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Full text of "The McKendrean : being the year book of McKendree College"

\ 



THE 

McKendrean 

OF 1937 

Published by the students 
of 

McKEXDREE COLLEGE 
Lebanon, Illinois 




Gustav W. Krizcl; F:ditur-in-Chief 

Myra Jeanes - Associate Editor 

Eldon r.auer Business Manager 

Clifford r.rown Assistant Ijusiness Manager 

STAFF 

Charles Hortin - Advertising 

Malcom Randall Advertising 

Roberta Heyer (Organization Editor 

Roy Jaeckel ^^l'"rts Editor 

j\Iaxine Douthitt - I'eaturc Editor 

Milton Sager Art E.lit(jr 

Gerald Wliittiiigton Photography 

J,,hn Oppitz Circulaticm 

Marie IMock - Typist 

Miss Alleen Wilson Faculty Adviser 




'He 2cli<i hinds liis 
steals the key 



^]aX^' 




BOOK ONE 

Academic 

The Administration 
The Facultv 



CONTENTS 



Classes 

Seniors 

Juniors 

Sophomores 

Freshmen 
Honorar}' Organizations 

BOOK TWO 

Extra Cirkicular 

Organizations 

Athletics 

Features 



S(iul to kiundcd'jc 
of heaven." 



Dedication 



])K. C. J. ST( )\\ELL 

VVlTose efficiency am! sclf-sacrificiiiL; clforts liave iiifluenceil tlie col- 
lc,i;c life of many stiulenls. whose Cdunsel and svmpatlu' have heen 
iheir insi)iratinn, whose }iel|i and kinchiess liave been keenly fell l)\- 
all, llie l'».v~ McKen.lrean is dedicated. 




'The scttiii{i sun dniiblcs th< 
loKjIhcninij shadows." 




Foreword 



This, the 1937 McKendrean, breathes nf the .i;liir\' of McKen- 
dree toda_\', a college stimulated by the vision of her I'ast and secure 
in the forward Haine of her Destiny. 

Realized only through the mutual cooperation of tlic athninistra- 
tion, the student body, and others, the 1937 McKemhe it: is jire- 
sented by the staff. 




"77ic' sliadim' of some 
iinsccii Fiizcf)- floats, tlio' 
uusccii, aDiongst us." 



'Jl'luit f^carrfiil hnurs I oiicc cujoy'd'- 
Hozc sz^'cct their incin'rx still .' - -" 




• 


Academic 


w 




^ 


The Administration 
The Faci'lty 


o 


Classes 
Senior 


;^ 


Junior 
Sophomores 


o 
o 


Freshman 

Honorary Organizations 
Pi Kappa Delta 


CQ 


Alpha Psi Omega 
Sigma Zeta 


• 


Sigma Tail Delta 


• 


Beta Pi Theta 




riiK rki;siiii;.\"r 

CLARK R. YOST 
A.B., U.D. 



The Faculty 

lAMES C. DOLLEY 

M.A., Litt.D. 
Latin and Creek 
R. PAULINE HARPER 
I 'oiee, Piiblie School Music 
AILEEX SPENCER 

r..A. 

Bioloi/y 

S. M. AIcCLURE 

ALS. 
Che mist ?-y 
XELL G. OPPITZ 

ALA. 
History 
EDWIN R. SPENCER 

Ph.D. 
Biology 
WILLIAAI C. WALTON 

Ph.D., D.D. 
Philosophy and Religion 
AIRS. AIINNIE 

PHILLIPS 
Matron of Clark Hall 
LILLIAN L. 

STECKAIAN 

Ph.D. 
linglish 




THK DE.AX 

EDWIN P. BAKER 
r..A.. A.AI.. LL.D. 



AH^^S. BLANCHE 

HERTENSTEIN 
Matron of Carnegie Hall 

CHARLES L STOWELL 

Ph.D. 
Mathematics 

C. DEWITT HARDY 

ALA. 
History 

ALLEEN WILSON 
B.A., B.S. in L.S. 
Librarian 

REIN HOLD B. HOHN 

A.AI. 
Lducation 

\\\IS. LINDA B. 

WHITTINGTON 
LK-an of Women 

B. E. BLANCHARD 

ALA. 
Physical Education 
Athletic Director 



JOSEPHINE BITTNER 
B.A., AI.D. 

Physiology 

CORA AI. THOAIAS 

B.S. 
Expression 

CHRISTOPHER T- 
BITTNER 
Ph.D. 

Social Science 

LEWIS K. OPPITZ 

Ph.D. 
Physics 

OLIVER H. 

KLEINSCHMIDT 

A.A.G.O. 
Piano, Organ, Theory 

ELIZA L DONALDSON 

ALA. 
Commerce 
Comptroller 

ELSA AIAE TYNDALL 
M.A. 

Romance Language 



I'ayc Ten 




> 



1 I..II, X 


Harper 


^prn. - r 


M. 




( Ippitz 


-I" 


11 cr 


Walton 


)'lulli|.s 


Stcckman 


Ht-rt 


■n^tein 








Wil-on 


Holin 


\\h.tli!it;to-l 


I'.lan 


cliar.l 


liittner 


Tho 


mas 


li.inirv 


Oppitz 


Klt^in 


Schmidt 




Donaldson 


T\n 


lall 




SENIORS 



GERALD MONROE WHITTINGTOX, P-.M. 

Lebanon 

Voice 

Alpha Psi Omega; Bachelors, Vice-Pres. '37; Suphumore 
Class Pres. ; Senior Class Pres. ; Plato; McKendrean Staff 
'35, 37; Glee Club '34, '35, '36, i7, Pres. 'i7: Quartet '34, '35, 
'36, '^7; Band '34; Little Theatre; Student Ass'n ; Who's Who 
in American Colleges and Universities; "The Green Emer- 
ald"; "The Marriage of Nanette"; "New Fires". 

WILLIAM HINKEL, B.S. 
Carlyle 
Chemistry 
Bachelors; Senior Class Vice-Prcs. 

VELMA L. HAMILTON, A.B. 
Vandalia 

BlOEOGY 

Sigma Zeta, Asst. Rec.-Treas. '36; Beta Alpha Mu, Pres. '35; 
Student Ass'n; Senior Class Sec.-Treas. ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
'35, '36; W. A. A., Pres. '34; Nature Club; French Club. 

PEYTON LINGLE 
Atlanta, Georgia 

BlOEOGY 

Alpha Mu Omega. Pres. 'i7 ; French Club; Beta Pi Theta. 

GUSTAV WILLIAM KRIZEK, A.B. 

Belleville 

History, German 

Bachelors, Pres. '36; McKendrean StafT, Associate Editor '36, 
Editor-in-Chief 'i7 ; Basketball 'ii, '34, '35, '36; Tennis '36, 
'37, Capt. 'i7; Student Ass'n., Pres. '36; "M" Club, Vice-Pres. 
'36; Carnegie Hall Pres. '36; French Club; Who's Who ui 
.American Colleges and Universities. 



JAMES GRUCHALLA, A.B. 

Sawyerville 

English 

".M" Club; Football '36; Track '35, '36, '37. 

RALPH EDWARD WHITSON, B.S. 

East St. Louis 

Chemistry 

Sigma Zeta, Vice-Master Scientist '37; Bachelors. Sec.-Treas. 
'36, Pres. i7 ; Junior Class Pres.; Student Ass'n Pres. '37; 
Plato ; Associate Editor AIcKendrean '35. 

BERNARD H. BALDRIDGE, B.S. 

Gillespie 

Chemistry 

Sigma Zeta, Master Scientist '36, 'i7; Bachelors, Sec.-Treas. 
'36; Glee Club '36, i7 : Plato; Nature Club Pres. '36. 

CHRISTINE M. WHITTINGTON, A.B. 
Lebanon 
French 



Beta Pi Theta ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 'i7 ; Student Ass' 
Treas. '36; Glee Club '34, '35, '36, '37; Clark Hall Pr 
Nature Club ; French Club Pres. 'i7. 

KENNETH PAUL BROWN, A.B. 
Mt. Vernon 
Sociology 

Pi Kappa Delta, \'ice-Pres. '36; Sigma Tau Delta, 
Y. M. C. .A. Vice-Pres. '36, Pres. 'i7 ; McKendrean . 
Mgr. '35, Bus. Mgr. '36; Student Ass'n, Vice-Pres, 
view Editor 'i7 ; Glee Club, Vice-Pres. and Bus. 
Quartet '.%, 'i7; I'hilo; Who's Who in .American Ui 
and Colleges. 

fagc Tivcl 



Scc- 
;. 'i7; 



Pres 


'i7\ 


.Asst. 


Bus. 


. '37; 


Re- 


Mgr. 


'37; 


niver 


sities 



SENIORS 



JOHN LARS HAMERSON, A.B. 

Salem 

Philosophy 

Sigma Beta Rho, Pres. '57; Glee Chili '36. '37; Little Theatre; 
Spanish Cluli; "Dullars to Udughiiuts". 

DALE HARMON, A.B. 

Louisville 

Philosophy and Religion 

Sigma Beta Khci, X'ice-Pres. '35, '36; Sec.-Treas. '35; Y. M. 
C. A. Cabinet '34; Plato; Natnre Cluh; Spanish Clnli. 

CLAIR B. NORRIS, B.S. 

Hammond, Indiana 

Biology 

Bachelors, \-ice-Pres. '37; Kootl.all '34, '35. '36; Basketlall 
•35; Track '.VS, '36, 'i?, Capt. 'iT ■ "M" Cluh. 

JOHN DILLINGER, A.B. 
East St. Louis 

Mathematics 

Alpha Mu Omega, Pres. '36; Student Ass'n. \'ice-Prcs. '36; 
Pootl.all '35, '36'; Carnegie Hall Vice-Pres. '36. 

ARTHUR E. WEHMEIER. A.B. 
Collinsville 
Education 

Bachelors; Basketliall '36, 'i7 ; Tennis '36, 'i?; "^^' Club; 
Plato. 



HERI'.EKT T. CONDON, B. S. 
East St. Louis 

ClIlvMlSTKY 

DOROTHY V. THOMAS, A.B. 

Lebanon 

Latin 

Beta Pi Theta; French Chih; "The liinl's Christmas Carol". 



HAROLD V,. BROWN. A.B. 

v'^mithtoii. Missouri 

Siicidi.ocjv 

Sigma Beta Rho. Pres, '37; I'lalo; Little Trcatre; Natnre 
CInh. 



LOUISE M. CROW, A.B. 

East St. Louis 

English 

Beta .\lpha Mn, Pres. '36, '37; Student .Ass'n Program Com- 
mittee '36, Sec.-Treas. '37; W. A. A. Sec. '34, Vice-Pres. '35; 
French Clnli, Treas. '35; May Qneen '37. 



STANLEY OEXEMANN, B.S. 
Nashville 
Biology 

(No picture.) 




JUNIORS 



EIJx IX r.AUER 
r.unkcr Hill 



I'll VI. US BARNHART 
r.dk-ville 



IIL'C.M MILES 
Carlyle 

CARL DAMS 
Sims 

:marv ulaxche wolee 

Lebanon 

RUSSELL UXA'ERZAr.T 
r.unkcr Hill 



1)( )XALU KLIXE 
Mason 

WALTER PR LETT 
Kinniund\ 

CLIEEORD liROWN 
Ml. \'ernon 

I1AR( )LI) HERTEXSTEIX 
Xew liaden 



DOYLE DOXHAM 
Ridgway 

HELEX TTAXDEL 
East St. Louis 

JOHX OIM'ITZ 
Lebanon 

:MARY ETTA REED 
r.elk'vilk- 



CHARLES HORTIX 
Albion 

ALHEKT SCHMEDAKE 
Granite City 

WILLARD FRIEDERTCH 
Mascoutab 

MVRA JEAXES 
Staunton 



DDYXE WIXTERROW'D 
Lraiisville 

GEXE\'A DUEY 
Belleville 



C. KEXXETH POWELL 
Lebanon 

DOROTHY EATOX REED 
Edwardsville 



DUDLEY KLAMP 
Trvintjton 



CLAYTOX CAMPBELL 
r.eecher Citv 



JAMES COXXETT 
Granite City 

WEXDELL PHILLIPS 
Herrin 

PALTL CORRELL 
Lebanon 

LISLE AIEW'MAW 
Robinson 



GWEXDOLYX YOST 
Lebanon 

LOUISE PARKER 
, East St. Louis 

ROGER ZELLER 
Chester 

WAYXE BISE 
Omstead 



JAMES r.EERS 
Carrier Mills 



Pntic Fourteen 




o 

CO 



SOPHOMORES 



ROY JAECKEL 
New Athens 



JDE COOPER 
East St. Eouis 



LEOX r.EW'IS 
I'lora 



LAWRENCE FOX 
Hutsonville 



I'.^'RL WOODARD 
R(jbinson 



CHARLES HEELY 
St. Eiborv 



JAMES 1-lNEEY 
.Mound Citv 



ADA KOCH 
Breese 



CATHERINE RAWLIXSON 
Gravville 



EDWARD KENNEDY 

Hutsnnville 



LESTER WILSON 
Louisville 



HELEN ERNST 
East St. Louis 



ROY GRIEP.EL 
]\Iascoutah 



JOHN LARSH 
East St. Louis 



JOHN DAVIS 
Belleville 



ELINOR FRESHOUR 
Lebanon 



RALPH RUTH 
Trenton 



ROBERT CROUSE 
Olney 



VIRGINIA HEFLIN 
Kell 



ESTHER HEER 
Trenton 



CLARA FRANCES BOYD 
Belleville 



FRED DOERNER 

St. Louis 



iMALCOM RANDALL 

East vSt. Louis 



HELEN PORTER 
St. Tacob 



MILDRED LEONARD 
^It. Vernon 



COALMODORE GROVE 
Lebanon 



DALE HORTIN 
Albion 



MARVIN TRIMBLE 
Lebanon 



ROBERTA HEYER 
Louisville 



ALFRED MANIS 
Benton 




to 

o 

I 

o 

2: 
o 

m 

CO 



FRESHMEN 



BURDETTE WILLIAMS 
HAROLD WARNER SHIPP 
MEDELEINE YOST 
ARTHUR MARTIN 

benja:\iin r.ATsoN 

MYRL HER^L\N 
BETTY MAE PHILLIPS 
JOSEPH KIEFER 
MILTON SAGER 
ROBERT LANGENWALTER 
BERTIE BAUER 
VERGENE JENKINS 
EDWARD JONES 
DOROTHY DAUSMAN 
WILLIAM FISCHER 
ROBERT CHAPMAN 
FINIS COCKRUM 
RUBY ELLIS 
MARY HAWORTH 
VIRGINIA LEE HESS 
JOHN HARMON 
DELMONT BECKEMEYER 
HENRY HARPER 
LUCILLE FLOETMAN 



IRWIN GROTEFENDT 
LELAND BEELER 
DOROTHY H ERTENSTEIN 
GEORGIA RUSH 
HARVEY PISTER 
.MARY LOUISE READER 
LEONHARD STOECKLIN 
FLOSSINE RULE 
OWEN WILLIAMS 
ELIZABETH JENNER 
CECIL LOWE 
BYRON BALDRIDGE 
PEGGY BRECK 
MADGE DAVIS 
ROP.ERT DAVIS 
CLARENCE BOHM 
MARIE JAR VIS 
HELEN WAGGONER 
HERBERT FRITZ 
KAHL STROTHEIDE 
LEON SWINDLE 
MAGDALENA WILLIS 
MARVIN BUTLER 




73 

m 

CO 

I 
2: 



STUDENTS WHOSE PICTURES DO NOT APPEAR IN THE ANNUAL 

JLXJ( )RS 

Wallace Ulacklniii; George Cook 

Alililred r.niwn Maxine Douthitt 

Al\r(iii Carlisle Sol Ernst 



SOI'HCAIORES 

-Alarie I'.l.ick Sally TIeely 

W illiaiii cuius Albert Kk.tz 

Carl l),,llinger .Melvin .Madden 

llarr\ Ddutliitt .Alaxine .Miller 

I'ernard Isselhardt Howard I'istiir 

C.eral.Iine Cihs.r.! Wendell Rdl.ins 



FRESHMEX 

Carl lieartl John Schlosser 

I'aul I'.elcher .Mien Seihert 

George Handlon Kelly Simmons 

Everette Hayden . Charles Smith 

John Henderson l\a\ni(in<l Switzer 

Raymond Howe Kacliel Watson 
Glenn Isaacs 



SFECL\L STCDEXTS 
-ALary Jane Rowler William <)t\\( 



Othel I^ansler George Rafiaelle 



CLASS OFEICERS 

Juniors 

President James Pieers 

\"ice-President Doyle Donham 

Secretary-Treasurer Phyllis Barnhart 

SorHOMORKS 

President Marie Block 

\'ice-President John Larsh 

Secretary-Treasurer Fred Doerner 

Fkksiimkx 

President George Handlon 

Vice-Presitlent Owen Williams 

Secretar\--Treasurer Clarence Bohm 




To/-— J, Oppitz, C. r.rown. 

Muidlc—K. Brown, K. Cricl.el. H. HcrtcnMein 

f,, ,i(— Dian Baker. M.ss Thomas. Ml^^ Wilson, M. Reerl, Prof. Hardy. 



On :McKendrce's cami)\is the Illinois Theta 
Chapter represents Pi Kappa Delta, the lead- 
ing national honorary forensic fraternity in 
the country. The local chapter is now a mem- 
ber of the Illinois Province, having recently 
been transferred from the Missouri Province. 

The purpose of the organization is "the 
stimulation of progress in, and the promotion 
of the interests of intercollegiate oratory, de- 
bate, and public speaking by cncoura^ring a 
spirit of intercollegiate fellowship." 

Deserving candidates receive badges of dis- 
tinction which are varied and graduated ac- 
cording to merit and achievement. 

Pi Kappa Delta sponsors intercollegiate de- 
bate trips and this year's schedule was w^ell 
filled. Points toward eligibility for member- 
ship in Pi Kappa Delta are gained through 
participation in debate and other fo:-ensic ac- 
tivities. 



The organization is governed by a national 
council vvhich is elected by delegates of the 
local chapters at the national convention held 
biennially. 

Representatives attended and particijiated in 
the Province Tournament held at Northern 
Illinois State Teachers' College in DeKalb 
earlv in .■\pril, at which time John Oppitz, 
P,esident of the local chapter, won a trophy 
le-iresenting second place in extemporaneous 
speaking in competition with fourteen other 
schools. The delate team tied for fifth place, 
competing with fifteen other teams, defeating 
Wheaton College, which was favored to win 
the tournament. 

New members initiated this vear were Pro- 
fessor Hardv, Chft'ord Hrown and Claytc.n 
Campbell. 

The annual banquet was held on .Xpril .^Oth 
in lUlleville. 




President — Jolin Oppitz 
.'ice-President— Mary Etta 
etary-Treasurer— Harold He 



ALPHA PSI OMEGA 




From A'l.;,'— 11. 11 



Wilson, M. K. Kor.l. 



Tlu' Alplia 'I'lieta cast rif Alpha I'si ( )mt.'.t;a. national honorary dramatic fra- 
ternity, fiivcs rccntjnition to all students who have shown outstanding ability in 
dramatic pr(jductions. The McKendree Cast was organized in V927. 

Eligibility for membership is determined by the point system. The business 
manager of the pla\" is eligible for membership as well as the members of the cast. 

The olTicial publication of the national organization is '"The Playbill." This 
])ublication offers useful information regarding the selection and staging of plays. 
The local cast can also obtain reduced ro}'alty on plays. 

A delegation including Mary Etta Reed, Willard Friederich, Clifford Herten- 
stein, Aliss Thomas and Miss Wilson attended the national meeting of the (Jrand 
Cast ,Ll tlic I lotel Statler in St. Eouis during the Christmas holidays. 

The following members became eligible and were initiated during the first 
semester: Hetty Alae Phillips, Jerry Whittington, Walter Pruett, and Helen Han- 



I'rcsliknt— Jlary Ktta Reed 
Vice-President— Harol.l Hertcnstein 
ecretary-Treasurcr— Willard Friederich 





R. Whitson, I!, r.al.iridge. J I 



5.-<i/i-if— n. Reed, V. Ha 



The Beta Chapter represents Sigma Zeta, national honorary science and 
mathematics fraternity, on our campus. 

This rear an annual essay contest was established to be known as the Wag- 
goner Memorial Essay Contest. This contest has been inaugurated as a memorial 
to the life and work' of the late Professor Edw^ard B. Waggoner, a pioneer in 
modern instruction at McKendree. The memorial is also to include lectures, a 
rock editice and a geological museum, the nucleus of which is to be the collection 
owned by Professor Waggoner. 

Sigma Zeta holds an essay contest for h'reshmen each year in which scien- 
tific essays are submitted and awards are given. 

During the second semester of this year the historic conclave gavel of the 
society of Sigma Zeta was in the custody of the McKendree chapter, and was 
displayed in the library until the annual conclave in the spring. This conclave 
was held at Stevens Point, Wisconsin. The local chapter was represented by 
Professor McClure, Bernard Baldridge and Ralph Whitson. 




^nyc TlfCiity-lIu 



SIGMA TAU DELTA 







-R. Cl-lLbcl, \V. FritikrKli, f. II.; 
— Dr. Yubl, G. Yost. Dr. Slctkiii 



.M. Doulhitt. D. Ilurlin. 



Tin- liita 1 )flla chapter of SiKm-i 'I'^i" Delta, national honorary and profes- 
sional literar\' fraternit}', was organized on McKendree's campus last year. The 
purpose of the organization is to encourage student-writers in any type of writing 
which they nia)- prefer. The fraternit)^ encourages reading and promotes mastery 
of written e.xpression. Dr. Lillian Steckman, head of the English department, is 
the spf)nsor. 

The outstanding event of this _\ear was a lecture-recital given l)y John G. 
Xeihardt under the auspices of the local chapter. Mr. Neihardt is a critic and 
editor of the Post-Dispatch literary section, and is nationally known for his lyrics 
and epics of the West. He read several of his lyric poems in addition to parts of 
his epic poem, "The Death of Crazy Horse", from his volume of poems, "v^ongs 
of the Indian \\ ars." 

1 )egrees of membership, which are based upon academic classification, the 
nuinher of English courses taken, and the amount of material published in student 
publications, are conferred upon the members. Members also contribute mate- 
rial to "The Rectangle", the national publication of the fraternity. 

The annual social event will take the form of a theatre party in P.elleville on 
Alay 21, followed by a spaghetti party at the home of Gwendolyn Yost. 



I>rL■^i,^■nt— Kenneth Brown 
Secretary Treasurer— Cliarlcs Hortin 
nlilKilv ( liairman— WiUanl Frlederich 




I'.nic r-.n-iily-fo 




Bjik Ron- 
Front Rai 



-J. Cooper. C. Campliill, K. Zeller. C. 
—Miss Tyndall, il. Yost, C. WhittiiiKt. 



T. Finley, V. I, ingle. 
I, Ree.l, M. E. Reed. D. Tlu 



Beta Pi Theta, national honorary French fraternit)', was organized during 
the school year 1936-37 through the efforts of Miss Elsa Mae Tyndall, Head of 
the French' Department. The chapter name is Pi Sigma. 

The purpose of Beta Pi Theta is "to advance the progress of literary l-Vench 
and things cultural in America . . . and to encourage consecration to social service 
and the highest ideals of a liberal education." 

The students of the group strive to maintain the highest scholarship and^ lit- 
erary standards, and attempt to contribute to productive French literature. They 
contribute to the national publication, Les Nouvcllcs. 

The charter members are: Peyton Lingle, President: Madeleine Yost, X'ice- 
President ; James Finley, Recording Secretary : Clayton Campbell, Corresponding 
Secretary ; George Cook, Treasurer ; Gus Ayres, Parliamentarian : Alice Behrens, 
Critic; Local Editors. Dorothy Thomas and Christine Whittington : Sentinel. Joe 
S. Cooper: Pianist, Dorothy Eaton Reed; Publicity Manager, Doyle Donham : 
;\nd Faculty Adviser, Miss Elsa Mae Tyndall. 



Pmjc Tiveiity-fiv 



Extra Curricidar 



o 



h 

O 
O 

P3 



Okgaxizatioxs 

Philo 

Plato 

Clio 

Sigma Beta Rho 

Bachelors 

Alpha Mu Omega 

Kappa Theta Tau 

Beta Alpha .Mu 

Phi Lambda Tau 

French Club 

YAV.C.A. 

Y.AI.C.A. 

Women's Glee 'Club 

Men's Glee Club 

W.A.A. 

"M" Club 

Little Theatre 

Out-.State Club 

Athletics 

Football 

Basketball 

Track 

FkaTL'RKS 

Snaps 
Calendar 
Dramatics 
AIa\' Oueen 
Football Queen 
W.A.A. Oueen 



k^i 



i.-.i^ ^- 



.»MI:. 



PHILOSOPHIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 




Sl.ntJfii., -U. Shipp. I', r.rovf. C. Davis, C. ll.irlin, J. I M'pit'. H- Hnulhitt N I ini,, 
Scaled— C. C^iniplK-ll. li. Williams. K. C.rithtl, A. SLhiiu-dakc. M . llutltT, H. Hortin. 



invaltL-r, \V. Priu-tt. 



Poetically niimleil McKendrcans have often expressed the idea that if the 
trees on the campus could speak, they would have many interesting things to tell 
about the life at McKendree. One of the earliest recollections of these leafy sen- 
tinels would be the founding of the Philosophian literary society. This organiza- 
tion, which was founded one hundred years ago, is the oldest on the hill. Philo's 
record of achievement and success is almost as old as McKendree itself. 

The purpose of the society, as set forth by the charter members, is "to encour- 
age literary achievement and debate." Programs are presented eacji Monday 
night, and open session is held once a month. These meetings offer valuable lit- 
erary and oratorical training for the members. 

Muring the past }ear the walls of I'hilo Hall were redecorated. Panels and 
murals constituted a part of this redecoration. 

I'hilo sponsored the group of pla\s given b}' the McKendree players in the 
chaiiel on ]-"ebruary 24. Another project of the society, carried out for the first 
time this \ear, is the sponsoring of the McCormick Oratorical Contest. The pur- 
pose of this contest is to promote the oratorical ability of the members of the so- 
ciety. This contest is a memorial to Glenn McCormick, who was killed in action 
during the World War. 

The Centennial Anniversary of Philo was celebrated by a banquet which was 
held on May 14th in Pearson's Hall, 



PLATONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



The year 1849 saw the estabhshment of the Platonian Literary Society on 
the McKendree campus. The society has, since its estabhshment. promoted extra- 
curricular activities of various sorts, stressing those of hterary value in particular. 

The training afforded the college student through participation in the activi- 
ties of the literary society are of inestimable value. Though this type of organi/a- 
don may be considered as outmoded on some campuses it still provides a certain 
something not to be found in the activities of any other organization. 

Plato \von the Intramural liasketball championship this year in a hard fought 



One of the outstanding events of the year was the debut of the famous 
Schnitzelbanker quartet. The members of this illustrious group were Rov Jaeckel, 
Benny Isselhardt, Bernard Baldridge, and Malcom Randall. 



Regular meetings are held every Monday 
month. 



ijht, with open session once a 



Paue Tic 




Standilli,~-\\. Phillips. II Hirtiii-.tiin 
E. Strothclde, 1.. LewTs, k. Ho« 
L. Jlewmaw. 

Sinlcd^B. H. BaMridge. H. Bro%vii. A. Well 
R. Jaeckel, R. Whitson, E. Bauer. 



CLIONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



'I'lie admission of women to AIcKcndrct- in the year 1869 was soon followed 
1)\- tlie organization of a literary society, destined to bear the name of the famous 
muse of history. This society which in the year of its inception numbered fifteen 
members, now has himdreds of names on its records. 

ll would be interesting to step back thrcjugh time over a space of sixty-six 
years and be present at the first public entertainment held in the chapel May 6, 
1S70. The first essay on the program was entitled "Those Who Live in Glass 
1 louses vShould Never Throw Stones." Clionian programs are much the same 
now as they were then, e.xcept that the subjects are somewhat modernized. The 
society offers an opportunit}' for the girls on the campus to receive training in 
writing, speaking before the public. ;m<l in the responsibility of office-holding as 
well as Darliamentary procedure. 



In regular Clionian meetings, the janitor still 
llie face nl all men", to quote the McKendree lit 
H(jwe\er. once a month the men nf the campus and 
visit tlie society in "open session". 



OSes and locks tlie door in 
dlight of man_\' years ago. 
ither friends are invited to 



Clio continues to present interesting and worthwhile programs and strives 
\ I' up lo its motto, "N'irtute et Lahore." Seventeen new members were taken 



into llie 



;iet\' tliis \ear. 




luirt \ HUlii 
Seated— II Yost, C Ra»lin50n, C F Bo\rl. J) He 
R Heyer, M Davis, 



Paijc Thirl y 



SIGMA BETA RHO 




Slaudhig—Tlr. Walton, C. I.owc, D. Will 

K. Powell, Dr. Peterson. 
Seated—]. Henderson, C. Grove, L. Hamerson, W 



1'.. Woo.lard, I) 



Dr. Yost, H. Br 



Sigma Beta Rho fraternity has as its purpose the bringing together of min- 
isterial students of the campus into a closer fellowship, as well as the promotion 
of mutual helpfulness. The motto of the organization is "Schcilar.ship. r.nitlicr- 
hood. Religion." 

This fraternity was established in 1931 under the sponsorship of Dr. Walti^n, 
and has since proved a very worthwhile organization. Interesting meetings are 
held regularly, at which time problems and topics of interest are discussed in 
open forum. 

During the past year a new constitution was adopted. The society provided 
the chapel program on January 12th. The Preacher's Quartet made up of Ken- 
neth Powell. Donald Kline, Carl Davis, and Commndore Grove furnished music 
on various occasions. 

New members initiated during the year were Finis Cockrum, William Collins. 
Everette Hayden. John Henderson, Donald Kline, Cecil Lowe, Burdette Williams 
and Ra\mond Switzer. 



THE BACHELOR FRATERNITY 




Ri.llil—Vrof. McClure, A. Schmedake. E. Bauer, T. Beer 
\. Nranis. I). Klamp, J. Whittington, B. Baldridge. R. Ja 



, T. Finley, G. Krizek, C. Hortin, \V. Bise, 
ckel, C. Norris, A. Wehmcier, \V. Hinkel, 



The purpose of the I5achelor fraternity is "the promotion of fraternal and 
social relationships among the men students on the hill." This organization was 
founded in the year 1919, and now has a large active membership. 

►'special recognition is given for scholarship in the form of the Bachelor loving 
cup. This year the cup was received by Charles Hortin, whose name will be 
placed on the fraternity honor roll. 

The Bachelors entertained the A.M.O. fraternit)- this year at a stag banquet 
held at the Highway Hotel in Lebanon. There was a wiener roast on Fern Hill 
early in the year, as well as other social events which included a Christmas party 
at the Locust Hills Country Club and formal initiation services held for the sec- 
ond semester pledges at the Belleville Hotel on April 2(). 

The annual banquet was held at the Congress Hotel in St. Louis on May 8th. 



Pa<ie Thirt\--tivo 



ALPHA MU OMEGA 



Alpha AIu Omega fraternity has just completed its twelfth year (Jii the campus 
which has proved one of the most active in the fraternity's history. 

Social functions included the mid-term banquet at the Hcitel lielleville. and 
the Annual Spring Banquet, held at the St. Clair Ci)untr\- Cluh. 

In addition to tjiese, six stag affairs were held for the members and their 
pledges. The fraternity was also tjie guest of the Llachelors at the annual A.M.CJ.- 
Bachelor Banquet. 

The outstanding athletic event in the annals of the fraternity was a charit\' 
football game against a team (}f picked stars from large universities, which ended 
in a 6-6 tie. In this game former A.M.(.). and McKendree stars again donne<l the 
Purple and White and were united in a powerful teain that amazed the crowd in 
attendance. 

The famous A.M.O. paddle has become a tradition on the campus. The 
hardy pledges who survived the "booms" of this feared bludgeon for the first se- 
mester were: Robert Chapman, Rud Heely, and John Harmon; second semester: 
Bill Otwell, Bob Crouse, Ray Howe, and Russel Unverzagt. 




Left to Rujht—Vvoi. Hardy, M. Randall, C. Hcclv, I'.. Isselliardt 
F. Doerner, J. Larsh, R. Chapman, 1'. Lingle, M. .Madden. 



T. Dillingcr, W, lilackbiun. J. H.i 



h'age Thirty-three 



KAPPA THETA TAU 



'I'lu' !\a|ii>:i Thcta 'I'au sni-Drity was (ir,i;anize(l on the campus in Xo\tinb<jr, 
l'',xr 'I lit- purpose of this sororit} is "]irom(.)ting sch(;larship, friendship and 
social acti\ities among the members." 

1 )uring the summer of 193(i. a combined luncheon and plunge part}- was held 
at the Locust Hills Country Club in Lebanon for the purpose of interesting new- 
girls in AIcKendree College. 

The social acti\ities of the \ear included a rush tea at the home of Mrs. Har- 
old I'fetter on September 27th: a dinner party hcjnoring alumni members at the 
home of Elinor Freshour after the H(jmec(jming game; and rush week activities 
w Inch featured two \''alentine parties. — a tea at the h(jme of Mrs. L. J. East and a 
theatre part\- followed by a spaghetti supper at .Miss I'reshour's home. 

This \ear Dr. Josephine I'.ittner accepted the sponsorship of the sorority. 




Page Thirty-fo 




,'11/ K,>7,'' 



The Beta Alpha Mu sororitx", whicli was yiven (ift'icial recnynition in Xiiveni- 
ber. 1933. has for its purpose the prdinotioii of friendship, schnhirship, loyalty ami 
cooperation. 

The social calendar for the year includetl a rusli tea held at the LehaiKjn 1 lotel 
in September: a luncheon j^iven for the sorority b\' Mrs. E. K. Spencer; and the 
annual Homecoming' reunion held at the home of Margaret Chappie. The rush 
parties at the beginning of the second semester featured a tea at the home of Mrs. 
Robert Welch: a Mexican Fiesta at Mrs. Dwight Taylor's home, and a luncheon 
w ith Mrs. E. R. Spencer. A tea honoring the patronesses was given on April 1 1th 
at the home of Ada Koch in P.reese. Culminating the \ear's events was a tianquet 
at the Hotel Chase in St. Louis on May l.Mh. 

!'>eta Alpha Mu is the hrst sor(jrit\ on the campus to sponsor the present;!- 
tion of a loving cup. This cup, in the form of a traveling trophv, will go ti. a L;irl 
of Juni(jr standing who best fulfills the (|ualihcations, which are based upon schol- 
.-irship, leadership and character. 



Thirty-five 




Left to Rialit^U. Yost, H. H: 

K. Hcyer, M. Block. M. Jeanes 
ler, M. L,eonard, L,. Floetman. 



C. KawHnson, B. Bau 



Barnliart, G. Yost, 
r, M. Jarvis, M. Mil- 



The three-fold purpose of the Phi Lambda Tau sorority is the acquisition of 
hi,t,'h spiritual, scholastic, and social standards. The sorority was officially estab- 
lished in November, 1933. 

'I"he social events of the year included a rush tea at the home of ilrs. Herman 
Pfeffer in September ; a theatre party in St. Louis ; a dinner at the Golden Rod 
Tea Room in IJelleville, given by Dr. Steckman, sorority sponsor, after the Home- 
coming game ; a Christmas party in the form of a Scavenger Hunt from the home 
of Mary Etta Reed in Belleville at which time the members played Santa Claus 
to indigent families in Belleville : and a series of three rush parties at the begin- 
ning of the second semester; a tea at the home of Mrs. Herman Pfeffer, a visit 
to the Chicago underworld in the home of Dr. Yost, and a luncheon with Mrs. 
W. C. Pfeffer, which assumed the role of the Ritz. 

The Sorority sponsors Home-Town Week End every year, and during this 
time each member entertains a prospective McKendrean as her special guest. This 
}ear it was held during the week end of April 3rd and 4th. at which time a num- 
bc" of girls were entertained in cordial McKendree fashion. 

The annual banquet at Hotel Statler on May 15th concluded the activities for 
the year. 



FRENCH CLUB 



Those students who aspire to superiority in French are benefitted by member- 
ship in "Le Circle Francais." better known on the campus as the Frencli Club. 
The purpose of this club is to promote a deeper interest in L^rench language and 
literature as well as that the students may become acquainted with French cus- 
toms, songs, and folk dances. The organization has a large enrollment of active 
members. 

Interesting meetings and parties are held regularly. This year some of the 
social events were: a reception for the new French students at the beginning of 
the school year ; initiation ceremonies in whicli new members were mercilessly 
guillotined; an annual Christmas part}' held on December 15di, and a St. Valen- 
tine's party. 

Regular programs include short talks on French subjects, poems, jokes, con- 
tests, games, and songs. Miss Elsa Mae Tyndall is the sponsor. Membership is 
open to all students of the I'rench Department, and to students i^f the college who 
have studied French. 




Sfandiiui—T. Cuopcr, M. ISiitUr, A. Main 

H. Handel, il. Herman, J. Finley, C. li 

Scatcd—'Sl. Haworth, M. Yost. G. Rush, C 
M. L. Reader, 15. M. I'Inllips. 



y. w. c. A. 



The student purpose of the Y. W. is as follows : "We unite in the desire to 
realize full and creative life through a growing knowledge of God. We determine 
to have a part in making this life possible for all people. In this task we seel-c 
to imderstaiid Icsiis and Idllow Him." 

The local Y.W'.C.A. is one of the most active and helpful organizations on 
McKendree's campus. It begins its activities at the first of the year by providing 
a "big sister" for each Freshman girl when she arrives on the campus. A special 
effort is also made to engender and promote a more friendly spirit of cooperation 
between off and on-campus girls. 

Interesting and inspirational meetings are held each week. An uiuisual num- 
ber of outside speakers liaxe appeared on these programs, giving "charm schocl" 
talks, book reviews, and (ither ly])es of pr(]grams which have proved thorfiughl}" 
interesting and helpful. 

During "I'.dnk Week" in Xo\ember the V. coiuerted Clio Hall into a com- 
fortable and in\iting browsing rcjom, for which the library provided an interesting 
collection ni buciks. 

Tlie (ibservatinn (if "Heart v^ister" week, ending with a \''alentine supper at 
the home ni President Yost, proved a thorough-going success. 

In additiiin to these acvivities, frequent comliined services were held with 
the Y..M.C.A. 




> 



\'. H.imilton. .\I. lUock. M. .Miller, iliss Harper, Miss Wilson. 



Page Tliirty-cliihl 



00 

< 




Tor—C. Hortin, E. Bauer. H. He 


ten 


Mein. 


T. La 


M,ddlc—}. Oppitz. A. Schmedake. 


K. 


liro\ 


n. W 


Frwil/— Prof. Harriy. Dr. Yost. 









The Young .Men's Christian .\ssociati()n is a Christian organization intendeil 
for all the men of the college, the purpose of which is to help meet the religious 
and social needs of the men on the campus. It also endeavors to help new stu- 
dents during the first few weeks of their college experience. 

Interesting meetings are held during the year, and combined meetings with 
the Y.W.C.A. are of frequent occurrence. This year these meetings included a 
Christmas service at which Harold Gieseke was the speaker, a program by two 
negro choruses of Lebanon, as well as several other very interesting meetings. 

Through the efforts of the combined Y.'s, Rabbi Isserman of Temple Israel. 
St. Louis, was secured to speak at the chapel service on March 23. His subject 
was "The American Dream". 

The sponsors of the Y.M.C.A. for this year were Coach P.. E. P.lanchard and 
Professor C. D. Hardy. A new constitution was drawn up and adopted this year. 



WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB 




Ba.k Rotc~H. Hanflel. L. Floetman, B. Bai 

A. Koch. M. Miller, M. Teanes, L. Parker. 
Fioiit Rozv—Sl. E. Reed, G. Yost. II. Yost. P. B: 
D. Reed. R. Hcyer, E. Fresliour. V. Jenkins 



C. Rawlinson, I). I), 



iihart. C. Whittii 



man, R. Ellis, >I. L. Reade 
B. M. Hiillips, D. Hertenste 



The Women's Glee Club is a self-supporting organization which offer.« valu- 
able musical training to its members as well as being an advertising medium for 
the College. Its purpose is to develop musical ability among interested women 
students and Ut acquaint churches and schools of Southern Illinois with the Col- 
lege. 

The annual tour of Southern Illinois was made in May. In addition, several 
programs were presented by the McKendree chorus, composed of the Men's and 
Women's Glee Clubs combined. 

Awards in the form of pins, sweaters, and blankets are given for continued 
activity as a member of the club. 

The Women's Quartet filled numerous engagements during the year. 



QUARTET 

Mary Etta Reed 

Dorothy Eaton Reed 
Vergene Jenkins 




MEN'S GLEE CLUB 



OL'ARTET 




"There's music in the air" when the boys y;ather in the chapel fur (ik-e Ckih 
practice. Membership in the Glee Club means man\' hours of hard work, but it 
also has its compensation in useful musical training and interesting tours througii 
Southern Illinois. 

The Men's Glee Club is also a self-supporting organization, and its members 
are given awards for continued membership. 

This year the annual concerts were given in April. These concerts are a 
medium of contact with schools and churches throughout the Southern Illinois 
Conference, and they help the constituencx' to become better acquainted with 
McKendree. 

Several concerts were presented by the combined Men's and \\'omen's Glee 
Clubs. Tlie oratoricj. "Ruth," featuring both clubs, as well as singers of the com- 
munitw was presented on the evening of baccalaureate Sunday. 

The Men's (Ju;irtet tilled man\- engagements during the \ear, and the "Mc- 
Kendree Ouartet" is known lhroui;h(JUt Southern Illinois. This \ ear it was com- 
posed of lerry W'hittington, Robert Joe J-)avis. James Beers, and Kenneth llrown. 



Back Row—C. navi 

I,. Stoecklin. 
Front Rotf—T. Whil 



PciOC Forty 




WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



Tlu- \\'( mien's Athletic Association, better known as the W.A.A., was organ- 
ized in l''J)4. Its purpose is to promote organized athletics among the women of 
11k- college. 

Points are made by the members through participation in recognized sports, 
and letters are awarded to those who gain the recfuired number of points. 

This year the W.A.A. sponsored a circus which was presented b}' the Pontiac 
High School's Gym Circus Troupe, under the direction of Jack Haskins. a Mc- 
l\en(h-ee alumnus. The troupe included fifty performers and a fourteen-piece 
iircliestra. The coronation of the circus queen. Alary P.lanche Wolfe, opened the 
pertdrniance. 

Tlu- W.A.A. liad a ver\- successful basketball season this year, suffering nnl)' 
one defeat in com]jetitiiin w ith collegiate and surrounding community teams. ( )ther 
sports of the year were volley ball, Softball, tennis, track and ping-pong. 

The members of the organization were entertained at a party given earl\ in 
Ibe \ear b\' the pledges. A number of- new members were initiated into the or- 
ganization at the beginning of the \ear. 




,/( f, Ru,l,t-U. R«d. M. Jarvis, L Sw.n.ilc. C. K,,wl,„s„n. C. Y,.st, M T.-am- II llan,l,l, 

Mi^s Thomas, 1). Hertenstein. M. WoliV, K. W atsun, ].. Crow, M. .Milkr, (.. Ku-I:, M. ^ "-t. 



'M" CLUB 



M ,*^ » M MM _ 



m^ 



iiu;iM,/--A. Mams. J. Ileers, F. Docrner. J. Gruchalla. W . H.sc. J. Larsh, W l!lackbnrn, R. Zcilc 
atcd—R. Jaeckel, A. Wehmcicr, G. Krizek, C. :Sorris, M. Randall. 



The "M" club is composed of men who have won a college letter in a major 
sport. The purpose of this organization is to bind more closely together the ath- 
letes who make up McKendree's teams, as well as to promote the spirit of sports- 
manship and clean living on the hill. 

The club awards a trophy to each graduating senior fcjr each sport in wjiich 
he has won a letter. 

The feature activity of the club this year was the introduction of McKen- 
dree's first Football Queen to the campus on Homecoming day. A contest was 
held in which Helen Ernst was chosen queen with Sally Heely as maid of honor. 
This contest is to be an annual event. 

The presiding officers for the year were : President — Wallace Blackburn ; 
Vice-President — Gus Krizek ; Secretary-Treasurer — Roger Zeller. 



Fn'ic Forty-three 




Stuiulnia—],. I'.ec-lcr, W. Fricdcrirli, T. Whittinuton. K. I!;iiicr, M. Sag. 

M. Hav,-.. C\ H. I'.oy.l. S. Hccly, L. Hanursnn, .1. Oi.pitz, J. Fmle 

.Siv,/,-i/— M. I.. Keailcr. Ik M, I'll. 111]. s M. Y,,m. D. |laii>man. I', knlc, \' 

]i. I'.aiKT, .M. I.toiKir,!, l",. CiliM.n, .M. Rt-i-.l, P. I'.aniliart 



11. Williams, M. l;, Wolfe, 
C. lirown. K. Oruliil. 
Hess, Miss Thomas, A. Koch, 



Tlie Little Theatre offers an opportunity to AIcKendree students to obtain 
experience in dramatic work. This organization has a large membership and does 
a great deal of constructive work in dramatics. Its purpose is to "instigate and 
per|ietuate the histrionic art on McKendree's camjius." 

ICligibility for membership is attained liy a <lramatic test and a majority vote 
(if the members. 

The (organization is divided into four stock companies which take their turn 
in presenting programs and plays. Points for eligibility to Alpha Psi Omega may 
l)e obtained by participation in Little Theatre plan's. 

The (irganization sponsors frequent trips to the theatre in St. Louis. 

Degrees of Managing and Staging, Character Portrayal, and Pla_\' I'mduc- 
tion are conferred upon worth)' members of the organization. 



/'„,„■ r..:ly.fo„r 



OUT-STATE CLUB 



The ( Xit-v'^taU' Clulj was (ir.yanizfd h\ .Mis? 
1934. 'I'he purpose of the Club is to help stu<l 
in becoming adjusted to McKendree life. The 
contact and friendh" aid amontr its members. 



Klsa Mae Tvndall in the fall ni 
nts wild cimie t rum other states 
dub endea\'iirs to prdmute social 



Nine states are represent eil un the campus this }ear- 
Kentuck\-, Virginia, New |erse\, bjwa, Indiana. Texas, M 



-Georgia, Aliss 
ssouri, ;ui(l llli 



51PI)1. 



Interesting programs arc presented by the club. The members learn frnm mie 
another something of the customs, traditions, and places of interest of each state 
represented. Points of interest and of historical importance in the various states 
are discussed. Illinois and the cit\' of Lebanon each have a representative. This 
year also a member was chosen to represent the Seven Seas. jMateri.al of his- 
torical and geographical nature from the various states has been collected. The 
club had eighteen charter members and li.as maint.iined a good membership. 




ck A'uT4— H. sill].)). C. C'..,.k 
Bin Rozc^Ulss Tynd-ill. Ji.l 



FOOTBALL SQUAD 








;;.;./,■ A'..:,— K. Zcller. I'.. Issclliardt, P. Madden, T. Schlosser, M. Butler, K. Simmons, K. Davis, 

li. Woodard, H. Dunlhitt, J. Harmon, J. Heers, J. Dillinser. 
Uildh- Roz^—Z. Strotheide, I). Klamp, S. J^rnst, W . I'hdlips C. Xorris, \V. Bise, G. Cook, H. Shipp, 

J. Cooper, R. Jaeckel. 
Fnnit Row— Coach Blanchard, T. Grnchalla, I. Larsli, M. Kaudall, H. Doerner, \V. Blacklmvn, I,. Rice, 

L. Lewis, G. Handlon. 



For tlie first time in five years, the season of 1936 did not find the Bearcats 
contenders for the conference football title. Cjoinjj through a mediocre season 
because of injuries and lack of reserve material, the F'urple and White were only 
able to win three games while dropping six contests. 

They (jpened up the season's schedule with a forfeit from ShurtletT, the lone 
conference "win" of the season. The Purple dropped four conference battles 
before the season was over. Norris went over for the lone conference touchdown 
in the North Central game. AlcKendree's other two wins were over Chillicothe 
and Oakland City. The Rolla Miners and Washingtcm University accounted for 
the fifth and si.xth losses. 

One member of the football squad, Captain Wallace Blackburn, was honored 
when he was selected on the Second Team of the Associated Press All-Star Se- 
lection of the Little 19. 

Unlike other years, a wealth of material was not at hand, especially in the line 
of backfield men. Yet every game was a hard-fought one and not once did a Picar- 
cat quit fighting until the final gun. 



SEASON'S RECORD 



McKendrt-L'.. 
JMcKendree- 
McKendree- 
McKendree.. 
IMcKendree.. 





6 





jMcKendree 8 

McKendree 7 

McKendree 

McKendree 



Sliurtletl ( Forfeit ) 

RoUa Miners (Mo.) 27 

Chillicothe (Mo.) 

Carbondale Teachers 13 

St. X'lattjr 24 

Oakland City ( hid. I d 

North Central 25 

Washington U 33 

Illinois College 26 



COACH 1'.. K. rd,.\NCiiAki) 




With the school }ear, 1930-37, came a new athletic regime at Alckendree. It 
br(night to the campus, B. E. P.lanchard, former \'illa Park High School Director 
of Athletics, to replace Paul D. Waldorf, who had resigned to accept a position in 
Kansas. 

Coach P.lanchard earned his P..S. in Physical Education at Western State 
Normal College at Kalamazoo, Michigan, in l'}31. The following year he studied 
at the University of Iowa, where he received the degree of M.A. in Physical Edu- 
cation. For four years at Western State he competed in major sports and wris a 
member of the varsity football squad for three years. 

He conus to .McKen(h-ec as a higlily recommended athletic director and great 
things are expected from him in his future career as a coach. 



FOOTBALL LETTERMEN 




Tsselhardt 
Beers 

Ernst 

Randal! 



Madden 
Cook 



DUlin^er 

\V(...dard 



llise 



Larsh 

Gruchalki 
Doerner 



Blackburn 
Klamp 

N orris 



Bernard Issiclhardt, 
Sophomore 

Belleville. 

Ouarterhack; Captain-elect, F r^t- 
Year Lettermar,. 

Being laid up duriiiB most of the 
season, through injury, "Benny," our 
next year's captain, got into enough 
games to win his tirst letter. When 
in action, Isselhardt took care of the 
quarterback position and did a great 
job of it. Besides being a good signal- 
caller, Benny was the best passer on 
the squad. He is the first McK. toot- 
ball player to acquire national fame, 
making the headlines in the Washing- 
ton U. game when he completed a 
pass to himself. 

"When IfcKendrce plavcd Washing- 
ton U. at St. Louis, Benny Isselihardt 
of ^^CK. shot a pass over the line of 
scrimmage. The ball hit Walter Gog. 
Washington tackle, bounded back and 
was caught by Isselhardt for a net 



aain of three yard,." - -.Si. L.iiii iJLbc- 
Dcmocrat. 

"Benny was carried oft the field after 
re-injuring his battered knee, but he 
had helped to make football history 
when he completed a pass to himself." 
—Bi-llcvillc Daily AJvOLatc. 

I,-\Mi;s Beers, Junior 

Carrier Mills. 

End; Two- Year Letterman. 

Beers returned to McK, and played 
his favorite end position to a "T", The 
untalked-of and unheard-from Beers 
again knocked down interference like 
an Ail-American, was the hardest tack- 
ier on the squad, and snared his share 
of passes. "Jim", the hard-hitting 
Bearcat, messed up many a play of 
the opponents, not to speak of the op- 
ponents themselves. Beers was the 
only man on the squad who played the 
full 60 minutes in every game of the 



His place 



egula 



•McKendr 



otlu 



points were 
tallied when Vine was smothered by 
Beers behind his own goal line." — 
East St. Louis Journal. 

"Beers played the sort of game that 
makes him an outstanding end." — 
Bi-llcviUc Daily Ad-.-ocatc. 

Sol Ernst, Juniur 

East St. Louis. 

Center, First- Year Letterman, 

Ernst took over the center position 
when Schwartz was forced to quit foot- 
ball, due to injuries, and proved to be 
a good care-taker of the snapper-back 
position. His knowledge of the game 
made him one of the headiest line- 
men in the conference. Sol shoidd 
be a valuable man next season if his 
injured knee will stand the strain. 

"Ernst, injured in the S. I. N. U. 
game, will be lost for the Homecoming 
game."— £(iif St. Louis Journal. 



Puijc Forty-ciiiht 



Malcom Raxdall, 

Sophomore 

East St. Louis. 

Guard; Two-Year Letterman. 

Serving as a substitute in his Fresh- 
man vear. Randall came back this year 
to earn his second coveted ''M'' and to 
become a mainstay in the McKendree 
line. There is little doubt that "Mai" 
will be ripht in the front line when 
the season opens next fall. He makes 
up for bis lack of height in fighting 
spirit and love for the game, thus 
making of himself a great player. Ran. 
dall's outstanding performance was in 
the Washington game, when he knifed 
through the Bear's line on at least a 
dozen occasions to smear the play. Mai 
was al.so used in the backfield on a 
few occasions. 

"Gibbons' try for the extra jjoint was 
blocked by Randall."— £nif St. Louis 
Journal. 

"He was finally hauled down from 
behind by Randall on the one-foot 
line."— B,-/;i-;'i7/r Xcu'S Democrat. 

"Mai Randall probably played one of 
the best games of his gridiron career 
in the VVashington frav."— Bc/Zcti;/!- 
£><ii7v .-lilvocatc. 



^[ki.vix Madden. Sohhomorc 

I■:.l^t St. Louis. 

Quarterback; First-'i'ear Letterman. 

AFadden was substitute No. 1 of the 
backfield. He took care of the quar- 
terback post when Isselhardt was out of 
the game. "Pat" showed plenty of im- 
provement and should be a big help 

"McKendree held to its 6-point ad- 
vantage, acquired in the second quar- 
ter, when ;Madden took Schlosser's pass 
for the score."- i'f. Louis Glohc Demo- 
crat. 



George Cook, Jiiu'wr 

^^'ebster Groves. Missouri. 

Guard and Center; First-Year 
Letterman. 

Cook was Blanchard's No. 1 line sub- 
stitute. He was able to take care of 
any line position, and also at times 
dropped to the backfield to toss out 
one of his famous 60-yard spirals. Cook 
should prove to be a star next year. 

John Dillingee, Senior 

East St. Louis. 

Guard and Center; First-Year 
Letterman. 

Dillinger has been out for football 
for four years. This vear he received 
his first "'M" for his loyal service. Al- 
ways ready to step in and "dish it out", 
John proved to be a valuable reserve. 
He ends his career by graduation, 

"Dillinger, taking care of the pivot 
post for the first time in his life, 
turned in a nice i^me."—BcUciillc 
.\c:cs Democrat. 



r.vuL W'ooDARD, Sophoiiiore 

Robinson. 

End; First-Year Le 



Woodard was used as an end most 
of tile season, but played guard on a 
few occasions. Being a good defensive 
man. Woodard should become a regular 
next fall. 



W'av.nE PilsE, Junior 

.Moun.l City. 

Halfback; Two-Year Letterman. 

.\lthough lacking experience, Bise was 
an outstanding man for the Purple. 
After this year's experience he should 

Pane Forty-uine 



be a threat as a line-plunger for the 
Cats next season. Bise was used this 
year mostly as a blocking back and 
took good care of his post. A tall, 
rangy fellow, Bise also has an ability 
for catching passes. 

"Wayne Bise scored the McKendree 
touchdown bv a wide sweep from the 
Indiana team''s 6-yard line."— 5f. Louis 
Post Disratcl:. 

John Larsh, Sophomore 

East St. Louis. 

End; .Issociated Press .A.ll-Star Se- 
lection Honorable Mention; Two- 
Year Letterman. 

The last of the Larshs', as in his 
Freshman year, was again one of the 
best ends in the "Little 19." "Johnny" 
was the hardest-working man on his 
squad. His practice was as thorough 
as his game. Larsh is probably the 
best pass-receiver ever donning a Mc- 
Kendree football uniform, and his many 
spectacular catches will long be re- 
membered by local football fans. Al- 
ways a consistent ball player "Bud", 
in his next two years, should become 
one of the Bearcat immortals. Owing 
to his aggressiveness he was also a 
great defensive man. 
'"---- McKendree advanced into 
Washington territory on two passes 
from Norris to John L^rsh, the out- 
standing McKendree player on the 
field."— i';. Louis Globe-Democrat. 

"Larsh added the extra point." — 
Cliicai/o Tribune. 

".\ long pass to Larsh had put the 
ball on the Chillicothe 25.vard line."— 
Last St. Louis Journal. 



James Gruchalla, Senior 

Sawyerville. 

Tackle; One- Year Letterman. 

Gruchalla was awarded his first "M'' 
after four years of hard work. "Jim" 
was a reliable reserve, and this gained 
him many quarters of play. 



Fred Doerner, Sophoiuori 

St. Louis, Missouri. 

Guard; First-Year Lett( 



Doerner shared the left guard posi- 
tion with Handlon. Being big and 
fast, though lacking experience, Doerner 
nevertheless proved his worth and 
should come back next vear for a great 
season of football. 



LeRoy Rice, .Senior 

Flora. 

Center and Halfliack; Four-Year 
Letterman. 

Rice was the "handv-man" of the 
squad. If Coach Blanchard needed a 
man to fill a gap. "Duck" was the 
man. He started at guard, shifted to 
center, and finished the season as a 
halfback, also taking care of the kick- 
ing. Rice always fought to the finish 
and his fight and determination will be 
greatlv missed next year. 

"Rice also did some nice work in 
the kicking department, getting off sev- 
eral good' kicks."— 5f. Louis Post-Dis- 
ratch. 

Cabt. Wallace Blackburn, 
Senior 

Edwardsville. 

Tackle, .-IssociateJ Press Second 
All-Star Selection; Illinois Inter- 
collegiate Second AU-Star Selec- 
tion; Voted Squad's most valuable 
man; Four-Year Letterman. 

This year Blackburn brought his ca- 
reer to a grand finale. A spirited 
leader and hard fighter, his shoes will 



not easily be filled. As he had done 
in the past two years, "Wally" again 
headed the McKendree forward wall, 
and showed he could take it. He took 
terrific punishment in the Washington 
game, but went back for more. Always 
playing a charging game, bis most out- 
standing one of the season was with 
North Central. Blackburn was all over 
the field making tackle after tackle, 
and smearing plays before they were 
well started. 

"The Lebanonites two tackles. Capt. 
Blackburn and Klamp stood out in the 
line."— St. Louis Glohc-Dcmocrat. 

"Hill fumbled, and the ball was re- 
covered by McKendree's power-driver, 
Capt. Blackburn," — Carbondale Egyp- 

"Gamely returning to the .game after 
having his split lip bandaged up, Black- 
burn played a 'bang-up' game the sec- 
ond half."— ^f. Louis Post-Disfatch. 

DuDLKV Ki.AMP, .Junior 

Irvington, 

Tackle; Three-Year Letterman. 

Klamii again used his J50 pounds to 
great advantage and was an important 
link in the Bearcat line. Big, rough, 
and ready, "Dud" was always willing 
to give and take, thereby proving him- 
self one of the most improved players 
on the squad. With his ability for 
checking interference, there is no doubt 
as to the filling of the left tackle 



Clair Xorris, Senior 

Hammond. Indiana. 

Fullback; Three- Year Letterman. 

Norris was the outstanding backfield 
man for the Purple throughout the sea- 
son. His driving ability was remark- 
■ahle. He was the only man on the 
squad able to gain ground on running 
plavs. He also took care of a great 
deal of the passing. "Chuck" really 
opened up in the Washington game 



on the opening kick-off. when the last 
man between him and the pay-off line 
brought him down. Norris will leave 
us via the sheep-skin route, and will be 



sed. 



"McK scored from the 2S.yard line 
when Norris snagged Isselhardt's pass 
and ran fifteen yards for the score."— 
Chicaao Tribune. 

" - - - -, but they made only one 
threat, when Chuck Norris uncorked a 
string of passes that took the team to 
the 20 yard \inc.~Bellevlle Daily ■■Jrffn- 
cat-. 

"He made some nice kick-off and 
punt returns and brought down numer- 
ous Washington hacks with some hard 
tackling."— 5/. Louis Globe-Democrat. 



John Schlosser, Freshman 

Belleville. (No Picture). 

Halfback; First-Year Letterman. 

Schlosser. although weighing only 
140 pounds, did enough remark.ible 
work in the backfield to make him a 
letterman. Used mostly when a fast 
end run was needed "Johnny" became 
a threat when he got loose. What he 
lacked in brawn he made up in fast 
footwork. 

"Schlosser's punting was easily the 
outstanding feature oif the game." — St. 
Li'u:s Glohe-Demoernt. 



Kenneth Atkins, Freshman 

Halfback; First-Year Letterman. 

East St. Louis. (No Picture). 

Atkins was another one of McKen- 
dree's pony backs. He showed great 
promise, especially at running back 
punts. He should be a valuable man 



BASKETBALL SQUAD 




'I'lif basketball rfcnril of AlcKendree, eiylit \'ictnries and ten defeats. alth(]U,L;h 
lacking impressiveness. was a successful one in the eyes of the players. Pla}ing 
the strongest teams in the conference might ha\e had something to do with the 
w inning ways of the cagers. 

\\ hile |ila\ing nine conference games this season, the Bearcats managed to 
win onl\- one — a ,v^-30 \ictor}- o\er ShurtlefT. ^'et they battled some other power- 
ful ([uintcts to a standstdl, Insnig onh' b\' small iioint margins. 

In non-conference pla_\- the I'urple tdok se\'eu out of nine contests, and at 
the close of the season showed a powerful scoring punch, running" rcjugh-shnd over 
their last five opponents. 

Two members of the cage si|uad. Captain Ro\' Jaeckel. and Captain-Elect 
\\ a\'ne I'.ise were given honorable menti(jn in the Associated Press selecli(jn of 
the conference all-star team. 

Piasketball appears to be dehnitel}' on the up-grade at McKendree. Next year 
eight of the ten lettermen w'ill return for what should be McKendree's most suc- 
cessful basketball season in _\-ears. Returning lettermen are : Captain-Elect Wayne 
I'.ise. R(iy Jaeckel. Jim P.eers. Al Manis, Emil Strotheide. John Harmon. Robert 
I )avis. and Edw ard |ones. 



P,ASKETP,ALL SCHEDULE 



.AlcK. 


27. 


St. Eouis U. i7 


AlcK. 


2h. 


Alacomb 38 


AlcK. 


38, 


St. Viator 4 4 


AlcK. 


ii, 


Carthage 47 


AlcK. 


29, 


Sparks College 39 


AlcK. 


32, 


Carbondale Teachers 55 


AIcK. 


26. 


Illinois Wesleyan 45 


AlcK. 


29, 


Sparks College 24 


AlcK. 


3.1. 


Carbondale Teachers 39 


AlcK. 


27, 


ShurtleiT 29 


AlcK. 


27, 


Illinois College 34 


AlcK. 


34, 


Oakland City 24 


AlcK. 


35, 


Shurtleff 30 


AlcK. 


47, 


P)lackburn 17 


McK. 


i1. 


Principia 18 


AlcK. 


50. 


IVincipia 21 


lAIcK. 


27, 


lUackburn 23 


AlcK. 


()3, 


Scott Eield 22 

Payc Fiily 



BASKETBALL LETTERMEN 



Jamks Rkers, Junior 

Carrier Mills. 

Guard, Two-Year LcttL-rman. 

"Jim," a two-sport man, has abil- 
ity on the basketball court as well 
as on the gridiron. More silent than 
ever. Beers was content with being 
strictly a defensive man. He turned 
in a great piece of work in the Car- 
bondale contest. With a bit more 
determination and offensive ability 
r.eers should be a virtual regular 

RoBKRT Davis, Freshman 

Granite City. 

Guard; First-Year Letterman. 

Davis was the fourth first year 
letterman of the Blanchard regime. 
He was used quite a bit during the 
season. Being a big, husky boy he 
had ability to rebound. His chief 
weakness was his use of football 
tactics. "Joe" should be a candi- 
date for the vacancy left in the 
guard division by the graduation 
of Krizek and Wehmeier. 

Captain Roy Jai^ckei,, 
Junior 



Forward, Associated Press All- 
Star. Honorable Mention; 
Three-Year Letterman. 

Jacckel again was one of the bet- 
ter ball handlers in the conference, 
and also did his share of scoring. 
He ranked second to Bise in scor- 
ing, dropping in 112 tallies in IS 
games. Being cool under fire, and 
a heady player, he was the boy who 
held the team together all year. He 
turned in his best performances in 
the Hlinois College and Shurtleff 
tilts. Jaeckcl had the misfortune 
of dislocating his ankle in the last 
game of the season, and was lost to 
the track s,|uad for the season. 

Gus Kkizkk, Senior 

Belleville 

Guard, Four-Y'ear Letterman 

Krizek, who leaves the hardwood 
by the sheepskin route, made his 
fourth year the best of his career, 
becoming as he did a scoring threat 
during the past season. Yet through- 
out his career he has been outstand- 
ing for his spectacular defensive re- 
bounding. Somehow Krizek always 
came out with the rebound, was a 
hard fighter, and could always be 
depended upon. He is the only 
graduating regular, and his absence 
will be keenly felt. He turned in a 
stellar performance m the St. Viator 



Joiix Harmon, Freshman 

Lebanon 

Center, First-Y'ear Letterman 

Harmon, another outstanidng 
Freshman star, should go far next 
season. Being a heady ball player, 
and having a thorough knowledge of 
the game, "Ace" should become a 
threat. Harmon had a deadly eye 
for the basket and could flip a hook 
shot when an extra basket was 
needed. If he overcomes his foul- 
ing weakness, Harmon will be a val- 
uahle eager in coming years. 



Emil Stkothkide, 
Freshman 

New I'.aden 

Guard, First. Year L'tterman 

Strotheide, a giant in height and 
weight, after a slow start became a 
regular guard about midway in the 
season, giving a good account of 
himself in the remaining games. 
Without doubt, Strotheide has great 
scoring ability and, because of his 
height, is a clever defensive man. 
With this year's experience, "Bub" 
should prove his worth next year, 
.md should be hard to stop. 

Waynic P)isr-:, Junior 

^founds 

Forward, Associated Press All- 
Star; Honorable Mention; voteil 
squad's most valuable man; 
Three- Year Letterman, Captain- 
elect. 

Bise, the Blond Viking, was a 
steady, depenilable player all year. 
Strong on defense, dangerous on of- 
fense, he is one of the best rebound- 
ers in the conference. He led all 
scorers, piling up 172 cotmters in 
IS games. He also stood high in 
conference scoring with 76 tallies. 
Being a tip-in artist and a hard-driv- 
ing player, Bise was respected in all 
basketball circles. The captain-elect 
set a new scoring record when he 
scored 26 points in the Scott Field 
fray. Next vear "Clarence" should 
become an immortal among McKen- 
dree basketeers. 

Alfrkd RIanis, 
Sohhomore 

Benton 

Center. Two-Year Letterman 

Manis, one of the tallest players 
in the league, was a valuable man 
for the Purple because of his abil- 
ity to get the tip-off as well as for 
his tip-in tactics. "Slim" had 85 
points to his credit this season, and 
his .lefensive tactics were consider- 
ably improved. Manis played his 
best ball of the season in the Sparks 
game, thereby proving that he really 
could plav a bang-up game. Tf he 
can develop consistency he will be 
invaluable next season. 

Edward Jones, Fresliman 

Mound Cily 

Forward, First-Year Letterman 

"Bud" developed from a Fresh- 
man of unknown ability into a 
strong reserve. Jones has offensive 
power but lacks proper defensive 
tactics. With further experience and 
a sjjirit of seriousness and deter- 
mination he should develop into a 
great haskeleer. 

Art H IK \\'i:hmi:ier, 
Senior 

Collinsville 

Guard, Two-Year Letterman 

Wehmeier, the smallest man on 
the squad, was a valuable substitute. 
He had plenty of fight and could 
stick to his man like a leech. De- 
spite his small st.lture, ".\rt" had 
uncannv ability as a rebounder. 
Wehmeier is one of the two men of 
this vear's sc|uad to leave us this 
spring through graduation. 




TRACK 




ifkw n ^ o ? r e 




'() rN;/if— W. I'liilhii-. M. Kan.l.ill. W". I'l 
C. Norris, M. Mafldcii, L^ Muwuiaw. 



W iil'vdl. J. Gi-iicli;,lla, J. Larsh, C. IJ 



W'itli eitjht lettermen returning; this season, tlie cinder-men of Hypes Field, 
witli llie aid of a tjdiid l-'resliman crop, sent AIcKendree's track standing up a few 
imlclies. 

Tlie P'reslinien easily wun tlie inter-class meet, scoring 84J4 points, fullnwed 
liy the SophonKjres with C-iS^i, the Juniors with 25'.., and the Seniors with 10 
points. Several of these I'reshmen, including Herman, Harmon, Smith, Martin, 
.■-^Irotheide, Langenwalter. liohm, and Chapman continued to be a big aid to the 
\.irsity. anil <lid much to add to the success of the season. Herman, a middle 
ihslance man, and Harmon, a javelin artist, were among the high individual 
scorers of the season. 

Tlie nucleus of the sipiad, however, consisted of Captain Xorris, pole vaulter ; 
r.ise. .a high jumper: witli Larsh ;in<l (iruchalla, who took care of the weight 
e\ents. R.andall, Alailden, and 1 )oerner. all Sophomores, and I'ruett, a Junior, 
completed the s(|u,ad. 

Tlie schedule t(ir the season follows: 

April 8 — Interclass Meet 
April 17 — Principia, Elsah 
April 2-i — P)lackburn, Lebanon 
April 30 — Concordia, St. Louis 

Ma\- 15 — Ouadrangular Meet: Shurtleff, Blackburn, McKendrce, 
Principia at Elsah 



Page Fifly-tu'O 



TRACK LETTERMEN 



RciY J.\l-H'Ki:i., Jiiiiior 

Ni'vv Atluns 

Halt" .Milt 1-, TwoYoar L 



Jaeckel hail little chance to dem- 
onstrate his ability on the cinders 
this season. I^aid up until mid-sea- 
son by an ankle injury suffered dur- 
ing the basketball season, he was 
never able to round into perfect 
shape. 



Iv)C,i:r Zi:i.i.i:r, Junior 

niester 

.Mile. Hii;h Tump. Two-Year 
I.etterm.iu 

Zeller would have been JIcKen- 
dree's outstanding scorer this season 
had not an appendix operation 
forced him to leave school. With 
his long stride he woidd have 
matched the best in the .state, and 
strengthened this year's cinder team 



Jamks Gruchalla, Senior 

Sawyerville 

Weights, Three- Year Letterman 

"Big Jim" could always be count- 
ed on to come through with those 
important second and third places 
in every meet, and now and then he 
managed to win first honors. In his 
main event, the shot-put. Gruchalla 
did better than in previous years. 
He constantly threw the pellet close 
to the 4l)-f'oot mark. 



W'ai.Tf.k I'Kriri'T, Junior 

Knunuudy 

Dashes, Quarter-Mile, Two-Year 
Letterman 

Being one of the most improved 
men on the squad, Pruett did a bit 
of nice work in the 220-yard dash 
and the (juarter-mile this season. 
With some rigid training he should 
become one of McKendree's better 
trackmen ne.xt season. 



CaI'TAIX Cl.AlK XORRIS, 

Senior 

llamniuud, Indiana 

Pole-Vault, High Jump, Three- 
Year Letterman 

Captain Norris failed to round 
into shape in his specialty, the pole 
vault, until late in the season. How- 
ever, he accounted for his share of 
the jioiuts as the season progressed. 
■■(.■luK-k". on his better davs, was 
liraetically an 11-foot vaulter. He 
. binned his track uniform for the 
last tiiiie, being one of the few grad- 



^\'A^•Nl: I'lisi:. Junior 



Bise 



apta 



of baske 



ball, developed into a first rate high 
jumper the past season. He added 
a number of inches to the height he 
cleared last season, and should 
threaten the school record next 
year. Bise's best jump of the year 
was 5 feet, 8 inches. He also tal- 
lied quite a few points in the high 
linnlles. 



1*R1-;D DOKRNICR, 






Sophomovi 








St. Louis, ]\r,is. 


onri 






Dashes, Wei 
Lettermen 


Jits, 


Two- 


Year 


Although Doe 
much practicing 
ness about his w 
for a number of 
season. The 100 
best event. 


ner did 
nd lacked 
ork, he a 
points du 
yard dash 


not do 

ccounted 
ring the 
was his 


ToHX La RSI 


, .s 


oplioniorc 


Kast St. Louis 








Weights, Tw 


0-Ye 


ir Le 


terman 


Larsh confined his track activities 
to the shot put and took first place 
in every meet of the year. He was 
the mo.st consistent scorer on the 
srpiad. "Bud" never fell under 40 
feet and on occasions came close to 
tlie school record. 




pcKEHORl| IfeKEHDR^ 



laecki-l 


/l-IIlt 


Gruclialla 


1 'ruett 


Norris 


llTst 


Doerner 


Larsli 



TENNIS 

'J'liis }ear tennis became a major sport at McKendree, sweaters and letters 
beiny given as rewards, the same as in the other major sports. 

'J'he team was buih annnKl Captain Cius Krizek and Art Wehmeier, the only 
lettermen available. Eldon llauer. Herb Condon, and Harold Hertenstein com- 
pleted the roster. 

The team lost its first match to lUackburn 6-0. 

The season's schedule included: 

April 10 — lUackburn, Carlinville 

April 17 — Principia. Elsah 

April 2-1 — I'lackburn. here 

Mav 1 — Concordia, here 

Mav 15 — Concordia. St. Louis. Alissouri 



CROSS-COUNTRY 

This year cross-countrv running again made its appearance among McKen- 
dree sports. Captain Lisle jMewmaw, Captain-elect Carl Davis, Wendell Phillips, 
and Robert Langenwalter comprised the team. 

Their fiirst competition was against Blackburn and was a feature of the 
annual Homecoming. Carl Davis, of McKendree, easily won the event. 

The squad also entered the State Meet at Normal, but failed to place. 



INTRAMURALS 

Coach Elanchard expanded intramural activities at McKendree this year. 
Basketball was divided into two leagues, the class and the organization leagues. 
The winners of these two divisions, the Juniors and Plato, played for the school 
championship, with Plato being crowned champ. 

An extensive intramural softball program was also arranged. Five teams. 
Bachelors, A.M.O., Sigma Beta Rho, Freshmen, and Hortin's Aces, made up the 
league. 



Pane Fifty-fon 




to 
Z 
> 

CO 



CALENDAR... 



-Mary. A[y Dear : 

If m\' memory hasn't faileil me I 
have a vague recollection of a prom- 
ise made to you in a sudden hurst of 
S}'mpathetic enthusiasm last spring 
when we found you weren't returning 
this fall. Wasn't it something to the 
effect that I was to keep a sort of da)- 
to da}' record of "Kampus Kapers" to 
be passed on to you at intervals so 
tliat }'ou might not feel entirely out of 
touch with what was going on? \\'ell, 
1 had best be up and at it before I for- 
get what was when. So here goes — 



elected president of the Student 
Association. 

22 — Men's Glee Club organized. Xew 
faces. "Xew voices". 

2-1 — Women's Glee Club off t(i a start. 
Xow there will be music. 

27 — Rush teas and more rush teas. 
The annual or semi-annual burn- 
ing question arises : "W^hich so- 
rority shall I join?" and as an 
after-thought, 'If I am asked." 



CTOBER 



EPTEMBER 




7 — Freshman registration. 

8 — More l-'reshman registration. Up- 
per classmen and incidentally, 
women, stand about trying with 
difficultv to maintain that supe- 
rior air so essential to their status. 

9 — Freshman registration is finished, 
and the freshmen themselves look- 
somewhat "done for". Our day 
to wait in registration line. W^iat 
number do you have for yi/ur 
turn with the president? Does 
that have a familiar ring? 

10 — Classes organized. Xot so bad in 
the fresh state. P>_\" Emersor.'s 
rule of compensation the "Y" 
mixer balanced the scales. Or did 
it? 

11 — The first week-end is with us. 
The President's reception has 
passed. So many new faces, so 
man_\' new names, so many — 
whew ! but I'm sleepy. 

17 — This is no Ri]) \';m Winl<le af- 
fair. I haven't been asleep ever 
since the 11th. Just took time out 
to tell vou that Gus Krizek was 




1 — The freshmen entertained us in 
chapel this morning. A pity there 
wasn't more of it. But who are 
we to stick pins in butterflies? 
llii Lambda Tau and Kappa 
Theta Tau pledged their new 
memliers. 

5 — More pledging. This time it is 
I'.eta Alpha Mu. 

10 — The r.earcats played a gocxl game 
with Chillicothe. their first home 
grmie of the season. What's more. 
theA- tucked a victory into the bag. 

1-1 — Xow freshmen reall\' look like 
I-'reshmen. The green caps did 
it. These the "jM" Club kindly??? 
[jrovided. 

16 — Mrs. Spencer entertained tlie 
IkA.M.'s with a luncheon. Xo 
one marked absent or tardy. 

17 — Prepare for the worst — we lost 
again. P.ut, after all, it -u'as 
S.l.X.L'.'s Homecoming. 

19 — I'.ig night for the Clionian pledges 
and their dates. And who is Hez- 
ekiah ? Ask Geneva. 

20— Clark Hall holds open house. 
Much scouring and running aliout. 




CO 

> 

CO 



31- 



Much candy and writer's cramp 
from signing guest-books. Re- 
sults — good. 

-More honors for the Seniors. Gus 
Krizek, Jerry W'hittington and 
Kenneth II r o \v n chosen for 
"Who's Who in American Uni- 
versities and Colleges." 

-Hobo Day — a high spot in the 
}ear's doings. Will Bud Heely 
cook those vegetables like a true 
"son of the road"? Some of the 
"outlits" are too utterly utter. 

-Honieconiing. bringing with it all 
that the w(jrd suggests, e\en 
though we did not "Roll St. \'ia- 
tor in the sod". Reunions and 
what have }'ou. climaxed by tlie 
play, "Xew Fires". 

-Sigma Tau l)elta has c<.intracted 
the "pledging fever". 

-IWlieve it or not — a victory for 
the I'learcats with (_)akl;in(l Citv. 



them a run for their nione}'. And 
no one dr(jwned. 

17 — The I'hi Lambda's salh- forth to 
a theatre party in St. Loui>. Lots 
of fun. 

23 — Grade cards on display. Fresh- 
men pale with anxiety. "Live and 
learn". 

2-1 — Prof. Hardy's proteges debate 
Concordia. Audience decision, 
and how perverse an audience can 
be. 

25 — Haven't much time. Thanksgiv- 
ing vacation begins today. High 
time the bags were packed ! The 
freshmen have been ready for a 
week. 

30 — Hack rm the campus after :i hur- 
ried "hello" and "good-bye" to 
the "old folks at home". 



ECEMBER 



^ OVEMBER 




2 — Exams begin ! A whole week of 
work and worry ahead. That's 
the penalty for not learning what 
one should learn when one should 
learn it. 

6 — Exams are over! Let's hope all 
these wrinkles are not permanent. 

7— After a stiff hght. North Central 
won. ()li. well. "The paths of 
glory lead but to the grave". 

9 — Bachelors and .\.M.r).'s fnjlic to- 
gether, Bachelors acting as hosts. 

11 — The W.A.A. Queen has been 
elected. Why so much secrecy 
about her majesty? 

13 — Clio Hall converted into a brow- 
sing room with students reading 
a\i<ily. They should learn some- 
tJiing during Book \\'eek. 




-Why ask the score? It was with 
\\ ashingt(jn L". But McK. eave 



3 — Little Theatre oti'ers its first pres- 
entati(jn of the }ear, "The Res- 
cue". Good drama and portrayal. 

5 — I'irst basketball game. McK. 
comes out second to St. L. \J. 
I'lenty more chances to win. 

8 — Well ! Members of the cast of 
"The Torchbearers" have thrown 
away the torch since their suc- 
cessful performance in chapel this 
morning. The crowd at the bazaar 
turned their pockets inside out. 
The new reception room rug is 
just around the corner. 

10 — High spot for this month! Sigma 
Tau Delta brings John G. Xie- 
hardt to the campus. A huge suc- 
cess. 

11 — What a ]iarty ! The annual Christ- 
mas shindig. The "angels" do- 
nate their gifts to unfortunate 
children. 



Page Fifty-eight 



12 — 1 lu- l"i\"iii Circus clicks in a biji 
way. Ami now we know! Mar\- 
I'llanche is the Circus Oueen. A 
most impressive court, with her 
four ladies in waiting. 

13 — Tlie Christmas cantata jiresented 
ai cliurch this evening. 

16 — ( )ur students have made "Who's 
Who", but now" we have one mak- 
ing Kijilex's "Relieve Tt or Not". 
11mm! These Hortins — 

18 — Ciood-bye ! Good-b}e ! Two whole 
weeks at home this time. Girls 
will have to work fast, what with 
' leaji \ear ebbing away. 



ANUARY 




A — We're back again! Everyone 
looks happv in spite of the fact 
that semester exams are staring 
us in the face. Wedding bells 
during \acation ! 

8 — Did you see the score of the Car- 
bondale game? 39-35. A\'e al- 
most won. 

11 — I'liilo Hall has murals now. These 
I'liilosophians are getting ritzy in 
their centennial year. "First hun- 
dred \ears are the hardest!" 

IS — Exams ha\'e rushed along and de- 
scended upon us! Xow what shall 
we do ? 

21 — Why are those basketball men 
going around with their chests 
out? Oh! They defeated Shurt- 
leff last night. A Conference 
game, too ! 

23 — The ordeal of semester exams 
has passed. Drawn faces are re- 
laxing into normal lines. A.M.O.'s 
celebrate with a banquet. 

2-1--- Rush teas again. A wh(jle week 
in ^lexico for the B.A.M.'s and 
their rushees. The Kappa Theta's 
are eating spaghetti. An<l the Plii 
Lambda's are touring the under- 

W(V.-ld. 



23 — Dr. Yost's office was thronged all 
daw Yes, you guessed it — reg- 
istration again. 

2(1 — It's kind of fun — going tt) classes. 

30— I'.oth the \'arsity an.l W.A..\. 
teams defeated lUackburn. 



EBRUARY 




Z_^ 



1 — Mv! What an impressive list of 
honor students ! 

3 — There are a number of anxious 
faces on the campus. Those 
whose homes are in the flood dis- 
tricts are heard singing, "River, 
Sta}- 'Way from My Door." 

8 — The sor(jrities antl fraternities 
have enough pledges to clean 
rooms, press clothes, and run er- 
rands for the next few weeks. 

9 — The McKendree Players made 
their initial appearance at Mas- 
coutah. That troupe is the "ber- 
ries". 

10 — .\ccording to the inquiring re- 
])orter, tlie Dean is the most val- 
ued pr(ifessor. Hats off to tlie 
Dean. 

11 — The boxers from McKendree 
made a great showing in the (^lol- 
den Gloves Tournament, but will 
they ever look the same again? 

\i) — "Heart Sister" Week ! Have you 
done your good deed today? Fun 
too. unraveling all the mystery at 
the "\" party. The French Club 
lia<l a \"alentine party, too. 

18 — Coach r>lanchard wins with the 
longest name and Ada Koch with 
the shortest. It's a good thing 
they went to the Martha Wash- 
ington Tea. Sweet peas to both. 

20 — Jerr\- walked off with the honors 
in the Eisteddfod contest. Re- 
sulting iiroblem : how to spend ten 
whole dollars. 



24 — At last tlie McKendree Players 
have given us a break by present- 
ing their plays in the chapel. We 
still say thex're the "berries". 

27 — Chalk up another one for Mc- 
Kendree with her 49 to IVincip- 
ia's 21. 





^^^^iJ^ 



1— Are the A.M.O.'s "out of 
health" ? Otherwise, how ex- 
plain what we hear of a wiener 
roast with surplus food? And 
furthermore there were no 
"fenis" present. Something wrong 
somewhere. 

6 — Scott Field seems to like trim- 
mings. They always come back 
f(ir more — and get it. 

7 — Initial appearance of the com- 
bined chorus. Here's hoping thev 
make more local appearances. 
How a "tux" does enhance mas- 
culine beauty and the little 
"beiges" are niftv. 

10 — Texaco makes the front page 
what with his prowlings and 
growlings. Some Texaco. 

12 — Nine weeks between exams 
seemed such a boon when the new 
plan was first mentioned last 
year. How could nine whole 
weeks go by so (|uickl\? 

23 — A chapel program today that was 
really an event. A packed house ! 
Rabbi Isserman was the speaker. 
Could scarcely locate us among 
the visitors. 

26 — Another vacation. We are thank- 
ful for small favors. Half the 
fun of vacations is in coming 
back. 



1 — Hack again after tive da\s uf lei- 
sure. Can we possibl_\- get going 
for these two dangling days left 
in the week ? 

3 — Home-town week iiir I 'hi Lamb- 
da. The inmates of the .Mule 
l)arn get quite a thrill out of it. 

-I — Delegates to Pi Kappa Delta Pro- 
vincial Conference "bring home 
the bacon" — John Oppitz with a 
shining troph_\- for second place 
in extempore speaking and the 
debaters tie for fifth place. 

8 — April Fooled us on this week's 
"Review" they did. More yellow 
journalism and mcjre applesauce. 

9 — The FjAM's plan to give a cup to 
a junior girl who is strong in 
leadership, scholarship and char- 
acter. Unite a challenge ! 

11 — Another tea — for the BAM pat- 
ronesses — this time at Ada's. 

1-1 — A new French fraternity. More 
Greek letters on the campus. 
RAM pledges formally initiated. 

L^ — Phi Lambdas initiate. 

16 — Willard and his "troupe" depart 
for the Folk Festival at the Cape. 
Here's hoping. 

17 — Hurrah ! "The Angel Roost" shall 
at last be adorned with a new rug 
— definitely. Meeting of Illinois 
Church Council on the campus. 
Track meet with Principia. 

18 — Combined chorus at Belleville. 

30 — Phi Kappa Delta banquet in P.elle- 
ville. Art Hufl:'man is the speaker 
of the evening. 



Page Sixty 




3— The r.eta Alpha Mu's are nut 
again. This time it is a party at 
the Ernst summer cottage. 

8 — Bachelors and AMO's are dou- 
bling up on the evening;. The 
Bachelors banquet at the Con- 
gress, the AMO's at the St. Clair 
Country Club. 

14 — Philo's Centennial Banquet goes 
over with a bang. 

15 — The Beta Alpha ^lu's banc|uet at 
the Chase, and the Phi Lambda 
Taus chose the Statler. What a 
night ! 

21 — Sigma Tau Delta closes the \ear"s 
activities with a theatre party and 
a spaghetti feed. 



24 — More exams. Seniors, what a 
break. 

27 — Xine entrants in the Dorris Ora- 
torical. What a pity they can't 
all \\ in. 

28 — Philo-I'lato combined program. 

29— The Annuals are here! "Will 
\ou write in mine?" Clionians 
don formats and perform. 

30 — B)accalaureate service with Ken- 
ny's father as the speaker of the 
morning. The Oratorio "Ruth" 
in the evening by combined cho- 
rus and community singers. 

31 — Big day! Joint board in the morn- 
ing and a real alumni dinner at 
six, followed by the commence- 
ment recital. 



JUNE 

-Much dignity in gown and mor- 
tar board. Dr. \'ictor Thrall de- 
livers commencement address. 
And now — "Fate ordains that 
dearest friends must part." 





Left to n,jht—yi. Milkr, M. Wolfe, B. I'liillips. G. Rii-.l 



As in the past, dramatics have taken an important phice among tlie extra- 
curricular activities of the school _\ear. New talent has been discovered and de- 
veloped, particularly within the ranks of the freshmen. A resume of these activi- 
ties presents a very satisfying year's program. 

The outstanding effort of the _\ear was undoubtedly the spring play. "The 
Cradle Song" by Gregorio and Maria Martinez Sierra. This play, a comedy in 
two acts with an interlude in verse, has been translated from the Spanish into all 
the major languages and is fast becoming an "international classic". The theme, 
based on the happenings within the cloistered walls of a convent, is universal in 
its appeal. 

Througli tlie efforts of Miss Thomas, director, and W'illard Friederich, as- 
sistant director, some unusuall}' fine dramatic situations and stage effects were 
obtainetl. 

In McKendree annals it takes its place w ith such long-to-be-remembered fa- 
vorites as "The Focjl", "Sun-Up", "Lightnin'." and a few others of like caliber. 



CAST 

Sister Joanna Betty Mae Phillips 

Teresa Dorothy Dausman 

The Prioress Mary Louise Reader 

The ^"icaress Georgia Rush 

The Mistress of Novices Maxine Miller 

Sister Marcella Mary Blanche Wolfe 

Sister Maria Jesus Flossine Rule 

oister Sagrario Bertie Bauer 

Sister Inez Myra Jeanes 

Sister Tornera Madeleine Yost 

The Doctor Clayton Campbell 

Antonio Robert Crouse 

The Poet W'illard Friederich 



NEW FIRES 

"Xcw" I"ires". the Humecuniing play, by Charlts Ouimb}- Uurdftte, was a 
wholesome and thoroughly interesting portrayal of modern home life in whicli a 
world-weary family are forced to face real values in a time of extremitx'. It was 
presented b\- the following cast : 

CAST 

Stejihen Santr}- - Myron Carlisle 

Anne Santry, his wife Betty Mae Phillips 

Olive, his daughter Bertie Bauer 

Billy, his son Burdette Williams 

Phyllis, his daughter Vergene Jenkins 

Dick, his son Jerry Whittington 

Eve, his daughter-in-law Mary Etta Reed 

Dr. Lynn Gray Clifford Brown 

Lucinda Andrews Ruby Ellis 

Suzanne Toler Sally Heely 

Sid Sperry lohn Oppitz 

Jerry, his son Paul Belcher 

Angle Sperry, Sid's wife Helen Handel 

Marv ^^arshall Madeline Yost 

Mrs.' Marshall, .Mary's mother Phvllis Barnhart 



Little Theatre, with a large membership, has had an active and interesting 
year. The following plays represetit the year's activities : 

''The Rescue", hv Rita Creightdn Smith, was directed by Mary Etta Keed. 

CAST 

Miss Elvira Warden Mary Etta Reed 

.Anna Warden .\da Koch 

Kate Maxine Douthitt 

An adaptation of George Kelly's "Turchbearers" was arranged and directed 
by \\'illard Friederich. 

CAST 

Mme. Pompanelli Betty Mae Phillips 

Paula Ritter Clara F. Boyd 

Huxley Hassefrosse Walter Pruett 

Xellv Fell !Mvra Teanes 

Ralph Twiller Harold Shipp 

Clara Shepherd Phyllis Barnhart 

Mr. Spindler Burdette \\'illiams 

Florence McCrickett Helen Handel 

Teddy Owen WMlliams 

Stage Manager Roy Griehel 



Sallv TIeelv"s selection was "The Screen" by Jerry Emerson. 

CAST 

Sylvia Dodge Clara Frances Boyd 

Rita Mildred Leonard 

Bill Dodge Milton Sager 

Tames Gerald Dewey Clifford Brown 



Mildred llrown presented Warren P.eck's "\o (Jne Can Say." 

CAST 

Minnie West -Ada Koch 

Herschel West James Finley 

Rosetta Boole Maxine Douthitt 

Grandpa Hodge Roy Oriel lel 

.Adelaide Ruby Ellis 

Carrie Helen Ernst 

Mr. Meyer Walter Pruett 

Mrs. Mej'er Dorothy Reed 



"The Pearls", a little comedy of youth by Don Tothercjk, was directed bv 
Carl Davis. The cast was as tollows: 

Peggy Lewis Mary Blanche Wolfe 

Polly Lewis Madeleine Yost 

Tad Lewis Walter Pruett 

Brown Cliff onl T5rown 

Holsworth\' Hall's ever po|iular [Ti)'. "The X'aliaiit", was given as a play 
lirnduction class ])resentati(in in the college chapel on Tuesday evening. Mav 18th. 
Il was directed by Clayton C. Campbell with the following cast: 

fames Dyke Clayton Campbell 

Warden ff olt John Oppitz 

Father Daly Lars Hamerson 

Dan Alyrl Hermann 

Wilson Marvin Butler 

Josephine Paris Phyllis Barnhart 

A new dramatic group known as the McKendree ria\ers was organized this 
year under the sponsorship (jf Miss Thomas, \\ ith the assistance of Willard Fried- 
erich. Their repertoire was as follows: "Three Souls in Search of a Dramatist", 
b\- Esther Lindsay: "Again We Fight", by Willard I-Tiederich ; and "Petticoat 
' I'erfiih," b\' v^ir Charles Young. Performances were given at Mascoutah, T^>elle- 
ville, Kinnunidx, Venice, East St. Louis. Carlyle, and other neighboring towns as 
well as in Leb.inon, muler the sponsorship of the I'bilosopliian T^ilerary v^ociety. 



The Speech Department furnished several judges for the state division of the 
National h'orensic League Speech Tournament held at I )upo on March L^th. 



h'or the third time McKendree was represented at the i\Iid-western Folk. 
Drama Festival, held at Cape Girardeau on April 16 and 17, where a group of 
players, chosen and directed by Willard Friederich, presented his original play, 
"Road to Heaven". 

CAST 

^Faria Kurt Betty Mae Phillips 

Judith Kurt _ Madge Davis 

Richard Kurt Willard Friederich 

Gramp Harold Shipp 

Mrs. Grailley Mary Etta Reed 

This play, which was placed in the Native American Division of the tourna- 
ment, is ;i portrayal of the life of a Southern Illinois German commimity during 
tlie time of the Civil \\\ar. 

In the rankmg of the tournament, "Ro.id to Heaven" was rated as "Excel- 
lent", onh' one other plav being rated higher. 

lietty Mae Phillips received the only aw.ird r.ating "Highest Distinction", ff)r 
which she received a goKl pkK|ue. Mary Etta Reed and Madge Davis received 
certihcates for "Superior Acting". 



The pla}', "Bondsman to the Soil" by Herbert Krausz, winner of the Inter- 
collegiate I'olk Drama Tournament of last year, was presented at chapel on ^Lay 
18th imder the direction of Miss Thomas. 



SENIOR CLASS DAY 

Tlnirsdav, Mav 6tli. was tlu' (la\- (it (la\s for the Seniors, the nccasion heiiig 
Senior Class Dav. The following chapel prngram was presented hy the "cap and 
gowners" : 

Organ Prelude 

Song Assemlily 

Invocation Dale Harmon 

Welcome Gerald Whittington 

Poem Christine Whittington 

Class History Bernard Baldri<lge 

Music Women's Quartet 

Talk Lars Hamerson 

Solo Gerald Whittington 

Talk Kenneth Brown 

Presentation of gavel Ralph Wliitson 

Response for Junior Class James Beers 

"Alma Alater" 




SENIOR TREE DEDICATION 

The class of 1937 resumed their da\'s activities in the afternoon of May ()th 
with the dedication of two young trees. The f(jllowing program was given: 

Music Band 

Invocation Harold Brown 

Music Men's Quartet 

Address Prof. C. D. Hardy 

Dedication Ritual Gerald Whittington 

Benediction Dr. Walton 

"Alma Mater" Assembly 



l^auc S:xly-fivc 




Louisii Ckow 



MAY QUEEN 
1937 



This year's Ma\- (Jiiccn was the ck-imire hltk- hruiK'ttc frcjiii East St. Louis, 
Liiuise Crow. I )urin,L; her four \cars at AlcKeiKhee she has made a f:;ood scholas- 
tic record and a wide circle (it frioids. Her winnins^ smile will he missed from 
the campus next }ear. 

She has been president of r>eta .\lpha 'Slu Sororit)- throu;;hoitt the present 
year, and is a memlier of \\".A.A. and the h'rencli Club. 

Velma Hamilton of A'andalia acted as Maid of Honor to the (Jneen an<l 
Christine \\'hittin;;t(in and I )nrothy Thomas, the other two femmme members of 
the senior class, were her attemlants. 




FOOTBALL QUEEN 



Hki.kn Krnst 

F"or the first time in tlie history of football at 
McKendree, a queen was elected to preside over 
the Homecoming Day activities. Her majesty 
was revealed in the person of Miss Helen Ernst. 
East St. Louis sophomore. Sally Heely was her 
maid of honor. 

This popular little miss is a member of the 
Beta Alpha Mu sorority, I'rench Club, and Span- 
ish Club. 



W.A.A. QUEEN 



AIarv Blanche W'oi.i-h 

^Iar\- P.lanche Wolfe, junior, of Lebancin, was 
crowned W.A.A. queen at the Gvm Circus on 
December 12th in Old Eisenmeyer. After a ma- 
jestic procession, the queen, together with her la- 
dies in waiting, reigned over the evening's fes- 
ti\ ities. 

Mary Blanche has taken an active part in dra- 
matics. W.A.A., and Clio during the past three 
xears and is greatly admired b\- her fellr)w stu- 
dents. 




Alma Mater . . . 



A College 'mid plains is standing, 

Standing there from olden days ; 

A pioneer of learning; 

ViTst in untrodden ways. 

For service and Christian culture, 

For efficiency she stands : 

Her sons and daughters jtraise lier 

With voices, hearts, and hands. 

Hail to thee, our dear nld McKendree, 

I\Iay we always hiyal he; 

It's a song of praise we'll raise to thee. 

Alma Mater, dear old Mc. 

AIa\- we ever hold thee true, and wise, and right, 

Honor Purple and the White, 

And for A'ictory we'll .always fight 

'Til we win for old McK. 

Enduring and strong she stands there. 
Stands u])on our dillege hill; 
'I'ho' others may (lutnumher. 
She holds the first place still, 
Fur beauty, truth, and knuwledge. 
And for service without hound; 
Then let us raise our vi^ices 
Until the plains resound. 

Latchik AIvrick (Mrs. St. Claire Flint) 
and Elizabeth Wilkinson (Mrs. Don Cerking) 



Page Sixlyciiihl 



Patron ize the 
McKendrean 
Advertisers 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



ALAMO THEATRE 75 

BELLEVILLE DAILY ADVOCATE 75 

BELLEVILLE-ST. LOUIS COACH COMPANY 74 

BLUMENSTEIN BROS. MEAT MARKET 75 

CENTRAL ENGRAVING COMPANY 7? 

DAUMUELLER'S MUSIC & GIFT SHOP 72 

FOX-FINCOLN THEATRE 76 

GENERAL GROCER COMPANY ". 72 

HEER GENERAL MERCHANDISE .' 7! 

HOTEL BELLEVILLE 76 

INTERSTATE PRINTING COMPANY 72 

I. PESKIND & SONS 75 

LEBANON ADVERTISER 74 

LEBANON DRUG COMPANY 74 

LEBANON VARIETY STORE 75 

PARIS CLEANERS 74 

PFEFFER MILLING COMPANY 71 

ROGER S CLOTHING COMPANY 75 

ROMEISER'S 75 

SAYRE MOTOR COMPANY 71 

SPIETH PHOTO STUDIO 74 



Dally Capacity 1000 Barrels 
Elevator Capacity 200,000 Bushels 

Pfeffer Milling Company 

(Lebanon, Illinois "k 
Inc. 1899 _P 



Manufacturers of 

MAR'S PATENT HARD WINTER WHEAT FLOUR 
FLUFFY RUFFLES SELF-RISING FLOUR 

LEBANON BELLE CAKE FLOUR 
WHITE CORN GRITS AND CORN MEAL 



Dealers in 
Lumber and Building Materials of All Kinds 



Sinclair Gas Exide 
and Oils Batteries 




W 


^!s 


TIRES and 
ACCESSORIES 




- 


C. HEER 


SAYRE 


GENERAL MERCHANDISE 


MOTOR CO. 


THE QUALITY STORE 


Lebanon, III. O'Fallon, III. 




Buick . . Oldsmoblle . . Chevrolet 


71? 


General Repair and Storage 





A MOST PLEASANT 
WELCOME 

Awaits you at all times 



BILL'S 

for good fountain service, 
your College needs, etc. 



Visit 

DAUMUELLER'S 

Music and Gift Shop 

215-217 Wes+ St. Louis St. 
Lebanon, Illinois 



MANHATTAN COFFEE 

Something Different. Not Something 
Just as Good 



VACUUM-PACKED IN 
GLASS OR TIN 

Distributed by 

General Grocer Co. 

St. Louis, Mo. 



COLLEGE AND HIGH SCHOOL ANNUALS A SPECIALTY 




INTERSTATE 
PRINTING COMPANY 

COMMERCIAL PRINTING 
VOC. AGRICULTURE BOOKS 
CATALOGS <■ PUBLICATIONS 
ALL KINDS OF SCHOOL FORMS 

132 NORTH WALNUT STREET 

TELEPHONE 19 

DANVILLE, ILLINOIS 




SEUDS ITS BOLT IHTD THE 
SCHOOL ANIVLAL FIELD 



Just like a flash of lightning . . . CENTRAL'S ELEC- 
TROLYTICALLY ETCHED halftones are winning 
friends. Staff members as well as printers quickly 
grasp the advantages they offer. 

Your copy is faithfully reproduced on copper, assur- 
ing perfect printing reproduction, because the dots 
are DEEP, CLEAN AND SMOOTH, insuring less "wash 
up" on the press. 

On all future engraving orders, insist on CENTRAL 
ELECTROLYTICALLY ETCHED PLATES. 

you pay no more for these better halftones. 




The Holland 
Electrolytic Etcher 



CENTRAL EIVGRAVIIVG CDMPAIVX 

114 North 7th St. St. Louis 

YEAHBODK SPECIALISTS FDR A U A B T E R OF A CENTLRY 



SPIETH PHOTO STUDIO 

222 NORTH POPLAR STREET 
CENTRALIA, ILLINOIS 

PHOTOGRAPHS FOR HIGH SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 
OUR SPECIALTY 

HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS . . . ENLARGING 
KODAK FINISHING . . . APPLICATION PICTURES 

Write Us for Prices 



THE 


Why not have quality work for 
the same price? 


LEBANON 

ADVERTISER 


Hot Gas Process 

PARIS 


Sylvan E. Williams 


Cleaning and Dyeing 


Editor and Publisher 






Phone Lebanon 1 36 


Col'eae 




Books and Supplies 


Compliments 


Try our Soda Fountain 

We serve the best De Luxe Ice Cream 
and Toasted Sandwiches 


BELLEVILLE-ST. LOUIS 
COACH CO. 


LEBANON DRUG 
COMPANY 

O. C. Freshour, Prop. 


3 1 Public Square 



I\UH- S,-z'c-i<ty-fo 



ROGER'S 
CLOTHING 
COMPANY 



fl LflMO 
THEATRE 



"BELLEVILLE'S 
HOME NEWSPAPER' 

BELLEVILLE 
D A. I L Y 
ADVOCATE 

Established 1839 



Smart Clothes 

For Well Dressed 

Younq Men 

RQMEISER'S 

206^208 E. Main Street 
Belleville 



BLUMENSTEIN 
BROS. 

FRESH AND SMOKED 

MEATS 

Phone 113 



Complinnents of 

L PESKIND and SONS 

Outfitters for 
Men and Women 



16-118 East Main Street 
Belleville 



You Save Money 
by Shopping at the 

LEBANON VARIETY 
STORE 



Compliments 

FOX-LINCOLN THEATRE 

Belleville, III. 



HOTEL BELLE VHJE 

"On the Square" 

Nationally famous for Asparagus Din- 
ners. Quality food at sensible prices. 
Catering to bridge parties, banquets, 
etc. You are invited to see us for your 
next College Party. 

Phone Belleville 3500 for 
Re.servations 




"McKendree 
College 

— the oldest and best in the 
Middle West." 

—THEODORE ROOSEVELT 




^ 



To those individuals and companies v/ho have so generously advertised in the 
follov/ing pages, the McKendrean Staff extends its sincere appreciation. It was their 
help v/hich aided in making the 1937 McKendrean a financial possibility. 

We urge the students, faculty, and the many friends of the College, to return the 
favor by patronizing these firms. 




Page Seventy-six