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Full text of "The McKendrean : being the year book of McKendree College"


There comes a sohc from prairie plain . 
LEBPmn . OLD LEBfinon, 

6nD WeiTIHG VOICES CGTCH THE STRf^Iti 

LEBenon ,OLD LEBflnon, 

MER ROLUnC LEGS. AHD SHADY W0Y5 

Where ERRGnrs dream, eno sine their lgys; 
Old TRYSTinG place of college days 

LEBflMOM , OLD LEBflnON. 
/VIsKEnDREE TOWERirfG ON 1 75 CREST 

LEBanon, old LEBflMOfw; 

A MECCa m THE KNOWLEPGE UUEST 

LEBflnoi^ ,OLD LEBarton; 
Her lore , ano story ages old 

By MflMY fl HEARTH -STOnE GL9DLY TOLD 

The ties Tnax bimd vs multifold 
LEBflnon , OLD LEBflnon 

WhEPS dimness o'er all lustre 5TRflY5 

LEBfirion , OLD LEBanon , 
flno VOICES FaiiNT, no LOHGER PRfli5E 

LEBflhOM, OLD LEBflPtOri', 
OHJAfNGELS RIFT THE: VEIL BETWEEH, 

ThST WEaRY EYE5 MAY CSTCH THE JCENE; 
ED£h5 ETERrSGL CaMPU5 GREEM 

LEBflnOD , MEW LEBflnon. i-rc.B.own. 



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Professor Edward B. Waggoner 



There is perhaps no IMcKemJrco biudem cf die la->t 
<iuaner of a century who does not look back with lo\e and 
priue n]>(.n TvIcKcndree's "grand little niai'.." Profes-or E. 
B. '\\ aggoner. He is the n)Ost t_vpica!l\- McKendreean figin-e 
about McKendree's campus. His very presence carries an at- 
niospiitre that recalls all that is best in McKendreean tradi 
lion. First as a student and later as an in.-lructor, he drank in 
ihe McKendree spirit as he studied and taught side by side 
with such men as President Robert Allyn. Professor l^eneen. 
Professor Suahlen. Professor Jones and other iesser lights of 
that golden age in ^IcKendree history. Xo McKendree stu- 
dent of recent years can look back upon his college life with- 
out pleasant thoughts of Professor \\'aggoner, and he can- 
not think of Professor Waggoner without being concious of a 
soft spot in his heart for the old school of which the orofes- 
sor is a part, and for which he stands as a representative in so 
many ways. 

The high regard in which Pr"fe.-.sor Waggoner is lieM 
bv his former students is such as to warrant the alloting of 
this space to a brief sketch of his career. He was born in God- 
frey, Illinois, in 1853. of Scotch and German ancestry. He wa^ 
gra-duated from McKedree College witli the degree of A. E. 
in 1S75. Later he was given the degree of .\. M. by his alma 
mater. .\s a student Professor \\'aggoner made a fine rerori'i 
in his classes, and was popular with his fellow-students. His 
nresent-dav after dinner speeches on siich occasiiius as reuni- 
on? of his literarv societv and the alumni associations, are the 



delight of the college C'>mmunity, and he is especiallv delight- 
ful when talking of his college days in McKendree. 

After leaving McKendree, Professor \\'aggoner atten- 
ded various normal schools and specialized in the studv of the 
sciences in order to further prepare himself for his chosen 
profession, that of a teacher. He taught several years in the 
public scholls of Illinois, and in i.SSi was made an instructor 
in McKendree College. \\'ith the exception of one year spent 
as professor in Southwest College, Winiield. Kansas his ser- 
vice at ^IcKendree has been continuous. He has been brought 
into close touch with the students not onl\- as teacher of 
science, but also in his capacitv as fiscal agent. Those who 
went to Sundav School also will remember him as .Simday 
School Superintendent, a i>osition in the Lebanon Methodist 
Church which he has held for twenty-four years. Professor 
Waggoner has been twice married. His first wife was ^[iss 
Ella L. Sargent, a graduate of .\[cKendree. His present wife 
was Miss Ella yi. Cowen. C)ne of Professor Waggoner's 
children has alreadv completed the course at McKendree. and 
t\vo arc now students. 

As a teacher Professor \\"aggoncr is widely and favor- 
ablv known. For many years he has been a popular instructor 
at various teachers' institutes. His skill as an instructor is 
attested bv all his former students, one oi whom, who left 
^icKcndree fifteen years ago, recently wr.Me, "Frofesssor 
Waggoner is the best teacher I ever had, and I believe he is 
the best teacher in the world. 



Ifoicworb 

^^ 

ill lielialf (if the class nf imi 5 we prebcnl tlie first voi- 
inne ni the .McKendieaii tn the facuUy, students ant', ahinini 
01 the college. We trust that those who read this book nia\- 
find much therein that is pleasing and ol vahie. 

In prejiaring diis book the editors recognize the fact 
that thev are establishing a precedent for this institution. 
Tiiev earnestly hope that such ]irecedent may be improved up- 
on in coming years. 

That the rcMiU as a v. hole i.s not perfect we are well 
aw.'re. and u-hare\er we have 1 A-t-rli",ked or onutted may not 
be due directly to a lack of inlcrost or done intentionally. 
Believing, howeyer that our readers ar^- as. considerate of our 
errors as they arc apjireciative of our accomplishments, we 
present to them this Ijunk, the product of our endeavor. 



Erecting 



If ue nrtVntl it is witli oiir Ljood will. 

Tliat ynii sill ml, 1 think, wc write not {., uffcnd, 

But with gixid will. To show oiir smi)jle skill, 

1 hat is thi: true beginning of our end. 

C'onsiiler then, we write but in despite. 

A\ e do n, it write as minding to content you. 

'^)ur true intent is. all for your delight. 

This is not given, that you should here repent you. 

The jjages are at hand : by what thev shew 

Vou >hall kuLiw all that \ou are like to know. 



Board of Trustees 



JOHN ;\I. MITCHELL, President. 
PROF. JAMBS C. DOLLEV. A. -\L, Secretary. 
FRANK COXDREY, Treasiirt-r. 

PROF. E. B. WAGGONER. A. M., Fiscal Agent. 

REV. JOHN F. HARMON. D. D.. President of the College and ex- 
otficio Moniber ol the Bf.ard. 

Tirin lApilis l<»13. 

B. M. HYPES, .\. iM.. M. D S'Hi.j v'ictor St., St. Louis Mo. 

REV. C. A. BECKETT. D. l.i Centnalia, 111. 

JOHN U. MITCELL. Mt. Carniel, Hi. 

REA'. W. H. POOLE. Olney, 111. 

REV. O. H. CIARK. D. D Vienna, 111. 

E W. F1E(;ENBATM. M. I) Edwardsville. 111. 

JOHN H. FILGHAM. A. Jl.. :\1.D.. 

I'ith St. and St. Clair Ave., East Sc. Louis, 111. 

HENR\ i.A.ND Carmi, 111. 

RKV. F. H. KNIGHT D. D Edwardsville, 111 

EEV. CHAS. D. SHUMaRU, D. D Mt. Carmel, 111. 

IRA BLACKSTOCK Springfield 111. 

HON". JOSEPH B. MESSICK ,East St. Louis, 111. 

Torni Expht'S 1914 ... 

REV. F. M. VANTREESE, iJ. D Canni, III. 

HON. T. A. WILSON Lebanon, 111. 

BISHOP CHARLES W. SMITH, D. D., LL. D., St. Louis, Mo. 

HON. W. C. PACE*, M. D Ashley, HI. 

CAPT. E \y. HERSH Newton, III. 

REV. LAWRENCE SMITH Lebanon, Hi. 

EEV. J. A. SCARRITT, D. D Alton, 111. 

A. L. PIARPER East St. Louis, 111. 

L. C, HAYNES East St. Louis, 111. 

J. M. CHAMBERLIN. A. :« Lebanon. III. 

HON. C. ,1. PFEFFER. Lebanon. Hi. 

Teriii Evpiies 1915 

HON. GEORGE W. PARSCKS Cairo, III. 

REV. LAI'"AVETTE C. WILICIN .. Lebanon, 111. 



REV. J. \V. ILINT, A. M., 1). D Lawrenceville, 111. 

HON. L. Y. SHERMAN Springfield, II'. 

REV. L. W. THRALL, A. Jl., D. D Flora, 111. 

FRANK CONDREY Lebanon, 111. 

REV. ROBERT MORRIS McLeansboro, 111. 

P. M. JOHNSON , St. Elmo, Hi. 

REV. FRANK W. LOY, D. li Effingham, 111. 

HON. CHAS. S. DENEEN, A. M.. LL. IJ Springfield. IV. 

MRS. FANNIE JOLLY Grayville, 111. 

HON. JAMES Jl. IL\M1LL Belleville. Ill 

l!ii.)i<l ..I \ isildls (191i;.) 

REV. C. C. HALL, D. D Vandalia, 111. 

REV. J. t;. DEE Salem, 111. 

REV. G. E. McCAMMON, I>. D Mt. Vernon, IF.. 

REV. NATHANIEL CROW, •■ D. D Fairfield, 111. 

REV. W. T. CLINE. PH. D Alton, 111. 

REV. S. A. D. ROGERS, D L Centialia, 111. 

RE\'. J. A. TAYLOR .' - Carbondale, 111. 

REV. C. L. PETERSON, A. B Marissa, 111. 

REV. J. G. HARMON Graville, 111. 

Alipiiiates. 

RE\. I-', H. KNIGHT. Ii. D Edwardsville, 111. 

REV. W. H. WHITI.OCK Altamont. HI. 

REV. J. G. TfCKER Carbondale. 111. 

Executive Committee. 

RE\'. JOHN F. H^R.MON, U D., President. 
HON. T. A. WILSON, Secretary. 
FRANK CONDREY 
REV. L. C. WILKIN. 
J. B. MESSICK. 

Commissioners of Knilownient Fund 

HON. T. A. WILSON, Treasurer. 
FRANK CONDREY. 
DR. B. Jl. HYPES. 

"Deceased, 



The Makers of this Book 




VIEWS AND SCENES 






J' a s e 8 




EDWIX ri'l'i/V I.AKI-R >va. hnm 
in tlie hairJ.ct of .Mecliaiiicsvillr, 
Ashtalenla Co.. Ohio. Son vi ,i 
iiethodist Afinister. After fniisliinj.' the 
pubhc school, two years were spent in 
■Grand River Institute, three years in tlie 
Nortli Ea^t<rn Ohio Xormal College and 
three years at the ( >hio W'esleyan Uni- 
versity, where the dcj;ree .\. L'>. was ob- 
tained. Commenced teaching at the age 
■of 17. first m district school, ihen in a 
graded school, then tutor in the ahiue 
Tiamed Institute. After graduation in 
189.3 took np the work ol the Latin and 
■German Denartments in McKendree 
■College, .\fter three years ni this wnrk, 
■one year was spent in travel and study 
in Enro]ie. Upon returning tu McKeu- 
■dree the work assumed was (jerman and 
ITistory which it has remained to the 
present time. Tn i8i)8 this college con- 
ferred the A, M. degree. 
I'aee 10 




ROBERT ALLEN GILES was boni 
Is^t:, Peoria. Illinois. Was grad- 
uated fro'm Hedding College, 19n9, 
with tlie degre-^ B. S., having majored in 
Mathematics and Science. During his col- 
lege life he took special interest in mili- 
tary activities, bearing non-commissioned 
officers' orders in the organizations of his 
college and state. Spent two summer 
terms in Chicago University, specializing 
in Mathematics. Professor of McKen- 

dree 19U9 — 




Ji.;. IJOI.LEY was hi.ru in a Aletho- 
dist parsonage at New Hampton, 
• \"a. iSfij. Attended public school 
ui \ a. and foin- years at Prince Freder- 
icktnwn. Md. Took the Academy and 
College courses at Randolph-Macon, \"a. 
graduating with A. 13. in 1S.S7, and sev- 
eral years later toolc postgraduate work 
IV. the same institution in French, Phil- 
o: ophy, English and Greek, for the mas- 
ter's degree. Taught public school in 
.Aid. \\'as president of Aheghanv Co!- 
legrate Institute, \\\ \'a. i8S8-cki 
Taught Greek and Latin in Rcekville 
Acadeuiv. Md. one \ear. For three years 
taught Latin, and Mathematics in '^.an- 
<lolDh Macon Acadeni}', \'a. For four 
years taught ( ireek and .Latin, and two 
years served dean of the faculty of Hog- 
sett Militarv .-Vcademy, Ky. For one year 
was Priuci]5al of the Kentuckx W'esley- 
an Academy. Professor of La'.iu in Mc- 
Kendree College 1899. — 




Ei;. WAoijCJXER. A^ -M. ontcrcJ 
McKendree in 1860: Avas grad- 
• luited in 1875. Taught sciiool. was 
graduated in the Pioneer class of the 
Chautauqua Scientific and Literary Cir- 
cle : spent one year at Valparaiso. In- 
diana. Professor, one year in Southwest 
Kansas College. Specialised in Science 
at the School of methods. Chautauqua 
i^ake Xew York. Has conducted Insti- 
tute work in Southern Illinois for many 
Aears. Professor of Science in McKen- 
dree 1S80.— 




Wll.l.l.VM 1-LIXT THRALL A. 
1;. McKendree College. i<;oi ; 
.\. M.. ibid., 1902. Two years 
o\ graduate study in the L niversity of 
Illinois and the University of Chicago. 
At present pursuing courses in the latter 
school looking toward the degree of Ph. 
in English. Tutor in Spanish McKen- 
dree College 1S90-1900. Teacher Public 
Schools in P.lue, .Arizona 1902-04. Re- 
])Orter for World's Fair Company. St. 
Louis. 1904. Principal McLeansboro 
(111.") High School 1904-0:;; Principal 
I'lora (111) ITigh School. 1905-08. Head 
Department of English, Decatur (111.) 
High School, 1908-09. Professor of 
English. McKendree College since 1909. 




WILLIAM C. WALTOX grad- 
uated from Brighton (111.1 
High School, 1886: taught two 
vears in public schools : entered ^IcKen- 
dree 1888 receiving the following de- 
grees. A. B. 1892, A. M. 1S94. Ph. _D. 
1897. Joined Southern Illinois Confer- 
ence in 1S02. \\'as pastor two years at 
Huev. 111. Spent one summer term in 
Chicagii I'niver-ity specializing in 
Greek. 



^=^ H I u in n i ^= 

'"' Ye 'winds of memory, sweep the silent lyre." 



Officers of the Alumni Association 



DENEEN, LL. D.. I': 



WILLIAM F. THRALL, A. II., Vice President. Chairm; 
union Committee. 



MRS. WALTER H. BLANK. B. S.. 

MRS. HOMER C. EISEXMAYER. 

WILIJA.M C. WALTOX. PH. D.. 

EinVIX P. BAKER, A. JL 1 

EDMl'XU .1. BURGARD, B. S. | 
HELEX !.. HORXER. B. S. I ■^' 
ABBIE .L WALRATH. A. B. 



beotetary. 
D. F... Treasurer. 
Hi.itorian. 



.itive Committee. 




,;HAKLES S. DEXEEX 



XLhc 
Senior 





S c n i V s 



RALPH SMITH COXDREY, A. B. 
Lebanon, Illinois. 

Platonion; Tieasurer '12, ]:!; Atli- 
Ittio Eflitor McKendrean '13. 

■.S>,-ri/( is i^rcat but r.iiciicc ,■; 



ERXEST R. CRISP. A. B. 
.Tonesboro. IlliJiois. 

riatonion- Pres. '12, '13: Sec'y Y. 
M. C. A; Pi-ohibition Assoclatiou: 
Relgious Ed. MrKendrean '13. 

"/ was born to loftier tliimssr 



DAISY LEONORA GI.E.W, A.l 
O'Fallon, Illinois. 



lionian: Social Ed. Heartlishl: 
Hunioioiis Ed. ;McKpndrean 'KL 



'iVIiosr liL-artstriiics arc a I'ifr.' 



WILLIA.M M. GRAH,-\M, B. S. 
Greouville, Illinois. 

Platonian; Pros. 'IS; Basket Ball. 
Tennis; Intersociety i.iebate '13. 

''rl inoniiniciilnl licap "/ ;:iiiiplicit\ 
ami ■'""J humor." 



ACNES GILEAD HILL, A. B. 
Lebanon, Iliinois, 

Clionion; Domestic Science: Clio 
Quartet: Music PIditoi' McKen- 
drean '13. 

■•/; is not art. but heart lehich wiu^ 
the :.iilc :eorhl o:rr.'' 

CI. ARK WPJBSTER HOAR, A. B. 
Mounds, Illinois. 

PIritonion: Editor-in-Chief McKen- 
drean "13. State Treasvirer I. P. A.. 
Y. M. C. A: Editor Headlight '12 
Pres. P. A: Atheltic Association: 
Editor Platonian Reminiscent His- 
tory. 

"It makes a man bii; in soul ana 
mind to lo'ee something bigger 
and better tlian himself." 







Seniors 



THOMAS RALPH ISAACS, B, S, 
Xew rJouglas. Illinois. 

I'hilosophian ■ Business ;\lgr. Alclveii- 
drean 'IS: Headlight Staff; Y. M. 
C. A.: Pies. Athletic Association; 
Basket Ball; JIcKendree Quar- 
tette; Intersocietv Debate 'i:'. 



■Hi- sits hlril, ill alt tilt 
/ii-arts 



pinph- 



i;KRTR!"I)E AGNES PKSOLD B. S. 
St. Louis. Missouri. 

Clioniau" Domestic Science; Art 
ICditor McKendrean. 

-With all tliv Icuniiiii^. be sure : 
know thysrlfr 





BESS L. 5L\RKMAX B. S. 
Olney. Illinois. 

Cliouian; Pres. Y. \V. C. A. ■12. 

/.ist c<ili nii- a i-lussic scholar. Id 
lliat hi- my praise." 



CLArilE XEWTO.X STOKES A. B 
Cross\ilIe. Illinois. 

Flatonian; Pres. '1-'. 'i;',; Y. M. C. 
\; Basket Ball; Track: McKen- 
drean Start; Headlight Staff. 

''Tlioii<;h lie be blunt. I know him 
passing wise.'' 





RICHAUI) CLYDE -MYERS A. B. 
Belleville, Illinois. 

I'latonian. Pres. '11. '12, i;;; Y M. 
C. A. Intersocietv Debate 'l". '11, 
■l:J- Literary Editor McKendrean 
'IS; President of Senior Class. 

■"/ am not on the lole of eoninioii 



CLARK ROLAND YOST .A. B. 
Alma. Lllinois. 

Philosophian; President Y. .M. C. A 
'12: Headlight Staff: McKen- 
drea Staff Intersocietv Debati' 
'11. 'i:; : Prohibition Association 
Carson Oratorical '11. Bryan Es- 
say "12. 



•y will tiTar a passage Ihr, 
flintx ribs of thi.i hard 



'h Hu 
\irl,l.- 





S e n i V s 



EMMA BERRY 

Pleasant Hill. Illinois. 

(Two-'iear t'onrsei 

Linniestic Science, t'lionian; Chemis- 
try l.ahoraty Tutor ■11. 'la. '13. 

■■/'.T/. Vi-rsol III biwksr 



VKRl.A GILES 
I One-Year Course) 



Clionian: Domestic Science. 
".1/v mind to nic a kiiii^itoni is. 






HAZEL EVELYX DOPHEIDE 

East St. Louis. Illinois. 

(Two-Year Course) 

'Mionian; E.xpression. 

•■ / (Inii-^hfcr oj the .^imIs. liiriiiclv 



MAYME LEAH GRIFFITH 
Bronnstown, Illinois. 
iThree-Year Course) 

Clionian: Piano. 

•S7i.- siiiilcl as she sut l-.y flu- 

/,</'/.-.'■ 
;.'"///) ./ siiiiU- Unit was child-UI;:- 

and bland/' 



PRISCILLA RUTH KITTLE 
Wakefield, Illinois. 
(Two- Year Course) 

Clionain: Piano: 

"Her inodrst Inok a cottage migl't 
adorn." 



BLA.XCHE .MOORE 
Trenton. Illinois. 



Two-Year Course, Expression. 



■The noblest mind the best eo: 
tentment has." 






Seniors 



!: VTHEL E\"ELYNX .MORGAN B. M. 

Maunee, Illinois. 

(Three- Year Course) 

Clionian: Piano; Vocal. 

'Softly lu-r hiiiicrs wander o\-/ 
1 tic xiddiv.'^ hlai!lc< of i:-o,-x 
floor.- 



rrR.x LOUISE sh.\fer, b 

Carlyle, Illinois. 
I Three-Year Course) 



Clionian; Piano. 



(tl! her sti-f-s. /iiMT'i 






LTHEI. LECHXOR MORG.W B. .\1. 

.Maunee. Illinois. 

I Three-Year Conrse) 

Ci.onian; Piano; Vocal. 

"Is sliL not Massing fair." 



IK.SSIE XORTH 
Lebanon, Illinois. 
iThree-Y'ear Course) 

Clionian; .\cademic; E.xpression. 

"A happy s,oil that all the n'ay. 
'I o licaz-cn hath a siiiniiirr's liav. 



El.r^lE SI.MMiJX.- 

Medora. Illinois. 

I rwo-Y'ear Course i 



Clionian; ^'ocal. 



'■ S\- to her virtues -eerx l;ii}il. 
i:e to Iter faults a I'tt'e hlirii: 



C.R.\CV: .\XCrELIXE STTTOX 

Xe.vton. Illinois. 

( Two-Y'ear Course) 

Clionian; Domestic Science. 
"Let there be quiet." 







5cmor8 




AMY CRACE TURNER 
Bro\Misto\vn. Illinois. 
I Three-Year Course i 

t'liiinian Piano. 

'\slic sl^aihs. bclnii\s. ain! (his jiisr 
.IS she .mtflH." 



BEi^THA ANNA WEBB 

Ewins. Illinois. 

(Two-i'ear Course i 

Clinnian: Votal. 

■■.b/(// fo br neat, still to be drcsscJ 
.Is voii lecrc going to a feast. 



RIBV WIXD.MILLER 

Pleasant Hill. Illinois. 

I Two-Y'ear Course i 

lionian; Expression. 

.'.'\' (lihifeiiee she ii'ends her tcnv. 




MRS BEVIS, Matron of Clark Hall, 




Juniors 





A1>EXAXDER. R. P. 
Belleville. 



Washington and Jeftersou 
Fiatonion. 



hn-til z.'ork.s ui\- pcrfonitcd not tv 
sirciiglh hut by fcrsci-craucc." 



EJI.MA 3ERRV 
PiLtsficld H. S. l-.Ui 



\Vc-/i-/)ic-, SiU-iicc. whai crimes cii\ 
tcr/-,-ti\ilrJ ill thy iniiiic.'' 



VIVIEXXi: KRITTllX 
Alt. 01i\e H. a. 19!i>. 

.1 student. fric-uds. a sliiitt-p.i 
Miin: :eil! tlic 'rare a:is' in ou'< 
inidsf. 



BREWBAKER. C. E. 
Allamont H. S. 



Plaionian: V. .M. ■'. A; Proln Ch: 



''It is such a serious t'liii'^ to />, 
funny nnvi." 



i!.\BEL CRUMP 

Flora H. S. 191ii. 

And still the zeondcr e'-czc. ho:c 
one sinai: h'\id eo'nid cnnv 
all she h'lieie- 



DEFPEXBAPGH, ROY 
liiilosophian. 

"Where duty leads my eour 
onieard still." 











3 u 11 i V s 




EATON S. \ 


HOGAX «. W. 




Edwaidsville H. 
Philosopiiiim Debate -1 
son Oratorical. 

-His ,u-iV. arms heal 
Uit.il /•fill's." 


g 'iiq Mi-Leansboro H. S.. 1!. 
\, l:;': Car- natonian. 

•'SlllOnlli ((S llhnilInK ntol (ihlbf'sl 


■"■■■ 


cnRLiElJA Gl'M>iEI 
Beileiille H. R. 


MOORMAN. I. 0. 
iSFKl.MER 

EdivarrlsviUf H. S, 
lai". Philosophian; Pres. Y. M. C. A, 


'1" 


'■ll'li'fs ir a :v 


iiiu /" . •'Tlurc i;ocs a stroii'^ fclio2i: 




KAiiTMAX, :\r. 


PFTKRi. R. M. 




-IVIui sludics iu:^ht 


;'l<^.tonian: Editc(;- Hea.Uight 
Pres. Y. .\I. C. A. ■\2: Debate 
■]:;; Atliletir Ass'n; Base Ball, 
aiul ilay.- 


■ 1 :; . 
■u 




".'I i^ciitlciiiaii oil n'/io»( / biiih 
absoliiti- trust." 


■ rt' 





3 u n i V 6 




KUBY RICE 

Ilarri-iburg H. S. 1910. 

■Foirzcr snuliug: b'itlic aiuf <;.ty." 




FI.CTA RYDER 
Kfiwin Kan. H. S. 19 Hi. 

Hi-nHloti,s, Plato. PUiix and Or- 
/'/.■ these arc my boon coii'f'an- 



BER.MCE W.ilT 
'.IrHPiiville H. S. 1910. 

I c"''<' "i''! i;iz'ci! to qiiict slii(h 
mil! ■:nit!o di-rcrsioii." 



\MLTOX, L. E. 



Platonian, Vice-President Athlet 
Asso..'i.itiun; MeKeudree Quartet 



'Hr Tivi/W be abare the eloiuis.' 




Junior Officers 



01! DELIA GU.M.MERSHEIJIER 
President. 

R. M. PETERS 
Vice-President. 

EMMA BFRRV 
Secretary and Treasurer 



IRc 


)U of Soph 


oinorcs 




/2i 




BALL, MARY B. 


GOLDEN. MARGUERITE 


PFEFFER, LOUIE. 


BAUGH. AXGELEXE. 


GREER. VELMA. 


liEISXER. E. E. 


BEEDLE, WILIAM F. 


KORXER, BEX.IAM1X. 


ROGERS, BERXARD. 


DOSTER. RAYMOND Cr. 


.iOHXSOX. PEARL. 


SHIELDS, PAUL. 


BRAIXARD. MARGARET. 


KEXXED\', JIARY E. 


S.MITH, CHAS. 


BUXDY. CECIL G. 


LIEXESCH. CHAS. F. 


STANSFIELD, FRAXK. 


CARSOX, PAL-b E. 


I.OY, XELLE. 


STEWART, ALICE VICTORIA. 


CLAPP. ELEANOR. 


MILLER, MARIE. 


.STICE, EARL F. 


CUMJUNS. GEORGE F. 


j;oss. X. M. 


TRUEB. CHAS. 


EBBLER. EDWARD. 


PETTY. BERT. 


WALRATH. A. M. 


GIBSON, PALL \V. 




WILLI. CLAYTOX. 




PRESHMA N 







Morgan Windmiller Isaacs Hill Griffiiii 



• • •• 




Crisp 



Morgan Yost Shafer Moore 




1' a a e 2<i 



EXPRESSION 





MISS 
Studied at La 
at Chicago Tra: 
School of Orati 



.MARION lIcCRAY 

College. Appleton. Wl 
ig School; and at Cummoi 
Northwestern Universit 



Expression Department 



The Department of expression in McKendree Collet;e 
was ippened m the Autunm of the year ;yog. with Miss Rhiiila 
Jjrockmaii, of East St Louis, as instructor. Five pupils enrol- 
led at the beginning; of the term. Earh in the year Tgio the 
iiist recital, consisting- of six readings, was sjiven. At the end 
of the year twenty-one students were enrolled. The depart- 
ment is now in the third year. The members of the first class 
graduated were: Harriet E. Carlin, Lebanon; Alice E. 
Loy, Lebanon; Irma Day Otwell, Plainview ; Ethel Stephen- 
son. Marion ; and Stenna Harmon, Lebanon, ^liss Brcckman 
was succeeded by Mrs. A. C. Bancroft. The jjresent mstructor 
is Miss Marian McCray, of the Cimnock .School of Oratf>r\ . 
Xorth western L'niversity. 

The course in expression covers three \'.ars. It aiuis to 
prepare the student for reading, pubb'c speaking, teachina;, ap- 
preciating good literature. Man's first dutv is to develop self. 
The department aims to help the student in this re,;ard. that 
he may not rush into life unpreparrd. pairthenuore the pur- 
pose of this course is not only to teach students to enter- 
tain, but also to interpret life. The emotions, the luind, the 
voice, and the body are developed. This training is beljifnl in 
€very day life, since it gives a pleasing conversational voice 
ability to speak with ease in public, self-nossession. 



The w ork of the department includes : Ci->rrect method 
of breathing, to proiluce openness: freedom, and purity of 
tone; voice placing; overcoming of nasality and other defect.i. 
Monologue, description, impersonation , dramatic and epic 
narration, dialects, humor, pathos, are mastered. Pronuncia- 
tion and eiuinciation, extemporaneous speaking, Bible and 
hynm reading, and orations are taught. The individuality of 
each student is fostered and streughtened. Xumerous recitals 
give the student op]X)rtunity to appear before the public. 

To all wlio have attended public speaking contests, ex- 
liibitious, and debates before and since the de])artnient of 
pression was organized, it is known that a \er\ marked 
])rovement has been made in all these |ierlorniances and 
largest if not the sole contributing factor is the departiuent of 
expression. IMiss McCray is giving universal satisfaction. Her 
training at perhaps the verv best school of oratory in the coun- 
tr\' has given her a particular fitness for building up the ex- 
pression department in a school like McKenilree where have 
been trained not a few of the most succe.-'Sfu! men and women 
m public life today. 

Those in the graduating class of this vear a 
X.irth. Lebanon: Ruby .\. A\'inclmiller. Pleasant H 
Dopheide. East St. Louis: Blance Moore, Lebanon. 



ex- 
iiu- 
the 



Jessie 
Haze! 



Expression Students 



Graduates 



Dopheide. Hazel. Palmyra. 
Tiloore. Blanche, Trenton. 
North, Jessie. Lebanon. 
Windmiller Ruby, Pleasant Hil 

Undergraduates 

P.ritton, Ethel, Monnds. 
Bundy, Charles A.. Thompsonvi 



Larson, Paul E.. Luami. 
Ebbler. Edward. Godfrey. 
Elston Valentine W., Xoble. 
l''arris, Mayme. 'N'ienna. 
Gann. Alice. Ganntown. 
Gentry, Lillian, Masoontah 
Giles, v'erla, Wataga. 
ririffith, Isabelle. Brownstown 
Hall. Tessie. Brownstown. 
l-iarper Thomas E., N'orris f'i 



Hayes, Rolfe M., Casey. 
Kennedy, llary E.. Litchfield. 
Lamp. William E. Lebanon. 
McPlierson. \Vm. H.. Lebanon. 
Morrison, Katheryn. Bui nt Prair 
Petty. Bert. Claremont. 
Sonner Emilee. Xoble. 
Bniith, Marguerite, Lebanon. 
\\'arren. John Logan. Sandoval. 
Zunmerman. Arthur, .\Iton. 



Debate 



Tlicre is lield annually an i!Uercsuiiy lUliate, I'latu an I 
Philo partiL-iijalin^-. Tlie quejtir>n frn- ikbate tl.is }i.ai Aa--, 
'"Resolveil that all Cdrpnrations .l-jip;:; an irte'-siate linsiiicss 
shoulil be required to take out federai rharttis' iconsutu- 
tionality granteil, and a federal license n^t t' 
an alternative plan l. 

Decision in favor of the ne,L,'ati\e 



a\ada')lt 




Expression Contest 

Last vcar two o-uKl nieilals \\er.- awanled in tlie ex- 
pression department, the Keisling ( iold Aledal to Alarv Stepli- 
enson, the Rhoda llr(X"kman Gold Meda! to J'Jizaheth Alice 
Lov. 

The ,i;-oM medal oft'ered by Mrs. Rhoda I'.p.cbnian Lit- 
tle was this year awarded to lla;<e! 1 )opheide. 



Bryan Essay Contest 

The Bryan Gold Medal is estabiislid bv Hon. Wib 
liani Jennings liryan in honor of liis distincuishr-d father 
Judge Silas Lillard Hryan. who ;..;raduated at McK'endree i-i 
1849. 

The Annual goes to press liefore the dav of awarding 
the piize so we caii muI} give tie winrier of las: vear. Tin 
subject of the essay last year was: "The System of the Re- 
call as applied to Alunicipal and State officials." The medal 
was awarile<! to Clark Yost. 



Xegati\e : — I'eters. ( h'ahani. .\I\ 





McKendree ha< ill^t rea-un to 1k' prciud of her I.iterar\ 
Societies. Many men anil wmnen in pnl)lic life today owe their 
training to these societies. Since their organizatiorc there iia\e 
been about 5.000 members, more than half of whom are still 
living. There are three societies : Clionian, Plalonian, and 
Philosophian. the Clionian for ladies ; which hold weekly ses- 
sions. Once each niondi there is held in each society an open 
session to wdiich the public is invited. The societies are under 
the exclusive C'.intml of the students belonging to them, sub- 
ject to certain regulations of the iioard of Trustees and the 
tacultv. 



Xo])ers(Mi is permitted to become a u'embcr of any of 
these societes until lie has regularly r/iatriculatcd with the 
President of the College, or identified liimstlf «ith one or 
more of its departments. Regular requirenient-> are made up- 
on the membership in the form of essay writing, deiiate, de- 
clamation, oratory, and parliamentar}' practice. All these pro- 
ceedings are conducted in accordance with parliamentary 
usage, and the generous and spirited riNalrv to excell each 
other and win public favor proves a most wbolescme simu- 
lus in Ijringing out the latent faculties of all conr.ected there- 
with. The college recommends that all student- identifv them- 
selves with one of these societies. 



Platonian 



Literary 

1849- 1913 



Society 



The Platonian Literary S'V-ictx was founded on tlu' 
night of Ajjril 2r. 1849 It was founded hv sixteen young 
men of McKendree College who felt indisposed to take u|.> 
their abode with the Philos. This indisposition was probably 
due to the timidity of the AOuns;- men, probably to the over- 
crowded condition of the Pliilos, or probably to the inspire.! 
foresight of the nolile work thai has been so well done bv tl'^e 
Society. Whatever the cause of its foundation the Platonian 
Literary Society has accomplished a work in the world ihat 
stands without an equal. 

With a deep feeling of gratitude and reverence I h.cre 
submit the names .of the si.\teen genrlemen wlio began such a 
noble institution: Charles W. Jerome. St. Louis, ^lo. : David 
W. Bryant, Waterloo, III. : ( leorge W Caldwell. Franklin. 
111. : Joseph W. Drurv Waterloo, 111. : Henry C. Fike, Mascou- 
tah, 111.: Thomas C). Springer, Edwardsville. 111.: Alon^o 
Thompson, High Prairie, 111.: Ale.xandcr \ an Winkle. Frank- 
lin, III. : Thomas S. Casey, Mt. Vernon, 111. ; William Chance. 
W aterloo. 111. ; Isaac B. jack, Xashville, 111. ; I^Iichael Mum- 
mert, Waterloo, 111. : James H. Riggin, Lebanon, 111. ; William 
Schwartz, DuOoin, III.: William M. T. Springer, Edwards- 
ville, 111, : and \~'\'illiam K. Thomas, Belleville. Ilk All of these 
gentlemen, except Bryant, Fike, Jerome, and \'an ^^'inkk, 
haye gone to explore the mysteries of an unseen world. 

The Platonian Literary Society was conceived an.l 
born amid opposition, for it at once became the only competi- 
tive opponent of a like organization, which had for years been 
the "monarch of all it surveyed", but Plato has run her race 
for three score and four years without a handicap. She h?.^ 
■done her work well. 



About 1700 men have walked "Wi.--dom's Way" and 
have enjoyed its beneiits. Today over one thousand of Plato's 
sons are scattered throughout the worl.l and are to be found 
filling places of responsibility and trust in every honorable 
avocation of life. Platos are to be found at the top of every 
profession and in every legitimate business. Space forbids us 
to make mention of all lier son^ here ! but in the various avoca- 
tions of life we will find the following: A. C. Bernays, world- 
wide physician and surgeon : Nelson S. Cobleigh, an eminent 
journalist; Gen. J. H. \\'ilson. who was .second in command 
of the American torces during the Boxer uprising: Hon. J. A. 
Halderman, first L". S. Minister to Siam : C. P. Johnston. Ex- 
Governor of Missouri, and reputed to be the greatest crimin- 
al lawyer west of the .Mleghanies ■ Wesley Merritt, Majov- 
General C. S. A., and a host of others who are famous in 
state, national, and world-wide affairs, it is not an idle 
boast to .say that Platos have invaded nearly every position 
of merit and gained every distinction of honor.. 

-\t present the Society is in a splendid condition. She 
has an active membership of about a half hundred. The 
Platos play an active part in the present life of McKendree. 
Plato still arouses noble aspirations. She still moulds voung 
lives. She takes boys — diamonds in the rough — and trans- 
forms them into capable men who render service t'l the world 
on the farm, in politics, at the bar, in the ministr\. and in 
every other walk of life. 

Plato's door is open to the honest, sincere voung man, 
wdio W'ishes to avail himself of her benefits. With her glor- 
ious past, bright present, and brilliant prospects for the fu- 
ture we sa\ , "I'lat.'S may come and go: Inu Plato will go 
on forever. ' 



Philosophian Literary Society 

1837-1913 



The Philosopliiaii Literary Sni-iely has the <li>tiiicti.in 
of being tlie oldest hterary org-aiiization west of the AUc- 
ghenies. It has a protid record of seventy-six years, haviiie;- 
been organized January lo, iSjij. 

In 1840. twelve \ears alter the foiuidmg of the soceity, 
rhilo's representation in the Hiinrjis Legislature began with 
the election of the late Edwanl Abend of Belleville. From 
that time on Philo has had its representative in every session, 
excepting.two. of the General Assemhlies of Illinois. Since 
1857, the society has been co-itinuously represented on the 
Circuit Bench of Illinois, and there lias Ijeen Ijut one session 
of Congress since 1863 that has been withou'. its Philo mem- 
ber or members in either the Senate iir House of Representa- 
tive. Hon Charles S. Zane. who. as Chief Justice of Utali. 
handed down the first decisions which sounded the death knell 
of polyganny, was a Philo. lion. George W. Smith, who re- 
cently died at his home in Murphysboro, and who is said to 
b.ave had the record of the longest continuous service of all 
Illinois representatives to Congress ; Hon. John Baker, mem- 
"ber of Congress from Illinois, and Minister to \'enezuela: 
Brig- General Jessie H. ^loore, memlier of Congress and 
Consul General to Peru ; Hon. ^^nl. A. J. Sparks, former 
■Commissioner of the General Land Office: Hon. FUuford ^^'il- 



svn, fnrmerly L'nited States Di?trii-t Attorney from the South- 
ern District of Illinois, and afterward Solicitor of the Uni- 
ted States Treasury, are among the distinguished men on the 
roster of Philo. Among the men who are now or have been 
recently high in the Councils of State are : Judge \\'m. M. 
Farmer, Senator L. V Sherman, Hon. Walter ,S. Landen. Ex- 
Governor Deneen, Hon. George \\'. ^\'all. 

Among our men prominent in other fields are several 
of the greatest editors of the ^^'est. Chief of these was John 
Locke Scripps, one of the founders of the Chicago Tribune, 
and originator of the famous Scripiis-?\IcRae League. Mr. 
Scripps did more to give tone and character to the Chicago 
Press and to elevate its standards than any other man connec- 
ted with the early or middle period of Chicago news-paper- 
dom. A\'m. E. Hyde, formerly editor of the St. Louis Repub- 
lic, and Isaac N. Higgins at one time editor of the San Fran- 
cisco Call are also among our proiuinent representatives in the 
newspaper licld. 

Philos have served as College Presidents and profes- 
ors. Illinois, Missouri, and Florida have Iiad tlieir State .Sup- 
erintendent of Public Instruction from the rank; of Philo. 
There are Philo merchants, lawyers, ministers, bankers, phv- 
sicions. 




I c .Si c :U 




p.i=iu:fi' 



Piano Department 



Prof. Frank 2d. Church came to McKendree Conserva- 
tory four years ago, after two years of study in Paris. Before 
going abroad he spent four full years in the OterUn Conser- 
vatory and two more in the New England Conservatory, Bos- 




PKOF. ?'RANK II. CHURCH 



ton where he was graduated in June iijoo. As an organist he 
has had varied experience in many parts of the country. He 
is somewhat of a traveler having been in Africa, Mexico, Eng- 
land, Germany. Switzerland, Italy, Spain, Belgium, Nova Sco- 
tia, British Columbia, Quebec, from .Maine to Florida, and 
from San Diego to Vancouver up the Pacific Coast. He is emi- 
nently successful as a piano teacher as pupils in many states 
can testify as his work in McKendree has shown. He has a 
wonderful ear for music. By careful practice and earnest study 
he has developed a splendid memory. He believes with Men- 
delssohn that "the best in music is only just good enough." He 
is acquainted with the best books on music and has heard all 
the great artists. He is fully equipped with technic experience 
and ability to build a splendid school of music, and that is 
what he is doing here. A glance at the long list of recitals given 
since he came is sufficient evidence Pupils of all ages take 
part with equal success. He believes that "it never is a loss of 
time to take time to do a thing well," and "that good practice 
is never lost." Hence his success as a teacher and player. 

The McKendree Conservatory now offers splendid 
courses in the study of music. Its work is being watched with 
intense interest. The course requires six terms of harmony, five 
terms each of counterpoint and ear training, three of history 
of music and ensemble playing with frequent appearances on 
recital programs to obtain a Teacher's Certificate. A recital 
is also required of those receiving Diplomas. Two recitals have 
been given by all graduates receiving Diplomas in Piano this 
year. This list of Diploma graduates includes r^Iisses Eathel 
and Ethel Morgan, ^^launie ; and Fern Shafer. Carlyle. Those 
receiving 'J'eachers' Certificates this year are Misses Amv Tur- 
ner and ^layme Griffith, Brownstown. and Ruth Kittle, New- 
ton. From the list of students it is evident than the school is 
drawing from nearly all parts of the state. Those who have 
appeared on recitals as pianists this vear are : Misses Ruth 



Pag< 



Clionian Literary Society 



1869- 1913 



In the fall of 1869 ladies were admitted to McKendree 
College, Those attending the first term, feeling the need of 
some special means of cnltiire determined to attempt the for- 
mation of a literary society. After some preliminary steps had 
been taken the society was formed December 6, 1S69, imder 
the name of the Clionian Literary Society, with the following 
persons as charter members : iNlisses Edith Flint. Carrie 
Thrall. Jennie Roberts. Kate Parker. Maggie (jilbert. Addie. 
Georgia and Hattie Floyd. Pet Hypes. Xellie Raymond. El- 
vira Robinson. Nettie Ross. Martha Toney, -Mice N'aleiitim- 
and Jennie Thatcher. 

Of these charter members, only fonr are living; Mes- 
ilanies Carrie Thrall Campbell. Jennie Roberts iverr. Alice 
'v alentine Edwards. Jennie Thacher McBride. Mrs. Etlitn 
Flint Thrall had the honor of being the first President. 

A con^ititution and by-laws were drawn up which with 
fev,' exceptions still govern the Society. Ilie initiation fee at 
that time was .Si. 00 but later was changed to $3.00. The first 
motto was "Jure Diviu's.'" but was soon changed to 'A'irtutc 
et Lahore," our present motto. CHir pin is a gold arrow cros- 
sed by a scroll on which is engraved the societ\- motto. It was 
first made in silver, larger than at present, but was afterwarfis 
made in gold. 

Clio Hall has also seen many changes. It was at tliat 
time only the eastern half of the present hall, the floor was 
covered with hemp matting, the room was warmed by a large 
old fashioned heating stove, and lighted with oil lamps. But 
in later years it was enlarged ami now has modern furnish- 
ings, including a piano which was purchased recently. 



The first public exhibition was given May 6, 1870. 
Since then two public exhibitions are given annually. The 
program consists of music, orations and re;i dings. 

The Clio Quartette of this year is composed of: Miss 
Bertha Webb.First Soprano ; Miss F.athel Morgan, Second 
Soprano: ^liss Agnes Hill, First Alto; Miss Mary Ball, Sec- 
ond Alto. 

The Clio of today is composed uf fifty-two enthu- 
siastic members, who are determined to make this the uost 
successful year of her history. 

Clio is a literary society, but it is also much more than 
that. It provides a wholesome social life for the girls, and 
teaches them clear and concise expression of thought. 








1- a s e :i8 



Vocal Department 



Miss Lalhcliiepell Myrick, McKeinlreo instructor in 
vocal music for tiie last tlirce _vear>, ^s unu.sually well equipped 
both by nature and training for the position. Realizing the ini- 
oortance of a thorough training. Miss M\rick early laid the 






^^ 




MISS LATCHIEPEIvI MYRICK 



i'uundation of her musical education at llelnicnt College. Xash- 
viile. I'enn, She also completed the cla.-.sical course of that 
institution receiving her diploma in 1902. Smce her gradua- 
iion from Belmont, she has continued her vocal studies with 
some of the best instructors in the country, .\niong i-.er teach- 
ers were: Miss Edith Freeman of Mary Connor College, 
Paris. Te.x; Mr. John Towers, St. Louis; Mrs. Mavme Scar- 
haroiigh-Fov.der, New York: and Mr. Sullivan .\. Sar,gent, 
\ew England Conservatory, r.ost'in. The past tv.n summers 
she has taken a special course in rublic .Sciiool Music in the 
.\merican Institttte of Xormal Methods at I'.oston and Chica- 
go. Miss Myrick has been uniformly successful in the various 
church positions which she has iield. Both as a soloist and di- 
lector her rare ability to ei'.ter fully into the spirit of her work 
has proved her capability. She is proficient in the interpreta- 
tion of compositions and has a complete appieciation of the 
theory of music. The department has .grown rapidly under the 
direction of Miss Myrick. last year the first lime in the hi.-:- 
tory of the department diplomas were granteci to Miss Flor- 
ence .Alexander. Belleville: Bess Carter. Freeburg: and Rose 
Ella Jones. Sumner. Each of the young ladies gave a success- 
ful recital in the Spring Term which is required of all seniors. 

.\ Gold Medal Conte-t was also instituted and has be- 
come an annual afiair. Miss Florence Alexander was the win- 
ner in the first contest. This .gold medal was given bv Mrs. T. 
-V. ^^'ilson, Lebanon. .V Scholarship Medal was al'^o given the 
same year to Miss Bess Carter making the highest average for 
the year. 

-\ tAo year course in Bublic School Music was added 
last year. The object of this course it to prepare students for 
]iositions as supervisors or teachers of music in the public 
schools. 

The regular course in vnice culture is outlined for four 
vears. The vocalists useil are Marchesi Part I. TI. and III; 



r a :; < 



43 



Vaccai's Stiulie?: and Lamperties Studies in bravura singing. 
Song-s from the best English, Itahan aud Moilern composers 
are studied, also concerted pieces from oratoriiis. and scenes 



and arias from the best German. French and Italian operas. 
The department now has the largest enrollment in its history 
and is as follows : 



Voice Students 



Post-Gi'acluate 

Alexander, Florence, Belleville. 

Graduates 
Morgan, Eathel, Maunie. 
Jlorgan, Ethel. JIaunie. 
Simmons, Elsie, I\Iedora. 
Webb. Bertha, Ewing. 

Vndergraduates 
Archibald, Myrtle. O'Fallon. 
Bachmann, Magdalena. Lebanon. 
Behymer, Ruth, Lebanon. 
Britton, Vivienne, Jit. Vernon. 
Carter. Fay, Cypress. 
Clark, Frank, Nen-ton. 
Cover, Olive, Tunnel Hill. 
Cover, Sylvia. Tunnel Hill. 
Crump. Mabel, Flora. 



Cummins, George, Olney. 
Daubs, Mabel, Olney. 
Dopheide, Hazel, Palmyra, 
i'arris, Mayrae, Vienna. 
Ferg?uson, Jewel, Buncombe. 
Follis, Jessie, Johnston City. 
Gann, Alice, Ganntown. 
Gentry, Lillian, Mascoutah. 
Goldman, Max, Chicago. 
Gordon, Agnes, O'Fallon. 
Griffith, Mayme, Brownstown. 
Haines, Maude, Rose Hill. 
Heslet. Guy, Mt. Carmel. 
Hill, Agnes, Lebanon. 
Holdner, Blanche, O'Fallon. 
Hughes. Mrs. L. D., Lebanon. 
Isaacs. Ralph, New Douglas. 



Kittle, Ruth, Newton. 
Mittler, Helen, Golconda. 
.McCormick, Glen, Bone Gap. 
McCorkle, Lula. Vienna. 
Morgan, Ila, Grantsuurg. 
Morrison, Katlierine, Burnt Prairie. 
Owens, Lura, Fairfield. 
Perrin, Maude. Mascoutah. 
Randle, Tora, Freeburg. 
Ruth. "Walter, Sumnierfield. 
Shafer, Fern, Lebanon. 
Seed. Nell, Carlyle. 
?mitli, Lester. Lebanon. 
Sonner, Emilee, Noble. 
Sudbrack, Anna, Belleview. 
Walton, Ruth, Lebanon. 
Vi'hittenburg. Wayne, Vienna. 




THE .McKEXDREE JL\LE QUARTLs'TTE 



Page 44 



Morris, CoUinsville : Jessie Follis, Jolinston City ; Fern Shafer 
and Nellie Kahlert. Carlyle ; Emma Reuss, r,ellvil!e ; Eatliei 
and Ethel Morgan, Maunie ; Nelle Dee, Herrin ; Ruth Kittle, 
Ne.vton: Emile Sonner, Xoble ; Alice Stewart and Marie Mil- 
ler, Metropolis : Edgar Brockhahn. Margaret Declnold. Paula 
Tiedeniann and Dolly Welch, O'Fallon ; Amy Turner and 
Maynie Griffith, Brownstown : Bertha Webb, Ewing; Jewel 
Ferguson, Buncombp: Hannah \\'ilHn, Kell : Mr. Arniin liof- 
somnier, Breese ; Syhia and Olive Cover' Tunnel Hill; Maude 
Fiaines, Rose Hill; Madge Ross, Reno: Katherine Morrison. 
Burnt Prairie ; Ila Morgan. Grantsburg; Guy Ohlson, Flor- 
ence Weber, Magdalena Bachman, \'eneta Anderson, Flo 
Crowder, Ruth Chaniberlin. Ruth P.ehynier, Sadie McBride, 
Harriet and Ruth F.ird, Elsie Jan<en, Marie K'llb. .Anna 
Schniitt. Lillian Hainion and Edith Deniiison, Lebanon. 

Others registered for a term or more are : ^Misses. 
Blanche Holdner, Irene Henmier, O'Fallon; j\Iae Gregory, 
Cave-in-the-Rock ; Marie Coddington, East St. Louis ; Glenn 
Dorney, Sumner ; Margaret Brainard. Metropolis ; Lura 
Owens, Fairfield ; Maxine Charmness. Carbondale ; Hilda 
Schroeder and Maudie Perrin, Mascoutah ; Frank Clark, Xew- 
ton ;Verena Langenwalter, St. Jacobs ; Stella Chappie, Hilda 
Blum, ^■elma Weber, Mamie Rock, p'dna and Louise Schmitt, 
Velma Greer, Marion Waggoner, Bernice Savre, ^^'ilnla 
Harms, Laura Traband. Stella Bonhani. Lebanon; Xell Seed, 
Billett ; Willard R. Dewhirst, Noble ; Alice Gann, Ganntown ; 
l-'ay Carter, Cypres^; Nettie Luke\-, Xoble; Erma Rauscliknlb 
and Estella Baldus, ISelleville ; Marea Johnson. Xewton ; and 
JMarie Alueller, Summcrfield. 

Mr. T. L ^IcKnight \w:m the director's Gold Medal in 
igil. Last year Miss Maude Haines and Miss Fern Shafer, 
Carlyle, were each given a medal after twice playing to a tie. 
In 191 1 Miss Sadie McBride won the W. C. Da.umueller Har- 
mony medal Last year it was wnn bv Miss Ruth Morriss 
Coilinsville. Miss Florence Weber won the T. .\. Wilson 
medal for pupils imder .fifteen vears of age. Mi'JS Haines re- 
ceived a medal for splendid work in counterpoint. The grad- 



uates in 1910 (the first year under Prof. Chiircli ) were Misses 
Lucile Bntton (now Mrs. T. I. McKnightl, .Mt. 1 )live ; Laura 
Burgard and \'ioIa Ficher, Lel>anon ; Mabel McCormack. Bone 
Gap; and Mr. Harold Benton, .Ashley. 

The following year Misses Birdie Robertson, Bun- 
combe ; and Mollie (ox, Louisville. Last year Miss Maude 
liaines. Rose Hill, received a diploma, and Misses Mattie 
Dollahan, Lawrenceville; Beiibh Hall, Bible Grove; Alma 
Holland, Pocahontas; Georgia AJcCommoiis, O'Fallon. and, 
Edith Shaw Lebanon, received teachers' certificates. 

On December 9, Miss Ruth Morriss pianist and Mr. 
George Cummins, tenor gave a highlv successful recital. They 
were ably assisted by Miss Farris, reader. C'n March 10, 
Jlisses Turner and Kittle gave a piano recital that was highly 
spoken of. Miss Sonner, read.er and Mr. Isaacs. ba-;s, ad.ded 
greatly to the success of the evening. 

On Alarch 17. Miss WebD gave her senior vocal re- 
cital. She is undoubtedly one of our best singers. She had the 
assistance of a splendid pianist in M'ss Doe v.ho plavs with a 
finesse that approaches the arti:t. Miss Farris. a; a reader is 
always entertaining. 

On -April 21, Miss Rcuss pla\cd a most difficult pro- 
gram in a highly artistic manner. Jliss Follis never sang bet- 
ter, and Miss Xorth gave a reading that was greatlv enjoved. 

On April 28' the Director's Contest was gi^ en. This al- 
ways draws one of the largest crowds of the seasons. Eight of 
the advanced pupils played. It was piano playing par excel- 
lence. .... 
Cjther recitals ; 

Mav 10 — Alisses Webb, Farris and Mr. McCormack. 

Alay 12 — Alisses Shafer, Alexander and Xorth. 

May 17 — Misses \\'eber, Bachmann. Walton. \\"ind- 
miller and Air. Brockhahn. 

May 1 9 — Misses Simmons. Dennison and Farris 

Alay 26 — Alisses Eathel and Ethel Alorgan and Dop- 



heid 



May 27 — Alisses Ethel and Eatb.el Alorgan and Aloore. 
lune 6 — Conservatorv Commencement E.xercises. 



Piano Students 



Post GrafliKite 

Haines. Maude, Rose Hi)l. 
Keuss, Erna, Belleville. 

Giadiuite (DipIoiKal 

Morgan, Eatliel, Maunie. 
Morgan. Ethel, Maunie. 
?liafer, Fern, Cailyle. 
Graduates (Teacher's C'ertilicate. 
Oriltith. Mayme. Brownstoivn. 
Kittle, Ruth. Newton. 
Turner, Amy, Brownstown. 

I'nclei'graduates 

Anderson, Veneta, Lebanon. 
Bachmann, Magdalena. Lebanon. 
Ealdus. Estella, Belleville. 
Bechtold. Jlargaret. O'Fallon. 
Belnniei-. Riitli Lebannn. 
Bf.nliani. Stella. Lebanon. 



Blum. Hilda. Lebanon. 
Brainard, Margaret, Metropolis 
Brockhahn, Edgar, O'Fallon. 
Carter, Fay, Cypress. 
Chamness^ Ma.\ine, Carbcndale 
C'liamberlin, Ruth, Lebanon. 
Chappie, Stella, Lebanon. 
Clark, Frank, Xewtoii. 
Cover. Olive, Tunnel Hill. 
Cover, Sylvia. Tunnel HilL 
Coddington, Jlarie. E. St. Louis. 
Crowder, Flo. Lebanon. 
Dee, Xelle, Herrin. 
Dcnniiion, Edith, i^ebanon. 
Dev/hirst, Willard R.. Noble. 
Dorney, Glen, Sumner, 
.^'ollis, Jessie, Johnston City. 
Ford, Harriet, Lebanon, 
Ford, Rutn. Lebanon. 
Ferguson, Jewel. Buncomije. 



1-ieuimer, Irene. O'Fallon. 
Hofsommer. Armin. Breese. 
Holdener, Blanche. O'Fallon. 
.lensen. Elsie, Lebanon, 
.lolmsou, Glares. Ne-vton. 
Kahlert, Nellie, Carlyle. 
Kolb, Marie, Lebanon. 
Lukey, Nettie, Noble. 
Langenwalter, Verena. St. Jacob. 
Lysakowski. Jean, Lebanor». 
Miller, Marie, Metropolis. 
.Morrison, Cath., Burnt Prairie. 
Jlorriss, Rutn, Collinsville. 
Morgan, 11a, Grantsburg. 
Miller. Maud, Summerfleld. 
}.icBride, Sadie, Lebanon. 
Ohlson, Guy, La Croise, Wis. 
Owens, Lura, Fairfield. 
Perrin. Jlaude. .Mascoutah. 
RaiisfUkolb, Erma, Belleville. 



Rock, Mamie, Lebanon. 
I;os.s. Madge. Reno. 
Soare, Bernice, Lebanon. 
Schmidt. Edna, Lebanon. 
Schmidt, Louise, Lebanon. 
Schroeder, Hilda. Jlascoutah. 
Seed, Nell. Eillett. 
Soulier, Emilee, Noble. 
Stewart, Alice. Metropolis. 
Tiedemaun, Paula. O'Fallon. 
Trabaud, Laura, Lebanon 
Webb, Bertha. Ewing. 
V.'eber. Florence. Lebanon. 
AVeber. Velma, Lebanon. 
Welch, Doll)-, O'Fallon. 
Wilkin, Hannah, Kell. 
Gann, Alice. Ganntown. 
Gregory. Mae, Cave-in-Rock. 
Harmon. Lillian. Lebanon. 
l-'arnis. Wiliua. Lebanon. 




AnCATEf IN PIANO 



Page 42 



1.4 i 


^1 ?f 


^^v-*'^ 






y «rIRw 



^la 


-iLi 


J-^TV.l 


GREER CUMMIXE 


LIEXESCH 


ISS BALL 




XELSOX 


JIISS SLIGH (Instructor! 
■ -MOSS 


'AKKER HOAR 
FOEHXFR 




E MESS HALL. 




THT^ Ci.IO QUAKTITIE 



Violin Department 



Miss Alexa Calhoun Sligli, Diroctor of the Moliu De- 
partment McKendree CoUese (Jonservatorv. Giaduated with 
A. B. degree from ^.lansfield Female College 1005: eradiiated 
in piano and violin, Beethovc-n Conscrvatorv; piano and theory 
under A. T. Epstein; violin nndcr Christopher Jacoh, igo6. 
Charter nieniher of "Chopin Club," St. Louis. 1906. 

She was instructor in violin and piano at Mansfield Fe- 
male College Tgo6-07: special ■student in Louisiana State Lni 
versity during the sessions of 1908-01), ujog-to, 1910- 11. First 
violin in Louisiana State Univcrsitv C)rchesfra : charter mem- 
ber of "Ihe jNlusic Chih," Baton Rof.ge, Louisiana. Three 
years study teaching violin and piano, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 




\ioiinist at Sea Shore Camii (inannK, llil'ixi Mis-., season 
1910. Concert engagements as violniist in Louisiana. Missis- 
sippi, Texas. Missouri and Illinoi-. 

Director of the N'iolin Department McKendree College 
Conservatory 1912. A new department of N'iolin was added to 
tiie McKendree College Conservatory in igi2. L'nder the dir- 
ection of Miss Sligh the first year has been a most sticcessful 
one. Pupils received instructions in private le>sons, ensemble 
classes, and orchestral work. The String Onintet and the AIc- 
Kendree Orchestra of fifteen pieces furnished nimibers for the 
Recitals and special occasions throughout liie vear and filled 
a long-felt need in the College life. 

She formed a "Music Clnb'" and was looked upon as a 
musician of the truest type in' the nm-ic levers of the citv. 
Miss Sligh brings to her work qualities which liy inheritance, 
training and experience ])lare her in the furenmst rank as a 
teacher. 



swt 



Violin Students 



-MISS ALEXA (WLHOl'N Si.K 



Charbulak, Olga, Clayton. .Mo. 
Henderson, Bland, Watson, 
Long, Eleanor. Sumraerfleld. 
McAllister, Ivan, Carmi. 
Morrrison, Kath., Burnt Prairie, 
Moss, .Norman, Mt. \'ernon. 



.\elson, Harry, ,Morrison, 
I'arker, Theo., Carml. 
I odesva, Anna, Lebanon, 
Smith, Ella, Marion. 
Sudbrriok .Anna, Belleview. 
ViDiiardt, .Arnold. Summerfld 



Domestic Science Department 



In the three years since it was openetl in the fall of 
lyio the Domestic Science department lias grown into one of 
the best equipped and most important branches of the institu- 
tion. 

The real grijwth of the deparrment betrnn when the 
Joint Board at its session in June lyi i voted to the depart- 
ment the three ground floor rooms of Pearson Hall. Air. T. 
A. Wilson agreed to raise sufficient funds to equi]> the new 
home' whicii \\af remodled according to plans submitted by 
Miss X'illa Sprague. head of the departmnet. In September 
1911, the furnishing and equipping of a combinefl sewing and 
class room, a dining-room and adjoining pantrw a f'ji«I and 
cooking laboratory were completed,. 




MISS VILLA SPRAGUE 



Tlie first vj^ar sewmg and house construction and deco- 
ration were taught with difliculty as a much needed libraiy 
and equipment were lacking but September 1911 began a new 
epoch for the work. The newly prepared department rooms 
gave opportunity for e.xtending the work and the strengthen- 
ed science department gave support. In September 1912, a 
gasoline gas plant and a microscope for the domestic science 
and agriculture departments added greatly lo their assets and 
and the installation of an art department gave more support 
to the house decoration and dress designing work. The de- 
partment now ranks second to none of the minor colleges of 
Illinois and the middle west. The enrollment has increase:! 
lr(.im 29 the first year to 48 at the present time. Six students 
have been graduated and all expect to teach the work. Each 
lune an exhibition of worK has been given and minor exhibi- 
tions, sales and social afifairs during the year have proved very 
interesting and ll'.e deparmenis have become a factor in all 
phases of the colle,ge life. 

A two year certificate and a four year degree course 
are offered. The course is planned to give such instruction in 
Domestic Science and art as seems an important part of the 
general education of every young v.-oinan and aims, by the 
teaching and practicing of principles, to develop resources and 
ability and to inspire an interest in the home. 

Cooking, including a thorough study of foods, their se- 
lecliiin. preparation, jjreservation and service; dietetics, a 
study of diet in health and disease and under all conditions of 
work ; sewing and careful stud}' of materials from production 
to consumption, with special attention to the question of dtess ; 
the architecture, sanitation, decoration, furnishing and care of 
the house: history of the H<ime Economics movement and a 
course for teachers make up Driefx the outline of ivork follow- 
ed. Related work in the literary anil science department is re- 
quired and also high -cliriol or equivalent credits frir comple- 



lion of the course. The plan for future work is to intensify 
that already given and k-eej) it U]) to date m every way. Xew 
books have been added each year to the library and the best 
magazines are used largely for reference reading. 

r^Iiss X'illa Sprague, head of the deparrnient, received 
her professional training at the I'niversity of Illinois. She re- 
ceived the dregree of Bachelor of -\rts from the latter institu- 
tion in 1910. Her preparation work wa.- d-me in the bolet 
Township High School. 

Miss Sprague came to .McKen.lree from Jacksiin\ ille. 
Illinois, where she held the position of dietctian at I'a-savani 
Hospital. Be>ides the arduous work of organizing the depart- 
ment and bringing it to its present high standard she has been 
a considerable factor in the advancement of Domestic Science 
in Southern lUinoi.s. Miss Spra.gue has delivered many adresses 
before various Institutes and Domestic Science Clubs in this 
section of the state, .^he was one of the speakers at the ii)i- 
n-iCeting of the State Farmer's Institute in Centralia. 

Aldridge Amv. Treninn -. I'.aldus Estelle. Bellevelle ; 
Behvmer Ruth. Leliauon- l'.err\ Emma. Pleasant Hill; Brain- 



ard -Marguerite. Metropolis; Britmn F.llicl, .M'>und-: Brittoii 
\'ivienne. Mt. \'ernon; Browning Persi5. Golconda; Crump 
^dabel. Flora ; Dee Xelle. Herrin : Everett, Zaidee, Trenton : 
F'arris. ilayme, \'ienna ; Follis, Jessie. Johnston City : Gentry, 
Lillian. ;Mascoutah; Giles, \'irla, Wataga; Glenn, Daisy, O'l^al- 
ion : Golden. Marguerite Fast St. Louis ; Hill Agnes, Leba- 
non ; Hill, ^label. Lebanon: Iloldncr. Blanche, lyFallon: John- 
peter. Myrtle. Posey : Kalbert, Xellie, Carlvle ; Loy, Xellie Le- 
banon ; Lukey, Xettie. Xoble ; Markman. Bess,. Oli'ey ; Miller, 
Marie, Metropolis; Mittler. liellen Golconda; McCorkle. Lu- 
la. X'ienna ; McGuire. Mary, Lebanon ; Pesold. (jcrtrude. St. 
Louis. Mo.; Rauschkolb, Irma. Belleville; Remick. Genevieve. 
O'Fallon; Rice. Ruby, Harrisburg; Roberts, Frances. Thomp- 
bonville; Ross Madge. Iveno; Seddon. Irene, OT'alion ; Sim- 
mons Elsia, Medora , Stewart, Alice, Metropolis: Ludbrack. 
.\nna. Belleview: Sutton. Grace, X'ewton: Tiedman. Paula, (j'- 
Fallon ; Turner Amy. Brownstown ; X'an Horn. Ethel. Webs- 
ter Grove, Mo. ; Wait. Berni-e. Oeen\ille ; Watte. Leon. Le- 
banon ; XViggins. Lelia D.. Lebanon ; Woods. Xora. Bible 
( h-ove ; \\'o(i:l. Lola, Bible Grove. 





McKEXDRfJH CAMPUS 



!• a g e 



Page 53 





PROF. G. A. CKOSTHWAIT PROF. GEORGE R. NEW 



Agricultural Department 



This new department of McKeii.lree College was added 
durint,' the fall of igii. At that time we were without equip- 
ment or funds but had friends and a firm conviction that there 
was a real demand for Agriculture in McKendree College. 
The results for the first two years have proved this to be true. 

Through the untiring effort of Prof. F. C. Grannis and 
others, during the \ear lC)li-iy\2. a great deal of money was 
raised for the deparliuent and many gifts other than money 
were secured. A fine modern chemical laboratory was equipped 
largely through the generosity of Ex-Crovernor Charles S. De- 
neen. 

During the winter- a two weeks SliLirt Course was held 
which pro\ed to be so popular that it was vested to make it an 
annual affair. About lOO students attended one or more of the 
sessions. During this first vear there were quite a large num- 
ber of students who took the work in Agriculture for one of 
the terms and some few who specialized in the work. 

The opening of the present year found us lietter equip- 
ped than ever with strong probability o! a hea\ier enrollnienc. 
An additional instructor. George R. Xew. has been added 'o 
the teaching force to take charge of the dairy and animal hus- 
bandry work. This, together with the soils and crop work, has 
made possible a broad and well balanced course. 

The present \ear has been a very successful one and 
sixty-five students have taken work in .Agriculture alone, for 
one'or more terms while more than a hundred, have been en- 
rolled counting the allied sciences. 

The second siiccessful short c-:iurse was h.elii during 
the fall with several instructors here from the state univer^itv. 

PRF.SEXT IXSIRI \'rOKS 

Prof. }■'. C. Grannis resigned near the close of the 
fall term to take up work in the .Agriculture College at .Ames, 



Iowa. He was succeeiled by Prof. G. .A. Crosthwait who com- 
menced work at the beginning of the second term. 

Prof. Crosthwait is a man of matured years, with broad 
experience and thorough training. He is a graduate of Phnois 
I'niversity an<l has had considerable experience as a teacher 
in public schools- in county Agricidlural school work and as 
an experiment station worker. He- is thoroughly practical 
having had considerable experience and is running a small 
farm of his own on scientific principles at the present time. 
^IcKendree mav consider herself fortunate in having such a 
man as head of the Agricultural department. 

Associated with Prof. Crosthwait in Agriculture is 
George R. Xew. of Kmporia. Kans. I'rof. Xew has recently 
iniished work in Illinois Cniversity and Kansas State Xor- 
mal College. His work here has demonstrated that he is an 
able teacher and thoroughly prepared for the work which he 
is called to do. .At the present time Proi. Xew is handling 
part of the science work. 

SCOPE OP H'ORK. 

We aim to fill two needs: nr>t- to furnish thoroughly 
prepared and equipped men for teachers or for .Agricultural 
positions of trust, or for successful work upon the farms. 
Second, we offer to farmer hoys with little schooling a chance 
to come in and get some practical work that their practice on. 
the farm mav be more successful 

To this end we have planned a two years course leail- 
ing to diploma and a four years course leading to B. S. de- 
gree in Agriculture. Both of the-e courses presuppose a high 
school education or its equivalent. At the same time there are 
certain courses open to special students who have not the fun- 
damental education or who do not care for the degree oi 
diploma. 

In these courses we have had. and hope ro have a great 



many more farm boys \^'l'lO will come in for one, two, or tliree 
terms and who will then return to the farm ^vith higher ideals 
and better ideas of how to farm ceonomically and sricntihcolly. 

E0U1PME\'T .IXD WORK 

We are constantly a<ldin<4 to onr eqnipnient. This year 
ihnin,c:h the efforts of T. A, Wilson v.'e have our ov-ui ga^ 
pant to furnish gas for the laboratory. Through other gitts 
we have added a new science demonstration table, compnund 
misroscope, and have for use incubators, model silos and nthe" 
things. Practical work is done where possiiile and it mav be 
another year we shall have our own farm. We rercivr: nun-,- 
erous samples of milk from farmers to be tested, advise feed- 
ing rations, analyze soils an<l have made the department oi 
veal use to farmers as well as students. One of the State Ex- 



periment fields is located here and is availalile for our work. 
Our graduates are in great demand and get good positions. 

OPISIOSS OF OTHERS 

Dr. Cyril G. Ibjpkins of the l'ni>'crsity. of Illinois who 
was with us last fall said he would rather have a boy of his 
spend the first two years at iNTcTCen.lree than at the L^niver- 
sitv, because the instruction here would be better. Of course, 
students come in close contaet with the instructors here. 

!Mr. H. £. Young oi the Farmers' Review was aston- 
ished that so nnich could be accomplished in so short a time, 
and complimented us upon the work achieved and organiza- 
tion of the department. We predict a marvelous growth and 
bright futm-c fur the .Vgriculturi.nl Department of ?v[cKendree 
CoUese. 




Agricultural Students 



Ahrens, Erick. Trenrou. 
Brewbaker. Charles. Altamoiit. 
Caldwell. William. Havana. 
Cliapple. Willaim. Lebanon. 
Contirey. Ralph, Lebanon, 
Crisp. E. R.. Bec-kemeyer 
Dewhirst. Arleigh. Browns. 
Dewhirst. Guy. Browns 
Dewhirst. Willard, Noble. 
Early, Charles. Alhambra. 
L'aton, Samuel. Edwardsville. 
Could, Roy, Bible Grove. 
Graham, William, Greenville. 
Groer, Cliauncy. Carlyle. 
Gubser. Karl H., Carlyle. 
Harmon, J. F. Jr.. Lebanon, 
liarmon. J. M.. Louisville. 
Tlartman, M. yj., Freeburg. 
ITinson. Lo.. . We^t Fr-inkfort. 



Henderson. Bland. Watson. 
Hoar. Clark W.. Mounds. 
Heiligenstein. E. J.. Freeburg. 
Iiogan, G. \V., JlcLeansboro. 
Horner, Kent, Lebanon. 
Isaacs, T. R.. New Douglss. 
■Ichnpeter. Charles. Posey. 
Krausz. Arthur. NeM Men:pl.iS- 
l.angenwalter. Leroy. Lebanon. 
Lienesch, Charles, O'Fallon. 
Lippold, Ralph. Oswego, 
l.oy. B. W. Lebanon. 
Moss, Norman, Ml. Vernon. 
.\!oore. E. O., Macedonia. 
North, Edgar A.. Lebanon. 
Peters, Robert, Louisville. 
i:andle, William M.. Belleville 
Robinson. .lohn V... Johnston Ci' 
Stice. Earl F .Gillespie. 



Stindidge. Cil. Fveeourg. 

Puhroeder. Rali)h, Addieville. 

Shields. Lewis. Charleston. 

Smiley. Leslie C, O'Fallon. 

Stans-ield, Frank, Lawrenceville. 

Vogelsang. Fred, Breese. 

Walrath. \rtliur, Lebanon. 

Walker. E. A., Ashly. 

Wiggins. Lelia D., Terre Haute. In 

Wilton. Lane. Huey. 

'Vilhite. J. N.. Thon-.pson\ ille. 

Whittenbiirg. D. W., Vienna. 

V, iili. Clayton. Lebanon. 

Wolf. A. P.. Freeburg. 

Wolf. Walter. Freeburg. 

Wood. Paul L.. Bible Grove. 

Wood, Xora. Bible Grove. 

Yost. Clark. Lebanon. 



Art Department 




S.ARAH E. SEABROOK 



It ha> liecn m\- prixelcgc to put into the .Mclvendrfc 
College tliis year the fuundation for an .Vrt Department, aivl 
liaving tried to place it on good strong first principles of ?rt 
training, I sincerely hope it shall grow to be a great blessing 
to the college, and the community, in s.) nuich. as it shall give 
a clearer vision, for the wonderful beauty surroimdmg us; 
made by an all ruling God. and drawing us closer each day to 
the Creator of all things. 

The enrollment has beer, goo.l this \ear. but far more 
to be proud of. is the strong work done by each student and 
the influence an each life as a balance for the conventional 
.side of life of the refinement of such an appreciation of the 
beautiful. 

To be aide to look and see with a trained eye. and an 
understanding intellect the objects we see about us. \Ve ha\e 
offered a course in drawing and painting in all mediums, 
china, leather, metal and pottcrv. pen and ink, lettering, illus- 
trations, etc., and have a fine start for erjuipment in some 24. 
good casts. 

\\"e have also had a juvenile department, believing we 
cannot begin this training to early in life. Two classes which 
correlate with Domestic Science and I'otany ha\ e also been 
held. From a practical, industrial standpoint, I hardly know 
of a career in which drawing wouldn't Ije useful, if not ab- 
solutely necessary, for the vcrv simj.le reason that it teaches 
one to see correctly, to rcmcndier w liat one has seen, and to 
give form tt> thought. 



Page 58 



Art Student 



Alexander. R. P. Btllevir.e. 
liritton Etiie! Alounls. 
F'.i'ainard Margaret, Metropolis. 
Cover, Olive, Tunnell Hill. 
Dolle.v. Paul Lebanon. 
Dulle\ , James, Lebanon. 
Ilolley, Robert, Lebanon. 
Daubs Mabel. Olney. 
Farris, Maynie, Vienna. 
Gummersclieimer, Belleville. 
Gann .Alice, Ganntown. 
}iesle'tt, Frank G., :Mt. Carmel. 
Haines, Maude. Rose Hill. 
Johnpeter, Myrtle, Posey. 
Kahlert, Xellie, Xoble. 
Kittle, Ruth, Xewton. 
Landiss Charles. Owaneeo. 
l.ukey, Nettie, Xoble. 
Morgan, 11a, Grantsbnr.s, 



Marknian, Bess Olncy. 
.>iiller, Marie, Metropolis. 
McCray, Jlarion, Letanon. 
?ilittler^ Helen, Golcouda. 
I\Iackely, Vivian, St. Louis, Mo. 
Shat'er, Fern, Carlyle, 
Smith -MSrgaret, Lebanon. 
Sutton, Grace, Xewton. 
?ininions, Elsie, Medora, 
Stewart Alice, Metropolis, 
Tlirall, Mrs. \\'. F., Lebanon. 
Turner. Amy, Brownstown. 
Wait, Beraice_ Greenville. 
v,'illhite, .Tames, Thomsonville. 
■^Vilkin, Mary^ Lebanon, 
Wilkin, Hannah, Kell, 
V\'oods, Xora Bible Grove. 
\v'aJ?goner, Marion, Lebanon. 
Wiederliold, Ora Lebanon. 



liarmon. Matio)i_ l.eii.tnon. 
McKnight. Xoble, Lebanon. 
P'each, Robert Leb,inon. 
Eager. Alice, Lebanon, 

China 

Giles, Vcrla, Wataga, 
Grannis, Mrs. F. C. Joliet. 
Eicher, Viola, Lebanon, 
Pieft'er. Agnes, Lebanon, 
Renick, Genevieve, O'Fallon. 
Sprague, Villa M., Lockport, 

.Juvenile 

Battoe, Lee. Lebanon. 
Erwin. Edgar, Lebanon, 
Gregory, Joe Lebanrn. 
Loy. Hazel, Lebanon. 




-~- 


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^"V 


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^ vC- 



Brief History of Athletics in McKendree 



In tliis little sketch we will imt tr_\ to C'ver any of ibe 
territory of athletical history before iijoS, wl'.icb is so well 
covered by the ''Pig Skin" excluding- the tin'e that McKen- 
dree was niactive in athletics. Tn iqoS the board as, the result 
of a petition, granted intercollegiate basketball, and in igio all 
other games were allowed excluding football, and since that 
time the greatest success ha-- Iieen accijnii'li~hed. for we ha\e 




(■YRU.S STOKES GENTRY, A. M. 
Athletic Director 

Born Kldorado. Ill,, May 14, isyi'. 
Was graduated from McKendree 
College 1911, Received scliolar- 
Pliip to Illinois h. 1911-1912, Di- 
rector of Athletics in JIcKendroe 
College 1912. 



not only piU out the best teams on the court, track and dia- 
mond but have based athletics on a good foundation as to 
finances and management, the latter success we give credit 
to L, \V, Smith who thru his untiring efforts interested those 
who had authority to establish the Mctvendree Athletic Asso- 
ciation, Just this year w-e were admitted into the lea,gue of 
minor colleges of the state by a unanimous vote of every col- 
lege in the league. This consequently places us in a position 
of recognition which is state-wide in its scope. 

Previous to the year 190(1. .McKendree had no recog- 
nized department of athletics. The students conducted their 
own athletic work under the supervision of a faculty mem- 
iier. They had various teams but the chief sport at that time 
was football. The history of athletic activities before 1906 is 
given in detail in the "Pigskin" and need not be repeated here. 

It was in the fall of 1906 that the athletic depanment 
of ^McKendree College was organized and a Director was 
chosen w'ho was to devote his entire time to this Vi'ork, The 
man selected was Professor I'.. E. Wiggins of the University 
of Pennsylvania, who had had several years of successful ex- 
perience in athletic work before coming here. 

Professor \\'iggins was an expert in his field and he 
showed his ability bv establishing a department in a short time 
w-hich compared favorably with almost any of the minor col- 
leges. During his first two vears. McKendree was not allow- 
ed to compete in intercollegiate athletics, but by his imtiring 
efforts in arranging society and class teams he aroused the 
athletic spirit of the school and when intercollegiate compe- 
tition was again permissible, in 1908. McKendree had a well- 
trained group of men capable of making a creditable showing. 

During the time m which there was no inter-institu- 
tional competition, basketball was the leading sport. Society 
teams were organized the first vear and Plato won the cham- 
pionship. The members of the winning team were : Wood, 



Dee, PfefTer, Miller, Massey with Cummins, Sayre and Far- 
mer, subs. In 1907, the following year, it was thouglit liest 
to discontinue the society teams and independent teams were 
selected. They were the Romans, who won the championship, 
the iNIeteors, the Trojans, and Greeks, whose place was later 
taken by the Rovers. The line-up of the Roman- was G. C. 
Gentry. Warren, R. Pfeffer. \'. Shick. E. Sa\re and C. Farth- 
ing. 

Professor Wiggins also held an annual Track and 
Field Day for the students only in which medals were award- 
ed to the three highest point winners in igoCt were C. .\. Ea'- 
on, F. Howard. G. C. Gentrv: in 1907 the medals were won 
by R. Miller, F. Howard, and E. R. Sayre. 

As stated above, intercollesiate teams were again al- 
lowed in 1908 and as a result the athletic interest in the 
school increased in leaps and boimds. A basket ball team was 
put into the field for the first time in AlcKenree's history. The 
team was captained by "Froggie" Pfeffer with Philips, \\'ar- 
ren, Burguard, and Shick as team-mates and Large, G. Gen- 
try and E. Sayre as substitutes. A very good showing was 
made considering that it was their first year of competition. 
About fifty per cent of the games ^vere won and the chanc- 
es for a winning team the next }'ear were very bright. Some 
of the players failed to return, however, and the team in 
1909-10 was composed of new men with one exception. 
Philips the captain was an experienced pla\er. The others on 
the team were C. Gentry, E. Sayre, O. Walters. Andrews and 
Massev. Onlv mediocre success «as had that year and it was 
not until the following year that McKendree began putting 
•out the winning teams that she has had for three vears. The 
addition of new material made possible the selection of a well- 
balanced team. The team Iiad an average of .8.^3. The play- 
ers were Stokes. C. Gentry, captain. Eicher. Ebbler, Beedle 
and Isaacs. At the opening of school the next fall, all. of the 
piaytrs were back except Cientry and Eicher. whose places 
were filled bv "Boots" ^^"illi and Isaacs. This is the combina- 



tion which has made -ij <pk-n lid a record in i'jii-i2 and 
1912-13 when their average?- were . and .875 respectiveh-. 

Baseball was confined to games among our own students 
until the spring of 1910 wlien a few games were played. The 
team was composed of L. Walters, Murdock, R. Pfeft'er, E. 
Sa\re, LeCrone, C. Gentry, O. Walters, G. Gentry and R. 
Sayre. The team in 1911 included the following: LeCrone, 
captain, Trousdale. Rode, Peters. Endicott, Kershaw 
Beedle, Wilton, Campbell, and Gentry. A short schedule was 
played but the season was unsuccessful. It was during this 
year that Flypes' Field was made ready for use. In 1912 a 
longer schedule was played and the team picked from the 
following; flill. captain: ^^'ilii. Gibson. Graham. Cummin-. 
Schuwork. Endicott. Peters. McHugh and Wilton. 

Base ball has not been a leading sport at McKendree. 
but the establishment of an Athletic .-\ ssociation through the 
efforts of "Dad" Sn'ith, and put our finances on a firm basis, 
and an eft'ort is being made this year to get a start. In a 
year or two our liase ball team may be counted on to win just 
as regularly as the basket ball five. 

Track and Field sport have always been the be-t class 
at McKendree. In the last three vears several meets have been 
held and never have we been defeated in a dual meet. A list 
of our best performers would include men like LeCrone. Rav. 
Beedle. St.jkes. Smith, Morgan, Campbell. \\'il!i. McHugh an.l 
Moore. 

\\'ater sports ha\e been confined to competition an'ong 
the students themselves. \\'aler polo teams have been or- 
ganized and the aquatic events have been keenly contested. 

Tennis has had nuicli recognition bv our students and 
several good tennis players have been de\eloped. It was not 
until last year, however, that inter-institutional matches were 
arranged. 

Wrestling has been taught at various times lint it has 
been only among- local followers. Medals were awarded in 
1911 by the Director to \\'. R. Spragg. the heavy-weight 
champion and to C. H. Dickman. the light-weight champion. 



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FIRST ROW — Gently (Coaclil. Isaacs. Ebler. Stokes. Harmon. 
SECOXD ROW — Graiiam Smiley. Beedle. Moore 
THIRD ROW — Loy. Willi. 



P a 2: e 05 



Athletics 1912-13 



BASKET BALL 

McKenclree's leading- sport is basket ball and for tl;e 
last five years a team has been in the field which has made an 
enviable record. When the call was made for basket ball can- 
didates last fall, every one of the members of the winnini^- 
team of 1911-1912 reported for work. The}- were ISeedle. 
this year's captain, Stokes, last year's captain. Willi, Isa.-^ s 
and Eblei. The selection of the team was consequentlv an 
easy matter. .'-Several new men reported and soiii-j .->f last 
gear's "scrubs" tried hard for the team, ln.it the lii;e-np \v<.nld 
have remained unchanged had it not liecn for sccr.il nnsliaii- 
to the re.tjulars. 

"I'.iU" r.oeille, the cai.taiu, is an athlete known to ail 
]\IcKendrceans and to m?n\- of his opponents for his atliletio 
prowess. His sjiced, floor work, and scoring abilitv make hiri 
an important part of the ofifense as well as the defense. 

Stokes, center, who has been high scorer for the last 
three years was unfortunate in receivnig a severe injurv 
which kept him out of the early games. He had played but 
one game when he was again forced to leave the team be- 
cause of another accident. He recovered sufificiently to get in- 
to the last few games and was just regaining his igi2 form 
when the season closed. His graduation will leave a vacancv 
which will be hard to fill. 

"Tommy Ralph " Isaacs has held down the position at 
right forward for the last two years and has made his pre- 
sence felt in every game because of his re-markable eye for the 
'Dasket. During Stokes' absence he was the mainstay of the 
offense, and it is a great blow to the team to lose two such 
men in one year. 

"lliiiits" \\'illi. the other forward, is the most spectacu- 
lar ])laycr that has ever tos,-ed a ball here. He is a miilget, 
barelv five feet high, but his sneeri. nimbleness. aiifl aliilitv to 



follow the ball have made him invaluable as a player. He 
i-arely makes many points in a game but his floor work en- 
ables Stokes and Isaacs to roll up their high scores. 

Ebler was a wonderful guard last year but he has im- 

jirc'ved this year. His ability to watch tw-o or three men at 
..nee and get the ball c^iit of the crowd make it possible for 
the other members to devote their attention to the attack. 
This was largely responsible for the high scores made in some 
of the games. His headwork in noting the style of offense of 
die other team w-as excellent and lie was quick to take advan- 
tage of it. 

Harmon. Smiley and Loy form a trio of substitutes, 
A\-hose speed and floor .vork have been seldom equaled at Mc- 
Kendree. Graham was an excellent guard and would have 
]irobably have broken in on the team had we not been so well 
lortificcl of that position. 

These nine players were awarded ')asket ball "Ms". 

The pospects for 1913-1914 are very bright. Our ad- 
mission into the Illinois Intercollegiate .\thlelic Association 
■i\ill insure a good schedule and participation in the state 
tournament. 

SCHEDULE 1972- 1913 



TvlcKendree 4 4- 
I'lcKendree 29- 
^JcKeiKlree 3S- 
r.IcKendree 21- 
MeKendree IC- 
McKendree 4 9- 
-UcKendree 4.5- 
McKendree C2- 
lotals; 

McKendree 
?iokes 97 



-Royals 12 

-C. BC. 5 

-Cen. Wesleyan 15 

-C. B. C. 15 

-Cen. -Wesleyan 2 5 

-Ind. State Xor. IG 

-Winona Ag. Col. 20 

-Bun. Hill M. A. 2-; 

304. Opponents 12 4 



leaacs, 9 'i 
lieedle. :;2 
Harmon, 22 
Ebbler, is 



IXDlVIDr.AL SCOUiJS 

Loy. U 
t^miley 1-] 
\A'illi, 12 
Coiidrey, 1 



The reserves won three ij'aines and lost two. The .srii'l- 
Avon one and lost one. 

BASE BALL 

Base ball ha? never had nntil this year sufficient hnan- 
cial support to make it successful. A strong schedule Im- 
been arranged and it is hoped that the team may make a goo '. 
showing. Much of the success of the team depends upon the 
development of a reliable pitcher. The line-up of the team 
cannot be definitelv determined at the present time but it will 
be chosen from the following: Gibson, captain, ^^'illi, Heilii;- 
cnstein, Graham. Peters, Whittenberg, Caldwell. Pigott Wil- 
ton, Endicott, Pfeffer, Schuwerk, Campbell and J. AI. H.ir- 
mon. 

Tl-.e schedule is as follows : 

April Ifl. Carlyle at .Lebanon. 

April 2iJ, C. B. C. at Lebanon. 

May 3. Belleiille Com. College at Lebanon. 

.May 10 Shurtleff at Lebanon. 

May JG, Bunker Hill JI. A. at Bunker HilL 

J(oy 1 7, E. I. S. X. S. at Charleston 

Jlay 2S. C. B. C. at St. Louis. 

.June 7, E. I. S. N. S. at Lebanon. 

TRACK AXD FIELD ATHLETICS 

AIcKendree has always had good track teams and thi^. 
year will probably be no exception. Three meets have been 
arranged. The most important is of course, the state meet at 
Peoria in which it is hoped that our athletes may win several 
points. The addition of new material iias helped considerably 
"but the decision of Stokes to quit the cinder path will leave 
a wide gap. The team will probably be selected from the 



following: Willi, captain, P.eedle, Campbell, ,Smt!ey, Moore, 
Caldwell. Whittenberg, and '"loldman. Several others are 
trying for the team but their ability is unknown at the jiresent 
writing. 

r£.\;\7.? 

Tennis euthu-ia^t^ find |Menty of enjovnu-nt on our e.\- 
(.client courts and many promising player- are developing. 
( )ur tennis team composed of T'.eedle an 1 'iraliam are to enter 
the state tournament at Peoria Mav 2^. W'e are exjjecting- 
much of this team this year, especially (ir;ihani. who plaveJ 
-nch excellciU tenni> last season. 

.inoi'Arics 

Mckendree ha< two good l.-athing and -swimming pools 
within easy access and the levers of acquatics have plcntv of 
opportunity to enjoy themselves and become acquainted -vith 
tiiis branch of athletics. \\'ater polo has been the favorite 
game in this sport. 



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I'age 08 




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ADVANCED GYM CLASS 
Top Row — Greer. Gentry 1 coach ) , Eaton. 
Bottom Row — Weiderhokl. BeecUe, BrewliaKer, Gould. 



P a s e TO 



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}' .M. C. A. 
The Y. AI. C. A. endeavors to train its nieiiihers to livi.' 
princi]iles rather than to profess doctrines or i-reeds. The 
practical phases of life are especially emphasized. The needs 
of men of today and the modern methods of dealing with men 
and leading them to lines of righteousness are some of the 
live subjects with which thi^ organization deals. Our aim is 
Christain manhood, 

}'. W. C. A. 

The I\IcKendree girls find aid for Christain develop- 
ment in the Y. W. C. A. This organization endeavors tn 
equip its members for useful religious work both during their 
college career and after college days are oxer. The need of 
Christain women workers in foreign fields is one of the prin- 
cipal subjects kept before the Y. W. C. A. members. Spec- 
ial emphasis is placed upon the wisdom of living lives which 
are both purposeful and useful. 

THE PROHIBITIOX LEAGUE 
The Prohibition League is the remnant of the .\etb- 
olia League of Acient Greece. For 2000 vears this League 
lay buried in the perils of revolutions and wreckages of 



wars. It was resurrected to its present form in the latter part 
of the ninteenth century. The Ancient League was composed 
of the half civilized tribes of the mountain regions of Central 
Greece. The present League differs from the earlv League 
in that, it is composed of all the bottle holders of both the 
mountains and plains of Xorth America. This League has 
chosen for its emblem a quart bottle: its motto is "Personal 
Freedom:" and its watch word war cry is "Liberty. License 
and Booze." 





YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 




SSOCI ATIO r 



ACADEMIC STUDENTS 



AHRENS, ERICH 

Trenton. 

ALDUIDGE. AMY J. 

Trenton. 

BALDUS, ESTELLA .M., 

Belleville. 

BEC'HTOLn, WILLIAM GEORGE. 

OTallon. 

BEEDIjE. WILLIAM FEAIv(KI.,I.N", 

OFallon. 

beh\mi{;r ri'th v.. 

Lebanon. 

BOGGY, HORACE E.. 

Lebanon. 

BRAIXARD, JIARGARET. 

Metropolis. 

BO^VKR. HOMER C, 

Bone Gap. 

BRENT. IRL Fl'LTOX. 

Lebanon. 

BRE.Xr, .lEWELL ALLi;X. 

Lebanon. 

BRITTOX ETHEL I.UCRETIA 

Moundb. 

BU.VDY, CUARLEri AUGUSTUS. 

Thompsonyille. 

BUSCHEK. FRANCIS .f.. 

Lebanon. 

CALnWELL. EUGENE. 

Havana. 

CAMPBELL. LEO FRANK, 

Mt. Olive. 
CARSON. PAUL ELBERT. 

Loami. 

CHAPPLE. WILLIAM H.. 

Lebanon. 

COVER. OLIVE. 

Tunnel Hill 

COVER, SYLVIA. 

Tnnnel Hill. 



CROSBY, ,:lare\ce ED.MUND, 

OFallon. 

CRU,'\I, ELMO WILLIAil. 

Quincy. 

CUJl'.MIXS, GEORGE FOWLER. 

Olney. 

CUMMINS. WALLACE .1.. 

East' St. Louis. 

DAMS, HARRY EDWIN. 

Marion. 

DEE, NELLIE LEH.MAN. 

Ilerrin. 

DEWHIRST, ARLEIGH N. 

Brov ns. 

DEWHIRST. GUY FLNLF.Y. 

Lebanon. 

DEWHIRST. WILLARD RAY. 

.Noble. 

DIECKMANN WILLIAM .lOSEPH. 

Belleville. 

DOELLING. GKORGE LOUIS. 

Addieville. 
DOI.LEY, .lAMES CLAY, IR., 

Lebanon. 

DOPHEiDE HAZEL EVELYN, 

Paliavi-a. 

DOR.NEV. GLENN. 

Sumner. 

DUNCAN, HELEN WHlMnRE. 

St. Louis. Mo. 

EARLY. CHARLES M., 

\lliambra. 

EBLE, JOSEPH G., 

Xev Baden. 

ELIZAXDO, PRISCILTANO. 

Monterey, Mexico. 

ELSTON, VALENTINE W. 

Xoble. 

EXniCOTT, CYRIL C, 

Cr.^ssvillP. 



EVEP.El'T, ZAiniE. 

Trenton. 

FERGUSOX. ESSIE .lEW EL, 

Bunrombe. 

FISHER. HARVEY .MARSHALL. 

i\Ia<'euon!a. 

FOEHNER. CHARLES EDWARD, 

.lamesto'.vn. 

1-OLLIS, .lESSIE M.. 

.loluiston City. 

GAHM, ARTHUR KEXNETH. 

.lolinston City, 

GANX, ALICE MAE. 

Ganntovvn. 

GENTRY, LILIAN, 

JIasfoutali, 

GIPSON. PAUL WILLIAM, 

Louisville. 

GILES, SARA VERLA, 

Watago. 

GOLDEN, MAP.GUERITE ETHEL 

East St. Louis. 

GOLDMAN, MAX, 

Cliioa.eo. 

GOULD. JJELIA GERTRUDE, 

Bible Grove. 

GOULD, HOWARD W., 

Bone Gap. 

GOULD,' ROY, 

Bible Grove. 

GRE'^R, CLANCY OTHO. 

Oakford. 

GREER, GERTH ORVILE, 

O.ikford. 

GREER. VELMA LOYS, 

Oakford. 

GREGORY, JIAE, 

Cave-in Rock. 

GRIFFITH. ISABELI.E EMILY' 

Bronvstcwn. 



!• 



ACADEMIC STUDENTS 



GRODEOX. EI.J!ER A., 

Lebanon. 

Gl'BSER, KARL HERBERT. 

C.arlyle. 

HADLEY. CLIFTOX EVERETT 

Herrick. 

HADLEV. \\'ILLIA.M LEWI;., 

Hoffman. 

HALL, EVERETT E.. 

Bible Grove. 

HALL, TESSIE MAY. 

Brownstown. 

HOLLAAL ALVIA OSCAR, 

Lebanon. 

HARAIOX, LTLLJAX CATHERIXI:. 

Lebanon. 

HARllOX. .!OHX lULI.ARn. 

Lo\iisvil]e. 

HARPER. THO^^AS EDWARD, 

Norris City. 

HAYS, ROLFE JIILLER. 

Casey. 
HEILIGEXSTEIX. EDW IX. 
Freehurg. 
HEIIJIEH, R. IREXE, 

O'Fallon, 

HEXDERSOX, BLAXD. 

Watson, 

HEXDRIX, W., 

Renault, 

HEX.?OX. Loy. 

West Frankfort, 

HESLETT. FRAXK Gl^Y 

;\It. Carrael. 

HEXTER. GEORGE EDWARD. 

Freeburg. 

HILL. MABEL M., 

Lebanon. 

HH-L. WARREN ELLIOTT, 

Lebanon. 



HOAR, WILLI.AII DEE. 

Jlounds. 

HOFSO:WKR. ARMIX COXRAD. 

Breese, 

H0FS0:\1FR, HARRY CAriPER. 

Breese. 

HOLDXFR. BLAXi'HE P. 

OFallou, 

HOLMES, GEORGE WILLIAM. 

Lt-bancn, 

HORXEK, wn,L[AM KEXT. .. 

Lebanon. 

JOHXPETEK. CHARLES HEXRY, 

Posey, 

.TOHXPETER, MYRTLE ROtE, 

KMlLLRr, XLLLII-: E.. 

Carlyle. 

KASEL. ALFERD W. 

Washington. Mo.. 
KEIX, JOHX HEXRY. 

Lensburg. 

KR.\yZ. ARTHUR A.. 

Xew Memphis. 

LAMP, WILLI A.M ELBERT, 

Lebanon, 
LAXniS, HUBERT FERRIS, 

■\'en!ce, 

LAXDIS .TA.MES ARTHUR. 

Venice. 

LANDIS. CHARLES WTLLIAM 

Oweneuo, 

LAXGEXWALTER. T.EROY 

Lebanon, 

LAUGHTOX, WILLARD HERALD, 

Clay Cirv. 

LEMEX. .lo'sEPH .lAMKS^ 

O'Fallon. 

LEWIS, RAV.MOXD, 

Bible Grove, 



LlPPOl.D, ROLPH GODFREY, 

Bibie Grove, 

LUKEY XETTIE .MAY. 

' Xohlp. 

,McCaLL1STER, ALOXZO, 

3t, Louis, Mo,. 

.McCALLISTER. ROY I VAX 

Carnii. 

Mc( ORKI.E, LULA. 

Vienna. 

Mccreary, .alexaxder, 

Benton. 

McGUIRE MARY. 

Lebanon. 

:MrKXIGHT, ROBERT B., 

Oblont, 

McPHERSOX. WILLIAM HEXRY, 

Lebanon, 

M a"S . CHARLES G i LE 

Chicago. 

MEXDES , rABLO, 

Monterey, Mexico, 

MiCHELP, EVA MALEL 

Albion, 

MILLER, ERl.IX.A ADELL. 

Lebanon. 

MITTLER, HEf.EX, 

CralconOa, 

MOORE. ERXEST OTTO. 

Macendonia. 

M0RGA.\'. EATHEL EVELYXX. 

Mannie. 

:VI0RGAX. ETHEL LECHXOR, 

Maunie. 

MORGAX. ILA EVELYXX, 

Grantsbnrg. 

MORPJSOX. KATHERIXE. 

Burnt Prairie. 

XELSOX. HARRY' E.. 

Morriscni. 



ACADEMIC STUDENTS 



noltintt, miller edwald 

Nolting. 

NORTH. EDGAR A.. 

Lobanon. 

XORTF, JESSIE iR?;.\E. 

T-ebaiion. 

PARKER, THEO. CHRiSTAIX 

Carmi. 

PERRLN, :\L4UDE C 

Mascoiitah. 

PIGOTT, LE'\"I DECATLR. 

Hurphysljoro. 

PRODAX. GEORGE. 

Granite City. 

RANDLE. ^VILLIAM 'mcK;INLEY 

Belleville. 

RATjSCHKOLB. ERJIA MiOORE, 

Belleville. 

REIBOLD. FLOREXCE. 

Lebanon. 

REIXH.ARDT. ETHEL ELAIXE 

Lebanon. 

RE.MICK, GENEVIEVE. 

O'Fallon. 
REYNOLDS. HERBERT. 

Simpson. 

RIEDFR. LUELLA R.. 

Lebanon. 

ROBINSON. JOHN MILTOX. JR. 

.Tohrston City. 

ROSS. .MADGE. 

Reno. 

SAXDRIDIIE. CL.ARKNCE .MONROE 

Preeburg. 

SECHKEST. SYL\'ESTER. 

!\lt. Vernon. 

SELDOX, IP.EXE. 

OEallon. 



SCHUOEDER, R.aLVH WILL. 
Acldieville. 

schijWerk. \v alter J.. 

Evansvilie. 

SHIELDS. HALOLIl PARKER. 

Charleston. 

SHIELDS, LEWIS WESLEY 

Charleston. 

SiMJIONS. ELSIE M.. 

I^Iedora. 

S.MILEY, LliSLlK CHARLES. 

OFallon. 

S.VHT'i, MARGCERITE A.. 

Lebanon. 

SONNER. EMI LEE. 

Noble. 

STEVES. NOBLE. 

Benton. 

STEWART, ALICE VICTORIA, 

Metropolis- 

STDBRACK, ANNA FREDERICA. 

Bellview. 

TIEDEJIANN PAULA, 

O'Fallon. 

TORRENCE, CALE, 

Herrick. 

TRACTMAXN. EL.MER GEORGE 

Belleville. 

TRUEE. CHARLES, 

St. Lotiis. Mo. 
VOGLER, JOHN D. 

New Athens. 

VOGELSANG. FEP.D. 

Brtese. 

VrAGGONER. .MORRIS EDWARD. 

Lebanon. 

WAGGO.XER, RUTH, 

Plasa. 

W.4LKER, ERNEST A., 

Ashley 



WALKER, .MARTHA P,, 

Alma. 

WALTON, RUTH CATHERINE, 

Lebanon. 

WARREN. JOHN A. LOGAN, 

Xenia. 

WATTS, LEXORA, 

Lebanon. 

WERXER. FLORENCE, 

Xe^v Athens. 

WHITE, RALPH, 

Murphysboro. 

WHITTENBURG. DANIEL V,"AYXE, 

Vienna. 

Vv'EIDERHOLD. ORA. 

Lebanon. 

WEIDERHOLD, RAYJIOND 

Lebanon. 

WILLHITS, JAMES NEWTON 

Thorapsonviile. 

WaLKIN. MARY, 

Lebanon. 

WINL'JllLLER, RUBY 

Pleasant Hill. 

WIXTER. LOUIS EDWARD, 

Rose Hill. 

WOLF. ALVIN PHILIP. 

Freeburs. 

WOLF WALTER ROnURT. 

Freeburg. 

WOOD, LOLA, 

Bible Grov". 

WOOD, PAUL LEAXDER. 

Bible Grove. 

WOODS NORA CATHERINE, 

' Bible Grove. 

ZIMMERMAN. A. FRANKLIN, 

.Vlton. 



THE HEADLIGHT STAFF 




Top Row — B. W. Loy. C\ R. Yost. (\ X. Stokes. R. M. 

R. G. Boster. 
Bottom Row — Bernice Wait, Daisy Glenn. 



A Song of McKendree 



On a hill-top in the torest 

In the Jlississiiipi Valley^ 

Near that great and mighty rivei' 

Near the Father of Waters, 

1'here they built for us a college. 
There tliey made a school of learnins, 
There, a home lor truth and wisdom 
And thev builded for our glory. 



Once tlie Redmen owned tliis region, 
When they pitched theii- tents upon it 
Wlien they wandered o'er its hill-sides. 
With their bows and arrows hnuting: 

^\"hen the deer roamed in the torest. 
And the turkeys in the woodland: 
\\'hen tlie wolves howled in liie gloainiiis 
And th.-" pantliers screamed at midnight. 



i.eain tlie story of the raindrop. 

And the language of the flowers; 

Know llie nature of each creature. 

On the land and in the ocean. 

Watch the stars that shine from heavea 
Learn to follow in their circuits, 
Hear the singing of fair maidens. 
And their music in the morning 



To the east a verdant prairie, 

To the south a little city. 

To the west a silver streamlet 

And a graveyard to tlie nortliward — 

Where the dead of y'car.-: uit sleeping 
Waiting for that Glorious j;ornii¥^ 
For the sounding of tlie Trumpet, 
And tlie call to life Eternal. 



Four score years and five ha\e vanislied. 

Since they built McKendree College — 

1 ike a guide set in the desert. 

Like a beacon on the ocean. 

Ere the virgin soil was furrowed. 
Or the trees hewn down by word-m 
Or the passing liighwayy oiiened ; 
Then lliey built .McKendiee College. 



How we love McKendree College, 
With its campus full of shade trees; 
Oak and Ash and Elm and Walnut 
Locust, Cedar, Pine and Maple — 
Here the lovers gentle wander 
When the light of day is dying. 
And they hear the south-wind wooing. 
Mingled with their fond caresses. 



Just beyond the silent graveyard — 
Wiiere a rich man built a mansion — 
There are springs of gushing water. 
Flowing water full of sulphur. 

There are wheat-fields all about us; 

There are fields of corn and clover; 

Cattle feeding in the meadows, 

For the land is lent to frrniing. 



Come and live a season with us. 
Learn the wisdom of the ages. 
Learn the tongues of acient nations. 
And their hidden arts and secrets. 

Lcain how kingdoms rose and conquered 

And how empires waned and crumbled; 

I-earn how unkno.vn worlds were opened. 

-And how heroes came to grertne.ss. 



O, ye students of McKendree! 

O. ye strong youths and fair maidens! 

Live for all that's true and noble. 

Keep unstrained McKendree's banner. 
Fields untrodden lie before you, 
Heights unclimbed look before you. 
For the voice of all Creation 
Calls you to the paths of Duty. 



The Professional College Boy 



That the prolessiona! hoy is coming to tlie front ra- 
pidly there is no question. 

The purpose of this little lesson is to put the outwar.l 
and visible signs of higher thought within the reach of the 
high class. The inward signs count for little, as they can- 
not l)e depended upcjn. The\' are like the chici;en-pox and 
measles — you cannot tell which it is until the doctor arrives. 
No industry on earth offers such tempting opportunities as 
that of the Professional College Boy. The ivork is light and 
the pay or rather the remittances from papa are constant. 

The studies are the lightest and there are no examina- 
tions. 

To begin colle^je .'irst procure a good suit of cb'lne- 
which will be the "hall mark" of your position of life. 

The shoulders should be three times the width of the 
waist and nui,-.t cast a shadow like the top of the letter ''T." 

Don't let the mere trifle of being pro\ided by nature 
Avith narrow shoulders worry you. for the tailor carries cii- 
lege shoulders in stock. 

The trousers should be of that vague general sort 
which are profanelv descrilicil as the "coming and go'.ng" 
varietv. 



The hair must be long :ini[ should .grow m a dispiritei/ 
sort of style in tlie back, nearly cover the ears and in front 
should be combed into the eves. 

Gel a <linky little cane, a bull -dog ],ine and the smal- 
lest cap that can be procured in th.e college colors. 

These three items are especiallv necessary. The only 
study absolutel)' necessar_\- is to perfect yourself in college 
yells. Procure the little volume "Hinds anil Xobie." the bes; 
and latest comiiendinm of animal husbandrv ever ]>ublished. 
If a facultv member should come to an athletic meet, don't 
scare the poor fellow by staring at him. 

Read all the late botiks of jokes and tbe spcrting sheet.T 
of the daily pa])ers. 

If the Professional CiiUeg.- 1'.. ;v W"u!d carefully follow 
this lessim it wrmld l.)e unnece^arv for the college to include 
a surgical ward where ideas ma\' forcibiv be inserted into the 
head. 

In all cand(ir we will state that ih^ se who do not wi-h 
to be Professinnal C'lllege Doys all their li\es need not take 
tiiis cotirse. 

.Miraliile dictu I 



A dignified Senior namod Bess 
Was exceedingly fond of fine dress 

Site still goes wltn Winter. 

Altiio it is spiing, 
And thus backward does ever.vtlung 



There once was a poeov inu^e 
Who .•••eut oft' like a fire-.:racl>er fuse. 

With swiftness apallini:. 

\\'hen penivis was callinsr. 
But for me she has not niucli use. 



Senior Swan Speech 



(Spoken In- the l-'n-si.leiit at a Seiiinr MectiiiL;-, ) 
Seniors, we are abont to .ay farewell to Mckemlree 
and her kindred associations forever. Forever I Thai'-- a 
long time Seniors. Did von ever stop to think oi that: .Such 
a thought causes queer flntterings around mir hearts. Ilul 
comrades, though we are sad. we must lie lira\e lor think of 
the sadness unexpresed ni the hearts of the faculty at the 
diought of our (lepartin-e. i ( 'ricN of yes. -.es ) They will 
miss US, and the student^ uho come atlet can never take mir 
places. We have occupied a unique position in this college. 
We are the faculty's pets, i Applause. 1 So now Seniors the 
thing for us to do is to cheer each iiieml.er of the facultv in 
the best manner possible. Speak kindly to them, and teil 
them not to grieve as those who have no hojn- hut to take 
courage. Tell them we are .going out to bruig honur to them 
by our glorious acltievements. ( )h. be kind to the facult}-. 
rrears. ) The faculty has had reason for loving u-. for whi 
have recited in classes better than we' Did we ever rlunk 
■ to use a vulgarism) in class. Did we I say" Well let it go 
at that. We have acted our part noM\- and throughout the 
coming vears tlie professcjr^ will iioiut with pride to the class 



ami supreme nobility 
havt 



of 11)13 as an example of goodnes 
(great and prolonged applause.) 

Hut others will miss us. dear ones. Some of us 
formed tender ties that might have been closer if time had 
1 ermitted. In fact there might have come conjugal felicity. 
Hut now those fellowships are to be broken. Oh, it is hard I 
(Tears, and sympathetic looks towards Bess, and Stokes.) 

Yes, Seniors, our farewell is a sad one. They all will 
miss us for we mean =0 much to them. \\'hy, luiless some 
kiudlv hand coiues, the undergraduates luay make shipwreck 
withntit --ome enobling influence. May they watch out for 
the reefs ! 

-\nd. uo\\-. .Seniors, it becomes niy sad duty tc) say 
farewell to you all. Let us .grasp hands for the last time, 
let us look each other in the eyes once again, frankly, ear- 
nestly, and then let us take our denarture quietlv from the 
liuilding so that we may not disturb the other classes. 

"Dear old AIcKendree College 
Is it ncjt your funeral knell 

When the Senior Class of '13 
('lives to you its last farewell." 

( Spattering of tears as the .Seniors ^hake liands 11 
parting. ) 




THE I'SEXiOK PS.U.y 
The faculty is my linss. 1 sbail imt .Iciiy it. it niakrlh 
me sit down in the classroom, it lea.leth mo to chapel. It re- 
stored! my pocket book after it hath iledMao'l tuition anil 
athletic fee. It leadeth me in the paths of hard thinking, de- 
lighting in my misery. Yea. though I crawl da\- :ind. night 
I will fear flunking, the examinations they do auNthing hut 
comfort me. It preparest hard questions for me from the 
midst of its knowledge, it exposeth nn iLinorancc before mine 
classmates. My sorrow nmneth ■vir. Surely I.vsias an! 
Livv shall follow nie all the days of mv life and I will fear 
the Logic examination forever. 



iligni;\ 
ml aloni. 



and 
liv 



THE SEX'ORS' CKE-J? 

I believe in the noble senior das-, 
worth, and in ^IcICendree's seal, wrirn •mi 
ourselves. 

I believe in the seniors' oration, learned dissertation 
solving the monmentous questions of the nation, I belie\e ii 
•our eventual evolution into hon.ored alumnae, and in that long 



sought for diploma, received i ^n the -ecnd Thur-.lay in lune. 
m the year of our Lord, nnieteen hundred and thirteen. 

I believe in .nir homered class, like which there i- no 
other, in the envy of the Juniors, the adoration of the .'-^onlio- 
mi:>res and the humble reverence of the Freshman. 

.\men. 

PS.ILM L 

l'.le--.ed is the stmleni that walketh n.'t in the yiatb of 
the cemetery, mir standeth d'A\n town in the ])ost office, nor 
sitteth in the Rest-a-whyle, Hut his delight is in the jokes of 
Dr. Harmon and in his advice doth he riieditate dav and night. 
And he shall be like a man that standeth well in the eyes of the 
Profs, that bringeth his memorized lesson to every class : his 
mind shall not be a blank for what so-ever he sayeth shall 
flavor of wisdom. The frivolous students are not so .but are 
like those who ,go horseback ridin.g upon a small ponv. There- 
fore the frivolous shall stand under judgment before the l-"ac- 
ulty upon the green carpet. For the faculty knoweth the wav 
of the studious, but the way of the frivolous -hall perish fi.ir- 
ever from the face of the campus. 




There is a young lady named Clean 
Who is rather sarcastic with men; 

She is graceful and nice, 

But a chip oft the ice. 
And slie treats us qnite cool now and then 



Another young maiden n.-^.mi-d 
Whn is .seldom luiown to hf 
Cave her (ellow some eruh 
Whicli she'd cooked for the 
He ale it and now he is nil' 




THE LONG AND SHORT OF IT. 




JUST FRIENDS. 



A Letter Written to the Underworld 



His majesty, Beelzebub was lookins over a '-opy ol th.' "Pro 
gressive Thinker" when an asbestos message vis put onto liis 
fork. "A report from Brimstone", cried tliis deliglued Satan, as 
lie proceeded to read: 

LebauoM. 111.. Oct. :;, 10 II'. 
Dear Nick: 

Found lIcKendree as yon said, and hi.ve made many ac- 
Quaintances who are in line to make an extended call at your 
headquarters later; but a list of ti.em. lor the present, is impos 
sible. 



As you say the chapel ".vercises 
the same "yesterday, today, .■intl foreier, ■ wiile tl 
bility for a change is a re\oUition of the stmients 
to say, is not likely to occur. 



the oil', routine — 

ile the only possi- 

liich, sorry 



The \iext edition of \our olHcial pajier, tiie "Progressive 
Thinker \ is to be Y. M. C. A. number. Copies sre to be sent to 
the preachers to inspire them to attend meetings. This should 
not cause the least anxiety in yotir mind for I myself shall at- 
tend the writing of tlie articles. 

The roAV between .Mr. Philo and -Mr. 
friends of mine, was over the pretty maileii, 
gentlemen will visit your popular resort later. 

If yon can spare some imps for secretaries. I should like 
to get ihe names of all the recruits. 

Obediently yours. 

Sulphur de Fire, 

Mgr. Hades. 



Plato, both jolly 
Miss Clio. These 




EICHER RANXH. 



A Parody 

(With Apolugies tu Bryant I 

To him who in the love of woman liolds 

Conimuniou -witli her Fridiiy nights, slie speaks 

A various lang'uage. for her frayer hours 

She has a dish of fudges, and a light 

Cut from the matron, and she glides 

Into the reception room, widi a sweet 

And graceful bearing, that steals away 

His heart Ivey, 'ere he is aware. Whei: tlionglits 

Of the last parting hciir come lilse a blislit 

Over his spirit, and unwelcome sound 

Of tue ten-thirty bell, and matron's voice 

Make thee shudder and grow sick at heart — 

(;o forth, onto the piazza, and list 

To the maidens words, until from tlie Jiall 

Comes that same voice — yet a lew days, :nid thee 

The all-enchanting Dorm, sliall see no more, 

Jn all its course unless thou shalt depart 

Even now when the word is given. 

So live that when thy summons comes to join 

The innumerable caravan, which moves 

To tile cold, cold outer world, whore each, shall hie 

Him home'vard to th.; task of study. 

Thou go not. like the rejected lover 

Soured on the world, but. sustained and sootlieu 

Uy lier unfaltering trust, goto thy room. 

And place her picture on the table 

'Jelore thee, and sit down to pleasant dreams. 



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LEBANON, 



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Psalm No. 23 



Time — 9::,i -'i : ^5 A. M. 

Place-— Cnapel Building. 

Aud 1 saw ii! the tiont of the Chap^-l a bunch of digui- 
taries. sitting in the front row. 

And I saw a strong angel nroclaiiniKg wirh a loud voice. 
■'Where is the man who spendeth not a cent on pipes and to- 
bacco, but goeth and buyeth n:ni a boi k ind readeth therein, 
that he may pursue knowledge? ' 

And no man in the chapel nor on the roof over the chapel, 
nor in the library under tlie clip.p>^l w:is able to say "Here am 1. 
Lora. take me." 

And I wept much, because no student was worthy. 

And one of the Profs, arose and baid. "Behold I ^vill be 
in my classroom from 1 : 1 .'i to l::;ii to receive the board money 
of the students, for lo! there are those who o\i e many dollars, 
aud their, name is legion. And verilv I say upto you. if they 
pay not up. we will all come out even in tae ho'e." 

And another I'rof. ariseth and sayeth. "Owing to the 
tact that Adam was created before Eve. man is more important 
than woman, .ind an it shall he in the afternoon of tliis day. 
that the women's gym class shall not meet, but the baseball 
.~uuad shall assemble.' 

Then ariseth a Prot. who sayeth in duket tones. "There 
will be a recital to-night at 7' I.''. Will (he young angels please 
assist the piano to the platform?" 

Then they saug a new sous, saying, "Oh' piant my feet 
on higher groundl'' 

Aud 1 listened, and beheld and lo! there v.ere many 
present, but the seats of the absent were beyond number. 

And the strong angel a''cse and said again with a loud 
\oice. "The cattle on a thousand hills. And worthy is the mar 
who hath a .goal in life and strivelh thereto, but the man who 
knoweth not what he is about to do is as a ship without a rud- 
der, whicii buildeth a Itouse upon Pinking sand and steereth 
to destruction. For a man is as a Oene\a watch, tne maker 
niaketh him lor a purpose. Yea. veri'v. if I were a young man, 



; would be somebody. Oh! the 
when there are ten thousand boo 
read, and lie readeth them not." 

.And when he had piayed. 
thence. 



minutes tliat a man wasteth 
ks below in the library to be 



all arose and departeil 




Jitce /Vovtu)' 



There once was a Senior named Gertrude 
Who was a great crank upon pure food; 

She took lots of D. S., 

Made many a mess. 
And succeeded in mailing muih poor food. 

I With apologies to Miss Sprague of D. S. Dept. I 



Aspirations 



one s'le^it family 
polygaiiiisl. 



students. 



DR. HARMON — To hav 

ROB PETERS — To be 

G-IBSOX — To do nothing. 

PROF. BAKER — Spectacles tliat won't slip. 

STOKES — "Emilee, my Emilet.' 

PROF. DOI.LEY — To be u Roman. 

HOAR — Mark TNvain. II. 

YOST — To jilt Marteiii;e. 

HARDY — To fiddle. 

HESLET — To be a modest yonng ladv. 

ISAACS—? ? ? 7 ■.' ■? 

PROF. GENTRY — To be able to eat Sprague's cooking 



Married Club 

Song- -■'When 1 was single, et>.." 
Club Colors — Blue and Gray. 
Club P'lower — Crab ap|ile blossom. 
Yell — ■•Rah! Ral,: Freedom." 



.Me 

Douihit, Landis. .Mcl'li 
lallam, Wiggins, Myers. 



I. .imp. Secrist, McKnigiit, 



I mild 
Ijokr.) 



arcasm ) . 



jper gentlenuan. 



DAISY GLEXX — A humorist 

BREW BAKER— To Turner 

EATON — To be a clown. 

GUY DEWHIRST— To he a 

G. RESOLD — A gay time. 

B. MARKMAN — To grab the world, and choke it. 

WINTERS — To be choked, by Bess. 

PROF. THRALL — To flunk us all. 

PROF. NEW— If he onlv kuev,-! 



Yost, Stokes, Simmons. 
Crii;\ '--onn-^v, Peters. 

Woiihl oes. 

Wiuteis, Wait, Wilton. 
Waircn. Markmau, Petty. 

.\otice: 

It any others desire to enter this club, please do so at 
;o!' the list is a limited one. Hand your name to Presi- 
r.iUam and your rnatriculatior fee to Treasurer Peters. 

Pass-word — Douiih roller.^ and tlatirons. 





1 



A Song of McKendree 

How dear lo my heart are tlie sctlii-s ol .MtKeiuhte 

W'heu foud recollections present them lo view. 

The campus^ the buildings the suoet faced iirotessors 

And all the loved ones which my college days kue>\ . 

There were breaking ot locks there was stealing ol organs 

There were programs of hops and masquerade balls 

Uut the Dr. ])e score^i them, with words that were ■searching 

And made the rrugh bunch looK oxceediiigh small. 

How dear to my heart was the spooning o( students, 

On campus, en streets and cemeter}' walks 

What thou.gh there was kissiuj; and action^- imprudent 

We cared not a whit if the people did talk. 

There was Stokes with Miss Sonner. Miss Shafer with Graham. 

iliss Lukey with Wilton and Miss Foulk with Yost. 

'ihere wei-e dozens of others whose names arc not mentioned 

Who, confirmed college catters, were Mc"s. proud boast. 

How dear to m\- heart were the examinations 
Which the loviiig professors oft biniigiit io view^ 
1 took those exams, with extreiue trepidation 
And signing my name, quickly made my skiddoo 
.\ty grades were completed, my standing was taken 
My credits so low that I felt like a fool 
The faculty told me they thought I was fakiii'j 
And perhaps I had better quit coming to sriu.ol. 



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There w:is a little girl n^Tiied iilsali. 
"I love you," the fellows all told hah. 

They came every night 

They would turn do\,n the ligiit, 
And iioldah' and holrtah' and hol'iah! 



X THE COGGAN STUDIO 2 

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Page sn 



JournaJism Fraternity 

Siiue the founding of the .Mu Tan liarama .Journalistic 
J-'rateinity the success of the organization has been phenomenal. 
The membership especially has been on £. steudy increase, and 
is now strong enough to assure its permanency as a l)ig college 
factor. 

The meetings consist of lectures, essays aivl sliort ad- 
dresses by the members, alter whicli there is a geii'^-al dis- 
cussion. 

Tlie fraternity solicits its n'embeis. and re niires a un- 
auainous vote to elect. 

THE PRESENT OIKSCFKS \l;K .AS i'O.M.OMS; 

R. G. Boster, President. 

C. \V. Hoar Vice-President 

S. \V. Eaton, Secretary. 

B. A. Piogers, Treasurer. 



The rules of McKendree Collegi; at ri,p doruiitory are 
that if two persons, a lady and gentleman, are left alone in a 
room tliey shall have at least one c'lair beiween them. So 
passing the reception hall one evening. Miss Sprague was hor- 
rined upon observing Mary and Alexander occupying the same 
cliair. 

Said she, "Mr. Alexander. I am surprised. Do you not 
know the rules of the college?" "Why-er-yes, Don't they say 
thai it a fellow and a girl are alone in a room, tl:ey can have 
only one chair between them?'* 



A LYRIC or THE DEEP. 
.■My bieakfast lies o\ev the ocean 
My dinner lies over tlie sea. 
My stomach is all iu cun.inoti'jn. 
Don't talk about supper ti me. 



Books and Station 


ery Cigars and Tobacco 


Xebanon Bvucj Coinpan\: 

PURE DRUGS 
AND DRUGGIST'S SUNDRIES 


Lebanon, 


Illinois 


Ice Cream, Etc. 


McKendree Pennants 







OUR SODA 


FOUNTAIN 


Wher 


e we serve Soda and 


Ice Cream is well known 




Fancy Cand 


e s. such as 




LOWNEY'S a 


nd MORSE'S 




in Package 


and Bulk 





DAUMUELLER'S | 



R, Blumenstein Wm. Midgley 

BLUMENSTEIN & MIDGLEY 
Cash cMeat Market 

Fresh and Smoked Meats 
Phone. No, 2S 



THE EXCLUSIVE SHOE STORE 

AH kinds of dependable Footwear for 
Men, Women and Children. 

^est Goods, Loinest Prices 

Somebody said: "You can drive a horse to work, 
but you can't make it think." 

Invariably the thinking people buy our shoes. 



ERNEST GRAUEL. 

Opposite 



Proprietor 




'HE HOME OF 

QUALITY GOODS 



YOU 
will 


■" You, like theo 
ind it a good pla 
buy good goods. 


thers, 


TRY 


THESE THEY 


WILL 




PLEASE: 




An 


nerican Lady Canned 



Gvpsv Hosiery. Peter's S 
lor Men. Women. Chile 

mbrelUs. Ribbons, Notions. Decoral 
China, Cut Glass. 
W, BLANCK mercantile: COMPANY 



I'p from the aieartows rit:i witli ,0111. — HE.VDERSON". 

The call of the track men uncovers a multitude of shins. 
-TRACK. 



Isn 



bli; 



so 1 am fciinr 



happ.v. — E.VDICOTT. 
You I an never tell the spee-1 of an nuto by its noise. — 

bosti-:r. 

Mary's lamb.- -ALE^ANDER. 

A word to the wise is resisted -GOLUM.A.N. 

Even ;ho vauqaishert, lie would argue still. — Faculty ad- 
viser. WlLIlITE. 

Ain't it fierce to be lonesome''-— bliiR.ARlA.V. 

-Misness of herself. — MYRrLE JOH.M'ETEK. 

Any show for a pleasant chap like Mie .' — FISHER. 

Tho lost to sight, to memory dear, 
Thou ever wilt remain. — SE.NIOR.S. 

The .ila\es of custom and estaMisbed mode. — FACULTY'. 

The path of the great is to be misundcj stood. — BEN.N"^ 
HOKNER. 

God iiuisL ha\e loved the dunkers. He made so many cf 
them. — I REPS 

Pure as the d°w that filters thru ihc rose. -BER.VICE 
WAIT. 

The Gill 1 Eelt Behind Me. — ROGERS. 

A liiile learning is a dangerous thing. — FRESHY'. 

Y'o are the salt 01 the earth. — CLASS OF 1913. 

Right into her heart he '.von h:s way. — TIES LET. 

Our favorite gem — the diamond. — BASEBAJ^L. 

The evil pulls the strings that wink the eye. — KITTY 
MORRISON. 

I'll make me glorious by my pen. — EATON". 

Brevity is the soul of wit. — CORDELIA ELIZABETH 
GUMMERSHEIMER. 



Paae 91 




I' a g e 92 



Rub-a-dub-dubs 

TliL-re was a vouu- Se'.ii.ir luiK^ei! .Myers, 
Who quencliPi! lovp's ^inonIJei iua fires 

By marrying early 

And now-, ^rowin.u: su"ly. 
Of our Senior viieetin2:s soon iir^s. 

(And runs for the 3:3*' car to Belleville yet.) 

It was a smart Senior named Yost 
NVho Aas not so easy tn masl : 

If you'd say ".Madeline" 

He'd ne'er t^ive a sign. 
But would seem luite ^.-^ deaf as a post. 

There \vas a \oung feliow pa:ned Stokes 
Who .vas a m)st miseiable Iio.'^x: 

On Emilee Sonuer 

He sure was a gonrsr 
To marry him. her he did coa\. 

Another youns fellow n.imed Hear 
Was thought to be eternally sore. 

Cause he had a rod head 

Said he wished he was dead. 
And then he would ha\ e it no more. 

"Twas a pleas.mt young Senior named Graham 
Who often to people \vould sayum, 

"If I had my waj- 

Life should always be ga>'. 
And I'd ride to heaven nn !ia\um." 

A preacher Senior, named Crisp, 
Ne'er so weaU-muided "\'as a- to lisp, 

But he did fall in love 

With his sweet Sadi" dove. : 

Thai he did. 



There are Condrey, Stokes, Graham and Hoar, 
Crisp, Myers, .saocs. 'i'ost aad some nior". 

Who are saving farewoU 

To ;Mc's personnel. 
Wliicli leaves ilie old volleee r.uite voor. 

Jack Spratt conhl eat no fat. 
Miss Sprague could eat no lean. 

.\uO so between them both 
The.\ licked the platter clean. 

iWe apologize to .Mother Uoosc.) 

One spoon for two. 

Oh: what fiM.. 
Bui tUen you see 

"^'ou two art-; otie. 

I Dedicated :o Haitmsn and Ethel.) 

"Oli: you are a lemon. >'et." 

Lane said it just to tease her. 
The maiden laughingly replied. 

"Then you're a lemeji squeezer."' 



\ni.\M \ 

Dramatis Personnae: -—Emilee Sonner, Heroine; Claude 
Xewton Stokes. Hero; Church and Choir; Little Girl. 

Emilee and Stokes meet alone in the vestibule of the 
church. Stokes stretches out his arms and E:nilee rushing for- 
ward is gathered in. Song by the choir. "Gathering in the 
Sheaves." The church door opens. The church assembly and 
choir gaze upon the scene with intense interest. The freshies 
take notes. The minister announces. "Little children love one 
another." Emilee and Stokes are about to kiss and are much 
absorbed. .V little girl runs for^vard. moved b> pity, and says 
"Here's my umbrella, use it.'' 



Vasi 



»;> 



A Few Daffodils 

ir H-e liad a raw ilii.'kin woblrl Piuf. Daker? 
If Dr. Harmon is old is Prof. .\>v.-? 
If Funny Wolf was late for A?. oLiss. v.oulci Crostiiw 
If Bert Petty were detained \vonld Beinire Wait? 
If Sam Eaton stole her candy wo'iid .Mary Ball? 
If Webb makes Doplieide would Brewbaker? 
If George is Cunimiu. Gale Mae. 
When Hays is late for Enj,lisli is diaries Early" 
If Ethel Morgan should ilrown would Harney Fish=r 
If Rob Peters pitched would Stnnsfleld 
If Miss .lohnpeter were sick would Ernest Walker? 
Sometimes Paul Shields Miss Wagsouei. 
If Eathel Morgan did not go \vith Cummins, would 
,- to? 
If Miss Britton's shoe came untied would Wallace 
If Ernest had two. would lie want Jloore? 
If this is West, is Edgar Xp:th^ 
If Wolf sat between Miss Olive and Miss Sylvia 



arm . 



If Bundy should altenipt to go with a girl 



ould 



Co^'er. 
Heslet 



Who walks with 
Deiiotins future 



such great rtigni 
,o\"ere:a:-ity? 
The Senior! 
\\'hose langua;ue is so up-to-da'e T 
W'l:o to his class is never late? 
Whose every act is quite sedate? 
The Senior' 



Whos 
Whus 



prv la 



juds 



iient 



itheiit flaw^ 
The Senior: 
\\ ho doth the Freslimans" course 
W 1,0 also Sopl'.oniores refine? 
Who keepeth the faculty in line? 
The Senior! 




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