(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The McKendrean : being the year book of McKendree College"

m 



m 



in 



McKENDREE COLLEGE LIBRARY 

Gift of 




One 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/mckendreepigskin1927mcke 



The 



McKENDREAN 




PUBLISHED BY THE CLASS 

of 

1927 
McKENDREE COLLEGE 

Lebanon, Illinois 

Volume 3 
1926 



1 9 



14250 



Three 



Jftorehuiri* 



\T7E. the class of 1927, pre- 
** sent this edition of the 
McKendrean for your accept- 
ance and approval. We sin- 
cerely desire that this Annual 
shall in later years serve you 
to recall the treasured days you 
spent on old McKendree's 
Campus. This is the only pur- 
pose for which we have com- 
piled this volume. 



19 2 6 



Order of Books 

Book of the College 

Book of the Classes 

Book of Fine Arts 

Book of Organizations 

Book of Athletics 

Book of Features 

Book of Advertisements 



19 2 6 



Dedication 



TV 7ITH a sense of how in- 
* * adequate this tribute is. 
we, the class of 1927, humbly 
dedicate this Annual to our 
parents, who have made it 
possible for us to live and to 
enjoy the blessings of life and 
the advantages of a college 
education. 



Six 




19 2 6 



Seven 



Staff of the 1927 McKendrean 



Editor-in-Chief LEWIS V. PETERSON 

Assistant Editor JOSEPH GUANDOLO 

Business Manager MAYO MAGILL 

Circulation Manager EDWARD HOPPER 

Advertising Manager NOBLE MCKNIGHT 

Advertising Manager CHARLES WALKER 

Organization Editor DOROTHY DEE 

Sports Editor GUY MAGILL 

Feature Editor ALICE HOYE 

Artist Edna Kinsey 

Cartoonist LaVeRNE JACOBS 



1 9 



^^PP530fm=UIu\\y^ I 







^ P ■ ■ - £*)£¥& X V ^Vlk m ) K ML 



sjxi w \ y^-*- ^ mesas 








t wm \ . :•:• x 



V\ \\H ' WR=Fi!t 1 



m 




M 



ItLLVLliy 




Dr. Cameron Harmon 

President of McKendree College. 



I 9 1 (> 



Fifteen 





C.C.HALL 
PRES. BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



J. M. MITCHELL 





HON. C.P.HAMILL REV. G.R.GOODMAN D.D. 



19 2 6 



President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Fiscal Agent 

.President of the College 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Rev. C. C. Hall. D. D 

Leonard Carson 

C. B. Peach 

Rev. W. C. Walton. Ph. D 

Rev. Cameron Harmon, D. D 

and ex-officio member of the Board. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES 

Bishop F. D. Leete Indianapolis. Ind. 

Dr. C. B. Spencer Kansas City. Mo. 

Rev. E. C. Wareing. D. D Cincinnati. Ohio 

EMERITUS TRUSTEES 

Rev. O. H. Clark. D. D 

Rev. F. W. Flint. A. M.. D. D 

Rev. F. M. Van Freese. D. D 



East St. Louis. 111. 

Madison. Wis. 

East St. Louis. 111. 



TERM EXPIRES 1926 

Dr. W. P. McVey Carbondale. Ill 

W. C. Pfeffer Lebanon. Ill 

Capt. E. W. Hersb Newton. Ill 

Rev. W. T. Morris Epworth. Ill 

J. L. McCormick. M. D. Bone Gap. Ill 

Rev. Ressho Robertson. D. D Lawrenceville, 111 

Leonard Carson Granite City. Ill 

J. G. Wilkin . Robinson. Ill 

C. B. Peach . . Lebanon. Ill 

John A. Henley Lichfield. Ill 

Edward E. Miller East St. Louis. Ill 

Rev. Eli Crause Carmi. Ill 

TERM EXPIRES 1927 

Rev. G. R. Goodman. D. D East St. Louis. Ill 

Rev. C. B. Whiteside Centralia. Ill 

Rev. C. L. Peterson. D. D Mt. Vernon 

Frank Condrey Oblong 

Rev. Robert Morris Granite City 

P. M. Johnson St. Elmo 

Rev. C. C. Hall. D. D Mt. Vernon 

Hon. Chas. S. Deneen. A. M.. L. L. D Chicago 

Rev. M. H. Loar Carbondale 

J. B. Stout Lawrenceville 

C. P. Hamill Belleville 

Judge Lewis Bernreuter Nashville 

TERM EXPIRES 1928 

W. R. Dorris O'Fallon 

Rev. O. L. Markman. D. D Mt. Vernon 

John M. Mitchell Mt. Carmel 

Rev. Frank Otto Belleville 

Rev. J. G. Tucker. D. D Carbondale 

H. F. Hecker St. Louis. 

H. H. Bailey Altamont 

Rev. J. O. Wilson. D. D Olney 

Rev. Chas. D. Shumard. D. D Alton 

Ira Blackstock Springfield 

C. M. Roos Cairo 

Judge Chas. H. Miller Benton 

BOARD OF VISITORS 
TERM EXPIRES 1926 

W. I. Terhune • . Flora 



Rev 



Rev' L.'S. McKown Murphysboro 



Rev. Robert Peters 



East St. Lc 



TERM EXPIRES 1927 



J. M. Ada 
T. B. Sowers 



Cairo. 
Frankfort. 



Rev.' W. H. Whitlock . . . ■ Harrisburg. 



19 2 6 







< 



Edward Percy Baker, Dean 

German 
A. B.. Ohio Wcsleyan. 1893. 
Sauveur School of Languages, summer 1896. 
A. M., McKendree College. 1896. 
Graduate studv. University of Berlin. 1896- 
97. 




Belle M. Nixon. Dean of Women 

English 
Illinois State Normal. 1910. 
Ph. B.. University of Chicago, 1912. 
Graduate study, Columbia University, sum- 
mers, 1920-21-23. 
A. M.. Columbia University. 1923. 
Graduate study, summer, 1924. 




William Clarence Walton 

Philosophy and Education 
A. B.. McKendree College. 1892; A. M. 

1894: Ph. D.. 1897. 
Graduate study. University of Chicago, sum- 
mer 1909: University of Illinois, sum- 
mers 1917-18. 




James Clay Dolley. Registrar 

Latin and Greek 

A. B.. Randolph-Macon College. 1888: A. 
M.. 1898. 

Graduate student. University of Wisconsin, 
1917-18. 

A. M.. University of Wisconsin. 1918; Uni- 
versity of Michigan, summer 1922: 
Washington University. 19 22-23: 
American Academy in Rome. and 
travel in Greece, summer 19 24. 



/ 9 



Eiqhte 



€1 



Charles Jacob Stowell 

Mathematics 
B. S., Illinois Wcsleyan University, 1911. 
M. A.. University of Illinois. 1912. 
Ph. D.. University of Illinois, 1917. 
Graduate study, University of Illinois, 1923- 
24. 




Lorraine Pierson 

French 
A. B.. Transylvania University, 1916; A. 

M.. 1917. 
Graduate study. University of Wisconsin, 

summer 1920. 
A. M., University of Chicago, 1922. 




Stanleigh Myron McClure 

Chemistry 

B. S.. Drury College. 1914; M. So, 1915. 

Graduate study. Northwestern University, 
1915-16. 

University of Illinois, summer 1920; Har- 
vard University, summer 1922. 






* K_y 






VS 



William Earp Burns 

Biology 
A. B., Southwestern College. 1913. 
Kansas University. 1913-14. 
Fellow, Kansas University, 1914-15. 
M. S., Kansas University, 1915. 
University of Iowa, 1917-18. 
Yale Army Laboratory. 1919. 



1 9 



Nineteen 



r* 



<t 



Ernest R. Crisp 

Spanish and English 
A. B.. McKendree College. 1913. 
Graduate studv. University of Chicago. 

1016-17. 
Instructor in Panama College. 1 "5 20-24. 




Zella Vivian Brown 

English 
S., University of Missouri. 1924: A. 
1025: A. M.. 1025. 





Ross L. Large 

Social Science 
A. B.. Denver University. 1912: A. M. 

1913. 
Teacher in Philippine Islands. 1914-17. 
Officer in A. E. F., 1 8 months overseas. 
Instructor Colorado State Reformatory. 

1923-24. 



Claude E. Vick 

Education 
S.. University of Illinois. 1925. 



19 2 6 



Twenty 




John William Andrew Kinison 

Bible and Religious Education 

A. B.. McKendree College. 1915. 

B. D.. Garrett Biblican Institute. 1918. 
Graduate study. Washington University. 

1921-22. 
A. M., Washington University, 1922. 




Alleen Wilson 

Librarian 

A. B.. Missouri Weslevan College. 1919. 

Graduate study. Colorado University, sum- 
mer 19 20. 

Summer Library Conference. Madison, Wis- 
consin. 1923. 

University of Illinois Library School, summer 
1024. 




Wesley Charles Kettlecamp 

History 
A. B.. Central Weslevan. 1921. 
A. M.. University of Chicago. 1922. 




James Wendell Dunn 

B. S.. McKendree College. 1925. 
Graduate studv. University of Illinois, sum- 
mers 1924-25. 



/ 9 



Twenty-one 



Oar McKendree 

A College 'mid plains is standing, standing there from olden days. 
The Pioneer of the prairies, first in untrodden ways. 
For service and Christian culture, for efficiency she stands. 
Her sons and daughters praise her. with voices, hearts and hands. 

CHORUS: 

Hail to thee our dear old McKendree, 

May we always loyal be, 

It's a song of praise we'll raise to thee. 

Alma Mater, dear old M-C. 

May we ever own thee true and wise and right. 

Honor Purple and the White. 

And for victory we'll always fight, 

'Till we win for old M-C-K. 

Enduring and strong she stands there, stands upon our College Hill. 
Though others may outnumber, she holds the first place still, 
For beauty and truth and knowledge, and for service without bound. 
Then let us raise our voices, until the plains resound. 



Che 



1 9 




£!&££££ 



Senior Class History 




At the beginning of the school year of 1922 a large num- 
ber of freshmen entered McKendree in the pursuit of a higher 
education. For three years the Class of '26 has met successfully 
the sorrows and joys that are a part of a college education. 
Now, entered upon the fourth and last year of our college life. 
we begin to realize as never before how much it has meant to 
us. We have formed many friendships, both among students and 
professors, which will last through life. Twelve of the original 
members of the Class of '26 have gone through all four years 
together which is an unusually large percentage. 

Many honors have been bestowed upon members of the 
Class of '26. During our sophomore year, the office of presi- 
dent of the Student Association was held by one of our mem- 
bers. Robert Stephens. This is an office seldom held by a sopho- 
more. Again in our junior year the same office was bestowed 
upon another of our members, St. Clair Harris. This year this 
office was held by Paul Schuwerk the first semester and Walter 
Bailey the second semester. 

The Class of '26 has been well represented in Pi Kappa 
Delta, the Press Club, Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. as well as in 
the literary societies. During our junior year the histronic ability 
of the members of our class was ably demonstrated in the pro- 
duction of "Clarence." However, our ability lies not only along 
intellectual, dramatic, and social lines, but along those of ath- 
letics as well. We have been well represented in football, basket- 
ball, and track. 

Looking back upon our four years stay at McKendree, there 
are few changes we would make in our history as a class were it 
within our power to do so. 



1 9 2 6 




George Darrow. A. 

Senior President. 

Track Captain. '26. 

Track. '24-25. 

"M" Club. 

Y. M. C. A. 

Operetta'. "Gypsy Rover," '24. 

McKendrean Staff, '25. 

Plato President. '26. 



St. Clair M. Harris. B. S. 

Philo President, '25. 
Student President. '25. 
Advertising Manager Review. '24. 
Advertising and Business Manager Reviev 

'25. 
Sport Editor McKendrean. '26. 
Band and Orchestra. '23-' 24. 
Bachelor. 
Biologv Assistant. '24-'25. 



ROSCOE HOLLIS. A. 



1 9 



Tiventy-faur 




Christine Karnes. B. S. 

Clio President. '2 5. 
Y. W. C. A. Treasurer. '24-'25. 
Student Association Sec.-Treas.. '26. 
Class Sec.-Treas.. '25. 



John G. Rogers. A. B. 



Ozark Wcsleyan. 
Assistant Coach. 
Athletic Manager. 
Men's Glee Club. 



Kenneth Waggoner, A. 

.'23. 



Illinois University. 
Philo President, '26 



/ 9 



Twenty -five 




William Mowe. B. S. 

Alpha Mu Omega. 



Opal Smith. A. B. 

Clio Vice-President. '26. 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. '23-'24. 

Student Association Secretary-Treasuret 

Glee Club. '25. 

May Fete, '23 -'25. 

Basketball. '2 3. 



James Wendell Walker. A. B. 

Philo. 

Y. M. C. A. 

Student Pastor. 



19 2 6 



Twenty-si* 




Robert Adair. A. B. 

Plato President. '26. 
Pi Kappa Delta. '25. 
Y. M. C. A. President. '26. 
Review Staff. '25. 
McKendrean Staff. '25. 
Ohio Wesleyan. Hamlin. University, 
ington University. '23-'24. 



Thelma Morgan. A. B. 



Clio. 
Y. M. 



William T. 

ident, '2 5. 



Sawyer. A. B. 



Plato p 

Football. '22. 

"Eliza Comes to Stay." '23. 

"Clarence." '25. 

Review Staff. '23-'24-'25. 

Business Manager McKendrean. 

Class President. '24-'25. 



1 9 




Emma Bergman. B. S. 



Pi Kappa Delta. 
Clio. 



Paul E. Schuwerk, 


A 


President Student Association. 


26. 


Pi Kappa Delta. '25-'26. 




Editor Review. '2 6. 




McKendrean Staff. '25. 




Chancellor Plato. '26. 




Junior Vice-President. '25. 




"Clarence." '25. 





Raphael V. Carter. A. B. 

Football. '23-'24-'25. 

Basketball. '24-'25-'26. 

Glee Club. '24-'25-'26. 

Student Association Business Manager. '25. 

Bachelors President. '26. 

Y. M. C. A. 

"M" Club President. '26. 



Twenty-eight 






Edmund 


D. 


Wahl. A. B. 




Central Wesleyan 


'23 


-'24. 




Y. M. C. A. 








Orchestra and Band. 






Glee Club. 








Plato President. 


26. 






Purple Trio. 






Dorothy E. 


Harmon. A. B. 




Barbara Crabbs. A. B 


Missouri Wesleyan. 


'ii. 




Clio President. '25. 


Clio President. '25. 






Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. '23-'24. 


Y. W. C. A. Preside 


nt, '24. 




Glee Club. '23-'24-'25. 


Woman's Debate Ti 


am. '25. 




Vice-President Student Association. 


Pi Kappa Delta. '25 






May Fete. '2 3. 


Press Club, '24-'25 






Basketball. '23. 


Editor Review. '25 






"Gypsy Rover." '24. 


Class Secretary-Treasurer. '25. 




"Clarence." '25. 


McKendrean Staff. 


24. 




McKendrean Staff, '25. 


McKendree Concert 


Company. '25. 







/ 9 



Twenty-nine 




Mrs. Grace Zimmerman, A. B. 



Clio President, 
Y. W. C. A. 



'25. 



Percy J. Hill. B. S. 

Plato. 

Senior Vice-President, '25. 

Assistant in Chemistry. '24-'25. 

Assistant in Physics, '25. 

Bachelor. 



Harry E. Mueller. B. S. 

Plato. 

Violin Instructor. 

Band and Orchestra Director. 

Manager of Quartette. '24. 

Chapel Choister. 



19 2 6 



Thirty 




Wilma Denbeaux Dolley, A B. 

May Fete, '23-'25. 
McKendrean Staff, '25. 
Basketball. '23. 
Y. \V. C. A. 



Walter L. Bailey, A. B. 

President. Y. M. C. A.. '25. 
Editor McKendrean. '25. 
Vice-President Sophomore Class. '24. 
Review Staff. '25. 
Plato President, '25. 
Pi Kappa Delta President. '26. 
Debate Team. '24-'25-'26. 
President Student Association, '26. 
Library Assistant. '23-'24. 
Assistant to Registrar. '25. 
Assistant in English. '26. 



Lloyd F. Pettit, A. B. 



Football Captain. 
Basketball. '26. 
"M" Club. 
Y. M. C. A. 
Alpha Mu Omega. 



25. 



1 6 



Thirty -one 




Earl H. Coen. "Barney' 

OLNEY 

"Sure, he's French.' 



David R. Fleming 

LEBANON 
"A man of family." 



Dorothy L. Dee 

LEBANON 
.\ dainty little maid is she. so prim, so neat. 



John Gardner 

BELLEVILLE 
The more you worry, the sooner uou are dead. 



Daniel S. Gerlach. "Dan" 

SPARTA 
Give me a girl — preferably more of them. 



Thirty-two 



1 Q 2 6 



Ray Goode 
whitehall 

'Greater men than myself have hoed, but I 
doubt it." 



Marvin Grupe. "Grup" 

LEBANON 
'Hush! Then say he once had a girl. 



Ruth DuComb 
keyesport 

7 stood among them, but not of them. 



Wm. Edward Hopper, "Ed" 

ML VERNON 

ieicare the fury of a patient man." ( Monc 

logue addressed to "Leaking Lena.") 



Joseph Hortin. "Joe" 

ALBION 
Sincerity is the foundation of success. 




19 2 6 




John Isom. "Wop" 

CHRISTOPHER 

As an athlete he's little lower than the angels 
and among the stars." 



Mayo L. Magill 

GREENVILLE 
Whate'er he does he does it well." 



Alice Hoye 
christopher 

'Who mixed reason with pleasure and wisdom 
with mirth." 



Maurice McHenry. "Mac" 

LEBANON 

They say that geniuses die young. Be careful, 

"Mac:" 



Noble W. McKnight 

OBLONG 
education is not the thief of time but my 
northerly trips are. 



Thirty-four 



19 2 6 



Lewis V. Peterson. "Peet" 

MT. VERNON 
'A fery model young man whose body is as 
appendage to the wit container above it.' 



C. Kenneth Rippel. "Rip' 

MOBERLY. MO. 

"He has a way with the women." 



Evelyn McGeehon 

OTALLON 

For she is just the quiet kind whose natures 

never vary." 



Charles Walker ."Gyp" 
bone GAP 

Cheerful by disposition and friendly by nati 



Walter Whitlock 
harrisburg 

"I make no lofty claims. 




19 2 6 



Thirty-five 




Guy N. Magill 

GREENVILLE 
'Made up of wisdom and fun. 



Ray Bass 

ELDORADO 
My nature is subdued. To what it works in. 



like the dyer's hand. 



Verna Andrews 

ALTON 
"Modest and retiring." 



Harold M. Brown. "Brownie" 

CENTRALIA 

'It is nice to be natural when one is naturally 
nice. " 



W. Wendel Brown. "Red" 

OFALLON 
'Hands off. McKendree girls! He's taken. 



1 V 2 6 



Minnie Reed Sawyer 
alton. illinois 

'She sings as sweetly as the night- 
ingale." 



Victor A. Haines 

"Business" 

LAWRENCEVILLE, ILLINOIS 

"I'm here for business." 




John C. Hall. "Skipper" 

MT. VERNON. ILLINOIS 

'My one ambition is that I might be rich 

instead of handsome." 



Evelyn McNeely 

Her voice was ever soft, gentle, and lot 
excellent thing in woman." 



Harry E. Brown. "Parson" 

FLORA. ILLINOIS 

'A specialist in ancient history, mythology. 

and long words." 



John Stout 

'A lover of knowledge. 



Jesselyn Grieve 

BELLEVILLE. ILLINOIS 
And those who paint her truest, praise her 



E. Dale Wilson 

NEWTON. ILLINOIS 

The smallest things are often the most 

difficult to deal with." 



19 2 6 



Thirty-seven 



The Junior Hall of Fame 

Who's who in Junior Hall of Fame, we will now to you relate. 
Before we leave our gayety to the class of '28. 

Somewhere in the future, in the journalistic mill. 

As a world renowned sport's writer, you will see our Guy Magill. 

Lebanon sends out Dorothy Dee to make our class more fair. 
A certain diamond tells us she'll be Mrs. "Bob'' Adair. 

Photography is his business: they say that he's some talker 
About his little studio. "Buy pictures from Walker." 

She came to us a simple Reed, a sunny voice had she. 
Now she sings with Sawyer, a duet for life — "do. mi." 

Next comes a Noble one. an ad-man. yes. that's right. 
A ready smile, a bachelor: his other name's McKnight. 

Swift as wind in basketball: all the rooters thrill. 
To see the super-playing of our hero — Mayo Magill. 

Little is seen of Harry Brown in the way of outward show. 
By kindly deeds and words he impresses us. you know. 

Verna Andrews is the queen of intellectual fields. 

By innate sweetness and faith her influence she wields. 

Evelyn McNeely is a debater with an analytic mind. 
Gracious, friendly, patient, yet, she surely is a find. 

Her smile is bright, her heart is true, her jest is free from malice 
The old home town is proud of her. and so are we — 'tis Alice. 

All the members of our crew like the pleasant mien 
And the sweet spirit of Miss Evelyn McGeehon. 

With mind aflame with burning thoughts which issue forth in rhymes, 
His gaze is fixed, his jaw is set; 'tis Daniel penning lines. 

Do you remember one who from life great joy does sip. 

Who has a lovely tenor voice? Of course, you do — 'tis Rip. 

Our chief editor has an envious line which really can't be beat. 

He's gifted with a voice quite rare. We have high hopes for "Peet." 

For a quiet willing worker. Ed Hopper has no peers. 

A smile for all and everything; the future holds no fears. 

Demure as shrinking violets: the library is her home. 
By dint of honest labor, we remember Ruth DuComb. 

With beaming face and an outstretched hand, he greets both great and sr 
For dispelling gloom and sorrow, there's no one like John Hall. 

Since music — especially jazz — morbid thoughts does drown. 
To be a great musician is the aim of Harold Brown. 

Mild in spirit, quiet, demure, in our hearts she leaves 

A tender feeling and respect for the name of Jesselyn Grieve. 

A rising pedagog we have next to present to you. 

Some say that he's a painter, but Grupe says taint true. 

Maurice McHenry and Wendel Brown are steadfastly true blue. 
They live outside McKendree's Hill. We like their point of view. 

A member of the Male Quartette, among singers he's a pearl. 
For everyone sure likes to hear the melodious voice of Earl. 

Fleming is a minister. Hearts with hope he oft does fill. 
While Gardner is a student from the city of Belleville. 

He hurls a mighty javelin, king of the spear is Ray. 
Good fortune smiles on him for he wins in every fray. 

Captain of every sport, his luck will never stop. 

He has a variety of names, but he's better known as "Wop." 

Who's who in Junior Hall of Fame we have to you revealed, 
And now. oh class of '28. our sceptre you may wield. 



1 9 



Thirty-eight 



Sophomore Class 



Russell Isom • ■ President 

JOSEPH HORTIN Vice-President 

VIVIAN YOUNG Secretary -Treasurer 



Allen. Glen 
Bass. Ray 
Barlow. Helen 
Brennan. Clarence 
Brown, F. C. 
Brown, Wensel 
Buess, Alma 
Coale. Ralph 
Cralley. Elza 
Crossley. Alfred 
Douglass. Helen 
Frohardt. Ralph 
Gaskins, M. B. 
Glotfelty, Philip 
Gould, Clifton 
Guandolo, Joseph 
Hardy. Vernal 
Haskins. Glenn 
Hawkins, Leone 
Hazel. Wilma 
Henley. Jean 
Holsinger. Violet 
Hortin, Paul 
Hussong. Earl 
Isom. Russel 
Jack. Charles 
Jessop. Frank 
Johnston. Ben 
Kinsey. Edna 

KOSTOFF, PANDO 

Kolb. Edgar 



Kotelly, Samuel 
Lacquement. Delbert 
Liu. Pinghon Chang 
Lynch, Edna 
Mason. Mary 
McKnight. Eunice 
Metcalf. Henry 
Mowe. Ronald 
Minton, Robert 
Oxendine, Clifton 
Peach, Robert 
Richards. Mary 
Rigg. Camilla 
Robinson, Margaret 
Ruddick, Beulah 
Sawyer, Cyrus 
Seibert. Glenn 
Sites. Lela 
Smith. Eugene 
Sorrells. Robert 
Starr. Ida 
Swaers. Verona 
Taylor. Golda 
Thomas. Harold 
Todd. Erle 
Valette. Amy 
Vance. Helen 
Van Leer. Margaret 
Wahl, Oliver 
Williams. Joseph 
Wills. Grace 
Young, Vivian 



19 2 6 



Thirty-nine 




19 2 6 



Fresh 



man 



Class 



Stephen Kolesa President 

Julia Wilson Vice-President 

EMERY MARTIN Secretary-Treasurer 



Adams. Mary E. 
Baggott. Val M. 
Baker. Lee R. 
Bernreuter. Edward 
Berryman. Sue E. 
Bower. Audrey B. 
Brown. Eugene A. 
Brown. Marian A. 
Campbell. Rorley M. 
Carrothers. Ray A. 
Clark. Norbert G. 
Collins. Granville 
correll. verdie b. 
Coulson. Miriam I. 
Coulter. William 
Cowan. Byron F. 
Culver, Harold W. 
Darner, Carrie R. 
Dillingham. Marion 
Elliott. Marguerite 
Ferrell. E. Helene 
Fischer. Anna 
Fleming, Mrs. Pearl 
Foster. Henry 
Fulton. August 
Glenn. Constance H. 
Glover. Elva E. 
Grantham. Charles 
Harrington. Lenora 
Havill, Frank W. 



Hawkins. Leone 
Hoerscher. Lucille 
Hoover. LaVerne 
Horrell, Dewey 
Hughes. Mary E. 
Hunter. Fay 
Ikemire. Dorothy 
Jacobs. LaVern 
Jasper, John 
Jessop, Fred 
Kaeser, Harold 
Karnes, Marie 
Karsteter. Kelvin 
Kirkbride. Marion 
Koch. Felton 
Kolb. Edgar J. 
Kolesa. Stephen 
Kratzer. William 
Kugler. Morris A. 
Likert. Evelyn 
Magill. Circe 
Martin. Emery 
Meehan. Opal F. 
Mitchell. Lorin 
Moll. Adelia 
Moll. Elsie 
Nance. Alva 
Newton, Thelma 
Nichols. Charles 
O'Donnell. John 
O'Haver. Walter 



Oster. John W. 
Perkins. Thomas 
Pfennighausen. Belle 
Ragland. Paul 
Richards. Herbert 
Runkwitz. Julius 
Schmidt. Leroy 
Schuette. Lewis 
Shepard. Kenneth 
Shore. Irma J. 
Small, Abe 
Smith. Egbert 
Solero. S. Elliott 
Stephens. Emerson 
Stuart. James 
Taylor. Fred 
Teague. Margaret 
Thage. Ellen 
Van Leer. Blanche 
Wattles. Loy 
Weber. Margaret 
Wendt. Rolland 
West. Russell 
White. Frank 
White. James 
Willhite. Laura 
Wilson. Julia 
Young, James 
Young, Ralph 
Young. Robert 



I 9 




Ill 



19 2 6 



Forty-two 



Fine Arts 



The School of Music offers a four-year course of study leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Music. Certificates are also granted in piano, organ, voice, violin, 
and public school music. 

Judging by the increased enrollment in all departments, the past year has 
been a successful one for the School of Music and Expression. Semi-monthly 
afternoon recitals, several public recitals, and a faculty recital have been given. 
A branch studio in piano has been opened in Mascoutah as well as piano and 
violin studios in O'Fallon. 

Students have the opportunity of receiving good training by participating 
in the Glee Clubs, Band, or Orchestra. An operetta, "The Lass of Limerick 
Town," was successfully presented in Lebanon by the Glee Clubs under the 
direction of Miss Pauline Harper. The McKendree Quartette and Glee Clubs 
presented programs in adjoining towns, including a broadcasting program from 
St. Louis. Ten recitals in organ and piano were given in various towns of 
Southern Illinois. "The Taming of the Shrew" was one of several plays given 
under the direction of Miss Olive Patmore. 

Students are fortunate in being able to attend concerts by great artists which 
are frequently given in St. Louis. 



The faculty of the School of Music and Expression consists of the fol- 



lowing 



Grant McDonald 
Pauline Harper 
Olive E. Patmore 
Harry Mueller 



Director and Dept. of Piano 

Voice 

Expression 

Violin 



19 2 6 

IIMcKENl 



Forty-thr 



4013 




Grant McDonald. Director of Music 



Graduate in piano, organ, and theory. Drury 
College Conservatory of Music. 1919. 

Concert work with the Allen Bureau. Lima. 
Ohio. 1919-20. 

Chautauqua work, summer 1921, with Stand- 
ard Bureau. Lincoln. Neb. 

Head of piano department. Ozark Wesleyan 
College. 1921-23. 



Olive E. Patmore 

Expression 

Graduate School of Expression. Trevecca Col- 
lege. 1921. 

A. B.. 1922. 

Graduate work. Boston School of Expression, 
summer 1923. 



R. Pauline Harper 

Voice 

Graduate in Piano and Theory. Missouri Wes- 
leyan College. 1909. 

Graduate Northwestern University in Public 
School Music. 

Graduate in Voice. Missouri Wesleyan. 1920. 

Student of Summer School. University of Dcn- 



Harry Mueller 

Instructor in \ r iolm 
Graduate in Violin. McKcndree Conservatory. 

1918. 
Pupil of Hugo Oik, summer 1921. 
Instructor in Violin. Heink Conservatory, St. 

Louis. 1921. 



19 2 6 



Forty-four 




Grace Wills 

Having completed the two-year course 
Public School Music. Miss Wills received 
certificate from the School of Music. 



Irene Hazel 

Miss Hazel, having completed the tw 
course in Public School Music, received 
tificate from the School of Music. 



Leone Hawkins 

Miss Hawkins received a certificate from the 
School of Music for having completed the two- 
year course in Public School Music. 



19 2 6 



Forty-Hi 




The McKendree Orchestra 

OFFICERS 

President JOSEPH HORTIN 

Vice-President EDWARD FAHNESTOCK 

Secretary -Treasurer RUSSELL IsOM 

Director HARRY E. MUELLER 



With the major part of its personnel retained from last year and with 
the addition of several experienced musicians from the present student body, the 
McKendree Orchestra has this year enjoyed greater popularity than ever. 

Many new numbers have been added to the repertoire this season. These, 
together with the favorites of previous years, proved themselves to be a vital 
part of chapel programs, recitals, concerts, and social affairs by their enthusiastic 
reception. 



19 2 6 



Forty-six 




McKendree College Band 



Harry E. Mueller. Director. 

The activities of the Band began with the opening of the football season. 
Appearing at all local games and accompanying the team on some of its trips 
away from McKendree, it added materially to the enthusiastic spirit so evident 
during every gridiron battle. 

With its members in appropriate uniforms it headed the Home-Coming 
parade and appeared in concert at various times throughout that day. 

A number of other local engagements have proved the Band to be a real 
live musical organization. 



; 9 i 6 



Forty -seven 




Treble Clef Club 



OFFICERS 

President GRACE WILLS 

Secretary-Treasurer HELEN BARLOW 

Librarian VERNA ANDREWS 



The Treble Clef Club, under the direction of Miss Pauline Harper, is 
composed of about twenty members. 

The club was organized in the early fall, and work was carried on in the 
same manner as in a regular class, one credit hour being given each semester. 

The Treble Clef Club joined the Men's Glee Club in a rehearsal once a 
week, and the combined clubs gave several programs during the year. Among 
these was a broadcasting program from station WSBF in St. Louis. The two 
clubs also appeared before the public in Lebanon on April Oth when they pre- 
sented "The Lass of Limerick Town," a light musical comedy. 



/ Q 



Forty-eight 




Mens Glee Club 



OFFICERS 

President EARL HUSSONG 

Vice-President • • KENNETH RlPPEL 

Secretary -Treasurer ROBERT PEACH 

The Men's Glee Club, under the direction of Miss Pauline Harper, has 
enjoyed a very successful season. This year, for the first time, credit has been 
given for Glee Club work. 

Numerous programs, which include the broadcasting from St. Louis, the 
concert at Madison, Illinois, and the light opera. "The Lass of Limerick Town." 
have been given in conjunction with the Treble Clef Club. 

Prospects for an even better club and a more successful season for next 
year are very bright. 



19 2 6 



Forty-nine 



The McKendree Quartette 



The McKendree Male Quartette has now been in tact for 
three years. During this time it has appeared all over Southern 
Illinois taking the fame of McKendree wherever it has gone. It 
has made for itself, in these three years, an enviable reputation as 
an organization giving high-class and enjoyable entertainments. 

The quartette is an ensemble of which the College is justly 
proud. Each member of the organization has a pleasing, well- 
trained voice which blends beautifully with those of the others. 
The members of the quartette are also versatile. Besides being 
able to do his part in the group, each member is a capable soloist 
executing with charm the music in his vocal range. 

This stellar ensemble has been sent out by the president for 
two successive summer seasons as an advertising agency for the 
College. The increased enrollment has been due in part to their 
efforts. 

During the school term, the quartette is in much demand 
in and out of town. Hundreds of entertainments and formal 
programs have be;n given by the quartette since its organization. 
It has also broadcasted from St. Louis. 

The personnel has remained unchanged for three years. 
The members are as follows: Harold M. Brown, Centralia. 
Illinois, first tenor; Kenneth C. Rippel. Moberly, Missouri, sec- 
ond tenor; Earl Hussong, Woodriver, Illinois, first bass; and 
Lewis V. Peterson, Mt. Vernon, second bass. 



1 9 



Fifty 




fLtti<Lni'£tLti 6 ttg 







5TAFF JRk 

, 8 * 



M C KENDREAN 




000 



1 9 Z 6 

fifty -one 




Y. M. C. A. 



OFFICERS 

Robert 

Clarence Brennan 

Josi H 

- Philip Glotfelty 



. ^ . M. C. A. is an organization whose aim is to stimulate and develop 
piritua and in a ;.:. f students on the campus. In the regular de- 
. h ch an held zach Wednesday Evening at 7 o'clock, ques- 
-T+d problems of general interest to the men are discussed. 

Eaci iBTtht - - represented through delegations to the various 

State and National Conferences Thus the local group keeps in touch with 
rgei : : the mtside worldL 



- 







Alpha Mu Omega 



SUIXINS 

Vice-President .... JOHN ] 

Secretary -Treasurer WBLJBUl 



Xor.-r 

LEF 1 Z - 

: i 

it Neal 
The :r :e_e Search 
Month Granth 
Hi :ii Hutchins 

v _ TH 
E - 

Gus Holsinger 

: 
Elliot Solero 
Paul Adams 

y Black 
William S: uth 
E 

WlLLOUBY BRO T 

Harry J -. 

_ Frier 



Residi - • 

Erle Tode 
Li Pfcim 

Ri ssi Isc 

rocK 

Glen Alien 

-_ :: ~ 
v ; Zosle 

Clifi 

:-: - • - usee 

S >E7^ 
H] F 3STEI 

I 



The Press Club 



With the close of the 1925-1926 school year, the McKendree Review, stu- 
dent weekly newspaper of the College, completes its fifth year on the campus. 
As its slogan. "Devoted to the interests of McKendree College." implies, the Re- 
view has for its aim the advancement of McKendree's cause. However, it is 
a true student publication, and it is permitted to operate with a minimum of 
faculty supervision. 

The McKendree Review is published by the Press Club, an organization 
whose membership is placed on a competitive basis. Any student is eligible 
for membership in the club after samples of his work have been submitted and 
satisfactorily passed upon by the faculty advisor and the editor-in-chief. 

To persons interested in journalism as a life profession, the Review offers 
an excellent opportunity to secure practical experience which will be of value 
to them in later years. Members of the staff have, in the past, successfully 
entered the field of journalism after the completion of their college careers. 

Miss Zella V. Brown, of the English Department, has. through the past 
school year, held the office of faculty advisor for the Review. P. E. Schuwerk 
and St. Clair Harris served as editor and business manager respectively during 
the 1925-1926 school term. As both of these men graduate with the class 
of '26, a new editor and a new business manager will be chosen next year. 

The office of the Review, which was provided by last year's staff, is located 
on the first floor of the Chapel Building. The major portion of the publication 
work is done in this office, and a file, which consists of copies of all numbers 
of the Review which date back to the founding of the paper, are kept in 
this place. 

A banquet for members of the staff is provided each year and some authority 
on journalism addresses the staff members at that time. The Review is a 
member of the Illinois College Press Association and is represented each year 
at meetings of that organization. 

Student subscriptions to the McKendree Review are included in the regu- 
lar fees paid each semester. In this way every student automatically becomes a 
subscriber for the paper upon matriculating in the College. Through the 
columns of the Review, former students as well as other friends of the institution 
are enabled to keep in touch with "Old McKendree." 



/ 9 2 6 



J^^l 




19 2 6 




The Bachelors 



Non-Resident Members 

Howard W. Gould. '18 
Ben H. Hall. '20 
Guy E. Tucker. '20 
Lawrence J. East. '21 
Burtis E. Montgomery. '22 
J. Bertram Harmon. '23 
Paul L. Jones, ex.. '23 
Aaron H. Lauchner. ex.. '23 
John W. Cralley. '24 
Noble P. Newsum. '24 
John B. Zimmerman. '25 
J. Wendell Dunn. '25 
Chauncey L. Rockwell, ex.. 
Henry J. Dietz. ex.. '26 
Edwin F. Dickson, ex.. '26 
Frank R. Runyon. ex.. '28 
Harold V. Thomas, ex.. '28 
Clinton V. Harris, ex.. '28 



'25 



Resident Members 

Ray V. Carter. '26 
St. Clair Harris. '26 
Percy J. Hill. '26 
Albert Willis. '26 
Wensel L. Brown. '27 
Noble McKnight. '27 
Guy N. Magill. '27 
Mayo L. Magill. '27 
Clarence R. Brennan. 
Elza M. Cralley. '28 
Ralph E. Frohardt. '28 
Glenn Haskins. '28 
Pando G. Kostoef. '28 
William B. Kratzer. '28 
Stephen A. Kolesa. '29 
Loy Wattles. '29 
Emery Martin. '29 



28 



/ 9 



Fifty-six 




Student Association 



First Semester 

Paul E. Schuwerk 
Evelyn McNeely 
Golda Taylor . 
Glenn Haskins 
Earl Hussong 
Grace Wills 
John Isom 



OFFICERS 



President 

. Vice-President 

Secretary- Treasurer 

Cheer Leader 

Song Leader 

Pianist 

Associate in Athletics 



Second Semester 

Walter L. Bailey 

. Barbara Crabbs 

Christine Karnes 

Glenn Haskins 

Harold Brown 

Margaret Teague 

John Rogers 



The Student Association was organized in 1921. Its purpose is to cen- 
tralize all student activities: to stimulate enthusiasm in behalf of the College, 
and to give support to any student or group of students representing the College. 
Any student who is regularly enrolled automatically becomes a member of the 
Association. 

The Student Association has charge of the chapel exercises each Friday 
morning. After disposing of any business which concerns the student body, 
interesting and entertaining programs are provided by individual students or 
organizations of the College. The Association assists materially in formulating 
and carrying out the Annual Inter-Scholastic and Home-Coming Day programs. 



/ 



Fifty-seven 



Philosophian Literary Society 



The record established by the Philosophian Literary So- 
ciety has been an enviable one. The year of her organization. 
1837, marks her as the oldest literary society west of the Alle- 
gheny Mountains. 

Since 1837, she has sent her members into every honorable 
calling. In politics, religion, teaching, medicine, banking, and 
law, Philos have always led the way. L. Y. Sherman. Charles 
S. Deneen, and Frank Hereford, all eminent men. have sat in 
the Senate of the United States. Great editors from the ranks 
of the Philo are: John Locke Scripps. a founder of the Chi- 
cago Tribune: William E. Hyde, formerly editor of the St. 
Louis Republic, and Isaac N. Higgins. at one time editor of the 
San Francisco Morning Call. Judges William M. Farmer, and 
Charles S. Zane, Philo will always remember with pride. 

The purpose of the Society, as stated in the original consti- 
tution, was "the mutual improvement of its members in ora- 
torical attainments, and scientific and literary pursuits." In ad- 
dition to this, Philos have always enjoyed a spirit of good fel- 
lowship, fostered by the Society. From the aims above stated, 
Philo has never drifted. 

On College Hill, as well as in the outside world, Philo 
has achieved her share of honors. In exhibitions, as in the 
Bryan Essay Contest, she has shown her efficient training. This 
year, the members have been trying to maintain the high stand- 
ard that has been developed in the past. 

Philo will continue to send out her great men into the 
walks of life, and her men will always strive to work toward 
the motto engraved in her star. "Detur Digniori." 



19 2 6 



Fifty-eight 




19 2 6 



Fifty -nine 



The Clionian Literary Society 



The fourteen girls who in 1869 founded the Clionian 
Literarv Society, started a work which has proved of inestimable 
value to the girls of McKendree College. Through these many 
vears Clio has been providing for young women a type of 
intellectual training which no other college organization offers 
them. 

The purpose of Clio is to give its members literary train- 
ing of the practical type which every girl needs in this age. 
It also affords social and moral advantages by bringing the girls 
of the school closer together and developing in them a spirit 
of friendliness and cooperation. 

Since nearly every girl of the College is a member of Clio, 
the year 1925-1926 has been a prosperous and active one for 
the Society. 

Regular meetings are held every Friday evening, and once 
a month occurs the Open Session to which everyone is invited. 

On December eleventh. Clio entertained at its annual ban- 
quet, one of the important social functions of the year, which 
is especially enjoyed by the former Clionians who return for 
that occasion. 

At the time of the McKendree Home-Coming. Clio holds 
her annual reunion where the Clios of today become acquainted 
with the Clios of yesterday, thus strengthening the ties of 
sisterhood. 




19 2 6 



Platonian Literary Society 



From a small band of sixteen men, who in 1849 estab- 
lished the Platonian Literary Society, the organization has 
grown to a large and influential body on and off the campus. 
As the years have gone by, hundreds of men have passed through 
the period of training in Plato and have gone out into the world 
better prepared for life by the practice and training received 
within her classic walls. 

Realizing the value of extra-curricular activities to the de- 
velopment of a foursquare man, men have naturally turned to 
literary work as the best possible means of development out- 
side of their regular scholastic pursuits. It has ever been the 
foremost aim of Plato to develop men to the highest plane 
of literary efficiency. 

Perhaps never in the history of the Society has there been 
a keener interest manifested in the regular Friday meetings than 
has been shown this year. Here each week men match their 
wits in heated debates and receive training in parliamentary drill. 
There is constant practice in the organization and delivery of 
speeches. Through he medium of impromptu speeches men 
learn to think quickly and to make use of their general fund 
of information. 

In order that the members may not become too serious, an 
element of humor is frequently introduced to add spice to the 
meetings. 

Side by side with the literary work, Platonians have de- 
veloped the spirit of fraternity. The aim is to make the Society 
something more than a Friday night meeting. The members 
are active throughout the week, taking prominent parts in all 
student activities and constantly striving for a bigger and better 
Plato. 



1 9 



Sixty-two 




19 2 6 



Sixty-three 



Pi Kappa Delta 

Illinois Theta Chapter 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



Dr. Cameron Harmon 
Dean E. P. Baker 
J. W. A. Kinison 



Belle M. Nixon 
Olive Patmore 



Robert C. Adair . ■ . 


. '26 


Walter L. Bailey . 


. '26 


Emma Bergmann . . 


. '26 


Dorothy Harmon 


. '26 


Paul E. Schuwerk . 


. '26 


Joseph L. Hortin 


. '11 


Alice Hoye . . . 


. '11 


Evelyn McNeely 


. '11 



STUDENT MEMBERS 

Lewis V. Peterson 
Vivian Young . 
Clarence Brennan 
Alma Buess . . 
Joseph Guandola 
Mary Richards . 
Eugene Smith . . 



'11 
'11 
'28 
'28 
'28 
'28 
*28 



The Illinois Theta Chapter of Pi Kappa Delta, national honorary forensic 
society, was established at McKendree College in the spring of 1924 with ten 
members. 

Pi Kappa Delta has 1 1 2 chapters in the United States, and students win- 
ning forensic honors at McKendree College are thus given national recognition. 
Membership in the organization is open to those who have represented their 
college in a recognized intercollegiate oratorical contest or debate. 

The Southern Illinois-Southeast Missouri Oratorical Association, organized 
in 1925 under the direction of the Illinois Theta Chapter, met again at Mc- 
Kendree College, where six colleges were represented. Two classes, one for 
men and one for women, were held in the contest which took place in the after- 
noon and evening of April 16.1926. Each college sent representatives to the 
contest in oratory and extemporaneous speaking. 

In December, 1925, McKendree added distinction to her forensic activities 
by gaining admission to the State Oratorical Association. 

In debates the women's teams met teams from Greenville and Shurtleff. 
The men's teams likewise debated teams from these colleges. The men's negative 
team also met a team from the State Teachers' College of Cape Girardeau, Mis- 
souri, and the men's affirmative team met the negative team of St. Louis Uni- 
versity. The question used by both men and women was the Pi Kappa Delta 
debate question: "Resolved, that the United States Constitution should be 
amended to give Congress power to regulate Child Labor." 

The debating teams were as follows: 

Women 



Affimative 
Dorothy Harmon 
Alma Buess 
Evelyn McNeely 

Affirmative 
Walter L. Bailey 
Joseph L. Hortin 
Eugene Smith 



Men 



Negative 

Alice Hoye 
Vivian Young 
Mary Richards 

Negative 
Paul Schuwerk 
Clarence Brennan 
Joseph Guandola 



/ 9 




19 16 



Sixty-five 




y. w. c. a. 



OFFICERS 

President DOROTHY DEE 

Vice-President JESSELYN GRIEVE 

Secretary HELEN BARLOW 

Treasurer CHRISTINE KARNES 

Undergraduate Representative ALMA BUESS 

The members of the Young Women's Christian Association, one of the 
active religious organizations on the campus, strive to live unreservedly Jesus' 
Law of Love. 

Helpful and inspiring devotional meetings are conducted every Wednesday 
evening by the women of the faculty and of the student body. 

Representatives are rent each year to the State and Geneva Conferences to 
increase their knowledge of the great work of the Association and to learn better 
methods of carrying on the work of the local organization. 



/ 9 



Sixty-six 




Sp6tiS 





The Coaching Staff 



Coach Glenn F. Filley in his first year as mentor of the Purple athletics has 
won the respect and confidence of the entire student body and the friends of the 
College. 

During his four years as a student at Missouri Wesleyan. he played under 
the direction of Earl A. Davis, whom he succeeded as coach of the Bear Cats 
a year ago. While in school at Wesleyan. Coach Filley was chosen captain of 
the All-Conference football team, and also captain of the Varsity track and 
basketball teams. He coached high school athletics two years at Grand Island, 
Nebraska, and last year his track team won the state championship. 

All through the past season, purple teams have ranked high in the Con- 
ference and have attained their positions under the direction of our coach who 
takes a firm stand for clean play and clean athletics. He gets the most from 
his teams, also. 

Much of the success of the season is due to the work of John Rogers, who 
has been assistant coach. "Jack" has played the game and can tell others 
how to play it. We are afraid we will lose him next year, but we are sure 
that some team will profit by his coaching. 



19 2 6 



Sixty-seven 




**• .' ~r,.;^^ , 



Football Scores 





CONFERENCE 


McKendree 
McKendree . . 
McKendree . . 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 


. . . . 
. ... 27 
. ... 21 
. ... 13 
. . . . 3 
. . . . 6 


Knox 

Lincoln 

Macomb 

Shurtleff 

Carthage 

Carbondale 


TOTALS . . 


. ... 70 


TOTALS 



NON-CONFERENCE 



McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 

TOTALS 



GRAND TOTAL 



Rolla . . . 
Springfield 
Cape Girardeau 



TOTALS 



GRAND TOTAL 



40 

19 



59 
93 



19 2 6 



Football Summary 



At the opening of college last fall, Coach Filley found that 
only seven letter men had returned to school. However, the 
squad settled down to hard work and, as the time for the first 
game drew near, the prospects at the McKendree camp became 
brighter. 

The first game of the season was with the strong Knox 
College eleven who had been runners-up to the Bear Cats in the 
conference race the previous year. The Siwash handed the 
Purple their first and only conference defeat in two years. Al- 
though this defeat cost McKendree the title, it served to put the 
team in a fighting spirit and no other team in the "Little Nine- 
teen" scored against them during the remainder of the season. 

The next two games were with non-conference teams and, 
although both were lost, the team displayed a more consistent 
attack and a stronger defense than before. The Rolla School of 
Mines, represented by one of the strongest teams ever turned out 
at that school, showed a powerful scoring machine and won a 
decisive victory. 

The following week the Springfield Teachers won a hard 
game from the Filley-men at Springfield. The Teachers led 7-0 
at the end of the third period, then, by taking advantage of the 
breaks of the game, raised the final score to 19-0. 

Lincoln College was the first conference foe to fall before 
the Bear Cats. The Filley-men scored four touchdowns and 
three tries-for -point to score a 27-0 victory, thus starting the 
drive which gave them fourth place in the final standings. 

The gridiron opponent for the Third Annual Home- 
Coming was the Macomb Normal team. Early in the game the 
Purple scored on a 60-yard return of a punt. Macomb had 
plenty of fight and "pep," but the Bear Cats played their best 
game of the season up to that time, scoring 21 points, while they 
held the Teachers scoreless. 

Shurtleff College, as was expected had a fast team which 
offered strong competition at all times. The game was played 



1 9 



in a sea of mud, and, after taking a 13-0 lead at the half, Mc- 
Kendree was content to play safe and hold their lead. 

Coach Omer's eleven from Carthage played the last home 
game of the season which proved a fitting climax. The Purple 
were striving to keep their record of no defeats in three years 
on Hupes' Field intact. The "fighting spirit" and speed of the 
Bear Cats proved to balance the weight of the Carthage squad 
and until the closing minutes of the game the score was dead- 
locked, 0-0. A drop kick from the 30-yard line in the last two 
minutes gave McKendree a well-earned victory, 3-0. 

The final conference tilt of the season was played at Car- 
bondale with the S. I. N. U. team. Injuries received in the 
Carthage game weakened the locals and only after a hard fought 
game were the Teachers beaten 6-0. This game was the fifth 
straight conference victory for the Bear Cats, during which time 
they made seventy points while they held their opponents score- 
less. 

On Turkey-day the Filley-men journeyed by Fords to 
Cape Girardeau where they battled to a scoreless tie in a driv- 
ing rain. Many times the Missourians were forced back and it 
seemed that the Bear Cats would score, but the wet ball in- 
variably caused a fumble. The final whistle found the ball in 
the middle of the field. 

Since only two of the men receiving letters this year will 
be lost through graduation, the prospects for a second conference 
championship next year are bright. With the aid of the veterans 
who will return to college next fall and a number of freshmen 
to choose from. Coach Filley will have another formidable ag- 
gregation out scrambling with the other members of the con- 
ference for the peak of the final standing. 



19 2 6 



LLOYD PETTIT. "Speed" — Captain 

PATTONSBURG. MO. 

Lloyd "Speed" Pettit. captain of the 1925 

3car Cat gridiron team, will be lost through 

graduation this year. "Speed" played tackle on 



the Purple line for three years and w< 
letters from McKendree. 



thr 



JOHN ISOM, "Wop" — Captain-Elect. 
CHRISTOPHER. IEL. 
Isom. captain-elect, is another three-letter 
man in football. His play at halfback during 
the time he has been in school has been one 
of the features of the games. He is a natural 
player and will be an ideal captain for next 
season. 



Raphael Carter. "Ray" 

CARTERVILLE. ILL. 
"Ray." one of the two players to b 
this year, has won football letters the th 
years he has been on College Hill. The cente 
position was always well handled when Carte 
was in the game and he 
the 1926 eleven. 



ost 



be missed from 



Joseph Guandolo. "Joe" 

CONWAY. PENN. 
Although only a sophomore, "Joe" made 
his second varsity letter this year. In all of 
the games he did star playing at end both on 
defense and offense. 




1 9 2 6 



seventy-one 




Erle Todd. "Toddy" 

CONWAY. PENN. 
Todd played quarter for the second consecu- 
tive year and is a two-letter man who has twc 
more years to play for McKendree. 



M. B. Gaskins, "Mose" 
HARRISBURG. ILL. 
"Mose." in his first year of football at 
McKendree. played a clean, hard game at tackle. 
He should develop into a real star. 



Delbert Lacquement. "Lacky" 

COLLINSVILLE, ILL. 

Lacquement. by his determination and hard 

tackling developed into a star this year. He 

has been in school two years and has gained 

the coveted "M" twice. He plays guard. 



EARL COEN. "Barney" 
OLNEY. ILL. 
"Barney." also a two-letter man. played 
halfback. He was always able and ready to add 
a few yards when called upon. 



Robert Minton. "Bevo" 

MURPHYSBORO. ILL. 
"Bob" won his second letter this year and 
will be back in school another year to play 
the game. He was a consistent player at tackle 
and could always be depended upon to stop 
an offense or help in starting an attack. 



Seventy-two 



Joseph Williams, "Pokey" 

POCAHONTAS. ILL. 
"Pokey." a sophomore, earned his first 
sity letter this year. He played in the g 
position and was like a "stone wall.' 



William Smith. "Bill" 

WHITE HALL. ILL. 
"Bill's" punts were always good for a 
gain and he played a strong game at fullback. 
He is a member of the class of '28 and has 
two service stripes to his credit. 



Stephen Kolesa. "Steve" 

EDWARDSVILLE. ILL. 
"Steve" was a speed demon on the field 
and. although only a freshman, he played half- 
back and won his letter. 



Clifton Gould. "Hurley" 

MT. CARMEL. ILL. 

"Hurley" was a good mate for Guandola for 

these two were always in the game, giving the 

two-letter man 

the Bear Cat 



best they bad. Gould is 
and has two more years 
eleven. 



Ray Goode. "Ray" 
WHITE hall. ill. 

"A hard fighter all the time" will charac- 
terize Goode's playing at guard. Ray. who has 
already made two letters, has one more year 
to play. 




1 9 



Seventy-three 




Basketball Scen- 



es 



CONFERENCE 



McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 



37 
23 
29 
40 
16 
29 
26 
23 



Lincoln 

Shurtleff . 

Shurtleff 

Lincoln 

Macomb 

Carthage 

Carbondale 

Carbondale 



24 
8 
16 
16 
20 
30 
24 
17 



NON-CONFERENCE 



McKendree 36 

McKendree ... .30 

McKendree 28 

McKendree 26 



McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 

TOTALS 



22 
22 
45 
33 

465 



Scott Field 
Concordia 
Belleville M. E. 
Rolla . . . 
Springfield 
Springfield 
Drury . 
Rolla . . . 



TOTALS 



13 
35 
25 
21 
43 
25 
21 
10 

348 



/ 9 



Seventy-four 



Basketball Summary 



With four letter men back from last year's championship 
basketball squad around which to build a team. Coach Filley 
placed a fast combination on the floor. Of the sixteen games 
played during the season, ten were victories for McKendree. 
Eight of the contests scheduled were with conference teams and 
five of these games were annexed by the local quintet. 

The first game of the season was with the team from Scott 
Field. The aviators failed to be a serious threat at any time 
during the game. The Purple mentor used three different teams 
in the contest and tried out several combinations. 

Concordia Seminary was the next opponent and, due to 
the fact that several of our basketball men were out for football 
and not accustomed to the floor, the Lutherans nosed out a 
35-30 victory. The Bear Cats were doped to be easy victims, 
but they soon found their stride and forced the game along at 
top speed. Three times during the closing minutes of the game 
the score was tied, but several long shots gave Concordia the 
heavy end of the score. 

McKendree defeated the First M. E. Church team of Belle- 
ville in a listless game the next week. Coach Filley sent four- 
teen players into the game so that he might get some idea of the 
combination to be used in the conference games. 

The Rolla Miners were the next victims of the Bear 
Cats when McKendree played there the first of a four-game series 
in Missouri. The Miners played a hard and fast game and 
were leading 15-14 in the half. McKendree opened with a burst 
of speed during the last half taking a lead which held their op- 
ponents for a 26-21 victory. 

The following night the Bear Cats played the first of 
two games with the Springfield Teachers. Both teams played 
stellar ball with the lead changing hands often. In the last 
half Magill who had been scoring heavily was disqualified, and 
the Teachers ran wild during the last few minutes to a lead of 
43-22 at the end of the game. The second game was dropped 
to Springfield on the following night by the score of 25-22. 

An even break on the trip was made when Drury was 
trounced by the Filley-men 45-21. This game was not as hard 



1 9 



as was expected because of the failure of Drury to break through 
the Purple defense. 

The Lincoln College team was the first conference foe of 
the Bear Cats, and suffered one of the three reverses they met 
during the season. Although five reserves went into the game 
during the last few minutes. Lincoln failed to gain on them. The 
final result was in favor of McKendree. 

The game with Shurtleff on the local floor was annexed 
by the Purple quintet with little trouble. The following week 
McKendree went to Shurtleff and won the second game from the 
Pioneers by the score of 29-16. These two victories gave the 
Bear Cats a good chance for the championship of Southern 
Illinois which they eventually won. Brown's speed and basket- 
shooting were strong factors in both of these triumphs. 

A three-game invasion up-state found the Bear Cats in a 
basket-shooting slump and. although they out-played their op- 
ponents, they lost all three games. The first game of the trip 
was dropped to Lincoln. The Railsplitters featured with long 
shots, and. when the final whistle blew, the Purple were forced 
to accept defeat. 

On the night following the defeat at Lincoln. Macomb 
nosed out a close victory over Coach Filley's squad. This game 
was hard fought and neither team had a safe lead at any time. 
Jack played a brilliant game and led his team in scoring. The 
final result was 20-16 in favor of Macomb. 

After out-playing Carthage during the early part of the game, 
the Purple five lost, 30-29. The local team had a twelve-point 
lead at the half, but the "jinx" would not let them win on the 
road trip. 

The losing streak was broken after a thrilling contest with 
S. I. N. U. It was any one's game until the last play when 
McKendree held to a 26-24 lead. 

Rolla found Carter and Kostoff too willing to break up an 
attack when the two teams met the second time, and the 
Purple administered them a set back of 3 3-10. 

The final game of the season was with Carbondale. By win- 
ning it, McKendree won the Southern Illinois title. The Teach- 
ers proved more invincible than had been expected and only after 
a hard struggle were the Bear Cats victors by a 23-17 score. 



1 9 







\ 



JOHN ISOM. "Wop." Captain 
CHRISTOPHER. ILL. 
Although forced out of most of the 
°ames by an injury received in football. 
"Wop" showed his old skill and speed 
at guard while in the game. He will be 
ineligible next year since he has already 
won four letters. 



Wensel Brown 
"Brownie" 

GRANITE CITY. ILL 
Eor the second year. 
"Brownie" has won a let- 
ter in basketball. One of the 
features of the game was his 
fast floor-work and drib- 
bling. He was an excellent 
shot from any part of the 
floor. 



Pando Kostoff 
"Pancho" 
GRANITE CITY. ILL. 
Pando displayed plenty 
of fight and ability this year 
to make a regular position at 
guard. This year he earned 
his first varsity "M." but he- 
has two more years to play. 



Charles Jack. "Charlie" 

, Captain-Elect. 
OPDYKE. ILL. 
Jack made his first letter this year 
and has two more years at McKendree. 
He played center on the 1926 team and 
was always reliable both on defense and 
offense. 




1 9 



Seventy-seven 



Raphael Carter, 
carterville, 



■Ray' 
,L. 



"Ray" has played guard on the Bear 
Cat five for three years. He will gradu- 
ate this spring. His work on the floor 
has been consistent and dependable. 



Mayo Magill 

"Mac" 

GREENVILLE. ILL. 

"Mac" is a junior and 
a three-letter man in basket- 
ball. His speed and his ac- 
curate eye for the basket won 
or him the place of high- 
point man of the season. 




Clifton Gould 

"Hurley" 
MT. CARMEL. ILL. 



"Hurley" played a fast 
floor game and was good for 
points at a critical time. This 
was his first vear to receive 
a basketball letter. 



Lloyd Pettit. "Speed" 

PATTONSBURG. MO. 

"Speed" is a senior this year. His 
position was at center where he played 
a steady, hard game. This was his first 
"M" received on the basketball floor. 



1 V 



Seventy-eight 




Track 



Review for 1925 



Only two dual meets were scheduled for the track squad last year and 
both proved to be victories for the Bear Cats. A dual meet was held with Shurt- 
leff, and the local team piled up 91 y^ points to 38 x /i for the Pioneers. 

The second dual meet was with Ewing College where first honors were 
annexed by the Purple. 

In the state meet at Galesburg, Goode broke his own record in the javelin 
and placed second in the discus throwing. He also carried off second honors 
with the javelin at the Drake Relays and third at the National Meet in Chicago. 

Other events at the state meets in which McKendree placed near the top 
were the pole vault, relay, and 100-yard dash. 



With seven letter men from last year's track squad again in college a 
successful season is expected during the 1926 season. 




Baseball Summary 



For the first time in three years McKendree College had a baseball team 
last season. Prospects seemed good at first, but a rather disastrous season re- 
sulted. Although only one game was captured by the Purple baseball team 
and seven were lost, the members of the squad had the pep and dash which 
gave their opponents no rest. 

A team is being organized at the present time and games are being booked 
with nearby schools. At precent games are scheduled with Eden and Concordia 
Seminaries. 

BASEBALL SCORES (1925) 



McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 



4 


Washington Univ. 


. . 6 


1 


Washington Univ. 


. . 7 


7 


Eden Seminary 


. . 10 


6 


Concordia Seminary 


. . 10 


4 


SburtlefT 


. . 6 


1 


ShurtlefF 


. . 12 


8 


Ewing College 


. . 1 


2 


Concordia Seminarv 


. . 7 



Eighty 



19 2 6 



The Eighth Annual Interscholastic 



Six records were broken in the track and field events of the Eighth Annual 
Interscholastic, which was held at McKendree on May 2, 1925. This is one fact 
which points to the ever increasing success of this annual event. 

Competition for the highest honors among the thirty-six high schools of 
Southern Illinois that were present was very keen. In the track meet Eldorado 
led victoriously with twenty-four and one-half points, nosing out Staunton 
by the bare margin of one-half point. Mt. Carmel obtained third place with 
a total of thirteen and one-half points. Eldorado also won the mile relay in 
the record-breaking time of three minutes, thirty-six and four-fifths seconds. 

The following is a list of the events with the winners of each: 

Shot-put: Breidenstein, Eldorado — 47 feet 7 inches. 

220-yard low hurdle: Votaw. Mt. Carmel — 27.4 seconds. 

Broad jump: H. Murphy, Eldorado-Votaw, Mt. Carmel — 22 feet 3 3 4 
inches. 

Mile run: Church, Lebanon — 4 minutes 50.2 seconds. 

Discus: Arniciar, Staunton — 126 feet 10 inches. 

Pole Vault: Aue, Staunton — 11 feet. 

Javelin: Tison, Eldorado — 160 feet 8 inches. 

440-yard run: First race, Wilson, Staunton: second race, Lichenfeld. 
Centralia — 54.6 seconds. 

High jump: Skinner, Carlinville — 5 feet 9 inches. 

100-yard dash: Harris, East St. Louis — J 0.1 seconds. 

880-yard run: First race, Lording, Chester — 2 minutes 10.2 seconds. 
Second race, Lomelino, Modesto — 2 minutes 7.3 seconds. 

220-yard dash: Harris, East St. Louis — 23 seconds. 

In the straight sets of the tennis tournament, Centralia won from Granite 
City in the finals, and Mascoutah defeated East St. Louis in the singles. 

Centralia also won the intellectual meet of the Interscholastic with eighteen 
points while O'Fallon and Eldorado tied for second and third places with six 
points each. 

The ninth McKendree Interscholastic will be held Saturday, May 1, 1926. 



Eighty-one 




The "M" Club 



MEMBERS 

FOOTBALL: Dr. Cameron Harmon, Lloyd Pettit, Raphael Carter, Ray 
Goode, John Isom, Clifton Gould, Samuel Todd, Joseph Guandolo, Del- 
bert Lacquement, Stephen Kolesa, Joseph Williams, M. B. Gaskins, Robert 
Minton, William Sawyer. 

BASKETBALL: Raphael Carter, John Isom, Mayo Magill. Wensel Brown, 
Clifton Gould, Pando Kostoff, Charles Jack. Lloyd Pettit. 

BASEBALL: John Isom, Wensel Brown. Stephen Kolsca, John Hall, Erie 
Todd. Joseph Guandolo, Charles Jack. 

TRACK: John Isom. George Darrow, Ray Goode, Wendell Dunn, Clifton 
Gould, Stephen Kolsea, Lewis Peterson, Russel Isom. 

TENNIS: Glenn Allen. 



19 2 6 



Eighty -two 



Last Will and Testament of the Class of '26 



We, the Senior Class of 1926. being in our safe, sane, and sound minds do hereby draw 
up our last will and testament. 

To the Juniors we bequeath our recipe. "How to become a successful senior;" to the 
Sophomores the art of handshaking; and to the Freshmen the ability to act dignified when 
occasion demands. 

The individual members of the Class of 1926. in order to promote happiness and the 
general welfare, do hereby make the following personal bequests: 

Robert Adair, his argumentative disposition to John Hall. To him who hath, more shall 
be given. 

Walter Bailey, his executive ability to Jack Jasper that his dignified appearance may have 
something to back it up. 

Ray Carter, his athletic ability to Roscoe Hollis. who at present is high-point man as a 
Beau Brummel. 

George Darrow. his ability to sleep in class to Kenneth Rippel — anything to keep him 
out of mischief and thus bring relief to long suffering professors. 

St. Clair Harris, the assistant professorship in Science to "Wop" Isom. 

Percy Hill, his reputation as a gay Lothario to Daniel Gerlach. the poet laureate of 
McKendree. 

Wilburn Mowe. his ability as a chauffeur to "Peet" Peterson. It will be useful in contend- 
ing with "Lena." 

Harry Mueller, his artistic tendencies to John Oster. 

"Speed" Pettit. his avoirdupois to Frank White, the human exponent of a straight line — 
occupying little or no space. 

John Rogers, his dimples to Edna Lynch. 

William Sawyer, his talent as an actor to Todd, the Apollo of the campus. 

Paul Schuwerk. his wonderful "line" to Sam Kotelly. who can develop it in several 
languages. 

Kenneth Waggoner, his intellectual appearance to Jack Haskins. 

Edmund Wahl. his permanent wave to Edna Kinsey. 

James Walker, his ability as a clear thinker to Brigham Young. 

Emma Bergman, her studiousness to "Mose" Gaskins. who has time for everything but 
study. 

Barbara Crabbs. her solemn disposition to Alma Buess, who is often inclined toward undue 
levity. 

Christine Karnes, her coquettishncss to Jesselyn Grieves. 

Thelma Morgan, her chief outside activity, "Poky," to anyone who will promise to 
cherish him tenderly. 

Opal Smith, her ability as a vamp to Ruth DuComb. 



19 2 6 

Eighty-three 




*.J 







J5oRMl7nfltE5 



PhbF. StnlL.y 



CAMPU5 



CvM« F,LLb 



1 





^cKCamP^ 



,^AVB(?\ /v\Hlu> 



FIXTURE 5 



P*T' 





P, N(WG H^ 




jjE/.*N.«»«fc/Vtai.pMiu;M 



ftjttF. PiCKbPN 



19 2 6 



Eiqhtu-four 



Those Happy Days 



SEPTEMBER 3. Doors of McKendree open and "Frosh" pass into the land 
of corn flakes and scrambled eggs. 

SEPTEMBER 4. Where is room 4? What is a registrar? I want to take 
chemistry, French, "math," and physics. 

SEPTEMBER 5. Too bad the Shenandoah got wrecked. It's hard to keep 
cool and collected today. 

SEPTEMBER 7. Joint Home-Coming of McKendree and Lebanon. "Frosh" 
get humble as the upper-classmen look them over. 

SEPTEMBER 8. "Y" social. Wisht I could remember who that black-haired 
girl was. 

SEPTEMBER 9. Strangers decide that the democratic drinking cup breaks 
the ice better than parties. 

SEPTEMBER 10. Faculty get in their bluff. 

SEPTEMBER 11. Dear Mother: "I'll be home in twelve more weeks if I 
don't get sent home sooner," — "Fat" Jasper. 

SEPTEMBER 12. Met another person at the Epworth League social. 

SEPTEMBER 14. Look here "Frosh!" My name is Rocky: Just remember 
that the seat next to Alma in the library belongs to me. 

SEPTEMBER 15. "Red" Collins gets a letter from his "love-bird." 

SEPTEMBER 16. To think that Wednesday night is dedicated to dating! 
"Bo" steps out with "Satch." 

SEPTEMBER 17. Faculty women pour cocoa for us tonight. "How wet is 
the college pond, upper-classmen ?" 

SEPTEMBER 18. "There ain't no justice, is there Bill?" The training table 
motto is: "They shall not pass." 

SEPTEMBER 19. Walked down the front walk for the fifty-first time. 

SEPTEMBER 21. Why didn't I study Saturday? 

SEPTEMBER 22. Girls wear best manners to Faculty Dames tea. 

SEPTEMBER 23. "Frosh" show their true color. If we only could wear 
green caps. 

SEPTEMBER 24. "Viv" entertains a Florida million (in the aire). 

SEPTEMBER 25. Rah! for McKendree. Hard luck, Scott Field! 

SEPTEMBER 26. What a storm! McKendreans seek shelter at Centralia's 
banquet. 

SEPTEMBER 27. "I wish my folks would move to Millstadt." — "Rip." 

SEPTEMBER 28. Six weeks exams. — Did you say scared' Freshmen write 
home to explain what hard courses they're taking. 



1 9 



Eighty -five 



October 


1. 


October 


2. 


October 


3. 


October 


4. 


October 


5. 


October 


6. 


October 


7. 


October 


8. 


October 


9. 


October 


10. 


October 


11. 


October 


13. 


October 


14. 


October 


15. 


October 


16. 


October 


17. 


October 


18. 


October 


19. 


October 


20. 


October 


21. 


October 


22. 


October 


23. 


October 


24. 



Paul Hortin finds his ideal girl. 

A Tuxedo is worn to Philo open session. New social cus- 
tom established. 

Townspeople open their homes to us. McKendree loses to 
Knox at Galesburg. 

Catting on the partnership plan begun. Girls keep engage- 
ment books. 

Girls become little again. Wasn't Audrey darling in her 
pinafore.'' 

Journalism class encourages the Belleville Advocate. 

Miracles! A speaker gives up the privilege of charming us. 

Migrations to St. Louis to do Christmas shopping. Giant 
and Pewee game. 

Prof. Large: "Miss Reed, could I hold you a moment after 
class?" 

Well — Rolla Miners won from us 40-6, but we're not down- 
cast. 

Ray Carter isn't so sure that a woman rules the home — yet. 

John Crow Hall asks to be excused from journalism a few 
moments to apply for the Rhodes Scholarship. 

Sam Kotelly rolls in the sod. A collar bone will heal how- 
ever. 

Bible students pray over mistakes made in Bible exam. 

Boys green with envy because of Herb's red Ford. 

Bad beginning. Luck will come. Springfield Teachers 
win game, 1 9-0. 

Fuse blows out when we are in the notion of studying. 
Well, there's a light at Bill's. 

McKendree's temporary orphans view "Orphans of the 
Storm." 

Did Apolonius of Tyre have anything to do with auto tires' 
Advanced French class seeks information. 

Informal reception. Tired hands, throats, and feet. We 
strut our etiquette. 

Midnight candy patrons given unusual welcome by "Rip." 

Luck starts — and we rolled old Lincoln in the sod. 27-0. 

"Cy" and "Min" decide to face the world together. Sh! 
This is a secret until November 16. Don't tell a soul. 



19 2 6 



OCTOBER 26. To cat or not to cat! That is the question. Whether 
'twould be more beneficial to mail a laundry bag home or 
take his girl to Bill's — bewilders the young Romeo. 

OCTOBER 28. Anyhow I only flunked two exams. My folks shouldn't 
care about that. 

OCTOBER 31. We wallop Macomb, 20-0. "Hail to thee our dear old Mc- 
Kendree." Alumni and friends come home. Hallowe'en 
party. Witches! 

NOVEMBER 2. Why couldn't we just sleep until next Home-Coming: 
This world isn't made right. 

NOVEMBER 3. "Susie" is entirely too rough to belong to Clio this year. 
Only Rocky can appreciate our "bar." 

NOVEMBER 4. Six weeks honor roll. Is your name written there? 

NOVEMBER 6. "And the king said, 'Daniel come forth and Daniel slipped 
and came fifth'." — John Hall. 

NOVEMBER 7. The Bear Cats scratch Shurtleff 13-0 in a hard fought 
tussle. 

NOVEMBER 9. Joe Hortin as he fastened his eyes on the hash: "Pass th t 
Review of Reviews." 

NOVEMBER 10. "Bob" and "Peet" trust students. Candy Honor System. 

NOVEMBER 12. Students resigned to "no vacation." 

NOVEMBER 14. Give fifteen rahs for the team and sing the Alma Mater song 
before you leave the field. Score 3-0. You're good 
losers, Carthage. 

NOVEMBER 15. Boys wish the girls would go out every Sunday for dinner. 

NOVEMBER 16. The cat is out of the bag. "Cy" and Minnie announce 
their marriage. 

NOVEMBER 17. "Fat" Jasper thinks that pauses grow on cats. 

NOVEMBER 18. Edna Kinsey proposes to Rowell and gets turned down. Oh, 
Listerine, where is thy victory ? 

NOVEMBER 19. Let's sing that pretty little thing, 'La Valliere from Wools- 
worth! Next, "The Refrain from Spitting." B. C. 
Boys in Chapel. 

NOVEMBER 21. We meet the enemy and they are ours. McK., 6 — S. I. N. 
U., 0. 

NOVEMBER 22. Rumors of a vacation. Hopeful students pack their bags. 

NOVEMBER 24. Daniel asks Tillic for a date. "I'm sorry Daniel, but — 

NOVEMBER 25. The faculty remember that they were young once. Tell 
mother we'll be there and have the turkey rare. 

NOVEMBER 30. Freshman "Prexy" lodged in jail for a golden hour. Ques- 
tion: Where was the freshman party? 



19 2 6 



Eiqhtii-seven 



December 1 

December 2 

December 3 

December 4 

December 5 

December 6 

December 7 

December 8 

December 9 

December 10. 

December 1 1 . 

December 12. 

December 13. 

December 14. 

December 16. 

January 5. 

January 6. 

January 7. 

January 9. 

January 10. 

January 12. 

January 14. 

January 15. 

January 17. 



Just fifteen more days and we won't be here. 

"Business" Haines, owing to rush of affairs, has only 22}'2 
seconds to spend eating dinner. 

Prospective debaters work feverishly on manuscripts. 

"I look at my watch because I have it with me." — Dr. 
George L. Nucholls of Denver, Colo. 

Are there any books on etiquette in the library? 

Is that Mayo? One wouldn't have known him. Where 
did you go? What did you have to eat? 

Everyone votes for the World Court. 

Oh, judges, we're here! "Viv" shuffles her cards and wins. 

All the candy is gone, but see the Japanese booth. What 
pretty rooms you girls have! Are they always this 
clean? How remarkable! 

Who are you taking to the banquet? Mean old appendicitis 
to make our Julia suffer. 

Ed. where did you get that beautiful black eye? Journal- 
ists visit the Post-Dispatch. Coach Filley interviews a 
speed cop. 

The banquet is on. Please do be formal. 

"Viv" holds an etiquette meeting. 

Time tables are religiously studied. 

Have a good time. Be sure to write. Vacation! 

Tillie thinks Mickey isn't as practical as Wilson. One can't 
use a manicure set to shield one from the rain or sun, 
can one? 

The boy friend back home receives fat letters from the girl 
who left him there. 

So "Billy" Denbeaux is a Dolley now! 

"Tobacco is a dirty, filthy weed." — Fahnestock. 

Faculty consider chartering a freight car to carry flunkers 
away. 

Even the upper-classmen lose their carefree expressions. Why, 
oh why, were exams invented? 

Know how to shovel coal at midnight? Oh, you deah, deah 
man. The boys prove their housekeeping ability. Was 
"Peet" selling Bibles, too? 

Colored lights flash in dorm cells. 

Text books are hunted up. Note books are even taken 
to church. 



Eighty-eight 



1 9 



January 


19. 


January 


20. 


January 


22. 


January 


24. 


January 


26. 


January 


27. 


January 


28. 


January 


29. 


January 


30. 


February 


1. 


February 


2. 


February 


3. 


February 


4. 


February 


5. 


February 


6. 


February 


8. 


February 


9. 


February 


10. 


February 


11. 


February 


12. 


February 


13. 


February 


14. 


February 


15. 


February 


18. 


February 


21-5 



Student Association entertains the football men at banquet. 

Business men take our team to Belleville. 

Margaret and George begin their lingering good-byes. We 
walk over Lincoln 37-24 in basketball. 

Our song birds twitter for the Madisonians. 

Profs get their revenge. Furious cramming. 

Reams of paper sold at Doc's. 

The college pond is frozen. May I borrow your skates? 

The Bear Cats get Shurtleff's shirt. Wisht we had pretty 
backs so we could box. 

Call us early, Jack, no more work this semester. 

Anxious haunting of postoffice for registration checks. 

A certain prominent student wears a tie to lunch. Wonder 
what's up. 

Just think how sublime it would be if the profs acted the 
same every day as they do the first of the semester. 

Todd shines his shoes. Ruddick is back. 

Beware of too much feminine company. It causes an ath- 
letic heart. 

Will discovered in the safe. Unusually good meals are 
served. 

"Way Down East" in the Chapel. 

Dr. Stowell refuses to take responsibility for Prof. Crisp's 
downfall. 

In China — no lessons — no eats. Good way to reduce. 

"Did you hear what I heard a little while ago." — The 
bugle! 

Those hiding their light under a bushel, hand in your 
names to Bailey. 

P. O. breaks the record in selling special delivery stamps. 
Library force entertained by Miss Wilson. 

Clark Hall resembles a heart factory. 

Will some one page Prof. Kratzer.' 

The male sex learn how to tame a shrew. Did anyone see 
Daniel's pedal extermities:' 

Dr. Losh of Urbana delivers many inspirational lectures. 
Student body impressed. 



19 2 6 



Eighty-nine 



March 



March 


3 


March 


4. 


March 


6 



March 



March 


10 
i i 


March 
March 


j i 
12 


March 


13 



March 



March 



March 
March 



15. 



March 


16. 


March 


17. 


March 


19. 


March 


20. 


March 


22. 



23. 



Debaters journey to St. Louis to hear the Marquette-St. 
Louis University debate. 

Daniel breaks his arm writing so many odes to the fair sex. 

Dale Wilson invests in a Ford coupe. 

Lenora drafts a girl friend to help her care for her many 
admirers. 

Six weeks exams take student's time from their usual amuse- 
ments. 

French table yells for the team. Hard luck. Carbondale. 

Real literary creations revealed in course of exams. 

You tell 'em debaters, we stutter. 

Dope upset. Negative teams lose everywhere in the con- 
ference. 

Joe tells them that the Annual is worth three dollars. Many 
awake to the fact. 

Sam Kotelly endeavors to bribe the staff. Never mind Sam! 

St. Patrick's Day! Blaze of green glory. John Hall invests 
in a new tie. Y. W. C. A. banquet. 

The men's teams win at home and abroad. 

How beautiful is the rain after the dust and heat of the day. 

Faculty members invest in new cars. New shoes are pur- 
chased for "Leakin' Lena." 

Prof. Kettlekamp delights the student body with a "fresh 
air" speech. 

Candle light installation at Y. W. C. A. 

Charles Walker takes the "faith" speech literally. 



19 2 6 




19 2 6 



Ninety-one 



Senior Class and Faculty of 1876 



McKendree in 1876 was far different from the college we now know. There were two 
hundred and twenty-five students in attendance, but only one hundred and twenty-six were college 
students. The rest were academic pupils. The students lived in private homes and bought 
their own wood for fire. They also had to purchase oil for their lamps. The expenses for 
one year, at that time, amounted to about $2 80 — a high price for that time. 

Of the class of fifty years ago, nine were graduated from the scientific course. At that 
time the college offered but two curriculas — the classical and the scientific. The Greek motto 
of the class is indicative of their age. Translated it means "Everything for God." 



FACULTY 



Reverend John W. Locke. D. D.. President and Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy. 

Reverend Oliver V. Jones. A. M.. Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

Samuel H. Deneen. A. M.. Professor of Latin Language. Literature, and History. 

Reverend William F. Swahlen. A. M.. Professor of Greek Language. Literature, and 

History. 

Reverend E. E. Edwards. A. M., Professor of Natural History and Physics. 

Honorable Henry H. Horner. A. M., Professor of Civil and Common Law. 

Professor James H. Brownlee. A. M.. Special Instructor in Phonetics and Education. 



GRADUATES 



J. W. McKee 

W. C. Goforth 

P. T. Chapman 

M. W. Schaeffer 

J. N. Huggins 

J. 

E. 

L. 

E. 

F. 



N. McCurdy 

W. Dressor 

C. Blume (Miss) 

C. Moore (Miss) 

P. Crews 

L. Calhoun 

A. J. Penrod 

C. P. Bell 

S. M. Irwin . 

A. Watson 

Looking at the Chapel and Old Main from the 



Summerfield 

Mt. Carmel 

Vienna 

Lebanon 

New Athens 

Augusta. 

Greenville 

Edwardsville 

Lebanon 

Teutopolis 

Summerfield 

Makanda 

Cobden 

Litchfield, 

Mt. Vernon, 



Illino 
Illino 
Illino 



Arkans, 
, Illino 
, Illino 



Illino 
Illino 



19 2 6 



<&23& 




19 2 6 
McKENDREE COLLEGE 
LEBANOI 



Ninety-three 



Autographs 



Autographs 



19 2 6 

Ninety-five 



Intta-Mmal Athletics 



The basketball class tournament each year is the feature of the contests 
between the different class teams. The games this year were close and drew large 
crowds. For the third consecutive year the Class of '27 won the tournament 
when they nosed out the Sophomores by one point. 



The schedule played during the tournament and the scores are: 

Freshmen 14 Sophomores 30 

Juniors 39 Seniors 17 

Sophomores 44 Seniors 15 

Juniors 25 Freshmen 19 

Seniors 15 Freshmen 19 

Juniors 14 Sophomores 13 



A scrub tournament composed of eight teams from the student body was 
also held. This was won by the "Tom Cats." a team composed of Lebanon 
students. 

The tug-o-war between freshmen and upper-classmen proved to be a de- 
cided upset. The upper-classmen were strong favorites to pull the "Freshies" 
through the pond, but as they were exulting in their apparent victory — some- 
thing happened and the one hundred and first class dragged the upper-classmen 
through the pond. 

Before the end of the year a number of other intra-mural sport events 
will take place. Among these are the Athletic Carnival, an inter-class track 
meet, and probably a tennis tournament. 



I 9 



A Firm is Known by 
the Quality of Work 
it Does 




—THAT'S WHY EVERY YEAR 

SEES MORE SCHOOL ANNUALS 

BEING PRINTED BY 



WIESE PRINTING CO 

PINE AT TWENTY-SECOND 
Saint Louis, Missouri 



19 2 6 



Rentchler Electric Shop 

325 East Main Street Belleville, 111. 

Electrical Contracting Lighting Fixtures 

Appliances 

Complete Line of RCA Radio Equipment 
Rentchler Service Satisfies 



DO YOU REMEMBER' 

When there were "four horses" corraled in Clark Hall.' 

When Alma and "Rocky" wouldn't speak for two whole days: 

When the famous Fords blocked the Coach's return in state: 

When August Fulton wore his Tuxedo to Philo? 

When "Cy" and "Min" got hitched.' 

Rain kept catters apart.' 

When you made an A in every exam' 

When garters were worn by men? 

The first slicker at McKendree? 

The debut of "sailor pants.'" 

The exodus of several students.' 

The Ellison boys.' 

The chapel when it was warm' 

The history class vacation' 

Honor candy system? 



Original 

Mc Knight Tailoring Co. 

We never allow any Tailor to undersell us 

513 LOCUST 

The man who made the name famous 



19 2 6 



Ninety-eight 




19 2 6 



Ninety-nine 



SPIETH STUDIO 



High- Grade Portraits 

Photos Finished in Oil Colors 

Artistic Picture Framing 

Enlarging 

Kodak Finishing 

Commercial Work 

Home Portrait Work 

Copies from 

Old Photos and Tin-types 



Special Attention Given to High School and Col- 
lege Annuals and Class Pictures 



Where most people of Southern Illinois 
have their photographic work done 



Centralia. Illinois 



/ 9 2 6 

One Hundred 



Mc Kendree College Students 

Are Like Our Merchandise 

"Just Right" 

The Amos-James Grocer Company 



IF 

If Julia were quiet and homely, Cy Perkins bashful and shy, 

If "Speed" never were lonely, nor the college pond dry, 

If Burns never made speeches. Dale n' Margaret hated to fuss. 

If there were no rules to abide by, it sure would be hard for us. 



GENERAL RULES FOR DORM CALLERS 

1. Take charge of the first girl that comes into view. 

2. Repeat all calls as often as possible. 

3. Find your doorway and keep it. 

4. At night after bidding your lady friend good-night, proceed im- 

mediately to Singer Hall. 



Wm. Monken Mercantile & Implement Company 

Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Shoes, Groceries, 
General Merchandise 

"Always the best for the money." 

Lebanon, Illinois 



19 2 6 

One Hundred One 



Illinois 

Power and Light 

Corporation 



Th 



Symbol 
of 



Serv 



ice 



ILLINOIS 



POWER AND LIGHT 1 



SERYICB 



1 Q 2 6 



One Hundred Tit'o 



McKendree College 



McKendree College was founded in 1828. It is the oldest college with 
a record of continuous operation west of the Alleghany Mountains. Dur- 
ing the Civil War many colleges were forced to close, but McKendree not 
only served the educational need but also had a regiment in the Northern Army 
known as the McKendree Regiment. 

The present campus consists of twenty acres. Thirty-nine different 
varieties of trees, some of which are a part of the original forest, offer shade and 
add to the natural beauty of the place. The College is located in the highest 
part of Lebanon. 

There are nine buildings on the campus. Views of six of these buildings 
are given in the front portion of this annual. Through the generosity of the 
late Dr. Benjamin Hypes of St. Louis. McKendree has an enclosed athletic field 
which includes a two hundred and twenty yard straight-a-way, a quarter-mile 
cinder track, a baseball diamond, and a football gridiron. 

McKendree confers the degrees of A. B. and B. S. in scholastic work. In 
conjunction with the college is a splendid Musical Conservatory which confers 
degrees in either musical theory or public school music. There are four-year 
courses given in piano, voice, and organ music. 

The student activities are numerous and varied. There are literary so- 
cieties for both men and women. The student body is organized and regulates, 
in the main, the activities of the student body. This organization meets every 
Friday morning. There are social fraternities and other organizations which 
offer a student nearly all the forms of activity which he may desire. 

At the next meeting of the North Central Association it is expected that 
McKendree will be admitted into full membership. This year graduates are 
to be given North Central standing. McKendree is a "B" class college, but the 
entrance of McKendree into this Association will give her graduates a standing 
which has long been desired. 



19 2 6 

One Hundred The 



EXPRESSIONS HEARD ABOUT OUR HALLS 

Thanks for the buggy ride! 

I wisht I was in Peoria. 

Let's get tight, gang! Throw in a couple of wrenches. 

Thundernation! Give me room! 

Excuse me all to thunder. 

Pardon me for breathing! 

I may be Professor to others but only — — to you. 

Honorable Judge, ladies and gentlemen. 

Who has the tub? Who's got the mop' 

I'm simply starved. 

We'll now have a series of sentence prayers. 

Is the mail up yet ? I'm goin' to wring Sam's neck. 

Can I borrow ? 

H 



ave you seen : 

What time is it? 

(Sleepily) Has the first bugle blown: 



BLUMENSTEIN BROS. 

Quality Sausages 

BEEF LARD 

PORK HAMS 

VEAL BACON 

Lebanon, Illinois 



10 2 6 

One Hundred Four 



TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 

L. V. Peterson, Candy Manufacturer St. Louis 

Harold Brown, Symphony director Chicago 

Kenneth Rippel, King's Jester London 

Mayo Magill, Editor Post Dispatch St. Louis 

Guy Magill, Chemist Breeze 

Edward Hopper, Missionary South Africa 

Daniel Gerlach, Poet Laureate St. Joseph, Mo. 

Noble McKnight, Circulation Manager, Globe-Democrat ... St. Louis 

Charles Walker, Photographer Niagara Falls 

Joseph Hortin, Aviation Corps Washington, D. C. 

Marvin Grupe. Caricaturist M. M. Chautauqua 

Parson Brown, Fuller Brush Salesman Belleville 

Dorothy Dee, Mrs. R. Adair Sandoval 

Evelyn McGeehon, Professor of Science Urbana H. S. 

Evelyn McNeely, Debate Coach Ozark Wesleyan 

Ruth DuComb. Interpretative Dancing Northwestern U. 

Jesselyn Grieve, Chiropractor Davenport, la. 

Verna Andrews, Dean of Women McKendree 

Alice Hoye, Head of Child Labor Department . . . Washington, D. C. 

Ross Fleming, Bishop Greenville 

Maurice McHenry, Political Boss Carlyle 



C. B. PEACH 

Dry Goods, Furnishings, Variety Goods 
LEBANON, ILL. 

We Specialize in Underwear, Hosiery, Men's 
and Boys' Caps, Overalls — Work Pants 

Exclusive Agents for Ever Fast Fabrics and Arrow Hosiery 



You need our smiling, cheerful service and- 
We need your business. 



19 2 6 

One Hundred Five 




.>■■. -'. 



5UGAR V " 

AND l'-i 

"" '■ *• i\ 



5PICE 




cX/*y 



7 9 2 6 



One Hundred Si 



Belleville, Illinois 



Location- 



St. Clair County, Illinois, eighteen miles 
east of St. Louis, Missouri, on the Illinois 
Central, Louisville and Nashville Railroads 
and on the East St. Louis and Suburban 
( electric ) Railroad. 



Business- 



Mines, Factories, and a prosperous busi- 
ness district. It is the county seat of St. 
Clair County. 



Education- 



One of the best high schools in the county 
and modernly equipped grade schools. 

Churches — 

Numerous denominations with excellent 
community interest; fine buildings. 

Improvements — 

Gas, electricity, street cars, and many 
blocks of good pavement. It has a beau- 
tiful residential district. 



Population — 25,000 



19 2 6 

One Hundred Seven 



BREAD ROLLS 



FREY BAKERY 



The Home 
of Good Things to Eat 



CO 

u 



Bakers forMcKendree 




FRUITS CANDIES 



19 16 



Sue Berryman — Are you a track man? 

"Peet" — Ye gods, woman, you should see the callouses on my chest from 



breaking tapes. 



"I wouldn't mind going to the dogs," said Darrow, 
place where the rum hounds go." 



if I could pick out 



Paul H. — I wish I could revise the alphabet. 

Margaret T. — Why? 

Paul H. — I'd put U and I closer together. 



"Never mind," said Sam, who had just broken his left arm. "I still have 
the right to love you." 



'He was only a tailor," said Laura, "but he suited mi 



The 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of 
LEBANON, ILLINOIS 

May We Serve You 
Courteous Treatment 




Prompt Service 
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



19 2 6 



One Hundred Nine 



CITY DAIRIES LIGGETT 8 NORRIS 

DE LUXE ICE CREAM CHOCOLATES 



STUDENT HEADQUARTERS 



for 



Toilet Requisites, Spalding Athletic Goods 

Eversharp and Parker Pencils 

Parker and Waterman Fountain Pens 

Eastman and Ansco Cameras 

and Supplies 

Text Books, School Supplies and 

Stationery 



THE LEBANON 
DRUG COMPANY 

The Rexall Store 



REXALL PUREST 

REMEDIES DRUGS 



19 2 6 

One Hundred Ten 



Edna Kinsey — We're going to have milk for lunch. 
Marion Kirkbridc — Oh, cow! 



Dorothy Harbon — What are you writing? 

Dorothy Dee — A joke. 

Dorothy Harmon — Well, give him my regards. 



Mr. Dunn — Can any person in this class tell me what steel wool is? 
Ed. Kolb — Sure, steel wool is shearings from hydraulic rams. 



Mr. Bailey — Mr. Schuette, you rise to majestic heights in your theme. 

Schuette — Why? 

Mr. Bailey — Quite a tall bluff. 



He was in the Confederate Army but he wore a union suit. 



Daily Capacity. 1.000 Barrels Elevator Capacity. 200,000 Bushels 

INCORPORATED, 1889 



Pfeffer Milling Company 

Lebanon, Illinois 

Manufacturers of 

Winter Wheat Flour 
White Corn Grit and Corn Meal 

Dealers in 

Grain, Lumber and Building Materials of All Kinds 



19 2 6 

One Hundred Eleven 




o 




Qte 




U^ 




04 a 




* O* 


CO 

'o 


=q r- 1 O 


C 


s OS 




* ss 


o 


-c J 


J3 


-W3 


_J 


Cd a 




>-" 




<* 





(jo a 



/ 9 2 <5 



One Hundred Tiveh 



Lebanon, Illinois 



Lebanon is located in St. Clair County, twenty-two miles 
east of St. Louis, Missouri, on the main line of the Baltimore 
and Ohio Railway, on a branch of the East St. Louis and 
Suburban (electric) Railway, and on State Highway No. 12. 

The business consists of a large and successful mill, coal 
mines, cigar factories, and a beverage factory. The town is 
surrounded by a rich, active agricultural region. 

The educational facilities are unusual. They consist of, 
besides an elementary school, a new community high school, 
McKendree College, and the Conservatory of Music. 

There are numerous churches having good buildings and 
displaying an excellent spirit for the good of the community. 

The town has electricity, an efficient fire department, many 
blocks of good pavement, and a new water works system. 

Lebanon, with its elevated, healthful situation, natural 
beauty, religious and educational advantages, good community 
spirit, and excellent business relations as evinced by the Rotary 
Club, is the ideal city for your home. 



Population — 2,000 



19 2 6 

One Hundred Thirteen 




ft 



&.r. 




-r 



i 



[A D 




1 



i 



I 
U 




t 



AA 



T 




If: 



K 



MP: 







1 





fill 



7 9 2 6 



One Hundred Fourt 



Carrothers — Why did you rent a garage for your flivver? 

Hopper — Caught a couple of ants trying to drag it through a crack in 
the sidewalk. 



Sample English theme — "When wound up, you will not have to bother with 
it for a week. This helps to save time which you can use by freeing you 
from daily winding. You can also save time by hanging up in the 
morning your clothes when you get up where they will be handy the 
night before. 



U. KISSEM AND I. HUGGEM CO. 

Heart Brokers 

Suite 1 6 Skiddo Bldg. Next door to Matrimony 

City of Happiness 

State of Contentment 

Office Hours: One to won. 



Master and Servant 



College men are the future leaders of their com- 
munities; for as citizens — professional or business men — 
they are trained to master those problems so vital to com- 
munity development. 

The Public Utility has been the servant of the com- 
munity in the past, and so it will be in the future — a good, 
reliable servant, well worthy the patronage and commenda- 
tion of its master — the public. 



EAST ST. LOUIS ft SUBURBAN RAILWAY CO. 



One Hundred Fifteen 



DAUMUELLER'S 

Music and Gift Shop 

Lebanon, Illinois 

Welcomes 

You 



Kodaks 

Kodak Films 
Fountain Pens 

Eversharp Pencils 
Stationery 
Everything 
in Music 



Fobs, Jewelry, Watches 
Pendants, College Pins 
College Rings 
Up-to-Date 
Novelties 
Brooches 
Bar Pins 



Candies-Bulk, Bars, Packages 

Busy Bee 

Morse's Park & Tilford — Bunte's 



19 2 6 



One Hundred Sixteen 



The 

Lebanon Advertiser 

All the News of Lebanon and 

McKendree 

College Printing and Supplies 

Help Support 

where 

Support Is Received 



Peet's 
Candy Emporium 



for 



That Midnight Lunch 
Room 38 Boy's Dorm 



CAN YOU IMAGINE ? 

John Hall calling at Clark Hall when Helen is out of town. 

Daniel Gerlach, a famous poet. 

"Speed" as an artist. 

Professor Large as head waiter. 

Roscoe Hollis, a football captain. 

Audrey as Aphrodite in the May fete. 

Julia Wilson giggle-less. 

"Viv" Young embarrassed. 

The college Fords hitting on all four. 

McKendree co-eds not dating. 

Charleston classes in the girl's dorm. 

Mr. Liu playing chess. 

Edna Kinsey, our Titian beauty, deprived of her college humor 

Grace Wills blase. 

Irma Jane Shore on the debating team. 

Sorrels playing a flute. 

Marion Brown not asking "Why ? " 

Alma and "Rocky" not tete-a-teeing. 



Bertram Hotel 


"We'll Meet Your Demand With 
the Finest of the Land." 


Rooms By Day or Week 

Meals Served 


AMERICAN LADY 

BRAND 

Food Products 


Block East of the Bank 


Distributed by 


L. B. BUSHER, Proprietor 

Lebanon, Illinois 


HASS-LIEBER GRO. CO. 

St. Louis 



19 2 6 



One Hundred Seventeen 



QopGraficm 



- - - : 
- 







WHAT THE SENIORS WANT FOR COMMENCEMENT 

Mrs. Dolley — Real estate in Florida. 

Grace Zimmerman — Several catalogs. 

Rav Carter — A home for two and a honeymoon special. 

Edmund Wahl — A bishop's license. 

Kenneth Waggoner — A private secretarv. 

J. W. Walker — A pastorate in Lebanon. 

Emma Bergman — A golden future. 

Roscoe Hollis — A blank cook book for his own recipes. 

"Speed"' Pettit — Only Helen. 

Walter Bailey — A storv book and an alarm clock. 

"Satch" Shuwerk — A scholarship and a good night's rest. 

Saint'' — Salesmanship for Fuller brushes. 
George Darrow — A new bodv for the "Wiggle Wagon." 
Percv Hill — A place on the facultv. 
"Bob'' Adair — A new Buick. 
'Bill Sawver — A modern bungalow. 

Dorothv Harmon — Reams of paper for her coming novel. 
Thelma Morgan — A dictionarv with French. Latin. Spanish, and Eng- 
lish terms. 

Barbara Crabbs — A Ford coupe and lots of money. 

Opal Smith — A position in the same school with Barbara. 

Christine Karnes — A sheepskin coat. 



A FRIEXD 



One Hundred Sineteen 





Kl 



TT 




-'••.•: - '■/ , '-' JJ 







/ 9 2 6 



One Hundred Twa 



QUESTIONS WE CANNOT ANSWER 

Does Jesselyn Grieve because her hair is curly? 

Will Edna Lynch any one who crosses her will? 

Does Sue Berryman with attention? 

Can Audrey Bower head? 

Does Carrie Darner hose? 

Does Barbara Crabb about Eugene? 

Is "Viv" Young never to be old? 

Is Vernal Hardy and hale? 

Has Helen Douglas since she entered college? 

Has Earl Hussong to sing in chapel? 

Is Harold Brown when he's blue? 

Does Kenneth Rippel like the laughing brook? 

Has "Bill" Sawyer brand new "lizzie?" 

Can Irma Jane Shore enough sing? 

Do you know whether Jack Haskin all over the world? 

Does Russel Isom or all of the women? 

Does John Hall coal for a living? 

Is Professor Large or small? 

Is Ray Goode when he's bad? 

Does Helen Barlow grades? 

Does Tillie Rigg herself up like a circus clown? 

If Grace Wills, won't she? 

How will Fay Hunter happiness? 

Was Paul Hortin class today? 

Does Shuwerk all the time? 

Has Ray Bass or baritone voice? 

Does Ed Fahnestock in the summer time? 

Why is it Ed Kinsey some people and not others? 

Does Mr. Oxendine alone? 

Would Mickey Martin if he fell on it? 



SUNSHINE BISCUIT CHASE 8 SANBORN 

COFFEE and TEA 



F. W. LANDWEHR 

General Merchandise 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Shoes, Fruits 

THE STORE OF SERVICE 

Orders Called for and Delivered 

CANNED GOODS PETERS SHOES 



/ 9 



One Hundred Twenty-one 



WE SUGGEST 

That Prof. Large get married. 

That "Herb" Richards take yeast to rise in the world. 

That Platonians forget "I will paint for you a picture." 

That the debaters be ostracised. 

That Clionians learn a new pet phrase instead of copying Bishop Mc- 
Kendree — "All is well." 

That elephants roost in trees. 

That Harry Mueller get a hair-cut. 

That the duty on putty be lowered. 

That classes be abolished. 

That the faculty resign. 

That "Bobby" Sorrells has been around lots, but they were cow lots. 

That Grace Wills is like a third rail. She can't be touched. 

That every caveman isn't a miner. 

That Erie Todd be admitted to the Hall of Fame. He stayed up all 
night to study for an eleven o'clock exam and then was too sleepy to take it. 

That "Dan" Gerlach write a new song entitled "The Tie that Blinds." 



Kolb Mercantile Company 

Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Shoes, Groceries and General 
Merchandise 



Lebanon. Illinois 



19 2 6 

One Hundred Ticenty-two 



THE WOODRIVER JOURNAL 

Printers 

of 

THE McKENDREE REVIEW 






ii 

T 



Fine Jo£> Wor/? A Specialty 



Woodriver, Illinois 



/ 9 2 6 

One Hundred Twenty-three 



Gerlach — I want the heel. 

Rip — That's the old McKendree spirit. Got a lot of crust. 



"I have everything coming to me," said Rippel as the head of the table 
passed the hash. 



John H. — Helen told me I was the answer to the maiden's prayer. 
Brie. Y. — She didn't ask for much. 



"I must have the brakes tightened," remarked "Bill" Sawyer as he hit 
a flying train, "Some day I'll have an accident. 



Mary Adams — Sh! I hear footsteps. 

Vernal H. — Oh, that's all right. That's just me coming to a decision. 



Lebanon Ice & Bottling 
Works 

M. RlTHMAN, Proprietor 

Manufacturers and Bottlers 
of 

Pure Ice and Soda Water 

Lebanon, Illinois 



19 2 6 



One Hundred Twentu-four 



McKendree Advertisers 



This publication would have been impossible without the 
support of our advertisers. Let us support them. 

Wm. Monken Mercantile and Implement Co. . . Lebanon 

Pfeffer Milling Co Lebanon 

First National Bank Lebanon 

Illinois Light and Power Co Lebanon 

Lebanon Bottling Works Lebanon 

Bertram Hotel Lebanon 

Kolb Mercantile Co Lebanon 

Blumenstein Bros Meat Market 

Sayer Motor Co Garage 

F. W. Landwehr General Merchandise 

Lebanon Drug Co Drugs and Fountain 

C. B. Peach Dry Goods and Notions 

Peet's Candy Emporium Eats 

W. C. Daumueller Music and Gifts 

Charles Frey Bakery 

Spieth Studio Centralia 

Amos James Grocery Co Belleville 

Rentchler Electric Shop Belleville 

Haas Leiber Grocery Co St. Louis 

McKnight Tailoring Co St. Louis 

Sanders and Melsheimer Engravers St. Louis 

Wiese Printing Co St. Louis 

Woodriver Journal Printing 

East St. Louis and Suburban Railway . . East St. Louis 



/ 9 



One Hundrtd Twenty-fit 




Jhms 



One Hundred Twenty-six