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Full text of "The McKendrean : being the year book of McKendree College"

•v 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/mckendreepigskin1935mcke 



THE McKENDREAN 

« or » 
19 3 5 



o 



PUBLISHED BY THE STURENTS 
of 

McKENDREE COLLEGE 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 




c 



DEDICATION . . . 
to 

Miss Alleen Wilson 

Whose efficiency and loyalty, understanding and 
co-operation have been of immeasurable value to hun- 
Ireds of McKendreans, this book is affectionately 
dedicati d. 






AIXEEX WILSON, A. ]'... B. S. IX L. S. 



Page Three 



FOREWORD 



We, the staff of the 19 
our book, .is a remembranc 

ullk ii : Hid SGCil) LCtl\ UK 



McKendrean, c iffer this, 
if the various scholastic, 
f the past school year. 



The 193S McKendrean has been realized only 
rough a spirit of mutual endeavor extending beyond 
the efforts of the staff and including students, faculty. 
and Mr. F. A. Behymer in particular. 

For those who will leave college life behind them, 
may this edition prove a pleasant reminder of the days 
spent "ii the Mill: for those who will return, may our 
serve as inspiration for future achievement. 




CONTENTS . , 

The Collsg; 
Classes 
Activities 
Features 



Page Five 



OUR CAMPUS . . . 

Standing on one of the highest points of the Lebanon hill is old McKendree 
College, its ml brick buildings surrounded by trees, some of which were fully 
grown when the college was established here one hundred seven years ago. To him 
who is impressed with the majesty of trees and with the splendor that falls on old 
buildings, there is nothing more impressive than McKendree's eighty-year-old 
Chapel Hanked by two giant white oaks that looked on when the building was con- 
structed and which now reach out with their forty-foot branches as if trying to 
shield the sacred roof. From these branches the squirrels drop upon that roof 
which serves them as a playground and as a bridge in their journeys from one tree 
;.' another. At the door of Science Hall stands another giant oak. on guard, its 
three-foot trunk towering far above that three-story building. 

'There are eight of these venerable white oaks on the campus, not one of them 
less than two centuries old. These, with several of their offspring, many of which 
arc already more than a hundred years old, give a majestic air to this wooded hill 
such as no other trees could provide. 

Fifty-one species of trees, young and old, are flourishing on our campus, and 
every year is adding to this number as well as to the number of native shrubs and 
perennial plants. The Hill will he an arboretum of note some day if the sons and 
daughters of McKendree do not forget her. 

McKendree has been taken out of the mud by walks constructed where paths 
run. A rock garden and three perennial flower beds adorn the one-time 
ipe north of Clark 1 till. The parking lot has been taken from the front cam- 
pus, and now. where dust and noise formerly mingled with the music from the 
Chapel studios, harmony reigns supreme. The old parking space will be reduced 
afford only enough room for visitors' cars, while the ugly view from the 
front windows of Clark Hill will be changed to one of beauty. 

Trei j set in a cordance with a plan on the back campus, and Lake 

iful will some da) deserve the name. Daffodils and wild flowers have been 

on the north shore of the lake, and the dam. once unsightly with weeds, 

■ I being < overed with the almost-evergreen vines of the money- 

i nior memorials, memorial seats, and bird baths given by local clubs have 

the int< n 51 and convenience of the campus. Best of all. there is a grow- 

i worth and beautv of ii all. 

here has a more unique or more beautiful campus than \lc- 
i pj ireciate and cherish it. 

DR. 1'.. R. SPENCER. 




THE COLLEGE . . . 




Centennial Gateway 



" 

Pi Mairikr. 




Carnegie Hall, named after 
the donor, Andrew Carnegie, 
is the college home for men. 
This dormitory, one of the last 
buildings to he constructed on 
the Hill, is connected with 
1 'earson's I tall by a glazed 
pergi ila. 

Tin- first building to he 
erected (in Mckcndi'cc's cam- 
pus was a small wooden struc- 
ture which was destroyed by 
fire in 1856. Since that time 
nine buildings have been 
erected. The Benson Wood 
Library was the last to he 
built and was completed in 
lime. 1918. 



I'lwto - 



I'aiic liii/ht 



x> 



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-Photo by Bcln 



'Where sweet peace doth abide 
Where truth and beauty grow" 



Robert Bridges. 



Sm cJ(c kmiSzjzcwh 



$ 



M 11. con. 




Hypes Field, one of the fin- 
est athletic fields in the Little 
Nineteen Conference, was 
built through the generosity 
of Dr. Benjamin F. Hypes of 
St. Louis. Concrete bleachers 
line the western side and a 
splendid cinder track encircles 
the football held. 

The Chapel, with its tall 
clock-tower spire is a famous 
landmark. This building hous- 
es the music studios, a liter- 
ary society hall, and the audi- 
torium. 

The Science Hall and Old 
Main are three Story buildings 
constructed in the colonial 
style md lend i dignified ur 
to the Hill. 

The Eisenmeyer Gymna- 
sium, also named for the 
di inor, seals i me thousand pei i- 
ple and is architecturally in 
harmony with other campus 



/ i. . 



u 



N 




—Photo 1 ; B ft 



77ir visions of to-day 

Are the memories of to-morrow. 




THE ADMINISTRATION 



t~s~i 




c 



CHRISTOPHER JOHN BITTNER, Ph. D. 

SoCl \l. SCIENCE 

CH \UI.ES A. SCHERER, Ph. D. 

CHEM ISTRV 

JAMES CI. AY DOLLEY, M. A.. I.itt. D. 
Latin and Greek 

KARL WILEY HAYTER, I'll. I >. 

HlSTORV 

CHARLES JACOB ST( WELL, Ph. D. 
Math emaTICS 

EDWIN R< M.I. IX SPENCER, Ph. D. 
Biology 

WILLIAM CLARENCE WALTON, Ph. D., I). D. 
Philosophy and Religion 

LILLTAN L. STECKMAN, Ph. D. 
English 

B. B. W( « >I>. M. A.. L. L. I'.. Ed. I).. Registrar 
Education 

< ILIVER HENRY KLEINSCHMIDT, A. A. G. i ». 
Piano, ( irgan, and Theory 

PAUL DOUGLASS WALDORF, .M. A. 

Spanish, Atii LETIC I llRECTOR 

R. PAULINE HARPER 

Voice, 1 'ublic School M usic 

\\ EBSTER !'.. SCHMIDT, M. S. 
Physics 




The President 
CAMER< )N HARM* >N, 

B. A.. I). D.. I.. L. D. 



i i / 



cJ&mkwb Miifdtf 'fm 



ALLEEN WILSON, B. A.. B. S. in L. S. 
Librarian 

ELSA MAE TYNDALL, M. A. 
French 

R( ISAEIND MAE HOHN, B. A. 
English and Expression 

NELL GRISWOED OPPITZ, M. A. 

I I 1 STORY 

JOSEPHINE BITTNER, B. A., M. D. 
Physiology 

AIEEEN SPENCER, B. A. 
Biology 

AIRS. LINDA P.. WHITTTNGTON 
Dean of Women 

.MRS. BLANCHE HERTENSTEIN 
Matron of Carnegie Hall 

AIRS. MINNIE M. PHILLIPS 
Matrox of Clark Hall 

MISS ELIZA JANE DONALDSON. M. A. 
Fiscal Agent 

DARREL R. DOOLEN, A. B. A. 
Mechanical Drawing 

EUGENE VERNON SCHAEFER, B. M. 
Violin 

ROBERT I. HARTLEY 

Coach of Basketball 





THE ADMINISTRATION 



V-v-^ 



The I >ean 
EDWIN PERCY RAKE 

B. a., a. m., l l. d. 



o»> 




c 



STORY OF THE TREES 



the meadows, through the wheatfields, comes a breath of summe 
And it rustics through the branches of our old McKendree trees: 
Let us listen for a moment to the stun that it tells, 
As it mingles with the music of the old McKendree hells. 

Let it tell iif virgin forests, sown in ages long before, 
lire the eye of tlie explorer ever tested mi our shore : 
How they waved above the builders of the mounds we see today, 

Temples fur their early worship, or tii lay their dead away. 

Let it tell i't other races coming mi to take their place, 
Painted peoples of the prairies, bent mi war or on the chase: 
Tell ut pioneer and settler, men of faith and hardy breed, 
As they laid the bounds of cities and of culture sowed the seed. 

Let it tell of Christian fathers, gathered piously in prayer, 

As the_\' patterned out the vision of a school and campus fair: 

Tell nf toiling and of labor, sacrifice of wealth and ease, 

As they hewed a Hall nf Learning from the old McKendree trees. 

Tell a century of service, people gathered far and near. 
laim the happ) record of our Centenar} year; 
rising from the forest, lifted up in grateful prayer 
!'< r the living and the learning that our school had builded there. 

to linger 'neath the old McKendree trees, 
stoi coming in upon the breeze, 
And we vision fur the future, happy ages drawing nigh, 
>nd leafy branches tower upward to tin- sky. 



DR. C. J. ST( (WELL 



t'aue Fourteen 



cMmfeimjMttA/^m 



CLASSES 




BENSON WOOD LIBRARY 



Page Fifteen 



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Sm ^r(c kWidteanj 



G< >RD< ».\ R. BEERS, B. S. 
Carrier Molls 

Biology 



CO 



Bachelor Vicc-Chairr'an '34, Chairman '35; Senior Class Pres. '35; Carnegie 
Hall Vicc-Pres '34; Gld Club '.e 'A\ '34, Mgr. '35; Quartel '32, '33, '34, '35; 
-l. '35; Press Clnh '32, '33; Nature Chih; "The Mikado", 
"Martha", "Birds' Christmas Carol", "Marriage of Nannette". 



ALBERT \Y. MANWARING, B. S. 
Chester 

Ci-i km istkv 

AMQ 

AMP Vice-Pies. '35; Vicc-Pres. Senior Class '35; Foothall '34; Basketball 
' = :. '35; Glei CIuli '33, '34, '35; Pres. Carnegie Hall '34; V. M. C. A. Cabinet 
"M" Club 



C \K< >LYN M. \Y.\1II.. A. I'.. 
St. Louis, Missouri 

English 

<1>AT 



■• i c-Prcs '34, Pres. '35; Clio; Pres Y. VV. C. A. '35; Pres. French 

"lnl, '34; S. Trcas Senioi Class '35; Oui State Club. 



KATHLEEN V. PIKER, I'.. M. 
Mounds 

I ' I A N I ) 



Club '3-'. '33; \ccompanisl '.(-I. '35; Clio; Y. W. 0. A. Cabinet '35 
I "1 Ih. ,,n, '35; Sec.-Treas. Clark Hall '35; "The Mikado 1 




DOROTHY L. DINTELMAN, A. B. 
Belleville 

History 

$AT 



*AT Sec.-Treas. '34, '35; Pres. Clark Hall '35; Sec.-Treas. Student Ass'n. 
'35; Annual Staff \V?; Pres. Y. W. C. A. '34; Clio; Press Club '33, '34; Na- 
ture Clul>. 




CO 



DARREL R. DOOLEN, A. B. 
Kinmundy 

History 

Bachelors Sec. '35; Pres. Student Ass'n. '35; Publicity Director '34, '35; Press 
Club '34; Annual Staff '34; Sec. Carnegie Hall '35; Publicity Director Y. 
M. C. A. '35; "Jethro", "The Florist Shop". 



DAVID E. MELTON, A. 
Okawville 

Philosophy 

SBP 



Plato. 



RICHARD CHAPPLE 
Lebanon 

Biology 




Pui/e Seventeen 



CO 

on 

o 



CO 




?7An <=J(c KjemSteufi 




HAki >LD W. GIESEKE, B. S. 
Trenton 

Mathematics 

sz 

■?Z Master Scientist '35; Philo; Y. M C. \. Cabinet '33; Glee Club '34, '35 
Editor "McKcndrcan" '34; Review Staff '33, '35. 



HAR( >LD T. WHITLOCK, A. B. 
Springfield 

Si 'i h iLOG"S . 1 1 [STORY, GliRW w 

1 1 K A . a<m>. SBP 

vp,P Yicc-Pres. '34; Sec. PK.A '34; Plato; Glee Club; Debate '33, '34, '35; 
Nature Club. Oi hestra; Hand; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet '33; Little Theatre; 
"Hedda Gabler", "The Youngest", "The Doctor in Spite of Himself", "Eve- 
ning I (rcss Indispensable". 



CLARENCE II. WAI,T( )N, B. S. 
Lebanon 

Chemistry 

Sz 

Philo; Glee Club '53, '34; Annual Staff '33; Y. M. C. V Cabinet '32; Pre 
Club '32; Nature Club. 



A. KENNETH SO >TT, A. B. 
Marissa 

I I [STORY 
iachclors; "M" Club; Basketball '32, '33, '34, Capt. '35. 



I'aui Hiuhlren 



cJ/mzhm, iktidkj 'me 



RAYMOND B. MUSGROVE, B. S. 
Salem 

Chemistry 

Bachelors; A*Q Cast Director '35, Business Mgr. '34; Football '33, '34; 
Pres. Carnegie Hall '35; "Friend Hannah", "The Youngest"; "M" Club 



ROBERT I. HARTLEY, A. B. 
Irvington 

History 




Bachelor Vice-Chairman '35. 



C. JACK PFEFFER, A. B. 
Lebanon 

Economics 

Bachelor Chairman '34; Pres. Student Ass'n. '34; Pres. Freshman Class '29; 
Glee Club '32, '33, '34; Quartet '32, '33 ; Annual Staff '34; "M" Club; Basket- 
ball '29, '33; Tennis '30, '33; Cross Country '29; "Martha". 



ARTHUR V. HUFFMAN, A. B. 
Clinton, Indiana 

Social Science 
nKA, A*fi 

Bachelors; nKA Sec.-Treas. '34, Correspond. Sec. '35; Plato; Editor "Mc- 
Kendrean" '35; Press Club '33; Debate '34, '35, Student Ylgr. '35; Out-State 
Club, Pres. '35; Little Theatre; Second Place in Dorris Oratorical Contest 
'34; Nature Club; "The Rector", "The Doctor in Spite of Himself"; Stage- 
Director of "Shavings". 




Page Nineteen 





w 



WALTER 1.. BEGUELIN, A. 1'. 

Caseyville 

Social Science 




CLEVE W. STR( >H, A. B. 
Mt. Carmel 

1 1 tSTORV 
AMI.' 

\\I>| Pres. '34; Vice-Pres Student Ass'n. '35; Pres. luni,,,- Class; "M" 
Chili Pres. '34; Basketball '32, '33, Capt. '34. 



LE< »NA A. BISCH( IFF, B. M. 
Mascoutah 

Voice 
Glee Club '35; Fundi Club; "The Marriage of Nannette". 




STANLEY R. SCHUBKEGEL, 
Mascoutah 

Chem istrv 

SZ 



<=Mfisfmnj Mufdtj 'pve 



DOLLY I. WATTLES, A. B. 
Clay City 

English 

BAM 

BAM Pres. '34, Vice-Pres. '35; Clin; Little Theatre; Annual Staff '35; P 
Chili '35; "Confessional". 



GEORGE J. GOODMAN, A. B. 
Herrin 

English 

AMn 



AMfi Treas. '35; Glee Club '33, '34, Treas. '35; Quartet '33, '34; Studei 
Ass'n. Vice-Pres. '35; French Club ; "The Mikado", "Martha", "The Mai 
riage of Nannette". 



CLIFFORD J. HERTENSTEIN, B. S. 
New Baden 

Mathematics 

A*n, riKA. sz 

Plato; Debate '33, '33; Y. U. C. A. Cabinet '34. '35; Little Theatre; Tennis 
'34, '35; Football '35; "Shavings", "Apple Sauce", "Hedda Gabler", "The 
Green Emerald". 



PAUL E. STEVENS, A. B. 
Mount Vernon 

Philosophy - Religion 

SBP 

Debate '35. 




CO 




CO 




Page Twenty-one 



It* 



on 

o 



<S) 




*5m cJ(c kSmSz&cW; 






HERMAN 11. PRESLEY, A. B. 
Trenton 

English 

AMQ 

AMi< Treas. '34, Sec. '35; Annual Staff '33, '34, '35; Track '33, '34, '35; Foot- 
hall Student-Mgr. '33, '34, '35; V. M. C. A. Cabinet '33; Glee Club '33, '34, '35'; 
(2; "M" Club; "Marriage of Nannette". 



E. ELAINE AHRING, A. B. 
O'Fallon 

English 

K(-)T 
K0T Prcs '35; W. A. V; French Club. 



RUTH M. SCHMALENBERGER, B. S. 
Belleville 

Biology 

•I'AT, ^Z 

Clio; Y W. C. A. Cabinel '32, '33; Student Ass'n. Sec.-Treas. '34; Tennis 
'32, '53; Nature Club. 



WILLIAM W. BENNETT, B. S. 
\, banon 

I'.Kll.i II ,\ 
AM!!. A + <! 

\M'> Pres '35; Glee Club '32, '33, '34, Pres. '.15; Philo; Band; Orchcstr; 
h Club; Y M C \ Cabinel ; \nnual Staff '34 



Page Twenty two 



cMlmhofb jtukaf 'pm 



PAUL MEADOWS. A. B. 
Herrin 

Social Science 

HKA, 2BP 

Philo; Debate '34, 35; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet '33, '34; Student Ass'n.; Revie\ 
Staff '35; Glee Chili '35; Third in State Oratorical Contest '34; Dorris Ora 
torical Contest, second in '33, first in '34; First in State Economical Essa 1 
Contest '33; Little Theatre; "The Green Emerald", "The Dust of the Read' 
"Confessional". 



EUGENE V. SCHAEFER 
Belleville 

Music 





CLAYTON A. EAWKES. B. S. 
Bone Gap 

Chkmistry 

Philo; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet '33, Pre-,. '35; 2£Z Vice-Master Scientist '35 
Animal Staff '33, '34. 



PHEBE G. ANDERSON, A. B. 
Troy 

History 

II KA 

(dec Cluh '32, '35; Debate '35; Little Theatre; "The Mikado", "Marriage of 
Nannette", "Joint Owners in Spain", Stage-Manager of Homecoming 
plays '35. 





Page TWeitty-thfee 



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??$& <J(c ftjewSieafi 



J( >11\ D. HEARST, A. 1',. 
Kit ingham 

1 I tSTORV 
Student Mgr. Track '.5-'. '35; Nature Club, 



'MARJORIE A. KEEX 
Mount Carmel 



English 
BAM 



EMILE F. MIGNERY, A. 11. 
St. Joseph, Missouri 

Philosophy - Religion 

SBP 

SBP Sec Treas '34, \ ice-Pres. '35; Plato; Debate '34, '.15; Y. M. C. A. Cab- 
inel '35; Nature Club; Glee Club '34, '35; "lie. Ma Gabler", "The Doctor in 
Spite of Himself", "Marriage of Nannette". 

WhIhIiiu iii accept teaching position in November '.'4. 



4t 



Page Twenty jo 



CLASS OFFICERS . . . 

JUNIOR 

President William I). Sandkrs 

Vice-President Howard Larsii 

Secretary-Treasurer Phyllis BuRGE 

SOPHOMORE 

President Gerald Whittington 

Vice-President James T. Sampson 

Secretary-Treasurer Genevieve Burge 

FRESHMAN 

President Oswald BerEndt 

Vice-President j OI . : Crawford 

Secretary-Treasurer IMOGENE Brines 



l J aye Twenty-five 





c 



JUNIORS 

\\ 1 1.1.1 \M D. S W'l'LKS 
Cn ssville 

C \THERINE GILK1S0N 
Mi. Carmel 

C \RL C BR VCY 

I I n rill 



in >R< iTHV BENNETT 
St. Louis 

IK >\\ ARD LARSH 
I St. Louis 

I )( IROTHY SCUM KHAKI'. 
Granite C i t \ 



MARY M \ku \KLT CARSON 
Lebanon 

CI. \HYS BR \I>FORD 
It'.a Bena, Mississippi 

P U I. E. MAUCK 
left 



M \KTII A MOW I'. 
Lebanon 

IS \|',KI. SMITH 
Granite Citj 

I XMLS T M< ii IRE 
Bluford 



LI WLTII WILSON 
Granite Citj 

MARY DIECKM \.\X 
Lel>anon 

\i \ky s wm-.ks 

Graniti Citj 



DALI HARMON 
Louisville 

PHYLLIS BURGE 
L St. Louis 

CHARLES F BENNER 
Si Louis, Missouri 



cJ/Lfidixm itwdif 




JUNIORS 



.oWF.l.L J. PENNELL 
E. St. Louis 

FRANZ HOHN 
Warrenton, Missouri 

ROY HARRIS 
I lorchester 



l-'.MIL F. FRECH 
Lenzburg 

MARTHA H1NREL 
Carlyle 



LOUISE WINTERROWD 
Louisville 



CARL F. KOCH 
Brecse 



CARLF.E S. LOWRY 
Pembroke, North Carolina 



FLORENCE ZAHNOW 
E. St. Louis 



MARTHA RUSSELL 
E. St. Louis 

IOHN DORKO 
Benld 

MARY L. McCLAIN 
Beaver Creek 



IVA LOU CRALLE 
Bone Gap 



IOHN RAUTH 
Belleville 



CLYDE L. MELTON 
Coffeen 



MARJORIE BINDER 
Centralia 



CORNELIA FRITZ 
Mascoutah 



MARY T. KNAPP 
E. St. Louis 





c 



SOPHOMORES 









HIGH MILES 
Carl) le 






ARTHUR WEHMEIER 
Troj 


DOROTHY HOOVER 
Millstadl 






RICHARD SUHRHEINRICH 
New Baden 


RALPH WHITSON 
East Si. Louis 






EDNA X I'll IMS 
Worden 


1 .!< >RGE M •". I.XT 
East Si. Louis 






GEORGE STANLEY BRINES 
Albion 


BERNARD BALDRIDGE 
1 )orchester 




LOUISE PARKER 
East St. Louis 


\l KRY IANE BOW 1.1 
i I'Fallon 


■:r 




JU WIT A SHELTON 
Karnak 


PEYTON LINGLE 
Atlanta, Georgia 






M \\<r, \ki-.T Cll \ITI.K 
Lebanon 


M \KIOX WILSON 
Easi St. Louis 






M \DONN \ W 1 I.SOX 
East St. Louis 



Pag, i ., . «fv eight 



aMmdsGnj itwdhfpve 



SOPHOMORES 



GUSTAV KRIZEK 
Belleville 



JAMES T. SAMPSON 
Pemliroke, North Carolina 



GERALD WHITTINGTON 
Flora 



I.EROY RANDLE 
Caseyville 



DON LUSK 

Denver, Colorado 



CLAIR NORRIS 
Pontiac 



LOUISE CROW 
East St. Louis 



KHXXFTH BROWN 
Mt. Vernon 



GENEVIEVE BURGE 
East St. Louis 



WILLIAM HINKEL 
Carlvle 



VELMA HAMILTON 
Yandalia 



JOHN DILL1NGER 
East St. Louis 



JAMES A. GRUCHALLA 
Sawyerville 



HOWARD GADDY 
Ferrin 



CHRISTINF WHITTINGTON 
Flora 



IOHN PAUL SAMPSON 
Pemliroke, North Carolina 



r _ ^ 





r, ) 










I'ayt Twenty-nine 



^Tm cJ(c kmuhj2Ufi 




ester Haurj 
Clarence Weber 
Lloyd Barnard 
Evelyn Schmedake 
Richard Schwartz 



Doyne Winterrowd 
Usle Mewmaw 
Russell Unverzagl 
Phyllis Barnharl 
Man J., Byrne 



Wilbur Zirgcs 
Evelyn Ellis 
Willard Friederich 
Harry Walker 
Warren Schmalenbcrger 



George Welborn 
Eldon Bauer 

William Holl 

Estclle Frasei 
Pearl Dick 



Roger Zeller 
Charles Hortin 

Maxine W I 

Walter Pruetl 
Gwendolyn Yost 



John Oppitz 
Paul Beamon 
Joe Crawford 

Herberl I )xendine 
Fern Fox 



FRESHMEN 



cMfie&mjAtidi/ftve 



Jeanette Clendenny 
Glenn Coles 
|)oii Wilson 
Laverne Drcsscl 
Virgil Mourning 



Jfrieda Heer 
Arline Stanton 
Dorothy Fincke 
Mary Etta Reed 
lames Beers 



Imogene Brines 
William Brausa 
Lloyd Morris 
Maxine Douthit 
Wayne Bise 



Harold Hertenstein 
Maxine Clements 
Charles Heely 
Waller Cope 

Albert Schmcdake 



Raimen Lowry 
Myra Jeanes 
Dudley Klamp 
Helen Handel 
Eddie Stroehlein 



Eldon Browning- 
Raymond Daniels 
Raymond Harms 
Mary Blanche Wolfe 
Bona Fae Frecsmever 




^g^ ^Bfjk. j*^± 





♦ 



FRESHMEN 



♦ 



Page Thirty-one 



2m& <J(c /(WiSieaTb 



Students Whose Pictures Do Not Appear in the Annual 



SENN u<s 

Almus Carruthers 
August Dieckmann 
Naomi Eaton 



JUNK )RS 

Harold Brown 
William Baton 
Eloise Koelling 
Cecil Morris 



S( >PH( )M( )RES 

Erwin Aufderheide 
Ruby Beutler 
Wallace Blackburn 
Forrest Cravens 
Edith Donaldson 
Dennis Donaldson 
Lars 1 Iamerson 
l.eroy Rice 
Naomi St. Clair 



KRESHMEN 

< »sw aid Berendt 
Margaret I lame 
Richard Dippold 
Sol Ernst 
Joseph 1 1 raba 
Robert Jackson 
Roy Jaeckel 
I >an Jett 
Amos Reed 
Ruth Reilman 
Jasper Rosetto 

\\a\ nc Sims 
Ed\\ in Smith 



SPECIAL 

Mrs. Mildred Brown 
Kldon I leer 

Mrs. I'. I). Waldorf 



I'm/,- 1 llii! v tU'i\ 



cAe^J^?fc 



ACTIVITIES . . . 



ORGANIZATIONS 
ATHLETICS . . . 




CLARK HALL 



Paijc Thirty-thr 



?ffi& cJ(c /dmSzoari 



The following organizations are to be found on the 
campus of McKendree College: 

XATIi >NAL HOW iRARY 

l'i K \it \ I >ei, ta. 'Illinois Theta chapter 

Sigma Ze r\. Beta Chapter 

Ai.ru \ Psi < >w eg \. Alpha Theta Cast 

LITERARY St (CIETIES 
Philosophian 

1'l.ATllN | \N 

Clionian 

Si iCIAL FRATERNITIES 
Alpha Mu * >mega 
The Bachelors 
Sigma Beta Rho 

S< >CIAL S( >k( iRITIES 

I'll I I.AM BDA TaU 

Beta Alpha M u 

K\ri' \ T ii eta Tatj 

CLUBS 

Y. M. C. A. 

Y. \\ . C. A. 

M en's < rLEE Club 

Women's < '.mi Cli b 

Women's Athletic Association 

"M" Cn b 

X \ture Cli b 

Press Club 

ch Club 
Little Thi 
1 M i S'i vi i. Clot 

S'fUDI I OCIATION 



Page Thirty 





ORGANIZATIONS 




OLD MAIN 



Page Thirty-five 



PI KAPPA DELTA 



^Az cJ(c Kmidkeufh 




H : Hertens 



M adoxvs, Win 



inization. A badge of distinction, varied 
achievement is conferred upon deserving 



Pi Kappa Delta, which is represented lure on our campus by the Illinois 
Theta chapter, ; s the largest nati nil forensic fraternity in the country, having an 
active chapter roll of one hundred thirty-eight chapters in thirty-four slates. "The 
stimulation of, progress in, and the promotion of the interests of intercollegiate 
oratory, debate and public speaking by encouraging a spirit of intercollegiate fel- 
lowship" are the chief aims of thi 
and graduated according to merit and achi< 
candidates. 

A National Council, elected b) dele- 

■ the local chapters at biennial 

national conventions, governs the organiza 

tion. Each chapter is required to be repre 

sented in at least every other national 

tion. This year not being the year 

for the national convention, the Illinois 

'I'lu-ta chapter, a member of the Missouri 

Province, sent representatives to the Prov- 

■ ion held March 28, 29 and 30, 

on the campus of Cape Girardeau State 

Paul Meadow s and 

mpeted in men's debate, 

while Arthur V. Huffmai ■, ted Mi 

Kendree in orator;, and e tempore speak 

■ eligible for membership im luded 
i I lolm i honorar) i . Car! 
('. (.racy, Kenneth Brown, Phebe MiT i 
si ii, I'loreni <■ Zahnow, John ( (ppitz. 

2 1th, the fratei nit) held its an 
nual social affair, a banquet, at the Hotel 
Belleville. 




Preside) 
Presides 

< retary 



FFICERS 

Paul Meadows 
Dorothy Schtned 
Arthur \ Huffmai 
/v Harold Wl.nl. 



Pane Thirty 



cJ/hwhtm Mitih/fve 



SIGMA ZETA 




Worthy achievement on the part of students in the fields of science and 
mathematics is recognized at McKendree by the Beta chapter of Sigma Zeta. This 
chapter, established on the campus in 1926, is one of eight similar organizations 
belonging to the national honorary science fraternity. 

In April of this year a National Conclave 
of Sigma Zeta, held in conjunction with the 
Alpha Chapter at Shurtleff. was the out- 
standing event. Sessions were held both at Al- 
ton and Lebanon. In addition to this, Sigma 
Zeta sponsored a Freshman Essay Contest on 
scientific subjects, giving as prizes a silver cup 
and a book. Several evening meetings were 
held to which non-members were invited. 
Through these meetings Sigma Zeta has made 
a definite contribution to campus life by bring- 
ing in valuable speakers as well as by the 
showing of interesting films. 




OFFICERS 
Master Scientist— Harold W. Giesekc 
Vice-Master Scientist — Clayton Fawkes 
Secretary-Treasurer — Dr. C. I. Stowcll 



ALPHA PSI OMEGA 






>r. Ha 


rmon, Bt 


■nnt'tt. Hertenst 






Harper. 


Mi- U 




- 


- 


1 



Y\ lnllnel;. Silts 



College students interested in dramatic work aspire to become members of 
Alpha Psi Omega, National honorary dramatic fraternity. At McKendree, the 
Alpha Theta Cast, established in 1927, gives recognition to all those who have 
shown outstanding ability in dramatic productions. 

Eligibility is based mi the point system. Since the success of a play often de- 
pends largeh i n its management, proper advertising and other like features, eli- 
gibility credit is also given the business manager as well as the actual participant 
in the play. 

The national organization aids the local 
n securing reduced royalty on popular 

- The Playbill," official publication of the 
national organization, provides information re- 
garding problems of selecting and staging plays 
Is and colleges. 

Arthur V. Huffman, Carl C. Bracy and 
ami eligible and were ini- 
tiated during the second semester. The initia- 
tion ceremony was followed by a Valentine 
party in Clin 1 [all. 

The annual banquet was held in the Col- 
lege Inn of the Hotel Belleville on the six- 
teenth of May. 




OFFICERS 

President Raymond B, Musgrove 

Vice-President Dorothy Schmedake 

Set retary-Treasurer Catherine Gilkisoi 



cMfiefmfb 




PHILOSOPHIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 




A long period of achievement, extending almost as far back as McKendree 
itself, can be pointed to by the Philosophian Literary Society as it enters its ninety- 
ninth year of activity. Philo may well be proud of such a record and also of the 
Philos who have successfully gone out into the various professions. 

Though old in years the Philosophian society is an organization with dis- 
tinctly new ideas. Not content to rest solely on the achievement of past years it 
has continued to improve. "To encourage literary achievement and debate" still 
remains the purpose of the organization, but the members realize that only by 
living in the present and looking to the future can this aim be carried out. 

The society meets in open session once each month and all those who are 
interested are invited. This was triennial year and the banquet was an important 
event. 



Page Thirty-nine 



PLATONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 




B<r, Suhrhdnrich, 

n H. Hrrtcnstcin, Barn 

I. P. Sampson. Whitlo 



The burning of a note which marked the payment of an old debt of the so- 
ciety and the development of a championship Intramural League basketball team 
are two of the year's outstanding features of which the Platonian Literary Societ) 
is justly proud. 

Established in 1S4 1 '. Plato has long been recognized for its literary merit, 
and fur the opportunit) it affords young men for training in debate, extempo- 
raneous speaking and the related fields. This year, however, with its success in 
athletics, Plato feels that a definite step forward has been taken. By the foster- 
ing of athletics, the societ) believes that it does not weaken but rather strengthens 
the original purpose of the founders and thai the development of the whole man is 
sary for outstanding success in any endeavor. 

foyful over success in a new field, the Platonians celebrated their victory with 
a dinner at the Bertram Hotel in Lebanon. Later, a banquet, followed by a theatre 
party, was held at the College Inn of Moid Belleville. 

New members initiated d 
Amos Reed, and John Rauth. 



the second semester are Herbert Oxendine, 



1^ 



cJufiefmfb mifdtj 




CLIONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



KSIk'4 


H^HFBK^H^ 


■ ■ 41 






tojk' 




IT* 


m 




apt 9m% tM 


t Mi 









To/> roj 


c — Knapp, Cralle, Jeanes, Wih 


.IfiiUlc 


rou'— Gilkison. licnnett. Wolft 


Front r, 


711 — E. Schmedake, Handel, F 



Clements, McCla 



A few months after the admission of women to McKendree the Clionian Lit- 
erary Society was founded in December of 1869. Of the twenty women listed in 
the college catalogue at that time, fifteen were charier members of the new society. 
To-day it still remains the only woman's organization of its kind upon the campus. 

Since its organization, Clio has been carried on enthusiastically. Many a girl, 
who has later become a leader, received her training through participation in Clio 
programs. Meetings are held every week and interesting programs consisting of 
declamations, essays, assigned addresses, impromptus, and current events are de- 
livered. Once a month an open session is conducted. 

The truth of the saying of the society, "once a Clionian, always a Clionian" 
was demonstrated at the reunion held in the society hall during the forenoon of the 
last Homecoming da} 1 . This meeting was well attended and actives listened eagerly 
as old grads related their experiences while members of Clio. 

The Clionian banquet and the exhibition program at the close of the school 
year are annual events. 



Payc Forty-one 



^tflll <J(c KJm$i£<Mh 



ALPHA MU OMEGA 




- 

It. Larsh. Dorku, Daniel 



Zirges. Brownine. Schwartz, Benin 
. Mourning, Rice, 
btrol . k. W ilson, Aufderheide 



Believing that one fraternity could not meet 
the campus, the Alpha Mu < >mega fraternity was 
second decade the organization lias continued to 
members, both fraternally and socially. The A. M 
on the campus, are proud of their large active me 
gram they have carried out. 

Homecoming this year was made a little 
brighter with the sale of souvenirs by the fra- 
ternity and the hunger of man) a football fan 
Hayed by the purchase of a bag of pea- 
nuts from an A. M. ' >. pledge. Plent) of laughs 
also in store for those attending the 
fraternity minstrel show at the Alamo Theatre. 
Three stag affairs were given during the 
I as two semi-formal parties at the 
Locust Hills Country Club. The New Hotel 
: St. Louis was the scene of the an- 
nual banqui 

-^,r Webster Schmidt is the faculty 
sponsor of the fraternity. 



the demands of all the men on 
organized in 1 ( »24. Entering its 
further the best interests of its 
. < >.'s, as they are better known 
mbership as well as of the pro 




I (FFICERS 

President Clcve W. Stroh 

VI ,- President William Bennett 

Secretary Albert W. Manwhring 

Treasurer Herman Presley 



Page Forty-two 



^/K^g&^A^ 




THE BACHELOR FRATERNITY 




KESnB&BHHBBHHHHHffiHBHHIIIH 



Standing — Crawford, Coles, T. P. Sampson, Huffman, Klamp, Gr 

J. Beers, Norris, Pfeffer. 
Scored— Hartley, Dr. Hayter, Krizek, Rauth, Scott, Doolen, S 

grove, Whitson. 



Whittington, 1). Wilson, 
Mauck, G. liters, Mus- 



"The promotion of fraternal and social relationships among the men students 
on the hill" has been the aim of the Bachelor's fraternity ever since its founding 
in 1919. That it has been successful can readily be seen in the fact that the organ- 
ization has grown and carried on until today it has an active membership of twen- 
ty-three. Dr. E. W. Hayter, head of the His- 

| has always been given special recognition. 
This year the Bachelor loving cup, presented 
in this connection, was received by Guslav 
Krizek of Belleville. Krizek's name will be 
engraved on the cup as well as being placed 
on the fraternity honor roll. 

A wiener roast in the fall and a Christ- 
mas party at the Locust Hill Country Club 
were enjoyed by the members and guests 
while a dinner at the College Inn of Hotel 
Belleville, a strawberry festival and the an- 
nual banquet at the Hotel Statler in St. Louis 
on May 25, were the features of the spring 
social program. 

Members initiated during the second se- 
mester include: James T. Moore, Kenneth 
Brown. Carl Koch and Wayne Bise. 

OFFICERS 

Chairuian — C. Jack Pfeffer 

/ 'ice-Chairman — Gordon R. Beers 

Secretary-Treasurer — William D. 

Sanders 

Scrgcant-at-Arms — Raymond Mus- 

grove 




PHI LAMBDA TAU 




.Russell. Sanders, Wahl, ('.ilk. 
ilenberser, McClai 



Seven of the eleven charter members, together with their newly-chosen spon- 
sor. Dr. Lillian I.. Steckman, and the members initiated since the second semester 
'if last year, proudly observed the first Founders' Day of the Phi Lambda Tau 
sororitv on November 16, 1934. It was on that da\ one year ago, that the tirst of 



McKendree's sororities was officially recognize* 
it is still very young and this tirst year has 
been one of severe testing during which the 
members have striven earnestly to live up to 
the three-fold purpose of Phi Lambda Tan: 
high spiritual, scholastic and social standards. 

The social calendar included a hayride ; 
homecoming reunion; a Christmas party al 
the Locust Hills countr) club; rush-week 
activities which carried out the "Alice in Won- 
derland" theme; Old Home Town day the 
first week-end in April: and a spring banquet 
on Ma) 18. 

Members initiated b) the sorority during 
iter were: Evelyn Schmedake, 
Helen Handel, Mary Etta Reed, Phyllis Barn- 
hart, and Maxine Clements. 



Although the "oldest" sorority. 




OFFICERS 

President Carolyn \l. Wahl 

VI , President Mary McClain 

,, relai t I reasurer I iorothj I 'in 

telman 

Historian Florence Zahnow 



Page Party foui 



<=Mm(mfb 




SIGMA BETA RHO 




"Service, Brotherhood, Religion," is the motto of Sigma Beta Rho and noth- 
ing could better state the high purpose of the organization. Through it the group 
of ministerial students on the campus are brought together into a closer fellowship. 
At the regular monthly meetings subjects relative to their profession are 
discussed bv the members. The problems which confront the young minister are 
given special attention. In this way Sigma Beta Rho renders a definite service 
to her members and enables them to more effectively carry out her motto. 

Dr. Walton has been sponsor of the 
group since its organization in 1931 and Rev. 
Todd has been an active member since its 
inception. Honorary members are Dr. Cam- 
eron Harmon and Rev. W. E. Bennett. New 
members initiated this year are : Lloyd Bar- 
nard. Carl C. Bracy, Lisle Mewmaw and Wal- 
ter Pruett. 

During the year Sigma Beta Rho con- 
ducted a special chapel service. The annual 
banquet was given this spring. 




OFFICERS 

President — Paul Stevens 

( 'ice-President — Harold Whitlock 

Secretary-Treasurer — Emile Mignery 



Page Forty-five 



^Tm^c/tjmSz&cWj 



BETA ALPHA MU 




ties, Miss Hohn, Shelton, liimlc 



Fraternal and social relations as well as scholarship, arc also promoted among 
the women students on the hill by the Beta Alpha Mu sorority. Although the 
the sororities to organize it, like the other two, received official recognition 
ii November of 1933. At present five of the charter members remain active. 

Again, as in the year of its founding, the sorority has taken an active part in 
ampus affairs. Social functions given by the 
Beta Alpha Mu sorority during the year have 
been numerous. These include a "Kaffee 
h" at the home of Mary Dieckman, a 
"Rush tea." a dinner and theater party at the 
Lincoln Hotel and Theater in Belleville, a 
ure hunt and an annual banquet. 
Miss Rosalind Hohn has been the group 
fi lunding of the organization. 
ii • . \ 1 1 i in- Stanton, \\ as ini- 
during the -i- ond semester. 



'** 




OFFICERS 

Pre <<l,ni Gladvs Bradford 

\ i , President boll) Wattles 

,.', relary Treasurer Mai iorii 

mndei 

I i fil . I nn ! In. mil. i Shelton 



cJ/twdemj Mufdkjfm 



KAPPA THETA TAU 



t II 




November of 1934 marked the first anniversary of the founding of the Kappa 
Theta Tau sorority. The purpose of the organization as set forth by the nine 
charter members, two of whom are now in school, is "to promote scholarship, 
friendship and social activities among its members." One of the most important 
forward steps taken this year was the formation of an Alumni Association whose 
aim is to continue the purpose of the sorority after leaving school. 

The fall activities included a tea at the home of Mrs. Cameron Harmon, a 



party at the h 




h Habig '34, in St. Louis, a wiener roast and a home- 
coming reunion dinner. Rush week in Janu- 
ary featured a tea and parties at the homes of 
Airs. Harold Pfeffer, Mrs. John Zinkgraf and 
Airs. L. H. Pfeffer. A pledge party and the 
annual banquet were among the spring func- 
tions. 

Airs. Paul D. Waldorf was chosen spon- 
sor of the group to succeed Airs. Claude E. 
Vick. Alembers initiated bv the sorority this 
past year are : Dorothy Fincke, first semester ; 
Imogene P>rines, Fern Fox and Elfrieda Heer, 
second semester. 



OFFICERS 

Preside:)! — Elaine Ah ring 

Vice-President — I-abel Smith 

Secretary — Dorothy Hoover 

Treasurer — Dorothv Fincke 



y. M. C. A. 




Like its sister organization, the Y. M. C. A. is an 
\nil and hi worthwhile merit on the hill. From the fir 
attempts to smooth the way of new students and in h 
in a new and different lite. Regular evening meetings 
spiritual side. Because it is all-inclusive in character 

• needs on the campus as they arise. 
The Y. M. and Y. W. have always o 'Op- 
erated m college activities. < ipening-week 
functions as ivell as a Hallowe'en part' and 

' cither parties throughout the year were 
■ red jointly by the two organizations. 
The annual handbook, the "Y's M> ken- 
is the resull of another cooperative 
project. This small edition, containing all sorts 
1 information concerning McKen- 
i^ issued ;;raiis t" students and 
ol Hi'- - 1m iol year. 
hi Ipful m acquainting new- 
th campus traditions as well as other 
if informal 
The national Y. M. C. A. also holds a Stu- 
' ,' nev a. I 'lans are now 

• b 'l:i i ollege organization to send 

■ entatives to the meeting this 



organization oi long stand- 
it llay of school, the Y. M. 
■lp them make adjustments 
ook toward the care of the 
the Y. M. is able to meet 




i (FFICERS 

President Clayton V Fawkes 

/ ,. , /'/, ideni \\ illiam Sanders 

Set retary Emile M igncry 

Treasurer Clarence Walton 



Pa BI Ptrtytighl 



y. w. c. a. 




The \. W. C. A., as it enters its thirty-seventh year, has proved definitely 

that it has a place to fill on McKendree's campus. 

A "Big Sister/' designated by the Y. W., is one of the first persons to greet 

the Freshman girl as she arrives on the hill and to introduce her to college life. 

This year a "balloonatic" party given in the reception room of Clark Hall was 

the first of the opening-week functions which 
have to do with making the new girl feel at 
home. 

Nor does the Y. W. stop here, but brings 
together all the girls throughout the school 
year by weekly devotional and discussion 
meetings as well as through social affairs. 

Xeither is the organization purely local. 
It is a member of the Geneva Region of the 
^ . W. C. A. and this year sent six representa- 
tives to a Cabinet Training Conference held 
at Bradley University in Februarv. The Y. W. 
C. A. will also be represented at the summer 
conference at Geneva. One of the objectives 
of this year's program has been the correlation 
of the interests of the off and on-campus girls. 
Two very enjoyable parties have borne witness 
to the success of the undertaking;. 



OFFICERS 
President — Carolyn M. W'ahl 
Vice-President — Iva Lou Cralle 
Secretary-Treasurer — Mary Mar- 
garet Carson 
Program Chairman — Catherine Gilk 
son 




Page Forty-nine 



^h,<J(ckwij$zJ2Cmj 



MEN'S GLEE CLUB 




P effer, w . Bennelt. 
:. — 11 Hi -. Meadov 

i Heer. Pruett. Presley, 

Manwaring 



Whitlock, J. Be 



The Men's Glee Club comes in for an 
i- a pan of McKendree campus life. 
director of this organization which has done s 
its members. 

Many a high school senior and the publii 

- .. ome "McKendree consi ious" 

ittending a program given b> the 

club during its spring trip. This year the trip 

during Max 8-12. Towns of the 

iadi up the itinerary. 

The Men's < il< • Club is also proud of the 

production of the "Marriage of Nannette" in 

which a number of it- members had leading 

i Men's and Women's Glee Clubs, 

nuing in their spirit of peration, prc- 

imbined spring concerl as well as 
ed with the oratorio, "Hymn of Praise," 
i ■ ■ ning of June 2 



Miss 1 
luch 



re ut pi 
'auline 

tu brim 



arper i 
out the 



provicl 
s also 
talents 




OFFICERS 
I're idem William \\ Bennett 
I ice President Gordon l< Beers 
SV< retnry 7 reasuer ' icorgc Good- 
man 



Pane Fifty 



cJafiehon) 




WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB 




Tot row— Carson, Dick, Hoover, M. Harmon. 
Second rou — Eaton, Barnhart, Bulge, Bennet 
Third roar— Reed, Jeanes, Gilkison, Smith. 
Fourth ron — Yost, Knapp, Shelton, Fraser, F 
Bottom row — Bischoff, Russell, Pifer, C. Whi 



McKendree college life would not he complete without music — music for 
those who have the ability to participate actively and music for those who appre- 
ciate it. The Women's Glee Club, under the interested and active direction of 
Miss Pauline Harper, not only brings music to the college, but also provides an 
extra-curricular activity which does much toward the development of a well- 
rounded individual. 

"The Marriage of Nannette," an opera by 
Curtis, produced on March 13 by the Women's 
and Men's Glee Clubs working together, was 
received with enthusiasm. It was the first pro- 
duction of its kind since the opera "Martha" 
two years ago. 

Every year the club makes an annual con- 
cert trip, during which time programs are pre- 
sented before various church audiences and 
high school groups. This year the trip, extend- 
ing from May 1-5, took the club east, Litch- 
field, Oblong, Robinson, Lawrenceville, Mt. 
Carmel and Bridgeport being the towns visited. 




OFFICERS 

President — Phyllis Burge 

Vice-President — Mary Knapp 

Secretary-Treasurer — Martha Russell 



Page F'.fty- 



^Jw cJ(c /SmSzjzoti 



WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 




-,. Freesmeyer, Miring, Crow, Clendenny, Mi 
I 

i imillon. Fox, Gilkison, Mm*.-. 
F riser. 



Hi.lm. Stanton. Wilson. Ba 
[eer, Yost. Handel, E. Schi 



The Women's Athletic Association lias given to the women students of 
McKendree an excellent opportunity for participating in organized sports, thereby 
affording the proper kind of exercise which is so necessary to efficient college 
work. Recognition in the form of a purple and white "M" is given for continued 
activity in sports. 

Since the founding of the W. A. A. in the 
spring of 1934, under the leadership of Miss 
Rosalind Hohn, the organization has carried 
or, an active program. Last fall the associa- 
tion attended an annual Sports Day at Normal, 
Illinois, where, in competition with teams from 
other schools, McKendree's team won tirst 
place in volley hall. The W. A. A. has also 
-full-, sponsored soccer, volley hall, bas- 
il baseball, and tennis tournaments as 

ii et. 

Girls "!i«, received their letter the first 

■ r bj earning tin- required live hundred 

points are: Ahring, Carson, Crow. Donaldson, 

• n. Hamilton, Mowe, and Madonna VVil- 

Membership in tin- \\ . A. A. is open to 

all undergn nen after tin- candidates 

tarticipated active!) in two spoils. 



OFFICERS 

// 1 ,,/, n/ \ . hn.i I tamilton 

Vice l J ra til, hi Louise Crow 

SV, iri.n v Madonna Wilson 

Treasurer Marion Wilson 




Pai/c Fifty-two 



'M" CLUB 







f f A S 

M" fit M* M< 




Standhw— Rautli, Ptcffcr, 

hum. Musgrove, P, 

.SYn/i-rf— Krizek, Stroll, h: 



Aufderheide, T. 

esley. 

rsh, K. Wilson. 



Athletic ability receives its recognition and reward through the "M" club. 
Any man who has won his college letter in a major sport is eligible to be ini- 
tiated into the organization. 

The club enables the athletes of the school to join in a united effort to bring 
about a better type of sportsmanship in collegiate contests. Graduating seniors 

are also honored each year with trophies for 
each sport in which they have won a letter. 
Long after letters have become worn and 
sweaters frayed at the edges this emblem, the 
parting gift of the "M" club, remains a valua- 
ble treasure to the former letterman. 




m 



OFFICERS 

President— Cleve W. Stroh 

Vice-President — Howard Larsh 

Secretary-Treasurer — Kenneth Wil 

son 

Page Fifty-three 



LITTLE THEATRE 







i. Reed, Fox, Bradford, Wattles, 
ndenny. 
iv.' Pruett. Hohn, F.-iederich, Moor, 
rms, Whittington. Walker, II 
nterrowd, Donaldson, Anderson, Cralle, M 



Whitlock, 
II.: Harn 
ss Hohn, 



With the organization of the Little Theatr 

tunity was afforded a larger number of studen 

tii ms. The purpose of the organization is to 

trionic ;irt on McKendree's campus." Member; 

the p. - dramatic tesl and also a major 

The Little Theatre is divided into four 

lanies which take turns in presenting 

\ni' ui.u the plays presented were 

ners in Spain." "The Dying Wife," 

iress Indispensable," "The Alan in 

the Howler Hat," "On Vengeance Height," 

I hz I nseen ( in sssi; m d ml Cctirt- 

ship." The Homecoming plays, "The Green 

Id" and "The Doctor in Spite of Him- 

■ sponsored by the Little Theatre. 
Special honor is given the worthy mem- 

■ organi satii m b) the conferring of 
various de§ e degrees are three in 
number: Managing and Staging; Character 
Portrayal; and Play Production. Eligibility 
points for Alpha Psi Omega mav be attained 
through participation in Little Theatre plays. 

Will," an original play by Willard Fri- 
derii h presented at I ape < lirardead on 

II. 



e gr 


OU] 


)1 


as 


I fa 


11 an i 


;xce 


llei 


It O] 


its t 


ii t; 


ik 


e 1 


iarl 


m d 


ram; 


itk 


pro 


"instig 


al 


e 


am 


1 per] 


>etu; 


lie 


the 


sliip 
■it\ 


in 
VOt< 


tl 


ie 
if 


org 

the 


aniza 
mem 


tinn 
bers 


is 


l.ase 



duc- 




OFFICERS 

President Carl C. Bracy 

Vice President Paul Meadows 

Secretary-Treasurer Fern Fox 



/•„,„■ fiflyfow 



cJ/imfmniktfdbijpve 



FRENCH CLUB 




iu — Wilson, Yost, Crov 
, row— Bennett, Goodm 


,, l!arnliart, Handel 
an, J. P. Sampson, 


, Schmedake, E- 
Lingle, Oxendin, 


:, Zeller, Hortin 


, Holt, Mi 


ra« V — Ahring, Chappie, 
dake, Gilkison, Fraser, 


Keen. Hinder, Mis 
Bischoff. 


IS Tyndall, W'ilsoi 


,, C. Whittingto 


n, 1). Schi 



The French Club, under the direction of Miss Elsa Alae Tyndall, is one of 

the three organizations enjoying its first year on the campus. 

French customs, songs, current literature and folk dances, as well as a closer 

acquaintance with spoken French language, are the things of primary interest to 

the club members. Consequently, special stress 
is given to these points in the program arrange- 
ment. In order that there may be greater 
variety in the programs each French class is 
given its own song and folk dance which is 
later presented at a regular club meeting. A 
"French Christmas Party" was the feature of 
the December program. 

Membership is confined to those enrolled 
in the regular French courses. Meetings are 
held bi-monthly. 




OFFICERS 

President — Carolyn M. Wahl 

Viec-President — William W. Bennett 

Recording Secretary — Marjorie 

Binder 

Corresponding Secretary — George J. 

Goodman 



Papc Fifty-five 



OUT-STATE CLUB 




v. Bradford, Wahl, Binde 



Although the greater part of the college enrollment is drawn from the states 
of Illinois and Missouri, still we rind a number of other states represented on our 
campus. It was in recognition of this fad and in order that persons from these 
various sections might become acquainted that the ( hit-State Club was organized 
hv Miss Elsa Mae Tvndall in the fall of 1934 with eighteen charter members. 

The prevailing spirit of the organization is one of appreciation of the "other 
fellow" and a sharing in his interests and 
ideals. There is also a definite desire on the 
part of the members to learn from one another 
something of the customs traditions and places 
of interest of each one's native section. 

States represented in the chili are Colo 
rado. Virginia, Alabama, Indiana. North Caro- 
lina, Mississippi, Kentucky, Missouri and 

. a. Illinois anil the city of Lebanon eai h 
■ - tative. 

Arthur V. Huffman was elected to the 

presidency of the club at the end of the first 

lii'- other officers served through- 




Vice 1'rcsidenl Gladys Bradford 

. pi retat i / reasurer Marjoric 

Bindci 



cMfiefmn, 




NATURE CLUB 




front row— Cralle. Neuhaus. Knapp, Hinder, Dr. Spencer, Hamilton Ke 
Back row— Harris, Hearst, G. I'.eers, Walker, Barnard, I.usk, Eaton, H 
man, Mignery, Mewmaw. 

"Campus Week," a new thing on the Hill, answers conclusively the question, 
"Why have a Nature Club on McKendree's campus"? This week of "campus 
consciousness," sponsored by the Nature Club, was really an intensification of 
the program the group has been working on all year. During this time the student 
body was made to appreciate more fully the natural beauty of our campus. Many 
improvements, such as the planting of trees and shrubs and the building of rock 

walks, have been accomplished through the 
Nature Club. Further ways of improvement 
have also been pointed out. In connection with 
the week's activity outside speakers brought 
interesting talks and a "Nature Exhibit" was 
held in the basement of the library. 

A special study of the trees on the 
campus was made by the club this year as one 
of the means of acquainting its members with 
nature. Also, through the efforts of the Nature 
Club, Mr. Fain King, noted archeologist, was 
brought to the campus and delivered several 
interesting lectures. 

Fast fall, club members enjoyed a camp- 
ing trip at Fountain Bluff in Southern Illinois. 
There are also regular bird hikes. On one of 
the field expeditions a maple tree was tapped 
and an explanation of the sugar making 
process was given. 

OFFICERS 

/'resident — Mary T. Knapp 
Vice-President — Emile Mignery 
Secretary-Treasurer — Yelma Hamil- 
ton 
Proyram Chairman — Iva Lou Cralle 



Whittington, Pifer. 
on, Whitlock, Huff- 




Pac/c Fifty- 



PRESS CLUB 







Campus news and student opinion finds expression in the McKendree Review 
published every Wednesday by the Press Club. The membership of the club is 
made up of the students of the Journalism class for whom the publication of the 
Review is a kind oi lab iratory in which they receive practical experience. 

'his year witnessed the revival of the "Campus ( )wl," time honored "scandal 
:eker." who had apparently lain dormant for the past two years. A new column, 
'( 'pinion Parade." which discusses pertinent problems of national as well as inter- 
national importance is a valuable addition to the paper, provoking, as it dues, a 
great deal of thought ami comment. 

litorial polic) the Review lias always stood for cooperation and the 
the best interests of the College. However, it is frank and candid 
s criticism and offers numerous improvements. A special 1 [omecoming edition 
of the Revie added to the success of that event. 



STUDENT ASSOCIATION 




First Semester 
C. Jack Pfeffer 
George J. Goodman 
Ruth Schmalenberger 
Paul Meadows 
Mary Sanders 
Isabel Smith 
Gerald Whittington 
Carl C. Bracv 



OFFICERS 

President 

I 'ice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Program Committee 

Song Leader 
Pianist 



Second Semester 

Darrell R. Doolen 

Cleve W. Stroh 

Dorothy R. Dintelman 
I Gordon R. Beers 

Mary McClain 
I Hermann Presley 

Gerald Whittington 

Isabel Smith 



A "New Deal" was effected this year in the regular student chapel hour which 
is conducted by the Student Association. With the change from a short daily 
chapel to an hour period on Tuesdays and Thursdays the Student Association now 
holds its regular meeting and program on the last Thursday of each month. 

Upon enrollment every student automatically becomes a member of the 
Association and is free to take part in its meetings and discussions. The programs 
this year have been very carefully worked out by a committee whose aim was 
to make this hour worthwhile. 

Besides participation in the regular chapel programs the Student Association 
is active in supporting the various athletic teams and in fostering school loyalty. 
Much of the success of the Homecoming celebration was due to the efforts of the 
Student Association, working in cooperation with the faculty homecoming 
committee. 



Page Pifty-nine 



5^c^/&^afe^% 



ANNUAL STAFF 







—J. I'aul Sampson. Carl C. Brai 
Hoffman. 

rothj Dintcl 



Gerald Whittington, \ 
■.lake. Miss Alleen Wilso 



We, of the annual staff, have found real happiness in creating this year's 
McKendrean. To us the publication is a symbol of McKendree's natural beauty. 
lier stern strength, her youthful spirit, the idealism of her sons and daughters. 
indeed, her very life. Give this symbol a mission if you will; let it eulogize the 
past: let it vision the roseate future. To us the McKendrean is McKendree. 

The willing spirit with which the men 
and women on this year's staff have joined 
together in a common aim. lias lieen an 
inspiration. 

■• Editor. 



Till'. STAFF 

Arthur V. I luff man Editor-in-Chief 

Ralph Whitson Associate Editor 

Carl C. I'racy Business Manager 

eth Brown.. Assistant Business Manager 

hmedake \rt Editor 

Herman Presley Sports Editor 

ttington A<1\ ertising Manager 

holly Wattles Feature Editor 

Dorothy Dintelman < (rganization Editor 

John Paul Sampson .Circulation Manager 

I ai uli \ Vdvjser 




tiditor Arthur \ Huffman 

I o, late liditor Ralph Whitson 

Bu he Manager Carl C Bracy 

I / Bu tine.\ i Manager Kenneth 

Brow n 



cMmfemjMi^pm 



WOMEN'S QUARTET 




Left to right — Gilki: 



ruth, McClain, He 



The two quartets, while singing on the Glee Club programs, are really organi- 
zations in themselves. They are able to appear on occasions where it would be 
impossible to use the entire clubs. In this way they are able to contact a larger 
number of persons. 

This year the Men's Quartet, because of graduation of members, has been 
re-organized and the new group made its initial appearance on the Glee Club trip. 

On the other hand, the Women's Quartet has been very active. Their engage- 
ments have included programs at the Trenton Baptist Church ; D. A. R. tea at 
Belleville ; Prospect Park Community House ; Belleville Parent-Teacher meet- 
ing; the national Sigma Zeta conclave; and the annual McKendree luncheon held 
during the meeting of the Southern Illinois Teachers' Association. 

MEN'S QUARTET 




Left to right— G. Whi 



??^<J(cM2M{tkJ2a4% 



DEBATE SQUAD . . . 

That students arc reall) vitall) concerned with the social problems ami 
economic trends of today was clearly shown l>\ the keen interest in debate this 
year. The forensic season, which officially closed with the Missouri Province 
Convention, has been an unusually successful one on the hill. Largely because 
of the interest and careful coaching of Mr. Marl Wiley 1 layter. McKendree has 
been represented b> debate teams of which she may he justly proud. 

The men's Pi Kappa Delta question fur this year was: Resolved: "Thai the 
nations should agree to prevent the international shipment of arms and muni- 
tions." - ere also prepared on the Socialized Medicine, the Democratic 
Collectivism and the Collective Bargaining questions. 

A glance over the record fur the season shows a total of seven favorable 
decisions as against three losses. McKendree lost decisions to Blackburn, Cape 
Girardeau and Asbury Colleges but emerged victorious from a single encounter 
with Shurtleff College and the dual debates with Southern Illinois State Normal 
University, St. Louis University and Blackburn College. Non-decision debates 
were held with Greenville, Carthage and the Principia Colleges. 

Those who made up the debate squad this year were: Paul .Meadows. Harold 
T. Whitlock and Arthur V. Huffman, four years experience; Clifford J. Ilerlen- 
stein, three years; F.mile F. Mignery, two years; and Carl C. Bracy, Kenneth 
Brown, Harold Hertenstein, Paul I*.. Stevens, John Oppitz, Phebe Anderson, 
Florence Zahnow and Walter Pruett, each with one vear of experience. 



<^Mmfmnj Mi%&/ 'pve 



ATHLETICS 




OLD MA1X 



CHAI'EL 



I'aye Sixty-thr 



3Pfe <J(jc kwiSiean; 



FOOTBALL SQUAD 



5 



•» C 



* ?* 



o 



fi I 



- ;. 



2 



r. - 



w ^ tit <■> iii ii, -^> 






Gruchalla, Zcllcr. Eaton, (Clamp C Hertenstein Berendt 

lcI) Waldorf. J. Beers, Beamon. Ernst, Harms. Dippold, Schmedake 
Aufderheide, Presley. 

N'orris. Larsh, Schwartz, Rice, Musgrove, Cope, Mourning, Zirge 
Hartley. 

Heely. Randle, D. Wilson, Hinkel, Captain Wilson, Simmons, Brausa, 



Blackburn, Browning, 
Coles, II. Hertenstein, 

. Daniel. Asm. Coach 
Rauth, Manwaring. 



F< K iTBALL SUMMARY 

The Purple started the season by giving the Scott Field Flyers a 36-0 trounc- 
ing, with Coach Waldorf using forty Bearcats in the struggle. The touchdowns 
were well divided, Captain Wilson leading his teammates with two, while Berendt, 
Daniels, Sampson and Aufderheide each carried the pigskin over the line for a 
six-pointer. 

"Wilson, Aufderheide and Norris distinguished themselves in the backfield, 

while Rice, Larsh and 'Chief Sampson stood out mi the line." 

.... , . , , , . , . Belleville News-Democrat, 

u ith perfect blocking in the lirst few 

minutes of play, the Purple eleven trampled 

over the Normal team like a steam roller. They 

gained at least three yards per try which 

resulted in a touchdown after four consecutive 

first downs. N'orris gave a good exhibition that 

day and plunged the ball from the three-yard 

line over for the lirst touchdown. Wilson made 

idown and kicked the extra 

point. 

Waldorf, former Baker University 

1 !it) . Kansas, has keen with us 

for two seasons and has made a splendid show - 

ing in the Athletii Department. Great things 

; from him in Ins future Oftrei 

■ >ai h. 

"Waldorf is not a kij^ man as sizes go, 

■ has made the Lebanon school a mighty 

m state i ollege football i in les." 

Pantagraph. c< i \cn \\ m.doki- 




ilr fotlt 



zJAmhi2^b 




McKENDREE vs. ROLLA 




\ \ ' -,-, 



"Captain Ken Wilson, halfback, counted the second McKendree touchdown in 
the final quarter after Ervin Aufderheide, the other halfback, had placed the ball 
in scoring position with a 27-yard run." 

— Pantagraph. 

"One of the outstanding individual performances of the season was made by 
Captain Ken Wilson, McKendree halfback, against Carbondale Teachers last Fri- 
day. Wilson made touchdown runs of 58 yards and 71 yards, and ran his total 
points to 19." 

— Pantagraph. 

'"Old McKendree is always a tough hombre to bring down on the gridiron." 

— Pantagraph. 
Robert Hartley, a former hardwood star 
at Carbondale, assisted Coach Waldorf in 
football and track and was head coach in bas- 
ketball. He was a great aid to Waldorf and 
produced a very flashy basketball quintet. 

SCHEDULE 




McKendree 36 

McKendree 

McKendree 20 

McKendree 13 

McKendree 40 

.McKendree 

McKendree 12 

McKendree 

McKendree 



Scott Field 

Washington U 18 

Rolla Mines 6 

Normal 7 

Hanibal La Grange 

Macomb 14 

Carbondale 19 

111. Weslevan 7 

111. College ....33 



ASSISTANT COACH HARTLEY 

Page Sixty-five 




^m^ckimSazan, 



LETTERMEN 



KENNETH WILSON, Captain, Granite City. 
Junior, Halfback. 

Pantagraph Firsi All-State; United Press First All- 
Star; Associated Press First All-Star; Honorable Men- 
tion in "Little All-America" Selection. "The man Wash- 
ington has tn slop is 'Tug' Wilson, a great open-field 
runner." — Conzelman, Post-Dispatch. "Spike" was the 
target at which all opposition was aimed. He dis- 
played great ability on both ends of the Purple's aerial 
attack as well as gaining a wide reputation as an open- 
field runner. 



I.KKOY RANDLE, Casey 
Sophomore, Halfback. 



ille. 



Randle's speedy ability to lug the leather gained him 
several quarters of play. Thus lie earned his first let- 
ter. With tins year's experience lie should be a real 
threat For the Cat's next season. 



I.KKOY RICE, Flora. 

Sophomore, Guard, Center. 

Guard, Honorable Mention Pantagraph All-State; Cen- 
ter, Honorable Mention Associated l'ress. "Duck" 
started the season at guard but was later switched to the 
snapper-hack position, where he proved his worth. He 
fought to the finish, lettered for the second time, and 
still lias two more years to slaughter the Purple's oppo- 
sition. 



U \I.I. VCE BLACKBURN, Edwardsville. 
klc. 

•■nii! Associated Press Bi 
i kbum proved too much for many an off- 
sh. "Wally" was among those men showing 
last year's record. Watch out 

.■. 'T-dn\ IT ! 

KRVIN VUFDEKHEIDE, Granite City. 
re, I lall'back. 

ufderheide, McKendree has two hall- 
.- anj two Washington can show."- 
was handicapped t In ~ year by 

Still proved to the 

ind headiest backfield men 

tarring in 
\i Rolla he recovered a 

tOUl lldow II. 



ke, N. C 

Pantagraph A 

"('In,. 



' the 



; Honor 
hard hit- 



ting end for the Bearcats, messed up many a play of the 

opponents, not to speak of the Opponents themselves, 
lie played end on defense hut was shifted to fullback on 
offense because of his supreme ability to smash the line 
as well as his excellent way of running interference. 
This was demonstrated at S. I. N. U. when he led Capt. 

Wilson for on and "ii yard runs for touchdowns. 

\ IKi',11. MOURNING, W 1 River. 

Freshman, Tackle. 

Mourning was not particular whether he went in at 
guard or tackle- just SO he had a chance to mow them 
down lie was a very reliable reserve who should be a 

high bidder for a tegular berth in the future. 

|i il IX R \l Til, Belleville. 
Junior, Guard. 

Besides being the all-round man of the sepiad, "Johnnie" 
proved his "gift of gab" when he talked the Kolla team 
out of a victory. He also shared honors in punting, av- 
eraging over 15 yards in the game at Macomb. 

K \Y\lo.\D It, MUSGROVE, Salem. 
Senior, Guard. 

"Muskic" was capable of plugging Up any hole left in 
the guard position lb' i^ one of the trio to be gradu- 
al, d i In, year, hut he has two service sin pes to Ins credit. 



r„,„- Sixty-six 



cJ/mmm> 



LETTERMEN 




HOWARD I.AKSH, Captain-Elect, East St. Louis. 
Junior, Guard. 
Larsh was probably the hardest fighter on the team and 
earned the much-coveted "M" for the third time. He 
should be a great leader for the team this coming year 
for he never gives up nor lets his team-mates slacken. 

PAUL MAUCK, Jeff. 
Junior, End. 
The blond viking played his consistent game 
as wingman, thereby earning his second letter 
has one more year to participate. 

RICHARD SCHWARTZ, Belle 
Freshman, Center, End. 
"Dick" was the final catch of the season. He worked 
first at center, but was later shifted to end on offense. 
Owing to his aggressiveness he was one of the best de- 
fensive men on the squad. 

WILLIAM EATON, Edwardsville. 
Junior, Tackle. 
Bill had to overcome the hazard of an injured knee with 
a consequent loss of weight, but he was still rough and 
ready. He has lettered for two years with one more 
year to go. 

ALBERT MANWARING, Chester. 
Senior, End. 
"Al", the fastest man on the team, came in very handy 
at the flank position. His fight and determination w 
be greatly missed next year, since he leaves us this 
spring by the sheep-skin route. 

WILBUR ZIRGES, Worden. 
Freshman, Quarterback. 
Coach Waldorf found a fast, heavy, and capable back- 
field man in Zirges, who solved the problem of filling in 
the quarterback position. Zirges showed his speed and 
drive in the Normal game. Watch him next year. 

DON WILSON. Oblong. 
Freshman, Guard. 
Don was the smallest lineman to letter, but he was al- 
ways anxious to get into the game. Wilson had two 
ways of getting his man — actions and words. 

ELDON BROWNING, Pleasant Hill. 
Freshman, Tackle. 
Although handicapped by lack of experience, Browning 
was always ready to step in and dish it out when the 
Purple's forward wall began to weaken. 



DUDLEY KLAMP, Irvington. 
Freshman, Tackle. 
Klamp was the largest man on the squad, tipping the 
scales at 265. He starred in the Wesleyan game when he 
displayed his ability at checking hard-driving interfer- 
ence. Next year he should work off 20 pounds and 
really man-handle them. 

OSWALD BERENDT, Granite City. 
Freshman, End. 
Berendt was Coach Waldorf's answer for a punter. The 
Washington game saw "Dutch" give the ball a ride of 
80 yards in the rain. He had the size, scrap and knowl- 
edge of the position such as a good end should have. 

CLIFFORD HERTENSTEIN, New Baden. 
Senior, Center. 
"Cliff" has been out for football for four years. He 
ends his career on the gridiron by graduation. 




c 



BASKET BALL SQUAD 




. Suhrlieinrich, Krizek, Harms, .1. Be 
list, Mai oit, Wilson, N'orris. 



BASKETBALL 

Coach Hartley's men, winning four conference games out of nine starts and 
collecting thirteen decisions out of twenty-three tilts, proved to be one of the best 
hardwood lives for old McK. in several seasons. 

They showed what a flashy, sharp-shooting quintet could do as they won their 
lasl -' . ! fine style. 

Tin- addition of Bise, Welborn and Ionian, all over 6 feet two inches, gave the 
Bear deal of additional strength over last season. 

With the return of all the present material a great team should develop for the 
I year since onl) three of the fifteen letter men will lie lost by graduation. 

The season's schedule included: 



7 ( larlinv ille, hei e. 

Ii Shi IK. here. 

Louis I '.. 
Ian. 3 Illinois < lollege, there. 
Jan. ! Carthage, there. 
Jan. " M;n omb, there. 



Jan. 11- S. I. \. t'.. there, 
[an. 19 Charleston, here. 
J.-m. 2u S. I. \. I'., here. 
Feb. 2 Shurtleff, lure, 
i ; eli. 15 Charleston, there. 
Feb. 16 Central Wesleyan, lure. 



Feb. 22 Shurtleff, there. 



/'...,, Sixty eiuhl 



cJ/Lrnhmj ikikb/ 'jhe 



LETTERMEN 




KENNETH SCOTT, Marissa. 

Senior, Captain and Guard. 
"Scotty" broke into the scoring column more 
than usual this season, still playing his good guard- 
ing game. This is his fourth year and, although 
rather small, he was a fine, dependable defensive 

CLEVE STROH, Ait. Carmel. 

Senior, Forward. 
Although "Izzy" had a little tough luck hitting 
the basket early in the season, he regained his eye 
and was among the high scorers during the last 
on, starring in the game at Charles- 
ting a total of 175 points for the 
season. Stroh will be lost this year by graduation. 

ALBERT MANWARING, Chester. 



part of 



regular bertl 



the 



quintet, 

d played his position 
waring is another of 



"Al" did not earn 
but he saw plenty of 
at forward up to a "T." M 
the trio to be lost by graduation. 

KENNETH WILSON, Granite City. 

Tunior. Captain-elect and Guard. 
Wilson was shifted to guard this year, where 
he came through in fine shape. "Spike" was as 
tricky on the hard-wood as he was on the gndiroi 
and developed an accurate eye for long shots, scor 
ing eight points in the last six minutes of play al 
Charleston. He was second high scorer for tin 
Purple, netting 206 points, 80 being in conferenct 
play, ranking him among the high scorers in tin 
Utile Nineteen. 
CLAIR NORRIS, Pontiac. 

Sophomore, Forward. 



letter on the Purple team. He should be quite an 
aid to the squad next year. 

ROY IAECKEL, New Athens. 

Freshman, Forward. 
.Taeckel enlisted on the squad at mid-year and 
showed possibilities of a good forward. 
RAYMOND HARMS, Bone Gap. 
Freshman, Forward". 
Harms played sort of "off and on" games at 
forward. He has plenty of size and with a little 
more experience should make an important cog in 
the Purple's machine. 

RAYMOND DANIELS, Pleasant Hill. 



The 



rly-haired guard f r 



Pie 



ant Hill pe 



formed well on both defense and offense. Willi 
his speed and skill he should develop into a very 
good guard. 

RICHARD SIHRHEINRICH, New 
Baden. 

Sophomore. Center. 
"Dick" was the star guard in intra-mural basket- 
ball last year, but was advanced to the varsity this 
season. He seemed never to tire and kept up a 
terrific pace all the time he was in the game. 

TOE CRAWFORD, Belknap. 

Freshman, Guard. 
Although handicapped in the early season by a 
bad knee, the "Hutsonville Flash" demonstrated 
his skill at ball-handling in the latter part of the 
season. Joe was a fast, tricky player as well as 
a great little passer and displayed spectacular 
shooting-ability at times. 

GEORGE WELBORN, Centralia. 

Freshman, Forward. 
Welborn made it plenty hot for several teams 
this year and was the Purple's main point-getter. 
He compiled a total of 227 points, 95 of which 
were in conference tilts, placing him in eighth 
position in the Little Nineteen. 

WAYNE BISE, Mound City. 

Freshman, Forward. 
When there was a scramble to get the ball off 
the back-board, Bise often came out with the 
sphere. His size gave the team greater strength in 
recovering rebounds, and he was good for at least 
five or six points per game. 

ALVIN IORDAN, Dupo. 

Freshman, Center. 
Jordan joined ranks at mid-year and immediately 
became the first string center, where he proved to 
be more than a match for several teams. He also 
shared honors in dishing out a brilliant defeat to 
E. I. T. C. 

GUSTAY KRIZEK, Belleville. 

Sophomore, Guard. 
Krizek was used by Coach Hartley to relieve 1,,, 
regular guards. "Gus" was a hard fighter and a 
good defensive man. 

lAMES BEERS, Carrier Mills. 
Freshman. 
Beers developed from a freshman of unknown 
ability into one of the best reserve guards on the 
squad. He was a levelheaded player and had quite 
an eye for the basket. 



Page Sixty-nine 



TRACK SQUAD 



^Jw cJ(c KmtSv2Ufl 




rsl, Manwarii 
P - >mpson, Walki r, Sai 



Daniels, Oxendine, C. Lowry, M. 
Presley, Zeller, Bise, Rauth, Captai 



naw, Cope, 

Ca uthers, 



The track season opened with four lettermen reporting for the squad. 
Caruthers, Presley, Sanders, and J. P. Sampson. 

The rirst meet outside the inter-class activities was held at Blackburn Ci 
"ii April 17 and resulted in a splendid victory for the local squad. 

i he outcome of the Quadrangular Meet held on Hypes Field on Apr 
resulted in the following standing: 
S. I. X. V.. First. 
Illinois College, Second. 
McKendree, Third. 
Shurtleff, Fourth. 

Captain Carruthers won a silver medal in 
i. "ill- Relays, having placed second in 
• run. 
The schedule for the thinly-clads for this 

Mar. 2' 1 Intend.,-- leet. 

Apr. 17 Blackburn, Carlinville. 

Apr. IV Quadrangular Meet 



no]- Colli 

I Carbondal 
Louis. 

I l : arleston 
lacomb. 



Shurtleff, llli- 
uthern I eachers. 



I hey 
liege 

.1 1" 




LETTEKMEN 
Alums Carruthers 

lohn Paul Sampson 
William D. Sanders 

Herman Preslei 



cMfiefmfb ikbdtf 'pve 



INTRAMURAL . . . 

Intramural athletics attracted quite a number of men in the fields of basket- 
ball, track, tennis and indoor baseball. 



BASKETBALL 

In Basketball — The Plato Literary Society won the six-team two-round race 
by nosing out the second position AMO fraternity team. Because of their team 
work and determination to win. the Platos were undefeated. The Bachelor fra- 
ternity team held the same position as last year, that of third. The Philo Literary 
team ranked fourth and the Rough Riders beat the Faculty for fifth place. 

Hertenstein was high-point man during the race with 78 points to his credit. 
Sanders and Rauth were close on his heels with 76 each. The Review All- Star 
selection was composed of C. Hertenstein, Plato, and Sanders, Bachelors, for- 
wards ; Larsh, AMO, center ; Harmon, Plato, and Wehmeier, Plato, guards. Sim- 
mons, Presley, Schwartz, Rauth, and Pruett composed the second five. 

TRACK 

In Track — The freshmen walked off with the laurels in the annual inter- 
class field meet, scoring 53 points. The seniors were second with 43 : sophomores 
third with 31 ; and the juniors last with 26. John P. Sampson, a sophomore, was 
high-point getter with 21 tallies to his credit. Sanders rated second with 15'_- 
points; Manwaring and Presley tied for third, each claiming 14; while Daniels 
had 12. Other point getters included Hearst for the seniors ; Rauth and Dorko 
for the juniors ; Morris, Blackburn and Dillinger for the sophomores ; and Pruett, 
Zeller, Cope, Jaeckal, Mewmaw, Oxendine, Zirges and Bise for the freshmen. 

TENNIS, SOFT-BALL 

As we go to press, a men's tennis tournament with 28 contestants is in prog- 
ress. The soft-ball league will soon be organized. 



Page Seventy-one 



^fm <d(c Kmiclhearfz 



STUDENT ASSISTANTS . . . 

Secretary to the President Dolly Wattles 

Assistant Secretary to the President Myra Jeanes 

Secretary to the Dean Maxine Clements 

I Marjorie Keen i 1st Semester) 

T ., Genevieve Burge i 1st Semester) 

Library < T . .... ' , -, , n . .. 

Louise \\ interrowd ( 2nd Semester) 

' Phyllis Burge (2nd Semester) 



Biology 

Chemistry .... 

Mathematics. 
Music 



\ t iordon R. Beers 

I William Eaton 

t Clayton Faw kes 
' Bernard Baldridge 



.1 Clifford I fertenstein 
' Franz I lolin 



Kathleen Pifi 
I Isahel Smith 



Assistant to the Registrar Catherine Gilkison 

l'h\ S1CS Clarence Walton 



Page Seventy-lv 



aMm&2mjMi%A/ppe 



FEATURES . . . 




THE CHAPEL 



Page Seventy-three 



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SENIOR TREE PLANTING 



t >n Thursday, May 23d. the seniors dedicated their two cypress trees and 
rials which consisted of a sun dial and a senior bench. 



Program 

Music Band 

Invocation Paul Stevens 

Music Men's Quartet 

Talk Rev. Aeschliman 

! )edicatory address Gordon R. Beers 

Benediction 1 )r. Cameron 1 tarmon 

Alma Mater Assembly 



SENIOR CLASS DAY 

May 2.^1 was set aside as Senior Class Day, the second to be observed 
on the local campus. Dr. E. R. Spencer, head of the Department of Biology, was 
it assistance to the class in this connection, being largely instrumental in 
securing the day as a holiday fur the class. Following the program of the morn- 
ing, the seniors attended a picnic. 



1 'ri iGRAM 

Organ Prelude Kathleen Pifer 

Son;: Assembly 

Invocation D. E. Melton 

Welcome < Gordon R. Beers 

1 'nem 1 'aul Meadows 

! listorv Dorothy 1 lint eh nan 

Music ...Women's Quartet 

r Four Years" \rthur V. Huffman 

i ieorge • *i iodman 

5o What ?" ..Emile Mignery 

tation of gavel Gordon R. Beers 

funior Cla I 'i i sid< nl \\ illiam Sanders 
Alma Mater Assembl} 

Postlufll Kathleen Pifer 



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h< HXY WATTLES, MAY < m KI'.X. 1935 



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MAY FETE . . . 

Dolly Wattles was crowned queen of the annual May Fete this year. Miss 
Wattles, senior from Clay City, served as the first president of the Beta Alpha Mu 
Sorority. She has also been active in Clio, Little Theatre, and the Nature Club. 
Kathleen Pifer, of Mounds, was the maid of honor. The attendants were Dorothy 
Dintelman, of Belleville; Elaine Ahring, of O'Fallon ; Ruth Schmalenberger, of 
Belleville, and Leona Bischoff, of Mascoutah. 

The program for the fete included : 

Procession. 

Crowning of Queen. 

Pantomime: "A Mexican Legend." 

Winding of the Maypole. 

Demonstration by Women's Athletic Association. 
Miss Rosalind Hohn was in charge of the activities for the day. 



Page Seventy-nine 




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DRAMATICS 



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E FROM "THE DOCTOR IN SPITE OF HIMSELF" 
;•;- Harms. Friederich, Dick, Mignery. Fox, Whitlock, Moore. Huffman, Wolfe 



This year's program for Homecoming Day included two plays, produced by 
the Little Theatre, under the direction of -Miss Rosalind Hohn. 

THE DOCTOR IX SPITE OF HIMSELF 

!. B. Mni.iKki: 
College Chapel, Nov. 24 

CAST 

Sganarelle, ;i wood-chopper Emile Mignery 

Martine, his wife Pearl 1 )iok 

M. Robert, a neighbor Raymond Harms 

Geronte, ;i country gentleman Willard Friederich 

Valere, Geronte's servant Janus T. Moore 

Lui servant ....Harold Whitlock 

Jacqueline, Lucas' wife and nurse in 

Geronte's home - .... Fern Fox 

Lucinda, Geronte's daughter Mary Blanche Wolfe 

Leondre, her lover \rthur V. Huffman 

THE GREEN EMERALD 
an adaptation of Lord Dunsany's 

"A Nighl at an Inn" 
College Chapel, Nov. 24 

CAST 

Captain < '■era I<1 Whittington 

I [arold I fertenstein 

Albert Carl ('. Bracy 

I 'aul Meadows 

Idol Clifford I fertenstein 

First Priesl Harold Brown 

I )nn Lusk 

Thir4 Priesl Franz Hohn 

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DRAMATICS 




•> ■ 
i/ *« b t 

SCENE FROM "MARRIAGE OF NANNETTE" 
Above— Heer, Carson, Whittington, Smith. 

is/J So ritiht— Bennett, Reerl, Bennett, Morris, Gilkison, Presley Bracv 
tenstein, Russell, Beers, McClain. 

MARRIAGE OF NANNETTE 

Comic Opera In Three Acts 

Book and lyrics by Agnes Emilie Peterson 

Music by Louise Woodson Curtis 

CAST 

Heloise, Comtesse de Martigny Man- Mirgaret Carson 

Yvonne, her sister, also known as LaGitana Martha Russell 

Frederic, Due d' Antin . Eldoi Heer 

Madelon, his daughter Catherine Gilkison 

Henri, Marquis de Hauteur, his nephew Gordon R. Beers 

Hilaire, his steward Hernnn Presley 

Mme. Zenobie. keeper of the inn Pearl Dick 

Xannette. her daughter Isabel Smith 

Edmond, Mme. Zenobie's son, a high- 
wayman Harold Hertenstein 

Other highwaymen 

Roderique Tames Beers 

Baptiste '....Bill Holt 

Jean William Eaton 

Reporello, a Gypsy chief George Goodm n 

Zingara, a Gypsy girl Mary McClain 

Rene, a village youth in love with Nannette, Gerald Whittingt i 1 

Emile, a village boy William Bennett 

Yvette, a village maid Mary Etta Reed 

Susanne. servant at the inn Dorothy Bennett 

Marcel, a servant at the inn Lloyd Morris 

Pierre Parthenav, notary, town crier, etc Carl C. Bracv 

Paulino, a peddler Emile Mignerv 

Santo, Reporello's bear Robert Jackson 

Chorus 

Page Eighty-one 



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DRAMATICS . . . 

On December 12 the "Ys" presented their annual play and musical program 
which consisted oi vocal and organ numbers followed by the presentation of the 
.'iie-act play, "Oust of the Road" by Kenneth Sawyer Goodman. 

Cast 

Peter Steele Kenneth Brown 

Prudence Steele Phyllis Burge 

An old man Carl C. Bracy 

The tramp Paul Meadows 

For the third consecutive year, the Faculty Dames sponsored an evening of 
one-act plays in the College Chapel on February 13. 

Casts 

"PINK AND PATCHES" 

by 

Margaret Bland 

Texie, a mountain girl Mrs. E. W. Hayter 

Rexie, her twin brother Dr. Geo. E. Scherer 

A city lady Miss Pauline Harper 

A mountain mother Mrs. Minnie Phillips 

"WILL-O'-THE-WISP" 

by 

Doris Holman 

Country woman Mrs. Minnie Phillips 

Poet's wife Mrs. C. J. Bittner 

Her maid Mrs. O. H. Kleinschmidt 

Will-o'-the-wisp Mrs. P. D. Waldorf 

"THE FLORIST'S SHOP" 

by 

Winifred 1 [awkridge 

Maude the office clerk Miss Alleen Wilson 

Miss Wells, a spinster Mrs. 1,. K. < >ppitz 

Mr. lackson. her fiance Dr. E. R. Spencer 

Henry, the office boy I larrel Doolen 

Mr. Slovsky, proprietor of shop.... Coach I'. I). Waldorf 

Till'. McKENDREE LITTLE THEATRE 
The Little Theatre organization which came into existence during the pres- 
ent year was divided into four stock companies which presented the following 
plays : 

"J( UNT OWNERS IX SPAIN" 

by 

\liee Brown 

C VST 

Miss Dyer Mar) Kit a Reed 

Mrs. Blair Phebe Anderson 

Mrs. Fullerton Naomi St. Clair 

Mrs. Mit. hell Velma Hamilton 

Pane Biijhl i two 



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DRAMATICS 



THE DYING WOMAN— By Laurette Taylor 
Cast 

Arabella Fitzgerald Jeanette Clendenny 

Maurice Fitzgerald Emile Mignery 

EVENING DRESS INDISPENSABLE— By Roland Pertwee 
Cast 

Alice Waybury, the mother Mary Margaret Carson 

Sheila, her daughter Kathleen Pifer 

Nellie, the maid Gladys Bradford 

George Connaught ..._ Harold Whitlock 

Geoffry Chandler Roy Harris 

THE MAN IN THE BOWLER HAT— By A. A. Milne 
Cast 

John _ j Walter Pruett 

Mary Louise Winterrowd 

The Hero lames T. Moore 

The Heroine Phyllis Barnhart 

The Villain Harold Brown 

The Bad Man Carlee S. Lowry 

ON VENGEANCE HEIGHT— By Allan Davis 
Cast 

Chertiah Gormley Pearl Dick 

Hope, a neighbor girl Myra Jeanes 

Clay, Gormley's grandson r . ..Franz Hohn 

Lem Carmalt Harold Hertenstein 

THE UNSEEN— By Alice Gerstenberg 
Cast 

Jeffrey Baldwin Carl C. Bracy 

Baldwin's wife > Mary Blanche Wolfe 

Hulda, a Swedish maid Fern Fox 

CONFESSIONAL— By Percival Wilde 
Cast 

Robert Baldwin Paul Meadows 

Martha, his wife Arline Stanton 

Evie, his daughter Dolly Wattles 

John, his son Harry Walker 

Marshall : Raymond Harms 

A maid luanita Shelton 

COURTSHIP— By Fred Eastman 
Cast 

Mr. Johnson Roger Zeller 

Mrs. Johnson Edna Neuhaus 

Helen Johnson Bona Fae Freesmeyer 

Ruth Tohnson _ Elfrieda Heer 

Billy Bates Don Lusk 

SPRING PLAYS 
Two plays constituted the spring presentation in dramatics. They were "Thy Will", an 
original pla3 - by Willard Friederich, together with an adaptation of "The Taming of the 
Shrew". Casts 

THY WILL 

Mark Kemberly Franz Hohn 

Brian Kemberly Willard Friederich 

Jeanette Kemberly _...Jeanette Clendenny 

Toe Bohack Emile Mignery 

TAMING OF THE SHREW 

Baptista, a rich gentleman of Padua Lloyd Barnard 

Katherina, the shrew, daughter to Baptista Fern Fox 

Bianca, daughter to Baptista Mary Etta Reed 

Petruchio, suitor to Katherina Emile Mignery 

Gremio, suitor to Bianca Don Lusk 

Hortensio, suitor to Bianca Roger Zeller 

Lucentio, in love with Bianca Harold Hertenstein 

Tranio, servant to Lucentio Pearl Dick 

Grumio, servant to Petruchio Helen Handel 

Page Eighty-three 



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CALENDAR 



SEPTEMBER 



[all. 

r students and faculty. 



17 
19 
21- 



28 



in. 



L'pper classmen sell seals to the Freshmen. 

Stag po\v-\vo\v in Carnegie Hall; P. J. party in Clark I 

V. M. and Y. W, h iener roast, 

President and Mrs. Cameron Harmon give reception fo 

"I 'car Dad : Please send me ten bucks. I gotta buy mor 

Kappa Theta Tan tea in honor of Mrs. Waldorf. 

lack Pfeffer elected president of the Student \.ssociati 

The Freshmen caps arrive at last. 

Little Theatn organi ed b\ Miss Hohn. Bracy elected | 

Pep session and big snake dance through town. 

Scott-Field McKendree 36. 

■Beta Alpha Mn has KafFee Klatsch ; Phi Lambda Tan gives tea fur Dr. Steck 

man. 
Clionian ( >pen Session. Refreshments drew big crowd. 
Frosh entertain us in chapel exercises. 
Annual water polo game at Washington University. 



.lent. 



i >CT< iBER 

1 I Inrn i game i m 1 lypes Field. 

4 Clio party in Pearson's Hall. 

5 Mature club goes "tt trip to the ( )zarks. 
8 Freshmen-Upperclassmen fight. 

9 — Clio pledges take dates and sandwiches to "Bill's." 
13 McKendree 20— Rolla School of Mines 6. 
1 5 Clark I fall house party. 
li> — Kappa Theta Tan wiener mast. 
17 — Phi Lambda Tan hay ride. Hey! Hey! 
2< i \\ . A. A. girls go to Normal. 
23 — Dr. Cummins speaks at chapel. 
2 1 - Pictures taken for McKendrean. 

28 Who hocked the funnies from Carnegie Mall reception room? 
31 Hallowe'en party in Pearson's Hall. 

X' IVEMBER 

7 fournalism class visits the Globe-Democrat office and plant in St. Louis. 

I lark I lall open house. Miss anything, girls? 
12 I ■• io teachers spend the day in Belleville. 
21 Debaters meet the Principia College of St. Louis. 
2^ Hobo Dav. Prizes l;" t" Hohn, Maria Russel, and Fincke. 
24 HOMECOMING. 

27 Alpha Mn Omega fraternity has party at Locusl Mills Country Club, 
hanksgiving recess. Thank goodness! 



DECEMBER 

Bai 1 on thi- 1 lil) again. 

10 W. A. A. girls are all decked 

impany Two of the 
12 Tk' V Christmas play, "Tl 
1.', W. A. A. initiation. 

hurtleff debate 



cini in pretty < ? i hair ribbons. 

.itlle Theatre gives pla\s in the chap 

e I Mist ni the Road." 

mi Pi Kappa I lelta men's question. 



cJ/lfiefmn MkA/ 'five 



15 — Phi Lambda Tau Christmas party at the Country Club. 
17 — Christmas carolers out. Clark Hall Christmas party. 

18 — The Bachelor Fraternity has a party at the country club and at the home of 
the president, Jack Pfeffer. 

JANUARY 

1 — How many New Year's resolutions? 

3 — Coach Waldorf presents twenty-one football letters in chapel. 

6 — Dorothy Schmedake dyes. 

7 — Arline Stanton has a radio. Hum ! 

8 — Howard Larsh elected football captain for next season. Good luck! 

9 — I miss Mar)- Sanders, don't you? 
14 — Semester examinations. 
18 — Eastern Illinois State Normal game. 
20 — The three sororities give rush teas. 
21 — Second Semester registration. , 

23 — Phi Lambda Tau "Mad Hatter" party. 
2-1 — Kappa Theta Tau "Press Meet" party. 
25 — Beta Alpha Mu dinner and theatre party in Belleville. 
31 — Braveheart, the Indian, lectured to us in chapel. L T gh ! Palefaces. 

FEBRUARY 

A — Everyone goes to see "Flirtation Walk." 

5 — Phi Lambda Tau formal pledge service. 

8 — Girls play basketball at Fairview High School in St. Louis. 
11 — Kathleen Pifer gets a cedar chest for her — birthday. 
13 — Faculty Dames present plays which are a big success. 
14 — Alpha Psi Omega initiates Carl Bracy, Art Huffman and Jimmie Moore, and 

holds Valentine party in Clio Hall. 
15 — Y. W. delegates attend conference at Bradley in Peoria. 
19 — Clark Hall co-eds give a Washington tea. 

22 — Dames Club have annual patriotic party at the home of President and Mrs. 
Harmon. 

MARCH 

1 — President Harmon leaves for Bakersfield, California. 

2 — Bracy, Meadows, and Huffman win sensational debate with the cop. 

6 — Plato has stag party at the Bertram Hotel. 

7 — Sigma Zeta picture show in Pearson's Hall. 

8 — The Bachelor Fraternity has a banquet in the College Inn of the Hotel Belle- 
ville. Gus Krizek is awarded the fraternity scholarship cup. 
13 — The Glee Clubs present "The Marriage of Nannette." 
14 — "Spike" Wilson elected basketball captain for next year. 
16 — Alpha Mu Omega collegiate party at the country club. 
19 — Beta Alpha Mu has informal initiation. 
21 — Dolly Wattles elected the queen of May. 
22 — Debate with Carthage College in Plato Hall. 
24 — Two helpings of ice cream at dinner to-day. 

Page Eighty fiic 



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25 — V. W. C. A. part)' at Mary Margaret Carson's home. 
Dr. Harmon returns from California. 

27 — Fern Fox entertains the members of Kappa 'I'heta Tan at her home. 

3* — Freshmen win the Inter-Class Track meet. Papoose wins high score honors. 

; '. i oris' Glee Club makes the season's debut at Signal Hill. 

Al'KIL 

1 Plato presents John Rauth in well attended open session. 

3 — Dr. Scherer gives interesting chemistry lecture in auditorium. 

A — Alpha Mu Omega presents minstrel at the Alamo Theatre. 

5 — Beginning of Phi Lambda Tail Home-Town week-end. 

Plato holds stag banquet and theatre party in Belleville. Dr. Harman 
and Or. Hayter are the guests of the society. 

7 — Pre-Easter services begin at the College Church. 
12-15 — Sigma Zcta holds national conclave on the Hill. 
19 — Spring recess begins ! 
30 — Back at school. 

MAY 

11 — The Alpha Mu ( 'mega fraternity has its annual banquet. 

IS — May Fete. The queen is crowned. 

P> — Alpha Psi Omega holds its annual banquet at the Hotel P>elleville. 

17 — Kappa Theta Tau banquet. 

IS — Phi Lambda Tau banquet. 

21 — Kathleen Piter gives recital in the college auditorium. 

23 — The Glee Clubs present their home concert. Senior day. 

2-1 — Pi Kappa Delta banquet in the College Inn of the Hotel Belleville. 

The pledges are formally initiated at the hotel preceding the banquet. 
25 — The Statler Hotel in St. Louis is the scene of the Bachelor Fraternity banquet. 
30 — Dorris Oratorical Contest. 
31 — Plato-Philo annual exhibition program. 

JUNE 

1- — The Clionian Literary Society presents its program. 

2 — Baccalaureate sermon is delivered by Rev. Bennett. 

1 i (ratorio. 

3 — Meeting of the Joint Board. 

4 — Commencement exercises. Bishop Waldorf of Chit ago delivers the address. 

4 — Philo Triennial. 



f J ayf r.ifjhtysix 



cMmkwv Mikhj wee 



Pat 



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Mc Kendrean 
Advertisers 



l J aga Eiphty-sivan 



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To tin isc individuals and companies who have so 
generously advertised in the following pages, we ex- 
tend "in" sincere appreciation. Their help has aided in 
making the 1935 McKendrean a financial success. 

We urge the students, faculty, and the many 
friends of the college to return the favor by patroniz- 
ing these businesses. 



Page Eighty-eight 



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INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

A BELLEVILLE FRIEND 95 

ALAMO THEATRE 92 

BLUMSTEIN BROS., MEAT MARKET 96 

CENTRAL ENGRAVING COMPANY 93 

DAM TELLER'S MUSIC and GIFT SHOP 95 

DINTELMAN'S NURSERY 95 

GENERAL GROCER COMPANY 91 

HEER, GENERAL MERCHANDISE 90 

HIGHWAY CAFE 92 

INTERSTATE PRINTING COMPANY 92 

LEBANON ADVERTISER 90 

LEBANON DRUG COMPANY 91 

McKENDREE COLLEGE 94 

OCH'S MOTOR SERVICE 96 

PARIS CLEANERS 90 

PFEFFER MILLING COMPANY 90 

SAYER MOTOR COMPANY 92 

SPIETH PHOTO STUDIO 91 



Page Eighty-nine 



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Daily Capacity 1000 Barrels 
Elevator Capacity 200,000 Bushels 

Pfeffer Milling Co. 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 
Inc. 1899 

Manufacturers of 

Mar's Patent Hard Winter Wheat Flour 
Fluffy Ruffles Self-Rising Flour 

Lebanon Belle Cake Flour 
White Corn Grit and Corn Meal 

Dealers in 
Lumber and Building Materials of All Kinds 





The 




LEBANON 


C. Heer 


Advertiser 




Sylvan E. Williams 
Editor and Publisher 


GENERAL MERCHANDISE 


Why not have quality work for the 
same price ? 




HOT GAS PROCESS 


The Quality Store 


.PARIS. 

n<";iiiiii» «V llvoing 




Phone Lebanon 136 



cJ&whenj Muldypm 



Spieth Photo Studio 



222 N. Poplar St. 
CENTRALIA, ILL. 



PHOTOGRAPHS FOR HIGH SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 
OUR SPECIALTY 



HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS, ENLARGING, 
KODAK FINISHING, APPLICATION PICTURES 

Write Us for Prices 



College Books and Supplies 

Try our soda fountain 

We serve the best 
De Luxe Ice Cream 

and 
Toasted Sandwiches 

♦ 

LEBANON DRUG 
COMPANY 

O. C. FRESHOUR, Prop. 



MANHATTAN COFFEE 

Something different 
not something 

Just as good 




Vacuum-packed in glass or tin 

Distributed by 

GENERAL GROCER 
CO. 

St. Louis, Mo. 



Page Ninety-i 



Sm <=J(c /umSiean; 



Sinclair Gas 
and Oils 



Exide 
Batteries 



TIRES AND ACCESSORIES 



SAYRK 

Moior Company 

Lebanon. 111.— O'Fallon. 111. 



Buick 

Oldsmobile 
Chevrolet 



General 
Repair and 

Storage 



ALAMO 

im aiici: 



HIGHWAY cafe 



Quality Foods 
Efficient Service 



TRY US 



This Book is a Product of the 



Interstate Printing Co. 

Danville, Illinois 

Printers - Publishers 
Bookbinders 

tnnuals - Vocational Agricultural Texts - School Forms 



A- you take pride in bringing to completion this, your I!).".-") year- 
book, so we have been proud for 39 years of line printed products. 



r,,,. Sinety-twc 



cJ/ifideotb Mufdk/fm 



pr 



JWPf 



Distinction 

Distinctive ideas in annuals 
are a prime factor in a 
successful book" of course 
service and quality can 
not be overlooked ~ ** & 
c /he sign oft he 
trade mark means~ 




C H C**>'+-e<*\ ENGRAVING 
V^CIlllclI COMPANY 

CALUMET BUILDING 

ST.LOUIS. MISSOURI 

College Annual Builders of America 




Pane Ninelythr 



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McKENDREE COLLEGE 

One hundred seven consecutive years of service. Offers courses lead- 
ing to certification for high and grade school teaching; specializes in pre- 
medical, pre-legal, pre-engineering and other pre-courses ; offers high grade 
instruction in voice, piano, organ and dramatics. 

McKendree has an original twenty acre campus upon which nine build- 
ings are located; owns an additional twenty acres adjoining, upon which is 
located a fine athletic field and field house. 

One hundred fifty-seven of our recent graduates have entered the teach- 
ing field ; sixty-one have gone to graduate schools for advanced degrees ; 
forty-three have entered the ministry and through the years hundreds 
have entered these and various other fields. 

Our faculty has pursued graduate work in twenty-one of the leading 
universities. Scholastically, it is the best equipped faculty of our entire his- 
tory. 

For a catalog write to 

CAMERON HARiMON, President 

McKENDREE COLLEGE 

Lebanon, Illinois. 



!■;.,■■ Nin, 



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This space is our contribution to the 
1935 McKendree Annual 



DAITMUELLER'S 



MUSIC AND GIFT SHOP 



Confectionery 



School Supplies 



DINTELMAUPS 


A BELLEVILLE FRIEND 


NURSERY 




Belleville, 




Illinois 




Established 1891 






Me Kendree ... 


FRUIT AND SHADE TREES 




EVERGREENS, SHRUBS, ROSES 


ALWAYS 


PEONIES, GLADIOLUS & IRIS 






. . . FIGHTS! 


Route 13 at State Street Road 





?M& cJ(c /dzwfhean 





BLUMENSTEIN 


Compliments of 


BROS. 


<m irs 


» ♦ « 


MOEOIC 


Fresh and Smoked 
MEATS 


SERVICE 


»<#« 




Phone 113 



Life's a great business. Not always a safe or comfortable business, bu1 al- 

reat. And Life, in its greatness may lie yours if you have the courage 

to take it. Km remember, for every step that you take ahead of the herd, you'll 

stand a beating from those who want to Play Safe and Stand Pat. So 

So it' you can't take it, don'l start. I f you do start, thank God for the chance 

to keep going! You'll suffer plenty. You'll make mistakes. You'll tail yourself and 

- and others will tail you. Be sensibly sorry, when necessary, and 

healthily angry. Then forget it! Don't let yourself linger over old grief, remorse, 

ent. You can'1 go forward it' you keep looking hark. Lot's wife tried 

- with tlie inevitable result. She turned to a pillar of salt. So will you, if 

try to mix your Yesterdays with your Tomorrows." 

ELSIE R< iBINSON, 



Cosmopolitan, June, 1934. 



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