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Full text of "The McKendrean : being the year book of McKendree College"






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McKENDREE COLLhut 
LEBANON, ILLINOIS 




THE 

McKENDREAN 




PUBLISHED BY THE CLASS 



1-9-2-6 



McKENDREE COLLEGE 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 




14240 



The McKENDREAN 



JWcmorh 

To offer a true representation of college 
life on McKendree's campus during the 
1924-25 school year; to promote and sustain 
that indefinable something known as "McKen- 
dree Spirit" ; to record the achievements of 
the present as an inspiration to greater suc- 
cesses of the future — this book is presented 
by the Staff of the 1926 McKendrean. 



1926 





The McKENDREAN 




©rocr of Books 

Book of the College 
Book of the Classes 
Book of Fine Arts 
Book of Organizations 
Book of Athletics 
Book of Features 
Book of Advertisements 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 



Pcbicatimt 



To Miss Lorraine Pierson, who, by her 
noble example of unselfish devotion to our 
Alma Mater, and to the fostering of those 
ideals which she has given us, has proved 
herself to be endowed with those virtues 
which make of one a true teacher, a splen- 
did character, and a worthy friend. 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 





The McKENDREAN 



#taff of tlte \W2\S JUfunHrean 

Walter L. Bailev - Editor-in-Chief 

William T. Sawyer - - - -.Business Manager 

Harold M. Kay..... - - .-.-Assistant Editor 

Peggy Smith - - Art Editor 

Paul E. Schuwerk ...- - Circulation Manager 

Martha W. Denbeaux. ....Classes and Fine Arts Editor 

Barbara Crabbs -- - .—Organization Editor 

St. Clair M. Harris -- -- —Sports Editor 

Dorothy E. Harmon - - Feature Editor 

Eobert C. Adair ..-. - Advertising Manager 

George Darrow Asst. Advertising Manager 



1926 




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The McKENDREAN 




C.C.HALL 
PRES. BOARD OF TRUSTEES 










J. M. MITCHELL 





HON. C.P.HAMILL REV. G.R.GOODMAN D.D. 



-;"T1; .^Jl^' 



1926 



The McKENDREAN 




BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Rev. C. C. Hall. D. D., President. 
Leonard Carson, Secretary. 
C. B. Peach, Treasurer. 
Rev. W. C. Walton, Ph. D., Fiscal Agent. 

Rev. Cameron Harmon. D. D., President of the College and ex-officio member of the 
Board. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES 

Bishop F. D. Leete Indianapolis. Ind. 

Dr. C. B. Spencer Kansas City, Mo. 

EMERITUS TRUSTEES 

Rev. O. H. Clark, D. D East St. Louis, 111. 

Rev. J. W. Flint, A. M., D. D. Madison, Wisconsin 

TERM EXPIRES 1925 

Dr. Percy Swahlen St. Louis, Mo. 

Rev. 0. L Markman Mt. Vernon, 111. 

John M. Mitchell Mt. Carmel, 111. 

Rev. W. H. Poole '. Collinsville, 111. 

Rev. J. G. Tucker, D. D Olney, 111. 

Thomas L. Cherry Carbondale, 111. 

R. H. Isaacs Gillespie, 111. 

Rev. F. O. Wilson, D. D Mt. Carmel, 111. 

Rev. Chas. D. Shumard, D. D Alton, 111. 

Ira Blackstock Springfield, 111. 

C. Crouse Louisville. 111. 

Judge Chas. H. Miller Benton, 111. 

TERM EXPIRES 1926 

Dr. W. P. McVey Carbondale, III. 

W. C. Pfeffer Lebanon, 111. 

Capt. E. W. Hersh Newton, 111. 

Rev. W. T. Morris : Epworth, 111. 

J. L. McCormick. M. D Bone Gap, 111. 

Rev. Ressho Robertson, D. D Lawrenceville, 111. 

Leonard Carson Granite City, 111. 

J. G. Wilkin Robinson, 111. 

C. B. Peach Lebanon, 111. 

John A. Henley Litchfield, 111. 

Edward E. Miller East St. Louis, 111. 

TERM EXPIRES 1927 

Rev. G. R. Goodman, D. D East St. Louis. 111. 

Rev. C. B. Whiteside Centralia. 111. 

Rev. C. L. Peterson, D. D Mt. Vernon, 111. 

Frank Condrey Oblong. 111. 

Rev. Robert Morris Granite City, 111. 

P. M. Johnson St. Elmo, 111. 

Rev. C. C. Hall, D. D Mt. Vernon. 111. 

Hon. Chas. S. Deneen, A. M., L. L. D Chicago, 111. 

BOARD OF VISITORS 

TERM EXPIRES 1925 

Rev. C. W. Hal! Woodriver, 111. 

Rev. P. R. Glotfelty Herrin, III. 

Rev. Clark R. Yost Lebanon. 111. 

TERM EXPIRES 1926 

Rev. W. I. Terhune Flora, 111. 

Rev. L. S. McKown Murphysboro, 111. 

Rev. Robert Peters East St. Louis, 111. 

TERM EXPIRES 1927 

Rev. J. M. Adams Cairo, 111. 

Rev. T. B. Sowers West Frankfort, 111. 

Rev. W. H. Whitlock Harrisburg, 111. 



J3 



1926 



f 



The McKENDREAN 



/ > 




Ross L. Large 



SOCIAL SCIENCE AND HISTORY 
A. B.. Denver University. 1912; A. M., 1913. 
Teachei in Philippine Islands, 1914-17. 
Officer in the A. E. F.. 18 months overseas. 
Instructor Colorado State Reformatory, 
1923-24. 



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Ernest R. Crisp 

SPANISH AND ENGLISH 
A. B.. McKendree College. 1913. 
Graduate study. University of Chicago, 19K 

Instructor in Panama College, 1920-24. 





jfitifc. 



( )live E. Patmore 

HISTORV II SEMESTER. 1925 
Graduate School of Expression. Trcverca 

College. 1921; A. B.. 1922. 
Graduate Work, Boston School of Expres- 
sion, summer 1923. 



David ~\\ arner Shipp 

ENGLISH 

A. B. McKendree College. 1924. 

B. D.. Drew Theological S, miliary. 1921. 
Special student in Graduate School. N- 

York University. 1920-21. 



"ZZ. -Z^*X^" 



19-26 




i 



The McKENDREAN 




Lorraine Pierson 



B.. Tiansy) 
M., 1917. 
iriuate study 
summer 1920. 
M., University of Chicago, 192: 



ty of Wisconsin, 




Claude E. Vick 

(II. Semester, 1924-25). 
EDUCATION AND HISTORY 
B. S.. University of Illinois, 1925. 




John William Andrew Kinisox 

BIBLE AND RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 
A. B. McKendree College, 1915; B. D. Gar- 
rett Biblical Institute. 1918: Graduate 
study Washington University, 1921-22. 
A. M., Washington University. 1922. 








Ruth Katherine Walton 

(1924-25) 
HOME ECONOMICS 
University of Illinois, summer 1920. 
B. S., McKendree College, 1921. 
Graduate study, University of Chicago, si 
mer quarter, 1922. 



Missouri Wesleyan College, 1919. 
Graduate study, Colorado University, sum- 
mer 1920. 
Summer Library Conference. Madison, Wis- 
in, 1923; University of Illinois Library 
School, summer 1924. 




The McKENDREAN 




J. E. Robinson, 
Purchasing Agent 



J. PURDY ISlEEL 
(I. Semester. 1924-25) 
HISTORY 
A. B. McLean College, 1912. 
Transylvania College- of Theology, 



Mrs. Earl A. Davis 

(I. Semester, 1924-25) 
EDUCATION 
McKendree College. 1924. 



1926 



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The McKEISTOREAISr 



Junior history 

Four years ago a goodly number of Freshman came to McKendree 
College to enter into its atmosphere for a term of years, which looked to 
them, at that time, a century. But soon came the realization that college 
days pass only too quickly. 

We came through the Freshman year victorious and entered into the 
Sophomore year with decreased numbers but, unmolested by the upper- 
classmen, learned the ways of the world by experience. The Junior year- 
passed and now we come to the close of our college course realizing with 
Pope that we cannot here take space to set clown all our memories for, 

"Lulled in the countless chambers of the brain our thoughts are linked 
by many a hidden chain ; awake but one, and lo, what myriads rise !" 

But we do wish to recall and to review only a few of the many. 

Among our number are found four of the last graduates of the Old 
Academy: Delta Jessop, M. P. Akers, J. B. Zimmerman, and G. O. Karnes. 

It was through the efforts of members of our class that the Press 
Club was founded, and that a chapter of Pi Kappa Delta was formed 
at McKendree. Here the names of "Pete" Akers and "Zim" Zimmerman 
may be mentioned. 

Again we remember that for two years we were victorious in the in- 
ter-class basketball tournament and that for three years we were winners 
of the inter-class track meet. We have had representatives in every form 
of athletics and it is with especial pride that we point to "Monk" New- 
comb as one of us. 



In Plato, Philo, Clio, Pi Kappa Delta, The Student Association, Y. M., 
Y. W., the '24 McKendrean, and many other activities of the college, mem- 
bers of the class of '25 have taken leading parts. 

During these four years we have formed a peculiar attachment for 
our college, an attachment which every McKendrean forms, and we de- 
part testifying, as many have before us, to the beauty of the "Old McKen- 
dree Spirit." 



1926 






Class Vice-President '24-'25 

Clio President '24-'25 

Y. W. C. A. Vice-President '24 

Pi Kappa Eelta '25 

Glee Club '24-'25 

''Clarence" 

Beaver College '21-'22-'23 

•'How sad if by some strange new law 

all kisses scarred 
For she who is most beautiful would 

be most marred." 



Delta Jessop, A. B. 

Lebanon, Illinois 
Class Secretary and Treasurer '24- 
Clio President '24-'25 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet , 24-'25 
McKendrean Staff '24 
Press Club - 23-'24-'25 
Pi Kappa Delta '25 
May Queen '25 

Vice-President Student Assn. '24 
"Of all those arts 

In which the wise excel, 
Nature's chief masterpiece 
Is writing well." 



Guy 0. Karnes, B. S. 

Lebanon, Illinois 
Class President '24-'25 
Plato President '23-'24 
Y. M. C. A. 
Track '22-'23-'24 
"M" Club 

Secy. Student Assn. '23 
Laboratory Assistant, Physics 
"In thy face I see 
Honor, truth and loyalty." 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 




James Royce Newcomb, A 

Herrin, Illinois 
Captain Basketball Team "24*25 
Basketball '23- '24 
Football '23-'24 
Tennis '24-'2.5 
"M" Club 

Secy. Student Assn. '24 
President Junior Class '23-'24 
McKendrean Staff '24 
"Ah. who can tell how hard it 

Is to climb 
"The steep where Fame's proud 

Temple shines afar?" 




James Wendell Dunn, B. S. 

Johnson City, Illinois 
Class President '22-'23 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet '23-'24-'25 
Press Club '23-'24-'25 
McKendrean Staff '24 
Student Assistant in Chemistry 

'23-'24-'25 
Philo President '24 
Eachelors 
"He reads much; 

He is a great observer and he looks 
Quite through the deeds of men.' 



Milburn P. AJcers, A. L 

Lebanon, Illinois 
Editor of Review '23-'24-'2o 
Editor-in-Chief, McKendrean '24 
Pi Kappa Delta '24-'25 
Student Associate in Athletics 

'23-'24-'25 
Plato President '25 
Debate Team '23-'24-'25 
Y. M. C. A. Treasurer '21-'22 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet '24-'25 
"The fire of God fills him. 

I never saw his like. 
There lives no greater leader." 



1926 





Lawrence E. Freeman, B. 

Newton, Illinois 

Student Association President '25 
"Around his heart, he gets a pain 
Me thinks he's in love again." 



Alton, 
Philo President '25 
Y. M. C. A. Secretary '22 
Pi Kappa Delta President '25 
Bachelor Club President '25 
Business Manager McKendrean '24 
Business Manager Review '23 
Bryan Medal '21 
Debate '23-'24-'25 
"His speech is burning fire." 



Fern Van Ness, A. B. 

Welsh, Louisiana 

Clio President '24-'25 

Y. W. C. A. 

Silliman College '19-'20 

University of Virginia '21 

Tulane University '22 

"She is a klepto 

I'm sorry to say, 

She steals every heart 

That comes her way." 



1926 



*=^ > *g j g»^ 




F. C. Stelzriede, A. B. 

St. Jacob, Illinois 

A head for thought profound am 
clear unmatched." 



Sidney W. Frey, B. S. 

Lebanon^ Illinois 
Football '22-'23-'24 
Track - 22-'23-'24 
Student Assistant in Chemistry 

'23-'24-'2o 
"M" Club 
Orchestra 
'"What his heart thinks his tongue 

speaks." 



Harold Verne Calhoun, A. B. 

Belleville, Illinois 

"I dare do all that may become a man, 
Who dares do more is none." 



-c--^ ^-->-^r 




The McKENDREAN 




Henry George Mais, A, 

Lebanon, Illinois 

"The dauntless heart 

that fears no human pride, 
The friend of man, 

to vice alone a foe." 



Frank E. Harris, A. B. 

O'Fallon, Illinois 
Plato Chancellor 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet '20 
Oxford Club 

Captain Y. M. C. A. Gospel team 
McKendrean '24 
Student Pastor, Dorchester 
Bunker Hill '22-'23 
O'Fallon '24-'25 
Secretary-Treasurer of Sophomore 

Class 
"Choice of word and measured phrase 
Above the reach of ordinary man." 



Opal C. Hartline, B. S. 

Norris City, Illinois 

"A perfect woman nobly planned, 
To warm, comfort, and command." 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 



^Itc juniors $\\ ^Innnc 

The days have sped by, our jolly days are passed. 
Before we're dignified seniors we'll tell you of our class. 

The prexy of our class has the eloquence of a lawyer. 
He will keep forever Young; Rah, for William Sawyer. 
Next comes Satchel Schuwerk, who is both witty and wise, 
He has enough intelligence for one just twice his size. 

Dorothy Harmon, a lassie fair, is one you'd like to know, 
A reader fine, a leader too, her aim is never low. 

The charm of Billie Denbeaux, speaks of culture rare, 
Her wisdom, pep, and beauty, drives away all care. 

St. Clair Harris is very quiet, but action speaks louder than word, 
He is a dependable man, you see. his praises are always heard. 

Then there is Walter Bailey, who is a fine debater. 

He excells in everything he does, the world will know him later. 

Feggy Smith is our actress, and also our artist rare, 
A pretty girl and quite brilliant, her sky is always fair. 

Happiness of babbling brooks, is mirrored in her smile, 

Dreams, romances, and fiction, the thoughts of Barbara beguile. 

Wop Isom is our star athlete, in scholarship does excel, 
A quiet, willing worker, success will surely spell. 

Sullins is a steady player, in games of intellect and skill, 
Lebanon should be very proud of her student on the "Hill." 

Percy Hill, our Chemistry man, is known to be very wise, 
He. like "Satch", is quite small, great power within him lies. 




Full of pep, a bouncing step, carefree — this is no myth, 
A bit of heaven in her eyes, thus we remember Opal Smith. 

So calm and peaceful is Christine, one never knows she's near, 
ut her friendly, kindly acts, have made her to us clear. 

Bob Stephens is a giant in intellectual prowess, 

We girls don't try to capture him. you see his wife won't allow us. 

A happy person is George Darrow, he's a most ambitious boy, 

He comes seven miles to school each day, education to him is joy. 

Carter the famous basketeer, is one of our jolly crowd, 
A hearty laugh, a genial manner, spirits are never cowed. 

Sizemore is another musician, the piano is his mainstay, 
He has a ready word or song to cheer us on our way. 

The able prexy of the "Y" also hails from our number, 

When Adair in his Ford speeds by. pedestrians best not slumber. 

Hollis and Page we never see, they're always gone away, 

To teach the people in their Church, the many evils of modern day. 

Walker and Wahl walk among us, gently speaking here and there. 
Their many acts of goodness are known of everywhere. 
Mowe, Van Ness, and Hause, are the last but not least of our crew, 
They are always happy and jolly, because they have nothing else to do. 

We've sung the praises of Juniors, and this prayer we raise, 
That when we are Seniors we still may merit your praise. 

—ALICE HOYE, '27 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 



William T. Sawyer — "Bill" 

"Tall, and all the girls say, 'He's just right' 
Calm, but all his conquests are not slight." 



Paul E. Schuwerk — "Satch' 

"Handsome is as handsome does 

More handsome, then, there never was." 



Christine M. Karnes 

"To those who know thee not; no words can 

paint, 
And those who know thee, know all words 

are faint." 



Walter L. Bailey — "Bail" 

"The brilliant chief irregularly great 
Frank, haughty, rash, the Rupert of debate! 



St. Clair M. Harris — "Saint' 

"Fierce for the right he bore his part." 



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1926 




The McKENDREAN 



Eaphael V. Carter — "Ray" 

'An abridgement of all that is pleasant in 
man." 



Robert D. Stephens — "Bob" 

'His smile is sweetened by his gravity." 



Dorothy E. Harmon — "Dot' 

-In vouth and beauty wisdom is but rare.' 



Wilburn Mow e— ' ' Bill ' ' 

'It isn't the clothes that make the man 
It's the car." 



Percy J. Hill 

'I'm not a politician and my other habits arc 
good." 



1926 




The MgKENDREAN 





W. Perry Sullins — "Prof" 

'A princelier-looking fellow ne'er stepped 
through prince's hall." 



Martha W. Dexbeaux — ''Bileie' 

''Today whatever may annoy 

The world for me is joy — simply joy." 



George G. Darrow — "Nap' 

'He has a way with the ladies." 



Elzirha L. Smith — "Peggy" 
"You've got to give the Flappers credit 
For when they get their bobbed hair curled. 
And cheeks rouged up and stockings furled 
You may be shocked — but you forget it." 



Robert C. Adair — "Buick ] 

"Stately and tall he moves in the hall 
A chief of a thousand for grace." 



.--T^-^ r^sr: 




The McKENDREAN 




J. Caeteb Sizemore — "Sic 

"If money talks 

If that's no lie 

It always says to me 

'Good-bye'!" 



Roscoe Holt. is 
'He reads much, he is a great observer. 



Barbara Crabbs 

"A daughter of the Gods 

divinely tall 
And most divinely fair." 



Johx M. Isom — "Wop 

"In talk or sport he whiled away 
The morning' of a summer day." 



James W. Walker 

"Every man has his faults 
And honesty is his." 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 




Gerald Hause — "Jerry" 

'A fair exterior is a silent recommendation. 



Edmund D. Wahl — "Ed" 

"He worked and sung from morn till night 
No lark more blithe than he." 



Mary ( )pal Smith 

"And when once the heart of a maiden 

is stolen 
The maiden herself will steal after it soon. 



Marvin L. Van Ness — "Van" 

"Men of few words are the best of men." 



Loren E. Page 

"Love of truth and all that makes a man." 

Louis A. Schafer 

"He was a scholar and a ripe and good one." 



The McKENDREAN 



#npIiomorc Class 

Ray D. Goode, President 

Mildred A. Adams, Vice-President 

Harold M. Kay, Secretary-Treasurei 



Bass, Ray 
Bergmann, Emma 
Berst, Donald 
Black, Henry M. 
Bramley, Karmyn M. 
Brown, Harold M. 
Brown, Harry E. 
Brown, Wendell 
Brown, Wensel 
Coen, H. Earl 
Colwell, Helen F. 
Dee, Dorothy L. 
Fleming, D. Ross 
Fullerton, Pauline E. 
Gardner, John 
Grieve, Jesselyn 
Gerlach, Daniel S. 
Greene, Harry 
Haines, Arva J. 
Haines, Victor A. 
Hall, John C. 
Harms, Russell 
Henry, Ruth 



Hopper, Wm. E. 
Hoye, Alice 
Hussong, Earl 
Magill, Guy N. 
Magill, Mayo L. 
Mangum, Sylvia 
McKnight, Noble W. 
Morgan, Alberta 
Mueller, Harry 
Peterson, Lewis V. 
Pettit, Lloyd 
Reed, Minnie 
Ripple, C. Kenneth 
Search, Theodore C. 
Starr, Ida 

Taylor, Lorraine E. 
Todd, Ruth 
Veatch, Ruth 
Walker, Charles 
Weber, Lucille 
Werre, Mildred 
Wilson, E. Dale 



1926 




The MgKENDREAN 



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1926 



The McKENDREAN 



Jfircsliman Class 

Eable Todd, President 

Theodore Jacobs, Vice-President 

Philip Glotfelty, Secretary-Treasure; 



Adams, Paul S. 
Alcorn, Charles E. 
Allen, Glenn I. 
Andrews, Verna 
Barlow, Helen 
Blum, Cornelia 
Brennan, Clarence R. 
Brooks, J. W. 
Brown, Grace 
Buess, Alma 
Burns, Mrs. Rose 
Campe, Harold W. 
Carter, Donald H. 
Carter, Carleita 
Coale, Ralph 
Crain, Mildred 
Cralley, Elza 
Crank, Leland R. 
Crosby, Alfred 
Cullen, David E. 
Day, Ellis 
Douglas, Helen 
Dunn, John L. 
Eckert, Frances 
Fahnestock, Edward 
Farrar, Walter R. 
Ford, Walter W. 
Frazier, Estelle 
Frier, Arnold 
Frohardt, Ralph 
Gaskins, M. B. 
Goddard, Mae 
Goodman, Mildred 
Gould, Clifton 
Graham, Adelaide 
Grantham, Charles 
Grupe, Marvin M. 
Guandolo, Joseih 
Hagler, Francis L. 
Harland, WilsGn L. 
Harris, Clinton D. 
Haskins, Glenn 



Hockaday. Wm. S. 
Hodge, John T. 
Holsinger, Charles 
Holsinger, Violet 
Hortin, Joseph 
Hortin, Paul 
Hutchins, Harold 
Isom, Russel 
Jack, Charles K. 
Jessop, Frank H. 
Jessup, Gladys 
Jones, Bertram 
Kershner, Mary 
Kinsev, Edna 
Kolb, Charles 
Kostoff, Pando 
Lacquement, Delbert 
Likert, Evelyn 
Link, Mildred 
Lowry, Earl 
Loy, Dorothy 
Lynch, Edna 
Martin, James H. 
Mason, Mary 
McCormick, Virgil 
McGuire, Leo P. 
McKnight, Eunice 
McNabb, Richard 
Metcalf, Henry L. 
Morris, Edith Nelle 
Mowe, Ronald 
Newcomb, Julia 
Nolden, Wesley 
Ohl, Elmer 
Oxendine, Clifton 
Peach, Robert 
Pelhank, James H. 
Pierson, U. S. 
Prince, Juanita 
Purcell, Frank 0. 
Richards, Mary 
Rigg, Camilla 



Ripple, Malcolm 
Robinson, Margaret 
Robley, Porter 
Rowell, Harry S. 
Ruddick, Beulah 
Runyan, Frank 
Sampson, Stanley 
Sawyer, Cyrus H. 
Schoene, Luratta 
Schubert, Roy 
Seibert, Glenn 
Siddell, Bernice 
Sites, Leh 
Smith, Eugene J. 
Smith, Harold 
Smith, H. Irving 
Smith, Lela J. 
Smith, William R. 
Snowdall, Harold 
Sparks, Sylvia 
Starr, Ora 
Stelle, Thompson B. 
Stoffel, Orena 
Stoffel, Paula 
Stout, John H. 
Sullins, Hattie 
Swaers, Verona 
Tait, Minnie 
Taylor, Golda 
Thomas, Harold V. 
Thompson, Milton 
Tressler, Louis 
Underwood, Fred 
Vallette, Amy 
Wahl, Oliver C. 
Wakeland, Roy 
Whitlock, Walter 
Williams, Cleo J. 
Williams, Joseph 
Wills, Grace 
Yarger, Lenis 
Young, Carolyn 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 




#ttb-(!loUcntatc #tuibcnt5 



Boring, Laura 
Dettman, Clarence 
Daszko, Walter 
Dean, Harry 
Doyle, Otis 
Eiler, Genevieve 
England, Harold 
Falkner, Howard 
Grieves, Donald 
Heim, Helen 
Heim, Vernon 
Holsinger, Charles 
Horrel, Dewey 



Jones, George H. 
Kclesa, Stephen 
Merry, Fred 
Miller, Arthur 
Mitchell, Riley 
Murdach, Ernest 
Ragland, Paul 
Richards, Herbert 
Schulte, Mayme 
Shipp, Mrs. Agnes 
Martin, Wayne 
Wattles, Loy 



1926 



The McKENDREAN 



Mm Arts 



The present year has been a very successful one in 
the School of Music and Expression. There has been an 
increased enrollment in all departments. 

McKendree has a quartette and two excellent Glee 
Clubs directed by Miss Harper of the Voice Department. 

Enrollment in the Violin Department has more than 
doubled that of last year. Under the leadership of Harry 
Mueller, the violin, orchestra and band work have added 
much to the musical activities of the College. 

Similar improvement has been made in the Depart- 
ment of Expression under the direction of Miss Patmore. 
The Play "Clarence" by Booth Tarkington was a great 
success. 

The Piano Department has added a new Steinway 
Grand Piano. Also a two-manual Gratian Pipe Organ 
has been installed in the College Chapel. A complete 
course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music is now 
offered in Piano, Organ and Voice. Certificates are 
granted upon the completion of a two-year course in 
Expression and Public School Music. 

McKenree is fortunate to have the same faculty 
in these departments for the year 1925-26: 

Grant McDonald... Director and Dept. of Piano 

Pauline Harper Voice 

Olive E. Patmore Expression 

Harry Mueller. Violin 




1926 



ff 



The McKENDREAN 




Grant McDonald, Director of Music 

PIANO 
Graduate in piano, organ, and theory, Drury 

College Conservatory of Music, 1919 
Concert work with the Allen Bureau, Lima, 

Ohio, 1919-20. 
Chautauqua work, summer 1921, with Standard 

Bureau, Lincoln, Nebraska. 
Head of piano department. Ozark Weslevan 
College, 1921-23. 



Olive E. Patmore 

EXPRESSION 
Graduate School of Expression, Trevecca Col- 
lege, 1921; A. B. 1922. 
Graduate Work, Boston School of Expression, 
summer 1923. 



P. Pauline Harper 
voice 
Graduate in Piano and Theory ,Missouri Wes- 
leyan College, 1909. Graduate North- 
western University in Public School 
Music. Graduate in Voice, Missouri Wes- 
leyan, 1920. Student of Summer School, 
Univeisity of Denver, 1921. 



Harry Mueller, Instructor in Violin 

Graduate in Violin, McKendree Conservatory, 
1918. Pupil of Hugo Oik, Summer '21. 
Instructor in Violin, Heink Conservatory, 
St. Louis, Mo., 1921. 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 




Kaemyn Mize Bramley 

Miss Bramley received a certificate from 
the School of Music for having com- 
pleted the two-year course in Public 
School Music. 



Mrs. Agnes Shipp 

Having completed all requirements of 
the Department of Expression, Mrs. 
Shipp was this year granted a di- 
ploma. She has had considerable 
experience in teaching and the giv- 
ing; of recitals. 




1926 



r 



% rAeMcKENDREAN 



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,. 



5 1 I- iL 



The McKendree College Concert Company, organized this year, will 
represent the College in sixty-five programs to be given throughout South- 
ern Illinois during the summer. The programs will be varied, consisting 
of trios, solos, instrumental music, and readings. 



The Concert Company is composed of: 

Miss Pauline Harper ,. .Mezzo Soprano 

Instructor of Voice at McKendree 

I Mildred Adams .....Contralto 

Helen Colwell... Pianist 

Dorothy Harmon Reader 



:^2i^z5s 



1926 



The McKENDREAN 




^Itc jfc|fotttee (Quartette 

The McKendree Quartette is an ensemble of which the College is just- 
ly proud. All members of the Quartette have excellent and cultured 
voices which blend beautifully. The constituency of the quartette remains 
intact from the time of its formation two years ago. Last summer the 
quartette established an enviable reputation throughout Southern Illinois 
which it toured for the purpose of getting students for McKendree. 

This summer the quartette will again delight Southern Illinois audi- 
ences with its extensive repertoire of quartette harmonies, duets, solos, 
and readings. 

The quartette is composed of: 

Harold Brown.. ....First Tenor 

Kenneth Rippel Second Tenor 

Earl Hussong. ...First Bass 

Lewis Peterson Second Bass 



1926 



t^^^^V— 3- 




iMotvel 



ENDREE COlXEvJt 



LEBANON, !LtrNOic 



The McKENDREAN 




Archie Clef Club 

Officers 

Pre side itt Mildred Adams 

Secret aril and Treasurer ....Minnie Reed 

Librarian Alma Buess 

The Girls Glee Club adopted the name of the Treble Clef Club and 
pins with its insignia were secured. 

The first program was given at the First M. E. Church of East St. 
Louis, Illinois. It consisted of readings, duets, solos, and quartets. The 
Club entertained the student body at several Student Association meetings 
during the year. 

The Club has among its members a quartette which has created an 
enviable record. The quaitette has given many programs on various oc- 
casions. 

Under the direction of Miss R. Pauline Harper, the Club assisted in 
the production of the opera, "Martha". 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 







ittcn's C6lcc (Club 

Officers 

President --'- ...Lewis V. Petersox 

Vice-President -- - ...Harold M. Brown 

Secretary-Treasurer - -J- Carter Sizbmobe 

The Men's Glee Club is composed of the best male voices in the school. 
Under the direction of Miss Harper the Club prepared an excellent pro- 
gram which was given out of town on several occasions. The Men's Glee 
Club with the Girls' Glee Club gave the opera "Martha" on May 27. 

This is the second successful year for the Club. The men are or- 
ganized and contract for their own engagements. Over half of the mem- 
bers are Freshmen and Sophomores, making the prospects for a better 
club next year quite favorable. 




The McKENDREAN 



McKENDREE COLLEGE CAMPUS 

Queen Delta Jessop 

Maid of Honor Helen Young 

Fern Van Ness 

Attendants to Queen > Dorothy Harmon 

\ Dorothy Dee 
( Alberta Morgan 

Crown Bearer Elizabeth Luke 

Train Bearer Marion Luke 

( Georgia Lee Thompson 

Flower Girls . 

| Elinor Freshour 

( Harold Shipp 

Heralds , J 

J Allen Schueneman 

PROGRAM 
Ceremonies in Honor of the Queen: 
Procession 
Crowning of Queen 
May Pole Dance 

\ Peggy Smith 

Balloon Dance - 

I Eillie Denbeaux 

_ \ Georgia Lee Thompson 

b oik Dance - 

I Elinor Freshour 

Dance by the Ladies of the Court. 

Interpretive presentation of Myth : 

Bacchus Peggy Smith 

Venus Billie Denbeaux 

, Julia Newcomb 

Nvmphs I ^ura Boring 

\ Margaret Robinson 
' Hattie Sullins 

Bacchus, one of the Roman gods, after wandering joyously through the fields, 
grows weary and falls asleep. He is surprised by some nymphs who surround him. 
After his initial fright is past, he and the nymphs become friends. In their frolicking 
he initiates them into the secret of making the Nectar of the gods. The Bacchanalian 
revelry follows which ends in the death of the poor nymphs, who not being immortal 
were unable to drink the Nectar of the gods. In his despair Bacchus calls Venus to 
his aid. Unable to restore them to life she finally changes the Nymphs into trees. In 
answer to the renewed pleadings of Bacchus, she reveals the fact that if they could 
bring back the flame of life from Pluto's realm, the Nymphs could be restored. This 
is accomplished and the friends of the Nymphs all rush in to celebrate the happy 
event. 

Friends of Nymphs: Vera Andrews; Emma Bergmann; Helen Barlow; Alma Buess; 
Carleita Carter; Edna Lynch; Opal Smith: Ora Starr: Paula Stoffel; Mary Richards; 
Camilla Rigg; Amy Vallette. 



^ ^? ^ r-> -gS2 



1926 




ORGANIZATIONS 



The McKENDREAN 




The McKENDREAN 



rre.< 



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I'Uvr^ 



#hiocnt Association 



( )fficers 
First Semester Second Semester 

Lawrence Freeman Presiden ' St. Clair Harris 

Delta Jessop ...Vice-Pres..... Ruth Henry 

Barbara Crabbs.. Sec.-Treas Opal Smith 

Carter Sizemore... Cheer Leader Philip Glotfelty 

Lewis Peterson Song Leader Kenneth Ripple 

Lucille Weber Pianist Grace Wills 

Milburn Akers Assoc. in Athletics.. Ray Carter 

The Student Association of McKendree was organized in 1921 and is 
a valuable organization as it gives students practical training in Parlia- 
mentary drill and self-government. The Association loyally and enthus- 
iastically supports all forms cf athletics as well as any enterprise promoted 
by the College. Any student regularly enrolled automatically becomes a 
member of the Association. 

The Association has charge of the Chapel services each Friday morn- 
ing. At these meetings any business which concerns the student body is 
disposed of. After the business session an interesting and entertaining 
program is provided by individual students or organizations of the school. 



1926 




Non-Resident Membei 
Howard W. Gould '18 
Ben H. Hall '20 
Guy E. Tucker '20 
Lawrence J. East '21 
Burtis E. Montgomery 
J. Bertram Harmon '23 
Paul L. Jones ex '23 
Aaron H. Lauchner ex '23 
John W. Cralley '24 
Albert Willis ex '25 
Chauncey L. Rockwell ex 
Henry J. Dietz ex '26 
Edwin F. Dickson ex '26 
Noble P. Newsum 



! * 



Resident Members 

J. Wendell Dunn '25 
John B. Zimmerman '25 
St. Clair M. Harris '26 
Wensel L. Brown ' 
Guy N. Magill '27 
Mayo L. Magill '27 
Noble W. McKnigh: 
Clarence B. Brennan '28 
Elza M. Cralley '28 
Ralph C Frohardt '28 
Clinton V. Harris '28 
Glenn Haskins '28 
Pando G. Kostoff '28 
Frank R. Runyan 
Harold V. Thomas '28 
Stephen Kolesa '29 



The McKENDREAN 



®Ijc pisttoman Jatcnury Society 



In 1849 gold was discovered in California. Thousands of men and 
women crossed the prairies, struggled o'er the mountains, or braved the 
rigors of an Antarctic sea in order that they might enrich themselves. 

In 1849 sixteen students of McKendree College met and organized 
the Platonian Literary Society in order that they, and those who came 
after them, might have the advantage of training in forensics and parlia- 
mentary procedure. To this was added a spirit of fraternity. 



In 1925 those who gave their lives for gold are forgotten or little re- 
membered. But those who founded the Platonian Literary Society are 
revered today by hundreds of Platonians who have taken advantage of 
the opportunity presented to them by the organization. Men too numer- 
ous to mention have entered McKendree College, joined the Platonian 
Literary Society, and then gone forth, after their training was complete, 
to play their part in the drama of life. And they have always given credit 
to Plato, in whose Hall they learned the art of public speaking, for much 
of their success. 

Plato, however, has not been content with laurels won in former days. 
Today her members are taking prominent part in student activities, 
especially forensics. Each Friday night sees her members gathered to- 
gether for oratory, declamations, essays, debates, impromptu and assign- 
ed speeches, as well as spirited contests in parliamentary law. And 
throughout the week these men are banded together in the fraternal spirit 
of Plato. 

In the building of a great nation it is not those who seek gold whom 
we shall honor, but those who make possible the education and training 
of the men upon whom the cares and duties of that nation may some day 
develop. 




1926 



The McKENDREAN 




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1926 




The McKENDREAN 



(Lite (Cltonian ilitcrary #ncictu 

The Clionian Literary Society was founded in 1869, soon after the 
admission of women to McKendree, and ever since that time has been a 
valuable adjunct of the school. In the course of its history it has num- 
bered among its members the most successful women who have gone forth 
from the institution. 

It is the aim of Clio to provide an opportunity for the student to de- 
velop qualities of leadership, and to increase the ability to speak easily 
and fluently. To attain this aim, besides the regular weekly meetings and 
literary programs, Clio has many social gatherings. Among these are the 
"Kid Party", the Initiation Service, Clio Homecoming, and the Triennial 
Banquet. Twice each year members of Clio prepare and give a program 
which shows how the literary and musical talent has been developed. 

Memories of happy associations in Clio Hall are cherished by the old 
members who have gone forth into the world to put into actual practice 
the ideals Clio has helped to form. 



That Clio may go on rendering, in ever-increasing measure, the ser- 
vice it is best fitted to render, that it may at all times prosper, and ever 
live up to its loftiest ideals, so that we in truth may say "All is well", is the 
sincere desire of those Clionians who, with the passing of 1925, will retire 
from the roll of active members. 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 





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The McKENDREAN 



IT lie piulosnpliicin ititcran) ^'nciety 

The Philosophian Literary Society, founded in 1837, is almost as old as 
McKendree College. For eighty-eight years, during the school year, Philo 
has been holding weekly meetings for the developement of oratory, debate, 
and literary pursuits. 

The society has always been dominated by a strong social and fra- 
ternal spirit which has resulted in the formation of life-long friendships 
and cherished memories of happy hours under under Philo's Star. 

Philos have bean a vital factor in State and National politics. McKen- 
dree has had three representatives in the United States Senate — all Philos : 
Frank Hereford, L. Y. Sherman, and Charles S. Deneen, Ex-Governor of 
Illinois. The Society has had almost continuous representation in the Illi- 
nois Legislature since 1849, and in Congress since 1863. Philo has been 
well represented on the judicial bench, and points with pride to Judge Wil- 
liam M. Farmer, present Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Illinois, as 
well as to Honorable Charles S. Zane, who as Chief Justice of Utah, handed 
down the decision which sounded the knell of polygamy. 

Other prominent Philos are: Honorable Jehu Baker, former minister 
to Venezeula ; Brigadier General Jesse H. Moore, former Consul General 
to Peru ; John Locke Scripps, one of the founders of the Chicago Tribune ; 
Isaacs N. Higgins, former Editor of the San Francisco Morning Call; 
Judge Silas Bryan, father of William Jennings Bryan ; and a host of others 
including several State Superintendents of Education, heroes of three wars, 
and eleven college presidents. 



Although the tradition of Philo is rich, she does not live in the past 
alone, but putting aside personal gain, she labors for a larger and better 
McKendree, whose sons will serve in a greater way even than those of 
the past. 




1926 




The McKENDREAN 



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1926 




'=^' i ^g»^ 



The McK END R E AN 




19. m. C A. 

Officers 

President... Dorothy Harmon 

Vice-President ----- ----- Helen Young 

Secretary...... -... ...Barbara Crabbs 

Treasurer - ..Christine Karnes 

The purpose of the Y. W. C. A. is to help fill the religious and social 
life of the women of McKendree as well as to aid the spiritual, physical, 
and mental development. Each year the old members meet the new girls, 
and help them to become acquainted with their new surroundings and in- 
troduce them to college life. 

Helpful and inspiring devotional meetings are held Wednesday 
evening of each week at seven o'clock. Other college activities are sus- 
pended during this time. 




! 



The McKENDREAN 



1$\ iKappa Bdtct 

ILLINOIS THETA CHAPTER 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



DR. CAMERON HARMON 
DEAN E. P. BAKER 
J. W. A. KINISON 



BELLE NIXON 
D. W. SHIPP 
OLIVE PATMORE 



STUDENT MEMBERS 



Milburn P. Akers '25 
Delta Jessop '25 
Frederick Stelzriede '25 
Helen Young '25 
John B. Zimmerman '25 
Robert C. Adair '26 
Walter L. Bailey '26 



Dorothy Harmon '26 
Paul E. Schuwerk '26 
Robert Stephens '26 
Lewis V. Peterson '27 
Emma Bergmann '27 
Adelaide Graham '28 



The Illinois Theta Chapter of Pi Kappa Delta, national honorary forensic society, 
was established at McKendree College in the spring of 1924. Formal installation cere- 
monies took place in the fall of 1924 with Professor Seibert of Bradley Tech represent- 
ing the national organization. 

Pi Kappa Delta, membership in which is open to those who have represented their 
college in intercollegiate oratory or debate, has 108 chapters in the United States. 
Students winning' forensic honors at McKendree College are thus given national rec- 
ognition. 

Debate and oratory have been prominent in the school life of McKendree this year. 
The College has taken part in three men's delates and three for women. In addition 
an oratorical and extemporaneous speaking contest, in which five institutions par- 
ticipated, was held here. 

The Pi Kappa Delta debate question. Resolved: That Congress should be empower- 
ed to over-ride by a two-thirds vote decisions of the Supreme Court which declare acts 
of Congress unconstitutional, was used in the three men's debates and in one of the 
other two co-ed debates. In the other two co-ed debates the question. Resolved: That 
the Philippines should be granted immediate and complete independence, was used. 

The debating teams were as follows: 



M. P. AKERS 
W. L. BAILEY 
R. C. ADAIR 



Negative 
J. B. ZIMMERMAN 
P. E. SCHUWERK 
L, V. PETERSON 



Affirmative 
HELEN YOUNG 
EMMA BERGMANN 
LELA SMITH 



Negative 
DELTA JESSOP 
DOROTHY HARMON 
ADELAIDE GRAHAM 



An oratorical and extemporaneous speaking League consisting of Greenville, Ew- 
ing, Will Mayfield, Blackburn and McKendree was organized this year at the instance of 
Miss Belle Nixon. McKendree forensic coach. John B. Zimmerman represented McKen- 
dree in the oratorical contest and Milbum P. Akers in the extemporaneous speaking 
contest. These were held under the supervision of the League. 



Is iC-: T ^' 



1926 



The McKENDREAN 



Z\)t $rcss (Club 



The McKendree Review, the student weekly newspaper of McKendree 
College, is published by the Press Club. Membership in this organization 
is placed on a competitive basis, students desiring membership being re- 
quired to submit numerous examples of their work which is then judged by 
the faculty advisers and the editor-in-chief. 

The Press Club furnishes an excellent opportunity for students in- 
terested in journalism to obtain practical experience which will be bene- 
ficial to them later in their chosen field. 

Miss Belle Nixon, professor of English, and S. M. McClure, head of 
the division of science, are the faculty advisers of the Review. Milburn 
P. Akers, who served for three semesters as the editor-in-chief, resigned at 
the end of the first semester and was succeeded by Miss Dorothy Harmon. 
John B. Zimmerman, who was business manager in 1923-24, and was re- 
elected for 1924-25, resigned during the first semester and was succeeded 
by Victor Haines. 

The Press Club is now housed in new quarters, permission having been 
obtained from the college to build a new room in the College Chapel. The 
room was built this year and has been a decided asset to the organization. 

F. A. Behymer, feature writer for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, was 
the principal speaker at a banquet which was given by the Club. 



I 



Every student in the college is a subscriber for the McKendree Re- 
view, their subscription being included in their fees which are paid each 
semester. Many members of the Alumni Association and former students 
of the college subscribe for the paper and it serves as a unifying agency 
for the entire McKendree family. 




1926 





The McKENDREAN 



\£ 2> «/ «> »# 9 

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< # <i> \> <€& 

President 
Theodore Search, Vice-President 

Perry Sullins, Secretary-Treasure 




Lloyd Pettit 
Ray Goode 
William Smith 
Trying Smith 
Henry Black 
Erle Todd 
Leo McGuire 
John Isom 
Clifton Gould 
James Newcom 
Wilbur n Mo we 
Earl Coen 



1926 




J. W. Brooks 
Donald Berst 
Charles Holsinger 
Edward Fahnestock 
Walter Farrar 
Arnold Frier 
°- Ronald Mowe 
*j Charles Grantham 
Charles Alcorn 
Ralph Coale 
Glenn Allen 
Harold Hutchins 




™r 



r 



The McKENDREAN 





i 



(Lite (Eoadying #taff 

Coach E. A. Davis and his assistant. Prof. J. P. Xeal formed a coaching staff for 
the Purple which established a record far above that of any recent years. Having 
played through college together and coached opposing teams, they were well acquain- 
ted with each other's methods and made an excellent coaching staff. 

In his year and a half as mentor of McKendree's teams, Coach (Lefty) Davis de- 
veloped several teams of the championship class. He resigned at the end of the first 
semester to accept an enviable position as director of athletics in Centenary College, 
at Shreveport, Louisiana. 

Coach Charles M. VanCleave has been appointed to pilot the Bear Cats during the 
coming year. He has filled a position as the Athletic Director of the Olney High School 
for over a decade. During this time his teams have won seven undisputed Egyptian 
championships. After such success in the high school field Coach VanCleave will un- 
doubtedly continue McKendree's succession of championships. 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 





M\}t football Jlccorft 



McK. 


CONFERENCE 


OP. 





Illinois College 





17 


Eastern Normal 





39 


Blackburn 





16 


Lincoln 


3 


13 


Carthage 





42 


Southern Normal 


6 


24 


Shurtleff 





151 


TOTALS 


9 




NON-CONFERENCE 




13 


Scott Field 


13 





Rolla 


27 


88 


Ewing 





101 


TOTALS 


40 


252 


GRAND TOTAL 


49 



1926 




The McKEISTDREAlSr 
Jflaotball JUtttcm 

During the past four years McKendree College has made steady prog- 
ress in football development. Last autumn the climax of this develop- 
ment was reached when the purple won her first "Little Nineteen" cham- 
pionship without a defeat in the seven games played. Not since the days 
of President Harmon's "Tri-State Champions" has McKendree been rep- 
resented by so formidable a squad. Weight, speed, and ability— all co- 
ordinated by excellent team play made a powerful scoring attack and of- 
fered a defense almost impregnable to conference opponents. 

The season opened inauspiciously. But seven players remained from 
the 1923 squad and Coach Davis used the three pre-conference games in 
an effort to effect the proper combination from the horde of inexperienced 
Freshman material. The Scott Field Aviators held the Bear Cats to a 
J 3-13 score in the initial game at Hypes Field. On the following week 
the Missouri School of Mines administered the only defeat of the season. 

The final extra-conference contest, with Ewing College as the oppo- 
nent, demonstrated for the first time the potential scoring ability of the 
1924 eleven. Thirteen touchdowns, a safety, and eight tries-for-point 
counted the largest score made during the year. The material for the 
conference champions had been selected and even then was being welded 
into the best scoring machine in Illinois. 

The first conference game was staged at Jacksonville with Illinois 
College. The Purple decisively outplayed the Presbyterians in every phase 
of football and were on numerous occasions in scoring territory. At that 
time, however, the precision, as well as the "scoring punch" so prominent 
in later games, had not yet been developed and to the Presbyterians goes 
the season's honor of holding the Conference champions scoreless. 

The Eastern Illinois Normal Eleven afforded the first of the half- 
clozen conference victories. Before the largest crowd in recent years on 
Hypes Field the Bear Cats exhibited the first consistently brilliant attack 
and sustained defense to overcome the hard fighting visitors. The first 
field goal of the year and two touchdowns netted the seventeen points of 



1926 



the game, but failed to represent the real superiority of the battling Bear 
Cats over the Easterners. 

Although the opening of the third conference game with Blackburn 
found seven regulars on the bench, a touchdown was registered in the 
first three minutes of play. The entire game was featured by straight 
line bucks and end runs. The frequent yet effective substitutions in the 
Davis lineup showed that the Bear Cats were bidding fair for Egyptian 
honors. During the game the Bear Cat center straddled the ball for one 
hundred and twelve plays, while the opponents were in possession of the 
ball but twenty times. 

Lincoln proved a more stubborn foe than was expected, holding the 
Bear Cats to a 3-3 tie during the first half. In the last half the Davis- 
men found their stride and out-played the Railsplitters by a 16-3 score. 

The hardest conference game with Coach Omar's Carthage College 
squad followed the Railsplitter contest. Here for the first time in the 
season the Purple met her equal in weight and speed, and aggressive play 
decided the game in favor of the Bear Cats with a touch down in each 
half of the game. The defensive play of the Davis-men was, on the whole, 
the outstanding feature of the contest and demonstrated that the Bear 
Cat eleven was reaching championship calibre in this phase of the game 
as well as in the attack. 

The Home-Coming crowd saw the Purple at the peak of its form 
against the S. I. N. U. aggregation. A 65-yard run lor a touchdown in 
the opening moments of play began the scoring which never ended until 
the forty-two points were counted. The fighting* Teachers, how- 
ever, spoiled the Purple claim to an uncrossed goal-line in the final mo- 
ments of play by recovering a fumble in the shadow of their own goal posts 
and converting it into a touchdown after a 90-yard run. 

The final game of the season found a badly bruised and crippled Bear 
Cat squad pitted against Shurtleff. While the visitors displayed a spark- 
ling offense, the defensive work of Purple forwards held them scoreless, 
and the crippled attack counted for 24 points to bring to an end the 
most successful McKendree football season in recent years. 




1926 



The McKENDREAN 





Donald Berst, "Red" — Captain 
Guard 



Lloyd Pettit, "Speed" 
Captain-Elect — Center 



Johx Isom, "Wop" 
Halfback 



James Xewcom, "Monk : 
End 



William Smith, "Bill' 
Halfback 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 





Baphael Carter, "Ray 
Center 



Charles Holsinger, "Grs' 
Halfback 



Theodore Search, "Ted' 
Quarterback 



Irving Smith 

Edwardsville Smittv 

Halfback 



David Cullex, "Bloxdv 
Tackle 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 




Leo McGuiee — ' ' Pat ' 
Guard 



Clifton Gould — ' ' Hurly 
End 



Delbert Lacquement — ' ' Lacky 
End 



Joseph Guaxdolo — "Joie" 
End 



Earl Coen— "Barxey 
Halfback 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 




Stephen Kolesa — ' ' Steve 
Halfback 



Erle Todd — "Toddy" 
Quarterback 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 




jgj <^ys~s^ 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 







ITlte Psffikeilrall JRecorfr 

CONFERENCE 

Lincoln 

Macomb 

Carthage 

Shurtleff 

Southern Illinois Normal 

Shurtleff 

Southern Illinois Normal 

Lincoln 

Macomb 

Carthage 

NON-CONFERENCE 

Rolla School of Mines 
Springfield Teachers 
Rolla School of Mines 
Maryville Teachers 
Concordia Seminary 

TOTALS 



1926 



OP. 

17 
29 
22 
12 
22 
20 
29 
30 
85 
22 



18 
27 
26 
18 
37 

364 




r 



The McKENDREAN 



basketball $etriehi 



McKendree's athletic success in championships was not confined to 
football, since the Purple was equally successful in basketball. Among the 
thirty men who were early candidates for the team, there were six letter- 
men. Early in the season Coach Davis was assured of a hard-working 
squad without having a continual grind. Fifteen games were staged dur- 
ing the season, ten of which were conference games. Of these ten there 
were eight victories. 

The conference season opened in a contest with the Lincoln College 
Railsplitters. Although this game exhibited the early season mistakes, 
such as bad passing and wild shooting, the Davis-men kept well in the lead 
throughout the game. 

The work of the Bear Cats against the Western Teachers of Macomb 
was an improvement over their action of the previous night against Lin- 
coln. A 21-2 score before the visitors found the basket illustrates this 
point. However, at the beginning of the second half there was a decided 
spurt and at one time the visitors were one point ahead. But a reaction, 
bringing the Purple on the long end of the score, was featured by a long- 
shot duel in which Captain Newcom was involved. 

The next week a Missouri invasion resulted in two victories for the 
Purple. The first game with the Rolla Miners offered dangerous com- 
petition in the early part of the game. The high scoring ability of the 
Purple forwards and the excellent defense of the remaining three men 
were the outstanding features of this fray, as well as in the victory over 
the Springfield Teachers on the following night. 

Returning from the Missouri trip the Bear Cats trounced Carthage 
College for the third conference victory. After appearing somewhat life- 
less in the early part of the game, the Davis-men led the half and re- 
turned with an intensified defense. This was too much for the Carthage 
squad. 

At Alton the Purple annexed another victory in a one-sided game 
against the Shurtleff Pioneers. The use of reserves was prominent in 
ihis game. Captain Newcom again led the scoring attack with sixteen 
points. 

Although the Rolla Miners came for revenge they suffered a second 
defeat at the hands of the Bear Cats. The game opened with the char- 
acteristic whirlwind playing. Although greatly outclassed in size, 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 




Fighting Little Magill" showed excellent scoring ability in this as well 
as in the other games. 

Being consistent w T ith tradition the Southern Illinois Normal Quin- 
tet, probably played the best game of the season against the Purple. 
The Davis scoring-machine was barely able to hold its own during the 
fore part of the battle. However, "Red" Berst broke a tie in the second 
period, which started the winning. 

A fast aggregation from the Maryville Teachers College afforded the 
Bear Cats some keen competition for the third game of the week. The 
consistent and repeated scoring on both sides ended the first period with 
a 10-10 score. By the end of the 21-18 victory the fans had witnessed 
one of the most hotly contested engagements of the season. 

The last conference game at home was a victory over the Shurtleff 
squad again, although three of the regulars were on the bench. In spite 
of the fact that the Pioneers started the scoring early, the Davis squad 
had doubled the score at the half. Thereafter the score continually piled 
up until a 49-20 victory was reached. 

The seventh conference victory over the Southern Illinois Normal 
squad compared favorably to the game with the Pioneers. The opening, 
strong, offensive play of the teachers was soon quenched by Carter if it 
successfully encountered the floor guarding of Isom, — all of which was 
too much for the Egyptians. 

The thirteenth consecutive victory was collected from Lincoln Col- 
lege at Lincoln. From the start to the finish of the encounter the teams 
alternated for the lead in the scoring. The Railsplitters proved much more 
invincible than in the earlier game, and it took the best efforts of the 
Bear Cats to conquer them. 

Playing in the second game of an unpromising road-trip, the Purple 
victors received the first taste of defeat when they bowed to the Western 
Teachers of Macomb. The opponents, however, did not have an easy vic- 
tory. Neither did the untiring efforts of the fighting Bear Cats keep 
Carthage from administering a defeat in the final conference game of the 
season. 

The hottest and probably the best game of the season was the last 
game with Concordia Seminary of St. Louis. The Purple squad showed 
the disastrous effects of the intensive strain for the conference title, and 
after a very fast and hard fought game the Bear Cats dropped the battle 
to the visitors. Displaying excellent ability in passing and shooting, Cap- 
tain Newcom played his last college basketball in this game. He had led 
his team through the most successful basketball season in years. 



1926 





The McKENDREAN 




James Newcom — "Monk" 
Captain, Forward 

Fighting from whistle to whistle Monk 
was good for a basket from any part of 
the floor. He was a true star of the 
game during every minute. 



John Isom — "Wop" 
Guard, Capt.-Elect 

Wop has played three years with the 
Purple squad and every year he shows 
marked improvement. A fast man he 
broke up play after play for the oppo- 
nents. 



M 



ayo Magill — ' ' Mac 
Forward 



Fast and tricky "Mac" was a surprise 

to any one who tried to stop him. A: 
accurate man on basket-shooting. 




The McKENDREAN 



Frank Runyan — ' ' Jake ' ' 
Guard 

This was Jake's first season. An excel- 
lent man on defense who generally broke 
through an offense at the right time. 



Donald Berst — "Red" 
Center 

Red was steady as an old horse. Could 
not take part in the last few games be- 
cause of injuries, but always played a 
hard, fighting game. 



James Martin 
Forward 

Made a fast running mate for either 
"Monk" or "Mac." Although coming out 
late he added much to the team's scoring 
force. 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 





s 


•• 


m 






Kay Carter 
Guard 

During his three years at McKendree 
Ray has proved invaluable on defense un- 
der the basket. He was a real factor in 
discouraging opposing forwards. 



Perry Sullixs (Prof.) 
Forward 

Old Prof., a McK star came back strong 
after a season out of the game and im- 
proved steadily throughout the season. 



Wensel Brown (Brownie) 
Guard 

He was true proof of the saying that 
good things come in little parcels. 



i 



~--:^z3Z3sz: 



1926 




PasdraU JUtnetti 



During the 1924 season no baseball team was organized at McKen- 
dree. However, the class of '28 brought an influx of baseball material, 
and since several letter-men are again doing good work, the Purple bids 
fair for a promising baseball squad. 



Although the team worked well together, the first four games of the 
season were lost. The first of these defeats was registered in St. Louis 
by Washington University and was duplicated here by the same oppo- 
nents on the following week. In concluding this same week the Purple lost 
to Concordia and Eden Seminaries of St. Louis by scores of 12-6 and 10-7 
respectively. 



The remaining games of the season were two engagements with 
Shurtleff and one with Concordia, Ewiug College, and Eden in the order 
named. 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 



I 1 



M 



M 



.— I 



I I \ 



M 1 .HK ' '-VrU 



£he fetch '(Uaw of Hi 2 5 

Track Review (1924) 

The first evidence of a hard working track team for 1924 was shown 
in the triangluar meet in St. Louis between Washington, Rolla and the 
Purple. In this meet Washington took first place and McKendree second. 

The Purple received first honors with a large score in a similar meet 
when Shurtleff and Western Military Academy were the opponents. 

The third appearance of the McKendree athletes was the participa- 
tion of the Medley relay team in the Drake Relays. 

In the Bradley State meet held at Peoria, Goode tallied a first in the 
javelin and the relay team placed. 

Early in the 1925 season Goode, the Purple javelin thrower, made an 
admirable showing in the Drake Relays by counting second honors in this 
sport. 

Among the meets booked for the 1925 season there were two dual 
meets with Shurtleff and a triangular meet with Ewing College and South- 
ern Illinois Normal University. 



1926 



The McKENDREAN 



®Ite ^ii^lttl) JX mural 3fntcrschoUisttc 



The eighth annual McKendree Interscholastic was held on May the 
second. It was marked by the general increase in successfulness, which 
has been characteristic of each of the consecutive previous meets. These 
occasions have always offered an outlet or climax for the best track and 
field athletes of Central and Southern Illinois high schools. 

Thirty-six high schools entered contestants in the 1925 Interscholastic, 
representing an increase of three schools over the 1924 meet. This fact, 
as well as the breaking of six standing records, illustrates the successful- 
ness of this eighth event. The records broken were in the shot-put, jave- 
lin, 440 yard run, 220 yard dash, discus, and the relay. The records in the 
440 and 220 has been standing since 1916. 

In the track and field events Eldorado led the scoring with twenty- 
four and one half points. Staunton followed with a half point less, while 
Carlinville finished in third place. Votaw of Mt. Carmel received individual 
honors by amassing eleven points. 

Competing in the largest Interscholastic tennis tournament ever held 
at McKendree, Centralia won the doubles and Mascoutah the singles. 

The intellectual meet was marked by a record number of contestants 
and the excellent talent displayed. Centralia High School carried first 
honors with a total of eighteen points, while Eldorado and O'Fallon tied 
for second and third with six points each. 

The ninth Interscholastic will be held the first Saturday in May, 1926. 



1926 



m 



Yea Bear ! Yea Cats ! 
Yea Yea ! Bear-Cats ! 




The McKENDREAN 



Hc|fetttas fells 



Rah! Rah! Rah! Hip! Hi! Hee, 
Rip Boom! Zip Boom! 
Mc-Ken-dree ! 



Purple! White! McKendree Fight! 

Purple! White! McKendree Fight! 

Purple! White! McKendree Fight! 

Purple! White! McKendree Fight! 




S-U-C-C-E-S-S 

Is the way to spell Success 

Who shall have it? Can't you see? 

Nobody else but Mc-Ken-dree! 



Siss ! Boom! Ah-—! 

McKendree! McKendree! Wow- 



M-M-, M-C-K, E-E, E-N-D, R-R, R-E-E ! 
Team! Team! Team! McKendree! 



Locomotive 
Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! McKendree! McKendree! 
Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! McKendree! McKendree! 
Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! McKendree! McKendree! 
Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! McKendree! McKendree! 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 




%m\ Will ano Testament of tltc ©lass of 2* 

We, the members of the Class of '25, being of sound mind, clear judg- 
ment, and lawful age, do hereby will and bequeath the following property 
to the designated heirs, to wit : 

To the Class of '26, our privileges, which were ours as Seniors, and 
our front seats in chapel. To the Freshies of the coming year, our ac- 
quired tendency to hard work. To the student body as a whole, we leave 
the love, friendship, and good will which the faculty has bestowed on us. 

The following individual students with grace and reverence hereby 
kindly bequeath the following personal properites, to wit : 

Helen Young — her monopoly on Bill Sawyer to, no one, 

so she says. 

Delta Jessop — her good grades, to "Billie" Denbeaux. 

Fern Van Ness — her Freshman admirer, to any one of the Senior 
girls of '26 who will promise not to lead him astray. 

Opal Hartline — her red hair, to "Peggy" Smith. 

Pete Akers— Wants to leave so much that space can not be spared 
to print it. 

Harold Calhoun— his teaching ability, to the sub-collegiate faculty. 

J. Wendell Dunn — his recipe for breaking hearts, to Roscoe Hollis. 

Larry Freeman — refuses to leave anything but his "rep," which is 
bad enough, to Dorothy Harmon. 

Sydney Frey — his chemistry assistantship, to Lenis. 

Frank Harris — his ability as a student pastor, to Bill Mowe. 

Guy Karnes — his raven hair, to Jerry Hause. 

Henry Mais — his reckless hilarity, to Bob Stephens. 

Jim Newcom — his athletic prowess, to Percy Hill. 

Frederick Stelzriede — his studious habits, to Bob Adair. 

John Zimmerman — his oratorical ability and spectacles to "Wop" 



Isom. 



SENIOR CLASS OF '25 

Witnesses: Leonard Metcalf 
Helen Colwell. 




1926 



The McKENDREAN 



"(the (Calendar 



Sept. 8. Registration begins, lots of new students. Many happy reunions. 

9. Ten cent picture show "Yankee Consul." 

10. Classes begin. Many moans. Y. M. and Y. W. acquaintance social. 

11. Y. W. tea. Epwoith League entertains students. Some new catters 

begin work. 

12. "Lany" Freeman elected president of the Student Association. Defense 

Day program, with F'rexie the main speaker. Clio open session. 

13. Lebanon Home Coming. Madri Gras. 

14. All students, especially the new ones, go to Sunday School and Church. 

15. "The Man from Brodney's." 

17. Joint meeting of Y. M. and Y. W., Prexie speaks. Chapel seated. 

18. Helen and Bill went to town. 

19. Literary societies meet. Date night at Clark Hall. 

20. Saturday classes already a bore. 

22. Ray Goode starts the season by breaking his ankle. 

23. Guy Karnes lsans on "Speed" too hard. Dr. Renner gets the job. 

24. Y. W. has Geneva meeting. Y. M. "also met." 

25. Pep meeting on the back campus. More catters begin work. 

26. Class fight. "Wop" gets Freshman flag from tower. "Cookie" Smith 

and "Red" Berst tangle. 

27. Faculty has steak fry. Enthusiasm dampened. Cats join the party. 

29. The 40th door found in the chapel. 

30. Clio Kid Party. 

Oct. 1. Zimmerman leads Y. M. Subject "Campus Code." 

2. Y. W. sells sandwiches after chapel. Hard luck for the boys in training. 

3. Rolla at Rolla. We lost 27-0. Wait till next year. Philo and Flato open 

sessions. 

4. Pi Kappa Delta installation. We are Theta chapter. 

7. Y. M. and Y. W. want money. They got it too. 

8. Karnes and Bailey go to Pecria in the old Buick. Y. M. conference. 
10. McK., 88. Ewing 0. Clio open session. 

12. Freshman history class learns that America was discovered on this data. 

13. Pompeii has her last days in the chapel. 

15. "The Ideal College Man" in Y. M. More sandwiches. One man breaks 
training by eating one. 

17. Illinois College 0, McK. 0. We won. Culver Stocton cleans the Cubs, 

38-12. 

18. Hope they don't have Saturday classes in heaven. 

20. Another blue Monday. No picture show. 

21. The new pipe crgan dedicated by Mr. Davis of Christ Church Cathedral 

of St. Louis. 

22. Joint Y. M. and Y. W. meeting. 

23. Bear due to arrive. Doesn't come. Daszko and Adair elected to Press 

Club. 



1926 



The McKENDREAN 



'"Mac" is bear custodian. Poor bear. Committees for' Home Coming- 
day appointed. E. I. S. N. U., 0, McK., 17. 
The bear came over the mountain. No school. 
The "Pioneer Trails" in chapel. The bear disappears. 
Big bear hunt. No school. Shurtleff invaded. 
Y M. and Y. W. meet. 

Bear got the granary door open. We play Blackburn. B., 0. McK., 39. 

"Lady Godiva." 

Fresh party. Freshmen and the cops win scrap. 

Dean Baker leads Y. M. 

Bear named "Lady Clio." Lincoln 3, Mck. 16. Open sessions. 

Everybody's "Grumpy." 

Big pep meeting after Y. 

Steinway piano graces the chapel. 

Clio opens session. 

Bear Cats roll Carthage, 13-0. Blondy almost makes a touchdown. 

Try-out for women's debate teams. 

Embryo journalists take hand at editing the Review. 

We all clean up ready for company. 

McKendree Home Coming. Senator Deneen here. Carbondale 6, McK. 

42. Movies taken. 
Ernest Gamble Company entertain us. 
Monty Bank holds a lucky race in chapel — all laugh. 
Bear Cats clean up Pioneers, 26-0. Win state championship. Vacation 

begins. There is no place like home. 
Lots cf turkey. 

Business men hosts to the McKendree Bear Cats. Press Club moves. 

35 men and no women come out for Basketball. 

Ye Old Time Country Scule at the H. S. Auspices Y. M. 

Clio open session. 

Department of music and expression in first public recital. 

Joint Y. M. and Y. W. Prof. Crisp leads. 

"Dec" Murdoch confesses. Cupid sure did a quiet job. 

Co-eds beat Greenville 30% -29%. Some debate. 

Big sleet storm. 

Dorothy Dee has a birthday. Age 11111 

Men's debating teams chosen. Miles Standish calls. 

Freshmen write their letters to Santa. 

Students return from Christmas vacation. 

School begins. 

Mrs. Behymer leads the Y. W. 

Clio open session. F'ete Akers makes an attempt at poetry. 

David Copperfield. 

Annual staff appointed. 

Miss Wilson leads the Y. W. 

Lincoln 17, McKendree 24. 

Macomb 39, McKendree 49. 



1926 





The McKENDREAN 



Thirty cents is a whole lot to pay to see "My Man." Bear cage benefit. 
Miss Nixon led Y. W. Annual staff holds its first meeting. 
The McKendree film and Zimmie's brother entertain us in the chapel. 
Bear Cats roll Carthage. 
Flying Squadron at the Methodist church. 
Finals begin today. Everybody crams. 
Exams! Poor Freshmen. 

Survivors go to Alton to see the McKendree-Shurtleff game. We won. 
More exams! ! 

And still we are pestered with exams! ! ! 
Big bunch leave for home over week end. 
Feb. 2. Registration. Everybody that did not flunk gets to stay. 

3. McKendree versus Rclla. Another victory. 

4. First meeting of classes in new semester. 

5. Dr. Stitt Wilson speaks in chapel and at Y. M. and Y. W. Subject, "The 

Failure of Modern Education." 

6. McKendree has her own "teapot dome" scandal. St. Clair Harris elect- 

ed Student "Prexie." 

7. Review changes hands. Bear-Cats versus "Green Devils." 

8. Professor Kinison mired down. 

9. More scandal. 

10. Honor roll for first semester read in chapel. 

11. Everything quieting down. Lefty Davis signs contract with Centenary 

College. Mrs. Yost lead Y. W. 

12. Press Club banquet. Big eats. Some of the faculty go to hear John R. 

Mott. 

13. Friday. Slate for new officers of Student Association read in chapel. 

Isobel Thcbum Auxiliary has party for girls. 
14. McKendree wallops Shurtleff to tune of 49-14. Some girls get valentines. 

16. "Mollycoddle" at chapel. 

17. We wonder what caused Prof's frogs to die. 

18. Miss Pierson has charge of Y. W. 

19. Philo Exhibition. 

20. Clio Exhibition. A few boys go to Carbondale by hand. 

23. "Dorothy Vernon of Haddon Hall." Real treat of the season. 

24. Co-eds pledged to Pi Kappa Delta. Big pep meeting. 

25. Dean Baker calls the students??? down in chapel. Mrs. Crisp leads Y. W. 
27. Dr. Hall speaks at chapel, and in afternoon to the men and women. 

Mar. 2. Revival meetings begin. Dr. Brasher has charge. Picture show adver- 
tised. 

3. More revival. 

4. Good ones still attending revival. 

5. Meetings continue. 

6. McKendree versus Concordia. We lose. 

8. Doctor Brasher preaches on "The Crucifixion and Atonement." 

9. "The King of Wild Horses" in chapel. First practice of Annual Play, 

"Clarence." 

10. Second recital by Department of Music and Expression. 

11. Y. W. elects new officers. 



1926 





The McKENDREAN 



Friday. McKendree-Greenville Debate. We lost. There's a reason. 
See date. 

Play practice. 

Y. W. banquet. All the Irish wear a bit of green. 

Professor Schuenemann talks to Y. M. and Y. W. Subject, "The World 
Court." Campaign for Annual in chapel. 

Cyclone disaster in Southern Illinois. 

Concern among students as to the extent of the disaster. 

"Captain Blood" comes to see us. 

Dr. Landrith speaks on "America First for World Weal." 

Cleanup day. Prof. Burns takes some pictures. 

Delta Jessop elected May Queen. 

Dr. Harmon goes to Burlington, Iowa to hold revival. 

First flowers of Spring. 

Everybody becomes "Girl Shy." Lloyd does his stuff. Helen Colwell gets 
a diamond. Lenis beat her by getting" hers March 7. 

Professor Burns' mother leads Y. W. Scandal sheet appears. April Fool. 

Sawyer and Akers eat wild onions. May Queen attendants chosen. 

Professor Stowell reads modern version of "Paul Revere's Ride." Philo 
and Plato open session. 

Epworth League wiener roast. 

A picture show with a lesson. 

"Clarence" practices at Singer Hall. 

Ethel Morris reads an Easter story. 

Easter vacation. 

How many Easter eggs did you get? 

Oh! ! C-L-A-R-E-N-C-E ! ! 

"Shall the law be enforced?" by Johnson and son. "Satch" and Peter- 
son pledged to Pi Kappa Delta. 

Oratorical contest. "Zim" and "Pete" place second. 

Wesley Barry puts on a fight in chapel. 

Record attendance at Sunday school. Movies taken. 

THE REVIEW COMES OUT ON TIME. 

May Fete. Early arrivals for Interscholastic appear. Delegates leave 
for Champaign. 

Interscholastic. 

"Baree Son of Kazan." 

Y. W. initiates new officers. 

"Martha" by Department of Music. 

Semester exams. 

Clio Exhibition. 

Baccalaureate sermon. 

Plato exhibition. 

Plato exhibition. 



Philo exhibition. 
Joint Board meeting. 
4. Commencement day. 



Alumni reception. 
Clio Triennial. 



1926 



f 



The McKENDREAN 



STANDING DATES 
Prof. Burns: — Chapel movies. Mon- 
days. 

Monk Newcomb: — Every night, en- 
tertaining Euth. 

St. Clair Harris: — Real often. 

Ted Search: — Every night, any place. 

Sidney Frey : — Chemistry laboratory 
every day. 

Barbara Crabbs: — All the time with 
Opal. 

Bill Sawyer: — Every Sunday — Ceme- 
tery. 

John Hall: — Daily under marked tree 
on South campus. 

Billie and Peggy: — Every night, down 
town. 

Harold Kay: — After dinner at 
Freshours. 



Parson Brown: "There is entirely too 
much slang used now days." 

Harold Kay: "I agree with you. I 
knew a girl last summer and all she 
said to me was, 'Cut it out.' " 



Hill: "Is Adelaide going ou't this 
evening?" 

The Other End of the Telephone: 
"Yes, sir." 

Hill: "Do you know whether I am 
going' with her?" 



Sylvia: (At Basketball game) : "On, 
why did they put Frank out of the 
game?" 

Fern Van Ness: "For holding." 
Sylvia: "Oh, isn't that just like 
Frank." 



"Abie, mein son, vy for you go up 
stairs two steps at a time?" 

"Vy papa, to safe mein shoe leath- 
er." 

"Veil, be careful and don't split your 
pants." 




Dorothy Dee, at butcher-shop: "I want 
to buy a chicken." 

Butcher: "Very well! Would you want 
a pullet?" 

Dorothy: "No, I'll carry it." 



Harry M., as he catches a cushion 
thrown from the window of the gii 
dorm. "You follow, dear, I will catch 
you." 



Tod, (to Mildred) : "There lias been 
something trembling on my lipr for 
over a month." 

Mildred: "Yes, I see. Why don't you 
shave it off?" 



At the circus the people wondered ft 
the delay. 

Said a live-looking newsboy: "They 
ain't going to be no show today." 

"Why not?" 

"Cause the elephant stepped on the 
coffee-pot and they can't find the 
grounds." 



Prof. McClure (in lab.) : "Being as it 
is hard to get enough alcohol for you 
all, I will perform the experiment my- 
self." (Selfish man!) 



Lowry: "I play only by ear." 
F'rof. Large: "Well, don't you ev°r 
have the earache?" 



1926 



m 



The McKENDREAN 



JVutotjvapIts 




1926 




The McKENDREAN 



AlttOlU'ctpItS 



1926 




LEBANON, 



TJOLLEoL 
ILLINOIS 



The McKENDREAN 




Frof. Kinison: Now Adair, give us a 
quotation from the Bible. 

Bob, promptly: And Judas went 
forth and killed himself. 

Prof. Kinison: Good, now another 
one. 

Beb, more promptly: Go thou and do 
likewise. 



We'd like to know who this man 
Anno Domini is; he's built a lot of col- 
lege dormitories. 



Prof. Kinison : 
Israelites? 



Who defeated the 



Brownie: I don't know; I never fol- 
low those bush league teams. 



HOW IT IS DONE 

F — ieree lessons 
L — ate hours 
U — nexpected exams 
N — othing prepared 
K — id flunks. 



Bob: No, I don't want a large pic- 
ture. 

Photographer: All right, now close 
your mouth. 



I kiss her so lightly 

In just the proper way 

Then whispered most politely 
Respondez si vous plait. 



Adelaide : You never can believe all 
you hear. 

Mary: No, but you can repeat it. 



Old Mr. Alligator: Well, well, my lad; 
what are you going to be when you 
grow up? 

Little Alligator: Oh, a traveling bag, 
[ guess. 




Love is like eating mushrooms; you 
don't know whether it's the real thing 

until it's too late. 



1926 





The McKENDREAN 



To those who talk and talk, 
This proverb should appeal, 

The steam that blows the whistle, 
Can never turn a wheel. 



McClure (Teaching class in Organic; : 
What is gun-cotton, Percy? 

Percy: Gun-cotton is what soldiers 
put in their ears before they shoot off 
their guns. 



We say Amen to this: 

The annual is a great invention. 
The school gets all the fame ; 
The printer gets all the money; 
The staff gets all the blame; 

(You've heard that before? Oh, well, 
for that matter, so have we.) 



Sylvia: Why don't you have a mirror 
in your vanity case, Mildred? 

Mildred: Don't need it^ I carry one 
of my photographs in it. 



Guy Karnes: "Just One!" 
Dr. Walton (from window upstairs) 
'It's nearly two, young man." 



Abe Alcorn: "Mother, may I go out 
and play?" 

Mrs. Alcorn: "What! with those holes 
in your stockings?" 

Abe: "No; with the little boy next 
door." 



The pale, proud girl turned hautily, 
He held a glittering knife in his hand. 

"Have you no heart?" she asked in a 
low, even tone. 

"No," he growled. 

"Then give me a pound of sausage.' 



Lenis: How do you like Miss Nixon? 

Sid: Oh so, so; but she seems to have 
a one track mind. 

Lenis: How come? 

Sid: She thinks there's only one way 
to spell a word. 



Lady of the house: How much for 
this brush? 

Harris: Three dollars. 

Lady: Couldn't you sell it to me 
cheaper? 

Harris: Sure I could, but I couldn't 
make so much profit. 



Editor-in-Chief turned this joke in, 
and what could a poor joke editor do? 
But there really is a sort of a point, if 
you look up Hamlet, Act V, Scene II, 
Line 366. 



There isn't really much difference be- 
tween an optimist and pessimist. The 
optimist says as the rising bell rings, 
"The beginning of another day," and 
che pessimist, "the end of another 
night." 



Prof. Kinison (to Noble McKnight) : 
"Where is Solomon's temple?" 

Noble: "Sir, do you think I don't 
know anything?" 

Prof.: "Where is it, then?" 

Noble: "Why, on the side of his 
head, of course." 



Dean Baker: "Describe the manners 
of the Germans." 

Red Brown: "They have none." 



1926 



The McKENDREAN 



(fur jRt$en!)tree 



A College 'mid plain* is standing, standing there from 

olden days, 
The Pioneer of the prairies, first in untrodden ways, 
For service and Christian culture, for efficiency she stands, 
lit r sons and daughters praise Iter, with voices, hearts and 

hands. 

Chorus: 

Hail to thee our dear old McKendree, 

May we always loyal be, 

It's a song of praise we'll raise to thee, 

Alma Mater', dear old M-C, 

May we ever own thee true and wise and right, 

Honor Purple and the White, 

And for victor// we'll always fight, 

'Till we win for old M-C K. 

Enduring and strong she stands there, stands upon our Col- 
lege Hill, 

Though others may outnumber, she holds the first place 
' still, 

For beauty and truth and knowledge, and for service with- 
out hound. 

Then let us raise our voices, until the plains resound. 

Chorus: 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 

DAUMUELLER'S 

Music and Gift Shop 
LEBANON, ILL. 

Welcomes 
You 



Kodaks 
Kodak Films 
Fountain Pens 

Eversharp 
Pencils 

Stationery 
Everything 

in Music 





Candies 



Bulk, Bars, Packages 

Busy Bee 

Morse's Park & Tilford 

Bunte's 



1926 




If 



The McKENDREAN 



GAS 






OIL 




E. 


C. SAGER 

GARAGE 




Sole dealers in 


Overland and Willys Knight 


STORAGE 






REPAIR 



Wop Isom: — Her father must be 
fruit seller. 

Jack: — How come? 
Wop: — She's the berries. 



Cy Sawyer: — Gee, my girl is a beaut 
Vic Haines: — Remember beauty 
only skin deep. 

Cy: — Well, I'm no cannibal. 



Grantham: — I am going- to grow a 
mustache and I wonder what color it 
will be when it comes out. 

Gaskins: — At the rate it is growing 
now I would think it would be gray. 



Prof. Burns: — Describe the habitat 
of the tapeworm. 

E. L. : — I don't know, but I think that 
it is in damp, dark places. 



Any girl in the dorm (walking down 
the street) : — Would you like to see 
where I was vaccinated? 

He (with enthusiasm) : — Sure! 

Girl (pointing to an old house) : — 
Well, right there. 



"Do you think we can squeeze in 
here?" he asked, as he helped her on 
the crowded street car. 

But she was a McKendree Girl. "Of 
couise not!" she cried. "Dean Nixon 
might be in here, too, and see us." 



Josephine Shea: "How long can a 
goose stand on one leg?" 

Walter Bailey: "I don't know; how 
long?" 

Josephine: "Try it and find out!" 



Wm. Monken Mercantile & Implement Co. 

Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Shoes, Groceries, 
General Merchandise 

Always the best for the money." 

LEBANON, ILL. 




1926 





The McKENDREAN 



BUICK 



SAYRE MOTOR CO. 



Where the College folks and their friends 
like to stop 



GOODYEAR 



PIERCE 



<s^y <^r-->:35S? 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 



DINNER 


LEBANON CAFE 

Day and Night Service 

More For Less Money 


FOUNTAIN 


LUNCH 


Rag-land & Childerson, Props 


SANDWICHES 



Photographer: — Look pleasant, Mr. 
Zimmerman. 

Camera : — Click. 

Photographer: — All right, Mr. Zim- 
merman, you may resume your natural 
expression. 



"And I'll bring' up the rear," s 
Rowell as he pulled the mule's tail. 



Dean Robinson (to Mary K. and Lela 
S. ) : — Goodness, don't you girls ever 
sweep under the bed? 

Lela. — Why, yes, Dean, we sweep 
everything- under it. 



"Troubles never come singly," said 
Black as he walked into John's room. 



"Who's your companion?' 
John without looking up. 



replied 



Camilla R. : — Do you like indoor 
sports? 

Eunice M. : — Yes, if they go home 
early. 



Doyle had been quite ill. One day 
Doctor Renner called and found him in 
h bath tub. 

"Why man, are you crazy? You must 
be anxious to die." 

"No I ain't," protested Doyle, "but 
didn't you say that last medicine must 
be taken in water?" 



"It's simply nothing- in my young- 
life," said the Freshman as he got back 
his first examination paper. 



Physiology, calling his mate: — "Hy- 
gene." 



"The Cream of Quality" 

THE 

PUREST, FRESHEST 
MILK 

Delivered to Your Door Daily 
Milk, the Ideal Food for All Ages 

L. S. Langenwalter 



1926 





The McKENDRBAN 



FORD 

The Universal Car 



GERSTENECKER RROS. 

Authorized Ford and Fordson Dealers 
Accessories and Supplies 
Kinloch 56 



LEBANON, ILL. 



W. H. Gerstenecker R. H. Gerstenecker 



<^> ^ >*s-.^ 




The McKENDREAN 



USE FUNEROL 

Mrs. B. Sickley, 8 Too Much Avenue, Indigestion, Iowa, writes: 

I wish to be one of the many riters to tell of my marked improvaments due to 
the efficiency of yor wonderful remedy. Three years ago I was a complete wreck. 
I was a victim of acute harmonica, internal revenue, and a host of other suburban 
attacks too numerous 2 mention. At times my head pained me so that I was forced 
to use crutches, and on examining my eyes the doctor told me that I was forced 
to be totally deaf in two years. My nerves were in such a terrible state that for 
months I could not pass a gravy dish at the dinner table. I was utterly unable co 
prepare meals for my family, and this forced the cook to leave. My full weight 
fell off so perceptibly that I was forced to wear galoshes to keep me on the ground. 
At last I heard of your wonderful cure and sent for a bottle of Funerol. I had 
only swallowed three spoonsful when I realized that behind the clouds there was 
a silver lining. Even the conductor on the; street car noticed the change. All of 
my former ills have disappeared except one; I am still dizzy, but I feel confident that 
nine more gallons of Funerol, which has saved so many, will bannish my last regret. 

(Signed) Mrs. B. Sickley. 

Thousands of these letters pour into our office every day. Simply mail us your 
name and collar size along with two dollars in stamps and we will mail you free of 
charge the wonderful Funerol which has saved so many from old age and decrepitude. 

—Adv. 



BLUMENSTEIN BROS. 

Quality Sausages 



BEEF 
PORK 
VEAL 



LARD 
HAMS 
BACON 



Lebanon, Illinois 



1926 




CITY DAIRIES 
DE LUXE ICE CREAM 




The McKENDREAN 



LIGGETT & NORRIS 
CHOCOLATES 



Student Headquarters 



FOR 

Toilet Requisites, Spalding Athletic Goods 

Eversharp and Parker Pencils 

Parker and Waterman Fountain Pens 

Eastman and Ansco Cameras 
and Supplies 

Text Books, School Supplies and 
Stationery 

THE LEBANON 
DRUG COMPANY 

The Rexall Store 



PUREST 
DRUGS 



1926 



The McKENDREAN 



Margaret Robinson : — Ray was the 
goal of my ambition, but — 
Grace Brown: — But what? 
Margaret: — Father kicked the goal. 



Sizemore : — Why did you tell her that 
I was a fool? 

Gaskins : — Gee, I'm sorry — was it a 
secret? 



Joe Hortin: — How can I keep my toes 
from going to sleep? 

Faul: — Don't let them turn in. 



Kenneth Ripple: — What makes you 
think that the Greeks practiced disarm- 
ament? 

Earl Hussong: — Look how they made 
poor Venus. 



SAYINGS OF THE PROFS. 
Miss Patmore: — Queen Elizabeth was 
tall and thin but she was a stout Prot- 
estant. 

Prof. Vick: — Lincoln wrote the Get- 
tysburg address riding to Washington 
on an envelope. 

Prof. Dolly: Would it be correct to 
call the cook the Secretary of the In- 
terior? 



Lacquement (excited) : — What bell is 
that? 

Jack Haskins: — That one right up 
there in the tower. 



Of all sad words of tongue or pen 

typewriter or Victrola, 
The worst are these, "You take again 

This semester's Espanola." 



c. 


B. PEACH 


Dry Goods, 


Furnishings, Variety Goods 




LEBANON, ILL. 


We specialize 


3 in Underwear, Hosiery, Men's 


and Boys' 


Caps, Overalls— Work Pants 


Exclusive Agents for Ever Fast Fabrics and Arrow Hosiery 


You need 


our smiling, cheerful service and — 


We need i 


four business 



1926 



^McKENDREAN i 



THE 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF 
LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



May We Serve You? 



COURTEOUS TREATMENT 



f 



O 

h : 
o 



ON 

THE 

SQUARE 

PROMPT SERVICE 



MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



1926 



Guy Magill: — I know two girls namec 
Hazel. 

Malcolm Ripple: — Which Hazel? 



Ted Jacobs: — Are you taking good 
care of that cold? 

M. B. : — Indeed I am. I've had it for 
six weeks and it is as good as new. 



TWO LETTERS 

Dear Dad: — 
Roses are red, 

Violets are blue ; 
Send me 50 

P. D. Q. 

Dear Son : — 
Roses are red, 

Carnations are pink; 
Send you 50? 

Well— I'll think. 




The McKEJSTOREAISr 



What is a Latin Race, Rockey 




Rockey: — It must be a race between 
a Latin Pony and a Teacher's goat. 



Miss Harper (in Bridal Chorus): — 
You tenors must be careful not to slide 
cff from heaven. 



How-r-chances 

4-2-nite 

2-c-u. 

U-no-y 

R-u-on. 



Percy Hill: — Hungray Adelaide? 
A. Graham : — Yes Siam. 
Ch, all right, I'll Fiji. 



Lebanon Ice and Fuel Company 

A. J. KECK, Mgr. 

Dealers in 

Good Clean Coal, Ice and Feeds 

Our Coal Makes Warm Friends 
Excellent Service Guaranteed 
Phone Us Your Requirements 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 



Sheet Metal Works, Plumbing, Stoves, Ranges 

EMIL J. WEBER 

HARDWARE 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



Prof. Large: "If the president, the 
vice-President, and the cabinet, along 
with all the members of Congress should 
die, who would then officiate?" 

Russell Isom: "The undertaker." 



If George Washington were to come 
back and see Congress he would lose 
no time in delivering another farewell 
address. 



Miss Patmore: — "Everything that is 
said to you, Mr. Todd, goes in one ear 
and out of the other." 

Todd: — Oh, is that why I've got two 



Rattled clergyman : — I believe it the 
kistum to cuss the bride." 



HOOSIER CABINETS 



MEYER & SON 



Furniture and Undertaking 

Telephone 69 Lebanon, 111. 

See us for furniture cheap in price — Trade in your home town 
RUGS, LINOLEUM, ETC. AMBULANCE— FUNERAL PARLORS 



1926 




The Freshman English class was in- 
structed to compose a sentence using 
the words defeat, deduct, defense and 
detail. After the customary roll had 
been called Prof. Shipp asked all of 
those who had completed the sentence 
to please raise their hands. There 
was only one volunteer. 

"All right, Mr. Smith, you may read 
your sentence to the class," commanded 
Prof. Shipp. 

Irving Smith: — "De feet of de duck 
went over de fence before de tail." 



Prof. McClure (in chemistry): — "If 
I wasn't full of gas I would collapse." 



Motor car, 

Engine dead, 
Town afar 

Bad words said. 



UE LUXE BED SPRINGS— ROME QUALIT 



The McKENDREAN 




The LEBANON GARAGE 

Automobile Livery, Storage and Repair Work 
Accessories and Supplies 



C. W. SIEGEL, Prop. 



F. L. LEIBER, Mgr. 



Agents for 

DODGE, STUDEBAKER 

DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE 




1926 



The McKENDREAN 



A Friend 



General Merchandise 

C. HEER 

Quality Goods 



Edna Kinsey: — "It was certainly fine 
of you, Daniel, to send me those flowers. 
They were so fresh that there was still 
a little dew on them." 

Gerlach: — "I know. But I'm to pay 
that next week." 



Prof. Shipp (in English Class) : — "Mr. 
Sawyer, form a sentence in which you 
use the first person." 

Cy: — "Adam lived in the Garden of 
Eden." 



Black (coming around corner of 
Chapel with a lollypop in his mouth) : — 
"The prettiest girl in school gave me 
this." 

Lela Sites: — "I never done it." 



Plumber: — "I've come to fix the old 
tub in the kitchen." 

Mary Mason : — "Oh, mamma, here's 
the doctor to see the cook." 



Conductor (to Co-Ed) : — "Sail right 
lady, you can ride on your face." 

Violet H.: — "Thank you, Conductor, 
but I'd rather sit down." 



Bill Mowe : "I've got a new siren f oi 
my car." 

Grantham: "That so? What happen- 



ed to the little blond?' 



Guest: "What a splendid dinner! I 
don't get one like this very often." 
Bill Sawyer: "We don't either." 



Judge : — "Ten days or ten dollars — 
take your choice." 

John Hall: — "I'll take the money, 
your honor." 



The Saddest Words— 
(The words I hate) 

Are, these, "Get up! 
It's after eight." 



McKENDREE REVIEW 



Published weekly 
bv 



McKendree College Press Club 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 



The Home of Good Things to Eat 



FREY'S BAKERY 



BREAD 



ROLLS 



FRUITS CANDIES 



Raisin Bread a Specialty 



We Bake Hams 



CAKES 



i 



1926 




m 



1926 



The McKENDREAN 




Belleville, Illinois 



LOCATION— St. Clair County, Illinois, 18 miles east 
of St. Louis, Mo., on the Illinois Central, L. & N. 
Railroads, and the East St. Louis and Suburban 
(electric) Railroad. 

BUSINESS — Mines, Factories, and a Prosperous Busi- 
ness District. 



EDUCATION— One of the finest High Schools in the 
county. Modernly equipped grade schools. 



CHURCHES — Numerous denominations with excellent 
community interest ; fine buildings. 

IMPROVEMENTS— Gas, Electricity, Street Cars and 
many blocks of Fine Pavement. 

POPULATION 25,000 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 



Feiekert Bakery Goods 

Fritz & Wallace Lebanon Agents 

Special orders given our personal attention. 

We Appreciate Your Patronage. 

PHONES: 
Lebanon, 107-J Belleville, 173-1773 



Feiekert Bakery 



Belleville, Illinois 



Jerry: — "I've got a date with Bernict 
tonight. I wonder if I ought to shav< 
first." 

Speed: — "Know her very well?" 

Jerry: — "Yes, very well." 

Speed: — "Better shave." 



The other night I stole a kiss 
My conscience hurts, alack. 

I think I'll go again tonight 
And put the darned thing back 



Hopper : — Lost my notebook. 
Mary: — Lost all you know? 
Hopper: — No, lost all my professors 
know. 



Sparkey: — What's that bump on the 
front of the car? 

Bill Mowe: — Oh, the radiator just 
had a boil. 




Prof. Shipp (concluding a difficult 
explanation) : — Is that someone smoking 
back there? 

Ted Search: — Not at all, sir. Only 
the fog that I'm in. 



Pierson : — Where in thunder is my 
comb? 

Brown: — I don't know; you parted 
with it this morning. 



Dorothy Harmon: — Guy's new mus- 
tache makes me laugh. 

Evelyn McNeely: — Yes, it tickles me 
too. 



My father took me to the woodshed 
And lingered with me for a time, 

And when we both departed 

He left footprints on those pants of 
mine. 



Rentchler Electric Shop 

325 East Main St., Belleville, 111. 

ELECTRICAL MERCHANDISE, LIGHTING FIXTURES, 

LAUNDRYETTE WASHERS 

RADIO LIGHT AND POWER WIRING 

RENTCHLER SERVICE SATISFIES 



1926 





The McKENDREAN 



Get Up a Party and Come Over to 
THE 

LINCOLN THEATRE 

BELLEVILLE, ILL. 

We Show First Run Pictures Only 
High Class Vaudeville 

If You Come Once You Will Come Often 



A refreshing Drink, or a tasty Lunch after 
the theatre is always pleasing 

LINCOLN SODA SHOP & BELLEVILLE 
HOUSE CAFE 



"Belleville's Sweetest Spot" 
•The Bright Spot On the Square"' 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 



STEINWAl 




WEBER 






STEINERT 




Exclus 


ive Representatives for These 


Famou 


3 Makes 




1104 Olive 


Street 


AEOLIAN COMPANY 

OF MISSOURI 
W. P. Chrisler, Prop. 




St. Louis 


Our display 
Convenient 


of grai 
Terms 


d pianos is unquestionably one 
and a Suitable Allowance foi 


of the 
Your 


finest in 
Present 


the country. 
Instrument. 


VOSE 




KURTZMANN 






PREMIER 



Newton High School Student: — "Are 
you out for anything- at college?" 
Brooks: — "Yeh, out for good." 



Prof. Stowell : — "Your answer i 
about as clear as mud." 

Virgil McCormick: — "Well, that co\ 
ers the ground anyway." 



Cherry Sizemore: — "I'm the champ- 
ion long distance cornet player. I en- 
tered a contest once and played 'Annie 
Laurie' for three weeks." 

Helen: — "And did you win? 

Cherry: — "No, my opponent, Charles 
Walker, played Sousa's 'Stars and 
Stripes Forever.' " 



Prof. Kinison: — "Roscoe, did Martin 
Luther die a natural death?" 

Roscoe Hollis: — "No, sir, he was ex- 
communicated by a bull." 



There have been several ages in this 
world : the stone age, the wood age, the 
iron age, the glacial age, and the 
garbage. 



And still we wonder why Pete Akers 
goes to Edwardsville every Sunday. 



Which reminds us that Susie needs 
some of the latter cleaned from her 
cage. 



PUT YOUR DUDS IN OUR SUDS 


DRY CLEANING 


Belleville Laundry Co. 


23rd & W. Main Belleville, 111 



238 Collinsville Ave. Bridge 1111 
Flowers for all occasions beau- 
tifully arranged by 

Grimm and Gorly 

Murphy Bldg. East St. Louis 



1926 





The McKBNDRBAN 



Your Next Annual 



College and High School Animal 
printing is a "Hobby" with us. Our 
interest in your Annual will afford 
you unthought-of benefits and as- 
sistance. 

We have a department devoted ex- 
clusively to this work and we offer 
you the services of those in this de- 
partment who have learned through 
experience in editing year books. 

Write to us about your next Animal. 
Let us plan with you to produce an 
Annual to exceed in beauty those of 
other vears. 



COMMERCIAL PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

East St. Louis Daily Journal 

4 I 5 Missouri Ave. - East St. Louis, III. 



1926 



:sn^z5s^: 



The McKENDREAN 



GET YOUR BOOK NOW! ! ! ! 

Only a Limited Supply 

Mrs Jennie Bobinson's Famous College 

Etiquetter De Luxe 

To give you a fair introduction to this book we shall name a few 
of the cardinal rules for well mannered students: 

1 When reaching for food keep at least one foot on the floor. 

2 Select a dull knife to avoid cutting- the lips. 
If you live in the dormitory do not leave your cell after 1 a. m. 

you may be old and weak somed 



Do not make fun of the coffee; 
yourself. 

Do not stir your tea with the left hand. Always use a spoon. 

you can get more on youi 



Don't drink your tea out of your saucei 
plate. 

(These and a score of other rules may be had in this excellent book 
Let us take your order now. The price is five smackers). 








: | 


For College Annuals and Other Books 




Becktold Covers 




In the binding of this boo!; Year by year the popular- 

vou have an example of how ity of these covers as bind 

beautiful and practical a in 8' s for College Annuals in- 

Becktold Cover can be. creases In the business 

world, too, there is a fast- 

Attractiveness, durability growing demand for them on 
and economy are outstanding catalogs and other books 
characteristics of Becktold that need a durable and at- 
Covers. Then they offer an tractive dress, 
almost unlimited range of We shall be glad to send 
colors and color combina- samples to anyone interested 
,. , , , , in Becktold Covers and to 
tions and can be embossed make tions as to how 

with practically any sort of they can be adapted to any 
design. book. 


* 




BECKTOLD PRINTING & BOOK MFG. CO. 

Manufacturers of distinctive covers for college annuals. 
St. Louis - - - Missouri 





19-26 




The McKENDREAN 



High Grade 
Portraiture 



Photographer To — 

The Family 
The Church 
The High School 
The College 
Classes and Clubs 



VAN MILLER STUDIO 

3546 Olive Street St. Louis, Mo. 



<5^ < ir--?<fe' 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 



NECKWEAR Established 1856 SWEATERS 

WEAR 

The Best. It Pays. We have it 
The Most Economical. We sell the best for less. 
The Style. We feature the latest. 
Individuality. Our clothes reflect men. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER $25.00 TO $50.00 
LEBANON'S STORE FOR MEN 

C. AND H. REINHARDT 

Your Clothier 
HATS AND CAPS SHIRTS AND HOSE 



Daily Capacity 1,000 Barrels Elevator Capacity 200,000 Busr 

Incorporated 1889 



PfefFer Milling Company 



LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



Manufacturers of 



Winter Wheat Flour, 
White Corn Grit and Corn Meal 



Dealers in 

Grain, Lumber and Building Materials of All Kinds 



1926 




The McKENDREAN 



Bertram Hotel 

Rooms by day or week 

$1.00 night 

Rates for the week 

Block east of the Bank 



Phone 98 

The Lebanon 
Advertiser 

L. A. Bartlet, Publisher 

Printing and Publishing 

Linotyping for the Trade 

'Ask Any McKendree Student 

About Us." 



Innocent Freshman : "What is that 
new Frat that everybody is talking 
about?" 

Superior Senior: "What one do you 
mean, my dear?" 

I. F. : "Why haven't you heard? 
Eska Mo Pi." 



Sir, I've never been kissed. 
You tell a Grimm story, woman. 



Pres. Harmon (to Brennen) : "Did 
you occupy your pulpit with credit?" 

Brennen: "I certainly did. There 
never was any money connected with 

it." 



Lenis: "I can accept you upon one 

condition." 

Sid: "Oh, that's all right. I entered 
the Senior class with six conditions." 



When a woman gets too fat to get 
into a telephone booth, there's no use 

talking. 



Miss Nixon: "Mr. Sawyer, why didn't 
you prepare your lesson?" 

Bill: "You said read "Twelfth 
Night" or "what you will," and I read 
the "Beautiful and Dammed." 



Hussong (at McCormick recital ) : I 
wonder if he'll sing "All Alone." 

Brown: You don't think he'll come 
out with a chorus, do you, Dismal? 



Miss Harper: Karmyn, what is a 
scale? 

Karmyn: Why, a freckle on a fish. 



"Peterson: Say, Ripple, I know more 
than you do. 

Ripple: Yes, you know me, and I 
know vou. 



Prof. Large: Hey there; don't spit on 
the floor. 

"Blondv": S'matter. Does it leak? 



Hair Cutting a Specialty fc 

Men and Ladies 

The best Hair Tonic, Toilt 

Articles 

Low Prices 

Caloway Barber 
Shop 



PIES 



LUNCHES 



HARM'S CAFE 

Home Cooking 



SANDWICHES 



DINNER 



The McKEISTDREAlSr 



.iWcJfccnltrean j^totcrtiscrs 

Without the support of the following advertisers the publication of 
this book would be impossible. Let us support them. 

Aeolian Co., of Missouri St. Louis 

The Advertiser Printing 

Becktold Printing and Book Manufacturing Co St. Louis 

Belleville Laundry Co Belleville, 111. 

Betram Hotel Lebanon, 111. 

Dr. W. H. Blanch Dentist 

Blumenstein Bros Meat Market 

Central Engraving Co St. Louis 

Caloway, E Barber 

W. C. Daumeuller Music & Gift Shop 

East St. Louis & Suburban Railway East St. Louis 

First National Bank Lebanon 

Feikert Bakery Belleville 

Chas. Frey Bakery 

Grimm & Gorly East St. Louis 

Illinois Light & Power Cc Lebanon 

The Daily Journal East St. Louis 

C. Heer Grocery Store 

L. S. Langenwalter Dairy 

Lebanon Cafe Lebanon 

Lebanon Coal, Ice and Feed Co Lebanon 

Lebanon Drug Co Drug Store 

Lincoln Theatre Belleville 

Lincoln Sweet Shop Belleville 

Gerstenecker Bros Ford Garage 

McKendree College Press Club McKendree Review 

Meyer & Son, Furniture Undertaking 

Wm. Monken Mercantile and Implement Co Lebanon 

Papproth Bros Battery Shop 

C. B. Peach Dry Goods and Variety 

Dr. P. J. Pecau Dentist 

Pfeffer Milling Co. Lebanon 

C. & H. Reinhardt Men's Furnishings 

Rentchler Electric Shop Belleville 

Sager, E. C Garage 

Sayer Motor Co Garage 

C. W. Seugel Lebanon Garage 

S. L. M. T. Bus Co Lebanon, III. 

Van Miller Studio St. Louis 

E. J. Weber Hardware 



1926 



The McKENDREAN 




FINIS 



1926