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Full text of "The McKendrean : being the year book of McKendree College"

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McKendrean 




1924 



Holman Library 

McKendree College 
III. 62254 



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To revive epochal incidents in the his- 
tory of our Alma Mater; to perpetuate them 
for future generations of McKendreans ; to 
present a true record of the College year — 
such has been the purpose of the Staff of the 
1P24 McKendrean. 



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AKERS-EDTOR-INCHIEF 

1924 1 ' 

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DcM cation 

To Dr. Cameron Harmon, alumnus of 
McKendree College, soldier of his country in 
the Spanish-American war, pastor of the 
Southern Illinois Conference, President of 
Missouri Wesleyan College, and now Presi- 
dent of his Alma Mater, we, the Staff, dedi- 
cate the 1924 McKendrean. 



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DR CAMERON HARMON 



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©roer of looks 

Book of The College 
Book of The Classes 
Book of Fine Arts 
Book of Athletics 
Book of Organizations 
Book of Features 
Book of Advertisements 



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McKendnv College \va,s founded in 1N2N 
by tile Circuit Riders, those pioneer 
Methodist ministers who penetrated 
the wilderness to carry the Gospel of 
Jesus Christ. Realizing that one of 
the fundamental needs of a Christian 
democracy is Christian education they 
founded McKendree College. 



Book of the College 

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Through the green arches of fresh-leaved 
trees which dot the campus, the College Chapel, 
with its stately spire reaching heavenward, recalls 
to our minds the pleasant days and years we have 
spent at McKendree — the morning devotional 
hour, the entertainments, the exhibitions, and 
other activities of the College in which we have 
been privileged to participate. 



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C.C. HALL 
PRES. BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



J. M. MITCHELL 




IF 

HON. C.P. HAMILL 




REV. G.R.GOODMAN D.D. 



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Board of Trustees: 
OFFICERS 



VSev. C. C. Hall, I >. D.. Preside 
Rev. J. G. Tucker. D. D.. Sec 
Rev. Cameron Harmon. D. D.. 



C. B. Ptach. Treasi 
Rev. W. C. Waltoi 
lege and ex-officio 



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HONORARY TRUSTEES 
Quayle Baldwin. Ka 



Dr. C. B. Spencer ■ Meges St.. Kansas City. Mo. 

EMERITUS TRUSTEES 

Rev. O. H. Clark. D. D East St. Louis. Illinois 

Rev. J. W. Flint. A. M., D. D Fairfield. Illinois 

TERM EXPIRES 1924 

* Rev. Lafayette C. Wilkin Centralia, Illinois 

Rev. Charles L. Petersen. D. D Mt. Vernon Illinois 

Frank Condrey Obloiig, Illinois) 

Rev. Robert Morris Granite City Illinois 

P. M. Johnson St. Elmo. Illinois 

Rev. C. C. Hall. D. D Mt. Vernon, Illinois 

Hon. Charles S. Deneen. A. M.. LL.. D 29 S. LaSalle. St.. Chicago, Illinois 

C. P. Hamill ■ Belleville, Illinois 

Judge Louis Bemreuter Nashville, Illinois 

Rev. M. H. Loar • Carbondale. Illinois 

TERM EXFIRES 1925 

* B. M. Hypes, A. M.. M. D 

Rev. O. L Markman 

John M. Mitchell ■ 

Rev. W. H. Poole .... 

Rev. J. G. Tucker. D. D 

Thomas L. Cherry Carbondale. Illinois 

R. H. Isaacs - Gillespie. Illinois 

Rev. F. O. Wilson -..Mt. Cramel. Illinois 

Rev. Charles D. Shumard, D. D Alton. Illinois 

Ira Blackstock ■ Springfield. Illinois 

Colonel Crouse Lebanon. Illinois 

Judge Charles H. Miller ■ Benton. Illinois 



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md Ave., St. Louis. Mo. 

Benton, Illinois 

Mt. Carmel, Illinois 

Collinsvillo. Illinois 



TERM EXPIRES 1926 



Rev. F. M. Van Treese, 

W. C. Pfeffer 

Judge E. C. Cramer 

Capt. E. W. Hersh 

Rev. W. T. Morris 

J. L. McCormick. M. D. 
Rev. Ressho Robertson. 
Leonard Carson 



East St. Louis. Illinois 

Lebanon, Illinois 

.East St. Louis. Illinois 
Newton, Illinois 

Jersey ville, 

Bone Gap, 



Illinois 
Illinois 
Illinois 



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Board of Visitors 

TERM EXFIRES 1924 

M. Adams Cairo, 

B Sowers West Frankfort. 



Rev. W. H. Whit lock. 



TERM EXFIRES 1925 



Rev. 



C. W. Hall.... 
P. R. Glotfeltj 
F. L. Geyer... 



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.Wood River, 111. 
. .Herrin, Illinois 
t. Louis. Illinois 



TERM EXFIRES 1926 

Rev. W. I. Terhune ...Flora. Illinois 

Rev. L. S. McKown Murphysboro. Illinois 

Rev. G. R. Goodman. D. D East St. Louis, Illinois 

* Deceased 



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In the busy market places of the world, in 
the legislative and judicial chambers, in the class- 
room, in the service of the Master, and in the 
evening glow of the fireside, men and women who 
have made and are making American civilization 
the envy of the world will think back, sometimes, 
to McKendree, and will see again in reverent 
memory. Old Main. 



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Edwin Percy Baker, Bean 
GERMAN 

A. B., Ohio Wesleyan, 1893. 

Sauveur School of Languages summer 1896 

A. M., McKendree College, 1896. 

Graduate Studv, University of Berlin, 

1896-97. 




Mrs. Jenxie L. Eobinson 
Dean of Women 



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William Clarence Walton 
PHILOSOPHY AND EDUCATION 

A. B., McKendree College, 1892; 

A. M., 1894; Ph. D., 1897 

Graduate Study, University of Chicago, 

Summer 1909; University of Illinois, 

summers 1917, 1918. 



James Clay Dolley, Registrar 
latin and greek 

A. B., Randolph-Macon College; 1888; 

A. M., 1898. Graduate Study, University 

of Wisconsin, 1917-18. 

M. A., University of Wisconsin, 1918; 

University of Michigan, summer 1922; 

Washington University, 1922-23. 





Lorraine Pierson 

FRENCH 

A. B., Transylvanie University, 1916; 
A. M., 1917. 

Graduate Study, University of Wisconsin, 
summer 1920. 

A. M., University of Chicago, 1922 



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Standleigh Myron McClure 
chemistry 

B. S.,Drury College, 1914; M. Sc, 1915 

Graduate Study, Northwestern University, 

1915-16. University oi Illinois, summev 
1920; Harvard University, summer 1922. 



Charles Jacob Stowell 

MATHEMATICS 

B. S., Illinois Wesleyan University, 1911. 

M. A., University of Illinois, 1912. 

Ph. D., University of Illinois, 1917 







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John William Andrew Kinson 

BIBLE AND RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

A. B., McKendree College, 1915; B. D., 

Garret Biblical Institute, 1918; 

Graduate Study, Washington University, 
1921-22. A. M., Washington University, 1922 



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Page Sixteen 




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Belle M. Nixon 

ENGLISH 

Illinois State Normal, 1910. 

Ph. B., University of Chicago, 1912 

Graduate Study, Columbia University, 

summers 1920-21-23. 

A. M., Columbia University, 1923 



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William Earl Burns 
biology 

A. B., Southwestern College, 1913 

Kansas University, 1913-14 

Fellow, Kansas University, 1914-15 

M. S., Kansas University, 1915 

University of Iowa. 1917-18 

Yale Army Laboratory, 1919 




CONSTANTINE D. CaLOGERIS 

MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS 

Kansao State Agriculture College, 1919-21 

S. B., University of Chicago, 1923 

Graduate work, University of Chicago 



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J. PURDI NEEL 
HISTORY 



Eabl A. Davis, Director of Athletics 

Played at Southern Kentucky College. 
1906-08 
:oach Southern Kentucky College, 1909-10 A. B., McLean College, 1912 

Played at Transylvania, 1914-15 Transylvania College of Theology, 1913-1-1-15 

Student Coach, Phillip:; University, 1916-17 
Coach Missouri Wesleyan College, 1917-22 





Ruth Catherine Walton 
home economics 

University of Illinois, summer 1920 

B. S., McKendree College, 1921 

Graduate Study, University of Chicago, 
summer quarter, 1922 



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Alleen Wilson, Librarian 

A. B., Missouri Wesleyan College. 1919 

Graduate Study, Colorado University, 

summer 1920 

Summer Library Conference, Mad'son, 

Wisconsin, 1923 




J. E. Robinson, 
Purchasing A pent 




Howard Woodham Gould 

Instructor 

CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 

B. S., McKendree College, 1918 

Graduate Study, University of Illinois, 
summer 1920, and II Sem. 1921-22. 

M. A., University of Illinois, 1922 



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JULIA HODGSON 

Presidents Secretary 



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Pi.se Twenty 



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JRemories of I\\v (Collcyc teachers 



My Major Professor 

My Minor Professor 

Activities, Likes, and Dislikes 



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Season IB a oft Kb ran) 

The storehouse of the ages, wherein we find 
the woiks of the masters and are privileged to 
witness the drama of civilization as the actors 
move across the stage from the dawn of history 
to the present day. Here we see again enacted 
primitive man's struggle to rise from barbarism, 
great generals and armies as they sweep across 
the pages of history, daring explorers as they 
penetrate the unknown, martyrs to religious and 
political ideals, the scientist as he investigates 
the natural laws — all the wealth and lore of the 
ages are gathered together under the vaulted 
roof of the library. 



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A College 'mid plains is standing, standing there from 

olden days, 
The Pioneer of the prairies, first in untrodden ways, 
For service and Christian culture, for efficiency she stands. 
Her sons and daughters praise her, with voices, hearts and 

hands. 

Chorus: 

Hail to thee our dear old McKendree, 
May we always loyal be, 
It's a song of praise we'll raise to thee, 
Alma Mater, dear old M-C, 
Mag we ever own thee true and wise and right. 
Honor Purple and the White, 
And for victory we'll always fight, 
'Till tee win for old M-C-K. 

Enduring and strong she stands there, stands upon our Col- 
lege Hill, 
Though others man outnumber, site holds the first place 

' still, 
For beauty and truth and knowledge, and for service with- 
out bound, 
Then let us raise our voices, until the plains resound. 

Chorus: 



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Tage Twenty-four 







Although founded in 1n2n as Lebanon 
Seminary, the name of the institution 
was changed in 1s::o to McKendree 
College in honor of Bishop William 
McKendree. The first charter was re- 
ceived in 1S35. Largely through the 
influence of Abraham Lincoln, a new 
and more liberal charter was obtained 
in 1S39, and is still in force. 



Book of the Classes 



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Mentor piston? 

On the twenty-seventh day of September in the year Nineteen Hun- 
dred and Twenty A. D. fifty-five aspiring lads and lasses departed from 
the shores of parental jurisdiction to embark upon the mystic voyage of a 
college career, eagerly anticipating a day four years hence when the last 
lap of the vovage of life should begin. Now that day has come, bringing to 
us not a spirit of eager anticipation, but one of reluctant realization that 
those college days have passed too quickly. They are mere memories; 
pleasant, 'tis true, — exciting, too. 

We had things our way the first year here, although the green was 
slow to wear off. The grass, however, was hardier than weeds and we 
soon crowded the upper-classmen out of the way. Our first attempt to have 
a -teed' was crushed, we admit, but a counter attempt was successful and 
from them we defied all of them, ate when we liked and said what we 
pleased. 

Our return the next year was marked by renewed vigor and deter- 
mination to instill in the hearts of every McKendrean a true college spirit. 
To do this we had to be the examples. The Freshies of this year were 
not the right caliber to experiment with. So we gave our own parties, in- 
vited fellow McKendreans, and really were a congenial bunch. Five girls 
from our ranks effected the organization of the Student Volunteer Band. 
Then came the campaign for McKendree's endowment and the Class of 
'24 responded with the largest pledge of all classes. The crowning achieve- 
ment of the year was the establishment of the Student Association and the 
election of one from our midst as the first president. 

In our Junior year we did not intend to be forced into the background 
and from the beginning maintained our position so nobly obtained. Al- 
though many did not return, the twenty-five who did. ably carried on our 
colors Again, one from our class was elected president of the Student 
Association and was re-elected the following term. Assistantships in every 
department of college work were awarded to members of the Class of 1924. 

The works of the former three years were carried on during our Senior 
year In all school activities we had our representatives in the Student 
Association, in the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. cabinets, on the 1924 Mc- 
Kendrean Staff, assistantships and student instructors. It was indeed ap- 
propriate that the student body should dedicate the beautiful elm to the 
memory of the Class of 1924. 

But these are reminiscences, the actualities never to be experienced 
again. However, these pleasant memories of attainments in our college 
career encourage us and arouse within us the determination to attain to 
the best in life. 



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1924 




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Jo//;/ William Cralley, B. S. 

Carmi, Illinois 

Clas,; President, '23-'24 

Philo Prescient, '23-'24, Bachelor 

Y. M. C. A. Treasurer '23, '24 

Laboratory Assistant, Biology, '23, '2 



i?«/A Agnes Fain, B. 8. 

Belknap, Illinois 

Class Secretary-Treasurer '23, '24 

Clio President '23 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet '23, '24 

Student Volunteer, Glee Club '23, '24 

"The Gypsy Rover", '24 



Scrcmton Coit Van Houten, 

B. S. 

O'Fallon, Illinois 

Class Vice President '23, '24 

Plato President '23. '24 
College Quartette '22 



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George W. Orauel, A. B. 

Lebanon, Illinois 

Plato; Wayfarer's Club 

Electrical Engineer's Society 



Arthur Warren Hendrix, A. B. 

Mulberry Grove, Illinois 

Philo President '19, '23 

Y. M. C. A. President '18-'19 

Drew Theological Seminary '20-'23 



Mary Agnes Tressler, B. S. 

Herrick, Illinois 

Clio President '24 

Y. W. C. A. President '23-'24 

Student Volunteers; Glee Club '23-'24 

Teacher's Club, '20-'22 

Girls' Basketball Team '23 



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Martha Elisabeth Hughes, 
A. B. 

Robinson, Illinois 
Clio President '24; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 



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iasketball Team '22-'23 



Mrs. Lillie Cotton Davis, A. B. 

Lebanon, Illinois 

Student Association Vice President 

'24 

Director of "The Gypsy Rover" '24 

Missouri Wesleyan College '21-'23 

Graduate in Voice '18 

Post Graduate Voice '19, '20 

Physical Director '18, '19 

Basketball '20, '21; Quartet '22, '23 

Glee Club '22, '23 



Ernest Raymond Britton, B. S. 

Mounds, Illinois 

Plato President '24 

Y. M. C. A. Cabinet '22-'24 

Student Association President '22-'23 

English Seminar; 
Student-Faculty Welfare Committee 

'21-'22 

Cheer Leader '23-'24; McKendrean '24 

Advertising- Manager 

Board of Control of McKendree 

Review '23-'24 

Laboratory Assistant, Chemistry '22-'23 



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Erwin Herman Runkwitz, B. S. 

O'Fallon, Illinois 

Basketball '23 

"M" Club. '23-'24 



George K. A. Haase, A. B. 

Walnut Hill, Illinois 

Glee Club '23-'24 

A. M. Chesborough Theological 

Seminary '19 

Greenville College, '21-'23 

Kansas U. Summer Session '22 

Iowa U. Summer Session '23 



Alice Hester Walton, A. B. 

Lebanon. Illinois 

Cl'o President '23 Glee Club '23-'21 

Clio Quartette, '21-'22-'23-'24 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet '22-'24 

Sextet '22-'23; McKendrean '24 

McKendree Review Staff '23 

eature Editor; "The Gypsy Rover" '24 



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Marian Irene Harmon, A. B. 

Louisville, Illinois 

Clio President '24 
McKendiee Review Staff '23-'24 
Girls' Basketball Team. '22-'23 



Cecil Otto Corlaic, A. B. 

Rogers, Arkansas 

Clio; Glee Club '23-'24 

Defiance College, Defiance, Ohio '20-'21 

A:s istant D'rector of Religious 

Education, Ohio Sunday School 

Association '22 



Orville Richard Spreckelmeyef 
A. B. 

Madison Illinois 

Fhilo President '23 

Quartet '22, '23 '24 

Y. M. C. A. Cabinet '23-'24 

Glee Club '23-'24; College Quartet "11 

Student Association Song Leader '23 

Debating- Team '23-'24 



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David Warner Shipp, A. B. 

Lebanon, 111. 

Philo President '16, '23; Glee Club '16 

Football '16 

McKendree Echo Staff '14-'16 

Debating team '15 

McKendree Review Staff '23-'24 

Wayfarer's Club 

Drew Theological Seminary '17-'20 

New York University, '20-'21 



Omer Floyd Whitlock, A. B. 

Lebanon, Illino'r, 

Plato President '21, '22 

Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Basketball, '20 

Plato Quartet '23 



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jjunior (Class 

James Boyce Newcom, President 

Albert Willis, Vice President 

Etta Violet Starkey, Secretary-Treasurer 

Akers, Milburn P. Karnes, Guv ( >. 

Dolley, Robert I). Mais, Henry G. 

Duxx, James W. Stelzriede, Frederich C. 

Frey, Sydney W. Willis, Alice C. 

Harris, Frank E. Young, Helen 



Jessop, Delta 0. 



Zimmerman, John B. 



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Paul D. Reese, President 

Walter L. Bailey, Vice President 

Grace Cunningham, Secretary-Treasurer 



Carter, Raphael V. 
Collom, ( Iraxck 
Crabbs, Barbara L. 
Darrow, George G. 
Deitz, Henry 
Denbeaux, Martha W. 
East, Erwix 
Glenn, Carrie E. 
Groshong, Mary D. 
Harmon, Dorothy 
Harris, St. Clair M. 
Hill, Percy J. 
Hollis, Roscoe R. 
Isom, John 

Karnes, Christine M. 
Kinsey, Carl B. 
McHenry, Maurice L. 
McNeely, Eyelyn E. 



Mowe, Wilbur n 
Mueller, Harry 
nolting, gertride 
Pearce, Eya G. 
Pearce, Lee James 
Plater, J. Rue 
Sawyer, William T. 
Schuwerk, Paul E. 
Scruggs, Walter 
Sizemore, J. Carter 
Smith, Mary ( )pal 
Stephens, Lucille H. 
Stephens, Robert I). 
Sterling, Edward 
Taylor, Carl L. 
Walker, James W. 
Wentz, Louise 



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John C. Hall, President 
Dorothy C. Pahnestock, Secre 
Adams, Mildred A.\x 
Albaugh, E. W. 
Aleaugh, Mrs. Maude Fowler 
Allen, Raymond Franklin 
Bailey, Willie Henry 
Berst, Donald H. 
Bramley, Karmyn Mize 
Brian, Clyde Wayman 
Brown, Harold Melroy 
Brown, Harry Edwin 
Brown, Wendell W. 
Bumgarner, John Riley 
Chapple, Eugenia 
Comley, Ruth May 
Dausman. William J. 
Davison, Ray Thomas 
Dee, Dorothy Lee 
Dickson, Edwin F. 
Dieterich, Minnie M. 
Dorris, Ralph 
Fleming, David Ross 
Fullerton, Pauline E. 
Gardner, John Jr. 
Gibson, Hubert Irev 
Gibson, Noel E. 
Gladders, John Walter 
Goode, Ray Daniel 
Greaves, Rachel Alice 
Greene, Harry Duane 
Grieve, Jesselvx L. 
Grupe, Marvin 
Haines, Arva J. 
Haines, Victor Augustus 
Hardy, Vernal R. W. 
Harms, Russell 
Hawkins, Leona 
Henderson, Carl A. 
Henry, Olive Ruth 
Holsen, Levi Sharon 
Hopper, Scott 
Horn La Pur 
Hussong, Daniel Earl 
Jessop, Frank Harper 



Thedore C. Search, Vice-President 
tar y -Treasurer 

Jones, Bertram Vaile 
Jones, Cyril Marvin 
Jones, Paul Edwin 
Kay, Harold Moore 
Kolb, Charlie Wm. 
Lee. Omar Clare 
Linder, Karl A. 
Magill, Guy Nelson 
Magill, Mayo Llther 
Mangum, Sylvia Margaret 
McAfee, Leslie Hays 
McCreery, Anna Mary 
McDill, Kenneth Bailey 
McGill, Stricklen Horace 
McKnight, Noble W. 
Miller, Walter Alt a 
Minton, Robert Edward 
Molineu, Herbert W. 
Moody, Dorothy Mildred 
Morgan, Alberta Marie 
Muench, Henrv Lewis 
Patterson, Elmer J. 
Peterson, Lewis V. 
Pettlt, Lloyd 
Ravenstein, Reno 
Reed, Minnie Mae 
Rehmus, August William 
Rippell, Charles Kenneth 
Robbs, Buel A. 
Robertson, Clarence H. 
Robinson, Bertha 
Ross, Robert B. 
Schroth, Grace R. 
Shields, Margaret Cathryn 
Stilley, Ruth 
Todd, Grace Ruth 
Walker, Chas. Jr. 
Weber, Lucille Dorothea 
Werre, Mildred 
Whitlock, Walter Peterson 
Whittenberg, Thos. 
Wiley, Lewis Henry 
Wilson, Elza Dale 



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1 R HARMS 


K. M E DILL E. 


PATTERSON 



In an effort to aid young men earning their way through college, the 
McKendree Self-Help Plan was started last Fall by Dr. Harmon. Arrange- 
ments were made with Swift's in East St. Louis to furnish the students 
with employment for periods of one week. They then returned to college 
for two weeks. In this manner students were enabled to earn two-thirds 
of the usual number of semester hours of credit while aiding themselves 
financially. An effort is now being made to secure the location of a factory 
in Lebanon so that the system may be continued on a larger scale and in a 
more convenient manner. 



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Sub-Collegiate Students 

Daszko, Walter 
Freesemeyer, Mrs. Fay Estell 
Galeener, Louis Ed. 
Greenley, Veon 
Horrell, Dewey H. 
Jones, William Monticello 
Loying, Walter James 
Miller, Arthur 
Murdach, Ernest J. 
Newcomb, Julia 
Schroth, Flossie 
Starr, ( )ra 



^ P i 



P:isi' Fony-or 



D 



Jtiate Dells 



S-U-C-C-E-S-S 

Is a word that spells SUCCESS 

Who shall have it? 

Can't you see? 

Nobody else but 

McKENDREE 

M-M-McK, E-E-END, R-R-REE, 

Team, Team, Team. 

McKENDREE 



BOOOooo Lah, Rah, Rah, 
McKendive Rah, Rah. 
BOOOooo Lah, Rah, Rah, 
McKendree Rah, Rah. 
BOOOooo Lah, Rah, Rah, 
McKendrce Rah, Rah. 
YEAaaaaaa, TEAM 



Rah, rah, rah. 

Hip hi he, 

Rip, boom, Zip boom 

McKENDREE 



Purple white, purple white, 
McKendree fight, McKendree fight, 
Purple white, purple white, 
McKendree fight, McKendree fight, 
Purple white, purple white, 
McKendree fight, McKendree fight. 



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The first edifice for higher education 
in the State of Illinois was erected on 
the campus of McKendree College. It 
was started in 1828 and completed the 
following' year. In 1S56, after 27 years 
of service, it was destroyed by a fire 
of incendiary origin. 



Book of Fine Arts 






m\ m [m\ [5>{a] ll^SS 



JFinc Arts 



The School of Music and Expression of McKendree College offers a 
four year course in music leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music. To 
those completing the work in the Expression Department a certificate is 
awarded. A two year course in public school music is also offered, a state 
certificate being granted to those completing it. 

Due to the close affiliation of the College of Liberal Arts and Science 
and the School of Music, McKendree College offers unique advantages to 
those desiring a musical education. 

Membership in the College Glee Clubs and Quartette is by competitive 
examination. The training received by participation in these activities is 
invaluable not only to those looking forward to a musical career but also 
to those studying music lor its cultural benefits. 

Although specializing in the advance work, attention is given to the 
preparation of beginners in all branches of work. 

An added feature of the School is the study made of great artists. 
Due to the proximity of Lebanon to St. Louis students are enabled to 
attend the concerts given in that city by great artists at a nominal cost. 

The faculty for the year 1924-1925 will be as follows: 

Grant McDonald, Director and Department of Piano. 

Pauline Harper, Voice. 

Olive E. Patmore A. B., Expression 

Harry Mueller, Violin. 



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Page Forty-th 



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Grant McDonald, 
Director of Music 

PIANO 

Graduate in piano, organ, and theory, Drury 

College Conservatory cf Music, 1919 
Concert work with The Allen Bureau, Lima, 

Ohio, 1919-20. 
Chautauqua work, rummer 1921, with Stand- 
ard Bureau, Lincoln, Nebraska 
Head of piano department, Ozark Wesleyan 
College, 1921-23 



Mrs. Earl A. Davis 
voice 

Studied under Prcf. Claud- 3 R. Newcomb of 

Phillips University, '14, '15. '16. 

Graduate in Voice, Missouri Wesleyan, '18 

Pest graduate in Voice. Missouri Wesleyan, 

'20, '21. 



D. W. Shipp 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

A. B., McKendiee College. 1924 

Crsw Theological Seminary, '17. '20 

New York University, '20, '21 



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Ludwig L. Carl 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC METHODS 

Graduate Dresden University 
Conservatory, 1900 



iMus. D. W. Shipp 

EXPRESSIOX 



Hakry Mueller 

VIOLIN 



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Officers 



President - - 
Vice President 
Secretary 
T 



reascrer 



Miss Lorraine Pierson 

Sidney Frey 

Charles Walker 

St. Clair Harris 



In almost any school or college one may find a band of instrumental 
harmonists. Very few institutions, however, can boast of an organization 
such as the McKendree orchestra. Only five of its former members were 
back at the beginning of the first semester but with ten new members to 
fill the ranks, prospects for the year looked blight from the very first. 
Rehearsals began ; after a few weeks of faithful practice the initial public 
appearance was made on the McKendree Home-Coming program. From 
that time on, numerous appearances at the College and at public entertain- 
ments gave experience to the players and enjoyment to the various audi- 
ences. 

At present the Orchestra is composed of fifteen members. Elaborate 
plans are being formulated by the society for next year during which 
time several tours are to be made. 



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The McKendree Quartette is one of the best in this section. This is 
vouched for by the immediate popularity it has met with everywhere it 
has gone. The programs are of high grade and are very clever and in- 
teresting. In addition to regular quartette numbers, the men give solos, 
readings and a play. For versatility and true entertaining ability, they 
are unsurpassed. 

This is the first year these men have been together but they sing 
with the tonal effect and confidence of professionals. The quartette has 
filled numerous engagements out of town. This summer they plan to tour 
Southern Illinois making eighty-eight towns in their itinerary. 

The McKendree Quartette has Harold Brown of Centralia, 111., as first 
tenor; Kenneth Ripple of Moberly, Mo., as second tenor; Earl Hussong, 
of Independence, Kansas, as baritone; Lewis Peterson of Mt. Vernon, 
111., as bass and Thomas Wittenburg of Benton, 111., as soloist. 



□ 



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This is the first year that McKendree has had a Young Men's Glee 
Club in a number of years. This year the Club is composed of sixteen 
regular members. The Club loses only one man this year. Thus with 
Prof. McDonald as director, and a large Freshman class from which to 
choose, we are assured of another good Glee Club next year. 

The Club is an efficient organization. It has a regular time for meet- 
ing. It selects its officers every semester. The officers for the first sem- 
ester were Paul Jones, president, and Lewis Peterson, corresponding secre- 
tary. The second semester Buell Robbs was elected president and Lev/is 
Peterson re-elected corresponding secretary. 

The Club filled several engagements in Lebanon, Madison, East St. 
Louis and several other places. The Club plans to make an extended trip 
for a week or ten days next year. College credit is given for Glee Club 
work. 



Page Forty-eight 



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Officers 



President ■ 
Vice President 
Secretary - • 



Alice Ruxkwitz 

Delene Groshong 

Dorothy Dee 



Our College has always felt the need of Glee Clubs and this year i 
most successful attempt at building up such organizations was made. 
The Girls' Glee Club was organized in November but circumstances pre- 
vented any serious work until February. Since that time the Club has 
developed rapidly in strength and ability, and prospects for a strong Club 
next year are of the best. The Club will be one of the most worthy or- 
ganizations of its nature in the community. 

The Girls' Glee Club has appeared in Chapel and on recital at vari- 
ous times. The first out-of-town date was filled at the State Street Metho- 
dist Chinch in East St. Louis in May. A well balanced program of club 
numbers, solos and readings was prepared and presented. 



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(llic (!5upsy }\ inter 

Under the direction of Mrs. E. A. Davis, assisted by Mrs. D. W. 
Shipp, the McKendree Players presented the Gypsy Rover, a musical 
comedy, at Singer Hall, April 15. It was the only such production at- 
tempted this school year and showed the result of intensive practice and 
directing. 

Meg, (Rob's foster mother), an old gypsy woman Mildred vVerre 

Zara. a belle of the gypsy camp Minnie Reed 

Marto, Meg's husband Lewis Peterson 

Sinfo, gypsy lacl in love with Zara Harold Brown 

Rob. the Gypiy Rover Thomas Whittenburg 

Lady Constance Mildred Adams 

Lord Craven Henry j. Dietz 

Sir George Martendale Earl Hussong 

Nina Karmyn Bramley 

Captain Jerome Kenneth Ripple 

Sir Toby Lyon Dale Wilson 

McKorklc Victor J. Haines 

Chorus Gypsies, dames, squires, etc. 



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The 117th Illinois Volunteer Infantrj 
Regiment in the Civil War whs knowi 
as the McKendree Regiment becaus* 
of the large number of McKendre« 

students and professors who served ir 
it as officers and enlisted men. 









Book of Athletics 




f^ 



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^hc (Coacl)iiu^ #taff 



In Earl A. Davis, director of athletics, and Prof. J. P. Neel, assistant 
coach, McKendree possesses a coaching staff unrivaled by any small col- 
lege in this part of the country. Both are veteran players in all lines of 
sport; both have had a number of years experience in the coaching pro- 
fession; and both have turned out championship teams in all branches 
of sport. 

This is the first year for both of them at McKendree. As was to be 
expected, they were forced to spend most of this year developing their men 
and in laying the groundwork for future successes. 

Davis came to us from Missouri Wesleyan College, where he was 
director of athletics for six years. During that time he won several state 
title3 in football and other sports. 

Neel was director of athletics at Chillicothe College, and as such 
often pitted his teams against those coached by Davis. As a result they 
understand each other's methods and are working together to give McKen- 
dree the best era of athletics in her history . 



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£he itt Club 



The McKendree College 'M' Club, to which only men who have been 
awarded an athletic 'M' are eligible, was organized this year. The Club 
seeks to foster clean athletics and interests itself in the development of 
the athleii2 prowess of its Alma Mater. 

Dr. Cameron Harmon, president of McKendree College, was elected 
the first president ; John Lsom, vice president and Henry Dietz, secretary- 
treasurer. 



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(L h c Jfnothall Reason 

The football season of 1923 was unique in that it was contemporaneous 
with a large growth in student body. Coach Earl A. Davis, coming from 
Missouri Wesleyan College found upon his arrival, High School stars, 
College stars, and the usual less capable aspirants for athletic honors, all 
numbering about thirty. From this aggregation he built, with the valuable 
aid of Coach Neel, a fighting machine of great promise to McKendree 
athletics. That the promise was fulfilled is shown by the success of the 
season. 

The season began by a game with Scott Field. The preceding training 
had made the McKendree Eleven a fighting machine which was easily the 
master of the Army aggregation. Early in the game Garrett, halfback, 
about whom Coach Davis had built many plays, received a collar-bone 
fracture which ended the season for him and lost for McKendree an ac- 
curate passer and brilliant runner. Notwithstanding this loss to the 
team a sensational run by Lee, with the touchdown by Isom ended the 
game with a six to zero score for the Purple. 



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Culver-Stockton, a formidable Eleven from Missouri, next came to 
Hypes Field. There was much fumbling caused by a cold, wet field, but 
the game gave splendid promise for the McKendree team. Excellent punt- 
ing by Berst, McKendree fullback, was an important feature of the game, 
which ended with a zero-zero score against the powerful Missourians. 

The third game, with Eastern Illinois Normal University, was played 
at Charleston. A brilliant open game in the final quarter evened chances 
for the Purple after three quarters of mastery by the mighty up-state 
eleven. A shift from punting to passing by Captain Willis permitted a 
gain of sixty yards by Goode and Pettit, with a final touchdown by Goode, 
before the whistle blew. The final score was thirteen to thirteen. 

When the McKendree Machine went to Carlinville for the game with 
Blackburn several of the regulars were absent, but this fact did not prevent 
a victory. In spite of the Blackburn team's well ordered defense and con- 
sistent passing, Willis, Pettit, and Lee crossed the Blackburn line, v/hich, 
helped by kicks by Isom, ended the annual argument with a twenty-three 
to three victory for the Purple. 

When Lincoln came they found the McKendreans entertaining alumni 
and friends. The Railsplitters contributed to the entertainment by an 
exhibition of splendid football on Hypes Field, and put up a valiant but 
futile fight against the undefeated Purple. Good interference and bril- 
liant running brought a touchdown by Lee, which was followed by a touch- 
down by Lincoln. An excellent defensive game by Pettit led to an ex- 
change of the ball after a powerful drive by the Railsplitters, and the 
Purple started the march which terminated in a touchdown by Search and 
try-for-goal by Isom. The game ended, thirteen to six. 

The first defeat of the Season came when McKendree met Cape Gir- 
ardeau Normal at Cape Girardeau. A cold, wet field hindered both teams, 
but a safety in the first quarter by Cape proved to be the only chance 
for a score, and the game ended two-to-zero in favor of the Missourians. 

McKendree went to Alton determined to gain a victory over Shurtleff, 
but due to inefficient interference and in spite of a brilliant passing attack, 
hopes were dashed when the Pioneers brought defeat for the Purple with 
a twelve point score. 

One week later McKendree defeated Western Military Academy on 
Hypes Field. Even after substitution of second-string men by Coach 
Davis the Purple gained a nineteen point lead on the Cadets, and held 
them scoreless. 

When the McKendree Eleven went to Carbondale for the annual 
Classic with S. I. N. U., a muddy field awaited it. After a punting duel in 
which Berst proved the master, the Egyptians opened up with an aerial at- 
tack for which the Purple defense proved inadequate. A remarkable 
tackle by Dietz in the last half prevented a touch-down for Carbondale 
just before the whistle blew with a twenty-to-seven score spelling defeat 
for the Davis men. 



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The last game of the reason, on Thanksgiving Day, occurred at 
Springfield, Missouri with the Southwest Missouri Teachers' College. 
Playing before more than one thousand fans on a field covered with mud 
and snow, the Purple lost by a twenty-six to zero score. 

Thus ended the season. In the ten games played the Purple made a 
total of eighty points to the opponents' eighty-two. Four games were won, 
two were tied, and four were lost. Considering that Coach Davis, coming 
from another college built a new team, the season was a success. Only 
three letter men returned to College last fall and since the team is com- 
posed largely of lower classmen, great hopes may be raised for football at 
McKendree. 



JflWfMl letter 4tten 
1923 

Albert Willis, Captain, Quarterback 

Theodore Search, Bight Halfback 

Omer Lee, Left Halfback 

John Tsom, Fullback 

James Newcom, Eight End 

Ervin East, Right Tackle 

Eay Carter, Right Guard 

Lloyd Pettit, Center 

Henry Dietz Left Guard 

Donald Berst, Left Tackle 

Ray Goode. Left End 

Robert Minton, Guard and Fullback 

Orange Collom, End 



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Albert Willis 

Captain, Quarterback 

ELDORADO, ILL. 

Willis, playing his second year on the 
McKendree team, played a versatile 
game. He is the only man in college 
to win two football letters. But for 
an accident at the beginning of the sea- 
son in his Freshman year he would no 
doubt be the possessor of three M's. 
He is a Junior. 



John I'som, Fullback 

CHRISTOPHER, ILL. 

Isom is the only college football man 
in Southern Illinois to receive mention 
for the All-State team. He is a consist- 
ent ground gainer and plays a great de- 
fensive game. This was his first year 
on the McKendree team. He is a Soph- 
omore. 



Theodore Search 
Right Halfback 

WHITE HALL, ILL. 
Ted, playing his first year for the 
Purple, was a star performer. He 
gained ground, broke up passes, or did 
anything else that the occasion requir- 
ed. He will be back again next year. 

Lloyd Pettit, Center 

PATTONSBURG, MO. 
Speed is the man around whom the 
team was built. Easily the best center 
in Southern Illinois, he was a constant 
source of trouble to ithe opposition. 
He was a stonewall on the defense and 
a veritable tornado on the offense. 

Henry Dietz, Left Guard 
CHRISTOPHER, ILL. 
Dietz, playing left guard, made up in 
fighting spirit what he lacked in weight. 
He was in every play and broke through 
the line time and time again to spoil 
the plans of the opposition for a gain. 
He is a Sophomore. 



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Page Fifty-six 



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E3XQ Q 




Robert Mintox, Eight Guard 

MURPHYSBORO, ILL. 

Bob was a general utility man, play- 
ing on the line or dropping back to the 
backfield as the need might be. As a 
High School player he was selected as 
the best full back in Southern Illinois 
and he lived up to his reputation as a 
member of the Purple squad. He is a 
Freshman. 

Ray Carter, Right Guard 
CARTERVILLE, ILL. 

Opposing teams soon learned that 
they could gain no ground through 
Carter. He played his position like a 
veteran and will be one of the sources 
of strength for the Purple for the next 
two years. 
Ray G-oode, Left End 

WHITE HALL, ILL. 

One of the White Hall duet, Goode 
was all that his name implied. He was 
a sure tackier and could get down the 
field to receive a forward pass faster 
than the opposition could cover him. 
He is a Freshman. 



1ST, Left Tackh 



OBLONG, ILL. 

It made no difference to Berst wheth- 
er he was wanted on the line to stop 
the drive of the enemy, or in the back- 
field to punt the ball out of danger. 
He also excelled as a forward passer and 
much of the credit for the team's suc- 
cess must be given to him. 

James Newcom, Right End 

HERRIN, ILL. 

Playing his first year of collage foot- 
ball, Newcom developed into a star per- 
former before the season ended. Al- 
ways in the fight, his was a hard posi- 
tion for opponents to get around. He 
is a Junior and will be back again next 
fall to aid Coach Davis in winning the 
State title. 



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Page Fifty-seven 



[h]*[1i 




lasketlrall 



The basketball season of 1923-'24 began well, with more than thirty 
men out for practice in Eisenmeyer Gymnasium. The coaches worked 
with individual groups until finally all were eliminated except a group of 
fifteen men, from which group the squad was selected. Dietz, '26 was 
elected to the captaincy to fill the vacancy caused by the non-return of 
Captain-elect Sullins. 

The schedule was in many respects the hardest attempted in recent 
years by the Purple and White. St. Louis University, Illinois Wesleyan, 
Eastern Illinois Normal and Concordia were considered the strongest teams 
to be met by the McKendree cagemen. Added to these new comers were 
Shurtleff, Southern Illinois Normal, and Lincoln, tried and worthy cage 
battlers against the Purple. 

Early in the season, after much hard work and drill, on the part of 
the Davismen, they met St. Louis University at Eisenmeyer gymnasium 
and conquered the powerful newcomers. This victory knitted the squad 



Q U/\(— 1 



into a machine which was destined to grind out many such successes dur- 
ing the season. An exchange of victories occurred with S. I. N. U., the 
Egyptians winning the return game at Eisenmeyer gymnasium. This loss 
upset the "dope" and caused much glee in the Egyptian camp — glee with 
which no loyal McKendrean could sympathize, since our squad was in a 
slump due to colds, "flu" and difficult trips to the northern part of the 
state. McKendree won from Shurfcleff at Alton by a score of 27-21. 

The season ended with the return game with Shurtleff. A 26-39 vic- 
tory over the Pioneers ended a brilliant and successful season for the 
Purple in which the Davis men won nine of thirteen games. Newcom. 
Berst, Carter, Dietz, Isom, Pearce, and Willis each starred, in that each did 
his part in making a fast, furious, fighting five, whenever and however 
directed by the coaching staff. 



The scores for the season follow : 



Western Military Academy 


14; 


McKendree 21 


Southern Illinois Normal 


14; 


McKendree 21 


Herrin Elks 


10; 


McKendree 20 


St. Louis University 


10; 


McKendree 14 


Concordia 


41; 


McKendree 26 


Lincoln 


15; 


McKendree 24 


Illinois Wesleyan 


38; 


McKendree 18 


Shurtleff 


21; 


McKendree 27 


St. Louis University 


41; 


McKendree 18 


Luccock Lodge 


8; 


McKendree 30 


Southern Illinois Normal 


18; 


McKendree 13 


Scott Field 


11; 


McKendree 38 


Lincoln 


10; 


McKendree 21 


Shurtleff 


26; 


McKendree 33 



Totak 



282 



309 



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iX^PTFlf^^^lll^AplB 



Page Fifty-nine 






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(the (track (Learn 

In the Washington, Rolla, McKendree track meet held in St. Louis 
at the beginning of the season the Purple track men shewed the re:ult of 
training and coaching by placing second. Ray Goode won the javelin with 
ease, throwing it 180 feet. He also took first in the shot. Isom placed 
in several events and the other men gave a good account of themselves. 

For most of the men it was their first collegiate competition, and for 
many of them it was their first effort on the track. Coach Davis will 
have an experienced squad of track athletes, Goode, Isom, Frey, Darrow, 
Ross, Karnes, Pettit, Dolley, Ravenstein, Plater, and Rehmus, around 
which to build a strong team next season. 

The medley relay team, Isom, 220 yd. dash ; Darrow, 440 yd. dash ; 
Frey 880 yd. run; and Karnes, mile run, took part in the Drake Relays 
and made an excellent showing. The team also met Shurtleff and Western 
Military Academy at Alton. 



McKendree. 



.Shurtleff. 



.Western. 



Standing in Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Association meet held at 
Bradley Institute, May 24 



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(Lcnms 

Despite inclement weather and other adverse conditions the Mc- 
Kendree College tennis team, composed of James Newcom and Vernal 
Hardy, developed into a fast aggregation. They were eliminated, however, 
in the Southern Sectional Tennis Tournament of the Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference which was held at Alton. 

After the experience of playing together this year, the team should 
develope into championship class for another season. Such is expected 
of them. 



DXoPTKl92fl-~ JBIBUM. 



* 



¥1 * [51 [d XczII [M |fM MPREM ( W [w){il[i 



^Tlic #ciunttli Annual jttrlnnil>rcc Jntcrsdjolastic 



Thirty-seven Central and Southern Illinois high schools participated 
in the Seventh Annual McKendree Interscholastic which was given May 3 
by McKendree College. Carlinville high school won the track and field 
meet, amassing a total of 25 points ; East St. Louis and Murphysboro tied 
for first place in the intellectual contest with 11 points each ; and Murphys- 
boro won the tennis tournament, Blair and Habermehle winning both the 
doubles and the singles. 

The McKendree Interscholastic is the largest track meet held in 
Southern Illinois, 11 more high schools participating in the local meet 
than in any other held in this section of the State. 

Jarboe, of Murphysboro, and Phelps, of Carlinville, won the individ- 
ual honors in the track meet this year. The Murphysboro track star won 
first place in the 100 yd dash and in the 220 yard dash, and Phelps won 
first place in the mile run and in the half mile run. 

The Eighth Annual McKendree Interscholastic will be held the first 
Saturday in May, 1925. 



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founded as a co-educational institu- 
tion 111 182S, McKendree College aban- 
doned thai policy within a few years. 
Following a long struggle, the advo- 
cates of co-education were victorious 
in ls<i<i ami women have been ad- 
mitted on a plane of equality with 
men since that time. 









Book 



( Organizations 



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In many institutions it is said the "sideshows are larger than the main 
tent." Such is not the case, however, at McKendree. The "sideshows," 
the organizations, receive proper recognition and every student is en- 
couraged to belong to those in which he is interested. But never is he 
encouraged to sacrifice time in the work of the various clubs which should 
be spent in the fundamental purpose — education. 

McKendree College has clubs for every purpose; the literary societies, 
Clio, Plato and Philo, are unequaled. Philo and Plato, for men, are two 
of the oldest literary societies in existence, the former having been estab- 
lished in 1836 and the latter in 1849. Clio provides the opportunity for 
co-eds to become proficient in public speaking and literary endeavor. 

The Christian organizations seek to inculcate the spirit of Christ ; the 
musical organizations provide rare opportunities for those gifted in that 
line; the Press Club gives students with journalistic aspirations a medium 
for expression; and the Student Association affords a means for self-gov- 
ernment and community work. 



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( )fficers 



First Semester 
Robert Stephens 



Second Semester 
Robert Stephens 
Mrs. E. A. Davis 
- James Newcom 
Ernest Brittox 

■ Alice Runkwitz 



- - President 
Vice President 
Guv (). Karnes - - Secretary-Treasurer - 
Ernest Britton - - - Jheer Leader 
Eva Pearce ----- Song Leader - 
Lucille Weber - ■ - - - Pianist - - - Ivarmvn Bramlev 

M. P. Akers - - Assoc. In Athletics - - - - M. P. Akers 

The Student Association of MeKer.dree affords the students an opportunity to 
do practical work in governing themselves and in securing profitable training for 
later citizenship. 

Tho Association was organized in the fall of 1921 for the three fold purpose of 
centralizing all student activities, of stimulating enthusiasm in behalf of the College, 
p.nd of giving back.ng to any student or any group of students representing Mc- 
Kendree. 

The Student Association endeavors to promote the welfare of the other organiza- 
tions an despecially lends its support to the intellectual and athletic activities of the 
student body, thus making the students' life as. interesting and educational as pos- 
sible. 

The chppel period each Friday morning is placed at the disposal of the Associa- 
tion. At this time entertaining and instructive programs are given for the benefit 
of the students. In addition to the weekly programs the student business is regular- 
ly brough before the Association for consideration. 



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Officers 



- Dean E. P. Baker 

Coach E. A. Davis 

John B. Zimmerman 

- - Paul D. Reese 



Instructor ------------ 

President ----------- 

Vice President --------- 

Secretary and Treasurer ------ 

The Wayfarer's Club, composed of the Master Masons of the college, 
was established with a three fold purpose in view : To foster and promote 
the ideals and principles of Fremasonry in the school, to advance a broad- 
er fellowship among the members, and to improve the workmanship of the 
craft. 

The club was organized in November 1922 with Jesse L. Clemens pres- 
ident. Benjamin C. Maxie, Vice President and Paul D. Reese as Secretary 
and Treasurer. Weekly meetings were held throughout the year and 
under the guiding influence of Dean E. P. Baker as instructor and lead- 
er the intentions and purposes of the club were abundantly realized. 

The organization has been continued through the present year. 



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The Philosophian Literary Society is the oldest literary organization 
in continuous existence west of the Alleghenies. The Society was or- 
ganized in 1837 and since then has been sending representatives into every 
walk of life. 

Philo boys have served in three wars. Colonel Ridson M. Moore, a 
Philo, headed the "McKendree" regiment during the Civil War. The first 
McKendrean to make the supreme sacrifice, in the World War, was Leo 
Glen McCormack, of Bone Gap, Illinois. 

Some of Philo's prominent sons are: Chas. S. Deneen, Judge William 
M. Farmer, L. Y. Sherman and Silas Bryan. 

Philo's representation in the Illinois Legislature began in 1849, and 
from that time on, with the exception of brief intervals, she has had her 
representatives in every session. The same has been true in Congress 
since 1863. The society has been represented on the Judicial Bench since 
1857. 

The principal aim of the society is to provide an opportunity for the 
student to develop "in oratorical attainments, and scientific and literary 
pursuits." It also provides a social privilege, a fellowship with other 
members, which is of great value. 



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The Clionian Literary Society was founded in 1869, with fourteen 
charter members. Miss Edith M. Flint, who was the first woman gradu- 
ate of McKendree, was also the first president of Clio. The work which 
has been accomplished along literary lines during Clio's fifty-five years of 
existence is deserving of high praise. Very few girls, who have passed 
through McKendree's Halls, as students have failed to join hands with that 
group of girls who are commonly known as Clios. 

The Clionian Literary Society is the only girls' organization on the 
campus which does literary work. The aims of the society are, primarily, 
to bring the girls closer together in their social life, to cultivate an appreci- 
ation of and a desire for literary work. During the past year many inter- 
esting programs have been given. 

Clio holds an important place in the life of each girl at McKendree. 
The standards which w^re established with the founding of the society 
are being upheld by the present Clionians. We are proud of the early 
record of the society. Her ideals are of the highest type. She trains 
the mind so that opportunities are met and difficulties are overcome in 
such a manner as to bring the greatest success. Clio serves as an incen- 
tive to mental life and action. 

Shall we always keep in mind what the wise man has said, "Content- 
ment with present attainment is the beginning of all decline." 



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The seven cy-f if th anniversary of the Platonian Literary Society was 
observed on June 5th at the regular triennial banquet which was held in 
Pearson's Hall. Prof. E. B. Waggoner, '75, acted as toastmaster and sev- 
eral distinguished alumni of the society responded to toasts. 

The year 1923-24 ha'' been a profitable one for the Society. Some 30 
new men have joined Plato's ranks, making a total of more than 40 active 
Platonians. The monthly open session programs have been given regular- 
ly and have been well patronized by visitors and friends of Plato. 

Plato is a vital force on the campus, interesting herself in every move- 
ment which has for its purpose the betterment of "Old McKendree." 

A vital factor in the life of the College, Plato has a history which ap- 
peals to all. Organized in April, 1849, Plato has not only been a factor 
in college life but has been the place of training and inspiration for twenty- 
two hundred men. 

Many and illustrious are the men who have passed through Plato's 
halls and gone forth to places of honor and trust in all walks of life. Among 
the sons of Plato who have held important positions are General John A. 
Halderman, former minister to Siam ; Charles P. Johnson, lieutenant-gov- 
ernor of Missouri; General Wesley Merritt ; William A. Kelsoe, journalist; 
and Carroll Boggs, former chief justice of the Illinois Supreme Court. 



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Officers 

President ------------- J. B. Zimmerman 

Vice President ------ _______ Albert Willis 

Treasurer --------------- J. W. Oral-ley 

Secretary --------------- Robert Stephens 

The Young Men's Christian Association affords the greatest oppor- 
tunity on the College Hill for the young men. It strives toward the high- 
est standards in physical, mental and spiritual development. At the regu- 
lar Wednesday night meetings it offers the inspiration of fellowship, devo- 
tion and good speakers. 

During the year several members have been sent as delegates to the 
various inter-collegiate conventions. Group discussion meetings are con- 
ducted weekly under the auspices of the Y. M. C. A. in Carnegie Hall. 




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(Officers 



President 
Treasurer 
Treasurer 



Agnes Teesst.ee 

( )pal Smith 

Baebaba Ceabbs 



The Y. W. C. A. is one of the live organizations maintained by the 
students at McKendree. The association is especially helpful to the new 
girls who, having received the "advance guard letter" before their arrival 
requesting them to become members, are met at the tram by old members 
and made to feel at home. This year, for the first time, the Big Sisters 
plan was carried out. 

The regular devotional meetings are held every Wednesday evening, 
and are led by the members themselves or by out-of-town speakers. 

The social life of the school is promoted by this organization in co- 
operation with the Y. M. C. A. through a number of entertainments, the 
first of which is the "Get Acquainted Social" at the beginning of tne year. 

The Y. W. C. A. plays an important part in maintaining the moral 
atmosphere in the College. 



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( M'FICERS 

President ._______._. John B. Zimmerman 

Vice President - -....- ----- _ _ _ "Walter L. Bailey 

Secretary and Treasurer --------- F. E. Stelsretde 

Reporter - - - M. P. Akers 

Intercollegiate debating was revived at McKendree, after a lapse of 
a few years, by the formation at Alton of the Southern Illinois Intercol- 
legiate debating League consisting of three members, McKendree, Shurt- 
leff and Greenville. The first debate under the League was on the ques- 
tion of the Government ownership of coal mines. This was held in April, 
1923. Owing to a technicality in the decision of the debate held here no 
championship was awarded. 

The debating season of 1924 was a complete success resulting in the 
awarding to McKendree the championship of the League. The question 
debated was Resolved: "that the United States should join the League of 
Nations." The affirmative team composed of F. E. Stelsreide, O. R. Speckel- 
meyer and J. B. Zimmerman. The negative had Paul D. Reese, Milburn P. 
Akers and Walter Bailey. The affirmative won from Greenville while the 
negative team lost to the Alton co-eds by a small margin. However, after 
the total number of points scored, by both of the McKendree teams, was 
added up McKendree had won the championship of the League. She is 
going to do the same thing next year. 



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Wqt pacltclors 

Howard W. Gould '18 
Ben H. Hall '20 
Guy E. Tucker '20 
Lawerence J. East '21 
Burtis E. Montgomery '22 
J. Bertram Harmon '23 
Paul L. Jones ex '23 
Aaron H. Lauchner ex '23 
Chauncey L. Rockwell ex 
Noble P. Newsum 
John W. Cralley '24 
J. Wendell Dunn '25 
Albert Willis '25 
John B. Zimmerman '25 
Raphael V. Carter '26 
Henry J. Dietz '26 
Edwin F. Dickson '26 
St. Clair M. Harris '26 
Mai-o N. Magill '2/ 
Guy L. Magill '27 
Noble W. Mc Knight '2< 



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#rcss Club 

Editor-in-Chief - - - ■ .'---. Milbuen P. Akers 
Assistant Editor - - Delta Jessop 

Business Manager - John B. Zimmerman 

Faculty Advisor - - ■ ■ - - - - Miss Belle Nixon 

Student Association Delegate - - Ernest K. Britton 

Sport Editor - - - Henry J. Dietz 

Society Editor - - - ------- Marion Harmon 

Reporter ------------- Louise Wentz 

Reporter ----- - - _ - J. Wendell Dunn 

Reporter ------------- 1). W. Shipp 

Reporter ---------- - Dorothy Harmon 

Reporter ------------ Alice Walton 

Advertising Manager -------- Paul D. Reese 

Circulation Manager --------- W. T. Sawyer 

The McKendree Review was first published in 1921 by class journal- 
ism. During the summer of 1923 plans were made for the organization 
of a Press Club with those students who had taken journalism as charter 
members. When College began in September this organization was ef- 
fected. Since that time the other members have been selected and 24 ad- 
mitted. The Press Club is a self-supporting organization and has full 
charge of the publishing of the McKendree Review, which is issued weekly. 
Here students obtain practical experience in newspaper work. 



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DEIOTED TO THE 1\TEREST> OF M.KEADREE COLLEGE 






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^tufoeni Volunteers 

( )PFICERS 

President --------- _ - - - - - Ruth Todd 

Secretary and Treasurer - - ■ - - - Jesselyn Grieve 

Captain Gospel Team - - - ■ ■ - - - Roscoe Hollts 

The Student Volunteers were organized in 1920. The purpose of the 
organization is for the evangelization of the world and especially for the 
propagation of Foreign Missions. The members have pledged themselves 
for Life Service in the foreign fields. 

A Gospel Team has been organized, under the auspices of the Student 
Volunteers, which has visited churches in about twenty different towns 
near Lebanon. At each church they left a McKendree pennant. 

Five delegates were sent to the National Conference held in Indian- 
apolis this last fall. 



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'he present plant of McKendree Col- 
lie was completed in 191$ with the 
building Of Benson Wood Library. 
Two dormitories and a dining hall 
were completed in 1910. In ninety 
fears McKendree's physical equip- 
ment has grown from a small log 
structure to the present plant of 
line buildings. 









Book of Features 



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Sept. 10-11 Registration Days 

11. Y. M. & Y. W. Party. "Pleased ta meetcha." 

12. Y. W. Tea. Dr. Harmon talks to the Men's Association. 

13. Football practice. Pep Meeting on Hypes Field. 

14. First meeting of the Student Association. Bob Stephens is elected 

President. 

15. Severe attack of homesickness in Clark Hall. 
17. Blue Monday. Time to get down to study. 

19. Senior Class Meeting. John Cralley elected President. 

20. Prof. McClure entertains the bachelors. 

21. Another week end. New catters begin to work up cases. Rue and Marian 

as steady as ever. 
24. Conference week. Dr. Walton and Prof. Kinison dismiss classes. Fresh- 
men are wondering when Prof McClure is going to Confernce. 

26. Prof. McDonald educates the men of the college along musical lines, 

popular and otherwise. 

27. Pep meeting on North Campus. Catters in evidence. 

28. Scott Field defeated 6-0. A wiener roast in honor of the victory. Dizzy 

Britton devoured 11 wieners. Recovered. 
Oct. 1. Faculty Recital. Miss Poole sings "Batti Batti". 

2. Veiled Prophet's Parade in St. Louis. Miss Buzard chaperones the flap- 
pers. Prominent parade on North Campus by Wendell and Fuzzy. 

5. Open Sessions. Initiation of new members. "Did you hit the ceiling-?" 

6. Culver Stockton football game. Score 0-0 in favor of McKendree. 

Roof party in Clark Hall. Result — campused for one week. 

7. Jonn Cralley spends the afternoon meeting cars. At last Delene arrives 

at six-thirty. 

8. Hobo party for the girls' S. S. Class. Some hobos. 

12. Eastern Illinois Normal vs. McKendree. 13-13, another victory. Home 
Coming Plans are made by the Student Association. 

14. Rev. Robert Peters, '14, arrives. An unusually gcod church attendance. 

15. The HUNDREDTH Freshman appears. 

16. Prof. Clayberg leaves. Mingled sorrow and gladness. 

17. Glee Clubs organize. Some singers we'd never suspect. 

18. Rev. Peters gives a chapel talk on games of chance. Moral: No more card 

playing. Adopted by Kinscy and Allen. 
20. Blackburn vs. McKendree. Victory for us, 23-3. 

23. "Bob" Morris in chapel, with the latest song hits. 

Mc-K-K-Kendree, dear old McKendree 
Yonr're the onlp C-C-Coliege I adore. 
When the m-moon shines over the c-campus 
I'll be waiting at the C-C-College door. 

24. Home coming. No classes. Lincoln defeated 13-6. 

The East St. Louis ice man is seen on the football field. 
26. "Husky" Reese is elected Sophomore President. 



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Nov. 



Dec. 



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30. 

31. 

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29. 
29. 

4. 

5. 
10. 
11. 
14. 

15. 

18. 
20. 



Philo Chautauqua. Unusual talent unearthed. 

Dr. Harmon reads the honor roll for the first six weeks. 

Hallowe'en Party in Pearson Hall. 

'Y" Financial Campaign begins. Freshman Class organizes. 

Open Sessions again. Dr. Harmon goes to see the Illinois-Chicago foot- 
ball game. 

Cape Girardeau 2, McKendree 0. Too much mud. Mrs. Davis, Minnie 
and Eugenia chaperoned the team. 

The McKendree Review has Dr. Harmon drinking cider at the Hallo- 
we'en Party, but really Dr. Harmon was at Evansville. 

"Y. W. C. A." Candlelight Recognition service. 

McKendree 0, Shurtleff 12. Tears, tears and we took the whole gang 

Gospel Team appears. Roscoe Hollis is in charge. Ruth Todd, chief 
assistant, Ruth Fain, chief boss. Prof. McClure visits in Champaign. 
He returned all smiles. 
Western Military Academy is squelched 19-0. 

McKendree-Illini Club banquet at Champaign. Prof. McClure is toast- 
master. S. I. N. U. 20, McKendree 7. 
Education week. John E. Miller speaks in Chapel. 
Southwest Teachers' College at Springfield, Mo. plays Thanksgiving 

game. Score 26-0 in their favor. 
To Dec. 3. Thanksgiving Recess. Everyone eats enough to last til! 

Christmas. Martha goes home with Ernest. 
Back to work. Everyone brings back something new. 
The English classes see the "Fool" in St. Louis. 
Basketball practice in dead earnest. 
Just two weeks till Christmas. 
Little "19" Conference. Coach Davis and Prof. Neel attend. 

The History classes have a vacation. 
Clio banquet. The agony of anticipation is ended. 
Student Recital. Initial appearance of the Girls' Glee Club. 
Christmas party in Clio Hall. Lots of letters to Santa Claus asking 

for a wife for Mr. Hendrix and 200 Freshmen for Dr. Harmon. 
Hardhearted and thoughtless Professors give examinations before vaca- 
tion. Everybody leaves town as early as possible. 
To Jan 8. Christmas holidays and the Student Volunteer Convention. 
Roscoe Hollis tells about the Convention at the "Y" meeting but tails to 
mention the fact that it served successfully as a matrimonial agency 
in many cases. _ . _. ., j rn- 

Literary program for Student morning. Guy and Delta read. Clio 

Open Session. , ^ 

Stenhens-Hileman wedding, with Martha and Ernest as witnesses 
The Chapel resounds with oratory in preparation for the Exhibitions. 

Spreck "drowns out all competitors 
The McKendrean Staff for 19" ' 

Western 29-9. 
Examination schedule is announced. 
Philo Exhibition. 
Clio Exhibition. 

Plato Exhibition. Herrin Independents 10, 
25 Semester examinations. Of all sad words 
St. Louis University 10, McKendree 14. A i 
McKendree 26, Concordia 41. 
29. Registration Days. Students all the way froo Beaver, Penn., 
Moberly, Mo. and some in between. 
Big Circus in the College Gym. Merry-go-round, nigger baby, balloons, 
pop corn, hot dogs, and soda pop. 
McKendree defeats Lincoln 24-15. 



!4 is elected. McKendree wins from 



McKendree 

etc. 

:eal game! 



20. 



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Football sweaters awarded. Prexy's has four service stripes. Summer ses- 
sion announced. Paderewski concert in St. Louis. 

Head Hunters of the South Sea Islands. Some Picture! ! !! 
The Stephens-Hileman wedding- is publicly announced. 

The McKendree Review announces the First Semester honor roll of 35 
names. 

Pete and Husky go to prayer meeting, and then to the Freshman party 
at the Chapel residence. Meanwhile the rooms are stacked high. 

De'an Baker gives some real advice in regard to stacking rooms and 
cutting classes. 

Double header basketball game. McKendree 39, Scott Field 11. Mc- 
Kendree 13, S. I. N. U. 18. A hot and fast game. 

The parrot scholar and "A" student controversy waxes hot. 

The second pay picture, "Nanook of the North." 

Prayer meetings before the "Y" service. Rev. McClusky speaks. 

Vacation. Students go home to St. Louis to have Annual pictures 
taken. Photographer now in insane asylumn. 

Big game. McKendree 21, Lincoln 10. 

Dr. Harmon preaches to a large audience at the Methodist Church. 

College Revival starts with the Conference quartet assisting. Executive 
Committee elects new faculty members for '24-"25. 

Quartet goes to St. Louis to see the tall buildings. 

A nice night for Leap Year proposals. 

Revenge is sweet. We beat Shurtleff 39-26, in the fastest game of the 
season. And they have a carload of rooters. 
Mr. Daszko springs a surprise by getting married. 

"The Toll of the Sea" draws a big cro"5vd. 

Glee Club goes to E. St. Louis in the Silver Fox. 
"Monk" Newcom joins the ranks of the wedded, making the third wed- 
ding of the season. Ted Search says he is next in line. 

McKendreans see Hamlet minus the Fifth Act. We should have a one- 
thirty car at night. 

Snow, snow, snow. 

Annual Staff meeting. Group pictures, the chief topic. Minnie and 
Greenley become very good friends. 

Mrs. Davis, in chapel, "The opera will practice at 5 o'clock." 

Ruth Fain orates in Chapel. "He who works in College for an A.B. geto 
out and gets T.B. afterwards." 
Bill Sawyer begins to get Young. 

Opera practice this afternoon at the usual time. 

The big triangle debate takes place. McKendree wins the Championship 
in spite of the female debaters. 

The Call of the Wild. Prof Dolley wears a green tie. 

Miss Nixon at "Y" meeting gives "For I was not called on today" for 
the benefit of her bothersome student. 

Minnie and Greenley decide to quit. 

Y. W. C. A. banquet is a big success. Treasury greatly reimbursed. 
Treasurer re-embraced? 

Minnie and Greenley start having dates again. Also peanuts and candy. 

"Pussyfoot" Johnson at the M. E. Church. Akers and Bailey reformed. 
Bootlegging ceases. 

Annual Stunt Show. "To see ourselves as others see us." 
"Moon" chorus practice — good attendance (?) 

Y. W. Cabinet feed. Sizemore and Dorothy fall for each other. 

Coach John Harmon says there is no such thing as luck. Dale Wilson is 
not convinced that it wasn't bad luck when he fell out of the dining 
room window. 

John Cralley goes to all the Sunday afternoon cars to meet Delene. 

Silas Maimer brings out all the High School and Town Catters. 



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Page Eighty-two 



April 1. 



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June 



Bachelor banquet with red carnations. April fool. Student Recital, the 

best of the season. 
Dean Baker puts his stamp of approval on borrowing anything from 

curtain stretchers to your neighbor's clothes. 
Open Sessions. Lots of visitors from the Teachers' Meeting. 
A real spring day with kodaking and catting parties. 
Track tryouts. Wop, Goode, and Speed are the stars. Berst, Minton, 

and McAfee a>e dangerous competitors. 
Election Day. Few people seem old enough to vote. Lights are out. 

Hence Operetta practice in the dark. 
Clio Open Session. Bill Sawyer seems lightly tripped up. 
Triangle track meet with Washington U. and the Rolla Miners. McKen- 

dree takes second place. 
Dress rehearsal. Satchel and Louise sell tickets for the Gypsy Rover. 

Dr. Harmon, his wife, and the Ford start on their trip to the East. 
"The Gypsy Rover" is given by the McKendree Players. "Hook" Deitz 

is "the berries" "doncha know." 
Vacation begins for the select few who can get by the Profs. We dis- 
covered it lasts till Tuesday. 
22. Easter Vacation. 

Prof. Burns' picture show given in the Biology room. The guests are 

few and select. 
Piano recital by Prof. McDonald. 
Most everyone is back in his place. Six weeks grades are the chief topic 

of gossip. 
Martha walks down town to meet Britten. 
Britton walks down town w^th Martha. 
All the Easter finery comes out to church to show the rest of us what 

was new last Sunday. 
Student Recital. 
Miss Carrie! Glenn, '26, of O'Fallon, and Mr. Jesse Agles are married. 

They are spending their honeymoon in Knoxville, Tenn. This is the 

fourth casualty for the year. We believe it will be the last. 
Last Open Sessions of the year. 

High School Interscholastic Track Meet. Lots of visitors. 
Many fair ones are being asked, "Are you going to Philo banquet?" 
Marian and Rue walk to town for the mail. 
"Haven't you got a bid to the banquet yet?" 
Clio Open Session. 
Philo Banquet. 

Flowers from the banquet are worn to church. 
Last big picture show of the season. 
Picnics and Fishing parties are in vogue. 
Cramming has begun among the conscientious few. 
One more week till exams, Prayer-meeting crowded. 
Barbara and Opal go to town seven times. Is it "mail" or "male?" 
Eleventh hour snap shots are being taken to distribute in the "M" books 

of Clark Hall. 
Flunkers hold a prayer-meeting to tide them over the coming storm. 
To June 3. Final Examinations. 
Moonlight strolls to the Cemetery are a sweet relief from the trials 

of examinations. Philo Exhibition. 
Baccalaureate Sermon preached by Rev. Ressho Robertson, of Lawrence- 

ville, 111. 
Clio Exhibition. 
Alumni Reception. The Seniors pass safely through the torments of 

the powers that be. 
5. Session of the Joint Board. 

Commencement. Plato Triennial — Seventy-fifth Anniversary. 
The Hill is deserted. 



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1 924 Collcrtc CalcnUar 1925 

I Semester, 1924 

Sept. 8, 9 Registration Days 

Sept. 10, Evening Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. Reception 

Sept. 11 Classes Begin 

Nov. 25.. 4:15 P. M.— Dec. 2, 8:00A. M. Thanksgiving Recess 

Dec. 23, 4:15 P. M.— Jan. 6, 1925, 8:00 A. M Christmas Vacation 

Jan. 15, 1925 Plato Exhibition 

Jan. 16 Philo Exhibition 

Jan. 17 Clio Exhibition 

Jan. 26-31 1 Semester Examination 

II Semester, 1925 

Feb. 2, 3 Registration Days 

Feb. 4 Classes Begin 

April 11, 12, 13 Easter Recess 

May 27 — June 2 II Semester Examination 

May 30, 8:00 P. M Plato Exhibition 

May 31, 10:30 A. M Baccalaureate Sermon 

June 1, 8:00 P. M Philo Exhibition 

June 2, 8:G0 P. M Clio Exhibition 

June 3, 8:00 P. M Alumni Reception 

June 3-4 Joint Board Meeting 

June 4 Commencement 

June 4, 8:00 P. M Clio Triennial 



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A Jtaimli or 'yJuui 



Bob Minton: "I see by this paper that 
the workers of the country are ruining 
it." 

"Red" Berst: "Didn't I always say 
that work was no good?" 



Why doesn't 

"Speed" wear his 
clothes? 

The McKendree Review eve 
on the date of publication? 

The faculty abolish final exams 

McKendree join the 'Big- Ten'? 

Bill Sawyer get Young? 



room-mates 



get out 



Hussong believes "that considering 
the price some women pay for their 
hose they must be up to their knees in 
debt." 

Peterson is of the opinion "that wom- 
an doesn't pay. She buys and the man 
with her does the paying." 

The football players say "that a cer- 
tain garage man in Edwardsville is still 
looking for a quantity of lead pencils." 



We always heard 

That McKendree 

Was a pretty good place 

But never 

Till we came here 

And heard everybody 

Tell how awful 

The other fellow 

Is 

Did we realize 

What a hole 

Of iniquity 

The place 

Really is. 

Dr. Hall (questioning John who 
wishes a raise in allowance) : "What's 
the average income of your fellow stu- 
dents at McKendree?" 

John: "About three a. m." 

Prof. Neel: "What were the last 
words of Lord Chesterfield?" 

Smokers' Row (in chorus) : "They 
satisfy." 

Gertrude Nolting (buying shoes) : 
"Thsse shoes are too tight. I do have 
so much trouble with my feet." 

Clerk: "Well, you have a lot to com- 
plain about." 



Doctor (looking over Mayo Magill af- 
ter his encounter with McAfee) : "Ever 
have any serious accident?" 

Mayo: "No." 

Doctor: "Then what's the bandage on 
your head for?" 

Mayo: "I got hit." 

Doctor: "Don't you call that an ac- 
cident?" 

Mayo: "No, the sucker did it on pur- 
pose." 



Plater: "I sure made a break at the 
Dean's table today." 

Robbs: "Don't tell me the old one 
about the cracked plate." 

Plater: "No, the Dean asked me if I 
woud have some more corn and I passed 
my glass." 

Grauel: "Patterson is a cheerful fel- 
low. Did you notice that he was 
whistling as he loaned me five dollars?" 

Bailey: "Yes — he was whistling 
Tosti's 'Goodbye, Forever.' " 



"Lefty": "The other day I was fish- 
ing and caught one of those big fish — 
let's see, what do you call 'em?" 
Neel: "Oh, you mean a whale?" 
"Lefty": "No, thit couldn't have 
been it. I was using whales for bait." 



Kinsey: "Does your sweet mama 
know anything about automobiles?" 

Mont Jones: "I should say not. The 
other evening she asked me if I cooled 
the engine by stripping the gears." 

The way some of the faculty have 
been flunking students this semester 
quite a number of the two hundred 
freshmen for next year will have al- 
ready spent a year at McKendree. 



INFORMATION 
McKendree College expects all fresh- 
men to observe the following rules: 
(1). Not more than 10 students can 
visit the kitchen ice box a night. 
(2). Doimitory rooms must be 

cleaned at least once a semester. 
(-3). No freshman shall study more 

than eight hours a day. 
(4). No freshman shall beat an up- 
per classman out of his girl. 




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Senior Class jplropltecy 



I was standing ankle deep in mud. The only foreign language I 
k n ew — and it wasn't the kind one finds listed in a college catalog — was in- 
adequate to express my feelings. My Ford, a 1942 model, which made it 
but seven years old at the time, refused to function. Not only did it re- 
fuse to function, but it paid no attention whatever to the dire fate I 
threatened it with. 

Becoming disgusted with the situation, I started across the field to 
the nearest farm house. More mud. More foreign language. 

To my sorrow I discovered that the owner of the farm was not at 
home. The hired man informed me that he was secretary of the chamber 
of commerce of the nearby village and had gone there to attend an impor- 
tant business meeting. He understood that the chamber was endeavoring 
to induce Dr. J. W. Cralley, a veterinarian of little more than local repute, 
to locate his livery barn and animal hospital in that city. 

But the hired man would call the farmer-secretary's wife and see if 
she would allow him to use a team to pull me out of the mud if I so desired. 
I so desired. 

He went into the house to obtain permission. He returned with the 
news that he would aid me for the small charge of ten dollars. I remon- 
strated. He was firm. I made use of more foreign language. He agreed 
to call the farmer's wife and did so. 

As soon as I saw her standing in the doorway I knew the situation 
was changed, the day was saved, and so were my ten dollars. She was pro- 
fuse in her apologies. She didn't know it was a fellow McKendrean who 
was in trouble. Martha ordered the hired man to hitch up the team im- 
mediately. 

I inquired as to where I might find Ernest and was told to go to the 
chamber of commerce. He spent most of his time there, she said, in an at- 
tempt to have big industries locate in Mounds. So far, he had secured a 
new blacksmith shop for the town. 

The hired man and his team succeeded in placing me on terra firma 
once more and I sped on into the village. I found the chamber of com- 
merce building and went into the office of the secretary. 



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There was Ernest. He was jubilant. Mounds was to be the location 
of Dr. Cralley's new hospital. The doctor had just departed. Ernest in- 
sisted on taking me home with him for dinner. We went and while Mai'tha 
busied herself in cooking the meal we talked about McKendree. 

Had I any news of the old school? 

I didn't. Ernest therefore began to tell me all the information he had 
gleaned from the Alumni Notes of the McKendree Review. 

Cecil Corlew, he told me, had achieved international fame as a toe- 
dancer. Her engagement to a scion of an ancient English family had re- 
cently been announced. 

The next bit of information "Dizzy" told me was even more surpris- 
ing than the tale of Cecil's success on the stage. Haase, it seemed, had 
been freed of his clerical garments by the conference. Ten years after 
receiving his degree he had become pastor of an aristocratic church in 
New York City. He evidently liked the social whirl, for he became an ar- 
dent advocate of dancing. 

And the fate of another one of the members of the Class of '24 was 
even more astonishing. Shipp, the august Mr. Shipp, was at that very 
moment engaging in leading a campaign seeking to establish blue shirts — 
work shirts — as the correct attire for business and social occasions. 

But my astonishment knew no bounds when I was told Agnes Tressler 
and Ruth Fain had been returned from the foreign field. Agnes had 
sought to have the heathen adopt bobbed hair. Ruth, well Ruth, it ap- 
peared, had wanted to return and was now keeping house at Bone Gap, 
111. 

The time came for my departure and it was with difficulty that I left 
the residence of Ernest and Martha and continued on my journey. I was 
compelled to be in St. Louis that evening for an important convention and 
banquet. 

As I neared Murphysboro I discovered I was running short of gas. 
On the outskirts of that city I drove into a filling station. George Grauel 
— none other than dear old George — cams to replenish my supply. But 
I had to hurry on. 

Driving into Belleville I noticed that it was nearihg supper time. I 
brought the Ford to a halt in front of one of Mr. Thompson's restaurants. 



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As I was handed the usual ticket I recognized the cashier as being 
none other than Omer Whitlock. A few words with Omer and I dashed 
to the counter where I was waited on by Arthur Hendricks. While Ar- 
thur was getting the necessary utensils together for repast I chatted with 
him. Both he and Omer, he said, had abandoned the ministry as a pro- 
test to the conference's treatment of Haase. 

Omer tried to short-change me when I paid the check. I accepted his 
profuse apology, however, and went my way. Near the Belleville high 
school building I was nearly run over by a street car. The motorman, 
using a language not learned at college, told me where I could go to. I 
thought his voice had a familiar ring to it and was not surprised to dis- 
cover that he was my old friend Runkwitz. 

Crossing Eads Bridge my fare was collected by Van Houten. By this 
time I was not' surprised at anything, so merely greeted Van in an af- 
fectionate manner and hastened on. Down Washington avenue I hurried. 
I hurried too fast, evidently, for I was ordered by a policeman to bring 
my Ford to a halt. When Spreckelmeyer recognized me he offered to save 
me the time of going to police court the next day by accepting my five dol- 
lar fine himself. And when he told me Marion Harmon was the police 
judge I was glad to give him the money. 

I parked the Ford near the Statler hotel and hurried in. The meet- 
ing I was to attend was already in session — that is the banquet part of it 
had commenced. I hastened into the cloak room. Divesting myself of my 
wraps I handed them to the check girl. Alice was surprised to see me. 
She said so. But I was hungry and hurried away after giving her a small 
tip. 

The banquet room was beautifully decorated, at least every one 
thought so since the Statler had introduced the custom of employing wom- 
en as waiters. As I was being ushered to my seat by the head waiter it 
dawned upon me that she bore a striking resemblance to Mrs. Davis. 

The day was complete. I had either seen or had received the latest 
news of all the members of the Class of '24. As I sat at the banquet table 
my mind went back to Commencement Day, 1924. The speaker, I remem- 
bered, had said something or other about leadership and making a place for 
oneself in the world; something about the crying need for college gradu- 
ates. Truly, the Class of '24 had — well, it had alright. 



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The Circuit Riders founded McKen- 
diee College in a veritable wilderness. 
Today, McKendree College, nearing 
the completion of its Hist century of 
service, stands a« a monument to 
their faith and memory. 



Book of Advertisei 



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McKendrean Advertisers 

Without the support of the following advertisers the publi- 
cation of the 1924 McKendrean would be impossible. Let's 
patronize them: 

The Advertiser Printing 

Becktold Printing & Book Mfg. Co St. Louis, Mo. 

Belleville Laundry Co Belleville. 111. 

Dr. W. H. Blanck Dentist 

Blumenstein Bros Meat Market 

Central Engraving Co St. Louis, Mo. 

W. C. Daumueller Music and Gift Shop 

East St. Louis & Suburban Railway East St. Louis, 111. 

First National Bank Lebanon, 111. 

O. H. Fox Barber Shop 

Chas. Frey Bakery Shop 

Illinois Light & Power Corporation Lebanon, 111. 

The Daily Journal East St. Louis, 111. 

Chas. Grauel Barber Shop 

E. Grauel Shoe Store 

C. V. Gregory Lebanon Cafe 

C. Heer Grocery Store 

Jaccard Jewelry Co Kansas City, Mo. 

Kolb Mercantile Co General Merchandise 

F. W. Landwehr Grocery Store 

L. S. Langenwalter Dairy 

Lebanon Coal, Ice & Feed Co Lebanon, 111. 

Lebanon Drug Co Drug Store 

McKendree College Press Club The McKendree Review 

Meyer & Son Furniture 

Sam Miciotto Shoe Maker 

W'ra. Monken Mercantile and Implement Co Lebanon, 111. 

Frank Ohl Restaurant 

C. B. Peach Dry Goods and Variety 

Dr. P. J. Pecau Dentist 

Pfeffer Milling Co Lebanon, 111. 

C. & H. Reinhardt Men's Furnishings 

F. L. Revoir Variety Goods 

Sayre Motor Co Garage 

C. W. Siegel Lebanon Garage 

Van Miller Studio St. Louis, Mo. 

E. J. Weber Hardware 



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0P1[qXq][o1i 



McKendree College 

Lebanon, Illinois 

Established A. D. 1828 

LOCATION — Lebanon, Illinois, twenty-two miles east of St. 
Louis, reached from all points east and west by the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, and from points west by 
electric cars of the East St. Louis and Suburban Railway. 

EQUIPMENT — Nine well equipped buildings, beautiful 
twenty-acre campus, well improved athletic field, two 
dormitories, modern library. 

STUDENTS — A fine class of men and women, hearty in their 
support of college life and work. 

FACULTY — Thoroughly qualified in character and training, 
graduates of the best recognized colleges and universities 
of the United States and abroad. 



Catalog and Information Gladly Sent 
on Application 



CAMERON HARMON 

President 



E. P. BAKER 
Dean 



Degrees: A. B., B. S. 

Conservatory of Music, directed by 

Grant MacDonald 



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[l[D>B][l^rKEMDRE^PII^><Ql[a 



FREY'S BAKERY 

The Home of Good Things to Eat' 



BREAD 



ROLLS 



CAKES 



FRUITS 



CANDIES 



"Raisin Bread a Specialty" 



ILLINOIS 



POWER AND LIGHT 



SERVICI 



Illinois 

Power and Light 

Corporation. 



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HOOSIER CABINETS 



DeLUXE BED SPRINGS— ROME QUALITY 



MEYER AND SON 



Furniture and Undertaking 

See Us for Furniture Cheap in Price — Trade in Your Home Town 

Telephone CO Lebanon, 111. 

RUGS, LINOLEUM, ETC.,— AMBULANCE— FUNERAL PARLOR 



BLUMENSTEIN BROS. 

Quality Meats 

Our meats are dressed and cured on our own premises 



Prof. Neel (calling- the roll) : "John Hall, take your feet out of the 
window or I'll have to count you absent." 

* * * * 

"The quickest way to become a clever fellow is to say something- dis- 
agreeable concerning an established fact." — Pece Akers. 

"The effect the footlights had on the 'Gypsy Rover' players was to make 
their heads light." — Mrs. Davis. 

* * * * 

John Hall: "The Lord sure pulled a bone when He made Eve." 

* * * * 

Hollis: "How did you scratch your face, Doc?" 
Doc Murdock: "I was learning to eat with a fork." 

* * * * 

Zimmie: "What do you think of Billy D. by this time, Bob?" 
Bob D. : "I'm no judge of paintings." 

Mrs. Stephens: "Don't sit there staring at me. Why don't you say 
something?" 

Mr. Stephens: "Sorry, dear, I didn't know it was my turn yet." 



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>»* The natural source of energy is food. For the 

day's activities you must have foods rich in 
energy and, more than that, foods that are easily 
digested. Our foods have these essential qualities 
so important for health. 

For those desirous of varities of quality foods 
and whose tastes demand foods of particular 
flavor, our wide assortment will please you. 

Particular attention is given to every patron 
that the utmost in service will be rendered. Try 
our free delivery service or visit our store in the 
"West End." 

The Initial Trial Order Will Convince You We Have 
the Most Economical 

For 

Parties and Picnics 

We Carry a Complete Stock of Fancy "Eats" 



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LANDWEHR'S 

General Merchandise 

QUALITY 

ASSORTMENT 



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SERVICE ^° 

Phone 12 j$> 



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The LEBANON GARAGE 

AUTOMOBILE LIVERY, STORAGE AND REPAIR WORK 
ACCESSORIES AND SUPPLIES 



C. W. SIEGEL 

Proprietor 
Kinloch Phone 104B 

Office Phone 
Kinloch 125 




F. L. LEIBER 

Manager 
Post Office Box 172 



Agents for 

Durant, Studebaker, Star 

DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE 



I'm offa 


women foi 


life — It's 


a tale that gives 


me pain 


I'm offa 


women for 


life— The 


reason for which 


is plain. 


The line 


she flung 


was far too deep — 




And the 


jokes I slung just n 


:ule her weep. 




But the 


worst she did was to 


fall asleep — 




So I'm offa women 


for Lfc. 












— "Purty" 


Neel. 


Clouds begin 


to gather 




Rain is pouring madly — 


Lightning- 


in the sky 




Nothing, 1 


othing dry; 


Lightning in 


the water 




While it soaks me on the head 


Lightning 


in her eye 




She soaks 


me in the eye. 










— The Czar. 



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DAUMUELLER'S 

Music and Gift Shop 
LEBANON, ILL. 

% Welcomes 

% J 

Kodaks % You ^ 

Kodak Films 

Fountain Pens 

Ever sharp 



/ 
/ 



Pencils 
Stationery 
Everything 
in Music 




# Fobs 

Jewelry 

Watches 

Pendants 

College Pins 

College Rings 

Up-to-Date 

Novelties 

i Brooches 



Candies 



% Bar Pins 
% 

/ \ 

/ Bulk Bars Packages % 

/ \ 



Elmer's Lowney's 



% 
% 

/ Morse's Busy Bee Bunte's % 




alilol^X^P^rtfl 



EAT 



EAT 



Lebanon Cafe 

Day and Night 
Service 

C. V. GREGORY, Prop. 



EAT 



EAT 



/ Make Your Old Shoes 
Look Like New 

All Kinds of Shoe Repairing 
at Reasonable Prices 

All Work Guaranteed 

I Do Not Cobble— I Rebuild 
Your Shoes 

SAM MICIOTTO 

Shoemaker 

Lebanon, Illinois 

Shop Open from 7 a. m. to 7 p. m. 



"T/ie Cream of Quality' 


THE 


PUREST, FRESHEST 


MILK 


Delivered to Your Door 


Daily 


Milk, the Ideal Food for 


All Ages 


L. S. Langenwalter 



Revoir's Variety 
Store 

Students' Supplies 

OUR POLICY: 

"A Low Price and a Quick 
Sale" 

OUR MOTTO: 

"Courtesy and Service" 
LEBANON -o- ILLINOIS 



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'GOOD BYE' 



'GOOD LUCK' 



Your faces are all familiar to us. We have had 
the pleasure of serving you for four years as we 
have done for more than thirty classes ahead of 
you, and as we confidently expect to do for count- 
less classes to come. Remember us, you who go, 
as well as you who stay. Come in to see us 
when you are in need of anything in our line. 

KOLB MERCANTILE CO. 

DEALERS IN 

Dry Goods, Shoes and Groceries 



George D. "How long' could I exist without brains, Professor?" 
Prof. Burns: "That remains to be seen." 

Zimmie (campaigning for Mr. Deneen) : "What party docs Husky 
belong to?" 

Alice W. : "I'm the party." 

Miss Nixon: "Tell me, Mr. Haase, how you would punctuate this 
sentence: 'The wind blew a ten-dollar bill around the corner'." 
Haase: "I'd make a dash after the bill." 

* * * * 

Fuzzy: "You can't kid a Chem. Assistant." 

Anna Mary: "Howzzat?" 

Fuzzy: "He has too many retorts." 

* * * * 

Red B.: "How's your wife, Monk?" 
Monk: "That's my business." 
Red B. : "How's business?" 

Eva says her father is a doctor and she can be sick for nothing; 
John says his dad is a preacher and he can be good for nothing. 



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CITY DAIRIES' 
DeLUXE ICE CREAM 



LIGGETT & NORRIS' 
CHOCOLATES 



Students' Headquarters 

FOR 

Toilet Requisites 

Spalding Athletic Goods 

Eversharp and Parker Pencils 

Parker and Waterman Fountain Pens 

Eastman and Ansco Cameras and Supplies 

Text Books, School Supplies, Stationery 

THE LEBANON DRUG 
COMPANY 

The Rexall Store 



REXALL 
REMEDIES 



PUREST 
DRUGS 



□ 



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Page A Eleven 



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SAYRE MOTOR CO. 

"Motor in Comfort 1 

BUICK AND OLDSMOBILE 
GOODYEAR TIRES AND TUBES 

Our Policy Is to Give You the Best in 
Service and Quality 



ACCESSORIES 



GASOLINE 
FREE AIR 



MOTOR OILS 



When Better Automobiles Are Built. Buick Will 
Build Them 



St. Clair (during- one of thos« 


lulls 


in conversation i 


t the Philo 


banquet) : 


"Awful pause." 










Polly 


(jerking hands from table) : 


"Well, 


if you'd 


washed as 


many pans 


as I have, your hands mi 


iht be 


a little 


rough, too 


!" 


Moody 


: "Last week he sent me 


candy 


saying, 


Sweets to 


the sweet'." 


Berk: 


"A pretty sentiment. What of it?" 






Moody 


: "Now he sends me an 


ivory 


hair brush." 




Pete: 


"I wish to ask you about 


a trag 


edy." 






Miss Nixon: ''What is it?" 










Pete : 


"What is my grade?" 










In astronomy class the ether 


light 


tve were 


looking 


at the stars 


through the telescope. It was Guy's 


time t 


d look and after a 


few minutes 


observation 


he remarked, "Heaven!' 










"Some 


telescope!" 











§>os 



D|S2>KQP 




Page A Thirl ;en 



JACCARD 

Designers and Manufacturers of 

Class Pins Rings 

And 

Exclusive Commencement 
Stationery 

Jaccard Jewelry 
Company 

1017-19 Walnut Street 
Kansas City, Mo. 



John C 


: "Mi 


y I kiss 


you?" 


Delene 

—But she 


G.: ' 

didn't. 


I should 


say 


not" 


Marian 


"Do 


you love 


me?" 


Rue: ' 


'Yes." 








"Would 


you (1 


e for me 


?" 




"No." 










"If you 
love me." 


would 


n't then 


you 


don't 


"If I did, then 


I couldn 


't." 




Some women have depth 
brains of others are merely 
vr.tions. — Prof. McClure. 


the 
exca- 



THE COVERS FOR THE 

McKendrean 

Are Becktold 
Products 

We will be glad to supply 
samples and appropriate 
suggestions for adapting 
Becktold Covers to any 
books. 

Becktold Printing 

And Book Mfg. 

Company 

200-212 Pine Street 
St. Louis, Mo. 



Cherub: "I have a 


chance 


for 


the track team." 






Doc. P. : "Why, are 


they g 


oina' 


to raffle it off?" 






* * * 






Parson : "Why don't 


you di 


own 


your sorrow?" 






Vic. Haines: "They'd 


get me 


for 


murder." 






We know a Frosh who 


is so d 


jmb 


that he thinks blank not 


e books 


ara 


written by anonymous 


writers 






-A So 


ph. 



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We are Printers and Designers of 
High Grade Annuals 



Quality Printing 



Prompt Delivery 



Close Co-operation insures you an Annual 
of highest quality and artistic achievement 



THE DAILY JOURNAL 
PUBLISHING COMPANY 

EAST ST. LOUIS ILLINOIS 



THE McKENDREE REVIEW 

Published Weekly 
by 

The McKendree College Press Club 



□ 



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Dr. P. J. Pecau 

Dentist 

Lebanon - - Illinois 



Dr. 


W. H. Blanck 




Dentist 


Thui 


sdays and Evenings Only 




Alamo Building 



"Hair Cuts That Fit'" 

At 

Lebanon Shaving 
Parlor 

O. H. FOX, Proprietor 

Special Attention to Ladies' 

Work 



Helen Y 




'Bill 


hadn't the 


face 


to kiss me. 


' 








Barbara 


C. 




"I suppose 


you 


hadn't the 


cheek 


to tempt hin 


." 



Hair Cutting a Specialty 

For Men and Ladies 
the Best 

Hair Tonics, Toilet Articles 
LOW PRICES 

Grauel Barber 
Shop 



GRAUEL'S SHOE 
STORE 

FOR 

STYLE COMFORT 

Durability Individuality 

SHOES FOR ALL— E. GRAUEL 



Parson : 


"Were 


yo 


u ever 


held 


up 


by a stage 


robber 


'" 








Spreck: 


"Once 


I 


took £ 


i chorus 


girl out to 


supper. 











Lebanon 
Advertiser 

L. A. Bartlett, Publisher 

$1.50 PER YEAR 
LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



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1924--] 



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Page A Sixteen 



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Page A Seventeen 



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HAS it ever occurred to you that behind the Public 
Utilities there is an army of people working to serve 
the community? They are doing many kinds of work 
which constantly offers opportunities to trailed men and 
women. The work is interesting and there is plenty of 
room at the top for the person who makes good. It might 
pay you to consider this great field before you decide on 
your life work. 

East St, Louis & Suburban Railway 
Company 



PIES 


CHILE 




OHL'S CAFE 




"Doicn by the Bank" 


LUNCHES 


SANDWICHES 



¥m. Monken Mercantile & Implement Co. 

DEALERS IN 

Dry Goods, Shoes, Groceries 
General Merchandise 

"Always the Best for the Money' 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



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Page A Eighteen 



THE 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 



Of Lebanon, Illinois 



May We Serve You? 



COURTEOUS TREATMENT 


Z 




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O 


ON 


o 


H 




o 


O 


THE 


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SQUARE 






PROMPT SERVICE 





MEMBER IEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



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Page A Nineteen 




PFEFFER MILLING COMPANY 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Winter Wheat Flour, White Corn Grits and Cream Meal 

And Dealers in Grain, Lumber and Building Materials of all Kinds 



ROSS, ROBBS AND REESE COMPANY 

Watches for Women 

Of Superior Design and Perfection of Movement 



LET US SEE YOU 



OFFICES IN CARNEGIE HALL 



H 



Page A Twenty 



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High Grade 
Portraiture 



PHOTOGRAPHER TO— 

The Family 
The Church 
The High School 
The College 
Classes and Clubs 



VAN-MILLER STUDIO 



3546 OLIVE ST. 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 



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Page A Twenty-one 



Sheet Metal Work Plumbing Stoves and Ranges 

EMIL J. WEBER 

HARDWARE 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



General Merchandise 

C. HEER 

Quality Goods 



Prof. Burns: "Why do the leaves turn red in the fall?" 
Percy Hill : "I suppose they are blushing to think how green they havs 
been all summer." 



Shorty Brian (At Reinhardt's) : "I'd like to see something cheap in 
a felt hat." 

Clerk: "Try this on. The mirror is at your left." 



Taxi Driver (After bringing the gospel team home from Granite) : 
"Five dollars and twenty cents." 

Gospel Team (In unison): "Back up to fifty cents. That's all we 
have." 



A boss is a boss, but a good-looking stenographer is an asset to any 
business. — The Editor. 



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Lebanon Coal, Ice and Feed Company 



A. J. KECK, Mgr. 



DEALERS IN 



Good, Clean Coal, Ice and Feeds 

Our Coal Makes Warm Friends — Excellent Service Guaranteed 
Phone Us Your Requirements 



NECKWEAR Established 1856 SWEATERS 

WEAR 

The best. It pays. We have it. 
The most economical. We sell the best for less. 
The style. We feature the latest. 
Individuality. Our clothes reflect Men. 

Suits Made to Order $25.00 to $50.00 

LEBANON'S STORE FOR MEN 

C. AND H. REINHARDT 

Your Clothiers 
HATS and CAPS SHIRTS and HOSE 



iX^^(^if2^^H^AQl[5" 



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Page A Twenty-tli 



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BELLEVILLE LAUNDRY CO. 



23RD AND WEST MAIN 



BELLEVILLE. ILL. 



THE QUALITY STORE 

Exceptionally choice merchandise — the things 
you desire — at reasonable prices. A complete 
assortment of Dry Goods, Toilet Articles, and 
many items in Variety and Household Goods. We 
desire to serve the students and college people 
to the best of our ability. 

C. B. PEACH 

AT SAGER'S CORNER 




Pas.' A Twent 



^^X^Pfree 



LEBANON, ILLINOIS 

LAID OUT IN 1825 

LOCATION— St. Clair County, Illinois, 22 miles east of St. 
Louis, Mo., on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and East 
St. Louis and Suburban (Electric) Railway. 

BUSINESS — A large, flourishing mill with elevators, coal 
mines, cigar factories, beverage factory, and a rich and 
prosperous farming region surrounding. 

EDUCATION — Modernly equipped buildings with qualified 
instructors ; new community high school ; McKendree 
College offering A. B. and B. S. degrees, with conserva- 
tory of music. 

CHURCHES — Numerous denominations with excellent com- 
munity interest ; fine buildings. 

IMPROVEMENTS— Many blocks of pavement, electricity, 
efficient fire department. 



With its elevated situation, healthful climate, natural 
beauty, rich traditions, possession of fine mineral springs, 
flourishing business enterprises, educational and religious ad- 
vantages and an excellent community spirit, Lebanon is an 
ideal city for your home. 

Population, over 2000 



Q 


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'& 



Page A Twenty-five 



e\M 



FINIS 



D