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Full text of "The McKendrean : being the year book of McKendree College"

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Holman Library 
McK^ndree Co!!eg€l 

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a§ 1938 





MYRA JEANES Editor-in-Chief 

ROY JAECKEL Associate Editor 

GWENDOLYN YOST ..-Orgam::.ation Editor 

ROBERTA HEYER Ecaturc Editor 

WILLARD FRlEDERlCr-I Art Editor 

MALCOM RANDALL Shorts Editor 

CLIFFORD BROWN Business Manager 

ROY GRIEBEL Assistant Business Manager 

MYRL HERMAN.. Advertising 

ROBERT LANGENWALTER Idvertising 

WALTER PRUETT Photography 

KENNETH POWELL - Circidation 

MARIE B. CONNETT, GEORGIA li[JSU....Typists 
MISS ALLEEN WILSON Faculty Adviser 





/938 



Published by the students 

of 

McKENDREE COLLEGE 
Lebanon, Illinois 





ADMINISTRATION 

FACULTY 

CLASSES 

HONORARY FRATERNITIES 

ORGANIZATIONS 

ATHLETICS 

FEATURES 

Snaps 

Calendar 

Dramatics 

Debate 

Senior Class Day 

May Queen 




h(m:a^6}yrh 




To our Miss Harper, the 1938 McKEN- 
DREAN is dedicated. It is her spirit 
that inspires love and admiration in all 
who know her. When one thinks of Miss 
Harper, one thinks of Music of which it 
has been said : 

"Servant and Master am 1. . . Through 
my spirit immortals speak the message 
that makes the world weep and laugh, 
and wonder and worship. . . For I am the 
instrument of God. I am Music." 



#, 



hw* 



CLARK R. YOST, A.R., D.D. 
President 

"To be alive in such an age! 

To live in it! To give in it! 

Rise, soul, from thy despairing knees. 

Give thanks and clasp thy heritage — 

To be alive in such an age!" 

Angela Morgan. 



To thcjse who have in any way been 
associated with Dr. Yost in the three 
years that he has been with us, surely this 
challenge has been given a new meaning. 
He has shown by his life the true mean- 
ing of the term "Christian Gentleman." 



W. C. WALTON, Ph.D., D.D. 
Treasurer 

Dr. W. C. Walton, who has served so 
long and faithfully as instructor in the 
department of Philosophy and Religion, 
is continuing his service to IMcKendree 
by filling the position of Treasurer of the 
College. 




CHARLES J. STOWELL, Ph.D. 
Dean 

Dr. Stowell, in this his first year as 
Dean of McKendree College, has carried 
the same thoroughness, so typical of his 
classroom work, into the administrative 
duties of his new office. Many students 
have this year been associated with him 
who otherwise would not have been privi- 
leged to know him and gain the benefit 
of his many years of experience in work- 
ing with college students. 



EDWIN P. BAKER 
P,.A., M.A., LL.D. 





"Tending fozvards moral ririu ti'as his spcchr, 
•\nd gladly zvoldc he Icrnc, and gladly tcchc." 

Chaucer. 

A life which has been lived as has Dean Baker's — in almost 
reverent dedication to the understanding of youth and its problems — 
has left an indelible mark upon all who have known him. One can- 
not know Dean Baker, even casually, and not be influenced by the 
beauty of a soul which lives with God. 



lu-inlth. cx>m,£A— 





OLIVER H. KLEIN- 
SCHMIDT 

A.A.G.O. 
Piano, Organ, Theory 



B. E. BLANCHARD 

M.A. 
Physical Education 
Athletic Director 



ALLEEN WILSON 
B.A., B.S. in L.S. 
Librarian 



CLAYTON R. WATTS 

M.A. 
Social Science 



ELIZA I. DONALD 
SON " 
M.A. 

Commerce 
Comptroller 



CORA M. THOMAS 

B.S. 
Speech 



ELL G. OPPITZ 


LEWIS K. OPPITZ 


M.A. 


Ph.D. 


istory 


Physics 



REINHOLD B. HOHN 

A.M. 

Education, 
Registrar 



S. M. McCLURE 

M.S. 
Chemistry 



OF NINETEEN 




HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT: 




HDWIN R. SPENCER 
Ph.D. 

Biology 



CHARLES F.KRAFT 
Ph.D. 

Philos<iphy and 
Religion 



C. DEWITT HARDY 
i\[.A. 

History 
Dean o£ Men 



IJLIJAN L. STECK- 
.MAN 
Ph.D. 



{nglish 



O'xxjcjuJUUj. 



MRS. BLANCHE HER- 
TENSTEIN 

Matron of Carnegie Hall 



R. PAULINE HARPER 

Voice 

Pul)lic School Music 



AILEEN SPENCER 

B.A. 
Biology 



MRS. MINNIE PHIL- RUTH McDANIEL 

LIPS M.A. 

Matron of Clark Hall Romance Language 

Dean of Women 



JAMES C. DOLLEY 

M.A., Litt.D. 
Latin and Greek 



Clark Hall, Sept. 8, 1937. 

Dear Bun: 

Well, I'm here. Arrived last night and after stalking through the "tall tim- 
bers" for ten minutes and barging into couples on green benches here and there 
who gave directions I tinally hit the Dorm. Talk about activity ! 

The girls are awfully nice. I'm on third and they tell me my room is the envy 
of the house — it's the last one on the north side on the west end. I can't quite 
figure it out myself. 

Today I registered. There were two things I wanted : I'rench and Shake- 
speare. You want t(j know what I got? I'll tell you. This is a rough idea of what 
happened : 

6:15 — I am awakened by the most terriffic noise I ever heard. 'Phey tell me it's 
someone trying to blow the bugle for rising. Imagine! In the middle of 
the night ! 

6:45 — Same bugle — it's time for breakfast now. I turn over and go to sleep again. 

9:30 — I saunter over into the office and begin to register. I must see Dr. Yost, 
they say. 1 don't want to see Dr. Yost, but they say I must. So, 1 get a 
number — 96. V.'hat does it mean? Nothing, only I am the 96th person 
to approach the President. What mmiber is in there now? Hmmmm, 
number 6. 

10:00 — 1 have secured a long series of attached cards to fill in and I triumphantly 
charge the office force again. Number 11 is in now. 

10:30 — The English Head is my adviser. She says I can't take Shakespeare — 
I want to take Shakespeare, so-o-o, I take Freshman Rhetoric. I must 
take Biology — you know, worms, and things. She puts a few more courses 
down ; I really don't care as long as I get to take French. 

11:50 — I can't take French, because I have lo take History at the same time I 
want to take French. I don't want History, but, I take History. 

12:00 — I take my wilted card and again crash the office force. What number's in 
now? 32!! What's more it's twelve o'clock, and the President is going 
home. So, I go home, too. 

1 :15 — I'm back again, all ready for the second round. I must take Bible — I can't 

graduate without Bible. 

2 :30 — Well, well, they're up to number 47 now. 

3:30 — Number 62! 

4:30 — Number 78. My cards and questionnaires have been filled out and held in 
my hot and nervous hands so long, that the ink has run all over the place. 
I can't tell now whether my answer to "Do you need deferred payment?" 
was "yes" or "gas". 

5 :30— Number 86. . . . 

6:30 — Number 95!! The President has to quit sometime today, so he quits at 
number 95. He goes home for dinner. ( I go crazy — I haven't a nail left.) 

Yours, 

Chatty. 

P. S. I got to go to Chapel, too. I don't want . . . Oh, well, what's the use? 



A ^.exwoh. to UaA Mmxt YlflaieA 



Four years, they tell us 'tis four years, — 

Upon the face of calendar and by the stars, perhaps, 

But surely 'tis but yesterday we came. 

Just yesterday we saw your drowsy trees, 

Quiet, slow-swaying, in September's idle breeze ; 

First walked upon your cool, green carpet. 

Heard your chapel bell 

Peal out its self -same message as in years agone. 

We were so care- free, were so gay. 

We had four }ears in which to learn and play — 

Four long, long, most interminable years 

To somehow worrv throu'^di before we cjuld depart, 
Four years of stud}-, wc^-k, and mayhap, tears. 

S1(J\\ h' thev began, dragging weary feet at times, perchance, 

Those years. 

Then graduall}- their pace c|uickened, tliey began to march, 

This march became a cjuickstep, then broke into a run, 

And now — thev have taken to tJTemselves wings — and we are at the end. 

What have we done? Oh, this and that — 
Made friendships, broadened horizons, we hope, 
Sloughed off old, useless prejudices. 
Opened new vistas, gained a clearer view. 
Retained much that is old, and added new. 

Is there a place for us when we fare forth ? 

We hope, we somehow do believe there is. 

If we have shaped ourselves to fit into the scheme of things. 

But we shall see. 

Yes, we shall see. 

But we shall go with lagging feet from you. 
Just as we came with lagging feet, perhaps, four years ago. 
And you shall hold forever in our heart of hearts, a shrine, 
At which, from time to time. Memory will pause awhile. 
To burn a bit of incense sweet to you. 

Four years — they tell us 'tis four years. 

— AlleEn Wilson. 



Page Fourteen 








OFFICERS 

President — Wayne Bise 

Vice-President — Clifford Brown 

Secretary-Treasurer — Gwendolyn Jo 
Yost 



CI 



dSS 



We entered McKendree in '34, one of 
the largest classes of typically green 
Freshmen of recent years. In looking 
back over these four short years, one of 
necessity remembers the green caps, the 
victorious freshman fight, our first col- 
lege Homecoming, and our first college 
commencement. The Sophomore and 
Junior years passed quickly, bringing 
with them their joys — and sorrows. We 
at last reached the dignified state of Sen- 
iors and, all too soon, our own Com- 
mencement Day arrived. 

It is with a note of joy and sorrow that 
we leave our Alma Mater, hoping in 
some way we have made it a little better, 
and that we will be worthy of its ideals. 



McfCenaAean. 



:OF NINETEEN 



CLIFFORD C. BROWN, A B 
Mt. \^enion 
History 

Pi Kappa Delta, Vice-Pies. "38, 
Philo; Y.M.C.A. Cabinet '38; Mc 
Kendrean Staff, Asst. Bus. Mgr. M/ 
Bus. Mgr. '38; Review Bus. Mcr 
'37. '38; Little Theatre ,'3/, i- 
Pres. '37; French Club; Senior cla- 
Vice-Pres. ; Epworth League Pit- 
'36, '37, 4th Vice-Pres. '38, "Xev 
Fires": "Dollars to Doughnut^ 
■•Jane, the Queen." 



MYRA JE.ANES, A.B. 
.Staunton 
Sociology 



>hi Lambda Tau. 

37, '38: McKen- 

- - -n-Chief 



Clio Treas. 

Y.W.C.A. 

drean Staff, '36, '37, Ed 

M8. Clark Hall Secy. 3/: >ecy. 

Treas., '38: W.A.A., Vice-Pres. '37 

Who's Who in American College; 

and Universities: Student Ass'n 

Program Committee '37: Little The 

atre; "The Cradle Song": "On \ en 

geaiice Height"; "Sauce for th, 

Goose": "Torchbearers": "Lite 1^ : 

Song"; "Marriage of Nannette." 



JAAiES A. CONNETT, A.B 
Granite City 
Religion 

Sigma Beta Kho; Little Thea 
Tennis '36; Y.M.C.A. Cabinet 
Glee Club '35, '36; "Dollars 
Doughnuts"; "Little Women . 



DOYLE DONHAM, A.B. 
Enfield 
History 

Beta Pi Theta, Uec. Secy. '37: 1 
Alpha Mu Omega: Football '37; 



ketball '38; 



Club 




C. KENNETH POWELL, 
A.B. 
Lelianon 

Philosophy and Religion 

Sigma Beta Rho, Pres. '38; Glee 
Club, '37, '38; Preachers Quartet. 



CLAYTON C. CAMPBELL, 
A.B. 
Beccher City 
English 

Pi Kappa Delta, Secy. -Treas. '37, 
'38; Beta Pi Theta, Cor. Secy. '37; 
Philo; French Club, Vice-Pres. '37; 
Little Theatre, Pres. '38; McKen- 
dree Players '38: McCormick Memo- 
rial Contest, second place, '37; "The 
Valiant"; "The Late Christopher 
lican"; "The Cradle Song"; "Jane, 
the Oueen". 



PHYLLIS BARNHART, A.B. 
I'.elleville 
English 

Alpha Psi Omega: Clio; Phi Lambda 
Tau, Pres. '38; Y.W.C.A. Cabinet 
'38; Little Theatre, Sec.-Treas. '37; 
French Club; W.A.A. ; Junior Class 
Secy.; Glee Club '3.';-'38; "Dollars 
to Doughnuts"; "The Man in the 
r.owler Hat"; "Torchbearers": "Life 
Is a Song": "Lady of Dreams". 



CHARLES L. HORTIN, A.B. 
\ll)ion 
Mathematics 

s.^ma Zeta; Sigma Tau Delta; 
I'h.lo; Bachelor's Pres. '37; Y.M. 
C.A. Cabinet '36-'38; Editor "Y's" 
Handbook '37, '38; Review Staff, 
\s.t Ed. '37, Editor. '38; McKen- 
1. in Staff '37; Sophomore Class 
\ :., Pres , Pres. Student Ass'n. '37; 
'\ Li,goner Science Society; Who's 
W li.i in .American Colleges and Uni- 
\ I iMties. 



HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT: 



JOHN OPPITZ, A.B. 

Lebanon 
Economics 

Pi Kappa Delta, Pres. '37, '3S; 
Philo; McKendrean Staff '37; Y.M 
C.A. Vice-Pres. '37, Pres. '38; Pub- 
licity Director, '38; Pi Kappa Delia 
111. -Wis. Province Convention ''". 
Second in Extempore Speakin. 
Glenn McCormick Memorial Or.ii.,, 
ical Contest, First Place '37; De-'.i.i,, 
■3S-'38; Dorris Oratorical Contest, 
Second Place 'i7: '-New Fires." 



CARL S. DAVIS 
Sims 
Philosophy and Religion 

Sigma Beta Rho, Pres. '38; Pliilo; 
Preachers' Quartet; Y.M.C.A. Cab- 
inet '38; Glee Club '37, '38; Nature 
Club; Little Theatre; Track 'i7, '38; 
Cross Country, '36; Football, '37; 
"M" Club. 



DOYNE E. Wn\TERROWD, 
A.B. 

Louisville 



SOL E. ERNST, A.B. 
East St. Louis 
Education 

Spanish Club; Football '35, '36, '37 




WESLEY W. MARTIN, A.B. 

Warrenton, Mo. 
History 



ADELYN 


MARTIN, . 


A.B. 


Cypress 
Englis 


h 






Aliiha Pm ( 

■(;! ■■Th. 1" 
IMlirr Wise 


)metj; 
; Rev 
.'lub 
uol"; 
Man 


»; Clio; \ 
iew Staff 
•ii: Little 
•■Rehearsa 
"; "Apple 


-.W.C.A. 
'32, '33, 

Theatre 
1"; "The 

Sauce". 



DONALD KLINE, A.B. 
Nashville 

Philosophy and Religion 

Sii^ma Beta Rho; Glee Club '31, '32: 
Quartet '31, '32; Band '31, '32; 
"Pirates of Penzance"; "The ilika- 



GWENDOLYN I. YOST, 
A.B. 



Lebanon 
English 

Sipma Zeta. As: 
Sigma Tau licli 
Phi Lamlida 'la 
Senior Cla- S. 
drean Staff '.^N 
Glee Club ■35-'3 
Y.W.C.A. Cahii 



'38: 



36, Vice-Pres. 
'37, '37; Band '35, '36. '37; W.A.A., 
Vice-Pres. '36, Secy.-Trcas. '38: 
Waggoner Science Society; French 
Club; "The Marriage of Xannette"; 
"Life Is a Sona". 



:OF NINETEEN 



GEORGE I. COOK, A.B. 
Webster Groves, Mo. 
Economics 

Beta Pi Theta. Treas. '38; Football 
'36; "M" Club Secy. -Treas. '38; 
Frcncb Club; Out-State Club; Na- 
ture Club. 



LISLE E. MEW^L\\V, A.l'.. 
Robinson 
Sociology 

Sigma Beta Rho; Plato; Little The- 
atre; Nature Club; French Club; 
Cross Country; Carnegie Hall, Secy- 
Treas. '36, '37, '38; "Jane, the 
Queen". 



ELDON BAUER, B. S. 
Bunker Hill 
Mathematics 

Sigma Zeta, Master Scientist '3.'- 
Plato; Bachelors, Pres. '38; Studen 
Ass'n. Vice-Pres. '38; Carnegie Hal 
Pres. '37; McKendrean Staff, Asst 
Bus. Mgr. '36, Bus. Mgr. '37; Y.M 
C.A. Cabinet '37; Nature Club 
Waggoner Science Society; Littl< 
Theatre; Tennis '37; Who's Who ii 
American Colleges and Universi 
ties; "Dollars to Doughnuts." 



HAROLD HERTENSTEIX, 
B.S. 
New Baden 
Mathematics 

Pi Kappa Delta, Secy. -Treas. '37; 
.\lpha Psi Omega, Vice-Pres. '37, 
Treas. '38; Sigma Zeta, Vice-Pres. 
■38; Plato; Rachelor.s, Recording 
Treas. '38; Little Theatre; Glee 
Club '35-'38. S^cy.-Treas. '38; 
Quartet '38; Y.M. C.A. Cabinet, '37, 
'38; McKendrean Staff, '36; Debate 
'36, '37; Chairman Student Ass'n. 
Program Committee, '38; Tennis 
'37; Football Mgr. '36; Band, '35; 
Waggoner Science Society Pres. '3.S; 
"On Vengeance Height"; "Taming 
of the Shrew"; "Marriage of Nan- 
nette"; "The Green Emerald"; "A 
Case of Circumstantial Evidence"; 
"The Late Christopher Bean"; 
"Jane, tlie Queen." 




HELEN HANDEL, A.B. 
East St. Louis 
Latin 

Alpha Psi Omega, Vice-Pres. '38; 
Sigma Tau Delta, Vice-President 
'38; Clio; Glee Club '35-'38, Secy.- 
Treas. '37, Pres. '38; W.A.A., Secy. 
•36, Pres. '38; Pan Hellenic Pres. 
'37; Clark Hall Treas. '37; French 
Club, Vice-Pres. '37; McKendrean 
Staff '36; Review Staff '37, '38; Lit- 
tle Theatre; McKendree Players; Y. 
W.C.A. Cabinet '35, '36; "Life Is a 
Song"; "Marriage of Nannette"; 
"New Fires"; "Torch Bearers"; 
"Again We Fight"; "Unto Justice." 



WAYNE R. BISE, A.B. 

Mound City 

History 

Plato; Bachelors, Vice-Pres. '37, '38; 
Football, '35, '36, '37; I.N.S. Second 
All-Conference Team '37; Honorable 
Mention A. P. All-Conference Selec- 
tion '37; Voted Team's Most Valu- 
able Player '37; Basketball, '35-'38, 
Capt. '38; Honorable Mention A.P. 
AU-Star Selection '37; Voted Team's 
Most Valuable Player '37, '38; 
Track '35; Senior Class Pres.; "M" 
Club; Carnegie Hall Pres. '38; Glee 
Club, '35-'38; French Club; Little 
Theatre. 



HUGH MILES, 
Carlyle 
Economics 

Spanish Club. 



PAUL CORRELL, A.B. 
Lebanon 
English 



HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT: 



WENDELL PHILLIPS, A.B 
Herrin 
History 

I'lato; French Club; Basketball '38 
Cross Country; Football Jlgr. '37: 
Intramural Mgr. '37. 



.MARY BLANCHE W OLl I 
AB 
Lebanon 

Pulilic Speaking 

Clio; \\ \ \ Pres '36, '37, Out 
State Club, Sec> Treas 37, LittU 
Theatre Cheer Leader '35, Capt 
Girls' Hisketbill 35 '3^ W \ \ 
Oueen lb AU\ QucLn lb Mai.l i 
Houoi to Footlidl (Jueen ob ^ 
Student \ss n \ ite Pre- 37, Cbi 



37; Studtii 
•A Docto 
'The I nsi 
'Pearls , ' 



ALBERT SCHMEDAKE, 
A.B. 
Granite City 
Biology 

Philo; Bachelors, Secy.-Treas. ' 
•37; Y.M.C.A. Cabinet '37; Nat. 
Club; Waggoner Science Society. 



W ALTER PRUETT, A.B. 
Kinmundy 

Philosophy and Religion 

Alpha Psi Omega; Sigma Tau Delta. 
Treas. '38; Philo; Sigma Beta Rho. 
Treas. '37; Y.M.C.A. Treas. '37. 
Vice-Pres. '38; Glee Club '35-'^s. 
Treas. '37, Vice-Pres. and Bus. Mui. 
'38; McKendrean Staff '38; Revu« 
Staff, '36; Band '35; Track '36; Mi 
Kendree Players '37; Little Theati . , 
"The Green Emerald"; "Xe« 
Fires"; "Torchbearers"; "Xo One 
Can Say"; "The Pearls"; "The 
Man in the Bowler Hat." 




GENEVA DUEY, A.B. 

Belleville 

Economics 

Clio; Phi Lambda Tau; Y.W.C.A. 
Cabinet '37, '38; Student Ass'n. 
Program Committee '38; Clark Hall 
President '38. 



RUSSEL UNVERZAGT, 
A.B. 
Bunker Hill 
Mathematics 

Pres. '38; 



WILLARD FRIEDERICH, 
A.B. 
Mascoutah 
English 

Alpha Phi Omega, Pres. '38; Sigma 
Tau Delta, Pres. '38; Little The- 
atre; McKendrean Staff '38; Glee 
Club Reader '37, '38; Director Mc- 
Kendree Players '37, '38; Author of 
Spring Play, "Jane, the Queen", '38; 
Produced: "Thy Will"; "Again We 
Fight"; "Life Is a Song"; "Road to 
Heaven"; "She Climbs Trees"; 
"There Comes a Time"; "Bird of 
Passage"; "Joint Owners in Spain"; 
"Dying Woman"; "Torchbearers"; 
"The Rescue"; "Petticoat Perfidy"; 
"Three Souls in Search of a Dram- 
atist," and "Not Quite Such a 
Goose". Designed for "New Fires", 
"Cradle Song"; "Late Ch istopher 
Bean"; "Doctor in Spite of Him- 
self"; Midwestern Folk Drama 
Tournament '36, '37, '38, winner of 
first prize for play '38; Who's Who 
in American Colleges and Universi- 





OFFICERS 

President — Roy Jaeckel 

Vice-President — Malcom Randall 

Secretary-Treasurer — Bennv Isselhardt 



No PiCTURKS 

Othel Fansler 

Commodore Grove 

Wendell Robinson 

Maxine Miller 



dSS 



Carlton liarton, Jacksonville 
Bernard Isselhardt, Belleville 
Mildred Leonard, Mt. Vernon 
Ralph Ruth, Trenton 

Marie B. Connett, Granite City 
Roy Jaeckel, New Athens 
Dale Hortin, Albion 

Roberta Heyer, Louisville 

Roy Griebel, Mascoutah 
Alfred Manis, Benton 

Edward Kennedy, Hutsonville 
Fred Doerner, St. Louis 

Virginia Hess, Centralia 

Geraldine Gibson, Louisville 
Elinor Freshour, Lebanon 
Sampson Piatt, Herrin 

Lester Wilson, Louisville 

Clara Frances Boyd, Belleville 
Malcom Randall, E. St. Louis 
Ralph Grote, Hoyleton 

Robert Rucker, Belleville 
Mary Reader, Lebanon 
Allen Seibert, Belleville 



Page Twenty 



/■"age Twenty-one 









OFFICERS 

President — Kelley Simmons 

Vice-President — Milton Sager 

Secretary-Treasurer — Betty Mae Phillips 

No Pictures 
Kenneth Atkins 

Finis Cockrum 

Henry Harper 

Everette Hayden 
John Henderson 
Cecil Lowe 



hjm&ie 



CI 



dSS 



Delmont Beckemeyer 
Barbara Boggess 
Herbert Fritz 

Lucille Floetman 
Myrl Herman 

L-vin Grotefendt 
Vergene Jenkins 
William Otwell 

George Handlon 
Elizabeth Jenner 
Milton Sager 
Paul Belcher 
Betty Phillips 
Marvin Butler 
Harvey Pistor 
Leland Beeler 

Owen Williams 
Harold Shipp 

Madeleine Yost 
Byron Baldridge 
Bertie Bauer 
William Fischer 

Leonhard Steocklin 
Flossine Rule 

Kelley Simmons 
Edward Jones 
Ruby Ellis 

Dorothy Dausmann 
Clarence Bohm 

Robert Langenwalter 

Magdalina Willis « 

Helen Waggoner 
Arthur Martin 
Georgia Rush 

Raymond Switzer 
John Harmon 

Madge Davis 

Dorothy Hertenstein ^ 
Carl Beard 

Marie Jarvis 





Pc.ac Twcnty-thr 








OFFICERS 

President — George Pimlott 

Vice-President — Ed Posage 

Secretary-Treasurer — Edgar Thilman 

No Pictures 
Ivan Bowles 
James Dean 
Sam Donham 
Elton Dressel 

Bartley Greenwood 
Oliver Reiser 
Don Ward 
Elmer Weber 
Charles Smith 
George Flesor 
Robert Allen 
Dorothy Bosse 
Lester Hickman 
Albert londro 



rvma/rv 

Class 



Dolores Cooper 
Charles Hill 

Richard Carson 
Boyce Garvin 
Betty Schatz 
Edgar Thilman 
Isabel Shaffer 

Harry Leckrone 
Ray Pike 

Florence Jackson 
Raymond Hortin 

Ruth Schmedake 
Charles Long 

Claude Tritt 

Alma Carson 
Viola Espenscheid 
Edward Posage 

Rolf Hartmann 
Stella Steidel 

George Pimlott 
Roger Tappme}-er 
Margaret Collins 
Lee Mooney 

James Cremeens 
Dale Broom 



Page Twcnti'-foi. 



mm 





Page Tzvcnty-fivc 



Angel Roost, Oct. 17, 1937. 

Dear Bun : 

Well, I met him! Seating lists in the dining hall changed last week, and sud- 
denly — there he was ! He smiled, and I came up for air long enough to smile back 
at him. That was last Monday. Tliis is Sunday ! ! Why didn't 1 land him? Well, 
it's a long series of strategies, but here goes : 

IMonday noon — (after that smile) 1 get the "lo — vel — y" weather safely decided 
and agreed upon, then suggest 1 have not seen the Country Club. He says 
he'd be tickled pink to take me — some time — only this afternoon he has to 
work on the Reviezv (he's editor, or something), and then, after that, he has 
football practice. 

Monday evening — (another much larger smile) I say I've heard that the moon 
was almost as bright as the sun for seeing things. He thinks a moment, then 
remembers that his Philo literary society meets. I say I don't mind going 
later, but after that he has Bachelor Fraternity meeting. And, of course, we 
must be in when the clock strikes ten ! 

Tuesday noon — (I never get up for breakfast) He says he has football practice 
all afternoon. 

Tuesday evening — Bless his heart ! He's in the glee club, too — rehearsal, 7 to 8. 
At 8, he has play practice ; belongs to some traveling troupe or something 
(he's in this because he can act ). 

Wednesday noon — (still smiling) This afternoon, he has Sigma Tau Delta meet- 
ing, writing fraternity (he's editor, remember?). And, of course, football. 

Wednesday evening — (I try new perfume tonight) He can't take a walk be- 
cause Y. M. C. A. meets right after dinner. Then he has Alpha Psi Omega 
meeting for their Fall Festival ( he's in this 'cause he's in the Players troupe 
'cause he can act ! ) . 

Thursday noon — (smile is growing more feeble) All afternoon — football ! You'd 
think they'd wear the thing out. 

Thursday evening — My stars ! Glee club meets twice a week ! Tonight again, 
7 to 8. Little Theatre m.eets as soon as they can chase the Glee Club out 
(he's in this 'cause he's in Alpha Psi 'cause he's in the Players 'cause he 
can act! See?). 

Friday noon — (weakening to a grin) Football .... 

Friday evening — This travelling troupe, McKendree Players, gives a performance 
tonight at Bellevelle. ( He's in this 'cause — Oh, well, skip it ! Fm all mixed 
up.) 

Saturday noon — (only a sigh) Football. . . . '"M" Club meeting to decide on a 
football Queen contest for Homecoming. 

Saturday evening — I quit ! He's going to a party — a stag party of the Bachelors. 
Could it be he doesn't like me ? 

Sunday noon — (I got no smile. I got no grin. I got no sigh, — I got nothin' ! ) To- 
night he goes to Epworth League and Church ! 

So, here I sit, crying, wounded to the quick, trying to piece together the 
wreck that activities have made of my life. But experience comes quickly. Xext, 
I pick me a good-looking moron who's too dumb to do anything! 

Love, 

Chatty. 

P. S. I would have answered your letter sooner, but Fve been rehearsing 
every afternoon and evening on the Homecoming Play. 



MclCend/Lean, 



9x Kappa ^£ita 



OF NINETEEN 




R. Griebel, C. Campb. 



)ppitz, H. Hertenstein. Di'. T.ake 



ORGANIZED 

In 1927, under the sponsorship of !\Iiss Belle Xixon. 

CM AFTER 
Theta, of the leadhig national honorary forensic fraternity. 

PURPOSE 

"The stimulation of progress in. and the promotion of the interests of inter- 
collegiate oratory, debate, and public speaking by encouraging a spirit of inter- 
collegiate fellowship." 

ACTIVITIES 

The local chapter sponsored a debate with the Anglo-Scottish Debate Team 
on McKendree's campus, December 3. 1937. 

April 17-21 John Oppitz and Clayton Campbell attended the National Pi 
Kappa Delta convention in Topeka. Kansas, where John Oppitz entered in extem- 
pore speaknig. The two also participated in the debates. 

April 30th was the date of the annual banquet which was held in P-elleville. 

PLEDGES 
Marvin P.utler. 

OFFICERS 

President John Oppitz 

Vice-President- Clifford Brown 

Secretary-Treasurer Clayton Campbell 

Page Tivcnty-ciyht 



HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT: 



Mpha 9m Omegu 

ORGANIZED 
In 1927, under the sponsorship of Miss Olive Patmore (]\Irs. O. B. Young). 

CHAPTER 
Alpha Theta, of the national honorary dramatic fraternity. 

PURPOSE 
"To develop dramatic talent and the art of acting; to cultivate a taste for the 
best in the drama ; to foster the cultural values which we believe dramatics de- 
velop; and to unite the dramatic forces of the several colleges and universities 
having chapters." 

PUBLICATION 
"The Playbill" is the official publication of the national organization. It con- 
tains information regarding the selecting and staging of plays. 

ACTIVITIES 
November 11, 1937, marked the tenth anniversary of the granting of the 
charter to McKendree College. This occasion was observed by a reception, a din- 
ner, and the presentation of three one-act plays. This year Alpha Psi sponsored 
the May Fete. 

PLEDGES 
Madge Davis, Adelyn Martin, Harold Shipp, Clara Frances Boyd. 

OFFICERS 

President Willard Friederich 

Vice-President Helen Handel 

Secretary-Treasurer Harold Hertenstein 

i k I I 

Back Roii'—\y. Pruett, 11. Hertenstein, W . I'. . .\. ,u U 
7?0K'— Miss Harper, B. Phillips, H. Handel, P. Il.nnhan, Ah-. 'I 




MclCe^nJAean-. 



:OF NINETEEN 



yiig/na ^eta 



..1. 




Kii^l 




■i 


1 




1 J 


^f 


^ : 

mm 


4^ 1 1 1 J 


11 



Bac* ifotf— Dr. Spencer, C. Hortin, L. Wilson, R. Ruth, Prof. McClure, Dr. Stowell. 
Front Rou — G. Yost, H. Hertenstein, E. Bauer. 



ORGANIZED 
In 1926. 



CHAPTER 
Beta, of the national honorary science and mathematics fraternity 



SPECIAL FEATURES 
In the spring of 1937 Sigma Zeta organized the Waggoner Science Society 
for those interested in science but not members of Sigma Zeta. The Waggoner 
^Memorial essay contest was held this year. The meeting of the national con- 
clave which was held at Western Illinois State Teachers' College, Macomb, Illi- 
nois, on April 15-16 had representatives from the local chapter. 



PLEDGES 
Charles Hortin, Ralph Ruth and Lester Wilson. 



OFFICERS 

Master Scientist Eldon Bauer 

Vice Master Scientist Harold Hertenstein 

Recording Treasurer Professor McClure 

Asst. Recording Treasurer Gwendolyn Yost 



HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT 

ORGANIZED 
In 1936, under the sponsorship of Dr. LiHian Steokman. 

CHAPTER 
Iota Delta, of the national honorary and professional literary fraternity. 

PURPOSE 
"To encourage student-writers in any type of writing which thev mav pre- 
fer." The fraternity encourages reading and promotes mastery of written ex- 
pression. 

PUBLICATION 

The "Rectangle" is the national publication made up of work sent in by the 
various chapters. Everyone is under obligation to submit something to this work. 

OFFICERS 

President Willard Friederich 

Secretary Gwendolyn Yost 

Treasurer Walter Pruett 




ack Rou — Dr. Yost, D. Hortin, C. Hortin, W. Pruett, W. Friederich, R. Griebe 
F-oiit Rou'—G. Yost, Dr. Steckman. H. Handel. 



Page Thirty-one 




c 



:OF NINETEEN 



9£aton.icui £itt^aA{^ yiacCety. 




.. K I'lnerzagt, E. Bauer, F. Doerner. O. Williams, A. Martin, R. Carson, \V. 
Front Roif—'Sl. Sager, L. Mooney, H. Hertenstein, M. Randall, A. Seibert, L- Mewmaw, B. Isselhardt. 



ORGANIZED 
In 1849 



PURPOSE 

"To promote extracurricular activities of varied sorts but not forgetting to 
emphasize literar}- qualities in particular." 

OPEX SESSION 

On the third Monday night of each month non-members are asked to attend 
an open meeting of Plato. 

NEW MEMBERS 

Richard Carson, Lee Mooney, Allen Seibert, Fred Doerner, Wayne Bise, 
Sam Donham, Don Ward, Paul Belcher. 



OFFICERS 
Plato changes its officers every six weeks. 



Page Thirty tn'( 



HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT: 



9Ai£olapfiLan £iteAaA(^ tP^oeieii^ 



ORGANIZED 
In 1837. 



PURPOSE 



As set forth by the charter members is "to encourage Hterary achievement 
and debate." 



OPEN SESSION 

Once each month Philo helfl (pen house as usual with programs to which 
non-members were invited. 



NEW ^lE^IBERS 
Edgar Thilman, Roger Tappmeyer, Sampson Piatt, Charles Long, Ralph 
Grote, Carlton Barton, Clifford Brown, Leland Beeler. 



OFFICERS 
New officers were elected every six weeks, the ex-president automatically be- 
coming the janitor. 




Back Rou—n. Shipp, C. Brown, C. Smith. S. Piatt, C. Hortin, C. Davis, J. Oppitz, R. Grote, M. Butler, 

R. Langenwalter, L. Wilson, 1,. Beeler. 
Front Roil — R. Griebel, C. Lowe, C. Barton, A. Schmedake, M. Herman, C. Campbell, D. Hortin, W. 
Pruett. 



:OF NINETEEN 



&latiicui £iteAaA(^ iEacieii^ 




Front Ron — M. Davis, M. Wolfe, V. He-s, F R 
liarnliart, M Leonard, G Due> 



M. Teanes. M. Reader, M. Miller, 
H. Handel, M. Yost, A. Martin, P. 



ORGANIZED 
In 1869. 



MOTTO 
'Virtute et Lahore. 



OBJECT 



"The improvement of its members in general literature and music both in- 
strumental and vocal." 

OPEN SESSION 
The doors of Clio were not aWays locked to the men and other "outsiders," 
since Clio also had open session once each month. The first open session of each 
semester was as usual a popular "affair." Refreshments were served to a large 
and appreciative audience. 

SPECIAL FEATURES 
A Clio banquet was given in Pearson's Hall to all of Clio's members, both 
present and alumnae, on May 11, 1938. The old Clionians of Lebanon cooper- 
ated with the present members to make the occasion a success. 

NEW MEMBERS 
Mary Louise Reader, Flossine Rule, Barbara Boggess, and Alma Carson. 

OFFICERS 
Every nine weeks brought the tisual change in the roll of officers with the ex- 
ception of that of the treasurer. This position was held throughout the year by 
Bertie Bauer. 



Page Thirty-fo 



HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT: 



9M£amMaJxtu 



ORGANIZED 
In November, 1933. 

PURPOSE 
"High spiritual, scholastic, and social standards." 

rOCIAE EVENTS 
A havride to Taylor's lake in September ; tea with ^Irs. W. C. Pfetifer ; a 
Homecomnig dinner given bv Dr. Steckman at Hotel Belleville ; a trip to "Gay 
Blades" in December: two rush parties the second semester with Mrs. Plmt and 
Mrs. W. C. Pfeffer , home-town week-end in April ; and a St. Louis banquet in 
May. 

PLEDGES 
Dolores Cooper, Betty Schatz. 

OFFICERS 

President - Phyllis Barnhart 

Vice-President.- - Geraldine Gibson 

Secretary-Treasurer - Gwendolyn Yost 

Historian Roberta Heyer 

Sergeant-at-Arms Dorothy Hertenstem 




Back Row—U. Yost, P. Barnhart, R. Heyer, H 
I'-ont Rozv—l). Hertenstein, L. Floetman, Dr. 



Handel, G. Gibso. 
teckman, G. Pitey, 



r.auer, M. Miller, M. Leona 
B. Connett, M. Jeanes, G. Yo 



Page Thirty-five 



McKenJ/iean. 



Back Rov. — E. Bauer, A. Manis, Professor McClure, W Fischtr 

Middle Ron — H. Hei tensteiu, B. Ualdn Irc M bacrer (. Hindlon T Tc 

Front Rozi — R. Griebel, A. Schmedake, C Hortr i, W Lise, K Simmon-,, 



:OF NINETEEN 




R. Jaecke 



ORGANIZED 
In 1919. 

PURPOSE 
"The promotion of fraternal and social relationships among the men students 
on the hill." 

SPECIAL RECOGNITION 
This vear Harold Hertenstein's name was added to the Bachelors' loving cup, 
which serves as the fraternity's honor roll. 

SOCIAL EVENTS 
Wiener roast with "dates" in October : January party at Locust-Hills Country 
Club; entertained by A.]\I.O.'s at Hotel Lincoln; spring banquet in St. Louis. 

PLEDGES 
William Fischer, Alilton Sager, Kelley Simmons, Lester Wilson, Delmont 
Beckemeyer, Paul Belcher, Samuel Donham, Edgar Thilman, Don Ward. 

OFFICERS 

President- Eldon Bauer 

Vice-President - Wayne Bise 

Secretary-Treasurer Harold Hertenstein 

Sergeant-at-Arms Byron Baldridge 

Page Thirty -six 



HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT 

ORGANIZED 
In 1924. 

PURPOSE 
"To create a spirit of fellowship, brotherl)- love, and loyalty to our school." 

SOCIAL EVENTS 
November party at the home of Bill Otwell in Belleville ; hosts to the Bach- 
elors at the Lincoln Hotel in Belleville: mid-year banquet at Hotel Belleville; and 
spring banquet at St. Clair Country Club. 

PLEDGES 
Richard Carson, Charles Long, Doyle Donham, Lee ]\looney. 

OFFICERS 

President - Russel L'nverzagt 

Vice-President Fred Doerner 

Secretary Malcom Randall 

Treasurer John Harmon 




Bi.^k RciL'—L Moone>. \V. (Uwell, J. Ha:mon, R. Carson, F. noerner, R. Unverzagt. D. Douliam, C. Long. 
ft out Ron — A. Martin A. Seibert, B. Isselhardt, U. Butler, M. Randall, M. Herman, Professor Hardy. 




tP^ixyna Reta Rhx> 



:OF NINETEEN 




Back Rvu'—W. Martin, S. I'latt. D Kline, R, S«,t/,, I ll.n.l.rsan 
Middle Rcni'—\)r. Walton, (. Groie, C Imms, l/i Kr„tt, \\ I'ruHt 
r,onl /?0K— E. Hoyden, C Lo«e, k Powell, L Me«ma«, C Uarton. 



ORGANIZED 
In 1931, under the sponsorship of Dr. Walton. 

PURPOSE 
"The bringing together of ministerial students of the campus into a closer 
fellowship, as well as the promotion of mutual helpfulness." 

GIOTTO 
"Service, Brotherhood, and Religion." 

SPECIAL FEATURES 
Weekly meetings are held ; occasional chapel programs are presented : and 
there is, within the fraternit}', a "Preachers' Quartet" made up of Kenneth Powell, 
Carl Davis, Walter Pruett, and Finis Cockrum. This quartet has appeared on nu- 
merous occasions during the year. 

PLEDGES 
Carlton Barton, Oliver Keiser, Roger Tappmeyer, and Sampson Piatt. 

OFFICERS 
First Scmcsicr Second Semester 

President- Carl Davis President ....Jvenneth Powell 

Vice-President Kenneth Powell Vice-President James Connett 

Secretary John Henderson Secretary.. Raymond Switzer 



Page Thirty-eiiihi 



HUNDRED THTRTY-FTOHT 

3-AefieAeM. 

ORGANIZED 
In 1934 as "Le Circle Francais." 

PURPOSE 
"To promote a deeper interest in the French language and literature, as well 
as that the students may become acquainted with French customs, songs, and folk 
dances." 

SOCIAL EVENTS 
Christmas party. 

NEW MEMBERS 
Barbara Boggess, Sampson Piatt, Edgar Thihiian, Helen Waggoner and 
Charles Long. 

OFFICERS 

President - Madeleine Yost 

Vice-President - - Marvin Butler 

Secretary-Treasurer - - Flossme Rule 




Back Rcnc^M. Herman, E. Thilman, M. Butler, H. Fritz. C. LonR. 
Front R0ZV--.1. Yost, F. Rule, H. Waggotrer, B. Boggess, M. Collins, C. Campbell, Miss McDa 



:OF NINETEEN 



y,. m. e. a. 




ORGANIZED 
On February 3, 1899. 

PURPOSE 
"We unite in the desire to realize full and creative life through a growing 
knowledge of God. We dertimine to have a part in making this life possible for 
all people. In this task we seek to understand Jesus and to follow Him." 

ACTIVITIES 
Meetings ever)- Wednesday evening, one of which, each month, is combined 
with Y.M. ; providing a "big sister" for every freshman girl at the beginning of 
the year ; representation at the National Methodist Youth Conference in St. Louis 
by Madeleine Yost ; sending of delegates to the area conference in Peoria ; spon- 
sorship of the World Christian Student Federation display as well as Book and 
Hobby Weeks, together with observance of Heart-Sister \A'eek and other social 
events. 



CABINET 
President, IMyra Jeanes ; Vice-President, Gwendolyn Yost ; Secretary-Treas- 
urer, Roberta Heyer ; Program Chairman, Geneva Duey ; Chaplain, Georgia Rush ; 
Publicity, Marie Block Connett ; World Fellowship, Madeleine Yost ; Social Chair- 
man, Phyllis Barnhart ; Pianist, Vergene Jenkins ; Room Chairman, Elizabeth Jen- 
ner, Flossine Rule ; Sponsors, Mrs. Kraft and ]\Irs. Watts. 



HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT: 



y.. m. e. a. 



ORGANIZED 
During the winter of 1897. 

PURPOSE 
"To more adequately meet the religious and social needs of the men of 



oampus. 



ACTIVITIES 
Regular meetings every Wednesday evening, including combined programs 
with Y.W. each month ; representation at Geneva Summer Conference bv lohn 
Oppitz, Harold Hertenstein, and Walter Pruett ; representation at the National 
Alethodist Youth Conference in St. Louis by John Oppitz and Carlton Barton; 
publication of the "Y's Handbook" ; sponsorship of a St. Patrick's day party as 
well as other social affairs, sometimes in connection with Y. W. 



CABINET 

President, John Oppitz: Vice-President, Walter Pruett I first semester), 
Ralph Grote (second semester) ; Secretary, Milton Sager ; Publicity, Charles Hor- 
tin, Harold Hertenstein; Deputation, Roy J. Griebel ; Treasurer, Carl Davis; So- 
cial Chairman, Clifford Brown ; Sponsor, Prof. C. D. Hardy. 




Staiidiiu/—C. Davis, M. Sager. 
Seated— R. Griebel, J. Oppitz, H. He 



Prof. C, Hard\ 
C. Hortin. C. I! 







:OF NINETEEN 




Reading from left. tof. across, and 
Kennedy, H. Shipp, C. Davi; 
L. Stoecklin, A. Seibert, E. 



iou-n:oard^R. t:ar,ou, H. Leek one. K. Tappmeyer, F. Cockrum, E. 
, R. Rutli. H. Hertenstein, \V. Pruett, W. Bise, M. Sager, M. Butler, 
Thilman, Miss Harper, M. Randall, M. Herman, K. Powell. 



ORGANIZED 
In 1924. by Miss Pauline Harper. 

PURPOSE 
To give to a group of selected men of the campus training in the art of sink- 
ing, as well as that this group should represent the school. 

SPECIAL FEATURES 

In March and April the Men's Club made their usual Southern Illinois tour, 
visiting the following towns: Pinckneyville. Nashville, Signal Hill, Alta Sita, 
Greenville, Mt. Olive, Gillespie, Oblong, Palestine, and Robinson. 

During the second semester the McKendree Chorus, composed of both the 
Men's and Women's Clubs, presented programs locally and in nearby towns. On 
the evening of Baccalaureate Sunday, this Chorus, with the help of a number of 
local singers, presented the oratorio, "The Messiah," by Handel. 

AWARDS 
This year the usual awards were made to those who were eligible according 
to the number of years' service in the club. 

OFFICERS 

President Malcom Randall 

Vice-President Walter Pruett 

Secretary-Treasurer Harold Hertenstein 



Page Forty-tzvo 



HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT: 



tUatneft'i, 9£ee, QM- 

ORGANIZED 

In 1924, under the direction of Miss Pauline Harper. 

PURPOSE 

"To stimulate and develop musical ability among those college women who 
are interested in music." 

SPECIAL FEATURES 
During May the annual tour of Southern Illinois was made. Among the 
towns visited this year were Hoyleton, Carlyle, Coulterville, DuOuoin, Edwards- 
ville, Louisville, Olney, Marion, Johnson City, and Centralia. The club also 
participated in the McKendree Chorus program and assisted in the rendition of 
"The Messiah." 

AWARDS 

Awards are given each year to those who are eligible to receive them, the 
awards differing for each of the four years. 

OFFICERS 

President Helen Handel 

Vice-President Myra Jeanes 

Secretary-Treasurer Gwendolyn Yost 




Kcadiny from ricihl taf across and downward— M. Reader, F. Jackson, D. Dausmann, R. Ellis, M. Miller, 
R. Heyer, A. Carson, B. Boggess, B. Phillips, M. Davis, P. Barnhart, H. Handel, B. Bauer, M. 
Leonard, G. Yost, V. Jenkins, R. Schmedake, M. Yost, Miss Harper, D. Hertenstein, M. Jeanes, 
I,. Floetman. 



Fagc Forty-three 




OF NINETEEN 



Lucille Floetman 
First Soprano 



\'ergene Jenkins 
Second Soprano 



Alyra Jeanes 
First Alto 



Dorothy Hertenstcir 
Second Alto 



Betty Schatz 
Accompanist 



As usual the McKendree Quartets were in great demand. 'I'hrDUghout the 
school year they have filled numerous engagements, appearing at churches, high 
schools and clubs in the surrounding towns. 

Among the appearances of the Women's Quartet have been the following: 
Wednesday Club, Literary Club, and Chamber of Commerce of East St. Louis : 
two Women's Club programs and a high school program in Staunton ; Collinsville 
Study Club ; Various McKendree banquets. The church programs included 
East St. Louis, Belleville, Lebanon, and Trenton. 

The itinerary of the Men's Quartet has included Mt. Vernon. O'Fallon. 
Bunker Hill, Collinsville and Belleville High Schools, and the Highland Woman's 
Club. 



Harold Hertenstein 
Second Tenor 

Malcom Randall 
First Tenor 

Leonhard Stoccklin 
Bass 

Milton Sager 
First Baritone 

JMyra Jeanes 
Accompanist 




HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT 

ORGANIZED 
In 1934, under the sponsorship of Miss RosaHnd Hohn. 

PURPOSE 
"To instigate and perpetuate the histrionic art on McKendree's Campus." 

THEATRE 
The organization is divided into four stock companies. Points of ehgibility 
to Alpha Psi Omega may be obtained by participation in stock plays. The group 
also sponsors trips to the St. Louis theatres. 

DEGREES 

Three degrees may be conferred upon worthy members, which are as follows : 
Managing and Staging ; Character Portrayal ; Play Production. 

NEW MEMBERS 
Georgia Rush, Harry Leckrone, Boyce Garvin, Alma Carson, Isabel Shaft'er, 
and Edgar Thilman. 

OFFICERS 

President Clayton Campbell 

Vice-President Betty Mae Phillips 

Secretary-Treasurer Georgia Rush 




Back Ron — H. Leckrone, C. Davis, R. Griebel. 

Third Ron — C. Brown, B. Garvin, H. Shipp, H. Hertenstein, W. Pruett, C. Campbell. 

Second Row—\\. Friederich, I. Shaffer, M. Reader, D. Daiismann. 

Front Rou — M. Wolfe, A. Carson, B. Phillips, Miss Thomas, F. Rule, M. Yost, P. Barnhart, A. Martir 



Page Forty-five 




c 



:OF NINETEEN 



Utamen^6. Aifiteiic AA6.oe.iation. 




ORGANIZED 
In 1934, under the direction of Aliss Rosalind Holm. 

I'URPOSE 
■'To promote organized athletics among the women of the college." 

SPORTS 
The "Bearkittens" basketball team again played games on the home and other 
floors. Other sports participated in were as follows : volley-ball, badminton, ten- 
nis, track, swimming, skating, soccer, and soft-ball. 

LETTERS 
Are awarded each year to those who have earned 500 points in specified sports. 

PLEDGES 
Ruth Schmedake, Mary Louise Reader, Clara Frances Boyd. Dolores Cooper. 
Elorence Jackson, Bertie Bauer, Madge Davis, and Dorothy Dausmann. 

OFFICERS 

President Helen Handel 

Vice-President Georgia Rush 

Secretary-Treasurer Gwendolyn Yost 

Page Forty-six 



HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT: 



uvy)ff 



m" eiuA 



ORGANIZED 
In 1924. 

PURPOSE 
"To bind more closely together the athletes who make up McKendree"s tea 
as well as to promote the spirit of sportsmanship and clean living on the hill." 



ACTIVITIES 
The "M" Club distributed the green freshman caps as usual at the beginning 
of the school year. It again sponsored the election and presentation of the Foot- 
ball Queen on Homecoming Day, Geraldine Gibson being chosen as queen this 
year. Each graduating member of the "M" Club received a gold emblem. 



OFFICERS 

President Roy Jaeckel 

Vice-President Bernard Isselhardt 

Secretary-Treasurer George Cook 







Back Rozv—J. Harmon. \V. Bise, G. Cook. A. Manis, F. Docrner, C. Davis. 
Front Rozu~R. Langenwalter, B. Isselhardt, M. Randall, C. Smith, R. Jaect 



Pugc Fcrty-scvi 







:OF NINETEEN 




*•*.•,■%,* 



fOifviil* 4i 



Ba.k h ., (.1 .M,k. \l -,.,1,1 I',.-.,., 

Middle Kuu — R. Carson. K. bimmuiis, il. Herman, X[. Huilti, H Harper, H. Ship|,, K. Weber. J. Harmon, 

W. Phillips, A. Mat tin. 
F--ciit Row — B. Greenwood, C. Long, F. Doerner, M. Randall, Captain Isselhardt, D. Donham, D. Ward, W. 

Bise, S. Einst, G. Handlon. 



After a mediocre season last year, the Bearcats came back with a rush and 
made a better showing than anticipated by their most ardent followers. Handi- 
capped by the lack of reserve material, the Purple and White presented a scrappy 
bunch who never knew when to quit fighting. To this fact may be laid much of 
the season's success. 

Thev opened the season by upsetting the powerful North Central team, hold- 
ing them to a scoreless tie. The Purple then registered their first conference win 
in two years by trouncing Eureka 14-0. After losing to Cliillicothe, McKendree 
lost a heart-breaker to SINU. Leading all the way, the Bearcats tired in the last 
few minutes of play and dropped the decision. Coming back with a vengeance, 
the gridders walloped Oakland City in the Homecoming Game 52-0 one of the 
high scores of the nation. The next two battles were lost to St. Viator and Rose 
Polv. A victory over Shurtleff completed the win cf)lumn. The last game of the 
season was lost to Illinois College. 

Three men were selected for All-Conference honors : Wayne Bise v,as 
named on the Internatioanl News Service Second Team, while Captain Issel- 
hardt and Malcom Randall were given Honorable Mention on the same All-Con- 
ference Team. Bise and Randall also were given Honorable Mention on the 
Associated Press AU-Star Selection. 



Page Forty-eight 



HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT: 



^ecuaft^i Recjo-^d 



McKendree North Central 



]\IcKendree. 
McKendree., 
AIcKendree. 



]\IcKendree 52 

McKendree 

]McKendree 13 

AIcKendree 6 

McKendree 3 



Eureka 

Chillicothe _12 

Carbondale 19 

Oakland City 

St. Viator 19 

Rose Poly .....26 

Shurtleff 

Illinois College 32 



Q-xxytUil Queen 

]\Iiss Geraldine Gibson, a Junior of Louisville, 
reigned as the second Football Queen over the victo- 
rious Home Coming game and its succeeding events. 
Gerry is an active member of the Phi Lambda Tau so- 
roritv. 





c 



9:ao-t&a££ £ette^men 








:OF NINETEEN 



Ward 



Ernst 



Handler 



Weber 



Harmon 



Donham 



Long 



Sager 



Simmons 



Isselhardt 



Martin 



Posage 



)Utler 



Atkins 



Greenwood 

Shipp 



Rise 



Doerner 



Randall 



Page Fifty 



HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT: 



WAYNE BTSE, Senior, Olmstead 

INS All-Star Selection Second Team; Associated 
Press Honorable Mention ; Voted Most \'aliiable Man ; 
Three-Year Letterman. 

Bise ended his gridiron career with a great year. He was one 
of the best ends McKendree has had. An excellent pass-receiver, 
a good defensive man. and a good blocker, he was always dangerous. 
His shoes will be hard to fill next year. 

"Wayne Bise turned in a great performance at end." — East St. 
Louis Journal. 

"On the first play Ward passed to Bise for the touchdown." — 
Bcllcvilic Daily Ad-jocatc. 

"The play of Wavne Bise was again outstanding." — St. Louis 
Giobc-Dcmocrat. 

FRED DOERNER, Junior, St. Louis 

Tackle; Co-Captain-elect ; Two-Year Letterman. 

"Bull" is one of the men who will lead the Bearcats next year. 
He is strong on defense, fast on offense, and is a mainstay in the 
forward wall. 

"Bull lioerner, a 200-pound tackle, has been one of the main 
cogs ui the Bearcat grid mdiChine."— Belleville Daily .Advocate. 

"Doerner played his best game of the season, stopping everything 
that came his way." — East St. Louis Journal. 

MALCOM RANDALL, Junior, E. St. Louis 

Guard; Co-Captain-elect; INS All-Star Selection Hon- 
orable Mention; Associated Press All-Star Selection 
Honorable Mention. Three-Year Letterman. 
Randall, as guard, missed only two minutes of play during the 
season. He was a tower of strength in the Bearcat line. 

"Malcom Randall, a tiny watch charm guard, is establishing an 
iron man tradition at McKendree, not having missed a minute of 
play this season." — Chicago Daily News. 

"He only tips the scales at 155 but he's all wool and a mile 
wide, and if Coach Blanchard can line up a few boys with the same 
courage, the Bearcats may go places next year. Mai Randall is ex- 
pected to become a fine leader for the 1938 McKendree eleven. 
— Bloomington Pantayraph. 

DON WARD, Freshman, Collinsville 
Halfback; First-Year Letterman. 

"Slingin' Don" Ward made a reputation with his passing abil- 
ity. His aangerons heaves kept McKendree in the ball game and re- 
sulted in many scores. 

"Don Ward was slinging the pigskin high, wide and handsome." 
—E. St. Louis Journal. 

SOL ERNST, Senior, E. St. Louis 

Center ; Two-Year Letterman. 

Although hampered by injuries the greater part of the season. 
Sol was very valuable to the Bearcats. His accurate passing and 
heady defensive work were important factors in the Bearcat machine. 

"Sol Ernst played almost the entire game at the pivot position 
and turned in a good performance." — E. St. Louis Journal. 

GEORGE HANDLON, Sophomore, Edwardsville 
Guard ; First- Year Letterman. 

Handlon was the other watch-charm guard and missed very few 
minutes of play. A fighter, he was a terror on defense and con- 
tinually smashed plays. George made the Illinois College all-oppo- 
nent team. 

"George Handlon turned in a great defensii'e game." — St. Louis 
Post-Dispatch. 

"Handlon has not missed a minute of play so far this season. 
^Chieaoo Daily .\e-fs. 

"Handlon of Kdwardsville, starred on defense."— Bf//ci'i7/c' 
Daily .Advocate. 

ELMER WEBER, Freshman, Belleville 

Tackle, First Year Letterman. 

When aroused, "Bud" was hard to stop. His best game was 
against St. Viator when he stopped the hard-running Saint attack 
cold. 

"Weber was a lion on dtt{ense."— Belleville Daily .-idvocate. 

JOHN HARMON, Sophomore, Lebanon 
End, First Year Letterman. 

"Ace" saw quite a bit of action in his first season of actual 
I'lav. He played great games against Shurtleff and I. C. 

"Harmon played a great game, slashing through continually to 
ijrab ball-carriers."— £. St. Louis Journal. 



DOYLE DONHAM, Senior. Ridgway 
Tackle; First Year Letterman. 

In his first year of competition "Red" held down a regular 
berth. Big and strong, he turned in a fine season on the line. 

"Donham recovered three fumbles."— .$■<. Louis Post-Dispatch. 

"Randall kicked off and the receiver was dropped in his tracks 
by ])onham."— Belleville Daily .Advocate. 

CHARLES LONG, Freshman. Granite City 
Halfback; First Year Letterman. 

"Scud" was used mostly at blocking back, but did some fine ball 
lugging against Eureka. He also handled some of the kicking duties 
this year. 

"Long fought his way to the 2-yard line."— £. St. Louis Journal. 

MILTON SAGER, Sophomore, Mt. Vernon. 

Center and Tackle; First Year Letterman. 

Sager was invaluable the past season. He worked equally well 
at center and tackle, doing great work at both posts. He is big 
and aggressive and loves the game. 

"Sager was on top of play all afternoon." — E. St. Louis Journal. 

KELLEY SI.MAIONS, Sophomore, Wood River 
Halfback; First Year Letterman. 

"Kel" was one of the shiftiest broken field runners on the squad. 
He demonstrated this against Oakland City. His future looks prom- 
ising, and he should develop into a valuable man. 

CAPTAIN BERNARD ISSELHARDT, Jnuior. Belleville 
Quarterback; INS -\11-Star Selection Honorable Alen- 
tion ; Two Year Letterman. 

Benny proved a real leader, his signal-calling showing his cool- 
ness under fire. He was also leading scorer of the Bearcats. 

"Capt. Isselhardt plunged over for the first touchdown of the 
season." — E. St. Louis Journal. 

"Isselhardt is being boomed by scribes for All-Conference hon- 
ors." — Cliicaiio Daily Nezvs. 

"Capt. Isselhardt kicked the longest field goal in the conference 
on a snow-covered held."— Chicayo Daily News. 

ARTHUR ]\IARTIN, Sophomore, Cypress 
Fullback; First Year Letterman. 

Art didn't get going till the last of the season, when he played 
bsng-up ball. Big and tough. Art was hard to hurt. 

"Martin, with an exhibition of sheer d.ive, went over the goal 
line."— C. St. Louis Journal. 

ED POSAGE, Freshman. E. St. Louis 

Fullback; First Year Letterman. 

Big Ed was one of the reasons for McKendree's success on the 
gridiron. One of the best kickers in the conference, he got off sev- 
eral kicks of over 70 yards. 

-MARVIN BITLER, Sophomore. E. St. Louis. 
Quarterback, First Year Letterman. 

"Mar\" didn't get much chance to show his wares, substituting 
for Capt. Isselhardt. When he was in there, however, he made his 
jjresence known by his tackling. 

KENNETH ATKINS, Sophomore. E. St. Louis 
Halfback; Two Year Letterman. 

BART GREENWOOD, Freshman, West Frankfort 
End ; First Year Letterman. 

Bart came to college without previous high experience in the 
game and landed a regular job. His work was always steady and 
dependable. 

"Greenwood again turned in a good performance at end." — St. 
Louis Globe-Democrat. 

HAROLD SHIPP, Sophomore, Sea Bright, N. J. 
Center; First Year Letterman. 

Shipp was bothered with a knee injury but was valuable when 
he was in the line-up. A conscientious worker, he should go far. 



a„e Fift\ 







:OF NINETEEN 




[lack Rozi — W. Ph 

Front Row — D 



While this year's edition of the Bearcats was not so successful in the won and 
lost column, the Purple and White have a season behind them of which they may 
be proud. 

Coach Rlanchard's hardwood crew really stepped into the "big time" and 
played teams far over their heads. In meeting Western State from Kentucky and 
Western St3te from Michigan, McKendree opposed two of the finest basketball 
teams in the country. 

In addition to the six major awards, tive minor awards were given to those 
who did not quite qualify for a letter. Among these were Benny Isselhardt, who 
was Rlanchard's first substitute throughout the season ; Doyle Donham, who closes 
his career by the graduation route ; Wendell Phillips, who also leaves via gradua- 
tion ; Bart Greenwood, a freshman with promise ; and Dick Carson, another fresh- 
man who bids fair to develop into a valuable man. 

In the e_\-es of all concerned the basketball season of 1937-1938 was one of 
the most successful in recent years. 



McK 32, Western State (Mich.). 

McK 27, Kalamazoo Teachers 

McK 27, Washington U 

McK 33, Western State (Ky)... 

McK 31, Sparks Business Col. 



.63 
.42 
.52 
.51 
.41 

McK 30, Western State (Kv) 37 

McK 28, Oakland City ' 39 

McK ()0, r.lackburn ..^ 48 

McK 38, Eureka 



McK. 
McK. 
McK. 
McK. 
McK. 
McK. 



ShurtlelT 40 

Carthage 38 

Principia 30 

St. Viator 36 

Central Wesleyan 31 

Blackburn 33 

McK 35, ShurtlelT 37 

McK 52, Principia 43 

41 



Page Fifty- 



HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT: 



BcU^et^icM £etteAmen 



EDWARD JONES, Sophomore, MonnA City 
Guard ; Two Year Letterman. 
"Bud" was one of the strongest reserves called upon by 
Coach Blanchard. He performed at all posts and gave a 
good account of himself at all of them. He has one of the 
easiest shots on the squad and knows the game thoroughly. 
He came along rapidly at the end of the season and will 
fill a breach in the ranks next year. 



JOHN HENDERSON, Sophomore, Thebes 
Guard ; First Year Letterman. 
"Jumbo" came up from the intra-mural ranks to win a 
regular berth on the varsity in his first year of competition. 
A good defensive man, he left most of the scoring to the 
other members of the team. Henderson has plenty of 
scrap and always fought till the last minute. With a year's 
competition behind hfrn, he should develop into a star. 

JOHN HARMON, Sophomore, Lebanon 
Forward ; Two Year Letterman. 
"Ace" was third in the scoring column for the Bearcats. 
Serving as a substitute his first year, Harmon came back to 
clinch a regular berth. Big and strong, he could shoot 
with both hands equally well. Ace usually came through 
with his baskets when they were most needed. He scored 
m6st of his points with his famous pivot shot from near 
the free throw circle. With two more years to go, Harmon 
should develop into a brilliant man before he finishes his 
career. 

DON WARD, Freshman. Collinsville 
Guard; First Year Letterman. 
Don came to AIcKendree from Collinsville with a great 
reputation as a basketliall player. He upheld the critics by 
living up to his reputation. Never a high scorer, Don was 
in his element on the defense. His quick, lightning move- 
ments broke up many offensive threats. He carried his 
passing ability from the gridiron and was responsible for 
many scores with his long passes down the floor. 

CAPT. WAYNE BISE, Senior, Olmstead 
Center ; Four Year Letterman. 
With the passing of Wayne Bise, McKendree loses one 
of her basketball immortals. Always steady and dependa- 
!j!e, he could have plaved on almost any college team in the 
country. One of the best rebounders in this area, Wayne 
was a continual threat to opponents. For the second 
straight year he led all scoring, amassing 224 points in 17 
games. Bise was also at the top of the heap in free throws 
garnered in the conference. 

ROY JAECKEL, Junior, New Athens 
Forward; Four Year Letterman. 
Jaeckel again proved to be a tower of strength to the 
Bearcats. One of the best ball handlers in recent AIcKen- 
dree basketball history, Roy was a hard man to stop. His 
fire and love of the game make him a great player. Jaeckel 
was second to Bise in the scoring column, accounting for 
158 points in 17 games. Roy will close his basketball career 
under the Purple and White next year, being eligible until 
February. He will be of great value to Coach Blanchar<! 
for the time that he is available. 




F'age Fifty-three 



Mcf\eMa/iea44^-. 



:OF NINETEEN 



jAadlc yiquad 




Back Roz( — Coach Blancliard. W. Bise, J. H 
Fiont Rozi'—W. Phillips, M. Randall, i\I. He 



ion, C. Davis, A. Martin. 

an. R. Langenwalter, L. Mewmaw. 



With eight lettermen returning for the season, the l'ur]»le and White track 
team had a strong nucleus around wliich to build the cinder squad. The lettermen 
from the past season were : Wayne Bise, senior hurdler ; Carl Davis, senior miler ; 
Mai Randall, junior sprinter ; Myrl Herman, sophomore middle distance man ; Bob 
Langenwalter, sophomore miler; George Handlon, sophomore pole vaulter; John 
Harmon, sophomore javelin ace; and Art Martin, sophomore weight man, 

Tn addition to these the following rounded out the squad : Ed Thilman, Bart 
Greenwood, Lester Hickman, Don Ward, Charles Long, Dale Broom, Wendell 
Phillips, George Pimlott, Roy Griebel, Fred Doerner and Lisle Mewmaw. 

The Freshmen again won the Inter-Class meet, nosing out the Sophomores. 
The Seniors and Juniors brought up the rear. 

The Bearcats closed strong last season and pulled the unexpected by winning 
the Quadrangular meet at The Principia. They continued their good work this 
season and piled up a successful record. In the light of the bad weather and 
continued handicaps preventing the cinder-men from getting in shape, the track 
squad should be congratulated on their splendid work. 

The schedule for the season follows. All meets were held on Hypes F'ield. 
April 30 — The Principia. 
May 7 — Concordia. 
May 14 — Quadrangular Meet : Blackburn, The Principia, 

Shurtleff, McKendree. 
May 21 — Quadrangular Meet : Milliken, Concordia, Shurtleff, 

McKendree. 



HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT: 



ItoAMiy, iEo§t^a£i 



Varsity Softball, a new sport, came into the limelight at McKendree this year. 
The Bearcats played a shortened but successful schedule. With excellent material 
on hand, the Purple and White put a classy team on the field. This team proved 
hard to stop. 

Those men returning from the championship team of last year which trounced 
Shurtlefif in extra innings 4-3 were : Roy Jaeckel, Malcom Randall, Benny Issel- 
hardt, George Handlon, Fred Doerner, Al Manis, and John Harmon. Several 
newcomers were added to the squad this year. Most promising of these were : 
Wayne Bise, Charles Hortin, Myrl Herman, Art Martin, Don Ward, Bart Green- 
wood. 

At present, plans are in the making for forming an intercollegiate league in 
this area. 



9^t^amu^a£l 



The Intramural activities, always interesting, proved very spirited and lively 
this year. In basketball two leagues were formed, playing twice a week. The 
Sophomores won the Class League and Joe's Boys were victorious in the Inde- 
pendent League. 

In the Softball League the champion A.iM.O. team was the favorite, with the 
Bachelors given an outside chance of winning. Four teams made up the league : 
A.M.O.'s, Bachelors, Allen's Aces, and Bohm's Bombers. Games were played 
twice a week under the Hood-lights. 



P(j£/e Fifty-five 



^.tiapl 




I ill 1 2^ ^iH^ii^^mh 



'!%/' ■' 



I 




^Ax.M#^*^ 




Page Fifty-six 



iPM^apl 




QcdendaA 



In the crystal depths of magic 

Wise magicians read the future, soft and dim; 
Noic the crystal ball turns backzcard, 

And its softly gloiving colors szcay and sivim. 
As the fast rei'eals its pleasures, 

Do not sigh for things forgotten, — only smile. 
And remember that remembrance 

Is life's golden compensation for each mile. 



Sept. 21— College Glee Clubs hold their first rehearsal, the 
prevue of a musical year under "Mom" Harper's capa- 
ble direction. Some of the songsters are dismissed 
early for the Phi Lambda Tau back-to-nature hayride. 
It's fun to travel in a wagon — if you don't care when 
3'ou get where you're goin'. 

Sept. 23 — First house meeting in Clark Hall. By the new 
rules, there ought to be a full crop of wings among 
the "angels". 



Sept. 24 — Yearly banquet held at Benton in connection with 
the Annual Southern M. E. Conference, Dr. Yost serv- 
ing as toastmaster and several students appearing on 
the program. 



^.eptem^ieA. 



Sec. the crystal ball is spinning. 

And September's skein of colors lies unfurled. — 
Crimson from the autumn hill-tops. 

And the golden threads of sunlight dcic-impcarled 

Sept. 6-8 — Registration for McKendree's one hundred and 
tenth year. Not everyone can boast of one hundred 
and ten years of service. As for the Freshman — well, 
we were all Freshmen once. 

Sept. 8 — Y. AI. and Y. W. annual wiener roast. Alenu : 
wieners, apples, doughnuts, and get-acquainted games. 

Sept. 9 — First "roll-call day." "Y" mixer held in Pearson's 
Hall, an annual event long remembered by students 
and faculty. Hidden dramatic talent is brought to 
light in "animated proverbs", "Eat, drink and be merry" 
winning first place. D. Donham and M. Miller starring 
in "Better to have loved and lost." 

Sept. 10 — The President's Reception adds dignity to Afc- 
Kendrec's opening week, its purpose being "to bring the 
students and faculty together that their acquaintance 
may lie something to be remembered." (AIcK. Rez'iei^:) 

Sept. 12 — Professor Watts sponsors first of a series of so- 
ciological field trips. "Sociologians" visit the Owen- 
Illinois Glass Works in St. Louis. Sociology depart- 
ment inaugurates a plan for the building up of a spe- 
cial library fund for liooks in the field of sociology. 

Sept. 13 — Sigma Beta Rho and the men's venerable Lit- 
erary Societies of the campus hold their first meetuigs 
of the year. No danger of "All work and no play" 
producing dull McKendreans. 



Sept. 27 — Memlicrs of Little Theatre attend the production 
of "Tovarich" at the American Theatre in St. Louis. 
First Clio Open Session held. Eats? You bet! With 
the men in the majority. 

Sept. 29 — The Bachelors stage one of their famous wiener 
roasts at Fern Hill. 

Sept. 30 — Freshman initiation period begins with perform- 
ances on the student chapel programs. High points 
of the program : Scud's account of his lonely church- 
step vigil, and the amateur drama which lirings results. 



O.cta0^^. 



As the magic ball spins slcnAy 

In a lazy. ha~.y motion. — grasp the skeins, 
Blue and gold, for sunny lecather. 

And October's silz'er-gray for misty rains. 

C)ct. 1 — Professor Watts conducts field trip to Cahokia 
Mounds and Swift Packing Plant. Let's go vegeta- 
rian ! 

Oct. 3 — Epworth League fellowship hour held at the Meth- 
odist Church. Games and refreshments enjoyed by a 
large group of students. 

Oct. 7 — Wa>iie Bise elected president of the Senior Class. 



Page Fifty-ciylit 



Qcden^doA 



Oct. 11— Plato holds i 
Sigma Zeta, its fir 



first Open Session program, and 
meeting of the year. 



Oct. 21 — Hobos reign supreme for a day. Roy J. Griebel 
as the Old Dutch Cleanser woman and Don Ward as 
a winsome college lassy play leading roles in the day's 
activities. The decapitated form of the late Christo- 
pher Bean appears at the Chapel program. After 
cliapel the "hobos" hold a pep session downtown, long 
to be rememliered liy all present. 



Oct. 23 — Homecoming, with its clas 
ing, reunions, and a victorious 



rush. Alumni meet- 
'ootliall game, with 
Gerry Gibson reigning as queen. Last but not least, 
the mystery of the late Christopher Bean is solved at 
the Homecoming play. 

Oct. 2S — Waggoner Science Society holds its public pro- 
gram under the auspices of the Geology department. 

Oct. 27 — Ghosts walk in the form of Hallowe'en scaven- 
gers, under the leadership of the Y.^I. and Y.W. Two 
ghosts in the persons of Dr. and Airs. Spencer appear 
from the general direction of the cemetery, and two 
friendly "little red devils" grace the evening. 



)iauiem£f£A, 



A'oii' t!ic darkrr skciiis arc drifting, 

And these sober-colored threads i^'C ninst not lose, 
For the gay ones seem much brighter 

In their contrast zcith Xoicmber's somber hues. 

Nov. 1 — All having studied like good fellows, nine weeks 
exams provide a pleasant dix'ersion from the usual rou- 
tine — or do they? 

Xov. — A.M.O. fraternity holds an informal house party 
at the home of Bill Otwell in Belleville. The Social 
Science Department sponsors a benefit tea — for the 
growing library fund. 

Nov. 13 — Alpha Psi Omega celebrates its tenth anniver- 
sary with a reception, a bancjuet, and a group of three 
plays given in the Chapel in which dramatic talent of 
students and alumni is demonstrated. 



Xov. 1-1 — Meeting of the East Side McKendree Alumni As- 
sociation in E. St. Louis. 

Nov. 17 — Thirty-four names appear on the honor roll. 
Need we say more? 

NoA-. 18 — The library becomes a "tea room for a day" with 
tapers, silver, and china, not to speak of colorful book 
displays, in celebration of National Book Week. Pro- 
fessor Hardy talks on "Books". 

IJr. Yost gives an address over radio station WGN on 
"Building Religion into Life" 

Nov. 26 — Bise, Randall and Isselhardt are awarded places 
on International News Service All-Conference team. 

Nov. 29 — Back to work again. "Did you have turkey?" 



^>ecem£ieA.. 



Gleaming i^'hite the threads are drifting, 

And the irridcscen' green and crimson lights 

Shine in gay Jh\ember's colors. 

Like the starlight in the snoic on zeinter nights. 

Dec. 3 — International Deliate is held in the chapel Iietween 
McK. debate team, represented by John Oppitz and 
Clayton Campbell, and the Anglo-Scottish team, rep- 
resented by H. H. >,Iunro and David Sealand-Jones, 
This is the first debate of its kind to be held on AIc- 
Kendree's campus. 

Dec. 6 — Science Club holds its second program, under the 
sponsorship of the Biology department. These pro- 
grams are unique in character. 

Dec. S— Y.W. Christmas program is held in Clark Hall 
Alary Blanche reads us a Christmas story as we gather 
in the firelight. 

Dec. 10 — Phi Lambda Tau sees "Gay Blades", an ice car- 
nival, at the Arena in St. Louis, under the sponsorship 
of Dr. Steckman. Faculty Dames have a Christmas 
party — with Santa Claus 'n e\eything. 



QaiendaA 



Dec. 13 — "Angels" hold their annual Christmas party in 
Clark Hall — with toj's which are later sent to the Or- 
phanage at Mt. Vernon. Clara Frances demonstrates 
her ability in the leadership of games ; "Blackie," the 
cat, makes a startling entrance. 

Dec. 1.5 — Y. M. and Y. \\'. ha\ c a Christmas party in Ciark 
Hall, following a Christmas play in the Chapel. Games, 
pop-corn, and apples furnish entertainment for the exe- 
ning's fun. 



Jan. 17-22 — The bitter with the sweet — Semester exams. 
All resolutions not to cram thrown to the famous "four 
winds". 

Jan. 22 — Wedding bells ring for Walter Pruett and Beulah 
Jones of Kinmundy. 

Jan. 23 — E. St. Louis Area Youth Conference held on the 
campus. The sight of high school "youngsters" brings 
back memories, not so far removed. 



Dec. 17 — Students leave for Christmas vacation, "while vi 
ions of sugar-plums dance in their heads." 



Jan. 24 — Registration for second semester. Turn the new 
leaf — ^"I hereby resolve to do better this semester." 



Dec. 2S — Sigma Beta Rho quartet broadcasts over KW'K. 
We tune in from here, there, and yonder. 
W. Friederich, M. Jeanes, E. Bauer, and C. Hortiii 
chosen for College "Who's Who". 



Jan. 26 — McK. Players begin their tours. Like knights of 
old, thev find many and varied adventures in their tour 
of Southern Illinois. It's all fun, even swallowing pins 
and forgetting to pull curtains. 



Jan. 28 — A.AI.O.'s hold their aimual mid-semester banquet 
at Hotel Belleville. 



Jan. 29 — Alore wedding bells — this time for Marie Block 
and Jim Connett. 



^anua^f^. 



Grasp the threads of January 

Spun upon a winter morning clear and cold 
By Jack Frost, the sprite leho traces 

Wonderlands with frosty fingers sharp and bold. 

Jan. 3 — .\nother Christmas vacation gone, and we still be- 
lieve in Santa Claus. 

Jan. 9 — ^liss Rose Terlin of Geneva, Switzerland, speaks 
on "International Affairs" at the M. E. Church. 

Jan. 10 — Intramural basketball season opens. Angels al- 
lowed to stay out until two minutes past ten to see the 
finish. 

Jan. 11 — Football banquet held in Pearson's Hall. Randall 
and Doerner elected co-captains for next year. Wayne 
Bise is selected as the team's most valuable player. 

Jan. 14 — ]\[cK. debate team meets Blackburn at Carlinxille. 

Jan. 15 — Bachelors ha\ e a party at the Locust Hills Coun- 
try Club. The e\'ening is a complete success, what 
with imported music 'n all. 



O'^^iuoAf^.,, 



Shurt, drab threads of broicii and yelloic, 

Clinging leaz'cs, and fields hewn by the wind's sharp 
knife; 
February's threads of death. 

Wherein is cloaked the hidden miracle of life. 

Feb. 5 — Neighboring high schools are guests of McK. at 
Warrenton game. Afterward a frolic at the Countrj' 
Club. 

Eel). 9 — AIcK. Players present "There Comes a Time", 
"Bird of Passage" and "Not Quite Such a Goose" in 
the chapel under the direction of Willard Friederich. 
AlcK.'s men's quartet — composed of the famous "four 
portly gentlemen" — makes its first public appearance. 

Feb. 10 — Sociology field trip to St. Louis Globe Democrat 
and Good Will Industries. 



Page Si. 



&cde.ndaA 



Fell. 13— Phi Limbda Tan rush tea at the home of Mrs. St. 
Clare Flint. Rushees are taken on a stormy trip to the 
imaginary isle of the "Tempest". 

Fell. 1-1 — Faculty members celebrate St. Valentine's day 
with a comic valentine bo.x in the dining hall. Dignity 
— did you say? 

Feb. 15 — "Heart Sister" supper, sponsored by the Y.W. at 
Prexy's mansion. By the valentine route each girl 
finds out who has been doing all those lovely things 
for her this week. 

Feb. 19 — Phi Lambda Tau holds second rush party, at the 
home of Airs. Will Pfeffer. 

Feb. 20 — The AlcK. chorus, resplendent in tuxes and aqua- 
marine dresses — to say nothing of white carnations^ 
makes its 1938 debut at the Lebanon M. E. Church. 

Feb. 25 — McK. group attends Wesley Commemoration 
meeting at Granite City Niedringhaus M. E. Church. 

Fell. 27 — McK. chorus sings at St. Paul's M. E. Church in 
East St. Louis. Might we say, "such harmony is in 
immortal souls." 

Feb. 28 — Mid-year recital given by McKendree Fine Arts 
department under the direction of Prpf. Kleinschmidt, 
Miss Harper, and Miss Thomas. 

Harold Hertenstein awarded the Bachelor scholarship 
cup for the highest scholastic average in the fraternity 
during the first semester. His name is added to the 
"immortals." 



MoAcA, 



Misty green threads iioi^' are drifting, 

Threads of promise that foretell the coming spring, 
Tli reads from daffodils' gold cups, 

.hid siii'er threads of March's prancing leinds that 
sing. 

March 1 — Girls' quartet appears before Woman's Club at 
Staunton during the afternoon. McK. chorus travels 
to New Baden the same evening for a program. 

March 2 — The famous "Professor Quizz" makes a second 
appearance — this time at a combined "Y" meeting. Stu- 
dents and faculty alike are put through their paces b)- 
the relentless prof. 



Mar. 3 — Debate team meets Illinois Wesleyan team at 
Bloomington and Normal U. at Normal on an inter- 
esting Northern tour. 

Mar. A — Debate team meets Wheaton College at Wheaton. 

Mar. 5 — J. Oppitz and C. Campbell debate over radio sta- 
tion WJJD, Chicago. 

Mar. 10 — Girls' quartet sings at Literary Club meeting in 
East St. Louis. These four young ladies seem to be 
much in demand this year. 

Mar. 13 — Men's Glee Club makes its first separate appear- 
ance at Pinckneyville and Nashville, via the Lebanon 
bus. Rainy weather, but "singing in the rain" isn't so 
liad. 

March 15 — Again Alary Blanche is to assume queenly hon- 
ors, having reigned as last year's W. A. A. Queen of 
the Gym Circus. This time it is as May Queen. 

Mar. 16 — Y. M. gives St. Patrick's Eve party in the Dining 
Hall. Dramatic talent is displayed in impromptu pan- 
tomime. 

"Study Racket Alethods Exposed as R-Man Conducts 
Investigation." — (McK. Reiieic). 

March 18 — Sociology students visit the St. Louis police de- 
partment and Shell Refinery. 

Mar. 22 — Myron Carlisle, baritone soloist, presents recital 
in the Chapel, accompanied by Betty Schatz. 

Alar. 2i — "Bing" Bohm wins the ping-pong tournament 
after a hard-fought battle. "Wendy" Phillips wins sec- 
ond place. 

Alar. 26 — Bachelors hold party at Hotel Belleville to cele- 
brate the end of exam-week. Pledges are honor guests. 

Mar. 29 — AIcKendree team debates St. Louis University. 
John Oppitz and Clayton Campbell uphold the affirma- 
tive. 

Alar. 30 — "Jane, the Queen," written and directed by Wil- 
lard Fncderich, is presented in the College Chapel. 



yip^ii.. 



Golden tints shine thru the crystal 

As the skeins of April's colors drift along 

Yclloie from the crocus petals, 

And a gold thread from the blue-bird's lilting song. 

April 2 — Phi Lambda Tau Iirings guests to the campus for 
their annual Home-Town Week-End. 



Parjc Six-ty 



QcdendaA 



April 3 — Beginning of two-weeks' pre-Easter services at 
the College M. E. Church. 

April 5 — Lucille Floetman and Betty Schatz present music 
recital in College Chapel. 

April 6 — AlcK. Rei'icz^' pulilishes an April Fool edition. 
Headline : "Profs Have Row in Dinina; Hall". 



May 7— A.M.O. Iianquet held at the St. Clair Country Club 
in Belleville. 



Alay 9 — Beginning of annual Campus \\'eek, sponsored by 
Dr. Spencer and the Senior Class. Senior Class fur- 
nishes a chapel program and an afternoon is marked by 
the dedication of the senior tree and the May Fete. 



April 9 — Play troupe presents W. Friederich's original play, 
"Unto Justice" at the Cape Girardeau Mid-Western 
Folk Drama Contest. 

April 10 — Fellowship Hour held by the Epworth League at 
the M. E. Church. 

April 15 — Beginning of Spring \'acation. It's been a long 
time this year between the advent of Santa Claus and 
the coming of the Easter Bunny. 

April 23 — Back to work again. The lure of spring on the 
campus has drawing powers. 

April 29 — Faculty Dames have a party at the home of Dr. 
and Mrs. Baker. 



Alay 11 — Clio banquet in Pearson's Hall. The plan of the 
program follows the regular Clionian program form. 

May 1-1 — Bachelor banquet is held at the Congress Hotel in 
St. Louis. 

Alay 21 — Phi Lambda Tau banquet held at the Hotel Chase 
in St. Louis. 

May 23- -Beginning of final examinations. This marks the 
triumjih of the Seniors. 

May 26 — Dorris oratorical contest is held. 

May 27 — Plato-Philo exhibition program is given. 

May 2S — Clio exhibition program is presented. 



April 30— Pi Kappa Delta banquet held at the Lincoln Hotel 
in Belleville. 



May 29 — Baccalaureate ser\'ice is held. 

The oratorio, "The Alessiah", is presented under the 
direction of }kliss Harper. 



May 30 — Recital is given in the College Chapel by the Fine 
Arts L)cpartment. 

Y<ay 31 — .Meeting of Joint Board of the College. Alumni 
dinner in Pearson's Hall. 



yUay., 



Ramhow colors, soft and shining, 

Arc the colors of the loirly mouth of May. 
.^s she treads across the ineadoies 

Drop/'ing floieers as she passes on her teny. 

-May 1 — Girls' Glee Club makes its initial Sunday appear- 
ance. 

May -I — Pearl Dick presents her recital in the Chapel. 

May 5 — The Play Production class gives two plays in the 
College Chapel. 



^Me. 



All the learinth of light and color 

Blends into the last bright skein of shining hues, — 
Light, and life, and loz'e, and dreams 

Which June presents — and you may haze them if yoi 
choose. 

June 1 — Commencement. 



Pnoe Si.rtv-tn-o 



^AamatCci. 




Left to right: 
Charles Long 
Georgia Rush 
George Flesor 
Helen Waggoner 
Marion Sweglich 
Sampson Piatt 
Mary Louise Reader 



SPRING PLAY 



^xm.t, tde Giueen 

March 30 



By Willard Friederich 



Directed by 
Miss Cora M. Thomas, and Willard Priederich 



CAST 

Mary Grey, Jane's sister, age 8 

Jane Grey, age 17 

Lady SulTolk, Jane's mother 

Lord Suffolk, Jane's father 
Alaster Roger Ascham, Jane's tutoi 
Katherine, Jane's sister, age 15 

Ellen, Jane's maid 

Lord Northumberlan<I, Chief Mmistcr ot England 
Lady Northumberland- 
Lady Sidney, their daughter 
Guilford Dudley, their son 

Lord Pembroke, Chief conspirator against Jane 
Lord Arundel, of the Privv Council 
Lady Northampton, daughtei -in-law to Dudlej 

Royal Messenger 

Mrs. Howard 

Caroline, her daughter- 
Princess Alary Tudor... 

Simon Renard, Ambassador from Chailes \ ot Spam 
Lord Winchester, Chancelloi of Exchtquer 
Lord Cecil, of the Privj Council 
Lord Robert Dudley, Northumberland's son 

Lord Warwick 

Princess Elizabeth Tudor 
Sir John Brydges 



Marion Sweglich 

Helen Waggoner 

Mary Louise Reader 

Sampson Piatt 

I'-uiis Cockrum 

Madge Davis 

Dorothj Htrtenstein 

Charles Long 

Georgia Rush 

Clai I Prances Boyd 

George Flesor 

bred Doerner 

Ro> Griebel 

Ph>llis Harnhart 

Lisle Mewmaw 

Isabel Shaffer 

Florence lackson 

Bettv PhilHps 

Ckuton Campbell 

Harold Hertenstein 

Chttord Brown 

Carlton Barton 

Edgar Thilman 

Mildred Leonard 

Ko\ Griebel 



Home Coming Play 



Directed by Aiiss Cora M. Thomas 



r>v Sidney Howard 



CAST 

Dr. Haggett Sampson Piatt Mrs. Haggett Betty Phillips 

Susan Haggett Madge Davis Warren Creamer Harold Hertenstein 

Ahby Isabel Shaffer Tallant Harold Shipp 

Ada Haggett Barbara Boggess Rosen Roy Griebel 

Davenport Clayton Campbell 



Page Sixty-three 



McfCenoUeoM 



:OF NINETEEN 




ORGANIZED 
Tn 1936 under the sponsorship of Willard Friederich with five players, later 
enlarged to seven. 

PURPOSE 
To bring drama to audiences of Southern Illinois, to advertise the college, to 
afi^ord travelling repertoire experience to the players themselves and to experiment 
witli new plavs and audience reactions. 

PLAYS 
The first six were written by Willard Friederich : "She Climbs Trees", "Again 
We Fight", "Road to Heaven", "There Comes a Time", "Bird of Passage", "Unto 
Justice". The seventh play is one of Elizabeth Gale's: "Not Such a Goose". 

PLAYERS 
Betty Phillips, Madge Davis, Georgia Rush, Helen Handel, Harold Shipp, 
Clayton Campbell, and Willard Friederich. 

CAPE GIRARDEAU TOURNAMENT 
Each year the Players sponsor McKendree's entry in the National Folk 
Drama Tournament at Cape Girardeau. This year the entry, "Unto Justice", by 
Willard Friederich, received the first prize of $50.00 in the play writing contest. 
Its presentation, April 9, 1938, included the following cast: 

Lisbeth Wilson, mountaineer woman Betty Phillips 

Birdie Wilson, her niece Helen Handel 

Jamie Wilson, her son Willard Friederich 

Lige Peters, her neighbor Fred Doerner 

Maw Munsen, the "yarb woman" Clara Frances Boyd 

For the third successive year, McKendree received the acting honors of the 
Tournament when Miss Boyd was given the gold cup for Degree of Special Dis- 
tinction Acting; Miss Phillips for Degree of Excellent Acting; and Doerner and 
Friederich tied for Degree of Superior Acting. 

The play as a whole was awarded Degree of Excellence in performance. 



HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT: 



Senate yicjAiad 



Members of this year's debate team travelled some two thousand miles, 
through three states, to engage in thirty forensic battles. At the National Pi 
Kappa Delta Convention in Topeka, Kansas, McKendree defeated Morningside, 
Sioux Falls, Greeley Teachers, Montana State, Kirksville Teachers, and Michigan 
State, losing to Maryville and St. Thomas. The local debaters received a rating 
of "Excellent", second highest honor given to any of the 104 teams participating. 

Three members of the squad made a five-day trip into Northern Illinois for 
encounters with James Millikin, Illinois Wesleyan, Illinois Normal, DeKalb 
Teachers, and Wheaton College. John Oppitz and Clayton Campbell engaged in 
an exhibition debate over radio station WJJD, Chicago, on the question, "Re- 
solved, that war is the midwife of progress." 

The other schools which McKendree met in debate this year were St. Louis 
University, vS.I.N.U., Cape Girardeau Teachers, Blackburn, and The Principia. 
The Pi Kappa Delta question, "Resolved, that the NLRB should be empowered 
to enforce the arbitration of all industrial disputes," was used throughout the 
season. 

The only veterans on the team were Clayton Campbell and John Oppitz, both 
of whom were seniors with three years of previous debate experience. Isabel 
Shaffer, Dorothy Dausman, Ruth Schmedake and Marvin Rutler were the new- 
comers to the squad. 




n, W. Martin, Professor Hardy. 
ffer, M. Collins, Miss Thomas. 



Hnije Sixty-five 



:OF NINETEEN 

The day to which the Seniors have lool<ed forward for the past four years 
was May 12, the occasion being Senior Day- The following program was given 
by the "Sheep-skinners". 

CJiairinan — Clifford Brown 

Organ Prelude Gwendolyn Yost 

Invocation Clayton Campbell 

Welcome John Oppitz 

Reading Mary Blanche Wolfe 

Class History Helen Handel 

Music Wesley Martin 

"Thus Far We Have Come" Myra Jeanes 

Solo - Phyllis Barnhart 

"Where Are We Going?" Donald Kline 

Presentation of the Gavel Wayne Bise 

Response by Junior President Roy Jaeckel 

Class Will Geneva Duey 

"Alma Mater" Assemblv 



The activities of Senior Day continued in the afternoon of May 12 with the 
dedication of a tree. The following program was presented in the Rock Garden : 

Music Women's Glee Club 

Invocation Lisle Mewmaw 

Reading Willard Fried'erich 

Music — "Trees" Preachers' Quartet 

Remarks and Purpose of Planting Dr. E. R. Spencer 

Address Dr. E. P. Baker 

Dedication Wayne Bise 

Benediction Pres. C. R. Yost 

"Alma Mater" Assemblv 



HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT: 



ITla^ (lueen 




Mary Blanche Wolfe 
Lebanon 

"You must z>.'akc and call nic early. 

Call iiic early, mother dear: 
Tomorrow'ill he the happiest time 
Of all the glad New-Year; 
Of all the glad Nezv-Year, mother, 
The maddest, merriest day; 
For I'm to be Queen o' the May, mother, 
I'm to be Queen o' the May." 
Mary Blanche is an active Clionian, an ardent lover of sports and greatly 
interested in speech and dramatics. Her popularity on the campus is evidenced by 
her election as "Queen o' the iNIay." 

Helen Handel of East St. Louis served as Maid-of-Honor. Phyllis Barnhart, 
:vrvra Teanes Adelvn Martin, and Gwendolyn Yost were the Queen's attendants. 



Pasje Sixty-seven 



9xd^.att £Ut 



MR. MILBURN P. AKERS 
Supt. Department of Finance 
Springfield, Illinois 

MRS. BEULAH McCLURE AKERS 
Springfield, Illinois 

MR. F. A. BEHYMER 
St. Louis Post-Dispatch 
Lebanon, Illinois 

MR. KENNETH PAUL BROWN 
Financial Agent, Orphanage 
Mt. Vernon, Illinois 



REV. PAUL R. HORTIN, Minister 
St. Petersburg, Florida 

MRS. W. A. HOWE 
Mt. Vernon, Illinois 

MR. ARTHUR V. HUFFMAN 
Psychologist 
Lincoln, Illinois 

MISS VICTORIA JOHNSON, 
Teacher 
Belvidere, Illinois 



MISS JENNIE GATES, Teacher 
Alton, Illinois 

MISS IVA LOU CRALLE, Teacher 
Sesser, Illinois 

MR. ERNEST R. CRISP 
Instr. in History, St. Louis U. 
St. Louis, Mo. 



MISS MARY TENNEY KNAPP 
Teacher 
East St. Louis, Illinois 

DR. V. T. McKEE, Dentist 
Lebanon, Illinois 

DR. F. A. RENNER, Physician 
Lebanon, Illinois 



HON. CHARLES S. DENEEN 
Attorney 
Chicago. Illinois 

MISS DOROTHY DINTELMAN, 
Teacher 
Belleville, Illinois 



MR. JOHN PAUL SAMPSON 
Teacher 
Pembroke, North Carolina 

MR. WILLIAM DEAN SANDERS 
Teacher 
Crossville, Illinois 



MR. L. J. EAST 
Supt. of Schools 
Lebanon, Illinois 

MISS CATHERINE GILKISON, 
Teacher 
Bluford, Illinois 

MR. ANDREW J. GOODPASTER 
Cadet — Regimental Sergeant-Major, 
U. S. M. A., West Point, N. Y. 



MISS MARJORIE SNOW, Teacher 
Okaw ville, Illinois 

DR. A. L. WEBER, Physician 
Lapland, California 

MR. GAYLON WHITESIDE, Chemist 
East St. Louis, Illinois 

MR. LOREN S. YOUNG, Teacher 
Erie, Illinois 



MISS MARTHA HINKEL 
Social Case Worker 
Detroit, Michigan 



MISS FLORENCE ZAHNOW, 
Teacher 
East St. Louis, Illinois 



9ncle/)c to /lcLuut\liieA6. 



Alamo Theatre 70 

Belleville Daily Advocate 70 

Blumenstein Bros 74 

Cathcart's Cafe .....74 

Central Engraving 7S 

Daumueller's 74 

General Grocer Co ...70 

C. Heer 71 

Hotel Belleville 70 

Hotel Lincoln 70 

Interstate Printing Co 72 

Langenwalter Dairy 72 

Lebanon Advertiser 7c) 

Lebanon Drug Co 70 

Paris Cleaners 7o 

Parkway Inn 72 

PfelTer Milling Co... 71 

Romeiser's 70 

Sayre Motor Co 71 

Eugene Seibert 74 

Spieth Photo Studio 72, 



CoHege 
Books and Supplies 

Try Our Soda Fountain 

We serve the best De Luxe Ice 
Cream and Toasted Sandwiches 

Lebanon 
Drug Company 

0. C. FRESHOUR, Prop. 


,/liamxy 
JAtaUe 


"Belleville's 
Home Newspaper" 

Belleville 
Daily 
Advocate 

Established 1839 


For Well Dressed 
Young Men 

Romeiser s 

206-208 E. Main Street 
Belleville 


Hotel B^-UemUe, 

"On the Square" 

Quality food at sensible prices. 
Catering to parties, banquets, etc. 
You are invited to see us for your 
next college party. 

Phone Belleville 3500 for 
Reservations 


Manhattan 
. . . Coffee 

Something Different, 
Not Something Just as Good 


—VISIT— 

Hotel Lincoln 

Vic Thien, Mgr. 

AIR-CONDITIONED 
DINING ROOM 

Belleville Asparagus Dinners 

Phone 200 "A" at High St. 


VACUUM-PACKED IN 
GLASS OR TIN 

Distributed by 
St. Louis, Mo. 



Daily Capacity 1000 Barrels 
Elevator Capacity 200,000 Bushels 

94e4§eA mimtg, eonvpcuu^ 

Lebanon, Illinois 
Inc. 1899 

Manufacturers of 
MAR'S PATENT HARD WINTER WHEAT FLOUR 

FLUFFY RUFFLES SELF-RISING FLOUR 
LEBANON BELLE CAKE FLOUR 

WHITE CORN GRITS AND CORN MEAL 



Dealers in 
Lumber and Building Materials of all Kinds 



Sinclair Gas 
and Oils 



Exide 
Batteries 



Tires and.... 
Accessories 






Phone 35 



Lebanon, 111. 



Buick . . . Chevrolet 



General Repair and Storage 






&. UeeA 

General 
Merchandise 



%fie GUui£U(^ tfio'vt 



V 



Page Seventy-oti 



Quality Dairy Products 



Milk 



Cream 



Butter 



etc. 



L. S. Langenwalter 

Lebanon, 111. 



PHONE 140 



HELMS 



Tta^^ujicu^ 9nti 



Famous For Fine Food 



25th and Lynch Ave. 
East St. Louis 



BEGIN RIGHT! 



<<Todo best whaf 
many do well 



Many a good printing 

job has been ruined 

by a poor start. 



You can depend on 

good printing only by 

depending on a good 

printer. 



THE INTERSTATE 

Danville «-» Illinois 



Page Seventy-two 



THE 

LEBANON 

ADVERTISER 


Why not have quality work for 
the same price? 

Hot Sxii, 9Aoceid, 


• • 
• 


PARIS 


Sylvan E. Williams 
Editor and Publisher 


Cleaning <&• Dyeing 

Phone Lebanon 136 



Spieth Photo Studio 



222 North Poplar Street 
Centralia, Illinois 



9AotoqAxvfiAl §o^ UigA JicAoaCl and Qoilex^e^ 



High Grade Portraits Enlarging 

Kodak Finishing Application Pictures 



WRITE US FOR PRICES 



Fttye Seventy-three 



Blumenstein 
Bros. 



FRESH AND SMOKED 
MEATS 

• • 



Phone 113 



Congratulations to 

McKENDREE COLLEGE 
STUDENTS 



GOOD FOOD IS GOOD HEALTH 



Cathcart^s Cafe 



Edwardsville, 111. 



OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



Compliments of 

EUGENE SEIBERT 

Distributor of 

LINCO GASOLINE 
MARATHON MOTOR OIL 

Tires, Batteries, and Accessories 



1000 Lebanon Ave. 
Belleville, 111. 



A MOST PLEASANT 
WELCOME 

Awaits you at all times 
at 



BILL'S 

For Good Fountain Service, 
Your College Needs, etc. 



VISIT 

Daumueller's 

MUSIC AND GIFT 
SHOP 

215-217 West St. Louis St. 
Lebanon, Illinois 



Page Sevcnty-fo 




SEIVDS ITS BOLT INTO THE 
SCHOOL ANIVUAL FIELD 



Just like a flash of lightning . . . CENTRAL'S ELEC- 
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friends. Staff members as well as printers quickly 
grasp the advantages they offer. 

Your copy is faithfully reproduced on copper, assur- 
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are DEEP, CLEAN AND SMOOTH, insuring less 'wash 
up" on the press. 

On all future engraving orders, insist on CENTRAL 
ELECTROLYTICALLY ETCHED PLATES. 

You pay no more [or these better halftones. 




The Holland 
Electrolytic Etcher 



CEIVTHAL EIVGRAVIIVG COMPANY 



114 Worlh 7lh Si. St. 

YEARBOOK SPECIALISTS FDR A QUARTER 



Louis 
OF A CENTURY 






-2 College 
^l 6225d 



\