(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The McKendrean : being the year book of McKendree College"

Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/mckendreepigskin1914mcke 





BEV^<5 T/IE Y^R. B9?K 
2f/^«K^PREE COLLEGE «" 
fl PVBLIS/IEP BY T/IE«^ 
:9CirASS 2f 7*I<METE^ 
f If TE^ (IH T/IEIR 





N.NIMOSS 



THE McKENDREAN 



GREETING 



'■'May you all live long and prosper.' 

Thus we greet you. alumnus, student, and friend of McKendree 
Tollege. 

We have labored long and cheerfully in the hope that the perusal 
'»f tliese pages might afford to you some little pleasure. If we have 
succeeded, we are glad; if we have failed, we regret that our best has 
not been better. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 




To 

PROFESSOR EDWIN PERCY BAKER 

This Book Is Lovingly Dedicated 



THE McKENDREAN 




McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 




JOHN FRANCIS HARMON, D. D. 
President of McKendree College 1908 



THE McKENDREAN 



Edwin Percy Baker, A. M. after graduating from the public school 
spent two years in Grand River Institute, three years at North Eastern 
Ohio Normal College and three years at Ohio Wesleyan University. 
In 1893 he took charge of the Latin and German Departments in Mc- 
Kendree College. Three years later he went abroad for a year of study, 
after which he returned to McKendree to teach German and History. 
At present he holds both the Chair of German Language and Litera- 
ture, and that of International Law. 

Mary E. Copenhaveu — • 
__ Student Interment College, 1901-1905. 

Graduated School of Art SuUins College, 1907. 

Special courses in New York City, summer 1908. 

Cincinnati Art Academy, Summer, 1912. 

Art Instructor Dalton College, 1908-1909. 

Art Instructor Linwood College, 1910-1912. 

Private Studio Work, 1912-1913. 

Art Instructor McKendree College, 1913-1914. 

Miss Latchiepell Myrick, A. B., is a graduate of Belmont College, 
where, in addition to her classical course, she studied music. Later 
she studied vocal music under some of the best instructors in this 
country, the most prominent of which was Sullivan A. Sargent, New 
England Conservatory, Boston. For the past three summers she has 
taken a special course in Public School Music, at the American Insti- 
Lutp ot Aormal Methods at Boston and Chicago. She is well equipped 
by nature, training and rare ability for her present position at the 
head of the Vocal Department. 

Miss I'ranc Berr>" graduated from the Robinson (111.) High School 
in 1909. In 1911 she was a student at DePauw University, and later 
entered the Cumnock School of Oratory of Northwestern University, 
where she graduated in 1913. She has, this year, been at the head of 
the Department of Expression in McKendree. 

George R. New, has had three year's work at Illinois University, 
and two years at Kansas Ktate Normal. He now occupies the Ohair of 
Chemistry and Physics in McKendree College. This year, under the 
expert direction of Prof, New, the Department has been unusually suc- 
cessful. 

Cj^rus Stokes Gentry, A. B., McKendree, 1911; A. M., Illinois Uni- 
versity, 1912. Athletic Director at McKendree 1912-13, 1913-14. Pro- 
fessor of Academy Latin 1913-14. Awarded a Rhodes Scholarship in 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 




FACULTY 



DoUey 

Willard 

Gentry- 



Giles 



CopenLaver 
^Vaggoner 
Thrall 



My^Vck 



Berry New- 
Walton CrostHwait 
Baker Sligk 
Ckurck 



THE McKENDREAN 



January, 1914. 

Alexa Calhoun Sligh, A. B., Mansfield Female College, 1905; Beet- 
hoven Conservatory, Piano and Violin, 190G; Instructior in Mansfield 
Female Oollege, 1906-07 ; Special student in Louisiana State University, 
1908-11; three years study at Baton Eouge, La.; Post Graduate work in 
Beethoven Conservatory, 1913; Director of the Violin Department in 
McKendree, 1912. 

G. A. Crosthwait, B. S., Illinois University; Teacher in the Public 
Schools; Active in County Agricultural Work; Lecturer on Agricul- 
ture; Ex!periment Station Worker; Practical Scientific Farmer; Pro- 
fessor of Agriculture, Botany and Geology in McKendree, 1913. 

Prof. Frank M. Church came to McKendree five years ago, and 
since that time the Music Department here has progressed rapidly. He 
studied four years at Uberlin Conservatory, and two years at the New 
England Conservatory of Biostion. Later he studied for two years in 
Paris. He has traveled widely, both abroad and at home, and has 
heard all the great artists. Pie is gifted with a wonderful ear for mu- 
sic, a faultless memory, and flawless technique. He is a master of the 
pipe organ as well as of the piano. McKendree is fortunate indeed, 
in having an artist of such ability at the head of the Piano Department. 

Robert Allen Giles, B. S., graduated from Hedding College in 
1909, having majored in Mathematics and Science. Since that time 
he has spent two summer terms at Chicago University specializing 
in Mathematics. He has since 1909 occupied the Chair of Mathemat- 
ics in McKendree, giving great satisfaction to all. 

E. B. Waggoner, A. M., graduated from McKendree in 1875. Later 
he graduated from the Chautauqua Scientific and Literary Circle, 
spent one year at Valpariso, and specialized in Science at the School 
of Methods, Chautauqua Lake, New York. He has for many years 
conducted Institute work in Southern Illinois. He has since 1880 oc- 
cupied the chair of Science in McKendree. 

J. C. Dolley, A. M., graduated from the public schools of Virginia 
and Maryland, and from the Academy and College at Randolph Macon, 
Virginia. Later he took graduate work at the same institution, in 
French, Philosophy, English and Greek. He was President of the Al- 
legthany Collegiate Institute for tw^o years, and served as Dean of the 
Uog^itt Military Academy, and Principal of Kentucky Wesleyan 
Academy. Since 1899 he has hold the Chair of Latin Language and 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



Literature as well as those of the Social Sciences, and Logic. 

William J^liat Tiirall, A. M. In addition to being a graduate of 
McKendree, lie has tw^o years of graduate work in the University of 
Ohicago and the University of lUiniois, and is at present pursuing 
courses in Ohicago University leading to Th. in i^ngiish. He has 
taught in Arizona, and has been principal of the High Schools in Mc- 
Leans boro, 111., i^'lora, 111., and has been the Head of the Department 
of English in the High School Illinois. During the World's i^'air in 
St. Louis 'he was the Keporter for the World's Fair Company. Since 
1909 he has been, with extraordinary success, at the head of the Eng- 
lish Department of McKendree. 

William C. Walton, A. M., Ph. D., graduated from the High School 
at Brighton, Illinois, and received three degrees from McKendree; 
A. B., A. M., and Ph. D. He joined the Southern Illinois Conference 
in 1892 and preaohed two years at Huey, Illinois. He then spent one 
summer term at Chicago University specializing in Greek. At present 
he is a Professor of Greek Language and Literature, and the Philoso- 
phies, as well as the universal favorite with McKendree Students. 

Maud Willard— 

Instructor of Domestic Science, McKendree College, 1913-1914. 

Illinois University, 1905-1907. 

Illinois University, 1904-1905. 

Science Instructor Belvidere High School, 1907-1912. 

Graduated from Illinois University, A. B. degree, 1913. 

Instructor of Domestic Science, McKendree College, 1913-1914. 

State Speaker for the Domestic Science Department of Illinois 
Farmer's Institute, 1908. 



10 THE McKENDREAN 



THE STAFF 

Cecil G. Bundy Editor in Chief 

Bert M. Petty Assistant Editor 

Bernard A. Rogers Assistant Business Manager 

Norman M. Moss Business Manager, Art Editor 

Edward Ebbler Athletic Editor 

Alice Stewart Conservatory Editor 

Paul A. Shields Society Editor 

Earl F. Stice and Pearl Johnson Humorous Editors 

Mary Ball Expression Dept. Editor 

Frank Stansfield Agriculture Editor 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



11 




El'l'ler Stewart 

p ^ S*^« Johnson 



Bundy Shfelds 

Moss 
2*11 Stansfield 



12 THE McKENDREAN 



A McKENDREE SONG 

Old Alma Mater College dear, where every boy and girl, 

Each morning wakes and newly makes her name their priceless pearl; 

From constant thrills the day distills perpetual ecstacy, 

For her we'l give — for her we'd live! Our own McKen-dre-e! 

Chorus. 
I love every leaf of her wild old trees. 

Each blade of her virgin sod; 
I love every path as it winds with ease 

Where the aimless have one time trod. 
I love every crook, every cranny and nook; 

They are all adored by me; 
The school that is worth all the schools of earth, 
la my own Mc-Ken-dre-e. 

In buoyant youth or tranquil age our homage still the same, 
T&e blood of old can ne'er grow cold where sounds McKendree's 

name. 
The name that lives through changing years, 
We'll give her three times three; 
Purjjle and white, our soul's delight, our old McKen-dre-e! 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



13 







14 



THE McKENDREAN 




RUBY RICE 

Harrisburg 

Classical Course. 

Clio; Y. W. C. A.; Qass 

Treasurer; Headlight 

Staff. 
' ' Come and trip it as you go 

on the liffht fantastic toe. ' ' 



ROY DEFFENBAUGH 

Millstadt 

Scientific Course. 
Philo; Trainer in Track; Y. 
M. C. A. 
''His cogitative faculties im- 
mersed in cogibundity of 
cogitation." 



EERNICE CORNELIA WAIT 

Greenville 

Scientific Course. 

Clio; Y. W. C. A.; Y. W. C. 

A. Cabinet. 
''Well versed in books.*' 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



15 




GEORGE W. HOGAN 
McLeansboro 

Scientiflc Course. 
Plato; Class politician. 
"Hang sorrow! Care will 

kill a cat, and therefore 

let's be merry." 



SARAH VERLA GILES 
Wataga 

Scientific Course. 
Y. W. C. A. 

''It is better to be right than 
to be left." 



C. EARL BREWBAKER 
Altamont 

Classical Course. 

Plato; Y. M. C. A.; Y. M. C. 

A. Cabinet. 
''Confusion now hath made 

his masterpiece." 



16 



THE McKENDREAN 




MABEL BELL CRUMP 
Flora 

Scientific Course. 

Clio; Headlight Staff; Y. W. 

C. A. Cabinet. 
** Unthinking, idle, wild and 

young, I laughed and 

danced and talked and 

sung. ' ' 



SAMUEL WEST EATON 

Ed wards villa 

Classical Course. 

Philo; Y. M. C. A. 

''He was the mild'est man- 
nered man, 

That ever scuttled ship or 
cut a throat." 



LELIA D. WIGGINS 
Terre Haute, Ind. 

Scientific Course. 

Clio; Y. W. C. A.; Y. W. C. 
A. Cabinet; Headlight 
Staff; Instructor in Sum- 
mer School, 1913. 

"To have things come your 
way, you must go after 
them." 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



17 




IVAN GLEN MOORMAN 

Edwardsville 

Classical Course. 
Philo; Y. M. C. A.; Head- 
light Staff (Ed.); Chemis- 
try Instructor. 
"Shall I, wasting in despair, 
Die because a woman's 
fair?'' 



WILLIAM C. EVERS 
Godfrey, 111. 

Classical Course. 

Plato; Y. M. C. A.; Vice 

President of the Senior 

Class. 
''He doth indeed show some 

sparks that are like wit." 



EMMA A. BERRY 
Pleasant Hill 

Scientific Course. 

Clio; Y. W. C. A.; Y W. C 
A. Cabinet; Headlight 
Staff; Class Secretary. 

"There's nothing ill can 
dwell in such a temple." 



18 



THE McKENDREAN 




ROBERT M. PETERS 
Louisville 

Classical Course. 

Plato; Y. M. C. A.; Y. M. C. 

A. Cabinet; Senior Class 

President. 

' ' What can an old man do, 

but die." 



MILTON M. HARTMAN 
Freeburg 

Scientific Course. 
Philo; Y. M. C. A. 
"Company, Amorous Company, hath been the spoil of me." 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



19 




^ 




MABEL DAUBS 

Olney 
Public School Music. 
Clio. 



EDITH DENNISON 

Lebanon 

Piano (Diploma.) 

Clio. 

"A wilderness of sweets." 



GEORGE F. CUMMINS 
Carbondale 

Voice. 

Plato; Y. M. C. A.; Treasurer Athlet- 
ic Association; McKendree Male 
Quartet (Pres.); Headlight Staff. 
"Soprano, basso, even the contralto, 
"Wished him five fathoms under the 
Rialto." 

NELLE DEE 
Lebanon 

Piano (Diploma.) 
McKendree Orchestra. 
"Music hath charms." 



20 



THE McKENDREAN 



ELLA GIBBS 

Okawville 

Public School Music. 
Clio. 



JESSIE FOLLIS 

Johnston City 
Voice. 
Clio. 
"Dove me little, love me long." 



BERTHA WEBB 

Ewing- 

Piano (Diplioma.) 

Clio; Y. W. C. A.; Voice Contest Med- 
al, 1913. 
"The Magic of a Face." 



MARGUERITE SMITH 
Marion 

Expression. 
Clio.; Y. W. C. A. 

"I Just Can't Make My Eyes Be^ 
have." 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



21 





MARY E. KENNEDY 

Litchfield 

Expression. 
Clio; Y. W. C. A. 

"She would giggle." 



NELLE LOY 

Effing"ham 

Home Economics (Diploma.) 

Clio; Y. W. C. A.; Y. W. C. A. Cahinet. 

' 'Small in stature, but great in deeds. " 



MARGARET BRAINARD 

Metropolis 

Home Economics (Certificate.) 
Clio; Y. W. C. A. 

''She has such sentimental eyes." 



NORAH MARIE MILLER 
Metropolis 

Home Economics (Certificate.) 
Clio; Y. W. C. A. 

"Take, oh take those lips away."- 
Earl F. 



22 THE McKENDREAN 



SENIOR CLASS HISTORY 

By Ivan Moorman 

The class entered MicKendree in the fall of 1911. That year was 
\ ery eventful. Several members of the class had graduated from High 
School the previous June, and, consequently were possessed with more 
knowledge than they now have. It took all of that first year to lose 
that superfluous learning and drop down to the regions where human- 
ity exists. 

In the second year of their college course they accomplished a 
great deal of good. Having learned their relative place in college life, 
they with great condescension undertook to direct and guide the fresh- 
men. In the due course of time they imparted their experience to that 
class and graciously allowed them to benefit by what it took them a 
whole year to acquire. 

When the third year began, the class was fitted individually and 
©oUectively to be a real factor in college life. It was at this time that 
they took charge of the publication of the college paper. This proved 
to be a splendid success, and the paper produced was far superior to 
any before published. 

During this same period they took an active interest in the estab- 
lishment of the athletic fee, which has beyond a doubt been a great 
success. In fact they were connected with all worthy enterprises of 
the college, and it was this spirit of helpfulness which enabled them to 
play the important part which they did in the school year just past. 

During this last year the class 'has allowed these student problems 
to pass into other hands. They have been content to direct and en- 
courage those of the class of 1915 in discharging these duties of minor 
note. 

But chiefly their energies have been spent in bettering the college. 
They have cheerfully lent suggestions and dropped kindly words of 
ad\ace to the faculty. They have seen clearly what was wrong in the 
different departments. Although, regretting the fact that the faculty 
and President have been so slow in following out their suggestions, 
they, nevertheless, have been patient and good natured with this body. 

This year is one of which the class is justly iproud. They have 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 23 

labored hard and faithfully for the college. They have been long suf- 
fering and patient with the faculty and with their fellow students. 
Their parting word is this: 

The class has instituted these many reforms, but in spite of these 
and the great amount of good accomplished, they feel at commence- 
ment that they are just starting on lives which should be of the ihighest 
efficiency and should contribute largely to the "Supreme Bonum" 
Each member of the class will be glad to give his name and future ad- 
dress to anyone who feels that he might wish to consult an authority 
concerning any phase of college life or college management. 



24 



THE McKENDREAN 




McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 25 



Prophecy of the Class of 1914 

By Mabel Crump 

Since this hard task was given me, 

To write the Senior prophecy, 
I hied me to Apollo's home 

And there high in a lofty dome 
I looked into a crystal well. 

And what I saw, to you I'll tell. 

First, right before my gleaming eyes, 

A face looked up in glad surprise. 
The fK>rm, I saw, was sadly bent 

As the long hours in toil were spent. 
I asked, "Sir, what is that you do?" 

Said he, "From doughnut's holes I chew.' 
Who was the man you ask of me! 

Old Bob Peters you may see. 

Next I beheld a circus ring. 

With girls and clowns who dance and sing. 
And walking on a tight-rope there. 

Was Bemice Wait, I do declare. 

Whom next do you suppose I saw, 
Afar from native home and ma, 

A 'teaching little heathen girls? 

Miss Berry's face, all framed in curls. 

Along a stream my gaze now strayed — 
There stood a man, his clothes all frayed. 

And as a means of livelihood 

This man caught bull frogs as the could. 

His name — I tell it you with pain — 

Boy Deffenbaugh, our German Swain. 



26 THE McKENDREAN 



Then there was Tommie Brewbaker 
I saw him still in search for 'her' 

Whom he should choose to be his wife 
To love 'him, cherish him thru life. 



A wonder now I will relate, 

'Twas surely wrought by hand of fate; 
Tho strange it seems, believe it true — 

Mrs. Wiggins' face came into view. 
I heard her singing wondrous grand, 

They say her voice has stirred the land. 



Miss Sarah Verla Giles, poor soul, 
A sorry part will be her role; 

An old, old maid she's doomed to be. 
Who loves her cat and drinks her tea. 



Presented next unto my sight, 

Was one who early took his flight 
Away from joys of single life, 

And took unto himself a wife. 
But there I saw him plowing com 

Until Old Gabriel blew his horn. 
Pray guess his name, it won't be hard — 

*Tis Milton Hartman, our old pard. 



Upon a form I soon did gaze 

Which walked about, as in a daze. 
It wondered 'round in the debris, 

And sadly, wildly looked at m-e. 
Explosions there had been, you see, 

A total nervous wreck was he. 
With sorrow listen to his name, 

Poor Ivan Moorman, seeking fame. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 27 



Do you remember Ruby Rice, 

The little girl with chin precise, 
How she and Grumpy lightly tripped 

Thru tango steps and never slipped? 
Well — now I see in vaudeville, 

These little maids are tripping still. 

A moment more and I descried, 

Our friend Sam Eaton, true and tried. 

This man has now quite wealthy grown, 
By wheeling smoke from zone to zone. 

Soon I did see a woeful sight! 

A man who chewed with strength and might; 
He sat upon a cracker box 

And ashes from a pipe he knocks. 
They say he does this day by day, 

And thus he wears his life away. 
His name I learned with some chagrin, 

Was Clarence Evers — pale and thin. 

And then I cried in accents wild — 

''From our whole class, so meek and mild, 
Will no one go to foreign lands, 

That he may preach to ignorant bands!" 
And lo! I' heard a mighty voice 

Say — *'I will preach; let all rejoice." 
Then all was still, but I had heard 

George Hogan's voice send forth that word. 



28 



THE McKENDREAN 




McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



29 




30 



THE McKENDREAN 



ra?5?--.'^U'.-:i*- ..-'<; 



iK 



b 



Ba 




BERT M. BETTY 

Claremont 
Philo; President Y. M. C. A.; Class President; 

Assistant Editor-in-Chief McKendrean '15. 
"One who to himself is true, 

And therefore must be so to you." 

ALICE V. STEWART "Pig" 
Metropolis 

Clio; Y. W. C. A.; Class Vice President; Mc- 
Kendrean '15 Staff. 

"Alice, where art thou going?" 

DAVID MORRIS HARDY 
Waterloo 

Plato; Y. M. C. A.; Orchestra. 
"Few words spoke he, but yet he played his 
part." 

FRANCIS E. ROBERTS "Bobbie" 
Thompsonville 
Clio; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Basket Ball, 1912-13. 
"She has a queer little laugh which is very 

infectious. 

FRANK AKIN STANSFIELD 
Lawrenceville 

Philo; Y. M. C. A.; President of Agricultural 

Club; McKendree '15 Staff. 
"Always willing to help and do." 



CLAYTON L. WILLI 
Lebanon 

Caipt. Track team 1913-14; Assistant in 
Athletics 1913-14. 
"Little, but Oh! bow mighty." 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



31 



JOHN F. HARMON, JR., "Johnnie" 
Lebanon 

Plato; Varsity Basket Ball 1914. 

"Pa, give me a cent, I want to be tough." 






[-* f*- 



ARTHUR M. WALRATH 
Lebanon 

Philo: Track team 1913. 




PAUL A. SHIELDS "Boaz" 
Bloomington 
Philo; Y. M. C. A.; Headlight Staff; McKer 
drean '15 Staff. 
"Dainty and sweet." 

EDWARD EBELER "Eb" 
Godfrey 

Philo; Y. M. C. A.; President of the Athletic 
Association; Varsity Basket Ball, 1911,12- 
13-14; McKendrean '15 Staff; Captain Var- 
sity B. B. 1914. 

"Dearest, I dream of thee, tho' far away." 

MARY B. BALL 
Litchfield 
Clio; Y. W. C. A.; McKendrean '15 Staff; 
Clio Quartet 1913 and 1914; Secretary Ath- 
letic Association; Class Treasurer. 
"Her voice was ever soft and Ibw, 
An excellent thing in wwman." 

NORMAN M. MOSS 
Mt. Vernon 
Philo; Business Mgr. McKendrean '15; Y. M. 

C. A.; Art Editor. 
"A rare bird on earth." 



32 



THE McKENDREAN 



/: 



PEARL JOHNSON "P. J." 

Belleville 

aio; Y. W. C. A.; Auditor of Athletic Asso- 
ciation; Headlight Staff; Girls Basket Ball, 
1913; McKendrean '15 Staff. 

"An all-round good student is Pearl; 
She's really a peach of a girl;! 

And when she is through 
Could we give her her due, 
We'd marry her off to an Earl." 

EARL FRANKLIN STICE 

St. Elmo 
Philo; Y. M. C. A.; McKendrean '15 Staff. 
' ' I care for nobody, no, not I if nobody cares 
for me." 

J. W. A. KINNISON 
Lebanon 
Philo; Y. M. C. A. 
"An angel! or if not, 
An earthly paragon." 

LOUIS HERMAN PFEFFER "Lutz" 
Lebanon 

Plato; Varsity Basket Ball Sub. 1913-14. 

' ' Happy am I, from care I am free, 

Why aren't they all contented like me?" 

L. GLEN McCORMACK 
Bone Gap 
Philo; Y. M. C. A.; Track Team 1913-14. 
"A quiet and pleasant manner wins many 
friends." 



FERD FRIEDLI "Fritz" 
Lebanon 

Plato; Varsity Basket Ball, 1914. 

"A'ccuse not nature, she hath done her part. 

. He means well." 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



33 



HARRY EVERET McKNIGHT 

Lebanon 
Philo; Y. M. C. A. 
**He had a face like a benediction." 



WOOD LOY 

Effingham 
Plato; Basket Ball sub. 1912, '13, '14. 

CHLOE LANDIS 
Lebanon 
Clio; Y. W. C. A. 

"Sense is the by-product of exiperience. " 

BERNARD A. ROGERS 
Centralia 
Plat'o; Y. M. C. A.; Class Secretary; McKen- 

drean '15 Staff. 
"Law, I once did have a college case." 



3 fSi. 



G. C. BUNDY 
Mt. Carmel 
Philo; Y. M. C. A.; Editor-in-Chief McKen- 
drean '15; McKendree Male Quartet; In- 
structor in English. Track team 1914. 
"A little nonsense now and then, 
Is relished by the best of men." 

CHARLES SMITH "Bishop" 
Dexter 
Plato; Y. M.C. A. 

Five years and more I've trod this weary 
shore. ' * 



34 THE McKENDREAN 



JUNIOR CLASS HISTORY 

McKendree College, it seems, will soon cease to be; 'Tis sad to 
think upon. McKendree, the ancient, the venerable cannot much long- 
er live. We weep to see the old school drawing its last breath. There 
will be much siorrow in the land, but neither sorrow nor tears will stay 
the end, the inevitable end. 

The past three years have been the most successful and progres- 
sive years in all of McKendree 's history. Finances have prospered, 
academic rank has advanced, morality has increased among the stu- 
dents, and a better college spirit has come to prevail. All this has 
come about because the positions of honor and responsibility have becD 
filled by competent and honorable members of the class of 1915. 

Now, another year and all will be over. The world is demanding 
that we come out and solve its great problems. We must go. The 
thought of parting makes us sad. Soon will thy halls resound no more 
with our footsteps, the Prof's, will cease to be astonished at O'Ur words 
of wisdom, the Spohs will go astray, for there will be no one to instruct 
them in the way they should go, the grass will soon s'piring up and hide 
the old familiar paths, solitude and desolation will reign supreme when 
the mighty class of '15 goes out to dwell in the world of con lict. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 35 



A STORY 

It was ni^ht, the night of November seventh. Mystery was 
abroad in the land. Midnight came, as dark as the proverbial ''stack 
of black cats." Not a star was visible, the sky was black. The wind, 
fresh with the smell of a coming rain, sighed among the well nigh 
leafless trees. Silence reigned supreme except for the occasional long- 
drawn howl of a dog. It was just the night for some dark deed. The 
chapel was safe behind locks and bars, and the guardians of that sa- 
cred place slept the untroubled sleep of the innocent. 

Suddenly, out of the night six dark, silent shadows slunk chapel- 
ward, disappearing again into the solemn darkness. Not a sound dis- 
turbed the intense solitude. 

Now and then one might imagine he caught a glimpse of a dark, 
solitary fig-ure, as if someone was standing guard, keeping a lonely 
vigil in the silent watches of the night. A long half-hour had just 
dragged itself into the past, when, as if by magic, the six mysterious 
phantoms appeared together, gave vent to a low chuckle of fiendish 
glee, shook hands, and vanished like black spirits into the silent night. 
The trees, silent spectators of the mysterious proceedings, doubtless 
wondered what awful deed the morning sun would reveal. 

New the swift hours, as if anxious to uncover the night's secret, 
sped rapidly by. It grew red in the East and lighter until it was dawn. 
What a glorious sight then burst upon the eyes of the morning. High 
up on the chapel steeple floated a beautiful banner of Old Rose and 
Nile Green. There was joy in the hearts of the Juniors, wonder and 
astonishment in the minds of the Sophs and Freshies, and consternation 
in the camp of the Seniors. How did it happen? Echo answers, how? 

For five days and six nights the Old Rose and Green floated in tri- 
umph, despite an unsuccessful attempt of the Seniors to remove the 
Junior class colors. On the morning of the sixth day the Junior class 
lowered their colors after they had taimted the Seniors for nearly a 
week. That night the Seniors plucked up sufficient courage to raise 
their colors on the steeple above the clock. They waved half heartedly 
all of Friday and Friday night and until noon Saturday, but thirty 
short hours in all. Then at noon, in the broad light of day the Juniors 
removed the Senior colors and (proceeded to march about the Campus 
on parade, flaunting the colors in the very faces of the timid Seniors. 
Dr. Griesbaum was kept busy for the next few days attending sick 
Seniors. There were no deaths. 



36 



THE McKENDREAN 




McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



37 




38 THE McKENDREAN 




SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 

Louis A. Butts. Seargcnt at Arms Ernest O. Moore. President 

Isabelle E. Griffith, Vice President 
Paul W. Gibson, Secretary Leeter Dorris, Treasurer 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 39 

SOPHOMORES 

Adams, Ethel— '' Oherub. " 

Bundy, Charles A. — ''A booster for the big red rooster." 

Butts, Lewis A.— ''The Confidential Man." 

Campbell, Leo — "Chief of the Squirrel tribe." 

Carson, Paul — "He's a good horse, but a Crowder." 

Condrey, Hamlin Gr. — "Happy is he who knows no cares." 

Doelling, George — "Socialism George." 

Dolly, Paul T. — "United we stand, divided we fall. . . 

Dorris, C. Lester — "Knapping Continuously." 

Gentry, Lillian — "Corkscrew curls, Then — ?" 

Gibson, Paul W.— "Natural bom Base Ball player." 

Griffith, Isabelle— "Silence Personified?" 

Henry, Alice — "Sunny Smiles." 

Hexter, Edward E.—" Cultivates the WAIST places." 

Jones, Nell — ' ' In whose eyes contentment lies 1 ' ' 

Knapp, Ethel — "Shy as a mouse." 

Kessler, Henry C. — "His lavishly flowing hair." ' ' , 

Miller, Erline A. — "Light fantastic toe." 

McPherson, W. Henry — "Relic of Spanish-American War." 

Moore, Ernest 0.—" Old Man." 

Reisner, Earl E. — "Monk of the Monastery." 

Ritchey, Marie — ' * Different and Indifferent. ' ' 

Robertson, Grace — "Deeds not Words." 

Schroeder, Ralph — "Still waters run deep." 

Shields, Harold — "Too good looking to be happy." 

Smiley, Lester C. — "Grand Central." 

Taylor, Loyd — "Puts not his light under a buslhel." 

Valentine, Roger — "Valley." 

Waggoner, M/arion — "Admirer of Curly 's locks." 

Warren, John A. L. — "Man with many names." 

Wilkins, Ruth — "Fair faces need no paint." 



40 THE McKENDREAN 



Proclamation to Freshmen 

1. Thou shalt make thy abode in the dormitory. 

2. Make your bed before 8 :00 o 'clock each morning, for you know 
not the hour the matron will oome to inspect. 

3. Three meals each day you must eat in the Mess hall, except 
on Sunday, and that day two will be thy portion. 

4. When seated at the table do not yell for ' * next, ' ' nor behave in 
any unseemingly manner, neither speak disrespectfully of the butter, 
for it is much older than thou, and its gray hairs must be respected. 

5. Go to the President's office and get a copy of McKendree's 
rules, read them every day that they may be a light unto thy path 
and a lamp unto thy feet. 

6. Uncover your head to all Seniors, Juniors and * ' Sof s. ' ' Try to 
be a gentleman. 

7. "Freshie" cuffs on your pants are out of place, so are soft 
shirts. Consult your Faculty Advisor. 

8. When you go up town, buy what you wish then letuin imme- 
diately, lest one of the Profs, see you loafing and lower your grade ac 
cordingly. 

9. Break not these rules at your peril, Freshies, and if you do 
blame not the powers that be when you find yourselves standing on 
"Green Carpet" looking into their learned faces. 

10. Proclaimed this 20th day of September in the year of Our 
Lord One Thousand, Nine Hundred and Thirteen, and in the Eighty- 
fifth year of this College. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



41 



\U\M m\ \U U Hllln .lll/ 




42 THE McKENDREAN 



He Flunketh Me 

He flunketh me, evil thought, 

word with dark forebodings fraught, 

What-e'er, I do where'er I be, 

Still grave the fear, he flunketh me. 

Clio. 
He flunketh me, he flunketh me. 

In numerous tests he flunketh me. 
A faithful student though I be, 

E^lentlessly he flunketh me. 

Sometimes midst New misspelling vials 

Sometimes twixt digets, jokes and giles, 

In Livy prose or English three 

It matters not, he flunketh me. 

E'en though my saddler I bestride 

O'er Attic's ancient turf to ride 
With Homer and his Odyssey, 

Alas, alas, he flunketh me. 

I fear my task will ne'er be done, 

Xo course complete, no lienors won. 
Like happy Tubby I would flee, 

Where n-one can say he flunketh me. — G. and B. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



43 




44 



THE McKENDREAN 




COACH CYRUS S. GENTRY 



In 1912 Prof. Gentry was 
elected to the position of Ath- 
letic Director in McKendree, 
which position he now holds. 
He has been very successful as 
a coach in athletics and has, 
usually, led his team to victo- 
ry. He is popular with the 
students on account of his ster- 
ling character, genteel conduct 
and fair dealing with all. He 
is mot, however, a fanatic on 
the question of athletics and 
does not assume, as some ath- 
letic coaches do, that his de- 
partment is the most import- 
ant in the institution. 

McKendree will lose Prtof. 
Grentry's services this year, as 
he leaves this fall for Oxford, 
England, to study in Oxford 
University, where he holds a 
Rhode's scholarship. 



"SHORTY" GATES 
McKendree's Cheer Leader 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



45 





1913- ^(CIJi/tDdJILf -1914- 



OPPONEWr- Score 



hloV.15^ GRfiHITEGry IC 

h/oV.ZZ^ CEHTifFiL lVEsUyfni-20 

V Z^^ CflffBOffOALE tfoffhffiL - 18 

Feb, 9, ^WHNsns /^^_s<zHooL.-z\ 

f^B.H, RuNOIsWESL^yfiH-^Z 

/^a.28, KunoisWesl^y^h- 13 

A//?/? ^, Uncolu 16 

Mfifr, 7, iLUNofs CoUeoE. 32 
Marf,y. liNcoun /s 

^'^^m.l iLut/ois WESL^yahf-4^ 

/^fffTJd. Heddinq Z(3 

Mf^Rj3, BRnoLEiy ^g 



^ 39 

„ 35* 

,. 44- 

„ 30 

,. 25- 

M 24- 

• 31 

" ZJ5 

.. 25 



loTaLfiiNl6:Opp0f/efiT^^^^J-O/ • 49-' 



46 THE McKENDREAN 



Athletic Review 

The season 1913-14 'has been the most satisfactory that the Ath- 
letic Department has ever had, although the average of games won 
and lost may not be the highest. 

McKendree became a member of the I. I. A. A. at the March meet- 
ing of the Association in 1913. The basket ball season was over but 
the base ball and track championships remained to be decided. For 
the first time in her history, McKendree had a good base ball schedule, 
and some of the best teams in this section of the state were p layed. 
The track team was probably the best that has ever represented us 
and a good showing was made at the state meet. Graham, our only 
entry in the tennis tournament, played well and was an acknowledged 
star, being beaten in close games by the final winner. 

The basket ball season this year was a success from every stand- 
point. Only two games of the regular schedule were lost and the team 
qualified for the finals only to lose there by two heart-breaking scores. 
The base ball team looms up as one of the best ever, while the track - 
team ought to be a factor in the state meet. 

The Athletic Association has proved its value by the results of 
the last two years. A financial stringency — one of the greatest draw- 
backs which the department has ever known 'has been eliminated. 
Careful and economical use of the finances made it possible for the 
Association to send representatives to the state track meet, tennis and 
basket ball tournaments; to keep up needed repairs and improvements 
on Hypes' Field and in the gymnasiums; to secure good schedules 
with strong teams; and to have a small surplus at the end of the year. 

The successful year of competition in the I. I. A. A., the strength 
of the Athletic Association, the loyal and enthusiastic support of stu- 
dents and faculty, and above all, the generally prevailing a^Ii^etio 
spirit are positive signs of many years of healthful activity. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



47 



THE TEAM 




Eb'bler, generally known as * * shorty, ' ' 
has been a regular member of the basket 
ball team for the last four years. The 
past season during which he was captain 
was probably the most brilliant of his 
career. Starting with no experience he 
has developed until he ranks with the 
best guards of the state. His position is 
defensive guard and he is a past master 
at guarding two or three men, es- 
pecially on a floor where the baskets 
are on the wall. His height and long 
reach make possible his phenomenal 
work in intercepting passies and bloek- 
ing shots. He was indispensible to the 
team this year not only because he is 
the best guard that McKendree has ever 
had but because he is a very capable 
jumper at the center ipiosition. Next 
year will be his last and he will certain- 
ly perform even miore brilliantly than 
ever before. His best game was against 
Illinois Wesleyan at Lebanon, when he 
held Eliott, the all-state forward, from 
s'coring a single basket. 



CAPT, EBBLER 



48 



THE McKENDREAN 



"Boots" Willi 

"Boots" Willi, the little giant, and cap- 
tain-elect has played left forward for three 
years. "Bbots' " value to the team is not 
in the fact that he is a heavy scorer, for 
he is not, as he averaged less than three 
points per game. His ability to cover the 
floor and feed the ball to the other men 
renders him one of the most important 
cogs in the machine. His floor work is 
easily the best that any McKendrean has 
ever shown. His ooiol head, excellent judg- 
ment and hard playing make him an ideal 
leader for next year. His unassuming 
ways obtain for him the good wishes of 
(his assoc^iateg. The dllinoiis Wiesleyan? 
game here showed him at his best. 



Louis Pfeffer 

"Pfeff" 

Pfeffer and Loy are two small, but 
speedy forwards. They are both excep- 
tionally hard workers, fair shots and be- 
cause of their size and speed are extreme- 
ly hard to guard. With a little more 
height both of them would become stars. 
Pfeffer 's best performance was against 
Illinois Wesleyan at Bloomington, while 
Loy's most clever work was in the Illinois 
Wesleyan game of the preliminary touma" 
ment. 



/ 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



49 



"Ferd" Friedli 

Friedli, former captain of tTie Central 
Wesleyan five, came to McKendree with 
an enviable reputation in basket ball and 
his year here has not marred it in the 
least. Although small and light, he is 
without doubt the best running guard 
that we have ever had. He is extremely 
fast, a wonderfully good shot, and handles 
the ball flawlessly. Some players are 
great floor men, other good scorers and 
others guards, only. Friedli combines 
these three qualities and is very proficient 
in each. His banner performance was the 
last game of the preliminary tournament 
against Illinois Wesleyan. 



Roger Valentine 

"Valley" 

Valentine played his first year in col- 
lege circles, but his High School exper- 
ience had been excellent and he made an 
enviable record. He has a pleasing habit 
of being able to cage the ball from almost 
any angle. He is light and dislikes the 
rough work but his accuracy in shooting 
proved a deciding factor in several games. 
He will be remembered for winning the 
Hedding game by throwing two field bask- 
ets in as many minutes. 



50 



THE McKENDREAN 




"Johnnie" Harmon 

Harmon, the mianager, lias won two M's 
in basket ball, but this was his first year 
as a regiilar. Hi;; position was center af- 
ter the jump and he played that excel- 
lently for a man of his slight build. Abil- 
ity to cage the ball both from the field and 
on free tlirows is his chief asset. He scor^ 
ed the largest number of points and was 
very good on the defense. During the last 
few games, however, he had bad luck on 
shots and his average was materially les- 
sened. The Oarbondale game gave him a 
chance to appear at his best by scoring 
eight field goals and two free throws in 
the first half. 



"Snooks'' Smiley 

Smiley, otherwise known as "Snooks" 
also played his first year as a regular. He 
was an excellent partner for ''Boots" as 
botli can play the rloor with the best of 
tliem. He is fast on his feet, never loafs 
n minute, and the best man on the squad 
to break up a dribble. His shots are of 
Mif ]:;ng distance kind. His best game was 
Mif exliibition contest with Lincoln at the 
|)r('1iminary tournament. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



51 



"Old Man" Moore 

Mioore is a guard of the E'bbler type and 
has been his understudy for the last two 
years. He is a "bear" for work; gets 
across the floor rapidly, and although 
rather short is the hardest man on the 
team to handle. If we did not have sueh 
a good back giiard as Ebbler, Moore 
would certainly prove a star. One of his 
best performances was against Hedding in 
the finals when he held Case, their crack 
forward to no field baskets. 



"Runt" Loy 



Pfeffer and Loy aTe two small, but 
speedy forwards. They are bbith excep- 
tionally hard workers, fair shots and be- 
cause of their size and speed are extreme- 
ly hard to guard. With a little more 
height both of them would become stars. 
Pfeffer 's best performance was jagainst 
Illinois Wesleyan at Bloomington, while 
Loy's most clever work was in the Illi- 
nois Wesleyan game at the preliminary 
tournament. 



52 THE McKENDREAN 



BASKET BALL 

When the basket ball season of 1913-14 opened and the call for 
candidates was made, >only two of the regulars of the previous /ear 
reported. Stokes, the star center for three years and Isaacs, the hp<iTy 
scoring forward, had graduated, while Beedle, our best all-round '♦^- 
lete had taken the (position as Physical Director at Shurtleff. This 
left only Captain Ebbler and Willi as a nucleus for a winning team. 
Of the second string men, Harmon, who had played Stokes' position 
so creditably in several games, Smiley, Moore and Pfeffer were back 
in school. The newcomers of experience were Friedli, former captain 
and star of the Central Wesleyan team, and Valentine a member of the 
championship high school five of Mt. Vernon. Loy's matriculation 
in the winter term added another forward. 

With this material on hand, the prospects for turning out a team 
capable of upholding our reputation in basket ball were very discour- 
aging to Coa<?h Gentry. The defensive end of the game could be well 
cared for by Ebbler and Friedli, but the forwards were all light and 
small, while Harmon, the only aspirant for the center position hasn't 
weight which an ideal pivot man should posses. The thing which prov- 
ed to be the greatest factor in making them a successful team was their 
speed and team work. Willi, Friedli and Smiley form a trio whose 
floor work has never been surpassed in Lebanon. 

The season opened with a practice game against a Granite City 
S. S. team which was an easy victory. The line-up which started this 
game was the regular team for the rest of the year. Willi and Smiley 
played the forward positions and Ebbler was at center for the jump 
after which he dropped back to defensive guard. Friedli, the run- 
ning guard and Harmon completed the combination. Smiley was 
first choice at right forward in practically all of the games but Valen- 
tine, Pfeffer and Loy made him work hard to retain his position and 
were capable of taking a place with scarcely any hitch in the team 
play. During the first term Central Wesleyan was also defeated by a 
good score. 

The second term opened with a game against Washington U. on 
their home floor. This was the first ''classy" team which had been 
played and our boys showed their ability by forcing Washington to 
extend themselves to win by a small score. The Hedding game which 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 53 

foliowea was tiie most tiirillmg contest that was staged during the 
>eai'. ine teams were evemy matonea ana alter torty minutes oi nard 
battimg tne score was a tie. Two extra periods were ipdayed and some 
spectacular basket shooting by Valentine during the last three min- 
utes gave us the victory by three points. 

Carbondale Normal offered us little opposition and during the 
second half our reserve squad easily bested them. The game with 
Central Wesleyan at Warrenton proved to be a hard fought contest 
but the result was never in doubt after the first ten minutes. McKen- 
dree won with several points to spare. On February ninth we met the 
Arkansas State Agricultural School, for two years champions of that 
state, and a good game was anticipated, but the superiority of the pur- 
ple and white was shown by the decisive score. 

Illinois Wesleyan, champions of the I. I. A. A. for 1914, over- 
whelmed us on their home floor. Unfamiliarity with the baskets, with 
the opponent's style of play and the fact that we were meeting the best 
team in the state may account for the large score. The team returned 
with a firm determination to get revenge. The otpportunity was of- 
fered two weeks later when Illinois Wesleyan visited Lebanon. The 
wearers of the purple and white had been coached and primed espec- 
ially for this game. The result was that they turned the tables on 
Wesleyan and by displaying the best team work of the season walked 
loff with the game. 

This victory and the one against Company K two nights later 
f'Oirmed a fitting climax to a successful season. Eight games had been 
won and two lost. A decided advantage had been gained over Cen- 
tral Wesleyan as the score on total number of games between these 
sdhool now stands seven-five in our favor; an even split had resulted in 
the Illinois Wesleyan games ; Washington University had won by only 
a few points on their floor; Hedding, Carbondale Normal, Arkansas 
State Champions, Granite City and Company K were among the eight 
losers. 

With this record behind them the team started to the preliminary 
State Tournament at Decatur expecting to qualify for the finals and 
hoping to place second. The first game was an exhibition contest with 
Lincoln on Friday night. The team played wtonderfully good ball 
and as a result was picked to make a strong showing in the tourna- 
ment. This game seemed to make them overconfident and w*hen Illi- 



54 THE McKENDREAN 



nois College was met they were surprised and defeated.. The loss of 
this game compelled us to meet Lincoln again and an easy victory was 
recorded. The third and last game of the day was with Wesleyan for 
third place. McKendree played hard and well but was beaten 44-31. 

In the finals for the state championship at Bloomington the team 
met Hedding, the winners of the northern tournament and Bradley, 
the runners-up. In the opening contest with Hedding, whose line-up 
had been greatly strengthened since their game here, the team worked 
hard but was finally nosed out by one point. The game with Bradley 
was a duplication of the first. The final scores were the same, 26-25 
and only the worst of hard luck lost the latter. ^'Snooks" Smiley had 
just made a s>hot at the basket and the gun fired as the ball was totter- 
ing on the rim, dropping through a half-second too late win the game. 

Reserves — Feb. 17 — ^Collinsville H. S., 13; McKendree Reserves 33. 

Feb. 21— Third Baptist S. S., 15; McKendree Reserves, 54. 

Individual Point Scorers, Varsity — Harmon, 156; Friedli, 136; 
Smiley, 58; Valentine, 49; Willi, 36; Pfeffer, 20; Loy, 20; Ebbler, 14; 
Pigott, 2. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



55 




ADVANCED GYM CLASS. 



56 



THE McKENDREAN 



El 



o 



? OB 



n 
Pi 

S* 5. 
ST ■ 



•a. i» 




McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



57 




CAPT. WHITTENBERG 



BASE BALL. 

The base ball season of 1913 was 
satisfactory because of two things 
— a, good schedule was played and 
although a comparatively poor av- 
erage was made, the team gained 
much valuable experience for this 
year. 

The players who won M's were: 
Graham, Willi, Hill, Schuwerk, 
Pigott, Campbell, Caldwell, Wolf, 
Endicott, Heiligenstein and Peters 
(manager.) 

Schedule : 

April 19 — Carlyle at Lebanon, 10-4. 

April 26 — C. B. C at Lebanon, 19-5. 

May 3 — Belleville C. C. at Lebanon, 9-10. 

May 7 — W. U. Dentals at Lebanon, 14-13. 

May 16 — Bunker Hill M. A. at Bunker 
Hill, 3-13. 

May 17 — E. I. S. NS. at Charleston, 8-1. 

May 28 — C. B. C. at St. Louis, 18-11. 

April 18 — Signal Hill at Lebanon, Mc- 
Kendree 7; Opponents 9. 

April 25 — Carbondale Normal at Carbon- 
dale, McKendree 10; Opponents 9. 

May 2 — Washington U. at Lebanon, Mc- 
Kendree 5; Opponents 7. 

May 7 — C. B. C. at St. Louis. 

May 13 — -"C. B. C. at Lebanon. 

May 16 — C. W. C. at Lebanon. 

May 30 — Carbondale at Lebanon. 

June 1 — C. W. C. at W^arrenton. 

May 10 — St. Louis U. at Lebanon. 



1914. 



The prospects for a winning team this year are very bright. Six 
of last year's men are back, while Whitenberg and Gibson who were 
ineligible for the greater part of last season are again in good stand- 
ing. Butts, Richter, Shields, and Hannon are among the new candi- 
dates showing the best form. Wolf, Whitenberg and Harmon are the 
leading candidates for pitcher, Whitenberg and Butts, catchers; Heil- 
igenstein, first base; Butts, Campbell, second base; Willi, s. s.; Gibson, 
third base, PigH)tt, left field; Richter, c. f.; Campbell and Shields, r. f. 



^ 



58 



THE McKENDREAN 



2: 

n 

u 



l< 



2, < 



van 

c o" s 
«>• 2 r 



n 



n 



2 =: 




McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



59 



TRACK. 

The track team of 1913 bettered the 
records which previous teams have 
made. Three meets were participated in 
and a creditable showing was made at 
Peoria. 

Hiiurtkff, C. B. C, and Central Wes- 
leyan "were defeated 56-42, 51-50, and 
10-11 respectively. The team placed 
Hfth at Peoria by taking 10 1-2 points. 
Beedle wion the running broad jump and 
tied for third in the running high. Eat- 
on was first in the pole vault. 

The work of Beedle wias especially 
brilliant all season. Willi, Whitenberg, 
Smiley and Eaton were counted as sure 
point winners. Stokes, although not 
running as well as in former years, was 
hard to beat in the half mile. MoOor- 
mack, who improved wonderfully, Wal- 
rath and Campbell were other capable 
distance ^nen. Caldwell was the Ibest 
hammer thrower we have had for some 
time. 

New McKendree records were made 
in the following events: 

Running High Jump, 68 inches, Beedle 

Pole Vault, 10 ft., 9 1-2 inches, Eaton. 

Shot Put, 41 ft., 1 in., Snodgrass. Discus, 115 ft., 5 in., Snodgrass. 

The huge silver loving cup donated by W. C. Pfeffer to the best 

track atlilet was won by Beedle. Medals for second and third places 

given by L. W. Smith were awarded to Willi and Caldwell. 




PROSPECTS FOR 1914. 



The loss of Beedle and Stokes will be greatly felt, but the improve- 
ment of the others, most of whom have returned, should offset this. 
Captain Willi, Whitenberg, Smiley, Walrath, McCormack, Vogelsang, 
Shields, Moore, Campbell and Bundy are showing well and will un- 



60 



THE McKENDREAN 



doubtedly prove the mainstays of the team. 

Schedule: 
May 9— Shiirtleff at Lebanon; Shurtleff, 51; McK, 58. 
May 16 — Central Wesleyan at Lebanon. 
May 23— State Track Meet at Peoria. 
June 6 — McKendree Field Day. 



WEARERS OF THE "M" 



Basket Ball 


Track 


Ebbler 


Willi 


Willi 


Beedle 


Smiley 


Caldwell 


Harmon 


MoCormack 


Friedli 


Whitenber^ 


Moore 


Smiley 


Valentine 


Eaton 


Pfeffer 


Walrath 


Base Ball 


Winners of " 


Willi 


Gould 


Graham 


Brewbaker 


PiRott 


Goldman 


Campbell 


Greer, G. (C.) 


Caldwell 


Miller, A. B. 


Hill 




Whitenber^ 




Heili^enstein 




Peters 




Endicott 




Schuwerk 




Wolf 





M. G. T." 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



61 



(T 




CLUBS, 

Socie:tie:5 
MisctuuaNEous 

s.0f^G/\NIZ/\Tl0H's. 

^\ 



62 



THE McKENDREAN 




THE CONSERVATORY 

Piano Department 

McKendree Conservatory is now a recognized school of music. 
Not only are the recitals being watched with great interest by the en- 
tire community, but everywhere its course of study is being comment- 
ed upon favorably. This course now requires six terms of harmony; 
three each of counterpoint, ear training, history of music, one of en- 
semble playing, one of analysis, and a recital. 

During tlio past year there were twenty-two recitals, which shewed 
the progress of the students to be remarkable. Only a few years ago, 
it was unusual to hear a recital, especially from memory. Now, it is 
taken for granted that each pupil has technical ability, and also a 
good memory. The seven Pupil's Recitals this year were models of 
what recitals should be. The average attendance was about four hun- 
dred. Evidently there is something in the training of the pupils that 
appeals strongly to the public for it is practically the same audience 
at each recital. The r)rograms were always interesting, doubly so 
hfcanso each number was performed from memory. So thorough was 
the work with the students in memorizing their selections that they 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 63 

gave the series without apparent effort or any signs of nervousness, 
even with those appearing for the first time. The audience comes 
only to enjoy, not to criticize. Forty-one pupils played last year; this 
year, forty-eight. The McKendree Conservatory is a splendid train- 
ing school for future teachers of music, and its influence is permeating 
all of Southern Illinois. This is largely due to the strong (personality 
of the Director. 



Vocal Department 

Miss Latchiepell Myric came to McKendree as instructor in voice 
four years ago, and since that time the department has risen from in- 
significance to prominence. Under her skillful direction the depart- 
ment has grown rapidly both in enrollment and efficiency. The De- 
partment now grants diplomas to students successfully completing the 
regular course, and also for the two-year Normal Course in Public 
School Music. 

A Gold Medal Contest is held each year in which each contestant 
sings two songs, one learned with the instructor and the other, which 
is common to all, without assistance. .The winner of this medal in 1912 
was Miss Florence Alexander, Belleville; 1913, Miss Bertha Webb, 
Ewing; 1914 — . 

A Scholarship Medal is also given each year to the one making the 
highest average throughout the year. The winner of this medal, 1912 
was Miss Bess Carter, Freeburg; 1913, Miss Eathel Morgan, Maunie; 
1914—. 

The McKendree Male Quartet, the Clionian Quartet, and the Girls' 
Quartet are popular organizations in the college. They appear on re- 
cital programs and in various church and social functions both in and 
out of town. 

Graduates in Voice, 1914— Cummins, George Fowler, Carbondale; 
Follis, Jess, Johnston City. 

Post-Graduates in Voice, 1914 — Webb, Bertha, Ewing; Alexander, 
Florence, Belleville. 

1914 Graduates in Public School Music — Alexander, Florence, 
Belleville; Gibbes, Ella E., Okawville; Shafer, Fern, Carlyle; Webb, 
Bertha, Ewing. 



64 



THE McKENDREAN 




Popular McKendree Quartets 




McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 65 



Violin Department 



The scboiol year 1913-1914 has been a most successful one in the 
Violin Department of McKendree College. A large enrollment has 
lead to increased interest, and Miss Sligh, the director, has made the 
year's work attractive by the presentation of several conservatory reci- 
tals by pupils of all grades. In addition to these pupils' recitals, sev- 
eral artists' recitals were given through the year by violinists of prom- 
inence from St. Louis. 

The McKendree orchestra has been bigger and better than ever 
this season, and they have furnished a variety of selections that have 
been very popular with a recital audience. 

The department has sent out violinists, along with representatives 
of the vocal, piano, and expression departments, to many neighboring 
cities and towns where they have always been well received, and the 
combination has never failed to render a delightful program. 

Mandolin Club 

First Mandolin — Theo. Parker, Alex McCreery. 

Second Mandolin — Roland Stroud, Frank Brown. 

A more popular bunch of musicians would be hard to find than 
McKendree 's Mandolin Club. Their work is confined almost entirely 
to popular music, but they have scored a hit wherever they have 
performed. 



66 



THE McKENDREAN 




McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 67 



McKendree College Orchestra 

Miss Sligh, Conductor 

First Violins— ^Mr. Hardy, Concert Master; Mr. Parker, Miss 
Hemmer, Miss Smith. 

Cornet — Mr. Baxter, Mr. Wilson. 

Second Violins— Mr. Willhard, Miss Lang, Miss Gibbs. 

Bases — Mr. Kessler, Mr. Doris. 

Flute — Mr. McCl-eary. 

Clarinets — Mr. Pharis, Mr. Landis, Mr. Barrett, Mr. Berger. 

Trombone — Mr. Cummins. 

Percussion — Mr. Sager. 

Librarian — Mr. Baxter. 

Pianist — Miss Dee. 



68 



THE McKENDREAN 




^ilHlffiPffi 



MOSS 




IN ^ 

RcTiON 



^\wr> 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



69 




COOKING LABORATORY 



Home Economics 



This department was installed into the college in the fall of 1910. 
The work was at first handicapped for lack of proper housing and 
equipment. But in the fall of 1911 three -rooms remodeled and fully 
equipped were ready to serve as a food laboratoiy, dining-room and 
adjoining pantry, combined sewing and class room. 

Two courses are offered — A four-year course leading to a degree, 
and a two-year certificate course. These courses aim to give the stu- 
dent such instiniction as will enable her to meet all household duties 
in a scientific, economical and practical manner, as well as to give her 
the technical knowledge which will enable her to teach the subject. 

The department has grown in efficiency this year, new books, 
pictures, and illustrative material having been added. 



70 



THE McKEN^DREAN 




MANSFIELD DRAMATIC CLUB 



Ejcpression Department 



McKendree's Expression Department opened in the year 1909, 
with Miss Ehoda Brockman of East St. Louis as instructor. Miss 
Brockman was succeeded by Mrs. A. C Bancroft, with Miss Marion 
McCVay following her. The present instructor is Miss Franc Berry, 
a graduate of the Cumnock School of Oratory, Northwestern University. 

Miss Berry is doing effective work and has established the De- 
partment on a firm foundation. She is ably fitted for her work through 
her training at one of the best schools of oratory in the country and 
is making it possible for McKendree to continue furnishing public life 
with successful public speakers. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 71 

The Mansfield Dramatic Club 

McKendree folks in particular and Lebanon people in general are 
fond of the right sort of amusements. There are many reasons for 
having a dramatic club at McKendree, first, to furnish the people 
clean, wholesom6 entertainment differing slightly from the recital 
and in this to substitute for the poor professional theatricals that 
Lebanon, in her many misfortunes is unable to avoid; secoind, for the 
purpose of studying the classics in drama, which, in themselves furnish 
splendid material for analysis and study but are too heavy and long 
for correct presentation; lastly, for the great benefit to the members 
of the department. 

Having realized that the enactment of drama is one of the most 
practical means of testing the powers of expression and characteriza- 
tion, the students of the Expression Department organized themselves 
into the MANSFIELD DRx^MATIC CLUB. They chose for their first 
play, a splendid three-act comedy "MR. BOB," full of clever situa- 
tions and having a plot of unusual merit. This was a decided success 
and paved the way for the ipermament organization and future pro- 
ductions. 

On Feb. 9, as a closing number for the splendid recital by the 
entire department, they presented a delightful one-act farce, "AN 
OBSTINATE FAMILY." 

April 14, they presented their closing performance for the year, 
a splendid farce-comedy in three acts "THE ELOPMENT OF 
ELLEN." 

We feel that the college and the department as well as the mem- 
bers of the club have profited by this organization. In addition to 
the members shown in the cut they have taken into the club, Mr. John 
Stewart of St. Louis and Prof. C. S. Gentry. 

OFFICERS. ■ ■'•] 

President and Stage Manager. _L. H. Taylor 

Business Manager F. A. Stansfield 

Sec'y. and Treasurer 0. E. Nobles 

Coach Miss Franc Berry 

Board of Control^Misses Mary Kennedy, Marguerite Smith, 
Ethel Knapp and Mr. Clarence Gates. 



72 THE McKENDREAN 



Art Department 



The Department of Art was organized in tbe year 1912 by Misa 
Sara Seabrook. She was succeeded by Miss Mary E. Copenthaver, 
whose thorough training and natural talents have made it possible 

for her to develope in a highly satisfactory manner the artistic ten- 
dencies of our students. 

This is the Department's first year in the College prosper and 
students are now receiving College credit. Thorough courses are of- 
fered in drawing and painting in the different mediums, oil, water 
color, pastel, pen and ink, leather, china and metal — these courses are 
regularly graded and lead to a diploma. Practice in making coloi 
combinations and a study of the treatment of color harmony in the 
house is taught to correlate with the House Ec-ouomics course. A 
course in drawing and painting, especially planned for children meets 
on Saturdays. 

The studio is a large, well lighted room, which is equipped with 
excellent studies in cast and still life subjects. Recently Rev. L. C. 
Wilkin, a highly valued friend of the college, presented the Depart- 
ment with six new tables, each accommodating two students. Much 
interest in china painting has lead to the purchase of a kiln for firing. 

Since there is no form of handiwork which is not benefitted by a 
study of art the Department deserves the heartiest co operation and 

support. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



73 




The needs of the student desiring to become a practical farmer are 
completely supplied in McKendree's Agriculture Department. This 
department, under the direction of Prof. G. A. Crosthwait, who is 
himself a successful farmer, has had a remarkable growth this year 
In addition to being a successful farmer, Prof. Crosbhwait is thorough- 
ly practical and scientific. Since this department so fully satisfies 
the demand for the best in Agriculture, it is safe to predict a glowing 
future for the '*Ag" Department. 



74 



THE McKENDREAN 




Agriculture Club 



F. A. Stansfield, President C. E. Brewbaker, Secretary 

Arleigli Dewhurst, Vice-President W. L. Glotfelty, Treasurer 

Professor G. A. Cro^sthwait, Director. 

The McKendree College Agriculture Club was founded December 
17, 1913 under the inspiration and direction of Professor Crosthwait. 
The first program was rendered the second Monday of January, fol- 
lowing. Since that time programs have been given every month, the 
last one being on the nineteenth of May. 

The club was organized to further the interests of agriculture in 
St. Clair county, to interest more students here in agriculture, to bene- 
fit the Agriculture Department, and interest prospective students in 
McKendree College. 

Each program consisted of several musical numbers, a reading or 
two, and several numbers along Domestic Science and Agricultural 
lines. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



75 




Chemistry 
Laboratory 



Dining Hall 



Kitchen 



76 



THE McKENDREAN 




p. Shields 



DELTA KAPPA GAMMA. 



H. Shields 



Petty 



Glotfelty 



Zimmerman 




POND RANCH. 

Hall Lewis 

V. Bard C. Bard 



Hogan 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



77 




78 



THE McKENDREAN 




Y, M. C. A. OFFICERS 



Bert Petty, Treasurer 

Earl Brew^baker, Vice President 



Ivan Moorman, President 
Earl Reisner, Secretary 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



79 




Y. W. C. A. OFFICERS 



Grace Robertson, Secretary 
Lillian Gentry, Treasurer 



Bernice Wait, President 
Emma Berry, Vice President 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



81 




82 THE McKENDREAN 



Philosophian Society 

1837 1914 

Philo is the oldest literary society in the oldest college west of the 
Allegheny Mountains. This would not be very much of a distinction 
if its history was not an honorable one. McKendree College is one of 
the oldest colleges in Methodism today, and her record is not equaled 
by any college, either denominational or state. She has turned out 
more great men than any other school in the United States. This 
is indeed a distinction. In this process of making great men the Phi- 
losophian Literary Society has had a very considerable part. On the 
pages of Philo 's records are found the names of very many of the 
greatest men that went out from McKendree College. In every line 
of activity, religious, social and business, may be found the names of 
Philos, who are gaining fame from their profession and for them- 
selves. Philo is justly proud of the many men who have gone in the 
past and are now going, out from her walls to bless the world and 
make it better. 

A manufacturing plant is judged by the kind of product it puts 
upon the market. If a factory takes raw material and converts it into 
a finished article i tis doing society a helpful act. Any process which 
takes rough, useless material and turns out a finely complete and high- 
ly useful commodity deserves the highest commendation. 

Philo may be likened to a manufacturing plant. Philo takes in 
tbe rough material — untrained, inexperienced, self-conscious boys from 
the farm and elsewhere — and makes out of them trained boys, skillful, 
self-confident men. Philo holds to the belief that in every man thert 
is some faculty, some capability, some power which, if rightly develop- 
ed, will come to the surface and be the making of that man. When a 
man gets into Philo 's trained hands he is made to work, and is hims?lf 
worked u])on after such a fashion that after he has gone through the 
traits worked out and the good developed; quiet, self-possessed, con 
scious of his power, a refined product. 

Philo points with pride to the many men who have gone out from 
the society which believes and teaches that success oomes to **the 
more worthy." 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



83 




Bard, Carma 
Bard, ^^iro-il 
Bower, Homer 
Brodheker, T. C. 
Bundv, C. G. 
Butts, L. A. 
Tarson, P. E. 
Deffenbaug-li, Roy 
Dewhirst, A. 
Dewhirst, Guy 
Doellina-, Geo. 
Dollev,'R T. 
Pearly, C. M. 
Early, Eoscoe 
Ebbler, Edward 
Gates, C. T. 
Ge'hr, Ralph 
Gibson, P. W. 
Goldman, Max 



PHILO HALL 

Membership Roll 

Greer, C. 0. 
Greer, G. 0. 
Gould, H. W. 
Harrin,:oton, Ed. H. 
Hendrix, A. W. 
Heslet, F. Gii.a; 
Homer, Benj. 
Isaacs, Dwi,2;-ht 
Kinnison, J. W. A. 
Landis, Chas. 
McGormack, L. G. 
McCreerv, Alex 
McKni.oht, H. E. 
Moorman, I. G. 
Moss, Norman M. 
Nobles, Orion 
Petty, Bert 
Price, Harry 



Rockwell, C. L. 
Scliroeder, Ralph 
Shields, Harold 
Shields, Paul 
Stansfield, Paul 
Stansfield, Benj. 
Stewart, J. T. 
Slice, Earl F. 
Taylor, Loyd H. 
Torrence, Cale 
Trautman, E. G. 
Tnieb, Chas. 
A^nlentine, R. W. 
Wait, Stephen 
Waffffoner, M. E. 
Walrath, A. 
Winter, L. E. 
Zimmerman, A. F. 



84 



THE McKENDREAN 




1913 



PHILO 



1914 



Stewart Waggoner Price Isaacs Harrington 

Doelling Zimmerman Nobles McKnight Brodheker 

Valentine Schroeder Trautman Torrence McCormack Deffenbaugh 

C. Early Heslet B. Stansfield G. Dewhirst C. Greer 

Trueb Petty Walrath Gates Gibson 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



85 




1913 



PHILO 



1914 



Butts 


Ebbler 


Carson 


Dolley 


Winter 


R. Early 


Kinnison 


Homer 


C. Bard 


McCreery 


Taylor 


V. Bard 


Moorman 


P. Shields 


F. Stansfield 


H. Shields 


Goldman 


O. Greer 


Hendrix 


Gould 


Stice 


Buady 


Wait 


A. Dewhirst 


Moss 



86 



THE McKENDREAN 



Clionian Society 



The first meeting of the Clionian Literary Society for the year 
1913-1914 was held iu Clio HaJl, September nineteenth, 1913. A spread 
was given for the new girls, October third and all enjoyed a social 
hour and good "eats" after the regular program. The presidents for the 
year, each term of office being six weeks in length, have been Misses 
Ruby Eice, Emma Berry, Mabel Crump, Bernice Wait and Mrs. Delia 
Wiggins. Several new members have been added to the enrollment. 

Clio has been very industrious this year and some improvements 
have been made in the hall, among which was the purchase of six 
dozen chairs. 

The Annual Banquet was held December sixth, and on January 
twenty second, the first exhibition was given in the Chapel. Miss Rice 
was president of the evening and a most successful program was given 

The members of Clio, have this year shown remarkable interest 
in the work of the society, and as a result, much splendid work has 
been done. 

The June Exhibition will be held on Saturday evening, June the 
sixth, with Miss Mary Kenedy in the president's chair. It need not le 
said that the girls will again crown themselves with glory. 



CLIO QUARTET 




McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



87 




Clionian Membership Roll 



Ethel Adams. 
Pauline Bachman. 
Mjary Ball. 
Ruth Behymer. 
Emma Berry. 
Margaret Brainard. 
Grace Brand. 
Eleanor Clapp. 
Mabel Crump. 

Mabel Daubs. 

Mabel Ewin. 

Jewell Ferguson. 

Jessie Folles. 

Lillian Gentry. 

Ella Gibbs. 
Isabel Griffith. 
Lillian Gowdy. 
Stenna Harmon. 
Pearl Johnson. 
Nell Jones. 
Ethel Knapp. 
Erline Miller. 



Marie Miller. 

Geneva Moeser. 
Katherine Morrison. 
Buby Rice. 
Marie Ritchey. 
Frances Roberts. 
Bernice Sayre. 
Mar^-aret Smith. 
Alice Stewart. 
Marion Wa^.s^oner. 
Beraice Wait. 
Bertha Webb. 
Mrs. L. D. Wi^^ins. 
Grace Robertson. 
Lura Witherspoon. 
Mary Kennedy. 
Nell Loy. 

Cyrena Schatt^en. 
CiiLoe Landis. 
Tessie Hall. 
Nelle Kahlert. 
Edith Dennison. 



88 



THE McKENDREAN 




1913 



CLIO 



1914 



Landi* 


Kennedy 


Behymer 


Rice 


Folli. 


Griffith 


Waggoner 


Kahlert 


Ritckey 


Morrifloal 


Gibbf Ewin 


Jones 


Hall 


Daubi 


Wait 


Loy 


Dennison 


M. Miller 


Clapp 


Roberta 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



89 




1913 



CLIO 



1914 



Brainard 


Smitli 


Adams 


Scbattgen 


Brand 


Wiggins 


Johnsoa 


Sayre 


Bachman 


Ball 


E. Miller 


Knapp 


Strsvart 


Berry 


Webb 


Dee 


fer^uaon 


Robertson 


Go-wiy 


Gentry 



90 THE McKENDREAN 



Interesting Plato Facts 



First meeting took place in. a recitation room of the old college building April 
20, 1849. 

Constitution adopted and officers elected May 4, 1849. 

First program was given May 11, 1849. 

First president was Thomas O. Springer. « 

First vice president was William K. Thomas. 

First recording secretary was Thomas S. Casey. 

First corresponding secretary was C. W. Jerome. 

First treasurer was Joseph W. Drury. 

First Librarian was C. W. Jerome. 

First janitor was Valentine Briegel. 

First critics were C. W. Jerome and Michael Mummert. 

First chaplain was R. C. Gillham. 

First judges were John A. Halderman and W. T. Miller. 

First prudential committee were John I. Rinaker, T. M. Williams and Malcolm 
NcNeill. 

First debate question was "Shall foreigners be allowed to dig gold in California?" 

First debate was won by Isaac B. Jack over H. C. Fike. 

First declamation was given by D. W. Bryant. 

First essay was read by William Chance. 

First oration was delivered by James H. Riggin. 

First fine assessed was against J. H. Riggin for disorder. 

First proposition for membership was offered by William Chance in favor of 
Benjamin F. Booker. 

First term tax was ten cents. 

First initiation fee was one dollar and fifty cents. 

First furniture for Plato Hall was bought by C. W. Jerome in St. Louis and 
brought to Lebanon by wagon. 

First Platos to be graduated by McKendree were J. W. Drury and Thomas O. 
Springer, class of 1849. 

First Plato emblem was a rosette. 

First meeting in present hall was October 18, 1851. 

First compact with Philo was ratified June 1, 1849. 

First honorary member of Plato was Rev. A. F. Crandall. 

First chandelier ever used in St. Clair County was hung in Plato Hall in 
January, 1852. 

First catalogue of Plato was issued in 185 2; second in 1859; third in 1867- 
fourth in 1901. 

First anniversary address delivered April 19, 1850 by President Erastus Went- 
worth. 

Since the organization of the society not a month has passed, summer vaca- 
tions excepted, without regular meeting of Plato. 

The f-ecretarial records of the society are all in existence. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



91 




PLATO HALL 



Membership Roll of Platonian Society 



Barrett, F. A. 
Baxter, V. B. 
Bechtold, E. 
Brewbaker, C. E. 
Brown, F. C. 
Bundy, C. A. 
Campbell, L. F. 
Condrey, H. G. 
Cornett, W. G. 
Cummins, G. P. 
Cummins, W. J. 
Curtis, H. W. 
Deacon, T. W. 
Dorris, C. L. 
Elsbon, V. W. 
Evers, W. C. 
Friedli, F. J. 
Glotfelty, W. L. 
Gould, Roy 
Hardy, D. M. 
Harmon, G. B. 



Harmon, J. P., Jr. 
Hexter, E. E. 
Hoar, W. D. 
Hogan, G. W., Jr. 
Ikemire, C. E. 
Joseph, Roy 
Kesslei, H. C. 
Landis, H. F. 
Landis, J. A. 
Latimer, C. B. 
Loy, B. W. 
McKnight, Rolla 
McPherson, W. H. 
Melton, D. E. 
Moore, E. O. 
-Mueller, A. B.— 
Nolting, W. E. 
Parker, T. C. 
Peters, R. M. 
Pfeffer. L. H. 



Pharis, P. M. 
Pigott, Lee 
Randle, Wm. 
Reisner, E. E. 
Reynolds, H. E. 
Robinson, J. M. 
Rogers, B. A. 
Rummel, C. M. 
Smiley, L. C. 
Smith, Charles 
Stroud, F. D. 
Stroud, R. C. 
Vogelsang, F. A. 
Warren, J. A. L. 
White, Ralph 
Whittenberg, D. W. 
Wilson, W. B. 
Wilton, L. E. 
Wolfe, W. R. 
Wood, P. L. 



92 



THE McKENDREAN 




1913 



PLATO 



1914 



G. Harmon 


Glotfelty 


J. Harmon 


Melton 


Stroud 


Baxter 


Peters 


Brown 


J. Harmon 


Barret 


Hardy Hoar 


Smith 


Ro^eri 


Pfeffer 


McKn^ht 


Whittenber^ 


Parker 


Wkite 


Brewbaker Keasler 


Landia 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



93 




1913 





PLATO 






Pigott 

W^arren 

Friedli 


Reynolds 
Wilson 
Bundy Cummins 


Hexter 
E. O. Moore 
Rummel 


Curtis 
Elston 
Dorris 

Joseph 

Robinson 


Wood 
Gould 


Reisner 
Evers 


Smiley 
Condry 



1914 



94 THE McKENDREAN 



The Uses of Less 

It is useless to try to enumerate now, the uses of less, and I do not 
know how; but I knoiw that the aimless can never be blameless, for 
they've countless opportunities 'neatli a flag that's so stainless. The 
country- we live in can never be hopeless, altho we know that our na- 
tion is hopeless; for unless ycu are listless or thotless, or wiltless, you'll 
see in some cases less really means more. For horseless carriages 
and horseless drays are about as common as cloudless days, and cow- 
less butter and cowless cheese are furnished to people of all degrees. 
At the wireless phone and telegraph not even the skeptic dares to 
laugh. Boneless chicken and boneless ham have become as common 
as a beardless man, and seedless oranges and seedless raisins are serv- 
ed out to us on all occasions. The noiseless typewriter and the 
noiseless slate have called down blessings on the inventor's pate. On 
the rustless tinware and the rustless skate we have noticed some red 
spots here of late. The dustless erasers and carpet-sweepers have brot 
more smiles than the old time reapers. The tasteless castor-oil and 
tasteless quinine have become so good that the kids don't whine. 
Creamless ice-cream and lemonadeless lemonade ^lave become the 
druggists stock in trade. The drugless doctors and queueless Chinese 
are not eligible to Ph. D.'s. With hornless sheep and hornless cattle 
the time has come for bloodless battle. Painless dentists and acheless 
teeth have removed another source of grief. Frictionless bearings and 
punctureless tires have become a part of our horseless cars. But the 
crankless auto and the autoless crank have not learned to run on an 
empty tank. Wilson's trustless country and revolutionless Mexico are 
sure to come, but they travel slow. Cobless com and stingless bees, 
spineless cacti covered with leaves, and saloonless towns that are free 
from drunks are hooped for along with stinkless skunks.. But the 
squallless baby and the barkless dog, the gruntless pig and the croak- 
less frog, the smokeless boys, and the cussless men are about as scarce 
as the teeth of a hen. But the hobbleless dress and the splitless skirt, 
on the girl that does not delight to flirt, with the paintless cheeks and 
the ratless hair are still found occasionally here and there. Our col- 
lege is not spiritless nnd our campus is not treeless, our classes are 
not colorless and our dorm is not B-less, and a satisfied student in a 
tobaecoless school is an exception instead of a rule. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 95 

In spite of the tales told by careless and thotless, we'll never be 
worthless, careless or lifeless, and none of us need to be girlless or 
wifeless. Some students may grow to be toothless and hairless, but 
none we hope will be cheerless or prayerless. Altho ho path is thorn- 
less and no winter iceless, your life is not hopeless, your career may 
be priceless. As you travel the road neither sunless nor showerless, 
your path to the grave will never be flowerless. So 'heres to the stu- 
dents, the tearless, and fearless; we'll prove to the world we are also 
the peerless. 

Guy Dewhirst. 



Twenty-third Psalm-Revised. 

The Pony is my helper, I shall not flunk. He maketh me to sit in 
my own seat, he leadeth me in the paths of diligent students for my 
grades ' sake. Yet, though I walk thru the valley of hard exams, I will 
fear no Prof, for thou art in my pocket. Thou helpst in translations, 
thou comfortest me. Thou preparest my paper before me in the pres- 
ence of mine enemy, the Prof. Thou annointest my head with praise, 
my grade runneth high. Surely honor and good grades shall follow 
me all the days of my college life, for I will ride on the back of my 
pony forever. 



96 



THE McKENDREAN 




McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



97 







IDA M. SAa^ETT MRS. LUCY BEVIS 

Guardians of the Peace in the Mule Barn and in the Angel Roost. 



98 THE McKENDREAN 



Thanksgiving at Carnegie Hall 

The fog had settled lazily upon Carnegie Hall 

So thick with gloom we scarce could see old Recitation's walls. 
The trees like giant skeletons arrayed in misty gray, 

Stretched forth their shadowy hands toward the tardy dawn of 
day. 

At five, Ealph Gehr did hustle out the kitchen fire to make, 
(His going home to dine on Turk' was only just a fake.) 

The villian, Taylor, as you know, must have a holiday 

After the effort he put fourth in that charming little play. . 

And so the day began to dawn, this gray Thanksgiving morn. 

No gun was fired, no bell was rung,no blast upon the horn. 
On each and all, as he awoke,, a solemn stillness fell, 

For what the day would shadow forth no mortal man could tell. 

The eO'W-bell tinkled merrily within the sacred halls. 

The boys came tumbling down the stairs but with no fatal falls. 
They met the g'irls, who solemnly came forth to Pearson Hall. 

So sweetly fresh, and thankful to hear that cow-bell call. 

The breakfast there was surely fine and we were truly grateful. 

But dinner was upon our minds, we couldn't be forgetful 
Of all those wondrous viands our homefolks were concocting. 

While little imps of ennui on qur hearts were pirouetting. 

The sen'ice at the churcli was fine, the sermon grand and noble, 
The music sweet and full of joy soon banished thots of trouble. 

Then in the solemn, thankful mood, with sunshine all about us, 
Within our souls and in the air, we wandered thru the campus. 

Back to tlu' donii wo slowly came with hunger gnawing frantic. 

But when we lieard that dinner bell 'twas good to see the antics 
Of dapper boys in brand new suits, in which they looked quite dandy; 

And others with new ties and pins which some had left out handy. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 99 

We decided on a program to be rendered in the eve, 

We'd gather prompt, in dear Clark Hall and stunts we'd freely 

give. 
Now Bishop Smith, the leader, is a smartly proper man. 

He takes the management in hand and prays and reads a Psalm. 

A solo by Max Goldman makes us feel the thrill of praise 

We would join in holy anthem while our hearts on high we raise. 

Nobles in a Declamation, and Brown in joyful song, 

F. Brodhecker an essay reads; so our program moves along. 

Ralph Gehr can play the violin with grace and animation, 
And sing with purity of tones that calls for an ovation. 

A reading by Paul Carson is also on the list. 

But Carson has an invite, so his reading will be missed. 

The Quartete is a leader, as fine as you will hear 

Upon the stage professional in lands both far and near. 

Our program will include the girls, but we don't know their talents. 
This truth is sure, they'll do their best to keep an even balance. 

McKendree has a noble set of young men brave and steady. 

Who never fail to ring out true. They are always strong and ready. 

Tbe purple of their banner shall speak of royal worth. 

Tn white its richest purity of life is shadowed forth. — I. S. M. 



100 THE McKENDREAN 



Natural Gas 

'Did you tell Mr. Phillippi that you loved him, Miss Clapp?" 

"Yes, I didn't want to, but he just sqeezed it out of me." 

Mr. Behymer langrily to Mr. Walrath:' "You young raiecal, I'll 
teach you to make love to my daughter." 

Mr. Walrath: "No. need — your daughter has taught me herself." 

Miss Stewart lin mournful tone:) "Yes I knew everybody likes 
me, but it's durned hard when nobody loves me." 

Is Latin a dead language? 

"Tango, Tangere, Turki, Trotum." 

Prof. New: "Miss Sligh, if I were to steal a kiss would it scare 
you so that you would scream?" 

Miss Slight: "I wouldn't. Fright always makes me dumb." 

"Mary can you think of anything sadder than a man without a 
country 1" asked Bernice Wait. 

"Yes, Bernice — a country without a man," replied Mary Ball, 
feelingly. 

Bundy: "Last night I had a dream. I dreamed that I got mar- 
ried,, but just as the performance was over I awoke, and I'm afraid 
that's the way it will be if the real thing ever happens." 

Stice and Marie got the red ear but Stice refused to do his duty. 
Marie was terribly embarrased because Earl so completely lost his 
nerve. 

Prof. Giles entertained the astronomy class May 4th. Fine dope 
this "star gazing." 

Marriage Club: Motto — When yo<u are young it's chicken and pie, 
but when you get married it's root, hog or die. 

Trautman: "Say Miss Sligh, if I had my right mind do you know 
what I'd do with it?" 

Miss Sligh— "No, Mr. Trautman." 

Trautman— "I'd give you half of it." 

Glotfelty— "Say Zimmerman wasn't it awfully cold standing out 
in the pergola talking to that girl." 

Zim— "No! No! It's never cold where love fires are burning." 

Glotfelty and Petty say they know how to get dates since they Ve 
been over to the Poultry Show at 'Fallon and studied the 'hens. 

You ought to have seen the smile on Louie when Bess was here. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 101 

Miss Isabelle Griffith, translating- a (phrase in Anabasis, read: 
"Proceeding into villages full of men." 

Dr. Walton— "What were those villages full of?" 

Miss Griffith — "0, I mean full of many good things." 

Dr. Walton — "Suppose a man should come up and hit you in the 
face, what would you do?" 

Bro. Warren — "Turn the other side." 

Miss Katherine Morrison told some of her near friends — "Mr. 
Dieckman and I are the cutest couple in college. 

A large white dog came into the dining hall during dinner hour. 
Mr. Trautman called him into the kitchen. The next morning "dog" 
was served for breakfast, — poor thing 

Brodhecker — "Say, Professor, I saw a place where the lightning 
struck the ground and nothing grows there, do you suppose the bacteria 
were all killed?" 

Boots — "Sure, scared 'em to death." 

Brodhecker — "I know a place in Indiana where the land on one 
side of the fence is worth $225 per acre, while on the other side of th« 
fence it is worth but 15 dollars. 

Prof. Crosthwait to B'Otots — "What would you do if you owned 
that land?" 

Boots — "Tear down the fence." 

Prof. Giles has offered to teach the girls how to wiggle gracefully. 

Earl — "Marie darling, Phillippi is going to ask you for a date 
tonight." 

Marie — "Well dear, doesn't he know that I am yours?" 

Prof. Crosthwait to Ag. class — "Have any of you seen com oil?" 

Paul Shields — "Yes I've seen com salve." 



102 THE McKENDREAN 



Information Bureau. 



Wanted — Some one to set music to my ipoems. — Brown. 

Wanted — Some one to hold my head still while playing for chapel 
— Miss Sligh. 

Wanted — Some girls that will go to bed when the lights go off. — 
Ma B. 

Wanted — A marksman to shoot woodpeckers — Hardy. 

Wanted — Some one to lead chapel when Dr. Harmon is gone — 
Students. 

Wanted — Some way of distinguishing ourselves — ^Seniors. 

Wanted — A matron — ^Occupants of girl's dorm. 

Wanted — A detective for my department — Miss Willard. 

Wanted — Some tin buckets to throw down the halls. — Occupants 
boys dorm. 

Wanted — Some one who knows more about the happenings of 
McKendree than Paul Shields — Everybody. 

Wanted — A grade in Chemistry — Hogan. 

Wanted — A Prof, in Ag who knows more in agriculture than we 
do — Ag Students. 

Wanted — One ''steady" instead of so many "once in a while" — 
Bobbie. 

Wanted — A letter from Champaign every day — Miss Adams. 

Wanted--Some base ball players that are in my class— Butts. 

Wanted— A girl that I can get along with— Moorman. 

WaritM— Tlie gum ])itcher stolen from the dining hall — ^Heslet. 

Wanted— A bottle of nervine— Stice. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



103 




104 



THE McKENDREAN 



Spooners 



Official„Ballot 

For 



Anti-Spooners. 



faculty Critic. 
Milstadt Deffenbaugh 

Supervisor of Cemetary Work. 
Cy Gentry 

Commissioners of Athletic Fee. 
Bro. Warren 

Conservatory Warden. 
Uncle Geo. New 

Recorder of Pergola Dates. 
Toofie McCreery 

Campus Police. 
Shortie Gates 

Cliief Goat Tender. 
Barrel Gibson 

Leader of Mexican Volunteers 
Pikes Peak McKnight 

Matrimonial Agents 
Ma B. 



Pigres Brewbaker 

Long Stroud 

Robe Peters 

Cutie Cummins 

B. B. Butts 

Louie Winter 

Bink Horner 

Hippo Shields 

Mother Sackett 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 105 



Department of Campustry 

Dean — Robert Allyn Giles. 

Prof. — Uncle George New. 

Associate Prof. — ^Cy Gentry. 

Instructors — Moorman, Miss Berry. 

Course A — General catting. — Elementary. 

This course is designed for beginners only. Credit is not given 
unless full course is completed. 

Text — Beatrice Fairfax's "Advice to Loveloms." 

Course B. — ^Course leading to engagement. Includes strolls down 
cemetary walk, moonlight visits to grand stand, talks on east chap-el 
steps, and the light tread of getting into the dorm after the lights are 
out. Text — Love and Courtship" — iStolen from Mother B. Library.) 
Course C. — This course is open only to those who expect to make 
it their life's work. Text — ^Shannon's Self Knowledge. 

Students Registered. 
Course A — Glotfelty — Miss Ewin. 

Zimmerman — Miss Robertsoin. 

Greer — Miss Wilkins. , 

Deffenbaugh — Miss Giles. 

Bundy — Miss Roberts. 

Kessler — Miss Waggoner. 

Heslet — Miss Bussler. 

Petty — Miss Spoon with 'er. 
Course B. Prof. Gentry — Miss Ball. 

Stroud — Miss Crump. 

Butts — ^Miss Rice. 

Cummins—? ??????? 

Whit — iMiss Kennedy. 

Taylor — Miss Stewart. 

Stice — Miss Miller. 

McCocmack — Miss Sayre. 
Course C. Prof. New — Miss Sligh. 

Moorman — Miss Berry. 

Dieckman — Miss Morrison. 

Rodgers — Miss Dennison. 

Boots — Miss Smith. 



106 



THE McKENDREAN 




McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



107 




108 THE McKENDREAN 



Alphabet. 



Aggies — A specimen of ignorant humanity. 

Affection — The tie that binds Prof, and Mary. 

Bone — One dollar. 

Borrow — A legal transaction wherein any promises are exchanged 
I'or the "'bones." 

Broke — Feeling common among students. 

Catalogue — A scandalous work of fiction not founded on facta. 

College — A dispensary of knowledge. 

Cupid — An invisible animal that hovers about the Library. 

D — ! — Faculty retaliation. 

Dormitory — Headquarters for all kinds of distilled liquors, card 
tables, crap games, smoking tobaccos, etc. 

Eat — A verb that will take any object. 

Energy — Much talked of but little seen. 

Ethics— A "cinch." 

Faculty — A group of wiseheads, easy to work. 

Flunk — A common occurrence. 

Feast — Fudge, welsh-rarebit, crackers. 

Goat — Clark Hall mascot. 

Gum — Can't be defined. 

Hash — An indefinable compound whose formula is S10C16E7A17 
P12H20— . i. 

Jake — One from the country, Eyman. 

Kiss— ? ? I ? M 

Literary Society — Hot air dispensary. 

Language — Heard in English class. 

Money — Seldom seen here. 

Morning — End of a glorious night. 

Mum — A state of attitude to be maintained when visiting the 
Faculty. 

Nonsense — Never heard on the Campus. 

Onions — Ma B.'s favorite vegetable. 

Police— A comedian employed by the town to furnish amuse- 
ments for students. 

Pun — Rotten joke. 

Quiz — rVosthwait*s hobbv. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 109 

Reports — The things which bring such pleasant letters from home. 
Sausage — Last rites of Fido'. 

Tobacco — Durham, Prince Albert, Lucky Strike, Boot Jack, etc. 
Tough — Meat served in Mess Hall. 
Trade-last — Exchange of humbug. 
Waist— That which the arm goes around. 
Woman — Man's woe. 

Y. M. C. A. — Headquarters for all graft. Proipounders of scandal. 
A bureau of yellow journalism. 



110 THE McKENDREAN 



Aspirations. 



Dr. Harmon — To make men. 

Mother B.— To look pretty. 

Grandpa — To make farmers. 

Prof. Gentry— To "marry" Ball. 

Prof. Giles— To walk like a soldier. 

Moss — To make the Annnal a paying proposition. 

Bundy, C. G.— To win the 100 yd. dash. 

Peters — To boss the Sophomore Class. 

Butts — To cultive Rice. 

Zimmerman — To be authority on any subject. 

Miss Wait — To be one of the faculty. 

Mother Sackett — ^To show partiality to none. 

Frank Stansfield — To Ivieep the gO'odwill of the Seniors. 

]\riss Busier — to go with Heslet. 

Phillippi — To get a girl. 

Jacquelyn — ^To do nothing. 

Trueb — To keep a stand in with the faculty. 

Deffenbaugh — Someone for a wife. 

]\riss Ewin — To talk to Dr. Harmon. 

Harper — ^To grow wings. 

Glotfelty — To grow a mustache. 

Fattie Shields — To love only one. 

Ebbler — To play tennis. 

Miss Witherspoon — To meet Mother B. as the lights are going out. 

Stewart — Knock! Knock! Knock! 

Dr. Walton — To be in his room every Monday from 1:00 o'clock 

to 2:30. 

Miss Ball — To go to England. 

Torrence — To play a trick on some one. 

Hfslet — To do as Miss Beny bids. 

Miss Walker — To go to basket ball games. 

Miss Greer — To be a Jewess. 

Schroeder — To be a sport. 
Brown — to write a decent song, 
Carson — ^To be head waiter. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK HI 

Dieckmann — ^To cat every night. 

Greer, G. 0. — To write essays. 

Valentine — To tell a bigger yam. 

Seniors- — To do something without the Juniors knowing it. 

Juniors — To see that the Seniors do nothing rash. 



Lasses. 

There are lasses on the market 

In their tins and in their teens, 
Some are found in every family 

Some are made in New Orleans. 
But the lasses we'll be loving 

When our heads with silver grays. 
Are the lassies of McKendree 

And the dear old College Days. 

When the waiters in the kitchen 

Filled their pitchers from the tin. 
When the dinner bell had sounded 

And the lads came trooping in. 
One could scarce find explanation 

W'hy the boys were so elate, 
Was it lasses at their elbows. 

Or the lasses on the plate? 

Pleasing was the scene in Eden 

To its solitary pair. , 
So our eyes were wont to revel 

In a picture passing fair. 
Paradise at morn and evening 

Oh, that one could justice do it; 
The lasses in the middies. 

And the lasses in the cruet. 



112 THE McKENDREAN 



Now Adam fell in Paradise 

And we in Eden fell 
'Twas too much apple tempted him 

And us — No need to tell, 
Which lasses think you now of blame 

The greater Sfhare should take 
The ones that gave us hearts disease 

Or made our stomachs ache. 

In that queer and quiet future 

Surely stealing on us all 
When the twilight round the ages 

Lets her shadowy curtain fall. 
Will our minds revert in fancy 

To the past and its sweet charms, 
To those lasses on our fingers, 

And those lasses in our arms. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 113 



The Students Decaologue. 

Revised Version. Adapted from the ** Rules." 
And it came to pass that Dr. Harmon spake unto the Wayward 
Children, saying: 

1. Thou shalt have no other Boss before me. 

2. Thou shalt not take my name in vain. 

3. Remember the Sabbath day, to go to church at least twice. 

4. Thou shalt honor the President and the Faculty, that thy days 
may be long in the land whither thy old man hath sent th^ee. 

5. Thou shalt not cast away fried potatoes which thy Mother 
Mac giveth to thee. 

6. Thou shalt not drop a class without first consulting the Prof, 
thereof, in order that be may know if thou art absent from the class. 

7. Thou shalt not lie, for a lie is an abomination in the sight of 
the Faculty, but a very present help in time of trouble. 

8. Thou shalt not bear false witnesses for thy neighbor. 

9. Thou shalt not put a Yale lock upon thy door and keep the 
key thereof, that the Matron may not be hindered from entering thy 
place of abode and finding thy bed unmade. . . 

10. Thou shalt cut neither the Campus, nor thy class, nor the 
Chapel exercises. 



114 THE McKENDREAN 



Smokers Club. 

Motto. 

'Tis better to smoke here, than hereafter. 

Flower. 

Tobacco Plant. 

Color 

Amber. 

Favorite Pastime. 

Smoking on the comer by the Gym. 

Favorite Saying. 

Lend me a little baccer. 

High Worthies. 

Johnnie Fatima Harmon High Worthy Keeper of the "Makin's" 

Tobacco Borrowing- Harmon — — Chief Procurer bf iSmpplies 

Piedmont Hancock Assistant Procurer of Supplies 

Briarwood Pfeffer Chief High Filler of Pipes 

Corncob Landiss Assistant Filler of Pipe-s 

Prince Albert Whittenberg Past Exalted Pipe Light- r 

Less Worthies. 

Duko's Mixture Brent. 

Tuxedo White. 

Bull Durham Friedli 

Nebo Horner 

Cube Cut Wolf. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



115 




116 THE McKENDREAN 



It Happened This Way. 

Ebbler asked "Baby" Walker in yearning, pleading tones, if he 
could not give her an engagement ring for her birthday. But she 
comes from a thrifty and far-seeing family which never loses its pres- 
ence of mind. 

'*No, darling," Pearl whispered, "I'll take the ring now. Let my 
birthday bring its happy surprises just as usual." 

First Club Member i^sampling beverages with appreciation — 
"Eeally this is siplendid stuff. They say it is both meat and drink." 

Second Club Member — ' ' You 're right there, and if you take plenty 
of it, it'll find you lodging too." 

Prof. Crosthwait suggests that it behooves McKendree boys to 
realize that they cannot live without "Rice." We notice that Mr. 
Butts needs no encouragement or suggestion. 

Visitor — "I understand that you have a fine track team here. 
Who holds most of the medals!" 

Prof. Gentry — "The pawnbroker." 

Girls faults are many, 

Boys have only two, 
Everything they say, 

Aind everything they do. 

Prof. Crosthwait, while illustrating a point in class, told this one. 
Once upon a time Pat hired out to a farmer. When he came into town 
at the end of the week he was asked this question: "Well, Pat, how 
do you like the farm?" "Oh," said Pat, "it's just like Heaven." 
"How is that?" inquired the friend. "There's no night there," replied 
Pat. 

Ag. Engineering; Wait — "What do they make those long leather 
belts out of?" 

Brewbaker — * ' Giraffe necks. ' ' 

Prof. Crosthwait — "Then I suppose they make rubber belts out 
of rubber necks." 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 1 1 7 



A student prayer on the night before exams: 
"Now I lay me down to rest, 

For tomorrow's awful test. 
If I should die before I wake, 

Thank Heaven, I'll have no test to take.'* 

Snooks, to Prof. Gentry— "I made 100 today. Prof." 

Prof. Gentry— "Good! What in, Snooks?" 

Snooks — "Fifty in Chemistry and fifty in Astronomy." 

Dr. Walton (getting up to lead ohai3el) — "I have several live 
newspaper clippings, but I did not know I was to lead chapel this 
morning so I suppose I'll have to read from the Bible." 

'Twas apple cider time. Dewhirst went to the cider mill, filled 
his jug and returned home, then sent an invitation to Ebbler, Petty 
and Bundy to come over and imbibe; they responded, and from their 
actions later we think Dewhirst surely went to the wrong cider mill. 

Bundy, returning from the Y. M. C. A., started into his room, but 
as <he opened the door a pail of water tumbled down upon him. He 
said nothing but listening quietly he heard Torrence and Isaacs 
chuckling to themselves and knew they were the guilty ones. Soon 
bedtime came and the two boys securely locked their door, left the key 
in the lock to make sure of no disturbance for they felt that something 
might happen. Eleven o'clock came and "all was well" to the work- 
ers of devilment, who were sound asleep; but before twelve o'clock 
some urchin climbed in at the window, quietly stepped to the door, 
unlocked it and gave admittance to his two partners, who each had 
a large pail of water. One water carrier stepped to the bed where 
Torrence had long before passed into the land of know-nothing, the 
other went to Isaac's bed. At a given signal they removed all covers 
and dashed the water upon the occupants of the beds. Feeling the 
dampness they soon aroused, but when they came to themselves they 
were all alone. Torrence uttered oaths of madness while Isaacs 
laughed. Something had to be done,, but what? Nobody knows, nor do 
we know how they ^pent the remainder of that cold February night. 

Walking ads for the dining-hall— Cyrene Shattgen, Fattie Stroud, 
Fattie Shields, Deacon Phillippi. 

Taylor and Heslet are dctng fine work this year— among tlie girls. 

Prof. Thrall— "Mr. Trautman what is the plural of "I". 

Mr. Trautman — "You." 



118 THE McKENDREAN 



Things heard in the Mess Hall: 
Pass the Gum, 
Shoot the Hash. 
Eoll the Sour Kraut. 
Pass the Keview of Reviews. 
Country butter today? 
Eat this or we'll get it next meal. 

Mr. Warren must have thought that Alice Stewart had reformed. 
At least she should feel highly honored. You know what we mean, Alice. 

Miss Brainard has been studying "beauty hints" and inquiring 
how to improve her looks in general. But when we saw that she was 
sitting near Prof. New at the table, the mystery was solved. She 
even pursues that poor man on Sunday afternoons. When he is in- 
tent on going to the conservatory, she insists that he go with her to 
the cemetery. Out of politeness he does so, poor man! Would that 
he could divide his attentions among his admirers. 

We would advise Mary Kennedy not to laugh while crossing the 
dining hall, for we fear she might bump into some of the tables, — 
her sight being impeded. 

Mrs. Bevis — "Miss Ball, have you been out this evening?" 

Mary — "Xo, not since I've been in." 

Mr. Deffenbaugh disclosed a beauty hint in English class, when 
he said that he consults Alden's English Verse for styles. Now we 
know where Mr. Deffenbaugh obtains his ideas for individual fash- 
ion. 

Louis Pfeffer was reading Greek, when 'he came to the expres- 
sion, ''beasts of burden." In his excitement he said "bursts of beaden." 

Mr. Heslet has been heard to remark that he is surprised tO' hear 
himself called a "sissy." 

Mr. Gates openly admitted his admiration for Miss Brainard. He 
twisted and squirmed that he might feast his eyes upon her. In fact, 
he left school because he had become cross-eyed from twisting his 
head so much. His supreme moment of delight, however, was when 
he managed to get a glimpse of her lovely brown eyes. 

"That Prof, gave me D — . What did he give you?" asked Traut- 
man. 

Handle — "He gave me H — ." 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



119 




CV^^^ ^^f^^^"^ ^^^"^^ 






HEiBJ^Erws i3-6 



\SPUDS / 




•WO' 



/»^E \Def\U 

FbffCouO ST^Rncie p,ifjposEs. L 



120 THE McKENDREAN 



What Would Happen If: 

If Mr. Hardy were to appear on the street without his umbrella, 
gloves and rubbers f 

If Doctor Hai-mon should refer to himself in the first person dur- 
ing a chapel talk? 

If Prof. Giles should quit trying to make his classes believe that 
he was a regular "tough mutt" when he was in college. 

WANTED 

To trade — A parlor lamp for a small settee. — Boots Willi. 

A (Dancing Glass, 
Signed: Elston, Reisner, Zimmerman, Bishop Smith, Bernice 
Wait, Grace Robertson, Madge Ross, Velma Greer. 

A publication of the Headlight containing something readable. 

Quaker Oats in the dining hall with fewer than 25 bugs to the 
square inch. 

Potatoes cooked less than a week before serving. 

"Marriage, like salad, is a failure when the dressing Is poor." — 
Noah Douthit. 

"I never associate with people who swear." — Marie Miller. 

Match factory — The library. 

"The good die young. My, I must take care of myself." — Ruby 
Rice. 

"Even a hair out of place casts its shadow." — Valentine. 

"Good looks run in my family, but they run clear past me." — 
Evers. 

"Fair, fat, frivolous, and fussy." — Ma! 

"The old man makes the money, the money makes the son, and 
the son makes the mischief." — B. Horaer. 

In every deed of mischief they had a heart to resolve, a head to 
contrive, and a hand to execute. — The Covers. 

Too bright, too beautiful to be true — ^Jewel Ferguson's complexion. 

"Ignorance is bliss, so^ we are supremely happy." — Seniors. 

"He's a pretty little feller." — Rummel. 

"Here's to love, the only fire against which there is no insurance." 

"Here's to woman, she needs no eulogy, she apeaks for herself." 



McKENDREE Y£AR BOOK 121 

Marriage Is An Institution for the Blind. 

The Inmates: 
Mr. and Mrs. Arleigh Dewhirst. 
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. A. Kinnison. 
Mr. and Mrs. H. E. McKnight. 
Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Latimer. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Curtiss. 
Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Hartman. 
Mr. and Mrs. Noah Douthit. 
Some Mysteries. 

1. What brand of hair restorer Prof. Dolley uses. 

2. Why Ma B.'s hair is always combed the same way. 

3. Where to find a Salamis horse. 

4. How the Juniors went thru three locks to enter the chapel 
tower and float their colors. 

5. Why Dr. Harmon didn't get into the color rush. 

Katherine and Dieckman were about to enter a crowed car. "Do 
you suppose we can squeeze in here?" Dieckman asked. "Don't you 
think we had better wait until we get back on the "pike!" was Kath- 
erine 's low reply. 

John Harmon was arguing with Paul Shields as to whose father 
was the greater man, when Shields said: "Your father ain't no good. 
Mine has given me a hen thatlays an egg every week." 

"That's nothing," John exclaimed quickly, "My father lays a 
cornerstone every week." 

Miss Willard was complaining to her waiter of the quality of 
milk he served her. He replied that he was just as sorry as she was, and 
that he had really wept when he was forced to serve it. 

"Oh, yes, I believe that, "responded Miss Willard, "but I have a 
suggestion to offer. In the future see that you do not drop your tears 
into our pitcher." 

It was on Saint Patrick's day when, boasting of England's pos- 
sessions, Landis said, "The sun never sets on England's possessions." 

MoCreery — "No, the Lord is afraid to leave her in the dark." 
The sewing class of D. S. was examining some table cloths and de- 
manded to be shown the newest patterns. In desperation the salesman 
said: "These are the newest patterns, you will notice the edge runs 
around the border and that the center is in the middle.' 

Girls — "Dear me, yes. Let us take a half dozen of these." 



122 THE McKENDREAN 



Xaturally Lillian Growdy was excited because Nolting was going 
to carry her suitcase. She asked in a flurry, "Conductor, what door 
shall I go out of?" The conductor politely replied, "Either door 
ma'am. The car stops at bo'th ends." 

Mr. Zimmerman is blessed with an inquiring mind which is his 
means of developing much argumentation. He asked Wayne Whit- 
tenberg what made his nose so red if he didn't drink. Wayne with a 
little peevishness replied, "It is glowing with pride because it has 
kept out of other people's business. 

After one of her trips home Alice Henry complained of nervous 
feelings. Upon investigation it was found that she had eaten a chicken 
and everything that goes with it, besides a pie and two pounds of 
candy, and her nervous system had not fully recovered. 

Slats Stroud to Fat Stroud — "Say, Eol, how dO' you spell road — 
r-h-o-d, or r-o-d-e?" 

Rol— "K-o-w-e-d." 

All right, thanks. 

Next day, same scene, same persons. 

"Rol, 'how do you spell doubt?" 

D-o-u-t." : 

"Thanks, Im wrong. I had it d-o-u-g-h-t. " 

On a cold day Geo. Cummins stood near a radiator in the library, 
when Mr. Hendrix entered and kindly informed him to move as his 
limbs were warping. 

Mr. Harrington, upon being questioned as to his future occupa- 
tion, gave a two-fold reason for becoming a physician. First, a doc- 
tor is paid whether his results are good or bad, and second, because 
my father is an undertaker. 

"Was that a demonstration of phonographs?" asked the visitor. 

"No, that was the "perg" before a meal," was a McKendrean's 
reply. 

The long and the short of it: Butts and Rube, Stroud and Mabel. 

Before and after taking: Cyrena and Heslet. 

"Asking a girl's permission to kiss her is cowardly. It is putting 
the responsibility up to her," writes the McKendree Headlight. We 
beg to ask which is worse, to kiss a girl without asking permission or 
not to kiss her after asking permission. 

After returning from a walk with Stroud, Mable Crump said: 
"Mary, just look how wrinkled my waist is." 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 123 

Grace Brand was warned by Mother B. not to allow Mr. White 
to take hold of her arm. Grace remembered that it was such a help 
to the conversation to have White's arms around her. 

It does seem that if Alice Stewart wished to demonstrate her 
kindly feeling toward John Harmon that she would lirst be sure ot 
his approval, for one day we overheard John say, because of such 
demonstrations, "Alice, quit that, I don't li-i-i-ke it." 

Mr. Whittenberg was showering comipliments on Miss Kenne- 
dy when she stopped him and said, "Don't tell me that, Wayne, for 
you won't be able to live with me, I shall be so conceited." We did 
not know that their case 'had become sO' serious nor that they had 
reached conclusions. 

Prof. Gentry and Mary Ball are already contemplating their sad 
parting next fall. They are talking seriously about the matter, and 
Mary has decided to come back for the summer t^rm to be with him 
as long as possible. 



124 



THE McKENDREAN 




McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 125 

CALENDAR 

For School Year 1913-1914 

SEPTEMBER. 

Sept. 15-16 — Eegistratiou Days. The Heavens shed copious tears 
over the greenness of the Freshies.' 

Sept. 17 — ^^The day of Battle. All classes engage in the conflict. 

Sept. 18-19 — Society "iiishing" begins. 

Sept. 20^Bohb5^' makes a hit with Phillippi. 

Sept. 21 — New couples pairing off. 

Sept. 22 — All students at chapel are informed that it is Dr. Har- 
mon's purpose to ''make men." 

Sept. 23 — Sky-pilots leave for conference. 

Sept. 24 — Y. W. C. A. girls serve tea. 

Sept. 26 — Basket ball squad begins practice. 

Sept. 27— Y. M. C. A. Stag Social in the Gym. 

Sept. 29 — Plato feeds the hungry, prospective candidates. 

Sept. 30 — ^Seniors hold their first meeting. 

OCTOBER. 

Oct. 1— Juniors have their first meeting and elect officers. 
Oct. 3— Open Session of Philo and Plato. Clio feeds the 'hnngry. 

Oct. 4 — Some society material still hungry. Philo tries the theory, 
"That the best way to reach a man's heart is thru his stomach." 

Oct. 6— Faculty Recital. Prof. New and Miss Clapp stir the audi- 
ence by appearing together. AlsO' Bro. Warren and Miss Wilder ap- 
pear for their first and only time. 

Oct. 8 — Delta Kappa Gramma is organized. 

Oct. 9— Clark Hall flooded with tears. Belleville Smith moves 
away from Lebanon. 

Oct. 10 — Open Session Clio. 

Oct. 11— First Basket Ball games of the season, "Fats" vs. 
"Leans."; "Waiters" vs. "Dishwashers." 

10:30 P. M.— Girls of Clark Hall serenade the inmates of Carnegie 
Hall, with songs and enthusia'stic yells. 

Oct. 12— Ma rv^ Ball is all smiles. Her friend Mr. Alexander is 
paying her a visit. 

Oct. 13 — Nell Dee moves out of dormitory to become a town girl. 



126 THE McKENDREAN 



Oct. 14— "Eube' Rice sits up until midnight to write Y. W. C. A. 

notes. 

Oct. 15 — It is announced that Tubby Wilton is married. Every- 
body replies, "How foolish." 

Oct. 16 — Dr. Hancher of New York gives his lecture on Mexico. 

Oct. 17 — Margaret Brainard studied astronomy. 

Oct. 18 — Petty and Bundy get to their 8:00 Greek class on time. 

Oct. 19— A day of Events. 

Stice and Marie have a falling out. 

Mr. Phillippi tries to make a date with Bobbie but Bobbie 
finally escapes. 

Oct. 20 — First snow of the season. 

Oct. 21 — Our Editor in Chief makes a long talk in chapel urging 
the students to part with a dollar and half of their father's money 
and subscribe for an annual. 

Oct 23 — Y. W. C. A. Recognition services in gym. 

Oct. 24 — Prof. Crosthwait goes home. Mr. Glotfelty teaches 
Horseology. One of his questions — What kind of a horse is the easiest 
kept. 

Mr. Peters — The kind that nobody else will 'have. 

Oct. 27 — Prof. Gentry and Ebbler are seen taking their little 
"Brown Jug' to the cider mill. 

Oct. 28 — In chapel, Prof. Gentr}^ announced "Mission Study on 
Moorman (ism) in Miss Berrjft room at 6:30. 

Oct. 29 — Mother B. pronounces a dreadful sentence upon "Rube" 
Rice and P. J. They are prohibited from going to vespers. 

Oct. 31 — Hallowe'en social in dining hall. 

NOVEMBER. 

Nov. 1 — Masquerade social in the Gym. 

Nov. 3 — Dr. Harmon announces why the faculty sat down on the 
first row of seats instead cf their chairs upon the rostrum. He said — 
"What speaker wants most of his congregation behind him." 

Nov. 4 — Astronomy class went star gazing. 

Nov. 6 — The calm before a storm. 

Nov. 7 — Seniors wore their colors to chapel. 

Nov. 8 — Junior's colors float from the chapel steeple. 

Nov. 9 — Seniors wonder how the Juniors made their way thru 
three locks and climbed up the steeple. 

Nov. 10 — Seniors still wondering. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 127 

Nov. 11 — Seniors offer a dollar reward to anyone who will re- 
move the Junior colors. 

Nov. 12 — ^Seniors make bold attempt tO' get Junior colors, but the 
ever alert Juniors were on the field of action before the Seniors could 
make their way into the steeple, caught them and took them outside. 

Nov. 13 — After the Seniors failing attempt the Juniors take down 
their own colors. 

Nov. 11 — ^The door being unlocked, the Seniors walk thi*u and put 
their colors on the steeple. Then put a new lock on the door. 

Nov. 15 — At 12:00 noon the Senior colors are stolen from the 
steeple by the Juniors. 

Nov. 16 — Seniors grieving the loss of their colors. 

Nov. 17 — Juniors and Seniors catching up a part of their lost skep. 

Nov. 18 — -Dr Harmon gives chapel lecture against football. 

Nov. 19 — Mother B. attends chapel. 

Nov. 20 — Five weeks till Christmas. 

Nov. 21 — Prof. Giles got a-hair-cut. 

Nov. 22 — ^Central Wesleyan 20, McKendree 35. 

Nov. 24 — Three members of the Delta Kappa Gramma got a hair 
cut. 

Nov. 25 — Mr. Bob comes to town. Bain. 

Nov. 26 — All who are financially able gO' home to partake of the 
Thanksgiving Turk. 

Nov. 27 — Thanksgiving Day. Chicken for dinner at McKendree. 

Nov. 28 — Editor in Chief and his associate work on the McKen- 
drean '15. 

Nov. 29 — Third day of vacation. Dolley gets lonesome and takes 
Miss Mclntyre for a walk. 

DECEMBER. 

Dec. 1 — All are back from Turkey feast, and ready to start in 
afresh. 

Dec. 2— Seats in the dining hall are changed. Paul Shield's hap- 
piness greatly disturbed, Ruth had to leave him. 

Dec. 3— ''Whom are you going to take to Clio Banquet?" 

Dec. 4— The guilty boys report to Dr. Harmon that they stacked 
the rooms of Messrs. Frank and Roland Stroud; and the one occupied 
by Moorman and Stice. 

Dec. 5— Many of the boys are disappointed because they have 
received no bid to Clio Banquet. 



128 THE McKENDREAN 



Dec. 6 — Messrs. Brewbaker and Deffenbaugh (members of the 
Senior class) claim that they preferred to see Hamlet rather than at- 
tend Clio Banquet. 

Dec. 7 — The Banquet couples go to church. 

Dec. 8 — Eeisner and Warren give up society for work as the end 
of the term approaches. 

Dec. 11 — Dr. Harmon in chapel — "Let us make men who will be 
money-makers and will become millionaires." 

Dec. 12 — Mrs. Vogt sang in chapel this morning. 

Dec. 13 — 'Miss Sligh had a caller today. He was the representative 
of the St. Louis Street Car Adv. Co. 

Dec. 14 — What's the matter with Dolley. He said he would Jiot 
go back if she asked him to, but we notice that he went and we irus- 
pect at his own invitation. 

Dec. 15 — News spread abroad that Prof. Gentry received the 
Rhodes Scholarship. Congratulations, Prof, from the Junior Class. 

Dec. 16 — Cram, Cram, Cram. 

Dec. 17-19 — Judgment days. 

Dec. 20 — Homeward Bound! 

Dec. 25 — Merry Christmas. 

JANUARY. 

Jan. 1 — A Happy New Year. 
Jan. 5-6— We are all back again. Mr. Glotfelty minus his mus- 
tache. Berry and Moorman keep shy of each other. What can the 
matter be? 

Jan. 7 — Moorman and Stice open their bachelor quarters. 

Jan. 8 — Miss Pearson addresses Y. W. girls. 

Jan. 9 — McCreery now sings: "There's a girl in the heart of 
"Marion." 

Jan. 10 — About thirty students follow the basket ball team to St. 
Louis where Washington U. defeats us 32-20. 

Jan. 11 — Wanted — Ner\^e tonic for the boys of Carnegie Hall who 
want to cat but have not the nerve tO' visit the "Angel Roost." 

Jan. 12 — Wiener Roast — Mabel and Stroud as chaperones. "Nuff " 
said. 

Jan. 13 — First skating on College Lake. 

Jan. 15 — Miss Sackett has a sprained ankle which greatly inter- 
feres with her work. 

Jan. 16 — ^Current events, in Clio by Syrina. Some awful slams. 

Jan. 17 — The greatest basket ball game in McKendree. Our 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 129 

team defeats Hedding after 15 minutes extra play, 27-24. 

Jan. 20 — Moorman was seen steipping into McBride's parlor. We 
wonder if he can go back. 

Jan. 21 — Dr. Harmon gives chapel talk, — "The height of optimism 
is a bow-legged, red-headed, cross-eyed boy, who is thankful that he is 
not bald-Jheaded. ' ' Taylor, Dorris and the Evers Brothers object, say- 
ing that they would prefer to be bald. 

Jan. 22 — Student Volunteer delegates give reports of the Kansas 
City Convention. 

Jan. 23 — Whit wore a white collar today. Plato exhibition tonight. 

Jan. 24 — Philo Banquet and exhibition. Miss Stwerat greatly ex- 
cited when she hears that Ethel Knapp received a bid to the banquet 
from an unknown friend. "It surely is Tommy Ralph," sh« said. 

Jan. 25 — After going to the banquet with Alex McCreery, Miss 
Dee decides that she must take care of the kids. We wonder if one 
of the kids isn't Billie. 

Jan. 26— First monthly meeting of the Ag. Club. 

.Ian. 27 — Whit's white collar again appears. Seems to go to the 
laundry quite regular of late. 

Jan. 28— Joint meeting of Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. Everybody 
catting but Moorman. 

Jan. 29 — Johnnie Harmon attends all 'his classes today. Great 
consternation among the Profs. 

Jan. 31— McKendree defeated C. W. C. of Warrenton, Mo. Eb. 
and Ferd starred as usual. 

FEBRUARY. 

Feb. 1— Boys of Carnegie Hall raid the rooms above the kitchen 
and secure the Sunday night supper of a few of the inmates. Revenge 
is feared. 

Feb. 2— Dr. Walton leads chapel services— "I had some newspa- 
per clippings to read but did not know that this was my day to lead 
chapel until a few minutes ago, therefore I did not bring them with 
me." Everybody aippreciates the joke except Prof. Crosthwait. 

Feb. 3— Seats are changed in dining hall. Many lovers disap- 
pointed. 

Feb. 4— Great excitement. General rough-house in both dorms. 
Miss Sackett has a number of third floor boys up on the carpet. 

Feb. 5— Pikes Peak McKnight announces that the has been to the 



130 THE McKENDREAN 



top of Pikes Peak, all over California, Washington, Idaho and Canada. 
.The facutly may make it known in the next catalogue that we have 
this gentleman in McKendree. 

Feb. 6 — Isothing stirring but a little breeze and it's so cold that 
it seems distant. 

Feb. 7 — Prof. Shannon arrives. Delivers a lecture to the boys. 

Feb. 8 — All afternoon classes dismissed. Prof. Shannon delivers 
five lectures during the day. 

Basket Ball at night, McKendree defeats State Champs of Arkan- 
sas, 44-21. 

Feb. 9 — ^IMiss Sackett sick. Brewbaker on time to Ag class. Great 
surprise. 

Feb. 10 — Miss Stewart accused of being out late with a boy. She 
hates to deny it but can do nothing else, as she is innocent. 

Feb. 12 — Eoscoe Early makes his debut. Quite a lady's man. 

Feb. 13 — Y. W. C. A. banquet. Dickman takes Kathryn to a 
moving picture show in honor of her birthday which comes on the 
morrow. 

Feb. 14 — All the girls look for Valentines, but are greatly dis- 
appointed. McKendree handed a comic when 111. Wesleyan defeats 
our team at Blo'omington 62-24. All had stage fright. 

Feb. 15 — Fat Shields returns from Piasa after a two week's visit 
with the (home folks I) 

Feb. 16 — A bunch of dorm, occupants go sleighing, ^rof. Gentry 
as chaperone has the best time of them all. 

Feb. 17 — Prof. New walks up from the conservatory with Miss 
Sligh. 

Feb. 18 — Prof. New, for a change, walks home from lunch with 
IVIiss Sligh. 

Feb. 19 — To relieve the monotony Miss Sligh walks to lunch with 
Prof. New. 

Feb. 20— Miss Sligh and Prof. New take their regular walk. 

Feb. 23 — Still the man from Benton and the lady from Harris- 
burg can't keep quiet during chapel. 

Feb. 24 — Have you noticed Marie Miller's hair? She uses the 
curling irons quite regular of late. 

Feb. 25 — Great excitement in Ag. department. Everything goes 
wrong for ''Grandma." 

Feb. 26 — Have you noticed Schroeder's hair? It was discovered 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 131 



today that be 'has a case that he kee^ps it in when not in use. 

Feb. 27 — Phillippi catting tonig-ht. Wondcri'uh How did it happen? 
Feb. 28 — The big basket ball game oi" the season. McKendree de- 
feated the Illinois Wesleyan team on our flour, .'JU-i:*. Revenge is sweet. 

MARCH. 
Mar. 1- — Everything is dead as can be. Katherine seen with 
Dickman. 

Mar. 2 — Mandolin practice at 6:15. Katherine seen with Dickman. 
Mar. 3 — Pancakes on third floor of girls dorm. Syrup on the floor, 
clothes, rugs and sugar everywhere. 

Mar, 4 — Kathrine and Dickman seen together again. 
Mar. 5 — A number of girls escaped from the Angel Rcost with the 
excuse of going to the C. W. Best Concert. Were seen strolling the 
streets suspended from the arms of Mule Barn Occupants. 

Mar. 6 — Open Session. Basket Ball team left for the preliminary 
tournament at Decatur. 

Mar. 7 — News from tournament. McKendree beats Lincoln twice 
and gives Wesleyan an awful close game for third place. Then Illinois 
College beats MrKendree, placing us in fourth place which allo'ws us 
to enter the Final at Bloomington. 

Mar. 8 — Basket Ball team returns. 

Mar. 9 — Nothing doing. Something out of the ordinary for Mc- 
Kendree. 

Mar. 10 — Prof. Crosthwait greatly embarrased by the presence 
of Randale in the Ag. class. 

Mar. 11 — Slat Stroud catting as usual in the library until four 
o'clock, then on the street until time for dinner. It's a shame that 
Belleville couldn't drop in for a few minutes some day. His anger 
surely would be aroused. 

Mar. 12 — Basket Ball team starts to Bloomington. Moorman, 
Greer, Shields, Kessler and Baxter take up the way of the weary 
and make their debut as bums. The intention is to bum their way 
to see the tournament. 

Mar. 13 — News from tournament. McKendree loses in first game 
by a score 26-25. Our old enemy you must remember. Later another 
telegram is received stating that we lost to Bradley Polytechnic 26-25 
again. Just as the whistle blew Snooks threw a goal but it didn't count. 
Mar. 14 — Everybody feeling bad over the results of the tourna- 
ment. No joy around McKendree today. 

Mar. 15 — Catting seems to be a thing of the past. What can the 



132 THE McKENDREAN 

matter be? 

Mar. 16 — Bums return from Bloomington. Report a fine time 
on about $2.50 eacih, while those who rode the cushions answer to a 
call of at least $12.00. 

Mar. 17 — Smiley fails to hav<e his twice weekly explosion in the 
chemical lab., but Whit has a double one making u\p for all shortage. 

Mar. 18 — Prohibition lecture at church. Several girls start but 
are accidentally (?) met by their gentlemen friends and go walking. 

Mar. 19 — Everybody cramming for exams next week. Nobody 
has time for catting. 

Mar. 21 — Social at the Methodist church under the auspices of 
the Epworth League. An imitation of the faculty is the attraction 
of the evening. It gave them an opportunity to see themselves as 
others see them. 

Mar. 22 — Many students go to church with the hope of winning 
the favor of the Prof. Many are those who expect to flunk. 

Mar. 24 — Exams begin. Everybody cramming. 

Mar. 25 — All those who have flunked will please keep a cheerful 
countenance, so as not to discourage others. 

Mar. 26 — All leave for vacation except a few who are either broke 
or too busy. 

APRIL. 

April 1 — All back from vacation. No-not all — for there are few 
fchat received special invitations from the faculty not to return. 

April 2 — Many are having great trouble with conflicts in classes. 

April 3 — Open Session. Many new couples appear. 

April 4 — Election day approaching. How are you going to vote? 

April 5 — Temperance lectures everywhere. 

April 6 — Dr. Harmon gives instruction to student voters. 

April 7 — Election Day. Gloomy and rainy, but everybody ven- 
tures out to vote. 

April 8 — ^Lebanon still wet. Prof. Dolley overworked and down- 
hearted. Cheer up, Prof., we sympathize with you. 

April 11 — Many of the occupants of the Angel Roost go to St. 
Louis to purchase new suits and bonnets for Easter. 

April 12 — Easter. Each student gets one boiled egg for break- 
fast. Ah! Home hain't nothing like this. 

April 20 — Vocal Contest tonight. Who won the medal 

April 22— Joint meeting of the Y. M. and Y. W C. A. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 133 

April 23 — All girls who expect to be in the May Fete must report 
at the Gym this evening at 6:30. 

April 24 — McKendree's water famine begins. All water works 
are closed. 

April 25 — ^Students form bucket brigades. 

April 27 — Director's Gold Medal Contest. Again the question 
comes, ' ' Who won the medal ? ' ' 

April 28 — Dr. Harmon in chapel tells how much trouble it will 
cause the matron and the faculty if fire escapes are put on the girl's 
dorm. 

April 29 — Will there be open session this week if the fire escapes 
are not completed for the society halls. 

April 30 — ^Meeting of the Junior class to make plans for the Sen- 
ior Reoeption. 

MAY. 

May 1 — Y. W. C. A. give their May Fete. Seniors appear in 
parade wearing their caps and gowns. 

May 2 — McKendree's Base Ball team is defeated by Washington 
U., 7-5 in the eleventh inning. 

May 3 — McKendree's water famine still on. 

May 4 — Juniors working hard on Annual. 

May 6 — McKendree begins to lay a (pipe line to Silver Creek. 

May 7 — Stansfield plays tennis with Miss Walker. Rivalry ex- 
isting between Stansfield and Eb. 

May 8 — Peter's moving gang works most of the night. 

May 9 — Track meet with Shurtleff Colleg-e — McKendree 58; 
Shurtleff, 51. 

At 7 p. m. water began flowing through the pipe line into the lake. 

May 11 — Editor in Chief takes the McKendrean '15 to press. 



134 



THE McKENDREAN 




McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 135 



Announcements 

The following business men and 
patrons of the college are worthy of the 
highest consideration by the student 
body. They have wisely seen fit to 
place their advertising in our year 
book^ and in doing so they have mater- 
ially assisted us and we trust that they 
will be given preference over others 
when opportunity is afforded. They 
are progressive business men who will 
deal squarely and courteously with 
the students and town people. 



136 THE McKENDREAN 



1 he rlalf Tones and Zinc 
Etcningfl in tkis took w^ere 
made ty Tke Northern En- 
graving Co., Canton, Ohio. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 137 

The Worlds Grandest Jewelry Establishment' 

Having our factory on the premises, and a corps of skilled work- 
men employed, we are enabled to supply you with the finest materials 
and workmanship in 

CLASS PINS, MEDALS, BADGES, RINGS, 
AND FRATERNITY JEWELRY 
on the shortest notice at most reasonable ip'rices. Original designs and 

estimates will be furnished if desired 
We are official jewelers for a great many Fraternities thrO'Ughout the 

country. 
OUR STATIONERY DEPARTMENT IS UNEXCELLED 
in its high quality 'of workmanship and materials. Our artists are 
skilled in their lines, and an order entrusted to us is an assurance of 
elegance and refinement, and that it will be correct in every detail. 

NOTE — We shall be pleased to send you without charge, our new 
illustrated catalogue. Write for it at once. 

Mermod, Jaccard & King Jewelry Company 

On Broadway at Locust St., Saint Louis, Missouri. 

Whit — "Any old style of beauty suits me." 
Mary Ball — "I came to McKeudree to go with the boys." 
Smiley — "'My two years at McKendree have been an entertain- 
ing and instructive vacation." 

Marie Miller — "If I were a boy, I could better express my opin- 
ions of Mother B." 

PENANTS PILLOWS 

Daumueller's 

SODA FOUNTAIN 

Fancy Candies, Lowney's and Morses' Chocolates in 
Packages and in Bulk 

VICTROLAS AND RECORDS 
SHEET MUSIC POST CARDS 



138 THE McKENDREAN 



R. Blumenstein Wm. Midgley 

Blumensteiit & Midgley 

CASH MEAT MARKET 

— A Variety of — 
FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 

At All Times 

Butts — -"Yes, 1 have a steady, six of tbem. " 
Prof. Gentry to Snooks — ''Stick around and I'll put you thru." 
Fat Stroud — "The girls forget who they meet too easily." 
Fritz Deffenbaugh — "Dutchmen are a handy thing to have around 
but I have a hard time making the girls think so." 
Alice Stewart — "I have not yet met my affinity." 
Stancfield — "I came to McKendree to keep from milking cows." 
. Trueb — "Get away before I lose control of my muscles." 
Pig — "I'm scared and am not afraid to tell it." 




Sunday Night Suppers 

STUDENTS CAN GET SUNDAY 
NIGHT SUPPEES AT 

Bunge's Bakery 

ALL KINDS OF DOUGHNUTS, PIES 
CAKES AND CANDIES 

Opposite Postoffice Lebanon, Illinois 




McKENDREE Y£AR BOOK 139 

Elevator Capacity MiUing Capacity 

250,000 Bushels 1000 Barrels 

Pf effer Milling Company 

— Manufacturers of — 
High Grade Soft Winter Wheat Flour 
Jewel Brand, Hard Wheat Flour 

High Grade Self-Raising Flour — for Biscuit and Cake 
High Grade White Com Meal — Kiln Dried 

High Grade Mill Feed — Bran, Middlings, Hominy 
Feed and Com Bran 



Lumber Yard 



THE LARGEST STOCK IN SOUTHERN H^LINOIS 
Building Material of Every Description, Including Sand, Composition 
and Gralvanized Roofing, Cement and Lime in Bulk at tbe Right Price 

LEBANON ILLINOIS 



THE PICTURES IN THIS BOOK WERE MADE 
BY R. R. LUTES, AT THE ELITE STUDIO. 
LEBANON ILLINOIS 



140 THE McKENDREAN 



TO THE WELL DRESSED STUDENT— 

WHEN IN NEED OF CLOTHES DON'T FORGET 

HI. Kauff man 

The Up-to- Date Merchant Tailor 

We specialize in Young Men's Clothes. Our sanitary cleaning depart- 
ment is unsurpassed; one trial will convince you. Prices are al- 
ways consistent with quality. 

M. Kauffman-Miller Building 



Lebanon Drug Company 

PURE DRUaS AND DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY 
CIGARS AND TOBACCO 

ICE CREAM AND SODA 
COLLEGE PENNANTS 

Rube Rice — ''The dog is mine for keeps." 

Miss Sligh — "Orchestra practice at 6:15." 

Rummy^"For Cat's Sake." 

McPherson — "Two hydrogen ions make a molecule, several mole- 
cules make a little particle, and several particles make a well 1 

guess that it is a little bubble." 

"THE HOME OF QUALITY GROCERIES" 

Quality Groceries Await You Here 
The kind that make hunger disappear 
Here the Pure Food Laws obtain 
And those with appetites on the wane 
Get them quickly back again. 
The Coast Products and American Lady Canned Goods; Woolson 
Spices; Chase and Sanborn's Coffees and Teas, Baker and Her- 
shey's Chocolates and Cocoa; Heinz' Goods, Beechnut Brands. 

H. W. Blanck Mercantile Co. 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 



141 



BOOKS 

Lebanon 



HAASE'S 

Drug Store 

PURE DRUGS 
SCHOOL SUPPLIES 



STATIONERY 



Illinois 



Red Dorris — "My girl in Edwardsville, and oh, yes the one in 
Collinsville too." 

Lloyd Taylor— "Well, Gee Whiz." 

Y. W. C. A. — A matrimonial agency and an old Maids Asylum. 
Mack Moss — "They tell me, that girls are parasites at McKendree." 

Whittenberg — "I came to McKendree because I ha dto leave Illi- 
nois." 

Phillippi— "She's a Queen." (Bobby.) 

Traut — "If you call for a soda in Belleville tliey laugh at you." 



THE BEST PLACE TO BUY SHOES IS AT 

Exclusive Shoe Store 

College Styles, Up-to-Date Dependable Footwear for Men, 
Women and Children 
ERNEST GRAUEL Lebanon, Illinois 



The Up-To-Date Variety Store 

HAVE A COMPLETE SUPPLY FOR EVERYONE IN EVERY LINE 

Our Goods are Always on Disj)lay Marked in Plain Figures 

D. SCHWARTZ, Prop. Lebanon, Illinois 



142 THE McKENDREAN 



Notice! 

A FEW COPIES OF THE McKENDREAN "15" IN FULL 
LEATHER BINDING MAY BE OBTAINED UNTIL THE 
SUPPLY IS EXHAUSTED. 

rfc • iTA !rf\ ORDER FROM tf^^ ir/\ 

Price $1 .50 normn m moss, Price $1 .50 

^ LEBANON, ILL. v,/ . .v-r v 



ESTABLISHED 1856— 

C. and H. Reinhardt 

CLOTHING, HATS, CAPS 
AND FURNISHINGS 



The Centralia Daily Review 

Centralia, Illinois 

Modern Book and Job Printers 

Our Hobby: ''Promises must be kept" 



Spalding 

ATHLETIC APPAREL 
— and — 

EQUIPMENT 

— at — 

Sager's 



McKENDREE YEAR BOOK 143 

Mary Kennedy — ' ' Some of the boys are all right, but others good- 
night. ' ' 

Alex Calhoun — "My favorite sport is talking." 
Heikgenstein — "I'll bet anybody in the class that I have the 
lowest grade." 

Arleigh Dewbrist — "Wait till I call up my wife." 

Bemice Wait — "The great need of the Y. W. C. A. is men." 

Idaho McKnight — "When I was at the top of Pikes Peak." 

Fatty Dieck — "Yes, Kathryn, I'll be over right after Vespers." 

Slats Stroud— "Which way did she go?" 

Parker — "Get away from here, boy." 

Peters — "I came here to McKendree to get an education but have 
failed." 

Carrie Lee Shadrick — "Some are Clios because th-ey can't help 
it, the others are to he pitied. ' ' 

John F. Harmon — "I've only met my affinity in my dreams." 

Baxter — "Pretty poor, pretty poor, I only made 98." 

Cummins — "I hate to blow my own horn, but ye Gods I am good 
looking." 

Zimmemrman — "I'm authority on that subject." 

Guy Dewhirst — ' ' Damif iknow. ' ' 

Rogers— "By Heck!" 

Prof. Thrall — "Not necessarily." 

Richter — ' ' If you kiss a Lebanon girl she thinks that you want to 
marry her." 

Prof. New — "In other words, as an actual matter of fact, this 
reaction is not reversible." 

Marie Ritchie — "I may be a fool but I am afraid that everybody 
knows it better than I do." 

Alex MeCreery — "You thought that you would pull something 
over on me and then rub it in." 

Ch^de Biggerstaff — "Lillian and I came to McKendree to have a 
good time but we've decided that we came to the wrong plac*e." 

Whit — "I wish that Mary didn't like chocolates so well."