 

Education 

Music 

Speech 

Biology 

German 



Biology 

Spanish 

English 

Education 

Sociology 

Business, Economics 

Art 

Religion 

History, Political Science 

Physical Education 

Biology 

Music 

Business, Economics 

Librarian 

Art 

English 

Mathematics 

English 

Philosophy 

Physical Education 

Political Science 

Business, Economics 

Sociology 

Education 

Psychology 

Business, Economics 

Mathematics 

Education, Vice President for 

Academic Affairs 

Music 

Physics, Physical Science, 

Soccer Coach 

Chemistry 

Music 

Assistant Librarian 



One Hundred and Ninety 



MC KENDREE Ei: 



Harry Statham 


Director of Athletics, Coach 


Roy Sturm 


Sociology 


Frank Stiers 


History 


Terry Thomlinson 


Speech 


Edward Streif 


Business, Economics 


Curtis Trainer 


Education 


Roy Sturm 


Sociology 


George Tuerck* 


Music 


Terry Thomlinson 


Speech 


Grace R. Welch 


English 


Blanche Tibbetts* 


Education 






Curtis Trainer 


Education 






George Tuerck* 


Music 


1974-75 




Grace R. Welch 


Speech, English 


Ted Anderson 


Biology 


Thomas Wheeler 


Physical Education, Golf 


Yvon Baber 


Spanish 




Coach, 


Evelyn Best 


English 




Director of Intramurals 


Wanda Bickel 


Education 






Stanley Bochtler 


Education 






Murella Bosse 


Psychology 


1973-74 




Robert Brown 


Sociology 


Ted Anderson 


Biology 


Lawrence Bryan 


Religion, Chaplain 


Yvon Baber 


Spanish 


Lowell Burger* 


Business Administration 


Evelyn Best 


English 


Dwayne Cole 


History, Political Science 


Wanda Bickel 


Education 


James Drake 


Art 


Murella Bosse 


Psychology 


David Dutler 


Physical Education, Director 


Robert Brown 


Sociology 




of Intramurals 


Lawrence Bryan 


Religion, Chaplain 


Fred A. Fleming 


Biology 


Lowell Burger* 


Business 


Glenn Freiner 


Music 


Dwayne Cole 


History, Political Science 


James Gray* 


Business Administration 


James Drake* 


Art 


Lynn Grove 


Librarian 


Robin Duram 


Music 


George Gruber* 


Business Administration 


David Dutler 


Physical Education 


Mary Hindelange* 


Sociology 


Fred A. Fleming 


Biology 


William Hodge 


Art 


Glenn Rreiner 


Music 


Douglas Jones 


Mathematics 


James Gray* 


Business Administration 


Jean Kirts 


Physical Education, Coach 


Lynn Grove 


Librarian 


John Kovac 


Political Science 


Carmett Helms* 


Science 


Janet McReynolds 


Education 


Mary Hindelange* 


Sociology 


Castor Mendez-Vigo* 


Mathematics 


William Hodge 


Art 


Philip Neale 


Philosophy 


Douglas Jones 


Mathematics 


Gary O'Connor* 


Psychology 


Richard Kamm* 


Mathematics 


Emerial Owen, Jr. 


Education, Vice President for 


Philip Kennedy 


Philosophy 




Academic Affairs 


Jean Kirts 


Physical Education 


Howard Porter 


Physics, Soccer Coach 


John Kovac 


Political Science 


Marianne Poston* 


English 


Kent Mandrell* 




Myron Reese 


Chemistry 


Janet McReynolds 


Education 


Orville Schanz 


Music 


Castor Mendez-Vigo* 


Mathematics 


Gail Schnipper* 


Music 


Gary O'Connor* 


Psychology 


Sara Schoon* 


English 


Emerial Owen, Jr. 


Education, Vice President for 


Robin Seiber* 


Music 




Academic Affairs 


Karen Stanfield 


Assistant Librarian 


Howard Porter 


Physics, Physical Science, 


Harry Statham 


Director of Athletics, Coach 




Soccer Coach 


Frank Stiers 


History 


Marianne Poston* 


English 


Edward Streif 


Business Administration 


Myron Reese 


Chemistry 


Terry Thomlinson 


Speech-Communication 


Orville Schanz 


Music 


Curtis Trainer 


Education 


Karen Stanfield 


Assistant Librarian 


George Tuerck* 


Music 


Harry Statham 


Director of Athletics, Coach 


David VanAken* 


English 


Frank Stiers 


History 


Grace R. Welch 


English, Speech 


Edward Streif 


Business, Economics 


Elizabeth Zelman 


Anthropology, Sociology 


*Part Time 








**0n Leave 









One Hundred and Ninety-One 




One Hundred and Ninen-Two 



<^^:s-.^c3;^-;^?:^^^S^MC KENDREE'^S^ 



The Administration of President Julian H. Murphy 

(1975-1978) 

By Paul W. Widicus ('71) 



On May 3, 1975, Dr. Julian H. Murphy was rec- 
ommended to become the new president of McKendree 
College starting July 1, 1975. Dr. Murphy came to 
McKendree from Western New England College in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, where he was director of 
development and planning. He had degrees in history 
and economics and a doctorate in education from the 
University of Massachusetts. The entire campus, in- 
cluding students, faculty, and staff, had participated 
in several open meetings with the candidate through- 
out the course of the selection. His message to 
McKendree at the end of 1975 was one of optimism 
tempered with caution. McKendree was in the black 
for the fourth consecutive year, but the expenses of nor- 
mal operations were rising as an inflationary spiral 
gripped the entire United States. It became difficult to 
balance endowments, operations, salaries, and other 
expenses with tuition and other fees. Murphy embarked 
on a program of "squeezing the maximum value from 
each dollar." 

With enrollment at 702, in the fall of 1975 two 
new degree programs were added to the McKendree 
curriculum. A bachelor of science degree in law enforce- 
ment and a bachelor of arts degree in management and 
marketing became two new areas of study for 
McKendree students. In the area of social life, 
McKendree students began a new group. Sigma-Egalite 
was composed of both male and female students wish- 
ing to serve their school, community, and mankind. The 
charter was given on April 9, 1975, by the international 
organization Soroptimists, who sponsored the new 
group. 

Work continued on Clark Hall through 1975 and 
into 1976. On November 20, 1976, a service of dedica- 
tion was held for the completely refurbished building. 



Enrollment climbed to 770 students in 1976 as 
McKendree entered what President Murphy called "... a 
pivotal point in the college's history." As the year be- 
gan, financial concerns once again surfaced due to rapid 
inflation in the economy. However, fund drives brought 
in $79,000 from the Southern Illinois Annual Confer- 
ence, and the debt was reduced to only $45,000. Three 
additional off-campus centers were operating: one in 
Louisville, Kentucky; one in Elizabethtown, Kentucky; 
and one on the United States Naval Base in Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. Four new majors were added in the 
areas of marketing, management, religion, and criminal 
justice. 

Although it looked as though all was well on the 
surface, internal strife and tension began to show. Dr. 
Murphy himself said, "Some have characterized this past 
year as a power struggle. Others have visualized it as a 
year in which we have tried to democratize structures 
and make them responsive to the ideas of all. Probably 
an accurate assessment lies somewhere between the two 
extremes." A result of the turmoil was wholesale changes 
in the staff at McKendree. Hal Montague became dean 
of admissions; Fred Robinson became dean of adminis- 
tration; Dr. Reed Stewart was hired as vice president 
for development; Dr Leo Downey was named vice presi- 
dent for academic affairs, and Tom Darrah was the vice 
president for student affairs. Dr. Murphy also saw the 
support of the Southern Illinois Conference of die United 
Methodist Church begin to wane. Stewart, an ordained 
minister, was also assigned to work in college/church 
relations. 

In addition to feeling the strain in staff, faculty, 
student and church relations. Dr. Murphy also rec- 
ognized a gulf developing between McKendree and 
the alumni. A survey taken early in 1977 indicated 



One Hundred and Ninen-Three 




Aerial photograph showing tin 



xnpleted. 



that most "have lost contact with the college." In addi- 
tion, they "... have been sent far too many mailings 
asking for money." The survey found that, "Not enough 
information is being sent as to what is going on at 
McKendree." Plans were begun to remedy these alumni 
problems, but changes came slowly. By the fall of 
1977, plans were presented for 40 Alumni Chapters 
across the United States. These were to organize to 
prepare for McKendree's 150th anniversary in 1978. In 
preparation. Dr. Murphy wrote a paper on McKendree 
College: 

McKendree is the past and the future all 
wrapped into one. She is what she has been 
and is still alive in the memory of her alumni. 
Everything that was here is still here and will 
remain here. Although the faces change, the 
memories still live on as actively as when 
they first began. 

These memories are of a campus whose char- 
acter - whose hopes and dreams reach into 
the heart of all who walk its grounds, beneath 




Grace Welch, a McKendree alumna, lived in Lebanon and 
ser\'ed the college when vacancies appeared on the faculty 
from the 1940s to the 1970s. She taught speech, drama, and 
English. 



One Hundred and Ninen-Foiir 



<:r^-^c->^<^^^^^^^jS^NiC KENDREE~^^ 



its trees and in the shadow of its stately red 
brick, to hold captive forever those who pass 
its way. 

McKendree is a feeling, a way of life, that 
we all would like to hold onto forever. It is 
the beauty of its setting where graduation 
under the trees really signifies the end of a 
beginning. It is the closeness of people who 
even in adversity are touched by the time- 
lessness of the purpose for which McKendree 
came into being. It is an oasis of isolation 
which encourages and fosters experimenta- 
tion with others. It is a reaching out and a 
reaching in, a testing ofwliat we are and what 
we can be. It is real and unreal, all wrapped 
into one, constantly demanding of each the 
separation of the two. It is people and place, 
learning and environment, success and fail- 
ure. It is awareness and unawareness for only 
after time has passed does a McKendree alum 
become aware of what he and she were un- 
aware when footsteps trod on this historical 
turf 

McKendree speaks with a poetry of her own 
and no one escapes that whispering certainty. 
She has never been free of the struggle to 
survive and it is those lessons of life and liv- 
ing that she imparts to those who share in 
that struggle. 

No one escapes hen All are indebted to her 
None remain aloof from her All are tested 
by her. She is McKendree. 

A new program called the English Language In- 
stitute began in the fall of 1977. Students from coun- 
tries in Central and South America came to McKendree 
to learn English and to take classes. The first group of 
35 came from Guatemala in January 1 978. The students 
stayed five months during which time they were taught 
both the written and spoken English language. Institute 
students lived in dorms and ate in the dining hall with 
other McKendree students so the cultures of both groups 
could be broadened and enriched. 

The only other event of significance at McKendree 
in 1977 was the beginning of coed dorms on campus. 
This policy had been opposed by the trustees for years. 
A student committee wrote a plan that was finally 
adopted for a trial period. The first and second floors of 




/-, CELEBRATING ^^ 

% OUR s^^ 

SESQUICENTENIAL 



Sesquicentennial Parade Float. 



h Service of Worship 

To Commemorate 

One Hundred and Fifty Years of 

McKendree College 






10:!»fl.M. 

FEBRUAHY 30. 1978 
BOTHWEU CHAPEl 



Chapel Service commemorating 1978 Founders Day. 



One Hundred and Ninety-Five 




Glenn H. Freiner, Professor of Music. 



KawvMUH' We Her Adams. 




Prof Glenn H. Freiner 's arrangement and student Kaywynne Weiler 
Adams' words commemorate McKendree College Sesquicentennial. 



One Hundred and Ninety-Six 



<:sr?-^c->^<^?::^^5X?|^MC KENDREE'^g 



Ojc- ofS.r.i.c 



•PROCESSIONAL: ■■Trumpet Tun 
THE NATIONAL ANTHEM 
THE INVOCATION 



Mr, Daniel G- Bryan 

THE HYMN: ■■Now Thank We All Our Cod' . Johann Cruger 

(Audience will begin singing wilh first stanza.) 
Now thank we all our God With heart and hands and voices. 
Who wondrous things hath done. In whom his world rejoices; 
Who, from our mothers' arms. Hath blessed us on our way 
With countless gifts of love. And still is ours today. 
O may this bounteous God Through all our life be near us. 

And keep us in his grace. And guide us when perplexed, 
.And free us from all ills In this world and the next. 
All praise and thanks to God The Father now be given. 
The Son, and him who reigns With them in highest heaven, 
The one eternal God, Whom earth and heaven adore: 
For thus it was, IS now. And shall be ever more. Amen. 

SCRIPTURE READING Mr. Robert Koch 

CHORAL SELECTIONS: 

■'The Last Words of David" Randall Thompson 

-The Heavens Are Telling" .... Franz Joseph Haydn 
McKendree College Choir • McKendree College Alumni Choir 
Professor Robin Seiber. Accompanist 
Professor Glenn H. Freiner, Director 

Dr. Julian H. Murphy 

President of the College 
Dr. Ralph M. Tanner 
ion, Boaid ol Higher Education 
slry. United Methodist Church 
VOCAL SOLO: "The Blessing of St. John" . Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky 
Stephen Kirchgraber, Bass 

PRESENTATION OF CANDIDATES 

FOR DEGREES IN COURSE .... Dr. Lc-o R, Downey 



COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS 



ol Highe: 



CONFERRING OF DEGREES IN COURSE 



Dr Ju 



H. Murphy 



PRESENTATION OF CANDIDA 
Senator Ketmeth Hall 
Doctor of Laws 

Candidaie 

Mrs. Martha Richardson O'Malley 

Doctor of Education 

Candidaic 

Dr. Ralph M. Tanner 

Doctor of Humane Letters .... 

Candidalc 

PRESENTATION OF EMERITUS CITATION 
Mr. William C, Hodge 
Professor Emeritus of Art .... 



FOR HONORARY DEGREKS 
Dr. Reed M. Slevva 



Prc< 



INDUCTION OF THE CLASS OF 1978 
SINGING OF ■■McKENDREE 
BENEDICTION 



RECESSIONAL: 



uring the Processional 



Mr. Dennis R. Butts 
College Alumni Associ,itinn 
Arr. by Professor Glerw H. Freiner 
Text by Kaywyrme Weiler Adams 
Dr. Lawrence D. Bryan 
Dean of the College 
Sir William Walton 



and 



Candidates for Degrees in Course 



JANUARY AND I 



JAMES E DAWSON 



JAMES L GOODWIN 






Sesqidcentennial Commencement program. 



Walton Hall were occupied by men, while the third floor 
was occupied by women. The students reported that the 
locks on the doors and security were increased to such 
an extent in Walton that the other dorms seemed to have 
more freedom. After the program proved successful over 
several months, the restrictions were gradually relaxed 
and McKendree's experiment in coed dorms continued. 
Even with all his plans and words to prepare 
McKendree for a 1 50th anniversary celebration, the year 
1978 did not turn out as expected. A gulf developed 
between President Murphy and all areas of the college. 
The distance grew with administration, faculty, students, 
alumni, and the church. Finally, a gulf grew between 
the president and the board of trustees. In the spring of 
1978, Dr. Murphy suddenly resigned. Minutes of the 
board of trustees are unclear as to the date or details. 
No letter of resignation can be found. Between April 
and August of that year, the "troika" of vice presidents 



Vernon Snead, Reed Stewart, and Tom Darrah adminis- 
tered the college. In a called meeting of the trustees on 
August 18, 1978, an "official announcement" was made 
that Dr. Adolph Unruh would be the interim president. 
Dr. Unruh was a strong leader and gave effective lead- 
ership in the interim. However, the damage done by 
the sudden departure of Dr. Murphy caused unrest and 
the departure of other McKendree administrators. In- 
stead of a year of celebration, the anniversary year be- 
came a critical year for the future of the college. Dr. 
Unruh and the trustees worked together to plan a transi- 
tion to a new college administration. It took a year of 
careful search before the new president was named in 
1 979. Dr Gerrit TenBrink was named to lead McKendree 
into the future. Although 1978 had seen the administra- 
tion of President Murphy brought to an abrupt end, 
McKendree overcame adversity as it had many times in 
the past. 



One Hundred and Ninen-Seven 



MC KENDRE^^^^^^^^^^^ 



The Administration of President Julian M. Murphy 
Faculty List 



1975-76 

Ted Anderson 
Yvon Baber 
Evelyn Best 
Stanley Bochtler 
Murella Bosse 
Robert Brown 
Lawrence Bryan 
Lowell Burger* 
Dwayne Cole 
James Drake* 
Fred A. Fleming 
Glenn Freiner 
Paul Funkhouser 
James Gray* 
Lynn Grove 
George Gruber* 
Mary Hindelange* 
William Hodge 
Don Hoist 
Douglas Jones 
Jean Kirts 
John Kovac 
Castor Mendez-Vigo* 
Janet McReynolds 
Philip Neale 
Gary O'Connor* 
Emerial Owen, Jr. 

Howard Porter 
Marianne Poston* 
Myron Reese 
Orville Schanz 
Gail Schnipper* 
Sara Schoon* 
Robin Seiber* 
Karen Stanfield 
Margaret Stan- 
Harry Statham 
Frank Stiers 
Edward Streif 
Terry Thomlinson 
Curtis Trainer 
George Tuerck* 
David VanAken* 
Grace R. Welch 
Elizabeth Zelman 



1976-77 

Ted Anderson* 
Yvon Baber 
Jere Berger 



Biology 

Spanish 

English 

Education 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Religion, Chaplain 

Business Administration 

History, Political Science 

Art 

Biology 

Music 

Chemistry 

Business Administration 

Librarian 

Business Administration 

Sociology 

Art 

Physical Education 

Mathematics 

Physical Education, Coach 

Political Science 

Mathematics 

Education 

Philosophy 

Psychology 

Education, Vice President 

for Academic Affairs 

Physics, Soccer Coach 

English 

Chemistry 

Music 

Music 

English 

Music 

Assistant Librarian 

English 

Director of Athletics, Coach 

History 

Business Administration 

Speech-Communication 

Education 

Music 

English 

English, Speech 

Anthropology, Sociology 



Biology 

Spanish, French, English 

Speech-Communication, English 



Evelyn Best 
Barry Biehl* 
Stanley Bochtler 
Murella Bosse 
Robert Brown 
Lawrence Byran 
Dwayne Cole 
James Drake 
Glenn Freiner 
Hazel Freeman* 
Paul Funkhouser 
Eldora Givens* 
Lynn Grove 
George Gruber 
Gale Hearn* 
William Hodge 
Don Hoist 

James Jackson 
Douglas Jones 
Jean Kirts 
John Kovac 
George Lawson* 
Janet McReynolds 
Frederick Meyer 
Philip Neale 
Emerial Owen, Jr. 

Howard Porter 
Marianne Poston* 
Myron Reese 
Orville Schanz 
Robin Seiber 
Karen Stanfield 
Margaret Starr 
Harry Statham 
Frank Stiers 
Mward Streif 
Terry Thomlinson 
Annette Tippin-Gordon^ 
Curtis Trainer 
David VanAken* 
William Walther 
Stormy White* 
Suzanne Wicks* 
Elizabeth Zelman 



1977-78 

Ted Anderson 
Robert Ameson 
Yvon Baber 



English 

Administration of Justice 

Education 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Religion, Chaplain 

History, Political Science 

Art 

Music 

Anthropology, Sociology 

Chemistry, Mathematics 

Spanish 

Librarian 

Business 

Business 

Art 

Physical Education, Director 

of Intramurals 

Administration of Justice 

Mathematics 

Physical Education 

Political Science 

Business 

Eiducation 

Education, Psychology 

Philosophy 

Education, Sociology. 

Psychology 

Physics, Soccer Coach 

English 

Chemistry 

Music 

Music 

Assistant Librarian 

English 

Director of Athletics, Coach 

History 

Business Administration 

Speech-Communication 

English, French 

Education 

English 

Biology 

Psychology 

Biology 

Anthropology-Sociology 



Biology 

Administration of Justice 
Spanish, French, English 



One Hundred and Ninety-Eight 






Alumni Choir and College Choir at the 1978 Commencement. 


Ronald Black 


English 


Frederick Meyer 


Education, Psychology 


Stanley Bochtler 


Education 


Charlene Mitchell 


Teacher Preparation 


Murella Bosse 


Psychology 


Philip Neale 


Philosophy 


Robert Brown 


Sociology 


Emerial Owen, Jr. 


Education, Psychology, 


Lawrence Bryan 


Religious Studies, Assistant 




Anthropology-Sociology 




Vice President for Academic 


Howard Porter 


Physics, Mathematics, 




Affairs 




Soccer Coach 


Michael Deering 


Administration of Justice 


James Rafferty 


Management 


James Drake 


Art 


Myron Reese 


Chemistry 


Glenn Freiner 


Music 


OrviUe Schanz 


Music, Art 


Paul Funkhouser 


Chemistry, Mathematics 


Robin Seiber 


Music 


Helen Gilbert 


Librarian 


Karen Stanfield 


Assistant Librarian 


George Gruber 


Business 


Margaret Stan- 


English 


George Hickenlooper 


Theatre 


Harry Statham 


Director of Athletics, Coach 


William Hodge 


Art 


Frank Stiers 


History 


Don Hoist 


Physical Education 


Edward Streif 


Business 


Douglas Jones 


Mathematics 


Katherine Svoboda 


Administration of Justice 


John King 


Speech-Communication 


Ronald Tremmel 


Marketing 


Jean Kirts 


Physical Education 


David VanAken 


English 


John Kovac 


Political Science 


William Walther 


Biology 


Thomas McAnnich 


Administration of Justice 


Elizabeth Zelman 


Anthropology-Sociology 


*Part Time 








**On Leave 









One Hundred and Ninen-Nine 



MC KENDREE' 




■iit'^itiiiiif^ 




Federal Building in Louisville 



M CJ^ENDRE E^r: 



The Kentucky Centers 

by Jo Ann Montague, Ph. D. (Staff) 



In 1970 plans were made at McKendree College 
to offer classes at night and at various sites to enable 
working persons and Scott Air Force Base personnel to 
obtain college degrees. Courses were offered on the base 
itself the following year. A plan to allow a student to 
concentrate on one subject for one month made it pos- 
sible for those in the service, particulariy, to earn col- 
lege credit, even though their terms of duty might not 
allow them the normal semester of work. 

Air Force Captain Michael Shirley earned his de- 
gree from McKendree in this manner, graduating in 
1972. He was soon transferred to the Armed Forces 
Examining Center in the Federal Building in Louisville, 
Kentucky. Recalling the one-month format at 
McKendree, Shirley reflected that a similar format of 
classes could provide an educational opportunity for the 
members of the recruiting staff, who frequently had to 
travel several weeks a year, and thus found it impos- 
sible to maintain regular attendance on a 16-week ba- 
sis, which most semesters required. However, no schools 
in the Louisville area offered a similarly compressed 
schedule. 

Several conversations took place with Dr. Emerial 
Owen, then the vice president for academic affairs at 
the Lebanon campus, and in August 1 973 Hal Montague 
was hired as the director of special programs, with one 
of his tasks being to explore the establishing of a center 
in Kentucky. After many discussions and myriad plans, 
in October 1973 Montague announced that the first 
one-month classes, a basic management course and 
an English class, would begin in the Federal Building 
in Louisville. The four-hour classes were to be held three 
nights a week. 

Civilian employees of the government soon heard 
about the schedule and wanted to enroll. The student 
body continued to expand as more and more adults, es- 
pecially those who were familiar with the business arena, 



became interested in obtaining a degree in this non-tra- 
ditional scheduling format. A factor making this edu- 
cational venture attractive to them was the individual 
attention that provided, at no charge, an unofficial evalu- 
ation of credits, an estimation of the time necessary for 
degree completion, an on-site application for admission, 
and an analysis of financial aid eligibility. Most stu- 
dents came to the college with some transfer credit. One 




Capt. Shirley presents gift to Dean Emerial Owen of the 
Lebanon campus. 



Two Hundred and One 



MC KENDREE 



even presented transcripts for transfer credit from nine- 
teen different schools that were located in various parts 
of the world. 

One of the early professors in the program, Rogena 
Walden, emphasized the importance of the one-month 
schedule for working adults, saying: 

// discourages procrastinating and getting 
behind - there isn 't enough time for that. As 
an instructor, it 's more fun to delve into a 
subject and be completely absorbed by it for 
a short period of time, rather than drag it 
out. Still, it isn't for everyone. The schedule 
is intense and demands concentration from 
students and faculty alike. The students [from 
military, government, corporate and retired 
backgrounds] bring a variety of viewpoints 
and perspectives that make the class come 
alive with their years of experience and 
higher expectations. When you engage stu- 
dents in discussion, invite them to challenge 
concepts and guide them in applying ideas 
to their workplace, they not only learn more 
- they have fun. But the material must be 
made relevant to their lives in order to have 
value, especially in the one-month schedule. 

Many of the military students who enrolled in the 
non-traditional program now being offered were "aca- 
demic vagabonds" who had never been in one place long 
enough to complete degree requirements, but who had 
taken classes whenever they had had an opportunity. 
Testing through the College Level Entry Program pro- 
vided some people with credit by examination while 
others gained credit because the college followed the 
American Council on Education guidelines concerning 
non-traditional academic experiences (corporate schools 
and military training classes where academic credit has 
been equated to traditional college courses.) 

Commenting about the rapid enrollment growth 
in the new program, Montague said of Shirley, "He's a 
driver and a hard worker; all I did was keep him in check. 
He built the enrollment to what it is at the present time 
( 1 975)." Shiriey, noting the high level of morale among 
the non-traditional students at the Louisville campus, 
said, "You'll see more McKendree jackets here than on 
the main campus in Lebanon." 

To provide the students with academic and finan- 
cial counseling, Montague arranged for campus person- 
nel to visit the Louisville site. JoAnn Montague was the 
registrar and made trips each semester to counsel stu- 



dents and help with the scheduling. Members of the Fi- 
nancial Affairs Office also traveled to the sites to coun- 
sel students in monetary concerns. By 1974, 25 of the 
first group of Kentucky students had completed their 
courses of study toward a bachelor of arts degree with a 
major in business administration, the only degree 
awarded at the site. Members of the Lebanon staff par- 
ticipated in the ceremony: Dr. Roy Sturm gave the in- 
vocation; Dr. Emerial Owen presented the candidates; 
Dr. Eric Rackham, president of McKendree College, 
distributed the diplomas; Hal Montague presented a 
special citation; and Mike Shirley inducted the gradu- 
ates into the Alumni Association. 

One of the first graduates, Hershel Finney, retired 
from the Air Force in January 1975 and became the 
Resident Center Coordinator. Other classes were sched- 
uled for Evansville, Indiana; Nashville, Tennessee; and 
Elizabethtown, Kentucky. The Indiana and Tennessee 
sites did not prove feasible, but the classes in 
Elizabethtown continued to expand. During this period 
Dr. Charles Fagin was hired as academic dean, while 
Finney became the admissions director and continued 
coordinating the programs for the Elizabethtown and 
Louisville Centers. By early 1979 the educational cen- 
ters had been approved by the State Council on Higher 
Education for continuation in Kentucky. 

An interesting story is that of Ron Hooper, a 1974 
retiree from the Air Force, who learned of McKendree 
College when his wife, Doris, went to the college 
office for a job interview and brought back informa- 
tion about this new program. After several visits with 
the staff, Ron decided to enroll in 1975 and finished 
his degree in 1978. Classes were held in the Federal 
Building, and Ron remembered the regulation requir- 
ing him to sign in with the guard-on-duty, as well as 
the hazards presented by extremes in the weather. The 
government's energy conservation program required that 




Hershel Finney 



Charles Fagin 



Tii'o Hundred and Two 



MC KENDREE^ET 



both the heat in winter and the air conditioning in sum- 
mer be turned ofT at 6:00 PM, just as class was starting. 
He also recalled the difficulty he had in overcoming 
the distaste for Friday night classes. The end-of-the- 
week syndrome to rest and relax, made learning a 
real challenge in those class periods. But the useful- 
ness of the curriculum, the expertise of the profes- 
sors, and the camaraderie with other students gave him 
the confidence needed to overcome the tough times in 
his academic career. 

The influence the McKendree College program has 
had on the lives of the student body at the Kentucky 
Centers can be measured by more than simply academic 
accomplishments. The opportunity for adults to have 
that second chance to obtain a college degree to 
complement their career backgrounds makes their 
educational experiences exciting and unique. Gradu- 
ates have often felt that their experiences were not 
always measured in financial rewards alone. The per- 
sonal rewards of learning to learn also became signifi- 
cant in their lives. 

In the years after 1978, the year that this particu- 
lar record of McKendree College history ends, the story 
of the Kentucky Centers continued. Dr. Tom Darrah 
moved from the Lebanon campus to become the aca- 
demic dean of Kentucky Centers and the program ex- 
panded far beyond the horizons of what the 1973 plan- 
ners could have imagined. Bishop William McKendree, 




Non-traditional students gather for class. 

the circuit riding preacher of the 1800s for whom the 
college is named, would surely be astonished at the num- 
ber of lives that have been forever changed for the people 
who have taken advantage of the non-traditional oppor- 
tunity to complete a baccalaureate degree and to dis- 
cover the pleasure of being exposed to the exciting op- 
portunities of lifetime learning. 




Two Hundred and Three 



jlic 

Ci^mmenccmcni Cxctciscs 

LOUISVILLE Center 
1975 

fflcKcndrcc College 



LOUISVILLE. KENTUCK 



SIX O'CLOCK IN THE EVENING 
FEBRUARY THIRTEENTH 




Orde! of Service 



L Von Beethoven 






Cher 



•PROCESSIONAL: •■Trumpel Tune in D Major" . . David J 

THE INVOCATION Tm Revereni Roy Stuum 

Associate Professor Emeritus of SO' 

THE NATIONAL ANTHEM . . Paoresoii Glenn H F 

COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS . CoL. Glenn F Stauffeh 

Vice President. Community College of the Au 

"Higher Education in the Military Services. 1975 and Beyond" 



Emebial L, Owen. Jh 



CONFERRING OF DEGREES 
DISTRIBUTION OF DIPLOMAS 



Eric N Rackham, ph.d. 
President of the College 
JoAnn Montague. m,s ( ed. ) 
Regutrar 
PRESENTATION OF 

SPECIAL CITATION . . CoL (Ret.i Hal MoNTACtre. M s. 

Director of Special Instructional Programs 
INDUCTION OF GRADUATING SENIORS 

INTO ALUMNI ASSOCIATION . Cait. Michael Shi«lev. a.b. 

Class of 72 

BENEDIC-riON 



RECESSIONAL: "Novclletle m F Ma;or" 



Dr Roy Stubm 



I seated through the I 



Candidates for Degrees in Course 



DECEMBER r.RADU.ATES 
Bachelor of Arts Degrei 
Paul Lfavk Bkrrier Loiiiv-illc Kentucky 

HKR.>;itKL L FiNSKY Louisville. Kentucky 

LouiK Harri.s. Jr. Now Albany, Indiana 

Sherman C. Lockard. Sr. Slaughters, Kentucky 
TiiARrKv R. Norman Evan.'i>ilte. Indiana 

Robert Henry Pinkel, Jr. Louisville. Kentucky 
Robert Baldwin Purcell Louisville. Kentucky 
John Calvin Raney Louisville. Kentucky 

Jlmmie Lee Thorn Louisville. Kentucky 



JANUARY GRADUATES. 197.5 
Bachelor of Arts Degrees 



Louisville. Kentucky Busina 

Kairdalc. Kentucky Runim-' 

Hopkinsvillc. Kentucky Btisinc' 
Luui.sville. Kentucky 



Robert G. Turi-in 



1975 Commencement at Louisville. Kentucky. 



Two Hundred and Four 



<:s:^.<^^<^?^:^^^^^MC KENDREE'g^ 



Kentucky Centers Faculty List 



Name 


Date of Service 


Name 


Date of Service 


Able, Ann 0. 


1976 


Heam, Gale L. 


1975-1977 


Aldrich, James L. 


1975 


Hess, Robert D. 


1975-1978 


Allen, Frederick M. 


1975 


Hill, James R. 


1976 


Asbury, William P. 


1978 


Hodge, Michael L. 


1974 


Baber, Eldora A. 


1975 


Irwin, Archibald E. 


1977 


Bailey, William T. 


1976-1977 


Jaffe, Jack M. 


1976 


Baize, Tim 


1978 


Johnson, Jesse 0. 


1974 


Baus, Joseph 


1975 


Keeping, John E. 


1975 


Beckman, Jr. Eugene T. 


1977-1978 


Kemp, James F. 


1977 


Berrier, Paul L. 


1976-1978 


Lawson, George D. 


1974-1978 


Bowden, James H. 


1978 


Leake, Charies R. 


1974 & 1978 


Brinkmeyer, Dennis L. 


1975 


Lewis, Bobby N. 


1977 


Brittain, Joan T. 


1977 


Lewis, Robert L. 


1976 & 1978 


Broman, Ralph W. 


1974 


Martin Jr., Henry G. 


1975-1977 


Budnik, Charles A. 


1976 


McCall, Louis E. 


1976 


Burke, Robert R. 


1977 


McCarty, Daniel E. 


1978 


Byrd, Gordon L. 


1974-1976 


Mead, John E 


1976 


Callahan, Frances 


1977-1978 


Memmer, John H. 


1978 


Carrico, Larry K. 


1975 


Miles, Ralph A. 


1977 


Case, Lloyd A. 


1976-1977 


Miller, Robert 


1977 


Ciriaco, Ruth 


1977 


Monarch, Sam H. 


1975 


Conaway, John B. 


1975-1977 


Nicklen, Gerald D. 


1977 


Cook, Jack W. 


1976-1977 


O'Risky, Dorothy S. 


1975 


Cook, Vickie L. 


1978 


Pace, Bobby S. 


1974-1976 


Copeland, William 


1978 


Paniello, Sandy 


1975-1976 


Coyle, David M. 


1976 


Perkins, James L. 


1974-1978 


Darling, Brian K. 


1976 


Polk, Lucian V. 


1978 


Davidson III, William A. 


1978 


Priddy, Barbara H. 


1976 


Davis Jr., Harry S. 


1974-1976 


Royston, Ralph 


1978 


Davis, Helen M. 


1977-1978 


Ruthenburg, John C. 


1975 


Deems, William 


1978 


Sanford, Stephen G. 


1975 


Denton, Maurice L. 


1976-1977 


Schuler, W. Douglas 


1978 


Detweiler, Daniel E. 


1976-1978 


Shiriey Jr., Michael D. 


1974 & 1976 


Driscoll Jr., David R. 


1976 & 1978 


Skaggs, Bruce T. 


1974 


Dunn, Millard C. 


1977 


Smith, Rev. Jeremiah J. 


1976 & 1978 


Few Jr., Benjamin F. 


1975 


Sohan, John P 


1975-1976 


Franklin, Harry 


1976 


Song, Inbum 


1976-1978 


Frost, Paul R. 


1974 


Twyman, Louis J. 


1974-1975 


Givens, Eldora A. 


1976 


Vance, John D. 


1975 


Goodyear, Robert R. 


1975 


Vogel, B. Louis 


1976 


Green, Gary M. 


1976-1977 


Walker, Maureen A. 


1975-1977 


Haddox, Hayes 


1977-1978 


Wnedling, Marvin A. 


1977 


Harris, John A. 


1977-1978 


Wingfield, John 


1975 


Harrison, Steven T. 


1977-1978 







Two Hundred and Five 



MC KEN DREE 




BoTHWELL Chapel 



Two Hundred and Six 



MC KENDR E E^KT 



Church and College 

By Rebecca Giles Brewer, Ph. D. ('47) 



From its inception, McKendree College has been 
a Methodist-related college with roots in the Methodist 
Episcopal Church and now in the United Methodist 
Church. Throughout these years the Southern Illinois 
Annual Conference acknowledged the college as one 
of the institutions for which it had responsibility. This 
commitment took many forms. 

The organic relationship meant that the member- 
ship of the board of trustees was all or predominately 
clergy. The board of visitors was all clergy. As late as 
1957, half of the trustees and all of the visitors were 
elected by the Annual Conference and were clergy. 
That year President Webb Garrison urged the aboli- 
tion of the board of visitors, which apparently was a 
carry-over from the very early years when the struc- 
ture did not include trustees. In 1958 there were no 
visitors appointed and from that year on the propor- 
tion of trustees coming from the secular segment was 
increased. 

Until Russell Grow became president in 1950, the 
presidents had all been clergy. In fact. President Grow 
was a local preacher for a short period in his career as 
an educator. The next non-clergy president was Max 
Allen (1960). Since 1968, when Eric Rackham was 
elected president, there have been no clergy presidents. 

While most of the clergy presidents were from the 
Southern Illinois Conference, there were some excep- 
tions during the 1928-78 period. One was Carl Bracy 
(1945-49), who was called from South Dakota to return 
to his home conference to be president. Another was 
Bishop Edwin Voigt (1964-68), who became president 
upon his retirement as bishop. 

There were faculty members who were members 
of the Annual Conference and were appointed to the 
college, most notable of whom was William C. Walton, 
who was so appointed from 1894 until his retirement in 
1958. 



In addition to providing leadership, the conference 
also gave support to the college through what is known 
in Methodism as apportionments - an assessment made 
by the conference on the local churches and budgeted 
by the conference to support conference institutions 
(McKendree among these) and other expenses and pro- 
grams at the conference level. The conference also un- 
dertook to raise specific amounts in financial campaigns 
of the college that were over and beyond the apportion- 




Lebanon Methodist Church 



Two Hundred and Seven 



MC KENDREE" 



merits. The local churches accepted these requests with 
care and concern and in many cases gave amounts be- 
yond their suggested goals (see Bracy and Rackham 
chapters). The laity individually often picked up on these 
drives and on other needs of the college, as did indi- 
viduals who acted independently of the churches, (e.g. 
Marion Bothwell) 

In 1974, $140,000 was granted to the college for 
refurbishing Clark Hall. This gift came from outside the 
Southern Illinois Conference. An alumnus and trustee. 
Rev. Jack Travelstead, was pastor of the Wesley United 
Methodist church in Macomb, Illinois, and was instru- 
mental in securing the grant from the Fellheimer Trust, 
managed by the Macomb church. 

Organizations within the church also undertook 
particular financial or in-kind support. The Woman's 
Home Missionary, later the Woman's Society of Chris- 
tian Service, and currently the United Methodist Women, 
undertook many projects for the college. In the 1940s 
they re-furnished Clark and Carnegie Halls, the women's 
and men's dormitories. The women also participated in 
other college-oriented projects. 

The Epworth League, the youth organization of 
the twenties and thirties, had an annual project, the Booth 
Festival. At a district level, the young people gathered 
food for the conference institutions, and in the fall the 
college pantry (located in the basement of Pearsons Hall 
and in the underground passageway to Carnegie Hall) 
was filled with home-canned goods from these events. 
This was during the period when Southern Illinois 
peaches excelled, and the students of those years re- 
membered the many, many peach desserts they were 
served, included the dish of peaches with a surprise in 
the bottom (a wafer) that awaited them almost, or so it 
seemed, daily. 

While the college received leadership and support 
from the church, it supplied leadership and resources to 
the church. It was not unusual for faculty members to 
fill the pulpits of churches whose ministers were ill or 
on vacation or to complete a ministerial assignment for 
a conference year when needed. 

The faculty also shared talents in music with the 
churches, particularly in the greater Lebanon-East St. 
Louis area. Professor Oliver Kleinschmidt and Profes- 
sor Glenn Freiner were often referred to in the 
McKendree Review as having played the organ at par- 
ticular churches, either as one-time artists, temporary 
organists, or regular organists for extended periods. 

The number of McKendree ministerial students 
who were assigned churches in Southern Illinois is a 
figure that went into the hundreds. These student min- 



isters gave enthusiasm and commitment as well as their 
special talents that were developed during their early 
appointments. Many of them in later years attained roles 
of leadership in large churches and in positions of lead- 
ership in the conference. Several students also moved 
on to serve as missionaries of the church and represented 
American Methodists at World Methodist conferences. 

This role of service to the church is also reflected 
in the hundreds of laypersons who taught Sunday 
School, sang in choirs, and had positions of leadership 
in the local churches, districts, and conferences. 

The facilities of the campus were often made avail- 
able to the church. For several years (1972-1985) the 
college hosted the Annual Conference sessions. The 
Southern Illinois Conference installed air conditioning 
in the Bearcat gymnasium in 1971 in preparation for the 
1972 session. Also, youth institutes were held in the sum- 
mer when the dormitories were available. The women of 
the conference met on the campus for several years for a 
period of study and worship in their annual School of Chris- 
tian Mission. The college also hosted one-day lectures and 
retreats for clergy and laypeople and provided a site for 
committees and board meetings. 

The Methodist church at-large contributed to 
McKendree in its many facets of development. Some- 
times this was through special grants from the Board of 
Higher Education (see Bracy chapter). The list of names 
of speakers on the campus for baccalaureate, commence- 
ment, religious emphasis week, weekly chapel services, 
and other occasions contains those from the ranks of 
bishops. General Board secretaries, church leaders, and 
clergy from outstanding pulpits. The bishop of the Illi- 
nois area consistently offered support to the college as 
it experienced change and challenge. 

The Lebanon Methodist church fell within the "lo- 
cal church" category in its support of the college; how- 
ever, the story of its church-college relationship goes 
far beyond that of the other churches in the Southern 
Illinois Conference. 

The Lebanon church and its members gave time 
and talent and a "place" to the students. Sunday School 
classes were organized for the students, and the best 
leadership in the church was assigned to teach these 
classes. F.A. Behymer, feature writer for the St. Louis 
Post Dispatch and Lebanon church member, was one 
of those teachers. In 1 934 there is a record of his giving 
a dinner for his Sunday School class members at the 
church. 

In a period from 1928 to 1938, the McKendree 
Review reported that the Epworth League (youth orga- 
nization) met at the church or in faculty homes. In some 



Two Hundred and Eight 




Chaplain Louis Youngs relaxes. 



instances these meetings were reported as tiiose of the 
College Epworth League. Presumably the high school 
young people of Lebanon had their own Epworth 
League at that time. Also in the Review were refer- 
ences to Standard Bearers, which was, in most 
churches, a junior high and/or senior high group 
whose focus was missions. At the Lebanon church 
the group continued with McKendree students included. 
Methodist faculty members were participating 
members of the Lebanon church, providing organists, 
choir members, and teachers, as 
well as laypersons serving in the 
activities and organization of the 
church. In turn, members of the 
church filled faculty positions 
when there was need. Notable 
among these was Leon Church, a 
McKendree graduate, editor and 
publisher of the Lebanon Adver- 
tiser, and member of the Lebanon 
church. He stepped in when 
there was a need to provide 
physical education for both men 
and women as well as coach ath- 
letics at a time when college 
funds were limited and physical 
education teachers were in short 
supply during World War II. Some 
pastors of the church also taught 



on the campus. F.C. Stelzriede taught speech and drama; 
Edward Hoffman taught religion and philosophy; David 
Durham was director of religious life and chaplain; and 
Louis Youngs was chaplain. 

Records indicate that the college choir presented its 
annual Christmas concert at the church some years and in 
the college chapel others. Organ concerts were given by 
Professor Oliver Kleinschmidt, sometimes with support 
by college vocal groups. It was often college faculty who 
filled the Lebanon pulpit in the absence of the pastor 




Choir presents concert in Lebanon Church. Director Pauline Harper 



Two Hundred and Nine 



iWci^enbree College 
Cf)oir 

(Etfriatmaa (Hhimal Concert 



DECEMBER 1 
3:00 p. I 



GLENN H. FREINER, Conductor 



ERIC THIMAN 



THE NATIVITY 



Bucky Jordan, tenor 
Bob Ziegler, baritone 
Jim Patterson, tenor 
Beverly Firgxison, soprano 
Floyd Williams, bass 



iCENES OF CHRISTMAS 



The Sleigh 

The Wassail Song 

Tannenbaum 



Richard Koimtz 
arr. by Kent Werner 
German Folk Song 



OLD ENGLISH 



Good Christian Men, Rejoice 

The Coventry Carol 

The Holly and the Ivy 

God Rest You Merry, Gentlemen 

Deck the Hall 



Traditional Carol 
English Carol 
English Carol 
Traditional English 
Traditional Carol 



TRADITIONAL CHRISTMAS 



At Christmastime 

He is Bom 

The Christmas Song 



Silent Night 
Sweet Little Jesus Boy 
Joseph Dear, Joseph Mir 
Christ Is The Lord 



idvard Grieg 

irr. Roger Wagner 

forme-Wells 



Franz Gruber 
Robert MacGimsey 
arr. Roy Ringwald 
arr. Roy Ringwald 



Christmas concert presented by college choir 



Two Hundred and Ten 



MC KENDREE 



Other instances of local church and col- 
lege involvement are found in reports of the 
Women's Home Missionary Society meeting 
in Clark Hall (1/18/39), the Susannah Wesley 
Circle (students' circle) entertaining the church 
Woman's Society of Christian Service on cam- 
pus (12/16/52), and the WSCS entertaining 
McKendree students ('50, '56, and '64). 

Throughout the 1928-78 period, records 
indicate the church hosted the students at new- 
student receptions, "College Day" events, and 
Sunday evening fellowship events. The other 
Lebanon churches also extended a welcome to 
the students. On one occasion there is a record 
of the Lebanon ministers entertaining the stu- 
dent PKs (preachers kids). ( 1 1/22/28) 

The college and the Lebanon church fre- 
quently planned shared services, such as at 
Easter and Christmas, as well as having evan- 
gelistic programs and jointly hosted guest 
speakers. 

The community welcome was evidenced 
by the Lebanon women entertaining Clark Hall 
women in their homes and the Lebanon 
Women's Club meeting in the college chapel 
for a student program. There is no common 
record found of these town and gown, church 
and college affairs; however, the McKendree 
Review, especially in the 1930s, ran frequent 
stories of such events. 

A college newspaper will reflect a particular 
editor's interests and biases; however, the atmosphere 
on campus and the pattern of church-related stories 
that appeared in the Review is interesting. From 1928 
to about 1940 there were stories on Annual Confer- 
ence sessions, recording appointments from the Con- 
ference to McKendree, the appointment of the local 
pastor, the number of ministerial students who at- 
tended, their appointments, and McKendree banquets 
or the appearance of McKendree musical groups at 
the sessions. 

In the 1940s there were stories of district youth 
meetings held in Lebanon with housing at the college 
as well as women housed in the dorms during WSCS 
meetings and then in the mid-to-late forties the efforts 
on the part of the Conference to support the college in 
its financial campaign and the WSCS furnishing the dor- 
mitories. 

In later years it was unusual for the Review to re- 
port Annual Conference sessions or student ministers' 
appointments. 




College Woman's Society of Christian Service Circle. 

Religious Life on Campus 

On campus the focus was on a liberal arts educa- 
tion; however, as a church-related school, the spiritual 
life of the students was an important focus of campus 
activities. 

Early in McKendree's second century, an Oxford 
Club was organized for ministerial students, and the 
Epworth League was for all students. The YWCA and 
YMCA were on campus in 1928 and on into the forties 
although they sometimes operated as one organization. 
The Methodist Student Movement was organized 
church-wide in 1960 and was an active organization on 
the campus. If one reads the biographical information 
of the ministerial students who became ordained clergy, 
there is consistent reference to their leadership roles in 
these student groups. Many of these clergy became dis- 
trict superintendents, pastors of leading churches, and 
assistants to the bishop. 

Religious Emphasis Week and later Religious Life 
Week were annual observances on the campus. National 



MC KENDREE~^r^ 



leaders of the church were brought to the college to fo- 
cus the students' attention on the spiritual aspect of liv- 
ing. The list of church leaders ranges from bishops to 
national staff members. Also, Southern Illinois Confer- 
ence leaders were brought to the campus for such events. 

As could be expected, through the years church 
representation widened as the non-Methodist students' 
presence was recognized. Records of chapel speakers 
from other denominations, particularly pastors in Leba- 
non churches, are frequent. Beginning in 1939 rabbis 
were chapel speakers. In the sixties. Roman Catholic 
priests were chapel speakers, and mass was celebrated 
on campus. In 1966 a Newman Club was organized. 
That year, Charles Wells, nationally known Quaker, was 
speaker in chapel. The rules were bent a bit for the Ro- 
man Catholic students; Mass was not celebrated on the 
day following Wells' appearance (the regular day for 
mass) and all Roman Catholic students were expected 
to hear Wells. 

As early as the spring of 1939, the McKendree 
Review carried an editorial criticizing the required 
chapel attendance and the program offered. Presi- 
dent Yost responded by indicating he was amenable 
to more variety in the chapel programs and to having 
more student participation but that there should always 
be devotions. 




Regular chapel attendance was required. A com- 
mon practice was for a student to be stationed in the 
balcony with a seating chart to record empty seats. In 
1958 chapel attendance was required to satisfy gradua- 
tion requirements. Four cuts were allowed; if the ab- 
sences exceeded that, the students were required to take 
a special reading course. A minimum of 10 books was 
required, written reports were assigned, and a general 
oral report was necessary to fulfill the graduation re- 
quirements. In 1963 an alumna wrote, decrying that 
chapel attendance was no longer compulsory. The Janu- 
ary 14, 1964, Review reported that chapel attendance 
had always been mandatory but no real enforcement had 
been exercised in recent years. The article stated that 
compulsory chapel attendance would be more strictly 
enforced. 

One area in which the college participated in the 
church-college relationship was the sending of student 
deputation groups throughout the Southern Illinois Con- 
ference. These groups frequently accompanied the presi- 
dent when he spoke before church groups. Choirs, glee 
clubs, and quartets made tours on their own, and reli- 
gious drama groups went on tour. There were also Wit- 
nessing Bands that spoke at churches. In 1 966 the choir 
was invited to sing at the Methodist bicentennial cel- 
ebration in Baltimore, Maryland. 

With this emphasis upon 
religion, primarily Methodism, 
many McKendree graduates be- 
came ordained ministers. An 
exact count is difficult to deter- 
mine; however, one listing gives 
455 during the 50-year period 
covered by this volume. At least 
six graduates became mission- 
aries; four, U.S. chaplains; four, 
staff members of national 
boards of the church; and two, 
assistants to the area bishop. 
Several became diaconal min- 
isters who work primarily in 
music and Christian education. 
These statistics are not exact; 
however, they do indicate the 
leadership that McKendree sup- 
plied the church. 

Thus, the college main- 
tained its role in Southern Illi- 
nois as a church-related liberal 
arts college, Methodist without 
apology. 



Two Hundred and Iweive 




Student Christum A.y\(niii!u>n in 19-1^. 




McKendrcc Collci;c Cluni Icavini; for the Bi-Ccntennial celebration of the Methodist Church in Baltimore, 
Mar\iand. 



Two Hundred and Thii 




Hypes Field 



Bearcat Gymnasium 



Two Hundred and Fourteen 



MC KENDRE E~fe 



McKendree Athletics 

By Wayne R. Bise ('38) 



Introduction 

The 1905 McKendree Pigskin details athletics in 
the early years at McKendree, and the Centennial 
McKendree College History draws on that publication 
while updating the college's sports history to 1928. To 
give continuity to this writing, highlights from these 
publications introduce each sport activity covered. 

The McKendree Review, McKendrean. and 
McKendree College Bulletin provided the information 
used for this sports history. Also, Carol Trame '86 con- 
densed some valuable information in a paper entitled 
"McKendree College Basketball: The First Half (1908- 
1939)." 

Any future sports historian should be aware that 
frequent conflicts exist between records found in the 
McKendree Review and in yearbooks. In addition, stu- 
dent sportswriters for a current year didn't always do 
adequate research when reporting a new sports record. 



Bearcat 

A 1924-25 McKendree Review noted, "Mascot 
female cub weighing 20 pounds, 4 months old, obtained 
from Johnson Auction Co. of Canton, Illinois." The fol- 
lowing is taken from a McKendree College Bulletin, 
which was reprinted from Leon Church's Lebanon Ad- 
vertiser. In the early days of McKendree College ath- 
letic teams, the mascot was a bear. For a number of years, 
a bear cage approximately 20 feet to the northwest of 
Pearsons Hall housed the bear, and a "Keeper of the 
Bear" was duly elected to feed and otherwise care for 
the mascot. Usually a new bear was obtained each year, 
because, with over-feeding of sugar and the inevitable 
teasing by the students, coupled with the normal aging 
of a bear cub, the animal sometimes became unfriendly 



and trading in for new stock was necessary. McKendree 
teams thus came to be known as "Bearcats" - like the 
Stutz Bearcat automobile. "It's a bear" and "It's a cat" 
were common expressions in the late teens and early 
twenties, indicating superior quality in the subject be- 
ing described. 

During the period of Model T open air transporta- 
tion, when Coach Glen Filley took football, basketball, 
and track teams on the road trips, he usually had "Susie," 
the mascot, beside him on the front seat. Filley said in 
later years that he would have frozen on the way home 
from Rolla, Missouri, one night without Susie. Though 
her arm (paw? foreleg?) was a bit heavy around his neck, 
she kept her chauffeur warm. "Susie was quite a gal." 
Usually she was confined to her cage or tethered to the 
large oak tree across the sidewalk from the northwest 
comer of the old science building. Sometimes, however, 
circumstances combined to give her freedom, and, with 
the long chain attached to her collar, she wandered about 
the campus, even going in and out of the classroom 
buildings. 

With the absence of a bear on the campus in re- 
cent years, curious students examined Webster and found 
that a bearcat is really a cat, so the mutation (or perhaps 
throwback) has been accomplished. The insignia for 
current McKendree teams is, as Webster says, how a 
bearcat should look, with gleaming eyes and snarling 
countenance. 

To be "Keeper of the Bear" was considered quite 
an honor, and an election was always held to determine 
the lucky person. One morning the custodian found his 
charge missing, and several McKendree students, feel- 
ing sure they knew the bear's whereabouts, jumped in 
their automobiles and proceeded to Alton. Here they 
called on the president of Shurtleff College and de- 
manded that their mascot be given to them. Shurtleff 
students, however, were innocent of any caper, and the 



i92^lM^3Tf 



Two Hundred and Fifteen 



MC KEN DREE" 



Our McKendree 

Chorus: 

Hail to thee, our dear old McKendree; 

May we always loyal be. 

It 's a song of praise we raise to thee 

Alma Mater dear old M. C. 

May we ever hold thee true and wise and 

right: 

Honor Purple and the White, 

And for victory we'll always fight 

'Til we win for old M. C. K. 

{Words written in 1915-16 by Latchiepell Myrick 
and Anne Wilkinson, and adapted to the music of 
"Dream of the USA. ") 




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/uY) Hundred and Sixteen 



bear was not found in Alton. A few days later the cub 
was found in Lebanon tied to a fence. 

However, a more serious threat to the bearcat logo 
itself came in 1962 when a college board member chal- 
lenged the student body with, "'There are more than 
enough good thinkers at McKendree to come up with a 
first-class name that would suit the team better. Just 
what is a Bearcat? It's the name of a car that was made 
in the '20s but isn't even made anymore. Is that a he- 
roic name to pin on a fine team such as we have today?" 
He suggested "The Circuit Riders" as a possibility. 

Many names were suggested by students: Bears, 
Bulldogs, Buckeyes, Owls, Mustangs, etc., and the Re- 
view staff recommended "Circuit Riders." One student, 
seeing an opportunity for humor, suggested, "Since our 
banishment from the Prairie College Conference, "Barred 
Rock" (rooster) might be appropriate." However, after 
much discussion it was decided that "Bearcat" didn't need 
fixin'. 



Facilities 

In McKendree's early years there had been no 
physical fitness building, but by 1867 student sentiment 
for such a facility had risen to a point that students or- 
ganized the McKendree College Athleteon Association, 
with Athleteon being the name selected for the build- 
ing. They then took their cause to the McKendree Col- 
lege Board of Trustees. The members were duly im- 
pressed, and a committee from the board was appointed 
to study the situation. After joint meetings between the 
student association and the board committee, a go-ahead 
to construct a building was give — but with instructions 
not to involve the board in any expense. About $1,500 
was raised through subscriptions; students furnished the 
labor, and in 1868 the Athleteon was completed. (The 
original subscription funds had not been sufficient to 
complete the building, and it is believed that the college 
president, Dr. Robert Allyn, advanced the additional 
funds needed.) The building continued to be student- 
operated several years for athletic purposes, but inter- 
est subsided and in 1897 the college took over the title 
to the building for use by its Commerce Department. 

From 1879 to 1903 students were without an ath- 
letic building. Then in 1903 Eisenmayer Gymnasium 
was built. It was so named because Andrew Eisenmayer 
of Trenton, Illinois, contributed most of the money for 
its construction. The building's size was eighty by forty 
feet, and its floor was originally sawdust. Later a con- 
crete floor was put in and rugs and mats were used by 



the students for tumbling and trapeze work. Later when 
the concrete fioor was found to be too dangerous for 
basketball, a board fioor was laid over the concrete. 

About 1921 a wing on the west side of the rectan- 
gular-shaped building was added to seat spectators. The 
McKendree Review, October 2, 1923, reported that 
through a gift from an alumnus. Dr. Benjamin Hypes, 
Eisenmayer gymnasium had been improved. The west 
wall had been removed; a new section added, accom- 
modating 400 spectators; and two dressing rooms con- 
taining lockers and showers were built under the bleach- 
ers. In subsequent years, Eisenmayer became .so out- 
dated that during mo.st of the 1950s the team's home 
games were played and the team's practices were con- 
ducted in the New Baden, Mascoutah, and Lebanon high 
school gymnasiums. 

A drive for funds for a new gymnasiuin started in 
the early 1950s and actual ground breaking had been 
initiated in 1954. But the area only grew weeds until 
1956 when a new fund of $160,000 was proposed as 
required for the building's construction. In 1 957 the new 
gymnasium plans were released. Location was to be on 
the Northeast Campus at the site of the original excava- 
tion. The cost was now pegged at $85,000. Plans called 
for a playing fioor of 50' by 94' to be made from the 
very best maple. 

Construction was completed in the fall of 1958. 
On Tuesday, November 18, a practice game was held, 
and the tlrst scheduled game took place on December 
3, against Lincoln University. Unfortunately, the bas- 
kets were more receptive to the Lincoln players, who 
scored 117 points to the Bearcats' 78. Dedication cer- 
emonies were held on Friday night, December 1 2. Cen- 
tral State College spoiled the ceremonies with an 80 to 
75 victory. 

In May 1 96 1 , old Eisenmayer was dedicated as an 
auditorium, having received a new paint job, new stage, 
new lighting system, and a new entrance. 

In 1909 Dr Benjamin M, Hypes, who had a keen 
interest in promoting McKendree's physical education, 
gave the five acres of land for the athletic field that bears 
his name. He also purchased and donated a strip of land 
100 feet wide on the land's eastern boundary. The col- 
lege then let a contract in the sum of some $3,000 to a 
construction company to grade the field and make it 
professionally suitable for athletic events. After comple- 
tion, a board fence enclosed most of the field and some 
years later a grandstand to accommodate 300-400 people 
was built on the north end of the area. 

Sometime before World War I the grandstand was 
removed and an oval track was laid around the football 



Two Hundred and Seventeen 



playing and practice area. The west side of the oval that 
passed in front of the bleachers was part of a 220-yard 
straight-away. It was believed to be the only track in the 
Midwest that had such a long straight-away. In 1921 
the turns in the track were widened and banked and two 
railroad carloads of cinders were added to the track's sur- 
face. The track was now second to none in the country. 

In the summer of 1927, concrete bleachers were 
built along nearly the whole west side of the track and 
field to accommodate one thousand or more spectators. 
In 1929 a brick wall was built to enclose the field on the 
west side along Alton Road at a cost of $40,000. Also in 
1929, night lighting was installed on each side of the foot- 
ball playing area at a cost of $4,000. Lighting consisted of 
reflectors erected on twelve poles on opposite sides of the 
field, and these produced 40,000 watts of light. 

The Centennial McKeudree College History states 
that "a tennis court appeared on McKendree's front cam- 
pus as early as 1 890. It was not prepared by the college, 
but by individual interest and effort with the permission 
of the college authorities. The first one was located near 
the present comer entrance to the campus. Within the 
next two or three years, two more courts appeared near 
the first one. These were all owned by the students who 
had prepared them." 

About 1905, the college board decided that "ten- 
nis courts in the front yard were not dignified and were 
somewhat of a disfigurement to the campus " There- 
after, there were no courts on campus until after the 
dormitories were built in 1911. Three courts were then 
constructed on the back campus just back of Carnegie Hall. 
These would fall into a state of disrepair and be abandoned 
in the early 1 940s. It would be the spring of 1 963 before 
construction would start on courts good enough for home 
matches. These were located north of Hypes Field. Foot- 
ball, track, baseball, softball, soccer, and all intramural 
outdoor sports were conducted on Hypes Field. 



Intramural Sports 

Prior to 1 906 all campus sports activities and those 
events against off-campus teams were student-organized 
with the assistance of faculty members and without the 
college's official blessing. In 1906, athletics on cam- 
pus, with the exception of football, was granted recog- 
nition by the board. 

Shinny (shinney), a forerunner of modem-day 
hockey, was a favorite early men's sport. It was played 
with a stick — hickory sapling a favorite — carved to the 



size of a broomstick and with a curved end made so by 
heating and bending. The stick was used to propel a 
small rubber ball covered first by woolen sock ravelings 
and topped by leather from the lining of an old boot. 
Surprisingly, it could be made into quite a durable pro- 
jectile. The field of play was on the front campus. 

Other games played in the early history years were 
swinging (rope swings), jumping (standing jump, run- 
ning long jump, high jump, and hop-skip-jump), foot 
racing, skating, and townball. Also played were leap- 
frog, roly poly, marbles, and mumble-peg. Swimming 
was accomplished in an off-campus swimming hole. 
Silver Creek, located about a half-mile west of the cam- 
pus, was an early favorite. 

Town ball, although not as popular as shinny, was 
played in the spring. It was played by two teams made 
up of an indefinite number of players chosen by two 
captains. The winning team scored the most runs in an 
even number of innings played. A side was not out until 
every member of that side was put out, which was ac- 
complished by crossing out (throwing the ball across 
the path of a running player before he reached a base) 
or by catching out. 

In 1868 calisthenics drills commenced in the new 
Athleteon gym, as well as work-outs with dumbbells, 
wands, and Indian clubs. Also, gymnastics was intro- 
duced, and students leamed how to work with swinging 
rings hanging from the rafters, trapeze swings, and the 
horizontal bar. These were all under the tutelage of a 
young man, William F. Ratcliff, from Olney, Illinois. 

Mr. Ratcliff, who had been on at least one road 
trip with a circus, enrolled as a student for the school 
year 1868-69 and became athletic director and janitor 
of the new Athleteon. For these duties he received $75. (X) 
per month. Unfortunately, during a dismount from the 
trapeze in a public exhibition in 1 869 he badly sprained 
an ankle. He went to his home in Olney to recover and 
never returned to McKendree as a student or teacher of 
athletics. Thereafter, interest in the gymnasium and gym- 
nastics waned and finally died completely. 

Basketball became a favorite intramural sport; 
leagues were formed and a champion crowned. Other 
sports — tennis, table tennis, bowling, shuffleboard, ar- 
chery, horseshoes, cross-country racing, and trapshoot- 
ing — fumished competition during various years. Soft- 
ball was .started in the spring of 1 935 and was played at 
Hypes Field under the lights. Volleyball and golf were 
also added in the late thirties and touch football became 
a fall league sport in 1951 following the dropping of 
football as an intercollegiate sport. Wrestling, boxing, 
and gymnastics also had their day during various years. 



Two Hundred and Eight 




A/(7i',v Intrainunil Football in IS>()9. 



A 1957-58 McKendree Review states that intra- 
mural sports were poorly organized the year before and 
included only basketball but the current year covered a 
wide range including softball, basketball, ping-pong, and 
touch football, all fully organized and directed. Softball 
in the spring was under the direction of baseball coach 
Dale Cruse, but it was headed by a senior student whose 
major was in sports leadership. It was then common 
practice that physical education majors teach certain 
intramural sports. 



In 1962 Dan Peterson was hired specifically as 
a faculty member to run the intramural and physical 
education programs. David Dutler became director 
of intramural sports in 1969. By this time intramu- 
ral leagues furnished competition in bowling, vol- 
leyball, Softball, football, soccer, and basketball. 
Leagues in other sports were formed over the years 
as interest dictated. 




Conferences 

The year of McKendree's first entry into an orga- 
nized conference is cloudy. However, as early as the 
1 890s, championships of Southern Illinois and champi- 
onships of the Midwest appear in writings, but it is be- 
ieved these were mainly bragging rights. 

Largely through the efforts of L.W. Smith, a 
McKendree Athletic Association was organized in 1910, 
and McKendree joined the Illinois Intercollegiate Ath- 
letic Association in March 1913. This consisted of 13 
small colleges. State competition started in track and 
tennis that spring and in basketball and baseball in the 
1913-14 school year. 

The Southern Illinois (Egyptian) Conference con- 
sisted of McKendree, Blackburn, Shurtleff, and South- 
em Illinois Normal at Carbondale. The Bearcats par- 
ticipated in this conference through 1922-23, winning 
championships in football in 1921 and in basketball in 
1922-23. 



1978 



Two Hundred and Nineteen 



MC KENDREE~gr 



The Little Nineteen (Illinois Intercollegiate Ath- 
letic Association - State) Conference was organized in 
1 920. How the number 1 9 was derived is uncertain, since 
there were always more than 19 participating schools. 
Early members were Augustana, Bradley, Carthage, 
Eastern Illinois State Normal, Elmhurst, Eureka, Illi- 
nois College, Illinois State Normal, Illinois Wesleyan, 
Knox, Lake Forest, McKendree, Millikin, Monmouth, 
Shurtleff, Southern Illinois Normal, North Central, 
Northern Illinois State Teachers Normal University, St. 
Viator, Western Illinois State Normal, and Wheaton. 
McKendree claimed championships in football in 1924 
and 1932 and in basketball in the 1924-25 season. 

Almost as soon as the conference was formed, 
there was bickering over whether freshmen should be 
allowed to participate in varsity sports. The large schools 
said "no," and the smaller schools, McKendree in- 
cluded, said "yes." The freshmen rule was brought 
to a vote in 1924 and the restriction on freshmen was 
voted down. 

The number of schools in the conference made it 
difficult to determine a true champion. This was especially 
true in football where there was a short schedule — a con- 
ference winner would have played only a small number 
of member schools. Thus, by the middle 1930s there 
were rumblings about splitting the conference into two 
conferences, specifically dropping the five teachers' 
colleges. And the freshman rule was still an issue, so 
much so that 10 schools favoring the rule -Augustana, 
Bradley, Illinois College, Illinois Wesleyan, Knox, Lake 
Forest, Millikin, Monmouth, North Central, and 
Wheaton — agreed that they would form a new confer- 
ence named the Illinois College Conference. 

The five teachers' colleges. Eastern Illinois State 
Normal, Illinois State Normal University, Northern Il- 
linois State Normal, Southern Illinois Normal, and West- 
em Illinois State Normal, plus Carthage, Elmhurst. Eu- 
reka, McKendree, St. Viator, and Shurtleff would stay 
put, with the possible addition of Blackburn and 
Principia. However, the conference ne\ er got untracked. 
and in May 1938, President Clark R. Yost wrote a letter 
to Frank Phillips, president of the Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Association, w ithdrawing McKendree from the 
association. 

McKendree, Shurtleff, Eureka, and Quincy formed 
the Pioneer Conference in 1947. However, it is not cer- 
tain how long this conference functioned. 

In 1952, Eureka, Greenville, McKendree. 
Principia. and Shurtleff joined to form the Illinois 
Church Conference. McKendree promptlv won the first 
basketball championship with a 7 and I record. 



In 1953, Blackburn. Concordia (Illinois). Eureka, 
Greenville. Illinois College, McKendree, Principia, Rose 
Poly, and Shurtleff formed the Prairie Conference. The 
1953-54 basketball season closed with McKendree and 
Shurtleff as conference co-champions with 9 and 1 
records. McKendree then won nine straight basketball 
championships. The baseball team was just as success- 
ful. After the reincarnation of baseball in 1953-54, the 
Bearcats tied for one championship and won nine cham- 
pionships outright. 

McKendree's sports dominance in the Prairie Con- 
ference brought complaints from other members and for 
this reason and for differences in philosophies over aid 
to athletes, McKendree withdrew from the conference 
in 1963. 

McKendree joined the National Association of In- 
tercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) in 1 966 and at the end of 
the 1968-69 basketball season received her first invita- 
tion to the field of four in the NAIA District 20 tourna- 
ment since becoming an independent. The Bearcats 
reached the finals by beating Chicago State but lost to 
Millikin University in the finals. 

In 1975, McKendree. along with Quincy College, 
Lewis University. St. Ambrose College, and Lorras Col- 
lege, attempted to form the Midland Conference; how- 
ever, a schedule between the schools was never com- 
pleted and the conference never became a reality. 



Athletic Directors 

According to the Centennial McKendree College 
History, the first paid coach of any McKendree athletic 
activity was William F. Ralcliff in 1 868-69, a student 
who served as athletic director and janitor of the 
Athleteon gymnasium. Over the years there were other 
students who. under the supen ision of a faculty mem- 
ber, acted as club presidents for certain sports, such as 
W. A. Kelso in baseball and Cameron "Cap" Harmon 
in football. But following the recognition of sports by 
the board of trustees in 1906. an Athletic Department 
w as organized and a director w as chosen w ho w ould be 
a member of the faculty and would devote his entire 
efforts to athletics. 

According to the 1 9 1 3 McKendrean. "the man se- 
lected was Professor B. E. Wiggins of the University of 
Pennsylvania, who had had several years of successful 
experience in athletic work before coming here." It 
should be noted there were directors prior to this time. 



hvo HunJrrJ and Turnn 



.^MC KEN DREE 



but they were not faculty members. Professor Wiggins 
established a department in a short time, which com- 
pared favorably with almost any of the small colleges. 
During his first two years, McKendree was not allowed 
to compete in intercollegiate athletics, "but by his un- 
tiring efforts in arranging society and class teams he 
arou.sed the athletic spirit of the school and when inter- 
collegiate competition was permissible in 1908, 
McKendree had a well-trained group of men capable of 
making a credible showing." 

Following Professor Wiggins and through 1923, 
came Homer T. Osbom, Cyrus S. Gentry, Marvin W. 
Krieger, L.C. LeVan, C. N. Stokes, Frank Laurence, 
Orville A. Hall, and E. A. "Lefty" Davis. Then came 
Glen F. Filley, 1925-30; Arthur Doolen, 1930-33; Paul 
Waldorf, 1933-36; B. E. Blanchard, 1936-38; Arthur K. 
Henderson, 1938-41; Lewis Scholl, 1941-42; Leon 
Church, 1942-46; Wesley Jonah, 1946-48; Ralph 
Barclay, 1948-50; Hugh R Redden, 1950-52; James D. 
Collie, 1952-57; James "Barney" Oldfield, 1957-63, and 
Lou Vesely, 1963-66. 

Up to 1 966 most McKendree athletic directors had 
short tenures. There had been a six-year director, James 
Oldfield, and two five-year directors. Glen Filley and 
James Collie. With the arrival of Harry Statham, a 1 960 
McKendree graduate and letterman in ba.seball and bas- 
ketball, as athletic director in 1966, the longest tenure 
in this position was launched and still counting through 
the period of this history. 

Coach Statham brought with him an intense be- 
lief in physical fitness as a prerequisite to sports excel- 
lence, as his basketball players soon learned when in- 
troduced to pre-season exercises, including long-dis- 
tance running, isometric exercises, weight lifting, and 
.station exercises. 

Prior to the mid-1960s most athletic directors ran 
a program with three varsity sports — football, basket- 
ball, and track — with sporadic years of baseball as a 
fourth, and spurts of tennis as another. Sometimes the 
make-up was basketball, baseball, and track, and after 
track was dropped, just basketball and baseball. Soccer 
and golf were then added as men's varsity sports, and in 
the early 1 970s basketball, volleyball, and Softball were 
added as women's varsity sports. 

But there were exceptions during the Glen Filley 
years. In 1 928-29, varsity letters were awarded in eight 
sports — football, track, basketball, cross-country, mara- 
thon, baseball, men's tennis, and women's tennis — some 
74 in all. The outpouring of varsity awards brought 
criticism from some "M" club members, and several 
letters of complaint appeared in the McKendree Review. 



One member wrote, "There are so many letters on cam- 
pus I'd rather not wear mine around here in order to be 
distinguished." Another complained that his "M" would 
no longer help him get rides hitchhiking home; "every- 
one in Southern Illinois is wearing one." 

In 1977, Jean Kirts became McKendree's first di- 
rector of women's athletics. 



Women's Athletics 
Intramurals 

Women's intramural sports in the early years were 
as the men's — mainly student-organized and under the 
spon.sorship of a faculty member. Volleyball, soccer, 
basketball, tennis, bowling, badminton, softball, archery, 
table tennis, shuffleboard, and touch football were on 
the menu during various years before varsity women's 
sports were started. 

In the 1933-34 school year, McKendree became a 
member of the Women's Athletic Association, with Miss 
Rosalind Hohn as faculty sponsor. The WAA's purpose 
was "to render possible the participation of more women 
students in athletics and various forms of physical edu- 
cation. Definite numbers of points are to be given for 
the activities in which each woman student takes part, 
and upon having accumulated a specific number, that 
individual will receive a letter." 

The letter was a purple "M," and a girl had to par- 
ticipate in at least five of eight sports to receive one. 
Not more than 100 points could be counted from any 
one sport. Points were earned through practices, par- 
ticipation in tournaments, being winners or runners-up 
in tournaments, and substituting in a tournament game 
for some other member. 

In its first year McKendree's WAA boasted 24 
members, and, led by Burdine Utiey with 593 points, 
13 members gained the necessary 500 points for let- 
ters. 

An annual Field Day was a feature of the WAA. 
In the spring of 1936 the tennis matches were rained 
out, but the remaining events were held — broad jump, 
hurdles, 50-yard dash, and baseball throw. The winner 
in all events was Mary Blanche Wolfe. 

At times McKendree's girls took part in special 
off-campus events. In the late 1 930s, annual Spring Field 
Days were conducted at Normal, Illinois. A 1939 
McKendree Review states that McKendree's girls trav- 
eled there to compete with DeKalb and Millikin Uni- 




Two Hundred and A 



MC KENDREE" 



versities. In soccer they lost to DeKalb 4 to 2, but con- 
quered Millikin 2 to 0. Dolores Cooper scored both goals 
against Millikin. 

In the late 1950s, student majors in physical edu- 
cation taught various sports in the women's physical 
education classes. Phyllis Nies, '62, and Joyce Hudson, 
*60, were two students who instructed intramural sports. 

In 1966 women's bowling was started, and by the 
school year 1967-68 there were seven or eight teams com- 
peting in intramural sports in basketball and volleyball. 

Other sports were tried. During the 1 966-67 school 
year, members of McKendree's Women's Recreation 
Association were invited by the Illinois Field Hockey 
Club to participate in a field hockey clinic at Eastern 
Illinois University. They accepted and in the exhibition 
game against Eastern crafted a 2 to 1 victory. Upon 
their return to campus the girls invited interested coeds 
to turn out at Hypes Field for practice in order to form a 
team for future competition. Apparently, the interest 
didn't develop. 

A women's Major and Minor Club (PEMM) was 
organized in the early 1970s to "promote and sponsor" 
the intramural program. Awards were given to outstand- 
ing participants. Points were earned through participa- 
tion and by winning a first, second, or third in any sport 
event. The club's name did not intend to imply that a 
participant had to be a PE major or minor. Jean Kirts 
was director of intramurals at this time. 

Women's intramurals soon included tennis, soc- 
cer, bowling, pool, volleyball, basketball, badminton, 
and Softball. Intramurals served well as a prelude to the 
introduction of a sport to varsity competition. 

In 1977, Luanne Lucy became director of 
intramurals for both men and women. 



Basketball 

It will surprise most to learn that according to the 
Centennial McKendree College History and the 
McKendree Pigskin the first basketball played on cam- 
pus was by the women's basketball team of 1903-04. 
The team was comprised of Mabel Duncan, Lulu Large, 
Dora Dougherty, Florence Reinhardt, Myrtle Duncan 
(team captain), and Lydia Malemee. The McKendree 
Pigskin records: "The first few nights great crowds 
gather to see the games, it being comparatively new in 
McKendree. At first it was a great sight for the specta- 
tors to see them bump heads and mix up in general a 
mighty effort to gain possession of the big leather ball. 
But soon the awkward rushes were pushed aside and 
the mighty hand of athletic training was greatly in evi- 
dence, and they became very graceful and soon carried 
off the honors of Championship of Southern Illinois." 
This was claimed by virtue of a 2 to 1 victory over 
O'Fallon and a 2 to 2 tie with Collinsville. 

Basketball would continue to be a favorite 
women's sport. The 1913 McKendrean and others con- 
tain photographs of women's basketball teams, but 
games are not recorded. A 1921 McKendree Review 
notes that the McKendree College girls played the of- 
fice force, but results are not mentioned. The McKendree 
Review also states that a McKendree graduate. Miss 
McCammon, "coaches girls' basketball team from 
Lebanon's 6th, 7th, and 8th grades." 

A women's class tournament in basketball was held 
during the 1922-23 school year, won by the freshmen 
class. The McKendree Review noted that this was the fu-st 
class tournament in 10 years to decide a championship in 
women's athletics. There are no records available that 






Women 's Intramural Touch Football in 1969. 




Two Hundred and Twenty-Two 



MC KENDREE 



J':_.'-\ 



M':-i$i 



refute its being a first in McKendree 
women's sports, when varsity "]VI'"s 
were awarded to the all-star team 
selected from the tournament. The 
recipients were Martha Hughes, 
Dorothy McCammon, Eva Pearce, 
Elizabeth Sawyer, Opal Smith, 
Peggy Smith, and Ruby Van Dyke. 

Games were played under 
women's rules, which required six 
players on a team. The playing floor 
was divided into two halves; three 
players played on the offensive half 
and three players on the defensive 
half. The ball had to be passed 
across the center line; players could 
not cross the line in either direction. 
Players could dribble the ball only 
three times before they had to pass 
the ball or shoot. The three players 
on the offensive end were the only 
ones who could score. Thus, the 
low scores. 

Sponsored by the WAA, 
McKendree's 1935-36 basketball 
team made its debut in an intercol- 
legiate game against Blackburn 
College at Carlinville, Illinois, on 
January 23, 1936. The score was 
McKendree 10, Blackburn 8. 
Mary Blanche Wolfe made eight of 
the 10 points, causing Blackburn's 
coach to comment, "She's the best 
women's basketball player I've 
ever seen." 

McKendree would also win the 
return match played in Eisenmayer 
Gymnasium on February 28. 
Mary Margaret Carson joined 
Wolfe in sharing scoring honors. 
A McKendree Review gave the 
lineup as follows: Mary Blanche 
Wolfe, Mary Margaret Carson, 
and Helen Handel, forwards; 
Myra Jeans, Dorothy Pfeffer, and Dorothy Eaton, guards; 
and Catherine Gilkerson and Arline Stanton, substitutes. 

The following year Principia College was added 
to the "Bear Kittens" or "Kittycubs" schedule, and games 
were played in 1937-38 as well. 

Athletic Director A. K. Henderson coached 
women's basketball during the 1939-41 seasons with 



1^ 



;) 






^■^ 



1 



mtMmmmyi^MMmmmtl 



Women's Athletic Association in 1936. 




Women's RE. class in 1944. 

former students Dorothy Hertenstein and Mary Louise 
Reader acting as game officials. 

In 1941-42 with Cora Marie Thomas as coach, 
home and away games were played with Blackburn, Har- 
ris Teachers, Principia, and Shurtleff. Marion 
Kleinschmidt completed her fourth year as one of the 
team's top guards. 




Two Hundred and Tv 



-^3S23£^2S^M£J<E^^^^^^^^g^^^^ 



In 1 942-43 due to gas rationing, only games against 
Lebanon girl teams were played. There was no desig- 
nated coach, but Ruth Hauser and Eunice Bivens acted 
as co-captains. 

After 1943 articles in the McKendree Review note 
that the WAA scheduled intramural games until 1948- 
49. That season the women's varsity, coached by physi- 
cal education instructor Janelle Kleinschmidt, posted a 
55 to 50 win over Shurtleff College. Intercollegiate com- 
petition then waned, and the WAA sponsored basket- 
ball tournaments for any girls interested. 

At least one game, a 50 to 32 loss to Shurtleff, 
was played in 1 95 1 -52 when Dorothy Bamett was physi- 
cal education instructor. In 1952-53, under the direc- 
tion of physical education instructor Velta Jean Taylor, 
one varsity game was played, a 33 to 30 loss to Wash- 
ington University of St. Louis. And intramural games 
were played between the Kitty Cubs and Bear Kittens. 

The following year the WAA women organized a 
team that was coached by male students who also served 
as referees. This student-organized team beat Shurtleff 
but lost to Greenville, Principia, Washington U., and 
Webster College. 

A 1957-58 McKendree Review states that the 
women's PE class taught by Helen Brown organized a 
basketball team called "Cubkittens." Games were played 
with Scott Field and Greenville. 

The 1959-60 season, coached by senior student 
Joyce Hudson, in which two games were played, is 
worthy of note since Peggy "Chip" Jackson scored 25 
and 22 points in the games. The 25 points, although 
not declared so, were probably a single game scor- 
ing record. 









lyruiCiih Kitlcns. 



1973 Women's Basketball in action. 

From 1 963-64 through 1 965-66 when Lou Vesely 
was athletic director, Mrs. Lou Vesely coached women's 
basketball as an intramural sport. By the following year 
there were seven women's teams competing in intra- 
mural sports. 

In January 1970, a quickly organized team with 
Jean Kirts as coach participated in the Eastern Illinois 
University Invitational Basketball Sports Day with SIU 
Carbondale, SIU Edwardsville. EIU Charles- 
ton, and Indiana State University. The 
McKendree girls beat EIU by four points but 
lost to SIU by two. Michaelynn Brownfield, 
Mary Burk, Mary Moeller, Suzanne Phillips, 
Bernice Stambaugh, Rose Statham, and 
Marsha Terry represented McKendree. 

With Jean Kirts as coach and the game 
now played under relaxed boys' rules, 
women's basketball started as a major sport 
in the 1 973-74 school year. Two games were 
played, both losses to Principia and 
Blackburn Colleges. Both games were away 
due to lack of funds to pay officials. 

Eleven games were played in 1974-75 
and three of these ended in victories, two over 
Lewis and Clark and one over Blackburn. 



MC KENDRE E~K_ 



Vf 


-"7 


1 ' 


v 1 


"\ '.^ 


i; 




%o 







Womc/i 5 Basketball Squad in 197H. 



Losses were to Lindenwood, Forest Park, Maryville, and 
Meramac. Players were Nancy Weible, Kathy Jones, Dee 
Walker, Trina Schaefer, Connie Horman, Mary Beans, 
Patty Thompson, Val Thaxton, and Jeri Petri. 

Brenda Hedges coached the 1975-76 team to a 4 
and 7 season. SIU-Edwardsville, Greenville, John A. 
Logan, Florissant Valley, and Principia replaced Forest 
Park, Meramac, and Maryville in the schedule. Mary 
Beans, Kathy Jones, and Dee Walker were the only vet- 
erans from the previous year. 

According to the McKendree Review, Luanne Lucy 
coached a 1976-77 team composed entirely of fresh- 
men to a 2 and 10 season. The victories came at the 
expense of Greenville and Lindenwood. 

McKendree's first winning season came in 1977- 
78 with eight victories against five losses. Kathy 
Hardesty, Bonnie Hoover, Camilla Demaree, Cindy 
Luedeman, Karen Missey, Laura Percival, and Janet 
De Bourge were second year players. Luanne Lucy was 
the coach. 



Volleyball 

Women's intramural volleyball tournaments 
were sponsored by the WAA at least as early as 1 940, 
from which a McKendree team was victorious over 
Blackburn College's women. The McKendree Re- 
view notes that matches were played in the 1950s 



between the morning and afternoon gym classes. In 
1957 a volleyball tournament was conducted under 
Helen Brown, women's physical education instruc- 
tor. 

In 1972 women's inter-collegiate volleyball was 
initiated with Jean Kirts as coach. Principia, SIU- 
Edwardsville, and Greenville furnished the opposition. 
Randie La Russa, Sally Ford, Sherry Ratz, Nancy 
Weible, Mary Beans, Mary Ann Moeller, Diane Ohl, 
Ann Darin, Kathy Jones, Judy Thompson, Sharon 
Zuliene, Bemice Stambaugh, and Ellen Olds constituted 
the squad. 

Varsity volleyball became a reality in 1973 with 
McKendree's girls playing in league games at Forest 
Park Community College, Florissant Valley, and 
Lewis and Clark junior colleges. Lindenwood, Har- 
ris Teachers, Blackburn, Greenville, MacMurray, and 
Principia colleges were league members. Jean Kirts 
coached the teams through 1975 and Luanne Lucy in 
1976 and 1977. 

After a 2 and 4 record in the inaugural year, 
McKendree's best record was 4 and 9 in 1976. The 
McKendree Review gave credit to Patty Douglas, Pat 
Kiehna, Claudia Cook, Cindy Luedeman, Karen Massey, 
and Bonnie Hoover as key players in the improved sea- 
son. 

Bradley, SlU-Carbondale, and Illinois College 
were added to McKendree's 1977 schedule, in which 
there were eight victories. 




Two Hundred and Tv 



0%^ 




1! 


1 Ml! 


*^' *«^ ^ i 


' ^!^^ 


^^ai b^J 


&^M 



1976 Women's Volleyball Squad. 




I97fi Women s Softball Squad. 




Two Hundred and Twenry-Si. 



MC KENDREE~EI: 



Tennis 

Tennis, from its very beginning in 1890 when a 
court was "prepared" by students on the front campus, 
was a sport in which "pleasant hours were spent by the 
boys and girls of the college." It would continue only as 
a recreational sport for women until the 1 920s. The 1 920 
McKendrean refers to tennis for girls and that "some 
girls can play with the best." 

The first record found of intercollegiate competi- 
tion is in the 1928-29 school year. The number of 
matches is unknown, but it is recorded that the women 
lost only one match. Varsity letters were awarded to 
Martha Rogers, Inez Hageman, Orena Mowe, and Dor- 
othy Pfeffer. Other letter winners in the late twenties and 
early thirties were: Zook, Buetelman, Hertenstein, Jacobs, 
Shamalenberger, Kershner, and Schnyder. Mowe, 
Hageman, and Beutelman were four-year letter winners. 

Women's tennis would continue into the late 1 930s 
but with only sporadic intercollegiate matches. Those 
who represented McKendree during this period were 
Dorothy Hoover, Myra Jeans, Dorothy Hertenstein, 
Mary Blanche Wolfe, Maxine Miller, Helen Handel, 
Velma Hamilton, and Mary Etta Reed. 

Intramural Women's Athletic Association tennis 
continued until there were no courts upon which to play. 
When new courts were constructed around 1953, tennis 
again became a recreational sport. After the permanent 
courts were completed in 1963, it became a women's 
intramural sport. 



Softball 

A McKendree women's softball team was orga- 
nized at least as early as 1960 when McKendree's 
women beat Lebanon High, 32 to 11. Softball was a 
well-established intramural sport for women before it 
became a varsity sport. 

In inter-collegiate contests in 1972, McKendree 
lost games to Greenville and Principia colleges. In the 
game with Greenville, Sally Ford had a home run and 
Mary Moeller had four hits, two doubles, and two 
singles. Moeller was also the losing pitcher. 

The first year of varsity softball was 1 974. Luanne 
Lucy and Ellen Olds were the coaches. They were fol- 
lowed by Anita Moores and Brenda Hedges, and then 
in 1977 Luanne Lucy again became the coach. 

Some of the players through 1 977 were Pat Kiehna, 
Debby Marlen, Debby McNelly, Karen Diecker, Patty 
Douglas, Angle Moore, Kathy Jones, Lisa Lindsay, 



Peggy Klein, Jenny Bamett, Janet De Bourge, Cindy 
Luedeman, Kathy Hardesty, Diane Halloran, Karen 
Missey, and Laura Percival. 

The 1974 team had a won-lost record of 4 and 1, 
while the 1975 and 1976 teams were both 5 and 4. The 
1976 team was 4 and 5. 

Note: Unfortunately, little information on game 
or individual records on women's sports was found. 
However, it appears that the following were three sport 
letter winners: Karen Missey, Patty Douglas, Cindy 
Luedeman, Kathy Jones, Janet De Bourge, Kathy 
Hardesty, and Laura Percival. 



Men's Athletics 



Football 

The 1905 McKendree Pigskin and the Centennial 
McKendree College History state "as early as 1888 
McKendree played among themselves a game they 
called foot ball." But in this game the ball was only 
propelled by kicking. The first real football team was 
organized in 1 892 with Jean F. Webb as captain. The 
team played only one game, a loss to Smith Academy 
of St. Louis, 66 to 0. Since there were no eligibility rules. 
Smith had padded their roster with "ringers" from lead- 
ing teams around the city. In 1893 McKendree lost to 
Drury College, 1 4 to 0, but when Smith Academy played 
at Lebanon the following year, the McKendree boys had 
become wise to the ringer game and won 22 to 0. 

Cameron Harmon, who would become 
McKendree's president in 1923, played on the 1895 
team, but he would drop out sometime after the football 
season to teach in a school near Flora, Illinois, in order 
to pay expenses. The following year he would journey 
to Lebanon long enough to practice and play in a losing 
game against the Belleville Tigers on Thanksgiving day. 
Dissension then struck the team and remained a prob- 
lem until Harmon returned as a student in 1 899. He was 
elected captain, and one W. L. Lucas assumed the role 
as manager. The following year "Cap" Harmon exhib- 
ited his recruiting powers and brought in a few fresh 
bodies, who, along with himself and some old hands, 
would make McKendree a football power. 

Nap Bon Thayer, an ex-Harvard man, who lived 
in Lebanon, volunteered as coach, and in 1900 for the 
first time McKendree could compete successfully with 
other colleges. Prior to this year games were played on 




Two Hundred and Twenn-Se' 




1936 "M" Club. 

an open field, and the team was financially supported 
by contributions from students and the citizens of Leba- 
non. But now Lebanon Park, where the games were 
played, was enclosed and paid admission could be 
charged. The team tied Western Military Academy 12 
to 12, defeated Barnes Medical 17 to 0, St. Louis High 
22 to 11, Southern Illinois Normal 25 to 0, and lost to 
Christian Brothers College 17 to 5, and Ewing College 
12to0. 

The McKendree Pigskin and Centennial 
McKendree College History disagree on the 1 901 record, 
but both agree that five games were won in 1902 and 
McKendree had her best record ever. Also, in a game 
with Marion-Simms-Beaumont College of St. Louis 
there was the largest crowd, including 600 visitors, ever 
to witness a game in Lebanon. Neither the size of the 
crowd nor the game score was recorded, but the team's 
bank account was increased by $103. This was Harmon's 
final year as a student at McKendree. He had served as 
captain of the team for four years. The 1903 team won 
four games including a 12 to 5 victory over St. Louis 
University. Only 1 game was lost. 

The 1904 season in which two games were won 
and one lost would be the last football game played by 
the McKendree men for some time. Dr. McKendree H. 
Chamberlin was college president at this time, and he 
was passionately opposed to intercollegiate sports. He 
told the board of trustees that athletics had no proper 
place in the college curriculum and called football a 
"cruel sport." He stated that it "gives special privileges 
to the welfare of eleven of its students, at the expense of 
all others. . . ." 

The board of trustees agreed with Dr. Chamberlin 
and football was banned, as well as intercollegiate par- 
ticipation in any sport. However, in 1906, Dr. 



Chamberlin finally agreed 
that a physical education pro- 
gram should be organized on 
campus. This led to the hir- 
ing of Professor Wiggins to 
organize classes in physical 
education, but there would be 
no form of football. 

It wouldn't be until the 
fall of 1916 that football be- 
came an intercollegiate sport 
along with basketball, base- 
ball, track, and tennis. The 
coach was Professor L. C. 
Le Van, and team captain was 
a burly quarterback named 
Turner. By 1918the schedule included Illinois College, 
Shurtleff, Lincoln, Charleston Normal, Blackburn, and 
home and away games with Carbondale Normal. 

McKendree was now poised to enter her golden 
age of sports, and football would be in the forefront. 
The 1 920 McKendrean stated, "McKendree College cul- 
tivates athletics as a pastime. There is less professional- 
ism here than in most other institutions. Nevertheless, 
our record shows that such a condition by no means 
detracts from the ability to win victories." Pastime or 
not, the McKendree Review editors saw that athletics 
received primary coverage. Bold headlines of team vic- 
tories frequented the front pages of many editions, and 
when there was athletic news of any kind, it was usu- 
ally found on the front page. Strong rivalries developed, 
foremost with Shurtleff College, with Southern Illinois 
Normal close behind. 

The 1921 football team, coached by Orval Hall, 
claimed the Southern Illinois (Egyptian) Conference 
championship with a 4 and 1 record, having beaten Jack- 
son Academy, Carbondale Normal, Blackburn, and 
Shurtleff. A 2 to loss came at the hands of Carbondale 
in a return engagement. But Carbondale needed an as- 
sist from McKendree to record the win. When punting 
from his own end zone, McKendree's punter banked 
the ball off the posterior of one of his blockers. The 
ball was recovered by a McKendree player behind 
the goal line, unfortunately, for a 2 point safety. Those 
were the only points scored by opponents in any con- 
ference game. McKendree scored 167 points, including 
94 against Jackson Academy. The latter would be a last- 
ing record. Six McKendreans — Carvel, Catt, Adams, 
Lizenby, Miller, and Sayre — made the All Southern Il- 
linois all-star team. Cralley and Maxey were on the sec- 
ond team. 




Ul!^MC KENDReF 



The 1922 team won two, lost two and tied two, 
with Sayre as its captain. Cralley, Hall, and Rhiel were 
selected to the All-Conference team. 

Ten games, constituting the biggest schedule ever, 
with "Lefty" Davis as coach and Albert Willis as quar- 
terback and captain, were played in 1923. The 4-4-2 
record was respectable considering that Southwest Mis- 
souri, Western Illinois, Cape Girardeau, and Charleston 
had been added to the schedule. 

It was only fitting that McKendree would now have 
a "12th" man in Dr. Cameron Harmon, as the Bearcats 
joined the Little Nineteen Conference — Illinois Inter- 
collegiate Athletic Conference (I.I.A.C.) — in 1923. 
Perhaps it was also appropriate that McKendree held 
her first annual homecoming on Wednesday, October 
24, 1923. 

McKendree wasted no time in letting her presence 
be known by winning the conference title in 1924 with 
six wins and one tie. Her overall record was 7-1 - 2, 
including an 88 to victory over Ewing University. The 
loss came from the Missouri School of Mines in RoUa, 
Missouri, a school that over the years would give 
McKendree more grief in football than any other. 

Fred Young, a sports writer on the Bloomington 
Pantagraph newspaper, was a well-known and respected 
football official. He was noted no less for his all-state 
all-star conference selections and placed McKendree's 
freshman fullback, Holsinger, on his first II in 1924. 
Lloyd Pettit was picked as a tackle on the third team. 
Captain Donald Berst, tackle, would be back, but se- 
niors who would be sorely missed the next season were 
Pettit, James Newcom, Theodore Search, and Ray 
Carter. 

The lettermen personnel constituting this team 
were very unusual in that five of its number were from 
Freedom High School, Freedom, Pennsylvania — most 
probably a result of Dr. Harmon's persuasive powers. 
And to add to the sports fever sweeping the campus, a 
cub bear was added as mascot. 

McKendree's freshman sensation fullback, 
Holsinger, did not return to school, but the 1925 team 
with Glen Filley as coach and Pettit as captain was 6 - 3 
- 1 overall and 5 and 1 in the conference. However, there 
was no conference championship due to the one loss, 
which was to Knox College. Other losses were to Rolla 
and the Springfield, Missouri, Teachers. The tie was with 
the Cape Girardeau Teachers. 

John Isom, halfback, had been elected captain of 
the 1926 team, but due to an injury received in the prior 
season's Carthage game he was not able to play. Joe 
Guandolo, an end, was then elected captain. The injury 



would prevent Isom from being a four-sport, four-year 
letterman. As it was, he would earn 15 letters, a 
McKendree record. 

The 1926 team recorded only one win, a 13 to 
victory over Lincoln, and a to tie with Carbondale 
Normal. One of the losses was a rare one, to 3 to Scott 
Field on a drop kick in the last quarter. 

The centennial year was 1927-28 and Mc- 
Kendree's team was known this year as the Fighting 
Centenarians. Quarterback Erie Todd, a four-year 
letterman, was captain and led the team in a 6 - 2 - 2 
season. He was selected as a quarterback on Brig 
Young's all-state second team. Other four-year lettermen 
were Clifford Gould, Joseph Guandolo, and Delbert 
Lacquement. 

Edward Shadowen, a diminutive halfback but con- 
sistent ground gainer, was captain of Coach Filley 's 1928 
team, which recorded a 7 and 3 season. The victories 
included a 26 to win over Southwest Missouri State, a 
36 to 6 pounding of Bradley Tech, and a 20 to 13 
squeaker over Evansville. St. Louis University was a 6 
to victor, and the old nemesis, Rolla School of Mines, 
tacked on a 19 to loss. 

The 1929 season was memorable in that the first 
night football game was played on Hypes Field on Sep- 
tember 19, 1929. Not only was this the first night game 
locally but the first one in the "football industry of the 
Middle West." Three thousand fans, the largest crowd 
ever to attend a home sports event, witnessed McKendree's 
center, Cormin Watkins, also her drop-kicker, split the 
uprights with a kick that subdued Scott Field 3 to 0. The 
McKendree Review reads that he kicked two in another 
game the year before but doesn't tell us the opponent. 

In the second game of the season 1 ,500 fans turned 
out for a night victory over Central Wesleyan; then two 
more night victories over Cape Girardeau and Illinois 
Normal extended a home winning streak to 12 straight. 
The Bearcats' last five games, all in daylight, were los- 
ers, including a 73 to loss to Rolla, the worst in school 
history. Idris "Dudes" Comwell, backfield triple-threat 
man and triple letter winner the past two seasons, was 
Bearcat captain. 

The Bearcats had a new coach, Arthur Doolen, for 
the 1930 season, and play was opened with a 13 to 6 
victory over Scott Field. This was the fifth straight night 
victory; however, the streak ended with a 12 to 7 loss to 
Shurtleff Only two victories were gained this year. 
Fuzzy Hubble was the captain, and his being picked to 
a center position on the Little Nineteen All-Conference 
team by the Associated Press was quite remarkable in 
that the Bearcats had no conference victories. 



Two Hundred and Twenty-Nine 



<:s:^5*c^;'^^?^^^^E^MC K ENDREE ^^ 



A. E. Horton captained the 1 93 1 team to a 4 - 4 - 1 
season, 2-3-1 in the conference. The United Press 
picked Elmer "Butch" Todd, who led the team in scor- 
ing with 30 points, on its second team at a halfback po- 
sition. Josef Spudich at fullback and William "Bud" 
Saunders at end were given honorable mention. How- 
ever, the Associated Press placed Spudich at halfback 
on its first 1 1 and Todd was given honorable mention. 

The 1931 homecoming was especially festive. 
Friday morning the entire student body observed Hobo 
Day by appearing in hobo costumes. Friday evening a 
general hobo get-together was had, and this then turned 
into a pep rally. Prizes were given to the best dressed 
hobo and hoboette, which was followed by a snake- 
dance downtown. The normal frat and social meetings 
were held Saturday morning, and kickoff for the foot- 
ball game with Southern Illinois Normal came at 2:30 
PM. This resulted in a disappointing to 7 loss. That 
evening's entertainment featured the play "Shavings." 

Only eight lettermen, Todd, Fulkerson, Spudich, 
Gruchalla, Kurrus, Sooy, Bradham, and Moorman, re- 
turned for the 1932 season. But 12new lettermen-to-be 
would take up the slack, and Coach Doolen's men 
brought glory back to the campus with nine wins and a 
second Little Nineteen championship. Scott Field, Cape 
Girardeau, Chillicothe, Washington University of St. 
Louis, Southern Illinois Normal, Shurtleff, Elmhurst, 
Eastern Illinois Normal, and Illinois State Normal were 
all losers. The only loss in the 10 game season was to 
St. Louis University. The 5 and conference record 
made McKendree co-champions with Illinois Wesleyan, 
whose record was also unblemished. 

But as great as winning the championship was, 
future old-timers would remember the season more for 
the 13 to 6 win over Washington University than for 




/ 932 Little Nineteen Football Conference Champions - record 9 and I 



being conference champions. Todd, Spudich, Fulkerson, 
Brock, Comfort, Moorman, Derwelis, Kurrus, Howard 
Larsh, Hrasky, and Flanders were the starters in the 
game. A key play in the win was a fake punt by Todd. 
From punt formation he took the ball on his own 12 
yard line, then ran 88 yards for six points. Bradham, 
Spudich, Fulkerson, and Kurrus made key blocks in the 
execution of the play. A place kick was also faked suc- 
cessfully, and Spudich ran through a gap over left guard 
for the point. The Bearcats' other six points were scored 
on a cross-buck by Spudich. 

The Associated Press picked Captain Todd as a 
halfback on its All-Conference first team. Spudich was 
named to a second team position at fullback by the AP, 
while the UP and Bloomington Pantograph placed him 
on their first team. Fulkerson was given honorable men- 
tion at quarterback by the AP and UP and given a first 
place slot by the Pantograph. Frank Gruchalla at cen- 
ter, Kurrus at guard, and Bradham at halfback were given 
honorable mention by the Pantograph. After gradua- 
tion, Spudich would go on to several seasons as full- 
back for the St. Louis Gunners professional team. The 
team's nine wins were the most ever and the best record 
ever by a McKendree football team. 

Following McKendree's pioneering in 1929 with 
some home games at night, other schools embraced the 
idea. The Cape and St. Louis U. games in 1932 were 
away at night, but McKendree's home opener at night 
with Scott Field would be the Bearcats' last ever home 
night game. 

Coach Paul Waldorf, brother of Northwestem's 
Waldorf, mentored the 1933, '34, and '35 teams. He 
would also be head of the Romance Languages Depart- 
ment, a departure from past practices of athletic direc- 
tor only, an economy move. 

Moorman captained the 
'33 team, which included re- 
turning lettermen Fulkerson, 
Gruchalla, Walter Rauth, 
Bradham, Larsh, Harsky, Paul 
Mauck, and "Spike" Wilson. 
With another bumper crop of 
freshmen, including Leroy 
Rice, James Sampson, William 
Eaton. Wallace Blackburn, 
Raymond Musgrove, Ervin 
Aufderheide, and Donald Allen 
being added, the season looked 
promising. It was indeed, and 
the Bearcats met Illinois 
Wesleyan for the conference 




Two Hundred and Tli 



championship in the final game 
of the season. The purple and 
white lost 7 to 13 and finished 
with a 4 and 1 conference 
record. Illinois Wesleyan fin- 
ished 4-0-1. The loss also 
ended the Bearcats consecutive 
conference win streak at 1 1 . 

Losses to Washington U., 
7 to 22, and the Rolia Miners 
6 to 7, gave McKendree a not- 
so shabby 6 and 3 season. In- 
cluded in the wins was a 58 to 
whopper over Eastern Illinois 
State U. 

The United Press and Pantagraph selected 
Moorman as a tackle on their All-Conference first teams. 
The AP gave him honorable mention. "Woody" 
Fulkerson was placed on the first team, either as a quar- 
terback or fullback by all three. Gruchalla made center 
on the AP's second team and honorable mention by the 
UP and Pantagraph. The Pantagraph picked Wilson as 
halfback on its first team; the UP gave him honorable 
mention. James "Big Chief Sampson was selected for 
honorable mention by the AP and Pantagraph while 
Leroy "Duck" Rice received honorable mention at guard 
by the Pantagraph. 

Wilson captained the '34 team to a 4 and 5 season, 
the brightest win being a 20 to 6 victory over Rolla, the 
first win in seven meetings with the Miners. 

In a game played in a continuing downpour at 
Washington University, the Bearcats' freshman end and 
punter, "Dutch" Berendt, got off a punt for an unbeliev- 
able 80 yards. This was the highlight of an 1 8 to loss. 
Then later in the season, with Sampson mowing down 
would-be tacklers and Wilson stutter-stepping behind 
him, a Southern Illinois Normal University homecom- 
ing crowd was shocked into silence by Wilson's touch- 
down runs of 60 and 71 yards. Unfortunately, the home 
rooters went home happy with a 19 to 12 victory. 

Wilson was selected to the All-Conference first 
team by the AP, the UP, and the Pantagraph. Rice, 
Blackburn, and Sampson received honorable mention 
by the AP 

In December at the annual "M" awards dinner. Dr. 
Harmon aroused considerable interest and excitement 
when he discussed the possibility of a football game 
with Boston University. Unfortunately, he was unable 
to materialize the dream. 

Only three lettermen, Raymond Musgrove, Albert 
Manwaring, and Clifford Hertenstein were lost by gradu- 




?.•? Football team McKendree vs. Sliiirtleff. 



ation, but first stringers Berendt and Sampson, ends; 
quarterback Wilber Zirges; halfback "Mr. Outside" 
Ervin Aufderheide; and reserves Don Wilson and Eldon 
Browning failed to return to school. And the freshmen 
list was below par, but led by Captain Howard Larsh, 
the 1935 Bearcats still managed a 5 - 3 - 1 season with 
a 13 to loss to Illinois College keeping them from 
another conference title. The other losses were to Wash- 
ington and Rolla. 

Wilson was again named to a first-place position 
on the conference team by all three news services. 
He was also voted most valuable player in the con- 
ference and for the second year was named by 
Grantland Rice, nationally renowned sports writer, 
to his Little AU-American team. Upon graduation, 
Wilson was signed by the Detroit Lions to a profes- 
sional football contract. 

Wallace Blackburn was picked as a tackle on the 
International News Service's first team and on the AP's 
second team. The AP and INS gave Larsh a place at 
guard on their conference second team. Rice, James 
Beers, John Larsh, and George Strecker received hon- 
orable mention by a news service. 

B. E. Blanchard, whose coaching position was 
consolidated with professor of education, inherited the 
Bearcats for the 1936 and '37 seasons, which would 
complete their final schedules in the Little Nineteen 
Conference. 

Minus Dr. Harmon, their top persuader, but with 
Blackburn as captain and replacements Isselhardt, Ernst, 
Madden, Cook, Woodard, James Gruchalla, Doemer, 
and big (265) Dudley Klamp, the 1936 team eked out a 
3 and 6 season; however, they won only one in the Little 
Nineteen. Still, Blackburn was picked at tackle on the 
AP's conference second team. John Larsh received an 
honorable mention by the AP. 



Two Hundred and Thim-One 




1940-1941 Football team McKendree vs. Mission House in Wisconsin. Behind 
0-6. McK took a time out and sang "My Gal Sal" in their huddle. McK won the 
game 7-6. "My Gal Sal" became the sweetheart of the campus. 



A December 1936, McKendree Review noted, 
"McKendree's Benny 'Nose' Isselhardt, along with 
Lan7 Kelly of Yale, headed the AP's rating of freak plays 
for the football season. In the McKendree vs. Wash- 
ington game, Benny threw a pass that hit Gog, Wash- 
ington University tackle, and was deflected back to 
Isselhardt for a 3 yard gain." 

The 1937 team with quarterback Isselhardt as cap- 
tain rang up a 3 - 5 - 1 season record and a 2 - 3 - 1 in its 
Little Nineteen schedule close-out. Replacement players 
were the rule with Ward, Weber, Harmon, Simmons, 
Donham, Long, Butler, Atkins, Shipp, Sager, Greenwood, 
Martin, Handlon, and Posage all winning their first "M"s. 

A happy homecoming crowd witnessed a 52 to 
defeat of Oakland City (Indiana) College as Bearcat 
passer Ward completed 7 of 12 passes for 136 yards. 
Six of his completions were to left end Bise, who at 
season's end was picked on the INS All-Conference 
second team. The AP gave him honorable mention. After 
graduation he was a starting end on the St. Louis Globe 
Democrat all-star team in a benefit game against the 
Chicago Cardinals. 

A new coach, Herbert Gould, came on board for 
the 1938, '39, and '40 seasons. The 1938 team had as 
co-captains Doemer and Randall and was 2 and 6 for 
the season. The wins were over Eureka and Principia. 
The losses included a school record 88 to loss, to Wash- 
ington University. This was the final meeting between 
the schools in football. 

The McKendree Review sports writer assessed 
the season: "McKendree's eleven has been playing 
out of their class practically the entire season — only 
three games matched against teams of equal strength." 



The 1939 team recorded three 
wins against four losses. The victo- 
ries were over Chillicothe, Eureka, 
and Moberly Junior College. Losses 
came from Shurtleff, Burlington, 
Principia, and Illinois College. "Ace" 
Harmon captained the team. 

Coach Gould's 1940 team had 
no elected captain; one was appointed 
for each game. Three junior colleges 
were included in the eight-game 
schedule, and the Bearcats came 
away with two victories. 

Coach Lewis Scholl's man- 
power was very thin in the 1941 sea- 
son, and he used at most 16 men in 
any one game. George Edwards was 
the captain, and the team had a 2 - 4 - 
1 record. With World War II on everyone's schedule, 
McKendree's manpower was such that football couldn't 
be reasonably supported and was therefore dropped as 
a competitive sport after the '41 season. 

With an all-freshmen plus one sophomore team, 
football was revived in 1946 with a four-game sched- 
ule. No touchdowns were scored by the Bearcats, and 
all games were losses. But Captain Gene Briggs, fresh- 
man quarterback, and his teammates gave their best ef- 
forts and at least made the games interesting. 

Again in 1947, Coach Wesley Jonah had to rely 
mainly on freshmen, supplemented by two sophomores 
and one junior. Mason Holmes, who also served as team 
captain. No games were won in the seven-game season, 
but three touchdowns were scored, one against Principia 
and two against Millikin's "B" team. Holmes gained a 
position as center on the Pioneer All-Conference team. 
Ralph E. Barclay coached the 1948 and '49 teams. 
Holmes, the only senior on the team, again was '48 team 
captain. Eight games were played, and the Bearcats 
gained their first victory since restarting football in 1 946, 
an 18 to 7 win over Chillicothe (Missouri) Business 
College. In the victory all three touchdowns were scored 
by Ed "Slick" Schaefer, one a 70-yard punt return. 

Coach Barclay's 1 949 team might have been called 
the "pseudys," since every team member had a nick- 
name. Tackle Kenneth "Jaw" Austin was team captain. 
Bill "Turk" Nagel was quarterback. And there were 
Elvis "Rosie" Rosenberger, Monty "Monk" Hull, 
Bill "Wrighta" Wright, Gene "Bore" Briggs, 
Roy "Butter" Katayama, and Dick "Pitt" Pittenger. Per- 
haps the scheme worked, for the Bearcats had three vic- 
tories for the season. These were claimed over Eureka, 



Tii'o Hundred and Thii 



MC KENDREE 



Chillicothe, and Missouri Baptist. And 84 points were 
tallied, but the opposition had 146. 

Coach Hugh Redden's team gained three victo- 
ries against five defeats in 1950, but after this season 
the old pigskin would bounce no more on Hypes Field. 
The end appeared sudden to the fans when the 1951 
schedule was canceled; but, the old ball had lost some 
of its life as far back as 1936. When Dr. Harmon de- 
parted the campus in the fall of 1935, McKendree foot- 
ball lost its most ardent recruiter and persuader. Also, 
the college had lost its accreditation in the North Cen- 
tral Association of Colleges and was in a severe finan- 
cial squeeze. Campus jobs filled by students, some by 
athletes, now only satisfied half their previous fulfill- 
ment toward tuition and board and room. The $75 per 
semester for tuition compared to the $15 per term at a 
state university like SINU loomed large. There were 
some transfers, but many athletes dropped out to find 
employment; the Southern Illinois oil fields claimed 
some. 

An influx of good new recruits was essential if 
McKendree was to compete with the Washington Uni- 
versity Bears, and this game played in St. Louis had 
been vital to the Bearcats' sports programs. Washing- 
ton was big-time college football for most of the 1 930s 
and the largest football draw in St. Louis. When the 
Bearcats played the Bears on November 14, 1936, 
Washington had lost to Illinois University and Notre 
Dame by single touchdowns and had beaten Bradley 
Tech and Oklahoma A & M by scores as large as the 
33 to score administered to McKendree. Tickets 
were $2.20 reserved, $1.10 unreserved, and Francis 
Field, the home of the Bears, was packed. McKendree's 
take from the Washington University game was the larg- 
est single resource for Bearcat sports, and when this 
annual game was lost to the program, football became 
an unaffordable financial liability. 



Yearly Records 



Year 


Win 


Loss 


lie 


Coach 


1916 


7 


? 




L. C. LeVan 


1917 


9 


7 




Zachritz 


1918 


1 


7 


forfeits - flu 


Claude N. Stokes 


1919 





7 




Claude N. Stokes 


1920 





7 




Frank Laurence 


1921 


4 


1 




Orville Hall 


1922 


2 


2 


2 


Orville Hall 


1923 


4 


4 


-) 


Earl A. Davis 


1924 


7 


1 


2 


Earl A. Davis 


1925 


6 


3 


1 


Glen FiUey 


1926 


1 


6 


1 


Glen Filley 


1927 


6 


2 


2 


Glen Filley 


1928 


7 


3 




Glen Filley 


1929 


4 


5 




Glen Filley 


1930 


2 


5 




Arthur Doolen 


1931 


4 


4 


I 


Arthur Doolen 


1932 


9 


1 




Arthur Doolen 


1933 


6 


3 




Paul Waldorf 


1934 


4 


5 




Paul Waldorf 


1935 


5 


3 


1 


Paul Waldorf 


1936 


3 


6 




B. E. Blanchard 


1937 


3 


5 


1 


B. E. Blanchard 


1938 


2 


6 




Herbert Gould 


1939 


3 


4 




Herbert Gould 


1940 


2 


6 




Herbert Gould 


1941 


2 


4 


1 


Lewis SchoU 


1942-45 no 


f oo 


ball 




1946 





4 




Wesley Jonah 


1947 





7 




Wesley Jonah 


1948 


1 


7 




Ralph Barclay 


1949 


3 


5 




Ralph Barclay 


1950 


3 


5 




Hugh Redden 




Two Hundred and Tliirn-Tliree 



MC KENDREE 



Basketball 

According to McKendree College Basketball: The 
First Half (1908-1939), a research project done by 
McKendree College student Carol Trame in 1986, 

The game of basketball is truly an American 
sport. It was invented by a young minister, 
James Naismith, at the YMCA Training 
School in Springfield, Massachusetts, in the 
winter of 1891. He was asked to invent an 
indoor game that would hold the interest of 
young men training to be YMCA instructors. 
These men, aged tn'enty-six to thirty, had al- 
ready managed to force tM'o instructors to 
quit. They were disgusted with the marching 
drills, calisthenics and routines their instruc- 
tors compelled them to do. Naismith began 
e.xperimenting and finally invented a game 
he believed would meet the needs of the 
YMCA Training School. He drew up five 
guiding principles: 1. There must be a ball; 
it should be large, light, and handled with 
the hands. 2. There shall be no running with 
the ball. 3. No man on either team shall be 
restricted from getting the ball at any time 
that it is in play. 4. Both teams are to occupy 
the same area, yet there is to be no personal 
contact. 5. The goal shall be horizontal and 
elevated. 

The first goals used were peach baskets that 
Naismith secured from the janitor and nailed 
exactly ten feet from the edge of the balcony. 
Baskets today are still elevated ten feet from 
the floor He devised thirteen rules for his 
new game, which have changed through the 
years, but most of the basic concepts still 
hold. The game was an instant success, and 
its popularity spread rapidly to other YMCA 's 
and local gymnasiums throughout America. 
It also quickly appeared throughout the rest 
of the world, because the YMCA was a uni- 
versal organization. 

The rules of basketball have changed through 
the years to make the game easier to con- 
trol. For example, Cornell was the first col- 
lege to give basketball a try. They were also 
the first college to ban it. They tried to play 
the game with twenty-five players on each 
side, and the thundering offifh' players up 



and down the gym floor caused the adminis- 
tration to ban the game before the building 
toppled. The rule for size of team was 
changed in 1894, and restricted the number 
of players to five on a team. The restriction 
of not being able to touch or hug the ball 
to the rest of the body was changed in 
1908. The out-of-bounds play sometimes 
would cause a riot, because the first player 
to touch the ball after it went out of bounds 
was the one who was permitted to throw it 
back in. This rule caused players to rush 
through and over spectators to secure the 
ball, even crawling up to the balconies if 
needed. In 1913 this rule was changed to the 
current one. One of the original rules neces- 
sitated a player to pass the ball and not run 
with it. At Yale, some shrewd players began 
to pass the ball at the floor, then catch the 
ball on the rebound, thus establishing the 
dribble. 

There were also physical problems to over- 
come. In 1894, the rules finally stated the 
exact boundaries which were to be at least 
three feet from the wall. Courts were not 
necessarily rectangular in shape. This was 
changed around the turn of the century. Also 
by 1900, the free-throw line was marked fif- 
teen feet from the basket, the keyhole and 
foul lines were painted on the court, and 
the teams played twenty-minute halves. 
Before 1903, the shoes that a player wore 
were a major problem. Any kind of shoe 
was used, from a leather street shoe to 
large-heeled work shoes. The Spaulding 
Company invented a basketball shoe in 
1903. The type of basket used was also a 
major obstacle. Some were closed at the bot- 
tom, and had a chain that was pulled to tip 
the ball back out. Some baskets did not even 
have a chain, requiring a person to stand by 
with a ladder to retrieve the ball. It was not 
until 1906 that open baskets were used. 
Backboards were invented to keep fans in the 
balconies from helping out their team by 
goaltending. After experimenting with wood, 
which did not allow the fans to see, a wire 
mesh backboard was tried, but it kept get- 
ting out of shape. The first glass backboard 
was used in 1909. 



Two Hundred and Thiriy-Four 



-^^zSSSSS^^I^^^^N^^F^^^g^gSss^Si^ 



High schools actually adopted a basketball 
program before colleges. It was not until 
1894 that it got a footing in the Eastern col- 
leges. It was difficult to schedule games, be- 
cause there were so few colleges that had 
basketball. The ensuing result was the play- 
ing of games between colleges and YMCA 's, 
high schools, and independent teams. Eligi- 
bility rules were not in effect, which caused 
teams to come and go, and players to go from 
team to team. Graduate students and teach- 
ers could be on a varsit}' squad, and it made 
no difference how much ball they had played 
as undergraduates at other schools. 

Intercollegiate contests began in the 1894- 
95 season, with Minnesota State School of 
Agriculture beating Hamline nine to three in 
the first intercollegiate game in February of 
1895. On March 20, 1897, the first five-man 
college game was played. Yale played the 
University of Pennsylvania, and soundly beat 
them 32 to 10. 

The first college to start a basketball pro- 
gram was Geneva College in Beaver Falls, 
Pennsylvania, in February, 1892. In 1901 the 
Eastern League, today 's Ivy League, and the 
New England League were formed. In 1905, 
the Western Conference, today 's Big Ten, was 
established. 

The first record of men's basketball being played 
at McKendree occurred after Professor B. E. Wiggins 
became athletic director in 1 906, some three years after 
it was first played by the women. Through the 
professor's efforts, men's basketball society teams were 
organized in 1906-07 and basketball became the lead- 
ing sport. Plato Society had the sport's first society cham- 
pion. The next year society teams were discontinued in 
favor of independent teams and the Romans became the 
new campus champion. 

These teams formed a good nucleus of trained 
basketball players for McKendree's entry into intercol- 
legiate competition in the 1908-09 school year. With 
"Froggie" Pfeffer as captain and Olin Philips, Fount 
Warren, Edmund Burguart, and Shick as teammates and 
Aaron Large, C. Gentry, and E. Sayre as substitutes the 
team won about 50 percent of their games. 

Philips, who was team captain. Gentry, Burguart, 
and Sayre returned for the 1909-10 season, which was 



reported to be a mediocre one. At least one game played 
in Eisenmayer Gymnasium, was won, 26 to 18, over 
Christian Brothers College. 

A 6 and 1 season was recorded in 1910-11, even 
though only one member, Cyrus Gentry, reported in from 
the last year's team. He was joined by William "Bill" 
Beedle and Oliver Eicher, both with high school expe- 
rience, and Edward Ebbler, Thomas Isaacs, Claude 
Stokes, and C. Smith. 

The only information found about the 1911-12 
team was that they won over 50 percent of their games. 
Cyrus S. Gentry, who played on the 1 909-1 McKendree 
team, was the coach. 

The following year, McKendree fielded an excel- 
lent team that produced a 7 and 1 record, losing only to 
Central Wesleyan. "Bill" Beedle was team captain, and 
Stokes, playing center, was the team high .scorer for the 
third year. "Tommy Ralph" Isaacs filled one forward 
position, with "Boots" Willi, reported to be the "most 
spectacular player that ever tossed a ball here," filling 
the other forward spot. Willi stood barely five feet high, 
and. . . "rarely makes many points in a game, but his 
floor work enables Stokes and Isaacs to roll up their 
high scores." Ebbler at guard had the "ability to watch 
two or three men at once and yet get the ball out of the 
crowd. . . ." 

The 1913-14 McKendrean credits "Shorty" Ebbler 
as being the best defensive guard "McKendree has ever 
had" and that he held Illinois Wesleyan's all-state for- 
ward scoreless. "Johnnie" Harmon scored 18 points 
against Carbondale in the first half; no mention made 
of the second half. The team finished fourth in the state 
tournament and had a 10 - 4 record for the season. 

An 8 - 2 record was posted by the 1914-15 team, 
its last loss coming in the state tournament. No infor- 
mation was located on the players. Neither is there in- 
formation on players or statistics for the 1915-18 sea- 
sons. 

Due to the illness of Athletic Director C. N. Stokes, 
"Fritz" Friedli was hired as an assistant basketball coach 
for the 1 9 1 8- 1 9 season. The team finished second in the 
state tournament and compiled an 1 1 - 7 record. Jim 
Dolley, forward, and Fritz Wagener, guard, were selected 
as members on the all-state team. 

The 1919-20 team won 15 of 20 games. Run- 
ning guard and team captain Wagener repeated as a 
member of the all-state team. Other team members 
were George Weineke, Clifford Garrett, Merrel Col- 
lard, Harvey Sayre, and Frank Canedy. In only a nine- 
game season, the 1920-21 team came up with five 
victories. 



Two Hundred and Thirn-Fiv 



<s^.<^-^?c^^^^^MC KENDREE~^y 



A 1 92 1 -22 McKendree Review observed that "five 
former McKendree athletes are now coaching in high 
schools." And a sports writer for the student paper wrote 
that "Captain Adams has played two years and has not 
scored a point." His position of back guard required that 
he play under the opponent's basket at all times while 
Sayre's position as floor guard permitted him the full 
court. 

The 1922-23 team was champion of the All-Egyp- 
tian (Southern Illinois) Conference, which included 
McKendree, Carbondale Normal, Shurtleff, and 
Blackburn. The team was 5 and 1 in the Conference and 

9 and 4 overall. High point man was William Sullins 
with 73 points, followed by Milton Hailing with 69. 

In 1923-24, 10 of 14 games were won, including a 
victory over St. Louis University. 

Earl "Lefty" Davis coached his 1924-25 team to a 
12 and 3 season while winning 8 of 10 in The Little 
Nineteen Conference. The 1 925 McKendrean offers this 
about the team's captain, "Led by the brilliant Newcom, 
one of the greatest cagers that ever stepped on a 
McKendree floor. . . .His season high of 225 points, an 
average of 1 5 points per game, established a McKendree 
record." Other team members were Mayo Magill, Perry 
Sullins, Donald Berst, John Isom, Wensel Brown, Frank 
Runyan, and James Martin. 

With Glen Filley as coach, the 1 925-26 team won 

10 of 16 games, with half the victories over conference 
teams. McKendree declared themselves champions of 
Southern Illinois by reason of double victories over 
Carbondale Normal and Shurtleff. 

In 1926-27 a record of seven wins and 12 losses 
was posted. Lettermen were Charley Jack, Hurley 
Gould, Emery Martin, W. L. Brown, Mayo Magill, Guy 
Magill, and Earl Todd. 

A 1927 McKendree Review stated that Clifford 
Garrett, who attended McKendree in 1920, '21 , '22, and 
'23 and who captained the 1920-21 basketball team, and 
also lettered in baseball and football, coached the 1926- 
27 Mt. Carmel, Illinois, high school basketball team to 
the Illinois state championship. 

In the 1927-28 season opener against Allen's Ci- 
gar team of Belleville, Charley Jack established a 
Bearcat single game scoring record of 26 points. The 
team this year went by the moniker "Centenarians" in 
deference to the 1928 centennial year. Martin. Gould, 
Harold Culver. "Eddie" Shadowen, Chlorus "Fuzzy" 
Hubbell, and Jack were awarded "M"s for the season. 
A record of nine wins and seven losses was posted. 

Virgil Church with 105 points and Hubbell, who 
was unable to play the entire season because of illness 



but still managed 88 points, were the scoring aces for 
the 1928-29 season. Coach Filley's Bearcats finished with 
nine victories in 17 games. In the Linle Nineteen Confer- 
ence the team gathered in five wins out of nine contests. 

During the 1929-30 season Hubbell set a 
McKendree individual game scoring record of 29 points 
against Scott Field. But for the mercy of Coach Filley, 
Hubbell probably would have set a school record for all 
time because, according to the McKendree Review, he 
played only the equivalent of a little more than one quar- 
ter. The Bearcats' team score of 7 1 points in the 7 1 to 
32 victory was also a team high. Hubbell, while averag- 
ing 14.5 points per game, was selected as center on the 
Little Nineteen All-Conference team. His season total 
of 262 points in 18 games bested Newcom's record of 
225 points set in 1924-25 in 15 games. Newcom's 15 
points per game record remained intact. 

The last game of the season against McKendree's 
old rival, Shurtleff, was played in Eisenmayer gymna- 
sium before some 1 ,000 fans who, the McKendree Re- 
view states, "made enough noise to awake the deceased 
in the nearby graveyard. The gentler shrieks of the la- 
dies, the hoarse shouts of the men, and the muffled cuss 
words of the players combined to make the game un- 
usually colorful." 

The 1930-31 team with Arthur Doolen as coach, 
logged a 1 3 - 7 record overall and 7 - 4 in the confer- 
ence. Hubbell again led the scoring while Elmer Todd 
and Owen Evers filled the guard positions in excellent 
fashion. Other lettermen were Virgil Church, Charles 
Summers, Laurence Wright, and Robert Schafer. 

A 15 -13 record was posted for the 1931-32 sea- 
son, but only two of 1 1 conference games were won. 
Church with 160 points and Wright with 158 were the 
leading scorers. 

In an effort to speed up the game a new 10-second 
rule was introduced in the 1932-33 season. An offen- 
sive team after receiving the ball in the back court had 
to advance the ball across the center line into the front 
court within 10 seconds. Other rule changes were: I. 
Blocking rule. "Player using personal contact to slow 
down player not having the ball is guilty of a personal 
foul." 2. "Player in 'bucket' with his back to basket and 
in possession of the ball must pass or dribble out of the 
free throw line within 3 seconds." Only 5 of 16 games 
were in the win column for the 1932-33 season. Cleve 
Stroh led the team in scoring. 

A change is also noted in the McKendree Review 
reporting format. After getting front page coverage for 
several years, sports are now relegated to the inside or 
back pages. 



Two Hundred and Thim-SLx 



The 1933-34 season opened with Paul Waldorf as 
coach. The season record was 10 and 9, with four of 
nine in the conference. Stroh with 1 99 points was again 
the leading scorer Spike Wilson with 96 points in con- 
ference games was given honorable mention on the 
United Press All-Conference team. Other varsity team 
members were Woodrow Fulkerson, George Moorman. 
Kenneth Scott, Albert Manwaring, Gustav Krizek, and 
Jack Pfeffer. 

Athletic Director Waldorf coached football and 
track during the 1934-35 season, while Bob Hartley took 
over as basketball coach. Hartley's team won 13 while 
losing 10. A team high of 71 points against Scott Field 
tied the 71 points scored against the same organization 
in 1 929. Stroh had 2 1 points in the 1 935 victory. George 
Welbom was top scorer in the 23-game season with 227 
points. 

Waldorf coached the 1935-36 team, which re- 
corded a 10 - 12 season. Spike Wilson was top scorer 
with 256 points. Even though he filled a guard position 
on the Bearcats' team, the Associated Press voters 
thought so highly of him that he was picked as a for- 
ward on the Little Nineteen's first team. This made him 
the only player in Bearcat history to be selected on the 
conference's first team in football and basketball. His 
four-year total of 757 points in basketball was a 
McKendree record. Wayne Bise was given honorable 
mention by the Associated Press. Other lettermen were 
Roy Jaeckel, Krizek, Johnny Rauth, Art Wehmeier, John 
Larsh, and Alfred Manis. Manis was the Bearcats' first 
tall man, standing at almost 80 inches. His height cre- 
ated some theorizing among St. Louis newspaper sports 
writers. Some theorized that it might be a disadvantage 



when shooting from outside, since his ball would have 
less of an arc. More new rule changes came in 1936. 
One required that all players remain outside an eight- 
foot circle around the center jumps until the ball was 
tapped. Another increased the number of time-outs from 
three to four, and a player upon being substituted could 
talk to fellow players before the ball was put into play. 

Under a new coach, B. E. Blanchard, the Bearcats 
registered eight victories against 10 defeats in 1936-37. 
Captain Jaeckel and captain-elect Bise were given hon- 
orable mention on the AP's Little Nineteen Conference 
all-star team. Other lettermen for the year were James 
Beers, Manis, Emil Strotheide, John Harmon, Robert 
Davis, Edward Jones, and Krizek. Bise was top scorer 
with 172 points. Included in this number were 26 points 
against the friendly neighbor Scott Field. 

Western State Kentucky, Western State Michigan, 
Kalamazoo Teachers, and St. Viator were strong teams 
added to the 1937-38 schedule, and the Bearcats didn't 
fare well, winning only six of 17. Bise again lead the 
team in scoring with 224 points and led the conference 
in free throws. Jaeckel had 158 points. The other 
lettermen were Harmon, Don Ward, Jones, and John 
Henderson. 

Following McKendree's withdrawal from the Illi- 
nois Intercollegiate Athletic Association, a somewhat 
weaker schedule was programmed for the 1938-39 sea- 
son, and under new coach Arthur K. Henderson, the 
Bearcats brought home 1 1 victories in 15 contests. Co- 
captain Roy Jaeckel was a mid-term graduate, and Don 
Ward took over as captain full time. Harmon was high- 
point man. Harry Stilwell had 25 points against Oak- 
land City College, and Charles Mueth, a freshman, tal- 




Tno Hundred and Thim-Se 



MC KENDREE" 



lied 1 8 points in his first Bearcat start. Other team mem- 
bers were Henderson, Bart Greenwood, Benny 
Isselhardt, Fred Doemer, and Sam Donham. 

With only captain Henderson, Harmon, and Green- 
wood returning as lettermen, the Bearcats logged a 5 
and 12 record in 1939-40. Harmon as high point man 
had 161 points and tied Hubble's single game record of 
29 points in a game against Springfield Junior College. 

Carrol Lowe, George Edwards, Lewis Winterrowd, 
Walter Pimlott, and Ernest Smith were some of the play- 
ers who gave their all in a 5 and 10, 1940-41 season for 
Coach Herbert Gould. On the opposition side, the high- 
est individual score ever recorded against a Bearcat five 
came on February 21, 1941, when Bill Spradley of Oak- 
land City College, Indiana, tallied 68 points in an Oak's 
111 to 60 victory. But this was a habit with Spradley 
most everywhere he played. 

With Winterrowd and Andy Patterson as co-cap- 
tains, 20 games were played in 1941-42. The team's 
eight victories included wins over Jefferson and 
Centralia junior colleges, Harris Teachers, Blackburn, 
and Concordia Seminary of St. Louis. St. Louis Uni- 
versity, Washington University, and Austin Peay were 
some of the teams that administered defeats. 

Only seven games were played in 1942-43, 1 1 in 
1943-44, 1 1 in 1944-45, and nine in 1945-46. Gas ra- 
tioning kept the contests close to campus; thus, 
Greenville, Shurtleff, Harris, Parks Air College, Army 
squadrons at Scott Field, and close-by independents and 
junior colleges furnished the opposition. 

With a low enrollment, less than 30 men in 1944- 
45, and mainly freshmen or sophomores to choose from, 
Coach Leon Church did well to keep the basketball pro- 
gram going during the war years. The 1 943 McKendrean 
pictures only six senior "M" club members - Ross 
Hortin, Lewis Winterrowd, James Loy, Malcolm Myers, 
Donald Hartman, and Paul Griffin. 

In 1945-46 Tommy Lusch set a new single-game 
scoring record with 35 points against Scott Field's 
Squadron H. Mason Holmes had scored 29 points a week 
earlier against Scott's Squadron B. 

With new coach Wesley Jonah, the Bearcats were 
back with a full schedule for the 1946-47 season. The 
squad of nine freshmen, two sophomores, and one jun- 
ior produced six victories out of 20 games, per the 
McKendree Review. The McKendrean inadvertently re- 
versed some of the won-loss scores. 

Oakland City, Eureka, Quincy, Lincoln, and Au- 
rora Colleges were the most notable additions to the 
schedule and were again in the 1947-48 schedule of 21 
games. Eight victories were recorded this year Harter 



Dermondy had 94 points in six Pioneer Conference 
games and won a place on the All -Conference team. 
Bill Gregory was given honorable mention. Ernie 
Johnson followed Dermondy in scoring and Jimmy 
Sells, a guard, was reported as being the backbone of 
the team. 

Paul Mauzy coached the 1948-49 squad in an 8 
and 12 .season. Paul Beaty served as captain and was 
selected most valuable player by his teammates. Ma- 
son Holmes was the team's only four-year letterman. 

Bobby Lee, a freshman, was the 1949-50 team's 
point leader and was voted most valuable by his team- 
mates when the Bearcats recorded their first winning 
season since 1 938-39, with twelve wins and seven losses. 
He also hit 36 points in a game, but Jim Burnett, Bearcat 
forward, broke this record with 37 points in a win over 
Belleville Junior College, 82 to 59. In Gene Hoyt, a 6- 
foot, 8 inch freshman, the Bearcats had their first tall 
man since Alfred Manis in 1 935-37. Unfortunately, af- 
ter 102 points in 10 games, an automobile accident put 
him out of action for the season. But Hoyt was in great 
form the following year when he had a season record 
570 points, which bested Bobby Lee's 418 .set the pre- 
vious year. However, his 21.1 point average for 27 
games did not best Lee's 22 point average for 1 9 games. 

The 23 and 5, 1950-51 season record produced 
the most wins in McKendree hi.story, but its .821 won- 
lost percentage remained second to the .875 percentage 
of the 1912-13 team. TheBearcats'totalof 2235 points 
was a season high as was its 79.82 points per-game av- 
erage. And Coach Hugh F. Redden's Bearcats estab- 
lished a new game high of 125 points in a 125 - 75 win 
over M & A University. The combined 200 game points 
was also a single game high, and the team's 30 of 38 
successful charity tosses in a game against Shurtleff 
College was also a record. During the season. Coach 
Redden's consideration for the underdog was displayed 
in a 121 - 68 victory over Sanford Brown of St. Louis 
when he removed Hoyt from play after Hoyt's 35-point 
production in only three quarters. There was also good 
news for the fans when Hoyt was declared a freshman 
even though he had played in 10 games the previous 
year 

Coach Redden's Bearcats, co-captained by Ron 
Herrin and Clifford Maddox, were back with a 21 and 6 
record for the 1951-52 season. And Hoyt added more 
superlatives. His 701 total points and 25.96 per-game 
average were new McKendree records, as was his 39 
points in a game against Greenville College. Then, this 
was surpassed by his 45 points in a 109 to 82 win over 
Rolla School of Mines. His 701 total points were sec- 



Two Hundred and Thirty-Eight 



csrv^^c^^-C^^^^^^^^X^MC KENDREE"gf 




H t-i'-^ .■'.--"•> Uho} 



1950-51 Men 's Basketball team - record 23 wins and 5 losses. 



ond only to Seattle University's Johnny O'Brian, and 
his 27.3 rebound average per game was tops among 
small college rebounders. During Coach Redden's ten- 
ure, Centralia and Belleville Junior Colleges were 
dropped from the schedule and Fort Leonard Wood and 
Missouri Baptist were among those added. 

In Coach James Collie's first season, 1952-53, 
Eastern Illinois State Normal returned to the schedule 
for the first time since 1935. During his five-year resi- 
dence, Kalamazoo Teachers, Westminster College, Mis- 
souri Valley College, Illinois State College, Chicago 
Teachers, and William Jewell College were fit into the 
schedule. A highlight of the 1952-53 year was a game 
played at Herrin, Illinois, against the Phillips Oilers of 
National AAU fame. The result was predictable, but the 
84 to 55 Oiler win was narrower than most by this semi- 
pro team. A junior varsity program had been well de- 
veloped under Coach Redden and the "Cub Cats" turned 
in a 6 and 2 record. The varsity Bearcats won the newly- 
formed Illinois Church Conference with a 7 and 1 record. 
Gene Hoyt, Loy Dale Cruse, and Burton Gedney domi- 
nated the first team conference selection. Richard Herrin 
was selected to the second team, and Charles Leckrone 
received honorable mention. Hoyt led the team in scor- 
ing with 624 points for a 23. 1 per-game average in a 19 
- 8 season. (Records that show a 28-game year counted 
the same Illinois College game twice.) Charles Leckrone 
rarely missed a free throw and was crowned NAIA 
champion after hitting 63 of 72 for a .875 percentage. 
Dale Cruse pitched in his share of two-pointers to come 
in second to Hoyt, who also hauled in rebounds at a 25 
per-game rate. 



Blackburn, Rose Poly, and Concordia (Illinois) 
joined the old church group to form the Prairie Confer- 
ence in 1953-54. The Bearcats and Shurtleff swapped 
victories and ended the season as conference co-champs 
with identical 9 and 1 records. Overall the Bearcats were 
1 8 and 9. In 24 of these Hoyt garnered 5 1 3 points, giv- 
ing him a four-year total of 2408 points. Add to this 102 
mini-season points, and he ended his brilliant career with 
25 1 points in 115 games, an average of 2 1 .8 points a 
game. Along the way he established a Prairie Confer- 
ence record of 27 points a game. For the year. Cruse 
was second in scoring with 467 points. At season's end 
Hoyt was selected for honorable mention on the Con- 
verse All-American team. 

Captain Cruse led the Bearcat parade with 566 
points in 1954-55. Richard Herrin had 482 and Lloyd 
Castillo had 443. George Butler, Amie Feldt, and Dean 
Heitman rounded out the top scorers in a 20 - 9 season. 
McKendree placed second in the Christmas Sunshine 
tournament at Portales, New Mexico, besting Western 
Colorado State and Southwestern Oklahoma, but los- 
ing to Kansas State, Fort Hayes, in the finals. Cruse was 
selected as a guard on the all-tournament team. A 12 
and Prairie Conference record gave the Bearcats an- 
other conference championship. Cruse made the All- 
Conference first team for the third season in a row. 
Castillo and Herrin were on the second team, and hon- 
orable mention was gained by Butler and Heitman. 
During the season Cruse had 37 points in a 95 to 87 win 
over Ottawa University of Kansas. And Cruse and Herrin 
each made 15 charity points in a single game, tying 
Hoyt's record set in 1953-54. 



Two Hundred and Thirty-Nine 



Another Prairie Conference championship was 
gained in 1955-56 with an 1 1 and 1 record in a 23 and 7 
season. Castillo and Herrin were selected to the All- 
Conference first team. Jeff Riggs gained a place on the 
second team, and Rich Stein and Amie Feldt were given 
honorable mention. Castillo had a team high 583 total 
points, Herrin had 494, and Arnold Feldt had 345. Ri- 
chard Stein, Cletus Hubbs, Jeff Riggs, and Linn Smith 
were the other leading scorers. And in an 81 - 71 vic- 
tory over Blackburn College, Richard Herrin racked up 
47 points for a new McKendree single game scoring 
record. A third-place finish was gained in the city of 
Richmond, Indiana, Thanksgiving Tourney with a 67 - 
62 win over Southeastern Oklahoma State. A 54 - 46 
loss to McNeese (La.) State College had put 
McKendree in the loser's bracket. In the first 
McKendree-Rotary Invitational Tournament, the 
Bearcats were victors with wins over Eureka, Shurtleff, 
and Missouri Valley Colleges. 

Confusion reigns over Coach Collie's 1956-57 
won-lost record, but much cross checking places it at 
21 and 9. And a 9 and 1 Prairie Conference record gave 
McKendree a fifth Prairie Conference championship. 
Lloyd Castillo was selected to the all-conference first 
team, Linn Smith to the second team, and Feldt, Don 
Proctor, and Riggs gained honorable mention. In the 
Greenville College Invitational Tourney, McKendree 
lost to Oakland City in the opener but beat Aurora Col- 
lege for third place. And in the second McKendree-Ro- 
tary Tourney, consisting of six teams, the Bearcats bested 
Greenville and Illinois College, but lost to Southeast 




Timer John Symer, Scorer Darrell Conner, Scorekeeper Helmut Gutekiinst check score 
during a lime-out. 



Missouri in the finals, 69 to 65. The Lebanon Rotary 
co-sponsored this tournament. A first in Bearcat history 
was recorded when McKendree was invited to the N AIA 
District 20 final play-offs, but the Bearcats suffered an 
87 to 82 loss to Eastern Illinois State in the opener. 

A big win of the season was an 88 to 87 victory 
over the Illinois State Normal Redbirds. In an incred- 
ible record that was set in a 1 22 to 87 victory over Rose 
Poly Technical Institute of Indiana, Bearcat team mem- 
bers made 29 consecutive free throws. In addition, in a 
game against Lincoln University, Castillo netted 1 8 free 
throws to beat the old single game record of 1 5. He also 
hit 14 consecutive free throws in a game and set a record 
of 3 1 for consecutive free throws made. His 244 charity 
tosses for the season were a record, and he led the team 
in total points with 652. Amie Feldt, Linn Smith, Jeff 
Riggs, and Don Proctor each had over 300 points. At 
the end of the season Fred Russell's Methodist Together 
Magazine placed Lloyd Castillo on its Methodist All- 
American team. 

Coach James "Barney" Oldfield's first year at the 
helm in 1957-58 produced 18 victories against 1 1 losses. 
McKendree won the Greenville Invitational Tournament 
by beating Oakland City College and Harris Teachers; 
came in second in the McKendree-Rotary by beating 
Greenville and Principia but lost to Oakland City in the 
final; and a fourth place finish in the Concordia Invita- 
tional Tournament was delegated to the Bearcats after 
losses to Christian Brothers College of Memphis and 
Concordia Seminary of St. Louis. Lloyd Castillo led 
the team in scoring, with 388 points in 22 games, giv- 
ing him a career total of 2067 
points in 111 games and an 18.6 
per-game average. His 303 re- 
bounds gave him a four-year total 
of 1772, a 15.96 game average. 
Both career totals were second 
only to Hoyt's. But there was a 
name missing from the year's 
schedule. Never again would a 
McKendree athlete hear the famil- 
iar cry "beat Shurtleff' reverber- 
ate off a gymnasium wall or echo 
across Hypes Field. Shurtleff had 
closed her doors for good. Sad 
commentary, indeed! 

A new gymnasium beckoned 
the 1958-59 Bearcat team. 
McKendree and SIU, Carbondale, 
held a practice game on Tuesday, 
November 18, in which no winner 



Two Hundred and Forty 




1959-60 Jr. Varsin- Basketball ream. 



was announced, and on Friday night, December 12, the 
first official game was played with Lincoln University 
as guest. Unfortunately, the guests didn't mind their good 
manners and trimmed the Bearcats 1 17 to 78. Pruett, of 
Lincoln, put wear and tear on the nets with 39 points. 
Another Prairie Conference championship was claimed, 
this time with a 9 and 1 record, with the last game won 
by Principia. It wasn't a good tournament year, as the 
Bearcats settled for fourth in the Greenville College 
Invitational Tournament and a third place in the 
McKendree-Rotary Invitational. As PCC champion, 
McKendree represented the conference in the NAIA 
District 20 playoffs but lost to North Central College in 
the opener. A 1 5 won, 1 lost year was posted. Bill Rob- 
erts, Don Proctor, and Sherman Nelson each registered 
over 300 points. Nelson, a freshman, averaged 21.6 
points in 1 5 games. Proctor and Roberts made first team 
PCC, while Marvin Jones and Harold Welch were given 
honorable mention. 

A 10 and record gave McKendree another PCC 
crown in 1959-60, in 18 and 9 overall season's record. 
A 63 to 62 overtime victory over Harris Teachers gained 
the Bearcats first place in the McKendree-Rotary Tour- 
nament, but another trip to the NAIA District 20 play- 
offs was for naught when SIU, Carbondale, tripped the 
purple and white, 97 to 7 1 . Marvin Jones had 3 1 points 



in the losing cause. Bill Roberts and Marvin Jones were 
named to "Who's Who in Small College Basketball" by 
coaches, publicity directors, and athletic directors of 
NCAA and NAIA schools. Roberts was named for su- 
perior performance at guard with a 20.3 per-game aver- 
age, and Jones for 263 rebounds and a 15.6 scoring av- 
erage. Willie Williams was voted most valuable player 
by his teammates. The Bearcats placed three on the All- 
Conference first team — Roberts, Williams, and Jones, 
while Sam Hippie received honorable mention. 

Another 10 and season gave McKendree a PCC 
championship in 1960-61. But a loss to MacMurray 
College relegated the Bearcats to second place in the 
McKendree-Rotary Tournament, and a trip to the NAIA 
District Tournament ended in a loss to Illinois Wesleyan. 
A big victory in the 1 7 - 6 (not counting exhibition game 
with Jamaco of Chicago) season was a 71 to 55 win 
over Illinois State Normal. Bill Roberts, Willie Will- 
iams, and Sam Hippie were selected to the PCC all- 
Conference first team. Leonard Clendenin, a freshman, 
received honorable mention. 

The 22 won, 6 lost, 1 96 1 -62 season included a first- 
place finish in the McKendree-Rotary Tournament and 
a fourth-place in the Indianapolis Classic, after losses 
to Indiana Central College and Franklin College, and a 
first-ever win in the NAIA District 20 Tournament. Illi- 



Two Hundred and Fom-One 



-^^SI^^^^^S^m^^^M^^^^^SSS^^^:^ 



nois Wesleyan was the loser 58 to 62, but there was no 
trip to Kansas City for McKendree as Western Illinois 
University claimed an 83 to 66 victory in the final game. 
In the McKendree-Rotary Tournament, an old Little 
Nineteen rival, Carthage College, made the trip to Leba- 
non to participate but fell victim to the Bearcats in the 
final game, 87 to 80. The final Prairie Conference game 
of the season with Illinois College gave the Cats their 
26th consecutive PCC victory, and the 10-0 record 
another PCC title. No doubt McKendree had men on 
the All-Conference team, but no record was found. 
Willie Williams, Sam Hippie, Ray Hassett, and W. 
Johnson were the leading scorers. 

The PCC winning streak was extended to 36, and 
another title was claimed in 1962-63. For the year 
McKendree was 16 and 1 1 . In the Concordia, St. Louis 
Tournament, victories were registered over Concordia 
and College of the Ozarks, but a loss to Harris Teachers 
gave McKendree a second-place finish. At Fairfield, 
Iowa, in the Mid-America Christmas Tournament, there 
was a win over Lewis College, but a two-point loss to 
Parsons College eliminated the Bearcats. And another 
trip to the NAIA District 20 Tournament ended with a 
loss to Western Illinois University. Southeast Missouri 
State was a newcomer this year to the Bearcat schedule, 
and State pleased their homefolk with a win. For the 
year, Bruce Minier, Chuck Garrett, Curtis Reed, and Jim 
Morby were the leading scorers. 

The Bearcats were just too good for the Prairie 
College Conference; therefore, withdrawal was made 
and McKendree entered the 1963-64 season as an inde- 
pendent. Replacements on the schedule for many of the 
old conference schools were Drury College, Indiana 
Central, Illinois Tech, St. Procopious, MacMurray Col- 
lege, Quincy College, Wabash College, Western Illinois 
University, and Tennessee A & I. Five of the teams on 
the schedule received bids to either NIAA or NCAA 
tournaments at the end of the .season. It was a tough 
schedule, and Coach Lou Vesely's team ended his first 
year as coach with a 10- 10 draw. Graduating lettermen 
on the team were Curt Reed, Ron Bodtke, Jim Morby, 
and David Nottrott. No .scoring statistics were found. 

A 14 and 8 record was posted in 1964-65. Along 
the way a second place finish was gained in the Capitol 
City Tourney in Indianapolis, and a third in a Wayne, 
Nebraska, tournament. Chuck Garrett led the team in 
scoring with 392 points and finished his career with 1 068 
points. In a game against Illinois Tech his 46 points 
logged were cause for much jubilation, until, as the 
McKendree Review said it, "With 4.6 minutes left Garrett 
hit what was supposedly a new record, 46 points. At 



that point he sat down only to find out after the game he 
had fallen one shy." Other top players for the year were 
Larry Richardson, Lester Long, Tom Wheeler, Larry 
Gresson, and Terry Richter 

Twenty-three games were played in 1965-66, and 
the Bearcats were victors in 10. Best wins were over 
Westminister College, Western Illinois, Iowa Wesleyan, 
and William Penn College. Southeast Missouri, Oak- 
land City, Quincy, Rolla, and Missouri Valley were some 
of the conquerors of the Bearcats. In the Capitol City 
Tournament at Indianapolis, los.ses to Earlham College 
and Marion College relegated McKendree to fourth 
place. Tom Wheeler and LestCf Long acted as co-cap- 
tains. Other starters were Vic Eskra, Ron Matikitis, 
Clarence Oliver, and Fuzz Linton. Unfortunately in Janu- 
ary Coach Vesely became ill, and the Reverend John 
Curtis assumed the responsibility of interim coach for 
the remainder of the season. 

During the 1 965-66 year, intramural basketball had 
been relied on more as a feed-in to the varsity. But with 
new coach Harry Statham for the 1966-67 season, jun- 
ior varsity again became the dominant training ground 
for those not quite ready for the big trips. Nine games 
were scheduled to be played as preliminary games to 
the varsity features. The 13-10 record wasn't what 
Coach Statham ordered, but his team won the inaugural 
McKendree Tournament by beating Sanford Brown 
University of St. Louis and the University of Missouri, 
St. Louis, Rivermen. Eureka was the fourth team in the 
tournament. During the year the Bearcats and the 
Rivermen were featured as the preliminary opponents 
to a St. Louis Hawks professional game. The Rivermen 
won this one, but later in the season McKendree won 
the rubber game. Freshmen Paul Funkhouser and Den- 
nis Korte were the leading scorers for the season. Korte 
had 34 points in a losing cause to Quincy College. Bob 
Linton, a senior, was the team playmaker. Jerry Boner 
was the winner of the Vesely Memorial Scholarship 
Award given in honor of former Coach Lou Vesely. 

The 1 967-68 season showed marked improvement 
with a 20 and 7 record. The Bearcats again won their 
own invitational tournament with wins over Sanford 
Brown and Eureka, and a third place was taken in the 
Concordia, St. Louis Tournament. The year's schedule 
included Washington University, and Washington 
wrapped up a 98 to 93 victory. Paul Funkhouser was 
top scorer with a total of 5 1 8 points. Wendell Johnson 
had 366 rebounds for the season, 26 of these coming in 
a win over Eureka. Mike Finley had 36 points in a 95 - 
66 win over Park College and 34 points in a 98 - 76 
victory over Harris Teachers. He shot at a rate of 60.6 



/ho Hundred and Fom-Two 



<:3:s-.^c^r-^^?C^^^O^MC KENDREE 




1964 Bearcat basketball crowd and cheerleaders. 




Two Hundred and Fom-Three 




Bearcat Gym action in 1967. 



Two Hundred and Forty-Four 



-^=S2S^3S^^tt^lISlNDaEES^^^SSS5gSS2> 



percent from the field for the season. His 14.6 point 
average for the year was third to Funkhouser's 19.2, 
and Johnson's 17.1. Terry Florek and Dennis Korte were 
also in double figures. Paul Funkhouser was the recipi- 
ent of the second Vesely Scholarship award, which was 
presented annually to the athlete "who is of outstanding 
character, scholarship, and sportsmanship." 

At the end of the Bearcats' 21 and 6, 1968-69 sea- 
son, McKendree received a bid to the NAIA District 
finals for the first time since becoming an independent. 
And for the second time in history she won her opening 
game, a 104 to 91 victory over Chicago State, which 
was played in the Lebanon High School gymnasium. 
However, Millikin University took McKendree's mea- 
sure 102 to 77 in the final. McKendree again won her 
own Invitational Tournament, beating Southern Illinois 
University, Edwardsville and Southeast Missouri State. 
Some of the Bearcat victims during the season were St. 
Benedict and Northwood colleges of Indiana, Olivet Col- 
lege, and Midwestern College of Iowa. Washington Uni- 
versity, St. Louis, and Quincy College were two of the 
six victors. As a team the Bearcats averaged 90 points a 
game, a new record, and totaled 2430 points. Paul 
Funkhauser led the team in scoring with 558 points and 
had 291 rebounds. Dennis Korte was second in points 
with 516 points and first in rebounds with 351. Max 
Hook was outstanding on defense, and Terry Florek was 
the team's floor leader. Mike Finley was there when it 
counted and was voted the team's most valuable player. 
Dennis Korte was the recipient of the third Vesely Schol- 
arship award. 

No bid was received to the NAIA District 20 Tour- 
nament after a 19 and 6, 1969-70 season. But 
McKendree won her own Christmas Tournament by 
besting SIU, Edwardsville 93 to 89 in the final game. 
Paul Funkhouser finished his four years of play with 
2000 points, and Dennis Korte finished with 1 500. Korte 
was selected to the NAIA all-district first team. And 
Max Hook, a senior guard, received the Vesely Schol- 
arship award honor. Following graduation Funkhouser 
was drafted by the Chicago Bulls of the NBA and the 
Carolina Cougars of the ABA. He signed with the Cou- 
gars but was cut during the rookie training camp. 

The Bearcats slipped to 15 and 12 in 1970-71, but 
uncovered a new star in transfer student Mike Vargo, 
who tallied 703 total points and a 26.03 per-game aver- 
age, besting Hoyt's record of 701 and 25.96 average set 
in 1951-52. He had a single game high of 40 points in a 
losing cause with SIU, Edwardsville. On the season he 
hauled down 334 rebounds. Steve Keene led the team 
in field goal percentage with 54.5 percent. Bob Stone 



led in free throw percentage with 81.6 percent. Tom 
Pollak's 15.6 points per-game average placed him sec- 
ond to Vargo. Vargo's stellar play eamed him a spot on 
the NAIA District 20's first team and an NAIA All- 
American honorable mention. He was second in NAIA 
District 20 scoring. For the season, a new team average 
of 92.07 points a game was established, but the team 
total of 2486 points was short of the 2583 points made 
in 1 955-56. Wayne Loehring was the Vesely award win- 
ner. 

It was an over-20 win season in 1971-72 when 
McKendree finished 21 and 7. But a trip to the District 
Tournament ended in a 102 - 74 loss to Eastern Illinois 
University. Senior Mike Vargo again led in team scor- 
ing with 683 points and in rebounds with 35 1 . His two- 
year total of 1 386 points and average of 25.2 points for 
55 games was a 2-year record. Bob Stone was second 
in scoring with 420 points, followed by Bill Biggerstaff 
and Don Bums, each with over 300 points. Loehring, 
Dan Johnson, and Jim Bunge were also in triple fig- 
ures. Burris and Bunge were each over 200 in rebounds, 
and Johnson had 1 44. Vargo received the Vesely award. 

The 1972-73 season was another good year for the 
Bearcats, with 23 wins against 6 losses. They were one 
point shy of an all-time single game high in a 1 24 to 86 
win over Harris Teachers. SIU, Edwardsville, was tamed 
1 10 - 99, but SIU, Carbondale, took McKendree's mea- 
sure 88 to 78. The Chilean National team was the op- 
ponent for the home opener and offered light opposi- 
tion in an 88 - 64 Bearcat victory. Bob Stone, Dave Ellis, 
and Bill Biggerstaff all racked up 450-plus points for 
the season. Don Burris had 357 and was second in re- 
bounding. Ellis was tops in rebounding with 302. Stone 
received honorable mention on the NAIA Ail-Ameri- 
can team, and Biggerstaff won the Vesely Scholarship 
honor. 

The 1973-74 season was high gear from the be- 
ginning, with 15 wins in the first 16 games. SIU, 
Edwardsville, was the spoiler 94 to 80. For the season, 
the record was 24 and 8. Along the way McKendree 
took the measure of Arkansas Baptist, Westminister, and 
Olivet, but Kentucky Wesleyan was too much. With 
Indiana teams, McKendree again handled Indiana State 
of Evansville easily, but Southeast Indiana was still too 
hard a nut to crack. Bob Stone was again high in points, 
this time 530: Jim Bunge had 514 and Ellis 496. Bill 
Douglas and Gary Vandeloo topped 300 and Don Burris 
chipped in 270. Ellis was top rebounder with 309. 
McKendree fans were rewarded with a 109 to 96 semi- 
final victory over Millikin University in the NAIA Dis- 
trict 20 Tournament. But Augustana College detoured 



Two Hundred and Fom-Five 



MC KENDREE' 



the trip to Kansas City with a 94 to 66 win in the finals. 
The Bearcats topped the century mark in nine games 
and finished the season with 2837 points for an 88.7 
points per-game average. The total points were a new 
record, but the per-game average was short of the 92.07 
set in 1 970-7 1 . And in a 121 to 119 win over Missouri 
Baptist of St. Louis, the 240 combined points established 
a new game total record. The 24 games won were the 
most ever by a McKendree team. Bob Stone received 
the Vesely Scholarship award. 

McKendree slipped to 17 and 9 in 1974-75. SIU- 
Edwardsville, Kentucky Wesleyan, Southeast Indiana, 
Olivet, and Chicago State all topped the Bearcats. Los- 
ers included Missouri Baptist, St. Xavier, Lincoln, 
George Williams, Greenville, and Harris. Bill Douglas 
was top scorer with 482 points and a 21.9 per-game 
average. Dale Haverman had 304 points and Mike 
Schaulat 295. Burris and Vandeloo each topped 200. 
Vandeloo and Burris were the top rebounders. Burris 
was the Vesely award recipient. 

Another 1 7 and 9 record was had in 1975-76. SIU, 
Edwardsville, was a loser to the Bearcats, as was new- 
comer St. Ambrose College. But Kentucky Wesleyan 
again was a winner, as was Chicago State. Dale 
Haverman racked up 502 points to lead in scoring, with 
Bill Douglas not too far behind with 461 . Mike Schaulat 
tallied 390 and Gary Vandeloo 306. Greg Jones, Phil 
Souders, and Chuck Renner all topped the century mark. 
Vandeloo was high man in rebounds with 266. 
Haverman, Souders, and Douglas were all over 200. 
Douglas had 36 points in a 91 - 85 win over St. Ambrose 
College. He was also recipient of the Vesely award. 

An outstanding 21 and 5 season was recorded in 
1976-77 and the .8076 won-loss f)ercentage was the sec- 
ond highest since 1 9 1 2- 1 3. At the semester break the record 
stood at 7 and 4, but then, Ron Henry, a 6-foot, 8-inch 
transfer from Kansas State became eligible; 
plus a healthy Chuck Renner, point guard, re- 
turned. The Bearcats won all remaining regu- 
lar season games, 15 in a row including a win 
before the break. Among the victims were Mis- 
souri Baptist of St. Louis, Harris Teachers of 
St. Louis, University of Mis.souri-St. Louis, and 
SIU, Edwardsville, causing an article entitled 
"Little Ol McKendree" to appear in the St. 
Louis Globe Democrat newspaper as follows: 
"Despite an enrollment of only 750, the 
Bearcats from Lebanon, Illinois, may be the 
best college basketball team in the St. Louis 
area." Kentucky Wesleyan, a five-time national 
champion in NCAA Division II, fell to the 



Bearcats. And the Kentucky fans didn't take their 112- 
95 pasting lightly. A local Kentucky newspaper called 
it the worst home-court defeat in 20 years. McKendree 
defeated Quincy College 80 to 75 in the final game of 
the season and was seeded number 2 in District 20. A bye 
was drawn in the first round of the tournament. Quincy 
bested Eureka, then faced McKendree in the Bearcat gym. 
After leading by five at the half, the Bearcats were humbled 
by one point. Quincy then lost to Illinois Wesleyan by two 
points in overtime. Wesleyan went to the Nationals in 
Kansas City, won their first two games, then lost in over- 
time. McKendree fans could only say, "What if ???" Six- 
foot, 7-inch Dale Haverman had 660 points for the sea- 
son, an average of 25.38 points per game. Mike Schaulat 
had 347, Gary Vandeloo 330, Barry Harris 324, and Ron 
Henry had 288 in 1 5 games. As a team, 2437 points were 
scored, and a record 1 2 games exceeded 1 00 points in the 
home win column. Haverman was drafted by the Seattle 
Supersonics of the NBA in the fifth round and was one 
of the last to be cut from rookie camp. 

McKendree's record in 1977-78 was 15 won and 
1 1 lost. A trip to Salina, Kansas, to participate in the 
Marymount University Invitational Tournament resulted 
in one victory and two defeats. The losses were to 
Marymount of Salina and Mount Marty College of South 
Dakota. The 86 to 83 loss to the host team was no dis- 
grace in that Marnmount was second-ranked by the 
NAIA, and the win was the team's 94th consecutive 
home victory. McKendree's victory came at the expense 
of Southwest Baptist 117 to 87. Freshman Gary 
Haverman had 63 points in the three games and was 
selected to the all-tournament team. During the season 
two good wins were recorded over North Central Illi- 
nois, and a split was had with Southeast Missouri State, 
but Kentucky Wesleyan, Northeastern Illinois, and Chi- 
cago State took the Bearcats' measure. 



fPT^ 




1978 Cheerleaders. 



Two Hundred and Fom-SLx 



"=-^23e£S5^^1!S|M^aNDREE^^^232^SS^ 



Season Records 



Year 


Won 


Lost 


Coach 


1908-09 


50% 




B. E. Wiggins 


1909-10 


-50% 




B. E. Wiggins 


1910-11 


6 


1 


L. W. Smith (Mgr.) 


1911-12 


+50% 




Homer T. Osborne* 


1912-13 


7 


1 


Cyrus Gentry 


1913-14 


10 


4 


Cyrus Gently 


1914-15 


8 


2 


Cyrus Gentry 


1915-16 


■? 


■? 


Marvin W. Krueger 


1916-17 


? 


? 


L C. LeVan 


1917-18 


9 


? 


L C. LeVan 


1918-19 


11 


7 


C. N. Stokes 

{Fritz Friedli.Asst.) 


1919-20 


15 


5 


C. N. Stokes 


1920-21 


5 


4 


Frank Laurence 


1921-22 


6 


3 


On'ille A. Hall 


1922-23 


9 


4 


On'ille A. Hall 


1923-24 


10 


4 


E.A. "Lefty" Davis 


1924-25 


12 


3 


E.A. "Lefty" Davis 


1925-26 


10 


6 


Glen Filley 


1926-27 


7 


12 


Glen Filley 


1927-28 


9 


7 


Glen Filley 


1928-29 


9 


8 


Glen Filley 


1929-30 


7 


11 


Glen Filley 


1930-31 


13 


7 


Arthur Doolen 


1931-32 


15 


13 


Arthur Doolen 


1932-33 


5 


11 


Arthur Doolen 


1933-34 


10 


9 


Paul Waldorf 


1934-35 


13 


10 


Robert Hartley 


1935-36 


10 


12 


Paid Waldorf 


1936-37 


8 


10 


B. E. Blanchard 


1937-38 


6 


11 


B. E. Blanchard 


1938-39 


11 


4 


Arthur Henderson 


1939-40 


5 


12 


Arthur Henderson 


1940-41 


5 


10 


Arthur Henderson 


1941-42 


8 


12 


Lewis Scholl 


1942-43 


1 


6 


Leon Church 


1943-44 


4 


7 


Leon Church 


1944-45 


2 


9 


Leon Church 


1945-46 


3 


6 


Leon Church 


1946-47 


6 


14 


Wesley Jonah 


1947-48 


8 


13 


Wesley Jonah 


1948-49 


8 


12 


Bill Mauzy 


1949-50 


12 


7 


BUI Mauzy 


1950-51 


23 


5 


Hugh Redden 


1951-52 


21 


6 


Hugh Redden 


1952-53 


19 


8 


James Collie 


1953-54 


18 


9 


James Collie 


1954-55 


20 


9 


James Collie 


1955-56 


23 


7 


James Collie 



1956-57 


21 


9 


James Collie 


1957-58 


18 


11 


James Old field 


1958-59 


15 


10 


James Oldjield 


1959-60 


18 


9 


James Oldfield 


1960-61 


17 


6 


James Oldfield 


1961-62 


22 


6 


James Oldfield 


1962-63 


16 


11 


James Oldfield 


1963-64 


10 


10 


Lou Vesely 


1964-65 


14 


8 


Lou Vesely 


1965-66 


10 


13 


Lou Vesely 


1966-67 


13 


10 


Harry St at ham 


1967-68 


20 


7 


Harry Statham 


1968-69 


21 


6 


Harry Statham 


1969-70 


19 


6 


Harrt' Statham 


1970-71 


15 


12 


Harnt' Statham 


1971-72 


21 


7 


Horn' Statham 


1972-73 


23 


6 


Ham' Statham 


1973-74 


24 


8 


Harry Statham 


1974-75 


17 


9 


Harry Statham 


1975-76 


17 


9 


Harry Statham 


1976-77 


21 


5 


Harry Statham 


1977-78 


15 


// 


Ham' Statham 



^Hired but later resigned and then Cyrus Gentry. 



Bearcat Team Records 



Season total points 

Season per-game average 

Most wins in a season 

Single game most points 

Win vs loss percentage., modem 

all time 

Consecutive free throws a game . 
Most Games over 100 points 



1973-74 2837 

1970-71 92.07 

1973-74 24 

1950-31 125 

1 950-5 1..23-5/.821 
1912-13.... 7-1/.875 

1956-57 29 

1976-77 12 



Individual Records 
Four-year total points.. ..Gene Hoyt.... 1950-54 . 2408 

Career total Gene Hoyt 1949-54 2510 

Two-year total points.. .. Mike Vargo.... 1970-72. 1386 

Single season total points Mike Vargo.. 1970-71 .. 703 

Single season scoring avg...Mike Vargo.. 1970-71 . 26.03 
Single game total points. .Richard Herrin.. 1955-56 47 
Single game free throws.. Lloyd Castillo.. 1956-57. .18 
Consecutive free throws in a game 

Lloyd Ca.stillo... 1956-57 14 

Consecutive free throws made 

Lloyd Castillo ...1956-57 31 

Single season free throws made 

Lloyd Castillo...l956-57 244 

Single game combined points, 1973-74 240 

McKendree 121 - Mo. Baptist 119 



Two Hundred and ForTx-Seve 



MC KENDREE' 



Track 

Prior to 1 906 track was an intramural sport. When 
the first intercollegiate meet was held is debatable, but 
notations from the diary of W. A. Kelso, class of 1872, 
state that between 1 908- 1912 "all teams successful, es- 
pecially track which was undefeated in a dual meet." 
The 1913 McKendrean states that "track and field sports 
have always been the best class at McKendree. In the 
last three years .several meets have been held and never 
have we been defeated in a dual meet." The 1914 edi- 
tion credits McKendree with three dual meet victories 
and a fifth in the State meet. 

The first event record credited to an individual was 
in 1913 when William 'Bill' Beedle set a record of 10 
seconds fiat in the 100-yard dash. He also set a record 
in the running broad jump that year. Whitenberg (no 
listing) was the record setter in 1914, setting records in 
the high and low hurdles and the 220-yard dash. 

The Centennial McKendree College History states 
that in 1919 "the 'cinder men' were victorious in a dual 
meet, thus keeping the record intact of not losing a dual 
meet since 1916, when Washington University won. . . 
." It reports that in 1920 the track team was undefeated. 

In 1923, at the end of the track season, McKendree 
had her first single season four-letter man. Norris Sayre 
had won letters in football, basketball, baseball, and 
track. 

Ray Goode was the star of the 1924 season when 
he not only won the javelin event in the Little Nineteen 
(State) meet but also set a State and McKendree record 
with a toss of 187 feet, 3 inches. 

Records continued to be set and broken and by the 
centennial year the McKendree all-time track records 
were as follows: 



50-yard dash 


5.5 sec. 




Kolsea 


1927 


100-yard dash 


10 sec. 




Beedle 
Isom 


1913 
1925 


220-yard dash 


23 sec. 




Whitenberg 
Peterson 


1914 
1927 


220-yard low hurdles 


26.2 sec. 




Whitenberg 


1914 


120-yard high hurdles 


16 sec. 




Whitenberg 


1914 


440-yard dash 


53.1 sec. 




Da r row 


1925 


8H0-yard run 


2 min. 1.8 


sec 


Perkins 


1927 


One-mile run 


4 min. 35 .' 


iec. 


Rawlings 


1915 


Two-mile run 


10 min. 13 


sec 


. Rawlings 


1915 



Shot-put 


42 ft. 7-1/2 in. 


Cullen 


1925 


Discus 


126 ft. 9 in. 


Goode 


1925 


Javelin 


197 ji. 7 in. 


Goode 


1925 


Running high jump 


5 ft. 10-1/4 in. 


Isom 


1925 


Running broad jump 21ft. 9 in 


Beedle 


1913 


Pole vault 


12 ft. 3 in. 


Gould 


1926 


Half-mile relay 


1 min. 35.6 sec. 


Peterson 

Kolsea 

Darrow 








Isom 


1925 


1200-yard relay 


2 min. 20.5 sec. 


Await 

Haskin 

Martin 








Kolsea 


1928 


One-mile relay 


3 mitt 32 sec. 


Await 
Martin 
Baggott 
Peterson 


1927 



In late spring in 1928 Goode competed in the Na- 
tional Collegiate track meet in Chicago. Here he set a 
new McKendree record in the javelin with a throw of 
209 feet, 8 3/4 inches. This throw, good for fourth place, 
qualified him to enter the final Olympic tryouts at 
Harvard in July. Unfortunately, he didn't have one of 
his better days and didn't qualify, but McKendree had 
an Olympic contender. 

McKendree entered a cross-country team in the 
state meet in 1929 and finished fourth. During the sea- 
son, Harold Culver broke Whitenberg's 120-yard high 
hurdle record, and William Saunders tied Beedle's record 
in the 100-yard dash, and set a new record of 22.4 sec- 
onds in the 220-yard dash and a record of 52.9 in the 
440-yard dash. Culver also set a record of 25.8 seconds 
in the 220-yard low hurdles. And the McKendree mile 
relay team of Saunders, Bartlesmeyer, Perkins, and 
Tedor set a Bearcat record at 3 minutes, 31 seconds. 
McKendree took ninth place in the state meet; Culver 
had a second in the high hurdles and fourth in the low 
hurdles; Saunders took a fourth in the 220-yard dash. 

On April 24, 1930, the first night track meet was 
held at Hypes Field, and it was a rousing success with 
McKendree winning a quadrangular meet over S.I.N.U., 
Carbondale, Cape Girardeau Teachers, and Shurtleff. 

The Bearcats would also win triangular meets with 
Illinois College and Shurtleff; and with Springfield 
(Missouri) Teachers and Shurtleff. In the latter meet. 



Two Hundred and h'orty-Eiglu 




Hypes Field 220 yard straight away. 



freshman Steve Novotng took first place in the high 
jump, high hurdles, and discus, plus a second in the broad 
jump and a third in the shot-put. But that year 
McKendree lost dual meets to Washington University 
and SINU. In the Washington meet, McKendree's 
Beaney Meyer, always a team competitor with Saunders 
in the sprints, won the 100-yard dash in 09.7 seconds, 
just one tenth of a second off the world record. How- 
ever, there was a helping wind, so Meyer couldn't claim 
a McKendree record. But the 880 yard relay team of 
Saunders, Tedor, Todd, and Meyer set a new McKendree 
record at 1 minute, 35 seconds. 

Saunders took a fourth in the 220-yard dash at the 
1931 State meet. That year's team won at least one tri- 
angular meet but lost a quadrangular, won by SINU. In 
the triangular meet Saunders tied his own McKendree 
record of 22.4 in the 220-yard dash while winning the 
event. 

In the 1932 season opener, a 681/2 - 621/2 loss to 
Eastern Illinois State, Saunders again tied the 
McKendree record of 10 seconds in the 100-yard dash, 
and Howard Stansell, a freshman, set a McKendree 
record in the broad jump. 

Coach Doolen took five men to the Kansas Re- 
lays that season, but the complete record of their efforts 
is missing. However, Stansell broke his own McKendree 
record in the broad jump with a leap of 22 feet, 6 7/8 
inches, finishing fourth behind Oklahoma, Illinois, and 
Indiana. Later in the season in a dual meet against Wash- 
ington he moved the record to 23 feet, 2 inches. 



In the Little Nineteen (State) meet Frank Gruchalla 
took second place in the shot-put with a heave of 41 
feet, 6 inches. Big Frank was high-point man for the 
season with 57 points and Saunders was second with 
56. 

In 1933 Gruchalla was the only McKendree entry 
in the Little Nineteen Indoor Meet at North Central Col- 
lege and took first place in the shot-put with a put of 40 
feet, 6 inches. And in the first Concordia Turner's an- 
nual track meet in the St. Louis Coliseum, Almus 
Caruthers took the honors in the mile in 4 minutes, 45 
seconds, beating two former Missouri University stars 
in the process. Gruchalla took a fourth with a less than 
par heave of 39 feet, 5 inches. 

"Woody" Fulkerson placed third in the 60-yard 
dash at the 1934 State Indoor Meet. An Illinois College 
sprinter. Baker, won the event in 6.1 seconds, tying the 
world record. Caruthers ran fourth in the mile. During 
the season, Gruchalla set a new McKendree record of 
43 feet, 3 inches in the shot-put. 

The freshmen won the 1935 class meet, scoring 
53 points. John P. Sampson, a sophomore and the 
Bearcats' premier 440 man, raked in 21 points while 
"Bill" Sanders, McKendree's top hurdler, claimed 
15 1/2 points for the juniors. Almus Caruthers took 
second and won a silver medal in the mile run at the St. 
Louis Relays. 

In a quadrangular meet with SINU, Shurtleff, and 
Blackburn, the team finished third, trounced Blackburn 
in a dual meet, and met four additional teams in duals. 



Tho Hundred and Forty-Nine 




1934 Track Team. 



for which no records are available. In the meantime, Al 
Manwaring joined three others when he tied the 
McKendree record of 10 seconds in the 100-yard dash, 
and Caruthers set a new record in the mile run at 4 min- 
utes, 28 seconds. 

The 1936 cinder men got off to a fast start, win- 
ning dual meets with Blackburn, Concordia Seminary, 
Shurtleff, and Principia. In the Shurtleff meet, Paul 
Sampson entered six events and gathered in 22 points. 
He and Sanders were the leading point getters for the 
season. 

Three dual meets were entered in 1937, and the 
Bearcats were victorious over Concordia of St. Louis, 
but lost close meets to Blackburn and Principia. How- 
ever, in the annual track and field quadrangular meet at 
Principia the Bearcats were winners. Jim Gruchalla, 
Strotheide, Bise, and Harmon all took firsts in their spe- 
cialties. 

The 1938 trackmen swamped Principia in a dual 
meet to open the season. Bise led in points with 2 firsts 
and a second. But in a home quadrangular meet with 
Principia, Blackburn and Shurtleff, McKendree came 
in fourth. Don Ward was McKendree's only first-place 
winner, taking firsts in the javelin and pole vault. The 
final quadrangular meet with Millikin University, 
Concordia, and Shurtleff was not recorded. 

Only five letters were given in track for the 1939 
season. Bob Langenwalter, Bearcat distance runner, led 
in team points for the year with 37. Charles Long was 
the team's other leading point winner. The team lost dual 
meets to Principia and Concordia and took third place 
in two triangular meets. 



John Harmon, Bob Allen, and Petty were the lead- 
ing point gainers for the 1 940 cinder men. The team 
was second in one triangular meet, third in another, and 
lost a dual meet to Millikin University. 

Incomplete records for the 1941 season show 
that second place was gained in a Principia quadran- 
gular meet and a victory over Blackburn in a dual 
meet. 

In 1942 "Tex" Anderson put on a one-man show 
while taking five firsts and one fourth in a triangular 
meet with Shurtleff and Harris Teachers College of St. 
Louis. He had 92 points for the season. Double dual 
meets were held with Shurtleff and Harris, results not 
recorded. 

World War II caused a break in track competition 
until 1947. At this time the all-time McKendree track 
and field records were as follows: 



50-\ard dash 



JOO-vard dash 



5.5 sec. 



10 sec. 



Kolsea 



1927 



220-yard dash 22.4. sec. 

120-yard high hurdles 15.6 sec. 
220-yard low hurdles 25. 8 sec. 
440-yard dash 52.9 sec. 

880-Yard run 2min.l.8 



Beedle 


1913 


Isom 


1925 


Saunders 1930 1932 


Manwaring 


1935 


Saunders 


1929 


Culver 


1928 


Culver 


1929 


Saunders 


1929 


Perkins 


1927 



Two Hundred and Fifty 



MC KENDREE 



Mile- run 


4 min. 28 sec. 


C a rut hers 


1935 


Two-mile run 


10 min. 13 sec. 


Rowlings 


1915 


Shot-put 


43 ft. 3 in. 


Gruchalla 


1934 


Discus 


128 ft. 8 in. 


Gruchalla 


1934 


Javelin 


209 ft. 8 3/4 in. 


Goode 


1928 


High jump 


5 ft. 11 3/4 in. 


Whiteside 


1933 


Broad jump 


23 ft. 2 in. 


Stansell 


1932 


Pole vault 


12 ft 3 in. 


Gould 


1926 


880-yard relay 


1 min. 35 sec. 


Saunders 

Tedor 

Todd 








Meyer 


1930 


1200-yard relay 


2 min. 20.5 sec. 


Await 

Haskin 

Martin 








Kolsea 


1928 


One-mile relay 


3 min. 31 sec. 


Tedor 

Saunders 

Bartlesmeyer 








Perkins 


1929 



Track didn't return to McKendree readily. Early 
in its 1947 season, aspirants cleaned up the Hypes Field 
track in an effort to get it ready for meets, even though 
there were none scheduled. But Coach Jonah assured 
the men that meets could be scheduled if there were 
enough interest shown. 

At least one dual meet was held, and in that one 
McKendree trounced Principia 85 to 45. Elvis 
Rosenberger was the star, taking firsts in the high and 
low hurdles, and in the high jump. In the process, he set 
a new McKendree record in the low hurdles with a time 
of 25.4 seconds. The old record had stood since 1929. 
There was also a triangular meet with Shurtleff and 
Principia scheduled, but there is no record of the out- 
come. 

The 1948 season could easily be called the Elvis 
Rosenberger year, for in a quadrangular meet with Scott 
Field, Harris Stowe, and Concordia, in which 
McKendree finished second behind Scott Field, 
Rosenberger broke Culver's high hurdle record of 15.6 
seconds set in 1928, with a 15-second performance. In 
a dual meet with Concordia he was meet high-point man 
with firsts in the high and low hurdles, and the high 



jump. His 24.7 performance in the low hurdles bested 
the record he had set in the triangular meet. Again he 
won three firsts in a five-school meet at Washington 
University's Francis Field with Washington, Principia, 
Shurtleff, and Concordia Seminary of St. Louis, in which 
McKendree finished third. In this meet he set a new 
Bearcat record of six feet in the high jump. John Crutcher 
was the only other McKendree first-place winner with 
a win in the pole vault. Then in the Shurtleff Relays, a 
six-school meet, Rosenberger took firsts in the two 
hurdle events and a second in the high jump. Again, 
Crutcher was McKendree's only other first-place win- 
ner, topping all others in the pole vault. 

In the 1949 season, dual meets were held with 
Harris, Shurtleff, and Principia, and a triangular meet 
with Principia and Shurtleff. The Bearcats were victori- 
ous in all. Then in the Rose Poly Relays in a field of 1 3, 
a sixth place finish was had, and in the Shurtleff Relays 
with a field of 11, McKendree was second to Lincoln 
University. Some of the others in the field were St. Louis 
University, Scott Field, Shurtleff, Rose Poly, Harris, 
Principia, and Greenville. During the season, Art 
Hartman broke Saunders' 1929 record in the 440-yard 
dash with a time of 5 1 .9 seconds. Rosenberger and Ed 
Schaefer, a transfer student from Millikin University, 
where he had set school records in the high and low 
hurdles, were the leading scorers for the season. 

In 1950 the Bearcats won four dual meets, a trian- 
gular meet, came in second in a field of 11 in the Shurtleff 
Relays, and sent five representatives to the Rose Poly 
Relays and two to the Elmhurst Relays, a meet includ- 
ing only top performers in the state. In the latter, Ed 
Schaefer took a first in the 120-yard high hurdles, and 
in finishing .second in the 220-yard low hurdles estab- 
lished a new McKendree record at 24 seconds. Cloyce 
Bums, the other McKendree representative, had a third 
in the discus. McKendree finished seventh in a three- 
way tie with Millikin and Chicago universities. 

In the Rose Poly Relays, Schaefer won the low 
hurdles, while Rosenberger finished fourth. Schaefer, 
Rosenberger, and Jim Burnett took a first in the shuttle 
hurdle event. Bums was second in the discus. During 
the season he established a new McKendree record of 
132 feet, 2 inches in that specialty. 

The season had seen a duel between Rosenberger 
and Schaefer for not only scoring honors but in hurdle 
honors as well, with Schaefer getting the best of both. 
Schaefer won all the high hurdle races, with Rosenberger 
finishing second. In these, Schaefer set a new record of 
14.9 seconds against Millikin University. In the low 
hurdles, Schaefer won four firsts and Rosenberger one. 



Two Hundred and Fifty-On 



MC KENDRE E" 



The 1951 Bearcats won a dual meet with Harris 
Teachers, placed second in one triangular meet, tied for 
second in another, and took third in a St. Louis meet 
with Millikin, Principia, Harris, and Concordia. For the 
season, Charles Leckrone scored 45 3/4 points in the 
pole vault, broad jump, and high jump; Bill Lambeth 
had 45 1/8 points in the pole vault and dashes. Jim Red- 
den, Cloyce Bums, and Engel Grow were the other lead- 
ing point gainers. 

McKendree participated in six dual meets in 1952, 
winning all but one, and took an eighth place in the Rose 
Poly Relays. Another Schaefer (Robert) won all six of 
his dual mile run events and was also the team's 880- 
yard runner. And Cloyce Bums tied his own McKendree 
discus record at the Rose Poly Relays, while Ron Herrin 
tied the McKendree record of 10 seconds in the 100- 
yard dash, becoming the fourth Bearcat to tie Beedle's 
1913 Record. Charles Leckrone was the other consis- 
tent point winner, with his events being the pole vault, 
broad jump, and high jump. 

McKendree's 1 953 thinclads beat Greenville twice 
and Quincy once in dual meets, came in second in a 
triangular meet with Principia and Greenville, third in a 
meet with Principia and Harris, third in another with 
Scott Field and Harris, and third in the Prairie Confer- 
ence Meet at Rose Poly. Leckrone led the team in sea- 
son points with 79, gained in field events. Rich Herrin 
had 64 5/6 points in the 440-yard dash and high 
hurdles, followed by Don DuRall with 59 points and 
Jim Redden with 58 1/2. 

With baseball established as a spring major sport, 
track was reported as being participated in more on an 
individual basis than as a team in 1954, but no record 
was found on any participation. 

There was some track activity in 1955 as Coach 
Engel Grow took five men to a triangular meet at 
Rose Polytechnic. The five were Herman Edwards, 
Jack Creek, Dale Sonners, Larry Grove, and Richard 
Herrin. Rose Poly finished first, McKendree second, 
and Greenville third. The same five men then took 
part in the Prairie Conference Meet, also at Rose Poly, 
but no record was found of the outcome. Neither were 
any records found of the events in either meet. 

Coach Collie announced in the spring of 1 956 that 
if enough men reported for track, there would be dual 
meets scheduled with Greenville and Illinois College. 
As it was, two dual meets and four triangular meets were 
scheduled, but the number that actually came off is not 
recorded. It is reported that McKendree finished third 
in a triangular meet with Principia and Harris Teachers, 
with Rich Herrin taking first places in the low hurdles 



and broad jump, and a second in the high jump. Also a 
Harris Teachers Invitation Meet was reported, with 
Herrin scoring the only point for McKendree. Then, five 
men. Rich Herrin, Jerry Essington, John Creek, David 
Guthrie, and Charles Brown, attended the Rose Poly 
Relays. Eleven schools participated, and McKendree re- 
corded a seventh place finish with Herrin taking a third in 
the low hurdles, and the relay team of Herrin, Essington, 
and Creek finishing third in the shuttle high hurdles. 

After the 1956 season, if anyone participated in 
any track and field event it was on an individual basis. 
As one lad put it, "The railroads ain't makin' cinders 
anymore." 

Final McKendree Track and 
Field Records 

50-yard dash 5.5 sec. Kolsea 1927 

100-yard dash 10 sec. Beedle 1913 

Isom 1925 

Saunders 1930. 1932 
Manwaring 1935 

Ron Herrin 1952 

220-yard dash 22.4 sec. Saunders 1929 

440-yard dash 51.9 sec. Hartman 1949 

120-yard high hurdles 14.9 sec. Schaefer 1950 

220-yard low hurdles 24 sec. Schaefer 1950 

880-yard run 2 min. 1.8 sec. Perkins 1927 

Mile-run 4 min. 28 sec. Caruthers 1935 

Two-mile run 10 min. 13 sec. Rawlings 1915 

Shot-put 43 ft. 3 in. Gruchalla 1934 

Discus 132ft. 2 in. Burns 1950 

Javelin 209 ft. 8-3/4 in. Goode 1928 

High jump 6 ft. Rosenberger 1948 

Broad jump 23ft. 2 in. Stansell 1932 

Pole vault 12 ft. 3 in. Gould 1926 

880-yard relay 1 min. 35 sec. Saunders 
Todd 
Tedor 
Meyer 1930 



Two Hundred and Fifty-Tw, 



<:s:^s^c?^;^?^^^50^MC KENDREE 



1200-yard relay 2 miii. 20.5 sec. Await 
Haskin 
Martin 
Kolsea 1928 

One-mile relay 3 min. 31 sec. Tedor 

Saunders 
Bartlesmeyer 
Perkins 1929 



ciation of Colleges in 193 1 , whose officials didn't seem 
to favor such affairs when handled by a college. The 
Association took a poll of some 2000 high schools on 
interscholastics and found four out of five voted against 
them. Therefore, McKendree's was abandoned because 
of the desire as announced by Dr. Harmon, McKendree's 
president, "To keep in harmony with the views of the 
North Central Association of Colleges." McKendree's 
kitchen staff especially favored the shut-down, because 
they had to furnish meals for all the contestants and their 
mentors. 



The Interscholastic Meet 

Starting in 1916 some 30 or 40, sometimes more, 
high schools were invited to send students and essential 
teachers to a spring interscholastic day at the McKendree 
campus involving their track and field athletes and other 
talented students to participate in athletic events and 
intellectual contests. The athletic events included all 
track and field events and a tennis tournament, when 
courts on campus were adequate for the sport. These 
affairs were held during the day, and at night intellec- 
tual contests in music and expression, including girls' 
solo, boys' solo, girls' quartet, boys' quartet, and read- 
ing and oratory contests for both boys and girls were 
held in the chapel. 

After the evening contests, medals and/or ribbons 
were awarded to the first three-place finishers in the 
day's sporting events and to those in the intellectual 
contests as well. When medals were given, they followed 
the Olympic pattern of gold, silver, and bronze. The in- 
terscholastic day is reported to have "drawn big crowds 
not even equaled by homecoming. Greatest of its kind 
in the State, no other meet like it in the nation." 

The Centennial McKendree College History states, 
"It is doubtless a means of inspiring some to intenser 
efforts than they have ever made before in some worthy 
field of endeavor. It is a long and tiresome as well as 
interesting day. Probably one of the great values of it is 
that it promotes acquaintance and friendly rivalry among 
the various schools, as well as a slight introduction to 
McKendree College. Even a little whiff of college at- 
mosphere sometimes originates in the mind of a boy or 
girl a desire to some day become a college student and 
college graduate." It might be added that it was also a 
great experience for McKendree's students, for many 
of them were pressed into service to monitor or judge 
the events. 

The Interscholastic was held, except for 1918 be- 
cause of World War I, for the next 14 years. Then 
McKendree was accepted into the North Central Asso- 



Baseball 

According to a Mr. W. A. Kelso's diary, dated April 
1, 1867, and the Centennial McKendree College His- 
tory, the first baseball club, Mazeppa, was organized at 
McKendree on April 1, 1867, and the first game was 
played on Saturday, April 6, on a vacant lot in the east 
end of Lebanon. Mr. Kelso was from the McKendree 
class of 1872 and is generally given credit as the club's 
organizer. 

As noted in the intramural section of this chapter, 
other clubs were formed, inter-club play followed, and 
sometimes a club played an out-of-town team. But in 
1 868 the clubs were reorganized into one that was chris- 
tened "McKendree." It is recorded that one of 
McKendree's first victories came at the expense of the 
"Eclipse" of St. Louis, McKendree winning 79 to 34. 
Such high scores were not uncommon. In 1871 the Tren- 
ton Athletics defeated McKendree 61 to 45, largely due to 
the Remick brothers, who lived in Trenton and played on 
both teams, and who elected to play with the Athletics. 

The all-time high scoring game was probably one 
in which McKendree beat the Cariyle Sooners 110 to 
27. In this game McKendree's Cy Happy was put out 
three times while each other man scored three times for 
a total of 24 runs in one inning. It was stated that Kelso 
was the only man on either team who could catch a fly 
ball and hold it. 

One of the first recorded intercollegiate games was 
in 1901 with Shurtleff. Shurtleff was the victor 14 to 13. 
Baseball continued as a sport at McKendree until 1906, 
not financed by the college but by the merchants of Leba- 
non, since athletics were not recognized on campus. 

The 1913 McKendrean states. 

Baseball was confined to games among our 
own students until the spring of 1910 when a 
few games were played. The team was com- 



Two Hundred and Fifty-Three 



posed of L. Walters, Murdoch, R. Pfejfer, E. 
Sayre, Le Crone, C. Gentry, O. Walters, G. 
Gentry, and R. Sayre. 

A short schedule was played in 1911, but the 
season was unsuccessful. 

Baseball has not been a leading sport at 
McKendree, but the establishment of an Ath- 
letic Association through the efforts of 
"Dad" Smith put our finances on a firm ba- 
sis, and an effort is being made this year to 
get a start. In a year or two our base ball 
team may be counted on to win just as regu- 
larly as the basket ball five. 

The Centennial McKendree College History states 
that the 1918-19 veteran baseball team was undefeated, 
the 1919-20 team won the majority of their games, the 
1920-21 team won four and lost one, and the 1921-22 
team lost all except one, beating Shurtleff 4 to 3. Norris 
Sayre was one of the key players. He pitched or played 
shortstop and sometimes was behind the plate. 

The 1 922-23 team won two and lost two. No games 
were played in 1923-24 by direction of Dr. Cameron 
Harmon, college president, in order to concentrate on 
track. However, five games were played in 1924-25; of 
these one was a win, a 28 to 1 slaughter of Ewing Col- 
lege. On the loss side were games with Eden, Washing- 
ton University of St. Louis, Concordia Seminary, and 
Shurtleff. Only one victory out of seven was claimed in 
1925-26, and four out of 1 1 in 1926-27. 

The 1928 Centennial McKendree College History 
states. 

Since 1901 baseball has not been maintained 
continuously, but in most of the years there 
has been a team organized in the spring 
which has afforded excellent practice on the 
home field between the first and second 
teams, and usually a few intercollegiate 
games have been played, but it has not been 
a strong competitor of football in the inter- 
est it arouses. 

For the 1927-28 school year, 1 1 games were sched- 
uled and for the 1929 season 15 games, 10 of which 
were to be played in four states, but no record was found 
of season results. Following the 1929 season, baseball 
was dropped as an intercollegiate sport. Largely through 
the efforts of a student, Roy Jaeckel, who was a second 



baseman on the Belleville Stag Brewery semi-pro base- 
ball team, a varsity softball team was organized in 1937. 
Although not recognized as a lettered sport, the team 
was highly successful, losing only two games through 
1938. The sport continued with a very limited sched- 
ule into the World War II years. After graduating, 
Jaeckel signed with the St. Louis Cardinals and 
played four years of AAA baseball before entering the 
Navy in 1942. 

In the school year of 1953-54 a fall baseball pro- 
gram was installed by athletic director and coach, 
James D. Collie. The fall schedule, consisting of no more 
than six games, was mainly a warm-up for the spring 
season and would continue through the fall of 1962. 

The 1954 spring season produced a Prairie Con- 
ference championship and a 15 and 2 season overall. 
Burton Gedney was the leading hitter, ending with a 
.394 batting average, followed by Harold Royer with 
.393. Gedney also led in home runs with four. The team 
batted .296 for the season. Dale Cruse was the biggest 
thief on the team, stealing 1 bases. Jim Spickard, with 
1 1 wins and two losses, was the leading pitcher. Among 
his wins was a 27 - no-hitter rout of Eden Seminary in 
which he fanned 16. McKendree's home games were 
played either at O'Fallon or Trenton. 

A 10 and 8 season was recorded in 1955. Lloyd 
Castillo led the team in hitting with a .389 average. 
Behind him was Dale Cruse with .356. Jim Spickard 
and Amie Feldt each had four wins against one loss, 
and Charlie Waldo pitched a no-hitter while giving up 
no base-on-balls and striking out 1 2 in a 6 to win over 
Principia. The team batted .307 and ended the season as 
co-champions of the Prairie Conference. 

Linn Smith led the Bearcats in hitting with a .409 
average for the 1 956 spring season when the team won 
18 while losing only three. Jack Parker was next in 
hitting with a .392 average. Wayne King recorded 
five wins against no losses to lead the pitchers, while 
Arnie Feldt and Jim Spickard were each 3 and 0. 
Shutouts were administered to Concordia Seminary 
of St. Louis, Principia, and Concordia of Springfield, 
Illinois. Concordia of St. Louis, Greenville, and 
Harris Teachers accounted for the Bearcats' three 
losses. A .316 team batting average no doubt was a 
big factor in gaining another Prairie Conference cham- 
pionship. Larry Englebright pilfered 14 bases to set a 
Bearcat record. 

Another conference championship was won in 
1957 in a 16 and 8 season. Jack Parker was Bearcat 
batting champion with a .425 average. He was followed 
by Lloyd Castillo with a .355 average. Harold Royer 



Two Hundred and Fifn-Four 



MC KENDREE" 



ripped out eight homers, a Bearcat record, and Linn 
Smith contributed six. The ace of the pitching staff was 
Amie Feidt with six wins against only one loss, while 
Wayne King logged a 4 and 2 record. 

King had a perfect 8 and pitching record in 1 958 
when Coach Dale Cruse's Bearcats won 1 8 and lost only 
four. He fanned 16 in a 15 to win over Concordia of 
Springfield, Illinois. Ward laun was also perfect with a 
6 and record. "Woody" Derickson batted .460 and 
Jack Parker .434, while Dan Fizer stole more bases, 26, 
than any previous McKendree player. In the Prairie Con- 
ference the Bearcats were 1 and and again PCC cham- 
pions. For the season the team had a lusty .349 batting 
average. 

King and Ron Speiser had identical 7 and pitch- 
ing records in 1959. King's 1.66 earned run average 
paced the Bearcats in that department. He also had eight 
homers, tying Royer's 1957 total. The 24 won - 1 lost 
record was the best ever by a McKendree baseball team. 
Opponents hit Bearcat pitchers at a meager .194 aver- 
age, while McKendree batters racked up a .321 average 
against the opposition. Jack Parker led the parade with 
a .474 average. Dan Fizer's 34 stolen bases topped his 
record of 26 set the previous spring. The team's 24 vic- 
tories included five shutouts. These were over Rose Poly, 
Concordia Seminary, Concordia of Springfield, Menard 
'Pen', and Friends University of Wichita, Kansas. The 



lone loss was in the first of four with Friends. After that 
loss the Bearcats reeled off 21 straight. Wayne King 
ended his brilliant four-year pitching career with a 24 
and 2 spring record, while Jack Parker set a four-year 
batting mark of .43 1 for future Bearcat hitters to target. 
At the end of the season Parker signed a bonus contract 
with the Cleveland Indians. 

The 1960, 17 won - 6 lost season ended with the 
Bearcats as PCC champions for the seventh straight year. 
A 3 to 2 win over Illinois State Normal in the opening 
game of the season extended McKendree's Spring win- 
ning streak to 22 straight; counting five games in the 
previous fall, it was 27. However, an 8 to 3 loss in the 
second game of the doubleheader opener stopped the 
streak. Other losses were single games to Washington 
University, Illinois College, Rose Poly, and two more 
to Illinois State. All of these teams except Washington 
University were single game losers to the Bearcats and 
a solid 7 to 4 victory was also posted over Southeast 
Missouri State. Lee Schulte led in Bearcat hitting with 
a .41 3 average, followed by "Woody" Derickson's .390. 
Schulte also had four home runs and seven triples. 
Derickson also had four home runs. Warren Ittner led 
the hurlers with a 7 and 3 record, and Gerald Brooks 
had five wins against three losses. Bob Kubach was 3 
and with a team leading 2.21 earned run against aver- 
age. 




* ^ If ir»» 



[ 









W^~:^ 



Men 's Baseball - 1959 Spring- record 24 and 1. 



i978j 



Two Hundred and Fifty-Five 



MC KENDREE 



In the Bearcat's 19 and 4, 1961 season, Leonard 
Clendenin was the leading hurler and recorded eight 
wins against one defeat while holding opposing hitters 
to a remarkable 0.94 earned run average. In a 1 to 
victory over Principia, he turned in a no-hitter while 
striking out 14. McKendree batters had only two hits 
against the Principia hurler, but his teammates' two er- 
rors coupled with two Bearcat steals in the same inning 
were his undoing. Allen Clendenin was the team's sec- 
ond most productive hurler with five wins against one 
loss. Both Clendenin and Warren Barty, who led the 
Bearcats in runs scored, signed professional contracts 
after the season. A third hurler, John Schieppe, estab- 
lished a Bearcat and PCC record by striking out 20 
Greenville College batters in a McKendree 8 to vic- 
tory. He gave up only one hit, a lead-off double to start 
the ninth inning. Warren Ittner finished the season with 
a top .369 batting average. Bill Roberts came in with a 
.341 average and stole 17 bases. Ittner also had five hom- 
ers, second to Dennis Sexton's seven. An 8 - PCC 
record gave the Bearcats their eighth consecutive con- 
ference title. 

Coach Cruse's baseballers continued their PCC 
dominance with another perfect 8 and conference 
record in the 1962 season. The overall record was 13 
wins and five losses. Pitcher John Schieppe struck out 
16 Rose Poly batters while pitching a no-hitter in a 15 
to win. He was perfect for the season with a 9 and 
record. His earned run average was 2.02. In a 16 to 2 
win over Illinois College, he aided his own cause with a 
grand-slam homer. Bearcat leading hitters were Ray 
Hassett, .333, and Denny Symer, .308. 

McKendree ended her stay in the Prairie Confer- 
ence with another 8 and conference record and 10th 
consecutive title - one was a tie - but the 1 and 9 over- 
all 1963 record was short of Bearcat standards. Denny 
Symer at 3 and 2, Bill Hellmer at 2 and 0, and Ben Rezba 
at 2 and 1 were the Bearcats' leading pitchers. Sy Korte 
led the hitters with a .373 average, followed by Mike 
Kessler at .343. 

Coach Lou Vesely was at the helm in 1964, and 
McKendree's record as an independent was six wins 
and 1 1 losses. Southeast Missouri State, Memphis State, 
Washington University, and Westminister College were 
responsible for most of the losses. Oakland City Col- 
lege, Harris Teachers, Menard, and Concordia were 
some of the losers to the Bearcats. Gary Heame led the 
team in batting, .327, and in home runs with six. Pitch- 
ing records were not available. 

The first eight games of the 1965 season were 
rained out, but there was enough sunshine later for Coach 



John Schieppe's team to log five wins and eight losses. 
Dave Stalker had four of the wins against three in the 
loss column and was the leading pitcher. Also, as the 
team's strikeout leader he had 36 in two games, 18 in a 
7 to 4 win over Harris Teachers and 18 in a 7 to 6 win 
over University of Missouri, Rolla. 

No statistics were located on the 1966 team, ex- 
cept that Coach Schieppe's Bearcats had a 5 win - 8 
loss season. 

Coach Harry Statham, a former Bearcat infielder, 
tutored the Bearcats to a 14 and 8, 1967 season. Jim 
Mueller, Wendell Johnson, and Howard Thomas re- 
ceived honorable mention on the NAIA Ail-American 
small college team. Johnson was the only returning 
mound veteran and was McKendree's top pitcher. The 
Bearcats really flexed their muscles in a 14 to 8 win 
over Harris Teachers when Jim Mueller, Dennis Korte, 
Howard Thomas, Jim Nail, and Dennis Swick all hit 
home runs. 

As of May 14, the 1968 Bearcats had a record of 
16 and 5. Jerry Boner was the leading hitter with a .367 
average, followed by Dennis Korte with .363. Terry 
Musso was 6 and on the mound with a 0.36 earned 
run average. Wendell Johnson had five wins against three 
defeats and a 2.94 ERA. 

Coach Dave Duller was Bearcat coach for the 1 969 
season and his Bearcats ended the season with 9 wins 
and 12 losses. Dennis Korte, Terry Etling, Mike 
Fenton, and Howard Thomas were the leading hit- 
ters. Nick Posomato, Tony Russo, and John Mule were 
the pitchers. 

A 1 2 and 1 5 season was recorded in 1 970. Den- 
nis Korte led the hitters, and John Mule, pitcher/out- 
fielder, led the pitchers with a 3 - 1 record and a 2.2 
earned run average. Bill Biggerstaff was 3 - 3 with a 
2.30 ERA. 

The 1971 team had difficulty finding the win col- 
umn and lost the first 16 games. Double losses were 
administered by Greenville, SIU Edwardsville, St. 
Louis University, Washington University, Harris 
Teachers, University of Missouri at Rolla, Eastern 
University, and University of Missouri at St. Louis. 
The win column was found in a double-header victory 
over Concordia. A 5 and 19 mark was recorded for the 
season. 

Van Smith coached the 1972 Bearcats to a 6 and 
1 8 season. Lettermen back from 1 97 1 were Mike Vargo, 
Bill Biggerstaff, Dave Markwell, Dan Johnson, Dale 
Calvert, John Mule, and Abner Norman. A highlight 
of the season was Jim Bone's 4 to no-hit win over 
Harris Teachers. 



Two Hundred and Fifty-Si. 



<^z^^:z->^<^;^^^^SX3^Mc KENDREE" 





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1967 Baseball Team. 



The 1973 Bearcats improved to 12 and 12. In- 
cluded in the win column were double victories over St. 
Louis University and Washington University. There were 
double losses to Eastern Illinois, SIU Edwardsville, SIU 
Carbondale, and University of Missouri, St. Louis. 

No game or individual statistics were located on 
the 1974 team except that 10 wins were gained against 
17 losses. 

McKendree was in top form for the 1975 season 
and registered 23 victories with only eight losses. Don 
Barton, Mike Harr, Mark Schmidt, and Dave Wamecke 
were the leading pitchers. Gary Mauser was batting .398 
with six home runs, Tim Johnson .316 with eight home 
runs, and Greg Jones .368 with four triples through 24 
games. 

Mauser was again the top hitter in 1976, hitting 
over .360, and Tom Weber hit over .340. Greg Jones 
finished his four-year career as the starting catcher. 
Wamecke led the pitchers with a 1.93 ERA while win- 



ning three and losing three. For the season McKendree 
had 11 wins and 15 losers. 

The Bearcats didn't break even again in 1 977, win- 
ning 12 of 26 games. But Mauser had another banner 
year, hitting .351 with nine home runs. He also led in 
hits, walks, and runs batted in. Mark Schmidt started 
nine games in the pitching box and logged five wins 
and five losses. Dave Wamecke, Don Barton, and Ken 
Meddows were the other pitchers. 

Coach Van Smith's men came up with 20 wins for 
the 1978 season, and 10 games were in the loss column. 
Quincy College, Greenville College, St. Louis Univer- 
sity, Washington University, Maryville, and Principia 
all lost to the Bearcats. But Missouri Baptist, Univer- 
sity of Missouri, St. Louis, and Belmont College were 
some of the winners. No individual statistics were un- 
covered. At the end of the season, pitcher Dave 
Wamecke was drafted by the Cleveland Indians and later 
assigned to their Class A Farm Club in Waterloo, Iowa. 



Two Hundred and Fifty-Seven 



MC KENDREE" 



Yearly Records 

Year Win Loss Coach 

1 9 1 0-20 No won-lost records of games during this period. 

1921 4 1 Frank Laurence 

1922 1 ? OrvilleHall 

1923 2 2 OrvilleHall 

1924 No baseball 

1925 1 4 E.A.Davis 

1926 1 6 GlenFilley 

1927 4 7 GlenFilley 

1928 ? ? GlenFilley 

1929 ? ? GlenFilley 
1930-53 No baseball 

1954 15 2 James Collie 

1955 10 8 James Collie 

1956 18 3 James Collie 

1957 16 8 James Collie 

1958 18 4 Dale Cruse 

1959 24 1 Dale Cruse 

1960 17 6 Dale Cruse 

1961 19 4 Dale Cruse 

1962 13 5 Dale Cruse 

1963 10 9 Dale Cruse 

1964 6 11 LouVesely 

1965 5 8 JohnSchieppe 

1966 5 8 JohnSchieppe 

1967 14 8 Harry Statham 

1968 16* 5* Harry Statham 

1969 9 12 DaveDutler 

1970 12 15 DaveDutler 

1971 5 19 DaveDutler 

1972 6 18 Van Smith 

1973 12 12 Van Smith 

1974 10 17 Van Smith 

1975 23 8 Van Smith 

1976 11 15 Van Smith 

1977 12 14 Van Smith 

1978 20 10 Van Smith 
* Incomplete 



Individual Records* 

Batting average Jack Parker 474 1959 

Batting average, 4 yrs Jack Parker 431 1956-59 



Most hits 



Jack Parker 38 1959 

Lee Schulte 38 1960 



Home runs Gary Mauser 9 1977 

(with 7 games to be played) Tim Johnson 8 1975 



3-base hits 
2-base hits 
Runs batted in 



Lee Schulte 7 1960 

Jack Parker 13 1959 

DanFizer 38 1959 



Runs Lee Schulte 35 1960 

(through 24 games) Gary Mauser 32 1975 



Base on balls 
Sacrifices 



Stolen bases 



Linn Smith 23 1956 

Lloyd Castillo 6 1956 

Lee Schulte 6 1957 

Orval Kimmle 6 1960 

DanFizer 34 1959 



Pitchers 

Best ERA Terry Musso (6-0) 0.36 1968 

Leonard Clendenin (8-1) 0.94 1961 

Most wins in season Jim Spickard 1 1 1954 

Most career wins Wayne King 24 56-59 

Most consecutive wins Wayne King 15 58-59 

Undefeated season 

(6 or more games) JohnSchieppe 9-0 1962 

Wayne King 8-0 1958 

Wayne King 7-0 1959 

RonSpieser 7-0 1959 

Wardlaun 6-0 1958 



Bearcat Team Records* 

Team batting average 349 1958 

Most wins in a season 24 1959 

Win vs loss percentage 24-1 1959 

Consecutive wins 22 (27 counting fall) 1959-60 



Most strikeouts JohnSchieppe 20 1961 

No hitters 27-0 over Eden Jim Spickard 1954 

6-0 over Principia Charlie Waldo 1955 

1-0 over Principia Leonard Clendenin 1961 

1 5-0 over Rose Poly John Schieppe 1 962 

4-0 over Harris Jim Bone 1972 

* Spring season only. 

Unofficial, since some yearly statistics are missing. 



UQ28lf1EW.l978j 

Two Hundred and Fifu-Eighi 



MC KENDREE 



Soccer 

The cancellation of football following the 1950 
season left McKendree without a fall varsity sport. On 
campus this void was filled with the introduction of 
touch football as an intramural sport. Four teams were 
formed, each team to play the others three times. The 
fall varsity program was partially filled when a base- 
ball schedule of five or six games was started in 1953 
and continued through 1962. Then, McKendree was 
again without a major varsity fall program. 

With the arrival of Harry Statham as athletic di- 
rector in 1 966, soccer came to the forefront as a pos- 
sible fall varsity sport. The word went out for anyone 
interested in organizing a team to leave their name in 
the McKendree Review mailbox. Interest was such that 
intramural teams, the same number as touch football 
and basketball, were formed. 

In the fall of 1 97 1 , McKendree, with Howard Por- 
ter as faculty sponsor, entered intercollegiate play on a 
club basis. The first game was played at Forest Park 
against the University of Missouri, St. Louis, and was 
lost 13 to 1 . But McKendree had her first goal in inter- 
collegiate soccer. It was scored by Emanual Okon of 
Nigeria. Other foreign students on the team were David 
Hassenflug of Bermuda, Archibald Amarh of Ghana, 
Okon Uko of Sierra Leone, and Ken Suzuki of Japan. 
Four other games, all away, with Harris Teachers, Wash- 
ington University of St. Louis, Greenville College, and 
Lindenwood College were played and lost. But Jerry 
Robler, Mike Collins, and Mike Przybyl each had the 
thrill of scoring a goal. The team had no uniforms, and 
all games were played in sweat suits. 



Interest increased, and the following year with Por- 
ter as coach, and the team in new uniforms, intercolle- 
giate varsity soccer was played on a home and away 
basis. In the first game of the season, played at 
Lindenwood College, the Bearcats suffered a 3 to 2 loss, 
but Jim Williams and Larry Schupback teamed to score 
McKendree's first goal in varsity soccer. At Hypes Field, 
Tim Triggs scored the Bearcats' first goal before the 
home fans in a 9 to 1 loss to Washington University. 
McKendree's first victory came later in the season and 
was a 3 to 2 squeezer over Lindenwood with Fred Brauer 
scoring the winning goal. It was the team's only vic- 
tory while losing seven, but intercollegiate soccer was 
underway. Doug Rose was the number one goalie and 
was voted the teams' most valuable player 

Coach Porter's 1973 Bearcats showed marked im- 
provement in a 4 - 1 - 1 season. In a 2 to win over 
Westminster College, the team had its first shutout, and 
goals against were lowered from 5.4 per game to 1 .6. A 
record seven goals were scored against Lindenwood Col- 
lege, and 21 were scored for the season. Chris Carstetter 
led the team in points with six goals and three assists. 
Jim McKall had seven goals and one assist for eight 
points. Doug Rose was goal tender and Bill James in 
his sweeper fullback position was recognized as the team 
leader 

By their third season, McKendree's Bearcats were 
more than holding their own in soccer. They posted 
double wins over Lindenwood and Mary ville, and single 
victories over Westminster, Greenville, and Central 
Methodist. A I to 1 tie was registered with Parks Col- 
lege, but losses were administered by Principia, Wash- 




WW* 



1973 Men 's Soccer. 



Two Hundred and Fifry-Nine 



ington University, and Harris Teachers. Doug Rose 
earned another letter in goal while Fred Brauer, Brad 
Flinders, Bob Blackwell. and John Potthast also earned 
their third "M'"s. 

Improvement continued and Coach Porter's 1975 
team posted a best-ever record often wins, three losses, 
and one tie. First time Bearcat victims were Parks Col- 
lege, Harris Teachers, and Illinois State University. Two 
of the losses, Washington University and Columbia Col- 
lege, were 1 to affairs, while Lewis University pinned 
a 4 to loss on the Bearcats. McKendree, ranked third 
behind Quincy College and Lewis University in NAIA 
District 20, scored 37 goals while holding the opposi- 
tion to 1 7 and was undefeated in her last six games with 
four shutouts. Norm Seim was the leading scorer with 
seven goals and five assists, followed by Kent Burroughs 
with five goals and four assists, and Charlie Brown with 
five goals and two assists. Tom Clark and Joe Morgan 
were the goal tenders. 

A single game scoring record, a 14 to 2 win over 
Lindenwood College, was set in the 9 and 5, 1976 sea- 
son. Norm Seim had four goals. Bob Polka three, and 
Messiah Kolokolo three, in the rout. Shutouts were reg- 
istered over Principia, Parks, Lewis, Greenville, and 
Evansville. A 3 to 1 win was recorded over newcomer 
Judson College, but newcomer Aurora College stuck a 
3 to 2 loss on the Bearcats. The team scored 36 goals 
and had 18 goals against. For the season. Norm Seim 
had nine goals and five assists, Messiah Kolokolo five 
goals and five assists, and Mike Woods three goals and 
five assists. Bearcat goalies again were Tom Clark 
and Joe Morgan. Seim was voted most valuable 
player by his teammates, Don Bosslet best offensive 
player, and Larry Beerman best defensive player. 
Keith Mess was chosen for defense on the NAIA 
District 20 second team. 

Coach Porter's 1977 team scored eight wins, five 
of which were shutouts while opponents registered six 
victories which included four shutouts. A 1 to 1 draw 
was played with Harris Teachers. No player statistics 
were found for the season. 

Yearly Records 

Year Win Loss Tie Coach 

1972 1 7 Porter 

1973 4 4 1 Porter 

1974 7 3 1 Porter 

1975 10 3 1 Porter 

1976 9 5 Porter 

1977 9 6 Porter 



Golf 

A 1939 McKendree Review states that golf was 
added as an intramural sport and that a tournament was 
held to pick a winner, but there is no record of a winner. 
It is recorded as an intramural sport through 1941 ; then, 
presumably, it was dropped. 

Golf instructions were organized in the spring of 
1951 by the physical education department and given 
by Mrs. Johnnie Dee Denton of Lebanon. Whether the 
sport had McKendree players after that is not recorded 
until 1955. During that spring, golf was added as a sport 
and was coached by Wayne Artis. The Bearcats were 
represented by Dick Lotz in the Prairie Conference meet, 
and he was the event's top golfer. The following spring 
McKendree was victorious over Greenville, and Lotz 
was the PCC player of the year. He later qualified for 
the Carling Golf Open, where he shot an 80. Other team 
members were Rich Herrin and Roger Jensen. 

Lotz was again the Prairie Conference's top golfer 
in 1957. 

In 1960, with Dale Cruse as coach, McKendree 
for the first time had a full team to represent her in con- 
ference play. Then in 1 96 1 , with three. Bill Roberts, Bob 
Johnson, and Carl Behrens, of five lettermen returning, 
a victory was posted over Greenville. The team came in 
third in a quadrangular meet, and third in a field of five 
in the conference meet. 

In 1962 13 matches were played, with McKendree 
victorious in six. In the conference meet, the Bearcats 
finished third behind Principia and Illinois College. 
Team members were "Buddie" Johnson, Ron Bodtke, 
Bob Reed, Dave Rawlings, Bob Johnson, and Rich- 
ard Neal. 

Yearly matches were continued, and in 1965 
McKendree had three victories against three losses. Bill 
Hayes shot a 73 in a win over Washington University, 
and Riley Bill Blue had a 69 in a victory over Illinois 
College. 

Coach John Schieppe's 1966 team won five 
matches while losing only three. Team members were 
Louis Capazzoli, Bill Hayes, Dick Hayes, Riley Blue, 
Earl Thomas, Kay Eldridge, and Bill Holt. 

With only Dick Hayes and Holt as returning 
lettermen in 1967, McKendree was and 6. 

Four meets were scheduled in 1968, but results 
were not found. Paul Funkhouser, Steve McFall, and 
Dan Strobo were noted as team members. 

No record of golf played was located for 1969 
and 1970, but a McKendree Review notes that two 
lettermen, Ed Belva and Jack Weber, were available 
for the 1971 season. It is also noted that Bernice 




Tito Hundred and Si. 



<:s::^^C5;^'^^?^^^^S^MC KENDREE 




7972 Golf team. 



Stambaugh, Weber, and Jim Bunge won matches, but 
the team had no wins. 

Reverend Louis Youngs, pastor of Lebanon Meth- 
odist Church, volunteered as coach for the 1972 sea- 
son. Home matches for the first time were played on 
the new 18-hole Locust Hills course. Team members 
included four-year letterman, Jack Weber; three-year 
letterman, Ed Belva; two-year letterman, Jim Bunge; 
and letterwoman Bemice Stambaugh. 

Coach Thomas Wheeler's team was 2 - 5 - 1 in 
1973, and in 1974 McKendree was 6 and 2, and played 
in the NAIA tournament in Chicago. The Bearcats also 
played in the SLACCA tournament in St. Louis, but no 
record was found of team results. During the season 
McKendree had wins over Blackburn (2), Greenville 
(2), Washington University at home, and Illinois Col- 
lege. The losses were to SIU, Edwardsville, and Wash- 
ington away. 

Rich Vandergraft was Bearcat coach in 1975, and 
his team registered two victories against six defeats. 

Again the Bearcats were 2 and 6 in 1 976 and then 
1 and 5 in 1977 with Jerry Evans as coach. Neil Baker 
was the team's top golfer in 1977 with a match average 
of 78 strokes. 



Multi-letter winners in golf who graduated after 
1 973 and through 1 977 were Tim Boehne, Kevin Shinn, 
Phil Sauders, Jim Bunge, Jim Watt, Rodney McGrew, 
Mike Krause, Tom Wolfslau, and Don Burris. 



Tennis 

According to the Centennial McKendree College 
History, the first tennis matches played to determine a 
championship were in 1897. Two Edwardsville, Illi- 
nois, young men who claimed to be champions of South- 
em Illinois were challenged by two McKendree students, 
Samuel J. Clucas and Walter H. Blanck. The first match 
was played at Edwardsville and won by McKendree. 
The second at McKendree was won by the Edwardsville 
men. The rubber match played at Edwardsville was won 
by the McKendree pair; thus they claimed the champi- 
onship of Southern Illinois. They played all comers and 
retained the title for several years, suffering only one 
defeat. 

In 1901 a tennis club was organized on campus 
with a membership of 14; the object, to promote inter- 
est in the game by McKendree students and citizens of 



Tiio Hundred and Sixn-One 



MC KENDREE 



Lebanon. A tournament was arranged for the week of 
commencement. Upon completion of play, loving cups 
were awarded at court-side by McKendree President Dr 
Chamberlin to the singles and doubles champions. E. W. 
Donoho was the singles winner, and the doubles cham- 
pions were Donoho and J. P. Edwards. 

Membership in the tennis club grew, and in 1904 
there were 30 members. Donoho and A. W. Morriss, Jr., 
were crowned champions in the spring of 1903 and rep- 
resented the college that year and the following year. 
However, in 1905, when the college board ordered that 
something more aesthetic (presumably grass) replace 
the courts on the front campus, there was no place to 
play. 

It wasn't until 1911, when new courts were built 
behind the men's dormitory, that tennis returned to the 
campus. There were no records found of tournaments 
being held for a number of years, but it is recorded that 
"the students engage in tennis very freely as a means of 
wholesome exercise and pleasant pastime." It is also 
recorded that after McKendree joined the Illinois In- 
tercollegiate Athletic Association (II AA) in 1 9 1 3, her 
tennis teams began participating in State meets, and 
a 1922 McKendree Review states that Norris Sayre was 
the YMCA's tennis champion for the third successive 
year. 

But McKendree emerged as a power during the 
1924-25 school year when James Newcom and Allen 
(no listing) became Little Nineteen champions in State 
doubles. The following year Allen took third in the State 
singles and he and Ronald Mowe took third in the 
doubles. In 1926-27 Mowe and Hardy were the only 
lettermen. The next year there were four lettermen, and 
the team of Hardy, Mowe, Klein, and Baggott were un- 
defeated during the season with eight straight victories. 
Klein took third in the State tournament. 

In 1928-29 a brothers' doubles team, Virgil and 
Leon Church, emerged and took second in the Little 
Nineteen State meet, beating North Central and 
Carthage, but losing to SINU, Carbondale. For four 
years they would dominate McKendree tennis and be 
joined over the years by lettermen Edward Woo, Jess 
Nichols, Jack Pfeffer, Dan Hertenstein, Hadfield, H. 
Lewis, and Gordon Beers. 

But McKendree's victories would decline after the 
departure of the Church brothers. A sportswriter wrote 
sarcastically in a 1933-34 McKendree Review, "The 
McKendree tennis team scored a moral victory last 
Thursday when the Purple netters, enroute to Jackson- 
ville to meet the Illinois College Blue Boys, were 
smashed by a truck, causing the local netmen to stop in 



Alton for the afternoon and making it impossible for 
the Bears to lose their third scheduled match of the cur- 
rent racquet season." Old English "M"s were awarded 
Clifford Hertenstein, Forrest Clark, Gordon Beers, Don 
Lusk, and Elvin Harmon at the end of the season. 

The 1 934-35 season had a record turnout (28) for 
tennis, but the intercollegiate play fell to Beers, Lusk, 
Dick Suhrheinrich, and "Spike" Wilson, who had small 
successes in the win column. 

Men's tennis, with Captain Gus Krizek and Art 
Wehmeier as lettermen, would continue through 1937, 
then for lack of a suitable home court for competitive 
play, it was dropped as a regular intercollegiate sport. 
However, a victory over Parks College in 1940 is on 
record. 

The holding of intramural tennis tournaments dur- 
ing the 1940s is recorded, but it would be the fall of 
1 95 1 before competition with other schools began again. 
Playing on courts in O' Fallon, the Bearcats recorded a 
4 - 2 season. 

The tennis spirit waned again, then in 1954 a new 
court was built, and an intramural tournament was held 
in order to pick a team of four players. Only one match 
was played, and that due to a hurry-up call from the 
Centralia Junior College coach that his team needed 
some competition. The following year a McKendree 
Review notes that two new sports, tennis and golf, were 
added in the spring. 

In 1 956 nine matches were scheduled and the team 
finished second in the Prairie Conference, with Dave 
O'Neal taking second in singles in the conference tour- 
nament. 

Captain O'Neal and Ronald Hoercher returned as 
lettermen for the 1957 season and 13 matches were 
scheduled, with seven of these in the conference. The 
home courts weren't good enough to entertain matches, 
so home contests were played at Jones Park in East St. 
Louis. With home matches being played off campus 
and the team conducting much of their practices in the 
gymnasium, the tennis spirit was missing, but yearly 
matches were played. 

Then, in 1 964, new permanent campus courts were 
available, and the student newspaper noted that the "new 
courts" had created more interest in tennis. It also re- 
ported that Coach Schoon, who was head of the intra- 
mural program, was the tennis coach and that an exhi- 
bition by four local tennis players was given on Sun- 
day, October 18, 1964. Nine matches were scheduled 
for the following season, but results were not found. 

Tennis matches were held at least through 1968. 
Thereafter, tennis is noted only as an intramural sport. 



Two Hundred and SLxn-Two 



MC KENDREE 





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McKENDREE 
COLLEGE 

FOUNDED AT LEBANON IN 
1828. McKENDREE COLLEGE 

IS THE OLDEST COLLEGE 
IN AMERICA UNDER THE 

CONTINUOUS SUPERVISION 
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH. 
IT WAS NAMED FOR BISHOP 

WILLIAM McKENDREE. 
EDWARD AMES WAS THE FIRST 
PRINCIPAL. PETER AKERS THE 

FIRST PRESIDENT PRESENT 
BUILDINGS DATE FROM 1850. 



Two Hundred and SLxty-Fotir 



^ZSffM^KENDREE ff!!^T^ 



McKendree College 
1978-1996 

By Irwin Halfond, Ph. D. (Faculty) 



During the first year after McKendree's 150th an- 
niversary. Dr. Adoiph Unruh served as interim presi- 
dent. A national search was undertaken to find a new 
president, whose most pressing problem would be to 
eliminate a deficit of over $1 million in the operating 
budget. After the installation of Dr. Gerrit J. TenBrink 
as president in 1979, a primary dilemma was reducing 
the debt without also reducing the quality of education. 
Austerity measures, affecting most heavily the number 
of administrative staff and their operating budgets, pro- 
duced a balanced budget in 1980, and continual bal- 
anced budgets thereafter. The institutional endowment 
of $1 million rose to over $6 million by the 1990s, 
producing greater financial health, but the endow- 
ment remained low for an institution as old as 
McKendree College. 

To a considerable extent, dependence on tuition 
revenues caused a new thrust during the 1980s towards 
opening additional off-campus sites in the Metro-East 
area and in Kentucky. McKendree programs also ex- 
panded onto community college campuses all over 
Southern Illinois. By the 1990s new classroom/office 
buildings were in operation in Radcliff and Louisville, 
Kentucky. An associate of science in business degree at 
the Kentucky centers increased attendance there. In ad- 
dition, the college opened the McKinley Educational 
Center in a former bank building in downtown 
Belleville. A freshman program was even created as far 
away as Tokyo, Japan. The off-campus sites primarily 
served business and nursing students. McKendree also 
attempted cooperative graduate programs leading to a 
masters in education (with Washington University) and 
a masters of divinity (with several seminaries), but these 
ventures proved impermanent. On the Lebanon cam- 
pus, the business and nursing areas, coupled with a new 



computer major and an expanded education program, 
helped attract an ever increasing number of students. 
English language programs, which served students from 
Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, and Japan, added an interna- 
tional dimension to McKendree. 

The combination of tighter fiscal management, 
more attractive academic and student life programs, and 
the dramatic demographic expansion of the Metro-East 
area, burned away the clouds of financial gloom that 
hung over the campus in the late 1970s. Furthermore, 
McKendree College continually improved its academic 
standards. A Presidential Scholarship competition helped 
attract better quality students, as did the institution of 
an Honors Program and the addition of honor societies 




Dr. Adoiph Unruh. Interim President 1978-1979. 



Two Hundred and Sixn-Five 



MC KENDREE" 



in several disciplines. The institution of national searches 
for all tenure-track faculty openings helped attract first- 
rate faculty to the campus. Institutional growth after 
1979 was thus both quantitative and qualitative. 
McKendree College earned two 1 0-year renewals of its 
North Central accreditation, continued state re-accredi- 
tation of its teacher education program, and won Na- 
tional League of Nursing accreditation for its nursing 
program. 

A rosier financial picture also meant steady in- 
creases in faculty/staff salaries and benefits. By 1994 
faculty salaries drew closer, in some categories, to the 
national average for comparable four-year colleges. In 
addition, a faculty sabbatical program was initiated, 
along with a more dynamic program of faculty devel- 
opment. Similarly, McKendree was better able to serve 
student extra-curricular and co-curricular needs by in- 
stituting a Learning Center, a Career Development and 
Placement Program, and an annual Fine Arts Series. 
Also, the drama program, an effective student newspa- 
per, and a literary magazine were re-established. 

TheTenBrink administration did much to enhance 
the physical facilities of the Lebanon Campus. In Clark 
Hall, the Methodist Fellheimer Trust funded the addi- 
tion of eight classrooms on the second floor, which was 




designated as the Travelstead Academic Center. A stu- 
dent lounge and offices were also created on the first 
floor, and a computer center was established on the lower 
level. The old Science Building was extensively reno- 
vated with funds from a gift from Alexander Wildy and 
turned into an administrative center named Wildy Hall. 
Old Main and Carnegie Hall were also renovated to add 
classrooms, offices, and a faculty lounge. Pearsons Hall 
was redecorated and the ground-level bookstore was ex- 
panded. Most buildings on campus were upgraded and 
many had air conditioning systems added. Computer 
terminals were added to most faculty offices and dorm 
rooms, and Holman Library was linked to a statewide 
computerized library network. In addition, construction 
of suites expanded student housing choices. Sports fa- 
cilities on campus were improved by the construction 
of a much needed larger gymnasium in the new Melvin 
Price Convocation Center. A four-unit tennis court, a 
Softball field, a baseball diamond, and a women's soc- 
cer field were also built. Extensive campus landscap- 
ing and additional outside lighting enhanced both the 
beauty and security of the campus. 

The expansion of McKendree's sports facilities 
mirrored the growing scope and reputation of Bearcat 
athletics. The 1980s saw the men's basketball team be- 
come a major National Association for Intercollegiate 
Athletics (NAIA) power in Illinois, consistently con- 
tending for the district title. The team won the district/ 
state championship and advanced to the national tour- 
nament in Kansas City three times during the TenBrink 
era. The 1987-88 team set a national scoring record. 
Coach Harry Statham, a 1 960 McKendree graduate, won 
his 600th game on February 10, 1994, becoming the 
winningest active coach in Illinois. The McKendree 
College soccer team developed into a nationally ranked 
contender during the 1980s, and the college baseball 
squad compiled an impressive winning record. The golf 
team went to the national tournament in 1982, and 
McKendree even developed a short-lived collegiate 
wrestling program. But the greatest athletic growth dur- 
ing the TenBrink presidency occurred in women's sports. 
The expansion of athletic scholarships, hiring of expe- 
rienced coaches, and upgrading of facilities led to the 
development of an outstanding women's sports program. 
The volleyball Bearcats won state championships in 
1982, 1983, and 1985, and the 1985 team finished the 
national tournament in fifth place. The softball squad 
was also frequently nationally ranked, and women's 
basketball saw several impressive seasons. In the early 
1990s, women's soccer was added to the list of 
McKendree College athletic teams. 



Tii'o Hundred and Si.xn-Six 




MC KENDREE 



Dr. James M. Dennis, selected as President in 1994. 

The emphasis on new programs, expansion, and 
growth during Gerrit TenBrink's presidency did not 
mean that McKendree forgot its past. A renewed em- 
phasis on McKendree's storied history led to the 
adoption of the motto: "Illinois' Oldest College." The 
college archives were reorganized, computerized, and 
moved to Bothwell Chapel. A new student 
McKendree History Society sponsored biannual 
Civil War reenactments in the 1990s to honor 
the 117th Illinois, "the McKendree Regiment." 
The Model United Nations Program, begun by 
the college in the mid-1970s, was continued and 
expanded until it hosted nearly 700 area high 
school students each semester in the 1990s. 

The expansion and development of the 
McKendree faculty was also built on a solid base. 
Like earlier periods, the TenBrink years saw the 
culmination of decades of service by a few addi- 
tional "McKendree Stalwarts." Three McKendree 
graduates, Emerial Owen ('51), Robert Brown 
('51), and Orville Schanz ('50), were recognized 
for over a century of combined service on the fac- 
ulty of the college. 

The TenBrink years saw McKendree Col- 
lege move from looming financial crisis to 



growth and expansion. The latter years of the admin- 
istration were fraught with problems of a different 
sort. But McKendree College entered the 1990s with 
a spirit of commitment to the college among all ele- 
ments of the campus constituency and addressed this 
crisis successfully as well. 

Gerrit TenBrink served the last year of his con- 
tract as chancellor and retired in 1994, making him the 
longest serving president in the college's history, with a 
tenure of 15 years. 

In June of 1994, Dr. James M. Dennis assumed 
the college presidency, catalyzing a dramatic expansion 
in student enrollment, but producing the concomitant 
need to expand classroom and dormitory facilities to 
accommodate expansion. The sports program also took 
a quantum leap forward with the introduction of teams 
in football, track, cross-country, tennis, and women's 
golf. Sports accomplishments in 1 995-96 are also note- 
worthy. The women's softball team took fourth place 
in the NAIA national tournament, the men's basketball 
team made it to the second round in the nationals, and 
the golf team exhibited success in its national tourna- 
ment performance. 

Only 168 years young, McKendree College is still 
vital and growing. Hundreds of well qualified students 
applied for admission for the 1996-97 academic year, 
and the college has become increasingly selective in its 
admissions policy. "The best kept secret in the Midwest" 
is a secret no longer. Aware of its past, and confident in 
the present, McKendree College is moving toward the 
challenges of the 21st century eager to fulfill its mis- 
sion in higher education. 




Melvin Price Convocation Center completed in I9SS. 




Two Hundred and ian-Sei 




7i.o Hundred and Si.m-Eighl 



<cs3-^c^^<^?^^^^1^^MC KENDREE" 



Appendix 

I. Trustees and Years Served 



Abbott, J.S. 


1930-33 


Carson, Leonard 


1923-52 


Goodman, George 


1924-39 


Ackerman, Walter E. 


1968-71 


Chapman, B. F. 


1949-56 


Gordley, William R 


1945-48 


Adair, Robert C. 


1948-57 


Classen, Alice 


1952-62 


Greene, Kenneth 


1958-60 


Akers, J. R. 


1930-36 


Coen, H. E. 


1958-60 


Griffith, Mayme 


1944-49 


Akers, Milbum R 


1947-70 


Comer, James 


1977- 


Grob, Constance 


1975-91 


Amberg, Richard 


1958-67 


Cousley, Paul 


1962-66 


Hahs, Billy G. 


1965-77 


Bailey, H. H. 


1925-40 


Crocker, Don 


1960-63 


Hall, C. C. 


1916-48 


Barnes, Harold 


1926-53 


Crouse, Eli 


1929-31 


Hall, J. O. 


1956-62 


Bamett, Vernie 


1963-69 


Cummins, Mrs. B. R. 


1970-73 


Hamill, C. R 


1921-57 


Barty, Warren 


1977-80 


Cummins, J. W. 


1927-29 


Hanbaum, W. L. 


1938-53 


Bauer, Glen 


1977-81 


Cummins, William L. 


1954-65 


Hand, George H. 


1959-72 


Baugh, Roy 


1959-68 


Daily, Charles L. 


1967-76 


Hanser, Harold 


1968-70 


Behymer, F. A. 


1936-51 


Davis, Mrs. Robert 


1961-65 


Hardin. V. S. 


1975-82 


Bennett, Herbert R. 


1947-49 


Deedle, George 


1950-56 


Hardy, D. M. 


1931-69 


Bennett, W. E. 


1931-46 


Deneen, Charles S. 


1900-40 


Hardy. Robert 


1974-77 


Bemreuter, Louis 


1922-36 


Dexheimer, Herbert 


1973-89 


Hardy, Vernal 


1949-53 


Berry, Roy 


1936-63 


Dickson, George E. 


1940-45 


Harmon, Cameron 


1936-47 


Blackstock, Ira 


1912-31 


Dorris, C. H. 


1932-40 


Harmon, Dale 


1963-70 


Bott, Edward S. 


1969-93 


Dorris, W. R. 


1925-32 


Harmon, John 


1945-47 


Brashares, C. W. * 


1952-62 


Dosier, Robert 


1976- 


Harris, Frank E. 


1936-60 


Britton, Ernest R. 


1958-83 


Dycus, Ernest M. 


1952-57 


Harris, St. Clair 


1947-56 


Brooks, E. B. 


1926-33 


Edwards, Mrs. Gilbert 


1966-69 


Hasler, Robert 


1951-60 


Brown, Anna 


1954-57 


Eidman, Arthur E. 


1932-47 


Heath, Vernon 


1966-70 


Brown, H. C. 


1938-53 


Farquhar, L. C. 


1951-54 


Hecker, H. E 


1925-52 


Brown, Paul B. 


1945-51 


Farthing, Paul 


1937-58 


Hemphill, Charles 


1932-37 


Brown, William M. 


1928-52 


Fox, Raybum 


1960-80 


Henderson, John 


1970-76 


Burkey, Wayne 


1954-55 


Funkhouser, Clyde 


1953-59 


Herrin, Homer 


1955-61 


Butler, Walter 


1977-78 




1964-67 


Hill, Mrs. Ralph 


1970-71 


Button, Robert 


1977-80 


Gedney, William B. 


1970-73 


Hodapp, Leroy* 


1976-84 


Cannady, Edward W. 


1970-75 


Godbold, Albea 


1958-67 


Hodson, Glenndon 


1951-59 


Carlton, Don 


1973-76 


Goldenberg, Max 


1968-75 


Hoffman, Edward 
-^fc^ — - 


1952-55 




fe|u928^itf| 


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Two Hundred and Sixty-Nine 



MC KENDREE 



Holmes, Mason 
Holt, B. J. 
Hurley, H. G. 

Hum, Luther 
James, Mrs. Darrell 
Jenkins, Farrell D. 
Jennings, Robert 
Jensen, Roger 
Johnston, R M. 
Johnston, Wayne 
Jossell, Leonard 
Kaisor, Allen 
Karandjeff, Ernest A. 
Kean, Roy N. 
Kelso, W. A. 
Kimmle, Jo Ellen 
Knapp, Arthur 
Koebel, Delmar 
Krause, Robert A. 

Kruse, Leroy E. 
Kugler, Morris 
Lacquement, Delbert S. 
Lamblin, Wendell D. 
Leckrone, Eugene 

Lewis, William 
Livingston, Park 
Loar, M. L. 
Loving, Harold 
Lowe, Cecil 
Lowe, Donald 

Lowery, Joseph 
Luttrell, Consuelo 
Magee, Ralph* 
Magill, L. A. 
Manwaring, Jack 
Markman, O. L. 
Marshall, James 
Martin, John C. 
Mautz, W. R 
McCann, Harold E. 
McClain, James E. 
McCormick, J. L. 
McCracken, Mrs. W. A. 
McKinley, L. Dean 



1970-72 

1970-75 

1946-55 

1962-68 

1939-42 

1969-74 

1946-61 

1971-76 

1974-76 

1900-30 

1966-68 

1977-79 

1973- 

1970-71 

1938-47 

1927-31 

1975-78 

1936-68 

1972-91 

1969-84 

1991- 

1972-74 

1959-62 

1949-64 

1966-71 

1949-59 

1963-67 

1973-79 

1966-69 

1923-30 

1962-66 

1955-60 

1968-74 

1979- 

1969-73 

1965-73 

1944-52 

1935-49 

1975-79 

1917-37 

1955-60 

1934-51 

1962-81 

1962-68 

1958-61 

1922-29 

1949-58 

1958-67 



McKnight, Timothy 
McKown, L. S. 
McVey, W. R 
Metzger, Donald G. 

Mitchell, John J. 
Miller, Charles 
Monroe, James O. 
Morris, Robert 
Morriss, Jr., A. W. 
Mount, Mrs. J. H. 
Neill, Clifford 
Nettleton, James 
Nooner, H. H. 
O'Neal, Dave 
Otto, Frank 
Overton, Robert 
Owens, James W. 
Peach, C. B. 
Peterson, Charles L. 
Pfeffer, W. C. 
Phillips, Earl C. 
Piper, Marion 
Postel, Philip 
Purdy, Leslie E. 

Rawlings, Wyatt 
Rendlemen, John 
Richards, Charles 
Richardson, Raymond 
Rickey, Branch 
Robertson, Ressho 
Robinson, Wendell A. 
Rogers, C. J. 
Roos, C. M. 
Rosenberger, E. E. 
Russell, Garland 
Scarritt, Nathan 
Schermer, Avery 
Schmidt, H. G. 
Shumard, Charles 
Simon, Paul 
Sims, Paul 
Skelton, Neva 
Skiles, Charles E. 
Smith, June 
Smith, Lowell 
Smith, Walter 



1962-67 

1940-52 

1924-38 

1974-78 

1991- 

1898-37 

1921-37 

1961-67 

1916-45 

1928-30 

1966-70 

1975-76 

1976-79 

1953-58 

1977-80 

1925-34 

1973-79 

1969-73 

1921-35 

1918-54 

1918-62 

1946-58 

1972- 

1932-48 

1962-70 

1991-95 

1971-80 

1972-75 

1966-70 

1940-43 

1935-38 

1916-35 

1949-62 

1971-87 

1926-28 

1972-75 

1964 

1958-63 

1969-73 

1926-49 

1919-37 

1966-80 

1957-75 

1960-64 

1959-60 

1934-36 

1974-80 

1951-60 



Stelzriede, F C. 


1939-48 


Stevenson, Mrs. Nell 


1942-53 


Stewart, Edward B. 


1962-69 


Stout, J. B. 


1915-30 


Stuck, Charles A. 


1958-60 


Swahlen, Percy 


1924-38 


Tappmeyer, PA. 


1940-46 


Thetford, Ira 


1964-70 


Thompson, Everett 


1962-74 


Thompson, James C. 


1959-62 


Thrall, V. W. 


1936-39 


Todd, Clyde H. 


1933-56 


Travelstead 


1966- 


Treat, Robert 


1973-78 


Trover, Joseph E. 


1974-77 


Tucker, J. G. 


1918-40 


Unruh, Adolph 


1960-75 


VanLeer, M. B. 


1940-44 


Voigt, Edwin* 


1960-64 


Wagner, Boyd 


1977-85 


Waldorf, Ernest* 


1932-43 


Watson, Albert 


1929-33 


Webb, Lance* 


1964-76 


Weber, A. L. 


1938-50 


Weir, Stanley 


1959-63 


Wells, Mrs. Harry 


1958-61 


Welshans, Merle T 


1976-83 


White, Robert F 


1960-70 


Whiteside, C. B. 


1924-30 


Whitlock, O. F 


1943-63 


Whitlock, W. H. 


1927-35 


Wilkins, J. G. 


1926-32 


Williams, Charles 


1971-74 


Williams, W. E. 


1936-38 


Wilson, Bayne D. 


1959-62 


Wilson, Donald E. 


1968-71 


Wilson, F 0. 


1922-40 


Winn, Maurice L. 


1955-68 


Woodward, Robert 


1967-81 


Wright, Karl 


1976-80 


Yates, Earl U. 


1937-61 


Yost, Clark R. 


1932-35 


Young, Howard Lee 


1970-72 



*Bishop, ex-officio member 



192 8 



1978 



Two Hundred and Seventy 



MC KENDREE 



II. Administrators and Staff 

(Two OR More Years) 



Name 


Years 


Positions Held 


Name 


Years 


Positions Ht'd 


Alford, Joe 


1974-76 


Director of Deferred 


Canty, Mildred 


1955-61 


Kitchen Worker 






Giving 


Gates, Robert 


1961-63 


Director of Public 


Ambum, Duane 


1970-72 


Director of Development 






Relations 


Anheuser, Ronald 


1965-68 


Custodian 


Chapman, Charles 


1963-66 


Director of Development 


Ayers, Mrs. A. W. 


1930-32 


Dean of Women 


Christ, Erwin 


1970-73 


Custodian 


Baker, Daniel 


1977-81 


Dean of Admissions 


Church, Virgil 


1961-64 


Business Manager 


Harden, Irvin 


1959-61 


Maintenance Worker 


Clark, Aletha 


1967-70 


Secretary Library 


Beaver, Brenda 


1966-68 


Transcript Clerk 


Clayton, Doris 


1971-74 


Clerical Assistant Library 


Becker, Chris 


1968-81 


Secretary to Director of 
Physical Plant 


Collver, Marcia 


1963-65 


Secretary Development 
Office, Alumni Assistant 


Belva, Jan 


1970-72 


Secretary Development 
Office 


Coriett, Debra 


1977-80 


Secretary Athletic 
Department 


Bennett, Dorothy 


1972-77 


Secretary to Librarian 


Cornell, Betty 


1976-82 


Secretary to Registrar, 


Berkemann, Doris 


1969-72 


Custodian 






Secretary Academic 


Berquist, Mary 


1967-70 


Secretary Library 






Affairs 


Berutti, Theresa 


1972-75 


Clerk Communication 
Center, Secretary 
Financial Aids 


Cox, Charies H, 


1958-61 


Photographer, Director 
of Development, Public 
Relations 


Birdwell, Emily 


1971-74 


Secretary to Business 


Cruse, Letty 


1957-61 


College Office Worker 






Manager 


Cummins, Evelyn 


1967-72 


Clerical Secretary, 


Boner, Joe 


1956-69 


Superintendent of 






Library 






Grounds and Buildings, 


Cumiiiigham, Veronica 


1976-79 


Library Assistant 






Director of the Physical 


Daniel, Raymond 


1950-61 


Business Officer, 






Plant 






Business Manager, 


Boone, Elva 


1967-79 


Food Service Worker 






Veteran's Counselor 


Booth, Mary 


1968-70 


Transcript Clerk 


Dairah, Thomas Lee 


1971-96 


Dean of Students, Vice 


Brown, Clifford C. 


1939-43 


Executive Secretary 






President of Student 


Brown, Helen 


1959-61 


College Office Worker 






Affairs, Academic Dean 


Brown, Rosie 


1968-75 


Cook 






Kentucky 


Brownfield, Loiraine 


1968-79 


Secretary to President 


Davis, 0. Sue 


1977-94 


Secretary Criminal 


Brownfield, Sharon 


1975- 


Switchboard, Accounts 






Justice and Nursing 






Payable and Accounts 


Dawson, Ted 


1967-69 


Maintenance 






Receivable Clerk 


Dennis, Ed 


1972-77 


Custodian 


Bryant, Bobbie 


1968-70 


School Nurse 


Devery, Raymond F. 


1972-74 


Vice President for 


Burger, Patricia 


1978-82 


Secretary Library 






Development and 


Burk, J. Thomas 


1975-78 


Staff Consultant and 






College Relations 






Area Service Center 


DeWeese, Mary A. 


1956-58 


Secretary to President 


Burk, Robert 


1974-80 


Assistant Director of 


Dillender, Margare 


1969-72 


Secretary to Dean 






Admissions 


Dillender, Richard 


1969-73 


Security 


Bums, Frances 


1964-79 


Cook, Food Service, 
Director of Dining Hall 


Dixon, Frances 


1967-74 


Director Language 
Laboratory 


Bums, Pamela 


1971-73 


Switchboard Operator 


Dorencamper, Beny 


1974-88 


Transcript Secretary, 


Bush, W. E. 


1948-58 


Special Representative 






Assistant Registrar 


Campbell, Hugh 


1958-66 


Maintenance 


Dorencamper, Thomas 


1976-82 


Maintenance 






.^^-jj^^^S^^'CTq r\ Q ; gp 


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Two Hundred and Seventy-One 



MC KENDREE 



Name 


Years 


Positions Held 


Name 


Years 


Positions Held 


Dubson, Geoffrey 


1973-75 


Library Assistant 


Gauble, Kay 


1964-66 


School Nurse, Director 


Dunbar, Deborah 


1976-82 


Payroll Accountant 






of Clark Hall, Secretary 


Durham, David 


1966-69 


Director of Religious 






to Dean of Students 






Life, Chaplain 


Gauble, Michael 


1966-68 


Director of Clark Hall 


Downey, Leo 


1976-78 


Vice President for 
Academic Affairs 


Gaut, Kay 


1971-76 


Secretary to Vice 
President of Academic 


Eisel, Mary 


1976-82 


Custodian 






Affairs, Secretary to Dean 


Eisel, Richard 


1976-82 


Custodian 






of College, Secretary to 


Eskridge, Robert 


1974-77 


Director of Grants and 






Registrar 






Foundations, Program 


Gehmin, Phil 


1966-68 


Maintenance 






Director Adult 


Giger, Margaret 


1969-79 


Food Service 






Continuing Education 


Gillespie, Virginia 


1965-68 


Registrar 


Evans, Harry 


1970-74 


Custodian 


Glotfelty, P R. 


1942-48 


Chief Engineer 


Evans, Janet 


1975-80 


Secretary Financial Aids, 


Goetter, Gary 


1974-78 


Security 






Account Receivable 


Gordon, Annette 


1974-78 


Scott Air Force Base 






Clerk 






Co-ordinator, Veteran's 


Evans, Jerry 


1975-79 


Assistant to Vice President 






Affairs Officer 






for Student Affairs, 
Director of Housing, 


Gott, Edith 
Graham, Lena 


1930-32 
1967-75 


Secretary to President 
Assistant to Director of 


Fagin, Charles 


1970-79 


Golf Coach 
Resident Professor, 
Center Director, 


Greenwalt, Donna 


1958-61 


Development 
Registrar Office Worker 








Gross, William 


1961-72 


Maintenance 






Academic Dean, 












Kentucky 

Secretary, Louisville 
Printer 


Gullick, Lucy 


1962-64 


Director Clark Hall 


Fagin, Mary 


1976-79 


Haack, Ethel 


1969-76 


Custodian 


Federer, Tina 


1977-80 


Haack, Gottlieb 


1964-69 


Maintenance Foreman 


Ferguson, Nancy 


1970-90 


Secretary to Director of 


Haeuber, Onita 


1967-76 


Snack Bar Supervisor 






Special Programs, 


Hall, Louise 


1975-77 


Cafeteria 






Division of Language, 


Hallberg, Patricia 


1968-70 


Secretary to Academic 






Literature and Social 






Dean 






Sciences 


Hammonds, Denver 


1965-68 


Assistant Business 


Ferrier, Sue 


1974-78 


Secretary to Registrar 






Manager, Financial 


Ferris, Sarah 


1974-78 


Security 






Aid Officer 


Fiedler, Mary 


1967-70 


Secretary to Director of 


Hanbaum, Blanche 


1954-61 


Director Clark Hall 






Admissions 


Harmon, Bill 


1962-77 


Shop Worker 


Finney, Hershel 


1976-89 


Director of Admissions 


Harris, Harold 


1967-74 


Maintenance 






Kentucky Center 


Harris, Timothy 


1973-75 


Custodian 


Fischer, John 


1966-82 


Maintenance 


Harris, William 


1967-82 


Groundsman 


Floro, Mrs. Jack 


1947-49 


Secretary to Dean 


Henman, Mary 


1972-79 


School Nurse, Director 


Fohne, Albert 


1960-67 


Custodian 






of Health Services 


Frerking, Verena 


1977-82 


Snack Bar Worker 


Heitenstein, Blanche 


1933-53 


Matron of Carnegie Hall, 


Frisby, Raymond 


1974-77 


Security 






Housemother of Clark 


Fry, Karen 


1973-76 


Secretary to Athletic 






Hall, Dietician 






Director 


Hess, Gladys 


1974-88 


Communications Center 


Funkhouser. Clyde R. 1965-68 


Vice President and 






Clerk 






Director of Development 


Hohrein, Dan 


1958-61 


Maintenance 


Gabrenya, Mark 


1978-80 


Photo Journalist and 


Hodgson, Julia 


1927-29 


Secretary to President 






Publications Specialist 


Holderby, Nigel 


1962-68 


Secretary to Registrar 




Two Hundred and Se 



MC KENDREE 



Name Years 

Hollingsworth, Mary 1968-70 

Houghland, Bamby 1966-68 

Huffman, Shelia 1963-67 

Huffstutler, Jessie 1929-33 

Howe, Georgia 1956-58 

Iberg, Marcella 1965-76 

Jackson, James 1976-78 

Jacolick, Donelda 1964-70 

Jaeger, Kenneth 1968-70 

Jefferson, Doris 1969-81 

Johnson, Charlie 1965-68 

Jones, Sammie C. 1966-68 

Keck, Marcella 1959-69 

Kessler, Sara 1963-66 

King, Lucille 1977-79 

Kittle, Louis 1958-63 



Klein, Wilbert 1967-78 

Krause, David 1976-79 

Kuhl, Phyllis 1968-83 

Lahr-Well, Almeda 1 977-80 



Lahr, Guy 



1967-69 



Lamb, Mrs. Robert 1947-49 

Landry, Adam 1977-80 

Lautenschlaeger, Frances 1969-82 

Lougeay, Donald 1977-82 

Lowe, Donald 1959-61 

Lucy, Luanne 1977-80 

Lyons, George 1974-82 

Mack, Luvesta 1943-51 

Malina, Emil 1970-74 

Mandley, Calvin 1971-78 

Maneke, James 1968-72 



Positions Held 

Receptionist Business 

Office 

Secretary to Dean of 

Students 

Secretary to Business 

Manager 

Matron of Carnegie Hall 

Secretary to Business 

Manager 

Kitchen Worker 

Director of Admissions 

Director of Food Services 

Director of Development, 

Public Information 

Librarian Technician 

Maintenance 

Dean of Women 

Bookstore Manager 

Secretary to President 

Food Service Worker 

College Office Worker, 

Bookkeeper, Clerk of 

Veteran's Affairs 

Maintenance, Custodian 

Supervisor 

Director of Financial Aid 

Director of Deneen 

Center, Director of 

Student Activities 

Director of Language 

Institute 

Assistant Director of 

Admissions 

Secretary to President 

Plumber 

Snack Bar Worker 

Carpenter 

Clerk of Veteran's Affairs 

Director of Intramurals, 

Coach 

Maintenance 

Housekeeper 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Admissions Officer, 

Registrar 



Name 



Years 



Manuel, Paul 1966-69 

Marks, John 1973-76 



Martin, Howard 1977-80 

Massie. John 1948-53 

Mauck, Virginia 1964-66 
1969-77 

McDuffy, Michael 1970-82 

McLaren, June 1966-68 

Meggs. Kathi N. 1959-67 



Meggs, Lawrence 1963-67 
Monken, William 1967-76 
Montague, Hal 1973-77 



Montague, JoAnn B. 1972-83 



Morgan, Judy 1974-81 

Morgan, PhylHs 1970-72 

Moss, Dorothy 1966-68 

Mueller, Walter 1967-79 

Mueller, William 1974-78 



Mumaw, Joan 



1971-78 



Munoz, David 1970-78 

Nailing, Geraldene 1966-79 
Neider, Deborah 1976-82 

Neider, Robert L. 1972-80 

Newcomb, Mary Ann 1973- 



Positions Held 

Dean of Students 
Assistant Director of 
Special Instructional 
Programs, Diicctor of 
Financial Aid 
Assistant Director of 
Admissions, Counselor 
Superintendent of 
Buildings and Grounds 
Kitchen Worker 
Snack Bar Worker 
Custodian, Security 
Secretary to President 
College Office Worker, 
Director of Plato House, 
Secretary to Academic 
Dean and Registrar, 
Secretary to President 
Director of Plato House 
Groundskeeper 
Dean of Admissions, 
Veteran's Affairs 
Officer, Director of 
Special Instructional 
Programs 
Registrar, A.I. D.P 
Co-ordinator, Academic 
Dean Kentucky 
Accountant 
Clerical Assistant 
Library 
School Nurse 
Custodian Dining Hall 
Director of Public 
Relations 

Secretary to Vice President 
for Academic Affairs and 
Dean of Students 
Bookstore Manager 
Food Service 
Switchboard Operator, 
Accounts Payable, Cashier 
Assistant Business 
Manager 

Secretary to Vice President 
for Financial Affairs 



Two Hundred and Seventy-Three 



TVIC KENDREE^^^^^g^^^^ 



Name 



Years 



Northam, Emily 1970-72 

Ogden, Judy 1962-65 

Oldfield, Dorothy 1959-65 

Olds, Maijorie 1970-78 

Olack, Adalbert 1973-76 

Oppitz. Harold 1963-70 

Ragles, Carl 1968-70 

Paradis, Patricia 1975-83 



Peach, Janet 



1972-76 



Pegg, Ruthellen 1965-93 

Pence, George 1965-69 

Pence, lone 1965-70 

Pepper, Virginia 1967-79 



Phillips, Minnie 1926-39 

Podesva, Glenn 1968-82 

Pomeroy, Katherine 1958-61 

Rafferty, Barbara 1966-68 

Rapp, Norbert 1969-81 

Rhoden, Lin wood 1958-61 

Ripley, Alvin 1971-73 

Ripley, Donna 1969-73 

Robiason, Bonnie Baer 1 967-70 



Robinson, Frederick 1968-79 



Rutland, Mary Lx)u 1961-63 



Positions Held 

Clerical Assistant Library 

Receptionist to Registrar, 

Business Office Secretary 

Director of Carnegie Hall 

Director of Food Services 

Custodian 

Cashier, Bookkeeper 

Admissions Officer 

Secretary A.I. D. P. 

Grant Office 

Secretary to Director 

Public Relations, 

Secretary Development 

Office 

Secretary Development 

Office, Director 

Communications Center 

Admissions Counselor, 

Director of Admissions 

Admissions Counselor, 

Registrar 

Accounts Payable Clerk, 

Cashier, Accounting 

Assistant 

Housemother Clark Hall 

Custodian 

Office Manager 

Secretary to Dean 

Director of Physical 

Plant 

Maintenance 

Custodian 

Food Service 

College Office Worker, 

Secretary to Business 

Manager 

Assistant Business 

Manager, Director of 

Institutional Research, 

Assistant to President, 

Dean of Administration, 

Assistant Vice President 

Financial Affairs, 

Lecturer in Business 

College Office Worker 



Name 



Years 



Schiefer, Audrey 1968-75 



Schieppe, John 1964-67 

Schieppe, Dona 1965-67 

Schmitt, Barbara 1976-80 



Schmulbach, Sandy 1974-76 

Schroeder, Joan 1 970-82 

Schulte, Lee 1958-61 

Shandler, Donald 1977-79 

Shirley, Michael 1973-74 

Slagle, J. Edward 1950-56 

Smith, Charlotte 1971-76 

Smith, Linda 1977-80 

Smith, Milton 1967-70 

Smith, Sheri 1967-70 

Smith, Van 1972-88 

Smith, Walter 1973-80 

Smith, Walter A. 1970-74 

Snead, Doris 1963-68 

Snead, Nancy 1967-75 



Snead, Vernon 1 964-79 



j Stamper. Constance 1976-78 

Stanton, Barbara 1969-72 

Stanton, John 1970-73 

Stanton, John P 1971-74 



Steck, Mary 1962-68 

Stewart, Reed 1976-78 



Stuart, Bill 



1965-68 



Positions Held 

Accounts Payable Clerk, 

Secretary to Financial 

Aid Officer 

Director of Carnegie 

Hall, Baseball Coach 

Director of Carnegie Hall 

Communications Center 

Clerk, Recorder's 

Assistant 

Counsultant 

Custodian 

Maintenance 

Director of Continuing 

Education 

Co-ordinator Louisville 

Center 

Carpenter, Superintendent 

of Buildings and Grounds 

Secretary to Director of 

Admissions 

Custodian 

Assistant Chaplain 

Director of Deneen Center 

Baseball Coach 

Custodian 

Director of Admissions 

Secretary Develoment 

Office, Director of 

Development 

Switchboard Operator, 

Secretary to Dean of 

Students, Office 

Manager 

Business Manager, Vice 

President for Financial 

Affairs 

Admissions Counselor 

Secretary to Librarian 

Custodian 

Associate Director of 

Admissions, Counselor 

Registrar 

Vice President for 

Development 

Maintenance 




Two Hundred and Seventy -f 



<=^:^:^:^^^^^^^^SiM^ KENDREE 



Name 



Years 



Stuart, Dorothy 1962-64 
Thomas, Becky 1975-82 
Thaxton, Valerie 1976-83 



Thomlinson, Tommye 1970-72 
Thomley, Florence 1948-65 



Thorson, Gayle 1976-78 
Toles, Lillian 1948-51 

Turner, John O. 1961-63 



Trame, Irene 1966-69 

Vandergraft, Rich 1973-75 



Voruz,Thelma 1963-71 

Votrain, Ivy 1953-60 

Waggoner, LeRoy 1937-42 

Walker, Tom 1964-66 

Walton, Ruth 1951-58 

Walton, William C. 1950-57 

Ward, Charles 1977-79 

Ward, James 1969-79 

Ward, Peggy 1949-51 

Ward, Roy 1964-77 

Warner, Marjorie 1948-58 



Watt, Ella 



1964-66 



Wease, Bertha L. 1939-41 
Weber, LaDoris 1965-87 



Webster, Margaret 1969-77 



Positions Held 

School Nurse 

Custodian 

Head Resident, Director 

of Housing Bamett Hall, 

Director of Student 

Development 

Secretary to Director of 

Admissions 

Cook, Director Pearsons 

Dining Hall, Kitchen 

Supervisor and Dietician 

Snack Bar Worker 

Cook 

Director of Church 

Relations, Admissions 

Counselor 

Cook 

Assistant Vice President 

Student Affairs, 

Assistant Dean of Students, 

Golf Coach 

Kitchen Worker, Snack 

Bar Supervisor 

Kitchen Worker 

Chief Engineer 

Shop Worker 

Registrar, Assistant 

Registrar 

Treasurer of College 

Executive Director for 

Alumni Affairs 

Custodian 

Secretary to President 

and Dean 

Shop Worker 

Hostess Pearsons Hall, 

Housemother Carnegie 

Hall 

Director of Whitfield 

Hall and Clio House 

Housemother Clark Hall 

Secretary to Financial 

Aid Officer, Financial 

Aid Officer 

Custodian 



Name 



Years 



Webster, Stewart 1971-82 
Weik,Alma 1969-90 



Weil, Ji 



1972- 



Weil,Loretta 1973-75 

Wesley, Naomi 1968-70 

White, Betty 1968-70 

White, Evelyn 1970-76 

White, Lynn 1973-76 
Whittington, Linda 1933-38 

Wilkey, David 1970-75 



Williams, Ted 1957-71 

Winterrowd, Lewis 1943-49 
Wiser, Elaine 1971-73 



Wolfslau, Doris 1967-85 

Woods, Alonzo 1974-82 

Wright, Marsha 1964-66 

Yelvington, Ruben L. 1971-74 

Youngs, Louis 1969-71 

Zeeb, Harold 1968-82 

Zika, Dean 1971-79 

Zimmerlee, Ann 1976-82 



Positions Held 

Custodian 

Gifts Secretary, Secretary 
Development Office, 
Accounting Assistant 
Secretary Director of 
Institutional Research, 
Secretary Dean 
Administration, Payroll, 
Computer Center 
Snack Bar Worker 
Custodian 

Secretary to Registrar 
Director of Housing 
Bamett Hall 

Junior College Counselor 
Dean of Women 
Associate Director of 
Admissions, Admissions 
Counselor, Director of 
Admissions 
Maintenance 
Proctor, Carnegie Hall 
Assistant Dean of Students, 
Director of Deneen 
Center, Director of 
Student Activities 
Secretary to Vice President 
for Development 
Junior College Recruiter, 
Assistant Director of 
Admissions, Director of 
Financial Aid 
Secretary to Director of 
Development 
Director of Information 
Chaplain 
Custodian 
Custodian 

Secretary to Vice President 
of Acadmic Affairs, 
Secretary to President 



Two Hundred and Seventy-Five 



MC KENDREE~ 



III. Faculty and Years Of Service (* Part-time Faculty) 



Adams, J.* 


1957-58 


Burkett, Eva 


1951-52 


Doolen. Darrell 


1933-35 


Adolphson, Harold* 


1957-58 


Burkey, Wayne* 


1953-55 


Duram, Robin 


1973-74 


Agersborg, H.P.K. 


1943-46 


Burner, Jarvis 


1963-65 


Dustin. John 


1952-53 


Alcorn, Charles 


1965-69 


Burton, Vivian 


1949-50 


Dutler, David 


1968-75 


Alcorn, Mary 


1966-67 


Butts, Louis 


1955-63 


Drake, James 


1970- 


Aldrich, Gordon* 


1961-66 


Caldwell, Carla 


1946-47 


Dysinger, Wendell 


1965-70 


Allison, Lelah 


1947-50 


Caldwell, Carol 


1948-49 


Einsman, Herman 


1963-65 


Anderson, Ted 


1972- 


Carter, Samuel 


1951-54 


Eller, Meredith 


1947-49 


Ameson, Robert 


1977-82 


Cass, Robert* 


1972-73 


Evans, Thomas D.* 


1951-55 


Artis, Wayne 


1954-57 


Charles. Neva 


1942-43 


Fairbum, Velma 


1954-56 


Ashby, Robert 


1951-54 


Chester, Mary 


1965-68 




1961-65 


Austell, Joseph* 


1960-61 


Church, Leon H. 


1942-46 


Filley, Glen F 


1926-30 


Baber, Yvon 


1969-79 


Clark, Marita 


1958-60 


Fitch, Robert 


1965-67 


Baeder, Robert* 


1952-54 


Clark, Otha 


1957-71 


Fleming, Fred 


1947-76 


Bagg, Chester S. 


1947-53 


Clayton, James 


1971-73 


Ford, Laura 


1940-42 


Baker, Edwin R 


1893-53 


Cole, Dwayne 


1967-77 


Fortado, Robert* 


1962-63 


Bailey, William* 


1953-54 


Collie, James 


1952-57 


Fox, Lawrence 


1 946-48 


Barclay, Ralph E. 
Bamett, Dorothy 

Rartnn Carl* 


1948-50 
1941-51 
1957-58 
1942-46 


Conrow, Marion 
Couch, Walter 


1941-43 
1929-30 


Fox, R.C.* 
Fox, Tommy Lou 


1951-52 
1950-52 


Barton, George H. 


Covey, Cyclone 


1951-56 


Frederick, William 


1940-41 


Baskette, Ewing 


1947-48 


Cox, Jennie 


1958-61 


Freeman, Loren 


1957-66 


Bauersachs, L.D.* 


1959-63 


Cox, Nell* 


1961-63 


Freiner, Glenn 


1949-50 


Beck, Norman* 


1954-55 


Cox, Ralph* 


1960-62 




1953-82 




1957-63 


Cox, Robert 


1961-63 


Freeman, Hazel* 


1976-77 


Belcher, Talbert* 


1954-55 


Crenshaw, H.* 


1957-58 


Funkhouser, Paul 


1975-85 


Benson, Ronald 


1970-71 


Crouse, Eli 


1929-31 


Gafke, Roger* 


1962-63 


Berger, Jere 


1976-77 


Cruse, Loy Dale 


1957-64 


Gantrell, Robert* 


1963-66 


Bergmann, Emma 


1931-33 


Curtis, John 


1963-66 


Garcia, Beatriz* 


1967-68 


Best, Evelyn 


1969-77 


Daniel, Katherine 


1950-51 


Garcia, Marino* 


1957-58 


Biagi, Alma* 


1961-62 




1955-61 




1960-69 


Bickel, Wanda 


1972-75 


Dawes, Earl 


1947-51 


Garvin, W.B. 


1928-32 


Biehl, Barry* 


1976-77 




1957-58 




1950-51 


Bittner, Christopher J. 


1927-37 




1963-65 




1955-56 


Bittner, Josephine 


1931-37 


Deering, Michael 


1977-79 


Gee, Mrs. Donald 


1945-46 


Black, Ronald 


1977- 


Demick, Margaret 


1971-72 


Gilbert, Helen 


1977- 


Blanchard, Birdsall 


1936-38 


Dickerman, Allen* 


1961-62 


Givens,Eldora* 


1976-77 


Blankenship, J.R. 


1950-51 


Dickson, Zada 


1955-61 


Givens, Mary 


1953-55 


Bochtler, Stanley 


1974-80 


Dilente, Gail 


1966-68 


Glover, Lee R. 


1946-47 


Bos, Gertrude 


1948-51 


Diseth, Glenn 


1966-68 


Godwin, Beatrice 


1944-47 


Bosse, Murella 


1973- 


Dittemore, Audrey 


1957-59 




1951-55 


Boyd, H.* 


1957-58 


Dittemore, Eldon 


1957-69 




1961-65 


Boyer, Lawrence 


1949-51 


Dixon, Elizabeth Park 


s 1957-60 


Godwin, John 


1954-55 


Brandenburg, Ronald 


1965-67 


Dixon, Frances 


1970-71 




1957-66 


Brown, Mrs. H.* 


1957-58 


Dolan, Beth 


1949-51 


Goldstein, Burton 


1947-49 


Brown, Robert 


1957-88 


Dolley, James C. 


1899-42 


Gould, H.D. 


1938-41 


Bryan, Lawrence 


1973-79 


Donaldson, Eliza 


1934-51 


Govro, Marvin 


1946-48 


Budina, John 


1963-65 


Donham, Mary 


1959-60 


Grandy, Marguerite 


1952-55 


Burger, Lowell* 


1970-76 


Donham, Sam 


1963-66 


Grandy, William N. 


1951-68 


Bundy, Howard* 


1953-55 




1967-70 


Gray, James* 


1965-68 




1963-65 


Doolen, Arthur 


1930-33 


^^^^g^S^^e? 


1970-76 






^^^irtiiR 


JQ^Y^^K 




*-^-;^<:S^^Z 







Two Hundred and Sevt 



Greer, Freeman* 


1959-64 


Jackson, James 


1976-77 


Marty, Ralph 


1963-71 


Grove, Lynn 


1968-77 


Janes, Leonard 


1967-68 


Mason, Lew* 


1951-53 


Grow, Dorah 


1950-57 


Jennings, James 


1948-49 


Mauzy, William 


1948-50 


Gruber, George* 


1974-79 


Jonah, Wesley 


1946-48 


McAnnich, Thomas 


1977-79 


Gummersheimer, Victor 


1967-71 


Jones, Douglas 


1971- 


McCain, John W. 


1957-64 


Gutekunst, Bertha W. 


1942-51 


Jopin, Laum 


1954-55 


McAnn. Ann* 


1964-65 


Gutekunst, Helmut C. 


1942-57 


Jung, Loren* 


1959-60 


McClintock, Elizabeth 


1 943-44 


Hackney, J. Carlyle 


1941-42 


Kamm, Bemice* 


1967-68 


McClure, Standleigh M. 


1919-41 


Harden, K.* 


1957-58 


Kamm, Richard* 


1973-74 


McDaniel, Ruth 


1937-43 


Hardy, G. DeWitt 


1936-42 


Kaump, Ethel 


1954-57 


McKee, Joseph* 


1964-66 


Hargis, Wilma* 


1960-61 


Keldermanns, Maude* 


1963-65 




1970-72 


Harper, Leslie* 


1962-63 


Kelly, Joan* 


1970-73 


McKee, Wilbur 


1929-30 


Harper, Pauline 


1928-39 


Kennedy, Carolyn 


1932-33 


McNeely, Evelyn 


1927-33 


Harrell, Joseph 


1927-30 


Kennedy, Philip 


1958-60 


McReynolds, Janet 


1972-77 


Harris, Cecil 


1966-68 




1971-74 


Mendez-Vigo, Castor* 


1973-76 


Harris, Frank 


1949-50 


Kerr, Mariella 


1959-60 


Mercer, Opal* 


1962-63 


Hartley, Robert 


1933-35 


Kerr. Whitney* 


1960-62 


Metz, Mary 


1946-47 


Hayter, Earl 


1934-37 


Kestly, William* 


1961-65 


Meyer. Frederick 


1976-81 


Heam, Gale* 


1976-77 


Ketring, W. Howard* 


1951-53 


Miller, Charles* 


1957-66 


Helms, Carmett* 


1973-74 


Kettlekamp, Wesley 


1925-31 


Miller, Gordon 


1967-68 


Henderson, Arthur 


1938-41 


King, Jean Fisher 


1952-53 


Miller, June* 


1965-66 


Hertenstein, Clifford 


1935-36 


King, John 


1977-79 


Minnegerode, Fred 


1969-71 


Hertenstein, Harold 


1939-42 


King, William* 


1951-52 


Miser, Wilson 


1951-57 




1949-51 


Kinison. John 


1922-29 


Mitchell, Charlene 


1977-81 


Hickenlooper, George 


1977-82 


Kleinschmidt, Janelle 


1948-49 


Mitchum, George 


1971-72 


Higgenbothan, W.* 


1957-58 


Kleinschmidt, Oliver H 


1928-53 


Moore, Daniel* 


1960-62 


Hill, Stephanie 


1962-63 


Koebel, Delmar* 


1953-55 


Morris, Francine 


1971-73 


Hindelange, Mary* 


1973-76 




1958-60 


Morse, Walter 


1930-32 


Hirons, Sidney* 


1961-62 


Kooner, Murray* 


1954-55 


Mulvaney, Annette 


1964-68 


Hirth, Frank 


1930-31 


Kirts, Jean 


1968- 


Murray. Elmer* 


1950-53 


Hock, Edward* 


1970-71 


Kovac, John 


1970-81 


Neal. Inez* 


1951-52 


Hodge, William 


1961-78 


Kraft, Charles 


1937-39 




1957-58 


Hoffman, Edward 


1950-52 


Kraucovic, Richard 


1957-58 




1960-66 




1955-57 


Krughoff, Mildred 


1942-43 


Neale. Philip 


1974- 


Hohn, Gottlieb 


1931-32 


Kruwell, J. Max 


1928-29 


Neblock, Charles* 


1973-73 


Hohn, Rosalind 


1933-35 


Kwon, Ik- Whan 


1972-73 


Nelson, Irvin 


1928-29 


Hohn, Reinhold 


1935-47 


Lawson, George* 


1976-77 


Nettleton, James* 


1954-60 


Hohn, Dorothy West 


1945-47 


Lawson, Harold 


1931-32 


Nickell, Patricia* 


1958-59 


Hoist, Don 


1975-90 


Leas, Carroll 


1965-69 


Nichols, Charles* 


1959-60 


Hopkins, Elizabeth 


1968-71 


Lefler, Helen* 


1970-72 


Nielson, Gerald 


1948-52 


Hopkins, Richard 


1966-67 


Leiber, Joseph* 


1953-54 


Nies, Phyllis* 


1961-62 


Homer, Ethel* 


1960-62 


Leilich, Avis* 


1950-51 


Norris, Kenneth* 


1957-58 


Horsch, Lawrence* 


1959-61 


Lesher, Gladys 


1942-43 




1972-73 


Hortin, Arthur 


1932-33 


Lewis, Donald 


1963-65 


Nugent. Paul 


1958-60 




1959-60 


Lewis, D.W. 


1951-53 


Noss, Emma 


1928-29 


House, Naomi 


1971-73 


Lientz, Mary Blanche 


1947-48 


O'Connor, Gary* 


1973-76 


Howe, Agnes 


1930-33 


Lougeay, Jean 


1950-55 


Ogent, Albert 


1949-50 


Howe, Richard 


1953-54 


Mabry, Robert* 


1962-63 


Oldfield, James 


1957-64 




1955-56 


Mandolini, Ann* 


1972-73 


Olmstead, Richard 


1956-57 


Huck, Harold 


1968-69 


Mandrell, Kent* 


1973-74 


Oppitz, Louis K. 


1930-32 


Huck, Raymond 


1932-33 


Mange, Aedythe 


1930-31 




1935-38 


Husted, Grace* 


1968-69 


Manuel, Esther* 


1967-68 

... F=S=^? 


Oppitz, Nell 


1930-57 


<:3S^;Z^^^ 




t^^928(fl 3^197 8M^ 


^^^^g^S^^ 






Two Hundred and Seven 


y-Seven 







Osling, Julia W. 


1929-32 


Scholl, Lewis 


1941-42 


Troutman, Evelyn 


1949-52 


Owen, Emerial 


1952-91 


Schoon, John 


1963-68 


Troy, Patricia 


1969-70 


Owen, Stephanie Hill 


1963-73 


Schoon, Sara* 


1967-68 


Tuerck, George* 


1958-76 


Packard, David 


1962-69 




1974-76 


Tusov, Joanne 


1968-69 


Park, Helen* 


1961-65 


Schwerdtfeger, Dale 


1970-71 


Tyndall, Elsa 


1934-37 


Parker, Sophy 


1928-32 


Seiber, Robin 


1974-78 


Upchurch, Naida* 


1965-66 


Parks, Elizabeth White 


1946-52 


Seubert, Eugene* 


1966-69 


VanAken, David 


1973-82 




1955-57 


Seymour, Virgil* 


1952-55 


VanDanElzen, Robert 


1964-71 


Patterson, R.A.* 


1954-55 


Shaffer, Eugene 


1928-30 


Van Leer, Pauline Harpe 


1939-40 


Pattmore, Olive 


1924-29 




1933-35 


Van Winkle, Lewis B. 


1947-53 


Pearson, T.M. 


1953-57 


Shull, Dede Ann 


1948-49 


Vesely, Alice 


1965-66 


Peterson, Dan 


1962-64 


Silver, Mildred 


1950-64 


Vesely, Louis 


1963-66 


Pierce, Frank* 


1957-60 


Simmons, Kelly* 


1962-66 


Vick, Claude 


1924-34 


Pittenger, Theodore 


1953-56 


Simmonds, Ellice 


1958-62 


Vise, P* 


1957-58 


Porter, Howard 


1968-81 


Simms, James* 


1953-58 


Waldorf, Paul 


1933-36 


Poston, Marianne 


1973-77 


Skaar, Marguerite 


1967-70 


Waldron, Nell 


1932-34 


Potter, Abby 


1967-68 


Smalley, Stimson 


1952-56 


Wallace, Harold 


1940-42 


Proost, Robert* 


1965-66 


Smith, Clyde* 


1960-65 


Walther, William 


1976-81 


Pulliam, Robert* 


1951-52 


Smith, Eula 


1942-47 


Walton, William C. 


1894-50 


Purdy, Edgar* 


1952-53 


Smith, Judith* 


1962-63 


Ward, Toby 


1968-69 


Purdy, Leslie* 


1949-53 


Snead, Vernon* 


1964-65 


Warner, Joan 


1954-56 


Putt, Dwight* 


1960-63 


Spencer, Aileen 


1929-40 


Watts, Clayton 


1937-39 


Rafferty, James 


1977-81 


Spencer, Edwin R. 


1926-40 


Weatherly, Edward 


1932-33 


Redden, Hugh 


1950-52 


Stanfield, Karen 


1972-79 


Weaver, David 


1955-56 


Reed, J. Frank 


1933-34 


Stanley, Marvin* 


1959-60 


Welch, Grace R. 


1940-41 


Reed, Leone C. 


1933-34 


Stanley, Robert* 


1953-54 




1942-43 


Reeder, Orpha* 


1960-66 


Starr, Margaret 


1975-82 




1944-47 


Reese, Myron 


1968- 


Statham, Harry 


1966- 




1960-61 


Renfro, Mary* 


1965-68 


Steckman, Lillian 


1934-38 




1964-76 


Reynolds, FJ. 


1955-57 


Stelzreide, Frederick 


1943-47 


Werner, Kent 


1957-62 


Reynolds, T.H. 


1955-58 


Stewart, John* 


1957-59 


West, Dorothy 


1941-45 


Rice, Roland 


1945-47 


Stiers, Frank 


1971-79 


Wheeler, Thomas 


1972-73 




1957-70 


Stivender, Willie 


1947-48 


White, Victor 


1933-34 


Richardson, Francis 


1951-57 


Stockton, Carl 


1967-70 


Whitlock, Vera 


1932-33 


Ridgeway, Jean 


1942-43 


Stowell, Charles J. 


1920-55 


Wicks, Lester 


1958-68 


Roberts, C.J.* 


1931-32 


Strange, John* 


1952-53 


Wicks, Suzanne* 


1957-60 


Robinson, Fred* 


1970-72 


Streif, Edward 


1970-80 




1976-77 


Rogers, Howard 


1966-70 


Stumpf, Hope* 


1955-57 


Williams, Felix* 


1957-61 


Roloff, Robert 


1930-32 


Sturm, Roy 


1967-74 


Williams, Mary Ellen 


1958-67 


Roper, Martin* 


1953-55 


Svoboda, Katherine 


1977-78 


Willoughby, Ernest 


1969-72 


Roy, Herbert 


1946-47 


Tanner, Dinah* 


1960-61 


Wilkins, G.* 


1957-58 


Ryker, Charlotte 


1956-57 


Taylor, Vetta Jean* 


1952-53 


Wilkinson, Thelma* 


1964-65 


Sakurai, Edward 


1960-64 


Thomas, Cora 


1935-42 


Wilson, Aileen 


1923-43 


Sapp, Margaret 


1947-48 


Thomlinson, Terry 


1968-69 


Wolf, Thiemo 


1949-50 


Sayre, R.C. 


1945-61 




1970-77 


Wood, Benton 


1934-35 




1962-63 


Thompson, Richard 


1965-67 


Woods, Paul* 


1953-54 


Scarborough, William 


1939-42 


Tibbetts, Blanche 


1966-73 


Woodward, Exean 


1928-32 


Schanz, Orville 


1957-87 


Tippen-Gordon, Annette* 1976-77 


Wright, William* 


1957-58 


Schamau, Ralph 


1965-70 


Todd, Clyde 


1932-35 




1962-66 


Scherer, George 


1934-36 


Tollefson, Harris* 


1967-68 


Wright, Mary 


1938-41 


Schmidt, Webster R. 


1933-35 


Trainer, Curtis 


1958-63 


Young, Otis B. 


1928-29 




1938-41 




1966-77 


Zamrazil, James 


1968-72 


Schmucker, Martha 


1928-29 


Tremmel, Ronald 


1977-81 


Zelman, Elizabeth 


1974-80 


Schnipper, Gail* 


1974-76 


Trimpe, W.* 


1957-58 


^^^^^^S^^^ 




^^<:^^^2 


^^ 


Two Hundred and Sevt 


nn-Eiglu 











IV. Presidents-McKendree College Alumni Association 



J. W. A. Kinison 


1928 


Bumell Heinecke 


1951-52 


Bumell Heinecke 


1967-69 


W. R. Dorris 


1929-30 


R. C. Sayre 


1952-54 


Elvis Rosenberger 


1969-71 


Harold F. Hecker 


1931 


Lee Baker 


1954-57 


Roger Jensen 


1971-72 


Louis Butts 


1934-35 


William Lambeth 


1957-58 


Donald G. Metzger 


1972-74 


Roy Kean 


1937-41 


Leon Church 


1958-61 


Robert Dosier 


1974-76 


0. F. Whitlock 


1941-43 


Frank Harris 


1961-62 


Darrell Franklin 


1976-77 


W. L. Hanbaum 


1943-46 


Louis Butts 


1962-63 


Dennis Butts 


1977-79 


R. C. Adair 


1946-50 


David Packard 


1963-66 






Milbum Akers 


1950-51 


Walter Storey 


1966-67 







V. Honorary Degrees Conferred By McKendree College 



Year Name 

1928 Rev. E. W. Akers 

Edwin Percy Baker 
James C. Dolley 
Charles H. Dorris 
Arthur H. Harropp 
Charles H. Miller 
Chester F. Miller 
C. Edmund Neil 
Dr Lew is Otiof\ 
Branch Rickey 
Henry G. Schmidt 
James T. Seiben 
William C. Walton 
Casper S. Yost 

1931 Charles W Bliss 
Eli Crouse 



De gree Conferred 

Doctor of Divinity 
Doctor of Laws 
Doctor of Literature 
Doctor of Literature 
Doctor of Laws 
Doctor of Laws 
Doctor of Literature 
Doctor of Literature 
Doctor of Laws 
Doctor of Laws 
Doctor of Literature 
D. Fm. 

Doctor of Divinity 
Doctor of Laws 

Doctor of Laws 
Doctor of Di\init\ 



1933 Dr C M Thompson Doctor of Literature 



1934 George A. Fouler 
Charles H. Thrall 

1935 Harr> C Brown 
Waller M Brov* n 

1936 WE Bennett 
193" Paul Fanhmg 

1939 PaulRHortm 
Ro\ N Kean 

1940 John L. Dickson 
Frank E Hams 
Clark R Yost 



Doctor of Di\ init\ 
Doctor of Di\init> 

Doctor of Di\init\ 
Doctor of Divinit) 

Doctor of Di\init\ 

Doctor of Law s 

Doctor of Di\init> 
Doctor of Divinitx 
Doctor of Law s 
Doctor of Di\init\ 
Doctor of Laws 



Year Name De gree Conferred 

1942 Aloysius Angeleo Aita Doctor of Laws 

1944 John Lester Buford Doctor of Laws 

Joseph Morton Harrell Doctor of Divinity 

1946 Carl Cluster Bracy Doctor of Divinity 

1947 H. G. Hurley Doctor of Divinity 
1952 Adlai E. Stevenson Doctor of Laws 



1954 



1955 



1956 



Robert C. Adair 
Milbum P. Akers 
Newton C. Henderson 
L. Joseph Hortin 
Earl Clarence Phillips 
Clyde H. Todd 
Omer Floyd Whitlock 
Earl U. Yates 

Lee Robert Baker 
William E. Britton 
Charles Monroe Crowe 
Emest M. Dycus 
Cyrus S. Gentr> 
Dale Harmon 
Timoth} 1. McKnight 
Wendell A. Robinson 
Walter Allen Smith 

Charles C. Hamill 
Clarion D. Hardy 
Henrv Merkel 
Richard W. Miller 
Maurice L. Winn 



Doctor of Laws 
Doctor of Letters 
Doctor of Divinity 
Doctor of Letters 
Doctor of Divinity 
Doctor of Divinity 
Doctor of Divinity 
Doctor of Divinity 



Doctor of 
Doctor of 
Doctor of 
Doctor of 
Doctor of 
Doctor of 
Doctor of 
Doctor of 
Doctor of 



Science 

Laws 

Divinity 

Divinity 

Laws 

Divinity 

Laws 

Divinity 

Divinity 



Doctor of Laws 
Doctor of Laws 
Doctor of Divinity 
Doctor of Laws 
Doctor of Di\inity 




MC KENDREE~ 



:^ar 


Name 


Degree Conferred 


Year 


Name 


Degree Conferred 


1957 


W. E. Bush 


Doctor of Divinity 


1966 


Orville Herbert McKay 


Doctor of Laws 




W. L. Cummins 


Doctor of Divinity 




Rev. Paul C. Reinert,S.J 


Doctor of Humane 




Webb B. Garrison 


Doctor of Divinity 






Letters 




E. M. Leckrone 


Doctor of Divinity 




Sen. Paul Simon 


Doctor of Letters 




Charles Loucke 


Doctor of Laws 




Ira Louis Thetford 


Doctor of Divinity 




Vernon Loucke 


Doctor of Laws 














1967 


James Aaron Connett 


Doctor of Divinity 


1958 


John L. Figley 


Doctor of Divinity 




Gen. Andrew J. Goodpaster 


Doctor of Laws 




Clyde Funkhouser 


Doctor of Divinity 




Delyte Wesley Morris 


Doctor of Laws 




Delbert S. Lacquement 


Doctor of Divinity 














1968 


William Norman Grandy 


Doctor of Laws 


1959 


Patrick Henry Beaird 


Doctor of Literature 




Ray Page 


Doctor of Laws 




Clarence C. Collins 


Doctor of Divinity 




Chester A. Pennington 


Doctor of Divinity 




Robert A. Mulligan 


Doctor of Divinity 




Jack D. Travelstead 


Doctor of Divinity 




George T. Wilkins 


Doctor of Laws 




Robert Fulton White 


Doctor of Laws 


1960 


Merle D. Broyles 


Doctor of Divinity 


1969 


Lindley Joseph Stiles 


Doctor of Laws 




Webb B. Garrison 


Doctor of Literature 




David Elton Trueblood 


Doctor of Letters 




Bayne D. Wilson 


Doctor of Divinity 




Robert I. White 


Doctor of Laws 




Chuzo Yamada 


Doctor of Divinity 














1970 


Roy Clifford Berry 


Doctor of Laws 


1961 


Scott D. MacDonald 


Doctor of Divinity 




Clarence D. Blair 


Doctor of Letters 




Edwin E. Voigt 


Doctor of Humane 




Donald Lewis Lowe 


Doctor of Divinity 






Letters 




Robert Wallenbom 


Doctor of Music 


1962 


William Gehl Devore 


Doctor of Divinity 


1971 


Fred Arthur Fleming 


Doctor of Science 




Ivan Lee Holt, Jr. 


Doctor of Laws 




Raymond Paul Sims 


Doctor of Divinity 




Ivan Lee Holt, Sr. 


Doctor of Humane 
Letters 




Lance Webb 


Doctor of Letters 




Otto Kemer 


Doctor of Laws 


1972 


George Henry Hand 


Doctor of Laws 




Julian Nave 


Doctor of Divinity 




John Henderson 
James William Owen 


Doctor of Divinity 
Doctor of Divinity 


1963 


Leiand D. Case 
John 0. Gross 


Doctor of Laws 
Doctor of Divinity 




Mildred Silver 


Doctor of Letters 




Herbert H. Hoover 


Doctor of Humane 
Letters (In absentia) 


1973 


Dr. Phillip Shriver 


Doctor of Humanities 




O. H. Kleinschmidt 


Doctor of Music 


1974 


Mrs. Edith Green 


Doctor of Laws 




William J. Scarborough 


Doctor of Humane 












Letters 


1975 


Robert Krause 


Doctor of Divinity 


1964 


John W. Allen 


Doctor of Laws 


1976 


Dr. James B. Holdenman 


Doctor of Laws 




Louis A. Butts 


Doctor of Letters 




Boyd Eugene Wagner 


Doctor of Divinity 




John E. Grinnell 


Doctor of Literature 










Frederick E. Maser 


Doctor of Laws 


1977 


Dr Arthur P. Caliandro 


Doctor of Humane 




Nell G. Oppitz 


Doctor of Letters 






Letters 






(In absentia) 




Barbara E. Campbell 


Doctor of Laws 


1965 


Vemie T. Bamett 


Doctor of Divinity 


1978 


Sen. Kenneth Hall 


Doctor of Laws 




Rollo Clifton Sayre 


Doctor of Laws 




Arthur V. Huffman 


Doctor of Laws 




Joseph B. Webb 


Doctor of Divinity 




Martha R.O'Malley 


Doctor of Education 




Myron Forest Wicke 


Doctor of Humane 
Letters 




Dr. Ralph M. Tanner 


Doctor of Humane 
Letters 




Two Hundred and Eigh 



MC KENDREE 



VI. Academy Of Science 

The Academy of Science was started in 1989 and recognizes those individuals who, through 
leadership and character, have made exceptional contributions to the honor and prestige of 
McKendree College in the field of science, and who have continued to demonstrate in their 
daily lives, the values imparted through the study of the sciences. Listed below are the gradu- 
ates and instructors through 1978 who have been inducted into the Academy of Science. 



Bernard Baldridge 


'37 




Carmett "Corkey" Helms 


'59 


E.M. Cralley 


'28 




Benjamin Murray Hypes 


1866 


Lester V. Cralley 


'33 




Guy Otwell Karnes 


'25 


Lewis J. Cralley 


'33 




Howard W. Larsh 


'36 


Cyril D. Curtis 


'43 




Standleigh M. McClure* 


1919-34 & 


Raymond Wick Fary Jr. 


'42 






1936-41 


William A. Fischer 


'40 




Stanley W. Oexemann 


'37 


Fred A. Fleming* 


1947-1976 


William Powell 


'52 


Paul S. Funkhouser* 


'70 


*1975-1985 


Edwin R. Spencer* 


1926-1940 


Paul M. Griffin 


'43 




Charles Jacob Stowell* 


1920-1955 


Vernal R. Hardy 


'28 




Suzanne R. Potter Wicks 


'45 


♦Instructor 











VII. Sports Hall of Fame 

The McKendree College Sports Hall of Fame was started in 1988 and recognizes individuals 
who, through leadership and character, have made exceptional contributions to maintain the 
honor and prestige of McKendree College in the field of athletics, and who have continued to 
demonstrate in their daily lives those values developed through the inter-collegiate athletic 
program. 

Listed here are the graduates and coaches through 1978 who have been inducted into the 
Sports Hall of Fame. 



Warren Barty '65 

Wayne R.Bise' 38 

George 'Tip" Butler '51 

Lloyd Castillo '58 

Virgil Thomas Church '32 

William Lawrence Cofield '63 

James E. Collie, Basketball Coach 1952-57 

Loy Dale Cruse '55 

Sally Ford '73 

Woodrow W. Fulkerson '34 

Paul S. Funkhouser '70 

William Burton Gedney '54 

Ray Goode '28 

Homer "Hurley" Gould '28 

Cameron Harmon '03 

John "Ace" Harmon '40 



Glen "Jack" Haskin '28 
Dale Haverman '78 
Richard E. Herrin '56 
Ronald H. Herrin '52 
Ralph Mason Holmes '49 
Eugene "Pidge" Hoyt '54 
John M. Isom '27 
Wayne King '59 
Dennis Lee Korte '70 
Virgil H. Motsinger '55 
Elvis E. "Al" Rosenberger '50 
Edgar A. "Slick" Schaefer '50 
Robert Leland Schulte '60 
Joseph Spudich '33 
Kenneth "Spike" Wilson '36 
Mary Blanche Wolfe Young '38 



Two Hundred and Eighry-One 




A.,'H,i';,;'r,;.i',j ^j.;';r%-A. 



<^s:^^^:^^^^5^^^1£JlEND R E E 



Index 



A 

Abbott, J.S. 269 
Able, Ann O. 205 
Ackerman, Walter E. 269 
Adair, Robert C. 269, 279 
Adams 228, 236 
Adams, J. 114,276 
Adams, Kaywynne Weiler 

196 
Adolphson, Harold 114, 276 
Affsprung, Harold E. 60 
Agersborg, H.P.K. 34, 46, 47, 

87, 276 
Agles, Edgar A. 50 
Agles, James 41, 50 
Aita, Aloysius Angeleo 279 
Akers, E. W. 279 
Akers, J. R. 269 
Akers, Milbum 109, 122, 129, 

131, 136, 137, 140, 142, 

163, 167, 168, 169, 170, 

174, 179, 183,269,279 
Akers, Peter 8, 118, 122, 123, 

126, 131 
Albright, Cecil R. 50 
Alcorn, Charles 176, 177, 189, 

276 
Alcorn, Mary 177, 276 



Aldrich, Gordon 143, 144, 

176, 276 
Aldrich, James L. 205 
Alford,Joe271 
Allenl27, 132, 133, 135, 141, 

262 
Allen, Bob 250 
Allen, Donald 230 
Allen, Frederick M. 205 
Allen, John W. 280 
Allen, Max 113, 127, 132, 

133, 136, 141, 142,207 
Allison, Lelah 87, 88, 276 
Allyn, Robert 217 
Amarh, Archibald 259 
Amberg, Richard 1 10, 141, 269 
Amburn, Duane 185,271 
Ames, Edward R 8, 170 
Anderson, Boyd 50 
Anderson, L. 98 
Anderson, Merlin 50, 73 
Anderson, Ted 190, 191, 198, 

276 
Anderson, Tex 250 
Anheuser, Donald 27 1 
Ameson, Robert 198, 276 
Artis, Wayne 104, 105, 260, 

276 



Asbury, William R 205 
Ashal, R. 86, 97 
Ashall, Rocjard 60 
Ashby, Robert 103, 104, 276 
Ashby, William 50 
Atkins 232 

Atkins, Kenneth 50, 73 
Aufderheide, Ervin 230, 231 
Austell, Joseph 143, 276 
Austin, Kenneth, 60, 232 
Awah 248, 251,253 
Ayers, Mrs.A.W. 271 



B 

Babb, Franklin 60 
Baber, Eldora A. 205 
Baber, Yvon 189, 190, 191, 

198, 276 
Baeder, Robert 103, 104, 276 
Bagg 100 
Bagg, Chester 83, 87, 88, 103, 

276 
Baggott 248, 262 
Bailey, Dale 60 
Bailey, Frances 57, 70 
Bailey, H. H. 269 
Bailey, William 104, 205, 276 



Two Hundred and Eighty-Three 



MC KENDREE' 



Baize, Tim 205 

Baker 249 

Baker, Daniel 27 1 

Baker, Edwin 19,21,23,24, 

25, 27, 34, 45, 46, 47, 87, 

88, 103, 140, 170, 123, 

146, 276, 279 
Baker, Lee 174,279 
Baker, Neil 261 
Baker, Von 38 
Baldridge, Bernard 50, 60, 

281 
Baldridge, Byron 50 
Baltz, Otilla M. 118 
Barclay, Ralph 87, 88, 221, 

232, 233, 276 
Barden, Irvin 271 
Barnard, Lloyd 50, 69 
Barnes, Harold 269 
Barnes, Marvin 50, 73 
Bamett, Dorothy 88, 103, 224, 

276 
Barnett, Helen T. 170, 171, 

179 
Bamett, Jenny 227 
Bamett, Sally 4 
Bamett, Vernie 269, 280 
Barrow, Harold 50 
Bartlesmeyer 248, 251, 253 
Bartlett, Robert C. 183 
Barton, Carl 114,276 
Barton, Don 257 
Barton, George 46, 47, 87, 

276 
Barty, Warren 256, 269,281 
Baskette, Ewing 87, 276 
Bauer, Glen 269 
Bauersachs, L. D. 115, 143, 

276 
Baugh, Roy 269 
Baum, Arthur 50, 73 
Baum, "Butch" 112 



Baus, Joseph 205 
Baver, Faith F. 118 
Beaird, Patrick Henry 280 
Beans. Mary 225 
Beardsley, Whitmore 50, 69 
Beaty, Paul 238 
Beaver, Brenda 271 
Beck, Norman 104, 114, 115, 

143, 276 
Beckemeyer, Delmont 50 
Beckemeyer, Warren 50 
Becker, Chris 271 
Beckman, Eugene T. Jr. 205 
Beedle, William 235, 248, 

250, 252 
Beerman, Larry 260 
Beers 262 

Beers, Gordon 50, 262 
Beers, James 51, 231, 237 
Behrens, Carl 260 
Behymer, F. A. 79, 208, 269 
Belcher, Paul 51 
Belcher, Talbert 104,276 
Belva, Ed260, 261 
Belva, Jan271 
Benitone, Don 60 
Bennett, Dorothy 271 
Bennett, Herbert R. 269 
Bennett, W. E. 269, 279 
Bennett, William 51,69 
Benson, Ronald 189,276 
Berendt, "Dutch" 231 
Berger,Jere 198,276 
Berger, Lauren 60 
Bergmann, Emma 25, 27, 

276 
Berkemann, Doris 271 
Bernreuter, Louis 269 
Berquist, Mary 27 1 
Berrier, Paul L. 205 
Berry. Clyde 51, 70 
Berry, R.C. 122, 133 



Berry. Roy 269, 280 
Berst, Donald 229, 236 
Berutti, Theresa 271 
Best, Evelyn 189, 190, 191, 

198, 276 
Beutelman 227 
Biagi.Alma 143,276 
Bickel, Wanda 190, 191,276 
Biehl, Barry 198, 276 
Biggerstaff, Bill 245, 256 
Birdwell, Emily 271 

Bise, Wayne 4, 51,215, 237, 

250,281 
Bittner, Christopher 25, 27, 

45, 276 
Bittner, Josephine 25, 27, 45, 

276 
Bivens, Eunice 224 
Black, Ronald 199,276 
Blackburn, Wallace 51, 230, 

231 
Blackstock, Ira 269 
Blackwell, Bob 260 
Blair, Clarence D. 280 
Blanchard, B. E. 221, 231, 

233, 237, 247 
Blanchard, Birdsall 45, 276 
Blanck, Walter H. 261 
Blankenship, J. R. 103,276 
Bliss, Charles W. 279 
Blue, Riley 260 
Bochtler, Stanley 191, 198, 

199, 276 
Bodtke, Ron 242, 260 
Boehne, Tim 261 
Bogard, Edward Benny 60 
Bone, Jim 256, 258 
Boner, Jerry 242, 243, 256 
Boner, Joe 139, 175,271 
Boone, Elva 271 

Booth, Mary 271 

Bos, Gertrude 87, 103, 276 



Tiio Hundred and Eighn-Four 



MC KENDREE 



Bosse,Murellal91,198, 199, 

276 
Bosslet, Don 260 
Bothwell 128, 129 
Bothwell, Henry Clay 119 
Bothwell, James 119 
Bothwell, Marion 118, 119, 

121, 122, 128, 131, 180, 

182 
Bott, Edward S. 269 
Bowden, James H. 205 
Bowker, Kenneth 60 
Bowler, John 5 1 
Bowles, Ivan 5 1 
Box, Gertrude 88 
Boyd, H. 114,276 
Boyer, Lawrence 88, 103, 276 
Bracy 80 
Bracy, Carl 50, 77, 86, 207, 

279 
Bradham 230 
Braeutigam, Earl 5 1 
Brandenburg, Ronald 176, 

177,276 
Brashares, C. W. 109,269 
Brauer, Fred 259, 260 
Breitwieser, George 51,61 
Brewer, Arthur 5 1 
Brewer, Rebecca 4, 77, 207 
Brewer, Wayne 5 1 
Briggs, Gene 232 
Briner, Charles 5 1 
Brines, George S. 51 
Brinkmeyer, Dennis L. 205 
Brissenden, Carrol 5 1 
Brissenden, Eugene 5 1 
Brittain, Joan T. 205 
Britton, Ernest R. 269 
Britton, William E. 279 
Brock 230 

Broman, Ralph W. 205 
Brooks, E. B. 269 



Brooks, Gerald 255 
Broom, Dale 5 1 
Brown 186 
Brown, Anna 269 
Brown, Charles 252, 260 
Brown, Clifford C. 31,271 
Brown, Donald 5 1 , 60 
Brown, H. 114,269,276 
Brown, Harold 51, 69 
Brown, Harry C. 279 
Brown, Helen 224, 225, 271 
Brown, Paul B. 269 
Brown, Robert 114, 115, 
122, 133, 139, 143, 144, 
174, 176, 177, 189, 190, 
191, 198, 199,267,276 
Brown, Rosie 271 
Brown, Thomas 43 
Brown, W. L. 236 
Brown, Walter M. 279 
Brown, Wensel 236 
Brown, William M. 269 
Brown, Wilson 51 
Brownfield, Lorraine 27 1 
Brownfield, Michaelynn 224 
Brownfield, Sharon 27 1 
Browning, Eldon 231 
Broyles, Merle D. 280 
Bruno, Tony 60 
Bryan, Lawrence 191, 198, 

199, 276 
Bryant, Bobbie 271 
Budina, John 144, 176, 276 
Budnik, Charles A. 205 
Buetelman 227 
Buford, J. Lester 109,279 
Bullock, Helen D. 128 
Bundy, Howard 104, 144, 

176, 276 
Bunge 33, 245 
Bunge,Jim245, 261 
Burge, Fletcher 5 1,70 



Burger, Lowell 189,190,191, 

198, 276 
Burger, Patricia 271 
Burguart, Edmund 235 
Burk, J. Thomas 271 
Burk, Mary 224 
Burk, Robert 271 
Burke, Robert R. 205 
Burkett, Eva 103, 276 
Burkey, Wayne 104, 105, 269, 

276 
Burner, Jarvis 144, 176,276 
Burnett, Jim 238, 251 
Burns 252 
Bums, Cicero 43, 51 
Burns, Cloyce 251, 252 
Burns, Curtis 43, 51 
Burns, Don 245 
Burns, Frances 271 
Burns, Pamela 271 
Burris 245, 246 
Burris,Don245, 261 
Burroughs, Kent 260 
Burton, Vivian 88, 276 
Bush,W.E. 271,280 
Butler 232, 239 
Butler, George 239, 281 
Butler, Marvin H. 51 
Butler, Walter 269 
Button, Robert 269 
Butts, Dennis 279 
Butts, Louis 105, 114, 115, 

143, 144, 276, 279, 280 
Buzzard, Harry 5 1 
Byran, Lawrence 198 
Byrd, Gordon L. 205 



Caldwell, Carla 87, 276 
Caldwell, Carol 276 
Caliandro, Arthur R 280 



Two Hundred and Eighn-Fivt 



MC KENDREE" 



Callahan, Frances 205 
Calvert, Dale 256 
Campbell, Barbara E. 280 
Campbell, Hugh 271 
Campbell, Robert H. 4, 98, 

131 
Canedy, Frank 235 
Cannady, Edward W. 269 
Cantrell, Robert 144, 176 
Canty, Mildred 271 
Capazzoli, Louis 260 
Cardwell, Carol 87 
Carlisle, Myron 5 1 
Carlton, Don 269 
Carradine, John 175 
Carrico, Larry K. 205 
Carson, Leonard 269 
Carson, Mary Margaret 223 
Carson, Paul 51, 69 
Carson, Richard 5 1 
Carson, William 5 1 
Carstetter, Chris 259 
Carter, Ray 229 
Carter, Samuel 103, 104, 276 
Cartwright, Peter 7, 8, 124 
Caruthers 250, 251,252 
Caruthers, Almus 249 
Carvel 228 
Carver, George W. 93 
Case, Leland D. 280 
Case, Lloyd A. 205 
Cass, Robert 190, 276 
Cast, Allen 51 
Castillo, Lloyd 112, 239, 240, 

247,254,258,281 
Cates, Robert 137,271 
Catt 228 

Caughlin, D. W. 117 
Cavins, Edward 5 1 , 60 
Chamberlin 117, 118, 228, 

262 
Chamberlin, Hypes 10, 21 



Chamberlin, McKendree H. 

228 
Chamberlin, Ruth 38, 122, 

133 
Chapman, B. F. 269 
Chapman, Charles 141,271 
Chapman, Robert 5 1 
Charles, Neva 46, 276 
Chester, Mary 176, 177,276 
Christ, Erwin 271 
Church 122, 236 
Church, H.B. 51 
Church, Harrison 4 
Church, Helen 4, 138 
Church, Leon H. 34, 46, 47, 

87, 221, 238, 247, 262, 

276, 279 
Church, Virgil 80, 139, 236, 

262,271,281 
Ciriaco, Ruth 205 
Clare, Thomas H. 51,69,72, 

73 
Clark, Aletha 271 
Clark, Forrest 262 
Clark, Marital 15, 276 
Clark, Otha 114, 115, 139, 

143, 144, 174, 176, 177, 

189,276 
Clark, Tom 260 
Classen, Alice 269 
Clayton, Doria 271 
Clayton, James 190, 276 
Clendenin, Allen 256 
Clendenin, Leonard 24 1 , 256, 

258 
Clucas, Samuel J. 261 
Cobleigh, Nelson 9, 117, 183 
Coen,H.E. 269 
Cofield, William Lawrence 

281 
Cole, Dwayne 177, 189, 190, 

191, 198,276 



Coles, Glen 52 

Collard, Merrel 235 

CoUie, James 98, 103, 104, 105, 
112, 221, 239, 240, 247, 
252,254,258,276,281 

Collins, Clarence C. 280 

Collins, Mike 259 

Collins, William 52, 69 

CoUver, Marcia 27 1 

Comer, James 269 

Comfort 230 

Compton, Karl T. 74 

Conaway, John B. 205 

Conner, Darrell 240 

Connett, James 52, 69, 280 

Connett, O. E. 79 

Connett, Xon 52, 72, 73 

Conrow, Marion 46, 276 

Cook 231 

Cook, Claudia 225 

Cook, George 52 

Cook, Jack W. 205 

Cook, Lymon 52 

Cook, Vickie L. 205 

Cooper, Dolores 222 

Cooper, Josiah 52 

Copeland, William 205 

Corlett, Debra271 

Cornell, Betty 271 

Comwell, "Dudes" 229 

Correll, Paul 43, 52 

Corrie, Harold 52 

Corris, Beryl 52 

Corzine, Marvin 52 

Couch, Walter 25, 276 

Cousley, Paul 269 

Covey, Cyclone 103, 104, 
105,276 

Cox, Charles 12, 139,271 

Cox, Jennie 115, 143,276 

Cox, Nell 143, 144, 276 

Cox, Ralph 143, 276 



Two Hundred and Eight) -Six 



Cox, Robert 143, 144,276 
Coyle, David M. 205 
Cralley 229 
Cralley, E.M. 281 
Cralley, Lester V. 28 1 
Cralley, Lewis J. 281 
Cramer, Donald 52 
Crawford, Joe 52 
Creek, Jack 252 
Creek, John 252 
Cremeens, James L. 52 
Crenshaw, H. 114,276 
Crocker, Don 269 
Crone, Le 254 

Crouse, Eli 25, 269, 276, 279 
Crowe, Charles Monroe 279 
Cruse, Letty98, 271 
Cruse, Loy Dale 112, 114, 

115, 139, 143, 144, 219, 

239, 254, 255, 256, 258, 

260,276,281 
Crutcher, John 251 
Cullen 248 
Culver 248, 250 
Culver, Harold 236, 248 
Cummins, David 60 
Cummins, Evelyn 271 
Cummins, J. W. 269 
Cummins, Mrs. B. R 269 
Cummins, W. L. 269, 280 
Cunningham, Veronica 271 
Curry, Edward M. 52 
Curtis,Cyril52, 73, 281 
Curtis,John60, 144, 176,242, 

276 



D 

Daily, Charles L. 269 
Daniel, Katherinc 103, 105, 
114, 115, 139, 143,276 



ijMC KENDREEjfe^ 

Daniel, Raymond 52, %. 97, 27 1 
Dannenbrink, Robert 52 
Darin, Ann 225 
Darling, Brian K. 205 
Darrah, Thomas 4, 193, 197, 

203,271 
Darrow 248 
Daumueller, Bill 33 
Davidson III, William A. 205 
Davidson, J. 98 
Davis, Don 59 
Davis, E. A. 221, 229, 233, 

236, 247, 258 
Davis, Harry S. Jr. 205 
Davis, Helen M. 205 
Davis, Jefferson 10 
Davis, Mrs. Robert 269 
Davis, O. Sue 271 
Davis, Raydean 1 10 
Davis, Robert 52, 237 
Dawes, Earl 87, 88, 103, 109, 

144, 176,276 
Dawson, Ted 271 
De Bourge, Janet 225, 227 
Deedle, George 269 
Deems, William 205 
Dcering, Michael 199.276 
Delente, Gail 177 
Dcmarcc, Camilla 225 
Dcmick, Margaret 190,276 
Deneen. Charles S. 170, 171, 

179,269 
Dennis, l':d271 
Dennis, James M. 4, 267 
Denton, Johnnie Dec 260 
Denton, Maurice L. 205 
Derickson, Woody 255 
Dermondy, Hartcr 238 
Dcrwclis 230 
Detweiler, Daniel E. 205 
Devery, Raymond E. 1 86, 27 1 
Devore, William Gchl 280 



DeWeese, MaryA. 271 
Dexheimer, Herbert 269 
Dickerman, Allen 143, 276 
Dickson, George E. 269 
Dickson, John L. 279 
Dickson, Zada 105, 111, 114, 

115. 143,276 
Diecker, Karen 227 
Dilente, Gail 276 
Dillender. Margaret 271 
Dillender, Richard 271 
Dilliard, Irving 122, 133, 186 
Diseth. Glenn 177,276 
Dittcmore, Audrey 114, 115, 

276 
Dittcmore. Eldon 109, 110, 

114. 115. 143, 144. 174, 

176. 177. 189.276 
Dixon 127 

Dixon. Alan J. 133 

Dixon. Elizabeth 114. 115, 

122, 123, 133, 139, 276 
Dixon. Frances 189,271.276 
Docrncr231.232 
Doerncr. Fred 52. 238 
Dolan. Beth 88. 103.276 
Dolley. James C. 21. 25. 27. 

34. 45, 46, 235, 276, 279 
Donaldson, F-li/a 27, 30, 34. 

42,45,46,47,84,87,88, 

103,276 
Donaldson, Ivan 52 
Donaldson, Victor 52 
Donham 232 
Donham, Clyde D. 52 
Donham, Mary 115,276 
Donham, Sam 52, 144, 176, 

177, 189.238.276 
Donoho. F:. W. 262 
Doolen 230, 249 

D(K)len, Arthur 25, 27, 52, 69, 
22 1 , 229, 233, 236, 247, 276 



-5.2c^;S^^^\ 



Iwii Humlrpd anil I mhl 



MC KENDREE 



Doolen, Darrell 27, 276 
Dorencamper, Betty 271 
Dorencamper, Thomas 27 1 
Dorris,C. H. 269,279 
Dorris, W. R. 269, 279 
Dosier, Robert 269, 279 
Dougherty, Dora 222 
Douglas 246 
Douglas, Bemice 57, 70 
Douglas, Bill 245, 246 
Douglas, Patty 225, 227 
Douglas, Paul 122 
Douglas, Stephen A. 8 
Douhitt, Harry 52 
Downey, Leo 193, 272 
Drabik, Alex 67 
Drake, James 189, 190, 191, 

198, 199, 276 
Dressel, Elton 52 
Dressel, Lavem 52 
Driscoll, David R. Jr. 205 
Drought, James 175 
Dubson, Geoffrey 272 
Dunbar, Deborah 272 
Duncan, Mabel 222 
Duncan, Myrtle 222 
Dunn, Millard C. 205 
DuRall, Don 252 
Duram, Robin 191,276 
Durham, David 209, 272 
Dustin, John 103,276 
Dutler, David 189, 190, 191, 

219, 256, 258, 276 
Dycus, Ernest M. 269,279 
Dysinger, Wendell 176, 177, 

189,276 



E 

East, Larry 52 
Eaton, Dorothy 223 
Eaton, William 52, 230 



Ebbler, Edward 235 
Eddings, Arnold 52 
Edwards, Etta 136 
Edwards, George 52, 72, 73, 

232, 238 
Edwards, Herman 252 
Edwards, J. R 262 
Edwards, Mrs. Gilbert 269 
Edwards, Ralph 41, 52 
Edwards, Robert H. 4 
Eicher, Oliver 235 
Eidman, Arthur E. 269 
Einsman, Herman 144, 176, 

276 
Eisel, Mary 272 
Eisel, Richard 272 
Eisenhower, Dwight 91, 131 
Eisenmayer, Andrew 10,217 
Eldridge, Kay 260 
Eller, Meredith 83, 87, 276 
Elless, Vernon 52 
Ellis, Dave 245 
Ellis, Estil 52 
Englebright, Larry 254 
Ernst 231 
Ernst, Sol 52 
Eskra, Vic 242 
Eskridge, Robert 272 
Essington, Jerry 252 
Etling, Terry 256 
Evans, Harry 272 
Evans, Janet 272 
Evans, Jerry 261, 272 
Evans, Ken 107 
Evans, Thomas 103, 104, 105, 

276 
Evers, Owen 236 



Faeth, Warren 59 
Fagin, Charles 202, 272 



Fagin, Mary 272 

Fairburn, Velma 105, 143, 
144, 176, 276 

Farquhar, L. C. 269 

Farrington, Erwin E. 68 

Farthing, Chester 38 

Farthing, Paul 38, 269, 279 

Fary, Raymond 53,281 

Faulkner, Dorothy 84 

Federer, Tina 272 

Feldt, Amie 239, 240, 254, 255 

Feller, Bob 64 

Fenton, Mike 256 

Ferguson, Nancy 272 

Ferrier, Sue 272 

Ferris, Sarah 272 

Few, Benjamin F. Jr. 205 

Fiedler, Mary 272 

Fiegenbaum, Bruce 53 

Figley, John L. 280 

Filley,Glen25,215,221,229, 
233, 236, 247, 258, 276 

Finley, James 53 

Finley, Maxine 56, 70 

Finley, Mike 242, 245 

Finley, Robert O. 53, 72, 73 

Finney, Hershel 202, 272 

Fischer, John 272 

Fischer,WilliamA. 53, 281 

Fitch, Robert 176, 177, 276 

Fizer, Dan 255, 258 

Fizzell,John53,61,70 

Flamuth, Forrest 53 

Flanders 230 

Fleming 111, 112, 113, 139, 
165, 184 

Fleming, Fred 80, 83, 87, 88, 
96, 103, 104, 105, 112, 
114, 115, 139, 143, 144, 
165, 168, 174, 176, 177, 
186, 189, 190, 191, 198, 
276,280,281 



Tho Hundred and Eighty-Eight 



Flesor. Paul 53 
Flinders. Brad 260 
Flint, Edith 10 
Florek, Terry 245 
Floro, Mrs. Jack 272 
Fohne. Albert 272 
Folk. Patrick 4. 6 
Ford. Laura 46, 276 
Ford, Sally 225. 227. 281 
Foreman, Rebecca 10 
Fortado. Robert 144.276 
Foulk, Madeleine 29 
Fowler. George A. 279 
Fox. Charles 60. 79 
Fox, Lawrence 53, 87, 276 
Fox, R. C. 103,276 
Fox, Rayburn 269 
Fox, Tommy Lou 103, 276 
Franklin, Darrell 279 
Franklin, Hany 205 
Frazier, Ken 1 1 2 
Frederich, William J. 46 
Frederick, William 276 
Freeman, Hazel 198,276 
Freeman, Loren 1 15, 176. 276 
Freeman, Loren K. 114, 115, 

143, 144 
Freiner, Glenn 88. 100. 104. 
105. 112, 114, 115, 119, 
139. 143. 144. 169. 174. 
176. 177, 187, 189. 190. 
191. 196.198.199.208. 
276 

Frerking, Verena 272 

Frcshour, William 53 

Frey 62 

Frey, Junealda 53, 61, 70 

Friedli, Fritz 235, 247 

Frisby, Raymond 272 

Fritz, Herbert 53, 70 

Frost, Paul R. 205 

Fry, Karen 272 



MC KENDREE~fC^ 

Fulkerson 230 

Fulkerson, Woodrow 237, 

249,281 
Funkhouser, Clyde 4, 167, 

269, 272, 280 
Funkhouser, Paul 198, 199, 

242,245,260,276,281 



Gabrenya, Mark 272 
Gaddy, Howard 53 
Gafke, Roger 144, 276 
Gammon, Oren 53 
Gantrell. Robert 276 
Garcia. Beatriz 177, 276 
Garcia, Marino 114, 143, 144, 

176, 177, 189.276 
Garrett 242 
Garrett, Chuck 242 
Garrett, Clifford 235, 236 
Garrison 107, 109, 113, 122, 

123 
GaiTison. Carol 107 
Garrison, Mary Elizabeth 107 
Garrison,Webbl07, 110, 113, 

118, 119, 127, 131, 142, 

207, 280 
GaiTison, William 107 
Garvin, Boyce 53 
Garvin. W.B. 25. 276 
Garvin. Wiley 25. 103, 105 
Gauble, Kay 272 
Gauble, Michael 272 
Gaut, Kay 272 
Gay. Holt 53 
Gedney, Burton 239, 254, 

269,281 
Gee, Donald 87 
Gee, Mrs. Donald 276 
Gee, Wade 60 
Gehmin. Phil 272 



Geiger, Orville 53 
Geist, Andrew P. 60 
Gentry, C. 221, 235, 247, 254, 

279 
Gibson. Stanley 53 
Gibson, Ted 53 
Gier, Scott 53 
Giger, Margaret 272 
Gilbert, Helen 4, 199,276 
Giles, Rebecca 4. 207 
Gilkerson, Catherine 223 
Gillespi, William 59 
Gillespie, Virginia 272 
Givens, Eldora 198,205,276 
Givens, Mary 104, 105,276 
Glotfelty 138 
Glotfelty, Frank 53 
Glotfelty. P R. 34, 272 
Glover, Lee R. 87,276 
Glowatski, Edward 4 
Godbold, Albea 269 
Godwin, Beatrice 47, 87, 1 03, 

104, 105, 143, 144, 176, 

276 
Godwm, John 105, 114, 115, 

139, 143. 144, 176,276 
Goetter, Gary 272 
Goldenberg. Max 269 
Goldstein, Burton 87, 276 
Goode. Ray 248. 251, 252, 

281 
Goodfellow, William 9 
Goodman, George 269 
Goodpaster, Andrew 53, 73, 

75, 109, 280 
Goodyear, Robert R. 205 
Gordley, William P 269 
Gordon, Annette 198, 272, 

278 
Gott, Edith 272 
Gould 232, 236, 248, 25 1 , 252 
Gould, Clifford 229 



7iir> Hundred and Eighry-Nine 



MC KENDREE^T^ 



Gould, H. D. 45, 46, 276 
Gould, Herbert 232, 233, 238 
Gould, Homer 236, 281 
Govro, Marvin 87, 276 
Graf, King 119 
Graham, Lena 272 
Grandy97, 109, 113 
Grandy, Marguerite 103, 104, 

105, 276 
Grandy, W. N. 96, 103, 104, 

105, 113, 114, 115, 131, 

139, 143, 144, 174, 176, 

177,276,280 
Grauel, Walter 53 
Gray, James 176, 177, 189, 

190, 191, 198,276 
Green, Edith 280 
Green, Gary M. 205 
Greene, Kenneth 269 
Greenwalt, Donna 272 
Greenwood, Bartley J. Jr. 4, 

49, 53, 232, 238 
Greenwood, Estelle 4 
Greer, Freeman 1 15, 143, 144, 

176,277 
Gregory, Bill 238 
Gregory, Dick 175 
Gresson, Larry 242 
Griebel, Roy 59 
Grieve, Leland 53 
Griffin, Paul 238 
Griffith, Mayme 80, 269 
Grinnell, John E. 280 
Griswold, Kathleen 59, 70 
Grob, Constance 4, 269 
Gross, John O. 122,280 
Gross, William 272 
Grothjahn, Harry 53 
Grove, James 53 
Grove, Larry 252 
Grove, Lynn 109, 181, 189, 

190, 191, 198,277 



Grow 94, 95, 102 

Grow, Dorah 103, 104, 105, 

277 
Grow, Engel 252 
Grow, Russell 86, 92, 102, 

207 
Gruber,Georgel91,198, 199, 

277 
Gruchalla230,231,249,251, 

252 
Gruchalla, Frank 230, 249 
Gruchalla, James 53, 231 
Gruchalla, Jim 250 
Guandolo, Joseph 229 
Gullett, Russell 40, 60 
Gullick, Lucy 272 
Gummersheimer, Victor 177, 

189, 190,277 
Gutekunst, Bertha 34, 46, 47, 

87, 88, 277 
Gutekunst, Helmut 34, 46, 47, 

83, 87, 88, 103, 104, 105, 

112,240,277 
Guthrie, David 252 



H 

Haack, Ethel 272 
Haack, Gottlieb 272 
Hackney, J. Carlyle 46, 277 
Haddox, Hayes 205 
Hadfield 262 
Haeuber, Onita 272 
Hagan, John 75 
Hageman, Inez 227 
Hahs, Billy G. 79, 269 
Halcomb, Jayhew 60 
Hale, Sarah 22 
Haley, Alex 175 
Halfond, Irwin 4, 265 
Hall 229 
Hall, C. C. 269 



Hall, Charles 53 

Hall, J. O. 269 

Hall, Kenneth 280 

Hall, Louise 272 

Hall, Orval 228 

Hall, Orville 221, 233, 247, 

258 
Hallberg, Patricia 272 
Hailing, Milton 236 
Halloran, Diane 227 
Hamill, C. 108, 269, 279 
Hamilton, Velma 227 
Hamm, Benjamin 53 
Hamm, Robert N. 53, 70 
Hammill, James M. 180 
Hammonds, Denver 272 
Hanbaum 111, 112 
Hanbaum, Blanche 272 
Hanbaum, W. L. 269, 279 
Hand, George 134, 136,269, 

280 
Handel, Helen 223, 227 
Handlon 232 
Handlon, George 53, 62 
Hanser, Harold 269 
Happy, Cy 253 
Harden, K. 114,277 
Hardesty, Kathy 225, 227 
Hardin, V. S. 269 
Hardy 262 

Hardy, C. D. 45, 46, 277, 279 
Hardy, D.M. 122,269 
Hardy, Robert 269 
Hardy, Vernal 269, 281 
Hargis,Wilma 143,277 
Harmon 15,62,231,232,233, 

237, 238, 250, 253 
Harmon, "Ace" 232 
Harmon, Bill 272 
Harmon, Cameron 13, 18, 19, 

29,35,220,227,229,254, 

269,281 



Tii'o Hundred and Ninety 



MC KENDREE 



Harmon, Dale 269, 279 
Harmon, Dorothy 42 
Harmon, Elvin 262 
Harmon, John 54, 62, 237, 

250, 269 
Harmon, John "Ace" 281 
Harmon, "Johnnie" 235 
Harms, Raymond 60 
Harper, Henry 54 
Harper, Leslie 144, 277 
Harper, Pauline 25, 27, 45, 62, 

209, 277 
Harr, Mike 257 
Harrell, Joseph 25, 277, 279 
Harris 250 
Harris, Barry 246 
Harris, Cecil 177, 277 
Harris, Frank 88, 269, 

277, 279 
Harris, Harold 272 
Harris, John A. 205 
Harris, Marshall 54 
Harris, Roy D. 54 
Harris, Saline 54 
Harris, St. Clair 269 
Harris, Timothy 272 
Harris, WilUam 272 
Harrison, Steven T. 205 
Harropp, Arthur H. 279 
Harsky 230 
Hart, Milton 110 
Hartley 237 
Hartley, Robert 27, 237, 247, 

277 
Hartman,Art251,252 
Hartman, Donald 54, 238 
Haseman, Leroy 54 
Haskin248,251,253 
Haskin, Glen "Jack" 281 
Hasler, Robert 269 
Hassenflug, David 259 
Hassett, Ray 242, 256 



Hauser, Ruth 224 
Haverman, Dale 246, 281 
Haverman, Gary 246 
Hayden, Everette 54, 69, 73 
Hayes, Bill 260 
Hayes, Dick 260 
Hayes, Raymond 54 
Hayter, Earl 27, 45, 277 
Heam, Gale 198, 205, 277 
Heame, Gary 256 
Hearst, John 54 
Heath, Vernon 269 
Hecker, H. F. 269, 279 
Hedger, Frank 54 
Hedges, Brenda 225, 227 
Heeley, Charles 54 
Heer, Eldon 54 
Heinecke, Bumell 60, 279 
Heiser, John 60 
Heitman, Dean 239 
Hellmer, Bill 256 
Helms, Carmett 4, 191, 277, 

281 
Hemmer, Thomas 60 
Hemphill, Charles 269 
Henderson 238 
Henderson, A. K. 45, 46, 54, 

69, 221, 223, 237, 247, 

277 
Henderson, John 237, 269, 

280 
Henderson, Newton C. 279 
Henman, Mary 272 
Henry, Ron 246 
Herman, Myrl 54 
Hernandez, Roberto 79 
Herrin 239 
Herrin, Homer 269 
Herrin, Richard 239, 240, 247, 

252,260,281 
Herrin, Ron 238, 252, 281 
Hertenstein 99, 227 



Hertenstein, Blanche 34, 272 
Hertenstein, Clifford 45, 231, 

262, 277 
Hertenstein, Dan 262 
Hertenstein, Dorothy 223, 227 
Hertenstein, Harold 23, 46, 

88, 103, 277 
Hertenstein, "Mom" 40 
Hess, Gladys 272 
Hess, Robert D. 205 
Hickenlooper, George 199, 

277 
Hickman, Lester 43 
Higgenbothan, W. 114,277 
Hill, James R. 205 
Hill, Mrs. Ralph 269 
Hill,Stephaniel44, 177, 189, 

190, 277 
Hindelange, Mary 191, 198, 

277 
Hines, Elva 4 
Hines, Ernest J. 68 
Hines, Gail 54, 69 
Hinson, Arthur 54, 73 
Hippie, Sam 241, 242 
Hirons, Sidney 143, 277 
Hirth, Frank 25, 277 
Hock, Edward 190, 277 
Hodapp, Leroy 269 
Hodge, Michael L. 205 
Hodge, William 135, 139, 

143, 144, 174, 176, 177, 

189, 190, 191, 198, 199, 

277 
Hodges, Jay 128 
Hodgson, Julia 272 
Hodson, Glenndon 269 
Hoercher, Ronald 262 
Hoffman, Edward 103, 105, 

209, 269, 277 
Hoffmann, Harrison A. 54 
Hoge 66 



Two Hundred and Ninety-One 



MC KEN DREE" 



Hohn, Dorothy 34, 87, 277 
Hohn, Gottlieb 25, 277 
Hohn, Reinhold 34, 45, 46, 

47, 83, 87, 277 
Hohn, RosaUnd 27, 221,277 
Hohrein, Dan 272 
Holderby, Nigel 272 
Holderman, James B. 280 
Hollingsworth, Mary 273 
Holhs, Bob 97 
Holman,C. C. 172, 180, 181 
Holmes 232 
Holmes, Mason 85, 238, 270, 

281 
Holsinger 229 
Hoist, Don 198, 199, 277 
Holt, B. J. 270 
Holt, Bill 260 
Holt, Ivan Lee 280 
Holzhauser, Stanley 60 
Hook, Max 245 
Hooper, Ron 202 
Hoover, Bonnie 225 
Hoover, Dorothy 227 
Hoover, Herbert 13,280 
Hopkins, Elizabeth 189, 190, 

277 
Hopkins, Richard 177, 277 
Hoppe, Arthur 54, 69 
Horman, Connie 225 
Homer, Ethel 112, 143, 144, 

176, 277 
Horsch, Lawrence 115, 143, 

277 
Hortin 63 

Hortin, Arthur 27, 115,277 
Hortin, Charles L. 54 
Hortin, Dale E. 54, 62 
Hortin, James 54 
Hortin, L. Joseph 279 
Hortin, Paul 54, 69, 279 
Hortin, Ross 54, 238 



Horton. A. E. 230 
Houghland, Bamby 273 
House, Naomi 190, 277 
Houser, Gene Lowell 60 
Howe, Agnes 25, 27, 277 
Howe, Gaylon 54, 69 
Howe, Georgia 273 
Howe, Raymond 54 
Howe, Richard 54, 60, 104, 

105, 277 
Hoyt, Eugene 238, 239, 240, 

245,247,281 
Hrasky 230 
Hubbell, Chlorus "Fuzzy" 

229, 236 
Hubble 238 
Hubbs, Cletus 240 
Huck, Harold 189,277 
Huck, Raymond 27, 277 
Hudson, Joyce 222, 224 
Huff, Dale 60 
Huff, Gordon 54, 73 
Huffman, Arthur V. 280 
Huffman, Shelia 273 
Huffstutler, Jessie 273 
Hug, Annette 4 
Hughes, Martha 223 
Hull, Monty "Monk" 232 
Hurley, H.G. 141,270,279 
Hum, Luther 270 
Hursey, Howard 60, 79 
Husted, Grace 189,277 
Hypes, Benjamin 19, 217, 281 



laun, Ward 255, 258 
Iberg, Marcella 273 
Irwin, Archibald E. 205 
Isaac, Elbert 60 
Isaacs, Thomas 235 
Isom 248, 250, 252 



Isom.John229, 236, 281 
Isselhardt231,232 
Isselhardt, Benny 232, 238 
Isselhardt, Bernard 15 
Ittner, Warren 255, 256 



Jack, Charley 236 
Jackson. Andrew 9 
Jackson, David 60 
Jackson, J. 98 

Jackson, James 198,273,277 
Jackson, Junealda 61, 70 
Jackson, Marion B. 54 
Jackson, Max E. 54 
Jackson, Peggy "Chip" 224 
Jackson, Robert G. 54 
Jackson, William 54 
Jacobs 227 

Jacolick, Donelda 273 
Jaeckel, Roy 54, 63, 237, 254 
Jaeger, Kenneth 273 
Jaffe, Jack M. 205 
James, Bill 259 
James, Mrs. Darrell 270 
Jane, Liza 84 
Janes, Leonard 177, 277 
Jeans, Myra 223, 227 
Jefferson, Doris 273 
Jenkins, Farrell D. 270 
Jenkins, M. 98 
Jennings, James 87, 277 
Jennings, Robert 270 
Jensen, Roger 260, 270, 279 
Jewett, Jennie 154 
Jinx, Jonah Hoodoo 18 
Johnpeter, Albert 54, 70 
Johnson 245 
Johnson, Bob 260 
Johnson, Buddy 260 
Johnson, Charlie 273 



Tiio Hundred and Ninen-Tnc 



MC KENDREE 



Johnson, Dan 245, 256 
Johnson, Ernie 238 
Johnson, Jesse O. 205 
Johnson, Lyndon B. 169 
Johnson, Tim 257, 258 
Johnson, W. 242 
Johnson, Wendell 242, 256 
Johnston, P. M. 270 
Johnston, Wayne 270 
Johnston, William 60 
Jonah, Wesley 87, 221, 232, 

233,238,247,251.277 
Jones 237, 241 
Jones, Charles 55 
Jones,Douglas 190, 191,198, 

199, 277 
Jones, Edward 55, 237 
Jones, Greg 246, 257 
Jones, Kathy 225, 227 
Jones, Marvin 241 
Jones, Sammie C. 273 
Jones, Sherman Lyle 60 
Jones, Wes 138 
Jones, Will 138 
Jopin, Laum 105, 277 
Jossell, Leonard 270 
Juda, Ralph 60 
Jung, Loren 115, 277 
Just, Robert 55 



K 

Kaisor, Allen 270 
Kamm, Bemice 177, 277 
Kamm, Richard 191,277 
Karandjeff, Ernest A. 270 
Karnes, Guy Otwell 281 
Karstens, Wallace 55, 70 
Katayama, Roy 44, 60, 232 
Katayama, Mike 44 
Kaump, Ethel 105, 277 
Kean, Roy 270, 279 



Keck, Clifford 55 
Keck, Marcella 139, 175,273 
Keene, Steve 245 
Keeping, John E. 205 
Keldermanns, Maude 144, 

176, 277 
Keller, Steve 4 
Kelly, Joan 190, 277 
Kelly, Larry 232 
Kelso, W. A. 220, 248, 253, 

270 
Kemp, James F. 205 
Kennedy, Blaine 60 
Kennedy, Carolyn 27. 277 
Kennedy, George 55 
Kennedy. John F. 1 3 1 
Kennedy. Philip 115. 190, 

191,277 
Kercher, Robert 55 
Kerner, Otto 136,280 
Kerr, Mariella 115,277 
Kerr, Whitney 143,277 
Kershner 227 
Kesnar, Maurits 1 24 
Kessler, Mike 256 
Kessler, Sara 273 
Kestly,Williaml43, 144, 176, 

277 
Ketring, W.Howard 103, 277 
Kettlekamp, Wesley 25, 277 
Kiehna, Pat 225, 227 
Kimmle, Jo Ellen 270 
Kimmle, Orval 258 
King 255 

King, Jean Fisher 103,277 
King, John 199, 277 
King, Lucille 273 
King, Martin Luther, Jr. 113, 

169 
King, Wayne 254, 255, 258, 

281 
King, William 103,277 



Kinison,J.W.A.25,277,279 
Kirkpatrick, Dean 55 
Kirts,Jeanl89, 190, 191,198, 

199, 221, 222, 224, 225, 

277 
Kittle, Louis 273 
Klamp, Dudley 23 1 
Klein 262 
Klein, Peggy 227 
Klein, Wilbert 273 
Kleinschmidt 82 
Kleinschmidt, Janelle 87, 224, 

277 
Kleinschmidt. Marion 223 
Kleinschmidt. Oliver 25, 27, 

34, 45, 46, 47, 82, 83. 87, 

88. 103, 208, 209, 277, 

280 
Knapp, Arthur 79, 80, 270 
Knott, Vivian 4 
Koebel, Delmar 104, 105, 

115,270,277 
Koerber, Ruth 33 
Kohlmiller, DarrellH. 4, 91 
Kolokolo, Messiah 260 
Kolsea 248, 250, 251, 252, 

253 
Kooner, Murray 277 
Korte, Dennis 242, 245, 256, 

281 
Korte, Sy 256 
Kovac, John 190, 191, 

199,277 
Kovner, Murray 1 05 
Kraemer, Gerhardt 127, 
Kraft, Charles 45, 277 
Kraucovic, Richard 114, 277 
Krause, David 273 
Krause, Mike 261 
Krause, Robert 270, 280 
Krieger, Marvin W. 22 1 
Krizek, G. 55, 237, 262 



198, 



129 



Two Hundred and Ninen-Three 



MC KENDREE" 



Knieger, Marvin W. 247 
Krughoff, Mildred 46, 277 
Kruh, Robert 55 
Krumeich, John K. 60 
Kruwell, J. Max 25, 277 
Kubach, Bob 255 
Kugler, Morris 270 
Kuhl, Phyllis 273 
Kurrus 63, 230 
Kumis, Robert 55, 63 
Kwon, Ik- Whan 190, 277 



La Russa, Randie 225 
Lacquement, Delbert 55, 69, 

229, 270, 280 
Ladas, Pat 60 
Lahr, Guy 273 
Lahr-Well, Almeda 273 
Lamb, Mrs. Robert 273 
Lambeth, Bill 252 
Lambeth, William 279 
Lamblin, Wendell D. 270 
Landry, Adam 273 
Lang, Harry 55 
Langenwalter, Robert 55, 250 
Large, Aaron 235 
Large, Lulu 222 
LaRose, Dorothy C. 117 
Larsh 230 

Larsh, Howard 230, 231, 281 
Larsh, John 231, 237 
Laurence, Frank 221, 233, 

247, 258 
Lautenschlaeger, Frances 273 
Lawson, George 198, 205, 

277 
Lawson, Harold 25, 277 
Le Van, L. C. 228 
Leaf, Wallace 55 
Leake, Charles R. 205 



Leas, Carroll 176, 177, 189, 

277 
Leckrone, Charles 108, 239, 

252 
Leckrone, E. 270, 280 
Leckrone, Harry 55 
Lee 238 
Lee, Bobby 238 
Lee, Leslie 60 
Lefler, Helen 190, 277 
Lehman, 'Dopey' 112 
Leiber, Joseph 104,277 
Leilich,Avis 103,277 
Lesher, Gladys 46, 277 
Lester, Michael 4 
LeVan,L.C. 221,233, 247 
Lewis, Bobby N. 205 
Lewis, D. W. 103, 277 
Lewis, Donald 144, 176,277 
Lewis, H. 262 
Lewis, Robert L. 205 
Lewis, William 270 
Lientz, Mary Blanche 87, 277 
Lincoln, Abraham 8, 163 
Lincoln, Tad 1 63 
Lindsay, Lisa 227 
Linton, Bob 242 
Linton, Fuzz 242 
Livingston, Park 270 
Lizenby 228 
Loar, M. L. 270 
Lobring, Kim 4 
Loehring, Wayne 245 
Logan, Bernard 55 
Logan, John A. 8, 225 
Logan, Ralph 55 
Long 232 

Long, Charles 55, 250 
Long, Lester 242 
Lopinot, Alvin 55 
Lotz, Dick 260 
Loucke, Charles 280 



Loucke, Vernon 280 
Lougeay, Donald 273 
Lougeay, Jean 103, 104, 105, 

277 
Loving, Harold 270 
Lowe 64 

Lowe, Carrol 55, 63, 72, 238 
Lowe, Cecil 55, 64, 69, 270 
Lowe, Donald 55, 270, 273, 

280 
Lowery, Joseph 270 
Lowry, Earl C. 55, 64, 69, 70 
Loy, James 41, 55, 238 
Lucas, W. L. 227 
Lucy, Luanne 222, 225, 227, 

273 
Luedeman, Cindy 225, 227 
Lusk, Don 262 
Luttrell, Consuelo 270 
Lyerla, James 60 
Lyons, George 273 



M 

Mabry, Robert 144, 277 
MacDonald, Scott D. 280 
Mack, Luvesta 273 
Madden 231 
Maddox, Clifford 238 
Magee,Ralph81,92,95,270 
Magill, Guy 236 
Magill, L. A. 270 
Magill, Mayo 236 
Mahan, Don 55 
Malernee, Lydia 222 
Malina, Emil 273 
Malone, C. 98 
Mandley, Calvin 273 
Mandolini, Ann 190,277 
Mandrell, Kent 191,277 
Maneke, James 273 
Mange, Aedythe 25, 277 



Two Hundred and Ninen-Fou 



Manier, Carl 110 
Manis, Alfred 55, 237, 238 
Manuel, Esther 177,277 
Manuel, Paul 273 
Manwaring, Albert 55, 231, 

237, 250 
Manwaring, Charles 55, 73 
Manwaring, Jack 270 
Marck, Virginia 273 
Markarian, Anthony 60 
Markman, O. L. 270 
Marks, John 273 
Markwell, Dave 256 
Marlen, Debby 227 
Marshall, F. L. 187 
Marshall, James 270 
Martin 232, 236, 248, 251, 

253 
Martin, Daniel B. 55, 73 
Martin, Emery 236 
Martin, Francis 55 
Martin, Henry G. Jr. 205 
Martin, Howard 273 
Martin, James 236 
Martin, John C. 270 
Martindale, Harry A. 55 
Marty, Ralph 144, 176, 177, 

189, 190,277 
Maser, Frederick E. 280 
Mason, Kenneth V. 55 
Mason, Lew 103, 277 
Massey, Karen 225 
Massie, John 273 
Matikitis, Ron 242 
Matthews, Charles R. 55 
Mauck, Paul 230 
Mauser, Gary 257, 258 
Mautz, Ford 38 
Mautz, Ruth 38 
Mautz, W. P 140, 141, 184, 

270 
Mauzy, Bill 247 



Mauzy, Paul 238 

Mauzy, William 87, 88, 277 

Maxey 228 

McAnn, Ann 277 

McAnnich, Thomas 199, 277 

McCable, Robert 60 

McCain, John 109, 112, 114, 

115, 139, 143, 144,277 
McCall, Louis E. 205 
McCammon 222 
McCammon, Dorothy 223 
McCann, Ann 176 
McCann, Harold E. 270 
McCarthy 113 
McCarty, Daniel E. 205 
McClain, James E. 270 
McClay, Elmo T. 55, 70 
McClintock, Elizabeth 47, 

277 
McClure,S.M.25,27,34,45, 

46,277,281 
McCormick, J. L. 270 
McCracken 270 
McDaniel, Ruth 45, 46, 277 
McDuffy, Michael 273 
McFall, Steve 260 
McGarrity, Patrick 4 
McGrew, D. 98 
McGrew, Rodney 261 
McKall, Jim 259 
McKay, Orville Herbert 280 
McKee, Joseph 176, 190,277 
McKee, Wilbur 25, 277 
McKendree 155 
McKendree, William 155, 203 
McKinley, L. Dean 270 
McKnelly, Charlie (Bear) 110 
McKnight, Timothy 270, 279 
McKown, L. S. 270 
McLain, John V. 55 
McLaren, June 273 
McMurphy 8 



McNeely, Evelyn 25, 27, 277 
McNelly, Debby 227 
McNelly, John W. 55 
McReynolds, Janet 190, 191, 

198,277 
McVey, W. P 270 
Mead, John F 205 
Meddows, Ken 257 
Meeker, Tim 4 
Meggs, Kathi4, 163,273 
Meggs, Lawrence 273 
Memmer, John H. 205 
Mendez-Vigo, Castor 191, 

198,277 
Mercer, Donald 55 
Mercer, Opal 144, 277 
Merkel 123, 124, 126, 127 
MerkelHenry 123, 126, 127, 

279 
Mess, Keith 260 
Metz, Mary 87, 277 
Metzger, Donald 109, 270, 

279 
Meyer 249, 251,252 
Meyer, Anne 4 
Meyer, Beaney 249 
Meyer, Frederick 198, 199, 

277 
Mignery, Emile 56, 69 
Miles, Hugh 56 
Miles, Ralph A. 205 
Milholin, Leslie McKendree 

Jr. 155 
Miller 228 
Miller, Brainard 60 
Miller,Charlesll4, 115, 143, 

144, 176, 270, 277, 279 
Miller, Chester F. 279 
Miller, Gordon 177,277 
Miller, June 176, 277 
Miller, Maxine 56, 70, 227 
Miller, Richard W. 279 



Tho Hundred and Ninen-Five 



MC KENDREE 



Miller, Robert 205 
Miller, Ruth 33 
Minelli, Jenny 4 
Minier, Bruce 242 
Minnegerode, Frederick 189. 

190, 277 
Miser, Wilson 103. 104. 105, 

277 
Missey, Karen 225. 227 
Mitchell. Charlene 199, 277 
Mitchell. John J. 270 
Mitchum, George 190. 277 
Mockler, Lee 56 
Moeller, Mary 224, 225, 227 
Monarch, Sam H. 205 
Monken, Ralph 56 
Monken. William 273 
Monroe, James 133, 270 
Montague. Hal 193. 201. 202, 

273 
Montague, JoAnn 4, 20 1 . 202. 

273 
Mooney. Lee 56 
Moore, Angle 227 
Moore, Daniel 143, 277 
Moore, R.M. 117 
Moores, Anita 227 
Moorman 230. 23 1 
Moorman. George 237 
Morby. Jim 242 
Morgan. Joe 260 
Morgan. Judy 273 
Morgan. Phyllis 273 
Morris, Delyte Wesley 280 
Morris, Francine 190. 277 
Morris. Robert 270 
Morriss. A. W. Jr. 262. 270 
Morse. Walter 25. 27, 56. 277 
Moss, Dorothy 273 
Motsinger, V. 98, 281 
Molt. Hugh B. 67 
Mount 270 



Mowe 227, 262 
Mowe, Orena 227 
Mowe, Ronald 262 
Mueller, Harry 135 
Mueller, Jim 256 
Mueller, Walter 273 
Mueller. William 273 
Mueth. Charles 56. 64. 65. 

237 
Mule. John 256 
Mulligan. Robert A. 280 
Mulvaney. Annette 176, 177. 

277 
Mumaw. Joan 273 
Munoz, David 273 
Murdock 254 
Murphy 193. 197 
Murphy. Julian H. 193 
Murray. Elmer 103. 104. 277 
Murtagh. William J. 120 
Musgrove. Raymond 56, 230, 

231 
Musso, Terry 256, 258 
Myers, Malcolm 56, 238 



N 
Nagel, Bill 232 
Nail. Jim 256 
Nailing. Geraldene 273 
Naismith. James 234 
Nattsas. Albert 56 
Nave. Julian 280 
Neal. Inez 103. 114. 143. 144. 

176. 277 
Neal. Richard 260 
Neale. Philip 191. 198. 199. 

277 
Neblock. Charles 190.277 
Neider. Deborah 273 
Neider. Robert L. 273 
Neil. C. Edmund 279 



Neill. Clifford 270 
Nelson, Irvin 25, 277 
Nelson, Sherman 241 
Nesmith, Harry 56, 70 
Nettleton, James 105, 114, 

115,270,277 
Newcom, James 229, 236, 

262 
Newcomb, Mary Ann 4, 273 
Nichols, Charles 38, 115,277 
Nichols, Jess 262 
Nickell. Patricia 115.277 
Nicklen. Gerald D. 205 
Nielsen. Gerald 87. 88. 103, 

277 
Nies, Phyllis 143, 222, 277 
Nitsch, Chris 4 
Nooner, H. H. 270 
Norman. Abner 256 
Norris. Clair 56 
Norris. Kenneth 114. 190.277 
Northam, Emily 274 
Noss. Emma 25. 277 
Nothdurft. Harold 56 
Nottrott. David 242 
Novotng. Steve 249 
Nugent. George 56 
Nugent. Paul 115.277 



O'Brian. Johnny 239 
0-Brien. Robert 56, 66, 69, 70 
0-Connor,Gary 191, 198.277 
Oexemann. Stanley W. 281 
Officer. Marion E. 56 
Ogden. Judy 274 
Ogent. Albert 88. 277 
Ohl. Diane 225 
Okon. Emanual 259 
Olack. Adalbert 274 
Oldfield. Dorothy 274 



hvn Hundred and Vtn 



Oldfield, James 114, 115, 138, 
139, 143, 144, 221, 240, 
247, 277 
Olds, Ellen 225, 227 
Olds, Marjorie 274 
Oliver, Clarence 242 
Olmstead, Richard 105,277 
O'Malley, Martha R. 280 
O'Neal, Dave 262, 270 
Oppenheimer, J. Robert, 73 
Oppitz, Harold 274 
Oppitz, John 56, 66 
Oppitz, Louis 25, 27, 45, 277 
Oppitz, Nell 25. 27, 34, 45, 46, 
47,87,88, 103, 104, 105, 
277, 280 
Oppitz, R. James 4, 29, 56, 70. 

71 
Ore, Harold 56 
O'Reilly 64 

O' Risky. Dorothy S. 205 
Osbom, Homer T. 22 1 
Osbom, Robert L. 56, 73 
Osborne, Homer T. 247 
Osling, Julia 25, 27, 278 
Osterhage, Stanley 4 
Ottinger, David 160 
Otto, Frank 270 
Ottofy, Lewis 279 
Overton, Robert 270 
Owen,EmerialI04, 105, 111, 
112, 114, 115, 129, 139, 
143, 144, 174, 176, 177, 
184. 186, 189, 190, 191, 
198, 199, 201, 202, 267, 
278 
Owen, James William 280 
Owen, Stephanie 144, 176, 

177, 185, 189, 190,278 
Owens, James W. 270 
Oxendine, Clifton 42 
Oxendine, Herbert 56 



Pace, Bobby S. 205 
Packard,Davidl39, 144, 176, 

177, 189,278,279 
Page, Ray 280 
Pagles, Carl 274 
Palmer.Miley4, 107, 110, 117 
Paniello, Sandy 205 
Paradis, Patricia 274 
Park, Helen 143, 144,278 
Parker, Jack 254, 255, 258 
Parker, Sophy 25, 27, 278 
Parks, Elizabeth 87, 88, 103, 

105, 114, 115, 122, 123, 

276, 278 
Parks, Helen 176 
Pathenos, George 60 
Patmore, Olive E. 25 
Patterson, Andrew 56, 238 
Patterson, R. A. 105,278 
Pattmore, Olive 278 
Peach, C. B. 270 
Peach, Janet 274 
Peach, Robert H. 56, 70 
Pearce, Eva 223 
Pearson, T.M. 104, 105,278 
Pegg, Ruthellen 175,274 
Pemberton, Wilfred A. 56 
Pence, George 274 
Pence, lone 274 
Pennell, Anial 56, 73 
Pennell, Lowell 56 
Pennington, Chester A. 280 
Pepper, Virginia 274 
Percival, Laura 225, 227 
Percy, Charles H. 135 
Perkins 248, 250, 251, 252, 

253 
Perkins, James L. 205 
Perry, John 60 
Peterson 248 
Peterson, Charles L. 270 



Peterson, Dan 144,219,278 
Peterson, Lewis V. 56 
Petri, Jeri 225 
Pettit, Lloyd 229 
Petty 250 
Petty, Mason 56 
Pfeffer, Dorothy 223, 227 
Pfeffer, "Froggie" 235 
Pfeffer, Jack 62, 237, 262 
Pfeffer, R. 254 
Pfeffer, W. C. 80, 270 
Pfeffer, Will 30 
Philips, Olin 235 
Phillips, Earl C. 270, 279 
Phillips, Frank 220 
Phillips, Minnie 274 
Phillips, Morris 56 
Phillips, Suzanne 224 
Phillips. Wendell 57 
Pierce, Frank 114, 115,278 
Pike, Raymond 57 
Pimlott, Walter 57, 72, 73, 

238 
Pinkston, James 57 
Piper, Marion 270 
Pistor, Howard 57 
Pittenger, Dick "Pitt" 232 
Pittenger, Theodore 104, 105, 

278 
Pittman, LeRoy 136 
Plater, J. Rue 57, 70 
Plato, William 57, 73 
Podesta, William 57, 70 
Podesva, Glenn 274 
Poe, William H. 57, 70 
Polk, Lucian V. 205 
Polka, Bob 260 
Pollak, Tom 245 
Pomeroy, Katherine 274 
Pope, Harry H. 187 
Porter 185,259,260 
Porter, Archie 57 




Two Hundred and Ninely-Se 



MC KENDREE~^~ 



Porter, Howard 189, 190, 191, 

198, 199, 259, 278 
Porter, Ray 97 
Posage 232 

Posage, Edward 57, 72 
Posomato, Nick 256 
Postel, Philip 270 
Poston, Marianne 191, 198, 

278 
Potter, Abby 177,278 
Potter, SusanneR. 281 
Potthas, John 260 
Powell, William 281 
Price, Melvin 122,266 
Priddy, Barbara H. 205 
Proctor, Don 240, 241 
Proost, Robert 176, 278 
Pruett241 

Pruett, Charles E. 57, 70 
Pruett, Walter 57, 69 
Przybyl, Mike 259 
Pulliam, Robert 103, 278 
Purdy, Edgar 104, 278 
Purdy,Leslie57,88, 103, 104, 

270, 278 
Putt, Dwight 143, 144, 176, 

278 



Quick, Edward 57 
Quinn, Monica 4 



R 

Rackham,Eric 128, 129, 178, 
179, 181, 183, 188, 202, 
207 
Rafferty, Barbara 274 
Rafferty, James 199,278 
Raines, Richard C. 122 
Rainholt, John 60 



Randall 232 
Randall, Malcolm 57 
Rapinot, Allen 57 
Rapp, Norbert 274 
Ratcliff, William F. 218, 220 
Ratz, Sherry 225 
Rauth, Johnny 237 
Rauth, Walter 230 
Rawlings 248,251,252 
Rawlings, Dave 260 
Rawlings, Wyatt 57, 270 
Reader, Mary Louise 223 
Recard, Richard 57 
Redden 238, 239 
Redden, Hugh 103, 221, 233, 

238, 247, 278 
Redden, Jim 252 
Reed, Amos 57 
Reed, Bob 260 
Reed, Curtis 242 
Reed, Earl H. 119 
Reed, J. Frank 27, 278 
Reed, Leone C. 27, 278 
Reed, Mary Etta 227 
Reeder, Orpha 143, 144, 176, 

278 
Reese, Myron 189, 190, 191, 

198, 199, 278 
Reese, Pee Wee 63 
Reinert, Paul 280 
Reinhardt, Florence 222 
Reizer, James 60 
Remick 253 
Rendlemen, John 270 
Renfro, Mary 176, 177, 278 
Renner, Chuck 246 
Reynolds, F J. 105,278 
Reynolds,!. H. 105,114,278 
Rezba, Ben 256 
Rhiel 229 

Rhoden, Linwood 274 
Rhodes, William J. 60 



Rice 126, 127, 140,231 
Rice, Grantland 231 
Rice, Leroy 230, 231 
Rice, Priscilla 126 
Rice, Roland 87, 109, 112, 

114, 115, 122, 123, 124, 

133, 134, 139, 143, 144, 

174, 176, 177, 189,278 
Richards, Charles 270 
Richardson, Francis 103, 104, 

105,278 
Richardson, Larry 242 
Richardson, Raymond 270 
Richichi, John 60 
Richter, Terry 242 
Rickey, Branch 19, 270, 279 
Ridgeway, Bette 97 
Ridgeway, Jean 46, 278 
Riggs 240 
Riggs, Jeff 240 
Ripley, Alvin 274 
Ripley, Donna 274 
Ritchey, Ralph 57, 70 
Roberts, Bill 241, 256, 260 
Roberts, C. J. 27, 278 
Robertson, Ressho 270 
Robinson, Bonnie Baer 274 
Robinson, Frances 57, 70 
Robinson, Frederick 190, 193, 

274, 278 
Robinson, Wendell A. 270, 

279 
Robler, Jerry 259 
Rode, Albert 57, 73 
Rogers, C. J. 270 
Rogers, Howard 177, 189, 

278 
Rogers, Martha 227 
Roloff, Robert 25, 27, 278 
Rongey, Bemice 57, 70 
Roos, C. M. 270 
Roosevelt, Eleanor 69 



Two Hundred and Ninety-Eighl 



Roosevelt, Franklin D. 18 
Roosevelt, Theodore 7, 141 
Root, Etta 136 
Roper, Martin 97, 104, 105, 

278 
Rose, Doug 259, 260 
Rosenberger, Elvis "Al" 60, 

85,86,232,251,252,270, 

279,281 
Rouland, Elmer A. 60 
Roy, Herbert 87, 278 
Royer 255 
Royer, Harold 254 
Royston, Ralph 205 
Rucker, Robert 60 
Runyan, Frank 236 
Russ, Walton 57 
Russell, Fred 240 
Russell, Garland 270 
Russo, Tony 256 
Ruthenburg, John C. 205 
Rutland, Mary Lou 274 
Ryker, Charlotte 105, 278 



S 

Sager 67, 232 

Sager, Allen 57 

Sager, Bob 79 

Sager, Milton 57, 66, 67 

Sakurai, Edward 143, 144, 

278 
Sallman, Warner 1 63 
Salmon, Paul 57 
Sampson, James 42, 57, 230, 

231 
Sampson, John Paul 42 
Sampson, Paul 250 
Sanders 250 
Sanders, Bill 67, 249 
Sanders, John 57 
Sanders, William 57 



Sanford, Stephen G. 205 
Sapp, Margaret 87, 278 
Sappington, Glen 58 
Sauders, Phil 261 
Saunders248, 249, 250, 251, 

252, 253 
Saunders, William 230, 248 
Sawyer, Elizabeth 223 
Sayre 228, 229, 235 
Sayre, E. 235, 254 
Sayre, Harvey 235 
Sayre, Norris 254, 262 
Sayre, R. 87, 88, 103, 104, 

105, 114, 115, 120, 143, 

144, 254, 278, 279, 280 
Scarborough, William 46, 

278, 280 
Scarritt, Nathan 270 
Schaefer251,252 
Schaefer Robert 252 
Schaefer,Ed232,251 
Schaefer, Edgar A. "Slick" 

281 
Schaefer, Trina 225 
Schafer, Robert 236 
Schaffer, Eugene 27 
Schanz, Orville 4, 60, 112, 

114, 115, 139, 143, 144, 

174, 176, 177, 189, 190, 

191, 198, 199,267,278 
Scharnau, Ralph 176, 177, 

189,278 
Schaulat, Mike 246 
Scherer, George 27, 45, 278 
Schermer, Avery 270 
Schiefer, Audrey 274 
Schieppe, John 256,258,260, 

274 
Schieppe, Dona 274 
Schlafly, Phyllis 175 
Schmedake, Albert 58 
Schmidt, H. G. 270, 279 



Schmidt, Mark 257 
Schmidt, Webster R. 27, 45, 

46, 278 
Schmitt, Barbara 274 
Schmucker, Martha 25, 278 
Schmulbach, Sandy 274 
Schnipper, Gail 191,198,278 
Schnyder 227 
Scholl, Lewis31,46, 58, 69, 

221,232,233,247,278 
School, Lewis 221, 232, 233 
Schoon 262 
Schoon, John 144, 176, 177, 

278 
Schoon, Sara 177, 191, 198, 

278 
Schroeder, Herbert 58 
Schroeder, Joan 274 
Schuler, W. Douglas 205 
Schulte, Robert Leland 255, 

258,274,281 
Schupback, Larry 259 
Schwarzlose, Thomas 58, 72 
Schwerdtfeger, Dale 190, 278 
Scott, Frank 58 
Scott, Kenneth 58, 237 
Search, Theodore 229 
Searles, William 58 
Seiber, Robin 191, 198, 199, 

278 
Seibert, James T. 279 
Seibert, Paul 58 
Seim, Norm 260 
Selecman, Charles C. 92, 93 
Sells, Jimmy 238 
Seubert,E. 122, 177, 189,278 
Sexton, Dennis 256 
Seymour, Virgil 104, 105,278 
Shadowen, Edward 229, 236 
Shaffer, Eugene 25, 278 
Shamalenberger 227 
Shandler, Donald 274 



Two Hundred and Niners-Nine 



MC KENDREE' 



Sheese, Ernest 58 
Shepherd, Richard 58 
Shick 235 
Shinn. Kevin 261 
Shipp, Harold 58, 232 
Shirley Michael 4, 201, 202, 

205, 274 
Shriver, Phillip 280 
Shull, Dede Ann 88, 278 
Shumard, Charles 270 
Shurtleff240, 250 
Silver, Mildred 96, 97, 103, 

104, 105, 112, 115, 124, 

125, 139, 140, 143, 144, 

278, 280 
Simmonds, Ellice 115, 143, 

278 
Simmons 232 

Simmons, Kelly 144, 176,278 
Simms, James 104, 105, 115, 

278 
Simon, Paul 184,270,280 
Simons, Herbert 58, 73 
Simpson, Robert E. 60 
Simpson, Samuel W. 60 
Sims, John 4 
Sims, Raymond Paul 79, 270, 

280 
Skaar, Marguerite 177, 189, 

278 
Skaggs, Bruce T. 205 
Skelton, Neva 165,270 
Skiles, Charles E. 270 
Slagle 99 

Slagle, J. Edward 274 
Slaten, H. 58, 69 
Sleeper, Theodore 60 
Sleight, Ralph 58 
Smalley, Stimson 104, 105, 

112,278 
Smith, C. 235 
Smith, C. Earnest 58 



Smith. Charlotte 274 
Smith, Clyde 143, 144, 176, 

278 
Smith, Earnest 72 
Smith, Edwin 58 
Smith, Ernest 238 
Smith, EulaR. 34,46,47,87, 

278 
Smith, Jean 86 
Smith, Jonas 58 
Smith, Judith 144, 278 
Smith, June 270 
Smith, L.W. 219, 247 
Smith. Linda 274 
Smith, Linn 240, 254, 255, 

258 
Smith, Lowell 270 
Smith. Milton 274 
Smith, Opal 223 
Smith, Peggy 223 
Smith, Jeremiah J. 205 
Smith, Sheri 274 
Smith, Van 256, 257, 258, 274 
Smith, Walter 270, 274, 279 
Snead 169 

Snead, Doris 137,274 
Snead, Nancy 274 
Snead, Vernon 139, 164, 167, 

174, 176. 186. 197, 274, 

278 
Snyder, Richard 58 
Sohan, John P 205 
Song, Inbum 205 
Sonners, Dale 252 
Sooy 230 
Souders, Phil 246 
Sowers, Thomas B. 60 
Sparhawk, Thomas 4 
Speiser, King 255 
Speiser. Ron 255 
Spencer, Aileen 25, 27, 45, 46, 

278 



Spencer, Edwin R. 25, 27, 40, 

45.46.281 
Spickard. Jim 254, 258 
Spieser, Ron 258 
Spiller, John 58 
Spradley. Bill 238 
Spudich.J. 230, 281 
St. Martin, Phillip 57 
Stalker, Dave 256 
Stambaugh. Bemice 224, 225, 

260,261 
Stamper, Constance 274 
Stanfield, Karen 190, 191, 

198, 199, 278 
Stanley, Marvin 115 
Stanley, Robert 104, 278 
Stansell 249, 251,252 
Stansell, Howard 249 
Stanton, Arline 223 
Stanton. Barbara 274 
Stanton. John 274 
Starr, Margaret 198, 199 
Statham221,242 
Statham,Harry 177, 189, 190, 

191, 198, 199, 221, 242, 

247, 258, 259, 266, 278 
Statham. Rose 224 
Steck. George 80 
Steck, Mary 274 
Steckman. Lillian 27, 45, 278 
Stegall, Kenneth 58, 72, 73 
Stein, Richard 240 
Stelzriede, F. 34, 47, 87, 209, 

270, 278 
Stelzriede, Wesley 58 
Stevenson, Mrs. Nell 270 
Stevenson, Adlai 91, 93, 122, 

279 
Stevenson, N. G. 80 
Steward, Reed 274 
Stewart 193 
Stewart. Edward B. 270 



Three Hundred 



MC KENDREE~]E^ 



Stewart, John 115,278 
Stewart, Reed 193, 197,274 
Stewart, Robert 127 
Stiers, Frank 190, 191, 198, 

199, 278 
Stiles, Lindley Joseph 280 
Stilwell, Harry 237 
Stivender, Willie 87, 278 
Stockton, Carl 177, 189,278 
Stoecklin, Leonard 58 
Stoffel, Robert 60 
Stokes, C. 172,221,233,235, 

247 
Stone, Bob 245 
Storey, Walter 279 
Stout, J. B. 270 
Stowell,CharlesJ.23,25,27, 

34, 38, 45, 46, 47, 83, 87, 

88, 103, 104, 105, 278, 

281 
Strain, Lee I. 60 
Strange, John 104,278 
Stratton, William 110, 122 
Strecker, George 23 1 
Streif 185 
Streif, Edward 190, 191,198, 

199, 278 
Strobo, Dan 260 
Stroehlein, Eddie 58 
Stroh 237 
Stroh, Cleve 236 
Strotheide 250 
Strotheide, Emil 237 
Stuart, Bill 274 
Stuart, Dorothy 275 
Stuck, Charles A. 270 
Stumpf, Hope 105, 278 
Sturm, Roy 177, 189, 190, 

191,202,278 
Subhan, John A. 163 
Suggs, Raymond 58 
Suhrheinrich, Dick 262 



Sullins, Perry 236 
Sullins, William 236 
Summers, Charles 236 
Suzuki, Ken 259 
Svoboda, Katherine 199. 278 
Swahlen, Percy 270 
Swanson, Carolyn 4 
Swick. Dennis 256 
Symer, Denny 256 
Symer, John 240 
Symington, Stuart 110 



Tanaka, Kenji 44 
Tanner, D. 98, 143, 278 
Tanner, Ralph M. 280 
Tappmeyer, PA 270 
Taylor, Curtis 58, 67, 73 
Taylor, Velta Jean 104, 224, 

278 
Tedor248,249,251,252,253 
Tedor, Stephen L. 58 
TenBrink, Gerrit 4. 197,265, 

266. 267 
Tenney, Robert 58 
Tepatti, Antone 58, 70 
Terry, Marsha 224 
Tharp, Jack 119 
Thaxton, Valerie 225, 275 
Thayer, Nap Bon 227 
Thetford, Ira 270, 280 
Thilman, E. 58, 79 
Thomas, Becky 275 
Thomas, Cora 45, 46, 223, 

278 
Thomas, Earl 260 
Thomas, Howard 256 
Thomas, Vivian 4 
Thomlinson, Terry 189, 190, 

191, 198,278 
Thomlinson, Tommye 275 



Thompson, C. M. 279 
Thompson, Everett 270 
Thompson, James C. 270 
Thompson, Judy 225 
Thompson, Mary Elizabeth 

107 
Thompson, Newman 60 
Thompson, Patty 225 
Thompson, Richard 176, 177, 

278 
Thomure, Anne 4 
Thornley, Florence 86, 112, 

139,275 
Thorson, Gayle 275 
Thrall. Charles H. 279 
Thrall, V W. 270 
Tibbetts, Blanche 174, 177, 

189, 190, 191,278 
Timmons, Royce 58, 67 
Tippett. Thomas Jefferson 58, 

73 
Tippin, Annette 198,278 
Todd230, 249, 251,252 
Todd, Clyde 27, 270, 278, 279 
Todd, Earl 236 
Todd, Elmer 230. 236 
Todd. Erie 229 
Todd, Harold 58 
Togias, William 60 
Toles, Lillian 275 
Tollefson, Harris 177, 278 
Townsend, Richard 60, 85 
Trainer, Curtis 115, 143, 144. 

177, 189, 190, 191, 198, 

278 
Trame, Carol 215, 234 
Trame, Irene 275 
Travelstead 270 
Travelstead, Jack 208. 280 
Treat. Robert4. 270 
Tremmel. Ronald 199, 278 
Triggs, Tim 259 



Three Hundred and One 



MC KENDREE KT 



Trimble, Marvin 43 
Trimpe,W. 115,278 
Tritt, Claude 58 
Troutman, Evelyn 88, 103, 

278 
Trover, Joseph E. 270 
Troy, Patricia 189,278 
Trueblood, David Elton 280 
Truman, Harry 74 
Tucker, Billy 58 
Tucker, J. G. 270 
Tuerck, George 1 10, 1 15, 143, 

144, 176, 177, 189, 190, 

191, 198,278 
Turner 228 
Turner, John O. 275 
Tusov, Joanne 189,278 
Tuttle, George 58 
Tuttle, James 58 
Twyman, Louis J. 205 
Tyndall, Elsa 27, 45, 278 



U 

Uko, Okon 259 
Ungerzagt, Russell 58, 72 
Unruh,Adolph 134, 197,265, 

270 
Upchurch, Naida 176,278 
Utley, Burdine221 



VanAken, David 191, 198, 

199, 278 
Vanatta, Paul 58 
Vance, John D. 205 
VanDanElzen, Robert 176, 

177, 189, 190,278 
Vandeloo, Gary 245, 246 
Vandergraft, Rich 261, 275 
Van Dyke, Ruby 223 



VanLeer, M. B. 270 

VanLeer, Pauline Harper 46, 
278 

VanWinkle, Lewis 87, 88, 
103, 104, 278 

Vargo, Mike 245, 247, 256 

Vemor, Harold 58, 70 

Vesely, Alice 176,278 

Vesely,L. 144, 176, 177,221, 
224, 242, 243, 245, 246, 
247, 256, 258, 278 

Vick, Claude 25, 27, 278 

Villiger, Clair 58 

Vise, P 115,278 

Vitale, Anthony 4 

Viviano, Vita 4 

Vogel, B. Louis 205 

Voigt, Edwin E. 132, 135, 
136, 141, 142, 162, 163, 
164, 167, 168, 169, 170, 
172, 173, 174, 175, 207, 
270, 280 

Voruz, Thelma 275 

Votrain, Ivy 275 



W 

Wadlow, Robert 19 
Wadsack , Bette 97 
Wadsworth, Milo 60 
Wagener, Fritz 235 
Waggoner, Edward Baker 21 
Waggoner, LeRoy 275 
Waggoner, Roy 59 
Wagner, Boyd 270, 280 
Wagner, Richard 59 
Walden, Rogena 202 
Waldo, Charlie 254, 258 
Waldorf 237 
Waldorf, Ernest 270 
Waldorf, Paul 27, 45, 221, 
230, 233, 237, 247, 278 



Waldron, Nell 27, 278 

Walker, Dee 225 

Walker, Harry 59 

Walker, Maureen A. 205 

Walker, Tom 275 

Wallace, Harold 46, 59, 69, 
278 

Wallenborn, Robert 280 

Walters, Kenneth William 60 

Walters, L. 254 

Walters, O. 254 

Walther, William 198, 199, 
278 

Walton, Ruth 275 

Walton, William C. 5, 11,21, 
25, 27, 34, 45, 46, 47, 59, 
70, 83, 87, 88, 117, 146, 
170, 174, 207, 275, 278, 
279 

Ward 232 

Ward, Charles 275 

Ward, D. 59, 73, 237, 250 

Ward, Harry 59, 71 

Ward, James 275 

Ward, Peggy 275 

Ward, Roy 275 

Ward, Toby 189,278 

Wamecke, Dave 257 

Warner, Joan 105,278 

Warner, Marjorie 275 

Warren, Fount 235 

Watkins, Cormin 229 

Watson, Albert 270 

Watson, John C. 59 

Watt, Ella 275 

Watt, Jim 261 

Watts, Clayton 23, 45, 278 

Wease, Bertha L. 275 

Weatherly, Edward 27, 278 

Weaver, David 105,278 

Webb 168 

Webb, Jean F 227 



Three Hundred and Two 



Webb, Joseph B. 280 
Webb, Lance 167,270,280 
Weber 232, 261 
Weber, A. L. 270 
Weber, Jack 260, 261 
Weber, LaDoris 175, 275 
Weber, Tom 257 
Webster, Margaret 275 
Webster, Stewart 275 
Wehmeier, A. 59, 237, 262 
Weible, Nancy 225 
Weidler, Kathleen 59, 70 
Weik, Alma 275 
Weil, Jill 4, 275 
Weil, Loretta 275 
Weineke, George 235 
Weinel, Richard 119 
Weingartner, Jane 4 
Weir, Stanley 270 
Welbom, G. B. 59 
Welborn, George 237 
Welch, Grace 46, 47, 87, 139, 

143, 174, 176, 177, 189, 

190, 191, 194, 198,278 
Welch, Harold 241 
Wells, Charles 212 
Wells, Mrs. Harry 270 
Welshans, Merle T. 270 
Wentworth, Erasmus 9 
Werle, Arthur 59, 67 
Werner, Kent 115, 139, 143, 

278 
Wesley, Naomi 275 
West, Dorothy 46, 47, 

87, 278 
Weyenberg, Cleve 122 
Wheeler, T. 191,242,261,278 
White 128 
White, Betty 275 
White, Elizabeth 103, 105, 

133, 278 
White, Evelyn 275 



White, Lynn 275 

White, Robert F. 128, 270, 

280 
White, Robert I. 280 
White, Stormy 198 
White, Victor 27, 278 
Whitehurst, Dale 60 
Whitenberg 248 
Whiteside 251 
Whiteside, C. B. 270 
Whiteside, Gaylon 59 
Whitlock, Harold 59, 69 
Whitlock, O. F. 270, 279 
Whitlock, Vera 27, 278 
Whitlock, W. H. 270 
Whittington, Gerald 59 
Whittington, Linda 275 
Wicke, Myron Forest 280 
Wicks, Lester 115, 143, 144, 

174, 176, 177, 278 
Wicks, Suzanne 115, 198, 

278,281 
Widicus, Paul 4, 14, 33, 193 
Wiggins 221, 228 
Wiggins, B. E. 220, 235, 247 
Wildy, Alexander 266 
Wiley, Orval 59 
Wiley, Wilbur 59 
Wilkey, David 186, 275 
Wilkins, G. 115,278,280 
Wilkins, J. G. 270 
Wilkinson, Thelma 176,278 
Willi, "Boots" 235 
Williams 69, 241 
Williams, Burdette 60 
Williams, Charles 59, 68, 270 
Williams, F. 115, 143,278 
Williams, Howard 59 
Williams, Jim 259 
Williams, Mary Ellen 115, 

139, 143, 144, 176, 177, 

278 



Williams, Ted 275 
Williams, W. E. 270 
Williams, Willie 241, 242 
Williamson, Daniel S. 59 
Willis, Albert 229 
Willis, Magdalena 43 
Willoughby, Ernest 189, 190, 

278 
Wilson 231 
Wilson, Alleen 25, 27, 34, 45, 

46, 278 
Wilson, BayneD. 270, 280 
Wilson, D. 231,270 
Wilson, F. O. 270 
Wilson, Jean 86 
Wilson, Kenneth 59, 281 
Wilson, Lester 60 
Wilson, Spike 230, 237, 

262 
Wingfield, John 205 
Winn, Maurice L. 270, 279 
Winning, Robert 59, 70 
Winterrowd, Dorothy 4, 84 
Winterrowd, Lewis 238, 

275 
Wiser, Elaine 275 
Wittlinger, Karl 59 
Wnedling, Marvin A. 205 
Wolf, Thiemo 88, 278 
Wolfe, Mary Blanche 221, 

223,227,281 
Wolfe, Warren 59 
Wolfslau, Doris 275 
Wolfslau,Tom261 
Woo, Edward 43, 262 
Wood, Benson 18 
Wood, Benton 27, 278 
Wood, Jennie 18, 154 
Woodard231 
Woodard, Byrl 59 
Woodbum, Donald 59 



Three Hundred and Three 



27. 



2M 



Woods, Alonzo 275 
Woods, Mike 260 
Woods, Paul 104, 27S 
Woodward, Excan 25 

27S 
Woodward, Robert 270 
Wright 236 
Wright, Bill "Wright 
Wright. Karl 270 
Wright. Laurence 236 
Wright, Marsha 275 
Wright, Mary 45, 46, 27K 
Wright, Merrill H. 59 
Wright, Noble 59 
Wright, William I 15, 144 

176, 177, 27X 



l yViC K EN PRE E^ 



Yamada, Chuzo 280 

Yates, Earl U. 270, 279 

Yelvington. Ruben L. 275 

Yost 15.212 

Yost. Casper S. 279 

Yost. Clark 15,29,30.31.34. 

35,50.77, 118.220.270, 

279 
Yost, Gwendolyn 29. 38 
Yost. Madeleine 29, 38 
Yost, Paul 29.59. 124 
Young. Mary Blanche 281 
Young. Fred 229 
Young, Howard Lee 270 
Young, Loren 59 



Young, Otis B. 25, 278 
Youngs, Louis 209, 261, 275 



Zachritz 233 

Zamrazil, James 189, 190,278 

Zeeb. Harold 275 

Zeller, Roger 59, 72 

Zclman, Elizabeth 191, 198. 

199.278 
Zika. Dean 275 
Zimmerlec. Ann 275 
Zirges. Wilbcr231 
Zook 227 
Zuliene. Sharon 225 



iPWi! 



Hirer Hllil,lr,',l, 1,1,1 l„lir 



Holman Library 
McKendree Collegei 
Lebanon, IL 62234 



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ipa 

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