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Full text of "The McKendrean : being the year book of McKendree College"

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THE 


McKENDREAN 




OF 




19 3 6 




♦ 


PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS 




OF 




McKENDREE COLLEGE 
Lebanon, Illinois 




DR. CLARK ROLLAND YOST 



DEDICATION . . . 



The past scholastic year saw the advent of 
a new president to McKendree. The first 
year of this new president's regime will 
doubtless be associated with the McKen- 
dree Forward Movement, in its Cultural, 
Spiritual, and Financial aspects. It is to 
this new president, Clark R. Yost, a Chris- 
tian gentleman, that this book is sincerely 
dedicated. 



♦ 



FOREWORD 



There are so many incidents in our daily 
life on "the Hill" that much of the charm 
of this year will be ours in memories alone. 
The McKENDREAN has endeavored to 
catch some of the richness of our privileges 
and friendships, a few of the joys and per- 
haps sorrows, possibly worries and even dis- 
appointments. Should these pages bring 
you some satisfaction as you read them and 
aid you in recalling pleasant memories, we 
shall feel that our task will not have been in 
vain. It is to this end that we, the Staff, 
present this, the 1936 McKENDREAN. 



CONTENTS 



THE COLLEGE 
The Faculty 
The Administration 

CLASSES 
Senior 
Junior 
Sophomore 
Freshman 







ACTIVITIES 
Organizations 
Athletics 



FEATURES 
Snaps 
Calendar 
May Fete 
Dramatics 



[3] 



ALMA MATER 



A College 'mid plains is standing, 

Standing there from olden days; 

A pioneer of learning; 

First in untrodden ways. 

For service and Christian culture, 

For efficiency she stands; 

Her sons and daughters praise her 

With voices, hearts, and hands. 

Hail to thee, our dear old McKendree, 

May we always loyal be; 

It's a song of praise well raise to thee, 

Alma Mater, dear old Mc. 

May we ever hold thee true and wise and right, 

Honor Purple and the White, 

And for Victory we'll always fight 

'Til we win for old McK. 

Enduring and strong she stands there, 
Stands upon our College hill; 
Tho' others may outnumber, 
She holds the first place still, 
For beauty, truth, and knowledge, 
And for service without bound; 
Then let us raise our voices 
Until the plains resound. 

LATCHIE MYRICK (Mrs. St. Clare Flint) 
and ELIZABETH WILKINSON (Mrs. Don Gerking). 



[4] 



THE COLLEGE 



♦ 





[5] 




A scene that will recall the cloister, the classroom, the chapel, and the 
crucible. 



[G] 



Within these sacred walls we 
may commune 

At will with shining souls and 
giant minds 

Of every age — the light unto 
our feet — 

Who live in these, their 
books, eternally. 



#> 



A hall in which to study, a 
hall in which to worship, and 
a hall in which to live. 




17] 



Since pioneer days in the Middle West, 
many have sat at the feet of the Learned 
Ones to imbibe their wisdom. Not long 
now and We, who are so much concerned 
with "Us", shall bo as They — feet, echoina 
silently down the corridors of Old Main. 




[3] 




Just a picture of light and shadow where one may loiter and be sheltered 

from the sun; or perhaps a place to linger when the moon filters through 

the branches, where one may charm or be charmed. 



[0] 




THE FACULTY 



W I U.I AM C. WALTON, 
Ph. Ii.. Ii. H. 
Philosophy and ReUgioi 

JAMES C. DOLLEY, 
M.A., Litt.D. 
Latin ."-ml Greek 



REINHOLD B. IIHIIX. A.M. 
Education 

LEWIS K. OPFITZ, Ph.D. 



JOSEPHINE BITTNER, 
B.A., M.l>. 
physiology 

AILEEN SPENCER, B.A. 
Biology 



KDW1N R. SPKXCI 



ALLEEN \\ I 
B.A., B 

Librarian 



CIIRIST< UMIKR I. I'.ittxkr, 
F'ii.D. 
Social Science 

OI.IYKR II. KI.EIXSCHMIDT, 
A.A.G.O. 
Piano, Organ, Theory 

LILLIAN L. STECKMAN, Ph.D. 
English 



I'liHA M. THOMAS, B.S. 
Expression 



MRS. BLANCHE HERTENSTEIN 
Matron of Carnegie Hall 



MRS. LINDA B. WHITTINGTON 

Dean of Women 



CLIFFORD HERTENSTEIN, B.S. 



[10] 



THE ADMINISTRATION . 





The Dean 

EDWIN P. BAKER 
B.A., A.M., L.L.D. 



The President 

CLARK R. YOST 
A.B., D.D. 



[11] 



COLLEGE AGE 



By 



ETHEL R. FULLER 

'And he must go who's lived so few short springs — 

Just eighteen Aprils since his wide gray eyes 
First mirrored lilacs and blue butterflies — 

I did not know til now how swift the wings 
Of time! The full sweet years, where have they flown? 

Each minute of the day filled to the brim 
With plans, with hopes, with dreams alone for him! 

My little boy, who suddenly is grown. 

And he must go . . . for this, have mothers borne 
Tall splendid sons from immemorial days — 

To say God-speed some early autumn morn, 
To stand aside and let them go their ways. 

And if I weep to see my lad depart, 

It is from pride, not from a breaking heart." 



THE COLLEGE STUDENT . . . 

(With profuse apologies to Mr. Rudyard Kipling] 
By 

T. D. A. COCKERELL 

"Vacation's here, an' I return 
To Pokerville, but not the same; 
Things 'ave transpired which made me learn 
The size and meanin' of the game. 
I did no more than others did, 
I don't know when the change began; 
I started as an average kid, 
I finished as a thinkin' man. 
If college was what college seems, 
An' not the college of our dreams, 
But only yells an' jazz an' paint, 
'Ow quick we'd drop 'er — But she ain't!" 

— School and Society. 



[12] 



CLASSES 



♦ 






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[13] 



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<4c*«^ u*s „ ,2^ ^vm, amj*f (iwt +p*A*.£ry* 

Of >«*,, -^ 'CO*u 4&t cJu JU^t. GLaam." 






MARY LOUISE DIECKMANN, A.B. 
Lebanon 

Mathematics 
17.. BAM 
Sigma Zeta; Beta Alpha Mu. 



WILLIAM P. EATON, B.S. 
Edwardsville 
Biology 

ZZ 

Sigma Zeta; Philo: Football '33, 34. 35; Glee Club 
'33, '34, '35, '36; "M" Club; Nature Club; "Mar- 
tha," "The Marriage of Nannette." 



CARLEK S. LOWRY, A.B. 
Raynham, North Carolina 
Biology 

I'iiilo: Out-State Club '35, '36; Nature Club; Little 
Theatre, Band '35, '36; Review Staff '36; "The 
Man in the Bowler Hat." 



HYLLIS E. BURGE. A.B. 
East St. Louis 
English, Education 



'hi Lambda Tan, Vice-Pres. '36; Glee Club Pres 
15; Clio; Y.W.C.A. Cabinet '33; Debate '33; 
unior Class, Sec.-'Treas. ; "Dust of The Road;" 
He Lives." 



CATHERINE A. GILKISON, A.B. 
Mt. Carmel 
English 

Aifi!, <I-AT 



ida Tau; Glee Club '33', '34,' '35, '36; Quar- 
35, '36; Clio; French Club; Y.W.C.A. Cab- 



Dorchester 
Social Scier, 

'la to. 



RANZ El AVAR I) HOHN, B.S. 
Warrenton, Missouri 



Sigma Tau Delta; Philo; Little Theatre; Glee 
Club '36; McKendrean Staff '36; Press Club; 
"The Green Emerald:" "Thy Will;" "Little 
Women:" "We Fight Again." 

(ORO'THY MAY SCHMEDAKE, A.B. 
Granite City 
English, French 
Ai/i>. IIKA, *AT 

Alpha I'm Omega, Vice-Pres. '35, Sec. '36; Pi 
Kappa Delta. Vice-Pres. '35, Sec. '3d; Phi Lamb- 
da Tau. Sec-Treas. '35; Clio; Sophomore Class 
Sec: Y.W.C.A. Cabinet '34, '35, '36; McKendrean 
Staff '35; Clark Hall. Pres. '36; French Club; 
"Child-en of the Moon;" "Birds Christmas Carol;" 
"We Fight Again." 



. 






GLADYS M. BRADFORD, A.B. 
Itta Bena, Mississippi 
English 

STA, BAM 
Sigma Tan Delta, Sec. 



'35, Pr 



Clu1] 



'35; 



ess Club '34, '35; 



LOWELL J. PENNELL, 

Last St. Louis 

Economics and Histor 



WILLIAM DEAN SANDERS, A.B. 
Crossville 
English 

eta 

Sigma Tau Delta; Bachelors, Treas. '34, Vice-Pres. 
'35, Pres. '36: Philo; Y.M.C.A.. Cabinet '34; 
Editor Freshman Handbook '33. '35; Press Club 
'33, '34, '35; Review Editor '34; McKendrean 
Staff '34, '36; Tunior Class Pres.: Carnegie Hall 
Pres. '36; Student Ass'n. Pres. '36; "M" Club. 
Sec.-Treas. '36; Track '34, '35, Capt. '36. 

MARY MARGARET CARSON, B.M. 
Lebanon 
Voice 

Ai/-« 

Alpha Psi Omega: Clio: Nature Club: Y.W.C.A. 
Cabinet '35, '36; Glee Club '33, '34, '35, '36, Sec.- 
Treas. '36; Hand \U. '34. '35, Director '36; Or- 
chestra '33, '34, Director '36; Little Theatre; 
French Club: W.A.A. '34, '35, '36; "Hedda Gab- 
ler"; "Evening Dress Indispensable"; "The Mar- 
riage of Nannette"; "The Taming of the Shrew," 
Business Manager; "Little Women," Stage Man- 
ager; "The First Dress Suit." 



MARTA H. RUSSELL, B.M. 
East St. Louis 
Voice 
*AT 

Ph. Lambda Tau; Clio; Nature Club; Glee Club 
'34, "35, '36, Sec. '35; "Marriage of Nannette." 

EMIL F. FRECH, B.S. 
Lenzburg 
Chemistry 

Sigma Zeta; Band '32, '33; Orchestra '33, 'M. 



HAROLD A. STOUT, A.B. 
Mascoutah 
Mathematics 

ZZ 
Sigma Zeta. 

MARY TENNEV KNA1T, 
East St. Louis 
Biology 



Sigma Zeta; Phi Lambda Tau, Pres. '36; Cli 
McKendrean Staff '36; Glee Club '34. '35, Vic 
Pres. '35; Y.W.C.A. Cabinet '35, Vice-Pres. '3 
Nature Club '33, '34, '35, Pres. '35. 




CO 



to 




ATI. E; MAUC1 
Fairfield 



Bachelor Pres. '35; "M" Club; French Cluh; 
Nature Club; Student Ass'n. Vice-Pres. '35; 
Sophomore Class Pres.: Senior Class Pres. ; Foot- 
ball '33. '34, '35; "Children of the Moon." 



'A LOU CRALLK, U.S. 
Hone Gap 



Sigma Zeta, Vice-Master Scientist '36; Clio; 
V.W.C.A. Cabinet '34, '35, IVes. '36; Nature Club; 
Senior Class Sec.-Treas.; Clark Hall Sec.-Treas. 
'3i,\ Student Ass'n. Sec.-Treas. '35; May Queen 



MARTHA E. MOWE, A. 



History 

HAM 



Beta Alpha Mu Vice-Pres. '35, Pres. '35 ; Y.W.C.A. 
Cabinet '34; Band '32, '33; Orchestra '32, '33; 
W.A.A. "34, '35, '36. 

JOHN H. RAUTH, A.B. 
Belleville 
Biok t,y 

Bachelors, Vice-I'res. '36: Football '33, '34, '35; 
Basketball '3b; Plato: "M" Club, Pres. '36; Na- 
ture Club; Carnegie Hall Pres. '35. 



KENNETH L. WILSON, A.B. 
Granite City 
Biology 
AMI! 

Alpha Mu Omega Vice-Pres. '35, Pres. '36; Foot- 
ball '32, '33, '34, '35. Capt. '34; Most Valuable to 
Team '34, '35; All-State Halfback '33, '34, '35; 
Honorable Mention "Lttle American" Team '34; 
Most Outstanding Athlete in State '35; Basketball 
'33. '34. '35, '36, Capt. '36; Track '35; Tennis '35; 
"M" Cluh, Sec.-Treas. '34, Vice-Pres. '35; Y. M. 
C. A. Cabinet '35, '36; Student Ass'n.; Who's 
Who in American Colleges and Universities; 
"Children of the Moon." 



SAUKL C. SMITH, 



Pan. Vice-Pres. '35. Pres. '36; 
el '34: Glee Club '33. '34, '35, 
34; Girls' Quartet '34. '35, '36; 
'36: Clio: French Club: Accom- 
•e Club '35, '36; "Martha"; "Mar- 



CARL F. KOCH, B.S. 
Breese 
Biology 



Scient : st '35; 



MARJORIE A. BINDER, A.B. 








Centralia 










German 










French Club. Rec.-Sec. '35. 
Club; Out-State Club, Sec.-T 


Pre 


s. '3 
'36. 




tin 


HOWARD W. LARSH, A.B. 










East St. Louis 










Biolcjy 










ASM 










Alpha Mu Omeua. Sec.-Treas. '33, Pres. '34, 
Pres. 35; Football '32, '33. '34, '35. Capt. 
All-Conference Guard '35; Honorable Mentio 
•34; V.M.C.A. Cabinet '34. '36; ('.la- Clul 
Senior Class, Vice-Pres; Student Ass'n. 
Pres. '36. 


Vic 

i '3 
'36 

Vic 


CARL C. BRACY, A.I!. 










Herrin 










History 










IIKA. .\^o 2TA, SBP 











Pi Kapj.a Delta, Pres. '36: Alpha Psi Omega, Vice- 
Pres. '36; Sigma Tau Delta; Sigma Beta Rho, 
Pres. '36; Student Ass'n. Pres. '35; Little The- 
atre '35; Y.M.C.A.. Pres. '36; Glee Club, Pres. 
'36: I'iiilo; Editor McKendrean '36; McKcndrean 
Staff '35; Second Place Dorris Oratorical Contest 
'35; Who's Who in American Colleges and Uni- 
versities; "The Green Emerald"; "The Marriage 
of Xannette"; "Shawneewis" ; "Dust of the 
Road"; "Enter Madame." 



FLORENXI-: 1!. ZAHNOW, A.B. 
East St. Louis 



English 

IIKA STA, $AT 



LOUISE O. WlftTKIifattCv 

Louisvdle \ /* M, 

Latin, English ^J ^ 

Beta Alpha Mi/7ScZ?r#* '3$ Un^lrflArf^. 
"The Man in U ]f$-\l¥H^ ^ 



CLYDE L. MELTON, B.S. 
Coffeeu 

Mathematics 

Sigma Zeta. 



MARTHA R. HINKEL, A.B. 

Carlyle 

Public Speaking 
French Club; Clio; Little Theatre; W.A.A. '36. 




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^ 




JUNIORS 



FANLEY OEXEMANN 

Nashville 



WILLIAM HINKEL 
Carlyle 



HERBERT CONDON 
E. St. Louis 



BERNARD BALDRIDGE 
Gillespie 



RALPH E. WHITSON 
E. St. Louis 



LARS HAMERSON 
Salem 



ARTHUR WEHMEIER 
Collinsville 



LEROY RANDLE 
Caseyville 



PEYTON LINGLE 
Atlanta, Georgia 



JOHN PAUL SAMPSON 
Pembroke, North Carolina 



KENNETH BROWN 
Mt. Vernon 



VELMA HAMILTON 
Vandalia 



JAMES GRUCHALLA 
Sawyerville 



JOHN DILLINGER 
E. St. Louis 



CHRISTINE WHITTINGTON 
Lebanon 



GUSTAV KRIZEK 
Belleville 



LOUISE CROW 

E. St. Louis 



DALE HARMON 
Louisville 



GERALD WHITTINGTON 
Lebanon 



CLAIR NORRIS 
Pontiac 



[10] 




C\ Cfr O ' 




SOPHOMORES 



MARY ETTA REED 

Lebanon 

LAVERNE DRESSEL 

Lebanon 

HELEN HANDEL 

E. St. Louis 

ROGER ZELLER 

Chester 

BEULAH GROSSMAN 

Belleville 

JOE CRAWFORD 

Cypress 

ELFRIEDA HEER 

Lebanon 

WILLARD FREDERICK 

Mascoutah 

JAMES CONNETT 

Olney 

JOHN OPPITZ 

Lebanon 

MARY JO BYRNE 

Lebanon 

LESTER HAURY 

Trenton 

FERN FOX 

Lebanon 

HARRY WALKER 

Olmstead 

ALBERT SCHMEDAKE 

Granite City 

WALTER B. PRUETT 

Kinmundy 

HUGH MILES 

Carlyle 

DOROTHY FINCKE 

Belleville 

VIRGIL MOURNING 

Woodriver 

MARY BLANCHE WOLFE 

Lebanon 

HAROLD HERTENSTEIN 

Lebanon 

JAMES BEERS 

Carrier Mills 

EVELYN E. ELLIS 

St. Jacob 

MARTHA McCLAIN 

Bejver Creek 



LISLE MEWMAW 

Robinson 

RUTH REILMAN 

Vernon 

CHARLES HORTON 

Albion 

EVELYN SCHMEDAKE 

Granite City 

MYRA JEANES 

Staunton 

DON C.WILSON 

Oblong 

DUDLEY KLAMP 

Irvington 

ARLINE STANTON 

Collinsville 

LLOYD MORRIS 

Lawrenceville 

GWENDOLYN JO YOST 

Lebanon 

WAYNE BISE 

Olmstead 

PEARL DICK 

Mascoutah 

RUSSELL UNVERZAGT 

Bunker Hill 
RICHARD SCHWARZ 

Belleville 

ELIZABETH McGARY 

St. Louis, Missouri 

DOYNE WINTERROWD 

Louisville 

PHYLLIS BARNHART 

Belleville 

MILDRED CREED 

O'Fallon 

DOYLE DONHAM 

Ridgeway 

SOL ERNST 

E. St. Louis 

ELDON BAUER 

Bunker Hill 

DOROTHY EATON 

Edwardsville 

ROY JAECKEL 

New Athens 

CARL DAVIS 

Sims 



[21] 



FRESHMEN 



ROY GRIEBEL 

CATHERINE RAWLINSON 

DALE HORTIN 

LEWIS EVANS 

ADA KOCH 

BERNARD ISSELHARDT 

FRED DOERNER 

JAMES FINLEY 

ELINOR FRESHOUR 

DOLPH FISCHER 
EDWARD KENNEDY 
JOE COOPER 
MAXINE MILLER 
SALINE HARRIS 
HELEN PORTER 
LESTER WILSON 

ESTHER HEER 

MELVIN MADDEN 

GERALDINE GIBSON 



JOHN LARSH 

WILMA HEYER 

LAWRENCE FOX 

BYRL WOODARD 

KATHRYN HARMON 

ROBERT CROUSE 

*ELMER KELLER 

MALCOM RANDALL 

ROBERTA HEYER 

COMMODORE GROVE 

MARVIN TRIMBLE 

RUBY MEYER 

ALFRED MANIS 

LEON LEWIS 

HELEN ERNST 

GEORGE STRECKER 

JACKIE MAE KELLY 

RALPH RUTH 
HARRY DOUTHI1I 



]/■ 



'ELMER KELLER 
1917-1936 



[22 J 



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■■, 



S- 






pr 



.P 



FRESHMEN 







STUDENTS WHOSE PICTURES CO NOT APPEAR II* THE ANNUAL 



SOPHOMORES 
Clifford Brown 
Mildred Brown 
George Cook 
Paul Correll 
Maxine Douthitt 
Charles Heely 
Kenneth Powell 
Amos Reed 
Leroy Rice 
Clarence Weber 



JUNIORS 

Wallace Blackburn 
Oakley Bradhan 
Raymond Clodfelde 



v&j 



r 



FRESHMEN 

Clara Frances B 
Marie Block 
John Davis 
Sally Heely 
Constance Kelly 
Truman Reynold 






SPECIAL STUDENTS 
William Bennett 
William Otwell 
Dorothy Pfeffer 
Mrs. P. D. Waldorf 



CLASS OFFICERS 

JUNIOR 

President Ralph Whitson 

Vice-President Wallace Blackburn 

Secretary-Treasurer Velma Hamilton 

SOPHOMORE 

President Roger Zeller 

Vice-President Charles Hortin 

Secretary Martha McClain 

FRESHMAN 

President John Larsh 

Vice-President Malcom Randall 

Secretary-Treasurer Sally Heely 



[24] 



ACTIVITIES 



♦ 




■■/.•■'■•^i.-V-s^:.;:';.':-:' '" "' •■ 

^S>;v,;-..;^.,.- -'■--<: -' ...■;•■ .-■■ ■■:■:■■ 

'."■■ ■--v' : -.; ; :-^ '^---^.t : .-g 

' * """*" , : " ; ''-"'-''^ :: ' f ''- : v;':.'y, ':.' ' ■ 







[25] 



PI KAPPA DELTA 




The Illinois Theta chapter represents our campus in Pi Kappa Delta, the largest 
national forensic fraternity in the country. This organization has an active chapter 
roll of one hundred thirty-eight chapters in thirty-four states. The Illinois Theta chap- 
ter, formerly a member of the Missouri Province, has transferred its membership to 
the Illinois Province. 

The chief aims of the organization are "the stimulation of progress in, and the 
promotion of the interests of intercollegiate oratory, debate and public speaking by 
encouraging a spirit of intercollegiate fellowship." Deserving candidates are rewarded 
by badges of distinction, varied and graduated according to merit and achievement. 

The delegates of the local chapters to the biennial national conventions elect a 
National Council, which acts as the governing body of the organization. Each chapter 
is required to be represented in at least every other national convention. This year's 
national convention is being held at Hous+on, Texas. 

In carrying out its aims, Pi Kappa Delta sponsored intercollegiate debates with 
Carbondale Teachers' College, The Principia, Greenville, Shurtleff, and Blackburn Col- 
leges, Concordia Seminary, and St. Louis University. The question debated was the 
national Pi Kappa Delta one, Resolved: "That Congress should have the power to over- 
ride by a two-thirds majority vote, decisions of the Supreme Court declaring laws 
passed by Congress unconstitutional." 

Those eligible for membership included: Miss Thomas (honorary), Mary Etta Reed, 
Elizabeth McGary, John Oppitz, Roy Griebel, Harold Hertenstein and Harry Walker. 

The annual social atfair was held in the spring. 




President Carl Bracy 

Vice-President Kenneth Brown 

Secretary-Treasurer. . .Dorothy Schmedake 



I 26] 



ALPHA PSI OMEGA 



President Catherine Gilkison 

Vice-President Carl Bracy 

Secretary-Treasurer. Dorothy Schmedalce 




Alpha Psi Omega, National honorary dramatic fraternity, is the goal of every 
college student interested in dramatic work. The Alpha Theta Cast, established in 
1927, recognizes all those who have shown outstanding ability in the dramatic pro- 
ductions of the college. 

The point system is used to determine eligible members. The business manager, 
with his "mad job" of managing, advertising, and "last minute" changes, is given eli- 
gibility credit as well as the "Don Juan" and "ingenue." 

Reduced royalty on popular plays can be secured by local casts through the na- 
tional organization. Information regarding problems of selecting and staging plays, 
as well as interesting notes of the activities of the various casts is provided by "The 
Playbill," official publication of the national organization. 

The eligible members who were initiated during the second semester were: Mary 
Etta Reed, Elfrieda Heer, and Willard Friederich. 

The spring banquet was held May 22nd. 



Standing— Catherine Gilkison, Carl Bracy, Clifford Hertenstein, Haro'd Hertenstein, Pear! Hick 
Seated— Dorothy Schmedake, Hiss Harper, .Miss Thomas, Miss Wilson, Mary Margaret Carson. 





1 f 

taj • 






Hi i 









[27] 



SIGMA ZETA 




Top— Carl Koch, Dr. Spencer, Dr. Sclierer. 
Middle— Emil Freeh, Clifford Hertenstein, Williai 

Front — I'.ernard I'.aldridne, Marv L. I hockmann. 
Melton. 



in, Mary T. Knapp, Clyde 



Sigma Zeta, a national honorary science and mathematics fraternity recognizing 
worthy achievement in these fields, is enjoying its tenth anniversary on our campus 
this year. It is represented on "the hill" by the Beta Chapter. 

The National Conclave of Sigma Zeta was held at Cape Girardeau State Teach- 
ers' College, April 17-18, 1936. The fraternity again sponsored a Freshman Essay 
Contest on scientific subjects and presented a cash prize to the winner. 

The chapter celebrated its tenth anniversary with a party to which both active 
and alumni members were invited. 



*«#f 



Master Scientist. . . Carl Koch 
Vice-Master Scien + ist 

Iva Lou Cralle 

Asst. Recorder-Treasurer. . . . 

Mary Dieckmann 

Recorder-Treasurer. Dr. Stowell 



[28] 



SIGMA TAU DELTA 



Sigma Tau Delta, national honorary and professional literary fraternity, is a new 
organization on the campus. McKendree is represented by the lota Delta chapter, 
under the sponsorship of Dr. Lillian Steckman. 

The purpose of this fraternity is to promote mastery of written expression, encour- 
age reading, and foster a spirit of fellowship among those students who are interested 
in writing. 

There are several degrees of membership based upon academic classification, the 
number of English courses taken, and the amount of material published in srudent pub- 
lications. The students also contribute material to the national magazine, "The Rec- 
tangle." 

The charter members are: Florence Zahnow, President; Gladys Bradford, Secre- 
tary; Franz Hohn, Treasurer; William Dean Sanders, Carl Bracy, Kenneth Brown, and 
Willard Friederich. Dr. C. R. Yost is an honorary member. 



I 


Br ■* •• 




»•-*".•. * 





[ 29 ] 



PHILOSOPHIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 




Philo, the only centenary organization on the hill, may well hold its head high as 
it carries on its one hundredth year of activity. It is one thing to organize a society 
but guite another to keep it going for so long a period. It is difficult to realize that 
the Philosophian Literary Society extends almost as far back as McKendree itself. 
All of its members should be extremely proud of such a record of achievement and 
success. 

This society seems to improve with age. "To encourage literary achievement and 
debate," the purpose set forth by the charter members one hundred years ago, re- 
mains the purpose of the organization today; but in order to carry out this aim, the 
members realize that the new ideas of the present must be adopted to insure Philo's 
existence in the years to come. 

Open session is held once each month and all interested are cordially invited to 
attend. 

Plans were made for the banguet to be held next year celebrating the centennial 
anniversary. 



[30] 



PLATONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



Plato was established in 1849 — the year when the pioneers went West to try their 
luck in the gold fields. Just as they were successful in their endeavors, so the Plato- 
nians have been a great success in the literary field. 

From the practical standpoint, no study or activity offers a better preparation 
for the everyday affairs of life than does debating, and the related activities. 

Believing that the development of the whole man is necessary for outstanding 
success in any endeavor, the society again produced a fine basketball team. The team 
received its only defeat in the championship game of the Intramural League. 



Standinci — I). Harmon, 

I. Rauth. 
Seated— G. Whitt 



Wehmeier, B. Baldr 

Tippet 




31] 



CLIONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 





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Standing— D. Eaton. I. Smith, C. Ra,v:inson 
Grossman, H. Handel. E. Schmedake. M. 

Seated— M. McLa'n, C. Gilkison, M. Wolfe, 
J. Kelly, C. Boyd, S. Heely. 



P Barnhart, M. Teanes, M. Reed, B. 
R Heyer. W. Heyer. 
D. Fincke, I). Schmedake, M. Carson, 



The Clionian Literary Society, the only woman's organization of its kind upon the 
campus, was founded in December of 1869. This was just a few months after women 
were admitted to McKendree. Twenty women were listed in the college catalogue at 
that time and fifteen of them banded together to organize this fine society. 

Every member is enthusiastic in making the meetings held every week as inter- 
esting and beneficial as possible. The programs, consisting of declamations, essays, 
assigned addresses, impromptus, and current events, afford young women an excellent 
opportunity for training in leadership. The first Monday of each month is set aside 
for open session. 

The homecoming reunion of old grads again demonstrated the truth of the saying, 
"once a Clionian, always a Clionian." The old members, after telling of their experi- 
ences while members of Clio, listened to an account of the interesting pledgeship 
which the younger members experienced this year. 

The annual exhibition program held at the close of the school year is presented 
by the senior women of the organization. The Ciionian banquet is always an important 
social affair. 



[ 32 ] 



PHI LAMBDA TAU 



The third year of Phi Lambda Tau has seen ths production of tha musical comody, 
"Life Is A Song," presented by the members and pledges of the sorority. This year 
will also see the graduation of the last two charter members of the organization, who, 
with nine others, on November 16, 1933, received permission to carry on as a group 
the three-fold purpose of the sorority: high spiritual, scholastic and social standards. 

The social calendar of Phi Lambda Tau included a theatre party at the Orpheum 
in St. Louis; a number of rush parties which carried out a "nautical" theme; a Home- 
coming reunion; a "Progressive" party at Christmas; the annual spring banguet; and 
the annual Old Home Town day, held on the week-end of April 18 and 19. The pur- 
pose of Home Town Week-end is to entertain girls who are ready to enter college, with 
the hope of interesting them in McKendree. 

Members who were initiated into the sorority during the second semester are: 
Geraldine Gibson, Kathryn Harmon, Catherine Rawlinson, Beulah Grossman, and 
Myra Jeanes. 

The officers included: 

President Mary Tenney Knapp 

Vice-President Phyllis Burge 

Secretary-Treasurer - . Dorothy Schmedake 

Historian Florence Zahnow 

Sergeants-at-Arms Helen Handel, Martha McClain 



e. G. Yost, M. Russel, M. McCain, F. Zah-iow, D. 
Steckman, M. Knapp, P. Burge, D. Schmedake. 




[33] 



BETA ALPHA MU 




Miss Thomas, L- Wi 



Friendship, loyalty and cooperation is the three-fold purpose of the Beta Alpha 
Mu Sorority, and it is through efforts along these lines that they hope to attain a bet- 
terment of sorority life and make of college girls more cultured young women. 

The sorority was given official recognition in November, 1933. Two of the char- 
ter members are still active. 

Homecoming was a complete success for the BAM's this year, for they had an 
entire representation of all their members, past and present. 

The social activities of the year have been numerous and varied. They include a 
slumber party at the home of Margaret Chappie, Lebanon, and a fireside supper at 
the home of Arline Stanton, Collinsville. During the second semester there was the 
rush tea, hobo dinner, and final rush dinner at Hotel Belleville. Other events occurred, 
such as a St. Patrick's luncheon with Martha Mowe; a spring party given by Gladys 
Bradford and Leone King, associate member; and the annual spring banguet. 

Miss Cora Thomas, head of the Speech Department, is the new faculty sponsor. 

Three pledges have become Beta Alpha Mu members this year: Louise Crow, 
Louise Winterrowd, and Ada Koch. Helen Ernst was initiated as an honorary member. 

Officers were as follows: 

First Semester: President, Martha Mowe; Vice-President, Mary Dieckmann; Sec- 
retary-Treasurer, Gladys Bradford. 

Second Semester: President, Velma Hamilton; Vice-President, Mary Dieckmann - 
Secretary-Treasurer, Louise Winterrov/d. 



[34] 



KAPPA THETA TAU 



The nine charter members of the Kappa Theta Tau sorority, organized in Novem- 
ber, 1933, set forth the purpose "to promote scholarship, friendship, and social activi- 
ties among its members." The Alumni Association, whose aim is to continue the pur- 
pose of the sorority after leaving school, had its first anniversary in October, 1935. 

During the summer of 1935, a combined luncheon and plunge party was held at 
the Locust Hills Country Club of Lebanon for the purpose of interesting new girls in 
McKendree College. 

The fall activities included a waffle supper at the home of Mrs. Paul Walford, the 
sorority sponsor; a Kappa Theta Tau Studio party reunion on Homecoming day at the 
home of Mrs. Omar Fox; as well as a Christmas party. Rush week in January featured 
a transcontinental trip carried out by means of an English Tea at the home of Mrs. 
C. Heer, a visit to Chinatown at the home of Mrs. L. East, and an American Sports 
"Brunch" with Mrs. J. Zinkgraf. A Leap Year party was held at the Lincoln Hotel in 
Belleville on February 29. A wiener roast and the annual spring banquet concluded 
the year's activities. 

Members initiated during the past year were: Clara Frances Boyd, Elinor Fresh- 
our, and Jackie Mae Kelly. 

The officers of the society are: President, Isabel Smith; Vice-President, Dorothy 
Fincke (first semester); Secretary, Elfrieda Heer, and Treasurer, Fern Fox. 



-E. Fresliour 



F. Fox, C. Boyd. 



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[35] 



ALPHA MU OMEGA 




M 
sh, L. Randl 



!, J. Larsli, K. Z=ller, L. Cravens, G. Strecker, B. Isselhardt. 
R. Scliwarz, J. Dillinger, V. Mourning, W. Blackburn, h- Rice, P. jingle, 



Alpha Mu Omega fraternity, organized in 1925, has continued to further the best 
interests of its members, both fraternally and socially. This year the A.M.O.'s devel- 
oped a championship Intramural League basketball team. The fraternity "bas- 
keteers" defeated Plato in the season's final play-off game which ended the "hotly 
contested tourney." 

Instead of the usual minstrel show, the fraternity sponsored the movie, "Ah! 
Wilderness," at the Alamo Theatre. 

It is not an uncommon sight to behold an A.M.O. pledge in outlandish attire 
strolling about the campus offering his paddle to a "frat" brother. The pledges who 
"braved the storm" of ridicule, paddlings, and humi'iation were: first semester — John 
Larsh, Malcom Randall, Bernard Isselhardt, Roger Zeller, Melvin Madden, and George 
Strecker; second semester — Truman Reynolds, and Fred Doerner. 

The social activities of the year included three stag affairs for the pledges, a party 
at Hotel Belleville, and the annual spring banquet at the Hotel Jefferson in St. Louis. 

The presiding officers of the first semester were: President, Howard Larsh; Vice- 
President, Kenneth Wilson; Secretary, Peyton Lingle. Second semester officers were: 
Kenneth Wilson, President; Peyton Lingle, Vice-President, and Virgil Mourning, Sec- 
retary. 



[3(5] 



THE BACHELOR FRATERNITY 



The Bachelor fraternity was organized ; n 1919. The aim of the fraternity — "the 
promotion of fraternal and social relationships among the men students on the hill" — 
has been successfully carried out through the years of its existence. 

The Bachelor loving cup, presented as a special recognition of scholarship, was 
received by Ralph Whitson, whose name will be placed on the fraternity honor roll 
and engraved on the cup. 

A wiener roast in the fall opened the social events. The Bachelors and A.M.O.'s 
entertained jointly at a stag party. Other social affairs included a party at Hotel 
Belleville and the annual banquet in St. Louis, May 2. 

The officers of the first semester included: Paul Mauck, President; William Dean 
Sanders, Vice-President; Carl Koch, Secretary-Treasurer; and Wayne Bise, Sergeant- 
at-arms. Those of the second semester were: William Dean Sanders, President; John 
Rauth, Vice-President; Ralph Whitson, Secretary-Treasurer; and Don Wilson, Ssrgean- 1 - 
at-arms. 



Standing — J. Sampson, J. Beers, 

R. Jaecka', W. Hintel. 
Seated— J. Whittington, J. Raut 









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[37] 



SIGMA BETA RHO 




Top—B. Woodard, L. Mewmaw, W. Pruett, J 

Middle — L- Haraerson, D. Harmon, C. B.acy, 
Front — Dr. Yost, Dr. Walton. 



„ . Conne 
acy, C. Grot 



The high purpose of Sigma Beta Rho can best be stated by its motto — "Service, 
Brotherhood, Religion." The organization attempts to establish closer fellowship 
among the ministerial students. 

Sigma Beta Rho, besides arranging for her members to have interviews with 
representatives of the major seminaries, acts as a "round table" for discussions of the 
problems of the young minister and of subjects relative to the profession of her mem- 
bers. As such, she renders a definite service to the members and enables them to live 
their motto more effectively. 

The organization, sponsored by Dr. Walton, was established in 1931. Dr. C. L. 
Peterson, Dr. C. R. Yost, and Rev. D. A. Tappmeyer are honorary members. New 
members initiated this year were: Commodore Grove, James Connett, Lars Hamer- 
son, Carl Davis, Raymond Clodfelter, Byrl Woodard. 

A special chapel service was conducted by the society. 

Officers for the year were as follows: President, Carl C. Bracy; Vice-President, 
Dale Harmon; Secretary-Treasurer, Lisle Mewmaw. 



[38] 



OUT-STATE CLUB 



The Out-State Club is enjoying its second year on our campus. It v/as organized 
by Miss Elsa Mae Tyndall in the fall of 1934 with eighteen charter members, and has 
grown in popularity if not in numbers. Its membership depends upon the number of 
strangers within our gates, whom it is the Club's aim to look after in the best spirit of 
aid and friendliness. 

The prevailing spirit of the organization is one of appreciation of the "other fel- 
low", and a sharing in his interests and ideals. 

Programs have been presented which have furnished much information as to 
points of interest and historical importance of various sections. The special project 
for the year consisted of gathering material of historical and geographical nature 
from the various states represented. This material will be housed in the college library, 
and will be made available to all students of the college. 

States represented this year are Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi, 
Kentucky, Indiana, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Missouri. Illinois and the city of Lebanon 
each have one representative. 

Officers for the first semester were: President, John Paul Sampson; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Gladys Bradford; Secretary, Marjorie Binder; Treasurer, Peyton Lingle. The 
second semester officers included: President, Gladys Bradford; Vice-President, Jackie 
Mae Kelly; Secretary, John Paul Sampson; Treasurer, Carlee Lowry. 



Standing— P. Sampson, P. Lingle, Dr. Dolley, J. Crawford, C. Lowry. 

Seated— Miss Thomas, G. Bradford, M. Binder, Miss Tyndall, J. Kelly, M. Wolfe. 




[39 ] 



NATURE CLUB 





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H. Walker 


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The real purpose of the Nature Club is to acquaint people with and permit them 
to gain an appreciation of the various forms of nature. The Nature Club is an ex- 
cellent means of gaining such an appreciation. Nature study is a fascinating subject 
and all who know anything about it are anxious to learn more. Field expeditions and 
bird hikes make it possible to gain added information. 

To help the student body to appreciate more fully the natural beauty of our 
campus, the club again sponsored "Campus Week." In connection with this a "Na- 
ture Exhibit" was held. 

The Nature Club is responsible for many improvements on the campus. This year 
it sponsored the project of placing signs introducing McKendree College on the high- 
ways leading into Lebanon. 

Last fall, the club went on an over-night trip to the canyon south of Murphysboro. 
The msmbers brought back trees and ferns for the campus. /,}A7 ^ . 

President V Bernard Baldndge 

Vice-President Velma Hamilton 

Secretary-Treasurer Elizabeth McGary 




,40] 



LITTLE THEATRE 



President Clifford Hertenstein 

Vice-President Mary Etta Reed 

Secretary-Treasurer Elfrieda Hear 



One of the most popular organizations on the campus is the Little Theatre. This 
group not only affords a large number of students an opportunity to take part in dra- 
matic productions but also makes it possible for them to obtain eligibility points for 
Alpha Psi Omega. Its major purpose is to "instigate and perpetuate the histrionic 
art on McKendree's campus." Membership is based on the passage of a dramatic 
test and a majority vote of the members. 

Four stock companies take turns in presenting the Little Theatre programs. Some 
of the plays presented were "A Weakness for Nurses," "Fancy's Knell," "First Dress 
Suit," "The Mouse Trap," and "Sauce for the Goslings." 

"Little Women" was the Homecoming play sponsored by the Little Theatre. 

Various degrees are conferred upon the worthy members of the organization. 
These degrees include: Managing and Staging; Character Portrayal; and Play Pro- 
duction. "We Fight Again," an original play by Willard Friederich, was presented 
in the annual Midwestern Folk Drama Tournament at Cape Girardeau, April 4, as well 
as on our own campus in conjunction with the Spring play, "Dollars to Doughnuts." 




Standiiw—L,. Mewmaw, J. Connett. 
R. Unverzagt, M. Teanes, L. Wi 
C. Lowry. 

Seated — E. Heer, F. Fox. B. Grossman, P. Barnhar 
Stanton. M. Carson. M. Wolfe. M. Reel. M. Cr 



H. Handal. J. Kellj 



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[41] 



y. w. c. a. 



The Y.W.C.A., an organization of thirty-eight years' activity on the campus, is one 
of great importance. It provides a "Big Sister" for each Freshman girl as she arrives 
on the hill. In this way the new-comers are assisted in becoming acquainted with 
college life. 

This year the theme for the first semester study was appreciation of Art, Music, 
Poetry, and Nature. The study of various foreign countries to encourage world fellow- 
ship made up the discussions of the second semester. The Y.W. brings the girls to- 
gether throughout the school year through weekly devotional meetings. 

One of the main objectives of the organization is to establish a firmer friendship 
between the off- and on-campus girls. The Y.W. opened the year with a wiener roast. 
Early in the fall, it entertained all the girls of the college at a Pajama Party, given in 
the reception room of Clark Hall. Another activity of the organization was an out- 
door meeting which ended with a "Hamburger fry" at the oven near Lake Beautiful. 

The organization is a member of the Geneva region of the Y.W.C.A. Represent- 
atives of McKendree's Y.W. were present at the conferences held at Knox College in 
November and at James Millikin University in March. Two delegates were sent to the 
Student Volunteer Convention held in Indianapolis in December. Two representatives 
attended the Geneva summer conference last summer and representation is again 
being planned for the coming June. 

Presiding officers were: President, Iva Lou Cralle; Vice-President, Mary Knapp; 
Secretary-Treasurer, Mary Margaret Carscn; Chaplain, Gwendolyn Yost; Program 
Chairman, Dorothy Schmedake; World Fellowship, Helen Handel; Room Chairmen, 
Evelyn Schmedake, Fern Fox; Pianist, Catherine Gilkison; Social Chairman, Velma 
Hamilton. 



Left to ritiht—U. Handal. D. Schmedake. M. Knapp, E. Schmedake, C. Gilkison, Miss Wilson, M. Carson, 
Miss Harper, I. Cralle, F. Fox, V. Hamilton, G. Yost. 




[42] 



y. M. C. A. 



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m 





-W. Sanders, C. Bracy, W. 



An organization of long standing on the hill and of worthwhile standards is the 
Y.M.C.A. It is extremely helpful to new students in those first days of the inevitable 
"homesickness". In an effort to assist the new students to become familiar with a new 
and different life, the joint Y.'s entertained the entire student body at a "Get Ac- 
quainted Party" during opening week. 

The organization is responsible for the annual handbook, which contains essential 
information for all student and faculty members. It is issued gratis to all at the be- 
ginning of the school year. 

Regular meetings are held twice a month. Once each month a meeting is held 
in conjunction wirh the Y.W. 

This year the Y.'s sponsored a special Armistice Day program. The speakers were 
Dr. Elmer Leslie of Boston Seminary and Rev. Rene Aeschlimann. 

Delegates from McKendree were sent to the Student Volunteer Convention at In- 
dianapolis in December. The Y.M. also plans to send representatives to the summer 
conference at Geneva. 

The officers of the organization were: President, Carl Bracy; Vice-President, Ken- 
neth Brown; Secretary, James Connett; Treasurer, John Oppitz; Deputation Chairman, 
Harold Hertenstein; Social Chairman, Kenneth Wilson; Freshman Adjustment, Howard 
Larsh; Hi-Y Chairman, Waiter Pruett; World Fellowship, Albert Schmedake. 



[43] 



- - 










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WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB 




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Back row—T). Pfeffer, M. Carson. C. Whittington, C. Gilkison, C. Rawlinson, P. Dick. E. 

Heer. M M'"er. F. Fox. D. Eaton. 
Front row—R. Handel, M. Reed, P. Earnhardt. II. Russell, G. Yost, I. Smith, E. Freshoui 

M. Jeanes, E. bchmedake. G. Bradford, L. 1'ischoff. 



The Women's Glee Club, the goal of every girl who can "carry a tune," is com- 
posed of twenty-three voices under the interested, active, and talented direction of 
Miss Pauline Harper. This organization provides excellent opportunities for all who 
love to sing and appreciate good music. 

The annual spring concerts, consisting of appearances in various churches and 
schools, extended from March 26-30. The club visited Gillespie, Bunker Hill, Herrin, 
Benton, Carterville, Carbondale, Edwardsville, Murphysboro, and Harrisburg. The 
program at Harrisburg was broadcast over Station WEBQ. 

The following officers were elected: Pearl Dick, President; Catherine Gilkison, 
Vice-President; and Mary Margaret Carson, Secretary-Treasurer. 

The Women's Quartet, an organization in itself, has had a busy year. It has ap- 
peared before high school groups in the interest of its Alma Mater as well as on the 
Glee Club concerts. The outstanding event in the minds of its members was its 
"debut into the radio world" in conjunction with Dr. C. R. Yost's address over Station 
WIL, St. Louis. 



Catherine Gilkison 

Isabel Smith 

Pearl Dick 

Dorothy Eaton 








f$Sfas&^ 



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MEN'S GLEE CLUB 




McKendree life would be incomplete without this organization on the hill. Miss 
Pauline Harper, the director, has discovered many a boy with a promising voice who 
was too timid to let the world know about it. "Mom", as Miss Harper is best known 
to the boys, is a favorite with all. £*- 

The Men's Glee Club made its spring concert trip March 19-23, visiting Donncl - 
son, Hutsonville, Trenton, Olney, Lawrencevilie, and Mt. Vernon. 

The officers of the club are: Ca r l C. Bracy, President; Gerald Whittington, vice- 
president; James Beers, secretary-treasurer. 

The Men's and Women's Glee Clubs continued their fine cooperation by pre- 
senting a combined spring concert and by joining with the community chorus in the 
presentation of the oratorio, "The Daughter of Jairus," by John Stainer, on the eve- 
ning of May 3 I . 

The Men's quartet added one new member to its ranks — Kenneth Brown filling 
the vacancy created by the failure of William Holt to return this year. In addition to 
appearing with the Men's Club and before high school groups, it combined with the 
Women's Quartet and eight selected voices in presenting the cantata, "Calvary," by 
Wessel, in the Lebanon M. E. Church, April 5, and before the Schubert Club of East 
St. Louis, April 6. 







J). &ju^«. 



Hack rm '— E. Kenni <! -, 
H. Larsh, F. Hohn. 

Front row — T. Whittington, B 
stein, L." Fox. K. Brown, 



Pructt, J. Beers, C. Koch, W. Bise, L. Hamerson, W 
Randall, C. Grove, C. Bracy, L. Morris, R. Crouse 



. Ba'.dridge, 
H. Herten- 







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[45] 



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WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 




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l #v/-^ ; ^%~©~ jCa!~ 



ii li nil If lfW) 



Jar* roTf— M. Mowe. A. Stanton, M. Miller, M. Jcanes, Miss Thomas, C. Gilkison, K. Harmon, E. He 



The W.A.A. was founded in the spring of 1934. If gives the women students of 
McKendree an opportunity to participate in organized sports. It not only affords the 
proper kind of exercise but also helps one to lose those "extra pounds" — as one of the 
girls secretly stated. Continued activity in sports is recognized in the form of a pur- 
ple and white "M". To become a member of the association, a girl must participate 
actively in two sports. 

In the fall the main sports were baseball and soccer, at which time the local team 
participated in the annual Sports Day at Normal, Illinois. 

This year, for the first time, the women's basketball team played several inter- 
collegiate games. They returned from Blackburn with a victory, and again defeated 
the Blackburn quintet on the Eisenmayer court. 

A W.A.A. basketball tournament was held during the winter season. Volley ball, 
tennis, baseball, and track completed a very successful and active program. 




President Mary Blanche Wolfe 

Vice-President Gwendolyn Yost 

Secretary-Treasurer Arline Stanton 



[46] 



'M" CLUB 



President John Rauth 

Vice-President Kenneth Wilson 

Secretary-Treasurer William Sanders 




The "M" club, an organization made up of the men who have won a college letter 
in a major sport, enables the athletes of the school to join in united effort to bring 
about a better type of sportsmanship in collegiate contests. 

The club has, this year, changed the former policy of awarding sweaters. Begin- 
ning with next year, sweaters will be awarded in the major sports. The new policy pro- 
vides for the awarding of sweaters the first and third years only. For the additional 
years, chevrons will be given to replace the old ones. 

Long after the sweaters and letters have become worn, the graduating senior may 
still treasure the club trophy he received in each sport in which he won a letter. 

Plans are being made to bring an alumnus, Jack Haskins, with his amateur circus. 
This will enable the students of the college to see one of the best amateur circuses in 
existence in the country. 

The officers of the club are: President, John Rauth; Vice-President, Kenneth Wil- 
son; Secretary-Treasurer, William Dean Sanders. 



Top row—C. Hertenstein, G. Krizek, J. Beers, W. Bise, W. Blackburn. 

Third row—X. Mourning, W. Sanders, R. Jaeckel. 

Second row — C. Morris, L. Randle, R. Schwarz, P. Sampson. 

First rem — P. Mauck, H. Larsh, K. Wilson, J. Rauth, W. Eaton, D. Wilson. 



M M'M< M ' M '''M 



[47] 



FRENCH CLUB 




Standing — R Zeller, P. Lingle, T. Crawford, C. No ris, D. Fischer, P. Sampson. L. Mewmaw, T5. Woodv 

I)r' Dolley H Walker, P. St. Martin, T. Finley. E. Kennedy, D. Donham, C. Ho. tin, P. Mauck. 

Seated— C. Gilkison. V. Hamilton, C. Whittington. M. Binder, Miss Tyndall, T. Kelly. A. Koch, P. 
Barnhart, M. McClain, E. Schmedake. G. Yost, H. Handal. M. Carson, D. Eaton. 



Le Cercle Francais, under the direction of Miss Elsa Mae Tyndall, head of the 
French Department, is a flourishing organization of cultural and social nature. It num- 
bers some forty members. 

The club was organized for the purpose of promoting a deeper interest in the 
study of French language and literature as well as to gain some knowledge of French 
character, customs and traditions. 

The chief features stressed this year have been the learning of many songs and 
games. Interesting facts in French iife and history are given in answer to roll-call; 
and the programs consist of short topics on French subjects, poems, jokes, contests, 
charades, games, and songs. 

The officers of the first semester were: President, Marjorie Binder; Vice-President, 
Catherine Gilkison; Secretary, John Paul Sampson; Treasurer, Peyton Lingle. Those 
officiating the second semester included: President, Peyton Lingle; Vice-President, 
Helen Handel; Secretary, Mary Margaret Carson; Treasurer, Evelyn Schmedake. 



48] 



THE McKENDREAN STAFF 












[49] 



FOOTBALL SQUAD 




Back row—T. Crawford, T. Dillin K er, \V. B'ackl 
hitt, R. Schwaiz, C. Hertenstein, II. Hcrte 

Middle row—D. Klamp, B. Isselhardt. A. Schi 
Lewis, L. Fox, J. Gruchalla, ('.. Strecker. 

First rou — P. Manck, W. Eaton, T. Larsh, M. 
Mourning, L. Randle, D. Wilson, Coach \V; 



C. Norris, V. 



History repeals itself! At least the statement remains a fact when speaking of 
the Bearcats' recent records on the gridiron. In three of the past four years, Mc- 
Kendree has been a strong contender in the fight for a share in that coveted confer- 
ence crown. Their fondest hopes appeared inevitable and their conference crown 
seemed assured, but something happened. The Purple was knocked off in the grand (?) 
finale. 

Last year was no exception. The Bearcats went through their conference chart 
undefeated until the final game. On the basis of previous scores, the Waldorfmen 
seemed to have a slight edge over Illinois College. But history repeated itself, and 
something happened. Although the Bearcats outplayed the Blueboys in every depart- 
ment but touchdowns, they were unable to overcome an early lead and consequently, 
succumbed by a 13-0 score. 



Always a fighting team, McKendree again this year can present two full teams 
that would compare favorably in weight with almost any larger college or university." 

— St. Louis Post-Dispatch. 



[50] 



"Tackling, tackling and tackling . . . hard, fast, clean and low, just about tells the 
story of McKendrees scrapping band of Bearcats as they stood up before the highly- 
touted Washington University Juggernaut and gave them more than they had bar- 
gained for during most of the battle at Francis Field, St. Louis, last night." 

— I. W. Baechle, Belleville Daily Advocate. 



SEASON'S RECORD 

Washington U. 2, McKendree 
Rolla Miners (Mo.) 6, McKendree 
McKendree 26, Scott Field 
McKendree 20, Macomb Teachers 
McKendree 22, St. Viator 6 
McKendree 12, Carbondale Teachers 12 
McKendree 6, State Normal 
McKendree 6, North Central 
Illinois Colleae 13, McKendree 



COACH P. D. WALDORF 




[51 ] 



- ^— - 



-—7—^ 







fer^ 



CAPTAIN HOWARD LARSH, Senior 
East St. Louis 

Guard, Associated Press and International News 
Service Second All-Star Selection; Four-Year 
Letterman. 

The senior member of the Larsh linemen, uith a 
do-or-die spirit, always charging quick and hard, per- 
haps played the leading role on Coach Waldorf's 
"wrecking crew." The 192-pounder proved a great 
general. Larsh will doubtless be listed among JIc- 
Kendree's grid immortals. 

"Captain Howard Larsh, who has proven in previ- 
ous games that he relishes the mud, mowed down his 
heavier North Central opponents with comparative 
ease." — Belleville Daily Advocate. 

"Cap. Larsh played a marvelous defensive same 
against the Soldiers. " — St. Louis Globe-Democrat. 



KENNETH WILSON, Senior 
Granite City 

Halfback, AP, UP and INS First All-Star Se- 
lection; United Press "Little All- America" 
Honorable Mention; UP most Valuable P.ayer 
in Conference; Voted Squad's most Valuable 
Man; Second High Individual Scorer in Con- 
ference; Four- Year Letterman. 
The slippery, spinning, snake-hipped, wily "Spike" 
Wilson certainly justified the honors that every critic 
in the conference and every sports writer in the state 
bestowed upon him. He was one of the few quad- 
rup'e-threat backs in football history. 

"Wilson is a star of the first rank and will go 
down in McKendree history as one of the greatest, 
it not the brightest, light of the gridiron history of 
the college." — Fred Young, Bloomington Pantograph. 
" 'Spike' Wilson, lithe left halfback of the McKen- 
dree crew . . . was the best defensive man on the 
field in the Washington U. -McKendree game."— John 
('.. Scott, St. Louis Globe-Democrat. 

"Failure to keep the ball out of Kenneth Wilson's 
possession in the final minutes of play gave the con- 
ference's leading scorer his chance to down North 
Central almost single handed." — Chicago Tribune. 

"He fulfilled the chilled spectator's fondest expec- 
tations by going over a few minutes later with the 
score that keeps the llearcats at the top of Little 
Nineteen Schools." — Hast St. Louis Journal. 

JOHN RAUTH, Senior 
Belleville 

Quarterback, Three- Year Letterman. 

If there was an unsung hero on the 1935 outfit (he 
sings occasionally himself) it must have been "Riot" 
Kauth. I 'i.iying him at guard, center, and halfback 
its his first three years, Coach Waldorf shoved the 
talkative one into the hitherto weak quarterback post. 
And the "Flying Dutchman" proved to be a Spark- 
plug. He was an able punter, a deadly tackier, and a 
hard blocker. 

"Johnny Rauth, quarterback, saved the day for the 
Bearcats on one occasion when his deadly tackling 
averted a touchdown for the North Central Cardinals." 

Belleville News-Democrat. 

"Waldorf's only offense against the Miners con- 
sisted of an aerial attack . . . the hard-blocking 
quarterback snapped seven of Wilson's passes and 
missed one."— Belleville Daily Advocate. 



WILLIAM EATON, Senior 
Edwardsville 

Tackle, Three-Year Letterman. 
Bill never really learned to handle hi 
best advantage until his last year. He 
"rough and ready." Eaton's shoes will 
to fill next year. 



PAUL MAUCK, Senior 
Fairfield 

End, Three- Year Lett 
Unfortunately for Mauck, Waldorf had a couple of 



all-i 

H. Larsh 

Eaton 

Norris 

Randle 

Rice 

J. Larsh 



lference ends 



ll< 



K. Wilson 

Mauck 

Schwarz 

Mourning 

Beers 

Randall 



Rauth 

Blackburn 

D. Wilson 

Klamp 

Bise 

Strecker 



d%j^ *-*ju*. 



- *1 *-*oc- £-*■**■* 



y" "^tt^a^ 



_^ . (X2A*rftJ-rt>> 






viJQQ_ 



man, however, could hardly have been improved upon, 
In the art of knocking down interference, the big 
blond one was a master. He will be missed next 
year. Mauck was at his best in the mud. 

"Paul Mauck, capable end, 'sliced' through the mud 
from his flank position to nab North Central's offen- 
sive stars behind the line of scrimmage on as many 
as a dozen occasions."— Belleville Daily .■■ Ivocatc. 



WALLACE BLACKBURN, Junior 
Edwardsville 

Tackle, INS First All-Star Selection ;AP Sec- 
ond All-Star Selection; II' All-Star Honorable 
Mention; Captain-elect; Three-Year Letterman. 

Wally had an uncanny knack of using all of his 
2!S pounds to advantage. Never a colorful player lie 
must be rated as one of the leading tackles in the 
state. His opponents best respect his ability. His 
flair for "getting along" with his fellow gridders 
should make him a great leader next year. 

"Led by Wilson and Blackburn, who was a tower 
of strength in the line, McKendree gained a moral 
victory over Washington University's Wonderbears." 
— St. Louis Star-Times. 

"McKendree's heavier-than-usual forward wall is 
headed by Wallv B'ackburn, 218-pound tackle "— 
Belleville Xczes-Deinocmt. 



DUDLEY KLAMP, Sophomore 
Irvington 

Tackle, Two-Year Letterman. 
The 258-pound bundle of avoirdupois probably 
ranked second only to Wilson in the amount of 
printer's ink he drew during football season. He was 
one of the most talked-about men in the conference. 
He was the biggest gridder in the state, and was far 
from being below the average in ability. "Cuddle" 
Klamp should be a star next year. 

LEROY RICE, Junior 
Flora 

Guard and Quarterback, UP All-Star Honor- 
able Mention; Three-Year Letterman. 
"Duck," handicapped by injuries, was never the 
P aver he had been in his two previous years here. 
His ability to back up the line on defense, in addi- 
tion to playing guard on offense, made his services 

"McKendree football stock dropped slightly today 
with the announcement that Leroy Rice, star guard 
who sustained a serious leg injury in the home- 
coming game, would not be available for action .11 the 
State Normal game Saturday."- Bloomington Para- 
graph. 



CLAIR NORRIS, Junior 
Pontiac 

Fullback. Two-Year Letterman. 

Chuck came back in great style after only a mediocre 
season m '34. His ability to drive through the line 
was remarkab'e. Norris' play against St. Viator more 
than offset a few "off" davs that he suffered. 'There is 
every reason to believe that next year should prove 
the best of his career. 

"Chuck Norris, apparently off for a great year, 
scored a touchdown in each of the next three periods 
against the Aviators."— Belleville Daily Advocate 



RICHARD SCWHARZ, Sophomore 
Belleville 

Center, Two- Year Letterman. 

Over the ball nearly every minute of play during 
the entire season, Dick showed us what he cou'd do 
at his favorite pivot post. His defensive work was 
outstanding. For the next two years he is expected 
to dominate the conference play at the snapperback 
position. 

"Scliwarz played a prominent role in winning the 
crucial conference game by his numerous recoveries 
ot fumbles." — Belleville Daily Advoeatc. 
„.",'} ick ,. Schwarz - at center," formed the nucleus of 
Waldorf s formidable forward wall agains* the 
Miners." — Belleville News-Democrat. 

DON WILSON, Sophomore 
Oblong 

Guard, Two-Year Letterman. 
The husky guard with the dimples usually -von a 
starting assignment. He especially came in handy 
when McKendree chose to kick off. "Crow" is as 
smart a football man as Coach Waldorf had. His 
ttiture as a regular seems assured. 

LEROY RANDLE, Junior 
Caseyville 

Halfback. Two-Year Letterman. 
Always a spotty player. "Flappy" is at his best 
as an open-held runner. His failure to block is his 
chief weakness. His greatest asset is his speed, 
which more than makes up for his small stature. 
He is much too dangerous for the opposition to turn 



VIRGIL MOURNING, Sophomore 
Wood River 

Guard. Two-Year Letterman. 
Virg alternated at the guard post with D. Wilson. 
He Proved to all doubters that he's not actually 
blind by his numerous recoveries of fumbles — espe- 
cially in the Illinois College game. If be does decide 
to move to Beaver Creek, let's hope he doesn't make 
his residence permanent. 



JAMES BEERS, Sophomore 
Carrier Mills 

End, ,11' All-Star Honorable Mention; First- 

The Jim Beers of 1935 represents the greatest 
development of the Waldorf-made-machine. Only a 
comparatively poor substitute throughout his fresh- 
man year, Jim came back and clinched a first team 
n h m , ■ , he , first week of l ,ractice - He was espe- 
cially skilled in knocking down interference. The 
future looks rosy for "Silent Jim." 

•Jim Beers and Capt. Howard Larsh did some 



blockl 



making possible Wilson's 90-vard 



run against .Normal, just as the two led the McKen- 
dree hue play throughout the game."— e/o t „m)i</j ( >ji 
Pantograph. 

WAYNE BISE, Sophomore 
Mounds 

End and Fullback, First-Year Letterman. 
Without previous high school experience, the lanky 
blond came through in great style this year. When 
Strecker was injured, Bise was shifted to fullback 
and Ins performance even excelled that while playing 
on the flank. His development next year will be 



JOHN LARSH, Freshman 
East St. Louis 

End. UP and INS All-Star Honorable Men- 
tion; First-Year Letterman. 

The first of the Larshes brought over from East 
Side a great high school record, and be started in 
every game on the gridiron. He specialized in receiv- 
ing passes and his speed enabled him to nail the punt 
receiver in his tracks in several instances. A bright 
future is in store for him. He has a lot of color. 

"After sustaining a drive to St. Viator's 11-yard 
line, Johnny Larsh scored in three plays." — Bloom- 
tut/tan Pantograph. 

MALCOM RANDALL, Freshman 
East St. Louis 

Guard, First-Year Letterman. 
Mai will bid strong for a regular berth next tear. 
He showed a lot of fight while substituting at guard. 
He's unusually aggressive and he knows the name. 

GEORGE STRECKER, Freshman 
East St. Louis 

Halfback and Fu'lback, INS All-Star Honor- 
able Mention; First-Year Letterman. 

Sam, the thunderbolt from East Side, says little 
but does a lot. He's a deadly line plunger and a 
hard tackier. His future promises much. 

"Strecker scored through Western's line again in 
the final minute of the fourth quarter."— St. Louis 
Globe-Democrat. 

"Big George Strecker ... is always good for that 
extra needed yardage."— East St. Louis Journal. 



[53] 



BASKETBALL SQUAD 




The Bearcat basketball record was impressive, but far from spectacular. Barely 
breaking even in a schedule of 22 games, Waldorf's cagers found their conference 
competition much too keen. The Bearcats managed to down Shurtleff in one game 
and turned back Northern State Teachers, but in eight other conference conflicts they 
sustained setbacks. Though losing to the best teams in the League, the Waldorf- 
coached quintet was able to hold its foes to a comparatively low score. McKendree 
scored 851 points to their opponents' 829. 

Despite the fact that the Bearcat basketeers won only two Illinois Intercollegiate 
Conference games, they had the satisfaction of playing the best teams in the loop. 
With the exception of the Shurtleff Pioneers, every McKendree foe was a virtual con- 
tender for the conference crown. One Purple eager, "Spike" Wilson, was named by 
the Associated Press on the conference all-star team; and Wayne Bise, on the same 
selection, was awarded honorable mention. 

With only two men iost from the entire squad by graduation, basketball future 
at McKendree appears to be on the upgrade. Returning lettermen are: Gus Krizek, 
Arthur Wehmeier, Wayne Bise, Captain-elect Roy Jaeckel, John Larsh, and Alfred 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 



McK. 19, St. Louis U. 22. 

McK. 25, Granite City Y. M. 28. 

McK. 32, Sparks College 29. 

McK. 31, Carlinville All-Stars 29. 

McK. 27, Millikin 46. 

McK. 37, Sparks 53. 

McK. 37, Centenary 39. 

McK. 44, Granite City Y. M. 31. 

McK. 25, III. Wesleyan 36. 

McK. 50, DeKalb Teachers 40. 

McK. 35, Blackburn 23. 



McK. 56, Shurtleff 27. 

McK. 36, Illinois College 47. 

McK. 33, Macomb 53. 

McK. 35, Carthage 36. 

McK. 35, Carbondale Teachers 45. 

McK. 40, Principia 21. 

McK. 35, Shurtleff 39. 

McK. 65, Greenville Shells 39. 

McK. 36, Carbondale Teachers 69. 

McK. 70, Principia 42. 

McK. 43, Blackburn 36. 



[54] 



BASKETBALL LETTERMEN 

CAPTAIN KENNETH WILSON, Senior 
Granite City 

Guard, Associated Press All-Star Selec- 
tion; Four- Year I.etterman. 
••Si>?ke" Wilson scored 256 points in 22 crimes 
for a grand total of 751 points in four years of 
college basketball. His scoring mark was good 
enomrh to finish third among individual -eorers 
in the Little Nineteen Conference. Wilson', best 
performance was against Carbondale Teachers 
when he tallied IS markers. The sharp-shooting 
guard added a lot of color to the Bearcat squad. 



GUS KRIZEK, Junior 
Belleville 

Guard, Three-Year Letterman. 
Although handicapped late in the season w'tli 
an attack of mumps. Krizek came back to give 
Coach Waldorf's outfit a lot of help in the last 
two weeks. Krizek appeared to be headed for a 
spectacular season until the inflammation of the 
parotid glands downed him. It is hoped that Gus 
will continue to hit the hoop with the same con- 
sistency that he has done for the past two years. 



WAYNE BISE, Sophomore 
Mounds 



the 



most dependable man Coach Wa'dorf bad. He 
bad no first-hand experience with "off-nights." 
Bise's ability to shift to the pivot post in a relief 
role added to his usefu'ness. In spite of being 
held out of the last th-ee games because of a 
twisted ankle, Bise accounted for 135 markers. 



ALFRED MANIS, Freshman 
Benton 

Center, First-Year Letterman. 
Before the season ended '•Slim" Manis learned 
to use every inch of his 80 to advantage in 
knocking down passes and forwarding the offense. 
Manis' only fault was his lack of endurance, and 
he remedied this near the end of the season. In 
his fi^st yea r of college basketball, "SHm" racked 
uti 1-17 points to fiivsh third among the B.-arcats. 
Mam's' he'gbt should make him one of the most 
valuable men in the conference next year. 

JOHNNY RAUTH, Senior 
Belleville 

After four vears of diligent and ardent prac- 
tice. Rauth finally got his first "M" in basketball. 
His chief weakness was his tendency to use foot- 
ball tactics on the hardwood. Johnny's ability 
to make good long shots was much better than 
fbe average. He always d-d his share when 
Waldorf chose to use the man-to-man defense. 




Wilson 


Rauth 


Krizek 


Jaecke! 


Bise 


Wehmeier 


Manis 


Larsh 



ROY JAECKEL, Sophomore 
New Athens 



Forward, Two-Year Letterman; Captain- 
elect. 
In the art of handling the ball, Jaeckel copped, 
the honors on the I'urp'e quintet. He was so 
skillful in whipping the ball to all corners of the 
g--mnasium that even his mates sometimes found 
difficulty in following him. In his first full vear 
as a Bearcat Jaeckel scored 151 tallies in 21 
games to rank second to Wilson in lrgh scoring. 
Taeckel's future as a regular is assured. 



ARTHUR WEHMEIER, Junior 
Collinsville 

Guard, First-Year Letterman. 
Coach Wa'dorf recruited Artie from t 
mural League. He came along fast and 



end of the season he was a virtual regular, 
Wehmeier didn't break any scoring records but 
it was perhaps because he so seldom took a shot. 
He made it Ins own personal business to see to it 
that the opposition didn't do too much scoring. 



JOHN LARSH, Freshman 
East St. Louis 

Forward, First-Year Letterman. 
Just as in football, Larsh upheld his high school 
reputation. He made prog, ess as the season 
advanced and he has given us every reason to 
believe that he will be a star before he leaves 
McKcndree. His height added to his value as a 
defensive man. His favorite under-the-basket shot 
enabled him to score frequently. 



[55] 



TRACK 




k row—W. T.ise, R. Unverzagt, R. Je 

Waldorf. 
Middle row— P. Sampson. W. Sanders, H 
Front row—). Raulli, M. Randall, C. Davi: 



:al, G. Strec 


ker, J. Gruchalla. .1 


. Larsh, R. Zelh 


;r. Coach 


talker, W. 1 
. Finley, M. 


'ruett, S. Oexemani 
Madden, L. Mewms 


i, B. Ottwell, M. 


Trimble. 



The Purple thinly-clads, with a more versatile team than has represented McKen- 
dree on the cinders in recent years, got away to a flying start this year and emerged 
the victor in the first four dual meets of the season. In succession, Coach Paul Wal- 
dorf's Bearcats turned back Blackburn, Concordia Seminary, Shurtleff, and The Prin- 

cipia. 

In the initial meet of the season the weight men justified Waldorf's fondest hopes 
and came through to sweep all three places in each of the three weight events. Mc- 
Kendree lost only five firsts in the 73-57 victory over the Carlinville lads. Bill San- 
ders and Paul Sampson, with 15 and 14 points, respectively, stole the individual honors 
for the day. 

The Bearcats easily won their second victory of the season by downing the Sem- 
inarians at Concordia, St. Louis, 87-35. Roger Zeller beat out Sampson for high scor- 
ing honors for 14 points. 

In the Shurtleff Pioneers, McKendree faced its first real competition. Although 
the Purple tracksters lost only four firsts, the secondary men failed to do their part and 
as a result the Pioneers scored heavily in seconds and thirds. The versatile Sampson 
had his greatest day of the season against the Alton lads. Scoring in six events, the 
fleet-footed Indian garnered a total of 22 points. His leap of 2 I ft. II in. in the 
broad jump was a near-record performance. 



[56] 



TRACK 



CAPTAIN BILL SANDERS, Senior 
Crossville 

Hurdles, Broad Tump. Three-Year Letter- 

During his sophomore year. "Sande" donned 
his first track uniform and put on his first pair 
of track shoes, — and earned his letter. This year 
he -coed 18 points in five events in the inter 
class meet, and won scoring honors in the Black- 
burn dual with three fusts. 

KENNETH WILSON, Senior 
Granite City 

High Jump, Dashes, Two-Year Letterman. 
"Spike" usually accounted for a fair share of 
the points despite the fact that he did not always 
hie to report for daily practice. The 
Yilsou Roll" became famous in high- 



find i 
head- 
jump 



PAUL SAMPSON, Senior 
Pembroke, N. C. 

Dashes, Javelin, Broad Tump. Three- Year 
Letterman. 

Without previous high school experience, this 
versatile, fleet-footed Indian deve'oped into one 
of Coach Waldorf's greatest thinly-clad athletes. 
"Pap" had his "big day" in the annual inter- 
class meet when he entered five events and won 
five blue ribbons. With equal ability in the 
dashes, distances, weights and jumps. Sampson 
should fare well in competition with the best 
decathlon stars of the country. 



ROY JAECKEL, Sophomore 
New Athens 

Half Mile, Two-Year Letterman. 
Somewdiat physically handicapped, the lad from 
Xew Athens was permitted to run in only one 
race each meet. One race per meet, however, 
was enough for the captain-elect of basketball to 
win his "M" on the cinders. 



CHUCK NORRIS, Junior 
Pontiac 

Pole Vault, Two-Year Letterman. 
Norris limited his activities to one event and he 
did a good job of it. Despite the fact that he was 
handicapped by a swollen ankle in the meet at 
Concordia Seminary, Chuck was able to clear the 
bar at II) ft. 6 in. He was one of the most con- 
sistent men on the Purple squad. 





BP •-» *-* w 


| WK~- £2rjl 




1 Bi ~ £?H 
1 * 




■ ~^~ H 


\? -rf 



JIM GRUCHALLA, Junior 
Benld 

Weights, Half Mile, Two-Year Letterman. 
Just as was the case last year, Gruchalla did 
not round into form until late in the season. 
He did his best on extremely warm days. Al- 
though he heaved the discus better than 115 feet, 
he scored more points in the shot put. 



Sanders 
Sampson 

Norris 
Bise 



V/ilson 

Jaeckel 

Gruchallc 

Zeller 



WAYNE BISE, Sophomore 
Mounds 

High Jump, Hurdles, Two-Year Letterman. 
Even if Bise did spoil his reputation as a high 
jumper this year, he made an even better name 
for himself in the hurdling department. Bise 
took a second in the low^ hurdles at Concordia 
Seminary in his first attempt at clearing the 
lower barriers. 



ROGER ZELLER, Sophomore 
Chester 

Mile. High Jump. Two-Year 
By rigid training. Zeller turned o 
fair successor to Caruthers. His 
usually enabled him to account for ; 



first. In the Conco'dia meet he piled up 14 points 
and copped decath'on honors for the day. Zeller 
surprised Waldorf this year by revealing an 
unknown talent in the art of high-jumping. 



OAKLEY BRADHAM, Junior 
Cisne (No picture) 

Dashes. P.ror»d Tump. Two-Year Letterman. 
After keeping off the cinders for tire, years, 
t!'e one-time star sprinter staged a "come back" 
and managed to eke out the necessary number of 
points to merit him another letter. Due to other 
interests back home. Bradham was unable to 
participate in all of the meets. 



[57] 



The year 1828 was the beginning of an epoch in American life. The year 1928 
was the beginning of the end of that epoch. In that marvelous century systems, insti- 
tutions, and governments have arisen, flourished, and passed. McKendree survives 
this crash of things. The currents of confusion have raged in futility against her foun- 
dations. She is immortal because her ideals are 'anchored to the infinite." She looks 
hopefully toward the coming of a new day wherein justice, mercy, and humility shall be 
the prevailing and pervading powers among men. Increasing moral and financial sup- 
port will enable her to make permanent and powerful a program of Christian educa- 
tion that will conserve the cultural and scholastic traditions and build an enduring 
structure of learning, Christian faith, and service upon the foundations of heroic sac- 
rifice and glorious achievement. 

Class of 1936, be hopeful and unafraid. Intelligence, integrity, and industry will, 
by grace and faith, build a world of distributed plenty, ordered freedom, moral good- 
ness, and spiritual vitality — and this is the "abundant life." 

CLARK R. YOST. 



[58] 



FEATURES 






•V: 



^ 







k^ 












_ 



[59] 



CO 

Ql 

< 
CO 




[CO 




our new President, taking Dr. Har- 
mon's place. A good man for a 
hard job. 



SEPTEMBER, 



9 — Dear Diary: The freshmen were a 
scared-looking lot. They really took 
registration seriously. 

10 — Even we upperclassmen are serious 
when we register. Tonight the re- 
turned angels welcomed the new- 
comers into "The Roost" with a p.j. 
party. 

I I — Take a back seat, you old girls. This 
is the freshman's day. But we're 
glad to be back for the wiener 
roast. 

12 — Classes. Oh, well! They had to 
start sometime. The YM and YW 
reception, tonight, made up for our 
misery in classes today. We all feel 
pretty well acquainted now. 

13 — Our first week of school is over. It 
ended with the reception at Har- 
mon's toniqht. If only I had more 
room to tell you about it. 

18 — Please don't feel neglected when I 
skip a few days. I will try to be 
faithful to you this school year. 

19 — Carl Bracy was elected President of 
the Student Association today. I 
think we'll really go places. 

20— Shh! Shhh! quiet, please! The 
BAM'S are slumberinq peacefully 
(?) at Chappie's! Hush! 

24 — How many, please? Two. Will you 
have lemon? Yes — it's the rush 
teas. Quite a few new bonnets, 
too. 

27— McKendree, Rah! Rah! Rah! Dear 
Diary, tonight we lost to Washing- 
ton U. But our team promises fine 
things. It didn't rain. "How singu- 
lar," did I hear you say? 

29 — A new epoch in the History of Mc- 
Kendree begins today. Dr. Yost, 




OCTOBER 



5 — Dear Diary: Our old enemy, Rolla, 
was victorious. But next year - - - 

7 — Tell me, if you can, do you think 
those AMO's had fun (actually) on 
that "all-men" wiener roast? 

8 — What luck! Such a wet night for 
an outdoor party. But what hap- 
pened to those wieners the Bach- 
elors didn't roast? 

9 — Tonight was a great night for some 
folks. Good old Clio dates. I 
think some of them got in pretty 
late. 

10 — We showed our pep in Chapel to- 
day. But we must have a care. Re- 
member, Jericho! 

I I — Scott Field, I believe you enjoy be- 
ing trampled on. 

12 — There are other years coming for 
the girls to beat Illinois U. at soc- 
cer. Lots of fun at Normal, never- 
theless. 

14 — Can you take it? Clio initiates only 
those who can. 

24 — It isn't fair. They were stacked. 
Those Freshman rooms, you know! 

25 — Some game at St. Viator! Lots of 
fun — especially for those select few 
who got to see the game and stay 
over night 



at the KANKAKEE 
COMMERCIAL HOTEL. 

29 — Those freshmen think they're slick. 
Breaking up a perfectly grand 



[61] 



CO 

o. 

< 

CO 




[62] 



"Open-House Night" just to start a 
fight. Well, they got what they 
were hunting. 



3 I — Hallowe'en 
pas? 



speaks for itself, n'esf 




NOVEMBER, 



9 — Dear Diary: Victory is in our veins. 
McK defeats Normal. What if they 
did bring their band? We all were 
wet! 

I I — Such a life — classes on Armistice 
Day. So peaceful! Tonight the an- 
nual AMO-Bachelor spree. AMO's 
were hosts. 

15 — Tonight we betook ourselves to the 
church basement and "recreated". 
Was that good popcorn? 

16— McKendree vs. North Central— 6-0. 

19— W.A.A. had fun tonight at initia- 
tion. Great sport, that! 

23— What a blow! Illinois College 13; 
McKendree 0. 

27 — Thanksgiving at last! We 'need a 
vacation. Bye, bye bird! 




3 — Dear Diary: The Clark Hall Bazaar 
was a real success. Co-operation 
and hard work did it. 



7 — Some of the fellows haven't grown 
up yet. "Andy-Over" was the game 
of the day. 

8 — McKendree pictures broke into 
print today in the Post-Dispatch. 
Fun seeing yourself, isn't it? Scrap 
books were replenished. 

10— Football Banquet! What food, 
what fun. Wallace Blackburn 
elected Captain for 1936. 

I I — Toast your toes at the BAM fireside 
party at Stanton's. 

13 — Tempus fugit. The Phi Lambda's 
celebrated this Christmas with a 
Progressive party. 

16 — What a night — Kappa Theta's were 
surprised by a visit from Santa 
Claus after the Clark Hall House 
party. The AMOS had a banquet 
for their pledges. 

28 — Delegates off to Student Volunteer 
Convention at Indianapolis. 

31— Until 1936 this must be a closed 
chapter. See you next year. 




JANUARY 



5 — Dear Diary: We're all back with 
holiday smiles and gifts. ■ Prospects 
good; it's Leap Year! 

! — 36-25 isn't such a bad score, but 
Illinois Wesleyan had the 36. Tsk! 
Tsk! 



I 7 — Today we went to the last classes 
for this semester. Now we can rest 
up for awhile. 

18 — The team's traveling. We beat De- 
Kalb 50-40. The Bachelors "party" 
after the game. 



26- 



-Another lump, if you please, 
guessed it — Rush Teas again. 



You 



[63 



27 — A iittle fun is good for exams. 
AiviO relaxation in Belleville. 

28 — This week is crammed full. The Phi 
Lambdas start their "Rush Cruise" 
at Mrs. Will Pfeffer's. Seasick? 

29 — One Lun Hop. The first stop for 
the Kappa Theta's is "Chinatown". 
"Savee?" 

30 — Hobos seen in town tonight. In- 
quire of the BAM'S. 

31 — Phi Lambda Tau's rush from their 
last party to see McKendree beat 
Shurtleff. Good job— 56-27. 




F&BRAJARY 



I — Dear Diary: The Beta Alpha Mu's 
end Rush week with a dinner and 
Kappa Theta Tau's with an "Ameri- 
can Sports Brunch" party. 

3 — Here they come — those Intra-mural 
games. The fun begins! 

7 — The girls' Glee Club made its first 
appearance tonight; Institutional- 
ized (new uniforms). 

10 — Clio open session — Food; quite an 
attendance. 

14 — Carbondale is just flies in our hair. 
We lost 35-45. Tough luck, fellows! 

15 — We're the flies to The Principia — 
40-21. 

27 — Wm. Sanders elected new President 
of Student Association. 

29 — Kappa Theta's celebrated with a 
party. 

Against Blackburn, get that tip! 
Look, fellows, over there, Leap high; 
Now, Leap Year! 




9 — Dear Diary: Mario Capelli — an. Ital- 
ian artist. 

I I — It's surely fun to watch our sophis- 
ticated profs perform in plays. We 
think they should have Faculty 
Dames' plays more often. 

13 — The Beta Alpha Mu's entertained 
in honor of St. Patrick today at a 
luncheon at Mowe's. 

19 — Public opinion questionnaires given 

out in Chapel. 

20 — Men's Glee Club leaves for the 
East. Peace prevails for three days. 

23 — Black cloud — nine weeks exams; not 
six, only nine now. 

27 — Women's Glee Club goes South for 
the week-end. Babe and Helen 
spend the night in jail. 

29— A Spiritual Emphasis Period. Dr. 
Yost guides us. 




-Dear Diary: Iva Lou was elected 
Queen of the May. 

-Clara Frances received first award 
in the Intercollegiate Folk-Drama 



64] 



Tournament held in Cape Girar- 
deau for folk character portrayal. 

6 — Spring cleaning! Clio dusts off the 
Constitution. 

BAMS hold formal initiation. 
Chorus of sixteen voices presents 
cantata "Calvary" before the Schu- 
bert Club of East St. Louis. 

8 — Annual Inter-class track meet. Sen- 
iors took the honors. 

9 — Kappa Theta Tau and Phi Lambda 
Tau hold formal initiation. 

10 — Easter Recess. Short but sweet! 

16 — We're beginning the last lap for 
this year. Wish us luck, wont you? 
Roy Jaeckel, Basketball Captain- 
Elect. 

17— Dr. Yost speaks over WGN, Chi- 
cago. Delegates leave for Sigma 
Zeta Conclave in Cape Girardeau. 

18 — Phi Lambda Tau "home-towners" 
provide inspiration for McKendree 
track men. McK 73 — Blackburn 57. 

20 — How did you like the Opera? 

21 — First senior music recital — Isabel 
Smith assisted by Pearl Dick. 

28 — Martha presents her senior voice re- 
cital, assisted by Leona Bischoff. 




MAY 

2 — Dear Diary: This is the month of 
Banquets. Wouldn't it be fun to 
peek in at them all? 
Tonight the Bachelors banqueted. 



5 — Mary Margaret Carson sang and 
Isabel Smith was at the organ. 

9 — The Alpha Mu Omega follow up 
with a feed. 

12 — Pearl Dick's voice recital; Mary Etta 
Reed's piano recital. 

15 — Now the sororities are at it. The 
Phi Lambda Tau's hold forth to- 
night. 

16 — Two more tonight — Beta Alpha Mu 
and Kappa Theta Tau. Aren't they 
pretty in their organdies? 

19 — Dorothy Pfeffer's voice recital. 

22 — Alpha Psi Omega banquet, fol- 
lowed by theatre party. 

23 — Pi Kappa Delta didn't "forensic" — 
they too were banqueting. 

25 — From Joy to Sorrow — from Ban- 
quets to Exams. An entire week of 
trials and tribulations. "Lucky Sen- 
iors!" 

28 — The last few days, but what days 
they are. May the best man win 
the Dorris Oratorical contest. 

29 — Philo and Plato perform together. 

30 — Clio presents its annual program, 
too. 

31 — Today Baccalaureate Service, fol- 
lowed by the Oratorio, "The Daugh- 
ter of Jairus," tonight. 



JUNE 

I — Dear Diary: The alumna swamp us 
for this 1936 banquet. 
Combined Glee Clubs present 
Spring Concert. Meeting of Joint 
Board. 

2 — Commencement — "Parting is such 
sweet sorrow. . . " 



[65] 



SENIOR CLASS DAY 



May 7th was a gala day for the Seniors. It was set aside as Senior Class Day. 
The program given in the Chapel was as follows: 

Organ Prelude Isabel Smith 

Song Assembly 

Invocation Carl Bracy 

Welcome Paul Mauck 

Poem Franz Hohn 

Class History Dorothy Schmedake 

Music Men's Quartet 

"Our Hope for the World" Carl Bracy 

Solo Marta Russell 

Reading Martha Hinkel 

Presentation of Gavel Paul Mauck 

Response for Junior Class Ralph Whitson 

"Alma Mater" 



SENIOR TREE DEDICATION . . . 



Secrecy would appear to be the order of the day. Two young spruce trees re- 
cently sprang up on either side of the diagonal walk. Apparently no human hand had 
planted them for no human eye saw it done. But we like those silent symbols of the 
class of 1936. This class dedicated these trees to the college May 7th, with the fol- 
lowing program. 

DEDICATION 

Music Band 

Invocation Mary Knapp 

Music Women's Quartet 

Address Dr. C. L. Peterson 

Dedication Ritual Led by Iva Lou Cralle 

Response by class 

Benediction Dr. Walton 

"Alma Mater" Assembly 



[66] 




IVA LOU CRALLE, MAY QUEEN, 1936 



MAY FETE 

The blonde beauty of our campus was crowned Queen of the May on Saturday 
afternoon, May 2. Iva Lou Cralle of Bone Gap is a near-"A" student and has an 
"A"-rating parsonality. Her lack of size is more than compensated for in character. 
Her Maid of Honor was Phyllis Burge of E. St. Louis. The Queen's attendants were 
Isabel Smith, Mary Dieckmann, Catherine Gilkison, and Gladys Bradford. 

Miss Cralle was crowned queen in the early afternoon and she and her royal fol- 
lowing reigned over the May Fete. The W.A.A. field demonstration of the morning 
had "set the stage" of McKendree's "Kingdom" for a fete and celebration. After 
the crowning of the queen the Freshman girls pledged their allegiance by the winding 
of the Maypole. The men displayed their prowess at a track meet at which the con- 
testants performed for the queen and her lovely court. 
The program for the day was as follows: 
W.A.A. demonstration. 
Processional. 

Crowning of the Queen. 
Winding of the May-pole. 
Track Meet. 
Miss Cora Thomas was the director of the fete. 



[67] 



DRAMATICS 




Left to right— J. Con 



1. Zeller, M. Reed, M. Wolfe, F. Holm, F. Fox, P. Dick, C. He 



A splendid year of acting has been completed. The performances throughout the 
season have revealed talent hitherto unknown in our group of students. We have not 
only had students with ability to act but to write and produce plays as well. 

The Homecoming play was the ever-beloved story of a typical family, "Little 
Women," by Louisa M. Alcott. 

CAST 

Jo Mary Blanche Wolfe 

Meg Elfrieda Heer 

Amy Mary Etta Reed 

Beth Helen Handel 

Marmee Pearl Dick 

Father Clifford Hertenstein 

Larry Roger Lee Zeller 

Brooks James Connett 

Aunt March Fern Fox 

Professor Bauer Franz Hohn 

The Faculty Dames contributed their annual presentation. The plays and casts 
were: "A Half Hour's Reformation". 

Clem Dr. Scherer 

Maud, Clem's wife Mrs. Phillips 

The Doctor Dr. Hayter 

The second was "A Case of Circumstantial Evidence," by our own Mrs. Nell Gris- 
wold Oppitz. 

Miss Sarah Firman Mrs. Oppitz 

Dr. Edwin C. Hoyle Prof. Hohn 



Dr. Mary Monfort Dr. Steckman 

Dr. George Haworth Roger Tappmeyer 

Prof. Emil Schnabel Harold Hertensteln 

Miss Catherine LeCompte Mrs. Bittner 

Mary Ellen King Betty Mae Phillips 

Georgia Lee Menne Marion Kleinschmidt 

Miriam Browning Dorothy Hertensteln 

[he third was "The Piper's Pay," by Margaret Cameron. 

Mrs. John Burton Mrs. Hayter 

Mrs. Charles Dover Mrs. Eutzler 

Miss Freda Dixon Mrs. Scherer 

Mary Clark Mrs. Donaldson 

Evelyn Evans Miss Harper 

Mrs. Hereford-Carr Miss Wilson 

Katie Miss Walton 

Several one-act plays were presented by the "Little Theatre" group. Each stock 
company sponsored one or more plays. The first, directed by Fern Fox, presented 
"Fancy's Knell" and "A Weakness for Nurses." 

The second company, under the direction of Arline Stanton, presented "The 
Mouse Trap" by Howells. 

Ruth Reilman's company gave "Sauce for the Goslings" and the last was "First 
Dress Suit", directed by Mary Blanche Wolfe. 

"We Fight Again," written by Willard Friederich, was entered in a contest at 
Cape Girardeau, Missouri, where Clara Frances Boyd took first place for "character 
presentation." 

Orin Willard Friederich 

Nurse Dorothy Schmedake 

Becky Clara Frances Boyd 

Peter Nord Franz Hohn 

Janet Helen Handel 

The Spring Play, "Dollars To Doughnuts," under the direction of Miss Cora 
Thomas, was presented by the following cast: 

Mr. Boland Bill Bennett 

Mrs. Boland Mary Margaret Carson 

Chester Boland Eldon Bauer 

Caroline Phyllis Barnhart 

Hortense Elizabeth McGary 

George Hobbes Clifford Brown 

Helen Cory Mary Etta Reed 

Flossie Hill Fern Fox 

Reverend Piggott Lars Hamerson 

Prince Sergei James Connett 



[69] 



Pat 



ronize 



th 



McKendrean 
Advertisers 



[70] 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



ALAMO 74 

ALOES, CHEMICALS & LABORATORY SUPPLIES 75 

BLUMENSTEIN BROS. MEAT MARKET 75 

CENTRAL ENGRAVING COMPANY 76 

DAUMUELLER'S MUSIC & GIFT SHOP 75 

GENERAL GROCER COMPANY 73 

HEER, GENERAL MERCHANDISE 72 

HIGHWAY CAFE AND HOTEL ...74 

HOTEL BELLEVILLE 75 

INTERSTATE PRINTING COMPANY 74 

LEBANON ADVERTISER 72 

LEBANON DRUG COMPANY 73 

PARIS CLEANERS 75 

PFEFFER MILLING COMPANY 72 

RUTH'S BEAUTY SHOP 75 

SAYRE MOTOR COMPANY 74 

SPIETH PHOTO STUDIO 73 

WEBER, PLUMBING & HARDWARE 77 



[71] 



Daily Capacity 1000 Barrels 
Elevator Capacity 200,000 Bushels 



Pfeffer Milling Company 



LEBANON, ILLINOIS 
Inc. 1899 



Manufacturers of 

MAR'S PATENT HARD WINTER WHEAT FLOUR 

FLUFFY RUFFLES SELF-RISING FLOUR 

LEBANON BELLE CAKE FLOUR 

WHITE CORN GRIT AND CORN MEAL 

Dealers in 
Lumber and Building Materials of All Kinds 



C. Heer 



GENERAL MERCHANDISE 



The Quality Store 



The 

LEBANON 

ADVERTISER 



SYLVAN E. WILLIAMS 
Editor and Publisher 



[72] 



Spieth Photo Studio 



222 Nodh Poplar Street 
CENTRALIA, ILLINOIS 



PHOTOGRAPHS FOR HIGH SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 
OUR SPECIALTY 



HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS . . . ENLARGING 
KODAK FINISHING . . . APPLICATION PICTURES 

Write Us For Prices 



COLLEGE 
BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 

Try Our Soda Fountain 



We Serve the Best De Luxe Ice Crear 
and Toasted Sandwiches 



LEBANON DRUG 
COMPANY 

O. C. FRESHOUR, Prop. 



Manhattan Coffee 

Something Different . . Not Something 
Just as Good 

VACUUM-PACKED IN GLASS OR TIN 

Distributed by 

GENERAL GROCER 
COMPANY 

St. Louis, Mo. 



[73] 





A Most Pleasant Welcome Awaits You 


BLUMENSTEIN 






At All Times At 


BROS. 






Daumueller's 


■ 
FRESH AND SMOKED 






MUSIC & GIFT SHOP 


MEATS 






215-217 West St. Louis St. 


■ 






LEBANON, ILLINOIS 








PHONE 75 


PHONE 113 






Chemicals and 


HOTEL BELLEVILLE 






Laboratory Supplies 


"ON THE SQUARE" 

Nationally famous for Asparagus Din- 
ners. Quality food at sensible prices. 
Catering to bridge parties, banquets, 






A. S. ALOE Co. 


etc. You are invited to see us for your 






1819 Olive Street 


next College Party. 






St. Louis, ----- Missouri 


CHASE E. GILLEN, Manager-Director 








Why not have quality work for the 






Ruth's 


same price? 






Beauty Shop 


HOT GAS PROCESS 






PERMANENT WAVING 








CROOUIGNOLE AND SPIRAL 


. PARIS . 






Ail Branches of Beauty Culture 


Cleaning 8c Dyeing 






RUTH BUNGE Phone 120 


Phone Lebanon 1 36 





[74] 



inclair Gas 


Exide 


and Oils 


Batteries 


TIRES and 




ACCESSORIES 





SflYRE 

Motor Company 

Lebanon, III. — O'Fallon, III. 

Buick . . Oldsmobile . . Chevrolet 
General Repair and Storage 



KW 



ALAMO 

THEATRE 



HIGHWAY CAFE 
AND HOTEL 



QUALITY FOOD 
EXCELLENT SERVICE 



Trv Us . . . Phone 131 



Interstate . • • 

SERVES THE SCHOOLS 



Yearbooks 

Final Record System 

Diplomas 

Special Forms 

Commencement Announcements 

Extra Curricular Accounting System 

Athletic Record System 

Vocational Agriculture Texts 



THIS BOOK IS A PRODUCT OF 

THE INTERSTATE PRINTING CO. 



132 N. Walnut St. 



Danville. 



[75] 



w 



■* 




Distinction 

Distinctive ideas in annuals 
are a prime factor in a 
successful book* of course 
service and quality can 
not be overlooked ** ** * 
^Jhe sign of the 
trade mark means- 



Engraving Service Plus 

Close Cooperation between 
Staff and Annual Department 



Central 



ENGRAVING 
COM PAN V 

CALUMET BUILDING 

ST.LOUIS. MISSOURI 

College Annual Builders of America 



Ik 




[76] 



PLUMBING 



Emil J. Weber 

Lebanon, ----- |||; r 



HARDWARE 



'McKendree College — the oldest 
and best in the Middle West". 

—THEODORE ROOSEVELT. 



McKENDREE 
FORWARD 
MOVEMENT 



1828-1936 



The McKendrean Staff extends its appreciation to those companies that have so 
generously advertised in the preceding pages. It was their help which aided in making 
the 1936 McKendrean a financial possibility. 

We urge the students, faculty and many friends of the college to return the favor 
by patronizing these firms. 



[77] 




[78] 






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