(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The McKendrean : being the year book of McKendree College"




Wot JflcHenbrean 

of 

Jlitteteen Jj>unbret> ana 
€toentp=J2ine 



Publishes b\< tljr 3Iuuior Cl.iss of 

JflcHenbree College 



Lebanon, ill. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/mckendreepigskin1929mcke 




Jforetoorb 

On these pages which follow we 
have attempted to collect those 
bits of school life which we 
hope you will in after years re- 
call with much pleasure and de- 
light. If some things recorded 
here make you wish for those 
old days again, and some things 
make you laugh because of their 
absurdities; if in short, we have 
succeeded in making this a veri- 
table memory book of 1929, we 
are satisfied. 





Bebtcaticm 



This, our 1929 McKendrean, we 
dedicate to that indefinable atmos- 
phere that down through the years 
has continually lived, not only on 
the campus but also in the hearts 
of all true McKendreans — that 
noble sentiment which binds our 
hearts to our Alma Mater and 
lures the alumni back to old Mc- 
Kendree — that indescribable, un- 
explainable something which en- 
riches our lives and makes us loyal 
to that which is best — that beauti- 
ful McKendree Spirit. 





©rber of 2Book$ 



THE COLLEGE 



CLASSES 



ACTIVITIES 
FEATURES 





Faculty Adviser— — -MlSS AlLEEN WILSON 

Editor-in-chief—. .... Erwin Hake 

Business Manager.— LOREN DOUTHIT 

Assistant Editor ... Lewis Head 

Assistant Business Manager ....JAMES HORTIN 

Art Editor ._ - STEPHEN TEDOR 

Advertising Managers .. . !?° VARD Cl A yton 

(Marjorie Glotfelty 

Feature Editors.... \^ ACE Renner 

/Martha Rogers 

Sports Editor ... KENDALL BORN 



Campus! 




The Following Section Prepared by Prof. Herbert Hake, Warrenton, Mo. 




W$t (Sate 



God with his million cares 
Went to the left or right. 
Leaving our world; and the day 
Grew night. 



Back from a sphere He came 
Over a starry lawn. 
Looked at our world; and the dark 
Grew dawn. 

— Norman Gale 



<0M 




Cije TLibtary 



That place that does contain 
My books, the best companions, ts to me 
A glorious court, where hourly I converse 
With the old sages and philosophers; 
And sometimes for variety. I confer 
With kings and emperors, and weigh their counseh 



— Beaumont and Fletcher 



Eleven 




®f)e Cfjapei 

At morn, at noon, 

At twilight dim, 

My voice shall sound 
The earth around 

Christ for the world, 

The world for Him. 



-Charles M. Sheldon 



H*t -jr.. ' , : < 




S<0 






©lb jWatn 



Wear's hallowed ground? .'Tis what gives birth 

To sacred thoughts in souls of worth! 

Peace! Independence! Truth! go forth 

Earth's compass round: 

And your high-priesthood shall make earth 

All hallowed ground. 

— Thomas Campbell 




®f)e Science lfyd\\ 

Yet I know that I dwell in the midst 

of the roar of the cosmic wheel. 

In the hot collision of forces, and 
clangor of boundless strife. 

'Mid the sound of the speed of the worlds, 
the rushing worlds, and the peal 

Of the thunder of Life. 

— William Watson 



Fourteen 



<& * TV 3r^ Vn 




gfommtetratton 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES (1928-1929) 

Rev. C. C. Hall, D. D President 

Leonard Carson Secretary 

C. B. Peach Treasurer 

Rev. W. C. Walton, Ph. D._ .Fiscal Agent 

Rev. Cameron Harmon, D. D., LL. D. ._. .. President of College 

HONORARY TRUSTEES 

BISHOP F. D. LEETE, D. D., LL. D.__ Indianapolis, Ind. 

Rev. C. B. Spencer, D. D., L. H. D. .... Kansas City, Mo. 

REV. E. C. Wareing. D. D.__ ...Cincinnati, Ohio 

TERM EXPIRES 1929 

Rev. W. P. McVey, D. D ...Carbondale, 111. 

Mr. W. C. Pfeffer Lebanon, 111. 

Mr. Harold Barnes Harrisburg, 111. 

J. L. McCormick, M. D..__ Bone Gap. 111. 

Rev. Ressho Robertson, D. D. ...Lawrenceville, 111. 

Mr. Leonard Carson ....Granite City, 111. 

Mr. J. G. Wilkin Robinson. 111. 

Mr. C. B. Peach Lebanon, 111. 

Mr. W. A. KELSOE St. Louis, Mo. 

Prof. H. J. Schmidt. Belleville, 111. 

Rev. J. W. Cummins, D. D Marion, 111. 

Rev. W. H. Whitlock. S. T. B., D. D. ... ....East St. Louis, 111. 

TERM EXPIRES 1930 

Rev. G. R. Goodman. D. D Mt. Vernon, 111. 

Rev. C. B. Whiteside Centralia, 111. 

Rev. C. L. Peterson. D. D. ... Mt. Vernon, 111. 

Mr. E. B. Brooks ... Newton, 111. 

Rev. Robert Morris Murphysboro. 111. 

Mr. A. W. Morris. Jr St. Louis, Mo. 

Mr. P. M. Johnston St. Elmo, 111. 

Rev. C. C. Hall. D. D..._. ...Mt. Vernon, 111. 

Hon. Chas. S. Deneen, A. M., LL. D. Chicago, 111. 

REV. M. H. LOAR Centralia, 111. 

Mr. J. B. Stout Lawrenceville, 111. 

Judge Albert Watson, LL. D Mt. Vernon, 111. 

Mr. C P. Hamill Belleville, 111. 

Judge Louis Bernreuter .... Nashville, 111. 

TERM EXPIRES 1931 

Mr. W. R. Dorris O'Fallon, 111. 

Rev. O. L. Markman East St. Louis, 111. 

Mr. John M. Mitchell ... Mt. Carmel, 111. 

Rev. Frank Otto .. ... Edwardsville, 111. 

Rev. J. G. Tucker, D. D...__ Edwardsville, 111. 

Mr. H. F. Hecker ... St. Louis, Mo. 

Mr. H. H. Bailey Altamont, 111. 

Rev. F. O. Wilson. D. D. . ... Olney. 111. 

Rev. Chas. D. Shumard. D. D .... Albion, 111. 

Mr. Ira Blackstock Springfield, 111. 

Rev. W. M. Brown Carbondale, 111. 

Judge Chas. H. Miller Benton, 111. 




Dr. Cameron Harmon, A.B., D.D. 
President 



EDWIN P. BAKER, A.B.. A.M., LL.D., DEAN 
German 



Dr. Harmon needs no introduc- 
tion to either students or friends of 
the school. He is known wherever 
McKendree is known. Last year he 
was honored by being elected district 
Rotary Governor and this position 
with its necessary travel has enabled 
him to carry the name of the school 
to still wider fields than before. 
"Prexie," through a busy man has a 
cheering word for everyone he meets 
and is always ready to receive the 
confidences of the students, and to ex- 
tend to them judicious advice when- 
ever needed. Dr. Harmon, an ex- 
athlete is thoroughly interested in 
athletics and has assisted greatly in 
building up strong teams which Mc- 
Kendree has furnished. Dr. Harmon, 
a true son of Illinois, is one of Mc- 
Kendree's greatest assets. 



The mainstay of the administra- 
tion department is our highly es- 
teemed dean, who is an efficient 
executive as well as a cordial friend 
of the student body. He is the com- 
mander of the German forces at Mc- 
Kendree and his drills have become 
famous on the campus. Dean Baker 
is an enthusiastic supporter of all that 
bespeaks progress for the school and 
his decisions in matters of importance 
bear that touch of sincerity and rea- 
soning so characteristic of him. His 
office is always filled with persons 
desiring his counsel, but despite the 
cares of his position, he still main- 
tains his cheerful philosophy of life. 







Student Association 



Organized in l l >l] 

First Semester Second Semester 

Charles Nichols... .. .....President .... ___ John Oster 

Ray GOODE— . .....Vice-President..... _'. Loy WATTLES 

DCROTHY H. IKEMIRE..... .....Secretary and Treasurer , VERA SMITH 

Lewis Head..... .__.. Cheer Leader .....John Pepper 

Harold Culver..... .... Song Leader... Charles Nichols 

ZELLA MALANDRONE..... ....Pianist..... ERNA THILMAN 

Thomas Perkins .....Associate in Athletics Thomas Perkins 

WALTER KLEIN .... Custodian of Bear... ROSCOE BUSH 






The Student Association consists of all regularly enrolled students at 
McKendree. The Association has its official meeting each Friday at chapel 
time, when matters pertaining to student life are discussed and interesting pro- 
grams are presented. The chief events falling under the jurisdiction of this 
august body are Homecoming and Interscholastic programs, and other affairs 
more intimately related to McKendree's student activities. 



Eighteen 




MRS. MINNIE PHILLIPS 
Mrs. Phillips, our House Mother and Institutional Manager, in her four 
years' stay on our campus has made for herself the reputation of an efficient 
and dependable woman. She is never too busy to undertake whatever task faces 
her. In spite of her business-like qualities, she has a keen sense of humor which 
has made for her numbers of friends. 



MRS. ROSE EMERSON 
The boys of Carnegie Hall now 
have a mother. She came as a New 
Year's present and although she has 
been with us only six months, she is 
now a necessary part of the institu- 
tion. Carnegie Hall, so long dubbed 
"The Mule Barn," has received the 
touch of a woman's hand and is to- 
day a more attractive home than it 
ever has been. Mother Emerson is 
liked by all, and her genial spirit has 
pervaded the entire campus. Con- 
gratulations on your work, Mrs. 
Emerson. 



MISS VERA HERRING 

Our dean of women is no new fig- 
ure on the campus, as she was here 
for a short time last year. She comes 
to us from Missouri Wesleyan, where 
she served as dean of women, acquit- 
ting herself very favorably. Miss 
Herring is quite versatile, devoting 
part of her time to her duties as li- 
brarian and serving in her official 
capacity as dean. 




Twenty 



Jfacultp 



STepHEl^o^- 








Willi am Clarence Walton, D. D. 

Philosophy and Education 

A. B.. McKendree College. 1892; A. 
M., McKendree College, 1894; Ph. D.. 
McKendree College. 1897. 



Edwin Rollin Spencer 

Biology 

A. B.. U. of 111.. 191 l ; A. M.. U. 
111.. 1914; Ph. D.. U. of 111., 1920. 



John Clay Dolley. D. Lit. 
Registrar 

Latin and Greek 

A. B.. Randolph-Macon College, 1888; 
A. M., U. of Wisconsin, 1918. Grad- 
uate work and foreign study. 



C. John Bittner 

Social Science 

A. B.. U. of Valparaiso. 1916; A. M.. 
Iowa State U.. 1924. Graduate work. 



Charles J. Stcwell 

Mathematics 

B. S.. 111. Wesleyan U., 1911: A. M. 
U. of 111., 1912; Ph. D.. U. of 111. 
1917. 



O. B. Young 

Physics 

A. B. Wabash. 1921: A. M.. U. of 
111.. 1923: Ph. D.. U. of 111.. 1928. 



John W. A. Kinison. D. D. 

Bible and Religious Education 

A. B.. McKendree College. 1915; B. D., 
Garrett Biblical Institute. 1918: A. M., 
Washington U.. 1922. Graduate work. 






Twenty-two 



SjWt 






Wiley B. Garvin 

Education 

B. S.. U. of 111.. 1924: M. S., U. of 
111., 1927. Graduate work. 



Sophy Parker 

French and Spanish 

A. B.. Boston U., 1910: A. M., U. of 
Chicago. Graduate work and foreign 
study. 



Standleigh M. McClure 

Chemistry 

B. S.. Drury College. 1914: M. S. 
Drury College, 1915. Graduate work. 



EXEAN WOODARD 
English 

A. B.. Ohio Weslcyan. 1906: A. M.. 
U. of Chicago, 1913. Graduate work. 



Joseph M. Harrell 

English 

A. B., McKendree College, 1921 ; S. T 
B.. Boston School of Theology, 1924 
A. M., Boston U.. 1925. Graduat, 
work. 



Emma R. Noss 

History 

B. S.. Northwestern U., 1923: A. M. 
Northwestern U.. 1924. Graduat 
work and foreign study. 



Eugene Shaffer 

Band. Orchestra, and Violin 



Irvin R. Nelson 

History 

A. B.. McKendree College, 1928. 







1920 



Tiuentu-three 




Glenn F. Filley 

Coach of Athletics 

B. S.. Missouri Wesleyan. 1923. Grad- 
uate work. 



Olive E. Patmore 

Expression and English 

Graduate School of Expression, Trevec- 
ca College. 19 20; A. B. Trevecca Col- 
lege. 1922. Graduate work. 



J. Max Kruwell 

Piano. Organ. Theory of Music 
A. B.. B. Mus. University of 111. 



Pauline Harper 

Voice 

Graduate in Piano and Theory. Mis- 
souri Wesleyan. 1909: Graduate in 
Public School Music. Northwestern U.: 
Graduate in Voice. Mo. Wesleyan. 
1920. Graduate work. 



Evelyn McNeely 

English 

B. S.. U. of 111., 1927. 



Martha Schmucker 

Voice 

B. A.. U. of Pittsburgh. 1925; Oberlin 
College. 



Aileen Wilson 

Librarian 

A. B. Missouri Wesleyan. 1919. Grad- 
uate work. 






Julia Hodgson 

Secretary to President 



Ticenty-four 




^' 



*£5**v. 



V^ 1 -' 



STeW Tipo^/ 



Cias&e* 




emors 




Loy Wattles, A. B. 

Clay City, 111. 
helors: Debate '29; Tr.ick; Footba 



Mary Hughes, A. 

Robinson, 111. 

Clio: President Glee CI 



Adequate commendation cannot be 
given to "Watt," the tall blond from 
Clay City. Loy comes from a fam- 
ily of great men and he has already 
achieved certain heights which form 
for him an enviable record. He is 
the president of the senior class, an 
active Platonian, a true Bachelor, a 
debater, and an athlete as well. He 
frequently "loses" the discus and this 
year won his letter in football. As 
a student Loy is also a star, for his 
grades reveal the reward of persistent 
and diligent study. He has given his 
best to the school and will always be 
a worthy alumnus. 



Just remember the girl with the 
friendly smile and greeting for every- 
one and you have Mary. She is very 
versatile and her activities cover al- 
most every phase of college life. Cli- 
onians will remember her as an in- 
terested spectator and willing per- 
former. She served as president of 
this organization when she acquitted 
herself very favorably. Mary is a 
loyal backer of all worthy McKen- 
drean activities and is, by the way, 
the leader of our next year's football 
captain. She is a prospective teacher 
and her personality is a sure indica- 
tion of her success. 



Twenty-eight 




Harold Culver. A. 

Galatia. 111. 



Dorothy Helen Ikemire. A. B. 

Louisville. 111. 



■M" Club; Tr. 



Happy-go-lucky Culver; did any- 
thing ever worry him.'' Have you 
ever seen him excited or irritated? 
Well, neither have we. Harold stars 
in all phases of school activity. He 
is captain of the basketball team and 
excels as a hurdler in track. What 
would a public function be without 
Culver and Nichols? That deep bass 
voice is famous and holds audiences 
in rapture, whether the composition 
being sung is the latest popular num- 
ber or a negro spiritual. He por- 
trayed Romeo in the play given last 
February when he proved to be an 
ardent lover and a capable actor. 
Harold has passed the six-foot mark 
and we know with this reach and the 
qualifications which he possesses that 
he will hold high the banner of the 
class of '29. 



The almost Puritanical calmness 
and conscientiousness of Dorothy 
Helen is relieved now and then by a 
manifestation of her gentle and kind- 
ly sense of humor. Uproariousness 
and Dorothy Helen are complete 
strangers. Her love of music, par- 
ticularly the expression of music- 
through the medium of the piano, 
rounds out her daily routine of study 
and the performance of the usual 
every-day tasks of the student. She 
not only appreciates the music pro- 
duced by others — she, too, is able to 
entertain delightfully in a musical 
way. Her willingness to help is dem- 
onstrated in the library, where she ex- 
hibits her efficiency. 



Twenty-nifit: 










Charles Nichols, A. 
Lebanon, 111. 



lent Pi Kappa Delta: 
'27. 28. '29; Bascb 
Club; Alpha Mu ( 



Did you ever see such a public 
speaker as McK. has in Charlie.'' We 
are justly proud of him. There is 
scarcely a campus activity in which 
he is not the star number. How well 
do we remember the serenades of Cul- 
ver and Nichols with their "uke" and 
guitar. Charlie, no doubt, also re- 
members the result of the jealousy of 
other boys because they couldn't woo 
their fair ones through the aesthetic 
sense, for they threw the musician 
into the pond. Always cheerful with 
a ready story, he is an entertaining 
companion. Proof of this lies in the 
disappearance of his Alpha Mu pin. 
He is our representative in the law 
profession of the future. 



Helene Ferrell, A. B. 

Xcnia. 111. 
csident Clark Hall '28; V. W. C. A. 



Edu 



Club 



Helene is another "P. K." of which 
the group may well be proud. Being 
a "preacher's kid" hasn't hurt Helene 
any. She is an active Clionian and 
has done her bit toward making the 
Y. W. C. A. what it is. Besides be- 
ing a conscientious student, she is a 
good sport and a cheerful friend. She 
sings in the glee club and is an inter- 
ested member of the Education Club. 
This year Helene was elected to the 
presidency of Clark Hall and showed 
her executive ability in directing the 
annual Christmas Bazaar. She is in 
the formative stage of being a school 
teacher. We have no fears for your 
future, Helene. 






Thirty 







Ed, 
Center 
Editor 
Bachel 



Erwin Hake. A. 

Nashville, 111. 

lief McKcndrean '20; 
nnual '28; President 
dree Teachers' Bulletin 
rnegie Hall Council. 



Mae Goddard. A. I 

West Frankfort. 111. 



Meet our Editor-in-Chief. A 
genial leader, with an unusually 
cheerful disposition, a remarkable 
executive ability, and an unassuming 
personality is Hake. These traits so 
characteristic of him are evident in 
his work as president of the Educa- 
tion Club, and his activities in the 
Platonian Literary Society. His sin- 
cere purpose and worthy a:hieve- 
ments make for him a pla:e at the 
top in the ranks of the best students 
on our campus. The Bachelors, too, 
saw fit to give him a place in their 
exclusive circle during his first year 
in our midst. Success is waiting just 
around the corner for him and we 
know he is not far from the corner. 



Y. \V. C A. Cabinet 192? 
Psi Omega; Women's Debate 
French Club; "As You Like It 



Mae's panacea for worry and the 
blues is "Laugh it off." She agrees 
with the philosophy of the song- 
writer who wrote, "What's the use 
cf worryin'? It never was worth 
while," and she does her best to help 
others get rid of their low spirits in 
the same manner. Mae takes a lively 
interest in all outside activities in 
which she is engaged. The field in 
which she is particularly apt is that 
of public speaking and oral inter- 
pretation. Who can forget her dec- 
lamations or her impersonation of 
"Touchstone" in "As You Like It". ? 
As for argumentation — that Mae's 
favorite indoor sport. We wish she 
could have found time for debate 
work a little earlier in her career. 



Thirty-one 



A / Jtt 







Stephen Alan Kole. A. B. 


Jui.ia Wilson, A. B, 


Edwardsvillc, 111. 


Olncy. 111. 


Class President '25: President Plato: Editor Ccn- 
unm.il Annual: "M" Club: Assistant Editor McKend- 
ree '28: Eootball '24. '25, '26. '27: Baseball '25, 
'26, '27. '28; Track '25, '26. '27, '28; "Romeo and 
Juliet"; Alpha Psi Omega; Bachelors; Y. M. C. A.; 
Education Club; Review Staff '28. '20; Assistant 


McKendrcan Staff "27, '28; President Y. \V. C. A,: 
P.esident Clio. 

Peppy and happy is "Jay." Dur- 



One of our most versatile class- 
mates is "Steve." He stars in all 
phases of school activities from early 
fall until late spring. On the foot- 
ball field and in track his speed and 
athletic technique stand out predom- 
inantly. Scholastic excellence is an- 
other of his characteristics. He is an 
active Platonian and Bachelor despite 
the fact that he must keep the home 
fires burning, for he is comparatively 
a newly-wed in our midst. Steve has 
served as assistant coach this year and 
has shown his coaching skill to a de- 
cided advantage. To many his new 
name as given above may seem 
strange, but what's in a name? Any- 
way, he's "Steve" to us. 



ing her entire four years at McKen- 
dree she has always been an enthusi- 
astic worker in everything that has 
been for the good of the school. In 
her senior year, desiring to put every- 
thing into the home stretch, she took 
her pens and pencils to live out with 
the Lebanonites. She was one of the 
best Y. W. C. A. presidents that 
we've ever had and that's saying a 
let. Whether she was needed as a 
fortune teller or to train the vaude- 
ville "chorus-girls," Julia was there 
with all her enthusiasm and energy. 
We will miss her gay little gurgle and 
"stick-to-it-iveness" next year. She 
is not only a real sport, but a good 
student as well. 



Thirty-two 




Ray Goode, A. 

Sapulpa, Okla 



Alpha 



Mrs. Cecile Archibald, A. 

Lebanon, 111. 

ication Club: Ozark Wesleyan; Beta ; 



Ser 



Lea 



Ray has already set out on the 
journey of life, completing his work 
here with us last semester. Tall and 
built like a giant, with a friendly dis- 
position, he has made his way in col- 
lege activities. 

He shines most in athletics and we 
just can't say enough about that. He 
has broken the Illinois state record 
for the javelin throw four times and 
last year he was considered one of the 
outstanding spear-tossers in the coun- 
try. He missed making the Olympic 
team by a narrow margin. He ex- 
celled in the discus throw and shot 
put, and altogether he has won nine 
letters. 



Meek is the lady who came to be 
graduated with us this year. We 
have found out that she's a ready 
worker and an efficiency expert in all 
scholastic endeavors. 

She not only brought herself to 
toil and worry with us, but she 
brought the genial Mr. Archibald as 
well. Because of her sympathetic 
understanding of the problems of life 
she will be a success, we are sure, in 
teaching, or in any other chosen field 
of work. Stranger that she was last 
September, she has won her way into 
our hearts and is a decided asset to 
the senior class. 



Thirty-three 




Thomas Perkins, A. B. 

West Point, Miss. 



[all: Track '27. '28, '29; Cap- 
lto; Bachelors; "M" Club: Mc- 
StarT '2 7; Student Associate in 



Vera Smith, A. 

Albion. 111. 

; French Club: Educa 
. W. C. A.; Secretar) 
resident Clio; Debate 



Who could ever forget "Perk" — 
that inimitable man of action? He 
plays stellar roles in football, track — 
in fact, he is at ease in any environ- 
ment. Tom plays the piano, too, 
but that isn't the only way in which 
he makes noise. He is a Bachelor, but 
that fraternal allegiance does not pre- 
vent him from shyly expressing his 
preference for a certain member of the 
fair sex. Perk hails from the sunny 
South and he seems to have brought 
with him the characteristic Missis- 
sippi disposition which has, in the 
last four years, become famous on 
McKendree's campus. 



One would never suspect, from the 
above likeness, that Vera is usually 
thought of by those with whom she 
is not very well acquainted, as a very 
serious-minded and demure little lass. 
However, this picture is a true rep- 
resentation of her as her friends know 
her; as she might look, for instance, 
after having invented a new and par- 
ticularly fitting nickname for one of 
her fellow-sufferers, or after she has 
heard "a good one" on one of the 
students. Don't think, though, that 
Vera has no serious moments. She 
has. One glance through her list of 
student activities, or over her grade 
sheet, should be enough to convince 
anyone of that fact. Vera has one 
weakness that we know of — it is for 
red hair. 



Thirty-four 



(H^ A^uU 




Val Baggott, 

Zeigler, 111. 



Club; Football 



Val, the curly-headed man from 
Zeigler, has a bent for science. As 
everyone knows, science is a hard 
taskmaster and brains are the neces- 
sary starting point. Cheerful and 
ready to tell all kinds of funny stor- 
ies, he approaches with a friendly slap 
on the back. 

Besides books, the athletic field has 
a big attraction for him. On the 
football field Val proves his stability 
as a guard and in track, sprinting is 
his specialty. As a relay man he is 
perfectly at home. May he realize 
his ambitions in the race of life. 



Audrey Bower, A. B. 
Newton, 111. 

G'ee Club. Bohemian Gij.l. Debate '28, Pi Kappa 
Delta '28. '20. Pres. Clio. Y. W. C. A. Cabinet '29. 

Newton sent us this jolly care-free 
senior. We are sure that the town 
must be a great deal sadder since she 
left, for there never was a girl who 
could put more cheer into a group 
than can Audrey. When that char- 
acteristic ripple of laughter breaks 
forth, one knows that she is near and 
in her usual good humor. Her motto 
is: "Once a friend — always a friend," 
and a true friend she is. Freshmen 
coming to school instinctively turn 
to her for advice and comfort. Her 
favorite quotation is, "All is well" — 
and certainly that is her outlook on 
life. 



Thirty-five 




Hubert Hurley, A. B. 
Caseyville, 111. 

Oxford Club: Asbury College. 

Hubert, one of our student pastors, 
comes to us from Asbury College. 
Just before coming to McKendree, he 
cast his lot with the adventurers on 
the matrimonial voyage. While Hu- 
bert is very seldom seen or heard 
around McKendree's campus, if you 
should journey to the little city of 
Caseyville, you will find him very ac- 
tive there as pastor of the Methodist 
Church. We wish to commend Hur- 
ley on his choice of a school from 
which to take his degree. Such men 
as Hurley are always desirable stu- 
dents on McKendree's campus and 
become worthy alumni. He is a 
very conscientious and earnest work- 
er and guided as he is by high ambi- 
tion and the inspiration of his wife, 
success surely awaits him. 



Belle Pfennighausen, A. B. 

Maplewood, Mo. 



Debate -27. 28. 
Y. W. C. A. Cabi 
tary Pi Kappa Dell 
McKendrean Staff 
Club. 



Belle, although she comes from 
our sister state, Missouri, has come 
to be one of us during her four years' 
stay with us. She has been loyal to 
the Glee Club through all four years 
and her "uke" is simply a part of 
Belle. Two successive years as cap- 
tain of one of our woman's debate 
teams has established her ability in 
the line of forensics. 

She's an athlete, too, in spite of 
her size, and is never too busy to 
back McKendree's athletic teams — 
winning or losing. She has plenty 
of school spirit and we'll remember 
Belle as a loyal McKendrean. 



JUX - 




Thirty-six 



P^lX>\ 




Lee Baker. B. S. 

Lebanon, 111. 

Philo; Math. Club; McKendrean Staff '27; Physics 
Assistant. 

Lec is the studious member of the 
senior class and disdains grades below 
A. He likes his books, but he always 
has time to match wits with anyone 
ambitious enough to take the risk. 
No one ever enjoyed a hearty laugh 
more than he. Lee is a worthy mem- 
ber of every organization to which he 
belongs, for he never does things 
half-way. Philo will long remember 
his witty speeches and brilliant es- 
says. Lee seems to have only two 
weaknesses — "Beauty Baker" and red 
hair. McKendreans know that the 
word "failure" is not in his vocabu- 
lary. 



John Oster, A. 

Mascoutah, 111. 
Review '27. '28. '29: 



'26. 



McKcndr 



Editor '29; Pre 
;sident Bachelor 
'29: Capta 



Staff '28; Edu 



All that's gold does not always 
glitter. The air of sobriety which 
surrounds John in the Review office 
and in the library is a missing entity 
when he bursts forth in all his elo- 
quence on Philo floor. This year he 
has more time to devote to the pub- 
lic need, for heretofore his chief 
pleasure has been the approval of a 
fair one of the hill. Did he succeed? 
It appears so, and by the way, he 
goes to Belleville every week-end. He 
reminds one of the cream, always 
rising to the top, whether it be in 
baseball, Philo, or the Bachelors. 
John, always do your best, as you 
have here at McKendree. 






Thirty-seven 







Jay Hinchcliffe, A. 



Superintendent of Schools, O'Fallon, III. 



The most pompous and experienced man in our class is Mr. Hinchcliffe. 
Although he has not been attending classes with us, he has completed his regular 
college program by doing evening work under the direction of the faculty. Mr. 
Hinchcliffe is superintendent of the O'Fallon Public Schools and holds a high 
position among the educators of southern Illinois. Persevering by nature and 
filled with an ambition to attain greater heights, for which he has long striven 
and at last achieved. Our classmate, while not in intimate association with us, 
has become a friend of all and is a genial companion to all who know him. 






Thirty-eight 




Juniors 




EDWARD SHADOWEN, Christopher, 111. 

ddic". in football and basketball, too. 



ALLENE BEARDSLEY, St. Louis. Mo. 



Lavina Zook. St. Louis. Mo. 

igs a wicked racket and sings most mighty low; 



RALPH FROHARDT. Granite City, 111. 

is a star on the basketball floor; 



DALE HAGLER, Madison. II 

s. "I have to work — 

my lessons and preach at my kirk" 



MARJORIE GLOTFELTY. Granite City. 111. 

Marjory is peppy — a friend worth while; 

She greets everyone with a bright cheery smile. 



IDRIS CORNWELL, Newton. 111. 



ZELLA MALANDRONE. Herrin, 111. 



Forty 










Forty-one 



- ■•*« 



UA. 




DELTON LOWRY, Reynham. N. C. 

Good natured and quiet this American. 

Qualities like his make a rare man. 



CARR SMITH. East St. Louis. 111. 

Here and there and yonder for he has much to do. 

HAROLD YERKES. Mulberry Grove. 111. 

That sweet voiced tenor so obliging to all 
Is cheerfully ready at the very first call. 

; " 

LOREN DOUTHIT, Lebanon, 111. 

A public speaker of much merit is he. 



JAMES HORTIN, Albion. III. 

Another young Hortin as smart as the rest 



Martha Rogers. Lebanon. 111. 



ROBERT YOUNG, Chautauqua, N. Y. 

majors in English, he stays up all night, 
delves into books and finds there great light. 

LOT HENSON. Fairfield. Ill 

an athlete he was a "whiz" 
in coaching great skill was his. 



Forty-tivo 






Charles Hall, Kane, 111. 



BERNICE PARRISH, Belleville, 111. 



Of joy and laught 



Pauline Brooks, Jerseyville, 111. 



John Montgomery, Granite City, 

John, the president of our Y. M., 

Is a handsome preacher and quite a gem. 



Kendall Born, Chester, 111. 

When looking for Bachelors and Kendall you 
You'll hear a '•hello" called right cheerily. 



OLVENIA HECKLINGER. Lebanon, 111. 

O. H. stands for "Oh!" and oh how sweet 



ORENA MOWE, Lebanon, 111. 

: school music she finds great delight. 



ELMO McCLAY, Oakdale, 

Red", the sincere, dependable lad. 
Will never be found doing anything bad. 




I'Octy-thcee 




Ray Hamilton 


Chester, 111. 


•■Chippie's" from Chester, 'tho 


ugh not from the "penn" 
ye ken. 


Grace Renner. 


Lebanon, 111. 


A leader, an actress, a studiou 
We find in Grace, a gem, a cr> 


s gul, 


ELVIRA BEUTELMAN, Lebanon, 111. 


Though serious and quiet, wh 
She makes lots of noise with 


her orchestra "buddies". 


BOVARD CLAYTON, Vienna, 111. 


A Plato, a Bachelor, a whiz in 
Is th,s genial young man. so 


football 
stalwart and tall. 


Harold Kaesar. 


Belleville. 111. 


Good in basketball, football, a 
' Wh.tey" does well what he 


nd baseball, too, 
ries to do. 


Irene Smith. Ed 


wardsville. 111. 


We hope in opera some day si 


a singer outstanding, 
e'll be landing. 


LUELLA REINCKE 


Nokomis, 111. 


Luella has proved a friend to 
Of faults she doesn't seem to 


ha've 'any. 


EDMUND MAXWELL, 


Williamsvillc, Mo. 


To laugh and to talk, he can 
From arguing with "profs" he 





Forty-four 



Leonard Isley. Newton. 111. 



Robert Brissenden, Clay City, 111. 



Bertram Smith, Mt. Vernon, 111. 







McKendree Leaves 

When McKendree leaves are falling 
And breezes blow more cool, 
The old school spirit is calling 
Us back to the best old school. 

We wander forth among them 
Dreamily, pensively, walk; 
And think how near we're to Heaven 
While acorns drop as we talk. 






Forty -five 



1 


■ 


' 


3 


+ 




5 


6 


r 


s 






' 








1 


. 








ll 




n 






113 






" 








15 


1C 


17 




■ 




» 






20 




21 




u IMk 




■ i1 


if 






J6 


J.T 1 H 2 * 








2$ 




30 | ■ 1 






3z 




33 






3+ 








3y 


3S 


37 




38 














39 




40 




41 






1 


42. 






43 




1 


44 


45 








46 






47 






■ 


4? 




■ 


■ 49 






■■ 



The "Alpha Eta Pi" Cross-word Puzzle 





HORIZONTAL 


I. 


The best college in the middle 


9. 


Type of minds at McKendree. 


10. 


Soothes. 


12. 


Football position (abbr.). 


13. 


Something secondary. 


14. 


Field of learning. 


15. 


Before Christ (Latin abbr.). 


17. 


Each (abbr.). 


18. 


What good roommates don't dc 


20. 


Behold! 


21. 


Either. 


23. 


Feminine relative. 


25. 


Above. 


26. 


Osmium (abbr.). 


28. 


Degree conferred by McKendre 


29. 


Reformed Church of America 


31. 


The hardest part about exams 


32. 


What not to end sentences wi 


33. 


Roommates' common property. 


35. 


Toward. 


37. 


What Professor Harrell has. 


38. 


A prominent son of Illinois. 


39. 


Right there. 


40. 


Prefix. 


41. 


Female sheep. 


42. 


Found in freshmen's craniums. 


43. 


Syllable in diatonic scale. 


44. 


What Spencer and Stowell hav 



46. Shurtleff. 



VERTICAL 

Title of respect due Professor Nelson. 

A male swan. 

One of Sir Arthurs kmghts (poss.). 

Paradise (pi.). 

What McKendree girls are (to their i 

What good chapel programs a 

Is (Latin). 

Width of Archibald's shoes. 

Famous football team. 

Address of salutatorian. 

A pope in the Middle Ages. 

A terror of McKendree speede 

Found on Jess Nichols head. 

Bert Smith's "state of feet". 

One who cuts classes. 

Pumpkin pie (Eskimo). 

Liquid used in making dyes. 

Skin disease (plural). 

Purpose of "ponies". 

Where the last Methodist Gen 

held (abbr.). 

Klein and Cariss. 

Old English (abbr.). 

Mail (abbr.). 



r mothers). 
McKendree. 









(ANSWER TO ABOVE PUZZLE GIVEN ON PAGE 78) 



Forty-si> 




g>opljomore$; 






J 







Stephen Tedor, Zeigler. 111. 

er lad. a manly chap, who gives anc 



ERNA THILMAN, Caseyvi 

'If music be the food of love. 



MARjY EATON, Edwardsville. 111. 

in believing that you 



MARY 1:A 
Half tfu^attle 01 

V 



- / 



RALPH BARTLESMEYER, Hoyleton. 111. 

v 

• LEWIS HEAD, Eldorado, 111. 

N - a "Small but mighty." 

Opal Riley, Centralia, 111. 

\K> "A cure for blues." 

VERA GREEN, Nashville, 111. 



Chlorous Hubbell, Flora. 111. 

"A good fellow among fellows." 



ELI TATALCVICH, Buckner, 111. 

twice before you speak, and then 



WHITMORE BEARDSLEY. St. Louis, Mo. 

don't bother work and work doesn't bother mi 



BRUCE FlEGENBAUM, Edwardsville. 111. 

"Why aren't they all contented l.ke me'" 



OUIDA B. KOLE, Edwardsville, 111. 

"Perseverance gains the prize." 



7 A 






"> 



I 



Forty-eight 



CORWIN WATKINS, Cairo. 111. 

have often regretted my speech but never my 



Lois Maynor. Golconda. II! 

"The world is as you take it." 



GAIL HiNES. Alma. 111. 



MlLTCN SMITH, Altamont, 111. 

"Men of few words are the best men." 



Walter Klein, Granite City, 111. 

"All the world loves a lover." 



BESSIE LEE THOMAS. Lebanon. 

"Why worry? Life is too short'" 



Ruth Hamilton. Brownstown. Ill 

"A laugh is just like sunshine." 



FLOYD BiNGAMAN, Brownstown. 111. 



Wilson Dorries. Breese. 111. 



tlAZEL GARVIN. Lebanon, I 

heerfulness is the offshoot of goodn 



NELL CARMICHAEL, East St. Louis, 111. 



CLARK LEE ALLEN. West Frankfort, 111. 

"Knowledge is power." 




Forty-nirie 




DALE TEDRICK. Vandalia, 111. 

He thought as a sage though he felt as a m 



EARL KRUGER. Summerfield, 111. 



gift and the tools go to him tha 



VAN MUNDY. Elbert. Colo. 



LEMAN PHILBROCK. St. Elmo. 111. 



Laura Yargar. Stoy, in. 

tper, like .1 sunny day, scnJs br.ghtne 



WlLMER STEINCAMP. Mascoutah. 



Harold Stout, Mascoutah, 



VERA WHITLOCK. East St. Louis. 

"But that's another story " 



Herbert Bennett, Olney. in. 



Joseph Harris. Ashley. Ill 

ncn arc they who see that thought 



LEONTINE MCRELOCK. Mascoutah. 111. 



Herbert Spencer. Christopher, in. 



> 



Fifty 



Maurice Phillips. Mt. Vernon. Ill 

"A lover of knowledge.'' 



Marie Cariss, Granite Ci 

■Love is the fulfilling of the 



RUSSEL REICHERT. Grand Chain, 111. 

"A book is your best friend." 



Harmon Church. Renault. Ill 



Gladys Gewe. Nashv 



Jesse Nichols. Lebanon. 111. 



MCCOY CURRY, Palestine. 111. 

"Blow, bugle, blow!" 



Howard Rawlinson, Crossville. Ill 



Catherine Dey. Bunker Hi 



ALCNZO PlTCHFORD. Vienna. 111. 



Charles Reinhardt. Mascoutah. 111. 



ERNEST CRISSMAN. Columbia. N. J. 

On the brink of a great career, waiting to be pushed 




Fifty- 





RUTH DUGGAN, St. Louis, Mo. 

Music hath charms." 



Vernon Sanders, Crossviiie, III. 



George Baggott. Zeigler. 111. 



Violet Taylor. Lebanon. 111. 

Be wise worldly and not worldly wise. 



Marvin Barnes. Granite City. 



George Koch. Belleville. 111. 









Fifty-twi 




Jfrestfjmen 







"' ' ' ' 



4 : 'l 1 I 1 1 li fcS 11 

s a & * j £i tt 

J> M *£ 




>' 



Church 

Melton 

Akers 

Hertenstcin 

Barrett 

Lund 



Land 

Graham 

Gott 

Schumaker 

Boyd 

Henry 

Bohn 



Hortin 

Shirley 

Barbaglia 

Wattles 

Sarver 

Hull 



Ewan 


Rode 


Schaefer 






Sooy 


Hortin 


Tomlin 






Hageman 


Randall 


Pfeffer 






Rigg 


St. Peters 


Saunders 






Brown 


Evers 


Stanford 






Thompson 


Reuss 


Daumuelle 






Gosset Gra 











Fifty-Four 





1 

' 1 








r?i 


F 


Sarple 


Garner 


Tucker 


Nies 


Seaney 


Lippert 


Church 


Biggcrstaff 


Pepper 


Brown 


Turner 


Daggit 


Mason 


Shaffer 


Zinschlag 


French 


Brewer 


Schmisseur 




Shaefer 


Drummonc 



Mays 

Miner 

Southers 

Martin 

Bush 

Halcom 

Joseph 



Crouse 

Landwehr 

Pemberton 

Malandrone 

Moore 

Mathews 

Sparling 



Bergdolt 

Crouse 

Malacarne 

Brownell 

Workman 

Colyer 






Fifty -five 




McKendree College Hobo Day 

Hobo Day has become one of McKendree's permanent institutions and is 
the occasion of much festivity and originality on the part of the men of the 
college. The "dress parade," which usually continues throughout one day, 
always precedes an important event, as an athletic contest or some other school 
activity. This year the occasion inaugurated Homecoming Day which, despite 
the inclement weather, proved to be a success. On Hobo Day everyone not 
dressing in accord with the dictates of fashion is, temporarily at least, a social 
outcast. This year the girls of Clark Hall, not to be outdone, became 
"Hobelles" for the evening and formed an appropriate climax to the day of 
jollity. Professors tolerate the antics of the Hoboes, even in classes, knowing 
that the show is but an expression of energy which youth cannot contain. 
Hobo Day at McKendree received unusual distinction this year in that the above 
picture was taken to commemorate the occasion. The photograph appeared 
in a St. Louis newspaper and aroused much comment and interest. 




Hcttotto 






^ Wt\wities 




STe?h£H Tedo^/ 



#rgam?atton£ 








HHHHHHI 




~^r 



office: 

THE n^KESDREE 

Review 



.*-> v" *"" y *■ /? 




The McKendree Review 

THE STAFF 

Faculty Adviser MlSS WOODARD 

Editors-in-Chwf JOHN OSTER, JAMES HORTIN 

Managing Editors JAMES HORTIN. JOHN OSTER 

Business Managers HAROLD YERKES. McCoy CURRY 

Circulation Manager VERNON SANDERS 

Assistant Circulation Managers ROBERT BRISSENDEN, RALPH BARTLESMEYER 

Sports Editor STEPHEN TEDOR 

Society Editor NlNA MAE HARMON 

Feature Writer BELLE PFENNIGHAUSEN 

Exchange Editor ERWIN HAKE 

Reporters PEMBERTON, KOLE, MOORE 






*! 



®mmi 






\ 









nm>m 



*V "* 



Clionian Literary Society 



Founded in 1869 



Sixty- one 




Platonian Literary Society 



Founded in 1849 



Sixty-two 




a . 

I, 







Philosophian Literary Society 

toJra-, irw/»f /(,mJL - w*| «w(- 
nJL.t&r W>~U* tacta&tfc. 



Founded in 183 7 



"\, 



^uJUU&A"^ 






Sixty-three 





BIS 

fi 

Km 

M 

The Bachelors 

Faculty Adviser.-- — PROF. S. M. McCLURE 

President JOHN OsTER 

Secretary and Treasurer THOMAS PERKINS 







S L f] 



£' 1 O 



A/pA 



a Ma Omega 

OFFICERS 



First Semester Second Semester 

RAY C3OODE .__ __. President ... ... LEONARD ISLEY 

EDWARD Shado\VEN-__ ...Vice-President ... Idris Cornwell 

Leonard ISLEY Secretary -Treasurer GEORGE Baggott 






&JBD 



P* Kappa Delta 

President CHARLES NICHOLS 

Vice-President.... —AUDREY BOWER 

Secretary-Treasurer _„_ LOREN DOUTHIT 

Corresponding Secretary BELLE PFENNIGHAUSEN 

The Illinois Theta Chapter of Pi Kappa Delta, national honorary forensic 
fraternity, was established at McKendree College in 19 24. The aim of this 
organization is to encourage inter-collegiate forensic relations as well as to 
develop the art of public speaking and argumentation. Intellectual, rather than 
social activities receive the greatest stress. Pi Kappa Delta is open to both men 
and women of the college who qualify for admission. This year sixteen new 
members were received which is a decided increase over any previous period. 
The social event of the year is an elaborate banquet held in the spring, at which 
time faculty members and students enjoy a social evening and recall memories 
of debating days. 



Stxiy-&u 



iHc&enbrean 



f J ft f? 



fl & G f 

Alpha Psi Omega 

OFFICERS 
Faculty Director.... _ Miss Olive Patmore 

Casf Director..... GRACE RENNER 

Sfa#e Manager Mae Goddard 

Business Manager NlNA MAE HARMON 

MEMBERS 
Faculty Student 

Miss Harper Orena Mowe Harold Yerkes 

Miss McNeeley Ouida Kole Lorin Douthit 

Stephen Kole 

Alpha Psi Omega is a national honorary dramatic fraternity in which 
membership is granted for outstanding work in dramatic productions. Alpha 
Theta cast was installed at McKendree College in 1927 with sixteen charter 
members. Although only three faculty and three student members returned in 
the fall of 1928, five new members soon qualified and were admitted in the early 
spring of 1 929. 

The organization has inspired much interest in dramatics at McKendree 
so that the dramatic department, under the supervision of Miss Olive Patmore, 
has been able to accomplish much in the sphere of dramatic productions and 
the purchase of new stage fixtures. Alpha Psi Omega holds its standards high 
and its purposes worthy, thereby making membership an honor which is 
eagerly sought. 

Each year the cast holds an elaborate social function in the spring, at which 
time many of the former members return and enjoy recollections of former days. 
This and the production of "Romeo and Juliet" are the outstanding events of 
Alpha Psi Omega's second year at McKendree. 

There has been a frequent demand at various entertainments for one-act 
plays which are staged by the class in Play Production throughout the year. 






Sixty-seven 







Sigma ILeta 



OFFICERS 
Chapter President—. _ Zella M. MALANDRONE 

Recorder-Treasurer-... Dr. .C. J. Stowell 

Sigma Zeta. while one of McKendree's smallest organizations, is by no 
means of minor significance. The society was founded for the promotion and 
recognition of scholarship among undergraduate students in the sciences and 
mathematics. The Beta Chapter established at McKendree College in 1927. 
while the second oldest group chartered in the entire organization, has never had 
a large membership, due, in part at least, to the high standard of work de- 
manded of candidates. Membership consists solely of senior college students 
majoring in the sciences and members of the faculty interested in those particular 
fields. Within the past few years, several new chapters have been organized 
throughout the middle west and Sigma Zeta promises to become, some day, a 
fraternity of a national distinction. 



Sixty-eight 










Mathematics Club 

Organized in 19 26 
Founded by Dr. C. J. Stowell 



OFFICERS 
Maurice Phillips-— — President— 

Mary Eaton____ .—Vice-President 

FLOYD BlNGAMAN Secretary -Treasurer 



Zella Malandrone 

.._ James Hortin 

Charles Hall 



Honorary Members: 
Dr. Harmon, Dean Baker, Dr. Young, Prof. McClure 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

CLASS A 
Those enrolled or holding credit in work above the Calculus 

Lee Baker Zella Malandrone 

Charles Hall Vera Smith 

Dr. C. J. Stowell 



Those holding credit in 

George Baggott 
Ralph Bartlesmeyer 
Floyd Bingaman 
Robert Brissenden 
John Dolley 
Mary Eaton 
James Hortin 
George Koch 
Merle Lang 

El 



class b 

the Junior College mathematics work 

Leontine Morelock 
Van Mundy 
Jesse Nichols 
Bernice Parrish 
Leman Philbrook 
Maurice Phillips 
Howard Rawlinson 
Russel Reichert 
Harold Stout 
: Tatalovich 



Sixty-nine 




WmBm 






Y. M. C. A 

OFFICERS 
Faculty Advisers—. ... PROFESSORS WALTON, KlNISON AND GARVIN 

President.— John Montgomery 

Vice-President BOVARD CLAYTON 

Secretary— GAIL HlNES 

Treasurer JOSEPH HARRIS 

The Y. M. C. A. is an organization whose aim is to stimulate and develop 
the spiritual, moral and social ideals on the campus. It is not such a large 
group, but it is increasing as the years pass. 

The Y. M. C. A. has been co-operating with the Y. W. C. A. to a great 
extent this year in the way of "mixers" and the Lyceum Courses. 

The Faculty Advisors, Professors Walton, Kinison, and Garvin, have been 
a great help in promoting great interest in the devotional meetings. Projects 
among the students are also on the program of this group of young men. 



Seventy 




Y. W. C. A 

OFFICERS 

Faculty Advisers 

Misses Aileen Wilson, Olive Patmore, Vera Herring 

President MARJORIE GLOTFELTY 

Vice-President ... MARY HUGHES 

Meeting Chairman .... JULIA WILSON 

Membership Chairman .. ... LAURA YARGAR 

Financial Chairman ... ... AUDREY BOWER 

Social Chairman ... . NlNA MAE HARMON 

Chaplain GRACE RENNER 

Secretary-Treasurer... PAULINE BROOKS 

Pianist __ - Vera Whitlock 

The Young Women's Christian Association is an old and well-known 
organization upon McKendree's campus. It is organized to help the women 
of the campus to live full and creative lives. 

The work of the Y. W. has consisted of giving to the girls a devotional 
hour in the midst of their busy week and also talks by faculty members and 
visiters. 

The Christmas tree that was decorated on the front campus was placed 
there by the Y. W. The lyceum course is advertised by the two Y's that are 
on the campus. Social, as well as spiritual, development is the aim of this 
association and it is accomplished by the co-operation of the two societies. 



Seventy-one 







Oxford Club 

OFFICERS 

President HUGH ARCHIBALD 

Vice-President.^ .. ERNEST CRISSMAN 

Secretary-Treasurer- ... CLARK Lee ALLEN 

Ministerial students and faculty members compose this organization which 
was organized in 1920 by Dr. W. N. Sterns. It was reorganized in 1926 by 
Dr. J. W. A. Kinison and has continued as one of the active organizations of 
the hill up to the present time. 

Among its members we find nine active pastors: Clark Lee Allen serves 
Glen Carbon: G. W. Hines is at Huey: Lewis N. Head holds down St. Jacob: 
Dale Hagler goes to Livingston and Fairview: Fred Mery holds sway at Shattuc; 
John W. Montgomery leads the flock at East Granite: Wilfred A. Pemberton 
rides to Troy and Zion; Hubert Hurley preaches at Caseyville; Hugh Archibald 
is at Pissa and Fidelity and Professor W. B. Garvin at Brighton. 

Besides contributing to the various school activities throughout the school 
year the Club holds regular meetings every two weeks in which talks are enjoyed 
and vital problems of the minister are brought up and discussed. Many prac- 
tical helps are secured from these meetings. 



Seventy-two 







The Nature Club 

Founded in 1926 by Dr. E. R. Spen:cr 

OFFICERS 
President-^ ... BERNICE PARRISH 

Vice-President G. W. HlNES 

Secretary-Treasurer— MYRTLE DRESSLER 

Few clubs on College Hill show the direct results of their activities more 
than does the Nature Club which was founded by Dr. E. R. Spencer in 1926. 
Since its organization at that time, under the leadership of Dr. Spencer, this 
club has been one of the most active on the campus. 

Its chief aims are: the sponsoring of nature study, bird study, stellar ob- 
servation and beautification of the college campus. Much has been accomplished 
during the past year in beautifying our campus. Shrubbery has been planted, 
flower beds made, trees pruned and leaves raked from the grounds. 

The club meets each Wednesday evening at eight P. M. Here the problems 
of beautifying the campus are discussed, papers on nature subjects read, readings 
pertaining to nature given, and slides shown on interesting nature subjects, such 
as pictures of heavenly bodies or national park scenes. 

This year there are about thirty students of the college who are members 
of this society, as well as several faculty members. 



Seventy-three 







The Education Club 

Founded in 1928 

OFFICERS 
1st Semester 2nd Semester 

ERWIN HAKE .... . President PAULINE BROOKS 

Pauline Brooks.— .—Vice-President.— Erwin Hake 

Dorothy H. Ikemire — —Secretary -Treasurer Mary Hughes 

The Education Club is one of the largest organizations on the campus. 
This is the first year of its existence. Its organization was the result of the 
efforts of Professor Garvin, the head of the Education Department. Its pur- 
poses are: to acquaint prospective teachers with the practical problems of the 
profession, and to help them to solve those problems efficiently; and to sponsor 
the publication of the teachers' bulletin. The bulletin will be instrumental, 
under the supervision of Professor Garvin, in the placing of those students who 
are preparing for the teaching profession into suitable positions. 

The Club meets bi-weekly for business and social purposes and is certainly 
filling a long-felt need on our campus. The first semester the organization acted 
as host to the members of the Extension Course in Education given by Professor 
Garvin in Carlyle, Illinois. 

The second semester the Club was the means of bringing Superintendent 
Frohardt, of Granite City, to present a very helpful address to those who ex- 
pect to teach. Although the Club is in its infancy, we see it as an organization 
rich in possibilities. 



Seventy-foe 







French Club 

President GRACE RENNER 

Program Manager MARY EATON 

Secretary and Treasurer ^. LAURA Yargar 

Under the supervision of Miss Parker, head of the Romance Language 
Department, the French Club of McKendree College was organized this year. 
The purpose of this organization is to increase the facility of the intermediate 
and advanced students in the speaking of the French language. With this ob- 
jective in view, no English is allowed during any regular Club meeting. The 
meetings are held regularly bi-weekly at various places. The Club is divided 
into three sections, each of which with the assistance of the program manager, 
takes charge of the programs in their respective order. "La Marseillaise" and 
various French folk-songs, essays on eminent French men and women, im- 
portant historical events and French games and riddles find their way into the 
very interesting programs. That benefits both from social and educational 
standpoints are derived from the organization, is indicated by the interest of the 
members in the work of the Club. 









Seventy-five 




Societas Classica 

Founded in 1928 

OFFICERS 

NELLE CARMICHAEL —President—- ....VERA SMITH 

Myrtle Dressler ... —Vice-President.... — Ruth Melton 

WILFRED PemBERTON ... ... Secretary -Treasurer- ... .. JOHN MONTGOMERY 

MARJORIE GLOTFELTY Program Chairman ... ... MYRTLE DRESSLER 

The Societas Classica is the newest organization founded on McKendree's 
campus this year. It consists of Greek and Latin students who have certain 
scholastic qualifications. The purpose of the Societas Classica is to promote 
an active and organized interest in the Greek and Latin classics. 

The organization has a good start and will continue to grow under the 
capable and interesting leadership of Professor J. C. Dolley. A pin has been 
selected to represent the club, of which it is very proud. The activities of the 
new society will undoubtedly build up and create new interests in the fascinat- 
ing ancient languages 



Seventy-si> 



Jjj iJ #■ j 9 

Although the personnel of the faculty has undergone a change this yeaV 
the Fine Arts department of McKendree College has maintained its usual high 
standards. 

The School of Music offers a four-year course in piano, organ, violin, 
and voice leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music. An unusually large num- 
ber of advanced students are enrolled this year in this department. 

Six students were graduated this year from the department cf Public School 
Music after completing the two-year course in that work. The quality of 
work coming out cf this department proclaims the high worth of the instructor, 
Miss Pauline Harper. 

A number of students take advantage of the educational opportunities 
presented by the orchestra, band, glee clubs, quartettes, etc. These organiza- 
tions creditably represent McKendree whenever the occasion arises for such 
programs as are included in their repertoire. Miss Martha Schmucker is the 
director of the glee clubs and quartettes. Mr. Eugene Schaefer is the efficient 
director of the band and orchestra as well as instructor in violin. Professor 
Kruwell is the instructor in piano and organ. 

The Expression Department has been unusually successful under the direc- 
tion of Miss Olive Patmore. This year, for the first time in the history of 
McKendree College, a four-year course leading to the degree cf Bachelor of 
Arts was offered. The department presented, very successfully, Shakespeare's 
Romeo and Juliet in February, and the class in Play Production presented a 
very interesting program of one-act plays in the Spring. 

The faculty of the School of Fine Arts consists of the following: 

MAX KRUWELL . Piano and Organ 

Pauline Harper. ___ Public School Music 

Olive Patmore — Expression 

Martha Schmucker . — *_ Voice 

Eugene Schaefer Orchestra 



A. 



Seventy-seven 



Solution to the "Alpha Eta Pi" Crossword Puzzle 
Found on Page 46 





HORIZONTAL 




VERTICAL 


1. 


McKendree 


1. 


Mr. 


9. 


Broad 


2. 


Cob 


10. 
13. 
14. 


Eases 

Bye 

Art 


3. 

4. 


Kays 
Edens 


18. 


Snore 


5. 


Dears 


20. 


Lo 


6. 


Rare 


21. 


Or 


7. 


Est 


23. 


Sis 


8. 


Ee 


25. 


Up 


9. 


Bearkittens 


26. 


Os 


11. 


Salutatory 


28. 
29. 
31. 


A.B. 

R.C.A. 

Ans. 


12. 
16. 


Leo 
Cop 


32. 


At 


19. 


Oil 


33. 


Necktie 


22. 


Cornless 


35. 


To 


24. 


Absentee 


37. 


It 


27. 


Sceiwee 


38. 


Lincoln 


28. 


Aniline 


39. 


On 


30. 


Acnes 


41. 


Ewe 


31. 


Atone 


42. 


Nit 


32. 


Aid 


44. 


Noses 


34. 


K.C. 


46. 


Enemy 


36. 


One 


48. 


Ese 


45. 


Oe 


49. 


Eel 


47. 


Ml 






Seventy-eight 



Jftustc 




Seventy-nine 




College Orchestra 

Violins Cornets 

Dcn Moore Wilfred Pemberton 

Mildred Beutleman Walter Gindler 

George Schumaker George Daggit 

Saxophones Clarinets 

Clark Lee Allen Elvira Beutleman 

Albert Rode Mary Eaton 

Marybelle Hertenstein Laura Yargar 

Paul Zinschlag Grace Renner 

Bass Drums 

George Koch Fred Tomlin 

Trombone Flute 

Randal Klein Whitmore Beardsley 

Pianist — RUTH HAMILTON 

OFFICERS 

Director — EUGENE SCHAEFFER 

President CLARK LEE ALLEN 

Vice-President ... ....MARY EATON 

Secretary and Treasurer—-. ....Grace Renner 



Eighty 




Cornets 
McCoy Curry 
John Brownell 
Wilfred Pemberton 
George Daggit 

Trombones 
John Pepper 
Randal Klein 

Piccolo 
Whitmore Beardsley 



College Band 

Saxophones 
Clark Lee Allen 
Wilson Dorries 
Albert Rode 
Milton Smith 
Paul Zinschlag 

Drums 
Fred Tomlin 
Edgar Weber 



Clarinets 
Elvira Beutleman 
Mary Eaton 
Grace Renner 
Laura Yargar 
Harold Henry 

Baritone 
Arthur Brewer 

Bass 
George Koch 



OFFICERS 

Director EUGENE SCHAEFFER 

President Clark Lee Allen 

Vice-President .1 7 MARY EATON 

Secretary and Treasurer * GRACE RENNER 



Eighty-one 



Priftfjfi^l 



I fa fi *fc $t h 






Mens Glee Club 

Organized in 10 24 

OFFICERS 
President .... .. HAROLD CULVER 

Vice-President .... JESSE NICHOLS 

Secretary-Treasurer ... HAROLD YERKES 

Pianist . ERNA THILMAN 

Director... - MlSS MARTHA SCHMUCKER 

PERSONNEL OF CLUB 
First Tenors First Bass 

Charles Hall Herbert Bennett 

Charles Nichols Leon Church 

Harold Yerkes Earl Kruger 

Thomas Perkins 

Second Tenors MAURICE PHILLIPS 

Virgil Church 

Joseph Harris Second Bass 

Vernon Sanders Harold Culver 

Eitel Schroder Jesse Nichols 

Herbert Spencer Milton Turner 






Eighty-two 




Women s Glee Club 

Organized in 1 9 24 

OFFICERS 

President.... . Ruth DUGGAN 

Vice-President ORENA MOWE 

Secretary -Treasurer. .. Martha Rogers 

Pianist OPAL RlLEY 

Director... . MlSS MARTHA S.CHMUCKER 

PERSONNEL OF CLUB 
First Soprano 
Orena Mowe Ava Mathews 

Dorothy Ikemire Marie Cariss 

Marjorie Shirley Bernice Parrish 

Ruth Hamilton Helen Mays 

Second Soprano 
Elvira Beutleman Wilma Nell Land 

Edith Gott Lena Biggerstaef 

Helene Ferrell Helen Nies 

Vera Whitlock 

First Alto 

Ruth Duggan Mary Eaton 

Gladys Hull Elberta Malandrone 

Audrey Bower Gladys Gewe - 

Second Alto 

Belle Pfennighausen Martha Rogers 



Eighty-three 




Mens Quartette 



First Tenor, Charles Nichols; Second Tenor. Virgil Church; First Boss. Jesse Nichols; Second 
Bass, Harold Culver 




Women s Quartette 



First Soprano, Orena Mowe; Second Soprano. Edith Gott; First Alto, Ruth Duggan: Second 
Alto, Martha Rogers 



/ 



Eighty-four 




JforettStcsi 







Mens Affirmative Team 



Clark Lee Alle 



Captai 



If red Pcmberton. 
SCHEDULE 



Affirmative 
Greenville at McKendree 
McKendree at Iowa Weslevan 
McKendree at Carthage 
Shurtleff at McKendree 
Cape Girardeau at McKendree 
Washington U. at McKendree 



Loy Wattles, Lewis Head 

Negative 

McKendree at Greenville 
Carthage at McKendree 
McKendree at Shurtleff 
Evansville Women at McKendree 
Des Moines at McKendree 







Mens Negative Team 

Charles Nichols. Captain: Loren Douthit, Charles Hall, Bovard Clayton 



Eighty-six 







Women s Affirmative Team 

Ouida Kole, Captain: Zella Malandrone. Mae Goddard. Nina Mae Harmon (alternate) 



Affirmative 
Washington U. at St. Louis 
Wheaton at McKendree 
Shurtleff at McKendree 
Greenville at McKendree 
Illinois College at McKendree 
Bradley at McKendree 



SCHEDULE 



Negative 

Shurtleff at Alton 
Greenville at Greenville 
Illinois College at Jacksonville 
Bradley at Peoria 
Wheaton at Wheaton 




Women s Negative Team 

Belle Pfennighausen. Captain; Wilma Nell Land. Mary Eaton, Vera Smith (alternate) 



Eighty -seven 



Oratory and Extemporaneous Speaking 

Oratory is not merely literature. It is not a matter of moving the arms 
or the lips or the eyes or even the eyebrows — but of moving the audience. 
Oratory is the art of bringing ideas to white heat and then letting them loose 
among men through the immediate agency of the most powerful stimulus 
known to man — personality. 

Work in this great art has gained recognition and grown in popularity 
on McKendree's campus during the past year. When the call was given for 
orators in the fall several responded and as a result of a very closely contested 
preliminary Lewis N. Head and Mrs. Ouida Kole, both sophomores, were 
chosen to represent McKendree in the various contests of the season. Mr. 
Head in his oration had a very convincing plea for world-peace, using as his 
subject "The Unfinished Task and America's Responsibility." Mrs. Kole 
spoke in behalf of "The American College Student." 

On February 14th and 15th McKendree had the honor of being host to 
the Illinois Intercollegiate Oratorical Association. In this contest, which was 
won by Monmouth College, were found some of the strongest orators of the 
state. McKendree has the president of this association for the ensuing year. 

Our school was also represented in the Southern Illinois and Southeast 
Missouri Oratorical Association held at Cape Girardeau. 

The crowning achievement in the art of oratory came in the spring when 
it was announced that Mr. W. R. Dorris of OFallon endowed, in memory 
of his mother, Harriet E. Dorris, a fund for an intra-mural oratorical contest 
to be held on June 6, 1929. The prizes to be awarded are $50, $30, and $20 
for winners of first, second and third places, respectively. This contest, which 
is to be an annual event at commencement time, is open to all regular college 
students. There must, however, be not less than four contestants, and the 
winner of first place will net be eligible for competition in future years. 

In the field of Extemporaneous Speaking. Clark Lee Allen and Mrs. Ouida 
Kole were victorious in the preliminaries, and as a result represented the school 
in the different meets. The subject for the men's speech was. "The Over- 
population of American Colleges," and for the women, "The Influence of 
Invention on International Relations." 

With the increasing interest in this forensic work both oratory and extem- 
poraneous speaking should occupy a very prominent place among McKendree's 
extra-curricular activities for the next vear. 






Eighty-eight 



Alettes! 








The "M" Club 

OFFICERS 

President ,.... IDRIS CORNWELL 

Vice-President ... ELI TATALOVICH 

Secretary and Treasurer EDWARD SHADOWEN 







Glenn F. Filley 
Ccach Glen F. Filley holds an enviable position in the 
hearts of all true McKendreans. His staunch stand for 
true sportsmanship at any cost has been a major factor 
in his success at McKendree and has gained for him the 
respect and admiration of all who come in contact with 
him. There has never been anything other than clean 
American sportsmanship displayed by any team which 
he has coached. Filley came to us from Missouri Wesleyan 
where his records as an athlete speak for themselves. While 
at the Missouri school his ability as a football man gained 
for him the selection as all-state end. During his four 
years at McKendree Coach Filley has turned out football, 
basketball and track teams that have rated high in the 
"Little Nineteen " Conference. 



Ninety 




Football Squad of 1929 



Stephen Kole 
After four years of active participation in athletics 
"Steve" has become a very important cog in the direction 
of sports at McKendree. For three years Kole won the 
Purple "M," earning his letter in three major sports. His 
speed in the backfield wen for him the name of the 
"Edwardsville Flash" on the gridiron, and this same speed 
was available in the spring on the track. In baseball 
"Steve" ranked with the best Purple fly-chasers. Under 
his coaching this year the second basketball squad lost 
only one game and defeated some of the best independent 
teams in this section of the state. He now has full charge 
of a very promising baseball squad. 




Assistant Coach 



Ninety-one 










EDWARD SHADOWEN, Captain 

Quarterback 

Christopher, Illinois 

Earning his third varsity "M." Captain Shadowen 
played his usual steady, but aggressive brand of 
football. His ability in rifling passes, receiving passes 
and his tactful signal calling, wen for him an en- 
viable place in McKendree athletics. "Eddie" has 
another year of football before him. 



FOOTBALL SUMMARY 

The Purple grid squad of 1928 faced a more formidable array of opponents 
than any football team in the historv of McKendree athletics. The Bear Cats 
were in action ten times during the fall and five of these games were on the 
right side of the sport's ledger. The five reverses were by some of the strongest 
teams in Illinois and Missouri. 



1DRIS CORNWELL, Captain-Elect 
Fullback 

Springfield, Illinois 

Cornwell presents a triple threat to all opponents. 
A punter de luxe, an able passer, a deadly line- 
plunger, made "Dudes" poison to the enemy. Above 
all, this fullback has won the respect of his team 
mates, which should prove a valuable asset to the 
captain of the Purple for 1929. 











Ninety-two 




VAL BAGGOTT 
Backfield-Guard 

Zeigler, Illinois 

This versatile athlete was an important addition 
to the grid squad. Beginning the season in the back- 
field in a capable manner, Val finished the season 
en the line with even higher honors. A true fighter 
in every sense of the word. 



The Filleymen inaugurated the grid season at Springfield, Missouri, where 
they faced the Southwestern State Teachers' College. By circling ends for 
long gains, the Springfield Bears downed the Purple by the rather decisive 
score of 26-0. 



LOY WATTLES 
End 

Clay City. Illinois 

"Watt" earned his first football letter at the end 
position, where he performed in a capable manner. 
Severely handicapped by injuries, "Watt" fought 
that much harder, which accounted for the little 
ground gaining around his side of the line. 




ft jl^falfifll ■ 















Ninetu-three 




Thomas Perkins 
quarterback 

West Point, Miss. 

"Perk" turned his track ability to the football 
cause and in his senior year won his "M" in the 
fall sport. His shrewd selection of signals and his 
fleetness of foot made him a worthy addition to 
the Purple backfield. His wcrk was especially bril- 
liant in the Scott Field game, in which he directed 
the team in a praiseworthy fashion. 



The first real indication of the strength of the Purple came on the follow- 
ing Saturday when the men of Filley met the strong St. Louis University 
Billikens. Although doped to lose by five touchdowns, the Bear Cats held 
the Blue and White to a single touchdown, which was scored late in the second 
period. The McKendree line, and especially Koch, gave a splendid account 
of itself. 



Eli Tatalovich 



HALEBACK 



Christopher, 111. 

Eli more than fulfilled expectations. This 
athlete was a back difficult to equal on the defense, 
while he was an important cog in the running 
attack. His work was prominent during the en- 
tire season, and especially outstanding in the 
Lincoln game. 





Ninety-four 




BOVARD CLAYTON 

End 

Vienna, Illinois 

"Slim's" six -foot -four altitude made this southern 
Illinois lad a real end. On the defense Clayton was 
unusually brilliant. Slim was also a lineman who 
broke into the scoring column by picking up a fumble 
in the Scott Field battle and going over for the 
counter. 






Evansville College of Evansville, Indiana, proved to be the first victims of 
the Methodists, when they were downed en their own field by a score of 
20-13. The McKendree backfield gave its first exhibition of a smooth- working 
offense. Led by Captain Shadcwen and Sarple, the Purple rounded the ends, 
hit the line and passed to their first victory of the season. 



CHLORUS HUBBLE 

Tackle 

Flora, Illinois 

"Fuzzy," tipping the scales at one hundred and 
ninety pounds, was an outstanding performer on the 
Purple line. He was equally as good on offense as 
defense. His fast thinking accounted for his scoring 
two touchdowns for the Filleymen during the 
campaign. 




,li 




Ninety -Hi 







GEORGE KOCH 

Tackle 

Belleville, Illinois 

Koch was the outstanding lineman during the past 
season. Weighing over two hundred pounds, this 
Belleville youth made hole after hole in the enemy 
line, paving the way for the Purple backs. His con- 
sistent brilliant performance won for him a place on 
the second All-State Team. 



The mighty Rolla Miners presented the Bear Cats with their third defeat 
of the year by trouncing the Filleymen at Rolla to the tune of 19-0. Koch 
and Sarple again stood out in stellar roles. 



HAROLD KAESAR 
Halfback 

Belleville, Illinois 

"Whitey" won his second "M" on the gridiron 
by displaying real college football. His lightness 
in weight proved to be an asset rather than a lia- 
bility to him. A deadly tackier, a wonderful blocker 
and a genius at snaring passes made Kaesar a real 
backfield star. 





Ninety-mji 




BRUCE FIEGENBAUM 
Tackle 

Edwardsville, Illinois 

Early season injuries kept Fiegenbaum on the side- 
lines until mid-season. Then "Fiege" displayed his 
wares in splendid style Although light in weight 
he was a heavy burden to the enemy. His character- 
istic ability in stepping would-be ground gainers was 
especially pronounced. 






The third invasion into Missouri territory was the most disastrous game of 
the year and the worst defeat in many years. Using all known tactics in offen- 
sive football, the Kirksville Osteopaths defeated the Bears by the overwhelming 
score of 47-0. Sarple's forty-five yard run was the only bright light in the 
otherwise drab day. 



LEONARD ISLEY 
End 

Newton, Illinois 

Although handicapped throughout the season by 
injuries, Isley won his second football "M." On 
both defense and offense, this six-foot athlete played 
the end position as it should have been played. His 
rare ability in blocking and tackling was an out- 
standing factor in almost every game. 








Ninety-seven 







CORWIN WATKINS 

Center 

Cairo, Illinois 

"Tony" won his football "M" by giving all he 
had on the gridiron. This former Purdue lad was a 
fast charger in spite of his weight. He was also a 
drop-kicker of real ability, booting the oval through 
the bars for six counters in one game. 



The Purple entered its first "Little 19" tilt against Lincoln on the foreign 
field. Led by Tatalovich, the Filleymen completely mauled the Railsplitters, 
31-0. Tatalovich, Captain Shadowen, Church, and Sarple, proved to be very 
troublesome to the Lincoln crew. 



ALONZO PITCHFORD 

Center 

Fairfield, Illinois 

Coming from Southern Illinois Normal University 
to McKendree, Pitchford brought all of his football 
ability. A good defensive man, coupled with per- 
fect passing ability, was responsible for Pitchford's 
great showing at center. He will perform two more 
years for the Purple. 





Ninety-eight 







JOHN BARBAGLIA 

Guard 

Herrin, Illinois 

"Big John" earned a berth on the line in his fresh- 
man year by exhibiting real football. With the true 
Herrin spirit he turned back many a thrust at the 
McKendree line. Despite his two hundred and six 
pounds. "Big John" broke through the enemy line 
many times throwing backs for losses. A real line 
prospect for 1 929. 



Revenge was indeed sweet on Homecoming Day when Shurtleff, the tradi- 
tional foe, was defeated. Playing in a sea of mud, neither team could make any 
headway. However, late in the third quarter, Hubbell, who had been in a 
stellar role all day, broke through the Pioneer line to block a punt and fall on 
it for the decisive score. Again the McKendree line was the major factor in the 
victory. 



ARTHUR HORTIN 

Tackle 

Albion, Illinois 

"Art" was another member of the Hortin family 
to become a distinguished McKendrean. "Art's" 
hobby happened to be football, and he was an im- 
portant member of the 1928 football machine. His 
characteristic voice did much to bolster up the Purple 
morale. 








Ninety-nine 




WILLIAM SAUNDERS 
Guard 

Xenia, Illinois 

"Bud," of track fame, performed equally well on 
the football field. His clear thinking, hard tackling, 
and speed made him a valuable man to the squad. 
Determination was a major factor in his success. 
"Bud" is only a freshman. 



Flat River was completely routed on the following Saturday, 48-0. Corn- 
well, Koch, Tatalovich, Perkins and Kaesar crossed the goal line for counters. 
Watkins gave an excellent example of a de luxe drop kick. The scoring orgy 
continued after the Purple substitutes had relieved the regulars. 



OWEN EVERS 
Guard 

Mounds, Illinois 

Coach Filley received a real addition to his 1928 
squad in "Fat" Evers, who proved to be an able line- 
man to send into any game. Although only a fresh- 
man, Evers succeeded in winning his letter by proving 
his worth in stopping line smashes. 








One Hundred 




JAMES TUCKER 

Guard 

Mounds, Illinois 

Egypt sent us another athlete of no mean ability 
when Tucker reported for football. A fast charger, 
a hard tackier, a clear thinker, made Tucker a de- 
pendable lineman. Being only a freshman, we should 
see this lad play an important role in future Purple 
encounters. 



The Scott Field Aviators were the next victims of the rejuvenated Bear Cats. 
The Flyers were defeated 45-0, in which the entire McKendree squad took 
advantage of every break. 



RAY SPARLIN 

Halfback 

Flora, Illinois 

A dash around end was "Spot's" specialty and 
there he used his speed to a real advantage. A sure 
and mighty tackier made Sparlin a real halfback. The 
"Flora Flash" will see three more years of service. 








One Hundred One 




LEO SARPLE 
Halfback 



This fast, shifty back was a major factor in the 
success of the 1928 Bear Cats. His speed, coupled 
with his shifty broken field running, was responsible 
for many a gain for the Purple. "Feety-Two" Sarple 
was perhaps the best ground gainer on the squad. 



By reason of the previous defeats of Lincoln and Shurtleff in Conference 
games, the Purple journeyed to Peoria with the "Little 19" championship at 
stake. Meeting Bradley Tech in the last game of the season, the Filleymen 
were downed by the score of 39-6. Captain Shadowen and Sarple were back- 
field stars, while Koch shone on the line. Goode, Perkins. Baggott, and Wat- 
tles played their last grid game in the Purple uniform. 



CHESTER DRUMMOND 
End 

East St. Louis, Illinois 

Being the smallest man on the squad did not keep 
"Indigo" from becoming a McKendree letterman. 
Red proved his caliber as an end, where his deter- 
mination and ability made him a general nuisance to 
the enemy. 








One Hundred Two 




VIRGIL CHURCH 
Halfback 

Lebanon, Illinois 

With no previous football training, this local 
youth made a name for himself in his freshman year 
on the gridiron. His speed and shifting gained many 
yards for the Bear Cats. In the next three years 
Church should develop into a premier backfield man. 



Honorable mention is here made of Ray Goode, who was one of the most 
formidable men on the Purple squad. Ray has become famous as a local and 
national track star, but does not confine his activities to one field. The fact 
that his picture does not appear here is no reflection on his prowess, but rather 
an unavoidable coincidence. Goode is a four-letter man in football. 



LORIN DAUMUELLER 

Tackle 

Belleville, Illinois 

Belleville High presented Daumueller to the 1928 
Purple squad. A steady and dependable man won 
for "Butch" the confidence of his fellow players. 
His dish was in breaking up line smashes. 











One Hundred Three 






McKendree Loyalty 

A college 'mid plains is standing, standing there from olden days, 

A pioneer of prairies, first in untrodden ways, 

For service and Christian culture, for efficiency she stands, 

Her sons and daughters praise her, with voices, hearts, and hands. 

Hail to thee, our dear old McKendree 

May we always loyal be; 

It's a song of praise we'll raise to thee, 

Alma Mater, dear old M-C. 

May we always own thee true and wise and right, 

Honor Purple and the White, 

And for victory we'll always fight, 

'Til we win for old McK. 



Enduring and strong she stands there, stands upon our college hill, 
'Though others may outnumber, she holds the first place still. 
For beauty and truth and knowledge, and service without bound, 
Then let us raise our voices, until the plains resound. 






One Hundred Four 







Basketball Squad 






ATHLETICS AT McKENDREE 

Participation in and enjoyment of sports at McKendree is growing yearly. 
With the building of strong teams has come a recognition of the school by the 
larger institutions of learning in the Middle West, as a producer of fair fighting 
athletes and formidable rivals. This year the football squad engaged in combat 
with the teams of Bradley Tech., St. Louis U., and other schools of similar 
ranking. The basketball team played schools of high calibre, such as St. Louis 
U. and Rolla School of Mines. This year the baseball nine played the Univer- 
sity of Illinois Reserves. While all of these games are not always won, never- 
theless, the Bear Cats always furnish such competition that return games are 
requested. In addition to these, McKendree always makes remarkable showings 
in the "Little Nineteen" Conference tilts. In Doctor Harmon, the school has 
a man who is vitally interested in sports and who assists greatly in securing 
athletes of recognized ability, to attend McKendree. Coaches Filley, Garvin, and 
Kole have also proved themselves to be leaders of no mean ability and are 
entitled to a goodly share of the glory which McKendree has received in inter- 
collegiate athletics. 






One Hundred Five 










Harold Culver, Captain 



Captain Culver finished his basketball 
career for the Purple in a brilliant fashion. 
Equally good en the defense as on the 
offense, this six-foot-two athlete was a 
constant threat to the enemy. Culver's 
passing and floor work was especially out- 
standing during the past season. He leaves 
a place which will be difficult to fill. 



Chlorous Hubbell, Captain-elect 

FORWARD 

"Fuzzy" was a scoring ace of the 1928- 
'29 squad. A deadly shot made this Flora 
lad a dangerous man from any angle on 
the floor, and his work under the basket 
was especially brilliant. A six-foot height 
made "Fuzz" a consistent defensive man. 



EDWARD Shadowen. Captain-elect 

GUARD 

"Eddie," although handicapped in size, 
displayed a consistent game at guard. His 
fast thinking, calm judgment, and ability 
to advance the ball, were major factors in 
many Bearcat victories. This stellar ath- 
lete has one more season to don the 
Purple. 



Harold Kaesar 

GUARD 

Hard, but clean playing, was an out- 
standing characteristic of "Whitie," and 
made him a dependable guard. The same 
determination which he displayed on the 
gridiron was carried over to the basketball 
court to a decided advantage. 






One Hundred Si.i 



Virgil Church 



forward 



Deadly shooting, aggressiveness, and 
fast breaking, all combined to make this 
local youth's freshman year a successful 
one on the basketball floor. Church is 
another high point man who proved a 
vital factor in running up scores against 
the enemy. 



Owen Evers 



guard 



Fat" found 
From then 



It was mid-season before 
himself at the guard position 
on, Evers was in every Purple battle and 
gave a splendid account of himself. With 
this defensive power, and three years of 
service before him, "Fat" should rate high 
among the conference guards. 



Charles Sanders 

forward 

"Charlie" was a dependable man to 
send in at any stage of the game. He was 
a real offensive threat. Whether to stave 
off a rally or to start one, this Witt ath- 
lete was a valuable man to rush into the 
fray. Being only a freshman, Sanders 
has a real basketball career ahead of him. 



William Saunders 

guard 

"Bud" was another freshman who 
earned his "M" by displaying real basket- 
ball. He entered McKendree with a splen- 
did high school record as a guard, and 
certainly lived up to his reputation. A 
defensive star with even more promise for 
the coming season is "Bud." 




One Hundred Seven 



Basketball Summary 



Coach Glen Filley's Purple basketball cagers finished a season in which 
they copped nine victories in seventeen battles. Six of the eight tilts lost were 
close games, the games being decided in the closing minutes of play. Dame 
Fortune seemed to frown on the Filleymen in the close games. 

In the "Little Nineteen," the Bear Cats claimed five wins and four reverses. 
According to traditions, the Purple lost to the Shurtleff Pioneers at Alton in a 
close game, and won from their rivals on the home floor by a decisive score. 
With Carbondale Normal the tables were turned, S. I. N. U. winning on the 
local floor and the Filleymen downing the Teachers at Carbondale, 37-26, 
when Culver proved the hero. In a ragged contest, Carthage defeated Culver 
and his mates at home by the score of 24-20, while McKendree won from 
Carthage at Carthage by seven points. Lombard, the Conference leaders, 
administered the Purple Aces their fourth and last Conference set-back, when 
they won 38-3 3 in a real battle, in which Hubbell and Church proved to be 
the stars. Lincoln was defeated, 3 7-19, in which "Fuzzy" again had a stellar 
role. The highly-touted Macomb five were downed by the score of 3 3-26 to 
give the Men of Filley a percentage of .5 56 in the Conference. 

In non-Conference tilts the Bear Cats finished the season with a record of 
four wins and as many losses. Two games were won from the Belleville 
Turners by overwhelming scores. Evansville College defeated the Purple, 34- 
30 at Evansville in an overtime tilt. However, the Evansville crew were de- 
feated on the local floor later in the season by the brilliant work of Culver, 
Hubbell and Shadowen. St. Louis University was responsible for the Bear's 
most humiliating defeat of the year. The Springfield Teachers and Missouri 
Wesleyan also boast of victories over the locals. The husky Rolla Miners were 
downed at Rolla by the score of 34-29. 

Hubbell and V. Church proved to be the scoring aces of the squad, while 
the passing and floor work of Captain Culver was especially brilliant. The 
guard positions were well cared for by Shadowen, Kaesar, Saunders and Evers. 
Culver will be the only letterman lost to the squad. 



One Hundred Eight 






/S***iJL 




Cross Country Team 






In addition to her other athletic activities, McKendree added a cross- 
country team this year. The team made a very creditable showing under Coach 
Garvin's able leadership. Jts greatest handicap was a lack of experience, which 
will be overcome in following years. The team participated in two dual meets 
with Illinois College of Jacksonville and in the state meet (I. I. A. C.) held 
at Peoria. In the dual meets McKendree won one (24-31) and lost one 
(27-28). The team placed fourth in the state meet. The prospects for next 
year are indeed promising as none of the men will be lost by graduation. Coach 
Garvin also announces that men will be kept in training throughout the sum- 
mer months in order that a team may be in readiness for the early fall track 
meets. Cross country running is fast becoming a popular sport at all of the 
colleges of the Middle West, for it makes a delightful combination with football, 
which does not appeal as strongly to some persons as do track events. The 
letter men of this year are: Captain Hall, Spencer, Bartlesmeyer, Church, Bush, 
Colyer, Hortin, and Hines. 



One Hundred Nine 




Track Summary of 1928 

The Purple track squad opened the season in a dual meet with Washington 
University, in which Washington proved the victor. Spencer won the two- 
mile and Goode hurled the javelin over 190 feet to place first. The Filleymen 
were the victors at Lebanon on May 4 in a triangular meet between Shurtleff, 
Carbondale Normal, and McKendree. The trusty Goode won both the javelin 
and discus throw. Culver amassed ten points by winning the high and low 
hurdles. Middleton finished ahead of the field in the mile run and Spencer 
won the two-mile. Gould tied for first in the pole vault and Isley did the same 
thing in the high jump. The Purple also won the mile relay. At a tri- 
angular meet at Springfield. Missouri, between the Teachers, Shurtleff, and 
McKendree, the Fillymen won second place. Goode again won the javelin and 
Culver ankled over the high hurdles in 16 seconds flat. Upsetting all dope, 
the Carbondale Teachers downed the Bear Cats by the score of 65^-64^. 
Goode hurled the javelin over 205 feet and put the shot over 41 feet. Isley 
won the high hurdles and Bartlesmeyer finished first in the 880-yard run. 
Culver was the victor in the low hurdles. In the relay, Await, Haskin. Bag- 
gott and Perkins easily proved supreme. At the State Meet at Monmouth, Ray 
Goode broke his own record in the javelin throw with a throw of 197 feet 
and 8 inches. Culver placed second in the high hurdles. 



One Hundred Ten 






Baseball 

(By a Fan) 

Despite a lack of seasoned material, a stiff schedule, and loss of the ace of 
the hurling staff in mid-season through ineligibility, the Bear Cat diamond men 
of 1928 won three of the eight games played. 

There were eight lettermen available as the season opened; of these, four 
were outfielders and two were catchers. Captain Jack, Kole, Martin, and Clay- 
ton were the returning gardeners, Nichols and Guandolo, the receivers, Cornwell 
the twirler, and Oster at the keystone cushion, the lone survivor of the 1927 
infield. Coach Hall settled the third base problem by converting Captain Jack, 
a classy flychaser, into an excellent guardian of the hot corner. The hard hit- 
ting freshman, Tatalovich, soon showed that first base was to be his position. 
After a hard duel for the shortstop position, Reichert beat Hamilton out of the 
place. Koch, neat freshman back-stop, broke into the line-up in practically all 
the games. Howard Taylor assumed the bulk of the pitching burden after 
Cornwell retired. Kole patrolled the center garden in all the games, while the 
work in the other fields was divided between Clayton and Martin, and the two 
newcomers, Hamilton and Maxwell. 

The season's scores are Western Military Academy 3, McKendree 8; 
Washington University 10, McKendree 3; Concordia 3. McKendree 1: Eden 
11, McKendree 10; Blackburn 0, McKendree 14: Eden 4, McKendree 5; Black- 
burn 7, McKendree 5; Shurtleff 15, McKendree 12. 

At this early date the forecasters are predicting a successful season for the 
1929 Bear Cats. There is good reason for this attitude. A glimpse over the 
roster reveals that there are ten lettermen available for duty as the season opens 
and a wealth of new material as well. Cornwell is back for his third season to 
baffle the opposition with his shoots, while Kaesar, moundsman in '26 and '27, 
is ready for another year. Dorries, relief hurler of last year, may develop, while 
much is expected of Larsch, a freshman. Koch and Nichols, 1928 catchers, are 
promised plenty of opposition by Watkins, formerly of Purdue, for the catching 
assignment. Advance reports have it that the slugging Tatalovich will have a 
fight for the initial sack with Evers and Hosier, two frosh. Captain Oster will, 
in all probability, start his fourth season at the keystone unless Frohardt, second 
sack of the 1926 squad, who is again in school, takes the job. Reichert seems 
to be a fixture at short, because of his steady feeling and level-headed playing. 
Gossett and Sanders, freshmen with the highest recommendations as infielders, 
are expected to put up a scrap for the third-base position. Maxwell, Hamilton 
and Clayton, outfielders, are promised opposition by Isley, Barbaglia, Koch, 
Nichols and Randall. 

The schedule is not definitely arranged as yet, but to date two games are 
scheduled with Shurtleff, two with Illinois College, two with Eastern Normal, 
and two with Murray Normal of Murray, Kentucky. One game is scheduled 
with the University of Illinois Reserves. Though not yet scheduled, Concordia, 
Washington University and Western Military Academy are almost certain to 
be on the card. 

Stephen Kole will coach the team. 






One Hundred Eleven 



Tennis Record of 1928 

(By a Fan) 
For the first time in the history of McKendree the tennis team paraded 
through the season without a single defeat. Ten tilts were won in easy fashion 
against formidable opponents. The men who carried the Bear Cat tennis rac- 
quet to dazzling heights were the letter-men, Vernal Hardy and Ronald Mowe, 
and a pair of skillful Frosh. George Baggott and Walter Klein, both of whom 
set a dizzy pace for opponents. During the season the Bear Cats squelched 
Carbondale in two matches, smothered Illinois College in two meets, smeared 
Blackburn twice, walloped Eden Seminary mercilessly in a pair of tilts, and 
last, but not least, the old rival Shurtleff was forced to bow to the Purple Aces 
in two matches. The ace of the team was the brilliant Klein, who hails from 
Granite City. The scintillating freshman hammered his way over all opposi- 
tion, bowing to no one and losing not a single match. At the State Meet Klein 
took third place after a quiet uphill battle. Baggott was also a stellar performer, 
who paired with Klein in doubles. The other pair, Mowe and Hardy, deserve 
far more than passing mention, inasmuch as they furnished the nucleus of the 
team with plenty of seasoned experience. 

Last year the girls broke into the limelight through the medium of tennis 
playing. The team consisted of Lavina Zook and Edna Kinsey, doubles; 
Martha Rogers and Orena Mowe, doubles; and Martha Rogers, singles. The 
first match was played with Shurtleff on May 23rd, McKendree losing the 
match with the exception of the doubles game played by Martha Rogers and 
Orena Mowe. This did not discourage the girls, however, and they were repre- 
sented on May 25th at the State Meet held at Milliken University. Kinsey and 
Zook won their initial match with Lincoln and lost the next match to Mon- 
mouth, winners of the meet. Rogers lost her singles match to Milliken by a 
very close score. On May 30th, Shurtleff came to McKendree and won a hard 
fought battle, surrendering only one singles match. Rogers took second honors 
in the State Meet. At Carlinville, on May 31st, McKendree defeated Blackburn 
in every match. Prospects for an interesting tennis schedule and a successful 
season this year are very bright, for after a beginning such as least year's, many 
are ready to fall in line and encourage this form of girls' athletics. 



One Hundred Twelvt 




Jfeatureg 












'Yet it was not that nature had shed o'er the seen? 
Her purest crystal and her brightest of green: 
'Twas not the soft magic of valley or hill. — 
O. no! it was something mere exquisite still. 

"Twas that friends, the beloved of my heart, were near. 
Who made every dear scene of enchantment more dear, 
And who felt how the best charm of nature improve. 
When we see them reflected from looks that we love." 









One Hundred Fourteen 




Popularity Contest Winners 



Harold Culver 

Popularity and accomplishment go 
hand in hand with Culver. He stands 
in the public eye throughout the year 
and in whatever activity he partakes 
success seems to follow him. Harold 
makes his first bow as an athlete on 
the basketball court. This year he 
very capably filled his office as Cap- 
tain of the squad and won even 
greater laurels than in former years. 
With the approach of spring he is to 
be found on the track where he spe- 
cializes in high and low hurdles. He 
is also a tennis player of no mean 
ability. Culver, while an athlete, is 
also a popular entertainer at social 
gatherings. His deep bass voice and 
instrumental technique find nothing 
but approval wherever presented. 
This year he is president of the Men's 
Glee Club. Plato boasts of him as 
a favorite son and he has also broken 
into the exclusive Bachelor Society. 
The student body is to be com- 
mended for its selection of Culver as 
the best all-around man, for if popu- 
larity on the campus and student 
activities are a standard of measure, 
he certainly deserves high honors. 



Lavina Zook 
Although the contest among the 
boys was closely contested, Lavina 
took an early lead in the voting and 
was an easy victor when the final 
ballot was cast. Lavina is quite ver- 
satile in her activities about the cam- 
pus. She left school at the end of 
the first semester in order to supply 
a teacher's vacancy in the city schools. 
Although she no longer attends 
classes on the hill, her face is still a 
familiar sight here during her leisure 
hours. She is an active member of 
Clio, where her rich alto voice charms 
all listeners. She has a bent towards 
commercial work and served as assist- 
ant registrar during the first semester, 
where efficiency characterized her 
work. Last year she served as secre- 
tary to the president. The success 
of our girls' tennis team of last year 
was due in a large measure to her 
skill as a player. Lavina represents 
the typical American girl of which 
McKendree is so proud. 



One Hundred Fifteen 







Prize-Winning Snapshot 

A novelty in the McKendrean cf 1929 is the snapshot contest. The 
above picture was selected by faculty judges from a great number which was 
submitted. This particular snapshot was chcsen because of its fulfillment of the 
cardinal requirements of good photography. 

1. Unity of photographic composition 

2. Clearness of detail 

3. Pertinence to college life 

The picture is an excellent example of coherence in photographic com- 
position. The details of the snapshot are clearly defined and vivid in an 
artistic way, giving the composition real photographic worth. 

The scene is one which is familiar to every McKendrean. No person who 
has known our schcol can fail to recall happy memories connected with this 
particular campus scene. Virgil Church is one cf cur most enthusiastic photog- 
raphers, whose personal photograph album with its unusual collection of snap- 
shots is proof enough of real ability in his hobby of photography. This 
example of merit fully entitles him to the award of $2.50, which was first 
prize for the snapshots submitted in the contest. 



One Hundred Sixteen 



McKendree College Calendar 

1928-1929 

1928 

SEPT. 14, 15. All the green ones learn to write their names and classify 

themselves. 
SEPT. 15. Y. W. initiates freshmen into the ranks of society. 
SEPT. 17. The well-informed return. 
SEPT. 18. The professors begin girations. 

Y. M. and Y. W. receive all cordially at the annual reception. 
SEPT. 2 1 . Freshmen feel their inferiority when they hear rules of suppression. 
SEPT. 24. The three societies hold first sessions. 
SEPT. 28. Pep meeting. Bert does his stuff. 
SEPT. 29. Purple Bear Cats lose game to St. Louis U. 
OCT. 2. Rumors of fresh party. Chapel fire extinguished through bravery 

of John Oster. 

"Suppressed Desires" but they aren't. 

Charles Nichols addresses the League on barrels and presidential 

candidates. 

Clio open session. Kaeser and Hubbell make dainty waitresses. 

Freshmen girls entertain themselves at a "tea." Krantz family 

concert. 

Klein and Carriss can talk again. Oh bliss! 

Leaguers or hct-doggers disband on back campus at 9:30. 

Rolla ropes the Bear Cats 19-0. 

Several freshmen seen in the library. Exam's coming? 

Calls for kerosene. Ah, tomorrow — tomorrow!!! 

Such questions! 

Another tea. 

All mix well at Y. M. and Y. W. mixer. 

See the birdie? 

Mck. turns out for Hoover. It's all Bert's fault. 

Ghostspookis Circus comes with skeletons, fat lady, rogues' gallery 

and Siamese twins. 

Bergderfer certainly sounded like a whole barnyard. 

Hobo and Hobelle Day. 

Pep meeting. 

Home Coming. We win 6-0 in spite of the flood. Parade and 

vaudeville a treat. 

Who'll win the Vanity Fair contest? 

Clio initiation. Whoopee! 

Clio initiation continued. 

McK. makes many touchdowns against Flat River. 

Three sandwiches disappear from the dining room. 

Phillips. 

All girls "leap" over to Carnegie Hall. 

La Circle Francais organized. 

McK. 45, Scott Field 0. 

"Are you a blind intellectual or a seeing 

Young. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ulrich perform magic for us. 

Boys actually clean the dorm! 

Remember Bush's Glee Club! 

Not so good! McK. 6, Bradley 39. 

Home and turkey — what a combination! 



Oct. 


4. 


Oct. 


7. 


Oct. 


8. 


Oct. 


10. 


Oct. 


11. 


Oct. 


12. 


Oct. 


13. 


Oct. 


19. 


Oct. 


21. 


Oct. 


22. 


Oct. 


23. 


Oct. 


24. 


Oct. 


25. 


Oct. 


26. 


Oct. 


30. 


Oct. 


3.1. 


Nov. 


2. 


Nov. 


3. 


Nfv. 


5. 


Nov. 


6. 


Nov. 


7. 


Nov. 


10. 


Nov. 


11. 


Nov. 


14. 


Nov. 


16. 


Nov. 


17. 


Nov. 


20. 


Nov. 


21. 


Nov. 


22. 


Nov. 


23. 


Nov. 


24. 


Nov. 


28. 



oom. Page Mrs. 








;noramus?" — Dr. 









One Hundred Seventeen 






Dec. 


3. 


Dec. 


4. 


Dec. 


5. 


Dec. 


6. 


Dec. 


9. 


Dec. 


10. 


Dec. 


11. 


Dec. 


12. 


Dec. 


14. 


Dec. 


17. 


Dec. 


18. 


Dec. 


19. 


Dec. 


20. 


1929 




Jan. 


1. 


Jan. 


3. 


Jan. 


7. 


Jan. 


8. 


Jan. 


11. 


Jan. 


13. 


Jan. 


15. 


Jan. 


16. 


Jan. 


17. 


Jan. 


18, 


Jan. 


21. 


Jan. 


22. 


Jan. 


23. 


Jan. 


25. 


Jan. 


28, 


Jan. 


29. 


Feb. 


1. 


Feb. 


4. 


Feb.* 


5. 


Feb. 


6. 


Feb. 


7. 


Feb. 


8. 


Feb. 


9. 


Feb. 


12. 


Feb. 


13. 


Feb. 


14. 


Feb. 


15. 


Feb. 


16. 


Feb. 


20. 


Feb. 


23. 


Feb. 


25. 


Feb. 


26. 



McKendree Colleqe Calendar 

1928-1929 

"High-powered salesman" appears for the third time. 

Girls display their arts. Bazaar and Open House. 

Football banquet. 

Freshmen win class tournament. 

Girls dine out. 

The girls vote to do away with leap year date nights. 

Student recital. 

Mr. Flude entertains with lecture on Japan. 

Evansville 34 McK. 30. 

Popularity contest ends. Culver and Lavina victors. 

Miss Parker entertains French and Spanish aspirants at Christmas 

dinner. 

Christmas carolling. 

Homeward bound. Merry Xmas! 

Cop Nichols causes Head to make new resolution, "Drive more 

slowly." 

McK. 50, Belleville Turners 36. 

Dr. Winfield Scott Hall lectures. 

Lewis Head and Ouida Kole take honors at oratorical contest. 

Six Sizzling Sisters sing soulfully. 

Alpha Mu pledges attend church services. 

Bert makes a goal playing basketball. 

American Glee Club entertains. 

Alpha Mu Initiation. Deep mystery. 
19, 20. There's a big time coming! 

Semester exams. Much paper, ink and energy consumed. 

More paper wasted. 

A thriller, but we lost to Carbondale. 

McK. subdues Evansville. 
29 Red tape again in evidence. 

Registration. 

Future McKendreans perform at recital. 

Students elect John Oster president. 

Men's open Sessions. Good eats and good programs. 

McK. trounces Lincoln. 

Mr. Hollman displays rare pigeons. 

Girls' Glee Club gives first public performance in chapel. 

Bush elected Custodian of the Bear. 

Many ex-McKendreans come home, but we lose to Carthage, 

20-24. 

Dr. Buskirk of Korea tells us about the Orient. 

Y. M. and Y. W. mix up. 

All the girls receive red hearts from St. Valentine, presumably. 

Many representatives speak here in oratorical contest. 

Girls organize Athletic Club. 

Romeo and Juliet "goes over big" before large audience. 

"She's cold!" 

Clio Banquet — best ever. 

North Central Inspector inspects. Rain! 

Fine Arts Recital. 



One Hundred Eighteen 



Feb. 


27 


Feb. 


28 


Mar. 


1. 


Mar. 


4, 


Mar. 


5 


Mar. 


9 


Mar. 


11. 


Mar. 


12. 


Mar. 


13 


Mar. 


15. 


Mar. 


20. 


Mar. 


21. 


Mar. 


22. 


Mar. 


23. 


Mar. 


26. 


Mar. 


28. 


Mar. 


29 


April 


10. 


April 


11. 


April 


12. 


April 


16. 


April 


18. 


April 


20. 


April 


20, 


April 


23. 


April 


24. 


April 


27. 


April 


30. 


May 


3. 


May 


10. 


May 


17. 


May 


24 


June 


5, 


June 


6. 


June 


7. 


June 


8. 


June 


9. 


June 


10. 


June 


11. 


June 


12. 


June 


13. 


June 


13. 



McKendree College Calendar 

1928-1929 

Filipino Concert Company draws large audience. No wonder 

with the eyes of that little man. 

Shurtleff leaves McKendree with the small end of a decisive score. 

Lots of Whoopee! 

Wild Rose Ramblers here. Very collegiate. 
8. Revival week. Reverend Crouse at his best. 

Scrub tournament opens. 

Both girls' teams win from Shurtleff debaters. 

Pearson's Hall team wins scrub tournament. 

Kole and Allen are victors in impromptu try-outs. 

Girl debaters win from Greenville here, but lose there. 

Greenville wins from our men debaters. 

Mr. Bale lectures on "Tomorrow's Citizens Today." 

Carthage out-argues McKendree men. 

"The Model Husband" presented by Alpha Psi pledges. Big hit! 

Superintendent Frohardt addresses Education Club. 

Men debate Shurtleff. 

Annual staff presents negro minstrel. 

Scandal sheet scandalizes. 
April 8. Easter recess. 

Lyceum-Loseff Russian Quartet. 

Washington U. debates McK. men here. 

Bradley debate McK. women. 

Philo Chautauqua. 

Track meet at Fulton, Missouri, with Westminster College. 

Final copy of McKendrean sent to printer. 
21. Y. W. C. A. Cabinet training conference. 

Girls' Glee Club concert. 

Dual meet with Washington U. at St. Louis. 

Glenn L. Morris — Lyceum number. 

Interscholastic Day. 

Recital given by Misses Whitlock and Mowe. 

Triangular meet with Shurtleff and Carbondale at McKendree. 

Triangular meet with Springfield Teachers and Shurtleff at 

Springfield, Missouri. 

Dual meet with Carbondale, there. 
25. Little Nineteen meet at Knox. 
1 2. Semester examinations. 

Harriet Doris Oratorical contest. 

Musical Recital. 

Clio Exhibition. 

Baccalaureate sermon. 

Plato Exhibition. 

Philo Exhibition. 

Joint Board meeting. 

Alumni Reception. 

Commencement. 

Philo triennial banquet. 



One Hundred Nineteen 




Romeo and Juliet 

Given in College Chapel. February 20, 1929 

CAST 

Romeo, son of Montague Harold Culver 

Juliet, daughter to Capulet Grace Renner 

Paris, a ycung nobleman Herbert Bennett 

Montague ) TT , , . . . . . . ^Loy Wattles 

Capulet } Heads of twc hcuses at vanance Wlth each other ^Charles Sanders 

Mercutic, friend to Romeo William Saunders 

Benvclio, friend to Romeo Howard Rawlinson 

Tybalt, Nephew to Lady Capulet Stephen Kole 

Friar Lawrence, Franciscan friar Harold Yerkes 

Friar John Lcrin Douthit 

Balthaser, servant to Romeo Bovard Clayton 

Peter, servant to Juliet's nurse Charles Nichols 

An Apothecary Lorin Douthit 

Lady Montague, wife to Montague. _„ Dorothy Helen Ikemire 

Lady Capulet, wife to Capulet Dorothy Pfeffer 

Nurse to Juliet Nina Mae Harmon 




% 



mim 




One Hundred Twenti 






To My Room 

Once again before I leave thee. 

Dark and dingy, dear old room. 

Leave thee, it may be forever, 

Wrapped in solitude and gloom, 

Let me whisper in thy silence, 

Thoughts which still, like sweet perfume, 

Stealing o'er me, thrall my senses 

Bind my heart to thee, my room. 

For thy very gloom I loved thee, 
For thy peaceful solitude 
Here, within thy steady silence, 
Where no gaping crowds intrude; 
Here when tried by fickle fortune 
Or by such encounters rude 
As distressed me. I found shelter, 
Fearing none, by none pursued. 

Often too with "chums" around me 
Here by day and night forsooth, 
Berne along upon the current 
Of our merry, boisterous youth, 
Plots were laid and plans recited, 
Full of mischief, waking ruth 
For the victims who not seldom 
Proved to be ourselves, in truth. 

Here, too, in thy silent precincts 
I have prayed and labored true: 
Was it all for naught? I leave it 
To my God, the world, and you. 
Thou my room with my Creator, 
Canst reveal what strife I knew, 
Only thou hast been my witness, 
Only thou canst know my due. 

If from long association 
Aught arises in the mind. 
To endear an object, why then 
May I not such pleasure find. 
When I pass across the threshold. 
Where my memory hath entwined 
Wreaths which only death can wither, 
Wreaths long since by love entwined? 

Fare thee well, scarred walls and broken, 
Keep the secrets left with you 
Which my soul with strong emotion, 
Struggling could net hide from view. 
Days to come will find me turning 
To thy scenes with pleasure true. 
And around thy walls will cluster 
Peaceful thoughts. Old Room, adieu! 



One Hundred Tiventtj-one 










One Hundred Twenty-two 




SPIETH STUDIO 

CentraHa, M- 



P1C TURES FOR ^UALS 
AND CLASSES 

, „f Southern I/lmois 






Plumbing 



Heating 



Emil J- Weber 

Hardware 



SHEET METAL 
WORK 



LEBANON 



Illinois 




Jj£» 



«hsiib»» Ha * 



Go* 



WHY STUDY! 

Th e more you study, 

The less you study. 
-ruo less you Lnow , 
The £ 7» g£ : 

pernor" you know. 
WH Y STUDY? 



Hu^rrf Taw.™-" 






Buick Oakland-Pontiac 

Automobiles Automobiles 



SAYRE MOTOR CO. 

Oldest Continuous Automobile 

Agency in Lebanon 

LEBANON, ILL. 



^ 



Goodyear Pierce Pennant 

Tires Gas and Oils 



One Hundred Twentv-four 



Daily Capacity 1,000 Barrels 



Elevator Capacity 200,000 Bushels 



Incorporated 1889 

I PFEFFER MILLING COMPANY 

Lebanon, Illinois 



Manufacturers of 

Winter Wheat Flour, White Corn Grit, 
and Corn Meal 



Dealers in 

Grain, Lumber and Building Material* 






KENT CLOTHES 

New Styles — Great Selections 
Outstanding Values 

ALL ONE PRICE 

$22.50 

Guaranteed All Wool - $35 and $40 Values 

303 N. SEVENTH ST. 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 



ELY 8 WALKER 
DRY GOODS CO. 

St. Louis 



WM. MONKEN 

mercantile CO. 

The Store of Service 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 



George Baggctt: "Have you tele- 
graphed to the old man for money?" 

Val Ditto: "Yes." 

George: "Got any answer?" 

Val: "Yes. I telegraphed the gov- 
ernor, 'Where is that money I wrote 
for?' and his answer reads, 'In my 
pocket.' 



One Hundred Twenty- fit 



Lebanon, Illinois 



Phone 31 



MOTOR TRUCK SERVICE 

Local and Long Distance 

MOVING AND GENERAL HAULING 

Dealer in Coal for 

SOUTHERN COAL COKE AND MINING CO. 



Harry B. Ochs 



PRICES REASONABLE 



SERVICE ASSURED 






The Cover For This Annual Was Created By 

THE DAVID J. MOLLOY CO. 



2857 N. Western Avenue 



Chicago, Illinois 



Phone Phone 

Belleville Lebanon 

421 136 




Paris Cleaning & 
Dyeing Co. 


Frey's Bakery 

Also 


(Main Office) 

309 East Main St. 
Belleville, III. 


Newspaper Agency 


PLEATING AND REPAIRING 




FOR SUDDEN SERVICE 
CALL US! 


> > > 


You can fool some of the people 
some of the time; all of the people 
part of the time; but you can't fool 
with women all of the time. 


121 W. St. Louis St. 
LEBANON, ILL. 



One Hundred Twenty-six 




McKendree 

Students' 

Needs 

Are 




ALWAYS FOUND AT THIS STORE 



College 
Jewelry 



Leather 
Goods 



Felt 
Novelties 




Sheaffer & 

Parker 

Pens and 

Pencils 



Fancy 
Stationery 



Daumueller's Music and Gift Shop 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



Visit 

Our 

Fountain 





Palatable 

Quality 

Confections 



One Hundred Tiventy-seVt 






PROFESSORS DIARY 

Following is the diary of an absent- 
minded professor: 

Monday — Arrived on the farm today. 
Found a funny kitten in the woods. Spent 
rest of the day in the creek. 

Tuesday — Took a bath in the stove and 
built a fire in the wash-tub. Repairs to 
start next week. 

Wednesday — Was going to milk the cow 
today but couldn't find her faucet to turn 
on the milk. 

Thursday — About drowned today in the 
creek. Got in ten feet of water and forgot 
to swim. 

Friday — Gave Baby a bath and forgot to 
turn off water in the tub. Funeral tomorrow. 

Saturday — Forgot to write in my diary 
today. 

Sunday — Went to church today. Put a 
poker chip in the collection plate. Shook 
hands with the preacher's baby and kissed 
his wife. Will be out in a week. 



The Most Popular 
Car Today 

THE NEW FORD 

Reader Motor Co., Inc. 

AUTHORIZED DEALERS 

LINCOLN— -FORD— FORDSON 



A FRIEND 
Wm. Ford Co. 

ST. LOUIS 



McKendree College 

Students 

Are Like Our 

Merchandise 

"JUST RIGHT" 

THE 

AMOS-JAMES 
GROCER CO. 






Illinois 

Power and Light 

Corporation 



BERTRAM HOTEL 
AND CAFE 

Meals. Short Orders, 

Sandwiches 

ONE BLOCK EAST OF BANK 



One Hundred Twenty-eight 



The Spirit of the Age is Speed 




The Speed of our oAutomatic Presses 

Saves us Time and Saves You Money n 

Blotters Four-Color Process Work Ice Cards 

Envelopes Birth Announcements Feel-Type 

Pamphlets Social Stationery Catalogues 

Office Forms Letterheads Calling Cards 

Ruling - Binding 
Mourning Stationery 

if you want it ! 



Business Cards 
Engraved Invitations 



Tickets 
Offset 



Twenty Four Hour Service, or Quicker 



SINGERS PRINTING COMPANY 






127 North Seventh Street 

' The Post Office is Opposite Us 

Telephone, BRidge 3484 



One Hundred Twenty-nine 



Herff-Jones Co. 

1411-1419 N. Capitol Ave. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



Jewelers and Stationers 

to McKendree 

College 

R. L. Gehrt. State Mgr. 



For Fifty Years . . . 

We have faithfully and correctly 
clothed the people of this com- 
munity. 

Our policy of honest merchandis- 
ing and truth in advertising has 
proved to be the best method of 
successfully conducting a business. 

We Show Large Selections of Stylish 
Merchandise in 

Men's and Boys' Clothes 
Hats and Caps 
Ladies' Ready-to-Wear 
Men's and Boys' Furnishings 

Your Patronage is Cordially Invited 

The 
Romeiser Co. 

Belleville 



*$§***-<•• 



''The Cream of Quality" 

THE PUREST. FRESHEST MILK 
DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR DAILY 

Milk, the Ideal Food for All Ages 

L. S. LANGENW ALTER 



A man once tried to train a fish to live out of water. The first day he kept 
the fish out of the bowl for one hour. The second day, for two hours; the third, 
for three hours, and so on until it would live in the air for a day at a time. 

One day the man was walking over a bridge, while the fish, which had be- 
come very fond of its master, followed close behind. But oh, the pity of it — the 
fish slipped, fell off the bridge into the river and (sniff, sniff) drowned. 



One Hundred Thirty 




Not Charity But a 
Chance . . . 

Is given to the children, the old, 
the crippled and the handicapped 
through reconditioning cast - off 
garments which are collected from 
the homes of the more fortunate. 
A bag in which to place these 
articles may be obtained by calling 
CHestnut 7460. 

Visit 

The Goodwill Industries 

1730 North 13th Street 



The Clover Farm Store 

for 

Quality Meats and 
Groceries 

PROFFITT BROS. 

Quality Dairy Products 
Company 

O'Fallon, III. 

ICE CREAM SPECIALTIES 
PASTEURIZED MILK AND CREAM 



POSTER ADVERTISING 



P 



ERSISTENTLY 

RACTICED 

AYS 

OWERFUL 

ROFITS 



J. Knox Montgomery Poster Adv. Co. 

BELLEVILLE 



Two boys were boasting about their rich relatives. Said one: "My father 
has a big farm in Connecticut. It is so big that when he goes to the barn on 
Monday morning to milk the cows he kisses us all goodby, and he doesn't get 
back until the following Saturday." 

"Why does it take him so long?" the other man asked. 

"Because the barn is so far away from the house." 

"Well, that may be a pretty big farm, but compared to my father's farm 
in Pennsylvania, your farm ain't no bigger than a city lot!" 

"Why, how big is your father's farm?" 

"Well, it's so big that my father sends young married couples out to^the 
barn to milk the cows, and the milk is brought back by their grandchildren." 






One Hundred Thirty-one 



Headquarters for Students' Supplies, Athletic 

Goods, Stationery, Fountain Pens 

and Toilet Goods 

THE BEST IN FOUNTAIN SERVICE 



LEBANON DRUG CO. 

O. C. Freshour, Prop. 



Blumenstcin 
Bros. 



Fresh and Smoked 
MEATS 



MEYER 

Furniture & Undertaking 
"The House of Quality" 

LEBANON, ILL. 



ALAMO THEATRE 

"The Home of better 
^Pictures" 

Features, Comedies. News, and Educational 
Specialties 

LEBANON, ILL. 



One Hundred Thirty-two 














Congratulations 

and Best Wishes to 

the Class of 

1929 




Blue Goose Motor Coach Co., Inc. 

Lebanon — O'Fallon — St. Louis 



For Special Maid Bread 

and Feickert's Bakery 

Products 

Call 
Clarence Bachmann 

Belleville 
Tel. No. 41R 



A man whose trousers bagged 
badly was standing on a corner 
waiting for a car. A passing stu- 
dent stopped and watched him with 
great interest for two or three min- 
utes; at last he said: 

"Well, why don't you jump?" 
i i i 

Jim Hortin hurried into a quick- 
lunch restaurant recently and called 
to the waiter: "Give me a ham sand- 
wich." 

"Yes, sir," said the waiter, reach- 
ing for the sandwich: "will you eat 
it or take it with you?" 

"Both," was the unexpected but 
obvious reply. 

f 1 1 

Doctor Spencer as an after dinner 
speaker was called on to speak on 
"The Antiquity of the Microbe." 
He arose and said, "Adam had 'em," 
and then sat down. 






One Hundred Thirty-three 



"Is this the speedometer?" asked the pretty girl, tapping the glass with 
her finger. 

"Yes, dear," he replied. 

"And that's the clutch?" 

"That's the clutch, darling," he said, jamming en the brakes to avoid a 
fast approaching taxi. 

"But what on earth is this?" she inquired, at the same time giving the 
accelerator a vigorous push with her foot. 

"This, dear," he said, in a soft, celestial voice, "is Heaven." And picking 
up a harp he flew away. 

i 1 1 

Two ardent fishermen were sitting back-to-back in a boat, and sport 
being rather slow, they both fell into a half doze. One overbalanced and went 
overboard. As he rose to the surface, the other looked around. 

"Hello, my friend!" he cried. "I'd only just missed you. Where have 
you been?" 

"Only to see if my bait was all right," answered the drenched one, cooly. 



Crisman: "There are an awful lot of girls who don't want to get 
married." 

Bennett: "How do you know?" 

Crisman: "I've asked them." 



Belle (winding up an argument) : "I think you are a stupid fool!" 
Madge: "And I think you are a polite girl: but, possibly, we are both 
mistaken." 

i i i 

Thompson (applying for a job at haying time) : "What will you pay?" 

Farmer: "I'll pay you what you're worth." 

Jake (scratching his head) : "I'll be durned if I'll work for that.' 



The other night I stole a kiss 
My conscience hurt, alack. 
I think I'll go again tonight 
And put the durned thing back. 



When ice cream grows on macaroni trees, 
When Sahara's sands are muddy, 
When cats and dogs wear overshoes, 
That's when I like to study. 



One Hundred Thirty-four 






THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
Of Lebanon, 111. 

MAY WE SERVE YOU? 



COURTEOUS TREATMENT 



ON 

THE 

SQUARE 



PROMPT SERVICE 

MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



J. J. Lysakowski 

LEBANON, ILL. 

Jeweler and Watchmaker 
Also General Repairing 



The speaker was waxing eloquent, 
and after his peroration on woman's 
rights he said: "When they take our 
girls, as they threaten, away from the 
coeducational colleges, what will fol- 
low? What will follow, I repeat? 

And a loud voice in the audience 
replied: "I will!" 



Stude: "Do you smoke, profes- 
sor?" 

Prof.: "Why, yes, I'm very fond 
of a good cigar." 

Stude: "Do you drink, sir?" 

Prof.: "Yes, indeed, I enjoy noth- 
ing better than a bottle of wine." 

Stude: "Gee, it's going to cost me 
something to pass this course." 



BUECHLER 

Printing Company 

PUBLISHERS 

Belleville, III. 



One HundredThirty-five 









"Put Your Duds in 
Our Suds" 

DRY CLEANING 

BELLEVILLE 

LAUNDRY 

CO. 

The Laundry Does it Best 

23rd and W. Main - Belleville, 111. 
HAROLD YERKES, Lebanon Agent 



THE LEBANON 
ADVERTISER 



Sylvan E. Williams 
Editor and Publisher 



KOEBEL 8 SON 

Quality Fruits, Meats and 
Groceries 

Two Stores 
LEBANON, ILL. 



WHITE LILY 
DAIRY, INC. 

1613 W. Main St. 
EELLEVILLE, ILL. 

Phone 80 



"What is a faculty <"' 
"A faculty is a body of persons sur- 
rounded by red tape." 



Chas. Rcinhardt 



Hugo Rcinhardt 



C. 8 H. Reinhardt 

Clothing. Hats, Caps and 
Furnishings 



LEBANON. ILL. 



"Dear Alice," wrote the young 
man, "pardon me, but I'm getting so 
forgetful. I proposed to you last 
night, but really forgot whether you 
said 'y es ' or 'no'." 

"Dear Will," she replied by note, 
"so glad to hear from you. I know 
I said 'no' to someone last night, but 
I had forgotten just who it was." 



Dne Hundred Thirty-six 









A 
McKENDREE BOOSTER 






One Hundred Thtrty-seVen 









Mrs. Noss: "John, how many wars was Spain engaged in during the 
seventeenth century?" 

John Oster: "Seven." 

Mrs. Noss: "Seven? Enumerate them." 

John: "One, two, three, four, five, six, seven." 



Mrs. Philbrook (he being discovered by his wife kissing a pretty girl): 
'Why, Leman, I'm surprised." 

Philbrook: "No, my dear, I'm surprised. You're astonished." 



The football hero: "No, mother, I didn't lose my front teeth; I have 
them here in my handkerchief." 



'Hist, Romulus, shall we go to the fire sale?" 

Nay, nay, Arcturus: I have no wish to buy a fire." 



Crouse (pointing to the orchestra leader at the famed soprano's recital) 
Hey, Orena, why does that man keep shaking that stick at that woman?" 
Orena: "Sh-sh, he's net shaking that stick at her: be still." 
Crouse: "Well, then, what's she hollering for?" 



"Father," said a little boy, "had Solomon seven hundred wives?" 
"I believe so, my son," said the father. 

"Well, father, was he the man who said, 'Give me liberty or give me 
death?' " 



SPRING 

In the Spring the cc-ed's fancy 
Lightly turns from "may and can," 
To the greater necromancy 
Of a young unmarried man. 
You can hold her through the winter, 
And she'll work around and sing, 
But it's just as good as certain 
She will marry in the Spring. 

It's easy enough to look pleasant, 

When the Spring comes along with a rush; 

But the fellow worth-while 

Is the one who can smile 

When he slips and sits down in the slush. 



One Hundred 1 hirtu-eight 



McKendtean Advertising Directory 

Daumueller Gift Shop Lebanon, 111. 

Lebanon Drug Co. Lebanon, 111. 

Spieth Studio Centralia, 111. 

Weber Hardware Company Lebanon, 111. 

Sayre Motor Co Lebanon, 111. 

Pfeffer Milling Company Lebanon, 111. 

Langenberg Hat Company Lebanon, 111. 

Harry B. Ochs Lebanon, 111. 

David J. Molloy Co Chicago, 111. 

William Monken Lebanon, 111. 

Kent Clothing Company St. Louis. Mo. 

Ely 8 Walker ___ St. Louis, Mo. 

Paris Cleaning Company Belleville, 111. 

Frey's Bakery Lebanon, 111. 

William Ford Company St. Louis, Mo. 

Reader Motor Company Lebanon, 111. 

Amos James Grocery Company St. Louis, Mo. 

Illinois Power & Light Corporation Lebanon, 111. 

Hotel Bertram Lebanon, 111. 

Meyer Furniture Co. Lebanon, 111. 

Alamo Theatre Lebanon, 111. 

Lowe K Campbell St. Louis, Mo. 

Singers Printing Company East St. Louis, 111. 

Proffitt Brothers Lebanon, O'Fallon, 111. 

Quality Dairy Company O'Fallon, 111. 

J. Knox Montgomery Belleville, 111. 

Goodwill Industries St. Louis, Mo. 

Herff- Jones Company Indianapolis, Ind. 

L. S. Langenwalter Lebanon, 111. 

Romeiser Co Belleville, 111. 

Blue Goose Motor Coach Company East St. Louis, 111. 

Clarence Bachmann Belleville, 111. 

First National Bank Lebanon, 111. 

J. J. Lysakowski Lebanon, 111. 

Buechler Printing Company Belleville, 111. 

Belleville Laundry Belleville, 111. 

Lebanon Advertiser -'- —Lebanon, 111. 

Koebel and Son '— — Lebanon. 111. 

C. 8 H. Reinhardt ____Lebanon, 111. 

White Lily Dairy Company Belleville, 111. 



One Hundred Thirty-nine 



If you can draw better cartoons than 

you find in this book, draw 

them here. 






If you can write better jokes than you 

find on these pages, write 

them here. 



OR FOREVER HOLD YOUR PEACE 



One Hundred Forty 







iiyr ETHODS and Machines . . . that 
(L/uJL belonged to grandfather's day still 
belong there. Yesterday's standards are 
forgotten in the light of today's dis- 
coveries . . . Yesterday's machines have 
no place in today's competition . . . They 
belong in the museums or on the scrap 
heap. 

THE McKENDREAN 

is a Product of Our Modern Automatic Machinery 



KOH LER S. CO 

St Ljou z&.Tvlo. 



2122 PINE ST. 



Qualify ^Printers 



One Hundred Forty-one 






A Last Word 












One Hundred Forty-two 






, 



A Last Word 



' 



(/U /sL^,^^ «~J £h^~* ^ ^ff^\ 






■ 



L*-y\ 



T 







£-<-<_ 






'fytr. 



cA*- 



<&. — ^ 






I y ^ iW ^ Y" **7/ ' 

f 



One Hundred Forty-three 









"You to the left and I to the right, 

For the ways of men must sever — 
And it well may be for a day and a night, 

And it well may be forever. 
A pledge from the heart to its fellow heart 

(For our ways are past our knowing) , 
On the ways we all are going! 

Here's luck! ..." 



One Hundred Fortu-tour