(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The McKendrean : being the year book of McKendree College"

^x f ibris 



192B 



l^lfc fear ^onk of 




Published in [927 by the Junior Class 



Holman Library 
McKendree College 
Lebanon. III. 62254 



SDfce) 



< 



^ Wc pause for a xo\\\U to 
ujctti tljc mang attittittcs 
of i\\t itfar, Ijo^Jtng tijat 
as you trattcl up tlje roa^ 
tljroutilj tlfc years, a 
bacluxiarb glance at tlye 
l^ol^en Ijours anb familiav 
scenes of to^ag inill 
stir a poignant lunging 
lor Ijalf-forgotten beauty 
anb joy tijat l^as f!e^— 
tljia expresses our aim 
for compiling tlye 1928 
^c]^enbrean. 

%\\t -Staff. 





Jf'i -#!»P 


1 .i<Z \ 


■^"^ «-%l ! 


IP / 




• 



'^3. f . ^aker, Pean 



I 




"Libraries are as the shrinss where all the relics of the ancient saints, full of true virtue, and that, 
without delusion or imposture, are preserved and reposed." — Bacon. 




"Let It rise! Let it rise! 'Till it meet the sun in his coming: let the earliest light of the morning 
gild it, and the parting day linger and play on its summits."— Webster. 



I 




"The sighl oj such a monument is like continual and stationary music which one hears for one's 
good as one approaches it." — Alleen Wilson. 




'But beyond the bright searchlights of science, 
Out of sight of the windows of sense, 

Old riddles still bid us defiance. 

Old questions of Whv and of Whence. 

'—W.C.D. Wheiham. 



Our McKendree 



A College 'mid plains is standing, standing there from 
olden days. 

The Pioneer of the prairies, first in untrodden ways. 

For service and Christian culture, for efficiency she stands, 

Her sons and daughters praise her, with voices, hearts and 
hands. " 

Hail to thee our dear old McKendree, 

May we always loyal be, 

It's a song of praise we'll raise to thee. 

Alma Mater, dear old M.-C. 

May we ever own thee true and wise and right, 

Honor Purple and the White. 

And for victory we'll always fight, 

'Till we win for old M-C-K. 

Enduring and strong she stands there, stands upon our 
College Hill, 

Though others may outnumber, she holds the first place 
still, 

For beauty and truth and knowledge, and for service with- 
out bound. 

Then let us raise our voices, until the plains resound. 





^1|^ C^ik^e 




^ibtTtitttstration 



^1 



Rev. C. C. Hall, D. D 

Leonard Carson . . . . 

C. B. Peach . . . . . . ." . 

Rev. \V. C. Walton, Ph. D. 

Rev. Cameron Harmon, D. D. President of the College and Ex-offic 



Bishop F. D. Leete 
Dr. C. B. Spencer 
Dr. E. C. Wareing 




Rev. F. M. Van Treese, D. D 



Rev. G. R. Goodman 
Rev. C. B. Whiteside 
Rev. C. L. Peterson, D. D 
Mr. E. B. Brooks 
Rev. Robert Morris 
Mr. P. M. Johnston 
Rev. C. C. Hall, D. D. 
Hon. Chas. S. Deneen, A 
Rev. M. H. Loar . 
Mr. J. B, Stout 
Mr. C. P. Hamill . 
Judge Louis Bernrcuter 



Mr. W. R. Dorris . 

Rev. O. L. Markman . 

Mr. John M. Mitchell 

Rev. Frank Otto 

Rev. ]. G. Tucker, D. D 

Mr. H. F. Hecker 

Mr. H. H. Bailev . 

Rev. F. O. Wilson, D. D. 

Rev. Chas. D. Shumard, D. D 

Mr. Ira Blackstock 

Mr. C. M. Roos 

Judge Chas. H. Miller 



Dr. W. P. McVey . 

Mr. W. C. Pfeffer 

Mr. Harold Barnes 

Dr. J. L. McCormick, M. D. . 

Rev. Ressho Robertson, D. D 

Mr. Leonard Carson . 

Mr. L G. Wilkin . 

Mr. C. B. Peach 

Mr. W. A. Kelsoe . 

Prof. H. G. Schmidt . 

Rev. I. W. Cummins 

Rev. W. H. Whitlock, D. D, 



Eighteen 



We McKENDREAN 




Edwin Percy Baker, Dean 

German 

A. B., Ohio Wesleyan, 1893; Sauveur School of Languages, summer 1896. 

A. M., McKendree College, 1896; Graduate study, University of Berlin, 1896-97. 




Belle M. Nlxon, Dean of Women 

English 

Illinois State Normal, 1910; Ph. B., University of Chicago, 1912; Graduate study, Columbia 
University, summers 1920-21-23. 

A. M., Columbia University, 1923; Graduate study, Columbia University, summer 1924. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Athletics; Filley, Patmore, Large, Vick. 

Credits; Baker, Dolley, Nixon, McClure, Kinison. 

Curriculum; Walton, Kinison, McDonald, Nixon, Baker, Kettelkamp. 

Exhibitions and Entertainments; Nixon, Patmore, Harper, Brown. 

Library; Dollcy, Wilson, Stowell, Burns, Nixon. 

Schedule: McClure, Walton, Kinison. 




Twenty-One 



We McKENDREAN 




W l:M 1.1 CllARLES KeTTLEKAMP 
History 
A. B., Central Wcsleyan College, 1921. 
A. M., University of Chicago, 1922; Graduate 
work, University of Chicago, summer 
1922. 

Ross L. Large 

Social Science 

A. B., Denver University, 1912; A. M., 1913. 

Teacher in Philippine Islands, 1914-17. 

Officer in the A. E. F., 18 months overseas. 

Instructor Colorado State Reformatory, 
1923-24. 

Graduate work. University of Illinois, sum- 
mers 1925-26. 



Wendell Dunn 

Phvsics 



B. S. McKendree College, 1925; Graduate 
studv. University of Illinois, summers 
1925-1926. 

Charles Jacob Stowell 

Mathematics 
B. S., Illinois Wesleyan Univer.sity, 1911. 
M. A., University of Illinois, 1912. 
Ph. D., L'ni\ersity of Illinois, 1917; Graduate 
studv. University of Illinois, 1Q23-24, 



Grant McDonald 

Piano, Organ, Theory of Music 
Graduate in Piano, Organ, and Theory, Drury 
College, 1920; Mus. B., American Con- 
servatory, summer 1925. 
Student of Heniot Levy and of Josef Lhevinne. 

Olive E. Patmore 

Expression, English 

Graduate School of Expression, Tre\'ecca 
College, 1921. 

A. B., ibid., 1922. 

Graduate Work, Boston School of Expres- 
sion, summer 1923. 

Gymnasium Course, Morse School of Ex- 
pression. 

R. Pauline Harper 

Voice 

Graduate in Piano and Theory, Missouri 
Wesleyan College, 1909. 

Graduate in Public School Music Methods, 
Northwestern University. 

Graduate in Voice, Missouri Wesleyan Col- 
lege, 1920; Student, Denver University, 
summer 1921 ; Student of John C. Wilcox, 

Voice pupil of John W. Bohn, 1926. 

Northwestern University School of Music, 
summer 1926. 

Oliver C. Wahl 

Violin 
Graduate in Violin and Theory, Beetho\cn 

Conservatory, 1926 
Student of Ernest La Prade, summer 192(i 




^^^^^^^^ V^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ 



m McKENDREAN 



S^^WVWWt 




Ernest R. Crisp 

English, Spanish 
A. B., McKendree College, 1913. 
Graduate study, University of Chicago 

1916-17. 
Graduate study, 

1925-26. 



Washington University 



Lennie Bertha LaRue 

French and Spanish 

A. B., Missouri Valley College, 1923. 
Graduate work, ibid., summer 1923. 
Graduate work, University of Missouri, sum- 
mer 1925. 

Ibid., 1925-1926. 

Zella Vivian Brown 

English 
Colorado College, 1920-22. 

B. S., University of Missouri, January, 1924; 

B. A., ibid.", August, 1924; M. A., ibid., 
June, 1925. 

Claude E. Vick 

Education 
B. S., University of Illinois, 1925. 
University of Illinois, summers 1925-26. 



Alleen Wilson, Librarian 

A. B., Missouri Wesleyan College, 1919. 

Graduate study, Colorado University, sum- 
mer 1920. 

Summer Library Conference, Madison, Wis- 
consin, 1923; University of Illinois 
Library School, summers 1924-25. 



Edwin Rollin Spencer 

Biology 
B. A., University of Illinois, 1911. 
M. A. ibid., 1914. 
Ph. D., ibid., 1920. 



Mrs. Minnie Phillips 
House Mother 



Julia H. Hodgson 
Secretary to the President 




LhmJj!a 




p^. 



# 



1^ 



^ ^^W^^NA>^V\ ^ A^^^^^ ^ % 



Twenty-Three 



> wv\> w vw 



We McKENDREAN 



^[f ittc Utork upon marble, it null pcrisl); 
if itic Vuork upmt brass, time tuill efface 
it; if Uie rear temples, theu ttiill crumble 
tttt0 b«st; but if Uie luark upou mortal 
souls, if Uie imbue tijem Uiitlt priuciples, 
toitlj tlte iust fear of (!5o^ auit tlie loue of 
fellom mau, Uie euiU'^Ue ou tliose tablets 
sometliiu0 mliidi mill brii^liteu all eternitu, 

— laniel ^cbstcf 





emors 







Mildred Ann Adams, A. B 
"Mi 

East St. Louis, 

President of Glee Club, '24-'25._ 
Secretary Student Association, '26-'27. 
President Clio, '26-'27. 
Glee Club, '23-'24-'25-'27. 
Girls' Quartette, '23-'24-'25-'27. 
McKendree Concert Co., Summer, '25 
Y. W. C A., '23-'27. 



John M. Isom, A. B 

Christopher, 

President Student Association, '26. 

Student Associate in Athletics, '25. 

Football, '23-'24-'25. Captain-elect, '26 

Basketball, '23-'24-'25-'26. Captain, '26 

Baseball, '23-'24-'25. Captain, '25. 

Track, '23-'24-'25. Captain, '25. 

A. M. O. 

Plato. 

"M" Club. 



We McKENDREAN 




Gertrude Alice Hoye, A. I 
••Hoye" 

Christopher, 111. 

President Y. W. C. A., '26-27. 

President Clio, '26-21. 

Review Staff, '25-'26-'27. 

McKendrean Staff, '26. 

Pi Kappa Delta. 

"Taming Of The Shrew", '26. 

L. Joseph Hortin, A. B. 
"'Prexie" 
Albion, 111. 

Vice-President Student Association, '26 
President Student Association, '27. 
President Philo. 
President Orchestra, '25. 
Secretary Y. M. C. A. 
President Carnegie Hall. 
Pi Kappa Delta. 

Debate, '25, '26, '27, Captain '27. 
Editor of The McKendree Review, '26. 



Dorothy Dee Adair, B. S. 
•Dot" 

Lebanon, 111. 

President Y. W. C. A., '26. 

Clio. 

Glee Club, '25-'26. 

Sigma Zeta. 
"McKendrean" Staff, '26. 



John Crow Hall, A. B. 
"Crow" 

Mt. Vernon, 111. 

Class President, '23, 

Social Chairman Y. M C. A., '25. 

Plato. 

"M" Club. 

Band, '24-'25. 

Y. M. C. A., '25-'26. 

Baseball, '25-'26. 

Football, '26. 



Twenty-Stitn 



^ W W WMN^ 



We McKENDREAN 



^^V^^^V^ 




Charles Kenneth Rippel, A. 
"Rip" 

Moberly, Mo. 

President Glee Club, '26-' 21. 

President Plato, '26. 

Song Leader, '25, -'26. 

McKendree Quartet. 

"Gypsy Rover," '24. 

"Martha," '25. 

"Lass O' Limerick Town," '26. 

"Taming Of The Shrew," '25. 

"An Economical Boomerang," '26. 



Lewis Vincent Peterson, A.B. 
"Peet" 

Mt. Vernon, 111. 

President Plato, '25-'26. 

President Pi Kappa Delta, '26. 

President Glee Club, '25. 

Song Leader, '25. 

Editor-in-Chief, "McKendrean," '26. 



( Pclcr.son, continued) 

Pi Kappa Delta, '25-'26-'27. 

"M" Club. 

Debate Team, '25-'27. 

McKendree Quartet. 

Track Team, '24-'25-'26. 

"Gypsy Rover," '24. 

"Martha," '25. 

"Lass O' Limerick Town," '26. 

"Taming Of The Shrew," '26. 



Evelyn Elizabeth McGeehon.A.B. 

O'Fallon 111. 



William EdwardReid Hopper, B.S. 
"Hopper" 

Mt. Vernon, 111. 
President Plato, '26. 
Glee Club, '24-'25-'26. 



^fs^*i „ ^^^^^ A^ ^^iAA/i^^A/^^^^^^^>^^^^ 



Tu-enty-Eight 




Ticenly-Nine 




Wensel Langley Brown, A. B 
"Brownie" 
Granite City, 111. 
Manager Baseball Team, '26. 
Basketball, ■25-'26-'27. 
Captain Baseball Team, '27. 
Baseball, '25-'26-'27. 
Bachelors. 
Philo. 
"M" Club. 



Harry Edwin Brown 
bishop" 

Louisville, I 

President Philo, '25. 

Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, '23-'24 

Pi Kappa Delta. 

Oxford Club. 



Sparta, 

Philo. 

Y. M, C. A. 

"Taming of the Shrew." 




3)mtt0rs 



Ii 



h 




Erie is another one of the wise men who 
came to us from the East. The funnv 
thing about Erie is his tired temperament. 
However, he had ambition enough to play 
football so well that he has been chosen to 
lead our Centennial team. Todd is an 
orator of rare ability and is president of our 
"M" Club. 



The tallest, slimmest boy on the Campus 
is Vernal Hardy. A capable fellow who 
drives a "mean" tennis ball. He is an honor 
student of the first rank. The McKendree 
Review and Bulletin are results of his tireless 
efforts. 



Thirt)/ Two 




Although handicapped since he is rooming 
with Loy Wattles, Gene has made good 
This makes his second appearance upon 
McKendree debate teams. The walls of his 
Literary Society are replete with the pictures 
he has painted therein. 



Thirty-Three 




Tliirty-Four 




rown is a believer in that motto, "If at 
first you don't succeed, try, try, again." 
He commenced his education in 1910 at 
McKendree. After completing his Academic 
work he accepted a position as pastor. He 
came back to McKendree and will be 
graduated in 1928. 



^ ^^^^^^^^^^ M¥ 



^W^'WW^W^ <SF 



Thirty-Five 




Thirty-Six 




0|rlf0m0res 




Leonora Harrington N4itchell 

"Give me the man I love." 



Mary E. Hughes 



"If all is fair in love, 
Where do the brunettes come in?" 



Charles Nichols 

"I know more than all my teachers. ' 



Fred Jessop 

Who could look and think I am ignorant?" 



Thirty-Eight 




Harold W. Culver 

No one can say what height he may attain.' 



Thirty -Nine 



g N^A^i^WVW 



W McKENDREAN 




Forty 




Fofiy-Ont 



We McKENDREAN 




James Stuart 

'Let them call it mischief, when it's past and 
prospered 'twill be virtue." 



La Verne Hoover 



"Laughing, carefree maid, 
With never a thought in the world. 



Seniors 



Jesselyn L. Grieve, B. A., Mt. Vernon, 111. 
Ethel Horner, B. A., Lebanon, 111. 
John Henry Stout, B. S., Mascoutah, 111. 



Juniors 



Delbert Laquement, Collins\ille, I 
Henry Leonard Metcalf, Lebanor 
Lela Grace Sites, Salem, 111. 
Elza Dale Wilson, Newton, ill. 
Edward Woo, Canton, China. 



Sophomores 

Amiel Whitecotton 

Val. M. Baggott 

Hugh H. Black 

Ray Alberts Carrothers 

Granville Collins 

Frank Jessop 

Gladys J essop 

Robert Young 

Inis Malacarne 

Neva McDermott 

Opal Meehan 

Helen Metcalf 

Mildred Ropiequet 

Egbert Smith 

Helen Stout 




IHrtslfnteit 



>vs^^^^^ ^ 



Freshmen 



AsHBY, Walter William — 11, O'Fallon, 111. 
AuLviN, Lelah Mae — I, II, Albion, 111. 
AwALT, George Frank, Jr — I, II, 

Ridgway, 111. 
Beardsley, Edith Allene — I, II, 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Berghan, Myrtle— I, II, Belleville, 111 
Blume, Beatrice — I, II, East St. Louis, 111. 
BoiTNOTT, Clayton — I, Carlow, Ky. 
Born, Kendell Eugene — I, II, Chester, 111. 
BozETT, Mildred Carrie — I, Vandalia, 111. 
Brian, John Harvey — I, II, Sumner, 111 
Canning, Rolland — I, Marissa, 111. 
Carter, Everett Bruce — I, Ridgwav, 11! 
Clark, LeRoy Van— I, II, Collinsville. Ill 
Clayton, Wilson Bovard — I, II, 

Elizabethtown, 111. 
Cornwell, Leonard Idris — I, II, 

Newton, 111. 
CoTHERN, Walter Harrison — I, II, 

Ramse\', 111 
Crossin, Everett Martin — I, II, 

Murphysboro, 111. 
Davidson, William Joyce — I, II, Sesser, 111. 
Davls, Earl Reis— I, II, Bluford, 111. 
DoLLEY, John Seiver — 1, II, Lebanon, 111. 
DouTHiT, LorenBlunk — I, II, Ingraham, 111. 
Englehardt, Herbert — I, 11, Baldwin, 111 
Farrell, Carl Edwin — II, Louisville, 111 
Fehrenbacher, Delmar — I, II, 

Ingraham, 111. 



II, 



ville, 111. 
Elmo, I 



FuLK, Kneffler Varda — I, II, Ingraham, II 
Fullerton, Lorene Mildred — I, II, 

Marissa, 111. 
Gillespie, William L. — I, II, Cairo, 111. 
Glotfelty, Marjorie Ellen — I, II, 

Herrin, 111. 
Griebel, Henry Adam — 1, II, 

Mascoutah, 111. 
Grieve, Geneva Elizabeth — I, 

Belleville, 111. 
Hadfield, Lucille — I, II, Carter 
Hagler, Dale Albert — I, II, St. 
Hale, Lonna Louise — I, II, Maplewood,Mo 
Hall, Charles Stanley — I, II, Shipman, 111. 
Harmon, Nina Mae — I, II, Lebanon, 111. 
Harper, Glenn Everett — I, Louisville, 111. 
Hecklincer, Olvenia — I, II, Lebanon, 111. 
Heim, Margaret Josephine — I, 

Mascoutah, 111. 
Hertenstein, Dan — I, II, New Baden, 111. 
Hesse, Walter Conrad — I, II, O'Fallon, 111. 
Hoover, Harvey W.— 1, Milstadt, 111. 
HoppE, Arthur Osborne — I, II, Cairo, 111 
Horsley, Marcella — I, II, Flora, 111 
Jackson, Dorothy Alice — I, II, 

Hutsonville, 111. 
Jarvis, Verna Opal — I, II, Gillespie, 111 
King, Esma Fay — II, Toledo, 111. 
Lang, Merle Claudia — I, II, Lebanon, 111. 
Lasater, Verna Dee — I, II, 

McLeansboro, 111. 
Lathrop, Harry William — I, Newton, 111. 



Forty-Four 




Class Roll 



Leibig, Allen Georc^e — I, II, Mascoutah, 111. 
Luster, Rolland Clair — 1, II, 

Granite Citv, III 
Lynn, \\m, Clark— I, II, X'andalia, 111. 
Malandrone, z,ella KIae — 1, II, Herrin, III 
Mason, James Arnold— I, II, Bcllc\illc, 111 
Maxwell, Edmond — I, II, Taskcr Sea., Mo 
May, Ralph— II, Dix, 111. 
Mayes, Elizabeth Lee — I, II, Albion, 111. 
McClay, Elmo Todd— 1, II, Oakdalc, 111. 
McCuLLUM, Fred — I, II, Louis\-ille, 111. 
McHenry, Adrin— I, Bluford, 111. 
Melson, Elizabeth Rae — I, II, Fairfield, 111. 
Miller, Earl W. — I, II, Granite City, 111. 
Miller Mrs. Genen'a Smith — I, 

Granite City, 111. 
Mitchell, Ralph — 1, II, Roodhouse, 111. 
Moulin, Leland Delore — I, II, Ziegler, 111. 
Montgomery, Jof n Wesley — I, 1 1, 

E. St. Louis, 111. 
Moore, Day Allen — II, Logan, 111. 
Mueller, Theodora — I, II, New Baden, 111. 
Muscovalley, George — I, II, 

Mound City, 111. 
Oglesby, Irma Lonille — I, II, X'andalia, ID. 
Osborn, Al\'a Ray — I, Grand Chain, 111. 
Parrish, Bernice Thelma — 1, II, 

Belleville, 111. 
Pate, Harry Lan'ern — I, II, Sesscr, 111. 
Peak, Mildred Lee— I, II, Pinckncyillc, ill. 
Renner, Cleda Anne — I, II, Belleville, 111. 
Renner, Della Grace — I, II, Lebanon, 111 
Rogers, Martha Whitaker — I, II, 

Lebanon, 111. 



Rlnkwitz, Julius Carl — I, 1 1, Lebanon, II 
Saegesser, Samuel — I, II, Granite Citv, II 
S.-vger, Lloyd Ray— 1, II, Noble, 111. 
Sandige, Helen Maurine — I, II, 

Webster Gro\es, Mo. 
Schaefer, Richard— I, II, O'Fallon, 111. 
Scheller, Jane Frances — I, II, 

Kirkwood, Mo. 
Schmidt, CleolaOlixia — I, II, Lebanon, II 
Schmidt, Vera Martha — I, II, Red Bud, 11 
Schmidt, Wilma Melle — I, II, Breeze, 111. 
Schroeder, EitelOlif — 1, 1 1, Metropolis, II 
Shadowen, John Edward — 1, II, 

Christopher, 111. 
Shaffer, KIargaret Beatrice — I, II, 

Lebanon, 111. 
Sheppard, Robert Morgan — I, II, 

Edwardsxille, 111. 
Smith, Irene Ruth— I, II, Ed\vards\ille, II 
Smith, Vera Irene — I, II, Albion, 111. 
Stanley, Teddy — I, Crossville, 111. 
Stein, AdaKatherine — I, II, Mascoutah, II 
Stehlick, John — I, II, Belleville, 111. 
Stoeckel, Inez — I, II, New Baden, 111. 
Stout, Glenn John — I, II, Mascoutah, 111. 
Thurmond, Pauline — II, East St. Louis, Ii: 
Tracey, Harold Oscar — I, II, 

Central City, 111. 
Tunnel, Lucius B. — I, II, Hornsby, 111. 
Well, Helen Mae— I, II, Brighton, 111. 
WisELEY, Eugene Nelson — I, II, 

X'ergennes, 111. 



Forty F, 




Forty-Si 








^tltlettcs 



m McKENDREAN 



McKendree Coaches 

Coach Glenn F. FiUey. director of athletics at McKendree for the past 
two years has proven himself a capable leader. 

In 1923, Coach Filley graduated from Missouri Wesleyan, where he 
gained recognition as an all-around athlete. Following his graduation he 
coached in the high school at Grand Island, Nebraska. 

During his two years at McKendree his teams have ranked high in con- 
ference circles. Last year the grid team finished fourth in the conference, 
and the Purple track squad gained fifth place in the State meet. 

With a number of new men expected next year to add to the letter-men 
returning. Coach Filley should again produce teams of high caliber. 




Coach Everett Jordan, who has served as assistant 
to Filley, has played a large part in the Purple victories 
this year. His ability as a leader has put the Bear Cats 
in a fighting spirit when the morale was low. Coach 
Jordan had complete charge of the baseball team, and 
since a team of veterans will take the field in the opening 
game, the prospects for a winning team are good. 




Coach JoRDA 



m McKENDREAN 




Gliy Magill 
Associate in Athlelics 



The -A'/" Clw 



President 

Vice-President 



Erle Todd 
John Isom 



MEMBERS 



FOOTBALL 
Dr. Cameron Harmon, Joseph Guanciolo, Erie 
Todd, John Isom, CHfton Gould, Delhert Laquement, 
Stephen Kolesa,Irvin Nelson, Harold Kaesar, Clayton 
Boitnott, Alva Osborne, Harry Lathrop, John Hall, 
Ralph Mitchell, Edward Shadowen, Idris Cornwell, 
Claire Luster, Paul Knauff, Charles Jack. 

BASKETBALL 

Charles Jack, Mayo Magill, Wensel Brown, Clifton Gould, Erie Todd, 
Emery Martin, Guy Magill. 

BASEBALL 
Wensel Brown, Stephen Kolesa, John Isom, John Hall, Erie Todd, Joseph 
Guandolo, Charles Jack, Harold Kaesar, John Oster, Guy Magill. 

TRACK 

Clifton G3uld, Stephen Kolesa, Lewis Peterson, John Isom, Emery Martin, 
Val Baggott, Glenn Haskins, Wendall Dunn, Loy Wattles. 



Ronald Mowe. 



i '^ •'<r4 / U 




Forty-Eight 



m McKE 



TV T T' » :; 1 -r7> 



^AN 



Slf ^v yv^^^^v>i 



Football 



Joseph Guandolo — Captain 
"Joe" 

CONWAY, PENNA. 
Joe not only acted captain during the 1926 
season, but played like a captain. This was Joe's 
third year on the team, and he has another year 
to play. That means that very few plays will be 
pulled around right-end next year. 



CONFERENCE GAMES 




McKendree 

McKendree 

McKendree 

McKendree 13 

McKendree 



Shurtleff 26 

Carbondale 

Macomb 25 

Lincoln 

Carthage 38 



NON-CONFERENCE GAMES 

McKendree Scott Field 

McKendree Springfield 

McKendree 13 Rolla . 

Total 26 Total 



\ I \ I Jl 



3 

10 

41 

143 




^d^W^i^^^^ W^ ^- 



Forty-Nine 



We McKENDREAN 



a.A*x 





Erle Todd, Captain Elect 
CONWAY, PENNA. 

The Centennials will have Todd for their 
captain, as he is the second of the Conway 
dynasty to lead the Bear Cats. Todd, who has 
played quarterback for the past three years, has 
all the qualities of a leader, and plays a hard, 
consistent game. 

Harold Kaesar 

"Whitey" 
BELLEVILLE, ILL. 

Kaesar's willingness to fight against larger 
men, overcame his handicap of being rather 
small, and he developed into the best line- 
plunger on the squad. 



Football Summary 

The McKenclree Bear Cats suffered a larger 
number of defeats this year then they had in the 
entire two previous seasons. A lack of line-material 
to aid a fast, smooth working hackfield pro\ed to he 
too much of a handicap and, out of eight games 
played, six were reverses, one resulted in a tie and 
one was a Purple victory. 



Kaeser, Halfback 



^11 







Fifty 




Fifty-One 



We McKENDREAN 



^A/^A/o/o/oAA^ 





DLESA, Halfback 




Stephen Kolesa 

"Steve" 

EDWARDSVILLE, ILL. 

Steve's specialty was a dash around end, and 

he made some long gains. The Bear Cat 

followers welcome Steve's return next year, as 

he should be a big factor during the Centennial 

campaign. 

Charles Jack 

"Charlie" 
OPDYKE, ILL. 
The basketball star thought he would try 
his hand at football, and much to his surprise, 
not only could he play a good brand of football 
but most of the time his work at the tackle and 
end positions was of a stellar character. An- 
other year should see even greater improvement 
in "Charlie." 



the Miners were declared victors. Kolesa played his 
best game of the season against Rolla. Springfield, 
another Missouri team, defeated the Bear Cats in the 
best game of the year by a score of 10-0. On this 
occasion the Filleymen looked good even in defeat. 

The first conference game against Lincoln saw 
the Bear Cats put up a brilliant game, and as a re- 
sult the Railsplitters failed to score, while McKendree 



J:. 







Fifty-Two 



w^^ 



V---.-4^ 



Clifton Gould 

"Hurlev" 
MT. CARMEL, ILL. 
Gould will be another letterman who will 
return to McKendree next year. All of his 
opponents will testify that Hurley hits hard and 
has a habit of spilling a man with the ball, on 
an end-run. 

Idris Cornwell 
. "Dudes" 
NEWTON, ILL. 
"Dudes" has well acquired the two rnain 
attributes of good punting — distance and height. 
His excellent drop-kicking and his "jack-rabbit" 
running ability won for him the fuU-back posi- 
tion. We expect much from this Newton fresh- 
man. 



CliU'LD, End 



crossed the opposing goal for 13 points. This was 
McKendree's twelfth conference victory in thirteen 
games played. 

The Western Teachers met the local team in the 
midst of a slump, and easily won a victory, 25-0. 
The McKendree line seemed to he unable to cope 
with the Teachers" attack, and despite the fact that 



Guandolo spoiled many 
Cats lost. 



Me 



plays, the Beg 



Cornwell, Fullback 



^S #WUi»-4.<3=»»— JC ^^ 



■^C 



1^- 



Fifty-Three 



McKENDREAN 





Shadowen, Halfback 




Edward Shadowen 

-Eddie" 
CHRISTOPHER, ILL. 
This quiet, unassuming, bashful Christopher 
boy required some time before he could adapt 
himself to college football. Finally he hit his 
stride and his fighting qualities on the defense — 
his clean-cut tackles — his nevcr-give-up spirit — 
won for him his coveted "M". Eddie is sure to 
make regular half next season. 

Claire Luster 
"Major" 
GRANITE CITY, ILL 
Western Military Academy sent us one of 
their big soldier boys, and Coach Filley immedi- 
ately set to work and made a plunging full-back 
out of him. The first half of the season found 
Luster in a guard position, but later his line 
smashing abilities were recognized by his shift 
into the backfield. 



Playing before the largest crowd in McKendree 
History, and against an old traditional rival, the Bear 
Cats dropped the Home-Coming game to Shurtleff, 
26-0. The Pioneers played stellar ball in avenging 
their Homecoming defeat at the hands of the Filley- 
men in the previous season. 



Luster, Fullback 



I 




Fifty-Four 




Fifty-Five 



i 



< 





Osborne, Tackie 



Alva Osborn 

"Slim'' 

GRAND CHAIN, ILL. 

Old "Slim" with his split lip and his dogged 
persistence upheld the right side of the line. This 
big, lanky freshman was always the life of the 
trip — who can ever forget his songs? 



Harry Lathrop 

"Heavy" 
NEWTON, ILL. 

The big boy from Newton was a consistent 
hard-hitting center, whose specialty consisted 
in crashing line -bucks. His passing was faultless 
throughout the year. 




The final game of the season proved to be an 
upset. The Carbondale Teachers were doped to beat 
the Bear Cats by three touchdowns, but when the 
final whistle blew the score was deadlocked 0-0. This 
game failed to furnish many thrills, probably due to 
bad weather conditions, the field being covered with 
two inches of snow. 




y >10> 



VV^AA^^xAA^^^^^^^^^^^^^^V ' 



Fifty-Six 



m McKENDREAN 




%. 



Clayton Boitnott 

"Tucky" 

HERRIN, ILL. 

The name of his home town should at least 
give a man enough inspiration to play tootball, 
and that is what Tucky did. This Herrin boy 
is only a freshman and should play several more 
hard games for McKendree. 

Paul Knauff 

"Whitey' 

NEW BRIGHTON, PENNA. 

Although beginning football practice rather 
late, Knauff soon was awarded a position in the 
line. The best way to describe him is thus; "He 
was a fighter." 



Coach Filley faced a real problem when practice 
began. Only five letter men returned to school and, 
since only two of these were linemen, a new line had 
to be built. The new material was good, but only 
coaching and experience can mould a winning team. 
Prospects for a strong eleven for the Centennial year 
are bright and the Bear Cats expect to take their 
place among the conference leaders. 





IIS 



Fifty-Seven 



^^^ 



We McKENDREAN 



Basketball Scores 



CONFERENCE GAMES 



McKendree 36 

McKendree 20 

McKendree 22 

McKendree 43 

McKendree 23 

McKendree 31 

McKendree 34 

McKendree 32 

McKendree 47 

McKendree 24 

McKendree 45 



McKendree 38 

McKendree 23 

McKendree 32 

McKendree 27 

McKendree 18 

McKendree 26 

McKendree 25 

McKendree 29 

Total 634 



Shurtleff .... 


. . . 38 


Charleston 


. . . 38 


Milliken .... 


. . . 41 


Shurtleff .... 


. . . 32 


Macomb .... 


. . . 27 


Lincoln .... 


. . . 42 


Macomb .... 


. . . 30 


Charleston 


. . . 23 


Carbondale 


. . . 35 


Carbondale 


. . . 27 


Carthage .... 


. . . 21 


^CE GAMES 




Evansville 


. . . 61 


Werner- Werner . 


. . . 29 


Rolla 


. . . 24 


Springfield 


. . . 32 


Springfield 


. . . 28 


Evansville 


. . . 37 


Concordia 


. . . 41 


Springfield 


. . . 28 


Total 


. . .577 



1%. LI I jr 



■?m^t¥f.€ 




*®eMcKENDREAN 



The Basketball Season 



Charles Jack — Captain 

"Charlie ' 

OPDYKE, ILL. 

Twisting, squirming, tearing, writhing, 
puffing, "Charlie" dribbles out of a mass 
of players and suddenly with a queer con- 
tortion, loops another of his sensational 
baskets. Besides being the high point 
man in the Conference, Jack is also the 
respected and well-liked leader of his 
team-mates. 



Although the basketball season was not as successful as the previous one 
a number of interesting and closely-contested floor games were played. Nine- 
teen games were staged during the season, eleven of which were conference 
games. Of these eleven, there were five victories. 

The Bear Cat team was considered the smallest basketball aggregation 
in the "Little Nineteen" conference. However, the Bear Cats offset this 
"handicap" with their characteristic whirlwind style of game and fast floorwork. 

The season opened with a listless game with the Werner-Werner team 
from St. Louis. This game merely exhibited the early season mistakes of 
the Filleymen, and the following game with the speedy EvansviUe quintet 
showed a decided improvement in the teamwork of the Bear Cats. 

The work of the Bear Cats against the Rolla Miners was fast and accurate 
and Coach Filley and his men came out on the long end of a 32 to 24 score. 
The work of Captain Jack and Brown was particularly brilliant in this game. 

In two closely-contested battles with the Springfield Teachers of Spring- 
field, Missouri, McKendree was defeated. Returning to the home floor the 
Bear Cats were revenged by defeating the Teachers by one point. In the 
last two minutes of play Mayo Magill looped the winning basket. 

McKendree broke even in their two game series with the Shurtleff Pioneers. 
The Bear Cats were defeated by a two point margin at Alton and on the home 
court the McKendreans annexed a victory by a wide margin. "Pup" Brown's 
scoring was a feature of this game. 

Probably the best game of the season was played against McKendree's 
ancient rival, Southern Illinois Normal. Playing on foreign territory, the 
Bear Cats unleashed a powerful attack which netted 47 points and a victory 
for the Filleymen. On the return engagement, McAndrews' quintet copped 
the game with a last minute spurt. 

This season ended the basketball careers of three stars, Wensel Brown, 
and the two Magills. Coach Filley will doubtlessly find difficulty in filling 
the two forward positions left vacant by Wensel Brown and Mayo Magill and 
the back guard position which is now open. However, Todd, Martin, and 
several other reliables will be of assistance to Coach Filley in the moulding 
of his centennial team. 




- V* 

1^ 



^ i^N^^^^^^^^V^ 



Fifty-m 



We McKENDREAN 



^^wvyvw^ 



Mayo Magill 

"Mac" 
GREENVILLE, ILL. 

For the past four years one 
of McKendree's mainstays has 
been this quick, cat-like, wiry 
Greenville boy who was 
always on the go, who could 
always be depended upon to 
"loop 'em" when they were 
needed. In the pcrsonofMayo 
Magill, we ha\e lost one of the 
best forwards in the history of 
the school. 




Guy Magill 

"Cotton" 

GREENVILLE, ILL. 

Our cottonheaded back- 
guard never knew that the 
English language had .such a 
word as ' 'Quit . ' ' From the first 
whistle to the last, "Cotton" 
was actively engaged in break- 
ing up opposing plays, inter- 
cepting passes and at times 
even shooting a few baskets. 
"Beeson" ended his college 
basketball career by playing 
a "bang-up" good game. 




Emery Martin 

"Adickey" 
SUMNER, ILL. 

Sumner High School sent 
us a well-built chap who came 
into his own during the latter 
half of the basketball season. 
It was only the fact that two 
extra good forwards were on 
the team that hindered 
"Mickey" from makirg a 
regular forward. We will see 
more of him in the year to 
come. 




v ^w V ^^^^^ ^ ^^^A^^^^ V ^^^^AA^ ^ 



Sixty 



We McKENDREAN 



Wensel Brown 

"Pup" 

GRANITE CITY, ILL. 

For three years our midget 
forward has effectively 
shouldered the responsibili- 
ties, of a burden much too 
great for many a bigger man. 
With his uncanny ability to 
dribble, his fast floor work 
and a keen eye for the basket, 
"Pup" has established a 
basketball reputation at Mc- 
Kendree which will long 
endure. 



Clifton Gould 

Captain-Elect 

"Hurley" 

MT. CARMEL, ILL. 

Although bigger men have 
handled the guard position 
at McKendree, no one has 
played it with as much fight, 
as much vigor and as much 
honest-to-goodness headwork 
as has our next year's cap- 
tain. We expect Hurley to 
fill Jack's shoes in splendid 
fashion. 





Erle Todd 

"Ashur" 

CONWAY, PENNA. 

The tall, handsome boy 
from the East, was called 
upon time and again to take 
over one of the guard posi- 
tions. His stellar work as- 
sures him of a regular posi- 
tion next year. 



Sixty -One 




Sixty-Tin 



■^McK 



i/^i^ 



p 



Track 

1926 

The 1926 Track Team was one of the strongest that ever represented 
McKendree. The season opened with the A. A. U. Indoor meet at the Coliseum 
in St. Louis, when the Bear Cat Relay team showed their heels to the fast 
Washington U. team. Later in the season in a track meet at St. Louis the 
Washington University team defeated McKendree 723^ to 273/2- 

In the James Miliken University track meet at Lebanon, the Bear Cats 
walked away with high honors, winning by a score of 703^2 to 603/^. Ray Goode 
was high point man, garnering first places in the javelin and shot put, and 
seconds in the discus throw and pole vault. 

On May 13 the McKendree tracksters defeated Shurtleff College to the 
tune of 74 to 52, and the following week they placed fifth in the "Little Nine- 
teen" Field and Track Meet held at Illinois College. Ray Goode broke the 
State javelin record for the third time with a throw of 192 feet 53^^ inches. 



LETTER-MEN 



Captain George Darrow 
Ray Goode 
Lewis Peterson 
Stephen Kolesa . 
Val Baggott . 
Leroy Schmidt . 
Ray Carter . 
Emery Martin . 
Jack Haskins 
Russell Isom 
Cliffton Gould 
Loy Wattles 
Glen Seibert 



Relay and quarter mile 

Field events 

Relay and dashes 

. Relay and dashes 

Relay and quarter 

Dashes 

. High hurdles 

. Half-mile 

One mile 

. Half mile 

. Pole vault and relay 

Field event 5 

Field events 



Ray Goode, premier track star and holder of the State record in the javelin 
event was elected Captain of the 1927 track team, but owing to his failure to 
return to school, Lewis Peterson, a member of the relay team and dash man 
extraordinary, was elected in his place. The prospects for the 1927 season 
are very bright. 

SCHEDULE FOR 1927 

March 21 — A. A. U. Indoor Meet at St. Louis. 

April 21 — Class Meet at Lebanon. 

April 27 — Washington University at St. Louis. 

May 6 — Shurtleff and Southern Illinois Teachers at Lebanon. 

May 14 — ^J. Milliken and Eastern Illinois Teachers at Decatur. 

May 21— Illinois Intercollegiate A. A. Meet at Peoria. 



Sixty-Three 



/ V\^/VNAA/MV 



We McKENDREAN 



^^^^^A^^< 




Sixty-Four 




OsTER, Brown, Magill, Foster, Kolesa 
Jack, Frohardt, Kaeser, Guandolo, Hall 



Sixty-Five 



We McKENDREAN 



Baseball 



1926 



After a slow start due to bad weather and a poor diamond, the baseball 
team came back strong and defeated Eden Seminary and Shurtleff College, after 
losing to St. Louis University, Western Military Academy, Concordia and 
Shurtleff. With the injury of Captain-Elect John Isom, Wensel Bro\\n took 
charge of the team and acted as manager, captain and coach. The 1927 season 
finds a host of lettermen back, and the prospects for the coming season are 
very bright. Coach Jordan and Captain Brown are slowly molding an excel- 
lent team into shape. 



LETTER-MEN 



Wensel Brown 
Harold Kaeser . 
John Hall 
Ralph Frohardt 
John Oster . 
Jos. Guandolo 
Steve Kolesa 
Charles Jack 
Guy Magill . 



Third base 

Pitcher 

First base 

Second base 

Shortstop 

Catcher 

Outfielder 

. Outfielder 

Outfielder 



SCHEDULE FOR 1927 

April 6 — Western Military Academy at Alton. 

April 9 — Eden Seminary at Lebanon. 

April 12 — Eden Seminary at St, Louis. 

April 20 — Washington University at St. Louis. 

April 23 — Concordia Seminary at Lebanon. 

April 28 — Shurtleff College at Lebanon. 

April 29 — St. Louis University at St. Louis. 

May 4 — Shurtleff College at Alton. 

May 12 — Concordia Seminary at St. Louis. 

May 16 — Monmouth College at Monmouth. 

May 17 — Western Teachers at Macomb. 




#r0amzattoits 




President 

Vice-President 

. Secretary-Treasurer 

. Cheer Leader 

Song Leader 

Pianist 

Associate in Athletics 



Second Semester 

L. Joseph Hortin 

Lewis Peterson 

. Dorothy Adair 

Philip Glotfelty 

Charles Nichols 

Lucille Hadfield 

Guy Magill 



Student Chapel each Friday. 
Disposition of Student Business 



Home-coming Program. 
Annual Interscholastic Program. 



The Student Association is composed of the regularly enrolled students. 
This representative student-body's purpose is to centralize student activities i 
as well as to stimulate "McKendree pep." The year's program consists of: ^ 



Sixty-Seven 



!«V^NVVVVSV 



■We McKENDREAN 



^A^VWVW> 



Ma?/i Club 

Organized 1926 
Founded by Dr. C. J. Stowell 



LoRiN Mitchell 
\'erdie Corell 
Emery Martin 



President 
. \'ice-President 
Secretary-Treasurer 



. Lee Baker 

Charles Jack 

V'ernal Hardy 



CHARTER MEMBERS 



Lee Baker 
J. W. Dunn 
\'erdie Corell 
Clifton Gould 
Vernal Hardy 
Charles Jack 



LoRiN Mitchell 
Eugene Smith 
John Stout 
James Stewart 
C. J. Stowell 
Emery Martin 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

Professor McClure 
Dr. Cameron Harmon 
Dean E. P. Baker 



ASSOCLATE MEMBERS 

SCRANTON \'aN HoUTEN ErNEST BrITTON 

Sidney W. Prey Emma Bergmann 

Howard W. Gould Russell Isom 

Marie Shurtleff 




yjterar^ 



'We McKENDREAN 



Pi Kappa Delta 

National Honorary Forensic 
Illinois Theta Chapter 

Established 1924 

Membership — Intercollegiate Orators and Debaters 

OFFICERS 

President Lewis Peterson 

Vice-President Vivian Young 

Secretary-Treasurer Eugene Smith 

MEMBERS 

HONORARY 
Dr. Cameron Harmon J. W. A. Kinison 

Dean E. P. Baker Belle M. Nixon 

Olive Patmore 

INSTRUCTION 
W. C. Kettlekamp 

STUDENTS 

Harry Brown Carrie Darner 

Lewis Peterson Edna Kinsey 

Joseph Hortin Harry Pate 

Alice Hoye Belle Pfennighausen 

William Sawyer Louise Hale 

Vivian Young Sue Berryman 

Clarence Brennan Joseph Guandolo 

Mary Richards Erle Todd 

Eugene Smith Constance Glenn 

Beulah Ruddick Charles Nichols 



Seventy 




Seventy-One. 






We McKENDREAN 



Philosophian Literary Society 



1837 - 1927 



After a continuous service of ninety years devoted to the 
cause of literary training, the Philisophian Literary Society 
can view an unbroken record, survey a worthy accomplish- 
ment, and, in consequence, gain an inspiration for a glorious 
future It has written an enviable history and has never 
deviated from its original purpose. Through these eventful 
years it has furnished toilers in every noble sphere of human 
endeavor — many of whom have won distinction. In the 
World War two of Philo's sons made the supreme sacrifice for 
their country; namely, Glenn McCormack and Harold Adams. 

A McCormack Memorial Fund is being established, the 
interest accruing from this forming an Annual Philo Scholar- 
ship at McKendree College. In the near future a similar 
Adams Memorial will be founded. 

The meetings have been changed from Friday to Monday 
night, and, as a result of this alteration, an increased interest 
has been manifest by both old and new members. 

Thus nonagenarian Philo again drinks deeply at the 
"Fountain of Youth," arises, and with a toss of his proud head 
throws back the hoary locks of passed glories, picks up the 
shield of determination upon which is emblazoned "Detur 
Digniori," unsheathes the keen sword of intellectual endeavor, 
and faces with a firm step the dawn of a new day! 



- V^^A^ ^^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^^MV 



Seventy-Two 




Seventy-Thfee 



We McKENDREAN 



The Platonian Literary Society 



Founded 1849 



"V(a Sapientiae" 



Lov Wattles 
Olixer W'ahl 
Robert Young 

F. C. Brown 
Earl Hlssong 
Kendall Born 
E. Schroder 
H, Pate 

j. Daxtdson 

C. Luster 
H. Kaeser 

B. Clayton 
E, Davis 

\V. Gillespie 

D. E^ertenstein 

G. Muscovalley 
L. Sager 

S. Saegesser 

L. TUNNELL 

C. Lynn 

R. Mitchell 
P. Englehart 

E. Shadowen 



Edward Bernreuter 
Harold Brown 
Philip Glotfelty 
Jos. Guandolo 
John Hall 
Vernal Hardy 
Paul Hortin 
Edward Hopper 
Charles Jack 
John Isom 
Frank Jessop 
Steve Kolesa 
Sam Kotelly 
LoRiN Mitchell 
Clifton Oxendine 
Lewis Peterson 
Thomas Perkins 
Kenneth Ripple 
Eugene Smith 
Erle Todd 
Dale Wilson 
Harold Culver 



Seventy-Four i 



We McKENDREAN 



>kgiw^r ^";^ 




» '^^ ji n - 'ii ■^■' 









We McKENDREAN 



Clionian Literary Society 

Founded at McKendree College, 1869 
Charter Granted by State of Illinois, 1881 



Alice Hoye 
Dorothy Dee Adair 
Mildred Adams 
Beulah Ruddick 
Vivian Young 
Marie Karnes 
Julia Wilson 
Marion Kirkbride 
La Verne Hoover 
Carrie Darner 

Marguerite 



Mary Hughes 
Ruth Henry 
Audrey Bower 
Belle Pfenninghausen 
Constance Glenn 
Dorothy Helen Ikemire 
Margaret Teague 
Sue Berryman 
Mary Richards 
WiLMA Jessop 
Weber 



PLEDGES 



Edith Kaley 
Irma Oglesby 
Bernice Parrish 
Irene Smith 
Mildred Peak 
Merle Lang 
Lucille Hadfield 
Vera Smith 
Elizabeth Mayes 

LORENE FuLLERTON 

Zella Malandrone 
Verna Dee Lasater 
Edith Plato 
Lavina Zook 
Cleda Renner 
Alice Classen 
Laura Dillon 
Edna Kinsey 
Elizabeth Melson 
Alleen Beardsley 



Grace Renner 
Mildred Bozett 
Evelyn Dunn 
Martha Rogers 
Marjorie Glotfelty 
Nina Mae Harmon 
Georgia Wangelin 
Jane Scheller 
Geneva Grieves 
Areta Gould 
Marcella Horsely 
Thelma Brandon 
Cleola Schmidt 
Dorothy Jackson 
Louise Hale 
Margaret Schafer 
Myrtle Berghahn 
Neva McDermott 



j yw^^^^^^^ ^^ ^N^^^^^^^^ 



Seventy-Six 



•©e McKENDREAN 







^^^ iE 




L. 






^^ 1^ f*l . ^ ^^ 





m ^^ 



f-4 



^.^ . i' 







/^•-^•-•-•-Wi^ 



We McKENDREAN 



V VW^^/^> ^ WV»k 



The Press Club 

Organized 1921 
Publishers of the McKendree Review 



\ 



OFFICERS 

Editor-in-Chief Joseph Hortin 

Managing Editor Vernal Hardy 

Business Manager William Kratzer 

Exchange Editor Tom Perkins 

Circulation Manager Glenn Haskins 

Assistant Circulation Manager James Stuart 

Feature Editor Edna Kinsey 

Society Editor Helen Douglas 

Sports Editor GuY Magill 

Assistant Sports Editor John Oster 

Reporter Alice Hoye 

Faculty Advisor Zella V. Brown 

The members of the Press Club publish the McKendree Review, a weekly 
publication, to which each student becomes a subscriber when he matriculates 
in the College. The Review is a member of the Illinois College Press Associa- 
tion. 

Work on the Review offers an opportunity to the student who is interested 
in journalism and who desires practical experience. Any student submitting 
samples of work which are satisfactory to the editors-in chief and to the faculty 
advisor, Miss Zella V. Brown, of the English department, is eligible for 
membership in the Press Club. 

It was the Club's good fortune this year that Joseph Hortin and Vernal 
Hardy were appointed editors of McKendree's paper, for the editorial column 
throughout the year has brought favorable comment to the publishers as well 
as praise for the editors. 

Very few college papers have been able to publish a column containing the 
special features or the humor such as we find in that of Miss Edna Kinsey. 
Her consistent work has drawn much attention, and a large number of college 
papers have often found her work worth copying. 

It is the wish of those who support McKendree College, that every new 
student will realize the part that the McKendree Review plays in advancing 
college ideals, in expressing student opinion, and in supporting every helpful 
organization on the campus. 



V^ V ^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^A^i^ S ^V ^ ^^^^^^ 



Seventy-Eight 



McKENDREE REVIEW 



BEAR CATS \m LftL<T GAw.ES OF SEASO 




Mil 




'.*■*■:» 



Seventy-Nine 




r.ujhty 




Eighty-One 







AFFIRMATIVE 
Captain Joseph Hortin, Clarence Brennan, Harry Pate 
S. E. Missouri Teachers at Cape Girardeau, Mo. 
Western Illinois Teachers at Macomb, 
Carthage College at Carthage, 111, . 
Shurtleff College at Lebanon 

NEGATIVE 
Captain Joseph Guandolo, Eugene Smith, Lewis Peterson 
Lincoln College at Lincoln, 111. 
W'heaton College at Wheaton, 
Illinois College at Jacksonville, 
Carthage College at Lebanon, 111. 
Eureka College at Lebanon, II 
Greenville College at Greenville, 
Westminster College at Fulton, Mo. 
Missouri Wesleyan College at Cameron, 
William Jewell College at Liberty, Mo. 

PI KAPPA DELTA CONVENTION AT MT. PLEASANT, 

Hortin and Guandolo 
Des Moines University (aff.) vs. McKendree (neg. 
Drake University (neg.) vs. McKendree (aff.) 
Iowa Wesleyan University (aff.) vs. McKendree (neg.) 



Eighty-Two 



We McKENDREAN 



^^^^^WV»^ 




Women s Debate 

E. R. Spencer, Coach 



Affirmative 
Alice Hoye 
Beulah Ruddick 
Sue Berryman 



Negative 
Edna Kinsey 
Belle Pfennighal'sen 
Lol;ise Hale 



Affirmative, victory, from Green\ille College 
Negative defeated hy Shurtleff College 



The greatest orator, save one, of antiquity has left it on record that he ahvays studied his adver- 
sary's case with as great, if not with still greater, intensity than even his own. What Cicero practiced 
as the means of forensic success, requires to be imitated by all who study any subject in order to arrive 
at the truth. He who knows only his own side of the case, knows little of that. His reasons may have 
been good, and no one may have been able to refute them. But if he is equally unable to refute the 
reasons on the opposite side, if he does not so much as know what they are, he has no ground for pre- 
ferring either opinion. The rational position for him would be suspension of Judgment, and unless he 
contents himself with that, he is either led by authority, or adopts, like the generality of the world, the 
side which he feels most inclination. — On Liberty, by John Stuart Mill. 



Eicility -Three 



W^ANNV^ 



We McKENDREAN 



Other Forensic Activities 



FORENSIC LEADERS 



Miss Belle Nlxon . 
Professor W. C. Kettlekamp 
Dr. E. R. Spencer 



. • Manager 

Men's Debate Coach 

Women s Debate Coach 



ORATORS 

Representative to the Illinois State Oratorical Association and 

to the Pi Kappa Delta Convention 

Harry E. Brown 

Representatives to Southern Illinois and Southeast Missouri 
Oratorical Association 
Charles Nichols 
Alice Hove 



EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEAKING 

Representatives to the Southern Illinois and Southeast Mo. 
Oratorical Association 
Erle Todd 
Constance Glenn 



Eighty-Four 




JHuskal 



i 



m McKENDREAN 



^^^^^\^ 






Trehk Clef Club 

Organized 1924 

Limited Membership 

OFFICERS 

Director Miss Pauline Harper 

President Margaret Teague 

Vice-President Mildred Adams 

Secretary-Treasurer La Verne Hoover 

Pianist Dorothy Helen Ikemire 

YEAR'S SPECIAL FEATURES 
Presentation of opera. "Bohemian Girl" — April 7.5. 

Presentation of pantomime and cantata. "Pan On A Summer's Day." — May 3. 
Broadcasting from East St. Louis' newest radio station — February 23. May 6. 

VOICES 

FIRST SOPRANOS FIRST ALTOS 

Zella Brown Marion Kirkbride- 

Alice Classen Constance Glenn 

Verna Dee Lasater Areta Gould 

Elizabeth Mayes Theodora Mueller 

Edith Plato Belle Pfennighausen 

LuciLE Hadfield Martha Rogers 
Margaret Teague 

SECOND SOPRANOS SECOND ALTOS 

Lavina Zook Mildred Adams 

Mary Hughes LaVerne Hoover 

Merle Lang Irene Smith 
Margaret Schafer 
Audrey Bower 



'""^ % < v% ^^v^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^^' 



Eighty-Six 




Mens Glee Club 

Organized 1924 
Limited Membership 

OFFICERS 

President Kenneth Rippel 

Secretary-Treasurer Edward Hopper 

Accompanist Areta Gould 

Director Pauline Harper 



ACTIVITIES 



Radio Broadcasting 

Spring Trip 

Opera — "Bohemian Girl" April 5. 



FIRST TENORS 
Paul Hortin 
Harold Brown 
Kenneth Rippel 



SECOND TENORS 
William Kratzer 
Charles Nichols 
Joyce Davidson 
Olaf Schroeder 
Jack Jasper 



VOICES 



BARITONES 
Earl Hussong 
Lewis Peterson 
Robert Peach 
Philip Glotfelty 
Arthur Hoppe 
Sam Kotelly 

BASS 
Harold Culver 
Julius Runkwitz 
Lee Baker 
Sam Saegesser 
Edward Hopper 



\\\ 



Eighty-Seven 



>w%/ww^ 



We McKENDREAN 



^^WVWV^ 




SECOND GIRLS' QUARTLil'TE 

First Soprano Elizabeth Mayes 

Second Soprano Merle Lang 

First Alto Areta Gould 

Second Alto Irene Smith 

FIRST GIRLS' QUARTETTE 

First Soprano Margaret Teagle 

Second Soprano Marian Kirkbride 

First Alto Theodora Miller 

Second Alto Mildred Adams 




Light n-Eigltt 




Eicihiy-Xine 



We McKENDREAN 




The McKendree College Orchestra 

The McKendree College Orchestra of this year consisted almost entirely 
of new members. In spite of a late start and numerous other difficulties, the 
members showed a fine spirit of co-operation and accomplished excellent work. 

The purpose of the college orchestra is to provide an opportunity for 
ensemble playing for musicians at McKendree and to assist in the various 
public entertainments sponsored by the school. 

Reviewing the work done by the new and old members this year, it is 
expected that the centennial year will find the McKendree College Orchestra 
bigger and better than ever. 




JUraternal 




Ninctij-Tico 




Ninety-Three 



McKendree College 
Lebanon, 111. 62254 




II 

y. M. C. A. 

FACULTY ADVISORS 
Dr. Walton, Professors Kinison and Vick 

CABINET MEMBERS 

President Delbert Lacql'Ement 

Vice-President Arthur Hoppe 

Secretary Eugene Smith 

Treasurer Bovard Clayton 



Ninety-Four 



We McKENDREAN 




y. w. c. A. 

FACULTY ADVISORS 
Miss Alleen Wilson Miss Olive Patmore 

CABINET MEMBERS 

President . . . . . . .' Alice Hoye 

Vice-President Mildred Adams 

Treasurer Edna Kinsey 

Secretary Marion Kirkbride 

Program Chairman Vivian Young 

Social Chairman Beulah Ruddick 



^ ^^^^^^^^^^^M/^^^^^^ ^ ^ M 



Ninety-Five 



J'^A^iA^VW 



We McKENDREAN 




The Oxford Club 



Among McKendree's students have always been found a goodly number 
preparing for the ministry. One reason for the founding of the College back 
in 1828 was that Southern Illinois might have preachers with an educational 
training. Some years ago the organization known as the Oxford Club was 
started with the idea of providing for ministerial students a means for mutual 
improvement. 

The meetings are held every two weeks and a variety of programs afford 
the student a chance to grow and develop a usefulness in the line of his chosen 
work. Look well at the above group. With the exception of the faculty 
members involved you are looking at future district superintendents, pastors 
of seven point circuits, and perhaps bishops. 



--^^ ^^^ ^ ^^^^^^^^A A i^S^V^^^^^^ ^ 



Ninety-Six 




Ninety-Seven 



»s^s^»»www 



W McKENDREAN 




Stellar Observation 
Beautijication of College Canifjus 

Elza Crawley 
Paul Hortin 
Edward Hopper 
Inez Stoeckle 
Theodora Miller 
Phillip Glotfelty 
Julius Runkwitz 
Allen Leibig 
Henry Grieble 



AA^ / ^i^^ V^^ ^ ^ V 



Ninety-Eight 




^minxts 




Himtor 



■m McKENDREAN 



SEPTEMBER 



'The morrow was a bright September morn: 
The earth was beautiful as if new-born; 
There was that nameless splendor everywhere, 
That wild exhiliration in the air, 
Which makes the passers in the city street 
Congratulate each other as they meet." 



15 — The first five thousand have arrived — our expectations are filled. 
16 — ^John Isom reigns. 

17 — "Peet" to Miss Brown on the phone, "Is this you, Viv.?" 
18 — General exodus of Freshmen. 

20 — Dr. Spencer starts a movement to cage the mosquitos. 
21 — Englehardt, the well-known statesman, made ruler of the Freshmen. 
22 — Much weeping over the seating list in Hash Foundry. 

23 — Everyone yells like true fellows at first pep meeting. Half Carnegie Hall introduced as 
team prospects. 

24 — Opening of grid season. 

25 — Only two more months till Xmas. Shop early. 

26 — Great day for preachers' kids. They wonder whither away. 

27 — Glee club begins its chanting. 

28 — Boys join in on chorus. 

29 — Another of Life's little jokes. 

30 — Still another. 

31 — Boys are off to make mud pies with RoUa. 




WA^/^>AA>V ^ ^MVS^^^^^ViA^^^^^^^V^i^^ ^ 



One Hundred 



^ McKENDREAN 



OCTOBER 



"October's foliage yelloiivd with his cold.' 



2 — What is our joy to learn that the heroes arc alive in spite of defeat, 42-13! 

3 — Fishing season opens in front of chapel. Tunnel says they're biting fine. 

4 — Hoover joins the button gang. Wild times were had at first open sessions. 

5 — Chapel favored by the Rev. McClusky. 

6 — Ed. Kinsey tries hearse act, but decides to rehearse. 

7 — Promiscuous betting on World Series. 

Eleven o'clock permission given for the girls to see "Three Musketeers." Bachelor— 
M. O. banquet. 
9 — Class Struggle. 

10 — Fill up, girls, 'till Thanksgiving. 

11 — Bruce Carter is instigator of "back-to-the-farm" movement. 
12 — The plot thickens. 
13 — Much sand strewn at Bill's. 
14 — Team ofT for Springfield. 

15 — The picnic at Perry's was enjoyed by all, even though the miserable little dogs were 
roasted to death. 

17 — ^John Hall leaves the campus for a brief space. No Kangaroo Court, 

18 — Preparation being made for the first great struggle — exams. 

19 — Watch your dignity, women! 

20 — Doug and John agree to carry bunion plasters on their cross-country rides. 

21 — Snake dance to village. 

22 — Big peps while we see the boys off. 

23 — The team fetches home the side pork from Lincoln. 

24 — "Another Sunday," saith the pastor. "Now I must earn my shekels." 

26 — Clionians cut many initial didoes. Owing to the climatic conditions the Coarse Girls 
were unable to meet today. 

27 — Mrs. Miller speaks to the Y's. All right, gang, let's get into the big tent. 

28 — It rained supreme while Rocky led a few yells in the Jim. 

20 I^utin entertains with "The Bat." 




One Hundred and One 



1 — Charles Hall sleeps thru a date. 

3 — Coarse Girls refuse to kick. 

4 — Hoppe is kicked out of Glee Club. 

5 — Breathing space B4 Homecoming. 

6 — Homecoming!!! Failed to conquer the Pioneers. 

-Vodvil show is Broadway bound. 
9 — Many of the likenesses taken for the Book won't need any funny captions. 
10 — While Parrish can't revert to the big porous spaces she can don the garb of the bovine- 




■We McKENDREAN 



NOVEMBER 



'The Wild November 



■ at last beneath a veil of i 



He had no voice in the matter. 
Vodvil Show. 



11 — James Stewart very boldly states that if someone would give him S200 with which to 
buy a dog, he would buy 200 of the butcher shop variety. 

12 — Dr. Leslie, the Bostonian bean, holds peace conferences. 

14 — Verna Jarvis spends entire day looking for the bones in animal crackers. 

15 — Gerlach takes on appearance of a worm — he came along, wiggled a bit, then some 
chicken got him. 

17 — Prof. Kettlekamp talked to the "Y's" on religious conditions in Mexico. 

18 — Several third floor boys absent from classes today since their mirror was taken. 

19 — Mittens in evidence at the game when McKendree balanced the scales with Carbondale. 

22 — Lucille Hadfield announces that when the roll is called up yonder she'll be there. 

23 — Anarchists meeting in chapel. 

24 — We'll stay with you. Alma Mater. 

25 — Big groans and a great silence. 

28 — Lack of activity. 

30- — The war is over — the Seniors win the tournament. 




One Hundred and Two 




One Hundred and Three 




One Eundred and Four 



m McKENDREAN 



FEBRUARY 



id Itnts the buds < 



vills the leaves ivithin 




1 — Brown and Wills wear the orange blossoms. 

2 — Shurtleff at McKendree and all the Weary Willies made merry. 

4 — Joe Hortin to reign for the semester. Election supported by elaborate orations. 

6 — Daniel Gerlach insists that it was spring chicken that he had today because he bit into 
one of the springs. 

7 — In order that the girls might tea off properly little tea sets were purchased. 
11 — Luster and his retinue of fair ladies bounce down to Carbondale to view the McKendree 
Carbondale game. 

I'l — Miss Brown assigns Lamb for Wednesday and advises the class to digest it thoroughly. 
18 — "The Black Pirate" shown in chapel. More ideas for Musco. 
19 — Bert Smith is caught imitating "Doug." 

20 — The little Boy Blues in Carnegie Hall sup with the Lebanon mamas and papas. 
22 — Marion Kirkbride says she wishes she were like the river so she could follow her course 
without leaving her bed. 

24 — Gould got a big drop in the world in chapel today. 
26 — Everyone cut classes. 



(Editor's note: It is Saturday) 




^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^A^^^^^^^^^^^^^^v 



One Hundred and Fire 



w vv^ 



We McKENDREAN 



MARCH 



'Ah, March! we know thou art kind-hearted, spite o/ ugly looks and thr 



1 — ^March entered with a roar. 

2 — Willie expressed. 

4 — In the debate today it was definitely decided that the future of marry is divorce. 

5 — And all the little chickens got drowned. 

7 — Spring has come. Kachoo-Kachoo ! 

9 — Nelson and Oster join the B's. 
10 — Spring fashion sheet out. Frock coats and ear muffs by Ed Kinsey. 
11 — Everyone put on his canoes and flew over to the debate. We think McNary-Haugen's 
bill should be amputated. 

14 — The men meet in their spacious reception hall and decide to become followers of 
Em Post. 

18 — Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell. — 

21 — Little Louis Peterson says the cliff dwellers aren't the only bluffers. 

24 — Goodfellowship Onion threw a Confetti in Carnegie. 

26 — Several of Y.W's to Peoria from whence they proceeded to Freeze. 

28 — Something new in oils — Cornwells. 

30 — Scandal sheet. Staff leaves under police protection. 




w ^^/v^^^ ^ ^^^^A^^ ^ ^^^^^^AA^AAA^ ^ 



One Hundred and Six 



We McKENDREAN 



Our Advertisers 



The following concerns have shown a keen interest 
in the activities of McKendree College, and it was 
through their generous cooperation that the publication 
of this year book was made possible. They are 
worthy of your most cordial consideration and 
patronage — boost them. 



^^^^^^^^^^^ A^ ^^»^^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ 



One Hundred and Seven 



i W^»»WV»V 



We McKENDREAN 



^^^^^N^k 



Dependable 



Illinois 

Tbwer oM Uglif 

Corporation 



S 



ervice 



One Hundred and Eight 




One Hundred and Nine 




^ ^VS ^^^^^^^^^^^V 



One Hundred and Ten 




One Hundred and Eleven 



W McKENDREAN 



GENERAL MERCHANDISE 



C. HEER 



(JiKiIity Goods 



Service 



LEBANON, ILL. 



Charles Frey 



BAKERY 



1 2 1 W. St. Louis St. Lebanon, 



The Cream of QuaJify' 



THE 



PUREST, FRESHEST MILK 

Delivered to Your Door Daily 

MILK, the Ideal Food for All Ages 

L. S. LANGEXWALTER 

The 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of 



LEBANON, ILLINOIS 


2j We Serve You 


Courteous Treatment 


.9 


On 
the 


r 


i 


Square 


1 



Prompt Service 
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



One Hundred and Twelve 



^ McKENDREAN 



Lebanon Shoe Repair Shop 

Quality Work for the Whole Family 

BEST OF LEATHER- 
MODERATE RATES- 
EXCELLENT SERVICE— 



SAM MICIOTTO, Prop. 



Nothing More Convincing TTian 
Black on White 

S,i>i it With Priiitrrs' Ink 

Lebanon Advertiser 

WEEKLY NEWSPAPER AND 
COMMERCIAL PRINTER 

SYLVAN E. WILLIAMS 
Editor and Publisher 



Lebanon Ice 8C Bottling Works 

M. RITHMAN, Proprietor 

Manufacturers and Bottlers 
Pure Ice Soda Water 

Lebanon, Illinois 



SUNSHINE BISCUIT 



CASE & SANBORN 
COFFEE and TEA 



F. W. LANDWEHR 

General Merchandise 

Groceries, Dry Goods, Shoes, Fruits 

the'~store~oFservice 



Orders Cedled for and Delivered 
CANNED GOODS PETERS SHOES 



One Hundred and Thirteen 



J&. JSk. jL:. A;i.. Ji;^ jSb^ Jk^ ^ 



^ 



*8fe McKENDREAN 



Opera ""The Bohemian GirF^ 

Presented by 
THE McKENDREE COLLEGE GLEE CLUBS 



CHARACTERS 

Count Arnheim, Governor of Presburg .... Earl Hussong 

Thaddeus, a proscribed Pole Harold Brown 

¥\ovQste\n, nephew of the Count Kenneth Rippel 

Dqv\\sY\oo{, Chief of the Gipsies Lewis Peterson 

A 1 J L, { tL n , [Elizabeth Luke 

krXmt, daughter of the Count 1 Margaret Teague 

Buda, her attendant Elizabeth Mayes 

Queen of the Gipsies Irene Smith 

Captain of the Guard Phillip Glotfelty 

Soldiers Robert Peach, Joyce Davidson, Olaf Schroeder 

Chorus of Nobles, Soldiers, Gipsies, and Peasants 



Act 1 

Act II 



Act III 

Act IV 



Chateau and grounds of Count Arnheim, Presburg, Austria. 

Scene I Street in Presburg, moonlight. Camp of Gipsies. 

Scene II Same. Daylight. 

Scene III A Grand Eair in the public Platz of Presburg. 

Interior of the Hall of Justice. 

Reception Hall in the Castle of Count Arnheim. 



STORY OF "THE BOHEMIAN GIRL" 

Thaddeus, a Polish exile, seeking concealment from Austrian troops, rescues the small 
daughter of Count Arnheim of Austria, from an infuriated stag. The grateful Count asks the 
stranger to join in the festvities about to take pace Thaddeus accepts but refuses to drink to 
the health of the Emperor. The Count is angered and ihaddeus departs with a band of gipsies. 
Devilshoof, one of the Gipsies, is imprisoned by the Count, but he escapes and steals Arline, 
the Count's child. 

Twelve years have elapsed. Arline ignorant of her parentage, is happy with the Gipsies. 
She loves Thaddeus, and is betrothed to him but the Jealous Queen plans to separate them. 

A grand fair is in progress. Arline is falsely accused of having stolen a medallion belonging 
to Florenstein, the Count's nephew. She is brought before the Count. He recognizes a scar 
on her arm and realizes she is his long lost child. 

Arline, in her court splendor, cannot forget Thaddeus. They have a secret farewell meeting, 
but are discovered through the scheming of the Gipsy Queen. The Count is enraged until 
Thaddeus reveals his true rank. The Gipsv Queen plots to kill Thaddeus but Devilshoof changes 
the course of the bullet and the Queen is killed. The Count consents to the union of Arline and 
Thaddeus and all ends happily. 



One Hundred and Fourteen 




^A^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^A ^ 



One Hundred and Fifteen 



We McKENDREAN 



Man's intuition is a species of cunning that tells him whether a certain 
co-ed must study diligently or not when he asks her for a date. 

Since we saw Osborne, our big he-man, trying to decide which of his seven 
felt hats was the most becoming, he doesn't seem so "he". 

Famous last lines: 

Hoppe: "I just filled this pen last week. " 

"Nip" Smith: "The only thing I can't forgive my roommate for is 
buying clothes that are too small for me. " 

John Hall: "I got my red cheeks from bending over the kitchen stove." 



Wm. Monken Mercantile Company 

Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Shoes, Groceries, 
General Merchandise 




"Always the Best for the Money.'' 
Lebanon, Illinois 



BLUMENSTEIN BROS. 

Quality Sausages 



LARD 
HAMS 
BACON 



^^^^^^^^^^^» 



One Hundred and Sixteen 



■We McKENDREAN 



Evolution of a Senior 
Freshman — Waxing floors. 
Sophomores — Waxing eloquent. 
Junior — Waxing witty. 
Senior — Waxing wise. 

Reading of the smoking ads. leads us to believe that gentlemen prefer 
blends. 

Weather forecast — Thunder showers Friday probably followed by 
Saturday. 

Bite your fingernails if you want to, nobody else will. 

McKendree College Students 

Are Like Our Merchandise 

''Just Right'' 
The Amos- J antes Grocer Company 

Get up a party and come over to 

THE 

Lincoln Theater 

BELLEVILLE, ILL. 

We Show First Run Pictures Only- 
High Class Vaudeville 

IF YOU GOME ONCE YOU WILL GOME OFTEN 



One Hundred and Seventeen 



1^ McKENDREAN 



Rentchler Electric Shop 

325 East Main Street Belleville, 111. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING LIGHTING FIXTURES 

APPLIANCES 

Complete Line of RCA Radio Equipment 



Rentchler Service Satisfies 



WHEN YOU WANT GOOD ICE CREAM 

BE SURE IT COMES FROM A 

HOME ICE CREAM DEALER 



Home Ice Cream & Ice Co 




Daily Capacity, 1,000 Barrels 



Pfeffer Milling Company 



One Hundred and Eighteen 



m McKENDREAN 



Bertram Hotel 



BLOCK EAST OF THE BANK 

L. B. BUSCHER, Proprietor 




Put Your Duds in Our Suds 
DRY CLEANING 

Belleville Laundry Co. 

2 3rd &W. Main Belleville, 



Sheet Metal Works Plumbing Stoves Ranges 

EMIL J. WEBER 

Hardware 
LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



Kolb Mercantile Company 



Dry Goods, Shoes, Groceries and General 
Merchandise 



One Hundred and Nineteen 



■We McKENDREAN 



Allow us to remind you of 

The time Lucius Tunnel went fishing. 

The arrival of Luster's Thresher Six. 

The days when Rippel and Brian whooped it up a bit on the campus 
by rendering the "T. B. Waltz. 

The time when Osborne moved to Dean Nixon's table in the Beanery. 

The sheiking days of Carter? 

Todd's waste of energy. 

Bill Kratzer scoring four touchdowns against Michigan — No. 77. 

Kolesa's excellent driving ability. 

The day Gerlach appeared in his ultra-colored sweater. 

Kaeser's good looks. 



A MESSAGE WORTH WHILE 

Do clothes make the man? It is doubtful whether clothes alone 
can make any man a success. But at the same time, the man that 
is well dressed has a decided advantage over the slovenly, neglected 
looking person. 

In these days of hasty judgments and high speed business, first 
impressions mean a great deal. Your appearance can frequently 
be the deciding factor for or against you. Meet the world with 
a smile on your face and with your clothes neat and in good taste. 
And then you may feel confident that that first impression will be 
favorable. 

For almost fifty years Romeiser's have been rendering this service 
of correctly clothing men and young men. And they are always 
ready and eager to render this same service to you. 



THE ROMEISER CO. 



BELLEVILLE 



One Hundred and Ticenty 



We McKENDREAN 



Prof. Large — "Have you done your outside reading ''" 
Alice Classen — "No, sir, it's been too cold to read out side." 

Fables 
One time there was 

A student who never cut a class. 

A professor who was always good-humored. 

A co-ed who had to use clubs to beat off the men. 

Chicken for dinner in Pearson's Hashery for two weeks. 

A Soph who had an over-sized allowance. 

Hot water. 

Poets like Gerlach are born — and there doesn't seem to be any remedy for it. 

We know a co-ed who thinks the postmaster is profiteering every time he 
sells her a postage stamp. 

Always take a man who makes love awkwardly, for you may be sure he 
has had no practice. 

We have a philosopher in our midst! Tom Perkins, who does nothing but 
contemplate the world, says he can readily see why new-born infants are red 
in the face. 



McKendree College is an institution of Learning 
that has grown venerable as it has progressed in years. — 
The graduate of McKendree can feel truly proud of his 
Alma Mater — an Alma Mater that has contributed many 
of the greatest men in the history of the Middle- West. 

We Congratulate the Class of '27 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIimiNllllltllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll'NIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIII^ 

EAST ST. LOUIS & SUBURBAN RAILWAY COMPANY 



' ^^^^^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^^A^^^AA^AA A ^Ai» V w ^^- ^ ^ -^AA^ 



One Hundred and Tvjenty-One 



^^^MVMVW 



m McKENDREAN 



Vaudeville Show 



Some of McKendrees choicest talent was represented at the vaudeville 
show given on Homecoming night in the Chapel. The vaudeville was staged 
by the members of the Junior class for the benefit of the McKendrean, and the 
various members of the entertainment were drawn from local talent. After 
the strenuous day of events, the show climaxed McKendree's annual Home- 
coming. The performance consisted of IX acts each one of which was worthy 
of comment; 

Act I. One Act Play '"The Economical Boomerang. " 

Kink Rippel and his College Players. Kink is gaining quite a 
reputation with his suberb dramatic power and is almost 
persuaded to take his company on the road for a season. 

Act II. Musical Number — Teague and Hussong. 

This duo showed their great talent and versatility as usual. 

Act III. McKendree Quartet. 

Hussong, Peterson, Brown, and Rippel. 

They need no introduction to the student body and the public. 

Act IV. Orchestral Presentation. 

Brownie and His Kittens. 

They have entertained the public on many former occasions. 

Act V. The Gayety Girl. 

Jewels of the aqua-marine type with hobo tendencies. 

Act VI. Musical Number. 

Wahl Brothers. 

This little act explained the atmosphere of mystery that has 

always surrounded these two. 

Act VII. "'A Pair of Lunatics." 

Young and Peterson. 

So Natural, we wonder ? 



Act 



Act 



\ III. Prof. Hoye and Magic Cans. 

Spirits and Mysticism. BRRRRRRRRRRRR! 

IX. Egyptian Quartet. 

Culver, Nichols, Jasper, and Horton. 

Another of McKendree's products of whom she is justly proud. 



One Hundred and Twenty-Two 



Class Fight 



One would think our upper-classmen were certain species of the educated 
cowboy from the veteran way they handled the ropes that night. It all came 
about this way. The Freshmen had planned their annual party but they 
were not generous or thoughtful enough (perhaps they didn't know they should) 
to tell the grown-ups about it. The party was to take place on Saturday 
night, October 9, (when many of the big, rough boys would not be here to 
enjoy it). However, the secret-service bureau was working, and before the 
clock struck 7:30, the cat was out of the bag. 

Two certain young ladies helped two timid Freshmen boys take the right 
street car to Trenton, much to their chagrin, for they were in a hurry to go to. 
the party. Other young ladies reconnoitered the scene of the festivities and 
were greeted most cordially with bouquets of brickbats and bottles and a 
deluge of water, while the big heroes of the hour were divesting themselves of 
their holiday attire and donning the accoutrements of war. 

The war was on. The outposts of the enemy were easily taken and sent 
to the rear of the lines nicely tied up. An attack centered on the stairway 
proved successful, and the upper-classmen went over the top amid cheers and 
vituperations. The next attack centered on the Freshman president, and 
when taken, he was placed in solitary confinement in a little school-house 
away out in no-man's-land. One by one the captives, after a hard struggle, 
were taken from the building and placed under guard. Each prisoner was 
treated royally, for he received a ride in a great big car out into the country 
and allowed to hike back. After the battle, every one adjourned to the 
campus where refreshments were served (at a late hour) and a pond party was 
held. Thus ended a perfect day. 



One Hundred and Twenty-Three 



We McKENDREAN 



Phone 32 Prompt Service Always 

FROZEN DAINTIES FOR ALL, OCCASIONS 

Quality Dairy Products Company 

Incorporated 

Pure Milk - - Ice - - Ice Cream 
O'FALLON. ILLINOIS 



A Refreshing Drink or a Tasty Lunch After the Theater is 
Always Pleasing 

LINCOLN SODA SHOP and 
BELLEVILLE HOUSE CAFE 

•■BELLEVILLE'S SWEETEST SHOP" 

"THE BRIGHTEST SPOT ON THE SQUARE- 



RESULTS OF THE 1926 McKENDREE 
INTERSCHOLASTIC 

Winner of the Track and Field Meet 

Benid High School 

Winner of the Intellectual Meet 

CentraUa High School 

High Point Man 

Novotny, Benld 

Winner of Tennis Doubles 

Muscoutah H. S. 

Winner of Tennis Singles 

Church, Lebanon 

Winner of Trophy for Most Points 

Benld High School 



v^^^(^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ' 



One Hundred and Twenty-Four 



We McKENDREAN 



SCHOENE MOTOR CO. 

SALES /Ml^l ^i^ SERVICE 

Automotive Electrical Service 
Panama Batteries Goodrich Tires 

LET US REPAIR YOUR BATTERY 

All Work Guaranteed 
Cars Alemited, Washed and Polished Upholstering Vacuum Cleaned 



BEFORE BUYING DRIVE 


THE NEW CHEVROLET 


THE 

MCKENDREE 
REVIEW 


H. B. OCHS 

Trucking 
Coal Hauling Alfo-Corn Feed 


Issued weekly by students. 


AGENT FOR SOUTHERN 
COAL AND COKE CO. 



RESULTS OF THE 1927 McKENDREE 
INTERSCHOLASTIC 

Winner of the Track and Field Meet 

West Frankfort High School 

Winner of the Intellectual Meet 

Lebanon High School 

High Point Man 

Novotny, Benld 

Winner in Tennis Doubles 

Lebanon High School 

Winner in Tennis Singles 

Church, Lebanon 

Winner of Trophy for Most Points 

Centralia High School 



One Hundred and Twenty-Five 







istinctive ideas in annuals ape 
la prime factor in a successful 
^iM%SM t)ool^ — ^ ^ our annuals there is 
ll^^li^l found distinction plus the finest 
l|Kw^%^| qualitij of workmanship— 

IIW vSII CENTRAL ENGRAVING COMPANY 








One Hundred and Twenty-Six 



McKendree College 




McKendree College was founded in 1828. It is the oldest college with 
a record of continuous operation west of the Allegheny Mountains. Dur- 
ing the Civil War many colleges were forced to close, hut McKendree not 
only served the educational need but also had a regiment in the Northern Army 
known as the McKendree Regiment. 

The present campus consists of twenty acres. Thirty-nine different 
varieties of trees some of which are a part of the original forest, offer shade and 
add to the natural beauty of the place. The College is located in the highest 
part of Lebanon. 

There are nine buildings on the campus. Views of si.x of these buildings 
are given in the front portion of this annual. Through the generosity of the 
late Dr. Benjamin Hypes of St. Louis, McKendree has an enclosed athletic field 
which includes a two hundred and twenty yard straight-a-way, a quarter mile 
cinder track a baseball diamond, and a football gridiron. 

McKendree confers the degrees of A. B. and B. S. in scholastic work. In 
conjunction with the college is a splendid Musical Conservatory which confers 
degrees in either musical theory or public school music. There are four-year 
courses given in piano, voice, and organ music. 

The student activities are numerous and varied. There are literary so- 
cieties for both men and women. The student body is organized and regulates, 
in the main, the activities of the student body. This organization meets every 
Friday morning. There are social fraternities and other organizations which 
offer a student nearly all the forms of activity which he may desire. 

At the next meeting of the North Central Association it is expected that 
McKendree will be admitted into full membership. This year graduates are 
to be given North Central standing. McKendree is a "B"' class college, but the 
entrance of McKendree into this Association will give her graduates a standing 
which has long been desired. 



Compliments of Charles Rebar 






One Hundred and Twenty-Seven 




One Hundred and Ticenty-Eight