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Full text of "The McKendrean : being the year book of McKendree College"

muMJ 

1939 



yy[cKendrean of 



ROY JAECKEL 
ISABEL SHAFFER 
BETTY MAE PI II BLIPS 
HELEN WAGGONER 
RALPH GROTE 
ROBERT ALLEN 
ROY GRIEB.EL 
EDGAR THILMAN 
PAUL YOST 
ROBERT HERMAN 
HAROLD SHIPP 
LESTER WILSON 
MISS ALLEEN WILSON 



Editor-in-Chief 

Associate Editor 

Organization Editor 

Feature Editor 

Art Editor 

Sports Editor 

Business Manager 

Assistant Business Manager 

Advertising 

Advertising 

Photography 

Circulation 

Faculty Adviser 




uWMMjnro 




^Nineteen ^hirty-ENine 

IN MEMORIflM 



£ouis K. Oppitz 

A.B., A.M., Yale University 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 




'.'jfif/\i fhit/rr ffiiir/itf/ Aim, 

ana lie ■ifrlit. — S/ennyson 



We pause a moment, be- 
fore proceeding further, to 
pay In image to a man. Dr. 
Louis K. Oppitz, who has 
left our campus, departed 
"From This Old Hill." 

1 )r. < >ppitz was a man of 
high quality and excellent 
education, fitted to take his 
place in society with the 
best. His absorption in his 
work led him on. and ever 
on, m 1 1 is chosen field. Mc- 
Kendree was proud of him 
and offers this tribute to his 
memory. 





Qrom this Old SKill 

By N. M. Bai.com 

. . . C/o //on know t/iat (ong, /vnrj after 

'//'e /tare none on domew/iere 
.j/iere w/// /<e toyd and t/irM and /anrj/iter 
7/a/iina t/ie e/'enina air, 
•yJnd ■luit'ieti Jti/f 
.7ro>n t//i.i o/d hi/I.' 



In the presentation of the 1939 Mc- 
Kendrean, the theme, "From This 
( >ld Hill" has been chosen. We have 
endeavored to relied the traditions, 
activities, friendships, and natural 
beauties of our home on "the Hill," 
portraying, by means of illustration 
and written word, the spirit of Mc- 
Kendree and its inestimable contribu- 
tion to us. 




It has been our aim to make this 
book your book. It, in any way, it 
arouses a new spirit or revives an old 
one, or serves as a reminder, in future 
years, of our college days, then our 
objectives and desires have been real- 
ized. 

We present the 1939 McKendrean. 




^Y[cKendrean of 




For the past fourteen years, men 
and women of McKendree have come 
in contact with a tine. Christian wom- 
an wlio lias worked tirelessly for the 
cause of their Alma Mater. To one 
whom we never met in the classroom, 
but who has fulfilled her every obli- 
gation and responsibility, who will al- 
ways be remembered by McKendreans 
— to Mrs. Minnie Phillips, House 
Mother of Clark Hall, this 1939 Mc- 
Kendrean is respectfully and sincerely 
dedicated. 




'JlJjJJJWJjyVLs 



Page Six 



ENineteen 




Page Seven 




'//'i/f/ roici. iiie.S.ienfjerA of June 
C/ffj/ifihifi i/otit ■ /iefa/-i 4(fft/u on t/ie Act, 

■iweet nra.U: 
^JreeJ, t<or>ie down wit/i bimdenA yreen, 
.J/Cow ma mi timed i/ou've we f corned u.i 
Or dent u-i .for-t/i 

■ 'Jlut to return aaain ana' yet anain 
&o "JnU ; €/M .Jffi//. " 



"Reason and calm judgment, the qual- 
ities specially belonging to a leader." 
— Tacitus 



EHe$, 



oven is 

CLARK R< >LLAXD YOS'l' 
A.B., D.D. 

President 

Leader 

Idealist 

Gentleman 

Friend 




DR. C. R. YOST 



DEAN C. L STOWELL 




3^ie Qounsels 

CHARLES JACOB STOWELL 
B.S..A.M., Ph.D. 

Dean of the College 

Guide 

Benefactor 

Gentleman 

Friend 



ar •*: 






■ fc< 



■*"*jr' 









'•v 



^Wjp^w^ 



•*r ' 



.V Jpi 



.*..*.. 






c/8r«J "@/d 3/&M" AaA made iti 
fire.ience <fe(t -for man it uear-i. 
■^l centuivu anr/ a auawter- aao 
it Af/r/ n« name of .fame. Un 
/Sj2S it teeame more t/ian a 
/if//, if /ecame a gateaiaa to a 
neat liJe. 



^5hey £ead. . . tffle follow 



CORA M. THOMAS 
B.S. 

Speech 



AIAKV II. WRIGHT 

Ph.D. 
English 



EDWIN P. BAKER 

ALA.. LTD. 

German 

I )ean Emeritus 



C. DEWITT HARDY 
M.A. 

History 
Dean of Men 



REIXIIOLD I',. IIOHN 
A.M. 

Education 
Registrar 



ELIZA J. DONALDSON 
MA. 

Commerce 
Comptroller 



WEBSTER R. SCHMIDT 

M.S. 
Chemistry and Physics 



CLAYTON R. WATTS 

M.A. 
Social Science 



ALLEEN WIESON 
B.A., B.S. in E. S. 

Librarian 




Page Eleven 




ylgain R&e (play, 

e(( jfollow the £eader 



EDWIN R. SPENCER 
Ph.D. 




Biology 


[AMES C. DOLLEY 
M.A., Litt.D. 




Latin and Greek 


KITH McDANIEL 
M.A. 




Romance Language 
Dean of Women 






AILEEN SPENCER 
B.A. 




Hi. ili .gy 


S M. McCLURE 

M.S. 




Geology 






MRS. MINNIE PHILLIPS 




Matron of Clark Hall 


ARTHUR K. HENDER 
A.B. 


SON 


Director of Physical 




Education 






OLIVER H. KLEIN- 
SCHMIDT 
A.A.G.O. 




Piano, Organ, Theory 


NELL G. OPPITZ 

M.A. 




History 
Social Science 
English 






MRS. BLANCHE HERTEN 

STEIN 




Matron of Carnegie Hall 



CHARLES F. KRAFT 
Ph.D. 

Philosophy and Religion 



R. PAULINE HARPER 
Voice 

Public School Music 




- J 



.Slaw urn n ii tt'i/tter.i /tare we -iee/t f/tee t/iii.i, 
(Itirheterf in ■ioftejt. lui re-it white, 
ffftife tftreititift tfte icti ftitrf t/te ruff/, f/rau a if, 
./rifted a fit/fit rm// ft a ji/. ■iif/ieit mi.it 
Sfo- /'ttrt/ier .i/irnttr/ ' ali e/rn/t/ie.i.i front fjtir .iitiftt. 



yy[cKendrean of 



(pages tjrom ^A Grades 3Y(ewiorij '-Book 



September, 1935, saw forty-five students pass through the Centennial Gate- 
way and acknowledge "the Hill" as their new home. Indeed, "we looked upon a 
world unknown." Little did we know about college life, or, in fact, about any- 
thing. Registration was a "world event" judging by its complications. What 
were college classes to be like if it took that much trouble just to get into them? 

< If course we had to sec the President, but "what for"? The President had 
to tell us why we wanted to see him. Next we contacted a lady, Donaldson by 
name, who took all that money from home which we had hoped we could keep — 
at least for awhile. 

From here we proceeded to the class room and the athletic field, lust as we 
were beginning to feel a bit settled and as if we were "somebody" we were 
reminded that we were nil. This brilliant class of '39 was bedecked with green 
caps and placed upon chapel programs — but we loved it. We soon made the 
acquaintance of a man whom we will never forget. Dean Baker called a meeting 
of the "greenies'', placed one of our caps upon his head, told us to be proud of 
them, and to fight for them. We no doubt followed his advice more literally than 
he intended we should. 

We elected a president and prepared for the traditional freshman scrap, with 
the usual result — we were still "fourth-stringers". The freshmen men finished 
Up in Pake Beautiful and the girls in the bear cage. We were living and learning, 
but we still liked it. 

Two outstanding events marked our hirst year: Dr. Yost succeeded Dr. 
Harmon as president of McKendree, and our football team battled for the con- 
ference championship. ( >ur class was represented in every organization on the 
campus. We boasted three lettermen each, in football and basketball, not to speak 
of tlie ten freshmen on the track squad. June came all too soon, taking with it 
our best friends, the seniors. 

As sophomores we found we had lost but two members of the class. This 
second year was not quite so eventful as the first, and as upperclassmen we dis- 
covered that we really should get down to work. 

Juniors! We were getting on. running in second place. Things were be- 
ginning to "pick up". Unfortunately our group was cut down by the dropping 
out of ten members, leaving us striding along, twenty-seven strong. Came Senior 
Day and we proudly and seriously took up their challenge to assume leadership 
and keep things going. 

The next thing we knew we were on top. Boy, oh boy, the front seats in 
chapel! Our last year became as eventful as our first. All too soon we have 
reached our goal. We go "Prom This ( >ld Hill" leaving a challenge with those 
who come after us. Now we have only memories, but these we will keep until 
the end — Pearson's Hall, literary societies, Eisenmeyer, our trips to town, heart- 
to-heart talks, room-mates, "get-togethers" and last, but not least, the classroom. 

Every class enrolling at McKendree goes through practically the same ex- 
periences. We, the seniors, hope that oncoming classes will maintain and cherish 
every fine tradition of the old college. There is but one more word to say, "So 
long, McKendree. and mav vou forever be the oldest and best in the Middle 
West". 



Page Fourte 



ENineteen c Ghirtij-SNine 







^ 



*/ 



If 




JuxbM!> 




Seniors 

( (FFICERS 

President Fred Doerner 

Vice 1 'resident Dale Hortin 

Secretary-Treasurer Geraldine Gibson 



Senior §wan S on g 

■ j/ii-i day r'i not aediqnea /or tr-entn/ina litii. 

• yJ neaeu near-t, oh aeefa ana done nequet; 
Unr dtat/ na-i not leen u-ieledd. vain, ana act 

■ j/icrc come-i a Sentiment, a-i coot minad n</ii/i 
•y/ero-i-i on/' Jacei. /le an- to at// to ao 

• y/n// /care /e/iine/ /one/ t/iineii t/iat mane n/i lUe; 
/Ve've /cariiir/ to aatt/e hneiuaice an/l itri/e. 

c/o dee tint' I'iitai w/iere dweet t'tojjotti-i aroic. 
•_/)ut noii' ire limit f/ctiart; t/ic cut tooin-i. 
•y/iif/ iff. unwitting, /care t/iede r/ier/i/iea /lat/i. 

• j/iii/ia/iotrca/ii//. t/tii ti'/c. t/ie-ic /ricna/ii roo/n-i. 
////life all tne iror/f/ our ti/ia/ifcf/ j ere ice eal/j. 

/ car .Jc/icol ire /oee/ -j/iona/i we e-itraiiaea a/iac, 

■ ytoif a/aa/ii we woii/f/ /inai r at your diae/ 

.Wal/i/t 0. fjrotc 




Page Sixteen 







INS 
'38, 



MAIX< »M RANDALL, A.B. 
East St. Louis, 111. 

HISTORY 

a Tnu Delta; Plato. Pres. '38; Football, '35, '36, 
'38; Co-Captain '38; Most Valuable Man MS; 

AP All-Conference Mention '37; Track '36, '37. 
39; Captain '38; Review Staff '37, '.is. '39; Editor 
Glee Club '36, '37, '38, '39; Pre-. '38-'39; Quartet 
'39; Pres. "M" Club '38; McKendrean Staff '37, 

Pres. Carnegie Hall '38; Vice-Pres. Student 
l. '39. 



GERALDINE GIBSON, A.B. 
Louisville, 111. 

ENGLISH 



Pres. Clark Hall 
W.A.A. '36; Revi, 
'3"; Football Once 



I, '39; Sec. Senior Class '39; 
Staff '37, '38. '39, Mgr. Editor 



RALPH ( >. GR( )TE,A.B. 

H.iylct.iti, 111. 
ENGLISH 

Sigma Tau Delta, Vice-Pres. '39; Philo; V.M.C.A. 
Cabinet '3s. Pre-. '39; Glee Club '39; Art Editor Mc- 
Kendrean '3": Asst. Editor Review '39; Who's Who 
in American Colleges an,! Universities '39. 



R( )Y JAECKEL, A.B. 

New Athens. 111. 
ENGLISH 



Plato: McKendrean Staff '38 
dent Ass'n '38; Junior Class P 
'3S: Basketball '35. '36, '37. ' 

Captain '.is: 11 



Edit 



\\ ' 



ck '35, '36 



- '39; Pres. Stn- 

"M" Club Pres. 

Captain '36, Co- 

Mention AP All Star Selec- 

Staff '35, '36: Who's 



Colleges and Universitie 



'.!". 



Page Seventeen 




FRED W. DOERNER. A.R. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

ECONOMICS 

Plato; Vice-Pres. Student Ass'n '38; Football '36. '37, 
'38. Co-Captain '38; S.I.N.U. All-Opponents Honor- 
able Mention '36; Track '36, '37. '38. '39; Pres. Car- 
negie Hall '39; Pres. Senior Class '39; Pres. "M" 
Club '39; Cirsle del Cielo; Martlia Shea Superior 
Acting Award '38; "lant the Queen"; "Unto Tustice". 



MILDRED LEONARD 
Mt, Vernon, 111. 

ENGLISH 

to accept teaching position, January, 1939. 



OTHEL ZEPHYRA FANSLER, B.S. 
Last St. L< mis, 111. 

CHEMISTRY 



LESTER WILSON, B.S. 
Louisville, 111. 

MATHEMATICS 



Sigma Zeta, Master S 
Science Society; Natu; 
McKendrean '39. 



entist '39; Philo; Waggoner 
Club; Circulation Manager, 



Page Eightc 




RALPH RUTH, B.S. 

Trent. hi. III. 

CHEMISTRY 

. Vice Master-Scientist '39; 



\t [ ': Glee Club '36, '37, '38. 



ROY J. GRIEBEL, A.B. 
Mascoutah, 111. 

ENGLISH 

Pi Kappa Delta, Pres, '39: Sigma Tau Delta, Pres. 
'39; Philo; Pres. Student Ass'n '39; Y.M.C.A. Cab- 
inet '38, '39; Editor Y Handbook '39; Debate Team 
'.I'.. '37; Track '.id. '.is. \i'i; Yarsitv Softball '37, '3S, 
'39; Football Mgr. '39; Review Staff '37. Sports Ed- 
itor '3S; McKendrean Staff '38, Hits. Mgr. MeKen- 
drean '39; Dorris Oratorical Contest '36. '37. '38, '39; 
Mi' onnicl: Oratorical Contest '38; "Late Christopher 
Bean"; "Quality Street"; "lane the Queen"; "Torch- 
bearers"; "Bondsmen of the Soil"; ■'The Blessed 
Vagrants"; "The Other due"; ■■Heat": "The Florist's 
\" One Can Say"; "The Little Fool"; "By 



the Lighl 



-ji tin 



ROBERTA HEYER, A.B. 
Louisville, 111. 

ENGLISH 

aggoner Science Society. Sec'y-Treas ' 




C. KENNETH POWELL, A.B. 
Caseyville, 111. 

PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

18; Glee Club '37, '38; 



Page Nineteen 





SAMPS< >N PLATT, A.B. 
Herrin, 111. 

HISTORY 

Sigma Beta Rho, Pies. '39; Fhilo. Vice-Pres. '39; 
French Club; Review Staff '37. '38; "The Late Chris- 
topher Bean"; "Jane the Queen". 



MARY LOU READER, A. P.. 
Lebanon, 111. 

HISTORY 

Glee Club '36. '37. '3S. '3»; Pies, of Glee Club "> ; 
French Club '36; Little Theatre '36, '37; Y.W.C.A. 
Cabinet '39; Clio Sec'y '38, VicePres. '3d. Pres. '39; 
W.A.A. Vice-Pres. '38, '39; Co-Capt. Girls' Basket- 
ball '39; Student Song. Leader '39- "The Cradle 
Song"; "Jane, the Queen". 



S. ALLEN SEIBERT, A.B. 

Belleville, 111. 
EC< ).\<)MICS 

Plato; Men's Glee Club '38, '39; Sec'y-Trcas. Glee 
Club '39; Tumbling Team '39; Mgr. Track Team '39. 



C( >MM< >D( >RE GR< >VE, A.B. 
Lebanon, III 

PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 
! Beta Rho, Pres. '38. 



Patje Twenty 




WILLIAM COLLINS, A. I',. 
Baldwin, III. 

PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

Sigma Beta Rho. 



DALE HORTON, A.B. 
Albion, III. 

ENGLISH 



■■/<iren<<<//, finr/ stand At.it. 

.//mAciherirr. 




Page Twenty-one 




yy[cKendrean of 



& 



uniors 



( iFFICERS 

I 'resident — William Fischer 
Vice-President -Benny [sselhardt 
Sec.-Treas. — [ohn 1 tarmon 



NO PICTURES 

lames Upchurch 

1 )elmont Beckemeyer 
Leland Beeler 

John 1 larmiiii 

Kelley Simmons 

Kavmond Switzer 



Ralph Koch 

Everette Hayden 
Lucille Floetman 

Byron Baldridge 
Marvin Butler 

Madeleine Yost 

William Fischer 

Dorothy Hertenstein 
Harvey Pister 

Helen Waggoner 

( Irlando Brakemeyer 
Benny [sselhardt 
Harold Shipp 

Robert C rouse 

( )wen Williams 

Lloyd Barnard 

John Henderson 
Madge Davis 

George Handlon 

Hetty Mae Phillips 

Carlton Barton 
Carl Beard 

Robert Langenwalter 
Bertie Bauer 

Arthur Martin 

Cecil Lowe 

Magdalena Willis 
Milton Sager 



fage Twenty In 



Nineteen ^kirty-SNine 




Pa<j? Twenty-three 




JY(cKendrean of 



Sopl 



wmores 



OFFICERS 

1 'resident — Edgar Thilman 
Vice-President— Charles Long 
Sec.-Treas— Stella Mae Steidel 



N< > PICTURES 

enneth Atkins 
Dale Broom 
Richard Cars..,, 
Sam I lonham 
Elton Dressel 
Rolf Hartmann 
Thomas Hummert 
Alhert Jondro 
Charles Lang 
Lee Mooney 
Don Ward 



<? Alma Carson 

Roger Tappmeyer 
I sal. el Shaffer 

Stella Mae Steidel 

Edgar Thilman 

Ruth Schmedake 

Florence Jackson 
Bart Greenwood 

Viola Espenscheid 
Charles Long 

George Flrsor 
Betty Schatz 

Oliver Kciser 

Mary Ruth Sowers 
George Pimlott 
Charles Hill 

Delores Cooper 

Allen Sager 



Pane Twenty to 



SNineteen c Ghirtij-3Sine 




Fa.je Twenty-five 




yy[cKendrean o\ 



tjresh 



men 



OFFICERS 

President — Robert Allen 
Vice-President —Robert Herman 
Sec.-Treas. — Virginia Brown 



\'< > PICTURES 

Janet Barkley 
Patricia Popkess 
Carmen Raffaelle 
Virginia Wielt 
Carlns Basinger 
Thomas Brown 
Ivan Cooper 
Leslie Lee 
Bruce Meng 
Marlyn Mosley 
Anial Pennell 
Charles Smith 
Curtis Taylor 
Harry Stilwell 
Charles Wilson 



Charles Mueth 

Robert Herman 

Marian Kleinschmidt 

John Fizzell 

Charles Briner 

Lawrence Vernor 

Carrol Lowe 

Dixie Dexter 

Allen Cast 

Robert Allen 

Robert Odell 

Anna Lois Gann 

Ted Gibson 

Mary Ruth Shelton 

John McLain 

1 )onald Cramer 

i Jei irge Breitwieser 

Edith Thompson 

George Edwards 

Keturah Stelzreide 

Clarence Drennan 

Dorothy Miller 

Ralph Edwards 

Vera Jenne 

Donald Mercer 

Marie Scates 

Dale Winter 

Dorothy Bosse 

Albert Tobnpeter 

Barbara Woolard 

Cecil Albright 

Gloria Baer 

John Watson 

Doris Miller 

. , ., c , . Harold Ore 

Dorothy Schumacher 

Harry Grothjahn 

Ethel Mae Hirstein 

George Brewer 

Helen Kriege 

Calvin Johnson 

T) . v , Helen Buesch 

Paul Yost 

Leland Grieve 

Raymond Fary 

Bernice Rongey 

James Lyerla 

Virginia Brown 

... . , Harrv Ward 

Allen Agles 

Alvin Martindale 

Russel Gullet 
Scott Gier 

Forrest Flammuth 
Arthur Baum 

Herbert Simons 
Cicero Burns 



Page Twenty-six 



^Nineteen ^hirty-ENine 



§ # S ! 





yy(cKendrean of 

H&hat Can You ^Do? 



DON'T JUST GET— GIVE. 

What's your contribution? Speak up now, let's have it. Don't 
be tin) modest or self-effacing. 

You've done a bit with youth activities of various sorts? 
Well, there's a place where M>u are needed — the Y's have a job 
waiting tor you. Everv Wednesday night, remember. 

You sing? A little? Oh, who can tell, you're young yet. Watch for the 
chorus tryouts and you might even make a quartet, who knows. 

You've dabbled a bit in debate and oratory? In that case Pi Kappa Delta 
ought to offer something for you to work toward. And do you really earn it 
when you finally arrive? 

Debate bores you but you do have a "yen" for plays? I thought you looked 
"dramatic." The Little Theatre will be after you and the first thing you know- 
there will be tryouts for plays. You may get a chance on the cast and then you'll 
have a good start toward Alpha Psi. 

Literary societies? Of course McKendree still has them. Do you think we 
would let go of anything as worthwhile as they? They are a part of our tradi- 
tion and we're strong on tradition. 

A scientific bent? I sec. Well, what about the Waggoner Science Society or 
the Nature Club as a starter, with a weather eye out for Sigma Zeta? 

Nothing scientific about you. eh? Well, just what are you aiming at.' You're 
literary-minded — oh. ves. With a slant toward journalism? Line. Have you 
investigated Sigma Tau Delta? It's another of those honorary fraternities of 
which McKendree has a chapter. Why not start working toward eligibility? 

Hut you're a budding preacher and haven't time for much, outside your 
work? Well, surely you could take time out to fellowship a bit on Tuesday after- 
noons with Sigma I '.eta Kino. 

All of this is very enlightening, you say, but what have we to offer you? 
You're athletic in your inclinations? So? Football, basketball, track, tennis, soft 
ball, soccer — take your choice, we have them all. Incidentally if you do enough 
for yourself in any. or all. of these sports you will find yourself a berth in the 
W.A.A. or the "M" Club some of these hue days. 

Is that all? Well just you try doing about a fourth of what's offered above 
and see where you find yourself. You have our word for it. time will not hang 
heavv on your hands. 



^Nineteen thirty -SNine 





yy[cKendrean of 



Cp\ Kappa c Delta 



PURPOSE 
"The stimulation of pro- 
gress in, and the promotion 
of, the interests of inter- 
collegiate orator)', debate, 
and public speaking by en- 
couraging a spirit of inter- 
collegiate fellowship." 

PUBLICATION 

"The Forensic" w It i c h 

contains information and 

news relative to national 

college forensic activities. 



( fRGANIZED 
1 ( >27. Under the direction 
of Miss Belle Nixon. 

CHAPTER 
Theta, of this national hon- 
orary forensic fraternity. 

< )FFICERS 
President— 
Roy Griebel 

Secretory-Treasurer — 

Marvin Butler 
Foe ul I v . idviser — 

Professor C. D. Hardy 




E. P. Baker, M. Butler, Miss Thoma 



R. Griebel, Dean C. D. Hardy. 



Page Thirty 



^Nineteen thirty -SNine 

^Alplxa tpsi Omega 



ORGANIZED 
1927. With .Miss ( Hive Pat- 
more i Mrs. i ». I'.. Young) 
as sponsor. 

CHAPTER 
Alpha Theta. of this na- 
tional honorary dramatic 
fraternity. 

OFFICERS 
President — 

Betty Phillips 
Secretary-Treasurer — 

Madeleine Yost 
Faculty Adviser — 

Miss Cora M. Thomas 



PURP< )SE 

"To develop dramatic talent and the art of 
acting; to cultivate a taste for the best in the 
drama; to foster the cultural values which we 
believe dramatics develops; and to unite the dra- 
matic forces of the several colleges and univer- 
sities having chapters." 

PUBLICATION 

"The Playbill" is the official publication of 
the national organization. It contains information 
concerning the selection and staging of plays. 





yy(cKendrean oj 



§igwi.a Zeta 



v 5 



PURPOSE 

"The local chapter spon- 
sors scientific efforts on the 
rani] ins, including the \\ ag- 
goner Memorial activities: 
and (iffers an annual award 
for outstanding science 
scholarship among the stu- 
dent-body. 

PUBLICATION 

"The Sigma Zetan" is the 
official publication of the 
fraternity. 

ACTIVITIES 
"( )n April 21, most of 
the active membership of 
the Beta chapter were in 
attendance at the annual 
Sigma Zeta Conclave at 
DeKalb, Illinois. Two local 
members, ( )wen Williams 
and Ralph Ruth appeared 
on the program. 



ORGANIZED 
1926. 

CHAPTER 
Beta, of this national hon- 
orary science and mathe- 
matics fraternity. 

( IFFICERS 

Master Scientist — 
I. ester Wilson 

/ 'ice Master Scientist- 
Ralph Ruth 

Recording Secretary — 
Professor S. M. McClure 




Back Row— Prof. Schmidt, R. Ruth, Dr. Spenc 
Front Row— Prof. McClure, M. Saner, I). Her 



Pa,,e Tkirty-tv 



^Nineteen ^hirty-SNine 



§igma ^dbu (Delta 



< IRGANIZED 
1936. L T nder the sponsor- 
ship of I >r. Gillian h. Steck- 
man. 

CHAPTER 
Iota Delta, of this national 
honorary literary frater- 
nity. 

< iFFICERS 
President— 
Roy Griebel 

Secretary-'! reasurer — 

I teleri Waggoner 
Facility . Idviscr — 

Dr. Marv II. Wright 



PURP( >SE 
"To encourage student-writers in any tvpe of 
writing which they may prefer. Wider reading 
mi the part nf members is encouraged together 
with a definite effort on their part toward the 
mastery of written expression." 

PUBUCATK IN 
The national publication "The Rectangle" is 
a collection of material contributed by members 
of the various chapters. This year it contained 
two poems by Ralph Grote and one bv Rov Grie- 
bel. 

ACTIVITIES 
The organization sponsored a lecture bv Carv 
Cl\de Burford on "Eugene Field, Native Poet of 
St'. Louis." 




Back Row— Dr. Yost. Dr. Wright, R. Grote. II. Hor 
Front Rou — R. Griebel, H. Waggoner, M. Randall. 



Pa,,c Thntvlln 




yy[cKendrean of 



(philosophian 

Jtiteravy Society 



PURPOSE 
As set forth by its char- 
ter members is: "To en- 
courage literary achieve- 
ment and debate." 

ACTIVITIES 
Weekly meetings are 
held. ( 'nee a month. Philo 
issues an invitation to fac- 
ulty members and students, 
not belonging to the society, 
to meet with its members in 
open session. 

NEW MEMBERS 
Robert 1 lerman. Ralph Ed- 
wards, Herbert Simons, Al- 
len Sager, Cecil Albright, 
Carrol Row e. Carlus Ras- 
inger, Scott Gier, Charles 
Briner, W a v n c Brewer, 
Raul Yost, Harold Ore. 



ORGANIZED 
1837. 

MOTTO 
"1'etur Digniori", signify- 
ing, "Ret it be given to the 
most worth)." 

OFFICERS 

New officers are elected 
every six weeks. The fol- 
lowing members have serv- 
ed as president during the 
year : 

Roy Griebel Hale Horiin 

Ralph Gro^e Carl Barton 

Sampson Piatt 




Back Row—R. Grote, E. Thilman, L. T.eeler, C. Loxve, L. Wilson. 
Front Rok—R. Griebel, C. Long, R. Allen, D. Hortin. 



Page Thirty-fo 



^Nineteen c GhiHij-SNivie 



Qlionian £,iteraru §>ocieti) 



ORGANIZED 

1 81 1. >. 

M< )TTO 
"Virtute et Lahore." 

< >FFICERS 
The roll of officers is 
changed every nine weeks, 
with the exception of the 
office of treasurer, which is 
held by Bertie Bauer. The 
presidents for the year 
u ere : 

Roberta Heyer 
Mildred Leonard 
Marv Louise Reader 



PURP< iSE 
"The improvement of its mem: 



literature an< 
vocal.'' 



1 general 
th instrumental md 



ACTIVITIES 

Besides its regular weekly closed meetings, an 
open session is held once a month to which non- 
members are invited. 

As a special feature during the past year the 
society was entertained at a dinner given by Mrs. 
W. C. P fetter. 

NEW MEMBERS 
Florence Jackson Isabel Shatter 

Mary Ruth Sowers Marion Kleinschmidt 

Marv Ruth Shelton Vera Tenne 




Buck R,m — M. Leonard. M. Yost. R. Hever. M. Davis, I 
Front Rov.'—M. Reader, A. Carson, F. Jackson, I. shark 



Page Thirty-five 




yyfcKendrean of 



T. M G. A. 



PURPOSE 
"To m () r e adequately 
meet the religious and so- 
cial needs nf the men of 
the campus." 

ACTIVITIES 
Meetings are held every 
Wednesday evening, in- 
cluding combined programs 
with the Y.W.C.A. During 
the past year, the organiza- 
tion sponsored the publica- 
tion of the "Y" handbook, 
as well as various social af- 
fairs. 



( IRGANIZED 
1897. 

CABINET 
President— 

Ralph Grote 
/ ice President — 

Carlton Barton 
Secretary — 

\\ llliam Fischer 
Publicity — 

l\o\ Griebel 

George Pimlott 
Social Chairman — 

Charles Eong 
Sponsor — 

Dean C. 1). Hardy 
Deputation — 

Allen Seibert 




nlott, R. Grote 
ton, C. Long, 



W. Fischer, I>ea 
K. Griebel, A. Se 



^Nineteen thirty -SN'ine 



Y. c m. G. A. 



ORGANIZED 
1899. 

CABINET 

President— 

Madeleine Yost 
Vice President - 

Betty Phillips 
Secretary-Treasurer — 

Florence Jackson 
Program Chairmen - 

Roberta 1 leyer 

Vera Jenne 
Chaplain — 

Mildred Leonard 

Marie Scates 
Publicity— 

Mary Lou Reader 
World Fellowship— 

Isabel Shaffer 
Social Chairman — 

Dorothv Hertenstein 



Pianist — 

Dorothy Miller 

Sponsors — 

Mrs. C. F. Kraft 
Mrs. C. R. Walls 



Room c 'hairmen— 
Dixie Dexter 
Bernice Ronge) 
Virginia Wielt 



PURP< >SE 
"We unite in the desire to realize full and 
creative life through a growing knowledge of 
God. We determine to have a part in making 
this life possible for all people. In tins task we 
seek to understand Jesus and to follow Him." 

ACTIVITIES 

Meetings are held every Wednesday evening, 
one of which, each month, is combined with the 
Y.M.C.A. 

The organization provided every freshman 
girl with a "big sister" at the beginning of the 
school year. It also sponsored a "Hobby Week," 
"Heart Sister Week," and many other social 
events. 




Back Row— IS. Rongey, B. Phillips, Mr. C. R. Watts, M. Leonard, Mrs. C. F. Kraft, II. II 

M. Yost. 
Front Roar— I. Shaffer, F. Jackson, M. Reader, D. Hertenstein. 



ge Thirty-scl-cu 




yy(cKendrean of 



§>igma tfleta c HJio 



PURPOSE 

"Tin.- hnnging together 
of ministerial students of 
the campus into a closer 
fellowship, as well as the 
promotion of mutual help- 
fulness." 

SPECIAL FEATURES 
Weekly meetings are held, 
and occasional Chapel pro- 
grams are presented. The 
Preachers' Quartet, made 
up of Charles Hill. Oliver 
Reiser. Ralph Edwards, 
and \< u s s e 1 Gullet, has 
made several appearances. 



ORGANIZED 
1931, under the sponsorship 

of Dr. W. C. Walton. 

M( iTTO 
"Service. br< itherhood, 

and religion." 

OFFICERS 

President — 

Sampson Piatt 
Vice President— 

Lloyd Barnard 
Secretary-! reasurer — 

Carlton Barton 
Program ( hairman — 

Oliver Reiser 







Back Row— O. Brakemeyer, t. Watson, I). Cramer, R. Gullet, R. Edwards, J. Henderson 

R. Tappmeyer. 
Front Row—L,. llamar.l, C. Grove, 1 >r. Kraft. K. Powell. C. Barton, C. Lowe. 



I'aye Thirty eight 



SNineteen thirty -SNine 



SNature Glub 



ORGANIZED 
1927, under sponsorship of 
Dr. E. R. Spencer. Reor- 
ganized this year. 

( (FFICERS 
President— 

( (wen Williams 

Secretary-Treasurer — 

Roberta I lever 
Faculty Sponsor — 

I >r. E. R. Spencer 



PURP< )SE 
"To study nature in its various forms ami to 
contribute to the improvement anil beautification 
of the campus." 

ACTIVITIES 
Besides the regular weekly meetings, the spe- 
cial projects of the club included the beginning of 
an outdoor stage on the back campus. The study 
and tabulation of birds, during the migration 
period, were undertaken. 




Back Ron'- II. Miller. I'. Yost, C. Lowe, R. Lang 
I.. Wilson, V. Espenscheid, E. ]!er K <lolt. 
Front Roic—C. Lowe, E. Thilman, M. Yost. 0. Wi 



:ilter. M. Sager, I:. Bauer, W. P.reuer, E. Hayde 
is, R. Heyer, Dr. Spencer, A. Carson. 



Page Thirty-nine 



yy[cKendrean of 



W 



Sy[cKejidree Ghoncs 




McKendree's musical talent, which 
has hitherto been divided into two 
clubs, the Women's and the- Men's, 
was combined this year to form the 
McKendree Chorus. Under the direct- 
or. Miss Harper, the chorus toured 
southern Illinois, giving programs in 
various churches. The schedule, which 
usually included three programs on 
Sunday, extended from February to 
Mav. ' 



< iFFICERS 
women's club 
President — Alary L. Reader. 
Business Manager — Lucille Fleet- 
man. 
Secretary-Treasurer — Bertie Bauer. 

men's club 
President — Malcom Randall. 
Business Manager — Milton Sager. 
Secretary-Treasurer — Allen Seibert. 



The oratorio. "Saint 
sohn, was presented on 
calaureate Sunday, by 
assistance of a group ( 

The personnel of the 
(',. Baer 
I >. 1 >auer 
V. Bn iwn 
A. Carson 
L. Floetman 
1 i. I lertenstein 
F. Jackson 
M.'Kleinschmidt 
M. Leonard 
!',. Phillips 
C. Raffaelle 
M. Reader 
K. Schumacher 
R. Schmedake 
S. Steidel 
K. Stelzreide 
M. Yost 
J. Upchurch 



Paul," by Mendels- 
the evening of Rac- 

the chorus with the 
f local singers. 

chorus is as follows : 
C. Basinger 
M. Butler 
J. Fizzell 
R. Grote 
R. Herman 
11. Ore 
M. Randall 
A. Sager 
M. Sager 
\ Siehert 
R. Tappmeyer 
F. Thilman 
P. Yost 
R. Gullet 
M. 1 lerman 
R. Edwards 




^Nineteen ^kirty-ENine 



Quartets 




LUCILLE FLOETMAN 

First Soprano 

FLORENCE JACKSON 
Second S<ifr<i"<-> 

DOROTHY 

SHUMACHER 

First Alto 

DOROTHY 

HERTENSTE1N 

Second .-III,: 



This year there has been an unusual demand for the services of the two 
quartets, owing to the numerous McKendree dinners and programs given through- 
nut the Southern Illinois Conference in the interest of the college. 

Other engagements of a more general nature have also been tilled by the 
ouartets or by individual members. 



MALCOM R WD \LL 
First Tenor 

ROBERT HERMAN 
Second Tenor 

MILTON SAGER 
Baritone 

ALL EX SAGER 
Bass 




Fane Forty-one 




yy[cKendrean of 



"She eiuh 



PURPOSE 
"To bind more closely together the athletes 
who make up McKendree's teams as well as 
In promote the spirit of sportsmanship and 
clean living i in the I I ill." 

ACTIVITIES 
The organization sponsored the distribu- 
tion of the green caps in the fall, as well as 
the election and presentation of the football 
queen. Miss Bertie Bauer, at the Homecoming 
name. According to custom the graduating 
members were presented with gold emblems 
by the organization. 



ORGANIZED 

1924. 

OFFICERS 

President — 

Fred Doerner 
Vice President— 

Milton Sager 
Secretary-Treasurer — 

Bernard Isselhardt 




Back Roif— J. Henderson, G. Edwards. R. Allen. 
Middle Row—O. Williams, R. Fary. R. Langenwalter, I 
Front Rou— E). Thilman. 1!. Isselhar.lt, M. Randall, M. 



Vagc Forty-tux 



^Nineteen thirty -ENine 



c (q)oi lien's ^Athletic Association 



< >RGANIZED 
1934, u n il i' r direction of 
Miss Rosalind Holm. 

( IFFIGERS 
President — 

Dorothy Hertenstein 
Vice President - 

Mary Louise Reader 
Secretary-Treasurer— 

I Jolores Cooper 



PURPOSE 
"To promote organized athletics among the 
women of the college." 

ACTIVITIES 
The "Bearkittens" basketball team played 
numerous games on the home and other floors. 
Members of the W.A.A. took an active part 
in tennis, soccer, soft-hall, volley-hall, and 
badminton. They promoted their social inter- 
ests through their sponsorship of a scavenger 
hunt, a wiener roast, and a skating party. 

AWARDS 
Letters were awarded to Florence Jackson, 
Mary Louise Reader. Dorothy Hertenstein, 
and Bertie Bauer, for points earned in speci- 
fied sports. 




V. liro.il. H. Kri«c, F. lacks, hi, I). Miller, M. Keailer, I). Hertenstein. Miss Cora M. Thomas, 1!. Bi 
M. Yost, D. Cooper, R. Schmedake, D. Dexter, D. Schumacher, B. Woolard, A. Gann. 




yY(cKendrean of 



£ittle theatre 



PURP< >SE 

"To instigate and per- 
petuate the histrionic art 
mi McKendree's Campus." 

ACTIVITIES 
This organization offers, 
Ui those interested, the op- 
portunity tn participate in 
the various phases of the- 
atrical production — from 
character portrayal to the 
managing ami directing of 
plays. Among the one-act 
plays presented under the 
sponsorship of the organi- 
zation, were : 

•The Florist Shop": 
"lie" : "Pink and Patches" ; 
and "The Little Fool". 

These were directed by 
Roy Griebel, Roger Tapp- 
meyer, .Madeleine Yost, and 
l'.ertie Bauer. 



ORGANIZED 
1 ( >,U. under the direction of 
Miss Rosalind fiohn. 

( >FFICERS 
President— 
Betty Phillips 

Vice President — 

Madeleine Yost 
Secretory-Treasurer — 

Milton Sager 




Back Rou—M. Randall RGreibel, M.Sager, H Ore H S ™°^ uer H Waggone r, R. Heyer, R.Herman. 

i r, i a . u .- ■ \ s-urr-r T. I\oiiL. r ev I > I >c\U-r. Miss L nomas, i >■ i>iut. i , n. ** ".'•^"" V, 1 ■ * , J ' ,, ., 

S'^^LKtaLIlKail.r.,,*,,, J. Upchurch, B. Phillips, R. Schmedake, M. Yost, G. Baer. 



Page Forty-fa 



^Nineteen ^kirty-SNine 




Page Forty fir 




yyfcKendrean of 



football Squad 



Faced with innumerable injuries and handicaps, the Bearcats fought 
their way through the heaviest schedule ever played by a McKendree team. 
Playing against some of the top-notch teams in the country, the Purple and 
White are to he admired for their courageous battles against overwhelming 
odds. 

Co-Capt. Randall. Greenwood, tsselhardt, Harmon. Grothjahn, Butler, 
ami Edwards, were all lost to the team, at various times during the season, 
because of injuries. Their absence undoubtedly hurt the Purple in both 
morale and man pi i\\ er. 

The highlight of the season was the Bearcats' intersectional game with 
the nationally known St. Mary's Rattlers in San Antonio. Texas. Realizing 
that they were in "big time" football, the Purple put up a great game, 
standing oft the powerful St. Mary's gridders time after time, in gallant 
goal-line stands. The 1'urple clicked offensively only once during the season, 
when they swept Principia before them with a devastating ground and aerial 
attack. This game marked most of the McKendree scoring for the year, 
rolling up 33 points as against 6 for Principia. The Bearcats, under the 
tutelage of Coach Herb Could, dropped only one home game during the 
year. This was lost to Shurtleff. traditional rival, in a hard-fought contest. 

Co-Captains Randall and Doerner, and Hen Isselhardt are the only men 
who will be lost to next year's team, leaving via the sheepskin route. Despite 
the loss of these three veterans, the VhV) McKendree team should go places, 
with a host of young, but experienced men returning. 




^Nineteen thirty -SNine 



football Queen 

hi a ceremony before the Homecom- 
ing game, Miss Bertie Bauer, popular 
junior from Bunker Mill, was named 
football queen for 1938 by the retiring 
queen, Miss Geraldine Gibson. 

Miss Bauer is very active in extra- 
curricular activities on the campus and 
is the third queen to reign over the 
I lomecoming festivities. 




L ljhe homecoming Game 

Ami may not remember me, but I was the chap who sat as close to the fifty 
yard line as possible without crowding Prof. Watts, h was a cloudy day. I 
remember that I prayed for no "precipitation." Alas, my prayers seemed in vain 
for a time. Before we had made our first touchdown i which was in the first few 
seconds of play), we had a sprinkle. My petitions must not have Keen entirely 
disregarded, however, for before the game had progressed into the fifth minute of 
play the shower was over. A sharp, cold wind blew, making me shiver inside my 
suit coat. 

I suppose this chatter about the weather doesn't interest you, hut I can't help 
thinking that the game would have been rather uninteresting if there had been just 
one of us watching it. The spirit of the day caught at us and those cheer leaders 
surely did nothing to dampen that spirit. Since I'm a freshman this year, you can 
he sure I'm proud that one of them was a member of our class. < )f course. I just 
mention this in a general way because my girl was with me and if she reads this 
I wouldn't want her to get any peculiar ideas. 

Well, we won the game by a big margin — 33 to 6, I think. All in all, it was 
a grand homecoming game. 

lunior de Coverley 




yy(cKendrean oj 



(Jootball JEettermen 




Doerner 



Mens 



Edwards 



First Row 

Gould* 



Second Row 



Sager 



Third Row 



I'.utler 



Fourth Row 



Martin 



Fifth Row 



Ward 



Randall 



Handlon 



Simons 



Fary 



"Herbert B. Gould 

Coach of Football 
P..S. University of Illinois, 1934 
Postgraduate Work. University 
of Illinois, 1937-38 



Page Forty-eight 



^Nineteen thirty -SNine 



CO-CAPTAIX FRED DOERNER, Senior 

St. Louis. Tackle; Three Year Letterman. 
'"Bull" will leave a vacancy in the Purple line that 
will be felt. He leaves via the sheepskin route, and 
will take with him a great deal of the effectiveness of 
the Bearcat line. Big and strong, he proved a mainstay 
in the forward wall all season. He was a hard charger 
011 offense, a pile driver on defense, and could always 
he counted on to he right in the thick of things. His 
best game of the season was against St. Marx's when 
he stopped the vaunted running attack of the Rattlers, 
time after lime. The going of Bull (and his senior 
partner) will tear a huge hole in the right side of the 
line which will he hard to mend. 

CO-CAPTAIN MALCOM RANDALL. Senior 

East St. Louis. Guard; Four Year Letterman. 
Mai will undoubtedly go down among McKendree's 
grid immortals. He was the only four year letterman 
on the squad. Although being one of the smallest men 
in the "Little 19", this watch charm guard set a new 
McKendree record for consecutive play. Hampered by 
an injured back suffered in the Eureka game, Randall 
came hack, despite doctor's orders, and played bang-up 
ball for McKendree, closing his gridiron career with 
a great game against Washington U. Mai made up for 
his lack of size with his speed, aggressiveness, and 
heady play. He will be a hard man to replace, and will 
be sorely missed by the Bearcats next year. 

J( >HN HARMON, Junior 

Lebanon. Tackle; Two Year Letterman. 
"Ace" was a powerhouse in the line this year. Al- 
though he was shifted in the line at various times, he 
was very effective at any position he played. His big 
games were St. Mary's and Shurtleff. Time after time 
he tore through the line at San Antonio to break up 
plays. "Ace" is a quiet type of player, but makes his 
presence felt by his vicious tackling. 

MILTON SACxER, Junior 

Ml. Vernon. Center; Two Year Letterman. 
"Milt's" size and experience made him a valuable man 
in the Purple line. He was efficient in opening holes 
in the line, and was pretty difficult to get around w-hen 
plays came his way. He showed his versatility in the 
Shurtleff game when he was sent in cold to take over 
an end post. He immediately began stopping plays 
with his slashing tactics and was soon turning plays in 
toward the center of the line. 

GEORGE HANDLON, Junior 

Edwardsville. Guard ; Two Year Letterman. 
^ "Roughhouse" lived up to his name again this year. 
George's greatest delight was to smash through the line 
and break up plays. An aggressive player" Handlon 
made all of his games count. Probably his best game 
of the year was the Homecoming game. George will 
be a big help in forming next year's team, and should 
make his final year his best. 

KELLEY SIMMOXS, Junior 

W 1 Ri\er. Halfback; Two Year Letterman. 

Kelley was the Purple and White's best passer. When 
the yardage was needed, "Kels" came through with his 
flashy running. Although light, Kelley carried the pig- 
skin for many gains. His clever running and passing 
will carry him right into the hearts of McKendree fans 
next vcar. 



MARYIX BL'TLER. Junior 

East St. Louis. Halfback; Two Year Letterman. 
Despite the fact that "Marv" was in on a great many 
tackles, he was always the first man back in his posi- 
tion waiting for the play. He didn't carry the ball very 
often, but he paved the way for a great deal of the 
McKendree yardage. "Marv" showed his courage 
throughout his stay in the hospital, due to a broken arm 
suffered in the Washington I*. game. 

HERB SIMONS, Freshman 

Edwardsville. End ; First Year Letterman. 
Herb came to McKendree with a good reputation as 
a football player, and lived up to it. Although never 
having played end, when shifted to that position, he 
proved his mettle by his light ami "never say die" spirit. 
He should be valuable to next year's team. 

BRUCE MENG, Freshman 

East St. Louis. Tackle; First Year Letterman. 
Meng, fresh from honors in high school, came to Mc- 
Kendree to try his hand at college ball. He was the 
biggest man on the squad ami was very effective at 

stopping smashes into the line. 

ARTHUR MARTIN, Junior 

Cypress. End; Two Year Letterman. 
Art was shifted from the backfield to end, and came 
through in fine style, playing bang-up ball in that posi- 
tion. He was tough and aggressive, a combination that 
made it hard to get around him. Art had the honor of 
scoring McKendree's first touchdown of the season, 
when he carried the ball over, against Eureka. 

RAYMOND FARY, Freshman 

Seabright, Xew Jersey. Center; First Year Letter- 
man. 
Little was known of Ray at the first of the season, 
but his presence was soon felt, after a few scrimmages. 
His specialty was snapping the ball back with speed and 
accuracy. Ray gained valuable experience in his first 
year and should be heard from later. 

GEORGE EDWARDS. Freshman 

East St. Louis. Quarterback; First Year Letterman. 
When a loud thud was heard on the field, it was 
known that Buddy had made another of his clean blocks 
or tackles. As a blocker Buddy stands in a class by 
himself. He scored two touchdowns against Principia, 
and made several beautiful returns of kick-offs against 
Washington U. Edwards has three years of school 
ahead of him, anil McKendree fans will be assured of 
a reliable quarterback for some time. 

HARRY WARD, Freshman 

Granite City. Halfback; First Year Letterman. 
One of the hardest runners on the squad, "Roz" tore 
off several dazzling runs in the Eureka game. His love 
lor the game made him an outstanding player in the 
Purple lineup. His powerful driving and determination 
will no doubt win him a berth on next year's gridiron 
machine. 

HARRY STII.WELL, Freshman 

Madison, Xew Jersey (no picture). 
Fullback; First Year Letterman. 
Harry was the fastest back on the squad and showed 
his heels to opponents on numerous runs. He was also 
very adept at catching passes and set up several Mc- 
Kendree touchdowns with his brilliant catches. His 
longest run was sixty yards for a touchdown, through 
a broken field, against Principia. 



Page Forty-nine 




yy(cKendrean of 



basketball Q^quad 

The McKendree cagers turned in one of their must successful seasons 
in recent years, winning eleven and dropping four. Two of these games 
were dropped by one-point margins, and a third was lost to Washington 
University in the first game of the season. In this contest the Purple gave 
the highly-touted Hears all they asked for, and bowed only in the last few 
minutes of play after a see-saw game. 

The team was weakened somewhat at the end of the first semester by 
the loss of Co-Captain Roy Jaeckel, who finished at mid-year. 

The Bearcats kept their home slate for the 1938-39 season clean, win- 
ning every home encounter, several of these by top-heavy scores. 

Coach Henderson used very few men throughout the season, the six 
who lettered bearing the brunt of the McKendree attack. John "Ace" 
Harmon, big center, was lost for the last two games of the season due to 
a streptococcic infection. His absence, no doubt, had a great deal to do 
with the loss of the Eureka game. 

With all lettermen and all reserves, except Isselhardt and Doerner, 
coming back, the Bearcats should have another strong team next year. 



Bach Row—'R. Grouse, J. !,„>-. H. Ward, F. Doerner, I'.. Isselhardt, Coach Henderson. 

Front Rou^S. Donham, J. Henderson, C. Mueth, D. Ward. It. Stilwell, 11. Greenwood, P. Flamuth. 




Page Fifty 



^Nineteen %liirty-SNine 

(Basketball £ettermen 




D. WARD II. ST1LWKLL 




C. MUETH T. HENDERSON' 




J. HARMON B. GREENWOOD 




OY JAECKEL (No picture) 




New Athens. Forward. 




"Cappy", one of the- greatest basketball players ever to 
Purple uniform, ended bis successful cage career in 
-ar. He was a varsity man fo.- four years, and was re 
zed as an outstanding player by his mates. They gave 
i honor which is very seldom accorded any McKendree 
te — that of captaining the cagers for two years. The a 
extrous star was chosen bv the St. Louis newspapers as 
itstanding player in the Washington U.-McKendre : g; 
oy's best performance of last season. He was sorely mi 
uring the last half of the past season, and will be mi 


don 
nid- 
:og- 
liiu 
nil. 
,.bi- 

: 

,scd 
=-ed 


or years to come. 




hogc Fifty-one 





CO-CAPT. DON WARD, Sophomore 

Collinsville. Guard; Two Year Letterman. 
\ good defensive man, a dead-eye long shot, ami a good passer: 
this ( k-scnl.es Don Ward, leader of the cage squad for the second 
semester. As a freshman, Don could be counted on to do his share 
of the defensive work, but never liroke into the scoring column a 
yreat deal. This year he surprised everyone by coming up with a 
new-found scoring ability. In several games he led the Bearcats in 
scoring, and always came through with a few of his special 'swish 
shots from the center. He demonstrated that he was equally ef- 
fective with both hands. He was especially "hot" in the Principia 
game. "Slick" was a cool-headed leader in tight spots and made a 
good captain throughout the season. 

HARRY STILWELL, Freshman 

Madison, X. 1. Forward; One Year Letterman. 
Harry gained renown when he set a new scoring record for 

McKendree College in the Oakland City game. He came to scl 1 

with a thorough knowledge of the game itself, and demonstrate.! 
that he Could put this knowledge to use. Harry was a good passer, 
and was equally good at connecting for points. He led the scorers 
lor the year. Three more years of caging are ahead of the blonde 
star from the east coast. 

CI I \RI.KS MUETH, Freshman 

Mascoutah. Forward; One Year Letterman. 
"Chuck" was always one of the tallest men on the floor, and 
his one-handed pivot shots could hardly lie stopped. He led the 
scorers in the first games of the season. His favorite shot was a 
one-handed flip from behind the foul circle, and it seemed that when 
"Chuck" got hot, the entire team followed suit. The slim Mascou- 
tahan was verv fast at getting hack on defense, and his long arms re- 
trieved the hall for the Purple many times. He will undoubtedly 
he of value to McKendree for his remaining three years. 

fOHN HENDERSON, Junior 

Thebes. Guard; Two Year Letterman. 
"lumbo" was exceptionally handy at rebounding, and tune after 
time "recovered the hall from the backboard when the Bearcats 
needed possession of the sphere. He was always good for one or 
two long shots from the center of the floor in every game, hut his 
outstanding work was turned in on defense. Henderson was a 
steady man to have as hack guard, hut his easy-going manner cov- 
ered up a scrappv, fighting spirit. The McKendree cage fans will 
look forward to the services of the fighting minister next year. 

lOHN "ACE" HARMON, Junior 

Lebanon. Center; Three Year Letterman. 
"Ace" was the oldest man in the point of service on the squad. 
A good rebounder, a strong defensive man, and a heady basketball 
player, he proved to be a very valuable man. He didn't often talk 
about his deeds, but his presence was always felt. "Silent Ace" 
could often be heard giving himself a good tongue-lashing on the 
court when he missed one of his favorite pivot shots. He gave the 
appearance of being a slow, easy-going player, but he was always 
there when he was" supposed to be. A streptococcic infection laid 
him low toward the end of the season, and his loss was felt keenly 
by the liearcats. Harmon is one of the few men who can handle 
one hand as well as the other, and should prove invaluable to the 
Purple team next year. 

BART GREENWOOD, Sophomore 

West Frankfort. Guard; One Year Letterman. 
Bart saw^ the greatest part of his service after Roy Jaeckel fin- 
ished in mid-year. He broke into the starting lineup, and became 
one of the steadiest men on the floor. He could always be trusted 
with the ball when the Purple was on the offensive, and was a men- 
ace to the enemy when they had the ball. Bart's steady plugging 
on the second team brought him his just deserts. He will be back 
for two more years on the McKendree cage squad. 




yy[cKendrean of 



^Srack §quad 



With twelve lettermen returning for the 1939 track season, a strong 
nucleus was provided for the Purple and White thinclad squad. The return- 
ing lettermen were Captain John Harmon, junior javelin thrower; Mai 
Randall, senior dash man; Bob Langenwalter, junior miler; George Hand- 
Ion, junior pole vaulter and high hurdler; Fred Doerner, senior shot putter; 
Eddie Thilman, sophomore dash man; Bart Greenwood, sophomore quarter 
miler; Don Ward, sophomore pole vaulter and javelin thrower: Charles 
Long, sophomore weight man; Roy Griebel, senior miler; Owen Williams, 
junior broad jumper; and Boh Allen, sophomore broad jumper. 

Coach A. K. Henderson was blessed with a promising crop of freshmen 
recruits. Among them were Hubert Smith. Harry Stilwell, CharTes Mueth, 
Harry Grothjahn, Harry Ward, Curt Taylor, and George Edwards. 

The Bearcats competed in only three meets last season because of in- 
clement weather, but emerged victorious in one. the opening meet with 
Principia College. They were nosed out in a pair of quadrangulars. 



1939 TRACK SCHEDULE 

April 29 — Principia, at Elsah. 

May fi — Concordia, at St. Louis. 

May 13 — Quadrangular meet; Principia, Blackburn, Shurtleff, and Mc- 
Kendree, at Lebanon. 

May 20 — Triangular meet: Blackburn, Shurtleff, McKendree, at 
Lebanon. 




Back 


Row— 


i ... 


ch 


Hei 


dcr 


son. 


A. 


Vgles. G. F 


Middl 


'. Row 


II 


s 


Tiitl 


. C 


\!l, 


igh 


, C. Johns 


Front 


Row- 


i 


Lc 




S. 


Gier 


R. 


Langenwa 



,-ards. C. Long, R. Allen. L. Grieve. A. Seibert. 
O. Williams. C. Taylor, R. Griebel. C. Mueth. H. Stilwell. 
r, M. Sager, R. Crouse, H. Grothjahn, A. Johnpeter. 



^Nineteen thirty -SJVine 



yy(inor Sports 



VARSITY SOFTBALL 

The Bearcats' Softball team closed last season with only one defeat to mar 
their record. Must of their opponents were trounced by top-heavy scores, the 
only loss being the powerful Concordia team from St. Louis. 

With a number of men returning from last year's championship team, Coach 
Henderson was able to place an excellent team on the field. Those returning from 
last year included Mai Randall, Don Ward, Benny Isselhardt, Bob Allen, Roy 
Griebel, George Handlon. Fred Doerner. John Harmon, and Charles Long. This 
group, supplemented by Bud Edwards, Hubert Smith, Harry Grothjahn, Harry 
Stilwell. and Tubbv Grieve from the Freshmen, made it possible for McKendree 
to come through again with a verv successful season. 



IXTRAMURALS 

The intramural tournament proved very interesting again this vear with the 
basketball league taking the limelight. The Rover Boys, who suffered only one 
defeat, won the title in a closely-contested tourney. Other teams entered were the 
Elites. Jitterbugs, and Philo. 

Volleyball was introduced for the first time with the Violets emerging vic- 
torious. Four other teams, the Rover Boys, Roomy Club, Reefers, and the Xub- 
Xubbers participated. 



Page Fifty-three 




[ere we live, ramble, study, and think out highest thoughts 



Page Fifty-four 




And here we rove, frolic, and go places. 



Page Fifty-five 



yy[cKendrean oj 



iic (5ke SNoiseless ^Jfoot of ^ime 
Steals §wiftly ^By" 



Sunday — the eleventh of September. . . . The expanse of trees and old brick 
buildings, asleep in the late summer sunshine, suddenly awakes. Up the Hill come 
cars, cars, and more cars. ... A few Seniors, a few more Sophomores, a number 
,,f Juniors — and all those Freshmen, gazing, wide-eyed! Sunday Night — and a 
hit of them are already homesick; but church helps, and so do numbers. . . . Next 
day they will be too busy in their first encounter with those long white cards to 
feel lonely. It's a serious matter for them this time. . . . "Which course do you 
think would do me the must good, professor?" . . . When the experienced upper- 
classman's turn comes it's, "Sorry, prof. 1 can't take that one. It comes at 7:40." 
Tuesday evening belongs to the women and their pajama array. Clark Hall 
is in a cordial and informal mood, what with everyone calling names. To be sure 
they all get stuck on "Keturah Stelzriede". but it's a pretty name and it won't be 
long until it's a familiar one. "You know," says one of the girls, "this is our 
lucky year. Carnegie Hall has us outnumbered two to one." . . . Brrrr— imagine 
such a chilly day for September! But it's just right for a bonfire back of Hypes 
Field. Fine for the girls too: they can wear their new fall 
suits for the first time. By twilight the flames have died 
down to a glow— -for roasting the wieners. What's Dr. 
Yost doing with so many? He says they're for someone 
else. Are they? . . . Such a gorgeous night to end so 
prosaically at dawn with alarm clocks and bugles. Thurs- 
day morning means business, and on the very first day 
the Freshman attitude alters. Next semester, he too will 
be saving, "No, thanks. Xo 7 :40's for me." . . . This 
night, in brightly-lighted 1'earson's Hall, is different, be- 
cause the "Y's" intend for everyone to be gay! Xo sophis- 
tication, no dignity needed to make the dramatization of Poor Richard's Almanac 
a success! The star? Well, there are arguments. Table Xine's is the loudest. 
Five davs of aimless wandering, and then — a leader — that tall, dark 




^Nineteen thirty -SNine 



jfi " £ 1 



silent fellow, Roy Jaeckel. . . . Five days since the Mixer and then another eve- 
ning of a still different sort. President Yost's home is softly lighted tonight, 
for the annual reception, and five young ladies stand around the punch howl, 
serving the dignified guests. This year there are 
lour new-comers in the faculty receiving line — 
1 lady and three gentlemen. "That line, freshman, 
is to introduce you, and your kind, to the profes- 
sors." As if you didn't know all about them by 
this time — at least as far as their taste for apples 
is concerned. 

The air is full of song! So many want to 
please Miss Harper — and in the background 
looms the new "Bearcat Special." From the __ 

chapel windows float La-Lalala's and Hallelu- 
jahs. . . . Vet it isn't the glee clubs, but the football team that initiates 
new bus on their three hundred mile trip. And word is brought back that North 
Central sighed with envy. . . . Three days later— the bus is again in use. 
Another campfire, and. this time, steaks to fry. . . . Odors of burnt meat 
and coffee on the warm, dark air. and the remarkable conversation of professors 
forgetting their classrooms. ( >nly their families hear, and they won't tell. 
Then another party — a quiet one, with all the youngest children of the school 
attending. A few of the elders try to crash the affair — too late. The food is gone, 
if there was any food. Was there? ? 




J^ 



the 



OCTOPER. A great month this year because winter is slow in starting on 
his rounds. Not even his footsteps are heard as yet. . . . Those youngsters 
again! The snappiest show in years is theirs — with just the right mixture of 
comedy, song and romance. Here are the seven dwarfs, Elea- 
nor Powell with a jumping-rope, the Inquiring Reporter — and 
shades of Gene Tunnev ! . . . The great day is drawing 
near. You can tell by preparations on the stage, on the foot- 
ball field, in the dormitories. Finally, the day before — Octo- 
ber 21 — finds the Hill overrun with hoboes. The intellectuals 
have retreated for a day. What a motley bunch of tramps, 
with a king whose ensemble might have come fresh from the 

swanky pages of Esquire \ bright, clear sky greets 

Homecoming Daw < >ld grads wend their way to the chapel 




y^cKendrean of 



for th 


e fir 


which 


tin- 


Now 


t's i 




;t program, and at two o'clock Hypes Field is a riot of color — for 
ladies alone are not responsible. See that bright purple Stetson? 
n "Snuffy" Williams — now it's on Dr. Yost. The game is won. of 
course. What team wouldn't win with such a lovely queen to 
lead them as Bertie Bauer? . . . Now the scene shifts to 
the chapel. Another crowd, another hit to go down on the 
McKendree records. It's late at night before the dormitory 
lights signal the "end of a perfect day." On the heels of 
Homecoming the "Bearcat Special" loads for Texas, leaving 
the co-eds to a week of boredom. The team returns defeated 
but bursting with glorious descriptions of the sunny south 
— and the senoritas. 



\( IVEMBER. "Soon be time for a new floor covering." 
says .Mother Earth. .Meantime the trees are sacrificing their 
apparel to provide a temporary carpet, while their own bare limbs are left shiver- 
ing against the darkening sky. . . . Startling news! One day a small group 
of sociologists make a tour of the Federal Reserve Bank, and the next week 
they are transported to the penitentiary at Chester. Many men before them have 
made this trip from bank to jail, but few of them have returned home as quickly 
as Professor Watt's crew. Not all of them have had a "Bearcat Special." . . . 

The enchanting music of Schubert at the American— "Serenade, Phe Lonely 

Heart," "Moment Musicale." ... At Bunge's— "F.D.R. Jones." . . . First 
appearance of that great piano team, Schatz and Vogel. Their "Night and Day" 
keeps everyone leaning forward in lus seat. . . . Suddenly the Hill settles 
down to sleep, as the Thanksgiving exodus toward 
home begins. This time it's just a sample of what will 
come later. 

DECEMBER. A short month, but one crowded 
with activities. . . . "Marie Antoinette" here at 
last — McKendreans turning out in full force. . . . 
Then there's the Christmas play, with Gloria and 
George making their debut together, while the McKen- 
dree Chorus provides the music. A new development! 




Page Fifty-eight 



^Nineteen ^hirtij-SNine 



This year the Hill has acquired several radio-minded young men, so they're 

getting together to put McKendree on the air, by short wave station. 

And all the time the < Mil Saint's day is coming closer ami closer. Packing begins. 

The first to leave are often the first to return. Some 

are anxiously awaiting the signal to start — others 

are nut. depending, you know, mi circumstances. 

Mere it is- the sixteenth! Little by little the Mill 

drops into midwinter slumber. Sunday morning is 

quiet, and church seems almost deserted. 




•W.'.w.PArjv.v.swyMvX 



It's JANUARY. l'MQ! Life trickles back to 
the campus toward evening and Monday is as busy 
as if nothing had interrupted the usual routine. . . 
. . Now the foresighted ones begin to look ahead 
toward the end of the semester. It's time to 
S-t-u-d-y-! . . . Another queen is here — this 

time. "Victoria the Great," a beautifully filmed romance but very few IVIcKen- 
dreans present. . . . Plenty of them riding the "Special" over to Temple 
Israel with all enjoying it thoroughly — again basing the privilege of hearing 
Rabbi Lsserman and being shown over the Temple. . . . Dynamic Gertrude 
Lawrence at the American. Playgoers from the Mill cross the bridge to St. Louis 
to find "Standing Room ( )nly" for those whose tickets were not purchased some 
time ahead. "Which foot are you standing on now?" "Tired? ( >r. are you too 
thrilled to notice?" . . . "It's over! Could you believe we have been stand- 
ing three hours ?" 

They come with a rush, those exams! Three hours with this one, two 
hours with that. "Will you love me just as well if 1 think?" "If 1 am study- 
ing when you come in tonight, waken me. will you?" And the midnight oil 
burns on. 



It's FEBRUARY now and the white cards are all tilled out again. "I'm 
terribly worried about finding a major. Imagine taking that many hours of 
anything!" . . . Right now there's no activity to speak of on the campus. 
All the good boys and girls are attending the special services at the church, but 
some of the bad ones steal off to skate around the Crystal Rink in St. Louis. 
. . . On a certain Tuesday night the campus is a veritable fairyland as viewed 



yy(cKendrean of 




by the lights as they gleam softly here and there. Early the next morning the 
glamour has disappeared, carried before the whim of a warm wind. . . . Roy 
Taeckel has finished his work as presiding officer and Roy Griebel is called to 
take his place. . . . "Have you seen the glee 
club dresses? They're the smartest ones the girls 
have had for years. Black, with little white col- 
lars." Now the bus belongs to the singers as well 
as to the athletes. And now also begin those long 
trips that end around midnight. But they're fun. 
Good! that piano team is back again — this 
time for a real evening's recital. There's a good 
representation from the football team seated right 
up on the front row along with Prof. Klein- 
schmidt's protegees, "So's not to miss anything." 
They like to watch the girls' hands lly over the 
keys as well as to hear their special arrangements of "Donkey's Serenade and 
"Chloe." . . . The athletes of the Hill "hog the limelight" at the annual foot- 
ball banquet. The crowd is glad to Hear Dr. Harmon again and to welcome 
Johnny Harmon as the new track and football captain. Thus another MARCH 
is ushered in and SPRING brings with her a new green rug for the campus. 
Down in the prop room the hammer sounds continually, which warns 
that before long two ladies will be sitting in the little blue and white room on 
Quality Street, drinking tea as they wait for Mr. Valentine Brown to come and 
propose. . . . How in the world does a person manage his wardrobe? No 
sooner are the overcoats wrapped up in mothballs than they're dragged out 
again by a cold north wind, which, in turn, is chased away by a balmy spring 
breeze that sends us scuttling for the said moth balls again, 
that if she were elected, she'd hang the mercury very high, 
where the frost couldn't get at it. but now that she's in 
office- what's a promise? . . . Anyway, Mr. Brown 
has finally arrived at Quality Street, but it's taking him a 
long time to propose. . . . Oh, horrors! Editor Ran- 
dall and his staff have published the most atrocious lot of 
stuff! So April's government is going to be one of graft! 
At least, she pays for it with a vacation for everyone. The 
students wake, the Hill goes to sleep, and the beauticians 
get busy on the chapel. 



APRIL promised 




^Nineteen thirty -SNine 



Did you make the most of your seven extra days? The last few weeks are 
going to take all the energy you have, and they're going past you with a rush. 
Here they are! Play practice, track practice, study! Study, track practice, play 
practice! . . . Lovely Roberta Heyer en- 
chances the MAY FETE. . . . the Seniors 
do their bit of entertaining. . . . Exams! 
Term papers ! Last-minute reports ! ! ! 




MF'jLr^ 



JLXE and suddenly, it's all over. The 
Hill makes one last twirl, and then the lines 
of black-gowned figures march slowly up the 

walk into the chapel, and a bit later out again — down the walk, through the 
Centennial Gate — and away. A brooding silence settles over the Hill as the 
"Good byes" die out of the evening air. Slowly, reluctantly perhaps, she relaxes 
into another of her long summer naps to await September's clarion call. 





yy[cKendrean oj 



°(Q)e (Review the (Drama 



The loss of publicity for McKendree's dramatic activities through the 
discontinuance of the Players group was off-set to a very great extent by 
a number of excellent productions presented during this year. 

The Homecoming play. "Adam and Eva," by Guy Bolton and George 
Middleton, with its ultra-modern theme and its clever lines, drew many 
laughs from a large and responsive audience. Considerable ingenuity was 
evidenced in the rather pretentious settings produced in the local workshop. 

In sharp contrast with this first major production dealing with our 
present-day hectic way of life was the spring presentation, "Quality Street." 
Like all of Barrie's plays it is an artistic, winsomely charming thing whose 



l l«*W»1 




M. Kleinschmidt, F. Jackson, I. Shaffer, P.. H 



Woolard, D. Mille 



t'age Sixty twe 



^Nineteen ^hiHy-ENine 



little old maids clutch at the heartstrings and the funny-bone at the same time. 
Costumes were perfect. .Miss Thomas confessed that she was first attracted to 
the play by the little Napoleonic-era pattens that carried the ladies over the 
muddy streets. To Miss Thomas and her Play Production class goes the credit 
for the charming settings. "Quality Street" required scenery that was not in 
the prop room so the "dramatists" went to work and made it. 

AND MEET THE CASTS 

"ADAM AND EVA" 

By Guy Bolton and George Middleton 

Eva Kins: Marion Kkinschmi.lt 

Adam Smith Charles Long 

Janus Kins Harold Shipp 

Aunt Al.l.y Rocker IVttv 1'lnllips 

Horace Pilgrim Milton Sager 

Julie De Witt fane Upchurch 

Clinton l)e Witt Harold Orr 

Corinthia isabel Shaffer 

I >r. Jack 1 >elameter Charles Briner 

Lord Andrew lion Ion George Flesor 

"QUALITY STREET" 
By James M. Barrie 

Miss Willoughby Madeleine Yost 

Miss Fanny Willoughby Dorothy Miller 

Miss Henrietta TurnbuH Barbara Woolard 

Miss Susan Throssel Mary Ruth Sowers 

Phoebe Throssel Isabel Shaffer 

Recruiting Sergeant Roy Griebel 

Patty Doris Miller 

\i ilmr Wellington Thompson Ralph Kamm 

Isabella \ nlla L ois Gann 

\ alentine Brown Robert Herman 

Ensign Blades Herbie Simons 

Lieutenant Spicer \rtlmr Baum 

Charlotte Parratt Marion Kleinschmidt 

Harriet Florence Jackson 

The activities of the Little Theatre and the Play Production class were so 
closely intermingled this year as to be almost indistinguishable. Suffice it to say 
that, due to the combined efforts of the two, a Christmas play and some seven 
or eight one-act plays in the spring constituted the year's dramatic offering. 

"In the Light of the Star." one-act Christmas play, directed by Betty Mae 
Phillips, depended for dramatic effects upon a combination of acting, panto- 
mime, music and lighting. 

Because the Play Production class was larger than usual this year, one-net 
plays were rather prevalent during the spring. Most of them were the first 
efforts of their student directors, and, as such, were exceptionally well done. 



Pane Sixty-three 



yy[cKendrean of 



Senior Glass ©ay (program 

MAY 9th, CHAPEL 
Chairman — Mary Louise Reader 

1 'relude — Geraldine Gibson 

Invocation — Commodore Grove 

Welci ime — Lester Wilson 

Reading — Roy Griebel 

Class History— Dale Hortin 

Music — Girls' Quartet 

Poem— Roberta Heyer 

Talk— Ralph Grote 

Solo — Malcom Randall 

Presentation of the Gavel — Pred Doerner 

Response by Junior President— William Fischer 

Class Prophecy — Ralph Ruth 

Class Will— Allen Seibert 

"Alma Mater" — Assembly 



^3ree ^Dedication 

Invocation — Sampson Piatt 
Reading — Ralph Grote 
Music — Men's Quartet 
Remarks — Dr. P. R. Spencer 
Address — Prof. C. D. Hardy 
1 ledication — Fred Doerner 
Benediction — William Collins 
"Alma Mater" — Assembly 



Sixty-four 



^Nineteen thirty -SNine 




jY(ay Queen 



R< >BERTA 11EYER 



Not because she is a student, an active Clionian, and a charming person- 
ality, although she is all of these, but rather because she seemed to typify (lie 
true spirit that we would have emanate fnmi our Mill, Roberta was chosen May 
Queen by the student body of McKendree. 

Roberta I lever, of Clay City, lias been the friend of everyone on the 
campus. 

We have shown our esteem for her by bestowing upon her a visible crown, 
but we know that she goes "From This Old Mill" wearing a crown which we 
could not give her. hut which, certainly, no one can take from her. 



Cpatron £ist 



MR. !1. P. BARNES 
Harrisburg, Illinois 

MR. WALTER BEGUELIN 
Caseyville, Illinois 

MR. F. A. BEHYMER 
St. Louis Post Dispatch 
Lebanon, Illinois 

MR. CLIFF( »RD C. BROWN 
Field Representative 
McKendree College 
Lebanon, Illinois 

DR. HARRY C. BROWN 

First Methodist Church 

Alton. Illinois 

MR. KENNETH PAUL BROWN 
Field Agent 
Methodist ( >rphange 
Mt. Vernon, Illinois 

AIR. CHARLES B. CARROLL 
4935 Page Avenue 

St. Louis, Missouri 

IK >N. CHARLES S. DENEEN 
Attorney 
Chicago, Illinois 

MR. WILSON C. DORRIES 
Supt. Public Schools 
Rainier, Illinois 

MR. W. R. D< )RRIS 
( )'Fallon, Illinois 

PROF. AND MRS. L.J. EAST 
Lebanon, Illinois 

IK )N. RALE FARTHING 
7 Public Square 
Belleville, Illinois 

MR. CYRUS S. GENTRY 
50 West 50th Street 
New York. New York 

MR. |< >SEPH GUAND< >LA 
1350 Jarvis Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 

MISS HELEN HANDEL 
Teacher 
Granite City, Illinois 



REV. FRANK E. HARRIS 
I listrict Superintendent 
( >lney 1 )istrict 
Law renceville, Illinois 

MR. GEORGE W. HOCAN, JR. 
Attorney-at-Law 
Count)' Judge 
McLeansboro, Illinois 

REV. R< >Y N. KEAN 
First Methodist Church 
I [arrisburg, Illinois 

DR. V. T. McKEE 
I )entist 
Lebanon. Illinois 

MR. J< >HN OPPITZ 

Editor of New Baden News 

Lebanon. Illinois 
MR. WILLIAM D. SANDERS 

Teacher 

Crossville, Illinois 

MR. LER< >Y R. SCHMIDT 

Assistant County Superintendent 
of Schools 
Lebanon. Illinois 

REV. C. E. SISNEY 

Kansas Avenue Methodist Church 
Topeka, Kansas 

MRS. RUBY RICE SMITH 

Newman, Illinois 
IK >N. FRED J. TECKLENBURG 

Attorney 

Belleville, Illinois 

DR. AND MRS. A.L.WEBER 
404 North Second Avenue 
Upland, California 

DR. ( i. R. WINKLER 

Physician 
Lebanon. Illinois 

MR. C. A. WILLI 

Vocational Agriculture Director 
Torrington, Wyoming 

DR. AND MRS. CLARK R. YOST 

McKendree College 

Lebanon. Illinois 
MISS GWENDOLYN YOST 

Teacher 

Eldorado. Illinois 



. . Index of ^Advertisers 

Alamo Theatre 71 

Relleville Daily Advocate 71 

Elumenstein Bros 70 

Central Engraving 73 

1 )aumueller's - 69 

Dot's Beauty Shop 68 

General Grocer Co 70 

C. Heer 70 

Interstate Printing Co 72 

Knapp's Jewelry Co 68 

Lebanon Advertiser 71 

Lebanon Drug Co 71 

I.uHelen Luncheonette /I 

Meyer Furniture and Undertaking Co 68 

Paris Cleaners 71 

Parkway Inn - - 68 

Peskind's Clothing Co 71 

Pfeffer Milling Co 69 

Romeiser's Clothing Co 68 

Sayre Motor Co 70 

Eugene Seibert 68 

Shattinger Music Co 68 

Spieth Photo Studio 69 

Wehrle Jewelry Co 71 



KNAPP JEWELRY CO. 


MEYER 


304 East Main St. 
Established in 1891 


FURNITURE 


PHONE 332 


AND 


Watches Kodaks 

Diamonds Leather Goods 


UNDERTAKING 


Silverware Clocks 




Glassware China 


• « • . 


■•---«-.-.— 




BELLEVILLE, ILLINOIS 


Lebanon, Illinois 


SMART CLOTHES . . . 


HELMS' 


For Well Dressed 


PARKWAY INN 


Young Men 






FAMOUS FOR FINE FOOD 


••■■••—>•••••-■ 






..-$-.. 


ROMEISER"S 




206-208 E. Main Street 


25th and Lynch Avenue 


BELLEVILLE, ILL 


EAST ST. LOUIS 












COMPI IMFI\IT<; OF 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Eugene Seibert 



Distributor of 



LINCO GASOLINE 
MARATHON MOTOR OIL 



TIRES, BATTERIES and ACCESSORIES 

1000 Lebanon Ave. 
BELLEVILLE, ILL 



DOT'S BEAUTY SHOP 



Lebanon, Illinois 



SHATTINGER 

MUSIC AND PIANO 

COMPANY 



331-335 Arcade Bldg. 
Eighth and Olive 

ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 



Page Sixty-eight 



Daily Capacity 1000 Barrels 
Elevator Capacity 200,000 Bushels 

Pfeffer Milling Company 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 
Inc. 1899 

• •■♦■ 

Manufacturers of 

MAR'S PATENT HARD WINTER WHEAT FLOUR 
FLUFFY RUFFLES SELF-RISING FLOUR 
LEBANON BELLE CAKE FLOUR 

WHITE CORN GRITS AND CORN MEAL 



Dealers in 
LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIALS 



Spieth 
Photo 
Studio 

222 North Poplar Street 
Centralia, Illinois 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

for High Schools and Colleges 

OUR SPECIALTY 

High Grade Portraits . . . 

Enlarging . . Kodak Finishing 

. . . Application Pictures 

WRITE US FOR PRICES 



A MOST PLEASANT 
WELCOME 

Awaits you at all times 
at 



ILL'S 



For Good Fountain Service, 
Your College Needs, etc. 



VISIT 

DAUMUELLER'S 

MUSIC and GIFT 

SHOP 



215-217 West St. Louis St. 
LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



Page Sixty-nine 



Blumenstein 
Bros. 



FRESH AND SMOKED 
MEATS 



PHONE I 13 



CHEER 



GENERAL 
MERCHANDISE 



The Quality Store 



Manhattan 
Coffee 

Something Different, 
Not something just as good 

— O — 

VACUUM-PACKED IN 
GLASS OR TIN 

□ S3 

Distributed by 

General Grocer 
Company 

ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 



SINCLAIR GAS EXIDE & DELCO 

AND OILS BATTERIES 



TIRES and 
ACCESSORIES 

Sayre Motor 
Company 

Phone 35 Lebanon, III 

BUICK — CHEVROLET 



,.;... 



General Repair and Storage 






COLLEGE 
BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 

Try Our Soda Fountain 

We Serve the Best De Luxe Ice Crear 

and Toasted Sandwiches 

9 O 

LEBANON 
DRUG COMPANY 

O. C. FRESHOUR, Prop. 



U HELEN 
UNCHEONETTE 
EBANON. ILL. 



Phone 154 
Lucille Schmidt Helen Behymer 



ALAMO 
THEATRE 



THE 

LEBANON 

ADVERTISER 



SYLVAN E.WILLIAMS 
Editor and Publisher 



Wear 
A Smart New 

GRUEN WATCH 

and you'll always be on time 

DIAMONDS — JEWELRY 

F. G. WEHRLE & SON 

At 16 E. Main Belleville, III. 

Since 1859 



Congratulations to the Class of '39! 

I. PESKIND & SONS 

OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND WOMFN 

I 16-1 18 East Main Street 

Belleville, Illinois 



Why Not Have Quality Work for 
the Same Price? 



CLEANING by the MODERN METHOD 

PARIS 
CLEANING AND DYEING 

Phone Lebanon I 36 



The Newspaper for the Home' 



BELLEVILLE 
DAILY ADVOCATE 

Established in 1839 



Your friend is 
the man who knows all about 
you and still likes yon"' 



TJJ7E HAVE among those 
we class as our friends, 
the many schools throughout 
the Central West, who, year 
after year, trust us to print 
their Yearhooks and Annuals. 

Such faith is a guarantee of 

our ability as printers 

and publishers. 



"GOODWfLL is the disposition 
of a satisfied customer to go 
where he has been ivell treated" 



This book is a specimen 
of our workmanship 

The Interstate 

Printers and Publishers 
Danville, Illinois 



Pane Seventy-two 



^Nineteen thirty -SNine 



Another Book By Central' 



Central Engraving Company 

I 14 North Seventh Street 
SAINT LOUIS, MISSOURI 



McKENDREE COLLEGE 



LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



Concluding Her One Hundred Eleventh Year 
1828-1939 




The Staff of the McKENDREAN extends its thanks 
to all firms and individuals who have kindly given financial 
aid to the publication this year, through advertisement 
and contribution to the Patrons' List. 

To those students, outside the staff, who have ren- 
dered service, appreciation is also extended.