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MEDICAL LEXICON. 



DICTIONARY 



MEDICAL SCIENCE 



CONTAININO 

A CONC7I8B EXPLANATION OF THE VABI0U8 SUBJECTS AND TERMS; WITH THE FRENCH 
AND OTHER 87N0NYMES; NOTICES OF CLIMATE, AND OF CELEBRATED 
MINERAL WATERS: FORMULiE COR VARIOUS OFFICINAL 
AND EMPIRICAL PREPARATIONS, ETC. 



BOBLEY DUNGLISON, M.D., 

rmormmnoR of 'Ob uumvm or midioiiib, sto., in jirfEEaoR mnioAi. collboi, pbiladilpbia. 

SEVENTH EDITION. 

OABBFOLLT BEVISED AHD OBBATLT EHLABaBD. 




PHILADELPHIA: 
LEA AND BLANCHARD 
1848. 




fintnpA according to the Act of Congress, in the year 1848, 

Bt Lka ahd Blarchaed, 

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. 



WM. 8. T0UN«y Fa.y 50 N. SIZTB ST. 



TO 



ROBERT M. PATTERSON, M.D. 

DIBKCTOR or THK MIVT Or THK VNITXD 8TATB8, TICX PRKSIDIHT Or TBX 
AMBRICAJI PHIL080PHICAI. 80CIXTT, XTC. XTC. 



OHOB HIS OOLUBAGUB IN TKB UVIVB&SITT OF VZBailfIA, 



ALWAYS HIS FRIEND, 

VMS work te Bettcnteti, 

FOE THS SBVZHTH TIIU9 
WITH UVCHANQKD AMD UKCHAMGIABLK BXHTIMBHTB, BT 

THE AUTHOR. 



PMiuMpkiaf Seplember, 1848. 



PREFACE 



TO THE SEVENTH EDITION. 



In issuing the present edition of bis Dictionary, it is but ne- 
cessary for tbe autbor to repeat wbat be stated in tbe preface to 
the sixth edition, in regard to the cares bestowed by him on its 
revision and improvement, and the great objects which he has 
always kept in view. That edition — as tbe autbor remarked — 
comprised nearly two thousand five hundred subjects and terms 
not contained in the one immediately preceding, many of which 
had been introduced into medical terminology in consequence of 
the progress of the science, and others had escaped him in pre- 
vious revisions. 

That the author has not sufiered his exertions to flag in the 
preparation of the present edition is sufiiciently manifested by 
the fact, that be has added beiiveen six and seven thousand terms^ 
which are not to be found in the previous editions. To accom- 
modate these, not only has the size of the page been increased, 
bat the whole work has been enlarged by more than one hundred 
pages. These additions have necessarily required a vast amount 
of labour, which has been cheerfully bestowed, in order that the 
work might be made still more worthy of the great favour which 
it has experienced. It has ever been the anxious wish of the 
author, to render it " a satisfactory and desirable — if not indispen- 
sabk — Lexicon, in which the student may search without disap- 
poiDtment for every term that has been legitimated in the no- 



Yl PREFACE. 

menclature of the science. This desideratum he is enabled to 
attempt in successive editions, by reason of the work not being 
stereotyped/' 

The present carefully revised and greatly enlarged edition 
cannot fail to be more extensively useful, and offers stronger 
claims to the attention of the practitioner and student than any 
of its predecessors. 

The author gladly iterates the testimony borne by him, in the 
preface to the last edition, to the assiduity and accuracy im- 
pressed on the typographical department by Mr. Young, who 
printed also the four preceding editions, 

ROBLEY DUNGLISON; 

Philadxlphu, 34pt§mUr^ 1848% 



PBEFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION. 



Thb present undertaking was suggested by the frequent complaints^ made by 
the author's pupils, that they were unable to meet with information on numerous 
topics of professional inquiry,— especially of recent introduction, — in the medical 
dictionaries accessible to them* 

It may, indeed, be correctly affirmed, that we have no dictionary of medical 
subjects and terms which can be looked upon as adapted to the state of the science. 
In proof of this, the author need but remark, that he has found occasion to add 
several thousand medical terms, which are not to be met with in the only medical 
lexicon at this time in circulation in the country. 

The present edition will be found to contain many hundred ~terms more than 
the first, and to have experienced numerous additions and modificatioa9. 

The author's object has not been to make a mere lexicon or dictionary of 
terms, but to afibrd, under each, a condensed view of its various medical relations, 
and thus to render the work an epitome of the existing condition of medical sci- 
ence. In its preparation, he has freely availed himself of the English, French, 
and German works of the same nature, and has endeavoured to add every subject 
and term of recent introduction, which has fallen under his notice ; yet, with all 
his care, it will doubtless be found that subjects have been omitted. The nume- 
rous additions, however, which he has made, and his strong desire to be useful, 
" by removing rubbish and clearing obstructions from the paths through which 
learning and genius press forward to conquest and glory," will, he trusts, extenuate 
these and other objections that might be urged against the work ; especially when 
the toil, which every compiler of a dictionary must endure, is taken into consi- 
deration ; a toil which has been so forcibly depicted by the great English Lexico- 
grapher, as well as by the distinguished Scaxioks : 

" Si qQelqa'an a commis qaelqne crime odieax, 
S'il a tu6 son p^re, on blasph^m^ les Dienz, 
QaMl fasse on Lexicon : s'il est supplice an monde 
Qui le ponisM mieox, je venx que I'on me tonde.'' 



EXPLANATION. 



If the simple synonymy of any term be needed, a mere reference to the 
term may be sufficient; but if farther information be desired, it may be obtained 
under the term referred to. For ezample, the French word Tronc is -said to 
be synonymous with Trunk. This may be sufficient for the inquirer; should it 
not, the requisite information may be found by turning to Drunk, 



ABBREVIATIONS ARBITRARILY EMPLOYED. 



Arab. 


Arabic. 


Ch. 


Chanssier. 


D. 


Dutch. 


Da. 


Danish. 


E. 


English. 


F. 


French. 


F. or Fah. 


Fahrenheit 


Fam. 


Family. 


G. 


German. 


Heb. 


Hebrew. 


I. 


Italian. 


L. 


Latin. 


Linn. 


Linnieus. 



NatOrd. 


Natural Order. 




P. 


Portngnese. 




Ph.D. 


PharmacopcBia of Dablin. 


Ph.E. 


u 


Edinburgh. 


Ph.L. 


u 


London. 


Ph. P. 


« 


Paris. 


Ph. U.S. 


ii 


America. 
(Edit. 1842.) 


R. 


R^anmur. 




S. 


Spanish. 




S.g. 


Specific Gravity. 




Sax. 


Anglo-Saxon. 




Sex. Syst. 


Sexual System. 




Sw. 


Swedish. 





NEW DICTIONARY 



OF 



MEDICAL SCIENCE. 



A, before a consonant; An before a vowel, a, 
«y, bave, in the coxnpomid medical term^ a 
privative or debasing signification, like that of 
the particles in, im, un, •>, in English. Thus 
StJUnt^a means strength ; — Asthenia, want of 
strength \r-An€emia, want of blood, &c . Occa- 
siooallj, in compound words, the/ have an in- 
tensive meaning. 

AACHEN, Aiz-la-Chapelle. 

A, or AA. See Abbreviation. 

AARZHIL, MNERAL WATERS OF. A. 
is in the canton of Berne in Switzerland. The 
chief spring contains chlorides of calcium and 
sodiom, sulphates of lime and soda, oxyd of iron, 
and solphohydric acid gas. 

AASMUS, Anhelatio. 

ABACH, MINERAL WATERS OF. A hy- 
dro-sulphuretted saline spring, not £u' from Ka- 
tisbon or Regentsberg in Bavaria. 

ABAISSEMENTyVeipression: see Cataract 
-^. de la Matrice, Prolapsus uteri. 

ABAISSEUR DE VAILE DUNEZ, De- 
pressor alae nasi — a. de VangU des llvres. De- 
pressor angnli oris — a, de la Uvre inferieure, 
Depressor labii inferioris — a, de la Maehoire in- 
ferieurey Digastricus — a. de Pail, Rectus infe- 
rior oculi. 

ABALIENATIO MENTIS, Insanity. 

ABALIENA'TUS. Cormp'tus, Corrupted, 
from ab, and alienus, 'different.' Membra aba- 
fieiu/ta. Limbs dead, or benumbed. — Celsus, 
Scribonius Largus. 

ABANGA. Name given by the inhabitants 
of St. Thomas to the fruit of a palm' tree, the 
^eeds of which they consider very useful in dis- 
««s of the chest, in the dose of three or four, 
given two or three times a day. 

ABAPTIST'A. Abaptiston or AbaptisUum, 
from a privative, and {inTtntet r, * to plunge . ' A 
tprm applied to the old trepan, the conical shape 
of wlucn prevented it from plunging suddenly 
into tne cavity of the cranium. 

ABAPTISTON, Abaptista. 

ABAPTISTUM, Abaptista. 

ABAREMO-TEMO. A Brazilian tree, wjbich 
STOWS in the moimtains, and appears to be a 
mimosa. Piso relates that the decoction of its 
Wk, which is bitter and astringent, was applied, 
in that country, to ulcers of a bad character. 

ABARNAHAS, Magnesia. 

AB ARTICUL A'TIO, Diarthrosis and Synar- 
throsis. 

2 



ABBREVIATION 

AMATARDISSEMENT, Degeneration. 

ABATTEMENT, Prostration. 

ABATTIS, Giblets. 

ABBECOURT, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
A chalybeate spring, six leagues from Paris, 
and one from Poissy. It was once much fre- 
quented, but is now abandoned. 

ABBEVILLE, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
An acidulous chalybeate at Abbeville, in the 
department of Somme, France. 

ABBREVIATION, Abbrevta'tio, Braehifn'' 
sis, Braehys'mos, Abbreviatu'ra. (F.) Abri- 
viation, from brevis, 'short.' Abbreviations 
are chiefly used in medicinal formulae. They 
are by no means as frequently employed now 
as of old, when every article had its appropriate 
symbol. The chief abbreviations now adopted 
are the following : 

R. Recipe, Take. 

A. A A, ANA, (flti-a) utriusquey of each. 
Abdom. Abdomen. 

Abs. Febr. Absente fehre^ In the absence of 
fever. 

Ad. or Add. Adde or addaJtur, 

Ad. Lib. Ad libitum, At pleasure. 

Admov. Admoveatur, Let it be applied. 

Alte&n. hor. Alternis koris. Every other 
hour. 

Alv. Adstrict. Alvo adstrietS, The bowels 
being confined. 

Aq. Aqtia, Water. 

Aq. Comx. Aqua communis. Common water. 

Aq. Font. Aquaforitis, Spring water. 

Aq. 'QvLi,. Aqua bulliens, Boiling water. 

Aq. Terv J Aqua fervens, Hot water. 

Aq. MariJ? . Aqua marina, Sea water. 

B. A. Balneum are nee, A sand-bath. 
Bals. Balfamum, Balsam. 

BB. BBDSi. Barbadensis, Barbadoes. 

Bib. Bibe, Drink. 

Bis Ind. Bis indies. Twice daily. 

B. M. Balneum nnarioi, A salt water bath. 

Bol. Bolus, 

Bull. Bulliat, Let it boil. 

But. Bitty rum, Butter. 

B. V. Balneum vaporis, A vapour-bath. 
C^RUL. Cceruleus, Blue. 

Cap. Capiat, Let him take. 

C. C. Cornn cervi. Hartshorn. 

C. C. U. Cornu cervi it stum. Burnt harts- 
horn. 
C. M. Cras man}, To-morrow morning. 



ABBREVIATION 



10 



ABBREVIATION 



C. N. Cras noets, To-morrow night. 

C. V. Cras vespere, To-morrow erening. 
CocBL. Coehltarey A fpoonfiil. 

CocHL. Ampi*. Cochleare amplum, A large 
spoonfiil. 

CocBi.. Ivr. CoekUare Infantumy A child's 
spoonful. 

Coom.. Mod. or Med. Cochleare modicum or 
fnedium, A de8sert-«poonM. 

CoCHL. Paet. Cochleare parvum, A tea- 
spoonful. 

Col. Colay eolatur€By Stndn, and to the 
strained. 

CoMP. Compositusy Compound. 

Coup. Confeaio, Confection. 

Cons. Conserva, Conserve. 

CoNT. ConUnuetury Let it be continued. 

CoQ. Coquet Boil. 

CoRT. Cortexy Bark. 

Crast. Crastinue, For to-morrow. 

Cuj. CttjtM, Of which. 

CujUBL. Cujuslibety Of any. 

Ctatb. Cyathusy A glassful. 

Ctath. Thsje, a cup of tea. 

D. Dosisy A dose. 

B. et S. Dctur et Hgtutury {placed at the end 
of a prescription,) 

D. D. Detur ad. Let it be given in or to. 

D. D. ViTR. Vetur ad vitrumy Let it be given 
in a glass. 

Deaur. Pil. Deaurentur pilulesy Let the pills 
be gilded. 

Deb. Spiss. Dehita spissitudoy A due consist- 
ence. 

Dec. DecafUa, Pour off. 

Decub. Deeubitusy Lying down, going to bed. 

De D. in D. De die in diem. From day to day. 

Dej. Alv. DejeetioTtes alviy Alvine evacua- 
tions. 

Dep. Depuratusy Purified. 

Det. Detury Let it be given. 

Dieb. A1.TERM. Diehts altemisy Every other 
day. 

biSB. TKtLT^piebus tertiis, Every third day. 

Dig. Digeratur, Let it be digested. 

Dii«. Dilutusy Dilute. 

Dim. Dimidiusy One half. 

DisT. Distilla, Distil. 

Div. Divide, Divide. 

DoNEC Alv. Solut. Fuer. Donee alvus so- 
Inta fuervty Until the bowels are opened. 

Drach. Drachma, A drachm. 

Kjitsd. Ejusdemy Of the same. 

Knem. Enemay A clyster. 

KxHiB. Exhibeatury Let it be exhibited. 

KxT. Super Alut. Eztende super alutamy 
Spread upon leather. 

F. Fiaty Let it be made. 

F. Pil. Fiat pilula, Make into a pill. 

F. Venjes. or F. VS. Fiat venasectioy Let 
ble«?dingbe performed. 

Feb. J>UR. Febre durantCy The fever conti- 
nuing. 

Fex. Intern. Pemoribus intemis, To the in- 
sid"; of the thighs. 

Fist. Arkat. Fistula armatay A bag andpipCy 
a clyster pipe and bladder fitted for use. 

Fl. Fluidusy and Floresy Fluid, and Flowers, 

Frust. Frustillatimy In small pieces. 

Gel. Qua vis. Gelatind guivisy In any kind 
ofielly. 

G. G. G. Oummi guttee Gambia, Gamboge. 
Gr. Granum, A grain. 



Gtt. Gutta, A drop. 

Gtt. or GuTT. QuiBUBD. Guttis guibusdam, 
With some drops. 

Gum. Gummi, Gum. 

GuTTAT. Guttatim, By drops. 

HoR. Decub. Hor& decubitus, At bed-time. 

HoR. Intbrm. Horis intermedHs, At interme- 
diate hours. 

H. S. HorA somsU, At bed-time. 

Inf. Infunde, Infuse. 

Ind. Indiesy Daily. 

Inj. Enbm. Jhjiciatur enema, Let a clyster be 
given. 

In Pulm. In pulmentoy In gruel. 

Jul. Julepusy a julep. 

Lat. Dol. Lateri dolentiy To the pained side. 

Lb. and Lib. Libray A pound weight. 

Lib. Llb. Librte, Pounds. 

LiQ. Liquor. 

M. Misce, Mix. 

Mac. Macera, Maceimte. 

Man. Mawipulus, A handful. 

Man. Prim. Mank prima. Early in the mom- 



io. Pan. Mica panis. Crumb of bread. 

MiN. MivUmum, The 60th part of a drachm 
by measure. 

Mitt. Mitte, Send. 

Mitt. Sano. Mittatur sanguis. Let blood be 
drawn. 

Mod. Prasoript. Modo praseripto. In the 
manner directed. 

Mor. Sol. More solito. In the usual manner. 

Muc. MudlagOy Mucilage. 

N. M. Nux mosehata. Nutmeg. 

0. Oetarius, A pint. 

01. Oleumy Oil. 

Ol. Lini, S. I. Oleum lini sine ignCy Cold- 
drawn linseed oil. 

Omn. Bid. Omni biduoy Every two days. 

Omn. Bih. Omni bihorioy Every two hours. 

Omn. Hor. Omni hordy Every hour. 

Omn. Man. Omni mani. Every morning. 

Omn. Nocte, Every night. 

Omn. Quadr. Hor. Omni quadrante horesy 
Every quarter of an hour. 

O. O. O. Oleum oliva optimum. Best Olive 
oil. 

Ov. Ovumy An egg. 

Ox. OxymeU 

Oz. Unday An ounce. 

P. Pondercy by weight. 

P. and Pug. Pugillusy a pugil. 

P. ^. Partes csqualesy Equal parts. 

Part. Vic. Partitis vicibus. In divided doses. 

Psract. Op. Emet. Peractd operations emS' 
tidy The operation of the emetic being over. 

Pil. Pilula, A pill. 

Post Sing. Sed. Liq. Post singulas sedes li- 
quidasy After every liquid evacuation. 

Pot. Potioy A potion. 

P. P. Pttlvis patrumy Jesuits' bark. • 

P. Rat. ^tat. Pro rations tetatisy Accord- 
ing to the age. 

P. R. N. Pro re nath. As occasion may be. 

PuLv. Pulvisy A powder. 

Q. P. Quantum placeaty As much as may 
please. 

Q. S. Quantum suffieiat. As much as is sufil- 
cient. 

QuoR. Quorum, Of which. 

Q. V. Quantum volueris. As much as you wish. 

Rad. Radix, Root. 



JtBCkS 



u 



ABDUCTOR. 



lUs. Basurm, SbaTings. 

Rect. R^aifieatus, Recti£ed. 

Rb3>. or RsDie. in Puly. Bsdaetus in pulve- 
rM», or RedigoHur in pulveremy Powdered, or 
I Let it be powdered. 

I Rbo. Umbii.. lUgio umhUieiy The umbilical 

rcfion. 

Rbpbt. Repetaturf Let it be repeated. 

S. A. Secundum artem, According to art. 

Se3(> SetHsn^ oeed. 

Semj-dk. Semi-draekma, Haifa drachm. 

SsMi-H. Semi'hora, Half an hour. 

SsRY. Servm, Keep, preserve. 

SssqiJiB. SMqmhora, An hour and a half. 

Sesuhg. Sesundoy An ounce and a half. 

Si Noh Yax.. Si nan valeat^ If it does not 
answer. 

Si Op. Sit. Si opus sit, If there be need. 

Si Yn. Psnx. Si vires penrnttmnt, U the 
itrength will permit. 

SoLT. Salve, DiasolTe. 

Sp. and Spir. Spiritus, Spirit. 

Se. Semi, One half. 

St. Stei, Let it stand. 

Sub Fn. Coct. Subjinem eoetionis. Towards 
the end of the boiling. 

Sum. Sumat, Let him take ; also, Sumtmitates, 
The tops. 

S. Y. Spiriius vini. Spirit of wine. 

S. Y. R. Spiritus vini rectifieatus. Rectified 
spirit of wine. 

S. Y. T. Spiritus vini tenuiar. Proof sjnrit 
of wine. 

Sra. Syrupusj Syrup. 

TxMP. Dbxt. Tempori dextro. To the right 
temple. 

T. O. Timcttira opU, Tincture of opium. 

Ta., Tr and Tdict. Tinettura, Tincture. 

Trit. Triiura, Triturate. 

v. O. S. or Yn. Or. Sol. VitsUo avi seiutus, 
Dissolved in the yelk of an egg. 

TS. Venaseetio, Yenesectioa. 

Z. Z. anciently mprrh: now zingiber, or 
ginger. 

b, lAhroy a pound. 

% Undety An ounce. 

z, Dradtmea, A drachm. 

§, Serupulumy A scruple. 

a^, Mtnimmm^ a minim. 

ss, Semissis, or half; iss, one and a half. 

j, one; ij, two; iij, three; iv, four, &c. 

The same system is not alwap followed in 
abbreviating. The subjoined will exhibit the 
osualmode: 



f..^iss 
gtt. XL.M 



Infus, Colomi. 

Timet, gent, e, 

Sfr. Cart. Aurtmt. 

Tinet. Caps. 
Capt. Coch. ij. p. r. n. 

This, written at length, is as follows : 
Recipe 

Infusi ColamhsB sesqui-fittidunciam. 

Tincturm Gentiana Composite fluidrach- 



Sfrupi Cortieis Aurantiorwn semi-flui- 

drachmam. 
Tinctures Capsid guttas quadraginta. 
Kitce. 
Capiat cochlearia duo pro re natft. 
ABCkS, Abscess — a. Aigu, see Abscess— 
•• Chaudf see Abscess— • a. Chr^nique, see 



Abscess — a. Fisr eangestion, see Abscess — a. 
Diatkisipte, see Abscess — a. Froid, see Ab- 
scess— ns. Mttastatiquef see Abscess — a. Sero-- 
fuUux, see Abscess — a. Soudain, see Abscess. 

ABDO'MEN, from ab'dere, <to conceal;' 
Etran, Sypoga/trion, HypoeafUwn, Epis'^ 
ehton, Lap'ara, Hypoehoi'lion, Gaster, Hypau'- 
trian, Nedys, Abdu'men, Venter imus, Venter 
in'fimusy Alvus, XTterus. (F.) Ventre, V. infe- 
rieur. Bos ventre. The largest of the three 
splanchnic cavities, bounded, above, by the dia- 
pnragm; below, by the pelvis; behind, by the 
lumbar vertebrae ; and at the sides and fore part, 
by muscular expansions. It is distinguished 
into three anterior re^^ons, from above to be- 
low ; viz. the epigastric, umbilical, and hypo- 
gastric, each <^ which is itself divided into 
three others, one middle, and two lateral : thus, 
the epigastric region comprises the epigastrium 
and hypochondria; the umbilical, the umbilieus 
andjianJts or lumbar regions ; and the hypogas' 
trie, the hypogaetrium and Uiae regions . None 
of these regions has its limits well defined. The 
chief viscera contained in the cavity of the ab- 
domen, Ca'lia, Cavum Abdom'inis, are the 
stomach, intestines, liver, spleen, pancreas, kid« 
neys, &c. It is lined by the peritoneum. 

ABDOMINAL, Abdomina'lis, Ventrt^Us^ 
Yentral. That which belongs to the Alxiomen,. 
as abdominal muscles, abdominal viscera, &c. 

ABBOAONIS £XPLORATIO,Abdominos. 
copia. 

ABDOMimSCOP'lA,Gastreeeop'ia^ A hy- 
brid word, from Abdomen, 'the lower belly,' 
and 0«oniai, 'I view;' Zaparaecep'ia, Abdom'^ 
inis exploraftio. Examination of the lower belly 
as a means of diagnosis. See Auscultation* 

ABDUCENS LABK)RnM, Levator anguU 
oris. 

ABDUC£NT£S„ Motor oculi extemus. 

AEDUCTEUR DE V(EIL, Rectus eztec>^ 
nus oculi— «. de PoreiUe,. Abductor auris — a. 
du gros ovteit. Abductor poUicis pedis — a. du 
petit oeteil. Abductor minimi digiti pedis — a. 
court du pouee. Abductor pollicis brevisi— «• 
long duvouce, Abdoctox longus pollicis.. 

ABDUCTION, Abduc^tia, from abdu'eere, 
t» separate, (o^ and dueere, <k> lead.') The 
movement which separates a limb ok other past 
from the axis, of the body. 

The word has also been used synonymously 
with Abruj/tio, Apag'ma, Apoclas'ma, a frac- 
ture near the articular extremity of a bone, with 
separation of the fragments. 

ABDUCTOR^ same etymon. (F.) Abdue- 
tcur.. A muscle which moves certain parts by 
separating them from the axis of the body. 

Abductor Auricularis, Abductor auris-*-' 
a. Indicis pedis. Prior indicis pedis, Posterior 
indicis pedis — a. Medii dicild pedis, Prior medri 
digiti pedis — a. Minimi digiti, Flexor parvus 
mimmi digiti — a. Minimi digiti. Prior piinimi 
digiti— a. Oculi, R^ctua extemus oculi-— a. Pol- 
licis manus, and a. Brevis alter, Abductor pol- 
licis brevis. 

Abductor Auris, Abductor aurieulafria^ 
(F.) Abdueteur de VoreilU. A portion of the 
posterior auris, whose existence is not constant, 
which passes from the mastoid process to the 
concha. 

Abductor In'dicis, Semi-interos'seus in'di- 
ds. A muscle which arises from the os trap 
slum and metacarpal bone of the thumbj i 



ABDUMBN 



19 



ABUOOTATION 



iiwerted into the first bone of the forefinger. 
Its use is to bring the forefinger towards the 
thomb. 

Abductoh Min'imi Dio"iti, Carpo^halan*' 
geus min'imi digiti, Carpo^pkalangrien du petit 
doigty Extenfaor ter'tii int€mo'dii minimi digiti 
— (Douglas.) Hypoih'enar minor metae^rpevs. 
See Flexor parvus. It originates fleshy from 
the OS pisiforme, and from the annular ligament 
near it ; and is inserted, tendinous, into the in- 
ner side of the base of the first bone of the little 
finger. Use, to draw the little finger from the 
rest. 

Abductor Minimi Digiti Pedis, Caleosub^ 
phalangmtsmdmmii digiti^ Cedeaneo-phalangien 
du petit orteilf Paratk'enar major — (By Wins- 
low, the muscle is divided into two por- 
tions, — Farathenar major and metatarseus.) 
Caleaneo'scus'pkalangien du petit orteil — (Ch.) 
<F.) Abducteur du petit orteil. This muscle 
forms the outer margin of the sole of the foot, 
and is immediately beneath the plantar aponeu- 
rosis. It arises, tendinous and fleshy, from the 
outer side of the protuberance of the os calcis, 
and from the root of the metatarsal bone of the 
little toe, and is inserted into the outer part of 
the root of the first bone of the little toe. Use. 
To draw the little toe outwards. 

Abdvctob Pol'licis Brevis, Abductor Pol- 
Ueis Maniksy Seapho-earpo-super-phalangeus 
PoUieis, Sus-pkalafigien du pouee, A . pollicis 
manus and A. brevis alter — (Albinus.) (F.) 
Abdueteur court du pouee. Carpo-sus-phalan' 
gien du pouee — (Ch.) A short, flat, triangular 
muscle, which arises from the anterior surface 
of the oe scaphoides and the annular ligament 
of the carpus, and terminates at the outside of 
the upper extremity of the first phalanx of the 
thumb. A particular portion, on the inner side 
of this mnscle, is called, by Albinus, Abdudtor 
brevis alter. 

Abductor Lonous Pollicis, A. LP. Man4ks, 
Extensor ossis metaearpi pollicis maniksy Ex- 
tensor primi intemodii — (Douglas,) Extensor 
primus Pollicis, CuHto-radi-sus-mitacarpien 
du pouee, Cubito-sus-m^taearpien du pouee, — 
(Ch.) (F.) Abdueteur long du pouee. A long, 
thin muscle, arising from the posterior surface 
oi the ulna, radius, and interosseous ligament, 
and inserted at the outer side of the upper ex- 
tremity of the first metacarpal bone. 

Abductor Pollicis Pedis, Caleo-sub-phalan- 
geus Pot lids. (F.) Abducteur du gros orteil. 
This muscle arises, fleshy, from the anterior 
and inner part of the protuberance of the os 
calcis, and tendinous from the same bone where 
it joins with the os naviculare. It is inserted, 
tendinous, into the internal os sesamoideum and 
root of the first bone of the great toe. Use. 
To pull the great toe from the rest. 

The name Abductor has been given also to 
all those interosseous muscles of the hand and 
foot, which perform the motion of abduction on 
the fingers or toes, and to muscles which exe- 
cute the same function on other parts of the body. 

ABDUMEN, Abdomen. 

ABEBiE'OS, from « neg. and fitpat^g, * firm,' 
infir^mais, deb' His. Weak, infirm, unsteady. . 

ABEILLE, Bee. 

ABELMELITCH. One of the names of the 
Ricinns, according to some authors. — Prosper 
Alpinus says that a tree, which grows about 
Mecca, is so called. Its seeds, which are black 



and oblong, are said to be a most violent ca- 
thartic. 

ABELMOSCHUS, Hibiscns abelmoechus 
— •• Moschatus, Hibiscus abelmoschus. 

ABELMUSK, Hibiscns abelmoscfaus. 

ABENSBERG, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
A. is a city of Bavaria, where there is a cold, 
sulphureous spring. 

ABERRATIO, Aberration— a. Lactis, Gfalac- 
toplania — a. Mensium, Menstruation, vicarious 
— a. Menstruorum, Menstruation, vicarious. 

ABERRA'TION, Aberrdtio, irom ahorrt^rt, 
(ab and errors,) * to stray,' ' to wander firom.' 
This word has several meanings. 

1. The passage of a fluid of the living body 
into an order of vessels not destiaed for it. In 
this sense it is synonymous with the Error 
Loci of Boerhaave. 

2. The flow of a fluid towards an organ dif- 
ferent from that to which it is ordinarily direct- 
ed ; as in cases of vicarious hemorrhage. Aber- 
rations of sense or judgment are certain errors 
in the perceptions, or certain derangements of 
the intellectual fiu:ulties. 

The word is used in optics to designate the 
dispersion of the rays of light in passing through 
a lens. 

Aberration, Chrokatic, Aberration of 
Refrangibility — a. Spherical, Aberration of 
sphericity. 

Aberration of RBTRANOiBn/iTT, Chromat'ic 
aberraftion, exists, when, as in a common lens, 
the rays that pass near the circumference of the 
lens are decomposed, so that a coloured image 
is observed. This aberration in the human eye 
is corrected by the iris, which does not permit 
the rays to fall near the circumference of the 
lens, and also by the crystalline lens itself, 
which, owing to its structure, serves the pur- 
poses of an achromatic glass. 

Aberration op Sphbric"itt or spherical 
aberra'tion takes place, when the rays, as in a 
common lens^ which pass through the centre of 
the lens, and those which pass near the circum- 
ference, are unequally refracted, so that they 
do not meet at a common focus. 

This aberration of sphericity in the human 
eye is corrected by the iris. 

ABESSI, Realgar. 

ABEVACUA'tiO, Apoeeno'sis, from ah, 
and evacuare, < to empty.' An evacuation. A 
partial or imperfect evacuation. By some, it 
is applied to an immoderate evacuation. — Eraus. 

ABHAL. A fruit well known in India, and 
obtained from a species of cypress. It passes 
for an emmenagogue. 

ABIES, Pinus Picea — ^a. Balsamea, Pinus 
balsamea — a. Canadensis, Pinus Canadensi»— 
a. Excelsa, see Pinus abies — a. Chillica, Pinus 
picea — a. Pectinata, Pinus picea — a. Picea, Pi- 
nus picea — a. Rubra, Pinus rubra. 

ABIGA, Teucrium Chaxnspitys. 

ABIOSIS, Death. 

ABIOTOS, Conium maculatum. 

ABIRRITA'TION. Abirrita'tio, from ah, 
privative, and irritatio , * irritation.' Th is word 
strictly means absence or defect of irritation. 
The disciples of Broussais used it to indicate a 
pathological condition, opposite to that of irri- 
tation. It may be considered as synonymous 
with debility, asthenia, &c. 



ABLACTATIO 



13 



ABRU8 PRfiCATORIUS 



ABLACTATIO, Wsaning. 

ABLASTES, Sterile. 

ABLATIO, Extirpation. 

ABLEPH'ARUS, from «, privative, and /Uf- 
^(or,* eyelid.' One who has no eyelids. 

ABLEPSIA, Caecitas. 

ABLUENTIA, Detergents. 

ABLUTION, Ablu'tioy Apomp^sis, Cata- 
rif/mus, from abluurt, {ii and luere,) Ho 
wash.' A Dflune giv^ji to legal ceremonies in 
whidi the body is subjected to particular affu- 
sions. Ablution (especiaU^ of the extremities) 
with cold or tepid water is employed, thera- 
peutically, to reduce febrile heat. Also, the 
washing by which medicines are separated from 
the extraneous matters mixed with them. 

ABNORMAL, Abnormous. 

ABNORMITAS, Anomalia. 

ABNOR'MOUS, Almo/mal (V.) Anorvtal, 
from aby ^frorn,' and norma, 'rule.' Not con- 
formable to rule; irregular. 

ABOLr'TION, AMi'^tioj destruction or sup- 
I^ession, from ab and luwe (?) Ho wash.' A 
word, often employed, especiall]^ by the French, 
to express the complete suspension of any symp- 
tom or function. Abolition of the sights e. g. 
is the complete loss of sight. 

ABOMA'SUS, Abouu/aum, Eny/troH, Ron- 
net. The lowermost or four^ stomach of ru- 



ABOMINA'TIO, Disgust. 

ASONDANCB, Plethora. 

ABORSIO, Aborti<»k. 

ABORSnS, Abortion. 

ABORTICIDIUM, Foeticide. 

ABORTJPy Abortive. 

ABORTIFACIENS, Abortive. 

ABORTION, Abor^iuB, Aboi^ouB, Ahar'm, 2>y»- 
Ufoa abartifvaf Omgtt/dtt, Paraeyeftis abottua, 
AmMm, AmWma, AmbMmut, Eifbole, Em^ 
hrphifkL, DimA'tkora, Edn/nt, Exambk/moy 
Exambt/mB, Atroi^moo, ApopaUmay Apopatdo, 
Apopk'tkara, Pkthara, Commfao ufUri, DepetdHUo. 
(F.) AvrUmenty BUssurty Miscarriage, from 
eb and orirt, * to rise,' applied to that which has 
orison out of season. The expulsion of the 
fetus before the seventh month of utero-gesta- 
tion, or before it is viaUo. (q. v.^ The causes 
of this accident are referrible either to the mo- 
ther, and particularly to the uterus ; or to the 
fstos and its dependeneies. The causes, in the 
mother, may be:— extreme nervous suscepti- 
bility, great debility, plethora ; faulty confor- 
mation, he, ; and it is frequently induced im- 
mediately by intense mental emotion, violent 
exercise, &c. The causes seated in the foetus 
are its dnth, rupture of the membranes, &c. 
It most frequently occurs between the 8th and 
12th weeks of gestation. The symptoms of 
tbortion are >— uterine hemorrhage with or 
without flakes of decidua, with mtermittin^ 
pain. When abortion has once taken place, it 
is extremely apt to r^cur in subsequent i>reg- 
naacies about the same period. Scnie writers 
have called abortion, wnen it occurs prior to 
three months, Effitusion, The treatment must 
vary accordiiig to the constitution of the patient 
and the causes giving rise to it. In all cases, 
the horixontal posture and perfect quietude are 



Aboktioh is likewise applied to the product 
of an untimely birth. Abo/tuo, Abor^atu, 
ApoiUnkOy ApoVoUy EeUo'nta, AmUotkriifion, 



Eetro'may Prwltuo vmm^idrWy Abortmont, 
(F.) Avortouy Avortin. 

TO ABOKT, Abori'ri. To miscarry. (F.) 
Avorter, 

ABOR'TIVE, Aborti'vuoy Eeboriiu, Amblo'- 
tieusy Amblothriifiumf Fhthor^iuo, Apophthor'- 
iusy Eetrot^ieusy Abortifa'eiona, Aeyl^rius, 
Expel'leno, Fhthiro^tonuo, Pkthoroo' tonus, 
EeboVicusy Parturient, (q. v.) Parturif ancient, 
Ee'bolie, (F.) Abortif, A medicine to which 
is attributed the property of causing abortion. 
There is probably no direct agent of the kind. 

ABORTMENT, Abortion. 

ABORTUS, Abortion. 

ABOUCHEMENTy Anastomosis. 

ABOULAZA, a tree of Mada^car, used, 
according; to Flacourt, in the practice of the 
country m diseases of the heart. 

ABOUTISSEMENTy Suppuration. 

ABRABAX, Abrasax, Abraxas, A mystic 
term expressing the number 365, and to which 
the Cabalists attributed miraculous properties. 

ABRACADA'BRA: the name of a Syrian 
Idol, according to Selden. This word, when 
pronounced and repeated in a certain form and 
a certain number of times, was supposed to 
have the power of curing fevers and preventing 
many diseases. It was figured on amulets and 
worn suspended around the neck. 

AB&ACADABRA 

BB-AQADAB&A 

BACADABBA 

AGADAB&A 

y CADABBA 

AD A B B A 

D A B & A 

ABBA 

B B A 

B A 

A 

ABRACALAN, A cabalistic term to which 
the Jews attributed the same virtue as to the 
word Abracadabka. 

ABRASAX, Abrabax. 

ABRA'SION, Abra'sioy Aposyr'moy Apoxys*' 
musy from abraders, (ab and rtuhre,) < to rasp.' 
A superficial excoriation, with loss of substance, 
under the form of small shreds, in the mucous 
membrane of the intestines,— ^F.) Raelures des 
Boyaux, Also, an ulceration of the skin, pos- 
sessing similar characters. According to Yicq 
d'Azyr, the word has been used for the absorp- 
tion of the molecules composing the various 
organs. 

ABRATHAN, Artemisia abrotanum. 

ABRAXAS, Abrabax. 

ABRlVIATIONy Abbreviation. 

ABRICOTy Prunus Armeniaca. 

ABROSIA, Abstinence. 

ABROTANUM, Artemisia abrotanum--a. 
Cathsum, Artemisia abrotanum — a. Mas, Arte- 
misia abrotanum. 

ABBOTONrTES,*jJ^«TewTi;c,(««*'«c, * wine,' 
understood.) Wine impregnated with Arte- 
misia Abrotanum or Southernwood. 

ABROTONUM, Artemisia abrotanum. 

ABRUPTIO, Abduction. 

ABRUS PREC ATO'RIUS, U^uorieo Bushy 
Red Beany Love pea, A small ornamental shrub, 
found from Florida to Brazil, as well as in 
Egypt and the West Indies ; Nat, Ord, Legu- 
minosflB. Sex, Syst* Monadelphia enneandria ; 
having beautiful scarlet seeds with a black 



ABSCESS 



14 



ABSORPTION 



spot. The roots and leaves are sweet and ma- 
cilaginouB demalcents. The seeds of the Ame- 
rican kind are considered to he purgative and 
poisonous. 

ABSCESS, from abtcedo, (ais, and esdere,) 
« I depart,* or • separate from.' Absce/tus, Ab- 
sees'no, Aphistifait, Apoat^may Eopye'may 
Eepf/att, Receysvsy Impos^tkume, (F.) Abeh, 
Dep6t» A collection of pus in a cavity, the re- 
sult of a morhid process. See Pyogenia and 
Suppuration. 

The French have various distinctive terms 
for Ahscesses. 

ABCkS CHAUDy AIGXTy SOUDATN, is 
one which follows violent inflammation. 

ABCkS FROIDy CHRONIQUEy SCRO- 
FULEUX, one which is the result of chronic 
or scrofulous inflammation. 

ABCkS PAR CONGESTION, A, diathi- 
tiqiis, a symptomatic abscess, one which occurs 
in a part at a distance from the inflammation 
by which it is occasioned: e. g. a lutnbar 
aiseess ; (q. v.) in which the inflammation may 
be in the lumbar vertebre, whilst the pus ex- 
hibits itself at the groin. 

Abscess Metastat'ic, Abaee/siu metastal^' 
icusy (F.) Abcea mhastatique ; A, eonaietOify 
an abscess, which forms suddenly, and some- 
times without any precursory signs of inflam- 
mation, in a part of the body remote from one 
in a state of suppuration, and without presenting 
a sufficient reason for its development in the 
place which it occupies. It is a consequence 
of phlebitis. 

Abscess, perfokatino of the Lxmo, see 
Lung, perforating abscess of the — a. Psoas, 
Lumbar abscess. 

ABSCESSUS CEREBRI, Encephalopyosis^ 
a. Gfangnenescens, Anthrax — a. Gangnenosus, 
Anthrax — a. Lacteus, Mastodynia apostematosa 
— a. Lumborum, Lumbar abscess — ^a. Mammae, 
Mastodynia apostematosa — a. Metastaticus, Ab- 
scess, metastatic — a. Nucleatus, Furunculus — a. 
Oculi, Hypopyon — a. Pectoris, Empyema — a. 
Pulmonum, Pneumapostema—- a. Renalis, Ne- 
phrapostasis — a. Spirituosus, Aneurism — a. 
Thoracis, Empyema — a. Urinosus, ITraposte- 
nu. 

ABSCISSIO PR^PUTII, Circumcision. 

ABSCIS'SION, Abseia'ioy Abacia^aioy from ab- 
aeidere or abacinder$y 'to cut off,* Apoe^opiy 
Apothrau'atay Diaeopi, Excision or extirpa- 
tion of a part, especially of a soft part. — ^Fabri- 
cius HildanuB. 

Fracture or injury of soft parts, with loss 
of substance. — Hippocrates. 

Diminution, or loss of voice. — Celsns. 

Sudden and prenuture termination of a dis- 
ease.^-6alen. 

ABSCONSIO, Sinus. 

ABSENCE DU BRUIT RESPIRA- 
TOIREy see Murmur, respiratory. 

ABSINTHI'TES, cn^iy^iTijc, ApaintkCteay 
Wine impregnated with Absinthium or Worm- 
wood .-^Dioscorides. 

ABSINTHIUM, (Ph. U. S.,) Artemisia ab- 
sinthium — a. Maritimum, Artemisia maritima 
— a. Ponticum, Artemisia pontica — a. Roma- 
nnm, Artemisia pontica — a. Santonicum, Arte- 
misia santonica — a. Vulgare, Artemisia absin- 
thium. 

ABSORB ANTy Absorbent. 

ABSOR'BENT, Abaor^benay from abaorberey 



(ai and aorbere,) * to drink, to suck up.* (F.) 
Abaorbant, That which absorbs. 

Absorbekt Ststbm is the collection of ves- 
sels, Vaaa ahaorban'tia sen reaorban'ttUy and 
glandsy which concur in the exercise of absorp- 
tion. 

A medicine used for absorbing acidity in the 
stomach and bowels, as magnesia, chalky &e. 
Invertenfy Reaor'benay Sat'urana* 

Also, any substance, such as cobweb, spoQge, 
&c., which, when applied to a bleeding sur&ce, 
retains the blood, and forms with it a solid and 
adhesive compound, which arrests the hemor- 
rhage. 

ABSORPTIO, Absorption— a. Sanguinis, 
Haemorrhophesis. 

ABSORP'TION, Reaorp^tioy Inhalaftioy Im- 
bibi"tioy Abaorjftio, Ana/rkopkiy Anarrhopha^^ 
ata, Catapino'aiay Rhoebdt^aiay CtUarrkophtf sia, 
Catar'rhopht; same etymon. The function of 
absorbent vessels, by virtue of which they take 
up substances from without or within the body. 
Two great divisions have been made of tms 
flmction. 1. External ahaorption, or the ab- 
aorpHon of eompoattion, which obtains from 
witiiont the organs the materials intended for 
their composition ; and, 3. Internal abeorptiany 
or the ahaorption of deeompoaitiony which takes 
up from the organs the materials that have to 
be replaced by the exhalants. 

By external ahaorption is meant not only that 
which takes place at the external surface of the 
body, but also that of the mucous membianes of 
the digestive and respiratory passages. Hence, 
again, the division of external absorption into 
eutaneoua — reaorp^tio eute^naa sen eutiayinkalt^' 
tio eutia — inteatinal or digeativey and pulmonary 
or reapiratory* 

Internal absorption is also subdivided into, 
(. Molecular or interatitialy nutrititfe or orgaaUcy 
which takes up from each organ the materials 
that constitute it, so that the decomposition is 
always in equilibrio with the deposition. 2. 
The ahaorption of recremantitial aecreted fiyxday 
such as the fluid of serous membranes, synovia^ 
&c. As these are constantly exhaled on sur- 
faces which have no external outlet, they would 
augment indefinitely, if absorption did not re- 
move tiiem in the same proportion as that in 
which they are deposited. 3. The ahaorption 
of a part of the exerementitialjlutday as th^ 
pass over the excretory passages. 

Absorption does not effect tiie decomposition 
of the body immediately. It merely prepares 
the fluid which has to be eliminated by the se- 
cretory organs. 

The great agents of external absorption are 
the veins and chyliferous vessels; of internal 
absorption, probably the lymphatics. In the 
chyliferous vessels and lymphatics the fluid is 
always found to possess the same general pro- 
perties. In them, therefore, an action of ela- 
boration or selection must have taken place. 
The veins, on the other hand, seem to exert 
no selection. Any fluid, possessing the neces- 
sary tenuity, passes through the coats of the 
vessel readily by imbibition, and proceeds along 
with the torrent of the circulation. Watery 
fluids in this manner enter the blood when they 
are taken into the stomach. Substances that 
require digestion, on the other hand, must pass 
through the chyliferous vessels and thoracic 
duct. 



JBSTkME 



15 



ACAWERIA 



Absokptio!! of CoifPOSiTioiiy 866 Absorption 
—a. Cataneous, see Absorption— a. of Decom- 
position, see Absorption — a. Digestiye, see Ab- 
•orptionh--a. External, see AlMorption— a. of 
Ezeremeotitial Secreted Fluids, see Absorption 
—a. Internal, see Absorption— a. Intestinal, see 
Absorption — a. Interstitial, see Absorption — a. 
Molecular, see Absorption — a. Nutritive, see 
Abeorption— a. Organic, see Absorption— a. 
PnlmcHiary, see Absorption— a. of Recremen- 
titial Secreted Flnids, see Absorption— a. Res- 
piratory, aee Absorption. 

ABSTkMB, Abstemious. 

ABSTE'MIOUS, Abstt^mius, AoinoB^ from 
ah; 'witbont,^ and tmrntwi^ <wine.' (F.) 
AhvtkmB. Used' bj tbe ancient writers, as 
well as by the French, in the sense only of its 
roots ; one who abstains from wine or fermented 
liquors in general. 

ABSTERGENTIA, Detergents. 

ABSTERSITA, Detergents. 

ABSTERSORIA, Detergents. 

AB'STINENCE, AhsHnen'tia^ from dbs^ 
* from,' and ttner^y * to hold,' Abros'iay Atitfioy 
Limamfekiay iMiUcUmOay Fasting. Privation, 
nsoally voluntary, as when we speak of tAsti- 
ntnet from pUaturg, aistin&rue from drink , 3ec. 
It ia move particularly used to signify voluntai^ 
privation of certain articles of iooA, Fasting is 
a oaefril remedial agent in certain diseases, par- 
ticularly in those of an inflammatory character. 

ABSU S, a kind of cassia— C. il&«iM^which 
grows in Egypt and in India, the seeds of 
which, pulverized and mixed with powdered 
sugar, have been employed, in form of a dry 
coTlyrinm, in the endemic ophthalmia of Egypt. 

ABU'LIA; from a, 'privative,' and /loviq, 
' will.' Loss of the will, or of volition. 

ABU'LICUS; same etymon. One who has 
lost the power of will, or of volition. 

ABU3 DE SOI'MSME, Masturbation. 

ABUTA, Pareira brava. 

ABUTILON CORDA'TTJM, Sida ahuaon, 
Tiilow maliow. An indigenous plant, common 
from Canada to Mexico, which resembles com- 
mon mallow in its medical virtues, being mu- 
cilaginous and demulcent. 

ABVACUA'TIO, an excessive or coUiqusr 
tive evacuation of any kind. 

ACACIA, (Ph. U. S.) Acaciae gummi^-a. 

, Catechu, Catechu — a. Germanica, see Prunus 

' spinosa— a. Indica, Tamarindua— «. Nostras, 

see Prunus spinosa — a. Vera, see Acacis gummi 

—a. Zeylonica, Hsmatoxylon Campechianum. 

AC ACIJE GVMMly Aet^tdoy from ttirn, <a 
point,' so called in consequence of its spines, G. 
Aet^dm AraViemy O, Arab'icumy O, Aeanth'- 
inum, G. Ltu4tumy G, TksMieumy G. 8$rapio'' 
tdsy G, LamaCy G, S&nsga, or Senseoy Cfum 
A/aiie, (F.) (romms AroHqtes, The gum of 
the HfCmota Ifilirtfiea, Aet^eia vera^ Spina 
.SgyfHaeoj of Upper Egypt, Nat, Ord. Mimo- 
ie«. Sex, Sfst, Polvgamia Moncecia. It is 
in irregular pieces, colourless or of a pale yel- 
low colour, hard, brittle, of a shining fracture, 
transparent, soluble in water, and insoluble in 
alcohol, s. |. 1. 431 7. 

It is mocilaginous ; but is rarely used, except 
in pharmacy. Sometimes it is administered 
alone as a demulcent. 

ACAJOVy Anacardinm occidentale. 
ACAM'ATUS, from « priv., and jrauvo, * I 
labour.' This word has been sometimes used 



for a good constitution of the body. According 
to Galen, it means that position in which a limb 
is intermediate between flexion and extension ; 
a position which may be long maintained with- 
out fatigue. 

ACAMPSIA, Contractura. 

ACANOS, Onopordium acanthium. 

ACANTHA, Vertebral column. Also, Spi- 
nous process of a vertebra. 

ACANTHABOLUS, Aean'tktdusy VoUeria, 
from oMap&ay ' a spine,' and jlnXXmy * 1 cast out.' 
A kind of forceps for removing extraneous sub- 
stances from wounds. — ^Paulus of .£|ina, Fa- 
bricius ab Acqnapendente, Scnltetus, «c. 

ACANTHALZUCA, Echinops. 

ACANTHE FAUSSEy Heracleum spondy- 
lium. 

ACANTHTCTM, Onopordium acanthium. 

ACANTHULUS, Acanthabolos. 

ACANTHUS MOLLIS, Same etymon as 
Acacia, (q. v.) MtlamphyHlwmy Branca ursi'- 
nay Branlur^sinsy Bear^t Breeeh, (F.) Fied 
d*omr$. This plant is mucilaginous like Althaea, 
and is used as a demulcent. 

ACAPATLI, Piper Ionium. 

AC AR'DIA, from « priv., and xo^^ia, ' the 
heart.' The state of a foetus without a heart. 

AC ARDIOTROPHIA, Heart, atrophy of the. 

AC ARICOBA. The Brazilian name for the 
HydrocotfyU umJMla'twny used by the Indians 
as an aromatic, alexipharmic, and emetic. 

ACARON, Myrica gale. 

ACARP^, from * * privative,' and xaqvfy 
* fruit.' A division of the family of cutaneous 
diseases by Fuchs, in which there is no << fruit,^' 
(Germ. Pruehty) or production from the cutane- 
ous sur&ce — ^tubercles, vesicles or pustules. 
Lentigo, Chloasma, Argyria, and Pityriasis be- 
long to it. 

AC'ARUS, from a privative, and iraen«9 ^ ^^' 
visible.' A minute insect, one species of which 
has been noticed by several observers, in the 
itch« — The Aearus Seabiei, Sareoptty Ciron. 

Ac'artts Ciao, see Psora— a. Comedonum, 
A. Folliculorum. 

AcA&us FoLLicuLo'suM, ErUoxo* tm Follieu^ 
lo'ruf»y A. Comedo'numy Dtftnodex follieulo'^ 
rumy Simt/nsa follictUo'rumy Steatoxo'on fol- 
Uenlo'rum. An articulated animalcule, disco- 
vered in the sebaceous substance of the cuta- 
neous follicles. According to Professor Owen, 
it belongs to the Arachnida. 

AoARUs ScABisi, Aearus, see Psora. 

ACATALEP'SIA, from * privative, and wt- 
ral^ft^tty 'I comprehend.' Uncertainty in 
diagnosis. Its opposite is Catalepsia. — Galen. 

ACATAFOSIS, from a privative, and ira- 
TttTTOtf^K, * deelutition.' Incapacity of swallow- 
ing. Yogel has given this name to difllculty of 
deglutition. 

ACAT ASTATIC, Aeata*tat^ieu$y from a 
priv., and xadiarriftty * to determine.' An e;»i- 
thet given to fevers, &c., when irregular in 
their periods or symptoms. — Hippocrates. 

ACATHAR'SIA, from a priv., and *a&»i^i' 
C»>»*I parge;' 8ord«»y Impurities. Omission 
of a purgative. — Foesius. 

ACATSJAVALTI, a Malabar plant, which 
is astringent and aromatic. A bath of it is 
used in that country in cases of hemicrania. It 
is supposed to be the Caaaytka filiformis of 
Linnsus. 

ACAWERIA, Ophioxylum serpentinum. 



ACCABLEMBNT 



16 



ACEPHALOCTST 



ACCABLEMBNT, Torpor. 

ACCALARATETTRj Accelerator ttrins. 

ACCELERA'TOR URI'NiE, Bvibo-caver- 
w/susy Bulbo^urdtral^Ch.) Ejacuia'tor Se- 
mi'nisj Bulbo'SyndesfnO'eavemeuz. (F.) Ac- 
e^Iirateur, from ad and eeler, < quick.* A mus- 
cle of the penis, which arises, fleshy, from the 
sphincter ani and membranous part of the ureth- 
ra, and t^idinous from the eras and beginning 
of the corpus cavemosum penis. In its course 
it forms a thin, fleshy layer, the inferior fibres 
of which run more transversely than the supe- 
rior, whieh descend in an oblique direction ; the 
muscles of both sides completely enclosing the 
bulb of the urethra. It is inserted into its fel- 
low by a tendinous line running longitudinally 
on the middle of the bulb. Its use is to propel 
the urine or semen forwards. 

ACCENT, Sonus voeis, from ad and eanere, 
eantum, to sing. Inflection or modification of 
the voice, which consists in raising or dropping 
it on certain syllables. 

The accent exhibits various alterations in 
disease. 

ACC£S, Paroxysm. 

ACCES'SION. Aeee/sio, from aecedoy (ad 
and eedere,) * I approach.' The invasion, ap- 
proach, or commencement of a disease. 

ACCESSOIRE, Accessory— a. du longjU- 
ehisseur eommun des orteils : see Flexor longus 
digitorum pedis profundus perforans (accesso- 
rius) — a. de PObturateur interne , Ischio-tro- 
chanterianus — a, du pied d'Hippoeampe : see 
Comu ammonis — a. du Saero-iombaire : see 
Sacro-lumbalis. 

ACCESSORIUS FLEXOR LONGUS DIGI- 
TORUM PEDIS; see Flexor longus digitorum 
pedis profundus perforans (accessorius) — a. Pe- 
dis hippocampi ; — see Comu ammonis. 

ACCESSORY, Aceesso'rins, (F .) Aeeessoire, 
Annexe, same etymon. A consequence or de- 
pendence on any thing ; as accessory ligameniy 
muscle, nerve, &c. 

AccEssoKY OF THE PAROTID, is s name given 
by Haller to a small gland, which accompanies 
the parotid duct, and which is commonly a mere 
prolongation of the parotid itself. See Parotid. 

AccxssoRT Sciences to Medicine are those 
which do not relate directly to the science of 
man in a state of health or disease ; as physics, 
chemistry, &c. 

Accessory of the Par Yaoum, Spinal nerve. 

The term accessory is also given to several 
muscles. 

ACCESSUS, Coition. 

ACCIDENS, Symptoms — a. Conseeutifs, 
Consecutive phenomena. 

ACCIDENT, Ac'eidens, from acddere, (ad 
and eadere,) * to happen.' A casualty ; an un- 
foreseen event. The French use the terra in 
nearly the same sense as symptom. It means 
also an unexpected symptom. 

ACClJ)EI9'TAh,advenH"tious. That which 
happens unexpectedly. 

The French give tlie name Tissus aeeidentels, 
to those adventitious textures, that are the re- 
sult of a morbid process. 

ACCIP'ITER, fltVr«r, *#f^at, 'the hawk,' 
from aecipere {ad and eapio,) ^ to take.' Me- 
7ie<fratis Aeeij/iter, (F.) Epervier, A band- 
age applied over the nose, so called from its 
likeness to the claw of a hawk. 
ACCLFMATED, ClimaUi assue'tus, (firom I 



ad and elima.) A word of recent introduction 
from the French, which means * accustomed to 
a climate.' 

ACCLIMATEMENT, Acclimation. 

ACCLIMATION, flftfo/imfw^. (F.) Aeeli- 
matem&nt. The act of becoming accliniated, or 
accustomed to a climate. 

The constitution of a person, who goes to 
live in another and a very different climate, 
usually experiences changes, which are fre- 
quently of an unfavourable character, and the 
study of which is of conkiderable importance in 
medicine. 

ACCOMTANIMENT, AdjisnTctiou. (F.) 
Accompagnement, {eompagnon, <an associate.*) 
That which is joined to any thing. 

Accompaniment to the cataract is a whitish, 
viscid substance, which sometimes surrounds 
the opake crystalline, and remains after the ope- 
ration for cataract, causing a secondary cata- 
ract. 

ACCOXTCHiE, Puerpera. 

ACCOUCHEMENT, Parturition— a. Labo- 
rious, Dystocia — a. Contre nature, see Presen- 
tation, preternatural — a. Lahorieux, LaborioOB 
labour. 

ACCOUCHEUR, (F.) Adju'tor Partus, Oh- 
stetfrieans, Ohstetri'*eius, Maiev^ter, Maisi^tss, 
He who practises the art of midwifery. A 
physician- Accoucheur, a Surgeon^Accoueheury 
a Man'-midunfe, &g. 

ACCOUCHEUSE, Midwife. 

ACCOUPLEMENT, Coition. 

ACCOUTUMANCE, Habit. 

ACCRE'TION, Accr^tio, from ad, »to,» and 
crescere, 'to increase.' Augmentation; also, 
increase by juxtaposition. 

ACCROISSEMENT, Increase. 

ACCUSATIO, Indication. 

ACE'DIA, Inci/ria, from a privative, and 
*tido9, * care.' Want of care, neglect. Also, 
fiitigue. — Hippocrates. 

ACELLA, Axilla. 

ACENINOSUS, Curative. 

ACE06NOSIA, Pharmacognosia. 

ACEOLOGIA, Materia Medica. 

ACEPHALIA, see Acephalous. 

ACEPH'ALOBRACHUS, from a privative, 
xt^aXri, * head,' and |9^a/>t«i», ' arm.' A fcetus 
without head or arms. 

ACEPH'ALOCHFRUS, from « privative, 
xt<^aXff, <haui,' and x''i» 'hand.' A fcetus 
without head or hands. 

ACEPH' ALOC YST, Acephaloeyst^is, from a 
privative, mt(>aXti, * head,' and itvnrif, • bladder.' 
An hydatiform vesicle, without head or visible 
organs, ranked amongst the Entozoa, althongh 
possessed of few animated characteristics. In 
no organ of the body are acephalocysts so fre- 
quently found as in the liver. Generally it is 
the < multiple acephalocyst,' A. soeu^Hs seu 
prolifera, which is met with. At times, how- 
ever, it is the < solitary acephalocyst,' A, ere- 
mi'ta seu ste/ilis. 

The acephaioeystis endog**ena has a firm 
coat, and is composed of different layers, which 
have numbers of smaller hydatids within them, 
and are thrown off from the interior of the pa- 
rent cyst. This species has hence been termed 
endogena, to distinguish it from the A, exog^'ona 
of ruminant animals, in which the young vesi- 
cles are developed from the exterior of Uie pa- 
rent vesicle. — See Hydatid. 



AGEPHALOGASTER 



17 



ACETONE 



ACEPH' ALOGAS'TER, AtMracoetpHtdmy 
from oe privative, xii^«li}, ^heod,' and yoorqp, 
< the belly.' A name given to monsters devoid 
of bead, chest, and abdomen ; or to those which 
have an abdomen, bat no chest or head. 

ACEPHALOS'TOMA, from a privative, 
Ki^aiq,* head,' and (rro^«, < month.' An ace- 
phaloos ffletns, at the upper part of which there 
is an opening resembling a month. 

ACEPHALOTHCXRUS, from a privative, 
sfl^oiir? ' headj' and ^M^a$, < chest,' Apeetoe^pha- 
iwu, A monster devoid of head or chest. 

ACEPH'ALOUS, from « piiv., and stf oln, 

* head.' A monster bom devoid of head. The 
ooDditi<m is called Aeejpha^lia* 

ACER, Acrid. 

AcsR Sacchak/nuk. Mapley Sugar Maple. 
(¥.) irabie^ This tree contains a large amount 
of sweet sap, whence a considerable quantity of 
sugar may be extracted. When purified, this 
sugar can scarcely be distinguished from that 
obtained from the cane. — See Saccharum. 

ACERATCXSIS, from « privative, and jn^c, 

* horn.' Defective development of the corneous 



ACERB', Aeef^hu, Strypknos, from aesr, 
< sharp.' A savour, or taste, compounded of 
the acid, bitter, ausd astringent ; such as is met 
with in unripe fruits, &c. 

ACER'CUS, from a pivative, and xi^o^, <a 
tail.' A monster devoid of tail. — Onrlt. 

ACE'RIDES, Aeero'des, from a privative, 
and x^«$, ' wax.' Plasters devoid of wax. — 
Galen. 

ACERODES, Acerides. 

ACERO'SIJS, Aehyro'dety PithfrCnus, from 
•^vc*v, < chaff.' Pur/urafeMus. An epithet 
used by Hippocrates, for the coarsest bread, 
made of floor not separated from the chaff— 
Foesiofl. 

ACERYULUS CEREBRI. See Pineal 
Gland. 

ACES'CENCTy Ageso^tia, from aeeseerey 
' to grow sour,' (« s'p, ' a point,' ac&r, * sharp.') 
A disposition to acidity. The humourists be- 
lieved that the animal humours are susceptible 
of this change. 

ACESIA, CuK. 

ACESIS, Curation, Cure, Medicament. 

ACESMA, Medicament. 

ACESMIUS, durable. 

ACESMUS, Cure. 

ACESODYNES, Anodyne. 

ACESOPHORtJS, Curative, 

ACESTER, Physician. 

ACESTIS, Medicament. 

ACESTOR, Physician. 

ACESTORI A, Medicine. 

ACESTORIS, Midwife. 

ACESTOS, Curable. 

ACESTRA, Needle. 

ACESTRIA, Midwife. 

ACESTRIS, Midwife. 

ACESTRUM, Medicament. 

ACETA MEDICATA, Acetica. 

ACETABULA UTERINA, Cotyledons. 

ACETAB^ULUM, from aeetnm^ ' vinegar,' 
becanse it resembles the old vinegar vessel, 
oTybapkfion» A measure capable of containing 
the eighth part of a modem pint. Athenieus. 
Galen. See Cotyloid. According to Castelli, 
the lobes or cotyledons of the idiu:ent» of ra- 
Bunsting animals have been so called. 



AoiFTABULVM, Cottle, Cotyloid — a. Humeri, 
see Glenoid — a. Marmum, Umbilicus marinus. 

ACETA'RIA, same etymon. A salad or 
pickle. 

ACETAS, Acetate. 

ACETATE; Ace'tas. A salt formed by the 
union of the acetic acid with an alkaline, earthy, 
or metallic base. The acetates chiefly used m 
medicine, are the acetates of ammonia, lead, 
potash, and zinc. 

ACE'TICA, Aee^ta Medieo^ta. (F.) Vinai' 
gres M6dieinauaB, Pharmaceutical preparations 
of vinegar. 

ACE'TICUM KClDVlA.AeidtmAei^Hewm 
far* tins ^ A. A. forti, A, Ae^Hcum purumy 
Aee'tum radie^/H, Oseosy Aet^He Acid, StroTtg 
Acetous Add, Aeidum Ac0t{/sumfortB, Radfi" 
eal Vin'egar, Spii^ituB Ven'tria {when made from 
verdigrie,) Spirit of Verdigris* Concentrated 
acetic acid, prepared by de€omposin|f an acetate 
and receiving the acetic acid bydistillation, has 
a very pungent and grateful odour, and an acid 
and acrid taste. Its s. g. is about 1.046, and it 
is very volatile. 

It IS stimulant, mbefacient, and escharoCic, 
and is applied to the nostrils in syncope, as- 
phyxia, headache, &c. It destroys warts. 

An Aromatic Spirit of Vinegar, Atf'idwm 
Aafticum Camphort/tum, A. aeeto'eum campho- 
ro^tum, is formed of this strong acid, J vj. Com- 
phor, J^BB, 01, Carjopk. g»' xv. 

A strong Acetic Acid was ordered brthe 
London pharmacopoeia prepared from wood. It 
was called Vinegar of wood. Improved distilled 
Vinegar, Pyroliffneous Acid, Aee'tvm lAgnet" 
rum, snd its strength was such, that ii7 gt. ot 
crystallized subcarbonate of soda should satu- 
rate 1<K) grains of the acid. 

Ae"idum Ae/tieum Dilt^tum, A, a. tenfuiy 
Aee'twm destilla^tum, Aeidum tte/ticum, Aeid^ 
um aeettfswm destilla'tvm, Aeidum ace'tieum 
debitius, Distitled vin'egar, (F.) Acide Ad* 
tique foible, Vinaigre distilli, is pepared by 
distilling vinegar, until seven-eighths have 
passed over. An Addum aeeticum dtlutum, Dt- 
Ittied acetic acid, is made by mixing half a pint 
of the strong acetic acid with five pints of dis- 
tilled water. — Ph. U. S. Its properties are 
like those of vinegar. 

AcETicTTM Maktialb, Ferrf Acetas. 

ACETONE, from a««*ttm, • vinegar.' Py- 
ro-aee'tie spirit, Pyro-aeetie Ether, Mesi^ie At' 
eohol, Bihydrate of Mesit'ylene ; erroneously 
called Naptha and Wood Naptha. A limpid, 
colourless liquid, having a peculiarly pene- 
trating and slightly empyreumatic odour. Its 
density in the liquid state, is almost the same 
as that of alcohol, 0.7921 . Its taste is disagree- 
able, and analagous to that of peppermint. It 
is miscible in all proportions with water, alco- 
hol, and ether. It may be prepared by distil- 
ling a mixture of two parts of crystallized ace- 
tate of lead and one part of quicklime in a salt- 
glaze jar (gray-beard,) the lower part of the jar 
being coated with fire-clay ; and a bent glass 
tube, half an inch in diameter, adapted to the 
month by a cork, so as to form a distillatory 
apparatus. The jar is supported on the moutli 
of a small furnace, by which the lower part 
only is heated to redness, and the vapours are 
conducted into a Liebi^'s condenser. The pro- 
duct is repeatedly redistilled from quicklmie, 
until its boiling point is constant at 132°. 



ACET08A NOSTRAS 



18 



ACHNC 



It haa been brought forward as a remedy in 
phthisis pulmonalis; but evidently with un- 
founded pretensions. It is an excitant^ and 
may be serviceable in chronic bronchitis. The 
dose is ten to forty drops three times a day, di- 
luted with water. 

ACETOSA NOSTRAS, Rnmez acetosar-ft. 
Pratensis, Rnmez acetosa — a. Romana, Rumez 
seutatus — a. Rotundifolia, Rumez scutatus — a. 
Vulgaris, Rumez acetosa. 

ACETOSELLA, Ozalis acetosella. 

ACETUM, okvt, Oxys, Aee'tum Vini, A. 
Britan'nioumy Common Vinegar, Aeidum aeeto*' 
««•§, A'legar, Aetftum Cerev%3*iay (F.) Vinai- 
gre ; from ««ic, * a point,' acer, * sharp.' A li- 
quor obtained by the acetous fermentation, 
vinegar has a pungent odour, and a pleasant 
acid taste. One fluid ounce of the Acetum of 
the United States Pharmacopoeia is saturated by 
about 36 grains of crystallized bicarbonate of 
aoda. It is refrigerant in fevers; antiseptic, 
and anti-narcotic ; and eztemally is stimi&ant 
and discutient. 

Acs'tith Arohat'ict7M, Aeidum Aee^tieum 
Aromat'icum, Aee'tum Tkeriaea'U^ A, quatuor 
funim, J%iev9s* Vinegar, Vinegar of the four 
Tkievee, MarseHlee Vinegar, (W.) Vinaigre Aro- 
matique, V, dee quatre voleure, (Rorismarin 
eaeum, eiee,, Fol. Salvia sing. §j. Lavand. 
Jhr. sice. ^iv. Caryopk, eont. 3SS. Add, Aeet, 
Oij. Macerate 7 days, and filter. — Ph. E.) Odour 
pungent and aromatic. Used as a perfume. 

AcETUH Britamnicum, Acetum. 

Acs'tum Canthah'idis, Vinegar of Cantho" 
rides, {Cantharid. in pulv. 2iij. Aeid, aeet. f. 
,^v., Aeid. pyrolign, f. ^xwiEupkorh* in pulv. 
crass, ^ss. Mix the acids ; add the powders ; 
macerate for seven days; strain; express strong- 
ly, and filter the liquor. — Ph. £. The London 
College macerates cantharid. S^ ^ 9jdA* acet. 
Oj. for eight days; expresses and strains.) It 
is used as a prompt vesicant. 

Ace'tuh Col'cbici, Vinegar ofmeetdow eaf- 
fron, (Colehie. rad» contue. ^ij ; Aeet, destU' 
lot. Oil ; Alcohol, f. Jj : Ph. U. S. It may also 
be made by displacement.) It is used as a di- 
uretic, and also in gout. Dose f. ,:^ss. to ^iss. 

AoETUH Dkstillatum ; see Aceticum aeidum 
— a. Lignorum : see Aceticum aeidum — a. Mul- 
sum dulce, Ozyglycus— «. Opii, Gutta Nigra — 
a. Quatuor furum, Acetum Aromaticum — a. 
Radicale, Aceticum Aeidum — a. Rosatum, Oz- 
yrrhodinon. 

Acetum ScxlljB, Aeidum Aceftieum SeHlit^- 
ieum. Vinegar of Squills, (F.) Vinaigre eeilli- 
tique. (SeilliB eontxa. ^iv; Aeet.destillat. Oij; 
Alcohol, f. ^j. Ph. U. S. It may also be made by 
displacement.) Diuretic, expectorant, and eme- 
tic . Dose f . ^ss to 9^ij as a diuretic and expecto- 
rant. 

Acetum Theriacals, Acetum aronuticum. 

ACEYTE DE SAL. A remedy for bron- 
chocele used in S. America. Roulin found it to 
contain a portion of iodine. 

ACHAuANA. A species of cactus, in the 
province of Potosi in Peru. Its root is thick 
and fleshy, and of a conical shape. It is a good 
edible, and is sold in the markets of the country. 

ACHANACA. A plant of the kingdom of 
Mely in Africa. It is used by the natives as 
an antisyphilitic. 

ACHAOVAN, a species of Egyptian chamo- 
mile. — ^Prosper Alpinus. 



ACHAOYAN-ABIAT. The Egyptian name 
of Cineraria maritima, used in female dis- 



ACHAR, Atchar. 

ACHE, Ap^ium graveolena—^. dee Mom- 
tagnes, Ligusticum levisticum. 

ACHE? LI A, Achi'lia, from a priv., and 
retltg, <lip.' A malformation, consisting in a 
deficiency of a lip or lips. 

ACHEIXUS, Aehi'lus, same etymon. One 
who is without lips. 

^ ACHEIR, Achir, D/manue, from « priva- 
tive, and /•{(, < hand.' One devoid of hands. — 
Galen. 

ACHEim A, Aehi'ria : same etymon. The 
state of being devoid of hands. 

ACHEROIS, Populus. 

AC HI A, Achiar, A name given in India to 
the pickled shoots of the bamW. 

AcHiA, Atchar. 

ACHIAR, Achia. 

ACHIC'OLUM, Aehit'olue, Hidrote'rion, 
Suda^rium, Fornix, Tholue, Sudato'rium, The 
sweating-room in the ancient bagnios. 

ACHILIA, Acheilia. 

ACHILLEA AGE'RATUM, Balsami*tafa:' 
min'ea, Eupaito'rium mxs'ubs, Age'reOum, Cos'» 
tus horto'rum minor, Maudltn, Maudlin Tan- 
eey; (F.) AehilUe Vieqtteuee; Nat. Ord. Coro- 
posits; Sui. Ord. Anthemide»; Sex, Syet. 
Syngenesia Polygamia superflua, — ^has the same 
properties as tanse^r, bitter and aromatic, and 
is used in like affections. 

Achille'a Atra't a, Herba Gen'ipi veri, (F.) 
AehilUe Noire, has similar virtues. 

Achille'a Millefo'lium, AekUWa Myrio- 
phyVlon, Chryso^oma, MUlefo'lium, Chilio- 
phyl'lon, Lumbus Ven'eris, Common Tarrouf or 
Milfoil. (F.) MillefeuUle, The leaves and 
flowers have an aromatic smell, and a rough, 
bitterish, somewhat pungent taste. They have 
been used in dyspepsia, flatulence, &c. 

Achille'a Pta&'mica, Peewh-py'rethruen, 
Py'rethrum eylvee'tri, Draco eylvee'trie. Tar- 
chon eylveetrie, Stemutamento*ria, Draeun'' 
cuius Praten'sis, Sneeze-wort, Bastard Petli- 
tory, Ptar'mica, (F.) Herbe ^ etemuer. The 
roots and flowers have a hot, biting taste, ap- 
proaching that of pyrethrum. Their princii«l 
use is as a masticatory and sialogogue. 

ACHILLME noire, Achillea atrata— a. 
Visqueuse, Achillea ageratum. 

ACHILLE'IS. A beautiful species of barley , 
mentioned by Theophrastus aiui Galen, called 
after Achilles, a labourer. The decoction was 
used in fevers and Jaundice. — Hippocrates. 

ACHIL'LIS TENDO, Funis HiPFOc'RATist, 
Corda sen Chorda Hippoc'ratis, Corda mag- 
na, Nervus lotus, (F.) Tendon d'Aehille. The 
strong tendon of the gastrocnemii muscles above 
the heel : so called, because it was the only vul- 
nerable part of Achilles, or because of its 
strength. See Tendon. 

ACHILUS, AcheUus. 

ACHIMBASSI. An archiater or chief of 
physicians. A name given, at Grand Cairo, to 
a magistrate who licenses physicians. 

ACHIR, Acheir. 

ACHIRIA, Acheiria. 

ACHITOLUS, Achicolum. 

ACHLYS, Caligo. 

ACHMELLA, Spilanthus acmella. 

ACHNG. Lint. See Linteum. Also, small 



ACHOU4 



19 



TO AaDULATE 



macoiu floccnli seen in front of the cornea.—* 
Hippocrates. 

ACHOL'IA, from « priTativey and x^ni 
* bile.' Deficiency in bile. 

ACH'OLUS: same etymon. One deficient 
in bile. 

ACHOR, Porrigo larvalie. 

ACHORES. Atennoften employed by the 
ancients to designate both enuta latftea^ and 
small saperficial ulcerations on the skin of the 
iaee and head. See Porri^o Larvalis. 

AcRORvs Capitis, Pomgo scutulata. 

ACHORISTUS, from « priy., and ;r"piC«»» ' I 
separate.' Any sign which necessarily accom- 
puiies a state of health or disease. 

ACHOUROU. The Caraib name for a spe- 
cies of myrtle used in dropsy. 

ACHRAS SAPOO'A. ElNispero. Avery 
abradant tree in South America, the fruit of 
liliieh is excellent. It is astringent. The 
leares are likewise astringent. The seeds are 
aperient and diuretic. It belongs to the fimiily 
Sapotea». Sex, 8yst. Hezandria Monogynia. 

ACHROI, Jchtomatufti, Jiekn/mati, Aekn/- 
miy from « privative, and xQ**f"'9 ' colour.' Pale 
individuals. — Hippocrates. It is nearly synony- 
mous with Ici^t^i, persons without colour; 
bloodless. 

ACHROMA8IA, Decoloration. 

ACHROMATI, Achroi. 

ACHROMATIC, Arkromat'ieus ; same ety- 
mon. A lens so constructed as to correct the 
aberraticm of refrangibility of common lenses. 
The Crfstalline is an achromatic lens. 

ACHROMATISTI, Achroi. 

ACHROMATOPSIA, Ckramttttfp$ewdoj/$uf, 
Ckr9wtat&metaU0]/siay Pmrm^krtfmay Vint dtt- 
tfitfTy Cohut bUndmetM, Ittiop^iof, Dattoni9m^ 
from a privative, <vp«^, ' colour,' and •nrofutt, 
<Isee.' Incapabmtv of distinguishing colours. 
A deliect situate in the cerebral part of the vi- 
sual organ. See Acjanoblepsia. 

ACHROMI, Achroi. 

ACHTLO'SIS, from a privative, and %vil*<, 
< juice, chyle.* Defective chylosis or mrma- 
tion of chyle. 

ACH YMO'SIS, from « privative, and xvfi^^ 
'juice, chyme.' Defective chymification. 

ACHTkODES, Aceroeus. 

ACHYRON, Furftir. 

ACIA, from intig, a point. A word used by 
Celsns, which has puzzled commentators,-— some 
believing it to have meant a needle ; others the 
thread ; and others, again, the kind of suture, 
'*Ad* moSis, ntm mtmit torta,*' — Celsus, Galen. 
(Chiflet thinks it meant the thread. — ^Antwerp, 
J63H.) 

ACID, ACETOUS, STRONG, Aceticnm 
acidum — a. Aerial, Carbonic acid--a. Antimo- 
ttiooa, Antimonium diaphoreticum— a. Arseni- 
ous, Arsenicum alburn-^. Auric, see Gold — a. 
Azotic, Nitric acid — a. Benzoic, Benjamin, 
flowers of— a. Boric, Boracic acid— a. Calcare- 
ous, Carbonic acid— a. Carbonaceous, Carbonic 
acid— a. Carbonous, Oxalic acid — a. Citric, Ci- 
tric acid— a. Cyanhydric, Hydrocyanic acid— a. 
Cyanoh^dric, Hydrocyanic acid— a. Gastric, 
Gastric juice. 

Acid, Gallic, Atfidum GalVieum, (F.yAeidt 
Gaiiique. This acid is found in most of the 
astringent plants that contain tannic acid of the 
kind obtained from galls. It is in delicate silky 
needles, uaoally somewhat yellowish, inodorous. 



and of a harsh, somewhat astringent taste. It 
dissolves in one hundred parts of cold and threa 
parts of boiling water. It is very soluble in al- 
cohol, and but slightly so in ether. 

It has been higUy extolled in internal hemor- 
rhage, especially from the urinary organs and 
uterus. Dose from ten to twenty grains. 

Aero, Hippu'kic, A^'idttmHippt^ricwnyXXrO" 
hevfzoie acid. An acid found in the urine of 
graminivorous animals. It is contained in hu- 
man urine, especially after benzoic acid has 
been taken. 

Acid, Htdriod'ic, Atf'idwm Hydriotticum, 
This acid is made by mixing solntions of iodide 
of potassium and tartaric acid ; filtering the li- 
quor to separate the bitartrate of potassa, and 
adding water to make the resulting hydriodic 
acid of definite strength. 

It has been used in the same cases as the 
preparations of iodine in general, but is rarely 
employed. 

Aero, Htdrochloronitkic, Nitro-muriatic 
acid — a. Hydrocyanic, Hydrocyanic acid— a. 
Hydro-eulpnuric, Hydrogen, sulphuretted — a. 
Hydrothionic,Hydrogen, sulphuretted — a. Iflpasu- 
ric : see Jatroplui curcas— a. of Lemons, Citric 
acid — a. Lithic, Uric acid — a. Dephlogisticated 
marine. Chlorine — a. Mephitic, Carbonic acid 
— a. of Milk, Lactic acid---a. Muriatic, see Mu- 
riaticum acidum — a Nitric, see Nitric acid — a. 
Nitro-h]rdrochloric, Nitro-muriatic acid — a. Ni- 
tro-Muriatic, see Nitro-Muriatic Acid — a. Ni- 
trous dephlogisticated. Nitric acid — a. Oxysep- 
tonic. Nitric acid — a. Polygalic : see Polygala 
senega — a. Prussic, Hydrocyanic acid— a. Py- 
roligoeous : see Aceticum acidum — a. Pyroli^- 
nic, Pyroligneous acid — a. of Sorrel, Oxalic acid 
— a. of Sugar, Oxalic acid — a. Sulphuric, see 
Sulphuric acid — a. Tannic, Tannin — a. Uric, 
Uric acid — a. Urobenzoic, A. Hippnric. 

ACIDE ACATiqUE FAISLEy see Aceti- 
cum acidum — a. Boretciquey Boracic acid — a. 
Gtdliquey Acid, gallic — a, Hydrocyamquey Hy- 
drocyanic acid-^. Hydrotulfuriquey Hydro- 
gen, sulphuretted — a. LcteUquey Lactic acid — a, 
Nitriqu9y Nitric acid— a. Pho9phor%qu9y Phos- 
phoric acid — a. Prussique, Hydrocyanic acid — 
a. Sidfurtuxy Sulphuric acid — a, Sulfuriqus^ 
Sulphurous acid— a. Sulfuriqus d$li»yiy Sulphu- 
ricum acidum dilutum — a. TanniqtUy Tannin. 

ACIDITATIO, Acidities. 

ACIiyiTIES, Aeo'resy AddUe^tioy Ae"idum 
morbo'ttmm^ At^'idum prime/ rumvic/rrim,OxyteSy 
Sordes o/'idtB, (F*)Aigreurs. Sourness of the 
stomach, the result of indigestion, indicated by 
acid eructations, &c. The affection is very 
common in children, and must be obviated by 
absorbents, as magnesia, chalk, kc, and by re- 
gulated diet. 

ACIDOLOG'aA, from ajcfc, < a point, a sharp 
instrument,' and Aoyof, ' a description.' A de- 
scription of surgical instruments. 

ACIDS, A^'iday Aeo'rUy from osic, 'a 
point,' ffenitive cm^c. Any liquid, solid or 
gaseous body, possessed of a sour, more or less 
caustic taste, and the principal character of 
which is the capability of saturating, wholly or 
in part, the alkaline properties of bases. 

Acicb, in general, are refrigerant and anti- 
septic. Their particular uses are pointed out 
under the individual articles. 

To ACID'ULATE. {Y ,) AiguiseryAeidtder. 
To render acidulous, or slightly acid. 



ACIDULOUS 



ACCEUOB 



ACIDULOUS, Acid^ulu;Ox^d€9y 0»^tU$, 
(F.) Aeiduie, Aigre, Aigrtlet, Substances are 
called acidulous which possess a sourish taste, 
as tamarinds, cream of tartar, &c. 

AciDVLous Fkuits, Oranges, gooseber 
ries, &c. 

Acidulous WATSR8,il^ie0a«M^«/<s. Mineral 
waters containing carbonic acid gas snfficient to 
render them sourish. See Waters, mineral. 

Acidulous WxTBa, Simple, Aqua A^'idi 
Carbon'iei^ (Ph. U. S.) Apia a'erisJSxi, Aqua 
aeid'ula simplex, Liquor seu Aqua Soda $jfor' 
v$s'e«ns, Aqua Carbofudtis Soda acutula, Soda 
wattr, Mineral watery (F.) Eau Addult tim- 
pie, is water impregnated with fixed air. 

Water, so impregnated, is cooling, and slight- 
ly stimulating. It is used beneficially in dys- 
pepsia, and in cases of vomiting, &c. 

ACIDUM ACETICUM, Aceticum acidnm— 
a. Aceticum aromaticum, Acetum aromaticum 
— a. Aceticum camphoratum: see Aceticum aci< 
dnm — a. Aceticum empyreumaticum, Pyrolig- 
neous acid — a. Aceticum Scilliticum, Acetum 
•cillflB— a. Acetoselhe, Oxalic acid — a. Aceto- 
sum, Acetum — a. Allantoicum, Allantoic acid 
— a. Amnicum, Amniotic acid — a. Arsenico- 
sum, Arsenious acid— a. Arseniosum, (Ph. U. 
S.) Arsenious acid — a. Azoticum, Nitric acid — 
a. Benzoicum, Benjamin, Flowers of— a. Bo- 
racicum, Boracic acid — a. Borussicum, Hydro- 
cyanic acid — a. Carbonicum, Carbonic acid — 
a. Citricum, Citric acid— a. (Sallicum, Acid, 
gallic — a. Hydriodicum, Acid liydriodic-~«. 
Hydrocarbonicum, Oxalic acid — a. Hydrochlo- 
ric um, Murtaticum acidum-^. Hydrocyani- 
cum, Hydrocyanic acid — a. Hydrothionicum 
liquidum, see Hydrosulphuretted water — a. Ja- 
trophicnm, see Jatroplui curcas — a. Lacticum, 
Lactic acid — a. Ligneum, Pyroligneous acid — 
a.^ Ligni pyro-oleosum, « Pyroligneous acid — a. 
Lithicum,tJric acid — a. Marinum concentratnm, 
Muriaticum acidum — a. Morbosum, Acidities 
-^. Muriaticum, Muriaticum acidum — a. Mu- 
riaticum nitroso-oxygenatum, Nitro-muriatic 
acid — a. Nitri, Nitric acid--«. Nitricum, Ni- 
tric acid — a. Nitro-Muriaticum, Nitro-muriatic 
acid— a. Oxalinum, Oxalic acid — a. Phosphori- 
cum. Phosphoric acid — a. Primarum viarum. 
Acidities— a. Prussicum, Hydrocyanic acid — a. 
Pyro-aceticum, Pyroligneous acid — a. Querci- 
tannicum. Tannin — a. Sacchari, Oxalic acid 
-;-«. Saccharinum, Oxalic acidr--a. Sails, Mu- 
riaticum aeidum— a. Sails culinaris, Muriati- 
cum acidum— a. Salis marini, Muriaticum aci- 
dum — a. Septicnm, Nitric acid — a. Succini- 
cum. Succinic acid— a. Sulphuricum, Sulphuric 
acid — a. Sulphuricum alcoolisatum, Elixir aci- 
dum Halleri — a. Sulphuricum aromaticum, Sul- 
phuric acid, aromatic — a. Sulphuricum dilu- 
turn. Sulphuric acid, diluted— «. Sulphuris vo- 
latile, Sulphurous acid— a. Sulphurosicom, Sul- 
phurous acid — a. Tannicum, Tannin— a. Tartari 
essentiale. Tartaric acid— a. Tartaricum, Tarta- 
ric acid — a. Tartarosum, Tartaric acid — a. Uri- 
cum, Uric acid — a. Urolithicum, Uric acid — 
a. Yitriolicum, Sulphuric acid — a. Vitriolicum 
aromaticum, Sulphuricum acidum aromaticum— 
a. Vitriolicum alcohole aromaticum, Sulphuri- 
cum acidum aromaticum — a. Vitriolicum vino- 
sum. Elixir acidum Halleri — a. Zooticum, Hy- 
drocyanic acid — a. Zootinicumy Hydrocyanic 
acid. 

ACIDURGIA, Surgery (operative.) 



ACIERy Cfaalybs. 

ACIES, Chalybs— a. Digitorum manus. Pha- 



langes of the fingers— «• Diurna, Hemeralopia. 

ACINE'SIA, Adntfsis^ AMn^sia, ImmoM- 
itasyQuies,Roquies, Requio'tiOyEsyeh'ia, Erom'' 
»a,from a privative, and iterate, 'motion,' »!»••, 
< I move.' Rest. Immobility. Also, the in- 
terval between the systole and diastole of the 
heart— Para9y«/o/f. 

Under the term Aeinoses, Remberg incliidea 
the paralytic neuroses, or those that are cha- 
racterized by defect of motive power. 

ACINI OF MALPIGHI, Corpora Malpighi- 

ACINIFORMIS (TUNICA) Choroid, Uvea. 

ACINUS, Aef'inus glandulo'nu, from a^'- 
inu*, * a grape-stone.' A glandiform eorpuseU 
or granulation, A fancied termination of a 
secretory artery of a gland in a granular body, 
in which the secretion is supposed to tiUce i^ace, 
and the excretory radicle to arise. Acini are 
the gloVuli arteric^rum ter^mini of Nichols. 
The termo^^mt glandulo'si has also been given 
to glands, which, like the pancreas, are arringed 
as it were in clusters. See Lobule. 

ACIURGIA, Surgery, (operative.) 

ACLEITROCARDIA, Cyanopathy. 

ACMAS'TICUS, from ok/ui;, < the top,' and 
o'Tau, 'I remain.' A fever which preserves an 
equal degree of intensity throughout its course. 
It is also called Homot'onoe. The Greeks gave 
it the name of Epttomas^titos^ and Syn'o5u>9y 
when it went on increasing,— «nd ParaofmM'H'- 
eos, when it decreased.^— Galen. 

ACM fi. Vigor, Cor^y^hl, Culndna Ho, Status, 
Fastig^'ium, The period of a disease at which 
the symptoms are most violent. A^/^, is * the 
commencement;' antftmn^, <the period of in- 
crease;' and eaifiiiy * the height.' 

ACMON, Incus. 

AON£, Aenajonftkus varus, Varus yPgfdr^^ 
da Aene, Stone Poek, Wholkj Buhwde, (F.) 
Dartre vustuleuse diss&miniio. A small pim- 
ple or tuoercle on the face* — Gorrasus. Foenus 
thinks the word ought to be Aemo, and, accord- 
ing to Cassius, it is, at all events, derived from 
AxAcif) ' vigour ;' the diseate affecting those in the 
vigour of life, especially. 

Willan and Bateman have adopted the term 
in their Nosology of cutaneous diseases, and 
placed it in the Order, Tubbrcula. Acne, 
with them, is an eruption of distinct, hard, ii^ 
flamed tubercles, sometimes continuing for a 
considerable length of time, and sometimes sup- 
purating slowly and partially. They usually 
appear on the forehead, temples and chin; and 
are common to both sexes; but the most severe 
forms are seen in young men. They require 
but little management, and consist of four vari- 
eties; Aens indura'ta, A, simplex, (HaploSenM,) 
A» punete^ta {Ion' thus varus puneta'tus, Pune- 
ta muetfsa, Comedo'nss or Maggot Pimplo,) and 
A, rost^cea* — See (rutta Rosea. 

Aoifs RosACKA, Gutta rosea— a. of the Throat, 
Pharyngitis, follicular. 

ACNES'TIS, from a privative, and irraf tr, *Xo 
scratch.' The part of the spine which extendg, 
in quadrupeds, from between the shoulders to 
the loins. According to Pollux, the middle of 
the loins. The vertebral column. 

ACNESTOS, Cneorum tricoccum. 

ACOE, Audition, Ear. 

AC(E'LIOSy from a privative, and «ouua» 



ACOEMET£S 



SI 



ACRALEA 



^bellY.' Devoid of belly- One wbo is so em 
ciaUn a* to aroear to have no belly. — Galen. 
ACOSM'ETER, Aeoumeter. 
ACOEMETRUM, Acoometer. 
ACOENOSI, Aconnai. 
ACOESIS, Audition. 
ACOGNOSIA, PharmacognoBia. 
ACOLASIA, Intemperance. 
AC0LO6T, Materia Medica. 
ACONE, Mortar. 

ACONira GRANDS FLEZmS, Aconitam 
cammararo-— «. Salutaire, Aconitum anthora. 
ACONITA, see Aconitum napellns. 
ACONITE, Aconitum. 
ACONITIA, see Aconitum napellus. 
ACONITIN, see Aconitum napellus. 
ACONITINE, see Aconitum napellus. 
ACONITIUM, see Aconitum napellns. 
ACONITUM, from Ac'oni, a place in Bithy- 
nia, where it is common. Cynotftomm, Par- 
dcU^ckesy Pardalianfekum, Canic^day Ae'o- 
nitef Wolfsbane, MonJktkood. Nat, Ord, Ra- 
nnncniaces. 8ex. Syst. Polyandria Trig^rnia. 
AooNi-HTM, Aconite, in the Pharmacopceia of 
the United States, is the leayeji of Aconitum 
Napellus, and A. paniculatum. 

Acoifi''rDii An'thob.a. AeonCtum Salvtif' 
tr u m y Anftkora vtUge^riSy An'thora, Antitk'oray 
Sal'fUmrff Monishoody Wholesome Wol/sbaney 
YUlofo helmet jlower, (F.) Acotdt salutaire. 
The root of this variety, like all the rest, is 
poisonous. It is used as a eathartic and anthel 
mintic. Dose ^ss to ^j. 
AcoHi^Tuaa'CABi'iiAarM, A. panieula'tvm, (F.) 
Ae^ndt ^ grands fieursy resembles Aconitum 
Napelhis in properties. 

Aconi'tuv Napel'lus, Napel'lus verusy Aeo- 
nCtnmy Commum Monkshood or Wolfsbane y A. 
Neamumttinum. (F.) Chaperon de Maine, The 
leaves are narcotic, sudorific, i^id deobstruent(7) 
They have been used in chronic rheumatism, 
scrofula, scirrhus, paralysis, amauroeis,&c . The 
active principle is called Aeonitfiay Aeomti^na, 
Aeoni'tay Aeanit'ium or Aeon'itine, It has been 
used of late, applied externally, in neuralgic 
cases, iatraleptically and endermically. Dose 
of tiie Aconitum, gr. j. to gr. iij. 

AcoNirmc Nbomontanuh, A. napellus — a. 
Paniculatum, A. cammarum. — a. Salutiferum, 
A. anthora. 

ACONU'SI, Aeohi'osiy AeoMosiy from axoi;, 
'audition,' and mv^^;, 'disease.* Morbi auf- 
rium et audi*tts. Diseases of the ears and au- 
dition. 
ACOONOSI, AconnsL 
AC'OPIS. Same etymon as the next Pliny 
^ves this name to a precious stone, which was 
boiled in oil and used against weariness. 

ACOPON, from « privative, and xs^e;, •wea- 
riness.* A remedy against weariness — Foesius, 
Gorraens, &c. Ac*opumy — Celsus, Pliny. See 
Anagyris. 
ACOPRIA, Constipation. 
ACOPROSIS, Constipation. 
ACOR BENZOINUS, Benjamin-<a. Boraci- 
cua, Boracic acid— a. Snccineus, Succinic acid 
~«. Sulphuris, Sulphuric acid — a. Tartaricus. 
Tartaric acid. 

ACORE BATARDy Iris pseudacorus— a. 
Pout, Iris peeudacorus — a, Odoranty Acorns 
calamus. 
ACORES, Acids and Acidities. 



satiate.* An inordinate or canine appetite. — 
Hippocrates. 

ACORI'TES. A wine made of Acorus.— 
Dioscorides. 

ACOR'MUS, from a privative, and ««p/toc, 

•trunk.' A monster devoid of a trunk. — Gurlt. 

ACORN, JUPITER'S, Fagus castanea— a. 

Oily, Guilandina moringa — a. Sardinian, Fagus 

castanea. 

ACORNS. See Quercus alba. 
ACORUS ADULTERINUSjIris pseudacorus. 
Ac'oBUS Cal'amus. a. VeruSy Catamus Aro- 
mat'ieusy C. Odorc^tusy Cal'amus vtUga'riSy Ty* 
pha Aromca'ieay Acorus Brazilien'stSy Clava 
Rugo*say Sweetjlag or Atforusy Flagrooty Sweet 
eane. Myrtle Plagy Sweet grass. Sweet rooty 
Sweet rush. (F.) Jonc Roseau on Conns aro^ 
matigusy Acore odorant, Nat. Ord. Aroides; 
Acoraceas. (Lindiey.) Sex. Syst. Hexandria 
Monogynia. The rhizoma— Oa/'aif»t<j (Ph. U. S.) 
— is stomachic and carminative, but is rarely 
used. It is regarded as a good adjuvant to bark 
and quinia in intermittents. 

Ao'oRus Palustkis, Iris pseudacorus-— a. Vul- 
garis, Iris pseudacorus. 
ACOS, Medicament 

ACOS'MIA, from a privative, and xoff^*;, 
•order, ornament.' Disorder, irregularity in 
the critical days, according to Galen, who uses 
the word ito0-/uo; for regularity in those days. 
Others, and particularly Pollux, call bald per- 
sons etxoafi,oty because they are deprived of one 
of their most beautiful ornaments. 

ACOUM'ETER, Aeouom'ster, Aeoem'etery 
Aeoem'etmmy Acn'meter, Acustm'etery (F.)Acou' 
mitre y from ttirovcr, • I hear,' and /uit^ov, • mea- 
sure.* An instrument designed by M. Itard for 
measuring the degree-of hearing. 
ACOUMATREy Acoumeter. 
ACOUOPHO'NI A, Co^'nia; from <kov», 'I 
hear,' and ^oiri;, 'voice,' ^^Aus'ciUtcUoryPereus'^ 
sion.'* A mode of auscultation, in which the 
observer places his ear on the chest, and analy- 
zes the sound produced by percussion. — Donne. 
ACOUS'MA, an imaginary noise. Depraved 
sense of hearing. 

ACOUS'TIC, Acus'tieus. That which be- 
longs to the ear ; as Acoustic nerve. Acoustic 
trumpety ifC. 

Acoustic Msdicink is one used in diseased 
audition. 

Acous'tics, ilcttj'ftVo. (F .) Acoustigue. The 
part of physics which treats of the theory of 
sounds. It is also called Phonics. 
ACOVSTIQUEy Acoustics. 
ACQUA BINELLI, Aqua Binellii— a. Broc- 
chieri. Aqua Brocchierii — a. Monterossi, Aqua 
Binellii — a. di Napoli, Liquor arsenicalis — a. 
della Tofiana, Liquor arsenicalis. 
ACQUETTA, Liquor arsenicalis. 
ACQUI, MINERAL WATERS OF. These 
thermal sulphureous springs are in Piemont. 
Their temperature is 167^ Fahr.; and they con- 
tain sulphohydric acid, and chloride of sodium. 
ACQUIRED DISEASES, Morbi aeqni si' tiy 
Adventitious diseases y M. Adventi'tii, M. epiC' 
te'ti. (F.) Maladies acquises. Diseases whj^ 
occur after birth, and which are not dependent 
upon hereditary predisposition. * 

ACRAI'PALA, from « privative, and x«er»- 

TzaXr;, 'drunkenness' Remedies against the "ef- 

I fects of a debauch. — Gorroeus. 



i- 



ACOR'IA, from a privsitive, and xjiw, •!» ACRALEA, from «x«^f, 'extremity.' The 



ACRANIA 



ACROP81LON 



ertreme parts of the body, u the head, hands, 
feet, noee, ears, kc^ — Hippocrates and Galen, 
gee Acrea. 

ACRA'NIA, from a priyative, and x^a^icf, 
'the cranium.' Want of cranium, wholly, or in 
part. 

ACRAS SAPOTA, Achras sapota, Sapota. 

ACRA'SIA, from a privatire, or * bad,' and 
*il*^tf9 < mixture.' Intemperance. Excess of 
any kmd^ — Hippocrates. 

It has been employed to denote debility, sy- 
non3rmou8ly with Aeratia; but this may have 
been a typographical inaccuracy. 

ACRATI'A, from a privative, and xforo;, 
*■ strength.' Impotence ; weakness, fainting. 

ACRATIS'MA, from a privative, and xf^ov- 
«i;fc I , < to mix.| A breakfast, consisting of bread 
steeped in wine, not mixed with water. — 
Galen, Athenasus. 

ACRATOM'ELI, fromM^^areir, * pure wine,' 
jmd ^cxi, < honey.' Wine mixed witn honey. 

ACRATOPC)SlA,from^era«im, and noot;, 
< drink.' The drinking of pure or unmixed 
wine. 

A'CRATUM, tfx^oTvir, from a privative, and 
rmujo^y ' strength.' Unmixed wine, — Aeratum 
vinum, Vinum merum* 

ACRATnRE'SIS,from^eratta,<weaknes , 
and ovQ»Ty < urine.' Inability to void the urine 
from paralysis of the bladder. 

ACRG. The extremity or tip of the nose. 

A'CREA, Aerottfria^ from axv«f , ' the sum- 
mit.' The extreme parts of the body, as the 
feet, hands, ears, &c. 

Also the extreme parts of animals that are 
used as food. Aeroeo'lia. 

ACRID, from ajcf oc, * a point or summit,' or 
from uKi(, ' a point,' ^Mr. An epithet for sub- 
stances which occasion a disagreeable sense of 
irritation or of constriction at the top of the 
throat. 

Acrid heat, (F.) Ckaleur dcre, is one that 
causes a hot tiiijgling sensation at the extremi- 
ties of the fingers. 

AcBm Poison, See Poison. 

Acams, in Pathology, are certain imaginary 
substances, supposed by the humourists to exist 
in the humours, and to cause various diseases. 
See Acrimony. 

ACRIDOPH'AGI, from aMQtg, « a locust,' and 
•ay CI, <I eat' Locust-eatert. Acridophagous 
tribes are said to exist in Africa. — Strabo. 

ACRIMONY, Aeu'itiu, Aerimo'nia, from 
meer, ' acrid,' ok*;, ' a point.' Acrimony of the 
humours. An imaginary acrid change of the 
blood, lymph, &c., which, by the humourists, 
was conceived to cause many diseases. 

ACRIN'IA, from a privative, and tt(fivu, * I 
separate.' A diminution in the quantity, or a 
total suspension, of the secretions. 

ACRIS, a sharp bony prominence. J\}ao the 
locust 

ACRI'SIA, Acrifsisy from a privative, and 
x?>a>i0, < judgment' A condition of disease, in 
which no judgment can be formed ; or in which 
an unfavourable opinion must be given. — ^Hipp. 
and Galen. 

ACRISIS, Acrisia. 

ACRIT'ICAL, A<fr%to$, from * privative, 
and xqioiq, < judgment' That which takes place 
without any crisis, or which does not foretell a 
crisis ; as a eritieal symptom, abteest, &c. 

ACRITOS, AcriticaL 



ACRIVIOLA, Tropvolum majus. 

ACROAMA, Audition. 

ACROASIS, Audition. 

ACROBYfi'TIA, Aeropos'Ma, from ct«(«r, 
'top,' and fivw, <I cover.' The extremity of 
the prepuce. — Hippocrates. Rufiis. 

ACROCHEIR', AeroMr', AeroehHr'tm, from 
oxfoc, < extremity,' and /ii^, < the hand.' The 
fore arm and hazuL Gorrseus. Also, the hand. 

ACROCHORDON, fromcx^o;, < extremity,' 
and xm^n, * a string.' A tumour, which hai^^ 
by a pedicle. A kind of hard wart, Vem^ca 
pens'ilis. — ^Aetius, Celsus. 

ACROCHORIS'MXJS, from om^oq, 'extre- 
mity,' and x*9*v»»f * I dance.' A kind of dance, 
with the ancients, in which the arms and legs 
were violently agitated. 

ACROCOLIA, Acrea. 

ACROCOLIUM, Acromion. 

ACROD'RYA, from ax<«^ ' extremity,' and 

te'a tree.' Autumnal fruits, as nuts^ ap- 
&c. 

ACRODYN'IA, Eryths'ma aerotPynum, £. 
aerodyn'iii, (F.) AerodywU, from ax{»(, <ex. 
tremity,' and •^tftn, < pain.' A painful affection 
of the wrists and ankles especially, which ap- 
peared at Paris as an epidemic, in 1828 and 
1839. It was supposed by some to be rheanoa^ 
tic, by others to be owing to spinal irritation. 

ACROLENION, Olecranon. 

ACROMASTIUM, Nipple. 

ACROMIA, Acromion. 

ACRO'MIAL, Aeramia'lU. Relating to the 
Acromion, (q. v.) 

Acromial Ar'tbet, External Seajfutar, A. 
Arte'ria I%orae^'iea humera'lis, Arthre troisihme 
dss Thoraeiques^ — (Ch.) A, Th0raeiqus kumi" 
rale, arises from the anterior part of the axillanr 
artery, opposite the upper edge of the pectorals 
minor. It divides into two branches : one, su- 
perior; the other, •n/«rtor,--the branches of 
which are distributed to the subclavius, senrn- 
tus major anticus, first uitercostai, deltoid, and 
pectoralis major muscles, as well as to the 
shoulder joint, &c. The^ anastomose with the 
superior scapular, thoracic, and the circumflex 
arteries. 

Acromial Ybiii. Has the same arrangement 
as the artery. 

ACRO'MIO-CORACOIDEUS. Belonging to 
the acromion and coracoid process. 

The triangular ligament between the acro- 
mion and coracoid process of the scapula is so 
called. 

ACRO'MION, Aero'mium, Aero'nUa, Aero'- 
mis, from a«<o^, * the top/ and wpios, * the shoul- 
der,' Os Aero'mii, Hu'merus summus, Armus 
summus, Muero-hu'meri, Rostrum porei'num. 
Caput Sea]/ula, Aeroco'lium. The process 
which terminates the spine of the scapiQa, and 
is articulated with the clavicle. 

ACROMIS, Acromion. 

ACROMPHALIUM, Acromphalon. 

ACROM'PHALON, Aeromphalium, from 
attgoc, ( the top,' and o^cf al«c, * the navel.' The 
ei^emity of the umbilical cord, which renMiins 
attached to the fcBtus after birth. 

ACROMYLE, PatelU. 

ACRO-NARCOTIC, See Poison. 

A'CRONYX, from »tiQog, <the sununit,' and 
om^, ' the nail.' Growing in of the naiL 

ACROPOSTHIA, Acrobystia. 

ACROPSI'LON, from aicH, < extremity,' 



ACRORIA 



ACTTERIUS 



and 4fil9f, * naked.' Tbe eztremity of the glana 
penis. 
ACRORIA, Vertex. 

ACRORRHEU'MA, Ekeumatis'mw extf- 
mitatumy from a»{f>$, ' extremity,' and {••Ma^ 
<deflnxiony rbeomatiam.' RheumatUm of the 
extremities. 

ACROS, MfK, 'extremity, top.' The 
strength of the Athlets, and of diseases ; the 
prominences of hones : the extremities of tbe 
fingers, &c See Acrocheir, Acromion, &c 
ACROTERIA, Acrea. See Extremity. 
ACROTERIASIS, Acroteriasmns. 
ACROTERIAS'MUS, Acrofri'<uiSy from 
«K^oTii(M, 'the extremities ;' hence ««c»Tif{ia- 
Cfir, 'to mntiJate.' Amputation of the extre- 
mities. 

ACROTHYMION, from (ur«o«, «top,* and 
9^ory 'thyme.' A kind of conical, rugoos, 
hloody wart, compared hy Celsus to the flower 
of thyme. 

ACR0T1CA, from w^o^j 'summit* Dis- 
eases aflTecting the excement frmctions of the 
external su^ce of the hody. 

Ptavity of the floids or emonctories that onen 
on the external sorfiice; without fever or oUier 
internal affection as « necessary accompani- 
menL 
The 3d order of the class Eeerii'iea of Good. 
ACROTISMUS, Asphyxia. 
ACT, Aetuty from aetumy past participle of 
€ger€y ' to do,' ' a thing done.' The effective 
exercise of a power or faculty. The action of 
an agent. Aeu is used hy the French, to signi- 
fy the public discussion, which occurs in sup- 
porting a thesis : — thus, sout&nir un Aef aux 
MeoUs ds M6dieiney is, < to defend a Thesis in 
the Schools of Medicine.' 

ACTJE'A RACEMCKSA, Cimicifitgay (Ph. 
U. S.) C. rae$wto*say Ma6ro*try$ raeemn/say 
JMrofkU Serpenta'riaQ) Serpenta'ria fdgray 
Blaei snaJtervciy Riehwedy Cokoshy Squaw 
rooty RattUwudy Black Cohosh. (F,) Aeiie d 
grappoMy Serpontairo noirt. Nat, Ord, Ra- 
noneulaces. Sex, Syat. Polyandria Pentagy- 
ma. A common pfamt in the United States. 
Tbe root is astringent; and, according to Bar- 
ton« has been successfully used, in the form of 
decoction, as a gargle in putrid sore throat A 
decoction of the root cures the itch. It is acro- 
narcotic, and has been used in rheumatism, acute 
and chronic ; chorea, &c 

AcTJtfA Spica'ta, Baneberryy H$rh ChMto- 
pker. (F.) H$rbe St, ChriHopho, A perennial 
herbaceous European plant, the root of which 
resembles that of the black hellebore. The 
root is cathartic, and sometimes emetic, and in 
overdoses may produce dangerous consequences. 
Aeta'a America'nay of which there are two var 
rieties. A, alha and A, rubray — iohite and red 
n>ho9h, is indigenous in the United States. It 
has the same properties as A. spicata. 
ACTE, Sambucus. 
ACTBy Act. 

ACTf.B a GRAPPESy Actiea racemoaa. 
ACTIPy Active. 
ACTIO, Action, Function. 
KCTlOHyAe'tiOyOpera^tioyEnergi^ayPraxie: 
from oi^roy aotvmy 'to act.' Mode in which 
one object influences another. 

The animal aeiions are those that occur in 
the animal body: the vital, those that are «»> 
ieatial to life: the physidlogiealy those of a 



healthy character : the pathological, or morbi/iey 
those that occur in disease, &c. The ancients 
divided Htud physiological actions into vital, ani- 
maly natural, sexualy particular, general, &c. 
See Function. 
ACTIONES NATURALES, see Function. 
ACTIVE, same etymon. Dras'tieusy Acti'- 
urns, Sthen'icus, Hypersthen'ieits, (F.) Aetif. 
This adjective is used, in Pathology, to cbnvey 
the idea of superabundant energy or strength. 
Active eymptomsy e. g. are those of excitement. 
In Therapeutiesy it signifies energetic : — as, an 
active treatment. The French use the expres- 
sion Medeeinc agissante, in contradistinction to 
Midecinc expectante. In Physiology, ttctiv 
has a similar signification, many of the func- 
tions being divided into active and passive. 

ACTON. A village near London, at which 
there is a purgative mineral spring, like that at 
Epsom. 

ACTUAL. Same etymon as active. That 
which acts immediately. A term usually re- 
stricted to the red hot iron, or to heat in any 
form ; in contradistinction to the potential or vir- 
tual, which is applied to caustics or escharotics. 
ACTU AWUS. Originall)r a title of dignity 
given to the Byzantine physicians. 
ACTUS PARTURITIONIS, Parturition. 
ACUITAS, Acrimony. 
ACULEUS LIGNEUS, Splinter. 
ACUMETER, Acoumeter. 
A'CUPUNCTURE,-4c«jw««*wVa, from acus, 
'a needle,' and punctura, 'a puncture.' A 
surgical operation, much in use amongst the 
Chinese and Japanese, which consists 'in punc- 
turing parts with a very fine needle. It has 
been eim)lo;^ed, of late years, in obstinate rheu- 
matic affections, &c., and apparently with suc- 
cess. Acupuncture is likewise a mode of in- 
fanticide in some countries; the needle being 
forced into the brain through the fontanelles, 
or into the spinal marrow, &c. 
ACURGIA, Surgery (operative.) 
ACUS, Needle— a. Capitata, Pin->a. Inva- 
ginata, see Needle — a. Ophthalmica, see Needle 
— a. Paracentica, Trocai^~a. Paracentetica, 
Trocar— a. Triquetra vulgaris. Trocar— a. Ve- 
neris, Eryngium campestre. 
ACUSIMETER, Acoumeter. 
ACUSIS, Audition. 
ACUSTICA, Acoustics. 
ACUSTICUS, Auditory. 
ACUTE, Aeu*tusy o^uf , (a*ig, 'a point.') (P.) 
Aigu, A disease which, with a certain degree 
of severity, has a rapid progress, and short du- 
ration, is said to be " acute."— 02;yno««'ma, 
Oxyn*osos, Oxynu'sos, 

Diseases were formerly subdivided into ilfor- 
hi acutis'simiy very acute, or those which last 
only three or four days: JIT. suhacutis'simiy 
which continue seven days : and M, subacu'tiy 
or those which last from twenty to forty days. 
The antithesis to acute is chronic. Acute, 
when applied to pain, sound, cries, &c., means 
sharp, - 

ACUTENACULUM, Porte-aiguille, 
ACYAN0BLEP8IA, from « privative, xum. 
roc, 'blue,' and (ixtnta, 'I see.' Defective 
vision, which consists in incapability of distin- 
guishing blue. — Gothe. 
ACYESIS, Sterilitas. 
ACVUUS, Arnica montana. 
ACYTERIUS, Abortive. 



ADACA 



AD£LFHi2IA 



ADACA. The Sf^€Bran'thus In'dieusy a 
Malabar plant, which U acrid and aromatic. 

ADAC'RYA, from a privative, and iaa^trnf 
* I weep.' Defective secretion of tears. 

ADiEMONIA, Anxiety. 

ADAKO'DIEN. A Malabar plant of the 
family Apocynes, used in that country in dis- 
eases of the eyes. 

A]>ALI, Ldp'pia* A Malabar plant, which 
the Orientals regard as an antidote to the bite 
of the naja, 

ADAMAS, Diamant. 

ADAMITA, AdanU'twin, A very hard, 
white calculus. — Paracelsus. 

The first word has been used for stone in the 
bladder : the second for lithiasis or the calcu- 
lous condition. 

ADAM'S APPLE, Pomum Adami. 

ADANSONIA DIGIT AT A, Baobab. 

ADAR'CB, Adar'cion, Adar'eis, A concre- 
tion found about the reeds and grass in the 
marshy regions of Galatia, and hiding them, as 
it were : hence the name, from u privative, and 
^«$xai, < I see.' It was formerly in repute for 
cleansing the skin from freckles, &c. 

ADARIGO, Orpiment. 

ADARNECH, Orpiment. 

ADARTICULATIO, Arthrodia. 

AD CUTEM ABDOMINIS (ARTERIA.) 
The superJicicU artery of the abdofnen, — a branch 
of the crural or femoral, w^hich arises at the 
lower part of Poupart's ligament and ascends 
towards the umbilicus, being distributed to the 
integuments. 

ADD AD. A Numidian plant. Bitter and 
poisonous. 

ADDEPHAG"IA, Adepkag^'ia, from adiijy, 
'much,' and <pay«(f, 'to eat.' VoriMotisness. 
Galen and Hoffman have given this name to 
voracious appetite in children affected with 
worms. Sauvages refers it to Bulimia. Also, 
the goddess of gluttony. 

ADDER'S TONGUE, Ophioglossum vulga- 
tum. 

ADDITAMENTUM. A term once used 
synonymously with Epiphysis, q. v. It is now 
restricted to the prolongation of two cranial 
sutures, the lambdoidal and squamous. 

Additamentum Coli, Appendix vermiformis 
csBci — a. Necatum, Olecranon— a. ad Sacrolum- 
balem, see Sacro-lumbalis — a. Uncatum ulnae. 
Olecranon — a. Ulnae, Radius. 

ADDUCENS OCULI, Rectus internus oculi. 

ADDUCTEUR DE VCEIL, Rectus inter- 
nus oculi — a. du Gros orteil, Adductor poUicis 
pedis — a. Premier ou moyen. Adductor longus 
femoris — a. du Fouee, Adductor pollicis manus 
— a. Second ou petit. Adductor brevis — a. Troi- 
siems ou grand. Adductor magnus. 

ADDUCTION, Adduc'tio, from ad, «to,' 
and ducere, * to draw.' Parago*gi, The action 
by which parts are drawn towards the axis of 
the body. 

The muscles which execute this function are 
called Adduc'tors, 

ADDUCTOR MEDII DIGITI PEDIS, Pos- 
terior medii digiti pedis-— a. Oculi, Rectus in- 
ternus oculi. 

Adduc'tor Metacae'pi min'imi Dig"iti, Me- 
taear'peits. Car' po-met oca/ pens nUn'imidig"iti, 
is situate between the adductor and flexor, next 
to the metacarpal bone. It arises, fleshy, iVom 
the unciform process of the os unciforme, and 



from the contigiioaB part of the amiuUr li|;a- 
ment of the wrist, and is inserted, tendinous 
and fleshy, into the fore-part of the metacarpal 
bone of the little finger, from its base to its head. 

Adduc'toe Pols' licjs Manus, A, PoPlids, A, 
ad min'i'mum dig'^itum^ Metaear^po-phalan'gt' 
us pol'lieis--{C)i.) (F.) Addueteur dupouee, A 
muscle which arises, fleshy, from almost the 
whole length of the metacarpal bone of the 
middle finger, and is inserted into the inner part 
of the root of the first bone of the thumb. 

Adduc'toe Pol'licis Pedis, Aruith'enar, 
Metatar'so'tubphalan'geus pollieis, -{Ch.} Tar- 
so-metatarsi-phalangien du pouee, (F.) Ad- 
dueteur du gros orteil* Arises by a long, thin 
tendon, from the under part of the os calcis, 
from the os cuboides, os cuneiforme externum, 
and from the root of the metatarsal bone of the 
second toe. It is divided into two fleshy por- 
tions, and is inserted into the external sesamoid 
bone, and root of the metatarsal bone of the 
great toe. 

Bichat has given the general name, Addtuf» 
tors, to those of the interosseous muscles of the 
hand or foot, which perform the action of ad- 
duction. 

Adductor Teeth Dxoiti Pedis, Prior tertii 
digiti pedis. 

Adductobs 07 THE THioH. These are three 
in number, which have, by some anatomists, 
been united into one muscle^the Triceps Ad- 
duc'tor Fem^oris, 

1. Adduc'tor longus fim oris, Addue' tor fom'" 
oris primus, Triceps mtnor, Pu'bio-femore^lism 
-^(Ch.) (F.) Premier ou moyen addueteur. 
Arises by a strong tendon from the upper and 
fore part of the os pubis and ligament of the 
symphysis, at the inner side of & pectinalia. 
It runs downwards and outwards, and is iiisert- 
ed by a broad, flat tendon, into the middle of 
the Imea aspera. 

2. Adduc'tor brevis, A, few! oris s^cun'dus^ 
Triceps secun'dus, Sub^pubio-fetnoraUis. — (Ch.) 
(F.) Second ou petit Addueteur* Arises tendi- 
nous from the os pubis, at the side of its sym- 
physis, below and behind the last moscle. It 
runs obliquely outwards, and is inserted by a 
short, flat tendon into the inner and upper part 
of the linea aspera, from a little below the tro- 
chanter minor to the beginning of the insertion 
of the adductor longus. 

3. Adduc'tor magnus, Adduc'tor fem'oris 
te/tius et quartus. Triceps magnus, le'ehio- 
femoraflis — (Ch.) (F.) Troieieme ou grand 
addueteur, is much larger than either of the 
others. It arises from the ramus of the pubis, 
from that of the ischium, and from the tuber 
ischii, and is inserted into the whole length of 
the linea asperaV Near the lower part of the 
linea aspera it is pierced by a kind of oblique, 
fibrous canal, through which the crural artery 
and vein pass. 

ADEC. The inner man. — Paracelsus. 

ADECTA, Sedatives. 

ADELIPARIA, Polysarcia. 

ADELODAGAM. A bitter Malabar plant, 
used in asthma, catarrh, and gout. 

ADELPHIA, see Adelphixia. 
^ADELPHIX'IA, Adelphix'is ; from dL9a<po€, 
< brother.' Consanguinity of parts in health or 
disease. Fraier'n\tas,Fratratio, Hippocrates 
used the epithet Adetphia, for diseases that re- 
semble eftch other. ' 



ADELFHIXIB 



ADIANTUM AJLBUM 



ADELPHIXIS, Sympftthy. 
ADEMONIA, Depression^ Nostalgia. 
ADEMOSTNE, Depression, Nostalgia. 
ADEN, a/qv, <a gland;' hence Admalgia, 
Adeniformy &c. — See Gland. 

ADENAL'GIA, Adenodyn'ui, from adnr, *a 
gland,' and aXyo^f < pain.' Glandular pain. 

ADENECTOPIA, from aii/t, «a gknd,' and 
ff jrro;roc, ' removed from its place.' Dislocation 
of a gland. 

ADENEMPHRAXIS, from a«»», *a gland,' 
and c^f^o^i g, * obstruction.' Glananlar obstruc- 
tion. 

ADENTFORM, AdeniforvifU, Adtnctdesy 
Adsnoidy from Aden, <a gland,' and Formoy 
'form or resemblance.' Glandiform^ or re- 
sembling a gland. 

AdInITE LTMPHATIQUE, Lymph- 
adenitis. 

ADENI'TIS, from aHypty *a gland,' and xHsy 
a termination denoting inflammation. Pkleg- 
wta'sia aderu/sa sen glaitdulo*sa. Glandular in- 
flammation. 
Adenitis Ltmphatica, Lympluldenitis. 
Asehi'tis MssKnTKa'iCA, JUfssenter'ie Gan- 
gli»ni^tis. Inflammation of the mesenteric 
glands. 

Adehitis Paubbraeum Comtagioba, see 
Ophthalmia. 

ADENOCHIBAPSOLOG"IA, from ain** '« 
gland/ jfti^* 'the hand,' anrai, <I lay hold of,' 
and io/of, <a description.' The doctrine of 
caring scrofnla or the king's evil by the Toyal 
touch. 

ADENOCHON'DRIUS, from mir^v, ' a gland,' 
and j)rovd^«(y 'a cartihige.' Relating to gland 
and cartilage^ — ^for example, Arthroj^y'ma ade- 
noehtn* driumy a tumefaction of the glands and 
cntilages of joints. . 
ADENODYNIA, Adenalgia. 
ADENOG'RAPHY, Adetiogra'phiay from 
oil^, * a gland,' and y^at^oi, ' I describe.' That 
part of anatomy which describes the glands. 
ADENDID, Adeniform. 
ADENOIDES, Adeniform. 
ADENOL'OGY, Adenolo^'ia, from oai^r, <a 
gland,' and io)'o(, 'a description.' A treatise 
on the glands. 

ADENOMALA'CIA, from a^r^r, « a gland,' 
and ^alattia, ' softening.' Mollescence or soft- 
ening of a gland. 

ADENO-MENINGEAL, see Fever, adeno- 
menittgeal. 
ADENONCOSIS, Adenophyma. 
ADET^O-PHARYN'GEUS, from adtity «a 
0and,' and 9«<vxl, ' the pharynx.' Some fleshy 
fibres, which pass from the constrictor pharyn- 
ds inferior to the thyroid gland, have received 
uiis name. Their existence is not constant. 

ADETfO-PHARYNGI'TIS. Sameetympn. 
Inflammation of the tonsils and pharynx. 
ADENOPHTHALMIA, Ophthalmia tarsi.» 
AD'ENO^tLY'MA^Adenon'euSyAdenonco'na, 
from adtjvy 'a gland,' and tpvftay <a swelling.' 
Swelling of a gland, or glandiform ganglion. 
(F.) Glandagt, AdenophypM is used by some 
to signify a soft glandukr swelling; — Adenon- 
€u*y one of a harder character. — Kraus. 
Adehopbtxa Ieouinaus. Bubo. 
ADENOSCIR'RHUS, Adenosdero'aisy from 
■1^, *' a gland,' and 0M»tfSy < induration.' Scir- 
ihoos induration of a gland. 
ADENOSCLEROSIS, Adenoscirrhus. 
3 



ADENOSIS SCROPHULOSA, Scrofula. 

ADENO^SUS, (Abscet'sus.) A hard, glan- 
dular abscess, which suppurates slowly.— M. 
A«- Severinus. 

ADENOT'OUYyAdenotom^tayAomadtity <a 
gland,' and T«^y», < I cut.^ Dissection of the 
glands. 

ADEPHAGIA, Addepbagia, Boulimia. 

ADEPS, Adeps SuiUa, Oxyn'giumy Pingtuf* 
do. Pig's flare. The fat of the hog. In the 
Ph. U. S. the prepared &t of 3ub $crofay fr«e 
from saline matter. 

Adeps Anbeei'ma, Adept an'seri* or CrooM 
greasey (F.) Graisse d'Oie, is emollient. It 
has been used as an emetic 

Adeps Canthaeidibus Medicatus, IJnguen- 
turn lyttaD medicatnm — a. Cortice Daphnes gni- 
dii medicatus, Unguentum epispasticnm de 
Daphne gnidio— a. Humanus, Liquamumia— a. 
Hydrargyro medicatus, Unguentum Hydraigyri 
— a. ex Hydrargyro mitius dictum cinereum, 
Unguentum oxidi hydiargjrri cinereum— a. Hy- 
drargyri muriate oxygenato medicatus, Ungoen* 
turn muriatis hydrargyri oxygenati medicatum 
— a. Hydrargyn nitrate medicatus, Unguentum 
hydrargvri nitratis — a. Hydrargyri oxi^o rubro 
et plumbi acetate medicatus, Unguentum oj^*- 
ths3micum— a. Lauro medicatus, Unguentum 
laurinum — a. Ovilli, Sevum — a. Papavere, by- 
oscyamo, et belladonnA medicatus, Unguentum 
populeum — a. Sulfur^ et ammonix muriate me- 
dicatus, Unguentum sulphuratum ad scabiem— 
a. Sulfure et carbonate potassce medicatus, Un- 
guentum sulphuratum alcalinum ad scabiem — 
a. Tartaro stibii medicatus,, Unguentum anti> 
monii tartarizati — a. Oxido zinci medicatus, Un- 
guentum oxidi zinci impuri. 

Adeps Prapara'ta, Hog's lard, Barrows 
grease. Lard, Axunge, Axun'gia, Adeps euifla 
prapara'ta, A. pmpara'ta, Axun'gia porei'na, 
(F.) Graisse de Pore, Saindoux, is prepared by 
melting, pig's flare, and straining it This is 
called rendering the lard. Lard is emollient, 
but is chiefly used for forming ointments and 
plasters. 

ADEPT, Alchymist 

ADEPT A MEDICI'NA. Medicine, which 
treated of diseases contracted. by celestial ope- 
rations, or communicated from neaven. 

Adepta Puilosophia, Alchymy. 

ADFLATUS, Afllatus. 

ADHiERENTIA, Adherence. 

ADHiESIO, Adherence. 

ADHATOTOA, Jueti^'ia adhato'da. The 
Malabar Nut Tree, (F.) Noyer de Ceylon. 
Used in India for expelling the dead fcetus in 
abortion. The word is Miid to convey this 
meaning in the Ceylonese. 

MilSEfKR^C^,Adhtf*ion,Adharer^tia,Con' 
ere'Hoy Atrtfsia, Proe'phyeis, ProeeclUaie, Ad^ 
hedaio, from adkcerere, (oJ and karere,) <to 
stick to.' These words are usually employed 
synonymously. The French often use adhe^ 
renee for the state of union, and adhesion for 
the act of adhering. 

ADHESION, Adherence. 

ADHE'SIVE INFLAMMATION is that in- 
flammation which terminates by an adhesion 
between inflamed and separated surfaces. 

Adh/sive is also an epithet for certain plas» 
ters, which stick closely to the skin. 

ADIANTUM ALBUM, Asplenium ruta mu- 
raria— «. Aureum, Polytrichum. 



ADUFHOROBIB 



ABTRAMIA 



Adiam'tiTm Cafil'lto Vsn'sais, from a, pri- 
vative, and ^iam»y 'to grow wet/ from the 
leaves not being easily moiatened. Maid&n 
hair,. Nat. Ord, Filices. Sex, Sfst, Crypto- 
gamia Filicea. (F.) Oapiilaire de Montpellier. 
A European plant, of feeble, aromatic and de- 
mulcent properties. It is used for forming the 
Strop ds CapiUair9 or Capillair$, 

Adian'tvii Pbda'tum, A» Canadgn'sB, Ca- 
piFlus CunadMfsisy Herba Vefiferis, FUix Vm'- 
eriSy Canada Mmd&nkairy Anferieem Maiden- 
hair j Roekfertiy Swtttftmy (F.) CapUlmre du 
Canadoy has the same properties. Capiilidre 
was once made from this. 

Adiahtvu Rubkum, Aspleidum trichoma- 
noides. 

ADIAPHOR<y8IS, Adiaphor^sisy from a, 
privative, Sta, 'throng,' and ^t^'c, *a pore.' 
Defect or sappresaion of perspiration, Adiap^ 
neu9*tia, 

ADlATWOBOUSyAdiaph^orus, TndiJTerensy 
Ntutral. A medicine wluoh will neither do 
harm nor good. 

ADIAPNEUSTIA, Adiaphorosis. 

ADIARRHCE'A, from o, privative, and ^lo^* 
p«ey, < to flow.' Retention of any ezctetioQ. — 
Hippocrates. 

ADICE, Urtica. 

ADIPATUS, Fatty. ^ 

ADIPEUXy Adipose. 

ADIPOCERA, Adipoeire—au Cetosa, CetSr 
ceom. 

AiyiPOCIREy Adipoce^roy from adepsy * fat,* 
and etray * wax.' The base of biliary calculi, 
Called also Chofetteriney (F.) Gras de9 Co- 
davres, Gras des Citnetih-es. Also, a sort of 
soap, formed from animal nutter under certain 
circumstances. The human body, when it. has 
been for some weeks in water, assumes this 
appearance; and it has been a subject of legal 
inquiry, what length of time is necessary to 
produce it This must, of course, depend upon 
various circumstances, as climate,^ season, &c. 

ADIPOCmE DE BALEINEy Cetaceum. 

AIVIPOSE, Adfipouty Adipo*9us,ftomadepSy 
<fat.' (F.;| Adipeux. That which relates to 
fht — as Adipose membraney A. vessels, &c See 
Fatty. 

Ad'iposb Sa&co'ma of Abernetht, Emphy^' 
ma saroo'ma adipo'sufn, is suetty throu^out, 
and enclosed in a thin capsule of condensed cei- 
lular substance, connected by means of minute 
vespels. It is chiefly found on the fore and 
back parts of the trunk. See Sarcoma. 

ADIPOSIS. See Polysarcia. 

Adifo'sis Hepat'ica, Pimslo'sis hepafieay 
Fatty livety Fatty degeneration of the livery 
(^,) Diginsriseenee gredsseuse du Foie. Fatty 
disease of the liver. 

ADIPOSUS, Fatty. 

ADIPOUS, Fatty. 

ADIFSIA, Dips</sis expers. Absence of 
thirst 

ADIP'SON, from a, privative, and dtrpoy 
< thirst' Any substance which relieves thirst 
Applied to a decoction of barley to which oxy- 
mel was added. — Hippocrates. 

ADIPSOS, Glycyrrhiza, 

AiyiTUS, *an entrance,' *an approach;' 
from aderey aditumy <to go to.' Pros'odos, 
The entrance to a canal or duct, as Aditus ad 
Aqfitsdnrtum Fallopii. 

ADinLlS'TOS,from a, privative, and 9tvitl;a, 



'I run.' Unstrained wine for phannacentical 
purposes.-»Gomeus. 

ADJUNCTUM, Accompaniment 

AD JUTOR PARTUS, Accoucheur. 

AD'JUVANT, Ad'juvansy from adjuvare, 
'to aid.' A medicine, introduced into a pre- 
scription to aid the operation of the principal 
ingredient or basis. Also, whatever assists in 
the removal or prevention of disease. 

ADNASCENTIA, Prosphysis. 

ADNATA (TUNICA,) Cfonjunctiva. 

ADNAE {MEMBRANEy) Conjunctiva. 

ADOLES'CENCE, Adolescsn'tioy Juvsn'tus, 
JEtas bona, Tonth; from adolescere {ad and 
olescere) * to grow.' (T.) Jeunssse, The period 
between puWty and that at which the body 
acqoires its full development; bein^, in man, 
between the 14th and 25Ui year; and, m woman, 
between the 12th and 21st 

ADOLES'CENS,J«'re«»*, Hebe'teSyHebe'tery 
Hebe'tor. A youth. A young man in the period 
of adolescence. 

AD(yLIA. A Malabar plant, whose leaves, 
put in ml, form a liniment, used in facilitating 
labour. 

ADOR, Zea mays. 

ADORION, Daucus carota. 

ilDOtrC/SflTiUVr, Demulcent 

AD PONDUS OM'NIUM. The weight of 
the whole. In a prescription it means, that any 
particular ingredient shall equal in Weight the 
whole of the others. 

ADRA RIZA, Aristolochia clematitis. 

ADROBCTLON, from «u)^oc, 'great,' and 
ftoXcfy < mass.' The bdellium of India, which 
IS in larger pieces than that of Arabia. 

ADROS, a8^9fy < plump and full' Applied 
to the habit of body, and also to the paJae. — 
Hippocrates. 

ADSARIA PALA, Dolichos prnriens. 

ADSPIRATIO, Aspiration, Inspiration. 

ADSTANS, Prostate. 

ADSTITES GLANDULOSI, Prostate. 

ADSTRICTIO, Afftriction, Constipation. 

ADSTRICTORIA, Astringents. 

ADSTRINGENTIA, Astringents. 

ADULAS'SO. The Justitia Hvalvis. A 
small shrub, used in India as a local applica- 
tion in gout 

ADULT AGE, Andri'oy from adoleseerSy « to 
grow to,' {ad and olerey olitnin, *to grow.*") 
Viril'ity. The age succeeding adolescence, and 
preceding old age. Adnlty AduTtusy is also 
used for one in the adnh age. 

ADULTERATIO, Falsification. 

ADUNCATIO UNGUIUM, Onychogrypho- 
sis. 

ADURENS, Caustic. 

ADURION, Rhus coriaria. 

ADUST, Adus'tnsy ftom adUrere, (ad and 
urere,) * to bum.' The blood and fluids Were 
formerly said to be adust, when there was much 
heat in the constitution and 'but little serum in 
the blood. 

ADUSTIO, Adustion, Bum. 

ADUS'TION, Adus'Ho. State of the body 
described under Adust In surgery, it signifies 
eauterixation, 

ADVENTITIOUS DISEASES, Acquired 

ADVENTITIUS, Accidental. 
ADYNA'MIA, Impoten'tia; fh)m a, priva- 
tive, and ^vrtf /KIC9 * strength,' AdyMsioy Ady^ 



ADYNAMIC 



«7 



A^Ri 



ru^Ha. ConaideT&ble debility of the vital powfen ; 
as in tyj^ns fever. Some Noeologists have a 
claaa of diseases under the name Adjfnamitf, 
B^fyse^y Morbi astken'iei, 

Adtnamia Virtus, Impotence. 

ABTNAM'IC, Adynamfieus yMy fodynam%e, 
Hffodjfnamficus; same etymon. Appertaining 
to debility of the vital powers. 

AByNASIA, Adynamia. 

ADTNATIA, Adynamia. 

ADYNATOCOMIUM, Hospital. 

ADYNATODOCHIUM, HospitoL 

ADYN ATOS, Sickly. 

JEIXEA, Genital organs. 

JED(E^ AORAy from ai^tuy 'genital organs/ 
and my^oy * seizure.' Gout in the genitals. 

iEDCEAG^RAPHT, JEdaagra^'ia, from at- 
6tM, * offgans of generation,' and y^a^w, * I de- 
scribe.' A description of the organs of generation . 

iEDCEAL'OGY, JEdebaiag^'ia, from otaoia, 
< the padendum,' and xo/o;, < a description.' A 
treatise on the organs of generation. 

^IKEATOMY, JEdaatowliay from «i0oia, 
' the pudendum,' and rt^m, < I cut' Dissection 
of the parts of generation. 

iEDCEI'TIS, JEdaotifHsy MedeCHs; from 
flci^io, ' genital organs,' and itisy denoting in- 
flammation. Inflanunation of the genital organs. 

iEDCEOBLENORRHCEA, Leucorrhcea. 

.SDCEODYN'IA, from aiifom, 'genital or- 
gans,' and o^rij, ' pain.' Pain in the genitals. 
Podendagra (q. v.) 

iEIXEOGARGALUS, Masturbation, Nym- 
phomania. 

iEDCEOOARGARISMUS, Masturbation, 
Nymphomania. 

iEIKEOMANIA, Nymi^omania. 

,£IKEON, Inguen. 

.£D(£OPSOPH£SIS, .£d(Bopeo|rfiia. 

i£DCE0PS0PH1A, JBdaopaopke^nsy from 
ai^oto, < the pudendum,' and yro^itv, <to ntiike 
a noise.' Emission of wind by the urethra in 
man, by the vagina in woman. — Sauvages and 
Sagar. 

iED<BOP8oraiA Utskira, Physotnetra. 

iEDCEOrmS, ^dceitis— s. Gangrenosa, 
Colpocace— e. Gangrenosa puellamm, Colpo- 
cace infantilis — e. Gangrenosa pnerperarom, 
Colpoeace puerperarum. 

ieDCEOTOMfi, JBdmatom'ia; from aiBo^Oy 
'genital organs,' and to/c^, 'incision.' Ana^ 
toiny or direction of the genitals. 

iEDOPTOSIS,Hy8teroptoeis— w. Uteri, Pro- 
lapsus uteri — e. Uteri inversa. Uterus, inver- 
sion of th€« — e. Uteri retroversa, Retroversio 
uteri— «. Yaginse^ Frolapsus V. — le. VesicaB, 



EIG'LUCES^ Aeigflncesy from o«, «al. 
wayi,' and ylvirvc? ' sweet.' A kind of sweet 
wine or must.— Gomens. 

iEGAGROPlLA, JBgagrop'iliy from mya^ 
r^jHy * the rock goat,' and ntXo^y * hair,' Bizoar 
fC^AlUmagrUy Pxta Dama'rum sen Rupieapra\ 
nm. A ball composed of hairs, found in the sto- 
iDachofthesoatzoncensedniedicinaliy. Besoar. 

iEGEIROS, Populus. 

.SGER, Sick. 

iE'GI AS, JSgisy JBgtiay JEgides, fnmtv «4, 
Mhe goat;' why, is not Imown, (F.) Aige or 
Aia^, There is obscurity regarding the pte- 
riae meaning of this word. If was used to de- 
fiipate an ulcer, or speck on the transparent 
forasa^— Hi ppo c iates. 



Maitre Jean vses it for a caleareous deposite 
between the conjunctiva and sclerotica. 
iEGIDES, .£gias. 

.fi'GILOPS, An'ehilopsy An'kylopsy from «i^, 
'goat,' and anp, 'the eye.' An ulcer at the 
greater angle of the «ye, which sometimes does 
not penetrate to the lachrymal sac, but at others 
does, and constitutes fistula lachrymalis. — Ga- 
len, Celsus, Oribasins, Aetius, Paulus of iEgi- 
na, &c. ^ 

iEGI'RINON. An ointment of which the 
fmit or flower of the poplar was an ingredient; 
fit)m oiyM^oc, 'the 'black poplar.' 
iEGLIA, iEgias. 
^GOCERAS, Trigonella fcenum. 
iEGOLETHRON, Ranunculus flammula. 
^GONYCHON, Lithospermum oflicinale* 
jEGOPHONIA, Egophony. 
iEGOPHONICUS, Egophonic. 
jEGOPODIUM pod AGRARIA,Ligusticum 
pociagraria. 
^GRIPPA, Agrippa. 

^GRITUPO, Disease— ». Ventriculi, Vo- 
miting. 
^GROTATIO, Disease. 
iEGROTUS, Sick. 

iEGYPTIA. An epithet for several medi- 
cines, mentioned by Galen, Paulus of ^ina^ 
and Myrepsus. 
i£oYp'TiA Moscrata, Hibiscus abelmoscfaos. 
-^Egtp'tia Sttftb'eia, Atyvnna orvmii^im, 
JBgyptian atum. Recommended by Hippocr. 
lE^TP'TiAViJcKSiK'y JBgyfiianiacers, Ul- 
cers of the fauces and tonsils, described by Are- 
taeus, as common in Egypt sod Syria. 

^GYPTIACUM, JSgyftimty Mende'aion, 
Mel MgypHaet&m, Phar'macum .Sgyptiaeum. 
A preparation of vinegar, honey, and verdigris, 
scarcely used now, exe^ by veterinary sur- 
geons as a detergent. See LinunentaiD iBra- 

ginis. 

^GYPTION, ^gyptiacum. 
-fiGYPTIFM MEDICAMEKTUM AD 
AURES, Fharmacom ad awes. 

iBGYPTIUS PESSUS: JSgfptian pessary . 
A pessaf y, co m poswl of honey, turpentine, but- 
ter, oil of lily or of rose, saffron, each one part ; 
with sometimes a sanll qoantity of verdieris.. 
AEICHRYSON, Sedme. 
i£IPATHEIA, see Continent ((fisease.) 
AEIPATHIA, see Continent (disease.) 
iEMOPTOICA PASSIO, Hwmoptysi^ 
^NEA, Catheter. 
iEOLECTHYMA, VwioJa. 
iBOLLION, Yaricelk. 
JBOLLIUM, Varieella. 
J50N, atw. The eBtire age af a man frvm 
birth til! deatL— Hippocrates, Galen. A Iso the 
spoMd marrow. See Medulhi Spinalis. 
ifiONESIS, Fomentation. 
iEONION, Sedum. 

iECRA, from etrM^t*, <1 suspend.' Gesta- 
tion, swinging.— Actios, Cetsns, &e. 
iBQUALIS, Equal. 

iBQUArrOR OCULI. The line formed by 
the union of the upper and under eyelid, when 
they are closed. It is below the middle of the 
globe. 
JBWIVOCUS, Eqidvocai. 

AftR, Air. 

AERATKMOF THE BLOOD, HMiMtosia. 
AERATUS, Carbonated. 
AMiUy Carbonated. 



JBREOLUM 



98 



^THER 



JSREOLUM,jSf«o/««,CAtf/«AM#. Theiizth 
part of an oboluB by weight, conaequently about 
2 grains. 

THESIS, atj^t^tf, < the removal of any thing.' 
A suffix denoting a removal or Beparation, aa 
Aph<BrB»iSf Diarins, &c. 

AER6IA, Torpor. 

AERIF'ER0US,il2rf/>r, (F.) Akri/ire, from 
asr, * air,' and ferre, * to carry .*^ An epithet for 
tubes which convey air, as the larynx, trachea, 
and bronchia. 

AERIFLUXIJS. The discharge of gas, and 
the fetid emanations from the sick. Flatulence. 
— Sauvages. 

AERODIAPHTHORA, from atih '«r,' and 
6ia^6opa, 'corruption.' A corrupt state of the air. 

AERO-ENTERECTASIA, Tympanites. 

AEROL'OGY ; A6rolog"ia^ Aerolog'^ieB, from 
«!}{, ' air,' and iioyof, <a description.' That part 
of ^ysics which treats of the air, its qualities, 
lil^B, and action on the animal economy. 

AER'OM ANC Y, Aeromanti'ay ftom « ^^9 'air,' 
and 0La**t%imy ' divination.' An art in judicial as- 
trology, which consists in the foretelling, by 
means of the air or substances found in the at- 



SROMELI, Fraxinus omus. 

AEROPJtRITONIEy see Tympanites. 

AEROPHO'BIA, from arig, *air,' and yo/Jn, 
* fear.' Dread of the air. This symptom often 
accompanies hydrophobia, (q. v.) and some- 
tihies hysteria and other affections. 

AEROFUOB'ICVS, Aeroph'obus ; same ety- 
mon. One affected with aerophobia. 

AEROPHOBUS, Aerophobicus. 

ARROPHTHORA, Aerodiaphthonu 

AEROFLEUJRIE, Pneumothorax. 

AEROSIS, Pneumatosis, Tympanites. 

AEROTHORAX, Pneumothorax. 

^RUC A, Cupri subatetas. 

iERU'GINOUS, JBrugino'sus, lo'des, from 
JErugo, 'verdigris.' (F.) ifugineux. Re- 
sembling verdigris in colour ; as the bile when 
discharged at times from the .stomach. 

JBRuGO, io«, from ««, ' copper.' The rust 
of any melal, properly of brass. See Cupri 
Sobacetas. 

M%tjQo Ferki, Ferri subcarbonas— ». Plum- 
bi, Plumbi subcarbonas. 

JE&y Cuprum. 

^SCHOS, «e0;^0c. Deformity of the body 
generally, or of some part. — Hippocrates. 

^S'CULUS HIPPOCAS'TANUM, from 
MCOy 'food,' [7] Casta^nea equi^na, Pavi^na, 
Horse-eksstnut^ Buek-^9, (F.) Marrmtier 
4>Ind9, JVof. Or<i. Hippocastanee. Sex.Syst, 
Heptandria Monogynia. The bark has been 
advised as a su^ititute for cinchona. Both 
bsrk and fruit are astringent Ej^ternajly, it 
has been employed, like cinchona, in gangrene. 

^SECAVUM, Brass. 

JESTATES, EpheUdes. 

JESTHE'MA, atia^q/cat, gen. tn^Aij/tMOf, <a 
aensation, a perception.' See Sensation and 
Sensibility. In the plural, asthtfmata, the ap- 
paratuses of the senses. 

^STHEMATOL'OGY, jS8t1umatolog"ia; 
from aiobfiftta^ and 2oyo(, 'a description.' The 
doctrine of, or a treatise on, the senses, or 
on the appa ratus of the senses. 

^STIlEMATONU'SI, JSstksmatorganonu'' 
tiy from 0na6iifiia, and 9wo9i, ' diseases.' Dis- 
eases affiBcting sensation. 



iESTHEKATOROANONUSI, iBsth^nato- 
nusi. 

^STHE'SIS, Aistke'sisy from a<r^«»r. 
M«t9 'I feel.' The faculty of being affected 
by a sensation. Perception. Sensibility, as 
well as the senses themselves. See Sense. 

JSSTHETERION, Sensoriom. 

JQSTHETICA, from <u<r^aro^ai, 'I feel.' 
Diseases affecting the sensations. Dulnesa, de- 
pravation 6r abolition of one or more of the ex- 
ternal organs of sense. The 3d order, clasa 
N«urotiea of Good. 

JBSTIVUS, Estival. 

wESTUARIUM, Stove. 

ifiSTUATIO, Ardor, Ebullition, Fermenta- 
tion. 

^STUS, Ardor. 

JSsTvs Yolat'icus. Sudden heat, scorching 
or flushing of the face. — Vogel. 

JBTAS, Age — ^, Bona, Adolescence — e. De- 
crepita. Decrepitude — sb. Mala, Senectus— 9. 
Provecta, Ssnectus— fs. Senilis, Senectus. 

i£THER, Ether, from «i^, <air,' or from 
<u9m, * I bum.' lAquor aths^rsus, A volatile 
liquor obtained by distillation from a naixtme 
of alcohol and a concentrated acid. 

JQTHBa Chloiucus, Chloroform. 

^THXR KYDtLOCYAit^ictSyJEther Prus'sieus, 
Hydroeyan'ic Ether, Hydroey'anate 0/ E'tke- 
rine, Cyan'uret of EthtUe, (F.y£ther hydros 
eyaniqwe, has been advised in hooping-cough, 
and where the hydrocyanic acid is indicated. 
Dose, 6 drops. 

^Ether Martialis, Tincturaseu, Alcohol aul- 
fusico-asthereus ferri-^ae. Nitricus alcoolisatus, 
Spiritus etheris nitrici— «. Pyro-aceticua, Ace- 
tone. 

-^tAbr Svi^rwifRicvs, JB,Vi»riol'icus, TTapk^ 
tha Vitrioiij Sttlph'urie Ether* Ether prepared 
from* sulphuric ether and alcohol. (Sp.' rectiji- 
cat,; Add, Sulph. as Ibiss. Distil until a hea- 
vier liquid passes over. Ph. L.) 

Rectified Ether, JSther recHfica'tue, prepared 
by distilling 12 oz. from a mixture of suipkurie 
ether, f. ^iv, fused potass, ,^ss, and distilled 
water, f. ^ij, is a limpid, colourless, very in- 
flammable, volatile liqUor ; of a penetrating and 
fragrant odour, and hot pungent taste. Its s. g. 
is 0.732. 

It is a difiusible stimulant, narcotic and anti- 
spasn^odic, and is externally refrigerant. Doee 
gtt. XXX to il^iss. When'ether is inhaled, it is 
found to be a valuable aniesthetic agent : and is 
employed with advantage in spasmodic afllee- 
tions, and in surgical operations. 

.£ther Sulphurieus, of the Pharmacopceia of 
the United States, (1843,) is formed from aloo- 
hoi, Oiv; sulphuric and, Oj ; potassa, ^y} ; dis^ 
tilled water, f. ^iij, distilling and redistilling 
according to the process there laid down. 

The PSirisian Codex has an JBther ace*tieu*, 
an ^her murie^tieus sen hydrochlor'icus, an 
JSther ni'trieus sen rUtro'sus, and an .XtlUt 
phosphora'tus . They all possess similar virtues . 

^THBR SuLPHURicus AciDus, Elixlr acidiun 
Halleri — ». Sulphurieus cum alcohole, Spiritus 
aetheris sulphurici — se. Sulphurieus cum alcohole 
aromaticns, Spiritus aetheris aromaticus. 

^Ethbr Terebinthina'tub, Terebinth'inated 
ether, made by mixing gradually two pounds of 
alcohol, and half a pound of spirit of turpei^ 
tine, with two pounds of concentrated nitrie 
add, and distilling one-half the mixture with 



.STHEREA HERBA 



99 



AITU8ION 



a gentle beat. Employed ezternfily and inter- 
oally in biliaiy calcnliy riieumatism, &c. Dose 
20 to 40 drops, in honey or yolk of egg. 
JBTHEREA HERBA, Eryngium noariti- 



JBTHEItE AL, Btke'real, Bthe'rtousy JEtktf^ 
mu, (F.> MthMe. An ethereal tincture, (F.) 
Tmnture itkiri*^ is one formed by the action of 
solphnric ether, at the ordinaxr temperature, on 
medicinal substances. An ethereal oil is a vo- 
latile oil. See Olea Volatilia. 

JBTHERIZATIO, Etherizatim. 

-«THEIUZATUS, Etherised. 

-ffiTHEROLEA, Olea volatilia. 

.«TfflOFICUS LAPIS, Ethiopian stone. A 
stone formerly supposed to be possessed of con- 
siderable yirtue-x-OribasiuB. 

opir'm»4y.^kdojno's%s^m.SthiopSy9ndfaeerej 
*to make.' The mummy-like colouring of the 
skin, induced at times by the use of mercurial 
ointment; and seen in bodies poisoned by arsenic. 

iETHIOPIOSIS, iEthiopificatio. 

iETmOPIS, Salvia sclarea. 

^TmOPISMUS, ^thiopificatio. 

iETHIOPOPOESIS, iEthiopificatio, 

iETHIOPS, from ai&wy a burn,' and wp, 
' countenance.' A black or burnt countenance. 
The ancients gave this name to certain oxides 
and salphurets of metals, which were of a black 
colour. 

iETHIOPS Albus, Albino— «. Alcalisatus, 
Hydrargynun cum creta — m* Animal, see Cho- 
roid. 

^THiops Maati a'lis, Perfi DetUa^ydum nt- 
^rmm. The black deutozide of iron: once in 
repute as a tonic. 

^THiops MnfKRAi.is, ' Hydrargyri sulphure- 
turn nigrmn — ee. Narcoticus, Hydrai^jyri sul- 
phnretum kugmm — ee. per se, Hydrargyri oxy- 
dmn dnereum — ae. Saccharatus, Hydrargyrum 
aaccharatum — e. VegetabiUs, see Fucus vesicu- 



-fiTHOLICES, from oi^», « I bum.' Fiery 
pustules on the skin. Some have considerea 
them to have been boUs: 

iETHU'SA CYNATITTM, PooPa Parsley, 
(Y.) Faux Pergil, Petite CiguH. Family, Um- 
bellifersB. Sex. Syet, Pentandria Digynia. A 
poisonous plant, which has been mistaken for 
true parsley, producing nausea, vomiting, head- 
ache, giddiness, sopor, and at times, Atal results. 
It resembles conium in its action. 

^THtr'sA Mkum , Meum, Men, Spignel^ Bald^ 
money. (F.) Atkuse Meum, The root has been 
advised as carminative, stomachic, &c. 

iCTIOL'OGY, JEtiolog"iay EHoVogy, AiHo- 
legf'ioy from aina, * cause,' and xoyo;, < a dis- 
course.* The doctrine of the causes of disease. 

iETI'TES, from atroc, «an eagle,' Eagle^ 
siene, Pierre tPAigie, Hydrate de tritoxide de 
fer. This stone was formerly supposed to fa- 
cilitate delivery, if bound on the tiugh; and to 
preventabortion, ifboundon thearm. It was 
also called Lapis Collymue. 

JETOl PHLEBES, Temporal teins. 

.STOLION, Cnidia grana. 

AFFADISSEMENTy (F.) from fade, *in- 
sipid.' That condition of the digestive function 
in which the appetite is diminished, the sense 
of taste blunted, and the action ^ the stomach 
enfeebled; a state usually accompanied by ge- 
aerd languor. 



AFFAIBLI88EMENT, Asthenia. 

AFFAIRES, Menses. 

AFFAiaSEMENT, Collapsus. 

AFPECTIO, Affection— a. Arthritica Cor- 
dis, Cardiagra — a. Hypochpndriaca, Hypochon- 
driasis — a. Hysterica, iHysteria — a. Sarmatica, 
Plica — a. Tympanitica, T3rmpanites. 

AFFECTION, Affeekio, from aJ/Mo or affee- 
tare {ad and faeere,) <to move or influence.' 
Any mode in which the mind or body is affected 
or modified. 

AFFECTION TFPHOIDE,tee Typhus— 
a. FapomMtf, Hypochondriasis. 

AFFECTIONES ANIMI, Affections of the 
mind. 

AFFECTIONS OF THE MIND, Affee^tus 
seu Passio'nes sen AffecHo'ties seu Conqiias- 
saHo'nes seu Confusio'nes seu Turhatio'nes 
seu Perturbatio'nes an'ind, (F.) Affections de 
I'Bme, include not only the different passions, as 
love, hatred, jealousy, &c., but every condition 
of the mind that is accompanied by an agreeable 
or disagreeable feeling, as pleasure, fear, sor- 
row, &c. 

In Pathology, Affection, Pathos, Pathe'ma, is 
synonymous with disease: thus we speak of a 
pulmonary affection, a calculous affection, &c. 

AFFECTIONS DE L'JME. Affections of 
the mind. 

AFFECTIVE. That which afEkcts, touches, 
&c. Gall gives the term affective faculties, (F.) 
Faeultis effectives^ to functions dependent upon 
the organization of the brain, comprising the 
sentiments, affections, &c. 
^AFFECTUS, Passion— a. FauciumpestUens, 
Cynanche maligna— a. Hyderodes, Hydrops-^ 
a. Spasmodieo-convnlsiws labiorum. Neuralgia 
faciei. 

AF'FERENT, Afferens, Centrip^etal, from 
afferof {ad vadfero, « to carry,') * I brine.' The 
vessels which convey the lymph to the lym- 
phatic glands, are called afferent. Also, nerves 
that convey impressions towards the nervous 
centres — fiervi entobesnon'tee. 

AF'FION, Ofjiwm,0'pium, (q. v.) The 
Bantamese thus designate an electuary of which 
opium is the basis, and which they use as an 
excitant. 

AFFL ATUS, Adfla'tus, Epipno'a, from ad, 
<to,' axidjiare, <to blow.' Any air that strikes 
the body and produces disease. 

AF'FLtJENCE, Afflux, from affluere, (ad 
ttndjluere, *to flow,') *to flow to.' A flow or 
determination of humours, and particularly of 
blood, towards any part. 

AFFLUXUS, Fluxion. 

AFFUSIO, Affusion— a. Frigida, see Aflii- 
sion — a. Orbicularis, Placenta. 

AFFU'SION, Affu'sio, Pros'chysis, Epiok'- 
ysis, from ad, *to,' and fundere, fusum, *to 
pour.' The action of pouring a liquid on any 
body. Affusions, Rkyptolu'sies, cold and warm, 
are used in different diseases. The cold effusion, 
Affu'sio seu Perfu'sio frig"ida, is said to have 
been beneficial in cutting short typhus fever and 
scarlatina, if used during the first days . It con- 
sists in placing the patient in a tub, and pouring 
cold water over him^ then wiping him dry, and 
putting him to bed. The only precaution ne- 
cessary, is, to use it in the state of greatest heat 
and exacerbation ; not when chilliness, or topical 
inflammation is present* 



AFIUM 



jlOITATION 



AFIUM, Opium. 

AFTER-BIRTH, Seoondioei . 

AFTER-PAINS, see Pains, labour. 

AGACEMENTj (F.) from auaU^v, «to sharp- 
en.' The setting on edge. 

AOACEMENT DBS DENTS. A disa- 
greeable sensation experienced when acids are 
placed in contact with the teeth, Tootk edge. 
Setting the teeth on edge. 

AGACEMENT DES NERFS. A slight 
irritation of the system, and particularly of the 
organs of sense and locomotion, corresponding 
nearly to the English Fidgets. 

AGALACTATIO, Agalactia. 

AGALACTIA, Agtdax'iay Agalae'Ho, 
Agalaeia'tioy Defec^tus lacftie^ OHgoge^Ua, Oli- 
gogaiae^tia, from « privative, and yalaf *milk.' 
Absence of milk in the mamm». 

AGALAXIA, Agalactia. 

AGALXOCHUMjfrom ayaaafl^ai,< to become 
splendid,'Ca/affi5ac, CalambouJkjLig'num Agal'- 
loehi vert, Ug'niwm Ai'oie, L. Aspal'athiy Xylc 
aloie, Aloes wood. A resinous and very aro- 
matic wood of the East Indies, from Excaearia 
Agalloeha. Used in making pastils, &c. — ^Dio- 
scorides, Oribasius, Paulus. 

AGAMOUS, see Cryptogamous. 

AG'ARIC, Agar'ieum. A genus of plants in 
the Linniean system, some of which are edible, 
others poisonous. It was so called from Agaria, 
a region of Sarmatia.— Dioscor ides . Among the 
edible varieties of the Boletus, the following 
are Ae chief. 1. The Agar'icus edu'lis, (F.) 
Agaric comestible et champignon de couche. 9. 
The Agar*ieus odora'tus, (F.) Mousseron. The 
most common poisonous varieties are the Agar*- 
ieue neea'tory <F.) Agarie meurtrier: and 3. 
The Agarieus aoris^ (F.) Agarie Acre; besides 
the Auranite, a sub-genus, which includes se- 
veral species. One of the most delicate is the 
Agarieus Aurdntiaeus, but care must be taken 
not to confound it with the A.- Fseudo-auran- 
<MtftM, which is very poisonous. TheA.auran- 
tiaeus is called, in French, Oronge. See Poi- 
sons, Table of. 

Agaric, see Boletus igniarius — a. Blanc, 
Boletus laricis — a. de Chhie, Boletus ignia- 
rius — a. Female, Boletus igniariu»-^ of the 
Oak, Boletus igniarius — a. Odor ant. Boletus 
snaveolens-^a. White, Boletus laricis. 

AGARICUM, Boletus igniarius. 

AGARICUS, Boletus igniarius— a. Albus, 
Boletus laricis — a. Aurantiacus, Amanita — a. 
Anrantiacus, Bolites— 4i. AuricuLEBfornui, Peziaa 
auricula — a. Chinargorum, Boletus igniarius — 
a. Pseudo-aurantiacus, Amanita— a. Quercus, 
Boletus igniarius. 

AGATHIS DAMARRA, Pinus damarra. 

AGATHOSMA CRENATUM, Dioema ere- 

AGATHOTES CHIRAYITA, Gentianachi- 
rayiU. 

AGATE AMERICA'NA, American Agave, 
Maguey, from ayauo^, 'admirable.' Nat. Ord. 
BromeijaceaB. Sex. Sya$. Hexandria Mono- 
gynia# This plant has been considered diuretic 
and antisyphilitic. The fiivourite drink of the 
Mexicana— PM/gti«— is the fermented juice df 
this plant. 

AGE, 'qliiriM, Belikiay JEtas; — Of uncertain 
etymon. Period of life. Time that has elapsed 
since birth^ &c. Five ages are often designated 
in the life of man. 1 . Firat infancy {^Infan'tia;) 



2. Second inftocy {Fueri"tia;) 3. Adoleseenoe 
(Adolescen'tia:) 4. The adult age (FmV't<a#.') 
5. Old age (Senee'tus.y 

AGENEIOS, Imberbis. 

AGEN'ESIS, from « privative, and ymMCt 
'genention.' Imperfect developomit of any 
part of the body; as eerehrai agenesis, i. e. im- 
perfect, development of the brain in the fcostna. 

AGENNESIA, Impotence, Sterilitas. 

AGENNESIS, Impotence. 

AGENT, Agensyixomagere, 'toact.* Any 
power which produces, or tends to parodaee an 
effect on the human body. Morbific agents, (F.) 
Agens morhijifues, are the causes of disease ;»- 
therapeutical agents, {Y .) AgensthirapniHfms^ 
the means of treating it, &c. 

AGER NATURiE, Uterus. 

AGER A'SI Ay Insenescen'tia, from a privatiTe, 
and YnQ*^9 * old age.' A vigorous and green oU 
age, 

AGERATUM, Achillea ageratum. 

AGE'RATUS LAPIS. A stone used by 
cobblers to polish shoes. It was formerly es- 
teemed discutient and astringent. — Galen, Ori- 
basius, Pauius. 

AGES, Palm. 

AGEUSIA, Ageustia. . 

AGEUSTIA* Agkeus'Ua, Ageu'sia^ Apo^ 
geus'tia, Apogeu'sis, Dysessthe'sia gust^to'rta. 
Par ageu^sis, from « priv., and ywartg,, 'taste.' 
Diminution or loss of taste, Anasthe'sia Ungues 
Sauvages, Cullen. 

AGGLOM'ERAT£,ii^/<MiMra'ttM, frmn^^ 
glomerare {ad and glomerare, < to wind up yam 
in a ball,') <to collect together.' App&ed to 
tumours or glands in aggregation. 

AGGLU'TIN ANT, Agglu'tinofis, CoUefums, 
Glu'tinoMSyftoiaigiiaen,* glue.' (F.) Aggiuti^ 
nant, AggliOimuif, Glutinatif. Remedies were 
formerly so called, which were considered eft- 
pable of uniting divided parts. — Paulus. 

Plasters are called aggltuinants, (F.) iifg/ti- 
tinatifs, which adhere strongly to the skin. 
Certain bandageaare likewise so termed. (F.) 
Bandelettes agglutinatives* 

TO AGGLU'TINATE. The French use the 
word aggluHner, in the se^ of ' to reunite;' as 
aggiutiner les livres d'une piaie, ' to reunite the 
lips of a wound.' 

AGGLVTINATIF, Agglutinant. 

AGGLUTINATIO, Coition. 

AGGLUTINA'TION, Colle'sis,EpieoUe's%s^ 
ProseolWsis, Glutina'tio, from aggludnarej* to 
glue together.' The first degree of adhesion. 
Also, the action of agglutinants. 

AGGLUTINER, To agglutinate. 

AGGREGATE, Aggrega'tus, from aggre- 
gare, {ad and gregare,) *to flock together,' * to 
assemble together.' Glands are called aggro" 
gate which are in clusters. Aggregate pUley 
(F.) Pilules agrigatives, signified, formerly, 
those which were believed to contain the pro- 
perties of a considerable number of mediciaes, 
and to be able to supply their place. 

AGHEUSTIA, Ageustia. 

AGIAHAOiID or AGIHAO^ID, or AGRA- 
HATilD. An Egyptian and Ethiopian shrub, 
similar to the Ximenia.. The Ethiopians use it 
as a vermifuge. The fruit is purgative. 

AGIHALID, AgiahaUd. 

AGISSANT, Active. 

AGITATION, Agita'tio, Done' sis; from 
agere, < to act.' Constant and fatiguing motion 



AOfTATOBIUS 



U 



A0TBIA8 



of the body, ZVrd«, 3Vr^M»i**9«»^«y-H>rdi»- 
trewing mental inquietude, — An'imi Agita'tio. 

A6ITAT0RIUS, Convulaive. 

AGLOS^Ay from o, privative, and yxWrct, 
<the tongue*' A malformation which consists 
in the want of a tongue. 

A6LOSS0ST0MA, from Aghsna^ (q. v.) 
and rto^Mf < month.' A mouth without a tongue. 
AGLOSSOSTOMOG'RAPHY, Aglossosto- 
mografpkiaj from a, priv., yXwaca^ < the ton^,' 
rT«/ua, 'the mouth,' and r<e<^«b 'I describe.' 
Description of a mouth without a tongue. — ^Ro- 
land (of Saomur.) 

AGLUTITION, AgluH'tio, from « priv., and 
ghuir€^ <to swallow.' A hybrid tera^ desig- 
nating irapoesibility of swallowing. — ^Limmus. 

AQMA, Fracture. 

AGMATOLOG'IA, from «yM«> 'fractiu»,* 
and lof^ < a description.' The doctrine of frac- 
tures. A treatise <m fractures* 

AGME, Fracture. 

AGMINA DI6IT0RITM MANU9, Phalan- 
ges of the fingers— a. Membrana, Amnios. 

A6MINATED GLANDS, Peyer's glands. 

A6NATHIA,from«,priv., andrrad«;,^jaw.' 
A malformation which consists in the want of 
the jaw, especially of the lower. 

AGNINA MEMBRANA, Amnios. 

AGNOIA, fromfli,priv.,andyiroa'x»,<I know.' 
State of a patient wnp does not recognise indi- 
vidoals. — Hippocrates, Galen, Foesius. 

AGNUS CASTUS, Vitei. 

AGOtxfi, aytayfi. The order or condition of 
a disease^ — Hippoc., Galen. Likewise the state 
of the air. — ^Hippoc., Galen, Gorraeus, Foesius. 

AG06UE, aywysy 'a leader,' from ay v, <I 
lead or expel.' Hence Cholagogv&y an ezpeller 
of bile: Hffdragoguey &c. 

AGOMPHI'ASIS, Asrompho'tisy from c, pri- 
vative, and y9ft^ouy *l nail.' Looseness of the 
teeth. — Gorraeus. See Gomj^iiasis. 

AGOMPHOSIS^ Agomiihiasis. 

AGON, Agony. 

AGONE, Hyoscyamus. 

AGONIA, Sterilitas. 

AGONISMA, Agony. 

AGONISMUS, Agony. 

AGONIS^ICA, from «r»r9 'a combat.' The 
part of ancient gymnastics, which had reference 
to the combats of the Atfaletae. 

Also, very cold water, given internally, to 
cafan febrile heat. — Paulns of .£gina. 

AGONIZANS, Psychorages. 

AGONOS, SterUe* 

AG'ONY, Agon'iay Agon, Agonis'ma, Ago^ 
nWmusy MochtkusyMogus^Psfehorag^^iayPay- 
rkorrhag^'ta, An'gor, from Ayan*, 'a combat.' 
The last struggle of life. — Galen, (rorraBus, &c. 
The agony, wfaach is of longer or shorter dura- 
tion, is characterized by great change in the 
features, gradual abolition of sensation and mo- 
tion, loss of voice, dryness or lividity of the 
tongue and lips, rattling in the throat, small 
and intermittent pulse, and coldness of the ex- 
tremities. This state is not present in those 
who die suddenly. See Facies Hii^pocratica. 

AGO&'TUS, from «ya, «I lead.' The fore 
arm from the elbow to the fingers. Also, the 
palm of the hand. — Gorrseus. See Palm. 

AGRA, «y^«, from Ay^f «» * I seize hold of.' 
A seizure, as OdofUagra, a tooth seizure, tooth- 
ache; Chimgray Padttgra^ &c. 

AGRAFE DE VALENTIN. A kind of 



forceps witK parallel bran^Ms^ empbyed by 
Valentin in the operation for hsjre lip, to effect 
the approximation of the edges of the woondk 

AGRAHALID, Agiahalid. 

AaRAGATIVES PILULES. See Aggre- 
0kte. 

AGRIA, Herpes exedens. 

AGRIAMPELOS, Bryonia alba. 

AGRIGOCCIMELEA, Prunus spinoea. 

AGRIFOLIUM, Ilex aquifolium. 

AG'RIMONY, Eupato'rwm, Cafal, Laf- 
]fula hepafiea (F .) Aigremoins. TheAgrimo'' 
niaEupato'rium. CockU^iwySHeiwort. Nat. 
Ord. Rosaces. Sex. Sy$t. Icosandria Digynia. 
A mild astringent and stomachic. J^ose, in 
powder, fromQ j to zj. 

Agrimomt fisMP, Eupatorium cannabinum. 

AGRIOCASTANUM, Bunium bulbocastSK 
num, Lycoperdon tuber. 

AGR10CINARA» Sempervivum tectbmm. 

AGRIORIGANUM, Onganum majorana. 

AGRIOSELINUM, Smymium olusatrum. 

AGRIOTHYMIA, from ttyeiof , <ferociouB,' 
and ^vfAOfy < disposition.' Ferocious insanity. 
— Sauvages. 

AGRIPALMA GALLIS, Leonums cardiaca. 

AGEIPAUMB^ Leonums cardiaca. 

AGRIP'PA, JBgrip'pay from legtr p€utu$y 
< difficult birth:' or perhaps from, «ypa, < taking 
or seizure,' and nwfy * the foot.' This term has 
been given to ^ose bom by the feet. It is pre- 
tended that the fiuniljr of Agrippa obtained their 
name from this circumstance. Parturiti<m 
where the feet present is called Agrippm par^ 
tus, Agrtppinus partus. 

AGRIPPINUS PARTUS, see Agrippa. 

AGRO DI CEDRO, see Citrus medica. 

AGROSTIS, Bryonia idba. 

AGRUNA, Prunus spinosa. 

AGRYPNIA, Insomnia. 

AGRYPNOCOMA, Coma vigQ. 

AGRYPNODES, from «y^;Tvo«, <sleepleas.' 
Characterized by sleeplessness, as Pebns Agry^ 
pnodes, a fever accompanied with sleepless- 



AGRYPWJS, oY^vnvot, 'sleepless,' «vigi. 
lant.' Hence Agrypnodes (Feiris,) fever at- 
tended with watching. 

AQUA DE VERUGAy see Verogas. 

AGUARDIENTEy'^i93aAy. 8ee also Spirit. 
•^-0. d$ Italia, see Spirit. 

A'GUE, from Gothic agtsy 'trembling.' [?] 
Intermittent fever. 

AouB AND Fever, Intermittent fever. 

AouE Caee, Plaeen'ta fehri'lis, Physeo^nia 
sple'mctim, P. splenieay Splenis Tumor; (F.) 
Gdteau fibrilt. A visceral obstruction — gene- 
rally in the spleen — which follows agues, and 
is distinctly felt by external examination. To 
a greater or less degree, it is not uncommon. 

AoT7B, Dead, see Fever, masked — a. Dumb, 
see Fever, masked — a. Free, Laums sassafras 
—a. Leaping, see Leaping ague— a. Quartan, 
Quartan-^a. Tertian, Tertian fever— a. Weed, 
Eupatorium perfoliatum. 

AGIJL, Alka'giy the Hedi$a'rum alhagi. A 
thorny shrub of Persia and Mesopotamia, which 
affords manna. The leaves are purgative. 

AGY10N, from a, priv., and yvioy, ' limb.' 
Mutilated or wanting limbs. — Hippocr. Weak, 
feeble. — Gralen. 

AGYRl AS, from ayviitfy ' a collection.' Opa- 
city of the crystalline. — Aetius, Par6, 



ilGTRTA 



AKOLOGT 



AQTRTA, from «rv(ic, 'a crowd/ For- 
merly, a stroller who pretended to sopematural 
powers. Sabseqaentlj, a quack or illiterate 
pretender. See Charlatan. 

AGTRTIAy Charlatanry. 

AHO'RA, from a priyative, and 'wqu, * youth.' 
Tardy development of the organs »-4he oppo- 
site to Hyperko^ra. 

AHOUAI, TheTetia ahonai. 

AHUSAL, Orpiment. 

AHYPNIA, Insomnia. 

AIDB,(V.)Ad'jutormin'%»ter. An assistant 
to a surgeon in his operations. 

AIDOROMANIA, Nymphomania. 

AIERSA, Iris Germanica. 

AIGE^ JE^M. 

AI6LE, MINERAL WATERS OF. Near 
the city of this name, in Normandy, is the 
chalybeate spring of. Saint Xantin, mnch used 
in the 16th and 17th centories. 

AIGLE, JEgna. 

AIGREy Acidukms. 

AIORELET, Acidaloas. 

AIQREMOJNE, Agrimony. 

AIOREURS, Acidities. 

AIGU, Acute. 

AIGUILLBf Needle— 0. d Aeupunehtre, see 
Needle — a. 6 Appareil^ see Needle — a. h Bee de 
Lihvre, see Needle — o. d Cataraete, see Needle 
^-a. de DesehampSf see Needle — a, Engainde, 
see Needle-^a. d FistvUj see Needle-~a. i 
Gaine, see Needle — a. it Ligature^ see Needle 
«. ^ Manehe, see Needle-^-a. d SeioUy see Needle 
— a. ii Suture^ see Needle. 

AIGUILLON, (F.) Spina Helmon'Hi. A 
term used since the time of Van Helmont to 
designate the proodmate cause of inflammation. 
According to him, an inflamed part is in the 
same condition as if an adgtiillon or thorn were 
thrust into it. 

AIGUISER, to Acidulate. 

AIL, Allium. 

AILE, Ala, Aileron. 

AILERONy (F.) Extrrma ala eeu Pin'nvla, 
diminutive of (F.) Aile^ a wing. The extremity 
of the wing of a bird, to which the great fea- 
thers are attached. 

AILERONS DE LA MATRICE. Three 
folds at the base of the broad ligaments of the 
uterus, which are occupied by the ovary and its 
ligament, the Fallopian tube, and the round li- 
gament. 

AIMA, ^atfioy See Hsma. 

AIMANTy Magnet. 

AIMATERA, Henatirrhflra. 

AIMORRHOCA, Haemorrhagia. 

AIMORRHOIS, Hsmorrheis. 

AINE, Inguen. 
- AIPATHIA, Continent disease. 

AIPI, Jatropha manihot. 

AIPIMA COXERA, Jatropha manihot. 

AIPIPOCA, Jatropha mamhot. 

AIR, Aer, Pneutna, from aw, <I breathe.' 
Common adr, Atmoepherie air, (F.) Air atmo- 
spkiriqne, is an invisible, transparent, inodorous, 
insipid, ponderable, compressible and elastic 
fluid, which, under the form of the atmosphere, 
surrounds the earth to the height of 15 or 16 
leagues. 

Air is essentially composed of two gases, 
oxygen and nitrogen, in the proportion of 20 of 
the former to rH) of the latter. Oxygen is the 
vital portion, but the nitrogen is necessary to 



dilute it. Air also contains a small portiim of 
carbonic acid gas, and it has always floating in 
it aqueous vapour, diflbrent terrestrial emana- 
tions, he. Its effects upon the human body 
vary according to its greater or leas denatty, 
temperature, moisture, &c.; hence, change of 
air IS found extremely serviceable in the pre- 
vention and cure of certain morbid conditioiia. 
See Climate. 

AIR ACIDE VITRIOLIQUEy SnlphiDons 
acid — 0. Aleatimy Ammonia — a. Atm»9pkMquey 
Air. 

Aia Cells of the Lungs, Bronchial cell*; 
see Cellule — a. Dephlogisticated, Oxygen — a. 
Empyreal, Oxygen— a. dn Peu, Oxygen — a. 
Factitious, Carbonic acid — a. Fixed, Ckrbonie 
acid — a, GatS, Azote— a. Inflammable, Hydro- 
gen, Hydrogen earburetted. 

AiK Passagws, (F.) Voi4e ahimmst mhif^rt** 
The larynx, trachea, bronchia, &e. 

Aia, Pure, Oxygen^-a. Solid, of Hale, Car- 
bonic acid-^a. Vteii, Asote — a. Vital, Oxj^u. 

AIRAINy Bell-metal, Brass. 

AIRE, Areola. 

AIRELLEANGULEUSEyy^ccimmtt myr- 
tillus— ^. Ponetitkey Vaccinium vitis idssa. 

AIRIGNE, Hook. 

AIRTHREY, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Airthroy is situate about two miles north of 
Stirling, Scotland. The waters are saline ca- 
thartics ; containing chloride of sodium, chlcMide 
of calcium, sulphate of sine, and chloride of 
magnesium. 

AISSELLEy Axilla. 

AISTHESIS, iEsthesis. 

AITHOMO'MA, from *i^c, <bl8ck.» A 
black condition of all the humours of the eye. 
A. Par<. 

AITIA, Cause. 

AITIOLOGY, iEtiologia. 

AITION, Cause. 

AIX-LA-CHAPELLE, MINERAL WA- 
TERS OF. Called by the Germans, Aachen. 
A thermal, sulphureous, mineral water, which 
contains, in 1000 grammes, 38.54 cubic inches 
of suli^ohydric acid gas, 18.05 cubic inches of 
carbonic acid gas, 0.1304 grammes of carbonate 
of linoe, 0.0440 grammes of carbonate of mag- 
nesia, 0.5444 grammes of carbonate of sodia, 
2.3697 grammes of chloride of sodium, 0.2637 
of sulphate of soda, and 0.0705 of silica. The 
temperature is 134^ Fahrenheit. 

The faetitioHs weUer of Aix-la-Chapsllf, 
A' qua AqtUsgrarun'sisy (F.) Eau d^Aix^a- 
Chapeiiey is made by adding pure water f. 
2xvijss, to hydro^ulphuretted water f. .j^iv, car- 
bonate of soda gr. xx, ehloride of sodium gr. 
ix.— Ph. P. 

There aro thermal sulphureous springs at 
Aix in Savoy, (98°) and some thermal springs 
at Aix in Provence (91®.) 

AIZOON, Sempervivum tectorum. 

AJU'GA, A. pyramida'lisy ConsoVida m^- 
diay Bu'guiay XTprigkt Bnglossy Middle Con- 
sound, (F.) Bugle pyramidale. This plant 
is subastringent and bitter. 

Ajuoa Chamjbpitts, Tencrium cfaamspitys. 

Aju'qa Reptans, Bu'giday Common BngU. 
(F.) Bu^e rampante, has similar properties. 

AKAT ALIS, Juniperus communis. 

AKATERA, Juniperus communis. 

AKINESIA, Acinesia. 

AKOLOGY, Materia Medica. 



ALA 



ALBUMEN 



ALA»P»«MhPie«fyap, 'awing.' (F.yAiie. 
A lerm often used by anatomiite for partB 
widch project like a wing from the meduun 
line; as the Ma nasi, Ala of tks vterus, he. 
See Axilla and Pftvilion of the Ear. Alio, 
Pterygium. 

ALa EzYksma, see AiUrcn. 

ALABASH^ERy JJabas'trum. i¥.)AU6tr6y 
Almhagtri'Us, A variety of compact g3npsmn ; 
of which an ointment was once made ; — ^the «mi- 
guemftum aldbastri*num; used as a discntient. 
Alabaster likewise entered into several denti- 
frices. 

ALABASTRIT£S» Alabaster. 

ALiE INTERNJS MINORES CLITORI- 
DIS, Nymp hap a . Majores, Labia padendi— a. 
MinoreSyNymi^bBD— a.Miiliebre8 minores^Nym- 
phaB--«. Nasi, see Nasos— a. Pudendi mnliebris, 
Labia pudendi — a. Pnlmonum, see Pulmo—a. 
of the UieniSy -see Ala-^a. Vespertilionis, see 
Utems. 

ALAJTERy from (F.) laity <milk.' To 
suckle. 

ALALIA^ Mntitas. 

ALAMBICy Alembic. 

ALANFUTA. A name giren by the Arap 
bians to a vein, situate between the chin and 
lower lipy which they were in the habit of 
opening in cases of fcetor of the breath. — Avi- 



ALAQUE CA. The Hindnsthanee name of 
a stone, found in small, polished fragments, 
which is considered efficacious in arresting he- 
morrhage when applied externally. 1 1 ii a sul- 
phnret of iron. 

ALARES MUSCULI, Pterygoid muscles. 

Ai^A'aas Ykr JK. The superficial veins at the 
fold of the arm. 

ALAiaA OSSA. The wing-like processes 
KiS the sphenoid bone. 

ALARIS, Aia'tusy Aliformfis; from 0/0, <a 
wing»' Wing-shaped, Winged. 

ALATERNUS, CO:(fMON, Rhamnus ala- 
temns. 

ALATITS. Pttrygo'detySomoala'tuM. One 
whose scapnls project backwards like wings. 

ALBADARAN, Aldabaran, The sesamoid 
bone of the metatarso-phalangal loint of the 
i^reat toe. The Rabbis and Magicians attri- 
buted extraordinary virtues to it. — Arabians. 

ALBAGIAZI, Sacrum. 

ALBAMENTUM, Albumen ovi. 

AL6AN, SAINT, MINERAL WATERS 
OF. A French acidulous chalybeate, in the 
department of the Loire. 

ALBARAS ALBA, Lepra alphoide»— a. 
Nigra, Lepra nigricans. 

ALBARiCS, Lepra alphoides. 

ALBAROS, Lepra alphoides. 

ALBJTRE, Alabaster. 

AJ.BEDO UNGUIUM, see Nail. 

ALBIN D*(EJTPy Albumen ovi. 

ALBINISM, see Albino. 

ALBINISMUS, see Albino. 

ALBI^NO. 'White.' Ltue^g'thiopSy JBthiops 
alhfusy Dondoy from alhit, 'white.' (F.) Bla- 
ford, Negr€-biane. A Spanish word applied to 
indiridoals of the human race who have the 
tkin and hair white; the iris very pale, border- 
ing on red; and the eyes so sensible, that they 
cannot bear the light of day. This condition, 
which has been called Leuetetkio'pia, Alpko'ns 
JSikiop^icay AlHnots'muSf Aibinit'mi^Sf Ai'hin- 



MM, LaueopatMay is seen more frequently in 
the Negroi Both sexes are exposed to it ; but 
it does not seem to be true, that there are tribes 
of Albinos in the interior of Africa. 

ALBINOISMUS, see Albino. 

ALBOR OVI, Albumen ovi. 

AL'BORA. a kind of itch or complicated 
leprosy. — ^Paracelsus. 

ALBOT, Crucible. 

ALBOTIM, Terebinthina. 

ALBUGIN'EA, Tu'nica albugin^eay A. Tei- 
tisyP$nUt^HsyTu'rUea vagina'lis UHis propria^ 
M^mhra'na eapnUa^ri* testis, (F.) AJbuginiSy 
Tuniftts ulhfugifUs. A strong, fibrous, and re- 
sisting membrane, which immediately enve- 
lop! the testicle, and has, at its upper part, 
an enlargement, called corpus Highmorianum. 
From its inner surface it sends off a number of 
flat, filiform prolongations or septa, between 
which are contained the seminiferous vessels. 
Externally, it is covered by the tunica vagina- 
lis testis. 

ALBTTGINJtEy Albuginea, Albugineoos. 

ALBUGIN'£OUS,^6flf^»'0tt#, 'white,' from 
alhusy (F.) Alhuginis, A term applied to tex- 
tures, humours, &c., which are perfectly white. 

AuBVQin'soTTS FiBKK, (F.) Fihrs albuginds, 
A name given by Chanssier to what he consi- 
ders one of the four elementary fibres. 

The albugineoos fibre is linear, cylindrical, 
tenacious, elastic, but little extensible, and of a 
shining, satiny appearance. It always forms 
&sci» or fasciculi, which constitute the tendons, 
articular ligaments, and aponeuroses: hence the 
name Albuginsous msmbranssy given by Chaua- 
sier to the fibrous membranes. 

Gauthier considers that the rete mucosun 
consists of four layers, to two of which he gives 
the names, — msmbra^na albugin'sa profun'day 
and msmbra^na alhugin'sa supsrfieia'lisy respec- 
tively. 

ALBUGINPTIS, (F.) Ali/Ugtnite. A tenn 
employed by some authcvs for inflammation of 
the albngineous tissue. , Thus, gout and rheu- 
matism are regarded as species of the genus al- 
buginitis. 

ALBUGO OCULORUM, Leuconur— a. Ovi, 
Albumen ovi. 

ALBULA, Lencoma. 

ALBUM CANIS, Album grteenm— «. Ceti, 
Cetaceum. 

Albuh Gkjbcuh, Cfnoe'oprus^ Spo'dinm 
Grsteo'rumy Album Canisy Stereus Cani^num 
Album. The white dung of the dog. It con- 
sists almost wholly of phosphate of limsy from 
the bones used as food. It was formerly ap- 
plied as a discntient to the inside of the throat 
m quinseys, but is now justly banished from 
practice. 

Album NioaxrH. The excrement of the moose. 

Album Oculi, see Sclerotic. 

Album Rhasis. A white ointment made of 
cemsse and lard, prescribed by the Arabian 
physician Rhases. 

ALBV'MEN J^euoo'matOoni*ni,Og0munfaom 
albusy 'white.' (F.) Albumins. An immediate 
principle of animals and vegetables, which con- 
stitutes the chief part of the white of egg. It 
is found in the serum, chyle, synovia, serous 
fluids, &c. There is not much difiierence in 
chemical composition between animal and ve- 
getable albumen, fibrin and casein: fibrin alone 
appears, however, to be possessed of plastic 



JUsBUMVa 



34 



ALCN>aOI. 



Moperties. 
Sclerotic. 



Alooy the white of the eye. See 



Albu'm 111 Ovi, Albu'moTy Allm'go Otfi, Aibor 
Ovi, Can'didum Ovi^ Aibu'iMny Clare^tOy Ovi 
alius liquoTy Aliuminftum, Lac avis or VfkUe 
of*gg> (^0 BiaTied'auf, (Old F.) Aliin d'muf, 
IB used in phanoacj for soipendiDg oole, &c.y in 
water. See Ovum. 

ALBUMINEy Albumen. 

ALBUMINU'RIA. A hybnd term from 
'Aliuwten,* and ou^or, <the urine.' The condi- 
tion of the urine in which it contains albamen, 
the preaence of which is indicated by its coagn- 
laticm on the application of adequate heat. 

AJ4BXTMINUROKRHAE, Kidney, Bright's 
disease of the. 

ALBUMOR, Albumen ovi. 

AL'CAEST, Al'cahsst, Al'ehasst^ perfa^s 
from (6.) all, <all,' and geist, 'spirit.' A 
word invented by Paracelsus to designate a li- 
quor, which, according to him, was capable of 
removing every kind of swelling. 

The same word was used by Van Helmont 
for a fancied universal solvent, capable of re- 
ducing every body to its elements. 

Alcaest of Glaubkr is a thick liquor ob- 
tained by detonating nitrate of potassa on hot 
coals, which transforms it into subcarbonate of 
potassa. 

Alcabst of Rb8pou& is a mixture of potassa 
and oxyd of zinc. 

ALCAHEST, Alcaest. 

ALCAHOL, Alcohol. 

ALCALES'GENCE, AliaUs'eenes, AleaUs- 
een'Ua. The condition in which a fluid becomes 
alkaline. 

Alcaxsscbnce of the Humoubs was an old 
notion of the humourists. It can only occur 
during the putrid fermentation of animal mat- 
ters, which contain azote, and produce ammo- 
nia. Alcalin'itt is the quality of being alca- 
line. 

AL'CALI or Alea'li^ Al'kaliy from ai {Arah^) 
'the,' and kali^ the name of the Salso'la Soda, 
a plant which contains a large quantity of one 
of the principal alkalis — soda. The alkalis are 
substances soluble in water, possessing gene- 
rally a urinous, acrid, and caustic taste, turning 
the syrup of violets grfeen, and restoring to blue 
the infusion of litmus, which has been reddened 
by acids; reddening the yellow of turmeric, and 
having the greatest tendency to unite with acids, 
whose character the^ modify, and form salts 
with them. In medicine we understand by this 
term Potassa, Soda, or Ammonia (q. v.) 

Aix;alt, Caustic, Al'kali Caus*tieum, A 
pure alkali. One deprived of its carbonic acid. 

Alcalis, Fixbd, soda and potassa; Vola- 
tile Alcali, ammonia. 

Alcalx Ammonxacvm Acetatuh, Liquor am- 
monis acetatis — a. Ammoniacum fluidum. Li- 
quor ammonis — a. Fixum tartarizatum, Potas- 
ss tartras — a. Minerale sulphuricum. Soda, sul- 
phate of— a. Tartari aceto saturatnm, PotasssB 
acetas — a. Vegetabile salito dephlogisticatum, 
PotassaB murias hyperoxygenatus— a. Vegeta- 
bile tartarizatum, Potassae tartras— a. Vegetabile 
vitriolatum, Potassas sulphas— a. Volatile ace- 
tatum. Liquor ammonis acetatis — a. Volatile 
aeratum, AmmonisB carbonas — a. Volatile ez 
sale ammoniaco, Ammonia carbcmas. 

ALGALIGENE, Azote. 

ALCALINITY. See Alkalescence. 



ALCANA, Ancfansa ofBetnaUs. 

ALCANNA MAJOR LATIFOLIA DEN- 
TATA, Prinee— «. Orientalis, Lawsonia Iner- 
mis — a. Spuria, Anchusa tinctoria — a. Vera» 
Lawsonia inermis. 

ALCEA, Hibiscus abelmoschus— a. .£gyp- 
tiaca. Hibiscus abelmoaehus»-a. Indica, Hibu- 
ctts abelmoschus. 

Alob'a Ro'sba, Common koUyhoci, Emol- 
lient, like Althsa. 

ALCHACHEN6E, Pfaysalis. 

ALCHACHIL, Rosmarinus. 

ALCHAEST, Alcahest. 

ALCHEMILTiA, said to have been cele- 
brated with the Alchemists [?] A, vutga'ris^ 
Common Ladies^ MantU, Fes Lso'nisy Leonto^ 
po'dium (F.) Pisd de Lion, Formerly in great 
repute as an astringent ia hemorrhage. 

ALCHEMY, Alchymy. 

ALCHITRAM, see Finns Sylvestris. 

ALCHITURA, see Pinus Sylvestris. 

ALCHOOL, Alcohol. 

AVCISYMY, Al'eh0mf,Aleh«mi'a,Alckimi'a, 
Adep'ta Philosoph*ia, from oL, an Arabic par- 
ticle, signifying ' superiority, excellence,' and 
Chimiay * Chymistry .' This word was formerly 
synonymous with Cfhymistry; but, from the 7u 
century, it has been applied to the mysterious 
art of endeavouring to discover a universal re- 
medy, and a mode of transmuting the baser me- 
tals into gold: an operation to which they gave 
the name Opus magnum, and Philosopher's 
stone, 

Alch3rmy has also been called Seien'tia vel 
PkUosoph'ia Hermet'iea, from an idea that Her- 
mes or Mercury was its inventor. 

Harris has well defined this chimerical art : 
*Ars sine arte, eujus prineipinm est mentiriy me- 
dium lahorare, et finis mendieare? 

Al'chymist, Flatua^rius, Adept*, One pre- 
tending to alchymy. 

ALCOCALUM, Cynara scolymus. 

AL'COHOL, Al'eahol, Alehool, AUol,Aleol, 
Al'eooly Al'kool. An Arabic word, formerly 
used for an impalpable powder, and Bignif3m!ig 
' very subtile, much divided.' At thie present 
day it is applied to highly rectified spirit of 
wine: — see Spiritus reetifieatus or rectified 
spirit, distilled from dried subcarbonate of po- 
tassa. In the Ph. U. S. Alcohol is rectified spi- 
rit of the specific gravity 0.835. 

Alcohol is an inflammable liquor, lighter than 
water, of a warm, acrid taste, colourless, trans- 
parent, and of a pungent, aromatic smell. It is 
the product of the distillation of vinous liquors; 
is miscible with water in all proportions, and 
is the direct solvent of resins, balsams, &c. Va- 
rious other vegetable principles are soluble in 
it, and hence it is used, in different states of 
concentration, in the preparation oi elixirs, tinc- 
tures, essences, &c. 

Alcohol acts on the animal body as a power- 
ful stimulus : as such, in a dilute form, it is used 
in the prevention and cure of disease. Its ha- 
bitual and inordinate use is the cause of many 
serious affections, of a chronic character espe- 
cially, as visceral obstructions, dropsy, &c. 

Alcohol ^thbbbitb Fbbbatds, A. sulfiuico- 
aBthereuB ferri— a. cum Aloe perfoliata, Tinc- 
tura aloes — a. Ammoniac et guaiaci. Tincture 
gnaiaci ammoniata — a. Ammoniatum, Spiritus 
ammoniaB — a* Ammoniatum aromaticum, Spi- 
ritus ammonioB aromaticus— a. Ammoniatum 



ALGOL 



35 



AUaSDON 



fceUdimi, Spiritw •mmonim f<Btidci»--B. enm 
Aromalibija Bulphuricatns, Sulphuricum teidura 
mnMnaticum — a. cum Aromatibu* compoaitufl, 
Tinctun ciimamomi compotit»— a. Caatoria- 
tum, Tmctura castorei — a. cum Crotone caaca^ 
rilla, Tinctuia cascarillaB — a. Dilutum, Spiritus 
temior — a. Feiratos, Tinctuia ferri muriatic— 
a. com Sulphate ferri tartarisatus, aee Fesrum 
tartarixatnin — a. cum Cruaiaco officinale ammo- 
niatnsy Tinctura guaiaci ammooiata — a. lodii, 
Tinctura lodinas— a. cum Opio, Tiuctora opii 
—a. Sulphuricatuoo, Elixir aekiom HaUeri — a. 
Sulphuricum, Elixir acidum Hallefi — a. Sul- 
phmis, Carboois sulphnretum— a. Vini, Spiritua 
rectificatua. 
ALGOL, Alcohol. 
ALGOLS, AphthflB. 

ALC0OL,Alcohol—^C<if»pAr^ Spiritus cam- 
phone* 
ALCOOLATy Tincture. 
ALCOOLATUM, TinctUTe— a.- Antiscorbu- 
ticum, Tinctura de cochleaiiie — a. Carminati- 
▼um Sylvii, Tinctuia de Cochleariis — ^a. de 
Cioco compoeitum,Tinctuiade croco composita. 
ALCOOLISER (F.) Formerly, « to reduce 
into an impalpable powder.' No Icmger used. 
ALCOOLOMETER, Areometer. 
ALCORNOQUE (F.) Cortex Mcomoeo, A 
bark, but little known and distributed in France, 
which has been considered capable of curing 
phthisia. It is bitter, tonic, and slightly astrin- 
geat. Dose of the powder gi to zss. 

ALC: YON, Hal'cyon. A swallow of Cochin 
Chma, whose nests are gelatinous and veiy nu- 
tritious. They have been proposed in meoiciae 
as analeptic and aphrodisiac. 

ALC YO'NIUM, B^uifd sponge. The ashes 
were formerly employed as dentifrices: they 
were believed proper ibr fiivouring the growm 
of the hair and the beard, and were used in 
Alopecia. 
ALDABARAN, Albadaran. 
ALDER, AMERICAN, Alnus serratnla--^. 
Black, Prinos, Rhamnus frangula — a. Euro- 
pean, Alnus glutinosa. 
ALE, Cerevisia. 
ALEACAS, Glycyrrhiza. 
ALECOST, Tanacetum balsamita. 
ALECTO'RIUS LAPIS, Aleeto'ria; from 
aXittrtnQy * a cock.' The name of a stone, sup- 
posed to exist in the stomach of the cock, or, 
according to others, in that of the capon, four 
yean oM. Many marvellous propertiies were 
fonnerly attributed to it, which ar« as ground- 
less as Its existence. There are no stones in the 
stomach, except what have been svrallowed. 
ALEGAR, Acetum. 
ALEHOOF, Glechoma hederacea. 
ALEIMMA, Liniment. 
ALEIPHA, Liniment. 
ALEIPTEHICTM, from aXtt^w, < I anoint.' 
The place in the ancient gymnasium where the 
eombatants anointed themselves. 

ALEIPTRON. Same etymon. A box for 
eontuning ointments. , 
ALEMA, Farina. 

ALEM'BIC (Arab.) Moorshead, Capitel'lum, 
Capit'ulum, Am'bicus, (F.) Alambie, A ttten- 
sil made of glass, metal, or earthen ware, and 
adapted for distillation. It consists of a body 
or euenrhit,, to which is attached a head or «a- 
ptW, and out of this a hetik descends laterally 
to be inserted into the receiver. 



ALE]y('BR0TH(;Sfa/f.)5a/ii/em^tA. The 
alchymists designated by this name, and by those 
of SeU sapien'tiigf Sal urtisy Sal vittt and £f. 
SeUn'tim^ the product resulting from the subli- 
mation of a mixture of corrosive sublimate and 
sal ammoniac. It is stimulant, but not em- 
ployed. 

ALMSE, (F.) Alkze, Lin'teumy from oulf^v, 
' I preserve.' A guard. A cloth arranged in 
several folds, and placed upon a bed, so as to 
guard it from the lochial or other discharges. 

ALETON, Farina. 

ALETRIS, A. iarinosa. 

Al'etws, a, Farino*sa, Stttrgrasa, Starworty 
Blazing star, Aloe^oot, Bitter grass yBlaeJk rooty 
Unicom rooty Ague rooty Ague grassyDeviPs Hty 
Mealy stanoorty (F.) AUtris MeurUsr, Nat. 
Ord, As^odelea). Sex, Syst. Hexandria Mono- 
gynia. This plant is an intense and permanent 
bitter, and is used as a tonic and stomachic. It 
is comn^on in the United States. 

ALEURON, Farina. 

ALEUROTESIS, see Cribration. 

ALEXANDERS, Smymium olusatrum. 

ALEXANDRIANTIDOTUSAUREA. See 
Alexandrine. 

ALEXA^'BBJiil^yEfnplas'trufnAlexan'dri. 
A garlic plaster, invented by Alexander, con- 
temporary of Mesue. Other ancient prepara- 
tions were called < Alexandrine;' as the Alex^ 
an'dri antid'otus au'recky used in apoplexy; the 
Collyr'ium sieewn Alexandri'num, or ' Uollyr- 
turn of King Alexander,^ mentioned by Aetius. 

^LEXICACUM, Amuletum, Alexipharmic. 

ALEXIPHAR'MIC, Alexiphar'macusyAfUi- 
phar'mactis, Alexica'eusy Caecalexite'ria, Lexi* 
phar'maciis, (F.) Alexipkarmaque, from alc^iiv, 
« to repel,' and ya^^oxor, * poison.' A term for- 
merly used for medicines which were consi- 
dered proper for expelling from the body vari- 
ous morbific principles, or for preventing the 
bad effects of poisons taken inwardly. 

ALEXIPYRETICUS, Febrifuge. 

ALEXIR, Elixir. 

ALEXITE'RIA, Caealexite'ria, from oxt(- 
aa^ai, ' to assist.' Originally, alexiterium was 
used synonymously with remedy. In more 
modern times it has been applied to a class of 
medicines, that counteract poisons placed in 
contact with the exterior of the body, in coib- 
tradistittction to alexipharmic. 

ALEXITERIUM CHLORICUM, see Disin- 
fection — a. Nitricum, see Disinfection. 

ALkZEy Al>»e, 

ALFUSAi Tutia. 

ALGALIE, Catheter. 

AL'GAROTH, AVgaroty Algaro'thi Pulvisy 
Pulvis AngtVicus, Ox'idum sen submu^rias 
Stiya praeipitan'do para'tum^ Antimo'nii Oxf^ 
ydumy Ox'idum cmtimo'nii Nitro-muriat'ieumy 
Ox'idum Stih'ii A&'ido Muriat'ieo oxygena'to 
paraftumy Mereu^rins Vitcsy Mercu*rins Mortisy 
Flowers of Antimony, (F.) Oxyde d'Anti' 
moine, so. called from Victor Algarothi, a Ve- 
ronese physician. The suh-muriate of protox- 
ide of antimony y separated from the muriate of 
antimony by washing away some of its acid. 
It was rormerly much used as an emetic, pur- 
gative, and diaphoretic. 

ALGEDON, from oxy»c, *pain.' Violent 
pain about the neck of the bladder, occasionally 
occurring in gonorrhoea. — Cockbum. 

Algedoii, Pain. 



ALOKIIA 



ALKERMB8 



ALGEMA, Pain. 

ALGESIS, Pun. 

ALGETICUS, see AlgO0. 

AL'GIDUS,from0/^r,<eold.' Thatwtuch 
is accompanied by coldneia. 

Al'oxda Febris, F. korrifieaf JP. hor^rida, 
F, quer^quera, F. erymo^deSf Bry'eetui, Brf^eks' 
ttu, (F.) Fihfrt algide. Algid F»v»r, A per- 
niciooa intennittent, accompanied by icy cold- 
ness, which is often fatal in the second or third 
paroxysm. 

ALGOR, Rigor. 

ALGOS, alyo^y <paitt.' See Pain. Henee» 
Alg§ficus, 'painful/ as Epilep'sia algtfica. 
Tbtt suffix algia has the same signification as 
in Cephalalgia^ Pleuralgia^ Neuralgia^ &c. 

ALGOSPAS'MUS, from ai)r*c> <pain,' and 
anatr/utot, < spasm.' Painful spasm or cramp of 
the muscles. 

ALHAGI, Agul. 

ALHANDAL, see Cucnmis colocynthis. 

ALHASEF, Sudamina. 

ALIBILIS, Nutritious. 

ALICA, Hal'iea^ Farina'riumy Ckondrusy 
from ai&ref ' to nourish. A grain from which 
the ancients made their tisanes'; supposed^ by 
some, to have been the Tritieum spdta. At 
times, it seoms to have meant the tisane itself. 

ALICES, from aiiC«>, <I sprinkle.' SpoU 
which precede the eruption of small pox. 

ALIENATIO, Anomalia— a. Mentis, Insa- 
nity. 

ALIENATION, MENTAL, Insanity. 

ALIENUS, Delirious. 

ALIFORMES MUSCULI, Pterygoid mus- 
cles. 

ALIFORMIS, Alaris, Pterygoid. 

ALI6ULUS, Confection. 

ALIMA, Aliment. 

ALIMELL^, Parotid. 

ALIMENT, Alimm'twm,Al'ima, ffarma'lia, 
Nutri'meny Nu'triensy SvsieTUae^uium, Ciha'' 
rifMM, Broma^ Comis'ti, Cibus, Esea, Nutri'tus, 
Nutrimen'tum, Sitot, Trophi, (F.) Aliment^ 
Nourriturey from aler$, <to nourish.' FMd, 
Any substance which, if introduced into the 
system, is capable of nourishing it and repair- 
ing its losses. 

The study of aliments forms one of the most 
important branches of hygiene. They are con- 
fined to the organized kingdom, — ^the mineral 
affording none. 

As regards the immediate principles which 
pedominate in their composition, they have 
been classed, but imperfectly, as follows : — 



TABLE OF ALIMENTS. 



ft, MudUigiM0U». 
3. SocdkcHiM. 



5. Oi$afinm$ mtd 
Ally. 

7. 



9. F^hufus, 



J Wheat, bsrley, oau, rye, ries, In- 
dian corn, poUto, Mgo, pi u, 
beans, &e. 
I Carrot, aaMiy, beet, turnip, aipa- 
rsfftif. cabbaff*, lettaoe, arii- 
cboka, melon, kc 
Boaar, flf , date, raliin, aprieot, 

! Orange, currant; vooi^berry, 
cherry, peach, ftrawberry, rasp- 
berry, mulberry, prune, pear, 
apple, aorrel, kc 
i Cocoa, olive, aweet almond, nnt, 
walnut, animal fat, oil, butter, 
Jbc. 
DIfiprent kin<<s of milk, rheeee. 

{Tendon, aponeurosis, true skin, 
eellu'ar texture; very young 
animals. 
Brain, nerve, efrs*. kc. 
(lesb and blood. 



Dr. Prout has four great cl a s iet t he aque^m^, 
saeeharin$y oUaginotu^ and albumineus : — ^I>r. 
Pereira twelve; — ^the aqueous , mueilaginams 
or gummpf gaeekarine^ amj^laeeoue, ligneoma^ 
peeiinaeeoue, adduloue, aleokolie^ oily or/aity, 
proteinaeeoue, gelatinous, and' ealine, 

Liebig divides them into two cli 

MITROOXMIZZD Or PLASTIC BI.XMS1IT8 OF Mimai- 

TioM, in which he comprises vegetable Jibrit^ 
vegetable albumeny vegetMe eaoein, Jlesh and 
blood I and the NOM-zftTRoosiftzin or njEMxRTS 
of KiSFiEATioif, in which he comprises, fta, 
etareky gum, earn eugor, grape sugar , sugar 
of milky pectin, hassorin, wine, beer and spirits m 
The former alone, in his view are inservient to 
the nutrition of organized tissue: the latter are 
burnt in respiration, and furnish heat. 

ALIMENTARY TUBE, Canal, aUmentary. 

ALIMENTATION, Alimenta'tio. The act 
of nourishing. 

ALIMENTUM, Aliment, Pabulum. 

ALIMOS, Glycyrrhiza. 

ALINDE'SIS; from niiv/o^i, < to be tuned 
about.' A species of exercise, which consisted 
in rolling in the dust, aftsr having be^m anmnted 
with oil.'^Hippocrates. 

ALIP^'NOS, Alipts'numy Alipan'tos, from a, 
priv. and ImAvt iv, < to be fiit.' An epithet for- 
merly given to every external remedy, devoid 
of fat or moisture; such as powders.-4iale&. 

ALIPANTOS, Alipenos. 

ALIP'TA, Alip'tes, from a^tif oi, < I anoints' 
He who anointed the Athleta after bathing. 
The place -^ere this was done was call^ 
Alipte'riwn, 

ALIPTERIUM, see Aliptrn. 

ALIFTIC A, same etymon. The part of an- 
cient medicine, which treated of inunction, as 
a means of preserving health. 

ALISIER BLANC, Crat»gus aria. 

ALISMA, Arnica montana. 

Alis'ma Plaiita'oo, Water Plantainy (F.) 
Plantain d*Eau, Nat, Ord, Alismaceas. Sex, 
Syst, Hejcandria Polygynia. The fresh root 
is acrid, and the driM leaves will vesicate. 
The leaves have been proposed as substitutes 
for Uva Ursi. 

ALITURA, Nutrition. 

AL'KAL£, O'leum aalli'nm. An ancient 
pharmaceutical name for pullets' fat. 

ALKALESCENCE, Alcalescence. 

ALKALI, see Alcali — a. Ammoniacuro caus- 
ticum. Ammonia — a* Ammoniacum spirituo- 
sum, Spiritus ammoniac— «. Minerale nitratum. 
Soda, nitrate of— a. Minerale phosphoratum. 
Soda, phosphate of— a. Minerale salinum, Soda, 
muriate of— a. Vegetable, Potash— a. Vegetabile 
cum aceto, Potassss acetas— a Vegetabile fixum 
causticum, Potassa fusan-«. Volatile, Ammonia 
— a Volatile causticum, Anunonia — a. Volatile, 
concrete, Ammoniss carbonas— a. Volatile nitra- 
tum, AmmoniflB nitras— a. Volatile tartarizatum. 
Ammonias tartras — a. Volatile vitriolatum, Am- 
monias sulphas. 

ALKANET, BASTARD, Lithospermum of- 
ficinale— a. Dyer's, Anchusa tinctona — a. Gar- 
den, Anchusa officinalis — a. Officimd, Anchusa 
officinalis. 

ALKAR, Medicament. 

ALKEKEN6I, PhyaalU. 

ALKER'MES, Confte'tio Alkefmes, Aleksr'- 
mes, A celebrated electuary, composed of a 
multiti^ of substances. It was so called from 



ALRERVA 



87 



ALLOTRIOCHETTA 



the gimini of kermec contumd in it. It wbb 
naed as a stimulant. Also kermes (q. v.) 

ALKERVA, see Ricinns communis. 

ALKJTRAN, Cedria. 

ALKOL, Alo^l. 

ALKOOL, Aleohol. 

ALLA, Cerevisia. 

ALLAITEMENT, Lactation. 

ALLAMANa)A, A. CatMrnr'tiea^ Ore'lia 
grvmdiJUWa^ Gal'aripSy Eeki'nus seandensy 
Afoef'ynum ^eandens. A shrub, native of Gui- 
ana, the infusion of whose leayes is said by Lin- 
nsBus to be useful in colica Pictonum. 

ALLANTODES, Allantois. 

ALLANTOIC AClDyAe^ulumallaHto 
A peculiar acid, found in the liquor of the allan- 
tois of the cow. 

ALLANTOIBES, Allantois. 

ALLANTOIS, AUantoi'desy Ailamto'des, 
Mewtbrafna urina'riay M, sen Ttmiea Fareimi- 
naflUy 3r. InfMtina'U9y the AUatUoid Vesicle, 
from aXlaty * a sausage,' and <i/«f , * ahvpe,* A 
sort of elongated bliulder, between the chorion 
and anuiion of the foetus, and communicating 
with the bladder hj the urachns. It is very 
apparent in qnadri:^eds, but not in the human 
species. The fluid of the allantois has been 
ooosidered inservient to the nutrition of the 
fcetus; but our ideas, in regard to the vesicle in 
man, are lar from being determinate. 

ALLANTOTOX'ICUM, from aXlaty «a sau- 
as^ani toIimt, 'a poison.' Sausage poison 
(6.) Wurttgi/t. The Germans have given this 
name to a poison developed in sausages formed 
of blood and liver. 

ALLELUIA, Ozalis acetosella. 

ALLE'VIATOR: from o^, <to,' and/et^artf, 
<to raise.' A soother. An instrument for 
raising invalids, invented by Mr. Jenks of 
Rhode Island. It consists of two upright poets, 
about six feet high, each supported by a pedes- 
tal; of two horizontal bars at the top, rather 
loneer than a common bedstead; of a windlass 
of the same length, placed six inches below the 
upper bar; of a cog-wheel and handle; of linen 
belts from six to twelve inches wide; of straps 
secured at one end of the windlass; and at the 
other havinff hooks attached to corresponding 
eyes in the linen belts, and of a head piece made 
c£ netting. The patient lying on his mattress, 
the surgeon passes the linen belts beneath his 
body, attaching them to the hooks on the ends 
of oie straps, and adjusting the whole at the 
uroper distance and length, so as to balance the 
tx>dy eocactly, and then raises it from the mat- 
tress by turning the handle of the windlass. 
To lower the patient again, and replace him on 
the mattress, the windUss must be reversed. 

ALLGOOD, Chenopodium bonus Henricus. 

ALLHEAL, Heracleum spondylium. 

ALLIA'CEOUS, Allit/eeus, from alliumy 
'garlic' Belonging to garlic, as alliaeeout 
otknr. 

ALLIAlREy AUiaria. 

ALLIA'RIA, from allium, its smell resem- 
bling garlic. A. oJleiTu/lis, Ery/imum allu^- 
fia, JatJt-in-the-hedgey stinting hedge Mustard, 
Bedge Garlie, Sauee- alone, Hes'peris allia'ria, 
(7.) AUiaire. This plant has been sometimes 
given in humid asthma and dyspnoea. It is re- 
puted to be diaphoretic, diuretic, and antiscor- 
Wic. 

The Parisian Codex has a compound lyrup 



of alliaria, Sirop d*eiysimum eomposi, which is 
used in hoarseness. 

ALLIGATURA, Fascia, Ligature. 

ALLIOTICUS, Alterative. 

AL'LIUM, from oleo, ' I smell.' A. saH'fmm, 
T%eriaea rustieo'rum, Ampelo^rasum, Seot'o- 
don, Seordon, Garlie, (F.) Ail. Nat, Ord, 
Asphodeieae. Sex, Syst. Hexandria Monogynia. 
A native of Sicily, but cultivated for use. The 
bulbs or eloves, Ag'lithes, have a strong, offen- 
sive, and penetrating odour; and a sweetish, 
biting, and caustic taste. Internally, garlic is 
atimidant, diuretic, expectoran^ emmenagogue 
{?), diaphoretic, and anthelmintic ExUrnally, 
it is rubefacient, maturative, and repellent. 

Dose, one to six cloves, swallowed whole, or 
from f. ^ss to f. ^ij of the juice. 

Taylor^s Remedy for Deafness, a nostrum, 
appears to consist of garlie, infrued in oil of 
almonds, and coloured by alkanst root. 

Allium Asqalonicuh, £ehaloite, 

Al'lit71C Cbpa, Common Onion, CepuPla, 
Cromfmyon, (F.) Oignon» Acrid and stimu- 
lating and possessing yery little nutriment. 
Onions have been used as stimulants, diuretics, 
and anthelmintics. The boiled or roasted 
onion, as a cataplasm, is emollient and matu- 
rating. The fresh root is rubefacient. The 
expressed juice is sometimes used in otalgia and 
in rheumatism. 

Allium Gallicum, Portnlaca. 

Al'lium Porkum, Porrum, Prasum, r^oao*, 
the LeeJk or Porret; (F.) Poireau, Porreau. It 
possesses the same properties as the onion. 

The virtues of the genus Allium At^nA upon 
an acrid principle, soluble in water, alcohol, 
acids, and alkalies. 

Allium Rsdolbns, Teucrium scordium. 

Al'livm YiCTORiA'Li, Victoria'lis longa. 
The root, which, when dried, loses its allia- 
ceous smell and taste, is said to be efficacious 
in allaying the abdominal spasms of pregnant 
women (?) 

ALLOCHET'IA,il//o<rtofiA«<'»a,from alXos, 
* another,' and %iC«'y, * to go to stool.' The dis- 
charge of extraneous matters from the bowels. 
The discharge of frsces by an abnormous open- 
ing. 

ALLOCHOOS, Delirious. 

ALLOCHROMA'SIA, from aXlog, 'another/ 
and mm<»9 * colour.' A change of colour. 

ALLOCOPATHI A, Allopathy. 

ALLCEOSIS, Alteration. 

ALL(EOTICUS, Alterative. 

ALLOIOSIS, Alteration. 

ALLOIOTICUS, Alterative. 

ALLONGEMENT, Elongation. 

ALLOPATH, Allopathist. 

ALLOPATHES, Allopathic. 

ALLOPATH IC, Allopath'ieus, AUofatAes, 
Seteropath'ie, from aXXos, < another,' and noAo^, 
< affection.? Relating to the ordinary method of 
medical practice, in contradistinction to the ho- 
moecraathic. 

ALLOPATHIST, ATlopatk, same etymon. 
One who follows allopathy. 

ALLOPATHY, Allopathi'a, AUaopaJthSa, 
Hypenantio'sis, Hypenantio'ma, Cura'tio eon- 
trario'rum per eontra*ria, same etymon. The op- 
posite to homoeopathy. The ordinary medical 
practice. 

ALLOPHASIS, Delirium. 

ALLOTRIOCHETIA, AUochetia. 



ALLOTRIODONTIA 



ALTEKATION 



ALLOTRIODONTIA, from allorpioc, * fo- 
reign/ and odovgy ' a tooth.' Transplantation of 
teeth. 

ALLOTRIOEC'CRISISjfrom oaaoreioc,' fo- 
reign/ and f «ir(i0i«, ' separation.' The separa- 
tion of extraneous matters from the body in dis- 



ALLOTRIOGEUSTIA, Peragenstia. 

ALLOTRIOPHAGIA, Malacia. 

ALLOTRIOTEX'IS, from aXXoTQtof, < fo- 
reign/ and Tf|i(, < parturition.' The bringing 
forth of an abnormous fflstus. 

ALLOTRITJ'RIA, from allor^ioc, < foreign/ 
and ov^ov, * urine.' Admixture of foreign mat- 
ters wil^ the urine. 

AL'LOTROPISM; from allot, ^another/ and 
TQonofy * a turn or change.' A term recently 
introduced into chemistry; the object of which 
is to express the property possessed by certain 
simple bodies, of assuming different qualities on 
being'subjected to certain modes of treatment. 
Carbon, for example, ftunishes three fonns — 
plumbago, charcoal, and diamond. 

ALLSPICE, see Myrtos pimenta — a. Bush, 
Laurus Benzoin — a. Wild, Launts Benzoin. 

ALLUCINATIO, Hallucination. 

ALLURE, Influenza. 

ALMA, Water. 

ALMARIAB, see PImnbi oxydum semivi- 
treum. 

ALMEZERION, Cneorum tricoccum. 

ALMOND, Amygdala. 

Almond Bloom. A liqiiid cosmetic, formed 
of Brazil dusty ,^j, vratsr, Oiij; boil and strain; 
and add isinglass ^yj, grana sylvestria ^ij, or 
roMneal 9;lj, aliim ^j, borax ^iiy, boil again, 
and strain through a mie cloth. 

Almond Cakb^ see Aniygdala — a. of the Ear, 
Tonsil — a. Earth, Arachis hypogea — a. Paste, 
see Amygdala — a. Powder, see Amygdala — a. 
of the Throat, Tonsil. 

ALJUVS QLVTJNiySAyEurope'anAldsr. A 
tree which grows in Europe, in moist places. 
The bark and leaves are astringent and bitter; 
and hence are employed in intermittents, and as 
a tonic and astringent. 

ALNtis Sbrrat'ula, Awurican Alder, has 
similar properties. 

Alnus Nigra, Rhamnus frangula. 

ALOCHPA, from a privative, and Xox^ta, 
^ lochia.' Absence of the lochial discharge. 

ALOEDA'RIUM. A compound memcine, 
containing aloes. — Gorrofus. 

ALOE ROOT, Aletris farinosa. 

AL'OES, Al'oly Fsl Natu'ra, The inspis- 
sated juice of the alo9. Nat, Ord, Asphodelee. 
Sez. Sifst. Hexandria Monogynia. 

Aloes Caballi'na, A. GtafUen^sis, Jfforse^ 
aloes. Used chiefly for horses. It is collected 
in Spain and Portugal, and is very coarse. 

Aloks Hbvat'ica, a, vttlga'risy A, Barba- 
den^sisy Bipat*ie oloeSyBombay aloes, Barbadoes 
aloesy A* wslge^ris extrae'tnmy (F.) Aloes en 
ealibassesy A, des Barbades, This species has 
a very disagreeable odour, and an intensely 
bitter and nauseous taste. Properties the same 
as the last. 

Aloes SuccoTori'na, Soefotrine aloesy Tnr^ 
tey aloesy East India aloes, Albes lu'eiday A* 
Zoetori'niay A, spiea'tay A* spiea^ta extrae^tum, 
A* extraetwrn, An'ima Aloesy is the best spe- 
<*.ies. Its odour is not unpleasant; taste very 
bitter, and slig^y aromatic; colour reddish- 



brown, with a shade of purple f mass hard^ fria- 
ble; fracture conchoidal and glossy; soluble in 
dilute alcohol. Powder of a bright cinnamon- 
yellow colour. It is cathartic, warm, and sti- 
mulating; emmenagogue, anthelmintic, and sto- 
machic. As a cathartic, it affects the rectum 
chiefly. J>osey as a cathartic, gr. v to 9 j u^ 
pill. 

Aloes, Wood, Agallochum. 

ALOET'fC, Aloet'ious. A preparation which 
contains aloes. 

ALOGOTROPH1A, from «2»x»c, 'dispro- 
portionate,' and t^a^q, < nutrition.' Irregular 
nutrition. Used particularly to designate the 
irregular manner in which the nutrition of 
bones is operated in rickety individuals. 

ALOPECES, Psoo. 

ALOPE'CIA,from tUonti^, <afox;' (thisani- 
mal being said to be subject to the afleccioii.) 
Capillo'rvm dejlu^vium, Atkrix depilis, PAo- 
laero'tisy DepUa'tiOy Trieko^sis- Athrix, Gtm- 
gres'na Alope'eia, Atrieh'ia, Dejhivium sen 
Lapsus Pilo'rum, Lipsotrich'iay Vulpis iftorbmSf 
Baldness. Falling oft of the hair; loss of the 
hair. When this is confined to the crown of 
the head, it is called ealvities (q. v.), although 
the terms are often used synonymously. 

Alopecia Areata, Porrigo decalvans-— «. 
Circumscripta, Porrigo decalvans— a. Partialis, 
Porrigo deoalvans. 

ALOUCHEy Cratsgns aria. 

ALOUCH'I. The name of a gum procured 
from the canella alba tree. 

ALOUCHIERy Cratsgus aria. 

ALPAM. A shrub which grows on the eoast 
of Malabar. Certain parts of this, infused in 
oil, form an antipsoric ointment. The juice of 
the leaves, mixed with that of ealamusy is em- 
ployed against the bite of serpents. 

ALPHENIC, Saccliarum candidum. 

ALPHITEDON, see Fracture. 

ALPHITON, aKfptrov, Polen'tay Fari'na, 
Any kind of meal. Toasted barley-meal. — 
Hippocrates. Polenta means also a food com- 
posed of Indian meal, cheese, &c. See Farina. 

ALPHON'SIN, Alphonsinum. A kind of 
bullet forceps, similar to a Porte-erayony so 
called from the inventor, Alphonso Ferri, of 
Naples.^ScuItetus. 

ALPHOS, Lepra alphoides. 

ALPHOSIS .ETHIOPICA, see Albino. 

ALPINIA CARDAMOMUM,Amomumcar- 
damomum — a. Galanga, Maranta galanga. 

ALPISTEy Phalaris Canadiensis. 

ALSANDERS, Smymium olusatrum. 

ALSI'NB ME'DIA, from oljrof, <a grove,' 
because growing abundantly in the woods. Mor- 
sus GaUi'nmy Holos'teum Alsi'iil^ Mouse^ear, 
Chieltffeed, (F.) Mouron des Oiseaux, Morge- 
line. This plant, if boiled tender, may be eaten 
like spinach, and forms an excellent emollient 
poultice. It was formerly regarded as a vulne- 
rary and detergent. 

ALTAFOR, Camphor. 

ALTER SEXUS, Sex female. 

ALTERANS, Alterative. 

ALT^RANTy Alterative. 

ALTERATION^/r^ra'tw/rdm a/ttfr,*other/ 
AIloio'sisyAUcBo'sis . This word is used in France 
to express a morbid change which supervenes 
in the expression of the countenance {eUtiration 
de lafaesy) or in the structure of an organ (o/- 
tiration organtqusy) or in the nature of fluids 



ALTERATTTB 



I^LVMOLB 



excreted {alUratian d$ Purine, tUs larmeg^ du 

Alteration ie ako QMd in an entirely differ- 
ent s«nBe> to express intense thirst in disease. 
In this case its etymologj is different. It comes 
from kaUter, and was formeily written haUur- 
ation, 

ALTERATIVE, Al'terans^Allaioftcus, Al- 
ImWieusy AlHafictts, Immu'tane* A medicine 
considered to be capable of producing a salutary 
cfauige in a disease, but withoiit exciting any 
sensible evacuation. As medicine improves, 
this uncertain class of rentiedies becomes, of ne- 
cessity, diminished in number. 

<F.) Altirant, (The French term likewise 
meaasy that which causes thirsty — Sitieulo'tusy 
lHp*eficu4j,a» Altirtr means botb to change, and 
to causa thirst. S'alUrtr^ is, to experience a 
change for the worse, — carrumfjri,} 

ALTERCANGENON, Hyoscyamus. 

ALTERCUM, Hyoscyamus. 

ALTH^'A, irom ox^cir, <to heal;' A, offi- 
einafliSi MtdvavU^eum, Aristaltha'a, Hihis'eusy 
Ihig'ekusylbis'eka mUmal^va, Bismol' va^Mareh 
mallew, (F.) Gtdmauve. Nat, Ord. Malva- 
cea. 5«2. fl^y^t. Monadelphia Polyandria. The 
leaves and root contain much mucilage. They 
aie emollient and demulcent, and are employed 
wherever medicines, possessing such properties, 
are required. In the Ph. U. S., Althsa is the 
root of Althaea officinalis. 

ALTHANAIHA, Orpiment. 

ALTHEUS, Physician. 

ALTHEXIS, Curation. 

ALTHOS, Medicament. 

ALTILIBAT, Terebinthina. 

ALU'DEL, Alu'tely Vitrum enhlimato'rium, 
A hollow sphere of stone, glass, or earthen ware, 
with a short neck projecting at each end, by 
means of which one glass might be set upon the 
other. The uppermost had no anerture at the 
T<^. Aludels were formerly used in the subli- 
milion of various substances. 

ALUM, Symphytum — a. Cataplasm, Coagu- 
Imn alaminosnm— a. Egyptian, ^gyptia styp- 
teria. 

Alttm , Rociix,i4/«'swn de Roehi, (F.) Alun de 
Boeke, So called from Roccha in Syria, where 
there was a manufactory. It is in pieces of the 
size of an almond, covered with a reddish efflo- 



Comman Roeke Alumy A, Roehi Oallis. Frag- 
ments of common alum, moistened and shaken 
with prepared bole. It is white when broken. 

Alum Root, Geranium maculatum, Henchera 
cortnaa — a. Solution of, compound, Liq. alu- 
mittii compos. 

ALU'MEN, (an Arabic term, o/fim,) Alum^ 
Hyftrrul*pktu alu*minm et Potaa'sa, Poiag'sa 
alnfmino-iulphasy Sul'pkae AluwintB Aeid'tUua 
ntmPotas*sd,Snlphas Alu'nunta^ Sul'pkas Kal'- 
ieoHtlHimn'iettmy SiUphas aluminafrisy Super- 
ttU'fluu atu*mina et potae*eay Argil'la eulphu'- 
riea alealieafta. A, vitriola'tai Styffte'ria, Su- 
pernU'pkae Argil'la idealisa'tum, Argilla Ka- 
/iiulpkuriea. (F.) Alun, 

Aluxbr Catiiium, Potash of commerce— a 
Fixun, see Potash-— a. Kinosatum, Pulvis sul< 
phatis alnmime compositus. 

Alu'hkh Commu'rc , Common alumy English 
ff/sM, RocJt alumy Alumen faeti*'Hnmj A. erys- 
f^inumy A. rufpeum, (F.) Alten d*Angleterre, 
ii the variety usually employed. It is in octa- 



hedral crystals, but generally in large, white, 
semitransparent masses; has a sweetish, styptic 
taste; effloresces in the air, and is soluble in 16 
parts of water at 60^. It is tonic and astrin- 
gent, and as such is used internally and exter- 
nally. Dose, gr. v. to xv. 

Alu'mbii Ezsicca'tum, Alu'men ustwn, A> 
ealeinatumy Sulphas alu'mina fusus, Argil'la 
sulpht/rica usta^ Burnt 'alum, dried alum, (F.) 
Alun caleini, {Alum melted in an earthen vessel 
until ebullition eeaess,) Escharotic. 

Alit'meii Roma'mum, Roman alum. A, Ru*ti' 
lum. A, Rubrum, (F.) Alun de Rome, In crys- 
tals, which are of a pale red when broken, and 
covered with a reddish efflorescence. 

ALUMINA, ACETATE OF, Alumine Ace- 
tas — a. Pura, Argilla pura— a. Sulphate of. 
Alumina Sulphas. 

ALU'MINiE ACETAS, At/'etate of Alu'^ 
mina, A deliquescent salt, obtained by the ad- 
dition of acetate of lead to sulphtUe of alwnUna 
and potassa. It possesses the same properties 
as the sulphate of alumina. 

ALu'MiNii AT Potassa Htpersvlphas, Alu- 
men — a. et Potassas supersulj^s, Alumen — a. 
Sulphas, Alumen. 

Altt'minjb Sulphas, Sulphate of Alu'mina, 
Simple sulphate of alumina may be made by the 
direct combination of alumina and sulphuric 
acid, and contains 30 per cent, of the former, 
to 70 per cent, of the latter. It is a deliquescent 
salt; and is an excellent antiseptic and detergent 
to ulcers. It is chiefly used to preserve dead 
bodies— a strong solution being injected into the 
arteries. 

Aluminjb Sulphas Acidvlus cum Potass a, 
Alumen — a. Sulphas fusus, Alumen exsiccatum. 

ALUMINE FACTICE, ArgUla pura. 

ALXTN, Alumen. 

ALUNSEL, Gntta. 

ALUS, Symphytum. 
^ ALUSIA, Hallucination — a. Hypochondria- 
sis, Hypochondriasis. 

ALtfTEL, Aludel. 

ALYAQUILLA, Psoralea glandulosa. 

ALVARAS NIGRA, Ichthyosis. 

ALVEARIUM, Auditory canal, external. 

ALVE'OLAR. Alveola'Hs, from alveus, < a 
cavity.' (F.) Alviolaire. That which relates 
to the alveoli. 

Alvx'olar Aacmss, (F.) Arcades alvh- 
laires, are formed by tlie margins or borders of 
the two jaws, which are hollowed by the Alveoli 
(q. V.) 

ALVK'oi^a AaTsaT, Supra-max'illary A,, 
Arthre sus-maxillaire of CHiiaussier, arises from 
the internal maxillary, descends behind the tu- 
berosity of the upper jaw, and gives branches 
to the upper mokr teeth, gums, periosteum, 
membrane of the maxillary sinus, and buccina- 
tor muscle. 

Alveolar Border, Limbus alveola'ris. The 
part of tfie jaws, that is hollowed by the alve- 
oli. • 

Alvx'olar Membranes are very fine mem- 
branes, situate between the teeth and alveoli, 
and formed by a portion of the sac or follicle 
which enclosed the tooth before it nierced the 
gum. By some this membrane has been called 
the alveolo^dental periosteum, 

Alvk'olar Vein. This has a similar distri- 
bution with the artery. 

ALVMOLE, Alveolus.. 



ALV£oiJ DEirns 



AMBLTAPHU 



ALVEOLI DENTIS, see Alveoloi. 

ALVEOLO'LABIALt Buccinator. 

ALVE'OLUS, Bame etymon. Bo'trion^ Bo*- 
tkri&n, OdotUobotk' rium, Odontopkat'nif Frtna^ 
Mortariolumy HoVmieos, Pressepioium^ Pkainij 
Pkat'nion, Pmse'pinm, PatfU, Patknt, (F.) 
Alveole. The alveoli are the sockets of the teeth, 
Alvefoli dentis, Ma'nia Beu Cower na den'tiufHy 
into which they are, as it were, driven. Their 
size and shape are determined by the teeth 
which they receive, and they are pierced at the 
apex by small holes, which give passage to the 
dental vessels and nerves. 

ALVEUS, Auge — a. Ampullosus, Recepta- 
culum chyli— a. Ampullescens, thoracic dact — 
a. Communis : see Semicircular canals — a. XJtri- 
culosus : see Semicircular canals. 

ALVI EXCRETIO, Defecation— a. Fluxus 
aquosus. Diarrhoea — a. Lazitas, Diarrh<Bar--a. 
Profluvium, Diarrhoea. 

ALVIDUCUS, Laxative- 

AL VINE, Alvi'nus, from alvus, < the abdo- 
men.' That which relates to the lower belly, 
as alvifu dejections y alvinejluxy alvine obstruc- 
tions (q. V.) &c. 

ALVUM EVACUANS, Cathartic. 

ALVUS, Abdomen, Uterus — a. Adstricta, 
Constipation — a. Cita, Diarrhoea — a. Dura, Con- 
stipatio — a. Renum, Pelvis of the kidney — a. 
Tarda, Constipation — a. Viridis, Dejection. 

ALYCE, Anxiety. 

AL'YPON, from «, priv., and Ivnij, <pain.' 
An acrid, purging plant, described by Matthio- 
lus. By some it has been supposed to be the 
Olobularia alypttm of botanists. 

ALYSIS, Anxiety. 

ALYSMUS, Anxiety. 

ALYSSUM PLINII, Galium Mollugo. 

ALYSSUS, Antihydrophobic. 

AL'ZIL AT. In some of tiie Arabian writers, 
a weight of three grains. — £Luland and John- 
son. 

AMABILE, Lacuna Labii Superioris. « 

AMADOU, Boletus igniarius. 

AMADOXTVIER, Boletus igniarius. 

AMAIGRISSEMENTy Emaciation. 

AM ANDES, see Amygdala. 

AMANI'T-^, from a privative, and ^avia, 
* madness :' i. e. ' not poisonous.' A name given, 
by the Greeks and Romans, to the edible cham- 
pignons, Amanita forms, at the present day, a 
genus, some of which are edible, others poison- 
ous. Amongst others, it contains the Agaricus 
'€Uirantiaeus and A, pseudo-aurantiaeus. 

AMARA DULCIS, Solanum dulcamara. 

AMARACI'NIJM. An ancient and esteemed 
plaster, containin|; several aromatics, the mar- 
joram, aHagaxnf, m particular. 

AMARACUS, Origanum majorana. 

AMARITIES, Bitterness. 

AMARITUDO, Bitterness. 

AMAROR, Bitterness. 

AMARUCACHU, Polyanthes tube|osa. 

AMA'RUS, Picros, * bitter.' (F.) Amir* The 
bitter principle of vegetables is the great na- 
tural tonic, and hence bitters, as they are termed 
collectively, belong to the class of tonics. Se- 
veral are used in medicine ; the chief are, gen- 
tian, quassia, cinchona, calumba, dog-wood, &c. 

AMASE'SIS, Amasse'sis, from a privative, 
and ftaarioif, < mastication.' Mastication when 
impeded or impracticable. 

AMATORIUM^ Lacuna labii superioris* 



AMATORII, Oblique muscles of the eye. 

AMATORIUM VENEFICIUM, Philter. 

AMATORIUS MUSCULUSyObUquus supe- 
riori oculi. 

AM AURO'SIS, Ob/usea'tio, Offnsceltio, from 
aiiav^o(, * obscure. ' Drop serene, Gutta scre'na, 
Catarae'ta nigra, Parop'sis amauro'sis, Immo* 
hU'itas pupil'la, Suffu'sio nigra. Black cta'a- 
raet, (F.) CrotUte-serdne, Cataracte noire, Anop- 
tieonervic (Piorry.) Diminution, or complete 
loss of sight, without any perceptible alteration 
in the organization of the eye; generally, per- 
haps, owing to loss of power of the optic nerve 
or retina. Counter-irritants are the most suc- 
cessful remedial agents, although the disease is 
always very difficult of removal, and generally 
totally incurable. 

Amaurosis Dimipiata, Hemiopia — a« Imper- 
fecta, Hypo-amiBiurosis. 

AMAUROTIC, Atnaurotfieus ; same ety- 
mon. Affected with amaurosis. 

Amaurotic Cat's Etb, Gaieamauro'sis. A 
name given by Beer to an amaurotic affection, 
accompanied bV a remarkable change of colour 
in the pupil, which presents, apparently in the 
fundus of the eye, a lighter tint, yellowish or 
brownish yellow, inst^ of its natural clear 
black. 

AM B ARUM, Ambergris— «. Cineritium, 
Amberf^is. 

AMBR, from anfiauva, < I ascend;' AmU, A 
superficial eminence on a bone. Also, an old 
surgical machine for reducing dislocations of 
the shoulder; the invention of which is ascribed 
to Hippocrates. It is no longer used. — Hippo- 
crates, Scultetus. See Crista. 

AMBER, Succinum — a. Liquid: see Liquid- 
amber styraciflua. 

AM'BERGRIS. Ambra grUsea, Amior, Am- 
bar, Ambra cinen^cea, A. ambrosiaea, Am'b»- 
rum, Suc'cinum dn/reum, S, grifseum. Am' bit- 
rum cineri"tium. A concrete substance, of the 
consistence of wax, cineritious colour studded 
with yellow and blackish spots, and exhaling a 
very pleasant odour. It seems highly probable 
that ambergris is formed in the intestines of the 
whale, and voided with its excrements. Like 
all aromatic substances, ambergris is slightly 
antispasmodic and excitant; but it is oftener 
employed as a perfume than as a medicine. 

AMBIA. A liquid, yellow bitumen, the 
smell and virtues of whicn are similar to those 
of the resin tacamafaaca. It is obtained from a 
spring in India. 

AMBICUS, Alembic. 

AMBIDEXTER, Amphidex'ius, from ambo, 
' both,' and dexter, * right.' One who uses both 
hands with equal fiu;ility. Celsus says the sur- 
geon ought to be 'non mintis sinistra gua^n dean 
trd promptusJ One of the aphorisms of Hippo- 
crates says, that a woman is never ambidexter. 
This is a mistake. 

AMBILiEVUS, Ampharisteros. 

AMBITUS GENITALIS MULIEBRIS, 
VcFt'bulum. 

AMBLOMA, Abortion. 

AMBLOSIS, Abortion. 

AMBLOSMUS, Abortion. 

AMBLOTHRIDION, see Abortion. 

AMBLOTHRIDIUM, Abortive. 

AMBLOTICUS, Abortive. 

AMBLUS, aufiXv^, < obscure.' Hence, 

AMBLYAPHIA9 from 0/c/Uv(, < obscure,' 



AMBLTOGMOe 



41 



and ^0999 'leeling.' DuIdms of the sense of 
loach. 

AMBLY06M0S, Amblyopia. 

AMBLYOPIA, from afifiluiy < obscure,' and 
vnify * the eye.' Am6lyos*mos, Amblyog'mos, 
Ampiu/jfea (so called by some, according to 
Castelli, ob igHorafUiam Graete lingua,) Hebe* 
tu'do tTM^^, FeeAieness of sight, (F.) Vub fai' 
U; First degree of Amaurosis. — Hippocrates. 

Amvltofia Ckrpvscitlaris, Hemeralopia — 
a. DissitOrum, Myopia — a. Meridians, Nyctalo- 
pia — a. Proximorum, Presbytia. 

AMBLTOSMOS, Ambly;opia. 

AMBON, Bufiwv, 'the raised rim of a shield 
or dish,' from anftattv, < I ascend.' The fibro- 
cartilaginous rings or bourrelets^ "which sur- 
round the aiticular cavities, as the glenoid ca- 
vity of the scapula, the acetabulum, &c., have 
been so called. — €ralen. See Crista. 

AMBOR, Ambergris. 

AMBRA, Succinum — a. Ambrosiaca, Amber- 
gris — a. Ciaeracea, Ambergris. 

AMBRAGRISEA, Ambergris, 

AMBRE BLANCy Succinum (album)-w>. 
Jaume., Succinum. 

AMBRETTEy Hibiscus abelmoscfans. 

AMBROSIA, from «, privative, and |9(«toc, 
' mortal.' Food which makes immortal, or the 
food of immortals. The food of t}ie gods. — 
Homer. See also, Chenopodium botrys. 

Ambkosia Et^ltior, see A. Tri£da. 

Akbro'sia Marit'ik a . A plant which grows 
on the shores of the Levant, and has a pleasant, 
bitter and aromatic taste. It is given in infu- 
sion, as a tonic and antispasmodic 

AxBHO'siA TaiP'mA, Horsewt^, Riehmeed, 
Horseminty Horsecane, Bitterweed, This in- 
digenous plant is found in low grounds and 
along streams, ftom Canada to Georgia, and 
west to Louisiana and Arkansas. It is an an- 
nual, and flowers in August a,nd September. 
An infusion has been recommended locally in 
mercurial salivation. 

Ambrosia Elatior, Ragv^ed, is said by 
Dr. R. E. Griffith to have much more deve- 
loped sensible properties. 

AMBROSIE jyU MEXIQVEy Chenopo- 
dium ambrosioides. 

AMBULANCE, (F.) from ambftlare, <to 
^walk.' A military hoepitalattached to an anny, 
and moving along with it. Also called Htpitml 

(WfkhutilHt 

AXBXTLANT^ (F.) Am'btdanBy AmhUati'- 
vtw, Am'bnlatiffs, A morbid affection is said 
to be amhUamte, when it skips from one part to 
another; as EritypiUs ambulants, &c. When 
blisters are applied successively on difl^rent 
parts of tha body, they are called V6sieatoires 

ffllfilllfnillf J. 

AMBULATIO, Walking. 

AMBULEIA, Cichorium intybus. 

AM'BULI. The Brachmamc name for an 
Indian aquatic herb, which appears to belong 
to the family LysimaekicB, The whole plant 
bas a sweet smell. Its decoction has a very 
bitter taste, and is an excellent febrifuge, it 
is also taken in milk in cases of vertigo. 

AM'BULO FLATULEN'TUS ET FURIO'- 
SUS, Flatus furi&susy Yaf'ni, Painful, mo- 
bile, and periodical tumours affecting different 
parte, which were once considered as the effect 
of vny subtile vapours — ^Michaelis. Their nar 
tare is by no means clear. 
4 



AMBUSTIO, Bum. 

AMBUTUA, Pareira brava. 

AMBU Y A-EMBO. A very beautiful, creep- 
ing aristolochia of Brazil, the decoction of 
which is exhibited successfully in obstructions. 
It is also used in fumigation and in baths as a 
tonic. 

AmE, Anima. 

AMELI. A Malabar shrub, belonging to a 
genus unknown. The decoction of its leaves 
is said to relieve colic. Its roots, boiled in oil^ 
are used to repel tumours. 

AMELIA, Apathy. 

AMENIA, Amenorrhcea, Emmenagogaes. 

AMENOMA'NIA. A hybrid word, formed 
from the Latin amanusy * agreeable,' and /dattOf 

* mania.' A gay form of insanity. 

AMENORRHCE'A, Farame'nim obttruetio'- 
mUy Menoeryph'ta, Msnosta^siay Apophrax'is^ 
ArrhfB'ay Dtft&tu^ seu Fitmainfsio seu Ctssa'tiQ 
mmfsiwny Mentttrua*ti9 impedi'tay Isekome^niOf 
Avte^nia, from a, privative, fitrfVy * a month,' Mid 
{<c», * I flow.' Suppression 9ftkB menses, (F.) 
auppreswm dnjtux menstrueL This suppres- 
sion is most commonly symptomatic, and hence 
the chief attention must be paid to the cause. 
Usually, there is an atonic state of the system 
generally, aad hence chalybeates and other 
Conks are advisable. 

Two great varieties of Amenorrhcea are com- 
monly reckoned. 1. A. Emansio'wisy Eman'^ 
eiosnen'siumy Mervis'ekewisy Menos^ekesisy Men^ 
strua'tio rMenta, Men'sinm reten'tioy Reten^- 
Hon oftke menses, when the menses do not ap- 
pear at the usoal age : and, 2, Suppres'sio Men*- 
sium, Suppres'sio Menstruatio'nisyAmenorrkc^a 
Suppresseo'nisy Intermp'tio menstruatio'nis^ 
Menstrua'tio snppressa, in which the catamenia 
are obstructed in their regular periods of recur- 
rence. See Emansio Mensium, and Menses. 

Ambnorrb(sa Difficius, Dysmenorrhcea — 
a. Emansionis, see Amenorrhea — ^a. Hymenica, 
see Hymenicus — a. Partialis, Dysmenorrhcea — 
a. Suppressionis, see Amenorrhcea. 

AMENTIA, Dementia: see, also, Fatuitas, 
and Idiotism — a. Senilis, Dementia of the aged. 

AMkR, Amarus. 

AMERICANUM TUBEROSUM, Solanum 
tuberosum. 

AMERTUMEy Bitterness. 

AM'ETHYST, Amethyetusy fh>m «, priva- 
tive, and fAt^woy <I am drunk.' A precious 
stone, to which the ancients attributed the pro- 
perty of preventing drunkenness* It was also 
used as an anti-diarrhoeic and absorbent. — Pliny, 
Albertus Magnus. 

AMETH'YSUM, Amethys'tum, (remedium) 
Same etymon as Hie last. A remedy for drunk- 
enness. 

AMETRIA, Intemperance. Also, absence 
of the uterus; from a, privative, and fcqr^'y 

* the uterus.' 

AMICULUM, Amnios. 

AMIDUM, Amylum. 

AMINiEA, Anime. ' 

AMIN-ffi'UM ymVMyAmine'an «wW, high- 
ly esteemed as a stomachic. Virgil distinguish- 
es it from the Falernian. — Pliny, Macrobius, &c. 

AMMA, Truss. 

AMMI, Ammi majue. Bishop* e weed, A. VW- 
ga'ri* The seeds of ^is plant are aromatic 
and pungent. They are said to be carminative 
and diuretic, and are tonic and stomachic. 



AMVION 



AMMONIA SULPHAS 



Aiiin Tbrum, see Siflon ainnu»--0. dtt Bou- 
tiques, see Sison ammi. 

AJMQflON, Hydraigyri sulphoretnin rubrom. 

AMMISMUS, Pwinmiamus. 

AMMOCHO'SI A, Aittmoeko'ns^ from a^^c, 
< sand,' and ^tm, * I pcNir«' Artia'Ho. Putting 
the human Dody in hot sand, for the curt of 
disease. 

AMMONIA, ^DMw'iMa br Ammmi'atalgtu, 
Volatile al'^Ui, Al'eali ammoni'aeum eaus'tieuit^y 
A, volat'U€ eaue'tieum, Ammo'nia eaus'tieay A. 
pur a, Ammoni'aeum, A, eoMs'tiewm, Gas ammO" 
niaea'li, Mephi'tis urino'sa, (F.) Ammomaque, 
Air alealin, Gag a mmoni aeal* An alcali, so 
called, because obtained principally by decom- 
posing sal ammoniac (muriate of ammonia) by 
lime. This gas is colourless, transparent, elas- 
tic, of a pungent, characteristic odour, and an 
acrid urinous taste. It turns the synip of rio- 
lets green, and its specific character is 0.596. 
When inhaled, largely diluted with common 
air, it is a powerful irritant. When anmized, 
it instantly induces suffocation. 

Ammonia, Acbtatb, Solution op. Liquor 
ammonis aeetatis — a. Arseniate of, Arseniate 
of ammonia — a. Caustica liquida. Liquor am- 
moniae — a. Chlorohydrate of, Ammonias murias 
^-a. Citrate of, Ammonue citras — a. Hydriodate 
of, see Iodine — a. Hvdrochlorate of. Ammonias 
murias — a. Hydroeiuphuret of, Ammoniie sul- 
phuretum — a. Iodide of, see Iodine — a. Lini- 
ment of, strong, Linimentum ammonias fortius 
— «. Liquid, Liquor AmmoniiB— «. Muiiatica, 
Ammomss murias — a. Nitrata, Ammonias nitras 
— «. Phosphate of, Ammonias phosphss — a. 
Prasparata, Ammonias carbonas— a. Pura liquida, 
Liquor anmionias— a. Solution of. Liquor am- 
monias — a. Solution of, stronger, Liquor anmio- 
IU8B fortior — a. Tartrate of, Ammoniae tartras. 

AHMO'NIAC, GUM, Ammoni'aeum, (Ph. 
U. S.) Gum'wn Ammoni'aeum, Armoni'aeum, 
Mato'rium, (F.) AmmoTiifte, Gomme ammo^ 
niaque, so called from Ammonia in Lybia, 
whence it is brought. A gum-resin, the con- 
crete juice of Dore'ma ammoni'aeum, of Persia : 
a species of a genus allied to Ferula. It is in 
irregular, dry masses and tears, yellow exter- 
nally, whitish within. Its odour is peculiar, and 
not ungrateful : taste nauseous, sweet, and bitter. 
It forms a white emulsion with water : is solu- 
ble in vinegar; partially so in alcohol, ether, 
and solutions of the alealies. 

Gum ammoniacum is expectorant, deobstru- 
ent (7) antispasmodic, discutient, and resolvent. 
It is chiefly used, however, in the first capacity, 
and in the formation of certain plasters. 

Two varieties are met with in the market, 
Gutta ammoni'aei, the best ; and Lapis ammo- 
rti'aei, the more impure. 

AMMONIACiE NITRAS, Ammonia nitras 
— a. Sulphas, AmmoniaB sulphas. 

AMMONIACUM, Ammonia, Ammoniac 
Gum — a. Succinatum, Spiritus ammonias foeti- 
(loa-— a. Volatile mite. Ammonia carbonas. 

AMMONIiE ACfiTAS, Liquor ammonias 
asetatis— «. Arsenias, Arseniate of Ammonia. 

AMMomJE Car'bonas, a, Suhear'Uonas, A, 
i^sqyica/bonajtt Sail of bones, Sal Wsium, Salt 
nfwood-eoot, Sal FulipUnis, Sati of urine. Vola- 
tile Sal Ammonia t^ Baker's salt, Atcajli vokt'Hi 
airaftum, A. volat'ilB ummoniaca'li, A. voLu'ili 
ex Bali amm&niafeo, AmmnnHaeum vohtfUi mUi, 
Ammt/nvimear^n'ieum, A.subcaMneum, Car- 



bouao emmo'ma mUsmK^nus sen ineompUhu sen 
euptrammonifacust Hypoeaar'bcnaB ammt/miat, 
Flores salis amuwnifaei, Sai cornu ctroi vola^iU. 
Sal vdalfilU' eeJis ammonVaei, Concrete tjotatUt 
alkali. Carbonate or subearbonate of ammonia, 
Ammo'nia praeparaUa, Sal volatfiU, Smelling salt. 
(F.) Carbonate tCammoniague, Sel volatU d*An- 
gleterre, (Amman, muriat. Ibj ; Creta Ibiss. Su- 
blime. — Ph. U. S.) A wlute, striated, crys- 
talline mass, odour and taste pungent and am- 
moniacal : soluble in two parts of water : inso- 
luble in alcohol : effloresces in the air. It is 
stimulant, antacid^ diaphoretic, and antispas- 
modic. Pose, gr. V. to xv. 

Carbonate of ammonia is at times used to 
form effervescing draughts. One scruple satu- 
rates six fluidrachms of lemon-juice, twenty- 
six grains of crystallized tartaric acid, and 
twenty-six grains of crystallized citric acid. 

Ammonia Citeas, Citrate of Ammo'nia. 
Made by saturating lemon or lime juice, or a 
solution of citric acid, with carbonate of ammo- 
nia. Dose, f. gss. 

It may be made extemporaneously, and taken 
in an effervescing draught. Seventeen grains 
of citric acid or half a fluidounce of leinon juice 
will be sufficient for thirteen gruns of carbo- 
nate of ammonia. 

Ammoniac Cup&o^uu*ras, Cuprum anuno- 
niatum. 

Ammonijb et Fkrri Mueias, Ferrum ammo- 
niatum — a. Hydrosulphuretum, Liquor fumana 
Boylii— «. Uypocarbonas, Ammonis Carbonas. 

Ammo'nia Mu'rias, Mu'riate of Ammo'nia, 
Hydroeklo'rate of Ammo'nia, Chlorohydrate 
of Ammo'nia, Sal Ammoni'aoum, Sal Amaeo'- 
niae, Sal Ammoni'aeus, Anuao'nia Muriat- 
iea, Ammo'niuwi Muria'tuvi, Sydroehlo'ras 
Ammo'nia, Sal Armoni'aeum, Salmiae, Fuli- 
go Al'ba Philosopho'rum,Misadir, (F.) Muriate: 
d'Ammoniaque, A saline concrete, formed by 
the combination of muriatic acid with am- 
monia. In Egypt it is manufactured in lairgt* 
quantities by subliming the soot formed by 
burning camel's dung — 26 pounds of the soot 
yielding 6 pounds. It is also prepared, in grea^* 
quantities, by adding sulphuric acid to the vola- 
tile alkali obtained &om soot, bones, &c., mix- 
ing this with common salt, and subliming. 

Muriate of ammonia is inodorous, but has an 
acrid, pungent, bitterish, and urinous taste. 
Three parts of cold water dissolve one. Solu- 
ble also in 4.5 parts of alcohol. It is aperient 
and diuretic, but seldom used internally. Kx- 
temally, it is employed, producing cold during 
its solution, in inflammations, &c. 

Ammo'niae NiTRAS, Nitrate of Ammonia, Al- 
kali volat'ilB nitra'tum, Sal ammoni'aeus m- 
tro'sus, Ammo'nia nitra'ta, Nitras ammoni'aei, 
Nitrum flammans, (F.) Nitrate d'Ammoni- 
aque. A salt composed of nitric acid and am- 
monia. It is diuretic and deobstrueiit.(?) Ex- 
ternally, it is discutient and sialogogue. 

Ammoni;b Phosphas, Phosphate of Ammo'- 
nia, (F.) Phosphate d'Ammoniaque. This salt 
has been recommended as an excitant, diapho- 
retic, and discutient. More recently, it has 
been proposed as a new remedy for gout and 
rheumatism, as a solvent of uric acid calculus, 
and for diseases, acute and chronic, connected 
directly with the lithic acid diathesui. 

Akhonijb Sbsquioarbomas, a. carbonas. 

Amho'nls Sulfuas, Sulphate of Ammo'nia, 



AMMOmAQVE 



SMipkas ammanifmemy Ammo'nium suijphi^ri' 
fMM, Athali volatrili tntriola'tum^ Stti Awmo- 
KCaeum stert'tum Glaubski, Sal sBcr^tiu 
Gi^UBUi, Viiriolum amuumiaedUy (F.) Bui- 
pkate d'Ammoniaque. Formed by adding buI- 
plinric acid either to aal amiDoniac or to ammo- 
niiAU liquor. Its propertiee are like those of 
the muriate of ammonia. 

AmMO'MLS SvLPBTOB'TUlf, Sutfkuftt tf Am' 
w^tuOy Hydftmd'fkmrH qf Ammt/mn, Hydro- 
gulpkms Amnumuf^ Smr'itus Bsein'Nl, Sp. Ju- 
wtMu Bbovi'mi, SmbAwrt^tum ammowfaemy ^. 
tmSs ammmiHad mUpkwn^tu9^ Uquor amnu/nU 
kmdraikwdisy Hydrtmdpkur^tum Awmt/nieum, 
Hydrmrg. ammmUttfU aquf/aum, Hifdrog^'eno- 
mMntrdtum ammomifam Uq'wdum^ Spi/itus 
mUpkuns volalfiUs^ Htp» su^huns volaifiU, 
BoYLx's or Beguihe's fuming tpirit^ (F.) Bu- 
drotmlfkaU tu(furi dAmmomMfut, Liqueur fu- 
mamu d€ Botu, Suljure hydro^ini dAmmo- 
mmqtte^ Hydrowuffurt dAmmoniaque, Odour 
veij fetid ; taste naiiseoiu and styptic ; colour 
daric yellowish green. It is reputed to be se- 
datiTe, nauseating, emetic, dis(^gemzing,(?) 
and has been given in diabetes and diseases otf 
increased excitement. Dose, ^ viij . to gw- xx. 

Ammo'ivi£ Taetras, AJ^kali volat'tU tarta- 
riza'tumy Sal Ammonia acum tartc^reum, Tax^- 
ianu ammo'Miay Tartrate of Awmo'nia, (F.) 
TartraU dAmmoniaque. A salt composed of 
tartaric acid and ammonia. It is diaphoretic 
and diuretic ; but not much used. 

AMMONIAQUBy Ammonia — a. Arsifn- 
at$ d*y Arseniate of ammonia — a. Hydrosulfure 
d*i ibmnonise sulphuretum — a. Hydrosulfaie 
nlfuri d^y Ammonis sulphuretum — a. I*- 
fw^. Liquor ammonise-— a.PAo«j9Aa<« <iS Am- 
noois phosphas — a. Sulfuro hydroginb d*y 
Ammoniie sulphuretum. 

AMMONIO-CUPRICUS SUBSULPHAS, 
Cnpruin ammoniatum. 

AMMONION, from «/u^off, < sand.' An an- 
cient eollTrium of gfeat virtues in many dis- 
siies of the eye, and which was said to remove 
•sad from that organ. 

AMMONIUM ARSENICUM, Arseniate of 
Mntnnwia — a. Carbonicum, Ammonie carbenas 
-«. Iodide of, see Iodine— a Muriaticum mar- 
tiatum seu martiale, Ferrum ammoniatun) — a. 
Moriatum, AmmonicB murias — a. Subcarbone- 
vm, AmmoaiflB carbonaa — a. Sulphurieum, Am- 
moiiis snlpfaas. 
AMNA ALCALIZATA, Water, mineral, 



AMNEMOSYNE, Amnesia. 

AMNE'SIA, AmTuat'ioy Amnomos'^i, from 
M, privative, and ^nj^'ic, 'memory.' Moria 
iwhe^Uis anm^siay OUiv'ioy ReeolUetxo'nis 
jmA^roy Dysasike'aia inft^noy DehU'itas me- 
mo'riay Memo'ria dele'tay (F.) Porte do Jlft- 
tiw»r», < loss of memory.' By some Nosologists, 
constitutes a genus of diseases. By 
it is considered only as a symptom, 
I may occur in many diseases. 

AMNESTIA, Amnesia. 

AMNIITIS, Amnitis. 

AMNIOCLEFSIS, from Aftmiosy and xUn- 
r«» < I steal or take away clandestiiiely .' Pre- 
Qsture escape of the liquor amnii. 

AMNIORRH(E' A, from amniosy and ^i» » * I 
Amt.' a premature dischai|;e of the liquor 



AlTNIOSy Aa^nion, Am'mmm, Sfm'mmm, 



I AMOTTREUZ 

Charta virgin' oay Armatufroy Agni'na mtomhra'- 
noy Follu'eida momhra^nuy Galeay Seopaf^nmmy 
indt^oittmyAwUdtdumyJUom^t^nafeBtvm invol'- 
vono. The innermost of the enveloping mem- 
branes of the foetus :— so called because first ob- 
served m the sheep, (?) «^toc, <a sheep.' It is 
thin, transparent, perspirable, and possesses 
many delicate, colourless vessels, which have 
not been injected. It sends a prolongation, which 
serves as a sheath to the umbilical coid. Its ex- 
ternal surface is feebly united to the chffirion by 
cellular and vascular filaments. Its inner sor- 
fkce is polished, and is in contact with the body 
of the foetas and the liquor amnii, (q. v.) 

AMNIOTIC ACID, Ad'idwm am'niewm vel 
ammiot'tcum, A peculiar acid, found by Yao- 
quelin and Buniva m the liquor amnii of the cow. 

AMNrTIS,ilM«»V'iM,firom AmmonoxAitioy 
inflammation. Inflammation of the Anmion. 

AMCENOMA'NIA, from offiontM, < agreea- 
ble,' and mania. A form of mania in which the 
hallucinations are of an agreeable character. 

AMOME FAUX, Sison amomum. 

AMO'MUM C ARDAMO'MUM, A. raoom/- 
ovm, A. vorumiy AlpinHa eardawuffnum, Caro'pi, 
MaU/nia Cardamo'ntumy Elotttiria Cardamo*^- 
mumy Cardaiaoo'mtua Minus, Lesser or ojioinal 
Car^damom, Amo'mum repons, (F.) Cardamooee 
de la C6te de Malabar, Cardamoms. The seeds 
of this East India plant have an agreeable, aro- 
matic odour, and a pungent, grateful taste. 
They are carminative and stomachic : but are 
chiefly used to give warmth to other remedies. 
The fruit is called ^«io«fH>. Dose, gr. v. to 9J* 

Ahokvm Galanga, Maranta G. 

Amomum Granum Paradi'si, Cardafno'msim 
majuMy Meleguotfta, Maniguot'tay Cardamo'- 
mum pipora^tum, A. max'tmum, (F.) Gredues 
de Paradis. Greater cardamom seeds resem- 
ble the last in properties. They are extremely 
hot, and not much used. 

Amomvm Pimenta : see Myrtus pimenta^— a. 
Zedoaria, Esmpferia rotunda. 

Amomum Zin'oibee, Zinfgiber oJHeina'li, 
Zin'gibor aliumy Z. nigrum, Z, oommu'ni, 
Zin' Tiber y Gingery (¥.) Gingembre. The 10*^ 
and biacih gingery Zin'xiber fustwm et alburn^ 
are the rUzoma of the same plant, Zin'gibor 
offieinc^li, the difference depending upon the 
mode of preparing them. 

The odour of ginger is aromatic ; taste warm, 
aromatic, and acr^. It yields its virtues to 
alcohol, and in a great degree to water. It is 
carminative, stimulant, and sialogogue. 

Preserved Ginger, Zingib'eris Hadix Con' 
dtta. Radix Zingib'eris eondi^ta ex Tndid al- 
la'tay is a condiment which possesses all the 
virtues of ginger. 

Ginger-Beor Powders may be formed of 
white sugary 3J. and ^ij. gingery gr. v. sub* 
earbonato of soda, gr. xxxvj in each blue paper : 
add of tartar, T^iss in eacn white paper ,---4or 
half a pint of water. 

Oxlejo Concontratod Essenoo of Jasnmea 
Ginger is a mere solvtion of ginger in reotijlod 
spirit, 

AMOR, Love. 

AMORGE, Anmrw. 
' AMORPHU3, AnfistooB, Anideys. 

AM03TEUS, Osteoo(^la. 

AMOUR, Love. 

'Ol7JK£Z7Z(mnBeIe.) OUiquas superior 



AXPAC 



AMYGDALA 



AMPAC, Amj/aeus. An East India tree, 
the leaves of which have a strong odour, and 
are used in baths as detergents. A very odo- 
riferous resin is obtained from it. 

AMPAR, Succinum. 

AMPELOCARFUS, Galium aparine. 

AMPELOPRASUM, Allium. 

AMPELOS, Vitis viniferar-*. Agria, Bryonia 
alba— «. Idaea, Vaccinium ritis Idaea — a. Oino- 
phoTOS, Vitis vinifera. 

AMPHAMPHOTERODIOPSIA, Diplopia. 

AMPHARJS'TEROS, AmMa'vusy « awk- 
ward;' from afA^i, and opioTt^o^, 'the left.' 
Opposed to ambidexter. 

AMPHEMERINOS, Quotidian. 

AMPHEMERUS, Quotidian. 

AMPPU, «MS(» ^ hoth, around, on all sides.' 
Hence, a prefix in many of the following terms. 

AMPHIAM, Opium. 

AMPfflARTHRO'SIS, from «a«<^i, 'both,' 
and a^&^watfy * articulation.' A mixed articu- 
lation, in which the corresponding surftces of 
bones are united in an intimate manner by an 
intermediate body, which allows, howeyer, of 
some slight motion. Such is the junction of 
the bodies of the vertebre by means of the in- 
tervertebral cartilages. This articulation has 



The 



also been called DtareAfVM de C<mtinuUL 
motion it permits is but slight. 

AMPHIBLESTRODITIS, Retinitis. 

AMPHIBLESTROIDES, Reticular. 

AMPHIBLESTROMALA'CIA, from am 
pkiblestro^des (membrana) the retina, and ft* 
XAKUij < softening.' MoUescence or softeniag 
of the retina. 

AMPfflBRAN'CfflA, from «/a^i, 'around,' 
and ^idYx^y 'the throat.' Amphibronfehia, 
The tonsus and neighbouring parts. — ^Hippoc. 

AMPHICAUSTIS, Vulva. 

AMPHHyEUM, from a/c^i, 'around,' and 
9tWi ' I bind.' The outermost margin of the 
cervix uteri \ the Labium uteri, 

AMPHIDEXIUS, Ambidexter. 

AMPHIDI ARTHRO' SIS, from aAA^», 
' about,' and dtAt&^toatf, ' a moveable joint.' A 
name given by Winslow to the temporo-maxil- 
lary articulation, because, according to that 
anatomist, it partakes both of ginglymus and 
arthrodia. 

AMPHIESMA CORDIS, Pericardium. 

AMPHIMERINA, Pertussis— a. Hectica, 
Hectic fever. 

AMPHIMERINOS, Quotidian. 

AMPHION, Maslach. 

AMPHIPLEX, Perineum. 

AMPHIPNEUMA, Dyspncea. 

AMPHISMELA, Knife, double-edged. 

AMPHISMILE, Knife, double-edged. 

AMPHISPHAL'SIS, Cireumae'tioy Cireum- 
du^tio, from a^c, 'around,' and tttpaXXwy 'I 
wander.' The movement of circumduction 
used in reducing luxations. — ^Hippocrates. 

AMPHODIPLOPIA, see Diplopia. 

AMTHORA, per syncop. for a^^i^a^iv^, 
from afi^iy ' on both sides,' and ^i^*, ' I bear :' 
because it had two handles. A liquid measure 
among the ancients, containing above 7 gal- 
lons. Also called Quadrantad, Cera'mium^ 
Ceramlnimm^ Cadua* ** 

AMPHORIC RESPIRATION, see Caver- 
nous Respiration. 

AMPHOTERODIPLOPIA, see Diplooiiu 

AMPHRODIPLOPIA, Diplopia. 



AMPLEXATIO, Coition. 

AMPLEXUS, Coition. 

AMPLIFICATIO, Platynosis. 

AMPLIOPEA, Amblyopia. 

AMPOSIS, Anaposis. 

AMPOULES, Essera. 

AMPULLA, Gavitas elliptica-*. Chylifcra 
seu chyli, Receptaculum chyli. 

AMPULLiE, PhlyctBDB. 

AMPUTATION, AmpiUt/tio, from ampu* 
tare, (am, ' around,' and putare,) ' to cut off.' 
Apot'omi, Apotom'ia. The operation of sepa- 
rating by means of a cutting instrument, a limb 
or a part of a limb, or a projecting part, as the 
mamma, penis, &c., from the rest of the body. 
In the case of a tumour, the term excieion, re^ 
movaly or extirpation, (F.) Resection, \b more 
commonly used. 

Amputation, Cikculak, is that in which 
the integuments and muscles are divided circu- 
larly. 

AiCFUTATiON, Flap, (F.) A. d lambeaux, is 
when one or two flaps are left so as to cover the 
stump, when the limb has been removed. 

Amputation, Joint, Exarticula'tio, (F.) A, 
done V article on dans la eantigtdti des mem* 
hres, is when the limb is removed at an articu- 
lation. 

Each amputation requires a different process, 
which is described in works on operative sur- 
gery. 

AMULET, Amaletum. 

AMULETTE, Amuletum. 
. AMULE'TUM, from amoliri, 'to remove.' 
Ah Amulet, — Periam'ma, Apotropafum, Peri- 
apfton, Phylacte'rion, Apoteles'mai Exart/w%a, 
Aiexica'cum, Praservati'vum, Prohasca^nium, 
Probascan'iium, (F.) Amulette, Any image or 
substance worn about the person for the pur- 
pose of preventing disease or danger. 

AMURCA, Amurga, ctpf^yfi* The mare or 
grounds remaining after olives luive been crushed 
and deprived of meit oil. It has been used as 
an application to ulcers. 

AMURGA, AmuTca. 

AMUSA, Musa Paradisiaca. 

AMYCE, Amyeha, Amy'xie, Excoriation, 
Scarification. 

AMYCHA, Amyce. 

AMYCTICA, from c^twim, 'I lacerate.* 
Medicines which stimulate and vellicate the 
skin. — Caelius Aurelianus. 

AMYDRIASIS, Mydriasis. 

AMYELIA, from a, privative, and fixflee, 
'marrow.' A monstrous formation, in which 
there is an absence of spinal marrow. 

AMYGr^ALA, same etymon as Amyctica; 
because there seem to be fissures in the shell. 
The Almond, of which there are two kinds; 
Amyg'dalee amelret and A*dulees, (F.) Amandee 
dotiees, and A* amhres, obtained from two va- 
rieties of Amyg^dalue eommunis, or A. stUifva, 
a native of Barbary. Nat, Ord, Amygdalese. 
Sex. Syst. Icosandria Monogynia. 

The taste of the Amygdala duleis is soft and 
sweet; that of the A, amara, bitter. Both 
yield, by expression, a sweet, bland oil. The 
bitter almond contains Prussic acid. They are 
chiefly used for forming emulsions. 

AMTo'DAi.iB 1?LACEV*TA, Almond Cake, is the 
cake left after the expression of the oil. The 
gr9wnd Almond Cake, Almond Powder^ Fori' net 



AMTGDALATUM 



45 



ANACLINTERIUM 



Amygdala^rmnf IB used instead of soap for wash- 
ing the hands. 

Amtg'dax.^ Pasta^ Almond Fcute, a coeme- 
tie fort sQftening the skin and preventing chaps, 
is made of bitter almonds y bkmchedy ,^iv, white 
of ono egg; rose water, and reetified tjirity equal 
parts, or as mnch as is sufficient. 

AMTGDAI.A, Tonsil. Also, a lobe of the ce- 
rebellum, so called from its resemblance to an 
enlarged tonsil. This and its fellow of the op- 
jxMite side form the lateral boundaries of the 
anterior extremity of the valley, (q. v.) and are 
in great part covered by the medulla oblongata. 

AMTGDALATUM, Emulsio AmygdaUa, 

AMTGDALE, Tonsil. 

AMYGDALITIS, Cynanche tonsillaris. 

AMY6DALUS COMMUNIS, see Amygdala. 

Avro'DALUS Pkb'sica. The Common peack- 
treof (F.) Picker. The leaves and flowers have 
been considered laxative. They are bitter and 
aronude, and have been given in hematuria, 
nephritis, &c. The fruit is one of the pleasant 
and wholesome summer fruits, when ripe. The 
kernels, Aw^^dala Per'tieeBy as well as the 
flowers, contain prussic acid. 

Peach Brandy is distilled from the fruit, and 
is nmch used in the United States. 

Amygdalus, see Amygdala. 

AMY6MOS, Scarification. 

AMTLEON, Amylum. 

A'MYLUM, A'midumy Feffuia, Amfl'eon, 
Amffion, from o, priv., and /ccvli}, 'a mill,' be- 
, caose made without a mill. Starch, (F.) Ami^ 
don. Amnion. Starch of Wheat, Pari'na, Trit^- 
idfari'na^ Fee'tUa Amyla'eea, is inodorous and 
insipid, white and friable. It is insoluble in 
cold water and alcohol; but forms with boiling 
vnXer a strong, semi-transparent jelly. It is 
demulcent, and is used as an emollient glyster, 
and as the vehicle for opium, when given per 
fmum. Starch is met with abundantly in all 
The cereal grains, in the stalks of many of the 
pahns, in some lichens, and in many tuberous 
roots, particularly in the bulbs of the orchis. 

Amtlum Iobatum, see Iodine. 

A'MYON, from «, priv., and /cmtt, ^a vaam- 
c\b,* Emuseula'tuo, Without muscle. Applied 
to the limbs, when so extenuated that the mus- 
cles cannot be distinguished. 

AMYOSIS, Synezizis. 

AKYRIS COMMIPHORA, see Bdellium. 

Ax^xu Ei.bmip'bra, (F.) Baieamier Eli- 
mi/irt, Nat, Ord. Terebinthacee. Sex. Syst. 
Octandria Monogynia. The plant whence it has 
been supposed 6ux El'emi is obtained. This 
gum or resin is brought from the Spanish East 
and West Indies. Brazilian Elemi, according 
to Dr. Royle, is produced by Idea leicariha; 
Mexican Blomi by Elt^phrinm elemiferum; 
and Manilla Elemi by Canafrium commufni. 
It is softish, transparent, of a pale whitish co- 
lour, inclinnig a little to green, and of a strong, 
thoi^gh not unpleasant smell. It is only used 
in ointments and plasters, and is a digestive. 

Amtkxs 61Z.EADE11SI8, see A. opobalsamum. 

Ax'TBis Opobal'samux, (F.)Baleemier de la 
MJecqne, Bateem, Batsamfum, The plant from 
which is obtained the Balsax of Mbcca, BaT- 
toimum genvi'num antiquo*rum, Baletvmelaton, 
Mgyptiaeum Batsomum, Battamum Asiatfi- 
mm, B. Judo^ieum, B, Sftiaeum, B. e Meced, 
Ceeohafsamum, B, Alpffni, Oleum BoTeami, 
Opo^afMommnyXylobal'eamium^aleam oi Balm 



of Oilead, (F.) Bimme Blanc, B. de Conotanti- 
nople blane, B. de Galaad, B, du Grand Caire, 
B, Vrai, Terehinthine de Gildad, T. t^Agypte, 
T. du Grand Kaire, T, de Judie, A resinous 
juice obtained by making incisions into Amyrie 
opobal'samum and A. GUeadcn'aie of Liuueus, 
Balsamaden'dron Gileaden*ei of Kunth. The 
juice of the fruit is called Carpobal'samum; 
that of the wood and branches Xylob<d'samum. 
It has the general properties of Uie milder Te- 
rebinthinates. 

Axtbis Toxxntosux, Fagara octandra. 

AMYRON, Carthamus tmctorins. 

AMYUS, froxn a privative, and /iv«, * a mouse, 
a muscle.' Weak or poor in muscle. 

AMYXIA, from a privative, and /lv^o, < mu- 
cus.' Deficiency of mucus. 

AMYXIS, Amyce, Scarification. 

ANA, aro, a word which signifies ^of each.' 
It is useid in prescriptions as well as a and u, 
its abbreviations. As a prefix to words, it 
means < in,' < through,' < upwards,* < above,' in 
opposition to Cata, (q. v.;) also 'repetition,' 
luce the English re. Hence, — 

ANAB'ASISj from ara/fa(rw,< I ascend.' The 
first period of a disease, or that of increase. — 
Galen. See Augmentation. 

ANABEXIS, Expectoration. 

AN ABLEP'SIS, from ara, < again,' and /Mtnio, 
< I see.' Restoration to sight. 

AN ABOL^'ON, Anabole'ue, from atafiaXZm, 
* I cast up.' An ointment for extracting darts 
or other extraneous bodies. 

AN AB'OLE, from ava, < upwards,' and fialXw, 
*I cast.' Anago'gi, Ana^'ora, Anaeine'mut, 
Anadn^aia. An evacuation upwards. An act 
by which certain matters are ejected by the 
mouth. In common acceptation it includes, e»- 
sjmition, expectoration, regurgitation, and t^o- 
miting, 

A^ABB.OCmS^MXJSydnabronchiymMe,from 
Ota, * with,' and fiQoxotf * a running knot.' An 
operation for removing the eye-lMhes, for ex- 
ample, when they irritate the eye, by means of 
a hair knotted around them. — Hippocrates, Ga- 
len, Celsus, &c. 

ANABRONCHISMUS, Anabrochismus. 

ANABROSIS, Corrosion, Erosion. 

AN ACAMPSEROS, Sedum telephium. 

ANACARODIUM OCCIDENTA'LE, Co*- 
eu'vium pondferum. Cashew {W. Indies.) (F.) 
Acajou. iVat. Or<#. TerebinthacesD. Sex.Syst. 
Enneandria Monogynia. The OH of the Cashew 
Nut, O'leum Anaoar'dii, (F.) Huile d* Acajou, 
is an active caustic, and used as such in the 
countries where it grows, especially for de- 
stroying warts, &c. 

Anaoabdiux Orixntalb, Avicennia tomen- 
tosa. 

ANACATHAR'SIS, from ova, 'upwards,' 
and xa^fiupffiv, * to purge.' Purgation upwards. 
Expectoration, (q. v.) See, also, Repurgatio. 

Anacathabsxs Catabrhalxs Sixplbx, Ca- 
tarrh. 

ANACATHARTICUS, Expectorant. 

ANACESTOS, Incurable. 

ANACHREMPSIS, Exspnition. 

ANACHRON, Soda. 
^ANACINEMA, Anabole, Exspnition. 

ANACINESIS, Anabole, Exspnition. 

ANACLASIS, Repercussion. 

ANACLINTE'RIUM, Anadin'trum, Becu- 
Uttfrium, from ata*k\tm, < I recline.' A long 



ANACUATRUM 



ANAMNESTIG 



elnur or seat, so fonned, tliAt tha penoik can rest 
IB m reclinifig posture. 

ANACLINTRUM, Amelinterium. 

AN ACOLLEOVfA, from ova, < together/ and 
jf«Alaw, * I glue.' A healing medicine. 

Anacollbmata, Frontal bandages. 

ANACOLUP'PA. A creeping plant of Ma- 
labar, the juice of which, mixed with powdered 
pepper, passes in India as a cure for epilepsy, 
and as the only remedy for the bite of the naja. 
It is supposed to be Zapafnia nodifto'ra. 

ANACOLUTHIE, Incoherence. 

ANACOMIBE, Restauiatio. 

ANACONCHYLIASMUS, Gargarism. 

ANACONCHYLISMUS, Gargarism. 

ANACTESIS, Restauratio. 

ANACTIRION, Artemisia. 

ANACYCL'EON, Charlatan. 

ANACYCLUS OFFICINARUM, see An- 
themis Pyrethrum — a. Pyrethrum, Anthemis 
pyrethrum. 

ANADESMUS, Fascia. 

ANADIPLO'SIS, from ova, < again,* and *i- 
Ttloco, < I doable.' Epanadiplo'sis^ Epanaltp^- 
ns, Redupliet^tio, The redoubling which oc- 
curs in a paroxysm of an intermittent, when its 
type Lb double. — Galen, Alexander of Tralles. 

ANADORA, Ecdora. 

ANAD'OSIS, from awaSiduptt, 'I distribute.' 
Purgation upwards, as by vomiting. Conges-^ 
tion of blood towards the upper parts of the 
body. AfuuUsis seems also to have occasion'^ 
ally meant chylification, whilst diadogis meant 
capillary nutrition. — Hippocrates, Galen. 

ANAJyROME, from «va, < upwards,' and 
S^t/ua, ' I run.' The transport of a humour or 
pain from a lower to an upper part*— Hippoer. 
Also, the globus hystericus (q. r.) 

AN^.DOS'USy from av privatiTe, and atSota, 

* organs of generation.' A monster devoid of 
sexual organs.- 

ANAMATOPOIE'SIS, from «, «v, priva- 
tive, 'aifiuf, < blood,' and 7ra«iio, * I make.' Im- 
peded or obstructed httmatosis. 

AN^MATO'SIS, from «, «y, privative, and 
<«i^ft, < blood.' Defective hsmatosis or prepa- 
ration of the blood. 

ANi£'MiA, Exgfmia, Anx'vuuia^ Anhif- 
mia, Anhamato'sis, Polyanha^mia, Anstmo'gia, 
OligtB'miai Oligok^miay Hypafmia^ (q. v.) 
Hfdroaimiay (q. v.) Hydrafmiaj An^ffda^ (F.) 
AnimUy Polyttnhimie, Hydrohimie, Exsan^ 
gtUn'tty, Bloodies 9nea s : from a, priv. and 
<ai/ia, 'blood.' Privation of blood;— the op- 
posite to plethora (q. v.) It is chaxaeterized 
by every sign of debility. Also, diminished 
quantity of fluids in the capillary vessels {«— 
the opposite to Hypermtma. — The essential 
character of the blood in anemia is diminution 
in the ratio of red corpuscles. 

AN£'MIC, Atum'icj Ant/mieus ; same ety- 
mon. Appertaining to Anemia,— as an ^^anm- 
mie person ;" « anamie urine." 

ANiEMOCH'ROtJS, from «, a», privative, 

* ttua, ' blood,' and %(•<, * colour.' Devoid of 
colour, pale. 

ANi£MOSIS, Anemia. 

ANiEMOTROPHY, Anmmotroph'ia : fr«|| 
ov, privative, <«f/ic«, 'blood,' and r^c^i;, *n^F 
rishment.' A deficiency of sanguineous nourish- 
ment. — Prout. 

ANiBSTHE'SIA, Anmsth^sit, InsmsmV- 
iteuy Analgt'ndy ParmjfatM txpertj (F.) Anet' 



tkitU : from «, privative, and mc^vopLoi^ ' 1 
feel.' Privation of sensation, and especially of 
that of touch, according to some. It may be 
general or partial, and is almost always symp- 
tomatic. 

AiiABTBBSiA LiNocjB, Ageustia^-a. Olftc- 
toria, Anemia. 

AN^STHESIS, Anesthesia. 

ANiESTHET'IC, Afustkst^iey Anmsekefi- 
out, (F.) AnssthiHgue ; same etymon as Anm*'- 
thesia. Relating to privation of feeling, as an 
*' anasthetie agent;" one that prevents feeling, 
as chloroform inhaled during a surgical opera- 
tion. 

ANiBSTHISIA, Insensibility. 

ANAGAULIS, from ova and rai«, < milk,' 
from its power of coagulating mUk. A. arven'- 
ai»y A. Pktanit^'Bc^ Red Pitnfpemel, SearUt 
Pimpernel, Nat. Ord, Primulacee. 8ex» Syet, 
Pentandria Monogynia. (F.) M&uron range, 
A common European plant; a reputed anti- 
spasmodic and stomachic. 

Another species — AnagaTHe omru'lea is a 
mere variety of the above. 

Anaoallis AquATiCA, Veronica Beccabonga. 

ANAGAROALICTON, Gargarism. 

ANAGARGARISMUS, Gargarism. 

ANAGARGARISTON, Gargarism. 

ANAGLYPHS, Calamus scriptorins. 

ANAGOGE, Anabole, Rejection. 

ANAGRAPHE, Prescription. 

ANAG^YRIS, Anag'yrut, Ai^opon^ Anoff- 
yria ft/tida, StinJHng Bean Trefoil, Native 
of Italy. The leaves are powerfully pui^- 
tive. The juice is said to be diui^tic, and the 
seeds emetic. — Dioscorides, Paulus. 

ANAGYRUS, Anagyris. 

ANAL, Amelia, That which refers to the 
anus ;— as Anal region. Ice. 

ANAL'DIA, (F.) Analdie ; from «r, priva- 
tive, and cdJ'ttr, ' to grow.' Defective nntri- 
tion. 

ANALEMSIA, Analepsia. 

ANALENTIA, Analepsia. 

ANALEFSI A, Analep'sie, Analen'tia, Ana- 
lem'eia, from «i«, ' fresh,' and l«^if«niv, * to 
take.' Restoration to strength after disease^ — 
Galen. A kind of sympathetic epilepsy, ori* 
ginating from gastric disorder. S^ Epilepsy. 

Also, the support given to a fractured extre- 
mity;— il;)>^n'Wo. — Hippocrates. 

ANALEPSIS, Convalescence, Restauratio. 

ANALEPTIC A, AnapsyifHea, Psychat^iea, 
Refeeti'va, Rejieien'tia, Analejftiet, same ety- 
mon. Restorative medicines or food ; such as 
are adapted to recruit the strength during con- 
valescence : — as sago, salep, tapioca, jelly, &c. 

Aralsptic Pills, Jakks's, consist of Somes'* 
Powder, Gum Ammoniaeum, and Pills of Alefs 
and Myrrh, equal parts, with Tincture of Cas- 
tor, sufficient to form a mass. 

ANALGE'SIA, Anal'gia, from a, priv., and 
alY*»?9 * pain.' Absence of pain both in health 
and disease. See Anaesthesn. 

ANALGIA, Analgesia. 

ANALOGOUS TISSUES, see Tissues. 

ANALOSIS, Atrophy. 

ANALTESIS, Restauratio. 

ANALTHES, Incurable. 

ANAMIRTA COCCULUS, Menispermum 
coccnlus— a. Paniculata, Menispermum coc- 
culus. 

ANAMNESTIC, Anamnestieumfftookawm, 



ANANAS 



47 



rANASTCEOHEIOfilS 



<ag&]ii,'uid/if«o^Mti/ 1 remember/ A medicine 
for in^roving tiie memory. See, also, Com- 
memorative. 

ANANAS, Bromelia ananas— a. Acoetae ova- 
tae, &C., Bromelia ananas — a. Americana, Bro- 
melia pingniii — a. Wild, broad-leaved, Brome- 
lia pingnin. 

ANANAZIPTA. A word formerly scrawled 
on amulets to charm away disease. 

ANANDRI'A,from «, Ar, privatire, aad ar^, 
<a man.' Want of manliness. Impotence in 
the male. The state and act of emasculation. 

AN ANEO^IS, lUn^a'tio; from ara/ again,' 
and Moc, 'new.' Kenovation or renewal, — as 
of the blood by the chyliferous vessels and lym- 
phatics. 

ANAPETI'A, Expam'sio wiMftuuwty from 
cv« , and nnmrn^ < I dikte.' A state opposite to 
the closure of vessels. — Galen. 

ANAPHALANTPASIS, AnaphaUn»9*ma, 
from a»^93LArtia^^ * bald.' Loss of the hair of 
the eyebrows. Also, baldness in general. 

ANAPHALANTOMA, Anaphalantiasis. 

ANAPHE, Anaphia. 

ANAPH'IA, AnJkaph'iaf An'apkBy from a, 
ov, priv., and '0917, * touch.' Diminution or pri- 
vation of the sense of touch. 

ANAPHLASMUS, Masturbation. 

AN APHONE'SIS, irom ava, ' high,' and ^«^, 
' voice.' Exercise of the voice : vociferation :— 
the act of crying out. V^eifera'tio, Clamor, 

ANAPHORA, Anabole. 

AN APHRODISl A, from a, priv., and A^^- 
/iTij, « Yenus,' JDe/se^tiu Ven'trU, Absence of 
the venereal appetite. Sometimes used for /«•- 
poieue9 and Surilitf, 

ANAPHROMELI, Mel despumatnm. 

AN AP'LASIS, Anapl09mu4,fnm «vaffMinw, 
' I restore.' Confirma'tioj Rep9si"ti9. Resto- 
ration. Union or consolidation of a fractured 
bone. — Hippocrates. 

ANAPLASMUS, Anaplasisv 

ANAPLASTIC, Attapltu'tieus; same ety- 
moo. An epithet applied to the art of restoring 
lost parts, or the normal shape— as *AnaptasHe 
Surgery.' See Morioplastice. 

AN APLERO'SIS, from anrTriMow, * I fill up.' 
Repletion. That part of surgical therapeutics 
TOMS object is to supply parts that are want- 
ing. Also, Apposition or Proatkesisy (q. v.) 

ANAPLEROTICUS, Incamans. 

ANAPLEU'SIS,i7«Mtf«a'i»0,/«wMto<e»o,from 
atanUt^y ' to swim above.' The looseness or 
dakiog of an exfoliated bone; or of a carious 
or other tooth, &c.— Hippocrates, Pisulus. 

ANAPLOSIS, Growth. 

ANAPNEUSIS, Respiration. 

ANAPNOB, Respiration. 

ANAPNOfeNU'SI ; from Anapnoly < respira- 
tion,' and 99ur9r9 * disease.' Diseases of the re- 
spiratory organs. 

ANAPNOMETER, Spirometer. 

ANAPODISI8 UTERI, Retroversio Uteri. 

ANAPODISMUS UTERI,RetroversioUteri. 

ANAPODOPHYLLUM C ANADENSE, Po- 
dophyllum peltatum. 

ANAPOSIS, Am'ponsy from «ira, ' again,' and 
vctf-ic, < drink.' A recession of humours from 
the circumference to the centre of the body^ 
Hippocrates. 

ANAPSE, Auante. 

ANAPSIA, CsBcitas. 

ANAPSYCTICA, Analeptiea. 



ANAPTYSIS, Expectoration. 

AN APTYXIS, Growth. • 

ANARRHEGNU'MINA, from avae«i}ynMciu^ 
< I break out again.' Fractnres are so called 
when they become disunited; as well as ukers 
when they break out afresh. 

ANARRHI'NON, from av«, < inwards,' and 
fly, <the nose.' That which returns by the 
nose. — GornBUs. 

According to others, that which issues by the 
skin, from 4va, and «cvoc9 ' the skin.' 

ANARRHINUM, Sternutatory. 

ANARRHOE, Anarrhcea. 
A^kli^tXL(E.'KAnar'rho'irAMar*rko'pia^n4u'' 
toHsyftom away < upwards,' and (»», 'I flow.' 
Aflux of fluid towards the iqpper partof the body. 

ANARRHOPHE, Absorption. 

ANARRHOPHENU'SI; from AnarrkopkSy 
'absorption,' and Mvro(, < disease.' Diseases 
of the absorbents. 

ANARRHOPHESIS, Absorption. 

ANARRHOPIA, Anarrhcea. 

ANARTHRUS, from «», priv., and a^^e*^ 
' a joint.' Without a joint. One who is so fat, 
that his joints are scarcely perceptible.^ — Hipp. 

ANASAR'C A, from « va, < through,' and«-«^(, 
* the flesh.' Anatorek% Catatar*ea, Aqua tn- 
terctts sen inur eutom, Hypotar'eay Hydrops 
cellula'ri* totiiu eor^poris, H» Ana$ar'cety H, 
inter^eus seu suheuta^nsus sou c§Uulo'»u§y Kth- 
teumr^ea, JSpisarcid*ium, Hy'dero*, HydaUm'" 
eu8y Hydsron'eusy Hydrottfeus^ Hydro*ar*eay 
Hydroder*may Hydrop'isis vera^ 8w^eit$s, P«- 
lylprnfj^uoy Hypotardd^iusy L$uoophlogmaftiay 
Qtneral dropsy y Dropsy of the eellular mo m^ 
hransy (F.) Anasarqus. Commonly, it be- 
gins to manifest itself by swelling around the 
ankles; and is characterized by tumefaction of 
the limbs and of the soft parts covering the ab- 
domen, thorax, and even the &ee, with paleness 
and dryness of the skin, and pitting when any 
of these (especially the ankles) are pressed 
upon. Like dropsy in general, Anasarca may 
be aetivo or passive ; and its treatment must be 
regulated by the rules that are applicable to 
general dropsy. At times, the imnptoms are 
of an acute character, and the efiusion sudden, 
constituting the Dermatoch^ysis, Hydrops Ana^ 
sar'ea aeu'tuSy (Eds'ma eal'idum, CE. aeu^tumy 
(E. febri'U of some. See Hydrops. 

AiTASAROA Htstb&icum, Ansthymiasls— «. 
Pulmonum, Hydropneumonia, (Edema of the 
Lungs — a. Serosa, PUegmatia dolens. 

ANASARCHA, Anasarca. 

ANASARQUE, Anasarca. 

ANASISMUS, Concussion. 

ANASPADIA, see Anaspadiaeus. 

ANASPADIAS, Epispadias, from atuy < up- 
wards,' and o-rttw, < I draw.' One whose ure- 
thra opens on the upper surface of the penis. 

ANASPADISIS, see Anaspadiaeus. 

ANASPADISMUS, see Anaspadiasus. 

ANAS'PASIS, Anaspasm'usy from avarroMo, 
<I contract.' Retreteftio. Contraction, espe- 
cially of the bowels. The condition is called 
Anaspa'diay Anaspad'isisy and Anaspadis'mus. 
— Hippocrates. 

ANASPASMUS, Anaspasis. 
I ANASSA, Bromelia ananas. 

ANASTALTICA, Styptics. 

ANASTASIS, Anarrhcea. Also, restoration 
from sickness. Convalescence. 

AN AST(ECH£I0^IS, from ova, < again,'and 



A1IA8TOM08I8 



A3YAZE8I8 



oroix»i99y * element.' ReiUmenta'tto, Reso- 
lution of a body or its parts into their elements. 
— Galen. 

AN ASTOMO'SIS, from «»«, « with,* and 4tf' 
fiOf * a mouth.' Inoseula*tio seu Rtu'nio va$o*' 
rumy Exanastomo'siMy Concur' sua ^ {V.)Aboueh^ 
mtnt» Oommonication between two vessels. 
By considering the nerves to be channels, in 
which a nervous fluid circulates, their commu- 
nication likewise has been called Anastomoais, 
By means of anastomoses, if the course of a fluid 
be arrested in one vessel, it can proceed along 
others. 

Ahastomosis AifBuaisMATiCA, Telangiecta- 
sia — a. Jacobson's; — see Petrosal ganglion. 

ANASTOMOTICS, Anaafmoi'iea. Same 
etymon. Certain medicines were formerly so 
called, which were believed to be capable of 
opening the mouths of vessels: — as aperients^ 
diuretics, &c. 

AN ASTOMOT'ICFS MAGNUSv(RAMUS,) 
(F.) Arthra eoUtUirala interna^ A. eoliaidraledu 
eoudey is a branch of the brachial arterr which 
comes off a littie above the elbow, and bestows 
branches tothe brachialis internus, to the under 
edge of the triceps, and to the muscles, liga- 
ments, &C., about the elbow joint. See, also. 
Articular arteries of the knee. 
ANASTROPHE UTERI, Inverno uteri. 
ANATASIS, Extension. 
ANATHYMIAMA, Anatiiymiasia. 
ANATHYMI'ASIS, Afuuh^ttu'ama, from 
0va, * upwards,' and dv^ o, < fumigatios.' OSde'^ 
mafugaXf (Eda'ma spas'tieum, CEde'mahyatar'' 
ieumy Amuar'ca kystanfieum. An uncertain 
and transient swelling, said to have been ob- 
served at times in nervous and hysterical per- 
sons. It also means Exhalation, Fomigatioa, 
and Hypochondriasis, (which see.) 
ANATOLE UNGUIUM, see NaU. 
ANATOME, Anatomy— a. Animata, Physi- 
ology. 

ANATOMIA, Anatomy— a. Animadis, Zo- 
otomy — a. Comparata, Zootomy— «. Compara- 
tiva, 2^tomy— «. Viva, Physiology. 

ANATOMIE, Anatomy— a. CkimrgieaUj 
see Anatomy — a. des Rsgiona^ see Anatomy. 

ANAT'OMIST, Anatomficus. One who oc- 
cupies himself ¥rith anatomy. One versed is 
Anatomy. 

ANAT'OMY, Anat'omEy Anatom'ia, Proaee'- 
tioy from ttva, and rtuvtir, * to cut,* (F.) Anato- 
mi$. The word Anatomy properly signifies dis- 
section; but it has been appropriated to the study 
and knowledge of the number, shape, situation, 
structure, and connexion, — in a word, of all the 
apparent properties of organized bodies. Ana- 
tomy is the science of organization. Some have 
given the term a still more extended accepta- 
tion, applying it to every mechanical decom- 
position, even of inorganic bodies. Thus, 
Cryatallography has been termed the Anatomy 
of crystallized minerals. Anatomy has also been 
called Morphol'ogyy Somatol'ogy, Somatot'omy, 
Organol'ogyy &c. It assumes different names 
according as the study is confined to one orga- 
nized being, or to a species or class of beings. 
Thus, Androt'omyy or Anthropot'omy, or Anthro- 



tomy of man: — Zo^omy^ that of the other spe- 
cies of the animal kingdom : and Veterinary 
Anat'omy is the anatomy of domestic animals: 
but when the word is used abstractly, jt 



meani human Anmtomyy and partieolarly the 
study of the organs in a {diysiological or healthy 
state. PhyeiologiccU Anatomy is occasionaUy 
used to signify the kind of anatomy which in- 
vestigates structure with a special view to Aioe- 
tion. The Anatomy of the diseased human body 
is called Fatholog^'teal or Morbid Anatautyy and 
when applied to Medical Jurisprudence, Fo- 
ren'sic Anatomy, Several of the organs possess- 
ing a similarity of structure, and being formed 
of the same tissues, they have been group^ into 
Systems.or Genera of Organs; and me study of, 
or acquaintance with, such systems, has been 
called Gmural Anat'omy^ Histol'ogy, or Mor- 
pkot'omMy whilst the study of each organ in par- 
ticular W been termed Descriptive Anatomy. 
Descriptive Anatomy has been divided into Ske- 
letol'ogy which comprises Osteology y and Syn^ 
desmoVogy ; and into Sarcol'ogyy which ia sub- 
divided into Myol'ogy, Neurol'ogy, AngioVogy, 
Adenoi^ogy, Splanchnol'ogyy and Dermol*ogy, 
Sur'gical Anat'omy ^ Medico'Ckirurgieal Anato- 
myyfopograpkfical Afiat'omy, Re'gumat Anat'o- 
my, (F.) Anatomie Chirurg%eale,A.desIUgiansy 
is the particular and relative study of the bones, 
muscles, nerves, vessels, &c., with which it is 
indispensable to be acquainted before perform- 
ing operations. Compar'ative Aftat'omy is the 
comparative study of each organ, with a view 
t» an acquaintance with the modifications of 
its strvctnre in diflbrent animals or in the dif- 
ferent classes of animals. Transeendent'al or 
FkUosopk'ieal Anatomy inquires into the mode, 
plauy or model upon which the animal frame or 
organs are formed; and Artifi'dal Anat'omy is 
the art of modelling and representing in wax or 
other substance, £e different organs or diffe- 
rent parts of the human body, in the sound or 
diseased state. Phytot'omy is the anatomy of 
vegetables. 

Anatomt, Artificial, see Anatomy — a. 
Comparative, see Anatomy, Zootomy— a. De- 
scriptive, see Anatomy — a. Forensic, see Ana- 
tomy—a. Gieneral, see Anatomy — a. Human, 
see Anatomy — a. of Man, see Anatomy — a. 
Medico-chirurgical, see Anatomy— a. Morbid, 
see Anatom^r—a. Pathological, see Anatomy — 
a. I^osopmcal, see Anatomy— a. Ph^ologi- 
cal, see AnatiMny— a. Practical, see Dusection 
— a. Regional, see Anatomy— a. Surgical, see 
Anatomy — a. Topographical, see Anatomy — a. 
Transcendental, see Anatomy — a. Veterinary, 
see Anatomy. 

ANATON, Soda. 

ANATREPSIS, Restanratio. 

ANATRESIS, Perforation, Trepanning. 

ANATRIBE, Friction. 

ANATRIPSIS, Friction. 

ANATRIPSOLOGY, Anatripsolog^ia, Ana- 
triptolog"ia,fTcma9'ar(ft^fif, * friction,' and ioyoey 
* a discourse.' A treatise on friction as a re- 
medy. 

ANATRIPTOLOGIA, Anatripsology. 

ANATRON, Natrum, Soda. 

ANAT'ROPE, from <»«, 'upwards,' and 
T{ff7Tfli, < I turn.' A subversion, A turning or 
subversion or inverted action of the stomach, 
characterized by nausea, vomiting, &c. — Galen. 



pog'rapky, or Anthroposomatot'ogy, is the Ana^W^ vtill speak of the stomach turning against 



any thing. 

AN AUDI A, Catalepsy, Mutitas. 
ANAXYRIS, Rumex acetosa. 
ANAZESIS, Ebullition. 



ANAZOTURU 



49 



ANBG£RT1CE 



AKAZOTURIA, see Urine. 

A^iCHA, Haimch. 

ANCHILOPSy ^gilops. 

ANCHORALIS PROCESSUS, Concoid. 

ANCHU'SA OFFICINALIS, Alea'na, Lin- 
gua Bovisy Bugios'sum syUes'trty OJW*inal or 
Gardm Al'kanet or Bugloss ; Nat, Ord, Boragi* 
neiF. Sex, Sytt, Pentandria If oDogjnia. (F.) 
BugloM, A native of Great Britain. The herb 
ms formerly esteemed as a cordial in melan- 
cholia and hypochondriasis ; but it is now rarely 
osed. It is also called Bugios'sa, Bugloa'snm 
UHgHstifo'Uum majtUy B, vulga'rl majusy B, 

AiiCHu'sA TiROTo'aiA, AUan'no spu'iia, Df- 
er't BugUsSfAne'HumyBugloyswii Tinet&rumy 
Utkotftr'mmm viUo'nim, Jeer's Al'ianet, (F.) 
Oreamette, A European plant. The medical 
properties are equivocal. It is used to give a 
bcantif ol red colcnir to ointments. 

ANCHYLOSIS, Ankylosis. 

ANCISTRON, Hamolos. 

ANCOUB, Aquilegia vulgaris. 

ANCOiV, Elbow, Olecranon. 

ANCONAGRA, Pechyagra. 

ANCONM, Anconeus. 

ANCONE'US, from ay»»r, « the elbow.* A 
term once appli^ to every muscle attached to 
the olecianon. Winslow distinguished four: 
—the great J e^gtemal, internal f and small; the 
fint three being portions of the same muscle, 
the triceps braekialis. The last has, alone, re- 
tained the name. It is the Antone'us minor of 
Wioslow, the Ancone'us vel Cuhita'lis Riola'ni 
of Douglass, the Epieondflo-CuHta^lis of Chaus- 
sier, the Brevi* Cu'biti, (F.) Aneond^ and is si- 
tuate at the upper and back part of the fore-arm. 
It arises from the external condyle of the os 
bnmeri, and is inserted into the posterior edge 
of the opper third of the ulna. Its use is to aid 
ia the eztensi<m of the fore-arm. 

Ahconsits Exterrus, see Triceps extensor 
nibiti— a. Intemus, see Trioeps extensor cubiti 
—a. Major, see Triceps extensor cubiti. 

ANCTE'RES. Fibttla or Clasps, by which 
the lips of wounds were formerly kept together. 
— Celsos, Galen. 

ANCTERIASMUS, Infibulation. 

AliCTT'BITUS, Petrifae'tio, An affection 6i 
the eye, in which there is a sensation as if sand 
were irritating the organ. 

AKCUN N UEN TM . A name formerly given 
to females during menstruation. 

Ai*9CUS, Ankus, from arxwy 'the elbow.' 
One who cannot extend his arms completely. 

Also the deformity resulting from a luxation 
of the famnerus or fore-arm. — ^Hippocrates. 

ANCTLE, Ankylosis. 

ANCYLOBLEPHARON, Ankyloblej^iaron. 

ANCYLODERE, Torticollis. 

ANCYLODERIS, Torticollis. 

ANCYLODONTIA, Ankylodontia. 

ANCYLOGLOSSIA, Ankyloglossia. 

ANCYLOMELE, Ankylomele. 

ANCYLOMERISMUS, Ankylomerismus. 

ANCYLOSIS, Ankylosis. 

ANCYLOTOMUS, Ankylotomus. 

ANCYRA, Hook. 

ANCYROID CAVITY, Digital cavity. 

ANCYROIDES PROCESSUS, Coracoid. 

ANDA. A tree of Brazil ;—i4«J« Gomtfsit, 
^•wndsia prineeps. Nat, Ord. Euphorbiaceap. 
Stz,Syst, Moncecia Monadelphia. An oil is 



obtdned from the seeds by pressure, 50 to 60 
drops of which act as a cathartic. The fruit is 
an oval nut, containing two seeds. These have 
the taste of the chestnut; but are strongly ca- 
thartic, and even emetic. The shell is astrin- 
gent, and used as such in diarrhoea, &c. 

ANDELY, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Andely is in France, near Gysore, and eight 
leagues from Rouen. The water is cold, and a 
weak chalybeate. It is used in chlorosis and 
abdominal obstructions. 

ANDERSON'S PILLS, Pilul© Aloes et Jar 
lape. 

ANDIRA INERMIS, Oeoffima inermis— «. 
Snrinamensis, Geoflhea Surinamensis. 

ANDRACHAHARA, Sempervivum tecto- 
rum« 

ANDRACHNE, Arbutus unedo, Portnlaca. 

ANJ>KAfJ ATOM'IA, Andranat'omi, Andro- 
tomfiay Androt*omif Anthropot'omy, from avufQ^ 
genitive ar^o^, < a man,' and Tf^vatr, ' to cut.* 
The anatomy of man. 

ANDRI'A. Adult age, Manhood. 

Aitdri'a Mu'lisr, Mttflier Hermapkredit^iea* 
A female hermaphrodite. 

ANDROGEN'IA, from avijc, ^BHm,' and 
rtyi<7i (y < generation.' The procreation of males. 
— Hippocrates. 

ANDROG'TNUS, fromai^p, «a num,' and 
ywriy * a woman.' An herma^irodite. An ef- 
feminate person. — Hippocrates. 

ANDROLEPSIA, Conception. 

ANDROMANIA, Nymphomania. 

ANDROM'EDA ARBO'REA, Sorrel Tree, 
Sour Tree, Sour Woody EU Tree, Elk Woody 
Sorrel Wood, Sour Leaf, (Y .} Andromddier. A 
small indigenous tree; Nat, Ord, Ericeae, Ser, 
Spst, Decandria Monogvnia; found in the Alle- 
ghany Mountains and tne hills and valleys di- 
vergmg from them, as far as the southern limits 
of Georgia and Alabama; but seldom north of 
Virginia. The leaves are refrigerant and astrin- 
gent, and have been used to n»ke a kind of le- 
monade, which has been given in fevers. 

Andsom^eda Mabia'na, Broad-leaved Moor- 
wrt, A decoction of this American plant is 
said to have been successfully employed as a 
wash, in a disagreeable affection, — ^not uncom- 
mon amongst the slaves in the southern parts 
of the United States,— called the Toe Itehy and 
Ground Iteh. — Barton. 

ANDROPOGON SCHCENANTHUS, Juncus 
odoratus^a. Nardus, Calamus Alexandrinus, 
Nardus Indica. 

ANDROSACE, Umbilicus marinus— a. Mat- 
thioli. Umbilicus marinus. 

ANDROS^MUM, Hypericum perforatum. 

ANDROTOMY, Andranatomia. 

ANDRUM. An East India word, Latinized 
by Kaempfer, signifying a kind of elephantiasis 
of the scrotum, endemic in southern Asia. 

ANlANTISSEMENT (F.), Vir'ium ex- 
tiw/tio. This word is often employed hyper- 
bolically, by patients in France, to signify ex- 
cessive fatigue, debility or syncope. 

ANEBIUM, Anchusa tinctoria. 

ANEBUS, Impuber. 

ANECPYE'TuS, from ar, for art©, <with- 
i|ut,' and nvw, ' I promote suppuration.' That 
which does not Suppurate, or is not likely to 
suppurate. 

ANEGER'TICE, from awy«ip», < I awaken.' 
The^irt of resuscitating the apparently dead. 



ANEILEMA 



M 



ANEURISM 



ANEILE^MA, Aneil/sisy from artiZtoAaif 'to 
be rolled upwards.' Applied particularly to the 
motion of air in the intestines and the tormina 
accompanying it.— Hippocrates. 

ANEILESIS, Aneilema. 

ANEMIA, Anaemia. 

ANEMCNE. The Wind Flower: from art- 
fAOiy * the wind/ because it does not, open its 
flowers till blown upon by the wind. 

ANEMONE DBS BOIS, Anemone nemo- 
rosa. 

Areko'r? UMVAT^iCA^Hepaifiea nob'tliSfHer" 
ba Trtnita'tisy Hepai'ica or Herb Trinity, He- 
pat'icut Flos, Trifo'lium Bepat'icum, Arum'- 
ony. The plant is a mild astringent and tonic. 
Dose ^ of the powder. It may be given in in- 
fusion. 

Ankmo'nr NsMo&o'SAy Ranun'eulut albus. 
Wood atfm'ony, (F.) Anemons d€s bois. The 
herb and flowers are poisonous, acrid, and cor- 
rosive. They have been used as rube&cients. 

AMEMo'iii pRATEninSfFulsaHl'lani'grieans, 
This plant has similar properties with the last. 
It is also called Meadow Anemany, (F.) Fulea- 
title noire, P, dee pr6s. 

Arsho'm K PuLSATiLL'LA, Pulsotil'la vulga'- 
rie,Herba venti*yNola eulinariOfPasqueJiower, 
(F.) Coquelourde, possesses like properties. 

ANEMON Y, Anemone hepatic*-*. Meadow, 
Anemone pratensis — a. Wood, Anemone nemorosa. 

ANEMOS, Wind. 

ANENCEPHALIA, see Anencephalus. 

ANENCEFHALOTROFBIE, from at pri- 
vative; a/xc^a/lo?, 'the encephalon,' and TQoipii, 
* nourishment.' Atrophy of the encephalon. 

ANENCEPH'ALUS, from « privative, aad 
c/Kffif a2oc, < brain.' A monster devoid of brain. 
— Bonetus. 6. St. Uilaire. Also one that has 
a part only of the brain ; — Faraceph'alue. The 
condition has been called Anetieephal'ia. A 
weak, silly person. — Hippocrates. 

AiNENERGESIA, DebiUty. 

ANENERGIA, DebiUty. 

ANENTERONERVIA, Colic. 

ANEPISCHESI3, Incontinentia. 

ANEPITHYM'IA, from a priv., and tmi^V' 
fiia, ' desire.' Many nosolo^ists have used this 
word for a loss of the appetites, as of those of 
hunger, thirst, venery, &c. 

Anepitutkia Cblobosis, Chlorosis. 

ANER, a*ijQ, genitive o^S^qq. A man. 

ANERETHIS'IA, InirritabiVitas, from « 
priv., and %Q%9i(Hi, * irritebility .' Defect of ir- 
ritability. — Swediaur. 

ANESIS, Remission. 

ANESTHASIE, Anaesthesia. 

ANESTHiSIE EXTATIQUE. The ag- 
gregate of phenomena of impaired feeling pro- 
duced especially by the manipulations of the 
animal magnetizer. — Andral. 

ANESTHETIC, Anassthetic. 

ANESTMTIQUE, AnsBsthetic. 

ANESON, Anethum. 

ANESUM, Pimpinellaanisum. 

ANET, Anethum. 

ANETHy Anethum graveolens. 

ANE'THUM, Ane'son, Ane'ton, Ans'thum 
Femie'ulum, Fmnic'ulum, F. vulgt^rB, F. Dftlei, 
lAgu^tieumfiB!Mulwm, Fan' eUnm, Fennel o^ 
Finekle, Ma/athrwn, Anet, Sweet Fennel, (F.) 
Fenovil ott Anis doum. Nat. Ord, Umbellifers. 
Sex, Syet, Pentandria Digynia. The seeds, Fa- 
ni^ulum, (Ph. U. S.) have an aromatic odour, 



and wann sweetish tute. They are earmina* 
tive. The oil — Oleum Fitni^uli — is officinal 
in the Ph. U. S. The root is said to be pecto- 
ral and diuretic. 

Anethum F(biiicvlum, Anethum. 

Ame'thum Graveolens, Anethnm^ A. kor- 
ten'si. Dill, (F.) Anetk, Fenouil puant, A na- 
tive of the south of Europe. Tho seeds are sti- 
mulant and carminative. Dose, gr. zv to 3j. 

Oleum Ane'thi,Oil of Dill,(F.)HtUled'AnstA, 
possesses the carminative propertiea of the plant. 

ANETICUS, Anodyne. 

ANETON, Anethum. 

ANETUS, Intermittent fever— «. Quartanns, 
Quartan — a. Qootidianus, Quotidian — a. Tertia- 
nus, Tertian fever. 

AN'EURISM, Aneury^ma, Aneury/mne, 
Aneurie'ma, Cedma, from attvgvteir, ' to dilate 
or distend.' Dilata'tto Arteria'rum, Eeta'Ha^ 
Emioris'ma, Exangi'a aneuri^ma, Arterieu- 
rye'ma, Artereurye'ma, Htmnatoee'le arterio'ea, 
Abeees'sut epirituo'sne, Arteriee'ttuis,(¥.^Anev 
ryeme, Aneuryeme. Properly, Aneurism sig- 
nifies a tumour, produced by the dilatation of an 
artery; but it has been extended to various le- 
sions of arteries, as well aa to dilatations of the 
heart. 

There are various kinds of aneurism. The 
following are the chief. 

I. When the blood, which forms the tumonr, 
is enclosed within the dilated coats of the arte'> 
ry. This is the true aneurism, Aneurys'ma vc- 
rum. Hernia Arteria'rum, (F.) An^ryeme vrax. 

II. When the blood has escaped from the 
opened artery, it is called spurious or false an- 
eurism, Ancuris'ma spu'rium, Rupti^ra Arte'- 
riiByArteriorrhex'is , Arte riodiaCysis, Eechymo' - 
ma arterio'sum, (F.) Anivrysme faux. The 
latter is divided into three varieties. 

1. The diffused false aneurism, <F.) Anir^ 
rysme faux, primitif, diffus, nondreonserit ou 
par injUtration, which occurs immediately after 
the division or rupture of an artery, and consists 
of an extravasation of blood into the cellular 
texture of the part. 

2. The eireumseribed false aneurism, (F.) A. 
faux eonsieutif, eireonserit oo par ipanekement, 
eniysti ou saceiforme, tumeur himorrhagiale 
eireonseriu, in which the blood issues from th^ 
vessel some time after the receipt of the wound, 
and forms itself a sac in the neighbouring cel- 
lular membrane. 

3. The An'eurism by Antutomo' sis, or Var*- 
icose An'eurism, FhlebarteriodioTysis, Anett- 
ryifma veno^so-arterio'sum, A.varieo'sum,{T.) 
Anivrysme par anastomose ou variqueux, A . par 
erosion. A, de Pott, A. des plus petites arth^s, 
which arises from the simultaneous wounding of 
an artery and vein; — ^the arterial blood passing 
into the vein, and producing a varicose state of it . 

III. Mixed Aneurism, (F.) An^rysme mixte, 
is that which arises from the dilatation of one 
or two of the coats, with division or rupture of 
the other. Some authors have made two va- 
rieties of this. 

) . Mixed erterfial Aneurism, where the inter- 
nal and middle coats are ruptured, and the cel- 
lular is dilated. 

S. Mixed intemM Aneurism, in which the 
internal coat is dilated, and protrudes, like a 
hernial sac, through the ruptured middle and 
outer coats. This variety has been called Aneu- 
rys'ma Her'niam Arte'ries sistens. 



ANBUBI8MAL 



SI 



ANGEIOLOGY 



AnevismB baye been likewise termed trau^ 
matte and spanta'neausf according as they oia^ 
have been caused by a wound, or have origi- 
nated spontaneously. They have also been di- 
vided into iniemal and exUrtuU. 

The iftiemal aneurisms are situate in the 
great splanchnic cavities, and occnr in the 
heart and great vessels of the chest, abdomen, 
&c Their diagnosis is difficult, and they are 
often inaccessible to surgical treatment. 

The external aneurisms are sitoate at the 
exterior of the head, neck, and limbs, and are 
distinctly pulsatory. 

Aneurisms, especially the internal, may be 
combated by a debilitant treatment, on the plan 
of Valsalva, which consists in repeated blood- 
letting, witk food enough merely to support 
life. In external aneurism, the artery can be 
obliterated. This is usually done by applying 
a ligature above the aneurismal tumour. 

Ajckubism, Disskctino, is one in which, ow- 
ing to rupture of the inner and middle coats of 
an artery, tike blood makes itself a channel be- 
tween th»e coats and the outer coet. 

In many cases, the lesion appears to consist 
in a separation of the lamina of the middle coat, 
between which the blood forms itself a channel. 
AirauaiSMs otths Heart, Carditm^eki, Car- 
dieurye'ma^ (F.) Anivrysmes du eesur, have 
been divided into oeHve and passive. The for- 
mer can scarcely be esteemed aneurisms, as 
they most commonly consist of increased thick- 
ness of the parietes of the heart, which dimi- 
nishes its cavity instead of increasing it. The 
term Hypertrophy of the heart, (q. v.) better 
indicates their character. . Paesive aneurism, 
Cardiee^asisy on the contrary, is attended with 
extenuation of the parietes of the organ, and 
enlargement of the cavities. The physical signs 
of dilatation of the heart are the following: — 
The action of the heart is not visible, and no 
impulse is conveyed to the hand* On percus- 
sion, there is a loss of resonance over a larger 
sor&ce than usual, but the dulness is much less 
intense than that which accompanies hypertro- 
phy. On auscultation, the action of the heart 
is only slightly felt, and communicates at once 
the impression of its diminished power. The 
impulse is feebler than usual. Both sounds are 
widely transmitted over the thorax, and are not 
moch fiunter at a distance from their point of 
origin. 

Partial or true aneurism of the heart — Car^ 
die4ftasis partia^lis, Aneurys*ma eonsseuti'vuen 
cordis, is sometimes seen, — ^rarely, however. 

The name Aneurism of the Valves of the heart 
has been given to pouch-like projections of the 
valves into the auricles. 

AmsuaisK bt Anastomosis, see Aneurism — 
a. External, see Aneurism— a. False, see Aneu- 
rism—a. False, circumscribed, see Aneurism — 
a. False, difiused, see Aneurism— a. Internal, 
tee Aneurism — a. Mixed, see Aneurism — a. 
Mixed, external, see Aneurism— a. Mixed, in- 
ternal, see Aneurism— a. Spontaneous, see Aneu- 
rism — a. Spurious, see Aneurism — a. Trau- 
matic, see Aneurism — a. True, see Aneurism 
—a. Varicose, see Aneurism. 

ANEURIS'MAL, Aneurys'mal, Aneuris- 
met'ie, Aneurysmat*ieus, Aneurisma*lie* That 
whidi belongs to Aneurism. 

AinnniisMAL Sac or Cyst, (F.) S<»e ou KysU 
anivrysmali is a sort of pouch, formed by the 



.dilatation of the coats of an artery, in which the 
blood, forming the aneurismal tumour, is con- 
tained. 

ANEURISMATIC, Aneimsmal. 

ANEURTSM, Aneurism. 

ANEURYSMA, Aneurism — a. Herniam ar- 
teriae sistens, see Aneurism— a. Spurium, see 
Aneurism — a. Varicosum, see Aneurism — a. Ve- 
noso-arteriosum, see Anenrismr— a. Verum> see 
Aneurism. 

ANEURYSME, Aneurism. 

ANEURYSMUS, Aneurism, Dilatation. 

ANAVRYSME, Aneurism— a. de l^Aorte, 
Aorteurysma — a. Cireonserit, see Aneurism — 
a. de Pott, see Aneurism — a. dee Plus petites 
artires, see Aneurism — a. Diffus, see Aneurism 
— a, Enlystty see Aneurism — a. Faux, see 
Aneurism — a. Faiux eonsieutif, see Aneurism 
— a. Mixte, see Aneurism — a. par Anastomose, 
see Aneurism— a. par Apcmehement, see Aneu- 
rism — a. par £rosion, see Aneurism— o. par In* 
Jlltration,aee Aneurism — a. Primitif,aee Aneu- 
rism — a. Sacciforme, see Aneurism — a, Vari' 
queux, see Aneurism — a. Vrai, see Aneurism* 

ANFION, Maslach. 

ANFRA C TU0SIT&3 CiRABRALES, 
Anfractuositiss, cerebral — a, Ethmoldalea, see 
Anfra^tuosity. 

ANFRACTUOS'ITY, Anfra4ltus, Gyrus, 
from am, * around,' and ff angers, frctetum, * to 
break.' A groove or furrow. Used in anatomy 
to signify sinuous depressions or sulci, of great- 
er or less depth, like those which separate the 
convolutions of the brain from each other. 
These 

Arfbaotuositibs, Cerbbbal, Anfrae'tus 
Csr'ehri, Gyri Cerebri, Intestin'ula Cer'ebri, 
(F.) Anfraetuositks Cirtbrales, are always nar- 
row, and deeper at the upper surface of the 
brain than at its base; and are lined by a pro- 
longation ai the pia mater. 

The Ethmoid Cells are, sometimes, called 
Anfraetuositfs ethmoldales. 

ANFRACTUS, Anfractuosity— a. Cerebri, 
Anfractuosities (cerebral.) 

AiNGECTASIA, Angiectasis. 

ANGEIAL, Vascular. 

AN6EIECTASIA, Angiectasis. 

ANGEIECTASIS, Angiectasis. 

ANGEIOG'RAPHY, Angiog'raphy, Angei- 
ograph'ia, from Ayyuot, <a vessel,' and r^ee^q, 
< a description.' The anatomy of the vessels. 

ANGEIOHYDROG'RAPHY, Angiohydrog^ 
raphy, Angeiondro^raphy, Angetohydrogre^^ 
phia, Hydrangiograph'ia, from «yyff loi^, 'a ves- 
sel,' *v/oic, < water,' and r{«f », ^ I describe.' A 
treatise on the lymphatics. 

A^GKIOKYDROTOUY, Angiohydrot'omy, 
Angeiondrotfomy, Angeiohydrotom'ia, Hydran" 
giotom'ia, from axyiisv, ' a vessel,' 'vitag, < wa- 
ter,' and Tt^rair, ^to cut.' Dissection of the 
lymphatics. 

ANGEIOLEUCI'TIS, Angioleuei'Hs, Lym- 
phangei'tis, Lymphangitis, Lymphangioi'tis, 
Hydrangei'tis, I^mphi'tis, Lymphiati'tis, In- 
flamma'tio vaso'mm lymph<aieo' rum, from «y- 
ynBf, *a vessel,' xfvjrep, 'white,* and tti«, in- 
flammation. (F.) Inflammation des vaisssaux 
lymphatiques ou des tissus blanes. Inflamma- 
tion of the lymphatics : lymphatic or scrofulous 
inflammation. 

ANGEIOL'OGY, AngioVogy, Angeiolog^'ia, 
iiom ayyuw, ' a vessel,' and \«r»«, < a discourse.' 



ANGfilOMALACIA 



G9 



ANGINA 



A diflcoune on the resselt. The anatomy of 
the vesaeU. It includes Artariotogy^ I^hleboF' 
ogyt and AngeiokydroVogy. 

ANGEIOMALA'CIA, Angiomalc/eia; from 
ayyiuvy <a vessel/ &i>d /taXAxta, ,< softening.' 
MoUescence or softening of vessels. 

ANGEIOMYCES, Hcmatodes Amgus. 

ANGEION, Vessel. 

ANGEIONDROGRAPHY, Angeiohydrogr*. 
phy. 

ANGEIONDROTOMY, Angeiohydrotomy. 

ANGEIONOSUS, Angeiopathia. 

ANGEIONUSUS, Angeiopathia. 

ANGEIOP ATHI' A, Angiopathi'a, AngtionT^ 
otuSf Angeionvfsus, Angio'ai9y from ayy«i«v, * a 
vessel/ and nr«dof , < a disease.' Disease of the 
Vessels. 

ANGEIOPLEROSIS, Plethora. 

ANGEIOPYRA, Synocha. 

ANGEIORRHAGIA, Hamiorrhagia activa. 

ANGEIORRHCE'A, (F.) AngeiorrkSe; from 
oyytiov, ' a vessel/ and {■«», *l flow.' Passive 
hemorrhage. 

ANGEIOSIS, Angiosis. 

AN6EI0STEGN0S1S, Angiemphraxis. 

ANGEIOSTENOSIS, Angiemphraxis. 

ANGEIOSTEO'SIS, Aiigiosto'ns, from «y- 
yicoy, <a vessel/ and •rxKoo-ic, ^ossification.' 
Ossification of vessels. 

ANGEIOSTROPHE, see Torsion. 

ANGEIOTELECTASIA, Telangiectasia. 

ANGEIOT'OMY, Angiotfomy^ Angeiotom'ta, 
from oyyf to>, < a vessel/ and Tf^vscy, 'to cut.' 
Dissection of the vessels, 

ANGEFTIS, Angii'tu, Angiai'tis, Injiam' 
me^tio voBo'rufiiy (F.) AngHte, Inflammation 
of vessels in general. 

ANGEL'ICA, Angelica Arehangsfiea, A, 
Hispa'na, Garden Angelica, (F.) Angilique, 
Raeine de Saint Esprit, So called from its 
supposed angelic virtues. Nat. Ord. Umbelli- 
fere. Sex. Syet. Pentandria Digynia. Native 
of Lapland. The roots, stalk, leaves, and seed 
are aromatic and carminative. A sweetmeat 
is made of the root, which is agreeable. 

AnoEL'iCA ATROPtrapu'REA, Angelica (Ph. 
U. S.), Maeterwort. An indigenous species, 
growing over the whole of the United States, 
and admitted into the secondary list of the Phar- 
macopoeia of the United States. Virtues, same 
as those of the Angelica of Europe. 

Anoel'ica Sylves'tris, a. sati'vGy Wild An- 
gel'iea, (F.) Angiliqne sauvage. Possesses si- 
milar properties to the last, but in an inferior 
degree. The seeds, powdered and put into the 
hair, are used to destroy lice. 
^ Angelica Stt.vbstris, Ligusticum podagra- 
ria — a. Tree, Aralia spinosa. 

ANGEU'N^ CORTEX. The bark of a 
Grenada tree, which has been recommended as 
anthelmintic and cathartic. 

ANGALIQXTEf Angelica—^. Sanvage, An- 
gelica sylvestris. 

ANGELOC ACOS, Myrobalanu^. 

ANGEMPHRAXIS, Angiemphraxis. 

ANGIDIECTASIA, Trichangiectasia. 

ANGIDIOSPONGUS, Hematodes fungus. 

ANGIEMPHRAXIS, Angemphraa^is, An- 
geiotteno^sis, Angeioetegno'eisy from oyyitsv, ' a 
vessel,' and e/K^^agic, ' obstruction.' Obstruc- 
tion of vessels. 

ANGIECTASIA VENOSA, Varix. 

ANGIEC'TASIS,iln5'«wcfa'na,il«^cta'*w», 



Angieury»*may from ayyiov, <a vessel/ and 
f xrarir , < dilatation.' Any dilatation of vessels. 
— Griife and Alibert. Telangiectasia, (q. v.) 

ANGIEURTSMA, Angiectasis. 

ANGirTEf Inflammation, Angeitis. 

ANGIITIS, Angeitis. 

ANGPNA, Febris Angino'sa, Isthmi'tis, 
Quinsey or Sore Throat; from angere, * to suf- 
focate.' Inflanunation of the supra-diaphrag- 
matic portion of the alimentary canal, and of 
the air passages. The Latin writers applied 
the term to every disease in "v^ch deglutition 
or respiration, separately or united, was effected, 
provided that such affection was above the sto- 
mach and lungs.— -Boerhaave speaks of the an- 
gina of the moribund, which is nothing more 
tiian the dysphagia or diflicult deglutition pre- 
ceding death. See Cynanche. 

Angina Aphthosa, Aphtha — a. Aqnosa, 
(Edema of the glottis — a. Bronchialis, Bron- 
chitis — a. Canina, Cynanche tracheadis — a. 
Cordis, Angina pectoris — a. cum Tumore, Cy- 
nanche tonsillaris — a. Epidemics, Cynanche 
maligna— a. Epiglottidea, Epiglottitis— a. Ery- 
sipelatosa, Erythranche — a. Exudatoria, Cy- 
nanche trachealis— a. Externa, Cynanche paro- 
tidsa— a. Faucium, Isthmitis— a. Faucium Ma- 
ligna, Cynanche maligna— a. Gangnenosa, Cy- 
nanche maligna— a. Humida, Cynanche tra- 
chealis — a. Inflammatoria, Cynanche, Cynanche 
trachealis— a. Laiyngea, Laryngitis— a. Laryn- 
gea CEdematosa, (Edema of the glottis— a. Lin- 
guaria. Glossitis — a. Maligna, Angina pellicn- 
laris, Cynanche maligna. Pharyngitis, ciipfathe- 
ritic— a. Maxillaris, Cynanche parotidsa — a. 
Membranacea, Cynanche trachealis — a. Mitb, 
Isthmitis. 

Anoi'na Nasa'lis, Naai'tis poeti'ea. An in- 
flammation of the posterior portion of the Schnei- 
derian membrane lining the nose. Also, Coryza^ 
(q. V.) 

Anoi'na (Edemato'sa, (F.) Angine adima- 
teuse, (Edhne ' de la Glotte, An cedematous 
swelling of the glottis ; the effect of chronic 
cynanche laryngea. See (Edema of the Glottis. 

Angina Palatina, Hyperoitis— a. Paralyti* 
ca, Pharyngoplegia— a. Parotidsa Externa, Cy- 
nanche parotidca. 

AnoI'na Pec'toris, a. cordis, Stemal'gia, 
Asthma spas'tico-arthrit'ieum ineon'stans, Astk" 
ma diaphragmeU^ieum, Arthri'tis diaphragma- 
tica, Orthopna'a cardi'aea, Stemodyn'ia syn» 
eop'tiea et pal'pitans, S. syneopa'lis, Cardiog*' 
mus cordis sinis'triyAstheni'apeetora'lisyAngor 
pee'toris, Stenoear'dia, Diaphragmat'ic gout. 
Asthma eonvulsi'vum,Asthma arthrit*ieum,Car' 
dioneural'gia, Neural'gia hrachiothorae"iea, 
Hypermsthe'sia plexus cardi*aei, A. dolorif- 
icum, Syn*eopi angino*sa seu angens, Cardiod'- 
yni spasmod'ica intermit'tens, Pnigopho'bia, 
Prunel'la, Suspir'ium cardi'tteum, Pnewnonai'' 
gia, Suff'oeative Breast-pang, (F.) Angine de 
Poitrine, Nevrose du Caur. A disease, the 
precise pathology of which is not known. The 
principal symptoms are, violent pain about the 
stemimi, extending towards the arms; anxiety, 
dyspnoea, and sense of suflbcation. It is an af- 
fection of great danger, and is often connected 
with ossification, or other morbid affection of 
the heart. It appears to be neuropathic, and 
has been termed Neuralgia of the Heart. Some, 
however, employ this last term for an acutely 
painfiil intermittent affection of the heart, 



ANQtJtE GDTTURALE 



53 



ANGLB 



width Memi to diifer from angina pectoris 
more in regard to the small number of parts 
which are drawn into morbid consent with the 
affected cardiac nerves, than in regard either to 
its nature or appropriate treatment. The most 
powerful stimulating and narcotic antispssmo- 
dies are required during the paroxysm. 

ri'tis (q. v.) of the throat. A name given to 
those inflammations about the throat, in which 
exudations or false membranes are thrown out, 
during the phlogosis of the mucous membranes. 
Aphthtgy Traekeitisy when accompanied with 
the membraniform exudation, are, with some, 
examples of diphtheritic inflammation. 

Alt oiMA PxaniciosA, Cynsnche trachealis— 
a. Pestilentialis, Pharyngitis, diphtheritic — a. 
Polypota, Cynanche tzachealis — a. Pol^poaa 
sea membrsjiacea, Cynanche trachealis— a. 
Psendo-membranosa, Pharyngitis, diphtheritic 
—a. Pulpoca, Cynanche trachealis— a. Sangui- 
nea, Cynanche tonsillaris. 

Ahoih A Sicca, (F.) Angine theh€, is a chro- 
nic inflammation of the pharynx, with a dis- 
tressing sense of dryness and heat» in chronic 
diseases of the stomach and lungs. See Psb- 
danchone. 
Amoih A Simplex, Isthmitis. 
Angina SQinaao'aA,(F.) Angine squirreuss^ 
consists in difficulty of deglutition, caused by 
scirrhous disorganization of the pharynx or 
«Bsophagas, or by enlarged tonsils. 

Anowa STaANO]JX.AToaiA, Cynanche trache- 
alis— «. Strepitosa, Cynanche trachealis — a. 
Sufibcatoria, Cynanche trachealis^-a. S^o- 
cfaalis, Cynanche tonsillaris — a. Thyreoidea, 
Thyreoitis — a. Tonsillaris, Cynanche tonsillaris 
—a. Trachealis, Cynanche trachealis— a. Ulce- 
rosa, Cynanche maligna-— a. Uvnlaris, Staphy- 
liedema, Uvulitis — a. Yeta et Legitima, Cy- 
nanche tonsillaris. 

ANGINE GVTTITRALE, Cynanche ton- 
stllaris-^a. Laryngiey Laryngitis — a. Laryngie 
m traehsaUy Cynanche trachealis — 0. LaryngU 
rnddwuttouBSf (Edema of the glottis—^. (Etopket^ 
gimm^y (Esophagitis — 0. Pkarfngesy Cynanche 
parotidaea — a. de Poitrinsy Angina pectoris— «. 
SedkSy Angina sicca — a. Simple^ Isthmitis — a. 
SfuirfusBy Ansina Squirrosa — a. TonnUairey 
Cynanche tonsillaris. 
ANGINEtrX, Anginon. 
ANGINCSA, (F.) Anginsux. That which 
is accompanied with angina; as ScarlaU'na an- 
gino'sa, 

AN6I0C ARDFTIS, from oyYtiOPy «a vessel,' 
end eardiiisy * inflammation of the heart.' In- 
flsmmation of the heart and great vessels. 
ANGIOGRAPHY, Angeiography. 
ANGIOHAMIEy Hypenemia. 
ANGIOHYDROGRAPHY, Angeiohydrogra- 
phy. 
ANGIOHYDROTOMY, Angeiohydrotomy. 
ANGIOITIS, Angeitis. 
ANGIOLEUCITIS, Angeiolencitis. 
ANGIOLOGY, Angeiology. 
ANGIOMALACIA, Angeiomalacia. 
ANGIOMYCES, HsBmatodes fungus. 
ANGIONOSUS, Angeiopathia. 
ANGIONTJSn^ Angei<mathia. 
ANGIOPATHIA, Angeiopathia. 
ANGIOPLEROSIS, Plethora. 
ANGIOPYRA, Synocha. 
ANGIO^IS> from myv^^^t '« vessel.' An- 



gno^sis, AngBiopatH'my (q. v.) Under this term 
Alibert includes every disease of the blood ves- 
sels. 

ANGIOSTEGNOSIS, Angiemphraxis. 

ANGIOSTENOSIS, Angiemphraxis. 

ANGIOSTOSIS, Angeiostoeis. 
• ANGIOSTROPHE, See Torsion. 

ANGIOTELECTASIA, Telangiectasia. 

ANGIOTEN'IC, Angeioten'icy Angioten't- 
eus sen Angeioten'icusy from «/x*<"*') '^ v®^* 
sel,^ and Tftvccr, <to extend.' An epithet given 
to inflammatory fever, owing to its action 
seeming to be chiefly exerted on the vascular 
system. 

ANGIOTOMY, Angeiotomy. 

JM^GL&y An'gulu9y from m/xvIo^, *a hook.' 
The space between two lines which meet in a 
point. 

Angle, Fa'cial, pointed out by Camper, is 
formed by the union of two lines, one of which 
is drawn from the most prominent part of the 
forehead to the alveolar edge of the upper jaw, 
opposite the incisor teeth, and the other from 
the meatus auditorios extemus to the same 
point of the jaw. According to the size of the anr 
gle it has been attempted to appreciate the respec- 
tive proportions of the cranium and face, and, to 
a certain extent, the degree of intelligence of 
individuals and of animals. In the white va- 
rieties of the species, this angle is generally 
80^ ; in the negro not more than 70^, and soooe- 
times only 65®. As we descend the scale of 
animals, tne angle becomes less and less; un- 
til, in fishes, it nearly or entirely disappears. 
Animals which have the snout long, and fecial 
angle small, such as the snipe, crane, stork, 
&c., are proverbially foolish, at least they are 
so esteemed; whilst intelligence is ascriM to 
those in which the angle is more largely deve- 
loped, as the elephant and the owl. In these 
last animals, however, the large facial angle is 
caused by the size of the frontal sinuses: — so 
that this mode of appreciating the size of the 
brain is very inexact, and cannot be depended 
upon. 

The following is a table of the angle in man 
and certain animals : 

FACIAL ANGLES. 

Man firom 65<» to Po° 

Sspajon ....... 0.^ 

Orsng-Utsaff 56to5S 

Gocnon 57 

Mandrill 90 to 43 

CoatI B5 

Pnie-eat ...... 31 

Mmi!?. ".'.'.'.".*.' J? 

Hare 30 

Ram * - ao 

Horas S3 

An OLE, Occipital, of Datjbentoh, is formed 
by a line drawn from the posterior margin of 
the foramen magnum to the inferior margin of 
the orbit, and another drawn from the top of 
the head to the space between the occipital 
condyles. In man, these condyles, as well as the 
foramen magnum, are so situate, that a line 
drawn^ perpendicular to them would be a con- 
tinuation of the spine; but in animals they are 
placed more or less obliquely; and the perpen- 
dicular is necessarily thrown farther forward, 
and the angle rendered more acute. 

AifOLE, Optic, (F.) Angle optijKff is the 
angle formed by two lines, which shave the 
extremities of an object, and meet at the centre 
of the pupil. 



ANQOISSE 



M 



ANIMAL 



ANOOISSE, Angor. 

ANGOLAM. A very tall MalaVar tree, 
which possesses yermifuge properties. 

AN'GONfi, Prcefoea'tio Fau'ciwm sett Vteri'- 
na seu Matri'eit, Strangula'Ho tUeri'na, Suffo- 
ea'tio uteri'na seu hfste/tea, Globus hyater't- 
eus, Ortkopna'a hyater'iea^ Dyspha'gia giobo'- 
sa, D. hyster'iea. Nervous Quins&y. A feeting 
of stTEDgulation, with dread of suffocation. It 
is common in hysterical females, and is accom- 
panied with a sensation as if a ball arose from 
the abdomen to the throat. 

ANGOR, Anguish^ (F.) Angoisxe, Extreme 
anxiety, accompanied with painful constriction 
at the epigastriimi, and often with palpitation 
and oppression. It is frequently an unfavoura- 
ble symptom. 

Angor, Agony, Orthopnea — a. Faueium, 
Isthmitis — a. Pectoris, Angina pectoris, 

ANGOS, Bubo, Uterus, Vessel. 

ANGOURION, Cucumis sativus. 

ANGUIS, Serpent. 

ANGUISH, Angor. 

Anguish, Febrile, Angor Pehri'lis. The 
combination oi weariness, pain, anxiety, and 
weakness affecting the head and neck, which 
is so generally observed at the commencement 
of fever. 

ANGVLAIRE DE VOMOPLATE, Le- 
vator scapuliB. 

AN'GULAR, Anguii/ris, from angulus, 
< an angle,' (F.) AnguitUre. That which re- 
lates to an angle. 

Angular Artery and Vein. A name given, 
1 . to the termination of the facial artery and 
vein, because they pass by the greater angle of 
the eye ; and, 2. to the fecial artery and vein 
themselves, because they pass under the angle 
of the jaw. See Facial. 

Angular Nerve is a filament fhmished by 
the inferior maxillary, which passes near tlie 
greater angle of the eye. 

Angular Processes of the frontal bone are 
seated near the angles of the eyes. See Orbitar. 

ANGULARIS, Levator scapule. 

ANGUUSCAPVLO'HUMlRAL, Teres 
major. 

ANGULUS OCULARIS, Canthus. 

AN6URIA, Cucurbita citrullus. 

ANGUSTATIO, Arctatio— a. Cordis, Sys- 
tole—a. Intestini recti vel ani. Stricture of the 
rectum. 

ANGUS'TIA, Angusta'tioy Stenoeho'ria. 
Anxiety, narrowness, strait, constriction. 

Angustia Abdominalis, Pelvis, (Brim) — a. 
Perinralis, Pelvis (Outlet.) 

ANGUSTURA, Cusparia febrifuga— a. Spu- 
ria, Brucea antidysenterica. 

ANGUSTURE, FAUSSE^ Brucea antidy- 
senterica — a. Ferrnginsfiss, ^ucea anti-dysen- 
terica — «. Vrais, Cusparia febrifuga. 

ANHiCMATOSIA, Asphyxia, Ansmia. 

ANHifiMIA, Anemia. 

ANHAPHIA, Anaphia. 

ANHELA'TIO, from anksio, * I pant.' An- 
hsl'itus. Atu'^usy Panting f AnksUiion, (F.) 
Essou/ismsTU. Short and rapid breathing. See 
Byspnopa. 

Anhelatio is sometimes employed synooy- 
mously with asthma. 

ANHELITUS, Breath. 

ANHIS'TOUS, from a, ay, privatiTe, and 
'irr««9 * organic texture/ ' ssnargi 



jskus. The tunica decidua uttri k teimed by 
Velpeau the ankistous membrane. 

ANHUIBA, Laurus sassafras. 

ANICE'TON, Aniee'tum, Mesu/mum, from 
«t, privative, and rtxtjy « victory,' « invincible.' A 
plaster much extolled by the ancients in cases 
of achores. It was formed of litharge, cemsse, 
thus, alum, turpentine, white pepper, and oil 

ANFDEUS, from At, privative, and udot, 
'shape.' Amorpkus, A monster devoid of shape. 
—J. G. St. Hilaire. 

ANIDRO^IS, from «, privative, and Uifvt, 
* sweat.' Sudo^ris nul'iitas vel privet tio. Ab- 
sence of sweat. Deficiency of perspiration. — 
Hippocrates. 

ANILEMA, Borborygmus, Tormina. 

ANILESIS, Borborygmus, Tormina. 

ANILITAS, see Dementia. 

AN' IMA, An'imuSf Mena^ Psyek€. The 
mind, breath, &c., ft'om aitAioc, ' wind or 
breath.' (F.) Jme. The principle of the in- 
tellectual and moral manifestations. Also, fbt 
principle of life:— the life of plants being 
termed^i4n'««ia vegettui*va,{Y .)Ameveghaiive ; 
that of man, An'ima sensiti'va, (F.) J^me sen- 
sitive. 

The Anima of Stahl, Ai^ima Stahlia'na, was 
a fancied intelligent principle, which he sup- 
posed to preside over the phenomena of life-- 
like the JirduBus of Van Helmont. 

Under the term Anima mttndi, the ancient 
philosophers meant a universal Spirit, which 
they supposed spread over every part of the 
universe. 

The precise seat of the mind in the brain has 
given rise to many speculations. The point is 
unsettled. 

With the ancient chemists, Anima meant the 
active principle of a drug separated by some 
chemical management. 

Anima Aloes: see Aloes— a. Articulonun, 
Hermodactylus— a. Hepatis, Ferri sulphas— a. 
Pulmonum, Crocus— a. Rhei, Infusum rhei— a. 
Stahliana, see Anima. 

AN'IMAL, Zoon^ ^cmv. A name given to 
every animated being. The greater part of 
animals have the power of locomotion; some 
can merely execute partial movements, such at 
contraction and dilatation. In other respects 
it is often a matter of difficulty to determine 
what is an animal characterbtic. The study of 
animals is called Zodl'ogf. 

An'imal, (adiective,) Anima' lis. That which 
concerns, or belongs to, an animal. 

Animal Heat, Caior anima'lis^ C. nati^mt*. 
Cal'idum anima'U, C. inna'tum, Biolyek'ni&9t, 
Flam'mula vita'lis^ Tksrma em'pkytum, Tker- 
mum em'pkytum. Ignis anima'lis seu natura - 
lis seu vitalise (¥.) Chaleur animaley is thn 
caloric constantly formed by the body of a 
living animal, by virtue of which it preserve;* 
nearly the same temperature, whatever maybs 
that of the medium in which it Is placed. This 
formation seems to take place over the whole 
of the body, and to be connected with the ac- 
tion of nutrition. 

The following are tiie natural temperatures of 
certain animals; that of man being 98^ or 100^. 

Animaia T*mpera»iirt9. 

Arctic Pnx H7 

Arrtic Wolf, > ,^ 

Squirrel S *^ 

whaie'i;!;!.';!;!!;;.';;;;!!;;;.';!.*;!!!;;;} '•* 

Aretomys dtiUos, luil- io wniner, 103 



ANIMALCULA 



65 



ANKYLODONTIA 



Do. 

Goat, 

Bat, ia aammer,, 



Tlmiperatmtt, 

wlieii torpid e0to84 

103 

MaraiuU bobae,->itoVMV/.*V/.'*' .'...' .'I... 101 or 108 

Hooae moiMe, 101 

AictomyB mannota, aiarMol,— in aurooier,. .. 101 or 103 

Do. when torpid, 43 

K»bWt. 100 to 104 

Polar Bear, 100 

Dof,. r....\ 

Cat 

••wine, I 100 10 103 



OXf 1 

G«inea*pif, 100 to 108 

AretooBjrs tl»« 00 

fliHvw, ee 

Yoaof wolf, 06 

l^ncilla arnica, •Alette jbftcA, > ,,, 

Prinplla^inaria, tow-'rcd pdl',.' ! 1 ! i 11 1 ! 1 ! . . 110 or 111 

nioD palarote'iua, gotkmni^ \ 

GBprfmnlgus Europaus. EMtvpem goat- > 100 

ndter, > 

Bttterixa oiTalia. «n#»-fasitiiy, 109 to 110 

PUco laaaria*. loiMMT 1 

rriDffi1larardue]it,f»l4lbia, i 

Cbr vm ci>ra z.raMN, V 100 

Tkirdaa. OrmA, (of t'eylon } f 

Tefraoperdrix.jiffrlrti/^ ) 

Anaa dypcata, •Araeto-, ..) 

THn^a pugaaz, n[fr i 

Seolopat liiitOM. leMcr /adMt, * 

'iytraot«triz,^rraM^ I 

FHocilU brumalia, tpintmiftmek, f 

Lozla pyrrbula.' • I 

FWco fiisoa. tparrtmkawk, | 

Vaiiur b^rbatw, J 



108 



pakliricoUia,. 

baa ai " 



m 



107 



Ooiyoibaa anritua, iu^grAt, 
Triofa vaneliaa, Impmanf, (wonnded, 

Teliao lacopua. plannymt,. , 

FMof ilia domeslka, kmu» apmrmg, 107 to 11 1 

dtrix paaaer.na, iittU awl, *) 

Hematopiis oatralef ua, na-pig, 1 

Aaaa penrlope, widlream i 106 

Aaaa atrepera, ^aAaaU, i 

PalccaRua carbo J 

Fako oaaifk-agoa, Ma-tagU \ 

Ftalica aira. ea«C, J 105 

Aaaaacata, ymfatf-dart, ) 



Fako niilvvs. kiu, (wounded,), 
Merops ap:a^t«r, tu-c^ 
Gooae, 



104 



Do;s;;::;;::::::;::::::;::;;;::;;::;:::::> ^^^o lo? 
D»ck, ) 

Aidea itellaria 4 :... i 

FWeoalbieollia, J 109 

Pleoa major. y 

Opama ligniperda, 80to01 

•hark 63 

Torpedo oiarararaia 74 

Animal KmoDox, (F.) Migne Ammai, com- 
prisea ail animated beings. 

Animal Magnbtism, see Bfagnetismy animal. 

ANIMALCULA SEMINALIA, Sperma- 
toioa— a. Spermatica, SpermatoEoa. 

ANIMAL'CULE, Animal'euium ; diminu- 
tive of animal. A small animal. An animal 
well seen only by means of the microscope. 

ANIMAL'CULIST, Jin'imudiat, One who 
attempts to explain different phjsiological or 
patholo^cal j^nomena by means of animal- 
cules. 

ANIMALCULUM, Animalcule. 

ANIMALIST, Animalcvlist. 

KJSlUKhriYyAfumal'itas. Qnaiities which 
difitingoish that which is animated. That which 
<*oostitiites the animal. 

ANIMALIZA^ION, JhtimtdMa'tu^. The 
tnnsformation of the nutritive parts of food 
into the living substance of the body to be 
noorished. 

To AN'IMATE, Ammt^H. To unite the 



living principle with an organized body. The 
French use it in the sense of, — to excite or ren- 
der active; as, animer un visieettoire: to excite 
a blister to suppurate. ^ 

ANIMATIO FOETUS, see Quickening. 

ANIMA'TION, Zo^sis, Anima'tio, from 
cenimay < the soul or mind.' The act of ani- 
mating. The state of being enlivened. 

Animation, Suspended, Asphyxia. 

AN'IMfc, Chim an'imt, AfMnafa, Can^eamy, 
Gutnmi an*im€y Can'eamum, A resin obtained 
from the trunk of Hymenoi'a cour'bariL It has 
been given as a cephalic and uterine. It is not 
used. The plant is also called Cour'bariL 

AHIMAy (F.) An epithet applied to the 
countenance, when florid, in health or disease. 

ANIMELL^, Parotid. 

ANIMI CASUS SUBITUS, Syncope— a. 
Deliquium, Syncope — a. P&themata, Passions. 

ANIMIST, from an'imay Uhe soul.' One 
who, following the example of Stahl, refers all 
the phenomena of the animal economy to the 
soul. 

The soul, according to Stahl, is the immediate 
and intelligent agent of every movement, and 
of every material change in the body. Stahl 
therefore concluded, that disease was nothing 
more than a disturbance or disorder in the go- 
vernment of the economy, or an effort by which 
the soul, attentive to every morbific cause, en- 
deavoured to expel whatever might be derang- 
ing the habitual order of health. 

ANIMUS, Anima, Breath. 

ANTS, Pimpinella anisom— ^. Aigrs, Cumi- 
Dum Cyminum — a. de la Chine, Illieium anisa- 
tum — a. Doux, Anethum — a. iioiU, Illieium 
anisatum. 

ANISATUM, from ^tnm, 'Anise.' A sort 
of medicated wine, formerly prepared with ho- 
ney, wine of Ascalon, and aniseed. 

ANISCALPTOR, Latissimus dorsi. 

ANISE, Pimpinella anisum-*«. Star, Illiei- 
um anisatum, I. Floridanum — a. Tree, Florida, 
Illieium Floridanum — a. Tree, yellow-flow- 
ered, Illieium anisatum. 

ANISEED, see Pimpinella anisnm. 

ANISI SEMINA, see Pimpinella anisnm. 

ANISOS'THENES, Innqua'li rob'orl pol'- 
lens. That which is unequal in strength : nom 
«, priy., ifl-of, « equal,' and a&tr^s, « strength.' 
An epithet applied particularly to the muscu- 
lar contractility, which, in the sick, is some- 
times augmented in certain muscles only, — in 
the flexors, for example. 

ANISOT'ACHYS,from «, priv., i(r op, « equal,' 
and Tae/i/c, 'quick.' An epithet lor the pulse, 
when quick and unequal. — Gorraeus. 

ANISUM, Pimpinella anisum — a. Africanuni 
frutescens, Bubon Galbanum — a. Fruticosum 
galbaniferum, Bubon galbanum — a. Sinense, Il- 
lieium anisatum— a. Stellatum, Illieium ani- 
satum. 

ANKLE, Astragalus, Malleolus. 

ANKUS, Ancus. 

ANKYLOBLEPH'ARON, Aneylobleph'aron. 
Palpebra'rum. coaVitue, from ay%vXv„ * contrac- 
tion,' and iS a i^^^or, * eyelid.' A preternatural 
union between the freB edges of the eyelids. 
Likewise called Symbleph'aron, Symblepharo'- 
sie, and Proa^phfeie. 

Also, union between the eyelids and globe of 
the eye. — Aetius. 

ANKYLODONTIAffroma^^auxoc, <crooked,' 



ANKTL06LOOSIA 



56 



ANNULW 



and c/piK , <a tooth.' An irregular potitum of 
the teeth in the jaws. 

ANKYLOGLOS'SIA, Ancyloglos'tia^ Con- 
trfftio lingua, from ayxvlog, 'crooked,' or 
* contracted/ and ylwr^it, < the tongue.' Im- 
peded motion of the tongae in consequence of 
adhesion between its margins and the gums; or 
in consequence of the shortness of the fnenum : 
the latter affection constituting TougiM'tiey 
Olopho'nia lin'gum frana'ta. It merely re- 
quires the (rsnum to be divided with a pair of 
scissors. 

ANKYLOGLOSSOT'OMUM, from oHhylo- 
glotsia, * tongue-tie,' and rc^i}, < incision.' An 
instrument used in the operation for tongue-tie. 
ANKYLOME'Lfi, Ancylome'li^ from ayxv- 
loff, « crooked,' and ^ijxif, * a probe.' A curved 
probe. — Gralen. 

ANKYLOMERIS'MUS, Ancylomerit'miu, 
from Ayxttltiy *a contraction,' and ^1^0(9 *a 
part.' Morbid adhesion between parts. 
ANKYLOPS, ^ilops. 
ANKYLO'SI^, Sncylo'sit, Anehflo'M, An'- 
e^lij Stiff Joint, from aY»vMg$ * crooked.* An 
affection, in which there is great difficulty or 
even impossibility of nx>ving a diarthrodial ar- 
ticulation. It is so called, because the limb 
conunonly remains in a constant state of 
flexion. Anchylosis is said to be complete or 
true, when there is an intimate adhesion be- 
tween the synovial surfaces with union of the 
articular extremities of the bones. In the m- 
eomplete or false anchylosis, there is obscure 
motion, but the fibrous parts around the joint 
are. more or less stiff and thickened. In the 
treatment of this last state, the joint inust be 
gently and gradually exercised; and oily, re- 
laxing applications be assiduously employed. 
Anktlosis Spuria, Rigiditas articulorum. 
ANKYLOT'OMUS, Ancylot'omua, from ay 
xvlo;, « crooked,' and Tiiivir, < to cut.' Any 
kind of curved knife. — Paulus. An instrument 
for dividing the frsnum lingus. — Scultetus. 

ANNEAU, Ring— a. Crural, Crural canal 
— a. Diaphragmatigue, Diaphragmatic ring— 
a. Femoral, Crural canal — a. Itigtdnal, Ingui- 
nal ring — a* Ombilioal, Umbilical ring. 
ANNEXE, Accessory, Appendix. 
ANNI CRITICI,Climacterici(anni)— a.De- 
cretorii, Climacterici (anni)---a. Fatales, Cli- 
macterici (anni)— a. Genethliaci, Climacterici 
(anni)— a. Gradarii, Climacterici (anni)--^. 
Hebdomadici, Climacterici (anni)— a. Heroici, 
Climacterici (anni) — a. Natalitii, Climacterici 
(anni) — a. Scalares, Climacterici (anni) — a. 
Scansiles, Climacterici (anni.) 

ANNOTA'TIO, Episma'sia. Under this 
term some have included the preludes to an at- 
tack of intermittent fever — as yawning, stretch- 
ing, somnolency, chilliness, &c. 
ANNOTTO, see Terra Orleana. 
AN'NUAL DISEASES, Morbi anfnui, M. 
anniversa^rii, (F,)Maladie9annuelles, A name 
given, by some, to diseases which recur every 
year about the same period. Fehria annua, 
(F.) Fiivre annuelle,ia a term used for a fiui- 
cied intermittent of thfs type. 

ANNUENS, Rectus capitis intemus minor. ' 
ANNUIT'IO, Nodding, from ad, «to,' and 
niaus, < a nod.' A gesture denoting assent in 
most countries. Also, the state of somnolency, 
when the individual is in the ^rect or sitting 
posture, with the head unsupported, in which 



the power of volition over the extensor muscles 
of the head is lost, and the head drops forward. 

AN'NULAR, Annulafris, CHeotdet, {annjus, 
* a circle.') Any thing relating to a ring, or 
which has the shape or fulfils the functions of 
a ring; from annnlus, 'a ring,' itself. 

Annular Finobr, Ring Finger, J>ig"itus 
annula'ris, Param'esos. The fourth finger, so 
called from the wedding-ring being worn thereon. 

Annular Ganglion, see Ciliary ligament. 
• Annular Lig'ament, Transverse ligasmsnt, 
Cru'cial ligament, A strong ligamentous band 
which arches across the area of the ring of the 
atlas, from a rough tubercle upon the inner sur- 
face of one articular process, to a similar tuber- 
cle on the other. It serves to retain the odon- 
toid process of the axis in connelion with the 
anterior arch of the atlas. 

An'nular Lio'ahent of ths Ra'dtus, is a 
very strong fibro-cartilaginous band, which 
forms, with the lesser sigmoid cavity of the 
cubitus, a kind of ring in which the head of 
the radius turns with facility. 

An'nular Lig'aments of the Carptts, Ar^ 
mil'lee manue enemihrano' sm, are two in number. 

The one, anterior, is abroad, fibrous, quadrila- 
teral band, extending transversely beforo the 
carpus, and forming the gutter, made by the 
wrist, into a canal. It is attached, externally, 
to the trapezium and scapho'ides; and internally 
to the OS pisiforme and process of the unciforme. 
It keeps the tendons of the flexor muscles, me- 
dian nerve, &c., applied against the carpus. 
The posterior ligament is situate transversely 
behind the joint of the hand, and covers the 
sheaths of the tendons, which pass to the back 
of the hand. Its fibres are white and shining, 
and are attached, externally, to the inferior awl 
outer part of the radius; internally, to the ulna 
and OS pisiforme. 

An'nular Lig'akents of the Tarsus are two 
in number. The anterior is quadrilateral, and 
extends transversely above the instep. It is 
attached to the superior depression of the os 
calcis, and to the malleolus internus. It em- 
braces the tendons of the extensor muscles of 
the toes, the tibialis antieus, and peronens anti- 
eus. The internal is broader than the last. It 
descends from the malleolus intemus to the 
posterior and inner part of the os calcis, with 

which it forms a kind of canal, enclosing the 

sheaths of the tendons of the tiUalis postims 
jUxor longus digiterum pedis, and F* longv* 
poUids pedis, as well as the plantar vessels and 

nerves. 

Annular Vein, Vena annula'ris, is situate 

between the annular finger and the little finger. 

Aetius recommends it to be opened in diseases 

of the spleen. 

ANNULARIS, Cricoid: see Digitus— a. Ani, 

Sphincter ani. 
ANNULI CARTILAGINEI, see Trachea- 

a. Cartilaginosi Trachec, see Trachea. 

ANNULI'TENDINO'PHALANGIENS, 

Lumbricales manus. 
ANNULUS, DactyliuSjVulva— a. Abdominis, 

Inguinal ring — a. Albidus, see Ciliary (body)^ 

a. Cellulosus, Ciliary ligament — a. Ciliaris, 

Ciliary ligament-^a. Fossa ovalis: see Ovalis 

fossa — a. (xangliformis, see Ciliary (body)-* 

a. Repens, Herpes circinatus-^a. tJmbilicalis, 

Umbilical ring — a. Ventriculi, Pylorus — a. 

Vienssenii, see Ovalis fossa. 



aho 



67 



autaoonism 



ANO» mm. A prefix denoting * aboYe, ap.' 
ANOCHI'LUS) from avw, < above/ and jr«iAtc» 
'Up.' The upper lip. Aiso^ one who has a 
lai^ upper lip. 
ANCfCCELIA, Stomach. 
ANCKDIAy from «r, priT. aad Mdij, 'aoog.' 
An nnconnected or dissonant mode of speech. 
ANODIN, Anodyne. 

ANODIN'IA, from <, «», privativey and wMw^ 
< a kboar pain.' Absence of labour pains. 
ANOIXMIA, Anosmia* 
ANODUS, Edentuhis. 
AN'ODYNEy^iiM^yMWyiiiiANl'yntw, AaUi^^ 
fnous (improperly,) Farego/ieus, Anat'ieu$y 
Ammt^lieusf Aeesotf^nss^ (F.) Aimdin cu Atto^ 
dfHj from «, stv, privative, and advvriy 'pain.' 
Anodfn€9 are those -medicines which relieve 
pain, or canse it to cease; as opium, belUdonna, 
&c. They act by blnabng the sensibility of 
the brain, so that it does not appreciate the 
moTvio Sensation. 

ANODYN'IA, Jfute^M'tui. Cessation or ab- 
sence of patn. Vogel has given this name to a 
genus of diseasps, ehamcterized by a cessation 
of pain, and the ezaspeiation of other symp* 
toms; as we see in gangrene. 

ANODTNUM MINERALE, PMassa nilras 
solphatis pancillo miztus.^ 

AN(E'A, frxmi «, privative, aad 9«e(, 'miad.' 
Delirium, imbecility. See DemsDtia sod Idiots 
lam. 
ANOMALy Anomalous. 
AN0MALE8, Anomakms. 
ANOKA'LI A, from «r, privative, and •uato^^ 
'regular.' AhMor^wutas, Aiiena'tio, Anomaly, 
irr^iularity. In Pathology, anomaly means 
something unnsnal in the symptoms proper to 
t disease. 
Aromalia Nxrvobttv, NervoQS diathesis. 
ANOMALOTROPHIESj from at priva- 
tive, ovtfiof, 'regular,' and Tpo<^i7, 'nourish- 
ment.' A class of diseases, which consist in 
modifications in the nutrition of organ9.^-Oen- 
drin. 

ANOM'ALOXJS, Anom*a2ns, Anom'ales; the 
sameetjrmon. xlrregjalarj contrary to rule. (F.) 
Anomal, In Medicine, a disease is called otiq- 
malous, in whose symptoms or progress there 
is something unusual. Affections are also called 
anomalous, which cannot be referred to any 
kno^vn species. 
ANOMALUS, Irregular. 
ANOMMATUS, Anophthalmns. 
ANOMOCEPH'ALUS, from « priv., »o^»c, 
' rule,' and jrc^axi?, ' head.' One whose head is 
deformed. — Geoffroi Saint-Hilaire. 

AXOMTHALUS, from etv, priv., and o/^f tfxor, 
'the navel.' One devoid of navel. Many wri- 
ten have endeavoured to show that Adam and 
Etc must have been «>oa£^oi, as they could 
not fasTe had umbilical vessels. 

ANO^A TRIPET'ALA. A tree of the /a- 
milf Anonese or Anonacee; 8ex^ Sptt. Poly- 
sndria polygynia, from fifteen to twenty feet 
fai|;h, native of South America, which bears a 
delicious fruit called Chirimoya. Both the fruit 
and flowers emit a fine fragrance, which, when 
the tree is covered with blossom, is almost 
•verpowering. — ^Tschndi. 
ANONIS, Ononis. 
ANONTMEy Innominatnm. 
ANONTMOUS, Anan'ymus, Unomina'tus^ 
5 



(F.) Jfiofif iM, from 09 privative, a^dd ovs^Miy 
' name.' That which has no name. 

The word has been applied to many parts of 
the body »— to the Aaton^mous bone or Os miuvn 
minatwm: — ^the Antmymotu foramen or Fbrtfm 
men innow^nattimy &c. 

ANOPHRESIA, Anosmia. 

ANOPHTHAL MUS, Atum'moius, from » 
privative, and otf&aXn^t^ 'an eye.' A monster 
devoid of eyes. 

ANOPSIA, from a* priv., aad e^;, < the eye.' 
A ease of monstrosity in which ths eye and 
orbit are wanting. 

ANOPTICONERVIE, Amanrosis. 

ANOR'CHIDES, from w priv., and tf vi^, 
'a testicle.' They who are without testicles. 
— Fortunatus Fidelia. 

ANOREXIA, from uy priv^and •^•^y 'ap- 
petite.' InapptUn'tia, Limo'tis ewpers, (F.) 
PeHt d*af petit. Absence of i^»petite, without 
loathing. Anorena or want d aj^tite is 
s^ptomatic of most diseases. Also, Indiges- 
tion, Dyspepsia (q. v.) 

Anorexia Exhausto'rum, Frigidity of the 
stomach — a. Mirabilis, Fasting. 

ANORGANIC, see Anhistons^aad Inorganic 

ANORMAL, Abnormoas. 

ANOS'IA, from a priv., and yocf^ ' disease.' 
Health. Freedom from disease. 

ANOS'MIA, from a privative, and otf/Kiji 
'odour.' Loss of smell. Diminution of the 
sense of smell. . Called, also, Anospkrt'siof 
Anoepkrafeioy Anophre'eiay JParoe'miay Anod'^ 
mia, Anoemo'na, Olfaetiu amie'eio^ O. dejie*'^ 
iens, DfS€Bsthe'sia olfaetei* Ha, Anmsthe'Ha o/- 
facto'ria, Odora'tue deptr'ditue, (F.) P$rte de 
rOdorat, 

ANOSMOSIA, Anosmia. 

ANOSPHRASIA, Anosmia. 

ANOSPHRESIA, Anosmia. 

ANSE (F.,) Ansa (U) signifies, properly, the 
handle of certain vessels, usually of an arched 
form. By analogy, it has been applied to that 
which is curved in the form of such handle. 
Thus, the French speak of Ante inteetinale to 
signify a portion of intestine, supported by its 
mesentery, and describing a curved line : — also. 
of Anst nervense, Anse anastomotiqus, &c. 

Anse de^ is used, in Surgery, to designate a 
thread, curved in the form of an Ante, 

ANSERINA, Potentilla anserine. 

ANSARINE, Chenopodium ambrosioides — 
0. Anthelmintique, Chenopodium anthelminti- 
cum — a, Bon Henri, Chenopodium Bonus Hen- 
rictts — a, Sotry*, Chenopodium Botrys — a. 
Fitide, Chenopodium vnlvariar-no. VemUfuge, 
Chenopodium anthelminticum. 

ANTAC"IDS,ilnf»-««rf*,il«<iatf"»A»,7»wr- 
ten*tia, from anti, ' against,' and aeida, ' acids.' 
Remedies which obviate acidity in the stomach. 
They are chemical agents, and act by neutral- 
ising the acid. Those chiefly used are anuno- 
nia, calcis carbonas, calx, magnesia, magnesias 
carbonas, potassa, potassss bicarbonas, p. car- 
bonas, sodsB bicarbonas, and s. carbonas. They 
are, of course, only palliatives, removing that 
which exists, not preventing the formation of 
more. 

ANTAG'ONISM, Antagonie'wue, Antie'ta- 
sisf from am, ' against,' and oywritctf, * to act.' 
Action in an opposite direction. It a];^lies to 
the action of muscles which act in a contrary 
direction to others. In estimating the fmrce of 



ANTAGONIST 



ANTHEMIS COTULA 



the miiscleB, this antagonism miut be attended 
to. , 

ANTAG'ONIST, Antaganis'ta. A muscle 
nrhofe action produces an effect contrary* to that 
of another muscle. Every muscle has its anta- 
gonist, because there is no motion in one direc- 
tion without a capability of it in another. 

ANTALGICUS, Anodyne. 

ANTAPHRODIS'IAC and ANTAPHRO- 
DIT'IC, Antaphrodinaeusy AnUrot'ieus, from 
«rri, * against,' and tnpQodtetaMOiy * aphftxiisiac.' 
A substance citpable of blunting the venereal 
appetite. 

ANTAPOiyOSIS, from arranoSamfity « I re- 
turn in exchange.' The succession and retorn 
of the febrile periods. — ^Hippocrates. 

ANTAPOPLECTICUS, Antiapoplectic. 

ANT ARTHRITIC, Antiarthritic. 

ANTASTHENICUS, Tonic. 

ANTASTHMATICUS, Antiasthmatic. 

ANT ATROPHIC, Antatropk'ieua,Antafro- 
phtu, Antiatroph'ieusy from arri, < against,' and 
axQOipiay Utrophy.' A remedy opposed to atro- 
phy or consumption. 

ANTEBRACHIAL, see Antibrachial. 

ANTECENDENTIA. The precursory or 
warning symptoms of a disease. 

ANTEL A'BI A, PfocW/a, from antSy 'be- 
fore,' and loHa, ' the lips.' The extremity of 
the lips. 

ANTELOPE, Antilopus. 

ANTEMBALLOMENUM, Succedaneum. 

ANTEM'BASIS, from am, and c^/fairw, 'I 
enter .^ Mu'tuus ingres^sus. The mutual re- 
ception of bones. — Galen. 

ANTEMETIC, Antiemetic. 

ANTENDEIXIS, Counter-indication. 

ANTENDIXIS, Counter-indication. 

ANTENE AS'MUS, from am, « against,' and 
reoy, * audacious.' One furious against himself. 
Mania, in which the patient attempts his own 
life. — ^Zacchias. 

ANTENNA'RIA DIOPCA, Onapha'lium 
JHoieumy Hispid'niay Pes eatiy Eitch'rfgum 
monta'numy Catsfooty (F.) Pied de ehat, A 
common European plant, which has been advised 
in hemorrhage, diarrhcea, &c. 

ANTEPHL^LTIC, Antiephialtic. 

ANTEPILEPTIC, Antiepileptic. 

ANTEPONENS, Anticipating. 

ANTE REPS IS, from am, 'against,' and 
tQtidwy < I support.' The resistance-— the soli- 
dity — of bcmes. — ^Hippocrates. 

AJSTERIEUR DU MARTEAU, Laxator 
tympani — a. de POrsUlgy Anterior auris. 

ANTE'RIOR, Anti'fus, from ante, « before.' 
Situate before. Great confusion has prevailed 
with anatomists in the use of the terms be/ore, 
hekindy &c. Generally, the word anterior is 
applied to parts situate before the median line, 
the .body being in the erect posture, with the 
face* and palms of the hands turned forwards; 
and the feet applied longitudinally together. 

Ante'kiok Au'eis (iB»«e/0,) Aurit^ula'ris a»- 
te'rior, At^traKene aurie'ulam, (F.) Aurieulaire 
antirteur, Aniirieur de Voreilley Zygamato-ori- 
culaire. A small muscle, passing from the pos- 
terior part of the zygoma to the helix. Use, To 
draw the ear forwiurds and upwards. 

Antbrior Mallbi, Laxator tympani. 

ANTEROTICUS, Antaphrodisiac. 

ANTEUPHORBIUM, Cacalia anteuphor- 
bium. 



ANTEVER'SION, Antever'sio, Antravt'eio, 
from ante, 'before,' and vertere, versum, 'to 
turn.' DuBplacement of the uterus, in which 
the fundus is turned towards the pubes, whilst 
its orifice is towards the sacrum. It may be 
caused by extraordinary size of the pelvis, pres- 
sure of the viscera on the uterus, &c.; and is 
recognised by examination per vaginae^. See 
Retroversio uteri. 

ANTH.£MOPTYiCUS, Antihennopiy^t 
from arrt, ' against,' and h€Bmopiysiey ' spitting 
of blood.' Against spitting of blood. A remedy 
for spitting ^ blood — aatHkmmoptyieum (jeme- 
dium,) 

ANTHiEMORRHAGICUS, Antihemorriia- 
gic. 

^NTHECTICUS, Antihectic 

ANTHELITRAGQS, (F.) AntUlitragien. 
One of the proper muscles of the pavilion of 
the ear. 

ANT'HELIX, Anti-heiixy from ovri, ' before,' 
and 'cAi^, ' the helix.' An eminence on the car- 
tilafe of the ear, in front of the helix, and ex- 
tending from the concha to the groove of the 
helix, where it bifurcates. 

ANTHELMINTIC, Antihelmin'ticusyAnti- 
eeol'ietUy Antkelmdnfthicue, Antieeolet'icusyHtl' 
min^thietUy Helminthago'guey Antivenmno'eusy 
Vermifugeuy Ver'mi/ugey.from arriy 'against,' 
and 'tA^tv;, 'a worm.' A remedy which de- 
stroys or expels worms, or prevents their for- 
mation and development.. The chief anthel- 
mintics are, the Chenopodium, Mucu'na, Oleum 
animale Dippelii, Oleum Terebinthina^ Sodii 
Chloridum, Spigelia, and Pulvis Stanni. See 
Worms. 

ANTHEMA ERUPTIO, Exanthem. 

AN^THEMIS COT'ULA, from a^em, 'I 
flower.' Cofula, C.fa'tiday Cota, Cfmm'tAe- 
misy Chamame'lumfa'tidum, An'tkemie Nove- 
boraeen'sisy ChamomU'la epu'ria, Ma^oi^ar^ 
Mapweedy Stinking Ckamamiley Wild Cham'- 
omiU, Dog^e fennel, XHllf, Dilweed, Field- 
ttfeedy Piseweed. Nat, Ord, Composite Corym- 
bifene. Sex. S^et. Syngenesia Superflua. ^F.) 
Xaroute, CamomUle fkttde, Camomille puante. 
This plant has a very disagreeable smell : and 
the leaves have a strong, acrid, bitterish taste. 
It is reputed to have been useful in hysterical 
affections. 

An'thekis No'bilis, CAifmame'lum, Ckame- 
ma'lum No'biliy ChamomU'la S'oma'nay Euan'- 
tkemony An'themiey Cham€eme*lum odora'tum^ 
Leuean'tkemum, MtUrica'riay (F.) Camomillr, 
Romaine, The leaves and flowers. — Anthtfmis, 
Ph. IT. S. — ^have a strong smell, and bitter, 
nauseous taste. The flowers are chiefly used. 
They possess tonic and stomachic properties, 
and are much given as a pleasant and cheap 
bitter. A simple infusion is taken to produce, 
or to assist vomiting. Externally, Uiey are 
often used in fomentations. 

The (yieum Anthem'idie possesses the aro- 
matic properties of the plant, bat not the bitter 
and tonic. Consequently, the * Chamomile 
Dropsy* as sold by the druggists, must be devoid 
of the latter qualities. They are made by add- 
ing Ol, anthem, f. ^j. to 8p. vini reetif, Oj. 

Antrbmis Novsbobacbnsis, a. Cotula. 

An'thkmis Pr'asTBauM, Pf^rethmm, Ana- 
eyeUue pffrethrumy Pyrethmm verum, Suph- 
thal'm»m Cre'ticum, Denta*riayBerbaaaliva'rif^ 
Pee Aletrandri'mie, Spanieh ChamamiU^ PelH- 



ANTHERA 



ANTHROPOMETRT 



iorf ofSpainy (F.) Pyrhthrs^ Radne MoHvaiire^ 
Pudd*Aiexandr€. The root iB hot and acrid, 
its acrimony residing in a resinous principle. 
It is never nsed except as a masticatorjr in 
toothache, rheiuDatism of the face, paralysis of 
the toDgae, &c. It acts as a powerful sialo- 



The 



PelUtory of the shops in Germany is 
Mid to he derived from Anacy&lu9 ojfieina'rum ; 
a plant cultivated in Thuringia for medicinal 
poiposes. 

Ar'thbmxs TmcTo'aiAy Buphthal'mi Harhih 
l>f0r*s CkamamiU, a European plant, has a 
hitterandastringent taste, and has heen regarded 
stomachic and vulnerary. (F.) Camomile des 
Tdnturiera, (EU de Bmuf, 

ANTHE'RA, from a*diic«(, * florid,' so called 
from its florid colour. A remedy compounded 
of sevwal auhetances, myrrh, sandarac, alum, 
ssflroB, &c. It was used under tha form of 
liniment, c<dlyrium, electuary, and powder. — 
Celaos, Galen. 

ANTHEREON, Mentum. 

ANTHORA, Aconitum anthora— a.Yulgaris, 
Aconitum anthoia. 

ANTHORIS'MA, from arriy « against,' and 
#ui;ia, 'houndaiy.' Tumor diffu'^us, A tu- 
mor without any defined margin. 

ANTHOS: see Rosmarinus-^. Sylvestris, 
Ledum sylvestre. 

ANTHRA'CIA, from ar^pal, « coal.' C^- 
bmmfadmr Exan'thom, An eruption of tumours, 
imperfectly suppurating, with indurated edges, 
and, for the most part, a sordid and sanious cetre. 
A genus in the order ExanthomoHca^ class 
Htmatica of Good, and including Plague and 
Yaws. 

Ahthkjicia, Anthracosis— a. PestiS) Pkgue 
—a. Rnhula, Framhcesia. 

ANTHRACION, aee Anthrax. 

ANTHRACOID, Aiuhraeo^desyh<mav9^i 
* eoid,' and tiSof, * resemblance.' (F.) Chttrbon- 
nmx. As hlack as coal. Accompanied by, or 
resembling anthrax. 

ANTHRACOMA, Anthrax. 

ANTHRACONECROSIS^ see Sphacelus, 

ANTHRACOPHLYCTIS, see Anthrax. 

ANTHRACOSIA, Anthrax. 

ANTHRACOSIS, Amhra'eia, Carlo Palpe- 
hrafnem, from at'^qa^, * a coal.' A species of 
esrbuncle, which attacks the eyelids and gk>be 
of the eye. — ^Paulus of .£gina. Also^ a car- 
boncle of any kind. It has been used recently 
for the << black lung of coal miners," which is 
induced bv carbonaceous accumulation in the 
lungs. When ulceration results from this cause, 
Uaci pktkisisj (F.) Phthisis avec JXilanose, 
exists. See Melanosis. 

AivTHRACosis PuLMONUK, sec MeUuioais. 

ANTHRACOTYPHUS, Plague. 

ANTHRAKOK'ALI, from icv^Cot^, 'coal,' 
and Jhalif 'potassa.'^ An article introduced as 
a remedy m cutaneous diseases. It is formed 
by dissolving carbonate of potassa in 10 or 12 
parts of boiling water, and adding as nrodi 
■lacked lime as will separate the potassa. The 
filtered liquor is placed on the fire in an iron 
▼easel, and suffered to evaporate, until neither 
froth nor effervescence occurs, and the liquid 
presents a smooth surface like oil. To this, 
levigated coal is added in the proportion of 160 
grammes to 1 92 grammes of potassa. The mix- 
tare is stirred, aod removed from the tn, and 



the stirring is continued, until a black homoge- 
neous powder results. A sulphuretted anthro" 
koktdi is made by mixing accurately 1 6 grammes 
of sulphur with the coed, and mssolving the 
mixture in the potassa as directed above. The 
dose of the simple and sulphuretted preparations 
is about two grains three times a day. 

ANTHRAX, ai^^«|, < a coal,' An'trax, Carbe, 
RuH'nue verue, Codesel'la, Erythe'ma gangre- 
no'sumf Orantrie'tum^ Pruna, Per'eicus Igtde, 
Pjfray GrofMriytum, Phyma anthrax^ Erytke'^ 
ma anthrax, CarhtH*eulus, Anthroeo'sia, An- 
throeo^ma^ Aheees'aua gangrttnee'eena. A, gan^ 
gr€Btio'9U8y Purun^eulus malig^nuSf P, gangrm- 
no^susf CarbuneUy ( F.) Chorion, An inflamma- 
tion, essentially gangrenonsj of the cellular 
membrane and skin, which may arise from an 
internal or external cause. In the latter case 
it is called, Anthra'eion, Vesic^ula gangr^eney- 
eetu, Anthraeophlfe*tis, Pustule mtdigne; Bou- 
ton d'Alep, Feu Persigue (Persian Fire), Mai- 
vat, Bouton malin, Puee maligne, and is cha- 
racterized at the outset bv a vesication or bleb 
filled with a sero-sanguinolent fluid, under which 
a small induration is formed, surrounded by an 
areolar inflammation, which becomes gangre- 
nous. It has been thought b;^ some to be in- 
duced altogether by contact with the matter of 
the carbuncle of animals, or of the exuvia of 
bodies of such as had died of the disuse. But 
it is now known to arise primarily in the human 
subject. 

Anthrax is a malignant boil, and its treat- 
ment is similar to that which is required in 
cases of gangrene attacking a part. 

Antbaax FvtMcfHTTKy NecTopoeumonia. 

ANTHRISCUS CEREFOLIUM, Scaodix 
eerefolium. 

ANTHROPE, Cutis. 

ANTHROPIAT'RICA (MEDICINA,) from 
aiy&fwtog, <man,' and tatgog, < a physician.' Me- 
dicine applied to man in contradistinction to 



ANTHROPOCHEMIA,Chymistpy (human.) 

ANTHROPOCHYMY, Chymistry (human.) 

ANTHROPOGENIA, Anthropogen'esis^An- 
thropog"eny, from »v^QWfog, < man,' and ytvcffif, 
< generation.' The knowledge, or study, or 
phenomena of human generation. 

ANTHROPOGHAPHY, Anthropograph*ia, 
from aif^qtinoq, * man,' and y^at^i^, 'a description.' 
Anthropology (q. v.) A description of the 
human body. 

ANTHROPOLlTHUS,fromo»6efti7ro«,<man,' 
and Xt&oi, <a stone.' The petrifiiction of the 
human body or of any oi its parts. Morbid 
concretions in the human body. 

ANTHROPOL'OGY, An$hropolog"ia, from 
Av^qmnoq^ * man,' and Xoyot, ' a discourse.' A 
treatise on man. By some, this word is used 
for the science of the structure and functions of 
the human body. Frequently, it is employed 
synonymously with NeUural History and Phy- 
siology of man, 

ANTHROPOMAGNETISMUS, Magnetism, 
animal. 

ANTHROPOMANCY, Anthropomanti'a, 
from Ar-^gamcf ' a man,' and juiafuui, ' divina- 
tion.' Divination by inspecting the entrails of 
a dead man. 

ANTHROPOM'BTRY, from «r^^»7r«$, «a 
man,' and tiet^ef, 'measure.' Measuremeat 



ANIVBOPOMCnRFHUS 



AHTIEMBnC 



of the dimen^ons of tlw difinvot pairts of the 
bninan body. 
ANTHROPOMORPHUS, Atropa mudn- 

ANTHROPOPH'AG^J8,<F.)i4««*WM«M^ 
from taS<fmtfti * m ttMa,' and ^v, * I eat.' A 
name given to one who eats his own species. 

ANTHROPOPH'AGY, Anikropopha'gia, 
game etymon. The custom of eating haman 
flesh. A disease in which there is gmt desire 
to eat it. 
ANTHROPOS, Homo. 
ANTHROPOSCOPIA, Physiognomy. 
ANTHROPOTOMY, AndianatomiA. 
ANTHUS, Flos, 

AJfTKYFIIiOTIC.Antkyjmofieus^Antihfp^ 
not*ie, from «m, ' asainst^' and ^mm^in^tf ' stu- 
pefying.' A remedy for stnsor. 

ANTHYPOCHON'DRIAC, Afakfpoeh<m- 
dri'ucusy from «»<», < against,' and <«;«r«j|ro9d^ia- 
xufy < hypochondrkc.' A remedy for hypo- 
chondriasis. 

ASTBYSTER1C,AfitihfHir'ic^nHkftitw'' 
ietuy from hfti, * against,' and <utf<r«^, < the ute- 
rus.' A remedy for hysteria. 

ANTI, aevn, as a prefix, in oompoaition, 
rally means < opposition.' 
ANTIADES, Tonsils. 
ANTIADITI8, Cynanche tonsillaris. 
ANTIADON'CUS, from tir*ttadtt, *the tonr 
sils,' and oyxoc, * tumour.' A swelling of the 
tonsils. — Swediaur. Anti* tiger has a similar 
meaning. 

Antiadoivctjs IiirLi.M»ATOKit», Cynanche 
tonsillaris. 

ANTIAPOPLE CTIC, AnHa/poplee'iieus, 
Antapoplee^tieusy Apojdee'tieuSf from avT<, 
< against,' and A#o«-M2|/«e, 'apoplexy.* A re- 
medy for apoplexy. 
ANTIARIS TOXICARIA, see Upas. 
ANTIARTHRIT'IC, Antartkrk'ie, Antiar- 
thrifious, AnHpodag^rie^ from dtf»H^ < against,' 
and AQ^Qirttf ' the gout,' (F.) AntigotUtewB. A 
remedy for gout. 

ANTIASTHEN'IC, Amiasthen'teus, from^ 
«tv9rf, ' against,' and tf^diifia, * debility.' A re- 
medy for debility. 

ANTIASTHMATIC, AntiasthnuU'ieufy An- 
tasthmafieusy from tfVTi, * against,' and ao^f*x, 
' asthma.' A remedy for asthma. 
ANTIATROPHICUS, Antatrophic. 
ANTIBALLOMENUM, Succedaneum. 
ANTIBDELLA, Antlia sanguisuga. 
AT^TIBRA'CHIAL, Atuibraehialis. That 
which concerns the fore arm. Bichat. J. Clo- 
qaet suggests that the word should be written 
aJUebraehial, from aTite, * before,' and braehiumy 
< the arm:' — as ofUtbrackial region, antebrachial 
aponeurosis y &c. 

Antebsa'crial Apovevro'sis, (F.) AponJv- 
rose antebraehiale, is a portion of the aponeu- 
rotic sheath which envelops the whole of the 
upper limb. It arises from the brachial aponeu- 
rosis, from a fibrous expansion of the tendon of 
the biceps muscle, from the epicondyle, epi- 
trQchlea, and, behhid, from the tendon of tiie 
triceps bra^hiaUs. Within, it is inserted into 
the cubitus, &c.; and, below, is confounded 
with the two annular ligaments of the carpus. 
It is covered by the skin, b^ veins, lymphatics, 
and by filaments of superficial nerves; it covers 
the muscles of the fore-arm^ adheres to them, 



and sMids between them several 6brMtt aepC^ 
whidi serve them fbr points of iBsertioa. 
ANTIBRACHIUM, ForeHnn. 

AKTIBRO'MIC, Antibro'iimtmsy from «rTi, 
< against,' end f^mfioty < UtUnt.* An ageat that 
<iestro3^ offeMiv« odours— «s the eUovide of 
zinc, simple sulphate of alumina, &c. 

ANTICACHEC'TIC,4*f»<j«*»e«uw*,^4ftf»- 
eaeoekfm'ie, firom ovn, < against,' and Kax»k«h 
* cachexy.' A remedy agaiast cachexy. 

ANTICACOCHYMIC, Anticachectic.. 

ANTICAN'CEROUS, jt#rtiMWwr»'#«#, An. 
ti^amerif'm»tAntieareinom'atous^AinHseir'rkotUy 
from amy < against,' and xaq*iHBftay *eaacer,' 
carcinoma. Opposed to cancer. 

ANTICANCROSUS, AnticaiieeiDns. 

ANTICARCIN0MAT0U8, Anficancerous. 

ANTIC ARBIUM, Fossme du eemty Scrobi- 
cohis cordis. 

ANTIC AT ARUHAL, Amtieaiarrka'iUy Am- 
Ucatarrheileusy ftom ovti, * against^^and jbcn^^o;, 
' catarrh.' A remedy for catarrh. 

ANTICAUSOD'iC, Antieausoficy AnHtai^ 
sod'ieusy from «»ti, < against,' and MNMro^, *a 
burning fever.' A remedy for emumu or in- 
flammattMT fever. 

ANTIC AUSOTIC, Anticamsodie. 

ANTICHEIR, Poltex, see Digitus. 

ANTICHOERADICUS, Antiscroftilooa. 

ANTICHOLERICA, Sophota heptaphylla. 

ANTICIPATING, AntW'ipansy Antepo'- 
nmsy Proiopt*i€U9. A periodioal phenomenon 
recurring at progressively shorter intervals. 
An amHeipating inimmittent 'b one in which 
the intervals b«tween the paroacyvms become 
progressively less. 

ANTICNEMIUM, Shin. 

ANTIOCEURy Scrobiculos cordis. 

ANTIC OL'IC, Antieoi'iensy from *»«, 
^against,' and ittaXtno^y <the colic' That which 
is opposed to colie. 

ANTICOMMA, O&ntr^^up. 

ANTICOPE, Cbntre-wup^ 

ANTICRUSIS, Contre-coup, 

ANTICRUSMA, Cantr^-eoup. 

ANTICUS, Anterior. 

ANTIDARTREXTX, Antilierpetic 

ANTIDEIXIS, Counter-dndioation. 

ANTIDIARRH(ElC,k«t»<tftffrA«-i>tM. A 
remedy for diarrh<ea. Opposed to diairhcBa. 

ANTID1NIC, Antidin'imsy Din'iwsy from 
dLfrty < against,' and <t»of, * vertigo.' Opposed 
to vertigo. 

ANTIDOTAL, Antidotaflisy same etymon as 
antidote (q. v.) Relating to an antidotes pos- 
sessed of the powers of an antidote. 

ANTIDOTA'RIUM, from afrOcrrwy^un an- 
tidote.' A dispensatory (q. v.) A pharmaeo- 
poeia or formulary. 

ANTIDOTE, Xw^uf'o<iw»,from «inr/,* against,* 
and Stdwftiy < I give.' Originally this word sig- 
nified an internal remedy. It is now used sy- 
nonymously with eounter-poison, Antipkar^nu^^ 
eum, and signifies any remedy capable of com- 
bating the efiTect of poisons. 

ANTIDOTUM HERACLIDIS, Enneophar- 
macos — a. Mithridatium, Mithridate. 

ANTIDYNAMICA, Debilitants. 

ANTIDYNOUS, Anodyne. 

ANTIDYSENTER'IC, Antidysentor'ienty 
from«?Ti, < against,' M, * with difficulty,' and 
•»T«99r, 'intestine.' Opposed to dysentery. 

ANTIEMETIC, Antemeficy Antiemst'ieuSy 



AKTIEPHIALTIC 



61 



ANTDftONII (BUTTRUM) 



from «VT<, < agaiiist,' tad Bfurutt^ * emetic.' A 
remedy for vomiting. 

ANTIEPfflALTIC or AJTrEPHIALTIC, 
Amtispkial'Hcms^ {torn Afvty ^againsV *im^ '9*' 
Ml^TKy * nifhtmare.' A remedy for nightmare. 

ANTIEPILEPTIC or ANTEPILEPTIC, 
AwiUfiUj^tieuai from «yT#9 ' agiinst/ and am* 
Xf^M, < epiiepej/ A remedy for epilepay. 

ANTIFEBRILIS, FebriAige. 

ANTIGALACTIC, Antigalae'tUuSy AfUi- 
htettu^y firom Arriy * against,' and yoia, ^milk.' 
(F.) Antiimt&uof, O^Kwed to the eecretion of 
milk, or ta diaeaeee caused by the milk. 

ANTIGONI COLtYRlUM NIGRUM, 
BUci 4olijfv*t9k of Antio'onxb. It was com- 
posed of cadmia, antimony, pepper, verdigrift, 
gam Aiahie, and water. 

ANTIGUA, see Weet Indiee. 

ANTIHiEMOPTYICUS, Antbemoptyicufc 

ANTIHECTIC, AMtitkeetUiMyAnUfe'Hmiay 
from ttw^tj 'against,' and '•{t$, 'habit of body.' 
Hw AntUkMtfticMm Pots'rxi is the white ozyd 
of astimoay; also called Diafhoret'Uum Jo- 

ANTIHSLIX, Anthelix. 

ANTIHELMINTICUS, Anthelmintic. 

ANTIHEMORRHAG'IC, Antihmmorrkag'*- 
ims, AiUkeemorrhag^'ieus; from avri, 'agamst,' 
and *^fu^Q0YtOf < hemorrhage.' That which is 
agaiiMt hemorrhage; an antihemorrhagic re- 

A?ifTIHEMORRHOn)'AL, AmaamorrhoU 
da^Hay from oyri, * against,' and <ai/(«oec*<^<f 9 'he- 
morrhoids.' A remedy for hemorrhoids. 

ANTIHERPET'IC, Antihsryeficus, from 
cffTi, * against,' and < i^tt* ;, * herpes.' (F.) An' 
tUartrtaof. A remedy for herpes. 
' ANTIH7DR0PH0B1C, Antth^dropkoi^i- 
MM, AMiyU*'susy Alps^stu, from <xm, < against,' 
^v^, * water,' and 90/tefi < dread.' A remedy 
for hydro phob ia. 

ANTIHYDROFIC, Antikfdrop'icus^ Hf- 
irop'itusy from arti^ < against,' and <ir6|^«^, 
'dropsy.' A remedy for dropsy. 

ANTIHYPNOTIC, Anthypnotic. 

ANTIHYSTERIC, Antihysteric. 

ANTI-ICTERIC, Anti4et9r*i§u9y leterHmuy 
from ovri, < against,' and f »ti(k>$3 'jaundice.' A 
reoMdy for ianndice. 

ANTI-IMPETIGENE8, SOLOMON'S, see 
Liqaor Hydrargyri oxymuriatis. 

ANTILABIUM, Prolabimn. 

ANTILACTEUS, Antigalactic. 

ANTILAITEUXy Antigalactic. 

ANTILEP'SIS, Affprthsnfsio, from amtttfC' 
jlcMi, (I take hold of.' The mode of attaching 
a bandage over a diseased part, by fixing it upon 
the soond parts. — 'Hippocrates. The mode of 
securing bandages, &c., from slipping. Treat- 
ment byreTulsiofl or derivation, (q. v.) 

ANTILETHAR'GIC, Antiiakar'gieusyfrom 
ovTi, 'against,' and Xti9*^r*»9fy 'affected with 
lethargy.' A remedy for letluirgy. 

ANTILITH'ICS, AntUith'iea, from m-ri, 
'against,' and li&o^^ 'a stone.' A substance 
that prevents the formation of calculi in the 
uriaary organst 

The chief antilithics— recording as the calculi 
are lithie acid or phosphatic-^are alkalies or 
acids; with revellents, especially ehange of air; 
teaics, as the diosma crenata, (7) and uva 
arB.(7) 

ANTILLT, MINERAL WATERS OF. A 



celebrated French medicinal spring, near 
M6auz, in France. The waters Imve not been 
analyzed; but astonishing and ehimerical ef- 
fects have been ascribed to them. 

ANTILOBIUM, Antitragus, Tragus. 

ANTILOI'MIC, AMtiloi'mUu*j Antila'miey 
AnHpestiUntia'itSy from «m, 'against,' and 
2«<fc««, 'the plague.' A remedy for the plague. 

ANTIL'OPUS. TheAn'ts^ps. (¥.)GagelU. 
An African animal, whose hoofs and horns were 
formerly given in hysteric and epileptic cases. 

ANTILYS8US, Antihydrophobic. 

ANTIMEL'ANCHOLIC, AntimeltvMfudfi- 
etuy from «rT<, 'against,' and /Atl^y^^oiiA, 'me- 
lanelK^.' A remedy for melancholy. 

ANTIMEPHITIC, Antimapkit'icus, from 
««T«, ' against,' and mepkUie (9. v.) A remedy 
against mephitic or deleterious gases. 

ANTIMOINEy Antimonium— a. Bturre d\ 
Antimomum muxiatum — «. Cklorurs </', Anti- 
monium muriatum — a. Oxide d*, Algaroth — 0. 
Oxide hlane d', Antimonium diaphoreticum— a. 
Sou/re dore d*, Antimonii sulphuretum praeci- 
pitatam— a. Sulfure d*y Antimonium— 10. Sul' 
fwri hfdroeulpkure rouge ^y Antimonii sn^u- 
retum rubrnm— a. Yerre d\ Antimonii vitrum. 

ANTIMO'NIAL, AnHm&nia'lisy SHHaflie, 
from arUvmonitimy 'antimony.' A composition 
into which antimony enters. , A preparation of 
antimony. 

Ajntixo'nial Powdsk, PuM$ aittimonut^lis, 
Oxfidum antimo^nii eumphoe'pkati etUcis, Phos- 
phot colds etibiatusy P. Cal'oieum eHHa'tumy 
Puims Jame'oiiy PtUvie stibia'tuoy Pulvia de 
pkos'pkat9 ealeie et eHh'U ooMpos'ttne, Factitious 
James's Powder, Scbwarbbeo's .F«««r Powdery 
CHsmvix's Antpmotdal Powdsr, (F.) Poudre 
antimoniale eomposee ou de Jambs. A peroxide 
of antimony combined with phosphate of lime. 
{Taie of common sulpkuret of aniimonf, 9>j; 
hartshorn shavings y O&ij. Roost in an iron pot, 
until they fdrm a gray powder. Put this into 
a long pot, with a snudl hole in the cover. 
Keep it in a red' heat for two hours, and grind 
to a fine powder.) This preparation has long 
been esteemed as a febrifuge: but it is extremely 
uncertain in its action. The ordinary dose is 6 
or 8 grains. 

ANTIMONIALE CAU8TICUM, Antimo- 
nium muriatum. 

ANTIMONIATUM SULPHUR, Antimonii 
sulphuretum prscipitatum — ^a. Tartar, Antimo- 
nium tartarizatum. 

ANTIMONII (BUTYRUM,) Antimonium 
muriatum^ — a. Calx, Antimonium diaphoreticum 

a. Cerussa, Antimonium diaphoreticum — a. 
et Potasse tartras, (Ph. U. S.) Antimonium tar- 
tarizatum— a. Murias, Antimonium muriatum — 
a. Oleum, Antimonium muriatum — a. Oxydulum 
hydrosulphnratum aurantiacum, Antimonii sul- 
phuretum prsecipitatum— «. Oxydum, Algaroth 
— a. Oxydum auratum, Antimonii sulphuretum 
praecipitatum-Ha. Oxidum nitro-muhaticum, Al- 
garoth— 41. Oxydum cum sulphure vitriihctum, 
Antimonii vitrum*-a. Oxydum suljphuretimi vi- 
tri£ftctnm, Antimonii vitrum^-«. Oxysulphive- 
tum, A. sulphuretum pnecipitatum— 41. Potassio- 
tartras, Antimonium tartarizatum— «. Regulus 
medicinalis, Antimonium medicinale — a. Sal, 
Antimonium tartarizatum — a. Sulphur auratum, 
Antimonii sulphuretum pnecipitatum — a. Sul- 
phur prsecipitatum, Antimonii sulphuretum prs* 
cipitatum — a. Sulphuretum, Aqtimonium — a. 



ANTIMONIOUS ACD) 



ANTIMONIUM 



Taitrft8» Aiitimonium taitarizatum— a. Tartras 
et PotaBsae, Antimoniam tartarixatmn — a. Vi- 
tnim hyacinthinttm, Antimonii vitnim. 

ArTIMO'NII SuLPHUBB'TUM pB^CIPITA'Ttnf, 

Sulphur antimonia'tumJSydro»ulpkur€*tu'm sti- 
bio^sum cum sul'phurM^ Qxo'df stih^ii sulphura'- 
turn, Oxfd'ulum antimo^nii hydrosulphuraftum 
auranti'aeum^ Ox'fdum aura'tum antiimo^nii, 
Sulphurt*tum tHh'U ot^ydttla'ti. Hydro-sulfU' 
r€'tum lufteum ox'ydi stib'ii tul/ura'H, Sulfhur 
antimo'nii praeipita'tum^Sulphur aura'tum an- 
Umo'niiy Golden Sulphur of Antimony, 

Antimo'nii Sulphure'tum Pradpitatumy A. 
Oxysulphuretum, (F.) Soufr$ dori d^Aniimotne, 
of tiie London Pkarmacopcsia, is nearly the same 
as the old K$rmes Mineral. It is a powder of 
an orange colour, of ^a' metallic, styptic taste. 
It is emetic, diaphoretic, and cathartic, accord- 
ing to the dose; and has been chiefly used in 
chronic rheumatism, and in cutaneous luSections. 
Do», gr. j. to gr. iv. 

Antimonii Sulphuretum Praeipitatum of the 
United States Pharmacopeia, (1843,) b made 
by boiling together SulphurH of Antimony , in 
fine powder. Solution of Potaeea^ and distilled 
footer; straining the liquor while hot, and drop- 
ping into it Diluted Sulphuric Acid so long as 
it produces a precipitate. 

Amtimo'rii Sulprubb'tux Rubbum, Red 
Sul'phuret of An'timony, Hydrosulfure'tum 
etU/ii ruSntm, Sub^ydroeul'fae stih'iiy Hydro- 
tulphure'tum ruhrum stib'ii eulphura'ti, Pulvis 
Carthusiano^rum, Kermea mineral, (F.) Hy- 
droeulfure rouge d^Antimoine sulfure, Vermil- 
ion de Provenee, Properties the same al the 
last. Dose, gr. j. to gr. iv. 

An timo'nii Vitbuk, Glcue of Antimony^ An- 
timo*nii ox'ydum aulphwe^twm vitrifae'tumy 
Oafydum stib'ii aemivit'reumj Antimo*fUum 
^itrifa&tumy Ox'idum aniimo'nii cum eul'phure 
vitrifac'twm, Vitrum etih^ii, Antimo'nii vitrum 
hyaein'thinum, Oxyd'ulum atib'ii vitrea'tum, 
(F.) Verre d'AfUimoine. (Formed by roasting 
powdered common antimony in a shallow ves- 
sel» over a gentle fire, till it is of a whitish 
!?ray colour, and emits no fumes in a red heat ; 
then melting it, on a quick fire, into a clean, 
brownish-red glass.) It has been used for pre- 
paring the tartarized antimony and antimonial 
wine. 

ANTIMONIOUS ACID, Antimonium dia- 
phoreticum. 

ANTIMO'NIUM, from onri, 'against,' and 
A&ovoc, 'alone;' ». e, not found alone: or accord- 
ing to others, from «vti, 'against,' and moine, 
* a monk;' because, it is asserted, certain monks 
suffered much from it. StiHy SHb'ium, Reg'u- 
lu$ Antimo'niif Miner allium, Gynaee'umyMag- 
ne'aia Satur'nif Marcaai'ta plum^beoy Platyoph- 
thatmony Stim'mi, Aurum lepri/aum, Antim</- 
nittm entdum, Antimo'nii atilphure'tumy Sul- 
phurtttum atib'ii nigrum. Common Antimony, 
Sulphnret of Antimony, (F.) Antimoine, Sul- 
fure d'Antimoine, Sulphuret of antimony is 
the ore from which all the preparations of anti- 
mony are formed. In Pharmacy, it is the na- 
tire sesquisulphuret of antimony, purified by 
fusion. When prepared for medical use, by 
trituration and levigation, it fofms a powder of 
a black, or bluish gnj colour, which is insolu- 
ble. It is slightly diaphoretic and alterative, 
and has been used in chronic rheumatism, cuta- 
neous diseases^ &c. 



AffTiMomvM Calcinatitii^ Antimonimn dk- 
phoreticum. 

AMTXxo'lfiUM DiAPBOBET'icTTM, Dtaphorofie 
Antimony, Antimo'nious Acid, Min'eral Bex''- 
oard, Antimo'nium Caldna'tum, Mineral Dio' 
phorefie, Matiire perlie de kxbebino, Pot" 
oxide of Antimony, Calx Antimo'nii, Antimo'- 
nium diaphoretficum latum, Ceru^aa Antimo'- 
nii, Calx Antimofnii elo'ta, Oxo'dea stiVU 
jalbUm, Ox'idum atibu/aum, Deutoxide of An'ti- 
mony, Ox'idum etib'ii album wtedianfti mtrtf 
confeetum, (F.) Oxide blane d'Antimoine pri- 
pari par la moyen du nitre. {Com m on anti>- 
**^»y9 ^} ; pufified nitre, ttliij. — Throw it by 
spoonfuls into a red hot crucible ; powder and 
wash. The flowers that stick to the side of 
the crucible must be carefully separated, other- 
wise they render it emetic.) Dose, gr. z to 

XXX. - 

Antimoniuii EMBTictm, A. tartarizatuoa. 

Antimo'nium Mbdicina^lb^ Reg^ulua Anti- 
mo'nii Medieina'lia, Medicinal Reg^ulus of 
Antimony, (Antimon, aulphur, Jv. Potaaa* 
aubearb. ^i. Sodii chlorid, ^vr. Powder, mix, 
and melt. When cold, separate the scoriae at 
top, powder the mass, and wash it well.) It 
is conceived to be more active than common 
antimony. 

Antimo'nitjm Mubia'tum, Antimo'nii Ma£- 
riaa, Chlor'uret of An'timony, . Chlorur^twm 
atib'ii, Spuma trium> draeo'num, Deuto-mmtiaa 
atib'ii auUima'tua, Butter of Antimony, Mu- 
riate of Antimony, Chloride of Antimony, Bm- 
ty'rum Antimt/nii, O'lenm Antimo'nii, But^- 
rum atib'ii, Caua^tieum antimofMli; Antitmo- 
nium aali'tum, (F.) ChlorUre d'Antimoino, 
Beurre d'Antimoine. (Common antimony and 
corrosive sublimate, of each equal parts : grind 
together, and distil in a wide-necked retort, and 
let the butyraceous matter that comes over, 
run, in a moist place, to a liquid oil.) A caustic, 
but not much used as such. Sometimes taken 
as poison. 

Antimonium Salitum, Antimonium mmm- 
tum. 

Antimo'nium Tabtariza'tum, Tartria Anti- 
mo'nii, Tartar Antimonia'tum, Sal Antiwto'nii, 
Tartraa Potaa'aea atibio'aua sen atibia'lia, Tar- 
trie lixiv'iea atibia'tua, Deuto-tartras pottta'em 
et etib'ii, Tar'tarUa emet'ieua, Tar'tarum emof- 
icum, Tartraa antimo'nii, Tartraa Antimo'nU 
et PotaaacB, Antimo'nii et Potaaaai Tartraa 
(Ph.U. S.), Antimo'nii potaa'aio-tartraa, Anti- 
mo'nium emet'ictim, Tar'tarized An'timony, Tar- 
trate of An'timony and potaa'aa, Potaaaio-tar- 
trate of Antimony, Emetic Tartar, Tartar 
Emetic, (F.) Tartre atibie, Tartre Emetiqm, 
Amitique; in some parts of the United States, 
vulgarly and -improperly called Tartar: (Made 
by digesting aulphuret of antimdny in a mix- 
ture of nitric and muriatic aeida witii the aid of 
heat; filtering the liquor, and pouring it into 
water: freeing the precipitate from acid, by 
washing and drying it ; adding this powder to 
bitartrate of potaaaa in boiling dietilled footer; 
boiling for an hour, and after filtering the liquor 
while hot setting it aside to crystalliie. — Ph. 
U. 8.) Tartarized antimony is emetic,, some- 
times cathartic and diaphoretic. Externally, it 
is rubefacient. Dose, as an emetic, gr. j. to 
gr. iv. in solution : as a diaphoretic, gr. one- 
sixteenth to gt. one-quarter. 

The empirical preparation, called NoBsn's 



ANTIMONY, BUTTER OF 



63 



ANTIBHACHITIC 



Dbofb^ consntB of a solatioii oiUrtarizMi atui^ 
memy in rgdifisd spirits, disgoiaed by the addi- 
tion of some vegetable colouring matter. 

AiiTiMORnTif YiTaiFACTUMy Antimoiiii vi- 
trnm. 

ANTIMONY, BUTTER OF, Antimo- 
niom mnriatum — a. Chloride of, Antimo- 
nilim muriatom — a* Chlomret of, Antimo- 
niiim muriatom — a. Beatozide o^ Antimoi^ium 
liiaphoreticom — a. Flowers of, Algaroth — a. 
Glass of, Antimonii vitrum — a. Golden pulpkur 
of, Antimonii salphuretum pnsciiatanim— a. 
Medicinal^ regolos of, Ajitinioaium medicinale 
— a. Muriate of, Antimonium muriatom— -a. 
Penuode of, Antimonium diaphoreticom — a. Po- 
tamo-tartrate of, Antimoniimi tartariaatom'^ 
a. Snbmuriate of, Protoxide of, Algaroth— a. 
Sulphuret of, red, Antimonii sidphuretnm ru- 
bmm— a. Tartarized, Antimonium tartarizatum 
^a. Vegetable, Eupatorium perfoliatimi. 

AirriMOHT AHD PoTAaSA, TABTaATS OP, An- 

timonium tartarizatum. 

ANTINEPHRITIC, Anttnepkret'ie^ Antine- 
pkrtt^itus, from arrt, 'against,' and r«q}piTi(, 
^ nephritia.' A remedy for inflammation of the 
kidney. 

ANTINEUROP ATHIC, Nenrine. 

ANTINEUROTIC, Nerviae. 

ANTKKim HPERA. A preparation ex- 
tolled Vy tiie «Dcients, in melancholy, hydro- 
phobia, epilepsy, &c. It was formed of ger- 
mander, agaric, pulp of colocynth, Aiabian 
stscfaaa, opoponax, sagapenum, parsley, aristo- 
lochia,wliite pepper, cinnamon, lavender, myrrh, 
hooey, &c. 

Ahti'ocbi Thbuiaoa. A theriac employed 
by Antiochus against every kind of ppison. It 
was composed of thynoe, opoponax, millet, tre- 
I<h1, femel, maiseed, nigella sativa, &c. 

ANTIODONTAL'GIC, AnUuUntal'gU, An. 
todcmaifgUuSy OdoHtal'gic, Odont*ic, Antiodon- 
tal'gicus, from «vti, 'against,' and o^oiTaiyt0, 
* toothache.' A remedy for toothache. 

ANTIORGAS'TIC, Antiorgas'timts, from 
crvTf^ <r.gainst,' and ooyawy < I desire vehement- 
ly.' A remedy for orgasm or erethism, and for 
irritation in general. 

ANTIPARALYT'IC, Antiparalft'ieus, from 
ovTf, 'against,' and wA^akvoa^ * palsy.' Op- 
posed to palsy. 

ANTIPAKASIT'IC, AnHparasifieus, An- 
Hphth^riaeus, Phthi'rius, Parasi$*ieids; from 
ani, 'against,' and aro^arrro;, ' a parasite '(q. v.) 
An agent that destroys parasites, as the differ- 
ent vermin that infest the body. The chief an- 
tipsimsitica are Coceulus, Staphisagria, Vsrct' 
trum albumy and certain of the mercurial prepa^ 



ANTIPARASTATI'TIS, from artiy < oppo- 
iite,'and itm^arxat^g, 'the epididymis;' also, 
'the prostate,' and iUs, denotinff inflammation. 
Inflammation of Cowper's glands. 

ANTIPATHI'A, from am, 'against,' and 
TTo^r, ' passion, affection.' Aversion. A' na- 
tural repugnance to any person or thing. 

ANTIPATHIC, AnHpath'ieus, (F.) ArUi- 
patii^us. Belonging to antipathy. Opposite, 
contiary, — as kumeurs antipathiqnss; humours 
opposed to each other. Also, palliative, (q. v.) 

ANTIP'ATRI THERIAC A, Thsnae of An- 
TiF'ATBa. A fiirrago of more than 40 articles 
osed as an antidote against the bites of serpents. 

ANTIPERIODIC, AntipMottieusy from 



am, ' against,' and ir$^ todo^, ' period.' A reme- 
dy which possesses the power of arresting mor- 
bid periodical poovements; — e. g. the sulphate 
of quinia in intermittents. 

ANTIPERISTAL'TIC, AnHpsristal'Heus, 
Antivsrmie'tUar, from am, ' against,' and Trt* 
<t0TixA<», ' I contract.' An inverted action of 
the intestinal tube. 

ANTIPERISTASIS, from ttm, 'against,' 
and vi^irroaK, 'reunion, aggregation.' A 
union of opposite circumstances: the action of 
two contrary qualities, one of which augments 
the force of the other. The peripateticians as- 
serted, that it is by Antiperistasis, that fire is 
jiotter in winter than in summer. Theophras- 
tus attributes the cause, which renders man 
more vigorous, and makes him digest more 
readily in winter, to the augmentation of heat 
caused by Antiperistasis. 

ANTIPER'NIUS, from am, 'against,' and 
Pmmoy ' a chilblain.' A remedy against chil- 
blains; — as Ungnsn'tum antiper^mum, an oint- 
ment for chilblains. 

ANTIPERTUSSIS, kee Zinci sulphas. 

ANTIPESTILENTIALIS, Antiloimic. 

ANTIPHARMACUS, Alexipharmic. 

ANTIPHLOGISTIC, AnHpklogis'Hcus, 
from arrt, ' against,' and i^Jnym, ' I burn.' Op- 
posed to influnmation ; — as AntipfUogisHc r«- 
medies, A. regimen, &c. 

ANTIPHTHEIRIACA, AnHphtkiri'aca, 
from aru, ' acainst,' and tp^u^ittw, ' I am lousy.' 
A remedy which is used to destroy lice. 

ANTIPHTHIS'ICAL,iln«»pAtAtV»<w#, from 
aiT(, 'against,' and 9^tri{, ' consumption.' Op- 
posed to phthisis. 

ANTIPHYSICA, Carminatives. 

ANTIPHYSICAL, AnHpkys'ieus, from av- 
Ti, 'against,' and ^9w, * I blow.' Anexpeller 
of wind : a carminative, (q. v.) 

It has also been usea for any thing preter- 
natural; here, the derivation is from arti, 
'against,' and 9v<r<(, 'nature.' The French 
sometimes say, ' XTn godu antiphysigue.* 

AIifTl¥hEXJKLT1C,Antipleurst'icus, Anti- 
plsurBt'ie, from *»ti, 'against,' and nXtv^iXit, 
' pleurisy.' Opposed to pleurisy. 

ANTIPNEUMONIC, AnHpneumon'ieus, 
from «vTf, ' against,' and nnv/utvia, ' disease or 
inflammation of the lungs.' A remedy for dis- 
ease or inflammation of the lungs. 

ANTIPODAGRIC, Antiarthritic. 

ANTIPRAXIS, from am, 'against,' and 
n^tt^am, ' I act.' A contrary state of different 
parts in the same patient: e. g. an increase of 
heat in one organ, and diminution in another. 

ANTIPSOR'IC, AnHpso'Heus, Antisea'hi- 
ous, from am, 'against,' and xf/mqa, ' the itch.' 
(F.) Antigalswp, Opposed to the itch. 

ANTIPUTRID, Antiseptic. 

ANTIPYIC, Antipy'icus, from «m, 
' against,' and ww>, ' pus.' Opposed to suppu- 
ration. 

ANTIPYRETIC, Febrifuge. 

ANTIPYROT'IC, Antipyrot'icus, from arti, 
' against,' and wvq, ' fire.' Opposed to bums or 
to pyrosis. 

ANTIQUARTANA'RIUM, Antiquar'Hum, 
A remedy formerly used against quartan fever. 
. ANTIQUUS, Cbronic. 

ANTIRHACHITIC, AnUrhaehit'ieus, from 
a»T(, 'against,' and rachitis. Opposed to ra- 
chitis, or rickets. 



ANTIBHEUMATIC I 

ANTIRHEUMATIC, Asuirrhmmaficus ; 
from artiy ' against,' and ^iftf^tty < rheumatism.' 
A remedy for rheumatism. 

ANTIBHI'NUM LINAIUA, Una'Ha, L. 
ituig^a^risj Oay'risy Urirn^rid, Common Toctd 
Flaxy (F.) lanaire. The leaves have a bitter- 
ish taste. They are reputed to he diuretic and 
cathartic. An ointment made from them has 
been extolled in hemorrhoids. 

AifTisHi'nuic Eulti'nk, Elati^ni, Fluoilon or 
FemaU Spesdwelly was formerly used against 
■eunry and old ulcerations. 

ANTISCABIOUS, Antitnoric. 

ANTISCIRRHOUS, Anticancerons. 

ANTISCOLETICUS, Anthelmintic. 

ANTISCOLICUS, Anthelmintic. 

ANTISCaRBUTIC, Antiteorb^tiauo^inm 
arttf 'against,' and 0€arhuu9y *ih» scurvy.' 
Opposed to scurvy. 

A N T I SC RO F 'ULO U S, Antismfuh'MU*, 
Antistru'mosuSf Antteheeraitieus, Oppeeed to 
scrofula. 

ANTISEPTIC, Antiseftieusy AnHpu'trid, 
from oyri, 'against,' and rij7rT*c, 'putrid.' An- 
tiputrodino'aiu. Opposed to putrefaction. The 
chief antiseptics, internally or externally em- 
ployed, are Aeidum MuriaHeumj Addum Ni- 
trieum, Aeidnm Stdphurieumy AlwmntB nc/- 
^pkaty Carho Ligniy Calx chlorintUa, Ckiori- 
num, Cifichona and its active principles, Croa- 
ooUf Daud Radix, Ftrmsntum Cerevisitty Soda 
ChloriMoiay and Zinei ehloridum, 

A^TlSlAL'AQOGUZyAntisiaUgo'gteJyAn- 
tisi'olusy from ovn , < against,' and ouLlor, * sa- 
liva.' A remedy a^inst ptyalism. 

ANTISPASIS, Derivation, Revulsion. 

ANTISPASMODIC, AnHspasmod'tous, An- 
tispa^Hen9y from arrty against,' and tf-Tram, ' I 
contract.' Opposed to spasm. The whole 
operation of antispasmodics is probably revul- 
sive. The following are the chief reputed an- 
tispasmodics. JBiher Siilpkurieuoy Asafmtiday 
Castoreumy Draeontiumy Mosekus, OUum And- 
male Bippelii and Va/efta»a^-with the mental 
antispasmodics, abstraction, powerful emo- 
tions, fear, &c. Of direct antispasmodics, we 
have not an example. 

ANTISPA8TICUS, Antispasmodic, Deriva- 
tive. 

ANTISTASIS, Antagonism. 

ANTISTERIG^A, from am, 'against,' 
and OTfi^vyuay 'a support.' A fulcrum, sup- 
port, crutch. — Hippocrates. 

ANTISTER'NUM, from arn, < against,' and 
o-jt^tovy < the sternum.' The back. — ^RuAis. 

ANTISTRUMOUS, Antiscrofulous. 

ANTISyPHILIT'IC, AnHsypkilit'iefiSy 
from orr/, ' against,' and syphilis y < the vene- 
real disease.' Opposed to the venereal dis- 
ease. 

ANTITASI8, Counter-extension. 

ANTITHENAR, Opponens poUicis, Adduc- 
tor pollicis pedis. 

ANTITHERMA, Refrigerants. 

ANTITHORA, Aconitum anthora. 

ANTITRAGICUS, AtuUra'geusy (F.) 2lff«^- 
eU d« VAntitragusy M, antUragtfn. -^Ch.) 
Belonging to the antitragus. A small muscle 
is so called, the existence of which is not con- 
stant. It occupies the space between the anti- 
tragus and anthelix. 

ANTITRAOIENy Antitragicns. 

ANTIT'RAGUS, from am, 'opposite to,' 



1 v^s 

andrefiro^'thetngBS.' Antilo'HumyOUo'Hmm, 
A conical eminence on the pavilion of the ear, 
opposite the tragus. 

ANTITYFIA, from mr^ * against,' and tvt- 
Tu, 'I strike.' Resistance. Hardness. Re- 
percussion. 

ANTIVENE'REAL, Antiveno'rouo, from 
ovrf y ' against,' and Venus, 'Venus.' The same 
aa Antisyphilitic. Formerly it wis used sy- 
nonjrmously with Antaphrodisiac. 

ANTIVERMICULAR, Antiperistaltic 

ANTIVERMINOSUS, Anthehnintic. 

ANT'LIA or ANTLPA, from awrUn, 'to 
pnmpiHit.' A syringe; a pump. Hence, Atu- 
Ua laftooy LattUufgittmy a breMt-^pump; and 
AntUa eangmsWgOy Antibdelloy Biru'do artiji' 
aia'lisy the exhauiting syringe used in o^qping. 

AxTUA Gastrica, StDmack*puni|>. 

ANTODONT AL6IC, Antiodootalgic. 

ANTODYNUS, AnodyiM. 

ANTRAX, AnChnx. 

ANTREy Antrum— ^.^ITyyAMDrVyAJitrBBi 
of Highmore. 

ANTROYERSIO, Anteversio. 

ANTRUM, 'A cavern,' Cwvemfa (q. r.) 
Bar'athrvmy (F.) Autre, A name given to 
certain cavities in bones, the entranee to whi^ 
is smaller than the bottom. 

Antrum Auxis, Tympanum— a. Boccinomini, 
Cochlea, Labyrinth-^. Bentale, see Tooth— n. 
Pylori, see Stomaeh. 

Antrum of HiaaMORB, Antmm Sigjlmoriof^ 
num. Antrum Otnesy Antrum maxUla'ri vel 
maxil'l^ ouporio*risy &enyaH'trumy Meuc'tllary 
Sinus y Sinus Oenat pituita'rittSy (F.) Aniro 
d'HygkmarSy Sinus itaeeillairB, A deep ca- 
vity in the substance of the superior maxillary 
bone conomnnicating with the middle meatus of 
the nose. It is lined by a pr«4ongation of the 
Scbneiderian membrane. 

AmJhUS,Possstt9. 

ANURESIS, Ischuria. 

ANURIA, Ischuria. 

ANUS, 'a circle,' Fodsx, PotsXy Mol'yniy 
Xolfn'Uy Daetfl'iosy Cath'sdroy Cyr^esoUy Cys^- 
sairoSy Cysthosy Apklodray Aph'sdroUy Hedroy 
Proetosy Archosy Sedesy Cuius. The circular 
opening situate at the inferior extremity of the 
rectum, by which the excrement is expelled. 
Thb fundament. The seaty (F.) Siige. The 
body. Thbseat. 

Anus also signifies the anterior orifice of the 
Aqusduet of Sylvius. By scmie, this Anus, 
called also Pora^mon eommu^nS poste^riusy has 
been supposed to form a communication be- 
tween the back part of the third ventricle and 
the lateral ventricles. It is closed up, how- 
ever, b}[ the tela choroidea, and also by the for> 
nix, which is intimately connected with this. 
The foramen is situate between the commissu- 
ra mollis of the optic thalami and the pineal 
gland. 

Anus, AxTinciAL. An opening made arti- 
ficially, to supply the natural anus. The term 
is often usea to include preteraatural anus, 
(q. V.) 

Anus, Cohtractrd, (F.) Anus riirsoi. A 
state of the anus when*, from some cause, it is 
constricted. 

Anus, Impervoratx. A malformation in 
which there is no natural anus. See Atresia 
ani adnata. 

Anus, Prktxrnat'ural, (F.) Anus eoutre 



AiaiETY 



APHASSOKENOS 



natun. A* amormai. An accidental opening 
which gives issue to the wbole or to a part of 
the feces. It. may be owing to a wound, or, 
which is most common, to gangrene attacking 
the intestine in a hernial sac. 

This term is also employed, as well as A^us 
dmfii, dmnou9 aifw«, to the case where the anus 
ioftead 6f being in its natnral situation, is in 
SQOie neighbonring cavity, as the bladder, va* 
gins, Jce. 

ANXI'ETT, Anxi:«ta»jA>ud'0tudM, Adrnnu/- 
ma, Vftpk^'ria afun^etaSj Alyt'mnu, Al'ytB^ 
Al'ysis, Asi, from ^ngere, 6r. ayx**^* 'to 
itnngle, to soflbeate.' A state of restlessness 
and agitation, with general indisposition, and a 
(hstieMmg sense of oppression at the epigas- 
triom. Ltgyittudt, mnaneif^ and anguUk^ xit- 
present de^ees of the same condition* 

ANYPNIA, Insomnia. 

AOCHLFSIA, ftom «, pHv. and t jlof , < dia- 
torbaiice.' Tranqnillity. Calmness. 

AORTA, ArU*rta magnd, A. erassth A. 
flior'tsia, (F.) AorU. This name was given 
fay Aristotle to the chief artery of the body. . It 
may have been derived from ao^toftoi, 'I am 
suspended,' as it seesas to be suspended from 
the heart; or from ai^f, <air,' and riiffat, <I 
keep,' beoiuae it was supposed to contain air. 
It is probable that Hippocrates meant by ao^M 
the bronchia and their ramifications. The 
aorta is the common trunk of the arteries of 
the body. It arises from die left ventricle of 
the heart, about opposite to the fifth dorsal ver- 
tebra, passes upwards {aseending Aortoy) forms 
the great arch of the Aoria^ and descends along 
the left of the spine {detcending Aorta,) until 
it reaches the middle of the fourth or fifth lum- 
bar vertebra, where it bifbrcates, to give origin 
to the common iltacs. The aorta is sometimes 
divided into the Tkorade or pectoral, and the 
AUominai. For the arteries which arise from 
it, fcc., see Artery. 

AORTEURTS'MA, from a»«Tir» 'the aorta,' 
ind n^(, < dilatfid.' Aneurism of the Aorta, 
(f.)JlHevrfsma de VAorte, Aortiectasie, By 
ordhlly auscultating over the dorsal vertebrs, 
a bellows' sound, vrith a deep and not always 
perceptible impulse, may be detected. 

AORTIC, Aof'Hme. Relating to the Aorta. 
The Aortic vmUrieU, (F.) Vmtride Aortiquo, 
is the left ventricle. The Aortic val^ea are 
the sigmoid valves at the origin of the Aorta, 
fcc. 

AORTIECTASIE, Aorteurysma. 

AORTITIS, Injiamma'tio Aor'tm, from 
Amta, and itis, denoting inflammation. In- 
flammation of the aorta. 

AORTRA, Aortron, a^^a, m^t^ «»• A lobe 
of the lungs. — Hippocrates. 

AOTUS, from a, privative,, and twc, «an 
ear.' A monster devoid of ears. Gurlt. 

APAG'MA, Apoclas^ma, Apoceeaulis'menon, 
from ora, < from,' and ayn, < I remove.' Separa- 
tion, abduction, (q. v.) Separation of a frac- 
tured booe.—- Galenus, Fofisius. 

APAGOGE, Defecation, Inductio. 

APALACHINE, Ilex vomitoria--tf.aF«wt7/«« 
de Prunior, Ptinos— 4U Gallia, Ilex Vomitoria. 

APALliAGE, Apallax'ic, from anaUrro, 
* I change.' Mutation, change. It is generally 
t>^ in a good sense, and means the change 
from disease to health. — Hippocrates. 

APALLAXIS, Apallage. 



APAL0T1CA, from anaxtrat, < softness, 
tenderness.' Fortuitous lesions or deformities 
affecting the soft parts. The first order in the 
class TyckUa, of Good. 

APANTHESIS, Apanthismus. 

APANTHIS'MUS, ApoMthc^sis, from an; 

< from,' and «rdf«, * I flower.' The obliteration 
of parts previously inservient to useful pur- 
poses, as of the ductus venosus and ductus ar- 
teriosus, which are essential to foetal existence, 
but are subsequently unnecessary. See, also, 
Stnprum. 

APANTHRO^IA, from ane^ 'from,* and 
m.f0qwrot, <man.' Detestation of man; desire 
for solitude.— Hippocrates. One of the symp- 
toms of hypochon<kiasis. 

APAPHRISM08,. Despumatimi. 

APARACHTTUM VINUM, from «, prir., 
and uAfAjnm, < I poor over.' The purest wine : 
that in4uai has not been mixed with sea-water. 
—Galen. 

APARINE, Galium aparine. 

APARTHROSIS, Diarthrosis. 

AP' ATH Y, Apathi'a, Amdi'a, from «, priva- 
tive, and 7r<t<^(, < affection.' {VJ)AfatkU. Ac- 
cidental suspension of the itaoral feelings. It 
takes place in very severe diseases, particularly 
in malignant fevers. 

APECHE^MA, from am, <from,' and >//or, 

< sound.' Properly the action o(f reflecting 
sound. In medicine, it is synonymois with 
the Latin Contraficenra, a coaiiter-fissure, a 
counter-blow.— Gorrseus, Celsus. 

APECTOCEPHALUS, Acephalothoms. 

AFEL^A,App«l'la,Lcipoder'mo9,Recuti'tus, 
from a, priv., and pellic, ' skin.' One whose 
prepuce does not cover the glans.— Galenus, 
Linnsus, Vogel. Retraction or smallness of 
any other soft appendage.— Sagar. One who is 
circumcised. 

APEPSIA, Dyspepsia. 

APE'RIENT, ApfrUns, Apertti'vus, from 
aperire, {ad and pario,) * to open.' Rce'erang, 
A laxative, (q. v.) (F.) ApMtif. A medicine 
which gently opens the bowels. The term had 
formerly a much more extensive signification, 
and, like Caialyt'icum, was given to a substance 
supposed to have the power of opening any of 
the passages, and even the blood-vessels. 

APERISTATON, Apcris^tatum,fTom «, pri- 
vative, and nt^um}fu, ' I surround.' An epithet 
for an ulcer not dangerous nor considerable, nor 
surrounded by inflammation. 

APERITIF, Aperient. 

APERITIVUS, Aperient. 

APERTOR OCULI, Levator palpebrse supe- 
rioris. 

APERTO'RITJM, from aporio, « I open.' An 
instrument for dilating the os uteri during la- 
bour. 

APERTURA, Mouth— a. Anterior ventriculi 
tertii cerebri. Vulva (cerebri)— a. Pelvis supe- 
rior, see Pelvis. 

APEUTHYSMENOS, Rectum. 

APEX, Mucro. The point or extremity of 
a part:— as the apex of the tongue, nose, &c. 

Apex Lihgujb, Proglossis. 

APH^RESIS, Aphevesis, Extirpation. 

APH AL ANGI'ASIS, from a, * intensive,' and 
<P*l*Yt, < phalanx,' (q. v.) The fourth stage of 
Oriental leprosy, which is recognised chiefly by 
a gangrenous condition of the fingers. 

APHASSOM'ENOS, from a^Mvo, <I touch. 



APHEDRA 



66 



APIUM GRAVEOLENS - 



I feel.' Tke touching of the parts of genera^ 
tion of the female as a means of diagnosis.— 
Hippocrates. See Esaphe. 

APHEDRA, Anus. 

APHEDRIA, Menses. 

APHEDRON, Anus. 

APHELI'A, ^tptXrig, < simple.' Simplicity. 
The simple manners of the sect of Methodists 
in teaching and practising medicine. 

APHELXIA, from a^tijrtti, <J abstract.' 
Voluntary inactivity of the whole or the greater 
part of the external senses to the impressions 
of surrounding objects, during wakefutaiess. 
R^very, (F.) Rsveru. Dr. Good has intro- 
duced this into his Nosology, as well as Apkilxf- 
ia soeors or absence of mind'^Am intm'.ta or db- 
Mraeti&n of mind: and A.oHt/ta, Stufdium ituji* 
ni, hrovm 9tudy or listless musing, 

APHEPSEMA, Decoction. 

A PHEPSIS, Decoction. 

APHE'RESIS, Apha'resisy from a$atqsm, * I 
take away.' An operation by which any part 
of the body is separated from the other. Hip- 
pocrates, according to Foesius, uses the expres- 
sion Apka'rssis S»n'guims for excessive hemor- 
rhage; and Sennertus, to express the condition 
of an animal deprived both of the faculties of 
the mind and of the mind itself. 

APH'ESIS, from ^fttjut, < I relax.' A remis- 
sion (q. V.) This word expresses sometimes 
the diminution or cessation of a disease; at 
others, languor and debility of the lower extre- 
mities. See Languor, and Remission. 

APHIL ANTHROPY, Aphilanthro'pia,fTom 
«, privative, tpilt*, < I love,' and atS^nn^y < a 
man.' Dislike to man. Love of solitude. Vo- 
gel has given this name to the first degree of 
melancholy. 

APHISTESIS, Abscess. 

APHODEUMA, Excrement. 

APHODUS, Excrement. 

APHONETUS, Aphonus. 

APHQ'NI A, Uga'tio lingua, Loqus'la aboT 
iiOy Defee't-ns logve'lee, Dyspko'nia, q. v.,; (of 
some,) Apk'ony, (F.) Apkonisy Perte ds la Voias, 
from a, privative, and 9«9V^, <* voice.' Privap 
tion of voice, or of the sounds that ought to be 
produced in the glottis. When aphonia forms 
Wirt of catarrh or of < cold,' it is commonly of 
but little consequence; but when produced by 
causes acting on the nervous . system, as by 
some powerful emotion, or without any appre- 
ciable lesion of the vocal apparatus, it fre- 
quently resists all remedies. 

Aphonia, Catalepsy — a. Surdorum, Mutitas 
Surdorum. 

APHONICUS, Aphonus. 

APHO'NUS, Apko'nicus, Apko'nstus; same 
etymon. Relating to aphonia. 

APHONY, Aphonia. 

APHORIA, SteriUtas. 

APHORICUS, Sterile. 

APHORUS, Sterile. 

APHOR'Mfi, ct^oc/Ki?, < occasion.' The ex- 
ternal and manifest cause of any thing. The 
occasional cause of a disease. — Hippocrates. 

APHRO'DES, 'frothy,' from «<fpof, <foam,' 
' and ai^sc, < resemblance.' Applied to the blood 
and the excrements.— Hippocrates. 

APHRODISIA, Coition, Puberty. 

APHRODISIAC, Aphrodisiaeusy from A«p»- 
^irn, * Venus.' (F.) Aphrodisiofiu, Medicine 
or food believed to be capable of exciting to the 



pleasures of love; as ginger, cantharides, lie. 
They are generally stimulants. 

APHRODISIACUS, Venereal. 

APHRODISIASMUS, Coition. 

APHRODISIOG'RAPHY, from A^Q^mi, 

Venus,' and ygafoi, <I describe.' Etymolo- 

gieally, this term means a description of tke 

pleasures of love, but it has been placed at tbe 

head of a work describing the venereal diseaK. 

APHROO" AL A, from as^«r, < foam,' and yaXa, 
< milk.' Lae spumo'sum, A name 'formerly 
given to milk rendered frothy by' agitation. 

APHRONIA, Apoplexy. 

APHRONITRUM, Natrum, Soda. 

APHROSYNE, Delirium, Insanity. 

APHTHA, Aphta, Aptha, from awrmy * I 
inflame.' Thrush or sort mouihy Aphtha U»- 
tufdmsn^ A. Infani*umy Ladu^eimeny LattU' 
cimfinayAl'colet^Laetu'minayEm'phlysis aphtha, 
Uleera sorpon*tia Oris, Pus*tula oris yFsbris aph- 
tho'sa, Angi*na aphtho^soy Vesie'uies gingiva'' 
rumy Typhus aphtholdeus, Stomati'tis eaesuda- 
ti'va, 8. vesieulo'sa infantum, Siomap^yra, 8, 
aphtha, Prunsl'la, Whits Thrush, MUk Ukrusk. 
Aphthae consist of roundish, pearl-coloured ve- 
sicles, confined to the lips, mouth, and inte»> 
tinal canal, and- generally terminatiiig in cord- 
like sloughs. In prance, the Aphtlw of chil- 
dren, Aphthss des- snfans, is called MuguM, 
Millet y Blanehst, Catarrhs buccal and SumatiU 
crtmeuse pultaee^, Fuitaesous Injlammatiom of 
the Mouth; and generally receives two divisionB 
—the mild or discreet, (F.) Muguet bsnin on 
discret, and the malignant, (F.) Mugust maU* 
ou conjluont, the Black Thrush. ConuDon 
Thrush is a disease of no consequence, requi- 
ring merely the use of absorbent laxatives. The 
malignant variety, which is rare, is of a more 
serious character, and is accompanied with ty- 
phoid symptoms. 

Aphthjb Adultobum, Stomatitis, aphthoiM— 
a. Preputii, Herpes prepntii— «. berpentes, 
Cancer aquaticus. 

APHTHE GANQRANEUXy Cancer aquati- 
cus. . 

APHTHE8 DES ENFANSy Aphthe. 

APHTHEVX, Aphthous. 

APHTHO'DES, Aphthoidss, AphthoUous, 
from aphth€B,w[kA H^i, < resemblance.' Aph- 
thous-like. Resembling aphths. 

APHTHOUS, ji^Ao'9««, (F.) A^thsHx. 
Belonging to aphtb«{ complicated with aph- 
tha ; as Aphthous Jpsver, 

APIASTRUM, MeUssa. 

APICES CRURUM MEDULLiE OBLON- 
GATiE, Corpora striatan-4. Digitorum, Pupoic. 

APILEPSIA, Apoplexy. 

APIONTA, see Excretion. 

APIOS, Pyrus comnmnis. 

APIS, Bee. 

APITES, from «7k<ov, <a pear.' Perry. — Gor- 
raus. 

A'PIUM GRAVEOLENS, il;»«M»s Paluda'- 
pittm, Beli'num, Smallage, (V,)Aehe. Nat. Ord, 
Umbelliferae. Sex. Syst. Pentandria Digynia. 
The plants, roots, and seeds are aperient and 
carminative* Selery is a variety of this. 

Apium Pktrjbum, Bubon Macedonicum. 

Apium PsTKOSELi'inrM, Apium Borten'sf, 
Eleoseli^num (7), Chielum, Petroseli'num or 
Common Parsley, <F.) PersU. The root— P«- 
troselinum, (Ph. IT. S.)— 4Uid seeds are diuretic 
and aperient. 



APLASTIC 



€7 



APOMTLENAS 



APLASTIC, Aplas'HeuSf from «, priTative, 
and n-Xar^my * I form.' That which is not cap^ 
ble of forming; that which does not serve to 
form, or is not organizable. ' 

Aplastic £i.BME]fT; one which is unsuscep- 
tible of any &rther amoont of organisation. — 
Gtfber. 

APLESTIA, Inglttvies, Intempeiance. 

APLEU'ROS, from «, privatire, and irlfti^oc, 
'arib.' One without ribsd — ^Hippocrates. Galen: 

APLOTX)MT, Aplotom'iay from anUoc,* sim 
(rfe,' and rtftrmy * I cut.* A simple incision. 

APNEUSTIA, Apncea, Asphyxia. 

APN(E'A, from «, privative, and mw, *I re- 
epire.' Asfkyx'ia, Apneus^tia. Absence of re- 
spiration, Bssfiraftio ahl^ita, or insensible re- 
spiration. Also, Ortbopncea, (q. v.) 

Apn<sa IiffFANTtns, Asthma Thymi^m. 

APN(EASP9TXIA, Asphyxia. 

APNUS, «ryoo^, same etymon. One devoid 
of nspiration. An epithet applied by authors 
to cases in which the respiration is so small and 
slow, that it seento suspended* — Castelli. It is 
probable, however, that the word was always 
applied to the patient, not to the disease. 

APO, ttwy a prefix, denoting * from, of, off, 
out.' Hence— 

APOBASOSA, Embamma. 

APOBAINON, Eventus. 

APOBESOMENON, Eventus. 

APOBIOSIS, Death. 

APOBLEMA, Abortion. 

APOBOLE, Abortion. 

APOBRASMA, Furfur. 

APOCAPNISMUS, Fumigation. 

APOCATASTASIS, Considentia, Restan- 
ratio. 

APOCATHARSIS, Catharsis. 

APOCATHARTICUS, Cathartic. 

APOCECAULISMENON, Apagma. 

APOCENO'SIS, Apo#Mn9'W#,fTom «m,<out,' 
sod sc?«0>ic, * evacuation .' A partial evacuation, 
Mcording to some, in opposition to Cenosis, 
▼faich signifies a general evacuation. — CuUen 
sod Swednor apply it to morbid fluxes. 

AP0CI50SIS, Abevacuatio^-a. Diabetes melli- 
ttts, Diabetes — a. Ptyalismus mellitus, see Sali- 
ratioD-^a. Yomitns pyrosis. Pyrosis. 

APOCHOREON, Excrement* 

APOCHREMMA, Sputum. 

APOCHREMPSIS, Exspnition. 

APOCHTMA, from acTrc/ioi, *^I pour out.' 
A sort of tar, obtained from old ships; which is 
impregnated with chloride of sodium. It was 
^»ed as a discutient of tumours. — Aetius, Pan- 
lus, Gomeus. 

APOCIN GOBE'MOZrCBB, A^ocynam an- 
droaannifolium. 

APOCLASMA, Abduction, Apagma. 

APOCLEISIS, Asitia, Disgust. 

APOCOPE, from «iro, and xinrtivy < to cut.' 
Abscission, (q. v.) A wound with loss of sub- 
stance. Fracture with loss of part of the bone. 
Amputation. 

APOCOPUS, Castratus. 

APOCRISIS, Contagion, Excrement, Secre- 
tion. 

APOCROUS'TIC, Apocrous'tiea sen Apo- 

f^Hs'tieay {remedHoy) from «7n>, ' out,' and ir^ot/iu, 

'1 iNish.' An astringent and repellent, (q. v.) 

— Galenas. 

APOCRUSTICA, Apocroustic. 

AP0CY£8IS>Pafturition. I 



APOC'TNUM ANDROSiEMIFO'LIUM, 
from eofy and xyt»Vy <a dog,' because esteemed, 
of old, to be fatal to dogs. Dog^s Btme, Bittt 
Dog^M Ban€y MilJkweed, Bitterrooty Honey bloomy 
Catekjly, Flytrap^ Ip^eeaCy (F.) Apoein goh9- 
mouehe. A, amer, Nat. Ord. Apocyneas. S^se, 
Syst, Pentandria Digynia. The root of this 
plant is found from Canada to Carolina. Thirty 
grains evacuate the stomach as effectually as 
two-thirdff of the amount of Ipecacuanha, by 
which name it is known in various parts of the 
eastern states. It is in the secondary list of 
the Pharmacopceia of the United States. 

Apoo^THrM Canitab'inuh, Indian Hemp. 
This American plant possesses emetic, cathar- 
tic, diaphoretic and diuretic properties, and 
has l>een strongly reconmi^ded in dropsy. 
It has been given m decoction, — ^i} of the root 
boiled in three pints of water to two. A wine- 
glassfrd for a dose. 

ApocTNtTM NovjB Anolije Hirsutum, Ascle* 
pias tuberosa — a. Orange, Asclepias tuberos e 
a. Scandens, Allamanda. 

APODACRYT'ICUS, DslackrymaH'vuSy 
from ««■«, <from,' and daitQvwf <I weep.' A 
substance, sui^posed to occasion a flow of the 
tears, and then to arrest them. — Columella, 
Pliny, Galenus. 

AP0DEMIAL6IA, Nostalgia. 

APOD'IA, from c, privative, and mvf, *a 
foot.' Want of feet; hence Apous or Apus, one 
who has no feet. 

APODYTE'RIUM, Contste'riwmy SpoHato'- 
rium, Spolia'riumy from aircivti, * I Strip off.' 
The ante-room, where the bathers stripped 
themselves in the ancient Gymnasia. 

APOGALACTISMUS, Weaning. 

APOGAL ACTOS, Exuber. 

APOGEUSIS, Ageustia. 

APOGEUSTIA, Ageustia. 

APOGLAUCOSIS, Glaucosis. 

APOGON, Imberbis. 

APOG'ONUM, from a/r; and yiM/uai, <I 
exist.' A living foetus in utero.— Hippocrates. 

AP0LEPISI9, Desquamation. 

APOLEPISMUS, Desquamation. 

APOLEP'SIS, Apolep'tiay Apolip^eis, from 
anoXafitfS*vw, *I retain.' Retention, suppres- 
sion. — Hippocrates. Asphyxia. 

APOLEX'IS, from airojiijy«, < I cease.' Old 
age, decrepitude. 

APOLINO'SIS, from ano, and it/wv, <a flaxen 
thread.' The mode of operating for fistula in 
ano, by means of a thread of Homolinon or JW- 
num crudum* — Hippocrates, Paulus. 

APOLIPSIS, Apolepsis. 

APOLLINARIS ALTERCUM, Hyoscya- 
mus. 

APOLUTICA, Cicatrisantia. 

APOLYS'IA, Apol'ysisy from atto^uw, 'I 
loosen.' Solution. Relaxation. Debility of 
the limbs or looseness of bandages. — Erotian. 
Expulsion of the foetus and its dependencies. 
Termination of a disease. — Hippocrates, Galen. 

APOMATHE'MA, Apomaihe'sity from «7r«, 
and Aia>^«r«, < I learn.' Forgetfulness of things 
taught. — Hippocrates. 

APOM'ELI, from *to, «of,' and a«»^<, 'ho- 
ney.' An oxymel (q. v.) or decoction made of 
honey. — Galen, Aetius, Paulus, &c. 

APOMEXIS, Munctio. 

APOMYLE'NAS, from «7roMw««««*, 'I 
make a wry moutli.' One who pushes his lips 



APOMTTHOflU 



APOPLEXIA 



ibrwardfi prettiBg them agdiut ^icli other. 
OceaaionAll^r a symptom of nerroos fevers- 
Galen, Erotian. 

APOMYTH(y SIS» from ^ofiv^rmy < I snora.* 
A dinaae in which tjiere ia 8tartor«-»Sanvagea, 
Sagar. 

APOMTXIA» Nanl mvcu. 

APONEUROGkRAPHY, Apomeurograffkiat 
from ovoftw^rir^ an * aponearouBy' and yQ"^^* 
< a deacription.' A deteription of the Aponeo- 
rosea. 

APONEUROL'OOT, Apomurolog^'ia^ from 
«nQFt«(«flr<f» < an aponeorosis,' voAlofty ^ adis- 
oonrse.' Ap9n»ur9siol'9gy. The Anatomy of 
the Aponeuroses. 

APON£UROSIOLOGT» Aponeurology. 

APONEUROSIS^ ApvMvrv'tif^ from ofrt, 

* from/ and M«9i»» ' a nenre.' JPnnurvc^iio, 
D w trv a ^tia, JEnsrvaftiOf SxpofnftiQ n^rvo'sOf 
(F.) Aponeurose, Apondvrou. The andents 
called every white part ftuQtti and regarded the 
Aponeurosis as a nervous expansion. The 
Aponeuroses are white, shining memhranes, 
very resisting, and composed of fibres inter- 
laced. Some are continuous with the musoular 
fibres, and differ onlv from tendons by their flat 
form. They are called Aponeuroses of insert 
Hon J (F.) Aponevroses dHnaettiony when thev 
are at the extremities of muscles, and attach 
them to the bone ; — Aponeuroses ofinterseeeion^ 
(F.) Aponivroses dHnUrseeiiony if they inter* 
rupt the continuity of the muscle, and are con* 
tinuous on both sides with muscular fibres. 
Others surround the muscle, and prevent its 
displacement : they are called enveloping Apo^ 
neuroses J (F.) Aponevroses d'enveioppe, 

Aponeukosis, Fascia — a. Crural, Fascia lata 
^a. Femoral, Fascia lata*— a. Iliac, Fascia 
iliaca. 

APONEUROSITIS, from aponeurosisy and 
itiSf < denoting inflammation.* Inflammation 
of an aponeurosis. 

APONEUROTIC, Apmuurot'unu. What 
relates to Aponeuroses : — thus, we say Aponeu^ 
roHc expansion^ Aponeurotic muscle^ &c. 

APONEUROT'OMY, Aponeurotom'iay from 
mvtnav^metty * aponeurosis,' and <n}uy», < I cut.' 
Anatomy of aponeuroses. 

Aponeurotomy has, also, been proposed for the 
division, (debridement) of filaments, &c. in apo- 
neurotic openings, and for the section of £uci«. 

APONiYROSE PADIEUSEy see Pedal 
Aponeurosis— a. Superfidelle de P Abdomen at 
ds la Ouisse, Fascia superficialis. 

APONEYROSIS, Aponeurosis. 

APON'IA, from », privative, and nof«c, 
< pain.' Freedom from pain. 

APONIPSIS, Ablution. 

APOPALLE'SIS,jtf;w/rarM5,from«7ro9r«ia», 

* I throw off.' Expulsion. Protrusion. — ^Hip- 
pocrates.' Also, Abortion, (q. V.) 

APOTATE'MAyApop'atkosyApop'atus. The 
excrement, and the plaee where it is deposited. 
— Dioscorides, Erotian. 

APOPEDASIS, Luxation. 

APOPHLEOMATISANS PER NARES, 
Errhine — a. per Os, Sialogogne. 

AP0PHLE6MATISANTIA, Apophiegma- 
tison*tay Apopkiegmatis*miy from ««*•, <out,' 
and sliy/ua, < phlegm.' Medicines which faci- 
litate ^e upward expulsion of mucus from the 
mucous membrane of the digestive or air pas- 
sages ; as gardes, maaticatories, fcc. 



APOFBLEQ^AnSMyApopUegmatiym 
The action of Apophlegmatisantia.— Galen. 

AP0PHLE6MATISMI, ApopUegmatiaan- 
tia. 

APOPiPRADES, from tare^e^ty 'uliieky.' 
An epithet applied to unlucky oays, (dies no- 
fandi,) Days on which a favourable change 
is not eiqiected to occur in a disease^— >A. Laa- 
reatius. 
• APOPHRAXIS, AmenorrhoBa. 

APOPHTHARIifA, Apopk'thoroy from one, 
and ^^11911, ^ I corrupt.' Abortion, aa well as 
a medicine to procure abortion. 

APOPHTHORA, AborUon. 

AP0PHTH0RIU8, Abortive. 

APOPHY'ADES, from ant, <from,' and ^«», 
( I spring.' The ramifications of veins and ar- 
teries."-**HippoCralea. 

APOPHYSB BAaiLAIRSy Baailary pio- 
c e s s a. Sngehumte on vetginaUy Yaginal pro- 
cess-*-4. ^yramidaley aee Temporal Boae a- 
Pitresy see Temporal Bone. 

APOPHYSES MPINEUSESy Spinous pio- 
cesses of the vertebne. 

APOPHTSIS, from catty • fiPOBS,' and 9**-, 
^I rise,' Ec^pkpsisy Proees'ansy Jippendi^y Ji 
process of a bone, Prominen'tia ossis etmtin'ua. 
When the apophysis is yet sepamted frt>m the 
body of the Done by intervening cartilage, it is 
called Epiphysis. The apophyses or- processes 
are, at times, distinguished by epithets, expres- 
sive of their form : as J§, styloid, A, eorucmdy 
&c. Others, are not preceded by the word 
apophysis; as Trochantery Tuberosity, &c. 

' Apopb'tsxs of In okab'sias is a term applied 
to the lesser ak of the sphenoid bone. 

Apophtsis op Rau, Or^ apophyse du Mar- 
teaWi see Malleus. 

Apophysis Ztoomatica, Zygomatic process. 

APOPIES'MA, from «irtrMC«, * I compress.' 
Hippocrates uses the term to signify a fancied 
expression or foreing out of humours by the 
application of bandages in wounds and frac- 
tores. 

APOPLANESIS, Error loci. 

APOPLECTIC, ApopMHeus. Referring 
to Apoplexy. This word has various significa- 
tions. It is applied,- 1. To individuals labour- 
ing under apoplexy : 3. To remedies proper for 
combating apoplexy: 3. To the constitution, 
temperament, or make, Arehiteem*ra apopiec'- 
tieay Hah'itus apople&ticusy which predisposes 
to it, and, 4. To the symptoms which charac- 
terize apoplexy; as Apopleetie sleep, A. etroJte, 
(q. V.) A. stertory &c. The jugular veins have 
also, by some, been called Apoplectic veins, 
Venee opoplec'tiees. 

Apoplectic Cell. The cavity remaining in 
the encephalon, after the efiusion of a clot into it. 

APOPLECTICUS, Antiapoplectic, Apo- 
plectic. 

APOPLEXIA, Apoplexy--^. Catalepaia, 
Catalepsisr-a. Cerebiaus, see Apoplexy — a. 
Cerebri, see Apoplexy — a.. Cordis, Hsemoear- 
diorrhagia — a. Hydrocephalica, Hydrocephalus 
intemus— «. Hepatica, Bepatorrhagia — a. Me- 
dullaris, Apoplexia myelitica — a. Meningaa, 
Apoplexy, meningeal. 

Apoplkxia Mtklit'ioa; A. MedmUt^riey A. 
Spina'liSyA, Raekia'lisy Hamor^rkaehisy My- 
elorrha^'iay Myelapoplex'iay (F.) Apoplesrie 
de la MoUle ipinikrCy Hihnerrhagie de Us Mo- 
Ule ipinihrcy Hemato^enyiliCymmO'mySlorrka* 



AJ^OTIMXIS CAPZLLAIRS fi 

gisj Hi f m mt o nkmthi 9, HUDorrbage into the 
spiflalBaanow. 

ApoPLBXIA NBBVOBAy ApOpleXy, I Htlf HO P- 

a. NemMH tnamatieay ConcoMioii of the btain 
«-«. PituitoMy see Apoplezy^-HU Pvlmoindis, 
see Haemoptyus— a. PHiinoimm, see Haemop- 
tysis — a« Ronlu, Apoplezj, renal — a* Rha- 
dualis, A. myeUtica— -a. Saagninea, see Apo- 
plezy--«. Seroaa, see Apoplexy— a. Simplex, 
Apoplexy, nervous — a. Spasmodica, Apoplexy, 
nerroos-^a. Spinal, Apoplexia myelitioft^-4i. 
Temnlenla, see Tenralentia. 

APOPLEXIE CAPILLAIRBy MoIUties 
cerebri — a. CMbraUf Apoplexy, Himorrkagie 
eiribraU. 

APOPLEJtIE FOUDROTANTEy « Thun- 
dering Apoplexy.' A form of apoplexy, which 
is intense and^rapidly firtal. 

APOPLEZIB MENlNQiBy Apoplexy, 
meningeal— «• J>« la Mt&h £piMikr&y Apo- 
plexy, sfnnal. 

AP'OPLEXT, Apoplt^iayfromaironKti^ttv, 
* to strike with Tiolence.' At the present day, 
the term apoplexy is employed by many writers 
to signify inUrHiHai himorrhagty (F.) Himor- 
rhagU inierstitielley or every efihsion of blood, 
which occnis suddenly into the substance of 
an organ or tissue. Hence, we speak of cere- 
bral apoplexy, pulmonary apoplexy, &c. &c. 
Fonnerly it was always and still is by many 
-MBiaed in an entirely symptomatic sense, to 
signify, in other woras, the train of phenome- 
na, which characterize cerebral apoplexy. This 
disease, H mmorrh s ^ gia Cer^eMy Aphro'niay Ca^ 
rat ApopUafiay Coma Apoplex^ia, Apoplta^ia 
mr*tbri tangidnftOy A. cerebrt^lUy EneBpkalor^ 
rka^ia, San'guifds ietusy Samat9fUiepk*a' 
lum, Pnlpem^iay Sid^r^Hoy ApiUpnoy Morbus 
atuyn'itusy OnUOy TkeopUgia^ Th»9pl9<e'%ay 
(F.) ApofUxiey A. eirihraUy Hemaio&nce-' 
fkaliey Coup de 'tomgy is characterised by di- 
minution, or loss of sensation and mental ma- 
nifestation ; b J the cessation, more or less com- 
plete, of motion ; and by a comatose state,— 
drcnlation and respiration continuing. It gene- 
rally consists in pressure upon the bmin; either 
from turgescence of vessels, or from extrevasa- 
tioD of blood; hence the terms 'Ham/BnMpk'alutiy 
Hemorrhagis eSrebnUoy and H4mo0neepkalor' 
rhagUy applied to it by some. The general prog- 
nosis is imibyonrable; especially when it occurs 
after the age of 35. When Apoplexy as accom- 
panied with a bard, full pulse, and flushed coun- 
tenance, it is called Apoplma gangmn'eOy -Ca- 
taplifora coma ; when with a feeble pulse and 
pde countenance, and evidences of serous eifti- 
sion, ApopUa^ia sero^say A, pUuUo'aay Serous 
Apoplexj, Catank'ora kydroeepheU'ieay Ence- 
^laioeh'ysis s$wlisyHydrocef^'alus aeu*tus se- 
num, Hydroeneephalorrhie, (Piorry,) Hydropi- 
K> cirihrals suraiguiy Hydrorrhagie, 

In Nsrvous Apoplssnfy Apapls^ia nervo^sa seu 
ifpasmod'ieay A. simplex, single apoplemyy no le- 
sion whatever may be perceptible on dissection, 
although the patient may have died under all ^e 
pbenomena that are characteristic of apoplexy. 
Apoplxxt of thx Hsart, Hemo-cardior- 
rhagia. 

Apoplsxt, BCvmiOB'AL, Apoplex'ia menin- 
gafa, (T.) Apoplexie meningiey Himorrkagie 
neningte. Hemorrhage fh>m the meninges of 
tlie brain or spinal marrow-^^enerally into the 
great cavity of the aiachnoid. 



AH>6TAXIS 

ApoplsxT) Nsbvoto, see ApopleKy>-4u Pul- 
monary, see Haemoptysis-— a. Simple, A. Ner- 



Apo^uzt, Rsnal, ApOflmfia ronatis. A 
condition of the kidney, chcraeterized by knotty, 
irregular, tuberenlated eminences, some of a 
deep blade eoloor. EfiVision of blood into th6 
substance of the kidney. 

Apoflbzt, SBawms, see Apoplexy*^. Spi^ 
nal, Apoplendamyelitica. 

APOPNEUSIS, Exhalatio. 

APOPNIXIS, Suffocation. 

APOPNOE, Exspiratio. 

APOPN(EA, Exspiratio. 

APOPSYCHIA, Syncope. 

APOPTO'SIS,flpom oneTrirw^ < I ihll down,* 
A relaxation of bandages. — Erotian. 

APORRHOE, Aporrhcea. 

APORRH<E'A^ Apo/rhoiy Apor'rkysisy De^ 
JlWfriumy ftovtL oro^s*, * I flow from.' An ema- 
nation, effluvium, contagion, (q. v.)-^Mo8chion. 
A falling off of the hair, accoiding to some. 

APOR'RHTSIS, Aporrhcsa. 

APOSCEM'MA, AposesT^sisy ftem wfo%ipn»^ 
* I lie down, I direct m3^1f towards.' Afflux 
of fluids towards a part. Metastasis. The first 
word has been applied to the excrements.^ 
Hippocrates, Galen. 

APOSCENOSIS, Afwcenosis. 

APOSCEPARNIS'MUS, Deaseia'tioy from 
etno and rircv-a^fai', * a hatchet.' Wound of the 
cranium, by a cutting instrument, in which a 
piece of the bone has been cut out, as with a 
hatchet. — Gorneus. 

APOSCEPSIS, Aposcemttia. 

APOS'CHASIS, Aposekas'musy from wiwv^ 
;tat*> * I scarify.' Searijioation, A slight su- 
piQfficial incision in the skin. Also, blood-let- 
ting. — Hippocrates. 

APOS'IA, Sitts dsfeetusy from «, privative, 
and «^0ff , < drink.' Want of thirst, absence of 
desire for liquids. 

APOSI'TIA, from ar«, «fS«>m,' and rirof, 
<food.' Aversion for food. — Galen. See Disgust. 

KVOSlT'lCyAjtoaitiens; the same etymology. 
Any substance which destroys the appetite, or 
suspends hunger. 

APOSPAS'MA,ih>m aroTTfaw, <I tear or la- 
cerate.' (F.) Arrackement (q. v.) A solution 
of continuity, especially of a ligament. Rk*gma 
ligamffUofriy Laeera'Ho ligamenta'ria, 

AVO^VnACKhnAl^yApospkaeelis'mMSyftim 
mwo, and (T^aiifliloo < mortification.' Gangrene in 
wounds and fractures, owing to the bandages 
being too tight. — Hippocrates. 

APOSPHINXIS, sLn^^ty^Ky constriction, 
compression. The action of a tight bandage^-* 
Hippocrates. 

APOSPONGIS'MUS, the act of sponging for 
any purposc^Gorraeus. 

APOSTALAGIVfA, Apoatag^ma, from cwro, 
<from,' and oraXaKvty <I drop.' The ancient 
name for the sacchanrine liquor which flows from 
grapes when not yet pressed. 
- APOS'TASIS, from cnro, and i*n;/i*i, « I stop.' 
The ancients had different significations for this 
word. It was most commonly used for an ab- 
scess. The separation of a fragment of bone 
by fracture. Removal of disease by some ex- 
cretion, &c. 

APOSTAX'IS, from a7rocrT*:e», *I distil 
from.' The defluxion of any humour, as of 
blood from the nose. — ^Hippocr, Staxis (q. v.) 



APOSTEMA 



70 ATPAREZL8 DE FORXATSON 



APOSTE'MA, from art, «from,' and i^titm's 
<I settle,' or from a^ttf-rq^Kt, <I recede from.' 
Tbifl word U lued by the ancients somewhat 
▼aguely . It meant an affection in which parts, 
previously in contact, are separated from each 
other by a fluid collected between them. The 
moderns regard it as synonymous with AbsMss, 
(q. V.) Some, even of the moderns, have ap- 
plied it to any watery tumour, and even to tu- 
mours in general. 

Apobtbma Cskbbbi, £ncephalopyosis^-a. 
Empyema, Empyema^a. Parulis, FB^ulis — a. 
Phalangum, Fourcke — a. Psoaticum, Lumbar 
abscess. 

APOSTERIG'MA, from artfor^iCo, * I snp- 
]^oit«' Aqy thing that supports a diseased 
part, as a cushion, a pillow, &c. — Galen. A 
deep-seated and inveterate disease of the intes- 
tines. — ^Hippocrates. 

APOSa*UI A, LnpoiUr'mia, from « |iriva- 
tive, and ntaSia, < prepuce.' Want of prepuce. 

APOSTOLO'RUM UNGUENTUM, 2>«- 
deeaphar'maeum, OtTUment vf tk$ ApostUs . So 
called, because as many solid ingredients entered 
into its composition as there were apostles. It 
contained several resins and gum resins, yellow 
wax, oil, vinegar, verdigris, &c., and was for- 
merly employed as a vulnerary. 

APOSTROPHE, from «7r«, and rr^tpv, <I 
turn.' An aversion or disgust for food. — ^Pau- 
lus. Also, the direction of humours towards 
other parts. 

APOSYRMA, Abrasion, Desquamation. 

APOTELES'MA, from awo, and nXt^fta, 
< completion.' The result or termination of a 
disease. See, also, Amuletum. 

APOTHANASIA, see Peath. 

APOTHE'CA, Fharmaee'umy Pharmaeopo'' 
hum, from ano, and o-id^/Kt, <to place.' Any 
place where things are kept, and therefore ' a 
shop,' and particularly a wine cellar. A place 
or vessel wherein medicines are kept. See 
PhanbacopoUum* 

APOTHECARIES' HALL. The Hall of 
the Corporation or Society of Apothecaries of 
London, where medicines are prepared and sold 
under their direction, &c. This Company ob- 
tained a charter of incorporation in the 15th 
jeu of James the First. No general practi- ' 
tioner can establish himself in England or 
Wales, without having obtained a license from 
the Court of Examiners of the Company. 

APOTH'ECARY, Apothsea'ritUy Dispensa'- 
tOTf Pharmaeopo'la, Pigmenta^rius^ Pharmaeo'- 
paifusj Pharma'e^us, Pkarmac§u'ta^ Rkizofo- 
mutf Myropo'lea, MyropofluSyPharmaeteryPkar- 
maeur'gietisy Pharmaeur'gusy Pharmae&u'tisty 
same derivation, (F.) Apothieaire^ Pharmtt- 
m^n^ Pharmacopoh^, In every country except 
Great Britain, it means one who selu drugs, 
makes up prescriptions, &c. In addition to 
these offices, which, indeed, they rarely exer- 
cise, except in the case of their own patients, 
the Apothecaries in England form a privileged 
class of practitioners — a kind of sub-phjrsician. 

jL?Oi:W£,BJiVYl'K,ApotherapiiayApothera' 
peu'sts, from anb^i^*w§v», («ro and dc()ar«v«i,) 
' I cure.' A perfect cure. — Hippocr. In the 
ancient Gymnastics, it meant tne last part of 
the exercises: — the friction, inunction, and 
bathing, for the purposeofoltviating fatigue, or 
curing disease. — Galen, Gan-<^s. 

APOTHERAPEUSIS, Apotherapeia. 



APOTHEROtfUM, from aro, and ^(^i;, 
<heat.' A pickle made of mustard, oil, and 
vinegar. — Galen. 

APOTH'ESI^ from oTfvtS^fUy^I replaoe.' 
The position proper to be given to a fraetnved 
limb, after reiduction. 

APOTHICAIREj Apothecary. 

APOTHICAIRERIE, (F.) from ano^^mnf 
< a warehouse, shop.' The same aa Apothoca ; 
also, a gallipot. 

APOTHLIM'MA, from «iro, and ^Xt^m,*! 
press from.' Anciently, the dregs, and aome- 
times the expressed juice, Succus ea^gs'stu, of 
plants. — GorneuB. 

APOTHRAU'SISyfromaa'o^C'vw,^! break.' 
Fracture of a bone, with spicnia remaining. 
Extraction of a spicnlum of bone.— Gorsasusw 
Also, Abscission, (q. v.) . 

APOTILMOS, Evulsion. . 

APOT'OKOS, from an*, and rimrci, < I brmg 
forth.' An abortive fcstus. — ^Hippocrates. 

APOTOME, Amputotion. 

APOTOMIA, Amputation. 

APOTROPi£UM> Amuletum, 

APOTROPE, Aversioa. Also, deviatioD^-as 
of a limb — Parat'ropB, 

APOXYSMUS, Abrasion. 

APOZEM, Decoction. 

APOZESIS, Decoction. 

APPARA'TUSt P4»ra«e0«'«, from odmaApa- 
rarsy < to prepare.' This word signifies a col- 
lection of instruments, &c., for any operatfen 
whatever. <F.) Appareil. 

In surgery it means the methodical arrange- 
ment of 9Xi the instruments and objects neces- 
sary for an operation or dressing. By exten- 
sion, the French give the name Appar&U, Cap- 
9a ehirur^giea, to the case or drawers in which 
the apparatus is arranged. 

Apparatus has likewise been applied to the 
different modes of operating for the stone. — See 
Lithotomy. 

In Phynologpy Apparatus [Apparni) is ap- 
plied to a collection of organs, all of which 
work towards the same end. A system of or- 
gans comprehends all those formed of a similar 
texture. An apparatus often comprehends or- 
gans of very different nature. In the formsr, 
there is analogy of structure; in the latter yesoA- 
logy of function. 

AppARAtUB Altus, see Lithotomy. 

Appabatos Immov'ablx, (F.) Appareil imme- 
hilsy Iwnaovabie Bandage y Permanent Bandag*. 
An appahitiis for fractures, which is generslly 
formed by wetting the bandages in 'some sub- 
stance, as starch or dextrin, which becomes 
solid, and retains the parts in situ, 

Appabatus Lateralis, see Lithotomy — a. 
Major, see Lithotomy — a. Minor, see Litho- 
tomy. 

ilPPA££/L, Apparatus, Bo\tier^a. Gram*l, 
see Lithotomy — a. HarUy see Lithotomy — n. 
Immobile, Apparatus*, immovable — a. Ijoteral- 
isiy see Litiu>tomy — a. Petit, see Lithotomy— 
a. Pigmental, Pigmental apparatus. 

APPAREILS DE FORMATION, (F.) 
Gall admits, in the brain, two kinds of fibres ; 
the one, divergent, proceeding from the cerebral 
peduncles to the convolutions, and constituting 
what he calls appareils de formation : the other, 
convergent, and proceeding from the convolu- 
tions to the centre of the organ, constituting 
what he calls appareils de reunion. The Jirtt, 



APPAITVRI 



71 



APYR0M£L£ 



at « whole, fonn the orgaoft of the mental fa- 
cdties : the latur are commissoreSy which unite 
parts of the organ that are donhle and in pairs. 
APPAUVRI^ Impoverished. 
APPBNBICEy Appendix— a. CtBetdy Ap- 
pendix vermiformis csci — a» DigittU^ Appen- 
dix Termifonnis csci — €hS&us-3t0maU, Xiphoid 
cartilage— a. SuS'SpksTwidaU du eerveauy Pi- 
tuitary gland — a* Xiphoidty Xiphoid cartilage. 

AppxiiniGBS CoLi AniPOSiB, Appendiculs 
epiploice— ^a. £^ploiqM*Sy Appendiculn epi- 
ploics. 

APPENDICULA CEREBRI^'ituitarygland 
—«. Yermiformis csBciy see Appendix— a. £pi- 
pioica. Epiploic appendage. 

APPENDIC'ULiE PlNGUBDINO'SiB,£>»- 
jrfbte appttuLxges (q. y.) Appandic'ulm Epiplo'- 
ic9i Aff&nfdiee» coii adijpo'taty Onten'tula, (F.) 
AfptHdicu EjnpldiquM. Prolongations of the 
peritoneum heyond the snr&ee of the great in- 
testine, which are analogous in texture and ar- 
rangement to omenta. 

APPEN'DIX, Epipk'ysisy from appenderey 
{ad and pendere, *to hang/) <to hang from.' 
Any part that adheres to an organ or is conti- 
nooos with it : — seeming as if added to it. An 
•pp^ndag9y an apophysis, (q. v. ) (F . ) Appendiee, 
Annexe, 

Appkr'oix Ysrmifor'mis, Apprndie'tUa Ver^ 
mifor'mis Caftiy Tubus Vsnnicula'ris Cady Ee'^ 
fkytUy Additamen'twm Coliy Apptn^dix Ctseiy 
(F.) Apptndtee vermi/crmSy A. catetU oudigital. 
A Tennicular process, the size of a goose-quill, 
which hangs from the intestinum cfecum. Its 
fsactions are unknown. 

Appshdix Cbrbbki, Pituitary gland— a. ad 
Cerehrum, Cerebellum^— a. Cutanea Septi Na- 
rinm, Statiea septi Naiium— a. to the Epididy-- 
mis, Yasculum aberrans — a. Yentriculi, Duode- 
oun. 
APPENSIO, see Analeptia. 
AP'PETENCE, A^pettn'tioy from appettr$y 
( ad and petere,) < to desire.' An ardent, passion- 
Me desire for any object. 
APPETIT PERTE D\ Anorexia. 
APTETITE, Appeti'tusy AppeUn'tia, Appe- 
H"tia, {ad and peisrey) <to seek,' Cnpi'do, 
Ortx'Uy Ormi : same etymology as the last. 
An internal sensation, which warns us of the 
■eceflsity of exerting certain functions, espe- 
«ally those of digestion and generation. In the 
latter case it is called venereal appetite, (F.) 
ApfetU vinirien: in the former, simply appe^ 
tiUy (F.) Appetit ou Appetition. If the desire 
lor food, occasioned by a real want, be carried 
to a certain extent, it is called hwtgery when 
^id food is concerned; thirei, when liquid. 
Appetiie and hunger ought not, however, to be 
employed synonymously: they are different de- 
crees of the same want. Hunger is an imperious 
^ire: it cannot be provoked, like the appetite. 
It ii always allayed by eating: but not so the 
sppetite; for, at times, it may be excited in this 
nanoer. They are rtry generally, however, 
wsed synonymously. 
Appetitb, Mokbio, Limosis. 
APPETITUS C ANINUS, Boulinlia-*. De- 
Wiens, I)y8orexia. 

APPLE, ADAM'S, Pomum Adami— a. Bitter, 
Cocomis colocynthis — a. Curassotf, Aurantium 
''wsseaventium — a. Eye, see Melon — a. May, 
Podophyllum peltatum— «. Root, Euphorbia co- 
rottat»-a. Tree, Pynis malus. 



APPLICANT A, from appliearey {ad and pit- 
earty «to fold,') <to apply.' A word, unneces- 
sarily introduced into medical language, to ex- 
press the objects whichare applied inomediately 
to the sut&ce of the body, as clothes, cosmetics, 
baths, &c.— Hall6. 

APPLICA'TIONv^/Ty/ica'too, (same etymon,) 
in a moral signification, is synonymous with 
Attention. Ako, the act of applying one thing 
to another; as the application of an apparatus, 
of a bandage, blister, &c. 

APPREHEN'SIO, from ad and prekenderey 
* to take.' This word is employed in various 
senses. It means catalepsv, (q. v.) or catocha. 
— ^Paul Zacchias. A kind of bandage for se- 
curing any part. Also, a therapeutical indica- 
tion. 

APPROCBE, Coition. 

APPROXIMATION, Appr6xima*t%Oy from 
ad and proximusy < nearest.' EttmuUer gavv 
this name to a pretended method of curing dis- 
ease, by making it pass from man into some 
animal or vegetable, by the aid of immediate 
contact. 

APRACT A, from «, priv., and «-e««-ff«, * I 
act.' Without action. An epithet for the 
parts of generation, when unfit for copulation or 
generation. 

APRICATIO, Isolation. 

APKICOT, Prunns Armeniaca. 

APROCTUS, see Atretus. 

APROSO'PIA, Tnoeepkal'ta, from <, priv., 
and nfot-tonofy <the face.' A malformation, 
which consists in the face being deficient. 

APROSOPUS, Microprosopus. 

APSINTHIATUM, from *v/iF^WF, 'worm- 
wood.' A sort of drink made of wormwood.- 
Aetius. 

APSINTHITES, Absinthites. 

APSYCHIA, Syncope. 

APSYXI A, Syncope. 

APTHiE, Aphthas. 

APTYSTOS, from «, priv., and irrvny « I 
spit.' Devoid of expectoration. An epithet 
given to certain pleurisies, in which there is 
no expectoration. — Hippocrates. 

APUS, see Apodia. 

APY'ETOS, from a priv., and itvor, 'pus.' 
An external affection, which does not end in 
suppuration. 

APYIQUEy Apyos. 

AP'YOS, from «, priv.', and «rtf»», 'pus,' (F.) 
Apyiqut, That which does not afford pus. 

APYRECTIC, Apyretic. 

APYRENOMELE, Apyromele. 

APYRET'IC, Apf review, Apyree'ticy Apy- 
ree^tieus, Apyr*etu», from «, priv., and Trwj, 
< fire, fever.' Without fever. This epithet is 
given to days in which there is no paroxysm 
of a disease, as in the case of an intermittent; 
as well as to some local affections which do not 
induce fever. Urticaria is sometimes called an 
apyretie exantJUtn. 

APYREX'IA. The same etymology. Ab- 
sence of fever; Diidem'may Dialeip'sisy Dio- 
Hp'fis, Tempus intereaia'riy Interval'lunif iSi- 
termis'sio, Apyrexia is the condition of an in- 
termittent fever between the paroxysms: the 
duration of the apyrexia, consequently, depends 
on the type of the intermittent. Occasionally, 
the term has been applied to the cessation of 
the febrile condition in acute diseases. 

APYROME'LG, ApprenomeUi, from«,priv.f 



AQUA 



79 



AQUJE XCTDVLM 



TtvQfjvy ^a nnt/ and ftiiKiiy ^a sound.' A sound 
or piobe, without a button or nut. It is the 
Mslo'tif, Spwil'lum amri&ula'rnim or AMrwular 
Mund of Galen* 

AQUA, Water— cu Acidi earbonici, Acidu- 
lous water— a. Acidula hydrosulphurata, Na- 
ples water (factitious) — a. Aeris fizi, Acidulous 
water (simple)'-4u Alkalinaozymuriatica, Earn 
de JaveiU — a. Aluminis compooitus. Liquor, a. 
c. — a. Aluminosa Bateana, Liq. aluminis com- 
posittts — a. Ammonis, Liquor ammoniac— ♦« 
Acetatis ammonis, Liquor ainmoniaB acetatis — 
a. Ammoma carbonatis. Liquor ammonin sub' 
carbonatis— «. AmmonisB caustics, Liquor am- 
monias— ft. Amnii, Liquor Amnii. 

Aqua Ajctodala'&uic CoNCBxriiA'TAy (F.) 
Eau d'Afnandea ameres^ Water of bitter al' 
numds. Made by bnusing well two pounds of 
iiuer almonds; adding, whilst triturating, ten 
pounds of tyring water ^ and four pounds of n/- 
oohol, letting the mixture rest in a weU-closed 
vessel, and then distilling two pounds. Used 
instead of the Aqua Laurocezasi, and the Hydro- 
cyanic acid. 

Aqua Anisi Fostks, Spiritusanisi— a. Aqois- 
granensis, see Aiz-la-ChapeUe- ^. Auditoria, 
Cotunnios, Liquor of— «• Aurantii, see Citrus 
aurantium — a.Bal8amicaarterialis, Aqua Binelli 
— a. Bareginensis, Barnes water — a. Barytas 
Muriatis, see Baryta, muriate of— €u Bellilucana, 
Balaruc waters— a. Benedicta, Liquor calcis— 
a. B^aedicta composita, Liquor calcis composi- 
tus— a. Benedicta Rulazidi, Y inum antimonii tar- 
tarizati. 

Aqua Binel'ui, Aequa Binelliy A. Monte- 
roeeiy Aqua Baleam'iea arteria*lis, (F.) Earn 
de Binelli, Eau de Monterosti* A celebrated 
Italian hsemostatic, invented b^ one Binelli. 
Its composition is unknown, but its virtues have 
been ascribed to creasote; although there is 
reason for believing it to possess no more ac- 
tivity than cold water. 

Aqua BaoocHiB'aii,^e9«Mi Broeekiefi^ Broe- 
Meri watery (F.) Eau de Brveekieriy Eau 
styptique de Broeehieri. A supposed styptic, 
which made much noise at Parts at one time. 
It is devoid of efficacy. Dr. Paris found no- 
thing in it but water perfumed by some vege- 
table essence. 

Aqua Borvonxnsis, Bourbonne-les-Bains, 
mineral waters of— a. Bristoliensis, Bristol wa- 
ter — a. Calcaria nsts, Liquor calcis— a. Calcis, 
Liquor calcis— a. Calcis composita, Liquor cal- 
cis compositus — a. Camphors, Mistura cam- 
phorae— a. Camphorata, Bates's, see Cupri sul- 
phas—a. Carbonatis sodae acidula. Acidulous 
water, simple — a. Catapultarum, Arqueh*sade 
eau ^'— a. Chlorini, see Chlorine. 

Aqua Cinnamo'mi, Cinnamon Water, Dis- 
tilled water of Cinnamon Bark. Prepared also 
in the following manner. 01. Cinniim, f. M; 
Magnee. Carbon, gss : Aq, deetillat^'^. Rub 
the oil and carbonate of magnesia; atfltil w^97a- 
ter gradually and filter. (Th. U. S.) " % 

Aqua Cinnahoici Fortis, Spiritus Cinna- 
momi — a. Colcestrensis, Colchester, mineral 
waters of— a. Cupri ammoniata, Liquor c. a. — 
a. Cupri vitriolati composita, Liquor cupri suL- 
phalis compositar-*«4 inter Cutem, Anasarcar— 
a. Destillata, Water, distilled— a. Florum au- 
rantii, see Citrus aurantium— a. Fluviatilis, 
Water, river. 

Aqua F<bnic'uli, Fennel Water* The dis- 



tilled water of fennel seed. It may be pr epTe d 
also like the aqua cinnamomt. 

Aqu4 Fomtama, Water, spring—*. Fortis, 
Nitric acid — a. Hqpatioa, Hydrosul^uretted 
water— a. Hordeata, Decoctum hOrdei— a. In- 
tercus. Anasarca— a. inter Cutem, AnasarcA — 
a. Juniperi composita, ^iritos juniperi comp^ 
situs— «. Kali, Liquor potassas siibcarbonatis— 
a. Kali caustici. Liquor potassa— a. Kali pn»- 
parati, Liqubr potassas subcarbonatis— a. Kali 
puri. Liquor potassas— «. Kali subcarbonatis. 
Liquor potasss subcarbonatis— a. Labyrinthif 
Cotannius, liquor of— a. Lactii^ Serum lactia— 
a. ex Lacu, Water, lake— ^a. Lithargjrri acetati 
composita. Liquor plumbi sobacetatis dilotoa— 
a* LucisB, Spiritus ammonias succinatus — a. Bfta- 
rina, Water, sea— a. Medicata, Water, minetal. 

Aqua Mirtrje PiPxni'TiB, Peppermint' Wa^ 
ter^ The distilled water of peppermint. It 
maybe prepared like the aqua cinnamomi. 

Aqua Mintbje Pipsamois Spmrruosi, Spi- 
ritus menthae piperita— a. Mentha vir idis, Spear- 
mint water; see Aqua menthas piperitas — a. Mea- 
th» tulgaris spirituosa, Spiritus menthae viridis 
—a. Mmeralis, Water, mineral — a..Miralnlis, 
Spiritus pimentae — a* Mnlsa, Hydromeli^ — a. 
Natri Oxyinuriatici, Liquor sods chlorinatafr— 
a. J^eapolitana, Naples Water (factitious)— a. 
Nephritica, Spiritus myristicsi — a. Nivata, Wa- 
ter, snow— a. Nucis moschata, Spiritus myris- 
ticae— a. Ophthalmica, Liquor zinci saljmatis 
cum camphora— a. Palndosa, Water, marsh — a. 
Pericardii, see Pericardium — a. Pioea, see Finns 
sylvestris->^. Picis, see Pinus sylvestrss — a. 
Pluvialis, Water, rain — a. Potassse, Liquor po- 
tassas— a. Pulegii spirituosa, Spiritus polegii — 
a. Putealis, Water, well— a. Rabelii, £lizir 
acidum Halleri— a. Raphani composita, Spiritiis 
armoraciae compositus-^a. Regia, Nitro-mnri- 
atic acid. 

Aqua Ro8;b, Rote Water, SJtodosta^'mea, ' 
{Roe, eentifoL Blviij: Aqua, cong. ij. M. Distil 
a gallon— Ph. U. S.) 

Aqua Salubris, Water, mineiml— a. Sappha- 
rina. Liquor cupri ammoniata — a. Satumi, Li- 
quor plumbi subacetatis dihltls — a. Sclopefearia, 
Arquehueade eau d* — a. Seminum anisi compo- 
sita, Spiritus anisi — a. Seminum carui fortis, 
Spiritus carui— a. Sods effervescens, Acidalous 
water, simple — a. Soteria, Water, mineral — 4. 
Stygia, Nitro-muriatic acid — a. Styptica, Liquor 
cupri sulphatis composita — a. Sulphurata sim- 
plex, Hydrosulphoretted water — a. Sulphnreti 
ammonias. Liquor fumans Boylii — a. Thediana, 
Arquebnaade eau d* — a. Theriacalis Bezoardica, 
Chylostagma diaphoreticum Mindereri — a. To- 
fana. Liquor arsenicalis— a. Traumatica The- 
denii, Arquebusade eau d* — a. Vegeto-mineralis, 
Liquor plumbi subacetatis dilutus — a. Viciensis, 
Vichy water — a. Vitriolica campborata. Liquor 
sinci sulphatis com camphori — a. Vitriolica 
caerulea, Solutlo sulphatis cupri composita — a. 
Ynlnenrva, Arquebuaade eau d^ — a. Zinci vitri- 
olati cum camphora. Liquor zinci sulphatis cuzn 
camphorA. 

AQU^ ACIDULA, Acidulous waters — a. 
Badiguae, Bath, Mineral waters of— a. Badizs, 
Bath, Mineral waters of— a. Bathonias, Bath, 
Mineral waters of— a. Buxtonienses, Buxton, 
Mineral waters of— a. Cantuarienses, Canter- 
bury, waters of— a. ChalybeatsB, Waters, mine- 
ral, chalybeate. 
Aqujs Destilla'tjb, Distilled Waters, By- 



AQUiEDUCTUS 



TS 



ARABS, XEBICINE OF THE 



droiafta^ (F.) Hfdrolats. These are made by 
potting Tegetftble sobstaneeS) as roaet, mmt, 
pennyroyaly &c., into a still with water, and 
drawing off as much as is found to posaeaa the 
aromatic properties of the plant. To every gal- 
lon of the distilled water, 5 oz. of spirit should 
be added to preserve it. The simple distilled 
waurs are sometimes called Aqua ttUlatWitt 
sim'piieeg: the spiriiueuSf AqutB stiUaiif'ia 
$firUuo**ay but more commonly Sjrir*itu8. 

Aquji MARTIAI.BS, Waters, mineral, chaly- 
beate — a. Minerales aciduls, Waters, mineral, 
gaxeoua — a. Minerales ferruginosae, Waters, mi- 
neral, chalybeate — a. Minerales snlphureaB, Wa- 
ters, mineral, snipbureooa — a. Stillatitiee', Aquas 
dettillata tu Soils, Bath mineral waters. 

AQXT/EDnCTUS, Aq'usduet^ from aquoy 
'water,' and du€€r$y dudumy <to lead.' (F.) 
AqtMdme, Properly, a canal for conducting 
water from one place to another. Anatomists 
have used it to designate certain canals. 

AQUiBDUcTus Ceexbri, Infuudibulum of the 
brain — a. Cotnnnii, Aquaedoctus vestibuli. 

Aquxduc'tus Coch'uejb, (F.) A&uedue du 
Lima^ou; — & very narrow canal, whicn proceeds 
from the tympanic scala of the cochlea to the 
posterior edge of the p€trs pttro^a. 

AQUjmuc'TUS Fallo'pii, Canal spireme de 
Pos temporal of Chaussier, (F.) Aquedue de Pal- 
Upe, A canal in the pars petrosa of the temporal 
bone, which, extends from the meatus audito- 
rius intemus to the foramen stylo-mastoideum, 
and gives passage to the facial nerve. The 
opening into this aqueduct is called Hia'tus 
Pallo'pii. 

Aqujeduc^tts Stl'vii, (F.) Aqueduc de Syl- 
viusj Iter ad quartum ventnc'ultim, Cana'lis 
me'diue. Canal intermediaire dee ventrieules of 
Chaussier. A canal formine a communication 
between the third and fourUi ventricles of the 
brain. 

Aqujeduc'tus Vbstib'uu, Aqy^ttttue Co- 
tun'nUy (F.) Aqueduc du vestibule ou Aque- 
due de Cotugno, This begins in the vestibule, 
near the conomon orifice of the two semicircular 
canals, and opens at the posterior surface of the 
pars petroea* ^ 

AQUALICULlIS, from aquality «a water- 
pot.' That part of the abdomen which extends 
from the umbilicus to the pabes. See Hypo- 
gsitrinm. It has also been applied to the sto- 
nsch or intestinal canal. 

AQU ASTER. A word used, by Paracelsus, 
to express the visions or hallucinations of pa- 
tients. 

AQUEDUC, Aqueduct — s. de Cotugno, 
Aquaeductus vestibuli — a. de Fallope, Aquae- 
ductos Fallopii — a,-du Idma^Qn, Aquaeductus 
cochlear— «. de Sylvius, Aqueductus Sylvii — 
4k du Vestibule, Aqueductus vestibuli. 
AQUEDUCT, Aquaeductus. 
AQUEOUS, A'queus, Aquo'sus, Hydato'des, 
Hydro'des, from aqua, < water,' {TJ) Aquoux, 
Watery. The absorbents or lymphatics are 
sometimes called, in France, Conduits on Co- 
naux aqueux. 

Aqueous Hukoue of the Etk, Humor aquo'- 
sms,Aliugin'eous humour, 0<bei'des, Oo'des,Hy- 
dmUVdes, Hydatefdes, Ova'tus seu Ovifor'mis 
kmmor, (F.) Hwmeur aqueuse. The limpid fluid 
which fills the two chambers of the eye, from 
the cornea to the crystalline, and which is, con- 
seqaently, in contact with the two surfaces qf 
6 



the iris. Quantity, 5 or 6 grains : s. g. 1.0003. 
It contains gelatin, albumen, chloride of sodi- 
um, and phosphate of lime in small quantity; 
and is enveloped in a fine membrane i^—ithe mem- 
brane of the aqueous humour — Tunica propria 
seu Vagi'na hwmo'ris a'quei seu Memhra'na 
Demuria'na seu Deseemet'ii, Membrane of De- 
mours or of Deseemet; although these last terms 
are by some appropriated to a third layer of the 
cornea. 

AQUEUS, Aqueous. 

AQUIDUCA, Hydiagogues. 

AQUIFOLIUM, Hex aquifolianh-a. Foliis 
deciduis, Prinos. 

AQUILA, Hydrargyri submurias. Sulphur. 

The alchymists used this word for sublimed 
sal ammoniac, precipitated mercury, arsenic, 
sulphur, and the philosopher's stone* See Hy- 
drargyri Submurias, and Sulphur. 

Aq'uila C(blest'i8; a sort of panacea, of 
which mercury was a constituent. 

Aq'fila LACH'aTMJc; a liquor prepared from 
several ingredients, especially from calomel. 

Aq'uii.a pHiLoeo^Ho'auM. The idchymists, 
whose terms were always mysterious, called 
mercury thus, when reduced to its original form. 

Aq^vila Ven'kbis; an ancient preparation, 
made by subliming verdigris and sal ammoniac. 

AQUIL-fi VENiE, Temporal veins. 

AQUILE'GIA VULGARIS, Common Co- 
lombine or Columbine, (F.) Ancolie. The seeds, 
herb, and flowers were formerly used in jaun- 
dice and cutaneous diseaso^. They are still 
retained in many of the Pharmacopoeias of con- 
tinental Europe. 

AQUO-CAPSULITIS, Aqua-membranitis. 

AQUO-MEMBRANI'TIS, KeratolHtis, 
Aquocapsuli'tis* Inflammation of the anterior 
chamber of the eye. A badly compounded 
term, denoting inflammation of the capsule or 
membrane of the aqueous humour. 

AQUULA, Ceratocele, Hydatid, Hydroa— 
a. Acttstica, Cotunnius, liquor of. 

Aquula seu Aqua Moroagnii. The minute 
portion of water, which escapes when an open- 
ing is made into the capsule of the crystalline. 

ARA PARVA, a small altar;— a kind of 
bandage invented by Sostratus, which repre- 
sents the comers of an altar. — Galen. 

AR'ABE; a wound, a blow. — Erotian. 

ARAB'ICA ANTip'OTUS HEPATICA, 
Ar'ahic Hepat'ie An'tidote, A powder, com- 
posed of myrrh, costus, white pepper, &c. it 
was administered in new Wine. 

ARABICUS LAPIS. A sort of white mar- 
ble analogous to alabaster, found in Arabia. 
It was regarded as absorbent and desiccative, 
and was employed in hemorrhoids. 

AR'ABIS MALAG'MA. An antiscrofulous 
medicine, composed of myrrh, olibanum, wax, 
sal ammoniac, iron pyrites, &c. — Celsus. 

AR'ABS, MEDICINE OF THE. The Ara- 
bians kept the torch of medical science illumi- 
nated during a dark period of the middle ages. 
Before the year of the Hegira, they had schools 
of medicine; but these were most flourishing; 
during the 10th, 11th, and 12th centuries. The 
chief additions made by them to medical sci- 
ence were in the departments of pharmacy and 
in the description of diseases. Their principal 
writers were Avicenna, Serapion, Averrhoes, 
Hali Abbas, Moses Maimonides, Avenxoar, 
Rhazes, Albucaais, &c. 



AlUCACHA 



T4 



ARBirrVS^ TRAILING 



ARACACHA, Conivm moMhatiUD. 
AR'ACHIS HYPOOE'A, Gnmnd nmi, P$a 
nutf Earth almond, (S.) Mans; enooibomlj 
caUad Pistaekio nast, in the Sonth; Pindar* of 
the West Indiee. Cultivated in the Southern 
States. The seeds are oil^ and are eaten. A 
kind of inferior chocolate may he made of them. 

ARACH'NEy a^/«^9 ' a spider, a eobweh.' 
Hence^ 

ARACHNITIS, Araeknoidi'Hs, Araekno* 
dei*tis, InJtammaHon of tJU Arachnoids A va- 
riety of phrenitis; which see. 

ARACHNODEITIS, Arachnitis. 

ARACHNOID CANAL, see Canal, aiach- 
notd. 

AjulChhoid ot txb En. The lining mem- 
hrane of a cavity, supposed b}[ some to exist 
between the sclerotic and choroid. 

Arach'noid MBmaAHB, Monin» Mg'dia, 
AraehndUousy Araehmo'dss, from oqax^9 '& 
cobweb,' and ic^of, 'form, resemblance;' 2V<'- 
wieaarafnsa, Arachno'dss, T, erystaFlina, Me- 
nin'gion, A name given to several membranes, 
which, by their extreme thinness, resemble spi- 
der-webs.-*Celsiis and Galen called thus tne 
membrane of the vitreous humour,— -the tunica 
hyaloidca* The modems use it now for one of 
the membranes gf the brain, situate between 
the dura mater and pia mater. It is a serous 
membrane, and composed of two layers; the 
external being confounded, in the greater part 
of its extent, with the dura mater, and, like it, 
liniDg the interior of the cranium and spinal ca- 
nal; the othsr being extended over the brain, 
from which it is separated by the pia mater, 
without passing into the sinuosities, between 
the convolutions, and penetrating into the inte* 
rior of the brain by an opening at its posterior 
part under the corpus callosnm. It forms a part 
of the investing sheath of the nerves, as they 
pass from the encephalic cavities. Its chief 
uses seem to be; — to envelop, and, in some 
measure, protect the brain, and to secrete a 
fluid for the purpose of keeping it in a state 
best adapted for the proper performance of its 
functions. 

ARACHNOIDITIS, Arachnitis. 

ARACK', ArracJf; (East Indian.) A SfHri- 
tnous liquor made in India in various ways, of- 
ten from rice, sometimes from sugar fermented 
along with the juice of the cocoa nut; frequently 
from toddy, the juice which flows from the co- 
coa nut tree by incision, and from other sub- 
stances, i It is a strong, heating spirit. 

Aracx, Mook, is made by adding ^ij of Sen- 
soic add to a quart of rum. The celebrated 
Vaoxhall punch is made with such arack. 

ARACOUCHINI, Icica aracouchini. 

ARACUS AROMATICUS, Vanilla. 

AR'ADOSj^ from oQadam, <I am turbulent.' 
The agitation excited in the stomach by the 
coction of aliments of diflferent nature. — Hip- 
pocrates. LikewiBe, the motion produced by 
cathartics. 

AIL£OMA, Interstice. 

AREOMETER, Areometer. 

AR^OTIC A, from tf^aioeo, < I rarefy.' Me- 
dicines supposed to have the quality of rarefy* 
ing the humours. See Rarefiiciens. 

ARAKI, see Spirit. 

ARALIA CANADENSIS, Panax quinqnefo- 
lium. 



Aea'lia Hia'rinA, Thoarf SUor, is said to be 
diuretic, and has been recommended, in decoc- 
tion, in dropsy. 

Aka'ua NimiOAU'Lis, Narduc Ammieafmu^ 
Small Spiicnardy Wild Li^norice, S^oeot rwK, 
Falc03arfaparil'la,i¥.) Petit nard* This Ame- 
rican plant is said to be a mild stimulant and 
diaphoretic, and has been recommended as a 
substitute for the sarsapariUa. It is used, also, 
as a tottie. It £■ in the secondary list of the 
Pharmacopeia of the United States. 

AnA'UA Racxvo'sa, American SpHanardy 
has the same properties as A. Nudicaniis. 

AftA'uA Spmo'BA, Angd'ica Tree, PricMf 
Ash, Toathaeh Tree, SfUenard Tree, PricMf 
Elder, Shothish, Pigeon Tree. Its. properties 
are not clear. The berries, and a tfnctnre of 
them have been employed, it is said, anccces- 
fully in tooth€teh, A spirituous infioBion bM 
also been used in colic. 

ARANEA, AraneiB Tel»— a. Tarentnla, aee 
Tarantula. 

ARA'NEJC TELA, Arafnea,Ara'neum, Coh- 
toeb, (F.) Toile d'Aradgn^e. Formerly, this 
substance was much employed, and suppoeed 
to possess extraordinary virtues, especially 
when applied to the wrists. It has been rc' 
cently used again in intermittents. The spider 
itself, soften^ into a plaster and applied to the 
forehead and temples, is said by Dioocorides to 
prevent ague. Cobweb is a n^echanical styptic, 
and is so applied, externally, at times. 

ARANEO'SA URI'NA. A term applied to 
the urine when loaded with filaments, uJce cob- 
webs. 

ARANEO'SUS PULSUS; a term employed 
to express extreme weakness of pulse; when 
the movements resemble those of a delicate net 
raised by the wind. 

ARANEUM, Aranes Tela. 

Ara'neubi Ulcus, AstakiVloa, A name given 
by Paracelsus to a malignant, gangrenous ul<5er, 
extending from the feet to the legs. 

ARARA, Myrobalanus citrine. 

ARASCON, Nymphomania, Satyriasis. 

ARATRUM, Vomer. 

ARAUCARIA DOMBETI, Dombeya ex- 
celsa. 

ARBOR BENIVI, Benjamin— a. Indica, Lau- 
rus cassia — a. Maris, Coral — a. Thurifera, Ju- 
niperus Lycia — a. Uteri Vivificans, Palmse uteri 
plicatae. 

Arbor Yitjk, (F.) Arbre de vie. A name 
given to an arborescent appearance, observed 
on cutting the cerebellum longitudinally; and 
which results from the particular arrangement 
of the white substance with the cineritious. 
Also, the Thuya occidentalis, (q. v.) 

Arbor Yitm of tbs Uterus, Palme uteri 
plicate. 

AR'BORES. A morbid alteration of the skin, 
which precedes its ulceration. Ruland. 

ARBQUSIER, Arbutus onedo. 

ARBRE DE VIE, Arbor Yite. 

ARBUSCULA GUMMIFERA BRAZILI- 
ENSIS, Hjrpericum bacciferunu 

ARBUTUS, TRAILING, A. Uva ursi. 

Aa'aimrs Uva Ursi, Aretoetaph'floe, TTma 
Ursi Fb'lia. Nai. Ord, Ericee. 5«r. Sfef, 
Decandria Monogynia, (F.) Suseerolle on Rai- 
eind'Oure. The leaves---( Uva Ursi, Ph.U.S.)— 
of this plant are tonic and astringent, and hart 



ABC 



TS 



ABCHOSntDIX 



bMB MD^oyed chiefly, in dunmB of tlM Qri- 
iiaiy organs. Dose of powder from gr. zv. to 

B§€u^s WkoitM&rrf^ or Btarberry^ MowUmn- 
iaxj SL^dUrryy Upland Crani$rrff Foxberry^ 
Qltfjiinrfljri'iy 

Aa'^oths VKifj)OiAftdraeh^nM;Un9'doyXTn6'do 
pmpyrafeta, xofiaQof, (F.) 4r59«MMr. A deooo- 
tun of the learee is astxingeot, and has been 
■aed in diarrhoBa. 

ARC, Archf Arcus. Any part of the body 
ifaemMing an arch in fyrpi as the Arek of th4 
mio^y <F.) Are du colony — the tranarerae por- 
tioBof that intestine I — Arek ofiko Aort^ Areut 
ao9't9y (F.) Crosoo do VAorUy fcc, the tnm 
which the aorta takes in the thorax. 

ABCA A&CANORUM, HydrargyranH-«. 
CordiSy Pericardium* 

ARCADE ANAS TOMOTIQirE,AxetfsmB* 
toiDOtie--«. Cruraloy Cniralarch-— a. IngtdndUi 
Cmrai arch — a. Orbitairoy Orbitar arcb---0. Pu- 
Uenmoy Pubic arch— ^. ZygomoHquOy Zygomatic 
arch. 

ARCAJ>B8 DENTAIBESy l>entnl arches 
— ^. Palmaireoy Palmar arches. 

ARC AD I'TEMP ORO-MAXILLAIREy 
Temporalis. 

ABC^'US or ARCCE'US, BALSAM OF, 
(F.) Bamme d*Aretnu, A kind of soft ointment 
ved in sores, contusions, &c. .It is made by 
melting two parts of mutton soet, one part of 
hag's lard: of turpentine and rosin, each one 
part and a half: straining and agitating till cold. 

ARCANSONy Coloplionia. 

ARC ATnJM, from arcAy < a chest. ' A secret, 
8 nottrwmy (F. ) Areano. A remedy whose com- 
position is kept secret; but Which is reputed to 
possess great efficacy. 

AmoAiiiTM CoBALUifirM, Hydrargyri nitrico- 
myJuBi — a. Diq>licatnm, Potass» sulphas — a. 
Tartari, Potasss acetas. 

ARCATOS^Jtferoe.- 

ARCBAUy ArcnluB, Cradle. 

ARCEUTHOS, Joniperus communis. 

ARCH, ANASTOMOT'IC,(F.)-dr<»rftf <mum- 
tamotiquoy is the union of two vessels, which 
aoastomoee by describing a curred line. The 
▼essels of me mesentery anastomose in this 

AacH or ran Aokta, see Aorta — a. Crural, 
see Cmral arch— a. Femoral, see Crural arch — 
a. Gluteal, see Gluteal aponeurosis— a. Inguinal, 
lee Crmai arch — a. Orbital, see Orbitar arch — 
a. of the Palate, see Palate bone— a. of the Pubis, 
see Pubic arcb--a. Subpubic, see Subpubic arch 
—a. Superciliary, see Superciliary arches— -a. 
Zygomatic, see Zygomatic arch. 

AacHss OF THE Palatb. These are two in 
onmber on each side of ths throat, one of which 
is termed anterior, the other posterior. 

The anterior arej^ arises from the middle of 
the velum palati, at the side of the uvula, and 
is fixed to Uie edge of the base of the tongue. 

The posterior arch has its origin, likewise, 
from the side of the uvula, and passes down- 
wards to be inserted into the side of the pha- 
rvBx. The anterior arch contains the circum- 
flexos palati, and forms the isthmus ftueium. 
The pMterioT arch has, within it, the levator 
pakti, and between the arches are the tonsils. 

ARCH^^S, Arehe*usy &am e^^iiy 'torn- 
meacement,' (F.) Archie. A word invented by 
Baal Yalentine, and afterwards adopted by 



PiLraeelsos and Yan Helmont. The latter used 
it for the internal principle of our motions and 
actions. This arciueus, according to Yan Hel« 
mont) is an immaterial principle, existing in 
the seed prior to fecundation, and pesiding 
over the development of the body, and overaU 
organic phenomena. Besides this chief at- 
chflBos, whose seat Yan Helmont placed in the 
upper orifice of the stomach, he admitted seve- 
ral of a subordinate character, which had to 
execute its orders; one, for instance, in each 
organ, to preside over its functions; each of 
them being subject to anger, caprice, terror, 
and every human fiuling. 

ARCHANGEL N£W,MINERAL SPRINGS. 
About twenty miles to the north of New Arch- 
angel, Sitka Ishmd, on the N. W. coast of 
North America, are 8<xne thermal snlphureovs 
waters^ the te)nperature of one of which is up* 
wards of }53^ of Fahr. They are much cek* 
brated. — Sir Geo. Simpson. 

ARCHANGELICA, Laminm album. 

ARCH£, a^j^y Inii**iumy Prineij/ium, Pri- 
mor'diumy Ori'gOy Iwoafsio. The first attack 
of a disorder. 

ARCHECPTOMA, Proctocele* 

ARCHAEy ArehflBus. 

ARCHELL, CANARY, Lichen rocoelfau 

ARCHELOG^'IA, hom agj^y « beginning,' 
and loyitty * a discourse.' A treatise onfun&- 
mental principles;— «f medicine, for example. 

ARCHEN'DA. A powder of the leaves of 
the ligustrumy used by the Egyptians after 
bathing, to obviate the unpleasant odour of the 
feet. — Prosper Alpinns. 

ARCHIA'TER, Arekia'truSyProtomsd'ieus, 
Protia'trosy from oQ/n^ * authority,' and lorfof, 

< physician.' The original signification of this 
word is a matter of cQspate. Some consider, 
with Mercurialis, that it meant physician to a 

Srince, king, emperor, &c.: others, with C. 
offinan, apply it to every physician who, by 
his situation, is raised above his colleagues. 
The former opinion seems to have ptevaiM^— 
Arekiatre des Rois de Pramee being applied to 
the chief physician to the kings of France. 

ARCHIG^'ENI MORBI. Acute diseases; 
because they hold the first rank: firom oQ^n, 

< b^inning,' and yi»o^ai, < I am.' 

ARCHIMAGIA, Chymistry. 
ARCHINGEAy,MINERALWATERSOF. 



nate of lime, a little chloride of sodium, carbo* 
nate of iron, and some bitumen. 

ARCHITECTURA APOPLECTICA, Apo- 
plectic make. 

ARCHITIS, Proctitis, Rectitis. 

ABCHOCELE, Proctocele. 

ARCTHOPTOMA, Proctocele. 

ARCHOPTOSIS, Proctocele. 

ARCHORRHA'GI A, from agxo^y ' the anas,' 
and (ftt, ' I flow.' Ari^orrkm*a> Hemorrhage . 
from the anas. 

ARCHORRHCEA, Archorrhagia. 

ARCHOS, Arcus, Rectum. 

ARCHOSTEGNOMA, Strietnn of the Rec- 



ARCHOSTEGNOSIS, Stricture of the Rec- 
tum. 
ARCHOSTENOSIS,Stricture of the Rectum. 
ARCHOSYRINX, FistuU in ano. 



\ 



ARCIFORM 



76 



AREOMETER 



AR'CIFORMy Ardfor'mist from ore, am#, 
< a top or ridge/ and/armoy * shape.' An epi- 
thtet given to certain fibres of the anterior py- 
ramids of the medoUa oblongata, which take a 
carved coarse around the inferior extremity of 
each corpus olivare and ascend towards the ce- 
rebellum. 

ARCTATIOyAretUu'iio, from artto, * I make 
narrow ;' Angusta'tio, Contraction, iY.)Retr4^ 
cissemMt^ of a natural opening or of a canal, 
and especially of the vulva, of Sie orifice of the 
uterus, or of the intestinal canal. Constipation, 
(q. T.) Reunion by suture or infibnlation. — 
Scribonius Largus, Paul Zacchias, he. 

ARCTITUDO, Arctatio. 

ARCTIUM LAPPA. . The root and seed 
of the Clit-hury Barda'na^ ArOivm^ riaphi*y 
Lappa glabra^ Lappa major y L, persona'tay Per- 
Mola'tay PersoUa'tay P^rtolu'tay BurdoeJh^ (F.) 
BardoMBy Glauteron, Nat, Ord. Compositae. 
S*x, Syst, Syngenesia squalis. Root diuretic : 
seod cathartic. It has iMsen used in decoction 
in diseases of the skin and in syphilis. 

ARCT0STAPHYLU8, Arbutus uva ursi. 

ARCTU'RA, from arrto,* I straighten.* The 
effects of a nail grown into the flesh, Areiu'ra 
unguis. — See Onychogryphosis. 

AaoTuaA Unouium . The growing in or in- 
version of ^e nails. See Onychogryphosis. 

ARCUA'TIO, Coneava'tio, An anterior giV 
bosity or projection of the sternum. 

ARCUEIL, MINERAL WATERS OF. Ar 
coeil is about one lea|pe south of Paris. The 
water contains carbonic acid, carbonate of lime, 
sulphate of lime, chloride of sodium, and some 
deliquescent salts. 

A celebrated society held its meetings at this 
village, of which BerthoUet, HumlMldt, La 
Place, &:c.) were members. 

ARCULA CORDIS, Pericardium. 

ARCULiE. The Orbitar Fossas: noiliaic. 
— Rnftia of Ephesus. 

ARCULUS, diminutive of areuMy < an arch.' 
A small arch; a cradle, (q. v.) <F.) Areeauy Ar- 
ekst* A semicircular box or basket used for 
preventing the bed-clothes from coming in con- 
tact with injured or diseased Pj^rts. An ordi- 
nance of the Grand Duke of Tuscany forbade 
mothers to sleep with an infant near then^, un- 
less it was put under a solid cradle. 

ARCUS MEDULLARIS, Fornix—^. Seni- 
lis, Oerotoxon— a. Subpubicus, Subpubic arch 
—a. Superciliaris, Superciliary arches — a. Un- 
guium, see Nail— «. Zygomaticus, Zygomatic 
arch. 

ARDALOS, Excrement. 

ARDAS, Excrement. 

ARDENT, ardensy from ard^rey • to bum.' 

Assent Fevxe, (F.) Fiivre ardente. The 
Cau9U9y Synockay or inflammatory fever. 

Abdbht or Imfulmbd Eyes, (F.) Teux ar^ 
dms. The eyes are so called when they are 
injected red. 

Aedbrt Uanni, (F.) TTrins ardente. Urine 
of a deep red« 

ARDESIA HIBERNICA, Hibemicus lapis. 

ARDEURy Ardor — a. du Cmur, Cardialgia 
^-a. d*BHoiaaey Ardor ventriculi, Pyrosis — a. 
d€ la FihfrSy Ardor Febrilis — a. d'Uriney Ardor 
Urins. 

AROWR, (F.) Ardour. Heat, (q. v.) A feel- 
ing of burning, of violent heat; JSstuSf .XstU" 
a^tiOf Cau4o'wM% 



Asnox Febki'lis, (F.) Ardour da la Pihfn: 
The hot period of feverc 

Aedoe Stom achi, PyroaSa. 

Aedoe UEi'ifiB, <F.) Ardour d^Urino. A 
scalding sensation occasioned by the uiine in 
passing over the inflamed mucous membrane of 
the urethra, or over the neck of the bladder. 

Aedoe VBiiEEBija,' Heat. 

Aedoe VevteiCuli, BhuUif'to Stamfadd^ 
(F.) Ardour d*Eatomae. Heartburn. See Car- 
dialgia and Pyroais. 

A'REA, * a void ply;e.' A Latin word used 
by some authors to desi^;nate a variety of Alo- 
pecia, in which the hair changes colour, but 
does not fall off; also, Porrigo d^alvans, (q. v.) 

ARE'CA. ThefrmtyAro'oanuiyBotolnmtyOf 
Aro'ea Cai'oohuy Caun'ga; Nat. Ord. Palm»; 
Sex. Syst. Monoecia Monadelphia; (F.) Arooy 
i^ astringent and tonic, and enteia into the com- 
position of the Botoly the great masticatory of 
the Orientals. 

AREF ACTION, Arofaeftioy ^wQwftfy from 
are/aooroy * to make dry,' (arorOy * to dry,' and 
faeoroy < to make.') The process of drying anb- 
stances, prior to pulverization. 
^ ARENA, see Gravel. 

ARENAMEN, Bole Armenian. 

ARENA'TIO, Ckooisy Sand or Earth Bath; 
from aronay <sand;' Saburra^tio. The appli- 
cation of hot Qpuid to the body. Podilu'tna o[ 
sand were formerly used in Ascites. 

.ARENCSA URI'NA, Sandy Urim. Urine 
when it depositra sandy sediment. 

ARENO'SUS, Sabulous, (q. v.) Also, one 
who passes sandy urine. 

ARENULA, see Gravel. 

ARE'OLA. A diminutive of Aroa. Ana- 
tomists understand by ArooltOy the interstices 
between the fibres composing organs; or thoaa 
existing between lamina, or between vessels 
which interlace with each other. 

Aroola is, also, applied to the coloured cir- 
cle Haloy Halooy which surrounds the nipple ; 
Artfola papUlt^risy and which becomes mach 
darker during pregnancy; as well as to the cir- 
cle surrounding certain vesicles, pustulea, hcc.y 
as the puitules of the small-pox, the vaccine 
vesicle, &c. Chaussier, in such cases, recom- 
mends the word Aure'oiay (F.) Aurioloy Aitro. 

Aeeola Papillaeis, see Areola. 

ARE'OL AR, Aroola'ris. Appertaining to an 
areola. 

Areolae Exhalations are those recremen- 
titial secretions, which are efiected within the 
organs of sense, or in parenchymatous struc- 
tures, — as the aqueous, crystalline and vitreous 
humours, &c. 

Areolae Tissxtx, Cellular Tissue. 

AREOM'ETER, Arctam'otory Ch-avim'otary 
Aleoolom'otory Ahrootat'ie BalaneOy from «i^iu«c, 
< light,' and /trr^o, 'measure:' i. e. *moasnro 
of lightness.' An instrument, so called, be- 
cause first employed to take the specific gravity 
of fluids lighter than water. The Aro&motorof 
Boaumdy which is the most used in Pharmacy, 
particularly in France, consists of a tube of 
glass, largely expanded towards its inferior ex- 
tremity, and terminating, below, by a small 
ball, containing mercury or lead, which serves 
it as a balance, so that it may remain uprighl 
in the fluid. This tube is frutiished with a 
graduated scale. If the fluid into which the 
Areometer is plunged ba heavier than wateri 



ABES 



77 



AR6ENTX7M 



the mitniioeiit rises: if lighter, it liiiki. There 
are Tirious Areometere , as those of the Dutch, 
oC Fahrenheit, Nicholson, kc. The Artometer 
is also called Hydromfeter^ (F.) Ariomktre^ 

K4LB 07 THE ASSOIIBTKB WITH OOftBBSPOND- 
UIO SFXCiriC O&AVITIXS. 

1. Aaetndimg Seai$for light Kqtdda, 
Beaom^. 



Scale of 



66 
60 
59 
48 
49 
46 
36 
33 
» 
36 



65 

63 



Id. 

66 



Gravis. 



715 

746 

788 

796 

816 > 

867 

847 

863 

88B 

878 

-1 

968j 
915] 

Id.' 
933 

93$( 
948> 
980 
966 



1006 



Pue kydroeyanic aeid.^1^ /.««. 

MC. 

Very pore ralphsrle ether. 
TlM Mpie ronoeatrated. 

Equal parte ofalcobol, aad ether. 
Very pure aieohol for pharmaeeuti- 

eal purpoaes. 
Pare aleobol. Naphtha. 
Alcohol o/eomifieiee. 
Braential oil of turpentine. 



Bydroeiraiile 
pore hydri 



aeid of Bchoele and 

^ lydroeyanie aeid. nUzed with 

an equal portion of water. (Jl». 

Wfa«<.) 

Acetie ether. ' 

Nitric etl^r. 
Muriatic ether. 
Liquid aamonia. 
Oiive oil. 

Brandy. 

Buifoody wlaa. 

Bordeaux wine. 
Diatilled water. 



2. Duunding Scale for ksavf Hptidg. 
(DtUeh.) 



Scale or Bpecifle 
BBtaaLGraTta. 



I 
6 

ji 

16 
60 
61 
65 
36 

35 

46 
41 
4S 
Id. 
96 
60 
66 
76 



1607 2 
10605 

1014 



10757 
16015 
1161 
II80{ 

isiot 

1961 

13841 
139eV 
1454) 
Id. 
IS-tt 
1714 
1847 
1940 



flubstancea. 



dlaiaied water. 
DisUUH vlnefar. < 
Connioa Tlnegar. 
Cow*e milk. 

GonecBtrated acetic add. 

LiquM hydrochloric add. 

Boiling aymp. 
Cold ayrup. - 
Common nitric acid. 

Ooneetttrated nitric add. 

Phoaphoric add for medical aae. 



Very eoneentiated aulpfaurie acid. 
Very concentrated phoaphoric acid. 



ARES. A term invented hy Paraeelsns to 
d6iigoate the principle on which depends the 
&nn of mercury, sulphur, and salt* These the 
•Ichymists regarded as the three bodies that 
give birfh to every other. 

AR'ETfi, airr^^ < viitoe.' Mental or corpo- 
real vigour— -Hippocrates. 

AUREUS. A pessary mentioned by Psolus 
ofiEgina. 

AR^EMA, Ar'gem^j Ar'gtmus, from *cy»^, 
* white.' Fos'nOay (F.) Enetwure. A white 



spot or ulceration of the eye« — ^Hippocrates. 
See Lencoma. 

ARGEM'ONl: MEXIC A'NA, J%om Poppf, 
PrieJUf Pappy, Ttllow ThUtU. A native 6f 
Mexico, but naturalized in most parts of ths 
world. Nai, Ord. Papaveracee. iS«r. Sy$u 
Potyandria Monogynia. The juice resembles 
gamboge, and has been used as a hydragogue. 
The scwos are employed in the West In£es as 
a substitute for ipecacuanha. They are also 
used as a cathartic. 

ARGENSON, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
A chalybeate Situate at Argenson in Dauphiny : 
used in cases of obstruction, jaundice, &c. 

ARGENTj Apgentum--a. Cklorurs d*, see 
Argentum — a. Cyanure d*y see Argentum — a. 
9t d'Ammoniaquey eklorw d*, see Argentum — 
a. Iodur$ d% see Argentum — a, Osndt d% see 
Argentum. v 

AR6ENTERIA, Potentilla anserlna. 

AliGENTI CHLORIDUM, see Argentum 
— «. et AmmoniflB -chloridum, see Argentum— 
a. et Ammonis chloruretum, see Argentuna — 
a. et Ammonias chloruretum, see Argentum — a. 
Gyanidum, see Argentimi — a. Cyanuretum, see 
Argentimi-*«. lodidom, see Argentnm*-a. lo- 
duretom, see Argentum. 

Aaoxn'Ti Nitras, Argen'tum Nitra'tum^ Sal 
argen^tif Argentum Nifricum, (F.) Nitrate iPAr^ 
gent, Azatate d* Argent y Nitrate of Silver. This 
preparation is sometimes kept in crystals, the 
Nitrae Argen'ti in ory»tal*los eonere'tusy Ni» 
trate d^ Argent eryttalliei of the Codex of Paris. 
Lunapotab'iliey Crystalli LunmyArgen'tvm nit'' 
rieum ery»taUiea*tumy Nitrae argenti eryetal'* 
linue, Nitntm lunt^ri, Hydrago'gum Boy'LSi. 
Generally, however, it is in the ftued state : and 
it is this which is admitted into most Pharma- 
copceias, and which^ besides the name Nitrae 
Argentiy is called Ni*trae argen'ti fueuty 
Cauifti'eum lumclrly Lapieinfema*liey Argen'-^ 
turn nit*ricum fueumy and lunar cauetity (F.) 
Nitrate d* argent fonduy Pierre in female. 

In the Pharmacopoeia of the United States, 
it is directed to be prepared as follows: Take 
ofeilvery in small meces, 2j.; nitric acid, f. ^r, 
dietilled voter , f. 51). Mix the acid with the 
water, and diseolve the silver in the mixture 
in a sand bath ; then gradually increase the heat, 
so that the resulting salt may be dried. Melt 
this in a crucible over a f^entle fire, and con- 
tinue the heat until ebullition ceases; then im- 
mediately pour it into suitable moulds. 

The virtuee of nitrate of silver are tonic, and 
escharotic. It is given in chorea, epilepsy, fcc.$ 
locally, it is used in various cases as an escha- 
rotic. Dose, gr. 1-8 to gr. M in pill, three 
times a day. 

When silver is eombined with iodine, it is 
said to have the same effect as the nitrate, and 
not to produce the slate colour of the surface, 
which ii apt to follow the protracted use of the 
latter. 

Aeoentx Oxiduv, see Argentum. 

ANGENTINE, Potentilla anserina. 

ARGENTUMy^r'^riM, from o^o^, < white.' 
Silvery ImuAy Dia'nay (F.) Argent, A solid 
metal of a sinning white appearance; insipid; 
inodorous; highly sonorous; malleable and due- 
tile; somewluit hard; cirstBllizable in triangu- 
lar pyramids; fusible a little above a red heat, 
and volatisable; s. g. 10.4. Not used at all in 
medicine, unless in some places for silvering 



AROILB OCSRBUBJS pJlE 79 



ABI8T0L0CHIA 



pilli. SiLVkft Lbap, Argt»*tmm fohatum^ k 
the state in which it is UMd for this pnrpoee. 

Abobntum Divi%uk» mttaUU silver , in very 
fine powder, has hean reoommended internally 
■in r^hilia. 

ll&e esLOBiPB {Argm'H eklo'ridum, Argm*- 
twm mmnai'iwmi A, ekloraftum^ A. sali'tmmy 
Chlorur$'tum Argntfti^ Ckhr^urtt or Mu'riate 
of Silver, (F.) Chlorw d'Argent;) the Cta- 
mvbbt; the Iodu>b {Argen'ti lo'didnm, Argonf- 
twm loda'ttim, lodure'twm Argtrn'ti, lod'urtt of 
Silver, (F.) Joduro d*Argmu;) the Oxidb {Ar- 
g^'ti oai'idwmyArgtnftum oxyda'tvm, (F^ Ox- 
ide d* Argent, and the Cblobdb of AicMoiru and 
SiLVBB {Argenti et Ammo'fUet eklo'ridum, Ar- 
gon'tum muriai'ioum ammoma*tum, Cklorure'' 
him Argen*ti et Ammo'nia, Chlo'ruret of Silver 
emd Ammonia, Ammomo-ehloride of Silver, (F.) 
Cklorure d'Ar^^ent et d'Ammoniaque, have been 
used in syphilis. At first, these difierent pre- 
parations were administered iatraleptically on 
the gnmsj the chloride, the cyanide and the io- 
dide in the dose of l-13thof a grain; the chloride 
of silTer and ammonia in the dose of l-14th of a 
grain, and the oxide of silver and divided silver 
in the dose of l-8th and l-4th of a grain. M. 
Serre, of Montpellier, who made many trials 
with Uiem, soon foond that these doses were too 
small; he therefore raised that of the chloride 
to 1-lOth, and of the iodide to l-6th of a grain, 
withont any inconvenience resnlting. The dose 
of the other preparations was likewise increased 
in a similar ratio. M. Serre extols Uie prepa^ 
rations of silver — used internally as well as 
iatraleptically — as antisyphilitics, but they are 
not to be depended upon. 

The Cfonuret or Cyanide of Silver, Argm'ti 
Oftmure'tum, A. Cyan'idum, Argenftum oyano- 
gena'tuwk, <F.) Cfommre d*argewt, is thus di- 
racted to be prepared in the Ph. U. S. (1842.) 
Argent, Nit,Txr, Aeid Hydroeyan* Aq, deatil- 
lot. U Oj. Having dissolved the nitrate of sil- 
ver in the water, sidd the hydrocyanic acid, and 
mix them. Wash the precipitate with distilled 
water and dry it. 

Abgxrtum Cblobatum, see Argca tuni a. 
Cfanogenatom, see Argentom — a. Fiigitivam, 
Hydrargyrum — a. Fusom, Hydrargyrum*-a. 
lodatnm, see Amntum-— a. Liquidom, Hydrar- 
gymm— 4u Mobile, Hydrarg^mm--a. Moriati- 
cnm, see Argentom— «. Muriaticom Ammonia- 
tam, see Argentom — a. Oxydatum, see Argen- 
tom— a* Salitom, see Argentom— a. Vivom, 
Hydrargyrom. 

AROILB OCHREUSB pAlE, Bolns Alba. 

AROILLA BOLUS FLAY A, Terra Leannia 
— ^L Bohis rubra, Bole Armenian— a. Fermginea 
Rubra, Bole Armenian — a. Kalisolphurica, Alu- 
men— a. Pallida, Bolns alba. 

Aboilla Pixba, Terra Alu'mima, 2*. hola'rie 
sen argUltfeea fura, pure Argil t>r Alumina, 
Alumine faetiee. This substance, which is pre- 
pared by drying alum and exposing it, for 
twenty or twen^-five minutes, to a red heat, 
until the sulphuric acid is driven off, has been 
recommendea in indip^tion as antacid, as well 
as in Vomiting and diarrhiea accompanied with 
acidity. The dose to a very young child is from 
l^ss to 3J.; to older children from 3) to ^i. 

Aboilla Sulphitbioa Aloalxsata, Alomen 
— «• Snlphnrica usta, Alnmen exsiceatom— a. 
Supersttlphas alcalisatum, Alumen-Hu Vitrio- 
late» Alumen. 



ARGOL, R£I>, Potaasa supeiUuUa s iBBparai 
—a. White, Potassv supertartras imparos. 
AROUMENTUM INTEGRITATI8, Hjr- 



ARGT'RIA, from oeyu^c, «silver.» The 
discoloration of the skin occasioned by the in- 
ternal use of nitrate of silver. 

ARGTROCHiETA, Matricaria. 

ARGYROPH'ORA, from a^vqo^, < silver,' 
and f t^M, < I bear.' A name given, by Myrep- 
SOS, to an antidote which he regarded as ex- 
tremely precious. 

ARGYROTROPHEMA, Blanemangwr. 

ARGYRUS, Argentum. 

ARHEUM ATIC, Arketmat*ieue, from a my 
vative, and ifv/ia, * fluxion or rheumatism.' One 
withont floxion or rheumatism. 

ARIA, CratBgus aria. 

ARICI'NA, Cue'eonin, Cuseo-einckonia^ so 
called from Arica in South America, the place 
wher« it is shipped. An alkali, found in Cnsoo 
Bark, which is vtij similar in many of its pro- 
perties to Cinchoma. Cuzco was the ancient 
residence of the Incas. 

ARICTMON. oQtMVfiof, from aqt, an inten* 
sive particle, and ttvtv, * to conceive.' A name 
given to a female who conceives readily ^ — ^Hip- 
pocrates. 

ARIDEl<f A. A Latin word employed to de- 
signate the leanness of any part. — ^Ettmuller, 
Sauvages. 

ARIDITY, Arid'itae, (F.) Aridity, from 
arere, <to dry-' The French use the word 
Aridity to express the dryness of any ornn, 
and particolarly of the skm and tongoe, men 
such dryness is so great as to render the organ 
rough to the touch. Aridity also means the 
lanuginooB appearance of the hair in some dis- 
easea in which they seem covered witii dust. 

ARIDU'RA. Wasting or emaciation of the 
whole or of any part of Vae body. — ^Marasmns, 
Atrophy, (q. v.) 

AamuBA Cordis, Heart, atrophy of the. 

ARIE A, see Spirit. 

ARISTALTHiBA, Althaea. 

ARISTOLOCHI'A, from attrreg, «very 
good,' and x^/ua, * parturition ;' so called, be- 
cause the different varieties were supposed to 
aid parturition. Birthwort, (F.) Arietolocke* 
Several varieties were once in use. 

Abistolocri'a Clbmati'tis, Aristoloekd^a 
Vulga'ris, Adra Riga, Arietoleekifa ten'uiSf 
(F.) Aristoloehe ordinaire, Vprigkt Birtkwort, 
The root has been considered stimulant and 
emmenagogue, and as such has been used in 
amenorrhea, chlorosiB, and cachexia. 

Aristolochia Fabacxa, Fumana bulboea. 

Abistoloohi'a Lonoa and A. Rotub'da, (F.) 
Aristoloehe longue et ronde. Long and nnmd 
Birthfoort. Virtues the same as the preceding. 

Abistolocri'a Pistolochi'a, Ptetoloeki'ay 
Arinoloeki*a polyrrhi^t^a. This variety has an 
aromatic odour, and an acrid and bitter tttte. 
(F.) Arietoloeke or/nol4e. 

Abistolocri'a Sbbvbnta'bia, Serpenta^riOf 
Vipera*ria, Viperifna Virginu^na, Coluhri'nm 
Virginu^na, Contrayer^va Virginia'na, S, Vir* 
gima*na, (F.) Serpentaire et Arietolooko eer- 
pentaire de Virgime, Colwvrine de Vtrgimo, Vir* 
ginia SnaJhroot, Snakeroot Birikwort, Snake- 
loeed, Snagrel. Virtues — ^tonic, stiimilant; 
and, as such, employed in debility, intennit- 
tentiy he. 



ABISlOLOOmC 



^BRItEBB NJmJNBS 



A^vroLocm'A TrnjcfSAtA, (F.) Atutoheks 
triiohi; A plant of Sarinam mnd Jamaica; 
poMeaaing tlie general virtaea of the Ariatolo- 
ciliia. The ouer variatica of Ariatolochia 
faaTe aimilar nropeitiaa. 

ARISTOLOCHIC, AristOock'unu. Same 
etymology. An old term for ramediaa aup- 
poaad to ha^e the property of promoting the 
flow of the lochia—Hippocntea, Theoplsaatiia, 
Dioacoridci, fcc« 

ARISTOiN MAONUMand ARISTON PAIU 
VUM. Theae names were formerL]^ given to 
pharmaeeotical preparationa, oaed in phthiaia, 
tormiDa, and fever ^—ATieenna. 

ARISTOPHANEION. A lort of emollient 
phater, prepared wkh four pounds of pitch, two 
of af^ekfmoj one of wax, an oance of opopo- 
naz^andhalf a innt of vinegar.-^ Gornnis* Not 



ARKANSAS^ MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Aboot 5 miles from the Waahila river, and 
about a quarter of a degree north -of the Lou- 
iataaa Ime^ there are 70 of those springs. They 
are thermal, upwards of 100^ Fanrenheit, and 
are emplojred in rheumatiami cutaneous affec- 
tiona, he. 
ARLADA, Realgar. 

ARLES, MINERAL WATERS OF. Ther- 
mal sulphureous springs in, the dejpartment of 
Pyr^n^M Orientales, France. Their tempera- 
tare is 103° to J45<* of Fahr., and they contain 
salphdlqrdric acid. 
ARM, Brachium. 
ARMA, Penis— a. Ventris, Penis. 
ARMAMENTARIUM, Arsenal— a. Chirur- 
gicnm, aoe Arsenal. 
ARMATORT UNGUENT, Hopiochrysma. 
ARMATURA, Amnioa. 
ARME, ««#ci7, from o^a, < I adapt.' Any phy- 
siological or mechanical junction or union of 
parte. — fieaychius. A sttture, as of the cra^ 
niom^ — Galen. 

ARMENIACA MALUS. The Apricot. See 
Pronns. 
ARMENIAN STONE, Meloehitea. 
ARMENITES, Melochites. 
ARMILL^ MANUS MEMBRANOSiE, 
Annular ligaments of the carpus. 

ilfi3rO/SrjS^LiLYCjB£,Artemisiarupestris 
— ^.Cmmnmm, a rtemisia vulgaris — AEstr€tgon, 
Artemisia dracnnculus — a, Ordmedre, Artemi- 
sia vulgaria. 
ARMONIACUM, Ammoniac, gum. 
ARMORAfCIA. InthePharmacopceiaof the 
United Statea, the fresh root of the Cochlearia 
•mMTacia. 
ARMOUR, Condom. 

ARMURE DE8 JAMBBS, see Conn am- 
monis. 
ARMUS, Humerus — a. Summus, Acromion. 
AR'NICA MONTA'NA. Derivation uncer- 
tain. Amiea, Leopard's Ban*^ DoronfMum 
Gtrmmmficumy Alis'may Ae^yrus^ JHuret'iea, 
Amiea Plauen'sig^ Panaee^a lapsc'rum, Ptof^- 
mica monit^naj Caitka seu Cal0n*dtUa Alpi^nay 
(F.) Armiquef Bitoine d«s MotUagn$*y Tabae 
d4s Vo^Sj Taiae ou Bitoine dee Savofarde^ 
Dorome d^AUomagne. Sex. Sfot. Syngenesia 
Polygunia superflua. Nat, Ord, SynanSieres. 
The plant and flower are conMdered, or have 
been considered, narcotic, stimulant, emmena- 
fiogue, &c. ; anc^ as such have been given in 
ammoaia, paralyais, all nervous 



rfaemnatiaw, gout, chlorosis. Sec. Dose, gr. ▼ 
to z in powder. In large doses, it is delete- 
rious. 

AuaoA SruaiA, Inula dysenterica— a. Sue- 
densis. Inula dysenterica. 

ARNOGLOSSUM, Plantago. 

ARO'MA, Artfmoy < perfune:' («^, « very,' 
and ooftti or oifiiif < odour.') Spir^itu* Rectory 
(F.) Arome, The odorous part of plants. An 
'emanation— frequently imponderable, from bo- 
dies—which acts on tine organ of smelly and va- 
ries with the body exhaling it. 

AROMATIC, Aromafieucy (F.) Aromaie. 
Any odoriferous substance obtained from the 
vegetable kingdom, which contains much vola- 
tile oil, or a light and aspansible resin. Aro- 
maties are used in perfomes, in seasoning, mad 
embalming. In uMdicine they are employed 
as stimulants. Ginger, cinnamon, cardamoms, 
mint, hCy belong to this class. 

AROMATOPOI4 A, from a^fioy < vk odour,' 
and 7r«li«, <I sell.' An apothecary or drug- 
gist. One who sells spices. 

AROPH. A barbarous word, which had va- 
rious significations with the ancients. Para- 
celsus employed it to designate a lithontriptic 
remedy. TIm^ mandragora, according to some. 
Also, a mixture of brwd, saifron and wine« — 
Van Helmont. 

A^opH Paracslsi, Ferrum ammoniatum. 

ARQUBBU8ADE EAUD^Aquatraumat'- 
ioa Thcdo'miy Aqua Tkedu^na^ Aqua edofCUf^ 
ria. Aqua vulnera^riay Aqua eatapultt^rump 
MUtufra vulnera'na ae"ida* A sort of vulne- 
rary water, distilled from a farrago of aromatic 
plants. iRoeemarf Ibiss, miUefoti, thprncy ewb 
Bms. Proof epirit 3 gallons— distil a gallon. 
This is one form*) 

ARRABON, Arraphon. 

ARRACHEMENT, (F.) from arrackory^Xo 
tear out,' Apoepae^may Abruf/tio, Avul^eio. Act 
of separating a part of the body by tearing it 
from the bonda connecting it with others. Evul- 
sion (q. V.) Laceration (q. v.) 

Arraekcment is applied to certain operations, 
aa to the extraction of a tootky the extirpation 
of a polypus y fcc. 

ARRACK, Arack. See Spirit. 

AR'RAPHON, AHfabony from a, priv. and 
^a^flf <a suture,' — ^^ without suture.' A term 
applied to the cranium when it preaents no su- 
tures. 

ARRECTIO, Erection. 

ARREPTIO, Insanity. 

ARREST A BO VIS, Ononis spinoaa. 

ARRET D'HILDANy Remora Hildani. 

ARRETE'BtBUFy Ononis spinosa. 

ARRHCEA, from «, privative, and ^lei, <I 
flow.' The suppression of any flux. Ame- 
norrhcea, (q. v.) 

ARRHOSTEMA, Disease. 

ARRHOSTENIA, Disease. 

ARRHOSTIA, Disease, Infirmity. 

ARRHYTHMUS, Cacorrhythmus. 

ARRIkRE'BOUCHEy Pharynx— a.-jDfl«*, 
See Dentition— a.-Kxt^, Secundinas. 

ARRlkRE-QOUTy (F.) ' aiter taste.' The 
taste left by certain bodies in the mouth for 
some time after they have been swallowed, 
owing probably to the papills of the mouth 
having imbibed the savoury substance. 

ARRlMREa NARINES, Nares, posto- 



JiBROCSE 



ARSENICUIC ALBUM 



ARROCREy Atriplex hortensii— a. Puatu, 

Chcnopodium volvuria. 

jSRROSEMENTy Aspenion. 

ARROW POISON. This diffen with dif- 
ferent tribes of Indians. By sooie, the potscm 
capsicum, and infusions of a strong kind of to- 
bacco, and of euphorbiaces are mixed together, 
with the poisonous enunet, and the teeth of the 
formidable serpent, called by the Peruvian In- 
dians Miuitmaru or Jargon, — Laeh4sis puta of 
Tschudi. 

ARROW ROOT, Fe&ula Maran'ta. The 
fecula of the rhizoma of Maranfta Arundinafteay 
which, like all fecula, is emollient and nutri- 
tive, when prepared with water, milk, fcc. 

Dr. Carson has shown, that Florida 
root is derived from Zafmia int$grifo'lia or Z. 
fvfmUay Sugar pins; Benau'daarrofo root being 
obtained from Haranta arundinacea. Florida 
arrow root as well as the farina is known in 
the Southern States under the name Coonti or 
Cooniis. 

Arkow Root, Bkasiliaii. The fecula of 
Jatropha Manihot. 

Arrow Root, Common, see Sohnum tube- 
rosum. 

Arrow Root, East Indian. The fecula of 
the tubers of Curcuma angustifolia or narrow- 
leaved Turmeric. 

Arrow Root, English, Arrow root, common. 

ARS CABALISTICA, Cabal-«. Chyniia- 
trica,Chymiatria — a. Clysmatica nova. Incision 
of medicines — a. Coquinaria, Cidinary art — a. 
Cosmetica, Cosmetics — a. Culinaria, Culinary 
art— a. Empirica, Empiricism — a. Hermetica, 
Chymistry'-«. Homceopathica, Homceopathy— 
a. fiydriatrica, Hydrosudotherapeia>-«. Infuso- 
ria, Infusion of medicines — a. Machaonia, Me- 
dicina — a. Majorum, Chymistry — a. Medica, 
Medicina — a. Obstetrician Obstetrics — a. Sa- 
nandi. Art, healing — a. Separatoria, Chymistry 
— a. Spagirica, Chymistry — a. Veterinaria, Ve- 
terinary Art — a. Zoiatriea, Veterinary Art. 

ARSALTOS, Asphaltum. 

ARSATUM, Nymphomania. 

ARSENAL (/ .) Ckirapotht'ea, ArmameH^ 
ta'rivm^ A, ehirur'gicum^ A collection of sur- 
gical instruments. A work containing a de- 
scription of surgical instruments. 

ARSENlATE, Arsen'ias. A salt formed 
bv a combination of arsenic acid with a salifi- 
able base. 

Arsbniatb of Ammonia, Arssn'tas Ammo* 
nia, Ammo'nium Arsen'ictu»y (F.) Arainiats 
tPAmmoniaque. This preparation is highly ex- 
tolled in cutaneous diseases. A grain of the 
salt may be dissolved in an ounce of distilled 
water, and 20 to *25 drops be commenced with 
as a dose. 

Arsbniatr op Iron, Ar»en'icu F»rr%, Ferrum 
Arsonia'tumy F. Arten'ieum oxydrila'tum, (F.) 
Arsiniat9 de Fer, This preparation has been 
applied externally to cancerous ulcers. An 
ointment may be made of ,:;ss of the arseniate, 
l^ij of the phosphate of iron, and ^vj of sperma- 
c sti ointment. The arseniate has also been given 
internally in cancerous affections, in the dose 
of one-sixteenth of a grain. 

Arsbniatr of Protox'xdb of Potas'bium, 
Proto-arton'iatf of Potas'sivmj Arsen'iato of 
Potctaaot A rgen'ias Poteuta, ArsenioJ Kali* Fnh 
perties the same as those of arsenious acid. 

AR'SENIC, Arsen'ieum. A solid metalj of a 



steel-gny- colour; granular texture; very brit- 
tle; volsitilizing before melting; very combus- 
tible and acidi&ble. It is not dangerous of it- 
self, and only becomes so, by virtue of the &• 
cility with which it abaorba oxygen. 

ARSENIC BLANC, Arsenicum album. 

Arsrnxo, Iodidb of, Arson'iei To'didum^ A. 
loduro'tumy Arson'ieum lodJtum, This pre- 
paration, applied externally, has been highly ex- 
tolled by Biett in various cutaneous affections. 
The ointment he uses contains three grains of 
iodide to Jj of lard. 

Arsbhic, Oxidb of, Arsenicum albani--«. 
Oxide of, White, Arsenicum albun^--a. White, 
Arsenicum album. 

Arsbnic and Mrrcxjrt, Iodidb of, Hydrar'' 
gyri §t Arson^d lo'didum^ DouiU Podido of 
Aor'ewry and Ar'sonic, lodo-art^oniu of Mor*- 
eury. A compound, which has been proposed 
as more efficacious than either the iodide of ar- 
senic or the iodide of mercury. It is made by 
triturating 6.0B grains of metallic arsmie; lAM 
grains ofmoreurv; 49 of iodine, with a fluidrachiki 
of alcohol, until the mass has become dry, and 
from being deep brown has become pale red. 
Eieht ounces of distilled water are poured on, 
and after trituration for a few moments, the 
whole is transferred to a flask ; half a drachm 
of kfdriodie acid, prepared bv the acidification 
of two grains of iodine is added, and the mix- 
ture is boiled for a few moments. When the 
solution is cold, make the mixture upte f. Jviij 
with distilled water. This is called by Mr. 
Donovan, the proposer. Liquor Arssn'iei et Ify- 
drar'gyri lo'didi, each drachm of which by 
measure consists of water ^, arsenious acid 
gr. l-6th; peroxide of mercury gr. I-4th, iodine 
converted into'hydriodic acid gr. 3-4ths. The 
dose of this, Do'iovan^s Solution, is from ii|^. 
XV to f. gss two or three times a day. 

It has been used successfully in inveterate 
cutaneous diseases. 

ARSENICAL PAISTE, (F.) Pits Arssnicale. 
This application to cancers is formed of 7M 
parts of dnnsAar, 22 of dragon* s blood, and 8 
of arsenious add; made into a paste with sa- 
liva, when about to be applied. 

ARSENICI lODIDUM, Arsenic, Iodide of-- 
a. loduretum, Arsenic, Iodide of. 

ARSENICISMUS, Intotdea'tio Arsoniea'Us. 
Poisoning by arsenic. 

ARSENICUM ALBUM; White Ar" sense. 
Oxide of Ar'senie, Ratsbane, Arsen*id ox'ydum 
album, Calx Arsen'id alba, A^'idum Arsenica'' 
sum, A, Arsenio'sum (Ph. U. S.) Arsen'ious 
add. White oxide of arsenic, (F.) Arsenic blane. 
An acid which is met with in commerce, in 
compact, white, heavy, fragile, masses ; of a 
vitreous aspect, opake, and covered with a 
white dust: of an acrid and nauseous taste; 
without smell when cold; volatilinble by heat, 
and exhaling the odour "of garlic : soluble in 
water, alcohol and oil ; crystallizable in regu- 
lar octahedrons. It is tms that is meant by 
the name Arsenic, a^ commonly used. 

Arsen^icum Album Sdblima'tum, Sublimed 
Oxide of Arsenic, is the one employed in me- 
dicine. It is tonic and eschtf otic, and is the 
most virulent of mineral poisons. It is used 
in iptermittents, periodical headachs, neuroses, 
&c. Dose, gr. one-tenth to one-eighth in pill. 
See Poisons, Table of. 

Arsbnicum Iodatum, Arsenic, Iodide of. 



ARSENI8 POTASS^ 



81 



JiBTkRS 



AtasEmcvM Rub&vw FACTiTum, Bealgar. 

ARSENIS POTASSJS, Anenite of protox- 
ide of potaMiam — a. Potasse aquosns, Liquor 
sraenicalis — a. Potaais liqaidut, Liquor arse* 
nicalis. 

A R'SENITE, Jfr'g^nis. A salt, formed by a 
eombinatkm o^ the anenious acid with a lalifi- 



Ae'sbhits of PaoTox'iDE or Potas^bhtm, 
Proio-ar'MtniH of Potas'tiumy Ar'senite of Po* 
tassa, Ar*9omM PotasstB. A a uncrystallizable 
and colourless salt, which forms the basis of 
the liquor arsenicaUs, which see. 

ARSE-SMART, Persicaria— a.. Biting, Poly- 
gonum hydropiper. 

ART, HEALING, Jirs Sanamfdi, MtdieifnOy 
(q. V .) The appropriate application of the pre- 
cepts of the best physicians, and of the results 
of experience to the treatment of ^disease. 

AsT, Vrmiif AXT, Veterinary art. 

AR'TABfi, oQ^ajfif. Name ef a measure for 
dry substances, in use with the ancients, equal 
at times, to 5 modii: at others, to 3; and at 
others, ag»in, to 7. — Galen. 

ARTANTHE ELONGATA, see Matico. 

ARTELSHEIM, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
These German waters have been much re- 
commended in hysteria, gout, palsy, fcc. 
Their physical or chemical properties, have not 
been described. 

ARTEMISIA, Anaeti'rioH, Called after a 
queen of the name, who first employed it; or 
from AfTtfuff * Diana;' because it was formerly 
Qsed in diseases of women, over whom she pre- 
sided. The Gauls called it Brieumvm, 

AxTxvn'iA AB.ROT*AnvUyAhrot*anum,Abrot*' 
onuMy Abroi*anum Cathtumy Ahrot'anwn maoy 
Abratkany South'omvfoodyOldman, (F . ) AuronOy 
Aaront imdUy Aurone des jardtns, Oardoroh^y 
CitronoUe. Supposed to be possessed of stimu- 
bat properties. 

Oil of Sotakomvwody O'loum Abrofamy (F.) 
Huiio d'Auronsy possesses the aromatic proper- 
ties of the plant. 

Artkmis'ia ABam'TBiUM, Ahnn'tkiumy Ab- 
sitt'tkium vtdga^riy Apin^tkium, Barypi^erony 
Common Wormwoody (F.) Abointho, Proper- 
ties:— tonic and anthelmintic. The Oil of 
TTonmwoody CUum AhHn'thiiy (F.) HtdU d^Ab- 
njukgy contains the aromatic virtues of the plant. 

Artbmisia Botxts, Chenopodium ambro- 
sioides. 

Aktshis'ia Cavpxs'tris, Pield Soutkem" 
*eood,(F.)Auronsdes Champs » This possesses 
the nme properties at A, Abrot*<mum. 

Artxxisia Chbhopodium , Chenopodium bo- 
tryt. 

AarmisiA CnnnBHSis, A. Infdieay A. Moxa* 
From this the Chinese form their moxas. 

AxTXMis'iA DxAOun'cuLUS, Tar^agofty (F.) 
Armoitt ostragon. Virtues :— the same as the 
last. • 

AsTKMis'iA Glacia'us or Siliy Wormwood; 

AsTKHiaiA IxDiCA, Artsmisia Chinensis, A. 
sutonica; 

Artbmis'ia Mabit'ima, Absin'tkium Marif' 
iwmmyS$a Wormwoody MariUmo Southernwood; 

AiTXMisiA MoxA, A. Chinensis; 
and 

AiTKMn'iA Pon'tica, a, Roma*nay Aboin^ 
tkiitm Pon'tieum sen Boma'numy Roman Worm' 
imodf Lesser Wormwood, possess like virtues ; 
—ts well as 



Axtbvxb'ia Rupxs'tkis, Creeping Wormwood^ 
Gen*ipi albumy (F.) Armoise blanCy Genipi blame. 
This variety has aromatic virtues, and is used 
in interinittents, and in amenorrhoea* 

Artxhis'ia Santor'xca, Santon'ienmy Arie^ 
mis'ia eontruy Semen eontra Vsrmesy Semen eon* 
tray S. Zedoa^riesy Canni Her bay Chameeeedrisy 
Cham4geyparis'susy Semen Cinesy Hagioeper*' 
matmy Sanctum Semeny Absin'thium Santon*» 
ieum, Sementi'noy XantoWnoy Seheba Ar'abum.y 
Artemie'ia Juda'ieay Sina sen Cina Levan'tieoy 
Wormseed, Tartarian Southernwood, (F.) Bar* 
botine. Virtues :— anthelmintic and stimulant. 
Dosoj gr. X. to zj in powder. 

Artemis'ia Yitlga'ris, Artemis'ia rubra et 
alba, Cin^gulum Saneti Joan*nisy Mater Herbal- 
mm, Beremeeeumf Bubasteeor[dium^ Canapa*» 
day Mugworty (F.) Armoise ordinairOy A. Com- 
mmisy Mrbe de Saint Jean. This, as well as 
some other varieties, possesses the general tonic 
virtues of the ArtemisiaD. The Artemisia vul- 
garis has been highly extolled by the Germans 
in cases of epilepsy. Dose of the powder in 
the S4 hours from gss to gj. 

AR TkREy Artery— 0. Sraehialy Brachial ar* 
tery-^a. Braehio-e^.phaliquey Innominataarteria 
— -<». Bronehifue, Bronchial artery — a, CUiaire^ 
Ciliary artery— o. Clitorienne : see Clitoris — a. 
CeseeUe: see Colic arteries — a. Collatirale du 
eoudey Anastomoticus magnus ramus — a. Col^ 
lat^rale extemey Arteria profunda humeri — a, 
Collateraleintemey Anastomoticus magnus »• 
mus — a. Coronaire dee livres. Labial artery-— a. 
Contnaire Stonutehique, Coronary artery — a. 
Cruraley Crural artery— 0. Deusdeme dee thora- 
eiquesy Arteria thoracica externa inferior — th 
ApineusSy Meningeal artery, middle — a. Fimo- 
ropoplitdey Ischiatic artery — a. Fessihrey Gluteal 
artery — a. Gastrique droite, petite. Pyloric ar- 
tery — a. Ghtuuro'maeeillaire, Maxillary artery, 
internal— 0. Honteuee extemsy Pudic, external, 
artery — a. Honteuse intemoy Pudic, internal, ar- 
tery — a, Hum^rale profondsy Arteria profunda 
humeri — a. Hiaque primitivey Iliac artery — a. 
Innominisy Innominata arteria — a, Irienne, Ci- 
liary artery — a, Isehio-pemenne : see Pudic, in- 
ternal, artery — 0. Midiane antirieure. Spinal 
artery^ anterior — a, Midiane posterieure du 
raehisy Spinal artery, posterior — a.' Meningia 
moyMSMtf, Meningeal artery, middle — a. Menton^ 
m'^4,Mental foramen — a. Mesoeephalique, Basi- 
lary artery— 0. Mesoeoligne: see Colic artery— 
0. Museulmre du bras, Arteria profunda humeri 
— 0. Museulaire dit bras, grands : see Collateral 
arteries of the arm — 0. Museulaire grande de la 
ntisssy Arteria profunda femoris — 0. Opistho* 
gastrique, Cceliac artery — 0. Orbitaire, Oph- 
thalmic artery— 4. de POvaire, Spermatic arte* 
ry — 0. Pelvi-erurale, Crural artery — 0. Pelvic 
erurale. Iliac artery — 0. Peltnenne, Hjrpogastric 
artery — a, Premikre des thoraeiques, Arteria tho- 
racica externa -superior — a> Radio-earpisnna 
transversals palmodre. Radio-carpal artery — a, 
Serotalsy Pudic, external, artery — 0. Sous-ela- 
vihrsy Subclavian artery — 0. Sous'pttbio-fim4>» 
rale. Obturator artery — 0. Sous-pubienns^MAiCy 
internal, artery— -0. aous-stemaly^amsoarf, in- 
ternal — 0. Spkbno'ipineusey Meningeal artery, 
middle— 0. Stomogastriqusy Coronary artery — 
0. 8uS'€arpienne,wetSue'barpien^--a, Sus-maaf^ 
illaire. Alveolar artery— 0. Sus^maxillaireyBne-^ 
cal artery — 0. Sus-Mitatarsienney Metatarsal 
artery— 0. Sus^puHennSy Epigastric artery — 0. 



ARTEBIk 



ARTERY 



TeHieuiairey Sperniatie axtery— ^. T%ormeiqus 
humSraley Acromial artery — th Trachilourvieal, 
Me Cerebral arteries — a. TrochofUirUniu, Cir- 
cumflex arterr of Uie thigln^a. Troisihiu d— 
tkoraeiqtitsy Acromial artery— 4. Tympanifue, 
Auditory artery, external — 0. JTnial^y see Cili- 
ary artery — a. VWv«>0,Padic, external, artery. 
ARTERIA, Artery-— a. Ad Cvtem Abdo- 
minis, see Ad Cutem abdominis, <arteria)— «. 
Anonyma, Innominata artery — a. Aspera, Tra- 
chea—a. Cerebralis, Carotid, internal — a. Cer- 
▼icalis, Basilary artery— «. Coronaria dextra, 
Pyloric artery— a. Crassa, Aorta — a. Externa 
cubiti. Radial artery— a. Dorsalis metacatpi, 
Metacarpal artery — a. Dnras matris media max- 
ima, Meningeal artery, middle— «. Encephalica, 
Carotid, internal— a. Gastrica saperior. Coro- 
nary artery— a. Ilio-colica: see Colic arteries 
-^-Hi. Iliaca interna. Hypogastric artery— -a. Ili- 
aca posterior, Hypogastric artery — a. Ma^ia, 
Aorta — a. Magna poUicis, ^rinceps pollicis — a. 
Malleolaris externa: see Tibial arteries — a. 
Malleolaris interna: see Tibial arter ie s a . Maiki- 
maria externa, A. Tboraciea externa, inferior 
— «• Maxinoa, Aorta — a. Media anastomotica: 
see Colic arteries — a. Meningsa media, Menin- 
geal artery, middle— «. Muscularis femoris, A. 
Profunda femoris — a. Pharyngea suprema, Pte- 
rygoid artery — a. Profnnda cerebri x see Cere- 
Inral arteries — a. Pudenda communis, Pudic, in- 
ternal, artery— a. Pudica, Pudic, internal, ar- 
tery — a. Ramulus ductus Pterygoidei, Pterygoid 
artery-^-a. Spheno-spinosa, Meningeal artery, 
middle — a. Spinalis, A. Profunda humeri— a. 
Stemalis, Mammary, internal— a. • Supra-orbi- 
talis, Frontal artery — a. SyWiana: see Cerebral 
arteries — a. Thoracica axillaris vel alaris. Sca- 
pular artery^ inferioi^-a. Thoracica humeralis. 
Acromial artery— ^.-Transyersalis colli: see 
Cerebral arteries — a. Transyersalis humeri. 
Scapular artery, superior — a. Ulnaris, Cubital 
artery— a. Uterina hypogastrica. Uterine artery 
— a. Vasta posterior, A. Profunda femoris. 

KKTWKlKCyArterHacuB. A medicine pre- 
cribed in diseases of the windpipe. Also arte- 
rial, (q. V.) 

ARTE'RI^ ADIPO'S^. The arteries which 
secrete the fat about the kidneys are sometimes 
so called. They are ramifications of the capsular, 
diaphragmatic, renal, and spermatic arteries. 

Artbbijb Apoplbctiojb, Carotids— 4. Capi- 
tales, Carotids — a. Ciltares, Ciliary arteries — a. 
Corporis callosi cerebri, Mesolobu arteries — a. 
Jugulares, Carotids — a. Lethargies, Carotids — 
a* Mesolobics, Mesolobar arteries — a. Pr»- 
parantes, Spermatic arteries — a. 8omnifer», 
Carotids— a. Soporales, Carotida— cu Soporarias, 
Carotids — a. Yenosas, Pulmonary yeins. 

ARTE'RI AL, ArUri'aeus^ ArUrio'sus. Be- 
longing to ar^ries. 

Aetsbial Blood, (F.) Sang artSriel. Red 
blood is so called because contained in the arte- 
ries. The pulmonary yeins, howeyer, also con- 
tain red blood: hence the name arterial vmns^ 
(F.) Veinss art€rtelles, applied to them. 

Aifrs^RiAL Duct, Cana'Us arterio^tutfDuetu* 
anerio'atUy D. BotaUi, (F.) Canal arterial, C. 
Pulmo'Oortiquey is the portion of the pulmonary 
artery which terminates in the aorta in the 
ftttns. When this duet is obliterated after 
birth, it is called Arte'rial Lig'amtnt, (F.) Liga^ 
msTtt arfkriel. 
Aetbeial Stbtem includes all the art(Bries» 



I c»ppo- 



from their origin in the heart to their termina- 
tion in the organs. See Yascular System. 

ARTERIALIZATION OF TiiE BLOOB, 
Hsmatosis. 

ARTARIARCTIEy from «^»fMi» 'artery/ 
and areto, * I straiten.' Contraction of ah artery. 
ARTERIECTASIS^ Aneurism. 
ARTERIECTOPIA, from u^nQut, « artery/ 
and wnWHi '* out of place.* Dislocation of an 
artery. 
ARTERIEURYSMA, Aneurism. 
ARTERIITIS, Arteritis. 
ARTERiODIALYSIS, see Anenrimn. 
ARTERIOG'RAPHY, ArUriogra'pkia: from 
o^niff «, ' artery,' and >^«^, < a description.' A 
description of the arteries. 
ARTERIOLA. A small artery. 
ARTERIOL'OGY, ArttHolog'ia: from «frv- 
^a, < artery,' and xa^tpy ' * discourse.' A trea- 
tise on the arteries. 

ARTE'RIO-PITUTTOUS. An epithet ap- 
plied to yessels which creep along tlw interior 
of the nostrils. — ^Rnysch. 
ARTERIORRHEXIS, see Aneurism. 
ARTERIOSITAS, from Arterioy «an artery.' 
A condition of the blood in which it preser 
in the yeins the arterial character « — The c»p 
site to Yenositas. 

Aetbeiositas Sab oxmiis, PisBdominiinn 1 
guinis arteriesi. 

ARTEKIOSTEIEy ftoxa fl^qfi«, 'artery,' 
and omofy ' a bone.' Ossification of an nrtny 
— Piorry. 

ARTERIOT'OMY, Arurtotom'ia, from a^rw 
fia, ^an artery,' and ri/uiw, * I cut.' Thia wont 
has been void for the dissection of arteries. 
Most commonly, howeyer, it means a surgical 
operation, which consists in opening an artery, 
to draw blood from it. Arteriotomy is chiefly 
used in inflanunatory affections of the heady 
when the blood is generally obtained from the 
temporal artery. See Blood-letting. 

ARTERI'TIS, AHwrii'tigy Injlamma'tio Aru-^ 
ria'rwny (F.) ArUritey Injiammation d$s ar^hrss; 
from *a^'ni^my < an artery,' and itisy a termina- 
tion denoting inflammation. Inflammation of 
an artery. Inflanunation of the inner oo«t of 
the artery is 'termed Endo-arttti'tiai or Bndo- 
narfri'Ht; of the outer, EasoHtrteri'tis or JSx' 
artefi'iis, 

AR'TERY, Arte'riay (F.) Arth^ from «n^, 
« air,' and rij^n*, * to preserve,' qnasiy « recepta- 
cle of air,' because the ancients belieyed that it 
contained air. They, at first, gaye the nune 
Artery to the trachea, of'nM rca/tia, becaose 
it is filled with air$ and afterwards they used 
the same term for the arteries, properly so 
called, probably because they conomonly found 
them empty in the dead body. We find, alao, 
9Xf/9f^ to designate the arteries, called bf the La- 
tins Venee miean'tes jmleafilee^ Arteries, yyith 
the moderns, signify that order of yessels, which 
arise from the two yentricles of the heart, and 
haye yalyes only at their origin. They are cy- 
lindrical, firm, and elastic ciuials; of a yellow- 
ish i^hite colour; little dilatable; easily lace- 
rable; and formed, 1. Of an external, laminated 
or cellular membiane, of a dense and close cha- 
racter. 9. Of a middle coat composed of fihrea, 
which does not, howeyer, contract on the appli- 
cation of the gslyanic stimulus; and 3. Of an 
inner coat, wluch is thin, diaphanous, reddish, 
and polished. 



iJtTERT 



81 



ABTERY 



Hie «M of the vteries ie to eerry the blood 
frtmi the heert to the Ttrioiifl parts of the syi- 
tem. It will be obTioos, however, that they 
egaaot all convey art$rial blood. The paboo- 
Dory ertery» for example, ie deitined to convey 
the vemaus blood to the lunfs, there to be con- 
verted into murial ; whiUt the pnlmonary veine 
convey arurial blood back to the heart. 

TABUI OF TtLK PRINCIPAL AETttRIES OF THS tfODT. 

Ail the Other arteries take their rise from the 
Pulmonary Artery, or the Aorta : and the names 
g^enerally indicate the parts to which they are 
distributed. 

I. Aetbkia Polmoma&is. 

The Pnlmonary Artery arises from the right 
ventricle, and soon divides into a right and left 
branch, coe of which is distributed to each long. 

n. Abts&xa Aoeta. 
The Aorta arises from the left ventricle. It is 
the common trank of the arteries of the body, 
and may be divided into five portions. 

a. ArterieM furnished by the Aorta at its origin. 

1. A. Cardiaca or coronaria anterior. 
9. A. Cardiaca or coronaria posterior. 

b. Arteries fwmUhed by the AeHa at its areh. 
The areh of the Aorta gives off, to the left, 

two considerable tronks — ^the Arteria earotidea 
fri m nt ivoj and A. suhdavia; and, to the right, a 
angle trtmk, which is hrgar^tiie A, innomi- 
natoy or Braehio-eephalieaf wliich divides into 
the primitive carotid and subeiaviem. 

A. AmTEBiA Cabi»- j Divideiitnto A.Carotideaezteraat 
nsKA PUiHTiVA. \ A. CarotJdea Isterna. 
rFarntebaa, I, A. Tkffrei^ee nperier. 

8. A. luufualis, which gttm» off the A. dona- 

Ha lingiie and A. anblinsualla 
9.dff. fmeimiis or jf. MeaiUeris ttsrma, 
a A r> whieb fttrnhtaaa the A. palaUaa iilfe- 

«. A. i.a. j^^^ ^1^ ^ aohnenulia, aad A. 

aaria aapbrior and Inferior. 

4. A. 9eeiffiulis, which glYea off the A. 
loldea poaterlor. 

5. A. smriailerU pogterioTt Which gifea off 
A. itylo-anMioiden. 

t 8. dff pksrfmfgn inferlcr. 
ThaaiiMnI rarotld Dltimacdy dlvida* Into the ta«i. 
pml arterj and Iniomal nuxttlaiy. 

'^Ljf'S Fernlahaa^. traiuiMt»eUsfktUi, Jf. msHeeie- 
fS!' ( ria amwJT. aad A, ttmpit ■«§ aMdia. 

ftmlabaa 13 hraaehea, vis. ^C mmUngte wMKa, 
A. dmiaria it^erUr, A, impermlia fr^kmde 
p^stniar, A. «— #i iw i n a, A. pUrfgridta, A. 
kueeeHe. A, UmpermHs pr^fitnda sntsrirr. A, 
ebmUsrUi A. suberUUfis. A. wdtmoy A. 
pie t ^p e l m tine or pksrfmfm emperur^ A, 

I peUim* sHmerier, aad A. apktnepelatma. 

^ftamiflhea, 1. A. ^jiJka^lnaea, which (Iveaoff 
A. lachrymalia, A. oantralia retins, A. to- 
piaorbitarla vol aupeieillaria, A. cillara* poa> 
trriorea, A. oiilarea Iobsb, A. mvacuiaria 
aaperlor et inferiOTi A. ethoioidalia posterior 
et anterior. A. patpebralla aoperior et Inlb. 
rior, A. naaaiia, and A. fttrntnlla. S. A. eem. 
wmmUams, mUesiL 3. A cktnUse, 4,A.€$. 
rtbtMlMM emUrior, 5, A.eertbrmkswudie. 

'Ftirnlabea, 1. A. vMieftraOr, which flyea off 
A. apiaaltM antarior «l poaterior, A. cere- 
beiloaa lalbrlor, and fortna— by anitinf It- 
•eir wkh that of the oppoaitp aide -the A. 
baailaria. dirldvd into A. eerebelloia anpe- 
rioi and A. cerebralia poaterior. 8. A. fW- 
fwidM tfi/Mir, which gi vet off A . eervkails 
aaoendene. 3. A. wMmmeria imifme, wiiich 
fiven off the A. mediaatina anterior and A. 
diapliragniatica anpetfor. 4. A. HUsnestellM 
septrior. S. A. est afcaivf frwnvMwa. 6. A- 
acofiaris mferier. l.A,unUaUMfo»Uriier 
vel fr^fimtd*. Farther on, the Mibclavian 
artery continoea iti protra i a nnder tlw name 
^.mUaHa. 



1 A 



kA.Ca. 

rotidta 
ii 



B. Aa- 

TiaiA 



A. AaU- 
iaris. 



A. Br*' 



l.A.1 



fLA.Cu- 



1. A, eeresOmHs. % A. ikerecUe 
sipetitr. 3. A, tkortmea imferior vel lenga 
▼ei wcwena cstama. 4. A. seapttUnria k0^ 
riar Tel etmmmvs. & A. eiremmJUse peati- 
riar. 6. A. e h x wa^pa a m n u riar, Kartlieron, 
the azillaiy artery coutinaea nnder tlie 
name A. hratUaUa, 

Fnrniahea A, kmaarmlh prafaMde or cajfattra- 
Ue eatema. 9. A. eabaUraUa Mama. ]t 
afterwards diyidea into the radial and em- 
kUal arteries. 

CHvea off A, raemrma radiiaJii, A, doreeUe 



ernrpit A. daraaMa metaiaifi, A. daraaUa pal' 
ticiat and terminatea in mrming the Areas 
pahaaria frofiandaa. 
Gives off A» raearrana ctAHaUa antariar and 
^aifariar i A, interoaaaa amtaHar and peat s 
rhr^ which latter fumiahea ^. rsoHrrsnar*- 
AaVs paaleiior. It terminates in Ibrmlnf 
the aaparjteial palmar areh, which fives on 
A. OoUaiataiaa digUaraoi. 



c. Arteries given off by the Aorta in the Thorax* 

1. A, Breaakica^ dsstra tt aimisttm, 

%. A, aaapkagam (to the number of four, ilvf , 

01 811.) 

8. A. madjga^nm pastariaras* 
4. A, intareaaUlaa Watieraa vel AaHiaa (to 
tlie njttmber of eight, nine, or ten.) 

d. Arteries furnished by the Aorta in the Abdo" 



Tl^sas 

ariariea < 

ara^ 



J^ 5 1. The A tfia;iira/aiat/ca vel pkreniae, d^ 
••^**' ^ tra at anUatra, 

Which diyidea into three branches, 1. A. ea- 
ranaria een<r<ea/i. S. A Hapatiea. which 
S. <f. j tivea off A. pyloriea. A. gastr»«plplolea 
deztra and A. cystica : and, Ivtly, the A. 
aplaaiea, which gives off A. gaatro-epiploloa 
^ sinistra and Vasa brevla. 
8. A, f Which givea off at ita concavity the ^. salAea 
Maaeu* ) daxira eapariar, media at ia^ariar, and Ulia 
tariea } convex part from 15 to 80 Kami Intcati- 
ataer.ar-l nales. 
S ^ ( Which glyes off .^. edtica nfasrtor ai«dia, and 

^evsn- ^ i«,#VWA« anJHIvMAMtntn A. hwrnnrrhAldalM 

iitferiar { 

5. The A, Capaularaa madia (to the number of two on 
each side.) 

6. A. KamaUa er Xmmlgat^es* 

7. A. SparmaUea. 

8. A. Lambarta (to the number of four er Ave on each 
aide.) 

e. Arteries reeuUing from the Bifureation of 
the Aorta. 
The AorU, a little above If* Bifurcation, givea off the 
A. aaera atadia, and divides Into A, Uiaem priaUtiva. 

'^r^SjUvidas into A, JHaea irUema and A. IHaea 



a. A.I1- 
iaca in- < 
terna. 



infaHor, and dlvldea into A. hsmorrhoidalea 
Boperlorea. 



b. A. 

iaca ez« 
terna 






A. Cra- 



Pop-^ 



Fumiahea, t. A. Uie-lvaibaria. 9. A. aaera la- 

taralia. XA gltitaaotiliaeapoatariar. 4. 
A. amHliealia. 5. A, vaaiealia. 6. A. okn- 
rstersa. 7. A. kamerrkaidaa madia. 8. A. 
aterina. 9. A. vagimiUa. 10. A. iaekUUca. 
11. A, pudanda inleraa, which gives off the 
A. kemorrkoidalfa iafariartai A. af t%a asp- 
faai, A, tranaveraa parinaa, A. aerperia c«- 
vsmaM, and A. daraalie paaia. 

Fttmiabea 1. A. aaigaatriaa. 8. A. iliaea anta- 
riar or eircumjUxa ilii, and \» rontlnued af- 
terwards under the name of Crural Artery^ 

Furnishes, 1. A. aaheataaaa akdaaimalis. 8. A. 
pmdenda auperJUuM* and pr^f^mda. 3. A. 
muaetUaria avpar/Uialia. 4. A. muaeularis 
2»r«/VnAi,whicii gives off the A. circumfleza 
eitema and inti^ma, and the three Ferfb- 
rantea, distinf ulshed into superior, middle, 
and inferior. Farther on, the crural artery 
continues under the name A. Panlitsa. 
* Fumiahea, 1. A. ArtieuUrre eipariaraa^ <tilar- 
IM, «Mdia, •( asUma. 8. A, gaiaallm. 3. A. 
Artiealaraa if/briorea, iaUma H eiAfma, 
4. A UbialiaanHea, which at the foot, takea 
the name,^. daraalia tarai, and givea off the 
tarsal and metatarsal arterle». In the leg, 
the popliteal artery dlvldea into the pero- 
neal and posterior tibial. 

Dlvldea Into A. paranaa emtiea and A. p e rmae 



ARTERY 



84 



ARTHROSIA 



hialis 
fgtiea. 



DiYldw Into 4. pUmUrU lateriM asd Jt.pUm- 
taria §tUmt, Tlie latter, by ftnactooMMing 
with the A ^m-gali* tarn, fomi Um pUnUr 
mrtk, whence erbe Rami tvptriitt or p«r« 
f^rtmUs p»$liei, JL h^$ri»r§9 yeflict tflcitti- 
d, which give off Rami perfiirmntes antici. 



Aktxkt, Aiioui*ak, Facial artery — a. Ar- 
ticular, Circumflex artery — «. Brachiocepfa»- 
lic, Innominata arteria — a. Central of the re- 
tina, Central artery of the retina^-*. Central 
of Zinn, Central artery of the retinar-a» Ce- 
phalic, Carotid — a. Cerebral posterior, Terte- 
oral--n. Cervico-acapular, see Cervical arteries 
— «. Coronary of the lips. Labial artery— a, Cro- 
tephite, Temporal artery— «. Fibular, Peroneal, 
artery — a. Gastric inferior, Gastro-eptploic ar- 
tery — a. Gastro-hepatic, see Gastro-epiploic 
artery—a. Genital, Pudic (internal^ artery— a. 
Gnttural inferior, Thyroideal A. mferior — a. 
Guttural superior, Thyroideal A. superior^— a. 
Humeral, Brachial artery— a. Iliac posterior. 
Gluteal artery — a. Iliaco-muscular, Ileo-lombar 
artery— «• Labial, Facial artery— a. Larrngad 
superior, Thyroideal artery superior — a. Muul- 
lary internal. Facial artery — a. Median of the sa- 
crum, Sacral artery, anterior--^. Nasal, lateral, 
large, Spheno-palatine artery— a. Palato-labial, 
Facial artery— a. Pericephalic, Carotid (exter- 
nal) — a. Phfljryngeal, superior, Pterygo-palatine 
artery— a. Phrenic, Diaphragmatic artery— «• 
Posterior of the brain, see Cerebral arteries — a. 
External scapular, Acromial artery— a. Spinal, 
Meningeal artery, middle — a. Subclavian right, 
Lmominata arteri»— a. Subscapular, Scapular 
artery, inferior— a. Superficial of the abdomen. 
Ad cutem abdominis (arteria) — a. Supramaxil- 
lary, Alveolar artery— «. Suprarenal, Capsular 
artery — a. Thoracic, internal, Mammary inter- 
nal — a. Urethro-bulbar, Transverse perineal 
artery— «. Yesico-prostetic, Vesical artery — a. 
Vidian, Pterygoid artery. 

ARTETIS'CIJS; from aviusy 'a limb.' One 
who has lost a limb. 

ARTEURYSMA, Aneurism. 

ARTH ANITA, from acT«(, « bread:' the 
Cye'lamtn or Sotohread, It was formerly made 
into ointment, Unguen^tum Arthani'tay with 
many other substances, and was employed as a 
purgative, being nibbed on the abdomen. 

Artranita CTCLAMxif, CycUmeu. 

ARTHETICA, Teucrium chamaepitys. 

ARTHRAGRA, Gout— a. Anomall^ Goat, 
anomalous — a. (renuina. Gout, regular — a. Le- 
gitima. Gout, regular— a. Normalis, Gout, re- 
gular — a. Vera, Gout, regular. 

ARTHRALGIA, Arthrodynia, Gout. 

ARTHRELCCVSIS, from a^tn, ' a joint,' 
and *iK]UM>i?, < ulceration.' Ulceration of a joint. 

ARTHREMBOLE'SIS, same etymon as the 
next. The reduction of a fracture or luxation. 

ARTHREM'BOLUS, from H^^^y < a joint,' 
vfy < in,' and $AkXtay < I cast.' An ancient in- 
strument used in the reduction of dislocations. 

ARTHRETICA, Teucrium chamspitys. 

ARTHRITIC, Jlrthrit'ufuty from a<^«y, <a 
joint.' (F.) Artkfitiyu^y Goutteux. That 
which relates te gout or arthritis, as arthriHe 
symptoms y fcc. 

ARTHRITICUS VERUS, Gout. 

ARTHRITIS, Gout, Arthrophlososis, Ar- 
throsia— a. Aberrans, Gout (wandering)— a. 
Acuta, Gout (regular)— a. Arthrodynia, Rheu- 
matism, chronic — a. Asthenica, Gout (atonic) 
—a. Atonic, Gout (atonic) — a. Diaphragmatica, 



Angina Pectorii-^. Erratica, Goat (wandering) 
—a. Hydrarthros, Hydrarthros — a. Inflammato- 
ria, Gout (regular)— 4i. Juvenilis, see Rheoma- 
tism, acute— a. Maxillaris, Siagonagra^-a. No- 
dosa, Ciout (with nodosities)— a. Planetica, Goat 
(wandering)— a. Podagra, Gout— a. Rheamatiea, 
see Rhenmatism,aeute — a. Rheumatismus, Rheo- 
matism, acute— «. Retrograda, (vout (retrograde.) 

ARTHROC'ACfi, from a^^£*v, <a joint,' 
and x*xo{y *bad.' Disease of tne jointe; and 
especially caries of the articular sumces. Spi- 
na ventosa, (q. V.) 

Aetheocacx Coxakvm, Coxarum morbus. 

ARTHROCACOLCX^aA, ttomartkroeaeiay 
— according, to Rost, a chrome disease of the 
joints; and ioy^, < a description.' The doctrine 
of chronic diseases of the joints. 

ARTHROCARCINO'MA, from «^»^, <a 
joint,' and nmnufu/iay < cancer.' Cancer of the 
joints. 

ARTHROCHONDRFTIS, from of^for, <a 
joint,' ^0v/for, 'a cartilage,' andi<t>, denoting 
mflammation. Inflanmiation of the cartilages 
and joints. 

ARTHROO)! A, from '^M^^fr, < a joint,' M- 
artieula'tio. A moveable joint, formed by the 
head of a bone applied to the sur&ce of a shal- 
low socket, so that it can execute movements 
in e^ery direction. Jhthrodium is < a small 
joint:' diminutive of Arthrodia. 

ARTHRODYN'IA, JrtkramU'giSy Attkrai'' 
giay from «(^v, < articulation,' and t^wi;, 
'pain.' Articular pain. Pain in the joints. 
See Rheumatism, ehronic 

AaTHKODTNXA PoDAOUOA, Gout. 

ARTHROL'OGY, 4rthrolog'*iay from ap^^f , 
^a joint,' and 2«r*ff> ' & description.' A descrip- 
tion of the jointe. The anatomy of the jointe. 

ARTHROM'BOLt:, from^^^^or, and /fallti, 
<I cast.' Coaptetion, redaction. Reduetion 
of a luxated or fractured bone. 

ARTHROMENINGITIS, Meai|igarthi>o- 
cace« 

ARTHRON, «ajoittt.' The anciente used 
the word Arthrony for the articulation of bones 
with motion, in opposition to Sj/mpkgtU or 
articulation without motion. 

ARTHRONALGIA, Arthrodynia. 

ARTHRON'CUS, Artkropk^ma; from «#- 
9pv¥y * a joint,' and •}^wc, < a swelling.' Tume- 
faction of a joint. 

ARTHR<JNEMPyESIS, Arthiopyosis. 

ARTHROPHLOCSCSIS, from a^S^^Vy <a 
joint,' and^a«x», <I bum;' Jirikrt^tisy Ostar- 
tkro'sia. Inflammation of the jointe. 

ARTHROPHYMA ADENOCHONDRIUM, 
see Adenochondrius. 

ARTHROPYO'SIS, Artkronempf/ns, ttom 
fl^^(«v, < a joint,' and nvoy, ' pus.' Suppura- 
tion or abscess of the jointe. 

ARTHRO-RHEUMATISMUS^Rheanaatism 
(acute.) 

ARTHRCSIA, from of ^^o«, <! articuhtte.' 
Arthritis y (of some.) Inflammation, mostly 
confined to the jointe; severely painful; occa- 
sionally extending to the surrounding muscles. 
A genus of diseases in the Nosology of Good, 
including Rkswmatismy Oouty Articular injiam- 
mationy Joint-aeksy fcc. 

AaTHRosiA AciTTA, Rheunuttism, acute— a. 
Chronica, Rheumatism,chroQic — a. Lumborum, 
Lumbago— a. Podagra, Gout— a. Podagra com- 
plicata, Gout (retrograde)— «• Podagnularvata, 



ARTHROSIS 



ARUM 



Goat (atonic)— «« Pod^^ regokrii. Gout (re- 
gular.) 

ARTHROSIS, Articulation. 

ARTHROSPON'GUS, from ae^fvy « a joint,' 
and a-jfyY9t, 'a aponge.' A white, fbngoua tu- 
naonr of the jointa. 

ARTHROTRAU'M A, from o^^qw, * a joint,' 
and r^Bv^s, * a wound.' A wound of a joint. 

ARTIA. According to some, this word is 
sjnonymoua with c<T^ia; others use it syno- 
nymoualy with 2Va«A«a. 

^RTICHJIJTTy Cynara scolymus. 

ARTICHOK£, Cynara scolymus. 

JRTICLE, Articulation. 

ARTICOCALUS, Cynara scolymus. 

ARTICULAR, Artieuia'ria : from artus, 
<a joint;' articulusy 'a small joint.' That 
which relates to the articulations; — as the ar- 
tieuiar eapsvUs, fcc. 

Aktic'ular Ak'tkries of TBS XMBE arisc 
from the popliteal artery, and surround the 
tihio>fenK>Tal articulation. Although of a small 
sixe, they are important, as they frimish blood 
to the lower extremity after the operation for 
popliteal aneurism. They are distinguished 
into superior and inferior* The superior arti' 
emlar arteries^ po^^iteai artieuiar artsriesy are 
commonly three m number : one of which is 
ieuemaii unother extemaly and another middle^ 
the ax'ygous artitfular. The first, Ramus 
auastomotfieus magnusy anastomoses by one 
branch with the external circumflex; and by 
another with the ^emal superior articular. 
The steoud anastomoses with the external cir- 
cumflex, the superior internal articular, and 
the inferior external articular ; and the third is 
distributed within the joint. The inferior at" 
tieuiar arteries are two in number : an internal 
and sxtermai* The former anastomoses with 
the internal superior articular and the external 
inferior articular. The latter anastomoses with 
the recurrent branch of the anterior tibial, and 
the external superior articular. To each arti- 
eokr artery there is an artieuiar nerve. 

kn.Ti&uLJLR Facbttbs' are the contiguous 
nrftees, by means of which the bones are ar- 
ticulated. 

AtTic'xTUkK Tbius of the knee follow the 
«me course as the arteries. 

ARTICULATIO, Articulation--a. Artifi- 
csalis, Pseodarthroais— a. Notha, Pseudarthro- 
sii. 

ARTICrULA'TION, Joint, Jirtieuiatioy Ar- 
tkro'sis, Aseastkro'sisj JSrtie'uius Junetu'ra, 

Coloj Conjune*tiOy Nodusy Comws i ssu'roy Com- 
pe^gesy SpntaoE^isy Har'musy Vsrtie'uia, Vertie^u- 
Uuy Vsrtie'uluu^ (F.) Artieulation, Article, 

Ssme etymon. The union of bones with each 

other, as well as the kind of union. 

TABLS or ABnClTLATIOIIS. 

Articulations are generally divided into Diar- 
tkro»9a or moveable articulations, and Spnar- 
tkroses or immoveable. 

f 1. Araphjartbmit. 
I S. DiMttlirMil, orblea- ( Enarthrotls. 
lar ysfue. j Arthrodia. 

3. Aliernative or Gtnglymuat wiikh 
[ adniuoTvarietias. 

!1. Sutare. 
t. Harnionf . 
aOomplKwia. 
. 4. flchindyletla. 

The articulations are subject to a nnmber of 



diseases, which are generally somewhat severe. 
These may be physical, as wounds, sprains, 
luxations, &c. ; or they may be organic, as an- 
kyloses, extraneous bodies, caries, rheumatism, 
gout, hydrarthroses, arthropuosis, &c. 

AaTicui*ATio2« means also the combination of 
letters which constitute words. See Voice. 

AaTicuLATion, False, Pseudarthro'sisy Ar^ 
tie*ulus falsusy (F.) il. fausse. A* aeeideruellef 
A. eontre nature. A, anormale. A false joints 
formed between fragments of bone, that have 
remained ununited; or between a luxated bone 
and the surrounding parts. 

ARTICULATION EN CHARNlkRE.Gv^ 
glymus— 4. de la Hanehe, Coxo-femoral articu- 
lation. 

ARTICULI DIGITORUM MANUS, Pha- 
langes of the fingers — a. Digitorum pedis, Pha^ 
langes of the toes. 

ARTICULO MORTIS, see Psychorage»-a. 
Spinalis, Semispinalis colli. 

ARTIFICIAL, Artifieia'lisy (F.) Artijieiei; 
from arsy artis, <art,' and faeere, <to make.* 
That which is formed by art. 

Artificial Etxs are usually made of enamel, 
and represent a sort of hollow hemisphere, which 
is applied beneath the eyelids, when the eye is 
lost. 

Artificial Tbxth are teeth made of ivory, 
porcelain, &c. 

PIECES IfANATOMIE ARTIFICIELLR8 
are preparations of anatomy, modelled in wax, 
plaster, paper, &c. 

ARTISCOCCUS L^VIS, Cynara scolymus. 

ARTIS'CUS, from ccfrof , < bread.' See Tro- 
chiscus. A troch of the shape of a small loidf. 
Also, and especially, a troch made of vipers. 

ARTOCARTUS. Thit Bread-fruit Tree,(F.) 
Jaquier, A Polynesian tree, so called because 
the fruit, which is milky, and juicy, supplies 
the place of bread to the inhabitants. It grows 
to the height of 40 feet. 

Artocarpus Imtsorifolia, Caoutchouc. 

ARTOC'REAS, from «fr»c, 'bread,' and 
xffof , f flesh.' A kind of nourishing food made 
of various aliments boiled together. — Galen. 

ARTOG'ALA, from «^oc, < bread,' and yaOM, 
<milk.' An alimentary preparation of bread 
and milk. A poultice. 

ARTOM'ELI, from «frec, < bread,' and ^ju» 
< honey.' A cataplasm of bread and honey. — 
(Salen. 

ARTUS, Membrum. 

ARTYMA, Aroma, Condiment. 

ARUM, A. maculatum, and A. triphyllum— 
a. Americanum beta foliis, Dracontium fceti- 
dum. 

Arum Dracuk'culub, Draeun^eulus polp^ 
pkpVlusy Colubri*na Draeon'tiay Ervade Saneta 
Maria, Gig'arus setpentafriay Arum polypkyV* 
iumy Serpenta'ria Gcdlo'rum, Family y Aroides. 
Sees. Syst. Monoecia Polyandria. The roots and 
leaves are very acrimonious. The plant resem* 
bles the A. maeula'tum in its properties. 

Arum Esculrm'tum, Calafdium esculen'tumy 
Taroy Kalo, The foliage and roots possess acrid 
qualities, which are dissipated by baking or boil- 
ing ; in which form it is used as food by the peo- 
ple of Madeira, the Polynesians, &c. 

Arum Macula'tum, Arum (of the older wri- 
ters) CueJhoio Pinty Barba Aaro'nisy Serpents^' 
ria minor, Zin' giber German'ieumy Saeerdos pe^ 
nis, WaJhe Robin, Priest's pintle, (F.) Gouet, 



ARUMARI 



A8CA1US 



Pisd d0 Vmu. The fredi root is itiiiiiihnt in- 
ternall^. Dom, 9J* of the dried root. Exter- 
nally, It IB verv acrid. From the root oi this 
Aram a starch is prepared, which is called 
% Portland Island Sago, Otrsa sorpmUa'riety C«- 
ru^ta *€rpenta'riety Ft^tUa euri maeuia*ti, 
» Aami, Thbkb-lbavkd, Anim triphyllum. 

AauM Tezphtl'luk, Thre4'Uavodarum,(^,) 
Piod-ds V$au tripkyllsy Indian Tumipy Dragon 
Booty Dragon Turmp, PfJPPfr Tttmip, This 
j^ant grows all over the United States, and is 
received into the Pharmaeopoia under the title 
Arum. The recent root, or Cormus — Arum, 
(Ph. U. S.)— is yery acrimonious, and has heen 
emplored in asthma, croup, and hooping-cough. 
BoUed in lard, it has been tised in tinea capitis, 
and in milk in consumption. 

ARUMARI, Caramata. 

ARUKDO BAMBOS, Bamboo— a. Brachii 
major, Ulna— «. Brachii minor, Radius — a. In- 
dica, Sagittarium alexiphalrmaeum — a. Major, 
Tibia— a. Minor, Fibula— a. Saccharifera, see 
flaoeharum. 

ARVA, Ava. 

ARTUM, VulTa— «. Naturae, Uterus. 

ARY-ARYTENOID^US, Ai^tenoidms-- 
a^Epiglotticus, Arytaeno-epiglotticus. 

ARYT^'N A, cpvrativa, < a ladle.' Hence, 

ARYT^ NO-EPIGLOT'TICUS, ArfttB'no- 
epiglottida'iUyAry'e^glot^tieus. That which 
belongs to the arytenoid cartilages and epiglottis. 
Winslow gives this name to small, fleshy ihsci- 
euli, which are attached, at one extremity, to 
the arytenoid cartilages, and, by the other, to 
the free edge of the epiglottis. These fibres do 
not always exist. They form part of the ary- 
tenoid muscle of modern anatomists. 

AR' YTENOID, Aryt€Bnoi!dMyArytonaidec'H*y 
from m^vraiifay *a ladle,' and »/«c, < shape. 
LadleHihi4>ed. 

Akttbnoid Cak'tii«aob8, Cartilag^'inot ary- 
tonai'desy C. guttura'Usy C. Chuturi^nay C, gut- 
turifor'nusy C, triq'uetray Guttur'niay are two 
cartilages of the larynx, situate posteriorly 
above the cricoid, and which, by approximation, 
diminish the aperture of the glottis. Their 
upper extremities or cornua are turned towards 
each other, and are now and then found loose, 
in the form oi appendices, which are considered, 
by some, as distinct cartilages, and termed 
•unciform or tuberetdated Cartilages or Cor- 
me*nla Laayn'gis, 

Ajlttxroid Glands, Glan'dulaArytenoidaftSy 
are small, glandular, whitish bodies, situate an- 
terior to the A. cartilages. They pour out a 
mucous fluid to lubricate the larynx. 

ARYTENOID^aJS, (F.) Arytenoldisn, A 
small muscle, which passes from one arytenoid 
cartilage to tlie other, by its contraction brings 
them together, and diminishes the aperture of 
the glottis. Winslow divided the muscle into 
three portions;— the Ajytenoida^i*s transvsr'- 
susy or Arf-arytenoidafusy and two Arytsnoi- 
da*i ohli^qui* 

ARYTH'M, Arytk'musy from a, privative, 
and ^/uec, 'rhythm,' < measure.' Irregular. 
This word is applied chiefly to the pulse. 

ASA, Asafcetida. See Assa. 

ASAFCETID A, .4««a/a'f»V^a, Sttreusdiai/oHy 
Cibus Deo^ntm, Asa, Dsvits dungy Pood oftks 
Oods. A gum resin — ^the concrete juice of 
P&r'ula Assafa'tiday Nai thex Assafa'tida* Or» 
doty Umbellifers. It is in small masses of a 



whitish, reddirii, i&d violet hue, adheriiig tog;e- 
ther. Taste bitter and subacrid: smell insnp- 
portably alliaceous. The Asiatics use it refo- 
larly as a condiment. 

Its medical properties are aatispaemodie, sti- 
mulant, and anthelmintic. Dose, gr. v. to xx, 
in pill. 

ASAGRiBA OFFICINALIS, see Vefrntriaa. 

AS'APES, « crude,' Assfton, A term ap- 
plied to the sputa, or to other matters evacu- 
ated, which do not give signs of coction. 

A SAPH' ATUM, from «, privative, and oo^qr, 
' ciear«' This term has been applied to collec- 
tions in the sebaceous follicles of the akin, 
which may be pressed out like little worms, 
with a black head. See Acne. 

ASAPHI'A, from a, privative, and o-ajpiKf 

< clear.' Dyspho*nia immodula'ta paUu^na^ 
Parapho'nia gutturt^Us; P. palatCna, DefiM- 
tive articulation, dependent upon diseased pa- 
late. — Hippocrates, Vogel. 

ASARABACCA, Asarum— «. Broad-leaTod, 
Asarum Canadense. 
ASAR'CON, from «« privative, and voe^, 

< flesh.' Devoid of flesh. Aristotle uses tJie 
term for the head when it is but little flMhy» 
compared with the chest and abdomen. 

ASARETy AjBarum — a, du Canada^ Aaanim 
Canadense. 

A S ARI'TES, from wm^ov, < the asarum.' A 
diuretic wine, of which asarum was an ingie- 
dient. — ^Dioscorides. ^ 

AS' ARUM, from «, priviSive, and r«4^ry < to 
adorn:' because not admitted into the ancient 
coronal wreaths; iU'amm Europm'vmy N^rdus 
Montt^nay Nardus Rust^icoy Arn'orum^ (F.) 
Asaret ou Cabaroty OrsilU d'hommsy OrMsiUy 
Oirard'Roussiny Nard Sauvage. jPom. Aroi- 
de». Ssz» Svst. Dodecandria Monogjmia. 
The plant, used in medicine, is the At^arwm 
Europ€t'wih Asaraka^ooy and of this the Usmrss. 
They are emetic, cathartic, and errhine, but 
are hardly ever employed, except for the last 
purpose. 

AsABUX CANAVBif'si, A, CaroUnia'num, Ca- 
nada Snakerooty Wild Gingery Colt's I^oot, 
Broadleaf Asarabaoooy Indian Ginger^ Semrt 
Snakerooty (F.) Asaret 4t» Canada. The root 
As'arwny (Phu U. S.) is used as a substitute Ibr 
ginger, and is said to act as a warm stimulant 
and diaphoretic. 

AsAftUK Cabolinianux, a. Canadense. 

ASBESTOS SCALL, see Ecsema of the 
hairy scalp. 

ASCAIN, MINERAL WATERS OF. As- 
cain is a village, situate about a league from 
St. Jean-de-Luz, in France. The water ia a 
cold chalybMte. 

ASC ARDAMYC'TES, from a, privative, and 
v%aq6afAvrr*ttty *I twinkle the eyes.' One 'who 
stares with £jced eyes, and without moving the 
eyelids. — Hippocrates. 

ASCARICIDA ANTHELMINTICA, Ver- 
nonia anthelmintica. 

A8CARIDE LXTMBRICOIDEy Ascnris 
lumbricoides — a. VeruUeulaire, Ascaria venni- 
cularis. 

AS'CARIS, pi. ASCAR'IDES, from «4aur- 
^i^«, *I leap.' A genus of intestinal worms, 
clmracterized by a lon^, cylindrical body, ex- 
tenuated at the extremities; and having a mouth 
furnished with three tubercles, from which a 



AfiCELES 



87 



ASITIA 



very short tabe is aometimes seen issuing* For- 
merly, there were reckoned two varieties of 
the A scans — ^the A/earis lumbrieoi'dwy lAtm- 
krCcms, L, Ur*» howiiwisy 3coUx^ As'eana gigas 
komlinisy (F.) Lambri9old»i Am^rid* lombri' 
9M€y Lombricy L, Tbtm, or long round worm; 
and the Jis'eari^ Vermieult^ris — the Ascaris 
proper — the thread toorm or maw worm* The 
former is alone included under the genus, at 
present-** new genus having been formed of 
the A» v tr w Un darUy under the name Ozyurii. 
It is the Oxfyfris vermicuiafris, (F.) Jisearidey 
df . vwrn me niai ref Oteyurs vrwueulmrt, 

A new species of entosoa has been found by 
Dr. Bellingham, the JUfearU alt^ta* 

AscAKis AxjLTA, seo Ascarie— «• Trichuria, 
Trichocephahia. 

AS'CELES, Jj'is^M, Car^iu eru'rihis, from 
a» privative, and na^9 * a leg.' One who has 

^ASCELLA, AziUa. 

ASC£Na>£NS, from asewdtrg, {ad and 
aeamdereyy * to ascend.* (F.y AseendaiU, Parts 
are thus called, which are supposed to arise 
in a remn lower than that where they termi- 
nate. Thus, Aorta asmndeus is the aorta from 
its origin to the arch: Vtna ea»a asc&tuUns, 
the large Tein which carries the blood from 
the inferior parts to the heart: Obliquu* aaetn- 
dsiu (amseUy} the lesser oblique muscle of the 
abdomen, &e« 

ASCEN'SUS MORBI. The period of in- 
erease of a disease. 
ASCESIS, Exercise. 
ASCHIL, ScUla. 

ASCHISTODACTYLUS, Syndae'tylus: 
6om at, priTattTO, rxtrrtf ^ cleft;' and ioKTuKo^y 
<a finger.' A monster whose fingers are not 
separated from one another. — Gurlt. 

ASf CI Ay Aadniy <an axe/ Sufor'nosy DoV- 
ahroy Fat'eia spira'lU. Name of a bandage men- 
tioned by Hippocrates and Galen, and figured 
by Seuitetna, in the shape of an axe or hatchet. 
— Oalen. See Doloire. 
A9CILLA, Axilla. 

ASCITES, from onui;, < a bottle :'— ^«i»'rM, 
Bfdroce'U PeritoH4g'iy Hydrops Abdom'iniay J3. 
Aidtt^fdrogat'tory Hydroea^liay Sydrs*trui»y 
AMcii'ttSy Caiioek'yaisy Dropay oftho lowor belly y 
Dropsy of the JPeritone'umy (F.) AedUy Hydro' 
peritonie, Hydropisie du Bae-ventre, A collec- 
tioQ of seroos fluid in the abdomen. Ascites 
proper is dropsy of the peritoneum; and is ch»- 
racterized by increased size of the abdomen, 
by floctoation and the general signs of dropsy. 
It is Taiely a primary disease; but it is always 
dangeroos, and but little susceptible of cure. 
Most generally, it is owing to obstructed circu- 
lation in some of the viscera, or to excitement 
of the vessels of the abdominal organs. The 
tnstment is essentially the same as that of 
other dropsies. Paracentesis, when had re- 
course to, can only be regarded as a palliative. 
Dropsy d the peritoneum may also be sac- 
cated or in cysts, and occasionally the fluid 
aecnmulates exterior to the peritoneum, Bydre- 
pigaa'trieim. When in cysts it is termed Hy- 
dreeye'tUy Hydropt abd&mfims eacea^tusy H, 
cf$'tieu* and Aed'tee eaeea*tue* 

Ascmes Hbpato-Ctsticus, Turgescentia ve- 
siads felie»-~a. Ovarii, Hydrops ovarii--a. Pa- 
ndeatos, Pyochexiar-a. Saccatos, see Ascites, 
Hydroanon, and Hydrops ovarii. 



ASCLiFIADEy Asclepias vineetoxicum. 
ASCLETIAS ASTHMAT'IOA, (F.) Ipeea^ 
euanha blame de I'Be de France. A creeping 
plant of the Isle of France, regarded as a spe- 
cific in asthnm. 

Asclepias Curassav'ica. The leaves are 
emetic in the dose of one or two scruples. It 
is the Ipeeeteuanka bUmc of St. Domingo. 

AscLBPiAS DxouM'feBNS, the root. Escharo* 
tic, cathartic, sudorific, diuretic. 
AscLBPiAS, Flish-oolouked, A. Incamata. 
Asclepias Gioamte'a. The milky juice is 
very caustic. It is used in Malabar against 
herpes; and mixed with oil, in gout. See 
Mudar. 

Asclb'pias Incarita'ta, Pleeh-^otoured ae- 
elepiae. The root of this plant, which grows 
in all parts of the United States, has the same 
virtues as the A. Syriaca. 

Asclepias pBOC''E&A(?)^«uMo«Mr; Beidel* 
ear. An Egyptian plant, the leaves of which 
are made into a plaster, and applied to indolent 
tumours. The milky juice is caustic, and it 
used as such. 

Asclbpi'as Pbbudosarsa, Hemidesmus Indi- 
cus. 

Asclepias Striaca, Common Silkweedy Milk 
Weedy (F.) Uerbe d la houette. The cortical 
part of the root has been given, in powder, in 
asthmatic and pulmonic affections in general) 
and, it is said, with success. 

Ascle'pias Tubero'sa, Butterjiy WeedyPleu* 
riay Root, Flux Boot, Wind Root, White Rooty 
Orange Sioallow Rooty SilJh Weedy Canada 
Rooty Orange Apoe'^ynum, Tuberous Rooted 
Swal'low Wort. JYat. Ord» Asclepiade». Se»* 
Syst, Pentandria Pigynia. Said to have been 
first recommended by the Asclepiades. In Vir- 
ginia and the Carolines, the root of this plant has 
been long celebrated aS a remedy in pneumonic 
affections. It is sudorific, and the powder acts 
as a mild purgative. Its chief powers are said 
to be expectorant, diaphoretic, and febrifuge. 
It is occasionally given to relieve pains of the 
stomach from flatulence and indigestion. 

Asclepias Yiecstox'icum, Cynan'ehum Vin» 
cetox'ienm, Vineetox*ioumy Apo^'ynum Nova 
An' glim hirsutuMy &c.. Swallow Wort, White 
Swallow Worty (F.) Aeelepiade, Dompte-venin. 
The root is said to be stimulant, diuretic, and 
enrnienagogue, but is hardly ever used. It is 
called also, Hirundina'ria. 
ASCLEPIASMUS, Hsmorrhois. 
ASCLITES, Ascites. 

ASCO'MA, from ct^wi, <a bottle.' The emi- 
nence of the pubes at the period of puberty in 
females. — ^Rufus of Ephesus. 
ASE, Anxiety. 
ASELLI, Onisci aselli. 
ASELLUS, Oniscus. 

ASE'MA CRISIS, x^tet^ aotifM, from «, pri- 
vative, and vmAOy ' a sign.' A crisis occurring 
unexpectedly and without the ordinary precur- 
sory signs. 

ASEPTON, Asapes. 

ASH, BITTER, Qoassia^a. Tree, Fraxinus 
excelsior— a. Mountain, Sorbus acuparia— ^u 
Prickly, Aralia spinosa, Xanthoxylum clava 
Herculis — a. Prickly, shrubby, Xanthoxylum 
fraxineum. 

ASIT'I A, from m., privative, and ©iro*, *food.' 
Abstinence from food. Want of appetitoi— J'e#- 
tidfivm eibe^rum, Apodoi'ais, 



AtSJAGAN 



ASPIRATIO 



ASJA6AN, As'jogam* An Indian tree, the 

juice of whoee leaves^ mixed with powdered 

cumin seeds, is employed in India in colic. 

ASJOOAM, Asjagan. 

ASKELES, Asceles. 

ASKITES, Ascites. 

ASaDES, Asso'detj from Miy, <diagnst,' 

< satiety.' A fever accompanied with anxiety 

and nausea; Fe'bris a»o'dta vel tuto'deM, 

ASPALASO'MUS, from wr.T«xaS» <a mole/ 
and 0-0/u<t, <body.' A genus of monsters in 
which there is imperfect development of the 
eyes.— I. 6. St. Hilaire. 
ASPALTUM, Asphaltum. 
ASPARA6INE, see Asparagus. 
ASP AR' AGUS, Aapat'aguB aJidiu^lMy Com^ 
mo» Asparagusy Sptu^agus, Sp^r^agus, Spar- 
rov Grass, Grass. Nat, Ord, Asphodelee. 
Ssx. Syst, Hexandria Monogynia. Aspar'agt 
offieina'lis Twio'nss, (F.) Aspsrgs. The fresh 
roots are diuretic, perhaps owing to the imme- 
diate crystallizable principle, Asparagine. The 
young shoots are a well known and esteemed 
vegetable diet. They communicate a peculiar 
odour to the urine. A svrup made of the young 
shoots and an extract of the roots has been re- 
commended as a sedative in heart affections. 

ASPA'SIA. a ball of wood soaked in an 
infusion of galls, and used by females for con- 
stringing the vagina. 

ASPEN, AMERICAN, Populus tremuloides 
— «. European, Populus tremula. 
ASPERA ARTERIA, Trachea. 
JiSPERGE, Asparagus. 
ASPERITAS ARTERIA ASPERJE!, Rau- 
oedo. 
ASPiRITADESPAUPlkRES.Inchomidi, 
ASPERITY, jSsper'itasy roughness. Aspe- 
rities are inequalities on the surfiitces of bones, 
which often serve for the insertion of fibrous 
organs. 
ASPERMATIA, Aspermatismus. 
ASPERMATIS'MUS, Asper'miay Aspsrma'- 
Ha, from «, privative, and o^tQ^ui, ^ sperm.' 
Reflux of sperm from the urethra into the blad- 
der, during the venereal orgasm. 
ASPERMIA, Aspermatismus. 
ASPERSIO, Catapaama, Fomentation. 
ASPER'SION, Asper'sioy from aspsrgersiad 
and spargsrsy) (F.) Jlrrosemsnt, Act of sprink- 
ling or pouring a Uquid guttatitn over a wound, 
ulcer, &c. 
ASPERULA, Galium aparine. 
Asper'ula Odora'ta, MaJtrisyVva, Hepaifica 
sltslle^ta, (F.) Asperule odoranie ou Mugustdes 
iois, JSepatique etoiles, Fam» Rubiaceas. Ssx. 
Syst. Tetrandria Monogynia. Swest-seentsd 
Wood-roof. Said to be diuretic, deobstruent, 
tonic, and vulnerary. 

ASPARVLE obORJiNTE, Asperula odo- 
^rata. 

ASPHALTI'TES, Nephri'tes, Nsphr^Hs, 
Prima Vertebra lumba'riay same etymon as 
asphaltum. A name given by some to the last 
lumbar vertebra. — Gorrasus. 

ASPHAL'TUM, Nep'ta, Jirsattoa, AspaP- 
<««!, from «ur9axi(tiv, 'to strengthen.' With 
the Greeks, this word signified any kind of bi- 
tumen. It. is now restricted chiefly to the Bi- 
TU'MBiv or JuDJEA, B. Juda'tcumy J§. sol'tdum, 
Jew's Piteky or Karabt of Sodom, (F.) As- 
phalts. It is solid, friable, vitreous, black, 
shining, inflammable, and of a fetid smell. An 



oil is obtained from it by distillation. It enters 
into the composition of certfdn ointments and 
plasters. 

It is collected on the surface of the water of 
the Dead Sea or Lake Asphaltites, in Judaea. 

ASPHARINE, Galium aparine. 

ASPHODELUS RAMOSUS, Asphodelus, 
A. Albusy A. Marisy Has'tula Regis, (F.) Lis 
aspkodkle. The bulbs of this southern Eoro- 
pean plant have an acrimony which they lose 
m boUing water. They contain a fecula with 
which bread has been made, and have been 
considered diuretic. Thev have been used aa a 
succedaneum for the squill. 

ASPHYX'IA,frQimc,priv.«and<r9v|»c> 'palae,' 
Defesftus Pulsi^y Aerotis*wasy Sidera'tioy Sy- 
dera'tio. For a long time. Asphyxia was con- 
fined to the sense of * suspension of circulaction 
or Syncope,' (q. v.) It now generally means 
suspended animation, produced by the noneon- 
version of the venous blood of the lungs into 
arterial blood, Apna*ay (q. v.) Apnmus^tia, 
Apnaasphyx'ioy Ankamato'sia, Etf lysis pneu- 
mo-eardi'aea. Owing to the supply of air be- 
ing cut off, the unchanged venous blood of the 
pulmonary artery passes into the minute radi- 
cles of the pulmonary veins, but their peculiar 
excitability requiring arterial blood to excite 
them, stagnation takes place in the palmonary 
radicles, and death occurs chiefly from this 
cause, — not owine to venous blood being dis- 
tributed through the system, and 'poiBoning* it, 
as was the idea of Bichat. Cams asphysc'ia. 
Mors appcirsns. Mors ptUati'va, Pseuelotkan'- 
atos. Apparent death, (F.) Mort apparently is 
characterized by suspension of respiration, of 
the cerebral functions, &c. Seveiid varieties 
of Asphyxia have been designated. 

1. AspHYx'xA OP THE New Boen, ^. neoMo- 
to'mm. This is often dependent upon tbt 
feeble condition of the infant, not permitting 
respiration to be established. 

2. ASPHYX'lA BT Noxious iNHALA'TIOIf Or 

inhalation of gases, some of which cause death 
by producing a spasmodic closure of the glottis : 
others by the want of oxygen, and others ase 
positively deleterious or poisonous. 

3. AsPHTx'iA BT Stranoula'tion or Sugo- 
ee^tion; produced by mechanical impediment to 
respiration, as in strangulation. 

4. AsPHTx'iA BT SuBMEE'siozf, A. hy dramm- 
ing, A. Imsnerso'rumy as occurs in thedrowned, 
who perish in consequence of the mediom in 
which they are plunged, being unfit for reepira* 
tion. See Submersion. 

Mr. Chevalier has used the term Aspkya:ia 
Idiopatk'iea, for fatal syncope owing to reiauca- 
tion of the heart. See Suffocation. 

AspHTxiA Immeesorum, A. by submersion — 
a. Local r^ — see Gangrene — a. Neonatoroniy A. 
of the new-bom— a. Pestilenta: — see Cholera 
— a. Pestilential: — see Cholera. 

ASPETXIE DBS PARTIES, Gangrene^ 
a. Lsnte des nouveau^^es. Induration of the cel- 
lular tissue. 

ASPHYX'IED, Asphyxiated, same etymon. 
In a state of asphyxia. 

ASPIC, Aspis; also, Lavendula. 

ASPIDISCOS, Sphincter ani extemns. 

ASPIDIUM CORI ACEITM, CalaguaUa radix 
—a. Filix femina, Asplenium filix feminai — a. 
Filix mas, Polypodlum filix mas. 

ASPIRATIO, Insinration. 



ASPntATION 



ASTHMA 



ASPIRA'TION, Adsfirt^tioyA$fir^tUy from 
msfirare {ad and tfirart) <to breathe.* The 
French sometiines use the tenn tynonymouBly 
with inspiratioD. It also means the act of at- 
tracting or sucking like a pump. Imbibition, 
(q. ▼.) Also, the prononeiatioB of a Towel 
with a full breath. 

ASPIS, «a^tc. A name given by the an- 
cients to a venomous serpent — ^the JSgyptum 
viper of hmcfcp^By ( F.) Jlspic^ Its bite is very 
dangerous, and it is supposed to have been the 
reptile, which Cleopatra used for her destruc- 
tion. 

ASPLE'NinM, from «, priv.,and ^xi|v,<the 
spleen/ Spletnmortf MUiwaste. 

Aspi^siuM Cet'erach, VoradHfiOf BU^ 
nwm, sqmmmQ^sutn, SeUopmfdrioy Atk^ion, 
Cet'eraek ofidfu^rvmy (F.) DoradOle, Sup- 
posed to be subastringrat and mucilaginous, 
and has been recommended as a pectontl. It 
has also been given in caleulous cases. 

Aspi^'HiTTM Fiux FosI'mhia, FolfjMf^dium 
jUix/aminay Aspidium/Uw/mmtnafJUthf/ium 
JUix fmminay Female ferny (F.) Foughre fe- 
melie. The root of this plant resembles dbat 
of the male fern, and is said to possess similar 
anthelmintic virtues. The name female fern 
is also given to the Fterie aquUinOy (q. v.) 

Aspu'ifiUM RuTA Mu&a'ria, A» mura'lly 
ParoHfek'iayWaHruSy White Maidenhair, Tent- 
werty Adiam/tum alM&my Ruta mura^rioj Sal'via 
VUtB, (F.) Rne dss muraillesy Sauvenns, Used 
in the same cases as the last. 

AspLs'irinM Scolopeh'drium, Seolopendrium 
effidm^rum^ Seolopenfdra, SeolopemdriotHart'e 
T^mgue, Splsenwoftf PhfUi^tity Lingua eer^ 
vCna, Bledmum lignifo'lium, (F.) Seolopendrs, 
Langwf tU eerf. Properties like the last. 

AspLS^HiuK TaiCHOMAifoi'nss, A, Trick/Md- 
SAM, CtUliphyPwm, Triehomfanes, Adian'ium 
rmhrnmy Cemman Maidenhair^ Polyt'ricum com- 
mu'ni, (F.) Falytrie. Properties like the last. 

ASPREDO, Trachoma--a. Miliacea, Miliary 
fever. 

ASPRBLEy Hippnris vulgaris. 

ASSA DOUXy Benjamin— a. Duleis, Benja- 
min—a. Odorata, Benjamin. 

AS8ABA. A Guinea shrub whose leaves are 
considered capable of dispersing buboes. 

ASSAFOETIDA, Asafoetida. 

ASSAIERET. A compound of bitter, sto- 
machic, and purgative medicines in the form of 
pill. — Avicenna. 

ASSAISONNEMENTy Condiment* 

ASSAKUR, Saccbarum. 

ASSALA, see Myristica moschata. 

AS8ARTHROSIS, Articulation. 

ASSA'TIO, Opt^Mts. The boiling of food 
or medicines in their own juice, without the 
addition of any liquid. Various kinds of cook- 
ing by beat.'-Galen. 

ASSELLA, Axilla. 

AS'SERAC, Aetie . A preparation of opium 
or of some narcotic, used by the Turks as an 
excitant* 

ASSERCTJLUM, Splint. 

ASSBRVATIONy Conservation. 

AS'SIDENS, from ad, <to,' and eedtrey «to 
W seated.' That which accompanies or is con- 
omitant. An epithet applied to the accessory 
tymptoms, AesuUnfHa tignoy and general phe* 
Qomena of disease. 

ASSIDENTIA SI6NA, see Assidens. 
7 



ASSIMILATION, AseimOa'tioy Simila'tioy 
Approprie^tioy Eesomou/sis, Homou/sis, Threp~ 
sisy l%rejfHei! from aeeimilarey {ad and eimi' 
larey) <to render similar.' The act by which 
living bodies appropriate and transform into 
their own substance, matters with which they 
may be placed in contact. In man, assimila- 
tion is a function of nutrition. 

ASSIS,Asserac.- 

AS'SIUS LAPIS, A'stus Lapie. A sort of 
stone or earth found near the town of Assa in 
the Tfoad, which had the property of destroying 
proud flesh. 

ASSODES, Asodes. 

AJSSOUFISSEMENTy Somnolency. 

ASSOURON, see Myrtus Pimenta. 

ASSUETUDO, HaHt. 

ASSULA, Splint. 

ASSULTUS, Attack. 

ASSUMPTIO, Prehension. 

ASTACI FLUVIATILIS CONCREMEN^ 
TA, Cancrorum chelae. 

ASTACUS FLUVIATILIS, Crab. 

ASTAKILLOS, Araneum ulcus. 

ASTARZOF. An ointment, composed of 
litharge, frog's spawn, &c. Ako, camphor dis- 
solved in rose water. — Paracelsus. 

ASTASIA, Dysphoria. 

ASTER ATTICUS, Bubonium— a. Ingui- 
nalis, Eryngiom campestie. 

ASTE^RIA GEMMA, Atte'riu»y Astroi'tesy 
Ae'trtesy Aetroi'olue. The ancients attributed 
imaginary virtues to this stone,-^that of dis- 
persing NtBvi Matemiy for example. 

ASTHENES, Infirm. 

ASTHENI'A, Vis immiwuftay from a, priv., 
and 0>^f fvc, 'force,' * strength.' Want of strength, 
debility, (q.v.) {Y.)Affaibli9eemetU. Infirmity, 
(q. V.) A word used in this sense by Galen, 
and emp]o;]red, especially by Brown, to de- 
signate debility of the whole economy, or di- 
minution of the vital forces. He distinguished 
it into direct and indirect: the former proceed- 
ing from diminution of stimuli; the latter from 
exhaustion of incitability by the abuse of stimuli. 

AsTHBifiA Dbolutitionis, Pharyugoplegta^- 
a. Pectoralis, Angina pectoris. 

ASTHENICOPYRA, Fever, adynamic. 

ASTHENICOPYRETUS, Fever, adynamic. 

ASTHENOPIA, DebUitae vieiisy (F.) Af- 
faihlisaement de la Vue, from «, priv., ir%vM9y 
< strength,' and «v/, <the eye.' Weakness of 
sight; Weai-sightednese. 

ASTHENOP YRA , Fever, adynamic,Typhus. 

ASTHENOPYRETUS, Fever, adynamic. 

ASTHMA, from ai^^a, < laborious breath- 
ing ;' from aay ^ 1 respire.' A» spattticum adulr 
t</ntmy A* SetUi/rumy A. Confmlet^tmrny A. 
spae^ticum intermit* tens, Dyspna'a et orthop* 
nala eonvidsifvay Malum Cadi^eum pulmt/" 
nvmy Broken-vrindedness, Nervous asthma, (F. ) 
Asthms, A, nerveux. Difficulty of breathing, 
recurring at intervals, accompanied with a 
wheezing sound and sense of constriction in the 
chest ; cough and expectoration. 

Asthma is a chronic disease, and not curable 
with facility. Excitant and narcotic antispas- 
modics are required. 

There are no pathognomonic physical signs 
of asthma. In some cases, the respiration is 
universally puerile during the attack. In the 
spasmodic form, the respiratory murmur is very 
feeble or absent during the fit ; and in all forms 



▲STHMi. 



ASTRnrOSNTS 



percnMion elidto a clear puUnoiiuy waiid. 
Tlie disease generally consists in some source 
of irritation, and occasionally, perhaps, in pa* 
xalysis oi the pneumogaBtric nerves ; more fire- 
qoently of the former-*all the phenomena indi- 
cating constriction of the smaller bronchkd ra- 
mifications. The treatment is one that relieves 
spasmodic action — narcotics, connter-irritants, 
change of air, &c. 

AsTHJCA Acu^TUK, of Miliar, w9. spas'tUum 
infan'tuw^ Cfnan'ckt traeksalis spa§wmdfiea, 
(F.yjisthnumgu* Probably spasmodic crovip.(7) 
See Asthma Thymicum. 

Asthma Ab&ium, Pneumothorax— a. Aerimn 
ab Emphyseooate Pulmonum, Emidiysema of 
the Lungs — a. Arthriticum, Angina pectoris. 

AsTBHAfCAR'jojLC. DyspuoBa dependent vpoQ 
disease of the heart. 

Asthma Cohtttlsivum, Angina pectcms— «. 
Diftphragmaticum, Angina pectoris— a. Dolori- 
ficum, Angina pectoris— a. Emphysematicnm, 
Pneumothorax. 

Asthma, 6ai]iDSB8% Grind0rs* Rot, The 
aggregate of iunctional phenomena, induced by 
the iimalatkm of particles thrown oJET during the 
operation of giinding metallic instruments, &c. 
The structural changes induced are enlargement 
of the bronchial tubes, expansion of the pulmo- 
nary tissue, and phthisis. 

Asthma Gypskujc, A. pttlreralentum—- a. 
Hay, Fever, hay. 

Asthma Hu'midum, Bumid,Comman,9ir Spit' 
ting aatkmutj is when the disease is accompanied 
witii expectoration. It is also called J§» hwmo- 
ri/iBf A. Jiatulsn'tumy .4. pruumon'ieumy Blen- 
notho'rax ekronficiu^ &c. 

Asthma Ihfamtum, Cynanche trarhealis a. 
Infantum Spasmodicum, A. Thymicum — a. 
Koppian, A. Thymicum— a. Laryngeum In&n- 
tum, A. Thymicum— a. Montanum, A. pulve- 
rulentum^-a* Nocturnum, Incubus. 

Asthma Pulvsrulsn'tum, A. gfj/seum, A. 
monta'num. The variety of asthma to which 
millers, bakers, grinders and others are subject. 

Asthma Siccum, so called when the parox- 
ysm is sudden, violent, and of short duration ; 
cough slight, and expectoration scanty; spas- 
modic constriction. 

Asthma Spastico-Akthriticttm Incokstans, 
Angina pectoris — a. Spasticnm Infantum, A. 
Thymicum. 

Asthma Tht'mioum, A. T. Kof/pii,A, spa/' 
tieum infan'tumy A, infaninm spasmod'ieum, 
nymasth'ma, Cynan^ekt trachea' lis spasmod'- 
ica, SpasfMts glot'tidis^ Asthma laryngtlufa in- 
/oHftumyA.intermit'tsns in/an' turn, A.Dsntisnf- 
Humy A, period^ieum acu'tumy Koppian Asthma, 
Thumic Asthma, Ztarfngis'mus stridSdusy Ap- 
nma infanUwmy Spasm of ths lairynxy Spasm 
ofths glottis, Croup4Hs inspiration of infants, 
Child-erowing,Spasmodic oroup,Pssudo'eroup, 
Spufriaus eroup, Cst'shral eroup. Suffocating 
nervous catarrh, (F.) Laryngits stridulsusc, 
Faux Croup, Pscudo'^roup nsrvcux, Spasms 
de la Glotte st du Thorax. A disease of in- 
fants, characterized by suspension of respiration 
at intervals ; great difficulty of breathing, espe- 
cially on waking, swallowing, or crying, end- 
ing often in a fit of suiibcation, wiih convul- 
sions. The pathology of the disease has been 
supposed to consist in an enlargement of the 
thymus gland,(r> or of the glands of the neck 
pressing on the pneumogastric nerves. The 



ear, on anscultation, at a ^stance (torn the 
chest, detects an incomplete, acute, hissing in* 
spiration, or rather cry; whilst the expiration 
and voice are croupal, both at the accession and 
termination of the paroxysm. The heart's ac- 
tion has been observed to be distinct and feeble. 
These symptoms are often accompanied by 
rigidity of the fingers and toes ; the thumb be- 
ing frequently drawn forcibly into the palm of 
the clenched hand, whence the nanae Carps- 
pedal spasm, (q. v.) applied, at timea, to the 



Asthma Utxex, Hysteria — a. Weed, Lobelii 



ASTHMATIC, Asthsnat'icuSyPnoocolpt'icmi, 
One aiiected with asthma. Relating to asthma. 

ASTHME AXaU, Asthnm acutum— «. Ner^ 
vsux. Asthma. 

AS'TOMUS, from a, privative, and rr*^, 
< a mouth.' One withoql a mouth. Pliny speab 
of a people in India without mootha, who lire 
anhslatu st odors t 

ASTRAGALS COL 2>', Collum astragali. 

ASTRAGALUS, Talus, the Aniis, Qua- 
trie, Quar*tio, Quater'nio, Viab'ehos, Peza, 
Cavic'ula, CavU'la, Tetro'ros, As'trion, 0* 
Ballist'm, from off^payxhstf 'a die,* which it 
has been considered to resemble.(7) A short 
bone situate at the superior and middle part 
of the tarsus, where it is articulated with 
the tibia. It is the anJtle bane, sHng bom, or 
first bone of the foot. The anterior surface is 
convex, and has a well-marked prominence, 
supported by a kind of neck, and hence has 
been called the head of the Astragalus. The 
astragalus is developed by two points of ossifi- 
cation. 

Astbag'alus EsycAPus, Stemless Milk- 
vetch, (F.) Astragals d gousses vslus. Nat. 
Ord. Leguminoee.- Sex. Sfst. Diadelphia De- 
candria. The root is said to have cured coor 
firmed syphilis. 

AsTRAOALVS Tbaoacahtbus, soo Trags- ' 
canth. I 

Astra6'ai.U8 Vhrus, Spina hirei, Astrag'- 
alus aeulea'tus, Goat's thorn, MilJk^etck. The 
plant which affords Gum Tyag'ae€mth. See j 
Tragacaatha. < 

ASTRANTIA, Imperatoria. I 

ASaHAPE, Corusca'tio, Fulgur, FulvtM, i 
Lightning. Galen reckons it amongst the re- ' 
mote causes of epilepsy. | 

ASTRICTION, Astri«ftio,Stfpsis,Adatri^- , 
tio, Constric'tio, from astringsrs, {ad and strin- I 
gsrs,) < to constringe.' Action of an astringent 
substance .on the animal economy. 

ASTRICTORIA, Astringents. | 

ASTRINGENT ROOT, Comptonia aspleni- i 
folia. I 

ASTRINGENTS, Astnngef^tia, Adstricto- j 
ria, Adstringcn*tia, Stryphna, CatastaPtieoj i 
Constringen*tia, Contrahsn'tia, Stegno'tiea^ \ 
Synoritfica, Astricte^ria. Same etymon. Me I 
dicines which have the property of constring- 
ing the organic textures. External astringenti { 
are called Styptics. I 

The following are the chief astringents : Aei- I 
dum Sulphuricum, A. Tannicnm, Alumen, Ar- | 
genti Nitras, Catechu, Cupri Sulphas, Tinct. 
Ferri Chloridi, Liquor Ferri Nitratis, Ferri \ 
Sulphas, Galls, Hasmatoxylon, Kino, Krameria, , 
Liquor Calcis, Plumbi Acetas, Quercus Alba, I 
Quercus Tinctoria, Zinci Sulphas, Creasoton. | 



AfiTTRION 



n 



ATHLETA 



AST]aON,AstnsAhu. 
ASTRIOS, Asteria gemma. 
AS'TROBLES, from amtv, U star,' and 
/kxxMy * 1 strike.' One struck by the stars (m- 
dgraftu*,^ One who is in a state of sideration 
-4n an apoplectic state. — Gomens. 

ASTBOBOLIS'MnS, Beli'atit^ BaWwU: 
same etymokigy. Sidertftum or action of the 
stars on a pers(». Apoplexy* — ^Theophrastosy 
Gornens* 
ASTROBOLOSy Asteria gemma. 
ASTROITISy Asteria gemma. 
ASTROL'OGT, Astrohgf'ia, from «rreov, * a 
star/ and xayw^ *a discourse.' The art of di- 
vining by inspecting the start. This was for- 
merly considered to be a part of medicine; and 
was called Judicial Astrology, to distinguish 
it from astronomy. 

ASTRON'OMY, jij<ro)Mi»'M, from «0T{«v/ a 
star/ and to^c^. ^a law/ 'rule.' A science 
which makes known the heavenly phenomena, 
sttd the laws that govern them. Hippocrates 
places this and astrology amongst the necessary 
itudies of a physician. 
ASTTPHlA, Impotence. 
ASTTSIA, InQKytence. 
ASUAR, Myrobalanus Indica. 
ASULCI, Lams lazuli. 
ASTNODIA, Impotence. 
ATACTOS, Erratic. 

ATARACTAPOIE'SIA, AtatraOopdi/nay 
from «, privative, ra{«xrec, < troubled,' and 
warn, <to make.' Intrepidity, firmness; a qua- 
lity of which, according to Hijppocrates, the 
physician ought to be p os se ss e d m the highest 
degree. 

ATARAXIA, from «, privative, and ra^^tf, 
'trouble/* emotion.' Mml tranquillity, peace 
ofmind. 

AT'AYISM; fitnn Aiavus^ <an old .grand- 
sire or ancestor, indefinitely.' The case in 
which ap anomaly or disease, existing in a fa- 
mily, is lost in one generation and reappears in 
the following. 

ATAXIA, from a, privative, and ra|ff, 'or- 
der.' Disorder, irregularity. Hippocrates em- 
ploys the word in its most extensive accepta- 
tion. Galen applies it, especially, to irregu- 
larity of pulse ; and Sydenham speaks of Ataseia 
Spirituwm for disorder of the nervous system. 
Atazii, now, usually means the state of disor- 
der that ^nracterizes nervous fevers, and the 
uervous condition. 

Ataxia SpiammM, Nervous diathesis. See 
Ataxia. 

ATAXIC, AiKi/itfM; same etymon. Having 
the characters of atstxia. 

ATCHA R, Aekioy Aehar. A condiment used 
in India, it is formed of green fruits of various 
)M^, gsrlie, ginger, mustard, and pimento, 
piekled in vinegar. 
ATECNIA, Sterilitas. 

ATELECTASIS; from onlvc, 'imperfect, 
defective,' and iKToric, ' dilatation.' Imperfect 
eitpsasion or dilatation ; as in 

Atxlbci'tasis PuLHo'iftm, Pneumonatelet^ta- 

«u. Imperfect expansion of the hxngs at birth , 

fnin«rfx«c, 'imperfect,' and ixTdto'ic, 'dilatar 

' tioa.' Giving rise to Cftme^ns pulmofu^iis, 

AT£L£S,«T«2i9(, 'imperfect,' defective.'— 

Hence, 

ATELOCHEl'Ll A, from tfrU^f, * imperfect,' 



and jru2«c> * lip.' A malformation which con* 
sists in an imperfect development of the lip. 

AT£LO£NCEPHALaA, from «T«xi7r, 'im- 
perfect/ and •xir*f«lM', ' the encephalon.' State 
of imperfect development of the brain. — Andral. 

ATELOGLOS'Sl A, from «t«1w, ' imperfect,' 
and Ylmoiuiy ' tongue.' A malformation which 
consists in an imperfect development of the 
tongue. 

ATELOGNA'THIA, from ATflijc, 'imper- 
fect,' and yi^of, ' the jaw.' A malfornuition 
which consists in an imperfect development of 
the law. 

ATEL0MYEL1A, from ^$lnt, ' imperfect,' 
and funXof, ' manrow.' State of imperfect de- 
velopment of the spinal marrow. — B^clard. 

ATELOPROSaPIA, from «T«Aq(, 'imper- 
fect,' and n^rmjftf 'Uie face.' A malforma^ 
tion which consists in imperfect development 
of the&ce. 

ATELORACHIDIA, Hydrorachis. 

ATELOSTOM'IA, from tt^kn, ' imperfect,' 
and oro/Mt, ' mouth.' One whose mouth is im- 
perfectly developed. 

ATER SUCCUS, Atrabilis. 

ATHAMAN'TA, from Athanas, a place in 
Thessaly. A genus of plants. 

Athaman'ta AvRMoaufiiVM, Oreossi^nrnm^ 
Seli'nvm oreogeii^num, Block Mountain Fairc* 
^*9j (E.) I*cr9il dc Montagnc. The plant, seed 
and roots are aromatic. It has been considered 
attenuant, aperient, deobstruent, and lithon- 
triptic. The distilled oil has been used in tooth- 
ache. 

Athakan'ta CxBTsn'sis sen Cas^ ica, Dom- 
eu* Creiieuc; D. Candia*nu$, Myrrkis an'nua^ 
Candy Carrot, The seeds <tf this {Jant are 
acrid and aromatic. They have been used as 
carminatives and diuretics. 

ATHANASIA, Taaacetum. 

Athaica'sxa, from a, privative, and #ttva«r9«, 
' death.' An antidote for diseases of the liver, 
jaundice, gravel, &e. It consisted of saffrcm, 
cinnamon, lavender, cassia, myrrh, juncus odo- 
ratus, honey, &c., and was esteemed to be su- 
dorific. 

ATHARA, Athenu 

ATHELAS'MTTS, from «, privative, and 
dijln, ' a breast or nipple.' Impracticabilit^jr of 
giving suck ; from want of nipple or otherwise. 

ATHELXIS, Sucking. 

ATHFNA. Name of a plaster, recom- 
mended by Asclepiades, and composed of oxide 
of copper, sublimed oxide of zinc, sal ammoniac, 
verdigris, gall nuts, and a variety of resinous 
and other ingredients.—Oribasius, Aetius, and 
P. ^gineta. 

ATHENiamS CATAPOTIUM. A pill, 
composed of myrrh, pepper, castor, and opium ; 
used to allay cougMng.— Celsus. 

ATHE'RA, Atha'ra, from adq^, 'an ear of 
com.' A (ind of pap for children : also, a kind 
of liniment. — ^Dioscorides, Pliny. 

ATHERAPEUTUS, Incurable. 

ATHERO'MA, from a^ij^a, ' pap or pulp.' 
Emphy'ma eneyt*tis athcro'fna^ MoUua'eumy 
(q. V.) Pulta'tio, A tumour formed by a cyst 
containing matter like pap or Bouilli: 

ATHEROMATOUS, Jlikcromato'dcs, 
Having the nature of Atheroma. 

ATHLETA, from a^Xog, 'combat.' Athletas 
were men who exercised themselves in combat 
at the public festivals*— Vitruvins. 



ATHLETIC 



ATRIFLEX FCBTIDA 



ATHLETIC, MiUfieua; concerning JIth- 
Uta. Strong in muBcnlar powers. — Foesins. 

ATHORACOCEPHALUS, Acej^oguter. 

ATHBIX, At'ricktu; from <, privrntive, and 
^9 rptxK, <hair.' Bald. One who has lost 
his hair. 

Athrix Dspxlib, Alopecia* 

ATHTM'IA, An*imi defee'tus et atuei'ttas, 
An'imi demis'sio, Tristit^ioy Mmror^ Lypi^ftom 
«, priy., and ivfi9ty < heart,' <coarage.^ Des- 
pondency. The prostration of spirits often ob- 
servable in the sick.-^Hippoerates. Melan- 
choly.— Swediaur. See Panoi^obia. 

Athtkia Plbonbctica, see Pleonectica. 

ATHYRION, Aspleninm ceterach. 

ATHYRIUM FILIX FOEMINA, Aspleninm 
fUix fceminar-a. Filiz mas', Polypodium filiz 

ATLANTION, Atlas. 

ATLAS, Atlan'tiouy from arlao, < I sustain.' 
The Jirst cervical ver'tcbra; so called, from its 
supporting the whole weight of the head, as 
Atlas is said to have supported the globe on his 
shoulders. Chaussier calls it Atloid. This 
vertebra in no respect resembles the others. It 
is a kind of irregular ring, into which, ante- 
riorly, the processus dtUatus of the second vJer- 
tebra is received. Posteriorly, it gives passage 
to the medulla spinalis. 

ATLOID'O-AXOID, (F.) Ailoldo-axoidim, 
Relating to both the AtUs and the Axis or Ver- 
tebra Dentata. 

ATtoi]>o-AZon> Articulation. The articu- 
lation between the first two cervical vertebrae. 
' Atloido-axoid Lio'amsnts. These are two 
in number; one anterior and vooihiet /posterior y 
passing between the two vertebrae. 

ATLOID'O-OCCIPITAL. Relating to the 
atlas and occiput. The Atloido-oceip'ital Ar- 
Ueula'tion is formed by the condyles of the oc- 
cipital bone and the superior articular surfaces 
of tiie Atlas. The Atloido'oceipital muscle is 
the Rectus capitis posticus minor. 

ATLOi'DO'SOTTS-MASTOi'DIENy Obli- 
quus superior oculi — a. Sous'oecipitale, Rectus 
capitis Uteralis. 

ATMIATRI'A, AtmidiiWricty from atftof, 
< vapour,' and lor^tio, < treatment.' Treatment 
of diseases by fumigation. 

ATMIDIATRICE, Aimiatria. 

ATMISTERION, Vaporarium. ' , 

ATMOS, Breath. 

AT^MOSPHERE, Atmospha*ra, from arnofy 
'vapour,' and aipat^a, *% sphere:' — as it were. 
Sphere of vapours . The atmosphere is a sphe- 
rical mass of air, surrounding the earth in every 
part ; the height of which is estimated at 15 or 
16 leagues. It presses on the surface of the 
earth, and this pressure has, necessarily sensi- 
ble effects on organized bodies. The surface 
of the human body being reckoned at 15 square 
feet, it is computed that a pressure of 33,000 
pounds or more exists under ordinarjr circum- 
stances ; and this pressure cannot be increased 
or diminished materially, without modifying 
the circulation and all the functions. 

ATMOSPHERIZATION, Hasmatosis. 

ATOCIA, Sterilitas. 

ATOL'MIA, from «, priv., and toA^o, * con- 
fidence.' Want of confidence; discouragement. 
A state of mind, unfiivourable to health, and in- 
jurious in disease. It is the antithesis of Eu- 
tot' ' 



ATONIA, Atony— a. Yentriculi, Gasteras- 
thenia. 

AT'ONT, Aton'ia, Infir'mUat et Rewus'tio 
vi^riunif Languor 9 Lax'itas, from «, priv., and 
TM'Of, <tone,* * force.' Want of tone. Weak- 
ness of every or^, and particularly of those 
that are contractile.' Violent gastritis has bean 
described by Scribonius Largus under a similar 

Lme, cTtvov, Afonon, 

ATKABIVI ABY.AtroHl'ious^Atra^lia'ris^ 
Atralfilio'susy fromater, *black,' and Hlis, * bile.' 
An epithet given by the ancients to the melan- 
cholic and hypochondriac, because they believed 
the Atrabilis to predominate in such. 

Atrabiliary CAPSULVSjARTRRiKsand Ysnrs. 
The renal capsules, arteries and veins ; the for- 
mation of Atrabilis having been attributed to 
them. 

ATRABIlilS, same etymon. Aier smeetuj 
BlaeJh Bile or melancholy. According to the 
ancients, a thick, black, acrid humour, secreted, 
in the opinion of some, by the pancreas ; in that 
of others, by the supra-renal capsules. Hippo- 
crates, Galen, Aetius, and others ascribe great 
influence to the Atrabilis in the production of 
hypochondriasis, melancholy, and mania. Tfaiere 
is really no such humour. It was an inrnginary 
creation. — Aretsus, Rufiis of Ephesus, &c. 

ATRACHELOCEPH'ALUS, from a, priv., 
tfaz^lofy < neck,' and irt^oai}, 'head.' A nMm- 
ster whose neck is partially or wholly deficient. 

ATRACHE'LUS. Same etymon. One who 
is very short-necked. — Galen. 

ATRACTYLIS GUMMIF'ERA, Car'dwm 
pi'neus, Leini, Ovmmy^rooted Atraetylisy JVim 
Thistle. The root, when wounded, yields a 
milky, viscid juice, which concretes into tena- 
cious masses, and is said to be chewed with the 
same views as mastich. 

ATRAGENE, Clematis vitalba. 

ATRAMEN'TUM, A. Suto'Hum, IfU^ Col- 
can'thouy (F.) Enere, It has been advised as 
an astringent, and as an external application in 
herpetic affections. 

Atramentum Sutorium, Ferri sulphas. 

ATRAPHAXIS, Atriplex. 

ATRESIA, Adherence, Imperforation. 

Atre'sia Ani Adna'ta, Anus Imperfora*tm9^ 
Imperfora'tio ani, (F.) Imperforation de Panus. 
Congenital imperforation of the intestinal canaL 

ATRETISMUS, Imperforation. 

ATRETOCEPH'ALUS, from «r^«Tor, < im- 
perforate,' and itcq)«x«, 'head.' A monster, in 
which some of the natural apertures of the 
head are wanting.— Gurlt. 

ATRETOCOR'MUS, from «Tfi|TK, < imper- 
forate,' and x0{Moc, 'trunk.' A monster in 
which the natural apertures of the trunk are 
wanting. — Gurlt. 

ATRE'TUS, from a, priv., and r^aoi, ' 1 per- 
forate.' Imper/ort^tus, Imper'forate. One whose 
anus, (aproiftusy) or parts of generation are im- 
perforate. 

AT'RICES. Small tumours, which appear 
occasionally around the anus. Some conuneiw 
tators consider the word to be synonymous 
with condylomata. — Forestus. 

ATRICHIA, Alopecia. 

ATRICHUS, Athrix. 

AT'RICI. Small sinuses in the vicinity of 
the anus, not penetrating the rectum. 

ATRIPLEX FCETIDA, Chenc^podium vul- 
varia. 



ATBIUM COBDIS DEXTER 



93 



AUBB^naNE 



Ar'UYLBX Hoktbn'sb, j9. Sati'va, (F.) JSr- 
redU, Bonn0 Dams. The herb and seed of this 
plsnt have been exhibited as antiscorbutics. 

AfripUm eU'imtu, A. Port^laee^'deM^ and A. 
Pat'^aloj are used as pickles, and have similar 
properties. 

At^ipi.kz Odokata, Chenopodium botrys— 
a. Olida, Chenopodium vnlvaria. 

ATRIUM CORDIS DEXTER, Sinns dexter 
eordis-^a. Cordis sinistmnk Sinus pulmonali^-~- 
a. Yaginsy Vestibulum. ^ 

AT'ROPA, from At^mto^, < immuUble,' <the 
l^oddess of destiny f so called from its fatal 
effects. 

Ateopa BsxXAPOif'iiAy BeUadon'na^ J>9adlf 
Tfig^skad€, Sola'ntim Utha'lE, Sola'num mani'- 
aeumj S, Purio'tun^y Sola'num meltmocw^asusy 
(F.) BeOadws, MortlU furieus$y Belle Dame. 
Nat. Ord. Soianee. Sex. Syst. Tetrandria Mo- 
nogynia. The leaver— Belladonna (Ph. U. S.) 
are powerfully narcotic, and also diaphoretic, 
and diuretic. Thej are occasionally used where 
narcotics are indicated. Sprinkling the pow- 
dered leaves over cancerous sores has been 
ibond to allay the pain ; and the leaves form a 
good poultice. Dose, gr. ^ to gr. j. of the pow- 
dered leaves. 

Atbopa Mahskao'ora, Mandre^oray Qit' 
eolay AnthTOfomorphk'usy Malum terree^trB, 
Mamdraie. The boiled root has been used in 
the form of poultice in indolent swellings. 

ATROPHIA, Tabes— a. Ablactatomm, 
Brash, weaning— -a. Cordis, Heart, atrophy of 
the— a. Glandidaris, Tabes mesenterica^-a. In- 
iantnm. Tabes mesenterica— a. Intestinorum, 
Enteratrophia. 

Atkophia Lactah'ttom, Tabes nutri^etimBea 
Ue'tea. The atrophy of nursing women. 

Atrophi a Ma sxicTEaiCA, Tabes mesenterica. 

ATROPHTEy Atrophy— 0. MimUiriquey 
Tabes mesenterica. 

AT'ROPHIED, see Atrophy. 

ATROPHY, Mara^mua Atro'pkia, Atrt/- 
pkioy Maraa'muSy Ma'desy Contabeeeen'tiay 
TaUsy Marti/ re9y Analo'aiey from a, privative, 
andrf94r% * nourishment.' (F.) Atrophiey Dee- 
tiektwunt. Progressive and morbid diminu- 
tion in the bulk of the whole body or of a part. 
Atrophy is generally symptomatic. Any tissue 
or organ thus affected is said to be atrophied. 

AnoTBT or ths Heart, see Heart, atrophy 
of the. 

AT'ROPINE, Atropinay Airo'pia, Airo'^i- 
umy Atropi'nvmy (F.) Atropine. The active 
OTinciple of Atropa Belladonnay separated by 
Biandes, by a process similar to that for pro- 
curing mor^da. 

ATTACBEy Insertion. 

ATTACK, InsuTitMy AssuVtusy IrrejfHoy 
hwa'Hoy EiyiolBy Lepsisy (F.) Attague. A 
sudden attack, invasion or onset of a disease. 
A seizure. 

ATTA6AS, Attagen. 

ATTAQVify Ai'tagasyihe FroM'colin. Ce- 
lebrated with the ancients both as food and 
medicine. — ^Martial, Aristophanes. 

ATTANCOURT, MINERAL WATERS 
OF. A mineral water in France at Attancourt, 
in ChanuMgne ; about 3 leagues north of Join- 
▼iile. The water is a chalybeate, and contains 
salphate of lime. In large doses it ii purgative. 

ATTAQUEy Attack—^, dee Nerfs, Nervous 
attack. . 



JSTTELLEy Splint. 

ATTENOTING, MINERAL WATERS 
OF, in Bavaria. The water contains carbonic 
acid, carbonates of lime and soda, sulphates of 
lime and macnesia, chloride of sodium, iron, 
and alum. It is much used in skin diseases, 
fistula, old ulcers, calculi, and hemorrhoids. 

ATTENITANTS, Attenuan'Hoy LeptunfHeay 
(F.) Leptontiguesy from tentds, ^thin.' Medi- 
cines which augment the fluidity of the hu- 
mours. 

ATTIRANTy Attrahent. 

AT'TITUDE, Sttut Cor^pons. Low Latin, 
apUtudo; from Latin aptarey < to fit.' Situation, 
position of the body. The attitudes are the 
different postures which man is capable of as- 
suming; In General Pathology y the attitude 
will often enable the physician to pronounce at 
once upon the character of a disease, or it will 
aid him materially in his judgment. In St. 
Vitus's dance, in fractures, luxations, &c., it is 
the great index. It will also indicate the de- 
gree of nervous or cerebral power; hence the 
sinking down in bed is an evidence of great ce- 
rebral debility in fever. The position of a pa- 
tient during an operation is also an interesting 
subject of attention to the surgeon. 

ATTOL'LENS AUREM, Attotl^m jf«r»V- 
«e/is, hevdtor Aurisy Supe'rior Avrisy Attol'lens 
Aurie'ulamy Aurieula'rie supe^rioTy (F.) Avri* 
etdaire supirieuTy TemporoniurieuUure. A mus- 
cle of the ear, which arises, thin, broad, and 
tendinous, from the tendon of the occipito-fron- 
talis, aad u inserted into the upper part of the 
ear, opposite to the anti-helix . It raises the ear. 

Attollrns Oouli, Rectus superior oculi — a. 
Oculum, Rectus superior oculi. 

ATTOTJCBEMENT; Masturbation. 

ATTRACTION OF AGGREGATION, Co- 
hesion> force of. 
• ATTRACTIVUM, see Magnet. 

ATTRACTIVUS, Attrahent. 

ATTRACTORIUS, Attrahent. 

ATTRAHENS AURICULAM, Anterior 
auris. 

AT'TRAHENT, At'trakmsy Attractt^vusy 
Attraeto'riusy from ad, <to,' and traho, <I 
draw.' (F.) AitraeHfy Attirant. Remedies are 
so called, which attract fluids to the parts to 
which they are applied, as blisters, rubefa- 
cients, &c. 

ATTRAPE'LOlTRDATTTy (F.) A bistoury 
invented by a French surgeon, called Bien- 
naise, and used in the operation for hernia. See 
Bistouri cach^. 

ATTRITA, Chafing. 

ATTRITIO, Attrition, Chafing. 

ATTRI"TION, Attn^tioy Eethlim'moy from 
ady and tererey < to bruise.' Friction or bruising. 
CluLfing. — ^Galen. Also, a kind of cardialgia. — 
Sennertus. Likewise, a violent contusion. 

ATTRITUS, Chafing. 

ATYPIC, Atyp'ietuy At'yposy from «, pri- 
vative, and Tvrer, ' type.' Tnat which has no 
type. Irregular. Chiefly applied to an irregu- 
lar intermittent, — Pehrie atypica. 

ATYPOS, Erratic. 

AIT ANSIS, Drying. 

ATTAN'Tfi, Anap'Hy from ovavrtc, < desicca- 
tion.' Hippocrates gave this name to a dis- 
ease, the principal symptom of which was 
emaciation. Atrophy. 

AXIBE-VIGNEy Clematis vitalba. 



Ausipms 



94 



AURI CHLOBETUM 



ATTB&PINE^ Mespilos ozyacantba. 

AVBERGINBy Solanum Melongeoa. 

ATTBIFOINy Cjranus segetum. 

AUCHEN, CoUum. 

AUCHENORRHEUMA, Torticollis. 

AUCHE'TICUS, from wx^y 'the n«ck.» 
One affected with stiff neck or torticollis. 

AUDE, Voice. 

AUDINAC, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Andinac is sitnate in the department of Ar- 
riige, France. The water contains a small 
quantity of sulphohydric acid, carhonic acid, 
sulphates of lime and magnesia, carbonates of 
lime and iron, and a bituminous substance. 
Temp. 67^ Fahr. It is much used in chronic 
rheumatism, herpes, scrofulous diseases, &c. 

AUDIT"ION, from aud%r9y < to hear ;' Aefoi^ 
Auditf'iOfAndi'tusy A'coB, Acro'ama, Aero'ans, 
Acoe'sisf Aeu^sis. Shearing. The act of hear- 
ing. The sensation arising frpm an impression 
made on the auditory nerves by the yibrations 
of the air, produced by a sonorous body. The 
physiology of Audition is obscure. It probably 
takes place : — 1. By the vibrations being com- 
municated from the membrana tympani along 
the chain of small bones to the membrane of the 
foramen ovale. 2. By means of the air in the 
cavity of the tympanum, the membrane of the 
foramen rotundum is agitated. 3. The trans- 
mission may be noade by means of die bony pa- 
rietes. In these three ways the vibrations pro- 
duced by a sonorous body may reach the audi- 
tory nerve. Audition may be active or pastive: 
hence the difference between listening and sim- 
ply hearing, 

A U'DITORT, Audited Hilt ^ Auditt^vusyAeus'- 
tieua. That which relates to audition. 

AuDiTOKT Arteries ANi> Veins, are vessels 
which enter the auditory canals, and are, like 
them, distinguished into internal and external. 
The external auditory artery f A, Tympaniqiie — 
(Ch.) is given off by the styloid, a branch of 
the external carotid : iheinterrtal is a branch of 
the basilary artery, which accompanies the au- 
ditory nerve, and is distributed to it. The Au- 
ditory Veins empty into the internal and ejrter- 
nal jugulars. 

AuDiTORT Canal, External, Mea'tue audi- 
tt/riue exte/nusyAlvec^riutnf Seaphay Seajphus^ 
(F.) Conduit auditif extmrnoy Conduit aurieu- 
lairey commences at the bottom of the concha, 
at the Forc^men auditi^vum exter'numy passes 
inwards, forwards, and a little downwar(u, and 
terminates at the membrana tympani. It is 
partly cartilaginous, partly osseous, and partly 
fibrous. 

Auditory Canal, Internal, Med tut audito'- 
lius inter^nu8yPorus seu Sinus aeus'tieusyCyar, 
(F.) Conduit auditif interne, C. labyrinthique, 
is situate in the posterior surface of the pars pe- 
trosa of the temporal bone. From the Pora*men 
auditi'vum inter'num, where it commences, it 
passes forwards and outwards, and terminates 
by a \tmAot eni-de'-saey ma^/ula erihro*say perfo- 
rated by 'many holes, one of which is the orifice 
of the Aquaeductus Fallopii ; and the others com- 
municate with the labyrinth. 

Auditory Nerve, Nerflabyrinthique — (Ch.) 
is the Portio Mollis of the seventh pair. It 
arises from the corpus restiforme, from the floor 
of the fourth ventricle, and by means of white 
stris, from the sides of the calamus scriptorius. 
As it leaves the encephalon^ it forms a flattened 



cord, and proceeds with the facial nerve throat 
the foramen auditivum internum, and as fio* as 
the bottom of the meatus, where it sepaiatea 
from the facial and divides into two brancbea, 
one going to the cochlea; the other to the rea- 
tibule and semi-circular canab. 

AUGE, Al'veus, Some of the older anato- 
mists gave this name to a reservoir, into which 
liquids flow in an interrupted manner, so that it 
is alternately ^11 and empty. Such are the 
ventricles and auricles of the heart. 

AUGMENTATION, from augerey <to in- 
crease;' Augmen*tumyTneremen*tumyAnayas^^ 
Aue'tioy AuxisyProgres'sioy Progres'susy AuaDSf- 
sis. The stage of a disease in which the symp- 
toms go on increasing. 

AULISCITS, Canula. See Fistula. 

AULOS, Canula, Fistula. See Vagina, and 
Foramen. 

AUMALE, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Aumale is a town of Upper Normandy, in the 
country of Caux. Several springs of fernigi- 
nous mineral waters are found there, whose 
odour ispenetrating, and taste rough and astrin- 
gent. They are tonic, and employed in debility 
of the Yiscera, fcc. 

AUNE NOIRy Rhamnus frangula. 

ATIN&Ey Inula heleninm— «. Dysont€riqu€, 
Inula dysenterica. 

AURA, Pnoh A vapour or emanation from 
any body, surrounding it like an atmosphere. 
Van Helmont regarded the vital principle as 
a gas and volatile spirit, which he called Aura 
vitalis. 

In Pathology y Aura means the sensatioKi of 
a light vapour, which, in some diseases, appears 
to set out from the trunk or limbs; and to rise 
towards the head. This feeling has beenfoond 
to precede attacks of epilepsy and hysteria, and 
hence it has been called Aura Epilep'tieoy and 
A. kyster^iea. 

Aura San'qtttnis. The odour exhaled by 
blood newly dravm. See Qaz Sanguinis. 

Aura Sem'inis or A. semincflisy Spiw^iius 
genite^lis; — A volatile principle fiuicied to 
exist in tike sperm, and redded by some as ^e 
fecundating agent Such is not the case. 

Aura Vitalis, Vital principle. 

AURANCUM, see Ovum. 

AURANITE, see Agaric. 

AURAN'TIA CURASSAVENTIA, Cttras- 
so'a apples or oranges. Immature oranaes, 
checked, bv accident, in their growth. They 
are a grateml, aromatic bitter, devoid of acidity. 
Infused in wine or brandy thev make a good 
stomachic. They are also used for issue peas, 

Aurantia Curassavica, see Citrus amran- 
tium — a. Poma, see Citrus aurantium. 

Aurantii Cortex, see Citrus aurantium. 

AURANTIUM, Citrus aurantium. 

AURELIANA CANADENSIS, Panax qnin. 
quefolium. 

AUREOLA, Areola. 

AURI CHLORETUM CUM CHLORETO 
NATRII, see Gold— a. Chloridum, Gold, mini- 
ate of— -a. Chloretum, Gold, muriate of — a. Cy- 
anidum, see Gold — a. Cyanuretum, see Gold — 
a. lodidum, see Gold — a. loduretum, see Gold 
— a. et Natri chloruretum, see Gold — a. Marias, 
Gold, muriate of— a. Nitro-murias, tee Gold — 
a. Oxidum, see Gold— a. Terchloridum, see 
Gold — a. Tercyanidum, see Gold--a. Terooddtmi, 
see Gold. 



AVBICHALCUM 



AUTARCIA 



A17RICHALCX7M, Bnat. 
AURICLE, Auru^iaa,(F.)AuricttUy OrieuU 
DiminiitiTe o/ aurisy aa ear. The auricle of 
the ear. See PavUioo. 

AmicLss OP THB Hkakt, CamU^ttt innomt^ 
Htitay (F.) OreUleUtsy are two caTities; one 
right, the ^er left, each comxiraiiicatiiig with 
the ventricle of ite side. These two cavities 
receive the blood ftom e^ery part of the body. 
Into the right awridty the two vens cavas and 
coronary vem open : into the Ufty ^ fimr pal- 
roonary veins. ChaussieT calls "die former the 
Suuu •fth* VatuB Cav«;— the latter, the Sinus 
•ftke Pulmanarf Veins, See Sinus. 

AuKKTTLA JxTDMy Peciza auricula— a. Muris, 
Hiermeium Pilosella— a. Muris major, Hieia- 
cium mnrorum. 

AXJRICULAJREy see Digitus— a. Poati^ 
rist$ry Retiahcus «uris— a. Supirieury AttoUens 
aurem. 

At7fiIC'nLAR,il«fTe«/</m, OrM'te/oryfrom 
mtriculoj <the ear.* That which belongs, to 
the ear, especially to the external ear. 

Avsic'uutK A&'TBRiBS AMP Vbihs, Ofteu- 
/Mf»«^'(Ch.), are divided into anteri^ and 
posterior. The anterior are of indeterminate 
number. They arise from the temporal artery, 
and are distributed to the meatus auditorius 
extemus, and to the pavilion of the ear. The 
pestorurr amricular is given off by the external 
carotid, from which it separates in the sub- 
stance of the parotid gland. When it reaches 
the inferior part of the pavilion of the ear it bi- 
furcates ; one of its branches being distributed 
to the inner suHkee of the pavilion, the other 
passing over the mastoid process, and being 
distrilrated to the temporal and posterior auris 
muscles, he. Before its bifurcation it gives 
off the stylo-nuutoid artery. The Anterior and 
Posterior Auricular Veins open into the tem- 
poral and external jugular. 

AuRicuiJkB. FiROSB., (F.) Doigt aurieulttirey 
is the little fineer, so called because, owin^ to 
its size, it can be more readily introduced mto 
^ meatus auditorius. 

AuBicuLAB Nb&ves uro several. 1 . The au- 
ricular iranek, Zygonutto-aurieulary is one of 
the aseending branches of the cervical plexus 
It ramifies and spreads over the two surfaces 
of the pavilion. 2. The auricular or superjl' 
dal tcMporal, Temporal-cutansous — (Ch.) is 
given off from the inferior maxillary. It as- 
cends between the condyle of the jaw and the 
meatus auditorius extemus, 8en<u numerous 
fikments to the meatus and pavilion, and di- 
vides into two twigs, which accompany the 
branches of the temporal artery, and are dis- 
tributed to the integuments of the head. There 
is also a posterior auricular furnished by the 
fteial. 

AURICULARIS ANTERIOR, Anterior 
aari s-^. Superior, AttoUens aurem. 
AUmTCULEy Auricle, Pavilion of the ear. 
AURIC'ULO-VENTRICULAR, Auric^ulo- 
mtriculafris. That which belongs to the au- 
ricles and ventricles of the heart. The com- 
oumications between the auricles and ventri- 
cles ire so called. The Tricuspid and Mitral 
Volvos are aurioilo-ventricular valves. 

AURI'GA. A species of bandage for the 
tfts, described by Galen. See, also, Liver. 

AIJRI60, Icterus— a. Neophytorum, Icterus 
In&ntum. 



ATTKiPI6MENTUM,0rpiment— a.Rabram, 
Realgar. 

AURIS, Ear. 

AURISCALPirM, Earjnck. 

AURISCOPltJM, Au'risoopsy from aurisy 
* the ear,' and rK«r«», * I view.' An instru- 
ment for exploring the ear. 

AURIST, OtiJtsr, Otit^trusy from aurisy <the 
ear.' One who occupies himself chiefly wi^ 
the diseases of the ear and their treatment. 

AURIUM FLUCTUATIO, Bombus— a. 
Marmorata, Cerumen — a. Sibilus, Bombus — a. 
Sonitus, Bombu8--a. Sordes, Cerumen-— a. Su- 
snrrus, Bombus. 

AURONBy Artemisia abrotanum — a. des 
Champs y Artemisia campestris — a. des Jardinsy 
Artemisia abrotanum — a* Mdlsy Artemisia ab* 
rotanum. 

AURUGO, Icterus. 

AURUM, «Gold,» (q. v.)— a. Chloratum, 
Gold, muriate of— a. Cfhioratum natronatum, 
see Gold— a. Foliatum, Gold leaf— a. in Libel- 
lis. Gold leaf— a. Leprosum, Antimonium— a. 
Limatum, see Gold— a. Muriaticum, Gold, mn- 
riate of— a. Muriaticum, see Gold— -a. Muriati- 
cum natronatum, see Gold. 

AuBUM MuBi'viTM, Aurum Moia^ieufity Sulph'-^ 
uret of Tiny Deutosulphuret or persulphuret of 
tin. {QuicJhsilvery tin, sulphury sal ammoniaoy 
S9 , equal parts. The tin being first melted, the 
quiclnilver is poured into it, and then the whole 
are ground together, and sublimed in a bolt- 
head. The aurum musivum lies at the bot- 
tom.) It is used in some empirical prepara- 
tions. 

AtTBTTM OzTDATUM, scc Gold — B. Oxydulutum 
muriaticum, Gold, muriate of— a. Nitro-muria- 
ticum, see Gold — a. Salitum, Gold, muriate of, 

AUSCULTATE, TO; from auseultarsy «to 
Usten.' ' To practise auscultation, (q. v.) * To 
auscult* is at times used with the same signifi- 
cation. 

AUSCULTATION, Ausculta'tioy Echos'eopiy 
act of listening. Buisson has used it synony- 
mously with listening. Laennec introduced aus~ 
e«/ra<tontoappreciate the differentsounds, which 
can be heard in the chest, and in the diagnosis of 
diseases of the heart, lungs, &c. This may be 
done by the aid of an instrument called a ste^ 
thoeeope (q. v.), one extremity of which is ap- 
plied to the ear, the other to the chest of the 
patient. This mode of examination is called 
Mediate Auscultation, (F.) Auscultation midi- 
atCy — ^the application of the ear to the chest be- 
ing immediate auscultation. 

The act of exploring the chest is called Ste^ 
thoseop'iay and Thoraeoscop^ia; of the abdomen^ 
Ahdominoscop^iay (q. v.) 

AUSCULTATORY, Auseultato'rius ; Aus- 
cul'ticy (with some.) Belonging or having re- 
lation to auscultation. 

Au8ct7ltato|lt Pbbcttbston, see Aconopho- 
nia. 

AUSTERE', Auste'rue. Substances which 
produce a high degree of acerb impression on 
the organs of taste. 

ATTSTRTTCHE, Imperatoria. 

AUTALGIA DOLOROSA JJeuralgia,facial, 
Pleurodyniar— a. Pruriginosa, Itching — a. Ver- 
tigo, Vertigo. 

AUTARCI'A, from awref, * himself,' and 
oQxtmy < I am satisfied.' Moral tranquillity. — 
Geden. 



AUTEMESiA 



AVEKA 



AUTEMESIA, from ovro^, * self,' and i^ trie, 
^vomiting.' Spontaneous or idiopathic vonut> 
ing.— Alibcrt. 

AUTEMPRESMUS, Combustion, human. 

AUTHE'MERON. A medicine which cures 
on the dav of its exhibition; from mnosy 'the 
same,' and *nf**Q<h * day.' 

AUtHTGIANSIS, Vis medicatriz nature. 

AUTOCHIR, Autochi'rusy Suiei'doy from 
ovTcf , < himself,' and /ti^, < hand.' One who has 
committed suicide. A self-murderer or suicide. 

AUTOCfflRIA, Suicide. 

AUTOCINE'SIS, Motus volunta'riu*^ from 
a vr »( , * self,' and Kiv^ffic, < motion.' Voluntary 
motion. 

AUTOCHASY, Autoerad'oj Autoerato'riay 
from avTttf, 'himself,' and k^otoc, 'strength.' 
Independent force. Action of the vital princi-^ 
pie, or of the instinctive powers towards the 
preservation of the individual. See Yii Medi- 
catrix Nature. Also, the vital principle. 

AUTOCRATIA, Autocrasy, Vis medicatrix 
nature. 

AUTOCRATORIA, Autocrasy— «. Physia- 
trice. Vis medicatrix nature. 

AUTOCTONIA, Suicide. 

AUTOGONIA, Generation, equivocal. 

AUTOLITHOT'OMUS, from avrtf, 'him- 
self,' iU^«(, ' a stone,' and *ffA vtcy, ' toxut.' One 
who operates upon himself for the stone. 

AUTOMATIC, AiUonut'icus, AtUom'atusy 
from AvTifiarofy 'spontaneous.' That which 
acts of itself. Those movements are called 
muUmuttie, which the patient executes without 
any object; apparently without volition being 
exercised; — ^involuntary moXionny motus atuo- 
mai'iei seu autom'ati sen involtLnta'rii, 

AUTOMNALEy Autumnal. 

AUTONOMIA, Vis medicatrix nature. The 
word Autonomia is occasionally employed by 
the French and Germans for the peculiar me- 
chanism of an organized body. Thus, although 
individuals of the same species may differ in 
outward conformation, their mechanism or in- 
stinctive laws, (AiUononUay) may be the same. 

AUTONYCTOBATIA, SomnambuUsm. 

AUTOPEP'SIA, from avrof, ' self,' and »•*»- 
T«9, 'I concoct.' Self-digestiony«-as of the 
stomach after death. 

AUTOPHIA, Autopsia. 

AUTOPHO'NIA, (F.) Ret^ntissement auto- 
pkonique, from avroty ' self,' and 9ori7, ' voice.' 
An auscultatory sign pointed out by M. Hour- 
mann, which consists in noting the character 
of the observer's own voice, while he speaks 
with his head placed close to the patient's 
chest. The voice, it is alleged, will be modi- 
fied by the condition of the subjacent organs. 
The resonance, thus heard, he terms retentisse- 
ffUfU autophonique* 

AuTOPHONiA, Suicide. 

AUTOPHOSPHORUS, Phosphorus. 

AUTOPLASTICS, Morioplastice. 

AUTOPLASTY, Morioplastice. 

AUTOP'SIA, Auftopsp; from *wT6ff, 'him- 
self,' and ty/tg, ' vision.' AiUoph'ia, Autoseop'- 
ia. Attentive examination by one's self. Im- 
properly used occasionally for the following : 

AuTOP'siA Cadaver'ica, (F.) Autopn0 ou 
Ouverture cadavirique. Attentive examination 
after death, ExaminaHon post mortemy Seetio 
Cadav'eris, Disttction, Neiroseopyy Necropayy 
Neeroaeop'ia, Neerop'sia, Neerop'sisy — ^prac- 



tised for the poipose of investigating the c 
and seat of an aoection of which a person rnsj 
have died, &c. 

AT7TOP81A Cadave&'ica Lbga'lis, Se^tio ea- 
dav'eris Ugalisy Obdu^tipy is the examination 
after death for medico-legal purpoees. 

AUTOPYROS, Syncomistos. 

AUTOSCOPIA, Autopsia. 

AU'TOSITE, from avr«c, ' self,' and ^ir*;, 
' nourishment.' A single monster, capable of 
deriving nourishment from its own proper or- 
gans, in contradistinction to OmpkeUonU, (q. v.) 

AUTOTHERAPIA, Vis medicatrix natore. 

AUTUMN, AtUum'wuMy PJuhiroporouy (F.) 
Avtomne. One of the seasons of the year, be- 
tween the Sdd of September and the -2l8t of 
December. In all climates, the Autumn or 
Fall is liable to disease ; a combination of local 
and atmospheric causes being then present, ft- 
vourable to its production. 

AUrUM'NAL; Autwm»u/li$y (F.) Atnfm- 
nale. Relating to Autumn; as jSntumiul 
FruitSy Auiumnal Fsversy &c. 

Autumn Ai. Fevxr, generally assumes a bi- 
lious aspect. Those of the intermittent kind 
are much nK>re obstinate than when they ap- 
pear in the spring. 

AUXESIS, Augmentation, Increase. 

AUXILIARY, AuxUia'ri^y from ansUiuwif 
' aid.' (F.) Auxiliary That which assists, or 
from widch assistance is obtained. 

Auxiliary Medicihs \b one which assists 
the principal medicine or basis. It is synony- 
mous with Adjuvant. 

AuxiuARY MuscLBs BTC those which coBcar 
in tl^ same movement. Some anatomists have 
applied the term to several ligaments, as well 
as to the fleshy fibres, which hang from the ««- 
cro^pinalis muscle. 

AUXILIUM, Juvans, Medicament. 

AUXIS^ Augmentation, Increase. 

AVA, Arvay Kava, An intoxicating narco- 
tic drink made by chewing the Piper -metbisti- 
cum. It is much used by the Polynesians. 

AVAILLES, WATERS OF. A smsOl vil- 
luge in France, 13 leagues S. S. E. of Poitiers, 
at which there is a cold saline chalybeate. It 
contains chlorides of sodium and calcium, sul- 
phate and subcarbonate of soda, iron, &c. 

AVANT'BOUCHEy{Y,)OtanH'cum. Tbis 
name has been applied by some to the faon/A, 
properly so called — in contradistinction to tbe 
Arritre bouche or Pharynx, 

AVANT'BRASy Forearm. 

AVANT'CCEURy Scrobjculus cordis. 

AVANT'GOUTy (F.) Prmgusta'tio ; a fore- 
taste; pregustation. 

AVANT'MAINy{Y.)Adv0r'saManu*, The 
inside of the hand, when extended. 

AVANT'PIEDy (F.) The most advanced 
part of the foot. 

AVANT'POIGNETyiV.) The anterior part 
of the wrist. 

AVELINE, Corylus avellana (nut.) 

AVELLANA CATHARTICA, Jatropba 
curcas. 

AVE'NA, OatSy Bromos. The seeds of Ave'- 
na tati'va, Nat, Ord, Graminess. Sex. Syst. 
Triandria Digynia. (F.) Avains, Oats are 
used as food for man, in some parts, particular- 
ly in the North of England and Scotland. 
when deprived of the husks they form Groats, 
(q. V.) Reduced to mealj — Avmk Fari'na* 



AYENiB FASINA 



97 



AZOODTNAMIA 



Omtmual — they are aTO>liedft8 cataplasma to pro- 
mote tuppaxatioa. The dry meal is sprixuded 
over eryBipelatonB parts. 

AvsKA ExcoKTioATA, Groats. 

AYEN^ FABINA, see Avena. 

AYENHEIM, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Aveoheim is three leagues firom Strasburg: 
near it is an aperient mineral water. ■ 

AYENNE^ MINERAL WATERS OF. 
ATeiuies is a village in the department of H6- 
ranlt in France : near it is a saline springs the 
temperature of which rises to 84^ FanreiSieit. 

AYENSy COMMON, Geom urbanom— a. 
Water, Geom rivale-^a. White, Geom Yirgi- 
nianum. 

AYERICH, Snlphur. 

AYERRHO'A BILIM'BI, BUvmfH, Bilim. 
hing ter$s> An Indian tree, which has a fruit 
th^t is too. acid to be eaten alone. It is used 
as a condiment, and in the form of syrup as a 
refirigerant. 

AvKaano^A Caram'bola, called after Aver- 
^boes; itfb/vm Cdhi'Ml^ Pnmum Mtella'tum, 
TamTaray Congay Coram' bolo. An Indian tree, 
Vfaose finits are agreeably acid. The bark, 
bruised, is employ^ as a cataplasm, and its 
fruit is used as a refrigerant in bilious fever and 
dysentery. 

A YER'SION, Aver'sioy Apot'ropi; from aver- 
ttrej (a and verUr$) * to turn from.' Extreme 
repugnance for any thing whatever. 

AVERSION^ (F.) also means, in therapeu- 
tics, the action of medicines which turn the 
afflux of fluids from o^e organ, and direct them 
to others ; being synonymous with counUr-ir" 
Tttationy or rather revulHon or derivation* 

AVERTINy (F.) A disease of the mind, 
which, according to Lavoisusk, renders the pa- 
tient obstinate and furious. 

AVEUGLE, Csecus. 

AVEUGLEMENTy Caecitas— 4. d* Jour, 
Nyctalopia — a* d$ Nuit, Hemeralopia. 

AYICEN'NIA TOMENTO'SA, called after 
Avicenna. The plant which affords the Mcdacf- 
ea Bean or Anaear'dium Qrienta'U of the Phar- 
macopceias, Semecar'pue ^nacar^diwm. The 
oil drawn from the bark of the fruit is a corro- 
sive, and active vesicatory, but it is not used. 

AVICULA CIPRIA, Pastil— a. Margariti- 
fers, see Pearl. 

AVOINy Avena. 

AVORTEMENTy Abortion. 

AVORTERy to Abort. 

AVORTINy Abortion. 

AVORTONy Abortion. 

AYXTLSIOy ArraehemmU. 

AVULSION, Evulsion. 

AX, MINERAL WATERS OF. Ax is a 
small town in the department of Arriege, 
France ; where there are several sulphurous 
springs, the temperature of which vanes from 
7r> to leao of Fahrenheit. 

AXEy Axis— tf. de PCEiiy Axis of the eye. 

AX'EA COMMISSUHA, TrochoVdee. A 
pvot-joint. See Trochoid. 

AXIL'LA, Alay Aseel'lay AseeTlay AseiTlay 
Aid'lay Cordis emuneto'riumy MaUy Hypo'fnioy 
P^vea axilla rUy Mas'ekaliy Mas*ekalisy (F.) 
Aiitelle. The cavity beneath the junction of 
the arm with the slioulder; the armpit; (F.) 
Creua de PAiseelle. It is bounded, anteriorly, 
by a portion of the pectoralis major; posteri^ 
wly, by tbe latissimus dorsi. It is covered 



with hair, contains much cellular membrane^ 
lymphatic ganglions, important vessels and 
nerves, and numerous sebaceous follicles, fur- 
nishing an odorous secretion. In consequence 
of such secretion, the ancients called it emuno* 
to^riwn cordis* 

AXILLARY, Masekalittfusy ("F.) Axil- 
lairs, from axillay 'the armpit.' Belonging 
to the armpit. 

Axillary Aktxrt,. Arte^ria axilla' ris; a 
continuation of the subclavian, extending from 
the passage of the latter between the scaleni 
muscles as &r as the insertion of the pectoralis 
major, when it takes the name of Brachial. 

Axillary Olanss are lymphatic glands 
seated in the armpit; into which the lymphatic 
glands of the upper extremity open. 

Axillary Nrrvx, Seaj/tUo^u'msrdl (Ch.), 
Nsrf drconJUxsy ArHeularnerve ; arises from 
the posterior part of the brachial plexus, particu- 
larly from the last two cervical pairs and the 
first dorsal. It is chieflv distributed to the 
posterior margin of the deltoid. 

Axillary Ysin, Vena AxUlafrisy Vena Sula» 
la'ris. This vein corresponds with the arterjr; 
anterior to which it is situate. It is a conti* 
nuation of the brachial veins; and, at its ter- 
mination, assumes the name Subclavian* 

AXINE, Ascia. 

AXIRNACH. An Arabic word, used by Al- 
bocasis to designate a fatty tumour of the up- 
per eyelid, observed particularly in children. 

AXIS, Axon, (F.) Axe. A right line which 
passes ^ough the centre of a body. 

A^is, CereSirq-Spinal, see Encephalon — a. 
of the Cochlea, Modiolus— a. Coeliac, Cceliac 
artery. 

Axis of tbe Eye, (F.) Axe ds Vaily called 
also. Visual Axis and Optic Axis, is a right 
line, which fiills perpendicularly on the eye, 
and passes through the centre of the pupil. 

Axis, is also the second vertebra of the neck, 
Axon, Epistroph'eus, Epis'trophus, Maseha- 
lister: the Ver'tebra Denta'ta, (F.) Essieu, So 
called, because it forms a kind of axis on which 
the head moves. Chaussieur calls it Axoidsy 
from a$*v, < axis,' and uSet, < shape.' 

AXOIDE, Axis— a. Occipitale, Rectus ca- 
pitis posticus major. 

AXOIDO-ATLOID'EUS. What refers to 
both the axis and atlas, as Axoido-atloidsan ar- 
ticulation. 

The lesions of the Axoido-atloidean, are, 1. 
Fracture of the Proces'at^ Denta'tus. 2. Rup- 
ture of the odontoid ligament, and consequently 
passage and pressure of the process behind the 
transverse lignment : and, 3. The simultaneous 
rupture of me odontoid and transverse liga- 
ments. These different accidents are fatal. 

AXOIDO-ATLOIDIEN, ObUquus inferior 
capitis. 

AXON, Axis. 

AXUNGE, Adeps prseparata. 

AXUN6IA, Pinguedo— a. de Mumift, Mar- 
row--«. Articularis, Synovia-«. Porcina, 
Adepe prseparata. 

AYPNIA, Insomnia. 

AZARNET, Orpiment. 

AZARUM, Asarum. 

AZEDARACH, Melia Azedarach. 

AZEDARACHA AM(ENA, Melia Azeda- 
rach. 

AZOODYNA'MIA^from a, priv., C*^, *life,» 



AZORES, CLIMATE OF 



^ BADEN, MINERAL WATERS OF 



and 4vwi/£C(, < strength.' Privatkm or dimina- 
tioB of the vital powers. | 

AZORES, CLIMATE OF. The Azores or | 
Western Ishuids are said to afford one of the 
best examples of a mild, homid, eqoable cli- 
mate to be met with in the northern henusohere. I 
It is slightly colder and moister than that of 
Madeira, bat even more eqoable. Sir James ' 
CUurk thinks, that a change from Azores to ! 
Madeira, and from thence to TeneriffB— one of 
the Canaries— would prove more beneficial to | 
the phthisical valetndmarian than a residence ' 
during the whole winter in any one of these 
islands. 

AZOTATE DURGENTy Argenti nitras. 

A'ZOTE, Axo'tumy from «, priv., and C«*i7) 
'life.' A'zof or Ni'trogen, Alealigenef Gas 
azo'ticumy Nitrog^n'iwi^ (F.) AsaUy Niiro- 
ghte, Air gaU^ Air vicid, is a gas which is un- 
fit for respiration. It is not positively delete- 
rious, but proves fatal, owing to the want of 
oxTgen. It is one of the constituents of atmo- ' 
spheric air, and is a distinguishing principle of 
animals. Vegetables have it not generally, 
diffused, whilst it is met with in most animal 
substances. It hu been variously called, pklo^ 
ginie airy wHat%d mV, &c. ; has been looke^ 
upon as sedative, and recooomended to be re- 
spired, when properly diluted, in diseases of the 

Azote, Protoxide of, Nitrogen, gaseous 
oxide of. , 

AZOTED, Nitrogenized. 

AZ0TEN£SE8, from azote, and voffop, ' 
* disease.' Diseases fancied to be occasioned 
by the predominance of azote in the body.-* 
Baumes. I 

AZOTIZED, Nitrogenized. 

AZOTURIA, see Urine. 

AZUR, Coral, Smalt. ' 

AZU'RIUM. A compound of two parts of 



mercury, one-third of sulphur, and one-foorlii 
of sal ammoniac. — ^Albert the Great* 

AZTGES, Ax'ygosy Az'ygouty sine pmri^ 
from «, priv., and CiY*f> < equal.' Unequal. 
The sj^noid bone, because* it has no fellow. 
Also, a process, Proees'aus Az'ygesy R&etrum 
spkenoldafliy projecting from under the middle 
and forepart of this bone. 

AZYGOS GANGLION, see Trisplanefanic 
Nerve. 

AzTGouB Akticttlak AaTX&T, see Artien* 
lar arteries of the skull. 

AzTooos Muscle, Azygos tPvulm, is the 
small muscle Which occupies the substance of 
the uvula. — ^Morgagni. The name is, however, 
inappropriate, as there are two distinct fascicu- 
li, placed along side each other, forming the 
Pal'atO'gtaphyli'ni, Stapkyli'ni or Ejnstapkf- 
li'fd muscles, Staj^yli'ni me'dii of Winslow. 

AzTOous Vk», Vnia Azfgoa, Veins Pr#- 
lomho-thoracique — (Ch.) Vena sine pari. Vena 
pari earent, (F.) Veine sane Poire, This vein 
was so called by Galen. It fbrms k commnni- 
cation between the V, eawa inferior and V. eo- 
va superior y permitting the blood to pass freely 
between the two. It rises firom the vena cava 
inferior, or from one of the lumbar or renal 
veins, passes through the diaphragm, ascends 
along the spine to the right of the aorta and 
thoracic duct, and opens into the V. csiva supe- 
rior, where it penetrates the pericardiom. On 
the left side, the bbmi-az'toos, Left hran'ckial 
or left euperior intereoe'tai vein, Vena demd^ 
azygosy V. henUaz^yga, Veine petite prelamtio- 
thoraeique^Ch,) presents, in miniature, neairly 
the same arrangement. 

AZYMI A HUMORUM, Crudity of the hu- 
mours. 

AZTMUS, from «, priv., and Cv^n, * leaven.' 
Azymous bread is unfermented, unleavened 
brc«d.— 'Gal^i. 



B. 



BAB^VRRE, Buttermilk. 

BABILLEMENTy Loquacity. 

BABUZICARIUS, Incubus. 

BAC'ARIS, Bach'aris, A ntoie given by 
the ancients to an ointment described by Galen 
under the name Ointment of Lydia. It was 
sometimes employed in diseases of the womb. 
—Hippocrates. 

BACC^ BERMUDENSES, Sapindus sapo- 
naria — ^b. seu Grana actes, see Sambucus ebu- 
lus — ^b. Myrtillorum, see Vaccinium myrtillus 
— ^b. Norlandicse, Rubus arcticus — ^b. Piscato- 
risB, see Menispermum cocculns. 

BACC AR, Bac'earisy Bae'eharis, An herb 
used by the ancients in their garlands, to 
destroy enchantment. Perhaps the Digitalis 
purpurea (q. v.) Some authors have errone- 
ously thought it to be the Asarum, 

BACCHARIS, Baccar. 

B ACCHI' A, from Baeekus, < wine.' A name 
applied to the red or pimpled face of the drunk- 
ard. See Gutta rosea. 

BACCHIC A, Hedera helix. 

BACHARIS, Baearis. 



BACHELOR'S BUTTONS, see Stryclmos 

nux vomica. 

BACHER'S TONIC PILLS, Piluls ex Hel- 
leboro et Mynrha. 

BACILE, Crithmum maritimum. 

BACiL'LVyLyBaeilluSyBac'uluSyBac'ctUus: 
<a stick.' This name has been applied to a 
kind of troch, composed of expectorants, and 
having the shape of a stick. Also, a supposi- 
tory. BacUlum was .used by the ancient che- 
mists for several instruments of iron. 

BACKACHE ROOT, Liatris. 

BACKSTROKE OF THE HEART, Im- 
puUe, diastolic. 

BACOVE, Musa sapientum. 

BACULUS, Bacillum. 

BADEN, MINERAL WATERS OF. Be- 
den is a town six miles from Vienna. Here 
are 12 springs, containing carbonates of liane 
and magnesia J sulphates of lime, and magnesia, 
and soda ; and chlorides of sodium and aluminiun. 
The water is used in diseases of the skin, rheu- 
matism, &c. There are tWo other towns of 
the same name; one in Snabia, and the other in 
Switzerland, about 19 miles from Zurich, where 



BABIAGA 



91 



fiALLOTA FtSTDDA 



wenuBeraltpringB. The iRFBtert of tlie last two 
are tfaemud Bslphureoiis. 

BADIAGA. A kind of sponge, loM in Roi- 
lia, tike powder of which is said to take away 
the liTid marks from blows and braises in a few 
boors. Its nstore if not understood* 

BADIANBy Illicinm anisatnm. 

BADISIS, Walking. 

BADUKKA, Capparis badukka. 

BAGEBIA, Pound. 

BAGNfeRES-ADOUR, MINERAL WA- 
TERS OF. Bagnires-Adonr is a small town 
in the department of the Haute* PyrinieMy 

cold chalyVeatee; others, thermal salines; but 
the greatest part solphnreous and warm. 

BAGN£RES DE LUCHON is a small town 
in the department of Httute Getronns, on the 
frontiers of Spain. It has been for a long time 
famoDS ibr its numerons snlphnreous springs, 
the temperature of which is from €19^ to 148<>, 
of Fahrenheit. 

BA6NIGGE WELLS. A salme mineral 
spring in London, resembling the Epsom. 

BAGNIO, Baignoire. 

BAGNOLE8, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Bagnoles is a village in the department of Orne. 
The water resembles that of the Bagnh-e* eU 
Imekon* 

BAGNOLS, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Bagnols is a village) two leagues from'Mende, 
in the department of Lozdre. The waters are 
hjdrosniphmtms and thermal : 109*^ Fahrenheit. 

BAGOAS, Castiatus. 

BAGUENAUDIBRy Coltitea arboreseens. 

BAHAMA ISLANDS, CLIMATE OF. The 
climate of the Bahamas is not considered to be 
well adapted for consnmptiYe patients, on ac- 
count of the rapid alternations of temperature, 
and the prevalence of winds, often of a dry, 
cold chancter. Still, the phthisical valetudina- 
rians from noost portions of the United States 
mi|^ derive advantage from a residence there 
dnnng tiie winter months. The accommoda^ 
tions are n ot, however, good, or numerous. 

BAHEL, Coium'nea longifo'lia, A labiated 
l^t of Malabar, whose leaves, bruised, are ap- 
plied as cataplasms to suppurating tumours. 

Babei. S chfll i, Genista spinosa Indica* 

BAIGNEURy Bather. 

BAIGNOIRE, (F.)Baptiste'riwn,tLBatking 
tuhy Bagnie, Soliumy Pisei'na. The vessel or 
place in which bathing is performed. Baig- 
noire oeuhdrty an eye-bathf'-^ small vessel for 
bsthhig the eyes. 

BAILLJSMENT, Tawning. 

BAILLONy Speculum oris. 

BAIN, Bath— 6. Ckaudy Batl^ hot-^. Miee^ 
trifHc, Bath, electric, see Electricity — b. Bntiefy 
Btth, general— 6. de Fauteuii, Bath, hip--d. 
Praisy Bath, tepid— d. Froidy Bath, cold— 6. Mo- 
ney Bath, watei^-^. Medieinaly Bath, medicated 
-4. de Piedy Bath, foot, Pediluvium— ^. de So- 
Uey Bath, sand— «. de Sikgey Bath, hip— &. Tem- 
firiy Bath, tepid, B. Temperate— d. de The, 
Batl^head— ft. !ZY^,Bath, tepid— ^. Tr^e froidy 
Bath, cold — 5. de VapeWf Bath, vapour. 

BAINS, MINERAL WATERS OF. These 
are situate at Plombi^es, department of the 
Vosges. They are said to he saline and ther- 
nal by some; others deny them any medical 
properties. • 

BALAMPULLIy Tanarindas. 



BALANCE, AREOSTATIC, Aerometer. 
BALANDA, Fagus Sylvatica. 
BALANEUM, Bath. 
BALANISMUS, Suppository. 
BALANITIS, Gonorrhcea spuria. 
BALANOBLENNORRHQBA, Gonorrhoea 
spuria. 
BALANOCASTANUM, Bunium Bulbocaa- 



BALAN6RRH(EA, G<«orrhoBa spuria. 

BAliANUS, jlalavof, <g1ans,' <aa aconu' 
The glans penis. Hence, Balanoblennorrhafoy 
Blennorrhcea of the glans; and BtUam^He, In- 
flammation of the ^ans. Suppositories and 
pessaries were, also, so called. 

Balanos PHCEiiicoe, Date. 

^ Baxanits, Glans, Suppository^— b. Myrep* 
sica, Gnilandina mbringa. 

BALARUC, MINERAL WATERS OF. Ba- 
laruc is a town in the department of H^raidt, 
in France. The waters are saline and ther- 
mal. They contain carbonic acid, carbonate 
of lime, carbonate of magnesia, chlorides of so- 
dium, calcium, and magnesium, sulphate of 
lime, and a .little iron. They are considered 
tonic, and are largely used. Their temjpera- 
ture is about 1 18^ Fahrenheit. 

Bauiruc Watbr, Factitious, (F.) Sou de 
Balarue,^ Aqua BeUUuea'nay is made of simple 
aeiduloue water (containing twice its bulk of 
carbonic acid) f. ^xzss ; chloride ofeodiumy ^iss; 
chloride of ealciumy gr. xviij ; chloride of mag* 
neeittm, gr. 56; earhonate ofmagneeiay gr. j. 

BALATRO, Bambalio. < 

BALAUSTINE FLOWERS, see Punicagra^ 
natum. 

BALBIS, paXfiiQy '« foundation.' Any ob- 
long cavity. — Galen. Hippocrates, in his trea- 
tise on the joints, gives the name BalUto'dee 
to the olecranon cavity of the humerus. 

BALBUS, (F.) Bigue. One habitually af- 
fected with stammering. A stammerer. 

BALBUTIES, P«W/m'«mm, Psel'lotesy Ble^» 
sitae, Barygloe^eiay Dyala'liay Mogila^lia, Ie» 
ehopho^nia, Battarie*mu8y Bamba'liay Hasita'' 
(to, Loquo'la hlee'aay (F.) Balhutiementy Bi» 
gaiemetu. Stammering, St. Vitus's Dance of 
the Voice. Also, vicious and incomplete pro- 
nunciation, in which almost all the conso- 
nants are replaced by the letters B and L. 
TrauHs'mue* • 

BALCHUS, Bdellium. 

BALD, Athrix. 

BALDMONEY, ^thnsa menm. 

BALDNESS, Alopecia, Calvities— b. Limit- 
ed, Porrigo decalvans — ^b. Partial, Porrigo de- 
calvans. 

BALENAS, Leviathan penis. 

BALIMBAGO, Hibiscus populeus. 

BALINEATOR, Bather. 

BALINEUM, Bath. 

BALL, Pila. 

BALLISMUS, Chorea. 

BALLIST A, Astragalus. 

BALLONNBMENTy Tympanites. 

BAL^LOT A YiR^lDKyMarru'Humnigrum^ 
Black Horehoundy Stinking H., (F.) Marruhe 
noir. This plant is esteemed to be antispaa- 
modic, resolvent, and detersive.(?) 

Ballota Laha'ta, Leonu^rus lana'tue* A 

Slant of the Nat. Family y Labiate, Seas, Syat, 
Adynamia Gymnospermia, which grows in 
Siberia. The whole plants with the exception 



BALLOTTSMSNT 



100 



BALSAM OF GENEVIEVE 



of the root, has recently been recommended in 
dropsy, and in rheomatum and gont, as a diu- 
retic. It is usnally given in decoction (Jss to 
gj,tof.J{viijofwater.) 

BALLOTTEMENTy (F.) AgUa'tiany Sue" 
cu8*sion,MouvsmMt de BiUlott&ment^tpercus'' 
fiony means the motion impressed on the fcetus 
in utero, bv alternately pressing the uterus by 
means of tne index finger of one hand intro- 
duced into the vagina; the other hand beinc ap- 
plied on the abdomen. It is one of the least 
equivocal signs of pregnancy. 

BALLSTON SPA. This village is situate 
in Saratoga County, New York. The spring 
Sans Souci belongs to the class of Acidulous 
Chalybeates. It contains iodide of sodium. 
There is also a sulphur spring. 

BALM, Melissa — b. Apple, Momordica bal- 
aaminfr— b. Bastard, Melitis Melissjophyllum— 
b. of Gilead, Solomon's, see Tinctuira cardamo- 
mi— b. of Gilead tree, Dracocephalnm Cana- 
riense— b. Indian, Trillium Utifelium — b. 
Mountain, Monarda coccinea — ^b. Red, Monarda 
coccinea— b. Stinking, Hedeoma. 

BALNEA C(£NOSA, Bone tUs 4aux. 

BALNEARIUM, Hypocaustum. . 

BALNEARIUS, Bather. 

BALNEATOR, Bather. 

BALNEOG'RAPHY, Balneograph'ia, from 
[kaavtiov, < a bath,' and ya^tpiiy 'a description.' 
A description of baths. 

BALNEOL'OGT, Balneolog^tay from /fal<- 
rtttv, < a bath,' and i«ytc, * a description.' A 
treatise on baths. 

BALNEOTHERAPrA, from fiaX^uiof, <a 
bath,' and Btf*9-na, Hreatment.' Treatment 
of disease by bath^. 

BALNEUM, Batb— b. Acidum, Bath, acid— 
b. Alkalinum, Bath, allnline— b. Animale, 
Bath, animal— b. Antipsoricum, Bath, antip- 
soric— b. Anti-syphiliticum, Bath, antisyphi- 
litic — ^b. Arena, Bath, sand— b. GeUtinosum, 
Bath, gelatinous— b. Maris, Bath^ watei^-b. 
Medicatum, Bath, medicated. 

BALSAM, BaFsamumy (q. v.) BotesoHy 
BetesoHy (F.) Bourne. This name is given to 
natural vegetable substances, concrete or liquid, 
but very odorous, bitter, and piquant : com- 
posed of resin, benzoic acid, and sometimes of 
an essential oil; — ^which allow benzoic acid to 
be disengaged by the action of heat ; readily 
4lissolve in volatile oil, alcohol, and ether ; and, 
when treated wiUi alcalis, afford a soluble ben- 
zoate, and throw down resin. We know of 
only ive balsams : — ^those of Peru, and Tolu, 
Benzoin, solid Styrax or Storax, and liquid 
Stjrrax. (See those different words.) There are, 
however, many pharmaceutical preparations 
and resinous substances, possessed of a balsamic 
smell, to which the name balsam has been 
givenj but they differ essentially in composi- 
tion and properties: hence the distinction of 
balsams into natural and arHJieial. The. natu- 
ral balsams include the five before mentioned ; 
the artiJUial the remainder. 

Balsam, Acous'tzc, Bal'samum Asous'Heumy 
(F.) Banms acaustiqus. A mixture of fixed 
and essential oils, sulphur, and tinctures of 
fetid gums. Used in cases of atonic deafness, 
dropi^d into the ear. Th» jacoustic balsam of 
Dr. Hugh Smith is made by mixing three 
drachms of 9»-gally with one drachm of balsam 
ofPsru. 



Baxaam, AnuoAN, see VLywrfUm Permfe- 
rum — ^b. Anodyne, Bates's, Limmentum sa- 
ponis et opii. 

Balsam Apoplbo'tic, Bafs ammm JipapU^- 
tieumy (F.) Baums apoplsaigMS, A medicine, 
composed of several balsams properly so called, 
resins, and volatile oils. It is of a stiff coosist- 
eftce, is worn in ivory boxes about the person, 
and is smelled at in headache, &c. 

Balsam Apple, Momordica balsamina. 

Balsam of AncoE^us, Bal^satmtm Areesi^ Un^ 
gusnftum El'smiy (F.) Baumu d'Arettus, A 
soft ointment ; sometimes employed in wounds, 
ulcers, &c. It is made by melting, with a 
gentle heat, two parts of mutton suet, one of 
lard, one and a half of turpentine, and as^mocb 



Balsam Canada, see Pinus balsamea — b. C»> 
nary, Dracocephalum Canariense — b. Caiiivi, 
Copaiba. 

Balsam op Caepa'thia, Bal'sa mm m Cmr^ 
path'ieumy (F.) Bourns ds Carpatkis. The re- 
sin of the Pinus Csmbroy (q. v.) v tree, which 
grows in Switzerland, Libya, and the Krapac 
mountains in Hungary. 

Balsam, Chaltb'batb, Bal*samsim Ckalf- 
bsa*tumy (F.) Baums d'aeisr ou d'aiguilUs, A 
mixture of nitrate of iron, alcohol, and oil, pre- 
pared by dissolving needles in nitric acid. It 
was formerly employed in frictions in pains of 
the joints. 

Balsam, CoMMAMuna's, Tincture benzoini 
compositar— b. for Cuts, Tincture benzoini com- 
posita. 

Balsam, CoKnxAZ*» op SBNinR'Tua, Bal^^a^ 
mum Cordia'li Ssnnsr'ti, (F.) Baums ^rdiaU 
ds Sennsrt, A stimulant medicine, composed 
of the essential oils of citron, cloves, and cin- 
namon, of musk, and ambergris. I>ose, 6 to 15 
drops. 

Balsam op Fibsabeas. A celebrated Spa- 
nish vulnerary balsam, mentioned by Cervantee; 
the composition of which was oil, rosemary, salt 
and wine. (?) 

Balsam, Spib'ituous, op Fio&avxrti, Bal*- 
samum Fioraven'ti spirituo'sum^ (F.) Bawrnsa de 
Fioravsnti spiritusux* Different ivodncta of 
the distillation of resinous and balsamic sab- 
stances, and of a number of aromatic substances, 
previously macerated in alcohol, have been tbns 
called. The Spirituous Balsam of Fioratfemtiy 
the only one now used in friction, in chronic 
rheumatism, is the first product of the distilla- 
tion from a sand-bath. It is entirely alcoholic. 
The Oily Balsam of Fioraventi is obtained by 
removing the residue, and distilling it in an 
iron vessel, at a white heat. It has the appear- 
ance of a citrine-coloured oil. The Blael .Bal- 
sam of Fioravsnti is the black oil, obtainf»d 
when the temperature is sufficient to carbonize 
the substances in the cucurbit. 

Balsam op Fib, see Pinus balsamea. 

Balsam op Foubcroy or of Labobds, CF.) 
Baums ds Eourerop ou ds Labords, A Idnd of 
liniment composed of aromatic plants, balsams, 
resins, aloes, turpentine, theriac, and olive oil. 
Used in chaps of the skin and nipples. 

Balsam, Fbiab's, Tinctura benzoini eompo- 
sita. 

Balsam op Gbhbvibvx, (F.) Baiums de Crans- 
vievs. An ointment composed of wax, turpen- 
tine, oil, red saunders, and camphor. Used in 
contosed wounds, gangrene, &e. 



BALSAM OF HONET 



101 



BALSAM, TRANQUIL 



Balsam of Horxt (Hill's.) A tinctnre 
nsdeof to/tf, Aofiey (U Bii) and spiritt(n. gallon.) 
A pectoral, used in coughs. The committee of 
the New York College of Pharmacy recommend 
the following fommla: — {Gum Bmznin iv, 
Bais. Toltu. Jj, MsUisy gyiij, Aleokoi Oii^ 
digest for 10 dm and filter.) See Mel. 

Balsam of fioaxHouMn (Ford's.) A tinc- 
ture of horekound^ liquoriee'^ootf camphor y opi" 
mmy htnzciny dried aquUlay oil of aniseody and 
konsf. It has the same properties as the above. 
See Marmbinm. 

Balsam, Huhoakxah, see Finns mnghos. 

Balsam, Htpnot'ic, Bal'aamfitm Hypnofi- 
enmj (F.) Bourne Efpnotique, A preparation 
of which opiom, hyoscyamus, camphor, and 
some other sedative substances form the basis. 
It is used externally in friction, to provoke 
sleep. 

Balsam, Htstxk'ic, Bal^samumHyster^ieumy 
(F.) Bmmu Hfstiriquo. A preparation made 
ii opium, aloes, asafcetida, castor, distilled oils 
of rue, amber, &c. It is held to the nose, ap- 
plied to the navel, or rubbed on the hypogas- 
trium in hysterical cases. 

Balsam, Indian, see Myroxylon pemiferum. 

Balsam ov Lbictousb of Uomdom or Vxir- 
CKGUEKx, Bal'samtim LtetormfH* A strongly 
stimulant and aiomatie mixture oi camplwr, 
saffi-on, mnak, and ambergris, dissolved in es- 
sential oils. The ancients burnt it for the pur- 
pose of piirifyin|( the air of a chamber, when 
infested with a disagreeable odour. 

Balsam of Lifb of Hoff'man/ Btd'twrnxtm 
Vita Hofwum'niy (F.) Bawmo do Vio d^Boffmau, 
A tincture, composea of essential oils and am- 
bergrisy employed internally and extemall]^ as 
a itimulant. A mixture of essential oils with- 
out alcohol constitutes the Saoson Baloamy Bal*" 
Mmum apopioc^tieumy B. aromafieum^ B, es^ 
pkoi'icumy B. Saxon^ieum, B, norvi*num, B» 
ScEsazKXX, B, Sfomaeh'ieum. Employed in 
friction as a stimulant. 

Balsam of Lxfs, Decoctum aloes composi- 
tmn— b. of Life, Turlington's, see Tinctura 
baooiiii compoeita. 

Balsam of Locatfl'li or Lvcatsl'li, Bal^- 
$amttm Lueaiel*li, (F.) Baume do LueatoL A 
•ort of ointment, composed of wax, oil, turpen- 
tine, sherry, and balsam of Peru, coloured with 
red Saunders. It was once administered in pul- 
nwnary consomption. 

Balsam of Mecca, see Amyris opobalsamum 
— b. Mexican, see Myroxylon Pemiferum — b. 
Natural, see Myroxylon Pemiferum. 

Balsam, GKXSif ,of Mbtz, Bal*samum Vir*idi 
Meten'aium, Bal'oomum Vir'idi, (F.) Baume 
tert do Motgy Baume do FouHlety HuiU verte, 
O'Uum ox'ydi eupri vir'idi. This is composed 
of several fixed oils, holding, in Solution, sub- 
esrbonate of copper, sulphate of zinc, turpen- 
tine, aloes, and tne essential oils of cloves and 
jimiper. It is green and caustic, and is em- 
pbyed to hasten the cicatrization of atonic nl- 
oen. 

Balsam, NxvHsrr'ic, of Fitllsb, BiU'samum 
• Jftpkrofieum Fulleri. A Uquid medicine, com- 
posed of oils, resins, and balsams, which have 
operienced an incipient state of carbonization 
from concentrated sulphuric acid. It was given 

in the dose of 15 to 30 drops in certain affee- 

tioBs of the kidneys. 
Balsam, Nsxvoto, Bal*oa mu m JUrpi'mumf 



(F.) Baume nervin on nerval. A kind of oint- 
ment, composed of fotty bodies, volatile oils, 
balsam of Pern, camphor, &c. It is employed 
in friction in cases of sprains and rheumatic 



Balsam, Paraltt'ic, of Mtnsicht. A sort 
of liniment or soft mixture of the essential oils 
of different aromatic plants, oils of turpentine 
and amber. — L6mery. 

Balsam of Pakei'ra bkava, Bal^oamum Po- 
r&i'ra brava. A soft mixture of balsam, resin, 
muriate of ammonia, and powder of the root of 
Paroira brava* It is given internally, to excite 
the urinary secretion. 

Balsam, PfeanviAN, see Myroxylon Peruife- 
ram— b. of Pern, red, see Toluifera balsamum 
— b. of Peru, white, see M3rroxylon Pemiferum. 

Balsam of Rackasi'ra or of Rakasi'ri. This 
substance is of a yellowish-brown colour i semi- 
transparent; fragile, when dry, but softening 
by heat; adherixig to the teeth, when chewed. 
It has a smell similar to that of the Balsam of 
Tolu, and is slightiy bitter. It is brought from 
India in gourd shells, and has been employed 
in diseases of the urinary organs, especially in 
gonorrhcea. 

Balsam, Riga. Prepared from the shoots of 
the Scotch Fir, macerated in spirit of wine. 
ItUemally, stimulant and diuretic; externally ^ a 
vufaierary. See Pinus Cembra* 

Balsam of Saturn, Bal'eamum Satur'ni, A 
solution of acetate of lead in spirit of turpen- 
tina, concentrated by evaporation; and to which 
camphor has been sidded. This balsam was ap- 
plied to hasten the cicatrization of wounds. 

Balsam of thx Samar'itah, (F.) Baume du 
Samaritain. A sort of liniment, prepared by 
boiling together, at a gentle heat, equal farts 
of wine and oil. It is said to have been the 
ointment used by the Samaritan of the Gospel 
to cure a patient covered with ulcers. 

Balsam, Saxon, Balsam of Life of Hoffinann. 

Balsam of Sttlphur, Bal'samum Sul'phurioy 
(F.) Baumo do Sou/re. A solution of sulphur 
in oil. — B. sulpk, anioa'Htm, (F.) B, do Soufro 
anioi, A solution of sulphur in essential oil of 
aniseed; given as a carminative.—^. Sulph. 
otUeinaftumy (F.) B, do Soufro euecini. A so- 
lution of sulphur in oil of amber. — B, Sulphuris 
terobinihina'tumy Common Dutch Dropo, (F.) 
B. do eoufro tirebinthini, A solution of sul- 
phur in essential oil of turpentine, administered 
as a diuretic. — The Balsam of Sulphur of Rv- 
LARD is a solution of sulphur in linseed oil or 
nnt oil. 

Balsam of Stm'patht, Balemnium Sympath*' 
ieumy (F.) Baumo do Sympathio, A bflJsam, 
used in the days when sympathetic influence 
was strongly believed in. It was composed of 
the raspings of a human skull, blood, ana human 
fat, and was applied to the instrument which 
bad inflicted the wound. 

Balsam, TBiBAirr's. A tincture of mjrrrh, 
aloes, dragon's blood, flowers of St. John's wort, 
and Chio turpentine. Intomally, diuretic; mh 
temaUyy vulnerary. 

Balsam of Tolu, see Toluifera Balsamum. 

Balsam, Tranquil, Bal'eameim tranquil'lum^ 
(F.) B, tranquille. A liquid medicine employed, 
externally, in the shape of friction : it is pre- 
pared by macerating and boiling, in olive oil, 
narcotic and poisonous plants, — belladonna, 
mandragora, hyoscyanmsy ^e^-4ad afterwards 



BALSAMADENDRON 



109 



BANDAGE 



infuMngy in the filtered deeoction, dii&rent aro- 
matic plants. It was employed as an anodyne. 

Balsam, TvnxxT, Diac(»cephalam Canari- 
ense. 

Balsam of Tur'pemtinv^ Dutek Drops, Bal'- 
samum Tsrebin'tkUug. Obtained by distilling 
oil of turpentine in a glass retort, mitil a red 
balsam is left. It possesses the properties of 
the turpentines. 

Balsam, Ysktaiu's, Tinctora Benzoini com- 
posita. 

Balsam, Yol'iiv&art, of MinnsRS'aus, Betl^- 
sammm vulnera^rium Mind9re^ri, (F.) J9. vulni- 
rtdre d$ Mindskbr. A kind of linimiBnt, com- 
posed of turfientine, resin elemi, oil of St. John's 
wort, and wax. Employed in friction, and as 
a (fareasing to wovnds. 

Balsam Wsxi>, Impatiens fiilya. 

Balsam, Woimn, Tinctora Benzoin! coin- 
posita. 

BALSAMADENDRON 6ILEADENSE, 
Amyris Gileadensis — b. Myrrha, see Myrrha. 

BALSAMEL JSON, Myrozylon Peroiferum. 

BALSAMIC, Salsam'ieus, from j^«x«-«e^«», 
< balsam.' Possessing the qualities- of balsams. 
Balsamie odour : — a sweet, faint, and slightly 
nauseous smell. BalsamU tubstanee; — one 
resembling the balsams in property. 

BALS AMIES, ELAMIFkRE, Amyris ele- 
mifera — b. de Id MM^usy Amyris opobalsa- 
mum. 

BALSAMINA, Momordica balsamina. 

BALSAMINEy Momordica balsamina. 

BALSAMITA F(£MINEA, Ac^Ueaageia- 
tum — ^b. Mas, Tanacetum balsamita. 

Balsami'ta Suav'xolbss, B. odora'ta, B. 
marisy Mtntha Saraeen'ieay ilf. Boma'na, Fam. 
Comfosita Corymbiferas. Sex, Syat. Synge- 
nesia Polygamia superflua. A plant, common 
in the sonSi of France, and cultivated in the 
gardens; -where it bears the names Mentkeeog, 
Grand baum$y Bourne dee Jardins, Its smell 
is strong and aromatic/ and taste hot. It is 
osed for the same purposes as the tansey, i. e. 
as a stimnlant, Termifuge, &c. 

BALSAMrTA SuAvxoLBMs, Tanacetum balsa- 
mita. 

BALSAMO-SACCHARUM, Elao-Saocha- 
rttm. 

BALSAMUM, see Balsam, Amyris opobal- 
samum— b. iSgyptiacum, see Amyris opobal- 
samnm — ^b. Album, see Myroxylon Peruifemm 
— ^b. Alptni, DracocephalumCanariense— b. Al- 
pini, see Amyris opoba l sa mum — ^b. Anodynmn, 
liinimentum saponis et opii — b. Apoplecticum, 
Balsam of life of Hofimann— b. Aromaticum, 
Balsam of life of HoflStnann — ^b. Asiaticum, see 
Amyris opobalsamum — ^b. Braziliense, Copaiba 
— b. Calaba, see Fagara octandrar— b. Catholi- 
ewD, Tincture benzoin! composita — b. Cepha- 
licum. Balsam of life of Hoffmann — ^b. Copaibs, 
Copaiba — ^b. Genuinum antiquornm, see Amy- 
ris opolnitsamum — b. Hyperici simplex, see Hy- 
pericum perforatum — b. Judaicmn, see Amyris 
opobalsamum — ^b. Libani, see Pinus cembra** 
b. Maris, see Fagara octandra — ^b. e Meccft, see 
Amyris opobalsamum — ^b. Mercuriale, Ungnen- 
tum hydrargyri nitiatis^b. Nerrinum, Balsam 
of life of Homnann^b. Opodeldoc, Linimentum 
saponis camphoratum — ^b. Ophthalmicum ru- 
brum, Unguentum hydrargyri nitrico-oxydi — 
b. Persicum, Tinctura benzoin! composita — b. 
Pemanum, see Myroxylmi Pemiferum— b. 8a- 



tuminam, Ungoeatan pkmbi siroeracetatis— 
b. Scherzeri, Balsam of life of Hoffinann— b. 
Stomachicum, Balsam of life of Hoffinann— b. 
Styracis, Styrax— b. Styracis benzoini> Benja- 
mm — b. Succiniy see Succinnm — b. Sulphoin 
Barbadense, Petroleum sulphuratum — ^b. Sol- 
phuris simplex. Oleum sulphuratum — ^b. Syria- 
cum, see Amyris opobalsamunk— b. Tolutanum, 
see Toloifera balsamum — ^b. Traumaticum, 
Tinctura henzoini composita — b. Universale, 
Unguentum plumb! superacetatis — ^b. Yiride, 
Balsam, green, of Metz; see Fagara octaandra. 

BALSEM, Amyris opobalsamum. 

BAMBA, Bamboo. 

BAMBALIA, Balbuties. 
. BAMBA'LIO, Bom'haloy Bala'tro, from 
Haftfiettt^, < I speak inarticulately.' One who 
stammers or Ittps, or utters inarticulate ooands. 
According to Krauss, one who speaks aa if be 
had pap in his mouth, or as if the tongue were 
paralyzed. 

BAMBOO, (F.) Bamhouy Bambu. Am. 
Gramineae. Sex. Syet. Hexandria Mooogy- 
nia. The young shoots of Bcmboe anmdima*' 
eea or Arun'do bamboe, and of Baemboe fMrtieU- 
Icita, contain a saccharine pith, of which tbe 
people of both the Indies ere very fond. They 
are sometimes made into a pickle. 

BAMBOS ARUNDINACEA, Bamboo-b. 
Verticillata, Bamboo. 

BAMIX MOSCHATA, Hibiscus ab^mos- 
chus. 

BAMMA, from p%n^my <I plunge,' «a paint; 
a dye.' Anciently, liquids were so called, in 
which certain bodies were plunged, to moisten 
or soften them. In the case of tea, fbr instance, 
into which bread is dipped^ the tea would be 
the boMimd, 

BANANA, Mosa sapientum. 

BANANIERy Musa sapientum. 

BANAUSIA, CharUtanry. 

BANC D'BIPjPOCRATE, Bathroe, 

BANCAL,(JP.) One who has deformed legs. 
It includes the vaigusy eompemie, and varu^y 
which see. 

BANCROCSE, (F.) A vulgar epithet for 
a rickety individual. 

BAN'DAGE, DeemoySyndee'mueyHypodes'- 
mie, Hfpodeema, Hypodee^mue, (the last three 
signify properly an under bandage.) A Under, 
from Sax. biadan, <to bind.' This word, with 
the French, is ^^enerally used to express the 
methodical, application of rollers, compresses, 
&c., Ban*daging, Syn'deeie, to fix an apparatus 
upon any part,— corresponding to &e words ^#- 
ligtitit^fcLStia'tio, faeeitifrwm Sppliea'tio, epid'- 
esie* With us the noun is usually applied to 
the result of the application, or to the bandage 
itself; — a sense in which the French employ 
the word Bande, Bandages are simple or com- 
pound. The simple bandage is equal, if the 
turns are applied circularly above each other ; 
unequal, if ue turns are not accurately applied 
upon each other. If each turn of the bandage 
be only covered one third, it forms the doloire 
of the French; if the edges touch only slightly, 
it is the moused; if the turns are very oblique 
and separated, it is the epiral or ereeping, (F.) 
rampant; if folded upon each other, it is termed 
the reversed, (F.) renverse* By uniting various 
kinds of bandaging, we have the compound; and 
these compound bandages have received various 
names expressive of their figure, or of the parts 



BANDAGE 



103 



BAOBAB 



to which they aie applied, as caputrum, syica, 
kt. Bandages are divided, also, as regards 
their uses, into tmiting^f dividing^ retaimng, 
expelling, eompreesing^ 6fe> 

BANSASB'or RoLLsa, JW«»0, (q*vO 3Vn»a, 
Efid€^mo*y Vin'culum, theBaude of the French 
is derived from (6.) bind en» 'to bind.' It 
may be mada of linen, flannel, or other stuff 
capable of offering a certain resistance. The 
two extremities of a bandage are called tails, 
(F.) «A«/#, and the rolled part is termed its 
ksad, (F.) glohs. If rolled at both extremities, 
it is call^ a doubU-headed roller or bandage, 
(F.) Bandt k deux globes. 

Bamdaox, Bodt, ManH'll, (F.) Bandage di 
Corps, is nsed. for fixing dressings, &c. to the 
tnmk. It is formed of a towel, naj^n, or some 
large comproBS, folded three or four times; the 
extremities of which are fastened by pins. 
This is again fixed by means of the eoapulary 
bmndage, which is nothing more than an ordi- 
nary bandage, stitched to Uie anterior and mid- 
dle part of the napkin, passing over the clavi- 
eles and behind the head, to be attached to the 
back part of the napkin. 

Bakdaok, CoMPRBssiHd, or RoLLXB, Faseia 
tompressi^va sen eonvolufti^, {F.) Bandogs com- 
pressif on ronlii is the simple roller with one 
bead; and ia employed in cases of nlcers, va- 
rices, &c. of the limbs. Whenever this roller 
is applied to the lower part of the limbs, it: is 
earned upwards by the- doloire and reversed 
methods aboire described. 

Barbaoe Divisif, Dividing bandage--^, en 
Ihloire, Doloire* 

Bahdagk, Eiohtesn-tailxd, Pas'da oetod'^ 
ftim eapitibus (F.) Bandage it due kuit ekefs. 
This bandage is made of a longitudinal portion 
of a common roller; and with a sufficient num- 
ber of transverse pieces or tails, to cover as 
moch of the part as is requisite. It is a very 
Bseful bandage, inasmuch as it can' be undone 
without disturbing the part. 

Bamdagk, Galbit's, or B, for ths Poor, Fas'- 
eia Gale'nd sen Pau'perum, (F.) Bandage de 
Galisn on des Pattvres, Oa'lea, is a kind of cv- 
eailus or hood, (F.) Coworeekef, divided into 
three parts on each side; and of which Galbm 
has given a description. See Cancer Galeni. 

Bakdagx, Hxkiiial, see Truss — ^b. Immo- 
vable, Apparatus, immovable. 

Bardagk, In'guinal, Pas'eia ingidna'lis, A 
bandage for keeping dressings applied to the 
groin. It consists of a cincture, to which is 
attached a triangular compress, adapted for 
covering the groin. To the lower extremitv 
of this, one or two bandages are attached, which 
pass under the thigh, and are fixed to the pos- 
terior part of the cincture. This bandage may 
be either simple or dpnble. 

Other bandages will be found described nn^ 
der their various names. 

Bahdags, PaaxANXNT, Apparatus, immova- 
ble — b. of the Poor, see Cancer Galeni; and 
Bandage, Galen's. 

Baiidaos ov sbfaxatk Strips, or B. or 
Sculte'tus, Fas' da fasafolis separaftim dis' 
pes^iiis sen SeuUefti, (F.) Bandage d bande- 
fsues siparees on de Seultet. This is formed 
ci linen strips, each capable of surrounding once 
aad a half the part to which they have to be 
spiled, and placed upon each otner, so as to 
cover soccessively one -third of their width. 



It is used chiefly for fractores, requiring fre- 
quent dressing. 

Baiu>aos, Undss, Hypodesmis-^. Unissant, 
Uniting bandage.- 

BANDAGING, see Bandage->b. Doctrine 
of, Desmaturgia. 

BAN'DAGIST. One whose business it is to 
make bandages, and especially those for hernia. 

BANDE, Bandage. The word Bands, in 
anatomy, is used by the French for various 
^larrow, flat, and elongated expansions. Bands 
d'Heliodore, is a kind of bandage for supporting 
the mammsB. 

BANDEAU, (F.) A kind of simple ban- 
dage, which consists of a piece of cloth, folded 
four times, and applied round the head. There 
is also the Bandeau ou Mouchoir en triangle or 
triangular bandage, a kind of couvrechef 
(which see,) made of a square piece of cloth, or 
of a handkerchief, folded diagonally, uid ap* 
plied round the head. 

BANDELETTE,(F.y Diminutive of ^on^/e, 
Faseiola, Taniola, Vitta; a narrow bandage, 
strip or fillet. Also Tiania semicircularis (q. v.) 

BANDELETTES AQGLXITINATIVES, 
small strips, covered with a glutinous plaster. 
Vittes agf^utinan'tes. See Agglutinant. 

BANDELETTES DECOUPLES, are 
strips of linen, notched on one edge, and co- 
vered, on one side, with ointment. They are 
applied to wounds to prevent the lint from 
sticking, and the laceration of the cicatrix. 

BANDELETTE 8EMICIRCULAIRE, 
Taenia semicircularis — b, dss Comss d^ammon. 
Corpus fimbriatum — b. des £minsnees ppri- 
formss. Taenia Semicircularis — b. de VHippo" 
eampey Corpora fimbriata. 

BANDURA, Nepenthe destillatoria. 

BANDY-LEGGED, Cnemoscoliosis. 

BANEBERRY, Actsa spicata. 

BANGUE, Bangi or Beng, Indian ksmp^ 
Gunjah, Haihisek. Adanson believes this to 
be the Nepenthe^ of the ancients, Canf nobis In'- 
diea, (F.) Chanwrs Indisn, probably identical 
with.C sativon Familp, Urticeae. Ssas, Syst, 
Dioecia Pentaadria. Its leaves and flowers are 
narcotic and astringent. They are chewed and 
smoked. Its seeds, mixed with opium, areca, 
and sugar, produce a kind of intoxication, and 
are us^ for this purpose by the people of In- 
dia. An alcoholic extract of the plant has been 
used in India, and since then in Europe and in 
this country as a narcotic, and anti-convulsive, 
in the dose of from half a grain to ten or more. 
It requires, however, great caution in its ad- 
ministration. See GiniJAH and CmniRus. 

BANICA, Pastinaca sativa. 

BANILAS, Yanilla. 

BANILLA« YanilU. 

BANILLOES, VanUIa. 

BANISTE'RIA ANGULCSA. This plant, 
in Brazil and the Antilles, passes for a power- 
fill sudorific, and an antidote to the poison of 
serpents. 

BANNIMES, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Banniires is a village in Quercy, diocess of Ca- 
hors, France. The waters are probably chaly- 
beate. They are celebrated in ameaorrhiaa, 
cachexia, jaun^ce, ke. 

BA'OBAB. The Adanso'nia digiti/ta, of 
Africa; Nat, Ord. Bombaceae; one of the 
largest productions of the vegetable kingdom. 
Its fruit is called, in the country, Pa»i> de singe. 



BAPTISIA TINCTORU 



104 BARRE, MINEItAL WATERS OF 



Ip is ■ourish, tJiid agreeable to eat : and 
ihing drink is made from it, which is 
feters. Prospero Alpini and Dr. L. 
think that the Terra Lemnia was pre- 
n Egypt, froni the pulp« All the parts 
laobab abound in mucilage. 
ri8IA TINCTORIA, Sophora tincto- 

nSTERIUM, Bmgnoir: 
AQXTETTE, (F.) A name given by 
physician at Nimes in France, to a ca- 
epiaemy, which occnrred there in 1761. 
uenza. 

ATHRON, Junipems sabina. 
ATHRUM, Antrum. 
BA, Beard— b. Aaronis, Arum macnla- 
. CaprsB, Spiraa almaria— b. Jovis, Sem- 
im tectorum. 

BADGES, see West Indies— b. Leg, see 
itiasis. 

BAREA, Erysimum Barbarea. 
BAROS'S^ PIL'UL^, Bariarossa*s 
An ancient composition of quicksilver, 
), diagridimn, musk, &c. It was the 
ternal mercurial medicine, which ob- 
iny real credit. 

;B£, Beard— ^. tU Boucy Tragopogon. 
BEAU, Cyanns segetum. 
BER-CHIRUR'GEONS. A Corpora- 
London, instituted by king Edward IV. 
rbers were separated from the surgeons, 
Greo. II., c. 15; and the latter were 
into a Royal College of Surgeons at the 
Qcement of the present century. 
BERIE, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
mineral waters are half a league from 
. They contain carbonic acid, chlorides 
lesium and sodium, sulphate of magnesia, 
ites of magnesia, lime, and iron. They 
d as chalybeates. 

BERRT, Ozycantha Galeni— b. Ameri- 
3 Oxycantha Galeni. 
BIEkS. a variety of paralysis chiefly 
nt in India, and bj many considered to 
same as Beriben (q. v.) Beriberi is 
Qly an acute disease. Barbiers is gene- 
ironic. 

BITIUM, Beard. 
BOTINE, Artemisia Santonica. 
BULA CAPRINA,.SpinBaulmaria. 
CLAY'S ANTIBILIOUS PILLS, Pi- 
dbiliosaB. 
DADIA, Pound. 
DANA, Arctium lappa— b. Minor, Xan- 

DANB PETITE, Xanthium. 

E6ES, MINERAL WATERS OF. 

I is a village in the department of Hautes 

», near which are several springs. 

re sulphureous and thermal, tM heat 

; from 85o to 119o Fahrenheit. They 
chlorides of magnesium and sodium, 

» of magnesia and lime, carbonates of 

ilphur, &c . These springs have long en- 
nigh reputation, and are daily advised 

leotts ana scrofulous affections, &c. 

iTions Babeobs Water, Aqua Baregi' 
(F.) Sou de Barigesy is made by add- 

irosulpkuretted ufoter, f. §iv, to pure 

f. Jzvijss, earbonate of soda, gr. zvj, 
of sodium, gr. ss. Bottle closely. 

QADA, Convolvulus pes capria. 

IGLIA, Soda. 



BARII CHLORIDtTM, Baryta, muriate of 
— ^b. lodidum. Baryta, hydriodate of. « 

BARILLA, Soda— b. Alicant, Sod»— b. Car- 
thagena, Soda^-b. Turkey, Soda. 

BARILLOR, Soda. 

BARIUM, BaWyum, PluU/tUumy ih>m fia^wc, 

< heavy.' The metallic base of baryta, so called 
from the great density of its compounds. 

Bakium, Ckloeidb of. Baryta, muriate <4-^ 
b, Chhrure de. Baryta, muriate of— b..Iodide o^ 
Baryta, hydriodate of-^b. Protoxide of. Baryta. 

BARK, Cinchona — ^b. Bitter, Pinckneya pn- 
bens — ^b. Calisaya, Cinchona cordifolia cortex 
— b. Caribaean, Cinchons Caribme cortex — b. 
Carthagena> see Cinchona — ^b. Crown, Cinchons 
lancifolifls cortex — b. Elk, Magnolia glaucft— b. 
Essential salt of^ see Cinchona — b. Florida, 
Pinckneya pubens— b. Georgia, Pinckneya po- 
bens — ^b. Gray, see Cinchona — ^b. Hoanoco, see 
Cinchona — ^b. Indian, Magnolia glancar— b. Je- 
suit's, Cinchona— b. Loxa, Cincli^nflB lancifolia 
cortex— b. Pale, Cinchonn lancifolias cortex— 
b. Maracaybo, see Cinchona — b. Peravian, Cin- 
chona — ^b. Pitaya, Cinchonae CaribaesB cortex— 
b. Red, Cinchons oblongifoliae cortex — b. Saint 
Lucia, CinchottflB CariMeae cortex — ^b. Santa 
Martha, see Cinchona — ^b. Silver, see Cinchona 
— b. Yellow, Cinchons cordifolis cortex. 

BARLERIA BUXIFOLI A, Cara schnUi. 

BARLET, PEARL, see Hordeum-^>. Scotch, 
Hordenm. 

BARM, Test. 

BARNET, MINERAL WATERS OF. Bar- 
net is not far from London. The water is of a 
purging quality, like thait of Epsom, and about 
half the strength. 

BAROMACROM'ETER,,P<K2o5aroiMa«roin'. 
eter, Padom'eUr, from |?«e<>o ' weight,' /utan^ot, 

< long,' and /atgor, * measure.' An instrument 
invented ^y Stein to indicate the length and 
weight of a new-bom in&nt. 

BAROM'ETER, Baroeeop'ium, Ba'rosecpe, 
from j9a(«c, 'weight,' and /ufr^sv, 'measure.' 
(F.) Baroniitre, An instrument which mea- 
sures the weight of the air. A certain degree 
of density in tlus medium is necessary for health. 
When we ascend high mountains great inconve- 
nience is experienced, owing to Uie diminished 
density. Changes of this character are indi- 
dicated by the Barometer or weather-glass. 

BA'ROS, ^9i, * heaviness.' Employed by 
the Greek physicians to designate tne feeling 
of lassitude and heaviness observable in many 
diseases. — ^Hippocrates, Galen. 

BAROSCOPE, Barometer. 

BAROSMA CRENATA, Diosma crenata. 

BAROTES SALITUS, Baryta, muriate <tf. 

B ARRAS, see Pinus sylvestris. 

BARRE, MINERAL WATERS OF. Bam 
is a small town, six leagues from Strasbnrg. 
The waters are thermal, and contain much 
iron, calcareous salt, &c. They are diuretic 
and tonic. 

BARRE (F.) Barrure, Varoy «a bar.' A 
projection or prolongation of t^e symphysis pu- 
bis >— a deformity rendering delivery difficult. 

BARR&E (F.) A term applied, in France, 
to a female whose pelvis has the deformity do- 
scribed under Barre. 

BARRIES, (DENTS,) The molar teeth, 
when the roots are spread or tortuous, so that 
they cannot be extracted without being broken; 



BABBEL OF THE EAR 



105 



BASILIC 



or without a portion of the alveolar arch being 
reiDoved. 
BARRKL OF THE EAR» Tympanum. 
BARRENNESS, Sterilitas. 
BARROS, Terra Portogallica. 
BAKRTTRE, Barrg. 
BARTCOCCALON, Datura stramoniom. 
BARYCOITA, Baryecoia. 
BARYECOI'A, BaryeoiUa, Brady ecoi% Pa- 
Tom'sia o&tu'soy Diseeoi'cb^ Dyaeea'a^ Audi'tus 
dijlc"ilisy Obaudi"tioy Ohaudi'tus, A. gravis, 
A. \mmtnu*tusy Hypoeopho*ais, Hy pocky ro' sis y 
(F.) Dur€ti d^OreUU, from ^^tqyqy * heavy,' and 
•nr^y 'hearing.' Hardness of hearing, mcom- 
plete deafness. See Cophosis, and Deafness. 
BART6L0SSIA, Balbuties. 
BARYGL03SIA, Baryphonia. 
BARYI HYDRAS lOD ATI, Barytr^ hydrio- 
date of. 
BARYLALIA, Baryphonia. 
BARYOD'YNE, from /J«e«/ff, 'heavy/ and 
«^»i:, ' pain.' A dull, heavy pain. 

BARYPHO'NIA, Baryglos'siay Baryla'liay 
Loque'la impedi'tay from /9<^vf, 'heavy/ and 
^iBfij, « voice.' Difficnlty of voice or speech. 
6ARYPICR0N, Artemisia abrotannm. 
BARYSOM ATIA, Polysarcia adiposal 
BARYSOMATICA, Polysarcia adiposa. 
BARYTA, from /»<{««, * heavy,' Terra pon- 
dtro'soy Bqry'tes, Protoxide ofBa'riumy Heavy 
Earthy Ptmderous Earthy (F.) BarytSy Barite, 
Terre pesoMU, This eartii and its soluble salts 
axe all highly corrosive poisons. It is never 
employed in medicine in &e pure state. When 
externally applied, it is caustic, like potassa 
and soda. 

BAaT*TA, Cab'boitaR oVyBary'ta Car*honas, 
(?.) Carbonate de BarytSy is only used Offici- 
Bally to obtain the moriate. 

B.iaTTA, HTi>ai'ODATSOF,^aryfa ffydriodas, 
Baryta Hydriod'icay Hydras Baryi loda'tiy (in 
the dry state, — Iodide of Bariumy Barii lod'i- 
dum, B. loda'tumy) has been given in scrofulous 
and similar morbid conditions. It may be ad- 
ministered internally in the dose of one-eighth 
of a grain three or four times a day, and be ap- 
plied ezteraally to scrofulous swellings, in the 
fonn of ointment, (gr. iv. to §j of lard.) 
Babtta Htdriodica, Baryta, hydriodate of. 
Bartta, Mu'riatb or Htdrochlo'rate op, 
Bary'tee mufriaSy Chlo'ride of Ba'rium, Ba^rii 
Cklo'ridum (Ph. U. 8.) Chlo'ruret ofBa'Humy 
Ttrra pondero'sa sali'ta seu muria'tay Sal muri^ 
^icuwe, harofieumy Baro'tes sali'tuSy (F.) Chlo^ 
mr« de hariumy is the combination chiefly used. 
The Muriate of Baryta may be formed as fol- 
lows: Baryt. Carbon.y in nagments, ftj. Acid. 
Muriat, f. ^zij . Aquay Oiij . Mix the acid with 
the water, and gradually add the Carbonaite of 
Barvta. Toward the close of the effervescence, 
kn»7 A Kentle heat, and, when the action has 
ceased, filter the liquor, and boil it down so that 
crystals may form as it cools. Ph. U. S. 

It is given in the form of the Bolu'tio Muria'- 
tu Barytety Idquor Barii Chlo'ridiy Aqua bary*' 
Utmaria'tisy (F.) Solutionde Muriatede Baryte, 
{Xuriate of Baryta, one part^ distilled watery 
tbee parts,) and is employed in scrofulous cases, 
vorms, and cutaneous diseases. Externally, to 
fingoos ulcers and to specks. on the cornea. 

Barttjb Carboiv'as, Baryta (Carbonate) — ^b. 
Hydriodas, Baryta, hydriodate of— b. Murias, 
Baryta, muriate of. 
8 



BAR TTEy Baryta— 3. Carbonate de, Baryta> 
Carbonate of. 

BARYTHMIA, Melancholy. 

BARYUM, see Barium. 

BAS'FONDj see Urinary Bladder. 

BAS'LASSEy Stocking, laced. 

BAS VENTRE, Abdomen. 

BASAAL. The name of an Indian tree, the 
decoction of whose leaves, in water, with gin- 
ger, is nsed as a gargle in diseases of the finuces. 
The kernels of the ^nit are vermifuge. 

BASANASTRA'GALA, firom fiaaavo^y 'tor- 
ture,' and aoT^«xaxoc, 'the astragalus.' Pain 
in the ankle jomt} gout in the foot. 

B AS ANIS'MOS, from jfa<ravi tiiv, ' to explore. ' 
'A touch-stone.' Inveitigation or examinationv 
— Hippocrates, Galen. 

BASE, Basisy from fianfm, 'I proceed,' 'I 
rest,' ' I support myself.' Tluit which serves as 
a foundation or support. That which enters, 
as a principal matter, into a mixture or combi- 
nation. In anatomy, it is employed in the for- 
mer sense, as Base of the Craniumy Base of the 
Brain — Basis w&xPammen'tum cere'bri; Base 
of a Process, jrc, Base of the heart — Basis yel 
eoro'na cordis* In the art of prescribing, Btssis 
is the chief substance which enters ifito a com- 
pound fornuila. 

BASEMENT MEMBRANE, see Membrane, 
basement. 

BASIATIO, Coition. 

BASIATOR, Orbicularis oris. 

BASIL, BUSH, Ocymum caryophyllatum— 
b. Cipron, Ocymum basilicum— b. Common, 
Ocymum basilicum — b. Small, Ocymum caryo- 
phyllatum — ^b. Wild, ChenOpodium vulgare — 
b. Wild, Cunila mariana. 

BASILAR, Basila'ris, Bas'ilary, (F.) Basi^ 
laire* That which belongs to the base, from 
(fs(0>ic, 'base.' This name has been given to 
several parts, which seem to serve as bases to 
others. The sacrum and sphenoid have been 
hence so called. 

Basilar Aktbry, A, basUa'risy A, cerviea'- 
lis, (P.) Arttre ou Tronc basUaire, A. mesoed- 
phalique (Ch.) The union of the two vertebral 
arteries. It ascends along the middle groove 
on the inferior surface of me tuber, and is sup- 
ported, beneath, by the Fossa basilaris. It ter- 
minates in the posterior cerebral arteries. 

Basilar Fossa, (F.) Oouttiire ou Posse ba* 
silairSy is the upper surface of the basilary pro- 
cess,— so called because it is channeled like a 
Fossa or Gutter, The Tuber annulare rests 
upon it. 

Basilar Process, Proees^sus bctsila'ris ossis 
oceip'itis, P. eunsifor'vUs ossis oecip'itis, (F.) 
Apophyse Basilaire, Prolongement sous-occi- 
pital, Cu'neiform Process, is the bony projec- 
tion, formed by the inferior angle of tne os oc- 
cipitis, which is articulated with the sphenoid. 

Basilar Sinus, Sinus transversus. 

Basilar Surpace, (F.) Surface Basilaire, is 
the inferior surface of the process. It is covered 
by the mucous membrane of the pharynx. 

Basilar Vertebra. The last vertebra of 
the loins. 

BASlLlC,Basil'icus,fTom (laeiltMot,* royal.' 
This name wa^ given, by the ancients, to parts 
which they conceived to play an important r6le 
in the animal economy. 

Basiuc Vein, Vena Beuil'iea, V, Cu'biti in- 



BASILIC COMXtm 



106 



BATH 



tatUs of Chaussier. This vein is one of those 
on which tiie operation of blood-letting is per- 
formed. It is situate at the internal part of the 
fold of the elbow, in front of the humeral arte- 
ry, and is formed bv the anterior and postirior 
cubital v0itu, and by the median hanUc* It 
terminates, in the arm-pit, in the axillary vein. 
The ancients thought, that the basilic of the 
right arm had soma connexion with the liver, 
and hence they called it fupatie. The vein of 
the left arm, for a similar reason, they called 
gplmie. The M»diem Basilie Vein, (F.) Veins 
medians ha&ili^pUf is one of the branches of the 
preceding vein. It joins the median cephalic at 
an acute angle, or rather by a transverse branch, 
and receives some branclMS of the deep radial 
and cubital veins, and a conaiderable subcuta- 
neous vei|k — ^the eommen median* 

BASILIC COMMUNy Ocymum basiliciim 
— 6. Sautfoge^ gra$tdy Chenopodium vulgare. 

BASIL'ICON, BasiNeum. < JEtoyal,' or of 
great virtue. An ointment, composed of yel- 
low wax, black pitch, and resin, of each one 
part, olive oil, four parts. Hence it was called 
Vngu&n^tum Teiraphar*maeum, (rt rpa^o^^axa, 
< four drugs.') — Celsus. Scribonius Largus. 

Basiliooh, Basilieitmy of the Parisian Codex, 
is the Onguent de Poix et ds Cire, In most 
PharmacopoBias, it is represented by the TTn- 
gmn'tum or Cera'twn Ren'na. It is used as 
a stimulating ointment. See Ceratum Resins, 
and Unguentum Resins Nigra. 

BASILICUM, Basilicon, Ocymum Basilicum 
— ^b. Citratum, Ocymum basilicum— b. Majus, 
Ocymum basilicum. 

BASILISCUS, Syphilia. 

BASIO-CERATO-CHONDRO-GLOSSUS, 
Hyoglossus. 

BA'SIO-CER'ATO-OLOSSUS, from paoi^^ 
'base,' xf^ac, <comu,' and yXwaaay < tongue.' 
A name given to « part of the hvoglossus, 
which 18 inserted into the comu of tne os hy- 
oides and base of the tongue* 

BASIOCES'TRUM, from /t««-if, 'the base,* 
and «<tf-r^a, < a dart.' An instrument for open- 
ing the head of the foetus in utero, invented by 
Mesler, a German. * 

BA'SIO-GLOS'SHS, Hypeeloglos'stu^ Byo- 
iasioglossut, Tpseloglos*eu«, from fiaatt^ ' base,' 
and y;iwrtf-tt, < the tongue.' A name formerly 
given to the portion of the hyoglossus which is 
inserted into the l>ase of the os hyoides. — Rio- 
Ian, Thomas Bartholine. See Lingual Muscle. 

BASIO PHARYNG^tJS,from/»o«-ic,«ba«e,' 
and tfoQvy^y ' the pharynx.' A name given to 
some fibres of the constrictor pharyng^ medius. 
— ^Winslow. 

BASIS, See Prescription — b. Cerebri, Base 
of the Brain — ^b. Cordis, Radix cordis — ^b. Cor- 
poris, Sole. 

BASSI-COL'ICA. Nameofa medicine com- 
posed of aromatics and honey. — Scribonius 
Largus. 

BA8SIN, Pelvis— 4. Oeulaire^ ScaphiniQ 
ocnlare. 

BASSINERy to foment. 

BASSINET, Pelvia of the kidney, Ranun- 
culus bulboflus. 

BASSWOOD, Tilia, 

BATA, Musa Paradisiaca. 

BATABASt Solanum. tuberosum. 



BATATAS. The iidiabitants of Pern gave 
this appellation to several tuberous roots, espe- 
cially to the Convolvulu* Bataiae, or Sweet 
Potato, (q. V.) Our word. Potato, comes from 
this. 

BATEMAN'S PECTORAL DROPS» see 
Pectoral DroiM, Bateman's. 

BATERION, Bathron. 

BATES'S ANODYNE BALSAM, Liaimen- 
tum saponis et opii. 

BATH, Anglo-Saxon, batt, Balnsum, Bala- 
ne'um, Baline'um, Loutron, (F.) Bain, Iro- 
meraion, or stay, for a longer or shorter dura- 
tion« of the whole or a part oS the body, in some 
medium, as water. Act of plunging into a li- 
quid, sand, or other substance, in which it is 
the custom to bathe. Also, the vessel in which 
the water is put' for bathing. Also^ a pablic or 
private establishment for iMthing. 

In Pharmaefy a vessel, placed over a fire, 
and filled with any substance, into which ano- 
ther vessel is placed, containing matters for di- 
gestion, evaporation, or distillation. 

Bath, Acid, Bal'neum aefidum {Add, mttri- 
at» Ibij : Aqua, cong. brvi. One half, one third, 
or one fourth the quantity of acid is more fre- 
quently employed.) 

Bath, Aik, Hot, see Bath, hot— b. Air, warm, 
see Bath, hot. 

Bath, Alkalins, Bal'newm alhUi*num, This 
may be made of half a pound or a pound of 
pearlash or of carbonate of soda, to sixty-six 
gallons of water. 

Bath, Animal, Balneum Anima'li, conaisU 
in wrapping an animal recently killed, or its 
skin, around the body, or some part of it. 

Bath, Am Tipsoa'ic, JBa/'MtftM» antipeo'ricmm. 
Recommended in cases of itch and other cuta- 
neous diseases. {Potass, sulphuret.^iv, Aqu^y 
cong. Ix.) 

Bath, Aictistphilit'io, Bal'newm antisypki- 
litHevm, Mercu'ria^ bath. Made by diasolving 
from two drachms to an ounce of the corrosiFf 
chloride of mercury in sixty gallons of water. 

Bath, Cold, see Bath, l^t — b. Coo^ see 
Bath, hot. 

Bath, Dry, is one made of ashes, salt, sand, 
&c. The ancients used these frequently for 
therapeutical purposes. 

Bath, Earth, Arenatio. 

Bath, Elbc'tric, (F.) Bain tleetrigue, con- 
sists in placing the person upon an insulated 
stool, communicating, by a metallic wire, with 
the principal conductor of the electrical ma^ 
chin% in action. The Electric Bath producer 
general excitement of all the frinclions, and 
especially of the circulation and secretions.*— 
See Electricity. 

Bath, Foot, Pedilu*viwm, (F.) Bain de-Pisd^ 
a bath for the feet. 

Bath, Gblat'inous, Bal'nsum gelatino'sum. 
Made by dissolving two pounds of gelatin in a 
gallon of «MU0r. 

Bath, Gxnera.^, (F.) Bain Enlist, is one, ia 
which the whole body is plunged, except the 
head; in contradistinction to the partial bati, 
Merobalane'vm, . Merobal'nsum, 

Bath, Half, Semicu'pium, (q. v.) Excatkis!- 
ma, (q. v.) Iness'sio, Inoss'sus, is one adapted 
for half the body. Ohie, for receiving only the 
hips or extremities, is also so called. 

Bath, Haiid, Manulu^vitim, (F.) Bain de 
Main ou MantUuvs, is a bath for the hands. 



BATH, HDXEKAL WATERS OF 107 



BAUXB 



Batr» Hkadj Capkiim^vinm (F.) Bmn de 
Tiu on CapitHuoey a bath for the head. 

B^m, Hip, Coxalu'vium, (F.) Baind^ Fan- 
umij Bain d* Siige, ia ona m which the lower 
part of the trunk and upper part of the thighs 
are immersed. 

Bath, Hot, Balneum Cai'tdrntmy Zettolu'tia^ 
(F.) Bain ekaudy is a hath, the temperature of 
which ia 98^ and upwards; the Warm Batb, 
from 99^ to 98^; the Txpm Bath, (F.) Bain 
TUda, BalHsum tep'idumy from 85^ to 93^; the 
TufPUATs Bath, (F.) Bain TempSrdy from 
75^ to bS^; Ae Cool Bath, (F.) Bain /rM#, 
from 60^ to 75**; the Cold Bath, Balmum 
frig^Hdumy Frigida'riwm, (F.) Bain /raid, Bain 
iris fmdy (of some,) from dO^ to &S^\ and the 
Yapour Bath, Balntumvape'rity (F.) Bain de 
Vapamry Mtwoe Bnmmde, from IW* to 130°, and 
opwaids. See Vaporarimn. A Warm Air 
BU.TB, or Hot Air Bath, consists of air the 
tenqieimtiire of which ia raised. 

BiATH,. Mkd'xoatxd, Bolnsum MMea^tum, 
(F.) Bain medUinal, is a bath, formed of decoe* 
tioos or infoaiona of regetaible substances, or of 
an7 ingredient, introduced into the water for 
therapeatical parpoaea. 

Bath, Mbrcuriai^ Bath, antisyphilitic — b. 
If itro-moriatic acid, Scott's acid bam. 

Bath, SAim, BeUneuwt Are^ntt, (F.) Bain ds 
SaiUy consists ofa Tessel filled with sand, and 
placed oTer the fire. Into this Tessel, the one 
is put which contains the substance to be eva- 
porated* See Psammismus. 

Bath, Sra Watkr, Balmmm Mar^ia, (F.) 
Bain Maris, consists ofa vessel filled with boil- 
ing sea water, or salt water, in which the ves- 
sel is placed, that contains the substance to be 
evaporated. Bain Marie, is, however, at the 
preaent day employed for any form of water 

Bath, Showsr, Impiu'vium, is one in which 
the water is made to fall like a shower on the 
body. See Douche. 

Bath, Stxah, mav be formed by introducing 
steam into a properly closed vessel in plaae of 
water, as in the water bath. 

Bath, Tempbratr, see Bath, hot — ^b. Tepid, 
lee Bath, hot — ^b. Vapour, see Bath, hot, and 
Vaponrinm— b. Warm, see Bath, hot. 

Bathing is much employed in the treatment 
of disease. The cold bath, especially the cold 
•ea bath, is a sedative and indirect tonic : the 
wann bath is a relaxant; and the hot bath a 
stimnlsnt. 

The regular use of the bath is extremely con- 
ducive to health ; but if too much indulged in, it 
is apt to produce injurious effects. 

BATH, MINERAL WATERS OVy^AqutB 
Batko'nia vel Bad*ixm,Aqua SolisyAquteBad'^ 
igua. Celebrated thermal springs at Bath, in 
Engknd. They contain but little impregna- 
tion, and are chiefly indebted to their tempera- 
ture, from 112^ to 117° Fahrenheit, for their 
■tility. The main ingredients are sulphate of 
Ums, chloride of sodium, sulphate of soda, car- 
bonate of lime, protoxide of iron, free carbonic 
add and azote. 

These waters are em^oyed in the most hete- 
rogeneous cases; and are serviceable where the 
ample thermal springs are indicated, as in rhan- 
nstism, paralysis, he. 



BATHER, Same etpion; BaineO'riusy Bali- 
nea'tor, Balnsa'tor, (F.) BaigTteur. One who 
bathes. Anciently, the name wac given ta 
those that administered baths to the diseased,— 
the JUuvistes of the French. 

BATHMIS,BikA«hi#,< base, support.' The 
cavity of a bone, which receives the eminence 
of another; and especially the two Foeeettef at 
liie inferior extremity of the humerus into 
which the processes of the ulna are received, 
during the flexion and extension of the forearm. 

BATHRON, Bathrum Hippot/ratis, Seam^ 
num Etppoe'ratia (q. v.^ Bate'riony 'a step, a 
ladder.' (F.) Banc d^Bippoerate, An in^ 
strument, used for the extension of a limb, in 
cases of fracture or luxation. The description 
of it is found in Galen,' Oiibaaius, and S<»iltt- 
tua, with a figure. 

BATHRUM HIFPOCRATIS^ Bathion. 

BATIA, Retort. 

BATISSE, MINERAL WATERS OF. Ba- 
tisse is three leagues from Clermont in France. 
The water is tepid, and contains subcarbonate 
and sulphate of so^ sulriiates of lime and iron, 
muriate of magnesia, and carbonate of lime. 

BATOS, Rubus Idaeus. 

BATRACHUS, Rannla. 

BATTALISM'US, Battat^t'musy from jfor- 
raCiir, <to stammer.' Balbuties (q. v.^ Stam- 
mering with incapacity to pronounce tae R. 

BATT'ALUS, Bat'tanuy same etymon. A 
stanmierer, a stutterer. 

BATTARISMUS, Battalismus. 

BATTARUS, Battalus. 

BATTATA YIRGINIANA, Sokmim tube- 



SATTEMENa JDOUBLSSy see Brwii dn 

Cnur fated » 

BATTEMENTy Pulsation. 

BAUDRICOURT, MINERAL WATERS 
OF. Baudriconrt is a town of France, two 
leagues and a half from Mirecourt. The wa- 
ters are sul|dittreoaB. 

BAUDBUCHESyCoDidam. 

BAUHIN, VALVE OF, Valve o/Tuwius, F. 
ef Fallopius, Y. o/ Varquxts, H'eo-eaeai Vaivt, 
nea-eolie Valve, Val'vttla llei, Val'vula CoHy F. 
Ceeeiy Oper'eulum Ueiy Sphincter liei. This 
name is given to the valve situate transversely 
at the place where the ileum o«>ens into thie 
ccecum, and which Banhin says he discovered 
at Paris, in 1759. It had, however, been pre- 
viously described by several anatomists; as by 
Vidus Vidius, Postius, &e. 

BAUMEy Balsam— 6. d^Aciery Balsam, cha- 
lybeate — b. Aromatique, Balsam, aromatic — h. 
d*Aiguillesy Balsam, chalybeate — b. Apoplee- 
tique, Balsam, apoplectic — b, d'Areansy Arcaeus, 
balsam of; see, also. Balsam of Arcsua— A. 
d'Areiua, Uttguentom elemi compositum — b. 
Benjsiny Benjamin — b, Blancy see Amyris 
Opobalsamum — b, du Brhily Copaiba—^, ds 
Canaday see Pinus balsamea — b* de Canneile, 
Laurus cinnamomom — 5. de Carpathie, Balsam 
of Carpathia—^. ds Carthaghney See Toluifera 
balsamum — ft. d* Constantinople blanCy aee 
Amyris opobalsamnm — b, de Copahuy Copaiba 
— b. Cordiale ds Sennerte, Balsam, cordial, of 
Sennertus — b. d'Eau d feuilles rideesy Mentha 
crispa— &. de Feviilety Balsam, green, of Metz 
— b. de Fioravenii spiritwueey Balsam, spirita- 



BAURAC 



108 



BEDEGAA 



oiiSy of Fionventi-^. de Foweroy oa d4 La^ 
hord0y Baliam of Fourcroy or LaDorde->3. tU 
Chalaad, see Amyru opobalsamnm — h, de Gene- 
vUve^ Baliam of Geneviive— 6. Grande Tana- 
cetum balsamita — b. du Grand Ctdre^ see Amy- 
ris opobalsamum— i. Hypnotique, Balsam, hyp- 
notic— &. Spstiriqu4f Balsam, hysteric— £. des 
Jar<^tn«, Mentha viridis — b.de Luca^«/, Balsam, 
LucatelU's— ^. Nervin, Balsam, nervous — b. de 
I*9rau, see Myroxylon Peruiferum — b. du So' 
mar»Va«», BalMun of the Samaritan — b. Saxtm, 
Balsam, Saxon — b. de Sou/re, Balsam of sul- 
fur — b. de Sympathie, Balsam of sympathy — b, 
TrofiquilUy Balsam, tranquil — b, de Tolu, see 
Toluifera balsamum— ^. de Vunille, Vanilla — 
b. Vert, ftee Fagara octandra-^. Vert de Metz, 
Balsam, green, of Metz — b. de Vie d^Hoffmanriy 
Balsam of Life, of Hoffioaann— 6. de Vie de Le- 
Uhvre, Tinctura aloes composita — 6. Vrai, see 
Amyris opobalsamum — 6. Vulneraire de Min- 
derer. Balsam, vulnerary^ of Mindererus. 

BAURAC, (Arab,) Nitre, or salt in general. 
From this word comes Borax. 

BAURIN, MINERAL WATERS OF. Bau- 
rin is a village four leagues from Roye, depart- 
ment of Somme. The waters are strongly cha- 
lybeate. 

BAVEy (F.) Sali^va ex are Jiuene, Spumay 
Humor Sali'vus. Frothy, thick, viscid saliva, 
issuing from the mouth. This drivelingy or, 
elaveringy (q. V.) we see in children, old peo- 
ple, &c. The term is, also, applied to the 
frothy liquid, which flows from the mouth of 
rabid animals. Sauvages uses it synonymously 
with salivation. 

BAT, CASTOR, Magnolia glauca— b. Rose, 
Rhododendron chrysanthemum-^b. Sweet, Lau- 
ras — ^b. White, Magnolia glauca and M. maero- 
phylla. 

BDALSIS, Sucking. 

BDELLA, Hirudo. 

BDEL^LIUM, Myrrkaimperfee'tay'Bolehony 
Mctdeleony Balehus. A gum-resin, brought 
from the Levant and India, and supposed to be 
obtained from a species of Amyris, Uttle known. 
It is solid, brittle, of a deep brown colour, of 
an acrid and bitter taste, and sweet odour. It 
was much vaunted by the ancients, but is now 
little employed. Two different gum-resins 
have been in the shops distinguished by the 
names Indian and African bdellium, Br. 
Royle was informed that the former was ob- 
tained f^om An^'fris Commiph'ara, growing in 
India and Madagascar. The latter is said to 
be from Heudelo'tia Afriea*nay which grows in 
Senegal. 

BDELLOM'ETER, from /9a«22«, <a leech,' 
and M*T<*'> 'measure.' ^ An instrument, pro- 
posed as a substitute for the leech; inasmuch as 
we can tell the quantity of blood obtained by 
it, whilst we cannot by the leech. It consists 
of a cupping-glass, t« which a scarificator and 
azhausting syringe are attached. 

BDELLUS, Fart. 

BDELYGMIA, Fart. 

BDELYGMTJS, Fart. 

BDESMA, Flatulence. 

BDOLUS, Fart. 

BEAD TREE, Melia Azedarach. 

BEAN, CARTHAGENA, HabiUa de Car- 
thagena — ^b. Egyptian, Nymphaea nelumbo— b. 
French, Phaseolus vulgaris — ^b. Garden, com- 
mon, Yieia fhbo— b* Kidney, Phaseolus vulga- 



ris-— b. Malacca, A vicennia tomentoaar^. Pan* 
tic, Nymphasa nelttmbo*-b. Red, Abrna precar 
torius— rb. Sacred, Nelumbinm luteum^ — b. St. 
Ignatius's, Ignatia amara— b. Trefoil tree, see 
Cytisine. 

BEAN TREE, WHITE, Gratagus aria. 

BEARBERRY, Arbutus uva ursi. 

BEARD, Barba, PogoUy Genei'on, Barbi*ti- 
um, (F.) Barbe. The hair which covers a part of 
the cheeks, the lips, and chin of the male sex, 
at the age of puberty. 

BEAR'S BREECH, Acanthus mollis— b. 
Foot, Helleborus fcetidus— b. Fright, Heptallon 
graveolens— b. Whortleberry, Arbutua uva 
ursi. 

BEARWEED, Yeratrum viride. 

BEASTINGS, Colostrum. 

BEATING OF THE HEART, see Heart. 

BEAUGENC Y, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Beaugency is a quarter of a league from Or- 
leans. The waters contain subcarbonate of 
soda, iron, magnesia, and lime. They aere tonic 
and aperient. 

BEAUMONT ROOT, GUlenia trifoliata. 

BEAUYAIS, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
These waters are chalybeate. Beauvaia is in 
Pieardie, 

BE AYER, Castor fiber— b. Wood, Magnolia 
glauca— b. Tree, Magnolia macrophylla. 

BEBEERIA, see ^ebeeru. 

BEBEERINE, see Bebeeru. 

BEBEERU, Sipeeri. A tree of British Gui- 
ana, Which yields two alkalies — Bebeerin, Be- 
beeri'na, Bebee'ria, and Sipeerine; and in its 
properties resembles the Cinchona. It has been 
referred to Noctan'dra Rodiei, The timber of 
the tree is known to ship builders by the name 
greenheart. The Sulphate o/Bebeerin has been 
employed in intermittents. 

BEC, (F.) Rostrum, (q. v.) Beak. This name 
has been applied to various parts. 

BEC CORACOII>IEN,{¥.) Cor*acoidbeai, 
is the end of the coracoid process. Bee de la 
plume a eerire, (F.) BeaJh of the Calamus Scrip- 
to'riusy is a small cavity at the superior part of 
the medulla oblongata, which forms part of the 
4th ventricle. 

BEC BE CXTILLERy Htmfulue, An instru- 
ment used for the extraction of balls. It con- 
sists of an iron rod, 7 or 8 inches long, having 
iX one eztremitv a small cavity, into which the 
ball is received to be drawn outwards. Sea 
Cochleariforaus. 

BEC DE GRUE MXTSQUA, Geranium Mos- 
chatum — ft. de Grue Robertin, Geranium Ro- 
bertianum — b, de Likvre, Harelip. 

BEC (Lb,) mineral WATERS OF. Bee 
is six leagues from Rouen in Normandy. The 
water is strongly chalybeate. 

BECCABUNGA, Veronica Beccabunga. 

BECHiESTHE'SIS, from fitj^, 'cough,' and 
ai0^ijrif , < sensation.' The excitement or desire 
to cough. 

BECHIA, Tussis. 

BECHIAS, Tussis. 

BE'CHIC, Be'chieay Seeha, Be&ekiea, Be'- 
chitoy from jiq^, < cough,' (F.) Biehigue* Me- 
dicines adapted for allaying cough. 

BECHITA, Bechic. 

BECHIUM, Tussilago. 

BECHORTHOPNCEA, Pertussis. 

BECUIBA, Ibicuiba. 

BED'EGAR, Bedeguar^ Bedeguard; Spon- 



BEDFORD, MINERAL WATERS OF 109 



BENEDICTUM 



gia Cynos'haitj Fungu* Rosa'rum^ F» Cynos^- 
iaiif (F.) Pomme mou^snUe, sponge d^eglan- 
tier. An excreseence, which makes its appear- 
ance on different species of wild roses, and which 
is produced by the ponctnre of a small insect, — 
the Cyniys Rmib, It was formerly employed 
as a lithontripticand vermifuge, but is not now 
used. It was slightly astringent. 

BEDFORD, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Bedford is a Tillage, situate on the great West- 
ern Turnpike road from PhiladelpUa Ko Pitts- 
burg, a few milea east of the chief elevation of 
the Alleghany mountains. There are various 
springs, saline, chalybeate and sulphureous.— 
The most celebrated contains carbonic acid, 
sulphate of magnesia, chlorides of sodium and 
calcium, and carbonate of iron. ^ 

BEDSTRAW, Galium verum— b. Ladies, 
greater, Galium moUugo, Galium ^erum. 

BEE, Smx^,\)eo.ApisyMelU'tayM€littay (F.) 
AbeUU* This insect was formerly exhibited, 
when dried and powdered, as a diuretic* 

BEEBREAD, Propolis. 

BEECH, Fagns sylvatica— b. Drop, Oroban- 
che Virginiana — ^b. Albany, Pterospora Andro- 
medea — ^b. Mast, see Fagus sylvatica. 

BEER, Cerevisia— b. Pipsissewa, see Pyrola 
nmbelli|ta« 

BEET, Beta. 

BiGAIEMENTy Balbuties. 

BEGMA, (SnYf^y according to some Bregma^ 
Pviffta, from|h^r0vi>or ^i^osiv, <to expectorate 
after coughing.' Cougmng ; also, the sputum or 
expectorated matter^ — Hippocrates. 

BEGONIA. The Begonia grandifio'ra and 
B. tomento'sa have astringent roots, which are 
used in Pern in cases of hemorrhage, scurvy, 
bw fevers, &c. 

BtGUE, Balbus. 

BEBEN ABIAJOy Centaurea behen— 5. Al- 
bum, Centanrea behen — b. Officinarum, Cucu- 
bal nsbe hen — A. Rouge, Statice limonium. 

BEHMEN ACKMAR, Statice limonium. 

BEIAHALALEN, Sempervivum tectorum. 

BEIDELSAR, Asclepias proceia. 

BEJUIO, Habilk de Carthagena. 

BELA-ATE or BE-LAHE. A tonic and 
astringent bark of a Madagascar tree. Du-pe- 
tit-TlMuars and Sonnerat think it may be sub- 
stituted for the Simarouba. 

BEL AD AMBOC . A species of convolvulus 
of the Malabar coast, which contains an acrid 
milky juice. From this a liniment is formed 
with oil and ginger, which is used against the 
bites of rabid animals. 

BE-LAHE, Bela-aye. 

BEL A-MODAG AM. A kind of Seavola of 
the Malabar coast, the leaves of which are con- 
sidered diuretic and emmenagogue.- 

BELANDKE, (F.) A Utter, surrounded 
with curtains, in which patients are sometimes 
carried to hospitals. 

BELCHING, Eructation. 

BELEMNOID, Belenoid. 

BELEMNOIDES PROCESSUS, Styloid pro- 



BEL'ENOID, BEL'ONOID,.BEL'EMNOID 
or BEL'OID, Belenoi^des or Behmftoi'des Pro- 
ee/sus, from |9f 2«c, 'an arrow,' and ii^c, 'shape.' 
This name has been given to the styloid pro- 
cesses in general — Processus helencrL'des. 

BELESON, Balsam, Musssnda frondosa* 

BELILLA, Muasmda frondosa. 



BELINtJM, Apinm Graveolens. 

BELI OCULUS, Belloculus. 

BELL, CANTERBURY, Campanula tra- 
chelium. 

BELLADON'NA, in the Pharmacopeia of 
the United States, is the officinal name of the 
leaves of Atropa Belladonna, (q. v.) 

BELLE DAME, Atropa belladonna. 

BELLEGU, Myrobalanus. 

BELLEREGI, Myrobalanus. 

BELLESME, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Bellesme is about three leagues from Montagne 
in Ff abce. The waters are chalybeate. 

BELLET, MINERAL WATERS OF. The 
waters at Belief, department of Ain, in France, 
are saline aperients. 

BELLIDOIDES, Chrysanthemum leucan- 
themum*'. 

BELLIS, Bellus ('pretty,') B, peren'nts, B. 
fiUnor, Bruisewort, Common Daisy, (F.) Po- 
^uertUe vivace, petite Marguerite » The leaves 
and flowers are rather acrid. They were, at 
one time, considered to cure different species of 
wounds. It is called also Sym'phytum min'» 



Bxujs MjlJob, Chrysanthemum leucantbe* 
mum. 

BELL METAL, Cal'eocos, (F.) Airain, 
Metal des eloekes. An alloy of copper, zinc, 
tin, and a small quantity of antimony, used for 
making bells. The mortars of the apothecary 
are often formed of this material. They re« 
quire to be kepi dean, to avoid the formation 
of verdigris. 

BELLOCULUS, BeH Oo'ulus, A kind of 
gem, which the Assyrians considered effica- 
cious in the eure of many diseases. They ima- 
gined that the figure of an eye could be seen in 
it, and hence its name, Bel^s Eye, 

BELLON^ Colic, metallic. 

BELLOTAS, see Ilex major. 

BELLOWS' SOUND, Bruit de soujfiet^h. 
Encephalic, see Bruit de souffiet — b. Placental, 
Bruit plaeentaire, 

BELLUS, Belli*. 

BELLY-ACHE, Colicar^b. Dry, Colic, me- 
tallic — ^b. Root, Angelica lucida. 

BELLY-BAND» Belt, Russian. 

BELMUSCHUS, Hibiscus abelAioschus. 

BELNILEG, Myrobalanus. . 

BELOID, Belenoid. 

BELOIDES PR0CESSUS,Styloidprocet8es. 

BELONE, Needle. 

BELONODES, Styloid. 

BELONOID, Belenoid.- 

BEL'S EYE, Belloculus. 

BELT, RUSSIAN, Ventrafli, vulgarly, Bel- 
ly-hand. Abdominal supporter. A broad ban- 
(&ge applied to the abdomen, so as to support, 
and make methodical pressure upon it. 

BELUL'CUM, from fitXot, 'a dart,' and 
'fU», 'I draw out.' An instrument used for 
extracting darts or arrows. Many instruments 
of this kind have been noticed by surgeons. — 
Ambrose Par6, Fabricius ab Acquapendente« 

BELZOE, Benjamin. 

BELZOIM, Benjamin. 

BELZOINUM, Benjamin. 

BEN, Guilandina moringa — ^b. of Jadsa, 
Benjamin — ^b. Nat, Guilandina moringa. 

BENATH, Pustule. 
I BENEDICTUM LAXATIVUM, Confectio 
Isemue. 



BiNiFKm 



uo 



IffiTA 



BJtNAPICE DB LA NATURE, Benefi- 
cium natunB— &. de VtUf^ jee Beneficium na- 
tone. 

BENEFICIUM NATU^iE, (F.) 2?«W/m 
d0 la nature. This term is uied by the French 
pethologUte, for cases, in which diseases have 
got well without medical treatment. With 
them, Bin4jh$ 44 nature, m B,de venire, is 
synonymous also with Alv* Proftu'vium; — a 
spontaneous diarrfacsa, often acting favourably 
either in the prevention or cure of disease. ' 

BENEL, Croton raeemosum. 

BENEOLENS, from bsM, 'well/ and 
oUrt, <to smell.' Euo'dee, Suaveolens, A 
sweet-scented medicine, as gums, &c. 

BEN6, Bangue. 

BEN6ALE INDORUM, Calsuamniar. 

BENGAL ROOT, Cassumuniar. 

BENOI, Hyoscyamus. 

BENIGN', Benig^nut, Euetk'es, (F.) Bdnin, 
BinigTu, Diseases of a mild character are so 
called : as well as med^cipes whose action 
not violent, as a Benign Fever, PehrU Unig'na 
impuftrie, &c. 

BENIN, Benign. 

BEN'JAMIN, Btn'gQtn, Benzo'innm, (Ph< 
U. S.) Benzo'tnum verum, Benzo'inum, Aesa 
odorafta, Benjui, Benfuin, A»sa duleia, Ben'- 
Jaoy, B9njo*inmn, Belzoi, Beiz&im, Ben*go9, 
Stf'raeie Benxo'ini Bal^eamum, Liquor Cyre» 
mfaeue, Croton Benzoi, Ben of Judm'a, Aeor 
Bonzi/inus, 8cU A^'idwn seu eetentia^U seu 
volafUi Benzoics, (F.) Benioin, Baume Benjoin, 
Aeta doux. A resinous, dry, brittle substance, 
obtained from Styrax Benzoin, Arbor Benivi, 
of Sumatra. The odour is extremely fragrant, 
and taste slightly aromatic. It is jmneipaliy 
used for the preparation of the acid which it 
contains. It is also employed in some vulne- 
rary tinctures, and as an expectorant. Benzoic 
Acid, A^'idum B^nzo'ieum, is obtained from it 
by sublimation. The purest Benjamin is in 
amygdaloid masses: hence called (F.) Bsnjoin 
amfgdalolde. 

Bxm'jaxiii, Flo wees or, Benzo'io Add, 
Ae"idum B&nzo'icum, JPlores Ssnzois, Flores 
Benzo'ini, Ac"idum Bsnzo'isum per suhlima- 
Uo'nem, (F.) Aeide Benzoiqus. This acid ex- 
ists in all ^ balsams, but chiefly in Benzoin, 
from which it is obtained by sublimation. It 
is in vanilla, canella, the urine of infants, 
and of herbivorous animals. Its odour is aro- 
matic and fragrant; taste hot, slightly acidulous, 
and agreeable. The crystals consist of white, 
satiny flakes, slightly mietlle. It is probably 
stimulant; and hu been used, as such, in chronic 
catarrh; but it has httle eiRcacy. 

BENJA07, Benjamin. 

BENJOINUM, Benjamin. 

BENJUI, Benjamin. 

BEN MOENJA. A Malabar tree. An 
alexipharmic decoction is made of its roots, in 
the country, v^ich is much praised in cases of 
malignant fever. Its bark, boiled with CoUih 
mut aromatieus and salt, forms a decoction 
used in bites of poisonous serpents. 
BENNE, Sesamum orientale. 
BENNET, HERB, Geum urbanum and G. 
Tirginianum. 

BENOiTE, Geum urbanum-4. Aquatiqus, 
Geum rivale— h, dee RuisseauXt Geum rivale 
— b, ds VirginUy Geum Yirginianum. 



BENZOE, Benjamin. 

BENZOENIL, VanUla. 

BENZOIN, Benjamin— b. Odorifemm, Lan- 
ms Benzoin. 

BERBERINE, see Oxrcantha Galeni. 

BERBERIS, Oxvcantha Galeni— b. Cstt- 
denais, see Oxvcantha Galani. 

BERCE, Heracleum spondylium. 

BERENDAROS, Ocymum basilicum* 

BERENICE, Succinum. 

BERENICIUM, Potasss nitras. 

BERENISECUM, Artemisia vulgaris. 

BERGAMOTE, Bergamot'ta, (F.) Bsrgth 
motte. A small orange, of a Yery agreeable 
taste ; and peculiar odour. From its bark sd 
oil, Olsum Berga'mU, (Ph. U. S.) is obtained, 
which is much employed as a perfiime, and 
sometimes in medicme. 

BERIBERI, Beribe'ria, Syn'elonms Bertie'^ 
ria, Indosyn'elonus, Paral'ysis Ber*iberi, from 
beri in the Singhalese language, which aignifiei 
< weakness;' therefore, beriUri, < great weak- 
ness.' This word is also said to be Hinda- 
sthanee, and to mean a #ib«0j9.-^Bontius. Beri- 
beri is an Indian disease, little known in En- 
rope. It consists in debility and tremors of 
the liijibsr-'Semetimes, indeed, of the vdiole 
body; with painful numbness of the sdiected 
parts, &C.: — ^the patient walking doubled; «ad 
imitating the movements of sheep! Some au- 
thors have esteenied it rheumatic; otiiers, para- 
lytic ; others, to be a kind of chorea. It is, al- 
most always, incurable ; is rarely fatal; and is 
treated by exercise, stimulant frictions, sodori- 
fics, &c. It is sometimes called Bar^bizrs, but 
this would seem to be a different disease. 

BERICOCCE, Prunusarmeniaca. 

BERLE NODIPLORE, Slum, 

BERLXTE, Metamorphopsia. 

BERMU'DAS, CLIMATE OF. Pnlmonary 
invalids are occasionally sent to Bermoda, but 
the principal objection to a winter residence 
there, is the prevalence of strong winds ; espe- 
ciallv of the dry, sharp, and cold north-west 
winds, durinc tlie winter and spring. Still, it 
affords a good winter retreat for the phthisicd, 
from any part of the United States, provided 
due- care be selected in choosing a suitable lo- 
cality. The neighbourhood of Hamilton has 
been strongly recommended with this view. 

BERNARD THE HERMIT, CanceUns. 

BERRIES, INDIAN, see Menispermum eoc- 
cuius — ^b. Turkey, yellow, see Piper cubeba. 

BERS. A sort of electuary* composed. of 
pepper, seed of the white fayoscyainus, opium, 
euphorbium, safiron, &c. The Egyptians used 
it as an. excitant. — Prospero Alpini. 

BERU,MINERAL WATERSOF. Beraisin 
Champagne, France. The waters are slightly 
chalybeate. 

BESASA, Ruta. 
BESICLES, Spectacles. 
BESOIN, Want— ^. de Reapirer, see Want 
— b. de la Vie, Necessary of life. 

BESSANEM. A word used by Avicenna, 
for redness of the skin, limbs, and fince) pro- 
doeed by the action of cold. 

IIISV^, is««Gemenus. 

BETA. The Beet, Sie'ula, (F.) Bms^JBet- 
terave, jPomm^, Chenopoden. Seo!,Syet,Peik' 
tandria Dig3mia. A genus of plants, of which 
the following are the chief varieties. 



BETEL 



111 



BEZOARDICUM 



Beta Ht'brida, Root of Scarcity . Root red, 
(Hitside; white, within. Very natritive; yields 
sugar. 

Beta Yttloa'ris Alba, White Sect. TThe 
root yields sugar, and the leaves are eaten as a 
snhstitute for spinach. 

Beta Yui^A'ais Rttiisa, Red Beet. Root red 
and nntritive; yields a small quantity of sugar. 

BETEL, Piper BeteL A species of pepper, 
cultiTSted in several parts of India. The In- 
draos sre in the habit of chewmg the leaves 
with lime and areca; and they give the name 
Betel to this preparation. It is used in all the 
eqnatoriftl countries of Asia. Betel is said to 
be tonic and astringent. It is also called Bette^ 
Bitre , Betl e. See Areca. 

BETHROOT, Trillium latifoliuro—b. Broad- 
leaf, Trillium latifolium. 

BATISE, Dementia. 

MTOINB, Betonica officinalis--^, dee Mon- 
tagnee^ Amica xnontana — h, dee S(tvoffardey 
Anuca montana. 

B^2Y7iV, Coloetnmi. 

BETONICA AQUATICA; 3crophnlaria 
aqoatica. 

Beton'ica Offxciha'lis^ Ceatron^ Betonfiea 
fwrpu'rea^ Veton^ica Cordi, fcc, Bet*anf, Wood 
Betonpy Psychot'rophuimy Veroni'ca purpu^rea^ 
{f.)BHoine, Family, LMaXtB. Se».Syet, Didy- 
ramia Gymnospermia. Betony Was in muck 
esteem amongst the ancients, who employed 
the flowers and leaves, in decoction, in gout, 
sciatica, cephalalgia, &c. It was so cidled, 
according to Pliny, from being in great repute 
among the Yettones, or Bettones, an ancient 
peopte of Spain. Antonius Musa is said to have 
written a volume in praise of it; recommending 
it in no less than 47 different diseases. It has, 
however, little or no virtue. The leaves are 
said to be aperient, and the root emetic. 

BiToificA Pauli, Yeronica. 

BETONY, Betonica officinalis— b. PanPs, 
Lycopna Yirginicus — ^b. Water, Scrophularia 
aqnatica— b. Wood, Betoniea officinalis. 

BkTRE, Betel. 

BETTEy Beta. 

BETTERAVE, Beta. 

BETULA ALBA. The Birch, (F.) Bon- 
ffou eommun. The young leaves are slightly 
odorons, astringent, and bitter. They are ap- 
plied to wounds and ulcers. They have been 
regarded as antiscorbutic and anthelmintic. 
The tree furnishes a saccharine juice, which is 
considered antiscorbutic and diuretic. 

BsTuiji Lbnta) Se^eet Birch, Black Birch, 
Cherry Birch, Monntain Mahogany, is an 
American species, the bark aAd leaves of whieh 
^▼e the smell and taste of (raultheria procum- 
l>«nS' An infusion is sometimes made of them, 
and used as an excitant and diaphoretic. The 
volatile oil is nearly if not wholly identical 
with that of Gaultheria. 

BEURRE, Butter— 5. de Bamhouc, Butter 
of bambone— 6. de Cacao, Butter of cacao-^. 
*<« Coco, Butter of cocoa— d. Vegetate, Persea 
gitisBima. 

BEUVRIGNT, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
wnvrigny is in the vicinity of Bayeuz in Nor- 
o»ndv. The vwiter is chalybeate. 

BtVTTE, Diplopia. 

BEX, Tussi*— b. ConvuUiva, Pertussis — ^b. 
Hninida, Expectoration— b. Theriodes, Per- 



BEXIS, Tnssis. 

BEXU'GO. Under this name, a purgative 
root was formerly introduced into ^urope 
from Peru. It is supposed to have been the 
root of a Hlppocratea. 

BEZ'OAR, Bes^aar, Bea^ehard, Pa'zahar, 
from Persian Pa, * against,^ and zahar, < poi- 
son.' Ijapie Bezoar'dicus, Cal*ctUue Best! oar, 
Enterol'ithtu Bezoar'dus, Bezoard. A calcu- 
lous concretion, found in the stomach, intes- 
tines, and bladder of .animals. Wonderful vir- 
tues were formerly attributed to these Bezoars. 
There were two great varieties: the Bez*oar 
orierUa'U, An'imal Bezoar^ticum oricTUe^li, 
formed in the fourth stonxach of the gazelle of 
India {Gazel'la In'dicd, or rather Antil'opl cer- 
vica'pra ;) and the Bez'oar oceidenta'U, Animal 
Bezoar'ticum oceidentafli, found in the fourth 
stomach of the wild goat or chamoie of Peru. 
These substances were esteemed to be power- 
ful alezipharmics ; but the former was the more 
valued. It was believed, that no poison, and 
no eruptive, pestilential, or putrid disease could 
resist its influence. As so many virtue^ were 
ascribed to' it, other animal concretions were 
substituted for it; and factitious Bezoards were 
made of crab's eyes and claws, bruised and 
mixed with musk, ambergris, &c. 

Bxz'oAR Bovi'wuM, (F.) Bizoard de Betuf, 
Bezoard of the beef, A concretion formed in 
the fourth stomach of beeves; also, a biliary 
calculus found in the gall-bladder. 

BxzoAE EQ17INT7M, Bczoard of the horse — b. 
Hystricis, Bezoard of the Indian porcupine. 

Bxz'oARD OF Cathan. This was once much 
prized. It is now unknown. 

BAZOABD d'ALLEMAGNE, JBgagro- 
phila. 

Bkz'oard of the Chamois, Horsb, Bezoar 
equifnum, Hippofithue^ &c., exhibits its origin 
in the name. 

Bez'oahj) of thx Indian Por'cvpinx, Bez- 
oar Hye'trieie, Lapie Porci'nue, Lapis Malu- 
con'sis, Petro del Poreo, (F.) Bezoard de Pore 
Epic, was formerly the dearest of all the Be- 
zoards, and was sold at an. enormous price in 
Spain and Portugal. 

Bbz'oaiu> Mineral, Antimoninm diaphoreti- 
cum — ^b. Vegetable, see Calappite. 

BEZOAR'DIC, Bezoar'dieue, (F.) Bizoar^ 
dique; concerning the bezoard. Bezoard ic 
medicines are those supposed to possess the 
same properties with the bezoard; as antidotes, 
alexiteria, alexipharmics, icordials. 

BEZOARDICA RADIX, Dorstenia contra- 
yerva. 

BEZOARDICUM SATUROT. A pharma- 
ceutical preparation, regarded by the ancients 
as antihysteric. It was formed of protoxide of 
lead, butter of antiinony, and nitric acid. 

Bbzoar'dicum Huka'ntjm. Urinary calculi 
were formerly employed under this name as 
powerful alexipharmics^ 

Bxzoar'dicum Jovia 'lr. a sort of greenish 
powder, used as a diaphoretic, and formed of 
antimony, tin, mercury, and nitric acid. 

Bezoar'dicitm LuNA'Rfi. A medicine for- 
merly regarded as a specific in epilepsy, con- 
vulsions, megrim, &c. It was prepared of ni- 
trate of silver, and butter of antimony. 

Bbzoar'd^ux Martia'lX. A tonic medi- 
cine, used by the ancients in diarrhoea. It was 



BI 



119 



BILE 



prepared from the tntoxide of iron and batter 
of antimony. 

Bbzoar'dicum M£RCURiA'Li. A medicine, 
formerly vaonted as an antisyphilitic, and pre- 
pared from the mild chloride of mercury, but- 
ter of antimony, and nitric acid. 

BxzoAB^DXCuM Miicbra'le; the deutozide of 
antimony; so called, because its properties 
were suppiosed to resemble those of animal be- 
zoard. 

Bbzoar'dioux SoLA'ai. A diaphoretic me- 
dicine, prepared of gold filings, nitric acid, and 
butter of antimony. 

Bezoar^icum Vsif ^srxs. a pharmaceutical 
preparation, formerly employed in lepra, dis- 
eases of the brain, &c.; and which was made 
from filings of copper, butter of antimony, and 
nitric acid. 

BI, as a prefix to words, has the same signi- 
fication as Di. 
BIAIOTHANATI, Biothanati. 
BIBITORIUS, Rectus intemus ocnli. 
BIBLIOGRAPHY, MEDICAL, firom/J»/W»<, 
< a book,* and rco9«, < I describe.' . Skill in the 
knowledge of medical books. The' most distin- 
guished medical biographers have been : J. A. 
Van dkr Lindrn, Amstelod. 1662, 8vo. (L.) 
M. Lxpxnius, Francf. ad Mom. 1679, fol. (L.) 
G. A. Mkrckuin, Norimb. 16U6, (L.) J. J. 
Manoet, Genev. 16^ to 1731 , (L.) Tarxn (ana- 
tomical,) Paris, 1753, (F.) A. ton Hallsr, 
Zurich, 1774, &c. (L.) Vioiliis von Crkut- 
ZENFELD (surgical,) Vindob. 1781, (L.) C. G. 
KuHN, Lips. 1794, (L.) C. L. Schweickasd 
(anat., phys., and legal medicine,) Stuttgard, 
1796 to l»00, (L.) G. G. Ploucquet, Tubing. 
IdOU to 1814,(L.) C.F.BuRDACH,Gotha, 1810 
to 1821. (G.) J. S. Erscb, (since 1750,) Leipz. 
1822, (G.) Th. Ch. Fr. Enslin, (of Germany, 
since 1750,) Berlin, 1826, (G.) J. B. Mont- 
pa lcon, Paris, 1827, (F.) J. Forbes, M. D., 
F. R. S., London, 1835. A. G. P. Callisen, 
Copenhagen, 1845, (G.) 

BICAUDALIS, Retrahens auris. 
BICAUDATUS, CatMJa'ttM, 'doable-tailed.' 
A monster having two tails. 

BICEPHA'LIUM, DicBpka'Hum. A hybrid 
word, from H and ki^aA^, < head.' Sauvages 
applies this epithet to a very large sarcoma on 
the head, which seems to form a double head. 
BICEPHALUS, Dicephalus. 
BICEPS, from M«, * twice,' and axpuf , < head.' 
That which has two heads. This name has 
been particularly given to two muscles; one 
belonging to the arm, the other to the thigh. 

Biceps Exter'nus, Mus'oulus. The long 
portion of the Triceps Braehia'lu, — ^Douglas. 

Biceps Flexor Cruris, Biceps Cruris^ Bi- 
cepsy (F.) Biceps Crurai, Biceps Fem'oriSy Is'- 
chio'fem'oro pironier — (Ch.) A muscle on the 
posterior part of the thigh; one head arising 
from the tuberosity of the ischium, and the 
other from a great part of the linea aspera. It 
is inserted into the top of the fibula. It serves 
to bend the leg on the thigh. 

Biceps Flexor Cu'biti, Biceps Bra'ckU, 
Cor'aco'Tadia'lis, BieepSy Biceps maniiSy Bi^ 
eeps itue/nuSy Biceps inter' 7ius hu'tneri, (F.) 
Seapulo-radial, (Ch.,) — Biceps Brachial, A 
muscle, situate at the anterior and internal part 
of the arm; extending from the edge of the gle- 
noid cavity and from the top of the coracoid 



process to the tuberosity of tha radios. It 
bends the fore^arm upon the arm. 

BICHE DE MERy Sea Slug. A moUus- 
cous animal belonging to the genua Holothuria, 
which is caught amongst the islands of the 
Feejee group. New Guinea, &c., and when pre- 
pared finds a ready sale in Chma, where it is 
used as an ingredient in rich soupa. 

BICHETy Terra Orleana. 

BICHICHli£. Pectoral medieinea> com- 
posed of liquorice juice, sugar, blanched al- 
monds, &c. — Rhazes. 

BICHIOS^Dracunculus. 

BICHO, Diacunculus— b. di Culoj Pxocto- 
cace. 

BICHOS. A Portuguese name for the ipromB 
that get under the toes of peojple in the Indies ; 
and which are destroyed by the oil of the cash- 
ew nut. 

BICIPITAL, from hiceps {his and aaput) 

* two-headed.' Relating to the biceps. 

Bicip'iTAL Groove, (F.) Coulisse on Gout- 
Hire HeipitalCy Coulisse kumerale, (Ch.,) is a 
longitudinal groove, situate between the tube- 
rosities of the OS humeri, which lodges the long 
head of the biceps. 

Bicip'iTAL Tu'BERCLB, Bicipital tuteros'iify 
(F.) Tuberosite bidpitale; — a prominence near 
the upper extremity of the radius, to which the 
tendon of the biceps is attached. 

BICORNE RVDEy Ditrachyceroi. 

'SiQV%'Vl'i>yBicuspida'tusy from «*,« twice,' 
and cuspisy ^a spear.' That which has two 
points or tubercles. 

Bicus'pin Teeth, Dentes Bienspida*ti^ (F.) 
Derus Heuspidiesy the small molares. See 
Molar. 

BIECHO,Bische. 

BlkREy Cerevisia. 

BIESTINGS, Colustrum. 

BIF£MORO'CALCANIEN,G%Atroctiem\\. 

BIFURCA'TION, Bifurca'tioy from Hsy 

* twice,* and furca, * a fork.* Division of a 
trunk into two branches; as the bifurcation of 
the traeheaj aorta, &c. 

BIGASTER, Digastricus. 

BIG BLOOM, Magnolia macrophylla. 

BIGEMINAL BODIES, Quadrigemina tu- 
bercula. 

BIGGAR. A disease of Bengal, remarka- 
ble for the intensity and danger of the cerebral 
symptoms. — Twinmg. 

BIG-LEAF, Magnolia macrophylla. 

BIGLESy see Strabismus. 

BIGNONIA CATALPA, Catalpa. 

Biono'nia In'dica. The leaves are em- 
ployed in India, as emollients, to ulcers. 

BIJON, eee Pinus sylvestris. 

BILAZ AY, MINERAL WATERS OF. Bi- 
lazay is a town in France, two leagues from 
Thouar, department of Deux Sevres, near 
which is a thermal sulphureous spring. Tem- 
perature about 77^ Fahrenheit. 

BILBERRY, Vaccinium myrtillus^b. Red, 
Yaccinium vitis idasa. 

BILE, Bilisy Fel, ChofoSy Choli, (F.) Bile, 
Piel. A yellow, greenish, viscid, bitter, nau- 
seous fluid, secreted by the liver. It is distin- 
guished into hepat'ic and cystic ; according as 
it flows immediately into the duodenum from 
the liver or from the gall-bladder. It containa, 
according to Muratori, water, a peculiar &tty 
matter, colouring matter, {Cholepyr'rhin or Bi- 



BILIARY 



113 



BISMUTH 



lipkm^in,^ dioleiterin eombined with soda; 
picromel or hiiin; extract of flesh, mucus; 
soda, phosphate of soda; phosphate of lime, and 
chloride of sodium. 

The use of the bile is to remove from the 
body saperfloous hydro-carbon; and it is pro- 
bably insenrient to useful purposes in digestion. 
BiLM, Furuncttlus — ^b. Black, Atrabilis— 6. de 
Baufj see Bile— 6. Repandue, Icterus. 

BiUB OF THS Bear, Gall of thit Bear^ Fel 
Urjn, was thought to be antiepileptic; and that 
of the Bei^ Fel anguiTlay to facilitate labour. 

B11.B OP TBS Ox, Gall of the Ox, Ox GeUl, 
Fel Tauriy Fel Bovis, F. Bovt^num, (F.) Bile 
ds Bumfy was once reputed cosmetic and deter- 
gent, anti-otalgic and emmenacogue ; as well, 
as to possess the power of faciutating labour 
It has also been giTen as a bitter stomachic and 
ftnthelmintic; and recently, as a tonic and laxa- 
tive, in cases of deficiency of the biliary secre- 
tion. 

BILIARY, Bilia'riey Bilia'rius, Pel'leus. 
That which relates to bile. 

Bii.'la&t Appara'tus, B, organ*, B, pas- 
sages. The collection of parts that concur in 
the secretion and excretion of bile : — ^viz. the 
liver, porl biliarii or tub'uli bili/eri; hi;patic, 
cystic, and choledoch ducts and gall-bladder. 

Bii.'iART Comcrx'tions are Concretions found 
in some parts of the biliary apjparatns* 
BiLLART Ducts, Fori biliarii. 
BlLJEUXj Bilious. 
BILIMBI, Averrhoa bilimbi. 
BILIMBING TERES, Averrhoa bilimbi. 
BILIN, Picromel. 

BILIOUS, BUio'sus, Ckol'icus, Chol'iue, 
Ffiin'eusy Epieh'oloa, Pieroeh*olo», Fel'leus, 
( F. ) Bilieux, That which relates to bile, con- 
tains bile, or is produced by bile. An epithet 
given to certain constitutions and diseases, 
which are believed to be the effect of supera- 
bundance of the biliary secretion 1 as BUious 
temperament y B, symptoms , B, fever* 
BILIPH^IN, see Bile. 
BILIS FLUXIO, Cholera morbus. 
BILIVERD'IN, from BUis, *bile,' and viri- 
disy < green.' On adding an acid to a solution 
of the yellow colouring matter of bile, a pre- 
cipitate of green flocculi takes place, which 
possesses all the properties of chlorophyll, or 
the green colouring matter of leaves. This is 
the hUiverdin of Berzelius. 
BILUMBI BITING-BING, Mains Indica. 
BI'MANUS, from bis and manusy < a hand.' 
One that has two hands. A term applied only 
to man, because he is the sole mammiferous 
animal that possesses two perfect hands. 
BIPmER, Bandage. 

BI!>n)WEED, Polygonum aviculare— b. Fid- 
dle-leaved, Convolvultis panduratus — b. Great, 
Convolvulus sepium — ^b. Lavender-leaved, Con- 
volvulus Cantabrica — ^b. Sea, Convolvulus solda- 
nella — ^b. Virginian, Convolvulus panduratus. ^ 
BINKOHUMBA, Phyllanthus urinaria. 
l!XSOCnjl,V%yB%ni>cleyDio^hal'miea Fas'- 
eia, 0/ulis duplex, from Hsy ^twice,'and oeulus, 
' an eye.' (F.) (Eil double. A bandage applied 
oTer both eyes. It was, also, formerly called 
I>iopktAai'mus, 

BIX'SICA. Disorder of the mind. Accord- 
in; to Yah Hejlmont, an atrophy of the organ 
of imagination. 



BIOCHYMIA, Chymistry, vital. 

B10J)YNAM'lCS,Biodynam'ieayBiodynam'- 
ieiy Biosoph'iayttora ^tot, Uife,' and ^o^i^, 
^ power,' < force.' The doctrine of the vital ac- 
tivity, or forces. 

BlOGAMIA, Magnetism, animal. 

BIOLOGY, Physiology. 

BIOLYCHNION, Animal heat. 

BIOLYCH'NIUM, from /9ioc, <life,' and 
Xv/tiovy <a lamp.' Innate neat, vital heat. 
Lyeh'niumy Lgehnid*iumy Tksrmum em'phytumy 
FlammdMiaFlam*mMlavita*lis seu cordis. Also, 
a secret preparation of which Beovin and Bur- 
oRAvx make mention. 

BIOMAGNETISMUS, Magnetism, animal. 

BIOPHiENOMONELOGlA, Physiology. 

BIOS, §toi. Life, (q. v.) Also, what is ne- 
cessary for the preservation of life. 

BIOSOPHIA, Biodynamics. 

BIOTE, Life. 

BIOTHAN'ATI, Biaiothan'oUy from ^10^, 
< life,' and ^ovaroc, < death.' Those who die of 
a violent death, very suddenly, or as if there 
was no sjpace between life and death. 

BIOTICS, Physiology. 

BIOTOMIA, Vivisection. 

BIPARIETAL SUTURE, Sagittal suture. 

BIR, Thorax. 

BIRA, Cerevisia. 

BIRCH, Betula alba— b. Black, Betuia lenta 
— b. Cherry, Betula lentSr-b. Sweet, Betnia 
lenta. 

BIRTH, CROSS, Presentation, preternatural. 

BIRtHWORT, Aristolochia— b. Snakeroot, 
Aristolochia serpentaria. 

BISCHE, Bieeho. A malignant kind of dy- 
sentery, which often prevails in the island of 
Trinidad. 

BISCUIT, Biseoc'tus, < twice baked.' A 
kind of dry, hard bread, or cake, which is va- 
riously made; and, when without eggs or butter, 
is easy of digestion. It was formerly caUed 
Dipyri'tesy and Di^pyros. 

BISERMAS, Salvia sclarea. 

BISFERIENS, Dicrotus. 

BISHOP'S WEED, Ammi. 

BISLINGUA, Ruscus hypoglossum. 

BISMALVA, Althea. 

BISMUTH, Bismu'thumyWismuUkumyBeg'- 
ulus of Bis'muthy Mareasi'tOy Tin glass y (F.) 
£tain grisy E, de Glaee. A metal, in spicular 
plates, of a yellowish-white colour ; s. gr. 9.832; 
fusible at 400^ Fahrenheit, and volatilizable at 
a high temperature. It is used only in the pre- 
paration of the subnitrate. 

Bismuth, Oxtd of. Bismuth, Subnitrate o^ 
b. Regulus of, Bismuth. 

Bismuth, Sdbni'trate of, MareasiHa eUba, 
Plumbum eifie'reu9ty Magiste'rium Mareasi'tes 
seu Bismuthiy Bismu'tkum Nit^rieum, B, Sub- 
fiit'rieumyNitras Subbismu'tkicumy Nitras Bis- 
muthiy Calx Vismu^thi, Bismu^thum oxydtUa*- 
tum albumy Oxyd of Bismuthy Mag"istery of 
Bismuthy Pearl WhitSy Spanish WhitSy (F.) 
Sousnitrate de bismvthy Oxide blanc de j9., 
Blane de fard, Blane de perle. {Bismuth, in 
frustulis, }j. Acid nitric, f. ^^iss. Aq. destill. 
q. s. Mix a fiuidounce of distilled water with 
die nitric acid, and dissolve the bismuth in the 
mixture. When the solution is complete, pour 
the elear liquor into three pinta of distilled 
water, and set the mixture by, tluit the powder 
may subside. Lastly, having poured off the 



BISBIUTBI NITRAS 



114 



blapabd 



lapernatant fiaid, wash the sabnitrate of Bismtith 
with distillefd water, wrap it in bibulous paper, 
■nd dry it with a gentle heat. Ph. U. S.) It 
is considered to be tonic and antispasmodic^ and 
has been chiefly used in gastrodynia. 

BISMUTH! NITRAS,Bi8muth,8ubnitrateof. 

BISMUTHUM, Bismuth— b. Nitricum, Bis- 
muth, snbnitrate of— b. Ozydalatom Albmn, 
Bismuth, subnitrate of— b. Subnitricmn, Bis- 
muth, subnitrate of. 

BISPIRUS, Dipnoos. 

BISSUS. The silky filaments which fix the 
Pinna Mariana to the rocks. In Italy and Cor- 
sica, clothes are made of these, which are con- 
sidered to favour perspiration, and are recom- 
mended to be worn next the skin in rheuma- 
tism, gout, &c.^— See Byssus. 

BISTORT, OFFICINAL, Polygonum bU- 
torta. 

BISTORT A, Polygonum bistorta- 

SISTOR TIER, (F.) A name given, by tbe 
Pharmaeien, to a long wooden pestle used for 
reducing soft substances to powder, and in the 
preparation of electuaries. 

BI8TOXmi,{Y,) PistoHen'sisgla'diusyScal' 
pel'lus, Seal'peum, Bistoury. A small cut- 
ting-knife, used in surgery, — so called, accord- 
ing to Huet. from the town of Pistori, which 
was fotmerfy celebrated for the manu&cture 
of those instruments. A bistoury has the form 
of a small knife, and is composed of a blade and 
handle. The blade, which \b most conmionly 
movable in tbe handle, may be fixed by a but- 
ton, spring, frc. When fixed in the handle, the 
bistouri is called by the French, B. 6, lame fixe 
on dormante. 

The chief bistouries are: — I. The steaioht 
B. (F.) B, droit, in which the blade and cutting 
edge are straight, the point being fine, round, 
or square. 2. The convex B. (F.) B, eonvexe; 
the blade of which is convex at the cutting 
edge, concave at the back. 3. The concave 
B. (F.) B, eoneave; the blade of which is con- 
cave at its edge, and convex at the back. 4. 
BLUNT-POINTED B. (F.) B. hovtonni ; the blade 
of which has a button at its extremity. 5. The. 

BLUNT OE PEOBB-POINT^D BlStOUEI OF POTT; 

concave at its cutting edge, and its point blunt; 
so that it can be carried on the palmar surface 
of the index finger, to divide the stricture, in 
strangulated hernia. . Sir Astley Cooper has 
recommended a useful modification of this, to 
avoid wounding the intestine, should it come in 
contact with the edge of the knife. His Bis- 
touri has an edge of not more than eight lines 
in length, situate about five lines from the point. 
6. BisTouEi a LA LIME, (F.) is a straight Bis- 
toury; the blade fixed in the handle, the extre- 
oiity with a button, and the edge made with a 
file. It is chiefly used for dilating parts. 7. Bis- 
TouEt EOTAL, (F. ) A Bistouriused in opei ating 
upon Louis XIV., forfistula in ano. 8. Bistouei 
OA8TETQT7E, (F.) A Complicated instrument, 
invented by Morand, for dilating wounds of the 
abdomen. 9. Bistouei oacre, B. hemiaire, 
OU Attrape'lourdaud de Biennaiae, Forceps de- 
eepto*ria. A curved bistouri, the blade of which 
is placed in a canula, i^ence it issues on press- 
ing a spring. 

The word Bistouri is used by the French, at^ v 
times, where we would employ knife. 

BIT NOBEN, Salt of Bitu'men, Padnoon, 
Souokerloon, Khala mimue. A white, saline 



substance, which is a Hindoo preparatioD of 
great antiquity, and has been supposed to be 
the Sal aephalti^tea and Sal Sodome'nus of the 
ancients. It is used by the Hindoo in the pre- 
vention or cure of almost all diseases. 

BITHNIMAL'CA, Gas'teranax. Two mi- 
meaning Words, used by Dolaeus, to designate 
an active principle supposed to have its seat in the 
stomach, and to preside over chymification^ fcc. 

BITIOS DE KIS, Proctocace.- 

SITTER, Amarus— b. Bark, Pinckneya pn- 
bens — ^b. Bloom, Chironia angularis — b. Holvt 
Hiera picra— b. Redberry, Comus Florida — ^b. 
Root, Apocynnm androscmifolium, Gentiana 
Catesbsi, Menyanthes vema — b. Sweet night- 
shade, Solanum Dulcamara — ^b. Sweet vine, So- 
ianum Dulcamara. 

BIT'TERNESS, Amaritu'do, AmaritHesj Am- 
a*r&ryPi^eria,(F.)Amertitme. A particular taste, 
which belongs to many substances. In aome 
diseases there is a sense of bitterness felt in the 
mouth. 

BITTERS, COLUMBO, Tinctura CalnmbR 
— b. Spirit, Tinctura gentianas compoaita — b. 
Wine, Vinum gentians compositum. 

BITTERSWEET, Solanum dulcamam. 

BITTERWEED, Ambrosia trifida. 

BITTER\^OOD TREE, Quassia. 

BITTOS. A disease, in which the chief 
symptom is an acute pain in the anus.— <7homeI. 

BITUMEN, GLUTINOUS, Pissasphaltma- 
b. Jadaicum, Asphaltum — ^b. of Judea, Aaphal- 
tum — b. Petroleum, Petrolsum-^b. Malta, Piss- 
asphaltum— b. Salt of, Bitnoben>-b. Solidum, 
Asphaltum.' 

Bl VENTER, Digastricu»— b. Cervicis, Com- 
plexns muscalus — ^b. Maxillae, Digastricua. 

BIVENTRAL LOBE OF THE CEREBEL- 
LUM, see Lobe, biventral. 

BIXA ORLEANA, Terra Orleana. 

BLABE, Wound. 

BLACCI JS, Rubeola. 

BLACIA, Debility. 

BLACKBERRY, AMERICAN, see Rabos 
fruticosus — ^b. Highor standbg, see Rubus fruti- 
cosus. 

BLACK DOSE, see Infusnm Semus com- 
positum. 

BLACK DRAUGHT, see Infuaum Senns 
compositum. 

BLACK DROP, Guttas nigne. 

BLACK ROOT, Aletris farinosa, Leptandria 
purpurea. 

BLACKWATER, Pyrosis, 

BLADDER, IRRITABLE, Cysterethismos. 

BLADUM, BU. 

BLiESITAS, Balbuties. 

Bla'sitas, Blasa lingua. Some authors have 
used this word as synonymous with stammering. 
See Balbuties. Sauvages understands by it a 
defect in pronunciations which consists in sub- 
stituting soft consonants for those that are hard; 
as the z for s, the n for t, the s for o and j, &c. 
Also, Lisping, Traulis'mus, Trau'lotes, (¥.) 
BUsify BU (parler.) 

BL^SOPODES, see Kyllosis. 

BLiESOPUS, see Kyllosis. 

BL^SUS. A distortion; especially the out- 
ward distortion of the legs. Also, a stammerer. 

BLAFARD,(¥.)Pallidus^allid'ulHe. This 
epithet is sometimes given to the skin, when 
pale and dull; but, most frequently, to the flesh 
of a wound, when it has lost its colour, and be- 



BLANC DE BALBINE 



115 



BLENNOHBHiEA 



Aa otnt' 
and 



»wliite. The word 18) also, sometqiies Tiled 
•ynonymoiislj wi^ Albino, (q. v.) 

BLANC DE BALEINEy Cetneeom— 4. 4^tf 
Pmrd, Bismuth, sabnitrate of-^. de I'CEtl, Scle 
rode — A. d^(Eufy Albumen ovi — h, tU PerU^ Bis- 
imith, sabnitnte of. 

BLANC MANGERy (F.) Ciius Mu^^ Leu- 
cophafgiwBty Leueopk'agumy Argyrotropke*ma, 
Aa amoial lelly, so called on account of its 
colour, combined with an emulsion of sweet 
almonds, to which sugar has been added, and 
some aromatic. It is sometimes prescribed as a 
Botrient in convalescence and chronic diseases. 

BLANC-RAISIN, Blanc Rhazis. 

BLANC RHAZIS, Blane-raisin. 
ment eooposed of cerussa, white 
alive eil. 

BLANCA, Plumbi subcarbonas. 

TO BLANCH,fTom (F.)A(0»MtV,' to whiten, 
to bleach/ To deprive of the outer rind ; as < to 
Uamek almonds;' i. e. to peel them. 

BLANCHET,(¥.) Ablanket. Atermgiven, 
hj the Frencb Pharmaciens, to the woollen 
stzainer thnmgh which they filter sjrup and 
other thick fluids. See, also, Aphdiae. 

BLANCNON ORIBASn, Polypodium filix 

BLAS. An unmeaning term, invented by 
Van Helmoat to designate a kind of movement 
ia the body; at times, local^— at others, under 
estraneous influence. Thus, he speaks of the 
Bias mettoras'af the heavenly bodies, and the 
Bias kuma*num, that which operates in man. 

BLAS Ay (F.) An epithet given to one whom 
the abuse of enjoyment has prevented from any 
longer deriving satisfaction or pleasure from it. 

BLASTE'MA, BIoHb'm, from fihatrrafm, < I 
bod.' Agerm,(q.v.) The sense of this word, 
which is often used fay Hippocrates, is -obscure. 
Castelli thinks it means the eruption of some 
morbific principle at the varfaee of the body* 
Also, the nntrix or general formative element 
of tissoes. 

BLASTODERMA, see Molecule. 

BLATTA BYZANTIA, UHguis odora'ttUy 
(F.) Blatu de B^sanee. This name seems, for- 
merly, to have been given.to a marine produc- 
tion from some of the Conchylia. It had an 
agreeable smell, a reddish tint,* and the shape 
of a nail. It was prescribed in epilepsy, hyste- 
ria, and hepatic obstructions. Rondelet affirms 
that it was the prodoction of the shell-fish «h»- 
Ttx or purpura ; and tint the name Blatta is de- 
rived from the Greek /riorrroc, ^ purple.' 

BLAVELLEy Centaurea cyanus. 

BLAV&OLEy Centaurea cyanus. 

BLAVEROLLEy Centeurea cyanus. 

BLAZING-STAR, Liatris. 

BL£y Bladum. This word answers, in 
France, to the word Com (q. v.) in England; 
i. e. any kind of grain employed for making 
bread. Wheat being most commonly used for 
this pnrpoee, Bleis sometimes restricted to this. 
Bli meteii is a mixture of wheat and rye. 

BLA CQRNUy Ergot— &. d*Bspagney Zea 
mays— £. d^ItalUy Zea Mays— 6. iVbtr, Polygo- 
nam frgopyrum— ^. de Thtrquisy Zea, Mays. 

BL£(PARLERy) Blesitas. 

BLEABERRT, Vaccinium myrtilhis. 

BLFJU)HIN6 LIQUID, Eau dejovUl^. 

BLEAR EYE, Lippitodo. 

BLEB, Bulla. 

BLECHNON, Polypodimn flliz 



BLECHNUM LIGNIFOLIUM, Aspkntnm 
Scolopendrium— b. Squamosum^ Aspleninm ce> 
teiaeh. 

BLECHROPYRA, see Blechros. 

BLECHROPYRUS, Typhus mitior. 

•BLECHROS, |fair;r€oc, f weak, feeble, slow.' 
An epithet, applied to diflerent aflections, and 
particularly to fevers. Hence Blechrop^yray 
<a slow fever:' BUehrosphyg^miay ^a slow 
pulse.' 

BLECHR08PHYGMIA, see Blechros. 

BLED, Com. 

BLEEDING, Bloodletting, Hasmorrhagia. 

BLEEDING FROM THE NOSE, Epistaxis 
— b. Heart, Cypripedium luteum. 

BLtMEy (F.) This word has nearly the 
same signification as Blafard. Generally, how- 
ever, it includes, also, emaciation of the coun- 
tenance. 

BLENNA, Mueus — b. Narium, Nasal mucus. 

BLENNADENITIS, from fiXtrtay 'mucus,* 
aSriry «a gland,' and itis, denoting inflammation. 
Inflammation of mucous follicles. 

BLENNELYT'RIA, from |J^t»ir«, «mucus,' 
and sxvrpoy, <a sheath.' A discharge of mucus 
from the vagina. Leucerrhiea, (q. v.) — Alibert. 

BLENNEM'ESIS. Slsnnoim'iisisyVom'itus 
pUiUto*au9y from BUirtay ' mucus,' and •fss^tty 
< vomiting.' Vomiting of mucus. 

BLENNENTERIA, Dysentery. 

BLENNISTH'MIA, from (fXtrray 'mucus,' 
and ir^/i9ty <the gullet.' Increased flow of 
mueus from the pharynx and larynx. — Alibert. 

BLENNOCHEZIA, Diarrhosa, mucous. 

BLENNOCYSTIDES, BursA mucosae. 

BLENNODES, Muciform. 

BLENNOEMESIS, Blennemesis. 

BLENNOG"ENOUS, BUnnog'enusy Mueif^ 
icy MudfietMy from |91e»vtt, 'mucus,' and Y»^*uy 
'I form.' Forming or generating mucus. Bre- 
sehet and Roussel de Vauz^me describe an ap- 
paratus of this kind for the secretion of the mu- 
cous matter that constitutes the cuticle, com- 
posed of a glandular parenchyma or organ of se* 
cretion sitnate in the substance of the true skin, 
and of excretory ducts, which issue from the 
organ, and deposits themucous matter between 
the papillae. 

bLeNNOIDES, Muciform. 

BLENNOIDEUS, Muciform. 

BLENNOPHTHALMIA, Ophthalmia, (pu- 
rulent.) 

BLENNOPTTSIS, from |Mfmf,and irrvmy *I 
spit.' Expectoration of mucus. Catarrh (q. v.) 

BLENNOP'YRA,B/^ffno|»y'r»a,from ^\«»v«, 
and nvfy ' fire.' Alibert has classed, under this 
head, various fevers with mucous complica- 
tions; as Mesentsrie /every Adeno-mefitngeal 
/every Iec. 

BLENNORRHAGIA, Gonorrhcea^b. Geni- 
talium, Leucorrbcea— b. Notha, Gonorrhoea spn- 
riar— b. Spuria, Gonorrhcsa spuria. 

BLENNORRHAGIC EPIDIDYMITIS, Her- 
nia humoralis. 

BLENNORRHAGIE FAUSSEy Gonor- 
rhoea spuria—i^. du Glandy Gonorrhoea spuria. 

BLENNORRHINIA, Coryza. 

BLENNORRHCE'A, Blennorrkoiy Blennor- 
rhag^^iayPhlegvtorrh^B'ayFhlegmorrhag^'ia, from 
jfiUvM, 'mucus,' and !»•», 'I flow.' Inordinate 
secretion and discharge of mucus. Also, Go- 
norrhoea. 

BuHKOBBaoA. Cheokioa, (gleet,) see Go- 



BLENNOSES 



116 



BLOOD 



norrhffiar— b. OeniUliimiy LeucoTrhflear— b. Lu- 
odes, Gonorrhcea imporar— b. Naaalis, Coryza — 
b. Oculi, see Ophthalmia — ^b. Oculi gonorrhoica, 
see Ophthalnua — ^b. Oculi neonatorum, see 
Ophthidmia — ^b. Oculi purulenta, see Ophthal- 
mia — ^b. tJrethialis, Gonorrhcea — ^b. Urinalis, 
Cystorrhoea — ^b. Ventriculi, 6a8trorrhj(Ba---b. 
YesicaB, CystorrhtBa. 

BLENNO'SES, from fiUyva, <nmcua.' Af- 
fections of the mucous membranes. — Alibert. 

BLENNOTHORAX, Catarrh, Peripneumo- 
nia notha — b. Chronicus, Asthma hmmdum. 
BLENNOTORRHCEA, Otirrhcea. 
BLENNURETHRIA, Gonorrhcea. 
BLENNURIA, Cystorrhcea. 
BLEPHARADENITIS, Oi^thalmia Tarsi. 
BLEPHARANTHRACO'SIS, BUphaH'Us 
gangrtsno'tayCarlmncula'tio Oe'tdi* Gangre- 
nous inflammation of the eyelids. 
BLEPHARELOSIS, Entropion. 
BLEPHARIDES, Cilia. 
BLEPHARIDOPLASTICE, Blepharoplas- 
tice. 
BLEPHARISMUS, Nictation. 
BLEPHARITIS, Ophthalmia tarsi— b. Gan- 
grsenosa, Blepharanthracosis. 

BLEPHAROBLENNORRHCEA, Ophthal- 
mia, purulent. 

BLEPHARO-CONJUNCTIVITIS, Blepk- 
aroayjideami'tia^ from ^;if^a{tt, < an eyelid,' and 
conjunctiva. Ophthalmia affecting the con- 
junctiva and eyelids. 

BLEPHARODYSCHRCE'A, from ifXf<p«^v» 
the < eyelid,' dvc, 'with difficulty,' and jir^oa, 
< colour.' Discoloration of the eyelid. NasYus 
of the eyelid. — Von Ammon. 

BLEPHARCEDEMA AQtTOSUM, Hydro- 
blepharon. 

BLEPHARON,Palpebrar-b. Atoniaton,Ble- 
pharoptosis. 

BLEPHARONCO'SIS, Blephartmfeus, BU-- 
pharophy'ma^ Palpebra^rum Tv/mor^ from /}2«^- 
«^ov, < eyelid,' and o^irof , < tumour.' A tumour 
on the eyelid. 
BLEPHARONCUS, Blepharoncosis. 
BLEPHAROPHTHALMIA, Ophthalmia 
tarsi — b. Neonatorum, see Ophthalmia-*-b. Pu- 
(ulenta, Blepharopyorrhcea. 

BLEPHAROPHTHALMITIS GLANDU- 
LOSA, Ophthalmia, purulent, of infimts. 
BLEPIlAROPHTMA, Bkpharoncosis. 
BLEPHAROPLAS'TICE, Bltpharidopltu'- 
tici^ Insi^tio C%lio'rw»yiTom pXtpagov, 'the eye- 
lid,' and wK*r^ix»(, ' forming,' ' formative*' The 
formation of a new eyelid. 
BLEPHAROPLEGIA, Blepharoptosis. 
BLEPHAROPTO'SIS, BUpkaroplc'gia^ Co- 
9U9 peU'pebrcB supcrto^ris^ Dclap'sus pal'pehra^ 
Prolap'sus ptU'pebrtBy Propto'ait pat'pehra^ 
Pto'sia pcdfpebra^ Atoniaton Slepkaron, from 
jSAffo^ov, <the eyelid,' and nrwatCf 'fall.' A 
falling down of tne upper eyelid over the eye, 
caused by a paralysis of the Levator palpebra 
superioris muscle. This paralysis is an unfh- 
vourable symptom, as it is generally connected 
with a state of the brain favouring apoplexy or 
palsy. 

Blbpraroptosis Ect&opium, Ectropium— b. 
Entropion, Entropion. 

BLE^HAKOFYORKaCE'A^BUpharophthal'' 
miapunden'ta^Pyorrka'apal'pehrm^ from |9xi^ 
uQovy 'eyelid;' 7iwo», 'puis,' and ^•w, 'I flow.' 
Secretion of put from the eyelids. 



BLEPHARORRHCE'A, from lUtya^o?, < eye- 
lid,' and fmy 'I flow.' A discharge of mnca 
from the eyelids. 

BLEPHAROSPAS^US: from plt^ai^, 
' eyelid,' and anw/Ao^, ' spasm.' A spasmodic 
action of the orbicularis palpebrarum muscle. 

BLEPHARO-SYNDESMITIS, Blepharo- 
conjunctivitis. 

BLEPH AROTIS,Ophthalmia tarsi— b.Gkn- 
dularis contagiosa, see Ophthalmia. 

BLEPHAROTITIS, O^thalmia tarsi. 

BLEPHAROTOSIS, Ectroplum. 

BLEPHAROXYSTUM, BUpkarorys'trmm^ 
from.^aa^^oy, ' eyelid,' and (iw, * I scrape.' An 
instrument used, by the ancients, for removing 
callosities, which ouuie their appearance in the 
affection called, by the Greeks> xf^x^fm* — 
Paulus of .£2ina, Gorrans. 

BLAaiTE, BlsBsitas. 

BLESSURE, Abortion, Wound. 

BLESTRISOtfUS. Restlessness of the- sick. 
— Hippocrates. 

BLETA. A word, used by Paracelsos for 
white or milky urine, arising from diseased 
kidneys. Biota alba bu the same meaning. 

BLEU DE PRUS8E, Prussian blue. 

BLEVILLE, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Bleville is a viUage about two miles from Hane. 
The waters are acidulous chalybeatea. 

BLIGHT IN THE EYE, Ophthalmia, ea- 
tarrhal. 

BLINDNESS^ C«citaa— b. Colour, Achro- 
matopsia. 

BLlSTERyVos%cato*r%um,Emplas'trum Fm»- 
cato'rium, Emplas'trum Lytta, Epispas^ticatmj 
from Vesica^ 'a bladder,' (F.) Vesicatoircy V^ 
sicant. Any substance which, when applied 
to the skin, irritates it, and occasions a serous 
secretion, raising the epidermis, and inducing a 
vesicle. Various articles produce this effect, 
as cantharido3y mu*ttsrdy garouy eupkorbiumy 
garlicy ammoniay ^c. Blisters are used as 
counter-irritants. By exciting a disease artifi* 
cially on the surfiftce, we can often remove 
another which may be at the time existing in- 
ternally. A perpetual blUUr is one that is 
kept open for a longer or a shorter time by 
means of appropriate dressings. 

Blister or vesication also means the vesicle 
produced by vesicatories. 

BLISTERING FLY, Cantharis— b. Tissue, 



Sparadrapum vesicatorium. 
BLISTERV 



ERWEED, Ranunculus aeris. 

BLITUM AMERICANUM, Phytolacca d»- 
candra. 

BLOOD, Anglo Saxon, blob, from bleban, 
'to bleed.' Sanguity Cruory Lapis anima'lisy 
JTanta, ^aiftuy (F.) Sang, An animal fluid 
formed chiefly from the chyle; acquiring im- 
portant properties during respiration ; entering 
every organ through the circulation; distri- 
buting the nutritive principles to every texture, 
and the source of every secretion. The blood 
is white in the molluscous and inferior ani- 
mals, which have been, hence, caUed ^okiis^ 
bloodedy to distinguish them from the r«^ 
blooded; which class includes the mammal ia^ 
birds, reptiles, and fishes. Human blood is 
composed of water, albumen, fibrin, an animal 
colouring substance^ a little fhtty matter— A<»- 
matela'itmy and different salts; as chlorides of 
potassium and sodium, phosphate of lime, sub- 
carbonate of soda, lime, magnesia, oxide of iron. 



BLOOD 



117 



Blood-letting 



ind Itetate of ioda, united with an aninml mat- 
ter. ArUrial blood is of a florid red colour, 
ftroog imell} temp. KHP; s. g. 1.049. Venous 
hlood is of a browniah led: temp. 98^; s. g, 
1.U51. This difference in colour has given oc- 
euioQ to tlie first being called rod blood ; the 
latter black. The former which is distributed 
firom the heart, is neai^l y the same through its 
whole extent : the latter is the remains of the 
arterial blood after the different elements have 
been taken from it in nutrition, and probably 
didera in composition. It likewise coiitains 
diflerent substances absorbed. Venous blood, 
taken from a vessel and left to itself, becomes 
aolid, and aepaiates into two distinct parts, — 
the MncM or watery, supernatant fluid; and 
the eruoTy eoag^uiuntf enusamen^ttuny hepar 
aeu fhemfts sanfguifUa^ plaeonfta eruo'rioy 
vi'suloy tkrombusy or elot. The semm is chiefly 
water, holding albumen in solution and the 
aalts of the bl<xKl. The clot contains the fibrin, 
CDlourlng matter — htomatooiny (q. y.) a little 
serum, nd a small quantity of salts. M. Le- 
eana foond the blood to be composed — ^in 1000 
parts— of water, 785.590; albumen, 69.415; 
fibrin; 3.565; colouring matter, 119.696; erys- 
tallizable fatty matter, 4.300; oily matter, 
2.270; extractive matter soluble in alcohol and 
water, 1.920; albumen combined with soda, 
2.010; chlorides of sodium and potassium; al- 
kaline phosphatea, sulphates, and subcarbonates, 
7J04; subcarbonate of Ume and magnesia, 
phosphate of lime, magnesia and iron, peroxide 
of iron, 1 .414 ; loss, 3 J^. The four principal 
components of the blood are fibrin, albumen, 
oorposeles, and aadine matter. In the dreu- 
Iniing blood they are thus combined — 

Albumen >'"* aolution forming Liquor San^ 
Salts, ' i«^'«^- 

Red Corpuscles— suspended in the Liquor 
Sanguinis. 

In eoagulaitd blood they are thus combined, 
Fibrin, > Forming the erassamontum 

Red CorpDscles, 5 or clot. 
Albumen, ) Remaining in solution, forming 
Saks, S serum* 

The following table exhibits the computa- 
doos of different physiologists regarding the 
weight of the circulating fluid— arterial and 
renoos. 

iJSk \ s 

\^ \ 10 

Lower. ( 

gwngd, iOtolS 

HQlkrand Bmdadi, '20 

Qw«ai 27 

F.Hoflfaann, 28 

5«fcr,. 28 to 30 

"«mg, 40 

J5*»BW, 80 

Kcfll, 100 

The proportion of arterial blood to venous is 
«bout4to9. 

, Knch attention has been paid to the vary- 
H condition of the blood in disease. The 
average proportion of each of the organic ele- 
BciU in 1000 parts of healthy blood is as fol- 



lows, acoording to Lecanu, and MM. Andral, 
and Gavarret : — fibrin, 3; red corpuscles, 127 ; 
solid matter of the serum, 80: water, 790. 

Juried human blood was, at one time, consi- 
dered to be antiepileptic ; that of the goat, 
dried. Sanguis kirei sieea'tus, sudorific, and 
antipleuretic. 

Bi.ooi>, Artxkial, see Blood— b. Black, see 
Blood — ^b. Black, Vascular system of, see Vas- 
cular— b. Casein, Globulin — ^b. Corpuscles, 
Globules of the blood— b. Disks, Globules of 
the blood — ^b. Dried, see Blood — ^b. Loss of, 
Haemorrhagia — b. Red, see Blood—- b. Red, sys- 
tem of, see Vascular — b. Spitting of, Haemop- 
tysis — ^b. Venous, see Bloodr— b. Vomiting of, 
Haematemesis — ^b. White, Lymph. 

BLOODLESSNESS, Amemia. 

BLOOD-LETTING, Missio seu Detrac'tio 
San^guints, Hesmax'is^ Cataschas'mus, Bleed- 
*^9 (F.) Saignie. A discharge of a certain 
quantity of blood produced by art : an opera- 
tion which consists in making an opening into 
a vessel to draw blood flrom it. When practised 
on an artery, it is called Arteriot'omy ; on a 
vein, Fhlebot'omfy Ven^esee^tio, Venesee'tion ; 
and on the capillary vessels, heal or capillary ^ 
in contradistinction to the former, which is 
termed general. Blood-letting is used both 
during the existence of a disease, as in inflam- 
mation, and in the way of pophylaxis. It is 
employed to fulfil various mdications. 1. To 
diminish the actual mass of blood ; — when it is 
termed, by the French pathologists, Saignie 
ivacuative. In such case, fluids ought not to 
be allowed too freely afterwards. 2. To di-^ 
minish the turgescence in any particular organ 
— ( (F.) Soignee rlvulsive. Revulsive blood- 
letting or bleeding, Veneesee'tio revulso^ria, 
when performed far from the part affected; 
and Soignee dirivativey when near.) 3. To 
diminish the consistence of the blood, ( (F.) 
Saignie spoliative.) The immediate effects of 
blood-letting are: diminution of the mass of 
blood and of heat; retardation of the pulse, 
and sometimes syncope. Blood-letting from 
the veins — phlebotomy , is practised on the 
subcutaneous veins of the neck, the ihce, th^ 
fore-arm, and the leg; sometimes on those of* 
the hand or foot. The necessary apparatus 
consists of a bandage or riband, a compress of 
rag, and a lancet or phleam. 

The veins selected for the operation, are, 1 . 
In the fold of the turmy five ; — ^the cephalic, ba- 
silic, the two median, and the anterior cubital. 
2. In the handy the cephalic and salvatella. 3. 
In the footy the great and little saphena. 4. In 
the nseky the external jugular. 5. In the fore- 
heady the frontal. 6. In the mouth, the ranine. 
The operation of phlebotomy in the limbs is 
performed by tving a circular bandage round 
the limb, in order that the subcutaneous veins 
may become turmd, by the course of the blood 
being obstructed: the bandage not being so 
tight, however, as to compress the arteries of 
the limb. A puncture is made into the vein, 
and the desired quantity allowed to flow. The 
ligature is now removed, and a compress and 
retaining bandage applied. Capillary or local 
blood-letting is practised on the skin or mucous 
membranes, by means of leeches, the lancet, or 
cupping. 

Bloodlsttino, Capillary, see Bloodletting 
^-b. Derivative, see Bloodletting — b. Evacua- 



BLOOD-LIKE 



118 



BGftETUS ALBUS 



tire, Me Bloedletting*— b. Genend, see Blood- 
letting — ^b. Local, see Bloodletting — b. Rewl- 
sive, eee Bloodletting— b. Spoliative, eee Blood- 
letting. 

BLOODLIKEy fiwognine. 

BLOODROOT, Senguinaria CanadenaiB. 

BLOODSTONE, Hematites. 

BLOOD VESICLE, Globule of the blood. 

BLOOD VESSEL, (F.) Vaisaum aangttin. 
A Tetsel destined to contain and convey blood. 

BlOOB VeSSIL, BRBAKUfO, BOaSTIHO, KUP- 

TU&iNo OF A. — Hamorrhagia. 

BLOODWORT, Sanguinaria Canadentia. 

WLOODYySanguin'eus^ Cruen'tua.Sanguin - 
eouSf (F.) Sanguin, Having the character of 
blood. Relating to blood. See Sanguine. 

BLOOM, HONEY, Apocynum andtoismifo- 
Uom. 

BLOTA ALBA, BleU. 

BLOW, letusy Plsgi^ (F.) Coup. Effect pro- 
duced by one body stnlong another. The im- 
pression made by any body, which strikes us or 
against which we strike ;— a common caose of 
wounds, contusions, fractures, &c. 

BLOWING SOUND, Bruit da Saufie. 

BLUE-BELLS, Gentiana catesbai. 

BLUE-BERRY, Caulophyllum thalicttoides, 
Lantana. 

BLUE BOTTLE, Centaurea cyanos, Cyanus 
segetum. 

BLUE STONE, Cupri sulphas. 

BLUET DBS M0I880NS, Cyanos sege- 
tum. 

BLUSH, CUTANEOUS, see Efflorescence. 

BOA , Boia. An eruption of red, ichorous pim- 
ples. Pliny. See, also, Hidroa and Sodainina. 

Boa Upas, Upas. 

BO^ Syphilis. 

BOBERRI, Curcuma longa. 

BOCHIUM, Bronchocele. 

BOCIUM, Bronchocele. 

BOCKLET, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
The springs of Bocklet in Bavaria are acidu- 
lous cnalybeates. 

BODY, Corpus, Somoj (F.) Corps: from 
bodauy the < fundus or bottom.' (7) llie human 
body is the collection of organs, which 'com- 
pose the frame. At times, however, body is 
used synonymously with truni. We say, also, 
hodf of the femury of the sphenoid, &c., to de- 
signate the shaft or nudue portion of those 
bones; body of the uterus, &c. Also, the rec- 
tum. 

Boot, Comtho dowr of tbv, Proctocele. 

BODY-SNATCHER, Resurrectionist. 

BOE, Cry. 

BOELLI, Intestines. 

BOETHEMA, Medicament. 

BOG-BEAN, Menyanthes triibUata. 

BOHON UPAS, Upas. 

BOIA, Boa. 

BOIL, Furuneulua— b. Gum, Parulis — b. 
Malignant, see Furunculos — ^b. Wasp^ nest, 
see Furunculus. 

BOIS BE CAMPtCHE, Hamaloxylum 
Campeohianura — b. de Chypre, Rhodium lig- 
num--^, de Couleuvre, see Stryvhnos — b. de 
Marais, Cephalanthus occidentalis — 5. de 
Plamb, Dirca palnstris — b, Ptutnt, Pnmus pa- 
dus — b, de Rose,'Bhodinm lignum — b. de Sap^ 
jKMt, Cssalpinia sappan — b, Sudorijique^ Wood, 
sudorific. 

BOISSE, MINERAL WATERS OF. These 



waters are eitnate about half a league fiom Foa- 
tenay-le-Compte in France. They are purgative, 
and seem to contain carbonate and sulphate of 
lime and chloride of sodium. 

BOlsaON, Drink. 

BOITEy (F.) A 60s or ease, Capsa, Ppaie. 
An apparatus for the reception of any matteis 
which it may be desirable to preserve. In 
Surgery and Anatomy, BtAtes d disseetiam, B» 
d amputation, B. a trepam, A. d cataracts, ke^ 
mean the cases in which these various instrt- 
ments are kept. Be^e du Crasu is the haaj 
case which receives the brain. BefUe ia, also, 
the portion of the stem of the trephine, vduch 
receives the pyramid or centrepin. Befke de 
Petit is a machme, invented by M. Petit to re- 
tain the fractured portions of bone in apposi- 
tion, when the leg, has been fractured in a cosa- 
plicated manner. B<Ate is, also, a kind of cast 
pot before an artificial anus to reeeiTo tiM 
inces, which arecontinually being dischaigsd. 
The vulgar, in France, give the name Be/ke to 
varioua articulatiois,— B. de gemau, B, da la 
hanehe; ^knee-joint. Hip-joint." 

BOiTBMBNT, Claudication. 

BOITIER, (F.) Appareil, Cap'suia mugum- 
ta'ria, Capsa'rium. A Dressing-case. A box, 
containing salves and different apparatos, used 
more particularly by the dressers in hospitals. 

BOL, Bolus — b, d'Arm6nie, Bole, Armenian 
— b. Blanc, Bolus alba. 

^OLA, Myxrha. 

BOLCHON, Bdellium. 

BOLE, Bolus, (F.) Bol, Terre bolaire, meant, 
with the older writers, argillaceous earth, used 
as an absorbent and alexipharmic. The varioui 
boles had different forms given to them, and 
were stamped, as in the following: 

Bole AaMx'RiAH, Bole Arm^niae, B. Ar^me- 
nic, ArgU'laferruginfea rubra. A* Bolus rubra^ 
Sinapi'sis, Arena'men, Bolus Orienta^lis, Bolus 
Armeniaea, B. Arme'nim, B. rubra, (F.) Bot 
d'Armenie, A red, clayey earth, found not 
only in Armenia, but in several countries of 
Europe^ — in Tuscany, Silesia, France, &c. It 
was once esteemed a tonic and astringent, and 
was applied as a styptic. It is now, scarcely, if 
ever, used. It cooaists of argil, mixed with 
lime and iron. 

BOLESIS, Coral. 

BOLESON, Balsam. 

BOLET ODORANT, Dsdalia snaveolens. 

BOLETUS ALBUS, Boletus laricis. 

Bole'tus Escdlen'tus, (F.) Morelle. An 
eatable mushroom, found in the woods in Eu- 
rope, and much admired by Gastronomes. It 
was formerly esteemed to be aphrodisiac. 

Bolb'tus loNiA'aius. The systematic name 
for the Ag*arie,^Ag^^'if^^y Agarieum of the 
Pharmacopoeias. Agar'icus Chirurgo'rumy 
Agar^ieus Querei^s, Is'ea, Bole'tus Vngnla- 
tus, SpunJt, Amfadou, Punk, Fungus J^nia'- 
rius. Fungus Querci'nus, Jigaric of the OaJtr, 
Tourhwood, Touchwood Boletus, Female Agaric, 
Tinder, (F.) Agaric de chine, Amadouvier. It 
was formerly much used by surgeons as a styp- 
tic. 

Bolk'ttts Lar'icis, B. LaricHnus, F^n'gm* 
Lar'ieis, Polyp'orus ojfieina'Us, Agar^ieus albus^ 
A. Albus optiemus, B. purgans, B. albms^ 
White Agaric, <F.) Agaric blame. On the con- 
tinent of Europe it hna been given as a catlisir- 



BOLIMASTia 



m 



BONE NIPPERS 



tie aad emeticy as well m to moderate the 
sweate in phthisis. — De Haen. Externally, 
styptic. 

Boi:btus Pim«Aiis, Boletus lancis<-*b. Salic\^ 
Daedalea snaTeoleDS. 

BoLS^TUs Sua v'soLSiiSt Fungus aal'ieis, Fuu- 
gms alim* ialigfnms, Dadn^Ua tuav'toUns, 
(F.) Agurie odorant* It has been used in 
rktyTT** pnlmonalis, and asthma^ in powder. 
Doee, from zas to ^ij. 
BoLBTTB ToucHwooB) Boletos igniarius. 
BOUMABTIS, Femun tartarisatum. 
BOLISMOS^ Boulimia* 
BOLITES. The mushr^^m; perhaps the 
Agar'ieus Aurmutiaems. — ^Piiny, MartiiUy Sen- 
tooiiia» Galen. It was so called» in consequence 
ci its shape, — ^irom Bolus, 

BOIJJS^ fmUfy a BM>rsely a monthliil, a bole, 
(q. T.9> (F.) Boi* A phatmaceoticai prepaxa* 
tioo, having a pilolBr ahape, bnt larger} capa^ 
ble, however, ti being swallowed as a pill. 

BoLCS Alba, Tsrra 3ig%Ua*taf ArgU'la pal'" 
U^ior: called sigillafta, from being conmionly 
made into small cakes or iat masses, and 
stamped or ssaUd with certain impressions. 
(F.) Bol hloMCy Tsrrs sigillde^ Argils^ oskrsuse 
pais. It was wed like tbs Bolus Anttsmts, and 
was brought from Etniria. See Terra. 

Bolus, Axjukn'tart, Bolus alimsnta'rius. 
The bole formed bj the food, after it has under- 
gone mastication and insalivation in the mouth; 
and been collected upon the tongue prior to de- 
glutition. 

Bolus OftiENTA'Lis. A kind of bolar earth, 
only distinguished from Bole Armenian in be- 
ing brought from Constantinople. See Bole, 
Armenian. 
Bolus Rubra, Bole, Armenian. 
BOMA'REA SALSILXA. The inhabitants 
of Chili use thb plant as a sudorific. It is 
firen in infusion in cutaneous diseases. 
BOMBAX, Qossypium. 
BOMBBMENTy Bombus. 
BOMBUS, Au'num JUutuoftioj A. sih'Uusy 
it. son'ituSyA. susur'rusy (F.) Bombemsnt, A 
kind of ringing or buzzing in the ears;-— cha- 
lacterized, according to Sauvagss, by the per- 
ception of blows or beating repeated at certain 
intervals. Also, Borborygmus. See Flatn- 
leoce, and Tinnitus Anrium. 
BOMBTX MORI, see Sericnm. 
BON, Coffea Arabica. 
BONA, Pfaaseolus vulgaris. 
BONDUE, Gymnocladus Canadensis. 
BONE,0«, Os'teofiy O/tsum^ (F.) 0«,Saxon, 
ban. The bones are the solid and hard parts, 
which form the basis of the bodies of animals, 
<]f the superior classes; and the union of which 
•oostitutes the skelstofi* The human body has, 
«t the adult age, 208 bones, without including 
the 32 teeth, the osea Wormiana, and the seea- 
xnoid bones. Anatomists divide them, from 
their shape, into 1. hong bonss, which form 
f«rt of the limbs, and represent columns for 
•opporting the weight of the body, or levers of 
different kinds for Sie muscles to act upon. 2. 
Plat Bonss, which form the parietes of splanch- 
oic cavities; and, 3. Short Bonss, met with in 
pwts of the body where solidity and some mo- 
bihty are necessary. Bones are formed of two 
different textares ; spongy and eompact. They 
afiofd, on analysis, much phosphate and carbo- 
Hte of lime, a little phosftete of 



phosphate of anmionia, oxides of iron and man* 
ganese, some traces of alumina and silica, gela- 
tin, &t, and water. The uses of the bones are 
mentioned under each bone. They give shape 
to the body, contain and defend the viscera, 
and act as levers to the muscles. 



TABLB of TBS BOMBS. 

'Frontal 1 

Bonesofthe ^^^, ? 

^^ Ethmoid, I 

Sphenoid, 1 

^Snperior MsziOaiy^.SI 
JogalorGheek,....9 

Nassl. 9 

Lachiymal, 9 

Pabitine» 9 

Inferior Spongy,.. . .3 

Vomer, 1 

Inferior MsziUaiy,. .1 

Incinres, 8 

Cuspidati, 4 

Molaies, SO 



Bosxs or 

THS 

Head. 



BoSBS or 

THl 

TausK. 



Bosssor 
THB Up- 
PSB Ez- 

TBXHITT. 



Bonis or 



Bonesofthe 
Faeu 




Bones (^ die 
Ear. 



VtrtcbnBm 



Sacrum,. 



Thsilrsi. 
Forsarm. 

f 



1 



Hyoid» 

Malleus,. 2 

fncus, 2 

Oibiculare, 2 

IStapes,. 2 

rCervicsI,. 7 

Doraal, 12 

^Lumbar, 5 

I 

Ob Coecygis, 1 

■"-»«»* iir.?:uv;;:.;:9j 

The Ps&ss. Innoininatanv 2 

TheSfc4mAfcr.|^|^;;;;;;;;;;* 

Humeruiv 2 

JUhia, 2 

>^ Radius 2 

^Naviculaie,. 2 

Lunare, 2 

Cuneiforme, 2 

Orbiculare, 2 

Trspezium, .2 

8^ Thipeioidei^ « 

^ Magnum, 3 

l^Undfimne, 2 

Metatarpusr 10 

Fkakmges, 98 

Femur,; 2 

(Patella, ,....2 

< Tibia, 9 

< Fibula, 9 

^CafcbOs, Ji 

Astragalus,: 2 

Cnboides 2 

^- Naviculaie, 2 

^ l^Coneifiinne, 6 

^ Metatarsus 10 

Phalanges, 28 

Total, 240 



BoNS, Bags, Vertebral column — b. Blade, 
Scapula— b.Bo0t-like,Ok scaphoides— b.BreaBt, 
Sternum-— b« Hauneh^ Ilion^— b. Share, Pubis— 
b. Splinter, Fibufai. 

Boms NirrsRS, Ostsul'sum, Tsn€^ul€^, from 
tsmo, <I hokl.' (F.) TsnaiUs ineisivs. An 
instrBment used iu cntttBg off spUnteis and 



Carpms 

or 
Wrist 



The Hdgh. 
TbBLsg: 



LOWBR -^ *s 
EXTRB- I J 
MITTr I ^ 



Tarsus 
at 
' Hstep. 



BONEBINBER 



110 



BOTANK 



cartilages. It is a kind of forceps, the handles 
of which are strong, and the edges, which touch 
each other, cutting. 
BONEBINDER, Osteocolla. 
BONES, BRITTLENESS OF THE, Fragi- 
litas ossium — ^b. Friability of the, Fragilitas os- 
sium — ^b. Salt of, Ammoniae carbona»— b. Soft- 
ening of the, MolUties ossium. 
BONESET, Eupatorium perfoliatum. 
BONIFACIA, Ruscus hypoglossum. 
BONNE DAMEy Atriplex hortensis. 
BONNES, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Bonnes is a village six leagues from Pau, in the 
department Battes Pyrineesy France. Here 
are several thermal springs. They were cele- 
brated as early as the time of Francis I., under 
the name Eaux d^ArqtubtuatU. They contain 
ddorides of sodium and magnesium, sulphates 
of magnesia and lime, sulphur, and silica. The 
temperature is from 78^ to 98<) Fahrenheit. 

The factitiou* Eau db Bonnbs is made of 
Hydroiulpkuretted watery f. Jiv: j^re watery 
Oj and f. Jss; chloride •/ eodiumy 90 grains; 
sulphate ofmagneeiay 1 grain. 
BONNET, Reticulum. 
BONNET A DEUX QLOBESy Bonnet 
d'Hippoerate. / 

BONNET V'HIPPOCRA TE, Cap offfip- 
poefratee, Mitra Hippocrat^iea, Fas'eia capita* li& , 
Pi'leus Sippocrat'icus. A kind of bandage, the 
invention of which is ascribed to Hippocrates. 
It consists of a double-headed roller, passed over 
the head so as to envelop it like a cap. The 
French, also, name it. Bonnet d deux globesy 
Capeline de la tite. 

BONNY CLABBER, from Irish, bainsy 
* milk,' and dahary * mire.' Sour milk. 

BONPLANDIA TRIFOLIATA, Cusparia 
febrifnga. 

BONUS GENIUS, Peucedanum— b. Henri- 
cus, Chenopodium bonus Henricus. 
BONY, Osseous. 
BOON UPAS, Upas. 
BOON A, Pbaseolus vulgaris. 
BORAC'IC ACID, Ac"idum Borae"icumy 
Sal sedati'vtu Hombbr'ox, Boric Addy (F.) 
Acide horacique. An acid obtained from Borax, 
which was once looked upon as sedative. It 
was also called Aeor Borac"icus, Sal vitrioli 
narcot'ieumy Sal volatile Bora^dsy and Flores 
Bora'eia. 
BORAGEy Borago officinalis. 
BORA GO OTFlCJNA'LlSyBuglos^eumve- 
rumy Bug, latifo'liwny Borra'gOy Corra'gOy Bo' 
rago horten'eisy Boragn, (F.) Bourrache, Nat, 
Ord, Boraffinea. Sex, Syat, Pentandria Mono- 
g^mia. The leaves and flowers have been con- 
sidered aperient. 
BORAS SUPERSODICUS, Borax. 
BORATHRON, Juniperus Sabina. 
BORAX, Bora* Soda, Soda Bibo'rasy Suhbo- 
ran Soda, Borae supersat'ume toddy Soda Bo- 
raxa'tOyChrysoeoVlayCapie'tfumauriySubborate 
ofprotox'ide of So*diumySubprotobo'rate ofSodi" 
Hilly Boras Soda alcalea'cene seu alctdi'nvmy 
Boras super so'dieuty Borax Ven'etuty Subbo'reu 
Na'trieumy Borax'triony Nitrmm facti^'tium, &c . 
Subbo'rate or Biborate of Soda, Borate of Soda, 
(F.) Borate on Sous-borate de Sonde, Borate 
sursatnri de sonde. It is found in an iitipure 
state in Thibet and Persia. It is inodorous; 
taste cool, and somewhat alkaline; soluble in 



12 parts of water. Borax is seldom nsed except 
as a lotion in aphthae. 

BoBATB OF Mbbcuby has been recommended 
as^n antisyphilitic. 
BORAXTRION, Borax. 
BORBORUS, Fimus. 

BORBORYG'MUS, from |f o^jf a^vCo, < I mika 
a dull noise.' Murmur seu Bombus seu Motua 
Iruestino'rumy AnUe'may AniWsisy Caloptofk'- 
iay Intona'tio intestina'lis'y Murmur ventm 
seu intestina'Uy (F,) Oargouiliomsnty GromlU- 
ment d'Entrailies. The noise made by flatm 
in the intestines. This happens often in health, 
especially in nervous individuals. 

BORD (F.) Margoy Edge, Margin. Anato- 
mists have so named the boundaries of an or- 
gan. Thus, the bones, muscles, fcc have borda 
as well as bodies. The * free edge/ bord iibre, 
is one not connected with any part; the <ad- 
herinE edge,' bord adherenty one that is eoo- 
nected; and the bord artieulairey or 'articular 
margin, or edge,' that which is joined to another 
bone. 
BORD CILIAIREy Ciliary nEiargin. 
BORDEAUX, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Near this great city, in the south-west of France, 
is a saline, chalybeate spring. It contains ox- 
ide of iron, carbonate and sulphate of lime, chlo- 
rides of sodium and calcium, subcarbonate of 
soda, and sulphate of magnesia. 
BORE, BoroQ. 

BORGNE, (F,yCoeleay Unoe'ulusy Luam*^ 
Lusdo'aus, One who has only one eye, or sees 
ovXj with one. The word has been used, figu- 
ratively, for Uindy in surgery and anatomy. Sea 
Caecus. 
BORIUM, Boron. 

BORON, Bo'Humy (F.) Bore, A simple sub- 
stance, the basis of boracic acid; obtained, bj 
heating potassium with boracic acid, as a dark 
olive-coloured powder, devoid of taste and smelL 
Heated in the air or in oxygen, it is converted 
into boracic acid. 

BOR'OSAIL, Zasl, Ethiopian names for a 
disease, very common there, which attacks the 
organs of generation, and appears to have coq- 
siderable analogy with syphilis. 
BORRAGO, Borago officinalis. 
BORRI, Curcuma longa. 
BORRIBERRI, Curcuma longa. 
BORSE, MINERAL WATERS OF. Borse 
is a village in B^arn. The waters are ehalyr 
beate. 

BO'SA. An .Egyptian name for a mass, 
made of the meal of darnel, henaqiheeed, and 
water. It is inebriating. — ^Prospero Alpini. 
BOSOM, see Mamma. 
BOSSA, Plague token. 
BOSSEy Hump, Protuberance — b. Nasale, 
Nasal protuberance. 

BOSWELLIA SERRATA, see Junipenv 
lycia. 

BOTAL FORA'MEN, Fora'msn Bota*lB; 
the Fora'men ovafUy (F.) Trou de Botal, A 
large opening which exists in the fcatus in the 
partition between the two auricles of the heart; 
and by means of which the blood jpassea from 
one to the other. Its discovery is generally 
attributed to Leonard Botallus, Botal or Bo^ 
talH, who wrote in 15G3. It was spoken of, 
however, by VesalioB. and even by Galen. 
BOTANE, Herb. 



BOTANIQWB MEDICALS 



in 



BOULIMIA 



BOTANIQUE M&DICALE, Botany, medi- 
cal. 

BOT'ANY, MFAyiCKL^Botan^iea Med'ica^ 
Mfdici^na Botan'teayPhytolog'^iamed^iea; from 
|$oTtf ri;, < an herV (F.) Botaniqtie Medicale. The 
knowledge of the properties, characters, &c., 
of those vegetables which are used in medieine. 

BOTAR'GO, (F.) Botargue. A preparation 
made in Italy and the south of France, with 
the eggs and blood Of the Mugilcepk'alua ot 
Mullet; strongly salted, after it has become pu- 
trescent. It is used as a condiment. 

BOTAUGUEy Botargo. 

BOTHOR. An Arabic term for abscess in 
the nares. It means, also, a tumour in general; 
especially those which are without solution of 
continnity. 

BOTHRIOCEPH'ALUS, Botrioeeph^alus la- 
tus, Bothrioeepk'alumy Bolrioeepk'iliis, from 
fto&^»^f, < a small pit,^ and «i9aii;,<head,' Tx*nia 
lata, T. vnlga'riSy Lumbri^eiia latusy Plate'a, T. 
Qs'cuUs lateral'Uiua gem'iniay T.grisea^ T. mem- 
hrana^eeay T. teneVla^ T, denta'ta^ T. kuma'na 
inermis, "Ilal'yHs fuemhraha'eea, T. prima, T. 
09'eulis lateral'ibus solita'Tiis, T. aeepk'ala, T. 
osculia snperficial'ibusj T. a anneaux courts, T. 
non armi, Ver solitaife, Broad Tape wqrfi» 
Common in Switzerland, Russia, and some parts 
of France. It inhabits the intestines of man, 
and extends to an enormous length. A broken 
specimen has been obtained 6U yards long. — 
Goeze. 

BOTH'RION, Both*riwm, from fi^^gog, «a pit, 
caTity,' &c. An alveolus, (q. v.) or small fossa. 
A small deep ulcer on the cornea. — Galen, Pau- 
las of iEgina. See Fossette. 

BOTHRIUM, Bothrion, Fossette. ' 

BOTHROS, Fovea. 

BOTIN, Terebinthina. 

BOTIUM, Bronchocele. 

BOTOTfflNUM. An obscure term, used by 
Paracelsus to denote the most striking symp- 
tom of a disease : — the Flos morbi, 

BOTOU, Pareira brava. 

BOTRIOCEPHALUS, Bothriocephalus. 

BOTRION, Alveolus. 

BOTROPHIS SERPENTARIA, Actaarace- 
mosa. 

BOTRTS, Chenopodium botrys, see Vitis 
▼inifera — ^b. Ambroisioides, Chenopodium am- 
brosioides — b. Americana, Chenopodium am- 
brosioides — ^b. Anthelminticum, Chenopodium 
anthelminticum — b. Mezicana, Chenopodium 
aznbrosioidea. 

BO TTINE, (F.) A thin hoot or busk%n,0'erea 
U'm'or, An instrument, which resembles a small 
boot, furnished with springs, straps, buckles, 
kc, and used to obviate distortions of the lower 
extremities in children. 

BOTTLE NOSE, Gutta rosea. 

BOUBALIOS, Momordica elaterium. Vulva. 

BOUBON,Biibo. 

BOUCAGE Af^JlEUH, Pimpinella magna— 
h.Afineur, Pimpinella saxifraga — b. Petit, Pim- 
pin^Ua saxifraga. 

BOirCHS, Mouth. 

BOUCLBMENT, Infibulation. 

BOUES DBS EAUX,{¥,) Bones Min^rales, 
B^'wa Cigno'sa. The mud or swamp, formed 
cear mineral springs; impregnated with the 
stibstances contamed in such springs, and con- 
*«iaently possessing similar properties. The 
fiwj are applied generally and topically, in 
9 



France,* at the springs of St. Amand, Bagneres 
de Luchon, Bagnols, Bareges; in the United 
States, at the White Sulphur in Virginia, &c. 

BOITE8 MINdRALES, Boues des eaux, 

BOUFFE,{¥,) llhe small eminence, formed 
by the junction of the two lips. — Dulaurens. 

BOUFFISSURE, Puffiness. 

BOUGIE, (F.) A wax candle: CandeVtUa, 
Cande'la, C, ce'rea, Cande'la medica*ta, Ce'reum 
medica'tum, Cereolus Chirurgo'rum, Dce'dion, 
Spedl'lwn ee'retim, Virga ce'rea, Cereolus. A 
flexible cylinder, variable in size, to be intro- 
duced into the urethra, oesophagus, rectum, &c. 
for the purpose of dilating these canals, when 
contracted. A Simple Bougie is composed of 
solid and insoluble substances ; as plaster, elas- 
tic gum, catgut, &c. It acts of course only me- 
chanically. 

Bougie, MsDiGATkn, (F.) B. Medieamenteuse, 
has the addition of some escharotic or other sub- 
stance to destroy the obstacle; as in the Caus- 
tic Bougie, v/YAoh has a small portion of Lunar 
Caustic or Common Caustic inserted in its ex- 
tremity. Ducamp has recommended a Bougie, 
which swells out near its extremity, for the 
better dilating of the urethia. This he calls 
B. d ventte* The metallic Bougie, invented by 
Smyth, is a composition of metal, allowing of 
great flexibility; and a hollow Bougie is one, 
with a channel running through it, to be used 
in the same manner as the catheter, or other- 
wise. 

BOUILLIE (Y.^^Pultic'ula, Pap, from (F.) 
bouillir, < to boil.' Flour, beaten and boiled 
with milk. It is a common food for infantsi 

BOUILLON, (F.) from bouillir, <to boil,* 
Jns, Sorbif'io. A liquid food, made by boiling 
the flesh of animals in water. The osmazome, 
gelatin, and soluble salts dissolve; the fat mehs, 
and the albumen coagulates. Bouillon is nou- 
rishing, owing to the gelatin and osmazome. 
The Jus de Viande is a very concentrated Bouil- 
lon, prepared of beef, mutton, veal, &c. 

BOUILLON^ in common language, in France, 
means a round fleshy excrescence, sometimes 
seen in the centre of a venereal ulcer. 

BOUILLON BLANC, Verbascum nigrum. 

BOUILLONS MEDICINAUXou PHAR- 
MACEUTIQUES, Medicinal or Pharmaceutic 
Bouillons, contain infusions or decoctions of me- 
dicinal herbs. The Bouillon aux herbes is ge- 
nerally composed of sorrel or beet, 

BOUILLON d'OS,(T,)Bouillonfrombones, 
is obtained by treating bones with muriatic 
acid, in order to dissolve the earthy parts. The 
gelatin, which remains, is then boiled with a 
little meat and vegetables. — D'Arcet. Bouil- 
lon, however, can be easily obtained from the 
bones of roast meat by simple coction. 

BOUILLONNEMENTy Ebullition. 

BOUIS, Buxus. 

BOULE D^ACIER, Ferrum tartarizatunt— 
b. de Mars, Ferrum tartarizatiim — 5. de Mol- 
sheim, Eerrum tartarizatum— 3. de Nancy, Fer- 
rum tartarizatimi. 

BOULEAU COMMUN, Betula alba. 

BOULIM'IA,^ Bulim'ia, Bulim'ius, Bu'li- 
mus, Bou'limos, Bulimiasis, Bolismos, Edim'- 
ia, JPames eani*na, Appeti'tus eaninus, Appe- 
ten'tia eani'na, Adepkagia, Cynorez'ia, Orex'- 
is ryno'des, Bnpi'na^ Bnpei'na, Fhaga'na, Pha- 
gedce'na. Fames Bovi'na, F, Lupi'na, from 
^ovQy «an ox,' and Xi/aoc, 'hunger;' or from (t&. 



BOUUMIE 1 

angmentatiye particle, and MfiHy < Iranger/ (F.) 
JBouiimie, Faim canitu^ F. divorante^ Poly- 
phagi«. An almost insatiable hanger. A fiO" 
nine appetite. H is sometimes seen in hysteria 
and jiregnancy; rarely under other circum- 
stances. 

BOUUMIE, Boulimia. 

BOULOGNE, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Boulogne is in the department of Paq-de-Calais, 
Fiance. The waters are chalybeate. 

BOUQUET ANATOMIQUE DE RIO- 
LANy (F.) from bouquet, a collection of flow- 
ers or other substances tied together. A name 
S'ven, by some anatomists, to the collection of 
,gaments and muscles, inserted into the styloid 
process of the temporal bone. 

BouQiTST Fever, -Dengue. 

BOURBILLON, see Furunculus (core.) 

BOURBON-LANCY, MINERAL WATERS 
OF. Bourbon-Lancy is a small village in the 
department of Saone-et-Loire, France; where 
there are thermal saline springs, containing car- 
bonic acid, chloride of sodium, and sulphate of 
soda, chloride of calcium, carbonate of lime, 
iron, and silica. Their heat is from 106^ to 
135^ Fahrenheit. 

BOURBON L'ARCHAMBAUT, MINE- 
RAL WATERS OF. This town is in the de- 
partment of the AUier, six leagues west from 
Moulins, and has been long celebrated for its 
thermal chalybeate waters. They contain sul- 
phohydric acid, sulphate of soda, magnesia, and 
lime, carbonate of iron, and silica. Their tem- 
perature varies between 136^ and 145^ Fahren- 
neit. 

BOURBONNE-LES-BAINS, MINERAL 
WATERS OF. These springs are seven 
leagues from Langres, department of Haute- 
Marne, France. They are thermal and saline, 
and have been long celebrated. Temperature 
from 106^ to 133^ Fahrenh^t. The Factitious 
watery (F.) Eau de Bourlfonne-les-BainsyAjgna 
Borvonen^sis, is composed of water, containing 
twice its bulk of carbonic acid, f. .^xxss; chlo- 
ride of sodium, f. 5J, chloride of calcium, gr. x. 

BOURBOULE, MINERAL WATERS OF 
A village near Mount d'Or, where there are 
two thermal saline springs. 

BOURDAINE, Rhamnus frangula. 

BOURDONNEMENT, Tinnitus aurium. 

BOURDONNET, Pulvit'hts,P. e linamen'- 
tis confee'tus. P.. rotun'dus, Dossil, A term 
in French surgery for charpie rolled into a 
small nmss of an olive shape, which is used 
for plugging wounds, absorbing the discharge, 
and preventing the union of tiieir edges. In 
cases of deep and penetrating wounds, as of 
the abdomen or chest, a thread is attached to 
them by which they may be readily withdrawn, 
and be prevented from passing altogether into 
those cavities. 

BOURGkNE, Rhamnus frangula. 

BOURGEON, Granulation, Papula—*. 
Chamu, Granulation. 

BOURGEONS, Gutta rosea. 

BOURRACHE, Borago officinalis. 

BOURRELET, (F.) A Pad, a Border. A 
fibro-cartilaginous border, which surrounds cer- 
tain articular cavities, such as the glenoid ca- 
vity of the scapula and the acetabulum ; and 
by which the depth of those cavities is aug- 
mented. 



9 BRACHIAL 

BOURRELET ROULA, Coma a 

BOURSES, (LES,) Scrotum. 

BOURSOUFLURE, Pufliness. 

BOUTON, Papula— n6. d'Alep, see Anthiu 
— h. Malin, see Anthrax — h. d*Or, Ranuociiioi 
acris. 

BOUTONNlkRE, (F.) Fusu'ra, lnd*'k. 
A small incision made into the urethra toextnct 
a calculus from the canal, when it is too largt^ 
to be discharged. 

Also, a small incision or puncture, made in 
the peritoneum, or above the pubis, to peD^ 
trate the bladder in certain cases of retentiofi 
of urine. 

BOVACHEVO, Datura sanguinea. 

BOVILL^, RubeoU. 

BOVISTj'A, Lycoperdon. 

BOWEL, Intestine. 

B0WLE6GED, see Cnemoscoliosis. 

BOWMAN'S ROOT, Euphorbia corollati, 
Gillenia trifoUata, Leptandria purpurea. 

BOXBERRY, Gaultheria. 

BOX, MOUNTAIN, Arbutus uva ursi. 

BOX TREE, Buxus, Comas Florida. 

BOXWOOD, Cornus Florida. 

BOYAU, Intestine. 

BRABYLON, Prunum Damascenum. 

BRACHERIOLUM, Truss. 

BRACHERIUM, Truss. 

BRACm^US, Brachial— b. Intcrnu»,Bn- 
chialis anterior. 

.BRA'CHIAL, Brachia'lis, Brackicf'usjm^ 
Brackium, < the arm.' What belongs to the am. 

Brachial ApoNEinio'sis. An aponeuroBS, 
formed particularly by expansion^ of the ten- 
dons of the latissimus dorsi, pectoralis major. 
and deltoides muscles, and which completely 
envelops the muscles of the arm. 

Brachial Artery, Arte'ria braehia'Us,Bf^' 
meral Artery, (F.) Arthe ou Tronc braekial. 
The artery, which extends from the axilla to 
the bend of the elbow; where it divides into 
^. cubitalis and A. radialis. It passes along 
the internal edge of the biceps, behind the m^ 
dian nerve and between the accompanying 
veins. Under the name Brachial Artery ^ M> 
Chaussier includes the subclavian, axillary, anJ 
humeral, the last being the brachial proper. 

Brachial Muscle, Anterior, Mus'cuhi 
Brachia'lis Ante'rior, BrachiaUis intemus, B. 
antigens, Brachiix'us, Br<iehia'us intemut, (F.) 
Muscle brachial interne, Humcro'eubitol— 
(Ch.) This muscle is situate at the anterior 
and inferior part of the arm^ and before the el- 
bow-joint. It arises, fleshy, from the middle 
of the OS humeri, and is inserted into the coro- 
noid process of the ulna. Use. To bend the 
forearm. 

Brachial Plexus, Plexus Brachia'lis, is a 
nervous plexus, formed by the interlacing of 
the anterior branches of the four last cervical 
pairs and the first dorsal. It is deeply seated 
in the hollow of the axilla, and extends as far 
as the inferior and lateral ]part of the neck. It 
gives off the thoracic nerves, supra and infrfi 
scapular, and the brachial (which are six ir 
number,) the axillary, cutaneous, muscuh-eK' 
taneous, radial, cubital, and median. 

Brachial Veins are two in number, and ac 
company the artery, frequently anastomosing 
with each other : they terminate in the axillary 
Under the term Brachial Vein, Chaussier in 
eludes the humeral, axillary, and subclavian. 



BBACmALE 



ISS 



BRAStGUB 



BRACHIAL£» Carpus. 

BRACHIALIS, Bradual— b. Anticus, Bxa- 
cliial mofcle— b. ExternoB, see Triceps ezten- 
wr cubiti— b. Internus, Brachial xnascle. 

BRACHIERIUM, Truss. 

BRACHILE, Truss. 

BRACHIO-CEPHALIC ARTERY, Inno- 
misata arteria — ^b. Veins, InnominatflB venae. 

BRA'CHIO-CUBITAL, Braehio-^iuHtc^lis. 
That which belongs both to the arm and cubitus. 
Thifl name has been given to the internal late- 
ral ligament at the elbow-joint; because it is 
attached to the os brachii or os humeri and to 
the cubitus or ulna. 

BRACmOCYLLO'SIS, from /f^tf/ivv, < the 
ann,' and MAxaoo-i^, < the act of making crooked.' 
Carvature of the arm inwards. Paralysis or 
loss of power from curvature of the arm. 

BRACmON, Brachium. 

BRACfflON'CUS, frena jS^a/iob, <the arm/ 
and oyMf , < a swelling.' A tumour of the arm. 

6RACHI0-RADIAL, Braehio-radia'lM. 
That which belongs to the brachium and radius. 
This name has been applied to the external la- 
teral ligament of the elbow-joint, because it is 
attached to the htunerus and to the radius. See 
Snpmator radii longus. 

BRACHIORRHEU'MA, RheumaH/mus 
hra'ekii, from /l^a/Mvr, < the arm/ and (iu/«« , * de- 
flazion, rheumatism.' . Rheumatism of the arm. 

BRACfflROLUM, Truss. 

BRACHIUM, Brafekiouy LiMr'tus, (F.) 
Bras, the arm. The arm from the shotilder to 
the wiist, or the part between the shoulder and 
elbow. See Hameri Os. 

BiAcmuM ^ovxNs QuA&TUs, Latissimus 
dorsi. 

BR^CHUNA, Nymphomania, Satyriasis. 

BRACHYAU'CIffiN, from ^xvc, 'short,' 
and «vv»r, 'neck.' One who luw a short neck. 

BRACHYCHRO'NIUS,fromi8^X«'^i 'short,' 
^ Z^^^9 ' tinae.' That which continues but 
t ihort time. A term applied to diseases which 
are of short duration.— ^Galen. 

BRACHYGNATHUS, from fieaxvf,< shorty' 
and ^vodtK, the * under jaw.' A monster with 
too short an under jaw, — Gurlt. 

BRACHYNSIS, Abbreviation. 

BRACHYPNCEA, Dyspnoea. 

BRACHYPOTI, from /J^a/wf, 'short,' and 
»^»Ti5f, 'drinker.* They who drink little, or 
who drmk larely. Hippoc., Galen, Foesius. 

BRACHYRHYN'CHUS: from i?«a/w, 
'ibort,' and ^vyx^tf ' snout.' A monster with 
too short a nose. 

BRACHYSMOS, Abbreviation. 

BRACING, Corroborant. 

BRADYiESTHE'SIA, from fifaivs, 'diffi- 
^t,' and atr&iiait, < sensation.' ^ Impaired sen- 
Blion. 

BRADYBOLIS'MUS, Bradyspernatismus. 

BRADYECOIA, Deafness, 

BRADYLOG"IA, Dysla'lia; from fif^aSuf, 
'diiBcQlt,' and xeyo«, ' a discourse.' Difficulty 
of speech. 

BRADYMASE'SIS, Bradymasse'nt, in^)ro- 
}^\j BradymaaWgiay Manduea'tio dijle"ilit, 
^ i^a^f , ' difficult,' and fuivr^i^y ' mastica- 
'^ Difficult mastication. See Dysmasesis. 

BUDYMASTESIS, Bradymasesis. 
^ BRADYPEP'SIA, Tarda cibo'rum eancoe'tio, 
•nan jSj^o^pr, 'slow,' and ntntm, 'I digest.' 
^ digestioii.^-Galen. See Dyspepsia. 



BRADYSPERMATISIKUS, BradyboKs'- 
nuu, Ejaeula'tio sem'inis impedi'toy Dygper- 
nuUi^musy from fi^»dvfy 'slow,' and ons^^ce, 
' sperm.^ A slow emission of sperm. 

BRADYSU'RIA, Ttnst'mus vesi'ea, (F.) 
Tine^me vesical ^ from |9^a/vc, ' difficult,' and 
ovQtttf ' to pass the urine.' Painful evacuation 
of the urine, with perpetual desire to void it. 
Dysuria (q. v.) 

BRADYTOCIA, Dystocia. 

BRAG'GET, Braggart, Bragtaort, Anam« 
formerly applied to a tisan of honey and water. 
See Hydromeli. 

BRAIy UQUIDE, see Pinus sylvestris— ^. 
£)«e, Colophonia. 

BRAIN, Cerebrum— >b. Little, Cerebellum. 

BRAINE, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Braine is a small village, three leagues from 
Soissons, France, which has purgative waters 
similar to those of Passy. 

BRAKE, COMMON, Pteris Aquilina— b. 
Rock; Polypodium vulgare— b. Root, Poljrpo^ 
dium vulgare. 

BRAMBLE, AMERICAN HAIRY, seejlu- 
bus fruticosus — b. Comnu»n> Rubus frutico* 
sus. 

BRAN, Furfur. 

BRANC-URSINE bAtaRDE, Heiacle- 
um spondylium. 

BRANCA URSINA, Acanthus mollis— b. 
Germanica, Heracleum spondylium. 

BRANCH, from (F.) Branehe^ originally 
probably from §iaxm^y 'an arm,'(?) because 
branches of trees, &c., eo off like arms. A term 
-applied, generally, to the principal division of 
an artery or nerve. The word is conunonly 
used svnonynaously with Ramus ; but often, 
with the French, Braneks signifies the great 
division; — Ramsau^ Lat. iSomiM, the division 
of the branches ; and Ramuseules, Lat. Ramus' 
ettli, the divisions of these last. 

The French, also, speak of the iranekes of 
the pubis, for the Rami of that bone, branehss 
of the ischium, for the rami of the ischium, &c. 

BRANCHES DE LA MO^LLB ALLON^ 
G£E (FETITESy Corpora restiformta« 

BBASCKl, Braneha. Swellings of the ton- 
sils, or parotid, according to some ; — of the 
thyroid gland, according to others. 

BRANCHUS, /J^oy/flc, Rauee'do (q. v.) A 
catarrhal affection of the mucous membrane of 
the fauces, trachea, &c. — Galen. Hoarseness. 

BRANCI, Cynanche tonsillaris. 

BRANCIA, Vitirum. 

BRANDY. (O.) Branntwein, Dutch, 
Brandwijn, ' burnt wine.' Vinum cuius'' 
turn sen erem'atum. Aqua Vita, (F.) Eau ds 
visy (S.) Aguardiente. The first liquid pro* 
duct obtamed by distilling wine. It is com- 
posed of water, alcohol, and an aromatic oilv 
matter, which gives it its flavour. Brandy is 
a powerful and diffusible stimulant, and as such 
is used in medicine. It has been also called 
Liquor Aquit^gius, See Spirit. ' 

BRAifDY, Apflb, see Pyrus mains. 

BRANKS, Cynanche parotidsa. 

BRANEURSINE, Acanthus mollis. 

BRANNTWEINy Brandy. 

BRASy Brachium — b» du Cervelety Corpora 
restiformia. 

BRASEGUR, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Brasegur is a place in the diocess of Rhodes, 
where ther^ are cathartic waters. 



BRASENIA 



134 



BEICUMUM 



BRASENIA, B. Hydropeltis. 
B&A8B'NiA Hydropel'tis, Bras^'rUa^ Gelat'u 
na aquat^iea, Frogleafy Little Water Lily, Wa- 
ter Jelly, Deerfood. An indigenous plant, Nat. 
Ord. Ranuncalaces, Sex* Syet, Polyandria Po- 
lygynia, flouriahing from Carolina to Kentucky 
and Florida; and covering the surface of pcmds, 
marshes, &e. The freah leaves are mucilagi- 
nous, and have been used in pulmonary com- 
plaints, dysentery, &c., like Cetraria. 

BRASH, WATER, Pyrosis. 

Brash, Weahino, Atroph'ia Ablaetato'rum, 
A severe form of diarrhoea, which supervenes 
at times on weaning. The Maiadie de Cruveil- 
heir appears to be a similar affection. 

BRASILETTO, see Ca»sa]pinia. 

BRASIUM, Malt. 

BRASMOS, Fermentation. ' 

BRASS, Sax. bpar* Welsh, pris. Aurichal'- 
eum, Oriehal'eum, JSeeeavum, Ckrysoehal'eos, 
(F.) Airain, A yellow metal, formed by mix- 
ing copper with calamine. The same general 
remarks apply to it as to copper. See Cuprum. 

BRAS'SICA, Crambe, tegafifiti, Bras' eiea ole- 
ra*eea: B, capita'ta sett euma'na of the old Ho- 
mans. The Cabbage, (F.) Chou potager, Fo- 
im/y, Cruciferae. Sex.Syst, Tetradynamia Sili- 
quosa. Cato wrote a book on its Virtues. It is 
a vegetable by no means easy of digestion 
when boiled; when raw, it appears to be more 
digestible. When fprming a solid globular 
mass, like a head, it is the B. Capita'ta, (F.) 
CkoU'Cabus, Chou Poitimi. 

Brassica Camina, Mercurialis perennis. 

Bras'sica Eru'ca^ Ern'ca, Garden Rocket, 
Roman Rocket, &c. {Y.) Chou Roquette, Ro- 
quette. This was considered bv the Romans, 
an aphrodisiac, — Columella. The seeds were 
ordinarily used. 

Bras'sica Floe'xda, — Bra^'sica Pompeia'na 
of the ancients — ^the Caulijlower, Caulis Flo- 
rida, (F.) Chou-Jleur, is a more tender and di- 
gestible variety. 

The Broc'coli, B, Sabel'liea of the Romans, 
B. Ital'ica, belongs td this variety. 

Brassica Marina, Convolvulus soldanella — 
b. Pompeiana, Brassica Florida. 

Bras'sica Napus, Napus Sylvestris, Su- 
viae, Rape, (F.) Navette. The seed yields a 
quantity of oil. 

Brassica Nigra, Sinapis nigra. 

Brab'sica RAPA,'Saj;a rotun'da, Rapum ma- 
jus, Rapa r^apus. Turnip, (F.) Chou navet, 
Navet, Rave. The turnip is liable to the same 
objection (but to a less extent) as the cabbage. 

BRATHU, Juniperus sabina. 

BRATHYS, Juniperus sabina. 

BRAVER, Truss. 

BRAYERA ANTHELMINTIC A, Hagenia 
Abyssinica. 

BRAZIL WOOD, Caesalpinia echinata. 

BREAD, see Triticum. 

Bread, Gluten. Bread made ol wheat dou^ 
deprived of the chief portion of its starch by 
washing. Bread, made of gluten only, cannot 
be eaten on account of its hardness afid tough- 
ness; hence, one fifth of the normal quantity of 
starch is allowed to remain, and in this form 
the bread is said to be tolerably light, eatable, 
and moderately agreeable. 

Bread, Housebou), Syncomistos. 

BREAD-FRUIT TREE, Artocarpus. 



BREAST, Thorax, Manmiar— b. Abscess o{ 
the, Mastodynia apostematosa. 

BREAST-GLASS, Milk-glass. A glass ap- 
plied to the nipple to receive the milk when 
secreted copiously by the mamma. 

BREAST-PANG, SUFFOCATIVE, Angina 
pectoris. 

BREAST-PUMP, AntlU lactca. 
BREATH, Sax. bna^e, Bal'itus, Anhel*itU4, 
An'imus, Spir'itus, Afmos, (F.) HaUine. The 
air expelled from the chest, at each expiration. 
It requires to be studied in the diagnosis of tlMi- 
racic diseases especially. 

Breath. Offensive; Ftetor Oris, Caeosto- 
matosphre sia, Hhl'itus oris fa'ttdusy Oxl., An 
offensive condition, which is usually dejiendent 
upon carious teeth, or some faulty state of the 
secretions of the air passages. The internal 
use of the chlorides may be advantageous. 

Breath, Short, Dyspncea. 

BREATHING, DIFFICULTY OF, Dysp- 
ncea. 

BRBCHET, (F.) The Brisket. This naioe 
is given in some parts of France to .the €arti- 
lago-ensiformis, and sometimes to the sternum 
itself. 

BRECHMA, Bregma. 

BRECHMUS, Bregma. 

BR£DISSURE,(V.y Trismus Capistra'tut, 
Incapacity of opening the mouth, in consequence 
of preternatural adhesion between the internal 
part of the cheek and gnms; often occasioned 
by the abuse of mercury. 

BR^DOUILLEMENT, (F.) TUuhan'tia, 
A precipitate and indistinct mode of utterance, 
in which a part only of the words is prononncedj 
and several of the syllables viciously changed. 
This defect is analogous to stuttering, bat dif- 
fers from it in being dependent on too great ra- 
pidity of speech ; whilst stuttering is charac- 
terized by continual hesitation, and frequent re- 
petition of the same syllables. 

BREGMA) Brechma, Brechmus, from |lof- 
Xttv, *to sprinkle;' Fontanell'a, {q, v.) JSin'- 
dpfit (q. V.) The top of the head was thus 
called, because it was believed to be humid in 
infants; and, according to some, because it was 
conceived to correspond to the most humid part 
of the brain. 

BRENNING, Burning. 

BREPHOCTONON, Conyza squarrosa. 

BREPHOTROPHE'UM, Eethdohrepkotro- 
phe'um,iTom IJ5190C, *a newborn child,' and 
r^o^ff/v. * to nourish.* A foundling hospital. 

BRESILLET, Cesalpinia sappan. 

BRE'VIA VASA, Short Vessels. This name 
has been given to several branches of the sple- 
nic arteries and veins, which are distributed to 
the great eul-de-sAc of the stomach. 

BREVIS CUBITI, see Anconeus. 

BRICK, (F.) Briqne. Hot bricks are some^ 
times used to apply heat to a part, as to the 
abdomen in colic, or after the operation for po- 
pliteal aneurism; or, reduced to very fine pow- 
der, and mixed with fat, as an application to 
herpetic and psoric affections. 

Bricks, Forna'eeee Testa or Tiles, were for- 
merly bruised in vinegar, and the. liquid \ra4 
used as a specific in cutaneous affections. Tbff«j 
entered, also, into a cerate used for sorofuloi:S 
humours, &c. To the Terra Foma'cnm, qi 
Brick earth, the same virtues were assigned. 
I BRICUMUM, Artemisia. 



BBIBB 



m 



BRONCHIA 



BRlDSy (F.) A bridle. Fra'nulum, ReH- 
naculuvi. This term is given, in the plural, 
to membruious filaments, which are found 
within abscesMS or deep-seated wounds^ and 
which prevent the exit of pua. The term is, 
also, applied to preternatural adhesions, which 
occur in cicatrices of the skin, in the urethra, 
or ia infla med s erous or synovial membranes. 

•BRi£R, WILD, Rosa canina. 

BRIGHT'S DISEASE OF THE KIDNEY, 
see Kidney, Bright's disease of tha. 

BRIGHTON, CLIMATE OF. The air of 
this fashionable watering place, on the south 
coast of England, is dry, elastic, and bracing. 
According to Sir James Clark, its climate ap- 
pears to the greatest advantage in the autumn 
and eaxiy part of the winter; when it is some- 
what milder and more steady than that of Has- 
tings. Accordingly, it is adapted for all cases 
in which a dry and mild air at this season of 
the year proves beneficial. In the spring 
months, owing to the prevalence of, and its 
exposure to, north-east winds, the climate is 
cold, harsh, and exciting to the delicate. It is 
well adapted for convalescents, and for all whd 
require a dry and bracing sea air. 

BRIMSTONE, Sulphur. 

BRINE, Muria. 

BRIXTON ROOT, Leptandria pnrpniea. 

BRION, Corallina. 

BRiqUE, Brick. 

BRIQUEBEC, J^flNERAL WATERS OF. 
This town is thuree leagues from Cherbourg, in 
Fiance. The water contains chloride of iron. 

BRISE'FIERRE ARTICUL^^ (F.) An 
iostniment invented by Jacobson for crushing 
tlie stone in the bladder. 

BRISTOL HOT WELL, Bristolien'sit Aqua. 
Bnsto^ ia about thirteen miles from Bath, in 
England. The water is an almost pure ther- 
mal; slightly acidulated. It contains chlorides 
of ma^esium and sodium, sulphate of soda, 
lolphate of lime, carbonate of lime, carbonic 
acid, oxygen and azote. Temperature, 74^ 
FaL The Hot Well has been long celebrated. 
Its action is like that of the thermal waters in 
feoeral. The climate of Bristol is mild, and 
^>eace the water has been* celebrated for the 
core of incipient pulmonary consumption. See 
Chiton. 

BRIZOCERAS, Ergot. 

BROAD, Sax» bjia©, Latw, (F.) Large. Any 
body is so termed whose transverse extent is 
coasiderahle compared with its length. The 
Broad £(m«#,such as the frontal, parietal, occi- 
pital, iliac, aid in forming the parietes of 

ipUnchnic cavities. Broad Muscles generally 

occupy the parietes of cavities, and especially 

jhose of the chest and abdomen. The epithet 

IBS also been applied to other parts— as to the 
• ^oad lijfomsnts, of the womb, &c. 
BROCCOLI, Brassica sabelUca. 
BROCHOS, Pfcx'^ti Lofueus, (q. v.) A ban- 

BROCHTHUS, /J^o/^^c , Gula. The throat. 
^^ a kind of sniall drinking vessel. — Hipp. 

BROCHUS, Morof. This name has been 
pen to one who has a very prominent upper 
^pM^astelli. According to others, it means 
^ whose teeth project in front of the mouth. 

BRO^IUM , A synonym of Jus or Jus'cu* 
'^a. Broth, or the Uquor in which any thing 
■> boiled. Bre^dium salts'—^, decoction of salt. 



BROIEMENT, see Cataract. 

BROKEN DOSES, see Doses, broken. 

BROKEN- WINDEDNESS, Asthma. 

BROMA, Aliment, Bromine. 

BROMATOfiCCRISIS, Lientery. 

BROMATOG'RAPHY, Bromatograph'iay 
Bromoffraphyy Bromograph'ioy ftom ^fAUy 
'food,' and y(a9it> 'a description.' A descrip- 
tion of aliments. 

BROMATOL'OGY, Bromatolog"ia, SitioV- 
ogjfy from fiioftoy < food,' and xoy0«, <a discourse.' 
A treatise on food. 

BROME, Bromine. 

BROME LIA ANANAS, called after OUus 
Bromel, a Swede. Car^duus Brazilia^nusy 
Avudnas aeosta ovalta sen aeulea^tus. Anas' sa, 
Capa'IsiaJh'Jhaf Ana'naSy or Pine Apple, A 
West India tree, wliich produces the most de- 
licious of fruits. 

Bboms''xia. PtHOUiN, Ana'nas Americafnay 
Pinguiny Broad-ieaved wild Ana'fiaSy &c. The 
West India plant, which affords the Pinguin 
.fruit. The fruit is refrigerant, and the juice, 
when ripe, very austere. It is used to acidu- 
late punch. A wine is made from the Pineuin, 
which is very intoxicating, and has a good fla* 
vour. 

BROMIDE OF IRON, see Bromine^r-b. of 
Mercury, see Bromine — b. of Potassium, see 
Bromine. 

BROMIDRO'SIS, from j9^»/io(, < stench,' and 
'tdiwfy*awedX,* Offensive sweat. 

BROMINE, Bro'minumy Bromin'iumy Bro* 
mayBromin'evsinyBro'miumyBro'mirui^Brofnmm^ 
Mu'rinay Muride^ Brome, A simple body, of a 
verjr volatile nature, and highly offensive and 
sufilocating odour, whence its name, from ^^^ 
fAocy <a stench.' It is met with chiefly in sea- 
water, and in many animal and vegetable bo- 
dies that live therein. It has likewise been 
found in n^y mineral waters of this and other 
countries. In its chemical relations, it may be 
placed between chlorine and iodine. With ox- 
ygen it forms an acid, the Bromie^%nd with 
hydrogen another*-the Mydrohromic, 

Pubs BaoMiNE, BaoMiDs of Ikon, (dose gr. 
i or.ij) and Bromidb of Potassium, HydrobrO' 
mate of Potassd, (F.) Bromure de potassium, 
(dose gr. iv to viij in the day,) have been used 
medicinally, and chiefly in scrofulosis, — inter- 
nally, as well as applied externally. Bromine 
may be dissolved in forty parts of distilled wa- 
ter, and six drops be commenced with as a dose. 
BaoMiDBS OF Mekcvet {Hydrar'gyriBro'fnida) 
have been given in syphilis. The protobromide 
and the bihromide are analagous in composition 
and medicinal properties to the corresponding 
iodides of mercury. 

BROMOGRAPHY, Bromatography. 

BROMOS, p^fjLOi, One of the cerealia, sup- 
posed, by some, to be oats. See Avena. 

BROMOSUS, Fetid. 

BRONCHBS, Bronchia— n6. Ganglions lym- 
phatiques des. Bronchial glands. 

BRON'CHIA, Bron'ehiee, Bronchi, from |f^- 
rof , * the throat.' The Latins used the term 
ironehusy for the whole of the trachea; whilst 
they called its ramifications Bronchia. Bron^ 
ehiay Bronchia, and Bronchi, (¥,) Bronehes, 
now meaf the two tubes, with their ramifica- 
tions, which arise from the bifurcation of the 
trachea, and carry air into the lungs,— Cora'- 
nula pulmo'nvm. 



BRONCHIAL 



196 



BRONCflORRH(EA 



Beonchia, Dilatation or tbs, Dilated 
Bronchia* The physical signs of this condition 
are the following: — Percussion usoally clear, 
bat not unfrequently less bo than natural, al- 
though very seldom quite dull. Auscultation 
detects coarse mucous or gargling rhonchi, in- 
creased by the cough, combined with, or re- 
placed by, bronchial or cavernous respiration, 
which is often effected as if ^y a sudden puff or 
whiff. The resonance of the voice is increased, 
but it seldom amounts to perfect pectoriloquy. 
The most common situations for dilated bron- 
chia are the scapular, mammary, or lateral re- 
gions. They are almost always confined to one 
side. 

Bronchia, Obliteeation, oe Compeession 
OF THE. The inspiratory murmur on ausculta- 
tion is weaker or wholly suf^ressed over a li- 
mited portion of the chest; the expiration is ge- 
nerally more distinct and prolonged : all the 
other conditions are natural. 

B R O N C H I AL, Bronehie, Bronehia'liSy 
Bron*ehicus. That which relates to the bron- 
chia. 

Beonchial Arteeies, (F.) Arthres Bron^ 
cMques. These are generally two in number, 
one going to each lung. They arise from the 
thoracic aorta, and accompany the bronchia in 
all their ramifications. 

Beom'cbial Cells, (F.) Cellules bronehiques. 
The Air-cells ; the terminations of the bronchia. 

BaoNCHiAL Cough, (F.) Toux bronchigue, 
T, tubaire. This generally accompanies bron- 
chial respiration. They both indicate obstruc- 
tion to the entrance of air into the air-cells. 

Brom'chial Glands, Glan'dulte Vescdia'nce, 
^ands of Vesa'lius^ (F.) Olandes bronckiquea 
ou Ganglions lyinphatiques des bronchcs, are 
numerous glands of an ovoid shape ; of a red- 
dish hue in the in&nt, and subsequently brown 
and black, seated in the course of the bronchia. 
Their functions are unknown. The bronchial 
inlands may be presumed to be affected by scro- 
fulosis, when, in addition to the existence of 
tumours in the neck, percussion gives a dull 
sound under the upper and central part of the 
sternum, whilst there is no appreciable lesion 
of thelungto. 

Beon'chial Nbeves, (F.) Nerfs Bronehiques, 
are furnished by the two pulmonary plexuses. 

Bronchial Fhtbisis, see Phthisis bronchial 
— ^b. Respiration, see Murmur, respiratory. 

Bron'chial Veins arise Arom the last divi- 
sions of the arteries of the same name, and pass, 
on the right side, into the vena azygos ; on the 
left, into the superior intercostal. 

BRONCHIC, Bronchial. 

BRONCfflECTASIS, Dilata'tio bronehio*- 
rum, from p^oyx^fy * A bronchus/ and mraotf, 
* dilatation.^ Dilatation of one or more bron- 
chial tubes. 

BRONCHIITIS, Bronchitis. 

BRONCHITE CONVULSIVE, Pertussis. 

BRONCHI'TIS, Bronehii'tis, Infiamma'tio 
hronehio'ru^n, Catar'rhus Pulmo'num, C, bron- 
rhio'mm, Pleuri'tia ht^nUda, P. bronchia'lis, 
Bronehos'tasis, Pul^monary Catarrh, Angi'na 
hronehiaiis, (F.) Inflammation des Sronckes, 
Inflammation of the lining membrane of the 
bronchial tubes. This is always more or less 
present in cases of pulmonary catarrh ; and is 
accompanied by cough, mucous expectoration, 
d3r8pncea, and more or less uneasiness in breath- 



ing. The aente form is accompanied with all 
the signs of internal inflammation, and requires 
the employment of antiphlogistics followed bj 
revulsives* The chronic form, l%issis smt'tit^ 
Catar*rhus seniflis, Rheumaeatarrha'U^Ptrif- 
noumo'nia nothd (q. v.) Bronchorrha'a acM'te, 
Winter cough. Chronic Catarrh, may be coa- 
founded with phthisis ; from which it nrast be 
distinguished mainly by the absence of hectic 
fever and of the physical signs that are chane- 
teristic of the latter, as well as by the nature 
of the expectoration, which is generally mn- 
cous, although at times mueo-purulent. Wben 
the expectoration is little or none, the bronchi- 
tis is said to be dry, dry catarrh, (F.) Catarrk 
Sec, 

When bronchitis affects the smaller tubei, it 
is termed capillary hronehi'tis, broneki'm 
capilla'ris, bronchoc^aei infanH'lis (7), and is 
often fatal to children. 

Bronchitis, Catarrh — ^b. Asthenics, Perip- 
neumonia notha — ^b. Capillary, see Bronekitii- 
b. Convulsiva, Pertussis— b. Membranacei, 
Polypus bronchialis — ^b. Plastic, Polypus bron- 
chialis — ^b. Pseudomembranous, Polypus braB- 
chialis — ^b. Summer, Fever, hay. 

BRONCHIUS, Stemo-thyroideus. 

BRONCHLEMMITIS, Polypus bronchialis. 

BRONCHOCACE, Peripneumonia notha- 
b. Infantilis, see Bronchitis.. 

BRONCHO-CATARRHUS, Catarrh. 

BRONCHOCE'LE, from ^Qoyxot, * a bron- 
chus,' and X17XI}, * tumour.' An inaccurate name 
for the affection which is called, also, Bo'chim^ 
Botium, Hernia gut'turis, (ruttur tu'midum 
sen globo'sum, Trachelophy*ma^ Hernia gut- 
tura'lis, Thyroce'U, Thyreoee'lB, Traeheo€e% 
Thyremphrax'is, Thyreophrax'ia, Thyreon'm, 
Thyron'cus, Deiron'eus, Deron^cus, 2%yro- 
phrax'ia, Oossum, Go*tium, 'Exeehebron'ekm^ 
Gongro'na, Struma, Glans, Bo'dum, Her'nia 
bronchia*lis, TracheloeeUE, Tuber gutturo'snm, 
Gutte'ria, ifC, the Derbyshire nsci, SwelUd 
n^ei. Wen, Go\tre, j-c, (F.) OiAtre, Gouttr*, 
Hypertrophic du Corps ^yroXde, Grosse Gerg«i 
Gros Cou, This is no rupture, but consists of 
an enlargement of the thyroid gland. It is 
common at the baseof lofty mountains in every 
part of the world ; and has been supposed to be 
owing to the drinking of snow-water, but it 
occurs where there is no snow. The tnmour 
is sometimes very extensive. Iodine has great 
power over it, and will generally occasion its 
absorption, when the case has not been of such 
duration as to have ended in a cartilaginous 
condition. 

BRONCHOCEPHALITIS, Pertussis. 

BRONCHOPHONY, Resonance. 

BRONCHOPLASTIC, Bronchoplasiiciu ;^ 
from f^ofxHi * » bronchus,*and nloootr, * I form-' 
An epithet given to the operation for closing 
fistulas in the trachea. 

BRONCHOPNEUMO'NIAjfrom ^eoy/of,*» 
bronchus,' and Pneumonia. Inflammation of 
the bronchia and lungs. 

BRONCHORRHOE'A, (F.) BroncMonhtt, 
Catarrhs pituiteux, Phlegmorrhagie pulmonoirtj. 
Flux bronehique, from ^oyy^, * bronchus,' and 
ptm, *I flow.' An increased secretion of nmcns 
from the air passages, accompanied or not by 
inflammation : — a gleet (q. v.) as it were, of the 
pulmonary mucous membrane. 

Beonchoreh<ba Acuta, Brbnchitis (chronic.) 



BR0NCH06TASIS 



187 



BRUIT DJff rAfE 



BRONCHOSTASIS, Bronchitis. 
BRONCHOTOMB^ Bronekot'omus, from 
9^>oy;^9;, andl ti^»f IT, * to cut.' A kind of lancet, 
with a blnnt and ronnded point, mounted on a 
nandle, and fitted to a canula, which passes in 
ulong with it, and is allowed to remain in the 
opening made in the trachea. 

BROffCHOT'OMYyBronekotom'ia,(FJ)Bran' 
rkotomie. Same etymology. A surgical ope- 
ration, which consists in making an opening 
either into the trachea, {TraekAOt^omy:) into the 
larynx, {Laryngoi'omy:) or into both, ( Traeheo- 
laryngot'omyy) to extract foreign bodies or to 
permit the passage of air to the lungs. These 
different parts are divided transversely or ver- 
tically, according to circomstanees. 
BRONCHUS, Trachea. 
BROOKLIME, Veronica beccabanga. 
BROOM, Sophora tinctoria, Spartium scopa- 
rinm — b. Butchers, Ruscus — b. Clover, So- 
phora tinctoria — ^b. Indigo, Sophora tinctoria — 
b. Rape, of Virginia, Orobanche Virginiana — 
b. Spanish, Spartium junceum — ^b. Yellow, So- 
phora tinctoria. 

BROSSARDlfiiRE, MINERAL WATERS 
OF. Broesardi&re is a chateau in Bas-Poitou, 
France. The waters contain carbonates of iron 
and lime, chloride of sodium, and sulphate of 
lime. Tliey are aperient. 
BROSSEy Brush. 
BROUILLARD, Caligo. 
BROUS'SAIST.* One who is a believer in, 
and professor of, the physiological and patholo- 
gical opinions of Broussais. The system itself 
was called Bsoubsaism or the Bhysiological 
Doctrine* 

BROW, Front— b. Agne, Neuralgia fronta- 
lis. 
BROWN RED, Colcothar. 
BROWN'IAN, Broiimo'niaih Bruno'nian. 
Relating to the systemor opinions of John Brown. 
BROWNISM, Bru^Ttomam, Bruno'nianiam. 
The doctrines of Brown. 

BROWNIST, Browno'numy Bruno 
follower of the system of Brown. 

BRU'CEA ANTI-DYSENTER'ICA. 
after Brace, the Abyssinian traveller. 
rugin'eoyAngustu'ra 9pu*riay{ F . )Pausse Angus- 
tun, A. Perrugtneuse. The systematic name of 
the plant whence is obtained the /also Angus- 
tura Bark, It aflbrds Bruda. 
BRUCIA, Bmcine^ 

BRUCINE, Bru'eioy Bruei'nay Bruei'num, 
Bru'HwHy Paeudangusturi'numy Vom'ieine, An 
organic,.8alifiable base, discovered in the false 
Angustnra — Brueea anti-dysenter^ia^f and ob- 
taioed from Strychnos nux vom'iea. It is of a 
pnrly white; crystallizes in oblique prisms 
vrith a parallelogrammatic base; is very bitter, 
slightly acrid and styptic, and soluble in water, 
bat more so in alcohol. Brucia is a less active 
poiflon than strychnia. It resembles it/ how- 
ever, and may be used as a substitute for it and 
for the extract of nux vomica. Dose, half a 
pain. 

BRUCKENAU, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
These springs are in Bavaria, and contain car- 
bonic acid and iron. 

BRUCOURT, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Bnicourt is three leagues and a half from Caen 
in Normandy. The waters contain carbonic 
«id, chloride of sodium, and sulphate of soda, 
much solphate of lime, &c. 



Called 
B. fer- 



BRT7ISE, Contusion. 

BRUISEWORT, Bellis saponaria. 

BRUISSEMENT, (F.) Frem'itus. This 
word has much the same signification as Bour- 
donn&ment, (q. v.) as well as Bruit, 

BRUIT, (F.) < Sound,' (q. v.) A French 
term applied to various sounds heard on per- 
cussion and auscultation, viz. 

BRUIT DE CRAQUBMENT, B. de TiraU- 
lementy Bruit d& euir neuf, * sound of crackling, 
or bursting, or of new leather.' A sound pro*' 
duced by the friction of the pericardium, when 
dried and roughened by inflammation. 

BRUIT DU CGSTjR FCETAL, Battemens 
doubles ; Double bruit du Caur du Fd^us. The 
pulsations of the fcetal heart heard in auscultation 
in the latter half of utero-gestation. 

BRUIT DE CUIR NEUF^Bruit de eraque- 
mont, 

BRUIT DE DIABLEyRonJUmentdeDiable, 
Bruit de soujfie d double eourant, * noise of the 
diable or humming-top.' Venous Hum, A high 
degree of Bruit de souffiet, heard on auscultating 
the arteries. It denotes an impoverished state 
of the blood. 

BRUIT DOUBLE DU C(EUR DU FOS- 
TUB, Bruit du Caur fiBtal-^, de Fr6lement, 
see Fr6lement. 

BRUIT DE FROTTEMENT ASCEN- 
DANT ET DESCENDANT, < Sound of fric- 
tion of ascent and descent.' Sounds produced 
by the rubbing of the lung against the parietes 
of the chest, as it rises and falls during inspira- 
tion and expiration. They are distinctly heard in 
pleuritis, when the pleura has become rough- 
ened by the disease. Friction sounds or To- 
and'fro sounds are also heard in pericarditis 
and peritoni tis. 

BRUIT HUMORIQUE, B, Bydropneuma- 
tique. The sound afforded on percussion when 
organs are filled with liquid and air. 

BRUIT ETDROPNEUMATIQUE, Bruit 
kwnorique, 

BRUIT MUSCULAIRE. The sound ac- 
companying the first sound of the heart, referred 
by some to muscular contraction. Called, also. 
Bruit rotatoire, in consequence of its having 
been thought to resemble the rumbling of dis- 
tant wheels. 

BRUIT MUSICAL, Sifiement module, 

BRUIT DE FARCHEMIN. 'Parchment 
tone.' A sound as if produced by two sheets 
of parchment applied to each other. It is said 
to be produced by thickening and rigidity of the 
valves of the heart. 

BRUIT FLACENTAIRE, B, de soufiet 
placentaire, B, utirin. Souffle utirin. Souffle 
plaeentaire. Placental bellows' sound, Utero- 
plaeen*tal murmur, Uterine murmur. The bel- 
lows' sound heard on auscultating over the site 
of the placenta in a pregnant female. It does 
not appear to be owing to the placental vessels : 
but to the uterine tumour pressing upon the 
large vessels of the mother. 

BRUIT DE PO T FlLi; * Sound of a cracked 
vessel.' This sound is heard on percussion, 
when a cavern in the lungs is filled with air, 
and has a narrow outlet. 

BRUIT DE RACLEMENT, ' Soundof scra- 

a* .' A sound produced by the scraping of 
, solid membranes, as the pericardium, 
against each other. 
BRUIT DE rJpE, « Sound of a rasp.' A 



BRXnr BOTATOIRE 



198 



BUBO 



sound heard during the contraction of either 
the auricles or ventricles. It is constant; and 
the contraction of the cavity is more prolonged 
than natural, and emits a hard, rough, and — as 
it were-^stifled sound. 

It indicates contraction of the valvular ori- 
fices by cartilaginous deposits, or ossification, 
and is better heard near the apex of the heart, 
if the auriculo-ventricular valves be concerned, 
— ^near the base if the semilunar valves be the 
seat of the disease. 

BRUIT ROTATOIREy Bruit musndaire. 

BRUIT DB SCIEy or < sayv-sound,' and 
BauiT DE LIMB a Bois, or ' file-sound,' resemble 
the Bruit d$ Rdpe, (q. v.) 

BRUIT DE SOUFFLE a DOUBLE COU- 
RANT, Bruit de DiabU, 

BRUIT DE SOUFFLET, Bruit de SouJU, 
'bellows' sound,' 'blowing sound.' A sound 
like that of a bellows, heard occasionally by the 
ear applied to the chest during the contraction 
of the ventricles, auricles, or large arteries. It 
coexists with afiTections of the heart, but ,is 
beard, also, without any disease in that organ, 
— whenever, indeed, an artery is compressed. 
An Encephalic bellows' sound, has been described 
by Drs. Fisher and Whitney. It is heard on ap- 
plying the ear to the occiput or to the top of the 
head; and is considered to indicate turgescence 
of vessels, or inflammation. When such. tur- 
gescence exists, the vessels are compressed, 
and the compression gives rise to the sound in 
question. 

BRUlTDESOUFFLETPLACENTAIREy 
Bruit placentaire — b. de Tiraillement, Bruit iU 
craqu&ment. 

BRUIT DE TAFFETAS. « Sound of Taf- 
feta.' 'Sarcenet sound,' A respiratory sound 
so named, by M. Grisolle, from its resembling 
the sound caused by the tearing of a piece c^ 
tafifeta; and which he considers to indicate he- 
patization of the lung limited to the surfiice in 
pneumonia. 

BRUIT rrj»fP./^JV/Qt7Z:,<Tympanic sound.' 
The clear sound afforded by percussing the sto- 
mach and intestines when containing air. 

BRUIT UTRAIN, B. placetUaire. 

BRULUREy Burn. 

BRUNELLE, Prunella. 

BRUNNER'S GLANDS, BrunneH Glcm'- 
dulcB, Glandtda solita'ritBy Solitary glands. 
Solitary follicles, Second pan'creas. Mucipa- 
rous follicles of a small size, seated between the 
muoous and muscular coats of the stomach, 
along the two curvatures of that organ, and in 
the small intestines, especially the duodenum; 
so called from their discovery having been ge- 
nerally attributed to Brunner. The solitary 
intestinal follicles are usually knownj at the 
present day, as the glands of Brunner, although 
Brunner restricted the latter term to the glands 
of the duodenum. 

BRUNONIAN, Brownian. 

BRUNONIANISM, Brownism. . 

BRUNUS, Erysipelas. 

BRUSCUS, Ruscus. 

BRUSH, Scop'vla, (F.) Brosse. A well 
known instrument, used in medicine chiefly for 
the following purposes. 1 . To clean the teeth. 
2. To remove the saw-dust, which adheres to 
the teeth of the trephine, during the operation 
of trephining. 3. To rub the surface of the 
body, for the purpose of exciting the skin, and 



favouring transpiratiim. Westring, a Swedish 
physician, has recommended metallic brushes 
for the purpose of conveying galvanism to a 
part. These brushes consist of a plate of ebon) 
fitted to another of gold, in which threads of ^ 
same metal are fixed; — ^the brush being con- 
nected with one of the poles of the galvanic pile. 

BRT!sit, Stomach, Excutia ventriculi. 

BRUT A, Juniperus sabina. 

BRUTIA. A sort of thick pitch, obtained 
from Brutia in Italy. From the Fix Brutia 
was obtained the O'leum Fiei'numm 

Brutia, Instinct* 

BRUTINO, Terebinthina. 

BRUXANELI. A Malabar tree, the bark 
and leaves of which have a strong smell, and 
are astringent. On the coast of Malabar, its 

i'uice, mixed with butter, is applied to boils, 
ts bark is esteemed to be diuretic, and its roots 
anti-arthritic. 

BRVTkRE VULGAIRE, Erica vulgaris. 

BRUYtRES, MINERAL WATERS OF- 
Brtiy^res is a small village, 7^ leagues from 
Luneville. The waters are acidulous and cha- 
lybeate. 

BRYCETOS, see. Algidus. 

HRYCHETHMOS, Rugitus. 

BRYCHETOS, see Algidus. 

BRYGMA, Brygmus, Trisis, Pri^is, Pris- 
mus, Odontopri'sis, Stridor Den'Hum, (F.) 
Gi inceme?it des Dents, (q. v. ) Grinding of the 
teeth. A common symptom in children of gas- 
tric or other derangement, but often present 
when there is no reason to suspect any. 

BRYO'NIA KLBK\ White Bry'ony, VUis 
alba sylves'tris, Agros'tis, Agriam'pelos, Am'pi- 
los a'gria, Areheos'tris, Eehetro'eisy Bryo'nia 
as'pera, Cedros'tis, Chelido'nium, Lahrus'eay 
Mdo'thmm, Ophrostaph'ylon, Psilo'thrufHf Bry- 
onia Dioi'ea. Nat. Ord» Cucurbitaceae. Ser. 
Syst, MonoeciaMonadelphia. (F.) Couleuvrie, 
Vigne vierge, V. blanche. The root is large 
and succulent, and has an acrid, bitter, and dis- 
agreeable taste.. It is a drastic cathartic. Ex- 
ternally, it has been applied, in form of cata- 
plasm, in gout. When repeatedly washed, a 
good starch is obtained from it. The active 
principle has been separated from it, and called 
Bry^onine, 

BRYONIA Mechoacanxa NIGRICANS, Convol- 
vulus jalapa — b. Peruviana, Convolvulus jalapo. 

BRYONINE, see Bryonia alba. 

BRYTIA, Marc of grapes. 

BRYTON, Cerevisia. 

BU, /Jov, abbreviation oTfiovg, * an ox;' in com- 
position expresses, < excess, greatness.' Hence 
Bulim/us, Buphthal'mia, &c. 

BUBASTECORDIUM, Artemisia vulgaris. 

BUBE, Pustiile. 

BUBO, /}« vj9o>», Pano'ehta, Panus ingtiina'lis, 
Adcnophy'ma inguinalis, Bubonopa'^ms, Bnbo' 
wm'cus, Bubon'eus, Cambu'ea, Angt/ts, Boubon, 
Codoee'li,CodosceVla,{Y.) Bubon, Ponlaifi, In 
the works of Hippocrates and Galen, this word 
sometimessignifies the groin~/n^^n; at others, 
the inguinal. glands; and at others, again, swell- 
ing or inflammation of these parts. The mo- 
derns apply the term to an inflammatory tumour 
seated in the groin or axilla, and they generally 
distinguish, 1. Simple or sympathetic Bubo, 
which is independent of any virus in the eco- 
nomy. 2. Venereal Bubo, (F.) Bubon vinirisn, 
which is occasioned by the venereal virus. 3. 



BXTBON 



1^ 



BUCKWHEAT 



PtstilenHal Buhoy or B. symptomatic of the 
Plague. The last two hare by some been 
called maUgnmU Buboy (F.) Bttbon malin, 

Frimary Bubo, (F.) Bubon primitifj shows 
itself with the first symptoms of syphilis : the 
consecutive not till afterwards. 

BURONy Bubo, Inguen — ^b. Gommiferum, 
see Ammoniac guii^ 

BuBON Gal'bamtjh. The systematic name 
of a plant which has been supposed to afford 
the galbanum. Meta'piouy Mato'rittm, The 
plant is also called Fer'ula Afriea^na, Oreoseii'- 
num A/rica'numy Ani^snm frutictfsufm gaibo' 
nd/*srumy Anisum Afriea'numfrutes'coTiSySreli'^ 
num GtUbanumy The long-leaved or lovage- 
leaved Gal'banum, Nat. Ord. UmbelliferaB. 
The plant can scarcely, however, be considered 
to be determined. Gialbanum is the gummi-re- 
sinoQS juice of this tree. Its odour is fetid, and 
taste bitter and acrid: the agglutinated tears 
are of a white colour, on a ground of reddish- 
brown. It forms an emulsion, when triturated 
with water, and is soluble in proof spirit of 
wine, and vinegar: s. g. Ii213. It has been 
given as an antispasmodic, and expectorant, in 
pill or emulsion. Dose, from gr. 10 to 60. Ex- 
ternally, it is applied as a cataplasm. 

BvBON Mackdor'zcum, Puroseli'num Maee- 
donficumy A'pium petra'umy Petralpiumy (F.) 
Persil de Maeedoine, Maeedo'nian Parsley, 
Its properties are similar to those of common 
parsley, but weaker and less grateful. The 
seeds are an ingredient in the celebrated com- 
pounds, Mithn&te and Theriac. 
BUBONA, Nipple. 

BUBONALGIA, from Heo^vy <the groin,' 
and «iix««, *pain.' Pain in the groin. 
BUBONCUS, Bubo. - 
BUB01<f lUM, Astor Atftieusy Golden Star^ 
vort. A plant anciently supposed to be effi- 
cacioDS in diseases of tlie groin, from pov^v, 
* the groin.' 

BUBONOCE'LG, from jfovjS«r, <the groin,' 
and xr^if, < tumour,' < nipture.' Her'nia ingui" 
naiisy (F.) Hemie inguinale, In^guinal Her^ 
»/a, or Rupture of the Crroin. Some surgeons. 
Lave confined this term to hernia when limited 
to the groin, and have called the same affection, 
when it has descended to the scrotam, Oscheo- 
€* l€y or Scrotal Hernia, The rupture passes 
through the abdominal ring: and, in coose- 
queoce of the greater size of the opening in the 
male, it is more frequent iu the nude sex. 
BUBONONCUS, Bubo. 
BUBONOPANUS, Bubo. 
BUBONOREX'IS, from fiouflary <the groin,' 
and Qt-ltfy *tL rupture.' A name given to bubo- 
nocele when accompanied with a division of the 
peritoneum, or when, in other words, it is de- 
void of a sac. 

BUBONIJLTJS, Bubun'eulns. A diminutive 
of Buhoy (q. V.) A painful swelling of the 
lymphatics of the penis, extending along the 
fiarsum of that organ to the groin. It is an oc- 
casional accompaniment of gonorrhcea* 

BUBUKLE. A word used by Shakspeare 
for a red pimple on the nose. 
BUBUNCtJLUS, Bubonulus. 
BUCAROS, Terra Portogallica. 
BUCC Ay Gnathos. The mouth. The cheek 
and hollow of the cheek. Also, the vulva. 
BUCCAC'EATON, from Bueea, and jc^av, 



< I mix.' A morsel of bread sopped in wine, 
which served of old for a breakfast. — Linden. 

BUCCAL, Bueea'lisy from Buceay Uhe 
mouth,' or n^er <the cheek.' That which 
concerns the mouth, and especially the cheek. 

Buccal Aktert, A* Sus-maanllairey (Ch.) 
arises from the internal maxillary or from some 
of its branches, as the Temporalis profunda an^ 
tieay or the Alveolar. It distributes its branches 
to the buccinator muscle, and to the buccal 
membrane. 

Buccal Glands, Molar Glands, Mucous 
follicles, seated in the buccal membrane, oppo- 
site the molar teeth. They secrete a viscid 
humour, which mixes with the saliva, and lu- 
bricates the mouth. 

Buccal Membrane, (F.) Membrane Buceale* 
The mucous membrane, which lines the inte* 
rior of the mouth. 

Buccal Ne£Ve, or Buecina'tor Nerve, Bueco > 
labial^Ch,y) is given off by the inferior maxil- 
lary. It sends its branches to the cheeky and 
especially to the buccinator muscle. 

Buccal Vein follows the artery. 

BUC'CEA, Bueeel'la. The fleshy excres- 
cence of nasal polypus, so called because it 
was believed to proceed from the mouth.— Para- 
celsus. Also, a mouthful. 

BUCCELA'TON, BueeeUtus. A loaf- 
shaped cathartic medicine; made chiefly of 
scammony. — Actius, Paulus of iEgina. 

BUCCELLATIO. A mode of arresting he- 
morrhage, by applying a pledget of lint to the 
bleeding vessel. — Avicenna, Fallopius. 

BUCCINA, Turbinated bones. 

BUCCINA'TOR, from buecinare, ' to sound 
the trumpet.' The Buecina'tor Musele, 22«- 
trae'tor An'guti Orisy Bueco-Alveolo-maxil" 
lairSy Alveolo-labial — (Ch.,) Manso'rius, is 
situate in the substance of the cheeks. It ex- 
tends between the posterior portions of the al- 
veolar arches of the two jaws and the commis- , 
sure of the lips, which it draws backward. It 
assists in mastication, by pushing the food back 
towards the teeth ; ancl^ if the cheeks be dis- 
tended by air, its contraction forces it out. 

BUCC 0. One who is blob-cheeked, or wide- 
mouthed. ; 

BUCCO'ALVAOLO'MAXILLAIREy Buc- 
cinator. 

BUCCO-LABIAL NEftVE, Buccal nerve. 

BUCCO-PHARYNGE'AL, Bueeo-Pharyn- 
ge'usy (F.) Bueeo'Pharyngien, Belonging to 
the mouth and pharynx. The Bucro-pharyn" 
ge'al Aponeuro'sis or Intermaxillary Lig'amenty 
extends from the internal ala of the pterygoid 
process to the posterior part of the lower alveo- 
lar arch, and affords attachment, anteriorly, to 
the buccinator, and posteriorly to the constric- 
tor pharyngis superior. 

BUC'CULA, from Bueeoy «the month.' A 
small mouth. The fleshy part beneath the 
chin. — ^Bartholine. 

BUCERAS, Trigonella foennm. 

BUCHU LEAVES, Diosma crenata. 

BUCICBEAN, Menyanthes trifoliata -^ b. 
American, Menyanthes vema. 

BUCKET FEVER, Dengue. 

BUCKEYE, .£sculus hippocastanum. 

BUCKHO, Diosma crenata. 

BUCKTHORN, PURGING, Rhamnus. 

BUCKWHEAT, Polygonum fagopyrum— b. 
Plant, eastern. Polygonum divaricatum. 



BUCNEMIA 



190 BUPLEURUM ROTUNDIFOLIUM 



BTJCNEMI A , see Elephantiati*— b. Tropica^ 
see Elephantiasis. 

BUCTON, Hymen. 

BUFF, INFLAMMATORY, Coriam pUo- 
gisticnm. 

BUFFY COAT, Corimn pblogisticum. 

BUG, (BED,) Cimex. 

BU6ANTIA, Chilblain. 

BUG'GERY, Sotromy, Sodom'ia, Co'itus 
Sodomit'ieusy (I.) Bugarofu. Said to have 
been introdaced b^the Balgarians. A carnal 
copulation against nature, as of a man or woman 
with any animal; or of a man with a man, or a 
man unnaturally with a woman. The unna- 
tural crime. 

BUGLE, Prunella — ^b. Common, Ajuga rep- 
tans — 5. Pyraimidaley Ajuga — h. Rampanie, 
Ajuga reptans — ^b. Water, Lycopus Virginicus 
— ^b. Weed, Lycopus. 

BVGLOSBy Anchusa officinalis. 

BUGLOSS, DYER'S, Anchusa tinctoria— b. 
Garden, Anchusa officinalis — ^b. Upright, Ajuga. 

BUGLOSSA, Anchusa officinalis. 

BUGLOSSUM ANGUSTIFOLIUM MA- 
JUS, Anchusa officinalis — ^b. Latifolium, Bora- 
go officinalis— b. Sativum, Anchusa officinalis 
— b. Sylvestris, Anchusa officinalis — ^b. Tincto- 
rum, Anchusa tinctoria — ^b. Verum, Boracic 
acid-— b. Yulgare majus, Anchusa officinalis. 

BXTGRANDE ItFINEirSE,Ononu spinosa. 

BUGRANEy Ononis spinosa?— ^. d$s Champs, 
Ononis arvensis. 

BUGULA, Ajuga. 

BUIS, Buxus. 

BUISARD, MINERAL WATERS OF. Bui- 
sard is two leagues from Chateau-Thierry, in 
France. The water contains chloride of cal- 
cium and carbonate of lime. 

BULB, Bvlbus, (F.) BuiU. A name, given 
by anatomists to diffisrent parts which ;-esem- 
ble, in shape, certain bulbous roots. ThtBtUb 
of the Aorta is the great sinus of the Aorta. 
Bulb of a Tooth; the vascular and nervous pa- 
pilla contained in the cavitj of a tooth. The 
Bulb or Root of the Hair is the part whence 
the hair originates. The Bulb of the Urethra 
is the dilated portion formed by the commence- 
ment of the Corpus spongiosum towards the 
root of the penis. We say, also. Bulb, for 
Globe, of the eye. 

Bulb of the Etb, see Eye — ^b. Rachidian, 
see Medulla oblongata. 

BU'L0£, Bulb— A. J0 laVoUte a trots Pi- 
lisrs. Mamillary tubercles. 

BULBI PRIORUM CRURUM FORNICIS, 
Mamillary tubercles. 

BULBOCASTANEUM, Bunium bulbocas- 
tanum. 

BULBO-CAVERNOSUS, Accelerator urinae 
— ft. Syndesmo^avemeuxy Accelerator urinas — 
A. Uretral, Accelerator urinae. 

BULBONACH, Lunaria rediviva. 

BULBUS, Bulb. 

BiTLBus Esculkn'tus. The Es'eulent Bulb: 
a particular kind, so denominated by the an- 
cients. It is supposed to have been the Cepa 
Asealon'iea. — Dioscorides, Celsus, Pliny, &c. 

BuLBus OcuLX, see Eye — ^b. Pili, see nair. 
BuLBus VoMiTo^aius. A plant, said by Dios- 
corides to be emetic and diuretic. It is the 
Musk-grape flower, according to Ray, — the 
Hyaeinthus Museari, 



BUL6A, Vulva. 

BULIMIA, Bonlitaiia. 

BUI-ITHOS, from /f«uc, <an ox,' and ^i^cc, 
'a stone.' A bezoar or stone, found in the kid- 
neys, gall-bladder, or urinary bladder of an oz 
or cow. 

BULLA, (F.) Bulls. A Bleb. A portion 
of the cuticle, detached fnpi the akin by the 
interposition of a transparent, watery fluid. It 
forms the 4th order in Willan's and Bateman's 
arrangement of cutaneous diseases, and includes 
erysipelas, pemphigus, and pompholyx. By 
some. Bulla has been used synonymously with 
Pemphigus y (q. v.) See, also, Hydatid. 

BULLACE PLUM, Prunus invitia. 

BULLiE ROTUNDA CERVICIS UTERI, 
Nabothi glandulas. 

BULL-FISTS, Lycoperdon. 

BUMELLIA, Fraxinus excelsior. 

BUNA, Coffea Arabica. 

BUNDURH, Corylus avellana. 

BUNIAS, Brassica napus. 

BU'NIOID, Bunioi'desyNa^piform; from fitt- 
riov, <a turnip,' and uSe^y * resemblance.' An 
epithet for a form of cancer, bearing some re- 
semblance to a turnip. 

BUNION, Bunyon. 

BUNITES VINUM. A wine, made by in- 
fusing the Bunium in must. It is stomachic, 
but scarcely ever used. 

BU'NIUM BULBOCASTANUM, |fov»iet,jso 
called, it has been supposed, from growing oo 
hills, from |?ei;f«c, 'a nill.' Balanoeas'tanum. 
The systematic name of a plant, whose root is 
called Pig-ntUy (q. v.) AgHoctu'tanwrn, Nu- 
cuta terres'trisy Bulboeasta'neum, Bulboeas'" 
tahum majfis et minus, Earth-nuty Hauf k n ut , 
Kipper-nuty (F.) Terre^noix. The root is tube- 
rous, ahd is eaten raw or roasted. It has been 
supposed to be of use in strangury. It is not em- 
ployed in nSedicine. 

BUNNIAN, Bunyon. 

BUN'YON, Bun'ion, Bun'niany from |9»uf oc, 
<an eminence.' (T) An enlargement and in- 
flammation of the bursa mucosa at the inside 
of the ball of the great toe. 

BUOPHTHALMIA, Bnphthalmia. 

BUPEINA, Boulimia. 

BUPHTHALMI HERBA, Anthemis tine 
toria. 

BUPHTHAL'MIA, Buophthal'mioy Bupk- 
thal'mos, Elephantom'ma, from /fov^, *an ox,' 
and e^^flX/uoc, <an eye.' Oa>eye. Under this 
name, the generality of authors nave designated 
the first stage of hydrophthalmia. Others, with 
Sabatier, mean, by it, turgescence of the vi- 
treous humour, which, by pushing the iris for- 
wards, forms around the crystidline a sort of 
border. 

BUPHTHALMUM CRETICUM, Anthemis 
Pyrethrum — ^b.. Majus, Chrysanthemum leu- 
canthemum. 

BUPHTHALMUS, Hydrophthalmia, Sem- 
pervivum tectorum. 
BUPINA, Boulimia. 

BUPLEUROIDES, Bupleurum rotundifo- 
lium. 

BUPLEU'RUM ROTUNDIFOl-IUM, Bt/- 
pleu'rouy BupleuroVdesy from /f^c/, augmenta- 
tive, and 7iil«vpflr, *side,' (F.) BupthjrSy Perce- 
feuilUy Round4eaved Hare's Ear, Thorourwetx. 
The herb and seeds are slightly aromatic. It 
was formerly celebrated for curing ruptures, 



BVPLkVRE 



131 



BUTUA 



being made into a cataplasm with wine and 
oatmeal. 

BUrLkVRE, Bupleunmi rotnndifblium. 

BURAC. Borax. Also, ahy kind of salt. 
(Arabic.) 

BURDOCK, Arctibm lappa-^b. Lesser, Xan- 
thiom. 

BURIS. Heiniii accompanied by scirrhous 
tnmefisction; or, perhaps, a scirrhous tumour 
only. — Avicenna. 

BURN. Sax. beirnan or btnnan, *to burn 
or bren.' XJa'tiOy Ambus'tioy Adu^tioy Tretia 
Causisy Erifthe'ma Ambua'tioy Causis, Eneauf' 
sisy Pyrieaua*titm, Combugtn'roy Catarau'may 
Combtts'tioy (F.) Br^ure, An injury pro- 
duced by the action of too great heat on the 
body. Burns are of greater or less extent, 
from the simple irritation of the integument to 
tbe complete destruction of the part. The con- 
seqaences are more or less severe, according to 
the extent of injury, and the part affected. 
Bunts of the abdomen, when apparently doing 
well, are sometimes followed by iatal results. 
Their treatment varies, — at times, the antiphlo- 
gistic being required; at others, one more 
stimulating. 

BURNEA, see Pinus Sylvestris. 

BURNETT'S DISINFECTINa LIQUID. 
A solution of chloride of zinc, first used by Sir 
WilUami Burnett for preserving timber, can- 
vass, &c., from dry rot, mildew, &c., and after- 
wards as an antibromic and antiseptic, espe- 
cially in the case of dead bodies. 

BtTRNING, Brenning, A disease mentioned 
by old historians, from which authors have un- 
successfully endeavoured to demonstrate the an- 
tiquity of syphilis. — Parr. 

BURRHISPIRITUSMATRICAI-IS. The 
f^pirit of Burrhus for diseaads of the Womb. 
It is prepared by digesting, in -alcohol, equal 
parts of myrrh, olibanum, and mastic. Boer- 
haave frequently prescribed it. 

BURSA CORDIS,Pericardium— b.Testium, 
Scrotum— b. Virilis, Scrotum. 

BURS^ MUCCS^, Burs€B mveo'stB vest- 
ntlafresy Bursa seu Caj/sttla aynovia'lety Blan- 
uoeyytides, Saeci mueo'aiy Veai'ea unguino'acB 
ten'dinnmy Synovial Crypts or Follielesy (F.) 
Bourats SynovftJea. Small membranous sacs, 
situate about the joints, particularly about the 
large ones of the upper and lower extremities, 
and, for the most part, lying under the tendons. 
They are naturally fill^ with an oily kind of 
Huid, the use of which is to lubricate surfaces 
over which the tendons play. In consequence 
of bruises or sprains, this fluid sometimes col- 
lects to a great extent. The bursas are, gene- 
rally, either of a roundish or oval form, and 
they have been arranged under two classes, the 
Mpkerieal and the vagiruzl. 

Bd.sjs Sykoviai^es, Bursse mucosae. 

BURSALIS, Obturator intemus. 

BURSEHA GUMMIF'ERA, TersHnth'ua 
srnmmif*eray Jmnaica Bark Tree. A resin ex- 
udes from this tree, which is solid externally, 
as met with in the shops ; softish internally; of 
a vitreous fracture; transparent; of a pale yel- 
low colour; turpentine smell, and. sweet, per- 
fumed taste. It has been used like balsams 
and turpentines in general, and is called, by 
the French, Caekibouy Chibouy and Reains de 
Gomart, 

BURSULA, Scrotum. 



BURTHISTLB, Xanthium. 

BURWEED, Xanthium. 

BURWORT, Ranunculus acris. 

BUSSANG, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Bussang is a village in the department of Voe- 
ges, France. The waters are acidulous chaly- 
beates. 

BUSSEROLLE, Arbutus uva ursi. 

BUS'SII SPIR'ITUS BEZOAR'TICUS, B«. 
zoar'die Spirit of Buaaiua, A preparation, 
regarded as sudorific, diuretic, and antispasmo- 
dic; obtained by distilling subcarbonate and 
muriate of ammonia, amber, oil of cedar or 
juniper, &c. 

BUTE, ISLAND OF, CLIMATE OF. This 
island is in the Frith of Clyde, about 18 miles 
below Greenocl;* The climate is mild and 
equable, but rather moist; and, as a winter re- 
sidence, it holds out advantages for those only 
that appear to demand such a condition of the 
atmosphere. The climate resembles, in cha- 
racter, that of the S. W. of England and France, 
and the channel islands; although its tempera- 
ture is lower. 

BUTEA FRONDO'SA, see Kino. A tree, 
common in Bengal, and in the mountainous 
parts of India; Nat. Ord. Leguminosae; from 
which gum hutaa flows. Dr. Pereira found this 
gum to be identical with a specimen marked 
gummi rubrum aatringena — ^the gomms tiatrin" 
gente da OamHe of M. Guibourt. By some this 
gum has been confounded with kino. 

BUTIGA, Gutta rosea. 

BUTOMON, Iris peeudacorus. 

BUTTER, from fiovrv^or; itself from (fovt, 
< ox,' and Tu^oc. * any thing coagulated.' Bnty'- 
rum, Pice'riofiy (¥.) B$urre. A sort of con- 
crete oil; obtained from the cream that forms 
on the surface of the milk fUrnished by the fe- 
males of the mammalia; especially by the cow 
and the goat. Fresh butter is very nutritious, 
whilst the rancid is irritating. The ancient 
chemists gave the name Butter to many of the 
metallic chlorides. It has also been applied to 
vegetable substances, which resemble, in some 
respects, the butter obtained from milk. 

Butter of Bambouc or Bambtjc,(F.) B^wrr* 
de BAmhouc ou Bamhuk. A vegetable oil ob- 
tained from a species of almond, and used in 
Senegal in neuralgic and rheumatismal pains. 

Butter of Ca'cao, OU of Ca'eao, Oleum Co" 
eao apiaaa'tumy O. Tkeobro'ma Caeao exprea*- 
aumy (F.) Benrre de Caeao, Huile de Caeao. A 
fat substance, of a sweet and agreeable taste, 
obtained f)rom the Theobroma eaeaoy or choco- 
late nut. 

Butter of Cocoa, (F.) Beurre de Coco. A 
fatty, concrete substance, which separates from 
the milk of the cocoa nut. It is sweet and 
agreeable. 

BUTTERBUR, Tussilago petasites. 

BUTTERCUPS, Ranunculus acris. 

BUTTERFLY-WEED, Asclepias tuberosa. 

BUTTERMILK, (T.) Babeurre, Lait de 
Beurre. The thin, sour milk, separated from 
the- cream bv churning. It contains caseum 
and a little butter. It is a refreshing drink 
when newly made. 

BUTTERWORT, Pinguicola vulgaris. 

BUTTONBUSH, Cephalanthus occidentalis. 

BUTTONWOOD SHRUB, Cephalanthus oc- 
cidentalis. 

BUTUA, Pareira brava. 



BUTTRUM 



189 



CACCIONDE 



BUTYRUM, Batter--b. Amygdalarom dul- 
cium, Confection (almond) — b. Saturni, Un- 
guentum plumbi superacetatis— b. Zinci^ Zinci 
chloridum. 

BUVEURy Rectus Internus ocnli. 

BUXTON, MINERAL WATERS DF,fli«> 
tonien'ses A^ee. Buxton is a village in Der- 
byshire. The springs are thermal, and about 
82^ Fahrenheit. They contain sulphate of soda, 
chloride of calcium, chloride of sodium, chlo- 
ride of magnesium, carbonate of lime, carbonic 
acid, and azote. They are used in cases in 
which thermal springs, in general, are recom* 
mended. They contain little or no mineral im- 
pregnation. 

BUXUS, Buxus stmpervi'rens. The Box- 
treey (F.) Buig ou Bouit* The leaves are bit- 
ter and aromatic, and, as such, have been used 
in medicine, in cases of worms, dyspepsia, &c., 
in the form of decoction. They are sometimes, 
also, added, to beer. The seed was anciently 
called Carthifgon, 

BYNE, Malt. 



BY^RETHRUM. A sort of cap or Couw- 
ehefy filled with cephalic substances. — ^Forestns. 

BYRSA, ^v^c^i* A leather skin to spread 
plasters upon. 

BYRSODEFSICON. A tan stuff, with which 
CiKLius AuAEUANus Sprinkled wool, which he 
applied in certain cases to the umbilical region: 
from fivfVi * leather,' and J#i^», < I tan.' 

BYRSODEPSICUM PRINCIPIUM,TanniiL 

BYSAU'CHEN, from /9u«, < I stop up,' wd 
cof/tpfy * the neck.' A morbid stiffness of the 
neck. One with a short neck, — Simotraehg'lut, 

BYSSOS, Vulva. 

BYSSUS, Byssvm, The ancienU gave this 
name to several vegetable substances, which 
were used for the fabrication of stuffs prized 
for their fineness, colour, and rarity of material. 
It is now chiefly applied to the filaments, bv 
the aid of which the acephalous molloaca attach 
their shells to the rocks. Byssus was formerly 
also applied to the famale pitdendum, 

BYTHOS, /9ud'0f, < depth.' An epithet used 
by Hippocrates for the fundus of tlie stomach. 



C. 



C. This letter in the chemical alphabet sig- 
nifies nitre. It is also sometimes used in pre- 
scriptions for cabc. 

C AA-AP'IA, Dorste'nia Brazilian' sis. The 
root, according to Piso, is employed as emetic 
and anti-diarrhceic. 

C A A-AT AY'A. A plant of Brazil, supposed 
to be a species of gratiola. It is very bitter, 
and considered to be one of the best indigenous 
cathartics. 

CAACICA, Euphorbia capitata. 

CAA-GHIYU'YO, Frutex hoifeifer BraxiH- 
9n'sis. A shrub of Brazil, whose leaves, in 
powder, are considered detersive. 

CAAOPIA, Hypericum bacciferum. 

C AAPEBA, Pareira brava. 

CAAP0N6A, Crithmum maritimum. 

C A AROB A . A Brazilian tree, whose loaves, 
in decoction, promote perspiration. See Cera- 
tonia. 

CABAL, Cdh'alay Cabal'la, Qal'balay Caha'- 
Ha, Kab'alay GAballa. This word is from the 
Hebrew, and signifies knowledge transmitted by 
tradition. Paracelsus and several authors of 
the 16th and 17th centuries have spoken much 
of this species of magic, which they distin- 
guished into Judaic or theologianyUid Hermetic 
or medicinal; the latter being, according to 
thein, the art of knowing the most occult pro- 
perties of bodies by an immediate communica- 
tion with spirits, — ^the knowledge being liius 
acquired by inspiration, and incapable of in- 
ducing error. It was also called Are cabalis'- 
tica, < cabalistic art.' 

C ABAL'H AU. A plant of Mexico, accord- 
ing to Dalechamps, which passes for an antidote 
to white hellebore, and yet is used for poison- 
ing arrows. It is unknown to botanists.. 

C AB'ALIST, Cahalis'ta. One instructed in 
the Cabal. 

CABALLATION, Cynoglossum. 

CABARET, Asarum. 

CABBAGE, Brassica^c. Cow, Nymphaea 



odorata — c. Irish, Bracontium fcetidum^c. 
Skunk, Dracontium f(Btidum«— c. Swamp, Bra- 
contium foetidum — c. Water, Nymphaoai odorata 

c. Tree, Geoffirasa inermis — c.. Bark tree, 
Geoffreea inermis. 

C ABB AGIUM, tTeofirasa inermis. 

C ABUREIBA, Myxoxybn Peruiferum. 

CABUREICIBA, see Myroxylon Peruife- 
rum. 

CACiE'MIA, Cae^a'mia, from xaxoc,<bad/ 
and *aifAAy < blood.^ A faulty or morbid condi- 
tion of the blood. 

C AC^STHE'SIS, Caeawthe'sis, Cacoeuth^- 
sis, from xaxoc, * bad,' and aiodi^oi^, ' feeling/ 
Morbid sensation. Morbid general feeling. In- 
disposition. 

CACAFERRI, Ferri subcarbonas. 

C AC'AGOGUE, Caeago'gus, from namw, 'ex- 
crement,' and diyccy, ' to expel.' . An ointment, 
composed of alum and honey; which, when ap- 
plied to the anus, produced an evacuation.— 
Paulus of .£gina. 

CACALEXITERIA, Alexiteria. 

CACAl-IA ANTEITPHOR'BIUM, Anteu- 
phor'bium, . A plant, which Dodoens and others 
coftsidered to be capable of tempering the caus- 
tic properties of the euphorbium. It is also 
called Klein'ia, 

Many varieties of the Cacalia are used, in 
different countries, chiefly as condiments. 

C A'CAO, Ca'coay Co'coa Cacamf'era, Coca'' 
vi, Quakoii, Cacava'ta, The cocoa or choco- 
late nut; fruit of Thabro'ma Cacao; Familff, 
Malvaceae. Sea. Syst, Polydelphia Pentandria. 

CACATION, Defecation. 

CACATORIA, Diarrhoea. 

CAC'ATORY, Cacato'rius, from caeare, 'to 
go to stool.' Febris eacato'ria; a kind of inter- 
mittent fever, accompanied by copious alvine 
evacaations.---Sylvius. 

CACAVATA, Cacao. 

C AC AVI, Cacao, Jatropha manihot. 

CACCE, Excrement, 



CACCIONDE 



138 



CAC0SI8 



C ACCION'DE. A Boit of i»ll, chiefly formed 
of catechu, recommended by Bagliy i in dysentery. 
CACEPHEBOTESIA, Puberty. 
CACHANG-PARANG. A rort of bean of 
Snntatra, mentioned by Martden, whose seeds 
axe given in pleurisy. Jxissieu considers it to 
be Die Mimosa scandens. 

CACHECTIC, Cache<ft6sfiathee'ticus, same 
etymon as Cacheria. One attacked with ca- 
chexia. Belonging to cachexia. Caehee'tiea 
remedia are remedies against cachexia. 

CACHEN LAGUEN^ Chanchalagua, Chiro- 
ivia Chilensis. 

CACHEXIA, from uauo^y «bad,' and '.$«c, 
< habit.' Status eachee'tieus, A condition in 
which the body is evidently depraved. A bad 
habit of body ; chiefly the result of scorbutic, 
cancerous, or venereal disefises when in their 
last stage. Hence we hear of a Scorbutic Co- 
cktxioy Cancsrfms Cachexia, &c. Sauvages and 
Cullen have included under this head a number 
of diseases — consumptions, dropsies, &c. Ca- 
chexia has, been sometimes confounded with 
diathesis. Cachexia Icter'ica. is jaundice or 
icterus itself, or a disposition thereto. Fluor 
albus is sometimes called Cachexia Uterina, 

Cachexia Africana, Chthonophagia — c. 
Calculosa, Lithia — c. Cancerous, see Cancer — 
c. Chlorotic, Chlorosis— c. Dysthetica, Dyscra- 
sia — c. Icterica, Icterus. 

Cachexia Loift»f ren'sis. The paleness and 
other evidences of impaired health presented 
by the inhabitants of London: a similar ca- 
chexia is seen in those of other crowded cities. 
Cachexia, Scorbutic, see Purpura — c. Scro- 
phulosa. Scrofula. 

Cachexia Sple'nica. The state of scorbu- 
tic cachexia, which often accompanies diseases 
of the spleen, especially in India. 

Cachexia Venerea, Syphilis — c. Venous, 
Venosity— c. Virginum, Chlorosis. 
CACHIBOU, see Bursera gummifera. 
CACHINNA'TIO, from eachitmoyn laugh 
aloud.' A tendency to immoderate laughter, 
as in some hysterical and maniacal aflkctions. 

CACHIRI. A fermented liquor made, in 
Cayenne, from a decoction of the rasped root of 
the manioc. It resembles perry. 

C AC BX.EX. A small stone or pebble, found 
on the sea shore. One of these, when heated 
in the fire, and cooled in whey, communicates 
an astringency to the liquid, so that it was an 
ciently esteemed to be useful in dysentery. — 
Galen. 

CACHOS. An oriental fruit, apparently of 
a Solannm, which is esteemed lithontriptic. 
CACHOUy Catechu. 
CACHRYS LIBANCTIS. An umbellife- 
rous plant which grows in Africa and the South 
of Europe. It is aromatic and astringent. Its 
seeds are extremely acrid. 

CACHUN'DP^. An Indian troch or pastile 
composed of amber, mastic, musk, cinnamon, 
aloes, rhubarb, galanga, pearls, rubies^ eme- 
ralds, fcamets, &c. It is regarded by the peo- 
ple of India as an antidote, stomachic and anti- 
spasmodic. 

CACO, xaexo, properly only an abbreviation 
of soxof. In composition it means something 
defective ; as in the following words. 
CACO^STHESIS, Cacaesthesis. 
CACO-ALEXITERIA, Alexipharmic. 



C ACOCHO'LIA^from x*jroc, 'bad,* and /ein, 
'bile.' Diseases induced by a depraved condi- 
tion of the bile. 

CAC'OCHROI, Cacoehra'esy from xairoc, 
'bad,' and ^oa, 'colour.' Diseases in which 
the complexion is morbidly changed in colour. 

CACOCHYL'IA, from s«xo(, 'bad,* and 
Tvxof , ' chyle.' Depraved chylification. 

CAC0C5HYM'IA, Kaioehym'ia, Corrup'tio 
Bufno'rumy from xanos, 'bad,' and /vfnof, 'juice,' 
'humour.' Caeoeh'ymy, Depravation of the 
humours. 

Cacochtmia Pluhbba, Lead poisoning — c. 
Scorbutica, see Purpura — c. Scrophulosa, Scro- 
fula— c. Venerea, Syphilis. 

CACOCHTMUS, CatochyWicus. One at- 
tacked with cacocbymia. Belonging to caco- 
chymia. 

CACOCNE'MUS, Caeocne'micusy Maiis 
suris prcsdi'tus; from kxaoc, 'bad,' and itn»/ui;, 
'the leg.' One who has bad legs. • 

CACOCOREMA, from Kaxsc, 'bad,' and 
jre^«», ' I purge, or cleanse.' A medicine which 
purges off* the vitiated humours. 

CACODiE'MON, from Koxof, ?bad,' and ^i- 
/Kow, 'a spirit.' An evil spirit, to which were 
ascribed many disorders. The nightmare. 

CACO'DES, from xaxoq, 'bad,' and ct»i», 'to 
smell,' — malholens. Having a bad smell; 
Caco'dia, Cacos'vUa. 

CACO I )I A, see Cacodes. 

CACOETHES, Caconh'ieus, from xaxot, 
'bad,' and c^e;, 'disposition, habit,' &c. Of a 
bad or vitiated character, as ulcus eaeo(^thesy 
an ulcer of a malignant character. 

CACOETHICUS, Cacoethes. 

C ACOGALAC'TIA, Cacoga'lia, from xaitof , 
'bad,' and yayAty gen. yctltfxToc, ' milk.' A bad 
condition of the milk. 

CACOGALAC'TICA, same etymon as the 
last. One who suflers from a bad condition of 
the milk. 

CACOGALIA, Cacogalactia. 

CACOGEN'ESIS, from v.a*oiy 'bad, and yi- 
wo-if, 'generation.' A morbid formation. 

CACOMORPHIA, Deformation. 

CACOMORPHOSIS, Deformation. 

CACOPATHI'A, Pas'sio Mala, from «oxof , 
'bad,' and 7i«^c, 'affection.' A distressed 
state of mind. — Hippocrates. 

C ACOPHO'NI A, from x« «off, 'bad,' and ^wny 
' voice,' vitiafta vox, A dissonant condition of 
voice. 

CACOPLASTIC, Caeopla/ticusy Dysplas- 
mat*ie; from xoxoc, 'bad,* and Tlawtt, 'I form.' 
Susceptible of dnly a low degree of organiza- 
tion, as the indurations resulting from low or 
chronic Inflammation, fibro-cartilage, cirrho- 
sis, &c. 

CACOPRA'GIA, Caeoprax'is, from xsxof, 
' bad,' and vqattv, • I perform.' Depraved con- 
dition of-the organic functions. 

CACOPRAXIS, Cacopragia. 

CACORRHACHITIS, from mxoc, 'bad,' 
and Q*z'ff *^^ spine.' Cacor'rhachis, Caeo- 
rhaehis, Cacorhaehi'tis, Spondylal'pia, De- 
formity of the spine. Disease of the spine. 
Spontaneous luxation of the vertebrae and ribs 
dependent upon internal causes. 

CACORRHYTH'MUS, Arrhyth'mvsy from 
xs xac, ' bad,' and qvSfcofy < rhythm,' ' order.' Ir- 
regular. 

C ACO'SIS. Mala disposi"tioy (F.) Vice. A 



CACOSITIA 



134 



CiECUM 



bad condition of body. — ^Hippocrates. A dia- 
eaaed condition in general. 

CACOSIT'IA, from jra«o(, < bad,' and i>it««», 
< aliment.' Disgust or aversion for food — Ftu- 
tid'ium eibo'rum, 
CACOSMIA, see Cacodes. 
CACOSOMFUM, from k<«o(» <bad,' and 
rai^«y < the body.' An hospital for leprosy, and 
incurable affections in general. 

CACOSPERMA'SIA, Caeosperma*tia, Co- 
eotper^mia, from x*xot, 'bad,' and •'/ii^a, 
* sperm.' A bad condition of the sperm. 

CACOSPHYX'IA, from xaxof, 'bad,' and 
<'fv^f, 'puise.'^-Vitio'MM puitus. Bad state 
of pulse. — Galen. 

CACOSPLANCH'NIA, from xauof, «bad,' 
andtf-jiilflty^^ov, 'a Tiscns.' Indigestion. The 
emaciation aependent upon imperfect digestion. 
— Siebenhaar. 

CACOSTOM'ACHUS, from «««•?, 'bad,' 
and oTo/cax^Cf ' the stomach.' What disagrees 
with the stomach. Indigestible. — Gorrseus. 

CACOSTOMATOSPHRESI A, Breath, offen- 
sive. 

CACOSTOMUS, from jraieoc, «bad,» and 
rr«M«9 ' A mouth.' Having a bad mouth. 

C ACOTHYM'I A,rit'»tM» An'imi, froia »<jt«c, 
'bad,' and ^v/uo(, 'mind,' 'disposition.' A vi- 
tious state of mind. — Linden. 
CACOTRIBULUS, Centaurea calcitrapa. 
CACOTRICH'IA, from x*xoc, 'bad,' and 
^Qdy r^tjr^c, 'hair.' Disease of the hair. 

CACOTROPH'IA, from xoKOf, 'bad,' and 
T^o9«, 'nutrition.' — Vitio'»a nutr%"Ho /—-disor- 
dered nutrition.— Galen. 
CACOU, Cagoty Catecbn. 
CACOU'CIA COCCIN'EA, Couein'ea Coe- 
ein'eay Sehousbm'a eoeein^ea, Tihimma. A pe- 
rennial twining shrub of South America, the 
plant of which, as well as the fruit, is possessed 
of emeto-cathartic properties. 
C AC TIER, Cactus opuntia. 
CACTUS OPUNTIA, Opun'tia. The In- 
dian Figy (F.) Caeiier, Raqueitey Figuier 
d*Indt, This plant grows in South America, 
Spain, Italy, &c . Its fruit, which h^ the shape 
of the fig, is of a sweetish taste, and colours 
the urine red when eaten. Its leaves are con- 
sidered refrigerant. 

The fruits of different species of cactus are 
called Tunas. 

CADA'BA, Strol^mia. A genus of the fa- 
mily Cappandea, natives of India and Arabia. 
The young shoots of the Cada'ba farino'ta are 
considered to be an antidote against venomous 
bites. 

C AD ATER, Ptoma, Necron, A d^ad body; 
a subject; a eateass^ (F.) Cadavre. The word 
has been supposed to come from eado, 'I fall;' 
and by some to be a contraction from caro data 
venfUbus, ' flesh given to the worms \ 

CADAVEROUS, Cadav'srte, Cadavsro'sus, 
Neero'des, (F.) Cadavireux^ Belonging to 
the dead body ; as cadaverous sm$lL The Ca- 
daw'erous or Hippocrat'ie face (see Face,) is an 
unfavourable sign in disease, and generally de- 
notes a fatal termination. 

Cadav'eroxjs or Cadav'brio Htpbrjb'mia. 
The hypostatic hyperemia observed in depend- 
ing parts of the dead body. 
CADEJI-INDI, Malabathrum. 
CADEL-AYANACU, Croton tiglium. 



CADIA. An Egyptian, legnminoos plant. 
The Arabs attribute to its fresh leaves tlie 
power of relieving colic. 

CADIVA INSANIA, EpUepsy. 
CADMIA, Calamina, Tutia. 
CADMIl SULPHAS, Cadmium, nUpku'ri- 
cum. Sulphas Cadmi'euSf MelVni StdphtUy 
Klaprc'thii Sulphas, Klupro'thium Sulj^uru 
eum, Melinum Sulphu'rieum, Sulphate of Cad- 
mium* Used in spots on the cornea, and in 
chronic torpid inflammation of the conjunctiva, 
in ithe quantity. of half a grain to a grain to the 
ounce of water. 

CADMIUM SULPHURICUM, Cadmii Sol- 
phas. 
CADTCHU, Catechu. 
CADUCA HUNTERI, Deciduar-c. Pauio, 
Epilepsy. 

CADU'CITT, Ifubecil'litasy Delnl'itas, Co- 
du'extcu, Ssoth cadere, 'to fiedl.' The French 
use the word Cadueiti for the portion of homao 
life which is comprised genenlly between 7U 
and 80 years, ifhe age which precedes de* 
crepitudcr It is so termed in consequence of 
the limbs npt usually possessing sufficient 
strength to support the body. The precise tge 
must of course vary in individuals. 
CADURCUS, Vulva. 

CADUS, xa^ft;. A Greek measure equal to 
ten gallons Enzlish. — Pliny. 
Cadus, Amphora. 

CiECA, FORAMINA— ANTERIUS ET 
POSTERiUS— are situate at the fore and hack 
parts of the tuber annulare of the brain, and St 
the extremities of the depression made bj the 
vertebral arterv. The former is placed between 
the nerves of the third; and the latter between 
those of the sixth pair. 

CMCM H.£MORRHO]fa)ES, Blind PiUs, 
(F.) Hemorrhoides aveugles, aie those unac- 
companied by any discbarge. 

CiEC AL, Caca'lis, Belonging to the cccnm, 
from eteeus, ' blind, hidden.' The Crctd aru- 
rits and veins are the branches of the Arterix 
et venrn colica dextrm inferiores, distributed to 
the caBCum. 
CiECATRiX, Cicatrix. 
C^'CITAS, Ca'eitasy Cseeiiu'do, Ablep'sis, 
Obemca'tioy OecKca*tio, Anap'sia, Ty'phlous^ 
Typhlo'tisy Blindness, (F.) Aveuglement, Ci- 
eiti, Psrte de la vue, Caecitas may be dependent 
upon many different diseases, — as upon amau- 
rosis, specks, hypopyon, cataract, glaucoma, 
oi^thalmia, atrophy of the eye, &c. 

CiBCiTAS Crbpusculabis, Hcmeralopia— c. 
Diurna,Nyctalopia— c. Noctuma, Hemeralopia. 
C^CITUDO, Caecitas. 
CiECUM, Ciseum, Intesti'num eaetem, Mo- 
nom*aehon, Monom'aeumf Monoco*lon, Monocn'- 
lum, Typhlo^tsron monoeo'lon, Typhloferum, Ty 
phloen'tOrum, Ini^tium intesti'ni crassi, Socetts 
Intestini crassi aevi Coli,Caeum Caput coli,Ca' 
put eoli. Prima sella eoli, Ini"tium extu'bsrans 
eoli, from etteus, ' blind.' The Blind Gut, so 
called from its being perforated at one end only 
That portion of tke intestinal canal which is 
seated between the termination of the ileum and 
conunencement of the colon; and which. fills, al- 
most wholly, the right iliac fossa; where the 
peritoneum retains it immovably. Its leni^th 
IS about three or four fingers' breadth. The 
Heo-eaeal valve or Valve of Bauhin shuts off 
all commnnication between it and the ileum; 



c^cus 



135 



CAKES, WORM, STORY'S 



and the Appendix vwmiformU ctsd is attached 
to it. 

Cjbcum FoKA'MEif of the frontal hone is a 
sm^ cavity at the inferior extremity of the 
internal coronal crest or crista. — Fronto-eth- 
uuidal forameny (F.) Trou av&vglt on borgne, 
Morgagni has given the same name to the small 
cavity in the qiiddle of the upper surface of the 
tongae, near its base; the sides of which are 
furnished with mucous follicles — Laeune de la 
/on^tM.^Ch.) 

CjKccji, Phugmorous Tumour of thx, Ty- 
phlo-enteritis. 

C^CUS. < Blind.' One deprived of sight, 
Typkiopsf (F.) AveugUy Borgns. In apatomy, 
it is osed to designate certain holes or cavities, 
which end in a eul-d^^sac; ox have only one 
opening. 

Biind Duets of ths Urtt'thra^ (F.) Conduits 
aveugies*ds'l'ur€ihr6y are the Mfieous Lacu'ncs 
of the Urs'thra, 

CML A-DOLO, Torenia Asiatica. 
CiEMENTUM, Lute. 
CiERULEUM BEROLINENSE, Prussian 
blue — c. Borussicum, Prussian blue. 

C^RULOSIS NEONATORUM, Cyano; 
pathy. 

C.SSALPI'NIA, C€Bsalpi'na sappaUi Sappan 
or Samp/en wood, (F.) BrisilUt, Bois de Sap- 
pan. A small Siamese tree, the wood of which 
is used in decoction, in cases of pontusipn. 

Braseil ufoody P^mamhueo or Femambueo 
woody formerly used as an astringent, is the 
wood of Cssalpin'ia Eghina'ta. This is the 
proper Brazil wood; but another variety in 
commerce is the Brasiletta, from Casalpinda 
Brasiliensisy and C. eristay which grew in the 
West Indies. 

The Nicaragua or peaek-wood is taaXogoviS 
to ^s, and is said to.be derived from a species 
of cSesalpinia. 

The kernel of Casalpih'ia Bonducsll'a, 
the seed of which is called in India KutkuUja 
and Kutoo Kurunjay is given as a febrifiige 
tonic. Dose ten grains. 

CiESA'REAN SECTION, Ca^Vson oj^^ra'- 
tiouy Tt>moto'eia, Casa'rta seetio. Partus ctBsa'^ 
reusy Opsra'tio easa'ruty Metrotom'iay (F.) Opi' 
ration CesarisnnSy from ecsderey < to cut.' An 
incision made through the parietes of the abdo- 
men and uterus to extract the foetus. In .this 
manner, Julius Caesar is said to have been ex- 
tiacted. — ^Pliny . It is also called Hysterptom'iay 
Hystsrotomoto'eiay Oastrometrotom'iay Gaster' 
kystsrof'omyy Gastrometrot'omiy Gaitrohysf' 
Tot'omyy (F.) Operation Cesarisnns, An inci- 
sion has been nuuie into the uterus through the 
vagina, constituting the Vaginal CsBsarean See- 
tiouy Gastrelytrotom'iay Gastrocolpotom'iuy La' 
paraeolpotomfiay Laparoslytrotom'iay (F.) Opt- 
ration eesarienns vaginals. The Csesarean sec- 
tion may be required when the mother dies be- 
fore delivery; — when there is some invincible 
obstacle to delivery from the &ulty conforma- 
tion of the pelvis; or when the child has passed 
into the abdominal cavity in consequence of mp- 
: me of the uterus. 

CiESARIES, Capillos. 
C.£SinS, Glaucoma. 

C^SONES, Ctssares. Children brought 
into the world by the Caesarean operation. 
CMSWLIM. They who have gray eyes. 
C.£SURA, Cut. 



C^TCHU, Catechu. 

CAF, Camphor. 

CAFAL, Agrimony. 

CAFAR, Camphor. 

CAFAy Cofiea. 

CAFA A LA aVLTANE. This name has 
been given to an infusion or decoction of the 
ground eoques or pericarps which surround the 
coffee. 

CAFE CITRIN. The aqueous infusion of 
unroasted coffee, so called on account of its yel- 
lowish tint. 

CAFETER, Coffea Arabica. 

CAFF A, Camphor. 

CAFIERy Coffea Arabica. 

CAFUR, Camphor. 

CAGASTRUM. The principle or germ of 
diseases which are conomunicable. Paracelsus. 

CAGNEUXy Cagot. See Kyllosis. 

C AGOSANGA, .Ipecacuanha. 

CAGOTy (F.). A name given to deformed 
and miserable beings, met with in the Pyre- 
neesj Bern, and Upper Grascony, in France, 
where they are also called Capots. In other 
districts they are called, Gezits, WMxtainsy Cri' 
tinsy GahetSy Caponsy ColibertSy Caeousy Cag- 
nsuxy he. See Cretin, The word Cagot is 
supposed to be an abbreviation of Ca»»> (xotkusy 
< Dog of a Goth.' 

CAGUE-SANGUE, Caquesangue. 

CAHINC^ RADIX, Caincae radix. 

CAI'EPUT OIL, Caj'eput oily Kyaput'tyy 
Cajapu'ti O'leum. The volatile oil of &e leaves 
of Melaleu'ea Cajapu'tiy a native of the Moluc- 
cas. The oil has a strong, fragrant smell, like 
camphor; taste pungent and aromatic. It is 
stimulant, and useful where the essential oils in 
general are employed. It has also been called 
Oil of Witnebsuy from the person who first dis- 
tilled it. 

CAILLE, Tetrao cotumix. 

CAILLEAUy Lantana. 

CAILLEBOTTEy Curds. 

CAILLELAIT BLANC, Galium moUugo— 
e, Vradey Galium verum. 

CAILLOTy Coagulum. 

CAINANiE RADIX, Camc» radix. 

CAiN'CiE RADIX, Radix Chioeoe'eay R. 
Caina'na seu Caninana seu Cahinecs sen Kct- 
hineiB sen Serpswta'ria Braxilien'sisy Cainea 
Root, The bark of the roots of Chiocoee'a an^ 
guifugay Ch. densifo'lia, and perhaps CA. raes- 
mo'sa, a plant of the Family Rubiaces. Stz. 
Syst, Pentandria Monogynia, of Linnaeus. It 
is bitter, tonic, and diuretic, but has not been 
long introduced. Dose of the powder from gj* 
to zss. 

Dr. John H. Griscom, of New York, consi- 
ders there is a remarkable analogy between 
ihe Cainea and the Apocynum eannabinum, 

CAINITO, Chrysophyllum Cainito. 

C AIPA^SCHORA. A cucurbitaceous Mala- 
bar plant, the fruit of which has a pyriform 
shape. The juice is drunk in that country for 
the purpose of arresting hiccough. The fruit, 
when unripe, is emetic. 

CAISSEy Case — c. du TambouryTjmpumm, 

CAITCHU, Catechu. 

CAJAN, Phaseolns creticus. 

CAJUPUTI, Cajeput. 

CAKES, WORM, STORY'S. These were 
composed of calomel and jalaps made into cakes, 
and coloured with cinnabar. 



CALABA8H TREE 



136 



CALCARIiE CHLORUM 



CALABASH TREE, NARROW-LEAVED, 

Crescentia Cujete. 

CALADIUM ESCULENTUM, Animewu- 
lentum. 

C ALAFy Salix JEgyvtiaea, A large-leaved 
Egyptian willow, called, alio, Ban, The dis- 
tilled water of the flowers, called Mctcahalefy 
passes, in that country, for an excellent anti- 
aphrodisiac. It is also used as an antiloimic, 
antiseptic, and cordial. 

C ALA6ERI, Vernonia anthelmintica. 

CALAGIRAH, Yetnonia anthelmintica. 

GALAGUAXiG RADIX, Calague'la Ra- 
dix. The root of Polypo'dium Calagua'la, or 
Aspid'ium eoria'e&um. It has been exhibited in 
Italy in dropsy, pleurisy, contusions, abscesses, 
&c. Its properties, are not, however, clear. 

CALAMANDRINA, Teucriura chasuedj^ys. 

CALAMBAC, Agalloehum. 

CALAMBOUk, Agallochtttt/ 

CALAME'DON, from xaZa/KOf, <a reed.' 
This word has had vi|rious significations. Some 
have used it for an oblique fracture of a bone; 
the fractured portions having the shape of liie 
nib of a pen. Others have used it for « longi- 
tudinal fracture ; and others, again, for one that 
is comminuted. — Dictionaries. 

CALAMI'NA, Cal* amine, from talamttUy *a 
reed,' so called from its reed-like appearance. 
CadnU'a, Cathmir, Cadmi'a lapido^sa aiiro'sa, 
Cadmi'a Foa'silia, Lapis Atro'sus, Calim'ia^ 
Lapis Calafni?ia'ris, Calamina'ris, Car'bonas 
Zinci impu'ntsy (F.) Pierre ealaminaire. Na- 
tive impure carbonate of zinc. Calamine is 
chiefly used for pharmaceutical purposes in the 
form of the Calamina pejspara'ta. Lapis Co- 
lamina'ris prapara'tus, Car'bonas zinei impu'- 
rus prapara'tus, Zinei car'bonas prapara'tus. 
Prepared Calamine f'—Colamine reduced to an 
impalpable powder by roasting and levigation. 
In this state it is sprinkled or dusted on exco- 
riated parts, or to prevent excoriation, &c. 

CALAMINARIS, Calamina. 

C ALAMINT, Melissa Calaminthar-^. Field, 
Melissa nepeta — c. Mountain, Melissa grandi- 
flora — c. Spotted, Melissa nepeta. 

C ALAMINT A HUMILIOR, Glecoma hede- 
racea. 

CALAMINTHA, Melissa C.—c. Anglica, 
Melissa nepeta— c. Erecta Virginiana, Cunila 
Mariana — c. Magno flore, Melissa grandiflora' 
^-c. Montana, Melissa grandiflora — c. Pulegii 
odore, Melissa nepeta. 

CAL'AMUS, xaXanof, *the reed.» In the 
Pharmacopoeia of the U. S. the rhizoma of ac<>- 
rus calamus (q. v.) 

Calamus Alexandri'nxJs. Celsus has thus 
called a medicine, which was long confounded 
with Calamus Aromatieus. It is not a root, 
however, but the stalk of a plant of India and 
Egypt, probably the Andropo'gon Nardus. It 
entered into the theriaca, and has been regarded 
as antihysteric and emmenagogue; — Calamus 
aromatieus verus. 

Calamus Aromaticxts, Acorus calamus—^. 
Aromatieus verus, Calamus Alexandrinus— c. 
Indicus, see Saccharum— c. Odoratus, Acorus 
calamus, Juncus odoratus. 

Calamus Rotang. The systematic name of 
a plant, whence Dragon^s Blood, Sanguis Dra- 
eo'nisf Cinnnb'aris Grsceo'rum, Draconthm'ma, 
(F.) Sang-Dragon, is obtained. It is the red, 
resinous juice, obtained, in India, from wound- 



ing the bark of the Calamus Rotemg. It has 
been utfed as an astringent in hemorrhages, &c.; 
but is now rarely employed. 

Calamus Sceipto'rius, AnMg'lyphty Rhom- 
boid' al Sinus; «a writing pen,* (F.) Fossetu 
aTtgulaire du qtiatrieme ventricule* A small, 
angular c^ivity, situate at the superior extremity 
of the medulla, in the fourth ventricle of the 
bri^n, which, has been, by some, supposed to 
resemble a pen. 

Calamus Vulgaris, Acorus calamus. 

CALAPPITE. Rumt>hius has given this 
name to calculous concretions, found in the in- 
terior of some cocoa nuts. The cocoa tree it- 
self the Malays call Calappa. These stones 
are, likewise, termed Vegetable JBezoards* llbe 
Malays attribute poteilt virtues to them, and 
wear them as amulets. 

CALASAYA, Cinchone cordifolis cortex. 

CALBALA, Cabal. 

CALBIA'NUM. The name of a x^aster in 
Myrepsus, the^ composition of which we know 
not. 

C ALC ADINXJM, Ferri sulphas. 

CALCAIRE, Calcareous. 

CALCA'NEAL, Calea'neits, from ealr, 'the 
heel.' Having relation to the calcaneum, as 
" ealeaneai arteries." 

CALCANEO-PHAtANOIENDU PETIT 
OR T£JL, Abductor minimi digiti pedis — cPka- 
langinien commun, Extensor brevis digitorom 
pedis — e, Sous-phalangettien eommun, Flexor 
brevis digitoruth pedis — e, Sous-Phalangimtu 
eommun, Flexor brevis digitdrum pedis — c. Sous- 
phalangien du petit ortetl, see Abductor minimi 
digiti pedis — e, Sns-phalangettien eommun^ Ex- 
tensor brevis digitorum pedis. 

CALCA'NEUM, from calx, Hhe heel.' Col- 
ea'neusy Calear, Cal'eia, lehnus, Os Calcis^ 
Pterna, Pter^nium. The largest of the ^arsal 
bones; that which forms the heel. It is situate 
at the posterior and inferior part of the foot; is 
articulated above and a little anteriorly with 
the astragalus ; anteriorly, also, with the os cu- 
boides. Its posterior surface,— called Heely 
Talus f Calx, (F.) Talon, — gives attachment 
to the tendo-achlllis : the lower has, posteriorly, 
two tuberosities, to which the superficial mus- 
cles of the sole of the foot are attached. The 
small Apophfysis or lateral Apophysis of the 
Calea'netim, (F.) Petite Apophyse on Apophyse 
latirale du Caleanium, is a projection at the 
upper surface of this bone, on which is formed 
the posterior portion of the cavity that re- 
ceives the astragalus. The great Apoph'ysis, 
anterior Apoph'ysis of the CcUea'fieum^ is the 
projection which corresponds, on one side, with 
the cuboides ; and on the other forms the ante- 
rior part of the facette which receives the as- 
tragalus. 

CALCANTHON, Atramentum. 

C ALCAR, Calcaneum, Ergot^c. Avis, Hip- 
pocampus minor. 

CALCA'REOUS, Cala/rens, Calea'^ns ; 
from calx,*\\me,* (F.) Caleaire. Containing 
lime: — as calcareous concretions, O. deposit 
tions, &c. 

CALCAREUS CARBONAS, Creta. 

CALCARIA CHLORATA,Calcischloridum 
— c. Chlorica, Calcis chloridum— c. Phospho- 
rica, see Cornu cervi — c. Pura, Calx— c. Pura 
liquida, Liquor calcis. 

CALCARIiE CHL0RUM,Calci8 chloridum. 



CALCATOR 



197 



CALCmj 



CALCATOR, Ferri rahOM. 

CALCATRBPPOLA, Centauiea cidcitnpa. 

CALCE'NA, CALCE'NON, CALCENO'- 
MA» CALCINCNIA. Words emplofed by 
PanceUos to itesigmite the concretions of tsr 
trmte of lime which form in the hnnaan hody. 

CALCENOS, Calcetns. 

CALCEOLA'RIA^froiii ealeetlusj «a Mall 
■Upper;' 8Upp9fwort> 

Calcbola'bia PbixaTa is nsed in Pern as a 
laxatiTe. 

Cai^cbola'Ua Tuf'da is esteemed to be 
Mriivge. 

CkXXyt/TV^Calcttw'niutyCaUe'nos. That 
which abounds m tartrate of lime. An adjec- 
tive used, by Paracelsos, in speaking of the 
blood; SamguU ^mlce'tus. Hence came the ex- 
pression Caleimsd Uoody Sang ealdni. 

CALCEUM EQUINUM, Tussilago. 

CALCHOIDEA, (OS.) Cuneiform bone. 

CALCIA, Calcaneom. 

CALCIGEROUS CELL, see Tooth. 

CALCIG'RADnS, Putmh'tUesy from Caixy 
TiT9^ay 'the heel/ and fiaLtta, <I walk.' One 
who walks on his heels^ — Hippocrates. 

CALCII CHLORURETUM, Calcis mnrias 
— c. Ozycfaloraretom, Calcis chloridum — c. 
Oinrdnm, Calx yiva — c. Piotochlororetum, 
Calcis cbioridnm. 

"calcination, Caldnatio, CaUi'non, 
ComermmafUo^ from ««2c» < lime.' The act of 
snbmitting to a strong heat an^ infusible mine- 
ral sabotanee, which we are desirous of depriving 
either of its water, or of any other volatilizable 
snbstaace, thsC enters into its composition; or 
which we wish to combine with oxygen. Alum 
is calcined to get rid of its water of crystalliza- 
tion; — dkaUf to reduce it to the state of pure 
lime, by driving off the carbonic acid; and otr- 
<a»M mUaU are subjected to this operation to 
«iidize them. 

CALCINATUM MAJUS POTERII, Hy- 
diarcymm pnseipitatnm. 

CALCINONIA, CalccMu 

CALCIS BICHLORURETUM, Calcis chlo- 
hdam — c. CarbowM, Creta— c. Carbonas dorus, 
Crete, Marmor— c. Carbonas friabilis, Creta— 
c Hepar, Calcis sulphuretum— c. Hydras, see 
Calx~€. Hypochloris, Calcis chloridum. 

Calcis Chlo'eidum ; Ckio'ruU of Lime^ 
ChWrur^i of Limej BfpoMo'riu •/ l^me, 
CJUoni4 of Umo^ Ox^mufriou of Umsy Cmlx 
dUorim^f (Ph. U. 8.) Protoneklor'uret of 
CoUiumj Calea'fim tUorafta^ Chlorwm Calea'- 
rimj ChUro'tmm CaUofrit^ Caiutria Chlo'riooy 
OxfdUormro'tum CmleUyProtookloruro'tum Cml- 
aij Ckioruro'tum Oxidi CaicU, BickUrurt^tum 
CalcUjOxjfmmfriao Caloisy Calois HypoMo'fisy 
Calx o x fw utr iat*ioay BlMoking Powder, Ton- 
mom's Potodery(F»yProioxieklorur$de Caldumy 
Chiofuro do Ckmux, Oxiohlorun do ChxmXy 
Ckioruro d*Oxido do CaleiumyVioUorutro do 
CkauXf Ozimurimto do Chaumf Muriato ourox- 
igenioaOxtginddo Chx^yPondrodoBUrndkO' 
momty P, do Temnani. A compomid resulting 
finm the action of chlorine on hydrate of lime. 
The chloride of lime is a most valuable disin- 
fecting agent, (see Disinfection,) when dissolved 
IB the proportion of one pound to six gallons 
«f water. It has likewise been employ^ both 
intemally and eztemally in various diseases, 
is inanofnla, fistor oris^ loul ulcei% &c. ke* 
10 



C ALOIS MimiAB; MuriaU of Xmm, Calx sa" 
li'toy CaleU Chloruro'tum sea Ckh'ridvm, Chlo- 
ride ofealeium, (F.) Chlorure de oalUumy Mw 
riato ou Sfdrocklorate de Ckaux. This salt 
has been given, in solution, as a tonic, stimulant, 
&c., in scroAiions tumours, glandular obstruc- 
tions, general debility, &c. The Solu'tio Mw 
ria*tio Caleioy liquor Colds Muria'tisy Solu- 
tion of Muriate of UmOy Liquid Shell, may be 
formed of muriate of Lime ^j. dissolved in die- 
tilled water f. giij. The Liquor Calcic Chlo- 
ami or Solution of Chloride of Oa/e»i»m, of the 
Pharmacopoeia of the United States, is formed 
as follows : — MarUoy in fragments,|| ix. Muriatio 
addy 0\\ Distilled water, a sufficient quantity. 
Mix the acid with a half pint of .the water, and 
gradually add the marble. Towards the close 
of the effervescence npply a gentle heat, and, 
when the action has ceased, pour off the clear 
liquor and evaporate to dryness. Dissolve the 
residuum in its weight and a half of distilled 
water, and filter. Dose, from gtt. xzz. to f. 3j. 
in a cupful of water. 

Calcis Oxthurias, Calcis chloridum. 

Calcis SuLPBuaB'ruif; Bepar CaloioySul'- 
phuret of Lime, (J,)ProtO'hydroeulfate do Col- 
dumy Hydroeulfato de ehaetx. Principally 
nsed in solution, as a b«th, in itch and other 
cutaneous affections. 

CALCITEA, Ferri sniphas. 

CALCITEOSA, Pfaunbi oKydum semivi- 
treom. 

CALCITHOS, Cnpri subacetas. 

CALCITRAPA, Centaurea Calcitnpa---c. 
Stellata, Centaurea calcitrapa. 

CALCITRAPPA, Delphiniam consolida. 

CALCIUM, CHLORIDE OF, Calcis murias 
— c. Chlor^ire dSy Calcis mnrias— «. Chlorure 
d'oside do, Calcis chloridum — e, Protohydro- 
sulphate de, Calcjs sulphnretum — e. Protoxi- 
ehlorure de, Calcis chloridum— c. Protoxichlo- 
niret of, Calcis chloridum— c. Protoxide of, 
Calx. 

CALCO-SUBEHALANGEUS MINIMI DI- 
GITI, Abductor minimi digit! pedis — c. Sub- 
phalangeus poUicis, Abductor pollicis pedis. 

CALCOCOS, Bell-meUl. 

C ALCOIDEA, (ossicola,) Cuneiform bones. 

C ALCOTAR, Ferri sulphas. 

CALCUL, Calculus. 

CALCULEUXy Calculous. 

CAL'CULI, see Calculus— c. Articular, see 
Calculi Arthritie ; and Concretions, articular. 

Calculi, Arthait'ic, Tophi, Tuber'eula or- 
tkr%t*ioay ChaUs stones. Nodes, (q. v.) (F.) 
Piorres erofeuees, Caleuls arthritiques, Nentds, 
Concretions, which form in the ligaments, and 
within the capsules of the joints, in persons 
affected with goat. They are composed of uric 
acid, soda, am) a little animal matter; very 
rarely, urate of lime and chloride of lodium are 
met with. Similar calculi are found in other 
parts besides the joints. 

Cal'ctjli, Bil'iart, Cal'euli hilio'd wafelV' 
d sen hUia^rii, BU'iary Conoretions, Gall- 
stones, Cholol'ithusy Cholel'ithusy (F.) Caleuls 
hUiairesy Piorres au fiel. Some of these con- 
tain all tiie materials of the bile, snd seem to be 
nothing more than that secretion thickened. 
Severu contain Pieromel ; and the greater part 
are composed of from 68 to 94 parts of Cholos- 
torim, and of from 6 to 12 of the yellow matt«r 



CALCULI IN THE EARS 



138 



CALCULI, URINARY 



of the bile. Biliary calculi are moet frequently 
foand in the gall-bladder : at other timee, in 
the substance of the liver, in the hranchea of 
the Ductus kspatiew, or in the Duehu Com" 
munis ChoUdoekut. The first are called Cyt- 
He; the second Sspatie; and the last, some- 
times, Hspaioeystie* The eaoses which give 
rise to them are very obscure. Often they oe< 
caslon no uneasinessi and at other times the 
symptoms may be confounded with those of 
hepatitis. At times, they are rejected ^j the 
month, or by the bowels, alone with a consider- 
able quanti^ of bile, which had accumulated 
behind ^em; at other times, they occasion 
violent abdominal inflammation, abscesses, and 
biliary fistulsB, rupture of the gall-bladder, and 
fatal eAision into the peritoneum. The passage 
of a gall-stone is extremely painftil ; ^et the putos 
is not at first affected; Antiphlogistics, when 
there is inflammatory action, and strong doses 
of opium, to allay the pain and spasm, with the 
warm bath, are the chief remedies. Solvents 
are not to be depended upon. They cannot 
reach the calculi. 

CAL'etn:.!, m ths Eabs, (F.) Calcuis ds 
VOrsilU. Hard, light, and inflammable con- 
cretions, which occur in the meatus auditorius 
taetsmusy and are merely indurated cerumen. 
They are a frequent cause of dealhess. They 
can be easily seen, and may be extracted by 
appropriate ioicepa, after having been detached 
by injections of soap and water. 

Calouu Fullui, Cakuli, biliary. 

Cax.'ouli, Laob^ktmal, (F.) Caleuls lasry^ 
maux. Concretions, sometimes, but rarely, 
form in the lachrymal passages, where they 
occasion abscesses and fistule, which do not 
heal until they are extracted. No analysis has 
been made of them. 

Cal'culi of Tn Mamma, (F.) Caleuls dss 
MamelUs, Haller gives a case of a concre- 
tion, of a yellowish-white colour, which had 
the shape of one of the excretory ducts of the 
nummary gland, having been extracted from 
an abscess seated in that organ. 

Cal'ouli or THx Pan 'casAa, (F.) Caleuls du 
Panerias, These are but little known. Ana- 
logy has induced a belief that they resemble 
the salivary. Some have supposed that certain 
transparent calculi, rejected by vomiting, or 
passed in the evacuations, have proceeded from 
the pancreas, but there seems to be no reason 
for this belief. 

Cal'ovu or TBS Piwu'al Gk.Aif2>, (F.) Col* 
&uls de la Olands Pinials. These have been 
fretjuently met with. No symptom announces 
their presence during life. They are composed 
of phosphate of lime. 

Cal'culi or thb Pbostatb, JProstat'ie eal'- 
euli. These are not very rare. They have 
generally the same compositimi aa the pre- 
ceding. They usually present the symptoms 
common to every tumefaction of the prostate, 
and sometimes those of calculi in the blad- 
der. 

Cal'ouli Pul'mohart, (F.) Caleuls pulmo^ 
fiMTSs. These concretions are very frequently 
met with in the dead body, without seeming to 
have produced unpleasant symptoms during fife. 
At other times, they are accompanied with all 
the symptoms of phthisis, Phthisis ealemlsuts, 
of Bayle. At times, they are expectorated 
without the supervention of any unpleasant 



symptom. They are usually fonned of carbo- 
nate of lime and animal matter. 

Cal'c17X.x, Sal'ivart, Col* euli salUfaflss^Sia- 
Isl'itkiy (F.) Calsuls salivairss, Coaacretions, 
usually formed of phoephate of lime and animal 
OMtter, which are developed in the aubatanee 
of the salivary glands or in their excretory 
ducts. In the firstcase, they may be «w«>«w«» 
for a simple swelling of the gland ; in the se- 
cond, th^ nmy be generally detected by the 
touch. They may be extracted by inetsioo in 
the interior of the mouth. The ealcnlns de- 
veloped in the subling[ttal ducts has bean called 
Cal'eulus sufdingua'lis^ and Ram'ula lapids'a. 

Cal'ciTu, SrxBMAT'io, (F.) Caleuls sperma- 
tiquss. These have be«i sometimes fi>und io 
the vesiculae seminales after death. They csa- 
not be detected during life. No analyaishM 
been made of them. 

Cal'culi or thx Stomacm Ann iKTss'Tiras, 
EntsroVithuSyB. Cal'eulusy Coprol'i^kus^ Con- 
erstio'nss akn'tusy (F.) Caleuls de V^stomac, C. 
intsstinauxy Pierres stsrearalss, Caueritions 
iutestinales. Calculi of the stomach are rare, 
and have almost always been carried thither by 
the antiperistaltic action of the intestines. The 
symptoms occasioned by them are those of 
chronic gastritis. It has been imagined that 
the continued use of absorbent powders, as 
magnesia, will give occasion to them. 

Intestinal concretions, (F.) Caleuls imtssti- 
naussj are not uncommon in annuals (see Bk- 
aoARD :) but they are rare in man. The causes 
which give rise to them sire little known: 
sometimes a biliary calculus affords them s 
nucleus. Their composition varies. They are 
lisfat, hard, very fetid, and not influnmable. 
They are formed, ordinarily, between tiie val- 
vulas of the small intestines, ot in the cells of 
the large, and sometimes in old heraiae. Whilst 
they do not obstruct the passage of the alimen- 
tary mass, they produce no unj^easant symp- 
tom. At times, the movable tumour which 
they form, may be felt through the parietes of 
the abdomen. They are generally evacuated 
psr anum, 

Cal'ouli or TBB Tonsils. Calculona con- 
cretions, which sometimes fi^rm in the tonsils. 
(F.) Caleuls dss Amygdalss. They are easily 
recognised by the sight and touch : sometimes 
they are discharged by spitting, either alooe or 
with the pus of an abscess occasioned by their 
presence. They have not been analysed. 

Cal'ouli, U'rihart, Urol'ithiy (F.) Caleuls 
urinairssy Pisrrss urintdrss. Concretions, 
which form from the crystallicable substances 
in the urine, and which are met with not only 
in the whole course of the urinary passages, 
but in fistulous openings wherever nie urine 
stagnates naturally or acJcidentaUy. Their 
causes are but little known. They are more 
common at the two extremities of life than at 
the middle, and more so in some countries and 
districts than in others. At times, a clot of 
blood, a portion of mucus, ke,, will form the 
nucleus. The symptoms and treatment vary 
according to the seat of the calculus. There 
is no such thing probaUy aa a medical solvent. 
See Urinary Calculi. 

Modem chymists have demonstrated the ex- 
istence of several components of urinary cal- 
culi, viz. Litkie Aeidy Pkosphats of Lims, ^ai- 
wtoniaco-Xagfusian Phcsphats, OtcmlaU aj 



CALCtiU» UBINARY 



119 



CALCULOUS 



Limt, C^Hic Omide^ and ZamMe Oaids, with I tensiztare of thMe ingMdients, an tkus repre- 
■D aiuiDal cenMntiiig ingredient. The Taxieties I gented by Dr. Parii. 
of calcoii^ prodnceabj the c^nnbination or in- 1 

A rXKULAM, YISW OT THS DIFFBSSHT SPSOm OV tnUHUlT CALOUU* 



■ncuaor cal- 



mwrallT 

iNUWUllB 



FoKM, a flatteaed o?ml. 0. O. 
•xoeedi IJOO. GWmt, 
or ravra-Uko. An^fbc*. 
antttMTi, laminated. 



It 



iviadpany of UtkU 
Wban treated witM alt" 
acM, a beaatiftU piak Mihetanoe 
•ults. TUi caleahii it tUa btly ao- 
lubie in water, almadaatly to in 
tiM pore alkalies. 



nitric tpoeiee; 



la-eoiaetiB 



bttt 

oecarillDe- 
ly tubereulated. It fia< 
quentlj conititutee tke 
Mfcifi or the otbtr epa. 



TtHwJaUqtlimgjUhd tedeaoai. 
poeed In tba flame of a eplrit lam| 
•welling out into a wliita eiBores- 
whiehlcfMidUtfai*. 



it ia tbe prerallinf 
theaorfaoe 



lliie epeeiea In 



CWo«r, dark kioara. 7*islMr«, 
harder thaa that of the other ape- 
deal S. O. from J.4i8 to L976; Ar- 
fm€9, eiadded with taberdt*. 



lampdadea some 



Priacipdl7pAe^Aala4f2tec It 
is soluble ia muriatb; acid. 



whidi 

bly 

cdonred. 



▼arieUea, 
mmarka' 



smooth and pale- 



\ and pale- 
laaembiiaff 



Oola«r. pale brown or gray ; sut' 
/kea, amooth and polished: ttrue 
fara rcgalarly lamiasted ; the Inmi 
am easily ssperaUng Into eoaersle 



It is 



OlMT, generally briliisat white. 
Bmrfof^ yneven, studded with pAe«yA«(a, ^nrrally jniii 



JscoHMfMaum 



\agm 

vA with 
Pare alkalies of the others. 



^ , uneven^ . _. , . 

shining erystais, less eompaet than'phospbste of lime, 
tbe prMsflng spedes. Between Its decompose it, extrseUng its 
ilaa small ceUs oeear, filled with ni«- 

spark ling particles. | 

~ ~ mpound of tlie t wo foiegoing 



This spedM attains 
a larger sise thaa eay 



CMsMP. Grayish while. 



eLcTtnc. 



Very like the triple catealus, bat! 
t is anetrMifled and mors eomaaet 



Ispedee. 



It consists of eyatfcMidt. Under 

eomaaet the blowpipe it yieMs a peculiarly 
ilbtid odoar. It is soluble ia edds, 
and in alkalies, even if they are 
^flilly saturated with carbonic add. 



It is very fuaiMe, 
melting Into a viueoaa 
globol.-. 

itiaaraieqiedea 



7. AJkTSBIlA> 
TIS0. 



& OOHVOCim. 



Its section exhibits diftreatcoa-l Compounded of several species, 

eentrk huaiaB. altematiag with eadi other. 

"No characteristic Ibrak, 



The ingredients are si 
oaly tydiymical aaalysia. 



]. Banal CaletUiy (F.) Caiculs r^namx, 
Theae have ahnoat always a yery irregnlar 
ahape : at timea, there will be no indication of 
their presence : at others, the^ occasion attacka 
of pain in the kidneys, sometimes accompanied 
witn bloody or tnrbid urine. Often, the}r cause 
inflamnoation of the kidneys, with all its un- 
pleasant results. They are generally formed 
of uric acid, animal matter, and («alate of 
lime, with, sometimes, phosphates. The treat- 
ment will haye to yary, according to the ab- 
sence or presence of inflammatory signs^ — ^re- 
lieving the irritation by opiates. A surgical 
operation can rarely be applicable. 

3. Calculi in th$ UrtUrt, (F.) Caieuls d€* 
TTritirBA, These come from the kidneys, and 
do not produce unpleasant effects, imless they 
are so large as to obstruct the course of the 
uine^ and to occasion distention of the whole 
of the ureter aboye them; or unless their sur- 
fiace is so roo^ as to irritate the mucous mem- 
brane, and occasion pain, hemorrhage, abscesses, 
Ace. The pain, during the passage, is some- 
tines yery violent, extending to the testicle of 
tbe same side in the male'; and occasioning a 
iMimbDess of the thi|^ in both sexes. Tbe treat- 
ment consists in general or local blood-letting, 
warm bath, and opiates. 

3. CaleuHf Vesical; Btonc in the Bladder^ 
IjitUia VecietilisyLUhii'aHc cfs'ticoy Jjiikfacic 
^fmaicaflicf Cfcto^itki^asiSf J) fcu*ria calculi/ sa, 
2>. %rnt4^ta^ Cal'culus vcd'cm^ (F.) Calculi 
wisicausB* These are the most common. Some- 
times, they proceed from die kidneys: most 
'fi thsy aie formed io the bladder it- 



self. Sense of weight in the perin»um, and 
sometimes of a body rolling when the patient 
chan^ his position; pain or itching at the ex- 
tremity of the glans in men; frequent desire to 
pass the urine; sudden stoppage to its flow; and 
bloody urine— are the chief signs which induce 
us to suspect their existence. We cannot, how- 
eyer, be certain of this without sounding the 
patient. Sometimes, when of a small siie, 
they are expelled: most commonly, they re- 
mam in the bladder, the disorganiiation of 
which they occasion, unless remoyed by a sur- 
gical operation. 

4. Calculi Uri^tkral. They almost always 
proceed from the bladder. The obstruction, 
which they cause to the ptssage of the urine, 
the hard tumour, and the noise occasioned 
when struck by a sound, indicate their pre- 
sence. They are remoyed by incision. 

5* Calculi §» Fistulous pascagec. Theaa 
arise when there is some fistulous opening into 
the urethra.. They can be readily recognised, 
and may generally be extracted with fiicility. 
(F.) CtUculc places kcrc dec voice itfintdrtc. 
See Urinary Calculi. 

Gal'ovu or TBB U'tsnus, (F.) Ctdeuh de 
PTTUme, These are yer^ rare. The signs, 
which indicate them dunng life, are those of 
chronic engorgement of the uterus. Their ex- 
igence, consequently, caanet be proved till 
after death. 

CALCULIFBAGUS, Lithontriptic. 

CAL'CULOUS, (F.) Calculeux, GravOeum. 
That which relates to calculi, especially to 
thoMoftheblwIder. 



CALCUia BILTAtRBS 



140 



CALLTPMDllL 



CALCtJLB BILTAIRSS, Calenli, biUary 
^e. de PEstomae, Calculi of the ftoinach— 9. 
de la Olands Piniale^ Calculi of the pineal 
gland — c. Inttstinavaty Calcnli of the itomaeh 
and intestinea-^0. Lairfmamas^ Calcali, lachrj- 
malr-tf. d4* MaimdUsy Calenli of the mamouB 
*^. de POreiiU, Calculi in the ean--^. dm Pan- 
eriasy Calculi of the Pancr c M - c . Flaeia hors 
d44 vviss uritudrety Calculi in fistuloua paa- 
■agee — e. Pulmtnairesy Calculi, polmonary — 
0. Rinmm, Calculi, renal — «. Salivaiva, Cal- 
culi, MliTanr — e, S^rmatiquesy Calculi, sper- 
matic — 0. Xfrinaire*, Calculi, urinary—^, det 
Vrith^Sy Calculi in the uretera— e. ds PUtirus, 
Calculi of the uterua — e. Vdsieanx, Calculi, 
yesical. 

CAL'CULnS, Lapity LUkosy U&oc. A di- 
minutive of eaixy a lime-atone. (F.) Caieuly 
PUrre. Calculi are concretions, wluch may 
form in every part of the animal body, but 
which are most frequently found in the organs 
that act as reservoirs, and in the excretor^r car 
nals. They are met with in the tonsils, joints, 
bilttry ducts, digestive passages, lachrymal 
ducts, mamms, pancreas, pineal gland, pros- 
tate, lungs, salivary, spermatic and urmarv 
passages, and in the uterus. The causes which 
give rise to them are obscure. 

Those that occur in reservoirs or ducts are 
tupposed to be owing to the deposition of the 
suMtences, which compose them, from the fluid 
as it passes along the duct; and those which 
occur in the substance of an organ are regarded 
as the oroduct of some chronic irritation. Their 
general effect is to irritate, as extraneous bo- 
dies, the parts with which they are in contact; 
and to produce retention of the fluid, whence 
they have been formed. The symptoms differ, 
according to the sensibility of the organ and 
the importance of the particular secretion whose 
discharge they impede. Their nltOum is ge- 
nerally impracticMile: spontaneous expulsion 
or extraetion is the only way of getting rid of 
them. 

Caloulus Bxzoax, BeBoaid— «. Dentalis, 
Odontolithus — c« Encysted, Cmleal dkaitnnd 
^-«. Sublingualis, see CaleuU, salivary— c. Ve- 
sicsB, Calculus, vesicaL 

C ALDA8, WATERS OF. Caldas ia a small 
town, ten leagues from Lisbon, where are mine- 
ral springs, containing carbonic and hydrosnl- 
pfanric acid gaaes, carbonates and nmriates of 
lime and magnesia, sulphates of soda and lime, 
flulphuret of iron, silica, and alumina. They 
are much used in atonic gout. They are ther^ 
mal. Temperature 93^ Fahrenheit. 

CALDE'RIiE ITALICJB. Warm baths in 
the neighbourhood of Ferraia, in Italy, much 
employed in dysuria. 

CjiLEBASSESy Cucnrbita lagenaria. 

CALEFA'CIENTS, CaiB/iBeim'tUy Tker- 
manftieOf from eaiidusy * warm,' and fano, * I 
make.' (F.) Jtekaufamte. Substances which 
excite a degree of warmth in the part to which 
they are applied, aa mustard, pepper, kc. 
They belong to the class of stimulants. 

CALEF ACTIO, Mchaufmmeni. 

CALENDULA ALPINA. Arnica mentana. 

Calbh^htui Aavxn'sn, CaUka Arven'si*, 
WUd Mar'igoidy (F.) Soud det Champa. This 
is, sometiines, preferred to the last. Its juice 
has been given, in the dose of from f. gj to f. 
%iy, in Jaundice and eachezk. 



Calbn^ula OnnoiivA^B, C. Sat^voy Okrj^ 
aanftha mu my Sponaa aoKsy CmUha vtdgalria; 
Yatruedriay SingU Ufar'tgoid, Garden Mar'4' 
gddy (F.) Souciy 8, ordiiudra. Famiify Sy- 
nanthereae, Syngenesia necessaria, Linn. 8b 
called from dowering every ealand. The flow- 
ers and leaves have been exhibited as ^>erient^ 
diaphoretics, fcc., and have been highly ex- 
tolled, of late, in cancer. 

CALENBULiE MARTIALES,Fernimanh 
moniatum. 

CALENTUHA, from ea/«rs, 'to be wann.' 
The word, in Spanish, signifies fever. A spe- 
cies of furious delirium to which sailors are 
subject in the torrid zone >—« kind of phreniti^ 
the attack of which comes on suddenly after 
a broiling day, and seems to be characterised 
by a denie in the patient to throw himself into 
the sea. It is only a variety of phrenitis. 

CALXRTfiaA CoNTiHUA, Syuocha. 

CALESTViRASiPaiodaCaUniit'raa. Vth 
met and lAm^rj say, that these words an 
sometimes applied to cinchona. Camelli says, 
they mean, also, a tree of the Philii^nne Isks, 
the wood of which is bitter and febrifuge. 

CALF OF^THE LEG, Sura. 

CiiZJC£,Calix. 

CAUCES R&NALESy see Calix. 

CALICO BUSH, Kalmia Utifolia. 

CALIDARIUM, see Stove. 

CALIDtJM ANIMALE, Animal heat^-^. 
Innatum, Animal heat. 

CALI6ATI0, Dazzling. 

CALrGO. < A mist.' ii«A/y#, (F.) Br^M/- 
lard* An obscurity of vision, dependent upon 
a speck on the cornea: also, the speck itself; 
Caligo eof^namy Mae' Mia eomamy M. aamipallt/' 
eiday Pktkarma ealigOy C. d napketio, Hahat^da 
viatay C. d Laueo'maily Neb'tilayiq, v.) Opaia 
aomaay Wah-ayay (F.) Nouaga da la Comiey 
Taye, ObacureiaaamarU da la vua. 

Calioo Lxirris, Cataract— c. Pupillv, Syne- 
zisis— c. S3mizesi8, Sjmeziais— c. Tenebrarum, 
Hemeralopia. 

CALIHACHA C ANELLA, Laurus cassia. 

CALIX, Catpxy Infundib'ulumy from %*Xi^ 
'a cup.' (F.) Calieay Entonnoir, Anatomists 
have given this name to small membranous ca- 
nals, which surround the papillas of the kidney, 
and open into its pelvis, whither they convey 
the urine; — Cal'ieaa rana'laa, Cyliniri mem- 
bram/eai Ranumy Fia'ttUa^ ure'terum ranttmy 
Canalaa mambra'nai Ranumy Tu'htdi palvia ra- 
num. Their number varies from 6 to 12 is 
each kidney. 

Calix Yom rroBXA, Goblet, emetic. 

CALLEUX, Callous. 

CALLIBLEPH'ARUM, from nolioc, < beau- 
ty,' and ^4ff9a^or, < eyelid.' A remedy for 
iNBautifying the eyelids. 

C ALLICOCC A IPECACUANHA, Ipecaco- 



CALLICREA8, Pancreas. 

CALLIOMARCHUS, Tossilago. 

CALLIP^1>IA, from xakUty « beauty,' 
and naity tici^c, *a child.' The art of beget- 
ting beautiful children. This was the title of 
a poem by Claude Quillet, in 1 655. CaiHpmdia 
aiva da fmlekraB proHa kaiandaa ratiome. The 
author absurdly supposes, that the beauty of 
children ia afliected bV the sensations which ths 
mother experiences onring her pregnancy. 



CALLIPERS OF BAUDELOCQUE 141 



CALX 



CALLIPERS OF BAUDELOCQUE, se^ 
FtelTimeter. 
CALLIPESTRIA, Connetict. 
CALLIPHTLLUM, Aspleninm trichoma- 

CALLOSITASy lodnntioii— «. Pa^bnunmv 
Scleiiasit. 

CALLOSITT, CuUo/ittUy Sefivs, Tyli^ 
Tylusy TyUtmOy Tplo'sis^ D9rmatescUr</ nsy 
Iht mut otylo'mtLy VermatotyWnSy jytrmatofy- 
lus, Porusy Ecffkyma Cullua, HardneUy in- 
dnntuHi, and tmcknest of the skiny whieh as- 
sunes a homy eonBiatencey in pUcas where it 
if expoeed to constant preiBure. (F,)DunUon. 
Alao that indnration, which is obterred in old 
wounds, old nlcersy fistulous passages, &c. 

CALLOUS^ CmUottUy O^htko'dM^ from eat- 
huy ^hardneas.' (F.) CaUeux, That which is 
faaid or indurated. A CaUous Uie^r is one 
wJwoe edges are thick and indurated. 

CALLUM PEDIS, Instep. 

CALLUNA YULGARIS, Erica vulgaris. 

CALLUS, CaAm, Caihtm, OsUot'yhsy (F.) 
Gs/. The bony matter, thrown out between 
the fractured extremities of a bone, which acts 
as a cement, and as a new bony formation. The 
words, are, likewise, used occasionally in the 
same sense as Callosity. 

Callus, PaovisioRAL. When the shaft of a 
long bone has been broken throu|^, and the ex- 
tremities have been brought in exact juxtaposi- 
tion, the new matter, first ossified, is tnat which 
oecnpies the central nortion of the deposit, and 
thus connects the medullary cavities of the bro- 
ken ends, forming a kind of plug, which enters 
each. This was termed by M. Dupuytren the 
provisional Callus. 

CALMANTS, Sedatives. 

CALMEy (F.) The interval that separates 
the paroxysms of an acute or chronic disease. 
When the type is intermittent, the word iau^r* 
wdsMon is used. 

CALOMBA, Calumba. 

CALOMEL, Hydi:arg]rri snbmurias. 

CALOMELANOS TORQUETI, Hydrargy- 
ri submurias. 

CALonKLAHOB TmLQiTXTi. A name given by 
Riverins to purgative pills, prepared with calo- 
mel, sulphur, and resin of jalap* — ^Dictionaries. 

CALOMELAS, Hydrargyri submurias. 

CALXyHlAy Molwta. An epithet formerly 
given to myrrhs— Hippocrates. See Myrrha. 

C ALOPHYLLUM INOPHYLLUM, see Fsp 
gsra octandra. 

CALOR, Heat— e. Animalis, Animal heat— 
c. Nativus, Animal heat. 

CALORlClTAy (F.) Caloru/'itas. The ft- 
enlty possessed bj living bodies of generating 
a sttjffieient quantity of caloric, to enable them 
to resist atmospheric cold, and to preserve, at 
all times and in every part, a tempeiature nearly 
equal. See Animal Heat. 

CALORIFA'CI£NT,Cii/or(ru0ir,Ca/or»/A'- 
nm»y CaXorififans : from ealoTy * heat,' and/rrt, 
* to be made.' Having the power of producing 
heat. Relating to the power of producing heat. 

CALORIFICATION, CaUHJica'tio, same 
etyinon as the last. The function of producing 
anunal heat. 

CALORINk8ESyfTomealor,*hB^J The 
Bune under which M. Baumes proposes to ar- 
nage all diseases, characterized by a sensible 
\ the quantity of animal heat. The 



Caiofimhes form, the first cksa of his Noeo- 



•^A 



ALOTROPIS GIOANTEAJif udar-^Mu- 

darii, Mudar. 

CALOTTE J (F.) FMolvm, Anatomisto 
sometimes give the name — Calotte apofUvrotiqm 
—to the aponeurosis of the occipito-frontalis 
muscle, which covers it externally ; and that of 
CalottB du crane to the sculi-cap* 

Calotte is also applied to an adhesive plaster} 
wi^ which the head of a person labouring under 
tinea capitis is sometimes covered, after uie hair 
has been shaved off. This plaster is pulled 
suddenly and violently ofi*, in order to remove 
the bulbs of the hair. It means, also, a sort of 
coif made of boiled leather, worn by those who 
have undergone the operation of trepan, &c. 

CALOTTE D'ASSURANCE, Condom. 

CALTHA ALPINA, Arnica montana— c^ 
Arvensis, Calendula arvensis— c. Vulgaris, Ca- 
lendula officinalis. 

CALTROPS, see Trapanatans. 

CALUM'BA, Colom'boy Calom'boy Colom'boy 
(Ph. U. S.;) Columioy Radix Columbaty (F.) 
Calumbe ou Columbe. The root of Menieper'' 
mum palma'tum^ Coefeultu palma^tue, indige- 
nous in India and Africa. Its odour is slightly 
aromatic $ taste unpleasantly bitter. It is tonic 
and antiseptic. Dose, gr. 10 to ^ in powder. 

Calumba, AuxRiOAKyFrase*ra WtdtoriyP.Ct^ 
rolinUnfeit^ F. Ojfidna'lity Swer^tia difform^iey 
Sw, Frase'roy American or Marietta Cohimboy 
Indian Lettuce^ Yellow Oeniiany Oolden Sealy 
Meadow pride, Pframidy is used in the same 
cases as uie true Calumba. 

CALUS, Callus. 

CALYA, Cranium. 

Calva, Calva'ria, The cranium; the upper 
part especially; the skull-cap;— the Vault of 
the Cranium, Cam*era. 

CALVARIA, Cranium. 

CALYATA FERRAHENTA. Surgical 
instruments, which have a head or button. 

C ALYER'S PHYSIC, Leptandria Yirginica. 

CALYI"TIES, Calvi"Hum, Phal'aera, Ph^- 
laero'sif, Glabri"tie*, Ophi'aeisyDepUa'tio Cap"' 
itie, Pkalaero^ma, Madaro'tie, Ijipeotrieh'iay 
Baldneee, &c., from ealvue, 'bald,' (F.) CAoti- 
vete* Absence of hair, particularly at the top 
of, and behind, the head. Calvi"tiee palpehra'^ 
rum, — loss of the eye-lashes. 

CALX, Lime, Ca^rium Terree, Protoa^ide of 
Cal'dum, Calea'ria pura, (F.) Chaux* The 
lime, employed in pharmacy, should be recently 
prepared by calcination, when water is sprin- 
kled over caustic lime, we have elaked lUke, 
hydrate of /mm^— the Calds Eydrae of the 
London phannacopceia. 

Calx, see Calcaneum— c. CUorinata, Calcil 
chloriduno— c. Cum kali ^o, Potassa cum calce 
— c. Salita, Calcis munas^-c. Biumtthi, Bis- 
muth, subnitrate of. 

Calx x TasTisj lime prepared from shells. 
It has iHTobably no medicinal advantages over 
that prepared from marble. 

Calx Oxtjcurxatica, Calcis chloridum. 

Cax.x Yiva, Ox*%dum Cal'cii, Calxreeene, Fu- 
mane nix. Calx utta. Calx et Calx viva. Lime 
or Quicklime, (F.) Chaux vive. The external 
operation of calx viva is escharotic, but it is 
rarely used. Lime. is a good disinfecting agent. 
It is employed internally in the form of Liquor 
Calcis, (q. V.) 



CALT8TE6U 80LDANELLA 



149 



CANAL 



CALT8TEGIA SOLDANfiLLA^CoarolTa- 

Ivs soldanelk. 

CALYX, Calix. 

CAMARA, Cmlva, 

CAMAREZ, BflNERAL WATERS OF. 
Camarez is a small canton near Sylvan^, in 
1^ department of Aveyron, Fiance, where 
there are some acidulona ehalybeatea. 

CAMARCBIS, Camaro'mOi from nafmia^ 'a 
▼ault;' Ctmtra'HOi Testudin&ftio Cra'mu A 
species of fiaeture of the sknll, in which the 
ftagments are placed so as to form a Tanit, with 
its base resting on the dura mater. -^Galen, 
Panlus of iE^na. 

C AMBIN6. A tree of the Molucca Islands, 
from the bark of which a kind of gum«resin ex- 
udes, which has been highly extolled in dysen- 
tery. It appears to have some resemblance to 
the simarouba. — ^Rnmphins. 

CAMBIUM, *B»ekaHg9,* A name formerly 
given to a fimcied natritire juice, which was 
supposed to originate in the blood, to repair the 
losses of every organ, and produce their in- 
crease*— Sennertns. 

CAMBO, MINERAL WATERS OF. A 
village in the department of Basses P3rr^n6es, 
France, where there are two mineral springs; 
the one an acidulous chalybeate, the other sul- 
phureous. Temperature, B39toG^ Fahrenheit. 

CAMBODIA, Cambogia. 

CAMBCGIA, from Cambodia, in the East 
Indies, where it is obtained. Hence, likewise, 
its names Cambo'dia/Camio'^um, Qambo'giay 
Ghmbo*giumy Oamhu^gimn, It is called, also, 
Outta, Gutta gamhti^Gummi Chitta, CatagoHfna, 
Caitagau^moy Ckry3o*pu9, Laxaii'vus Ind'icusy 
Oummi Borgia, O. gaman'drm, O. d« Croa, O, d* 
J§mUyCh%tta jemoeoy Outta Gaman'drm, Oummi 
ad Tod'agramy Camboge or Gambogs, &c., (F.) 
Chmme GuUb. Ord. Gnttiferap. A yellow 
juice obtained from Staiagmi^tis Camhogic^^dM, 
and other plants of the natural family Guttifera, 
but it is not known from which of them the of- 
ficinal camboge is obtained. It is inodorous, 
of an orange yellow colour; opake and brittle; 
fracture, glassy; is a drastic cathartic, emetic 
and anthelmintic; and is used in visceral ob- 
structions and dropsy, and wherever powerful 
hydragogue cathartics are re<2uired. Dose ftom 
gr. ii. to vi. in powder, united with calomel, 
squill, &c. 

CAMBV*CA, Camhufeamemhra'ta. Buboes 
and venereal ulcers, seated in the groin or near 
the genital organs. — ^Paracelsus. See Bubo. 

CAMELAEy Cneorum tricoccum. 

CAMERA, Chamber, Fornix, Vault— c. Cor- 
dis, Pericardium— c. Oculi, Chamber of the eye. 

CAMERATIO, Camarosis. 

CAMIN6A, CanelU alba. 

CAMISIA F(ETnS, Chorion. 

CAMISOLE, Waistcoat, strait. 

CAMMARUS, Crab. 

CAMOMILLE FATIDE, Anthemis cotula 
— e, Pnantt, Anthemis cotul*— e. Romaine, 
Anthemis nobilis — cdes T0f«ili»fMr«, Anthemis 
tinc^oria — e, Vulgair; Matricaria chamomilla. 

CAMOSIERS, WATERS OF. Camosicrs 
is a canton, two leagues from Marseilles, where 
are two springs containing carbonate of lime, 
sulphur, cnloride of sodium, he. They are 
purgative, and used in skin complaints. 

CAMOTES, Convolvulus batatas. 

CAMPAGNE, MINERAL WATERS OF. 



Campagne is in the department of Ande, Frsoee. 
The waters contain sulphate and chlorohydnte 
of magnesia. Temperature, 8(P Fahrenheit 

CAMPANITLA. Diminutive of CimjiaRtf. 
A bell. 

Cavpaitula TaAon^Limi, CaMUrhurf Bdl 
or Tkroatiport, was formerly used, in decoc- 
tion, in relaxation of the fiiuces. It is, kIm, 
called Cerviet^ria» 

CAMPE, Flexion. 

CAMPHIRE, Camphor. 

CAMPHOR, from Arab. Capkur or Km'- 
pkur, Cam'p^ra, Capku'ra, Cafa, Caf, Cofm, 
Caphora, Altafor, Campkirs, Camjpkoff ife, 
(F.) Camphr0, A concrete substance, pre- 
pared, by distillation, f^om Laurus Camfkitn, 
an indigenous tree of the East Indies. Ot' 
der, Laurineas. Its odour is stronc and fit- 
grant: it is volatile, not easily pulveTiztble; 
texture crystalline. Soluble in alcohol, ether, 
oils, vinegar, and slightly so in water. Iti 
properties are narc'otic, diap^retic, and ledir 
tive. Dose, gr. v. to 9 j- Dissolved in oil or 
alcohol, it is applied externally in rheonatie 
pains, bruises, sprains, &c. 

CAifpHoa Water, Mistura Camphore. 

CAMPHORATA HIR8UTA,C. JlfoiM^- 
«fmtM», Camphorosma Monspeliaca. 

CAMPH'ORATED, Campkort^tnt, (F.) 
Campkri. Relating to camphor; contaioing 
camphor ; as %eamphorat6d mw^bH, a eamfkanMi 
draught, 

C AMPHQROS'MA MONSPELIACA, from 
Camphor, and 9«-^ir, < odour.' Sel^go, Cmk- 
jkordta hirnita seu Monfpditfi num, Sairf 
Camphoros'ma, (F.) Campkrie d% MantpOHir* 
Family, Atriplices. Bex. Sfst. Tetnndrii 
Monogynia. This plant, as its name imports, 
has an odour of camphor. It is regarded as di- 
uretic, diaphoretic, cephalic, antiapasmodie, ftc. 
It is also called Chamap9u*ei vod, SHukiag 
Ground Fine, 

CAMPHRE, Camphor. 

CAMPHRA, Camphorated. 

CAMPHRE DE MONTPELLlER,Cmr 
phorosma Monspeliaca. 

CAMPOMANE'SIA LINEATIFO^IA. A 
tree, twenty to thirty feet high, which growi 
in Peru, and whose fruit— jMx/fV/o, of a bright 
yellow colour, and as luge as a moderate-tised 
apple— has an exceedingly agreeable scent, and 
is one of the ingredients in making the pe^ 
fhmed water called mi^turth — ^Tschndi. 

CAMPSIS, Fleat^io, Curvi^tio, Inpx'ifi, 
Bone or cartilage, forcibly bent from its proper 
shape, without breaking. — Good. 

Camfsis dxprsssio, Depression. 

CAMPYLORHHACHIS; fh>m mtM«^«r» 
'crooked,' and ^a/ic, * spine.' A monster whose 
spine is crooked. — Gurlt. 

CAMPTLORRHI'NnS; ftom n^ievlit, 
'crooked,' and ^i», 'nose.' A monster whose 
nose is crooked. — Gurlt. 

CAMPYLOTIS, Cataclasis. 

CAMPYLUM, Cataclasis. 

CAMUS, (F.) Simus, Reai'mus, Sinu, SUoi 
Situs. One who has a short, stumpy nose. 
The French speak of 2V«sr eamus, 'short nose.' 

CANAL, Cana'lis, Ductus, Mt^tus, Porot, 
Oek'etos, (F.) Conduit, A channel for afford- 
ing passage to liquids, or solids, or to certain 
organs. 

Cakax, Aumn'tAXT, C. IHgulfime, Cam*- 



CANAL ARTMRISL 



143 



CANCELLI 



tivs Tube, Aiimmfary Duet or Tube. The ca- 
ul extending from tfs mouth to the anus. 

Cabai^ AaACB'ifoin, Catu^Us Biehai*ii^ Ctf 
mat •/ Bickat. A canal formed by the exten- 
non of the arachnoid over the transverse and 
longitudinal fissures of the brainy and whi<ih 
furroands the Tena magna Galeni. The orifice 
of the canal has been termed the Foramen of 
Biefaat. 

CANAL ARTiRIBLy Arterial dnct-H}. de 
Bartkoiwy DuetoB Bartholinus— c. of Bicfaat» 
Canal, aiachnokl— e. Bullular, of Petit, God- 
rennk eamal — e. Citrotidi&u, Carotid canal — «• 
CkoUdQ^ue^ Choledoeh diict^-«. Ciliary, Ci- 
liary canal— c. of Fontsna, Ciliary canal — c. 
Goudramniy Oodnmmi eamml — e, HipoHqus, 
Hepatic doct. 

Cahai., Ht'ai^id. a cylindrical passace, de- 
scribed by M. J. Cloqnet as formed by the re- 
flection of the hyaloid membrane into the inte- 
rior of the vitreoQs body aiound the nutritious 
artery of the lens. M. Cnivoilhier has noTer 
been able to see it. 

Cah Ai. laci'snrs, see Palatine canals— c. In- 
fra-orbitar, Suborbitar canal — e, InJUxe de Voe 
temporal. Carotid canal— -e. Intermediare dee 
veutriculee, Aquaeductus SylyiL 

Casai., Ihtss'tikal, Canaflie seu Duetut 
tnuetiiui'Us, The portion of the digestive ca- 
nal formed by the intestines. . 
Cakal of Jacobsor, Canaly tympanic* 
C AXAi., MaD'ui.i.ABT. Tho cylindrical cavity 
in the body or shaft of a long bone, which con- 
tains the marrow. 
Canal, Nasai., Lachrymal canal. 
Cah AL of NvcK. A cyundrical sheath formed 
around the round ligaments of the uterus by a 
prolongation of the peritoneum into the inguinal 
ooal. 

CANAL DE PETITy Godronni eanal^^. 
Pulmth-aertiquef Arterial duct-— c. Rachidian, 
Vertebral canal. 

Cahal of ScHLEMM. A miuute circular ca- 
ml, discovered by Professor Schlemm, of Ber- 
lin. It is situate at the point of union of the 
cornea and sclerotica. 

Cahai., Spiral, Vertebral canal— 0. SpiroXde 
de Poe temporal, Aquaeductus Fallopii — e. de 
StemcMy Ductus salivalis superior — e. T^era- 
ti^ne. Thoracic duct — e. Veineuxy Canal, ve- 
noQs—c.Vulvo-uterine, Vagina — e*d€ Warthen, 
Ductus salivalis inferior. 

Cabal, TTV'PAiiic,Cafia7w tfmpttn'icusyCa-' 
nal of Jafeoheon, A canal which opens on the 
lower sor&ce of the petrous portion of ^ tem- 
poral bone, between the carotid canal and the 
groove for the internal jugular vein. It con- 
tains Jacobaon's nerve. 

Cahal, VsRona, Cane^lie seu Duatue €r«iro'- 
f aw, <F.) Canal veineucc, A canal, wluch ex- 
ists only in the foetus. It extends from the bi- 
furcation of the umbilical vein to the vena cava 
ialerior, into which it opena, below the dia- 
phra^n. At times, it ends in one of the infra- 
hepatic veins. It pour* into the cava a part of 
the blood, which passes from the jriacenta by 
the nmbUical vein. After birth, it becomes a 
fibro-cellttlar cord. 
Canal of Wiesuno, see Pancreas. 
CANAPES BB£SCH1STI. Canals in the 



diploe for the passage of veins ; so called after 
M. Breschet. 

Car ales Cxrcularbs, Semicircular canals— 
cCochlesB, Seals of the cochlea — c.Lacrymales, 
Lachrymal ducts — c. Membranei renum, see 
Calix — c. Tubsformes, Semicircular canals. 

CANALICULATED, Grooved. 

CANALICULATUS, Cannile, Grooved. 

CANAUCUM, Grooved. 

CANALICULI LACHRYMALES,Lachry. 
mal ducts— c. Limacum, Lachrymal ducts— >c. 
Semicirculares, Semicircular canals. 

CANALIS, Meatus — c. Arterjosus, Arte- 
rial duct — c. Bichatii, Canal, arachnoid — c. 
Canaliculatus, Gorget — c. Caroticus, Carotid 
canal— c. Deferens, Deferens, vas— c. Intesti- 
norum, Intestinal Tube— c. Lacrymalis, Lach- 
rymal or nasal duct— c. Medina, Aonaeductus 
Sylvii— c. MeduIIs Spinalis, see Vertebral 
column— c. Nerveos fistulosus renum, Ureter — 
c. Orbits nasalis. Lachrymal or nasal duct— c. 
Scalarum communis, Infundibulum of the coch- 
lea — c. Tympanicus, Canal, tympanic — c. Uri- 
narius, Urethra — c. Vidianus, Pterygoid canal. 

CANALS OF HAVERS, Canals, nutritive of 
bones— c. Haversian, Canals, nutritive of bones. 

Carals, Nutritive, Canals for the nutri- 
tiom of boneoy JDuctue nutri^'tiL JSaver'eian 
Canals, Ctmale of Havers, (F.) Canaux nour^ 
riders Ott du Nutrition des os, Conduits 
nourrieiers ou nutriders. The canals, through 
which the vessels pass to the bones. They are 
lined by a very fine lamina of compact tezturCx 
or are formed in the texture itself. There is, - 
generally, one large nutritious canal in a long 
bone, situate towards its middle. 

CANAPACIA, Artemisia vulgaris. 

CANARIES, CLIMATE OF. The climate 
of the Canaries greatly resembles that of Ma- 
deira. That of the latter is however more 
equable, and the accommodation for invalids 
much superior. 

C ANARIUM COMMUNE, see Amyris ele- 
mifera. 

CANART-SEED> Phalaris Canariensis. 

CANAUX AQUEUX, see Aqueous—*. D«- 
wUeireulairss^ Semicircular canals — e. Ajateula- 
teurs, Ejaculatory ducts — e. Nourrieiers, Ca- 
nals, nutritive— e. de Nutrition dee os, Canals, 
nutritive. 

CANAUX DE TRANSMISSION Ac- 
cording to Bichat, the bony canals intended to 
give passage to vessels and nerves going to 
parts more or less distant; as the Cana'lis Ca- 
retieue, &c. 

CANAUX VEINEUX, Venous Canals, 
The canals sitqate in the diploe, which convey 
vencms blood. 

CAN'CAMUM. A mixtare of several gums 
and resins, exported from Africa, where it is 
used to deterge wounds. Dioscorides calls, by 
the name x«r jra^or, the tears from an Arabian 
tree, which are similar to myrrh, and of a dis- 
agreeable taste. He advises it in numerous 
diseases. This name is given, alaO| to the 
Anime, (q. v.) 

CANCAMY, Anime. 

CAN'CELLATED, CaneeUa'tus, (F.) Cast- 
0«tf i; from CaiM«//*, Mattice-work.' Formed of 
cancelli, as the 'cancellated structure of bone.' 

CANCEL^LI. « Lattice-work.* The C«/- 
lular or Spongy Texture of Bones, (F.) Tissu 
eelluleux; consisting of numerous cells, com- 



CANCELLUS 



144 



CANCER A(ffTAtIXgrB 



nnmicating with each other. They contain a 
fatty matter, analagout.to marrow. This tex- 
ture is met withy principally, at the extremi- 
ties of long hones ; and some of the short hones 
consist almost wholly of it. It allows of the 
expansion of the extremities of hones, without 
adding to their weight ; and deadens concussions. 

CANCELl-US, from eaner^ «a cnih.» A 
species of crayfish, called the Wrong Heir, and 
Bernard the Hermit: which is stud to cure 
rheumatism, if rnhhed on the part. 

CANCER, <a crab.' (q. v.) Car'eino*, Lupus 
eancro^ene, Ulcus eanero^sum, A disease, 
so called either on account of the hideous ap- 
pearance which the ulcerated cancer presents, 
or on account of the great veins which surround 
it, and which the ancients compared to the 
claws of the crab : called also Careino*9ia. It 
consists of a scirrhous, livid tumour, intersected 



hr firm, whitish, divergent hands ; and oecnrs 
chiefly in the secernent glands. The pains are 
acute and lancinating, and often extend to other 
parts. The tumour, ultimately, terminates in 
a fetid and ichorous nicer. It is dlBtinguiahed, 
according to its stages, into occult and open ; 
the former being the scirrhous, the latter the 
ulcerated condition. At times, there is a sim- 
ple destruction ot erosion of the organs, at 
others, an enmpkeUoid or csreiriform, and at 
others, again, a colloid degeneration. 

For its production, it requires a peenliar di- 
athesis, or cachexia. The following table, 
frofn Dr. Walshe, exhibits the chanieters «f 
the three species of carcinoma : 

The use of irritants in cancerous affectioos, 
is strongly to be deprecated. When the dis- 
ease is so situate that excision can be practised, 
the sooner it is removed the better. 



Sawniblaf lobolatad oerebial mat- 
ter. 

Is comiDonlf opake fton its ear- 
liest fonnatiott. 

Is ofs <toad wUta eoloor. 

Cton talM a aiultitiide of mtnate 
VMns. 
Is i«M bard and deoss tlian sdr- 



Besembiei riad of baoon t ra ve rs ed 
by cellalp>fibroa« svpta. 
Has a senitraiisparaat glossiness 



Has a clear wbitlsh or bluish yel 
low tint. 
Is comparatively iU-supplfed witb 



CUIatfL 

Has tbe'tppearanoe of panicles of 
lellir ialaid in a r^pilar atmlar bed. 

The contained maUer la airitiitttf 
transparent 

Greenish yellow is lla^prodosninaDi 



Is exceedingly Arm and dense. 

Has not been distinctly detected in 
ihis situation. 

The main microscopical eonstiUi 
ents are Juxtaposed nuclear cells; 



Is Avqnently fboad In the veins 
issuing fbom the diseased mass. 

Tlie predominant microscopical 
<*1ements are globular, not always 

distinctly cellalar, and caudate cor* caudate corposoula danoteuiistinit 
puscttla. 

Rarely acquires larger dimenaiona 
than an orange. 

lu seat, as ascertained .by obeerva- 
lion, is somewhat more limited. 
Is not unusually solitary. 



Its ▼ess els have not 
ciently examined ss yet. 

The Jelly-like m«if«r is exceadlnilr 
10 A ; a eoMold moee U, however, ftim 
and reaistiog. 

The pultaeeonii variety i 
ted in the vein 



Oocaaionalfar attains an enormous 
bulk. 

Has been observed in almost every 
ilssaeofthebody. 

Very commonly co-exisu in several 
parts or organs of the same subjtfct. 

Is remarkable fbr its occasiunal 
vast rapidity of growth. 

Is fVequently the seat of tuterslitlal 
hemorrhage and deposition of Mack 
or bistre-coloured matter. 

When softened into a pulp, sppean 
as a dead white or pink opake mat 
ler of creamy consistence. 

Subcutaneous tumours are slow to 
contract adhesion with the skin. 

Crieented ene^phaioid Is frequent 
ly the teat of hemorrhage, followed 
by fapid fuagous development. 



The progress of the disease after 
oleeration la commonly very rapid 

It is the meet common fiwm under 
which secondary cancer exhibits it 

If. 

Is the speeiee of cancer moet fre 
quently oaservod In young sutjects. 



Ordinarily grows slowly. 

Is enoiparatively rarely the seal of 
these changes. 

B«aembles, when softened, a yel- 
lowish brown aemitransparent gela- 
tinous matter. 

Scirrhns thus situate usually be- 
comes adherent. 

Scirrhous ulcers much leas tn- 
quentiy give rise to hemoirhage ; am 
fungoua growthj 'provided they re 
tain the acirrhoua character} are now 
more alowly and leaa abundantly de* 
veloped. 

There la not such a remarkable 
change in the rate of progress of the 
after alearatloa has set i o . 



t hefbre pa- 



veins. 
Is composed of shells in a statec< 



Inthlsnspect 

Ras so far been aeea In a limited' 
number of pans only. | 

Has rarely been oiet with in more 

tan one organ. 

erows with a medittm degree at 
rapidity. 



Undergoes no visible change of the 
kind. 



Has so far been observed in adulfs 
only. 



Cancsb Alvbola&];39 Colloid. 

Carcsr AquAT'ictTS, Gan'grettous stomati*- 
tit, Cancrum Oris, Gangreenop'sisjCanier of 
the mofith, Gangrenous sore mouth. Sloughing 
Phageda^na of the mouth, Water Canker: 
called, also, Aphth€B serpen^tes, OangrcR'na 
Oris, Noma, Nomi, Nomus, Pseudoearcino*- 
ma la^bii, Stomac^acB gangreew/sa, Cheiloe'acB, 
tJtoe'aci, Uli'tis sep'tiea,Chsilomala'eia,8corbMf' 
tns Oris, Stomatomala'eia pu^trida, Stomatosep'-' 
sis, Stomatoneero*sis, Carbun'eulus lahio'rum 
et genalrum, 4*6. (F.) Cancer aqttati^ue. Stoma" 
tite gangrineuse, 8, Charhonneuse^ Oangrine 



de la Bouche, Sphacele de la Bouche, Fegarite, 
Aphthe gangrineux. Certain slonghing or gan- 
grenous ulcejs of the month,-— so called, per- 
haps, because they are often accompanied with 
an affinx of saliva. The disease is not uncom- 
mon in children's asylums, and demands the 
same treatment as hospital gangrene; — ^the 
employment of caustics, and internal and ex- 
ternal antiseptics. 

CANCER AQUATIQUE, Cancer «quati- 
ens, Stomacace — e. Areolaire, Colloid— c. As- 
tacus, see Cancrorum chels— c. Black, Mehmo- 
Caminariorum^ Cancer, chunney sweep- 



CANCSR 1}B QAUBN 



US 



CANINE 



eiV— €. CeHnlaryEnceplMloid— «• CMMform0i 
fee Encephaloid. 

Cancbk» CHXMnxT-ewuvvxs'y Sootwturt, 
Canegr mMndito*rtvmy Cancer purgaio^ris inf^ 
wtWtJif Cunetr sen earemo*ma eeroti, Cmutr 
eaminano*rum, O^eksoeardno^maf Osekocarci^ 
lufMo, (F.) Canmr dss Ramon^ms. This sf- 
fectioQ beg^ with a suoerficisl, psinltil, irre- 
pilar nicer with hud and elevated edges occn- 
pjing the lower partof the terotum. Eztirpa- 
tioQ of the part aifected is the only means of 
effecting a cure* 

CAsosa, DAyxDsoa's RsHBnT roE, see Coni- 
am macnlatnm — 0. du FvU^ Hipaioea * a s sw a 
e. Fibroos, Scirrhus. 

Cahcek Gals']!!, (F.) Omeer de Galieit. A 
bandage for the head, to which Galen gave the 
name Canctr, from its eight heads resembling, 
mdely, the ckws of the crab. It is now sup- 
plied by the bandage with six eks/s or heads, 
which IS called the JSamdage QfGaUmT B. of 
tJuP9or. 

CANCER DE GALIEN, Cancer Galeni- 
r. Otlatimf^rmef Colloid— c. Gelatinous, Col- 
loid--c. Hard, Scirrhns— c. Intestinornm, £n- 
teropathia cancerosa — e. des Intestins^ £n- 
teropathia cancerosa— -c, of the Lung, Phthisis, 
cancerous — c. LnKis,Lnpus--c.Medullaris,£n- 
cephaloid— e. Melssneus, Melanosis-^. Milanty 
Melanoais — c. Melanodes, Cancer, melanotic. 

CAifCKRyMKLAiioT'ic,C0iM»riiMlaii0'</M,Car» 
lino'ma i mian o'det, A combinMion of cano«r 
and melanosis. 

Carcsb. Mollis, see Ehcephaloid — r. JIfott, 
Encephaloid— c. Monditorum, Cancer, chimney- 
sweepers' — c. OculijScirrhopbthalmus— cQris, 
Stomacace — c. Ossis, Spina ventossr-c. Pharyn- 
gis et (esophagi, Laemoscirrhus— c. Purgatoris 
iniumicttli, Cancer,chimney-sweepers'— e. Scir- 
rhosus, Bcirrhus — c. Scroti, Cancer, chinmey- 
i weepers' — c« Soft, Hamatodes fungus— c. of 
the Stomach, Gastrostenosis cardiaca et pylorica 
~c. Uteri, Metro-carcinoma. 

CANCEREUX, Cancerous. 

CANCER ROOT, Orobanche Virginiana, 
Phytolacca decandra. 

C ANCEROMA, Carcinoma. 

CAN'CEROUS,C«fero'#iM,Carc»w'««,(F.) 
Caneireux. Relating to cancer ; as Cancerous 
nlecTy Cancerous Diathesis^ &c. 

CANCHALA'GUA, Cachenh^uen, Caehdti' 
iagua^ CkanceUtgua^ Erythrm'a CkUen*ns. A 
bitter Chili plant, which is considered aperient, 
sudorific, stomachic, Termifuge and febrifuge. 

CANCRENA, Gangrene. 

CAN'CROID, Cancro'decy Caner6t'desy Cmr- 
n'no'desy CardndUleSf CaneroVdeus^ from Mn<- 
efr and tjAvr, < form.' That which assumes a 
cancerous appearance. Chneroid is a name 
^▼en to certain cutaneous cancers by Alibert : 
called also Cheltnd or Keloid (/five, * a tor- 
toise,' and ti^r, * likeness,') from their present- 
ing a llattlsh raised patch of integument, re- 
iembiing the shell of a tortoise. 

CANCROMA, Carcinoma. 

CANCROHUM CHEL^, 0<ful% vel L«/- 
'^dee Cancro'rum^ LapUUi eancro'rum^ Conere- 
•en'ta Ae'tad Jluviat^iUe, Crab's etones or 
«y«#, (F.) Teuxd^ierevise. Concretions found, 
puticnlarly, in the Cancer A/taeus or Cray- 
fish. They consist of carbonate and phosphate 
of Ume, and possess antacid Tirtnes, but not 
aoce than chalk. 



CANCROSUS, Cancerous, Ckancreuse. 
CANCRUM ORIS, Cancer Aquations, Sto- 



CANDELA, Bougie— c. Fumalis, Pastil^-c. 
Medicata, Bougie^'-c, Ragia, Yerbascum ni- 
gram. 

CANDELARIA, Yerbascum nigrum. 

CANDI, Candumy Cantkumt Can^Hant 
' white, bleached, purified.' Purified and crjra- 
tallised sugar. See Sacchamm. 

CANDIDUM OYI, Albumen ori. 

CANE, SUGAR, see Sacchanmk-H:. Sweet, 
Acorns calamns. 

CANELAy Grooved. 

CANELLA, see Canella alba. 

Cauxl'la Alba, diminutive of Cmmmi, * a 
reed,' so called because the bark is rolled up 
like a reed. Cortem Winterafnus spu'riucy Cs- 
neliM Cuba'na, C. Wiuterafniay Cinnami/imem 
album, Cortex Aniieeorbt^ticuSf C. Aromat^ieue, 
Coetue cortico'susy Camin'ga, CaneUa of Lin- 
nasos, and of Ph. U.- S., Canella SarJt, CameBm, 
(F.) Canelle on Caaalle blanche^ Paueee Jteorea 
de Winter, Jtcoree Cmrioeoefine, Fam, Magno- 
liace». Sex. Spet, Dodecandria Monogynia. 
This bark is a pungent aromatic. Its virtues 
are partly extracted by water ; entirely by al- 
cohol. It is a stimufauit, and is added to bit- 
ters and caUiartics. 

Cahklla Cartopbtllata, Myrtns caryo> 
phyllatsr— c. Cubana, C. alba, Laurus cassia— 
c. Malabarica et Javensis, Laurus cassia. 

CANELLIFERA MALABARICA, Laurus 



CANEPIN, (F.) A fine lamb's skin or 
goat's skin, used for trying the quality of Ian* 
cets. 

CANICACEOUS, Furfturaceoms. 

CAN'ICiE. Meal, in which there is siuch 
bran. Also, coarse bmd ; or bread in which 
there is much bran— Pa«tM Camica'oaae. 

CANICIDA, Aconitum. 

CANICULA ; the Dogatary from canic, * a 
dog ;' Xfiei«r, Sirias, (F.) Cameule. This star, 
which gives its name to the Dogdaps, Dies eOf 
miculafree, because they commence when the 
sun rises vntii it, was formerly believed to ex- 
ert a powerAil influence on the animal econo- 
my. The Dogndays occur at a period of the 
year when there is generally great and oppres- 
sive heat, and therefore— it has been conceived 
— a greater liability to disease. 

CANIP, Knife 

CANIN, Canine. 

CANINANiE RADIX, CaincsB radix. 

CANINE, CanCnuty Cpn'icue, irvt i«ec, fram 
cams, < a dog.' (F.) Canin. That which has 
a resemblance to th» structure^ &c., of a dog. 

CANiifx Fossa, Posea Caninay InfraarhUair 
or SuborUtar foeea, <F.) Poeee Canine. A 
small depression on the superior maxillary 
bone, above the dene eaninut, which gives 
attachment to the eaninue or levator anguU 



Cahirx luiVan,Sardon^telaughjRieu* Cani'^ 
nus sen Sardon'ieue sen Sardo'nius, R. de Sar^ 
defnia,R.imjeUmtafriue,R.epae*tieua, Tortu^ra 
Oris, Distof'tio Oris, Oelas'mue, Sardifaeie^ 
Sardoni'aeie, Triemue Sardon'ieue sen epn'teusy 
Spaemue mueeulorum faciei seu eyn'ieue, (F.) 
Rie canin, R, Sardonique, R, Sardonian, R. mo- 
queur. A sort of laugh, the facial expression of 
which is produced particularly by the spasmodic 



CANmUS 



I4i 



CAPBERN, WATERS OF 



contTmetioD of tlM C^mmm* mniclcu Probablyy 
this ej^egnon, as well m Cfnie Spasm^ Spas' 
mus eaninus lea cf n'ieuSy Conntd'tU cam^na^ 
JVismus e^ieusj may have originatad in tlM 
T«Minblaiic6 of the affection to certain move- 
ments in the upper lip of the dog. The JEUstu 
Sard&n^icus is laid to have been so called Irom 
aimilar aymptoma having been induced by a 
kind of fianunculns that grows in Sardinia. 

mttkiv^y oevUir—^ mtortUm'Us, EfS SWrA, 
(F.) Dents eaninssy laniairBtf anguknr$s, eoti- 
mresy aiUhss on eonoi€hs* The teeth be- 
tween the lateral incisors and small molaresy 
of tech jaw ; — so named becanse they resemble 
tiie teeth of the dog. 

CANINUS, Levator angnli oris— c. Sentis, 
Rosa canina— c. SpasnniSy see Canine Langh. 
CANIRAM, Strychnos nox vomica. 
CANIRUBUS, Rosa canina. 
CAMS INTERFECTOR, Veratrmn saba. 
billa^-c. PonticQs, Castor fiber. 

C ANIT'lES, from etnus^ « white.* Wkits^ 
ns49 or gra^ness ofth$ Aetr, and mecially of 
that of the head. (F.) CsimIm. Wnen occur- 
ring in consequence of old age it is not a dis- 
ease. Sometimes, it happens suddenly^ and ap- 
parently in consequence of severe mental emo- 
tion. The causes, however, are not clear. 
See Poliosis. 

CANKER, Stomacace— c. of the Mouth, 
Cancer aquaticns— -e. Water, Cancer aquaticus. 
CANNA, see Toos-les-Mois, Cassia fistula, 
Trachea— c. Brachii, Ulna — c. Domestica cru- 
ris, Tlbia^-c. Fiitnla, Cassia fistnlar--c. Indies, 
Sbigittarinm alexipharmacum— c. Major, Tibia 
— c. Minor, Fibula, Radius— c. Solntiva, Cas- 
sia fistula. 

CANNABIS INDICA, Bangue. See, also, 
Chumis, and Gnnjah. 

Cah'nabis Sati'va,<F.) Chanvf, Ckambrie, 
The seed of this— JXMipMtf^, Som'ina Canfna- 
3m, (F.) Chsn§vi»t is otfy and mncilaginons. 
The decoction is sometimes used in gon9rrh(Ba. 
CANNACORUS RADICE CROCEA, Cur- 
coma longa. 
CANNAMELLE, see Saccharum. 
CANNE AROMATIQJXEy Acorus calamus 
— e. CongOy Costus— «. de Rivih^ Costus— «. 
d5«er#, see Saccharum. 

CANNEBERGEy Vaccinium ozyooccos— 
0. PonehUe, Vaccinium vitis id«u 

CANNEL& ou CANELAy (F.) from eana'- 
lis, ' a canal :' Sulea'tus, Striatus, Canalufu- 
la'tus. Having a canal or groove— as Mutels 
dmnnsli (Lieutaod,) the Gemini; Corps san^ 
nslis on strUs, the Corpora striata; Sonde coit- 
nsiiSi a grooved sound, &c. See Grooved. 

CANNELLEj Laurus cinnamomum-— 0. 
BlaneAs, Canella alba— «. do la Chins, Laurus 
cassia — 0. ds Coromand9l, Lauras cassi 
Fausse, Lanrus cassia— « Girofiis, Myibis ca- 

SjTophyllata — e. dts Indss, Laurus cassia — e.ds 
isva, Lanrus cassia— e. do Malabar, Laurus 
cassisr— «. Matte, Laurus cassisr-e. OfieinaU, 
Lanrus cinnamomum— e. Poivris, see Wintera 
aromatica. 

CANNULA, Canula. 

CANNULA PULMONUM, Bronchia. 

CANOPUM, see Sambncns. 

CANOR STETHOSCOPICUS, Tintomsnt 
mitalUqus. 



CANTABRICA, Convolvuhu Cantabrict. 
CANTABRUNO, Furfur. 
CANTARELLUS, Meloe proscarabnu. 
CANTATIO, Charm. 
CANTERBURY, WATERS OF,il^Cb». 
tuarisnfsss. The waters of Canterbury in Kent, 
England, are impregnated with iron, solpbir, 
and carbonic acid. 
CANTERIUM, Cantherius. 
CANTHARIDE Til CHfTite, Lyttavit- 
tata. 
CANTHARIDINE, see CantiMuris. 
CANTHARIS, from KOP^npo;, <a «earsi0- 
«#;* Musea Mspan'iea, Msfol vssieato'fiiUy 
Cantkaris vssieato'ria, Ly:tavssiet^'ria; BHt- 
tsring Plf, Spmush Fly,Flf, (F.) Canthanit, 
Mouohss, M. d'Espagns. This fly is nroeh 
employed in medicine. It is the most conuim 
vesicatory. Given internally, and even wbni 
absorbed from the skin, it affects the orioiry 
organs, exciting strangury. This may be pre- 
vented, in cases of bluters, by interposing be- 
tween the blistering plaster and skin a pisceof 
tissue paper. Diluents will relieve the stiiD- 
cury. Dose, half a grain to one giain. If kept 
dry, the flies will retain their activity for muf 
years. Their active principle, Can'thaniim, 
CantAaridi'na, has been separated from them. 
Cahthakis Vittata, Lytta Tittata. 
CANTHE'RIUS, Cants^rium. The ero«- 
piece of wood in the apparatus used by Hipfo- 
crates for reducing luxations of the humem . 

CANTHITIS. Inflammation of the csnthin 
of the eye. 

CANTHOPLAS'TICR, from jf«»«of, 'the 
angle of the eye,' and nlaortno^, * formative.' 
The formation, by plastic operation, of the ugl« 
of the eye. 
CANTHUM, Candi. 

CANTHUS, Epiean'this, An'gulus eesU' 
ris. Pons lackrfma*rum. The comer or angle 
of the eye. The greater eantkvs is the inm 
angle, Hireus, Hir'quus, Rhanter; the Utm 
eantkus, the outsr angle, Paro'pia, Pega. 

C ANTIA'NUS PULVIS. A cordial po^r, 
known under the name, * Countess of Kent't 
powder,' composed of coral, amber, crab's eyesi 
prepared pearls, kc. It was given in esncer. 

CANTION, Candi. 

CANVLA,Can*nula,Au'liseus,AtUoe. Di- 
minutive of Canna, <a reed;' Tu'bulfu,{f') 
Canule ou Cannnle. A smaU tube of gpM, 
silver, platinum, iron, lead, wood, or elaatk 
gum, used for various purposes in surgery. 

CA'OUTCHOUC. The Indian name for lit- 
dian Rubber, Ela/tie Qum, Gwm EUttie, Cau- 
ekue, Resi'na elas*tiea, Cayenne Resin, Cnrf- 
ekue. A substance formed from the milky 
juice of Hsevea seu Hevea Ouiansn'tis, Jot'' 
ropka elas'tiea seu Sipho'nia Cahuckfh ^' 
slos'tion, Pieus Indiea, and Artoear'ptu ii>^*- 
^r»yb7*a:— South American trees. It is inso- 
luble in water and alcohol; but boiling ivater 
softens and swells it. It is insoluble in the es- 
sential oils and in ether, when it may be blown 
into bladders. It is used in the Atbricatios of 
catheters, bougies, pessaries, &c. 

C APA-ISI AKKA : Biomelia ananas. 

CAPBERN, WATERS OF. Capbert w 
in the department Hautes-Pyrto^es, Fraaee. 
The waters contain sulphates and carbonates 
of lime and magnesia, and chloride of msgne- 



CAJPBLST 



m 



CAP8IGUM 



Tempentine, 75^ Fahreniieit* Thsy 
ve purgative. 

CAJ^ELBTf Mvrtns caryophyllatm. 

CAPEU'NA, CapMi^nay (F.) Capelins; « A 
W6mtatt's Hmt^ in French; CmfU'trtm^ from 
mpuiy «lieed.' A tort of banclaee, which, in 
diape, resembles m riding-hood. There are se- 
Tsral kinds of (Upeiinas. 1. That of the head, 
C. de la tke^ Fk/eU eapMlU. See Bonnet 
iPHippocrtte. C. of tk$ ekviclsy enmlojred in 
fractures of the acromion, clavicle and ipine of 
the scapula. C. of an amptttated lisi^— the 
bandage applied round the stnmp. 

C APELLINA, Capelina. 

CAPER 6U6H, Capparis apinosa. 

CAPER PLANT, Euphorbia kthyria. 

CAPERS, aee Capparis spinoaa. 

C APETUS, Imperforation. 

C APHORA, Camphor. 

C APHVRA, Camphor. 

CAJPILLAIREy Capillary, see Adiantnm 
c^nlloBi ▼eneris-— «. du Canada^ Adiantnm pe- 
d0 MontpMsr^ Adiantum capiUus 



CAPILLAMEN'TUM, from Cajdihu, <a 
hair,* CapiUC'tUm^ Trieko'ma^ Tnckoma^tion. 
Any villcras or hairy covering. Also, a small 
fibre or fibril. 

CAPILLART, CapiUdHiy C^pUUe$u$, 
from«flpftfAtf,<ahair.' (F.) CapiOmrB. Hair- 
like; snail. 

Cap'iixakt Ybsssls, Vasa mpUfafria^ (F.) 
Vaisstoux mpillair0»y are the extreme radicles 
of the arteries and veins, with perhaps a apongy 
^ or parenchyma between the two. These, 



together, eonstitote the eapiUarpf int0rm$diat$, 
or peripkarai vaseukr 9fHtm. In this aystem, 
secretion and nutrition are performed, and ani- 
mal heat is prohably eUcited. They possess 
an action distinct from that of the heart, and 
are the aeat of febrile, inflammatory and other 



CAPILLATIO, Triehismns. 

CAPILLATUS, Impuber. 

CAPILLITIUM, Capillamentum,£tttxopion, 
Scalp. 

CAPILLORUM DEFLUVIUM, Afepeeia. 

CAPIL'LUS, quasi Capitis Piius, Coma^ 
ChteUj Crinity JPihUf Tkrix, Cmsafries, (F.) 
C3k«vMi. This term is generally applied to the 
bair of the head, PiU sea Haaor ^itis, the 
characters of which vary, according to races, 
individnala, he. Hairs arise in th& eelluUr 
membrane, where the bulb is pbwed, and are 
eompoMsed of two parts— «fi0, external, tubuhi^, 
•ad transparent, of an epidermoid character ; 
the oiker, internal and std gtturisf which com- 
monicates to them their colour. The hair ia 
iaaenaible, and grows from the root. 

CArnxTTs CARAnsifSis, Adiantnm pedatam. 

CAPIPLE'NIUM, CapUiplt'iUum, from 
e«F>^,< the head,' and |»£m«MM,« full.' Aword, 
employed with different significations. A va- 
riety of catarrh.— Schneiier. A heaviness or 
tisorder in the head common at Rome, like the 
««frj|«(««y C«r0teris,of the GTeeka.-^Baglivi. 

CAPtSTRATIO, Phimosis. 

CAPISTRUM, Copdin»y Chsasstrsj Trismus 
-<<. Ann, Borax. 

Cafis'tkuii, PkdmoBy CmaoMy k^»c, * a hal- 
tier.' Tins name has been given to several 
bind^pea for the head.^— See Capeline, Che- 
vestre. 



CAPITALIA REMEDIA, CephaUe 
dies. 

CAPITALIS, CephaKc. 

CAPITELLUM, Alembic, see Caput. 

CAPITEXTX, Heady. 

CAPITILU'VIUM, from eaputy * the head,' 
and ib«fffv, < to wash.' A bath for the head. 

CAPITIPLENIUM, Capipleninm. 

CAPITIPUR6IA, Caput purgia. 

CAPITITRAHA, from eoput, <the head,' 
and traJUrSy <to draw.' Instruments which, 
like the forceps, draw down the head when im* 
paeted in the pelvis. 

C APITCNES, from eajmt, < the head.' JITs- 
eroeepk'oHy Proeeph'aH, Foetuses whose heads 
are so large aa to render labour difilcult. 

CAPITULUM, Alembic, Condyle, see Ca- 
put^-c. Costs, see Costar— c. Laryngis, Comi- 
culnm laryngisx-c. Martis, Eryngium campes- 
tre— c. Santorini, Corniculum laryngis. 

CAPITTTLUVIUM, Bath, (head.) 

CAPNISMOS, Fumigation. 

CAPNITIS, Tutia. 

CAPNORCHIS, Fumaria bulbosa. 

CAPNOS, Fumaria. 

CAPONy Coi^ou 

CAPOTy C0goi. 

CAP'PARIS SPINCSA, Cap'patUy Cappary 
Ca'pria, Prieily Caper Bushy (F.) Cdprisr* 
Pamilpy Capparides. 8sx, Spst. Polyandria 
Monogynia. The bark of the root, and the 
buds, have been esteemed astringent and diure- 
tic. The buds are a well known pickle. — Ca*> 
perSy (F.) Cdpres, 

Capparis Baduc'ca, Badui'ia. A species of 
caper, cultivated in India on account of the 
beauty of its flowers. The Orientals make a 
liniment with its juice, with which they mb 
pained parte. The flowers are purgative. 

CAPPONE, WATERS OF. At Cappone, 
in the isle of Ischia, are waters containing car* 
bonate of soda, chloride of sodium and carbo- 
nate of lime. Temp. 100^ Fah. 

CAPREOLA'RIS, from saprsolusy <a ten- 
dril.' Cissoidssy EUcMsSy (F.) Capridmirs. 
Twisted. 

Capxeola'bia Yasa. Some have called thus 
the spermatic arteries and veins, on account of 
their numerous contortions. 

CAPREOLUS, Helix. 

CJPRSS, see Capparis spinosa. 

CAPRIA, Capparis spinosa. 

CAPRICORNUS, Plumbum. 

CJPRIEB, Capparia spinoaa. 

CAPRIFOLIA, Lonicera periclymenum. 

CAPRILOQUIUM, Egophony. 

CAPRIZANS PULSUS, aee Pulse, capri- 
zant. 

CAPSA, Botf«, Capsule, Case— ^. Cordis, 
Pericardium. 

CAPSARIUM, Bt^Hsr. 

CAPSICUM, see Capsicum annuum. 

Cap'sioum AM'^uvif, from ncTcrv, * I bite.' 
The systematic name of the plant whence Ce y- 
snne Pepper is obtained^-— Pt^Mr In^dieum seu 
Bispaafieumy Solafnum ttttnsy Silipios'tmm 
PUn'iiy Piper Braxiiiofnum, Piper Ouinesfifsfy 
Piper Caleevftieumy Piper Tar^eieumy C. His* 
pan^ieumy Piper LusitaWioumy Capenne Psp^ 
pery QwMea Peppery (F.) PimsfUy Peivre 
d'Indey Poivre de (hdniey Vorail dee Jardins. 
The pungent, aromatic propertiea of Baeces 



CAJPaiQtTM 



148 



CA&ANNA 



Cap'stei, CmptiewmBerrUty Capwicwm (Ph. U. 
S.)y mre yielded to ether, alcohol, and water. 
They are highly stiimilant and rabelaeient, and 
are ueed as a condiment. Their active princi- 
ple is called Cap^itin* 

Capsicum HnpARicvM , Capsicom annnnm. 

CAPSIQUEj Capsicum annnnm. 

CAPSITIS, see Phaeitis. 

CAPSULA, MrMf^-c. Articolaris, Capsu- 
lar ligament— c. Cordis, Pericardium— -e. Ben- 
tis, Dental follicle— c. Lentis^ see Crystalline 
— e. Nervorum, Neurilemma* 

CAPSULiE SEMINALES, Yesieuto 8— e. 
Synoviales, Bnrss mucosas. 

CAPSULAJREy Capsular. 

CAP'SULAR. Relating to a capsnla or c^K 
snle. Capsulc^ris, (F.) Captuiaire. 

C^PSULAa Aktxbibs, Suprars'nal ArUrUt 
and Vein*. Vessels, belonging to the suprare- 
nal capsules. They are divided into superior, 
middle, and inferior. The first proceea from 
the inferior phrenic, the second from the aorta 
itself, and the third from the renal artery. The 
corresponding veins enter the phrenic, vena 
cava, and renal. 

Capsular Lio'AMKirT, Ligamtn'tvm eapsu" 
ia*riy Cap'nda artieula'rify Ariie'ular capsuU^ 
Fibrous eaptuit, hc», (F.) Ligament capsu- 
iair€y Capsule articulairSy CapsuU fihreux^ 
&c. Membranous, fibroolb, and elastic bags or 
capsules, of a whitish consistence, tiiick, and 
resisting, which surround Joints. 

CAPSULE, Cap'sulay CapsOy a box, or case, 
(F.) Capsule. TlM name has been given, by 
anatomists, to parts bearing no analogy to each 
other. 

Capsulx, Fibrous, Capsular ligament. 

Capsulb, Gblat'inoxts, Cap'sula geltO^inmy 
Consuls of gelatin, A modem invention by 
which copaiba and other disagreeable oils can 
be enveloped in gelatin so as to conceal their 
taste. 

Capsulb ov G1.I88ON, Ca^euia Gusso'hh, 
C eommufnie GLisso'iin, Vagi'na Pwrtesy F. 
Ozjsso'iiu. A sort of membrane, described by 
Olisson, which is nothinc n»ore than dense cel- 
lular membrane surrounding the vena porta and 
its ramifications in the liver. 

Capsule ov thb Hbabt, CapsuUs cordis. 
The pericardium, (q. v.) 

Capsulb, Rbnal, C Suprarenal or Airabil*^ 
iarp Renal Olaetdy Ohn'dula euprarenafUs^ 
Cap^sula rsna*lisy euprarene/lis vel atraUlim'' 
risy Ren sueeenturieitusy Nepkrid^iumy (F.) 
Capsule surrinale on atrahUiaire, A flat, tri- 
angular body, which covers the upper part of 
the kidney, as with a helmet. A hollow cavity 
in the interior contains a brown, reddish or vel- 
lowish fluid. The renal capsules were long 
•npnosed to be the secretory organs of the ftn- 
cied atrabilis. lliey are much larger in the 
fcetus than in the adult. Theb uses are not 
known. 

Capsulb, 8BM'iwAL,Cgymla s emi na'Us. Bar- 
TBOLiNB thus designates the extremity of the 
vas deferens, which is sensibly dilated in the 
vicinity of the vesiculas seminsies. Some ana^ 
tomists apply this name to the vesiculae them- 
selves. 

Capsulb, Stbo'vial, CSs^mls Spnoviaflie, 
A membranous bag, surrounding all the mova- 
ble articulations and canals, which gives pas- 
to tendons. Synovial capsnlM eacbale, 



from their articular torfiMe, a flaid, 
function is to favour the motions of psrts npos 
each other. See Bursa mucosa, and SynoTia. « 

CAPSULE SURRANALB ou ATkABh 
LIARBy Capsule, renal. 

CAPSULITIS, see Phadtit. 

CAPVCHONy Trapezius. 

CAPUCINBy TropsM^om majns. 

CAPULIES, Prwins capnlin. 

CAPULUS, Scrotum. 

CAPUT, < the head,' (q. v.) Also, the top 
of a bone or other part, (F.) The. TheUd 
of small bones is sometimes termed •opiihk' 
hem, eapiteWumy eapkaUd*immy eepkfaHty eh 
pAatiwm. Also, the glans penis. 

Caput Aspbrx Artbrlb, Larynx^-e. Coli, 
CsBCum— c. Galliaacenm, see Gallinaginii ctpot 
—c. Gallinaginis, see Gallinaginis ctpat— «. 
Genitals, Glans— c. Lubricum, Penis— c. Mo> 
nachi, Leontpdon Taiazacum— c. Obstipon, 
Torticollis— «. Penis, Glans. 

Caput Pue'oia, Capiiipmr'gim* Benedia, 
which the ancients regarded as proper kt 
purging the head : e rrk ines, stemutateriesyem- 
phlegmatisantiaj kc, PtoiptT Alpinos mua 
the eaput purgia to be the same as errhiiMi; 
and the apopklegmatiewd the same as the inw> 
ticatbries of the modems. 

Caput Scapula, Acromion. 

Caput Sucobda'nbum. A term sometimeB 
used for the tumefied scalps which first preiCBU 
in certain cases of labour. 

Caput Tbstis, Epididjrmis. 

CAQUE-SANGUEy Cagme^eamgue. OU 
French words which signify BloUp evesm- 
ttoney (F.) Ddjectione eanguimolentss. They 
come from caeare, < to go to stooV '■^ eengeit, 
* Uood.* Under tlus teim was comprehended 
every affection, in which blood is discfatiged 
from the bowels. 

C ARA XHUJJAyFruteatLt'dicus spiiu'itu, 
Barie'ria buxifo'Ha. A Malabar phnt, iriueh, 
when applied extomalty, ii matnrative ind re- 
solvent. The decoction of its root is used, io 
the country, in ischuria. 

CARABAC'CIUM. An aromatic wood of 
India, of a yellowish colour, and a smell like 
that of the clove. Its decoction and infinioo 
are given as stomachic and antiscorbutic. 

CAR'ABUS. A genus of coleopterous in- 
sects. Two species, the ^ryeoetpkfaks tnd 
ferrugin'eusy have been recommmended for tbe 
toothache. They must be pressed between the 
fingers, and then rubbed on the gum and tooth 
aflected. 

CARACTkREy Character. 

CARAGNA, Caranna. 

C ARAMATA, Arwmari. A tree is the in- 
land parts of Pomeroon. It fiirmshes a ftbri- 
fuge bark, which Dr. Hancock says may he 
used in typhoid and remittent fevers where the 
cinchona is either useless or pemiciotts. 

CARAMBOLO, Averrhoa caimmbols. 

CARAN'NA, Caragnuy Taeamahaeey Cereg- 
nay Caran'nm Qummiy Q. Breli'sisy Gum Cer 
ranfnay (F.) Caragnsy Gomme Caragne 00 Ce^ 
rane. A gum-resinous substance, which flo^ 
from a Urge tree in New Spain, and is obtained 
from South America in impure masses. It pro- 
serves its softness for a long time, has an aro- 
matic smell, and a slii^tly acrid and bitter 
taste. It was formerly used as a vnlneiary 
and in i^asters. 



CARAWAY 



149 



CABCnnTB SFQIfGIOSro 



CARA WAT9 CBmm. 

CARBASA, Linteiun. 

CARBASUS, Lintenm. 

CARBO, Carbo Ugm^ CkMreoml^ (F.) CAor- 
^M. Fieili Chureoal is antiieptic. It it used 
to improve the dijceitiye organs in ett^es of 
vrormsy dyspepsia, £c.{ as a cataplasm to gen- 
grenoos and fetid ulcers, tinea, &c., and forms 
a good tootli-powder. Bose^ gr. x. to 3j. Also, 
Anthrax, (q. ▼.) 

Cakbo Ahima'lis, Carbo eamis, Animal 
tkarcaaij (F.) Guirbon animal. In the Phar- 
macopeia of the United States, it is directed to 
be prepared from bones. It is given in the 
same cases as the Carbo Ligni, and has been 
CKtoUed in cancer. Dose, gr. ss. to gr. iij. 

The Pharmacopceia of the 'United States con- 
tains a formula for the preparati<m of Cakbo 
Ahima'ijs Pueifica'tub, purijied ammal ehar- 
aaal (^Carbarn, animal. Ij; Add mnriat,y Aqum 
52 f. .^xi^'O Pour the muriatic acid, previously 
mixea with the water, gradually upon the char- 
coal, and digest with a gentle heat for two days, 
occasionally stirring t^ mixture. Having al- 
lowed the undissolved portion to subside, pour 
otf the aapematant liquor, wash the charcoal 
frequentlT with water until it is entirely free 
from acid, and lastly dry it. 

Cakbo Fob'silis, Lithatukra^, Stone coal. 

Cakbo Hum A'livif. The human excrement. 



Cakbo Mimskalis, 6rr.phites^-c. Palpebra- 
nmi, Anthracoais— c. Spongiae, Spongia nsta. 

CARBON, SESQUl-IODIDE OF, Carbo- 
ixis sesqui-lodidnm— c. Bisulphuret of, Carbonis 
•dphnretnm— c. Sulphuret of, Carbonis sul- 
phuretam — c. Terchloride of, Chloroform. 

CAR'BONAS or CARBOOYAS. A earbo- 
nat€. (¥.) Carbonate. A salt, formed by the 
combination of carbonic acid with a salifiable 



Cakboitas Natkicvm, SodsB earbonas. 
CARBONATE DUMMONIAQUE, Am- 
moms carDcmas. 

C AR'BONATED, CarbonaftMSyAMtns,(V.) 
Carbonij AM. That which is impregnated 
with carbonic acid. 
CARBONi, Carbonated. 
CARBON'IC ACID, Ae"idmn Carbon'ieum, 
SoHd Air of Ha/s#, PacHHout Air, Futod Air, 
Carionafeemtt Aeid, Calea'reons Add, Atrial 
Add, Mspkifie Add, Spi/Uua Utha'lit, (F.) 
Adde Carboniquo. This gas, which nei- 
ther supports respiration nor combustion, is 
not often used in medicine. It is the main 
agent in effisrvescent draughts, fermenting 
poultices, &C. It is often found occupying the 
lower parts of mines — ^when it is called the ehoke 
d ump c a verns, tombs, wells, brewers' vats, 
fcc., and not unfrequently has been the cause of 
death. Lime thrown into such places soon ab- 
•orbs the acid. 

CARBCNIS SESQUMCDIDUM, C. 5s#. 
pd-Iodnre'tnm, Sesqni-Fodids or Sesqui'Tod'u- 
r^ of Carbon. This is made by mixine concen- 
trated alcoholic solutions of iodine and potsssa, 
mitil the former loses its colour; a solution is 
'obtained from which water throws down a yel- 
low precipitate— tiie sesqui-iodide of carbon. It 
las been used in enlarged glands and in some 
mta&eoua ^Ktctions, applied externally, (^ss, 
*oxvj. of cerate.) 
C ARBoiiis SirLPHVKS'TVM, Smlphwt'hMn Car^ 



bo'mU, Bitl'jUum Carbo'nU, Carbo'nium Sulpktt- 
ra*tumyAVeohol8nl'phuri9,BiMnlphuro'tmm Car* 
bo*nii, Snlphnret of Carbon, Bisulpkurot of Car' 
bon^ Carburet of Sulphur,(F.)8ulfurBdB Carbon. 
This transparent, colourless fluid, which has a 
very penetrating, disagreeable odour, and a 
taste trhich is cooling at first, but afterwards 
acrid and somewhat aromatic, is a difi!usible 
excitant. It is diaphoretic, diuretic, and has 
been said to have proved emmenagogue. It is 
also used in nervous diseases as an antispasmo- 
dic. Dose, one drop to four, repeated fre- 
quently. 

It is used externally, where a cooling inflo* 
ence has to be rapidly exerted. 

CARBONIUMSULPHURATUM,Carboni8 
sulphuretum. 

CARBUNCLE, Anthrax— c. Fungous, Ter- 
minthus — c. of the Tongue, Glossanthrax—- c. 
Berry, Terminthus. 

CARBUNCLED FACE, Gutta rosea. 

CARBUNCULAR EZANTHEM, Anthrsr 
cia. 

CARBUNCULATIO OCULI, Blepharan- 
thraeosis. 

CARBUNdULUS, Anthrax— e. Anginosas, 
Cynanche maligna— c. Labiorum et genarum. 
Cancer aquaticus — c. Pulmonum, Necropnen- 
monia. 

CAKBi7ii'cm.iT8 RuBi'ifim. A red, shining, 
and transparent stone, from the Isle <^ Ceylon; 
formerl]r employed in medicine as a preserva^ 
tive against several poisons, the plague, &c. 

Cakbumculdb Ulcobcttlosus, Cynanche ma- 
ligna. 

CARCAROS, from naQnaiom, <I resound,' 
* I tremble.' A fever, in which the patient has 
a general tremor, accompanied with an unceas- 
ing noise in the ears. 

CARCINODES, Cancroid, Chancrouso* 

CARCINOIDES, Cancroid. 

C ARCINO MA, Caneero'ma, Cttncro'ma, from 
jrapxirof, <a crab.' Some authors have thus 
called indolent tumours diiferent from cancer; 
others, incipient cancer; and others, again, the 
species of cancer in which the affected structure 
assumes the appearance of cerebral substance; 
but the majority of authors use Carcinoma in 
the same sense as Cancer. 

Cakcinoma Alveolakb, Colloid— c. Fibro- 
sum, Scirrhus — c. Haematodes, HsBmatodes fun- 
gus— c. Intestinorum, Enteropathia cancerosa — 
c. Linguas, Glossocarcinoma — c. of the Liver, 
Hepatoscirrhus— c. MeduIlare,Encephaloid— «• 
Melanodes, Cancer, melanotic — c. Melanoticum, 
Melanosis — c. Simplex, Scirrhus— c. Spongio- 
sum, Encephaloid, Hematodes fungus— ^. Scroti, 
Cancer, Chimney sweepers' — c. Uteri, Metro- 
carcinoma, Metroscirrhus— c. Ventriculi, Gas- 
troBcirrhus; see Gastrostenosis cardiaca et py- 
lorica. 

CARCINOM'ATOUS. Relating to Cancer. 

CARCINOME MOU ET SPONGIEUX, 
Encephaloid— 0. Sanglanto, Encephaloid, He- 
matodes fungus. 

CARCINOS, Cancer. 

CARCINO'SES, (G.) Knrnnoten, from jca#- 
ffrroc, <a crab.' A family of diseases, accord- 
ing to the classification of Fuchs; which em- 
braces the different forms of Cancer. 

CARClNOSUa, Cancerous. 

CARCINUS SPONGI03U3, Encephaloid. 



CABBAMAMTICA 



150 



CARmOlCALACIA 



CARDAMANTICA, Cmrdamine pntantii, 
Lepidiom Iberia. 

CARDAMINDUM.MINUS, TroiMDolam 
majiu. 

CARDAMINE FONTANA, Siaymbriom 
nasturtliuii. 

Cabdami'mC pKATBR'tity GofJ^MN'Mf, Cgrdo- 
man'tieay N'astur'tium Aqnai^ieumy Cmr*dan%any 
Cuiijiot, Ihtfrit sopk'ia, Ifattur'Humpraien'gij 
Ladi4»^'*mocky Cuchfo-Jfower, Common BitUr 
Cress, (F.) Cressan iligani, Cr§s99H tUs prks, 
Fatfrage iowvag; Onf . CrueifenB. The flow- 
en have been considered nseiiil as antispasmo- 
dics, in the dose of 9^j. to ^ij. Thej are pro- 
bably inert. 

CARDAMOM, LESSER, Amomnm caida- 



CARDAMOMB, Amomnm cardamomam — 
e.tUlm Ctu d§ Mtdahar, Amomum cardamo- 



CARDAMOMUM MAJIJS, Amomnm gra- 
na paradisi— c. Minns, Amomum cardamomum 
— c. Piperatum, Amomum grana paradisi. 

CARDAMON, Cardamine pratensis. 

CARDtREy Dipsactts Bjlvestri*— 0. Cuitivi, 
Dipsaens fullonum. 

CARDIA, MoQita, <the heart,' Stom'aekus, 
Orifi&'iwm tinig^trum sen Ingret'tut tupe'rior 
mfntri^uli. The superior or asophaceal orifice 
of the stomach, ^Ort^ViMi vntriJuli Hms'- 
trum. Also, the Heart, (q. ▼.) 

CARDIAC, Cardi'acut, from ra^ia, <the 
heart ;' or the apper orifice of the stomach. (F.) 
Cardiaque. Relating to the heart or to the 
upper orifice of the stomach. A cordial, (q. ▼.) 

Cabdiac Ab'tbeies, Co/onarj arterUi, (F.) 
Arthre* eardiaqvss on coronairesy are two in 
number. They arise from the aorta, a little 
above the free edge of the sigmoid valves, and 
are distributed on both surges of the heut. 

Cakdiao Ganglion, Cardiac plexus. 

Caediao Nbbvss, (F.) Nerft eardiaquss. 
These are commonly three on each sidei a su- 
perior , middle and inferior, which are furnished 
by corresponding cervical ganglia. Commonly, 
there are but two on the left side ; the upper 
and middle, which draw their origin from the 
last two cervical ganglia. Scarpa calls the ««- 
/Mfiof^— C. »uperjteia*li» ; the middle— -C. pro- 
fun* due or C. magnue; and the inferior — C 
parvus. There are, besides, Cardiac JU'amonts, 
(F.) FiUts eardiaques, ftirnished by the par 
vagum or pneumo-gastric nerve, which become 
confounded with the above. 

Caboiao Plexttb, Oan'glion eardiaeum, Car- 
diae ganglion. A nervous net-work, formed by 
the different nerves above mentioned. It is si- 
tuate at the posterior part of the aorta, near its 
origin. It affotds numerous branches, which 
are distributed to the heart and great vessels. 

Cabdiac Vbins, Coronarj veine, (F.) Veines 
Cardiaques, are commonly four in number; two 
anterior and two posterior. They open into 
the right auricle by one orifice, which is fbr- 
nished with a valve, and is called, by Portal, 
Sinus eoronaire du Caur, 

CARDIAC A CRISP A, Leonuras cardiae^*- 
c. Passio, Cardialgia. 

CARDIACUS, Cordial, Stomachal. 

CARDIA6MUS, Cardialgia. 

CARDPAGRA^ Age^tio eirihrWiea cordis: 



from ROf^ia, *the heart,' and ay^, <seifiiR.' 
Gout of the heart. 

CARDIAG'RAPHT, Cardiagra'phia, fsm 
MoqSia, * the heart,' and r(«f ir» * ^ descrqitioB.' 
An anatomical description ci the heart. 

CARDIAL'GIA, Cardi*aoa Pmssio, Celiea 
Ventrie*uliy Spasmus VentriefuHy Perodfu'ia, 
Cordo*lium^ CardUts'a, Dyspepsodyn'ia, Df»- 
pepsiodjfn'ia, Dfopepiodpn^ia, Perotodfu'ie, 
Cardiod'yni, Qustrml'gia, OaeUral'gia, (hutr^- 
eol'ia,Oastrod*fni,Fas'sio Cardi*aea,Stomaek- 
at'gia, Oastrodyn'ia, Stomaeai'gia, CarU'em 
Morbus, Cardiog*mus : from xo^cc, ' tfaecanbc 
orifice of the stomach,' and oXyo^, * pain :' Pern 
of the stomach, (F.) DouUur do PJtsiomae, D. 
nivralgique de PEstowuio : also, Hewfiium, <F.) 
CardialgU, Ardour d^Estowuse, A. du Cam, 
Impaired appetite, with gnawing or buniinf pun 
in the stomach or epigastrinm^ — Mornu tvI 
ardor ventrie'uli, Morsus otom'aeki, Seie, 
Idmo'sis eardial*gia mordens, Rosio Stomfadu 
sen Ventrie^uli: — a symptom of dyspepsia. 

Cabmaloia Inflamvatobia, Gastriti»-c. 
Sputatoria, Pyrosis. 

CARDIALOG'IA, from jroe^ia, < the heart,' 
and loyo(,< a discourse.' A treatise on the beart 

CARDIANASTROPHE, Ectopia cordis. 

CARDIARCTIE, Heart, concentric bxper- 
trophy of the. 

CARDIAIUUS; same etymology. A rnme 
given to a worm, said to have becoi fiiond in the 
heart or pericardium. 

CARDIATOM'I A, itom uo^a, < the heait,' 
and fnfiv, * to cut.' Diaaection of the heart. 

CARDIATROPHIA, Heart, atrophy of the. 

CARDIECTASIS, aee Aneurism of the 
heart^-c. Partialia, Anenriam of the heart. 

CARDIELCOSIS; from nm^Sia, <the heart,' 
and UXnof, < an ulcer.' Ulceration of the heart. 

CARDIETHMOLIPOSIS, Steatoais cordis. 

eARDIEURYSMA, Aneurism of the heart. 

C A RDIL^ELA, Cardialgia. 

CARDIM'ELECH, from aoeaw, <the heart,' 
and 1^0, MeleJt, (Hebr.,><a governor.' A 
auppoaititioos active principle seated in the 
heart, and governing the vital functians^—Do- 
Ueua. 

CARDINAL FLOWER, Lobelia cardiMhi 
— c. Blue, Lobelia syphilitica. 

CARDINAL PLANT, Lobelia cardinalif. 

CARDINAMENTUM, Ginglymus, Gom- 
idiosis. 

CARDIOBOTANUM, Centaurea benedieta. 

CARDIOCE'LR, from MOQhn, 'the heart/ 
and X11A11, * rupture.' Hernia of the heart, espt- 
cially into the abdominal cavity. 

CARDIOCLASIE, CardiorrhezU. 

CARDIOIXYNfi, Cardiodyn'ia; fxomu^. 
'the heart, the stomach,' and oiv^n, 'pain.' 
Pain in the heart. Also, Cardialgia. 

Cabdiodtnb Sfasmodica Intbbiiittbrs, An- 
gina pectoris. 

CARDIOG'MUS. Hippocrates emploTed 
this word synonymously with cardialgia. In 
the time of Galen it was used, by some writers, I 
for certain pulaationa of the heart, analogontto 
palpitations. Sauvages understood by Carii' , 
ogmus an aneurism of the heart or great ves- 
sels, when still obscure. Also, Angina pectoris. 

CABoio«Mira CoBois SiNisTBi, Angus pac- 
toria. 

GARDIOMALA'CIA, Malaoo'sis aeu Xa^ 



CAKDIOMTOLIPOSIS 



151 



CABLINA 



Ufdm sen Mmlma^is tea JItoUif'tu Cordis, 
(F.) BrnmoUUtn^nt du Caury from na^dm, 
*Xb» faevV and /c^ilmM, <MiftnMs/ Softening 
oi the hnrt, caused by inflammation of the 
argauy or a consequence of some lesion of the 
fimction of nutrition. 

CARBIOMTOLIPOSIS, Steatons cordis. 

CA&DIONCHI, see AneurUm. 

CARDIONEURALGIA, Angina pectoris. 

GABDIOPALMUS, Cardiotromus. 

CARDIOPERICARBITIS, see Pericarditis. 

CARDIORRHEU'MA, RhwmoHs'mus cor- 
dis; from ««(^<i,<the heart,' and (u^y^de- 
floxion, rheumatism.' Bheumatism of the 
heart. 

C ABBIORRHEXIS, Cardioeiasis, (Piorry,) 
Ruptu'ra Cordis, (F.) Rupture du Caur^Tom 
sM^A, <the heart,' mad mitt, < Ulceration.' La- 
cecmtioo of the heart. 

CABDJOSCLiROaiE, (Piony) from jm^* 
*»a, «the heart,' and irjri w«, « hard.' (F.) Sur 
durdssemeni du Caur* Induration of the 
heart. 

CARDIOSTENO^IS, ftom*a^dtu, <the 
heart,' and onrvrcf, 'contraction.' Contrac- 
tioD of the openings of the heart. 

CARDIOTRAU<MA, from jta^/ia, *the 
heart,' and rQavfta, <a wound.' A wound of 
the heart. 

GARDIOT'ROMUSy Patpita'tio Cordis 
irop'idmuj Cardio9al*mus, Trepida'tio Cordis, 
from jrof/iff, <the heart,' and m^/ut, * tremor.' 
Rapid and feeble palpitation, or fluttering of 
the heart. 

CARDIOTHOTUS, from so^ia, < the heart, 
and Ttmmnm, * I wound.' One affected with a 
woood of the heart.~Ga)en. 

CAKDIPERICARDITIS, see Pericarditis, 

CARDITB, Carditis. 

CARDITIS, from xa^ut, * the hearty' and 
the termination iHs, Inflammation of the 
fleshy substance of the heart. Emprss'ma Car^ 
di'tis, Jnjlammaftio Cordis, Injlaimma'tio Ciu^ 
di'tis, Cauma Carditis, Myoeardi'tisy CwrdC' 
Hs MuseuLafris, InJU nm ma t iou du Caur, (F.) 
Cardiio. The symptoms of this affection are 
hy no means clear. They are often conibmided 
with thooe of pericarditis, or inflammation of 
the membrane investing the heart. Carditis, 
indeed, with man]^, includes both the inflamma- 
tion of the inresting membrane and that of the 
heart itself. See Pericarditis, and Endocar- 
ditis. 

Caboitib Extbema, Pericarditis— c. Interna, 
Endocarditis — c. MuBculari#, Carditis — c. 
Membranosa, Pericarditis— c. Polyposa, Polypi 
of the heart — c. Serosa, Pericarditis. 

CARDO, Ginglymus. 

CARDOPaTIUM, Garlina acanlis. 

CARDUUS ALTILIS, Cynara scotymns— 
c. Benedicttts, Centaorea benedicta— c. Bxaxi- 
lianos, Bromelia ananas— c. Domesticus capite 
msjori, Cynara scolymns — c. Hemorrhoidalis, 
Cirshim aryense. 

CAA'DUirs MAUA'iniB, Caf^duus M^rim,aHf' 
Whum, Car*duus la^tius, Spina alha. Common 
MUi TkistU', or Ladios* ThistU, (F.) Chardon- 
Moris, The herb is a bitter tonic. The seeds 
ase oleaginous. It is not used. 

CAanuus Piubds, Atractylis gmnmifera-— c. 
flstiTBs, Cirthamns tinctonus— c. Sativus non- 
ipbosQSy Cynaia scolymn*— «• Solstitialis, Cen- 



taurea calcitrapa— c. Stellatus, Centaurea calci- 
trapa — c. Tomentosus, Onoporctiumacanthium. 

CAREBARESIS, Carebaria. 

CAREBA'RIA or CAREBARI'A, Car#*ar«'- 
sis, from xoQn, « the head,' and ^aQo^, 'weight.' 
Soordint^ma, Csrehe^ria, SeordirU/mus, Car- 
dine* ma* Heaviness of theiiead— Hippocrates. 
Galen. 

CARE'NA, Kare'na. The twenty-fourth 
part of a drop. — ^Ruland and Johnson. 

CAREUM, Carum. 
^ CAREX ARENARIA, Sarsaparilla Germa- 
nica. 

C ARI ACOU. A beverage, used in Cayenne, 
and formed of a mixture of cassava, potato, and 
sugar fermented. 

CARICA, Ficus carica. 

Ca&'ica Papaya, Pa/MMff trss,(¥.)Papaysr, 
Ord» Artocarpee. A native of America, India, 
and Africa. The fruit has somewhat of the 
flavour of the pumpkin, and is eaten like it. 
The milky juice cf the plant, and the seed and 
root have been regarded as anthelmintic. 

CARICUM;— said to have been named after 
its inventor Caricus. Car'yeum, A detergent 
application to ulcers; composed of black helle- 
bore, sandarach, copper, lead, sulphur, orpi- 
ment, cantharides, and oil of cedar. — Hippocr. 

CARIE, Caries— 0. dss Dsnts, Dental gan- 
grene. 

CARIt, Carious. 

CAiaES, Nigri'tiss Os'sium, An vlesro' 
tion of hone,— Necrosis being death of a bone. 
It resembles the gangrene of soft parts. 
Hence it has been termed Caries gangntno'sa, 
Qangrmfna Ca'ries, G, Os'sium, Tete'do, Ar- 
ro'sio. Euros, (F.) Carie. It is recognised 
by the swelling of the bone which precedes 
and accompanies it ; by the abscesses it occa- 
sions; the fistuls wmch form; by the sa- 
nious character, peculiar odour and quantity of 
the suppuration, and by the evidence afforded 
bj probing. The most common causes of ca- 
nes are bfows; — ^the action of some virus, and 
morbid diathesis. When dependent on any 
virus in the system, tkis must be combated by 
appropriate remedies. When entirely local, it 
must be converted, where practicable, into a 
state of necrosis or death of the affected part. 
For this end stimulants are applied, the actual 
cautery. Sec. 

C ABIES Dbhtium, Dental gangrene— «. Pu- 
dendorum, see Chancre— c. of the Yertebrs, 
Vertebral disease — c. Yertebrarum, Tertebral 



CARIEUX, Carious. 

CARIM GURINI, Justitia ecbolinm. 

CARINA, 'a ship's keel.' the vertebral 
column, especially of the foetus. Also, the 
breast bone bent inwards. Hence, Pectus m- 
rina*tum: — the chest aflfocted with such de- 
formity. 

CAiaOUS, Cario'sus, Euro'des, (F.) CaHi, 
Carieux. Affected with caries. 

CARIUM TERR^, Calx. 

CARIVE, Myrtns pimenta. 

CARIYILLANDI, Smilax sarsaparilla. 

CARLINA, <Carline Thistle.' 

Cabu'ra Acaul'js, Chammfleon Mum, Car* 
dopa'tium, (F.) Carline sans tige, which grows 
in the Pyrenees, and on the mountains of Swit- 
zerland, Italy, &c., has been recommended as a 
tonic, emmenagogue, and sudorific. 



CARLXNS SANS TIQB 



W 



CABOUDS 



CARUNE SANS TI&B, Otelina aenlk. 

CARLO SANCTO RADIX. <St. Charles's 
Root :' fonnd in Mechoachan, in America. The 
bark is aromatic, bitter and acrid. It is con- 
sidered to be sudorific, and to strengthen the 
gams and stomach. 

CARLSBAD, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Carlsbad is a town in Bohemia, 34 miles from 
Egra, celebrated for its hot baths. The water 
contains about 47 parts in the 100 of purging 
salts. It is a thermal saline ; temperature 121^ 
to 167° Fahrenheit. The constituents are — 
carbonic acid, sulphate of soda, carbonate of 
soda, and chloride of sodium. 

CARMANTINEy Justitia pectoralis— c. 
P^etoralBy Justitia pectoralis. 

CARMEN, < a verie,' because charms usually 
consisted of a verse. A charm (q. ▼.:) an 
amulet. 

CARMINANTIA, Carminatives. 

CARMINATIVA, Carminatives. 

CARMIN'ATIVES, Carminmn'tia seu Cmr- 
mtnati^vOf from emrmen, * a verss,* ox * charm,' 
AntipkyMHoa^ JPhftago'ga^ Xan'Hea, (F.) Car^ 
minatifs. Remedies winch allay pain, and 
cause Uie expulsion of flatus from the alimen- 
tary canal. They are generally of the class of 
aromatics. 

The FoubOrbatbr CAamii ativb Hot Sbsds, 
were, of old, anise, carui, cummin, and fennel. 

The FouK Lnsxn Cabkuiativb Hot Sbbim, 
Quat'uor 9§m'ina eal'ida mino'ray were bishop's 
weed, stone parsley, smallage, and wild carrot. 

CARMOT. A name given, by the alchy- 
mists, to the matter which they believed to 
constitute the Philosopher's stone. 

CARNABADIA, Carum, (seed. 

CARNA6ADIXJM, Cuminum cyminum. 

CARNATIO, Syssarcosis. 

CARNATION, Dianthus caryophyllus. 

CARNELIAN, Cornelian. 

CARNEOLUS, Cornelian. 

CAR^EOV^Car'ft«us,Camo'su9^are(/des, 
Ineama*tusj from cAro, < flesh.' <F*) Ckamu, 
Consisting of flesh, or resembling flesh. 

Cabmbous Columhs, Fluhy Columns, Co- 
lumfnm Camsm of the heart, (F.) Colonnes 
ekamuss, are muscular projections, situate in 
the cavities of the heart* Tney are called, also, 
Mus'euli PapiUafrei, 

Cabnbous FiBBESy FUskf Fibres, Mus'enlar 
Fihrt*, (F.) Fibres ehamust ou museulaires, 
are fibres belonging to a muscle. 

C ARNEUM MARSUPIUM, Ischio-trochan- 
terianus. 

CARNIC^LA. Diminutive of C(ifv,< flesh.' 
The gum, — Gingiva, (q. v.)— Fallopius. 

CARNIFICATIO, Caniiflcctioii— c Pulmo- 
Bum, Hepatisation of the lungs. 

CARNIFICA'TION,Carm;lc«'rw,from««r©, 
* flesh,' and Jieri, * to become.' Transformatum 
ituo JUth. A morbid state of certain organs, 
in which the tissue acquires a consistence like 
that of fleshy or muscular parts. It is some- 
times observed in hard parts, the texture be- 
coming softened, as in Otteo-eareoma. >¥hen 
it occurs in the lungs, they present a texture 
like that of liver. Such is the condition of the 
foetal lung. 

CARNIPOR'MIS ABSCES^US. An ab- 
•cess, which ordinarily occurs in the neighbour- 
hood of the artieulationsy and whose orifice is 



hard, the sides thick and calloosw — M. A. 8e- 
verinus. 

CARNIVOROUS, Camiv'orus, Sareopk'" 
ague, Creatopk^agus, Creopk'agus, (F.) Carm» 
vore, from earo, * flesh,' and v9roy *■ I eat.' That 
which eats flesh. Any substance which de- 
stroys excrescences in wounds, oleers, &c. 

CARNOSA CUTIS, Panniculus camoeus. 

CARN06ITA8, Camoi'ity, (F.) Camositi, 
from saro, * flesh.' A fleshy excrescence. 

CARNOS'ITIES OF THE URETHRA, 
Carbuncles in tks Ure'thra, (F.) Cmm^ntis 
ou Caroneules de Vurhre. Small fleshy ex- 
crescences or fungous growths, ^vHiich were, at 
one time, presumed to exist in the male ure- 
thra, whenever retention of urine followed go- 
norrhoea. 

M. CnllMer uses tine term Cmmostti «Am- 
rienns for a cutaneous, cellular, and noembri- 
nons tumour, dependent upon the syphilitie vi- 
rus. See, also, Polyaareia. 

CARNOSUS, Cameous. 

CARO, Flesh — c. Accessoria, see Floor 
longus digitorum pedis profrmdus perforans, 
(accessorius)— c. Excrescens, Excrescence— «. 
Fungosa, Fungoaity— c. Glandulosa, Epiglottie 
gland-— c. Luxurians, Fungoeity — c. Orbicula- 
ris, Placentar— c. Parenchymatica, Parenchyma 
— c. Quadrata, Palmaris brevis— c. Qoadratns 
Sylvii, see Flexor longus digitorum pedis pro- 
fundus perforans, (accessorius)— c. Viacenim, 
Parenchyma. 

CAROB TREE, Ceratonia siliqua. 

CAROBA ALNABATI,CeratoniumsUiqui. 

CARODES, Carotic. 

CAROLI, see Chancre. 

CAROLI'NA, NORTH, MINERAL WA- 
TERS OF. In the counties of Warren, Moot- 
gomery, Rockingham, Lincoln, Bnncomb and 
Rowan, there are mineral springs. They be- 
long generally to the sulphureous or aciduloOi 
saline. 

CAROLINA, SOUTH, MINERAL WA- 
TERS OF. They are numerous. PacoleC 
Spring on the west bank of Pacolet River, 
contam sulphur and iron. Many, with similar 
properties, out not held in estimation, are scat- 
tered about the state. 

CARONCXJLE, Caruncle— «• Laekrfmals, 
Caruncle. 

CARONCUtES MYRTIPORMES, Ca- 
runcula myrtiformes — e. ile VlTrhre, Camosi- 
ties of the urethra. 

CAROPI, Amomum cardamomum. 

CAROSIS, Somnolency. 

CAROTA, see Dancns carota. 

CAROTIC, (ARTERIES,) Carotids. 

CAROTIC A, Narcotics. 

CAROT'ICUS, Caro'des, Com^aiose, from 
MsiQof, < stupor.' (F.) CaroHque^ Relating to 
stupor or earns — as a sortie siate, &c. 

CAROTIDS, CaroVidss, CatotHetB^Oasyftidsm, 
CapMlss, Jngula'res, Soport^lss, Sopore^rist, 
Soporiferm, Sommferm, Apoplet'Hcss, Lsthar'- 
gisse Arts*rit^t\^ Carot'id Ar'isrisSf Cepkal'- 
ie Ar'teries, (F.) Arthres Cenrstidss; from vo^, 
Quat*Mor sem'ina sai'ida majo're^sarwUnatC voy 
* stupor.' The great arteries of the neck, which 
carry blood to ue head. They are divided into, 
1 . Primitive or eomms n ; the left of which arises 
frtmi the aorta, and the right from a trunk, con- 
to it and the subclavian. S. EM^rmai or 



CASOTTS 



153 



CARTILAGE 



ptricepkai'ie, a bnnch of the primitive, which 
extends from the last to the neck of the con- 
dyle of the lower jaw; and, 3. Int&mai, Art^^ 
ria cer«hra*lis vel encepkal'teoy another branch 
of the primitive, which, arising at the same 
place aa the external, eotera the cranium, and 
terminates on a level with the fissure of Sylvius, 
dividing into several branches. 

Carotid Canal, Cana'Us Carofictu^ Cemal 
injU^x d* Vo» t0mporeti~-{Ch,) Canal caroto- 
ditn^ is a caoal in the temporal bone, through 
which the carotid artery and several nervous 
filaments pass. 

CAKorm FoBAMXRA, Poramima Carot^ieay 
(F.) Trou* earotidieni, are distinguished into 
intental and etUemaln They are the fonmina 
at each extremity of the CanaUs Caroticu: 

CAROTfE, Daucus carota. 

CAROUA, Carum, (seed.) 

CAROUBIER, Ceratoniuffi sili^oa. 

CAROUGEy see Ceratonium siliqua. 

CARPASA, Carbasa. 

CARPA'SIUM, Car'patwmyViA Carp^'Httmu 
Dioscorides, Pliay, Galen, &c., have given 
these names, and that of Carpasos, to a plant, 
which cannot now be determined, and whose 
juice, called Opocar*pason^ 9no%*QWa^»rf passed 
Sot a violent, narcotic poison, and was con- 
6>unded with myrrh. 

CARPATHICUM, see Pinus cembnu 

CARFE, Carpas. 

CARPENTARIA, AchiUea millelblinffi. 

CARPESIUM, Carpasium. 

CARPH(yD£S, Carpk»id4s, from na^^of, 
^Jlocculusy* and •</•?, ' resemblance.' Flocco- 
lent, stringy; — as muetcs earpkaUs, flocculent 
or stringy moeos. 

CARPHOLOG'IA, Tilmut, CarpoUg^ia, 
Crocidis'mugj Croeydis'mnsy Flocco'ntm eena'- 
lie, FToreile'giumy Trichclog^iet, Crotidiafisy 
from x«e9>«r, *JUKfculusy^ and Jc»y», * I collect,' 
or 'phicV* (F.) Carphologie, Action of ga- 
thering floccnli. A delirious picking of Uie 
bed-clothes, as if to seek some substance, or to 
pull the flocculi from them. It denotes great 
cerebral irritability and debility, and is an unfa- 
vourable sign in fevers, &c. 

CARPHOS, Trigonclla foenum. 

CARPIA, Linteum. 

CARPI^US, Palmaris brevis. » 

CAR'PIAL, Car'pian, Carpia'nusf Cmr^a*- 
Us, (F.) Carpien. Belonging to the Carpus. 

Cardial Lio'ambwts, (F.) LigamentB Car- 
piensy are, 1 . The fibrous ftscie, which unite 
the bones of the carpus ; and, 2. The annular 
ligamentB, anterior and posterior, (q. v.) 

CARPIAN, Carpial. 
CAJRFIENy Carpial. 

CARPISMUS, Carpus. 

CARPOBALSAMUM, see Amyris opobal- 



CARPOL06TA, Carphologia^-<. Spasttodi- 
ca, Snbsultus tendinum. 

CARPO-METACARPEUS MINIMI DIGI- 
TI, Adductor metacarpi minimi digiti--«. Mi^ 
taemrpien du petit doigt, Opponens minimi digiti 
— c. Mitaearpien du pouett, Opponens pollicis 
— c. Phalangeus minimi digiti. Abductor minimi 
figiti — e. Fhalangien du petit \icigt. Abductor 
aunimi digiti — e. Pkalangien du petit doigty 
Flexor parvus minimi digiti—*. Phalangien du 
pniM, Flexor brevis pollicis manus — e. Sus'^ 
jkalamgUH du pouce^ Abductor pollicis brevis. 
11 



CARPO-PEDAL, from earpM, < the wrist,' 
and pes, psdis, <the foot.' Relating to the 
wrist aikl foot. 

Ca&po-pkdal Spasm, Csr*ehral spasmod'ic 
eroup, A spasmodic affection of the chest and 
larynx in young children, accompanied by ge> 
neral or partial convulsions. The disease com^ 
monly occurs between the third and ninth 
nwnth, and is characterized by excessive dys- 
pncea, accompanied by a loud croupy noise on 
inspiration; the thumbs being locked, and the 
hands and feet rigidly bent for a longer or 
shorter period. The seat of the disease is evi- 
dently in the eerebro-spinal axis, primarily or 
secondarily: generally, perhaps, it is owing to 
erethism seated elsewhere, but communicated to 
the eerebro-spinal centre, and reflected to the 
respiratory and other muscles concerned. It 
seems to he connected with dental irritation, 
and consequently, in the treatment, where such 
is the case, the gums should be freely divided; 
after which, cathartics and revulsives, with the 
use of narcotics and appropriate diet, will ge- 
nerally remove the affection; for although ex- 
tremely alarming, it is often not attmded with 
great danger. See Asthma thymioum. 

CARPOS, Fruit. 

CARPOT'ICA, from x^^nw, < fruit.' Pis- 
eases affecting impregnation. Irregularity, 
difficulty or danger produced by parturition*. — 
the 3d order, clus Gtnstica, of Good. 

CABFTJSyCarpis'muSyBraehiafle, Rasee'ta, 
Raste*ta, Raaehm, Rass^tn, Raset'ta, the wrist, 
(F.) Corps, Poignet, The part between the 
fore-arm and hand. Eight bones compose it, 
(in two rows.) In the superior row there are, 
from without to within— tSie Scaphoides or t/a- 
vieula'ri, Luna'ri or semiluna'ri, Cnnsifor*m9, 
and Orbieula'ri or pisifo/mi. In the lower 
row — TYape'zifimy Trapezoldet, Magnum, and 
TJntif&r'mM, 

CARRAGEEN MOSS, Fucus crispus. 

CARRB. DE LA CUTSSE, Quadratus fo- 
nioris — e, des Lombes, Quadratics lumbonun — 
€. du Mento7tf Depressor labii inferioris — e. du 
Pied, Extensor brevis digitorum pedis. 

CARRE AU, Tabes mesenterica. 

CJiRR&E, see Flexor longus digitorum pedis 
profundus perforans, (acceslorins.) 

C.iRRELET, (F.) Acus triangvla'ns, A 
straight needle, two or three inches long, the 
point of which is triangular; and which the 
ancients used in different operations. Also, a 
wooden, triangular frame for fixing a cloth 
through which different pharmaceutical prepa- 
rations are passed. 

CARROT, CANDT, Athamanta cretensis — 
c. Deadly, Thapsia — c. Plant, Daucus carota. 

CAR'TtfAMUS TINCTO'RIUS, Am'yron, 
Cnieus, Crocus German'ieus, Croeus Saraeen'' 
uius, Car'thamtim ojieinafrum, Car'duus sati'" 
vus, Safra'nufn, Saffron-flower, Saffiower,BaS' 
tard Saffron, Dyer's Saffron, (F.) Carthame, 
Safran b&tard, Carthame des Teintnriers. Pa- 
miif, Cynarocephalee. Sees. Sfst, Syngene- 
sis Polygamia squalis. The seeds are aroma^c, 
cathartic, and diuretic; yet to the parroquet 
they are an article of food, hence theii* name, 
Graines de Perroquet, The flowers, Ctt^tha- 
mus, (Ph. tJ. S.) are employed as a cosmetic, 
and are a reputed diaphoretic.[r] 
CARTHEGON, see Buxus. 
CAR'TILAGE, ChondroSf Car'tiiagQ, (F.) 



CARTILAGE ANONTUE 



154 



CASE 



Cartilage, A solid part of the animal bodT> of 
a medium consistence between bone and liga- 
ment, and which in the foetus is a substitute for 
bone, but in the adult exists only in the joints, 
at the extremities of the ribs, &c. Cartilages 
are of a whitish colour, flexible, compressible, 
and ver^ elastic, and some of them apparently 
inorganic. They are composed, according to 
J. Davy, of .44 albumen, .55 water, and .01 
phosphate of lime. 

CARTILAGE ANONYME, Cricoid, (car- 
tilage>--c. Epiglottic, Epiglottis — e. Muerane, 
Xii^oid Cartilage— c. Supra-arytenoid, Comi- 
culum lar]mgi8 — c. Tarsal, see Tarsus. 

Cartilaoxs, Articular, Ohdu'e^nt Car*" 
Hlitgesf invest bony surfaces, which are in con* 
tact ; hence they are called invsstimg or tn- 
erusting cartilages y (F.) Cartilages ds rsvhs" 
ment ou d'sturoi/temsnt, 

Cartilaces, Imtxrarticular, are such as 
are situate within the joints, as in the knee joint. 

Cartilages of Ossifica'tion are such as, in 
the progress of ossification, have to form an in- 
tegrant part of bones; as those of the long 
bones in the new-born infant. These are termed 
temporary; the others being perman&nt. All 
the cartilages, with the exception of the articu* 
lar, are surrounded by a membrane analogous 
to the periosteum, called Periehon'drium. 

Cartilaobs of the Ribs are, in some, re- 
spects, only prolongations of the ribs. Those 
of the nose, of the meatus auditorius, and Eu- 
stachian tube, present a similar arrangement. 
Other cartilages resemble a union of fibrous 
and cartilaginous textures; hence their name 
Fibr<HcartUagss» 

Cartilages, Semilunar, see Semilunar — c. 
Sigmoid, Semilunar cartilages. 

CARTILAGINES GUTTURALES, Aryte- 
noid cartilages— c. Semilunares, Semilunar car- 
tilages— c. Sigmoidese, Semilunar cartilages. 

Cartilaoinis AeyIxnoidaje Cafitulum, 
Comiculum laryngis. 

CARTILAGINOUS, Cartilagin'sus, Car- 
tilagino*suSyChondro*deSy CkondroVdss^ (F.) 
CartUaginsux, Belonging to, or resembling 
cartilage. 

Cartilaoikous, Tissins, see Tissue. 

CARTILAGO, Cartilage— c. Clypcalis, 
Thyroid cartilage — c. Ensiformis, Xiphoid car- 
tilage— c. Guttalis, Arytenoid cartilage— c. In- 
nominata, Cricoid---c. Mucronata, Xiphoid car- 
tilage^— c. Peltalis, Thyroid cartilage. Xiphoid 
cartilage — c. Scutiformis, Thyroid cartilage — 
c. Uvifer, Uvula— «. Xiphoides, Xiphoid carti- 
lage. 

CARUM, from Caria, a province of Asia. 
CaVmrM, Carvm Car*uly Carvi, CttnUfniim 
pratsn'se, CaruSf Car'wmj the Car'away^ (F.) 
Carviy Cumin dss prds. Family, Umbellife- 
rae. 8sx, Syst. Pentandria Digynia. The 
needs, Camaha'dioy Car'onay are carminative. 
Dose, gr. x. to 5ij, swallowed whole or bruised. 
The oil, Olsitm Car'uiy <F.) HuiU ds earvi, 
has the properties of the seeds. Dose, gu. ij 
to vj- 

CAR^UNCLE, Carun'culay diminutive of 
rsro, 'flesh.' A small portion of flesh, ;S0r^- 
ciotty Sareid'ium. A fleshy excrescence, — Ec- 
pky^maeamn^flttiayiF.) Caroncule. 

Caruncle, Camositat. 

Caruncles in the Urethra, Camosities. 

Carun'cula Lachrtka'lis, (F.) CaroncuU 



laerymaU, A small, reddish, follicular body, 
situate at the inner angle of the eye. It secretes 
a gummy substance. 

CARUNCULiE CUTICULARES, 
Nympha. 

1/ARVNOULjc Mamilla'reb. The extremities 
of the lactiferous tubes in the nipples. The ol- 
factory nerves (q. v.) have been so called by 
some. 

Carunculs Mtrtifor'mes, C. Vagina'Us, 
Glan^dtUa myrtifor'mesy (F.) Caroneules wtfr- 
tiformss. Small, reddish tubercles, more or 
less firm, of variable form, and uncertain nun- 
her, situate near the orifice of the vagina, and 
formed by the mucous membrane. I'hey are 
regarded as the remains of the h^tnen, 

Carunculs Papillarbs, Papills of the kid- 
ney. 

CARUN'CULOUS. Relating to caronclet 
or camosities. Carwt'eular. 

CARUON, Carum. 

CARUS, »a{of. Sopor earo'tieusy Profound 
sleep. The last degree of coma, with eompletr 
insensibility, which no stimulus can remove, 
even for a few instants. Sopor, Coma, Letkar- 
giay and Cams, are four degrees of the same 
condition. 

Carus Apoflxxia, Apoplexy— c. Asphyxia, 
Asphyxia— c. Catalepsia, Catalepsy — c. Ecsta- 
sis, Ecstasis— c. Hydrocephalus, Hydrocephalus 
intemus— c. ab Insolatione, Coup de soleil^-t. 
Lethargus, Lethargy — c. Lethargus catapbora. 
Somnolency — c. Lethargus vigil, C*oiiia vigil— 
c. Paralysis, Paralysis — c. Paralysis pBraplegia, 
Paraplegia — c. Vetemus, Lethargy. 

CARVI, Carum. 

CARTA, Jnglans regia— «• Basilica, Juglans 
regia. 

CARYEDON CATAGMA, see Fractore. 

CARYOCOSTINUM^Confectio scammonir. 

CARYOCOST'INUS. An electuarv pre- 
pared of the costns and other aromatic sub- 
stances, &c. It was cathartic. 

CARYON PONTICON, Corylus avellam 
(nut.) 

CARYOPHYLLA, Qeum nrbanum. 

CARYOPHYLLUM RUBRUM, Dianthas i 
caryophyllns. 

CARYOPHYLLUS AMERICANUS, see 
Myrtus pimentar— e. Aromaticus, Eugenia ca- ' 
ryophyllatar— c. Hortensis, Dianthus caryophyl- 
lus — c. Vulgaris, Geum urbanum. 

C ARYO'TI. The best kind of dates Galer. 

CAS RARE8y(¥.)y Rare eaites. This term 
is used, by the French, for pathologic^ facts, 
which vary from what is usual. See a cele- 
brated article under this head in the JHetton- 
noire des Seienees Midiealesy Vol. IV. 

CASAMUM, Cyclamen. 

CASAMUNAR, C'assumuniar. 

CAS'CARA,CASCARIL'LA. Spanish word* 
which^ignify karJk and little bark, under which 
appellations the bark (Cinchona) is known in 
Peru. They are now applied to the bark of 
Croton eascarilla. The bark gatherers are 
called CasearUUros, 

CASCARILLA, Croton casearilla. 

CASCHEU, Catechu. 

CASE, Ca^MOy Tkeeoy (F.) Caisse, This 
name is given to boxes for the preservation of 
instruments ; or for medicines necessary in boa- 
pital or other service. We say, e. gi — A ease 
of amptttatingy or of tfspasining instt 



CASEAEIUS 



155 



CASTOR BAY 



Cask, Casm*^ from catUr^y casum, ^to fall.' 
The condition of a patient; — as a eass offw^r, 
&c. {¥*) Observation. AlflOy the history of a 
disease. 

CASEARIUS, Cheesy. 

CA'SEIN, Casnns, Ca'seumy Galat/tiniy 
Caseous matter; from easeus, 'cheese.' The 
only nitrogenized constituent of milk. It is 
identical in composition with the chief consti- 
tuents of blood — fibrin and albumen, all being 
compounds of protein. A similar principle ex- 
ists in the vegetable. Vegetable Casein or Le- 
gu'min. It is chiefl^jT found in leguminous seeds 
— ^peas, beans, lentils. Like vegetable albu- 
men. Casein is soluble in water; and the solu- 
tion is not coagulable by heat. 

Casein, Blood, Globulin. 

CASEOSUS, Cheesy. 

CASEO0S MATTER, Casein. 

CASEUM, Casein. 

CASEUS, Cheese— c. Equinos, Hippace. 

CASEUXy Cheesy. 

CASHEW, Anacardium occidentale. 

CASfiOO. An aromatic drug of Hindusthan, 
said to possess pectoral virtues. 

CASHOW, Catechu. 

CASIA, Lauras cassia. 

CASMINA, Cassumuniar. 

CASSA, Thorax. 

CASSADA ROOT, Jatropha manihot. 

CASSAVA ROOT, Jatropha manihot. 

CASSE AROMATIQUEy Laums cassia^ 
c. en BdionSf Cassia fistula — e. en BoiSy Lau- 
ms cassift — e. des Boutiquesy Cassia fistula — «. 
Siniy Cassia senna. 

CASSE'LUNETTESy Cyannssegetum, Eu- 
phrasia officinalis. 

CASSEENA, Ilex vomitoria. 

CASSENOLES, see Quercus infectoria. 

CASSIA, Laums cassisr— c. Absus, Absus — 
c. Cinnamomea, Laurus cassia — c. Caryophyl- 
lata, Myrtus caryophyllata — c. Canella, Laums 
wmsia c. Egyptian, Cassia senna. 

Cas'^sia Fis'TULA, Cas^sia nigray Cassia Jis- 
tula^riSy C. AUxandri'nay Cannay Canna so' 
IntCvay Canna Jistulay Cathartoear'pusy Pur- 
suing Cassiay (F.) Casse Canefidery Casse en 
hitonsy Casse dee Boutiqves. The pulp of 
Cassia Fis'tvla or Cathartoear^pus Fistula; 
Pom. Leguminosae ; Sex. Syst. Decandria Mo- 
QOgynia, Pulpa Cas'siay Cassice Aramen'tumy 
Cassiet Fistulas Pulpay (Ph. U. S.), which is 
obtained in long pods, is black, bright, and 
!*hining ; sweet, slightly acid, and inodorous. It 
i« laxative in the dose of ;;iv. to ij. 

Cassia Lionba, Laurus cassiar— c. Lignea 
Ualabarica, Laurus cassia. 

Cassia Marilan'oica, Senna Americe^nay 
Ameriean Senna, Wild Senna, Locust planty 
(F.) Send d^Amcrique. The leaves of this 
plant are similar, in virtue, to the cassia senna. 
They, are, however, much inferior in strength. 

Cassia, Pukgiho, Cassia fistula. 

Cassia Senna. The name of the plant which 
aifiwds senna. It is yielded, however, by seve- 
ral species of the genus cassia. The leaves of 
tcona, Sennee Folia, Senna Alexandri'nay Sen- 
na Ital'ieay Senay Senna or JEgyptian Cassia, 
( F.) Siniy Casse S4ni, have a faint smell, and 

^Jttterish taste. Tbe active part, by some call- 
ed Cathartinsy is extracted by alcohol and wa- 
ter. Their activity is injured by boiling wa- 

^r. They are a hydragogue cathartic, and apt 



to gripe. Bose of the powder, g j. to ^. In- 
fusion is tbe best form. 

The varieties of senna, in commerce, are 
Tinnivelly Sennay Bomba/f/ or Common India 
Senna, Alexandrian SennayTripoli SennayWoA 
Aleppo Senna, 

C ASSL£ ARAMENTUM, see Cassia fistula 
— c. Fistuls pulpa, see Cassia fistula^-c. 
Flores, see Laurus cinnamomum. 

CASSIALA, Hyssopus. 

CASSIDE BLEUEy Scutellaria galericu- 
late. 

CASSINA, Ilex vomitoria. 

CASSINE, EVERGREEN, Ilex vomitoria. 

CASSIS, Ribes nigrum. 

CASSITEROS, Tin. 

CASSUMU NIAR, Casamu'nary Zenmbei, 
CasminayRisagony Ben'gall Indo'rumy Bengal 
Rooty (F.) Racine de Bengale. A root, ob- 
tained from the East Indies, in irregular slices 
of various forms ; some cut transversely, others 
longitudinally. It is an aromatic bitter, and is 
consequently tonic and stimulant. It was once 
considered a panacea, and has been referred to 
Zingiber Cassumuniar , and to Zingiber Zeruwk- 
bet. 

CASSUVIUM POMIFERUM, Anacardium 
occidentale. 

CAST, Caste. 

CASTANEA, Fagus castanea, see also Fa- 
gus castanea pumila— c. Equina, iBsculus Hip- 
pocastanum — c. Pumila, Fagus castanea pumlia. 

CASTE, Casty from (P.) Casta, <raca 
or lineage.' A name given, by the Poito- 
guese in India, to classes of society, divided ac- 
cording to occupations, and which have re- 
mained distinct from the earliest times. Hence 
a separate and fixed order or class. See Half- 
caste. 

CASTELLAMAREDI STABIA, WATERS 
OF. Castellamare di Stabia is a town in Na- 
ples, in the Principato Citra, 15 miles S. S. £. 
of Naples. There are two springs, the out 
sulphureous, the other chalybeate. 

CASTELLETTO ADONO, WATERS OF. 
These waters, situate near Acqui, in Italy, ate 
sulphureous. 

CASTERA-VIVENT, WATERS OF. Ca». 
tera-Vivent is a small village in the departmant 
of Gers, near which is a cold acidulous chaly- 
beate, and another which is sulphureous and' 
thermal. Temp. 84° Fahrenheit. 

CASTIOANS, i'orrigent. 

<;ASTIGLI0'NIA LOBATA, Pi^onsUU 
tree. A tree, which is cultivated insomepartsof 
Pern, and grows wild in abundance. Its bei 
tiful fruit, when roasted, has an agreeable I 
vour. When an incision is made into the i 
a clear bright liquid flows out, which, after 
some time, becomes black and horny-like. It 
is a very powerful caustic. 

CASTJOE, ( atechu. 

CASTLE-LEOD, WATERS OF. A sul- 
phureous spring in Ross-shire, Scotland, cele- 
brated for the cure of cutaneous and other dis- 



CASTOR BAY, Magnolia glaoca. 

Castor Fibkr, Fiber y Cams Pon'tiens, TW 
Beaver. (F.) Castor. It furnishes the Caitor. 
Rondelet recommends slippers made of its skin 
in gout. Its blood, wine, bile, and iat, ware 
formerly used in medicine. 

Castor Oil PianT, Ricinus communis. 



CASTOREUM 



IM 



CATAMEKIA 



CASTO'REITM, Casto^riwi^ CAHor, Caato- 
renmRos'sieiimet Canathn'sifaomita^rTmay <the 
beaver,* quasi yirT^j, from y«rtiiy * the belly,' 
be^Qseof the size of its belly; or it eastrando. 
A peculiar matter found in ba^, near the rec- 
tum of the beaver. Castor fiber. Its odotur is 
strong, nnpleatent, and peculiar ; taste bitter, 
subacrid ; and colour orange brown. It is an- 
tispasmodic, and often employed. Dose, gr. z. 
to^j. 

CASTORINA, from Castoreum, 'castor.' 
Medicines containing castor. 

CASTRAN6ULA, Scrophularia aquatiea. 

CA8TRAT, Castratns. 

CASTRA'TION, Castra*tto, Bc'ttmi, Ee- 
tom'iay Evira'tioy Exeattraftioy Ettstieula'tioy 
ExHrpa'tio tesHeulo'rum, DeUsta'tio, Exsee'tio 
virilium^ Eunuchia^mus^ Orehotom'ia^ Oreks- 
ot^om^, Orehidot'tmyy (F.) Chdtrure. The 
operation of removing the testicles. Some- 
tmies the term is employed for the operation 
when performed on one testicle , hence the di- 
vision into complete and incomplete castration. 
Castration renders the individual incapable of 
reproduction. 

CAS TRA TOy Castratus. 

CASTRATUS, (I.) Castrm'tOy Ectom'iusy 
Emaecula'tue, EviraftuSy Exeee^tusy Desee^tue, 
Exteaticula^tuSy InteHah'tlisy Inteeta'tusy Spa- 
doy Apoc'opu9y Bago'aSy from caetrare, * to cas- 
trate.' One deprived of testicles. {F.) Cnstraty 
Ckdtri, This privation has a great influence 
on the development of puberty. It is adopted 
to procure a clearer and sharper voice ; and in 
the East, the guardians of the Harem, for the 
sake of security, are converted into' Caetra'ti 
or Eu'nueksy tur«v/0j. Eunuchs have gene- 
rally both testes and penis removed. 

CASUS, Prolapsus, Symptom— c. Palpebne 
superioris, Blepharoptosis-^c. Uvulae, Staphy loe- 
dema. 

CAT A, KfltT*, * downwards ;* * after,' applied 
to time : at times, it gives additional force to the 
radical word. A common prefix, as in — 

CATAFASIS, from x*Ttf|»ai»«, « I descend.' 
An expulsion of humours downwards. Also, 
a descent,-l>e«00»'jiw, Descen'sioy as of the tes- 
ticles, Descen'sus tesHetUo'rvm. 

CATABLE^MA, xxra^^xi;^, (x^ra and jfa^- 
iicv,) * any thing let fall, as a curtain,' EpihW- 
ma, Perible'ma. The outermost bandage which 
secures the rest. 

CATABYTHISMOMA'NIA, from k*t*jJw. 
^^/K9c, < submersion,' and ueaiay * mania.' In- 
sanity, with a propensity to suicide by drown- 

CATACASMUS, Cupping, Scarification. 

CATACAUMA,Bum. 

CATACAUSIS, Combustion, human— c. 
Ebriosa, Combustion, human. 

CATACERAS'TICUS, from %*T*xt^a^^u,iiy 
*I temper,' *I correct.* The same as Epice^ 
raetieus, A medicine capable oi blunting the 
acrimony of humours. 

CATACHASMOS, Scarification. 

CATACHRISIS, Inunction. 

CATACHRISTON, Liniment. 
' CATACH'YSIS, Effu'sioy Perfu'sioy from 
xaLS»x'^9 ' I po^u* Upon.' Affusion with cold 
water. — Hippocrates. Decantation, (q. v.) 

CAT ACLASIS, from Koraxlatwy * I break 
to pieces.' Cam'pylum, Campylo'tis* Distor- 
tioD, or spasmodic fixation of the eyes ; spaa- 



modie oeeliiaioa of the ^fida \ Alio, fraetve 
of a bone^— Hippocrates, vogel. 

CATACLEIS'; from jrar«, ' beneath,' and 
KAffff, ' the clavicle.' This term has beea ap- 
plied to many parts, as to the first rib, the acro- 
mion, the joining of the sternum with tlK 
ribsy &e. 

CATACLEI'SIS, same etymon. Moi1)id 
union of the eyelids. 

CATACLYS'MUS,C«*«j/y/i»tf,CaftfWym, 
from tt^ranlvtuYy < to submerge, inundate/ A 
Clyster. Hippocr. Others mean, by the term, 
a shower-bath, or copious affusion of water; 
Caieeone'sis, Ablution, (q. v.) Douche^ (q. ▼.) 

CATiGONESIS, Catantlema, Cataclysfflu. 

CATAGAUNA, Cambogia. 

CATAGMA, Fracture — c. Fissura, Fisrore, 
see Contrafissura — c. Fractura, Fracture. 

CATAGMATICS, CatagmatHca rem'die, 
from Kctrmy/iay * fracture.' Remedies supposed 
to be capable of occasitming the formatios of 
callus. 

CATAGOGLOS"SUM, from xaraytr, «to 
draw down,' and yXwroAy 'the tongue.' An 
instrument for pressing down the tongue. See 
Glossocatochus 

CATAGRAPHOLOGIA, Phannacocatagn- 
phologia. 

CATALENTI A. Epilepsy, (q. v.) or some 
disease resembling it. — ^Paracelsus. 

CATALEPSIA SPURIA, EcsUsis. 

C AT'ALEPSY, CatalejtsiayCatalejfsisyCai'' 
oekBf Catfochusy Cafochi Gaie^ni, Morbus at- 
ton*itus Celsiy Hyste'ria eateUep*ticay CongtU- 
tioy Deten'tioy Enoatalep'sisy Apkonia^iJSai^ 
pocr.,) ^ntfttVftf— (Antlgenes,) Apprehen'aioy 
Contemplaftio, Stupor vig'UanSy Prekm'tio, 
Cams CcUalej/siay Oppre/sioy Comprehevfsio 
— (Gael. Aurelian.) Compren'eioyApoplez'ia Co- 
talep'siay from Korraxa/tt (fa^my *1 seize hold 
of.' Trance (T) (F.) Catalepsie. A disease in 
which there is sudden suspension of the action 
of the senses and of volition ; the limbs and 
trunk preserving the different positions giveo 
to them. It is a rare affection, but is seen, at 
times, as a form of hysteria. Some of the 
Greek writers have used the word in its tros 
acceptation of a seizurcy surprise, &c. 

CATALEPTIC, Catalep'tictiSy same ety- 
mon. Relating to catalepsy. Aflfected with 
catalepsy. 

Meth'odus Catalep^tica. The adtninistration 
of external agents when internal agents are in- 
applicable. 

CATALOT'IC, Catnlotrie7isyrtom Jtoraw**', 
< to break or grind down.' A remedy which 
removes unseemly cicatrices. 

CATAL'PA, C. Arbo'reoy Bigno'nia Catal- 
pay Catatpa Cordi/o'lia, C. Arbores'eens, Co- 
taw'ba tree. The decoction of the ]>ods of the 
Catalpa, an American tree, of the Nta, Fam- 
Bignoniaces, Didynamia Angiospermia, has 
been recommended in chronic nervous asthma. 

CATALTSIS, Paralysis, (q. v.) from nM.w, 
and Xvuty ' I dissolve or decompose.' The aetion 
of presence in producing decomposition; as 
when a body which possesses what has been 
termed catalytic force resolves other bodies into 
new compounds by mere contact or presence, 
without itself experiencing any modification. 

CATALYTIC FORCE, see Catalysis. 

CATAMENIA, Menses— c. Alba, Leocor- 
rhcea. 



CATAHENIORUM FLUXUS 



157 



CATABACT 



CATAMENIORUM FLUXUS IMMOPI- 
CI7S, Menorrhagia. 

CATANANCE, Cichorinm intybus. 

CATANGELOS, Ruscus. 

CATANTLE'MA, QatatuU^sis, from jtot*, 
'upon,' and arriUai, <I pour/ Cateone'tis and 
CaitBone'^s. Ablution with warm water. A 
fomentatioo. — MoschioUy Marcellus Empiricus. 

C AT APAS'M A, from ««t« rw^m, «I sprinkle.* 
Catapa**ti*my Consper'M, Epipas'ton^ JPasma, 
Stfnpas'ma^ Empas'ma, Diapas^ma, XerioHy 
Asp^r'sio, EpUpas^tttmj FvJvis atp^rso'rius, 
A compound medicinf , in the form of powder, 
employed by the ancients to sprinkle on ulcers, 
absorb perspiration, &c. — Paulus of .^gina. 

CATAPH'ORA, *a falV from xarafrte*, 'I 
throw down.' A state resembling sleep, with 
prlTation of feeling and voice. Somnolency, 
(q. T.) According to o&ers, Cataphora is 
simply a profound sleep, which it is difficult to 
rouse from — ^in this sense being synonyitaous 
with Sopor, (q. v.) 

Cataphoka Coma, see Apoplexy — c. Hydro- 
oephalica, see Apoplexy— c. Cymini, Theriaca 
LwidiBeosis — c. Magnetica, Somnambulism, 
magnetic. 

CATAPHRACTA, Caiaphreu/tes, a Cw- 
rtus, irom sarTa^p(Movtf, 'I fortify.' A name 
giren by Galea to a bandage applied round the 
thorax and shoulders. It was also called Quad' 

CATAPIESIS, Depression. 

CATAPINOSIS, Absorption. 

CATAP'LASIS, from xaT^TixM'irw, ^to be- 
smear.' The act of besmearing or overlaying 
with plaster. 

CATAPLASM, Cataptas'moy EpipUu'ma, 
B^Qs, Poultice f Puhice^ from xamnhaoanivy 
i*A<ra and War(rfi»,'to form or mould,') < to 
besmear.' (F.) Cataplasms . A medicine to be 
applied externally, under the form of a thick 
pap. Cataplasms are formed of various ingre- 
dients, and for different objects. They may be 
anodfuey emollUnt, torUcy antig^pticy irritating^ 
&c. A simple poultice acts only by virtue of 
its warmth and moisture. Meal, fatty sub- 
stances, leaves of plants, certain fruits, crumb 
of bread, &c., are the most common bases. 
The chief poultices which have been oflicinal 
are the following :^ — Anodyne, — c. Cicuts, 'c. 
Digitalis. Antiseptic — c. Carbonis, c. Dauci, 
c. Fermenti, c. Acetoss, c. cumini. Emol- 
lientf-^c. Lini, c. Panis, c. Mali maturi. Jr^ 
ritatingy — c. Sinapis, c. Sodii chloridi, c. 
Quercus Marini. Tonic and Astringent y — c. 
Alum, c. Goulard, c. Rosae. 

The Parisian Codex has some other officinal 
cataplasms. I. CcUapUts'maanod'ynttmytsaAe 
of poppy and hyoscyamus. 9. Cataplas'ma 
emaUiene, made of meal and pulps. 3. CatO" 
pUu'ma ad euppuratio*nem promoven'damy of 
palps and basiUcon. 4. Cataplas'ma rubefa*' 
dens vel antipleurifieum, formed of pepper 
and vinegar. 

The only cataplasms, the preparation of 
which it is important to describe, are the fol- 
lowing: 

Cataplasm, Alum, Coagulum Aluminosum. 
— c. of Beer grounds, see Cataplasma Fermenti. 
— c. Carrot, Cataplasma Dauci— c. Charcoal, 
Cataplasma carbonis ligni. 

CATAPLASMA BYNES, see C. Fermenti. 

Cataplas'ma Caebo'iiis Lighi, Charcoal 



Cataplasm or poultice. Made by adding pow- 
dered ekareeal to a common cataplasm. Used 
as an antiseptic to foul ulcers, &c. 

Cataplas'ma Dauci, Carrot Cataplasm or 
poultice. Made by boiliAg the root of the Car- 
rot until it is soft enough to form a poultice. 
Used in fetid ulcers. 

Cataplas'ma Fsculb Cbrevislb, see C. 
Fermenti. 

Catapuis'ma Fbamsnti, C efferves'cens, 
Teast Cataplasm or Foultiecy (F.) Cataplaeme 
de Levure. (Take of meal Ibj, yeast Ibss. Ex- 
pose to a gentle heat.) It is antiseptic, and a 
good application to bruises. A Cataplasm p/ 
Beer Grounds y Cataplasma Fes'eula Cerevie*i^, 
C, Bynesy is used in the same cases. 

Cataplas'ma Sima'pis, C Sina^peosy Sin'o- 
pism. Mustard Cataplasm or Poulticsy (F.) 
Cataplaeme de Moutard ou Sinapisms. {Mus- 
tard and Linseed meal or meal Aft equal parts. 
Warm vinegar or watery q. s.) A rubefacient 
and stimulant applied to the soles of the feet in 
coma, low typhus, &c., as well as to the pained 
part in rheumatism, &c. 

CATAPLEX'IS, Stvpory from jthtc, and 
nXt^evny <I strike.' The act of striking with 
amazement. Appearance of astonishment as 
exhibited by the eyes in particular. See Ha»- 
modia. 

CATAPOSIS, Deglutition. 

CATAPOTION, PUula. 

C ATAPSYX'IS, from %Ata^t^vymy * I refrige- 
rate.' Psripsyx'is. Considerable coldness of 
the body, without rigor and horripilatio. — Ga- 
len. Perfrietio. Coldness in the extreme 
parts of the limbs. — Hippocrates. 

CATAPTO'SIS, Deeidsn'tiay a fall. This 
word, at times, expresses the fall of a patient, 
attacked with epilepsy, (q. v.) or apoplexy^ at 
others, the sudden resolution of a paralytic limb. 

CATAPULTA VIRILIS, Penis. 

C AT APUTI A, MINOR,Ettphorbia lathyris, 
Ricinus communis. 

CAT'ARACT, Catarae'ta, Catarrhae'tay 
Suffu'sio Oc'uliy a. Lentis erystall'inay Pthar- 
ma eatarae'tay Cali'go lentis y Gutta opa'ea, Hy- 
poc'hymay Hypoc'hysisy Hypopk'ysisy Pkaeosec 
to'may Parop'sis catarac'tay Glauco*ma Woul- 
kou'siy/rom K9tTa#ar«'oiy (xata and ^aoofiir), <to 
tumble down.' A deprivation of sight, which 
comes on, as if a veil fell before the eves. Ca- 
taract consists in opacity of the crystalline lens 
or its capsule, which prevents the passage of 
the rays of light, and precludes vision. The 
causes are obscure. J)iagnosis^-^The patient 
is blind, the pupil seems closed by an opake 
body, of variable colour, but commonly whitish: 
— ^the pupil contracting and dilating. Cataracts 
have been divided, by some, into spurious and 
genuine. The form^ry where the obstacle to 
vision is between the capsule of the lens and 
the uvea: the latter, where it is in the lens or 
capsule. A lenticular cataract is where the 
affection is seated in the lens; — a cttpsular or 
membranous in the capsule. The capsular is 
divided again, by Beer, into the anterior, pos- 
teriory and complete capsular cataract. When 
the capsule is rendered opake, in consequence 
of an injury, which cuts or ruptures any part 
of it, it thickens, becomes leathery, and has 
been called Catarae'ta ar'ida sUiguo'sa. Ca- 
tara^ta Morgagnia'na laetea vel purifor'mis, 
is the milly variety, in which the crystalline 



CATARACT 



158 



CATARRHAL 



is tramformed into a liquid similar to milk, 
(F.)Ctttaraetelait$ute; or, as generally defined, 
in which there is opacity of the fluid situate be- 
tween the lens and its capsule. The eap'ttUo' 
Untie'ular affects both lens and capsule, and 
Beer conceives the liquor Morgagni, in an al- 
tered state, may contribute to it. Cataracts 
are also called stony, (F.) {pierreuse,) milky or 
ekeesy, {laiteuse o\i emsiuse, GeUctetoeatarae'ta, 
Catarattta laetie^olor,) according to their den- 
sity: — ^white, pearly, yellow, brown, gray, 
green, black, (F.) blanche, perU$y jaune, hrune, 
grite, verte, noire, according to their colour : — 
Jixed or vacillatifig,^-e€Uarae*ta eapsulo^enti' 
evia'rie Jixa vel trem'tUa, (¥.)Jixe ou branlante, 
according as tbey are fixed or movable behind 
the pupil. They are likewise called Catarae'- 
tee marmoTcl da, feneetreita, etella'ta, puneta'* 
tee, dimidia'tee, &c., according to the appear- 
ances they present. 

They may also be simple, or eomplieated with 
adhesion, amaurosis, specks, &c.; and primary 
or primitive, when opaJie before the operation; 
— seeotidary, when the opacity is the result of 
the operation. . 

Cataract is commonly a disease of elderly in- 
dividuals, although, not unfrequently, eongen'- 
ital. It forms slowly; objects are at first seen 
as through a mist; light bodies appear to fly 
before the eyes, and it is not until after months 
or years tbat the sight is wholly lost. No 
means will obviate the evil except an operation, 
which consists in removing the obstacle to the 
passage of the light to the retina. Four chief 
methods are employed for this purpose. 1. 
Couching or Depression, Hyalonix'is, Hyalo" 
nyx'is, (F.) Abedssement, Deplaeement de la 
Cataracte, This consists in passing a cataract 
needle through the sclerotica and subjacent 
membranes, a little above the transverse dia- 
meter of the eye; and at about two lines' dis- 
tance from the circumference of the transparent 
cornea, until the point arrives in the posterior 
chamber of the eye. With this the crystalline 
is depressed to the outer and lower part of the 
globe of the eye, where it is left. S. By ah- 
sorption^ — ^by the French termed broiement, or 
bruising. This is performed in the same man- 
ner as the former ; except that, instead of turn- 
ing the crystalline from the axis of the visual 
rays, it is divided by the cutting edge of the 
needle, and its fragments are scattered in the 
humours of the eye, where they are absorbed. 
3. By extraction, which consists in opening, 
with a particular kind of knife, the transparent 
cornea and the anterior portion of the capsule 
of the crystalline; and causing the lens to issue 
through the aperture. Each of the processes 
has its advantages and disadvantages, and all 
are used by surgeons. 4. Some, again, pass a 
cataract needle through the transparent cornea 
and pupil to the crystalline, and depress or 
cause its absorption. This is called Kerato- 
nyxis, which see. 

Cataract, Bi.ack, Amaurosis— c. Capsular, 
see Cataract~c. Capsulo-lenticular, see Cata- 
ract>-c. Central, Centradiaphanes-^. Cheesy, 
see Cataract— c. Congeniul, see Cataract— c. 
Complicated, see Cataract--^. Fixed, see Cata- 
ract— c. Grenuine, see Cataract — c. Lenticular, 
see Cataract— k:. Membranous, see Cataract — 
e. Milky, see Cataract — c. Opake, see Cataract 
— c. Primary, see Cataract— c. Primitive, see 



Cataract— «. Secondary, see Cataract— «. Sim- 
ple, see Cataract — c. Spurious, see Cataract — 
c. Stony, see Cataract— <;. Vacillating, aee Ca- 
taract. 

CATARACTA, Cataract— c. Arida sili- 
quosa, see Cataract — c. Capsulo-lenticularis, 
see Cataract— c. Centralis, Centradiaphanes — 
c. Dimidiata, see Cataract — c. Fenestrata, see 
Cataract — c. Glauca, Glaucoma— c.Lacticolor, 
Cataract, milky— c. Liquida, Hygrocatamcta— 
c. Marmoracea, see Cataract— c. Morgagniana, 
see Cataract— c. Nigra, Amaurosis — c. Punc- 
tata, see Cataract — c. Stellata, see Cataract. 

CA TARACTE,ABAISSEMENT DELA, 
see Cataract — e, Blanche, see Cataract — «. 
Branlante, see Cataract — e.Bruns, see Cataract 
— «. Casiuse, see Cataract — c, Deplaeement de 
/a, see Cataract — c, F»ic«, see Cataract — c. Orise, 
see Cataract — e. Jaune, see Cataract — e. Lm- 
teuse, see Cataract — c. Noire, Amaurosis, see 
Cataract — e, Perlee, see Cataract^-e. Piermue, 
see Cataract — c, Verte, see Cataract. 

CATARACTA, (F ,) Catarac'tus, Catarae'td 
vitia'tus. One affected with cataract. The 
French use this term, both for the eye affected 
with cataract and the patient himself. 

CAT ARIA, see Nepeta. 

CATARRH', Catar'rhus, Catar'rhopus, Co- 
tarrheu'ma, Rheuma, Defiux*io, Catastag'ma, 
Phlegmatorrhag"ia, Phiegmatorrhcs'a, from 
xfcra, 'downwards,' and (co, <I flow.' A dis- 
charge of fluid from a mucous membrane. The 
ancients considered catarrh as a simple flux, 
and not as an inflammation. Generally it par- 
takes of this character, however. Catarrh is, 
with us, usually restricted to inflammation 
of the mucous membrane of the air-passages: 
the French extend it to that of all mucous mem- 
branes. (^.)Flttx muqueux,Fiuxiofi eatarfhale. 

Catarrh, in the English sense, Bronehe-ca- 
tar'rhus, Pul*monary Catarrh, Lung fever, 
(vulgarly:) Rheuma Pee'toris, Destilla'tio Pec- 
toris, Catar'rhus Pee'toris, C. Pulmo*num, C. 
Pnlmona'lis, C. Bronchia'lis, Blennop'tysis, 
Tus'sis eatarrha'lis simplex,Grave*do (of many) 
Febris Catarrha'lis, Blcfiftotho'rax, Bronchi'- 
tie, Catar'rhus d Fri'gori, (F.) Catarrhe pnl- 
monaire, Pievre Catarrhale, Rhume de Poi' 
trine, a Cold, is a superficial inflammation of 
the mucous follicles of the trachea and bronchi. 
It is commonly an affection of but little conse- 

?[uence, but apt to relapse and become chrome* 
t is characterized by cough, thirst, lassitude, 
fever, watery eyes, with Increased secretion of 
mucus from the air-passages. The antiphlo- 
gistic regimen and time usually remove it.— 
Sometimes, the inflammation of the bronchial 
tubes is so great as to prove fatal. 

Catarrh, Acute, of the Utertts, see Me- 
tritis — c. Chronic, Bronchitis, (chronic)— -c. 
Dry, see Bronchitis— c. Pulmonary, Bronchitis, 
Catarrh— c. Rose, Fever, hay— <. Suffocating 
nervous, Asthma Thymicum— c. Summer, Fe- 
ver, hay. 

Catarrh', Eptdxm'ic, Catar'rhus epidem'- 
ieus, C a conta'gio, Rheuma epidem'ieum* Ca- 
tarrh prevailing owing to some particular Con- 
ttitutio aJtris, and affecting a whole country}— 
Influenza, (q. v.) 
CATARRHACTA, Cataract. 
C ATAR'RHAL, Catarrha'lis, Catarrhe'icHS, 
Catarrhoit'ieus, Catarrhoetficus, Relating to 
catarrh, — as Catarrhal Fever, ht, &c. 



CATARRBB AIOUE 2>E rUTERUS 159 



CATHARTIC 



CA TARRHE AIGTTE DE L'UTiRUS, see 
Metritis — «• Bueeal, Aphthae — c* Convulsiv^y 
Broarhitis — cGtutriguB, Gastritis — c GfttiureU, 
Cynanche tonsillaris — e, LttesHnaly Diarrhoea 
— c. Ijaryngien, Laryngitis — c. Nasal, Coryza 
— e, Oculairt, Ophthalniift— 6. d9 POreille, Otir- 
rhoea — c. Fkaryngien, Cynanche parotidea — e, 
Fittdteux, Bronchorrhcea — c. Pulnunudr*^ Ca- 
Urrh— «. Sw; see Bronchitis— «. Stomaeal, 
Ga8txx>rrhora. — e. Uttrin, Leucorrhcea — e» Veti' 
eaiy Cystorrhcea. 

CATARRHECTIC A, from Kara^iiyrvut,*! 
break down.' Remedies considered proper for 
e viLcoating ; — as dioretics^ cathartics, &c . Hip- 
pocrates. 

CATARRHEUMA, CaUrrh. 
CATARRHBUX, (F.) Catarrho'sua. One 
subject to catarrh; affected with catarrh. 

CATARRHEX'IA, Catarrhea/is ; same ety- 
mon as Caturrk$etiea : the action of Catarrhec- 
tlca. Also, efRision ; evacuation of the bowels. 
CATARRH£XIS, Catarrhexia, Excrement, 
(q. V.) — c. Vera, Hsmatochezia. 
CATARRHCEA, Rheumatism. 
CATARRHOET'ICUS, from jtatTaf^**, *I 
flow from.' An epithet for disease, produced 
hj a discharge of phlegm ; catarrhal. 

CATAR'RHOPA PHTMATA, from xaT«<- 
#o«-sc, ««T«^eviK>, * sloping downwards.' Tu- 
bercles tending downwards, or with their apices 
downwards. 
CATARRHOPHE, Absorption. 
CATARRHOPHESIS, Absorption. 
CATARRHOPIA, Catar*rkf»Uyfrom xara, 
* downwards,' and (oirii, < inclination.' An af- 
flux of fluids towards the inferior parts, and 
especially towards the viscera of the abdomen. 
The Greek word tn^oQ^mt* expresses an oppo- 
site phenomenon, or a tendency towards the 
upper parts. 
CATARRHOPUS, Catarrh. 
CATARRHOS'CHESIS, from k4»tocjoc, 'ca- 
tarrh,' and '^«r(c, 'suppression.' The su^ 
pression of a mucous discharge. 

CATARRHUS, Defluxion, Tussis— c. -ffisti- 
vus. Fever, hay—- c. Bellinsulanus, Cynanche 
parotidaeft — c. Bronchialis, Catarrh— c. Bron- 
chiorum. Bronchitis — c. i Contagio, Influenza 
--C. Epidemicus, Influenza, Catarrh, epidemic 
— c. Genitalium, Leucorrhcea — c. Gonorrhoea, 
Gonorrhfca— c. Intestinidis, Diarrhoea — c. La- 
ryngeus,Laryngo-catarrhus— c .ad Nares,Cory za 
— c. Nasalis, Coryzar— c. Pulmonalis, Catarrh 
— c. Pulmonum, Bronchitis, Catarrh---c. Seni- 
Ks, Bronchitis, (chronic) — c. Suffocativus Bar- 
badensis, C. trachealis — c. Trachealis, Laryngo- 
catarrhus — c. Urethras, Gonorrhoea pura— c. 
Crethralis, Gonorrhoea^-^cVesico, Cystorrhoea. 
CATARRHYSIS, Catarrhopia, Defluxion. 
CATARTI3IS, Catartismus. 
CATARTIS'MUS, Catar'tisit, from xarat" 
*nUiw, * to repair, replace.' The coaptation of 
a luxated or fractured bone, or hernia. 
CATASARCA, Anasarca. 
CATASCEITE, Structure. 
CATASCHASMUS, Bloodletting, Scarifica. 
tion. 
CATASTAGMUS, Catarrh, Coryza. 
CATASTALAGMUS, Coryza^ Distillation. 
CATASTALTICA, Haematostatica, Seda- 
tives. 

CATAS'TASIS, from xa^Km^pit, *l esta- 
blish.' The eoDstitutiony state, condition, &c. 



of any thing.— Hippocrates. Also the reduc- 
tion of a bone. See Constitution, and Habit of 
Body. 

C ATAT'ASIS, from ««T<Tiir», « I extend,' 
extension, (q. v.) The extension and reduc- 
tion of a fractured limb. — Hippocrates. 

CATATHLIPSIS, Oppression. 

CATAWBA TREE, Catalpa. 

CATAXIS, Fracture. 

CATCH FLY, Apocynum androssemifolium, 
Silene Virginica. 

CATCHUP, Ketchup. 

CAT'ECHU. The extract of various parts 
of the Aea'cia Caiftchu, Caat*ehu, an oriental 
tree. The drug is also called Terra Japon'iea, 
Extraeftum Catechu, Japan Earth, Casch^u, 
Oadtehu, Cashoio, Caitehu, Ceutjoe, Caeau, 
Cate, Kaath, Cuti, CtUeh, Colra, Sueeus Ja^ 
pon'ieus, (F.^ Caehou. It is a powerful as- 
tringent, and 18 used in diarrhoea, mtestinal hte- 
morrhage, &c. Dose gr. xv. to ,^ss in powder. 

CATBCHtr, SQtTARE, SCO Nsuclea gambir. 

C ATEIADION, from %ara, and im, <a blade 
of grass.' A long instrument, thrust into the 
nostrils to excite hemorrhage in headache. — 
Areteeos. 

CATENAE MUSCULUS, Tibialis anticus. 

CATEONESIS, Catantlema. 

CATGUT, Galega Yirginiana. 

CATHiG'RESIS, x«d«<$«0i(, < subtraction, di- 
minution.' Extenuation or exhaustion, owing 
to forced exercise. — Hippocrates. The action 
of catheretics <q. v.) 

CATHiERETICUS, Catheretic. 

CATHARETICUS, Cathartic. 

CATHARISMOS, Depuration. 

CATHAR'MA, P»r^am«n/'«m. The matter 
evacuated by a purgative, or by spontaneous 
purging : also, a catluirtic, (q. v.) 

CATHAR'MUS. Same etyinon; a purga- 
tion. — Hippocrates, Also, the cure of a lUs- 
ease by magic, &c. 

CATHAR'SIS, from xa&atQtiw, (ic«d' and 
atQttr, < to take away,') * to purge.' Furga'tio, 
Apoeathar^eis, Copropho'ria, Coprephore'sis* A 
natural or artificial purgation of any passage j — 
mouth, anus, vagina, &c. 

CATHARTIC, Cathar'Heus, Calhara'tieus, 
Cathar'ma, Coprocrit'ieum, Coprago'gum, Lus- 
tramen'tum, Purgant msdieomentum, Triehi' 
linm, Dejeeto'rittm Reme'dium, Eceathar'tieus, 
Hypactious, Hopoehoret^icus, Alvnm evacuans, 
Hypet'atos, Lapae'tieus, Apooathar*tieus . Same 
etymon. (F,)Cathartiqus, A medicine, which, 
when taken internally, increases the number of 
alvine evacuations. Some substances act upon 
the upper part of the intestinal canal, as calomel 
and eoloepnth; others, on the lower part, as 
aloes; and some on the whole extent, as saline 
purgatives. Hence a choice may be necessary. 
Cathartics are divided into purgatives and laxa- 
tives, (q. V.) The following is a list of the 
chief cathartics : 

Aloe, Cassia Marilandica, Colocynthis, Ela- 
terium, Gambogia, Hydiargyri Chloridum mite, 
Hydrargyrl Oxydum nigrum, Hydrarg. cum 
Magnesia, Jalapa, Juglans, Magnesia, Magne- 
sias Carbonas, Magnesias Sulphas, Manna, Man- 
nita. Oleum Euphorbias Lathyridis, Oleum Ri- 
cini, Oleum Tiglii, Podophyllum, Potassae Ace- 
tas, Potassae Bisulphas, Potassae Sulphas, Po- 
tassae Bitartras, Potassa Tartras,^eum Soam- 
monium, Senna, Sinapis, Sods et Potasss 



CATHARTlNi: 



169 



CAUDLE 



Tutras, Sodie Phoipbas, Sode Sulphu, Sodii 
Chloridum, Sulphur, Vcratria, Aque Minerales 
Sulphureae et Salinse, Enemata, Suppositoria. 

C ATHARTINE, aee Cassia Senna, and Con- 
Tolvulusjalapa. 

CATHARTIQUE, Cathartic. 

CATHARTOCARPUS, Cassia fistuU. 

CATHEDRA, Anus. 

CATHEMERINUS, Quotidian. 

CATHEMERU3, QnoUdian. 

CATHERETIC, Catharet'ieuwy Ectfiot'- 
ieuty Sareopk'agus, from k«^mu<iiv, <to eat,' 
< destroy.' Substances applied to warts, exu- 
berant granulatioBs, &c., to eat them down. 
Miid caustics. 

CATH'ETER, from Ka9iiif*t (xa6\ and tn,a, 
<to send,') <I explore.' JSfM'o, AVgalUy Co- 
thstc'risy Dcmissor, Immis'tor, A hollow tube, 
introduced by surgeons into the urinary blad- 
der, for the purpose of drawing off the oriae. 
Catheters are xnade of siWer or elastic gum. 
See Bougie. The French generally use the 
word caiictct for the solid sound or staff; and 
algralis and sonde for the hollow instrument. 

CATHETERIS, Catheter. 

CATHETERISIS, Catheterismus. 

CATHETERIS MUS, Cathcte'risis,CatketS' 
risa'tioj Cath'eterism^ Catheterixa'tion, Immis'- 
sio Catheteria, same etymon. The introduction 
of a catheter or sound into the bladder or Eusta- 
chian tube. Also probing a woimd. Melosis, 
(q. y.) 

CATHETERIZATION, Catheterismus. 

CATHID'RTSIS, from Ka^tdifva, <I place 
together.' Redoetion of a part to its natural 
situation. 

CATHMIA, Plumbi oxydum semi-yitreum. 

CATHMIR, Calamina. 

CATH'OLIC HUMOURS, (F.) Humeurs 
Cfttkoliguet, are the fluids sprMd oyer the whole 
body. 

CATHOLICON, Panacea. 

Catbol'icon DUPI.BX. An ancient, purging 
electuary, chiefly composed of cassia, tamarinds, 
rhubarb, senna, &e. 

CATHOLICUM, Panacea. 

C ATIL'LIA. A weight of nine ounces. 

CATILLUS, Cup. ♦ 

CATINUS FUSORIUS, Crucible. 

CATLING, Knife, double-edged. 

CATO,«aT»,*below,' 'beneath.' Thisword, 
in the writings of Hippocrates, is often used for 
the abdomen, especially the intestines. When 
he adyises a remedy xstroi, he means a purga- 
tive; when fltMv, aboye or upwards, an emetic. 
As a prefix, Cato means * beneath,' as in 

C ATOC ATHARTIC, Catoeathar'ticus,from 
««T0, < downwards,' and xa^« i^m, < I purge.' A 
medicine, which purges downwards. One that 
produces aJyine eyacuations. The antithesis to 
An€U!athartfe, 

CATOCHA GALENI, CaUlepsy. 

CAT'OCHE, Cat'oeheia^ Cafoehus, from 
jroTtjt'ef, <I retain,' <I hold fiist.' This word 
has, by some, been used synonymously with 
Catalepsy, (q. y.); by others, with Coma yigil; 
by others, with Tetanus. 

CATOCHUS, Catoche, Ecstasis— c. Cer- 
yinus. Tetanus — e. HolotonicuS» Tetanus— c. 
Infantum, Induration of the cellular tissue. 

CATOMIS^MOS, from mto, < beneath,' and 
oHcr, 'shoulder.' Svbkumera'tio, A mode 
with the ancients of reducing luxation of the 



humerus by raising the body by the ana.— 
Paulus of ^gina. 

CATOPTER, Speculum. 

CATOPTRIC EXAMINATION OF THE 
EYE. When a lighted candle is held beforo 
the eye, three images of it are seen — two erect, 
and one inyerted: — ^tfae former owing to reflec* 
tion from the cornea and anterior surface of tbe 
crystalline; the latter owing to reflection from 
the posterior layer of the crystalline. This 
mode of examining the eye has been proposed 
as a means of diagnosis netween cataract and 
amaurosis. In the latter, all the images tre 
seen. 

C ATOPTROM ANCT,from xffT07rr^,(iffrc, 
and oTiTo^ai,) * a mirror,' and /uct <rfia, ' diTin- 
tion.' A kind of diyination by means of a 
mirror. 

CATOPTRON, Speculum. 

CATORCHITES. A kind of aour wine, 
prepared with the orchis and black grape, sr 
dried figs. It was foroaerly employed as a diu- 
retic and emmenagogne.— Dioscorides. Called, 
also, Syeitfa. — Galen. 

CATORETICUS, Purgatiye. 

CATOTERICUS, Purgatiye. 

CATOTaCA,from«4T»,<beneath.' Diseaaea 
infecfmg udternal surfaces. Prayity of the fluids 
or emunctories, that open on the internal sur- 
faces of organs. The second order in the class 
Eeeritiea of Good. 

CATOX'YS, Peraeu*tusy from narct, 'an in- 
tensive,' and a^vr, * acute.' Highly acute; as 
Jtfbr5f«« Cataxft, M. PerAettius, a yery acute 
disease. 

CAT'S EYE, AMAUROTIC, see Amau- 
rotic. 

CATSFOOT, Antennana dioica. 

CATTAGAUMA, Cambogia. 

CATTITEROS, Tin. 

CATULOTICA, Cicatrisantia. 

CATU-TRIPALI, Piper longum. 

CAUCALOIDES, Patella. 

CAUCHEMARy Incubus. 

CAUCHEVIEILLE, Incubns. 

CAUCHUC, Caoutchouc. 

CAUDA, Coccyx, Penis. 

Cattda Eqvi'na. The spinal nmrrow, at its 
termination, about the 2d lumbar yertebra, 
giyes off a conaiderable number of nerres, 
wnich, when unrayelled, resemble a horse's 
tail, — hence the name; (F.) Qnme da Chemlf 
Q.dala Mo'eil* Apinilra . See Medulla spinalis. 

Cauda Salax, Penis. 

CAUDAL, Caudate, Cauda^lia, Canda'tua; 
from oauday <a tail.' Haying a tail or tail-like 
appendage: — as ^eattdai or caudate corpuaclea' 
— corpuscles having a tail-like appendage, as in 
cancerous growths. 

CAUDATIO. An extraordinary elongation 
of the clitoris. — Blasiua. 

CAUDATUS, Bicaudatus. 

CAUDIEZ, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Caudiez is a small town, nine leagues firom 
Perpignan, where there is a thermal spring, 
containing a little sulphate of soda and iron. 

CAUDLE : from (F.) chaftdy * warm or hot.' 
A nourishing gruel given to women during the 
childbed state. The following is a form for it: 
Into a pint of fine gruel, not thick, put, whilst it 
is boiling hot, the yolk of an egg beaten with 
sugar, and mixed with a large spoonful of cold 
water, a glass of wine, and nutmeg. Mix the 



CAUL 



161 



CAUSES, PHTSICAIi 



^htAe well together. Bnndy it semetimes 
Bobstituted for the wine, miul lemon peel or 
eapiilaire added. It ia alio sometimes made of 
groel and heer, with sugar and natmeg. 

CAUL, from (L.) eaulay <a fold,' JV/im, 
PiU'olus^ Ganea, VUtay (F.) Coefe, Coiff^— 
(Etr€ ni eo^f*-^' to be born with a caul.*') 
The English name for the omentum. Also, 
when a child is bom with the membranes 
over the face, it is said to have been << bom 
wtk eavi.** In the catalogue of superstitions, 
this is one of the favourable omens. The caul 
itself is sapposed to eonlier privileges upon the 
possessor ; hence the membranes are dried, and 
sometimes sold for a high price. See Epiploon. 

CAUL£1)0N, Sieye'dony from m»xoc, 'a 
stalk.' A transverse fracture. 

CAU'LIFLOWER, (G.) Kohl, 'cabbage,' 
and^fowr £7], Braasica Florida. 

Cauliflowbr Exobxb'cbrcx, EmerMcen'Ha 
SppluHt'ieay (F.) ChoujUur. A syphilitic ex- 
crescence, which appears about the origin of 
the mucous membranes, chiefly about the anus 
and vulva, and which resembles, in appearance, 
the head of the cauliflower. 

C AULIS, Penis--c. Florida, Brassica Florida. 

CAULOPHYL'LUM THALICTROI'DES, 
Lfon'tiei thalietrofdety Blueberry Cohosh, Co- 
49 yA, Cohuohy Slu$borry,Papoot$ Hoot, Squaw 
Root, Blue Ginsengy YtUow Oiusong', a plant 
of the Pamily BerberideaB; 8$x» Syst. Hezan- 
dria Monogynia, which grows all over the 
United States, flowering in May and June. 
The infusion of the root is much used by the 
Indiane in Tarious diseases. To it are ascribed 
emmenagogue and diaphoretic virtues. 

CAULOPLE'GIA, from navKoCf <the male 
or«an,' and xrxiix?, * a wound,' or * stroke.' An 
injury or paralysis of the male organ. 

CAULORRHAOIA, Stimatosis— c. Ejacu- 
latoria, Spermato-cystidoTrhagia-— c. StiUatitia, 
Urethrorrfaagia. 

CAULORRH(£A BENI6NA, Gonorrhna 
pora. 

CAULUS, Penis. 

CAUMA, jr«ufi«, <a burnt part,' from x<i», 
' I barn.' Great heat of the body or atmosphere. 
Synocha (q. t.) Empresma (q. v.) 

Cauma Bronchitis, C3rnanche trachealis — c. 
Carditis, Carditis>-c. Enteritis, Enteritis — c. 
Gastritis, Gastritis— c. HsDmorrhagicum, Ha- 
morrhagia activa— c. Hepatitis, tfepatitis — c. 
Ophthalmitis, Ophthalmia-~c. Peritonitis, Peri- 
Tinitis— c. Phrenitis, Phrenitis — c. Pieuritis, 
rieuritis^c. Podagricum, Gout— c Rheuma- 
ri^mos. Rheumatism, acute* 

C AUMATODES, Caumate'rut, from kovaca, 
* fire heat.' Burning hot. P«brt» paumato'des, 
F. causo'des. Inflammatory fever. S]mocha. 

CAUNGA, Areca. 

CAUSA CONJUNCTA, Cause, proximate— 
c. Continens, Cause, proximate. 

C AUSiE ABDIT^ Causes, predisponent or 
remote— >c. Actuales, Causes, occasional — c. 
PrapincipieBtes, Causes, procatarctic^c. Proe- 
rionensB, Causes, predisponent. 

CAUSE, Cau'sa, Ai'iia, Ai'tion. An act 
which precedes another, and seems to be a ne- 
c'^^sary condition for the occurrence of the 
Utter. The causes of disease are generally ex- 
tremely .obscure; although they, sometmies, 
>re evident enou^. The prtdispou&nt and oe- 
'oiionai causes are the only two, on which any 



stress can be laid ; but as authors have divided 
them differently, a short explanation is ! 



T; 



Auax, Ao'OESSOBT, (F.) Cause Aeeessoiro. 
One which has only a secondary influence in the 
production of disease. 

Causes, Accidknt'al, Common Causes, (F.) 
Causes Aeeidsnteiles, are those which act only 
in certain given conditions ; and which do not 
always produce the same disease. Cold, e. g., 
may be the accidental cause of pneumonia, 
rheumatism, &c. 

CAirSES CACBMES, C. occult— c. Com- 
mon, C. accidentid— c. Exciting, C. Occasional, 
— c. Essential, C. Specific — e. VetenninatUesy 
C. Specific — e. £loign6es, C. Predisponent. 

Causes, Extbrn'al, (F.) Causes extemss,tLn 
such as act externally to the individual i as air» 
cold, &e. 

CAUSES FORMELLESy (F.) are such as 
determine the form or kind of disease. They 
difller from the Causes matdriellesy which are 
common to a set of diseases ; as, to the neuroses, 
phlegmasis, &c. 

Causbs, Hidden, C. occult* 

Causes, Intern'al, (F.) Cm^es Intemss, are 
those which arise within the body;— as mental 
emotions, &c. 

Causes, Mechaic'ioal, (F.) Causes m^ea- 
niques, are those which act mechanically, as 
pressure upon the windpipe in inducing suflbca- 
tion. 

Causes, Neg'ativx, (F.) Causes negatives, 
comprise all those things, the privation of which 
may derange the functions ; — as abstinence too 
long continued. They are opposed to positive 
causes, which, of themselves, directly induce 
disease ; — as the use of indigestible food, spi- 
rituous drinks, &c. 

Causes, Obscure, C. occult. 

Causes, Occasion 'al. Exciting Causes, 
Causes actuaries, (F.) Causes oeeasionelles, 
are those which immediately produce disease. 
The occasional causes have be«i divided into 
the cogmssable and non-eognisable. — C J. B. 
Williams. 



I. Cognizable Agents ^ 
1. Mechanical. 
3. Chemical. 

3. Ingests. 

4. B(^ly exertion. 

5. Mental emotion. 

6. Excessive evacuation. 

7. Suppressed or defective eva- 

cuation. 

8. Defective cleanliness, venti- 

lation and draining. 

9. Temperature and changes. 



Exciting 
Causes 

OF 
DiSXASB. 



II. Non-Cogmzablo Agents, 

1. Endemic, i 

9. Epidemic. > Poisons. 

3. Infectious. ) 

Causes, Occult', Hiddsn causes, Obscure 
causes, (F.) Causes oeeultes on eaehees on o&- 
setires. Any causes with which we are unac- 
quainted ; also, certain inappreciable characters 
of the atmosphere, which give rise to epide- 
mics. 

Causes, Pkts'ioal, (F.) Causes Physiquss, 
— those which act by virtue of their physical 



CAX73E PROCHAJNE 



m 



CAVA 



pfopertieB; as form, hardness, fce. All wine- 
rating bodies belong to this class. 

Causes, Phtsiolog'^ical, (F.) Causes PAy- 
siologiqussy those which act only on living 
matter ; — narcotics, for example. 

Causes, Prbdispo'nbnt, Remote causes y 
Caus€B proigu'mena, Causa ob'dittB, Causa 
remo'tee ; (F.) Causes predisponanies. Causes 
iioignees, — ^those which render the body liable 
to duease. They may be general, affecting a 
number of people, or particular, affecting only 
one person. 

Causes, Prin'cipal, (F.) Causes prineipales 
— those which exert the chief influence on the 
production of disease, as distinguished from the 
accessory causes* 

Causes, Procatarc'tic, Causes proeatare'ti- 
eesj Causa prenncipien^tes, from v^oRtfTo^KTiitof ; 
* the origin or beginning of a thing,' (xaT(i^/«, 
<I beffin,' and n^o, < before.') These words 
have been used with different significations. 
Some have employed them synonymously with 
predisponeut or remote causes, others, with 
occasional or exciting causes • 

CAUSE PROCHAINE, C. proximate. 

Cause, Prox'imate, Causa prox'imaytXcon'- 
tincns vel eonjune'ta, (F.) Cause continente on 
proekaine, is the disease itself. Superabundance 
of blood, e. g., is the proximate cause of ple- 
thora. 

Causes, Remote, C. predisponent. 

Causes, Specif'ic, Essen'tial causes, ()re. (F.) 
Causes speeifiques^ C. essentielles, C, determi- 
nantes; those which always produce a determi- 
nate disease ; contagion, for example. 

CAUSIS, Burn, Ebullition, Fermentation, 
Incendium, Ustion. 

CAUSOMA, Inflammation. 

CAUSTIC, Caus'tieus, Cauteret'icus, Dim- 
ret*ieus, Ero'dcns, Adu'rens, Urens, Pyrot'ieus, 
from nAicD, * I bum.' (F.) Canstique. Bodies, 
which have the property of causticity; and 
which, consequently, burn or disorganize ani- 
mal substances. The word is also used sub- 
stantively. The most active are called Eseha- 
rot'ies. Caustics are also called < corrosives. 

Caustic Bearer, Porte-eaustiqus, 

CAirSTICA ADUSTIO, Cauterization. 

CAUSTICITY, Caustiif'itas, from Konrrri- 
K9f, « that which burns,' (ca»io, * I burn.') The 
impression which caustic bodies make on the 
organ of taste; or, more commonly, the pro- 
perty which distinguishes those bodies. 

CAUSTICOPHORUM, Porte-pierre. 

CAUSTICUM ALKALINUM, Potassafusa 
•— c. Americanum, Veratrum sabadilla-— c. An- 
timoniale, Antimonium muriatum-— c. Com- 
mune, Potassa fusa— c. Commune acerrimum, 
Potassa fusa— <. Commune fortius, Potassa cum 
calce — c. Lunare, Argent i nitras— c. Potentiale, 
Potassa fusa— c. Salinum, Potassa fusa. 

Causticum Commu'nI, Poten'tial Cau'tery, 
Common Caustic, Caute'riumpotentia*li, Lapis 
sep'ticus, Caus*ttcum commu'n^ mit'ius. This 
consists of quicklime and black soap, of each 
equal parts. 

CAUSTIQUE, Caustic. 

CAVS TIQTTE'PILHOS, see Powder, Vienna. 

CAUSTIQUE DE VIENNE, Powder, 
Vienna. 

CAUSUS, from naiu, «I bum.' A highly 
ardent fever; Deu*rens. Pinel regards it as a 
complication of bilious and inflammatory fever; 



Brousaais, as an iatense gastritis, accompanied 
with bilious symptoms. See Synocha. 

Causus, Emdbmial, of the West Indies, 
Fever, Yellow — c. Tropicus endemicus, Fever, 
yellow. 

CAUTER, Cauterium. 

CAUTkRE, Cauterium, Fonticnlus— e. Jii- 
kdrent. Inherent cautery. 

CAUTERETICUS, Caustic. 

CAUTERETS, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Cauterets is a bourg seven leagues from Bsrtgei 
(Hatues-Pyrenees,) France. The waters ire 
hydrosulphurous and thermal — temperature 133^ 
F. They are used in the same cases u the 
Bar6gea water. 

CAUTERIASMUS, Cauterization. 

C AUTE'RIUM, Cauterium attua'U, Caiaer, 
Cau'tery, Inusto'rium, Rupto'rium, Ignis at- 
tua'lis, from *atw^ *1 bum.' (F.) Cantirt^ 
Feu aetuel. A substance, used for <firiii|,' 
burning or disorganizing the parts to which it 
is applied. Cauteries were divided by the an- 
cients into actual and potential. The word is 
now restricted to the red-hot iron; or to positiTe 
burning. It was, formerly, much used for pre- 
venting hemorrhage from divided arteries; and 
also with the same views as a blister. Tbe 
term Poten'tial Cautery, Caute'riumpotentia'U, 
Ignis potentia'lis, (F.) Feu potentiel, was gene 
rally applied to the causticum comm u ne, (q. t.) 
but it IS now used synonymoosly with caustic 
in general. 

Cautire also means an issue. 

Cauterium Aotuale, Cauterium. 

CAUTERIZATION, Cauterisa'tio, CoMtu 
rias'mus, Exus'tio, Inus'tio, Caus'ticaAdus'tis* 
Firing. The effect of a cautery. The French, 
amongst whom cauterization is much used, dis- 
tinguish five kinds: 1. CautirUation Ink^rentt, 
which consists in applying the actual caaterj 
freely, and with a certam degree of force, so as 
to disorganize deeply. 3. Cauterisation trant-^ 
currents, which consists in passing the edge (A 
the Cautire cultellaire, or the point of the Cat»- 
tire conique lightly, so as not to disorganixe 
deeply. 3. Cauterisation par pointes, which 
consists in applying on the skin, here and ther(>, 
the hot point of the conical cautery, with suffi- 
cient force to cauterize the whole thickness of 
the skin. 4. Cauterisation lente, slow eautm- 
xation, by means of the moxa. 5. Cauteris^' 
tion objective, which consists in holding the 
cautery at some distance from the part to he 
acted upon by it. 

To Cau'tbrizb; Caustico adurert; (F.) 
Cautiriser, To apply the cautery. To bum 
with a cautery. 

CAUTERY, Cauterium— c. Potential, Caus- 
ticum commune. 

CAVA, Vulva. 

Cava Vena, Vena kepati'tes. The hollow 
or deep-seated vein. (F.) Veine cave, A name 
given to the two great veins of the body, which 
meet at the right auricle of the heart. The 
vena cava supe'rior, thorac"iea vel descen'dens, 
is formed by the union of the subclavians; and 
receives successively, before its termination at 
the upper part of the right auricle, the inferior 
thyroid, right internal mammary, superior dia- 
phragmatic, azygos, &c. The vena cava infe'- 
rior, abdomina'lis vel aseen'dens, arises from 
the union of the two primary iliaes, opposite 
the fourth or fifth lumbar vertebra, receives the 



CAVATIO 



163 



CEBIPARA 



midiU sacral, lumbar, rigkt spermatic, he- 
patic, and inferior diapkragm»tifs, and opens 
at the posterior and inferior part of the right 
anricle. 

CAVATIO, Cavity. 

CAVEA, Cavity— c. Narinm, Narea. 

CAVER'NA, Antrum. *A cavern.' This 
term has been used for the female organs of 
generation. See Cavity, and Vulva. 

Cavsbna Nariuv, Nares. 

CAVERNiE DENTIUM, Alveoli dentium 
— c. Frontis, Frontal Sinuses. 

CAVERNEUX, Cavernous. 

CAVERNOUS, Cavemo'sus, (F.) Caver- 
neux. Filled with small cavities or caverns,— 
as a sponge. 

Cav£R]iocs Boniss, Cor^pora Cavemos^a of 
the penis, Cor'pora nervo'sa, C Ner^veo-spoU' 
gio'sa Penis, (F.) Corps Cavemeux. The cor- 
pus cavemosum is a kind of cylindrical sac, se- 
parated, through its whole extent, by a vertical, 
mcomplete septum; and forming nearly two- 
thirds of the penis. The corpus cavemosum, 
on each side, arises from the ascending portion 
of the ischium, and terminates obtusely behind 
the glans. The arteries of the corpora caver- 
nosa come from the internal pudic. See Heli- 
cine Arteries. Nerves are found on the surfhce 
of the outer membrane, but they do not appear 
to penetiate the substance. 

J. Miller's researches have led him to infer, 
that both in man and the horse, the nerves of 
the corpora cavernosa are made up of branches 
proceeding from the organic as well as the ani- 
mal system, whilst the nerves of animal life alone 
provide the nerves of sensation of the penis. 

Cavernous Bodies, Corpora Cavernosa of 
the Clitoris, are two hollow crura, forming the 
clitoris. 

CAVEEHors Body of the Vagina, Corpus 
Cavemo'sum Vagi*nee, Plexus retiform'is, is a 
substance, composed of blood-vessels and cells, 
similar to those of the penis and clitoris, which 
covers the outer extremity of the vagina, on 
each side. It serves to contract the entrance 
to the vagina during coition. 

Caveenous Respiration, (F.) When a ca- 
vity exists in the lungs, and one or more rami- 
fications of the bronchia terminate in it, a loud 
tubal noise is emitted, provided the cavity be 
not filled with fluid, which is called cavernous 
respiration. In this condition the cough is ra- 
r«moK4 likewise. (F .)Toux Cavemeuse, When 
the capacity of the cavern is very great, the 
sound of respiration is like that produced by 
blowing into a decanter, with the mouth at a 
little distance from the neck. This kind of ca- 
vernous respiration has been called amphoric, 
from amphora, < a flask;' (F.) Respiration am- 
pkorique, SouJU amphorique, S» metallique. 

The Veiled Puff, (F.) SouJU voili, is a mo- 
dification of the cavernous respiration, in which, 
according to Laennec, "sl sort of movable veil 
interposed between the excavation and the ear " 
seems to be agitated to and firo. It is a sign 
which is not attended to. 

CAVERNors ^iws. Sinus Cavemo'sus, Sinus 
polymor^phus seu Rereptae'ulum, 8, sphenoidalis, 
Reeapta&nlum sellm equi'nm ItU'eribus appos'i' 
turn, (F.) Sinus cavemeux. The Cav'emous 
Si'nuses are venous cavities of the dura mater, 
filled with a multitude of reddish, soft filaments, 
inteiaecting each other; and, as it weri^ reticu- 



lated. They commence behind the inner part 
of the sphenoid fissure, pass backwards on the 
sides of the fossa pituitaria, and terminate by 
opening into a cavity, common to the superior 
and inferior petrosal sinuses. They receive 
some meningeal veins, the ophthalmic veins, 
&c. The anterior extremity of each cavernous 
sinus has been named the ophthal'mie sinus, 

Cav'brnovs Texture or Tissue, (F.) Tissu 
eavemeux. The spongy substance which forms 
the greater part of the penis and clitoris. It 
seems to consist of a very complicated lace- 
work of arteries and veins; and, probably, of 
nervous filaments, with small fibrous plates, 
which form by their decussation numerous cells 
communicating with each other. This spongy 
texture produces erection, by dilating and swell- 
ing on the influx of blood; and probably, also, 
by virtue of some property inherent in it. 

CAVIALE, Caviare. 

CAVIARE', Caviar, Caviale, Kaviae. A 
culinary preparation, much used by certain 
people, and made on the shores of the Black 
and Caspian Sea, from the roe of the sturgeon, 
mixed with salt and other condiments. 

CAVIC'ULA, Cavil'la, from eavus, 'hol- 
low.' The ankle, or space between the mal- 
leoli. Some have given this name to the os 
cuneiforme. See Astragalus. 

CAVICULiE PEDIS NODUS, Tarsus. 

CAVILLA, Astragalus, Cavicula. 

CAVITAS ANTROSA AURIS, Tympanum 
—c, Buccinata, Cochlea^-c. Cochleata, Coch- 
lea. * 

Cav'itJI Ellip'tica, Ampul'la. A dilata- 
tion at one end of the semicircular canals of the 
ear. 

Cavitas Humeri Glenoioes, see Glenoid — 
c. Narium, Nares — c. Oculi, Orbit — c. Oris, 
Mouth — c. PulpsB, see Tooth. 

CAVITATES CEREBRI, Ventricles of the 
brain — c. Durae matris, Sinuses of the dura ma- 
ter— c. Innominatae, Auricles of the heart— c. 
Interscapulares, see Interscapularis. 

CAVIT&, Cavity— c. JDentaire, Dental cavi- 
ty — e. des epiploons, see Peritonaeum — r. dn 
Tympan, Tympanum. 

CAVITY, Cav'itas, Cavum,Caslotes, Colon, 
Ca'vea, Caver'va, Cava'tio, ( F . ) Caviti, 
Every thing hollow, as the cranium, mouth, 
nasal fossae, &c. 

Cavities, Splanchnic, (F.) Caw>«« splanch- 
niques, are those which contain the viscera. 
They are three in number ; — the cranium, 
chest, and abdomen. The cavities of bones, 
connected with joints or otherwise, are de- 
scribed vender their particular denominations. 

CAVUM, Cavity — c. Abdominis, see Abdo- 
men. 

Cavum Cra'nii, Venter Supre'mus, The 
cavity formed by the proper bones of the cra- 
nium. 

Cavum Dentis, see Tooth— c. Narium, Nares 
— c. Oris, Mouth — c. Tympani, Tympanum. 

CAYAN, Pfaaseolns Creticus. 

CAZABI, Jatropha manihot. 

CEANOTHOS, Cirsium arvensc. 

CEANOTHUS AMERICANUS, Celaatrus. 

CEAR, Heart. 

CEASMA, Fissure. 

CEBI GALLPN^. The liver of the fowl, 
bruised.— Castelli. 

CEBIP'ARA. A large Brazilian tree» whose 



GSCX8 



16i 



CELLITLOBE 



bitter and astringent bark is used in making 
anti-rheumatic batha and fonaentations* 

C£C£S, Bee Querciualba. 

ClCITAy C9citai. 

CEDAR, RED, Junipenia Vixginiana. 

CEDEIA, Embalming. 

CEDMA, Anearifm, Variz. 

CED'MATA, ysa/4«T«. Rhewnatic pains of 
tbe joints, especiaUy of the hips, groin or geni- 
tal organs. A form of goat or rbeiMnatiam> 

CEDRAT^ Citrus medica. 

CEDRELE'UM, from xtiQocy * the cedar,' and 
f iUtfvv, < oil.' The oil of cedar .^Pliny. 

CE'DRI A, C^driumy Ce'drimum^ Ctdri Uuk'- 
rymo, AlJhitran, The oil or resin which flows 
from the cedar of Lebanoo. It was supposed 
to possess great virtues. Hippocr., Foesius, 
Scribonius Largus, Dioscorides. It has been 
supposed to be the same as the pyroUgneous 
acid. See Pinus SyWestris. 

CE'DRINUM YINUM, Cedar Wine. . A 
wine prepared bj steeping half a pound of 
bruised cedar berries in six French pints of 
sweet wine. It is diuretic and subastrmgent. 

CEDRITES, from xia^e;, <the cedar.' A 
wine prepared from the resin of cedar and 
sweet wine. It was formerly employed as a 
vermifuge, &c. 

CEDRIUM, Cedria. 

CEDROMELA, see Citrus medica« 

CEDRONELLA, Melissa. 

CEDROS, Juniperus lycta. 

CEDROSTIS, Bryonia alba. 

CEDRUS BACCIFERA, Juniperus sabina. 

CEINTUREy Cingulum, Herpes zoster. 

CEINTURE BLANCHE J>E LA CHO- 
ROi'DE, Ciliary ligament. 

CEINTURE DARTREUSB, Herpes sos- 
ter — e. de JSildane^ Cingulum Hildani-^tf. de 
Vif Argent, Cingulum mercuriale. 

CELANDINE, Impatiens— <. Common, Che- 
lidonum majus->-c. Lesser, Ranunculus ficaria. 

CELAS'TRUS, Celas'tut, Ceano'tkue Ame- 
riea'nusy New Jersey Tea, Red Root, Used 
by the American Indians, in the same manner 
as lobelia, for the cure of syphilis. It is slightly 
bitter and somewhat astringent. A strong in- 
fusion of the dried leaves and seeds has been 
recommended in aphthae, and as a gargle in 
scarlatina. 

GELATION, (F.) Concealment, from eelare, 
< to conceal.' A word used by French medico- 
legal writers for cases where there has been 
concealment of pregnancy or delivery. 

CELE, Riiiii, < a tumour, protrusion, or rup- 
ture ;' a very common suffix, as in hydrocele, 
bubonocele, &c. See Hernia. 

CEL'ERY, (F.) Celeri. The English name 
for a variety of Apium graveolens, (q. v.) 

CELETA, see Hernial. 

CELIA, Cerevisia. 

C^LIAQUA, Cajliac. 

CELIS, xnU(, ' a spot, a stain.' A wutotda 
(q. V.) or spot on the skin. 

CELL, Cella, A small cavity. The same 
s^ification as Cellule (q. v.) 

Cell, Apoplectic, see Apoplectic cell— c. 
Bronchic, Cellule, bronchic — c. Calcigerous, 
see Tooth. 

Cell, Epider'mic. The cells or corpuscles 
that cover the free membranous surfaces of the 
body, and which form the epidermis and epithe- 
lium, are termed ' epidermic edit.* They are 



developed from germs fumldied by the vit^ 
cent membrane. 

Cell, Fat, see Fatty vesicles— c. Germ, Cj- 
toblast — c. Germinal, see Cytobltst— <. Nu- 
cleated, see Cytoblast. 

Ckli. Lifx. The life which is posieswdby 
the separate cells that form the tissues, and by 
which the nutrition of the tissues is pressmad 
to be effected. 

Cell, Pigment* Pigment cells are mingled 
with the epidermic cells, and are most manifegt 
in the coloured races. They are best sees od 
the inner surface of the choroid of the eje, 
where they form the figmentum nigrum* 

CELLA TURCICA, Sella Turcica. 

CELLULA, Cellule. 

CELLUL^ see Colon— c. Mednllam, we 
Medullary membrane — c. Pulmonales, Celinki 
broncfaii, see Pulmo^^^:. Bmnrhicm, see Cel- 
lule. 

CELtULAR, CeUtdafHs, Cellu'lesut, (f-) 
Cellulaire. Composed of cells or cellules, from 
cella or eellnla, * a cell.' 

Cel'lular Meh'brane, Me9t6re^na celM- 
*a, M, Cellvla'ris, — M. adipo'sa, fingutdivJ- 
89, of some, JPanni^ulue adtpo*eue,-^}im- 
brane formed of cellular tissue, (F.) Membrm 
eellulairt. Generally used for the tisrne it- 
self. 

Cel'lulak Ststex. The wh<de of the cel- 
lular tissue of the human body. 

CxLLVLAE Tissue, Tela eeUula'ris^ T. oetfs- 
lo'ea, T. Hippoc^ratie erihro*»a, EthwjffU^rt- 
tieula'ted, fUamsntoua, laminated, crih'nform, 
porous, are'olar, andin««o«9 Tissue, Reticular 
or cellular substanee, Contex'tus cellmle'tm, 
(F.) Tissu eellulaire, retieuU, lamineux, tri- 
bleux, porewc, arMaire, mu^usu^p, ^e,, if the 
most common of all the organic tissues. A]» 
tomists do not agree regarding its intimate 
structure. It seems to contain cellules or ir- 
regular areolsB between the fibres and platm; 
as well as serum, ht, and tbe adipous tissot. 
The cellular tissue or texture unites ever? pirt 
of the body ; determines its shape, and by its 
elasticity and contractility, and by the floid 
which it contains in its cells, facilitates the mo- 
tion of parts on each other. 

Cellular tissue has been divided by anatomiib 
into the external, general or common cellular 
tissue — terius eellula'risinterme'dius walexMy 
which does not penetrate the organs,-— the cel- 
lular texture which forms the envelopes of or- 
gans — teaPtus eellula'ris strictu$: and that which 
penetrates into the organ8> accompanying and 
enveloping all their parts, — the teaetus eeUule'- 
ris stipa'tus, constituting the basis of all the 
organs. It has likewise been termed Tesm 
organ'ieus seu parenehyma^lis. 

Cellular Tissue of Bones, see (J^ancelli. 

CEL'LULE, CeVlula, diminutive oi etUa, 
«a cavity.' A small cavity. (F.)CelluU. Cel- 
lules are the small cavities between the lamin* 
of the cellular tissue, corpora cavernosa, kc, 

CELLULips or Cells, Beokchic, Ctl'l^* 
Bron'chieee seu Pulmona'Us, Pori pulme'numy 
Vesie'ula pulmonales. The air-cells of ^^ 
lungs. See Pulmo. 

CELLULES BRONCJSIQUES, Bronchial 
cells. 

CELLULITIS VENENATA, see Wound. 

CELXUL08E, same etymon as CW/«/*. 
The substance which is left after tbe action 



CELLULOSUS 



165 



CENTIUBIAPHAinSS 



upon aoy kM of Testable tiaaae of such sol- 
vents as are fitted to dissolve out the matter 
deposited in its cavities and interstices. It has 
been aflhrmed, that the timicated or ascidian 
molliisca have, in their integuments, a consi- 
derable quantity of it. 

CELLULOSUS, Cellokr. 

GELOLOG^'IA, from K17A17, < rapture/ and 
Ujty * a discourse.' The doctrine of hernia. 
A treatise on hernia. 

CELOSO'MUS, from xiili?, <a rupture,' and 
9mpMy * body.' A monster in which the trnnk 
is uniformed, and eventration or displacement 
Gf the viscera exists. 

CELOTES, see Hernial. 

CE1.OT0M1A, JCeiotom*mj (kloeon^, from 
jrijlij, «a rupture,' and xtnYury *to cut' An 
operation, formerly employed for the radical 
core of inguinal hernia; which consisted, prin- 
cipally, in passing a ligature round the hernial 
sac and spermatic vessels. It necessarily oe- 
easioned atrophy and loss of the testicle; and 
did not secure the patient against the return 
of the disease. The intestines were, of cotirse, 
not included in the ligature. Also, the opera- 
tion for hernia in general, — Semiot'omy, 

CELOTOMUS, same etymon. Hemiofo- 
mtfcff. A knife used in the operation for hernia. 
Adjectively, it means relating to celotomy, like 
Celoiotmfieut* 

CELSA. A term, nsed by Paracelsus for a 
cntaneotn disease, dependent, according to him, 
on a fiilse or heterogeneous spirit or vapour, 
<xyncealed under the integuments, and endea- 
vouring \xi escape. Perl^ps the disease was 
XhtieartA, 

CELSUS, METHOD OF, see Lithotomy. 

CEMBRO rrUTS, see Pinus cembra. 

CEMENT. A glutinous substance intro- 
duced into a carious tooth to prevent the access 
of air or other extraneous matters. The follow- 
ing is an example : (^r. Sandarae, ^ij ; Mastieh, 
Ji; Sit<riH. gr. X. ^ther, gi; Dissolve with 
Uieaid of beat.) 

CEMENTERIUM, Crucible. 

CEMENTUM, see Tooth. 

CENANGIA, Ceneangia. 

OENCHRON, Panicum miliaceum. 

CENDRA, Cineritious. 

CBNDRE DU LEVANT, Soda. 

CENDRES GfiAVUL^ES, see Potash— 
c. 44 Sarmsnt, see Potash. 

CENEANGI'A, CmangVa, from «twc, 
'empty,' and «yrew, <a vessel.' Inanition, 
Empty state of vessels. — Galen. 

CENEMBATE'SIS, from wwf, « empty,' 
and lufkurto, *\ enter.' Paracentesis, (q. v.) 
AIfo, the act of probing a wound or cavity ; 
Melo'aiit. 

CENEONES, Flanks. 

CENIGDAM, Ceniplam* 

CENIGOTAM, Ceniplam. 

CENIPLAM, CetUgdaniy Cenigotam, Ceni^ 
foiam. The name of an instrument anciently 
vsed for opening the head in epilepsy. — Para- 
celsus. 

CENIPOTAM, Ceniplam. 

CENOSIS, from xtvof, < empty.' Ine'tis, 
Imthmos. Evacuation. It is sometimes em- 
ployed synonymously with inanition, (q. v.) 
and oppo^ to repletion ; — EitinaiiU"tio, 

CENOT'ICA, from xtvu^ir, 'evacuation.' 
Diseasesaffecting the fluids. Morbid discharges 



or excess, deficiency or irregularity of such as 
are natural. The first order, class Oeneiica, of 
Good; also. Drastics, (q. v.) 

CENTAU'REA BEHEN, Beken Mad, ^- 
hin albums White Behen. Ord. Geatiaaee. 
Astringent. 

Centau'ksa BsNEnio'TA, Car'dufM b^nedu^^ 
tu0y Cnieus Bylves'trisy Cniew beTudic'tus, 
Cardiohot'anum, BUssed or Moiy Thistle, (F.) 
Chardon hinit, Pam, Cynarocephalen. flf«tr. 
Syst. Svngenesia Polvgamia frustranea. A 
strong decoction of the herb is emetic:— a 
strong infiision, diajAoretic (T) j a light infusion, 
tonic and stomachic. Dose, gr. xv. to aj* of 
powder. 

CawTATj'nEA CALOrrRA'PA, Caidira'pa, Col* 
eairep'pola, Car'duus solMiUa'Us, Carduvs 
ttella'tusy Ja'eta romons'aimay Caeotrih^ulus, 
Caleitrap'pa stella'toy Stetla'ta mpi'na. Cm- 
tau'rea steila'ta, Common Star-Tkiatle, Star^ 
Knapweed, (F.) Centauri^ iUnlie, Chardon 
itoUi, Chauaeetrappe, Pigwrole. It is pos- 
sessed of tonic i^operties, and has been given 
in intermittents, dyspepsia, fcc. It is not much 
used. 

CENTAxraK A CiB,mK\}'uxvm,Rhapon'Hcum vtU- 
ga'rl, Cetaavrium magnufi^ Centaurium ma- 
jua. Cheater Cen'taury, Centaurium tr^na'li, 
(F.) Centaurie grands. It is a bitter; and 
was formerly used as a tonic, especially the 
root. 

CairTAtr'RBA Cr'Airre, Cy'anue, Bine bottle, 
Com-Jlower, {T,)BUwelle, BlavMe,Blavirolle. 
The flowers were once much used as a cordial, 
tonic, &c. They are now forgotten. 

Cbntaurxa Stkllata, Centauree calcitrapa. 

CENTAURAE ATOIL&E, Centaurea calci- 
trapa — «. Grande, Centaurea centaurium — e. 
Petite, Chironia centaurium. 

CENTAUREUM, Chironia centaurium. 

CENTAURIS, Chironia centaurium. 

CENTAURIUM MAGNUM, Centaurea cen- 
taurium— c. Minus vulgare, Chironia centau- 
riun>— c. Officinale, Centaurea centaurium — r. 
Parvum, Chironia centaurium. 

CENTAURY, AMERICAN, Chironia angu- 
l*""i»— «• Greater, Centaurea centaurium— c. 
Lesser, Chironia centaurium. 

CENTESIS, Paracentesis, Puncture. 

CENTIGRAMME, (F.) from centum, 'a 
hundred,' and /^o^m*, 'gramme.' Cwuigram'- 
ma. The hundredth part of a gramme. A 
centigramme is equal to about the fifth part of 
a French grain, gr. .1544, Troy. 

CENTILITRE, Centili'tra, from eentum, 
*a hundred,' and Xnga, * litre.' An ancient Greek 
measure for liquids:— the hundredth part of a 
litre— equal to nearly ten grammes or a spoon- 
ful. 2.7053 fluidrachms. 

CENTIMkTRE, CenHm*eter; the hundredth 
part of a metre— equal to about four lines. 
.3937 English inch. 

CENTIMORBIA, Lysinuichia nunmiularia. 

CENTINERVIA, Plantago. 

CENTINODE, Polygonum aviculare. 

CENTINODIA, Polygonum aviculare. 

CENTO VIRGIN ALIS, Hymen. 

CENTRADIAPH'ANES, Catarae'ta centra'- 
lie, from xfVT^or, 'centre,' a privative, and 
9ta<^rfif, 'transparent.' Cataract owin<» to 
obscurity of the central portion of the crystal- 
line. 



CENTRAL ARTEBT 



lee 



CEPEALANTHUS 



CENTRAL ARTERY OF THE RETINA, 
ArU'ria Centra'lis Ret'in9y Central ArUry of 
Zinn, This artery is given oflf from tlie arto- 
ria ophthalmica, an 1 penetrates the optic nerve 
a little behind the hall of the eye ; running in 
the axis of the nerve, and spreading out into 
many small branches upon the inside of the re- 
tina. When the nerve is cut across near the 
eye, the orifice of the divided artery is observ- 
aole. This was formerly called Porus Op'ti- 
eua. 

CENTRE OF ACTION. The viscus in 
which the whole or a great part of any func- 
tion is executed, and to which several other 
organs contribute. Thus, the vital activity 
seems to be wholly centred in the stomach, 
during chymification; in the duodenum, during 
chylilcation. In like manner, the uterus be- 
comes a centre of action during gestation. 

CBRTas, Epioas'tric. The ganglions and 
nervous plexuses, formed by the great sympa- 
thetic and pneumogastric nerves, in the epi- 
gastrium, around the celiac artery; where the 
impressions received from various parts of the 
body seem to be centred. 

Cbnteb of Flux'ion. The part towards 
which fluidf are particularly attracted. An 
irritated organ is said to be a centre of fluxion. 

CxNTRss, Naavous, (F.) Centres nerveux. 
The organs, whence the nerves originate; as 
the brain and spinal marrow. 

Cbmteb, Oval, Centrum Ova'li,C. O, Vieue- 
te'mij Tegiimen'tum ventrieulo'rum eer'ebri, — 
When the two hemispheres of the brain are 
sliced away, till on a level with the corpus cal- 
losum, the medullary part in each is of an oval 
.ihape: hence called centrum ovali minus, (F.) 
renire meduUaire hemisphiral. The two cen- 
tres of the opposite sides, together with the 
corpus calloBum, form the centrum ovali of 
Vieus'ssns* Vieussens supposed all the medul- 
lary fibres to issue from that point, and that it 
was the great dispensatory of the animal spi- 
rits. 

Cbntrb, Phrbhic, Ten'dinous Centre of the 
Di'apkragmy Centrum Phren'teum^ C. Ner*- 
ffflMW or C TefulifUi'sum seu tendin^eum, (F.) 
Centre phrinique ou C. tendineux du Dia- 
pkragme. The central aponeurosis or eordiform 
tendon of the diaphragm. 

Cbntrb of . Stmpathet'ic Irradu'tions, 
( F.) Centre d* irradiations sympatkiques. Any 
organ, which excites, sympathetically, the ac- 
tion of other organs, more or less distant from 
it; and with which it seems to have no imme- 
diate communication. — ^Marjolin. 

Cbntrb, Tendinous, of thb Diaphraom, 
Centre, phrenic. 

CENTROMYRINE, Ruscus. 

CENTRUM COMMUNE, Solar plexus— c. 
Nerveum, Centre, phrenic— c. Ovale, Centre, 
oval — c. Ovale minus, see Centre, oval— c. 
Ovale of Vieussens, Centre, oval — c. Semicir- 
ftulare geminum, Tsnia semidrcuhtris—^. 
Teodinosum, Centre, phrenic. 

GENTRY, Chironia angularis. 

CENTUM CAPITA, Eryngium campestre. 

CENTUMNODIA, Polygonum aviculare. 

CSPA ASCALONICA, Bulbus escalentns, 
Echalotte. 

CRPiEA, Veronica beccabunga. 

CEPUiELIS IPECACUANHA, Ipecaca- 



CEPHAL^'A, Beadache, <F.) Cepkalit, 
from jit<paii7, 'head.' Sonfe use the term sy- 
nonymously with cephalalgia. Others, for a 
periodical headache: — others, again, for a mors 
violent headache than cephalalgia implies; and 
others for a chronic headache. The last wai 
its ancient signification. 

CephcUa'a spasmod^ica, Cephnlal'gia spas- 
mod'iea, C, Nausea' sa, Siek-headaeke, is chs- 
racterized by partial, spasmodic pain; oftea 
shilling from one part of the head to another : 
chiefly commencing in the morning, with sick- 
ness and faintness. It is extremely apt to re- 
cur, notwithstanding every care. 

Cbfhalaa Arthritic a, CephalagT«r—c. He- 
micipania, Hemicranisr-c. Nauseosa, Spasmo- 
dica — c. Pulsatilis, Crotaphe. 

CEPHALiEMATO'MA, from m^om, 
* head,' and ^at/^y ' blood ;' Tumor Capitis 
sanguin'eus nsonato'rum, Cephalopky'moy Cro- 
nioh^maton'cus. A sanguineous tumour, some- 
times developed between the pericranium and 
the bones of the head of new-bom children. 
Similar tumours are met with occasionally 
above other bones, and at all periods of exist- 
ence. 

CEPHALiE'MIA, Byperes'mia cer'ehn, E, 
Capfiiis, EneepkaloksBmia, (F.) Hyperemis oa 
CoTigestion du eerveau, En^epkalokemie, B. 
cirebrale, Congestion ceribrale, AccumuIatiQn 
of blood in the vessels of the brain. 

CEPHALAGO'GUS, Cepkaloduc'tor, Capi- 
tiduc'toTj from M^lq, * head,' and ax«r^> * * 
leader, a driver.' An instrument used for 
drawing down the foetal head. 

CEPH'ALAGRA, from xt^alij, <the head,' 
and ayQu, < seizure.' Cephales'a artkritieoy 
Meningi*tis arthHt'iea. Gout in the head. 

CEPHALAGRATHIA, from xt^altiy <the 
head,' and yj^'fiiy <a description.' An anato- 
mical description of the head. 

CEPHALAL'GIA, Cephalopo'nioy CopkaU- 
dyn'ia, Encephalodyn'ia, Bomonopa^gioy from 
iTf qiaiw, * the head,' and aky^c, ' pain.' FurejAo 
lal'gia. Dolor Cap'itis, D, eephal'iens. Soda, 
Pain in the head ; Headache^ (F.) Ciphalalgie, 
Mai a the. Every kind of headache, whether 
symptomatic or idiopathic, is a cephalalgia. It 
is ordinarily symptomatic, and has to be treated 
accordingly. 

Cephalalgia Contagiosa, Influenza— -c. In- 
flammatoria, Phrenitis. 

Cephalalgia Period 'ic a, Pehris intormit- 
tens eephal'iea larva' ta, IrUerwuttent Jkeastaehe. 
Headache which returns periodically; properly, 
perhaps, a form of neuralgia, (q. v.) 

Cephalalgia Pulsatilis, Crotaphe — c. 
Spasmodica, see Cephalaea. 

CEPHALALOG'IA, from »«9«aij, *the 
head,' and I'^y^f, ' a discourse.' An anatoooica! 
dissertation on the bead. 

CAPBALANTBE D'AM£RIQUE, Ca- 
phalanthus occidentalis. 

CEPHALAN'THUS OCCIDENTAO-IS, 
Buttonwood shrub, Bnttonhush, White Ball, 
Little Snowball, Swampwoody Pond Dogtp^odt 
Globejlower, (F.) Cephala7ahe d^Ameriquo, 
Bois de Marais. An ornamental shrub, Nat. 
Ord. RubiacesB ; Sex. Syst. Tetrandria Mono- 
gynia, which grows all over the United States, 
near streams and ponds, and flowers in July 
and August. The bark of the root has been 
used as an antiperiodic tonic. 



CEPHALARTICA 



167 CERAT BLANC ou DE G ALIEN 



CEPHALARTICA, Cephalic remedies. 

CEPHALATOMIA, Cepkalotom'ia^ from 
jTf^axt;, * the head,' and ri^tt it, < to cut.' Ana- 
tomy, or dissection, or opening of the head. 

CEPHALE, Head. 

CEPHALIC, Cephal'icus, Capiflis, from 
ft«^«xi;, ' the head.' (F.) Cepkaliyue. Relating 
to the head. 

CsniAL'ic Rbm'edies, Cephatica vel Capi- 
n^lia rtme'dia, are remedies capable of reliev- 
ing affections of the head, especially headache : 
— Cephalar'tica. 

Cephal'ic VKiif, Vena Cephal*iea,Vena Cap^- 
kiSf (T.) Veins cipkalique^ Veins radial» euta- 
nee of Chaussier. The great superficial vein at 
the outer part of the arm and forearm. It be- 
gins on the back of the hand, by a number of 
radicles, which unite into a single trunk, called 
the Cepikalie of the Thumb, CephtWiea Pol'H- 
dsj (F.) Veins eephaligue du pouee. It ascends 
along the anterior and outer part of the fore- 
arm, where it forms the auperfieial radial. At 
the fold of the elbow it receives the median ce- 
phaiie, ascends along the outer edge of the bi- 
ceps, and opens into the axillary vein. 

The name Cepkalie was given to it by the 
ancients, because they thought it had some con- 
nexion with the bead, and that blood-letting 
oq^t to be performed on it, in head affections. 

Chaussier calls the internal jugular, Veine 
e^pkaiiqusy and the primary or common carotid, 
Art^e eifJknliqus, 

CEPHALIDIUM, see Caput. 

CEPHALI^NG. The base or itMt of the 
toogoe. — Gorrsus. 

CEPHALIS, see Caput. 

CEPHALITIS, Phrenitis. 

CEPHALIUM, see Caput. 

CEPHAL0DU<;T0R, Cephalagogus. 

CEPHALODYNIA, Cephalalgia. 

CEPHALCEDEMA, Hydrocephalus. 

CEPHALOID, Encephaloid. 

CEPHALOMA, Encephaloid. 

CEPHALO-MENINGITIS, Meningo-cepha- 
Htis. 

CEPHALOM'ETER, from Kiq»axi7, nhe 
head/ and ^trcior, < measure.' An instrument 
for measuring the different dimensions of the 
ketal head, during the process of accouchement. 
A kind of forceps. 

CEPHALON'OSUS, from M9if^ri, < thehead,' 
and yoa«r, < disease.' This term has been ap- 
plied to the Fehria Hungar^iea^ in which the 
head was much affected. See Fever, Hunga- 
ric. Others have so called any cerebral disease 
or fever. 

CEPHAL0PA6ES, Symphyocephalu^. 

CEPH' ALO-PHARYNGiE'irS, from x«<p«;i», 
' the head,' and fc^vyS, ' the pharynx :' belong- 
iiig to the head and pharynx. Winslow has 
t^ven this name to the portion of the eonetrictor 
fkaryngie superior, (q. v.) which is attached, 
above, to the inferior surface of the basilary 
process of the os occipitis. The Cephfalo-pha^ 
rjng^ai Aponeuro'sie is a thin, fibrous mem- 
brane, which is attached to the basilary process, 
sad gives insertion to the fibres of the eonetrictor 
*»perior pharipiffie* 

CEPHALOPHYMA, Cephalsmatoma. 

CEPHALOPONIA, (Cephalalgia. 

CEPHALO-RACHIDIAN, Cephalo-spinal. 

E P H'A L 0-SPIN AL, Cepkaia^pina'Us, 
^•fk'alo^aehid^ian^ CeiUro^spinal, Crumo^pi' 



nal, A hybrid term from »• (^xji, < head,' and 
spina, * spine.' Belonging to the head and spine. 

Ceph'alo-spiwal Fluid, Cephiilo-rtiehid'ian 
Jluid, Cerobro-spinal fluid, Fla'idum cer'ebro^ 
spina'le, is an exhaled fluid, which is found be* 
neath the arachnoid, wherever pia mater exists 
in connexion with the brain andspioal cord. It 
seems to have a protecting office, and to keep 
up a certain degree of pressure on the organ, — 
at least in the spinal canal. 

CEPHALOTHORACOSTERU'MENUS, 
from xttfxX^, < head,' Bmea^, * the chest,' and 
VTtptir, * to rob.' A monster without head or 
chest. 

CEPHALOTOM'IA, Eccephalosis. 

OMPHALOTRIBE, (F.) An instrument 
invented by Baudelocque, the nephew, for 
crushing the head of the fetus in utero ; from 
jfty-ii;, <the head,' and -r^*/?*', * I bruise.' It 
consists of a strong forceps, the blades of which 
are solid : 16 lines broad, and 3 thick. The 
handles are perforated at their extremity to re- 
ceive a screw with three threads, the direction 
of which is very oblique, so as to allow great 
rapidity of rotation, and the screw is mov^ by 
a wincb 6 inches long, to increase the force of 
the pressure. The bones of the head are easily 
crushed by it. 

CEPHALOTRYPESIS, Trepanning. 

CEPHALOXIA, Torticollis. 

CEPULLA, Allium cepa. 

CER, Heart. 

CERA FLAVA et CERA ALBA, Ceroe, 
Telio^a and White Wax, (F.) Cire Jauns et 
Blanche, An animal substance prepared by 
the bee, and by some plants, as the Cerox'ylon 
and Myri'ea ceriftra* Its colour is yellow, and 
smell like that of honey, but both are lost by 
bleaching. It is demulcent and emollient; is 
sometimes given in the form of emulsion, in 
diarrhoea and dysentery, but is chiefly used in 
cerates and ointments. 

CER^'^, from ki^k;, 'a horn,' irf^Mi. 
The Cornua of the uterus, (q. v.>---Rufus of 
Ephesus. 

CERAMIC EyCfraWu'^, from *i^«Atec, « pot- 
ter's earth.' A sort of earth used as a cata- 
plasm in peripneumony. — Hippocrates. 

CERA MI UM, Amphora— €. Helmintho- 
chortus, Corallina Corsicana. 

CERAMNIUM, Amphora. 

CERAMURIA, see Urine. 

CERANTHEMUS, Propolis. 

CERAS, ii»^«c. * genitive,* ci^arof, 'horn,' 
Comu, (q. y.) : also, the Cornea (q. v.) Hence, 
Ceratertomia, Ceratoeele, &c. 

CERASION, see Prunus cerasus. 

CERAS'MA, from Kip^fw/i/, < to mix :' 
something mixed. A mixture of hot and cold 
water. Metarerae'ma, — Gorraeus. 

CERASUM, see Prunus cerasus. 

CERASUS AVIUM, Prunus avium— «. 
Laurocerasus, Prunus laurocerasua — c. Padus, 
Prunus Padus— c. Racemosus sylvestris, Pru- 
nus padus — c. Serotina, Prunus Yirginiaoa — c. 
Virginiana, Prunus Virginiana. 

C£RAT BLJINC ou DE G ALIEN, Cera- 
turn Galeni — r. de Blanc de Baleine, Ceratom 
cetacei — c, de Goulard, Ceratum plumbi — e. 
pour lea lAvree, Cerate for the lips — cdsplomb 
rompose, Ceratum plumbi compositum — c, de 
Savon, Ceratum Saponis — c. de SnraUtats de 
plomh. Centum plumbi supeiacetatis. 



CERATE 



168 



GE&ATUH 



CE'RATE, C^ra'tam^ from »w«c, I*at. wra, 
*waac,' CereleB'umy Ctro'ma^ Csro'nium, Cam'- 
tum, Ceraiomalag'ma, (F.) Cerat. A eompo- 
sitioQ of wax, oil, or lard, without other ingre- 
dients. 

Ceratx, Simple Cerate, Cera'twm, Cera'tttm 
simplex, P. L. (F^ Cirai Simple. {Yellow 
vax ^iv, olive oil 5iv.) It is applied as an 
emollient to excoriations, &c. 

Ceratb of CA.i,'AminK,Cera*tumCalami*nm, 
C. Carbona*tie xinei impu'ri, C. Zinci Carho- 
n»*tis, (Ph. U. S.) Cera'tum lap'idis Calami' 
fuifris, Cere^tum epnlot^ieum, Cerate of Carbo^ 
note of ZinCf Turfter^e Cerate, Healing Salve, 
(F.) Cerat de Pierre Calamdnaire, C. de Cala^ 
mine, C» (Zinei Carbon, preepar, Ceree Jlavce, 
fta Ibss. adipis,Vb\y Melt the wax and lard to- 
gether, and, on cooling, add the carbonate of 
sine and stir till cool.— Ph. IJ. S.) 

Cerate of Canthar'ides, Cera'tum Can^ 
thar'idis. Blister Ointment, Ointment of Spe^ 
rush Fliee, Unguen'tum ad veeieato'ria, Un- 
guen'twn PtU'veris Mel'oi^ veaieato'rii, Vng, 
epispas'tieum for'tius, Cera'tum Lytta, fF.) 
Cerat de Cantkarides, {Spermaceti eerate ^vj, 
Cantkarides in powder, zj. The cerate being 
softened by heat, stir in the flies.) This cerate 
of the European Pharmacopceias is used to keep 
blisters, issues, &c., open. See Unguentum 
Lyttas. For the cerate of Spanish flies of the 
U. S. Pharmacopoeia, (see Emplastnim Lytts.) 

Cerate, Gtoulard's, Ceratum Plnmbi com- 
positum. 

Cerate, Eirklano's Neutral. (DiaekyL 
^viij, olive oil 3^iv, prepared ekalk |^iy : when 
nearly cool, add Acet. dest, ^iv, plumb, supere^- 
eet, 3iij.) A cooling emollient. 

Cerate or Poma'tum for the Lips, Cera'- 
turn labia'19 rubrum, Pomma'tum ad labia de- 
muleen'da. — Ph. P. C^.) Cerat ou pommade 
pour lee llvree, (Wax 9 parts ; oil 16 parts; — 
coloured with Manet,) 

Cerate, Lead, Compound, Ceratum plumbi 
eompositum. 

Cerate, Marshall's. (Palm oil ^i, calo- 
mel HJj, sugar of lead §8S, oitUmcnt of nitrate 
£»/i»wr<»ry 5ij.) « „ . 

Cerate, Resin, Compound, Ceratum Reams 
eompositum — c. Savine, Ceratum sabinse — c. 
Soap, Ceratum saponis— ^. Spermaceti, Ceratum 
cetacei— c. of Superacetate or sugar of lead, Ce- 
ratum plumbi Buperacetatis— c. Turner's, Ce- 
rate of calamine — c. of Carbonate of zinc. Ce- 
rate of calamine. 

CERATECTOMIA, from xi^ac, <the cor- 
nea,' and cxrofcop, <cut out.' An incision 
through the cornea. See Ceratotomia. 

CERAT I A, Ceratonium siliqua. 

CERATI'ASIS; from jr«poc,* horn.' Amor- 
bid condition characterized by corneous growths. 

CERATION, Siliqua. 

CERATI'TIS, from xijof, 'the cornea,' and 
itis, ' inflammation.' Inflammation of the cor- 
nea, Cerati'tis, CeratodeVtis, Ceratomeningi'tis, 
Comei'tis, Inflamma'tio eor'neee, 

CERATIUM, Ceratonium siliqua. 

CER'ATO, in composition, in the names of 
muscles, is used for the cornua of the os hy- 
oides; — as Cerato>glossus. 

CERATOCE'LE, Aquula, XTva'tio, Promi- 
nen'tia Cor'nea, Hernia Cor'nea, Ceratodeoee'U, 
from xif « f , ' horn,' and xrjXri, * tumour.' A pro- 
trusion of the transparent cornea, or rather of 



the membrane of the aqueous humour through 
an opening in the cornea. 

CERATODEITIS, Ceratitk. 

CERATODEOCELE, Ceiatocele. 

CERATODEONYXIS, Ceratonyxis. 

CERAT0DE8 MEMBRANA, Cornea. 

CERATOGLOS'SUS, Keratoglos'sus, from 
xt^tt, < horn,' and yJ^e-a-x, ' the tongue.' A mus- 
cle, extending from the great coma of the os 
hyoides to the base of the tongue. It is a put 
of the hyoglossus, (q. v.) 

CERATOIDES, Cornea. 

CERATOLEUCOMA, Leuooma. 

CERATO'MA, Cerato'sis, from ftt$a(,<bQiiL' 
A horny growth, or homy formation. 

CERATO-MALAOMA, Cerate. 

CERATO-MENINGITIS, Ceratitis. 

CERATO-MENINX, Cornea. 

CERATO'NIA SILIQUA. TheCarebTm, 
Cera'tium, Ceraftia, Sil'igua duleis, Can'ha 
Alnabati, the Sfoeetpod, (F.) CarouUer (Fruit, 
Carouge.) This — the fruit of the CeratonU 
siliqua^iB mucilaginous, and employed in de* 
coction, where mucilages are indicated. 

CERATONYXIS, KeratonytCis, Cersteiefh 
nyx'is, from Kti^ac, 'the cornea,' and ?ti0v»/I 
puncture.' An operation by which the cry^ 
talline is depressed by means of a needle intro- 
duced into the eye through the cornea. Some 
divide the crystalline into fragments with the 
needle, and leave them to the action of the tb- 
sorbents. The operation is as old as the i7tb 
century. 

CER'ATO-PHARYNGE'US, Ker'ate-Pie^ 
rpnge'us, from xt^ar, <horn,' and ^{vrl, 'the 
pharjmx.' The great and smaH Cer'oto-fk't' 
rynge'i are small fleshy bundles, forming part 
of the Hyopkaryngeus of Winslow. 

CERATOPLAS'TICE, from ki{<«, «tiie cor- 
nea,' and jrxMtf-Tiirof , ' forming, formative.' Tbe 
operation for the formation of an artificial cor- 
nea. It has not been practised on man. 

CERATORRHEX'IS,li«;*f*'ra cor'nea^frm 
jrt^o^, <the cornea,' and ^ulicy * rupture.' Rop- 
ture of the cornea. 

CERATOSIS, Ceratoma. 

CER'ATO- ST APHYLI'NUS, Ker'ato-tt^^ 
pkyli'nus, from xifSf, *horn,' and irTa^viif, *th? 
uvula.' Some fleshy fibres of the TkyroSts- 
pkylinus of Winslow. 

CERATOTOM'I A, Ceratectom'ia,fTom tt^u 
•cornea,' and rtfifi*, «to cut.* Section of th$ 
transparent cornea* This incision is used in 
the operation for cataract, to give exit to piu 
effused in the eye, in case of h3rpopyon, &c. 

CERATOT'OMUS, Keratot'omus, Kerar- 
omus, from «?<<, * cornea,' and rt^ #»«»,* to cot.' 
A name given by Wenzel to his knLfe for di- 
viding the transparent cornea, in the operation 
for cataract. Many modifications of the iastni- 
ment have been made since Wenzel's time. 
See Knife, cataract. 

CERATUM, Cerate— c. Album, Ceratom 
cetacei, Ceratum C^leni^. de Alth»A, Unguen- 
tum de AlthseA — c. Calaminae, Cerate of Ca- 
lamine— c. Cantharidis, Cerate of Cantharides, 
Emplastrum Lyttie — c. de CerussS, Unguentam 
plumbi subcarbonatis. 

Cbra'tith Ceta'cei, Cera'tum spermaretiy 
Cera'tum album, Cera'tum simplex, C, Crft, 
Unguen'tum adipoce'ra eeto'mm, lAnimen'tum 
album, Emplas'trum Sperm'atis Ceti, Sperma- 
ceti Cerate, (F.) Cirat de bhmc de baleine. 



GERATUM CETI 



169 



C£B£BELLUM 



{Sp$rMa€0ii ij, wkits wax Jij; olive oil Jvi. 
Pb. IT. S.) A good emollient to ulcers, &c. 

Ceratum Ceti, Ceratum cetacei— «. Cicuts, 
Ceratum conii — c. Citrinum, Ceratum resiiue. 

Cbra'tuv Coni'i, Cera' turn Cieu^ta* (JJug. 
fonii ftjy eetaeoi Jij, cerm Mte Jiij.) A for- 
mula in Bartholomew's Hospital : occasionally 
applied to cancerous, scrofulous sores, &c. 

Cbaatuv Epvloticum, Cerate of calamine. 

Ceratum Gale'ni, Cera' turn album, C re- 
frig**erans Gale'ni, Ungiun'tum cera'tum, U, 
amygdaii'nnmy Z7. simplex, Emplas'trum ad 
fontic'ulosy O^lso-eera'tum aqud euhac'tum. Cold 
Cream, ( F.) Cirat Uane ou de ^alibn. ( White 
wax 4 parts ; oil of sweet almonds 16 parts ; add, 
when melted, water or rose water 12 parts. Ph. 
P.) A mild application to chaps, &c. 

Ceratum Labialb Rubbum, Cerate for the 
lips-— c. Lapidis calaminaris. Cerate of calamine 
^-c. Lithargjri acetati compositum, Ceratum 
piumhi compositum— c. Eytts, Cerate of can- 
tharides — c. Mercuriale, Ungnentum hydrar- 
gyri— c. Picatum, Pisselseum. 

Cbratitm Plumbi Compos'itum, Cert^tnm 
Lithar^gyri Aeeta'ti Compos'itum, Ooulard's 
Ointment, Cera'tum suhaeeta'ti plumbi mediea^- 
tmm, C. Plumbi Suhaeetaftis (Ph. U. S.), Cera'- 
tum Satur'niy Compound Lead CercUe, Gou- 
lard*9 Cerate, (F.) Cirat de Goulard, C. de 
Plomb eomposi. (Liq* plumb, subaeet, Jiiss, 
term JIaves, ^iv, ol. oliv, ^iz, camphor a ^w. 
Ph. U. S.) Its Tirtues are the same as the 
next. 

Ceratum Plumbi Superaceta'tis, Vngtien'- 
turn Ceru/sa Aeeta'tse, Cerate of Suj eraeetate 
or Sugar of Lead, Cera^tum Plumbi Aeeta'tis, 
Unguentum Acetatis Plumbi, (F.) Cerat de 
sur acetate de Plomb, {^Acetate of lead 3ij, whue 
wax ^ij, olive oil ftss.) Cooling and astringent. 

Cbratum Refrioeramb Gai^eni, Ceratum 
Galeni. 

Ceratum Hesi'na, C. Resi'nst Jlavst-, C eit'^ 
rinum, Unguen'tum basiVieon Jlavum, Ting, 
Kes^natjbtvte, Ung, Resino'sum, Re$i7i Cerate 
or Ointment, Yellow Basiticon, Basil'icon 
Ointment, {Resin, fav., ,^v. Cerm Jlav,, §ij; 
Adipie .^▼iij, Ph. U. S.) A stimulating appli- 
eation to old ulcers, he. Digestive. 

Dr. Smellome's OifUmerafor the Epes con- 
•ista of finely powdered verdigris ^bb, rubhed 
with oil, and then mixed with an ounce of eera- 



Ceratum Resi'hs Compos'itum, Coufpound 
Resin Cerate, {Resin,, Sevi, Cermfla/vcs, Aft Aj ; 
TertUnik,, Ibss. Ol, Lini, Oss. Melt together, 
strain through linen, and stir till cool. Ph. 
U. S.) 

Ceratum Sabi'ivji, Unguentum Sabinm, Sa* 
vine Cerate (F.) Cirat de Sabine, {Savifte in 
powder, 5ij. Resin Cerate Ibj. Ph. U. 8.) Irri- 
tative, < drawing.' Used in the saooe cases as 
the cerate of caintharides. 

Ceratum Sapo'nis, Soap Cerate, (F.) drat 
de Smfon {Liq, Plumb, subacetat,, Oij, Savon,, 



StJ; C*^^ ^^9 i^9 ^^- oliva, 6i. Boil the 
solution of snbacetate of lead with tne soap over 
1 slow fire to the consistence of honey, then 
transfer to a waier hath, and evaporate until all 
the moisture is dissipated; lastly, add the wax, 
previously melted with the oil, and mix. — Ph. 
U.S.) It is applied in cases of sprains or frac- 
tures. 
Ceratum Saturki, Ceratum Plumbi com- 
18 



positam— ^. Simplex, Ceratum cetacei, Cerate 
simple — c. Spermaceti, Ceratum cetacei — c. 
Subacetati plumbi medicatum, Ceratum plumbi 
compositum— c. Tetrai)harmacum, Pisselaeum 
— c. Carbonatis zinci impuri, Cerate of cala- 
mine. 

CERAUOTON, from xtQowof, 'thunder,' «a 
thunderbolt.' Jxipis fvlmin'eus, A kind of 
stone, which was believed to be formed during 
thunder; and to be possessed of the power of 
inducing sleep, and numerous other prophylactic 
virtues. It was rubbed on the knee, breast, 
&c. in swellings of those parts. 

CERBERUS TRICEPS, Pulvis cornachini. 

CERCA'RIA. A genus of agastric, infusory 
animalcules, one of the most curious of which 
inhabits the tartar Of the teeth. The sperma- 
tozoa are presumed by some to belong to this 
genus. 

CERCHNASMUS, Cerchnus. 

CERCHNOMA, Cerchnus. 

CERCHNUS, Cerehnas'mus, Cerehnum, 
Cerehno'ma, from xi^jryM, *1 render hoarse.' 
A rough voice produced by hoarseness. See 
Rattle. 

CER'CIS, Kf^xic. A sort of pestle for re- 
ducing substances to powder. Also, the radius 
or small bone of the arm. See Pilum, and Radius. 

CERCLE, Circulus — 0. de la Choroide, 
Ciliary ligament — e, Ciliaire, Ciliary ligament. 

CERCO'SIS, from)tfX(»e(, <aUil.' Men'tula 
mulitt'bris, the Clit'oris, Some, authors have 
employed the word synonymously with nym- 
phomania and elongation of the clitoris; and 
with Polypus Uteri, the Sarco'ma Cereo'sit of 
Sauvages. 

Cercosis Externa, Clitorism. 

CEREA, Cerumen. 

CEREA'LI A, from Ceres, 'goddess of corn.' 
(F.) Cir sales {Plantes,) The cerealia are gra- 
mineous plants, the seed of which serve for the 
nourishment of man : — as wheat, barley, rye, 
&c. At times, the same term is applied to 
some of the leguminous plants. 

CEREBARIA, Carebaria. 

CEREBELXA URl'NA. Urine of a whitish 
appearance, of the colour of the brain, from 
which Paracelsus thought he could distinguish 
diseases of that organ. 

• CEREBELLrxIS, badly formed from cere- 
bellum, and itis, denoting inflammation. Parens 
eephali'tisjlnfiammaftio eerebel'li, Infiammatioa 
of the cerebellum: a variety of phrenitis or en* 
cephalitis. 

CEREBEL'LOUS, CerebelWsus, from eere^ 
beUum, *the little brain.' (F.) Cerebelleux. 
Chaussieur has given this epithet to the vessels 
of the cerebellum. These are three in number | 
two of which are inferior : the larger, inferior 
eerebelli, which arises from the posterior cere* 
bral or vertebral j and the smaller, whose ex- 
istence is not constant, from the meso-cef^lie 
or basilary-: — ^the third, called. A, eeribelleuee 
supirieure {superior eerebelli,) is also a branch 
of the basilary. 

Cerebel'lous Ap'oplext, Apoplex'ia eere* 
bello'sa : apoplexy of the cerebellum. 

CEREBEL'LUM, diminutive of Cerebrum; 

C, parvum, Appen'dix ad cer'ebrum, Cer'ebrum 

poste'rius, Enera'nion, Enera'nis, Epenera'niey 

Parencepkalis, Pareneeph'alus, Encephal'ium, 

! Sneeph'alus opis'thius, Mierencepha'lium, Mi» 

' crencepk'alum, Little brain, (^F.) Cervelet, A 



OEBSBllAL 



170 



CEREFOLIUM 



portion oTtlie ttedidlAry mm, contained in the 
cavity of the cnuiiom. It fills the lower occi- 
pital foettB below the tentorium, and embraces 
the tuber annulare and medulla. It is com- 
posed, like the brain, of Tcsicular and medullary 
substance, arranged in lamine, as' it were; so 
that, when a section is made of it, it has an ar- 
borescent appearance, called Arbor vitm. The 
cerebellum is divided into two lobss or A«m»- 
s^ksrss or lateral mant^ and each lobe is again 
subdivided into Montiduli or Lobuies, In the 
cerebellum are to be observed the Crura etr*' 
b€llif the fourth venirich, the vaivula magna 
etrebri, the frofuus v$rmUular§»f superior and 
inferior, &c. 

CER'EBRAL, C€r$hra'li$y (F.) Ciribrai, 
ftom eerobrum^ * the brain.' Belonging to the 
brain, and similar to brain. 

CBaaBEAL Apophysis, Pineal gland. 

Cbsxbbal Aa^TxaiKS are three on each side : 
— the anUrior or artery of th» rorpus calhmm, 
and the middh, arte'ria Sflvia'na, are fur- 
nished by the internal carotid :— the posterior 
or pontoAor and inforior artory of the brain, A. 
profunda cerebri, arises from the vertebral. 
Chaussier calls these arteries iobaires, because 
they correspond with the anterior, middle, and 
posterior lobes, whilst he calls the trunks, 
whence they originate, corebral. 

Cerssbai. Nbrvbs are those which arise 
within the cranium, all of which, perhaps, 
with the exception of the olfactory, originate 
from the medulla oblongata. See Nerves. 

In JPatholory, an affection is called cerebral^ 
which specially occupies the brain. Fikvre 
ceribraUy Cerebral fever, is a variety in which 
the iMHid is much affected. 

CEREBRIFORM, Encephaloid. 

CEREBRO-MAL ACIA, MolUties cerebri. 

CEREBRO - SPINAL, Cephalo-spinal — c. 
Axis, see Encephalon. 

CEREBRO-SPINANTS, Narcotics. 

CER'EBRUM or CEREOBRUM. The brum. 
(F.) Cerveau, Cervelle. This term is some- 
times applied to the whole of the contents of 
the cranium : at others to the upper portion; — 
the posterior and inferior being called cerebel- 
lum. The brain, properly so called, extends 
from the os frontis to the superior occipital fos- 
se. Anteriorly, it rests on the orbitar vaults : 
behind this, on the middle fosaa of the base of 
the cranium; and, posteriorly, on the tentori- 
um rorebello 8uper'ea:tewum. Ths upper turf aee 
is divided by a deep median cleft (^Sdsture tii- 
terlobaire,—Ch.) into two halves, called Aem»- 
tpkoret^ which are united at the base by the 
corput eallotum. At its surface are numerous 
rowvolutionM. The inferior eurfare exhibits, 
f^om before to behind, three lobes, distinguished 
into anteriof , middle, and poftsrior. The nud- 
dle is separated from the anterior hy ihe/hsure 
of Sylvius ; and ftom the posterior, by a shal- 
low fbrrow which corresponds to the upper 
portion of the part petrosa, Tnternallf, the 
brain has, on the median line, the corpus eallo- 
tum, septum luridim, fornix, pineal gland, and 
third ventrirle:—9ind laterally, the lateral ««n- 
tricles, in which are the corpora striata, optie 
thalami, &c. It is contained in a triple enve- 
lope, (see Meninges.) Its texture is pulpy, 
and varies according to age. Two substances 
may be distingtldshed in it— the white, medulla- 
ry 01 JSbrous — wttduU'a etr^thi, and the eortital. 



timoriticut, vetieuiar, or gray. The former ii 
white I and occupies all the interior and btie 
of the brain. The latter is grayish and softer. 
It is situate particularly at the sur&ce of the 
organ. 

The brain receives several arterial veaseh, 
furnished by the internal carotid and vertebral. 
Its veins end in the sinuses. It is the material 
organ of the mental and moral manifestatiom. 
According to Gall, each part is the special mt 
oi one of those faculties, and the brain and cer^ 
bellum, inclusive, are called by him ** the ner- 
vous system of the msntal faculties.*' Tbe 
following table, from Haller and Cuvier, exhi- 
bits the proportion between the mass of the 
brain and that of the body in man and in aai- 



AehildGfnyears(H4LLBB) > loa 

Adult (Hallbb) 1-36 

(From lb.2,3abtolb.3,3;|.4oi. 
Sobkhbriho.) 

GiblMO (3miim) 1-48 

Sspitfoa fifBBl-41 tol-9« 

Ape from 1-48 to I-S4 

Baboon fiom 1-104 to 1^ 

Lemur Jrana IM toUi 

B^HVetpertiiia /foctmU) .1-95 

Mole..... 1-36 

Bear - .1-806 

Hedgehog 1-168 

Fox I'M 

Wolf. , IMO 

Beafor 1-fflO 

Hare \^a» 

Rabbit 1.140 to 1-199 

Rat 1-76 

Mouce 1-43 

Wild Boar 1-678 

bomeslicdo 141StoMI2 

Elephant (7 to 1>. 10) 1-500 

BtagTTV.. 1«0 

Roebuck Oroong) 1-84 

Sheep l«lloM» 

Ox... 1-76U to 1.860 

Calf. 1-819 

HoiSB 1-700 to 1400 

A« 1-154 

DolphiB 1-36,1.86, 1.00,1108 

EagleT. IW) 

Goose 1360 

Cock 1-85 

Canaiy-biid M4 

Humming-binl Ml 

Turds 1-5688 

Tortoise • !-88<0 

Frog M78 

Shark 18496 

Fike 1-1306 

Caip !•«» 

The substance of the nerTons system hM 
been analyzed by Yanquelin, and found to coB- 
tain water t^.OO; white iktty matter 4.63; red 
fktty matter, called eertbrino, 0.70; osmasome, 
1.1^; albumen, 7.00; phos^ras, 1.50; sal- 
phur, acid phosphates of potassa, lime, and 
magnesia, 5.15. 

CaasBRUM Abdosiitau, Solar plexus-— «• 
Elongatum, Medulla oblongata — e. Parvum, 
Cerebellum — c. Posterius, Cerebellum. 

CEREFOLIUM, Scandix eerefolium— c- 
Hispanicum, Chsrophyllum odoratam— e. Syl- 
Testre, Chnrophyllum sylvestre. 



CERELiBaM 



171 



CERTDt 



CBLBLJBUUy Cento. 

CEREOLUS, Bougis. 

CERERISIA, Cerevim. 

CEREUM MEDICATUM, 

CEREUS, B€mgi§. 

CEREYISIA, qoaii Cerfia'ta^ C^rvufda^ 
Ct'lto, ZftkmMf Zftkwm^ Liquor Cor'origy Vinum 
kardsm'ieum, Birm^ Bryton^ ^«^«vi B^rUff 
VMM, from Ceres, *eoni;' whence it is made. 
AU iAlUty) Bmt, PtfTy (F.) JEW^, Cst^oite. 
These fluids are dnink by the inhabitmnts of 
many conntriee, habitually, and in Great Bri- 
tain more than in others. They are nourishing, 
but not very easy of digestion. The old dis- 
peoaatories contain numerous medicated, ales, 
which a re no lo nger in use. 

CERFEUILy Scandiz cerefolium— e. JKti*- 
f«e» Cheney Hum odoratom— -c. Baumagty 
dynophTllnm sylvestre. 

CERION, Favus, Porrigo fiiTOsa. 

CARISIBRy Pnmos ceiasus— ^. d Orapp$$, 
'. d4 VirgimUy Prunns Yirgin- 



CSRNIN, SAINT, WATERS OF. St. C. 
is a parish in the diocess of St. Flour, Upper 
AnTctgne^ Fiance. The water is a chalybeate. 
It is called Eau du Cambon. 

CERNOS, Capistrum. 

CERO£^G, Cerou'niy or CirvMi'niy Cerolt' 
ffnei, from iri}c«c, 'wax,' and •iv«r, * wine.' A 
plaster composed of ytlUm «o«, muuon muty 
pitch, Burgumdy piteky BoU Armtniaty 7%ms 
and wins. It was used as a strengthening 
phater. Sometimes, it contained neither wax 



CEROBIA, Cerate. 

CEROMANTPA, from ki^oc, 'wax/ and 
00mr9im, 'divination.' The art of foretelling 
the lotore, from the ficnrea which melted wax 
■SBiiiHfH, whoa suffered to drop on the surihce 
of water. 

CERONIUM, Cerate. 

CEROPIS'SUS, from kw«c, « wax,' and rj^«, 
'pitch.' A depilatory plaster, composed of 
pitch and wax. 

CEROSyCera. 

CEROSTROSIS, Hystriciasis. 

CEROTUM, Cerate. 

CEROXYLON, see Cera flava et alba. 

CERUA, Ricinis communis. 

CEEU'M£N,fromr«ra,<wax.' CsmfrnmAu'- 
fimmtC/r^myAuriumSordUySordir'uim au'rium, 
Xarmor^tm Au'riumy Cymtiiy Csru'wunout 
HwrnoTy Cyj/Molisy Fu'ga^yiF .)Cire du OrnlUt. 
A name given to the unctuous humour, similar 
to wax in its physical properties, which is met 
with in the meatwi auditoriiu 9xtemm9. It is 
secreted by follicles, situate beneath the mem- 
bnne linmg the meatus. It lubricates the 
meatoB, preserves the suppleness of the lining 
membrane, prevente Ae introduction of bodies 
floating in the atmosphere, and by ite bitterness 
and unctoousness prevente inaecte from pene- 
tiatiag. 

^RU'MINOUS, Cannmf}o'#«#, (F.) Ctru- 
mimtust. Relating to oerumen. 

CsavMinous Glardb, Cem^minau* RUidUsy 
(F.) Glandss eirumiiuusM on FolHeuU$ eiru- 
mimnu4s. Glands or follicles, which secrete 
the cerumen. 

CERUSSA ACETATA,Plumbisapefaeatas 
-^. Alba Hispanica, Plumbi snbcaibon a s e. 
Alba Noriea, Plumbi snbcarbonaa e. Piymmi- 



Aran, Plumbi anbearbonis c. Serpenteria, tee 
Arum maculatum. 

CERUSSE, Plumbi subearbonas. 

CERUS'SEA URPNA. Terms used by P^ 
laeektts for the urine, when of a colour like 



CERVARI A ALBA, Laserpitium latifeliiim. 

CERVEAUy Cerebrum. 

CERVELETy Cerebellum. 

CERVELLEy Cerebrum. 

CERYI ELAPHI CORNU, Coma cervi, tee 
Cervus. 

CERYICAL, CfitieafUsy ftcfm eervtm, <the 
back of the neck.' Track$*iiaM, Every thii^ 



Cbrvioal Aa^EiBS are three in numb 
1. The aicmdimgy mnt^riary or swperJUied, a 
branch of the inferior thyroid, distributed to 
the scaleni muscles and integumenta. 3. The 
trmuvsrsB (C«rvf«0-«0aptt/«»r»—<Ch.,) a bianch 
of the axillary artery, or of the subclavian: db- 
tributed to the l^aior seapul^y trapegiu$y &c. 
3. The posterior or profoundy A, transversafHs 
colli Traehelo-oormeale — Ch.) a branch of t^ 
subclavian, distributed to the deep-seated mus- 
cles on the anterior and posterior parte of the 
neck. See, also, Princeps Cervicis (arteria.) 

CxRVicAL Gan'ouoms. The three gaogUoos 
of the great sympathetic. The oervieal gUmd* 
or lymphatic ghmds of the neck are, also, ao 
called. 

CaaviCAL Lio'AifxaTS. These are two in 
number. 1. The antoriory extending from the 
basilary process of the occipital bone to the 
anterior part of the first cervical vertebra. 9. 
The posterior or supraspinonsy Ligaw ttntm rn 
Nu'ekety which extends from the outer occipital 
protuberance to the spinous process of tibe 
seventh cervical vertebm. In animals with 
laige heads it is very strong. 

CaaviCAL Nxavas are eight in number^ en 
each side; and form the eight cervical poire y 
which are the first given off from the spinal 



CsaviCAZ. Plbxus, Plexue TraehHo-eoutem' 
tone (Ch.) The nervous net-work, formed by 
the anterior branches of the first three cervital 
nerves, above the posterior scalenas muscle, 
and at the outer side of the pneumogastric nerve, 
carotid arter^, and jugular vein. 

CXBVICAZ* RBOIOll,MRTBaiOK, Dxxp, jPrt- 

ver'tebrcU region. The region of the neck, oc- 
cupied by t&ee paira of muscles placed imme- 
diatelv in front of the cervical and three supe- 
rior oorsal vertebrsB— viz.! the rectn capitis 
anticus major, the rectus capitis antieus mmor, 
and longus colli; — hence termed prevertebre^ 
muaclee, 

CaaviCAL Yams have nearly the same distri- 
bution as the arteries. 

CsavicAL Yxa'raBas. The first seven vet- 
tebraB of the spine. 

CERYICALI8 DESCENDENS^ see Saeio- 
lumbalis. 

CERYICARIA, Campanula trachelium. 

CERVTCIDORBOSQAPULAIRBRhom- 
boideus— «. JDorMO^eoetaly Serratus posticus M- 

Serior — e, Doreo-mostoXdien et dom^tntchOiomy 
plenius — 0. Jlfa«teWf#f», Splenius. 
CERYISIA, Cerevisia. 
CERY1SPINA, Rhamnus. 
CERYIX, CoUmny (q. v.) The neck. A 



CEBYOJSB 



179 



CHAAimCELUM 



CsftTix OvmrAy Toiticollii— e. Uteri, Col- 

lum uteri. 

CERVOJSE, CereTiaia. 
CERVUS, Cerva. Th« born of the C^nms 
Bl'aphugf c^led Comu, Cervi El'apki Commy 
Cemu Csrvi'num, Hartshorn, <F.J Comg dt 
Mr/, containe 37 puts of gelatin in tne 1 00. A 
jelly made from the shavings is emollient and 
nutritive. 

The Staff t PizxUy Pria'jmi Cervi, was once 
considered to be aphrodiaiac. Doee, 9J to jj 
in powder. 

Caavx78AL'0B8. The EU,(F.)Slan. The 
hoof of this animal was anciently used as an 
anti-epileptic. The animal, it ymM asserted, 
waa subject to attacks of epilepsy, and always 
cared them by patting its hoof into the ear. 
The hoof waa also worn as an amulet. 

Comu Ustum, Burnt HaHshomy baa been 
used as an antacid, but it consists of 57 parts of 
fkospkat$, and only one of carbonaie of lune. It 
ia, therefore, not of much use. 

ClSARIENNE OPJiRATJON, Cinsarean 
section. ^ 

CESSATIO MEN^UM, Amenorrhcea. 

CESTRI'TES. A wine prepared from be- 
tooy, <xtrT#or, < beCony.') 

CESTRON, Betonica officinalis. 

CETA'CEUM,fromiiirT«*»*»whalc.* Album 
Cetif Adipote'ra eeto'tay Sptrmaeet^i^ (F.) Blane 
de Balein»y Cetine, Adipocire de Baieine, An 
inodorous, insipid, white, crystalliEed, friable, 
unctuous substance, obtained from the brain of 
the Phfse'ter Maeroeepk'alus or Spenuaesti 
Whale, and other varieties of whale. S. g. 
.9433: melts at 112^. It is demulcent and 
emollient, and has been given in coughs and 
dysentery, but is mostly used in ointments. 
Dose, 2ss to ziss rubbed up with sugar or egg. 

CETERACH OFFICINARUM, Asplenium 
ceterach. 

CJtTINE, Cetaceum. 

CETRARIA ISLANDICA, Lichen islandi- 
cos. 

CETRARIN, see Lichen islandicus. 

CEVADILLA HISPANORUM, Veiatrum 
sabadilla. 

CEVADJLLE, Yeratrum sabadilhu 

CHAA, Thea. 

CIL£REFOLIUM, Scandix cerefolium. 

CHJ£ROPHYLXUM, from ;t«e»» '^ ^^ 
joice,' and tpvllov, * a leaf.' 

CHiBROPHTL'LUx OdokaTum, Scondix Od0^ 
raUay Myrrhit Odora'ta, CerefeUium Hispan*- 
ieumy 8uM€t Cie^ely, (F.) CerfsuU musquie oo 
d^Etpagffy has the smell of aniseed, and is cul- 
tivated on account of its aromatic properties. 

Charophtl'lum Stlvss'tre, Cicuta'ria, 
Chmrophyl'lum Tem'ulumy Csrtfo'liumSylvts*- 
tr€. Bastard Hemloek, Wild Chsrvil or Cow- 
w$dy (F.) Csrfndl tauvagSy Psrsil d'AnSy is 
a slightly fetid aromatic; but is not used. 

Chjbbopbtllum TuniLTTV, Charoi^yllum 
sylvestre. 

CHiETE, Capillos. 

CHAFING, Erythe'ma Int$rtri'go, IntBrtri*- 
go, Parairirn'ma, Paratrips*is, Diatrim'ma, 
Mtri'tay Attrit"io, from iehauffor, <to heat.' 
Fret, erosions of the skin. Attri'tusy(F.)£ehauf' 
fomtmsy Aoorehures. The red excoriations which 
oeenr in consequence of the friction of parts, or 
between the folds of the skin, especially in fat or 
neglected children. Washing with cold wtter 



anddusting with hair powder is the beat pnveii- 
tive. When occurring between the nates and in 
the region of the perinsum, from long wakking, 
XnNrtri*go pod'idsy Proetal'gia intortrigiuo'say 
it ia vulgarly designated by the French EmttO' 
fosson, 

CHAIRy Flesh. 

CHAISE PERCAEy Laaannm. 

CHALASIS, Rekxation. 

CHALA8MU8, Relaxation. 

CHALASTICUS, from /«Aa»,< I relax.' A 
medicine proper for removing rigidity of the 
fibrea.-- Galen. An emollient or relaxant, (q. v.) 
CHAL'AZA, Chala'giouy Chala'tnumy Cha- 
loMo'sisy Poro'sisy Grando, HaUy (F.) OrUsy 
Oravells. Certain hard, round, tranaparcat tn- 
mours, developed in different parts of the body, 
more especially in the substance of the eyeUdb. 
Also, the Cicatricula, (q. v.) 

CHALCANTHUM, Ferri solpfaaa— c Al- 
bom, Zinci sulphas. 

CHALCEDONIUS, Cornelian. 

CHALCITES, Colcothar. 

CHALCOIDEUM, (os) Cuneiform boM. 

CHALCOS, Cimrum, ^reolum. 

CHALEXIR, Heat— <. Aors, see Acrid—*. 
Animale, Animal heat — e, do$ Animauxy Heat. 

CH ALEVES DUFOIEy Heat. 

CUALINOPLASTY, ChaHnoplag'Hei; from 
xaXtvfj <fr»nam,' <a bridle,' and nlaoomy 'I 
form.' The operation for forming a new frsnom. 

CHALK, Crete— <. Red, Rnbriea febriUs— 
c. Stones, Calculi, arthritic. 

CHAhYB'EATE^Chalyboa'tusyPorrugin'omo, 
P$rrugino'susy Ferra'tus, Metrtia*lis, Porrufgi^ 
nousy Mar'tialy (F,)Ferruginoux; from chalyhsy 
* iron or steel.' Of, or belonging to iron, con- 
taining iron. Any medicine, into which iroB 
enters, as ehaly beats ndxturs, piUsy watsroy &e. 
See Waters, Mineral. 

CHALYBIS RUBIGO, Ferri subcarbonas. 

CHALYBS, from Chalybss; a people of Pod- 
tus, who dug iron out of the earth; A'ciosy Stssl» 
The Proto-earburst of iron, (F.) Aeisr. As a 
medicine, steel does not differ from iron. 

Chaltbs Tartakizatus, Ferrum tartarin- 
tum. 

CHAMA, Cheme. 

CHAMiEACTE, Sambucus ebulos. 

CHAMiEBATOS, Fragaria. 

CHAM^CEDRIS, Artemisia santonica. 

CHAM^CISSUS, Glecoma hederacea. 

CHAM^CLEMA, Glecoma hederacea. 

CH AMiEGYP ARISSUS. ArtemUia santonica. 

CHAM^DROPS, Teucrium chamaedrya. 

CHAM^DRYlfTES. A wine, in which thi 
Tsu^erium Chammdrys has been iniased. 

CHAMiEDRYS, Teucrium Ch., Yeionica^ 
c. Incana maritima, Teucrium marum— c. Mi- 
nor repens, Teucrium Ch. — c. Palostris, Teo- 
crium scordinm— c. YnlgarU, Teucrium Ch. 

CHAM^GEIRON, TussUago. 

CHAMiELiEAGNUS, Myrica gale. 

CHAMiELAlfTES. A wine impregnated 
with Chamodsa, Daphni Alpi'na* 

CHAMiELEA, Cneorum tricoccum. 

CHAMELEON ALBUM, CarUna aeanlie. 

CHAMiELEUCE, Tussilago. 

CHAMiELINUM, Linum catharticom. 

CHAM^MELUM, Anthemis nohilia— «. 
Feetidam, Anthemis cotula^-c. Nobile, Anthe- 
mis nobilis— c. Odoratum, Anthemis aobilkh— 
c. Volgare, Matricaria chamomilhu 



CHAMiiafORUH 



173 



CSASSE 



CHAMiEMORUM, Tenerium chmivpitys, 
BaboB chaimmoniB. 
CHAMiEP£UC£, CampboTonnft Monspe- 



CEAMJEPirVlWU VimJM. A wine, 
ia which the leaves of the Chaima'fUft^ Tn»'- 
mriwm Chama'oUysy h^ve been infused. 

CHAMiEPITYS, Teucrium chamaBpitys^ 
c. AnthyliitSy Teucrium iva^-c. Moschate, Teu- 
trium iva. 

CHAM.£PLION, Erysimum. 

CHAM^RAPH'ANUM, from yopioi, «on 
the ground/ and Qm^wm^t <die radish.' So Pao^ 
los of JBgina calb iJie upper part of the root of 
the^^Hna. 

CHAMiE'ROPS SERRAT'ULAj^^awPa/- 
iMito. A iarina ia prepared from the roots of 
this plant, which ia used bj the Indians, in Flo- 
rida, as diet 
CHAMBAR, Magnesia. 
CHAMBER, C<Mi»'€ra, (F.) Chambre, ThU 
term is UMd in speaking of the eye, in which 
there are two chambers, Cam'Brm oc'uli : — an 
mU$r%or and a posterior; (F.) Chamhre anti- 
rieurt et postirUur; The anterior is the space 
between the cornea and the anterior part of the 
iris: — the postoriory the space between the iris 
sod anterior suriiftce of the crystalline. They 
are filled with the aqueous humour, and com- 
monieate by the opening in the pupil. 

CHAM'BERLAIN'S RESTOR'ATIVE 
PILLS. This nostrum, recommended in scro- 
fiila, and all inopurities of the blood, has been 
analyzed by Dr. Paris, and found to consist of 
ehmahmry etUpkur, sulphate, of lime, and a little 
vegetable matter. Each pill weighs 3 grains. 

CHAMBRE, Chamber. 

CHAMBRIE, Cannabis sativa. 

CHAICELEA, Daphne Alpina. 

CHAMOMILE, DOGS', Matricaria chamo- 
miUar-c. Dyers', Anthenus tinctoria— c. Ger- 
man, Matricmria chamomilla— c. Spanish, An- 
themia pyrethimn— «. Stinking, Anthenus co- 
tnk— c. Wild, Ajithemis cotula. 

CHAMOMILLA NOSTRAS, Matricaria 
cbamomilla— c. Romana, Anthemis nobilis— e. 
Spuria, Anthenus cotula. 

CHAMP ACA, Michelia champaca. 

CHAMPIGNON, Fungtt8--n0. de VApptsreil 
dei Fractures, Clavariar-«. do Coueke, see Aga- 
ric — e. de Malte, Cynomorion coccineum. 

CHANCE LAGUA, Canchalagua. 

CHANCRE, (F.) UUus eancro'sum, Uloue'' 
etUum eancro'sum, A sore, which arises from 
the direct application of the venereal yirus; 
hence it is almost always seated, in men, on 
the penis. The French use the word Chanere, 
ID popular language, for cancerous ulcers, the 
malignant aphthe of children, fcc. Formerly, 
the terms Carol* and Carries pudendo*rumwere 
need for Tenereal pustules or sores on the parts 
of geaeratioo. 

CHANCREUX, Chanereuse, (F.) Canero'^ 
toe, Cardm/dos. Having the nature of chancre, 
or of cancer. 

Bouton Ck^noreux. A small tumour of a 
cancerous nature, which makes its appearance 
on the lace — most frequently on the upper Up^ 
Ifoli me tangore. 

CHANT DES ARTkRES SiJUmmU mo- 
dnld. 

CHANVRE, Cannabis sativa^-^. Indien, 
Baagoe, 



CHAOMANTI'A. The alchymists meant, 
by this word, the art of predicting the future 
from observation of the air. The word Chaos 
was used by Paracelsus for the air; (jutftuo, 
< divination.') 

CHAOSDA, Plague. 

CHAPERON DB MOINE, Aconitum na-' 
pellus. 

CHAPPETONADE, (F.) Vom'itus rabio'- 
sus. Vomiting accompanied by furious deli- 
rium, attacking strangers in hot countries. 

CHAR'ACTER, x*Q»^'^W9 ' A mark or im- 
pression.' (F.) Caraethe, In Pathology it it 
used synonymonsly with stamp or appearance. 
We say,<< A disease is of an unfavorable cha- 
racter," ** The prevailing epidemic has a bi- 
lious character," &c. In Mental Philoaophf 
it means — ^that which distinguishes one indi- 
vidual from another, as regards his understand- 
ing and passions. 

CHARAa)RIUS. .£lian thus calls a bird, 
which was reputed to cure jaundice. The word 
now means the plover. 

CHARANTIA, Momordica ebteritmi. 

CHAR BON, Anthrax carbo. 

CHARBONNEUX, Anthracoid. 

CHARCOAL, Carbo-H:. Animal, Carba 
animalis. 

CHARDON AXTX JnES, Onopordium 
acanthium — e, BbrUt, Centaurea benedictsr-c. 
d Bonnetier, Dipsacus ftillonum — c. AtoiUy 
Centaurea calcitrapa — e, d Foulon, Dipsacus 
friUonum — t. Himorrhoidtd, Cirsium arvense — 
e. Marie, Carduus Marianus-~«. Roland, Er3m- 
gium campestre. 

CHAR'LATAN, from Ital. eiarlare, <to talk 
much;' Cireula^tor, Cireumfora'neue, Pme- 
deu^tes, Pseudomed^ieus, Agyr^ta, Anacffc'leon, 
A Quad, an Empirical Pretender, an Eimp'irie, 
Originally, one who went frx>m place to place to 
sell any medicine, to which he attributed mar- 
vellous properties. By extension— any indivi- 
dual, who endeavors to deceive the public by 
passing himself off as more skilful than he re- 
ally is. According to Manage, the word 
comes from eireulatanus, a corruption of drew 
later. 

CHAR^LATANRT, Agfr'Ha, Banaufsia, 
the conduct or action of a charlatan. (F.) 
Charlatanerie, Charlatamsme, Quackery, An- 
piT%etsa*» 

CHARLOCK, Sinapis arvensis. 

CHARM, Lat. Carmen, whence comes the 
Italian, Ciarma, (F.) Charms, with the same 
signification. Canti^tio,Ineantamen'tum, Trick. 
A sort of magic, or superstitious practice, by 
which it was believed, that individuals might 
be struck with sickness or death, or be restored 
to health. 

CHARNTkRE, Ginglymus. 

CHARNU, Cameous. 

CHARPIE, Linteum — e. Brute, see Linteam 
*—€, Rapie, see Linteum. 

CHARTA YIRGINEA, Amnios. 

CHARTRE, Tabes raesenterica. 

CHA3 (F.) Ae(ts fora'men. The eye of a 
needle. Sometimes, this opening is near the 
point of the instrument, as in the ligature 
needle. 

CHASME, Yawning. 

CHASPE, Variola. 

CHAS8E (F.) Manu'brium. A kind of 
handle composied of two moveable lamina of 



CBASaiS 



1T4 



CHBIU>PLAmCl 



boAi ilitU, or ivorjy luited only «C tke «itre- 
miiff which holds the bUdo of the iMtnunenit, 
^i«s in the common hleoding knoet. 

CHASSIS (F.)> Xm«» X«jva, Gkmm, 
GUme, Ora'mia, Ltmos'itM ; the gmm #/ <A« 

2«. A seboceoiM homonr, oeereted mainljr hy 
filUelei of Meibomiiis» which tonietiiiiee 
(inet the ejelidfl together. 

CBASSIEUX (f.) Up^; coTOred with 
CSI«#»#~afl Pattpikru eka§si&us0a. 
CHASTE TREE, Yitez. 
chatJigns, mo F«r» 



i^&w, Trape 
CKATAiGNIER COMMUN^ Foguo cm- 



I— «. Ntdn^ Fagot caetaneopomilo. 

CHATEAU-LANDON, WATERS OF. A 
town three leagues from Nemoors, in Fiance. 
The waters contain alum and iron. 

CHATEAU-SALINS; a town in the depart- 
ment of La-Meurthe, Franco. The waters 
contain carbonate of lime, sulphates of lime end 
angnesia, and chlorides of magnesium and so- 
dium. 

CHATELDON, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Chsteldon is in the department of Por-de- 
Ddme, France. The waters contain carbonic 
acid and iron. 

CHATEL-GUYON, MINERAL WATERS 
OF. A Tillage in France, in the demrtment 
PuT-de-Dome, near which thero are ire therr 
mii and acidulous springs. Temperaturoy 86^ 
Fahrenheit. 

CHATON (F.), « a husk.' In pathology, it 
moans ^fwnda or carity formed by the irregu- 
lar or Ao«r-Wa«v coturaaion of the uterus, in 
which the ]^acenta is often retained or eneha^ 
ttmimi after the birth of the child. It is detect- 
ed by passing the fingers akMig the cord as fiv 
ss the part which is contracted, when the pla- 
eenta will not be discorerable. 

The treatment consists in relaxing by a large 
dsoo of an opiate, then passing the fingers 
ahmg the cord, and gradually dilating the open- 
ing &roQgh which it passes, until it permits 
the hand to go through. The placenta must 
then be grasped and gently withdrawn. 

CHilTOi^, Vaginal process. 

CHATONNJt, CJiLCUL, (F.) Calatlut in- 
•mrfra'tmt Emeytfttd Cai*ndu»y Calcul m»- 
ijfHi. • A urinary calculus, adherent to the in- 
ner surface of the bladder, so that it is inmx>T- 
aUe, and cannot pass to the different parts of 
that organ. This happens when calculi form 
in some natural or accidental cavitv of the 
bladder; or when the organ, by ulceration, 

S>es rise to fungi, which surround the calcu- 
s; or when it is lodged in the orifice of the 
ureter or nrethnu 

CHATONNA, PLACENTA, (P.) The 
placenta when retained as above described. 
See Ckaton. 

CB/iTONHEMENT, (F.) Incaretri^tio, 
CkaionnsnuHt du plmcmU»y EniytUmtnt* — 
Hour-glass contraction of the uterus. See 
Ckatim, • 

CHATOVILLEMENT, (F.) This word 
sometimes means the action of (»ei/*ii^ or titil- 
ktion iTUiila'tioy) and, at others, the seneation 
which giyes rise to the action {PrurHtuty) Itch> 
ing. 

CBJtrA, Castratns. 

CBJTRURE^ Castration. 

CHAUDEBOURO, MINERAL WATERS 



09. C.isthMoqwsrtersofaleagQoftwnTlii- 
onville in France. The waters conUtn inm» 
sulphate of lime, sulphate of I 
borate of lime. 

CBAUDEPISSEp OoBorrhdea 
Cfde«9 Oooorrhsa cordsta--^. i ^ mkU d^ms im 
Bourses, Hernia humoralis» 

CHAUI>£S-AIGUe8,'BfINERAL WA- 
TERS OF« A small town in the department 
of Cantal, France, where there is a number ef 
■aline springs containing carhonie acid, carbo- 
nate of soda, and chloride of sodium. Temp. 
190» Fshrenheit. 

CBAUFFOm (F.yidnimm CaUfmef'rimmu 
According to the AradimU, a warmed ek^ 
used either ibr the purpose of warming a pa- 
tient, or to apply to a fesoale recently deliverad. 

CBAUSSEy (F.) CkaHS*4 d'Bi pp at r m U, 
Maneke d^Hippoerat; Man'ica Bif ^otfrmt U y 
Man'tea, Bippocrami* Sl—v4. A eomcal bag, 
made of flannel, for straining liquids. 

CBA US8E-TRAPPE,CeBtMxam caldtrapo. 

CBAUVETi, Calvities. 

CBAUXyCtlx—e. a»db/on«r« ^,CaleiacUs. 
ridum^-«. Cktorure d4, Calcis chloridnm — «. 
BffdreckUmu d; Calcis mnrias-^. Bpdrttd- 
fax$ ds, Calcis sulphuretnm— «. Murimu dt^ 
Calcis mnrisi r. Muriiiu osdgini de, Caleb 
chloridum— e. Mnri^U twroxigini de, Caleis 
chloridura — e. O^Bithiorwf d4, Calcis chlorkfam 
— <. Oximttfimu de, Calcis cUoridum-^. Psm, 
cralz Tiva. 

CHECKER'^BERRT, Arbnins uTa uni. 

CHEEK, Gena. 

CHEESE, Sax. cero, (L.) Ca'«s««, Tpros, 
P4€ti, (F.) Frosmagt. An aliment, prepared 
from tiie caseous and oleaginous parts of milk. 
Fresh cheeses owe their chief miedical propert i es 
to the immediate principle, essentially cheesy, 
to which the name a^seum or ca'$*in has been 
applied. Those, which have been recently 
salted, ere digested .with comparative IhcLlity. 
The flavour of cheese is owing to an ammonia- 
cal caseate. On the whole, cheese itself is not 
easy of digestion, althongh it may stimulate tiie 
stomach to greater exertion, and thus aid in the 
digestion of other substances. 

CHEESE RENNET, Galium verum. 

CHEE'SY, Casea'Hus, Casso'ms, J^rv'dts, 
(F.) CagnuB ou Catieum, Having the nature oC 
cheese. 

CBEP, Bandage (tail.) 

CHEILITIS, Ckili'Hsi ttom /fao^, <a lip.' 
Inflammation of the lip. See Ohilon. 

CHEILOC'ACE, from ji<Ji««, <a lip,' and 
soKA^^ <evil.' LahrUui'dnm, A disease, cha- 
racterized, it is said, by swelling, indnratioB, 
and sUght redness of the lips without inflam- 
mation; reputed, but without any authority, to 
be common in Englsnd and Scotland, i 
children. Also, the thickness of the upper 
of scrofblous children. See 
Cancer aquaticus. 

CHEILOCARCmO^A, from /va^c, <a lip,' 
and K«{KfrfH/(ta, * cancer.' Cancer of the Up, 

CHEILOMALACIA, Caneor aquaticos, 8lo- 



CHRILON, Chilon. 

CHEILON'CUS, Chnlopky*fma, from jiix«(, 
* lip,' and ayMc, < swelling.' A swelling of the 
lip. 

CHEILOPHTMA, Cheiloncus. 

CHEILOPLASTICfi, CkiUplmMei, fiwn 



0HBIL06 



19ft 



OHSNOCOPBUS 



29tU<9 *hp,* and nx^rrfttt^ *§ormiag.* -The 
•ptfmtion for an artificial lip. 

CHEILOS, Lip. 

CHEIMA, CoM. 

CHEIMETLON, Chilbtain. 

CH£IMIA> Rigor. 

CHEIR, Manus. 

CHEIRAN^HUS CHEIRI, from ^tiQ, < the 
hud,' and m^botf 'ilower.' The tygtematic 
name of the Common TdUw Wall Fhttery Vi'- 
•la Ufteoy Lnce^Um It^fum, Jutyn, Chnrit (F.) 
G10JU9 OQ ViolUr jaunt, TIm flowers hare 
been esteemed nervine* narcotic, and deob-, 
strncnt. 

CHEIRAF^IA. The action of mbbing or 
sciatcbingy from rif{, * the hand,' and anrm* * I 
touch.' A troublesome sjrmptom in the itch.' 

CHEIRIATER, Surgeon. 

CHEIRISIlIA, Ckeiris'mut. The act of 
touching:— handling. Any mannal operation. 

CHEIRIXIS, Surgery. 

CHEIRONOM'IA, Ckironom'iot from ^neo. 
*yt*m, 'I esercise with the hands.' An exer- 
cise, referred to bv Hippocrates, which con- 
sisted in osing the bands, as in our exercise of 
the domb-beUs. 

CHEIROPLETHES, Fasciculus. 

CHEIROSIS, Subaetio. 

CHELA, CJUii. This word has several sig- 
■ificatidos. CksUy a forked probe used for ex- 
tracting polypi from the nose. Ch§l m chaps, 
or cracks on the feet, organs of generation, «c. 
Ckslm likewise means claws, especiaUy those 
of tlie crab. See Cancrorum Cheke. 

Cmkljb PALPBaaAauM, see Tarsus. 

CHELAPA, Convolvulus jalapa. 

CHELE, Chela. 

CHjLUDOINE GRANDE, Chelidoatum 
maios-— e. Petiu, Rsnunculus ficaria. 

CHELIDON, /li'^t, the hollow at the bend 
of die arm. Eirundo, (q. v.) 

CHELIDONIA ROTUNBIFOLLA. MINOR, 
Ranmcnhis ficaria. 

CHELIDONIUM, Bryonia alba. 

CBBunoHiuM Mxxns, from /iIi^mt, *a swal- 
low,' becanse its flowering coincides with the 
appearance of the swallow. Papafvsr ComUt^ 
ia'iwmy P. li^temwh Camrnam Cd'andiiu, Tuur- 
warty (F.) Cki/idoina gramhy L'Adnir: Fa- 
mUy^ PapaveracesB. Stx, %«#• Polyandria 
Monogynia. The root and recent pUnt have 
been considered aperient end diuretic. Exter- 
nally, the juice has been employed in some cu- 



Chsudomiuii Mimis, Ranunculus ficaria. 

CHELIDONIUS LAPIS. A name aiven to 
stones, which, it was pretended, existed in the 
stomach of yonng swallows. They were for- 
nmrly believed capable of curing epilepsy. 

CHELOID. Cancroid. 

CHEIXyNR, /ilwrir, <a tortoise.' An in- 
strument for extending a limb ; so called, be- 
cause in its slow motions, it resembled a tor- 
toiscw— Oribasius. See Testndo. 

CaxiiO'iii GnABUA, Common Snaie hmd, 
TmrtU koadj TtirtU Uoow^, ShsllJIowir. An in- 
digenous plant, 8$^. Syst, Didynamia angio- 
mrmia; blossoming from Julj to November. 
The leaves are bitter end tonic ; without any 
tronatic smell, and with very little astringency. 

CHELCyNIA MYDAS, Tho Qroon TartU. 
This species of turtle abounds on the coast of 
Florida. Itistheonesoprixedbytheepicujre. 



CHELOmON, Chdo*fUnmy from r«l«rq. < a 
tortoise,' from its resembling in shape thesheU 
of that animal. The upper, gibbous part of the 
back. — Gorrsus. The scapula. 

CHELONOPH'AGI, from /li^viii 'the tor- 
toise,' and oar»> * I ^t.' An ancient name for 
certain tribes, who dwelt on the ceasts of the 
Red Sea, and who lived only on tortoises. — 
Pliny, Diodorus of Sicily. 

CHEL'SEA PEN'SIONER. An empirical 
remedy for rheumatism and gout, sold under 
this name. {Own guaiaty ;^, powdsred rA«- 
^^^ ^^ii «''<«w of tartar JHfJiowors of sulpkur 
gj, on4 nutmofy finely powdered : made into an 
electuary with a pound of eUrifiod AoiMy.) 
Dose two spoonfuls. 

CHELTENHAM, MINERAL WATERS 
OF. C. is a town in Gloucestershire, England, 
nine miles from Gloucester, and 94 W. of Lon- 
don. Its water is one of the roost celebrated 
natural purgatives in England. It is a saline, 
acidulous chalybeate, and is much frequented. 
Its main constituents are chloride of sodium, 
sulphate of soda, sulphate of magnesia, carbonic 
acid and carbonate of iron. 

CnLvaNHAN Salts. These are sometimes 
made from the waters; at others, fectitiously. 
The following is a formiria. Sodii ehlorid*^ 
magnes* $uljfiat^ sodm oulph., i& kj : dissolve, 
filter, evaporate to dryness; then add Forri 

Chzltbnham Watbe, Abtivicial, may be 
made of Epsom salt, gr. xij, ironfUings, gr. j: 
Oiatiber*s salt, giv t toatoTy 4 gallons ; impreg- 
nated with the gas from marble powdor and sul- 
pkurie aeid, ta lii. 

CHELYS, Thorax. 

CHELYS'CION, from x>^v^ 'the cbest.' A 
short, dry cough.--Galen, Hippocr. Foesius. 

CHEMI:, Chama, Chs'ramis, An ancient 
measure, equivalent to about two teaspoon- 
fuls. 

CHEMEUTICE, Chymiatry. 

CHEMIA, Chymistry. 

CHEMIATER, Chymiater. 

CHEMIATRIA, Chymiatria. 

CHEMICO-HISTOLOGY, see Cbymico-his- 
tology. 

CHEMICUS, Chymical, Chymist. 

CHEMIST, Chymist. 

CHEMISTRY, Chymistry. 

CHEMO'SIS, from x^n, <an aperture,' or 
from ^v/cof, <a bumour.' A name given to 
ophthalmia, when the conjunctiva, surrounding 
the cornea, forms a high ring, making the cor- 
nea seem as it were at the bottom of a well. 



By some,' it is used synonymously with opA- 
tkalmia m^mbranarttm. See Ophthalmia. 

CHEMOTICE, Chymistry. 

CHEMOTICUS, Chymical. 

CHENAY, MINERAL WATERS OF. 
Chenay is a town in France, two leagues from 
Rheims. The waters are chalybeate. 

CHENEy Quercus alba— 4. MaHn, Fueus 
vesiculosus-^. P«eir, Teucrium chanuBdrya— e. 
Vsrt, Ilex aquifolium. 

OHkNEVlS, sea Cannabis sativa. 

CHENOBOSCON, Potentilla anserina. 

CHENOCOPRUS, from xn*,*^ goose,' and 
Kovpoc, <dung.' The dung of tkt goose is so 
designated in some old PluLmiacopceias. It 
was formerly employed as a febrifiige and diu- 
retic. 



CHENOPODIUM AMBROSIOIDES 176 CHILI, MINERAL WATERS OF 



CHENOPOa)IUM AMBROSIOIDES, from 

jrqf , * a goose,' and wf, ' a foot.' Botrys Mex- 
iea'na^ Chsnopo'dium Mexiea'num^ Botrys^ 
AmhrosioVdBS Mexiea'na, Botrys ^meriea'na, 
Artemit'ia Botrys, Mexico Tea, Spanish Tea, 
(F.) Ansitine, Tki du Meadque, Ambrosio du 
Mexique, The infusion was once drunk as tea. 
It has been used in paralytic cases; and in the 
United States is said to be used as an anthel- 
mintic indiscriminatelj with Ch. anthelminti- 
cam. 

Chxnopo'divm Anthblvih'ticvm , Ckmopo*' 
dium, Botrys imthoinun'tiea, Wormseed, Worm' 
goosefoot, Wbrmseed gooeefoot, Jerutalom Oai 
of America, Ooosefoot, Stinkwed, (F.) Ansk- 
rMM anthelmintique, A» vermifuge. This plant 
grows plentifully in the United States. The 
fruit — Chefiopodium, (Ph. U. S.) — is much used 
in cases of worms. Dose of the powder, from 
a tea-opoonful to a table-spoonful or more. The 
oil, O'lntm Chsnopo'dii, (Ph. U. S.) from 8 to 
10 drons, is more frequently exhibited. It is 
aft much used in America as the Semen Santon'^ 
iei with the English. 

Cqenopo'dium Bonus Hs!f rz'cus, Chrysolaeh^- 
anitm, MereuriaUis, Bonus Henri'cus, Tota 
bona, Lap'athum unotuo'sum, Chenopo'dium, 
Pes anseri'nus, English Mereuty, Allgood, An- 
gular-leaved goosefoot, (F.) Anserine Bon 
Honri, £pina^ sauvage. The leaves are 
eiQollient, and have been applied to ulcere, &c. 
It has also been considered refrigerant and ec- 
coprotic. 

Chbropo^tum Botrts, Botrys, Botrys vul- 
ga'ris, Ambro'sia, Artsmis'ia Chenopo'dium, 
At*riplex odora'ta, Atfriplex suav'eolens ; the' 
Jerusalem Oak, (£ng.) (F.) Anshine Botrys, 
possesses anthelmintic properties, and was once 
given in diseases of the chest, palsy, &c. It is 
ubeless. 

CBEifOPonnTM FcBTiDUM, Chenopodium vul- 
varia. 

CHSROPonxuM (^iNOA, Quinua, A nutri- 
tious, wholesome, and agreeable article of food 
with the Peruvian. The leaves, before the 
plant attains maturity, are eaten as spinach: 
out the seeds are most generally used as food, 
boiled in milk or broth, and sometimes cooked 
with cheese and Spanish pepper. 

Chxnopo'oivie Vui,va'eia, At*riplex fcitida, 
Afriplexol'ida, Vulva'ria, Oaros*mum,Raphex, 
Chenopo^dium Fa'tidum, Stinking Orach or 
Ooosefoot, (F.) VulvairSy Arroehe puant. An- 
serine fitide. The fetid smell has occasioned 
it to be used as an antispasmodic and nervine. 

CHEOPINA, Chopine. 

CHEQUERBERRY, Gaultheria. 

CHERAMIS, Cheme. 

CHERBACHEM, Yeratrum album. 

CHERBAS, Lettuce. 

CHERMES, Kermes. 

CHERNIBIUM, Urinal. 

CHERRY, BIRD, Prunus padus— c. Tree, 
red, Prunus cerasus— c. Tree, black, Prunus 
avium— c. Tree, wild, Prunus Virginiana— c. 
Water, Kirschwasser — c. Wild cluster, Prunus 
padus— c. Winter, Physalis. 

CHERSiE, FflBces. 

CHERVIL, Seandix cerefolium--c. Wild, 
Ch»rophyllam sylvestre. 

CHESIS, from jriCtir, Ho go to stool.' A 
more frequent desire to evacuate the bowels* 

CHEST, Thorax. 



CHESTNUT TREE, Fagns castanea. 

CHEVAUCHEMENT, (F.) Os'num nr- 
perposi"tio vel equita'tio, ParaHax'is, Faral- 
lag'ma. The riding of one bone over another 
after fracture, giving rite to shortening of the 
limb. See Riding of Bones. 

CHEVELURE, Scalp. 

CHEVESTRE, Chevhre, Capis'trum, from 
caput, ' the head.' A bandage, applied round 
the head in cases of fracture or luxation of the 
lower jaw. According to the mode in which 
it is made, ift is called simple, double, oblique, 
&e. 

CHEVEU, Capillus. 

CHEVILLE DUPIED, Malleolus. 

CHkVRE-FEUILLE, Lonicera periclyme- 
num. 

CHEZANAN'CE,from /itoi^'I go to stool,' 
and a»*YKfi, < necessity.' An ointment com- 
posed of honey and alum, and rubbed on the 
anus to occasion evacuations. — Paulus of iEgina. 

CHIA, Chia terra, from Chios, an island 
where it was found. A kind of white earth, 
formerly used for burns.— Galen. 

CHI'ACUM COLLYRIUM. A coUyrium 
consisting of several drugs and Chian wine^- 
Paulus of ^gina. 

CHIADUS, Furunculns. 

CHI AS'MUS, Chias'ma, Chiasm,from z^atv, 
to form like the letter Z' The crucial union 
of parts, — as the optic commissure or chiasm 
of the optic nerves, — Chias^mus seu Chias'ma 
nervo'rum optico'rum, 

CHIASTER, Kia8t<*r. 

CHIASTOS. Same etymon. A bandage 
so called because it resembles the letter X' — 
Oribasius. 

CHIBOTT, see Bursera gummifera. 

CHICHA. A drink made in Peru with In- 
dian meal dried in the sun, and fermented with 
water. Its taste is that of bad cider. It is 
also made from rice, peas, barley. Sec. 

CHICKEN-BREASTED, see Lordoais. 

CHICKENPOX, Varicella. 

CHICKWEED, Alsine media. 

CHJCORAE DES JARDINS, Cichorinm 
endivia-— 4. Sauvage, Cichorium intjrbua. 

CHIENDENT, Triticum repens. 

CHI(}GO, Chique, 

CHIOGRE, Chique. 

CHIOOE, Chique, 

CHIL'BLAIN, Per'nio, Bugan'tia, Eryihe'- 
ma Per'nio, Erythe'ma a Prigorl, Cheimet'lon, 
Chimet'lum, Chimon, Maicf, from chill, ' cold,' 
and blain, <a pustule.' (F.) Engelure. An 
erythematous inflammation of the feet, — 
hands, he,, occasioned hj cold. It is verr 
conmion in youth— not so in the adult or in ad- 
vanced age. It is apt to degenerate into pain- 
ful, indolent ulcerations, cidled Kibes, Chil- 
blains are prevented by accustoming the parts 
to exposure; and are treated by stimulant, tere- 
binthinate and balsamic washes, ointments, and 
liniments. 

CHILD-BED STATE, Parturient sUte. 

CHILDHOOD, Infancy. 

CHILDREN'S BANE, Cicuta maculata. 

CHILI, see Lima. 

CHILI, MINERAL WATERS OF. The 
most celebrated mineral springs of Chili, in 
South America, are those of Peldehues and 
Canquenes. The former are not ftr from St. 
Jago. They consist of two springs, one ther- 



cmLIOORAMMA 



177 



CHIROTHECA 



mttly the other cold. The hot spring is clear, 
inodoroas, and contains soda and carbonic acid. 
The cold spring contains iron and sulphate of 
soda. Caoqaenes is much resorted to by inva- 
lids during the summer. Mineral waters are 
Tery common in Chili. 

CHILI06RAMMA, Kilogramme. 

CHILIOPHTLLON, Achillea millefolium. 

CHILITES, Cheilitis. 

CHILL, Rigor. 

CHIXON, Chn*lony ClUili'Hs, from ytilot, 
«a lip.' Inflammation of the lips. — VogeC One 
who has a thick lip; LoAno, Lab^s. 

CHILOPLASTICE, Cheiloplastice. 

€:HIMAPmLA, Pyrola umbellata. 

CHIMETLUM, ChUblain. 

CHIMIA, Chymistry. 

CHIMIATER, Chymiater. 

CHIMIATRIA, Chymiatria. 

CHIMIB, Chymistry. 

CHIMISTE, Chymist. 

CHIMON, ChilbUin, Cold. 

CHINA. Cinchona, Smilaz china— c. Ame- 
rican or West India, Smilaz pseudo-china— c. 
Occidentalifl, Smilaz peeudo-china^-c. Root, 
Smilaz china— c. Spuria nodosa, Smilaz pseu- 
do-c hina . 

CHINCAPIN, Fagus castanea pumila— c. 
Water, Nelmnbinm luteum. 

CHINCHE, Cimez. 

CHINCHINA, Cinchona. 

CHINCHUNCHULLI, lonidiimi marcucci. 

CHINCOUGH, Pertussis. 

CHIN£S£,M£DICINE OYTKEyM^dicifna 
Sin' tea. Medicine has been long, but most im- 
perfectly, practised by the Chinese. From 
their therapeutics we have obtained the old 
operations of acupuncture and mozibustion. 

CHINCPS WORM LOZENGES, see Worm 
Lozenges, Ching's. 

CHINICUS ACETAS, Quinine, acetate of 
~c. Citras, Qniiline, citrate of. 

CHINII ACETAS, Quinine, acetate of. 

CHININI ACETAS, Quinine, acetate of. 

CHININUM, Quinine— c. Arsenicosum, see 
Qainine, salts of — c. Sulfuricum, see Quinine. 

CHINIOIDINE, Chinoidiney Chiftoidi'nay 
QwincTdine; from China, < Cinchona.* A sub- 
stance presumed to be an alkaloid by Serturner, 
who separated it from cinchona. It has been 
supposed to be a mizture of quinia, cinchonia, 
and a pecnliar resinous matter, but according 
To Lieing it is simply the alkaloid quinia in an 
afDorpbous state. 

CHINIUM ACETICUM, Quinine, acetate 
of — c. Ferrocyanogenatum, Quinine, Ferrocya- 
oate oP— c. H[ydrochloricum, Quinine, muriate 
of — c. Muriaticnm, Quinine, muriate of— c. Ni- 
trieum, Quinine, nitrate of^— c. Phosphoricum, 
Quinine, phosphate of— c. Salitum, Quinine, 
muriate of — €■ Su lphnricum, &c., see Quinine. 

CHINNETWEED, Lichen roccella. 

CHINQUAPIN, Fagus castanea pumila. 

CHINWHELK, Sycosis. 

CHIOCOCCiE RADIX, Caincae radix. 

CHIOLI, Fumncultts. 

CHION, &IOW. 

CBIQUBy (F.) Pue€ pen4trant0, Pufex P#«'- 
fCraiu, Tick J Ckiggrey Chigoe^ Chiggo. A 
«mall insect in America and the Antilles, which 
i^f'ts under the epidermis, and ezcites great ir- 
ritation. 

CHIR, Ckeir^ %ri^, Manns. 



CHIRAETA, Gentiana chirayta. 

CHPRAGRA, from /cic, 'hand,' and axc<c, 
<a seizure.* Gout in the band. 

CHIRAPOTHECA, Ars^al. 

CHIRAPSIA, Friction. 

CHIRARTHRrTIS,from/ii{,«hand,' «g«#»», 
'joint,' and itity denoting infhunmation. In- 
flammation of the joints of the hand. 

CHIRAYITA, Gentiana chirayta. 

CHIRAYTA, Gentiana chirayta. 

CHIRETTA, Gentiana chirayta. 

CHIRHEITMA, Chirrheuma. 

CHIRIATER, Surgeon. 

CHIRIATRIA, Surgery. 

CHIRIMOYA, Anona tripetala. 

CHIRISIS, Surgery. 

CHIRISMUS, Surgery. 

CHIRIXIS, Surgery. 

CHIROCYRTO'SIS, from /ftc, <the hand,* 
and xvfrwyif, 'crookedness.' Crookedness of 
the hand. 

CHIROMANCY, Chiromanti^ay VaHein*iwm 
ehiroman'Heumy Paim'iatrpy from jt"tf 'the 
hand,' and/<arrf<«, 'divination.' (F.) Chiro' 
mancis. Art of divining by inspection of the 
hand* 

CHIRONAX, Surgeon. 

CHIRCNIA, (from Chiron, X«ie»*, the Cen- 
taur, who is said to have discovered its use.) 
A genus of plants. Fam, Gentianess. 

Chiro'nia ANOULA'ais, Amsr 'icon Cen^taurfy 
Rosepiniy Wild Sue^corf, Bitterbloomy Centrjy 
Sabba'tiay S. Anguli^ris. Every part of tMs 
plant is a pure and strong bitter, which pro- 
perty is communicated alike to alcohol and to 
water. It is used as a tonic and stomachic. 

Chiro'ni a Cbnta v'ri vm, Centau'rium minus y 
vulga'riy Centau'rtum parvumy Gwttia'na een- 
tai^rium, Centaufrium minuSy Erythrttfa Cen^ 
tau'riufny Centau'reumy Centau*ris, Smaller 
Centau'ryy Leaser C$ntauryy (F.) Centaur^ 
petite. The tops of the lesser Centaury, Cen- 
taurii Caeu'mina, are aromatic and tonic, and 
are sometimes employed as such. 

Cbiko'nia Chilkm'sis, Gentia'na Caehenla^ 
hiien, Caehen-lagueny Erytkrr'a Chihn'siey 
OenHa'na Peruv%a*na. A very bitter plant, in- 
digenous in Chili. It possesses the virtues of 
the Chironem. Given in infusion— (Jj, to wa- 
ter Oj.) 

CHIRONI'UM,' from xui^vy 'bad, malig- 
nant.' An ulcer di fficult orcure :— of a swollen, 
hard, and callous nature < — Galen. Some have 
supposed the word to come from Chiron, the 
Centaur; who was unable to cure such ulcers. 

CHIRONOMI A, Cheironomia. 

CHIROP'ODIST, (F.) Pedicure. One who 
treats diseases of the hands and feet, or rather 
whose profession it is to remove corns and bun- 
Yons, from ^n^, 'the hand,' and irov^, 'the 
foot.' 

CHIRORRHEUMA, Chirrheuma. 

CHIROSIS, Subactio. 

CHIROSTROPHO SIS, from ^ti ^ , 'the hand,' 
and nrpf ipury, ' to tum.' Distortion of the hahd. 

CHIROTHE'CA, fit>m /n^, 'the hand,' and 
^17x17, 'a sheath.' A bandase for the hand; a 
kind of bandage in which the fingers and hand 
are enveloped in spiral turns. When the whole 
hand and fingers are covered, it is called the 
double or complete Ckirotheeay Ch. eomple^ta, 
Vinetu'ra omnibus dig"itie ; and when only a 
finger is covered, the half or ineompletCy Ch. 



GHIROTRIBIA 



176 



CflLQBOno 



incompU'tay VinOu'ra pr9 umo 4ig"if* See 
QantilMm 

CHIROTRI'BIA, from rfi«, «tbe band/ and 
T^/9*, < I rub.' Friction witb tbe band. Ac- 
cording to others, dexterity in an art. — ^Hippo- 
crates, Galen. 

CHIRRHEU'MAy Chirorrkeu'mny Rheuma- 
H»*mu$ manutyfTom 5t<'<9 ' ^be band,' and^v/Miy 
« flux/ RbeumatisR] of tbe hand. 

CHIRURGKON, Surgeon. 

CHIRURGIA, Surgery— c. Anaplasdca, 
Morioplastire— c. Curtorom, Morioplastice — c. 
In/hsoria, Infusion of medicines — c. Tranffuso- 
ria, Transfusion. 

CHIRURGICUS, Surgical. 

CHIRURGIEy Surgery— «. MiUiair^y Sur- 
gery, military. 

CHIRUROIENy Surgeon— «. ConsuUaMy 
Consulting Surgeon— «. HemUutiy see Hernial. 

CfflRXXRGIQUE, Surgical. 

CHIRURGUS, Surgeon. 

CHIST. An Arabic woid which signifies 
the sixth part. The sixth part of the Congitu 
or gallon. 

CHITON, Tunic. 

CHITONISCUS, Indusium. 

CHIUM VINUM. From Chios, the island 
where it was produced; Chian wifu, used by 
tbe physicians of antiquity in cases of deflux- 
ions and ophthalmise. — Scribonius Largus. 

CHLTAROS, jhapofy <tepid.' A name 
given to slight fevers, in which tbe heat is not 
great.^-Galen. 

CHLIAS'MA> /lioMv^e, same etjrmon. A 
tepid and moist fomentation. — ^Hippocrates. 

CHLOAS'MA, Pityri'asM vsrne'olor, £pke- 
lid* seorbHiique, Mae'ula hepat'icay Pannus A«- 
pat'teuty Hepati'tofiy Pkaei, Pha'e§ay Pkacusy 
(F.) Taches kepatiques, CJUUeurs du /om, 
Livsrspot, from /ilooc, * a greenish-yellow co- 
lour.' A cutaneous affection, characterized by 
one or more broad irregular-shaped patches, of 
a yellow or yellowish-brown colour, and occur- 
ring most frequently on tbe front of the neck, 
breast, abdomen, groins. Ice. The patches do 
not generally rise above the surface. There is 
usually some deipee of itching. 

The causes are not very evident. Sulphur 
externally — in any and every form — generally 
removes it speedily. Should there be difficulty, 
the external use of tbe remedy in baths or fu- 
migations may succeed. 

CHLORA, Chlorine. 

CHLOR-\S KALICUS DEPURATUS, Po- 
tasss murias hyperoxygenatus. 

CHLORASMA, Chlorosis. 
CHLOREy Chlorine—^. LifuidBy see Chlo- 
rine. 

CHLORETUM CALCARI^, Calcis chlo- 
ridum. 
CHLORIASIS, Chlorosis. 

CHLORINE, from /Iwgoty < green/ Chlo'- 
rinum, Chloray Oxymuriat'ic Acid Gas, Oxyge- 
nat$d JIfuriatie Atid Om»y DfphlogintUaUd Jtfo- 
rim Addy ffal'ogensy Mu*rigetie, Chlorum, (F.) 
Chlor: So far as we know, this is an elemen- 
tary substance. It is a greenish, yellow gas, 
of a strong suffocating smell, and disagreeable 
taste; incapable of maintaining combustion and 
respiration, and very soluble in water. One of 
its characteristics is, that of destroying, almost 
immediat'*ly, all vegetable and animal colours. 
It is employed in fumigations as a powerful 



disinfecting agent. A tmt dilute solatm,ilfM 
seu Liquor ddo'tiniy (F.) Cklor* Uqidd*, ha 
been administered internally, in certain caso 
of diarrbflea and chronic dysentery. ImmenMB 
of the hands and arms in it has often remoi cd 
itch and other cutaneous affections. It kit ibo 
been inhaled in a dilute state in the early itigi 
of phthisis, but it is of doubtful efficacy, ind ii . 
better adapted for chronie bronchitis. I 

CHLO ROFORM, Porchlorido of Pamql, 
called, also, Tereklorids of CarboUy and CkUne 
othoTy JSikor eklo'rimtOy (F.) Cklorur* i* Cm- 
houy so called on account of the connezioB of 
chlorine witb formic acid, is a colourlcsi oks- 
ginous liquid, of a sweetish ethereal odoar,lMt, 
aromatic, and peculiar taste, and of the tpecik 
gravity ] .4h0. It may be obtained by distilliag 
from a mixture of chlorinated lime sod ilcobol, 
— ^rectifying tbe product by re-distilktion, fint 
from a great excess of cnlorinated lime, wi 
afterwards from strong aulpkuric acid. It las 
been used with advantage in astluns, and is 
diseases in which a grateful soothing agent ii 
required. Bose, f. ;;ss to f. 3J. diluted witk 
water. It has likewise been prescribed with 
great success as an anesthetic agent in ^tf- 
modic diseases ; and to obtund sensibility in mr- 
^ical operatiops and in parturition,— etpeciallf 
m dto way of inhalation { but its use reqnim 
caution. 

CHLOROPHTLLEy Fecula, .green. 
CHLORO'SIS, from ;t'«Voc» 'green,' ?ii^ 
dtu Morbus y Redus Vir'ginum color yFal'li^ 
color virgin'susy Ict$rtt'*ia albay Ic'tonu s/Ku, 
Ltueopathi'Oy Morbus virgin'suSy Morbut Ptf^ 
tken'iusy Dyspsp'sia ehloro'sisyFebris amato'm, 
Cachsx'ia vir'ginumy Febris veV^Mwa, Ptirii 
albay Anspitkym'ia ckloro'sisy Cklorat'ma,CU»- 
ri'asisy Citto'sisy Chssn-sieJtnoss, (F.) Ci/f 
rose, Pdles-couleurs, A disease which afecti 
voung females, more particularly those wlv 
have not menstruated. It is characterised by 
a pale, lurid complexion, languor, listleonMi, 
depraved appetite and digestion, palpitation, l(c. 
The disease generally goes off on the occorreoee 
of the menstrual flux; but sometimes it ii long 
before this is establi^ed, and at timei, the a- 
tamenia are in much larger quantity than iiisil- 
To this last form M. Trousseau has given tk 
name cklorose ksmorrhagiquo. 

The blood of chlorosis is generally thin,li^- 
coloured, and deficient in red corpuscles; «im1 
the clot is in less proportion to the serum tlni 
in health. On auscultation, a belbws' tossd 
has been almost invariably detected over tbr 
heart, and a continuous blowing sound in thf 
larger arteries, (especially the carotids and sbV 
clavians,) re-enforced by each ujtKoit of tw 
ventricle, and resembling the buzzing of a ImB* 
mine-top, the cooing of doves, the wfaiatlio^a 
air through a key-hole. Ice, (See Bruii*) Very 
similar sounds are heard in the arteries after 
copious hemorrhage : they seem, therefore, to 
comcide with enfeebled circulation. , 

Tonics — as iron— are usually required in tbe 
treatment, — ^the disease most commonly ocoir- 
ring in those in whom there is conudeisble 
torpor of the system. 

Chlobosis ^thiopuk Chthonophagis--<* 
Amatoria, Hectic fevei^-^. Gigantea, see mj- 
sarcia. 

CHLOROTIC, Cklorot'icusy (F.) Cklsn- 
Hquo, Affected with chlorosis, or pertaining 



onxmuM 



lit 



CHOLERA 



to chliMMisf— «• M^rwtie ftmtds, MufwtU 

CHLORUM, Chlorine. 

CHLORUBE DB CARBON^ Chloiofonn 
«-«. d*Or^ Gold, Muriate of. 

CHLORUBETUM OXIDI CALCU, Calcie 
eUondinn. 

CHOA, Cha. 

CHOA'CUM EMPLA8TRUM NIGRUM. 
A UMk plMtery mcationed by Celeiie, and com- 
poied or eqoU poite of litharge and resin. The 
iitfaaif e was fiitt boUed'in o&. 

CHOAlCy Cjnanche trachealia--€. Wolf, Lj- 



CHO AN A, PelTis— e. Cerebri, iDftmdibnlam 
if the brain. 

CHOANE, InAmdibnlom. 

CHOANORRHA6JA, Epistazis* 

CHOAVA, Coiiea Arabica. 

CHOCOLATE, Ckaeola'tum, Ckoeola*tay 
Smct^lm'tm^ SmteoeMa'ta. Dr. Alston sajs, 
that this word is compounded from two East 
Indian words : — «A««s, • sound/ end tuUy * water,' 
because of the noise made in its preparation. 
An alimentary paste prepared from the kernels 
of the Tlu9h^'ma 9aoao or Caeaoy with sugar, 
snd often aromatics. (See Cacao.) The cho- 
csiite thus simply prepared--as it is met with, 
indeed, in commerce — ^is called in France Ckc- 
mUi 4$ smmti. It is not very easy of digestion. 

The ekae^Ui ^ /« vanilU contains three ounces 
of 9mmiUa and two of cmmmmom to twenty pounds 
of SMMMM ekocolaU. The addition of the aro- 
nmtic renders it somewhat more digestible. 
Choeoiates may likewise be medicated. 

CHOCOLATE ROOT, Geum Yirginiannm. 

CHOCUS, Chu. 

CHOCNICIS, Trepan* 

CH(ENION, Cord. 

CH(ENOS^ ror4. 

CHCERUS, Serofhla. 

CHOIROS, Vulva. 

CHOKE DAMP, Carbonic acid. 

CHOLA, Chole. 

CHOLAGO, Cholas. 

CHOL'AGOGUE, Ckolago'gut, Ckolt'gosj 
FUiid'fteuMj from x^^f * ^^^* uid oyw, ' I ex- 
pel.' The ancients gave this name to cathar-' 
tics, which were reputed to cause the flow of 
bile. 

CHOLANSIS, Cholosis. 

CHOLAS, jr*M^ Plur. /oxfla^c The epi- 
pstric region. CMm'go. The intestines.—- 



CHOLASMA, Cholosis. 

CHOLiC CAWm, Ckda^ < bile,' (q. v.) in 
composition.— Hence : 

CHOLKCCHTSiaCJb/sit laftyjM; 6oro jr»ai|, 
* bile,' and t rxv^*^y * efl!bsion. ' Eflnsion of bile. 

CHOLECTST, Gall-bhulder. 

CHOLECT$TEURYSrMA,fromr«a», <bile,' 
nrrt^y * bladder,' and movrfa*^ * dilatation.' Di- 
hlatioo of the gall-blsdder. 

CHOLECYSTITIS, InUmma'tio V^ti'em 
m'9m^ I. ^Mtidis f€irm, CystCHs fei'lB*y H^ 
fm^Hs C^at^Uoy from vaiif, < bile,' and Rwrir, 
'Usdder.' (F.) Injlammatum tU U Ven€ui0du 
He/, CkoiicfftHu. Inflammation of the gall- 



adder. 

CHOL'EDOCH, CkoMToekua; from ^Xn, 
*bOc' and ^v/of, * containing or receivmg^' 
The Dwttna ekolsdoekus sett ktf/tito^g'iicusf, 
i>Mtiw tow Bi Ma is ekoUdockuty (F.) Omduii ou 



Cammt CMUoqu§y is the duct formed by the 
union of the hepatic and cystic ducts, which 
pours the hepatic and cystic bile into the duo- 
denum. 

CHOLEDOCITIS, from ekoledocknsy and 
•*»>; a snflbc denoting inflammation. Inflam- 
mation of the choledoch duct. 

CHOLED061tAPHT,CA«/«</o^tf'>Ua,nU»* 
legraph'iay Chologmph'iay from %v>l>/, 'bile,' 
and yptf^tiv, <to describe.' A description of 
what relates to the bile and bilisry organs. 

CHOLEDOL'OGT, ChoMoUg"iay Ckoi^ 
/o^'m, Chololoff'iay from ^oiq, <bile,' and 
aox«c, <a discourse.' A treatise on the bile 
and biliary organs. 

CHOLEGOS, Cholagogue. 

CHOLEGRAPHIA, Cboledography. 

CHOLEHiCMIA, Icterus. 

CHOLEIA, Claudication. 

CHtJLELITHIA, Cysthepato]ithissis*^c. 
Icterus, Icterus. 

CHOLELITHIASIS, Cysthepatolithiaais. 

CHOLELITHUS, Calculi, biliary. 

CHOLELOGIA, Choledology. 

CHOLEMES'IA, CkoUm'e9it, from /•lif, 
'bile,' and •^fvif, * vomiting.' Yomiting of 
bile. 

CHOLENCHYSIS, Cholecchysis. 

CHOLEPYRA, Fever, bilious. 

CHOLEPYRFFUS, Fever, bilious. 

CHOLEPYRRHIN, see Bile. 

CfiOL'ERA, CkoV0ru^mo*ku9y Chol'sra nof- 
trag, Ckoltra vnlgt^tisy Sforatfie CkofetOj 
CkoUrrk«^gi€ty Pa^sio rkoU/iea, F^liiflua 
jMSMOyJUorhufgliifluusy Hol'ernyBUitJlna^ioy 
(F.) Ckofdra-inorbHS spomdiqugy Ch. Euro^ 
ps'fift, TVousM-gafatUy from x^Xtf, 'bile,' and 
{Ml, * I flow.' According to others, from ;^c- 
x«^«(, * intestines,' or from x^^*9*» ' ^® gotter 
of a house to carry ofl" the lain.' The l^gher 
degrees have been called Centfgangfh'Hay and 
MyeiogangliS^tia. A disease characterised by 
<^>^icty, gripings, spasms in the legs and arms, 
and by vomiting and purging (generally bi- 
lious:) vomiting and purging are, indeed, the 
essential symptoms. The disease is most com* 
mon in hot climates, — and in temperate cli- 
mates, during summer. In India, Spasmotf* 
M ckoferay As*at*ie ckoleray MaHg'iumt «A., 
IWdiam. ekoUrmy EfUmmfic db., p0Hikn*iiaiek,y 
Asphyxia peHiian'tHy PestiUnftial aspky^uty 
Cko^erie P§st'iltu$y Eatttn rk., Orian'tui «4., 
ChoUra TUntu'ltM, Ch. In'dieay Ch, Efidamfi- 
em. Typhus Btngmlsnfsisy ChoNro-typhns, GtfM- 
gUoniftis periphsr'iea st msdull^risy ffymsn^ • 
gnngliCtisyPnntogang'ii^Hs, Cho 'srrhm'a/ymph^ 
aticoy Psar^nisr'ta ; Typhoid Fevsr of ItuUtiy 
Cholora asphyxia^ Hyporinuhrt ac'is, Entsrop^y" 
ra AsMlf%e»y JVtsplaneh'niay TritplanehnffHSy 
Manmataporrho'sisy Bamntorrho'sisy Morbus 
aryzeus, Mnlignaut ChoUrOy Convulsive ner^ 
vous ChoUra'y Rioe diseass, (because supposed 
by Tytler to be caused by diunaged rice,) (F.) 
Mort do Chiouy is frightful in &e rapidity^ of 
its progress, the patient sometimes dying m a 
few hours from the first onset. In temperate 
climates, common cholera is not usually a dis- 
ease of much consequence. It requires that tiie 
stomach and bowels should be cleared, and af- 
terwards the irritation be allayed by fbll doses 
of opium. In the malignant eho'sra of India, 
hissing at tha outset, without regard to the 



CHOLEBA-EUROFAEN 



180 



CHONDBO-PHARTNGEirS 



signs of apparent depression, and large doses of 
calomel, with opiates, form the great reliance 
of the practitioner. 

Cholera, Asiatic, see Cholera-— e. Asj^yxia, 
see Cholera— €. Epidemic, see Cholera— e. Eu- 
ropden, see Cholera^— c. Indian, see Cholera— «• 
Indica, see Cholera. 

Cholera Infan'tttm, Chol'*ric Fww of ht" 
fantt; Cholera of Infants, A disease so termed 
hy American physicians. It occurs, generally, 
in the middle states of the Union, in June or 
July, and continues during the hot weather, 
hence called the < summer c6mpjaint»' The 
chief symptoms are vomiting, purging of green 
or yellow matter, slime or blood, attended with 
pain or uneasiness ; and swelling of the abdo- 
men, with some pyrexia, generally. The heat 
of the weather seems to be the predisposing, if 
not the exciting, cause. It is a fiital disease in 
towns; differing little, if at all, from what is 
mlgarly called the Watory Gripes in England. 
Clearing, gently, the alimentary canal, so as to 
remove the offending matter, and then exhibit- 
ing chalk mixture and laudanum, with counter- 
irritants, as sinapisms to the a'bdomen, is the 
most satisfactory plan of treatment. 

Cholera Malignant, see Cholera — c. Mor- 
bus, Cholera — e. Morbus Sporadi^ue^ see Cho- 
lera — c. Nervous, convnlsive, see Cholera — o. 
Nostras, Cholera morbus— c. Oriental, see Cho- 
lera— <. Pestilential, see Cholera— c. Spasmo- 
dic, see Cholera— c. Sporadic, Cholera — &• See, 
Cholera siccsp— c. Vulgaris, Cholera morbus. 

Chol'vra Sicca, (F.) Ckoiira see. Pneu- 
matosis of the digestive passages in which there 
is a copious discl^rge of gas upwards and down- 
wards. 

CHOLERAPHOBIA, Choleromania. 

CHOL'ERIC, Chole/ieus. Belonging to 
cholera morbus or to the bile. The French use 
the term Fihvre ehoUrique for the fever accom- 
panying cholera. 

Crolbric Fbvsr op Infants, CholerK in- 
fontum. 

Choleric Txmpbramsnt is the same as Bi- 
lious Temperament, 

CHOL'ERINE. A diminutive of Cholera; 
The first stage of epidemic cholera; also, the 
precursory symptoms of cholera. 

CHOLEROMA'NIA, Ckolerapho'bia, CkoU- 
ropfu/Hay from cholera and mania, A dread of 
chDlera to such an extent that the individual 
fancies himself affected or threatened by it. 

CHOLEROPHOBIA, Choleromania. 

CHOLEROPHO'Nfi,from Cholera, BH&^mm^. 
# 'voice.' The peculiar voice of one in cholera. 

CHOLEROPROSOl'ON, ChoUrop'sis, from 
Cholera, and n^ovmnov, < coimtenance.' The 
fiicial expression of cholera. 

CHOLEROPSIS, Choleroprosopoa. 

CHOLERO-TYPHUS, Cholera, (spasmodic) 

CH0LERRHA6IA, Cholera. 

CHOLERRHCEA LYMPHATIC A,Cholera. 

CHOLESTEARINOMA, Cholesteatoma. 

CHOLESTEATINE, Cholesterin. 

CHOLESTEATO'MA, from ^eii;, <bUe,' 
and steatoma, (q. v.) An encysted tumour, 
which presents upon the interior of the cyst se- 
veral superimposed layers of cholesterin, which 
glisten like pearl. Hence it was named by Crn- 
veilheir the laminated ^naor sous fatty tumour, 

CHOL'ESTERIN, ChoVesteHne, CholesU- 
fi'ntiy Cholos'terina, Cholestearin£, ChoUstea- 



H'nt, from 5rta9, 'bile, and rTf^Mf, < solid,' i 
rTM^, ' suet? An inodorous, insipid substanc 



ibstanee, 
in white, shining scales; teible' and crystal- 
lizing, on cooling, in radiated fibres. Solobk 
in alcohol. It forms the crystalline part of 
certain biliary calculi. See Adipocire. 

CHOLEUMA, Cholosis. 

CHOLIA, Cholosis. 

CHOLICE'Lfi, from xelfi, <btle,' and it^aii^ 
( tumour.' A swelling, formed by the bile mor- 
bidly accnmnlated in the gall-bladder. 

CHOLICUS, Bilious. 

CHOLIUS, Bilious. 

CHOLICTaTIECTASIE,Tnrg!taeen^WB' 
sicse fellesB. 

CHOLICYSTITE, Cholecystitis. 

CHOLOCATAR'RHOPHE, Cholooat^^rko- 
phe'sis, Cholooatatrhoph'ia ; from ;^oili7, * bile,' 
and aroTtf^^^iv, * to sup up.' The absorptioB 
of bile. 

CHOLOGRAPHIA, Choledography. 

CHOLOLITHUS, see Calcnli, bil4ry. 

CHOLO'MA, from yoxo«, < lame, maimed.' 
Distortion of a limb : mcapacity of moving it. 
Also, the act of limping, claadication, (q. v.) 

CHOLOPLANIA, Icterus. 

CHOLORRHCE'A, from jr^lq, 'bile,' and 
«w, * I flow.' An abnormous discharge of bile. 

CHOLOS, Bile, Chole. 

CHOLO'SES, from /olif,' bile.' M. Alibert 
includes, under this head, every morbid affec- 
tion of the liver and spleen. 

CHOLO'SIS, from /auioc, < lame.' Cko'latos, 
Cholas'ma, Cholan'sis, Choleu'ma, CkalHa, 
Claiidiea^tion^ (q. v.) Hippocrates employs 
this word particolarly for a lameness of the 
hand, which renders a person one-handed, mam- 
choty(F.) Also, Icterus. 

Cholosis Americana, Fever, yellow. 

CHOLOSTERINE, Cholesterin. 

CHOLOTES, CholosU. 

CH0L0ZE3aA FEBRILIS, Fever, biliov. 

CHONDRITIS, /i»/f«iM)Mi'<tb Cartilag^ims; 
from ^ovifocf * cartilage,' anditeV, a termination 
den6tmg inflammatioiu Inflammation of car- 
tilage. 

CHONDROCLA'SIS, from /»»^(«c, « carti- 
lage,' and xl«0ic, < fracture.' Fracture of a 
cartilage. 

CHONDRODES, Cartilaginous, Chondroid. 

CHONDROGENES'IA, Chondrogen'esis ; 
from x*t^«c9 *A cartilage,' and ywtoi^, * forma- 
tion.' Formation of cartilage. A morbid 
conversion of parts into cartilage. 

CHONDROGLOS'SUS, from i^ovApoc, ' a car- 
tilaee,' and y^meou, < the tongue.^ A fasciculus 
of fleshy fibres, passing frt>m the lesser coma 
of the OS hyoides to the t<mgue. It fonns pait 
of the hyoglossus. ^ 

CHONDROGHAPHY, Chondrogra'pkia, 
from x^H^f* * cartilage,' and yf^y ' descrip- 
tion.' A description of cartilages. 

CHONDROiD, Chondroi'des, Chondro'd-, 
from jT"*^*'; 'cartilage,' and «f/oc, 'resekMh- 
blance.' Cartilaginiform. Resembling cartilage. 

CHONDROL'OGY, ChmdroUg'^ia, from 
5^«r^^c, < a cartilage,' and io^, *a discoorae.' 
A treatise on cartilages. 

CHONDROMA, Enehondroma, from ^o^ 
ifu, * cartilage.' A cartilaginous growth pro- 
ceeding from bones, including spina ventoaa, 
osteo-sarcoma. Ice, of many. 

CHONDRO-PHARYNGEUS, from 7«r«coc» 



CHONBROKS 



181 



CHOROtD 



* a ontikgV uid ^^vyl^ < the pharynx.' Fi- 
bres of the muscular coat of the phsrynz, which 
tfrise from the lesser comus of the os hyoides, 
end form part of the Coustrietor mediu** See 
Goostrictor pharrngis. 

CHONDRO'SES, from v^d^ic, < cartilage.' 
▲ morbid formation or condition of a cartilage. 
CHONBROSTERNAL, Ckondrostema'lis, 
from ^•'^{•Cy 'a cartilage/ and #i«n»iMiy *the 
breast bone.' Having relation to the cartilages 
of the ribs and breastbone, — as the ekondr^- 
tlmnai Ugaments, articulations, Ice. 

CHONDROSTNDES'MnS, from /ov^roc, ' a 
cartilage,' and 0>ifv^0>^*c, <a li^pment.' Union 
<tfboiieB,bjmeansof fibro-cartilage* Sjrnchon- 
drosis. 

CHONDROTOMY, Chondrotomfur, from 
/•y^of, ' a cartilage,' and xuftuty, ' to cut. Dis- 
section of cartilages. 

CHONDRO-XIPHOID, ChtrndrcZipMi'des, 
from xo9iff^y <a cartilage,' and xiphoid, the 
cartilage so called. Having relation to the 
xiphoid cartilage, as * Ckandro-xiphoid liga- 
ment*' 

CHONDRUS, Cartilage, like Xiphoid ear- 
iHagSy in particular. 

CHOHoaua, A Ilea, Fucus crispus — c. Cris- 
pQS, Focus crispus-— c. Polymorphns, Fucus 
cfupos* 

CHONOS, Infundibulom. 

CHOPINE, Chopi'noy Cheopi'na. A mea- 
sare» which contains 1 6 ounces. A pint measure . 

CHORA, ^Mf a, * region.' Any void space. 
Also, the orbit of the eye. 

CHORD, TESTICULAR, ^rmatic chord. 

CHORDA, Corda. A string of an instru- 
ment. It has several meanings : — asat^m^on, — 
the infatines {Chorda*) Araceltus calls the 
genital organs ehorda. Chorda sen Funie'tdut 
T\m*pafn; a branch of the 7th pair of nerves, 
according to some, but rather of the 5th pair, 
which passes through the t3rmpanum, — Nerf 
TfwtptuUqtiO^Ck.) Cordo du Tambour ou du 
Tympam, Chordm WUlit'ii^ Trahec'tda Wil- 
Uo*iij the small fibres which cross the sinuses 
of the dura mater : so called from their first 
describer, Willis. Chorda Tendififem; the 
tendinous and cord-like substances which con- 
nect the toiumnm eamem of the ventricles of 
the heart to the valves, &c. 

Chorda, Intestine — c. Hippocratis, Achillis 
Tendo. 

CHORDS Chordee— c. Ferrenii, Chords, 
vocal. 

Cboxda LoiroinmiifA'LBS Lancis'ii. Two 
or three longitudinal elevations and lines on 
the upper suHace of the corpus callosum. 

Chorda Psnis, Chordee— c. Tendinea, 
tee Chorda— c. Veneris, Chordee — c. Vocales, 
Chords, vocal— c. Willisii, see Chorda. 

CHORD AP'SUS, from xH^y < intestine,' 
aid anrfliv, ' to tie.' Intustuaeojttio» Constric- 
tion or twisting of the intestines. — Celsus. 
The Colica Ileus. See Enteritis and Ileus. 

CHORDEE', Cordo^y Chorda Ven'eria sen 
Fmaisy Fhaiiameflo'tig^ Phalloeamf/sit, Chor- 
imy Ckordafta Gonorrha'a. A painful affection 
of the penis, attending gonorrhcea, and happen- 
ing chiefly at night. It occurs when the vio- 
lence of the inflammation is such, that the ure- 
thra cannot expand as much as the corpora 
cavernosa during erection, and consequently 
the ^ans aaemt painfully drawn downwards. 



The application of cold water topically and 
the aoministration of opium internally, pal- 
liate it. V 

CHORE'A, Chorea Saneti ViH, Ch. Saneti 
ModM*ti, Ch, g99tieulato*ria, Choroma'ma^ 
Sfn'elonus saltans, Tripudia'tio 9pas*tiea, from 
/o(«iai, « a dance;' sometimes called Seelotyr'- 
hi, Viii SaltuSf Salta'tio Saroti Viti, Ballit'- 
mu§, Convul'tio habitua*lis, Siph'ita prava, 
Sffn'dontu Chorsoj Myotyr*bi, Choreoma'nia, 
Orehostroma^nioy EpUept'ia SeUtato'rioj Mor^ 
bus saltat</rius, Hieran'ostUy M, gsstietUtUo'^ 
riusySeelotfr^bi tarantitm'us, Si, Vitus' a Dance, 
because the movements resemble dancing. (F.) 
Chords, Danse de Saint- Witt, Danes de St. 
GruT. The characteristics are : — ^irregular and 
involuntary motions of one or more limbs, and 
of the ftce and trunk. It is a disease which 
usually occurs before puberty; and is generally 
connected with torpor of the system, and of 
the digestive system in particular. Its dura- 
tion is long, but it is usually devoid of danger; 
although frequently but little under the control 
of mMicine. The spasms do not continue 
during sleep. The indications of treatment 
are : to strengthen the general system, and stir 
mulate the intestinal canal. Purgatives, once 
or twice a week, and chalybeates, with appro- 
priate regimen, will fulfil these. 

Chorba, Chronic, see Tie—c, Faciei, Tio 
-t-c. Gesticulatoria, Chorea— «. Partial, see 
2Ve— c. Saneti Modesti, Chorea^-e. Saneti Var 
lentini, Tarantismus— c. Saneti Viti, Chorea. 

CHORE'61 A , from x^^^i * ^ ^^<^f o^ dancers 
and singers,' and ttyo, U lead.' Hippocrates 
uses this term for the whole of the apparatus 
necessary for a physician or surgeon. 
CHOREOMANIA, Chorea. 
CHORIODEf'TIS, ChorioidA'Hs', Chorit^" 
di'tis, Choroidi'tis, from x*i***^y '^^® <^^ 
roid,' and itis. Inflammation of the choroid 
coat of the eye. 
CHORIODES, Choroid. 
CHORIOIDEA, Choroid. 
CHORIOIDES, Choroid. 
CHO'RION, /e^ior, < skin,' from ^»ctc>, «to 
contain, include.' Camis'ia Fatus, the ehe- 
miss or shirt of the foetus in utero. A thin, 
transparent membrane, which surrounds the 
fcetus in utero on every side. It is exterior to 
the amnion. 

Chorion also means the true skin. See 
Cutis. 

Chorion Fungosum, Decidua — c. Reticula- 
tum, Decidua — c. Shaggy, Decidua — c. Spon- 
giosum, Decidua— c. Spongy, Decidua — c. To- 
mentosum, Decidua. 

CHORIONITIS. Induration of the Cellular 
tissue. 

. CHOROID, ChoroVdsue, ChorcVdee, Cho* 
rioides, Chorio'des, from xtf^tii^, * the chorion,' 
and •iiof, < shape,' < resemblance.' Several 
parts are so called, which resemble the chorion, 
in the multitude of their vessels. 

Choroidxa sen Chorioidea Tu'nica, Ch, 
Memhra'na, or simply the Choroid, Tt^niea 
vaseuii/sa Oe'uii, T, aeiniform'is seu rhago'^ 
dse, (F.) Membrane ehorolde, Choroxde, A 
thin membrane, of a very dark colour, which 
lines the sclerotica, internally. The part be- 
hind the iris is called Uvea, It is situate be- 
tween the sclerotica and retina, has an opening, 
posteriorly, for the passage of the optic nerve ; 



CBOEOIDS 



in 



CHRTSOIIELIA 



and tflnninttef , anterior! j, at tlit great cireiim- 
fbrence of the irU, where it is continaoaa with 
the ciliary processes. According to Raysch, 
the choroid consists of two layers, to the inner- 
most of which his son gave Uie name Tu^niea 
Ruytekiafnoy Membra'na Ruytekie^na^ (F.) 
Mmnbran^ RufsekUnne, The internal aurhce 
of the membrane is covered with a dark pig- 
ment, consisting of several layers of pigment 
cells, called Pigmm'tum nigrmmy Ophtkalmo- 
ckni'U9i .Sthiopt ainimaiy (F.) EnduU ckorol- 
dUm. Its use seems to be, to absorb the rays 
of light after they have traversed the retina. 

CHoaoi'DBS Plsxus, Pltwus ck9roViUu9 sen 
rsHnUa'tiSf Vsrwus cer'sbri, Choroid Phmus, 
Two membranoas and vascular duplicatnres of 
the pia mater, situate in the lateral ventricles, 
They are fixed to the Tela rAoroidsa by one 
edp, and are loose and floating at the other. 

CnoaoioBA Tbla, (F.) Tnl§ ekoro^dionns, 
A kind of vasculo-membranous prolongation of 
the pia mater, which lines the lower surface of 
the fornix united with the corpus calloeum. It 
is stretched above the third ventricle, and 
covers the posterior commissure and corpora 
quadrigemina. Anteriorly, the tela choroidea 
is continuous with the plexus choroides. 

Chosoidxa YaifA, VenmGale'niflF.) Vtirus 
ckoroidiennes. Two veins, which creep along 
the tela c