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Full text of "Medic : the 1962 yearbook of the Hahnemann Medical College"

(;!}\WIT, f>. CAM-RON. M.D. 









NXST) 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/medic62hahn 



THE MEDIC 



iHHi 




hahnemann 
medica l 

college 

Philadelphia 
Pennsylvania 




A great part of the instruction in Medicine that forms the transi- 
tion from classroom to clinic, the translation of thought into action, 
occurs at the bedside and in the informal conference. It takes a 
unique individual with a special dedication to be able to convey 
knowledge in these often adverse situations. Such an individual is 
Newlin F. Paxson. 

A true gentleman, he has shown us the value of tact, graciousness 
and dignity. As an administrator he has demonstrated interest in 
following the advances of Medicine. As a teacher and clinician, Dr. 
Paxson has revealed a thorough grasp of his field, a ready wit, and 
open mind, and an understanding heart. 

Because of his vital position in our education, we, the Class of 
1962, dedicate our MEDIC to Dr. Newlin F. Paxson. 



I 




dedication 



NEWLIN F. PAXSON, M.D. 

Professor and Chairman, 

Department of Obstetrics 

and Gynecology 



the class of 1962 








The class of 1962 is the first graduating class since I have been privileged 
to be Dean of this school. As you prepare to take your leave I hope you will 
reflect on the many things we are trying to accomplish here. The goals of 
medical education are far more vast in 1962 than they were in 1942, and the 
responsibilities of every institution for higher learning have stretched from 
those of service to its own community to encompass obligations to our country 
and, indeed, to the entire world. 

By virtue of your parchment it is your right to insist that your school meet 
its obligations to this nation and the world by providing progressive educational 
programs in medicine, in the graduate sciences and the para-medical fields, 
and also by promoting the profession of medicine through scientific research. 
By virtue of their appointment the faculty can expect your support and 
encouragement. This can be given best by maintaining an awareness and 
interest in our endeavors and by interpreting our purposes for the under- 
standing of others. More than anything else you can serve our cause by 
setting excellence as your own goal. 

With these responsibilities clear in mind, with recognition that you will 
soon be alumni of a school with an excellent faculty, a curriculum which is 
being constantly revised to meet the demands of our modern society, a pro- 
gram in scholarly research which is envied by many and an ever developing 
sense to serve our nation and the world, I urge you to take up the duties of a 
physician. Apply the techniques you have been given. Enrich them by remain- 
ing a perpetual student. And always remember you are the product of this 
school. In your accomplishments will rest the final judgment of the greatness 
of this College. You have our best wishes for your success. God bless you! 

WILLIAM F. KELLOW, M.D. 
Dean 










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HAROLD A. TAGGART, M.D. 
Associate Dean 

Dr. Taggart has contributed invalu- 
ably to the growth of Hahnemann by 
providing strong leadership and giving 
unselfishly of himself. By his trust and 
friendship he has placed us forever in 
his debt. As Dr. Taggart prepares to 
leave his present position for that of 
full-time Medical Director of the Hos- 
pital he carries with him our sincere 
good wishes. 




ALICE C. BRITT, B.S. in Ed. 
Registrar 

With a warm smile and a friendly 
greeting, Miss Britt almost singlehand- 
edly calmed our fears and attempted 
to lighten our burdens, both scholastic 
and financial. Few people enjoy her 
place in our hearts. When times seemed 
darkest. Miss Britt always found a way. 



MARCELLA BALUK 
Secretary to the Dean 




JANET TOOHEY 
Secretory fo the Registrar 





ERNEST LEISS 
Alumni Secretary 




JEAN MacARTHUR 
Front Office Secretary 



II 




LUCY COOKE 
Librarian 



SHIRLEY MOHN 
Bookstore 




I 12 



On September 8, 1958, 108 little rascals with sweaty 
palms and spastic colons eagerly entered Lecture Room 
A for the first time, fully anticipating complete expos- 
ure to the gems of medical knowledge which, we were 
sure, would emanate from that great shining dome in 
the front of the Hall. Such was our introduction to the 
course in Anatomy — an ordeal that was destined to 
make a lasting impression not only upon our minds, 
but also upon our clothing, which would forever carry 
the familiar odor of formaldehyde. 

The dissecting table became our "open sesame" to 
the structures of the human body. Lectures were given 
by all the members of the department. Dr. Callahan 
taught us how to recite mnemonics with a Texas accent 
and Dr. Perlmutter gently led us through the never- 
ending world of intricate "basic concepts". Daily read- 
ings from Woodburne were offered by Dr. Crouse and, 
when all seemed lost and the world appeared a dank 
and desolate mess, Uncle Ray was only too happy to 
show us how to study for two hours a night, watch 
T.V., get 8 hours of sleep and still pass the exams. 

Thus, amidst the rattle of bone boxes and nerve 
shaking exam buzzers, was laid the basic foundations 
upon which we would continue to build for the 
remainder of our professional careers. 



anatomy 



J. H. VAN DYKE, Ph.D. 
Professor and Acting Chairman, Department o/ Anatomy 





H. I. PERLMUTTER. Ph.D. 
To us . . . teacher, confidant, enduring friend 



"I thought you said he had testi- 
cular atrophy." 




WILLIAM CALLAHAN, Ph.D. 
"What do you mean you never wear 
a bow tie with a button-down?" 



GAIL S. CROUSE, Ph.D. 
"But Ray, you said I could have the 
department when you leave." 




histology 





Histology was something of a slow starter, commenc- 
ing for some of us, to the musical tinkle of "B" boxes being 
opened upside down and oil lenses gleefully crushing 
cover slips. When we were told, in no uncertain terms, that 
we had to "know the normal before knowing the abnormal" 
we bore down in earnest. The majority came away with 
at least an appreciation for Histology if not a thorough 
understanding thanks to the patience of Dr. Van Dyke, 
the cajoling of Dr. MacCreight and the browbeating of Dr. 
Amenta (the lesser). Just one question: What exactly is 
Hilton's Line? 



PETER S. AMENTA, Ph.D. 
'Now back in Chicago we used to do it this way 



' If we shorten the sleeves two inches 




"You might say it resembles thousands, of tiny little fingers rolling 
toasted marshmallows through a cyclone fence into a gigantic vat 
of chicken fat." 



16 




neuroanatomy 



We will no doubt carry the memory (and the scars) 
of Neuroanatomy forever with us. From the first spastic 
day when Dr. Truex began to lecture faster than any- 
one could draw even with four colored pencils, we 
knew deep down inside that we had had it. This impres- 
sion was strengthened by the time we were introduced 
to the machine that whisked the Professor's sketches out 
of sight as fast as he could draw, and confirmed the 
day that all of the blackboard was used to describe 
the cerebellum. Quizzes were unbelievable match- 
your-wits contests with the department trying to out- 
guess the guess of the student. The brief rays of sun- 
shine provided by Dr. Polley were all too few. It was 
even rumored that eventually there would be compre- 
hension but somehow none of the staff showed up 
that day . . . 



EDWARD H. POLLEY, Ph.D. 
"Has anyone got the correct time?" 





RAYMOND C. TRUEX, Ph.D. 
"In the 15 remaining minutes we will dis- 
cuss the cerebrum ..." 




So what happened after you showed her 
le distribution of 1Y" 



BEN CASEY, M.D. 



17 




M. JOHN BOYD, Ph.D. 
Professor and Chairman, Department of Biochemistry 



Upon entering Biochemistry identity was completely lost, 
and so were most of us. We did get to meet the rest of the class, 
however, since seating was at random most of the time. Once 
things settled down we all started to pull together to get 
experiments finished by 3:30 P.M. This was accomplished by 
means of hard work, cooperation, and rotating Coke time. 
The day of reckoning finally came with a practical using 
No-Cal as the unknown. 

The experience proved enlightening and educational 
despite these occasional setbacks. Due to the efforts of a 
dedicated and interested group of professors we were exposed 
to the most recent advances in a constantly advancing field. 



* 

y 



biochemistry 





JOSEPH S DeFRATES, Ph.D. 
"What are you, some new kind of nut?" 



"My hand's caught in the drawer!!' 





JAY S. ROTH, Ph.D. 
"According to yesterday's laboratory results the entire 
class is in diabetic coma." 



PETER OESPER, Ph.D. — CARL ALPER, Ph.D. 
Maybe we should have let it ferment for another day, Carl." 



physiology 



During our course in physiology we became 
uneasily aware that beneath the placid ex- 
terior sported by each of the department mem- 
bers, lay some fantastic, concept-shattering 
knowledge which in time would erupt on man- 
kind's complacency. It was with almost dia- 
bolical cunning and patience that they were 
able to wend their way through miles of kymo- 
graph records without even a suggestion of 
the research which will even now carry these 
men to the gates of Stockholm. 

We have now verified the fact that ten years 
ago a prominent member of the department 
suddenly expired while delivering a masterful 
lecture on "The Significance of the Decorticate 
Preparation in Medical School". Dr. Scott and 
his colleagues were undismayed by the sudden 
change in the physical appearance of their co- 
worker (his personality was fortunately undis- 
turbed) and were subsequently capable, by 
inconceivably agile maneuvers, to restore the 
professor to viability, by complex manipulations 
on the Tilt Board. A full report of this feat will 
be published shortly in the "Thermometer". 
Until then, "We can continue to look forward 
to his active participation in the department's 
research and teaching program", Ida said. 




JOHN C. SCOTT, Ph.D. 
Professor and Chairman, Department of Physiology 




EMERSON A. REED, Ph.D. 
"Just a few minutes on the tilt board and 
you'll feel like a new man." 



20 




"A joke's a joke fellas, but what did you do with 
Dr. Reed?" 





ANDRE VIALLET, M.D. 
"The next time you leave me with the bill at Brown's 



'Rhythm system, big deal." 





AARON A. BECHTEL, A.B. 
"I'll bet they don't find the answer to this in Dr. Scott's notebook. 



Okay Schatz, cough up that old exam." 



21 



pathology 



The study of pathology finally removed the 
partitions separating the Freshman subjects 
and became the common meeting ground for 
anatomy, histology, physiology and biochem- 
istry, and the area of maturation of the class. 

One hundred and thirty years ago Marie 
Francois Xavier Bichot, an eminent French 
anatomist and physiologist (1771-1802) and 
founder of scientific histology and pathologic 
anatomy, said: "You may take notes for twenty 
years from morning to night at the bedside of 
the sick, upon the diseases of the heart, lungs, 
gastric viscera, etc. and it will be to you only 
a confusion of symptoms, which not being 
limited in one point will necessarily present 
only a train of incoherent phenomena. Open a 
few bodies and the obscurity will soon disap- 
pear which observation alone would never 
have been able to have dissipated. Dissect in 
anatomy, experiment in physiology, follow the 
disease and make the autopsy in medicine. 
This is the threefold path without which there 
can be no anatomist, no physiologist and 
no physician." 



JOSEPH E. IMBRIGLIA, M.D., D.Sc. (Med.) 
Professor and Chairman, Department ot Pathology 





"And in closing ... I would like to state . . . that cystosarcoma 
phyllodes . . . is a rarely seen, pathological entity." 



22 




ROSARIO MANIGLIA, M.D, E. CARL KOIWAI, M.D., JOHN M. 
DOLPHIN, M.D. 



'We will spare you the unpleasantness of a trial. 



'Ughh." 





23 



microbiology 



AMEDEO BONDI JR., PH.D. 

Professor and Chairman, 
Department of Microbioiogy 




The average student beginning the course 
never envisaged the effects of the simultaneous 
uncapping of ninety stool specimens or the 
sudden aspiration of a mouthful of bacteria 
through a pipette. These were only temporary 
setbacks in our advance through the microcosm 
of bacteria and virus or the macrocosm of 
arthropod, all of which appeared in confusing 
array on the final practical. ("Anyone see 
sperm at #30?") 

We are grateful for the warning that only 
surgeons produce drug-resistant bacteria and 
note that medicine has been enriched immeas- 
urably by the lantern slides of Dr. Moat pro- 
duced in his sub-basement salon. We do give 
thanks for the lovely pleomorphism of the tech- 
nicians which certainly helped to break the 
monotony of rods and cocci. For the future, we 
hope that the unknowns will be coded cor- 
rectly and that the hills of Eastern Tennessee 
remain ever beautiful. 



WILLIAM L. GABY, PH.D. 
'You fellers ever had whaht lightnen'?" 



24 





Ed. Note: Second student from left is under the influence 
of white lightning. 



GEORGE BESKID, Ph.D. 
'Yeah, I've had whaht lightnen'." 




ALBERT G. MOAT, Ph D. 
'Such is the work of the silkworm." 



J- 



_L K 






"They told me I have amebiasis!" 



25 




Dry as a bone 
Red as a beet 
Mad as a hen 



MATCHING 
There is only ONE right answer for each letter: 

A. Medical student 1. 

B. Instructor 2. 

C. Pharmacology 3. 

Despite six flights of stairs, most sophomores, at least in 
January, were able to make the Wednesday lab. scene. Fortui- 
tously, the six members of each group were able to work 
diligently and harmoniously together and, with the help of an 
able Recorder, turned out reproducible, scientific results. At 
5:00 P.M., eighty odd pharmacologists reluctantly left their 
experiments but anxiously hurried home to correlate lab. 
with text. 

Dr. DiPalma's opening remarks about no early morning 
lectures surprised and momentarily relieved many nocturnal 
investigators who continued their research into the effects of 
ethanol on the CNS. Drill, with its cogent, pithy facts, its lack 
of ambiguities, its brevity and dynamically illustrated color 
plates was a welcome replacement to the spoon. Exams showed 
our educational maturity. We could separate now the wheat 
from the chaff with only the aid of 30 points. 

For some, April was the cruelest month; but most of us 
happily approached clinical medicine secure in the fact that 
at least we knew some Pharmacology. 



pharmacology 



JOSEPH R. DiPALMA, M.D. 
Professor and Chairman, Department ol Pharmacology 




'Loigman, if dis dawg dies 



26 




And in the 6th at Garden State 




ALEXANDER GERO, Ph.D. 
"Gentlemen, don't ever use ergot." 



"I think we should start the Pit, Jim. 




MORRIS A. SPIRTES, M.D. 
'This guarantees a safe suds level, Ma'am. 




27 



clinical pathology 




ROSARIO MANIGLIA, M.D. 
Associate Professor of Pathology 



The "nugget" on Clinical Pathology was that here 
was the place to pull up those low path grades. Most 
of the class tried this and, in the bargain acquired 
hematomas of the antecubital fossa, PSP poisoning, 
pipette sets, and an everlasting appreciation for the 
technicians who would, from now on, do our lab work. 




I think I've found a likely sounding answer to this unknown. 



"The patient may either lie down or 
be up and about during the deter- 
mination of Urea Clearance." 



28 



While Path and Micro busily sloughed 
whole sections from, the G.I. tract of the 
class, Physical Diagnosis began with one 
lecture per week. This was generally 
ignored in the hubbub of sophomore sur- 
vival until one day Dr. Brest put us in orbit 
with the shh-boom of cardiac pathology. 
Obviously they now meant business! 

Skill at Physical Diagnosis is a goal that 
is constantly pursued and infrequently at- 
tained. The degree of proficiency that we 
aspire to reach can be attributed in some 
part to the outstanding introduction we 
received as sophomores. 



physical 
diagnosis 




'Eureka! I've found it I" 




MORTON FUCHS, M.D. 



ALBERT N. BREST, M.D. 

Assistant Professor and Head, Section of Hypertension 

and Renofogy 

"lust buy this little book and I guarantee that you'll pass 
Physical Diagnosis!" 




29 




'They're trying to compete with Playboy!" 




Through bile-stained glasses (or with a jaundiced eye). 



those last 
eight weeks 




"Wouldn't you gentlemen lahk to come down hyar an' 
examine this patient?" 



"Wouldn't you gentlemen lahk to come down hyar an' 
examine this patient? Please?" 





Diuril, 1000 gm., t.i.d., p.r.n. 



30 



A 



"The future belongs to those who prepare for it ." 





Blair General Hospital 



Medical Muscle Man 




'Where's the Men's Room, dammit?" 





Wet conference in GYN. 



medicine 



The Medicine people put on a show which was well worth the 
price of admission. Intellectual challenge aside, the faculty, from the 
research of Dr. Moyer to the sophistication of Dr. Likoff, the brilliance 
of Dr. Fuchs and the grammar sessions of Dr. Reimann, presented quite 
a thorough course of instruction. 

Affiliations ran the gamut from hot to cold. Who could forget 
Fuzzy Ears or the vegetable patch at PGH? Who would deny the 
teaching value of General Medical Clinic or the ancillary course in 
sexology offered in Dermatology Clinic? 

The residents displayed sufficient wit and humor to be called 
human beings. Bill Oakes doing the perpetual twist . . . Bob Botnick 
and his slides . . . Joan Kornblum and the "brighter side" ... all 
characters in a department with character. 



JOHN H. MOYER, III, M.D. 
Professor and Chairman, Department o/ Medicine 



32 




"/ desire no epitaph othtl than the statement that I taught 

medical students in the wards, as I regard this as by tar tho most 
usetul and important work I have been called upon to do." 

Sir William Osier 




HOBART A. REIMANN, M.D. 

Professor and Head, Section of Public Health 

and Preventive Medicine 

"I wonder what these kids would do without 

penicillin ..." 




WILLIAM LIKOFF, M.D. 
Clinical Professor and Head, Section of Cardiovascular Diseases 




CHARLES THOMPSON, M.D. 

Professor and Head, 
Section of Gasfroenfero/ogy 



■&£ 




LEON CANDER, M.D. 
Assistant Professor and Head, 
Section of Chesf Diseases 
"Wait 'til I catch the student who 
Helium in here." 



put 



33 




LEWIS C. MILLS, M.D. 

Clinical Professor and Head, Sec/ion of Endocrinology 

and Metabolic Diseases 



B. MARVIN HAND, M.D. 
Professor and Head, Section of Neurology 



34 




DANIEL J. McCARTY. M D. 

Assistant Prolessor and Head, 

Section o/ Rheumatology 




FITZHUGH C. PANNILL, M.D. 
"Honey Fitz" 



"A.T.&T. down IV2 



GORDON BENDERSKY, M.D. 




BERNARD L. SEGAL, M.D. 




35 




surgery 



JOHN M. HOWARD, M.D. 
Professor and Chairman, Department ot Surgery 



The human retractor is a totally mute, senseless animal, incapable of 
learning, whose actions are reflexly oriented to maintain sham rage in the 
surgeon, hypertensive encephalopathy in the resident, decerebrate rigidity 
in the scrub nurse, sepsis in the patient, and the Waterhouse-Friderichsen 
syndrome in himself. He is unable to see the field, the pathology, the surgery 
or the sutures. He sees only the knots, which he cuts. His major stimulus is the 
bellow, which can either initiate or inhibit reflex activity. He also responds to 
the roar and the screech. He has never been exposed to the whisper. He must 
be able to maintain rigid immobilization while holding his retractor at arms 
length. But the experience he gains is immeasurable and is the highest tribute 
to this Age of Specialization. 



36 






ALEXANDER E PEARCE, M.D. 
So Trop is still scrubbed, eh nurse?" 





> 






"I don't want to say anything doctor, but you sewed your glove 
into the anastomosis." 



CHARLES C. WOLFERTH, M.D. 
"Unaccustomed as I am to public speaking . 




37 




ALEXANDER ULIN, M.D., EDWARD E. EHRLICH, M.D. 



You get no pity in the pit. 



38 





Shotgun Therapy 









r 



ROBERT BOWER, M.D. 



But I really like ward surgery. 







39 



The department of Obstetrics resembles an iceberg in the South 
Pacific — melting. The unshaven resident seals frolic at the base, snar- 
ing scraps from the two chief bears perched precariously at the top. 
Frozen in the ice and just barely visible are a group of students, seated 
on mounds of bloody sheets, their hands forever fixed on a 
pregnant belly. 

Oh Lawdy, what fun! The hallmarks of accomplishment Junior 
year were avoiding severe bodily trauma getting out of the top bunk 
and fitting a diaphragm using only one glove under the sympathetic 
guidance of Miss Brown. 

Senior sendoff consisted of three weeks in limbo at PGH or pub- 
jumping at H'burg, with the intense activity and intellectual stimula- 
tion of the Big H and Booth Hotel serving to render us competent and 
polished. May the iceberg drift once more into hospitable waters. 



obstetrics and gynecology 




^ 



NEWLIN F. PAXSON, M.D. 

Professor and Chairman, Department of 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 



40 




WILLIAM A REISHTEIN. M D. 
Remember that, doctor, that's a nugget." 



SEYMOUR STEIN, M D 
"I understand — everyone's entitled to sleep late 
now and then." 




DOMINIC J. PONTARELLI, M.D. 
'Eight centimeters and 100% already?" 



ROBERT M. HUNTER, M.D. 
"That's right, fourteen straight nights at PGH. 



41 



"How come you're the only one here at this 
hour, Faunce?" 




'Oh, I'm just trying to get some experience with Pit, Jim. 





"Better you should have to see my brother?" 







SARGEANT BROWN AND NEOPHYTES 
"One student to a booth, and rinse your gloves before 
throwing them away." 



obs-gyn 



42 




tjm 



& 




■> 



i 





"15.8 drops per minute, Dr. Catenacci. Keep an eye on 
it while I get some coffee, please." 



ALFRED J. CATENACCI, M.D. 
Pro/essor and Head, Section o/ Anes/hesio/ogy 



4 



To the geriatric patient passing gas is an interesting form 
of recreation but to the anesthesiologist it is a way of life. 
Alert and ready, busy adjusting the lights, drapes, position 
and chart of the patient, the anesthesiologist remains con- 
stantly attentive to the needs and desires of the surgical team. 
He has achieved a relationship in the operating room which 
is unmatched in any other phase of medicine. 



anesthesiology 







"Looks like Mike Nelson is dead.' 






D. DWIGHT GROVE, M.D. 



43 




CARL C. FISCHER, M.D. 
Professor and Chairman, Department of Pediatrics 



pediatrics 



SWEET BOIDS OF YOUTH 
Well Mother, how's your little dear feeling? 
How's that, you say he walks on the ceiling? 
Obviously its a normal Oedipal trait 
Which he'll get over when he finds a mate. 

Now Ma'am, it you'll just hold him over your shoulder, 
For I fear my exam may make him smolder, 
You must realize that it's not nice for the little squirt 
To urinate all over the doctor's shirt. 

This little lad complains of itching and sneezing 
Sometimes accompanied by enuresis and wheezing. 
Let's get an eosinophil count and all that tripe. 
Then refer him to Urology to check out his pipe. 

Hail to Pediatrics, that Carnival of Fun, 

All you need is fortitude, a whip, and a gun. 



44 




'Sounds like Pharyngolaryngotracheobronchiolalveolitis to me. 




ARTHUR LIPSCHUTZ, M.D. 
0.2 of B.M.D. 




JOHN R. NOON, M.D. 





o 




\ 




/ 



< 



J\{\ .?> 



WILLIAM P. GREGG, M.D. 
"Think we need some honey and lemon here.' 



"If you eat your spinach you'll grow big and strong.' 




45 




I 



.... 



> 



JOSEPH N. DEBBAS. M.D. 






J. STAUFFER LEHMAN, M.D. 
Professor and Chairman, Department of Radioiogy 



MILLARD N. CROLL, M.D. 



radiology 



N. VOLNEY LUDWICK, M.D. 




The department appears to be normal in size and 
shape. Some blunting of the faculty is noted but this 
may represent a filling defect on the part of the student 
body. Delayed filling is definitely present, most ap- 
parent in the region of the third and fourth years. 

Impression: A generally satisfactory department, 
but further studies are indicated. 



46 



affiliations 



PGH — "It's okay, Paul Jamos is back at Hahnemann!" 
"I learned a new way to do the Ritgen today, 
you can have the next one." 

Hanisburg — "Twelve straight weeks and nobody 
showed." 
"Oh no, here comes that little guy again." 

Einstein — "You can have your choice between Anes- 
thesiology, Radiology, Orthopedics or Urology. 
No, its too late to switch to Harrisburg." 
"Watch out, Fuzzy Ears is looking for the stu- 
dents." 

Misericordia — "That's right, they don't want us play- 
ing pool." 

EPPI — "Can't tell the players without a scorecard." 

Girard — "The soccer team will be in this week. The 
basketball team will be in next week. The track 
team will be in after the basketball team. Just 
annual physicals." 





47 



medicine 
of 



Medicine is unique among 
the professions in that it borders 
between Art and Science, ready 
at any time to prove to the one 
that it is truly the other. As a 
Science it knows no conclusion; 
as an Art it tolerates no one 
school. At the very instant that 
Medicine seems to have been 
mapped out and confined, it 
demonstrates for the thousandth 
time that its boundaries are 
beyond the complete compre- 
hension of any one era. 




Twenty years ago Medicine 
stood on the threshold of a new 
realm. Alexander Fleming's re- 
search, investigation into the 
secrets of the atom, problems 
posed by victims of the Second 
Great War all combined to 
destroy time-honored concepts 
and open new vistas. 

It would seem that we stand 
on similar ground in 1962. Ad- 
vances in radiosotope diagnosis 
and therapy, in hypothermia, 
in extracorporeal circulation 



and even in computer assisted 
medical practice predict an al- 
teration in the environment in 
which the Science of Medicine 
will be pursued. The Art of 
Medicine has likewise not stag- 
nated. There are those individ- 
uals and groups in lay circles 
who feel the necessity of alter- 
ing the doctor-patient relation- 
ship and impairing that quality 
of individuality in the physician 
which has carried Medicine to 
its present heights. 



The manner in which we, as 
the future practitioners of Medi- 
cine, react to the challenges 
which are being handed to us 
daily will determine for the 
most part the nature of Medi- 
cine. It would seem wise then 
to pause for a moment and at- 
tempt to delineate the future 
expanse of Medicine, and in so 
doing, forearm ourselves, the 
better to function in the Medi- 
cine of tomorrow. 



tomorrow 




The Oath and Prayer of 

Maimonides 



THE ETERNAL PROVIDENCE HAS APPOINTED ME to watch 
over the life and health of Thy creatures. May the love for my 
art actuate me at all times; may neither avarice, nor miserliness, 
nor the thirst for glory, nor for a great reputation engage my 
mind; for the enemies of Truth and Philanthropy could easily 
deceive me and make me forgetful of my lofty aim of doing 
good to Thy children. 

May I never see in the patient anything but a fellow crea- 
ture in pain. 

Grant me strength, time and opportunity always to correct 
what I have acquired, always to extend its domain; for know- 
ledge is immense and the spirit of man can extend infinitely 
to enrich itself daily with new requirements. Today he can 
discover his errors of yesterday and tomorrow he may obtain 
a new light on what he thinks himself sure of today. 

O God, Thou has appointed me to watch over the life and 
death of Thy creatures; here I am ready for my vocation. 

And now I turn unto my calling: 
O stand by me, my God, in this truly important task; 
Grant me success! For — 
Without Thy loving counsel and support, 
Man can avail but naught. 
Inspire me with true love for this my art 
And for Thy creatures, 
O grant — 

That neither greed for gain, nor thirst for fame, nor vain ambition, 
May interfere with my activity. 

For these I know are enemies of Truth and Love of men, 
And might beguile one in profession 
From furthering the welfare of Thy creatures. 
O strengthen me. 

Grant energy unto both body and soul 
That I might e'er unhindered ready be 
To mitigate the woes, 
Sustain and help 

The rich and poor, the good and bad, enemy and friend. 
O let me e'er behold in the afflicted and suffering, 
Only the human being. 

TWELFTH CENTURY A.D. 



50 







"During your Senior year you will 
be operating in the new Surgical 
Amphitheatre." 



Bruit de canon 




Meeting of the Scholarship Committee. 



"There's only one way to take care of 
a kibbutzer." 



"What do you mean the 
exam started an hour ago?" 




"A labile plasma accelerator acts directly, whereas a stable 
serum accelerator interacts with calcium in what may be a 
stoichiometric conversion of prothrombin to thrombin." 





^ -- "*• 



•stntu-^ 



Ahlstrcmd, Richard Gordon 
Apfelbaum, Ronald Ira 
Arnett, Charles Lee 
Barsky, Bernard Robert 
Barton, Robert Lester 
Bell, James Roy 
Berman, Arnold Theodore 
Black, William Alexander, Jr. 
Bloom, Myron J. 
Brimfield, Paul Edwin 
Brohm, Charles Mullins 
Brosgol, Franklin Leonard 
Buell, Robert Raymond 
Burgoyne, Andrew Sexton 
Byerly, Donald Ashton 
Cannarozzi, Nicholas Anthony 
Caprini, Joseph Anthony 
Carlson, Alfred John, Jr. 
Chidsey, Richard Anthony 
Cianciulli, Francis Daniel 
Cinti, Dominick Louis 
Cohen, Barry Herbert 
Corlin, Richard Frederic 
De Colli, Joseph Albert 
Deichert, Robert George 
Del Guercio, Edmund T. 
Dinenberg, Stephen 
Dobrota, John Stephen 
Ebaugh, Duane Wallace 
Emkey, Ronald Daniel 
Falik, Joel Lee 
Gaudio, John Carmen 
Ghigiarelli, Robert Erminio 
Gilhool, William John 
Greco, James Anthony 
Grieco, Emil Richard 
Grossman, Michael 
Gutekunst, Donald Paul 
Happ, Richard Anthony 
Harrison, John 
Hartman, Faith Audrey 
Haselkorn, Alexander 
Hemsley, Henry William 
Herbert, Wesley Richard, Jr. 
Hobbins, Thomas Eben 
Hoffman, Alexander 
Hoke, Hugh Holman, Jr. 
Hollis, William Holman 
Kaplan, Albert A. 
Katz, Richard David 
Keller, John Calvin 
Kleiman, Jacob AaTon 
Klein, Gershon Allen 
Kratsa, Gus Peter 
Kromash, Marvin Henry 
Kurtz, Michael David 
Kurtz, Robert Irwin 
Levine, Mark Roger 
Lewis, Thomas E., Ill 
Lippman, Alan Jeffrey 
Lorenz, Paul Philips 
Lundy, Joel 

MacKenzie, Charles Edward 
Mayrowetz, Stanley 
Mazur, John Robert 
McClain, Clifton Andrew, III 
Melini, Carlo B. 
Menna, Vincent Joseph 
Meyers, Allan Frederick 
Mickouls, D. Vaughn 
Miller, Stuart 
Negus, Lynn Dorraine 
Noble, Deborah Clarke 
Novotny, Clarence George 
O'Connell, James Richard 
Opderbeck, Carl Theodore 
Ort, Robert Barker 
Puglisi, Anthony Stephen 
Repice, Ronald Michael 
Rest, Herbert Frank 
Riceman, James Thomas 
Rogers, Diana Rosemary 
Romfh, Richard Forrest 
Rosen, Lionel Wayne 
Sapoznikoff, John Barry 
Scarlato, Michael 
Schecter, Lawrence Mark 
Schwartz, Joel 
Shankel, Joseph Marshall, III 



Freshmen 






Shibue, Charles Talsuo 
Silberfarb, Peter Michael 
Sipowicz, Carl Peter 
Snyder, Joel Mark 
Sokol, David Marvin 
Steeb, Robert Carl 
Suter, Harry Joseph 
Swiecicki, Alan Roy 
Tortorella, John Peter 
Van Dine, Kenneth George 
Visconti, Paul Baschen 



Vroom, John R. 

Waldbaum, Marc Louis 

Wenz, Barry 

Werner, Joseph Henry, Jr. 

Wiener Stephen George 

Wise, Arthur Jerome, Jr. 

Wolfson, Saul David 

Youshaw, Dennis Gordon 

Zall, Harry 

Zechman, Charles Richard 



53 



Sophomores 







\ 



1 

i 





Seltzer, Gary Willard 
Slifkin, Robert Feldman 
Stone, Gary Michael 
Thompson, Charles Frederick 
Tokarchek, Fred 
Tuckman, David Joshua 
Urban, Edward Louis 
Urbaniak, Thomas Frank 
Vigman, Melvin Paul 
Weinstock, Robert Michael 



Aherne, William Edward 

Alexander, F. Knight, Jr. 

Aronoff, Michael Eli 

Auerbach, Robert Erwin 

Banach, Stanley Francis 

Bendon, Michael Lawrence 

Bevilacqua, Dante John, Jr. 

Bocker, John Edward C. 

Branson, Barbara Jane 

Brill, Robert Frederick 

Capizzi, Robert L. 

Carruthers, Ralph Beam 

Casey, David Thornhill 

Cates, Jeryl Ray 

Cerciello, Mark James 

Cherubini, Thomas David 

Clement, Gordon Santo 

Cohen, Allan Mayer 

Cook, Donald Hunter 

Coopersmith, Norman Harris 

Corbett, John Michael 

Croissant, Paul Dennis 

Diaco, Joseph Francis 

Diaco, Nicholas Vincent 

Dominici, Raymond Henry 

Ferretti, Donald Alex 

Finnegan, James O. 

Finnegan, Loretta P. 

France, Laurence William 

Francis, William Leon 

Franklin, Denis Hubert 

Gallen, John H. 

Gasper, Courtney Brownell 

Germond, Peter Boyd 

Glaspey, Ben Lee 

Golden, Richard Ross 

Grosh, Paul Roebuck 

Guillozet, Noel 

Holl, Walden Martin, Jr. 

Hyman, David Lee 

Itskowitz, Alan Lee 

Jefieris, Earl Stein, Jr. 

Jenci, Joseph Donald 

Jones, Walter Burnett 

Kaminker, Kenneth 

Knopf, Edwin Ronald 

Landis, Robert Chester 

Laufenberg, Henry Joseph, Jr 

Leardi, Robert Thomas 

Lecher, Robert Charles 

Leese, Kenneth Hugh 

Lessin, David Eli 

Lipton, Charles Samuel 

Madden, Robert Abner 

Major, David Alan 

Martin, Robert Whitney 

McCoy, Georgia A. Turner 

McCullough, H. Norman, Jr. 

Meltzer, A. Donald 

Milke. Denis Jerome 

Milstein, Philip Stephen 

Mogil, Robert Allen 

Moore, M. Carolyn 

Morris, Joseph Thomas 

Neri, Michael A. 

Nicotera, Anthony Louis 

Nowsatka, Raymond Robert 

Oddi, Frederick John 

Olson, Ronald Anthony 

Oretsky, Martin Irving 

O'Shea, Kathleen Therese 

Pagano, Angelo Armand 

Phillips, Lawrence David 

Phillips, Lewis Everett 

Phillips, Nancy Lee 

Piatt, Benjamin Blieden 

Prutzman, George Washington, Jr. 

Rapp, Robert Sanford 

Regnante, Richard Matthew 

Renzi, Anthony Michael 

Rigbera, Herbert Saul 

Rozwadowski, Jack V. 

Rubins, Steven Bruce 

Russakov, Alan 

Russman, Richard B. 

Ryan, John Joseph 

Schantz, Troy Melvin 

Schwartz, Allan Bernard 



54 



Abda, John, Jr. 

Abrams, Arthur Jay 

Alley, Samie Abbas 

Allison, Howard Hazletl 

Arnold, Gordon Carl 

Bischolf, Ellen Jane Bossard 

Blumhardt, Ralph 

Brendlinger, Dirck Lowe 

Burns, Jess Robert 

Camitta, Francine Deborah 

Capriotti, Robert John 

Cavalier, Ralph John, Jr. 

Clair, Theodore William 

Cole, Dennis Gene 

Crawford, Donald Gordon 

Cummings, John Morton 

Di Stefano, Vincent James 

Eastland, Theodore William, Jr. 

Edson, Hobart Brattrud 

Fine, Burton Paul 

George, Edward Dale 

Glaser, Barry Louis 

Glauser, Frederick Louis 

Gotlieb, Jerry 

Gueriera, Charles Joseph 

Gutterman, Paul 

Haber, Arthur Stephen 

Halfpenny, Charles Francis, Jr. 

Hansen, Raymond Asbjorn 

Horowitz, Jerome Howard 

Hummer, Charles DeWitt, Jr. 

Hyman, Jack Edward 

Johnson, George Mark 

Julia, Walter 

Kaplan, Barry Stephen 

Katz, Joyce Zissman 

Katz, Michael Robert 

Katz, Steven Edward 

Kelly, Malcolm Robert 

Kemmerer, Dale Lee 

Kessler, Robert 

Koff, Marvin Saul 

Kratz, Vernon Halteman 

Lam, Carl Augustus 

Laska, Lawrence Kenneth 

Lathan, William Edward 

Lizschitz, Herman 

Little, George Robert 

Lundblad, Daniel Miles 

McCurley, William Stran, III 

Meyers, James LeRoy 

Morse, Barry William 

Mullin, Hugh Joseph, Jr. 

Nase, Donald Frederick 

Ondash, Bernard Stephen 

Padova, James Anthony 

Paskin, Sandor 

Patchefsky, Arthur Steven 

Pavitt, Peter Charles 

Petti, Alfonso F. 

Pettyjohn, Frank Schmermund 

Photias, George Nicholas 

Pitha, Nicholas Richard 

Portner, Barry 

Preiser, Franklin Mayer 

Ravin, John Murray 

Roth, Arnold M. 

Rutt, John Mark 

Rzepela, Stanley J. 

Sch'ade, John Foster 

Shartz, Edwin Sanford 

Shick, Herbert Louis 

Simon, Joseph H. 

Skweir, Leon Arthur 

Stamps, William Harris 

Steelman, Rush Barrett 

Stein, Manuel 

Steppacher, Robert Clarke 

Stoner, John Clinton 

Tatem, Henry Randolph, III 

Teramoto, Yoshitsugu 

Toland, Joseph Charles 

Toot, Paul John 

Ungar, Joseph Irwin 

Vukmer, George Jay 

Weinstein, Saul Frank 

Williams, Alexander William, Jr. 

Woldofi, Mitchell 

Wroblewski, Ronald John 

Zimpfer, Fletcher Everett, II 

Zuck, Thomas Frank 



Juniors 




i 





""v/iu 





57 




Dean Kellow and friends 



An intensive publicity program notwithstanding, Hahnemann's Town Hall 
Gala slid inconsequentially into oblivion in a ballroom with slightly more decor 
than a subway. The Moores failed to materialize as did their decorations and 
only the presence of the Dean, an excellent band plus the class of '62 assisted 
by sundry libations prevented complete disaster. 






v 



\ 



>> x 



* 



\ 






_s - 






f> 



58 



Honest Hon, it happened playing touch football I' 




<£°~ * 2> 



& jS> j& 



<r ^ * 4> 






\4* 




A few people literally danced out of their shoes. 



'Perls" 



59 





Roddy, Jerry and Peggy Seitter 




Jill, Kim and Jack Lillie 



ft i 




Marcia and Lowell Wilder 




Emmy and George Jarden 




Enos and Adrienne Andrews 




Elmer, Lori and Gerry Deck 



satel 




Stan, Ellen and Jean Spitzer 




Jim, Katky and Mary Lou Faust 




Pat, Ben and Ben McAdams 




Dick and Elayne Foxx 



ites 



60 




The Buckley Family 




The Hank Carters 




The Henrie Family 





Jean, Jenny, Carrie and Ken Miller 



Ken, Sandy, Jefi and Brad Williams 




Ed and Marie Wilson 






i ■■ 1 4 

Marilyn, Phil and Bruce LaVerde 



* 








ft* L 



The Kim Family 




Mel and Ruth Singer 




Ellen and Mort Richman 




Cas and Dot Czarnecki 



Cathy and Lionel Mailloux 



61 




Pete and Barbara Keblish 




Barbara and Paul Bremer (with 
Pat in background) 



The HUWA Orphans 




The Buonos 




Elyse and Tom Creamer 





The O'Malley Family 



Jim and Marge Compton 




ft 




Irv and Shiela Dardik 



62 




First Row: C. Buckley, V. Zarro, N. Pitha, N. Schatz. Second Row: 
A. Kellerman, W. Young, J. Meyers. Third flow: M. Singer, M. Kcrtz, 
S. Alley. Back flow: E. Wilson, S. Spitzer, J. O'Malley. 



President: Clifford J. Buckley 
Vice-President: Marvin Derezin 
Secretary: Melvin Singer 
Treasurer: William W. Young 
Advisor: Joseph R. DiPalma, M.D. 

Alpha Omega Alpha is the national honor medical 
society to which members are elected by faculty vote 
on the bases of superior scholastic achievement, 
integrity, leadership and professional dedication. The 
purpose of the organization is to foster an apprecia- 
tion of the moral and academic principles of medical 
education and practice. Established at Hahnemann in 
1952, the Zeta Chapter limits its membership to students 
in the junior and senior years. 

The society annually sponsors a lectureship at 
Hahnemann for the benefit of students and faculty at 
which many distinguished persons in the field of medi- 
cine have appeared. This year the tenth annual guest 
lecture was delivered by the eminent Dr. Owen H. 
Wangensteen, Professor of Surgery at the University 
of Minnesota. The organization also sponsored a bi- 
weekly discussion group under the direction of out- 
standing Hahnemann faculty members. 



ALPHA OMEGA ALPHA 



I 




63 




ALPHA KAPPA KAPPA 




First Row: N. Pitha, W. McCurley, D. Kemmerer, A. Pagano. Second 
Row: R. Hansen, J. Padova, A. Petti. Back Row: H. Mullin, T. Clair. 



President: William S. McCurley 
Vice-President: Nicholas R. Pitha 
Treasurer: Dale L. Kemmerer 
Recording Secretary: Robert A. Madden 
Corresponding Secretary: Theodore W. Clair 



Alpha Kappa Kappa was founded in 1888 at Dart- 
mouth College. Since that time it has grown to its 
present membership of 23,000 men. The men of the Beta 
Phi Chapter at Hahnemann are proud to be part of this 
vast fraternity of physicians and students. 

The fraternity has much to offer and each year the 
program becomes more varied and dynamic. Every 
brother has a fond place in his heart for our monthly 
dinner meetings. With such guests as Dr. Truex, Dr. 
Axel Olsen, Dr. Tropea, Dr. Mandarino and Chuck 
Bednarik, the success of these affairs is easy to explain. 
Of course, the social calendar always includes parties 
and stag beer blasts. 



64 



The brethren of Phi Bet' have had a year of 
reorganization and reform. After selling their house on 
Summer Street they have joined themselves to the 
Jefferson chapter in hopes of furthering the social future 
of students on the Hahnemann campus. With our new- 
friends and a budding group of new officers, hopes 
are high for the chapter as well as for improving 
inter-school relations. 



President: Samuel Puma 
Secretary: Carl Lam 
Treasurer: Bernard Ondash 



First Row: F. Nagy, S. Puma, N. Peters, G. Miyazaki. Back Row: 
L. Laska, Y. Teramoto. R. Johnson, J. Stoner, J. Schade. 




PHI BETA PI 




65 




PHI DELTA EPSILON 




President: Saul Weinstein 
Vice-President: Alan Itskowitz 
Secretary: Charles Lipton 
Treasurer: Joseph Simon 
Advisor: Donald Berkowitz, M.D. 



Hahnemann's Beta Zeta chapter of Phi Delta 
Epsilon was founded in 1929 as an important link in a 
nationwide fraternal chain. In 1961 it strengthened 
that link by pledging a class of 29 men. The local and 
national work together to sponsor an annual medical 
lectureship at Hahnemann as well as an extensive 
program of scholarship and loan aid. 

On the social side, 1961 opened with a memorable 
party at Dr. Weinstein's house. This was followed by a 
Polynesian Luau and a night with Harry Belafonte. 
Also in 1961 the local acquired a new house a few 
doors from the college. With our new headquarters, 
plans for 1962 seem to indicate our best year yet. 



66 



Phi Lambda Kappa was founded in Philadelphia 
fifty-two years ago, and the Alpha Beta Chapter was 
organized at Hahnemann in 1926. Its purpose is "to 
foster a spirit of fraternalism of mutual aid and moral 
support, to promote and advance the concepts of the 
medical sciences, and to encourage activities worthy 
of the highest precepts of human endeavor". Alpha 
Beta continues to strive to live by the high ideals set 
in its charter. In addition to its record of successful 
social events. Phi Lambda Kappa is very active in the 
academic aspect of medical school life. This year the 
annual Horace L. Weinstock lectureship has been 
added to the already extensive schedule of Phi Lambda 
Kappa activities at Hahnemann. 

President: Jack Solomon 
Vice-President: Barry Glaser 
Secretary: Franklin Preiser 
Treasurer: Sandor Paskin 




PHI LAMBDA KAPPA 




67 




PHI CHI 




President: Francis P. Colizzo, Jr. 
Vice-President: Fletcher E. Zimpfer 
Treasurer: John Corbett 
Secretary: Jack Rozwadowski 
Alumni Secretary: Thomas Urbaniak 



Phi Alpha Gamma has long been a member of 
the Hahnemann scene. In 1948 it became a local chap- 
ter of the largest national medical fraternity, Phi Chi. 
Phi Chi now represents the bulwark of social life on 
"campus". Our numerous parties throughout the year 
are highlighted by the annual rushing party, the Christ- 
mas party for underprivileged children and the 
Founders' Day Banquet. Scholarship is also recognized 
in Phi Chi and we honor it each year with the Eben J. 
Carey award in anatomy and the scholarship award to 
the highest graduating Phi Chi. 

This year Phi Chi introduced a new era of parties. 
We will all recall the "Harold's Club" gambling party 
— a blast worthy of the Phi Chi tradition. 



68 




First flow: W. Young, R. Caputo, K. Miller. Second Row: R. 
Cavalier, F. Nagy, R. Witzig. Third Row: S. Alley, B. McAdams, 
J. Abda. Back flow: J. Carter, C. Buckley. 



AESCULAPIAN 
SOCIETY 



The sober group pictured above does not repre- 
sent the direct descendants of Napoleon, but rather the 
members .of the Aesculapian Society. The club is 
officially the historical society of the College, but in 
actuality represents a group of students who firmly 
believe that many of the problems at Hahnemann can 
be solved with a few drinks, a good dinner, and a post 
prandial speaker. Of course we all remember the 
immortal words, "Next autumn we will be pleasantly 
disturbed by the hammering of air drills". Well, that's 
a problem for next year's group to solve. 

We are deeply indebted to our sponsors, Dr. Derin, 
Dr. Imbriglia, and Dr. Oakes for their good fellowship 
and loyal support. 




69 



Guest Speaker: Harry Eagle M.D., Professor and Chairman, Department o/ Cell Biology, Albert 
Einstein College ol Medicine . . . "The Experimental Usages and Limitations of Animal Cell 
Cultures"; Portable Bedside Placentography . . . Casimir Czarnecki, Hemodynamic Effects of 
Anti-Arrhyhtmic Drugs . . . Michael Katz, The Effect of Human Duodenal Extract on Walker Cell 
Sarcoma . . . Barry Glaser, The Effects of Abdominal Decompression in Various Clinical Situa- 
tions of Pregnancy and Labor . . . Mark S. Kramer, Hemodynamic Determinants of Myocardial 
Oxygen Consumption in the Intact Dog . . . Benjamin B. Piatt, Peripheral Fat Mobilization 
Following Whole Body Irradiation . . . Seymour W. Milstein, Robert Slifkin, Paul Croissant, 
The Noise Tolerance Test in Human Bioassay of Pharmacologic Agents . . . Leon A. Skweir, 
Selective Profound Cerebral Hypothermia . . . Henry Soltys, Isometric Contraction Time . . . 
William B. Strong, Mobilization of Atherosclerotic Plaque Calcium with Ethylene Diamine Tetra- 
acetic Acid . . . Lowell W. Wilder, Isolation of Myeloperovidase Particle from Human Leukocyte 
. . . Kenneth Kaminker, Myeloperoxidase Activity of Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes of Normal 
and Hyperuricemic Individuals . . . Clifford J. Buckley, Walter Jones Evaluation of Calcium 47 
in Normal Humans and Its Use in the Evaluation of Bone Healing Following Radiation Therapy 
in Metastatic Disease . . . Steven Rubins, David Hyman, Congenital Anomalies of the Carotid 
Artery — A Case Report . . . Enos Andrews, Lymphograms in Post-Radical Mastectomy Patients 
. . . Henry Berk, A New Staining Method for Serum Lipoprotein Studies . . . Robert Capizzi, 
The Effect of Ionizing Radiation Upon the Uptake of Sodium 22 by Mouse Erythrocytes Irradiated 
in Vivo . . . Joseph H. Carter, Jr., A Study on the White Blood Cell Origin . . . Elmer Dech, 
Intracellular Surface Potential of the Cardiac Cell . . . Vincent DiStefano, Hemodynamics of 
Cerebral Blood Flow . . . James Faust, Richard Katz, Hemodialysis of BaTbituates . . . James 
Finnegan Phospholipid Fractions of Penicillium Chrysogenum Incubated with Alpha Amino 
Isobutyric Acid . . . John H. Gallen, Steroid Myopathy in Mice . . . Jerry Gotleib, James Meyers, 
An Approach to the Experimental Production of Mitral and Aortic Valvular Insufficiencies . . . 
Charles Hummer, Jay Lehman, Gary Stone, Myeloperoxidase Content of the Neutrophiles of Var- 
ious Species . . . Walter Jones, Adolescent Medicine: The Adolescent Unit at Boston's Children's 
Hospital . . . W. Stran McCurley Intravenous Aldosterone Therapy in Endotoxin Shock . . . Joseph F. 
O'Malley, Acetylation of PABA in Pregnant Women . . . Hugh J. Mullin, Jr., Hyperuricemia in 
Diabetic Ketosis . . . James Padova, Fluid Replacement in Acute Hemorrhagic Shock . . . 
Arthur Patchefsky, Barry Glaser, Preliminary Studies in Localization of the Pressor and 
Depressor Vasomotor Centers by Stimulation of the Floor of the Fourth Ventricle . . . Alfonso 
Petti, Serial Renal Biopsies . . . Nicholas Pitha, A Long-Term Study on the Effects of Mer-29 on 
Adrenal Cortical Function in Diabetics . . . Arnold Roth, A Study of Some Effects cf Hemoglobin 
Infusion in the Dog After Incomplete Ligation of the Common Bile Duct with Cellophane . . . 
Girard Seitter, The Relationship of Parathyroid to Pancreatitis . . . Jack Solomon, A Study of 
the Relationship of Cerebrocardiovascular Disease in Males and Its Transmission to Their Off- 
spring . . . Mitchell Woldoff. 




UNDERGRADUATE 

RESEARCH 

SOCIETY 



First Row: S. Spitzer, S. Milstein, K. Miller. Second Row: D. Rosen, 
W. Young, W. Strong. Third Row: T. Oslick, R. Witzig, G. Seitter. 
Fourth Row: S. McCurley, R. Caputo, C. Buckley. Fifth Row: N. 
Pitha, M. Singer, J. Carter. Back Row: F. Nagy, P. LaVerde, B. 
McAdams. 



Chairman Stanley Spitzer 

Secrefary Arnold Roth 

Faculty Sponsors Alex Ulin, M.D. 

Amedeo Bondi, Ph.D. 



Since its inception 16 years ago, the Undergraduate 
Research Society has steadily grown until last summer 
33% of the student body were actively engaged in 
research. Any undergraduate interested in research 
mary carry out a project during the summer months in 
one of the basic sciences or clinical medicine. The 



society yearly sponsors an Undergraduate Research 
Day at which time original summer research papers 
are presented. This program is followed with a talk by 
a leading medical researcher. An attempt is made to 
encourage student research in both basic sciences and 
clinical medicine. 



70 




ALEXIS 

CARREL 

SOCIETY 



First Row: W. Strong, T. 
Creamer, K. Miller. Second 
Row: R. Caputo, P. LaVerde, 
K. Giulian. Back flow: W. 
Young, F. Calizzo, B. Mc- 
Adams. 



President: William Strong 

Secretary: Joseph O'Malley 

Faculty Advisor: Joseph Imbriglia, M.D. 





The Alexis Carrel Society is an organization of all 
of the Catholic medical students, nurses and technicians 
of Hahnemann. It is the purpose of the Society to 
promote the spiritual well-being of its members by 
presenting interesting discussions aimed at elucidating 
problems in medical ethics. During the past year 
Doctors Frignito, DiPalma, and LaFia spoke before our 
group together with several other imminent physicians. 




CHRISTIAN 




MEDICAL 
SOCIETY 



First Row: C. Zechman, V 
Kratz, H. Suter. Bade Row: 
J. Rutt, J. Vroom. 



President: Vernon H. Kratz 
Vice-President: Robert Martin 
Secretary: Ellen Bischoff 
Treasurer: Stanton Brown 
City -Wide Rep.: John Rutt 
City-Wide Representative: John Rutt 



The Christian Medical Society is a group of stu- 
dents who have committed themselves to seek out, 
understand and apply in daily experience, truth as 
revealed in the Bible. They have accepted the Bible 
as divinely inspired and as the final authority concern- 
ing the Word of God. Therefore they believe in Jesus 
as God, in His death as sacrificial for the sin of man- 
kind, and in His resurrection as victory over sin and 
death. The program consists of weekly meetings for 
Bible study and fellowship, social gatherings with other 
chapters in the city, and participation in a clinic at 
one of the local rescue missions. 



71 











First Row: F. Camitta, J. 
Padova, H. Mullin, E. Bis- 
choff. Second Row: I. Butler, 
A. Patchefsky, J. Katz. Third 
Row: R. Hansen, D. Craw- 
ford. Fourth Row: A. Petti, 
W. McCurley, T. Clair. Back 
Row: V. Kratz, R. Steppacher, 
N. Pitha. 



MAC FADYEN GYNECOLOGICAL SOCIETY 



The MacFadyen Gynecological Society is one of 
the oldest and most active organizations at Hahne- 
mann, founded in 1941 and named in honor of Professor 
Bruce V. MacFadyen. Its purpose is to foster interest 
in gynecology not only among those who plan to 



specialize but for the whole student body at Hahne- 
mann. This is accomplished by periodic meetings at 
Dr. MacFadyen's home where well known men in the 
field of gynecology discuss pertinent topics. 



ORTHOPEDIC CLUB 



First Row: B. McAdams, F. Nagy, K. 
Miller. Second Row: W. Young, J. 
Toohey, R. Witzig. Third flow: W. 
Strong, R. Foxx, P. LaVerde. Back 
Row: S. Milstein, C. Buckley, J. Carter. 



The Orthopedic Club of Hahnemann was founded 
in 1960 through the collaboration of the Orthopedic 
staff and several interested students. Members of the 
Junior and Senior classes are eligible and their mem- 
bership is solicited. The club holds dinner meetings 
four times a year at which time topics are discussed 
by various staff members relating to orthopedic prob- 
lems and progress, pertinent to both the future general 
practitioner and the orthopedist. The staff has shown 
sincere interest in this organization, particularly Dr. 
E. O. Geckeler. For this, we of the club thank them. 




72 





First Row. M. Singer, P. LaVerde, T. McKissick. Second Row: T. Oslick, B. Loigman, G. Seitter. 
Back Row. F. Nagy, D. Rosen. 



UNDERGRADUATE PSYCHIATRIC SOCIETY 



The main functions of this organization are 
to help enlighten the student body concerning 
basic concepts in Psychiatry, to create an 
awareness of modern trends, and to provide 
some insight into prospects for the future for 
those interested in specializing in the field. 



Each year an outstanding member of Hahne- 
mann's Psychiatric staff invites the Society to 
his home for an evening get-together. The 
society also attends the evening sessions of 
the Philadelphia Psychoanalytic Society which 
are held at Hahnemann. 



UNDERGRADUATE WIVES ASSOCIATION 



The Undergraduate Wives Association was 
founded to acquaint the wives of medical 
students with the profession of medicine — its 
aims, purposes and ideals — and to prepare 
them to accept their responsibilities as wives 
of medical doctors. 

The year passed in a whirlwind. . .initiation 



. . .Password "shhh, like the new drapes?". . . 
"Oh, my aching muscles". . .here comes Santa 
Claus. . ."Congratulations, here's the gavel" 
. . . weekend in N. Y. for free . . . "lovely fashions, 
Joanie" . . . PHT's at last and a sad farewell to 
old friends and wonderful years. 




73 




STUDENT 
INSTITUTE 



First flow: A. Cattcmo, C. DieE, R. Dominic. Second flow: W. 
Figueroa, W. Strong, T. Zuck. Back flow: Dr. Bower, Dr. Perl- 
mutter, W. McCurley. 



The Student Institute is an organization which was 
established over 25 years ago at Hahnemann for the 
purpose of promoting the social, academic and admin- 
istrative welfare of the student. To carry out these 
tasks the Institute functions as the coordinating body 
between the classes as well as liaison between faculty 
and students. The Institute sponsors numerous social 
functions annually and helps to support the MEDIC. 
Each class is represented by its president and two 
elected members. The faculty advisors are Dr. H. 
Perlmutter and Dr. R. Bower. 



74 



The Hahnemann Band was founded in 1961 by a 
group of seniors who felt the need for a musical outlet 
to medical pressures. A large-scale organization pro- 
gram recruited members of the staff and faculty and 
in short order rehearsals were being held on a bi- 
weekly basis. A Christmas concert at Klahr marked 
the debut of the group. Further plans for a full 
season are in progress and the organization looks 
forward to becoming a permanent fixture on the 
Hahnemann scene. 



Conductor: Seymour W. Milstein 
Secretary: Lionel U. Mailloux 



THE 

HAHNEMANN 

BAND 




75 




J- 

Editor-in-Chief Richard M. Foxx 

Literary Editor Edwin M. Henrie 

Literary Staff James Compton 

Kenneth E. Miller 

Seymour W. Milstein 

Sherman Robbins 

Richard A. Witzig 

Layout Editor Ivan Butler 

Art Editor Barry I. Loigman 

Photographic Editor Lionel U. Mailloux 

Photographic Staff Morton Richman 

Samuel Puma 

Business Managers Clifford J. Buckley 

J. Hankinson Carter 



THE 1962 MEDIC STAFF 



The preparation of a yearbook is, at one and the 
same time, a stimulating challenge, a great responsibility, 
and a seemingly insurmountable task. At no other time 
and in no other place are the day-by-day and year-by- 
year events of our education brought together, to be 
preserved for all time. The MEDIC staff has attempted 
to follow a policy which embodies individual recall, 
prompted by words, phrases, and pictures. In the process 
we have dealt with many dark situations with the light 
quip and the humorous barb, while trying not to lose sight 
of the awesome debt that we owe to those who initiated 
us into the fraternity of Medicine. 

Ours is not the first class in the long history of 
Hahnemann to have been decimated, nor is it the first 
class to have undergone numerous transitions and educa- 
tional forays. But the experience which occupied us for 
the past four years was unique to us and it is for this very 
reason that the MEDIC adopted its policy. The only true 
recording of the Class of '62 is engraved on the hearts 
and minds of its members. 



76 




ENOS TRENT ANDREWS 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Lambda Kappa Fraternity 
Society £ 



A.B., M.D. 

Lincoln University Phi 
Undergraduate Research 



Internship 



ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL, 
Syracuse, N. Y. 



77 



Internship 



PAUL WESLEY BAKER, JR. 



U. S. ARMY, WOMACH ARMY HOSPITAL, 
Fort Bragg, N. C. 



SC.B. # M.D. 



Haddonfield, New Jersey £ Dickinson College % Alpha 
Kappa Kappa Fraternity, Vice-President 




78 




HENRY MARVIN BERK 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 4 
Phi Lambda Kappa Fraternity 
Society £ Surgical Society 



M.D. 

Saint Joseph's College 
) Undergraduate Research 



Internship 



ABINGTON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, 
Abington, Pa. 



79 




LLOYD HAY BREMER 



A.B., M.D. 



Convent, New Jersey £ Hamilton College Phi Chi Fra- 
ternity £ MacFadyen Gynecological Society 



Internship 



HENRY FORD HOSPITAL, 
Detroit, Mich. 



80 



Internship 



U. S. ARMY, IRELAND ARMY HOSPITAL 
Fort Knox, Ky. 



STANTON R. BROWN 

Norristown, Pennsylvania 
tian Medical Society 



A.B., M.D. 

Rutgers University % Chris- 




81 



Internship 



CLIFFORD JAMES BUCKLEY 



HAHNEMANN HOSPITAL, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



A.B., M.D. 



Rahway, New Jersey University of Pennsylvania £ 
Alpha Omega Alpha Fraternity, President £ Aesculapian 
Society Undergraduate Research Society Surgical 
Society £ 1962 Medic, Business Manager % 




82 




FRANCIS LOUIS BUONO 

New Haven, Connecticut { 
Student Institute # 



A.B., M.A., M.D. 

University of Connecticut # 



Internship 



U. S. AIR FORCE, USAF HOSPITAL, 
Wright-Patterson, Dayton, Ohio 



83 




IVAN LEWIS BUTLER 



B.S., M.D. 



York, Pennsylvania Franklin and Marshall College £ 
Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity £ MacFadyen Gynecological 
Society Arts and Sciences Ball, Co-Chairman 1962 
Medic Staff # 



Internship 



YORK HOSPITAL, 
York, Pa. 



84 



Internship 



RONALD P. CAPUTO 



MAINE MEDICAL CENTER. 

Portland, Maine 



B.S., M.D. 



New Kensington, Pennsylvania Georgetown University 
Phi Chi Fraternity £ Aesculapian Society Alexis 
Carrel Society f 




85 



Internship 



JOSEPH HANKINSON CARTER, JR. 



YORK HOSPITAL, 
York, Pa. 



A.B., M.D. 



Philadelphia, Pennsylvania £ Amherst College Alpha 
Kappa Kappa Fraternity Q Aesculapian Society £ Under- 
graduate Research Society 1962 Medic, Business 
Manager £ 




86 




ANDREW N. CATTANO 



A.B., M.D. 



Summit, New Jersey Dartmouth College Eben J. 
Carey Memorial Award in Anatomy % Student Institute, 
President % Student A.M. A., Delegate Class President 
% Phi Chi Fraternity £ Aesculapian Society 



Internship 



LANKENAU HOSPITAL, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



87 




JERRY I. COHEN 



M.D. 



Merion Station, Pennsylvania University of Pennsylvania 
Phi Lambda Kappa Fraternity £ 



Internship 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY HOSPITAL, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



88 



Internship 



FRANCIS PAUL COLIZZO, JR. 



HARRISBURG HOSPITAL, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



B.S., M.D. 



Scranton, Pennsylvania University of Scranton Alpha 
Omega Alpha Fraternity Student Institute Phi Chi 
Fraternity, President Undergraduate Research Society 
Alexis Carrel Society Aesculapian Society 




89 



Internship 



JAMES FREDERICK COMPTON 



MIAMI VALLEY HOSPITAL, 
Dayton, Ohio 



E-.SC., M.D. 



Dayton, Ohio Ohio State University Undergraduate 
Research Society £ Aesculapian Society 




90 




THOMAS EDWARD CREAMER 



A.B., M.D. 



Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
graduate Research Society 



Temple University Under- 
Alexis Carrel Society 



Internship 



NAZARETH HOSPITAL, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 




CASIMIR CZARNECKI 



A.B., M.D. 



Philadelphia, Pennsylvania University of Pennsylvania 
Phi Chi Fraternity Alexis Carrel Society Undergradu- 
ate Research Society MacFadyen Gynecological Society 



Internship 



NAZARETH HOSPITAL, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



92 



Internship 



IRVING DARDIK 



HAHNEMANN HOSPITAL, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



M.D. 



Springfield, Delco., Pennsylvania University of Pennsyl- 
vania Phi Lambda Kappa Fraternity 




93 



Internship 



ELMER R. DECH 



HARRISBURG POLYCLINIC HOSPITAL, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



B.S. # M.D. 



Robesonia, Pennsylvania Franklin and Marshall College 
<$ Undergraduate Research Society Aesculapian Society £ 




94 




MARVIN DEREZIN 



A.B., M.D. 



Philadelphia, Pennsylvania University of Pennsylvania 
% Alpha Omega Alpha Fraternity, Vice-President Hoff- 
man La Roche Award £ Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity 
Undergraduate Research Society Psychiatric Society £ 



Internship 



PHILADELPHIA GENERAL HOSPITAL, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



95 




JAMES G. FAUNCE, III 

Overbrook Hills, Pennsylvania 
versity £ Phi Chi Fraternity 
Alexis Carrel Society 



B.S., M.D. 

Pennsylvania State Uni- 
Aesculapian Society £ 



THE BRYN MAWR HOSPITAL, 
Bryn Mcrwr, Pa. 



96 



Internship 



HARRISBURG POLYCLINIC HOSPITAL, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



JAMES ARTHUR FAUST A.B., M.D. 

Garden City, New York # Yale University # Undergrad- 
uate Research Society # 




97 



Internship 



RICHARD MAX FOXX 



HAHNEMANN HOSPITAL, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



A.B., M.D. 



Irvington, New Jersey Brandeis University Phi Delta 
Epsilon Fraternity Lunar Society £ 1962 Medic, Editor- 
in-Chief A 




98 




BERNARD FRIEDBERG M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania £ Temple University % Phi 
Delta Epsilon Fraternity Lunar Society £ 



Internship 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY HOSPITAL, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



99 




KARL A. GIULIAN 



B.S., M.D. 



Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State University 
Phi Chi Fraternity £ MacFadyen Gynecological Society 
Alexis Carrel Society £ 



Internship 



NAZARETH HOSPITAL, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



100 



Internship 



LARRY D. HAMMERBERG 



McKEESPORT HOSPITAL, 
McKeesport, Pa. 



B.S., M.D. 



McKeesport, Pennsylvania Wheaton College £ Chris- 
tian Medical Society, President £ MacFadyen Gynecological 
Society f 




101 



Internship 



McKEESPORT HOSPITAL, 
McKeesport, Pa. 



FRED CONRAD HAUSLER B.S., M.D. 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh £ 
Christian Medical Society £ 




102 




EDWIN JOHN HENRIE 



A.B., M.D. 



Wynnewood, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State University 
Undergraduate Research Society % Surgical Society £ 
Lunar Society £ 1962 Medic, Literary Editor 9 



Internship 



U. S. NAVY. U. S. NAVAL HOSPITAL, 
Portsmouth, Va. 



103 




CHARLES RUSSELL HENRY 



A.B., M.D. 



St. Davids, Pennsylvania Franklin and Marshall College 
Student Institute, Treasurer Phi Chi Fraternity £ 



Internship 



THE BRYN MAWR HOSPITAL, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 



104 



Internship 



OUR LADY OF LOURDES HOSPITAL, 
Camden, N. J. 



JAMES JOSEPH HIGBEE B.S., M.D. 

Woodbury, New Jersey Saint Joseph's College Alexis 
Carrel Society 




105 



Internship 



PAUL ALLAN IRONSIDE, JR. 



WEST JERSEY HOSPITAL, 
Camden, N. J. 



B.S., M.D. 



Haddonfield, New Jersey Washington and Lee University 
£ Phi Chi Fraternity Aesculapian Society Under- 
graduate Research Society f 




106 




GEORGE HUHN JARDEN, JR. A.B., M.D. 

Rose Valley, Pennsylvania Lafayette College # Phi 
Beta Pi Fraternity 



Znternship 



ST. LUKE'S HOSPITAL, 
Bethlehem, Pa. 



107 




N. RAGNER JOHNSON 



A.B., M.A., M.D. 



Los Angeles, California £ University of California at Los 
Angeles Phi Beta Pi Fraternity Christian Medical 
Society £ MacFadyen Gynecological Society £ Surgical 
Society £ 



Internship 



SANTA FE COAST LINES HOSPITAL, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



108 



Internship 



PETER A. KEBLISH, JR. 



ST. LUKE'S HOSPITAL, 
Bethlehem, Pa. 



A.B., M.D. 



Glen Lyon, Pennsylvania University of Pennsylvania % 
Phi Chi Fraternity % Alexis Carrel Society £ Orthopedic 
Club • 




109 



Internship 



ALAN KELLERMAN 



MOUNT SINAI HOSPITAL, 
New York, N. Y. 



M.D. 



Atlantic City, New Jersey Dickinson College Alpha 
Omega Alpha Fraternity £ Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity £ 
Undergraduate Psychiatric Society 




110 




HANG SUN KIM 

Seoul, Korea £ Grove City College 



B.S., M.D. 



Internship 



ALLENTOWN HOSPITAL, 
Allentown, Pa. 



II I 




MARK STEPHEN KRAMER 



A.B., M.D. 



Coatesville, Pennsylvania Johns Hopkins University 
Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity Undergraduate Research 
Society £ 



Internship 



HARRISBURG POLYCLINIC HOSPITAL, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



112 



Internship 



PHILIP SALVATORE LA VERDE 



U S. ARMY, WILLIAM BEAUMONT GENERAL HOSPITAL, 
El Paso, Texas 



A.B., M.D. 



Atlantic City, New Jersey Rutgers University Surgical 
Society Newman Club £ 




13 



Internship 



HOMER JOHN LILLIE, JR. 



U. S. ARMY, MADIGAN GENERAL HOSPITAL, 
Seattle, Wash. 



A.B., M.D. 



Kinsman, Ohio ® Miami University £ Phi Beta Pi Fra- 
ternity, Vice-President Aesculapian Society Ortho- 
pedic Club 




114 




BARRY ISADORE LOIGMAN 



M.D. 



Philadelphia, Pennsylvania LaSalle College Alpha 
Omega Alpha Fraternity Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity 
Undergraduate Psychiatric Society Q 



Internship 



HARRISBURG HOSPITAL, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



115 




LIONEL U. MAILLOUX, JR. 



B.S., M.D. 



Woonsocket, Rhode Island Georgetown University £ 
Aesculapian Society £ Alexis Carrel Society Ortho- 
pedic Club # 1962 Medic, Photography Editor # 



Internship 



HARRISBURG HOSPITAL, 
Harrisburg, Fa. 



16 



Internship 



BRENDAN VINCENT MC ADAMS, JR. 



HARRISBURG HOSPITAL. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



A.B., M.D. 



Williamsport, Pennsylvania Dartmouth College Class 
Treasurer £ Phi Chi Fraternity Aesculapian Society 
Alexis Carrel Society Orthopedic Club £ 




Internship 



ALLENTOWN HOSPITAL, 
Allentown, Pa. 



TREVOR LEE MC KISSICK 

New Castle, Pennsylvania ( 
College 



A.B., M.D. 

Washington and Jefferson 




18 




KENNETH EARLE MILLER 



A.B., M.D. 



San Leandro, California % Stanford University Class 
Vice-President £ Undergraduate Research Society 
Aesculapian Society £ Alexis Carrel Society £ 



Internship 



SAN DIEGO COUNTY GENERAL HOSPITAL, 
San Diego, Calif. 



19 




SEYMOUR WALTER MILSTEIN 

B.S., M.S., PH.D., M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania £ City College of New York 
Hahnemann Medical College Jefferson Medical College 
Undergraduate Research Society £ 



Internship 



MISERICORDIA HOSPITAL, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



120 



Internship 



QUEENS HOSPITAL, 
Honolulu, Hawaii 



YOSHIO MIYAZAKI B.S., M.D. 

Bridgeton, New Jersey Ursinus College Phi Beta Pi 
Fraternity Undergraduate Research Society Christian 
Medical Society £ Orthopedic Club # 




121 



Internship 



THE BRYN MAWR HOSPITAL, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 



FRANK MICHAEL NAGY A.B., M.D. 

Milford, New Jersey £ Lafayette College Class Vice- 
President Phi Beta Pi Fraternity Aesculapian 
Society 




122 




JOHN DANIEL NORANTE 



A.B., M.D. 



Rahway, New Jersey % Princeton University £ Phi Chi 
Fraternity % Aesculapian Society £ Alexis Carrel 
Society 



Internship 



MOUNTAINSIDE HOSPITAL, 
Montclair, N. J. 



123 




JOSEPH F. O MALLEY 



B.S., M.D. 



Doylestown, Pennsylvania Saint Joseph's College 
Alpha Omega Alpha Fraternity Class Secretary 
Undergraduate Research Society Alexis Carrel Society 



Internship 



HAHNEMANN HOSPITAL, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



124 



Internship 



HAHNEMANN HOSPITAL, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



THEODORE OSLICK A.B., M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania # University oi Pennsylvania # 
Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity, President # Interfraternity Coun- 
cil • Undergraduate Research Society # Undergraduate 
Psychiatric Society # 




125 



Internship 



HARRISBURG HOSPITAL, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



PETER C. PATUKAS 

Coatesville, Pennsylvania 
College £ 



B.S., M.D. 

Franklin and Marshall 




126 




NORMAN EUGENE PETERS 



A.B., M.D. 



Hazleton, Pennsylvania Lafayette College £ Phi Beta 
Pi Fraternity, Editor £ 



Internship 



U. S. NAVY, U. S. NAVAL HOSPITAL, 
Charleston, S. C. 



127 




CARMELA POSSEMATO B.S., M.D. 

Yonkers, New York £ Columbia University £ Undergradu- 
ate Psychiatric Society £ 



Internship 



PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



128 



Internship 



FRANK MICHAEL PUGLIESE, JR. 



BAYLOR UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 
Dallas, Texas 



B.S., M.D. 



Kingston, Pennsylvania University of Notre Dame 
Phi Chi Fraternity Aesculapian Society Surgical 
Society £ Arts and Sciences Ball, Co-Chairman 




129 



Internship 



U. S. AIR FORCE, USAF HOSPITAL 
Travis, Fairfield, Calif. 



SAMUEL CHARLES PUMA A.B., M.D. 

Wyoming, Pennsylvania ® Wilkes College Phi Beta Pi 
Fraternity, Archon % Alexis Carrel Society $ 




130 




MORTON WILLIAM RICHMAN 



A.B., M.SC, O.D., M.D. 



Philadelphia, Pennsylvania £ Temple University £ Ohio 
State University % Pennsylvania State College of Optometry 
Class Treasurer £ Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity, Secretary 
Undergraduate Research Society 



Internship 



HAHNEMANN HOSPITAL, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



131 




MARTIN JOHN ROACHE A.B., M.D. 

Pcroli, Pennsylvania Villanova University Under- 
graduate Psychiatric Society Newman Club 



Internship 



MISERICORDIA HOSPITAL, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



32 



Internship 



LESTER ELISHA ROBBINS, JR. 



HELENE FULD HOSPITAL 
Trenton, N. J. 



A.B., M.D. 



Hamilton Square, New Jersey Princeton University 
Phi Chi Fraternity Aesculapian Society £ 







33 



Internship 



CHARITY HOSPITAL, 
New Orleans, La. 



SHERMAN ARTHUR ROBINS 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
University of Pennsylvania 
Society % 



A.B., A.M., M.D. 

Northwestern University £ 
Undergraduate Psychiatric 




34 




DAVID ROSEN 



A.B., M.D. 



Philadelphia, Pennsylvania % University of Pennsylvania £ 
Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity £ Undergraduate Research 
Society 



Internship 



FRANKFORD HOSPITAL, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



35 




NATHAN SCHATZ 



B.S., M.D. 



Philadelphia, Pennsylvania £ Temple University £ Alpha 
Omega Alpha Fraternity Phi Lambda Kappa Fraternity # 



Internship 



ALBERT EINSTEIN MEDICAL CENTER, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



136 



Internship 



S. WILLIAM SEIDMAN 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY HOSPITAL, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



A.B., M.D. 



Penn Wynne, Pennsylvania £ University of Pennsylvania 
Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity 




137 



Internship 



PHILADELPHIA GENERAL HOSPITAL, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



GIRARD SEITTER, III 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania I 
graduate Research Society 
Society 



A.B., M.D. 

Gettysburg College Under- 
) Undergraduate Psychiatric 




38 




MELVIN SINGER 



A.B., M.D. 



Merion, Pennsylvania £ University of Pennsylvania % 
Alpha Omega Alpha Fraternity, Secretary £ Phi Delta Epsilon 
Fraternity % Undergraduate Research Society % Under- 
graduate Psychiatric Society £ 



Internship 



PHILADELPHIA GENERAL HOSPITAL, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



139 




BERNARD M. SKLAR 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Delta Epsilon Fraternity 
Society 



A.B., M.D. 

Temple University £ Phi 
Undergraduate Psychiatric 



Internship 



HERRICK MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 
Berkeley, Calif. 



140 



Internship 



ALLENTOWN HOSPITAL, 
Allentown, Pa. 



HERBERT I. SOLLER BS " M - D - 

lazleton, Pennsylvania • Franklin and Marshall College 
) Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity, Secretary # 




141 



Internship 



JACK L. SOLOMON 



ABINGTON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, 
Abington, Pa. 



B.S., M.D. 



Philadelphia, Pennsylvania £ Villanova University % Phi 
Lambda Kappa Fraternity, President Interfraternity Coun- 
cil, Secretary Q Undergraduate Research Society Under- 
graduate Psychiatric Society 




142 




HENRY DANIEL SOLTYS A.B., M.D. 

Camden, New Jersey Rutgers University Phi Chi Fra- 
ternity Undergraduate Research Society £ Alexis Carrel 
Society Q Surgical Society 



Internship 



WEST JERSEY HOSPITAL, 
Camden, N. J. 



143 




WILLIAM E. SPANGLER 



B.S., M.D. 



Ardmore, Pennsylvania Ursinus College # Class Treas- 
urer £ Phi Beta Pi Fraternity 



Internship 



HARRISBURG HOSPITAL, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



144 



Internship 



STANLEY SPITZER 



HAHNEMANN HOSPITAL. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



B.S., M.D. 



Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Swarthmore College Alpha 
Omega Alpha Fraternity Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity % 
Undergraduate Research Society, Chairman 




145 



Internship 



ARNOLD MARTIN STEIN 



ALBERT EINSTEIN MEDICAL CENTER, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



A.B., M.D. 



Philadelphia, Pennsylvania University of Pennsylvania 
Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity £ 



146 





JOEL STEIN 

Elkins Park, Pennsylvania 
Lambda Kappa Fraternity 



B.S., M.D. 

Villanova University Phi 



Internship 



ALBERT EINSTEIN MEDICAL CENTER, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



147 




LE ROY M. STEINBRECHER 



B.S., M.D. 



Conestoga, Pennsylvania Elizabethtown College Chris- 
tian Medical Society £ 



Internship 



LANCASTER GENERAL HOSPITAL, 
Lancaster, Pa. 



148 



Internship 



WILLIAM BRYAN STRONG 



ST. VINCENT HOSPITAL, 
Worcester. Mass. 



B.S., M.D. 



Cleveland, Ohio £ College of the Holy Cross Student 
Institute £ Undergraduate Research Society Alexis 
Carrel Society, President 




149 



Internship 



THOMAS HIROSHI TERUYA 



QUEENS HOSPITAL, 
Honolulu, Hawaii 



A.B., M.D. 



Honolulu, Hawaii £ Kenyon College 9 Phi Beta Pi Fra- 
ternity £ Undergraduate Research Society % 




50 




RICHARD H. WARD 



A.B., M.D. 



Brockway, Pennsylvania Washington and Jefferson Col- 
lege Aesculapian Society £ 



Internship 



HARRISBURG HOSPITAL, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



151 




LOWELL WENDELL WILDER 



A.B., M.D. 



Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania £ Dartmouth College # Phi Chi 
Fraternity % Undergraduate Research Society Christian 
Medical Society £ Surgical Society % 



Internship 



HEALTH CENTER HOSPITALS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



152 



Internship 



HENRY FORD HOSPITAL, 
Detroit, Mich. 



A. KENT WILLIAMS 



A. A., A.B., M.D. 



Scranton, Pennsylvania Keystone Junior College Lafay- 
ette College 




153 



Internship 



EDWIN S. WILSON, JR. 



HAHNEMANN HOSPITAL, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



A.B., M.D. 



Atlantic City, New Jersey University of Pennsylvania 
Alpha Omega Alpha Fraternity $ Dean's Award, 1960 
Student Institute # 




154 




RICHARD ALAN WITZIG 

Maplewood, New Jersey f 
Kappa Kappa Fraternity £ 
% Aesculapian Society £ 



B.S., M.D. 

Lehigh University £ Alpha 
Undergraduate Research Society 



Internship 



PHILADELPHIA GENERAL HOSPITAL, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



155 




WILLIAM WERNER YOUNG 



B.S., M.D. 



Hagerstown, Maryland £ Franklin and Marshall College 
Alpha Omega Alpha Fraternity % Phi Chi Fraternity 
Aesculapian Society, President 



Internship 



HARRISBURG HOSPITAL, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



156 



Internship 



HAHNEMANN HOSPITAL. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



VINCENT JOSEPH ZARRO B.S., M.S., M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania # Philadelphia College of Phar- 
macy and Science Alpha Omega Alpha Fraternity £ 
Alexis Carrel Society # 




157 



PATRONS 



Simon Ball, M.D. 
Francis E. Barse, M.D. 
Nathaniel G. Berk, M.D. 
Donald Berkowitz, M.D. 
Tibor Bodi, M.D. 
Albert Brest, M.D. 
Michael P. Brignola, M.D. 
James M. Brittain 
Benjamin Calesnick, M.D. 
Charles S. Cameron, M.D. 
Alfred J. Catenacci, M.D. 
Oscar Corn, M.D. 
John H. Davie, M.D. 
Joseph S. DeFrates, Ph.D. 
Thaddeus L. Deren, M.D. 
Joseph R. DiPalma, M.D. 
Daniel F. Downing, M.D. 
Robert G. Dunlop 
Edward W. Ehrlich, M.D. 
Myer Feinstein 
Philip Fieman, M.D. 
Carl C. Fischer, M.D. 
Morton Fuchs, M.D. 
Gerhard J. Gislason, M.D. 
Paul J. Grotzinger, M.D. 
D. Dwight Grove, M.D. 
Hahnemann Hospital Association 
Van Buren O. Hammett, M.D. 
Marvin Hand, M.D. 
Herbert P. Harkins, M.D. 
Malcolm L. Hayward, M.D. 
John F. E. Hippel 
Robert M. Hunter, M.D. 
Joseph E. Imbriglia, M.D. 
Andrew F. Jannette, M.D. 
Donald T. Jones, M.D. 
William F. Kellow, M.D. 
Lowell L. Lane, M.D. 
J. Stauffer Lehman, M.D. 
George C. Lieb 



William Likoff, M.D. 
Philip Lisan, M.D. 
William C. Livingood, M.D. 
N. Volney Ludwick, M.D. 
Bruce V. MacFadyen, M.D. 
Watson Malone, III 
Theodore H. Mandell, M.D. 
Daniel J. McCarty, Jr., M.D. 
Raymond J. McGrath, M.D. 
John Moyer, M.D. 
Franklin J. Myers, Jr., D.D.S. 
Leslie Nicholas, M.D. 
Henry T. Nichols, M.D. 
John H. Nodine, M.D. 
Wilbur W. Oaks, Jr., M.D. 
Axel K. Olsen, M.D. 
E. Spencer Paisley, M.D. 
Newlin Paxson, M.D. 
A. E. Pearce, M.D. 
Domenic J. Pontarelli, M.D. 
Thomas K. Rathmell, M.D. 
Stanley P. Reimann, M.D. 
William A. Reishtein, M.D. 
Demetrius S. Saris, M.D. 
Bernard L. Segal, M.D. 
Samuel Simkins, M.D. 
Hose Sosa, M.D. 
Seymour Stein, M.D. 
Francis X. Sweeney, M.D. 
Harold Taggart, M.D. 
L. G. L. Thomas 
Charles M. Thompson, M.D. 
Frank Tropea, Jr., M.D. 
Beatrice Troyan, M.D. 
Alex W. Ulin, M.D. 
Joseph F. Uricchio, M.D. 
Harry Weaver, Jr., M.D. 
Franklin H. West, M.D. 
Charles C Wolferth, Jr., M.D. 



158 



The HAHNEMANN 

MEDICAL COLLEGE and 

HOSPITAL of PHILADELPHIA 



extends sincere congratulations to all the members of the I I5tli graduating 
class of 1962. We wish each of you every success in your years of profes- 
sional service to mankind, and trust that you will recall with fond 
memories your student days as "one of the Hahnemann Family." 

We know too that you will always he proud of your Alma Mater for 
her progressive role in the fully accredited training of twentieth 
century physicians, teachers, nurses, medical technicians and research 
investigators.* 

We trust you will continue to be an "active member" of the Hahne- 
mann Family through your ever loyal interest, service and financial 
support. 



^Catalogs and additional information 

pertaining to the curriculum in 

each of these fields may be obtained from 



THE REGISTRAR 

235 North Fifteenth Street 
Philadelphia 2, Pa. 



159 



Dedicated to the 
discovery and development 
of better medicines 
for better health- 
since 1841. 










1 60 



ATLANTIC CITY HOSPITAL 

1925 PACIFIC AVENUE 
ATLANTIC CITY, NEW JERSEY 





a 1 "Tiri'TTfii 




New Intern-Resident Building at Atlantic City Hospital. 
One of the first Motel-Type in U. S. 




One of 18 apartments — completely furnished for single or 
married Interns and Residents. 



A.M.A. Approved for Internship 

A.M. A. Approved for Residencies in 
Medicine, Surgery and Pathology 

New 15 Bed Self-Care Unit 



285 heds (30% of which are 
Ward Service) 43,000 Clinic 
Visits per year. 

18,750 Emergencies per year. 



161 



BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF '62 



McNEIL LABORATORIES, Inc. 

FORT WASHINGTON, PA. 



| McNEIL [ 



MEDICAL SPECIALTIES COMPANY 



226 NORTH FIFTEENTH STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 2, PA. 



Supplies and Equipment for 

PHYSICIANS, HOSPITALS 

and 

LABORATORIES 



162 



Compliments <»/ 
YOUR SAMA LIFE* REPRESENTATIVES 

EDWIN O. WALKER 

and Associates 

2122 Land Title Building 
PHILADELPHIA 2, PA. 

Phone: LO 3-8181 

THE MINNESOTA MUTUAL LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 

* Student American Medical Association Life Insurance 



Congratulations! 
and Welcome 

to the 
Class of 1962 



FROM YOUR 

HAHNEMANN 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



163 



Congratulations and Best fFish.es 
to the Graduating Class 

MERIN STUDIOS OF PHOTOGRAPHY 

OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS TO THE 1962 MEDIC 

All portraits appearing in this publication 
have been placed on File in our Studio 
and can be duplicated at any time. 



WA 3-0146 
30147 
3-0148 



Write or Phone Us for Information 



1010 CHESTNUT STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 7, PENNA. 



Compliments of 

SACRED HEART HOSPITAL 

A 500 BED GENERAL HOSPITAL 
in ALLENTOWN, PENNA. 



OFFERING 

• Ten Rotating Internships 

• Approved Residencies in 

• Surgery, Medicine, 

• Pathology, Radiology, 

• Obstetrics and Gynecology 



164 



Where One Sandwich is a Meal 



BEN'S DELICATESSEN 

and 

SANDWICH SHOP 



2 IK iN'OUTII 15th STREET 



THE 
ADAMS-LESSACK COMPANY 

Stationers 



College Supplies (htr Specialty 



Southeast Corner 

15th and HACK STREETS 

PHILADELPHIA 2, PA. 



LOcust 7-1133 



LOcust 7-1134 




Ortho 




Pharmaceutical, Biological, and Diagnostic Products 
FOR THE MEDICAL PROFESSION 

ORTHO 
PHARMACEUTICAL CORPORATION 

RARITAN, NEW JERSEY 



165 



WILLIAMS, BROWN & EMU, 
Inc. 

Medical - Laboratory Equipment 



• Microscopes 


• Clinical 


• Stethoscopes 


Equipment 


• Diagnostic 


• Hematology Sets 


Equipment 


• Tuning Forks 


• Blood Pressure 


• Percussion 


Equipment 


Hammers 



"First with the finest — Since 1885" 

WILLIAMS, BROWN & EARLE, Inc. 

904-906 CHESTNUT STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 7, PENNSYLVANIA 



Best Wishes 
To the Class of 1962 



HAHNEMANN 

UNDERGRADUATE 

WIVES' ASSOCIATION 



Partners in health: 



You . . . 



Your Doctor . 



Your Hospital 



BLUE CROSS and BLUE SHIELD 

ASSOCIATED HOSPITAL SERVICE OF 
PHILADELPHIA 

MEDICAL SERVICE ASSOCIATION 
OF PENNSYLVANIA 



166 



Compliments of 

THE 
SAMSON LABORATORIES 

1619 SPRUCE STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 3, PA. 

Modern Laboratory Service for 
Modern Medicine 


Congratulationi to the 
CLASS OF '62 

from 

SOL and \ \\ E 

at the 

COLLEGE 
LUNCHEONETTE 

Facing the College for 
Twenty-eight Years 


Special Consideration Given to 
Hahnemann Students and Staff 

LIBERTY PHARMACY 

107 No. BROAD STREET 

Jos. H. Smith, P.H.G. 
B. W. Sobeix, P.H.G. 

LOcust 3-9488 LOcust 7-9120 


BOERICKE & RUNYON 

Division of BOERICKE & TAFEL 

1011 ARCH STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 7, PA. 

Manufacturing Pharmacists and Publishers 

A COMPLETE LINE OF 

Homeopathic Preparations, Specialties, 

FRESH Green Plant Tinctures and Books. 

Boericke's Materia Medica with Repertory — $8.00 



167 



QUAKER METAL 
MANUFACTURING CO. 



2228-38 NORTH 28th STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 32, PA. 



Manufacturers of 

LABORATORY CABINETS 

INSTALLED IN HAHNEMANN 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



THE 

STUDENT 

INSTITUTE 



168 






CONEMAUGH VALLEY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

J 086 FRANKLIN STREET JOHNSTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA 




A fully accredited voluntary general hospital of 500 beds and 40 bassinets. The hospital is located 
in an industrial community of approximately 65,000. Greater Johnstown including the boroughs 
surrounding the city has a population of 165,000 and is located 70 miles east of Pittsburgh and 120 
miles west of Harrisburg. 

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 

A twelve month rotational program beginning July 1 provides diversity of experience. The 
intern spends two months in pediatrics, two months in obstetrics-gynecology, four months in medicine 
(including psychiatry) and four months in surgery (including duty in the emergency room ); labora- 
tory anesthesiology and radiology experience is integrated into the total program. 

CONFERENCES 

Clinical Pathological Conference — biweekly Journal Club — weekly 

Educational Conference — weekly Medical Staff Conference — monthly 

Grand Rounds — monthly Radiology Conference — weekly 

Obstetrical — Pediatric Staff Conference — monthly Surgical Staff Conference — monthly 

Post-graduate Lectures by nationally known physicians — quarterly 

CLINICAL MATERIAL 

Over 15,500 admissions a year. Out-Patient visits number 8,000 in 11 clinics. 



In Patient 
Diagnosis 

Cancer 

Communicable 

Dental 

Gynecology 



Number 

of Cases 

436 

17 

298 
760 



Medicine 3,645 

Neurology 161 



In Patient Number 

Diagnosis of Cases 

Neurosurgery 36 

Newborn 1,540 

Obstetrics 1,862 

Opthalmology 259 

Orthopedics 410 

Otorhinolaryngology 184 



In Patient Number 

Diagnosis of Cases 

Pediatrics 2,615 

Psychiatry 365 

Surgery 1,473 

Tuberculosis 19 

Traumatic Surgery 672 

Urology 768 



FACILITIES 

The monthly stipend for interns is $250 plus maintenance and uniforms. Living quarters for 
single interns are provided at the hospital. Apartments are provided married house staff members. 

APPROVED RESIDENCIES 

Anesthesiology, Pathology and Surgical Residency appointments are made from the Intern Staff 
at Memorial Hospital and other approved hospitals. 

INVITATION 

Medical students are invited to visit the hospital to discuss internship and residence training 
programs with the Superintendent, the Director of Medical Education, Resident and Intern Staff and 
Active Staff members. 



THE 


HOWARD P. FOLEY 


COMPANY 


ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION 


90 ROCHELLE AVENUE 


PHILADELPHIA 28, PA. 


LO 3-8679 




Wp 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


"LIVE AND LET LIVE" 




• WILLIAM B. KOHN * 


MISERICORDIA 




HOSPITAL 


STANDARD 




OPTICAL EQUIPMENT 




COMPANY 


* 


223 N. 15th STREET 


54th & CEDAR AVENUE 


PHILADELPHIA 2, PA. 


PHILADELPHIA 43, PA. 



170 



CoRtiSonE 



". . . probably useful only in the treatment 
of Addison's disease." 

No knowledgeable person could have pre- 
dicted more for cortisone. The time was 
April, 1948. The conclusion by a panel of 
distinguished clinicians that this medical 
new-comer, the first of the corticosteroids, 
would probably be of value only against one 
rare disease reflected the best in scientific 
thinking. No one could have foreseen that in 
the coming decade and a half, the corticos- 
teroids would be utilized against more than 
50 diseases and disorders, and that millions 
of persons would benefit each year. 

Merck & Co., which pioneered with corti- 
sone, could trace its interest in the marvelous 
secretions from the adrenal cortex back to 
1933, when it had cooperated in studies at 
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. World 
War II gave the studies urgency when it was 
reported— falsely, as it turned out— that Ger- 
man aviators were making use of an adrenal 
extract to fly as high as 40,000 feet without 
oxygen. 

The federal government had lost interest 
by 1944, but Merck continued to push ahead 
with the adrenal program, cooperating closely 
in this work with Dr. Edward C. Kendall and 
his colleagues at the Mayo Clinic. It was Dr. 
Kendall who had first worked out the for- 
mulas for the corticosteroids. The first lab- 
oratory synthesis of cortisone, a mile-stone in 
medicinal chemistry, was accomplished by a 




brilliant young Merck scientist, Dr. Lewis H. 
Sarett, in December, 1944. 

It was in September, 1948, five months 
after the clinicians had issued their evalua- 
tion, that Dr. Philip S. Hench, also of the 
Mayo Clinic, made medical history with a 
series of cortisone injections given to a 29- 
year-old arthritic woman. The patient, who 
had been bedfast and virtually unable to 
move, delightedly went shopping after one 
week of therapy. A new era in medicine had 
been born. 

Within the research laboratories of Merck 
Sharp & Dohme, which came into existence 
through the merger of Merck with Sharp & 
Dohme in 1953, the quest for a better anti- 
inflammatory agent has never ceased. In 
these laboratories, scientists probe deeply 
into the basic nature of inflammatory disease. 
Chemists synthesize and study a wide variety 
of corticosteroids; pharmacologists, physiol- 
ogists and physicians check these and other 
compounds to see how they measure up in 
activity and absence of unwanted side effects. 

Merck Sharp & Dohme's research and de- 
velopment in the corticosteroid field is but 
one of the company's many programs of sci- 
entific investigation. The medical scientists 
engaged in this work are the trustees of the 
better medicines of tomorrow, which are now 
being created in their test tubes and minds. 



171 



Best Wishes to the 
CLASS OF 1962 



ABE'S 
LUNCHEONETTE 



BEST SANDWICHES IN TOWN 



ICE CREAM 

MA 7-5400 



MILK 

EV 6-1234 



YOUR FAMILY GETS THE MOST 
FROM 




•Foremost 




Also Makers of 
DOLLY MADISON ICE CREAM 

FOREMOST DAIRIES INC. 



albert einstein medical center 

Philadelphia, pa. 



"The result of the educative process is capacity for further education." 

— Jolui Dewey 

Residencies in: anesthesiology; internal medicine; obstetrics and gynecology: 
orthopedic surgery; pathology; pediatrics; psychiatry; radiology; surgery and 
urology. 

Facilities: northern division, 550 beds (135 ward), and southern division, 300 
beds (88 ward). 

For internship and residency information, write to: Executive Vice President and 
Medical Director, Albert Einstein Medical Center. York and Tabor Roads, 
Philadelphia 41, Pa. 



172 






ry of Medicii) 



The story of medicine 
...Your story now 




The story of medicine has many chapters . . . 
and the cast of characters is large. Wyeth is 
proud to be a part of the story; proud to serve 
as your ally as you begin adding your own 
chapter. 

Wyeth pledges you: 

therapeutic agents of merit, and full informa- 
tion about them 

continued research and development of new, 
useful pharmaceuticals 

alert, trained representatives to service your 
needs 



Wyeth Laboratories Philadelphia 1, Pa. 





173 




JOHN J. NESBITT, INC. 

STATE ROAD & RHAWN STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 36. PENNSYLVANIA 



BEST WISHES 



from 



HAHNEMANN BOOK STORE 



SHIRLEY E. MOHN 



171 



Congratulations 
from the 

HORN & HARD ART 
RESTAURANT 

2-14-18 NORTH BROAD STREET 


Have You Had a Financial 
(Inch Up Lately? 

^. — 1^_^ The Green Stuff bo 
/ #2\ Vital to Good Sound 
\wCs 'X* \f Financial Health 

\, n-jr- J J won't alwayi flow 

S-~^^?^Ni I Store some of it awaj 

/ ^JtS/CL ^ or f ,,,urr U8e > ^ e 

S-^^| ;'-\\ will .i • lil Dividends to 

\^^^^^y year. I\i\- 

) A / able June .'{Olh and 

L^J 1/ December .'Hxt at the 

^O rate of 4%. 

LIBERTY FEDERAL 

Savings and Loan Association 

Main Office 

So Convenient — A Few Steps Away 

202 N. Broad Street 

Branch 
Stenton Avenue and Duval Street 


Phone: WAlnut 5-4432 

H. PERILSTEIN 

Glass — Mirrors 

524 LOMBARD STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 47, PA. 


Some of the World's Most 

Brilliant Medical Diagnoses 

Were Made At . . . 

MAHON'S CLINIC 

Tom Mahon, Medical Director 

Dr. Logan and Dr. Grant 

Consulting Physicians 

TOM MAHON'S TAVERN 
1542 RACE STREET 



175 



Published by 

WILLIAM T. COOKE PUBLISHING, INC. 

21 South 21st Street 

Philadelphia 3, Pa. 




...,' 



<**u^