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THE M C KENDREAN 

19 3 3 



STAFF OF 1933 McKENDREAN 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Miss Alleen Wilson Lee Mockler Clarence Walton 

Sponsor Editor Associate Editor 



Jordan Fink Helen Saegesser Mildred Wilkin Herman Presley 
Athletics < >reanizations Features Art 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Robert Kurrus Shirley Nichols 

Business Manager Advertising 



Clayton Fawkes Loren Youn< 

\ssistan1 Business Manager Circulation 



THE McKENDREAN 
1933 



Published bv 



THE STUDENTS 

of 

McKENDREE COLLEGE 



LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



DEDICATION 

To Dr. Edwin Rollin Spencer— in commemoration 
of his untiring and unselfishly-devoted oil mis in ad- 
vancing the interests of McKendree College; in recog- 
nition of his ceaseless labor and unparalleled success 
with respect to the beautification of the College cam- 
pus; and with best wishes for future endeavor in 
improving our already beautiful and inspirational nat- 
ural surroundings — this hook is dedicated. 




EDWIN ROLLIN SPENCER 



FOREWORD 

To present a picture of life on the College Hill and 
to record the major events of the school year is the aim 
of the 1933 McKendrean. 

The stalY thanks .Mr. 1". A. I'.ehvnier, Virgil Church, 
the administration, and main others for their inval- 
uable aid in the production of this book. 



CONTENTS 

The College 
Classes 
Activities 
Features 



ALMA MATER 

A college 'mid plains is standing, standing there from olden days, 
A pioneer of learning, first in untrodden ways, 
For Service and Christian Culture, for Efficiency she stands, 
Her sons and daughters praise her, with voices, hearts, and hands. 

Hail to thee, our dear old McKendree, 

May we always loyal be; 
It's a song of praise we'll raise to thee, 

Alma .Mater, dear old M-C; 
May we always hold thee true and wise and right, 

Honor Purple and the While, 
And for victory we'll always fight, 

Till we win for old McK. 

Enduring and strong she stands there, stands upon oirr college hill. 
Though others may outnumber, she holds first place still, 
lor Beauty and Truth and Know ledge, and Service without hound. 
Then let us raise our voices, until the plains resound. 



THE COLLEGE 




Entrance to ' »ld Ma 



Si iem e Hall 



Entrance to Benson Wood Library 



Since President Harmon's inauguration in 
1923, McKendree College has experienced 
steady growth. With the help of the Christian 
and effective administration of Dr. Harmon, 
one <>t the College's most versatile and well- 
liked presidents, the old school on the Hill has 
kept its head above water in the present finan- 
cial crisis. 




Harmon, LI.. I)., D.I). 
President 



THE ADMINISTRATION 



William Clarence Walton, Ph.D., D.D. 

Philosophy and Religion 
Charles Jacob Stowell, Ph.D. 

Mathematics ; 

Edward 11. Weatherly, Ph.D. I 

English c5 

Standleigh Myron McClure, M.Sc. ' J; 

Chemistry and Geolog) >- 

Claude E. Vick, M.S.. Registrar 

Education 
Caroline Kennedy. M .A. 

Romance Languages 



James Clay Dolley, M.A., Litt.D. 

Latin and Greek 
Christopher John Bittner, Ph.] >. 

Social Sciences 
Edwin Rollin Spencer, Ph.D. 

Biology 
Xell Blythe Waldron, Ph.D. 

I [istory 
( (liver Henry Kleinschmidt, A.A.G.O. 

Director, Music Department 
Alleen Wilson, A.B., B.S. in L.S. 

Librarian 




,,. Dollcy, \\ il on, Mi II,, 

i I..,,... 



Paul lliuliteeu 




No one who has ever come under the influ- 
ence of Dean Raker's kindly, sympathetic and 
intelligent administration, either in the affairs 
of the College or the classroom, can fail to 
hold him in high regard. For forty years, the 
Dean has held a place in the heart of McKen- 
dree and McKendreans. 



Edwin Percy Baker, A.M., LL.l). 
Dean, Professor of German 



THE ADMINISTRATION 



Arthur H. Doolen, B.S. 

Physical Education 
Agnes Howe, A.P>. 

Expression 
Nell Griswold Oppitz, A. P.. 

History 
Aileen Spencer, R. A. 

Biology 
Mrs. A. W. Ayres 

Dean of Women ( first semester ) 
Mrs. Minnie Phillips 

House Mother 



Raymond Huck. M. S. 

Physics and Mathematics 
Evelyn McNeely. P..S. 

English 
Josephine Rittner, A.R., M.D. 

Physiology 
R. Pauline Harper 

Voice and Public School Music- 
Mrs. Rlanche Hertenstein 

Dean of Women ( 2nd semester ) 
Mrs. Jessie Lee Huffstutler 

Matron of Carnegie Hall 




T(,/._S pt -ncer, Ha per. Huck, Blttner. Weatherly. 

Bottom— Kleinschmidt, Ayres, McNeely, Waldron, Oppitz. Doole 



I'injc Nineteen 



FISCAL AGENT 
C. M. Wilton, A.M. 

GRADUATE ASSISTANTS 

Emma Rergmann, A.l'... [!.S. in U.S.. Library 
Arthur E. Hortin, A.l',.. Athletics 
Vera E. Whitlock, B.M., Music. 

UNDERGRADUATE ASSISTANTS 

Carl Brock, Biology 

Lester V. Cralley, Chemistry 

Clayton Fawkes, Chemistry 

Eunice Hall. ( )ffice 

Harrison Hoffman, Biology 

Bernetta Joseph, Library 

Marjorie Keen, Library 

Adelyn Martin. Library 

Rexford McHenry, Assistant to the Fiscal Ajjent 

Helen Saegesser, Assistant to the Registrar 

Marjorie Snow, Office i first semester) 

Holly Wattles. Secretary to (he President 

Loren Young, Physics 



CLASSES 










LEROY SCHMIDT 
Lebanon 
I [istory 
Alpha Mu Omega; "M" Club 



CR ALLEY 

WALTON 

SENIORS 

LESTER CRALLEY 
I irownstown 
Chemistry 



Track '26. 



Philo: Sigma Zeta; Nature Club '30, '31, 
'32, '33; Chemistry Assistant. 



u >ren \< >ung 

Richview 

Mathematics 

Plato; Bachelors; Sigma Zeta, Vice-Mas- 

lisl '33 ; Alpha Psi ' >mega ; llnsi- 

[anager Review '33; Circulation 

Manager 1933 McKcndrean; "Shavings"; 

f| Hannah"; Physics Assistant, 



EMMA WALTON 

Lebanon 

English 

Clio; Alpha Psi Omega; Secretary-Treas- 
urer Preshman Class; Glee Club, Secre- 
tary Treasurer '32. Presidenl '33; ¥ W, C 
A. Cabinet, Secretary-Treasurer 'M, Presi- 
dent '33; "Shanewis"; "The Fool"; "Pi- 
n Penzance"; "Shavings"; "The Mi- 
kado"; "\larllia". 



livilics of the senior class throughout the school year 1932 33 present, 
is usual, a in - ti n rcpri i ntative cross-section of the multiphase and diversified 

■ li 'i. Hill. Early in the year, the class decided upon Josef Spudich 
s (Di a !• ider, assisted by Ionian Fink, vice-president, anil Martha 

i tat treasurer. Time has proved the wisdom oj their choice. 













^y 



KERMIT O. BIERBAUM 
Marthasville, Missouri 
Mathematics 
Philo; Sigma Zeta. 

MILDRED C. WILKIN 
Robinson 



SENIORS 

SAMUEL B. MERCER 

West Salem 

Social Science 

Philo; Pi Kappa Delta, Vice-President '33- 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, Social Chairman '31; 
Boys' Work Chairman '32, President '33: 
Business Manager Review '32; Debate '29, 
'30; Business Manager "The Mikado". 



English-Latin 

Clio; Alpha Psi Omega, President '33; Pi 
Kappa Delta; Nature Club '29, '30; Illinois 
Intercollegiate Oratorical Champion '33; 
McKendree Graduate Scholarship ; Feature 
Editor Review '32; Secretary-treasurer 
Student Association '32; Feature Editor 
1933 McKendrean; "The Wonder Hat"; 
"The New Poor"; "The Fool"; "The Re- 
hearsal". 



DUANE W. HORTIN 

Albion 

English 

Philo; Bachelors. Yice-Chairman '33; Di- 
rector Publicity Y. M. C. A. '32, '33; Editor 
Ys' McKendrean '32; Review Staff, Circu- 
lation Manager '30, '31, Editor '32; "The 
Other Wise Man". 



/;; athletics, many members of the class have distinguished themselves. Senior 
men played an outstanding part in McKendree's Little Nineteen Co-championship 
football' team. Captain Miner Todd, Josef Spudich, Robert Kurrus, Carl Brock, 
and Milford Miltenberger, were all important cogs in the machine. The basket- 
ball team zvas likewise much strengthened during the first semester by Captain 



Page Twenty-tilt 







-/> 



^^at^r"; 



^^^^^ 



kershner lowky 

mockler hard 



MARTHA E. KERSHNER 
Effingham 

Mathematics 

S gma Zeta, Master Scientist '33; Y 
W. C. A. Cabinet, President 'M, Social 
Chairman '33 ; Nature Clul, '31, '32, '33; 
Personnel Council '32; President Clark 
Hall '.V! ; Secretary-Treasurer Senior 
Class; Band '31, '32, '33; Orchestra, '31, '32. 



SENIORS 

ELMER T. LOWRY 

Raynham, North Carolina 
Mathematics 
Philo. 



REE MOCKLER 


RE 


WARD E. 


HARD 


Aspinwall, Pennsylvania 




Lebanon 




English 




Philosi 


>phy-Religion 


Plato; Tr,,i.i.r l -r Y. M. C. V Ml. '32, '33; 
Personnel Council '.'2; Review Staff '.11, 


Phi 


i;Sigma Bet! 


Rho; Nature Clul 



Managing Editor '32, Editor '33; Editor 
1933 McKcndrean; "The Other Wise 
Mau" ; Manaj Countrj '30. 

Todd and Miltenbergcr. Jordan Fink, Robert Kurrus, and Josef Spudich repre- 
sented the seniors in track activities. VJartha Kershner and Mildred Beutelman 
were mainstays of the women's tennis tram. Berenice Mowc, md this war an ac- 
count of injuries, lias been one oj the ( ollcge's ranking tennis stars. 
Seniors hair not been nil- in forensics, Mildred Wilkin capturing the title <</' 



Page Twentyfou 




ROBERT F. KURRUS 
East St. Louis 

Social Science 
Bachelors, Chairman '32; "M" Cluh, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer '30, '31 ; President Student 
Association '32; Vice-President Junior 
Class; Business Manager 1933 McKen- 
drean; "Mistletoe and Moonlight"; "Brink 
of Silence"; Football '29, '30, '31, '32; Track 
■32, '33. 

CARL S. BROCK 
Cisne 

Biology 
Plato; Bachelors; "M" Club, President '33; 
Football '29, '30, '31, '32; Biology Assistant. 



CLEMENTS 
FINK 



SENIORS 

H. ELEANOR CLEMENTS 
Mount Vernon 
English 



Clio; Alpha Psi Omega; Pi Kappa Delta, 
President '33; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet '31. 
'32; Review Staff '32; Personnel Council 
'32; Secretary-Treasurer Student Associa- 
tion '33; Secretary-Treasurer Clark Hall 
'33; Debate '32; "The Birds' Christmas 
Carol". 

E. JORDAN FINK 
Carlyle 

Psychology- Philosophy 
Plato; Bachelors, Recorder-Treasurer, '32; 
President Carnegie Hall '33; Director News 
Bureau '31, '32, '33; Vice-President Senior 
Class ; Athletics Editor 1933 McKendrean ; 
Sports Editor Review '31, '32, '33; "M" 
Club: "Friend Hannah"; "Enter Dora, Exit 
Dad"; Track '32, '33. 

Illinois women's intercollegiate champion orator, a>id Gaylon Howe representing 
the College in men's orations as well as debating. Eleanor Clements zcas chosen 
president of the Illinois Theta chapter of Pi Kappa Delta, national honorary for- 
ensic fraternity, and Gaylon Howe, Mildred Wilkin, and Samuel Mercer hold 
membership in the local organization. 



Page Tu-cnty-fizt 




SPUDICH 
MILTENBERGER 



BERRY 
WHITLOCK 



SENIORS 



J( >SEF I. SPUDICH 

Sawyerville 

English 

Philo; Bachelors, Chairman '33; Nature 
Club, Secretary '31; "M" Club, President 
'M: Personnel Council '.12; President Stu- 
ilent Association '33; President Senior 
Class; "The Fool"; "Mistletoe and Moon- 
light"; Football '."', '.-ill, '31, 'M; Track 
'2v. '31. 



CLYDE BERRY 
Carlyle 

Chemistry 



Philo; Sigmi 
'32, '33; Cros 



Zeta; Nature Club '30, '31, 
Country '31. 



MII.R »RD MILTENBERGER 
Reatrice, Nebraska 

Si pi ial Si ieni e 

Alpha M;. Omega; Football '31, '32; 
kctball Ml. M2. 



\ ER \ E. WHITLOCK 
Fairfield 

Education 



Clio: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet '28, '29, '30, '31 ; 
President Clark Mall '31 ; Glee Club, Quar- 
tet '29, '3d: " \s You Like It"; "Shanewis"; 
"Pirates of Penzance"; Music Assistant. 

Upha 'I l> in chapter <<i Alph a Psi Omega, national honorary dramatic 
fraternity, had for its president Mildred Wilkin, um/. in addition, five oilier senior 

Emma Walton, Loren Young, Leroy Dude, Hugh McNelly, and Gay 
Ion II 

Indent Association offices were: First semester, Robert Kur 




Ml'RDACH 
WOLFE 



SENIORS 



ELBERT D. ISAAC 
Brookport 
History 
Glee Club '31, 'iZ, '2i. 



ERNEST J. MURDACH 
Troy 

Philosophy 
Sigma Beta Kho ; Nature Club '30. 



MARGUERITE C. READER 
Lebanon 
Latin 
Nature Club '31, '32, '33. 



LYMAN W. WOLFE 
Lebanon 

Social Science 
Plato; Glee Club 'iZ, '33. 



rus, president; Harry Lang, vice-president; Mildred Wilkin, secretary-treasurer; 
and second semester, Josef Spudich, president; Martha Kershner, vice-president; 
Eleanor Clements, secretary-treasurer. 

hi journalistic achievement, Lee Mockler, editor-in-chief of The Review and 
the 1933 McKcudrcuu, and Jordan Fink, sports editor for the same publications 
and director of publicity, represented the senior class. Albert Meyer figured 
prominently in the journalistic activities of the preceding year. 







MOWE 
JENKINS 


LARSH 
CRALLEY 




SENIORS 


BERENICE MnWE 
Lebanon 


LEROY LARSH 
East ,^t. Louis 


Biology 


.Social Science 



Clio; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet '31, '32; Glee 
Club '30; Tennis "30, '31, '.(2. 



FARRELL D. JENKINS 
I >ahlgren 

Philosophy 

Sigma Beta Rho, President '33; Glee Club 
'30, '31 ; Debate '30. 



LEWIS J. CRALLEY 
I trownstown 

Chemistry 

Philo; Sigma Zeta; Nature Club '30, 31. 
'32, '33. 



Three assistantships in the science departments were held by seniors. They 
- r, /.. ler ' ralley, chemistry; ( arl Brock, biology; and Loren Young, physics. 
la < hapter of Sigma Zeta, national honorary science fraternity, includes in 
is membership: Martha Kershner, who is master scientist; Loren Young, vice- 
master scientist ; < arl Broi k, I lyde Berrv, Kermit Bierbaum and Lewis (ralley. 



, /ft- 



^rr 








HUGH J. McNELLY 
Chester 

English 
Philo; Sigma Beta Rho ; Alpha Psi Ome 
ga; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, Vice-President 
'32, '33; Glee Club '30, '31, '32, '33; "The 
New Poor"; "The Other Wise Man"; "Pi- 
rates of Penzance"; "The Mikado"; "Mar- 
tha". 

JACK H. GOLDSTEIN 
St. Louis, Missouri 
Social Science 



McNELLY 1 1 EUT E L -\ I A X 




GOLDSTEIN DUDE 




SENIORS 




.MILDRED BEUTELMAN 




Lebanon 




English 




3me- Clio: May Queen '33; Glee Club 


'30, '31, 




'32, '33; Band '30. '31, '32, '33; Orchestra 
'30, '31, '32, '33; "Friend Hannah"; Tennis 
'30, '31, '32, '33. 



LEROY D. DUDE 
Edwardsville 

Philosophy-Religion 
Philo; Sigma Beta Rho; Alpha Psi Ome- 
ga; Glee Club '30, '31, '32, '33; Nature Club 
"30, '31. '32. '33; Band '30, '31, '32, '33; Re- 
view Staff '31, '32; "Martha"; "Friend 
Hannah" ; "Applesauce" ; Cross Coun- 
try '30. 



In the religious phase of student activity, the elass was well represented. 
Samuel Mercer headed the Y. M. C. A. and Emma Walton the V. W. C. A. 
Duane Horton was president of the College Hpzvorth League, while Gaylon Howe 
and Farrell Jenkins occupied the presidency of Sigma Beta Rho, student minis- 
terial organization, during the year. 



Fane Twenty-nine 




B»U 



"&*■> l^>~<^/ ^!/C<_~. <^^C<J^, guZg^ 



IH (WE 
BAER 


LANG 
STEVENSON 




SENIORS 


GAYL< in i.. ik >WE 

Shattuc 


J. HARRY LANG 
Lebanon 


Philosophy 


Social Science 



Plato Rho, President '32; Al- 

pha Psi Omega, Vice President '32; l'i 
Kappa Delta; Glci Club '32, '33; V M C 
A. Cabinet '32, '33; Debate '33; Winner 
l>i.rri> Oratorical Contest 'M ; "Shavings"; 
1 Hannah". 



HOPE I. BAEK 

Summerfii Id 

Piano 

0, '31, '32, '33; Orchestra 
'30, '31, '22, '33. 



Mpha Mn Omega, Secretary-Treasurer 
'30, Vice-President '31, President '32; Glee 
Club '30, '31, '32, '33, \ ice-President '33; 
Vice President Student Association '32; 
Vice-President Freshman Class. 



ABIGAIL, E. STEVENSON 
I . el ".UK >n 

Mathematics 
Glee Club '32, '33. 



. lined seniors wen members of the glee clubs. Fred Huff- 
sluller was president o) the men's organization, while Emma Walton was the 
ii i n lub Hope Baer, majoring in piano, was the first candi 
date i ■ r of n u u degree since 1931. 




HUFFSTUTLER 



SENIORS 



ELMER K. TODD 

Pleasant Hill 

Education 

Alpha Mu Omega, President '32 ; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer Sophomore Class ; Football 
'30," '31, '52. Captain '52 ; Basketball '30. 
'31. '32. '55. Captain, 55. 



FRED E. HUFFSTUTLER 
Lebanon 



Mathematics 



Bachelors; Gle 
.lent '55.. 



Club '30, '31, '52. 35. Prcsi- 



Thus Slw seniors of '33 have acquitted themselves with honor and are pre- 
pared to face the uncertain tomorrow with pride in past achievement as ivell as 
hope in future accomplishment. 



JUNIORS 



Gaylon Whiteside 
Fast St. Louis 



Louis Fortner 
I asl St. Louis 







Walter Rauth 
Belleville 




Lillie Carmichael 
East St. Louis 



Wilber Joyce 
Sandoval 



George Moormai: 
Edwardsville 



JUNIORS 



^ Ruth Habi& 
1 Y St. Louis, Mo. 



/ 



Harold Hathaway 
Mount Vernon 



Marion Harmon 
Lebanon 




Shirley Nichols 
Lebanon 



Marjorie Snow 
Vienna 












y>^*A^_— ^s. 



'O 



Alveria Wood 
Karnak 



Edwin Meyer 
East St. Louis 



Paye Thirty-thr 



JUNIORS 



Lloyd Harmon 
Lebanon 



Allien Nattsas 
Zeipler 



LaFern \\ i^c 
Trenton 



Alfred 
Lebanon 




Louise Hecly 
St. T.iliory 



Claude Lang 
Lebanon 



Raymond Horsl 
Carlylc 



Pai/c Thirty-fa 



JUNIORS 



Woodrow Fulkerson 
C:irmi 



Helen Saegesser 
Granite City 



Glenn Sappington 
Trenton 




Adelyn Martin 
Marion 



Frank Gruchalla 
Sawyerville 



Harrison Hoffman 
Breese 



Donald Kline 
Palestine 



Pa.je Thirty-fiv 



fohn Sanders 



rL. 



jX^^ 



||,.1K Wattle 



Aldenc Acuiicius 



I'., dros Levonian 



Herman Prcslej 



Bernctta Joseph 



Marjnrir Keen A 






|acl fioodpasler 



Rex Gammon 



Logan 




SOPHOMORES 



Helen Hudgens 



Harold Gieseke 



Ida Cohen 



Raymond Musgrove 




Charles '^Unvarter 



^\ii \\ 



George Sharp 



Kathleen Pifer 



Virginia Lauer 



Clifford Hertenstein 



Richard Chappie 



Evelyn Haerting 



Emma Martishus 



Vincent Tolli\ 



Rohert Hamm 



Phyllis Burge 



i%- + -■ " 



(sK>0l. 



Page Thirty-seven 



SOPHOMORES 



Wilson Brown 



Stanley Schubkegel 



Dorothy Dintelman 

■'••'■ 
Helen Hoppe 



Eunis Si'.ltz 



Clayton Fawkes 



Carmen Williams 



Lcona Bischoff 



Walter Beguelin 



; ini'lham 



Rachel Marshall 



1 1 iii in I lerwclis 










Evelyn Derwclis 



Page Thirty cialil 



SOPHOMORES 



Paul Meadows 



Marianne Hoar 



Burtis Spencer 



Frances Rieder 



Harold Whitlock 



Iona Jackson 




Mbert Manwaring *jJL* 



Layman May 



l'a<ic Thirty-nine 



FRESHMEN 



George Holtzscher 



Finley 



Wilma Schneider 



Mary Pharis 



Martha Mowe 






Paul Bateman 



Edward i 



Helen Beguelin 



Alice Griffin 



Dorothy Oppitz 



David 



Lcroy M 





t • ^Gerald Dultne 




1 




fp 

B 



ajjyju M -m^A -miM^^ 






\»*d- 



rhelma Carlson «, — "^ 



*v"i-b 




Burdine Utley 



il 



Q 





la I iiiliser 



J 




Gus Cianci 



FRESHMEN 



John Rauth 



Carelyn Marshy 



Isabel Smith 



Martha Russell 



Eagen Wilcox 




Henri Comfort 



Wendell Hoover 



idna Kraemer 



Emily Byrne 



Florence Zahnow 



William Eaton 



Louis Bost 



Dale Harmon 



Carl Koch 



Edwin Paul 



Elma Rollings 



Mary Knapp 



Dorothy Bennett 



Karl Wittlinger 



ihn Dorkc 



Page Forty-one 



FRESHMEN 



William Harmon 



Clyde Melton 



Martha Hinkcl 



Larry C 



Charles Rubesa 
~Ma&, Sander 



Emil Freeh 



Catherine Absher 



Allelic Mollenhauer 







I.lovd Flandt 



Jake Strieker ^^"^^ jd jl *JF M '"> Man K iiin 



Wilford Ausbrook 



Mary McClain 



Clifton Stephi 

Hrasky * Bfc ' k Charles Geilet 

Hill 



Page /■'"' I two 



FRESHMEN 



Howard Larsh 



Iva Lou Crallc 



Fayc Palmer 



\ enkmie^-Mason 



Kenneth Wilson 




les lienner 



Delmar Lawler 

Dorothy Schmedake 

William Sanders 

Forrest ClarkX^*^. 




Mary Dieckrn 



James Moore 



Horace Herrin 



Winter Wilson 



Catherine Gilkison 



Mary Carson 



Roy Singer 



Delbert Brown 



Doris Moore 



^f<W- 3£_^. 



The names of those students whose pictun 
dreari follow : 



do not appear in the McKen- 



SENIORS 

I lazel Garvin 
Marvelle Kleinschmidt 

Edward Maul 
Alice Yursell 
Doris Zottman 

JUNIORS 
Raphael Braun 
Joseph Butts 
Marshall Harris 
Evelyn Hoyt 
Edithe Reid 
Edward Soo) 
Robert Sorrels 
Arkell Weygandt 
( >scar Wild 
I (avid Zook 

S< >PH< (MORES 
Alice Behrens 
Elsie Bergdolt 
Delberl Birch 
Paul Bryan 
Edw in Cabbage 
.Minus Caruthers 
Louis I >elatine 
August 1 >ieckmann 
I inis Ernest 
Elizabeth Harding 
Max Jai I -"ii 
Fay Jenl ins 



William Koch 
Harry Lewis 
Cordelia Mann 
David Melton 
Jack Pfeffer 
Earl Potter 
Charles Short 
Dale Whitehurst 

FRESHMEN 

Dean Abendroth 
Rodney Behrens 
Clairetta Carpenter 
William Cochrane 
Dorothy Ellis 
Helen Ellis 
Eugene Kurz 
Peyton Lingle 
Russell Mauley 
Donald McHenry 
Rexford McHenry 
James McLaughlin 
Jack Patton 
Lowell Pennell 
Anita Schubkegel 
Thomas Shannon 
Fay Stanford 
Roy Stanton 
Arvilla Teague 
Catherine \\ ilk- 
Louise Winterrow d 
Warren Wolfe 



Page Part) fou, 



ACTIVITIES 



CONTENTS 

Organizations 

Forensics 

Athletics 



ORGANIZATIONS 



McKENDREE COLLEGE ORGANIZATIONS 

Journalistically inclined ? McKendree College offers the Press 

Club. 

Have a scientific mind? Try for Sigma Zeta. 

Ever speak in public? Set your goal at Pi Kappa Delta. 

Dramatic? Work toward Alpha Psi Omega. 

Are von a "good fellow"? Make a bid for the Bachelors or Alpha 

.M u Omega. 

Ever get serious about life ? There are the Young Women's and 

Young Men's Christian Associations. 

Are you a minister? Get acquainted with Sigma Beta Rho. 

I. ike sports? Join the "M" Club. 

Do vim sing? Try for the Glee Clubs. 

( ir do you play? Get in the band and orchestra. 

Like the good old out-of-doors? Join the Nature Club. 

Ever win an argument? Learn how with the debate squad. 

Ever have stage fright? Get rid of it in the literary societies. 

The organizations of McKendree College give to each student an opportunity 
for self-expression in all fields to which his inclination and ability may lead him. 



STUDENT ASSOCIATION 



First Semester 
Robert Kurrus 

Harry Lang 

Mildred Wilkin 

Wilford Ausbrook 
Wilma Schneider 

Burdine Utley 



OFFICERS 

President 
Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 
Cheer Leader 

Pianist 
Program Chairman 



Second Semester 

Josef Spudich 

Martha Kershner 

Eleanor Clements 

Burdine Ltley 
Wilma Schneider 

Isabel Smith 

Ruth Habig 



The Student Association was organized in 1921, and consists of all regularly 
enrolled students in McKendree College. The regular meetings are held each 
Friday morning at the chapel hour, when matters pertaining to the student body 
are discussed and interesting programs are presented. 

This has been another successful year for the Association, whose projects 
have included the annual Home-coming program, the football banquet, and the 
general stimulation of McKendree pep. 




First Rov. — Lang, Spudich, Kurrus. 
Second Roo>— Kershner, Wilkin, Cle 



PRESS CLUB 

The Press Club, organized in W21 under 
the direction of Professor Thomas E. W ig- 
gins, aow at Eureka College, is co-existent 
with the class in journalism, taught t>\ Pro- 
fessor S. M. McClure. 

There are no regular club officers, but 
members of the staff of the McKendree 
Review, publication of the class, are ap- 
pointed. Lee Mockler is editor of the 
paper, and I.oren Young is business and 
circulation manager. 

The purpose of the club is to develop 
journalistic ability among the students by 
enabling them to obtain practical reporting 
and newswriting experience. The McKen- 
dree Review, "devoted to the interests of 
McKendree College." serves as a laboratory 
for this purpose. 




Editor L«- Mockler 

Circulation and Bus. Mgr. . Loren Voting 

Sponsor Prof. S. M. McClure 

Sports Editor Jordan Fink 





:ist Martha 



ster Scii 
J. Stowe 



.Prof. S. M. McClu 



SIGMA ZETA 

The Ileta chapter of Sigma Zeta, national 
honorary scientific fraternity, was estab- 
lished at McKendree College in 1926. Its 
purpose is to encourage scholarship, espe- 
cially among the science students. A project 
inaugurated this year was the essay contest. 
The participants are limited to freshmen, 
but not necessarily to science majors, and 
the subject chosen must be on some phase 
of scientific work. 

The organization has no faculty sponsors, 
the faculty members, Dr. C. J. Stowell and 
Professor S. M. McClure, having the same 
rights and privileges as the student mem- 
bers. Dr. Stowell is a member of the na- 
tional constitutional committee, and Pro- 
fessor McClure is an official in the national 
council of the fraternity. 




Cralley, Meye 
Jacob, Dr. : 



ierbaum, V 
ell, Brock. 



PI KAPPA DELTA 

The Illinois Theta chapter of Pi Kappa 
Delta, national honorary forensic fraternity, 
was established at McKendree College in 
1924. Its membership this year includes 
four honorary and five active members, 
with ten pledges to be initiated. Miss Eve- 
lyn McXeely is faculty sponsor of the or- 
ganization and coach of debate. 

The purpose of Pi Kappa Helta is to 
encourage intercollegiate forensic activities, 
and to develop the art of public speaking 
and argumentation. 

The Illinois Theta chapter is a member 
of the Missouri Province of Pi Kappa 
Delta. Every two years a province conven- 
tion is held, and each alternate year the 
national convention. For the past three P 
years McKendree College has been repre- 
sented at both province and national con- 
\ entions. 





I . ; Ron . /. ft to riohl 
Bottom I -.. Mi Howe, Ja 



I, Mi Neely, ( I. 




OFFICERS 

President Mildred Wilkii 

Secretary-Treasurer Marion Harmoi 

Vice-President Gaylon How 



ALPHA PSI OMEGA 

The Alpha Theta cast of Alpha Psi 
( >mega, national honorary dramatic frater- 
nity, was organized at McKendree College 
in 1927, with a charter membership of six- 
teen. Miss Agnes Howe is the present fac- 
ulty sponsor of the fraternity. 

The purpose of Alpha Psi Omega is to 
promote worth-while dramatics in colleges 
and universities. Toward this end, the local 
chapter has presented this year "Apple- 
sauce," a comedy ; "Martha," an opera ; and 
"Children of the Moon," a drama, besides 
several one-act plays. 

Social functions of the organization this 
year have included a steak fry, a George 
Washington party, an initiation party at the 
Lebanon Country Club, a garden party, and 
the annual banquet. 




Top Roil; left to right — Snow, Walton, Dude, Hertenstein, Dr. Harmon, 

Wilson. 
Bottom Ron'— Miss Howe, Howe, Harmon, Wilkin, McNelly, Miss Harper. 



Miss McXeely, Mi: 



i'agc Fifty-three 



THE BACHELORS 

The Bachelors' Fraternity is a local or- 
ganization which was formally established 
in 1919 b> Prof. 1.. A. Butts, Dr. Howard 
W. Gould, Dr. P. L. Jones. J. Bertram 
Harmon, and Dr. A. II. Lochner. 'Phis was 
not the first time such an organization was 
established at McKendree College. Shortly 
after tin Civil War a Bachelors' Fraternity 
was organized, and it is from this group 
that the present fraternity developed. 

Prof. I.. A. Butts, who is principal of 

the Belleville, Illinois. Junior High School. 
and who was a former instructor in the 
summer session at the college, is the present 
faculty sponsor. 

The jiurpi.se of the fraternity is primarily 
to establish fraternal and social relation- 
ships among the members. 




OFFICERS 

Chairman Robert Kurrus 

Vice-Chai man Duane Hortin 

Recorder-Tnasurer Jordan Fink 

Sergeant-at-Arms Loren V oung 



' t I ? > 

I : f f • t ■ f - 1- ■ 



right Bradham, 
:•■ . . Il.iff-tiill.-r. ( 
Zook, Prof McClur 




OFFICERS 

President Harry Lang 

Secretary-Treasurer Albert Nattsas 

Vice-President Milford Miltenberger 



ALPHA MU OMEGA 

The Alpha Mu Omega Fraternity, a local 
organization, was established at McKen- 
dree College in 1924, and has grown to its 
present membership of twenty-four. The 
organization has as its faculty sponsors 
Professors Claude E. Vick, head of the 
department of education, and Wesley Ket- 
tlekamp, former professor of history in the 
college. 

The purpose of Alpha AIu Omega is to 
further the spirit of fellowship, fidelity to 
brother members, and loyalty to the school. 
It sponsors social gatherings and outings 
throughout the year, and gives an annual 
banquet shortly before the the close of the 
school year in June. 




Top Ro-j.; left to 
Middle Row— a. : 
Bottom Row — Wil 



l'agc Fifty-fir 



Y. W. C. A. 

Christ said. "1 have come that ye might 
have life, and have it more abundantly," 
The purpose of the Y. W, C. A. is to help 
each ^irl on the hill to live, in its fullness. 
the abundant life — socially, culturally, and 
spiritually. 

The McKendree Y. W. C. A. was organ- 
ized on Februan 3, 1899. Every woman 
student in the college is considered a mem- 
ber. The group meets regularly at 6:45 each 
Wednesday evening in Clio Hall for short 
devotional and discussion meetings. 

The Y. W. C. A. sponsors the Girls' Jam- 
In >rc<. at the opening of school in Septem- 
ber, and the Big and Little Sister movement. 
It joins the Y. M. C. A. in first-week activi- 
ties, the Hallowe'en frolic. Easter sunrise 
services, and Christmas and Easter plays. 





i ABINET 
riohl Burgc, M irlin, I ai '.I.. Mow.-, Kershner. 

II , t , .. i (i. i v iponsor), Walton, Mi w i 



(faculty s|h,„s„>i. 




V. 



C. A. 



OFFICERS 

President - Samuel 

Vice-President Hugh : 

Secretary Clayton 

Treasurer Lee 



The Y. M. C. A. attempts to seek out 
the spiritual and social needs of the men 
students on the campus, and administer to 
Them whenever possible. It was established 
in 1897, and its membership includes all the 
men students in the college. Professor Ray- 
mond Huck is the faculty sponsor of the 
organization. 

One of the most succesful projects of the 
V. M. C. A. this year has been the sending 
of deputation teams into surrounding towns, 
where they conduct the Sunday evening 
services in various churches. 

Each year the Y. M. C. A. joins with the 
Y. W. C. A. in publishing the "Ys' McKen- 
drean," containing helpful hints, the Alma 
Mater song, college yells, freshman rules, 
directions, time tables, and other items of 
interest to new as well as to old students. 




Top Ro-u 
Middle 



left to right— Meado 



CABINET 
Walton, Gieseke, 



Roie— Whitlock, Howe, McNelly, Me 



Prof. Huck, lie 



SIGMA BETA RHO 

Sigma Beta Rho, the successor of the 
Oxford Club, is the ministerial fraternity on 
the hill, h was founded in the fall of 1931, 
with a charter membership of eleven. Its 
present membership numbers ten ministerial 
students and five honorary members, the 
latter being President Harmon, Dr. Walton, 
Rev. Todd, Rev. Bennett, ami Prof. Garvin. 
Dr. Walton is the faculty sponsor. 

The real purpose of Sigma Beta Kim is 
to promote scholarship, brotherhood, am! 
religious faith among the ministerial stu- 
dents. Its bi-monthly meetings serve to 
deepen devotional life ami to arouse anil 
answer pertinent questions of value in the 
ministry. The fraternity has sponsored 
monthly chapel services, an annual banquet, 
and a questionnaire to certain of the min- 
isters of the conference. 




Howe 

:adows 

Dwlc 




Page Pifty eight 








"M" CLUB 

The "M" Club includes in its membership 
any student who has earned a college letter 
in athletics and who has been initiated into 
the club. 

The purpose of the organization is to 
present to all graduating seniors an emblem 
denoting the earning of a letter. One em- 
blem is given each senior for each sport in 
which he has earned a letter. 



-Josef Sptidich 



mm* 



Top Row, left to right- 
Middle Row— Moorman 
Bottom Roil- — Kurrus, 



nidt. Xattsas, Miltenberger, Bra. 

ichalla, Sooy, Todd. 

elis, Spudich, Fulkerson, Brock. 



t'ayc Fifty-nine 






/ rf' M 



WOMEN'S QUARTET 
£,*/« r. n"fl»* — First soprano, Junealda Frcy; Second soprano, Alice Matlack; Fi 
Second alto. Marion Harmon. 



alto, Gertnnlc Huey; 



WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB 

The Women's Glee Club, directed by Miss Pauline Harper, makes an annual 
tour through surrounding towns for the purpose of advertising the college. In 
the spring of each year an opera is presented by the Men's and Women's Glee 
L'hihs. jointly. The musical program for die year is concluded by an oratorio, 
which, with the help of the Lebanon chorus, is given on the Sunday evening before 
O immencement. 




, ,1 ■ il : ,, 1 1. , ,.. li . In ii, st, venaon, 

cr, Bacr, n, Mi I lain, AbbIii 

in. Iman, Walton, (jilkison, Kce 




Left to right — First 
Donald Kline. 



MEN'S QUARTET 
rack Pfeffer; Second tenor, Gordon I 
Second Semester, George Goodman.) 



MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

The Men's Glee Club was organized for the same purpose as the Women's, 
to advertise the college, and, like its sister organization, makes an annual one-week 
tour, presenting programs at various churches. 

New members, filling the vacancies left in the Glee Clubs each year by old 
members who do not return to school, are chosen by the director, Miss Pauline 
Harper, by means of competitive examination. 




Top Roil; left to right — Lang, Kline, Bennett, Pfeffer. 

Middle Row— McNelly, Nichols, Eaton, Behrens, Howe. Huffstutler, Goodman. 

Bottom Row— Whitlock, Manwaring, Beers, Jones, Presley, Ausbrook, Isaac, Ropieque 



Page Sixty-one 



BAND 



nets 

Forrest Clark 
Lero) Dude 
Bedros Levonian 
Jake Strieker 
F.\ ihii 1 )erwelis 



Mclophones 

Martha Kershner 
Carolvn Marshall 



Director — Donald Kline 

Saxophones 

Gertrude 1 tuey 
Martha 1 [owe 

Trombones 

Dale Whitehurst 
Mary Margaret Carson 

Bass 
Harold Whitlock 



Clarinets 

Emil Freeh 
Shirley Nichols 
Leroy Hasemann 
Wilma Schneider 

Rachel Marshall 



Drums 

William Bennett 
Harrv Lewis 



The McKendree College Hand was organized in 192<>. and has been increasing 
in membership since that time. This year it consists of twenty members, and is 
sponsored by Professor ( ). H. Kleinschmidt, director of the department of music. 

The band, whenever possible, accompanies the football team to its games 
away from the home held, and furnishes music for all the home games. It also 
takes part in special school programs. 




|'i ch, w lull'" l . II' 
R M ,i hall, ( 



Strii ker, I larl . Derwcli 



ORCHESTRA 



J'iolins 

Faith Baer 
Mildred Beutelman 
John Dorko 
Harold Whitlock 

Drums 

William Bennett 

Baritone 
Carolyn Marshall 



Director — Hope Baku 



Piano 

Kathleen Pifer 
Marjorie Keen 

Saxophones 

Certrude Huey 
Martha Mowe 



C or nets 

Forrest Clark 
Leroy Dude 

Clarinets 

Leroy Hasemann 
Rachel Marshall 
Wilma Schneider 

Trombone 
Mary Margaret Carson 



The orchestra plays an important part in the musical activities of the college, 
and affords excellent training in ensemble work. It furnishes the music for plays, 
operas, May Fete, and other special occasions on the hill. 




Standing, left to 

Seated— Beutelma 



right — Dorko, Bennett, Kline, Baer, Clark, 
n, Whitlock, Baer, C. Marshall, Carson, Hucy, Mowe, K. Marshall. 



Page Sixty-thr 



NATURE CLUB 

The Nature Club of McKendree College 
was organized in l l '2i> by Dr. Edwin Rollin 
Spencer. Professor of Biology, who is the 
sponsor of the organization at the present 
time. There are no special qualifications 
for membership in the club, and anyone 
interested is invited to join and to attend 
the meetings, which are held every Wednes- 
day evening at 7 :30. 

The purpose of the Nature Club is to 
improve the campus and to give the mem- 
bers a fuller appreciation of nature. Two 
years ago the club began to build a rock 
garden. Last year a lily p ol anil rustic 
bridge were added to the garden. Every 
Year the members make a trip to the Mur- 

President. 

physboro (Grand) Canyon and bring back Secretary 
wild plants for the campus. The latest proj- Program 
ect of the Nature Club has been a flower- 
bed contest, designed to beautify the back 
campus. 




■Treasur 
Chairma 



Le 

..Aide 



t t ft^tttt* 



II I Crallcy. \\ h t'.o 1 ., [)i anek, Urn 

Hard, Whitlock, Cohen, Acimciim, Williams, I r, Reader, Ci 

... Harmon. 

Uintclnian, Kernhni , Facob, Martiahua, Crallc, Kuanp, Brock. 



Page Sixty-font 



FORENSICS 



DEBATE SQUAD 

The debate squad has had an extensive program this year. Besides home 
debates and those at near-by schools, four members of the squad, Mary McClain, 
Helen Saegesser, lack Goodpaster, and Wendell Hoover, accompanied by Coach 
Evelyn McNeely, made a three-day tour to Macomb and Carthage, Illinois, carry- 
ing on a series of debates with Western Illinois State Teachers College and Car- 
thage College. 

Seven contestants from McKendree College entered the province convention 
of l'i Kappa Helta, held at Des Moines, Iowa, April 12, 13, 14, 1933. The men's 
debate team. Paul Meadows and Jack Goodpaster, went to the quarter-finals in 
the- tournament, and the women's team, Bernetta Joseph and Helen Saegesser, 
went to the semi-finals. Miss Joseph also won second place in women's extem- 
pore speaking. Mildred Wilkin, winner of the Illinois state oratorical contest; 
Gaylon Howe, and Wendell Hoover represented McKendree at the convention 
in women's oratory, men's oratory, and men's extempore speaking, respectively. 




I h, Mi 

How.-. Bu 



W hitloi k, llcrtcimti 
lai li Mi N'ccly, Hoo 



,,,. Goodpaster, McClnin 
i i. Si hmetlnkc 



ORATORY 



For the second time in two years McKendree College has won a first place 
in the Illinois State Oratorical Contest. In 1932 Donald Moore won this distinc- 
tion in men's orations, and this year Mildred Wilkin received the gold medal in 
the women's division. 

The contest was held on February 9th and 10th at Augustana College, Rock 




Island, Illinois. Eleven schools were entered, all members of the Illinois State 
Oratorical Association. 

Miss Wilkin's oration, entitled King Coal Is Starving, dealt with the impov- 
erished condition of the coal miners and the inefficiency of their unions. 



Winners in the women's division were as follows: First, McKendree Col- 
lege ; second, Augustana College ; third, Bradley Tech. 



PLATONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



This marks the eighty-fourth year of the Platonian Literary Society. Since 
its modest beginning in April, 1849, it has continued active, ami is now one of the 
prominent organizations on the hill, being composed of twenty-one members. 

Changes of officers are made each six weeks' period. Seniors are favored 
for the office of president, and each senior member usually has the opportunity 
to serve one term in that capacity. 

Regular meetings are held on Monday evening of each week. Visitors are 
welcomed to the "< (pen Session." which is held on the first regular meeting night 
of each month. 

The prime aim of the Platonian Literary Society is to promote intellectual 
and social interest, not only among its membership, but throughout the student 
body. Via Sapientiae is the motto of Plato and the watchword of every loyal 
Platonian. 




rol cr, II I ii I on, Dorl o, Urown. Harmon. 

i. ,odpa ti i. Hi rtcn lein, tt liitloi I . Moi Ic'.i 
i o Vouiik, I). Jack on, llroi I. 



Pane Sixty ciuht 



PHILOSOPHIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

Established in 1837, the Philosophian Literary Society is the oldest organ- 
ization on the campus, and the oldest literary society west of the Alleghenies. 
For nearly a century Philo's weekly meetings have been held for the "mutual 
improvement of its members in oratorical attainments and scientific and literary 
pursuits," Philosophians striving to work toward the motto on its star, Dctur 
Digniori. 

Philo points with reasonable pride to its leaders — United States senators, 
judges, a foreign minister, and scores of others, including heroes of three wars 
and eleven college presidents. 

Rut Philo does not live in the past alone. Last year the Triennial Banquet 
was a decided success, and this year the regular meetings, open sessions, and 
annual Chautauqua were all well attended and ably presented. The present active 
membership is twenty-six. 



f | f » 




Top Roil; left to right— Lawler, Joyce, Gieseke, Bierbaun 
Middle Row— Mercer, Lewis Cralley, Sanders, Meadows. 
Bottom Row— Dude, McNelly, Bennett, Hortin, Hard, Cla 



ch, Sharp. 
Walton, Le 



CLIONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

The Clionian Literarj Society, established in 1869 with fourteen charter 
members, is the only women's literary association cm the hill. It meets in regular 
closed session in Clio Hall on each Monday evening. The second meeting of each 
month, however, is an open session to which visitors are welcomed. ( )fficers are 
elected each six weeks, with the exception of the treasurer, who retains her office 
throughout the year. 

Quoting from the Constitution of the society, "The object for which this 
society is formed is for the cultivation of moral, social, and literary refinement, 
music, both instrumental and vocal, debate, and acquisition of knowledge of parlia- 
mentary usages." Clio's motto is Virtute ct Lahore, virtue and labor. The pro- 
gram of the organization during the school year includes the Clionian reunion at 
Home-coming, an annual banquet, and. an Exhibition Program during Commence- 
ment week, which "ives a resume of the activities of the society during the year. 




U Doolcn, Mangum, Williams, Marti: 

I'ifi ., Heely. 

A'hit'.ocl Cohen, Hoar, I) ntc Iman, Sanders, Sclin 
tValton, Hall. 

Ueutelman, Hal Clements, Wilkin, Burgc, Kcrshncr, Harmon, 



ATHLETICS 






'ftitf (&+&■- UJ J. -fct**oi A~~l 



X^^yUf o^ul*. , ^u.-^m-«. <^c 



it^us*-*-**^,**. 







OlA 




-SI 






^^*y. JLJL ^ &AA~% 3 
CO-CHAMPIONS, THE "LITTLE 19"— McK BE ARC J^YS^tiUU yij 

THEY KNOW THE AURA OF^****^- -<&«■*■£__ 

THE ALL-STAR ^ /A 

JOSEPH SPUDICH, Sawyerville, Senior J V 

Halfback, Paragraph First All-Star; \ : u\\W/ioo6, too — 
back, ( ;;i/,-</ Pn'w All-Star and Associated 
Press c econd All-Star; Voted Squad's Most /, 
Valuable Player; Four-letter Man. /^g^J^i 

"A i tram scouM N- complete wthoui Spudich's , / 

presence. Here is a fine all-around football player, \. / 

speedy, •o-.s/ei :l x and^a great defensive oack£ ^ ^\/ 

l.il.i the 




Fred Young, PANTAGRAPH. 
he list of the Purple's grid immortals goe 
His place will nut be filled. 



;RSON, Carmi, Junior 
ptain, Pantograph First 
Mention, Associated 
;s Selections. 

ml, the sparkplug of .-lr( 

■. He has all the qualities 

■adcr and not only h a top- 

d ball carrier himself. His 

1,1 not have been improved upon, 

call over Bill Nicolet, Shurtleff's 

,1 athlete." — Fred Young, I'AN'TA- 



gh, ,u 
[e had t 
ny Bearcat. 



fying Doole 



faith 



ELMER TODD, Capl., Plesflant 11 

Halfback, Associated Press First All-Star 
Honorable Mention United Press and Pan- 
tograph Selections. 

"A wheel h rse, hard to equal in ■niv backfield." 

—A. P. 
"</ur idea is to stop Todd. . . . He's a star, that 
fellow. . . . He knows how to ran on the football 
field ju-t as well as on the tack.— I. Conzelman, 
Washington U. Coach. 

Todd cann- back in great style, after a 
mediocre season in 1931. He beat S. I. 
N. U. alm,,>t single-handed. 



RTHUR H. DOOLEN, Coach. Kinmundy. 

"Doolcn, a graduate of Kansas State College, where 
was rated one of the best football and basketball 
lycrs in the .Missouri Valley, in the short space of 
rce rears, lias brought McKendree to the top of 
• heap. His football coach was Charley Bachman, 
,1 he employs the Notre Dame shift." 

Fred Young, PANTAGRAPH. 



And off the field he's the "princ 
Od fellows." 



(Continued on Pi 




r~ --~ i "j*-f?V 








uo .odd, Kurru . Miltcntergcr, pudich. Row Two- Fulkt 

., „ halla. M..„rtn:.n, I'landi . . [Jcrweln Row Three Ropieqt 

I . . Hill, Mauck, Bradham, Rubeua, Hoi 



> 



McK 19, SCOTT FIELD 0; 



—AND THEY WERE MENTIONED, 
TOO 

ROBERT KURRUS, East St. Louis, Seniot 
Guard, Honorable Mention Pantograph Se- 
lection ; Four-letter Man. 



# y fry \ v • ? V£ 



"Kurrt 
McKcndr 

ference e 



ratal the outstanding pcrfor 
ned on var 



the 



for the lest two 
has been just as outstanding 
Frei. Young, PAXTAGRAPH. 



When he 
kerson gave 
"The Hutch 



We think Kur 



FRANK GRUCHALLA, Benld, Junior 

Center, Honorable Mention Pantograph St 
lection. 

Frank was "over the ball" nearly every minute o 
the season's play. The Gruchalla of 1932 represent 
tile greatest development of Doolen's regime. An 
1933 should be his greatest year. 



OAKLEY BRADHAM, Xenia, Sophomore 

Halfback, Honorable Mention, Pantograph 
Selection. 

"Old Ironfoot" entered the limelight with a 91- 
yard jog for touchdown on the opening kickoff at 
Cape. He stayed there through the 
vision greatly handicapped him, but he 
portant cog in a powerhouse backfleld. 










ARTHUR E. HORTIN, Asst. Coach 
Albion 
"Cap" went to the footwall wars four yeE 
McKendree, captaining the 1931 team. He played 
his part in the great offensive of 1932 
dergraduate days, he "played 
played 'er square." 



first qu 



defeated Scott F 



9JU-JL aM^^- 
run ^J^- 



"Usimj SI men, McKendree, with the varsity playing in o 
19-0, on Hypes Field."— St. Lcuis POST-DISPATCH". 

The Purple's power was revealed in this first contest under the floodlights 
Bradham, Spudich, and Covington scored the touchdowns, ably backed by th< 
brilliant play of Todd, Gruchalla, Kurrus, Soov and Brock. -^f-a " 

"A 91-yard run for touchdown on the ooening kickoff by that flashy halfback, Oakley Bradham, gave /J „ - 

McKendree a 6-0 victory over Cahc at Houck Field Stadium before 2,000 persons, including five hundrcdy /} . Q 
Boy Scouts."— The SOUTHEAST MISSOURIAN. 

(Continued on Page 111) 



K 



fjdJLxS 




drV^ 



!$*,** 



<2 ^^Le^f<A- '• 






Fatje Seventy-thr 




cK.'O. ST. LOUIS 25: McK. 21. CHILLICOTHE 2 



AN END, A TACKLE, AND A 
COUPLE <>F BACKS 

GEORGE MOOKM \X. Edwardsville, Junior 
Tackle; Captain-Elect, 1933. 

With just a little more color. Moorman would be 




He'll 



.f 111, 



alked about tackles 
ebuildinR the left side of 
iier job. 



in t lu- 
lu- line 



CARL BROCK, Cisne, Senior 

End. 

Ml Kcndree's besl offensive end, Brock and his 
jumping jack tactics have been a source of wonder 
and amusement for four years. Can be block a tackle? 
Ask one Normal star! 



CHARLES RUBESA, St. Louis. Freshman 
Halfback. 



11 



d school late but developed rapidly 



>RRY COVINGTON, St. Louis, Freshman 

Half Lack. 

Covington ran well for McKendree in several 
Hi- bip action is his distinuiiisliinR feature. 



lie 



. tb 



Be 



"The fact that Ih score was only 25-0 testifies not to the weakness of the Billikens but to the strength 
ts."- .1. M. Gould, referee, m the St. L,ouis POST-DISPATCH. 

' Inh reserve strength of St. Louis doomed McKendree to a glorious defeat 
that starlit night in Walsh Stadium before 5,000 fans. The Purple gave as good 
as it took tin- first half, the Billikens leading hut (i-O. It carried the ball to the 
opponents' four-yard line just as the half ended. Power, alone, wore out the 
Toddmen the final half. Todd, Spudich, Bradham and Fulkerson were brilliant, 
defensively. 

' n's laddvbuck.t smashed their way to a 21-2 victory over Chillicothe—the moral for all Little 19 
teams should he 'don't let the Bearcats get started'." — Fred Young. PANTAGRAPH. 

The regulars punched over three touchdowns in the game's final ten minutes 
after the reserves had yielded a safety in the third period. Todd scored the first 
touchdown; Spudich the last two. The game was a thriller fur the six minutes 
after Chillicothe scored. 




McK. 13, WASHINGTON 6; McK. 20, S. I. N. U. 7 

—TWO ARE GONE, RUT TW( ) 
REMAIN 

HENRY DERWELIS, 




'■irv were just outmatincd."— Jimmy Conzelman, WashinRton U. Coach, to Walter W. Smith, St. 
Louis STAR and TIMES. 

Two Rearcat touchdowns, resulting from long runs, after Washington had 
been completely fooled on the plays about to be sprung, gave McKendree her 
sweetest victory of the season. From punt formation, Todd ran eighty-nine yards 
for the first score. Spudich ran thirty yards for the second on a fake buck. 
When Washington made first and ten on McKendree's five-yard line in the last 
period, substitute linemen, Hrasky, Flanders, Rauth and Larsh, yielded but two 
vards in four plays. Kurrus took sweet revenge on his former teammates. 



first til 



McKendr 



vnd-half rally 



"For 
sault, triumphed over Southern State Teachers. 20-7."— Feed Young, referee, in the PAXTAGRAPH. 

It was home-coming at Carbondale that night for Rradham — he even caught 
forward passes — and Captain Todd dragged Maroon plavers all over the field. 
S. I. N. U. had led at the half, 7-0. 




Koerner fails to gain 
No. 8 is Moorm 

Fagc Scventy-fi 



Spudich is helmetle 



McK. 13, SHURTLEFF 0; McK. 27, ELMHURST 7 

MISS( >URIANS AND EAST 
SIDERS— 

MILFORD MILTENBERGER, Beatrice, 
Neb., Senior 
End. 

"Milt," a transfer from Central Wesleyan (Mo.), 
mil) tackled one season for the Purple, but Ins work, 
1932, was .i tremendous help. We'll miss you. Mil- 

HENRI COMFORT, St. Louis. Freshman 

End. 

The foe seldom kmw when Spudich would pret ..ft' 
a .ini.'k kick. All they saw was a soaring ball and 

tin lone strides of Comfort, .lown fast. He was a 
-tar in mid-season. 




HOWARD LARSH 
Tackle. 

Injuries to Cianciolo s a\ 
I lay regularly 



E. St. Louis. /•' 



tin 



JAMES HI 
Guard. 

There was 



The 



talkative freshman a 
s presence iliil not 
t a harder fighter on 



ASK 1 !', East St. Louis, Freshman 

n extra 200 pounds of beef in the for- 
•n Hrasky fi'led a guard. He showed 
'ashington I'., and thereafter was Doo- 
:e for a guard reserve. 



straight conference games, went down, 13-0, before McKcndrec's title- 
•mc-coming game."— St. Louis GLOBE-DEMOCRAT. 

The home-coming tilt definitely established McKendree as a contender for 
titular honors. Fulkerson made his first college touchdown in the final period. 
Comfort intercepted a lateral pass and ran forty yards over the goal line, but an 
official's mistaken whistle called back the play. McKendree had the ball on the 
Pioneers' five-yard line when the game ended. 

"McKcndrec'i r, rva d • nearly nil tin- work In the achieving of a 27-7 verdict over Elmhurst." 

—Belleville NEWS-DEMI K HAT. 

( Ipening with only three regulars, McKendree had no trouble downing the 
Pirates. Gruchalla played the best game of his career. Kurrus, Fulkerson, and 
Spudich. were up to usual standard, and reserves, Covington, Wilson, .May, l.arsh. 
and Rauth, made good showings. 




, ignals ami 

.lie w. II. him: 



McK. 50, CHARLESTON 6; McK. 6, NORMAL 






i 




■'Coach H, 
the McKcn, 
can pick th 
Charleston 



Hancock, State No 
spuad, and that the 
if and lav them dou 



RAUTH 

MAY 

i at Charleston looking 

Big and powerful, with boxs 

top-notch aggregation." — H. V. Mil] 



McKcndrcc tea 
REVIEW. 

The Purple's grid powerhouse, under full steam, tore through the defense 
of the Eastern Teachers on a muddy field for eight touchdowns — the largest score 
recorded during the year in the conference. The regulars scored four times the 
last period. 

■■McKcndrcc has a fine team. They really played belter than my boys. And zee played one of our 
best games of the year, too." — Coach Howard Hancock, State Normal. 

With but one to go and victory meaning an undefeated, untied conference 
record, Doolen's battlers carried the ball ninety yards down a freezing field at 
Normal to win, 6-0. "Ole 23" and Spudich, from the six-inch mark, provided 
the margin. Spudich thus gained the honor of scoring all the points in both his 
first and last games for McKendree. Brock and Kurrus combined to take out 
Thomas, star Normal tackle, time after time on the drive to the goal. 










Up 



wm 



ball against Shurtleff. 
t the Pioneers many ys 



City flash is making 



BASKETBALL 




ELMER TODD, Pleasant Hill 

Senior. Captain and Guard 



MILFORD MIL.TENBERGER, Beatrice, Neb 
Senior, Center 



CLEVE STROH, Mt. Carmel, 

Sophomore, Captain-elect ami Forward 

His specialty is the 



Stroll leil Doiil 
hard-pressed conu 



shot. 



WOODROW FULKERSON, Carmi, 
Junior, Guard 



■HOPE SPRINGS ETERNAL " 

Failing to win a single conference game in nine starts and losing eleven of 
sixteen during the season. McKendree experienced one of her poorest basketball 
seasons in years — a complete reversal of form from football. Loss of her captain, 
Todd, and Miltenberger, star center, at semesters, through ineligibility, left Doolen 
with sophomores and freshmen to battle through the toughest part of his schedule. 
He developed a fast breaking, good shooting, snappy passing outfit whose weak- 
ness was defense. Ten of twelve lettermen will be back next year. 




ywWfck 



l|^ftJPtt 



11 Moore. Die Itmann, shannon, Gamm 

Ho lin. 

i i !■! ft", : K iIji i, I ipl Todd, Mo 



.li/. Bo r. Manwaring, Ass'l Coach 
Mi'.lenbergi r, Si ott, Stroll 



/',;,/,- Seventy riylu 



BASKETBALL 



KENNETH SCOTT, Marissa, 
Sophomore, Guard 

"Scotty" became a regular after h 
ihe Charleston game at home. His pi; 
orful; "effortless" best describes it. 
ball off the backboard and work it dc 



JACK PFEFFER, Lebanon, 
Junior, Forward 



A scrapper, Pfeffer, a lett 


erman retu 


■ned t 




100I 


after absence, won his sec 


ond letter. 


He 


has 


the 


height and speed to become 


a star. 









REX GAMMON, Kirimundy, 
Sophomore, Forward 



"Doc," the Bearcats' har 
letter. He excels at the fre 


dyman 
throw 


li 


".' 


his 


GEORGE MOORMAN 


Edw 


ar 


lsville, 


Junior, Guard 










The football captain-elect 
winning his first cage letter. 


became 
He is 


I 


gu 


o-spo 
ard % 




^Jl ft ****** 

lUt ^ l&JL 



} 



THE TALE OF A CRACKER BOX— OLD EISENMAYER 

McKendree's cage record was poor. But her scoring was enough to win, 
ordinarily. Her scorers averaged 33 points per game, but allowed their opponents 
nearly 40. A tightened defense should win games next season. 





NON-CONFERENCE 






CONFERENCE 




McKendr 


e 52, Blackburn 28. 




McKendr 


ee 39, Shurtleff 44. 




McKendr 


ee 15, Cape Teachers 42. 




McKendr 


ee 34, S. I. N. U. 48. 




McKendr 


ee 43, Flat River 31. 




McKcmli 


ee 18. S. I. N. U. 46. 




McKendr 


ee 40, Livingston Booster 


31. 


McKendr 


ee 40, Charleston 57. 




McKendr 


ee 34, Blackburn 26. 




McKendr 


ee 26, Illinois College 


30 


McKendr 


ee 43, Flat River 40. 




McKendr 


ee 26. Millikin 38. 




McKendr 


ee 22, Livingston Booster 


30. 


McKendr 
McKendr 
McKendr 


ee 31, Carthage 59. 
ee 31. Charleston 41. 
ee 33, Shurtleff 43. 






takes a crack at the Shurtleff basket, at Alton. He is front, left. Stroh 



faye Sevcnts-ni; 



BASKETBALL 




EURUS STOLTZ, Mt. Carmel, 
Sophomore, Center 
"Red" was a hettc nlaver after a 



.1 In 



II, 



KENNETH WILSON, Granite City. 
Freshman, Forward 

basketball as in football 



i, lint freshr, 



ul .It.l 



II, 



clos 
than his 



of his lack of height 



lie 



Stroll's heels 
.-. defensively. 



CHARLES RUBESA, St. Louis, 
Freshman, Guard 



Kubesa's ball-handling was intriguing. He 
orers ... conference games. Highly indiv 
as the center of most offensive rallies. 


led 
dua 


OUIS BOST, Granite City, 




Freshman, Guard 




A left-hander with a hook pass untelie 
leed. lie should he a star in future years. 


vabl 



SEVERAL CLOSE ONES 

Tin- Purple's hardwood season was disappointing. The old story — a winner 
looks good; a loser poor — held true, in general, but McKendree won and lost 
several excellent games — in point of interest. 

Miltenberger's under-basket work won the first Livingston game in the 
closing minutes. The Cats had Shurtleffs Pioneers tied up 38-38, only to lose 
b) five points, at Alton. They led the Wood's outfit at the half and 30-25 in the 
second half at Lebanon, only to lose by ten points when a change of line-up clicked 
for Shurtleff. Wilson and Stroh shot final second baskets to win over Flat River 
at home. The P.ears were roundly outplayed by the Southern and Eastern 
Teachers in traditional games. 




TRACK 

Six lettermen — Spudich, Kurrus and Fink, seniors; Captain Frank Gruchalla 
and Nattsas, juniors ; and May, sophomore, were on hand when Coach Doolen 
started track and field work this spring. Almus Caruthers, state high school and 
Illinois U. freshman champion distance runner, was the only outstanding new- 
comer. Bradham, Fulkerson, Moorman, Presley, W. Routh, Whiteside and Zook 
were prospects. Miles, Jackson, Singer and Wilson were freshmen to break into 
notice in tryouts. 

Gruchalla and Caruthers early gained distinction indoors. The former placed 
first in the shot in the Little 19 meet at North Central College, Naperville, March 
11, with a 40 foot, 6^ inch put. March 25 he was fourth in the shot at the Con- 
cordia Turners meet in the Coliseum, St. Louis, with 39 feet, 5 inches. Caruthers, 
the same night, took the mile run in 4 minutes, 45 seconds, nosing out W. R. 
Swartz, former Missouri U. star. 

Gruchalla, Caruthers and Fulkerson scored 26 of McK's points in her first 
outdoor meet, a dual affair lost to Washington U. by 31-100 on Hypes Field 
April 19. Caruthers won the 880 and mile; Gruchalla won the discus and second 
in the shot; Fulkerson won the 100 and second in the 220. Other Purple scorers 
were : Nattsas, third in 440 ; Bradham, third in 100 ; Whiteside, third in high 
hurdles; Todd, third in broad jump; Zook, third in low hurdles; Fink and Spu- 
dich, tied for third in pole vault. 

Gruchalla, Fulkerson and Whiteside starred as McK lost to SINU at Car- 
bondale, 27y 2 -\03 i /2, April 28. Gruchalla took firsts in shot and discus; Fulker- 
son first in 100, second in 220: Whiteside broke the McK all-time high jump 
record with a leap of 5 feet, 1134 inches. The latter also ran third in the high 
hurdles. Nattsas, Bradham, Harris, Zook, and Spudich won thirds, and Fink 
a tie for third. 

Three other meets were on the Purple's schedule, all at home. 




Huge Eighty-one 



MEN'S TENNIS 

In Bost and Pfeffer the McKendree men's tennis teams' strength seems to lie 
this season. Both are players of considerable experience, although the former 
is but a freshman. Pfeffer has played a season for the Purple. Lewis, Hamm. 
and l'eers are entering their second season of competition, while Hoover is a 
freshman. Home-and-home matches have been scheduled with SI XI' and Illinois 
College; single ones with Shurtleff and Blackburn. Prof. Raymond lluck has 
charge of the squad. 

Illinois College proved victorious at Lebanon. April 22, winning live matches 
against lack Pfeffer's singles triumph. Lewis lost to Hirth, 0-6, 3-6; Lfeft'er 
defeated Chenoweth, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2; Hamm lost to Kothen. 0-6, 2-<>; Hoover lost 
to Moriarty, 2-i>. 5-7. In the doubles, Lewis and Pfeffer lost to Hirth-Moriarty, 
2-6, n-2. 4-0; Hamm-Hoover lost to Rothen-Chenoweth, 4-6, 5-7. A return match 
with the I. C. squad at Jacksonville was called oft", April 29, on account of rain. 



The remainder of the schedule: 

\;>ril 28 — Shurtleff, at Lebanon. 

May 6—1. I. A. C. District Tryouts, 
nois College, Jacksonville. 

Mav 12-1. I. A. C. Fimls. Western 

Teachers' College. Macomb. 



May 19— Southern Normal, at Carbondale. 

May 2(i — Southern Normal, at Lebanon. 
lime 3 — Blackburn, at Carlinville. 




LEW IS 



PROP HICK 



in 1ST 
BEERS 



Paat Eiahti 



WOMEN'S TENNIS 

The women's tennis squad is blessed with two players of four years' experi- 
ence each, Misses Mowe and Beutelman, both of Lebanon. Berdine Utley, fresh- 
man, gives promise of being another star. Martha Kershner is a senior playing 
her first year. Leona Jacob and Ruth Schmalenberger are sophomores competing 
their second season. Home-and-home contests have been scheduled with Illinois 
College, Blackburn, and Shurtleff . 

Miss Jacob was the only victor for McK against Illinois College at Jackson- 
ville, April 21. She defeated Miss Stout, 6-2, 6-2. Other scores were : Schmal- 
enberger lost to Iyaughry, 6-2, 5-7, 4-6; Kershner lost to Martin, 0-6, 1-6; Schmal- 
enberger-Schnyder lost to Laughry-Predgen, 2-6, 3-6 ; Jacob-Kershner lost to 
Graff-Martin, 6-3, 3-6, 4-6. 

Rain halted the Blackburn matches at Carlinville, April 29. Miss Beutelman 
had taken a 6-2 first set from Miss Weidman. The Schmalenberger-Kelly first 
set was at deuce, 5-5, game 30-love, with Miss Schmalenbergerr serving. Miss 
Kershner was leading Miss Woolley, 3-2. 



The remainder of the schedule : 

May 5 — Shurtleff, at Lebanon. 

M ay 13— I. I. A. C. Meet, Millikin, Uni- 
versity, Decatur. 

May 20 — Illinois College, at Lebanon. 



May 27— Shurtleff, at Alton. 
Tune 2 — Blackburn, at Lebanon. 




KERSHNER 
SCHNEIDER 



;hmalenbergek 

BEUTELMAN 



Page Eighty-thr 



INTRAMURAL 

Basketball, track, tennis and ping-pong were sports to attract intramural at- 
tention the past year. 

Basketball. — The A. M. 0. fraternity team finally won the ten-team race, 
winning eight games while losing but one contest. The Wimpies, with a seven- 
two record, were second. The Bachelor fraternity rive and a Faculty quintet 
were tied tor third with six and three. The Wimpies beat the winners 22-20. 
but the S. P. < i.'s. fourth placers, late in the season downed the Wimpies, 12-10. 
Then the Bachelors, winners of six straight after losing their first three games, 
whipped the Wimpies, 24-17. giving the A. M. O.'s the title. W. kauth, Bachelor 
forward, was high scorer in the league with 91 points. An all-star selection made 
by the Review, student publication, was composed of Kauth, Bachelor, and 
Schmidt. A. M. ( >.. forwards; Gruchalla. Bachelor, center; I). Harmon, Wimpies, 
and W. Wolfe, Maple Leaves, guards. R. llamm, W. Sanders, H. Comfort. V. 
Mason and H. Lang were named on a second five. 

Ping-Pong. — Dave Zook won the men's ping-pong championship, defeating 
Almus Caruthers three straight games in the final round. 

Track. — The funiors won the annual interclass meet, scoring 68 points. The 
Seniors were second with 39j^. The Sophs scored 34j^ and the Freshmen 23. 
The Sophs won the 880-yard relay, leading to the tape in order the Seniors, 
luniors and Frosh. Gruchalla, Juniors, scored 22 points alone. Caruthers, Soph, 
had IN: Fulkerson, Juniors, 14'..; Xattsas, Juniors, 14. Todd. Zook, Spudich, 
Fink, Kurrus. Brock, Dude and 11. Lang counted points for the Seniors; C.ru- 
challa, Fulkerson, Xattsas, Whiteside. W. Kauth and Moorman, for the Juniors; 
Caruthers, Bradham, May. Presley and Musgrove, for the Sophs; Singer. Jack- 
son. Miles, Comfort. Eaton, Wilson and J. Rauth, for the Freshmen. 

Tennis. As we go to press a men's tennis tournament with 28 entries is just 
beginning. 



Page Eighty four 



FEATURES 




Nope, it isn't Hobo 
Day. It's nist the A. 
M. O. pledges showing 
nl'f their instruments of 
torture. Doesn't (mis' 
beard look cute 5 



And Marjory poses 
for us down by the 
Country Club. Go and 
get on your bathing 
suit, Marjory. 



McKendree is beau- 

ti fill at any time, in the 
fond eyes of her stu- 
dents, but when these 
line old t r e e s are 
loaded with snow the 
campus takes on new 
romance. 



Yep, now it is 1 [obo 
Day, and I wish you'd 
look at the outfits 1 
You can't help but see- 
that gorgeous shirt of 
Mary Lou's, and the 
Spanish sash in which 
Pauline is draped. 



More Hobo Day, and 
here is Wilma in that 
beautiful old-fashioned 
dress perched on "the 
rock." Wilma, Wilma, 
don't you know our 
grandmothers didn't do 
such things? 



Iva l.ou and Dolly 
are smiling for you, 
Readers of the An- 
nual. 



No group ol snaps 

would be complete 
without a view of our 
bake Beautiful. It's 

just to,, bad l.oren had 
to pop into the picture 
and spoil it all. 



Alice tripping d o w n 

the walk, 
Won't you Stop a bit 

and talk"' 



/'*/-/,■ Riffhty 



CALENDAR 
1932-33 



SEPTEMBER 

5 — Cars are arriving and trunks are being heaved up the steps. Freshmen are wandering 
around, moon-eyed and wondering. 

6 — Upper classmen have begun to return. Old sweethearts are reunited. Big P. J. party in 
Clark Hall, and the Mule Barn is scene of stag pow-wow. 

7 — Why won't a major prof ever let a student take what he wants? Why does a guy have 
to have majors and minors, anyhow? Yes, we're registering today! To revive spirits 
the students are invited to a big marshmallow toast on the College road. "Please to 
meetcha". 

8 — Ugh ! Classes today. Everybody is getting out their best duds for tonight's the night 
of Prexy's big reception. 

9 — Bob is elected president of the Student Association. Ys' reception and plenty of punch. 

10 — One of those blessed Saturdays has rolled around. My — what's that rumpus over in 
Clio Hall? Oh, don't worry, it's just some Clionians cleaning up the place, and I'll be a 
horn-swoggled Dutchman if they're not down on their knees! But what are you waxin' 
the floor for? 

12 — Literary societies are holding their first meetings tonight. Listen to that tongue-wag- 
ging. They must have been saving up steam all summer. 

14- — Moonlight everywhere, and out on Nugent's Lake Alpha Psi members and their dates 
enjoy it, plus music. 

15 — More moonlight and firelight. Tonight is the Bachelors' weiner roast. As the victrola 
plays on and the fire grows low, romance thrives. 

16 — Big election in student chapel this morning. Harry is vice-president and Millie secre- 
tary-treasurer. 

19 — Big pep meeting tonight. We're betting on that team of ours. 

20 — Hurrah! First victory of the season! McKendree 19; Scott Field 0. 

21 — Millie, Eleanor, Mildred Beutelman, and Emma were in St. Louis, and decided to buy 
some little thing for Clio. Guess what it was? A great, big, beautiful rug! No wonder 
Clio Hall got a cleaning the other day. 

23 — Another victory for the Bears ! Even though the Cape Girardeau Indians did have the 
"Indian Love Call" sung to them before the opening whistle, the Purple hopped all over 
them to the tune of 6-0. 

2-1 — Many McKendreans off to the Methodist Conference at Flora. All the P. K.'s going 
around gritting their teeth for fear they'll have to move or won't get to. 

26 — Clio is busy showing off the new rug at its first open session tonight. 




— — And we really were 
| served our lunch one 

B| daj by this kind of 
mob!! Wally did con- 
sent to take off the 
pussy before he served 
the soup, though. 



Is Dude ever high 
hat? But Dude, my 
dear boy, how dare you 
appear on McKendree's 
quad in a tux before 
six o'clock! 



One hot afternoon 
last fall, the football 
men had to stop to mop 
Let ween signals out on 
Hypes Field, and here 
they are! Don't Woody 
ami Joe look chummy ? 



The morning after 
Hall o W e ' e n many 
strange things were 
seen on McKendree's 
campus. Remember the 
table anil chairs perched 
on top the kitchen? 
May just had to go up 
there to eat his lunch. 



Evelyn, Wilma, and 

Mary off to Watch a 
football game. We won 
the game, too. 



Our yell leaders 

three. "Yea, purple, 
yea, while, tight 'em !" 



"The llortins" in 
their wluie sweaters 
are out for a tramp in 
the snow. 



Joe always has I,, 

-.top 10 play wnh the 

cats ami 'dogs, and 

even the little calves. 
Boy, look ai thai <\<w- 
pie! 1 No wonder Mil- 
lie likes him. 



Page Highly tight 



27 — Get out all your gloves, co-eds. Doesn't matter if they don't match, you must wear 
gloves ; for today is the Faculty Dames tea at the Stowells. 

29 — What do you think happened today' Remember the girl who lives in South St. Louis 
whose father is a doctor? Yes, you're right. Ruth "Queenie" Habig is the girl. She's 
come back from Missouri Valley convinced that McKendree's the garden spot of the earth. 
You're right at that, Ruth. 

30 — McKendrce put everything she had into it, but still St. Louis U. won, 25-0. 



OCTOBER 

3 — Plato and Philo holding big open sessions. Which one is going to serve the best re- 
freshments? 

■1 — All morning the men were busily washing windows. Tonight is Carnegie Hall's open 
house. Plenty of punch and candy. 

6 — The august seniors elected Joe their president. Fink is their vice-president, and Martha 
Kershner gets to take care of their "monies". 

7— Beat Chillicothe, 21-2. 

11 — The Bachelors and A. M. O.'s thought that they were going to have a big dinner tonight. 
They had the dinner all right, but had to cut it short and attend the freshman party. 
Did the upper classmen break up the party? I'll say they did. 

IS — Washington U. won't forget McKendree in a long time. Prexy won't either, because 
today we defeated Washington 13-6. Joe and Todd were "going good", ami you should 
have seen Prexy during the game. 

16 — Everyone went thankfully to church. 

21 — Guess Carbondale won't forget us so soon. McKendree 20; S. I. N. U. 7. 



MOVING UP TO THE LINE 




%t*^>Q) 



Courtesy of St. Louis Globe-De 



MAY FETE 

Queen Mildred Beutelman 

Mildred Wilkin 

Eleanor Clements 
Martha Kershner 
Emma Walton 
Berenice Mowe 

Crew n Bearer Marylin Kettelkamp 

,ck liittncr 
ibbie Vick 
Dick Bittner 
Jenelle Kleinschmidt 

1 '.i^i s Harold Oppitz 

Marian \*ick 



Attendants 



Heralds.. 



THE PROGRAM 
Ceremonies in Honor of the Queen: 

Procession; Crowning of the Queen; Max Pole 
The Play, "The Prince Who Was a Piper", by H. 



lean Spencer 



1 >anee 
Brighouse. 



THE CAST 

The King Mary Lou Pharis 

Prince 1 lenis Elma Rollings 

JegU, The Lord Chancellor Fay Stanford 

Beniez, Equerry to Denis Mlene Mollenhauer 

\ Sentry Run line I'tley 

Princess Maie Pauline Lucas 

l.ezina, the governess -\rvilla Teagtie 

Tepliany, maid -in-waiting Catherine Gilkison 

Marzinne, a peasant girl Mary McClain 

llelene. a shoemaker's daughter Iva Lou Cralle 

I Catherine Absher 
Three peasant girls Martha Hinkle 

I Mary Knapp 
\ illagers. 

Scene : A palace garden. 

The Princess Maie has been betrothed by Iter father to Prince Denis, whom 
-he lias never seen. There is to be a public wedding in the palace garden. But 
the princess refuses to appear as a bride until she has seen the prince. She dis- 
guises herself as a statue to watch for him. Iiecause he has determined to marry 
for love, the prince disguises himself as a piper and comes into the garden 
searching for his true love. After being refused by many maidens who take men 
of greater wealth, he turns to his muses for solace, praying that he might turn 
marble to life with his music. The princess, tired of her pose, moves. The piper 
discovers that she loves him, and the princess learns his identity, and all ends 
as it should. 




: 



Marian Vick, In. V. Bit 
idl, Uobb) \ '•>. 



25 — Angel Roost open for inspection! My! My! The male pictures on display. 

27 — Six weeks' grades are out, 

2& — Hobo Day, and oh, those bums! The Hill really looks as if a depression is on. Rags 
and patches have certainly had their day. 

2°- — Home-coming Day, and din and color everywhere. Many old grads are back, and, before 
the stars ot yesterday, the stars of today won the football game from Shurtleft, 13-0. 
"Applesauce" ends a perfect day. 

31 — Fifteen new little Clio pledges with their red and white ribbons make their bow. 



NOVEMBER 

1 — Did you hear any noises last night? Guess it was spooks, because not a soul knew a 
thing about how those tables got on top of the kitchen. 

2 — Bologna and cheese sandwiches appeared at Bill's tonight, for each Clio pledge brought 
lunch for her date. What's this about the way to a man's heart? Could it be via bo- 
logna? 

5 — Everybody busy turning dials from this station to that to find out who won the game. 
At last! McKendree 27; Elmhurst 7. 

7 — Al Jones and Jane Kean married! Come on, we're going to the charivari! 

9 — Botany class goes to Shaw's Garden. 

12 — McKendree 50; Eastern Normal 6. 

15 — Snow, lots of it, and all the time it was flurrying down, McKendreans were looking 
pleasant before the box with the birdie. Judging by the results, the birdie bit a few. 

16 — Alpha Psi holding party at Country Club. 

19 — McKendree Bears defeat Normal 6-0, and tie with Wesleyan for Little Nineteen foot- 
ball championship. 

20 — "Business Sam" organized a "Y" hike for this afternoon. 

22 — Chicken, mashed potatoes, special salads, cranberry sauce, peas, oyster dressing, celery, 
olives, hot rolls, and mince pie. Mrs. Phillips wishes us all a nice Thanksgiving. 

23 — Off for the Thanksgiving turkey. 

28 — Ooh — isn't it awful to have to get up to that bugle again? We hear you. Dude. Quit 
blowin' it ! ! 

29 — Waiters and kitchen force fought it all out on the basketball court tonight. 



DECEMBER 

5 — Woody and Joe make "Brick" Young's all-state team. 

6 — The Lebanon Rotarians entertain the football men tonight at the Country Club. 

12 — The College Christmas tree is lighted. 

13 — "Quit pullin' my hair. Such hands !" "Don't eat so much of that cranberry sauce, 
Clem." It's just the little Ruggleses talking over at the "Birds' Christmas Carol" in 
the chapel. 

Page Ninety-one 



APPLESAUCE 

By Barry Connkrs 

Presented in the College Chapel, ( Ictober 20, 1932 



THE CAST 

Ma Robinson Marjorie Snow 

Pa Robinson Clifford Hertenstein 

Hazel Robinson Jane Jones 

Mrs. Jennie Baldwin Adelyn Martin 

Matt McAllister William Bennett 

Bill McAllister \lfred Jones 

Rollo Jenkins Leroy 1 hide 

Directed by Miss Agnes Howe 



The Home-coming play, the first of the year, provided a thrill of expectancy 
for its audience, still murmuring over the afternoon's gridiron victor)', as the 
curtain rose for the first act of "Applesauce." 

It was a comedy of typical small-town folk in which love and business played 
a large part. "Applesauce" ( die ability to tell others what fine people they really 
are i was made to surmount many obstacles. Ma Robinson was a "simple soul." 
while Pa was a veritable stormy petrel. Hazel, the beautiful young belle of the 
town, played havoc with the affections of the rich hut dogmatic Rollo Jenkins, hut 
favored the handsome and penniless Bill McAllister. The turbulent L'ncle Nat 
and Mrs. Jennie Baldwin, town gossip and busybody, completed the picture. 



Ipple 




'.MJ.Y'- M ■ I' I I • 

LEROY Him; 



ALFRED JONES CLIFPORD HERTENSTEIN 

JANE J 1 >N ES MARJORIE SNOW 



/',;./,• Ninety two 



1-1 — Leap year date night, and here's your last chance to propose, girls ! And were the co- 
eds ever lucky ! No need to scrape together enough money to take "him" to the show. 
Just tell him to hring along his activity ticket and drag him to the game. McKendree 
wins from Blackburn, 52-28, in the first contest of the season. Just too much going on 
tonight. Santa Claus came to the women's dormitory and left the inhabitants rattles, 
dolls, tops, and candy on their Christmas tree. 

IS — Football banquet. George chosen 1933 football leader; Joe named most valuable man 
on the 1932 team by his mates. 



JANUARY 

1 — Why can't vacations last forever? 

-1 — All New Year's resolutions broken already. 

5 — Intramural basketball begins. 

6 — Purple passers beat an independent team tonight, 30-21. 

11 — Preliminary oratorical contest. No one dared to go against Gaylon, and Millie won in 
the women's division. On to the State ! 

16-20 — Less said about this the better. Just one exam after another. And then it all ended 
by our getting beaten by Southern Normal. 

23 — Registration. 

2-1 — Classes. 

26 — Flat River came up and got beaten 43-40. 

27 — Joe elected president of the Student Association. 

29 — League had big party tonight. 

31 — Dean Hertenstein and Mrs. Phillips served an informal tea to all the women on the 
campus. 

FEBRUARY 

1 — Faculty scores hit with three one-act plays. 

2 — The seniors argue about rings. Bears trounce Greenville independent team. 

4 — Bears take it on the nose at Carbondale. 

5 — Has Bill taken your picture yet with his movie camera? 

10 — Millie wins first place in the women's division of the state oratorical contest. 
17 — Alpha Psi initiates Marjorie, Lora, Dude, "Musky", and Hertenstein at a party. 
21 — Some students went over to see "Rasputin" at the American Theatre. 
22 — George Washington tea in Clark Hall. 
23— Bears lose to Shurtleff, 43-33. 
27 — Teague and Bennett initiated into Clio. Mary Louise and Isabel joined last week. 



MARCH 
7 — "Kwitcherbelliakin" chautauqua. 
8 — Pi Kappa Delta pledge party. 

14 — Miss Martha Kershner requests the honor of your presence at a birthday party for 
Miss Phyllis Burge. 

16 — "Martha" appears before us in her long and flowing gowns and her bevy of court ladies. 



Hagc Nmetx-thr 



THE BIRDS" CHRISTMAS CAROL 

By Kate Douglas Wiggin 

Presented in the College Chapel, December 13, 1933 

THE CAST 

Carol Bird Louise Heely 

Mr. Bird : Wendell Hoover 

Mrs. Bird Ruth Habig 

lack Bird Gordon Beers 

Elfrida Clifford Lora Doolen 

M is. Ruggles Eleanor Clements 

The Seven L.ittle Ruggleses — 

Sarah Maud Helen Saegesser 

Peter William Sanders 

Peoria I Jorothy Thomas 

Kitty 1 lorothy Sehmedake 

Clement lames Moore 

Cornelius Forrest Clark 

Larry.. Bobby Vick 

Directed by Miss Howe 

Christmas in the air! "The Birds' Christmas Carol," sponsored by the "V" 
Associations, added to the spirit of altruism pervading this glad season. 

The attachment of Carol, the little invalid in the big house, for the destitute 
and turbulent Ruggleses "in the rear," supplied the theme for this juvenile story, 
which, to many of us, recalled grade school days. Preparations for, and the 
Christmas party itself, presented a choice bit of action not soon to be forgotten. 

Scene from "The Birds' Christmas CaroV 

r 1m 
!-'■ " 

Standing Ruth Habig, Lora Doolen, Gordon llcei . Wendell I vcr, Elcanoi Clements 

Jilting Heli Porn I Clark, William Sanders, Hobby Vick, Jamca Moore, Dorothy Scln 

Doroth) Thoma . I. ouis< Heely. 




Page Ninety feu 



23— Dean Baker ill. 

29— Big "M" Club carnival. 

31 — Vacation begins. 



Fink and Hoffman starred. 



APRIL 

11 — Pi Kappa Delta delegates off for Des Moines. 

12 — Dr. Pimlott holding Easter services. 

14 — Bernetta Joseph wins second in Pi Kappa extemporaneous contest. 

19 — Seniors planted their three canoe birch trees. 

22 — Clionians banquet at the Castilla, in St. Louis. 

29— Mothers arrive for visit at the Angel Roost. The McKendrcan is put to bed. 



MAY 

6 — Pi Kappa banquet in St. Louis. 

9— May Fete. 

H_"The Children of the Moon", last dramatic production of year, presented. 
13— Bachelors stage annual feed at the Coronado. The A. M. O. party at Comfort's comes off. 
22 — The glee clubs entertain in chapel. 
26 — Alpha Psi holds garden party. 



JUNE 



1 — Dorris Oratorical Contest. 

2 — Philo and Plato exhibitions. 

3 — Clio stages its exhibition. 

A — Baccalaureate service and oratorio, "St. Paul". 

S — Hello, alumni. Did you enjoy your dinner and visit? 

6 — Commencement. 



SENIORS PLANT TREES 




With the senior class as a background, l>r. 
vhile Kurrus, Spudich, and Brock shovel in dii 






THE FACULTY PLAYS 

Something new under the sun! The faculty has gone in for dramatics. 
Three one-act plays, presented in the College Chapel. February 1. 1933, consti- 
tuted their "maiden effort." which was enthusiastically received by a full house 
made up of students and townspeople. 

Neighbors 

By Zona Gale 

THE CAST 

Mis' Diantha Abel Mrs Mmnic Phillips 

Hzru Williams Dr. E. R. Spencer 

Grandma. Miss Alleen Wilson 

Mis' Elmira Moran Mrs. C. E. Yick 

Mis' Trot Dr. Nell 15. Waldron 

Mis' Carry Ellsworth Mrs. O. H. Kleinschmidt 

Inez Miss Caroline Kennedy 

Peter Miss Evelyn McNeely 

Directed by Miss Howe 

( >ne of the best known of the author's sketches is concerned with the affairs of 
a small town of a quarter-century ago. The action is centered around the antic- 
ipated arrival of a small orphan boy, who was coming to make his home with 
a childless aunt. Small difficulties and grievances, such as buffalo bugs, the 
week's ironing, sore backs, carpet rags, and misplaced cordwood, were forgotten 
in the neighborly effort to help out in the emergency. Even when the child failed 
to materialize, all agreed that the friendly spirit created had done something for 
each of them, from the energetic Mis' Abel down to Grandma in her rocking 
chair. Even the love interest was not lacking, but was supplied by the shy young 
grocery clerk and the young daughter of Mis' Abel. 



Scene Irani "Neighbors" 




THE BOOR 



Bv Anton P. Chekhov 



THE CAST 

Elena Popova Mrs. E. H. Weatherly 

Gregory Smirnov Dr. E. H. Weatherly 

Luka Dr. J. C. Dolley 

Servants Dr. Cameron Harmon 

Mr. C. M. Wilton 
Directed by Mrs. Weatherly 



Something quite different. The audience was suddenly whisked to the heart 
of Russia, where "The Weatherlvs" provided a delightful little comedy enacted 
between a charming young widow, who would be true to the memory of an un- 
deserving husband, and an irate creditor, who would collect a just debt contracted 
by the deceased husband. A stormy clash of wills ended in mutual capitulation. 

Dr. Dolley as Luka, the old manservant of Elena Popova, shared generously 
in the limelight and provided a goodly portion of the comedy. The timely arrival 
of Dr. Harmon and Mr. Wilton brought the matter to an uproarious close. 



Scene from "The Boor" 




Mr. Wilton, ll 



JOINT OWNERS IN SPAIN 



By Alice Brown 



THE CAST 

Mrs. Mitchell. Director of Old Ladies" Home Mrs. C. .1. Bittner 

Mrs. Fullerton Mrs. W. C. Walton ) 

Miss Over Mrs. I. L. Huffstutler Inmates of Home 

Mr* Blair Miss Pauline Harper I 

Directed by Miss Howe 



Back to an everyday setting, thai of an old ladies' home, and the difficulties 
experienced by its matron in an effort to provide congenial roommates tor every 
inmate especially tor the self-pitying Miss Dyer. One after another, the room- 
mates came and went, hut when Mirandy Blair moved in, Greek met Greek. 
Nevertheless, a chalk mark, doing duty as a partition, worked wonders in provid- 
ing the desired privacy, and the two old ladies were left twittering happily to- 
gether at the prospect of a sleigh ride. 



Scene from "Joint Owners in Spain" 




Pane Nwelv eight 



MARTHA 

Text by W. Friedrich 

Music by Friedrich Yon Flotow 

Presented in the College Chapel, March 16, 1933 

THE CAST 

Lady Harriet Durham, Maid-of-Honor to Queen Anne Junealda Frey 

Nancy, her friend Gertrude Huey 

Sir Tristran Mickleford, Lady Harriet's cousin Rodney Behrens 

Lionel Jack Pfeffer 

Plunket, a wealthy farmer Hugh McNelly 

Sheriff of Richmond George Goodman 

Directed by Misses Harper and Howe 

Seemingly endless weeks of practice, busy days of costume making, prepara- 
tion of stage setting — all culminated in the presentation of the opera, an annual 
event of importance for the musically minded of the College and community, both 
participants and audience. 

The world-weary Lady Harriet, in a spirit of extreme boredom, prevailed 
upon her friend, Nancy, to join with her in disguising themselves and following 
a group of villagers to a near-by fair. In the bidding for maids of all work which 
followed, these two, in a spirit of adventure, allowed themselves to be bid in by 
two well-to-do young farmers, only to find it a bargain from which there appeared 
to be no escape. With the help of Sir Tristran, they managed to run away during 
the night, only to find themselves held captive through affection rather than law. 
After much singing and acting, a happy culmination was brought about. 

Principals and Directors of "Martha" 




Miss Howe, Rodney Belli 



Huey, Huuh McNelly. Jun 
man, Miss Harper. 



Frey, J;ick Pfeff 



Page Ninety-nine 



CHILDREN OF THE MOON 

By Martin Flavin 

Presented in the College Chapel, May 11, 1933 



THE CAST 

Judge Atherton J" h " Sanders 

Madame Atherton Dorothy Schmedake 

Laura Atherton Evelyn Haerting 

Jane Atherton Mary .Sanders 

Dr Wetherell Raymond Musgrove 

Walter Higgs Kenneth Wilson 

Major Bannister Wendell Hoover 

Thomas Paul Mauck 

Directed by Miss Howe 



The last play of the year was one of unusual interest in that its theme was 
somewhat unique — the supposed hereditary effect of the moon upon the members 
of a certain aristocratic family, the Athertons. Under the baleful rays of the 
full moon, this family had met death and disaster. A selfish mother, in an effort 
to hold her daughter, never let the latter forget for a moment the overhanging 
tragedy which might at any moment descend upon her. But love defied even 
heredity, only to meet defeat : for, with the "mad Athertons," there was no escape. 

'I'he stark tragedy of the situations was enlivened from lime to time by the 
little Cockney. Higgs, together with Thomas and Dr. Wetherell. It proved the 
• rious dramatic effort of the year. 



/'„,„ ".,,■ Innnlrnl 



PATRONIZE 

THE McKENDREAN 

ADVERTISERS 



The McKendrean staff thanks the many merchants 
who have advertised in the pages of this book and 
urges the student body to patronize these friends of 
the College. 



Page One Hundred Ti 



McKENDREAN ADVERTISERS 

Page 
Blumcnstein Bros., Meat Market 110 

Central Engraving Company 106 

Duitiiiueller's Music and Gift Shop 105 

Frey's Bakery 109 

C. Heer, General Merchandise HO 

Hi-Way Cafe 105 

Interstate Printing Company 108 

Lebanon Advertiser - 108 

Lebanon Drug Company 109 

Och's Motor Service 105 

Pfcffer Milling Company 109 

C. & H. Reinhardt, Men's Furnishings 108 

Say re Motor Company 110 

Van Miller Studio 107 



1'aye unc Hundred Three 






McKENDREE COLLEGE 

Closing- Its One Hundred and Fifth Year 

Rated in Class A by the University Senate of the Methodist Church. 

Fully accredited by the University of Illinois and the Department of 
Public Instruction of the State of Illinois. 

A member of the Federation of Illinois Colleges. 
A member of the Association of American Colleges. 
A member of the North Central Association. 

McKendree has a twenty-acre campus with nine substantial buildings j 
and a fine athletic field. » 

Offers regular four-year courses in arts and science. j 

Offers pre-medical, pre-legal, and pre-engineering courses. j 

i 
Offers high grade instruction in voice, piano, organ, and dramatics. 

.McKendree is a Christian College where a young man or woman may 
spend four happy, hopeful years in getting the best type of equip- 
ment for life. 



For a catalog write to 

CAMERON HARMON, President, 

McKENDREE COLLEGE 

Lebanon. Illinois 



Pane One ll«n,h.;l Pour 



The other night I stole a kiss, 
My conscience hurts, alack 

I think I'll go again tonight 

And put the darned thing back. 
1926 McKendrean. 



Hi- Way Cafe 

QUALITY FOODS 



Efficient Service 



TRY US 



Compliments of 

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Service 



Parker and Sheaffer Fountain Pens and Pencils 
Bulova and Elgin Watches for Men and Women 

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for 

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COLLEGE JEWELRY -:- KODAKS AND SUPPLIES 
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 






Page One Hundred Fh 



w^ 



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Distinction 

Disiincttie ideas in annuals 
are a prime facior in a 
successful hook* of course 
service ana qualiiy can 
noi be overlooked ** ** * 
c Ihe sign oflhe 
trade mark means-. 



Enqra^inq Service Plus 

Close Cooperation between 
Staff and Annual Department, 



C^Ci-ni- f«~k1 ENGRAVING 
V^CIllIcH COMPANY 



CALUMET BUILDING 

st. louis. missouri 

College Annual Builders of America 



k 




II mull, ;l Si. 



Pictures of the Graduates 

Appearing in this 
issue were made by 

VAN MILLER STUDIOS 

Good Work - - Good Service - - Good Prices 



3546 OLIVE STREET 

Saint Louis - Missouri 



Pmic Otic Hundred Sc 



A LYRIC OF THE DEEP 
My breakfast lies over the ocean. 

My dinner lies over the sea. 
My stomach is all in commotion. 
Don't talk about supper to me. 
1**13 McKendrean. 



C. & H. REINHARDT 

Men's Furnishing 
Goods 



THE 
LEBANON ADVERTISER 



SYLVAN E. WILLIAMS 
Editor and Publisher 



C ^)fus (-Booli ^produced 

The Interstate Printing \ 
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PHONE 
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INTERSTATE 

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llumlrcl Eight 



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Try Our Soda Fountain 
WE SERVE THE BEST 



HILL BEATITUDES 

Rlessed is the man who is bald, for 
he doesn't need to get his hair 
cut. 

Blessed is the back row in chapel, 
for the faculty can't see that far. 

Blessed is the first row in chapel, 
for the faculty thinks that they 
are good without watching. 

Blessed is the freshman, for he 
shall not burn. 



LEBANON DRUG CO. 

0. C. Freshour, Prop. 



FREY'S BAKERY 

and 
NEWS AGENCY 



Daily Capacity 1000 Barrels 
Elevator Capacity 200,000 Bushels 

PFEFFER MILLING CO. 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 
Inc. 1899 

Manufacturers of 

Mar's Patent Hard Winter Wheat Flour 

Fluffy Ruffles Self-Rising Flour 

Lebanon Belle Cake Flour 
White Corn Grit and Corn Meal 

Dealers in 
Lumber and Building Materials of All Kinds 



Page One Hundred Nine 



Blessed is the sophomore, for liis 
head is swelled to suit himself. 

Blessed is the junior, for he shall 
inherit the senior's place. 

Blessed is the senior, for the fac- 
ulty will probably recommend 
him for a job. 

Blessed is the faculty, for they'll ! 
have to break in a new bunch I 
next year. J 

Blessed is the chapel building since i 
the library building has been { 
built, for its seats won't be worn 
out. 

Blessed is Bill's, for he satisfied 
our wants. 

1 <: >10 McKendrean. 



C. HEER 



General Merchandise 



The Quality Store 



For Almost Twelve Years 
McKendreans' Favorite Garage 



SAYRE MOTOR CO. 



Sales and Service 



Towing, Gas, Oil, Tires and 
Accessories 



BLUMENSTEIN BROS. 



FRESH AND SMOKED 
MEATS 



Phone 113 



Page One llumlr.;! Ten 



CO-CHAMPIONS, THE "LITTLE 19"— McK. BEARCATS 



McKcndrcc's team went through the season undefeated in conference flay and ran up against some of 
the toughest teams in the race, including Shurtlcff and State Normal." — Kendall Olds, U. P. 

"McKcndrce was the best team we played this year."— Bob Brummett, Captain, State Normal. 

The Bearcat football team went through its hardest schedule of history unde- 
feated except by the great St. Louis U. Billikens. It is generally regarded as the 
greatest team of McKendree history. Undefeated in the conference, it justly 
claims co-championship rating with Wesleyan, also unbeaten and which played 
one more game. Wesleyan refused to play a post-season Thanksgiving game on 
her own field to decide the championship. 

Dearest of the victories was the 13-6 defeat of Washington University at 
St. Louis, but the defeat of both Shurtleff and S. I. N. U., traditional foes, alone 
made the season successful. 



A great line's play was overshadowed by the perfection of an all-star back- 
field. With good reserves for every forward position and two talented reserve 
backfields, the contests were mere questions of how much power the steam roller 
would turn on. Spudich, Todd, Kurrus, Miltenberger, Brock, Sooy — we will 
miss you! Moorman, Hrasky, Larsh, Wilson, Covington — we expect future 
"reatness of vou ! 



McK. 19, SCOTT FIELD 0; McK. 6, CAPE 

(Continued from Page /.i) 

Bradham's dash stunned the Teachers and provided the margin of victory, but 
McKendree had to stop two Cape thrusts inside her twenty-yard line. McKen- 
dree had the ball on Cape's seven-yard line at the final whistle. Early season 
roughness was evident in the contest. 



Page One Hundred Ele 



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