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Full text of "Memorial encyclopedia of the state of New Hampshire;"



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Gc M. L; 

974.2 

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1214169 



GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



3 1833 01085 8675 



JMcmorial encyclopedia 



of the 



State of JVcw Rarnpsbirc 



Under the Editorial Supervision of 
COL. JAMES A. ELLIS 



Historian of The American Historical Society 



Assisted bji 
A Staff of Experienced Qenealogical and Biographical Writers 



THE AMERICAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

INCORPORATED 

BOSTON NEW YORK CHICAGO 

1919 



iforetDorD 

EACH one of us is "the heir of all the 
ages, in the foremost files of time." 
We build upon the solid founda- 
tions laid by the strenuous efforts of the 
fathers who have gone before us. Noth- 
ing is more fitting, and indeed more 
important, than that we should famil- 
iarize ourselves with their work and 
personality; for it is they who have 
lifted us up to the lofty positions from 
which we are working out our separate 
careers. "Lest we forget," it is impor- 
tant that we gather up the fleeting mem- 
ories of the past and give them perma- 
nent record in well-chosen words of 
biography, and in such reproduction of 
the long lost faces as modern science 
makes possible. 

Col. James A. Ellis. 




12141G9 

JToretDort 

'HE historic spirit faithful to the record; the discerning judg-- 
ment, unmoved by prejudice and uncolored by undue enthu- 
siasm, are as essential in giving the life of the individual 
person as in wrriting the history of a people. The world 
to-day is what the leading men of the last generation have 
made it. From the past has come the legacy of the present. 
Art, science, statesmanship, government, as well as advanced 
industrial and commercial prosperity, are accumulations. They constitute 
an inheritance upon which the present generation has entered, and the 
advantages secured from so vast a bequeathment depend entirely upon the 
fidelity with which is conducted the study of the lives of those who have 
transmitted the legacy. 

In every community there have been found men who were leaders in 
thought and action, and who have marked the passing years with large and 
worthy achievement. They have left definite impress in public, professional, 
industrial, commercial, and other lines of endeavor that touch the general 
welfare. They have wrought well and have left a valuable heritage to pos- 
terity. 

The State of New Hampshire afifords a peculiarly interesting field for 
such research. Her soil has been the scene of events of importance and the 
home of some of the most illustrious men of the nation. Her sons have shed 
luster upon her name in every profession, and wherever they have dispersed 
they have been a power for ideal citizenship and good government. The 
province of the present publication is that of according due recognition to 
such leading and representative citizens, who have thus honored their State 
or community. Such a work cannot but have a large and intrinsic value, 
both in its historic utility and in the interest attaching to its subject-matter. 

The American Historical Society, Inc. 





w^ 



WILLIAM K. CHANDLER 




Hon* IKilltam €. Cljanliler 

N THE active national affairs of the country in the latter part 
of the nineteenth century, William E. Chandler was identi- 
fied and participated in all of the important legislations of 
that period. He was born in Concord, New Hampshire, 
December 28, 1835, son of Nathan S. and Mary A. Chandler. 
He was educated at the Academy of Thetford, Vermont, 
and Pembroke, New Hampshire, and was graduated at the 
Harvard Law School in 1854. In 1856 he was admitted to the bar and 
began practice in Concord, identifying himself with the Republican party, 
which was organized that year. He was appointed law reporter of the 
New Hampshire Supreme Court in 1859, and published five volumes of the 
reports. 

He was elected a member of the State Legislature in 1862, and was 
Speaker of the House in 1864-65. He was engaged by the Navy Depart- 
ment in the latter part of 1864 as special counsel in the Navy Yard frauds, 
and his conduct in the matter led to his appointment by President Lincoln 
as First Solicitor and Judge Advocate-General of the Navy Department. 
From June 17, 1865, to November 30, 1867, he was first assistant to Hugh 
McCulloch, Secretary of the Treasury. After his resignation he practiced 
law in New Hampshire and Washington, D. C. 

He was elected a delegate-at-large to the National Republican Conven- 
tion in 1868, and was subsequently chosen secretary of the national com- 
mittee, holding the position during President Grant's administration. 
Meanwhile he had become part owner of the largest interest in the "States- 
man," a weekly, and the "Monitor," a daily Republican paper of New Hamp- 
shire. In 1876 he was a member of the New Hampshire convention which 
met to revise the State Constitution. In 1880 he was elected a delegate to 
the Chicago National Convention, He was nominated by President Gar- 
field as Solicitor-General in the Department of Justice, but on account of his 
radical views on the southern question his confirmation was opposed by 
Attorney-General McVeagh and by all the Democratic Senators, and was 
rejected on May 20 by a majority of five votes. He was elected a member 
of the New Hampshire Legislature in 1880, and served during 1881. On 
April 7, 1882, he was appointed Secretary of the Navy by President Arthur, 
and served until March 7, 1885, making many notable improvements in that 
department. He almost entirely reconstructed the complex and expensive 
systems of conducting the navy, and brought about the beginning of a 
modern navy by building four new cruisers. In 1884 he organized the 
Greely Relief Expedition. He was elected to the United States Senate on 
June 14, 1887, to fill the unexpired term of Austin F. Pike, which ended 
March 3, 1889, and was reelected in 1889, 1895, and 1901. He was president 
of the Spanish Treaty Claims Commission. 



2 !|)on. mnUam OB. Chandler 

William E. Chandler was a man of national prominence; his senatorial 
career was marked with a strict application to business, he always having 
at heart the interests of his State. As a cabinet official, the Navy received 
in him a head fully competent to manage all the details of that trying posi- 
tion. His genial disposition, his courteous manner, and ever-willing help 
to assist others in their difficulties, won him the friendship and love of his 
subordinates. It was, however, as president of the Spanish Treaty Claims 
Commission that he became an international figure; his astute business 
training, his conception of details and his industry, were all qualifications 
that fitted him for this important position. 

Senator Chandler's home life was ideal; he ever had the respect and 
confidence of the citizens of his native city, and enjoyed every minute spent 
in their midst when seeking recreation from the arduous duties of his 
national positions. His death occurred at Concord, New Hampshire, 
November 30, 1917. Many were the condolences of sympathy received by 
his surviving relatives. To the citizens of his State it was not a national 
personality that had passed away, but that a dear friend and neighbor was 
no longer to greet them with the everready hand of friendship and a smile of 
welcome. Though a national figure was forevermore silent, it was those 
who were deprived of his daily intercourse and associations who realized 
the void thus created. 







Hon. 3(acob J|. (S^allinser 

HE Hon. Jacob H. Gallinger, late United States Senator from 
New Hampshire, was born near Cornwall, Ontario, Canada, 
March 28, 1837, the son of Jacob and Catherine (Cook) Gal- 
linger. He received an academic education, after which he 
first learned the trade of printer, and then took a course at 
a medical institute in Cincinnati, Ohio, graduating in 1858. 
After studying abroad two years, he returned to the United 
States, locating at Concord, New Hampshire, where he engaged in the prac- 
tice of medicine and surgery. He soon gained a large and lucrative practice 
that extended beyond the limits of his residential State. 

A Republican in politics, he was elected to the House of Representatives 
of New Hampshire in 1872, 1873 and 1891, and was a member of the State 
Constitutional Convention of 1876. In the latter he distinguished himself 
by advocating and securing the submission of important amendments to 
the State Constitution, which were ratified by the people. He served in ,the 
State Senate from 1878 to 1880, being president of that body in the two 
latter years. He was Surgeon-General with the rank of Brigadier-General 
of the National Guard of New Hampshire in 1879-1880. As chairman of 
the Republican State Committee from 1882 to 1890, he stamped himself by 
his services a political manager of great ability and shrewdness. He 
resigned this position in 1890, but served again in that capacity from 1900 
to 1908, when he again tendered his resignation. He was chairman of the 
New Hampshire delegation in the Republican National Convention, in 1888, 
held at Chicago, Illinois, and seconded by speech the nomination of General 
Benjamin Harrison for president. He attended the Republican National 
Conventions of 1900, 1904 and 1908, and was a member of the Republican 
National Committee from 1902 to 1904. He was chairman of the Merchant 
Marine Commission of 1904-05. 

Senator Gallinger's career as a national legislator commenced when he 
was elected to the Forty-ninth Congress, and he was reelected to the suc- 
ceeding Congress. He took a leading part in debate, served on important 
committees, but declined a renomination in 1888. The term of Henry W. 
Blair as United States Senator expired March 3, 1891, and Mr, Gallinger 
was elected to succeed him, taking his seat March 4, 1891. He was reelected 
to the United States Senate, and was serving his sixth consecutive term at 
the time of his death. He was a prominent member of the committees on 
appropriations, finance, rules, printing, besides many others. 

Mr. Gallinger received the degree of M. D. from the Medical Institute 
of Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1858, also from the New York Homoeopathic Medical 
College in 1868, and that of A. M. from Dartmouth College in 1885. 

He married, in August, i860, Mary Anna Bailey, of Salisbury, New 
Hampshire. His death occurred at his summer home, Franklin, NewHamp- 
shire, August 17, 1918. 



4 ^on. 3[acoIi 1^. 0al linnet 

Senator GalHnger was a ready and graceful writer, and a speaker of 
much power and influence, being one of the most popular and successful 
campaign orators in New England. His high talents and affable and engag- 
ing address won him exceptional popularity in his adopted State, and pro- 
cured him success in the broad field of national politics. 

As a parliamentarian, Senator Gallinger was recognized by his col- 
leagues as an authority. His senatorial career was marked by diligent 
industry; his work on the various committees to which he was assigned was 
faithfully attended to in every detail. A staunch political partisan, his voice 
was ever raised in support of the doctrines and principles of the Republican 
party. Though of foreign birth, he was an ideal patriot; he was ever, in 
thought and action, for the furtherance of his adopted country's interests 
not only at home but abroad. Senator Gallinger was a strong supporter of 
President Wilson when it became necessary to take war measures against 
Germany. He was always at the aid of the President in the various measures 
for the creation of a war force and the country preparedness for the event 
that was to place the country in the first place among the nations of the 
world. 

The death of Senator Gallinger removes a familiar figure from the walks 
of Washington. For over a quarter of a century he made his home at the 
National Capital, spending but a few months in the summer season at his 
country home in his adopted State. In his death the country lost a faithful 
official, and his resident State one of her most worthy and useful citizens. 




I^^rberl iFrrmonl (IIl|aB?r 




Herbert JTremont Cfjaper 

ERBERT FREMONT THAYER long held distinctive pres- 
tige in a calling that requires for its basis sound mentality, 
supplemented by a good, thorough professional training, 
without which one cannot hope to rise above the mediocre. 
The life of this gentleman affords a striking example of a 
well defined purpose, with the ability to make that purpose 
subserve not only his own ends but the good of his fellow- 
men as well. In addition to his creditable career, he proved himself an 
honorable member of those energetic men of affairs, whose united labors 
have built up the wonderful structure of New England's commercial devel- 
opment. His honor and integrity were unimpeached, while his sense of 
justice was sure and broad. The entire life of Mr. Thayer was an active 
one, and yet however actively he pushed his business operations it was never 
at the expense of the precepts of the stern New England morality or dictates 
of conscience. In all respects he was a model man, and his death, which 
occurred at his home in Manchester, New Hampshire, July 4, 1901, was uni- 
versally regarded as the greatest personal loss his city could experience. In 
his passing away, Manchester lost a man of spotless integrity, fair and 
candid in all his judgments, and generous and charitable to all. Joined 
with strong intellectual powers were rare courage and tremendous energy, 
and nothing seemed to dishearten him. He trod the path of life manly in 
all his ways, with an ever enlarging circle of friends, whose respect and 
deep esteem for himself increased with their intimacy and their knowledge 
of his achievements. The man who achieves success by well directed efforts 
of his own natural abilities and strength of character is a type which has 
from time immemorial ever appealed with peculiar force to us all. The New 
England States have acquired a well deserved reputation for the large num- 
ber of keen, progressive men which she has sent out in all directions, and 
the subject of this memoir may justly be placed in this class of men, and he 
was a fine instance of the man who can be trusted at all times and with 
whom it was a satisfaction to transact business. The personality of Mr. 
Thayer is one that will not be forgotten by the great host of those who called 
him friend, and his manner was frank and open, and he instantly won the 
confidence of those with whom he came in contact. 

The birth of Herbert Fremont Thayer occurred in Manchester, New 
Hampshire, September 13, 1854. the son of David and Sarah (Durgin) 
Thayer, who were the parents of two sons: Charles S., who died in May, 
1910, and Edgar A., of Manchester. His father, David Thayer, was a native 
of Boston. Herbert Fremont Thayer received his education in the public 
schools of Manchester, and upon the completion of his schooling engaged 
in the tailoring business in his native city. He became associated with 
J. B. Handy, under the firm name of Handy & Thayer, and this partnership 



6 f^ttbttt iFtemont Cbaper 

extended over a long period of years. Later in life Mr. Thayer formed a 
partnership with Edwin Adams, under the name of Adams & Thayer, the 
business being located in the Shaw Block. In all his business relations, Mr. 
Thayer maintained that high standard of justice and fair dealing which his 
name ever stood for. The moral principles which he held he strove to 
translate into the terms of common every-day conduct that they might 
become a practical guide in life. His code of ethics was high and strict, but 
no one could call it harsh or puritanic as applied to anyone but himself. For 
other men and their shortcomings he had the readiest charity and tolerance, 
a tolerance which won for him not only the respect but the affection of all 
those who entered into even the most casual relations with him. He was a 
man of large heart and a wide familiarity with life and the world-at-large. 
His thought and consideration for others extended beyond the boundaries 
of his own home and embraced all who were associated wath him. This 
example of personal good will and good cheer was without doubt a far more 
valuable one than any he could have exerted in the capacity of a consistent 
business man or even as a faithful public servant, and it is this above all 
things that should be preserved in the records for those who come after him 
to note with admiration. 

In his political belief Mr. Thayer was a Republican, but a voter only, 
as he never aspired to hold public office. It was in the realm of fraternal 
orders that he was perhaps better know, as he was affiliated with several 
lodges, holding membership in Wildey Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, Washington Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Mt. 
Horeb Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, Adoniram Council, Royal and Select 
Masters, and Trinity Commandery, Knights Templar. Mr. Thayer's whole- 
some love of human fellowship was a dominant characteristic, and he always 
rejoiced to feel that others were enjoying themselves about him, and his 
rejoicing was as spontaneous and free as that of childhood. He was a man 
whom it was a pleasure to know, and whose pleasing manner always 
impressed all those with whom he came in contact. 

On December 25, 1879, Herbert Fremont Thayer was united in marriage 
with Minnie Frances Hoyt, a daughter of William G. and Ellen O. (Paul) 
Hoyt. of Manchester, New Hampshire. Mr. Thayer was a man of domestic 
tastes, devoted to his wife, and finding in the precincts of his home his great- 
est pleasure and contentment. The traditions of good citizenship and the 
reputation of substantial, honorable business dealings established by Mr. 
Thayer are being well maintained by those who have come after him. It is 
fitting to close this memoir with the beautiful tribute rendered to Mr. 
Thayer by his fellow-members of Trinity Commandery, Knights Templar, 
which reads as follows: 

Again an alarm has sounded at the door of our Asylum and the visitor is the grim 
messenger, "Death," whose approach was almost unheralded, and whose departure left 
desolation and woe in his path. 

Scarcely three moons have waxed and waned since Herbert Fremont Thayer sat 
among us, a most pleasing personality, of most honorable birth, with a heart beating 
high with hope and purpose for the future, wherein achievement richly won should fill up 
the measure of a useful and honorable life, — to-day, cut down in the fullness of middle 



^tttett jFremont C&aper 7 

life, his body rests in the Valley of the City of his birth, and though the tender grass is 
carpeting the mound above him, where loving hands, in tender memory, place beautiful 
flowers, whose breath goes up as the incense of love, yet he revives not at these mani- 
festations of beauty and of love. "The silver cord is loosed, the golden bowl is broken, 
and the Spirit has returned to God who gave it." 

How mysterious are the councils of Death ! How strange that through this 
mysterious portal all must pass who would gain the realms of light and blessedness and 
peace. The passing beyond of our beloved Sir Knight was like the lying down to sleep 
and pleasant dreams, surrounded by those that he loved best of all on earth, and for 
whose sweet love he fain would stay. Yet he responded to the call of his Commander 
like a valiant Knight, true and with fortitude undaunted as he had lived, so he died with 
his armor on. 

"His work was not done, yet his Column is broken, 
Mourn ye and weep, for ye cherish his worth ; 
Let every teardrop be sympathy's token. 
Lost to the Brotherhood, lost to the Earth." 



Whereas, Our Heavenly Father has removed from our midst our beloved Sir 
Knight, Herbert Fremont Thayer; therefore. 

Resolved, That in the death of Sir Knight Thayer, Capitular Masonry and the 
Fraternity generally has lost a courteous, valiant, and accomplished member of this 
magnanimous Order, and the social and business circles of our city a just, genial, upright 
and much respected citizen. 



^laailltam (S. Hopt 




'HE memory of William G. Hoyt is cherished by the city of 
Manchester, New Hampshire, as one of those whom she 
delights to honor. He was one of the "old-time residents" 
of that city, who moved there when it was but a village, and 
he lived to see one of the most prosperous and thriving com- 
munities the sun shines upon spring up, as it were, and grow 
more and more fair and beautiful. The death of Mr. Hoyt, 
which occurred at his home, at No. 96 Walnut street, Manchester, New 
Hampshire, January 29, 1893, was deeply mourned in the community, for his 
attractive personality had gained for him many friends from the various 
walks of life. He was a true citizen, interested in all those enterprises 
which meditated the moral improvement and social culture of the com- 
munity. His leading characteristics might perhaps be stated as indomitable 
perseverance, an unusual capacity for judging the motives and merits of 
men, strict integrity and an unswerving loyalty. He was fortunate to sur- 
round himself with faithful friends, whose admiration for his abilities was 
surpassed only by their deep respect for his sterling qualities and by the 
affection which his many lovable traits of character never failed to inspire. 
Mr. Hoyt became one of the best known residents of Manchester, New 
Hampshire, enjoying the respect and confidence of the business world, and 
the friendship of those whom he met socially. He made for himself an envi- 
able reputation as a man of business, straightforward and reliable under all 
circumstances, and he was always endeavoring to please his patrons. Mr. 
Hoyt stands to-day in the memory of his associates as one of the most highly 
esteemed figures in the generation just passed, a man who consistently stood 
for the best and most worthy things in the community. Men of his calibre 
never compromise with the evil that is to be found in all communities, but 
may be counted upon to foster and support all such movements as tend to 
the advancement of the common weal, whether materially or in the realm of 
ethics, education and general enlightenment. 

The birth of William G. Hoyt occurred in Sanbornton, New Hamp- 
shire. April 8, 1821, and he was therefore at the time of his death almost 
seventy-two years of age. His boyhood days were passed upon a farm, and 
his education was obtained in the country schools of that locality. Mr. 
Hoyt left the farm at an early age and took up his residence in Concord, 
New Hampshire, where for a number of years he drove a stage between 
Concord and Nashua, New Hampshire, making his stopping place in Man- 
chester, New Hampshire, at Shepard's Old Tavern. In the latter years of 
his life, Mr. Hoyt had many an interesting experience to relate of those 
early stage-coach days. Like others engaged in a similar capacity, Mr. 
Hoyt soon found that upon the advent of the railroads the glory of staging 
speedily departed. About this time, which was in 1845, he removed to 




Utlliam (S. ^|0Ht 



Manchester, and became connected with his father, who had opened the 
famous old Amoskeag- Hotel in that city. Mr. Hoyt's business relations 
dated from the infancy of Manchester as a city. At that time all the mill 
interests were located on the west side of the river, in the vicinity of Amos- 
keag. After some experience in the Amoskeag Hotel. Mr. Hoyt started in 
the livery stable business, which he soon after relinquished to engage in the 
furniture business. He opened a large furniture warehouse in the old 
Arcade Building, which in the olden times was located at the corner of 
Amherst and Elm streets, and later admitted A. O. Parker into the business 
as a partner, the firm name becoming Hoyt & Parker. During the year 
1865, Mr. Hoyt sold out his interest to his partner, Mr. Parker, and in 1866 
took charge of the City Hall Stables. In 1868 he resumed the furniture 
business in the Central Block and followed that occupation for several years, 
during which time he met with success, and retired in 1872. His career from 
start to finish was characterized by much hard work and persistent expendi- 
ture of energy, and the substantial position that he came to occupy in the 
life of the community, which he had adopted, was the obvious and appro- 
priate reward of application and mental qualifications of a high order. Mr. 
Hoyt had always been of a frugal nature, and his success in life was well 
deserved, while the uniform happiness of his family relations and his life in 
general were the result of his strong and fine personality. 

Mr. Hoyt took a considerable part in the general life of the community, 
and was keenly interested in all public affairs. From 1878 to 1880, he served 
in the Common Council, and represented Ward Three in the State Legisla- 
ture, in 1883, serving in both capacities with marked ability, also upon 
important committees. He belonged to no fraternities and no clubs and his 
time was well apportioned between his office and his home. He was never- 
theless a conspicuous figure in Manchester, and always ready to do what he 
might to advance the interests of the community in general. For many 
years he was a member of the Amoskeag Veterans, and in his religious belief 
was a Universalist, being an attendant of the church of that denomination 
in Manchester, to which he was a liberal contributor. 

Mr. Hoyt was a business man of discerning judgment and keen fore- 
sight, and although his dealings extended over a long period of years, and 
'touched hundreds of persons, nothing but adherence to the strictest princi- 
ples of honor and integrity were ever attributed to him. The friends that he 
made in business channels were among the best that lightened his life, for 
even when greed frayed the moral fibre of those about him, he remained as 
firm in his honorable course as though temptation had not come near, and 
indeed it had not, for to such a character as his unfairness was incompre- 
hensible. Mr. Hoyt retired from active business life in 1872, and thereafter 
was engaged in looking after his property interests, which from time to time 
he had accumulated. 

Mr. Hoyt was a steady-going man of excellent judgment, and had 
applied closeness of application to his work in life. He succeeded in busi- 
ness and acquired a large property in legitimate ways. He seemed to com- 
mand the respect of those who had known him, and he was highly regarded 



lo mUUnm &, t^opt 

by his neighbors. He never sought public honors, nor thrust himself for- 
ward in public gatherings. He formed his own opinions, spoke and voted 
them freely, frankly and fearlessly, held himself in readiness to assume any 
place or trust to which his fellow-citizens assigned him, and to do his share 
in anything that promised to promote the interests of his party, the Repub- 
lican party, his city, his State or his country. He lived sensibly and well, 
and he passed away at a ripe age, leaving to his family and friends the record 
of a useful, successful and well-rounded life. 

Mr. Hoyt's family was one of the most distinguished in the State of 
New Hampshire, he being a direct descendant of Meschech Weare, the first 
President of New Hampshire. In those days the governor was called the 
president. The name of Hoyt has many variations, all coming from the 
spelling Hoit. The members of this family are to be found in all the walks 
of life, many in the learned professions, divinity, law and medicine. Mili- 
tary titles are common among them, and in New Hampshire there were at 
one time three generals named Hoyt. In the French, Indian and the Revo- 
lutionary wars, the family took an active part, a large number serving as 
soldiers and many thereby losing their lives. Mr. Hoyt's brother, Daniel J. 
Hoyt, was a prominent physician, died young, aged twenty-eight. 

William G. Hoyt married (first) Ellen O. Paul, of Concord, New 
Hampshire, with whom he was united at the Amoskeag Hotel, January i, 
1846. She died April 28, 1869, after bearing him two children, as follows: 
I. Clara Ellen, who died December 20, 1908, and was the wife of William H. 
Richmond, of Manchester. 2. Minnie Frances, who became the wife of 
Herbert Fremont Thayer, of Manchester, whose memoir precedes this in this 
volume. Mr. Hoyt married (second) Sarah F. Colby, April 6, 1871, and she 
passed away October 21, 1873. One child was born to them, Mabel Colby, 
who died September 24, 1878. Mr. Hoyt married (third) Sarah A. Colby, 
November 5, 1874, and she died October 18, 1892. Mr. Hoyt's first wife 
traced her lineage to noted Revolutionary stock, she being the daughter of 
Captain Amos Paul, of Concord, who served in the patriotic army during the 
War of 1812. 

The integrity and honor of William G. Hoyt was never impeached 
and this fact, combined with his genial manner, his courtesy and considera- 
tion of all men, and a certain intrinsic manliness which showed in every 
action and word, made him an extremely popular figure and won for him a 
great host of friends, whose devotion he prized most highly. There was no 
relation of life in which Mr. Hoyt did not play his part most worthily, and in 
which he might not well serve as a model for any ambitious youth. 



Barnes SRutlelige 




HE mind and character of James Rutledge were cast in such 
a mould as to inspire confidence and trust in those who came 
in contact with him, and his personality was strong, positive 
and independent. To do his duty as he saw it was his con- 
stant aspiration and determination. His many friends 
learned to prize him for his unassumed worth, and such 
were the qualities and forces of his character that in any 
calling or even under adverse conditions he would have occupied a com- 
manding position. The record of his achievements both in the time of war 
and in general business was extended and honorable. He was a gentleman 
in the highest and loftiest meaning of that term, and his life has shown what 
honesty combined with brains and hard work can accomplish. If one were 
called upon to select a career that might serve as a model for the youth of the 
coming generations, he could do no better than to take that of Mr. Rutledge, 
whose entire life, presenting as it did characteristics of a more gracious time, 
now alas passing, might well serve to leaven the somewhat thoughtless and 
careless customs of our own day. His death, which occurred at his home in 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire, April 28, 1903, left a gap in the life of the 
community which, despite the years which have elapsed, is still unfilled. It 
is undeniably true that every one of us shudders at the idea of war and prays 
to be delivered from it, and yet it is equally the fact that there is scarcely any 
one who does not feel a thrill awakened by the courageous, firm, self-sacri- 
ficing figures of those men who heard their country's call, and who showed 
themselves worthy of command during the turmoil of national emergency. 
The death of Mr. Rutledge marked the passing away of such a figure, a man 
well known and well beloved in his community, one who had dealt in the 
things of both war and peace, and was not found wanting in either. 

The birth of James Rutledge occurred in Newcastle, England, March 
19, 1840, the son of Arthur and Nancy (Hunter) Rutledge, both of whom 
were highly respected natives of England. It is a well known fact that the 
city of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, is greatly indebted to men of foreigii 
birth, who have at various times of her eventful history settled there, and 
whose industry and ability, through a succession of years, have added mate- 
rially to gain for the community wealth and importance, and to this class 
of men Mr. Rutledge most naturally took his place. Upon leaving his coun- 
try to come to America he chose Portsmouth as his place of destination, and 
shortly after his arrival, he obtained employment in the cloth mills there. 
When his adopted country called for volunteers in the Civil War, Mr. Rut- 
ledge's enthusiasm was aroused, and he answered the call for arms by enlist- 
ing in Company K, Second Regiment of New Hampshire Volunteers. 
He proved to be a gallant and fearless soldier, and served during three years 
of the war. At the second battle of Bull Run he suffered a sunstroke, which 



12 3[ame0 EutleDge 

greatly undermined his health. On December i, 1868, Mr. Rutledge had a 
stroke of paralysis, caused from this sunstroke, and this greatly handi- 
capped him during the remainder of his life. 

After being mustered out of the service and honorably discharged, Mr. 
Rutledge decided to return to his adopted city of Portsmouth, New Hamp- 
shire, to enter into the business world. Accordingly he engaged in the cafe 
business on Bridge street, which he conducted for a period of about twenty- 
five years, until illness, which was due to his experiences in the Civil War, 
compelled him to retire from all active business affairs. During the years 
of his business activities in Portsmouth, Mr. Rutledge stood high among 
the business men of the city, and was always considered a man of sterling 
integrity, whose word was as good as his bond. Surely this is one of the 
highest compliments that can be paid a business man, and Mr. Rutledge 
rightly deserved it. His cafe on Bridge street became well known through- 
out that region for its unusually fine table, which was always amply pro- 
vided with viands excellently cooked. Many prominent men were habitues 
of the place, and those who once became his customers rarely left him and 
never unless obliged to do so for the most cogent reasons. 

The progressive business man, if he be at the same time a citizen of 
large and public spirit, remains even after his withdrawal from the activities 
of the business world a power in the community, lending aid and force to all 
that pertains to advancement and betterment. Mr. Rutledge was such a 
man, and although he never participated in any way in active political 
affairs, he was always ready to promote the best interests of Portsmouth, 
his adopted city. In his political opinions he was a Republican, and ever 
willing to assist with his advice, but preferred to give his time and attention 
to the business interests which he had originated. By diligent application 
of his powers, and the practice of the essential principles of commercial 
integrity, Mr. Rutledge advanced steadily until he became one of the repre- 
sentative business men of Portsmouth. He had many friends, and had the 
remarkable faculty of keeping and retaining the friends that he made. He 
was indeed a man of more than ordinary merit, and it is no wonder that he 
possessed in a special manner the confidence of his fellow-men. For the 
many years that he remained in Portsmouth, Mr. Rutledge was ever build- 
ing up a large trade, winning the friendship of every one who dealt with 
him, and retaining many of his customers throughout the entire period of 
his business transactions there. He built up his own career, and the success 
he attained came solely from his own efforts and ability. 

Mr. Rutledge was a member of the General Gilman Marston Command, 
U. V. U., of Portsmouth. His record in military life was a most honorable 
and praiseworthy one. Many were the experiences he was enabled to relate 
in connection with the terrible conflict between the North and South. 

On June 19, 1867, James Rutledge was united in marriage with Annie 
M. Lynch, of Boston, a daughter of John and Margaret (Coffield) Lynch. 
Mr. and Mrs. Rutledge became the parents of nine children, as follows: 
I. William H., deceased. 2. James H., was united in marriage with Myra 
Sias, of East Boston, and they are the parents of two children, Arthur and 



3[amed EutleOge 13 

Harold R. Rutledge. 3. Arthur J,, married Georgia Rose, of Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire, and they are the parents of one child, Bradley G. Rutledge. 
4. Mabel A., became the wife of Edward L. Butler, of Portsmouth, and to 
them was born one child, Theodore R. Butler. 5. Hugh Edward. 6. Carrie 
M., became the wife of Alfred M. Barton, of Chester, Pennsylvania, and 
they are the parents of two children, Virginia R. and Ruth M. Barton. 
7. Lettie E., became the wife of Donald McDougall, of Springfield, Illinois; 
Mr. and Mrs. McDougall are the parents of three children, namely: Helen, 
Donald R. and Laura. 8. Annie M., became the wife of William Grover, 
of Dover, New Hampshire, and they are the parents of two children, Muriel 
R. and William Sherman Grover. 9. Laura J., became the wife of Thurston 
A. Smart, of Portsmouth, and to them was born one child, Kennard R. 
Smart. James Rutledge was devoted to his family, and was one of those 
men to whom the ties of home and family are held as sacred. 

For about six years previous to his death, Mr. Rutledge's health rapidly 
failed, and for quite a while he required constant care and attention. This 
was hard for him to bear, as he was of a temperament which craved to be 
active, but he did not complain nor bemoan his fate. One of his aims in life 
was to see that his wife and family had the best of everything, and it was 
only natural that around his home he shed a benign influence which acted 
as a ray of sunshine. He was never high-handed in his methods nor unjust 
in his treatment of others. The rights of others he considered as sacred, 
even more so than his own, and in all his dealings with his fellow-men he 
was first and last a gentleman in the best sense of that splendid term. He 
combined in very happy proportions the qualities of a practical business man 
with those of the public-spirited one, whose thoughts are with the good of 
the community. Throughout his long and worthy career Mr. Rutledge 
never conducted his business so that it was anything but a benefit to all his 
associates and to the community as well. These qualities gave him a host 
of friends from every rank and class in society. 



aionjo €llion 




'ROB ABLY the greatest compliment that can be paid a man 
is that he has made himself an honor to his nation in the 
commercial, financial and manufacturing world, as well as 
to the mercantile community in which he lived. Such a man 
was Alonzo Elliott, who by his own honorable exertions 
gained for himself all that a man could desire, namely, 
friends, affluence and position. In presenting to the public 
the representative men of the city of Manchester, New Hampshire, who 
have by a superior force of character and energy, together with a combi- 
nation of ripe qualities of ability and intelligence, made themselves con- 
spicuous and commanding in public and private life, we have no better 
example to present and none more worthy of a place in this volume than 
Mr. Elliott, whose death, which occurred in Manchester, New Hampshire, 
August 20, 1909, at the age of sixty years, was felt as a severe loss by his 
very large circle of friends and business associates. He was a man honored 
in life and blessed in memory. Courteous and friendly, he had won many 
friends whom he valued highly, and he was the very soul of uprightness. 
The winning of success for himself was not, however, incompatible with the 
valuable services rendered to the community-at-large, whose deep esteem 
he cherished, and certainly that is the greatest height that a man can reach, 
to win and retain the respect and admiration of his fellow-men. He was a 
high-minded gentleman, keenly alive to all the varied requirements of life, 
and one of those capable of conducting operations of the most extended and 
weighty character and influence. In the proud list of her citizens, known 
and honored throughout the business world for stability, integrity and fair 
dealing, Manchester has no cause to be other than satisfied with the record 
of Alonzo Elliott, financier, manufacturer, and president of the Manchester 
Board of Trade. It is always interesting to us to find the achievements of 
such men set down, as we still hope to find in the details of their careers 
some of the secrets of success. 

Alonzo Elliott was born in Augusta, Maine, July 25, 1849, the only son 
and second and youngest child of Albert and Adeline Waterman (Black- 
burn) Elliott. The line of Elliott of this article is of the country about New 
Bedford, Massachusetts, where for generations it has furnished hardy sea- 
farers to both the merchant marine and the government service. The 
absence of authentic records has prevented the tracing of any of the earlier 
members of the Elliott family. 

Albert Elliott, son of Joshua and Mercy (Gififord) Elliott, was born 
January 26, 1813, and died in Tilton, New Hampshire, January 13, 1S91. 
He followed the sea in his younger days, sailing from New Bedford, Massa- 
chusetts, upon long whaling voyages to the Arctic Ocean, and gradually 
rising from a position as a man "before the mast" to mate. He lived in 



aion^o OEUiott 15 

various places, among which were New Bedford, Massachusetts ; Augusta, 
Maine, where both of his children were born; and Tilton, New Hampshire, 
to which he removed in 1856, and where he was engaged in the provision 
business for fifteen years and where his latter years were spent retired 
from all active business life. He and his wife were attendants at the Epis- 
copal church. He married in Sidney, Maine, October 6, 1842, Adeline 
Waterman Blackburn, who was born in New Bedford, Massachusetts, 
March 3, 1823, a daughter of John Carter and Hepsibah Chase (Baker) 
Blackburn. She died in Tilton, New Hampshire, October 29, 1907. Mr. and 
Mrs. Albert Elliott were the parents of two children, namely: i. Horatio 
Anna, who married (first) Levi W. Hill, by whom she had one child, who is 
now the wife of William King, of Tilton, and they have one daughter, Alice 
Gertrude King. She married (second) Harley A. Brown, deceased, by 
whom she had one daughter, Hallie. Mrs. Brown resides in Tilton, New 
Hampshire. 2. Alonzo, in whose memory we are writing. 

Mrs. Elliott traced her ancestry to a very ancient family. Francis 
Baker, son of Sir John Baker, was born in 161 1, in St. Albans, Herfordshire 
county, England; he came to America in the ship "Planter" in 1635. He 
married Isabel Twining, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Dean) Twin- 
ing. Francis Baker died in 1696, and his wife, May 16, 1706. Stephen Dean, 
the father of Elizabeth (Dean) Twining, came to America in the ship "For- 
tune" in 1621. He came of a very strong ancestry, which can be traced to 
the year 600. Daniel Baker, the son of Francis and Isabel (Twining) 
Baker, was born September 2, 1650. He married, May 2, 1674, Elizabeth 
Chase, a daughter of William Chase, Jr. Shubal Baker, the son of David 
and Elizabeth (Chase) Baker, was born in 1676. His wife's name was 
Patience. Shubal (2) Baker, the second son of Shubal (i) and Patience 
Baker, was born March 24, 1710, and married, in 1733, Lydia Stuart. 
Shubal (3) Baker, the third son of Shubal (2) and Lydia (Stuart) Baker, 
was born November 11, 1741, and married (first) November 15, 1764, 
Rebecca Chase, married (second) in 1787, Elizabeth Chase. Shubal (4) 
Baker, the son of Shubal (3) and Rebecca (Chase) Baker, was born July 
10, 1772, and married, March 13, 1795, Mercy Smalley. Their daughter, 
Hepsibah Chase Baker, born March 3, 1801, died September 10, 1878, having 
become the wife of John Carter Blackburn, July 16, 1820, who was born in 
England, February i, 1797, and died in Augusta, Maine, March 12, 1827, 
and she was the mother of Mrs. Albert Elliott. 

Alonzo Elliott was taken by his parents at the age of eight years to 
Sanbornton Bridge (as the town of Tilton, New Hampshire, was then 
known) and received his education in the common schools there, and later 
at the New Hampshire Conference Seminary. When but fourteen years of 
age. Mr. Elliott accepted a position as clerk in a country store at Tilton, and 
later worked in a similar capacity at Colebrook, Coos county, far up in the 
"North Country." From there he changed to Wentworth, where he con- 
tinued in the same line of business until September, 1869. At this time, 
having previously gained a knowledge of telegraphy at Tilton, New Hamp- 
shire, he removed to Manchester, in acceptance of the position of ticket 



i6 aion^o OBUiott 

seller and telegrapher at the passenger depot, and in the employ of the 
Concord, Manchester and Lawrence railroads. He was one of the very 
first to read dispatches by sound. He succeeded to the position of ticket 
agent in 1870, and soon acquired the reputation of being the most expert 
ticket seller and telegrapher in the employ of those two railroads. Mr. 
Elliott continued in this line of employment until 1893, when he relinquished 
his work for the railroads to engage in the insurance and banking business 
on his own account. His insurance business became very extensive, his 
agency representing some twenty-five leading fire, life and accident insur- 
ance companies. He gave his energies to this business until 1896, during 
the winter of which year he was thrown from a sleigh and so seriously 
injured that he was unable to attend to business aflfairs for a year. It was 
while suffering from the injuries caused by this accident that Mr. Elliott 
disposed of his insurance business, and so far as possible relieved himself 
of all business cares. 

Mr. Elliott was one of the incorporators and organizers of the Granite 
State Trust Company, subsequently known as the Bank of New England, 
of which he was treasurer, and which went out of business in 1898. He 
was president of the Manchester Electric Light Company, and a trustee 
and one of the organizers of the Guaranty Savings Bank. He held the posi- 
tion of vice-president, director and clerk of the People's Gaslight Company, 
was secretary of the Citizen's Building and Loan Association, and a director 
of the Garvin's Falls Power Company. It was Mr. Elliott who secured the 
necessary funds to build the first electric light plant in Manchester, New 
Hampshire, and he organized the Elliott Manufacturing Company, which 
bears his name, and which is engaged in the manufacture of knit goods, 
employing over six hundred operatives, and was its first vice-president and 
its first treasurer. 

For forty years Mr. Elliott had been an active factor in the progress 
and development of the city of Manchester, New Hampshire, and no indi- 
vidual did more for its expansion. He was a "Booster" always, this being 
a favorite term of his, and he was ever found ready to contribute more than 
his full share to every cause which promised to enhance the prosperity of his 
adopted city. Many of the city's enterprises, which to-day give employment 
to thousands of wage-earners, owe their inception to his tireless energy, and 
in his death the city lost an energetic factor in its development. He was an 
enthusiastic optimist, and possessed a vision which penetrated the future 
and foretold the prosperity of the country, even in its darkest days of busi- 
ness stagnation. He believed in the future of this country, and of his home 
city, and there was not room in his make-up for even an ounce of pessimism. 
He was truly a herald of the future and better days, and possessed the 
faculty of imparting his resolute and buoyant enthusiasm to others. Mr. 
Elliott was intimately acquainted with the subject of finance, and it is 
recalled that when the municipality was hard pressed for funds, during the 
panic of 1893, to even meet the pay-roll of the street laborers, because of 
money being hoarded, he was enabled to procure a temporary loan for the 
city of Manchester, in Boston, when all other agencies had failed. 



Slon^o dBIliott 17 

Mr. Elliott was actively interested in numerous other business organi- 
zations, and through his ability to secure capital was instrumental in bring- 
ing to Manchester several of its most important industries and enterprises, 
including the F. M. Hoyt, Eureka, Cohas, East Side, of which he was presi- 
dent, and West Side Shoe companies, and the Kimball Carriage Company. 
He was treasurer and director of the Pacific Coal and Transportation Com- 
pany, which owns large coal deposits at Cape Lisbon, Alaska, and gold 
mines at Nome, Alaska. In company with the late ex-Governor Weston 
and John B. Varick, Mr. Elliott owned the valuable hotel property known 
as the Manchester House, and gave to the city the new hotel by that name, 
in place of the old hostelry which stood there in days past. He was a tire- 
less and persistent worker, and his labors and influence contributed mate- 
rially in making Manchester, New Hampshire, the business center which it 
is at the present time. 

Politically, Mr. Elliott was originally a Democrat, but during the free 
silver campaign in 1896 he showed his independence by voting for McKinley 
and against Bryan, who was the nominee of the Democratic party. In 1902 
Mr. Elliott was nominated as an independent candidate for governor, and 
was a staunch advocate of the liquor license law, in preference to that of pro- 
hibition. Mr. Elliott was also a prominent figure in the fraternal circles of 
Manchester, becoming a member of Washington Lodge, No. 61, in 1870, 
and in turn took up membership in the higher branches of Masonry, includ- 
ing Mount Horeb Chapter, No. 11, Royal Arch Masons; Adoniram Council, 
Royal and Select Masters; Trinity Commandery, Knights Templar; Bektash 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, and charter 
member of the Derryfield Club. In his religious belief, Mr. Elliott was a 
Unitarian and a faithful attendant of the church of that denomination in 
Manchester. His beautiful and modern residence, known as "Brookhurst," 
was erected in 1893, and is situated on the North River Road. The estate 
surrounding the house includes a part of the original historic Stark farm, 
which belonged to General John Stark, of Revolutionary fame. 

Alonzo Elliott married (first) in 1873, Ella R. Weston, a daughter of 
Amos Weston, Jr., and Rebecca J. (Richards) Weston, and niece of the late 
ex-Governor James A. Weston. Mrs. Elliott passed away in 1876, at the 
age of twenty-three years. Mr. Elliott married (second) in 1878, Medora 
Weeks, a daughter of George W. and Sarah (Mead) Weeks, and a direct 
descendant of Governor Thomas Dudley. She is also descended from 
Leonard Weeks, who was born in Somersetshire, England, and who built 
the first brick house in the State of New Hampshire at Greenland. Mr. 
and Mrs. Alonzo Elliott became the parents of four children, as follows: 
I. Lucille Weeks, died December 29, 1909, and was the wife of Harry Gilman 
Clough, of Manchester. 2. Laura Medora, who became the wife of Albert 
H. White, of Manchester. 3. Mildred Weeks, who became the wife of 
Harold A. Smith, also of Manchester, and they are the parents of one child, 
Lucille Elliott Smith. 4. Alonzo, Jr., graduated from Yale University, with 
the class of 1913, having been a pupil at St. Paul's School, Concord, New 



i8 9Ion50 dBUiott 

Hampshire. He is a fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, England, and is 
a gifted musician and composer of music, the famous and popular song enti- 
tled, "The Long, Long Trail," being one of his compositions. The domestic 
life of Mr. and Mrs. Elliott was an ideal one, and Mr. Elliott was one of 
those men who cherished his home as the dearest spot on earth. 

Mr. Elliott was president of the Manchester Board of Trade, and took 
an active and influential part in all of its activities. Thus was his career 
rounded out, as promoter, manufacturer, financier, and his death at the age 
of sixty years and twenty-six days dealt the city of Manchester, New Hamp- 
shire, a hard blow, from which she has never recovered. The memory of 
this exemplary gentleman will linger in the minds and hearts of all those 
who had been so privileged as to have been associated with him in any man- 
ner, while his many achievements will stand as a monument to his excep- 
tional capability and energy. 





/( J'( //l/(f// 



:j/.,/., 



3(eremtal) Jlolifie 




[N presenting to the public a review of the lives of such men 
as have deserved w^ell of their fellow-men and citizens, who 
although unobtrusive in their everyday life, by their indi- 
viduality and force of character mould the commercial desti- 
nies and give tone to the community in which they live, we 
have no example more fit to present and certainly none more 
worthy of a place in this volume than that of the late Jere- 
miah Hodge, of Manchester, New Hampshire, whose death, which occurred 
at his home in that city, July i6, 1916, brought genuine sorrow and deep 
regret to the hearts of all who had been so privileged as to have known him 
intimately, and recognized in him the qualities of a true man. Not only did 
he rise above the standard of his line of business, but he was also the pos- 
sessor in a high degree of those excellencies of human nature that never fail 
to make men worthy of regard among their fellow-men. He was not only 
high-minded, but liberal as well, keenly alive to all the varied requirements 
of life, and one of those capable of conducting operations of the most 
extended and weighty character and influence. By his most honorable exer- 
tions, Mr. Hodge carved out for himself friends, position and honor. By the 
strength and force of his character he overcame obstacles which to others 
less hopeful and less courageous would have seemed insurmountable. 
Through all the varied responsibilities of life, he acquitted himself with 
dignity, fidelity and honor, and his manners were those of the genuine gen- 
tleman, frank, kindly and courteous. The setting down of the personal 
records of the men who, by dint of worthy and tireless effort, have raised 
themselves to a high position upon the ladder of success and secured them- 
selves in the respect of their fellow-citizens must always be a work of great 
value. Self-made men, who have accomplished much by reason of their 
personal qualities and left the impress of their individuality upon the busi- 
ness and general life of the communities where they have lived and worked, 
men who have affected for good such customs and institutions as have come 
within the sphere of their influence, have unwittingly, perhaps, but none the 
less truly, reared for themselves monuments more enduring than those of 
stone or brass. Such distinction may well be claimed for Jeremiah Hodge, 
who was never weary of working for the benefit of the community and iden- 
tified himself with many movements undertaken for the general good. He 
was an unusual combination of the conservative and of the progressive, ever 
seeking to find the good in both the old and the new. Mr. Hodge was a 
gentleman of the old school, and all that phrase implies of grace and courtli- 
ness, yet he kept well abreast of the time in all practical affairs. He was 
indeed a rare and admirable character in every way, and one of those of 
whom it may be said that the world is better for his having lived in it. 

The birth of Jeremiah Hodge occurred on a farm near Concord, New 
Hampshire; he was the son of John and Sarah Hodge, the year of his birth 



ao 3feremiaf) l^oOgc 

being 1830. He passed his early years in the same manner as did most of 
the farmer boys of those days, and in the spring of 1849, having a desire to 
start out in Hfe for himself, he secured a place at the State Asylum in Con- 
cord, which was then under the charge of the late Dr. McFarland. Mr. 
Hodge was a strong, rugged country boy, and stood this disagreeable work 
for about fourteen months. From 1847 to 1850 he made his home in 
Andover, Massachusetts, for which town he had a fondness. After leaving 
his position at the State Asylum, Mr. Hodge gained his introduction into 
the business world when he entered the employ of a contractor by the name 
of Dow at Concord, and there he learned the carpenter trade. At that time 
the highest wages paid a carpenter was one dollar and fifty cents a day, and 
Mr. Hodge received fifty dollars a year, and had to purchase his own tools 
while learning. Upon leaving Mr. Dow, Mr. Hodge entered the employ of 
Henry M. Moore, who thought so well of the young man that he paid him 
one dollar and thirty-three cents a day and his board. The public in general 
take but little note of the beginning or the ending of a man's business career, 
and this is absolutely wrong, as close attention should be given to the life 
records of our most substantial and successful business men such as Mr. 
Hodge. 

In 1853 Mr. Hodge was placed in charge of some buildings at Dunbar- 
ton. New Hampshire, which Governor Gilmore was having erected, and he 
carried this work through in a most satisfactory manner. In the fall of that 
same year Mr. Hodge came to the city of Manchester, New Hampshire, and 
engaged himself to a man named Belknap, who was at that time building 
the old freight and passenger depots, and on these Mr. Hodge performed his 
first work in Manchester. This was the passenger depot which stood where 
the Amoskeag play-grounds now are, and the freight house was on the site 
of the present Union Station. For a few years after this, Mr. Hodge fol- 
lowed the carpentry trade, and then entered that of jobbing. One of his 
earliest jobs was the Martin block, which stood where the Western building 
now stands, and this was so satisfactory in every way that B. F. Martin 
engaged him to build the Martin House at the North End. This house 
called for much fancy work and at that time there was no machinery to make 
this, so Mr. Hodge hired a shop on Mechanics' Row on the Amoskeag and 
there set up a small shop, which was the first of that kind in Manchester, 
and here he was enabled to supply material for his own constructions, and 
later the material for other jobs. This was about the year 1864, and previous 
to that, in 1857, Mr. Hodge had built the house where he died, at the corner 
of Hall and Amherst streets, and had spent over half the years of his life 
there. 

The shop on the Amoskeag soon became too small for the demands on 
his business, and Mr. Hodge built an enlargement, which also became in 
time too small to adequately handle all his business. In 1873 he obtained 
the land at Auburn and Elm streets, and as he had often declared that he 
had his eye on this as a desirable place for some time, his wisdom was seen 
when one looked out of the office windows into the freight yard. Later Mr. 
Hodge built a large brick shop and as his business increased so also did this 



3Iercmia|) i^oDge 21 

brick shop, as he kept adding to it from time to time. The first buildings 
of his new plant were erected in time for him to begin operations of the 
plant on the first day of April, 1874, when he started to manipulate it every 
day, and up to the time of his death it was continuously operated. Mr. 
Hodge was the pioneer wood worker in the city of Manchester, New Hamp- 
shire, and was respected by all for his rugged honesty and business ability. 

He was of that type of business man of whom there are never too many, 
and his career had not only been one of great and ceaseless activity for him- 
self alone, but for the welfare of the entire city in which he had ever taken 
a deep and vital interest. Mr. Hodge had been engaged in business on Elm 
street. Manchester, for over forty years, and his office was one of the best 
known spots in the town, where many a weighty matter of interest to Man- 
chester and her citizens was discussed. During the three years prior to his 
death, he had been failing in health, and for the past few months before his 
passing away he was restricted to his home for weeks at a time. It maj^ be 
said that Mr. Hodge was never a really well man since the death of his son, 
Charles R. Hodge, a blow which shook him tremendously and from which 
he never fully recovered. 

In his political belief, Mr. Hodge was an active, ardent and consistent 
Republican, and took a deep interest in all political affairs, always ready 
and willing to assist with his advice. He was a member of the city govern- 
ment in 1871 and 1872, and at the time when the city acquired the water 
works, Mr. Hodge took an active part in this important transaction. He 
was also a member of the State Convention which nominated Governor Eze- 
kiel Straw. Although Mr. Hodge had not hunted nor fished much in recent 
years, in his day he had been an ardent sportsman and still retained the 
sportsman's spirit. He delighted in relating the story of a visit he once 
made to a Boston specialist, and seemed to regard the conversation with him 
relative to hunting and fishing as of much more value than the man's pre- 
scription. He had at his own expense re-stocked many a trout brook in the 
section where he lived. Mr. Hodge was a member of Hillsborough Lodge, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

He was a staunch friend always of the firemen, although he never 
actively became connected with the department, and was ever ready to do 
what he could for the betterment of the service and the assistance of its 
members. It may be truly said that Mr. Hodge was never half-hearted in 
anything in which he was engaged, and to this characteristic was traced 
much of his well earned success. Those who differed with him could not do 
otherwise than to respect his opinions, for his sterling honesty and declared 
beliefs were known to be founded upon conscientious convictions. 

For almost half a century Mr. Hodge was a business man of Man- 
chester, New Hampshire, and in his own business used nearly four million 
feet of lumber every year, and in addition to this he turned out a large quan- 
tity for corporations and other concerns. He employed a large force of 
men, and took pride in the quality of the work which he sent out, having 
always maintained a reputation for first-class work by employing skillful 
men and modern machinery. Besides house builders' supplies, Mr. Hodge 



12 3feremia|) ^oDge 

manufactured packing-boxes, and like the other departments of his mills 
this shop was not only a hive of industry but one of the leading shops in the 
city. 

On October 6, 1854, Jeremiah Hodge was united in marriage with 
Judith A. Colby, a daughter of Abner and Deborah (Gunnerson) Colby, of 
Goshen, New Hampshire. Mr. and Mrs. Hodge were the parents of two 
children, as follows: i. Charles R., who died January 3, 1910; he was united 
in marriage with Mary Frances Moore, of New Boston, and their union was 
blessed with two children, namely: Frederick Moore Hodge, and Mae 
Bertha Hodge. 2. Lucy Emma, who resides in Manchester, New Hamp- 
shire. Mrs. Hodge has lived at the home at No. 574 Hall street, Manchester, 
since 1857. 

Mr. Hodge's integrity and business ability were recognized by the city 
wherein he lived for so many years. He was an ardent sympathizer with 
every movement making for the uplift of humanity, and his heart was ever 
in sympathy with the sorrows of the unfortunate, his hand being ready to 
contribute to the alleviation of those in distress. He was greatly beloved 
because of his kindliness towards all humanity, and for his generosity and 
unselfishness. The community will long remember him, while his memory 
will be cherished most highly. 





y^..u,.W. //r/r.M. VW^.r/,. //.C/. 




ieonarii ilWelbille JFrentj). 01- 30. 

The French coat-of-arms is as follows : 

Arms — Ermine, a chevron sable, a crescent for difference. 
Crest — A dolphin embowed proper. 

'HE late Dr. Leonard Melville French, a prominent physician 
of Manchester, New^ Hampshire, achieved a reputation of 
which any man might well be proud. The profession of 
medicine is one which, if it be conscientiously followed, 
involves an enormous amount of self-sacrifice, and it is a 
source of the greatest blessing to others. So heavily should 
these considerations weigh, that it would be difficult to 
imagine a return from the community to its physicians that would make or 
balance the debt it owes them for all the good received. Hard work, loss of 
sleep, and a constant demand upon one's powers of sympathy are the physi- 
cian's offerings to humanity. AH these are the essential things that a true 
and worthy physician brings with him, a true and worthy physician such 
as the distinguished gentleman whose name heads this tribute, and whose 
death at his beautiful residence on the River Road, in the North End of 
Manchester, New Hampshire, December 22, 1914, in the sixty-fifth year 
of his life, left a vacant place in so many hearts. Few if any of the many 
brilliant men who have added to the lustre of the medical profession of Man- 
chester have exercised a wider influence for the good of the institution of 
medical learning than Dr. French. Being a man of great sagacity, quick 
perceptions, sound judgment, noble impulses and remarkable force and 
determination of character, he commanded the respect and confidence of all 
who knew him. It is unnecessary to add that as a physician he was held in 
the highest estimation by his fellow-citizens, and the record of his daily life 
was filled with evidences of this fact. In all professions, but more especially 
the medical, there are exalted heights to which genius itself dares scarcely 
soar, and which can only be gained after long years of patient, arduous and 
unremitting toil and inflexible and unfaltering courage. To this proud emi- 
nence we may safely state that Dr. French rose. He devoted his life to his 
chosen profession, and was deservedly crowned with its choicest rewards. 
The birth of Leonard Melville French occurred at Ashby, Massachu- 
setts. July 26, 1849; he was the son of Dr. Leonard French, who was a 
famous medical practitioner in Manchester, New Hampshire. His mother 
was Mrs. Sarah (Melville) French, and he was christened for both parents 
with the name of Leonard Melville French. Dr. French obtained his educa- 
tion at the University of New York and also at Dartmouth College, receiv- 
ing his medical degree from the latter college. Being the son of so success- 
ful a physician, it was but natural that the son would turn to the profession 
of medicine as his course through life. And as his father had met with 



24 JLeonacD Q^eltiille JFrenci), 0i. D. 

success in the city of Manchester, New Hampshire, so the younger Dr. 
French located in that city. He began the practice of medicine there in 
1873. soon after his graduation, and kept it up actively for about thirty 
years. During the latter part of his life. Dr. French had retired from active 
practice, although he had attended many cases among his personal friends 
and in those families for whom he had formerly held the place of family phy- 
sician. He was loved and admired by all, so that it was but a natural out- 
come that his death brought genuine sorrow to all who had come in con- 
tact with him, even in the most casual way. 

Politically, Dr. French was a staunch Republican, but was not active in 
politics, and never allowed his name to be used for a candidacy for public 
office. He was religiously inclined, and in his religious belief was a member 
of the Hanover Street Congregational Church in Manchester, and had been 
the president of the First Congregational Society since the year 1906. Dr. 
French was a member of various clubs and college fraternities. He belonged 
to the American Medical Association and the New Hampshire Medical Soci- 
ety. He had offices for the practice of medicine in the Kennard Building, 
Manchester. Both Dr. French and his wife were known all over the State 
of New Hampshire for their charities and their interest in all philanthropic 
work in various directions. Hardly a movement for the relief of the unfor- 
tunate and those in distress has been carried on in years in the "Granite 
State" but Dr. French and his wife contributed to it and worked in its 
behalf, although always in a most modest and inconspicuous manner. 

On June i, 1887, Dr. Leonard Melville French was united in marriage 
with Emma Blood, of Manchester, a daughter of Aretas and Lavinia K. 
(Kendall) Blood. Dr. and Mrs. French became the parents of one child, 
Margaret Lavinia French, who married Carl Spencer Fuller, the son of 
Spencer H. Fuller, of Lewiston, Maine. They are the parents of two chil- 
dren, namely: Mary Spencer and Henry Melville Fuller. The home life 
of Dr. French was delightfully happy, and his residence the scene of many 
social gatherings. Being an active and busy man. he had not as much time 
as his fellowmen in other walks of life to devote to his own fireside, but every 
spare moment that was his found him in the home circle surrounded by the 
family to whom he was always the affectionate husband and the good, kind 
father. 

There is something admirable in the profession of medicine that 
illumines by reflected light all those who practice it. Something, that is, 
concerned with the prime object, the alleviation of human suffering, some- 
thing about the self-sacrifice that it must necessarily involve that makes us 
regard, and rightly so, all those who choose to follow its difficult way and 
devote themselves to its great aims, with a certain amount of respect and 
reverence. 

In closing this brief biography it is proper that there be here recorded 
a splendid tribute to his memory written by his professional colleagues of 
the New Hampshire Medical Society, which is as follows: 

Dr. French was educated at the Manchester Public Schools, and at Dartmouth 
College, where he received his degree. Later he went to New York City, where he 



Leonard Q^eltJille JFtencl), Op, D. 25 

attended Bellevue Hospital and studied with the noted Dr. Loomis. He began to practice 
medicine in 1873, occupying the office with his father, in Manchester, where he was in 
active practice for thirty years. He had been president of the First Congregational 
Society since 1906, and a trustee of the Amoskeag Savings Bank. He was on the 
Medical Staff of the Elliot Hospital from the founding, April the fourth, 1890, until 
January the fifth, 1904, when he resigned, which resignation was reluctantly accepted by 
his fellow members. The onward and upward march of his profession he regarded with 
impressive loyalty. The marvelous changes from the early seventies to 1914. he accepted 
with a conviction, devotion and comradeship that was true and noble and divorced from 
puritanical prejudices. Progressive surgery and medicine he delighted in, and watched 
with interest and pleasure the strides made in both, welcoming and accepting the 
researches, discoveries, and phenomena in an enthusiastic and up-to-date spirit, satisfied 
and gratified that the profession to which he and his family had devoted their lives and 
been so efficiently helpful in, should constantly grow in healing power. His was a life 
of righteousness, a good Christian life, with nothing in it to suggest the worldly or the 
vain. One cannot say he held this or that important public office, but all his friends 
and acquaintances will agree he was a good man. To be able to say that of a man is 
better than all others. 

In his sick-room ministrations he was tender, cheery and helpful, leaving comfort, 
courage and healing in his wake. How valuable a legacy a successful physician of his 
temperament bequeaths to his patients is inestimable, but it is very large. Dr. French 
was unassuming, approachable, genial to meet as a friend, happy in his companionable 
relations, unwavering in his allegiance to the best things in life, always dependable 
upon in any hour of stress of deserving causes, and led a spotless life, clean and Christ- 
like. He was a good citizen and a likeable man. 

As a further tribute in memory to Dr. French, Mrs. French has just 
completed a children's ward at the Elliot Hospital in Manchester. 




aretas iSIooD 




The Blood coat-of-arms is as follows: 

Arms — Or, three bucks lodged proper. 

Crest — A buck's head erased proper, attired or, holding in the mouth an arrow gold. 

N THE death of the late Aretas Blood, in November, 1897, 
the city of Manchester, New Hampshire, lost one of its most 
substantial citizens. He was a man who was most widely 
known, highly respected by all who knew him, and whose 
influence was felt in many, many ways. Mr. Blood moved 
to Manchester when it was yet in its infancy, and his 
advancement was largely connected with the advancement 
of the city itself. No one did more to make the city what it is to-day, and no 
one was more looked up to in the community than he. In business he was 
prominent in many directions, the peer of his associates, and in charity and 
benevolence his name was widely known. He helped to found and maintain 
many public charities, while his generosity as a private giver was most 
marked. 

Mr. Blood was a self-made man in every sense of that term, which 
is so familiar with Americans. He started out in life a poor boy, with but a 
meager education, but by industry and ability he pushed his way forward 
and gained emoluments and honor; by his skill and ability, great enterprises 
were started and successfully carried on, and his labors were appreciated 
and rewarded. His name will ever be inseparably connected with the devel- 
opment of the massive locomotive in use to-day, with the inception and 
growth of the railroad systems of the United States, and as the builder of 
the finest steam fire engines the world has seen. If he had done nothing else 
to cause his name to be cherished and remembered, Mr. Blood would have a 
lasting monument in the Amoskeag fire engines and the Manchester loco- 
motives. The life of Aretas Blood and the history of the Manchester Loco- 
motive Works are largely synonymous, and the story of the one cannot well 
be told separate from the other. The death of Mr. Blood occurred on 
November 24, 1897, at his residence in Manchester, New Hampshire, and 
caused general sorrow in the community in which he was so well beloved 
and admired. 

Aretas Blood was the son of Nathaniel and Roxellana (Proctor) Blood. 
His father, Nathaniel Blood, was the great-great-great-great-grandson, in 
direct descent, of James Blood. The family was prominent in the early his- 
tory of Groton and Pepperell, Massachusetts. Nathaniel Blood's father, 
Sewall Blood, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Nathaniel Blood 
married Roxellana Proctor, a daughter of Isaac Proctor, also a soldier in 
the Revolution, and settled in Windsor, Vermont. He died in Waltham, 
Massachusetts, in 1876, having reached the advanced age of eighty-eight 




^ 



/^C^^ 



aretag ISIooD 27 

years. His wife passed away in 1865. Both were active members of the 
Congregational church. 

Aretas Blood, their son, was born in Weathersfield, Vermont, October 
8, 1816. From his ancestors he inherited many sterling qualities, good judg- 
ment, sound common sense, executive ability of a high order, courage to 
undertake almost herculean tasks, the perseverance to conduct them to a 
successful termination, and the requisite caution to keep him from embark- 
ing in any unsafe enterprises. His early life was that of all boys born and 
reared in the rural districts of the New England of the day. The home life 
was simple, frugal, and there was a goodly portion of work to be performed 
by all the members of the family. An active life upon his father's farm, the 
winters being spent in taking advantage of such meager educational advan- 
tages as the common schools of the countryside afforded, gave him a sound 
body, a clear mind, a knowledge of the common English branches and a little 
more. His religious training was of the kind common in that day, when 
life was simple and customs stricter than they are to-day. When he was 
three years of age, Aretas Blood's parents removed to Windsor, Vermont, 
and it was there that he obtained his early literary education in the common 
schools of the time, which were of brief terms and generally taught by indif- 
ferently educated teachers. At the age of seventeen years, Mr. Blood was 
apprenticed to a blacksmith to learn the trade. He worked at the forge for 
about two years and a half, mastering the various details of this sturdy call- 
ing, and then turned to something a little broader, which gave him more 
opportunity for the use of his mechanical and inventive mind, and became a 
machinist. In 1840 he went to Evansville, Indiana, where he remained, fol- 
lowing his trade until June, of the next year, when he came East again, in 
search of employment. On his return to New England he said that he had 
looked the West over and that "Yankee land was good enough" for him. 
He said that if a man could not get rich in New England he could not get 
rich anywhere. It was not until he reached North Chelmsford, Massachu- 
setts, that he found work for his ready and willing hands. He remained 
there for a short time, and then went to Lowell, Massachusetts, where he 
became employed in the Lowell Machine Shop. Seven years of labor here 
passed with but little to break their monotony. At the end of that time, Mr. 
Blood moved to Lawrence, Massachusetts, where he had a chance to advance 
his interests, being given charge of the manufacture for the large machine 
shop then in course of erection at that city. Here he took still another leap 
in his upward career. Working as a machinist in the shops, the character of 
the man began to assert itself. His ability demanded greater scope, and 
before long he was enabled to assume the management of the establishment, 
devoting his attention to the manufacture, under contract, of tools, turbine- 
wheels, locomotives, stationary engines and other machinery. His untiring 
energy and devotion to his work found therein reward ; he was master of the 
business. From that time on, his rise was a comparatively rapid one. 

In September, 1853, Mr. Blood came to Manchester, New Hampshire, 
where, associated with Oliver W. Bailey, he established the Vulcan Works, 
under the firm name of Bailey, Blood & Company, the business being 



28 aretas 15looD 

devoted to the manufacture of locomotives. The work was at first carried 
on in Mechanics' Row, but in the spring of 1854, buildings were erected on 
the site now occupied, and in the same year the company was incorporated 
as the Manchester Locomotive Works, with Oliver Bailey as its first agent. 
Three years later, Mr. Blood succeeded Mr. Bailey in the active management 
of the business, and from then until his death resided in Manchester, and 
personally superintended the operations of the works. From a moderate 
beginning the business grew and a great many engines were turned out for 
the various railroads of the country. The works now cover a number of 
acres of ground. The Blood Locomotive Works have acquired an enviable 
name and reputation, which is largely due to the personality of the man who 
was at the head. Mr. Blood proved one of the most successful locomotive 
builders in the country, and many hundreds of locomotives were turned out 
at his works. The business had a capacity for giving employment to 
upwards of one hundred workmen, and of turning out upwards of one hun- 
dred and fifty locomotives a year. In addition to this, the works turned out 
the finest steam engines the world has produced, which are known and 
valued everywhere. The fire-engine business of the Amoskeag Company 
was purchased by Mr. Blood in 1872, together with the patents and good 
will. The machine was remodelled and is now the old engine only in name. 
Mr. Blood built the first horseless fire engine used in this country. ,A 
thorough machinist, one capable of handling large forces of men and con- 
ducting large business enterprises, Mr. Blood commanded a large measure 
of success, and the Manchester Locomotive Works are regarded as a repre- 
sentative manufacturing institution of New England. 

While Mr. Blood was devoting his attention to the upbuilding of the 
locomotive and fire engine business, he in no ways lost sight of the many 
other business opportunities lying around him, and invested in many lines 
of manufacture and trade. There are few who had more varied or extensive 
business holdings than had Mr. Blood. Whenever he saw a chance for a 
sound paying investment he placed his capital. He was conservative and 
careful, and to his sound judgment is due much of his success. He was a 
director in the Second National Bank, and at the time of his death was its 
president. He was president and director of the Ames Manufacturing 
Company of Chicopee, Massachusetts, manufacturers of bicycles and other 
things; president of the Globe Nail Company of Boston; president of the 
Manchester Print Works; treasurer of the Nashua Iron and Steel Com- 
pany; president of the Amoskeag Paper Mills; treasurer of the Manchester 
Hardware Company; president of the Manchester Sash and Blind Company, 
and was interested in many other concerns. 

The advancement of years did not impair Mr. Blood's business ability 
and he continued as an active business man long past the age when most 
men feel as if there were no more work for them to perform. His life in this 
direction was characterized by great executive ability, indomitable energy, 
industry, foresight, good judgment, and common sense. When Mr. Blood 
took up his abode in Manchester, he was a great accession to that city, and 
up to the time of his death he was foremost among those whose transactions 



3tetas IBIooD 29 

tended towards the city's success. His own experience when in search of 
work made Mr. Blood considerate to those under similar circumstances. If 
he seemed entirely absorbed in his business, it must be remembered that he 
carried on his shoulders a great responsibility, and had the welfare of a 
great many people in his charge dependent upon his good judgment. He 
evinced no small amount of inventive ingenuity, and many valuable improve- 
ments in the products of the works in which he was interested were due to 
him. He was quick to see the value of new ideas, yet conservative and care- 
ful in adopting them. Mr. Blood attributed whatever success he achieved 
in life to the early training he received from his mother. When he left the 
parental roof his mother cautioned him to shun bad company and try to 
please his employers. This he tried to do, and the result shows that he suc- 
ceeded. When he was working for others he was devoted to their successes, 
and put in his spare time in improving his mind as best he could. He won 
the confidence and esteem of his employers in this way, his honesty, faith- 
fulness and industry being marked. He stuck to the small things as care- 
fully as to the greater ones. This, in his later years, he always demanded of 
those employed by him. Probably his largest and most daring investment 
after he had passed his seventieth year was when he started the Columbia 
Cotton Mills at Columbia, South Carolina. He became president of the 
Columbia Cotton Mills and also of the Columbia Water Power Company, 
and devoted a large portion of his time and money in building and perfecting 
these huge undertakings. The mills at that time were the only cotton mills 
in the world run entirely by electricity. 

On September 4, 1845, Aretas Blood was united in marriage with Lavi- 
nia K. Kendall. Two daughters were born to this union, namely: i. Nora, 
who became the wife of Frank P. Carpenter. 2. Emma, who became the 
wife of Dr. Leonard Melville French, of Manchester. Mr. Blood's home life 
was a quiet one. He enjoyed the pleasures of home and was very fond of 
his family. The family attended the Franklin Street Congregational 
Church, and this institution Mr. Blood aided in supporting. 

Up to within two years of his death, Mr. Blood always enjoyed rugged 
health, scarcely knowing a day's sickness. After that period his health was 
considerably broken. Had he been willing to give up his business career, his 
life might have been further prolonged. In his political views, Mr. Blood 
was a staunch Republican, he having voted with that party since its incep- 
tion. He cast his first vote for General William Henry Harrison. While 
never very active in politics, his endorsement always carried weight, and he 
served in a number of offices of trust and preferment. He was twice alder- 
man for his ward, and was an elector in the college which voted Garfield and 
Arthur into office. 

Mr. Blood was an ardent horseman, and there have been but few in 
Manchester who could better or quicker judge of the qualities of horses. 
During his long and active life he took much pleasure in owning and driving 
horses, and at various times possessed some fine ones. He displayed the 
same keenness for his business as he did in the management of finances, and 
as a result the locomotive works and other concerns in which he was inter- 
ested were always supplied with fine draught animals. A sample of his free- 



JO aretaisi 'BIooD 

handed generosity was his gift to the Woman's Aid and Relief Society of the 
twenty-five thousand dollars which made it possible for it to acquire the 
building now used for the home on Pearl street, Manchester. For twenty 
years Mr. and Mrs. Blood had taken a great interest in this Home, and Mrs. 
Blood practically devoted her entire time to its management. It is said that 
there was not a day in those twenty years when they have not done some- 
thing for the Home, either carrying food and supplies to it, or furnishing 
more substantial help. In 1891, Mrs. Blood started out to raise by subscrip- 
tion enough money to buy the present location for the Home. Mr. Blood 
headed the paper with ten thousand dollars, and later handed Mrs. Blood a 
check for twenty-five thousand dollars, enough to purchase the Home and 
assist in remodeling it. They had always been the mainstay of the Home, 
and although assistance had been received from other sources the Home 
would not have weathered the storms but for the liberal patronage of Mr. 
and Mrs. Blood. It is rarely that the metropolitan press of the country 
write editorials dedicated to the memory of women, but when Mrs. Blood 
passed away the following tribute to her memory appeared in one of the 
daily papers of Manchester: 

Mrs. Aretas Blood went about doing good. With great wealth, with social posi- 
tion, with a wide circle of accomplished friends, with a devoted family, with everything 
to tempt her to confine her cares and activities to the fields in which the prosperous and 
the happy live, and to enable her to command for herself luxury and ease, she turned 
aside to the unfortunate, and without neglecting her duties to her family or society made 
it her mission to heal the sick, comfort the distressed, clothe the naked, feed the hungry, 
and provide homes for the homeless. And year in and year out, until at a great age she 
was called to her reward, she gave herself to this work unreservedly, bounteously, 
quietly, industriously, successfully. She was the good angel of Manchester. To her 
we are mainly indebted for one of our noblest charities. To her hundreds of our deserv- 
ing poor and sick have been indebted for all the comfort and relief that human aid could 
secure for them. Above all we are indebted to her for an example which was a constant 
inspiration to others who were able to give and to do, and a promise to those who were 
dependent upon the more fortunate. She was a good woman and a great woman. Good 
in every relation of life ; great in her purposes, her methods and her achievements. She 
was respected and loved, almost revered, while she lived, and her memory will be ten- 
derly and gratefully cherished. 

The career of Aretas Blood strikingly illustrates the possibilities of the 
typical, sturdy New England character. Mr. Blood did not inherit great 
wealth from his ancestors, but he did inherit that which cannot be expressed 
in definite terms of value, because it is beyond value. He had the inheritance 
of generations of right living. He possessed character, he had by inherit- 
ance correct ideas of life. The lesson of his successful and useful life is that 
he had prepared himself, fitted himself, for such opportunities as should 
come to him, and the opportunities came. Later in life he could in a meas- 
ure shape his opportunities, create them, almost, but the great principle, the 
important fact, was that he had made himself ready in the first instance by 
the development of a splendid character. He was faithful in small things, 
and came to be master of great things. And dying, at a ripe old age, he 
leaves an example that should be of more value to the young throughout the 
New England States, of which he was so proud, than all the wealth that he 
left to those to whom it rightfully descends. 




^nn. dlnl^n ^l^afif iSay 




Hon. 3(o!)n Cfjase 2Rap 

^OTH the public and private life of John Chase Ray was a con- 
tinuous stream of fine endeavor, which never, however, was 
wasted upon useless tasks. Among those who have deserv- 
edly achieved prominence and position in public life, this 
distinguished gentleman stood in the foremost rank. His 
personality and efforts were of more than ordinary influence 
in keeping the public affairs of the city of Manchester, New 
Hampshire, from dishonesty and corruption, conditions which have stained 
the fair name of many cities and nations. In his endeavor to promote the 
welfare and integrity in that most important function of civilization, self- 
government, he never allowed his enthusiasm to over-balance his sound 
judgment, as was the case with many others. No State in the Union has 
maintained a longer or more unbroken record of efficient service on the part 
of its highest officials than the State of New Hampshire, and no one has 
more worthily contributed to this record than John Chase Ray, whose death, 
which occurred January 23, 1898, closed a career of great usefulness. After 
an honorable life of seventy-three years, Mr. Ray passed over the Great 
Divide into the Beyond, a man honored in life and blessed in memory. 
Courteous, friendly, and the very soul of uprightness, he had many friends, 
all of whom he valued very highly. Faithfulness to duty and a strict ad- 
herence to a fixed purpose in life will do more to advance a man's interests 
than wealth or advantageous circumstances, and the successful men of the 
day are they who planned their own advancement and have accomplished 
it in spite of many obstacles, and with a certainty that could have been 
obtained only through their own efforts. Mr. Ray was a member of this 
class of men, and at the same time he belonged to that class of representa- 
tive Americans whose labors resulted not alone to their individual pros- 
perity, but were far-reaching in their valuable influence and public aid. For 
many years the dignified figure of Mr. Ray, with businesslike mien, was a 
familiar sight to the residents of Manchester, New Hampshire, and it was 
only natural that when he passed away from earthly view, deep regret was 
everywhere expressed. In his death, the State of New Hampshire lost one 
of its most valuable and trusted officials, and the city of Manchester one 
of its best and truest citizens. At the time of his death, which came upon 
him suddenly, in a corridor of the State Industrial School Building, Mr. 
Ray was the superintendent of that institution, a position he had filled with 
consummate, all-around ability, rare tact, and to the entire satisfaction of 
every board of trustees who had officiated during his superintendency, 
covering the period from July 2, 1874, when he was first appointed, until 
the date of his death, or nearly a quarter of a century. 

The coat-of-arms of the Ray family, of which Hon. John Chase Ray 
was a representative member, was as follows : 



32 !^on. 3Io!)n Cbase Eap 

Argent, a fesse azure between two mullets in chief and a lion rampant in base 
gules. 

Crest — A naked dexter arm erect, holding in the hand a short sword, all proper. 
Motto— Fortihidine. (By fortitude). 

The birth of John Chase Ray occurred in Hopkinton, New Hampshire, 
during the year 1825. When he was seven years old, in 1832, his parents 
removed to Dunbarton, New Hampshire, and it was there that he received 
his early education in the public schools. His youthful ambition leaned 
toward teaching, and accordingly, upon the completion of his schooling, he 
taught school for a short time. Later Mr. Ray entered the lumber busi- 
ness, in which capacity he displayed unusual business ability, and much 
credit must be awarded him for the rapid strides he made in that business 
and his quick intelligence in learning a line of business so totally different 
to that which he had chosen as his calling in life. He was the possessor of 
a great deal of that quality described in this country as "Push," and in every 
enterprise undertaken by him he made his way to success through all the 
obstacles. When Mr. Ray had barely attained his majority, the town of 
Dunbarton elected him to the Legislature, and so favorable was the impres- 
sion he made there that he was reelected a second and third time. With 
one exception, he was the youngest member of the Legislature during the 
sessions in which he served. Such was the reputation that he established 
in that town that his fellow-townsmen later elected him chairman of the 
Board of Selectmen and Superintendent of Schools, and those offices he 
ably and acceptably filled. 

When called to the city of Manchester, New Hampshire, by his selec- 
tion as superintendent of the State Industrial School, the town of Dun- 
barton lost one of its most useful citizens, and his departure was universally 
deplored by the town-people of all classes, to whom Mr. Ray had so endeared 
himself. From the very beginning of his work in the State Institution, Mr. 
Ray never had a vote cast against him at the annual election, and his choice 
by the trustees was always unanimous. The State Industrial School rapidly 
grew and expanded wonderfully under the management of Mr. Ray and 
his delightful and capable wife, who in her capacity of matron achieved a 
success fully equal to that of her honored husband. It was an ideal com- 
bination and brought to the institution a reputation second to none in the 
United States. The position of superintendent of an institution like the 
State Industrial School requires exceptional qualities of head and heart. 
It demands constant care and labor, business ability of a high order, strict 
integrity, and the judgment and tact necessary to not only constantly con- 
trol but to reform, educate and train one hundred and fifty inmates, who 
have, for one reason or another, fallen into evil habits, become unmanage- 
able at their homes, and a menace to society. It was a hard place to fill, but 
Mr. Ray filled it, filled it so thoroughly that during the many years he was 
at the head of the school public confidence in him never once wavered. 

He was most loyal to the institution, and to the State of New Hamp- 
shire, even to the last year, when shattered health made it almost impossible 
for him to discharge his many duties. For a long time prior to his death, 



l^on. 3[o|)n Cjjase Kap 33 

Mr. Ray had felt that the burden he was carrying was too great, and he 
repeatedly proposed to resign. There was no lack of candidates to succeed 
him, but the trustees would not and could not consent to have him go, 
because, weak and broken in health as he was, in their candid judgment he 
was more useful than anyone else could be. Eulogy need not go much fur- 
ther than this, for if he had not been a good husband and father, a good citi- 
zen, a strong, honest and loyal man, he could not have made such a life 
record. 

After becoming an official of the State of New Hampshire, Mr. Ray 
ceased from political activities, but in 1881 the voters of Ward Two sent 
him to the Legislature. Again, in 1893, he was nominated by acclamation 
for State Councilor by the Second District Republican Convention, and was 
elected by a large majority. Upon taking his seat in the Governor's Coun- 
cil, Mr. Ray resigned his position as Superintendent of the Industrial School, 
but again its trustees, with full recognition of the high value of his services, 
steadfastly declined to accept his resignation. 

Mr. Ray was greatly interested in stock raising, and the cattle of the 
Industrial School always attracted attention wherever exhibited. He was 
also an ardent lover of a good horse, and his knowledge of them was keen 
and practical. Some of the best road horses of past years in Manchester 
were his property, and one of the sights of the city was Mr. Ray when he 
appeared in the streets driving an eight-horse hitch, drawing a heavily 
loaded barge of Industrial School boys. 

In social circles, Mr. Ray was a conspicuous figure, although other than 
the Grange he was never affiliated with any secret organization. He be- 
longed to the Amoskeag Veterans, and was a trustee of the Manchester 
Savings Bank and of the Merrimack River Savings Bank. He had never 
engaged extensively in industrial and financial ventures aside from the 
lumber business, and in his later years in some real estate investments. Yet 
he accumulated a large property, paying taxes the year before his death in 
fourteen dififerent towns. In his early life he was associated in the lumber 
business with the late John M. and David A. Parker, of Goffstown, and 
came to be regarded as one of the best authorities on wood and timber land 
in the State of New Hampshire. 

On December 30, 1857, John Chase Ray was united in marriage with 
Sarah A. Humphreys, of Chicopee, Massachusetts, who died December 30, 
1913. Womanly gentleness, fervency of spirit, religious life and undaunted 
courage distinguished Mrs. Ray, and she will long be remembered. The 
union of Mr. and Mrs. Ray was blessed with two children, a son, Harry P., 
who was ex-State Senator, and died January 9, 1916, and Mary E., who be- 
came the wife of Theodore McEwen Hyde, who died October 8, 1913. Mrs. 
Hyde resides in Manchester, New Hampshire, at No. 198 Pearl street. 

If the public life of Mr. Ray was so commendable, not less was his more 
intimate intercourse with family and friends. Even though the affairs of 
the community were ever uppermost in his mind, at the same time he was 
most devoted to his family and in all ways proved to be a faithful husband 

NH-3 



34 



^on. 3Ioftn Cljase Kap 



and a wise and kind father. Mr. Ray made an ideal citizen, and one that 
any community might hold up as a type for its youth to imitate and honor. 
Few men have ever passed away in the city of Manchester, New Hamp- 
shire, more beloved than John Chase Ray. Of the many tributes to his 
memory, none conveyed a deeper significance than that manifested in the 
heartfelt grief of the hundreds of boys and girls that he and Mrs. Ray had 
reclaimed from idleness and vice, and sent out equipped to become useful 
and successful men and women. Among all who mourned, apart from his 
devoted family, these were the best witnesses to his ability and worth. Mr. 
Ray was indeed a man among men, and his memory will long be cherished. 




1 21.-1:1G9 

Hon. (j^eorge alien ^RamslieU 

iF ALL distinguished men who have shed lustre upon the 
State of New Hampshire, none has a better record or a 
stronger hold upon the affections of the people in general 
than the late George Allen Ramsdell, of Nashua, New 
Hampshire, who made his way up to the responsible posi- 
tion which he held most earnestly and manfully, and having 
become a leader remained one of the people, and thus he 
was one of the best examples of the self-made man of our times. No State 
in the Union has maintained a longer or more unbroken record of efficient 
service on the part of its highest officials, both in its internal affairs and its 
representation in the National Government, than the State of New Hamp- 
shire, and certainly no one has more worthily contributed to this record 
than the distinguished gentleman whose name heads this memoir. Gov- 
ernor Ramsdell was altogether a most remarkable man, a man among men, 
and as such was instinctively accorded their high esteem and deep regard. 
He was, if humanity can ever attain perfection, an absolutely just man in 
all his dealings, and beyond the severe demands of justice he was always 
kind and even generous to his fellow-men. The world around him had 
little knowledge of the constant flow of his charity, of the numberless good 
deeds which adorned his daily life. New Hampshire, throughout her Col- 
onial and National history, has been exceptionally fortunate in her chief 
magistrates, and during the last century many men of conspicuous worth 
and efficiency have occupied the government chair. By none, however, was 
it filled with greater honor than by George Allen Ramsdell, whose adminis- 
tration was marked by executive ability of a high order and by strict adher- 
ence to the loftiest principles of integrity. Governor Ramsdell brought to 
the discharge of his official duties the fruits of an experience notably broad 
and comprehensive. His fellow-citizens had on several occasions placed 
him in positions of public responsibility, and in the fulfillment of these 
trusts he had developed the statesmanlike qualities which so eminently fitted 
him for the high office of governor of New Hampshire. The death of this 
noble man, which occurred in Nashua, New Hampshire, November i6, iqcx), 
was a real loss to the community, not alone because it cut short all the val- 
uable activities in which he had been long engaged, but also because it re- 
moved from among his fellow-men a strong and winning personality. The 
city of Nashua, in his death, lost one of her best known citizens, and the 
State of New Hampshire one of her most highly respected former governors. 
George Allen Ramsdell was born in Milford, New Hampshire, March 
II, 1834. He obtained his primary education in his native town, and was 
fitted for college at Appleton Academy, now known as the McCollum In- 
stitute at Mount Vernon. He completed a year at Amherst College, but 
was compelled by reason of delicate health to retire at the end of his sopho- 



36 ^on. (©corge alien KamsDcll 

more year. His ambition, however, to fit himself for a useful career did 
not end there, for after a season of rest he entered the office of Bainbridge 
Wadleigh, at Milford, where he read law. He completed his preparation for 
the profession in the office of Daniel Clark and Isaac W. Smith, of Man- 
chester, New Hampshire, and in 1857 was admitted to the Hillsboro bar. 
Soon after, Governor Ramsdell located in Peterboro, where he remained 
for six years in active practice. In 1864 he was appointed clerk of the 
Supreme Court of Hillsboro county, and removed to Amherst, where he 
resided until 1866, when the records were moved to Nashua, New Hamp- 
shire, and he became a resident of that city, and for nearly thirty-five years 
Mr. Ramsdell had been intimately identified and connected with business 
and professional circles in that city. Going there while clerk of the Hills- 
boro County Court, he continued thereafter to hold that position for many 
years, until he resigned in order to devote himself to law office interests, 
making a specialty of probate practice. Later Mr. Ramsdell formed a 
co-partnership with Lyman D. Cook, under the firm name of Ramsdell & 
Cook. This firm continued in business for three or four years, when banking 
responsibilities made such a demand upon Mr. Ramsdell's time that he gave 
up his court business and became directly identified with the City Guaranty 
Savings Bank, of Nashua, as its treasurer, one of the most reliable of the 
banking institutions of the State of New Hampshire, which was due to the 
business ability and sound judgment of its late treasurer. At the same time 
Mr. Ramsdell continued as president of the First National Bank, which 
office he held at the time of his death. 

The duties of clerk of the court took Mr. Ramsdell out of active prac- 
tice, and therefore he was not known as an advocate before juries. His legal 
acumen, however, was recognized by the bar, and every justice of the 
Supreme Court for twenty-eight years previous to his death appointed him 
referee and auditor in a large number of important and perplexing civil 
actions. In this judicial capacity, Mr. Ramsdell visited every county and 
all the large cities and towns in the State of New Hampshire. His ability 
and impartiality in weighing evidence was never called in question, and 
although he determined many causes, often involving large pecuniary inter- 
ests, in which it frequently happened that bitter feelings were engendered, 
there were but few appeals from his judgment and no aspersions relative to 
motive. This honorable record was recognized by Governor John B. Smith, 
who, upon the death of Judge Allen, in 1893, tendered Mr. Ramsdell a seat 
on the Supreme Court, which was refused reluctantly, and in the mean- 
time he was honored by Dartmouth College with the degree of A. M. Gov- 
ernor Ramsdell did not devote his time and attention wholly to the intricate 
problems and science of the law. He administered upon a large number 
of private cases and carried many responsibilities in connection with per- 
sonal and corporation investments, the wisdom of his judgment being ap- 
parent in the fact that those who relied upon his sagacity never had cause 
to regret it. He was identified in the temperance movement, and responsive 
in everything incepted to promote the w^ell-being of society and guard the 
home. 



^on, (George 3llen KamsDell 37 

Mr. Ramsdell was a staunch member of the Republican party, and did 
splendid service in its ranks. He took a deep interest in all political subjects, 
and ever advocated that which he considered best for his City, his State or 
the Nation. He was intensely loyal to New Hampshire interests, and he 
was a worthy son of a noble State. In 1870, 1871 and 1872, he was a mem- 
ber of the State Legislature. He served upon the judiciary and other im- 
portant committees, and won an enviable reputation as a careful and pains- 
taking law-maker, a luminous and convincing debater, and a man whom no 
influence could swerve from the path of duty. In the performance of his 
legislative duties, as in the performance of duty as a citizen, he was always 
a leader of the people, and a fearless advocator of what he believed to be 
right. Mr. Ramsdell was a working member of the Constitutional Conven- 
tion of 1876, and represented the Third District in the Governor's Council, 
in 1891 and 1892. 

Selected by the members of his own party in his adopted city as their 
choice to win gubernatorial honors, he was elected by the largest plurality 
ever given a candidate for governor in the Granite State. He enjoyed the 
distinction of being the chief executive of his State at one of the most im- 
portant periods of her history. It became his duty when President Mc- 
Kinley called for volunteers from that State to raise and equip New Hamp- 
shire's quota in the volunteer army, and in a most patriotic and business- 
like manner was that duty performed, and under the wise guidance of Gov- 
ernor Ramsdell, New Hampshire was able to place her regiment in the field 
well equipped, splendidly disciplined, among the first of the States to re- 
spond. Under his care one of the best regiments in the entire volunteer 
army was sent South to await wherever the call of duty might send them. 
The splendid achievements of the American forces having brought the war 
to a close before the New Hampshire regiment was needed at the front, 
that regiment returned to the State and was disbanded, minus the brave 
boys who fell victims to disease. During all the time that the regiment was 
in the hot climate of the South, Governor Ramsdell never once lost his 
interest in it and did all that came within his province to minister to the 
comfort of our brave lads while they were in the service of their country. 
When the demand for the return of the regiment was heard, Governor 
Ramsdell was prompt to recognize the call, and he respectfully requested 
President McKinley to allow the New Hampshire regiment to return home. 
The request was granted and the care and sympathetic ministrations show- 
ered upon the returning soldiers, and especially upon those who were ill and 
suffering, is a matter of history. In those attentions. Governor Ramsdell 
took no small part, meeting many of the invalid soldiers at Worcester, 
Massachusetts, and accompanying them back to Manchester and Concord, 
where everything that was possible was done for them at the expense of 
the State or of the Relief Association in which Governor Ramsdell was so 
actively interested. 

The exemplary life, the straightforward business dealings, and the loyal 
citizenship of this noble gentleman, was well known and highly honored in 
the city of Nashua, New Hampshire. In all undertakings for the good of the 



38 i^on. (Seorge 3llen EamsDcH 

city, his advice was sought and judgment relied upon to a marked degree. 
In many of the most important business undertakings of his native city, he 
took a prominent part and his opinions were deferred to to a remarkable 
extent. He was reserved in his tastes, conservative in his methods, and was 
a man who brought to his aid the experience of a long legal career in form- 
ing a judgment on the matter under consideration. It was characteristic 
of Mr. Ramsdell to give a subject careful consideration before announcing 
an opinion, and his business and professional sagacity were never questioned 
and rarely found at fault. He was ever looked up to as one of Nashua's 
most honored citizens, due to the esteem in which he was held, and his hold 
upon his fellow-citizens was not surpassed by any other resident of Nashua, 
New Hampshire. 

Among the minor, yet eqvially important positions, in which Mr. Rams- 
dell served the people of the State may be mentioned that of president for 
several years of the State Industrial School, and trustee of the Orphans 
Home at Franklin, being at the time of his decease a member of the last 
named board. He was many times solicited to stand as the Republican 
candidate for mayor of the city of Nashua, but owing to onerous duties in 
the position mentioned, and the added fact that his duties as president of 
the First National Bank, treasurer of the City Guaranty Savings Bank, be- 
sides other clients whose interests he must guard in the Supreme and Pro- 
bate Courts, the management of the ancestral farm at Milford, New Hamp- 
shire, and proper attention to his own private interests, compelled him to 
decline the honor of serving as mayor of his adopted city. 

The education of Mr. Ramsdell in literary, legal and financial realms 
was broad, and his views were liberal and tolerant. He was a sound 
reasoner, careful in defining his position, and a man whose word implied 
implicit trust. Mr. Ramsdell was an orator of no inconsiderable ability. 
For several years he was engaged in gathering material for a history of his 
native town of Milford, New Hampshire, which was later published. Liter- 
ary in his instincts, his work as historian of Milford and on other subjects 
would have won him fame had he depended upon this alone. 

Mr. Ramsdell was a Mason in Altermont Lodge, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, at Peterboro, while residing there, and on coming to 
Nashua, he became identified with Rising Sun Lodge. He was also a Scot- 
tish Rite thirty-second degree Mason, in Edward .A. Raymond Consistory 
of Nashua. He was the possessor of a kindly and a noble heart, and matters 
pertaining to the uplifting and advancement of his fellow-men were never 
disregarded or made little of. In his religious convictions, Mr. Ramsdell 
was a liberal Congregationalist and a member of the First Church of that 
denomination in Nashua. He was also a member of the Congregational 
Society and gave most generously of his means to the Young Men's Christ- 
ian Association and kindred organizations. He was one of the leading 
members of the New Hampshire Central Congregational Club, and religious 
and educational matters always received his support and encouragement. 
Neither his religious, social or Masonic life was marked or marred by dis- 
play or a forbidding spirit. The summary therefore of the career of this 



^on. (QtotQt alien iaam$DeII 39 

noted son of New Hampshire will serve as a useful and impressive lesson 
to the generations to come, in the community in which he resided, and 
where his name is known and revered. His name, however, was respected 
far beyond the limits of his adopted city, and he was a citizen whom Nashua 
will greatly miss. The public career of Ex-Governor Ramsdell included 
nineteen years of service on the Board of Education of Nashua, twenty 
years as trustee of the Public Library, and many other positions of trust 
and responsibility. 

In November, i860, George Allen Ramsdell was united in marriage 
with Eliza D. Wilson, who was born September 7, 1836, a daughter of David 
and Margaret (Dinsmoor) Wilson, of Deering, New Hampshire. Mr. and 
Mrs. Ramsdell became the parents of four children, as follows: i. Harry 
W., born February i, 1862. 2. Arthur D., born August 2, 1864. 3. Charles 
T., born July 7, 1866. 4. Anne M., born December 8, 1873. Mr. Ramsdell 
proved to be a devoted husband and father, and did all in his power to bring 
happiness and pleasure to the loved ones at home. 

Honorable in purpose, fearless in conduct, George Allen Ramsdell stood 
for many years as one of the most eminent and valued of New Hampshire's 
men, and the memory of his life remains as an inspiration and a benediction 
to those who knew him. And not only by those privileged to enjoy his per- 
sonal friendship, but by many who never saw him, will his name be held in 
reverence. Above all, will he be remembered as the governor of New Hamp- 
shire, the incorruptible statesman who held his high office as a sacred 
charge. He was the friend of the people, irrespective of creed, color or 
condition, and the people were his friends. His genial manner, his kindly 
temperament, his constant effort never to wound the feelings of others, made 
him most attractive. Seldom have the annals of any State recorded so rapid 
an elevation in the political world, and as a man, as a citizen, as a lawyer, as 
a financier. Governor Ramsdell easily stood in the front rank of Nashua's 
most prominent citizens, and at his death the entire State joined with his 
adopted city in mourning his loss. 



^ilas atJliteon JTelton 




O say of the late Silas Addison Felton, whose name heads this 
memoir, that he rose unaided to rank among the substantial 
and successful business men of the city of Manchester, New 
Hampshire, is bvit stating a well known fact, and his entire 
business record was one that any man might well be proud 
of. Beginning at the very bottom of the ladder of success, 
he advanced steadily until he occupied a position of prom- 
inence allotted to but few to hold in the business world. His business career 
was looked upon as a model of integrity and honor, and it was said of him 
that he was one of those men who form the backbone and sinew of any com- 
munity in which their lot has been cast. His ability and intellectuality won 
for him many honors, and his integrity and personality won something 
even better and far more valuable, warm friendship and deep respect and 
esteem. 

The death of Silas Addison Felton, which occurred at his home, 
No. 313 Bridge street, Manchester, New Hampshire, November 17, 1907, 
brought genuine sorrow to the hearts of many who had recognized in this 
noble gentleman the traits of our best New England people, and the sterling 
qualities of manhood. He was indeed a striking example of those who secure 
their own start in life, and his career illustrates in no uncertain manner 
what it is possible to accomplish when perseverance and determination form 
the keynote to a man's life. Depending upon his own resources and looking 
for no outside aid or support, Mr. Felton rose to a place of prominence in 
the business world by dint of tireless energy and great ability. At the time 
of his death, he was seventy-five years of age,, and was both prominent and 
influential in the general life of Manchester, New Hampshire, his adopted 
city. It is always a pleasure to investigate the career of a successful busi- 
ness man, for peculiar honor attaches to that individual who, beginning the 
great struggle of life alone and unaided, gradually overcomes environment, 
removes one by one the obstacles in the pathway to success, and by the 
master stroke of his own force and vitality succeeds in forging his way to 
the front and winning for himself a position of esteem and influence among 
his fellow-men. Such was the record of Silas Addison Felton, who was a 
most progressive man in the broadest sense of the word, always giving his 
earnest support to any movement that promised to benefit his community in 
any manner. 

In the town of Marlboro, Massachusetts, on September 4, 1832. Silas 
Addison Felton was born, the son of Aaron and Adeline (Baker) Felton, 
who were among the best known residents of that place. His father, Aaron 
Felton, was a leading and most successful contractor. The son's early train- 
ing was given to him in the schools of his native town, as far as schools 
could give it, for he passed through the doors of the school very early in 



©lias 3DDison jFelton 4» 

life. Mr. Felton learned the shoe manufacturing business, and in 1854 went 
to the State of Kansas and subsequently to Minnesota. The young man 
was assiduous, wide-awake and willing, and his active mind never rested 
in routine work or assigned duties. He watched, studied and worked, and 
later located in Eden Prairie, Minnesota, where he was for some time en- 
gaged in the hotel business. Returning to Marlboro, Massachusetts, after 
several years of absence, Mr. Felton resumed the shoe manufacturing busi- 
ness, in which he continued until the year 1869, when he took up his resi- 
dence in Manchester, New Hampshire, first filling the position of agent of 
the shoe shop, then conducted in Amoskeag by Crane, Heidenrich & Coombs. 
When this business was abandoned, Mr. Felton began the manufacture of 
brushes, first at the S. C. Forsaith Machine Company's building, and later 
in the Manchester Traction Light and Power Company's building. This 
business rapidly developed and increased its output in a most remarkable 
manner, and came to be known as the firm of Silas Addison Felton & Son 
Company, of which Mr. Felton was for many years the president. As a 
business man he enjoyed the confidence of the community in general, and 
had won the respect and esteem of all his fellow-men. His energy, deter- 
mination and thoroughness in whatever he undertook could not fail of good 
results. He put closeness of application to his work in life, uprightness in 
all of his business transactions, honesty and promptness in all matters, and 
these are the qualities which will go very far toward securing success. Yet 
the success which Mr. Felton achieved both as a citizen and as a business 
man was not the result of ability alone, for his talents were unusual, that is 
true, but it was really the triumph of his character. No man could have per- 
formed the many tasks that he assumed more admirably or with greater 
enthusiasm. 

In his political belief, Mr. Felton had been a life-long Republican, and 
although he never sought political office, he was elected a councilman and 
alderman while he was a resident of Amoskeag. He served in the two 
branches of the city government with honor to himself and to the city, and 
was regarded as a man of excellent judgment, thoroughly honest and con- 
scientious, having always in mind the best interests of the his adopted city 
of Manchester, New Hampshire. To a fine natural business ability he added 
the warmth of a deeply social nature, and a desire to be useful to his fellow- 
men. To establish on solid foundations, and to build up an enterprise under 
his management, such as did Mr. Felton, requires traits rarely found in the 
walks of everyday life. He was a man of marvelous courage, and where 
others might have yielded he stood firm. His mind was well balanced, his 
iudgment was practical in the highest degree, and his executive ability was 
one of his marked characteristics. The methods by which Mr. Felton at- 
tained the high position which held the estimation of his fellow-citizens 
attested his qualities of mind and heart, ever cheerful, alert to opportunity, 
untiring in labor, and always masterful in the management of men, he 
carved out of enduring granite his success as a monument to himself and to 
his exceptional qualities. 



42 ^ila0 aoDison jFelton 

On January 20, 1861, Silas Addison Felton was united in marriage with 
Mary E. Dudley, a native of Boston, Massachusetts, and the marriage cere- 
mony took place in Eden Prairie, Minnesota. Mr. and Mrs. Felton were the 
parents of three children, as follows: i. David Dudley, who died May 5, 
1914. was prominently identified with the business and social life of Man- 
chester. New Hampshire, and was one of the city's best known men; he 
was born in Eden Prairie, Minnesota, December 27, 1861, and was gradu- 
ated from the Manchester High School; in the early eighties, his father, 
Silas Addison Felton, took him into the business he was then conducting, 
that of the manufacture of brushes, and the firm became known as the Silas 
Addison Felton & Son Company. David Dudley Felton became an active 
spirit in the management and development of the business, and later the 
concern was incorporated under the firm name of S. A. Felton & Son Com- 
pany. After his father's death in 1907, Mr. Felton had the entire super- 
vision and management of the plant. About two years previous to his death, 
David Dudley Felton organized the D. D. Felton Brush Company at Atlanta. 
Georgia. He was one of the most popular members of the Derryfield Club, 
and in his youth he was one of the active and live members of the Man- 
chester Cadets. He was a director in the Manchester National Bank and 
the People's Gas and Light Company. He was also a member of the Inter- 
vale Country Club. Politically, he was a Republican, like his father, and 
was at one time the president of the Young Men's Republican Club, of 
Manchester, but never aspired to hold political office. In October, 1888, he 
was united in marriage with Mary Frederica Briggs, a daughter of the late 
Hon. James F. Briggs, ex-United States Congressmanfrom the State of New 
Hampshire. Mr. and Mrs. David Dudley Felton were the parents of one 
child, a son, James Briggs Felton. 2. Frank P., of Manchester, New Hamp- 
shire. 3. Harry, who died in infancy. To Silas Addison Felton his home 
was the sweetest spot on this earth, and there the excellencies of his admir- 
able character shone forth in great beauty. He was a devoted husband and 
father, and preferred to spend his leisure hours at his own fireside sur- 
rounded by those he loved best, the dear ones at home. 

Being a very companionable man, it was only natural that Mr. Felton 
become a member of a number of organizations and social clubs, among 
which should be mentioned that he belonged to the Washington Lodge of 
Masons, and to the New England Order of Protection. He was an honored 
attendant of the Unitarian church, always giving most liberally to its sup- 
port. Mr. Felton was looked upon as one of Manchester's most prominent 
and highly esteemed citizens, and his death meant the removal of a man 
who was long identified with the business interests of that city, benevolent, 
charitable and enterprising, and he has been greatly missed in the commu- 
nity. Patriotic, loyal, plain-spoken, with a tender heart, a jovial and happy 
disposition, and enthusiasm in business as well as in social affairs, Mr. Fel- 
ton closed his life, leaving behind him a host of friends who will long 
remember him. 




.ylffj/n'rr/ // rf.j/f j, r//r ,> •>//>/ 




'HE late Bushrod Washington Hill, a pioneer resident and 
business man of Manchester, New Hampshire, was in the 
broadest sense a man of affairs, having achieved high dis- 
tinction both as a financier and as a business man. That a 
man with the manysided mental equipment which this 
record implies must needs bring to the discharge of his many- 
duties an exceptional measure of capability, is a fact which 
Mr. Hill demonstrated to the unqualified satisfaction of all public spirited 
citizens of his adopted city, Manchester. The death of Mr. Hill, which occur- 
red at his home in Manchester, New Hampshire, March 3, 1904, marked the 
closing of a career of a business man who by his great force and energ)' had 
well exemplified the fact that constant labor when well applied, especially 
when joined with sterling qualities, must invariably win the deep respect and 
esteem of his fellow-men. His methods in business were clear and concise, 
and the system and ability which he displayed would have been equally as 
effectual if fate had decreed to place him in any other line of work. The 
death of Mr. Hill left a vacant place in many hearts, affecting not only the 
immediate family and his large host of friends, but every one in the com- 
munity who received some good from his life and work. His accurate esti- 
mate of men enabled him to fill the many branches of his business with 
employees who seldom failed to meet his expectation in every way. His 
clear and far-seeing brain enabled him to grasp every detail of a project, 
however great its magnitude. Genial and courteous upon all occasions, Mr. 
Hill easily surrounded himself with many faithful friends, whose admira- 
tion and affection for him were exceeded only by the deep respect which 
they held for him. His dominant characteristic was his love for his home 
and family, to which he was most devoted, considering them as a sacred 
obligation. Mr. Hill was one of those men whose lives and characters form 
the underlying structure upon which are built the hopes of the prosperity 
of America. The careers of such men as he show the possibilities open in 
a commonwealth like the State of New Hampshire to those who possess 
good business ability and the high integrity that forms alike the good citizen 
and the good business man. The ambition of Mr. Hill along the worthiest 
lines, his perseverance, his steadfastness of purpose, and tireless industry, 
all furnish splendid lessons to the young business men of the coming genera- 
tions, and the well earned success and esteem that he gained proved the 
inevitable result of the practice of these virtues. His entire life was devoted 
to the highest and best, and all his endeavors were for the furtherance of 
those noble ideals which he made the rule of his daily life. 
The Hill coat-of-arms is as follows: 

Arms — Sable, a fess argent between three leopards passant or, spotted sable. The 
fess is charged with three escallops gules. 



44 15usI)rolJ masttinston l^ill 

Supporters — Dexter a leopard gules, spotted or ducally collared, or. Sinister a stag, 
azure, attired gules. 

Crest — A stag's bead and neck azure, attired gules, on a wreath, over a ducal 
coronet. 

Motto — Per Demn et fcrriim obtinui. 

The birth of Bushrod Washington Hill occurred in Grafton, New 
Hampshire, June 26, 1832. He was the youngest of a large family, being 
the last one to die. His father was the village blacksmith, and a man of 
rugged temperament and practical ideas, who believed that success lay in 
the results of hard work, and brought up his family according to this idea. 
Mr. Hill learned to know the advantages and disadvantages of boy life in 
the country, and at an early age he was made to realize that his success in 
life was to be largely of his own making, and he therefore set out to accom- 
plish this with a brave energ}^ that characterized his entire life. Thus it was 
that Mr. Hill learned the elements of industry, and from his youth to his 
ripe age he worked steadily to make a success of his life. In every sense he 
was a self-made man, his early educational advantages being exceedingly 
limited, and in his young manhood he tried several occupations with vary- 
ing success, but it was not until he came to Manchester, New Hampshire, 
that he found the business in which he was eminently successful. 

Bushrod Washington Hill was one of four brothers who figured in the 
early life of the city of Manchester, and he arrived there in the forties, his 
elder brothers, Varnum and John M. Hill, having preceded him. Soon after 
his arrival, Mr. Hill engaged in the express business, and afterward formed 
a partnership with his older brother, John M. Hill, the concern being known 
as that of Hill & Company's Express, and its operations were confined to 
the line between Manchester and Boston over the Lawrence road. This 
business proved highly remunerative, and the company sprang into popu- 
larity almost from the very beginning. It was during the year 1882 that 
Bushrod Washington Hill succeeded to the business, having bought out 
the interest of his brother, and he continued to run the business until 1894, 
when he disposed of its trade and good will to the American Express Com- 
pany. 

In the last ten years preceding his death, Mr. Hill was attached to no 
active business interests, but took great pleasure in looking after his farm 
on the North Mammoth Road, immediately east of the observatory section 
of Derryfield Park. While he probably did not amass great wealth in the 
express business alone, it was there that he got his start in life, and he was 
a careful, prudent man, making safe investments. After his retirement from 
all active business affairs, Mr. Hill gave most of his attention to the improve- 
ment and development of his farm, which in fact had become a hobby of 
his. and it was there that he sought recreation and rest after a half century 
of close attention to business interests and cares. 

Mr. Hill became a prominent factor in the financial circles of Man- 
chester, New Hampshire, and was the president of the Hillsborough County 
Savings Bank, which is the savings institution connected with the Mer- 
chants' National Bank, of Manchester, and for some time had been its oldest 





^ 



/% 



^.y 



ISusftroD COasftington ^ill 45 

official. He had been also a long-time director in the New Hampshire Fire 
Insurance Company, his connection with which dated back to the company's 
very beginning. Mr. Hill was a man known by all of the last generation and 
by not a few of the present generation. He was supremely interested in 
everything that pertained to the history and growth of his adopted city of 
Manchester, and his wise counsel and sound judgment were many times 
sought in matters concerning the city's welfare and improvement. Al- 
though Mr. Hill did not participate actively in municipal affairs and politics, 
yet he had long served his city well and faithfully as one of the trustees of 
the Valley Cemetery. In 1902 he was one of the Fourth Ward's representa- 
tives in the Constitutional Convention, and it can be readily seen that the 
death of this noble gentleman removed one of the most interesting figures 
in Manchester, New Hampshire. 

Mr. Hill was a member of the Old Residents Association, but otherwise 
belonged to no other organizations outside of the Masonic body. There he 
was identified with Washington Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; Mount 
Horeb Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, and Trinity Commandery, Knights 
Templar. In length of membership he was the oldest member of Trinity 
Commandery, and a prominent and popular figure of that organization, 
while the high esteem and afifection in which he was held was proved in the 
set of resolutions passed by Trinity Commandery at the time of Mr. Hill's 
death, which were as follows: 

Whereas, It has pleased Divine Providence to remove from our midst our esteemed 
and beloved Sir Knight Bushrod Washington Hill, who passed beyond to the great 
"unknown city" on the third of March, 1904, and 

Whereas, To know our deceased Sir Knight was to honor him, to know him inti- 
mately was to love him. 

As a Sir Knight, a man, a citizen, a friend, a husband, a father, he was all that is 
comprehended in that grand phrase, "An honest man, the noblest work of God." His 
body rests in peace, his soul is with his God. He lived honored and beloved, he died 
mourned by all who had known him. 

Whereas, In recognition of our respect to his memory, and the regard which 
Trinity Commandery holds for his family and friends, it is hereby. 

Resolved, That we extend to them our sincere sympathy in this, their time of 
bereavement, and humbly unite with them in that consolation derived from the knowl- 
edge of that Truth which reveals to us the unbounded love of God, and teaches us to 
believe that, 

"Death is the gateway of a higher life, 
A life much broader than the one we see, 
A volume grand, rewritten and revised. 
Of what we are, and what we are to be. 

"So let him sleep that dreamless sleep. 
Our sorrow clustering 'round his head. 
Be comforted, ye loved who weep. 
He lives with God, — he is not dead." 

Bushrod Washington Hill married (first) Anna S. Appleton, of Man- 
chester, New Hampshire, and this union was blessed with two children, as 
follows: I. J. Frank, who was united in marriage with Frances Atwood, 
and they are the parents of ten children, 2. Sarah Louise, became the wife 



46 



"BusittoU maslfimton f^ill 



of T. Howard Campbell, of Portland, Maine, and they are the parents of 
two children. Bushrod Washington Hill married (second) Mrs. Helen M. 
(Hayes) Peasley. The marriage took place March 4. 1890, and since the 
death of her husband, Mrs. Hill has continued to reside in Manchester, New 
Hampshire. 

Mr. Hill was a most affable man, and while not at all ostentatious in 
the bestowal of favors, was always ready and willing to advise and encour- 
age young men who were making their start in life. He was a home man in 
all that term implies, and was an affectionate husband and a kind father. 
As a citizen he was singularly upright, and his death meant the removal of 
one of Manchester's most conspicuous and equitable men. 




3o0taf) Carpenter 




Carpenter Arms — Argent, a greyhound passant ; a chief sable. 
Crest — A greyhound's head, erased per fesse sable and argent. 
Motto — Celeritas virtus, fidelitas. 

'HATEVER the future may hold in store for New Hampshire, 
for New England and for the country-at-large, whatever 
may be the product, in manly and womanly character and 
patriotic citizenship, of the commingled blood of all the 
races now blended in our national life, it is safe to say there 
will never be found a nobler type of manhood and woman- 
hood than that presented during the last century in our New 
England life, in the descendants of the English Pilgrims and Puritans, who 
settled the land, builded their homes, conquered the wilderness, established 
the church and the school, and laid deep and strong the foundations of free 
government in the earlier years. A conspicuous example of this type was 
Josiah Carpenter, of Manchester, New Hampshire, a prominent figure in the 
financial life of the "Queen City" for many years, a citizen of high char- 
acter and commanding influence, who departed from this life on May 22, 
191 3, at the ripe age of nearly eighty-four years. 

Josiah Carpenter was a native of the town of Chichester, where his 
birth occurred on May 31, 1829. The family of which he was a worthy rep- 
resentative has occupied a conspicuous place in American and English his- 
tory for many generations, its established record going back to the time of 
that John Carpenter who was a member of the English Parliament in 1323, 
and was the grandfather of the famous town clerk of 1-ondon, of the same 
name. The pioneer American settler of that branch of the family of which 
Josiah Carpenter was a member was William Carpenter, who was born in 
1605, at Wherwell, near Surry, who sailed from Southampton, England, for 
America in the ship "Bevis," in 1638, with his wife. Abigail, and four child- 
ren, and settled in Weymouth, Masachusetts, where he was made a freeman 
in 1640, and elected to the Provincial Legislature in the year following. He 
was "Proprietor's" clerk, and manifestly a leading man in the community, 
but removed to the town of Rehoboth, in 1645, where he died in 1659, having 
been a captain of the militia and otherwise prominent in public affairs, and 
having won and enjoyed the friendship and confidence of Governor Brad- 
ford. 

Some of the descendants of this William Carpenter, of Weymouth and 
Rehoboth, found their way to Connecticut and there settled and it was in the 
town of Stafford in that State, or province as it then was, that John Car- 
penter reared a family of eleven children, of whom the fifth was Josiah 
Carpenter, born October 6, 1762. He graduated from Dartmouth College 
in 1787, studied for the ministry and was ordained and installed as the first 
settled minister of the Congregational church in the town of Chichester, 



48 31o0ial) Carpenter 

New Hampshire, November 2, 1791. This pastorate was the longest in the 
history of the town and one of the most notable in the State, continuing for 
thirty-six years, until the dismissal of Mr. Carpenter at his own request, 
July 24, 1827. He continued his residence in the town, however, until the 
time of his death, March i, 1851, and his life, his character, his teaching and 
example as pastor and citizen, left a lasting impress for good upon the com- 
munity. He had rendered his country patriotic service in early youth, hav- 
ing performed sentinel duty on Roxbury Neck with four brothers, one of 
whom was killed, and his entire life had been characterized by a spirit of 
devotion to the demands of religion and the obligations of citizenship. On 
April T3, 1790, he married Hannah Morrill, of Canterbury, the representa- 
tive of another family notable in the history of the State, by whom he had 
six children, the second of whom was David Morrill Carpenter, born in 
Chichester, November 16, 1793, and who was a soldier in the War of 1812. 
On January 13, 1818, he married Mary Perkins, of Loudon, was engaged in 
trade in Chichester for many years, and later in farming, and subsequently 
removed to Concord, where he passed away, December 9, 1873, having held 
various public positions including that of treasurer of Merrimack county 
for twelve years. 

The second son of David Morrill Carpenter was Josiah Carpenter, in 
whose memory we are writing. His early life was spent in labor upon his 
father's farm through which, like many another man who has won success 
in business life, he established the physical constitution and endurance 
essential to such result, and in attendance upon the district school and the 
academies in Pembroke and Pittsfield and the New Hampshire Conference 
Seminary at Sanbornton Bridge, now Tilton. After completing his school 
life, being possessed of an enterprising spirit, with the trading faculty so 
characteristic of the intelligent New Englander developed in good measure, 
he engaged for some time in the purchase and sale of live stock, ultimately 
extending his operations to the southwest, and making the State of Ken- 
tucky a field of enterprise. Returning north after a time, Mr. Carpenter's 
father having removed to a large farm in the town of Epsom, he engaged 
with him in extensive agricultural operations, and was soon after appointed 
a deputy sherifif for the county of Merrimack, in which capacity he trans- 
acted a large amount of business. He was also deputized to serve in a sim- 
ilar capacity for the counties of Hilsborough and Belknap. For some years 
before his father's removal to Concord, he had practically the entire care of 
the farm which, with various private enterprises in which he engaged and 
his official business, furnished ample scope for the full measure of energy 
and activity with which he was endowed. In April, 1858, the farm in Epsom 
having been sold, he was tendered and accepted the position of cashier of the 
bank in Pittsfield, and took up his residence in that town, where he con- 
tinued in the efficient discharge of the duties of his position (the bank having 
been reorganized under the federal banking law in 1864), successfully ad- 
ministering the afifairs of the institution, engaging in various important 
individual enterprises, and at the same time taking that active interest in 
public affairs which characterizes every loyal, intelligent and broad-minded 



3fosia!) Catpentet 49 

citizen. He filled various positions of trust and responsibility, serving his 
tow^n as representative in the Legislature in 1862 and 1863, and Merrimack 
county as treasurer in 1872 and 1873. Having determined to remove to a 
broader field of enterprise, and having already erected for himself a fine 
house on North Elm street, Manchester, in what is to-day one of its most 
attractive residential sections, he removed there in 1877, establishing, with 
his talented and accomplished wife and true helpmate, Georgia B. (Drake) 
Carpenter, the only daughter of Colonel James Drake, long a leading cit- 
izen of Pittsfield, with whom he was united in marriage on September i, 
1858, what has since been one of the most charming and hospitable homes 
in the "Queen City." He immediately engaged in the work of organizing 
and putting in operation the Second National Bank of Manchester, of which 
he was director and cashier at the start. This bank, through his manage- 
ment, characterized at all times by sound judgment and wise discrimination, 
pursuing conservative methods, rather than indulging in "wild cat" schemes, 
but ever fostering the spirit of legitimate enterprise, became one of the 
strong and successful financial institutions of the city and State and an 
important factor in the business life of Manchester and the surrounding 
region. Mr. Carpenter was president of the bank for many years, having 
succeeded the late Aretas Blood upon the death of the latter. Simultan- 
eously with the organization of the Second National Bank Mr. Carpenter 
secured a charter for and established the Mechanics Savings Bank, of which 
he was a trustee and treasurer until the time of his death, and which in its 
standing and success bears ample testimony to his judgment and ability as 
a financial administrator. In Manchester, as in Pittsfield, his enterprising 
spirit was by no means confined to his banking operations. He recognized 
the possibilities and the demands of real estate development in the rapidly 
growing city, and became an active factor in that field of enterprise. 

Although preeminently a business man, in the general acceptance of 
the term, devoting his mind and energy in large measure to the conduct of 
business affairs and gaining therein that substantial success which most 
men naturally seek and comparatively few secure, Mr. Carpenter never lost 
sight of the fact that there are interests in life of vastly greater importance 
than those that relate to the ordinary affairs of business, the acquisition of 
wealth and the development of the material resources of city. State and 
Nation. He was ever true to the spirit and traditions of these pioneers of 
American liberty who laid the foundations of our national greatness and 
glory on New England soil in the early days when they set up the church 
and the school as the first and highest objects of their fostering care and 
support beyond the mere subsistence of themselves and their families. He 
recognized the paramount claims of morality and intelligence, and gave 
constant and generous support to the allied interests of religion and educa- 
tion upon which all true progress and prosperity depend. Mr. Carpenter 
was an Episcopalian in his religious affiliation, was an active and interested 
member of the Grace Episcopal Church of Manchester, New Hampshire, 
and a liberal contributor to its support and for the furtherance of the work 

NH_4 



50 31osia|j Carpenter 

of the New Hampshire diocese. He had been a member of the vestry of 
Grace Church for thirty-six years ; had served as treasurer for nearly twenty 
vears ; and for a long time as junior warden. His last gift to the church was 
especially noteworthy, it being a substantial and convenient new parish 
house of granite construction corresponding with the church itself, and 
supplying a want which had been long felt by the parish. This elegant 
structure, which was given in the joint name of Mr. Carpenter and his wife 
in memory of their daughter, the late Georgia Ella (Carpenter) Gerrish, 
was formally dedicated on April 2, 191 3. Coadjutor Bishop Edward M. 
Parker officiated at the services, in conjunction with the rector, with ad- 
dresses by two former rectors, and by Judge Robert J. Peaslee, representing 
the vestry. The house, which was designed by Ralph Adams Cram, con- 
tains a large assembly room, an auxiliary room completely furnished by 
Mrs. Carpenter, and rooms for a men's club and other organizations con- 
nected with the parish, together with a spacious dining room, all properly 
arranged and furnished with every necessary convenience. Although Mr. 
Carpenter had been for some time in failing health, he was present at the 
dedication, enjoying the exercises and entering into the spirit of the occa- 
sion; but, as it happened, this was his last appearance at any public gather- 
ing, nor could any more appropriate selection have been made therefor. 
Could he himself have chosen he doubtless would not have had it otherwise. 
His death occurred May 22, 1913. 

Mr. Carpenter was long prominent in the affairs of the New Hampshire 
diocese, holding various responsible positions and taking a lively interest 
in the work done under its auspices, and had been one of its delegates at all 
the sessions of the general triennial convention held during the last twenty 
years, attending the convention in Minneapolis in 1895, in Washington in 
1898, in San Francisco in 1901, in Boston in 1904, in Richmond in 1907, and 
in Cincinnati in 1910. Intently devoted to business as he was, and neglect- 
ing none of its demands, he had, nevertheless, found opportunity to travel 
widely, accompanied by his wife, for recreation and observation, both in 
this country and in foreign lands. His strong interest in the cause of educa- 
tion was manifested in more than one direction. He was especially active 
and prominent in the establishment of the School for Boys at Holderness, 
of which he was trustee and treasurer from its inception, giving care and 
attention to the remodeling and enlargement of the buildings made neces- 
sary by the growth of the school, and otherwise promoting the welfare and 
prosperity of the institution. In connection with the mention of Mr. Car- 
penter's love and interest in the Holderness School for Boys, it is appro- 
priate to say that in honor of Mr. Carpenter's memory, Mrs. Carpenter has 
donated to that institution a handsome brick gymnasium, and also a schol- 
arship fund; both as a memorial to her husband. He was also for many 
years a trustee of St. Mary's School for Girls, at Concord, another valuable 
and prosperous institution fostered by the Episcopal church in that State. 
His interest in public education was always strong, and for the schools of 
Pittsfield he ever cherished, notwithstanding his removal to Manchester, 
an abiding regard which was manifested in a practical manner, as it was 



3[o$iab Carpenter 51 

through his instrumentality that provision was made for prize speaking in 
Pittsfield schools. The most substantial manner in which his interest in 
the intellectual welfare and educational progress of the town of Pittsfield 
or its people was shown, however, was in the erection and gift to the town, 
twelve years before his death, of a handsome and well-arranged library 
building of brick and stone construction, which is not only an ornament to 
the village in a material sense, but a blessing to the community in a far 
more important direction. Since then Mr. Carpenter made liberal contri- 
butions of books to the library and Mrs. Carpenter has continued the gifts 
since his death. It may not be amiss to remark in this connection that if 
more men of means in this and other states would build monuments of this 
kind before death, or provide for their erection afterward, their own mem- 
ories would be held in more lasting regard, and the general welfare be 
greatly promoted. Having at heart the interests of the town of Pittsfield 
and the surrounding region, and realizing the need of better transportation 
facilities for its development and prosperity, Mr. Carpenter took an active 
interest in promoting the construction of the Suncook Valley Railroad, and 
was one of the directors of the corporation. 

Politically, Mr. Carpenter was a conservative Democrat, adhering con- 
sistently to the doctrines of Jeflferson and Jackson. Seeking no office for 
himself, he gave hearty support to the policies and candidates of his party, 
attending its conventions and serving upon its committees, but he did not 
endorse its alliance with the free silver movement in 1896. His business 
training and experience naturally made him an adherent of the gold stand- 
ard, and he was one of the New Hampshire delegates in what was known 
as the Gold Democratic Convention of that year, at Indianapolis. 

Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter, a daughter, 
Georgia Ella, who became the vdfe of Frank M. Gerrish, and died soon 
after her marriage, and a son who died in infancy. Mrs. Gerrish was a 
woman of rare charm, universally beloved, and wielded a powerful influ- 
ence. By her early passing, her parents were bereft of their most precious 
treasure. 

Josiah Carpenter was a man of sterling character and real worth, 
widely-esteemed and respected. Dignified in bearing, courteous and frank, 
but never eff'usive in speech, his manner was that of the true gentleman, and 
as such he was ever regarded. Resorting to none of the arts by which pop- 
ularity is often gained, he won his friends through the power of manly 
character and a kindly spirit, and having won them he ever held them fast. 
He gained wealth by intelligent eff'ort and sagacious business methods, 
and used it generously for the world's advantage. Above all he was a well- 
rounded man, realizing fully all his obligations to himself, his family, his 
friends and neighbors, to the community, the State and Nation, and to his 
Creator, which latter, as he well realized, included all the rest, and he was 
true to all. He will long be remembered as one who, having made the most 
of his own opportunities, left the world better from having lived therein. 




Colonel 3(^ntes Brabe 

Drake Arms — Argent, a wyvern wings displayed and tail nowed gules. 

Crest — A dexter arm erect, couped at elbow proper, holding a battle axe sable. 

Motto — Aquila non capit muscas. (The eagle catcheth not flies). 

^HE family of Drake is of great antiquity. The name Drago 
or Draco, the Latin for Drake, was in use among the Ro- 
mans, and signifies "one who draws or leads," a "leader." 
The Romans obtained the name from the Greeks, among 
whom it is found as early as 600 B. C, when Draco, the cele- 
brated Athenian legislator, drew up the code of laws for 
the government of the people. This code of laws bore his 
name. Soon after the conquest of Wessex by the Saxons, a family or clan 
called Draco or Drago appears to have taken possession of an old Roman 
and Briton encampment in what is now the Manor of Musbury, Axmin- 
ister, Devon county, England, which subsequently became known as Mount 
Drake. From this family it is probable that all of the name in England and 
Ireland are descended, as, although the crests of the various families of 
Drake in later days varied, their arms were the same, thus proving the com- 
mon origin of the famil)^ 

Ashe, an ancient seat adjoining Mount Drake, was brought into the 
Drake family by the marriage, in 1420, of John Drake, of Mount Drake and 
Exmouth (the first from whom lineal descent can be traced), to Christiana, 
daughter and heiress of John Billett, of Ashe, and remained in the family 
about four hundred years. Of this family was Sir Francis Drake, the cele- 
brated navigator; Samuel Drake, D. D., and his son of the same name, both 
of eminent literary attainments; Francis Drake, M. D., a noted surgeon and 
antiquarian; James Drake, F. R. S., whose discoveries in anatomy are not 
surpassed in importance by those of Hervey. 

John Drake, of the council of Plymouth, one of the original company 
established by King James in 1606 for settling New England, was of a 
branch of this family of Ashe, several of whose sons came to this country, 
one of whom was Robert, born in 1580. He took up his residence in Exeter, 
New Hampshire, before 1643, but removed to Hampton early in 1651, where 
he died January 14, 1668. He was a man of eminent piety, great influence, 
and left a considerable estate. 

Colonel James Drake, of whom we are writing, was of the seventh 
generation from this Robert Drake, the line of descent being as follows: 
(I) Robert Drake, previously mentioned. 

(H) Abraham Drake, son of Robert Drake, was a man of especial 
prominence both in Exeter and Hampton. His residence in the latter town 
bore the name of "Drake Side," and has remained not only in the family 
to the present time, but with few exceptions in the name of Abraham. He 
was extensively engaged in running town and other boundary lines; was 



Colonel 31ame0 Drake 53 

marshal of the county of Norfolk for nine years, until the separation of 
New Hampshire from Massachusetts in 1679. He was a man capable of 
any business, a good penman and forward in all public service. 

(HI) Abraham (2) Drake, son of Abraham (i) and Jane Drake, held the 
office of selectman for many years, and was the wealthiest man in Hampton, 
where he died in 1714, aged fifty-nine years, highly-respected in the com- 
munity. He married Sarah Hobbs. 

(IV) Abraham (3) Drake, son of Abraham (2) and Sarah (Hobbs) 
Drake, married Theodate Roby, granddaughter of Judge Henry Roby, who 
held a conspicuous place in New Hampshire's early history. Mr. Drake 
was a prominent citizen, much in public business and affairs of responsi- 
bility. 

(V) Simon Drake, son of Abraham (3) and Theodate (Roby) Drake, 
was born in Hampton, October 4, 1730, but settled in Epping about 1752, 
when the town was almost a wilderness. The depredations and cruelties 
of the Indians severely taxed the courage of those early settlers. He was 
a man of remarkable exactness, and his farm was far famed for its neatness 
and methodical arrangement. He married Judith Perkins. An older 
brother, Abraham, was active in both civil and military affairs. He was a 
member of the Provincial Congress, Captain of Horse in the French War, 
and lieutenant-colonel in the Revolutionary War. 

(VI) Major James Drake, eldest child of Simon and Judith (Perkins) 
Drake, was born in Epping, November 14, 1755 (the year of the great earth- 
quake). Early in life he went to Pittsfield, and was one of its first settlers. 
Although but nineteen years of age when the War of Independence broke 
out, he promptly joined the Continental Army, and after faithful service 
received an honorable discharge. With characteristic zeal he resumed the 
work of clearing his farm and eventually became an extensive owner of real 
estate. In the State militia he was major of a regiment, and was one of the 
town's most prominent citizens. He was a member of Pittsfield's first 
Board of Selectmen, and filled that office for eighteen years, and long served 
in the State Legislature with honor. He was a man of great force of char- 
acter, possessing a strong will and much determination, tempered by sound 
judgment. His physical abilit}'^ has seldom been equalled and for integrity 
in all his dealings none could claim a higher place. He died in Pittsfield, 
February 26, 1834. He married Hannah Ward. 

(VII) We now reach the subject of our sketch. Colonel James Drake, 
who was born in Pittsfield, June 29, 1805, and died April 7, 1870. He was 
the eleventh in Major James and Hannah (Ward) Drake's family of twelve 
children. His youth was passed like that of other sons of well-to-do farmers 
in those days, but with the advantage in development which is the outcome 
of the stimulus of a large household. Inheriting the fertile and well-equipped 
farm from his father, he gradually added to its oversight extensive dealings 
in live stock and the acquisition of much outlying real estate. After a few 
years he moved to the village in Pittsfield where, because of his mature 
judgment and dependableness, he was a leading power. He was president 
of thp Pittsfield Bank (afterward a National Bank), holding the position 



54 Colonel Slameis Drake 

the remainder of his life. His fondness for miHtary affairs resulted in his 
rising from a private to the rank of colonel of the Eighteenth Regiment, 
which he commanded with signal ability and credit until the abandonment 
of the militia system. He had a fine figure, an authoritative voice, and made 
a soldierly appearance whether on foot or in the saddle. In politics he sup- 
ported the Democratic party, where his efforts and influence were ever for 
measures which pertained to the public good rather than personal aggran- 
dizement, but in deference to the wishes of his party he served in the State 
Senate in 1847-48. Conspicuous among his many commendable qualities 
was his staunch and generous support of morality and religion. 

On August 13, 1834, he married Betsey Seavey, daughter of George 
and Betsey (Lane) Seavey, of Chichester. She was a woman of rare attrac- 
tiveness and charm, well-educated (having finished her studies at Hampton 
Academy), and possessed those qualities which make of home "a corner of 
Heaven upon earth." She died September 28, 1865. They were the parents 
of three children: Georgia Butters, born January 15, 1836; Frank James, 
November 3, 1842, and Nathaniel Seavey, September 16, 1851. 

It seems fitting that the descendants of Colonel James Drake should 
have mention in connection with this, therefore will record that Georgia 
Butters, inheriting her mother's charm and power which passing years 
have enriched, was united in marriage, September i, 1858, with Josiah Car- 
penter, then cashier of the Pittsfield Bank. The greater part of their life^ 
was passed in Manchester, New Hampshire, where Mr. Carpenter died May 
22, 1913, at the age of nearly eighty-four years. To them was born, October 
13, 1859, a daughter, Georgia Ella, the pride and comfort of their home. 
She married Frank M. Gerrish, March 27, 1889, and entered into eternity, 
August 29, 1889; also a son, born May 29, 1861, who lived but a day. 

Frank James Drake, a man of rare integrity and uprightness, graduated 
with honor from Dartmouth College in 1865, and engaged in the wholesale 
flour and grain business in Manchester, New Hampshire, until the time of 
his death, which occurred at his summer home in Barnstead, August 20, 
1891. He married Harriet C. E. Parker, June 7, 1869, and their children 
were: James, who died in infancy; and Helen, born April 8, 1871, who grad- 
uated at Wellesley College, and on September 9, 1897, became the wife of 
Charles S. Aldrich, a prominent lawyer in Troy, New York. They have 
one child, Adeline, born December 10, 1901. 

Nathaniel Seavey Drake, a dealer in real estate, occupies the paternal 
home in Pittsfield village, where he takes an active part in the development 
and uplift of his native town. He married Mary A. R. Green, March 17, 
1873. The older of their two children is James Frank, born September i, 
1880, a graduate of Dartmouth College, who left his position as treasurer 
of the Phelps Publishing Company in Springfield, Massachusetts, in May, 
1918, in obedience to the government's summons for him to take charge of 
a finance division of the Ordnance Department, with rank of major. United 
States Army. His wife was Mildred A. Chase, of Plymouth, New Hamp- 
shire, the accomplished and attractive mother of three daughters, Ruth, 
Virginia and Constance, and a son, James Frank, Jr. The second child of 



Colonel 3lame0 Drake 55 

Nathaniel Seavey and Mary A. R. Drake is Agnes, born April 2, 1883, who 
graduated from Lasell Seminary. She married Calvin W. Foss, a Dart- 
mouth College graduate, and they reside in Brooklyn, New York, where two 
children were born, Agnes and Christine. 

Among the frequent substantial evidences of remembrance and loyalty 
to the home town of their father may be mentioned the "Drake Field," an 
athletic ground of thirteen acres, handsomely laid out and fitted with the 
most substantial modern equipment, presented by Mrs. Carpenter and her 
brother, Nathaniel Seavey Drake, also a fine library building of brick and 
stone construction, the gift of Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter. 

Colonel James Drake was typical of that fine class of manhood which 
is so characteristic of New England, and upon which, as a sure foundation, 
her wealth and prosperity rest. It is to the presence of such men, progres- 
sive, wide-awake and full of enterprise, that communities owe their pros- 
perity, and it is only appropriate therefore that they should mourn the loss 
of them as Pittsfield and the neighboring region did for Colonel Drake. 




Bemas Btotnell 




HE late Demas Dwinell, a well-known resident of the city of 
Manchester, New Hampshire, was for many years one of 
the leaders in any movement for the public good of the 
community, and to such an extent was this the fact that his 
name came to be accepted as a stamp of excellence and his 
endorsement of a public or private enterprise regarded as an 
evidence of its merit and honesty. His name should be 
found among the men entitled to a place in the noble company of those who 
when dying left the world better than they found it. In private life the 
amiable and generous disposition of Mr. Dwinell endeared him to a number 
of friends, and it is men like him who are intelligent factors in every idea 
and work that helps to develop the success of all great cities, and it is to be 
hoped that there are many more like him fit to follow in his footsteps. Mr. 
Dwinell was a well equipped man of prodigious energy, and a possessor of 
all those hardy virtues which gain the admiration and affection of all man- 
kind. Not every man who has reared to himself the monument of a suc- 
cessful career leaves his memorial in the heart of the public, but this was 
true in the case of the distinguished gentleman whose name heads this 
tribute, and none who had the honor of his acquaintance, and were familiar 
with the circumstances of his career, could for a moment doubt that the 
vacancy left by his passing away was one difficult to replace. The death of 
Mr. Dwinell occurred in Manchester, New Hampshire, May 28, 1913. and 
removed from the midst of that city a man who was just, generous and 
kind. He left behind him the memory of a nature rarely gifted with those 
attributes which made for doing unto others as he would have others do to 
him. He was a man of high ideals to which he adhered with an unusual 
degree of faithfulness throughout his entire life, and might well be pointed 
out as a model of good citizenship. The community-at-large felt the whole- 
some and inspiring effect of his example, and it will be long before its mem- 
bers cease to miss the genial and kindly influence which surrounded him. 
It is always very difficult, if not sometimes impossible, to fully estimate the 
effect upon their environment of such men as Mr. Dwinell, whose influence 
depends not so much upon the concrete deeds that they have accomplished, 
as upon that subtle force which communicates itself unseen to all about 
from a fine and gracious personality. Although it is difficult to estimate the 
influence for good of such a man, it is at least easy to set it high. Thus 
can be readily seen that the death of Mr. Dwinell was a loss not only to his 
immediate family and the large circle of devoted friends, which his many 
good qualities had won for him, but to his fellow-citizens in general, few 
of whom had not benefited in some way by his life and example. 

The birth of Demas Dwinell occurred in the northern part of the State 
of New York, and he was the son of Harvev Dwinell. Demas Dwinell was 




sniicll OVciinilii 



Dema0 DtoincII 57 

considered one of the best known and most respected citizens in Manchester, 
New Hampshire, and especially so in the East Manchester district, where he 
had lived for so many years and where he held extensive real estate inter- 
ests. He was particularly interested in the growth and development of this 
part of the city, the East Side, as it was called, and never missed an opportu- 
nity to aid in making that important part of Manchester keep abreast of 
the remainder of the city in every way. Mr. Dwinell believed in Man- 
chester being a city of progress and improvement, and his faith in the city 
led him to invest wisely and extensively in many different kinds of property. 

At one time Mr. Dwinell was a merchant in Manchester, but had 
retired several years prior to his death to attend chiefly to his real estate 
holdings. Even in the prime of life, Mr. Dwinell was progressive to the 
highest degree, and his influence was a potent one in the community. To 
the virtues of honesty and sagacity he added other graces, so that among 
all his associates, whether in the way of business or the more personal rela- 
tions of life, he was both loved and admired, and a complete confidence was 
felt in him from the start that he would fulfill whatever he engaged to do. 
He was indeed a courteous, kindly man, and a citizen of high repute and 
worth. 

At the time of his death, Mr. Dwinell was sixty years of age, and had 
resided in Manchester, New Hampshire, for over thirty years. He was one 
of those men who made friends easily, and had the rare faculty of retain- 
ing those friendships. His popularity was very widespread, and though the 
news of his death was felt as a loss in difl^erent parts of the State yet the 
strongest affection was felt for him in Manchester, the place of his adoption, 
as it was there that he gave most generously to his friendship and service. 

Mr. Dwinell was very charitable to every good work, and could not 
bear to witness need without an attempt to alleviate the circumstances. His 
support of charitable movements was most generous, and it is probable that 
no one, certainly no one outside his immediate family, realized the extent of 
these benefactions for he gave with that modesty which is recommended to 
us, so that his right hand knew not what his left did. It was rare indeed 
that an appeal was made to him for any public movement, of which his 
judgment approved, to which he did not respond most liberally, and of those 
who came to him privately for aid few were sent away unsatisfied. The 
soul of sincerity and honor, his purposes were always high-minded, and he 
turned his immense energy and unusual talents chiefly to the use of his 
fellow-citizens and to the community-at-large. 

Mr. Dwinell was a prominent member of Oak Hill Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Acorn Rebekah Lodge, both of Manchester, New 
Hampshire, the Passaconnaway Tribe, Improved Order of Red Men, and a 
member of the Foresters of America. He was a delightful companion, as 
he remembered and recounted with vivid power the many interesting exper- 
iences he had passed through during his long career as a business men. In 
his religious belief, Mr. Dwinell was an Episcopalian. 

Demas Dwinell was united in marriage with Minnie L. Jackson. Mr. 
and Mrs. Dwinell had one son, who is now Dr. George F. Dwinell, a grad- 



58 



Demas Dtoinell 



uate of Harvard Medical School. Mr. Dwinell was a strong character and 
was deeply interested in the affairs of the community, which were ever 
uppermost in his mind, and at the same time was most devoted to his own 
family ; in all ways a faithful husband and a wise father. He made an ideal 
citizen, and one that any community might hold up as a type for its youth 
to imitate. 




(g^eorge ilpron C|)antiler 

'HE CHANDLERS have always been natural leaders in what- 
ever community their fortunes happened to be cast, and long 
occupied an honorable and conspicuous place in New Hamp- 
shire history. A time-honored name in American annals, 
among the first in New Hampshire, this has been conspicu- 
ous in many States, and is among the most prominent of the 
commonwealth to-day. As jurists and legislators, as busi- 
ness men and philanthropists, its bearers have done service to New Hamp- 
shire and received honor at her hands. It has been said that Roxbury, 
Massachusetts, received the best of the English emigrants in Puritan days, 
and this family has furnished since those olden days many of the best 
pioneers in many States of the Union. Heraldic description of the Chandler 
coat-of-arms : 

Arms — Chequy argent and azure, on a bend sable three lions passant or. 
Crest — A pelican sable in nest vert feeding her young. 

Motto — Ad mortem fidelis. (Faithful until death). Matthews American Armoury 
1903 and 1908. 

William Chandler, the first of the name to come to America, settled 
in Roxbury, in 1637, and immediately became prominent in the development 
of the new plantation. His descendants participated in the border war- 
fares, and one of them, John Chandler, fought throughout King Philip's 
War. He was rewarded for his meritorious service with a grant of land in 
Narragansett, No. 5, now Bedford, and hither his son, Thomas, emigrated 
in 1750. Succeeding generations lived there, improving the homestead, 
hewn out of the wilderness by this sturdy pioneer, until Adam Chandler, 
the father of the subject of this tribute, occupied the old home. 

George Byron Chandler, of the ninth generation from William Chand- 
ler, the immigrant of the family, was born in Bedford, New Hampshire, 
November 18, 1832, the second son of Adam and Sally (McAllister) Chand- 
ler. Three sons, all worthy of their heritage, were born to this couple, 
namely: Henry, George Byron, and John M. Chandler. The second of these 
robust boys, George Byron Chandler, passed his boyhood days upon the 
well-kept farm of his parents, where he laid the foundation of that rugged 
manhood which so well served him in the cares of an active life. His parents 
were pioneer residents of the town of Bedford, and splendid representatives 
of the high-minded, frugal and industrious citizens, who, in the early days 
of its settlement, tilled the soil and shaped its affairs. They were anxious 
for their son to follow some more lucrative calling than that of his immed- 
iate ancestors, and gave him all of the privileges for education that were 
possible in his native town, which were later supplemented by instruction in 
several State academies, such as Piscataquog, Gilmanton, Hopkinton, and 
Reeds Ferry. Possessed of that ambition and energy characteristic of the 



6o (©corge 15vton CftanDler 

New England boy, George Byron Chandler laid well his plans and carried 
them out successfully. He believed in work if success was to be achieved, 
and after having made proper use of his educational opportunities, he taught 
school in Amoskeag, Bedford, and Nashua, before his majority, at the same 
time improving every opportunity to acquire information by reading and 
studying alone. Mr. Chandler spent the first year of his manhood in the 
service of the Boston, Concord & Montreal Railroad, as a civil engineer. 
Early in the year 1854, determined to devote himself to a business career, 
he entered the employ of Kidder & Duncklee, grocers, in Manchester, New 
Hampshire, as a bookkeeper, and there gave such promise of his subsequent 
success as a financier that he was ofifered a position of a similar nature, the 
following year, in the Amoskeag Bank. This he accepted, when that insti- 
tution was beginning to get a start, and his capacity was so demonstrated 
that he was promoted in eighteen months to the teller's position, which he 
occupied until the organization of the Amoskeag National Bank in 1864, 
when, after more than seven years of faithful and efficient attention to duty, 
he was chosen cashier. As such he was the real executive officer of that 
institution, and his friends may well be proud of the record in growth and 
strength of this bank under his administration. This relation continued 
until 1892, when Mr. Chandler became president of the bank. 

Upon the organization of the People's Savings Bank, in 1874, Mr. 
Chandler was made its treasurer, a position which he filled until his decease. 
The New Hampshire Fire Insurance Company was another of the institu- 
tions to prosper under Mr. Chandler's fostering care. He was one of its 
incorporators in 1869, and was its treasurer while he lived. As president of 
the Amoskeag National Bank, treasurer of the People's Savings Bank, and 
of the New Hampshire Fire Insurance Company, Mr. Chandler was one of 
the leading officials in control of large capital. In addition to this he was a 
director in the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, the Manchester & 
Lawrence Railroad, the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company, 
the Moline Plow Company, of Moline, Illinois, the Manchester Gas Com- 
pany, and various other corporations and large enterprises. Aside from 
other business connections he was entrusted with numerous trusts, involv- 
ing wise and skillful management of important and extensive interests. In 
fact he was a man of many-sided influences for the good of the public. His 
advice was often sought in matters pertaining to investments, and so uni- 
versal was the confidence in his tact and proper conservatism that a good 
word from him set doubts at rest. The figures of assets tell the story of 
the marvelous success of the institutions which Mr. Chandler principally 
directed during the half century of his uninterrupted banking life. Under 
his guidance their growth was rapid and substantial, and even during the 
critical periods, when other financial institutions in various sections of the 
country were crumbling and many of them forced to suspend, they stood 
the test. At no time did stockholders or depositors fear for their safety. 
This fact and the marked prosperity of his institutions is sufficient to give 
Mr. Chandler an imperishable place among the great financiers of the 
country. 



&totst 15pcon CbanDIet 6i 

While these have been the interests dearest to Mr. Chandler, he was 
ever inclined to assist other w^orthy enterprises especially those calculated 
to build up the city of his adoption, Manchester, New^ Hampshire. His v^fell 
know^n inclination to help home industries resulted in a unanimous choice 
of Mr. Chandler for president of the Manchester Board of Trade, v^hen that 
organization wras formed, and he took hold of the work with the vim that 
was characteristic in everything he undertook. When he retired from the 
presidency, a system had been formulated which made the board a most 
material factor in the city's industrial progress. Every worthy enterprise 
seemed to receive his hearty approval and financial support. To him in a 
large measure the citizens of Manchester are indebted for the busy shoe 
industry which has materially increased during the past few years. He saw 
in the new industry the probability of success, and through his energy and 
financial aid at least three large shoe shops were induced to locate in Man- 
chester. 

Standing out in bold relief as an illustration of Mr. Chandler's public 
spirit and generosity was his work in connection with the New Hampshire 
Club, of which he was an organizer and one time the president. His love 
for arts and sciences led him to take a deep interest in the Manchester In- 
stitute of Arts and Sciences, of which organization he was a benefactor of 
incalculable value from its inception. When that institution suffered so 
severely by fire, he did much toward its recovery from the blow. It was 
due entirely to his generosity that the lost items were replaced, and the 
Chandler course of lectures, which have afforded so much pleasure and 
instruction, was likewise the fruit of his public spirit. Mr. Chandler was 
also one of the leading spirits and supporters of the Philharmonic Society, 
of which he was president. In truth it would be difficult to find another 
person who has done as much towards affording good healthy entertainment 
for both old and young. In this respect, alone, Manchester owes much to 
Mr. Chandler's memory. If he had not been freely disposed to make good 
the deficits anticipated, the musical festivals, with world-famous artists, as 
soloists, would not have been Manchester's portion. He did it because he 
loved music and realized concerts were a benefit to the community. Mr. 
Chandler also founded an important lecture course in connection with the 
Manchester Institute of Arts and Sciences, and the course bears his name. 
At his own expense he brought to Manchester some of the most celebrated 
lecturers in the country, who entertained the members of the Institute and 
their friends. 

Mr. Chandler was at one time commander of the Amoskeag Veterans, 
and during the time he was at the head the famous organization flourished 
immensely. He was a member of the Derryfield Club, the Wildey Lodge of 
Odd Fellows, Royal Arch Chapter, Adoniram Council, and Trinity Com- 
mandery. Knights Templar, having joined Lafayette Lodge of Masons in 
1854. Governor Batchelder appointed him on the board of trustees of the 
New Hampshire Agricultural College, at Durham. He was also a trustee of 
the State Hospital at Concord, and for a time was a member of the State 
Forestry Commission. While Mr. Chandler always took an active interest 



62 ©eotge "Bpton CljanDler 

in politics, he never sought political preferment, but, like all patriotic citi- 
zens, he was solicitous for the welfare of his Country and State. He was a 
Democrat in his political afifiliations, and in 1874 his party nominated him 
for State Senator, he being elected in a nominally Republican district. He 
was also nominated for Congress by the Democratic party. 

On March i, 1904, Mr. Chandler had rounded out fifty years as a banker, 
and the occasion was fittingly commemorated by the officials and employees 
of the banks with which he was associated, who presented him an elegant 
silver loving cup. Mr. Chandler had read much and traveled extensively in 
this and other countries. He possessed a wide acquaintance with distin- 
guished men in all the walks of life, and had therefore a valuable knowledge 
of the resources, customs and characteristics of various sections, which stood 
him in good stead in his business transactions, as well as furnishing him in- 
valuable material for public addresses and private conversations. As a 
public speaker, Mr. Chandler was most pleasing, and in him was combined 
the elements of good citizenship. His death, which occurred in Manchester, 
New Hampshire, June 29, 1905, at the age of seventy-two years, caused that 
city to mourn his loss as she would few others because he had taught her 
to love and lean upon him. For weeks and months when it became feared 
that he would not live, people of all classes would remark, "Who can take 
his place? Who is there so faithful and competent in the handling of trust 
properties? Whose advice is so sound and safe? Who is there so capable 
to manage the great financial institution of which he was the controlling 
spirit?" 

In 1863, George Byron Chandler married (first) Flora Ann Daniels, 
who died May 3, 1868. One daughter was the fruit of this union, who sur- 
vived her mother only a few months. On October 27, 1870, Mr. Chandler 
married (second) Fanny Rice Martin, the only daughter of Colonel Benja- 
min F. and Mary Ann (Rice) Martin. Mrs. Chandler was a niece of Alex- 
ander Hamilton Rice, ex-governor of the State of Massachusetts. Mr. and 
Mrs. Chandler were the parents of three children, namely: Benjamin Mar- 
tin, Alexander Rice, and Byron, of Reading, Massachusetts. 

George Byron Chandler was in many respects Manchester's foremost 
citizen. He was public-spirited and interested in everything that pertained 
to the city's commercial, industrial and intellectual welfare. He prospered 
in business by the aid of his own ability and industry. He was charitable 
and there was probably no worthy public charity in which he did not interest 
himself. Many kindnesses to individuals will never be known, in fact his 
private charities were legion. It was Mr. Chandler's custom every winter 
to fit out the men on the Beach and Bridge street car lines with gloves. The 
newsboys that delivered him papers were also remembered by him. Almost 
everybody who came in contact with him had occasion to know his goodness. 

From his early days, Mr. Chandler had been a member of the Unitarian 
Society, and had served as its president and director. Although his own 
church affiliations were with the Unitarian belief, almost every church in 
Manchester had at one time or another to thank him for some substantial gift. 



©eotge 'Bpton CljanDIet 



63 



To both the rich and the poor, Mr. Chandler was the same helpful citizen. 
His conservative judgment, ripened by long and wide experience, was highly 
valued by his friends and acquaintances, and his advice was never sought in 
vain. His good counsel gave hope and ambition to many a young man, and 
to many an older man, pressed by difficulties, as well. And so passed a good 
man, who was just in all his dealings with the world. 





ilenjamm JFranfelm iUlarttn 

ENJAMIN FRANKLIN MARTIN, one of the most success- 
ful and progressive citizens of the city of Manchester, New- 
Hampshire, passed away at his home in that city on June i6, 
1886, and the city mourned his loss as a useful citizen and an 
exemplary man. He exemplified in an eminent degree the 
New England character, being industrious, prudent, far- 
sighted, benevolent, and kind in manner and thought. He 
had inherited these qualities from old Colonial ancestry, and never caused a 
stain to rest upon an honorable name. He was generally beloved, and justly 
honored for his sterling worth, high principle and unswerving integrity. 
He was. if humanity can ever attain perfection, an absolutely just man in 
all his dealings, always kind and generous to his fellow-men. 

The name of Martin is not only of frequent occurrence in the old world, 
but it became common in America from an early period, and may be found 
among the early settlers of Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Hampshire 
and Virginia, besides in other colonies. The name is variously spelled even 
in the records of the same family, as Martin, Martyn, Marttin, Marteen, 
Martain and Mortine. In nearly all the countries of western Europe, the 
name of Martin is very common, and there is nothing in the name alone to 
determine the nationality of the family which bears it. Martins for cen- 
turies, however, have been members of the aristocracy and gentry of many 
lands. The Martin coat-of-arms is as follows : 

Arms — Argent, two bars gules. 

Crest — An estoile of sixteen points gules. 

Motto — Sure and Steadfast. 

The first of the name of whom records appear was Martin of Tours, 
a Norman, who made a conquest of the territory of Cemmes, about 1077. 
Through successive generations the Martins of America have been mostly 
honest, good and useful members of society, acting well their part in the 
sphere of life in which they were placed, and from their manliness and 
probity winning the respect of the communities in which they lived. Many 
of them attained political eminence, and among them were judges, gov- 
ernors, senators and congressmen. Among the twenty-one families that 
accompanied the Rev. Joseph Hull from Weymouth, England, to Weymouth, 
Massachusetts, were Robert Martin and wife. They were from Badcome, 
Somersetshire, England, and arrived on the Massachusetts Coast, May 6, 

Benjamin Franklin Martin, the fifth in descent, was born in Peacham, 
Vermont, July 21, 1813, the son of Truman and Mary (Noyes) Martin. His 
father was a pioneer settler of that town, and there cleared up a farm and 
became one of the representative citizens. When but eighteen years of age, 



IBenfamin iFtanfelin Q^artin 65 

Benjamin Franklin Martin started out in the world to earn his own liveli- 
hood, and for this purpose proceeded on foot to Meredith Bridge, now 
Laconia, New Hampshire, where he learned the art of paper-makingf. He 
was apt and willing and rapidly mastered the details of this trade. His sub- 
sequent career as a business man and manufacturer amply testified the value 
of careful preparation and steady pursuit of his calling. After one year in 
the mills in Laconia, Mr. Martin was able to accept a journeyman's place, 
and proceeded to Millbury, Massachusetts, where he became engaged in 
that capacity. His habits were correct, and his earnings were not spent in 
youthful follies, so that a few years found him in a position to engage in 
business on his own account. Mr. Martin, in partnership with his brother- 
in-law, Thomas Rice, leased mills at Newton Lower Falls, near Boston, and 
together they operated these mills until the year 1844. During that same 
year Mr. Martin purchased a large mill at Middleton, Massachusetts, which 
he successfully operated for nine years. Desiring to enlarge his business, 
he leased a mill and residence at Lawrence, Massachusetts, and had shipped 
his household effects there when his attention was called to the facilities 
offered by the water power at Manchester, New Hampshire. Upon inves- 
tigation he decided to locate in that city and immediately proceeded to 
build a mill at Amoskeag Falls. This proved to be one of the leading in- 
dustries of New Hampshire's metropolis city, under the impetus given it 
by the master mind of Colonel Martin. After twelve years of extensive and 
profitable business, he sold out his interest in 1865, but could not be con- 
tented out of its activities, and re-purchased the mill in 1869. Five years 
later, Colonel Martin again sold the mill, and retired from his long activity 
in paper-making to enjoy the fruits of an industrious and honorable career. 

Many of the financial institutions of Manchester owed much of their 
success to the keen business instinct, shrewdness and foresight of Colonel 
Martin. He became a conspicuous figure in the financial circles of the city, 
and his excellent good judgment was sought on many matters of import- 
ance. He was a director of the Merrimack River Bank from its establish- 
ment, in 1854, and became its president in 1859, resigning in i860. He was 
one of the first trustees of the Merrimack River Five Cents Savings Bank, 
and was made its vice-president in i860. Colonel Martin was also made a 
director of the Manchester Bank, upon its charter by the State, and so con- 
tinued after its reorganization as a national bank, and was a trustee of the 
Manchester Savings Bank. 

Colonel Martin was essentially a man of affairs, and it is no wonder that 
his death was greatly lamented by the community in which he had lived 
for many years. He was a director of the Concord & Portsmouth Railroad 
Company, and of the Manchester & Lawrence Railroad, being elected the 
president of the latter road in 1878. He was also president of the Man- 
chester Gas Company, and while accumulating a competence was helping 
the industrial development of his adopted city of Manchester. Colonel 
Martin was furthermore a generous contributor to all elevating influences, 
both by example and financial aid, and his interest and influence in every- 

N H-5 



66 IBcn/amin jTranblin Q^artin 

thing that pertained to the material, social and moral advancement of his 
home city was marked. His fine residence on upper Elm street was the 
seat of hospitality and genial cheer, and his public spirit pervaded all por- 
tions and interests of the city. 

In his political principles, Colonel Martin was affiliated with the Repub- 
lican party, and he became a liberal contributor of time and means to the 
furtherance of good government. In 1857 and 1858, he served his city as a 
member of the Common Council, and as alderman in i860. During the same 
year he was chosen a delegate to the National Convention at Chicago, which 
placed Abraham Lincoln in nomination for President of the United States. 
In 1863 and 1864 he was representative in the Legislature, and acted as 
colonel on the stafif of Governor Gilmore. That a man with the many- 
sided mental equipments which this record implies must needs bring to the 
discharge of the duties of his office an exceptional measure of capability is 
a fact which Colonel Martin demonstrated to the unqualified satisfaction of 
all public-spirited citizens. Colonel Martin was a faithful member of the 
Protestant Episcopal church, but was not allied with other organizations. 
His heart was wide enough for the entire world, and he was ever ready to 
help any worthy movement. 

On January 3, 1836, Colonel Benjamin Franklin Martin was united in 
marriage with Mary Ann Rice, of Newton Falls, Massachusetts, a daughter 
of Thomas and Lydia (Smith) Rice. Mrs. Martin was born at Newton 
Falls, and was one of ten children, eight of whom lived to be over seventy 
years of age. The union of Colonel and Mrs. Martin was blessed with three 
children, daughters, of whom only one survives, namely: Fanny Rice Mar- 
tin, now the widow of George Byron Chandler, of Manchester, who died in 
that city, January 29, 1905. The home life of Colonel Martin was one of 
the marked features of his life, as he was a man who greatly enjoyed domes- 
tic happiness, and always tender and loving in the home circle, his heart 
was no less filled with love toward all humanity. 





(J Uy -C-t^ 



\yuA^y/L 



ilenrp CfjurcJjtU 




^HE career of the late Henry Churchill presents a fine example 

of honesty, integrity, energy and perseverance, struggling 

with the adverse circumstances of life, and rising, at last, to 

complete triumph. No man v^^as better or more universally 

esteemed by his fellow-men, and surely this is the highest 

test of manhood. Few citizens have lived in Nashua, New 

Hampshire, who have left a brighter record for every trait 

of character that constitutes true greatness, and certainly none, whose 

memories shall float down the stream of time, will be more honored and 

revered. 

The death of Mr. Churchill, which occurred in Nashua, New Hamp- 
shire, December 4, 1913, at the age of eighty-two years, deprived that 
city of a citizen who could be depended upon, the family of its wise coun- 
sellor, and humanity of a kind, thoughtful and considerate friend. The many 
with whom Mr. Churchill had intimate relations, in which his sterling char- 
acter was fully disclosed, felt that his passing away was a personal loss. 
In all his words and deeds he was ever faithful to all personal and public 
obligations, while his kindness seemed to solicit friendship, his wisdom 
invited confidence, and his integrity commanded respect. He earned for 
himself the best eulogy that a man can receive from his fellow-men, that he 
lived a useful life. He was a gentleman in the highest and loftiest meaning 
of that term, and his life has shown what honesty combined with brains 
and hard work can accomplish. It is an occupation alike of pleasure and 
profit to trace the life histories of those successful men whose achievements 
have been the result of their own unaided efforts, who, without even the 
average advantages surrounding the typical youth, have worked themselves 
up the ladder of accomplishment until they have found secure places in the 
regard and admiration of their fellow-men. Such a man was Mr. Churchill, 
a man who had dealt in both the times of war and peace and was not found 
wanting in either. 

The birth of the late Henry Churchill occurred in Lowell, Massachu- 
setts, September 15, 1831, the fifth child of Samuel and Sarah (Coburn) 
Churchill. Samuel Churchill was born May 28, 1796. He was a wheel- 
wright by trade, and built the first water wheels used in operating the cotton 
mills in Lowell, Massachusetts. He was united in marriage, September 18, 
1819, with Sarah Coburn, and on account of failing health, he bought a 
farm near Thetford, Vermont, where he died, September 9, 1869, at the age 
of seventy-three years. His wife passed away in Nashua, New Hampshire, 
November 14, 1884, at the age of eighty-seven years. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 
Churchill became the parents of eight children, as follows: Rodney, born 
September 14, 1820; Stillman, born July 28, 1823; Josephine, born August 
22, 1825; Samuel, Jr., born Tune 19, 1829; Henry, in whose memory we are 



68 l^enrp Cljutcbill 

writing this memoir; Robert Wallace, born January 7, 1834; George Web- 
ster, born June 5, 1836; Mary Lawrence, born July 20, 1840. 

The history of the English Churchill family dates back to the time of 
the Norman Conqueror. The name is derived from the town Courcil in 
Lorraine, France. The surname has been spelled Courcil, Curichell, Cher- 
icle. Churchil, Churchall, Churchell, and Churchill, the last form being the 
one generally accepted for many generations in England and in America. 
The Churchill coat-of-arms is as follows: 

Sable, a lion rampant argent debruised with a bondlet gules. 

Eight generations of the Churchill family have been Dukes of Marl- 
borough. Thus, like the majority of English families of renown, the 
Churchills trace their lineage to a follower of the Norman Conqueror, and in 
France their ancestral line goes to a much more remote period. The branch 
from which Henry Churchill, the subject of this tribute, was descended, 
settled in Marlborough, Massachusetts, as early as 1630, 

Henry Churchill obtained his education in the public schools of his 
native city of Lowell, Massachusetts, and when still a youth he learned the 
carpenter trade. Like many of his young friends. Mr. Churchill was greatly 
attracted by the splendid opportunities afforded in the West and accord- 
ingly left his home to make his place in the world in that part of the country. 
But a short while after his departure his father's health became impaired, 
and he returned to assist with the duties of the farm in Vermont. When 
President Lincoln called for volunteers during the Civil War, Mr. Church- 
ill's patriotic spirit came to the front, causing him to offer his services and 
life to his beloved country. He enlisted with the Vermont Volunteers, and 
served his country with valor and honor until the close of the war in 1865. 
After the death of his father, in 1869, Mr. Churchill sold the farm in Ver- 
mont, and located in Nashua, New Hampshire. He followed the trade of 
carpentry, and became connected with the Jackson Company in Nashua, in 
which capacity he remained until the year 1903, when he met with an acci- 
dent, after which he retired from active business pursuits. Mr. Churchill 
was a man beyond the average of intellectual power and skill in his depart- 
ment of work. Thoughtful, quick of discernment and prompt in action, he 
was particularly successful in his line of work. And to these qualities a 
sleepless energy, a perfect system of detail, an intensity of purpose that 
never took anything for granted, and one has a fair idea of Henry Churchill. 
These qualities, apart from his independence of character, steadfastness of 
purpose and indomitable energy, entitle him to a permanent place among 
the leaders of the business world. Mr. Churchill came of sturdy progen- 
itors, and proved this by walking from Nashua, New Hampshire, to Lowell, 
Massachusetts, a distance of fourteen miles, when he was eighty years of 
age, a feat of which he was very proud. He was a man of the strictest integ- 
rity, and an example of the highest type of citizenship. 

On October 13, 1877, Henry Churchill was united in marriage with 
Cassandra Sawyer Hathorn, a daughter of John and Hannah (Leslie) 




/^^^C27-/( 



^enrp Cfturcftill 69 

Hathorn, both of whom were natives of Henniker, New Hampshire. Mrs. 
Churchill was the youngest of ten children, and was born and educated in 
Henniker, New Hampshire. She is a member of the Congregational church 
in Nashua, New Hampshire, and resides at No. i6 Prospect street. Mr. 
Churchill's home life was a beautiful one, and his home he ever considered 
as the dearest spot on this earth. 

The death of Mr. Churchill called forth a remarkable expression of 
feeling from his numerous friends in the community, and this proved the 
depth and sincerity of the affection and admiration in which he was held. 
His friends and business associates learned to prize him for his unassumed 
worth, and such were the qualities of his mind and the forces of his char- 
acter that in any calling Mr. Churchill would have occupied a hig-h place in 
the regard of his fellow-men. The record of his achievements both in the 
time of war and in general business was most honorable. Success in life is 
the result of the most various kinds of effort and endeavor, and the prize of 
the most diverse types of character. Many there are who achieve it through 
some vigorous stroke which carries them at a bound from obscurity to 
prominence, and some few there are of these fortunate enough to accom- 
plish their rise without the loss of friendship or the affection of their fellow- 
men. But the true nobility is displayed most conspicuously when the same 
prominence it attained as the result of long and patient work performed for 
its own sake and because it is a duty. Such was the path followed by the 
late Henry Churchill. 




laatlltam JFranfe Hubbart 

'ILLIAM FRANK HUBBARD, for many years a well-known 
figure and business man of Manchester, New Hampshire, 
enjoyed the respect and confidence of the business world and 
the friendship of all those whom he met in a social manner. 
He made for himself an enviable reputation as a man of 
business, straightforward and reliable under all circum- 
stances, courteous and affable to his patrons, whom he al- 
ways endeavored to please. Mr. Hubbard was honest and sincere in all 
business transactions, ever conducting his affairs along the strictest lines 
of commercial integrity. His own labors constituted the foundation upon 
which he built his success in life, making him one of the substantial manu- 
facturers in Manchester. It is a well known fact that at the foundation of 
the prosperity of every great city lies the work of the manufacturer, for it 
is he, who, in seeking a market for his products, attracts commerce to his 
city, causes factories and business houses to arise, and gives employment 
to many. The methods by which Mr. Hubbard attained the high position 
which held the estimation of his fellow-men attested his qualities of mind 
and heart. Clear judgment, alert to opportunity, untiring in labor, and 
masterly in the management of men, he carved out of enduring granite his 
success as a monument to himself and his exceptional qualities. When he 
passed away at Pinehurst, North Carolina, while upon a pleasure trip, ac- 
companied by his wife, on the morning of February i6, 1905, the mourning 
of his wide circle of friends and business associates was everywhere apparent. 
William Frank Hubbard was born in Boston, Massachusetts, March 6, 
1843, the eldest son of William Winchester and Harriet M. (Hoitt) Hub- 
bard. The Hubbards were among the oldest and most distinguished families 
in early New England. Among the early American names this name has 
been found in many parts of England for centuries before any American 
settlement by white people. It was widely distributed in England, and is 
traced to the Norman Conquest, though not in its present form. Like 
thousands of the best known of our names to-day, its transition from the 
French form has greatly changed its spelling. Of this family one branch 
went to Connecticut, while the other settled in the vicinity of Boston. Abel 
Hubbard, the grandfather of William Frank Hubbard, in whose memory we 
are writing, was born in 1779, and died in 1852. He lived in Brookline, 
Massachusetts, and was a carpenter by trade, being occupied in building 
operations at Brookline and other points. His son, William Winchester 
Hubbard, father of William Frank Hubbard, was born in Brookline, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1819, and died in Manchester, New Hampshire, April 28, 1907. 
He was a machinist and wood worker in the city of Boston until he removed 
to Manchester, in i860, and opened a wood manufacturing business, at 
Winter place, where he continued until retiring from all active pursuits. 



mniiam jftanft l^uti&atD 71 

Before he was eighteen years of age, he began the construction of a steam 
engine, which was exhibited at the first fair of the Massachusetts Chari- 
table Fair Association. Mr. Hubbard also designed and constructed the 
first steam engine used in the press room of the Boston "Daily Advertiser." 
His life was a very active one, and he completed many useful inventions. 
He was united in marriage with Harriet M. Hoitt, of Moultonboro, New 
Hampshire, who died in 1891. This union was blessed with four children, 
namely: William Frank, Martha W., Emma and Harriet Ella Hubbard. 

William Frank Hubbard, better known as "Frank" Hubbard, attended 
the public school of Boston, through the grammar grades, and graduated at 
the head of his class, while there was only one other to equal him in rank in 
all the schools of the city. He was given a medal of scholarship at his grad- 
uation, which was presented by the governor of the State. It was Mr. Hub- 
bard's wish to enter the High School of Boston, but his father required him 
to start to work in his shop. Still ambitious to acquire a higher education, 
he improved every opportunity to earn money to pay his expenses through 
college, accomplishing this purpose by working at civil engineering, teach- 
ing school and working in his father's manufacturing factory until he had 
obtained the means necessary for entrance to Dartmouth College, where 
he took a four years course, and graduated in the class of 1869. For various 
reasons, Mr. Hubbard had taken a scientific instead of a classical course at 
college, and though it had been his earnest desire to follow a professional 
career, he was induced to enter the employ of his father as foreman of the 
manufactory, where he soon displayed marked ability. During the year 
1888, Mr. Hubbard bought out the business and continued it alone very 
successfully until the time of his death. Under his capable management 
the business had taken on a new growth, and by ability and diligence he 
made a success. 

In 1894 Mr. Hubbard built a fine residence on North Elm street, Man- 
chester, New Hampshire, where he lived with his family, being a man who 
enjoyed home life, preferring it to clubs. A great reader, he was well 
informed on all topics, and took a keen interest in passing events. He was 
never an uncompromising partisan, but had never accepted any office of 
public trust, as he had no time nor taste for public life. Mr. Hubbard was 
the possessor of an intensely religious and devout spirit, and was a member 
of the Franklin Street Church, to which he was a most generous contributor. 
He was one of the earliest members of the Manchester Historic Association, 
and was always a regular and interested attendant at its meetings. He was 
also a member of the Manchester Art Association, having joined this society 
when it was in its infancy. 

William Frank Hubbard was twice married, his first wife being Clara 
Leach, of New Boston, who died in 1881. On May 22, 1888, Mr. Hubbard 
was united in marriage (second) with Isabella M. Kelley, a teacher in the 
public schools of Manchester, New Hampshire, and a daughter of Daniel 
Richards and Betsey (Richards) Kelley. Mrs. Hubbard's grandfather was 
Dr. Amasa Kelley, a graduate of Dartmouth, medical department, and her 
grandmother was the daughter of Abraham Richards, of Atkinson, New 



72 a^Jilliam Jfrank l^ubbatD 

Hampshire. Mrs. Hubbard received her education at Pittsfield Academy 
and the Manchester Training School, having taught schools in Ashburn- 
ham. Massachusetts, for two years, and eight years in the schools of Man- 
chester, before her marriage to Mr. Hubbard. 

Mr. Hubbard's life was filled with zest and energ)% and he leaves behind 
him in the hearts of his friends an ineffaceable memory of kindness, devo- 
tion and courage. He was loyal, generous and unselfish to such a degree 
that he may be said to have had a genius for friendship. His ready sym- 
pathv and thoughtful devotion, his charming, natural courtesy, and his 
fearlessness, were most notable. His character had the fineness of gold, 
while his aims and standards were high, unselfish and faithfully adhered to. 
To have been honorable and generous in one's dealings with the world, and 
true and tender as son and husband, is to leave a memory which is indeed 
a priceless heritage. 




€ItjaJ) iflorrtll ^Jjato 




|NE of the most widely and favorably-known citizens of the 
city of Nashua, New Hampshire, in the past generation, was 
Elijah Morrill Shaw, who was closely identified with the 
public affairs and general life of the community. For many 
years the dignified figure of this distinguished gentleman, 
with alert business-like mien, was a familiar and pleasing 
sight to the residents of Nashua, and when he passed from 
earthly view, February 23, 190.3, at the old Shaw ancestral home in Kensing- 
ton, New Hampshire, where he had gone to spend the night with his twin 
brother, after attending an educational meeting in Manchester, New Hamp- 
shire, deep regret was expressed throughout the community. Mr. Shaw was 
always the very life of any gathering at which he was present, and this 
social, genial side of his nature won him favor with all, while the sterling 
traits of his character were many and well developed. Mr. Shaw was not 
only one of the best known residents of Nashua, but was for many years one 
of the leaders in any movement for the public good of the community 
wherein his lot had been cast, and to such an extent was this the fact that 
his name came to be accepted as a stamp of excellence, and his endorsement 
of a public or private enterprise regarded as an evidence of its merit and 
honesty. His name ever stood as a synonym for all that was enterprising 
in business and progressive in citizenship, and no history of the State of New 
Hampshire would be complete without extended reference to this noble 
man. He is justly entitled to a place among those men who, when dying, 
left the world better than they found it. It is men like Mr. Shaw who are 
always intelligent factors in every idea and work that helps to develop the 
success of all great cities, and it is sincerely to be hoped that there are many 
more like him, fit to follow his splendid example. The setting down of the 
personal records of the men who by dint of worthy effort have raised them- 
selves to a high position upon the ladder of success and secured them.selves 
in the respect of their fellow-men must always be a work of the greatest 
value. Self-made men, who have accomplished much by reason of their 
personal qualities and left the impress of their individuality upon the busi- 
ness and general life of the communities where they lived and worked, have 
truly reared for themselves monuments far more enduring than those of 
marble or stone. Such a distinction may well be claimed by Elijah Morrill 
Shaw, whose death deprived the city of Nashua, New Hampshire, of one of 
its most substantial men of business and a citizen of the highest type. 

The birth of Elijah Morrill Shaw occurred in Kensington, New Hamp- 
shire, July 16, 1826, and he was one of a large family of fourteen children. 
He was of the seventh generation from Roger Shaw, the emigrant of the 
family, who came to this country about the year 1630, and first settled in 
Cambridge, Massachusetts. In 1647 he purchased a farm in Hampton, New 



74 dBHjai) Q^ottill ^fjato 

Hampshire, and this farm is still in the possession of the Shaw family. 
Elijah Morrill Shaw was descended from a long line of military men serving 
in the French War at the siege of Louisburg, while his great-grandfather and 
his son served in the War of the Revolution, both being in the same com- 
pany. His father was in the War of 1812, and one brother was in the 
regular army for five years, and afterwards in the War of the Rebellion, 
together with one other brother. 

Mr. Shaw's boyhood and early youth were spent in attendance at the 
common schools and in the cotton factory of Exeter, New Hampshire, inher- 
iting from his illustrious ancestors a fondness for mechanical pursuits. He 
lived on the old Shaw farm until he reached his twentieth year, when he 
entered Phillips Exeter Academy, but left that institution after one year to 
enter the Exeter Manufacturing Company's Mill, thus beginning a career 
extending through a period of more than forty years of steadily increasing 
prominence in the cotton and woolen manufacturing trade of the New Eng- 
land States. For his valuable services in the employ of the Exeter Manufac- 
turing Company, Mr. Shaw received at first the meagre sum of eighty-five 
cents per day, this sum being gradually increased until before his retirement 
from all active business life he received an annual stipend of seventy-five 
hundred dollars. As stated in his "Reminiscences," which was a sketch of 
his early life and the customs of the times during that period, written by 
himself and first printed in the "Exeter News Letter," Mr. Shaw never 
asked an employer for an increase in wages, was never discharged from a 
position once held, never was heard to complain of his work, and never left 
a position except for the purpose of filling a more desirable one elsewhere. 
He acquired while comparatively a young man a practical knowledge of 
every phase of the manufacturing of both cotton and woolen fabrics, and 
his ability for constructing independent lines of action made him the ideal 
agent and successful manager. Later Mr. Shaw went to Newburyport, 
Massachusetts, and from there to Great Falls, New Hampshire, as a loom- 
fixer. In 1853 he was employed as an overseer in the Victory Mills, in Sara- 
toga township. New York, remaining there for four years, and then went 
to Lewiston, Maine, where he was overseer in the Bates Mills, and after- 
wards at Lisbon, in the Farwell Mills, remaining in Maine in this business 
for about twenty years. 

When the Civil War broke out, Mr. Shaw was engaged in a mill at Law- 
rence, Massachusetts, but holding a commission in the Lewiston Light 
Infantry, he at once obeyed his country's call to arms and joined the First 
Maine Infantry Regiment as second lieutenant of Company F. He served 
in this capacity until mustered out with the regiment, September 13, 1861. 
When the regiment was reorganized as the Tenth, Mr. Shaw was appointed 
adjutant and served in that capacity until January 9, 1863, when he was 
commissioned captain of Company H, Tenth Regiment. In this position he 
served until mustered out with the regiment. May 8, 1863. Captain Shaw 
had also before the war held ofiices by commission in the Maine and New 
Hampshire militia, and after its close he was at one time commander of the 
Maine Department of the Grand Army of the Republic. While residing in 



rnuab Qiortill ^[jato 75 

Maine, he was deeply interested in the work of the Grand Army and held 
various positions in a subordinate capacity. Mr. Shaw was also a member 
of the Sons of the American Revolution and the Loyal Legion. He was a 
Mason and a Granger. While living in Lewiston, Maine, he was a member 
of the Common Council and served as its president, besides holding other 
offices of trust and responsibility in that city. From 1863 to 1866, Mr. Shaw 
was connected with the Everett Mills in Lawrence, Massachusetts, and for 
three years afterward was the agent for the Moradnoc Woolen Mill in Leo- 
minster, Massachusetts. He then built the Farwell Mills in Lisbon, Maine, 
and managed them until 1884. While there Mr. Shaw was elected to the 
State Legislature for 1881 and 1882. 

Mr. Shaw was next engaged as agent of the Great Falls Mills, which 
he placed on a paying basis, but in 1888 he was called to Nashua. New 
Hampshire, to become agent of the Nashua Manufacturing Company, 
the leading corporation there, and filled that position until 1891, when he 
resigned, and retired from all business life. Soon after the close of his life 
as a manufacturer, Mr. Shaw was commissioned by the governor of New 
Hampshire as one of the Board of World's Fair Managers, which position 
he held until appointed executive commissioner from the State of New 
Hampshire. These positions Mr. Shaw held from the date of his appoint- 
ment in May, 1891, until the close of the Fair in November, 1893, and he 
performed the manifold and difficult duties pertaining to these offices with 
discretion and unquestioned ability as well as to the State's credit. 

Mr. Shaw, whose home was at this time established in Nashua, New 
Hampshire, became as prominent there in religious and business organiza- 
tions as in his former places of residence, and upon leaving the charge of 
the Nashua Corporation he built for himself a beautiful house, where he 
spent the remaining years of his life. He occupied various positions as 
administrator and trustee of estates while in Nashua, and was besides a 
director in the Nashua Trust Company from its formation, and in 1894 was 
chosen treasurer of the New Hampshire Baptist Convention, filling this 
office for five years. He was an active member of the First Baptist Church 
of Nashua, and contributed most liberally to its support, as well as to the 
building fund for the Crown Hill Mission Church, after donating the land 
upon which it was erected. Mr. Shaw was also an ardent supporter of pro- 
hibition, believing it to be the only cure for the evils of intemperance. In 
1899 he was elected the business manager of Colby Academy, at New Lon- 
don. New Hampshire, which office he held until his death, and was largely 
instrumental in clearing the institution of a debt which had encumbered it 
for many years. 

Elijah Morrill Shaw married (first), April 29, 1852, Amantha C. San- 
born, of Brentwood, New Hampshire. Mr. Shaw married (second) Mary 
Helen Davison, a native of Prince Edward Island. His children are as fol- 
lows: I. Irving Chase, of Kensington, New Hampshire, who married Nellie 
Gilpatrick, of Webster, Massachusetts, and they are the parents of three 
children, namely: Harry Elijah, Susie Maud and Hattie Isabella. 2. Anne 
Elizabeth, became the wife of W. S. Libby, of Lewiston, Maine, and their 



76 (ZBHfat) QiorriU ^fjato 

union was blessed with five children, namely: Freeman H., deceased; Ger- 
trude B.. Harold S., AUie S., and Winifred S. 3. Susie Shaler, deceased. 4. 
Elijah Ray, of Nashua, New Hampshire, was united in marriage with Louise 
E. Tolles, of Nashua, and they have one child, Frederick Elijah Shaw. 5. 
Susie McNeil, deceased. 6. Helen Maud, also deceased. Mr. Shaw was a 
man who felt strongly the ties of family affection and might well serve as a 
model of the domestic virtues, and indeed of the virtues of well nigh all the 
relations of life. 

He was high-minded and liberal, keenly alive to all the varied require- 
ments of life, and one of those capable of conducting operations of the most 
extended and weighty character and influence. He was a true type of the 
sturdy New Englander. With patriotic motives he entered the military 
service in the Civil War, and after living so many years was able to witness 
the fruit of his toil and that of his associates in the armies of the country. 
He was truly a man whose usefulness as a citizen has made him worthy of 
commemoration and whose memory will live forever, as long as life lasts, in 
the hearts of all those who were so fortunate as to have known him. 





llcLHey (jo(/u 



ISSEalter CoDp 




ALTER CODY, whose death at his home in Manchester, 
New Hampshire, June 7, 1904, left a gap in the life of that 
city impossible to fill and difficult to forget, was another 
example of the capable and successful Irishman who. com- 
ing to this country without friends or influence, rapidly 
makes his way to a position of leadership in the community 
which he has chosen for his home, and quickly identifies him- 
self with all that is best in American life and tradition. Mr. Cody was a 
self-made man in the best sense of that term, successful in all the operations 
which he undertook, although in a most unassuming and retiring way. He 
was instinctively a charitable man, but obeyed literally the Biblical precept, 
not to let his left hand know what his right hand did, so that his liberality 
was realized by but a few. While it is common enough to find men whose 
careers have accomplished conspicuous results in the community where they 
have been run, it is by no means so easy to find those, the net result of whose 
lives can be placed without hesitation on the credit side of the bal- 
ance, whose influence has been without question enlisted on the side for 
good. Successful men there are in plenty, but the vast majority of these 
have labored without ceasing in their own behalf, and without any regard 
for the welfare of the community-at-large. Not so in the case of Walter 
Cody, who never for an instant forgot his city nor his fellow-citizens in any 
selfish ambition, and who worked steadily for the advancement of all. It 
was his distinction that in every relation of life his conduct was equally 
exemplary, that he was a public-spirited citizen, a kindly neighbor, a faithful 
friend, and a devoted and affectionate husband and father. All during his 
life, Mr. Cody lived up to the best traditions of his race, and when that life 
finally ended, when he was sixty-seven years of age, it was one without 
blemish or stain. Among the varied and diverse elements which go to make 
up the complex fabric of our American citizenship, and which are drawn 
from wellnigh ever}'^ quarter of the globe, there are few as large and none 
more important and valuable in proportion to its size than that formed by 
the great Irish population in our midst. From first to last, they have 
brought with them those virtues pectiliar to the race, the brilliant Celtic 
qualities of wit, imagination, and a remarkable blend of the keenest practical 
sense with a vivid appreciation of the most subtle and illusive forms of 
beauty. A fine example of the best Irish type in this country was Walter 
Cody, and it is not a cause of wonderment that his death deprived the city 
of Manchester, New Hampshire, of one of its most successful business men, 
and a citizen of energy and public spirit. 

Walter Cody was born in County Kilkenny, Ireland, December 24, 1837, 
of highly respected parents. He was the son of Michael and Katherine 
(Fitzgerald) Cody, who were the parents of a large family, of which but 



78 Mlalter Cod? 

two were surviving at the time of Walter Cody's death, and they were Arch- 
deacon Cody, who lived in Ireland, and Mrs. Ellen Irish. Walter Cody 
received his education in the parish schools of his native place, and finished 
with a course in a private Academy at Waterford, Ireland. Early in life he 
emigrated to this country, and upon his arrival here lived for a short period 
in North Andover, Massachusetts, where he learned the machinist's trade at 
the Davis and Furber Machine Company's works. During the year 1855, 
he came to Manchester, New Hampshire, where he followed his trade, and 
was employed in the Manchester Locomotive Works until the Civil War 
broke out. His youthful enthusiasm was the cause of him promptly sacri- 
ficing his personal interests in his zeal for the cause of his adopted country, 
and on August i, 1861, he was enrolled in the Third New Hampshire Volun- 
teers, and started on his military career as a private. On August 22, 
however, Mr. Cody received a commission as second lieutenant in Company 
C, Third Regiment, which was organized largely by his untiring efforts. He 
was assigned to Captain Michael T. Donohoe's command, then to Colonel 
Enoch O. Fellows, and later to Colonel John H. Jackson. This regiment 
was the second to be raised in the State of New Hampshire for three years, 
and it was organized and mustered into United States service in August, 
1861, at Concord, New Hampshire. The regiment left the State, September 
3, 1861, arrived at Washington, D. C, September 16, and encamped east 
of the Capitol, where it was thoroughly drilled until early in October, when 
it moved to Annapolis, Maryland. At the battle of Secessionville, James 
Island, South Carolina, June 16, 1862, Mr. Cody served temporarily with 
Company G, and was seriously wounded by a gimshot in the right thigh, 
which caused him to be confined to the hospital at Hilton Head, South Caro- 
lina, for a few days. He was then removed to the Massachusetts General 
Hospital, where he remained for about four months. He was honorably 
discharged from active service, November 15, 1862, for disability caused 
by his wound. In speaking of this engagement, in his report, Colonel J. H. 
Jackson, said: "First Lieutenant Henderson was in a position near Com- 
pany C, and handled his company finely, with the assistance of Lieutenant 
Cody, detailed from Company C to assist him. Lieutenant Cody was shot 
through the thigh, and Lieutenant Henderson through the arm." Nearly 
one-fifth of the regiment's men were killed or wounded in this battle. Mr. 
Cody was constantly with his command until wounded, as above stated, 
bearing a loyal part in all its duties, and achieved a proud record for efficient 
service and soldierly conduct at all times. He was promoted to first lieu- 
tenant, June 22, 1862, for gallant and meritorious service, although still inca- 
pacitated for service on account of his wound, and in November, 1863, he 
was appointed first lieutenant in the Veterans' Reserve Corps, and in this 
corps he served at Cleffbourne Barracks, Washington, D. C, Fairfax Sem- 
inary Hospital, in Virginia, and in Nashville, Tennessee. Mr. Cody received 
honorable discharge at the latter place, from the Veterans' Reserve Corps, 
November 30, 1864, by reason of resignation on account of disability. 

At the close of hostilities, Mr. Cody returned to Manchester, New 
Hampshire, and engaged in the retail boot and shoe business, becoming a 



mmtet coDp 79 

member of the firm of McDonald & Cody, and continued in this capacity for 
twenty-seven years. In 1890 Mr. Cody's business partner died, and he con- 
tinued the business alone until February, 1892, when he retired from all 
active business affairs, and after that time he occupied himself with his 
property and other interests. Mr. Cody was not a politician, but first voted 
the Republican ticket on President Lincoln's second term. In 1890 the 
citizens of Ward Six, of Manchester, sent him to represent them in the I-eg- 
islature, and he served in that body during the term of 1890 and 1891, filling 
that office most honorably and faithfully. Soundly honesty clear in thought, 
high in his ideals of government, Mr. Cody possessed a magnetism that 
seemed to draw all classes and conditions alike toward him. Energetic, 
ambitious and zealous, his loyalty to American ideals knew no bounds, and 
his life was an inspiration to the growing youth, to maintain a constant 
devotion to our beloved country. Whatever duty he was called upon to 
perform was done diligently and to the entire satisfaction of superior author- 
ity. It is well for the public to review the career of a citizen who gave so 
much of his time in their interests, for it inspires emulation, gives honor 
where honor is due, and teaches a lesson of true patriotism. Mr. Cody was 
a citizen of whom any community could be proud, and was one of those men 
who could count a large circle of influential friends, living up to that old 
proverb, "A man is known by the company he keeps." Mr. Cody was a 
member of Louis Bell Post, No. 3, Grand Army of the Republic, and was 
also heartily interested in the Irish cause, and when the Land League was 
organized in his adopted city of Manchester he was its first treasurer. In 
the summer of the year 1900, Mr. Cody traveled to Ireland and spent a num- 
ber of weeks with relatives and friends, visiting his boyhood home and 
school. Reverential and conscientious in his nature, Mr. Cody was naturally 
religious in his tendencies, and his religious affiliations were with the Roman 
Catholic church, of which he was an active member. He was always loyal 
to his religion and his nationality, and has shown by his life what a good 
American an Irish Catholic citizen can make. 

On January 20, 1869, Walter Cody was united in marriage with Ellen 
Coughlin, the ceremony being performed by the Rev. William McDonald. 
Mr. and Mrs. Cody became the parents of five children, as follows: Gene- 
vieve C, deceased; Walter F. ; Ellen M., deceased; Michael D., deceased; 
and Mary G. Mr. Cody's wife and children found him a kind and loving 
husband and father. In his manner he was unassuming and courteous, and 
although he was deeply interested in everything that pertained to the city, 
he was happiest at his home, surrounded with the family to whom he was 
so devoted. 

Those who knew Walter Cody intimately tell of a man who rose from 
a moderate position in life to one of unusual prominence and authority in 
the business world. This is in itself considered most remarkable and 
entitles him to high tribute, but it is only part of the story of a life that was 
notable for the spirit of brotherhood and human sympathy. The sterling 
integrity which characterized and formed the basis of his honorable and 
useful life present a lesson worthy of imitation. 



3(o})n Cougj)ltn 




S the years pass by and kind "Mother Earth" gathers to her 
bosom the men who half a century ago formed the "long thin 
line of blue" that stood between union and disunion, the 
reverence felt for the old veterans increases as their number 
decreases. The young may die, the old must die, is true in 
every walk of life, but as each Decoration Day sees new 
monuments upon which flowers are to be laid by loving 
hands, that truism seems particularly applicable to that notable organiza- 
tion, the Grand Army of the Republic, whose youngest members have 
reached man's allotted years, that of three score years and ten. One of the 
most distinguished soldiers who served in New Hampshire's quota passed 
to the great army beyond when John Coughlin, lieutenant-colonel of the 
Tenth New Hampshire Volunteers, and the recipient of a medal of honor 
from Congress for gallant conduct on the field of battle, died at the homs 
of his sister, Mrs. Ellen Cody, now the widow of Walter Cody, in East 
Manchester, New Hampshire, May 27, 1912, at the age of seventy-four 
years and eleven months. 

General Coughlin was a native of Williamstown, Vermont, born June 
19, 1837. His parents had emigrated to this country some forty years before 
his birth and had engaged in farming in the Vermont town of Williams- 
town, where the boyhood days of John Coughlin were passed. They 
removed to Manchester, New Hampshire, in the forties, while he was still a 
boy, and it was in that city that he grew up to splendid manhood. His edu- 
cation was obtained in the public schools, and upon the completion of his 
studies General Coughlin engaged in business at the South End, this being 
before the outbreak of the Civil War, and he became prominent and active 
in Democratic politics. He served in the Legislature from 1859 to 1862, 
and took a prominent part in the important events at the State House during 
the exciting days of that period. When the majority of his party met in 
the Legislature, in caucus, and passed resolutions in opposition to a bill 
entitled "Ati Act to Aid in the Defense of the Country," he refused to side 
in with them, and fought the resolutions by voice and vote, despite the many 
protests of the leaders of his party, among whom was Ex-President Frank- 
lin Pierce. The fight was a bitter one, and General Coughlin stood firmly 
in the patriotic and loyal position he had first taken. 

During the year 1862, General Coughlin was authorized by Governor 
Nathaniel S. Berry and his Council to raise a regiment of volunteers, and 
he had the distinction of being the only man who ever received such author- 
ity as an individual for an entire regiment. He took up this work with 
vigor and inaugurated a series of "War Meetings," which were then opposed 
by some, who feared they might be taken as a showing of need which 
would encourage the South, but General Coughlin declared that enlistments 



n^^fev^4>sfe'' '•'-'■ 




jye^tej^cte ^o/ijf %vnfr/ili 



3[oi)n Cou0i)lin 8i 

were becoming hard to secure and that the fact must be faced. These meet- 
ings proved most successful, and not only was the Tenth Regiment recruited 
in this manner, but the ranks of the Ninth, Eleventh and Twelfth were 
filled in the same way. General Coughlin would not accept the colonelcy of 
the regiment, owing to his inexperience in military work, and on his recom- 
mendation Michael T. Donahue, a young man of twenty -two years of age, 
was commissioned colonel. General Coughlin accepted the rank of lieu- 
tenant-colonel, however, and was commissioned, July 17, 1862. He soon 
proved his fitness for the place, and no braver man wore the federal uniform. 
He received his title of general when he was brevetted brigadier-general of 
volunteers by a special act of Congress for gallantry in action at Swift 
Creek, Virginia, May 9, 1864. At the same time Congress voted him a 
medal of honor, and with the exception of Captain Charles D. Copp, of the 
Ninth New Hampshire Volunteers, General Coughlin was the only com- 
missioned officer of the State of New Hampshire who was thus recognized 
by Congress with its thanks and deep gratitude. 

In all but four of the eighteen battles in which the Tenth Regiment par- 
ticipated, Lieutenant-Colonel Coughlin commanded the regiment. The 
gallant history of the Tenth Regiment is too well known to need repetition 
here, and in the splendid achievements which that regiment performed, 
General Coughlin's name had a shining and prominent place. In speaking 
of this distinguished gentleman's service a few years prior to his death, 
J. A. Sanborn, of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, a companion and close 
friend, said : 

General Coughlin, as Lieutenant-Colonel of the Tenth New Hampshire Regiment, 
did more than any other man in raising and training this famous fighting regiment, while 
the General himself established a reputation as one of the most brilliant officers of this 
or any other State. General Coughlin commanded his regiment in nearly all the battles 
of the sanguinary period, from May, 1864, to the fall of Richmond, and the surrender of 
Lee, in April, 1865. It is also a matter of history that when the Confederate general, 
Bushrod Johnson, was ordered to make a night attack in order to break the Union lines, 
at Swift's Creek, Lieutenant-Colonel Coughlin, without orders and without support, 
charged the head of the rapidly advancing column, and by desperate fighting foiled 
three attempts to break through. At Port Walthal and Drewry's Bluff, his services 
and his regiment were equally as distinguished. Some histories give credit to Colonel 
Guy V. Henry's Corps, for having taken and held the most advanced position of Gen- 
eral Smith's front at the great battle of Cold Harbor, on June the third, 1864. It was 
Lieutenant-Colonel Coughlin's regiment, led by himself, which carried the first line of 
earthworks and held the same under what has been described as the most terrible mus- 
ketry and artillery fire of the entire war. 

General Coughlin acted as provost marshal in Richmond, Virginia, 
after the capture of that city, and when martial law was being enforced, he 
was in charge when President Lincoln made his visit there. When Presi- 
dent Lincoln addressed the people from the balcony of the Jefferson Davis 
mansion. General Coughlin stood in front of him, so that his own body 
should shield that of the President from any shot which might be fired at 
him by those who had threatened his assassination. General Coughlin was 
wounded seriously at Port Walthal, Virginia, May 7, 1864, and again at 



82 3Io[)n Cou0l)lin 

Petersburg, Virginia, July 30, 1864, at the explosion of a large mine. He 
was mustered out of service, June 21, 1865. 

At the close of the war, General Coughlin returned to Manchester, New 
Hampshire, but remained there for only a short time. In 1866 he went to 
Washington, D. C, where for many years he conducted a drug store at the 
corner of F and Ninth streets. He had a beautiful home on the Maryland 
side, but his residence there was destroyed by fire some years after, and 
many priceless records and trophies of the war were also destroyed. Gen- 
eral Coughlin retired from the drug business a few years prior to his death, 
and this was on account of his failing health. In 1908 he came to the city 
of Manchester, New Hampshire, for a visit, for the first time in forty-two 
years, and was heartily received by his old comrades and his many friends, 
who were both faithful and true. He attended the reunion of the Weirs, 
and was the guest of comrades and friends at a banquet at the New Man- 
chester House of that city. The affair was arranged by Lieutenant John 
G. Hitchinson, the well-known historian of the Fourth Regiment, and Sen- 
ator Burnham and Congressman Sulloway were among the speakers who 
paid their deep respects to the distinguished visitor. As a souvenir of the 
occasion General Coughlin was presented with a copy of the elaborate war 
record of the adjutant-general in two volumes, handsomelj'^ bound, and 
bearing his name in gold letters. In July, 191 1, General Coughlin again 
came to Manchester and passed the summer months with his old comrades 
in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. In October, he returned to Manchester, 
when his nephew. Post Office Clerk Michael D. Cody, was accidentally 
killed in the north country while deer hunting, and from that time General 
Coughlin remained in that city. General John Coughlin never married, and 
is survived by his sister, Mrs. Ellen Cody, who is now the widow of Walter 
Cody, at whose home he passed away. 

General Coughlin was considered one of the State of New Hampshire's 
most distinguished soldiers in the Civil War, and his military career was one 
of great honor and merit. General Coughlin was the possessor in a remark- 
able degree of those excellencies of character which always make men 
worthy of the regard of their fellow-men, and a list of the representative 
men of the State of New Hampshire, who have made themselves notably 
conspicuous in life by a combination of strong qualities, whose superior 
force of character has placed them in the front rank, would be decidedly 
lacking in accuracy were the name of General John Coughlin not to be found. 



Babtli iSlafee IParnep 




N 1843 Manchester, New Hampshire, was little more than a 
waterfall, a canal, a few buildings and a plain. The Amos- 
keag Company had laid the foundations of a city, but that 
was all. To assist in producing the superstructure and to 
share in the profits of the enterprise, to cast their lot with a 
few earlier settlers and live and die there in what was then 
called the little town of Manchester, there came from the 
country towns many robust, clear-headed, ambitious youths, and they came 
to work. They had no thought of living by their wits, but sought by in- 
dustry and skill, intelligently directed, to win their way in the world. 
Among them was David Blake Varney, a Tuftonborough lad, who had 
learned something of the machinist's trade at Portsmouth, and from that 
time on until a fatal illness prostrated him, he was with and of the city of 
Manchester, prominent and successful in its industrial enterprises, loved by 
a large circle of friends, trusted by business associates, and respected by all 
who knew him. For nearly sixty years Mr. Varney was pointed out as a 
typical Manchester man, whose advice it was safe to accept and whose 
exr.mple it was wise to follow. He was honest, faithful and always agree- 
able. He did something all the time and did it well. He prospered and his 
prosperity helped others. He enjoyed life and made it enjoyable for those 
about him, while there were no flaws in his admirable character. He lived 
far beyond man's allotted age, being seventy-nine years old at the time of 
his death, which occurred at his residence in Manchester, New Hampshire, 
March 25, 1901. The sad news of his passing away spread among his friends, 
and everywhere there was grief at the loss of a noble and public-spirited 
gentleman, and sympathy for the afflicted family. Those who did not know 
the ex-mayor personally mourned his death for the invaluable services that 
he had rendered the community. The record of his public services will 
always remain a priceless heirloom to his adopted and beloved city of Man- 
chester, and as time rolls on will be recognized as one of the brightest jewels 
in her escutcheon. An honest man, fearless to do the right as he saw it; 
one who always gave freely of his time and effort to find out what was 
absolutely right; a man who, by his own exertions and perseverance, had 
achieved success in all that he had attempted, both as a business man and in 
public life, and socially one whose friendship was to be highly prized, such 
a man was David Blalce Varney. He possessed the elements of real great- 
ness, and showed in his face the characteristics of a man that could not be 
trifled with. His ideals were honorable and high, and his judgment and will 
power were his strongest traits. 

The name of Varney is one of the most ancient in the United States. 
Eight generations have lived in the State of New Hampshire. The Varney 
family is not as numerous in this country, however, as some others, but it 



84 Dam'D 151 abe l^arnep 

has furnished a large proportion of useful, substantial and honorable citi- 
zens. The Varney coat-of-arms is as follows : 

Arms — Azure, on a cross engrailed argent five mullets of the first. 

The immigrant ancestor, William Varney. came from England, to Ips- 
wich, Massachusetts, in the early part of the seventeenth century. The 
name at that time was often spelled Varnie. David Blake Varney, in whose 
memory we are writing, was a lineal descendant of William Varney. and 
was born in Tuftonborough, New Hampshire, August 27, 1822, the son of 
Luther and Lydia (Blake) Varney. When four years of age his parents 
moved to a farm in Dover, New Hampshire, where the son attended the 
schools and also helped his father with the chores on the farm. Being of 
an ambitious nature, and eager to make a name for himself, he left the farm 
and went to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, when sixteen years old, and 
learned the machinist's trade, remaining there three years. Returning to 
Dover, he worked at his trade for two years, and then moved to Manchester, 
New Hampshire, and obtained employment in the Amoskeag Machine Shop. 
In 1854 he was appointed superintendent of the locomotive department of 
the same shops, and continued in that position until 1857. He then became 
a partner of H. I. Darling, and the firm of Darling & Varney, brass and 
copper founders, began business in a shop on Manchester street, where the 
same business continued up to the time of Mr. Varney's death. Mr. Darling 
died in 1868, and the extensive works were carried on alone by Mr. Varney 
until his death. 

In addition to the brass and copper business, Mr. Varney was for many 
years identified with the S. C. Forsaith Machine Company, as its treasurer, 
and was also vice-president of the Forsaith Electrical Company. For more 
than two years he was the proprietor of a flourishing box factory located on 
West Auburn street, and here Mr. Varney was to be found daily, engaged 
in the direction of its affairs, despite the fact that he was nearly eighty 
years of age. In doing this, Mr. Varney exemplified the bent of his nature, 
which was most decidedly toward that of activity and industry. He always 
wished to be employed, to be doing something, and idleness had no part in 
his composition. He was indeed a tireless worker, he himself often remark- 
ing that doing nothing a whole day was the hardest work he ever attempted. 
He had many things on his hands, and that he did all of them well is a 
tribute to his patience and perseverance. 

For more than a quarter of a century Mr. Varney was a director in the 
Amoskeag National Bank, one of the largest financial institutions in North- 
ern New England. He was a member of the Manchester Board of Trade, 
and was deeply interested in the welfare of the city, believing in its present 
and future, and performed a manly part in its upbuilding. In politics, Mr. 
Varney was an ardent Republican, and was a leader in the councils of his 
party. He served in the State Legislature in 1871 and 1872 from Ward 
Three, was State Senator from 1881 to 1882, and mayor of the city of Man- 
chester in 1889 and 1890, winning the election by a splendid margin after 



DatJiO 15lnke mtmy 85 

one of the warmest political contests in years. As chief executive of his 
adopted city he left behind a record of duty well done. During his admin- 
istration the first pronounced gain toward giving the city what it needed 
in the line of sewer construction was made. It was during his administra- 
tion, also, that the fine grammar school building in West Manchester, which 
bears his name, was built, and he also purchased, with the city's money, for 
the city, seventy-five acres which is now a part of Derryfield Park. Later, 
upon the retirement of Mayor E. J. Knowlton to assume the duties of post- 
master, Mr. Varney was elected by the Board of Aldermen to fill out the un- 
expired term, a position which he retained from May lo, until July lo, when 
the Supreme Court declared the action of the aldermen illegal, and decided 
that the person chosen as temporary chairman of the board should act as 
mayor. The last act of Mr. Varney as mayor of Manchester, in 1890, was to 
acquire possession of the land of Stark Park, and his farsightedness in this 
respect has many times been named to his credit. The office of mayor of the 
city of Manchester, New Hampshire, with its great industry, enterprise, 
and zeal, is one which any citizen may well feel proud to hold. The respon- 
sibilities attached to the position are great and are deserving of the best 
thought and warmest endeavor of the ablest men in the community. Mr. 
Varney was active and conscientious in the discharge of his manifold duties 
and held the best interests of the city at heart. He was honorable in every 
sense of the word, and was faithful and true not only in his private every- 
day life, but also in his public career as a representative of the people. No 
man stood higher; he demanded implicit confidence and unswerving integ- 
rity. His character and reputation could bear the fierce light of investiga- 
tion and criticism, and grew brighter and better by its searching rays. Such 
men as Mr. Varney are an honor to any community, and the city of Man- 
chester, unfortunately, has too few men of his stamp and character. The 
loss of such a man is to be lamented and his memory highly cherished, for 
in his death Manchester lost one of her most upright, honorable and loyal 
sons. 

After his retirement from the city government, Mr. Varney never per- 
mitted his interest in municipal matters to flag, and it will be recalled that 
at the last annual inspection and outing of the board of water commission- 
ers, at Lake Massabesic, in 1900, he was an honored guest. For years Mr. 
Varney was a member of the Amoskeag Veterans, and also held high rank 
in Masonry, being a member of Trinity Commandery, Knights Templar, 
and of the subordinate organizations. As a companion and friend he was 
charming. He was one of those men who in certain circumstances would 
have become a martyr rather than change his convictions. In his private 
life, industry, probity, and conscientiousness were characteristics of him. 
In social life he was most genial and pleasant to meet, and being a true 
friend and a wise counsellor, he will be greatly missed in many of the various 
walks of life. In all the positions, whether official or otherwise, he was 
called upon to fill, he brought to bear those peculiar traits of character that 
made his life a successful one. His administration of the city government 
was as nearly perfect as it well could be. 



86 Dam'D IBlnkt l^arnep 

On June 6, 1848, David Blake Varney was united in marriage with 
Harriet Bean Kimball, a daughter of John and Hannah (Bean) Kimball. 
Hannah Bean was the daughter of Daniel Bean, a native of Warner, New 
Hampshire, and Sally (Pattee) Bean. Sally (Pattee) Bean was the daugh- 
ter of Asa and Mehitable (Jewett) Pattee, who were married in 1798. Dan- 
iel Bean was the son of Daniel and Susannah (Currier) Bean. Susannah 
Currier was the daughter of Nathaniel Currier, a soldier of the Revolution- 
ary War. 

Mrs. Varney's father, John Kimball, was a native of Waltham, Massa- 
chusetts, born June 4, 1788. He died in Manchester, New Hampshire, 
September 10, 1841. Mrs. Kimball was a native of Warner, New Hamp- 
shire, born August 13, 1800, and became the wife of John Kimball, Febru- 
ary 10. 1817. Mr. Kimball was one of the pioneer paper manufacturers of 
the State of New Hampshire, and built the first paper mill in New Hamp- 
shire; he located in Manchester in 1835. Mr. and Mrs. Kimball became the 
parents of thirteen children, namely: John H., born July 15, 1818; Henry, 
born November 20, 1819; Hannah, born November 7, 1821 ; Miranda, born 
March 21, 1823, died April 12, 1848; Maria C, born August 9, 1824; Mar- 
shall, born June 22, 1826; Harriet B., born June 21, 1828, became the wife of 
David Blake Varney, and died April 24, 1903; Walter Wellington, born 
March 20, 1830, died March 6, 1863; Newell Sherman, born November 21, 
1831 ; Albert H., born January 7, 1833, died when one year old; Albert H., 
born January 5, 1835; Caleb J., born March 13, 1836; Susan J., born March 
21, 1838. 

Mr. and Mrs. Varney were the parents of three children, as follows: 

I. Emma L., born in Manchester, New Hampshire, July 16. 1849, and 
received her education in the public schools of that city, graduating from the 
Manchester High School. 2. Annie Maria, born in Manchester, April 28, 
185 1, and was educated in the public schools of her native city, graduating 
from the Manchester High School. She became the wife of Frederick Wil- 
liam Batchelder, a native of Pellham. New Hampshire, and the son of Amos 
and Rebecca (Atwood) Batchelder. Mr. Batchelder was a well-known 
musical instructor of Manchester, and passed away in that city, October 

II, 191 1. Mr. and Mrs. Batchelder were the parents of one child, Harriet 
Varney Batchelder, who was born October 12, 1878, died January 12, 1889. 
3. Susie Miranda, born October 8, 1858, and passed away November 3, 1863. 
Miss Emma L. Varney and Mrs. Batchelder reside in the Varney homestead 
in Manchester, New Hampshire. Mr. Varney was particularly fortunate 
in keeping his family together, as with the exception of a brief residence in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, by Mrs. Batchelder. his family had always been 
kept intact. Mr. Varney was an exceptional man in his home relations, was 
thoughtful and devoted, and labored with abundant success to make his 
home ideal. 

Mr. Varney was charitably inclined, and he believed in being helpful 
and useful to others, and carried out this belief in his daily life. He was a 
faithful and high-minded public character, while his uprightness made him 
a power and leader among all men. During his term of ofiice as mayor of 



DatiiD laiabe l^atnep 



87 



the city of Manchester, he gave it wise counsel, and by his intelligent, con- 
servative policy contributed largely to its prosperity. Mr. Varney was an 
active and influential member of the Unitarian church. It was indeed diffi- 
cult for his townsmen to become reconciled to the loss of one who was so 
well equipped for service to his fellow-men as Mr. Varney. He is dead, but 
his memory will live and his works and deeds as chief executive of his 
adopted city will last forever. There is no stain upon his life record. He 
did more than a man's work and he leaves to his family and friends a repu- 
tation which is to them a precious legacy, because it is that of a man who 
deserved of his fellow-men only good opinions. 



i^etoell ^Ijerman litmball 




EWELL SHERMAN KIMBALL was one of those men 
whose long and useful life had been filled with love and 
devotion toward mankind, and his death, which occurred 
in Chicago, Illinois, was a loss to the business world. Death 
in any case is always sad, but when it means the removal of 
a man who possesses those sterling qualities of character so 
greatly admired in both the business and social world, it 
becomes a double grief and a time for sorrow and regret. Mr. Kimball came 
of fine old New England stock, his forebears having lived for many years in 
the State of New Hampshire, where they were representatives of the best 
of New England character. The personality of Newell Sherman Kimball 
is one that has not been forgotten, for he was a man who combined gentle- 
ness and firmness, yielding easily where his sense of right and justice was 
not concerned, but inflexible enough where his conscience had rendered its 
decision. He was a delightful companion, as he remembered and recounted 
with vivid power the many interesting experiences he had passed through 
during his long career. 

The Kimball coat-of-arms is as follows : 

Arms — ^Argent a fesse within a bordure engrailed sable. 

The birth of Newell Sherman Kimball occurred in Warner, New Hamp- 
shire, November 21, 1831, the son of John Kimball, who died in Manchester, 
September 10, 1841. His mother was a native of Warner, New Hampshire, 
and became the wife of John Kimball, February 10, 1817. Mr. and Mrs. 
John Kimball were the parents of thirteen children, of whom Newell Sher- 
man Kimball, in whose memory we are writing, was the tenth child. John 
Kimball was a pioneer paper manufacturer and book-binder in the State 
of New Hampshire, and established the first paper mill in that State. He 
was a zealous Mason, often being obliged to travel over forty miles to visit 
his Lodge and Chapter of the Masonic Order. His Chapter apron was one 
of Newell Sherman Kimball's most cherished possessions. This apron was 
left to a member of the Oriental Consistory after Mr. Kimball's death. 

Newell Sherman Kimball's grandfather fought in the Revolutionary 
War, and his maternal grandmother witnessed the battle of Bunker Hill. 
One grandfather was with General Washington during the winter at Valley 
Forge, and was present at the historic crossing of the Delaware river. With 
such an ancestry, whose lives were spent in the trying days of the French 
and Indian Wars and of the Revolution, it is not to be wondered at that Mr. 
Kimball was always a lover of human liberty and of truth. When a mere 
lad he was taken to the city of Manchester, New Hampshire, and there 
looked upon a locomotive for the first time. Then and there his life's work 
was determined upon. He realized the infinite possibilities of human service 



laetoell ^{)etman mimdall 89 

which the locomotive would bring and he determined to become a factor 
in it. Accordingly he became an apprentice of the Amoskeag Locomotive 
Works in Manchester in 1848. After the closing of the Amoskeag Works 
in 1856, Mr. Kimball travelled westward, and entered the employ of the 
Michigan Central at Detroit, Michigan, where he spent a year. He then 
removed to LaPorte, Indiana, where he became connected with the Lake 
Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad. In 1858 he moved to Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, where he was given charge as foreman in the repair shops of the 
old Milwaukee & Mississippi Railroad, which at that time extended as far 
west as Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, and is at present a division of the 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway. Mr. Kimball remained in that 
capacity within a year of a quarter of a century, going to Green Bay, Wis- 
consin, in 1882, as division master mechanic of the Milwaukee & Northern 
Railroad, which also became a division of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. 
Paul Railway, with which company Mr. Kimball remained until May, 191 1. 
He therefore passed fifty-three years in the employ of practically the same 
company. 

Mr. Kimball was prominent in Masonry, having been raised in Lafay- 
ette Lodge, No. 41, at Manchester, New Hampshire, in June, 1854, and 
received the Capitular degrees in Wisconsin Chapter, No. 7, at Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, in May, i860. The orders of Knighthood were conferred upon 
him in April, 1879, i" St. John Commandery, Milwaukee. This Command- 
ery afterwards surrendered its charter and was merged with the Wisconsin 
Commandery, No. i, from which it originally sprang. In 1882, Mr. Kimball 
became a charter member of Palestine Commandery, No. 20, at Green Bay, 
Wisconsin, and served the new Commandery as its eminent commander 
for four years. In November, 1885, he received the degrees of the Ancient 
and Accepted Scottish Rite, in Wisconsin Consistory, at Milwaukee. Dur- 
ing the same month he was initiated into Tripoli Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

The funeral services of Newell Sherman Kimball were conducted at 
Green Bay, Wisconsin, where his Wisconsin brothers of the Oriental Con- 
sistory lovingly restored him to Mother Earth. Mr. Kimball was a brother 
of Mrs. David Blake Varney, deceased, and the uncle of Emma L. Varney 
and Mrs. Frederick William Batchelder, who is the widow of Frederick 
William Batchelder, a well-known musical instructor of Manchester, New 
Hampshire. Miss Varney and Mrs. Batchelder reside in the Varney home- 
stead on Myrtle street, Manchester. 

Newell Sherman Kimball was married, and no story of his life would 
be complete did it not include the sweet-faced little New England woman, 
who journeyed down through the years with him. Her tender and untiring 
care of him were as an inspiration to those who were so privileged as to 
know them both. 

Newell Sherman Kimball's life was full of achievement. He was dili- 
gent in his business, strong in his affections, just in his man-to-man rela- 
tions, and a Christian gentleman in all that word implies. 



Bartom iiWltlton ^oore 




E should not by any means forget those who, although unob- 
trusive in their every-day life, yet by their individuality and 
great force of character mould the commercial destinies and 
give tone to the communities in which they live. In an ex- 
tended search it would be difficult to find one who would be 
a better example than the late Darwin Milton Poore, for 
many years a well-known business man of Manchester, New 
Hampshire, and one who enjoyed the respect and confidence of the business 
world and the friendship of those whom he met in a social manner. Mr. 
Poore was a self-made man in the strictest sense of that term, and his 
excellent management of his business interests was mainly due to his good 
judgment, decision of character and strict integrity. His success in life 
was due to the possession by him of a combination of virtues and talents 
greatly in demand in this world. His sterling good qualities were very gen- 
erally recognized, and his honor, candor, and the democratic attitude he 
held toward all men won for him a most enviable reputation and the 
admiration of a host of friends. The death of Darwin Milton Poore occurred 
in Orange City, Florida, February 22, IQ12, where he, accompanied by his 
wife, was enjoying the winter season. Thus in the midst of life we are in 
death, and the anticipation of a pleasant winter in a beautiful country ter- 
minated in the death scene. The news of Mr. Poore's death cast a gloom 
over the entire business community of Manchester, where he was held in 
high esteem for a great many years. At first Manchester relatives could not 
give credence to the startling news of Mr. Poore's passing away, but to 
their sorrow it proved all too true. The private virtues of Mr. Poore were 
not less remarkable than his public, and the deep affection with which his 
family and intimate friends regarded him is the best tribute which can be 
paid to the strength and sincerity of his domestic instincts. 

The birth of Darwin Milton Poore occurred in Gofi^stown, New Hamp- 
shire, March 10, 1843, the son of George and Mary (Whitney) Poore, both 
of whom were respected natives of New Hampshire. The surname Poore 
appears among the early names of New England, and especially of New 
Hampshire, in which State it has been honored and has been borne by many 
worthy citizens. The line which traces to the early settlement of Goflfstown, 
New Hampshire, was located in northwestern Massachusetts until the close 
of the Revolution. John Poore, the emigrant ancestor of those bearing the 
name of Poore in this country, was born in Wiltshire. England, in 161 5, 
from whence he came to America in 1635. He settled in Newbury, Massa- 
chusetts, on the south side of the Parker river. In 1661 he had sixty acres 
of land assigned to him, and in 1678 built a house which is still standing and 
in possession of his descendants. Eight generations were born in this old 
historic house and it had been used at one time for an inn. John Poore died 
November 21, 1684, from exposure, while lost on a hunting expedition. 



Dartoin Qiilton poote 91 

Joseph Poore, the fourth lineal descendant of the emigrant ancestor, 
John Poore, and his great-grandson, was born August 24, 1737, in Rowley, 
Massachusetts, and settled on the west part of the homestead of his great- 
grandfather, John Poore. Joseph Poore was a soldier in the French and 
Indian War, and was at Lake George in 1757. He served in the Revolution- 
ary War and was captain of a company that marched to Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, April 20, 1775. He was deacon of the Byfield Church, and received 
a shock of paralysis while attending divine services, February 28, 1795, 
from which he died the same day. 

Darwin Milton Poore, in whose memory we are writing, was the ninth 
lineal descendant of the English emigrant, John Poore, and obtained his 
education in his native town of Goffstown, New Hampshire. His desire to 
enter business life was a strong characteristic in the yotmg man, and in 1866 
he left his home to settle in Manchester, New Hampshire, where he immed- 
iately found employment with the Hubbard Sash Factory. Later Mr. Poore 
was employed by H. K. Slaton, and then engaged in the grocery business 
with his brother, Charles Poore. At the death of his brother, Mr. Poore 
became the successor, and it was through his untiring labor that the business 
became so well established. For a number of years he conducted the groc- 
ery business alone, and then sold it to his son, Fred Poore, and engaged in 
the coal and wood business with his uncle, Alfred Poore. Great credit is 
due such a man, who started in a small way and by his great energy and 
business intelligence increased the growth of his business. To the very 
last, as well as in the beginning of his business career, Mr. Poore was ever 
ambitious, energetic, and a believer in being an early riser. He retired 
about two years before his death, which occurred in his sixty-eighth year. 
Mr. Poore spent the greater part of his life in Manchester, New Hampshire, 
where he won many friends and gained the confidence of the community 
through honest dealing. 

Mr. Poore was a Republican in politics, but had no ambition to win 
public honor, although he was ever willing to help his party in the way of 
advice or financial aid, and thus he moved serenely and unostentatiously 
along the different walks of life, unconsciously winning honors of far more 
value than those which are attached to public station. He was one of 
those men who contented himself with the discharge of his duties as a 
citizen and the influence he could exert through his personal association 
with others. Mr. Poore was affiliated with the Red Men, and was a member 
of the Calumet Club. He found his chief happiness in the intimate inter- 
course and associations of his own household, and did not enjoy formal 
social life to any extent. He was not a member of many clubs or organiza- 
tions, but devoted his time to his business and to his home. 

The energy of Mr. Poore has already been commented upon, and his 
business acumen was also of the highest type. There were many other sides 
to his nature which, while probably not so conspicuous, were quite as worthy 
of praise. In his religious belief, Mr. Poore was a Congregationalist, and a 
constant attendant of the Congregational church in Manchester. His suc- 
cess in life was deserved, and the uniform happiness of his family relations 



92 Dattoin ^ilton Poote 

and his life in general was the result of his own strong and winning per- 
sonality. 

On February 15, 1866, Darwin Milton Poore was united in marriage 
with Caroline Frances Hadley, the daughter of Nathaniel and Frances 
(Jones) Hadley. Nathaniel Hadley was a native of Gofifstown, New Hamp- 
shire, and belonged to the sturdy yeomanry of that place, being a farmer, 
and was loved and respected by his friends and neighbors. His wife was a 
native of Henniker, New Hampshire, and they were the parents of five 
children, namely: Franklin, Francina, Sylvia and Celia, twins, Caroline 
Frances, who is the widow of Darwin M. Poore. The union of Mr. and 
Mrs. Poore was blessed with three children, as follows: i. Fred Harvey, 
born in Manchester, New Hampshire; received his education in the public 
and high schools there; he entered his father's grocery store, and later 
became the proprietor; he was united in marriage with Mary Clough, of 
Manchester, and they were the parents of one child, Harold Milton Poore. 
2. Gertrude Mary, born in Manchester ; educated in the public schools there; 
she became the wife of Almon S. Carpenter, a native of Chichester, New 
Hampshire, and they are the parents of three children, namely: Darwin 
Milton, Georgia Frances and Charles Hodgen Carpenter. 3. Bertha Frances, 
born in Manchester; educated there; became the wife of Edwin S. Lane, of 
Boston, and they are the parents of one child, Harry Scott Lane. 

The self-reliance, energy and sound judgment of Darwin Milton Poore 
brought him success, so that he was able in later years to enjoy the fruit of 
a long life of faithful industry. He gave little time to public affairs, 
although he was interested in the progress of his country, and always, when 
opportunity afiforded, exercised the right and duty of every good citizen. 
His character was an unusually strong one, and his life should be an inspira- 
tion to every youth who seeks to improve his position in life and earn and 
retain the good will of his fellow-men. 





3oJ)n JFrands iiWloselep 

MONG the successful business men of Concord, New Hamp- 
shire, whose labors and achievements placed the community 
in her present influential position in the world of commerce, 
no name is more synonymous with enterprise and probity 
that of John Francis Moseley, whose death, which occurred 
at his home in Concord, Augnst 12, 1905, came as a cruel 
shock to his many friends and business associates. He 
exemplified in every manner the typical New England character, so well 
admired by all, and was the possessor in a high degree of those excellencies of 
character which are bound to draw all men toward him as if by magnetism. 
His methods in business were so clear and concise, and the ability which he 
displayed would have been equally as effectual if fate had decreed that he be 
placed in any other line of work. By diligent application of his business 
ability, and the practice of the essential principles of commercial honor, Mr. 
Moseley steadily advanced until he became one of the representative busi- 
ness men of Concord, New Hampshire. There are some lives that in their 
ceaseless energy are the cause of extreme wonder to their fellow-men, and 
might well serve as a model to all those who seek that illusive goddess, 
success. The men who are thus endowed undertake enterprises that would 
make the average business man pause. Such a man was Mr. Moseley, who 
possessed large business capacity, ability and enterprise. After a long and 
honorable life of sixty-seven years, he passed away, a man honored in life 
and blessed in memory. 

The birth of John Francis Moseley occurred in Hill, New Hampshire, 
July 20, 1838, he being the oldest of the three sons of Franklin and I.ydia 
(Hoyt) Moseley, and was a descendant in the eighth generation of John 
Moseley who came in the ship "Mary and John," which sailed from Ply- 
mouth, England, March 20, 1630. John Moseley settled at Dorchester, 
Massachusetts, in 1630, and was admitted a freeman, March 14, 1639, pass- 
ing away there, August 29, 1661. The original bearer of the name Moseley 
took it without doubt from the locality in which he dwelt. The assumption 
of the name indicates that he was one who dwelt permanently at that place, 
and was a person of settled habits. When the religious troubles of the 
seventeenth century arose, a descendant of the first English Moseley found 
his environment made intolerable by fanatical oppression and removed from 
England to the freedom of the New England forests, and settling there was 
the first of five generations who lived contentedly, like their descendants, in 
the same town. The name and the record of the family both show that the 
Moseleys were and still are of that class of citizens who are well thought of 
by their neighbors, they loved their home and friends, and succeeded wher- 
ever they chose to make their abiding place. 

Franklin Moseley, father of John Francis Moseley, and the seventh 
descendant of the English immigrant, John Moseley, was born in Weathers- 



94 3!of)n jFrancisi Q^osclcp 

field, Vermont, August 4, 1804, and died January 12, 1894, in Concord, New 
Hampshire. He was the second son and fifth child of Samuel and Priscilla 
(Baker) Moseley. His boyhood was passed in his native town, where he 
went to school, and between terms rendered such aid as he could to his 
father. When about sixteen years of age he went to Boston, and as he had 
but little money, but was possessed of a sound physical constitution and 
plenty of energy, he made the journey on foot, as was not an uncommon 
thing in those days. On his arrival in Boston, he took a place as clerk in a 
dry goods store, where he worked for a time. From Boston he went to 
New Chester, now Hill. New Hampshire, and in January, 1828, he and his 
twin brother, Francis, entered into partnership and opened a general store. 
In those days money was not plenty, and many who bought goods could 
only pay for them in work. To accommodate this class of customers the 
Moseley firm bought palm leaf strips which the women wove into hats that 
were sent to Boston to be sold. After the partnership had existed for some 
years, Francis Moseley died June 30, 1833, and Franklin continued the busi- 
ness alone, and also had other stores at Sanbornton and Danbury. In addi- 
tion to the mercantile business, he engaged in the manufacture of shoes. He 
had a shop in which he employed twenty or thirty men, and this constituted 
a large business in those days, when all the goods were hauled by teams 
between Hill and Concord, twenty-seven miles distant, and transportation 
between Concord and Boston was principally done by the Boston & Con- 
cord Boating Company, which ran a line of boats between those two cities 
by canal and the Merrimack river, a distance of eighty-five miles, until 1842, 
when the Concord Railroad was finished. Mr. Moseley's business ability 
and personal integrity were made evident by the fact that while a resident 
of Hill he was elected to and filled the offices of town clerk, selectman, jus- 
tice of the peace, and representative in the State Legislature. In 1852 he 
removed to Concord and entered the employ of J. A. Gilmore & Company, 
wholesale dealers in flour and grain, and on October 30, 1854, he and David 
T. Watson bought out the interest of J. A. Gilmore, but kept the old name 
of J. A. Gilmore & Company. This firm then consisted of Asahel Clapp, 
John H. Pearson, Benjamin Grover, David T. Watson, and Franklin Mose- 
ley. Subsequently the name of the firm was J. H. Pearson, Barron & Com- 
pany, and Moseley & Company. After his removal to Concord, Mr. Mose- 
ley never sought ofiicial recognition at the hands of his fellow citizens. He 
attended the South Congregational Church, of which he was a liberal sup- 
porter. His political affiliations were Democratic. He was emphatically 
a business man, and his life was one of steady and active devotion to busi- 
ness and family. He retired from active mercantile pursuits about 1870, 
with success achieved through long years of faithful attention to business 
and upright dealings. He married, in Hill, New Hampshire, February 24, 
1835, Lydia Rowell Hoyt, who was born in Amesbury, Massachusetts. April 
12, 1806, and their children were: John Francis, in whose memory we are 
writing, and Carroll and Carlos Beckwith, twins. 

John Francis Moseley received a common school education, and learned 
how to transact mercantile business in his father's store. On the removal 



31ot)n jftancis ^osclep 95 

of his father's family to Concord, New Hampshire, John Francis Moseley 
accompanied them, and from 1853 to 1898 was actively engaged in the flour 
and grain business, from which he retired in igoo. During this period he 
was associated either as clerk or as partner in most of the firms of which his 
father was a member in Concord. For several years before his death he was 
interested in the firm of G. N. Bartemus & Company, though not in an active 
personal sense. Mr. Moseley was a good business man and took pride in 
doing things well. Of a naturally reserved and retiring disposition, the 
number of his acquaintances was not large, but limited. He was a man of 
high principles and sterling character. Those who were brought into his 
favored circle speak in terms of the highest admiration of him. Without 
display he acted well the part of an exemplary citizen, and found true suc- 
cess in business by giving every man his due. In the sphere where he was 
best known he has been greatly missed and truly mourned. His principles 
were thoroughly established and he was a sincere Democrat, though he 
took no active part in political movements. While he shunned often-prof- 
fered ofificial responsibility, he never shirked his duty as a citizen, always 
expressing his convictions at the polls, and leaving political preferment to 
others who might desire it. 

On August 23, 1880, John Francis Moseley was united in marriage with 
Abbie Fletcher, who was born June 6, 1845, in Loudon, New Hampshire, 
the daughter of James and Catherine (Orr) Fletcher, the former a native of 
Loudon, and the latter of Chester or Auburn. James Fletcher was a son of 
Joshua and Elizabeth (Chase) Fletcher, who were married in 1799, and 
Joshua Fletcher was a son of James Fletcher. The Fletcher coat-of-arms 
is as follows: 

Quarterly, a cross flory between four escallops argent, first and fourth, second 
and third azure, a chevron between three quatrefoils slipped argent. 

Crest — An arm in armour embowed, holding in the gauntlet an arrow all proper 
pointed or. 

Motto — Per angusium. (Through difficulties). 

Mrs. Moseley resides in the beautiful house erected in 1899 by her 
husband, located on Warren street. Concord, New Hampshire. In memory 
of her husband, Mrs. Moseley has donated to the Margaret Pillsbury Hos- 
pital of Concord an out-door ward. The need of such a ward had long been 
felt by the authorities at the hospital, but the increasing expenses at the 
institution had made the building of the addition prohibitory. That such 
a gift should come unsolicited made it all the more appreciated, and in many 
ways increased the efficiency of the hospital. The ward is for the treatment 
of pneumonia and pulmonary diseases, it also being of great value for con- 
valescents whose strength depends greatly on out-door air. In the larger 
cities such wards have long been established, and the leading doctors of the 
country are strongly urging hospitals to establish them. The comfort of 
patients is always uppermost in such institutions, and although piazzas to 
some extent serve the purposes of out-door wards, in the summer months 
when dust as well as flies are apt to annoy persons under confinement, the 



96 



3[o|)n JFrancis Q^osclep 



task of doing away with the nuisance has been most troublesome. One of 
the outstanding features of this new ward is that all of the windows will be 
fitted with Whitney casement hardware which allows the opening of the 
windows at right angles, allowing free passage of air while, when condi- 
tions demand, the ward can be closed up tight and heated as well as the 
hospital. 

Mr. Moseley was one of those lovable and forceful men who seemed to 
draw to him all those privileged to call themselves his friends. His high 
ideals of business and social life, his unselfish, irreproachable character, his 
magnetic nature, so endeared him to all that it was only natural that his 
passing away became a personal and direct sorrow. It is not often that a 
community is blessed with such men as Mr. Moseley, and he will live in the 
memories of those with whom he associated as long as life lasts, not only 
because he was a man in the best sense of the term, but because he was the 
possessor of those admirable qualities which never fail to inspire respect and 
confidence. The good influence which John Francis Moseley exerted was 
beneficent to the community in which he had lived the greater part of his 
life, and those who come after him should consider it a privilege to keep it 
alive in the future. 



(S^eorge albert (Sutlli 




HE name of Guild has been an honored one from the beginning- 
of American history, and has sustained many noble move- 
ments and rendered valuable service in every capacity of life. 
The name is derived from the word meaning Society or 
Lodge, and may have been Guilder at first, that is one 
belonging to a guild, and was spelled Gyller, Gylard and 
Gildard. As Guilder and Guildard the name was found 
among the Huguenots, who emigrated to England and Scotland, and many 
of its bearers attained distinction in the yarious professions. John Guild 
was born in England about the year 1616, and died October 4, 1682. With 
his brother Samuel and sister Ann he came to America in 1636. He settled 
in Dedham, Massachusetts, July 17, 1640, that year buying twelve acres of 
upland on which he built the homestead, which was occupied by himself and 
descendants for more than two hundred years. He was made a freeman, 
May 10, 1643. 

George Albert Guild was a direct descendant of this sturdy Puritan, 
and his birth occurred in Wrentham, Massachusetts, October 31, 1841, the 
son of John Edmund and Sarah Ann (Hovey) Guild. His father, John 
Edmund Guild, was born in Wrentham, and his wife was a native of Boston. 
They were the parents of five children, three daughters and two sons, as 
follows: Lucy Ann Jeanette, Ellen Frances, Catherine Augusta, John 
Henry, and George Albert Guild, in whose memory we are writing. 

George Albert Guild was no exception to his predecessors or contem- 
poraries in high standards of mora) living, and business enterprises and 
probity. He was one of Nashua's best known residents, a capable business 
man, a good citizen, a faithful husband, and a kind and indulgent father. 
Coming to Nashua, New Hampshire, at the age of twelve years, he attended 
the public schools, and after receiving a common school education, when 
still a boy, he entered the employ of the Nashua Manufacturing Company, 
and remained continuously in the employment of that company for more 
than forty years. For thirty-eight years, Mr. Guild served as an overseer 
in the different departments, retiring from active business afi'airs in 1903, on 
account of poor health, and he passed away at Nashua, New Hampshire, 
January 25, 1915. 

When, at the outbreak of the Civil War, his country needed his assist- 
ance, Mr. Guild joined the First New Hampshire Cavalry and rendered 
patriotic and heroic service. Likewise his brother, John Henry Guild, served 
in the Mounted Rifle Rangers, under the command of General Ben. Butler, 
and was taken a prisoner, but escaped. This military trait was inherited 
from their forefathers, as history records the great-great-grandfather of 
George Albert Guild and John Henry Guild, Captain John Guild, was a sol- 
dier in the War of the Revolution, serving the entire duration of the war. 



98 (Seorge aifiert (5uilD 

Mr. Guild, during his long and active business career, illustrated in 
himself the composite character of our great American citizenship, and pre- 
sented in his temperament and disposition a masterful, forceful, intellectual 
and versatile quality of our race. His accurate estimate of men enabled 
him to fill the many different positions over which he had charge, with 
employees who seldom failed to meet his expectations in every waj'. It can be 
trulv said of him that he always commanded the respect of men and women 
working under his supervision. His clear and far-seeing brain enabled him to 
grasp every detail of a project, however great its magnitude. Genial and cour- 
teous upon all occasions, Mr. Guild surrounded himself with many friends, 
whose admiration and affection for him were exceeded only by the deep 
respect and esteem which they held for him. Hisdominant characteristic was 
his love of his home and family ties and his patriotism. He was a member of 
the Rising Sun Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Pennichuck 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; and John G. Foster Post, Grand 
Army of the Republic, of Nashua. 

During the year 1864, George Albert Guild was united in marriage with 
Julia Sultina Johnson, a daughter of Volney Hill and Edey (Gould) John- 
son. Mr. Johnson was a native of Hancock, New Hampshire, and Mrs. 
Johnson was born in Greenfield, New Hampshire. Mrs. Guild's birth 
occurred in Antrim, New Hampshire. She attended school in Washington 
and in Greenfield, New Hampshire. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Guild was 
blessed with two children, namely: i. Emma Alvera, born in Nashua, New 
Hampshire, and became the wife of Charles W. Collins, of Nashua. 2. Her- 
bert Elmer, born in Nashua, died at the age of eight years. 

No more fitting tribute to the memory of George Albert Guild could be 
recorded than the resolutions passed at the annual meeting of the First New 
Hampshire Cavalry Association, which was held at Weirs, New Hamp- 
shire, August 25, 191 5. These resolutions should prove to be an inspiration 
to many of the younger generation, who are striving to make their lives 
successful in an honorable manner. 

A keen and distinct shock will strike the hearts of every member of the First New 
Hampshire Cavalry at the announcement of the death of Sergeant George Albert Guild, 
which occurred at Nashua, New Hampshire, January the twenty-fifth, 1915. He was a 
cordial, courteous, genial man, there was not a more helpful and lovable comrade. He 
was a delightful companion and a devoted helper. Comrade Guild was a soldier, a citi- 
zen, a comrade and a friend of the highest order, and his passing away is an irreparable 
loss to all who knew him. There can be but one sentiment in reading the announcement, 
and that is intense grief at the passing of this comrade, whose life illustrated in full and 
rounded measure the principles of a citizen and a soldier. Peace to thy eternal rest, 
Comrade and friend, you never betrayed a trust, was ever faithful to your God, your 
home, your Country and your friends. 

It is indeed a distinct pleasure to trace the life story of such a man as 
George Albert Guild, for there are many good and beneficial lessons to be 
learned therefrom. It is to be regretted that there are not more men like 
him, but let us hope that New England will furnish men fit to follow in his 
footsteps. Mr. Guild was ever ready to hold out his hand to those in dis- 



George ai&ett ($uiIO 



99 



tress, his love for human kind being one of his strong characteristics. His 
familiar figure was long a welcome sight to the residents of Nashua, New 
Hampshire, the city of his adoption, where he was greatly beloved and 
esteemed. His heart was large, and in it he found room for all classes of 
people. He was not a man to judge another by the exterior, for it was the 
character of his fellow-man that appealed to him. He was of a hospitable 
nature, and greatly enjoyed to pass his leisure hours at his own fireside, sur- 
rounded by the loved ones to whom he was so attached. Being born of a 
sturdy and honorable ancestry, George Albert Guild did not fall below the 
standard which was thus set before him. 




>tep|)en ^restott 




^UT few men have left a brighter or better life record to the 
citizens of Deerfield, New Hampshire, than Stephen Pres- 
cott, and none is more worthy a place in this memorial than 
this noble gentleman. The great and varied influence that 
is always exerted by a man of high aims in his relations to 
the community in which he lives was well exemplified by 
Mr. Prescott, who was a man of the highest intellectual and 
moral integrity. Ambitious, energetic, persevering, courageous, and thor- 
oughly honest, he made himself a man to whom the community looked to 
for aid and influence. A strong will and a gentle and unselfish nature were 
some of the marked characteristics of Mr. Prescott. and his death, which 
occurred at his home in Deerfield, New Hampshire, March 31, 1886, meant 
the deprivation of a prominent citizen and a noble Christian man. It is cer- 
tain that when we can truthfully say of a man that he has been markedly 
successful in the affairs of the world, we have paid him the implied compli- 
ment of an unusual degree of strength of character and alertness of intelli- 
gence, and such was strikingly the case of Stephen Prescott. Measured as 
a man, Mr. Prescott occupied a position in the community allotted to but 
few to hold. The worth of his citizenship was recognized by all, and the 
offices, political and otherwise, that he was chosen to fill, were administered 
with the same high efficiency that marked the management of his own pri- 
vate concerns. A man of the strictest integrity and lofty purposes, he 
counted his friends among the high and the lowly, and his friendsh.ip was 
always to be depended upon. He was most kindly of heart, very approach- 
able, genial in disposition, and held sacred the rights and opinions of others. 
The life-time of Mr. Prescott, in which he arose to a position of prominence 
and importance and one of high regard in every relation to his fellow- 
citizens, was passed in the vicinity of Deerfield, New Hampshire, and at the 
time of his death he was fifty-four years of age. He was a man remarkable 
in the breadth of his wisdom, in his indomitable perseverance, his strong 
individuality, and yet one whose entire life was as an open scroll, inviting 
the closest scrutiny. 

Stephen Prescott was a native of Deerfield, New Hampshire, born dur- 
ing the year 1832, and was the son of Stephen and Jemima (Currier) Pres- 
cott. The Prescott family was one of the early families to locate in Deer- 
field, and for generations were well known and prosperous farmers of that 
vicinity. Mr. Prescott always lived in Deerfield, and received his early 
education there. Upon the completion of his studies, he naturally followed 
in the footsteps of his illustrious forebears, and became a successful farmer. 
While it is common enough to find men whose careers have accomplished 
conspicuous results in the communities wherein their lot has been cast, it is 
by no means so easy to find those, the net result of whose lives can be placed 




>//r/. /y)r.ur// 



%tepi)en l^rescott loi 

without hesitation on the credit side of the balance, whose influence has been 
without question enlisted on the side of good. Successful men there are in 
plenty, but the vast majority of these have labored without ceasing in their 
own behalf, and without any special regard for the welfare of the commu- 
nity-at-large. Not so in the case of Mr. Prescott, who never for an instant 
forgot his duty to his fellow-men in any selfish ambition, but who worked 
steadily for the advancement of all. It was his distinction that in every 
relation of life his conduct was equally exemplary, that he was a public- 
spirited citizen, a kindly neighbor, a faithful friend, and a devoted and affec- 
tionate husband. 

Mr. Prescott was a public-spirited man, and was an active and promi- 
nent worker in social and political affairs. His fellow-townsmen proved 
their deep regard and confidence in him by electing him to the State Legis- 
lature in 1873, and again in 1874. Mr. Prescott held, besides, many town 
offices, among others being one of the trustees of the Philbrick, James 
Library, holding this position from the time of the library's endowment. 
In his political belief, Mr. Prescott was a staunch Democrat, and his Dem- 
ocracy was of the solid, substantial type common to the members of that 
party in the "Granite State." 

Stephen Prescott was united in marriage with Judith Calvina James, a 
daughter of Enoch and Judith B. (Mardin) James, of Deerfield, New Hamp- 
shire. The James family is one of the oldest in Deerfield. On her maternal side, 
Mrs. Prescott is the great-granddaughter of Major Ezekiel Worthen, of Rev- 
olutionary fame. At the time of the Revolutionary War, Major Ezekiel Wor- 
then lived in Kensington, New Hampshire, and held many ofifices of impor- 
tance during the war, being promoted to the rank of major. He was one of 
Washington's most trusted officers, and the history of that period recounts 
many of his daring exploits. Mr. Prescott was buried in Tilton's burying 
ground in Deerfield, New Hampshire, where he rests, after a life well spent, 
in the long, eternal sleep that knows no awakening. Since the death of her hus- 
band, Mrs. Prescott has resided in the city of Manchester, New Hampshire, 
at No. 1952 Elm street. 

It was through his own efforts that Mr. Prescott won his way to suc- 
cess, by dint of enterprise and courage linked to indefatigable industry. By 
all who came in contact with him, whether intimately or casually, he was 
held in admiration and affection and it was in a large circle of associates and 
friends that his death was felt as a real personal loss. The success which he 
achieved was entirely due to his individual efforts, hard work, and the close 
application which he always paid to his own affairs. His reputation was 
second to none for honesty, justice and charity to the poor and unfortunate. 
By his honorable exertions and moral attributes Mr. Prescott carved out for 
himself friends, honor and position. By the strength and force of his char- 
acter he overcame obstacles which to others less hopeful and less courageous 
would have seemed insurmountable. Perhaps there is no single relation of 
life that is more a test of a man's essential worth than that most intimate 
one supplied by and in the home, and there as elsewhere Mr. Prescott meas- 



I02 ^tepben Pre0(ott 

ured up to the highest standards. His family life was in all respects ideal, 
and he was never forgetful of the wants and desires of those about him. 

Mr. Prescott was also a prominent figure in fraternal circles of his 
native town, and was a member of the Masonic order and of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. That feeling of sympathy which was so predomi- 
nant in him made him delight in the intercourse with his fellow-men, and 
he was always quick to enter into the informal social gatherings of his many 
friends. Whatever duty he was called upon to perform was done zealously 
and to the entire satisfaction of superior authority. Soundly honest, clear 
in thought, high in his ideals of government, and the possessor of a magne- 
tism that drew to him all classes and conditions alike, he was a man of whom 
his community and indeed the entire State could be proud. It is well for us 
to review the career of a citizen such as Mr. Prescott, who gave so much of 
his time and his life to the interest of the public, for it inspires emulation, 
gives honor where honor is due, and teaches a lesson of patriotism. It can 
be truly said of Stephen Prescott that he was a man whose usefulness as a 
citizen made him worthy of commemoration and whose memory will live 
forever in the hearts of those who knew and loved him. 



jBtoaf) Clarfe 




*HE surname Clark represents one of the oldest and most 
respected of families of New England, and there is no name 
more numerously represented in the pioneer settlements 
than that of Clark. This family is numerous in almost 
every New England town, and the name is undoubtedly 
derived from an occupation, such as a clerk, pronounced 
in the broad English as Clark. The Clark coat-of-arms 
is as follows: 

Arms — Ermine a lion rampant azure on a chief sable a leopard's face argent 
between two crosses crosslet or. 

Crest — A demi-lion gules collared or, on the shoulder an estoile argent, in the paw 
a baton sable. 

The name appears frequently in the records of Rockingham county, 
England, and the earliest definite record obtainable on the family herein 
traced locates John Clark, who was born at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 
October 15, 1751, and died at Chester, New Hampshire, January 23, 1827. 
He married Sarah Wadleigh, March, 1775, who was born at Raymond, New 
Hampshire, March 22, 1755, died at Chester, February 22, 1842. John 
Clark's father came from England and died when John was young. John 
Clark was a soldier of the Revolutionary War, and his widow was granted 
a pension for his services in that war, as a private in the New Hampshire 
troops for the period of six months actual service. He enlisted in Captain 
Baker's company of New Hampshire soldiers in the summer of 1775, and 
marched to Cambridge, Massachusetts, and also to Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire. He was in the army at Peekskill in the State of New York, 
and returned the latter part of the year 1776, being away about one year. 
The date of the widow's pension was April 14, 1837. John Clark came to 
Candia, New Hampshire, and learned the trade of tanning with Walter 
Robie. He purchased of Joseph Dearborn of No. 59, 2d D., P. Q. D., in 1777, 
and lived there. The children of John and Sarah (Wadleigh) Clark were: 
I. John, of whom further. 2. Abigail, born at Chester, December 12, 1777, 
died January 17, 1778. 3. Eleazer, born at Chester, January 5, 1779, went 
to Stanstead, Province of Quebec, where he died May 16, 1831. 4. 
Abigail (Clark) Robinson, born at Chester, October 29, 1780, died at 
Orange, Vermont, January 13, 1874. 5. Benjamin, born October 13, 1782, 
died at Boston. 6. Sarah (Clark) Wadleigh-Richardson, born at Ches- 
ter, September 12, 1784, died August 17, 1871. 7. Theopelos, born at Ches- 
ter, July 29, 1786, died October 5, 1789. 8. Henry, born October 25, 1788, 
died at Lyndboro, New Hampshire, April 11, 1867. 9. Charlotte (Clark) 
Dustin, born at Chester, January 8, 1791, died at Stanstead, Province of 
Quebec, July 19, 1854. 10. Anna (Clark) Norton, born January 4, 1794, died 
August 4, 1853. II. Abner, born June 13, 1795. died at New York, Sep- 



I04 J13oaJ) Clark 

tember lo, 1836. 12. Eliza, born April 10, 1797, died February 16, 1869; not 
married. 13. Mary (Clark) Austin, born May 11, 1799, died at Manches- 
ter, June 26, 1866. 14. Richard Sawyer, born at Chester, April 21, 1801, 
died at Auburn, New Hampshire, July 16, 1870. 

John (2) Clark, son of John (i) and Sarah (Wadleigh) Clark, born at 
Chester, New Hampshire, May 16, 1776, died at Brown's Hill, Canada, Prov- 
ince of Quebec, March 31, 1821. He married Mrs. Anna (Karr) Silver, 
widow of Silver, born at Chester, August 26, 1770, and died at Ches- 
ter, January 18, 1859. Anna Karr was the daughter of Joseph Karr, born 
November 20, 1742, died February 2^, 1835, and Hannah (Ayer) Karr. who 
was born in 1748, and died February 25, 1833, and granddaughter of Brad- 
bury and Anna Karr, said to be of Welsh origin. Bradbury Karr settled on 
Add No. 71, where his great-grandson, George Wood Clark, now lives. 
Anna (Karr) Silver had one child, Sally Silver, who became the wife of 
John Robie, the saddler, who lived at Candia, New Hampshire, and died in 
1867. Sally (Silver) Robie died in 1883. They had one child, Mary, who 
became the wife of John Dudly, and lived at Lynn, Massachusetts. The 
children of John and Anna (Karr-Silver) Clark were as follows: i. Noah, 
of whom further. 2. Jesse Remington, born at Chester. April 19, 1803, died 
at Chelsea, Massachusetts, December 27, 1873. 3. John, born at Chester, 
July 4, 1805, died at Topsham, Vermont, September 19, 1886. 4. William, 
born in Chester, went South, where he married, and had a family, but noth- 
ing more is known of him. 5. Lavinia, born at Chester, January i, 1809, 
died at Manchester, February 17, 1869. 

Noah Clark, son of John (2) and Anna (Karr-Silver) Clark, was born 
at Chester, December 29, 1801, died at Manchester, June 3, 1858, and was 
buried in the family lot at Chester, New Hampshire. In his early youth he 
enjoyed such privileges as were provided by his native town. He moved 
to Quincy, Massachusetts, in 1828, where he engaged in butchering, but 
returned to his native town, Chester, in 1835, where he followed the occupa- 
tion of a farmer until he removed to Manchester, in 1847, where he was in 
the real estate business at the time of his death. He married (first) Mary, 
daughter of George and Abra (Smith) Wood, June 18, 1823. She was born 
at Chester, July 20, 1798, and died at Chester, July 21, 1847. George Wood 
was born at Auburn, New Hampshire, in 1770, and died there in 1803. Abra 
(Smith) Wood, his wife, was born at Candia, New Hampshire, in 1775, and 
died at Auburn, New Hampshire, November 7, 1853. George Wood was 
the son of Nathaniel Wood, born August, 1737, died July 16, 1817, and Mary, 
his wife, a daughter of William Eaton, who died in 1813. Grandson of 
Nathaniel Wood, who came from Boxford, Massachusetts, and died in 1773, 
and his wife, Elizabeth (Powell) Wood, widow of Jonathan Goodhue, who 
died in 1731. Abra (Smith) Wood was the daughter of Biley Smith, born at 
Brentwood, New Hampshire, April 19, 1747, died at Candia, New Hamp- 
shire, October 3, 1829, and Mary, his wife, born at Brentwood, New Hamp- 
shire, in 1747, died at Candia, in 1820. Granddaughter of Israel Smith, born 
1706, and Mary, his wife, born 1709. They were married December 5, 1728, 
and were inn-keepers at the Sign of a Horse. Biley Smith was the ninth 



Ji3oai) Clark 105 

child of Israel Smith, and came to Candia from Brentwood, New Hamp- 
shire, in 1771, and settled on the north end of No. 49, 3d D., about 1788, 
bought of Jacob Worthen, the gore lot No. 81, 5th D., where his son Biley 
lived afterward. Noah and Mary (Wood) Clark were the parents of the fol- 
lowing children: i. George Wood, born in Chester, March 15, 1824. 2. 
Mary Jane, born in Chester, November 19, 1827. 3. Noah Smith, whose 
memoir follows this genealogical record. 4. Francis Carr, born in Quincy, 
Massachusetts, April 30, 1832. 

Noah Clark married (second) Lois Copp Bixby, in 1849, t>orn at Chester, 
December 19, 1823, died at Manchester, August 14, 1852. They had one 
child that died in infancy. Noah Clark married (third) Lorana Allen, at 
Manchester, May 2, 1853, born at Plymouth, Maine, Septem.ber 15, 1828. 
This union was blessed with two children, namely: Ella Matilda, born at 
Manchester, May 22, 1854, and Laura Allen, born at Manchester, October 
23, ^855- 




i^oal) ^mttf) Clarfe 




'HE late Noah Smith Clark, one of Manchester's best known 
business men and police commissioner for many years, was 
strong in his business ability and beautiful in his character. 
He passed fifty-five years of his life in Manchester, New 
Hampshire, and when he died at the age of eighty years, at 
his home there, on April 15, 1910, the sorrow in the com- 
munity was universal. Deep regret was everywhere mani- 
fest, for through his unselfish, kindly and winning personality he had 
obtained a place in many, many hearts. Mr. Clark was a business man of 
marked force and energy, and exemplified the fact that constant labor, well 
applied, especially when joined with sterling personal qualities, must inevi- 
tably win the respect and esteem of his fellow-men. His methods in busi- 
ness were clear and concise, and the system and ability which he displayed 
would have been equally as efifectual if fate had decreed to place him in any 
other line of work. Mr. Clark became one of the recognized business men 
of Manchester, and was an example of that species of success which makes 
a man a public benefactor. By diligent application of his powers to indus- 
trial pursuits and the practice of the essential principles of commercial 
honor, it is no wonder that he advanced steadily until he became one of the 
representative men of his adopted city. Courteous, friendly, and the very 
soul of uprightness, he had many warm friends, whom he valued very highly. 
There is always something instructive in the records of such men as Mr. 
Clark, because in them we see typified the earnest and unwearied effort 
that inevitably spells success. The great and varied influence that is exerted 
by a man of high aims in business, and in his relations to the community 
in which he lives, was well exemplified in Mr. Clark's career. In every 
respect he was a typical representative of the New England character, per- 
severing, enterprising, courageous and conservative, and a man of the high- 
est intellectual and moral integrity. 

The birth of Noah Smith Clark occurred in Quincy, Massachusetts, 
May 17, 1830. He was of the fifth generation of the John Clark family, 
and the second son of Noah and Mary (Wood) Clark. His father was a 
farmer by occupation, and was a native of Chester, New Hampshire, and 
his mother was born in Auburn. When five years of age, his parents 
removed to New Hampshire, making their home on a Rockingham county 
farm, in the historic town of Chester. Noah Smith Clark passed his early 
youth as a farmer lad on his father's farm, and received his rudimentary 
education in the small public schools of Chester. Afterward he was sent 
to Manchester, New Hampshire, where he was admitted to the high school, 
from which he was graduated in i8j|8. He left the school well equipped for 
the battle with life. Old timers declare that Mr. Clark applied himself with 
so much assiduity to his studies that he was one of the most successful 
pupils of the institution. 



Jl3oa|) %mitt Clark 107 

Mr. Clark's first experience in the business world was in the millinery- 
store of Amos B. Page, where he remained for a year and a half. He 
possessed a taste for mercantile pursuits, and a sound idea of business long 
before he had acquired any experience worth speaking of. But he began 
at the very lowest round of the ladder. He went to the city of Boston, where 
he clerked in the dry goods business, and then successively went to New 
York, Chicago and Cincinnati, where he followed the same trade, and 
gained an extensive knowledge of the line of work that he designed to 
follow. In Chicago, Mr. Clark worked under Potter Palmer, the famous 
multi-millionaire of that city. In fact Mr. Clark once seriously considered 
starting in business in Chicago, and would have done so but that his capital 
was limited. In his early life, he did not waste any of his time in frivolity, 
but saved his money and lived frugally yet comfortably. When he came 
back to Manchester, New Hampshire, he not only had some capital to his 
credit, but he possessed a wide experience that for half a century stood 
him well. 

Not engaging in business in Chicago, Mr. Clark decided to return to 
the East, and arrived in Manchester in 1855. At first he secured a place 
as a clerk in one of the local dry goods stores, but kept his eye open for an 
opportunity to embark in business for himself. The chance came the fol- 
lowing year, and in 1856 he started in business on his own account, in the 
building called "The Ark," which was situated at the corner of Elm and 
Amherst streets, where the Dunlap block now stands. At present the 
modern Marcotte store is located at that same corner, but in the old days 
Mr. Clark's first dry goods store was of the old-fashioned sort, but it was, 
for those days, well stocked with what was then regarded as the leading 
staples. It is worthy of note that Mr. Clark, from his clerkship days to the 
time of his retirement, clung tenaciously to the particular line of millinery 
and fancy goods. His strict attention to business had its reward, for success 
was instantaneous. He gave his personal attention to the business and per- 
mitted no one to do what he himself could do. He found that he possessed 
a natural aptness for managing a store, and this trait followed him through 
life. After one year at the "Old Ark" Mr. Clark saw greater possibilities in 
Hanover street as a commercial thoroughfare and determined to move to 
that street and enlarge his business, which he did late in 1857. Accord- 
ingly he opened a store in what was then known as the Jonathan Straw 
block, and remained there for thirteen years, and met with success. But 
in 1870 there came a calamity that almost ruined his business. This was 
the Manchester fire, July 7, 1870, which reduced Mr. Clark's store with all 
its stock to ashes. Undaunted by calamity, he determined to start over 
again, and for this purpose he bought the land at the corner of Hanover 
street and the present Nutfield lane. He formed a partnership with former 
Mayor John L. Kelly, and after remaining with Mr. Clark for several years 
Mr. Kelly withdrew, and in 1884 Mr. Clark formed a partnership with 
Joshua B. Estey, who remained with him for twenty years, the firm being 
known as Clark & Estey, and the store as the "Big Six." 



io8 jeoal) SmitI) Clarb 

In the olden daj's, it was the fnshion to name the stores in order that 
the people might familiarize themselves with the places. There was a dry- 
goods store known as "The Eagle" and another as "The Sign of the Star," 
then came "The Big Six." Mr. Clark was the pioneer in starting this 
curious custom of naming places of business. For many years there was 
suspended in front of the store at the corner of Hanover street and Nutfield 
land a large figure six, which swung to and fro in the idle winds, and in 
some winds that were not idle. On July i, 1891, all the overhead signs in 
the city were ordered down, and the "Big Six" sign went along with the rest, 
thus removing an old landmark. Mr. Clark's particular line of business in 
the last twenty-five years of his trade career was dry goods and notions, 
and he sold goods that would reach the purses of the working people. The 
"Big Six" became one of the most popular places in the city of Manchester. 
Mr, Clark early developed into one of the most sagacious and practical busi- 
ness managers in the city. It was in February, 1906, that Mr. Clark decided 
to retire from business and take a rest from his cares. That month he had 
been in business in Manchester for half a century. Mr. Clark sold out his 
business to Frederick D. Sperry, of Boston. Mr. Clark's relations with his 
numerous employees were unusually amicable and happy, he always having 
a kindly interest in their affairs. 

Mr. Clark never became affiliated with any of the secret organizations, 
for he never had the time. But his motto was always, "Live and Let Live," 
just the same. Even in his busy life, he was prevailed upon to enter municipal 
life as an ofiice holder, but his length of service was not long. He served 
as a member of the Board of Aldermen from Ward Four, in 1876, and was 
reelected for another term, serving in the years of 1877 and 1878. He was 
afterwards chosen to the Legislature for one term. In his political affilia- 
tions he was a Republican. 

Mr. Clark was one of the largest holders of stock in the Boston, Con- 
cord & Montreal Railroad. It was in the early eighties that a syndicate 
was formed to buy the stock of this railroad, and this syndicate was com- 
posed of Noah Smith Clark and others. Soon after this syndicate had 
acquired holdings in the Boston, Concord & Montreal Railroad, the Boston 
& Maine corporation took over the Concord & Montreal road, and from 
that time on the holdings became of a value commensurate with the increase 
in business of the Boston & Maine Railroad. Mr. Clark was a director in 
the Concord & Montreal Railroad, and one of its largest stockholders. His 
wisdom and sagacity in business affairs were recognized many years before 
this, and he was sought on all sides for his advice. For more than thirty- 
five years Mr. Clark was a director in the Manchester National Bank, and 
at the time of his death was said to be the oldest member of that bank's 
directorate. 

On December i, 1893, Mr. Clark was appointed by Governor John B. 
Smith a member of the then newly established police commission of Man- 
chester. He remained a member until the fall of 1909, when he retired. In 
his religious belief, Mr. Clark was connected with the Franklin Street Con- 
gregational Church. He was a member of the Derryfield Club. 



jeoab %mitlt Clatb 109 

Mr. Clark was ever a man who attended strictly to his own business 
affairs. He attended faithfully even to the small things. He became a large 
holder of real estate in Manchester, and his home at the corner of Elm and 
Salmon streets, in the North End residential section, was one of the best 
built structures in that aristocratic row. He was a good judge of horses, 
and when he was able to be around he drove a good team. He was plain- 
spoken in all that he had to say, and was extremely practical, being the 
possessor of much more good common sense than the average man. What- 
ever he did, he did with good results. He was a good waiter for a good 
bargain, and he had no use whatever for anything that was frivolous. No 
one ever had any reason to complain of Mr. Clark's manner, when they had 
a personal acquaintanceship with him. He was at heart one of the kindest 
of men, and whatever he did as a substantial favor for others was not 
heralded broadcast. He firmly and devotedly believed in Manchester, and 
was ever ready to advance the city's interests. In the old days, when Man- 
chester was but a struggling town, he had the same faith in the place. That 
fateful day in 1870, when the destruction of his business and stock by fire 
left him almost a ruined man, did not dismay him. It was then that he 
gave an exemplification of what was in him. An hour had not passed, after 
the control of the fire which destroyed a whole square, when he was planning 
for a phoenix-like rise from the ashes of a destroyed business. He was ready 
to begin all over again, with a renewed vim and an awakened interest. He 
was a type of the practical, far-sighted men who made Manchester. He 
was one of the few who were left, at the time of his death, and will be remem- 
bered as a man who was content to stay in Manchester and fight his battles, 
and as a man whose shrewdness and native sagacity, born of a good early 
training, served him in good stead in the place that he had made his home 
for nearly sixty years. 

On March lo, 1858, Noah Smith Clark was united in marriage (first) 
with Belinda McKeen, who passed to her reward, September 10, 1885. By 
this marriage there were three children born, namely: i. Edward Wilson, 
born at Manchester, March 4, 1865, and was united in marriage (first) with 
I-otta Kelly, July 12, 1886. She died May 12, 1896. This union was blessed 
with three children: Edith May Clark, born in Boston, in 1888, and became 
the wife of Dalton Flanders, in 191 1; Morris Smith Clark, born in Man- 
chester, in 1889, and died in infancy; Bertha Louise Clark, born in Boston, 
in 1890, and died in 1894. Edward Wilson Clark was united in marriage 
(second) with Lucy Mulhand, who died at Portland, Maine, and who bore 
him one son, Dana Edward Clark, born in 1893, and is now enlisted in the 
United States Army. Mr. Clark's third wife was Maud Evelyn Gerald, 
who passed away at Caribou, Maine, in 1906. He was united in marriage 
(fourth) with Elizabeth May McGeorge, who died in Manchester, July 31, 
1916. 2. Clara Bell, born in Manchester, January 20, 1869, and became the 
wife of George F. Matthews, of Boothbay, Maine. They are the parents of 
two children, namely: Irene, born in Somerville, Massachusetts, in 1891, 
and became the wife of Theodore Tripp. They are now residing in Los 
Angeles, California. Elmer Clark, born in 1893, is now in the service of 



no JI3oa!) @mit|) Clark 

the United States Army in France. 3. Helen Wood, born in Manchester, 
May 14, 1872, and became the wife of Herman Philips, of Lowell, Massa- 
chusetts. June 19, 1904. 

On August II, 1886, Noah Smith Clark was united in marriage (second) 
with Elizabeth Morrison Atwood, the oldest daughter of Daniel Gordon and 
Margaret Ann (Barr) Atwood. Mrs. Clark is a direct descendant of John 
Atwood, the English immigrant, who settled in Plymouth, Massachusetts, 
in 1643. Her father, Daniel Gordon Atwood, was born in Bedford, New 
Hampshire, April 12, 1812, of which town she was also a native. 

Mr. Clark's interest in Manchester frequently cropped out in late years, 
after his retirement from business. Some of the newspaper men had occa- 
sion to know this to be true, for when a subject would arise that touched 
happenings of many years ago, Mr. Clark with a smile would come forward 
and furnish detail as to those occurrences and, considering the years that 
had passed by, his memory was accurate to a remarkable degree. Another 
noticeable quality of Mr. Clark was his adherence to and faith in men, after 
he had tried them. No abuse or criticism would ever turn him from what 
he thought was right in his judgment of such men. If he thought well of a 
man, itmattered not to him that anybody else thought differently. He 
was strong in this characteristic, and it became almost a proverb that the 
man Noah Smith Clark backed was safe. And so, in a great many ways, 
Manchester lost a remarkable character, a successful merchant, a sagacious 
man, and a citizen who was ever mindful of his own affairs, and who was 
always painstaking when entrusted with the public's afifairs. 






amos Cucfe 

HE record of a busy life, a successful life, must ever prove of 
interest and profit as scanned by the student who would 
learn of the intrinsic essence of individuality. Such a life 
was that of the late Amos Tuck, for many years a represen- 
tative citizen of Exeter, and one of which his adopted State, 
New Hampshire, might well be proud, for his professional 
and ofiicial career reflected credit upon the community. A 
man of strong mentality, he won success at the bar by his ability, fidelity 
and perseverance. He was also known for his sterling qualities, his fearless 
loyalty to his honest convictions, his sturdy opposition to misrule in munic- 
ipal aflfairs, and his clearheadedness, discretion and tact made him a success- 
ful manager and leader. 

Amos Tuck was a descendant in the seventh generation from the Amer- 
ican ancestor, Robert Tuck, a native of England, from whence he came to 
New England, about 1636, accompanied by his wife and four children. He 
resided in Watertown and Salem, Massachusetts, and in 1638 was a peti- 
tioner, with others, for leave to settle at Winnacunnet, afterwards Hampton, 
New Hampshire. The line is traced through his son, Edward Tuck, a native 
of England, and for many years a respected resident of Hampton, New 
Hampshire; through his son, Deacon John Tuck, probably a native of 
Hampton, New Hampshire, who lived to be ninety years of age, and filled a 
considerable place in his day and generation; through his son. Deacon 
Jonathan Tuck, a native of Hampton, New Hampshire, a well informed and 
influential man, said to have been distinguished for his extensive and 
accurate geographical knowledge. Through his son, Jonathan (2) Tuck, 
a native of Hampton, New Hampshire, where he spent his entire lifetime. 
Through his son, John (2) Ttick, a native of Hampton, New Hampshire, 
from whence he removed to Parsonsfield, Maine, and there resided until his 
death, being principally engaged in agricultural pursuits. About 1800 he 
married Betsey Towle, daughter of Amos and Sarah (Nudd) Towle, of 
Hampton, and among their children was Amos Tuck, of this review. 

Amos Tuck, second son and fourth child of John (2) and Betsey 
(Towle) Tuck, was born at Parsonsfield, Maine, August 2, 1810. His father, 
John (2) Tuck, had moved from Hampton, New Hampshire, where six 
generations of the family had lived, because the elder brother Josiah had 
spent so much of the family property that all that was left for the younger 
brothers, Samuel and John, was two farms of moderate size in the unsettled 
region of Maine. The farm of Amos Tuck's father was in the extreme south- 
western part of Parsonsfield, bordering on Province Lake, and there the 
boy early became inured to toil and hardship. At the age of seventeen Amos 
entered the academy in the neighboring town of Efiingham, New Hamp- 
shire, where he began to prepare for college, meanwhile teaching during the 



112 ^mo$ Cuck 

winters. Two years later he went to Hampton to continue his studies, keep- 
ing on with his teaching till the winter of 1831, when he became a member 
of the freshman class of Dartmouth College. He was graduated in 1835 at 
the age of twenty-five. Among Mr. Tuck's classmates was Harry Hibbard, 
afterwards his contemporary in Congress, and in the next class, 1836, was 
another congressional contemporary, "Long" John Wentworth, of 
Chicago, also Samuel C. Bartlett, afterwards president of the college, and 
James Wilson Grimes, subsequently United States Senator from Iowa. 
Upon graduation Amos Tuck taught one term in the academy at Pembroke, 
New Hampshire, and during the following winter became preceptor of 
Hampton Academy, where he remained, meanwhile pursuing the study of 
law, until the spring of 1838. At that time he resigned his position to com- 
plete his studies with Hon. James Bell, of Exeter, subsequently United 
States Senator. Mr. Tuck was admitted to the bar in November, 1838, and 
shortly afterward became a partner of Mr. Bell, then one of the leading 
lawyers of the State. This connection continued for eight years, during 
which time the firm enjoyed an extensive practice. 

In 1842 Mr. Tuck was chosen representative to the New Hampshire 
Legislature, and took an active part in the revision of the statutes enacted 
that year. Mr. Tuck was a Democrat at that time, but events were ripening 
which soon put him out of accord with the leaders of this party. In was in 
1844 that Franklin Pierce, afterward president, decided that John P. Hale, 
who had boldly dissented from President Tyler's proposal to annex Texas, 
should be deprived of a renomination to Congress. This determination to 
sacrifice Hale aroused Mr. Tuck, who said that if Hale was read out of the 
party on account of his anti-slavery sentiments, he (Tuck) would go with 
him. The crisis came when it was determined to organize an independent 
sentiment in the party. At the February term of court held in Exeter in 
1845, Mr. Tuck with the assistance of John L. Hayes, of Portsmouth, a 
lawyer whose political opinions accorded with his own, issued a call for a 
convention to be held on Washington's birthday to form an independent 
movement to suport Mr. Hale. Between two and three hundred signatures 
were secured for this petition, and on February 22, 1845, in the vestry of 
the old First Church in Exeter, was formed the first crystallized opposition 
to the extension of the slaveholders' rule in the land. The company called 
themselves Independent Democrats, and with the help of George G. Fogg, 
they subsequently established a newspaper of that name, published for many 
years at Concord. Mr. Fogg, a native of Gilmanton, this State, who after- 
wards became minister to Switzerland, was the editor and proprietor of the 
paper. Without doubt the Exeter convention became the nucleus of the 
Republican party. 

At this day, when the principles for which they fought, have so long 
been established, it is difficult to realize what courage and zeal must have 
animated that little band of reformers, who journeyed over snow-blocked 
roads to the convention at Exeter in February, 1845. Dr. Andrew P Pea- 
body, afterwards preacher to Harvard College, said of them: " I well remem- 
ber the utter hopelessness with which the great public viewed this little 



amos Cucb 113 

band of Independents in New Hampshire. They were thought to have 
destroyed their political future beyond all retrieve." 

The poet, Whittier, between whom and Mr. Tuck existed an intimate 
sympathy and friendship, broke forth into a paean of joy when New Hamp- 
shire, until then the strongest Democratic State in the North, escaped from 
party control and placed in the Senate of the United States its first anti- 
slavery member. The poet begins : 

"God bless New Hampshire ! From her granite peaks 
Once more the voice of Stark and Langdon speaks. 
The long-bound vassal of the exulting South 
For very shame her self-forged chain has broken ; 
Torn the black seal of slavery from her mouth, 
And in the clear tones of her old time spoken ! 
Oh, all undreamed-of, all unhoped-for changes ! 
The Tyrant's ally proves his sternest foe; 
To all his biddings, from her mountain ranges, 
New Hampshire thunders an indignant No!" 

There is another poem of Whittier's, little known, but found in the 
complete volume of his works, which was originally published in the "Boston 
Chronotype," during 1846. There are some seventeen stanzas of eight lines 
each, and it is simply headed "A Letter," supposed to have been written to 
Hon. Moses Norris, then representing New Hampshire in the Senate at 
Washington. It is crammed full of local allusions, and as one of the rare 
humorous effusions of the poet, as well as for the reference to Mr. Tuck and 
the times, a few lines may be worth quoting: 

"We're routed, Moses, horse and foot, 
If there be truth in figures. 
With Federal Whigs in hot pursuit, 
And Hale, and all the 'niggers.' 



"I dreamed that Charley took his bed, 

With Hale for his physician • 
His daily dose an old 'unread 

And unreferred' petition. 
There Hayes and Tuck as nurses sat. 

As near as near could be, man ; 
They leeched him with the 'Democrat;' 

They blistered with the 'Freeman.'" 

"Charley" was Charles G. Atherton, of Nashua, who had introduced 
the gag-law, so-called, into the New Hampshire Legislature: "Papers and 
memorials touching the subject of slavery shall be laid on the table without 
reading, debate or reference." 

The Independent movement, which seemed so hopeless at first, resulted 
in the election of John P. Hale to the United States Senate in 1846, and of 
Mr. Tuck to Congress in 1847. When Amos Tuck took his seat in Decem- 
ber, there were but two other men in the House holding distinctly anti- 
slavery sentiment — Joshua R. Giddings, of Ohio, and Dr. John G. Palfrey, 



114 Smo0 Cucb 

of Massachusetts, and both of these had been elected as Whigs. Another 
colleague in that Congress with whom Mr. Tuck formed a strong friend- 
ship was a plain, awkward man from Illinois — Abraham Lincoln, whose 
future greatness no one could have presaged at that time. Mr. Tuck was 
twice reelected to Congress, closing his term of service there in 1853. That 
was the year when he called a meeting of anti-slaverj' men of all parties with 
a view to better cooperation and united action. The meeting was held, 
October 12, 1853, at Major Blake's hotel, later the Squamscott House, in 
Exeter, and on this occasion Mr. Tuck proposed the name Republican for 
the new party. The credit for the christening is usually given to Horace 
Greeley; but his suggestion was not made until the next year; and the great 
honor of the name belongs to Amos Tuck. 

Mr. Tuck was a member of the presidential conventions of 1856 and 
i860, helping to nominate both Fremont and Lincoln, and he took an active 
part in the Peace Congress of 1861. President Lincoln tendered a foreign 
mission to Mr. Tuck which was declined, and later offered him the appoint- 
ment of naval ofificer at Boston, which was accepted. Mr. Tuck held the 
latter position until removed by President Johnson in the fall of 1865. Sub- 
sequently he was appointed to the office of land commissioner of the Atlantic 
& Pacific Railroad in Missouri, which caused him to make his home in St. 
Louis for a number of years. Between 1847 ^"^ 1857 Mr. Tuck was asso- 
ciated in legal partnership with Hon. William O. Stickney, of Exeter, and 
afterwards with his own son-in-law, Francis O. French. Mr. Tuck traveled 
abroad several times, and in his later years was engaged with Austin Corbin 
of New York City, a native of Newport, this State, in railroad construction 
on Long Island. 

Amos Tuck was always greatly interested in the cause of education. 
He served as trustee of Dartmouth College for ten years, of Phillips Exeter 
Academy nearly thirty years, took an active part in the organization of 
Robinson Female Seminary at Exeter, and was president of the board of 
trustees for several years. An old student of the Seminary writes in grate- 
ful appreciation as follows: 

Exeter is deeply and lastingly indebted to Mr. Tuck's wisdom and sagacity in the 
work of establishing Robinson Female Seminary. He was elected president of the first 
board of trustees, and spared neither time nor pains to carry out the will of the founder 
to supply "such a course of education as would enable its scholars to compete and suc- 
cessfully, too, with their brothers throughout the world when they have to take their 
part in the actual duties of life." Forty years ago the idea of the equal education of the 
sexes was new to many. Mr. Tuck's aim was "to make the Seminary do for the girls 
what the Phillips Academy does for boys ;" and to this end he planned with his co-adju- 
tors, the course of study and selected the corps of instructors ; and the more closely his 
precedents have been followed, the greater has been the genuine prosperity of the school. 
When the present edifice was dedicated, in September, 1869, many and flattering were the 
encomiums showered upon the wisdom, judgment and indefatigable labors of Mr. Tuck. 
When called upon to speak, he modestly disclaimed the power attributed to him, but 
could not deny the ceaseless industry ; ending by saying, "The only reward I desire is the 
success of Robinson Seminary and the gratitude of the graduates of the first four years." 

Amos Tuck was a man of fine personal appearance, pure and upright 
character and exemplary life. A political opponent, who had business rela- 



9mo$ Cuck 115 

tions with Mr. Tuck, said of him: "He impressed me as no other man ever 
did; candid, honest, uncontaminated by contact with evil, with a high and 
noble purpose, magnanimous, kind, generous, and deferential, but firm to 
his convictions of duty as the eternal hills. He was in every sense a gentle- 
man. I never expect to meet his equal." He was generous to his friends 
and to every good cause, and gave liberally of his abundant means to schools, 
churches, missions and temperance work. Theodore Parker said of him: 
"His face is a benediction." A fine marble bust of Amos Tuck, presented 
by his daughter, Mrs. F. O. French, of New York, stands in the main hall of 
the State Library at Concord. The bust is the work of the noted sculptor, 
Daniel Chester French, a cousin of Francis O. French, and himself a native 
of Chester, this State. 

Amos Tuck was twice married. His first wife, and the mother of his 
eight children, was Sarah Ann Nudd, daughter of David and Abigail 
(Emery) Nudd, who was born October 13, 1810, at Hampton. New Hamp- 
shire, and died February 21, 1847, at Exeter. The children, al! but three of 
whom died in infancy, were: Abby Elizabeth, born November 4, 1835; 
Charles, December 26, 1836; Ellen, born April 4, 1838; Edward, born June 6, 
1841 ; Edward, born August 25, 1842; Isabella, born April 25, 1844; Charles, 
born July 10, 1845 ; Amos Otis, born August 26, 1846. The children who 
lived to maturity were Abby Elizabeth, Ellen and the second Edward. Abby 
E. Tuck, the eldest child, married William R. Nelson, of Peekskill, New 
York, and had three children: Laura, Ellen Tuck and Mary Delavan. Ellen 
Tuck Nelson married Henry W. Stevens, son of Lyman D. Stevens, of Con- 
cord. Mary Delevan Nelson married Rev. George Brinley Morgan, son of 
Henry K. Morgan, of Hartford, Connecticut. After the death of her first 
husband, Abby E. (Tuck) Nelson married Orrin F. Frye, member of the 
firm, Rand, Avery & Frye, of Boston. Ellen, the second daughter of Amos 
and Sarah A. (Nudd) Tuck, married, March 5, 1861, Francis O. French, 
grandson of Chief Justice William M. Richardson, of New Hampshire. Mr. 
French was graduated from Harvard College in 1857, became a lawyer, and 
afterwards a distinguished banker in New York City. The children of Mr. 
and Mrs. French were: Elizabeth R., who married General Eaton, of Eng- 
land; Amos Tuck, who married Pauline LeRoy, of Newport, Rhode Island; 
Benjamin B., who died young; Elsie, who married Alfred Gwynne Vander- 
bilt. of New York. 

Amos Tuck married for his second wife, October 10, 1847, Mrs. Cather- 
ine P. Shepard, widow of John G. Shepard, and daughter of John Town- 
send, of Salisbury, New Hampshire. She was born January 20, 181 5, and 
died without issue October 10, 1876, the twenty-ninth anniversary of her 
marriage. Amos Tuck died suddenly of apoplexy at his home in Exeter on 
December 11, 1879, ^t the age of sixty-nine years. He is buried in the cem- 
etery of the town he loved so well, where he spent most of his life, and where 
he organized political movements that have helped to make history. 



#on. 3o|)n liimball 




'HE career of the Hon. John Kimball affords a most interesting 

example of the achievements of one who may be regarded as 

a worthy representative of an honored ancestry, whose 

history has been connected with that of this country from 

an early date. He ranks among those men whose versatile 

talents command success in every field which they enter, 

and who rise to high place in that which ultimately claims 

their efforts. He was conspicuously useful in the public service, both at 

home and in the State at large, and the city in which he resided owed much 

of its advancement to his wise and long continued effort. 

The common ancestor of the great majority of Kimballs in this country 
was Richard Kimball, who, accompanied by his family, embarked at Ips- 
wich, England, April lo, 1634, in the ship, "Elizabeth." The line to the Hon. 
John Kimball descends through Richard (2) Kimball, one of the first settlers 
of Wenham; Caleb Kimball, who removed from Wenham to Exeter, New 
Hampshire, then returned to Wenham ; John Kimball, a resident of Exeter, 
New Hampshire; Joseph Kimball, a resident of Exeter and Canterbury, 
New Hampshire; John Kimball, also a resident of Exeter and Canterbury; 
Benjamin Kimball, a resident of Canterbury, Boscawen and Penacook, New 
Hampshire, an active and influential business man. In March, 1834, he was 
elected to represent the town in the Legislature, but his health did not permit 
him to take his seat. He died at Penacook, July 21, 1834. He married Ruth 
Ames, daughter of David and Phebe (Hoit) Ames, of Canterbury, and they 
were the parents of John Kimball, of this review. 

Hon. John Kimball, eldest child of Benjamin and Ruth (Ames) Kimball, 
was born April 13, 1821, in the town of Canterbury, New Hampshire. At 
the age of three years, in 1824, he went with his father to the town of Bos- 
cawen, and at the age of seventeen he was apprenticed to his cousin, Wil- 
liam Moody, to learn the trade of millwright. In 1848 he took charge of the 
new machine and car shop of the Concord Railroad at Concord, New Hamp- 
shire, and in 1850 was made master mechanic, a position he held for eight 
years. He became actively identified with various important interests, and 
was for many years treasurer of the Merrimack County Savings Bank, 
and a director of the Mechanics' National Bank at Concord ; president and 
treasurer of the Concord Gas Light Company, to which he was elected in 
1880; and a director in the Concord Republican Press Association. He 
was ever been deeply interested in charitable and religious institutions, and 
very active in his aid to the New Hampshire Odd Fellows' Home and 
the Centennial Home for the Aged, of both of which he was president, and 
the New Hampshire Orphans' Home and the New Hampshire Bible Society, 
of both of which he was treasurer. He became a member of the South Con- 
gregational Church of Concord by letter, June 28, 1849, ^"d was one of the 



^on. 3fo!)n CifrnfiaU 117 

committee of nine that built the present house of worship of that society. 
For thirteen years he was a deacon of the church. 

Mr. Kimball had been conspicuously useful in the public service at home 
and in the State at large, and the city in which he resided owes much of its 
advancement to his wise and long continued effort. In 1856 he was elected 
to the Common Council of the city of Concord, and when he was reelected 
in the following year he was chosen to the presidency. From 1859 to 1862 
he served as city marshal and collector of taxes. He was elected to the 
mayorality in 1872, and the efificiency of his administration finds evidence 
in his reelection to three consecutive terms following. During this period 
the system of water supply from Long Pond was successfully completed 
under his immediate direction as president of the Board of Water Commis- 
sioners. During his administration as mayor one wooden and two iron 
bridges were built across the river within the city limits, and the fire depart- 
ment was provided with new buildings and apparatus. 

In 1858 Mr. Kimball was elected to the House of Representatives of 
the State of New Hampshire, and again in 1859. I" 1862 President Lincoln 
appointed him collector of internal revenue for the Second District of New 
Hampshire. This highly important position he held for a period of seven 
years, during which time he collected and paid over to the treasurer of the 
United States the sum of nearly seven millions of dollars, and keeping so 
accurately the complicated accounts indispensable to this immense business 
that their final auditing at his retirement was promptly accomplished and 
without inaccuracy to the amount of a dollar. In 1876 Mr. Kimball was 
elected to the convention for the revision of the State Constitution, and he 
bore an active part in the deliberations of that body, and aided in formula- 
ting some of the most important provisions in the new organic instrument. 
In 1877 he was appointed by the governor one of the three commissioners to 
whom was committed the erection of the new State prison. In 1880 he was 
appointed by the Supreme Court of the State one of the three trustees of the 
Manchester & Keene Railroad. In November of the same year he was 
elected to the State Senate, and at the beginning of its session received the 
high honor of being elected president of that body. 

Mr. Kimball was an original Republican, aiding in the formation of the 
party in 1856, under the first standard bearer, John C. Fremont, and from 
that time one of the most steadfast and earnest of its supporters. He had 
frequently sat in the State and other conventions of the party, and always 
enjoyed the intimate friendship and confidence of many of the most eminent 
statesmen of his day, and particularly during the Civil War period, when 
he rendered all possble aid, by effort and means, to the administration of 
President Lincoln in its gigantic struggle for the preservation of the Union. 
Of cultured mind and reflective habits of thought, Mr. Kimball was deeply 
informed in general affairs and in literature, with a particular inclination 
toward historical and genealogical research, and his attainments found 
recognition at the hands of Dartmouth College, which in 1882 conferred 
upon him the degree of Master of Arts. Entirely regular habits of life and 
total abstinence from stimulating beverages and drugs (through conviction 



ii8 i^on. 31o!)n mimfiall 

of conscience as well as for other reasons) preserved to him excellent phy- 
sical powers, and his form was tall and erect, and his presence commanding. 
While firm and decided in his views, he was ever genial and courteous, and 
his wealth of informaton and fine conversational powers made him a wel- 
come addition to the most polished circle in his State. His residence was 
long in Concord. 

Mr. Kimball was first married, May 27, 1846, to Maria Phillips, daugh- 
ter of Elam Phillips, of Rupert, Vermont. She died December 22, 1894. Of 
this union there was born one child, Clara Maria. Mr. Kimball married 
(second), October 15, 1895, Charlotte Atkinson, of Nashua. New Hampshire. 







Bantel (j^orlion SttDoolf 

MONG the citizens of Bedford, New Hampshire, who achieved 
distinction in business, entitling them to be placed among 
the representative men of the community, there were many 
whose quiet perseverance in a particular pursuit elevated 
them to positions enviable in the eyes of their fellow-men, 
and as lasting as well-merited. In this class may be placed 
Daniel Gordon Atwood, who gained a success in life that is 
not measured by financial prosperity alone, but is gauged by the kindly and 
congenial associations that go toward satisfying man's nature. Mr. Atwood 
belonged to the class of men who in days gone by added to the growth and 
importance of his native town of Bedford, and who became prominent by the 
force of his own individual character. In that day and age but few citizens 
lived in the community that left a brighter record for every trait of char- 
acter that constituted real greatness, and Mr. Atwood's life is well worth 
preserving in such volumes as this, to furnish instruction for the generations 
to come. His name ever stood as a synonym for all that was enterprising 
in business, and progressive in citizenship, and his industry and energy, his 
courage and fidelity to principle, were illustrated in his career. His personal 
character was highly commendable, and he was truly a man of unusual 
strength of character and business ability. He was most kindly and com- 
panionable, made friends easily, and possessed the rare faculty of keeping 
those friendships. The death of Mr. Atwood, which occurred on November 
22, 1890, at the age of seventy-eight years, was the cause of general regret. 
His native town suffered deeply by his passing away, for the community in 
general had learned to love him and to lean upon him when in trouble. 
After an honorable and useful life he passed over the Great Divide into the 
beyond, a man honored in life and blessed in memory. 

The birth of Daniel Gordon .Atwood occurred in Bedford, New Hamp- 
shire, April 12, 1812, the third son and sixth child of David and Mary (Bell) 
Atwood. His father was also born in Bedford, and remained a lifelong 
resident of that place. His death occurred there October 12, 1857. David 
and Mary (Bell) Atwood became the parents of eleven children, whose 
names were as follows: Hannah, Joseph Bell, Mary Bell, Olive, John, Daniel 
Gordon, the subject of this tribute; Sarah, David, Jane Gordon, Clarinda 
and Isaac Brooks. 

The name of Atwood was originally Wood, and its first syllable was 
introduced in America. The Atwood coat-of-arms is as follows : 

Arms — Argent on a fesse raguly azure three fleurs-de-lis or. 

Crest— On a branch of a tree trunked lying fesseways or, a fleur-de-lis azure 
between two sprigs vert. 

John Wood, the immigrant ancestor of the Atwood family, arrived at 



ixo Daniel <£>orDon ^ttoooD 

Plymouth, Massachusetts, from England, as early as 1643. He was united 
in marriage with Sarah Masterson. 

Nathaniel Wood, the son of John and Sarah (Masterson) Wood, was 
born in Plymouth, Massachusetts, 1652. 

John Wood, the son of Nathaniel Wood, was born in Plymouth, 1684. 
He changed his name to that of Atwood. In 1700 he married Sarah Leavitt, 
and they became the parents of one son. whose name was Isaac. 

Isaac Atwood, the son of John and Sarah (Leavitt) Atwood. was born 
in Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1719. He was united in marriage with 
Lydia Wait, August 7, 1740, and was the father of Zaccheus, Wait, Isaac, 
Hannah and Lydia. 

Isaac (2) Atwood, the son of Isaac (i) and Lydia (Wait) Atwood, was 
born in Plymouth, July 17, 1747. In 1777 he settled in Bedford, New Hamp- 
shire, and resided there for the remainder of his life, which terminated 
March 15, 1836. On April 21, 1770, he married (first) Hannah Chubbuck, 
who died Augfust 10, 1798. He married (second) Lydia Whitmarsh, of 
Abington, Massachusetts. She passed away October 3, 1841. His first 
union was blessed with the following children : Isaac, Hannah, Lydia, David, 
John. Submit W., Thomas, Stephen and Zaccheus. 

David Atwood, the second son and fourth child of Isaac and Hannah 
(Chubbuck) Atwood, was born in Bedford, March 24, 1779, and he became 
the father of Daniel Gordon Atwood, in whose memory we are writing. 

In early life, Daniel Gordon Atwood was employed in a bobbin factory, 
and later became engaged in the manufacture of cider. From the beginning 
of his career, agriculture was more to his liking, and accordingly became his 
principal occupation. Mr. Atwood followed it with prosperous results, and 
he labored persistently and energetically, not only to win success for him- 
self, but to make his life a source of benefit to his fellow-men. His heart 
was ever in sympathy with the sorrows of the unfortunate and his hand 
was ever ready to contribute to the alleviation of those in distress. Mr. 
Atwood was indeed a pattern of generosity, charity and affection to all who 
were thrown in contact with him, and taken from every angle he was a man 
of the most sterling quality. Unlike the majority of his fellow-townsmen, 
Mr. Atwood did not confine his sole attention and time to his own business 
interests, but was more or less active in civic afifairs, serving with ability as 
a selectman for two years. Politically he was affiliated with the Republican 
party, and staunchly upheld its doctrines all through his life. In his religious 
faith, Mr. Atwood was a Presbyterian, and for many years sang in the choir 
of the Presbyterian church in Bedford. 

On May 2, 1837, Daniel Gordon Atwood was united in marriage with 
Margaret Ann Barr, who was born March 24, 181 5, the daughter of Thomas 
and Abigail (Palmer) Barr, of Bedford, New Hampshire. She died August 
16, 1887, having reared six children, namely: i. Eliza Morrison, who was 
born December 9, 1838, and is now the widow of Noah Smith Clark, of Man- 
chester. 2. Caroline, born February i, 1841, became the wife of Hazen K. 
Fuller, and they removed to Florida in 1878. 3. Julia Ann, born January 



Daniel ($orDon ^ttoooD 



121 



lo, 1844, became the wife of Leonard Bursiel, who died May 19, 1892. 
4. Daniel Webster. 5. Clara, born September 6, 1850, and became the wife 
of Bushrod W. Mann. 6. Thomas Byron, born February 5, 1853, deceased. 
In his home life Daniel Gordon Atwood was an exceptionally happy 
man, and was a devoted husband and a kind father. It was the pleasure of 
those about him rather than his own which he strived and studied to pre- 
serve and increase. It may be truthfully said in closing that in all the rela- 
tions of life he was beyond reproach, and might well serve as an example to 
the 3'outh of his community, and to those young men who would follow life's 
pathway in a manly manner. 





Charles JFretiericfe Ktmtx 

'OWHERE can we see more vividly illustrated the truth of the 
statement that time is measured by events and not by days 
or hours than in the various achievements of such men as 
Charles Frederick Tessier, who in their diverse characters 
seem to defy the limits of time and space as we count them, 
so that what the average man cannot accomplish in the 
allotted three score years and ten, they will complete in a 
brief period and stand ready for further efforts as though the deed had been 
a pastime. Such capable figures we all have seen in the business world of 
to-day, and they have been well represented in the life of that busy New 
England city, Nashua, New Hampshire, and it would be difficult to find a 
better example of the type than that offered by the man whose name heads 
this memoir. It is always intensely interesting to us to find the achievements 
of such men set down, as we still hope to find in the details of their careers 
some of the secrets of success. Yet, after all, their secret is no other than the 
secret of all accomplishment, for if they may possess more than the average 
of talent, yet it is the conscientious use of this talent that is the real touch- 
stone with which the door to success is unlocked, and this we all of us have 
it in our power to employ. Hard work, courage, patience in overcoming 
difficulties, these are some of the things that really matter, without which 
no degree of ability avails to make success permanent. Mr. Tessier was a 
man of high ideals, to which he adhered with an unusual degree of faith- 
fulness in the conduct of his every-day life. He inherited from a sturdy 
ancestry those strong principles that were the inspiration of his active and 
useful life. It is a well-known fact that the city of Nashua. New Hampshire, 
is greatly indebted to merchants of foreign birth, who have at various 
periods of her eventful development settled there, and whose systematic 
course of industry and business integrity has aided materially to gain for 
the community wealth and importance. In this class of men Mr. Tessier 
most naturally took his place, and was long regarded as one of the pioneer 
French-American business men in the city of Nashua. All that was useful, 
pure and good in the community appealed most forcibly to him, and the 
community responded by according to him its respectful admiration and 
sincere affection. He was the type of merchant of whom the city is justly 
proud, a type whose enterprise and integrity have not only developed the 
trade of the city but have given it an enviable reputation for fair dealing and 
honorable methods. The death of Mr. Tessier, which occurred in Nashua, 
New Hampshire, his adopted city, November 28, 1900, at the age of fifty- 
eight years, meant the removal of one of the best known and most admired 
French-Canadian residents of the city, and his" departure was mourned by 
the community-at-large, for he had endeared himself to all classes. 




^/ictrie:^ ^i^ede^icK ^cAiiet*^ 



Cfjarles JFteDericb Cessier 123 

Charles Frederick Tessier was born in Stuckly, Providence of Quebec, 
March 5, 1843, the son of Charles and Marie (Boisvert) Tessier, both of 
whom were natives of that region. Charles Frederick Tessier obtained his 
education in the public schools of his native town, and remained there until 
fourteen years of age, when he went to Coaticook, Providence of Quebec, 
where he continued to live for five years. At the age of twenty years Mr. 
Tessier removed to Montreal, where he became engaged in various kinds 
of work, remaining there for about two years. On April i, 1869, he moved 
to Nashua, New Hampshire, shortly after reaching his majority. He 
entered at once into the grocery business, in company with Eleazer Lucier, 
under the firm name of Lucier & Tessier. This was one of the earliest of 
French speaking business firms in Nashua, and Mr. Tessier did all in his 
power, during his long and well spent business life in that city, to give the 
French speaking people of Nashua the high place they have occupied for 
being progressive, honest and among the most useful and patriotic citizens 
in a city now made up of such a large proportion of thrifty and completely 
Americanized French speaking people. 

Mr. Tessier dissolved his partnership with Eleazer Lucier, in 1878, and 
engaged in the grocery business on his own account, with location in Rail- 
road Square. In 1893, owing to his rapidly increasing business, he moved 
from the Square to a fine new block which he himself had erected on West 
Pearl street, which bears his name, and his grocery store occupied the east 
end of the building. Mr. Tessier always maintained a high reputation for 
strict integrity, and was a man possessed of much business ability. Honest 
and upright in all his dealings with his fellow-men, he held a high place in 
the esteem of his associates and patrons. Thirty years of his life had been 
passed in Nashua, and during that time he had been identified with the 
trades interests of the city. All who knew him always spoke highly of his 
unimpeachable character and shrewd business sagacity. It was these attri- 
butes that won for him success in life, and will ever make his memory 
revered among those who had been so fortunate as to have called him friend. 

Mr. Tessier was never a politician, preferring to exert his influence for 
the welfare of the community in quiet and unostentatious ways. He had no 
ambition to win public honors, or public office, but moved serenely along 
the walks of social and business life, unconsciously winning honors of far 
more value than those which attach to public station. He devoted his time 
and attention to his business interests, and with an unyielding purpose in 
the enlargement of his activities and usefulness, he laid the sure foundation 
of an honorable and substantial life. His success was the merited reward 
of industry, ability and honesty. In all his words and deeds he was ever 
faithful to every personal and public obligation, and his commanding influ- 
ence among his many friends was the natural product of his moral qualities. 
His kindness solicited friendship, his wisdom invited confidence, and his 
integrity commanded respect. Mr. Tessier was in every respect a typical 
example of the strong, capable French-American, true to his home, true to 
his adopted city, and true to his country. 



124 Cljatles JFtcDeticb Cessiet 

Mr. Tessier was also a well-known figure in the financial circles of 
Nashua, New Hampshire, and was a director of the New Hampshire Bank- 
ing Company. In his religious belief he was a devout member of the Roman 
Catholic faith, and a constant attendant at the Church of St. Louis De Gon- 
zague. He was reverential in his nature, and gave liberally to the support 
of the church and its maintenance. He was one of the founders of the local 
Nashua St. Jean Baptiste Society. 

On February 19, 1871, Charles Frederick Tessier was united in marriage 
with Anna Olivier, a daughter of Eleazer and Adelaide (Girard) Olivier. 
Mrs. Tessier, at the time of her marriage, was a well-known, popular and 
talented vocalist. Mr. and Mrs. Tessier became the parents of seven chil- 
dren, as follows: i. Dr. George Olivier Tessier, now a leading dentist in 
Montreal, Canada; he married Lumina Lagasse, and they are the parents 
of ten children: Irene, Germaine, Frederick, Fernande, Olivier, Roger, 
Alphonse, Simonne, Joan d'Arc, Jean Peul Tessier. 2. Ernest Frederick, a 
leading merchant of Nashua, New Hampshire; he married Albina LeClaire, 
of Nashua, becoming the parents of two children, Roland and Marie Anna 
Tessier. 3. Dr. Arthur Joseph Tessier, died August 19. 1904; was a gradu- 
ate of St. Anselms College of Manchester, New Hampshire, and of the 
Baltimore Medical College, where he graduated with the degree of M. D. ; 
he married Edith Stacy, of Gardner, Massachusetts, and was just entering 
upon a fine practice in Somersworth, New Hampshire, when he was cut off 
in the full strength of young manhood. 4. Leon Alphonse, the organist at 
St. Mary's Church, in Manchester, New Hampshire; he married Alida Per- 
rault. of Manchester, New Hampshire, and they are the parents of seven 
children: Beatrice, deceased; Gerald, Armand, Cecile, Robert, Lucien, and 
Gertrude. 5. Juliette Anna, became the wife of Dr. Oswald S. Maynard, of 
Nashua, New Hampshire. 6. Florette Helen, became the wife of Leo F. 
DesParois, of Nashua. 7. Ralph Victor, passed away at Nashua, April 11, 
1905, at the age of eighteen years; he was a most promising youth, and at 
the time of his departing from this life was preparing to enter the priesthood 
at St. Charles Seminary, Sherbrooke, Providence of Quebec. 

Charles Frederick Tessier was a devoted husband and father, and found 
his chief happiness and interests in the intimate intercourse which centers 
around the hearthstone. In all respects he was a model man and his death 
was universally regarded as the greatest personal loss the city of Nashua 
could experience. If there was in his character one element which stood 
forth with special prominence, and could be pointed out as a marked char- 
acteristic of his life, it was his "rugged honesty." As a good citizen, and a 
true gentleman, in the best sense of the word, Mr. Tessier's memory will 
long be cherished. 




Baniel WAth^ttv 

*HIS great orator and statesman, one of the most distinguished 
men our country has produced, came from a fine ancestry. 
His line begins with Thomas Webster, born in County Nor- 
folk, England, who came to America with his mother and 
her second husband, William Godfrey, her first husband 
and father of Thomas Webster being deceased. This little 
family came to Watertown, Massachusetts, whence Thomas 
in his young manhood removed to Hampton, New Hampshire. He married 
Sarah,, daughter of Thomas Brewer, of Roxbury, Massachusetts. Their son 
Ebenezer served in the Indian war in 1710, and was one of the settlers of 
Kingston, New Hampshire, where he married Hannah Judkins. Their son 
Ebenezer married Susanna Batchelder. 

Ebenezer, son of the last named couple, was one of the strong men of 
his day. His education was extremely limited. He served under General 
Amherst in the French War and attained the rank of captain. At the out- 
set of the Revolution he recruited a force of two hundred men, and at their 
head joined Washington at Cambridge. He served at White Plains and at 
Bennington, and later at West Point. He left the army with the rank of 
colonel at the close of the war, and was chosen to various offices — Represen- 
tative, State Senator, Judge of Probate and Presidential Elector. His eldest 
son, Ezekiel, was liberally educated, graduating from Dartmouth College, 
studying law, and becoming a lawyer. He died in the court house at Con- 
cord, while making a plea before a jury. 

Daniel Webster, son of Colonel Ebenezer Webster, was two years 
younger than his brother Ezekiel, last-mentioned. He was born in a frame 
house near his father's original log house, in Salisbury, New Hampshire, 
January 18, 1782. When he was about a year old his parents removed to the 
town of Franklin, and here the youth came to young manhood. He was 
frail, and had few educational advantages as a child. After a few months at 
Phillips Academy, he completed his preparation for college under the private 
tutorship of Rev. Samuel Wood, of Boscawen, then entering Dartmouth 
College, partially supporting himself by teaching and in newspaper work. 
He soon made up for the deficiencies of his earlier education, becoming the 
foremost scholar in the institution, and distinguishing himself in the college 
society debates. After graduating, he studied law, at the same time read- 
ing a great deal of general literature. For a few years he taught an academy, 
did clerical work, and then returned to his law studies in Boston, where he 
was admitted to the bar, then entering upon practice in Boscawen, New 
Hampshire. 

His public career began in 1812, in his thirtieth year, by his election to 
Congress, and his reelection followed. In 1816 he removed to Boston, and 
practiced his profession several years. In 1822 he was elected to Congress, 



126 



Daniel meb$tet 



and reelected twice afterward. In 1827 he entered the United States Senate, 
and by repeated reelections retained his seat until 1841, when he resigned to 
accept the portfolio of Secretary of State in the cabinet of President Harri- 
son. In 1843 he resigned the position, and in the following year again 
became a United States Senator. This position he again resigned to become 
Secretary of State under President Fillmore, holding the position until his 
death, October 24, 1852. 

The above narrative is all that space here will permit. Of Mr. Webster 
it is to be said that his forensic ability, his exalted statesmanship, his broad 
knowledge of constitutional law, his wonderful influence over men, and his 
illustrious record generally, are too well known to demand repetition. 




Ctitoart $ap0on litmball 

'HE personal annals of New England contain many accounts 
of men who seem in an unusual degree identified with the 
development of some particular section of the country, iden- 
tified to such an extent, indeed, that they seem almost to play 
the part of fairy godfathers to the fortunate communities, 
taking share in the running of all their affairs from the most 
general functions of government to the private acts of char- 
ity to the neglected, helpless ones. Such a part was played for the city of 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire, by Edward Payson Kimball, whose death, 
which occurred there on March 31, 1910, was a loss to that city quite irrepa- 
rable. The banking institutions of any city are a fair index of its commer- 
cial character and financial strength, for they are the very centers around 
which they are regulated. To this end it is necessary, not only to have 
substantial assets and available capital, but wise, judicious and efficient 
officers, directors, and heads, whose administration and character strengthen 
confidence. Prominent among men of this caliber was Mr, Kimball, and it 
is only natural that his passing away came as a severe shock to the com- 
munity-at-large. 

The name of Kimball in England, as the records show, appears in the 
various forms of Kymbolde, Kembold, Kembould, and Kemball. The com- 
mon ancestor of the great majority of Kimballs in this country was Richard 
Kimball, who with his family embarked at Ipswich, in the County of Suffolk, 
England, April 10, 1634, in the ship "Elizabeth." He arrived at Boston, and 
from there went to Watertown. Massachusetts, where he settled and became 
a prominent and active man in the new settlement. He was by trade a 
wheelwright, and was proclaimed a freeman in 1635. 

Edward Payson Kimball, in whose memory this memoir is being writ- 
ten, was the eighth generation of Richard Kimball, the immigrant ancestor, 
and was the eldest son and third child of the Rev. Reuben and Judith 
(Colby) Kimball. He was born in Warner, New Hampshire, on July 4, 
1834. His father, the Rev. Reuben Kimball, was also born in Warner, and 
died in 1871, at the age of sixty-eight years. His first field of labor was at 
Kittery Point, Maine, where lie was ordained in 1841. It was pleasant to 
Rev. Kimball to be actively employed in the Master's service, and he used 
every degree of his remaining strength in the work of the ministry so long 
as opportunity was granted him. His knowledge of the Bible was intimate 
and extensive, and his faith in its doctrines was sound and discriminating. 
His wife, Judith (Colby) Kimball, was a native of Warner, New Hamp- 
shire, and died in Ipswich, at the age of seventy-three years. She was the 
daughter of John and Sarah Colby, of Warner. 

Edward Payson Kimball received his education in the common schools 
of Kittery Point, Maine, and later at Hampton and Andover academies. 



128 (ZBDtoarD Pap0on I^imtiall 

Upon the completion of his studies, Mr. Kimball engaged in mercantile busi- 
ness in Kittery Point from 1855 to 1857. The following year he removed 
to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, where he became interested in banking. 
He obtained a position as clerk in the Piscataqua Exchange and later in the 
Portsmouth Savings Bank. In 1871 he became the cashier of the First 
National Bank, in Portsmouth, and ten years afterwards was made presi- 
dent of that bank, and also of the Piscataqua Savings Bank. Mr. Kimball 
was a commanding figure in the financial circles of Portsmouth, New Hamp- 
shire, a man whose opinion carried weight in the financial world throughout 
that section of the country. His mind was clear and far-seeing, and he was 
ambitious to grapple with any project that was presented to him, however 
great its scope. 

Mr. Kimball did not confine his business interests to Portsmouth alone, 
for he was connected with other afifairs in the West, in which he met with 
success. He was the possessor of strong executive ability, and marked by 
a strict adherence to the loftiest principles of integrity. Long will memory 
hold him in fond remembrance by his host of friends and business associates, 
who learned to esteem him, to deeply love him, and who felt at the time of 
his departure from earthly view that out of the community had gone forth 
one who was indeed a leader and a friend. 

Politically, Mr. Kimball from his youth had adhered to the Republican 
party, being a staunch supporter of the measures advocated in its contests 
and platforms. Upon his arrival in Portsmouth, he became interested in 
the afifairs of the city, and was a member of the city government. In 1885 
and 1886 he served in the New Hampshire Legislature. He filled these 
offices of public trust with honor to himself and honor to the city, whose 
interests and welfare were made his own. He stood forth as a typical man 
in the community which he had adopted, and was most conspicuous for his 
public service. He gave much thought, time and service to grapple with the 
problems and other difficulties that confront our legislative branches. He 
was indeed a man of the highest integrity, and always adhered to what he 
believed was right and best for Portsmouth. 

In his religious belief, Mr. Kimball was a devout member of the Con- 
gregational church, and an active worker for its benefit in Portsmouth. In 
1871 he was made a deacon of the North Congregational Church, and held 
office as clerk and treasurer of the church from 1867 until the time of his 
death. His liberality to the church is well known, also his deep concern for 
the welfare of the public educational institutions of Portsmouth, and of the 
State, and the benevolent and charitable organizations of a private nature. 
Mr. Kimball's services along these lines, and in other fields of usefulness, 
were of great and lasting value. He elevated the standard of the public 
service, he secured many public movements and improvements, and he 
extended the good name of Portsmouth, at the same time promoting the 
welfare of its people. In his death the city truly lost one whose unselfish 
services will long be remembered with appreciation and affection. 

On September 13, 1864, Edward Payson Kimball was united in mar- 
riage with Martha Jane Thompson, who was a native of Wilmot, New 



CDtoarD papson mimliari 129 

Hampshire, and a daughter of Colonel Samuel and Anna True (Smith) 
Thompson, of Wilmot. Mr. and Mrs. Kimball were the parents of three 
children, as follows: i. Elizabeth Colby, born January 27, 1866, and died 
March 7, 1880. 2. Martha Smith, born February 28, 1870, graduated from 
Smith College with the class of 1892. 3. Edward Thompson, born Septem- 
ber 29, 1873, and graduated from Amherst College in the class of 1896. 

Mr.Kimball had an idealhome, in which his presence never failed to radi- 
ate happiness and content. Reaching out beyond that sacred circle he was 
connected with many organizations that stand for philanthropy, for social 
service and fraternalism. He had been a member of the Portsmouth School 
Board, a trustee of the Cottage Hospital of the Chase Home for Children, 
of the Seaman's Friend Society, and president of the Howard Benevolent 
Society and of the Young Men's Christian Association. Mr. Kimball was 
largely instrumental in building the beautiful Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation building in Portsmouth and contributed liberally to its cost and sup- 
port, always taking a keen, personal interest in its work. He was a member 
of Piscataqua Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and was one of its 
board of trustees. 

Although Mr. Kimball held political offices, he was emphatically a man 
of business, and his advent into the political world was more from business 
interests with a view to proper legislation than any desire to win official 
honors for himself. He was in no way a nominal member of the various 
other organizations in which he held official rank, but a worker for the end 
for which each institution was organized. 

It has been said of Edward Payson Kimball that he was a man of 
sterling public worth, of strict integrity, and an honor to his family, country 
and State. He was a broad-minded gentleman, whom it is neither exag- 
geration nor adulation to call a "great man," and it is hoped that his life 
story will prove to be an inspiration to other young men, in like circum- 
stances, who wish to achieve success in an honorable way. 




Babtli Bublep JFelton 




MONG the important business men of Manchester the name 
of David Dudley Felton is most conspicuous, as much for 
the high principle he observed in the conduct of his business 
as for the success that attended it. His death, which 
occurred at his North End home, May 5, 1914, removed 
from the community one w^ho had been prominently identi- 
fied with the business and social life of the city, as well as 
one of its best-known men. His passing away, while not unexpected, filled 
the community with sadness and sorrow, for his acquaintance was extremely 
wide and his friends were legion. For more than a year prior to his death, 
Mr. Felton had been in failing health. After consulting a specialist in New 
York he was informed that his case was most serious and would inevitably 
in a short time prove fatal. His character and cheerfulness could not better 
be illustrated than the way he received this news. He returned to Man- 
chester, cheery, full of grit and displayed a nerve typical of the man. He 
never complained nor lost his courage. He made a fight for life that for 
bravery astonished his friends. 

The birth of David Dudley Felton occurred in Eden Prairie, Minnesota, 
December 27, 1861, the eldest son of Silas A. and Mary E. Felton. His par- 
ents had moved out to this western town a short time before his birth, from 
Marlboro, Massachusetts. After remaining there for about five years, the 
Felton family again returned to Marlboro, where they remained until 1869, 
when they removed to Manchester, New Hampshire. Silas A. Felton died 
in Manchester, November 17, 1907, after a life of fruitful endeavor. "Dud," 
as David Dudley Felton was familiarly known, attended the Ash street 
school for his education, and later was graduated from the Manchester 
High School. Upon finishing his schooling, Mr. Felton became employed 
by the John B. Varick Company and the S. C. Forsaith Company. He later 
started to work for his father, who was a manufacturer of brushes, and was 
on the road for a short time as a traveling salesman for the concern. In the 
eighties his father admitted him into the business, and the firm name was 
changed from S. A. Felton to S. A. Felton & Son, and young David Dudley 
became an active spirit in the management and development of the business. 
Later the concern was incorporated under the name of S. A. Felton & Son 
Company, under which name the business continued to be conducted. After 
his father's death, in 1907, Mr. Felton had the entire supervision and man- 
agement of the plant, which had been increased by a large addition. In fact, 
some time before his father's passing away, the details of the business rested 
upon his shoulders, as the senior Felton had virtually retired. In addition to 
this, about two years previous to his death, Mr. Felton organized the D. D. 
Felton Brush Company, of Atlanta, Georgia. 



DauiD DuDIep jFelton 131 

Mr. Felton has been greatly missed in the business and social life of 
Manchester. He was known as a "hustler" in business, and as an enthus- 
iast in anything in which he became interested. Bright and witty in conver- 
sation, he was a moving spirit in any gathering at which he was present. 
He was one of the most popular members of the Derryfield Club, and his 
death removed one of the "Old Guard," who had been connected with the 
club for many years. After his return from New York, when he well knew 
that his days were numbered, with an indomitable will and with a display 
of stamina that showed his courage, he spent as much time out-of-doors as 
was possible and in the society of his friends. He visited the Derryfield Club 
on all occasions possible, and was also a member of the Intervale Country 
Club. In his youth Mr. Felton was one of the active and live members of 
the Manchester Cadets. He always took a great interest in sporting events, 
and attended personally affairs of prominence in that vicinity of the country. 

Mr. Felton was also a prominent figure in the financial circles of Man- 
chester. He was a director of the Manchester National Bank, and also of 
the People's Gas Light Company. Politically, Mr. Felton was a Republican 
and, like his father, was at one time the president of the Young Men's Repub- 
lican Club of Ward Two, and was most active in promoting the interests of 
this organization. He was a strict party man and was always willing to 
take hold and help his friends, although he never himself personally sought 
any public office. 

On October 24, 1888, David Dudley Felton was united in marriage with 
Mary Frederica Briggs, a daughter of the Hon. James Franklin and Rox- 
anna (Smith) Briggs. of Manchester, New Hampshire. This union was 
blessed with one child, a son, James Briggs Felton, who was born February 
25, 1891. He received his education in St. Paul School, Concord, and then 
entered Yale University, graduating from there with the class of 191 2. He 
entered his father's well established business, in which he took a very active 
interest, until he responded to the call of his country, when he went to 
Plattsburg and was appointed to the first lieutenancy in the Signal Corps of 
the Aviation Division. On August 4, 191 5, he was united in marriage with 
Beatrice Pike, the daughter of Charles E. and Sarah (Pearson) Pike. Mr. 
and Mrs. James Briggs Felton became the parents of one son, James Briggs 
Felton, Jr., born January 26, 191 7. 

In the intimate intercourse of his family life, David Dudley Felton 
proved himself a man of the highest character by that most difficult test of 
uniform kindness and consideration, and was an affectionate husband and a 
devoted father. He always derived the keenest pleasure at his own fireside. 
His mind was exceptionally well balanced, his judgment was practical in 
the highest degree, and his executive ability was one of his marked char- 
acteristics. His temperament, and his never untiring energy and enterprise 
presents a character which has always been greatly admired and which is a 
splendid example for the younger generation to emulate. His death, when 
in the very prime of life, fifty-three years of age, brought genuine grief to 
many hearts, and he left behind him many who mourned his loss. Even 
those whose contact with him was the most casual quickly developed a real 



132 



DaUiD DuDIep Jfclton 



affection and admiration for him, and this is perhaps the final test of any 
man's worth. Ever patriotic, loyal, and plain-spoken, with a tender heart 
toward all humanity, a jovial and happy disposition, and enthusiasm in busi- 
ness as well as in social affairs, David Dudley Felton closed his life, leaving 
behind him a host of friends and acquaintances who will long remember 
him. 





Hon. Barnes JFranfelm ilriggs 

^EYOND doubt one of the most prominent figures in the public 
life of Manchester, New Hampshire, during the past gener- 
ation, as well as one of the leaders of his profession, was 
James Franklin Briggs, whose death at the home of his 
daughter, Mrs. David Dudley Felton, in Manchester, Janu- 
ary 21, 1905, was felt as a heavy loss by the entire commu- 
nity. Few citizens have equalled him in the number of 
affairs with which he was identified, and in the capability of his leadership, 
for Mr. Briggs was a leader in whatever movement he undertook, and his 
fellow-men recognized this and submitted to a leadership which was always 
exerted for their good. Mr. Briggs became one of the best known figures of 
the bar in that region, and was equally distinguished as a citizen of great 
public spirit. His entire life was useful, laborious and honorable. His mind 
and character were cast in such a mould as to inspire confidence and trust 
in those who came in contact with him, and his personality was strong, 
positive and independent. To his family, Mr. Briggs was intensely devoted, 
and within its circle his greatest happiness and joy in life was experienced. 
He was a very just and generous man, of calm, deliberate judgment, and he 
led an unselfish, helpful life, full of activity, good deeds and kindly acts. 

James Franklin Briggs was born in Bury, Lancashire, England, October 
23, 1827. the son of John and Nancy (Frankland) Briggs. On his maternal 
side, Mr. Briggs was related to Sir Edward Bangs, who had charge of the 
construction of some of the largest bridges across the Thames river in 
London, England. When he was less than two years of age, the family left 
their native land, England, and came to this country, landing in Boston, 
March 4, 1829. They lived successively in Andover, Saugus and Amesbury, 
Massachusetts, until the year 1836, when they settled in Holderness, now 
Ashland, where the father, in company with two brothers, purchased a 
woolen mill. The parents were plain, hard-working, thrifty people, imbued 
with the loftiest attributes of Christian excellence, and gained the respect 
and confidence of all with whom they were brought in contact. 

James F. Briggs spent his early life at cloth-making in his father's mills, 
learning thoroughly every branch of the business and acquiring in leisure 
hours, with the aid of his parents, a fair elementary education from such 
books as he could secure. At the age of fourteen years, Mr. Briggs spent one 
term at the Newbury, Vermont, Academy, and later attended the Academy 
at Tilton, until 1848, working in the meantime at his trade during vacations 
to earn the means of defraying his expenses of education. In 1848, he 
entered the law oflice of the Hon. William C. Thompson, of Plymouth. New 
Hampshire, but owing to his father's death in February, of that year, he was 
not permitted to continue the studies which his ambition craved. The death 
of his father left his mother with eight children, six of whom were younger 



134 ^f"' 3[ames JFranblin 'Btigg0 

than James Franklin Briggs, and upon him fell a very large share of their 
support, as reverses had throwm the family into limited circumstances. 
With great courage and no small self-sacrifice, he returned to his old employ- 
ment as a cloth-maker, but continued to devote every spare moment to his 
legal education, procuring books from Mr. Thompson for this purpose. At 
the end of a year, he entered the office of the Hon. Joseph Burrows, of Hold- 
erness. In 1849, t^^ family removed to Fisherville, now^ Penacook, and Mr. 
Brisrgs continued his legal studies with Judge Nehemiah Butler, of Bosca- 
wen, being admitted to the New Hampshire bar at Concord, in the spring of 
1851. He immediately began active practice at Hillsborough Bridge, and 
soon gained a large and successful business. Within two years he was one 
of the leading lawyers of the town. As a Democrat Mr. Briggs took a 
prominent part in politics, and in 1857, 1858 and 1859, represented Hills- 
borough Bridge in the Lower House of the New Hampshire Legislature, 
being elected each time by an almost unanimous vote. In that body he was 
continuously a member of the judiciary committee, and in 1858 received his 
party's nomination for the speakership. Mr. Briggs was affiliated with the 
Democratic party until i860, and was nominated for councillor upon its 
"Peace at any price" platform, but declined the honor, and sided with the 
Union men of the North. From the outbreak of the War of the Rebellion, 
he became an ardent and consistent member of the Republican party, and 
it was only a short time before he was acknowledged as one of the foremost 
Republicans of the State of New Hampshire. 

When the Eleventh Regiment of New Hampshire Volunteers was 
recruited, Mr. Briggs promptly offered his services, and was commissioned 
regimental quartermaster on the stafT of Colonel Walter Harriman. and 
served through the battles of Fredericksburg, the military operations in 
Kentucky, and the Mississippi River campaign for about a year. He was 
finally prostrated by the malarial fever of the southern swamps and com- 
pelled to resign and return to Hillsborough Bridge, where he soon resumed 
the practice of his profession. In 1871, Mr. Briggs moved to Manchester, 
New Hampshire. For several years he was a law partner of the late Hon. 
Henry H. Huse. Major Briggs soon established himself in his profession 
and entered upon a career that was both brilliant and useful. Soon after 
locating in Manchester, Mr. Briggs was made city solicitor, an ofifice that 
he administered with characteristic ability and honor. In 1874, he repre- 
sented Ward Three in the Legislature, and in 1876 he was elected to both 
the State Senate and Constitutional Convention. In 1877, he was nomi- 
nated for member of Congress, without substantial opposition, and was 
three times elected, each time by an increased majority. Major Briggs, 
however, declined a fourth nomination for Congress. In 1883 and again in 
1891 he was elected to the State Legislature, and was chosen a member of 
the Constitutional Convention of 1899. He served a seventh term in the 
Legislature in 1897, and was elected speaker of the house by a unanimous 
vote. 

In the fall of the year 1850, James Franklin Briggs was united in mar- 
riage with Roxanna Smith, a daughter of Obadiah and Eliza M. (Moody) 



J^on, 3[ames jFranklin 15tigQS 135 

Smith, both of whom were natives of Holderness, New Hampshire. Mrs. 
Briggs passed away on January 2y, 1888. Mr. and Mrs. Briggs were the 
parents of three children, as follows: i. Frank O., born in Hillsborough, 
New Hampshire, August 12, 1851. He gained distinction by being elected 
to the United States Senate from New Jersey. 2. Sarah Frances, born 
October 22, 1855. 3. Mary Frederica, born in Hillsborough, August 19, 1866. 
She became the wife of David Dudley Felton, of Manchester, New Hamp- 
shire, and they were the parents of one son, James Briggs Felton, who is 
now serving in the Signal Corps of the Aviation Division of the United 
States Army. 

Major Briggs was regarded as one of the ablest members of the New 
Hampshire bar. His sound judgment, his courage and his industry, his 
broad and accurate knowledge of the law, his great force of character, all 
gave him a reputation which was not confined to the State of New Hamp- 
shire alone. He was essentially strong before a court or jury, where his 
oratorical ability and power to marshal facts won for him many notable 
victories. He was a brilliant public speaker, and for several years was one 
of the leading campaign orators. He had also been active and influential 
as a promoter of numerous enterprises, and had been president of the Hills- 
borough National Bank, of the Granite State Trust Company, and of the 
Queen City Land and Building Association. He was a director of the Citi- 
zens' Building and Loan Association and of the People's Gas Light Com- 
pany. 

The Hon. James Franklin Briggs was notable in his long life, which 
extended over seventy-eight years, for many things. He was noted for 
being a man of principle and for his deep interest in good causes. His strong 
and self-confident character was greatly moderated by the most kindly of 
hearts and cheerful dispositions. Throughout his entire life, during the 
early hardships and privations as well as through the not less difficult 
responsibilities of wealth and success, he displayed unbrokenly the virtues 
so characteristic of his race, patience, industry, courage, and a sort of 
buoyant optimism that simply overlooked obstacles and refused to admit 
defeat. His career may well be held up as a credit both to the race which 
produced him and to the country which he adopted as his own. 




ilenjamm Cbomas ilotoes 

^HE wide world has never produced quite such seamen else- 
where as those of the northeastern coast of our country, 
surely the very type of sailor the world over is the New 
England salt of the past generation, a class that is rapidly 
fading out of existence as steamships are taking the place 
of the magnificent old vessels that with the wind for motor 
power swept their way to every port of the globe and about 
which there grew up a romance of the seas that seems destined to vanish 
with the ships themselves and the men who sailed them. There is probably 
no people in the world so famous for their prowess as sailors of the open 
main as the hardy maritime folk developed in the New England States 
during the days when a sea voyage was a very real peril which only strong 
cause would drive a man to embark upon. These men who feared no 
weather have made their names and the name of their home region famous 
throughout the lands and seas of the world. On November i, 1909, there 
died in Keene, New Hampshire, Captain Benjamin Thomas Howes, one of 
the best known sea captains, who had but few rivals on the broad seas during 
his time for skill, courage and fame. He was a man of fine character, univer- 
sally esteemed and respected, and his death was lamented by a large circle of 
friends. Captain Howes was a descendant of a family long identified with 
the very calling in which he was later himself to take a part. He came of a 
sturdy race, a race of adventurous, freedom-loving men and women, typical 
of the splendid men who settled New England and made them known every- 
where. 

Captain Benjamin Thomas Howes was born in Chatham, Massachu- 
setts, August 5, 1843. His father, like nearly everyone in Chatham, was a 
seafaring man, and the son attended the public schools of his native place, 
growing up with the other boys, and becoming familiar with the life of the 
fisherman and sailor, so far as a boy's experience is likely to extend. There- 
fore, during his boyhood Captain Howes was dreaming of the sea, and at the 
early age of fourteen years he shipped for his first ocean voyage, which was 
to be of two years' duration, and which was to take him around the world. 
The ship on which he sailed was one of the staunch merchantmen of those 
days. She sailed around Cape Horn and up the west coast to Mexico and 
California, discharging a cargo and loading again for Hamburg, whence she 
sailed back to New York. This ocean voyage was taken against Captain 
Howes' father's wish, and gave him a splendid opportunity to test the bravery 
and courage of his son. He was not spared in the least, and every difficult 
and disagreeable task possible was heaped upon his young shoulders. It 
was all in vain, the lad's determination was entirely unshaken, and the father 
was obliged to become reconciled to his son following the call of the seas as 
his chosen profession in life. 




^/^\,/>/?u/, ^y.///./////A y/,^ //n^.> y/(/i', 



15en|amin Cfjomas l^otoes 137 

Captain Howes made good use of his opportunities and studied naviga- 
tion and the duties of the master of a ship, in which he became very pro- 
ficient, as his long record as a successful and efficient officer subsequently 
proved. He rose successfully to the positions of third, then second, and first 
mate on different ships, and in 1871 became captain of the schooner "Samos," 
which he was in charge of for three or four years, going to various foreign 
ports. He gave himself up to his work with a devotion that brought him 
success, and it was not long before he was embarked upon his remarkable 
career. Captain Howes next became master of the schooner "Henry Lip- 
pitt," and was her captain until she was run down by a large vessel and 
sunk one dark night, while at anchor off Old Point Comfort, Virginia, all 
on board with the exception of one man being saved. Captain Howes went 
down with his ship, but was rescued by a line when much exhausted. He 
had sailed the "Henry Lippitt" to all parts of the world, including Australia, 
India, and many African, European and South American ports. 

After the loss of the first "Henry Lippitt," a second and larger vessel 
with the same name was built, of which Captain Howes became the master 
in 1895. He remained in command of this vessel until 1907, when his health 
compelled him to retire from active work. In his long experience as a sea 
captain, he passed through many thrilling adventures, but he was a man of 
excellent judgment and ability, and one who did not easily lose his head in 
an emergency. He was the recipient of many testimonials for bravery and 
efficiency, including a medal from the King of Spain for saving three men, 
which in itself was an unusual honor, and also received one from the Life 
Service Station of Spain for the same deed. 

The character of Captain Howes was an unusually strong one, and 
from long habits of command he sometimes seemed almost stern in his 
manner, but this was due to the fact that he was a strict disciplinarian and 
insisted upon his commands being obeyed. He did not know the meaning 
of fear and this, together with a liberality towards those under him, was 
what gave him the great hold he had over his men. Like all who ever sailed 
the seas, he had all sorts and conditions of men with whom to deal, but his 
kind heart and broad sympathies endeared him to all. He was a man of 
extremely independent mind, and could never brook to have his conduct 
regulated by anything other than the operation of his own judgment and 
reason. He remained aloof from political affairs, and there is but little doubt 
that it was this and this only that prevented him from occupying many 
public offices, for his talents were peculiarly fitted for such activity. As it 
was, however, this extreme independence prevented him from any such 
career, probably considerably to his own relief, since his fondness for his 
home life was so great that he could not have failed to dislike anything that 
interfered with that enjoyment. He did not shut himself off entirely from 
the ordinary social intercourse which most men enjoy, nor did he fail to 
eniov it himself. Captain Howes was a member of the Masonic fraternity, 
and of the Pokahoket Tribe, Improved Order of Red Men, of Keene, New 
Hampshire. He also belonged to the Social Friends Lodge, Chesire Chap- 



138 'Bcni'amin Cfiomas ^otoes 

ter. Royal Arch Masons, and the Hugh de Payens Commandery, Knights 
Templar. He was a thirty-second degree Mason, and also a member of the 
Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, New Hampshire Consistory. 

Captain Howes had been a resident of Keene for over thirty years, and 
the attractions that won so many friends were not, however, of the surface 
merely, but had their basis in the strong and sterling virtues of the typical 
New England character, a fact well proven by the firmness with which those 
friendships were retained through the course of years. Integrity, wisdom 
and courage were all his and he may well stand as a model for the growing 
generation of the devoted husband, the worthy citizen and the upright man. 
In his religious belief, Captain Howes was a Unitarian, and an attendant of 
the Unitarian church in Keene. 

Captain Howes became connected by marriage with an old New Hamp- 
shire family, when he was united in marriage, June 16, 1872, with Maria A. 
Holt, a daughter of Ralph J. and Sally Ann (Towns) Holt, of Keene, New 
Hampshire. Captain and Mrs. Howes became the parents of four children, 
as follows: i. Benjamin Alfred, a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, and is now an expert concrete engineer in New York City; 
he was united in marriage with Ethel Dench Puffer, of Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, who bore him two children, Ellen and Benjamin Thomas Howes. 
2. Ralph Holt, attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for three 
years, and is a large contractor and builder in New York City; he was united 
in marriage with Hannah Cushman, of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and they 
are the parents of one child, Ralph Holt Howes, Jr. 3. Henry Lippitt, died 
aged eight years. 4. Josephine Holt, graduated from Wellesley College; 
she became the wife of Louis Young Stiles, of Boston, Massachusetts. 

Ralph J. Holt, the father of Mrs. Howes, was a native of Alstead, New 
Hampshire, where he was born in 1812, his father being David Holt. Ralph 
J. Holt was educated in the schools of Alstead and vicinity, and when a 
young man was a school teacher for a time. He came to Keene, New Hamp- 
shire, in 1846, and was appointed a deputy sheriff in 1854, and thereafter 
until his death he served the county as high sheriff or as a deputy. He was 
the first sheriff elected by the people under the new constitution in 1878. 
At the expiration of that term of office, he was ineligible for another election 
on account of his age, but he was reappointed a deputy. Sheriff Holt was 
an officer who seldom, if ever, made a mistake in the execution of his official 
duty. He had an excellent knowledge of law and never undertook to per- 
form any official duty without understanding exactly what it was necessary 
for him to do. When in doubt how to proceed to bring about results which 
were difficult, the best lawyers in the county often relied upon Sheriff Holt 
to assist them, and his advice seldom proved at fault. He was a most 
pleasant man to meet, affable in manner, kind hearted and obliging at all 
times. He served as alderman in Keene, New Hampshire, from Ward One, 
in 1882, making a good officer and favoring reasonable public progress and 
improvement. 

On May 7, 1844, Ralph J. Holt was united in marriage with Miss 
Sally Ann Towns, of Keene, a daughter of John and Nancy (Heaton) 



iSenfamin Cf)omas l^otoeg 139 

Towns. This union was blessed with three children, one son and two 
daughters, namely: i. Charles E. Holt, of Keene, New Hampshire. 2. Mrs. 
Mary Josephine Arms, deceased, late of Bellows Falls, Vermont. 3. Mrs. 
Maria A. Howes, the widow of Captain Benjamin Thomas Howes, in whose 
memory this memoir is being written. Mrs. Howes is a direct descendant 
of Seth Heaton, who was born in 1710, and died in 1797. He was one of the 
original settlers of Keene, New Hampshire. On the maternal side, Mrs. 
Howes is descended from Ephraim Boynton, born in 1734, and died in 1826. 
He served as ensign and as second lieutenant in the Massachusetts militia. 
On her paternal side, Mrs. Howes is a descendant of Jonathan Bailey, born 
in 1737, and died in 1814. He served as an ensign at the battle of Lexing- 
ton. He was born and died in Lancaster, Massachusetts. 

Since the death of her husband, Mrs. Howes has continued to reside in 
Keene, New Hampshire, at No. 36 Marlboro street. The self-reliance and 
energy of Captain Howes brought him success in life, so that he was able in 
his latter years to enjoy the fruit of a long life of faithful industry. He gave 
little time to public affairs, although he was interested in the progress of his 
country, and always, when opportunity afforded, exercised the right and 
duty of every good citizen in voting his choice. Firm in his convictions, he 
was gentle in manner, genial in his nature and generous in his impulses, 
qualities which caused him to be respected and beloved by all who knew him. 




(S^eorge iSlancljet 






''HE career of a successful man not only directly benefits 
society, but when the result of individual efifort it affords an 
incentive to others for high endeavor and the achievement 
of a like success. For this reason worthy examples not only 
justify but merit a place on the historic pages, and the career 
of the late George Blanchet, of Manchester, New Hamp- 
shire, was in the line of these observations. He well exem- 
plified in every way the ideal business man's character, enterprising, cour- 
ageous and conservative, a man of the highest intellectual and moral integ- 
rity. It is an occupation alike of pleasure and profit to trace the life histories 
of those successful men whose achievements have been the result of their 
own unaided efforts, who, without even the average advantages surround- 
ing the typical youth, have worked themselves up the ladder of success and 
accomplishment until they have found themselves to hold secure places in 
the regard and admiration of their fellow-men. It is an occupation of 
pleasure because the human mind is so constituted that it cannot fail to 
respond to the story of strong deeds worthily performed, of profit because 
the inevitable fruit of such pleasure is imitation of the thing admired, even 
though it be unconscious imitation. Such a record, so fraught with benef- 
icent possibilities for others, is to be found in the life story of Mr. Blanchet, 
who for many years was one of the best known figures in Manchester's 
business life, and a representative citizen of that city. The death of George 
Blanchet, which occurred at his home in Manchester, New Hampshire, 
December 25, 1916, was felt as a serious loss by the entire community. In 
his long and successful business career his word was always as good as his 
bond, and his private life was without stain or blemish. In his relation with 
the business world, he was highly regarded by all those who had the honor 
of his acquaintance, and in Manchester, where he was so well known and 
beloved, and in which he took such a deep and abiding interest in all that was 
for the best interests of the community, his untimely passing away from all 
earthly environment left a vacancy that it will be difficult indeed to ade- 
quatelv fill. 

The birth of George Blanchet occurred in St. Pierre, Province of Que- 
bec, January 6, 1849, the son of Norbert and Margaret (Blais) Blanchet. 
His ancestors came from St. Amiens, France, and were the first Blanchets 
to arrive and settle in Canada. Mr. Blanchet came to Manchester, New 
Hampshire, fifty years before his death, in 1866, and during his first years 
in the city attached himself to the firm of Stark & Piper, who were at that 
time well known photographers. Later he left this position to begin his 
career in mercantile life as a clerk for Holton & Sprague, and remained with 
that concern for twelve years, in which length of time he acquired valuable 
knowledge of business methods and principles which served him well later 



(Seotge 'Blancfiet H^ 

in life. He resigned from that position when he became the proprietor of 
the Golden Fleece, an establishment of prominence at that time, and for 
fifteen years Mr. Blanchet maintained this store with great success, con- 
ducting' it along the strictest lines of integrity and business honor.^ About 
this time the insurance and real estate field began to look promising, and 
Mr. Blanchet left the dry goods business and entered into this line, soon 
after taking his place in Manchester insurance circles. It was in this busi- 
ness that he attained the full measure of his success, and for nearly a quarter 
of a century he was prominent in the insurance circles of the city, retiring 
from all active business work two years prior to his death. Seven years 
before his retirement, Mr. Blanchet had organized the Prudential Fire Insur- 
ance Company, which is now a most flourishing concern. Throughout all 
the varied responsibilities of life this distinguished gentleman acquitted 
himself with dignity and fidelity, and although his business dealings brought 
him into contact with people from all walks of life, nothing but adherence 
to the strictest principles of honor was ever attributed to him. He was one 
of those men who seemed to delight in laboring energetically, not only to 
win success for himself, but to make his life a continued source of benefit to 
all his fellow-men. Although the influence of Mr. Blanchet upon the com- 
munity, due to the part he played in the business world, was a great one, it 
was not by any means the sum total of that which he exercised, or perhaps 
even the major portion of it. This was rather the result of the character of 
the man, a character which, coupled with a strong personality such as that 
possessed by Mr. Blanchet, could not fail to have its effect upon all those 
with whom he came in contact. His graces of manner and disposition made 
him at once the charming companion and the most faithful friend. 

Besides occupying a prominent place in the business circles of the city 
of Manchester, Mr. Blanchet was also actively identified with the political 
life. He took a keen interest in all things political, and in his political belief 
was a staunch Republican. He was not one of those men who devote all their 
time and attention to their own business enterprises, but was on the con- 
trary exceedingly public spirited, and the community recognizing this 
placed him in responsible places of trust. Mr. Blanchet served as a member 
of the Common Council in 1887 and 1888, and represented Ward Four in the 
State Legislature in 1890 and 1892. He was appointed a member of the 
police commission by Governor Robert P. Bass, and served in that capacity 
for a period of three years. Mr. Blanchet also believed in civic betterment 
and was constantly working in the interests of his adopted city of Man- 
chester, New Hampshire. He was a promoter of the Manchester Board of 
Trade, which was later amalgamated with the Chamber of Commerce, and 
he served at one time as vice-president and as a member of the board of 
directors of that organization. Mr. Blanchet filled all these offices with 
honor, and the account of his life and the various activities in which he was 
engaged tells far more eloquently than any formal praise of the remarkable 
powers possessed by him, especially if it be remembered that his ardent, 
enthusiastic nature would not permit his undertaking anything which he 
was not prepared to do, or any obligation which he did not observe to the 



142 (£)cot0e OSIancljct 

fullest. His labors were great, that is true, but his powers were equal to 
their adequate performance. 

On August I, 1876, George Blanchet was united in marriage with 
Celina Z. Blanchet, a daughter of Michael and Theresa (Denis) Blanchet, 
both of whom were highly esteemed natives of Quebec. The union of Mr. 
and Mrs. Blanchet was blessed with three children, as follows: George A., 
now residing in Arizona; Emile A., of Manchester, New Hampshire, and 
Bertha A., who is teaching in the High School of Manchester. In his home 
and family relations Mr. Blanchet enjoyed the highest happiness, the house- 
hold being rendered by his presence a center of domestic peace and harmony. 
His mind never wearied of devising ways and means of increasing the hap- 
piness and pleasure of others who made up his home, and in those intimate 
delights he himself joined with a gusto and enthusiasm that seemed to be 
infectious. 

Mr. Blanchet was an ardent automobilist and always owned as good 
looking a car as there was to be found in the city. He was affiliated with 
many local clubs, including the Club Jolliet, the Cercle National, St. John 
the Baptist Society, the Canado-American Association, and the Intervale 
Country Club. 

The death of this noble gentleman removed one of the most prominent 
French residents of the State of New Hampshire, a man who had served in 
the Common Council, in the State Legislature, and in the Police Commis- 
sion. He was indeed a man among men, deeply respected and esteemed by 
his business associates for his high sense of honor and sterling character- 
istics. He was a splendid example of an upright, business man of integrity, 
both in private and business life, who by reason of his ability, faithfulness 
and capacity reached the topmost round of the ladder of success. In all 
that he did for himself Mr. Blanchet ever kept the interests of those about 
him in mind, and took no step, however conducive to his own ends, if to his 
candid judgment it appeared harmful to others. He was the possessor of 
those sterling virtues which we all admire and these, coupled with his marked 
personality, made him a very decided force in any community. Energy, 
self-confidence and a strict adherence to the moral law were the traits which 
seemed to lie at the bottom of his character, and to shape and guide its 
entire development. His business success, as must all true success, depended 
upon his character just as much as upon his knowledge, which was a later 
acquirement. George Blanchet has left behind him a priceless heritage, and 
his life was so honorable in its purposes, so far-reaching and beneficent in 
its effects, that it is no wonder that it left its impress upon the city of Man- 
chester, New Hampshire. 



^^^^2^ 




3ames dEttoart iSalcom 

[AMES EDWARD BALCOM'S death, which occurred in the 
city of Nashua, New Hampshire, March 28, 1888, caused 
genuine grief among a vei-y wide circle of friends and busi- 
ness associates, and his passing away from earthly environ- 
ment left many a vacant place in the hearts of those who 
had been so fortunate as to have known him in an intimate 
way. He was one of those men who had contributed greatly 
to the prosperity of Nashua, New Hampshire, and the welfare and happiness 
of his fellow-citizens. He was devoted to the ties of friendship and family, 
regarding them as a sacred obligation, and it was only natural that when 
he was taken away that the city should mourn the loss of a member of one 
of its most representative and prominent families. The name of Balcom 
stood as a synonym for all that was enterprising in business and progressive 
in citizenship, and certainly no history of the city would be complete without 
extended reference to the distinguished gentleman whose name heads this 
memoir. Mr. Balcom was so closely identified with many of the public and 
private enterprises in Nashua that the vacancy left by him was an unusually 
large one, and one which it has been extremely difiicult to adequately fill. 
He stood for cleanness both in business and in politics, and was ever found in 
the van of any movement tending to advance the progress of his native city. 
He justly illustrated in himself the composite character of our American citi- 
zenship, and presented in his temperament and disposition the masterful, 
forceful, intellectual and versatile qualities which are so characteristic of our 
race. His clear and far-seeing brain enabled him to grasp every detail of a 
project, however great its magnitude. Genial and courteous on all occa- 
sions, Mr. Balcom surrounded himself with faithful friends and admirers, 
attracting even those whom he met in a most casual manner, and this is 
always the true test of splendid manhood. 

The birth of James Edward Balcom occurred in Nashua, New Hamp- 
shire, during the year 1826, and he came from old New Hampshire stock, 
being the son of Cortez and Phoebe (Temple) Balcom. The Balcom family 
is one of the oldest and best known of the many fine old families in Nashua, 
and James Edward Balcom was an excellent example and m.ember of one 
of these families. 

Mr. Balcom received his education in the public schools of his native 
city of Nashua, and early in life followed several callings before he settled 
down to be one of Nashua's substantial business men. His education was 
not completed, as he was eager to enter business circles and to make a name 
for himself in the world. He gained an introduction into the business world 
in the meat business, in which he was engaged for many years, and then 
later became interested in the ice business, being admitted into partnership 
with Joel C. Annis. This establishment was run on the best of business 



144 31anie0 CDtoatD TBalcom 

lines, and was conducted with a high degree of success. Afterward Mr. 
Balcom became the founder of the James Balcom & Son Ice Company, 
which is to-day the leading concern in its line in the city of Nashua. His 
son, George E. Balcom, was taken into the business, and since the death of 
Mr. Balcom this son has been at the head of the large business which was 
founded and so well established by James Edward Balcom. With his great 
mental equipment to strengthen and make effective his natural business 
ability, it was only a natural outcome that Mr. Balcom won success. He 
was a most ambitious and energetic man, and was also engaged in other 
callings and in many enterprises. 

It should be recorded that Mr. Balcom was not one of those successful 
business men who devote their entire time and attention to the business 
enterprises in which they are interested, for on the contrary he was 
extremely devoted to the interests of the city of Nashua, New Hampshire, 
for the promotion of which he gave unstintedly of his time and influence. 
His public spirit was most notable and no pains or effort were too great for 
him to take in the interests of the community or the welfare of those about 
him. Mr. Balcom set a splendid example of fidelity to civic and religious 
duties, which is of lasting benefit to his native city. Such indeed was the life 
of this noble gentleman to the very end, so that the community in general 
owed him a great debt for the assistance he had given in its development 
and advancement. 

Mr. Balcom always took an active interest in municipal affairs, and had 
served his ward as alderman in 1875. He also represented it in the General 
Court, in 1878, and again in 1879, where he was known as a hard and con- 
scientious worker for the interests of Nashua and the State. He was made 
street commissioner of Nashua during Mayor William's administration, and 
also held many other important positions of public trust and responsibility, 
both in public and private life. It is well for people to review the career of 
a citizen such as Mr. Balcom, who gave so much of his life to their interests. 
It inspires emulation, gives honor where honor is due. and teaches a lesson 
of patriotism. Whatever duty Mr. Balcom was called upon to perform was 
done zealously and to the entire satisfaction of superior authority. He gave 
to the city and State the very best that was in him, and was a citizen of 
whom his community and the whole Commonwealth could be proud. He 
was a brilliant, whole-hearted, brave and generous man, and his memory will 
be cherished by the very great circle of his fellow-men who were privileged 
to have known him. 

In his political belief, Mr. Balcom was a staunch Republican, and if it 
had not been for the press of business cares he could have held many more 
offices at the hands of his party. Soundly honest, clear in thought, high in 
his ideals of government, he was the possessor of a magnetism that seemed 
to draw all classes and conditions alike toward him. His sympathies were 
so intense and so human, and his mental view of life so broad and generous, 
that all realized that the void his death caused could not be filled. He has 
lived and will continue to live in the memories of those who knew him as 
long as life lasts, not only because he was a man in the best and highest 



3[ame0 dBDtoarD iSalcom 145 

sense of the term, but a lovable and forceful man who drew to him all those 
privileged to call themselves his friends. It is not often that a community 
is blessed with such men as James Edward Balcom, and not often that a 
business enterprise is helped along by the power of so irradiating an exam- 
ple. Mr. Balcom was always a strong force in the direction of a better life, 
a higher plane of citizenship, and a firm believer in the upbuilding of our 
industry. Every endeavor on his part was in the direction of a more sym- 
metrical career, whether in his business relations or in his private life, and 
surely this was the outward expression of a true and noble gentleman. 

On February 4, 1852, James Edward Balcom was united in marriage 
with Sarah Margaret Grimes, a daughter of John Grimes, of Derry, New 
Hampshire. Mr. and Mrs. Balcom were the parents of five children, as fol- 
lows: I. George E., who was united in marriage with Ida J. Morse, and 
their union was blessed with two children: i. Lillian M., who became the 
wife of Howard A. Goodspeed, of Providence, Rhode Island, and the par- 
ents of two children, Alta Joseph Goodspeed and Balcom Goodspeed; 
ii. Everett M. 2. James E., deceased. 3. Charles H., deceased. 4. Samuel 
D., deceased. 5. John C., deceased. Mr. Balcom was devoted to his family 
and spent as much time as was possible in their society, continually devising 
means for their pleasure and happiness. 

At the time of his death, Mr. Balcom was sixty-two years of age, and 
was considered one of the best known business men in the city of Nashua, 
New Hampshire. His activities were always along those lines which 
resulted in improvement and progress, and his worth in the world was 
widely acknowledged by those among whom his active years were passed. 
As a business man he enjoyed the confidence of the community, and had 
won the respect and esteem of his fellow-men. Mr. Balcom was what is 
sometimes called a "Rough Diamond," for beneath a rather stern exterior 
was a heart as tender as a child's. He was generous in all things, without 
letting his right hand know what his left hand did, a good and obliging 
neighbor, an affectionate husband and father, and in all his dealings with 
his fellow-men was ever honest and of the strictest integrity. Mr. Balcom 
was always to be found in the company of those who sought to promote the 
best ideals in both public and private life, and his talents and time were 
devoted to everv line of work which he undertook. 



Cfjarles B* ifKlagoon 




^HE death of Charles S. Magoon. which occurred at his home 
in Manchester, New Hampshire, February g, 1909, marked 
the closing of a career of a business man who by his great 
force and energy had well exemplified the fact that constant 
labor, when well applied, especially when joined with sterl- 
ing qualities, must inevitably win the deep respect and 
esteem of his fellow-men. His passing away from life's 
fleeting drama removed one who exercised an influence for good upon the 
business interests, developments and improvements of the city which will 
long be remembered. The name of Charles S. Magoon has ever stood as a 
synonym for all that was enterprising in business, and progressive in citi- 
zenship, and no history of the city of Manchester, New Hampshire, would 
be complete without extended reference to him. His clear and far-seeing 
brain enabled him to grasp every detail of a project, however great its mag- 
nitude. Genial ind courteous upon all occasions, Mr. Magoon surrounded 
himself with many faithful friends, whose admiration and affection for him 
were exceeded only by the deep respect and esteem which they held for him. 
The great group of cities that one passes in travelling through the State of 
New Hampshire are certainly a wonderful monument to the enterprise of 
the sturdy New Englander whose efforts have converted what was, his- 
torically speaking, but a few years ago an untracked wilderness, into a com- 
munity where all the activities of civilization are to be found at work in the 
most concentrated form and at the highest level of efficiency. Of these 
cities there is not one that has not its full list of names of men, and practical 
men of affairs, whose efforts for their own success and the betterment of 
their fellow-men have been responsible for the striking results that we now 
view. Manchester, for example, may boast of any number of talented per- 
sons identified with its progress to whom the general gratitude and honor of 
the community is due. Among these men certainly he who deals in real 
estate deserves an unusual amount of well merited praise, for he not only 
has his own interests at stake, but those of the community as well. Of all 
these men no name stands out of recent years more worthy of respect 
because of the sterling morality for which it stands than that of Mr. Magoon, 
in whose death not only Manchester, but the whole of the surrounding 
region, lost a prominent citizen and a conspicuous figure in its daily life. 

Charles S. Magoon was born in Stanstead, Quebec, June 27, 1848, the 
son of Stewart and Caroline Magoon, natives of Quebec. He was an 
unusually alert and industrious boy, and proved himself an apt student in 
the national schools of the country, and at Derby Centre, Vermont, which 
he attended for his education. Upon completing his studies in these institu- 
tions, Mr. Magoon left Quebec, and went to Vermont, first settling at Cov- 
entry, where he taught school. He then went to Troy, and to West Derby, 



Vermont, where he continued to follow this profession, and where he 
became interested in farming. For several years Mr. Magoon was engaged 
in the nursery business, in which he was successful, and the work along this 
line appealed forcibly to him. He became thoroughly acquainted with all 
the details of that endeavor, but decided not to adopt it as his course through 
life. Mr. Magoon then moved to Newport, Vermont, prior to his coming 
to Manchester, New Hampshire, which was fifteen years previous to his 
decease. His pleasing personality, hearty manner, and helpful tendencies, 
easily made a place for him in the business and social world of Manchester, 
and he became known as one of the most enterprising and active real estate 
dealers and auctioneers in the city. It was not long before Mr. Magoon 
identified himself with the best interests of Manchester, and became one of 
the foremost figures in the real estate circles of the city. He was one of 
those forceful personalities whose initiative lead them normally to assume 
and to be accorded the place of leaders among their fellow-men. No man, 
however powerful his personality, can retain his hold of success and influ- 
ence without a foundation of those sterling virtues that are so conspicuous 
in the hardy stock from which Mr. Magoon was sprung. Honesty, perse- 
verance, self-control, must all be present or men will look elsewhere for a 
leader to lead them. But all of these traits of character Mr. Magoon pos- 
sessed in full measure, as well as many other qualities of manner and bear- 
ing which, if not so fundamental, at least contributed potently to the gen- 
eral efifect which his personality produced. Mr. Magoon was exceedinglv 
fond of agriculture, and had often been heard to express the hope that he 
might end his days on a farm which might be to his liking. Some three 
years previous to his death, he purchased the fine residence at the northwest 
corner of Pine and Blodget streets, which had been occupied by the Rev. 
Charles J. Staples and family, and converted it into one of the most modern 
and best equipped houses in the city of Manchester. Since his death, his 
widow has continued to reside there. 

Mr. Magoon was a man of great public spirit, and throughout his life 
took a keen interest in the community of which he was a member. He was 
particularly interested in politics, but never aspired to hold public office, 
owing to a double circumstance. In the first place he was a firm believer in 
the idea that the ofiice should seek the man, and in the second place his busi- 
ness was so pressing that he was obliged to refuse any offers made him by 
his political colleagues, and to resist the importunities of his friends. In his 
political belief, Mr. Magoon was a staunch supporter of the Republican 
party, adhering to the principles and policies of that party all his life. He 
was a man of independent thought and action, however, but was never 
offensive in the expression or carrying out of his beliefs. On February 25, 
1869, Charles S. Magoon was united in marriage with Naomi Boynton, a 
daughter of Richard and Polly (Davis) Boynton, of Derby, Vermont. Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles S. Magoon were the parents of one child, Grace Elva, who 
became the wife of Frank H. Drake, of Manchester, New Hampshire. This 
union was blessed with one child, Miriam Elva Drake, now deceased. The 
domestic life of the Magoons was an ideal one, and Mr. Magoon proved him- 



148 Clbatle$ S, a^agoon 

self to be a devoted husband and a kind father. Mr. Magoon was also sur- 
vived by one brother, Garvin Magoon, of North Straf¥ord, and three sisters, 
namely: Mrs. Wilbur Holbrook, Mrs. Charles Taylor, of Derby Centre, 
Vermont, and Mrs. Charles Wright, of Coventry, Vermont. 

Mr. Magoon's only secret society affiliation was with Memphremagog 
Lodge of Masons, of Newport, Vermont, in which order he possessed many 
sincere and admiring friends. The company of his wife and daughter was 
the society that he enjoyed most, but he was also very fond of the informal 
intercourse with his friends and neighbors, such as is represented by what he 
called "running in of an evening," in short all those spontaneous little asso- 
ciations and amenities of which the best friendship is made up. 

Charles S. Magoon was one of Manchester's substantial, solid, trust- 
worthy business men, who was steadily adding to his good name when he 
passed away. He was a man of marked executive ability, of strong business 
and personal judgment, and because of these things largely he prospered. 
He lived quietly, finding his greatest compensation in life in business and in 
the home. He was ever the soul of honor and integrity, and his word was 
never challenged. He lived without an enemy and left no stain or blot 
upon his life record. 





•V?^Z'^rei'?^ ,^.^^ .,/(^,WJ:/^ ^^^H)y Or/rrn 




3Reb. JFatber M^ttin Henrp €gan 

^HERE is one satisfaction greater than fulfillment, and that is 
forbearance, for forbearance in one thing always means at 
least a partial fulfillment in something greater. This might 
well be the motto of those good men who, with complete 
self-sacrifice, give up the pleasures and objectives of worldly- 
achievements to devote themselves to the good of their 
fellow-men in this and the next world, for if what they put 
aside is great, yet still greater is that which they take up, the task of making 
God's truth prevail upon earth. Of no group of men can this more truth- 
fully be said than of that great army who have devoted their lives to the 
service of the Roman Catholic church, and whose efforts are continually 
directed toward furthering the cause of that great institution in all the 
countries of the world. A representative of the finest type of this priest- 
hood was the late Rev. Father Martin Henry Egan, whose sudden death 
at Keene, New Hampshire, May 7, 1913, deprived that community of one 
of its most zealous citizens, the Catholic church of one of the most promising 
of her priests, and the entire community of a very potent influence for good. 
The church from its very inception has wielded a power superior to that 
of the State, for the reason that the spiritual pervades and moulds, and 
sooner or later dominates the temporal. In the history of our race this 
truth has been repeatedly exemplified, most notably in the lives of some well 
known and well remembered ecclesiastics. That the influence of the church 
has steadily increased during the last century can not be questioned by 
thoughtful and penetrating observers, and while perhaps less obviously and 
institutionally exerted, it is for that very reason more persuasive and power- 
ful. Especially is this the case when the leaders of the church are men of 
broad minds, quick to discern the signs of the times, and men of the type 
so forcibly represented in our own day by Father Egan. That the influence 
of the church is declining is a remark frequently made by those who lack 
the discernment to perceive that while creeds and outward observances are 
undoubtedly losing their hold upon the world-at-large, there is convincing 
evidence that the essentials of religion are daily becoming more deeply 
rooted in the heart of mankind, and it is to such men as the late Rev. Father 
Egan, who devoted their entire lives to this purpose, that our sincerest 
praise should go forth. 

The birth of Rev. Father Martin Henry Egan occurred in Nashua, New 
Hampshire, July 30, i860, so that he was in his fifty-third year when that 
grim messenger "Death" came as a visitor to his home, leaving desolation 
and woe in his departure. Father Egan was the son of Martin and Maria 
(Gorman) Egan, both of whom had been residents of Nashua for many 
years. His education was gained in the schools of his native city of Nashua, 
and later he attended St. Hyacinthe's College, Province of Quebec, being 



I50 Keto. jFat&et Q^am'n l^cntp Cgan 

prepared for the priesthood at Levi University, Quebec, where he took up 
the ecclesiastical course. Father Egan was ordained to the priesthood in 
Manchester, New Hampshire, January 24, 1886, by the late Bishop Bradley. 
His first appointment as a curate was at St. Anne's Church, in Manchester, 
where he remained for six months. Then he went to Concord, New Hamp- 
shire, where he became assistant to the late Father Barry, remaining for a 
year and a half. Father Egan was then appointed pastor of the church at 
Penacook, remaining there for five years. From Penacook he was trans- 
ferred to Lebanon, where he had charge of a sixty-mile series of missions, 
including the towns of Hanover, Enfield, Canaan, Grafton, Danbury, 
Andover, Bristol and adjacent territory. He became one of the most pop- 
ular among the younger priests, and he held a high place in the affection 
of both the older and younger ones. Father Egan went from Lebanon to 
St. Bernard's Church as pastor, April 24, 1907, after fourteen years of 
service in Lebanon. He at once gained the love and respect of those of 
his church, and all others in the city as well. Father Egan's work for the 
church, all of which was with ardent enthusiasm, was successful in every 
way In the six years that he had been pastor of the Catholic church in 
Keene. New Hampshire, he had made hosts of friends both in and out of his 
denomination by his cheerful, yet reserved mannerisms. He was highly 
respected by his people, by the many priests who knew him, and by his 
superiors in the church. His kindliness and generosity made him a popular 
figure with all who were so privileged as to know him. 

When word of Father Egan's serious illness reached the Rt. Rev. 
George A. Guertin, Bishop of Manchester, New Hampshire, he started at 
once for Keene, New Hampshire, by automobile, for there was an unsual 
bond between the head of the church in that diocese and the loyal priest. 
When Father Egan was in Lebanon, Father Guertin, then a young priest, 
was his curate. 

Father Egan celebrated the silver anniversary of his ordination in 
Keene, New Hampshire, January 24, 191 1, just two years before his death. 
There was a large attendance of priests from all over the diocese, and the 
jubilee sermon was preached by Bishop Guertin. At the jubilee entertain- 
ment a purse of several hundred dollars, contributed by the members of 
Father Egan's parish, was presented to the faithful priest. He was also 
the recipient of many silver testimonials from priests and laymen through- 
out the State of New Hampshire. 

Father Egan is survived by four sisters, two of whom had made their 
home in Keene, New Hampshire, with him, namely: Maria and Jennie 
Egan, the other two being Mrs. Michael Connor, of Nashua, and Mrs. 
Patrick Delaney. 

Patrick Delaney passed away from earthly view, August 15, 1916, at 
his home in Nashua, New Hampshire. He was one of that city's most 
widely known and respected citizens, having resided there for nearly fifty 
years, and during the greater part of that time Mr. Delaney was a valued 
employee of the Nashua Iron and Foundry Company. He was a member of 
Division i, Ancient Order of Hibernians, of Nashua, and at the time of his 



HetJ. jFatijet Q^attin ^enrp Cgan 151 

death was considered one of the oldest members of that order. Mr. Delaney 
also belonged to Court Nashua, Foresters of America. 

On September i6, 1874, Patrick Delaney was united in marriage with 
Katherine E. Egan, a daughter of Martin and Maria (Gorman) Egan, of 
Nashua, New Hampshire, and a sister of the Rev. Father Martin Henry 
Egan, in whose memory we are writing. Mr. and Mrs. Delaney were the 
parents of three children, as follows: Edward J. Delaney, M. D., of Concord, 
New Hampshire, Martin H. and Emma F. Delaney. The home life of Mr. 
Delaney was an exceptionally happy one, and he proved himself to be a 
devoted husband and a kind father. 

There is always something tragic about an untimely death, and this 
feeling is accentuated by the possession of unusually brilliant talents and 
abilities on the part of those who die. A tribute to the sentiment in which 
he was held by the community which witnessed the major part of his efforts 
was the funeral which was accorded to Father Egan. The solemn High 
Mass was celebrated in St. Bernard's Church, Keene, New Hampshire, by 
Rev. Thomas E. Reilly, of Dover, assisted by the following: Deacon, Rev. 
A. J- Timon, of Franklin; Sub-Deacon, Rev. P. S. Cahill, of Hinsdale; 
Preacher, Rev. T. W. Coakley, of Walpole, New Hampshire; Master of 
Ceremonies, Rev. Thomas M. O'Leary, of Manchester, Chancellor, and the 
Rt. Rev. George A. Guertin, Bishop of Manchester. It was one of the 
largest and most imposing funerals ever held in the town, and the church 
was filled to the doors. There was also a large number of people from out- 
of-town as well as a large delegation of clergymen from various parts of the 
diocese who wished to pay a last tribute to a brother and a sincere friend. 
The interment was at Nashua, New Hampshire. 

Death is sad in any case, but doubly so when such a useful character as 
Father Egan has been taken away, for there are too few such men to spare 
any. His life was one from which those young men who are preparing 
themselves to become priests can derive many valuable lessons, and was one 
of usefulness to the town of Keene, New Hampshire, to his fellow-men and 
to his Maker. 



JFrancts ^. Buffp 




F ONE attempted to enumerate the men of talent and capabil- 
ity of the Irish race, who have appeared even in a small 
portion of the community, he would be confronted by such a 
list as would discourage the most enterprising. The city 
of Keene, New Hampshire, for instance, can show amongst 
its citizens so large a proportion of those who owe their 
origin to the "Emerald Isle" as to excite wonder and admi- 
ration. A splendid example of these men was Francis P. Dufify, whose 
death, which occurred at his home in Keene, New Hampshire, January 17, 
1900, was a loss to the business world in that region and to the community 
in general. All felt that death had removed a man of fine and natural 
endowments, and the feelings with which his passing away was regarded 
were of the most spontaneous and sincere kind. Mr. Dufify was well known 
for his high integrity and the absolutely upright life which he led. The suc- 
cess of Mr. Dufify in his chosen business was due to the possession by him 
of a combination of virtues and talents greatly in demand in this world. To 
a remarkable courageous spirit, that kept him cheerful and determined in 
the face of all obstacles, he added a practical grasp of afifairs. Both of these 
qualities, it is hardly necessary to point out, are most valuable ones in the 
business world. In all the relations of life, in all his associations with his 
fellow-men, these same qualities stood out in a marked manner, gaining 
for him the admiration and affection of all who came in contact with him, 
even in the most casual way. 

The birth of Francis P. Dufify occurred on January 30, 1830, in Bally- 
farnon, County Roscommon, Ireland. Coming to this country in January, 
1850, Mr. Dufify was virtually a stranger, and spent some time seeking 
employment. He was engaged in a number of positions until he learned the 
currier's trade in Winchester, New Hampshire, with L. H. Alexander, and 
followed this line until the outbreak of the Civil War. When President Lin- 
coln called for volunteers, Mr. Duffy's patriotism was aroused, and he 
offered his services, enlisting with the First New York Volunteers. He 
was with Sherman in the famous "march to the sea." At the close of the 
war, Mr. Duffy resumed his trade, working in nearly all the large tanneries 
of the New England States. Being a man of great enterprise, Mr. Duffy's 
effort was to engage in business on his own account, and this he finally suc- 
ceeded in doing through the practice of close attention to his work. In 
1879 he left the tannery owned by John Symonds, and became actively 
engaged in business in Keene until about one year before his sudden death, 
when his health began to fail. 

Mr. Duffy's success was largely due to the close and careful attendance 
to all the details of his business enterprise, never leaving important matters 
to the judgment of any one else, but overseeing all himself. He was 



JTtancis! j^, Duffp 153 

extremely industrious and a hard worker, and when not attending to his 
business affairs he was always to be found by his own fireside at home, pre- 
ferring the comforts and intimate intercourse of his immediate family and 
household to any other form of social life and pleasure. Mr. Duffy's quali- 
fications for success in his chosen calling were many and great, and included 
abilities both natural and acquired. It was said of him that he was a man of 
great independence of character, a strong personality, and an undaunted 
courage. 

Mr. Duffy was essentially a self-made man. He had little opportunity 
for acquiring an education in his younger days, and even into late manhood 
he took advantage of every opportunity to study, with the result that he was 
an especially well read man. He had a strong desire in his youth to attend 
college and regretted greatly the circumstances which rendered it impossi- 
ble. He was not, however, of the temperament which allows obstacles to 
discourage him, and while he could not take a formal course of studies in 
any advanced institution, he continued all through his life an independent 
scholar, so that there were but few men better informed upon general topics 
or more widely cultivated than he. Mr. Duffy acquired a taste for history 
and was a lover of fine editions of historical works. He gave all of his child- 
ren the best educational facilities, as he keenly felt the handicap of his early 
efforts to educate himself. 

It was not alone in his effect upon business that Mr. Duffy's influence 
was felt in the community. Of broad sympathies and a very human outlook 
upon life, it was impossible that a personality of his strong character should 
not exercise a potent effect upon affairs in general. In his religious belief, 
Mr. Duffy was a devout Catholic, and an earnest and effective advocate for 
the principles and tenets of his faith. He did much to support the work of 
the church in Keene, and was unstinted in his financial support of the faith 
he professed and lived up to. To those who knew Mr. Duffy best and were 
intimately associated with him in business and social life, his chief quality 
appeared as a benevolent heart which never displayed itself in ostentatious 
forms, but in generous effusion through channels calculated to produce the 
greatest good. He was a man of the most kindly nature, always considerate 
of all men, while his sympathies were quick and his affection strong and 
enduring. Politically, Mr. Duffy was a staunch Democrat, and a great 
influence in the politics of his party, but he always refrained from holding 
any public ofiice. He rather avoided than sought any office for himself, 
resisting the representations of his friends who held that he would make an 
excellent candidate for political office in view of his great personal popular- 
ity. But although he would not accept ofiice, Mr. Duffy gave freely of both 
his time and means in support of the campaigns waged by his party in the 
city and State. 

In 1857, seven years after his arrival in the United States, Francis P. 
Duffy was united in marriage with Mary A. Kelly, a daughter of Thomas 
and Bridget Kelly, of Winchester, New Hampshire. This union was 
blessed with sixteen children, as follows: i. Thomas Emmet, deceased. 
2. Elizabeth Sarah, deceased. 3. Mary Elizabeth Jane, who became the 



154 Jftancis p. Duffp 

wife of John Austin, deceased, of Worcester, Massachusetts; they were the 
parents of one child, Mary Ellen Austin. 4. Anna B., deceased; became the 
wife of Dennis Kearney, of Keene, New Hampshire, and they were the 
parents of one child, Catherine Mary Kearney. 5. Francis Joseph, deceased. 
6. John Martin, was united in marriage with Harriett Elizabeth Zimm.er- 
man, of Keene, New Hampshire; three children were the result of this 
marriage, namely, John F., Mary Joan and Harriett Elizabeth. 7. Margaret 
Agnes. 8. James Bernard, D. D. S. ; Dr. Duffy is a prominent dentist in 
Keene, New Hampshire; he graduated from the Boston Dental College in 
1897; upon receiving his degree as Doctor of Dental Surgery, he returned 
to his home town, where he has since practiced with exceptional success 
and popularity; Dr. Duffy is a member of the New Hampshire State Dental 
Society, and is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks ; 
he is also a past district deputy of the Knights of Columbus; he was united 
in marriage with Cornelia F. Gore, deceased, of Keene, New Hampshire, 
who bore him one child, Frances Gore Duffy. 9. Edward L.. died June 19, 
1917; he was united in marriage with Maud Young, of Bellows Falls, Ver- 
mont. TO. Ellen Frances. 11. Catherine, deceased. 12. Rose Madeline. 
13. Rev. Father Dominic Stephen Duffy, who is rector of St. Peter's Parish, 
North Walpole, New Hampshire. 14. Patrick, deceased. 15. Joseph, 
deceased. 16. Winifred, deceased. 

Mr. Duffy was a man in whose heart there existed the spirit of kindness 
and charity, and all who knew him were his friends. As a neighbor he was 
ever ready to accommodate and to contribute in any way to make the 
neighborhood pleasanter and happier. His death, at the age of seventy 
years, has created a void that will be difficult to fill, and as the years roll 
by he will be more greatly missed, for then his true character will be more 
properly estimated. Mr. Duffy also distinguished himself during the Civil 
War. with the result that his war record was a highly honorable one. 

The funeral services of Mr. Duffy were held at the Roman Catholic 
church in Keene, New Hampshire. The funeral was an extremely large 
and impressive one, it being found impossible almost to accommodate all 
who were present. All the available carriages and sleighs obtainable in 
the city were in use. The special mass was conducted by Father Ryan, 
celebrant, the Rev. Father O'Neil, deacon, the Rev. Father Dunn, formerly 
assistant pastor in Keene, was sub-deacon, and Edward Hayes, master of 
ceremonies. Mr. Duffy will be held in the memory of the community-at- 
large as one who was interested in its welfare, and as one whose upright 
course secured for him the respect and esteem of his fellow-men. 




C})arles Stearns JFaulfener 

'HE title of an "upright man" is one of the most honorable 
that can be borne by any business man. It is a distinction 
won in a warfare and against temptations that exist in the 
business world. Not many come through a protracted 
course unscathed and untainted, and it is an occasion for 
congratulation that the City of Keene, New Hampshire, 
shows a long list of successful business men who have hon- 
ored their occupations by pure lives and honest trading. The name of 
Charles Stearns Faulkner is one that was well-known in the business annals 
of that State, and it is written prominently among the best and most success- 
ful men of his day. Always cool and prudent in his methods, and prompt 
to the moment in all his engagements, he held a verbal promise as an abso- 
lute obligation, even in trifling matters. The death of Charles Stearns 
Faulkner, which occurred at his home in Keene, New Hampshire, July 28, 
iSjq. was mourned and deeply regretted by all classes of the community, 
for he was one of those masterful kind of men who always forge ahead, and 
in doing so win the affection and admiration of their fellow-men in the 
various walks of life. The loss of such a man is to be lamented, and his 
memory highly-cherished, while his career, like that of many a son of New 
England, should teach a lesson to the coming generations, that success in 
life may be assured as the fruit of industrious habits, thoroughness of work, 
and the strictest integrity. The memorials which such men as Mr. Faulkner 
leave behind them should be preserved and recorded in volumes such as 
this, for his life story will prove to be an inspiration to many a youth 
struggling to make a name for himself in the business world. 

The birth of Charles Stearns Faulkner occurred in Keene, New Hamp- 
shire. August 17, 1819, which made his age at the time of his death sixty 
years. He was descended from an old and distinguished family. His father, 
Francis Faulkner, who was the son of Francis, a clothier, at Watertown and 
Billerica, Massachusetts, was born in 1788, at Watertown, Massachusetts. 
The great-grandfather of Charles Stearns Faulkner was Major Francis 
Faulkner, who, with the Middlesex Regiment of Militia at Lexington and 
Concord, April 19, 1775, harassed the British on their retreat. He was a 
lieutenant-colonel at the battle of White Plains in 1776, and also at the 
surrender of Burgoyne in 1777, and conducted the prisoners to Cambridge, 
Massachusetts. Colonel Faulkner was a courageous officer, an able legis- 
lator, and an exemplary Christian gentleman. It was he who built the mills 
which for a century and a half have been known as the Faulkner Mills. At 
first they were only a saw and grist mill, later a fulling mill. The old Faulk- 
ner house is thus described by a writer in the "Middlesex County History:" 
"No tongue and no record fix the original date of this ancient landmark. 
It is safe to call it two hundred years old, some parts of it at least. It was a 



156 Cl)acle$ ^teatn0 jFauIknet 

block house, and in the early Colonial times it was a garrison-house, where 
the settlers in the neighborhood would gather in the night for protection 
against the assaults of the Indians." 

Edmund Faulkner was the immigrant ancestor of this illustrious family, 
and was born in England about the year of 1625. He was the ninth settler 
in order of their coming to Andover, Massachusetts, and was licensed in 
1648 as the first inn-keeper in that town. He was one of the ten freeholders 
who organized the Andover Church, in 1645, ^"^^ was one of the few men 
honored with the designation "Mr." in the records. Since 1735 the Faulk- 
ners have been millers, clothiers, and manufacturers of note, at Acton, 
Massachusetts, and in every case, at Acton, Billerica, Massachusetts, and 
Keene, New Hampshire, the Faulkner descendants have been owners of, or 
possessed large interests in the mills of their ancestors. As the father of 
Charles Stearns Faulkner was so closely identified with the beginning of 
the manufacture of woolen goods in Keene, New Hampshire, it is well to 
dwell briefly upon the career of this strong, business personality. Young 
Francis Faulkner learned the clothier's trade at his grandfather's mills in 
Acton, Massachusetts, and moved to Keene at the age of twenty-one years. 
He worked in the clothier's mills on the Ashuelot river, and in 181 5, in 
partnership with Josiah Colony, he formed the firm of Faulkner & Colony, 
purchased from John Maguire all the mills and water privileges on the 
Ashuelot river in Keene, with the exception of those owned by Azel Wilder, 
and began that very successful business which their descendants still con- 
tinue on greatly extended lines. Mr. Faulkner, Sr., was essentially a man 
of business, with clear perceptions and sound principles, and never sought 
political honors nor ofiice. He passed away at the age of fifty-four years, 
in 1842. He was united in marriage with Eliza Stearns, of Lancaster, 
Massachusetts, and they were the parents of six children, namely: Charles 
Stearns, of further mention; Elizabeth Jones, Francis Augustus, William 
Frederick, and two who died in infancy. 

Charles Stearns Faulkner, the oldest son of Francis and Eliza (Stearns) 
Faulkner, like his brother, the Hon. Francis Augustus Faulkner, who died 
May 22, 1879, was for years prominent in public affairs, and distinguished 
for keen business qualities, enterprise and public-spirit. His education was 
acquired in the public schools of his native town of Keene, New Hampshire. 
Upon the death of his father, when he was only twenty-three years of age, 
Mr. Faulkner upheld the family name in the firm, and accumulated a large 
property. He became senior partner in the firm of Faulkner & Colony, 
woolen manufacturers, and considered one of the oldest firms in the "Gran- 
ite State." Mr. Faulkner's integrity and honor were never impeached, and 
this fact, combined with his genial manner, his courtesy and consideration 
of all men, and a certain intrinsic manliness, which showed in every action 
and word, made him an extremely popular figure, and won for him a great 
host of friends, whose devotion he returned in kind. Mr. Faulkner had 
always taken a deep interest in political affairs, both local and national, and 
in his political belief was affiliated with the Republican party. He was 
chosen a delegate to the National Republican Convention that nominated 



Cbarles Stearns jFauIknet 157 

General Ulysses S. Grant for President of the United States. He was twice 
elected representative to the Legislature, in which capacity he displayed 
many qualities which fitted him for his position. 

On February 24, 1852, Charles Stearns Faulkner was united in mar- 
riage with Sallie Eliza Fames, of Bath, New Hampshire, and their union 
was blessed with eight children, as follows: Charles Edmund, died June 
20, 1861 ; Frederick Augustus, who was united in marriage with Emma 
Manning, of Keene, New Hampshire, and they are the parents of two 
children, Richard and Julia Faulkner; Jane Hutchins, who passed away 
August 22, 1858; Herbert Kimball, John Charles, William Edward, Mary 
Johnson, who resides in Keene, New Hampshire, at No. 70 West street; 
Robert Fames. The home ties were considered and held as sacred by Mr. 
Faulkner, and the closeness and strength of the ties that bound the family 
together, and the charm of the home life of the Faulkner family, were 
revealed in many ways. It was not only in this relation of life that Mr. 
Faulkner proved his great worth in the world, but in most every relation of 
life, and surely the record of his life story might well be held up as an 
example to the ambitious who wish to achieve success in a strictly honest 
way. 

Mr. Faulkner was a kind-hearted, genial gentleman, ever ready to 
assist in every good work, and liberal and generous toward the poor and 
needy. The life of Mr. Faulkner was a successful one, not alone from a 
financial point of view but, public-spirited and charitably inclined, he aided 
many over the hard places with encouraging words and substantial help. 
He never lost sight of his goal, and never forgot nor neglected the require- 
ments of the present. He was one of the best-known and wealthiest men in 
Keene, New Hampshire, and was widely and favorably known throughout 
the State. Nothing more truthful can be said of him than that he was one 
of those men of whom any community might justly feel proud, and whose 
memory it should deeply cherish. 





^HERE is something intrinsically admirable in the profession 
of medicine that illumines by reflected light all those who 
practice it. Something that is concerned with the prime 
object, the alleviation of human suffering, something about 
the self-sacrifice that it must necessarily involve that makes 
us regard, and rightly so, all those who choose to follow its 
difiicult way and devote themselves to its great aims, with 
a certain amount of respect and reverence. It is true that to-day there has 
been a certain lowering, on the average, of the standards and traditions of 
the profession, and that there are many within its ranks at the present time 
who have proposed to themselves selfish or unworthy objects instead of 
those identified with the profession itself, whose eyes ai'e centered on the 
rewards rather than the services, yet there are others also who have pre- 
served the purest and best ideals of the calling and whose self-sacrifice is 
as disinterested as that of any who have preceded them. To such men we 
turn to seek the hope of the great profession in the future, to the men who, 
forgetful of personal considerations, lose themselves either in the interest 
of the great questions with which they have concerned themselves or in the 
jov of rendering deep service to their fellow-men. A man of this type was 
Doctor Thomas Wheat, of Manchester, New Hampshire, whose work in 
that cit)^ in the interests of its health did the public an invaluable service. 
The life of Dr. Wheat, which terminated at his home in Manchester, New 
Hampshire, March 25, 1895, exemplified in the highest degree the sterling 
virtues which it is necessary to possess in order to fully live up to the demand 
of this great profession, and so highly were these virtues regarded by the 
community in which he dwelt and practiced, that his death was felt by all 
his fellow-townsmen as the loss of something like a personal friend. Dr. 
Wheat was a courteous, kindly man, a well-beloved and honored physician, 
a devoted and loving husband and father, and a citizen of high repute and 
worth. In him were happily blended the characteristics of a strong man, 
decision, toleration, firmness, and with all he was approachable, compan- 
ionable and lovable. He has gone to his reward, but his splendid spirit and 
influence remain, and always will remain as long as life lasts. 

Dr. Thomas Wheat was born in Candia, New Hampshire, January 22, 
1821, the son of Dr. Nathaniel and Sally (Fitts) Wheat. Dr. Nathaniel 
Wheat was born in Canaan, New Hampshire, November 12, 1783. He 
studied with Dr. Jacob B. Moore, of Andover, Massachusetts, and located 
in Candia, New Hampshire, in 1809. In 1819 he was united in marriage with 
Sally Fitts, a daughter of Moses Fitts. This union was blessed with three 
children: Thomas Wheat, in whose memory we are writing, and two who 
died in infancy. After a very successful practice of about twenty years in 
Candia, Dr. Nathaniel Wheat removed to Concord, in 1834. In 1838 he 




%, ///,.„/ 



C&oma0 M3l)eat, ^. D. 159 

returned to Candia, and the following year he removed to Manchester, New 
Hampshire, where he practiced medicine more than twelve years. He passed 
away January 15, 185 1. He was a very ingenious mechanic, as well as a 
skillful physician. In 1822 he made a pipe organ of moderate size, which 
was later set up in Master Moses Fitts' hall, and was often played upon by 
the builder and others. He was the first physician in Manchester to apply 
electricity in the treatment of nervous diseases, and was the first to own 
an electric machine. He was at one time the president of the New Hamp- 
shire State Musical Society. The first great temperance movement which 
was the means of making Candia one of the most temperate towns in the 
State owed much to his untiring efforts. 

Dr. Thomas Wheat studied with his father, who at that time kept a 
drug store on Elm street, where the Z. F. Campbell drug store is now 
located. Later he attended the Jefferson Medical School in Philadelphia, a 
well-known institution, from which he graduated in 1847. Soon after, he 
returned to Manchester, New Hampshire, where he began the practice of 
medicine. Dr. Wheat had an ofiice in the Dunlap block for many years, and 
remained in continual practice until the time of his death, at the age of 
seventy-four years. The success of Dr. Wheat in his chosen profession was 
due to the possession by him of a combination of virtues and talents greatly 
in demand in this world. At the basis of his character were the fundamental 
virtues of sincerity and courage, a sincerity which rendered him incapable 
of taking advantage of another, and a courage that kept him cheerful and 
determined in the face of all obstacles. Both these qualities, it is hardly 
necessary to point out, are most valuable in the profession of medicine and, 
indeed, Dr. Wheat's work as a physician amply showed this happy union 
of qualities. In all the relations of his life, in all his associations with his 
fellow-men, these same qualities stood cut in a marked manner and gained 
for him the admiration and aflfection of all who came in contact with him. 
Dr. Wheat was one of Manchester's oldest and best-known physicians, 
having been in practice there for nearly half a century. He became one of 
the most prominent figures in the community, and exercised there, from first 
to last, a potent influence for good. His practice was large and brought him 
into intimate personal relations with a very great number of his fellow-men, 
and everywhere he went he seemed to bring with him good cheer and hope- 
ful optimism. Dr. Wheat's grandfather was a Baptist minister, and was an 
officer in the War of the Revolution, serving with General George Washing- 
ton at Valley Forge. 

On July 3, 1865, Dr. Thomas Wheat was united in marriage with Irene 
Augusta Hunt, a daughter of J. T. P. and Irene (Drew) Hunt, both of 
whom were highly-respected natives of New Hampshire. J. T. P. Hunt 
was born in Gilmanton Iron Works, and his wife in Alton. Mr. Hunt for- 
merly lived in Lowell, Massachusetts, then located in Manchester, New 
Hampshire, in 1837. He was a contractor and built many of the large mills 
in Manchester. His death occurred February 23, 1865. Dr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Wheat became the parents of one child, Dr. Arthur Fitts Wheat, 



i6o CI)omag mbt^u ^* ^* 

who was born in Manchester, New Hampshire, Aug-ust 8, 1871. He 
attended the schools of Manchester for his education, and graduated from 
Harvard Medical College. After his graduation he entered his father's 
office in Manchester, where he has since continued to practice. Recently he 
offered his services to his countr)^ by enlisting in the Medical Reserve Corps 
of the United States Army, with the rank of captain. On July 19, 1913, he 
was united in marriage with Rachel Flint, a daughter of Joseph Almy and 
Frances (Home) Flint. They are the parents of one child, Arthur, who was 
born August 5, 1915. Since the death of her husband. Mrs. Wheat has con- 
tinued to reside in the Wheat homestead on Elm street, in Manchester. 
Another of Dr. Wheat's strongest instincts was the domestic one, and it 
was in the familiar intercourse of his home that he really found the greatest 
delight and comfort. Dr. Wheat was a member of the New Hampshire 
Medical Society, and an attendant of the Franklin Street Church, in Man- 
chester. He combined in himself to a rare degree the culture and skill of a 
physician with the unselfishness and devotion of a warm personal friend. 
He died the death of the righteous, and left behind him a large circle of 
sorrowing patients and friends. 

It is unnecessary to say that as a physician Dr. Wheat was held in the 
highest estimation by his fellow-citizens, and the record of his daily life was 
filled with evidences of this fact. In all professions, but more especially the 
medical, there are exalted heights to which genius itself dares scarcely soar, 
and which can only be gained after long years of patient, arduous and unre- 
mitting toil, and unfaltering courage. To this proud eminence we may 
safely state that Dr. Thomas Wheat rose. He devoted his life to his profes- 
sion and was deservedlv crowned with its choicest rewards. 





3|on. JTreeman aiei^anlier Huss^ep 

'EW citizens have lived in our midst who have left a brighter 
record for every trait of character that constitutes true 
g-reatness than the late Freeman Alexander Hussey, of 
Somersworth, Nev^r Hampshire. Certainly none whose 
memory shall float down the stream of time will be more 
honored and revered. It is utterly impossible to estimate 
the true value to a town of such men. The influence which 
they exert branches out through all the commercial, financial and industrial 
life, extending itself to the whole social economy. Every man from the 
toiling laborer to the merchant prince receives benefit from them. Aggres- 
sive, cool, prudent, far-seeing but exact, prompt to the moment in all his 
engagements, holding his verbal promise as an absolute obligation even in 
trifles, Mr. Hussey belonged to that class of distinctively American busi- 
ness men who promote public progress in advancing individual prosperity, 
and whose private interests never preclude active participation in move- 
ments and measures which concern the general good. A large amount of 
his time was devoted to the performance of public duties, and he justly ranked 
among the most useful and public-spirited citizens of the State of New 
Hampshire. He exemplified the sturdy virtues of the old stock from which 
he was descended and which were transplanted to the genial and friendly soil 
of the Granite State. He exercised an influence for good on the commercial 
interests, developments and improvements of both the place of his business 
and of his home, which will long be remembered. 

Freeman Alexander Hussey was born in Somersworth, New Hamp- 
shire, January 23, 1852, and died in the town of his birth, February 9, 1918. 
He was a son of John and Mary (Locke) Hussey, his father being a native 
of Acton, Maine, and his mother a native of Barrington, New Hampshire. 
John Hussey was a carpenter and contractor of Somersworth, New Hamp- 
shire, and he built many of the buildings in that town, among them the high 
school and some of the fine old residences of the place. 

Freeman Alexander Hussey attended the grammar schools of Somers- 
worth, New Hampshire, and Acton, Maine, and as a boy he entered the 
High street bakery and learned the baker's trade with James A. Locke, and 
remained in the employ of Mr. Locke as a journeyman baker for several 
years, at which time he purchased the business from Mr. Locke, and 
remained an occupant of the one building, first as an employee of Mr. Locke, 
and then as proprietor of the baking business, for a period of thirty-seven 
years, at the end of which time he sold out and retired from active business, 
but continued as a very busy man, settling estates, mostly for his own family. 
Mr. Hussey was very prominent in other lines of endeavor, although the 
baking business occupied most of his time and attention. He was vice- 
president of the Somersworth National Bank, and was also one of the 



i62 ^on. jFreeman aiexanDet Ipusstp 

directors of the Somersworth Savings Bank, and at the time of the remodel- 
ing and the making of extensive repairs on the Somersworth Savings Bank's 
building, Mr. Hussey was selected as the man under whose direction these 
repairs could be the most satisfactorially made, and he gave much time and 
attention to this work at the time. He was a Republican and took much 
active interest in the welfare of his party in Somersworth, and served one 
term as mayor of that town. He always took an active part in all matters 
pertaining to the betterment of the civic affairs of his native town, and 
served as selectman and in various other offices, and also served his town as 
representative in the State Legislature for several terms. He was prom- 
inent in fraternal circles, being a member of the Masons and of the Odd 
Fellows, and was a member of the Baptist church for forty years, serving 
as treasurer of the Sunday school for more than forty years, and was also 
chief warden of this church for several years. 

Mr. Hussey married, October 23, 1878, Celia A. E. Fall, who was also 
born in Somersworth, New Hampshire, a daughter of Noah L. and Amanda 
(James) Fall, formerly of Lebanon, Maine. Mr. Fall, in early life, learned 
the trade of bobbin-maker, which he followed for several years, but later 
entered the grocery business. The latter part of his life he lived retired. 
Mrs. Hussey was their only child. Mr. and Mrs. Freeman Alexander Hus- 
sey were the parents of two daughters : i. Leona Etta, who became the wife 
of Jordan Savithes, of Detroit, Michigan, and they are the parents of one 
daughter, Edith Dorothea. 2. Edith Amanda, who became the wife of 
Chester R. Adams, of Attleboro, where he is employed as a telephone 
inspector. Mr. and Mrs. Hussey were also the parents of one son, Kirk 
Herbert, who died as a child. Mrs. Hussey still retains her membership in 
the Baptist church. 

Brief mention has already been made of Mr. Hussey's activities in the 
political and fraternal life of the community. He was a member of the Board 
of Selectmen in 1887-1888, and after the incorporation of the city he was 
elected alderman and served three terms from Ward Three. In 1900 he 
was elected representative to the General Court and served at the following 
session. He was a member of Libanus Lodge, No. 49, Free and Accepted 
Masons, Edwards Chapter, No. 21, Royal Arch Masons, and St. Paul's 
Commandery, Knights Templar; also a member of Washington Lodge, No. 
4, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and served in the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows as past grand. He was also a member of Great Falls 
Encampment, No. 15. 

The success which Mr. Hussey achieved both as a business man and 
public official was not the result of ability alone, although his talents were 
unusual, but it was also the triumph of character. Perhaps the richest and 
most beautiful traits of his character were his strong domestic sentiments 
and habits, which impelled him to seek his highest happiness in the home. 
His success was the merited reward of industry, ability and honesty. In 
all his words and deeds he was faithful to every public and personal obliga- 
tion, and in return the people of Somersworth bestowed repeated honors 
upon him. His commanding influence in public affairs and among his 



^on. JFreeman aieiattDet ^U0scp 



163 



friends was the natural product of superior and mental and moral qualities. 
Energetic, ambitious and zealous, his loyalty to American ideals knew no 
bounds, and the memory of his life will remain as an inspiration and bene- 
diction to the growing youth to maintain a constant devotion to our beloved 
country. Clear in thought, high in his ideals of government, he possessed 
a magnetism that drew to him all classes and conditions alike. To all who 
knew him, and therefore loved him, his memory must recall the noblest and 
gentlest personality, all that constitutes the most essential worth, the purest 
charm of character, and the highest Christian manhood. 





3o!)n Wlmsloto Kihbim 

|NE of the most conspicuous figures in the life of Rochester, 
New Hampshire, during the past generation, was John 
Winslow Tibbitts, whose death, at East Rochester, New 
Hampshire, on October 28, 191 5, was felt as a real loss by 
a very large circle of friends and acquaintances, and in his 
passing away the city of Rochester and its environs lost one 
of its oldest, best-known and most successful citizens. 

John Winslow Tibbitts was born in Dover, New Hampshire, January 
5, 1831, a son of Samuel H. and Belinda (Cross) Tibbitts. The family name 
was formerly spelled Tibbetts, but was changed to Tibbitts by Samuel H. 
Tibbitts, the father of John Winslow Tibbitts. Samuel H. Tibbitts was 
born near Dover, New Hampshire, in what was for many years known as 
the old Heath House, which was located in the heath, directly opposite the 
county farm. Samuel H. Tibbitts later became proprietor of this hotel, and 
ran it for many years. 

Tibbitts is the usual spelling of the name in present use, though a part 
of the family employ the form, Tebbets, Tibbets, or Tibbits. It is among the 
earliest in New Hampshire, and has been continuously associated with the 
development of the State in worthy ways. From southeastern New Hamp- 
shire it has spread to all parts of the United States and is found in con- 
nection with pioneer settlements in many localities. 

(I) Henry Tibbetts, the ancestor of nearly all of the name in America, 
was born in England about the year 1596, and embarked from London, July 
13, 1635, i" the ship "James," bound for New England. He was accom- 
panied by his wife, Elizabeth, born in the same year as himself, and sons, 
Jeremiah, born 1631, and Samuel, born 1633. He was a shoemaker by trade, 
and soon settled in Dover, New Hampshire, where he had a grant of three and 
one-half acres of land for a house lot, at Dover Neck. At different times he 
had other grants, including one of twenty acres, situated on the west side of 
Back river (now called the Bellamy river) and another of one hundred 
acres adjoining the Newichawanock river, in what is now Rollinsford, then 
Dover. He held several minor offices in the town, was a hardworking, 
industrious farmer, and for some years was the only shoemaker in the place. 
He died in 1676, at the age of eighty years, having survived his wife, Eliza- 
beth, several years. They had several children born after their arrival in 
America. 

(H) Jeremiah Tibbetts, eldest child of Henry and Elizabeth Tibbetts, 
born in 1631, in England, died in the summer of 1677. His will was dated 
May 5, and proved October 31, of that year. His widow, Mary, survived 
him and married a Mr. Loomis. He lived at Dover, where he was a farmer, 
and for several years kept the jail or prison of the colony. He had several 
grants from the town, one embracing one hundred acres of land in what is 




^yy/// /////., /r//' . ///////> 




^ ^/^/v//.// y^/////.) 



now RoUinsford, and another of three and one-half acres at Dover Neck, 
for a house lot, on which he built his residence. He inherited the greater 
part of his father's land, including the one hundred acre tract in Rollins- 
ford. He married Mary Canney, daughter of Thomas Canney, a neighbor 
who lived but a short distance from the Tibbetts home. She died at Dover, 
July 2, 1706. They had eight sons and four daughters. 

(HI) Jeremiah (2) Tibbetts, eldest child of Jeremiah (i) and Mary 
(Canney) Tibbetts, was born June 5, 1656, and died some time after June 
27, 1735. and before December 17, 1743. He lived at Dover, New Hamp- 
shire, and was a farmer. He married Mary Twombly, daughter of Ralph 
and Elizabeth Twombly, and they were the parents of a large family of 
children. 

(IV) John Tibbetts, son of Jeremiah (2) and Mary (Twombly) Tib- 
betts, was born about 1685. He was alive in 1743, and died before May 2, 
1756. He resided in Dover, and followed the trade of carpenter. He mar- 
ried (first) Sarah Meader, daughter of John and Sarah Meader, of Dover. 
She died, and he married (second) Tamsen (Meserve) Ham, widow of 
Joseph Ham. He had three children by the first rriarriage, and one by the 
second. 

(V) John (2) Tibbetts, eldest child of John (i) and Sarah (Meader) 
Tibbetts, was born November 14, 171 1; the date of his death is unknown. 
He spent his life in Dover. He married Tamsen Ricker, daughter of Eph- 
raim Ricker, of the same place. 

(VI) Ichabod Tibbetts, son of John (2) and Tamsen (Ricker) Tibbetts, 
was born about 1745, but the date of his death is not known. He resided in 
Dover, and married Hannah Tibbetts, daughter of Jeremiah and Lydia 
Tibbetts, of Barrington, New Hampshire. She was born February 10, 1754, 
and died in 1831. They had twelve children. 

(VII) John (3) Tibbetts, son of Ichabod and Hannah (Tibbetts) Tib- 
betts, was born July 5, 1784, and died in 1821. He resided in Dover, New 
Hampshire, and was a farmer. He married Deborah Ham, of Barrington, 
New Hampshire, who died February 8, 1858. They had four children. 

(VIII) Samuel Ham Tibbitts, eldest child of John (3) and Deborah 
(Ham) Tibbetts, was born February 11, 1807, and died September 23, 1858. 
He resided at Dover, and married, December 7, 1826, Belinda Cross, daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Mary (Hayes) Cross, of Rochester, New Hampshire. 
She was born April 23, 1808, and died October 29, 1846. He had six children, 
John Winslow Tibbitts, whose name heads this memorial, was the second of 
these six children. The Tibbitts coat-of-arms is as follows: 

Arms — Azure, in chief three lions rampant. 
Crest — A bee volant in pale sable. 
Motto — Per industria. 

(IX) John Winslow Tibbitts spent his boyhood years in his native town, 
Dover, New Hampshire, and in accordance with the custom of those days, 
he attended the local schools for a few weeks each year. When about fifteen 
years of age he started to learn the carpenter's trade, which business he 



66 1 3lo5n Witt!Slo\s E^ibbim 

followed for many years. He came to East Rochester in 1850, at which 
time there were only five houses standing in the village. It can truly be 
said of Mr. Tibbitts that he has either built or helped build the greater part 
of the houses and buildings now standing in East Rochester, and among 
them should be mentioned the hotel, which he built and which he conducted 
up to the time of his death, the last few years prior to his death, it being 
under the management of his daughter, Mrs. Cora B. Hayes, under whose 
capable ownership and management it is still being conducted. It was in 
1854 that he bought the lot on which now stands the Glendon House, but at 
that time he built but a small house on this lot; in 1880 he erected the hotel, 
and at the time of his death he was the oldest hotel man in Strafford county. 
Although widely known as a popular and successful hotel man, it was prob- 
able that he was better known throughout New England as a prominent and 
successful operator in lumber and timber lands. He was the senior member 
of the well-known firm of Tibbitts, Hayes & Manson, whose business was 
that of buying up timber lots and operating mills to put the lumber into 
shape for the markets. In his connection with this firm, he made the name 
of Tibbitts especially well-known throughout the New England States. 
Although a very busy man, Mr. Tibbitts did not neglect his duties as a 
citizen, and as such he took an active interest in all civic and State affairs. 
In politics he was, in early life, a Whig, but upon the formation of the 
Republican party he, like most other men of that period who were then 
Whigs, transferred his allegiance to the newly-born Republican party, and 
as such he served two terms (1873-1875) in the New Hampshire State Legis- 
latiu-e. He was also active in local politics ; was one of the selectmen in the 
last vear of the town government, and he became one of the first councilmen 
under the city government. Mr. Tibbitts was always proud of the fact that 
his first vote, cast in 1852, before the formation of the Republican party, 
was cast for the Whig candidate. General Winfield Scott. He was very 
well-known in fraternal circles, being a member of the Masons, taking the 
degrees as far as the council, and he also received all the degrees in the Odd 
Fellows. 

John Winslow Tibbitts married (first) Charlotte F. Chamberlain, who 
died eight months later. Mr. Tibbitts married (second) Clarinda W. Blais- 
dell, a native of Lebanon, Maine, and a daughter of Jonathan and Sally 
(Wentworth) Blaisdell, who were both members of fine old families from 
Lebanon, Maine, where for generations both the Blaisdells and the Went- 
worths were among the most prominent families of that region of New 
England. John Winslow Tibbitts and his wife, Clarinda W. (Blaisdell) 
Tibbitts became the parents of two daughters, Cora B., and Avie E., the 
latter of whom died in 1900. Cora B. Tibbitts became the wife of the late 
Joseph O. Hayes, who became a member of the lumber firm of Tibbitts, 
Hayes & Manson. Mr. Hayes died February 15, 1919. Mr. and Mrs. Hayes 
were the parents of one son, Harry Tibbitts Hayes. 

John Winslow Tibbitts was a man of keen business judgment, and one 
who was looked up to as capable of giving advice in many lines of business. 
He was a director in the Rochester Loan & Banking Company, and although 




X' 



^/v.' /j. ./y^//-rV/.j 



3io|)n minsloto Cibftitw 167 

he was advanced in years his intellect was unimpaired to the last. He was 
a strict temperance man, and always conducted his hotel as a temperance 
hotel. The home life of Mr. Tibbitts was an exceptionally happy one, and 
he did all in his power to make his loved ones happy and contented. It was 
at his own fireside that he experienced more real happiness than he could 
extract from any other form of occupation, and every hour which he felt 
free to dispose to his own pleasure was thus spent among those he loved 
best. Mr. Tibbitts was in the best sense what is most aptly described in 
the typical American term, "self-made." It was through his own eflForts 
that he won his way to success, by dint of enterprise and courage, linked to 
indefatigable industry. In all the relations of life, private as well as those 
in connection with his business, his conduct was ever above reproach, dis- 
playing at all times those more fundamental virtues upon which all worthy 
character must be based, courage and honesty, and those scarcely less com- 
pelling qualities of kindliness and sympathy. By all who came in contact 
with him, he was held in admiration and afifection, and it was in a large circle 
of associates and friends that his death was felt as a personal loss. The 
success which he made was entirely due to his own individual efforts and the 
hard work and close application which he always paid to his business afifairs. 
His reputation was second to none for honesty, justice and charity to the 
poor and unfortunate, and in his death the New England States lost one of 
her best citizens. 



V 



3o0epl) ©. Hapes 




*HE list of important men of the town of East Rochester, New 
Hampshire, would not be complete without a memorial of 
the life and career of the late Joseph O. Hayes, a man pecu- 
liarly useful and successful in every direction in which his 
preference took him. He was a well-known resident and 
citizen of his adopted town. East Rochester, and was for 
many years one of the leaders in any movement for the 
public good of the community, and to such an extent was this the fact that 
his name came to be accepted as a stamp of excellence, and his endorsement 
of a public or private enterprise was regarded as an evidence of its merit and 
honesty. 

Joseph O. Hayes was born in Gonic, New Hampshire, in 1847, and died 
very suddenly at his home in East Rochester, February 15, 1919. He was a 
son of Joseph and Armine Garland Hayes, and was a descendant of one of 
the oldest families in that section of New England. 

The name Hayes is of Scotch origin. It was originally written Hay, 
and means an enclosed park or field. Four families of the name Hayes came 
to New England in the seventeenth century. Thomas Hayes settled in 
Milford, Connecticut, in 1645; Nathaniel Hayes settled in Norwalk, Con- 
necticut, in 1652; John Hayes settled in Dover, New Hampshire, in 1680; 
and George Hayes settled in Windsor, Connecticut, in 1682. George Hayes, 
born in Scotland in 1655, lived at Windsor and Simsbury, Connecticut, dying 
at the latter place, September 2, 1725. His great-grandson, Rutherford, 
born July 29, 1758, who lived at Brattleboro, Vermont, and served in the 
Revolution, was the grandfather of President Rutherford B. Hayes. It is 
probable that the present branch of the family, like all others born in New 
Hampshire, is descended from John Hayes, who came to Dover in 1680, and 
married Mary Home. 

There is a pretty tradition in connection with the Hayes coat-of-arms. 
In the reign of Kenneth III., of Scotland, A. D., 980, the Danes were pursuing 
the fleeing Scots from the field, when a countryman and his two sons 
appeared in a narrow pass, brandishing an ox-yoke; they rallied the fugitives 
and turned the course of battle. The king in reward for their valor gave to 
the countryman and his two sons, afterward known as Hay, as much land 
on the River Tay as a falcon, flying from a man's hand, could cover prior to 
settling down. This tract, six miles in length, was afterwards called Errol. 
The stone on which the falcon alighted is still pointed out in a little village 
called Hawkstone. For eight centuries the family of Hay have borne "three 
escutcheons gules" with a broken ox-yoke as a part of the crest, two Danes 
in armor as their supporters, and the motto, Renovate animos. The earls of 
Errol bear this motto, together with a falcon crest. In Scott's library at 
Abbottsford, among other coats-of-arms is that of Hayes, which has a cross 




CV,^AA.ovuv 



v^ — 



31O0CP& ©, images 169 

between four stars, the falcon crest, and the motto, Rccte. The present 
English family of Hayes, of Arborfield, Berks, have the "three escutcheons 
gfules," and the falcon crest. 

John Hayes, the immigrant ancestor of nearly all in New Hamp- 
shire bearing that name, settled in Dover Corner, New Hampshire, about 
1680. He had a grant of twenty acres of land, March i8, 1694, and this was 
laid out November 4, 1702. It lay between localities known as Barbadoes 
and Tole-end, and it is probable that most of his land was secured by pur- 
chase. He died October 25, 1708, of malignant fever, four days after he was 
taken sick, as appears by the journal of Rev. John Pike. He was married, 
June 28, 1686, to Mary Home. 

Joseph O. Hayes was raised in Gonic on the home farm, and during his 
younger years he assisted his brother, Benjamin, in the management of this 
farm. Later he came to Rochester and was employed in the hardware store 
operated by the late Captain A. W. Hayes. More than thirty years ago he 
came to East Rochester and bought a part interest in the livery and lumber 
business of the late John W. Tibbitts, and they were engaged in business 
for many years. Later he secured entire control of the livery business and 
was conducting the same at the time of his death. He had been greatly 
interested in the welfare of that community, giving much time, energy and 
money towards the bringing of new business to that place, he being one of 
the hardest workers in raising the necessary funds to procure enough money 
to buy the old factory at East Rochester which the N. B. Thayer Company 
now occupies. Mr. Hayes was a liberal giver in all war work, and where 
assistance was needed for the poor he was always a heavy contributor. 
Fraternally he was a member of Dover Lodge, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, Motolina Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of 
Rochester, the Edwin Forest Club and Rindge Lodge, Knights of Pythias, 
of East Rochester. He was a charter member of the Rochester Agriculture 
& Mechanical Association, and had been a director for years. Politically he 
was a life-long Republican, holding commanding sway in his community 
for years. He served a number of terms as councilman, two terms (1883- 
1890) as a Representative, and as delegate to various conventions at various 
times. Possessing a sunny, congenial disposition, "Joe" Hayes, as he was 
best known, was a prominent figure in his county. No one will be any more 
missed, as it was a very rare occasion that people would go to East Roch- 
ester that they did not see "Joe" Hayes around the hotel or stable, or some- 
where on the streets. He was very active, economical in his business affairs, 
and through his business sagacity had amassed a snug sum of money. He 
was also one of the largest real estate owners in East Rochester, being con- 
nected with the real estate firm of Tibbitts, Hayes & Manson. 

Joseph O. Hayes was united in marriage with Cora B. Tibbitts, a daugh- 
ter of the late John Winslow and Clarinda W. (Blaisdell) Tibbitts. Mr. 
Hayes is survived by his wife and one son, Harry Tibbitts Hayes. 

Mr. Hayes was a devoted husband and father, and in every relation of 
life his conduct was well worthy of being held up as an example to the youth 



of the community. He was quick to enter into the informal social gather- 
ings of his friends, of whom he had a host. He took a very keen interest in 
the affairs of East Rochester, and did much to promote its interests, so that 
the community owed him a great debt for the assistance that he gave to its 
development. His public spirit was most notable, and it seemed that no 
pains or eft'ort were too great for him to take in the interest of the commu- 
nity or the welfare of those about him. With his mental equipment to 
strengthen and make effective his natural business ability, he won success, 
and the great influence which he exerted in life was at once beneficent, and 
those who came after him should consider it a privilege to keep it alive in 
the future. The town of East Rochester is justly proud to number Mr. 
Haves among her representative citizens, and the memory of his useful 
career will be kept green in the hearts of many. 




Cljarles Bennett 




T is very difificult for those of the present generation, who are 
accustomed to view with but little passing interest the won- 
ders of modern inventions, to understand and appreciate 
the hardships and trials which those hardy pioneers of past 
generations took as a matter of course. We, of the present 
generation, with such everyday conveniences as the tele- 
phone, telegraph, electric lights, fast-moving trains, and also 
such wonders as the airplanes, wireless telegraphy, to say nothing of the 
now very common automobile, must not, however, think of those people of 
the early part of the nineteenth century as living lives devoid of pleasure and 
happiness, as those hardy people were just as happy, just as useful and 
perhaps more healthy than the people who populate this fast-moving world 
to-day. Certainly it cannot be said that Charles Dennett and his good wife, 
Abigail (Ham) Dennett, were not just as useful and just as happy as any 
couple who are living in Strafford county at the present time, although the 
period of Mr. and Mrs. Dennett's activities embraced those years which 
constituted the first half of the nineteenth century. Both were of good old 
New England stock, both were honest. God-fearing, and both lived happy, 
useful and contented lives. 

Charles Dennett was born in Barnstead, New Hampshire, September 28, 
1788, and was the sixth in descent from Alexander Dennett, the immigrant 
ancestor. He was also descended from those two Dennetts who were among 
the original settlers of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. In early youth Charles 
Dennett showed a remarkable aptitude for mechanical work, and at the age 
of fourteen years he was apprenticed to a cabinet-maker in Gilmanton, New 
Hampshire, with whom he remained seven years. After his apprenticeship 
had been completed, young Dennett hired out to his "master" at a salary of 
eight dollars a month and board, but was compelled to take part of his pay 
in clock cases, trusting to luck and to his ability as a salesman to sell them. 
In 1812 he came to Rochester, New Hampshire, and soon began business 
for himself as a cabinet-maker. It was at that time considered a very diffi- 
cult task to veneer mahogany, but Charles Dennett's first attempt at this 
difficult work was successful, although he had never seen the work done. 
He was a very artistic workman and to this day there are many inlaid 
clockcases, sideboards, secretaries, bureaus and tables in existence which 
testify to his skill and workmanship, they being made by himself and his 
apprentices. Mr. Dennett's upright habits and steady industry soon won 
for him the respect of the citizens. He had been in Rochester but a short 
time when his neighbor, Mr. Upham, offered him the loan of some money. 
He replied that he had no security, when Mr. Upham answered, "As long 
as I hear that you are at work every morning at four o'clock I need no other 
security." From his first coming to Rochester he interested himself with 



172 C|)atle0 Dennett 

the moral interests of the town, did much to help uplift the community, was 
g-reatly interested in the schools and did much in sustaining the old academy 
during- its existence. Soon after coming to Rochester he became a Meth- 
odist and was largely instrumental in establishing the church in that city. 
He, with James C. Cole and Simon Chase, took charge of building the first 
Methodist Episcopal church, erected in 1825, and he contributed largely 
towards its support. His home was the home for ministers who traveled 
horseback on a circuit before the church was able to support a settled pastor. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dennett were literally pioneers in the Methodist Episcopal 
church in Rochester, New Hampshire. 

At that period in this country's development, open fire-places were used 
for cooking, and in about 1823 Mr. Dennett bought the first cooking stove 
ever used in the town, and people came from many places, far and near, to 
see it as a curiosity, often declaring that they would never have such a black- 
looking thing in their house. Candles and whale oil lamps gave dim lights 
in public places and private homes. The convenience of lucifer matches 
was unknown. When Mr. and Mrs. Dennett began housekeeping it was 
then customary to keep liquor in the house to ofifer guests, ministers as well 
as others, but in later years Mr. Dennett became known as one of the most 
zealous advocates of temperance and he spent much time, strength and 
money for that cause. Mr. Dennett had quite an amount of inventive talent, 
and in 1822 he constructed a corn-sheller which would shell a bushel of corn 
in three minutes. He also invented a lock which was used many years on 
the vault of the bank in which he was a director, which lock repeatedly defied 
the efforts of burglars. At the age of forty-one he gave up cabinet-making, 
as machines were then taking the place of handwork, and he then devoted 
himself to surveying, and to the administration of estates, drawing up wills 
and other legal documents, and devoting so much time and attention to 
probate business that he soon became an authority in such matters. He 
filled various offices of trust, having served as town clerk, county treasurer, 
representative to the State Legislature, and was deputy sheriff eighteen 
years. He was on the first board of directors of the Rochester Bank, which 
was organized in 1835, and was on the first board of trustees of the Norway 
Savings Bank when that institution was organized in 1851, and was also its 
president for many years. His integrity and sound judgment were fully 
recognized, and he was often chosen as arbitrator in cases among his towns- 
men, and also acted as guardian for children. 

Charles Dennett was a prominent Free Mason and Odd Fellow. He 
joined the Masons in early life, and was master of the lodge for fifteen years 
and treasurer fourteen years, and also served as district grand master four 
years. He was a charter member of Motolinia Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and its permanent secretary for twenty-one years. He was in 
early life a Democrat, but joined the Free Soilers when Honorable John P. 
Hale made his great departure, and was always afterwards an earnest 
Republican. 

On November 11, 1813, Mr. Dennett married Abigail Ham, born at 



Cl)atle0 Dennett 173 

Rochester Neck, New Hampshire, January 8, 1792, died September 24, 1876, 
a daughter of Israel and Mehitable (Hayes) Ham. Israel Ham was a soldier 
in the Revolutionary War, having entered the Continental Army at the age 
of seventeen years. Charles Dennett's father was also in the same war, 
having entered at the age of eighteen. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Dennett were 
the parents of nine children, all of whom are deceased with the exception of 
Abbie H. Dennett, who is still a resident of Rochester, New Hampshire. 
Miss Abbie H. Dennett lives in the old house which has always been her 
home, and which was built in 1813. She is a member of the Mary Todd 
Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution. Her great-grandniece, 
whom she raised from childhood, is the wife of Rev. J. M. Adams, a Congre- 
gational minister, and they are the parents of two children: Myron Dennett, 
and Margaret Dixon. 

Charles Dennett was a remarkable penman, having taken writing 
lessons for some time after his marriage, and was considered as one of the 
best of the old style penmen in Strafford county. In the death of this remark- 
able man, which occurred on March 4, 1867, the entire community lost one 
of its foremost citizens, his family lost a devoted husband and father, and 
the people of Rochester lost one of its oldest and most useful men, a man 
whose place has never been completely filled. 




Cljarles 3St. Wlalfeer 




IHARLES K. WALKER, a well-known resident of West Man- 
chester, New Hampshire, passed away there at the old 
ancestral house in which he was born, at the ripe old age of 
four score years and two. His death, which occurred Sep- 
tember 9, 1912, brought forth many expressions of genuine 
sorrow and regret from his many friends, and to those with 
whom he had come in contact even in the most casual 
manner. He was the most likeable of men, the possessor of a pleasing dispo- 
sition, a genial nature, and ever ready to do a good turn towards one of his 
fellow-men. It is not always that a man who has served with distinction as 
a public official has the advantage of ancient lineage. In fact there are those 
who maintain that men of action are seldom men of birth. Even if this be 
so, it must be admitted that Mr. Walker was an exception to the rule, inas- 
much as he filled for many years a very responsible public position, and the 
fact of his patrician descent is beyond dispute, as he came of the sturd)'^ 
stock that from its bone and sinew and its moral fibre has built up the State 
of New Hampshire and given character to her institutions. His death, at 
what was apparently the zenith of a most successful and useful career, was 
not alone a severe blow to those connected with him by the ties of friend- 
ship or blood, but was a loss which affected the entire city of Manchester. 
He was a man of dynamic quality, a man who stood for cleanness in busi- 
ness and politics, and was ever to be found in the van of any movement tend- 
ing to advance the progress of the city in which he lived. Mr. Walker illus- 
trated in himself the composite character of our American citizenship, and 
presented in his temperament and disposition a masterful, forceful and intel- 
lectual quality which abound in our race. 

Charles K. Walker was born July 8, 1830, in what was then known as 
Bedford, now annexed to Manchester, New Hampshire, the son of James 
and Betsey (Parker) Walker. Mr. Walker descended on his father's side 
from one of the first settlers in Bedford, and on his mother's side from the 
largest landowners of the town, the Parker holdings in the early days taking 
in a large part of what is now West Manchester. His paternal ancestor, 
the Rev. George Walker, rector of the Parish of Donoughmore, was one of 
the leaders of the besieged inhabitants of Londonderry, Ireland, in 1689. 
Although an aged man, he was active in the defense of the city, and did 
much to assist the starving inhabitants in their efiforts to obtain food. He 
was a man of great force of character, a natural leader, and it is natural 
that from this forceful man should spring a family noted for its energy and 
strong character. 

(I) In 1714, a descendant of the Rev. George Walker, Andrew, by 
name, came over from Londonderry, and settled in Billerica, Massachusetts, 
afterwards removing to Tewksbury, where he died. He was accompanied 




€Aa,-/<. .:^/^^^.- 



Cbatles 1&. malktt 175 

by his wife and two sons, Robert, and James, of further mention, who were 
afterwards reinforced by seven other children: Alexander, who married a 
Caldwell; Margaret, who married Nathaniel Davidson; Mary, who married 
Robert Davidson; Sarah, who died single; Nancy, who married James Carr, 
of Goffstown; Hannah, who married Francis Barnet, of Bedford; Jane, who 
married William Barnet, of Bedford. At what time Andrew Walker, the 
common ancestor, died is uncertain. There is in the possession of the family 
of Charles K. Walker, of West Manchester, a power of attorney dated 1739, 
given by Captain James Walker to his father, Andrew, then residing in 
Tewksbury, Massachusetts. 

(II) Captain James Walker, son of Andrew Walker, was three or four 
years old when he arrived in this country. In 1734 Robert and James went 
to live with their uncle, Archibald Stark, father of General John Stark, then 
living in Londonderry, New Hampshire. Here for three years they made 
turpentine from the pitch pine trees growing abundantly in the forest. In 
the fall of 1737 they crossed the Merrimack river and built a log cabin for 
shelter during the winter, thus becoming the first settlers of the town of 
Bedford. During the winter they felled the trees, and in the spring finished 
clearing the first piece of land in the town. Here, too, they were joined in 
the spring by Matthew and Samuel Patten (brothers) from Dunstable, 
Massachusetts, who assisted in clearing the land and lived with them until 
their own house was completed. Robert was a noted hunter, while James 
excelled in fine horses. In one instance a man stole from him a fine mare; 
he traced the thief by a peculiar mark (figure of a pipe) on one of the shoes, 
made purposely by the blacksmith, and overtook him beyond Boston where 
he recovered his mare. He cleared up his farm, set out an orchard, enter- 
tained travelers, and built one of the first frame houses in town, still occu- 
pied (1905) by his descendant. He resided on his farm until 1783, and then 
moved to a small fifty acre lot in Gofifstown, where he lived with his wife, 
daughter Charlotte, and black servant until his death in 1786. He was a 
sutler in the regiment of his father-in-law, Colonel Goflfe, during the French 
and Indian War, and at its close was commissioned captain of a troop of 
horse by Governor Wentworth. He was in the Patriot Army during the 
Revolution, and was among the Bedford men who fought with General 
Stark at Bennington. He married Esther, daughter of Colonel John GoflFe, 
by whom he had seven children: Silas, James, of further mention; Sally, 
Esther. Jennet, Mary and Charlotte. Sally married Joseph Moor, who was 
killed at the raising of Piscataquog bridge. 

(III) James (2) Walker, son of Captain James (i) and Esther (Goffe) 
Walker, married Mary Wallace, of Bedford. They had eight children: 
Josiah, Sally, Reuben, Polly, James, of further mention; Rebecca, Stephen 
and Leonhard. 

(IV) James (3) Walker, son of James (2) and Mary (Wallace) Walker, 
was born in Bedford, December 2, 1789, and died in Manchester, February 
9, 1875. He was a farmer, merchant and surveyor. He married, January 
30, 1827, Betsey Parker, daughter of William and Nabby (Parker) Parker, 



176 Cftarles 1^, malktt 

and widow of James Parker. She was born in Bedford, September 23, 
1791, and died in Manchester, November 8, 1865. They had two sons: 
James P., born in Bedford, February 7, 1828, and Charles K., born July 18, 
1830. 

(V) Charles K. Walker received his education in the local district school 
and Bedford Academy, then located where the South Main Street Congrega- 
tional Church now stands. At the age of eighteen he left home and found 
employment with a railroad surveying party, which established the bent 
of his life and led to his becoming a successful civil engineer, he learning 
the profession under the tutelage of the late General Stark, in Nashua. His 
first employment was on the survey of the Stony Brook Railroad, and he 
continued in that connection until the completion of the road. From that 
road he went to the Wilton Railroad, thence in turn to the New York & 
Erie, and the Marietta & Cincinnati. Finishing his railroad work in the 
West, Mr. Walker returned to New Hampshire and entered the employ of 
the Suncook Valley Railroad, being associated with former Governor James 
A. Weston, who was his schoolmate at the Bedford Academy. Leaving the 
Suncook Valley Railroad, Mr. Walker went to the East Jaflfrey Railroad, 
the Lowell, Framingham & Hopkinton Railroad, and Montpelier & Wells 
River Railroad. He was appointed superintendent of the Manchester Water 
Works in 1875, which office he held until he retired in 191 2. The water 
system was built in 1874 by the city, and Mr. Walker was the first superin- 
tendent, so that the whole period of the development was under his direction, 
and the fact that the Manchester water system is recognized as the equal 
of any water works system in the country is a guarantee of his ability. 
When Mr. Walker took hold in 1875, the earnings of the department were 
$32,ocx) in a year, while last year the income exceeded $170,000, and this in 
spite of several reductions in the rates and big outlays for equipment taken 
from the earnings of the department. Had the original rates been in effect 
last year, the earnings would have been more than $250,000. Under Mr. 
Walker the system has been developed from the small, original reservoir in 
East Manchester to the present high pressure system, and the steam power 
has been largely supplanted by the modern electrical motive power. At the 
time of his retirement the water board passed a highly eulogistic resolution 
on his fidelity and the able management of the department by the retiring 
superintendent for the thirty-seven years it has been in existence. The 
well-earned rest he sought, though, was of short duration. Old age found 
him at peace, happy, even joyous, like "Cato" of old, he was a man "full of 
faith" and the memory of his life remains as a rich legacy to all who knew 
him. 

October 4, 1852, Mr. Walker was united in marriage with Ann Maria 
Stevens, of Wentworth, New Hampshire, daughter of John and Louisa 
(Glines) Stevens. They were the parents of two daughters : i. Ellen Parker, 
born in West Manchester, July 20, 1855; married Charles Howe, in 1897, 
who died October 10, 1916. 2. Henrietta Clinton, born in West Manchester, 
January 6, 1862, now living with her sister, Mrs. Howe, at No. 106 Carrall 
street, West Manchester. , , 



C!)arle0 m. mmtt 



177 



Mrs. Ann Maria Walker, wife of the late Charles K. Walker, died at her 
summer home in Weare, New Hampshire, Tuesday, June 4, 1918. She was 
born in Wentworth, New Hampshire, in 183 1, but the greater part of her life 
was spent in Manchester. She came of good Revolutionary stock, and 
possessed a very charitable nature. She was deeply interested in the 
Women's Aid Home, and the Manchester Children's Home, becoming a life 
member of both institutions. As a member of the South Main Street Con- 
gregational Church she took much interest in its work, and her life was 
marked by unselfishness and a genial spirit. 





Hon, Cljarles ^ilinep 1!0a{)ite|)ouse 

'HE distinguished gentleman whose name heads this memoir 
won great distinction both as a business man and as having 
filled many responsible offices of public trust. He was born 
at Gonic, New Hampshire, September 3, 1827, and died there, 
March 4, 1899, the son of Nicholas V. and Susan (Place) 
Whitehouse. 

Charles Sidney Whitehouse attended the district school 
until he was thirteen years of age, and in 1840 he entered the academy at 
Strafford Corner, where he spent two terms, and in the summer of 1841 and 
1842 he attended the academy at Durham, New Hampshire, and in the 
winters of these years he was at the academy at Rochester, New Hampshire. 
In 1843 he became a student at the Phillips Exeter Academy, at Exeter, 
New Hampshire, remaining at that famous academy for two years, then 
entered the store of W. E. Andrews, at Dover, New Hampshire, as a clerk, 
and in the latter part of 1846 he went to Lowell, Massachusetts, as a clerk 
for Benjamin T. Hardy. In January, 1848, he returned to Gonic, and entered 
his father's mill to learn the business. Being of an active temperament, he 
at once entered into the life of the village, and as soon as he reached the age 
of twenty-one he engaged in the political affairs of the town and county. 
He was very energetic in the political revolution of 1854-55, which resulted 
in the birth of what is now the great Republican party, and which at that 
time at once became the leading political party of both the town and the 
State in which Mr, Whitehouse lived. Mr. Whitehouse was possessed of a 
very beautiful voice, and when the presidential campaign of 1856 opened at 
Wolfeborough, New Hampshire, he joined, with his brother. Freeman, and 
with George and Smith Scates, two young men from Milton, but who were 
then employed in Rochester, and also with William Beedle, in organizing 
the Fremont Glee Club, and they sang at the gathering which was presided 
over by the Hon. John P. Hale. Mr. Hale was so impressed with the power 
and influence such singing would exert in a political campaign that he urged 
them to continue in the work and from that date until after the election in 
November their services were in constant demand at mass meetings, flag 
raisings and other political gatherings. 

Mr. Whitehouse represented Rochester in the Legislature in 1862, and 
was a member of the New Hampshire Senate in 1863-64. For the next ten 
years he devoted himself to the factory, with his father, but all the time he 
was foremost in all matters pertaining to the general prosperity of the 
village of Gonic, and of the whole town. In 1875 he was nominated by the 
Republicans of the First Congressional District for member of Congress, 
but although he conducted his campaign with vigor and credit to himself 
and to his party, he was defeated by his Democratic opponent, Frank Jones, 
of Portsmouth. Declining a renomination, which would have meant his 



^on. Ci)arle0 ^jDnep mWtiiomt 179 

election in 1877, he devoted himself to manufacturing, having in 1875 
assumed charge of the woolen mills at East Rochester, where he remained 
five vears, and then retired from the business. 

In 1882 Charles Sidney Whitehouse received the appointment as United 
States weigher in the Custom House at Boston, and served as such with 
credit until he was removed from the office by the Democratic administra- 
tion in 1886. In 1882 he was appointed by Governor Charles Bell the first 
State auditor under the new law, and was reappointed in 1883. He was 
also delegate to the National Republican Convention at Philadelphia which 
nominated U. S. Grant for his second term. Since 1886 he had not been 
engaged in active business other than looking after his own private affairs. 
Few men were more active in the affairs of the town than was he. He was 
always public-spirited in his acts, and liberal in his views. In many ways 
he served his neighbors and townsmen faithfully and well, his life being 
one of ceaseless activity, his mental energy, indomitable will, tenacious 
memory, his habit of investigating all theories before accepting them as 
facts, and his diligence in studying all intellectual as well as commercial or 
political questions, had marked him out as a predestined leader in society. 
His sharp insight into the character of the many classes of people with 
whom his business had brought him into contact had enabled him to main- 
tain a strong bond of sympathy between himself and those whom he 
employed. Few men had more genuine regard for the common brotherhood 
of man than he, and to that fact much of his popularity was naturally due. 
He had great local pride, and as a recognized leader, quick in thought, 
prompt in action, he awakened sluggish minds into useful activity. One of 
the sides of Mr. Whitehouse's character was his great love for nature, and 
it was directly due to his influence that the people were induced to plant 
shade trees and ornament their houses and grounds, until Gonic became one 
of the most beautiful country villages in the State. The meeting-house at 
Gonic was delapidated, services thinly attended, and the faithful few much 
discouraged. Becoming superintendent of the Sunday school, Mr. White- 
house organized and led the choir and then very materially aided in rebuild- 
ing the meeting-house. He was very active and much interested in school 
affairs and also in the fire department of the town. To his executive ability 
as superintendent of the first town fair was due in a great measure its suc- 
cess. His natural musical gifts had enabled him to create a healthy musical 
sentiment in the community. As far back as 1842-43 he sang in the old 
Congregational church on the Common, and from that time until his death 
there was not an Old Folks' concert or a Choral Union in which he did not 
take part. His earnest work in all those affairs was not for notoriety, but 
to accomplish results for public good. He was a writer of no small ability, 
pleasing and convincing as a speaker, and generally carrying his point. 
Rochester was fortunate in having a citizen so thoroughly public-spirited 
and possessed of such solid sense as Charles Sidney Whitehouse. 

On September 30, 1852, Charles Sidney Whitehouse was married to Ellen 
Frances Foster, of Norway, Maine, a daughter of Nathan and Sally (Gil- 
son) Foster. Her father was a native of Norway, Maine, while her mother 



]8o t^on. Ci)acle0 ^IDnep mbitttoust 

was from Dunstable, Massachusetts. They were farmers and were among 
the most highly-respected people of that section of New England. They 
were the parents of eight children, all of whom are now dead, with the 
exception of Mrs. Whitehouse. Mr. and Mrs. Whitehouse were the parents 
of two children: Walter Barker, born September 25, 1854, deceased; Alice 
Atherton, now the wife of W. C. Sanborn, the druggist of Rochester, New 
Hampshire; they are the parents of the following children: Morrill, Louise, 
Marion, now the wife of Guy Smart; and Charles, who was in the United 
States Army, now deceased. 

Mr. Whitehouse was a man of high ideals, to which he adhered with an 
unusual degree of faithfulness in the conduct of his life, and might well be 
pointed out as a model of good citizenship. He inherited from his sturdy 
ancestry those strong principles that were the inspiration of his active and 
useful life. In his career as public-servant he showed himself without any 
personal ambition, and actuated with no desire other than to further the 
advantages of the community and to strengthen his party. His private 
virtues were not less remarkable than his public, and the deep affection with 
which his family and intimate friends regarded him is the best tribute which 
can be paid to the strength and sincerity of his domestic instincts. The 
influence of his fine Christian life will long remain to be an inspiration in 
Rochester and Gonic, where the majority of his years were passed. 





S^ult(4>m ^im(^e ^Moivllo7t 



IS 



aniireto ilWorse ifWouIton 

'HE State of New Hampshire has been the scene of events of 
vast importance, and the home of some of the most illus- 
trious men of the nation. Her sons have spread htster on 
her name in every line of business and profession, and where- 
ever they have gathered they have been a power for ideal 
citizenship and good government. We should not forget, 
however, those who, although unobtrusive in their everyday 
life, yet by their individuality and great force of character, mould the com- 
mercial destinies and give tone to the communities in which they live. But 
few citizens have lived in Exeter, New Hampshire, who have left a brighter 
record for every trait of character that constitutes real greatness than the 
late Andrew Morse Moulton, and the record of his life is well worth pre- 
serving, furnishing instructions for the generations to come. His name ever 
stood as a synonym for all that was enterprising and progressive in citizen- 
ship, and his industry and energy, his ability and courage, and his fidelity 
to principle, were illustrated in his career. The purpose of a biography and 
memorial is to set forth the salient features of a man's life that one may 
determine the motive springs of his conduct, and learn from the record that 
which makes his history worthy of being preserved. Mr. Moulton's career 
was, indeed, characterized by high ideals of life's purposes and its objects, 
and a continuous endeavor to closely follow them. His death, which 
occurred at his home in Exeter, New Hampshire, December ir, 1914, 
deprived his adopted town of one of its foremost and best beloved citizens. 
Mr. Moulton was born in Hampstead, New Hampshire, June 2, 1847, a 
son of Caleb and Abigail (Morse) Moulton. He received an excellent edu- 
cation, having graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy with the class of 
1869, and spent two years at Dartmouth. Upon leaving school and college, 
he returned to Hampstead, where his father was a prominent farmer, having 
also served at one time as sherifif. Following in the footsteps of his father, 
Andrew Morse Moulton took up farming as his chief vocation in life, and 
continued as such for many years. He was very prominent in local politics 
in Hampstead, being a life long Republican, and he served his native town as 
selectman, chairman of the board, and as moderator. He was always con- 
sidered one of Hampstead's most prominent and influential citizens, and one 
who was always held in the highest esteem by his neighbors and, in fact, by 
all with whom he came in contact. Having devoted many years of his life 
to the arduous duties of his farm, Mr. Moulton decided to retire from active 
labor in the fields, and in 1907 he moved to Exeter, where he had spent many 
happy days during the time he had been a student at the academy, and where 
he had made many lasting friends. 

Andrew Morse Moulton was twice married. His first wife was Caroline 
A. Smith, by whom he had two children : Walter H., and Clara, who became 



i82 SnDteti) ^or0e Qloulton 

the wife of Frank Darling, and the mother of three children, Louis, Phillip 
and Esther. After the death of his first wife, Mr. Moulton married Helen 
G. Smith, who, although of the same name, is no relation to Mr. Moulton's 
first wife. Helen G. (Smith) Moulton is a daughter of Charles C. and Mary 
W. (Berry) Smith, her father a native of Exeter, and her mother a native of 
Pittsfield, New Hampshire. Her father was a son of Josiah Coffin Smith, 
and was long one of Exeter's leading men. In the boyhood and young 
manhood days of Mr. Moulton, while a student at the academy at Exeter, 
he became acquainted with Helen G. Smith, and at an early age they became 
sweethearts, but upon Mr. Moulton leaving Exeter, they became separated, 
Mr. Moulton marrying, but many years later they were reunited, completing 
very happily the romance which had begun in their youth. Upon their mov- 
ing to Exeter, Mr. and Mrs. Moulton took up their residence in the old house 
in which Mrs. Moulton was born, and in which she resided when Mr. Moul- 
ton would come to see her so many years before. Mrs. Moulton's parents 
were the parents of three children besides herself. They were: Marianna 
Berry, who became the wife of Rev. Charles H. Cole, now deceased, a former 
minister in the Baptist church; Charles Josiah. deceased, of further men- 
tion; and Caroline, also deceased. 

Charles Josiah Smith, who died in Exeter, New Hampshire, January 17, 
1893, was one of the most prominent men in Exeter, of which town he was a 
life-long resident, having been born in Exeter, September 11, 1848. He 
attended the Exeter grammar and high school, but left high school prior to 
his graduation to enter Burlinghame's machine shop to learn the trade of 
machinist. Mr. Smith became a thorough master of his trade and worked 
for that one concern up to the time of his death. Mr. Burlinghame in com- 
menting upon Mr. Smith's remarkable record and ability as a machinist and 
all around mechanic has often remarked that in all the years that he worked 
for Mr. Burlinghame he was never known to ask for more pay, nor did he 
ever think of leaving Mr. Burlinghame's employ, nevertheless, Mr. Smith's 
services were so highly valued that he became the highest paid man in the 
shop. He was ever steady and industrious, and never married, but always 
resided in the old Smith home on High street. By his industrious habits and 
saving disposition he became the owner of some very valuable property in 
Exeter. Mr. Smith was a member of the New Hampshire Legislature at the 
time of his death and was also a member of the Odd Fellows. 

Andrew M. Moulton endeared himself to many friends, especially in 
the neighborhood in which he lived, both in Hampstead and in Exeter, and 
also in the First Parish Church, of which he and his wife were attendants, 
and of which church Mrs. Moulton is still an attendant. Mr. Moulton also 
had many friends among the Masons, he having been affiliated with St. 
Mark's Lodge and the Mount Nebo Council at Derry. He was also a mem- 
ber of the Haverhill Lodge of Odd Fellows, and of the Squampscott Club. 
The funeral services were under the auspices of the Star in the East Lodge of 
Masons, and were conducted by the chaplain. Rev. Edward Green, assisted 
by Rev. George H. Driver. The pallbearers were Clarence M. Collins, Henry 
E. Durgin, William H. Seward and Herbert L. Eaton, all members of the 



^nDreto ^ot0e ^oulton 



183 



lodge. There was also a second service at Derry, which was attended by 
the Masons and others, and the burial was at Hampstead. The floral 
tributes were most beautiful. Mr. Moulton was known to be kind and genial 
to all, a man of rare nobility of character and usefulness of life, being the 
possessor of the strictest integrity, and of whom it can be truthfully said 
that his word was as good as his bond. His true monument is in the hearts 
of the many who knew him, and it is our sincere hope that there will be 
many more fit to follow in his footsteps. 




3o})n proctor prentice SSiellp 

*0 say of John Proctor Prentice Kelly, whose name heads this 
memoir, that he rose unaided to rank among the substantial 
successful business men of the town of Exeter, New Hamp- 
shire, is but stating a fact, and his entire business record was 
one of which any man might well be proud. Beginning at 
the very bottom of the ladder of success, he advanced stead- 
ily until he occupied a position of prominence allotted to but 
few to hold in the business world. His business career was looked upon as 
a model of integrity and honor, and it was said of him that he was one of 
those men who form the backbone and sinew of any community in which 
their lot is cast. His ability and intellectuality won for him many honors, 
and his integrity and personalit}'^ won something even better and far more 
valuable, warm friendship, deep respect and esteem. The death of John 
Proctor Prentice Kelly, which occurred at Exeter, New Hampshire, Janu- 
ary lo, 1894, brought genuine sorrow to the hearts of many who had recog- 
nized in him the traits of our best New England people, and the sterling 
qualities of manhood. He was indeed a striking example of those who 
secure their own start in life, and his career illustrated in no uncertain 
manner what it is possible to accomplish when perseverance and determina- 
tion form the keynote to a man's life. Depending upon his own resources 
and looking for no outside aid or support, Mr. Kelly rose to a place of prom- 
inence in the business world by dint of tireless energy and great ability. 
At the time of his death he was seventy-four years and seven days of age, 
and was considered as one of Exeter's old-time and best-known business 
men. It is always a pleasure to investigate the career of a successful man, 
for peculiar honor attaches to that individual who, beginning the great 
struggle of life alone and unaided, gradually overcomes environment, 
removes one by one the obstacles in the pathway to success, and by the 
masterstroke of his own force and vitality succeeds in forging his way to the 
front and winning for himself a position of esteem and influence among his 
fellow-men. Such was the record of John Proctor Prentice Kelly, who at 
the time of his death was Exeter's senior merchant and a citizen of special 
prominence. 

John Proctor Prentice Kelly was born at Northwood, New Hampshire, 
January 3, 1820, the only son and the second of five children born to Hon. 
John and Susan (Hilton) Kelly. As a boy he attended the grammar schools 
of his native town, but in 1831 his father receiving the appointment of 
Register of Probate, the family established their residence in Exeter. Hon. 
John Kelly soon became recognized as one of Exeter's most useful and hon- 
orable citizens. He served as Register of Probate for eleven years. He 
became the editor of the Exeter "News Letter" in 1833, continuing as such 
until 1853. While a resident of Northwood he had served two terms in the 



31ol)n proctot prentice Clellp 185 

Legislature, and in 1845 he was again elected to the New Hampshire Legis- 
lature, this time representing the town of Exeter. In 1847-48 he sat in the 
Executive Council, and in 1850 he was a member of the Constitutional Con 
vention. He was also for thirteen years treasurer of Phillips Exeter 
Academy. 

John Proctor Prentice Kelly, in 1836 entered Phillips Exeter .Academy, 
and in the same class were many young men who later became men of great 
prominence. Among them may be mentioned Amos T. Akerman, after- 
wards attorney-general of the United States; Dr. Howland Holmes, who 
died at Lexington, Massachusetts; Richard Wenman Swan, long of the 
Academy faculty; George Walker, who was afterwards consul general at 
Paris; Rev. George Osgood, of Kensington, and others. 

Mr. Kelly had as a boy an ambition to follow a sea-faring life, but upon 
graduating from the Academy in 1839 he was offered a position as clerk in 
what later became the house of Kelly & Gardner, and at six o'clock on the 
morning of July 9, 1839, he began his connection with this store by opening 
up and sweeping out the place. On the morning of July 9, 1892, Mr. Kelly 
celebrated his fifty-third anniversary in his connection with this store by 
opening up at six o'clock in the morning, the same as he had done fifty- 
three years before. This famous old hardware and grocery store in its age 
and hereditary character probably did not have its counterpart in the 
country. It was founded in 1770 by Ward Clark Dean, and about 1800 its 
founder associated with him his son-in-law, George Gardner, whose son, 
George Gardner, and grandson, John E. Gardner, successively, succeeded to 
partnership. The scope of the firm's operations in hardware and groceries 
long included the entire State of New Hampshire and part of the State of 
Vermont, and for years each winter would bring the annual visit of custo- 
mers from sections as far remote as Coos county, who bartered sledloads of 
products of their farms for a year's supply of such commodities as they stood 
in need of. Naturally Mr. Kelly's early years of mercantile life afforded him 
a vast store of entertaining reminiscences which he delighted to tell. He 
had a very retentive memory, and from his father he inherited a fondness 
for local history, biography and genealogy, and few men could converse as 
entertainingly on Exeter men, events and inclinations. As a citizen Mr. 
Kelly always took a keen interest in all of the town's affairs, and his integ- 
rity, worth and companionable qualities early won and kept the respect and 
esteem of the townspeople. Mr. Kelly had an active interest in Masonry, 
and was one of the oldest and most zealous members of the Star in the East 
Lodge. He also had membership in the St. Alban Chapter and the Olivet 
Council. 

On January 10, 1861, Mr. Kelly was united in marriage with Harriett 
N. Safford, who was born in Concord, New Hampshire, a daughter of Wil- 
liam B. and Dolly N. (Bott) Safford. William B. Safford was a native of 
Exeter, New Hampshire, and in early life he learned the trade of carriage 
trimmer, but for years was a merchant in Concord. His wife, Dolly N. 
(Bott) Safford, was a native of Salem, Massachusetts. Mr. Kelly is sur- 
vived by his wife and an adopted daughter, Ellen, now the wife of William 



1 86 3IoI)n Proctor prentice iKellp 

W. Gale, and they reside in Worcester, Massachusetts. They are the parents 
of one daughter, Elenore. Both Mr. and Mrs. Kelly for years were members 
of the Second Church of Exeter, of which church Mrs. Kelly is still a 
member. 

The personality of Mr. Kelly was one that will not be quickly forg-otten 
by the great host of those who called him friend. He was a man who com- 
bined gentleness and firmness, yielding easily where his sense of right and 
justice was not concerned, but inflexible enough where his conscience had 
rendered a decision. He was a delightful companion, as he remembered 
and recounted with vivid power the many interesting experiences he had 
passed through during his long and eventful life. He enjoyed the respect 
of his fellow-men in a measure that was the reward of very few others, and 
with their respect that yet rarer and more precious gift, their affection. In 
all Mr. Kelly made an ideal business man and citizen, and one that any 
community might hold up as a type for its youth to imitate. He loved his 
home and also loved all the members of his household, and the planning of 
their happiness and pleasures occupied a great share of his time. This 
fondness extended, however, beyond the immediate family to a host of good, 
staunch friends, which his personal attractions and virtues had gathered 
about him, and there were few pleasures that he relished more than receiv- 
ing a group of such friends about his hospitable hearth and indulging in the 
informal intercourse of intimate friendship. The attractions that won Mr. 
Kelly so many friends were not, however, of the surface merely, but had 
their basis in the strong and sterling virtues of the typical New England 
character, a fact well-known and proven by the firmness with which those 
friendships were retained through the years. Integrity, courage and wis- 
dom were all his, and he may well stand as a model for the growing genera- 
tions of the devoted husband and father, the worthy citizen and the upright 
man. 




r.9. 



>^/r///r// (>/^/.)r. /Y^v/^/^v 



)ttp\)tn Cljase ifJleatier 




FINE example of the successful New Englander, who has 
derived his sterling qualities from a long line of sturdy- 
ancestors, but has of his own efforts climbed the ladder of 
success, was Stephen Chase Meader, who died at his summer 
home at York Beach, Maine, June 3, 191 5. He was one of 
the distinguished men of business of Rochester and Gonic, 
New Hampshire, and an example of the qualities that we 
have come to look upon as typical of those men who are responsible for the 
prosperity of that eminently flourishing region. He was descended from 
one of the oldest of the New England families, his paternal immigrant ances- 
tor having been John Meader, who came from England in 1650, and settled 
at Oyster river, between Portsmouth and Dover, New Hampshire, and 
where he had a land grant in 1656. John Meader had a son, Daniel, among 
others, and at least seven of Daniel's sons settled in Rochester, New Hamp- 
shire, between 1750 and 1760, and took up land in that part of the town 
known as Meadeboro. One of Daniel Meader's sons, Benjamin, had a son 
Stephen, who was the grandfather of Stephen Chase Meader, and he was 
born in Rochester, New Hampshire, in 1782. He resided on a farm near 
Meadeboro Corner, the farm being now in the possession of one of his 
descendants. Levi Meader, the father of Stephen Chase Meader, was born 
in Rochester, New Hampshire, February 4, 1813, and in 1837 he married 
Amanda Eastman, of Peacham, Vermont. The Meader coat-of-arms is as 
follows : 

Arms — Gules, a wyvern sejant wings elevated or. 

Crest — A dove rising argent, holding in its beak a laurel branch vert. 

Motto — Persevera et vince. (Persevere and win). 

Stephen Chase Meader was born in Rochester, New Hampshire, 
December 14, 1840, and his boyhood days were spent on the farm with his 
parents. He attended the district schools, helping in the meantime with the 
arduous duties of the farm life, incidental to that period of the State's devel- 
opment, thereby laying a foundation of a strong and healthy physique. 
When he was about fourteen years of age his father moved to Gonic village, 
as it was the father's desire that his large family of children should have 
better educational advantages than those afforded by the district school. 
Here Stephen Chase Meader continued his studies, in the meantime working 
in the mills during the intervals of the school sessions. In 1856 he entered 
the Friends' School, now known as the Moses Brown School, in Providence, 
Rhode Island, where he remained as a student for four years. He was a 
most diligent student, excelling in mathematics and chemistry. In i860, 
completing his schooling at Providence, he returned to Gonic and entered 
the employ of the late N. V. Whitehouse, working in the various depart- 
ments of the mill, and from this time forward his mastery of the details of 



1 88 ^teplien Cl)a0e a^eaHet 

manufacturing was rapid, his methodical habits and quick insight into the 
various processes, united with good judgment and faithfulness, hastened his 
promotion to the position of dyer, then finisher, superintendent, and finally 
to that of agent. He was appointed to the position of agent for the Gonic 
Manufacturing Company in June, 1881, filling that position up to the time 
of his death, during which time the affairs of the Gonic Manufacturing Com- 
pany were in excellent condition. 

While Mr. Meader won great distinction in the manufacturing world, 
he was none the less active in other lines of endeavor. He was a director 
in the Rochester Loan & Banking Company, a trustee of the Rochester 
Library, and a director in the Rochester Loan & Building Company. He 
also had been elected twice to represent his town in the State Legislature. 
Mr. Meader always took deep interest in civic matters and all things pertain- 
ing to his town's welfare, and had served in the council for several years. 
He had often been asked to accept the nomination for mayor, but always 
refused to accept this honor. 

In September, 1871, Stephen Chase Meader was married to Efifie Seavey, 
a native of Farmington, New Hampshire, and a daughter of Calvin and 
Hyrena (Clark) Seavey. Mrs. Meader's father, who was a farmer, was born 
in Farmington, New Hampshire, and his wife was a native of Strafford, 
New Hampshire. Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Chase Meader were the parents 
of one daughter, Gertrude Amanda, who is now the widow of Henry D. 
Andrews, late of Boston, Massachusetts. 

This simple account of his useful life and the activities he engaged in 
tells far more eloquently than any formal praise of the remarkable powers 
possessed by Mr. Meader, especially if it be remembered that his ardent, 
enthusiastic nature would not permit his undertaking anything which he 
was not fully prepared to do, any obligation which he did not observe in 
the fullest. His labors were great, but his powers were equal to their ade- 
quate performance. Perhaps it was for this ideal of conscientious and 
enthusiastic energy that the personality of Mr. Meader stood in the minds 
of his fellow-men, yet it was only one of many commendable qualities for 
which his life might serve as an excellent example. The prominent points 
of his character were quiet, unobtrusive ways, firmness, and a conscientious 
regard to duty. He was always seeking for the best results and shaping the 
means at his command with excellent judgment to obtain them. He was 
constantly alive to the requirements of the position he held, and was 
possessed of indefatigable industry and perseverence. While holding to the 
faith of a long line of ancestors as a member of the Quakers, he was liberal 
to all denominations and a generous contributor to the village church. He 
was a man of strong domestic instincts, and although a Mason, and possess- 
ing many friends in that great fraternity, and being an exceptionally busy 
man in many ways, it can truly be said of him that his happiest hours were 
those spent at his own fireside surrounded by those he loved. He was also 
a devoted and most faithful friend and one whose attitude towards his 
fellow-men in general was open and candid, yet genial in the extreme, so that 
he easily won and retained the friendship and respect of all those with whom 



^tepl)en Ctiase ^eaDec 



189 



he came in contact. The personality of Mr. Meader was an unusual one, so 
that it cannot help but impress those who were so fortunate as to have 
known him, and the duties of such volumes as this is to preserve for all time 
the records of the lives of such men as Stephen Chase Meader, to serve as 
an example and inspiration for those who are to follow him. 




Hon. Bantel e. 3RoUtn$ 

'HIS history would not be complete without at least brief men- 
tion of the lineage and life of Hon. Daniel G. Rollins. Of 
his ancestry, we have the names of nearly a hundred who 
sleep within or near the limits of Rockingham and Strafford 
counties. Of these, Nicholas Frost, ancestor, it is believed, 
of all who in this county bear his surname, was one of the 
three who established the line between Maine and New 
Hampshire. Rev. John Wheelwright and Elder William Wentworth were 
of the Exeter Confederation of 1639. Hon. John Plaisted was speaker of 
the New Hampshire Assembly in 1696, and judge of the Superior Court for 
twenty years. Hon. John Pickering was speaker of the same body in 1677. 
Major Richard Waldron, of the Indian wars, was long time commandant 
of the provincial forces, and Hon. Ichabod Rollins was judge of probate for 
the county of Strafford at the organization of the State in 1776. 

Hon. Daniel G. Rollins was born in Lebanon, Maine, October 3, 1796, 
but it was in this State that he spent most of his long and useful life and 
proved himself worthy of his honorable ancestry. While yet a child he made 
frequent and extended visits to the home of his paternal grandfather, now 
that of Frank Hale, on the banks of the Salmon Falls river, in Rollinsford, 
and neither that town nor any of the towns about it has perhaps ever had an 
inhabitant more familiar than he with every road and by-way, nook and 
corner, important fact and interesting tradition in its local history. Mr. 
Rollins was the son of John and Betsey (Shapleigh) Rollins, both of 
unmixed English descent, and the ancestors of both had lived in America for 
almost two centuries. James Rollins settled in what is now Newington, in 
1634, and Alexander Shapleigh, as agent of Sir Ferdinando Gorges, went to 
Eliot, Maine, about 1630. Both these men were from Devonshire, England. 
They established their homes almost directly opposite each other, on the 
shores of the beautiful Piscataqua river, and the farms which that river 
watered have never been alienated except by death, but have remained in 
their possession and the possession of their respective descendants for almost 
two hundred and fifty years, and unto this day. Mr. Rollins was the third of 
eleven children, nine sons and two daughters. All of them were born in Leb- 
anon; all of them, save one, an infant, survived their parents; and when their 
mother died at their old homestead all the living except one were at her bur- 
ial, and there has not been a death in their family for half a century. Of such 
sturdy stock came Judge Rollins. His boyhood was largely spent upon his 
father's farm, admirably located in a community intelligent and religious. It 
was there that his character and health, for which inheritance had done 
so much, was fashioned and strengthened, so that at early manhood, when 
he went out into the great world for himself, he carried with him the 
elements and assurance of a successful life. The year 1822 he spent in 



I^ort. Daniel a. KoIIins 191 

Boston, and he often afterwards loved to fancy the story of his life as it 
would have read had he remained there. From 1823 to 1826 he was 
a^ent of a sugar refining company in Portsmouth, and while there, until 
his marriage in 1825, he was a fellow-boarder in a private family with the 
Hons. Ichabod Bartlett, W. H. Y. Hackett, and Ichabod Goodwin, all then 
young, unmarried men, and the friendships which then began lasted through 
the lives of all. From 1826 to 1835 he resided in Wakefield, and from the 
last date until his death, in Great Falls. Until 1848 he was engaged in mer- 
cantile and manufacturing pursuits, sometimes extensively, always success- 
fully. Afterwards he was for four years president of the Great Falls & 
South Berwick Railroad. Of the Great Falls & Conway Railroad he was 
treasurer five years and president two years. He was a director in the 
Great Falls Bank sixteen years, and from the time of its organization until 
his death was vice-president of the Somersworth Savings Bank. His fellow- 
citizens gave frequent expressions of their estimate of him. Five times in 
Wakefield they chose him one of the selectmen of that town. Of Somers- 
worth he was selectman seven years, town treasurer eight years, and three 
years he was one of its representatives in the State Legislature. From 1857 
to 1866, when he reached the age of seventy, and was thereby incapacitated 
by the State constitution from longer service, he was judge of probate for the 
county of Strafford. 

Judge Rollins was fortunate in his marriage. It was during his resi- 
dence in Portsmouth that he first met Susan Binney Jackson, who was there 
as a pupil at a boarding-school. Connected with their early acquaintance is 
a pleasant little romance, which limited space will not allow us to give. 
Sufficient to say that it ended, if it has yet ended, in a marriage altogether 
harmonious and ideal. Miss Jackson was of Watertown, Massachusetts, of 
a family prominently associated with the early settlement of that State, 
and of military distinction during the Revolutionary War, and she brought 
to her new home health, hope, culture, good cheer, and a large circle of 
delightful friends. They were married February 3, 1825, by Rev. Dr. Borie, 
of Watertown, Rev. Dr. Francis, afterwards for many years chaplain of 
Harvard College, giving her in marriage, and David Lee Childs, afterwards 
the husband of Lydia Maria, Rev. Dr. Francis' sister, serving as best man; 
they celebrated their golden wedding February 3, 1875, only twenty days 
before his death. What domestic joys and sorrows, hopes and fears, for 
themselves and their family, were crowded into their fifty years of wedded 
life! During all that time, however employed and whatever his sources of 
pleasure, it was in his home that he found his rest, refreshment, inspiration, 
and largest delight. To that he gave his best thought and his whole heart. 
Of his eleven children, two died in early life and nine survived him, and are 
still living. His sons are: Franklin J., of Portland, for many years United 
States collector of internal revenue in the district of Maine; Edward A., 
speaker of the New Hampshire House of Representatives in 1861-62, after- 
wards and for a long time United States Commissioner of Internal Revenue, 
and now president of the Centennial National Bank of Philadelphia; Daniel 
G., Jr., whose sketch follows, and George F., of the Treasury Department, 



192 ^on. Daniel 0. HoIIins 

Washington. His daughters are: Mrs. Thomas C. Parks, of Newton, 
Massachusetts; Mrs. Oliver W. Shaw, of Austin, Minnesota; and Mrs. John 
P. Pope, Carie E., and Mary P., who, with their beloved mother, still enrich- 
ing their lives and the lives of all the rest, keep the generous, hospitable doors 
of the old homestead in Great Falls wide-open, as they have been kept for 
more than a generation. 

Mr. Rollins' opportunities in early life for education at school were 
limited, as were those of most boys of his time and locality, but his wide 
mind was disciplined by its constant, judicious exercise, and filled by his 
natural aptitude for the selection of the best things to read and study and by 
absorption from all his surroundings. He was well-informed, and along 
with his love for the useful and the practical he had a marked poetic taste, 
and several early productions of his own pen are rhythmical and tender, and 
abound with sentiment. He gave his children the advantages of the best 
high schools and academies of their times, and two of his sons were grad- 
uated at Dartmouth College. He was a man of unusual enterprise. Before 
living in Great Falls, and when the village was small, he erected half a 
dozen of its largest buildings. His steam-mill on the Berwick side of the 
Salmon Falls was the first in all this section of the country. He was largely 
instrumental in the projection, construction, and management of the Great 
Falls & Conway and the Great Falls & South Berwick railroads. He was 
an incorporator of the Great Falls Bank, and of the Somersworth Savings 
Bank, and had much to do with the action of the town in the selection and 
purchase of what is now Forest Glade Cemetery, which he named. 

Mr. Rollins' enterprises were successful because of his industry and 
energy, and especially because these were guided and controlled by sound 
judgment. His heart was warm and his sympathies quick, but his judgment 
was logical, and where the rights of others were involved, superior alike to 
friendships and enmities. These qualities especially fitted him for the per- 
formance of the duties which devolved upon him as judge of probate, and 
won for him, while he occupied that office, the high respect of the bar and 
the approbation of the public. The unfortunate and disappointed made him 
their confidant, and it is the privilege of few to render to such, more service. 
He had the rare power of discerning the moral quality and the motives of 
men, of weighing well their worth or worthlessness, and in its exercise he 
rarely made mistakes. His integrity was never challenged nor suspected; 
he was a man of rare personal purity; his speech was never unclean, pro- 
fane, or irreverent; he was subject to no evil habit; his whole moral nature 
was elevated. Reared in a Christian home, he was always attracted and 
controlled by religious truth. In the town where he lived he was always a 
constant attendant of the Congregational church, but it was not until 1857 
that he publicly professed his faith in Christ and became a member of that 
church. He was always interested in its welfare, and almost his last work 
was with reference to the alteration of the church edifice and the enlarge- 
ment of its vestry. The improvements which were made after his death 
were in harmony with the plans which he prepared in his life. He never 
grew old, for his heart at seventy-eight was as young as at forty, and to the 



l^on. Daniel <Q, KoIIins 193 

last he was the companion of his children and grandchildren, no less than 
their counselor and guide. Only two or three days before his death he 
assisted them in the preparation of charades for private exhibition. Yet all 
the while he was ripening naturally and gradually for another and a better 
world. Taking large interest in existing things and current events in his 
neighborhood, State and country, he had a yet larger interest in the univer- 
sal and the immortal. His hold upon the material and the apparent grew 
measurably less and still less, and the glories of that country of which the 
Scriptures make prophecy and full promise grew brighter and yet brighter, 
until on the morning of February 22, 1875, as quietly and restfully as a 
ripened leaf falls in the autumn, he gave up the ghost and died in a good old 
age — an old man full of years — and was gathered to his people, and his sons 
buried him in the place which he had prepared for himself, and the whole 
community mourned for him as for one of its best and most beloved citizens. 





lANIEL G. ROLLINS, Jr., of New Hampshire birth and ances- 
try, became a leading member of the New York bar, few 
members of that bar enjoying a more extensive acquaintance 
or higher reputation. He served in high position, and as a 
public prosecutor in the criminal courts displayed eminent 
ability. In his social life and career Mr. Rollins enjoyed a 
reputation on a footing with that which he acquired as a 
lawyer. He was a candidate for judicial honors, but his party being in the 
minority he failed of election, but by a close margin. His life was full of 
honors, however, and while he would have adorned the bench of the Supreme 
Court his career was not marred by his defeat, on the contrary, the splendid 
vote he received added to his fame and popularity. 

Daniel G. Rollins, Jr., was born at Great Falls (now Somersworth), New 
Hampshire, October i8, 1842, died at his summer home on Beacon street, 
Somersworth, New Hampshire, August 30, 1897, having gone to the old 
homestead about four weeks prior to his death. After completing prepara- 
tory study he entered Dartmouth College, whence he was graduated with 
high honors, class of i860, the youngest graduate of that college. Later he 
entered Harvard Law School, a classmate being Judge Cowing of the New 
York Court of General Sessions. Mr. Rollins, upon receiving his degree in 
1863, located in Portland, Maine, where he remained three years. In 1866 
he was appointed assistant United States district attorney with headquar- 
ters in New York City, an office he held three years, then resigned and 
established in private practice in New York City, his particular field of 
practice being the United States courts. He remained in private practice 
four years, then returned to the public service, being appointed assistant 
district attorney in 1873 by Benjamin K. Phelps, the district attorney. He 
served as assistant under Mr. Phelps during the successive terms to which 
he was elected, and upon the death of his chief, soon after his election in 
1879, Governor Cornell appointed Mr. Rollins district attorney. As a public 
prosecutor he has gained high reputation. As a cross examiner he displayed 
the shrewdest tactics; he was almost invariably successful in securing convic- 
tion, and it was the verdict of the leading members of the bar of that period 
that he was one of the ablest criminal lawyers of the State. His long exper- 
ience as assistant district attorney, his familiarity with every branch of crim- 
inal law, as well as his wide acquaintance and popularity among lawyers, 
made his appointment to higher office thoroughly in keeping with public 
sentiment. He served out the remainder of Mr. Phelp's unexpired term end- 
ing January i, 1882, then entered upon a full term as district attorney, to 
which he had been elected by the people the preceding November. 

Among the important cases in which Mr. Rollins conducted the prose- 
cution while in the district attornev's office were the Lambert and Case 



Daniel &, laoIUns, 3It., ^^* D. 195 

insurance trials; the "Joe" Cobiirn case; and a series of arson and perjury 
trials which in the opinion of insurance men did much to prevent incendiar- 
ism in New York City. Before succeeding to the office of district attorney 
he had been a candidate for the office of recorder, and although he ran ahead 
of his ticket he was defeated by Frederick Symth. There is nothing perhaps 
in his entire career which is a more significant tribute to his ability than the 
fact that during his candidacy for the recordership a flattering endorsement 
was tendered him by thirteen jurymen who had been impressed by his indus- 
trious, skillful management of cases in which they had served. In 1883, Mr. 
Rollins was elected surrogate by a majority of fifteen thousand, an office he 
held until 1887. The most important of his decisions as surrogate were given 
in the Hoyt, Marx, Hamersley, Paine and Darling cases. He at all times 
enjoyed a reputation among lawyers of the city for his prompt and efficient 
disposition of all matters coming into the Surrogate's Court. 

In 1887 Mr. Rollins was nominated for judge of the Supreme Court of 
New York State, but after a close contest he was defeated by his Democratic 
opponent. His name was later mentioned as a candidate for judicial honors, 
but he continued devoted to his private practice which was very large. His 
last prominent appearance in court was as counsel for the American Tobacco 
Company, at its arrangement bv the district attornev's office of New York 
City. 

Mr. Rollins was president of the Dartmouth Alumni Association of New 
York City from 1880 to 1884; and in the latter year received from his alma 
mater the honorary degree, LI,. D. He was a member of Psi Upsilon from 
his college days, and throughout his life retained his interest in that frater- 
nity. He was a member of the Union League of New York, his clubs, the 
Lawyers, Century, City and Downtown Association. 

John Putnam Pope was born in Danville, Vermont, March 27, 1827, 
died December i, 1855. He was educated in the public schools and Phillips 
Academy, Danville, Vermont. On September 10, 1854, he married Susan 
A. Rollins, daughter of Hon. Daniel G. Rollins, whose biography forms a 
chapter of this review. Mr. and Mrs. Pope left a daughter, Elizabeth Put- 
nam Pope, born July 26, 1855, who now (1919), resides in the Rollins home- 
stead at Somersworth, formerly Great Falls, New Hampshire. It was at the 
old homestead in Somersworth that Daniel G. Rollins, Jr., of New York, 
died, he having gone there when stricken with what proved his last illness. 



j^on. albert IfailaUate 




'HE death of Hon. Albert Wallace, of Rochester, New Hamp- 
shire, which occurred very suddenly at his beautiful home on 
South Main street, on Thursday morning, September 28, 
1916, was a profound loss to the entire community, with the 
affairs of which he was so closely and progressively identi- 
fied. The city, almost as a single man, expressed its deep 
regret and the respect it felt for the distinguished member 
who had departed, and prior to the funeral services at the late home, Sunday 
afternoon, October i, 1916, the remains lay in state from twelve-thirty to 
one-thirty, where they were viewed by many people, including a large num- 
ber of the employees of the Wallace Shoe Factory. The local press and the 
various organizations of which he was a member united in a chorus of 
praise, which took the form of editorials, obituary articles and formal reso- 
lutions. Few men in the history of the city of Rochester have been more 
prominent than Hon. Albert Wallace. As a partner in one of the largest 
manufacturing concerns in the State, a life-long resident, and a member of 
one of the oldest families in the city, his father before him one of the most 
prominent manufacturers of the Granite State; as a stockholder and director 
in various enterprises, interested in the political fortunes of the Republican 
party at times; as a candidate for various offices or as a worker in the rank 
and file of the party, Albert Wallace may be placed among a very select list 
of Rochester's leading citizens, not only of his own day but of the long list 
of public-spirited and prominent men who have made their homes in that 
citv. Mr. Wallace was in very poor health for a number of years, but the 
impaired condition of his health was very noticeable to his immediate rela- 
tives the year previous to his death. He sought assistance from some of the 
best specialists, but to no avail. 

Hon. Albert Wallace was born in Rochester, New Hampshire, June 6, 
1854, a son of Ebenezer G. and Sarah (Greenfield) Wallace. He was edu- 
cated in the town schools, later attending the Berwick Academy with his 
brother, both graduating from that institution and entering Dartmouth 
College, from which institution they received diplomas in 1877. Then, in 
company with his brother, Sumner Wallace, they went into the shoe business 
of E. G. and E. Wallace, the concern being one of the most successful shoe 
manufacturing concerns in New England. Upon the death of his father, and 
uncle, Edwin Wallace, the management of the factory was assumed by 
Albert and Sumner Wallace, in partnership with a cousin, George E. Wal- 
lace. Later the interest of the cousin was purchased, and since the settle- 
ment of the Ebenezer G. Wallace estate the two sons have been in charge. 
Early in 1916 negotiations were commenced for the purchase of the shoe 
factory by a company, which sale was consummated March i, 1916, the new 
concern assuming entire charge at that time and doing business under the 



!^on. aiftett maWact 197 

name of the E. G. and E. Wallace Shoe Company. The fact that the pro- 
prietors disposed of the business was due in a great measure to the ill-health 
of both, although the Wallaces retained a large financial interest in the 
company. 

While personally affiliated with the shoe business, Mr. Wallace's inter- 
ests were directed in other enterprises. For many years he had been presi- 
dent and a director of the Page Belting Company of Concord, a director of 
the Worcester, Nashua & Rochester Railroad, a stockholder, and at one time 
an official, of the Great Falls Manufacturing Company, and vice-president 
and director of the Rochester Loan & Banking Company. He was also inter- 
ested in other railroad projects. Politically he was a life-long Republican, 
and had served two terms in the State Legislature, and nine years as council- 
man in the City Council. While he was naturally public-spirited and an 
enthusiastic contributor to all philanthropic enterprises, this work was 
always done very quietly, and many charitable deeds done and contributions 
made by him will be known only by those whom he has assisted. He was one 
of the incorporators and hearty supporters of the Gafney Home for the Aged 
in Rochester, and served as the president of the corporation for many years; 
he was a contributor to many of the churches of Rochester, although he and 
his family were affiliated with the First Congregational Church. Mr. Wal- 
lace's residence in Rochester was an evidence of the interest he took in his 
home. The estate is one of the beautiful spots in Rochester, a handsome 
residence surrounded by well-kept lawns and during the summer decorated 
with shrubbery and flowers, while nearby is a private conservatory and 
garage. Fraternally, Mr. Wallace was very prominent, he having been 
affiliated with all the Masonic bodies in Rochester, including Palestine Com- 
mandery. Knights Templar. 

Albert Wallace was twice married, his first wife being Rosalie K. Burr, 
of Rochester, New Hampshire. She died five years after their marriage. 
On October 24, 1894, he married Fannie Swift Chadbourne, of Watertown, 
Massachusetts, a daughter of Henry R. and Sarah Lydia (Green) Chad- 
bourne. By this marriage he had five children: Sara Josephine, Eben, 
Dorothy, who died in 1918; Ruth, and Kathryn. He is also survived by a 
son by the first marriage, Louis Burr Wallace, and by a brother, Hon. 
Sumner Wallace, and three sisters, Annie Wallace, Mrs. Josephine Sweet 
and Mrs. Carrie Hussey, all of Rochester. 

The manufacturing world is the debtor to Albert Wallace because of his 
interest and hearty cooperation in all things pertaining to its welfare; the 
city of Rochester is his debtor because he gave his time and strength to all 
which belonged to a better civic life; the church acknowledged her debt to 
him, as he was ever generous and loyal in meeting the demands for its sup- 
port ; society was his debtor for his cooperation in everything which made 
for a happier and more cheerful life. 

It is notable to have lived a life compelling such a demonstration in 
endorsement of it as took place to the memory of Albert Wallace. The 
master director of industry, who is at the same time alive to all the best 
interests of the community in which he lives, and as indefatigable a worker 



198 ^on. Albert tOallace 

in the one field as in the other, is both a potential citizen and a desirable one. 
He increases the business activity of the place of his residence, and at the 
same time helps to make it a better city in which to live. In these tw^o 
directions Hon. Albert Wallace was conspicuous in Rochester, New Hamp- 
shire. He possessed solidity of character, and those virtues of industry, 
thoroughness and reliability that men have always respected and always 
will respect. The vacancy that he left was visible, and the lesson of his life 
should not be overlooked by the coming generations. He was a man of 
strong and forceful personality, and a business man of the highest type. He 
won success in his business by honorable methods and a strict adherence 
of the principles that honorable and upright men adher to, and never did 
he deviate from them. He was prominent and influential in business circles, 
and was an energetic worker, devoted to his business interests, but when his 
day's work was done his own fireside claimed him, and there his hours "off 
duty" were spent. No man attained higher reputation for honorable dealing 
than he, and in the business world his firm friends were many. His prom- 
ises and statements could always be relied upon, for he held his word sacred, 
and his excellent business judgment often enabled others to profit as well 
as himself. Mr. Wallace was charitably inclined, and was very liberal in 
contributing to deserving objects, but preferred to be an anonymous giver. 
Such a man's name will be recorded in history for having made the world 
all the better for his having been in it, and leaves a memory gratefully cher- 
ished by many outside the family, and a circle of personal friends. 




C{)arle0 IKoobman 3|apes 

ERTAINLY among all the communities of the State of New- 
Hampshire, great or small, there is none that can point with 
pride to a higher average of good citizenship among its 
members than the City of Dover, New Hampshire, none 
which can boast of a greater number of their sons per unit 
of population whose names deserve to be remembered as 
having had to do with the development and growth of the 
place. Among these names, that of the late Charles Woodman Hayes stands 
high. Self-made in the truest sense of the word, successful in his business 
undertakings and aims, his career was an apt illustration of the value of 
character in determining the measure of success possible to attain. Indus- 
try, thrift and perseverance marked his way through life, and to these quali- 
ties he added business ability of a high order, and an honesty of purpose 
that enabled him to avoid those business and moral pitfalls that abound 
everywhere to trap the unwary. His death, which occurred in Madbury, 
New Hampshire, September 26, 191 5, while on a visit to the place of his 
birth, was not only a severe loss to his loved ones, but to the entire com- 
munity in which he had lived for so many years. It is of interest to note 
that Mr. Hayes died in the same house in which he was born. Mr. Hayes 
was a member of one of the oldest of American families, and inherited from 
various New England ancestors those qualities of enterprise and industry 
which lead to success and have made the New Englander preeminent 
throughout the United States and many other sections of the world. 

Charles Woodman Hayes was born in Madbury, New Hampshire, Sep- 
tember II, 1836, the second son and youngest child of Samuel Davis and 
Comfort (Chesley) Hayes. The name Hayes is of Scotch origin. It was 
originally written Hay, and means an enclosed park or field. Four families 
of the name of Hayes came to New England in the seventeenth century. 

(I) John Hayes, the immigrant ancestor of Charles Woodman Hayes, 
settled in Dover Corner, New Hampshire, about 1680. He had a grant of 
twenty acres of land, March 18, 1694, and this was laid out November 4, 
1702. It lay between localities known as Barbadoes and Tole-end, and it 
is probable that most of his land was secured by purchase. He died October 
25, 1708, of malignant fever, four days after he was taken sick, as appears 
by the journal of Rev. John Pike. He was married, June 28, 1686, to Mary 
Home. 

(II) Deacon John (2) Hayes, eldest child of John (i) and Mary 
(Home) Hayes, was born in 1687, and lived in Dover, at Tole-end. He 
was deacon of the first Dover church, being the third in succession from the 
establishment of that church. He died June 3, 1759, and was buried on Pine 
Hill, and his tomb-stone is still in existence. He married (first) Tamsen 
(Wentworth) Chesley, widow of James Chesley, and daughter of Deacon 
Ezekiel Wentworth, of Somersworth. She died December 30, 1753, at the 



200 Ci)arle0 ^ootiman \^apt$ 

age of sixty-five years. He married (second) Mary (Roberts) Wingate, 
widow of Samuel Wingate. 

(Ill) Hezekiah Hayes, fifth son of Deacon John and Tamsen (Went- 
worth-Chesley) Hayes, was born February 2, 1720, in Dover, New Hamp- 
shire, and settled in Barrington, New Hampshire, where he died, February 
24, 1700. He entered the army August 7. 1778. He married Margaret Gate. 

(iV) Elihu Hayes, second son of Hezekiah and Margaret (Gate) 
Hayes, was born August 18, 1757, in Barrington, New Hampshire, where he 
was a farmer. He married, in Barrington, April 28, 1772, Elizabeth Davis, 
daughter of Samuel Davis, and granddaughter of James Davis, one of the 
earliest settlers of Madbury, New Hampshire. 

(V) Jonathan Hayes, eldest son of Elihu and EHzabeth (Davis) Hayes, 
was born April 25, 1774, and married Mary Ham, July 3, 1794. She was 
born in Barrington, New Hampshire, April 11, 1773. They lived in New 
Durham for three years, and in 1797 moved to Madbury, which became their 
permanent home. He died March 27, 1851. His wife died December 25, 
1859. 

(VI) Samuel Davis Hayes, second child and eldest son of Jonathan 
and Mary (Ham) Hayes, was born in New Durham, April 8, 1796. His 
parents moved to Madbury when he was two years of age, and that place was 
his home during the remainder of his life of eighty-eight years. In 1814 he 
went as drummer with the Madbury Gompany of State Militia to the defense 
of Portsmouth. He afterward held all the company offices in the militia. 
He was seven times elected selectman, and he held other town offices. He 
married Gomfort Ghesley, third daughter of Samuel and Nancy Ghesley, of 
Madbury. She was born October 8, 1806, married July i, 1827, and died 
August 6, 1870. Immediately after their marriage they moved to a new and 
comfortable house on a farm adjoining his old homestead. This house was 
the successor of the original log garrison, and the farm, until their occu- 
pancy, had been occupied by three generations of the Daniels family, to 
whom it had been originally granted by the English crown. Samuel D. 
Hayes died February i, 1884, having outlived his wife fourteen years. He 
and his wife were the parents of three children, the 3^oungest of whom was 
Gharles Woodman Hayes. 

When Gharles Woodman Hayes was a child of but two years of age 
he met with a thrilling experience. While out in the pasture with his 
brother, he strayed ofif and was not seen after four o'clock in the afternoon. 
All night the search for him continued, and the next morning at eleven 
o'clock he was discovered mired in a swamp a few rods from the Bellamy 
river, about one and one-half miles from home. Mr. Hayes attended the 
public schools, and then fitted for college at the military g>^mnasium at 
Pembroke, New Hampshire, and graduated from Dartmouth Gollege, 
Ghandler scientific department, in 1858. He taught school nearly ten years. 
While teaching in Eliot and Baring, Maine, he took an active part in relig- 
ious matters, acting as leader of the choir and superintendent of the Sunday 
school. In 1866 he returned to Madbury to take care of his parents and 
cultivate the farm. He at once became actively interested in the affairs of 
the town, especially educational and religious matters. He held the office 




///'.y r'/A'// /A//-/^/ ■ Vr/ yr-.j 



Cf)arle0 ^ooDman leaped 201 

of superintendent of the school committee for a period of six years, and was 
a member of the school board eight years. In June, 1869, he canvassed the 
town for the establishment of a religious meeting and Sabbath school at 
Madbury town house. The people united with the Congregational Society 
at Lee Hill in the support of a minister. For ten years services were held 
at Madbury, during which time Mr. Hayes filled the position of leader of the 
choir, superintendent of the Sabbath school and chairman of the financial 
committee. Since 1858 Mr. Hayes practiced engineering and land surveying 
in Madbury and neighboring towns; he was a collector of taxes in 1872, and 
town treasurer for twenty-two years. 

On November 8, 1866, Mr. Hayes married Ellen Maria Weeks, a daugh- 
ter of William and Mariah (Clark) Weeks. Mrs. Hayes was born April 29, 
1843, at Strafford Corner, New Hampshire. William Weeks, her father, 
was born in 1812, and married. May 12, 1842, Mariah Clark, daughter of 
Hezekiah and Hannah (Ham) Clark. Mrs. Hayes is a granddaughter of 
Elisha and Polly (Potter) Weeks, and a great-granddaughter of Daniel 
Weeks of Gilford, New Hampshire. The Weeks coat-of-arms is as follows: 

Arms — Per chevron gfules and sable, three annulets or. 
Crest — A dexter hand grasping a scimitar proper. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Woodman Hayes were the parents of four chil- 
dren, all daughters: i. Nellie Marie, married October 30, 1895, George E. 
Crosby. 2. Anna Lillian, married June 19, 1901, Charles Sumner Fuller, of 
Cambridge, Massachusetts. 3. Cora Eunietta, died April 17, 1879. 4. Clara 
Comfort. In the fall of 1898 Mr. and Mrs. Hayes and family moved to 
Dover, New Hampshire, where Mrs. Hayes still resides, at No. 61 Belknap 
street. 

There is a pretty tradition in connection with the Hayes coat-of-arms. 
In the reign of Kenneth III, of Scotland, A. D., 980, the Danes were pursu- 
ing the flying Scots from the field when a countryman and his two sons 
appeared in a narrow pass, brandishing an ox-yoke; they rallied the fugitives 
and turned the course of battle. The king in reward for their valor gave to 
the countryman and his two sons, afterward known as Hay, as much land 
on the River Tay as a falcon, flying from a man's hand would cover prior to 
settling down. This tract, six miles in length, was afterwards called Errol. 
The stone on which the falcon lighted is still pointed out in a little village 
called Hawkstone. For eight centuries the family of Hay have borne "three 
escutcheons gules, with a broken ox-yoke as a part of the crest, two Danes 
in armor as their supporters, and the motto Renovate animos. The earls of 
Errol bear this motto, together with a falcon crest. In Scott's library at 
Abbottsford, among other coats-of-arms is that of Hayes, which has a cross 
between four stars, the falcon crest, and the motto Recte. The present Eng- 
lish family of Hayes, of Arborfield, Berks, have the "three escutcheons 
gules," and the falcon crest. The following is the arms of the family herein 
under consideration: 

Arms — Argent, three inescutcheons within a bordure nebulee gules. 
Crest — A hand proper holding an ox yoke or, bows gules. 
Motto — Renovate animos. (Renew your courage). 



202 Ciiarleg SOooDman ^ape0 

Charles Woodman Hayes was a man of high ideals, to which he adhered 
with an unusual degree of faithfulness in the conduct of his life, and might 
well be pointed out as a model of good citizenship. In all the relations of 
life he displayed those cardinal virtues that have come to be associated with 
the best type of American character, an uncompromising idealism united 
with a most practical sense of worldly afifairs. His success was of that quiet 
kind which integrity and just dealing with one's fellow-men is sure to bring 
when coupled with ability such as his, a success of the permanent type which 
the years increase and render more secure because it rests on the firm founda- 
tion of the trust and confidence of his community. In his career as public 
servant he showed himself without any personal ambition, and actuated 
with no desire other than to further the advantage of the community, and 
to strengthen his party wherever that did not conflict with the public wel- 
fare. His private virtues were not less remarkable than his public, and the 
deep afifection with which his family and intimate friends regarded him is 
the best tribute which can be paid to the strength and sincerity of his domes- 
tic instincts. He was the most devoted of husbands and fathers, ever seek- 
ing the happiness of those about him, and the most faithful friend, winning 
by his charming personality a host of intimates who repaid his fidelity in 
like kind. The community at large has felt the wholesome and inspiring 
eflfect of his example, and it will be long before its members cease to miss 
the kindly and genial influence which surrounded him, and bettered those 
with whom he came in contact. 





Barnes (S^reenougl) (S^eorge 

*0 THE minds of all of us the term "a New England character" 
presents a fairly definite picture. We think in the first place 
of these fundamental virtues upon which all worthy char- 
acter must be based, courage and honor, and in addition to 
those we think of a somewhat unusual combination of ideal- 
ism and practical common sense, the presence of which any- 
where is almost sure to spell success for its possessor. It is 
these qualities which, first possessed by the English ancestors of our New 
England people, drove them out to all quarters of the world to explore the 
wilderness and finally subject it to the needs and requirements of human 
life. This character we find admirably expressed in the life of James 
Greenough George, whose name heads this memorial sketch, just as we also 
find it in so many other of his fellow-countrymen and among his own fore- 
bears. The death of Mr. George occurred at his home in Plaistow, New 
Hampshire, in 1873. He was born in what is now Plaistow, but in former 
years was known as Kingston, New Hampshire, in 1799, a son of James and 
Tabitha (Noyes) George. 

The name, George, first a forename and later a surname, is derived from 
two Greek words, and signifies "earth-worker," or "farmer." The families 
of this name are probably of diflferent ancestors, and are scattered through- 
out the United States. The members of the George family who settled in 
Massachusetts Bay Colony about the middle of the seventeenth century 
came from the southeastern part of England, and as traditions of the family 
indicate, there were three brothers arriving in America at nearly the same 
time. 

Arms — Argent, a fess gules between three falcons volant azure, beaked and mem- 
bered or. 

Crest — A demi-hound sable, collared or, ears and legs argent. 

Motto — Magna est Veritas et praevalebit. (Truth is great and will prevail.) 

James George, one of the three brothers mentioned above, was in Haver- 
hill, Massachusetts, as early as 1652, when he was chosen as herdsman of 
the town. For this service he received a compensation of twelve shillings 
and six pence per week, payable in Indian corn and butter. He was "to Keep 
ye herd faithfully as a herd ought to be kept; if any be left on the Sabbath 
when ye town worships they who keeps are to go ye next day doing their 
best endeavor to find them." He was not permitted to turn his flock into 
the pasture on the Sabbath until the "second beating of ye drum." He 
worked for William Osgood, of Salisbury, as early as 1654. When the 
boundary between Salisbury and Haverhill was established in 1654, because 
of it he became a resident of part of Salisbury, since known as Amesbury. 
He was a townsman at the incorporation of that town, March 19, 1655. He 
received grants of land in 1655, 1658 and 1666. He is found in the list of 



204 3Iame0 ©rcenougl) ©corge 

"commoners" or owners of common lands in 1667-68, and subscribed to the 
oath of allegiance in 1677. He married Sarah Jordan, daughter of Francis 
and Jane Jordan, and they were the parents of five children : James, Samuel, 
Sarah, Joseph and Francis. 

James Greenough George, sixth in descent from James George, the 
immigrant ancestor, was raised in the town of his birth, Plaistow, New 
Hampshire, and with the exception of a short time spent in Haverhill, Mas- 
sachusetts, about 1838, at which time he was in the shoe manufacturing 
business, he spent his entire life in that town. He became a man of promi- 
nence in his locality, and although never a politician he was elected and 
served several terms in the New Hampshire State Legislature, being what 
was then termed an "old fashioned Democrat." In early life he was a shoe 
manufacturer, but later he purchased the general store at Plaistow, which 
he operated many years with success, and was also for several years depot 
master and postmaster at Plaistow. He was always a staunch friend of 
temperance and gave up a great deal of his time in furtherance of that cause. 

James Greenough George married Rebecca Plumer Bradle3% a daughter 
of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Currier) Bradley, and they became the parents 
of five children: Isaac Bradley, deceased; Eliza Ann, now the widow of 
Elijah Fox; James Newell, deceased; Cyrus Albert, now a resident of Lex- 
ington, Massachusetts; and Edgar Wallace. 




3oJ)n ^Sutler ^mttJ) 




O STATE in the Union has maintained a longer or more 
unbroken record of disinterested and efficient service on the 
part of its high officials than the State of New Hampshire, 
and none has more worthily contributed to this record than 
the distinguished gentleman whose name heads this imper- 
fect appreciation, John Butler Smith, manufacturer, man of 
affairs and Governor of the State from 1893 to 1895, whose 
death on August 10, 1914, at the age of seventy-six years, was felt as a direct 
loss by the whole Commonwealth. 

The stock from which Governor Smith was descended was a strong and 
hardy one, and has contributed many of America's most prominent citizens 
and many of the strongest figures in her political and industrial life. His 
progenitor in this country was Lieutenant Thomas Smith, a native of the 
North of Ireland, who was one of the group of men who formed the famous 
Londonderry (New Hampshire) Colony of 1719, and was one of the 
grantees of the nearby town of Chester. From him the line descends 
through a number of most worthy ancestors to Ammi Smith, the father of 
John Butler Smith, who flourished during the first two quarters of the 
nineteenth century. Ammi Smith was born in the town of Acworth, and 
when a young man operated a saw mill at Hillsborough. He later removed 
to Saxton's River, Vermont, where he was engaged in the manufacture of 
woolen goods for some time, but eventually returned to Hillsborough, 
where he retired from business and where his death occurred in 1887, at 
the venerable age of eighty-seven years. He married Lydia Butler, and 
they were the parents of a family of seven children, one of whom was John 
Butler Smith. 

John Butler Smith was born April 12, 1838, at Saxton's River, Ver- 
mont, the third child of Ammi and Lydia (Butler) Smith. He inherited 
from his ancestors the sterling character which had marked them, characters 
that were developed most effectively in him by his early training and the 
environment of his youth. His father, while successful in his business, was 
in no sense of the word wealthy, and his son was brought up in that stern 
school of hard work and the simple wholesome pastimes of outdoors, which 
has been the cradle of the best type of American citizenship. The first nine 
years of his life were spent in his native town of Saxton's River, and it was 
here that his earliest associations and impressions were formed. At the age 
of nine, however, he accompanied his father to Hillsborough, where the elder 
man went for business reasons, and it was in the public schools of that town 
and the Academy at Francestown that he received his education. In the 
latter institution he took the course which is given preparatory to entering 
college, but left before graduation in order to enter upon a business career. 
in which he had a most laudable ambition to excel. The first few years of 



2o6 31ol)n Sutler ^mitb 

his new endeavor were passed in a number of different places and in various 
occupations, all of which, however, increased the knowledge and experience 
of his young and receptive nature, and became mental and spiritual assets 
which were of advantage to him in his subsequent life. He worked in New 
Boston, Saxton's River and Manchester, spending a year or more in each 
place, and he also passed a similar period in Boston, in all of which places 
he acquired considerable experience in business and industrial methods. In 
1864, in his twenty-sixth year, he became associated with that line of busi- 
ness which he was to follow with such marked success during so many years 
of his life. He became connected with a mill in Washington, New Hamp- 
shire, which was engaged in manufacturing knit goods. A year later he 
entered upon a better position in a similar mill in Weare, and after another 
year engaged in an enterprise of his own, building a small mill in Hills- 
borough, and upon which was laid the foundation of his future great success. 
During forty years of continuous labor he carried on the enterprise, and 
always in harmony with the highest business standards. He built up the 
great corporation known as the Contoocook Mills, one of the best known 
and most substantial industries of its kind in America. While in one 
respect his policy in connection with this industry was conservative, in that 
he never accepted any of the more modern and less purely ethical standards 
of business, it was nevertheless progressive in the best sense of the word. 
There was no hesitancy in adopting modern improvements in his manufac- 
turing plant; he kept steadily abreast with the times, and when he passed 
away he left behind him an immense establishment fully equipped with 
every device which modern inventive genius had supplied to the industry. 
His reputation for probity was second to none, and the esteem with which 
his enterprise was regarded by the general public was made apparent by the 
response of investors both large and small, when in 191 5 a new issue of 
Contoocook stock was offered to the public through the Boston Bank. 

Besides his own great business talents, Governor Smith possessed that 
power which all truly great leaders must have — that of being able to select 
efficient and capable lieutenants. It was in no small degree due to this power 
that his great success in the industrial world was achieved, since he seemed 
to have an almost intuitive faculty for picking out the right man for the 
right place, from the very highest positions down to the lowest in his great 
plant. His relations with his subordinates also had much to do with his 
success, since he was able, through the esteem and affection by which he 
was held by his employees, to gain a far greater amount of work. He was 
vice-president of the Home Market Club, an organization which has done 
much for American industry, and which has had a national influence in the 
scope and character of its work. Governor Smith was very wise in investing 
no small portion of his fortune in real estate, and he was at the time of his 
death the owner of a very large estate both in his native region in New 
Hampshire and in the city of Boston, where several valuable properties 
belonged to him. He was for a number of years president of the Hillsbor- 
ough Guaranty Savings Bank, and was also affiliated with several other 
important business and financial concerns. 



3[oi)n IButler %mith 207 

But while Governor Smith was a very well known figure as a business 
man and industrial leader, it was really as a man of afifairs and through his 
connection with the public and political life of his State that he came to be 
best known to the general public. From early youth he had been a staunch 
supporter of the principles and policies of the Republican party, and partic- 
ularly of the principle of high tariff for which that party has stood for so 
long- and so consistently. His influence as vice-president of the Home 
Market Club broug-ht him into very considerable notice by the leaders of his 
party in this connection, and it was felt by them that no man could better be 
its standard-bearer in the State campaign than Mr. Smith. He had already 
held a considerable number of minor offices, and in 1884 had been chosen as 
an alternate delegate to the Republican National Convention at Chicago, 
and in the fall of the same year as one of the presidential electors from New 
Hampshire. Still later, in 1887, he was chosen a member of Governor 
Charles H. Sawyer's executive council, and distinguished himself as a mem- 
ber of that important body. From 1888, for a number of years, his name 
was prominently mentioned in connection with the gubernatorial candidacy 
in New Hampshire. In 1888 his friends were vigorous in supporting him for 
the Republican nomination, but on that occasion David H. Goodcll, of 
Antrim, was nominated and afterwards elected. Two years later, agitation 
in his favor was again taken up, but on this occasion Mr. Smith would not 
allow the use of his name, because of his friendship for another candidate, 
the late Hon. Hiram A. Tuttle, of Pittsfield. The claims of Mr. Smith, how- 
ever, were becoming more and more fully recognized year by year, and in 
1892 the Republican State Convention nominated him by acclamation. He 
was shortly afterwards elected successfully at the polls, in what was the first 
popular election in several years. 

He was inaugurated governor in January, 1893, and at once set to work 
at the great task which he performed with such distinction, of serving in 
every way the best interests of the commonwealth of which he was the head. 
Many important subjects came up for discussion and decision during his 
administration, among which were those of forest preservation and highway 
improvement, then indeed not given their due importance by the people 
generally or by any save those few far-seeing men such as Governor Smith, 
who realized how greatly the future welfare of the State depended upon 
them. He brought to the management of the State's affairs the same keen 
sense of what was practical that he had displayed in the conduct of his 
private business, nor had he ever worked harder or more devotedly for his 
own interests than he did now for the public weal. Speaking of his success 
as an executive, the "Concord Evening Monitor" said editorially: 

The successes of Governor Smith's term have been most brilliant and the Gov- 
ernor's frequent appearance at public functions as the representative of the State has been 
characterized by a dignity of person befitting his high standing and by a moderation and 
strength of utterance fully in keeping with the traditions of the Commonwealth. Gov- 
ernor Smith receives the congratulations of the people upon the unqualified success of 
his administrative labors and retires from office to become one of the foremost citizens 
of his State. 



2o8 3[o[)n 'Butlet Smitt 

Although from that time on until his death, not a senatorial election 
was held in New Hampshire at which his name was not mentioned as a pos- 
sibility, ex-Governor Smith had consistently refused to allow himself to be 
a candidate for nomination and has prevented his friends from seeking the 
honor for him. He did not desire further political honors, and although his 
service to his party in many ways, but particularly as a member of the State 
committee, continued to be notable, he gradually retired to a certain extent 
from the public eye and to a more private mode of life. 

John Butler Smith was united in marriage, November i, 1883, with 
Emma Lavender, old and highly respected residents of Boston, the latter a 
lady of unusual personal charm and culture. The long married life of Mr. 
and Mrs. Smith was an unusually happy and harmonious one, and the home 
which formed the environment for the early development of their children 
was an ideal one. They were the parents of the following children: Butler 
Lavender, born March 4, 1886, at Hillsborough, New Hampshire, and died 
at St. Augustine, Florida, April 6, 1888; Archibald Lavender, born February 
I, 1889, at Hillsborough, graduated from Harvard University with the class 
of 191 1, and received the degree of Bachelor of Arts; and Norman Smith, 
born May 8, 1892, at Hillsborough, prepared for college but did not enter. 
Mrs. Smith, who survived her husband, is a member of the ancient Lavender 
family of Kent county, England. Both Mr. and Mrs. Smith were Congrega- 
tionalists in their religious belief and attended the church of that denomina- 
tion at Hillsborough with their children. Mr. and Mrs. Smith always held 
the welfare of this church very much at heart, and contributed most gen- 
erously in support of its work, particularly that of a benevolent character. 

It will be appropriate to close this sketch with a number of the tributes 
paid to Governor Smith at the time of his death by many who had come into 
contact with him, either in personal, business or political relation. There 
was indeed an extraordinary number of such tributes even for a man so 
prominent as he and nothing can speak more eloquently of the personal 
esteem and affection in which he was universally held than their volume 
and character. The press of New Hampshire was in unison in a chorus of 
praise at the time of his death. The "Mirror" spoke of ex-Governor Smith 
in the following terms : 

John Butler Smith, Governor of New Hampshire in 1893 and 1894, was generally- 
recognized as one of the ablest and most accomplished chief executives this State ever 
possessed. He retired from office acclaimed as one of the foremost citizens of the State, 
a position he had ever since held with dignity and honor. He had not sought, nor 
allowed his friends to seek for him, any further political preferment, although there 
has not been an election of United States Senator since the years of his governorship 
of which mention has not been made of his eminent fitness for representing his State 
in the upper branch of the National Congress. 

Commenting editorially, the "Concord Evening Monitor" spoke in the 
following terms regarding ex-Governor Smith : 

The active, successful, beneficent life of the late John Butler Smith touched that 
of his fellow men in so many useful, helpful and honorable ways that the news of his 
death creates a very wide circle of sincere mourners. As chief executive of New Hamp- 



3Ioi)n IButler ^mitft 



209 



shire he gave the State a splendid business administration characterized by good gov- 
ernment and sound economy. For half a century he typified that class of manufacturers, 
proud of their product, just in their dealings, efficient in management, who have contrib- 
uted so much to the material prosperity of the State. His other business interests and 
his real estate holdings were extensive and judicious, proving his unusual ability as a 
man of afifairs. A Mason of high degree and one of the most prominent Congregational 
laymen in the State, Governor Smith took a lively and substantial interest in all move- 
ments for the public welfare and the true fraternity of his fellowmen. Within the past 
few years the owners of the "Monitor" and "Statesman" and the active stafJ of these 
papers have come into intimate relations with Governor Smith, in the respective capaci- 
ties of tenant and landlord, and thus have been enabled to appreciate even better than 
before his courtesy, kindliness and honor as well as his keen business judgment and 
public-spirited enterprise. In his death New Hampshire has lost one of her most hon- 
ored, most useful and best-loved citizens. 





ilenjamin fierce Ctjenep 

T Hillsborough, New Hampshire, a substantial stone wall has 
been erected around a small piece of land and upon a large 
boulder which marks the exact location is a bronze tablet 
thus inscribed: 

In Memory 
of 

BENJAMIN PIERCE CHENEY 

who was born here 

August Twelfth, 1815, 

died at 

Elm Bank, Wellesley, Massachusetts, 

July twenty-third, 1895. 

The preservation of the memory of one of New Hampshire's honored 
sons who won fame beyond her borders is a particularly appropriate recog- 
nition by the family of Mr. Cheney of the fact that in New Hampshire he 
developed the rugged honesty of his nature and obtained that start in life 
which made him a power in the business world. When finally the great 
express and railroad interests he founded took him to greater business 
centres, he did not forget his native State, but generously remembered her 
great educational institution, Dartmouth College, and in the city of Concord 
stands a statue of Daniel Webster presented to the State of New Hamp- 
shire by Benjamin Pierce Cheney, his lifelong friend. At the unveiling of 
the statue, Mr. Cheney made a brief address and alluded to the deep satis- 
faction it gave him to see the fruition of a hope that he had long cherished 
to do that which would fitly express his admiration for "a son of New Hamp- 
shire who as a patriot was unexcelled, and as an orator and statesman was 
without a peer." So, too, the rock and tablet which marks his own birth- 
place is a mark of loving respect for another "Son of New Hampshire," who 
in his achievement as a builder and founder of great express and railroad 
corporations gave to the entire country substantial benefits. He was one 
of the pioneers in the express business, and had accomplished much before 
he came into association with William Harnden and the other founders of 
the American Express Company, of which he became the largest stock- 
holder, director and treasurer, so continuing until his retirement. 

His leading characteristics were great tenacity of purpose, positive 
convictions, frankness and loyalty. A gentleman who was long connected 
with him testified that he had never known a man possessing a deeper sense 
of honor or sounder business judgment. Said Richard Olney, than whom 
there is no higher authority: 

Mr. Cheney was one of the self made men of New England and possessed in large 
measure the qualities to which their success in life is to be attributed. From his youth 
up he was temperate, industrious, persevering and resolute in his purpose to better the 
conditions to which he had been born. He brought to its accomplishment great native 



'Benjamin Pierce Cijenep 211 

shrewdness, a kindly, cheerful and engaging disposition, a sense of honor, the lack of 
which often seriously impairs the efficiency of the strongest natures, and an intuitive 
and almost unfailing judgment of human character and motives. The reward of his 
career was not merely a large fortune accumulated wholly by honorable means but the 
respect and regard of the entire community in which he lived. 

Mr. Cheney was well born, descending from John Cheney, of Newbury, 
Massachusetts, a man of prominence in that community. The line of descent 
from John Cheney was through Peter Cheney, 1639-95, a mill owner of 
Newbury; his son, John (2) Cheney, 1666-1750,' a house carpenter and mill- 
wright ; his son, John (3) Cheney, 1705-53, of Sudbury, a member of the town 
cavalry company; his son. Tristram Cheney, a farmer, and deacon of the 
Sudbury church; his son, Elias Cheney, 1760-1816, a soldier of the Revolu- 
tion and farmer of Hillsborough and Antrim, New Hampshire, who enlisted 
when a youth of seventeen in the Second New Hampshire Regiment, was 
wounded at Ticonderoga and was present at the surrender at Yorktown; 
his son, Jesse Cheney, 1788-1863, a blacksmith of Hillsborough, married 
Alice Steele, 1791-1849, daughter of James and Alice (Boyd) Steele, of 
Antrim, New Hampshire. Jesse and Alice (Steele) Cheney were the parents 
of Benjamin Pierce Cheney, to whose memory this appreciation of a valuable, 
useful life is dedicated. He was named for Governor Benjamin Pierce, of 
New Hampshire, at the Governor's request, so intimate were the families. 

Benjamin Pierce Cheney was born at Hillsborough, New Hampshire, 
August 12, 181 5, died at his beautiful country seat, "Elm Bank," near Wel- 
lesley, Massachusetts, July 23, 1895. He attended public schools until his 
tenth year, then began working in his father's shop although his friend. 
Governor Pierce, offered to finance his future education and put him through 
college. Before his twelfth year he was a clerk at Francestown, and at the 
age of sixteen began driving stages between Nashua and Exeter, New 
Hampshire. The stage coach was then the accepted mode of public convey- 
ance, largely patronized, and he became an expert horseman, taking pride 
in his work and skill. It was while driving stages that he became acquainted 
with many noted public men, including Daniel Webster, who was his life- 
long friend. He was often the custodian of large amounts of money in 
transit to and from Boston banks, and he won high reputation for honesty, 
fidelity and intelligence in executing such trusts. It was this reputation 
that brought him his first start in the field of effort in which he was to 
become famous. Several connecting stage lines combined their interests 
in one company and controlled a system of lines covering parts of New 
Hampshire and Vermont and extending into Canada. A general manager 
and agent was needed to control the working of the system and Mr. Cheney 
was selected for what was then a very important and responsible position. 
He made Boston his headquarters and home, drew a large salary, and man- 
aged the system until 1842. In that year he organized the firm of Cheney 
& Company, with Nathaniel White, of Nashua, and William Walker, and 
established an express line between Boston and Montreal. In 1852 he added 
to his line the express business of Fisk & Rice, thus gaining control of the 
route between Boston and Burlington, Vermont, by way of the Fitchburg 



212 'Benlamin pierce Cfjenep 

railroad. Now began a wonderful period of expansion for the pioneer 
express manager. He consolidated other express companies, controlling 
routes in other directions, and founded the United States & Canada Express 
Company to bring them all under one management. The railroads had then 
superseded the stages, giving him greater opportunity, and his express lines 
covered the northern part of the New England States. Mr. Cheney's won- 
derful grasp of detail, his ability to systematize and keep accurate accounts, 
and his untiring industry, easily made him a leader among the pioneers of 
the express business, and his success in organizing and controlling the busi- 
ness of northern New England lines made him an object of interest to other 
men who were gaining control in other sections. 

In 1879 the great business he founded was merged with that of the 
Am.erican Express Company under the name of the latter, and Mr. Cheney 
became a potent force in national and transcontinental lines, both express 
and railroad. He was elected a director and treasurer of the American 
Express Company, places of responsibility he ever held, and he became the 
largest individual holder of the company's stock. His large interest brought 
him into intimate relation with the Wells Fargo Express Company and 
with the Vermont Railroad Company, and through these into close connec- 
tion with transcontinental railroad building. He was one of the pioneers in 
the building of the Northern Pacific railroad, was heavily interested in the 
Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe system and in the San Diego Land and 
Town Company, serving as a director in all for many years. He was one 
of the incorporators of the Market National Bank of Boston, and of the 
American Loan and Trust Company, the foregoing being but the greater in 
a long list of corporate enterprises in which he was officially interested. He 
was loyal to the corporations with which he was connected and those in 
which others were induced to invest through his connection with them. At 
the time when the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe liquidated, he refused to 
abandon the smaller stockholders, but sustained a heavy loss with them 
although other directors of the road took advantage of the same knowledge 
Mr. Cheney possessed and sold their holdings before the crash came. He 
amassed a large fortune in his various activities and gained a leading position 
among financiers and men of business importance. But his wealth was 
gained fairly and wisely used. 

In 1854, while on a trip to Canada, he was in a railroad accident which 
caused the loss of his right arm, but this in no way interfered with his 
business activity nor did it afifect his cheerful disposition. In 1862 he made a 
trip to California, going by stage from Atchison, Kansas, to the coast, travel- 
ing in a stage coach by day and resting at the usual stopping places at night. 
During this time there was a run on the bank controlled by the Wells Fargo 
Company, but Mr. Cheney stood back of them, telegraphed to New York 
and Boston for funds, even went behind the counter to help out, and suc- 
ceeded in securing the necessary money, and consequently in forty-eight 
hours the trouble was at an end. During the progress of the Civil War, 
upon the request of the governor of Massachusetts, Mr. Cheney purchased 



IBeniamin Pietce Cljenep 213 

every horse used in that struggle by the State of Massachusetts. He per- 
sonally examined the hoofs and looked into the mouth of every horse pur- 
chased, and also paid for them out of his own money. The Governor 
informed him that it was impossible for him to reimburse him at that time, 
but that he would later, and one year hence he gave him a check for the 
amount paid for the horses, and in addition the interest thereon. Mr. 
Cheney would not accept this check, stating that he would only accept the 
money expended and not the interest thereon. He was drafted "three times, 
but owing to the loss of his right arm could not do army service; although 
it was not required of him to send a substitute, he did so in each case, paying 
the required money for the services of these men. 

Mr. Cheney gave freely of his wealth in numerous channels, benevolent 
and charitable, especially remembering Dartmouth College. Education, 
which had been denied him in his youth, had in him an ardent champion, 
and there is in a small Washington town an academy which bears his name, 
founded through his generosity. He was a well-read man of a high order of 
intelligence, deeply interested in New England history and genealogy, a 
member of the New England Historic-Genealogical Society. He gave the 
statue of Daniel Webster to the State of New Hampshire in 1886, and his 
benefactions were large, timely and frequent. His country residence, "Elm 
Bank," near Wellesley, was an estate of about two hundred acres, sur- 
rounded on three sides by the Charles river, and a beautiful example of the 
landscape gardener's art. "Elm Bank" was ever a source of joy to him, and 
after his retirement its beautifying was his greatest delight. His estate lay 
near historic Nonantum, where John Eliot preached his first sermon to the 
Indians, and five large elms planted by the Indian converts yet adorn the 
grounds near the site of the Cheney mansion. He was fast approaching his 
eightieth year when death claimed him; in fact, another month would have 
classed him with the octogenarians. But his work was done and well done, 
and he passed "to that bourne from which no traveler ever returns." leaving 
behind him the memory of a gracious Christian gentleman which shall 
endure so long as men cherish high ideals of character. 

Mr. Cheney married, June 6, 1865, Elizabeth Clapp, who survived him 
with three daughters: Alice Steele, Mary, and Elizabeth; and a son, Benja- 
min Pierce (2), a graduate of Harvard, class of 1890. Mrs. Cheney is a 
daughter of Asahel and Elizabeth Searle (Whiting) Clapp, of Dorchester, 
Massachusetts, and a lineal descendant of Nicholas Clapp, an early settler 
of Dorchester, and of Captain Roger Clapp, Major-General Humphrey 
Atherton, as well as other notables of the Colonial period. Her mother, 
Elizabeth Searle (Whiting) Clapp, was a descendant of the Rev. Samuel 
Whiting, whose wife, Elizabeth (St. John) Whiting, was of Royal descent 
and a sister of the Lord Chief Justice of England, in the reign of Charles I. 




Cfjester ilratilep 3ortan 

I HESTER BRADLEY JORDAN belonged to that splendid 
type of New England manhood which had its training in an 
environment of hard and even harsh simplicity. His child- 
hood and early youth were spent upon one of those unfertile 
farms, which require an expenditure of the most tremendous 
energy and unremitting endeavor to make even a livelihood 
from, and which had even more of personal hardship than 
was the lot of the average farmer's son of that region and period. There 
was something in the character of him and of his type, however, that seemed 
to thrive on misfortune, so that all the strongest and best characteristics of 
his nature were fostered and developed and fundamental virtues of life were 
purified as though by a refiner's fire. This environment has been the cradle 
of a majority of the strongest and most monumental figures in the history of 
our country, and undoubtedly has produced the most capable and effective 
type of our citizenship. 

Born October 15, 1839, at Colebrook, New Hampshire, Chester Bradley 
Jordan was the youngest of the family of ten children born to Johnson and 
Minerva (Buel) Jordan, old and respected residents of that place. His 
father met with financial reverses and was obliged to depend for his living 
upon a sterile New Hampshire farm, and it was here that his son was reared 
to manhood, and took perforce a part in the necessary tasks and labors 
there. Such time as he could spare from this work, almost too hard for 
childhood, he spent in the somewhat primitive district school, but though 
the advantages there were decidedly meagre and his opportunities for 
attendance most uncertain, so strong was his ambition that he overcame 
every obstacle, and by dint of his own consistent application and much 
reading out of school, gained for himself an excellent general education. 
The great school in which he learned, however, was that of experience, and 
how much he benefited by this hard tuition may be seen in the use he made 
of it during his subsequent life. His taste for learning was so great that 
for a time he followed the profession of teaching, for which he was fitted, 
and prepared at Colebrook Academy. He began as a teacher in the local 
schools, where he remained for eighteen years, the last two of which were 
spent as principal of Colebrook Academy. While teaching, however, he 
also carried on his own studies and graduated from Kimball Union Acad- 
emy at Meriden in 1866, when he already had been superintendent of schools 
in his native town for three years. He continued his studies privately after 
this and did not abandon them until the day of his death. He gave much 
time and attention to the study of history, especially that connected with his 
own State, and became a recognized authority in this branch of knowledge. 
As a mere youth Mr. Jordan had begun to take an interest in local political 
affairs, as well as in those broader issues connected with State and country. 



dLbtattt 'BraDIep 3[orDan 215 

In the year 1867 he became a selectman of Colebrook, this being but one 
year after his graduation from the Kimball Union Academy, and he was 
also nominated by the Republican party for representative in the State 
Legislature. In March, 1868, Mr. Jordan received the appointment as clerk 
of the Supreme Court for Coos county, and took up his duties in that capacity 
the following June. In October, 1874, however, he was removed for political 
reasons from this office by the Democratic administration, which had just 
come into power. But Mr. Jordan had in the meantime been making a study 
of the subject of the law, and upon losing his position continued the same in 
the law office of Judge William S. Ladd, of Lancaster, New Hampshire. 
After a time he entered the law office of Ray, Drew & Haywood, where he 
completed his studies. He was admitted to the State bar in November, 
1875, and to practice in the United States courts in May, 1881. He con- 
tinued with this firm after his admission, and upon the retirement of Mr. 
Haywood from active practice in May, 1876, was admitted as a junior 
partner, the style of the firm becoming Ray, Drew & Jordan. Still later, in 
1882, Mr. Philip Carpenter was admitted and the firm became Ray, Drew, 
Jordan & Carpenter. Since that time the name has undergone numerous 
changes, but eventually became Drew, Jordan, Shurtleflf & Morris. It is 
interesting to note that Irving W. Drew and Mr. Jordan were fellow stud- 
ents at the Colebrook, Stewartstown and Kimball Union Academy, and 
that after their association as attorneys, they practiced law together for 
about thirty years. 

But as well known as Mr. Jordan was in connection with the legal pro- 
fession, he was probably still better known to the rank and file of his fellow- 
citizens because of his connection with public afifairs. As a matter of fact 
he did not by any means seek public office and actually refused many oflfers 
of such, for instance, when he declined the postmastership of Lancaster, nor 
would he accept an appointment to the Supreme Bench of the State, as well 
as several other distinctions which his admirers and colleagues urged him 
to. Nevertheless his services in such positions as he did hold were of so 
noteworthy a character as to win for him the gratitude of the community- 
at-large, and a wide popular reputation. In politics he was a Republican, 
and early in life was actively identified with that party. His first vote, which 
was cast at Colebrook, was for Abraham Lincoln as President, and the first 
cast by him in Lancaster, where he later removed, was for Grant. In the 
year 1880 he was elected representative to the General Court on the Repub- 
lican ticket, and though it was his first term as legislator he was chosen 
speaker of the House by a handsome vote. In the year 1886 he was unani- 
mously nominated for State Senator from the Coos District, normally a 
Democratic stronghold, and though he was defeated that year by a few 
votes, was renominated the following year and was triumphantly elected 
bv a majority as great as his opponent's total vote. He was unanimously 
elected as president of the Senate in the years 1897 and 1898, an extraordi- 
nary honor, it being the first time that this had happened for more than one 
hundred years in New Hampshire. The crowning event of Mr. Jordan's 



ai6 €btstet 'BtaDIep 3IotOan 

political life was his election as Governor of New Hampshire in 1900. He 
had already, in 1898, refused to accept the nomination and had to decline it 
publicly three times before his refusal would be considered. When in 1900 
he was once more urged, he finally agreed to do so provided the nomina- 
tion should come unsolicited and unsought. He took up the duties of his 
new ofiice in January, 1901, and his administration rapidly developed into 
one of the most notable in the history of New Hampshire. The various 
services which he performed for the State are too many to be enumerated, 
but among them it may be stated that the State debt was reduced over four 
hundred thousand dollars during his administration and that the State 
treasury, at the close of it, contained over six hundred thousand dollars in 
its vaults, an amount never before approached. He also reformed and 
greatly improved the judicial system of the State, and he is said to have 
regarded this as his most valuable service to the community. After the 
expiration of his term of office he returned to his legal practice in Lancaster 
and continued actively so employed up to the time of his death. He was 
actively associated with a number of important organizations, business, 
social and fraternal, in the community, among which may be mentioned the 
Lancaster Trust Company, of which he was vice-president and director; 
the Lancaster National Bank, of which he was a director; the Grafton & 
Coos Bar Association, in which he held an office. He was also identified 
with the Grange and with the Masonic order, having been a member in the 
latter of Evening Star Lodge, No. 37, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; 
North Star Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; and Edward A. Raymond Con- 
sistory, Sublime Princes of the Royal Secret, of Nashua. 

Governor Jordan was united in marriage, July 19, 1879, at Lancaster, 
New Hampshire, with Ida Rose Nutter, a native of this town, born March 
31, i860, a daughter of Oliver and Roxannah (Wentworth) Nutter, of this 
place. Governor and Mrs. Jordan were the parents of four children, as 
follows: Roxannah Minerva, born in Lancaster, January 19, 1882; Hugo, 
born May 26, 1884, died May 7, 1886; Gladstone, born May 15, 1888; and 
Chester Bradley, born February 15, 1892. Although he nominally retired 
from the firm in the year 1909, Governor Jordan actually continued to be 
identified with it up to within a short time of his death. He did, however, 
allow himself a greater share of recreation than he had previously taken, 
and nothing pleased him so much as to spend his vacations fishing in the 
beautiful regions about the Connecticut lake and Millsfield ponds. He was 
a devoted lover of nature, and was never so happy as when out in the open 
engaged in some expedition with his children. His death eventually 
occurred on August 24, 1914, after a long and lingering illness, the trials of 
which he bore with an unusual degree of Christian fortitude. 

It will be appropriate to close this all too brief and inadequate sketch 
with the words of those who were acquainted personally with Governor 
Jordan, and who did not fail to express their heartfelt admiration for him 
both as public official and as man at the time of his death. The following 
extract occurs as the foreword in a most interesting volume entitled "Life 
and Reminiscences," by Governor Jordan's son, Chester Bradley Jordan, Jr. : 



dLttnttt TStaDIep 31otDan 



217 



It is the purpose of this book to place between its covers as much of Chester Brad- 
ley Jordan, man, citizen, able actor in, and keen observor of, New Hampshire public 
life of the last half century, as is possible through the instrumentality of cold print, and 
the limitation of one volume. This is not a eulogy over the body of a dead man, this is 
not a memorial in the usual sense of the word, but a book of the living, an attempt to 
perpetuate to continued life the best thought and deeds of a good man, that they may be 
an inspiration to future sons of the State for which he builded so well, and a source of 
delightful reminiscences to his friends and sincere admirers. 

The greater part of this volume is, therefore, made up of the writings and utter- 
ances of Chester B. Jordan. There is a brief biographical sketch designed merely to 
give a view of the principal events of his full life, that the life may be considered in its 
entirety with continuity. This is followed by extracts from the interesting and intimate 
autobiographical notes found among his personal effects. 





Cfjarles Hart ilopnton, 01* ®* 

'HE annals of the medical profession in New Hampshire are 
full of many notable names, names of men of the highest 
ideals and abilities, by whom the traditions of the past have 
been fully realized; men who are leaders in all branches of 
medical science and practice, who have stood at the head of 
their profession in research and the application of new 
methods to the practical problems of life. Among them also 
are to be found many who by sheer virtue of their great personality have 
made themselves famous in the various communities where they have lived 
and worked, and whose professional ethics towards the alleviation of suffer- 
ing have been rendered doubly effective by the good cheer which they carried 
with them wherever they went. Among those no name deserves greater 
prominence nor a more general respect than that of Charles Hart Boynton, 
whose death on August i6, 1903, deprived the community of Lisbon, New 
Hampshire, of one of its best loved and most universally respected members, 
a man who had done as much as any in the way of valuable service to the 
town. 

Dr. Boynton was a member of a family which could claim a very great 
and honorable antiquity, it having existed in an unbroken line in England 
from the tme of the Norman Conquest. It was seated in the eastern part 
of Yorkshire, England, at the village of Boynton, and the first mention of 
the name as a surname is of one Bartholomew de Boynton, Lord of the 
Manor of Boynton, A. D., 1067. It is probable that the family derived its 
name from the place, as was so very common at that time, a practice which 
was the origin of a very large group of our modern family names. From 
that time until about the middle of the seventeenth century the members of 
the Boynton family continued to reside in this region, and it was in the year 
1638 that one William Boynton, of Barmston, Yorkshire, came to America 
with a brother John and settled at Rowley, Massachusetts. This William 
Boynton was the founder of that branch of the American family of which 
Dr. Boynton was a member, he being of the seventh generation in direct 
descent from the immigrant ancestor. Dr. Boynton's father was Ebenezer 
Boynton, who was a farmer near the little town of Meredith, New Hamp- 
shire, and it was from this fine old farming stock that Dr. Boynton was 
descended. His mother before her marriage was Betsy S. Hart, also of that 
region, and Dr. Boynton was one of his father's eleven children. 

The early years of the childhood of Dr. Boynton were spent on the 
home farm, and during that period he attended the local district schools, 
which, if they did not carry their students very far, nevertheless gave them 
a thorough grounding in the elemental branches of knowledge. While not 
at school, the lad helped his father in the work about the farm, his time being 
regarded as belonging to his parents until he had attained his majority, after 



C!)arle$ ^art IBopnton, 00. D. 219 

the good old custom. At the age of eighteen, however, he paid his father 
one hundred dollars for the remaining years of his time, and made his way 
to Brighton, Massachusetts, where during the next twelve months he was 
variously employed. He returned, however, to New Hampshire at the end 
of this time and apprenticed himself to a carpenter in order to learn that 
trade. For a portion of the time during the following seven years he worked 
at his craft, thereby earning a sufficient sum of money to enable him to carry 
on his education. He himself stated that he never had a dollar until he 
earned it. Such laudable ambition as this certainly deserved success, and 
it is pleasant to record that his efforts were highly successful. He was 
enabled to attend the New Hampshire Conference Seminary at Northfield 
(now Tilton), New Hampshire, for four terms, during which time his mind 
was becoming more and more developed and more and more firmly fixed 
upon the idea of a professional career. His choice centered finally on the 
medical profession, and he began the study of his subject with Dr. W. D. 
Buck, of Manchester, New Hampshire. He also took a course at the Berk- 
shire Medical College at Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and was graduated there- 
from with the class of 1853. The following winter he spent at the Harvard 
Medical School in post-graduate work, and then in the early part of 1854 
settled at Alexandria, New Hampshire, and there began his active practice. 
In the year 1858, however, Dr. Boynton removed to Lisbon, which became 
his permanent headquarters, and where before long he reached a position of 
leadership in his profession. The young physician was admirably qualified 
for such leadership. He seemed, indeed, to possess practically all the traits 
in combination which spell success in his chosen field of labor. He was, in 
the first place, a profound student of his subject, and in the second, possessed 
that type of cheerful personality which is often more effective in producing 
the desired cures than the more theoretical branch of therapeutics. A keen 
practical sense of how theory should be applied to the circumstances of real 
life, and an almost intuitive insight into the ailments he was called upon to 
diagnose, were the happy possessions of Dr. Boynton, and still further an 
absolutely unwearied energy and a willingness to go as far as need be and 
under all circumstances, even the most difficult, in response to a call for 
help, and that without regarding whether the subject was high or low, rich 
or poor. There is no question that the profession has never been honored 
by one who labored more disinterestedly to alleviate not only the physical 
but the mental ills of his patients, and for forty-five years he traveled over 
the New Hampshire hills, alike in stormy and clear weather, night and day, 
summer and winter. There were few families within a radius of many miles 
of Lisbon who had not called him at one time or another, and who were 
supported and aided by his ready sympathy and presence of mind which 
seemed to teach him instinctively to do the right thing in the right place. 
The tax upon Dr. Boynton's strength made by these professional demands 
required some sort of relaxation, and for this he turned to agriculture. He 
was keenly interested in all kinds of domestic animals, as well as in the 
growing of the vegetable world, and was very successful in what he 



220 Cljarles ©art llSopnton, 99. D. 

attempted along these lines, considering how comparatively limited was the 
time he had to spend on them. 

Dr. Boynton was a member of the White Mountain Medical Society, 
serving as its president for two years, and of the New Hampshire Medical 
Society. He was a prominent Mason, and belonged to most of the Masonic 
organizations of Lisbon. For one whose time was so much occupied, Dr. 
Boynton was affiliated with quite a remarkable number of activities in his 
home town. At the time of his death he was president of the Lisbon Light 
and Power Company, and of the Lisbon Building Association, a concern 
which erected the Boynton Block. He was also a director of the Parker & 
Young Company, and of the New England Electrical Works. He was a 
trustee of the State Hospital at Concord, and there were not many charitable 
movements undertaken in this region of the State with which he was not 
identified. He was also an active participant in the public life of the com- 
munity, and served for a number of years on the Lisbon Board of Educa- 
tion, and was one of the originators of the Lisbon Public Library. In politics 
he was a Republican, and was elected on that ticket to represent the town 
in the State Legislature during the years of 1868 and 1869. As a very young 
man, Dr. Boynton became a member of the Free Will Baptist Church in his 
native town, but in later years he did not identify himself with any religious 
denomination. 

Dr. Boynton was united in marriage, October 19, 1854, at Lisbon, New 
Hampshire, with Mary Huse Cummings, a daughter of Joseph and Mary 
(Huse) Cummings, old and highly respected residents of this town. To Dr. 
and Mrs. Boynton one child was born, a daughter, Alice, September 30, 
1857, at Alexandria, New Hampshire. She attended the Lisbon public 
schools, Plymouth State Normal, and graduated from the Montebello Ladies' 
Institute, Newbury, Vermont. For three years prior to her marriage she 
served in the capacity of teacher in the Lisbon public school. She married, 
September 15, 1887, at Lisbon, New Hampshire, William Wallace Oliver, 
formerly of Magog, Province of Quebec, Canada, and resides at Lisbon. 
Children: Mary Boynton, born June 7, 1890; Charles Edward, born February 
II, 1895, died February 8, 1898; and Alice Louise, born April 2, 1899. For 
several years Mrs. Oliver was a member of the school board of Lisbon 
public schools, treasurer and secretary of said organization; a member of 
the Congregational church of Lisbon ; of the Lisbon Woman's Club ; of the 
Friends in Council, one of its originators in 1897, having served as its secre- 
tary and president ; and had held office in the New Hampshire Federation of 
Women's Clubs, serving as its treasurer. 



^^SS^ZSgk 




ifjflaurtce €ben ISttmball 

'OR many years one of the principal figures in the business life 
of North Haverhill, New Hampshire, Maurice Eben Kimball 
was one of the most eminently respected and venerated of 
this community's members, where he so long enjoyed a repu- 
tation for the most complete and unimpeachable integrity in 
all his business dealings, and where he passed away in July, 
1903. He was a member of a good old New England family, 
and a son of Charles C. and Hannah (Morris) Kimball, who were lifelong 
residents of North Haverhill before him. It was here that he was born, in 
October, 1843, ^^^ here that he enjoyed the then somewhat meagre educa- 
tional advantages offered by the local school. His business career was begun 
on a very humble scale, but by dint of perseverance, hard work and unweary- 
ing patience, he built up what eventually became one of the largest enter- 
prises of its kind in this region. For forty years or more he was actively 
connected with the well known general store which bore his name, and 
which enjoyed a long and well established patronage. It was inevitable that 
a man who became so prominent in the commercial life of the community 
should extend his interest into other lines of enterprise and endeavor, and 
he became many years ago a director of the Woodsville National Bank of 
this place. 

His activities, however, extended into departments of the community's 
life quite separate from personal interest or endeavor, and in his connection 
with the more general affairs of the place he displayed a disinterestedness 
and an ability which did good service for his fellow-citizens and won for 
himself their hearty approval and esteem. He held a large number of local 
town ofifices and also represented North Haverhill in the General Court of 
New Hampshire. 

Maurice Eben Kimball was united in marriage, March 7, 1867. with 
Gazilda C. Moran, a native of Derby, Vermont, and a daughter of Lawrence 
and Harriett (Brooks) Moran, old and highly respected residents of that 
place. Mr. and Mrs. Kimball were the parents of the following children: 
Addie M., born May 19, 1870, became the wife of Frank N. Keyser, of Haver- 
hill; Louis Maurice, born in 1876, and Roy E., born in 1877, who engaged 
in business with his elder brother. 

There is much in the life of the late Maurice Eben Kimball to command 
admiration, but it was not more his strict adherence to the principles of 
right and justice that attracted men to him, than his unfailing kindness and 
spirit of self-sacrifice. On the latter trait, his great popularity with all who 
knew him was based, while the respect of the business world was the out- 
growth of a career known to be honorable, upright and without guile. 
"Good business" with him did not mean necessarily volume, but quality; 
and everything he said and everything he sold was, in his belief, exactly as 



222 e^mtitt €ben l^imftall 

he represented it. His personality was most pleasing, dignified and courtly; 
he was the personification of kindness, and no sacrifice was too great, if it 
brought happiness to those he loved. His home life was ideal, and there the 
excellencies of his character shone forth in all their beauty. He was a 
gentleman, not of the "old school" but of every school, and nowhere was he 
more appreciated than by those whose lives brought them into daily contact 
with his gentle, kindly spirit. 



I^enrj Cutler Stearns 




'HE name of Henry Cutler Stearns stood high among the long 
list of capable physicians who have honored the medical 
profession in the State of New Hampshire. He enjoyed a 
great and well deserved popularity at Haverhill iri this 
State, and was regarded as one of the leaders of his profes- 
sion throughout the entire region. Dr. Stearns came of 
good old New England stock, and was a son of Josiah Heald 
and Sarah (Russell) Stearns, the former having been for many years a 
farmer in the region of Lovell, Maine. Josiah Heald Stearns was a sur- 
veyor, and followed that profession with a considerable degree of success in 
his native region. At the time of the outbreak of the Civil War, he enlisted 
in the Union army and became first lieutenant in the Twenty-third Regi- 
ment of Maine Volunteer Infantry. During this troubled period, his ability 
as a surveyor made him valuable to the government, and he was shortly after 
the close of hostilities appointed United States surveyor in Florida, under 
his cousin, Governor Marcellus Stearns. He and his wife were the parents 
of a number of children, one of whom was Dr. Henry Cutler Stearns. 

Born on August 21, 1866, at Lovell, Maine, Henry Cutler Stearns was 
brought up in his native region. It was there that his earliest impressions 
were formed, and there that he gained the elementary portion of his educa- 
tion, attending for this purpose the local public schools. Later his father 
sent him to the Fryeburg Academy at Fryeburg, Maine, and here he com- 
pleted his general education and was prepared for college, his expenses 
through college being defrayed by money earned in teaching school for 
many terms. The young man had by this time decided to make medicine his 
profession in life, and accordingly entered the Dartmouth Medical College, 
where he established for himself an unusually fine record for scholarship. 
He was graduated from this institution in the month of November, 1895. 
He immediately began the practice of his profession at Bartlett, New Hamp- 
shire, remaining for one year, and then removed to Haverhill, New Hamp- 
shire, which, with the exception of a break of three years, had continued his 
home and his headquarters since then. In the year 1904, however, he took 
a post-graduate course at the New York Post-Graduate Hospital, it being 
his policy to keep abreast of the latest developments in his science and pro- 
fession, and he also pursued a post-graduate course at Harvard Medical Col- 
lege. After ten years' residence at Haverhill, where he became very well 
known and had developed a large and remunerative practice. Dr. Stearns 
removed to Concord, New Hampshire, where he resided for three years, 
actively engaged in practice during that time. He then returned to Haver- 
hill and remained a constant resident of that place until his death, which 
he met in an automobile accident on August 23, 191 5. He became very well 
known throughout the region as a man of unusual rectitude and a physician 



224 ©enrp Cutlet Stcatns 

of great ability, while his character was of that optimistic and cheerful kind 
which is so great an asset to the physician and is an important element in 
his treatment of all kinds of sickness. He was on the staff of physicians at 
the Woodsville Cottage Hospital. 

Dr. Stearns was a staunch Republican, and had exceedingly strong 
views on political matters, which he was ever ready to defend with great 
intelligence and a spontaneous wit. In spite of this, however, he never had 
any ambition for public office or political preferment, probably feeling that 
the onerous demands made upon him by his profession rendered it impos- 
sible for him to take part in certain departments of activity for which his 
talents had otherwise so well fitted him. The nearest approach to public 
office that he ever held was that of trustee of the Haverhill Academy, a posi- 
tion which he consented to take on account of the very keen interest which 
he felt in the subject of juvenile education. Dr. Stearns was, however, a 
conspicuous figure in medical, social and fraternal circles, and was affiliated 
with a large number of orders and other organizations of a similar character. 
Among these should be mentioned the State and County Medical Societies; 
Haverhill Grange, No. 212, Patrons of Husbandry, of which he was master 
at the time of his death ; Blazing Star Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Concord, New Hampshire; Franklin Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons, of Lisbon, New Hampshire; and lona Chapter, No. 39, Order of the 
Eastern Star. His club was the Wonolancet of Concord, New Hampshire. 
In his religious belief. Dr. Stearns was extremely liberal. During his resi- 
dence in Concord he attended the Unitarian church regularly. 

Dr. Stearns was possessed of very strong literary tastes, and these, in 
connection with his social instincts, led him to take part quite actively in 
many delightful informal gatherings, and particularly in amateur theatri- 
cals, which were popular in his community. He was himself the author of 
manv clever and attractive plays, many of which have since been published. 
He was also an effective speaker, and was chosen by his community on a 
number of different occasions as Memorial Day orator. 

Dr. Stearns was united in marriage, September 30, 1897, at Haverhill, 
New Hampshire, with Mary Louise Poor, a daughter of Joseph and Eliza- 
beth (Swasey) Poor, old and highly respected residents of Haverhill. To 
Dr. and Mrs. Stearns one child was born, Joseph Poor, March 17, 1899. 

Dr. Stearns exhibited throughout his career that devotion which char- 
acterized the really great physician, and to this he added an energy and 
strength that seemed indefatigable. Of any man who takes up medicine as 
a profession, with the true realization of what is involved in the way of 
sacrifice and a sincere intention to live up to its ideals, it may be said that 
he has given himself for humanity's cause. This was unquestionably true of 
Dr. Stearns, and it met with the reward which was truly merited, that of 
an active response on the part of the community to his ministrations. For 
Dr. Stearns had resisted to a certain extent the great tendency towards 
specialization which was and is in evidence to-day, and had retained the 
character of the old-fashioned physician save for the fact already men- 



^enrp Cutler Steatn$ 2*5 

tioned, that he kept thoroughly abreast of the times in science. He was 
exceedingly generous in his treatment of the poor and those of limited 
means, never pressing his bills against those who were unable to pay, and 
in many cases never sending a bill for his services. There was much to 
suggest the gentleman of the old school in Dr. Stearns, and the courtesy of 
this type and the uncompromising firmness of the practical man of the 
world, fittingly complement and modify each other. During the many 
years of his residence in Haverhill, New Hampshire, he had been looked up 
to as were few other men in the community with respect for the unimpeach- 
able integrity, the clear-sighted sagacity, the strong public spirit that 
marked him, and with affection also for his tact in dealing with men, his 
spontaneous generosity, and the attitude of charity and tolerance he main- 
tained toward his fellow-men which made him easy of approach and a sym- 
pathetic listener to the humblest as well as the proudest. 




)eneta Augustus Eatilj 




^HE type that has become familiar to the world as the success- 
ful New Englander, practical and worldly-wise, yet gov- 
erned in all matters by the most scrupulous and strict ethical 
code, stern in removing- obstacles from the path, yet g-ener- 
ous even to his enemies, was nowhere better exemplified 
than in the person of the late Seneca Augustus Ladd, of 
Meredith, New Hampshire, who carried down into our own 
times something of the substantial quality of the past. The successful men 
of an earlier generation, who were responsible for the great industrial and 
mercantile development of New England, experienced most of them in their 
own lives, the juncture of two influences, calculated in combination to pro- 
duce the marked characters by which we recognize the type. For these men 
were at once the product of culture and refinement, being descended gener- 
ally from the most distinguished families, and yet were so placed that hard 
work and frugal living were the necessary conditions of success. Such was 
the case with Mr. Ladd, who was descended from fine old French and Eng- 
lish ancestry, the descendants of which have from the early Colonial days 
down to the present maintained the same high standard which was set for 
them by their predecessors. 

Edward Wilds Ladd, of London, England, is authority for stating that 
his ancestry, "the first Lads, came from England with William the Con- 
queror from France and settled in Deal, Kent county, where a portion of 
land was granted them, eight miles from Dover. Not many years after the 
Norman Conquest, and ever since that day, descendants of that family, 
spelling the name De Lade, De Lad, Lad and Ladd, have held land in that 
and adjoining counties." 

The Ladd family, of which the late Seneca Augustus Ladd was the rep- 
resentative in the last generation, was founded in this country by one Daniel 
Ladd, who sailed from London, England, March 24, 1633, in the good ship, 
"Mary and John." Upon reaching the New England colonies, which were 
his destination, he settled at Ipswich, Massachusetts, where he remained 
until 1638. In that year he became one of the founders of Salisbury, and 
two years later of Pawtucket, on the Merrimac river. He appears to have 
been' of exceedingly enterprising disposition and character, and to have 
found an irresistible attraction in accompanying those hardy bands of 
pioneers who continually ventured forth into the wilderness to found new 
settlements. He was one of those who founded Haverhill, and this town 
probably remained his residence for the remainder of his life. Later his 
descendants removed to New Hampshire, and it was in this State, at the 
town of Loudon, that Mr. Ladd's parents were living in the early part of the 
nineteenth century. These parents were Gideon and Polly (Osgood) Ladd, 



Seneca 2luqustm LaDD 227 

who were well known and highly respected residents of this community, 
and it was here that Seneca Augustus Ladd was born, April 29, 1819. 

Seneca Augustus Ladd was the fourth son of his parents and one of 
twelve children. His childhood was spent in that wholesome environment 
which has undoubtedly produced the very best type of American citizenship, 
namely, that of the farm, with the work of which he became acquainted at 
an early age. Up to the time that he was ten years of age he attended the 
local public schools during the summer months, but after that period, when 
he was supposed to have enough strength to assist with the lighter tasks 
about the farm, he went to school in the winter and gave up his summers 
to this other kind of work. He was a bright lad and displayed considerable 
precocity in his studies, and one of his teachers, the Hon. John L. French, 
afterwards president of the Pittsfield Bank, appreciated these qualities and 
encouraged him strongly to continue his studies. He undoubtedly proved 
one of the strongest influences in the young man's life, and developed the 
natural taste for study and scientific reading which young Mr. Ladd 
possessed. A habit was thus formed which continued throughout the 
remainder of his life, so that it may truly be said that much of Mr. Ladd's 
excellent education was gained through his individual efforts rather than 
through any school work which he did. When only thirteen years of age he 
went to Raymond and thoroughly learned the carriage maker's trade, com- 
ing to the town of Meredith when seventeen, where he worked for a time 
with John Haines, a wheelwright. The year from nineteen to twenty he 
spent in Boston and worked as journeyman at the pianoforte business with 
Timothy Gilbert, in the second pianoforte manufactory established in the 
United States. The young man developed qualities of industry and thrift 
during these years which enabled him, when twenty years of age, to purchase 
a house, for which he gave his note in part payment. At the same time he 
married and settled down to housekeeping. 

About this time he formed a partnership with Sewell Smith, the young 
men engaging in the manufacture of carriages. They met with considerable 
success in the first few years, but their plant was destroyed by fire, a disaster 
which put an end to their enterprise. Mr. Ladd was one of those characters, 
however, which appear not to know what discouragement is, and he immed- 
iately leased an unused plant in Meredith, and as soon as he had closed up 
his affairs in connection with the carriage manufactory, he started in an 
entirely new line. His brother, Albert W. Ladd, had settled in Boston, and 
had there begun the manufacture of the celebrated A. W. Ladd & Company 
pianos, and it was a branch of this large industrial enterprise which Seneca 
A. Ladd established in Meredith. In this he was highly successful and con- 
tinued actively engaged until 1869, when a serious impairment of his hearing 
caused him to give up this business. Once more, however, his enterprising 
nature suggested a new line of endeavor, and once more his organizing 
ability and business judgment brought success to his scheme. His new 
plan was to found a savings bank in Meredith, with the idea of encouraging 
young people to save their earnings, and thus inculcate habits of prudence 



228 Seneca au0U0tu$ LaDD 

and thrift. Mr. Ladd was always keenly interested in the welfare of the 
young", and in his capacity of banker was far more to his young depositors 
than a business association of the sort would imply. He was a counsellor 
and adviser, to whom they were only too willing to listen, as his good will 
and sincerity of purpose were apparent on the surface. For nearly twenty 
years he continued at the head of this concern and developed it until it had 
assumed important proportions in the financial world of the region. From 
the time of his death the Meredith Village Savings Bank has been per- 
petuated under the management of D. E. Eaton, who has held the office of 
treasurer for more than a quarter of a century. 

There was much to suggest the gentleman of the old school in Mr 
Ladd, and the courtesy of this type, combined with the firmness and shrewd- 
ness of the practical man of the world, were fitting complements to one 
another in his character. Dviring the many years of his residence in Mere- 
dith he was looked up to as were few other men, and enjoyed a reputation 
for unimpeachable integrity, clear-sighted sagacity, and strong public spirit, 
which so marked his career. But it was more than admiration which was 
felt for him by his fellow townsfolk, who regarded him with a warmer feel- 
ing of affection, due, no doubt, to his tact in dealing with men, his spon- 
taneous generosity and the attitude of charity and tolerance which made 
him easy of approach and a sympathetic listener to even the humblest. He 
made some temporary enemies, being outspoken and decided in the utter- 
ance of his opinions, but he had the rather unusual ability of not only form- 
ing his judgments sensibly, but of expressing them so clearly and convinc- 
ingly as to give others his own point of view. He never used liquor, even as 
a medicine, and being strongly opposed to the use of tobacco he formed an 
Anti-Tobacco Club among the boys and did all he could to encourage the 
breaking off of the habit with old and young alike. The interest which Mr. 
Ladd took in scientific subjects of all kinds and his taste for reading have 
already been remarked. To these may be added his intense love of flowers 
and gardening, and to these pleasures he turned whenever the opportunity 
arose, and despite the many calls upon his time and energy he devoted a 
large part of his attention to all these subjects. He made a number of 
handsome collections, connected with the various branches of geolog}' and 
its kindred sciences, which of all his studies interested him the most. A fine 
collection made by him is now in the public library of the town. He united 
with a church in his youth, but always held very broad and liberal views on 
religion as on almost every other subject. He was long a member of the 
New Hampshire Historical Society. 

Mr. Ladd married (first) Susan Tilton, a native of Meredith, with whom 
he was united March 24, 1840. Two children were born of this union: 
Charles F. A., who died in infancy, and Frances C. A., who became the wife 
of Daniel Wadsworth Coe. Mr. Ladd married (second), June i, 1852, Cath- 
arine S. Wallace, of Boston. One daughter was born of this marriage. Vir- 
ginia B. Ladd. 

It is often a difficult, if not impossible, matter to express in terms of 



Seneca augu$tu0 laDD 229 

material accomplishment the real value of a life, of a career, or to give an 
adequate idea of the position which a man has won for himself in the regard 
of a community. In the case of such men as, for example, Mr. Ladd of this 
article, whose death on January 22, 1892, was a loss to the community of 
which he was a member, it is apt to be highly misleading to state in bold 
terms that he succeeded in such and such a calling, since the true significance 
of a man is not so much to be found in this wealth or in that honor acquired, 
as in the influence which as a personality he exerts upon those with whom 
he comes in contact. The acquirement of wealth or honor does indicate that 
a certain power exists, that certain abilities must be present, so that to 
enumerate these things does serve as an illustration of the subject's quali- 
fications for success. But it ends there. An illustration, although a rude 
one it is, but as a gauge of these powers it has practically no value, for while 
the proposition is true that the presence of those perquisites which the 
world showers upon genius proved the genius of which it is the reward, the 
converse is not true at all, since half the genius, at the very lowest estimate, 
goes unrewarded. It is the duty of the biographer, therefore, to penetrate 
below the surface, in so far as his poor abilities will permit him to, to seek 
for those hidden springs of action which, although they do not often raise 
their heads into the region of the obvious, are at bottom the true gauges of 
effort and success. In the case of Mr. Ladd, the truth of the above is amply 
apparent. He did, it is true, have a very considerable success in business, 
and had his partial deafness not proved so serious a handicap might have 
won a much larger share of recognition from the world. The position which, 
as a matter of fact, he occupied in the community was not due, however, to 
any increment of fortune but to the native virtue of his character and the 
worth of his personality. He was without doubt a model man, and a public 
spirited citizen in the highest sense of the term. 





JFrantfe ^mttf) Sleeper 

^EYOND doubt Francis Smith Sleeper, late of North Haver- 
hill, New Hampshire, where his death occurred January ii, 
191 1, was one of the best known figures in this region where 
for so many years he had carried on his successful business 
operations. 

He was born at New Hampton, New Hampshire, April 
13, 1833, a son of Hiram and Sarah (Mason) Sleeper, and 
his early childhood was spent in his native place. He became a pupil at the 
local schools as a child, but was later sent by his parents to the schools of 
Newbury, Vermont, and there remained until he had completed his thir- 
teenth year, at which youthful age he began the serious business of earning 
a livelihood. He went to North Bridgewater (now Brockton), Massachu- 
setts, and there learned the boot and shoe trade. After completing his 
apprenticeship he made his way to the city of Lowell, Massachusetts, and 
there followed his trade for a number of years. After six years of this kind 
of work he was given a position as traveling salesman for a boot and shoe 
dealer in Boston and continued successfully in this line for a quarter of a 
century. It was finally in the year 1893 that he left this business entirely 
and organized the firm of F. S. Sleeper & Company to deal in grains and 
feeds. This concern was successful from the outset and is still carrying on 
a large and prosperous trade in this locality under the management of his 
son, Finlay P. Sleeper, who is mentioned briefly below. Mr. Sleeper was a 
staunch Republican and became a prominent figure in his party, taking a 
leading part in the county organization. He was the successful candidate 
of the Republicans for the State Legislature in 1897, and during his mem- 
bership in the House served on the committee on insurance. He was a 
Methodist in his religious belief and attended the church of that denomina- 
tion at North Haverhill. He was also very prominent in the Masonic order, 
having received the thirty-second degree in Free Masonry. He was a mem- 
ber of Pawtucket Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, of Lowell, 
Massachusetts; Omega Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, of Plymouth; Hiram 
Council, Royal and Select Masters, of Lisbon; St. Gerard Commandery, 
Knights Templar, of Littleton, New Hampshire; Aleppo Temple. Ancient 
Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of Boston, Massachusetts; and 
New Hampshire Consistory, Sublime Princes of the Royal Secret. 

Francis Smith Sleeper was twice married, the first time to Hannah 
Clay, of Blue Hill, Maine. After her death he married (second) Jane F. 
Page, a daughter of Henry and Eliza (Southard) Page. He was the father 
of two sons, as follows: Eugene H. and Finlay P., one child by each wife. 
Eugene H. Sleeper became a lieutenant in the quartermaster's department, 
United States Army, stationed in New York City. 

Finlay P. Sleeper was born March 21, 1883, and attended the public 



ftmtifi %mitb Sleeper 



231 



schools of North Haverhill, New Hampshire. He graduated from the St. 
Johnsbury Academy at St. Johnsbury, Vermont, in 1902, after being pre- 
pared for college. He then entered Dartmouth College, and after four years 
of the usual classical course was graduated with the class of 1906 and the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. In 1907 he entered the banking brokerage firm 
of Bright, Sears & Company, of Boston, and remained there two years. 
Upon the death of his father, in 191 1, he returned to North Haverhill and 
there took charge of the large business that had been developed here by the 
elder man and continues to conduct it most successfully at the present time. 
He is a Republican in politics, and a member of Grafton Lodge, No. 46, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and the Phi Gamma Delta college fra- 
ternity. He married Helen E. Carr, daughter of Clarence and Hittie (Land) 
Carr, March 20, 1916. 





Casstus ifWontgomerp Clap Ctottctjell 

'ASSIUS MONTGOMERY CLAY TWITCHELL, of Milan, 
New Hampshire, whose death at his home there on June 9, 
1904, removed one of the most prominent fibres from the 
general life of the community, and especially the industrial 
and business world, was a member of an old New England 
family, which has been associated with this State for the 
better part of three generations. He was a son of Adams 
and Lusylvia (Bartlett) Twitchell, and the grandson of Cyrus Twitchell, 
the first of the name to come to these parts. Cyrus Twitchell was a resident 
of Bethel, Maine, in the early part of the nineteenth century, and came from 
that town to Milan, New Hampshire, in the year 1824, settling first on Milan 
Hill and afterwards moving into the village proper. He was one of three 
men authorized to call the first town meeting at Milan and was the first 
justice of the peace there. His son, Adams Twitchell, was a native of Bethel, 
born January 2y, 1812, and came to Milan with his parents. At the age of 
twenty he purchased his time from his father for one hundred dollars and 
began his long and successful career. He owned a valuable farm at Milan 
and made his home there, but never farmed for profit, giving most of his 
time and attention to the great lumbering business, buying and selling 
timber lands both in New Hampshire and Canada. 

Born October 12, 1852, on his father's farm at Milan, New Hampshire, 
Cassius Montgomery Clay Twitchell passed his childhood and early youth 
amid the healthful rural surroundings which have been the cradle of the 
finest type of American manhood. The elementary portion of his education 
was received at the local public schools and, after completing his studies at 
these institutions he became a pupil at the Lancaster Academy. Upon his 
graduation from this academy, Mr. Twitchell engaged in the serious busi- 
ness of earning his own livelihood, not because it was necessary, as his 
father was very well ofif, but because he possessed that sturdy independent 
spirit of the typical New Englander, which impelled him to be making his 
own way in the world. For a few years, while still a mere youth, he worked 
for the Glen House at the foot of Mount Washington where, during the 
summer season, he was employed as driver of a stage coach. He then secured 
a place with a house on the summit of the mountain and worked there for 
about two seasons. The winters during this time were spent by him on his 
father's farm. Later Mr. Twitchell became a contractor of the Berlin Mills 
Company and was thus engaged for a number of years, until, in association 
with George W. Blanchard, under the style of Blanchard & Twitchell, he 
purchased the township of Success from the late E. S. Coe, of Bangor. This 
valuable timber tract they proceeded to develop by building a railroad into 
the heart of it and cutting out the lumber for the market. This enterprise 
proved remarkably successful, and Mr. Twitchell remained actively engaged 



Cas0iu0 g^ontgometp Clap Ctoitcftell 233 

in it until within a few years of his death, when he sold his share of the 
business to his partner. He then purchased the property of the Brown 
Lumber Company, which included extensive lumber lands "in Jefiferson and 
Randolph. These he resold to the Berlin Mills Company for a very hand- 
some figure, which netted him a large profit. Mr. Twitchell was also a 
member of the Berlin firm of Twitchell & Holt, his partner being Giles O. 
Holt, of that town, a concern which owns a controlling interest in the Cas- 
cade Electric Light & Power Company, the Berlin Water Company, and 
which conducts a large sale stable. In addition to these interests, Mr. 
Twitchell was connected with the City Bank of Berlin, the large pulp manu- 
facturing plant at Brompton Falls, Province of Quebec, Canada, and many 
similar concerns. 

Mr. Twitchell was a staunch Republican in politics, but never took a 
very active part in local affairs. His associates urged him strongly to allow 
his name to be used as the party candidate to the State Senate in the year 
1901 and he finally consented to do so. In the election which followed he 
was chosen to represent his country by a substantial majority. He entered 
into his legislative duties with the energy and care that had characterized 
his conduct of his business aff^airs, and served most efficiently on a number 
of committees. He was a member of Androscoggin Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, an organization which he joined soon after it was 
instituted in Milan. Neither Mr. Twitchell nor his father were formal mem- 
bers of any church, although both were liberal supporters of the various 
religious bodies in this part of the country, and the former attended the 
Union Church of Milan, together with all the members of his family. 

Cassius M. C. Twitchell was united in marriage, October 5, 1S80, at 
Lancaster, New Hampshire, with Leonora Ella Wentworth, a daughter of 
Joseph and Lovina (Newell) Wentworth. Their union was blessed with 
four children, as follows: Mark Antony, born April i, 1882, married Janu- 
ary 14, 1908, Anne R. Weston, of Harrison, Maine; Sidney Seymour, born 
January 4, 1884, married, October 25, 1916, Florence A. Murray, of Berlin, 
New Hampshire; Eva Aurilla, born June 3, 1886, married, September 7, 
1910. J. Clare Curtis, of Berlin, New Hampshire; and Marion Marr. born 
February 14, 1888, and on September 20, 1916, became the wife of Dr. Phillip 
C. Brackett, of Portland, Maine, a dentist. 




3Iosepf) Crastus Eombart 

T WAS a natural transition from tilling to selling farm lands, 
and in all New Hampshire there was not a better farmer 
nor a more successful, extensive real estate operator than 
Joseph E. Lombard after he adopted that as his exclusive 
business. He held high position in the business world, and 
in Democratic party councils was listened to with respectful 
attention. Brimfield, Massachusetts, was long the family 
seat of the family founded in New England by John Lombard, who went to 
Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1646, but in 181 5, Dr. Lyman Lombard, of 
the seventh generation, located in Columbia, New Hampshire, there prac- 
tising his profession until 1818, when he settled in Colebrook, there purchas- 
ing the residence and succeeding to the practice of Dr. Thomas Flanders. 
There Dr. Lombard practised both medicine and surgery, and on horseback 
rode the lonely roads and trails north to the Canada line, south to North- 
umberland and Guildhall, east to Errold and Dummer. Later, as the trails 
gave way to roads, he traveled in a gig and for nearly half a century defied 
the winter's snow, cold and storm, and the fierce summer heat. He was a 
true type of the "country doctor," the confidant of the young, the hope of 
the aged, adviser, counsellor, friend and healer, rejoicing at weddings, sor- 
rowing at funerals, everybody's friend, with his books crowded with accounts 
which would never be paid and which the "good doctor" would never try to 
collect. 

A Democrat in politics. Dr. Lombard served his district in the State 
Legislature ; was master of Evening Star Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; 
surgeon of the Twenty-fourth Regiment, New Hampshire State Militia ; and 
a Universalist in religion. In i860 Dartmouth College conferred the hon- 
orary degree of M. D. upon him. 

Dr. Lombard married Betsey Loomis, a woman of superior mind, her 
diary religiously kept being an epitome of the last fifty years of her life. He 
died in Colebrook, October 21, 1867, his wife on March 22, 1872. They were 
the parents of six sons and daughters, Joseph Erastus, of further mention, 
being the youngest of the family. 

Joseph Erastus Lombard was born in Colebrook, New Hampshire, 
December 28, 1837. His education, begun in Thetford, Vermont, and North 
Bridgton, Maine, schools, was completed with courses at Colebrook Acad- 
emy. He began business life as a farmer, and for several years he continued 
as an agriculturist. He then relinquished farming, and has since been 
engaged in the real estate business, operating largely in the Colebrook sec- 
tion and in different parts of the State. He was a good judge of land values, 
dealt fairly with everybody, and made his large business a successful one. 
Mr. Lombard was a Democrat in politics, was a selectman for several years, 
and held other offices. In 1867 and 1871 he represented Colebrook in the 



3Iosepi) €ra0tus JLomfiatD 



235 



State Legislature. He was made a Mason in Evening Star Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of Colebrook, in 1861, his father having been made 
one in the same lodge in 1823, wras master in 1865 and 1866, and both sons 
vi^ere later masters of the same lodge. He w^as also a companion of North 
Star Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, of Lancaster, and a Knight of Pythias. 
In religion he was a Congregationalist. 

Joseph E. Lombard married, January 7, 1863, Ellen L. Merrill, daugh- 
ter of Hon. Sherburne R. Merrill, of Colebrook, New Hampshire, and a 
descendant of Nathaniel Merrill, who settled at Newbury, Massachusetts, 
in 1634. Mr. and Mrs. Lombard were the parents of two sons : Darwin and 
Lyman Merrill, who, under the firm name, Lombard Brothers, are now 
engaged in mercantile and lumber business in Northern New Hampshire 
and Canada. 




Cbtoart Utram g)turtebant 

^URING a lifetime extending over more than the Scriptural 
allotment of "three score years and ten," Mr. Sturtevant 
won honorable standing in the business world, the last half 
of his useful life being spent in Franklin, New Hampshire, as 
treasurer and manager of the Franklin Needle Company. 
But that was only one of his activities, his interest extending 
to about every Franklin enterprise and even beyond State 
limits. He was a man of intense energy, active in all good works, prominent 
in the Masonic order, and deeply interested in public affairs. He was the 
eldest son of Hiram and Eliza S. (Corey) Sturtevant, of Craftsbury, Ver- 
mont, and of the eighth generation of the family founded in New England 
by Samuel Sturtevant, who is of record as a settler in Plymouth, Massachu- 
setts, as early as November, 1640, living on what was known as the "Cotton 
Farm." The line of descent from Samuel Sturtevant, the ancestor, is 
through his fourth child, Samuel (2) Sturtevant, and wife, Mercy: Their 
second child, Samuel (3) Sturtevant, and his wife Mary; their second child, 
Lemuel, and his wife, Deborah Bryant; their son, Lemuel (2) Sturtevant, 
who moved to Lyme, New Hampshire, later to Barton, Vermont, a soldier 
of the Revolution, and his wife, Priscilla Thompson, of whom it was writ- 
ten: "She was one of the holy women of the Congregational church, a 
mother in Israel gifted with a strong mind of much argumentative ability, 
and studious nature, given to hospitality, delighting to minister to the tem- 
poral wants of the saints, her house much frequented by ministers of the 
Gospel." 

The line of descent continues through Ezra Thompson Sturtevant, 
fourth son of Lemuel (2) and Priscilla (Thompson) Sturtevant, who set- 
tled in Craftsbury, Vermont, and his wife, Lucy Menifield; their son, Hiram 
Sturtevant, a farmer of Craftsbury, Vermont, until 1853, when he moved 
to Barton, Vermont, there remaining twelve years before removing to 
Lebanon, New Hampshire. He married. May 3, 1843, Eliza Scott Corey, 
who died June 11, 1905, aged eighty-three. He died December 8, 1894, aged 
seventy-five. They were the parents of Edward Hiram, of further mention; 
Mary E., married David G. Thompson, whom she survived; Ezra T.. who 
became a lumber dealer of Chicago, Illinois ; Henry H., a merchant of Zanes- 
ville, Ohio. 

Edward Hiram Sturtevant was born in Craftsbury, Vermont, April 27, 
1845, and died in Franklin, New Hampshire, March 6, 1913. He attended 
the public schools until twelve years of age, then was a student at Barton 
Academy for four years, graduating therefrom in June, 1861, and the fol- 
lowing winter taught a district public school. He spent two years with the 
mercantile firm, William Josslyn & Sons, then for two years was head clerk 
in a drug store in Wellington, Ohio, acting as buyer and manager the last 



(IBDtoatD ^iram Sturtetjant 237 

year. His health failed under the rigor of the climate and overwork, and in 
1866 he resigned his position, returning to Lebanon, New Hampshire, there 
opening a drug store in April, 1866. That business he soon sold to Dr. I. N. 
Perley, after demonstrating its possibilities as a profit maker, and soon 
afterward joined with his former employers, William Josslyn & Sons, open- 
ing a drug store at Colebrook, New Hampshire. He managed that store 
two years, then sold his interest and spent several months prospecting 
throvigh Michigan and Iowa. But he became convinced that the New 
England climate best suited his needs, and early in 1869 he opened a drug 
store at Woodstock, Vermont, later admitting his brother, Ezra T., to a 
partnership and adding boots and shoes to their Hne. This partnership con- 
tinued until April, 1879, when the brothers sold out, Edward H. going to 
Franklin, New Hampshire, where he bought an established drug business 
to which he added another just across the river at Franklin Falls. These 
stores were later sold, the Falls store to Frank H. Chapman, the Franklin 
store to W. W. Woodward. In 1883 he began his successful career as a 
manufacturer by purchasing a half interest in the Franklin Needle Com- 
pany, the business then employing twenty-five hands. Mr. Sturtevant, as 
treasurer-manager, was potent in the expansion of the business until the 
product of the plant was in general use throughout the United States, 
Europe, Canada and South America ; hundreds of hands were employed. In 
addition Mr. Sturtevant was a director of the Franklin National Bank; vice- 
president of the Franklin Power & Light Company ; president of the Frank- 
lin Falls Company; director of the Sulloway Mills Company; Kidder 
Machine Company; Franklin Building & Loan Association; and secretary- 
treasurer of the Hemphill Manufacturing Company of Pawtucket, Rhode 
Island. 

A Republican in political faith, Mr. Sturtevant never sought office, but 
in 1893-94 represented Franklin in the New Hampshire Legislature, and in 
1896 was elected mayor of Franklin, both offices coming to him unsought. 
In the York Rite of Free Masonry he held the degrees of Meridian Lodge, 
of Franklin ; St. Omar Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, of Franklin ; and Mount 
Horeb Commandery, Knights Templar, of Concord. In the Scottish Rite he 
held the thirty-second degree of Edward A. Raymond Consistory, and was 
a noble of Bektash Temple, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He also belonged 
to lodge, encampment and canton of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, and in religious faith was a Unitarian. He most generously aided in 
securing a free public library building in Franklin, and lent substantial aid 
to every laudable enterprise. His life was one of success, but it came 
through energetic, well directed effort and a strict adherence to the strictest 
interpretation of just and upright dealing. 

Mr. Sturtevant married. May 12, 1869, Ada E. Martin, daughter of 
Joseph A. and Elvira L. Martin, of Stratford, New Hampshire. They were 
the parents of two daughters: i. Eva E., married, October 9, 1891, George 
L. Hancock, of the Franklin Needle Company. 2. Ruth B., married, Octo- 
ber 7, 1903, Arthur Murry Hancock, of the G. W. Griffin Company, of 
Franklin. 



(S^artner Caleb Htll 




DEALS in medicine have changed much in recent years just as 
they have in almost every department of life, but the change 
is very nearly pressed home to us in the case of this profes- 
sion because of the close relation that must obtain between 
ourselves and our physician. In the main, of course, the 
change is the same as that wrhich has everyv^'here taken 
place, because an alteration in our fundamental outlook is 
responsible for them all, and one of its most typical expressions is the change 
from men of general learning and culture into specialists who must concen- 
trate with every faculty upon the chosen matter or run the risk of being 
distanced in the race. How true this is may easily be seen by taking such 
a figure as that of Dr. Gardner C. Hill, late of Keene, New Hampshire, a 
man who might truly be called an ideal physician, and comparing his wide 
sympathies and undertakings, not only of his subject, but of the human 
creatures that came under his care, with the highly developed, one had 
almost called it rarified, knowledge of the specialist to-day. Dr. Hill was 
a force, not only in his profession, but in the community, where his strong 
and helpful personality was felt by all those with whom he came in contact. 
Gardner Caleb Hill came of good old New England stock, and was a 
son of Caleb and Polly (Howard) Hill, old and highly respected residents 
of Winchester, New Hampshire. He was born in this town, March 20, 
1829, and spent his childhood and early youth there. The elementary por- 
tion of his education was obtained by attending the local public schools of 
his native town and later the academy at Chesterfield, and Mt. Caesar Acad- 
emy at Swanzey, New Hampshire. Still later he attended the well known 
academy at Saxon's River, Vermont, where he was prepared for college. 
He had in the meantime definitely determined upon the profession of medi- 
cine as his career in life, and accordingly matriculated at the Castleton Med- 
ical College in Vermont, from which he was graduated with the class of 

1856, taking the degree of M. D. He also went to the medical school in 
connection with Harvard University and took post-graduate work there in 
1866. Dr. Hill did not begin the practice of his profession at once upon 
receiving his medical degree, but taught in the high school in Winchester 
for one year, completing his work as a teacher, he having taught twenty 
terms in all, in this way earning the money for his medical education. In 

1857, however, he went to Warwick, Massachusetts, and here began the 
active practice of his profession. He continued thus occupied for some ten 
years, and then in 1867, after having completed his post-graduate course at 
Harvard, he returned to his native State and settled in the town of Keene, 
where he once more began his medical practice. It was not long before he 
was recognized at Keene as one of the most capable physicians in that part 
of the State, and before many years had elapsed he was one of the acknowl- 



(SarDnet Caleb ^ill 239 

edged leaders of his profession thereabouts. For many years Dr. Hill con- 
tinued actively engaged, not only in Keene, but in the whole outlying region, 
and this practice he continued until within three years of his death, being in 
active practice of his profession for over fifty-five years. Even then he did 
not discontinue his work altogether, but continued an office practice to 
within two and a half weeks of his death, when he was seized with his last 
illness. 

In spite of the great demands made upon his time and energies by his 
professional practice, Dr. Hill was an active participant in many other 
departments of the community's life, especially those connected with oublic 
affairs. He was a staunch Republican in political belief and was very prom- 
inent in the local councils of that party for many years. He held a number 
of important public offices also, being a member of the Common Council of 
the city from Ward Four for three years, president of that body for two 
years, and county treasurer for two years. He was also county commis- 
sioner for three years, city physician for seven years, and a member of the 
Board of Education in Warwick for nine years, being keenly interested in 
all educational matters. He was on the Board of Education in Keene for 
twenty-five years, and held the responsible position of county physician for 
five years. In all these capacities Dr. Hill proved himself a most efficient 
and disinterested public servant, and did an invaluable service to the entire 
community. He was for many years president of the Republican Club of 
Ward Four, and was very active in working in the interests of his party. 
Dr. Hill was also affiliated with a number of important financial and busi- 
ness concerns in Keene, among which should be mentioned the Keene Sav- 
ings Bank, of which he was president from 1897 until his death. He was 
also a member of the Keene Board of Examining Surgeons for the govern- 
ment, and was affiliated with the Cheshire County Medical Society, the 
Connecticut River Medical Society, and the New Hampshire Medical 
Society. He served for many years as a member of the staff of the Elliot 
City Hospital of Keene, and was president of the staff for several years. 
He was also an instructor in the school for nurses connected with that insti- 
tution. Dr. Hill always maintained a keen interest in historical matters, 
especially in connection with his native region, and was the author of a 
number of valuable contributions to this subject, which appeared with illus- 
trations in the "Granite Monthly" of Concord, New Hampshire. He was 
also a contributor to several other periodicals on the same subject and was 
regarded as an authority thereon. He was possessed of a remarkable mem- 
ory, which was invaluable to him in his historical studies, to say nothing of 
the other activities of his life. 

Dr. Hill married (first), in 1856, Rebecca F. Howard, of Walpole, who 
died in 1893. Dr. Hill married (second), in 1894, Carrie R. Hutchins, of 
Keene, New Hampshire, a daughter of Benjamin Dorr and Lucy (French) 
Hutchins, old and highly respected residents of that place. Mrs. Hill sur- 
vives him. Having lost two children in infancy, named Harriet and Wil- 
liam, he adopted three children: William H., Rebecca E., and Daisy M. Of 
these, only William H. Hill is living. 



240 ©atDnet Caleb i^ill 

The death of Dr. Hill, which occurred April 30, 191 5, was felt as a severe 
loss by the community-at-large and was the occasion of many expressions 
of admiration and regret on the part of those who knew him. The local 
press joined its voice to this chorus of praise, and in the course of a long 
obituary article appearing in the "New Hampshire Sentinel" occurred the 
following: "Dr. Hill was for many years one of the best known practition- 
ers in Cheshire county, covering a wide field in his professional visits and 
doing a great deal of work among the poorer people, for which he never 
received any financial remuneration. He was ready to respond to every 
call, however, and his benefactions were by no means confined to his pro- 
fessional work alone." 

The place held by Dr. Hill in the community was one that any man 
might desire, but it was one that he deserved in every particular, one that 
he gained by no chance fortune, but by hard and industrious work, and a 
most liberal treatment of his fellow-men. He was a man who enjoyed a 
great reputation and one whose clientele was so large that it would have 
been easy for him to discriminate in favor of the better or wealthier class of 
patients, but it was his principle to ask no questions as to the standing of 
those who sought his professional aid and he responded as readily to the 
call of the indigent as to that of the most prosperous. It thus happened 
that he did a great deal of philanthropic work in the city and was greatly 
beloved by the poorer classes there. It is the function of the physician to 
bring good cheer and encouragement almost as much as the more material 
assistance generally associated with his profession, and often it forms the 
major part of his treatment, and for this office Dr. Hill was pecuHarly well 
fitted both by temperament and philosophy. There is much that is depress- 
ing about the practice of medicine, the constant contact with suffering and 
death, yet the fundamental cheerfulness of Dr. Hill never suffered eclipse 
and was noticeable in every relation of his life. In his home, as much as his 
large practice would permit him to be in it, Dr. Hill was the most exemplary 
of men, a loving husband and a hospitable and charming host. 



i^arfeer 3(etoett Jlopes 




|EYOND doubt, the late Parker Jewett Noyes, of Lancaster. 
New Hampshire, was one of the most prosperous and influ- 
tial figures in the life of this striving community, and 
although not a native of the place had been for many years 
closely identified with its general life and afifairs. Mr. Noyes 
came of a good old New England family, and was a son of 
Michael and Sophronia (Cass) Noyes, being one of a family 
of five. His father, Michael Noyes, was a farmer who resided at East 
Columbia, New Hampshire, where he was a prosperous and influential mem- 
ber of the community. 

Born March 22, 1842, on his father's farm at East Columbia, Parker 
Jewett Noyes was but three months of age when his father died. His mother 
married a second time and as a mere lad he went to live with a cousin, Eben 
Noyes, of Colebrook. His brother James had already gone to Franconia 
and made his home in that town, and eventually Parker Jewett joined him 
there. A large portion of his elementary education was received at the 
schools of Franconia, but he afterwards entered Newbury Academy to pre- 
pare for college. He had been a student at this institution for only a year 
when the outbreak of the Civil War completely changed his plans, and in the 
fall of that year he and two brothers and a half-brother enlisted in Company 
C, Eighth Regiment of Vermont Volunteer Infantry, which was at that 
time quartered at St. Johnsbury. This regiment went into winter quarters 
at Brattleboro, Vermont, and then in the early spring was ordered to New 
Orleans to take its place in the division commanded by General Butler. 
Here Mr. Noyes saw two years of active service, and was present at the siege 
of Port Hudson. At the end of that period he was commissioned lieutenant 
in the Seventy-fourth Regiment, United States Infantry, stationed at Ship 
Island, and there did garrison duty until the end of the war. After the close 
of hostilities he continued at Ship Island for a number of months, the clos- 
ing up of the afifairs of Ship Island being deputed to him. After completing 
four full years of service, he returned to the North and took up his abode 
at St. Johnsbury, Vermont, where he secured a position in the drug store of 
Silas Randall. Here he learned thoroughly all the details of the drug busi- 
ness, and after a year in Mr. Randall's establishment he went to Barnet, 
Vermont, where he opened a similar establishment of his own. It was in 
1868, one year later, that he came to Lancaster, and from that time up to 
the close of his life this community remained his home. In Lancaster he 
purchased the building so long occupied by him, and there opened the drug 
store which for forty-four years has been known by his name, and which, 
because of his indefatigable labors and unimpeachable integrity, gained a 
reputation second to none of its kind in the region. In the year 1910 Mr. 
Noyes finally retired from active business, and from that time until his 



242 Ipatbcr 31etoett I3ope0 

death, two years later, enjoyed a very well-earned period of leisure. His 
business, which began in a very small way, he saw developed from stage to 
stage until at his retirement, when he left it in excellent hands, it was a great 
m.anufacturing and wholesale establishment, with a market which embraced 
practically the whole of the New England States. 

But Mr. Noyes did not make the mistake of so many successful business 
men of this day and narrow himself by a too close application to business 
affairs. He did devote a large proportion of his great energies to the build- 
ing up of the great establishment which bears his name, but his mind was far 
too broad to permit him to forget the interests of other people, and he always 
took a keen and active interest in local public affairs. In politics Mr. Noyes 
was a staunch Republican and identified himself prominently with the 
activities of his party organization in the community. He became a leader 
in Republican politics hereabouts, and in 1910 was elected to the House of 
Representatives, on his party's ticket. Mr. Noyes never forgot the associa- 
tions which he had formed during the Civil War and kept them alive and 
vital by his membership in the great veteran organization of the Civil War. 
He was a past commander of Colonel E. E. Cross Post, Grand Army of the 
Republic, and was always active in Grand Army affairs. He was also prom- 
inently associated with the Masonic fraternity, and was a member of North 
Star Lodge, No. 8, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; North Star Chap- 
ter, Royal Arch Masons ; Evening Star Council, Royal and Select Masters, 
of Colebrook; past commander of North Star Commandery, Knights Tem- 
plar, of Concord; and Bektash Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine. He was also a member of North Star Lodge of Perfection, 
and was past noble grand of Coos Lodge; Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, and a Patron of Industry. Besides his fraternal affiliations, Mr. Noyes 
was an associate member of Unity Club and an active member of Lancaster 
Club of Lancaster. In his religious belief he was an Episcopalian and 
attended St. Paul's Church of that denomination at Lancaster, 

Parker Jewett Noyes was united in marriage. May 14, 1856, at St. Johns- 
bury, Vermont, with Clara Isabel Randall, a daughter of Silas and Laura 
Ann (Weed) Randall, Mr. Randall having been his old employer at St. 
Johnsbury. To Mr. and Mrs. Noyes one child was born, a daughter, Ger- 
trude, January 25, 1869. 

Energy, self-confidence and a strict adherence to the moral law and 
those principles of human conduct that play so vital a part in the moulding 
of society, were the traits which lay at the base of the character of Mr, 
Noyes, acting as the mainspring of his life, shaping and guiding its entire 
development. His business success, as must all true success, depended first 
upon his highly moral character and then upon the special knowledge of 
his subject, a later and acquired power. In all that he did for himself, Mr. 
Noyes kept the interests of those about him ever in sight and made no step, 
however conducive to his own advantage it might seem, if, in his candid 
judgment, it appeared inimical to theirs. It was in line with this— it should 
not be called a policy, for it was too spontaneous for that— but in line with 
this instinct, that all his relations with his fellows were carried out. He 



Parker 31etoett jQopes 243 

would not allow, for instance, his extremely exacting occupation to inter- 
fere with what he considered to be due his family, any more than he erred 
in the opposite direction and allowed domestic ties to interfere with the dis- 
charge of his obligations to the outside world. Indeed, the only person 
whose inclinations and comfort he consistently sacrificed to the rest of the 
world was himself, for he rose early and retired late to fulfill his engage- 
ments with others and minister to their wants. Mr. Noyes was a man of 
very strong character, but a strength that was governed by the keenest sense 
of honor and justice, and tempered by gentleness to all those about him. Of 
firm convictions, he yet preserved an open mind and no one was more ready 
to listen to the ideas of other men or more tolerant of opinions that crossed 
his own. He was very well read, and could talk with understanding on the 
widest range of subjects, his conversations possessing a peculiar sort of 
vividness that rendered him a delightful companion. He had a truly demo- 
cratic outlook upon life and was no respecter of persons, the humblest find- 
ing him as easy of access and as sympathetic as did the proudest. It was 
perhaps this characteristic that accounted for his popularity and the host of 
devoted friends, more than any other, for there is nothing that men more 
value than this quality, and indeed nothing more worthy, approaching very 
closely to the Christian virtue of charity. 





amo0 ISaebster Breto 

|NE of the families of most ancient and honorable lineage in 
old England was that which bore the name of Drew, which 
has been transplanted in this country and is now widely 
spread through its various parts. According to a preamble 
of the Drew pedigree given by the King of Arms, the descent 
may be traced back to Richard, Duke of Normandy, the 
grandfather of William the Conqueror. In all probability, 
therefore, the ancestor two generations later accompanied his cousin, the 
Conqueror, to England and settled there, at a point which is not definitely 
ascertained. From here, however, the family spread until now it is to be 
found in England, Scotland and Wales. One branch of the family are now 
residents of Drewscliffe, Devon, and bear for their arms an ermined lion 
passant gules langued and armed. The crest is a bull's head erased sable, 
in his mouth three ears of wheat or. The motto: Drogo nomen et virtus 
arma dedit. It is not often that a name so completely baffles us in searching 
for its origin as that of Drew, which cannot be definitely referred to any 
of the great groups of names, such as those which come from nicknames or 
from earlier Christian names or yet from localities or trades. Its derivation 
is lost in an obscure part and the best we can do is to conjecture somewhat 
vaguely concerning it. It was founded in this country by a number of 
immigrants from the old world, but that branch of it with which we are 
especially concerned and of which Irving Webster Drew, the distinguished 
gentleman whose name heads this sketch is descended, was founded by 
one Drew, a grandson of Sir Edward Drew, of Drewscliffe, Devon- 
shire, who was knighted by Queen Elizabeth in 1589, and who came to this 
country and settled in the New England colonies, where many of his 
descendants still reside. 

Among these was one Samuel Drew, a native of Shapleigh, Maine, 
where he was born about 1756. He removed to Plymouth, New Hamp- 
shire, just prior to the outbreak of the Revolution, and was the founder of the 
family in this State. He enlisted July 11, 1775, at the age of nineteen in the 
company of Captain James Osgood, in the regiment commanded by Colonel 
Timothy Bedel, which was made up of rangers and which soon joined the 
Northern Continental army under General Montgomery. It took an active 
part in the compaign which followed in the north, and was one of those 
which participated in the investment of the fortresses of St. John and 
Chambly, and reduced them to surrender. Samuel Drew remained with the 
army which besieged Quebec, and was finally discharged in December, 
1775, after a campaign of great hardship and peril. He was one of the 
twenty men of Captain Osgood's company which reenlisted in the company 
of Captain Charles Nelson, which was one of the four which formed the 
detachment of Major Brown. This was stationed on the advanced line of 



amos mehtittt Dreto 245 

the American army and took part in the attack on Quebec, in which Gen- 
eral Montgomery was killed. The detachment remained with the army, 
however, and served successively under Generals Arnold, Wooster, Thomas 
and Sullivan. After taking part in the famous retreat to Crown Point in 
July, 1776, and having served as a private for two years and six months, he 
was honorably discharged December 31, 1777. On January 29, 1779, he was 
married to Elizabeth (Webber) Webster, a daughter of Edmond Webber 
and the widow of Amos Webber, who was killed at the battle of Saratoga, 
October 7, 1777. Samuel Drew and his wife then removed from Plymouth 
to Bridgewater, New Hampshire, in 1785, and the citizens of Bridgewater 
held their first town meeting at his residence. He and his wife were the 
parents of the following children: Amos Webster, Benjamin, who is men- 
tioned below; Elizabeth, Samuel, Sarah, Mary and John. 

Benjamin Drew, the second son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Webster) 
Drew, was born at Plymouth, New Hampshire, April 17, 1785. He removed 
with his parents to Bridgewater, where he became prominent in public affairs 
and was elected to every office within the gift of his fellow townsmen. He 
was selectman for six years and also represented the community at the 
General Court of New Hampshire in 1830 and 1831. He was a man of 
unusually fine character, charitable, generous and honorable to the last 
degree. He married, July 6, 1807, Sarah Harriman, a daughter of John and 
Sarah (Heath) Harriman, of Bridgewater. Benjamin Drew died October 
5, 1869, and his wife, December 10, 1870. They were the parents of the 
following children: Amos Webster, who is mentioned below; Mary Harri- 
man. Lucy, Sarah, Benjamin and Edwin Warren. 

Amos Webster Drew, eldest son of Benjamin and Sarah (Harriman) 
Drew, was born at Bridgewater, New Hampshire, April 5, 1808. He accom- 
panied his father to Stewartstown, in 1821, and eventually settled in that 
place immediately after his marriage in 1835. Like his father before him, he 
took an active part in public affairs and held many offices. He was town 
clerk of Stewartstown two years and selectman six years. In 1843 he went 
to live at Colebrook, where he was elected selectman for six years, and in 
1847 ^"d 1848 represented the town in the State Legislature. In 1850 he 
returned to South Hill, Stewartstown, and there made his home on a farm 
near the old homestead for many years. Although a Democrat in politics, 
Mr. Drew was an active figure in the anti-slavery movement of that day, 
and when the Southern States proposed secession, wholly condemned their 
action and spoke and worked for the Union. His speech at the meeting held 
in the town hall of Colebrook, after Fort Sumter had been fired upon, made 
a strong impression on his auditors, and he was very active in the recruit- 
ing cause, being appointed special recruiting agent for Stewartstown, 
Clarksville and Pittsburgh. In 1834, when he was a young man, Mr. Drew 
was commissioned ensign in a State militia company by Governor Samuel 
Dinsmore, and the year afterward he served in the Indian Stream War, a 
disturbance of considerable magnitude between the residents of Canada and 
the people of the "North Country" over disputed boundaries. On August 
17, 1836, he was made lieutenant by Governor Isaac B. Hill. In 1838 wa? 



U6 



3mos SjQebstet Dteto 



commissioned captain, and in 1842 adjutant of the Twenty-fourth Regiment. 
He was an excellent officer and a good tactician, and in those capacities and 
in the many other offices which he held he won for himself a most enviable 
reputation in his community. His death occurred March 22, 1888, at the 
age of eighty. On November 15, 1835, he married Julia Esther Lovering, 
of Colebrook, a daughter of Hubbard and Abagail (Bumford) Lovering, of 
that place, and they were the parents of thirteen children, seven of them 
living to maturity, as follows: Lucy Abigail, born May 4, 1843; Irving 
Webster, born January 8, 1845; Benjamin Franklin, born June 29, 1848; 
Edwin Warren, born June 28, 1850; Julia Ellen, born August 28, 1855 ; Hol- 
man Arthur, born August 21, 1857; and Edward Everett, born September 
24. 1859. 




3(ame0 ^eltien ^Ijtpps 




AMES SELDEN PHIPPS, late of Berlin, New Hampshire, 
where he was prominently engaged in banking and other 
enterprises for many years, and whose death there on April 
3' 1905. was felt as a loss by the entire community, was a son 
of James Monroe and Lydia (Gould) Phipps, old and much 
respected residents of Milan, New Hampshire. James Mon- 
roe Phipps was well known in the community where he 
dwelt as a successful merchant and farmer, and was a member of an old 
New England family. 

Born at his father's home at Milan, March 15, 1847, James Selden 
Phipps passed the early years of his life in his native place. There he 
attended the local town schools, and after completing his general studies 
took a business course at the Concord Commercial College. The first busi- 
ness venture of his long and successful career was engaged in by him at 
Milan, where he became a partner in his father's mercantile establishment 
together with a relative, a Mr. P. A. G. W. Phipps. the firm being known 
as J. M. Phipps & Company. He continued in this association for a period 
of about ten years, during most of which he also served as postmaster of 
Milan. In the year 1890, however, the Berlin Savings Bank & Trust Com- 
pany of Berlin, New Hampshire, was organized, and Mr. Phipps, whose 
business ability had became very well known throughout the region, was 
elected its treasurer. Under his careful and progressive management the 
new concern flourished greatly, and Mr. Phipps continued to serve it in his 
responsible capacity until the year 1900. About this time, however, certain 
changes in the directorate occurred which did not meet with his approval, 
and he accordingly felt constrained to resign. But in the month of October 
of the same year the City National Bank of Berlin was organized and Mr. 
Phipps was elected cashier of this institution. Another banking institution 
was organized in Berlin in February, 1901, and opened its doors for business 
the following May. This was the City Savings Bank of Berlin, which shared 
the offices of the City National Bank, and of this also Mr. Phipps was elected 
treasurer. These two offices were held by Mr. Phipps until the time of his 
death, and his conduct of them won for him an enviable reputation in bank- 
ing circles throughout the State. In addition to his banking activities, Mr. 
Phipps made himself very well known and added to his reputation as a con- 
servative and capable man by taking an active part in the general life and 
affairs of the community. He was a Republican in politics, and a staunch 
supporter of the principles and policies of his party. He held a number of 
local offices, acting as town clerk for nearly fifteen years. He also took the 
census of the town for the years 1880 and 1890. He represented Milan in 
the New Hampshire State Legislature in 1888, and it was through his activ- 
ities that the handsome steel bridge was erected across the Androscoggin at 



248 3iame0 ^elDen Pi)ipp0 

Milan, the State aiding in the appropriations for carrying on the work. After 
coming to Berlin, however, Mr. Phipps gave up political activities to a great 
extent and devoted himself undeviatingly to the banking business. He was 
a member of the Androscoggin Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
of Milan, having joined that body when it was organized in the year 1884. 
He was also affiliated with the Masonic order, having joined it in early life, 
and was deeply attached to this order and greatly interested in its welfare 
and work. He attained to the thirty-second degree in Free Masonry, and 
was a member of most of the Masonic bodies in the region. Among these 
should be mentioned Gorham Lodge. Free and Accepted Masons, of Gor- 
ham, New Hampshire, where he took his first degree; North Star Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons; Omega Council, Royal and Select Masters; the Com- 
mandery, Knights Templar; and KoraTemple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine, of Lewiston, Maine, which he joined March 23, 1893, 
and where he took his thirty-second degree in August, 1894. Mr. Phipps 
was not a member of any clubs. 

James Selden Phipps was united in marriage, June 17, 1875, in the city 
of Portland, Maine, with Ellen Maria Edwards, a daughter of Clark Swett 
and Maria Antoinette (Mason) Edwards, for many years residents of that 
city. The married life of Mr. and Mrs. Phipps was an ideal one, Mrs. Phipps 
proving a companion and advisor to her husband in an unusual degree. The 
domestic tastes and instincts of both were unusually strong, and it was in 
the home that he found the relaxation and recreation after his arduous 
labors in bank or offices which the majority of men seek elsewhere. It was 
to Mrs. Phipps that he turned to advice, advice which she was eminently 
capable of giving. These conditions, together with their conscious efiforts 
to this end, resulted in the establishment of an ideal home for the upbringing 
of children, two of whom were born to Mr. and Mrs. Phipps, Maude Lillian, 
born January 26, 1877, and Marcia Edwards, born November 9, 1889. 

James Selden Phipps was a man of the strictest business integrity and 
of the highest ethical ideals in all the relations of life. His excellent judg- 
ment won for him the unreserved confidence of the general public, and 
many people came to him for advice, not only in matters of business, but in 
personal affairs as well. He possessed the only too rare quality of knowing 
when to say no, and what is more of meaning it, and his inflexible will was 
valued as a tower of strength by his associates and friends. His own stand- 
ards made him particularly dislike anything like sharp practice, and he 
could not tolerate to have dealings with any who had recourse to it. 






3fo|)n €i)mWv attooob 

[OHN CHANDLER ATWOOD, late of Landaff, New Hamp- 
shire, where he was engaged in numerous and various activ- 
ities, was one of that class of industrial pioneers to which 
New England has contributed so many distinguished names 
and to which the country at large owes such a debt of grati- 
tude. His career was typical of the best traditions of the 
great State in which he was born and in which he lived, 
climbing, as he did, from the bottom of the ladder of success to a high place 
in the esteem of the community, and his death removed from this region one 
of its leading citizens and a man whose essential integrity and honor had 
never been questioned. He was a son of Joseph and Prudence (Chandler) 
Atwood, of Landafif, and came of the sturdy farming class of New Hamp- 
shire, his father having followed this occupation all his life. The elder Mr. 
Atwood was himself prominent here many years ago and represented Lan- 
daff in the State Legislature about the third decade of the nineteenth 
century. 

Born October i8, 1818, at Landaff, New Hampshire, John Chandler 
Atwood attended the local common schools of his native region. His formal 
educational advantages were few and far between, but he learned readily 
in the great school of experience, and as a youth gained a first hand knowl- 
edge of farming methods on the home place. He also learned the black- 
smith's trade while young, and practiced it to some extent until within 
about ten years of his death. He also operated a saw mill with consider- 
able success, but his chief claim to distinction in the industrial world came 
from his pioneer efforts in connection with the manufacture of potato starch. 
In this enterprise he was highly successful and owned and operated a mill 
of his own. He was largely interested also in several other mills, and was 
one of the chief factors in getting this important industry started in this 
part of the State. But although interested in these large manufacturing 
projects, he never altered the place of his abode from the old farm where he 
was born, and finally died there. May 14, 1894. This place was in the 
ownership of the Atwood family for a period of more than one hundred and 
twenty years. 

John Chandler Atwood was a Democrat in politics, but although active 
in local affairs, he rather avoided than sought political preferment or public 
ofiice. In spite of this fact, however, and because he was so strongly urged 
to by his friends and colleagues, he held practically every office in the gift 
of the town, a great tribute to his personal popularity and the esteem in 
which he was held by his fellow citizens. He was sent by the community 
to represent it in the State Legislature in the years 1875, 1876 and 1877. and 
was also a member of the Constitutional Convention of the State in 1876. 
The members of his familv were all identified with the Methodist Episcopal 



250 



3iOl)n CfjanDIet attoooD 



church of Landaff, and although not a formal member himself. Mr. Atwood 
was a liberal supporter of it and of the work that it did in the community of 
which he heartily approved. 

John Chandler Atwood was united in marriage, in 1844, at Landaff, 
New Hampshire, with Mary Doyle Simonds, a daughter of William and 
Sally (Page) Simonds, old residents of this place. Born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Atwood were the following children : Emily Eliza, who became the wife of 
Henry Noyes Whitcher, whom she survives; Mary Alma, who became the 
wife of Holmes Drew Titus, and died June 29. 1916; William Henry, who 
married (first) Minnie Edwards, and (second) Susan Brooks; Amanda S., 
who became the wife of Moses Whitcher, whose death occurred April 30, 
1903 ; Ada Francena, unmarried ; and Warren Bertrand, who married Martha 
J. Miner. 



ifWloolip Currter 




[T IS extremely difficult to express in words the value to the 
world of such a man as Moody Currier, governor of New 
Hampshire, and long- one of the most successful and prom- 
inent men of the commonwealth. As a business man, a 
scholar and philanthropist, he rendered distingtiished serv- 
ice to his native State and to humanity in general. Born 
amid conditions of poverty and misfortune, he rose superior 
to environment and achieved a success in his chosen lines which is vouch- 
safed to but few men even when blessed with every advantage at the start. 
His example will ever remain among those most worthy of emulation as an 
inspiration and encouragement to ambitious youth everywhere. His fame 
was not confined to one State, but extended over many, and the great final 
reckoning of mankind alone can tell the benefits of the world of his unblem- 
ished life. 

He was born April 22, 1806, in Boscawen, Merrimack county, and died 
at his home in Manchester, August 23. 1898, in his ninety-third year. To 
him was given length of days and wisdom of a high order. His boyhood was 
passed in an agricultural community where books were rare, but he used 
his leisure hours in the pursuit of knowledge. Compelled to labor diligently 
and almost incessantly in order to live,, from a very early age, he yet estab- 
lished the basis of that wide information which made his mature years so 
bright and useful to both himself and the country. A few weeks at the 
rural winter school enabled him to gain a footing at the base of the tree of 
knowledge, and by his own efiforts he secured a preparatory training at 
Hopkinton Academy, and he finally entered Dartmouth College, where he 
paid his way by teaching and farm work, being graduated from the classical 
course in 1834. He was the honor man of his class, delivering the Greek 
oration, and none disputed his title to honors so nobly earned. He now set 
about preparation for admission to the bar, engaging as a means to that end 
in the work of teaching, for which he was fitted by nature, and like all his 
undertakings, this was carried on with enthusiasm and thoroughness. He 
was employed in a school at Concord, was principal of the Hopkinton Acad- 
emy and of the Lowell (Massachusetts) High School. Having pursued his 
legal studies successfully while teaching, he was admitted to the bar at 
Manchester in the spring of 1841 and immediately set about the practice of 
his chosen profession, locating in that city. For two years he was associated 
with Hon. George W. Morrison, and subsequently pursued his profession 
alone, acquiring a handsome and valuable practice and continuing until 
1848, when he entered the field of finance, for which he was so admirably 
fitted. He was the moving spirit in the organization of the Amoskeag Bank, 
of which he was cashier until its reorganization as a National Bank, becom- 



252 e©ooDp Cuttiet 

ing at that time its president. This responsible position he held until failing 
health compelled his resignation in 1892. He was the first treasurer and 
subsequently president of the Amoskeag Savings Bank, and was the founder 
and one of the directors of the People's Savings Bank. In the broad field 
of industrial and financial development, he was a master, and his connections 
extended to nearly every useful and growing institution of his home city. 
He was a director of the Manchester Mills Corporation; was treasurer of 
the Concord Railroad Company, and of the Concord & Portsmouth Rail- 
road; was chosen president of the Eastern Railroad in New Hampshire in 
1877; was a director of the Blodgett Edge Tool Company and director of the 
Amoskeag Axe Company during its existence; was president and director 
of the Manchester Gas Light Company ; and was for many years treasurer 
of the New England Loan Company, the first to issue debenture bonds. 

It was natural that such a forceful mind should take an active interest 
in the conduct of public business, and we find him on record as clerk of the 
State Senate in 1843-44, to which position he was chosen as a Democrat. 
The slavery agitation caused him to join the Free Soil party, and he was 
among those who aided in the establishment of the Republican party in 
1856. In that year he was elected to the Senate, and was president of that 
body in the latter part of its session in the succeeding winter. In 1860-61 
he was a member of the Governor's Council, and as chairman of the com- 
mittee charged with filling the State's quota of soldiers for the Union armies, 
he rendered the State and Nation most valuable service. In 1876 he was 
chosen as presidential elector, and was urged to become a candidate for 
governor in 1879. I'o this he would not consent, but in 1884 he became his 
party's leader, and was triumphantly elected to that high office. His admin- 
istration was characterized by dignity, success and honor to all concerned. 
Besides an intimate knowledge of Greek and Latin, he possessed a knowl- 
edge of French, Spanish, Italian, German, and other modern languages, in 
which he read frequently in order that his acquaintance with them might 
not lapse. In recognition of his learning and distinguished services, both 
Dartmouth and Bates College conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of 
Laws. While teaching in Concord he edited a literary journal and, for some 
years after locating in Manchester, he edited and published a newspaper. 
He was an able writer of both prose and verse, and was a deep student of 
religious and scientific questions. His State papers, published since his 
death, furnish edifying reading for those who appreciate pure and classical 
English. In speaking of Governor Currier, a local historian says: "A dis- 
tinguished classical scholar," he was "learned in the literature and proficient 
in many of the languages of modern Europe. * * * For elegant expres- 
sion and polished style and fitness for the occasion, his address accepting in 
behalf of the State the statue of Daniel Webster has never been excelled." 
His proclamations, though without formality or dogmatism, were religious 
in tone and moral in sentiment. The following short stanzas disclose the 
soul of a poet, and are given as one of the gems from Mr. Currier's pen: 



Q9ooDp Cuttfet 253 

When one by one the stars go out, 

And slow retires the night, 
In shining robes the sun appears 

And pours his golden light. 

So, one by one, we all depart. 

And darkness shrouds the way ; 
But hope lights up the sacred morn 

Of Life's eternal day. 

Mr. Currier was thrice married, but left no offspring. His first wife 
was Lucretia Dustin; the second was Mary Kidder; the third, Hannah A, 
Slade, daughter of Enoch and Penelope (Wellington) Slade, survived him 
and treasures most worthily his honored memory. The best summary 
possible of the noble life and service of Governor Moody Currier is supplied 
by the following paragraphs, which were written by one who knew inti- 
mately all the phases of his long life and noble character: 

The long list of New Hampshire's successful and eminent men contains few if any 
names that are entitled to precedence over that of ex-Governor Moody Currier, who died 
at his residence in this city Tuesday noon, and there is certainly no other whose career 
illustrates more strikingly the rewards that are open to ability, integrity, industry and 
perseverance. His home reflected his large means, great learning and cultivated tastes 
His house and grounds were ornaments of the city and the delight of all admirers of sub- 
stantial architecture and floral beauty. His family idolized him, and in his declining 
years ministered to him with the greatest watchfulness and tenderest care. He lived 
almost a century with his mental facilities unimpaired and enjoyed as few can the old 
age which crowned his long life. He leaves to his family and friends a record which is 
to them a precious legacy and to all an inspiration. He was the most learned man with 
whom we were ever acquainted. For more than eighty years his books were the constant 
companions of his leisure hours. He never read merely for amusement, but always for 
instruction. Probably in all his life he did not read ten works of fiction. He read slowly, 
passing nothing which he did not understand, and when once he had finished a volume he 
never forgot what it contained. His knowledge of the Bible surpassed that of almost 
any New Hampshire man of his time. He could read and write several languages, 
ancient and modern, and was a master of pure English. He knew science, art and litera- 
ture. He was versed in philosophy, astronomy, geology, botany, and natural history. 
He was a mathematician of a high order. The geography of the world was in his mind 
and the world's history was familiar to him. He was always informed upon current 
events, and new inventions were the subjects of his constant study. He studied social, 
moral, theological, industrial and political problems, and was always able to discuss 
them intelligently. His mind was a storehouse of rich and varied knowledge upon nearly 
every subject. And yet he never displayed his learning and only his intimate friends 
knew how profound and extensive it was. 

As a financier he had no superior in the State. In the investment and management 
of capital his judgment was seldom at fault. The moneyed institutions which he founded 
prospered from the first and grew steadily in size and strength until they stood unshaken 
monuments to his courage, wisdom, prudence and skill against panics and depressions 
and all other adversities. 

Among all the corporations in which he has been a controlling director there is not 
one which has proved a disappointment to those whose money was invested in it. There 
are no wrecks along the paths through which investors followed Moody Currier. He was 
a public-spirited citizen. He helped lay the foundations of Manchester and build the 
superstructure upon them, and whatever in his judgment promoted her prosperity com- 
manded his support. He never gave because others did. He never tried to buy noto- 
riety. He never placated opposition by bribes, but for the causes in which he believed 
he had a willing hand and an open purse. He was a man of very decided opinions and 



154 99ooDp Curtfet 

therefore a strong partisan. From the birth of the Republican party he was one of its 
most courageous leaders, wisest counselors and most liberal contributors. He held 
many public positions and displayed in all of them the same ability which was so con- 
spicuous in his private affairs. 

During the War of the Rebellion he was a member of the governor's council, and in 
this position his financial and executive ability contributed immensely to the advantage 
of the State and Nation. Probably New Hampshire was more indebted to him than to 
any other man for her honorable record in providing money and men in response to the 
repeated calls of the government. 

As governor of the State he won a national reputation. His State papers are the 
classics of our official literature, and all his acts were such as to steadily strengthen him 
in public confidence and esteem. 

He was a generous patron of art and literature. In his religious views he was a 
liberal. Far from being an infidel, he rejected the creeds and ceremonies and supersti- 
tions of past ages and found his religious home in the Unitarian church, of which he was 
a firm supporter. He was not an effusive or demonstrative man. His self control was 
perfect at all times and under all circumstances. He was always calm, deliberate and 
quiet. He never sought popularity. He never contributed to sensations. He was 
always the thoughtful, earnest, steady-going, self-reliant and reliable citizen. Until 
within three days before his death his mind was as strong, as well balanced and as active 
as ever. He was an ardent lover of nature and a worshipper of her truth and beauty. 
He hated shams, hypocrisy and pretenses, and abominated Pharisees and demagogies. 
He had strong likes and dislikes. He remembered his friends and did not forget his 
enemies. His companionship was delightful and helpful to all who appreciated solid 
worth and enjoyed sound instruction. None could be much with him without growing 
wiser. His advice was sound. His example showed the road to honorable success and 
was an invitation to whoever was strong, ambitious and determined. 




IKtlltam Huse Cummtngs 

"ILLIAM HUSE CUMMINGS, whose death on July 15, 1891, 
at Lisbon, New Hampshire, removed from that community 
one of its most public-spirited citizens and one of the most 
conspicuous figures in its general life, was a member of a 
wealthy family which can claim a great and honorable antiq- 
uity, both in this country and abroad. Its origin is uncer- 
tain and may be said to be lost in the mists of an obscure and 
remote past, but there seems to be reason to believe that it was derived from 
the town of Comines, near the city of Lille, on the frontier between France 
and Belgium. There are indeed a number of legends which purport to 
account for a still earlier origin, but to these no great value can be attached 
in a historical sense. However this may be, it is certain that the family 
resided for many generations in Scotland and at times its members played 
very important parts in the destinies of that kingdom. We find the name 
there as early as 1080, A. D., though whether it came there originally from 
Flanders or the low country on the continent or not, would be difficult if 
not impossible to ascertain. We find it under all sorts of spellings during 
that age of orthographical laxity, and among others as Comines, Comynes, 
Comyns, Comings, Comyn, Cummungs and Cumings. There is a tradition in 
the family that it descended from one "Red Cumin" of Badenoch, in the south- 
eastern district of Invernesshire, a wild mountainous country in which occur 
great stretches of bleak moorland. Here the Cumin clan flourished from 
about 1080 to 1330 A. D. After this it began to decline. In the Chronicle of 
Melrose, we find an account of the first of the name to come to these parts 
and who is stated to have been slain with Malcolm III., of Scotland, on the 
field at Alnwick in the year 1093. It is stated that he left two sons, John 
and William, and that it was from the former that all the Cumins of Scot- 
land were descended. Sir John, the Red Cumin, or Comyn, was the first 
lord of Badenoch, and in 1240 was an ambassador from Alexander II. of 
Scotland, to Louis IX. of France. His son John, who rejoiced in the name of 
the Black Lord of Badenoch, was not inferior to any subject in Scotland 
for wealth and power and was one of the great nobles who vowed to support 
Queen Margaret, the daughter of Alexander III., in her title to the crown. 
At her death he himself became a competitor for the crown of Scotland, "as 
a son and heir of John, who was son and heir of Donald, King of Scotland." 
The son of this great noble, who was also known as the "Red Cumin," was 
the last lord of Badenoch to bear this name. In the year 1335 a number of 
the clan of Cumin were slain in the feudal battle, Calbleau in Glenwick, 
where a stone still stands to mark the spot. The badge of the clan was 
"Lus Mhic Cuiminn," which is the Gaelic for the Cummin clan. 

The first of this ancient family to appear in America was Deacon Isaac 
Cummings, who is believed to have come from England to the New England 



256 tiOUIiam ^u$e Cumming0 

colonies in 1627. He settled at Salem, Massachusetts, and became a prom- 
inent man in the community. He had a number of children, from one of 
whom John, the eldest, a well known New Hampshire family is descended, 
while from his second son, Isaac, the line of which the subject of this sketch 
is a member, originated, 

Joseph Cummings was a native of New Hampton, New Hampshire, 
born July 6, 1781. He was a carpenter by trade, and removed in early man- 
hood to Lisbon, where he died February 10, 1864. On June 17, 1812, he was 
married to Mary Huse, a native of Sanbornton, New Hampshire, born Aug- 
ust 2, 1787. To Mr. and Mrs. Cummings seven children were born, as fol- 
lows: Greenleaf ; William Huse, mentioned below; Joseph, who died June 
1, 1865; Stephen H.. Noah, Mary H., and Betsey. 

William Huse Cummings, born January 10, 1817, at New Hampton, 
New Hampshire, second son and child of Joseph and Mary (Huse) Cum- 
mings, passed his childhood and early youth in his native town. His edu- 
cation was obtained largely through private reading and study, a habit 
which thus acquired in early youth remained with him throughout his entire 
life. He was of an exceedingly ambitious temperament, and when but 
seventeen years of age he left the parental home and came to New Chester, 
New Hampshire, where he sought and found employment as a clerk in the 
store of Major Ebenezer Kimball. His salary during the first year that he 
was thus employed was scarcely munificent, amounting as it did to thirty- 
five dollars per year and his board. He continued to work in this capacity 
for some three years, and at the end of that time purchased his employer's 
business, which he conducted independently for the two years following. 
This was in 1837, and in 1840 he came to Lisbon, New Hampshire, where he 
entered the employ of the firm of Allen & Cummings. After twelve months 
of hard work with this concern, he went to Haverhill, New Hampshire, and 
spent eight years at that place, during most of which time he was engaged 
in business in partnership with John L. Rix. Upon the retirement of Mr. 
Rix, Mr. Cummings conducted the business on his own account, but at the 
end of the year, 1849, ^e returned to Lisbon and there took up his permanent 
abode. From that time during the more than forty years which intervened 
between that and his death, he was most prominently identified with the 
business and commercial interests of the town and took an exceedingly 
prominent part in its public affairs. The old firm of Allen & Cummings, by 
which he had been employed before, was still doing business and he becarne 
a member, the firm name becoming Allen, Cummings & Company. This 
concern was engaged in a mercantile business and also in lumbering and 
manufacturing. James Allen died in 1853, and Greenleaf Cummings in 
1865; the firm was succeeded by a number of others, but W. H. Cummings 
merely owned the store building and had no further connection with the 
business. He retired from active business life in 1875. Mr. Cummings did 
not by any means confine his activities to the conduct of this enterprise. On 
the contrary he was affiliated with many financial and industrial interests in 
and about Lisbon. For more than eighteen years he was president of the 



mnuam l^use Cumming0 257 

Wells River National Bank at Wells River, Vermont, and he vv^as also inter- 
ested on a large scale in real estate in the neighborhood of Lisbon and dealt 
largely therein. He owned in the neighborhood of sixty houses, which he 
afterwards placed on the market and disposed of on the installment plan to 
people desiring homes. 

Mr. Cummings was a very conspicuous figure in the general life of his 
adopted community and held a number of important public posts at different 
times in his life. He was a strong supporter of the principles and policies of 
the Democratic party and became one of the leaders of the local organiza- 
tion in the county. He was elected to represent the town of Lisbon in the 
State Assembly in 1856 and again in 1873, and was State Senator in 1877 
and 1878. In the year 1876 he was sent as a delegate to the National Demo- 
cratic Convention which nominated Mr. Tilden for the presidency. Mr. 
Cummings was a very prominent Mason, having joined in early life that fra- 
ternity as a charter member of Kane Lodge. For twenty-six years he was 
an active member of Franklin Chapter and served in all the offices of these 
two organizations. He was a charter member of St. Girard Commandery, 
Knights Templar, of Littleton. In his religious belief he was a Congrega- 
tionalist and was one of the group of men who founded the society of that 
denomination at Lisbon in the year 1878. For thirteen years thereafter, 
Mr. Cummings was treasurer of the society and chairman of the board of 
trustees, and in 1893, two years after his death, his family presented the 
church with a pipe organ in his memory. He was a man of exceedingly 
charitable instincts and impulses and did much to relieve the poverty that 
existed in the region. He was, however, exceedingly unostentatious and 
obeyed literally the Biblical injunction not to let his right hand know what 
his left was doing. It was in 1853 that he built the charming and commod- 
ious house on a tract of land purchased by him on the eastern side of the 
Ammonoosuc river. This property, which was formerly owned by Hamlin 
Rand, stood upon the crest of a hill overlooking the village of Lisbon. At 
the time of his purchase the property was nothing more than rough pasture 
land, but under Mr. Cummings' skilled hand, it was developed into a charm- 
ing and highly cultivated estate. 

William Huse Cummings was united in marriage, August 3, 1843, with 
Harriet Sprague Rand, daughter of Hamlin Rand, and a native of Bath, 
New Hampshire, born April 8, 1817. Mr. and Mrs. Cummings were the 
parents of three children, as follows: Harriet S., born August 24, iS-h, at 
Haverhill, New Hampshire, became the wife of Oliver P. Newcomb, of Lis- 
bon, October 20, 1869, and died April 29, 1903 ; William Edward, born March 
12. 1846, at Lisbon, died March 12, 1867, when just twenty-one years of 
age; and Mary Rand. 

The character of Mr. Cummings was one particularly well balanced, in 
which the sterner virtues were relieved by a most gracious exterior, his 
attractions appearing upon the former like blossoms on a gnarled apple 
tree, increasing the effect of both. An almost Puritanic sense of honor and 
the discharge of obligations was the very essence of his nature, but this 

NH-17 



258 William ^use Cummin00 

Puritanic conscience existed only in so far as his own conduct was concerned 
and for others he was tolerant to a fault, if that be possible. His industry 
and the courage with which he surmounted all obstacles in the way of his 
aim were well worthy of remark and all praise. These were the qualities 
that brought him success and the admiration of those with whom he came 
into contact, but there were others which, if less fundamental, were not less 
potent in their influence upon those about him. Such was his hearty friend- 
ship, his open candid manner, his warm greeting, which did not alter for 
rich or poor, high or low, and such also was his ready charity which made 
all men feel that he was a friend who would not desert them in the time of 
need. In every relation of life, his conduct was irreproachable; in the home, 
in the marts of trade, or the forum of public opinion, in all he may well stand 
as a model upon which the youth of the community can afford to model 
themselves. 




BabttJ ilarbej 0ootieU 




|AVID HARVEY GOODELL was born in Hillsborough, New 
Hampshire, May 6, 1834. When he was a small boy his 
parents moved to Antrim, and he lived upon the farm which 
his father purchased, until the time of his death, January 22, 
1915- 

He obtained his early education in the public schools of 
Antrim, afterwards attending the academies in Hancock, 
New Hampton and Francestown. In 1852 he entered Brown University, 
but on account of poor health was obliged to leave in his sophomore year 
and devote himself to a more out-of-door life. He taught school some, but 
in 1857 he settled upon the home farm with the expectation of making farm- 
ing his principal business. It was about this time, however, that another 
opportunity was presented and he was elected treasurer of the Antrim 
Shovel Company and afterwards general agent of this company. He held 
this position until the business was sold to a Boston firm. In connection 
with Mr. Carter, the copartnership of D. H. Goodell & Company was 
formed and later the corporation of Goodell Company, of which Mr. Good- 
ell was president and treasurer, and an extensive business in the manufac- 
ture of apple-parers, seed-sowers, cutlery and hardware specialties has been 
established. The goods are sold all over this country and in many foreign 
lands. 

In 1894 an electric light plant was installed for furnishing lighting for 
the factories, commercial and street lighting, about the towns of Antrim 
and Bennington. In 1909 more power being needed for the growing busi- 
ness than the water privilege could furnish, an 800-horsepower electric 
plant was put in at North Branch and power was furnished for his own 
factories and any others that desired it. 

For seven years Mr. Goodell was a member of the State Board of Agri- 
culture and gave unsparingly of his time for the development of the science 
of agriculture throughout the State of New Hampshire. He operated a 
large farm where many of the improved methods were tested. In the year 
1881 he built a large concrete silo on his farm, being one of the first in this 
country to appreciate the possibilities of what is now so universally recog- 
nized as necessary. For nearly thirty years he maintained a large herd of 
registered Holstein Friesian cattle which were somewhat famous in this 
section of the country. 

Mr. Goodell was always deeply interested in the uplift and improvement 
of the town. He was town clerk and superintendent of schools and repre- 
sented the town in the Legislature several times, and was honored by the 
State in being chosen to fill the highest office she could give, that of governor. 
When his term was but half spent it seemed unlikely that he would ever 
see his successor. Stricken with a desperate illness, he hung for weeks on 
the brink of the eternal, and, for the only time within living memory, the 



26o Dat)iD l^aiViep ^ooDell 

president of the Senate was called upon to exercise all the functions of the 
chief magistracy. Yet he, thanks to the sturdy physique which was his 
inheritance from a long line of robust New England ancestry, lived to see 
thirteen of his successors take office, to witness the passing of all eight of 
his predecessors who graced his own inauguration, of six of the men who 
followed him, of all five of his council and of the Secretary of State who sat 
with them, and of most of those whom he commissioned into the State 
service. This is by no means to say that he lagged superfluous upon the 
scene. The facts are to the contrary, and there has been hardly a day during 
the twenty-five years intervening when he was not found taking a keen and 
active interest in public affairs and devoting himself to the problems which 
an expanding business laid upon him. 

He came to the governorship by natural approach and through merit. 
He was born of Democratic stock, but the events of the Civil War led him 
into the Republican ranks and he early became a prominent figure in the 
local councils of the party. In the early seventies he was elected to the 
Legislature, and it is interesting to note that some of the highly contro- 
verted incidents of that period of legislative strife centered about his title 
to the seat which he continued to hold. In 1883 he served in the Council of 
Governor Hale, and of that group, too, he was a survivor. In 1886 he was 
first advanced as a candidate for governor and the support which he then 
secured made it evident that he was to be a central figure in the campaign 
of two years later. His nomination crowned a canvass of unprecedented 
activity. The convention ballotted for hours and without result, and when 
the end finally came, with a spectacular shift of alignment which brought 
him success, it was with a sense of certainty on the part of the delegates 
that the leadership of the party had been committed to safe hands. 

Those were days of Republican stress in New Hampshire. The Democ- 
racy was alert, well-led, amply supplied with all the equipment of contest, 
and for the first time the national administration was in their hands. Two 
years before, one of the congressional districts had been carried by a Demo- 
crat and it was evident that if the Republicans were to win, it would be only 
through superior organization and by means of an aggressive canvass before 
the people. To the Republican victory of that year the candidate for gover- 
nor made a signal contribution. He had secured the nomination over two 
strenuous contestants, who had dominated the earlier balloting in the con- 
vention. But he could hardly be called a compromise candidate. His sup- 
port was a natural support, drawn to him by his high character and by the 
knowledge that a man like him was required to bring unity to the party. 
This expectation was speedily fulfilled and was strengthened as the cam- 
paign developed. On election day in 1888 he saw New Hampshire safely 
aligned in the Republican column and he himself chosen governor by the 
largest popular vote which had ever been received by a candidate in this 
State and which has since been exceeded only six times, even during the 
years of the almost total submergence of Democratic strength. 

His administration was dignified and honorable. It followed the spec- 
tacular "railroad fight" of 1887 and the new governor's inaugural address 



DaDi'D ^arbep <$ooDeII 261 

said, "Let us have peace." Through his signature peace was secured in the 
passage of the Act creating the Concord & Montreal Railroad and providing 
the modus vivendi vi^hich existed until the railroad consolidation of 1895. At 
his initiative the Soldiers' Home at Tilton was established and one of the 
last of his official functions was to preside at its dedication. His appointees 
made the last codification of our laws; at his suggestion the board of bank 
commissioners was given permanency; and many other helpful features of 
administration were inaugurated. He was the last of our governors to call 
the Legislature together in special session, the occasion being the confusion 
arising from the questioned outcome of the election of 1890; and it was 
his calm courage that strengthened the Republican majority in its success- 
ful effort to maintain its rights. The appreciation of the State for his serv- 
ices was such that if he had desired he undoubtedly would have been given 
a seat in the United States Senate. 

Mr. Goodell was a strong temperance advocate and was a leader in the 
work in its pioneer state. He was president of the Anti-Saloon League for 
many years and was honorary president at the time of his death. Politically, 
he believed the Republican party the best means for advancing the temper- 
ance cause, even, though sometimes it grieved him deeply, as for example, 
in 1902, when the first steps were taken to supplant prohibition with local 
option, and in the meantime when the party had stood firmly for the policy 
then adopted. In the convention of 1902 he led the forces which favored 
the old order and before the Legislature which ensued he marshalled the 
advocates of prohibition. His efforts were fruitless as to the main question, 
but his great practical sense led him to take advantage of the opportunity 
to strengthen the temperance laws which were to be left in force in no- 
license territory. He never ceased to hope that some day New Hampshire 
would again be a prohibition State. 

Mr. Goodell was a member of the Antrim Baptist Church for nearly 
sixty-four years and a deacon of the church for about twenty-eight years. 
He was always greatly interested in everything that was for the uplift of 
humanity and advancing the cause of Jesus Christ here upon the earth. He 
was a very constant attendant at all the church services and even in his 
busiest years found time to attend the mid-week prayer meeting of the 
church. He considered it a greater honor to be a deacon of the church than 
governor of the State. 

Mr. Goodell married (first) Hannah J. Plumer, of Goffstown, who died 
in 191 1 ; and (second) Emma S. McCoy, of Antrim, who, together with his 
sons, Dura D. Goodell and Colonel Richard C. Goodell, and grandson, Claire 
D. Goodell, survived him. He was always very much attached to his home. 
Undoubtedly the following tribute from one of his friends expresses the 
feelings of many others: 

To me his death means not only that a strong character has gone out from among 
us, that a successful business man has dropped out of the ranks of our industrial life, that 
an elder statesman has passed from the council table, but a helpful moral force has ceased 
from personal activity here ; but it means that out of my own life I have lost an afTection- 
ate relationship of such paternal nature that it can never be replaced, but the memory of 
which will warm and bless all the years yet to come. 




Cfjarles 3acob amtDon 

'HE name of Amidon has for many generations been a distin- 
guished one, at first in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, 
and later in New Hampshire, but it had never come into such 
prominence as that which it has reached during the present 
generation and that just preceding it, in the persons of 
Charles Jacob Amidon and his son, Philip Francis Amidon. 
The family was founded in this country by one Roger Ami- 
don. who is believed to have been a French Huguenot who, obliged to flee 
from his native land at the time of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, 
lived for a time in England and finally emigrated to America. Although 
the exact date of his arrival here is not known, it is certain that it was 
extremely early in the Colonial period, since he is mentioned in the records 
of the Salem Colony in 1637, when he was alloted land there, so that he must 
have been there prior to that date. He lived in several different parts of the 
Massachusetts Colony, and finally took up his abode at Rehoboth, where 
his death occurred about November 11, 1673. The family continued to 
reside in that region until the time of Jacob Amidon, of the fourth genera- 
tion from Roger Amidon who, in 1782, purchased property at Chesterfield, 
New Hampshire, and probably settled in the town shortly after. He was the 
grandfather of Charles Jacob Amidon, of this sketch, and his son, Otis 
Amidon, was born at Chesterfield, April 26, 1794. Otis Amidon was a well 
known figure in the life of this place, served as selectman of the town for a 
number of years, and represented it in the General Court of New Hamp- 
shire. He married Nancy Cook, of Cambridge, Massachusetts, March 16, 
1825, and they were the parents of five children, of whom Charles Jacob was 
the only one to survive childhood. 

Born April 23, 1827, at Chesterfield, New Hampshire, Charles Jacob 
Amidon was educated at the public schools of that place and the Chesterfield 
Academy, where he was a student for a number of years. Upon completing 
his studies he became for a time a teacher, but in 1849 ^^ formed a partner- 
ship with Henry O. Coolidge, at that time one of the most prominent busi- 
ness men of Cheshire county, and the firm at once began business in Chester- 
field Center. In the year 185 1, however, the partnership was dissolved and 
Mr. Amidon removed to Hinsdale, New Hampshire, where he engaged 
independently in a mercantile enterprise. In the year 1862, after ten years 
of successful business, he became associated with Dr. Frederick Boyden and 
Sylvester Bishop for the manufacture of woolen goods, the firm being known 
as Boyden, Bishop & Amidon. Not long afterwards both of the elder men 
died, leaving Mr. Amidon as the sole owner of the large and prosperous 
concern, and later his two sons, P. Frank and William O., were admitted 
into the firm which was continued under the style of C. J. Amidon & Sons. 
The industrv thus founded and continued became in course of time one of 



Cftatles 3faco6 3miDon 163 

the most important in the region, and the "Hinsdale Woolen Mill," as it was 
generally called, was well known in the industrial world. For a number of 
years great quantities of the goods known as cashmerettes were turned out 
here, but later, in 1873, goods for use in the rubber industry became the 
principal product. The firm also purchased, in 1894, a large mill at Wilton, 
where men's wear was turned out in great quantities, but this was sold in 
1917, since the death of Mr. Amidon. In addition to the manufacturing 
concerns with which he was directly associated, Mr. Amidon was also a 
director of many others, especially of banking houses in various places, 
among which should be mentioned the Hinsdale Savings Bank, the Vermont 
National Bank of Brattleboro, Vermont, and the Ashuelot National Bank 
of Keene, New Hampshire. Although very far from taking part in politics 
in the usual sense of the term, Mr. Amidon was keenly interested in local 
affairs and in the broader aspects of politics as well, and it was quite out of 
the question that a man so prominent should be able to keep entirely aloof. 
As a matter of fact he held many public offices in the gift of the community 
and served town and .State in various capacities. He was postmaster of 
Chesterfield in 1849 ^"<^ 1850; State Bank Commissioner from 1855 to 1857; 
postmaster of Hinsdale from 1861 to 1872; and represented his town in the 
Legislature of the State in 1861-64, 1876-77, and 1883. He was State Sen- 
ator in 1878-79-80, and held many town offices such as selectman, moder- 
ator, etc. He was one of the committee to formulate plans for the new 
State Library in Concord. For many years he was rightly regarded as the 
most influential citizen in Hinsdale. In politics he was originally a Whig, 
but afterwards became a Republican and was a leader of that party for many 
years. His name was frequently mentioned for important State offices and 
especially as a candidate for governor and for Congress, but his own impulse 
was rather to shun than to seek such preferment. He was a charter mem- 
ber of Golden Rule Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, of Hinsdale, 
and was always ready to aid in any way possible any movement undertaken 
for the advantage of the community. He was one of those who accom- 
plished the erection of a handsome town hall which, however, was burned a 
few months prior to his death. 

Charles Jacob Amidon was united in marriage, May 11, 1851, with Mary 
J. Harvey, a native of Chesterfield, New Hampshire, and a daughter of 
Loring and Elizabeth Harvey, old and highly respected residents of that 
place They were the parents of the following children: i. Philip Francis, 
born June 27, 1852. 2. Mary Elizabeth, born July 13, 1859; married, October 
28, 1886, Dr. R. B. Whitridge, of Boston, Massachusetts; she died Septem- 
ber I, 1888. 3. Esther Maria, born February 4, 1862, died August 7. 1S65. 
4. William Otis, born November 24, 1864, who died November 18, 1908. 

The death of Mr. Amidon occurred at his home in Hinsdale, August 21, 
1900, and closed a life full of successful and altruistic effort and achieve- 
ment. It will be appropriate to bring this brief notice to an end with the 
quotation of a tribute paid him while he was still alive by a friend who knew 
and admired him. Writing to a mutual friend, Ezra S. Stearns, editor of 



264 



Cijatles 3lacob SmiDon 



the "Genealogical and Family History of the State of New Hampshire," 
said : 

Among his associates in State service, Mr. Amidon has been quickly recognized as 
the able, clear-headed man. His services have been valuable. Good judgment, directed 
by an honest purpose, has given him power that commanded universal esteem and 
respect. In very public position he has filled he has been foremost in influence, and his 
good common sense has attracted attention. Among his friends he is loved as a 
thoroughly honest, upright man, and he is a firm friend to those he deems worthy of 
such regard, but he will not tolerate anything that approaches treachery or double deal- 
ing. He is a faithful, sincere, truthful, honest man, and has a clear head and a vigorous 
intellect. He might have held many more positions of public trust, but he has never 
sought honor — all he has enjoyed have been freely tendered, and many possible honors 
have been declined. He is an example of the self-made man of New Hampshire. 




JFreliericfe C ^atoper 




FREDERICK T. SAWYER, son of Jabez and Hannah (Emer- 
son) Sawyer, was born in Bradford, May 13, 1819, and died 
in Milford, July 14, 1898, aged seventy-nine. He spent his 
boyhood in Bradford, and there started in life on his own 
account as a clerk in a general store. In 1840 he went to 
Nashua, and was similarly employed for some years. About 
1845 ^^ formed a partnership with a Mr. Roby, and under 
the firm name of Roby & Sawyer, they engaged in the manufacture of 
scythes, in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, until 1850. In 1854 Mr. Sawyer 
went to Milford, New Hampshire, where for two years he was employed as 
station agent of the Nashua & Lowell Railroad. At the end of that time he 
and the late William R. Wallace formed the firm of Wallace & Sawyer, 
dealers in general merchandise, which did a prosperous business for some 
years. In 1869 the firm dissolved and Mr. Sawyer was made cashier of the 
Souhegan National Bank, an office which he filled to the time of his death 
with efficiency and conscientiousness that was a credit to him and gave 
satisfaction to bank officials and patrons alike. From the date of its organ- 
ization till his death he was a director of the bank. 

On October 19, 1874, the Souhegan National Bank was robbed in the 
following manner: About one o'clock in the morning six men, masked and 
heavily armed, effected an entrance into Mr. Sawyer's residence on the east 
side of the river and bound and gagged him and the members of his family. 
Leaving three of their number there, the remainder of the robbers took Mr. 
Sawyer across the river on a footbridge to the bank, and by torture com- 
pelled him to open the vault. There the robbers seized spoils to the value of 
$135,000, mostly non-negotiable bonds. They then conveyed Mr. Sawyer 
to his home, bound him in a chair, and fastened it to the floor. The children 
of the family were locked in closets, and about three o'clock in the morning 
the robbers departed. As soon as they were out of hearing, Fred W. Saw- 
yer, then a boy of twelve years, broke out of his place of confinement, gave 
the alarm, and then liberated the other members of the family. The burglary 
made a great sensation, and the selectmen of the town offered a reward of 
$3,000, and the bank a like sum, for the capture of the criminals, but they 
were never caught. A few months later the most of the stolen bonds were 
recovered by the bank on payment of a reward for their return. 

Mr. Sawyer was elected town treasurer in 1871, and continued to fill 
that office by consecutive annual elections the remainder of his life, a period 
of twenty-seven years. He was also notary public for many years. In 
politics he was a Republican, but his political belief was not of the rancorous 
type that denies the existence of any merit in other parties. He was elected 
to the State Legislature in 1864, and reelected in 1865. He was elected 
moderator in 1873. Mr. Sawyer's long residence in Milford, nearly forty- 



266 



jFteDetick C %atoper 



five years, had g-iven him an intimate acquaintance with the people of that 
town. He was a man of sterling character, good judgment, familiar with 
the best business methods, attentive to duty, a firm, true friend and a valued 
citizen. 

Mr. Sawyer married, January 7, 1859, Sarah S. Lovejoy, who was born 
in Amherst, August 22, 1833, died in October, 1905, daughter of William 
H. and Hannah (Shedd) Lovejoy. 



Babtlf Jl. Patterson 




|AVip N. PATTERSON, for many years one of the most 
active and prominent business men of Contoocook, New 
Hampshire, was born June i, 1800, in Henniker, Merrimack 
county, and died March 28, 1892, in the village of Contoo- 
cook, at the venerable age of ninety-two years, nine months, 
and twenty-eight days. He was of Scotch-Irish ancestry, 
so called, being a direct descendant of John Patterson, who 
on account of religious persecution fled from Scotland to the northern part 
of Ireland, where his son Robert and his grandson, who, it is thought, was 
named Alexander, were born. The latter emigrated to America in 1721, 
bringing with him his family, which included a son, Alexander (2). 

Alexander (2) Patterson, married Elizabeth Arbuckle, who was born 
in 1720, on board the ship in which her parents came to this country. He 
settled first in Londonderry, New Hampshire, where he held office in 1751, 
but subsequently removed to Pembroke, New Hampshire, in the early days 
of its settlement, and was one of the first selectmen of the town. He served 
as a soldier in the Revolutionary War. His wife, a well educated woman 
for those days, taught school several terms. In 1799 they migrated to Thet- 
ford, Vermont, going thence to Strafford, Vermont, where both died in 
1802. They had nine children, Alexander, the third to bear that name, being 
the next in line of descent. 

Alexander (3), born July 10, 1763, married Mary Nelson, of Sterling, 
Massachusetts, and settled in Henniker, New Hampshire. In 1806 he erected 
a building on the site now occupied by the residence of W. P. Cogswell, and 
put in water works, which were used until 1878. He was very prominent 
and popular among his fellow-men, full of humor and ready wit, and was 
generally accosted by young and old as "Uncle Sandy." He died January 
12, 1827, in the sixty-fourth year of his age. He had a family of eleven 
children, of whom David N., the special subject of this biographical -sketch, 
was the seventh born. Their daughter, Mary M., the next younger child, 
became a very successful teacher, being endowed with a strong personality 
and a remarkable gift for imparting knowledge. She began teaching at the 
age of eighteen, and taught in Henniker and Warner until 1828. Going 
then to Cambridge, Washington county. New York, she taught in that local- 
ity twenty years. In 1844 she received a State license on parchment, and 
continued her labors until 1869. devoting forty-nine years to the education 
of the young. Her husband, Hervey Culver, to whom she was married in 
1846, dying in 1875, she removed to Vassar, Michigan. 

David N. Patterson left home at the age of sixteen years, going to 
Weare to work for his brother-in-law, John Chase. Four years later he 
began working at the clothier's trade with his brother Joab, a woolen manu- 
facturer in Deering, New Hampshire. In 1829 the two young men came to 



268 DatJiD je. Patterson 

Contoocook, establishing themselves in business, first in carding rolls, then 
engaging in fulling and shearing, eventually engaging in the full manufac- 
ture of cloths, their old mills standing on the site of the present silk factory. 
There w^ere several mills in that vicinity, including a saw mill, a grist mill, 
a sash, door and blind mill, a kit factory, a woolen mill, etc., all of which 
were destroyed in the fall of 1871, the silk mill having since been erected. 
The Patterson brothers continued in business until i860, building up a sub- 
stantial and profitable trade from one which at the beginning was largely 
an exchange. David N. Patterson continued his residence in the village 
until his death, preserving his mental and physical activities in a remark- 
able manner. He was very influential in local affairs, a strong worker in 
the temperance cause, and an enthusiastic laborer in the Free Will Baptist 
church, of which he was a member and for sixteen years the superintendent 
of the Sunday school. In 1842 and 1843 he was one of the selectmen of 
Hopkinton, and in 1845 ^^'^ 1846 was a representative to the General Court. 
In his younger days he served four years as lieutenant in a company of 
militia. 

On March 17, 1830, David N. Patterson married Maria Woods, a daugh- 
ter of William S. and Betsey D. (Dutton) Woods. Mr. Woods settled in 
Henniker in 1800, purchasing mills at West Henniker, and was the first to 
carry on the clothier's trade there to any extent. A citizen of prominence, 
he served as selectman in 1813, 1814 and 1815, and was a member of the State 
Legislature in 1832 and 1833. He died at a good old age, March 29, 1847; 
and his wife passed away October 31, 1849. Mrs. Maria Woods Patterson 
died May 19, 1873, leaving four children, namely: Susan M., wife of Captain 
D. Howard, of Concord, New Hampshire; William A., of Contoocook; and 
Annette and Jenette, twins. The latter first married Charles Upton, of 
Amherst, New Hampshire, and after his death became the wife of Charles H. 
Danforth, of Contoocookville. On June 15, 1875, Mr. Patterson married for 
his second wife, Mrs. Sarah W. Batchelder, widow of Moses Batchelder, and 
daughter of Samuel and Mary (Gove) Philbrick, of Andover, New Hamp- 
shire. She died June 14, 1890, aged seventy-nine years and eight months. 



Wm 



Hon. Cfjarles l^enrp g)atDper 

HE Sawyer family, which was worthily represented in the 
present generation by the late Hon. Charles Henry Sawyer, 
was of Eng-lish extraction, and the members thereof in the 
various generations have figured conspicuously in the 
United States Senate, in the ministry, in law and in various 
other callings. 

Thomas Sawyer, the American ancestor, son of John 
Sawyer, of Lincolnshire, England, was born there about 1626, and when 
ten years old came to this country with two elder brothers locating in the 
State of Massachusetts. In 1647 he was one of the first settlers of Lan- 
caster, removing thither from Rowley. He married, in 1647, Mary, daugh- 
ter of John and Mary (Platts) Prescott. The next in line of succession was 
their son, Caleb Sawyer, born in Lancaster, Massachusetts, April 20, 1659, 
and there died February 13, 1755. He married, December 28, 1687, Sarah, 
daughter of Ralph and Jane Houghton. She was born February 16, 1661, 
and died November 15, 1757. The next in line of succession was Seth Saw- 
yer, born December 31, 1704, at Lancaster, and died March 29, 1768. He 
married, October 12, 1732, Hepsibah, daughter of Richard and Elizabeth 
(Sawtelle) Whitney. She was born in 1710, and died in May, 1797. The 
next in line of succession was Caleb (2) Sawyer, born in 1737, in Harvard, a 
part of Lancaster. He married (first), December 9, 1760, Relief Fairbank, 
daughter of Joseph and Mary (Brown) Fairbank, of Harvard. She was 
born December i, 1730, and died December 2, 1764. He married (second), 
in 1766, Sarah Patch, and the next in line of succession was one of their sons, 
Phineas Sawyer, born in Harvard, 1791, married Hannah, daughter of 
Deacon Israel and Hannah (Mead) Whitney. She was born April 23, 1773, 
and died in Lowell, in 1849. The next in line of succession was Jonathan 
Sawyer, born in Marlborough, Massachusetts, June 17, 1817, and died in 
Dover, New Hampshire, June 20, 1891. After completing his studies, he 
learned the art of dyeing on his own account, conducting the business until 
1839. In that year he went to Watertown, New York, where for two and 
one-half years he was employed as superintendent of the Hamilton Woolen 
Company, and later he manufactured satinets on his own account in Water- 
town until 1849, ii^ which year he removed to Dover, New Hampshire, where 
he and his brother, Zenas Sawyer, associated themselves under the firm 
name of Z. & J. Sawyer, and they operated a grist mill and a custom carding 
and clothdressing mill. In 1832 the old woolen mill was enlarged and 
adapted to the manufacture of flannels, and at the end of two years Francis 
A. Sawyer, another brother, took the place of Zenas, and the name of the 
firm became F. A. & J. Sawyer. Jonathan Sawyer was a man of enterprise, 
skill and ability, and in all that concerned the public welfare he was an 
interested partaker. He was one of the founders of the Free Soil party, and 



Tjo ^on. Cljatles ^enrp Satopec 

after the organization of the Republican party he was one of its strongest 
supporters. Jonathan Sawyer married, in Barnard, Vermont, June 25, 1839, 
Martha, daughter of Cyrus and Martha (Childs) Perkins, of Barnard. They 
were the parents of Charles Henry Sawyer, of this review. 

Hon. Charles Henry Sawyer, eldest child of Jonathan and Martha 
(Perkins) Sawyer, was born in Watertown, New York, March 30, 1840. He 
was educated in the public schools of Watertown, New York, and Dover, 
New Hampshire, the removal of his parents to the latter place having been 
made in 1849, when Charles Henry was about nine years old. When seven- 
teen years of age he entered the Sawyer Mills as an ordinary operative to 
learn the business of flannel making in its different branches, acquiring a 
thorough knowledge of all the processes through which the material passes 
from the raw state to the finished product. At twenty-six he was made 
superintendent of the mills, at the time when the company was extending 
its sphere of operations, and adapted its machinery to the manufacture of 
high grade of woolens for men's wear, and upon the incorporation in 1S73 
was made agent, and from 1881 to 1898 was president of the company. 

At an early age Mr. Sawyer's ability and position made him conspicu- 
ous and an available party leader. He was offered, accepted and was elected 
to seats in both branches of the City Council of Dover, and in 1869-70, and 
again in 1876-77, he was elected to the Lower House of the New Hamp- 
shire Legislature, where he served his constituency in such a manner as to 
secure their hearty approval and attract the attention of the State. He was 
appointed on the staff of Governor Charles H. Bell, in 1881, and was a dele- 
gate to the National Republican Convention held in Chicago, 1884, when 
James G. Blaine was nominated for the presidency. Though a political 
cour.se was not the course Mr. Sawyer had started out in life to pursue, cir- 
cumstances had made opportunities for him, and his service in public life 
had been such as to make him conspicuous among the Republicans of the 
State as an available and sagacious leader, and in 1886 he was nominated 
for governor by nearly a three-fourths vote of the delegates to the guber- 
natorial convention. There was no choice by the people and the Legislature 
elected him. During his term of office various centennial celebrations were 
held which he, as executive head of the State, attended. Notable among 
these was the centennial celebration of the promulgation of the Constitu- 
tion of the United States, held at Philadelphia; the centennial celebration of 
the inauguration of President Washington in New York, and the laying of 
the corner-stone of the Bennington Monument at Bennington, Vermont. 

During Governor Sawyer's term of office arose the memorable struggle 
over the "Hazen Bill," a measure designed to facilitate the leasing of certain 
railroads. One powerful railroad corporation championed the bill, another 
opposed it, and arrayed on one or the other of the sides were all the politi- 
cians in the State, and much feeling was displayed. It was proved by testi- 
mony given before a legislative committee that unquestionable methods 
had been used both for and against the measure. In view of these facts, 
when the bill reached the governor, he vetoed it, not basing his action upon 



^on, Cljarles; lj)cnrp ^atopec 271 

any objections to its intrinsic merits, but upon the unfair methods used in 
support of it, and acting on the principle which prompts courts of justice to 
refuse to help either of the parties to an illegal proceeding; the court refused 
"not for the sake of the defendant, but because they will not lend their aid 
to such a plaintiff." The governor in summing up his objections to justify 
his refusal and express his disapproval of the methods of the party said in 
his veto message: "The most effectual way to check such practices is to 
have it understood that no bill attempted to be passed by such means can 
become a law. When the promoters of a measure see fit to offer bribes to 
members, they cannot be allowed to excuse themselves on the ground that 
their offers were not accepted. If it comes to be understood that successful 
attempts of this nature will not imperil the passage of a bill, such offers will 
become much more frequent. If the offer is accepted, neither party will be 
likely to disclose the fact. If it is rejected, it is, in this view, to be consid- 
ered of no consequence, and hence no harm could be done to the prospect 
of the bill. The bare statement of such a doctrine is its best answer." This 
courageous, wise and patriotic stand in favor of legislative purity taken by 
the governor was worthy of the commendation of every fair-minded person 
in the State; but instead of approbation it drew a storm of denunciation from 
certain sources, especially from newspapers retained to advocate the passage 
of the bill. 

Governor Sawyer was connected with many business enterprises both 
in Dover and in other places, and in most of them he was a leading member. 
Governor Sawyer was an attendant of the First Church in Dover (Congre- 
gational), and was a prompt and generous giver whenever it needed financial 
support. From 1865 until his death he was a member of the Free and 
Accepted Masons; was twice master of Strafford Lodge, No. 29, Free and 
Accepted Masons, of Dover, and was also a member of Belknap Chapter, 
No. 8, Royal Arch Masons; of Orphan Council. No. i. Royal and Select 
Masters, and of St. Paul Commandery, Knights Templar, of which he was 
for many years eminent commander. 

Mr. Sawyer married, in Dover, February 8, 1865, Susan Ellen Cowan, 
daughter of Dr. James W. and Elizabeth (Hodgdon) Cowan, of Dover. 
Governor Sawyer died in 1908. 






augusttn Cfjarles Cttus 

UGUSTIN CHARLES TITUS was one of that group of suc- 
cessful men whose careers have been closely identified with 
the greatest and most recent period in the development of 
the city of Newport, State of Rhode Island, one of those 
broad-minded, public-spirited citizens whose efforts have 
seemed to be directed quite as much to the advancement of 
the city's interests as to their own. The death of Mr. Titus, 
which occurred March ii, 1900, at Newport, Rhode Island, was a loss to 
the several communities in which he had resided, and was felt most keenly 
by a great host of personal friends whom his warm and genial personality 
had won him. 

Born April 27, 1842, at Bath, New Hampshire, Augustin Charles Titus 
was a son of Jeremy and Mary (Hunt) Titus, his father having been a suc- 
cessful farmer and lumber dealer in that region for many years. Here it was 
that he formed his first childish impressions, and here it was that he received 
the elementary portion of his education, attending for this purpose the local 
public schools. He later attended the public schools at Haverhill, New 
Hampshire, and it was while a scholar that he began to show the marked 
business talents which characterized his mature life. In the month of 
September, 1861, he left his parental home, though only nineteen years of 
age at the time, and made his way to Fall River, Massachusetts, where he 
secured a position with the firm of Flint Brothers, who were engaged in the 
house furnishing business. He worked for this concern as a salesman for 
a time and went overland to Newport, Rhode Island, where he took orders 
in various housefurnishing goods. He continued this work for about a year, 
and was so successful that at the end of that period he was able to purchase 
an interest in another business of that kind at Newport, and thereafter took 
part in the management of the concern. During the next few years he made 
such great strides in business that he was able to buy out his partners and 
conduct the business entirely on his own account. So great were the strides 
made by him after he came into full control of the establishment that it was 
not long before he erected a large new building, with a handsome store on 
the ground floor, for his establishment, where he carried everything for 
household use. To this handsome establishment he gave the name of Titus 
Emporium, and it became one of the most popular and largely patronized 
stores in the region. Later he admitted his brother, I. W. Titus, as a 
partner in the business, and the firm of A. C. Titus Company was formed. 
It was through his energy also that the first street railway established in 
Newport was built, and there were few departments of the city's life in 
which he was not a leading figure. Besides the street railway, which was 
one of the most important features in the development of the community, he 
was also largely responsible for the introduction of electric lights and for 
a number of other improvements. 



auffustfn Cljarles mms 273 

While Mr. Titus was in no sense of the word a poHtician, and rather 
avoided than sought public office of any kind, vet it was difficult for him to 
resist the pressure brought upon him by his friends and associates to accept 
various offices. He did so nevertheless, excepting in the case of his nomi- 
nation to the City Council of Newport. Mr. Titus was a conspicuous figure 
m the social and club life of Newport, and was affiliated with the Business 
Men's Club of that city and the local lodges of the Masonic order and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He was a member of the Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery of Boston, the most ancient military organization in 
the country, and always took a keen interest in its afifairs. In his religious 
belief Mr. Titus was a Methodist, and was for many years an active member 
of the Thames Street Methodist Episcopal Church of Newport. 

Augustin Charles Titus was united in marriage at Haverhill, New 
Hampshire, December 9, 1864, with Judith Henrietta Cogswell, a native of 
that city, a daughter of Thomas Jefferson and Ruth (McConnell) Cogswell. 
Mr. and Mrs. Titus were the parents of the following children: Harry 
Augustin, born July 27, 1866; Alonzo Flint, born April i, 1870; Nettie 
Louise, born February 14, 1872; Mary Estelle, born November i, 1874; and 
Raymond Stanton, born October 6, 1883. Mrs. Titus and her children sur- 
vived Mr. Titus, and Mrs. Titus then made her home at North Haverhill, 
New Hampshire. 

The welfare of his adopted city, where Mr. Titus began his career so 
humbly, and where he became so influential a figure, was very dear to him, 
and he was never a laggard when it came to a question of doing anything 
for the general advancement. He was justly regarded as one of the most 
public-minded members of the community, for he was always ready to give 
his aid in any form to all movements for the public weal. His personality 
had the effect of making all those who came in contact with him feel instinct- 
ively the value of life; the question of the pessimist as to what is its use 
seemed never to have occurred to him, and his own healthy, normal activity 
was the best of answers to it. In the height of his prosperity and good for- 
tune he never forgot the difficulties of his own youth and was ever ready 
to hold out a helping hand to such as were less fortunate than himself. 
Various and large as were his business interests, a remarkably large portion 
of his time and attention was devoted to these more altruistic purposes, and 
he never allowed, like so many successful men, his private pursuits to warp 
his generous feelings or shake his charity and faith in life and the goodness 
of his fellows. He himself had started out with high ideals which neither 
hardships nor prosperity could shake, and he credited others with the same 
idealism. And what may seem strange is that he very seldom was mis- 
taken, for it had been rightly said that men are apt to show the traits we 
attribute to them, good or bad. His career had been a busy and useful one, 
and all men, himself as well as others, had benefited by it. Nor were his 
virtues less apparent in his family life than in his relations with the outside 
world. He was possessed of a strong and religious faith, which it was his 
purpose to make practical in his everyday life. 



Henrp Jfrancfe (Screen 




'ENRY FRANCIS GREEN, late of Littleton, New Hamp- 
shire, where his death occurred on May 9, 191 7, was for 
many years most intimately identified with the life and 
affairs of this community, both in connection with its busi- 
ness interests and as an influence in public matters gener- 
ally. He was the only son of Henry and Marilla (Smith) 
Green, of Lyndon, Vermont, and it was at that place that he 
was born, February 6, 1844. His father followed the occupation of farming 
during his entire life and thus the lad had the advantage of growing up 
among the most wholesome surroundings in the world, those of the Amer- 
ican farmer. The elder man died, however, and the mother later became the 
wife of James Kimball, of Bath. 

It was at the age of sixteen that Henry Francis Green accompanied his 
mother to the new home in Bath, and there lived for a short time. He then 
went to Poughkeepsie, New York, where he took a course at the celebrated 
Eastman Business College, thus fitting himself the better for the business 
career he had determined upon by that time. Having completed his studies, 
he secured a position as station agent, at Barton, Vermont, on the Passump- 
sic Railroad, and there he remained some eighteen months, gaining much 
valuable knowledge of the railroad business and of business methods gen- 
erally. At the expiration of that period the young man, feeling the lure of 
the West, left behind him all that he was familiar with and removed to 
Indianapolis, Indiana, where he became connected with a large flour busi- 
ness as a bookkeeper. In the meantime his two sisters, Mrs. Charles Eaton 
and Mrs. H. H. Southworth, had come to Littleton, New Hampshire, and 
made this town their residence, and so it happened that when Mr. G'-een 
returned to the East he also came here. This was the beginning of his long 
association with Littleton, during which he came to occupy so very prom- 
inent a place in the community's affairs. It was in the year 1877 that he 
first made his dwelling place here and a little later another sister, a Mrs. 
George W. Jackman, removed here from Bath. The first business associa- 
tion of Mr. Green in Littleton was with Mr. Eaton, a brother-in-law, in the 
Brackett store, later owned by F. H. English. Some time afterward, he 
entered the employ of the Saranac Glove Company, a concern that just at 
that time was doing a great business and prospering highly. It was under 
the management of Ira Parker and George M. Glazier, and these two capable 
business men soon realized the talent of their new employee. He was 
therefore rapidly advanced in position and gained a very complete knowl- 
edge of business and industrial methods, especially in connection with the 
financial side of the concern. Later the business was reconstructed and for 
a time Mr. Green was not connected with it, but again Mr. Glazier became 
interested and finally gained complete control of it, whereupon he recalled 



I^entp JFrancis <5rccn 275 

his old assistant, and Mr. Green became treasurer. This post he continued 
to hold from that time until his death, and during that long period continued 
to give most valuable service to the company and exercised a very import- 
ant share in the management of its affairs. Another of the business concerns 
of Littleton with which Mr. Green was closely identified was the Littleton 
National Bank, of which he was elected a director in the year 1898. In 
1909, upon the retirement of Oscar C. Heath from the presidency, Mr. Green 
stepped into that place and from that time until the close of his life actively 
discharged its duties. His extremely capable management resulted in a 
long period of great prosperity for the institution, which developed so 
rapidly that it is to-day recognized as one of the strongest institutions of 
the kind in the State of New Hampshire. 

But even more in the world of public affairs than in that of business and 
finance was Mr. Green well known throughout his adopted region, while in 
both he was equally honored. While still a young man his peculiar qualifica- 
tions for caring for the affairs of others had manifested themselves, chief 
among which were his absolutely essential honesty and his courage in 
resisting anything like corrupt pressure. He had become the manager of 
the Littleton Water and Light Department while it was still under private 
control and ownership, and his work there did much to render the depart- 
ment more efficient and improve the service. Not long afterwards he was 
elected to the Littleton Board of Education and here again his efforts 
resulted in a great improvement in conditions and the rapid development of 
the schools followed. He served eleven years on this important board and 
then, in the year 1892, he was elected a selectman of Littleton. He remained 
a selectman until 1899, and showed remarkable administrative ability. It 
was during this period that the town building and the fine bridge across the 
Ammonoosuc river were built. Shortly after this Mr. Green was elected to 
the position of County Commissioner and served three terms in this capacity, 
during which time he instituted many much needed reforms. Among these 
should be mentioned the modern steel structure for the county jail at Haver- 
hill, which replaced a structure that had for long been a reproach to the 
community. A still wider scope was given to his work by his appointment 
to the Executive Council of the Governor, by the late Governor Rollins, and 
this experience put him into close touch with State affairs and made him a 
prominent figure in the politics of the region. In 1901 he was elected to the 
State Legislature and became chairman of the appropriation committee. 
For six years he was a member of the Bank Commission, a position for 
which he was especially well qualified, and he was also a member of the 
Constitutional Convention in 1902. He also served as a member of the 
Littleton Board of Health and the Water and Light Commission. 

Henry F. Green was united in marriage, on June 18, 1872, with Jennie 
M. Smith, a native of Chittenango, New York, and a daughter of Harry 
Smith of that place. One son, Harry D. Green, and a grandson. Henry 
Francis Green, of Worcester, Massachusetts, survive. Mr. Green was a 
prominent Free Mason and belonged to Burns Lodge, Ancient Free and 



276 f^emy jFtanci0 ©teen 

Accepted Masons, of Littleton, New Hampshire; Franklin Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons, of Lisbon, New Hampshire ; St. Gerard Commandery, Knights 
Templar, of Littleton, New Hampshire; and the New Hampshire Con- 
sistory. 

This brief notice cannot close more appropriately than with the words 
of Judge A. S. Batchellor, who wrote of Mr. Green as follows : 

His strong good sense, conservative instincts, and wide acquaintance with men and 
affairs in this region have rendered his service to these institutions (the banks) especially- 
valuable. * * * It is, however, in public affairs and political relations that Mr. 
Green has been, from the beginning of his residence here till the present day, the most 
effective producer of results among all his political co-workers and contemporaries in 
this region. If he had subordinated the success of his party to any private interest, his 
closest confidants would find it difficult to name that interest. He is sagacious, far- 
sighted and persistent in all those concerns which relate to party plans, party organiza- 
tion, party methods and party achievements. He is always true to his purpose and loyal 
to his friends. When he became a resident here he found his party in an apparently 
chronic minority status. He supplied the talent for organization, managernent, adapta- 
tion of means to ends, and adherence to definite purposes, on correct conceptions of polit- 
ical strategy without haste and without rest, which the local leaders lacked or had not 
discovered in their twenty or thirty years of almost uninterrupted defeat. From the 
outset Mr. Green has been recognized by his political opponents, as well as by his polit- 
ical associates, as an astute and potential mover in political events, unobtrusive and 
imperturable, far-sighted and tireless, an adept in the art of ultimate arrival ! 




(George 3Ro0coe Caton 






ITH the passing of George Roscoe Eaton, of Lancaster, New 
Hampshire, Lancaster and the State of New Hampshire lost 
an eminent citizen, and the business world a man of acumen, 
enterprise and resourcefulness. His life was one of well 
directed efforts from the time he entered railroad employ at 
the age of fifteen until its close, and during its course he 
reaped the honors of public life as well as the emoluments of 
business life. Until his death he was president of the Lancaster National 
Bank, and made Lancaster his home. He was a native son of Maine, son of 
Stephen Woodman and Miranda B. (Knox) Eaton, and of the ninth gener- 
ation of the family founded in New England by John and Anne Eaton, who 
came with their six children prior to 1639, as in that year their names appear 
on the proprietors' books of Salisbury, Massachusetts. Salisbury, Massa- 
chusetts, Hampton (now Seabrook), New Hampshire, Buxton and Port- 
land, Maine, have been towns in which Eatons of this branch lived. 

George Roscoe Eaton was born in Portland, Maine, November 16, 
1837. and died in Lancaster, New Hampshire, February 10, 191 1. He 
attended Portland grade schools and Yarmouth High School until fifteen 
years of age, then entered the service of the Atlantic & St. Lawrence (Grand 
Trunk) Railroad, his particular assignment being a clerkship in the office of 
the general superintendent, S. T. Corser. There he spent two and a half 
years, then for an equal period was connected with the freight department of 
the Grand Trunk in the Portland office. This brought him to the age of 
twenty, and a resolution to leave railroad employ, which he did, going to 
Berlin, New Hampshire, there becoming agent for the mill and manager of 
the store owned and operated by H. Winslow & Company. Although the 
ownership of mill and store changed several times he retained his position 
for fourteen years, until 1872. when he established in the mercantile business 
in North Stratford, New Hampshire. For ten years he successfully con- 
ducted business there, associating with him E. B. Merriam, under the firm 
name, E. B. Merriam & Company. During his business life in New Hamp- 
shire, Mr. Eaton fully comprehended the value of the timber tracts of the 
State, and as he was able, acquired all the acreage he possibly could. E. B. 
Merriam & Company marketed a great deal of the lumber from these tracts 
and purchased more, they operating largely along the lines of buying and 
selling timber lands and lumber manufacturing. Mr. Eaton's foresight and 
business ability had brought him financial success, and soon he was sought 
in furtherance of important business enterprises. He became president of 
the Lancaster National Bank, organized in 1882,. and became a resident of 
that city. In 1887 the Siwooganock Guaranty Savings Bank was organized 
with Mr. Eaton as one of the incorporators, and until his death he continued 
a trustee of the same. He was senior member of the firm, Eaton & Sawyer, 



278 C5eor0e Koscoe Caton 

lumber manufacturers of Columbia, New Hampshire; partner in Marshall 
& Eaton, carriage manufacturers of Lancaster, was interested financially in 
the Mt. Washington Stock Farm Company, promoter and president of the 
Lancaster Driving Club, and was everywhere known as a man of sound 
judgment and integrity. He performed every duty well, and was highly 
esteemed by his business associates. In addition to his manufacturing 
activities he dealt largely in real estate. 

In politics he was a Democrat, and very influential in party councils. 
He represented Berlin in the New Hampshire Legislature, 1872-73; was 
selectman in both Berlin and Stratford; was a member of the New Hamp- 
shire Constitutional Convention of 1876; member of Coos County Board of 
Commissioners, 1879-83; and county treasurer, 1885-91. He was a Unitar- 
ian in religion and most generous in his support of the Lancaster church. 
He was a member of the Masonic order, and among the selfmade men of 
his day none was more reliable or more naturally qualified for leadership. 

Mr. Eaton married, April 10, i860, Sarah J., daughter of Josiah Parker, 
of Saco, Maine, and they were the parents of three daughters: Minnie P., 
Georgia May, Sarah J., a twin with Georgie May. 





CommoDore (JJeorge Hamilton ^erfetns 

;OMMODORE GEORGE HAMILTON PERKINS, second 
child and eldest son of Hamilton E. and Clara B. (George) 
Perkins, was born in Hopkinton, October 20, 1835, and died 
in Boston, Massachusetts, October 28, 1899. He lived in the 
country and enjoyed the outdoor life of a country boy until 
he was about eight years old, when he accompanied his 
father's family to Boston where he spent the next three 
years. Then returning to Merrimack county, he engaged in the sports and 
learned the lessons that fall to the lot of a vigorous lad who grows up under 
circumstances embracing life on a farm or in a small town. He was always 
busy, sometimes in mischief, performing the tasks set for him to do, taking 
interest in every beast and bird, and often reluctantly learning the lessons 
a watchful and loving mother required him to learn. He attended the 
academy of Hopkinton somewhat irregularly during his early years, and 
later studied at Gilmanton. 

When young Perkins was fourteen years of age, Hon. Charles H. 
Peaslee, at that time a member of Congress, urged George's parents to 
accept for their son an appointment to the United States Naval Academy at 
Annapolis, which they finally did. While there he wrote many letters home, 
always showing the greatest attachment to home and everything connected 
with it. This love for home and friends was one of the strongest impulses 
of his nature throughout life. He graduated at the Naval Academy in 1856, 
and was ordered to the sloop of war "Cyane," Captain Robb. The ship went 
to Aspinwall, Central America, where trouble had grown out of the filibus- 
tering expedition of General Walker. Here he saw a great deal that was 
new, and learned much that was useful to him in later life. In this ship he 
also cruised as far north as Newfoundland and back to Hayti, when he was 
transferred to the "Release," and made a voyage to the Mediterranean, and 
afterwards to South Africa, with the Paraguay expedition. At Montevideo 
he was transferred to the "Sabine," returning to the United States for his 
passed-midshipman examination. This being over, he was ordered to the 
west coast of Africa as acting master of the United States steamship "Sum- 
ter." On that station he saw a great deal of dull, monotonous, and trying 
service, where there were only a few small white settlements on a coast of 
thousands of miles in extent, the elements of danger from storm and disease 
always being great. In June, 1861, he was made acting first lieutenant, a 
great compliment under the circumstances to a young man of twenty- four. 
He makes a calculation about his time, and finds that since they left New 
York they had run over fifty thousand miles. The "Sumter" soon returning 
to the United States, the young officer was ordered to the United States 
gunboat "Cayuga" as first lieutenant, a berth which he wrote home he 
found "as onerous as it was honorary." The "Cayuga" was ordered to report 



28o Commodore ^eotge Hamilton perMttd 

to Commodore Farragut at Ship Island, and was soon one of the great fleet 
prepared to attack New Orleans. In the attack of that city, which occurred 
April 24, the "Cayuga" led, and Lieutenant Perkins had the honor of pilot- 
ing the vessel, and his quick observation and skillful management in steering 
the vessel took the "Cayuga" past Forts Jackson and St. Philip in safety, 
though masts and rigging were badly shot through by the rain of projectiles 
hurled at her. Once past the forts she was attacked by eleven of the enemy's 
vessels, but made such a great fight that she crippled and took the "Gov- 
ernor Moore," the ram "Manassas," and a third vessel. Then, with the 
arrival of the remainder of the fleet, the day was won. The "Cayuga" led 
the way to New Orleans, and there Comodore Farragut ordered Captain 
Bailey to go on shore and demand the surrender of the city. He selected 
Lieutenant Perkins to go with him, and they two went ashore and passed 
through a howling, frenzied, threatening mob of citizens to the City Hall 
and performed their mission. Doubtless they would never have returned 
alive to the ship if Pierre Soule had not worked a ruse to attract the mob 
while these two brave ofiicers were taken to the boat landing in a carriage. 
Lieutenant Perkins' action in the battle at the forts and the events that 
followed marked him as one of the coolest and bravest men in the navy and 
brought him unstinted praise. 

He next commanded the "New London" and then the "Pensacoia" on 
the Mississippi and along the coast. He was next appointed to the com- 
mand of the "Chickasaw," a new and untried monitor. In the battle of 
Mobile Bay, which followed on August 5, Captain Perkins pitted his vessel 
against the rebel ram. "Tennessee," disabled her and forced her to surrender, 
having shot away her smokestack, destroyed her steering gear, and jammed 
her after-ports, rendering her guns useless, while one of the shots wounded 
the rebel commander. Admiral Buchanan. This brilliant action of Lieuten- 
ant-Commander Perkins elicited the highest encomiums from his compan- 
ions-in-arms from the admiral down, and from the newspapers. He had 
obtained leave to visit his home before he assumed command of the "Chick- 
asaw,'^ and only volunteered to command her in the attack on the fleet, but 
he was not detached until July 10, 1865. The winter following he was super- 
intendent of the ironclads in the harbor of New Orleans, and the next year, 
in May, 1867, he was sent on a three years' cruise in the Pacific as first 
lieutenant of the "Lackawanna." 

After this cruise he was ordered on ordnance duty in Boston. March 19, 
1869, and continued in that position until March, 1871, when he took the 
steamer "Nantasket" on her trial trip to New York. January 19, 1871, he was 
appointed commander in the navy. In March, 1871, he was ordered to 
command the "Relief," which carried stores from the United States to 
France, at that time sufifering from famine resulting from disorder of the 
Communists. After an absence of six months he returned to the Boston 
navy yard, but was soon after transferred to the position of lighthouse 
inspector of the second district, and continued to reside in Boston, which 
had now become his home. In 1877 he was ordered to China to take com- 



Commouote ©eotge IDamilton IpetWns 281 

mand of the United States steamer "Ashuelot." He performed the routine 
duties of his station until October, 1878, when he received orders to cruise 
as far south as Bangkok, and to visit various ports in Japan, China and the 
Philippines. While lying at Hong Kong, General Grant and party arrived 
on their trip around the v^rorld, and Captain Perkins was ordered to convey 
them from Hong Kong to Canton and back, which proved a very enjoyable 
voyage to all. After his return, Captain Perkins gave up his command of 
the "Ashuelot" to Commander Johnson, who had been appointed to suc- 
ceeded him, and returned to the United States. In March, 1882, Captain Per- 
kins received his appointment as captain in the navy by regular promotion. 
In 1884-85 he made a year's cruise in command of Farragut's famous old 
"Hartford," then flagship of our Pacific squadron. This cruise included the 
Pacific ports of North and South America and Honolulu. He retired from 
service in 1891 as captain, after forty years faithful service upon the active 
list of the United States Navy, and by special act of Congress, in January, 
1896, was honored with the rank of commodore. 

Commodore Perkins was married in 1870 to Anna Minot Weld, daugh- 
ter of William F. Weld, of Boston, Massachusetts. Of this marriage there 
was one child, Isabel, who became the wife of Lary Anderson, of Brookline, 
Massachusetts, and Washington, D. C. Commodore Perkins died at his 
home in Boston, October 29, 1899, ^^'^ was buried in the cemetery at Forest 
Hills. A magnificent monument to his memory was erected by his widow 
and daughter in the State House enclosure, facing State street. Concord, 
and presented to the State of New Hampshire with appropriate exercises, 
April 25, 1902. In the presence of many persons of official and social prom- 
inence, and more than ten thousand citizens, the statue, the work of Daniel 
C. French, of New York City, was unveiled by Mrs. Lary Anderson, escorted 
by her uncle, Mr. Hamilton Perkins, of Boston. In behalf of the donor, 
Rear Admiral George E. Belknap, United States Navy, presented the statue 
to the State of New Hampshire, which was accepted in behalf of the State 
by his Excellency Chester B. Jordan. Governor of New Hampshire. 



3o»)n abbott 




;OHN ABBOTT, eldest child of Amos and Judith (Morse) 
Abbott, was born November 15, 1805, at the old homestead 
in West Concord, New Hampshire, on the farm that has 
been owned by the family since the founding of the town. 
He was educated in the local public schools, and early in 
life engaged in the lumber business. From 1835 to 1849 he 
was in partnership with Captain Abel Baker, father of Gov- 
ernor Nathaniel Baker. Together they bought and cut off tracts of timber, 
and rafted their product down the Merrimack to Lowell and Boston. Mr. 
Abbott was expert in woodcraft and was often called upon as referee in 
placing valuation upon standing timber, sometimes going as far as the Adir- 
ondacks in this capacity. Mr. Abbott lived on the ancestral homestead until 
after his marriage, when he bought the house in Concord, 236 North Main 
street, which was the family home until 1905. This house, previous to the 
Abbott occupancy of half a century, was successively owned by Dr. Peter 
Renton and Dr. William Prescott, physicians of note in their day. 

Mr. Abbott was a man of great kindness of nature and of unswerving 
integrity. Of a sweet and serene disposition and absolute uprightness in 
every relation of life, public and private, he held the respect and confidence 
of the community to a degree possessed by few. "Honest John Abbott," as 
he was familiarly known, was frequently called upon to serve the public, 
and he filled nearly every official station in the town. He was selectman in 
1849 ^"d 1851, and alderman in 1854. The city government was founded in 
1853, and during the next twenty years he served twelve times as assessor. 
This office seemed to devolve upon him by natural right because the public 
had such faith in his honesty and judgment. In January, 1856, he was 
elected mayor by the city government to fill the unexpired term of Mayor 
Clement, who had died on the twenty-third of that month, and he was five 
times subsequently elected to fill the oflice at the March meetings in 1856- 
57-58 and 1866-67. No man has ever received the office so many times by 
popular vote, and no man discharged its duties, including at that time the 
supervision of the highways and the care of the poor, in more honorable 
manner. Mr. Abbott was a trustee of the New Hampshire Savings Bank, 
a director of the Page Belting Company and a member of the City Water 
Board. In politics he was a Whig and among the founders of the Repub- 
lican party. He was a regular attendant of the North Congregational 
Church, belonged in earlv life to the Odd Fellows, and at the time of his 
death was a member of Blazing Star Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons. Mr. Abbott's tall and commanding form, six feet four inches in 
height, made him a marked figure in any public gathering. 

On November 12, 1856, John Abbott married Hannah Matilda Brooks 
at the home of her parents "in Warner, New Hampshire. She was born 



31oi)n mbott 283 

March 14, 1828, at Charlestown, Massachusetts, and was the only daughter 
and sole surviving child of Samuel and Hannah (Cogswell) Brooks, both 
members of old Bay State families. In 1835, with her parents and yo'ung-er 
brother, Thomas Emerson, who died October 18, 1838, she removed to 
Warner. There in a delightful old house, which was the scene of constant 
hospitality, her happy youth was spent. Many of the winters were passed 
near Boston, either visiting or attending school. From her father Matilda 
Brooks inherited marked intellectual ability, and she received unusual edu- 
cational advantages, culminating in 1846-47 in a year at the private school 
connected with the famous Brook Farm Community, at West Roxbury, 
Massachusetts. Here she met many of the distinguished people of the dayi 
and lived in a most stimulating intellectual atmosphere. She was a favorite 
pupil of George Ripley, the head of the school and one of the foremost 
American men of letters. Charles A. Dana, afterwards editor of the New 
York "Sun," and Horace Greeley, were members of the Community at that 
time. Some of the pupils were from Cuba and the Philippines, regions far 
remote in those days. Mrs. Abbott was probably the only resident of New 
Hampshire ever connected with Brook Farm, and she regarded her year 
there as one of the great and special privileges of her life. 

At intervals, from the age of fifteen to twenty-eight years, Mrs. Abbott 
taught several terms of school in various places near her home. Her energy 
of character, magnetic personality and active mind made this occupation a 
delight, and she always spoke with the greatest pride and pleasure of her 
school teaching days. Her interest in education never flagged and in later 
year';, when her children were pupils, she was as regular in her visits to the 
schools as any of the committee. Mrs. Abbott possessed a remarkable per- 
sonality. She had great social charm, logical and brilliant mental powers, 
and the most unswerving spiritual ideals. She was especially fond of young 
people, and her fluent talk and ready wit made her always an entertaining 
companion. Few people were better informed on local history. Her mind 
was a storehouse of dates and genealogies, and her memory was infallible. 
Her standards of life and literature were of the highest; her judgment of 
character was instantaneous and unerring; her love of truth and justice, a 
passion. Courage, fidelity, affection and extreme conscientiousness were 
her marked characteristics. 

John Abbott died instantly of heart disease at the home in Concord on 
the evening of March t8, 1886, at the age of eighty years and three months. 
His father died in the same way at the same age. Mrs. Abbott, who had 
long been a sufiferer from nervous exhaustion, died at the home on the 
morning of April 22, 1898, aged seventy years and one month. Their three 
children, all born in the home at Concord, were: Frances Matilda, born 
August 18, 1857; John Boylston, born April 5. i860; and Walter Brooks, 
born December g, 1862. 




R. LELAND J. GRAVES was a progressive physician of 
Claremont, who by the introduction of more advanced ideas 
in the treatment of disease aided considerably in carrying 
the healing art to its present high standard of excellence. It 
is a well-known fact that the greatest amount of good in the 
way of scientific development has been accomplished by self- 
made men, and the subject of this sketch belonged to that 
worthy type of American citizenship. 

Leland J. Graves was born in Berkshire, Franklin county, Vermont, 
May 24, 1812, son of David J. and Mary (Leland) Graves. The founder of 
the family came from England, where its printed genealogical record covers 
a period of eight hundred years. The original form of the name was Greaves. 
Thomas Greaves, who ranked as a rear admiral in the Royal Navy, settled 
in Charlestown, Massachusetts, in 1636, and his family was prominent in 
early Colonial affairs. His son was one of the first physicians graduated 
from Harvard College; and a grandson, who also graduated from that insti- 
tution, became a judge. Dr. Graves's great-grandfather was Peter Greaves. 
His grandfather, Luther Greaves, who resided in Leominster, Massachu- 
setts, was born April 20, 1749. Luther served in the Revolutionary War as 
a minute-man in Sergeant Samuel Sawyer's company, and was a lieutenant 
in the company of Captain Ephraim Harris from May, 1778, to July 31, 
1779. He died in Leominster in 1790. He married Phoebe Jewett, of that 
town, and had a family of ten children. His widow married Colonel John 
Boynton, and moved to Weathersfield, Vermont. David J. Graves, who 
was born in Leominster, October 2, 1785, accompanied his mother and step- 
father to Vermont, where he was brought up as a farmer. The latter part 
of his life was spent in Wisconsin. His wife Mary, whom he married in 
Weathersfield, became the mother of four children; namely, Sereno, Leland 
J., Calvin Jewett, and L Franklin. 

As soon as he was able to make himself useful, Leland J. Graves began 
to assist upon farms in his neighborhood. He did not attend school until he 
was fifteen years old. An ambition to advance developed with his mental 
faculties; and in April, 1829, he bound himself to his uncle, Cyrus Boynton, 
with the understanding that he was to have three months' schooling each 
year, and that his wages were to be given to his father. That he made good 
use of these limited educational' facilities is attested by the fact that when 
he reached his majority he was competent to teach school. He taught in the 
winter and worked at farming in the summer, saving his earnings, and at 
intervals attending Chester, Cavendish, and Ludlow academies. He was 
about to enter college when he was attacked by a severe illness, which in 
spite of constant medical aid continued for four years. The suffering he 
endured at this time caused him to change his plans for the future. Exces- 



LeIanD 31. (©tatjcs, og. D. 285 

sive doses of calomel, prescribed by the physicians to break up his stubborn 
fever, produced such injurious results upon his system that he decided to 
study medicine, with a view of ascertaining if less dangerous and more 
effective modes of treatment could not be devised. Upon his recovery he 
entered upon a course of preliminary medical instruction under the guidance 
of Drs. Crosby, Peaslee, and Hubbard. He attended lectures at Dartmouth 
College, and subsequently received his degree on his thirtieth birthday. 
Shortly after he entered upon his profession in Langdon, New Hampshire. 
When firmly established. Dr. Graves began to depart from the usual course 
of treatment recognized in those days. In the treatment of fevers he sub- 
stituted fresh air and water for mercurial preparations. He acquired a large 
practice, his regular circuit including the towns of Langdon, Acworth, Wal- 
pole, and Charlestown, and other places ; and for a quarter of a century he 
devoted himself to his professional duties. 

In 1868 he decided to rest from his labors, and with a view of perma- 
nently retiring he moved to Claremont. Popular pressure, however, was 
such as to make it impossible for him to carry out his resolution at that 
time; and he continued in practice here for some years afterward. He was 
especially noted for his charitable and patriotic disposition. The poor and 
needy were never turned away, and during the war of the Rebellion he 
steadfastly refused to accept pay for treating soldiers or their families. He 
was a close student of botany, geology, and astronomy, and was familiar 
with the terrestial formation and vegetation of the United States from the 
State of Maine to the Rocky Mountains. With the practical value of plants 
he was thoroughly conversant. A large collection of minerals which he had 
spent years in collecting, was later presented to Durham College by his 
daughters. In politics he was originally a Whig, and he became an ardent 
Republican at the formation of that party. He was Superintendent of 
Schools in Langdon for fourteen years, and he was a member of the Legis- 
lature during the years 1867 and 1868. For fifty years he was a leading 
member of the Baptist church in Springfield, Vermont. He was a member 
of the New Hampshire State and Connecticut River Medical Associations. 
In Masonry he had advanced to the commandery, was at one time eminent 
commander, and was the organizer of the commandery in Claremont. He 
died February 22, 1891, at his home in Claremont, nearly seventy-nine years 
of age. 

On May 24, 1843, Dr. Graves was united in marriage with Caroline E. 
Strow, daughter of Reuben and Elizabeth (McEwan) Strow, of Weathers- 
field, Vermont. Previous to her marriage she taught in the Unity Scientific 
and Military School. She was a woman of superior mental endowments and 
noble character. She died August 29, 1885, leaving three daughters— Mary 
E., Harriet M., and Agnes J. 




(J^obernor Cjefetel a* Strata 

GOVERNOR EZEKIEL A. STRAW, eldest son of James B. 
and Mehitable (Fisk) Straw, was born in Salisbury, New 
Hampshire, December 30, 1819, and died October 23, 1882. 
His early education was secured in the public schools of 
Lowell, Massachusetts, whither his father had moved his 
family after a few years residence in New Hampshire. Later 
he became a student in the English department of Phillips- 
Andover Academy, where he gave his special attention practical mathe- 
matics. He left the academy in 1838. The Nashua & Lowell railroad was 
then in process of construction, and he became assistant civil engineer on 
this line. On July 4, 1838, he came to Manchester at the request of the con- 
sulting engineer of the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, to take the 
place of the regular engineer, who was ill and unable to work. He came 
expecting to remain in Manchester only a few days, but made it his home 
ever afterward. At the time of his arrival in Manchester, the canal was 
unfinished, and no mill had been built on the east side of the river. Among 
his first assignments were the surveying of the lots and streets, and what is 
now the principal part of the city, and assisting in the construction of the 
dams and canals. At the end of six years (1844) he had acquired so full a 
knowledge of the processes and needs of the business that the Amoskeag 
Company sent him to England and Scotland to obtain information and 
machinery necessary for making and printing muslin delaines. The knowl- 
edge and skill that he brought back with him enabled the Manchester Print 
Works to introduce first this process in the United States. Mr. Straw 
remained with the Amoskeag Company in the capacity of civil engineer until 
July, 1851, when he took the position of agent of the land and water power 
department of the company. At that time the mills and machine shops 
were under separate agents. Five years later, in July, 1856, the first two 
were united and put in charge of Mr. Straw; and in July, 1858, all three were 
combined under his management and he took entire control of the com- 
pany's operations in Manchester. 

Mr. Straw being so prominent in the construction of the mills, then, as 
now, the most important feature of the city, it was very natural that he 
should be appointed a member of the committee to provide plans and specifi- 
cations for the rebuilding of the town house in 1844, and one of the first com- 
mittee appointed to devise plans for the introduction of water works into the 
city. He was connected with all subsequent measures for supplying the 
city with water, and in 1871, when the board of water commissioners was 
appointed to take charge of the present water works, he was made its presi- 
dent, and held that office for many years. In 1854 he was chosen a member 
of the first board of trustees of the Manchester Public Library, and held that 
office for a quarter of a century. He was elected assistant engineer of the 



(©oiiernot dB^ekkl a. Strata 287 

Fire Department in 1846, and was repeatedly reelected to that position. His 
public service to the State at large began in 1859, when he was elected Rep- 
resentative to the State Legislature. He was reelected in each of the four 
years next following, and during the last three years served as chairman of 
the committee on finance. He was elected to the State Senate in 1864, 
returned in 1865, and made president of that body. The same year he was 
chosen on the part of the Senate one of the commissioners to superintend the 
rebuilding of the State House. In 1869 he was appointed by Governor 
Stearns a member of his stafif. In 1872 he had been employed almost con- 
tinually in the service of the State for thirteen years, and had been in one 
way or another connected with all the questions of public interest of that 
time. In that year the Republican party elected him Governor of the State, 
and reelected him the following year. In 1870 the commission to arrange 
for the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia in 1876 was appointed, and 
President Grant made Governor Straw a member of that committee from 
New Hampshire. 

From the organization of the Namaske Mills, in 1856, till their dissolu- 
tion, Mr. Straw was the treasurer and principal owner, and after 1854 until 
near the end of his business career was the sole proprietor. In 1874 he was 
chosen a director of the Langdon Mills. He was president and a director 
of the Blodget Edge-Tool Manufacturing Company from its organization 
in 1855 until its dissolution in 1862, and during the existence of the Amos- 
keag Axe Company, which succeeded it, he was a director. He was one of 
the first directors of the Manchester Gas-Light Company, when it was 
organized in 1851, and was chosen its president in 1855, holding the office 
until January 29, 1881. In i860 he was elected a director of the Manchester 
& Lawrence Railroad Company, and in 1871 became president of the corpo- 
ration, resigning in 1879. Upon the organization of the New England Cot- 
ton Manufacturers' Association he was chosen its president, and was also 
president of the New Hampshire Fire Insurance Company from its organi- 
zation in 1869 until 1880, when he resigned. He was one of the founders of 
the First Unitarian Society in 1842, its clerk and treasurer from that time 
until 1844, its president from 1853 to 1857, and was chairman of the com- 
mittee which built the present house of worship. In 1879 Mr. Straw was 
compelled by ill health to resign the management of the Amoskeag Manu- 
facturing Company, and after a prolonged sickness he died October 23, 1882. 
In the "History of Hillsborough County," Governor Straw's biographer 
said of him, "Mr. Straw was emphatically a great man, not only in his pro- 
fession, in which he towered far above nearly all others, but in all the various 
positions to which he was called. He was not known as a brilliant or a 
sharp man. He had but little need of the helps which men gain by dazzling 
or outwitting friends or foes ; for there was a massiveness about him, a solid 
strength, which enabled him to carry out great plans by moving straight 
over obstacles which other men would have been compelled to remove or go 
around. His mind was broad, deep and comprehensive; he had rare good 
judgment, great self-reliance, and a stability of purpose which seldom failed. 
He was peculiarly fitted for the management of vast enterprises. His plans 



288 aotiernor C^ebiel a. Strata 

were farreaching and judicious, and his executive ability was equal to the 
successful carrying out of whatever his mind projected and his judgment 
approved." Clark's "History of Manchester" (1875) says: "Governor Straw, 
in our judgment, is the ablest man in New Hampshire. In a room full of 
people, the judges of our courts, the managers of our railways, the professors 
of our colleges, he would take the lead of all. He is conversant with more 
subjects than any other man we know of, whether art or science, manufac- 
tures or financial themes. He is a great reader, and his tenacious memory 
makes all he reads his own. Not long after he came to this city, the Amos- 
keag Company began to look upon him as competent to manage its whole 
business and gradually it fell into his hands. In time, the other corpora- 
tions, the city and State, looked to him for advice, and for many years he has 
been the foremost man in Manchester, and for the past few years the leading 
man in shaping the policy of the State. Of great mental capacities, he is 
able to turn off a vast amount of work with the greatest ease. He never 
seems in a hurry, though probably surrounded by more business than any 
other man in the State. He never looks to others for his opinions, and 
though willing to fall in line with his friends and his party in nonessential 
things, he cannot be swerved from his idea of what is right by political con- 
siderations or fear of unpopularity. He enjoys truth, and takes pleasure in 
doing what his judgment dictates. A very generous man, liberal in his gifts 
to the poor and to all charitable institutions, to him more than any other 
man is Manchester indebted for its great prosperity." 

Ezekiel A. Straw married, April 6, 1842, at Amesbury, Massachusetts, 
Charlotte Smith Webster, who died in Manchester, March 15, 1852. To 
them were born four children : Albert, who died in infancy ; Charlotte Web- 
ster, the wife of William H. Howard, of Somerville, Massachusetts ; Herman 
Foster, who became superintendent of the Amoskeag Company's Mills in 
Manchester; Ellen, the wife of Henry Thompson, of Lowell, Massachusetts. 





'HERE was much in the life of the late Charles William 
Cheney, of Manchester, New Hampshire, to command the 
admiration of his fellow-men, but it was not more his strict 
adherence to the principles of right and justice that attracted 
him to others than his unfailing kindness and spirit of self- 
sacrifice. Upon these traits his great popularity with all 
who were privileged to know him intimately was based, 
while the respect of the business world was the outgrowth of a life known to 
be honorable, upright and without guile. "Good business" with him did 
not necessarily mean volume but quality, and this fact was appreciated more 
by those whose lives brought them into daily contact with his gentle and 
kindly spirit. His personality was most pleasing, dignified and courtly, and 
he was truly one of those men whose lives and characters form the under- 
lying structure upon which are built the hopes of the prosperity of America. 
His ambition along the worthiest lines, his perseverance, his steadfastness 
of purpose, and tireless industry, all furnish splendid lessons to the young 
business man of the coming generations, and the well-earned success and 
esteem that he gained proved the inevitable result of the practice of these 
virtues. The entire life of Mr. Cheney was devoted to the highest and best, 
and all his endeavors were for the furtherance of those noble ideals that he 
made the rule of his daily life. The success which he won as a business man 
never elated him unduly, nor caused him to vary from the usual tenor of his 
way. But any estimate of his character would be unjust that did not point 
to the natural ability and keien mental gifts which he improved by daily and 
hourly usage. He had a profound knowledge of human nature, and his 
judgment was sound and unerring. His strong and dominating person- 
ality, and his power over other men, was not the result of aggressiveness, 
but of the momentum of character and strength. In all the walks of life, 
Mr. Cheney acquitted himself as to be regarded as a most valued and honor- 
able citizen, and as a representative business man, and his death, which 
occurred at his home in Manchester, New Hampshire, September 14, 1914, 
meant the removal of one who had been endowed by nature with many fine 
traits of character, and an influence of inestimable value. Mr. Cheney was 
a progressive man in the broadest sense of that word, and gave his earnest 
support to any movement that promised to benefit his community in any 
manner. His was a long life of honor and trust, extending over seventy- 
two years, and no higher eulogy can be passed upon him than to state the 
simple truth that his name was never coupled with anything disreputable, 
and that there never was a shadow of a stain upon his reputation for integ- 
rity and unswerving honesty. He was a most consistent man in all that he 
ever undertook, and his career in all the relations of life was utterly without 
pretense. He was held in the highest esteem by all who had known him, and 

NH-19 



290 Cl)atle$ ^iUtam Ci)enep 

the city of Manchester, New Hampshire, could boast of no better man or 
more enterprising citizen. 

The birth of Charles William Cheney occurred in Goffstown, New 
Hampshire, October lo, 1842, the son of Charles William Cheney, Sr., who 
was born in Deering, New Hampshire, August 29, 1818, and on September 
28, 1 841. was united in marriage with Louisa Roberts, a daughter of Adam 
and Mary (Ring) Roberts. The history of the Cheney family is a most 
interesting one, and is exceeded by none in England. John Cheney, the head 
of the Newbury line of Cheneys, came to Roxbury, Massachusetts, as early 
as 1635, and brought with him four children. Later he went to Newbury, 
Massachusetts. His allotment of land was exceedingly large, and we learn 
from the Historian Cofifin that John Cheney took great interest in Governor 
Winthrop's campaign for the governorship of Massachusetts against Sir 
Harry Vane. John Cheney was admitted as a freeman, May 17, 1637, was a 
member of the Board of Selectmen, and was considered one of the most 
prominent and influential men in the Colony. His son, Daniel Cheney, was 
born in England, and became a resident of Newbury, Massachusetts. Dan- 
iel Cheney, the third in descent, the son of Daniel Cheney, was also a resi- 
dent of Newbury, and was a prosperous farmer by occupation, being the 
owner of a large estate. He was one of the brave defenders of the town 
against the attacks of the Indians, and he died in 1755. Thomas Cheney, 
the fourth in descent, and the son of Daniel Cheney, became a prominent 
resident of Haverhill, Massachusetts, and later of Plaistow, New Hamp- 
shire. He was born in Newbury, Massachusetts, February 25, 1703. His 
son, Daniel Cheney, the fifth in descent, was a resident of Salem, New 
Hampshire, and later of Goffstown, New Hampshire, where he bought land 
in 1780. Thomas Cheney, the sixth in descent, and the son of Daniel Cheney, 
passed away, September 17, 1862, and was buried in Goffstown, New Hamp- 
shire. He was the grandfather of Charles William Cheney, the distin- 
guished gentleman whose name heads this memoir, and such is the line of 
descent and the sterling New England stock from which he came. His 
traits of character, as exemplified in his industry, his strict integrity, broad- 
mindedness, and high type of citizenship, bears out the old and true saying 
that "Blood will tell." He was in everything and in every way a worthy 
descendant of his honored forbear, John Cheney, Sr., who was the staunch 
friend of Governor Winthrop, and one of the long list of the pioneer build- 
ers of our country. 

Mr. Cheney obtained his education in the schools of his native town 
of Goffstown, and also received a course of private instruction, thus laying 
a splendid foundation for his business career. At the time of his death, Mr. 
Cheney had been a resident of Manchester, New Hampshire, for forty-one 
years, or for the major part of his producing years. For thirty-five years of 
that period he had been a valued employee of the Amoskeag Corporation, 
and entered into that concern in 1880. His marked advancement in the 
Amoskeag Mills, from carpenter to master mechanic, was due largely to his 
native ability and power of strict application to all the tasks that came to 
his hand. At the time of his death, Mr. Cheney was at the head of the land 



Cbarles miUiam Cljenep 291 

and water department of this corporation, a position that called for execu- 
tive ability of a high degree. He attributed his success in life to the training 
which he had received from his parents, while at his home in Goffstown, 
during his boyhood days. His younger days were spent on the farm, where 
he learned the trade of carpentering, and then the yearning to enter the 
business world became strong and induced him to start his career in a larger 
city. Thus he came to Manchester, New Hampshire, and worked for a large 
firm before entering the employ of the Amoskeag Corporation. He proved 
his worth to this corporation before he had worked many years, and was 
advanced rapidly, until he became master mechanic of the department. Mr. 
Cheney also held the position of overseer of buildings and repairs. On 
account of illness, Mr. Cheney was obliged to give up his active work in the 
mills, and he had high hopes that inactivity and freedom from all worry 
over business would enable him to regain some of his lost strength and 
health, but it was too late. The best part of his life had been given over in 
perfecting the wonderful organization and work of the Amoskeag Corpora- 
tion. His services were deeply and fully appreciated, and his worth in the 
business world was acknowledged by those men whose opinion is best worth 
having. 

In his political belief, Mr. Cheney was a consistent and staunch Repub- 
lican, and always worked for the best interests of his party. He never 
aspired to any great office in politics, but he served one term, in 1899, in the 
State Legislature, as representative from Ward Three, of Manchester. He 
never attempted, however, to gain any higher honors, and during his term 
in the Legislature he served as chairman of the committee of labor. Mr. 
Cheney was the possessor of that frank, open manner that is so attractive, 
and his democracy was so fundamental and genuine that he never felt con- 
tempt for the humble, and thus drew all classes toward him as by magne- 
tism. During his business too, he had to deal with the most various classes 
of men. but with all he displayed a remarkable control of himself, and a 
self-possession which marked him as a leader of men. One may well be 
amazed at the enumeration of his achievements, of the offices which he filled, 
and the duties which he discharged. 

In fraternal circles, Mr. Cheney was a well known and prominent figure, 
being a member of the Masonic order, holding his membership in Washing- 
ton Lodge. He also belonged to Mount Horeb Chapter, Adoniram Council, 
Trinity Commandery, Knights Templar, Bektash Temple, Shrine, Ruth 
Chapter, Order of Eastern Star, Ridgley Lodge of Odd Fellows, the Social 
Lodge of Rebekahs, and was a member of the Calumet Club of Manchester, 
New Hampshire. There have been few men better known or more highly 
esteemed in Manchester's business and social circles than Mr. Cheney, and 
it is safe to say that if it were possible for any man never to have had an 
enemy, he was Charles William Cheney. In his religious belief, Mr. Cheney 
was affiliated with the Baptist church, and for many years was an influential 
member of the First Baptist Church of Manchester. 

Charles William Cheney was twice married, his first wife being the 
mother of two children, namely: i. Lucy, deceased. 2. Georgia May, who 



292 Cf)atle$ mnUam €htntp 

became the wife of Charles H. Marshall, of Laconia, and they are the parents 
of two children, twins, John and Richard H. Marshall. On January 31, 
1900, Charles William Cheney was united in marriage with Lizzie J. Ladd, 
of I-awrence, Massachusetts, who survives him, and since his death has con- 
tinued to reside in Manchester, New Hampshire, at No. 302 Orange street. 
The private life of Mr. Cheney was a model of virtue, his home relations 
ideal, and it was there that he turned for rest and recreation after the ardu- 
ous labors that claimed so much of his time and energy. His devotion to his 
home and family was one of the most attractive characteristics of this alto- 
gether lovable man. 

The various testimonies to the love and veneration in which Mr. Cheney 
was held are merely examples of the general popular feeling that was 
dominant throughout the city for this noble gentleman. It will be appro- 
priate to close this memorial with the following resolutions which were 
passed by the Knights of Trinity Commandery, Knights Templar, on the 
occasion of Mr. Cheney's death. These resolutions read as follows: 

IN MEMORIAM. 

Sir Knight Charles William Cheney was a native of Goffstown, New Hampshire, 
and in early life learned the trade of a carpenter. After applying himself to his trade 
in the vicinity of Manchester, he became identified with the Amoskeag Corporation, 
where, by his high moral character and his loyalty to his employers, he won distinction 
in his work, and at the time of his death was Master Mechanic in the Land and Water 
Power Department of the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, in whose employ he had 
been for a term of thirty-five years. 

Resolved, That in the passing away of our beloved Sir Knight Charles William 
Cheney, the community has lost an upright and honorable citizen. Trinity Commandery 
has lost a true and courteous Knight, and his family an indulgent and loving husband 
and father. And we as brother Sir Knights unite with the family in this hour of their 
sorrow and bereavement ; and be it further 

Resolved, That these Resolutions become a part of our records, and that a copy 
be sent to the family of the deceased. 





3(ame0 JTrancfe iSrtggs 

'HE late James Francis Briggs belonged to that class of men 
who, possessing by nature and inheritance excellent busi- 
ness abilities, are successful in more than one kind of activ- 
ity. Throughout his life he made his home in Manchester, 
New Hampshire, where he was well known and highly 
esteemed, not only in business circles but in social life as 
well. His bright and happy disposition attracted many 
friends, and won for him popularity and confidence. His high ideals and 
exemplary character were interwoven with his activities and were thor- 
oughly appreciated by his family, friends, business associates, and all others 
who knew him. The essence of a man's true and honorable success, as well 
as the very foundation, is his worth, and no higher compliment can be paid 
a man than to make the statement that he is a member of the class known 
as the worthy business men. No better example of this class can be found 
than Mr. Briggs, whose death, which occurred in Manchester, New Hamp- 
shire, February 3, 1913, came as a sorrowful shock to his many friends and 
acquaintances. His friends were indeed a legion, numbering many high in 
official and business life, who received the tidings of his death with great and 
deep regret. Mr. Briggs was blessed by nature with gifts of a high order, 
which he did not hesitate to use. He developed a strong business ability, 
and possessed a progressive habit of closely following the trend of modern 
thought. He was self-made, inasmuch as he rose to affluence and success 
through his own individual efforts, and not through a lucky turn of fortune's 
wheel. What was even better, he was one of the last men to ascribe the 
least merit to himself. 

The birth of James Francis Briggs occurred in Manchester, New Hamp- 
shire, June 20, 1870, the son of James and Anna (Cullenton) Briggs. His 
father, James Briggs, was one of Manchester's best known business men, 
and passed away March 26, 1901, at the Sacred Heart Hospital, in Man- 
chester. Mr. Briggs, Sr., was a native of England, and emigrated to the 
United States when a young man of twenty-one years of age. Soon after 
his arrival in this country, he located in Manchester, where he embarked in 
the stove and house furnishing business. It was not long before he became 
one of the largest dealers in that line in the city, and was considered as such 
up to the time of his decease. His absolute integrity and faithfulness in the 
discharge of every obligation was the foundation of his success in life. He 
was a Catholic and a member of St. Anne's Parish, Manchester. He was a 
Democrat, staunch in his support of his party, and held office in Ward Five, 
besides receiving the nomination of his party for several important positions 
in Ward Six. He was a man in whose heart there existed the spirit of kind- 
ness and charity, and this was manifested even in performing the sometimes 
disagreeable duties of a public officer. As a neighbor he was ever ready to 
accommodate, and generously contributed of his means to make the neigh- 



294 3!ames JFtancis IBriggs 

borhood more pleasant and happy. His death created a void that it will be 
hard to fill, and as the j'ears pass by and his friends and business associates 
more properly estimate his true character the more fully will they realize 
their great loss in his death. 

James Francis Briggs did not encounter the insuperable obstacles that 
beset other boys in securing an education, as he received the training 
afforded by the Old Park Street School, in his native city of Manchester. 
After his graduation he worked for his father for some time, and then 
engaged in the grocery business, on his own account, in the block owned by 
his father on Lake avenue. Early in life Mr. Briggs learned the value of 
punctuality and steadfastness, which he magnified throughout his daily life. 
Mr. Briggs remained in the grocery business for about three years, but on 
account of his not being wholly satisfied nor the business agreeing with him, 
he sold his interest and engaged in the milk business, which he followed for 
a period of eleven years. Through his hard work and industry a large and 
growing trade was developed, and his business sagacity, accompanied by 
untiring energy, made him a man among men. Success came to him 
because he rightly deserved it, and it came through industry, thrift and 
ability. 

About four years previous to his death, Mr. Briggs became interested 
in the wholesale confectionery business, and at the time of his death was 
looked upon as one of the most enterprising men in this line. He had an 
extensive trade, and his strict honesty and integrity made for him a host of 
friends, both socially and in the business world. Energy, self-confidence 
and a strict adherence to the moral law and those principles of human con- 
duct that play so vital a part in moulding society were the traits which lay 
at the bottom of Mr. Briggs' character. His business success, as must all 
true success, depended first upon his highly moral character, and then upon 
the special knowledge of his various subjects which was a later and acquired 
power. In all that he did for himself Mr. Briggs kept the interest of those 
about him ever in sight, and all of his relations with his fellow-men were 
carried out in like manner. He would not allow, for instance, his exacting 
occupations in the business world to interfere with what he considered to 
be due his family, any more than he erred in the opposite direction and 
allowed domestic ties to interfere with the discharge of his obligations to 
the outside world. 

Mr. Briggs never took an active part in the public affairs of the com- 
munity, although he lived up to the tasks and duties imposed upon him by 
virtue of his citizenship. He was an extremely industrious man, and when 
not attending to his business affairs, was always to be found by his own 
fireside at home, preferring the comforts and intimate intercourse of his 
immediate family to any other form of social life or pleasure. He was a 
member of Derryfield Lodge, N. E. O. P., where his genial disposition won 
him many friends. He was one of those men positive in his opinions, but 
considerate of the opinions of others. In almost every emergency he was 
self-possessed, cool and quick to realize what was necessary. In his reli- 
gious feeling and thought Mr. Briggs' views were very liberal, for religious 



3[ame0 jFrancis ISriggg 295 

bigotry had no place in his nature. He was a Catholic, and a member all 
his life of St. Anne's Catholic Church. For many years he was a member 
of Court Queen City, giving- his time and means to upbuild the Court. Mr. 
Briggs was also a member of the Holy Name Society, and of the Ancient 
Order of Foresters. 

In 1894, James Francis Briggs was united in marriage with Mary E. 
Kuhn, of Raymond, New Hampshire. Mr. and Mrs. Briggs became the 
parents of seven children, as follows: Mary, Margaret, Elizabeth, Irene, 
Frederick and Francis, twin brothers, and Charles Briggs. Mr. Briggs' own 
fireside was the seat of his real enjoyment and happiness of life, and though 
many mourned his departure from earthly view, it was in the family circle 
that the greater vacancy and the deeper mourning was to be found. Mr. 
Briggs was always intensely devoted to his family. His private virtues were 
not less remarkable than his public, and the deep affection with which his 
family and intimate friends regarded him is the best tribute which can be 
paid to the strength and sincerity of his domestic instincts. 

Mr. Briggs was a very just and generous man, of calm, deliberate judg- 
ment, and he led an unselfish, helpful life, full of activity, good deeds and 
kindly acts. In all the relations of life he displayed sterling traits of char- 
acter which stood out in a marked manner, and gained for him the admira- 
tion and affection of all who came in contact with him. With an unyielding 
purpose in the enlargement of his activities and usefulness, he laid the sure 
foundation of an honorable and substantial life. We are always interested 
and impressed by the success won by unusual talents and powers out of the 
common, for it appeals to a very fundamental trait in all of us. For instance, 
such records which describe how worth has won its way upwards through 
doubts and difficulties to a recognized place in the regard of men, and 
trusted to no power but its own indomitable courage and indefatigable 
patience for the result. Such an example we may find in the life career of 
James Francis Briggs, who by sheer perseverance gradually forged his way 
upward to one of influence and control in the business world. His life was 
a short one, less than half a century, but in the years of his business career 
in Manchester he stamped himself as a man of great worth. 



Wttlliam ^vut Cass 




■ILLIAM TRUE CASS was born February 7, 1826, under the 
shadow of old Kearsarge Mountain, in Andover, New 
Hampshire, son of Benjamin and Sarah (True) Cass. His 
father was a farmer, first in Andover, later in Plymouth, 
and the boy grew to manhood among the scenes of a country 
life. He attended the country schools and was a student at 
the Holmes Academy, Plymouth, for several years. 
In 1855 the family moved to a farm in that part of Sanbornton which is 
now Tilton, then known as Sanbornton Bridge. Here the banker of the 
future followed the vocation of farmer, like his father and grandfather 
before him. He worked for his uncle one year and carried on his farm for 
one hundred and fifty dollars, paying his wife's board out of that sum. He 
sawed his own wood evenings, and in the winter season when the land could 
not be tilled, he worked days in a mill, fulling cloth, and in that way length- 
ened out his purse. But such was not long to be his work, for in January, 
1856, he was chosen cashier of the Citizens' Bank of Sanbornton, and com- 
menced his new duties one afternoon, having spent the morning at his labors 
in the mill. The bank was then but a small affair, and had been in existence 
only a short time. It occupied one room in the brick dwelling which has 
been Mr. Cass' residence ever since he took possession of the bank and house 
together that January day. Although not familiar with banking, he studied 
the books of the institution until he had mastered them, and knew just how 
to keep them, and even till his last days he proved a good accountant and 
well versed in the best methods. The business of the bank rapidly increased, 
and in 1865 it was made a national bank, with increased capital. Mr. Cass 
continued cashier until 1889, when he resigned to accept the position of 
president, which he retained until his death. He was one of the directors 
of the bank almost from the beginning of his connection with it. In 1870 
the lona Savings Bank was established, largely through the efiforts of Mr. 
Cass, and he was made treasurer, in which office he continued the rem.ainder 
of his life. He saw the institution grow from a new bank with no deposits 
to nearly a half a million at the time of his death. At the latter date he was 
the second oldest bank official in the State in point of years of service, having 
been continuously in the work for more than forty-five years. His long 
experience in this connection gave him a wide knowledge to be sought for 
upon many matters outside of banking interests. He was for eighteen years 
treasurer of the New Hampshire Conference Seminary, and had been a 
trustee of that institution for forty years. He was also one of the board 
of three trustees in charge of Park Cemetery. He was for two years treas- 
urer of the town, served for several years as moderator at the annual town 
meeting, and had been supervisor of the checklist, but he never sought polit- 
ical honors, and refused them whenever possible. A man of quiet domestic 



mniisim Crue Cas0 2^7 

tastes, he preferred the comforts oi hoP^^ to the excitement of political life, 
and the pleasures of the outside world nevef appealed to him to any great 
extent. 

Mr. Cass became a member of the Methodist Episcopal church when 
only fourteen years of age. He had been connected with the Methodist 
Episcopal church of Tilton during the entire period of his life here, had been 
a class leader for forty years, a member of the quarterly conference, and 
president of the board of trustees for many years. He was almost all his life 
a teacher in the Sunday school, and was at one time superintendent. He was 
always actively interested in all that pertained to the church, gave liberally 
to all its benevolences, and never failed to be in his place at all the services 
unless prevented by sickness. He was a very intelligent Christian man. He 
loved the doctrines and polity of Methodism, and delighted in strong, 
earnest, evangelical preaching. He was always a generous supporter of the 
benevolent enterprises of the church. His knowledge of the Bible gave him 
an aptness in prayer and speech that was very marked. He held and prac- 
ticed the old-fashioned views of family piety, constantly maintained his 
family altar, and exercised a generous Christian hospitality. He commanded 
public confidence by his honest vipright dealings, so that his fellow-citizens 
trusted him without reserve. He finally allied himself with every moral 
reform that promised the wellbeing of men, and did not hesitate to speak out 
boldly in their behalf. In politics, Mr. Cass was a Democrat until the Civil 
War. He then became a Republican, and, although loyal to party, he was 
not slow to see any defects or weaknesses in party lines, and was always 
ready to help correct the same. His State and his country were always 
uppermost in his mind, and he was careful to obey his convictions of duty. 
Therefore, it was his custom to go to the party primaries as a proper place 
to correct errors or advocate reforms. 

Mr. Cass married, September t8, 1851, Mary Emery Locke, who sur- 
vived him. She was born at East Concord, New Hampshire, September 19, 
1830. Their children were: i. Alfred Locke, born October 28, i860, died 
September i, 1862. 2. Mary Addie, born March 5, 1863, married Abel Wesley 
Reynolds, October 29, 1889; children: Margaret, born September 23, 1890, 
died November 8, 1896; Alice, born December 30, 1893; Kenneth Cass, born 
May 28, 1897; Chester Abel, born February 6. 1900; Arthur Wesley, born 
April 2y, 1902, died October 31, 1902. 3. Arthur T., born April 9, 1865. 
4. William Daniel, born January 27, 1872, died May 7, 1879. Mr. Cass died 
May 26, 1901. His death came suddenly, after an illness of less than a week, 
of pneumonia. 




Jf r^berttfe it^ltllarmon (Bilbtxt 

FREDERICK MILLARMON GILBERT was a prominent 
figure in the industrial and business world of Walpole, New 
Hampshire, where, although he was not a native of the place 
or indeed of the State at all, he was closely identified with its 
general life for a number of years. He was a member of an 
old New York family, and his father was associated with the 
industries of the Empire State for many years, as was Fred- 
erick M. Gilbert also before coming to Walpole, New Hampshire. He was 
a son of Colgate and Martha (Austen) Gilbert. Mr. Gilbert, Sr., was a resi- 
dent for many years of New York City, and was there engaged in the manu- 
facture of starch, meeting with a high degree of success in business. He and 
his wife were the parents of a family of children, among whom was Fred- 
erick Millarmon. 

Born June 26, 1854, in the city of New York, Frederick Millarmon Gil- 
bert, son of Colgate and Martha (Austen) Gilbert, did not remain in his 
native place for more than the first few years of his life. He was taken by his 
parents to Buffalo, New York, whither his father removed to continue his 
manufacturing enterprise, and it was in this western city that the lad 
received his education or rather the elementary portion thereof, attending 
for this purpose the local public schools. He was later sent by his parents 
to the Zeigler School at Newburgh-on-the-Hudson, and still later attended 
the Horace Briggs School at Buffalo. Throughout his school years, Mr. 
Gilbert showed great aptitude as a student and established an enviable repu- 
tation for himself both in this connection and as a young man of good char- 
acter. He was popular with his fellow under-graduates, and won the 
approval and respect of his instructors and masters as well. Upon com- 
pleting his studies at the Horace Briggs School, he turned his attention to 
the serious business of earning his livelihood and was admitted by his father 
as an employee into the latter's starch factory at Buffalo. Here the young 
man, working up from a humble position through the various steps of 
employment, learned every detail of this industry until he became an expert 
on the manufacturing of starch. It was perhaps, however, the mechanical 
side of the operation involved in the turning out of this product which inter- 
ested young Mr. Gilbert the most, and as time went on his taste for mechan- 
ics grew and was developed. Eventually, Mr. Gilbert found his attention 
so drawn to this subject that he decided to give up the starch business alto- 
gether and turn his attention and energies into his favorite line of work. 
Accordingly he began on his own account the manufacture of gasoline 
engines, and in the year 1892 came to Walpole, New Hampshire, where he 
continued his enterprise, developing a large and satisfactory trade in gaso- 
line engines, his plant having been one of the most important of its kind in 
that region. The type of engine manufactured by Mr. Gilbert stood high 



iFrcDerick Q^illarmon (Silfiett 299 

in the g-eneral trade, and as he used only the best material and workmanship 
in its production, it commanded a large and excellent market. In addition 
to his industrial interests, Mr. Gilbert was also interested in enterprises of 
various characters in the West, especially at Des Moines, Iowa. Here he 
was an important figure in the financial situation, and was director of the 
Iowa National Bank of that city. While in no sense of the word a politician, 
his time and inclination both preventing him from actively identifying him- 
self with local affairs, he was, nevertheless, keenly interested in the great 
political issues and questions of the day. As is the case with most men of 
intelligence, he identified himself with no party, but was an Independent in 
his political attitude, using his influence in favor of that candidate or policy 
which he believed would be most beneficial to the community-at-large, quite 
without regard to what party supports or opposes him, or indeed of partisan 
considerations altogether. During his residence in Buffalo, Mr. Gilbert was 
a member of the City Club of that place, an organization not now in exist- 
ence. In his religious belief Mr. Gilbert was a Unitarian, and since his resi- 
dence in Walpole attended the church of that denomination. 

Frederick Millarmon Gilbert was united in marriage January 30, 1879, 
at Buffalo, New York, with Alice Clifton, a daughter of Henry and Elizabeth 
(Dorsheimer) Clifton, old and highly respected residents of that city. One 
child was born to Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert, Colgate, May 29, 1896. Mr. Gilbert 
died in 1902. 




Cpler UEestgate 




'YLER WESTGATE, Judge of Probate of Grafton county, 
New Hampshire, postmaster of Haverhill, the incumbent of 
many other offices of responsibility and trust, and one of the 
most prominent figures in the life of his community, was a 
member of a good old New England family, which has 
resided in these parts for many years. His death, which 
occurred on June 6, 1917, deprived the community of which 
he was a member, of one who had ever been actively interested in its welfare 
and a leader in all movements undertaken to advance its interest. Not only 
during his own life and career was the name of Westgate closely associated 
with the courts and legal life of the community, but his father before him 
was an eminent attorney of Enfield, New Hampshire, for more than thirty 
years. He was a son of Nathaniel Waite and Louisa (Tyler) Westgate, 
old and highly respected residents of Grafton county. New Hampshire, the 
former having held a number of posts there in which he was afterwards suc- 
ceeded by his son, the Mr. Westgate of this sketch. Nathaniel Waite West- 
gate was register of probate of Grafton county from 1856 to 1861, judge of 
probate for the same county from 1861 to 1871, and upon his retirement from 
that office was elected to represent the community in the New Hampshire 
State Legislature. He and his wife were the parents of a family of six chil- 
dren, of whom Tyler Westgate was one. 

Born December 2, 1843, ^^ Enfield, New Hampshire, Tyler Westgate 
passed the years of his childhood and early youth at his father's home in that 
town. The elementary portion of his education was gained at the local 
public schools, but he was later sent to the Haverhill Academy, where he 
studied for a time, and still later to the Kimball Union Academy, from which 
he was graduated with the class of 1864. It was natural that as a son of his 
father Mr. Westgate should early be interested in court procedure and legal 
afifairs generally, and he had not long graduated from school when he 
accepted the offer of assistant clerk of the Supreme Court of Grafton county. 
He held this position from 1865 to 1871, and then, just ten years after his 
father's resignation from the position, became register of probate and con- 
tinued in that office from 1871 to 1874. He was again appointed register of 
probate in 1876 and served for three years following. In 1876 he was also 
chosen clerk of the New Hampshire State Senate, a post that he held for one 
year and in which he gave eminent satisfaction despite the many difficulties 
involved therein. Mr. Westgate was a staunch Republican in his political 
belief, and in the year 1881, when Garfield became President, he was 
appointed postmaster of Haverhill and served in that capacity during the 
administration of that gentleman. During this time he did much to improve 
the postal service at Haverhill and brought his important department up to 
a high state of efficiency, instituting many much needed reforms. In the 



cpiet mtstmt 301 

year 1890 Mr. Westgate was appointed judge of probate and continued in 
this office until the year 1913, when he reached the age limit and resigned. 
During the twenty-three years of his service in this responsible post, Judge 
Westgate established a most enviable reputation for just and impartial deal- 
ings and for the wisdom and good judgment he displayed in his decisions. 

In addition to his many official capacities, Judge Westgate was also 
actively engaged in several business enterprises in which he met with a high 
degree of success. For a considerable time he conducted a large coal busi- 
ness and he previously had entered the insurance line and become a success- 
ful agent for the New Hampshire Fire Insurance Company, Indeed his 
activities made him a prominent figure in the industrial and business life 
of the community and played no small part in stimulating business activity 
there. He was also a conspicuous figure in the general life of the com- 
munity, and was a trustee of Haverhill Academy for many years. He was 
affiliated with the Masonic order and for a long period was a member of 
Grafton Lodge, No. 46, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. Another office 
in which Mr. Westgate served for many years and in which he established a 
most enviable reputation was that of justice of the peace. 

Judge Westgate was united in marriage, August 30, 1881, with Lucretia 
M. Sawyer, of Malone, New York. Mrs. Westgate died, however, a few 
years later, and on August 15, 1888, Judge Westgate married Phebe Jane 
Bean, of Limington, Maine, a daughter of Daniel and Nancy (Waterhouse) 
Bean, old and highly respected residents of that place. Of this second union 
two children were born, as follows : Louise B., July 17, 1890, and Elsie Mae, 
April 18, 1892, 




©Itber €rnesto ilrancb 

[ORN in that part of Ohio which at one time constituted the 
Western Reserve of Connecticut, Oliver E. Branch was by 
blood through both of his parents a Connecticut Yankee, 
who, contrary to the prevailing tendency of his time, came 
East to seek his fortune, and finally found success in New 
England, which his grandparents had left one hundred years 
before. Family pride was always one of his marked char- 
acteristics, and no sketch of his life would be complete without some account 
of his ancestry. 

Mr. Branch was a direct descendant in the seventh generation of Peter 
Branch, who sailed from England in 1638 on the ship "Castle," and who died 
during the voyage. With him upon this journey came his son John, then a 
boy about ten years of age, who was born in Kent county, England, about 
1628. After his arrival in America this John Branch probably spent the 
early years of his life at Scituate, Massachusetts, but eventually settled at 
Marshfield, Massachusetts, where he died August 17, 171 1. His son, Peter 
Branch, was born May 28, 1659, at Marshfield, Massachusetts, whence he 
moved as early as 1680 to Norwich, Connecticut, and later to Preston, Con- 
necticut, where he died December 27, 1713. His son, Samuel Branch, was 
born September 3, 1701, at Preston, Connecticut, and died in the year 1756. 
His son, Samuel Branch, Jr., was born at Preston, Connecticut, August 6, 
1729, and died February 15, 1773. His son, William Branch, was born at 
Preston, Connecticut, September 3, 1760, and died at Madison, Ohio, April 
13, 1849. His son, William Witter Branch, was born at Aurelius, Cayuga 
county. New York, August 31, 1804. He married, July 3, 1834, Lucy Jane 
Bartram, and died May 25, 1887, at North Madison, Ohio. Their son, Oliver 
Ernesto Branch (christened Erastus), was born July 19, 1847, ^t North 
Madison, Ohio, and died June 22, 1916, at Manchester, New Hampshire. 

Mr. Branch's grandfather, William Branch, was a fine type of the Revo- 
lutionary soldier and pioneer, whose life was full of hardship and adventure. 
At the outbreak of the Revolutionary War he was only fifteen years old, and 
his first attempt to enlist at the age of sixteen was thwarted by an older 
brother who secured his discharge on account of his youth. On April i, 
1777, he enlisted again, however, in Colonel John Durkee's Connecticut regi- 
ment and served until the end of the war. He fought at Brandywine, Ger- 
mantown. Fort Mifflin, Monmouth and Yorktown, and spent the winter with 
Washington at Valley Forge. About 1790 he settled in Cayuga county, 
New York, then known as Onondaga county, where he held the office of 
sherifif for three years. Thence he moved to Chautauqua county, New York, 
thence to Erie county, Pennsylvania, thence to Kirkland, Cayuga county, 
Ohio, thence to Madison, Lake county, Ohio. He married, November 27, 
1796, Lucretia Branch, a second cousin, who was born April 3, 1775, at Pitts- 



SDWoet (Ccnesto 'Btanclj 303 

field, Massachusetts, and died December 5, 1857, at Madison, Ohio. During 
the War of 1812 he raised a company of volunteers, known as the "Silver 
Grays," of which he was elected captain, but was never ordered into service. 
He was a farmer by occupation, a Whig in politics, and in religion he was 
a Presbyterian and a deacon of that church. 

Mr. Branch's father, William Witter Branch, followed in his early years 
the movements of his father from Cayuga county, New York, to Chautauqua 
county. New York, thence to Erie county, Pennsylvania, thence to Kirkland, 
Ohio, thence to North Madison, Ohio, in 1837, where he afterwards resided. 
In his youth he learned the trade of a wagon-maker, but later took up the 
study of law and became one of the leading lawyers and most influential citi- 
zens of Lake county. From 1847 to 1852 he was judge of the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas for that county. He was one of those who first foresaw in part 
the tremendous developments which lay ahead of the American railroads 
and he became widely known as one of the organizers of the Cleveland, 
Painesville & Ashtabula Railroad. He himself obtained the charter for this 
road, which subsequently became a link in the great Lake Shore system. 

Upon his mother's side also Mr. Branch was descended from distin- 
guished Revolutionary and Colonial ancestry. His mother, Lucy Jane (Bar- 
tram) Branch, who was born at Huntington, Connecticut, May 25, 1816, and 
died at North Madison, Ohio, May 17, 1897, was the daughter of Uriah 
Bartram, who was born at Reading, Connecticut, January 9, 1782. He was 
one of the early settlers of the Western Reserve and moved with his family 
to Madison, Ohio, in 1810, when there were but ten families in town and the 
whole country was covered with a dense forest. He was a captain in the 
War of 1812. He was the son of Daniel Bartram, who was born at Reading, 
Connecticut, October 23, 1745, and who was a soldier of the Revolution. 
He was the son of David Bartram, who was born at Fairfield, Connecticut, 
about December 13, 1702, and died at Reading, Connecticut, in 1768. David 
Bartram was the son of John Bartram, who died at Fairfield, Connecticut, 
December 11, 1747, and who was probably the son of John Bartram, who 
died at Stratford, Connecticut, in 1675. 

On the maternal side of the house the Bartrams were descended from 
the Chauncey family, which was founded in this country by Charles Chaun- 
cey, a native of England, who was the first minister at Scituate, Massachu- 
setts, and the second president of Harvard College. His son, Israel Chaun- 
cey, was born at Scituate, Massachusetts, in 1644, and was one of the 
founders of Yale College. His son, Charles Chauncey, was the father of a 
second Israel Chauncey, who in turn was the father of Ellinor Chauncey, 
who married Gurdon Merchant, of Fairfield, Connecticut. Their daughter, 
Ann Merchant, married Daniel Bartram, and was the grandfather of Lucy 
Jane Bartram. 

William Witter and Lucy Jane (Bartram) Branch were the parents of 
the following children: William Wirt, born September 5, 1835, and died 
April 12, 1907; John Locke, born October 4, 1837, and died March 27, 1909; 
Cornelia, born September 19, 1839, and died April 20, 1891 ; Ida Anna, born 



304 miMtt aBtnc0to 'Brancb 

August 27, 1842; Martha Lucretia, born March 19, 1845; Oliver Ernesto 
(christened Erastus), born July 19, 1847, and died June 22, 1916; Mary 
Alma, born October 2, 1850, and died November 29, 1916; Charles Coit, born 
July 25, 1852; Happy Ella, born June 17, 1855. 

Oliver Ernesto Branch v^^as one of a family of nine children. He passed 
his childhood at North Madison, Ohio, and his early education was obtained 
in the public schools of that town, but he later attended Whitestown Semi- 
nary at Whitesboro, New York, where he prepared for college. He entered 
Hamilton College in 1869, from which he was graduated in 1873 with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts and the highest honors of his class. The two 
years succeeding his graduation he spent in teaching, as principal of the 
Forestville Free Academy at Forestville, New York. In 1875 he came to 
New York City and entered the Columbia University Law School. During 
the two years that he was a student there he was also instructor in Latin 
and history at the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, thus accomplishing a 
dual task which might well have taxed his energies. He graduated from 
the Columbia Law School in 1877 with the degree of LL. B. In 1876 he had 
received the honorary degree of Master of Arts from Hamilton College, and 
in 1895 he received the same degree from Dartmouth College. In 1908 the 
degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred upon him by Hamilton College. 
From 1877 to 1883 Mr. Branch practiced law in New York City with his 
brother, John L. Branch, but in the latter year was obliged to give up his 
business for a time on account of illness. Accordingly, he removed to North 
Weare, New Hampshire, the home of his wife, where he hoped to regain his 
health, and was so far successful that in 1889 he was able once more to take 
up active practice. During his residence at North Weare he compiled and 
edited three volumes of selections for public speaking, which formed a series, 
published under the title of "The National Speakers." 

In 1889 he opened an office at Manchester, New Hampshire, and 
resumed the practice of law, which he continued uninterruptedly up to the 
time of his death. He took up his residence in the city of Manchester in 
December, 1894. During this period he was one of the general counsel 
of the Boston & Maine Railroad in New Hampshire, and had a large and 
varied practice. He was, in fact, connected with much of the most important 
litigation in the State from 1889 to 1916, and was recognized as one of the 
leaders of the New Hampshire bar. Among the notable cases in which he 
was engaged was that of the State of New Hampshire vs. Manchester & 
Lawrence Railroad, begun in 1895, in which the State sought to recover 
claims amounting to six hundred and fifty thousand dollars. Mr. Branch 
took a leading part in the successful defense of this action. He was also one 
of the associate counsel for the defendants in the famous "next friend" pro- 
ceedings of Eddy vs. Frye, et c/., begun in 1906, which involved the question 
of the mental capacity of Mrs. Mary Baker G. Eddy, the founder of Christian 
Science. In 1908 he was one of the counsel for the defendant in the case of 
State of New Hampshire vs. Boston & Maine Railroad, the so-called "rate 
case." which involved questions of the interpretations and validity of the 



ffl)Iii)et (Btntffto 15tmtb 305 

statutory limitations upon the rates of fares and freights contained in the 
acts which authorized the leasing and consolidation of New Hampshire 
railroads. 

Soon after coming to New Hampshire, Mr. Branch became interested in 
politics. He was always a Democrat and was twice elected representative 
of the town of Weare to the New Hampshire Legislature, and served as a 
member of that body during the sessions of 1887 and 1889. During both of 
these sessions he was a member of the judiciary committee and at the com- 
mencement of the session of 1889 he was the Democratic candidate for 
speaker of the House of Representatives. 

The legislative session of 1887 was the most famous of New Hamp- 
shire history on account of the noted "railroad fight" which grew out of the 
opposing efforts of the Boston & Maine Railroad and the Concord Railroad 
to secure legislation which would give one corporation or the other control 
of the railroad system of the State. In this contest Mr. Branch took a 
prominent part, favoring the passage of the Hazen bill, so-called, which per- 
mitted the union of the Boston & Maine and Concord railroads, and the 
enactment of which was desired by the Boston & Maine interests. In advo- 
cacy of this bill Mr. Branch made a remarkable speech, which is acknowl- 
edged to have been one of the greatest ever heard in the House of Repre- 
sentatives at Concord. The final passage of the bill was in a large measure 
due to the effect of this speech and it brought instant fame and prominence 
to its author. Thereafter, until 1896, when the Democratic party was dis- 
rupted by the Free Silver issue, he was one of the leading figures in the poli- 
tics of the State. During the legislative session of 1889 he further enhanced 
his reputation as an orator and debater by his successful advocacy of the 
Australian Ballot Law and by a notable speech in favor of Woman Suffrage. 
In 1892 he was elected chairman of the Democratic State Convention and 
received this honor again in 1904. In 1894 he was appointed by President 
Cleveland United States District Attorney for the District of New Hamp- 
shire and discharged the duties of that responsible office for four years with 
efficiency and success. In 1903 he was elected president of the New Hamp- 
shire Bar Association and for several years prior to 1910 he was a member 
of the Board of Examiners appointed by the Supreme Court to examine can- 
didates for admission to the bar. 

Always impatient of pretence or evasion, and always prompt to cham- 
pion a cause which he believed to be just, Mr. Branch was an early and con- 
sistent advocate of Woman Suffrage. He became greatly aroused over the 
situation which developed in the city of Manchester with reference to the 
liquor traffic under the old prohibitory law. Under the so-called Healy 
system which took its name from that of the chief of police of Manchester, 
the sale of liquor was permitted to go on openly for years, the dealers who 
engaged in this business being practically licensed by a system of fines, 
always for first offenses, regularly imposed in the police court. Mr. Branch 
attacked this system in a series of editorials which were published m the 
Manchester "Union" under the common heading of "The Reign of Lawless- 



3o6 flDIitoet (Btmfito TBrancb 

ness," and performed a great public service in thus laying bare the workings 
of the system. When a group of New York capitalists succeeded in securing 
the passage by the New Hampshire Legislature of the notorious New Eng- 
land Breeders' Club Charter, which was designed to legalize racetrack 
gambling in New Hampshire, Mr, Branch gladly lent his aid to the "Com- 
mittee of Twelve" which was organized to combat this institution, and made 
a notable speech upon the subject at a huge mass-meeting held at Mechanics 
Hall in Manchester. 

As an orator Mr. Branch was extremely versatile and effective. He was 
equally at home in arguing questions of fact to a jury, or questions of law 
before an Appellate Court. His services as a campaign speaker at political 
meetings were always in great demand and he was frequently called upon to 
speak upon important public occasions. He was always an unsparing critic 
of his own work and his judgment as to the relative worth of his public 
addresses was probably correct. Among those in which he took most pride 
were an address entitled "John Marshall, the Statesman," prepared to be 
delivered at a banquet of the New Hampshire Bar Association held in 1901 
in celebration of the one hundredth anniversary of Marshall's appointment 
as Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court; an address in favor 
of Woman Suffrage, delivered at a mass-meeting in Representatives Hall, 
Concord, in 1903, in reply to Dr. Lyman Abbott, who had made a strong 
anti-suffrage argument from the same platform on the previous evening; 
and another address entitled "American Democracy Still on Trial," deliv- 
ered by him as president of the New Hampshire Bar Association at its 
annual meeting in 1904. 

Mr. Branch's interests in life centered chiefly in his family. Social 
functions had but slight attractions for him, and he spent but little time in 
the clubs to which he belonged. During his college days at Hamilton he 
became a member of the Delta Upsilon fraternity and his high rank as a 
student brought about his election as a member of the Phi Beta Kappa fra- 
ternity. He was a Mason, and a member of the Derryfield Club and the 
Intervale Country Club, both of Manchester. He was also a member of the 
New Hampshire Bar Association, the American Bar Association, the New 
Hampshire Historical Society, and the sons of the Revolution. From 1905 
to 191 1 he was one of the trustees of Hamilton College. In religion Mr. 
Branch was a Congregationalist. He was one of the organizers and a mem- 
ber of the church of that denomination at North Weare, and after his 
removal to Manchester he was a constant attendant at the Franklin Street 
Church. 

Mr. Branch was married, on October 17, 1878, at North Weare, New 
Hampshire, to Sarah Maria Chase, who was born in that village, April 2, 
1857. Se was the daughter of John Winslow and Hannah (Dow) Chase, 
both natives of that town. Mr. Chase, her father, was the inventor of a 
skiving machine and was for many years engaged in the manufacture of 
these machines at North Weare. The death of Mr. Branch occurred at 
Manchester, New Hampshire, October 6, 1906. 




auiStin Corbm 

USTIN CORBIN— Third of his direct line to bear the name 
of Austin, Mr. Corbin in his business activity and efficiency 
is a worthy successor of Austin (2) Corbin and Austin (i) 
Corbin, both of whom were men of great prominence in the 
business world. Perhaps no section of this country owes 
more to the enterprise and genius of one man than Long 
Island owes to Austin (2) Corbin, whose success in reorgan- 
izing the Long Island Railroad and in developing the attractions of Long 
Island as a summer resort is well known. The Corbins are of ancient New 
England family, and in New Hampshire many generations of the family 
were born. They were substantial land owners of the State, and a roster of 
the State Senate reveals the fact that they were also prominent as legis- 
lators. The founder of the family in America was Clement Corbin, born in 
1626, who came to America in 1637. 

Austin (i) Corbin was a wealthy land owner and prominent business 
man of Newport, New Hampshire, and for a time was State Senator. He 
married Mary Chase. Austin (2) Corbin, born in Newport, New Hamp- 
shire, July II, 1827, died at his country estate in the town of his birth, June 
4, 1896, his death the result of being thrown from a carriage. He was edu- 
cated in private schools, academy and Harvard College, completing his 
studies with a law course and graduation from Harvard Law School, class 
of '49. Before entering law school he was a clerk in Boston, and while pur- 
suing his legal studies also taught school. Forming a partnership with 
Ralph Metcalf, afterwards governor of New Hampshire, he practised law in 
Newport until 185 1, then went West, locating in Davenport, Iowa. His 
keen foresight and business acumen led him into several business under- 
takings and the founding of the banking house of Macklot & Corbin, the 
only private Iowa bank which weathered the panic of 1857. In 1863 he 
organized and was chosen president of the First National Bank of Daven- 
port, that being the first institution organized under the National Banking 
Act. In 1865 he located in New York City, was appointed receiver and later 
president of the Indiana, Bloomington & Western Railroad, that being his 
introduction to the transportation business, a line of activity in which he 
became famous. In 1873 he founded the Corbin Banking Company and did 
a large business in mortgage loans on western farm lands. In 1880 he was 
appointed receiver of the Long Island Railroad Company, and a year later 
was chosen its executive head. 

From that time forward until the close of his life, Mr. Corbin was a 
recognized power in railway and financial circles and the promoter of many 
large business undertakings which he carried to successful issue. He was 
prominently concerned in the reorganization of the Philadelphia & Reading 
Railroad Company, of which he was first a receiver and afterwards presi- 



3o8 3u$tin Corliin 

dent. He was also president of the New York & New England Railroad 
Company, the Elmira, Cortland & Northern Railroad Company, the New 
York & Rockaway Beach Railroad Company, the Manhattan Beach Com- 
pany; a director in the American Exchange National Bank, the Western 
Union Telegraph Company, the Nassau Fire Insurance Company and the 
Mercantile Trust Company. He was the first to conceive the plan of tunnel- 
ing under the Hudson river to bring trains from the West and South into 
New York City direct. He brought Charles M. Jacobs, an English engineer, 
to this country to make the necessary borings, and interested the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad in the project, which was eventually carried out by that 
system, with Mr. Jacobs as engineer. He planned a free port and a steam- 
ship terminal at Montauk Point, Long Island, and was on the point of carry- 
ing these plans to a successful conclusion at the time of his death. Notwith- 
standing his high position in the business life of New York, he ever retained 
his pride in and love for his native State, maintained a large estate in New- 
port, his native town, and there spent his vacation periods. He established 
near his home at Newport, New Hampshire, the largest fenced game pre- 
serve in this country, the Blue Mountain Forest, containing 24,000 acres, 
and stocked with buffalo, elk, deer and wild boar. He was a member of 
numerous social and other organizations outside the realm of business, these 
including the Manhattan, Metropolitan, Lawyers, South Side, and Players 
clubs of New York City, and the Somerset Club of Boston. He also belonged 
and was much interested in the Sewanaka-Corinthian Yacht, the Meadow- 
brook Hunt and South Side Sportsmen's Club. 

Austin (2) Corbin married, in 1853, Hannah M. Wheeler, daughter of 
Samuel Wheeler, a prominent citizen of Newport, New Hampshire. Chil- 
dren: Mary, deceased; Isabelle C, married George S. Edgell; William, 
deceased; Anna W., married Hallet Alsop Borrowe; and Austin (3). 




. JEREMIAH W. WILSON, who was for fifty years a 
prominent physician of Contoocook, Merrimack county, was 
born January ii, 1816, in Salisbury, New Hampshire. He 
was a descendant of Thomas Wilson, who came with his 
wife from Exeter, England, in 1633, and located in Rox- 
bury, Massachusetts. The line of descent was continued by 
Humphrey Wilson, born in 1628, who married Judith 
Hersey, and settled in Exeter, New Hampshire; Thomas Wilson, born May 
20, 1672, who married Mary Light, and continued his residence in Exeter; 
Humphrey Wilson (second), born December 9, 1699, who married Mary 
Leavitt, and located in Brentwood, New Hampshire; Nathaniel Wilson, 
born June 24, 1739, who married Elizabeth Barker, and settled in Gilmanton, 
New Hampshire; and Job Wilson, M. D., born in Gilmanton, who was the 
father of Dr. Jeremiah W. Wilson. 

Job Wilson, M. D., removed from his native town to Salisbury, where 
he practised his profession for many years, finally removing from there to 
the town of Franklin, locating near the Daniel Webster place. He was a 
very skilful physician, and considered an authority by his professional breth- 
ren on small-pox. When that disease was epidemic in New Hampshire, he 
was employed by the State to take medical charge of the patients. His 
death occurred in Franklin. He inherited the ancestral homestead at Gil- 
manton, which was entailed to the children of his son. Dr. Jeremiah W. 
Wilson. His wife, whose maiden name was Nancy Farnham, bore him 
seven children. 

Jeremiah W. Wilson attended the public schools and the academy at 
Franklin. At the age of twenty he began the study of medicine under the 
instruction of his father. Subsequently he attended a course of lectures at 
Hanover, New Hampshire; and prior to receiving his degree of Doctor of 
Medicine at the University in Castleton, Vermont, he practised with his 
father and Dr. Ephraim Wilson, his brother. After his graduation he came 
to Contoocook, buying out the practice of Dr. Sargent, an old and well- 
known practitioner; and for the remainding fifty years of his life he was 
actively engaged in his professional labors, residing for the entire time in 
the house he at first occupied. His practice extended over a large territory, 
embracing every town and village in this vicinity, and he was eminently 
successful. In the diagnosis of the diseases brought to his notice he was 
particularly fortunate, being rarely mistaken; while as surgeon his skill was 
unquestioned. He had a rare delicacy of perception, and a refinement of 
thought and feeling very gratifying to the sick. Combined with these quali- 
ties were a decision and firmness of character that inspired confidence, and 
caused him to be regarded by his patients as a friend and counsellor as well 
as a physician. A close student, he kept up with the progress of his pro- 



3 lo 3[etemiai) m, milaon, 09, D. 

fession, and as a rule adhered to the regular practice, although his brother 
Ephraim, a physician in Rockville, Connecticut, was a warm advocate of 
homoeopathy. 

Ever heedful of the call of distress. Dr. Wilson gave his time and skill 
without making question of compensation; and, being a poor collector, fees 
amounting to hundreds of dollars, that the debtors could well afford to pay, 
have long since been outlawed. In his visits to the poor he often con- 
tributed necessary articles of clothing or food to needy families, besides 
gratuitously giving his services to the sick. Frank and outspoken, he never 
hesitated to express his honest opinion, and defend it when necessary. He 
bought a tract of land in Contoocook, and for some years did a little farming, 
intrusting the manual labor oftentimes to those owing him for professional 
work and unable to find ready money with which to pay their bills. Although 
other physicians located in the town, he maintained the even tenor of his 
way, never forgetting the ethics and courtesy of his profession. He never 
aspired to political honors, but was always an earnest supporter of the prin- 
ciples of the Republican party. He was held in high respect by his medical 
brethren, and was a valued member of the County Medical Society. For a 
time he served as surgeon of the Twenty-first Regiment of the State militia, 
to which he was appointed in 1845. 

On March 31, 1847, Dr. Wilson married Miss Elizabeth Gerrish, who 
was born September 5, 1820, daughter of Thomas and Betsey Gerrish, of 
Boscawen. She died November 8, 1882, having borne him three children. 
Doctor and Mrs. Wilson took Miss Martha J. Chase into their family when 
she was a girl of twelve years. She subsequently repaid the loving care they 
bestowed upon her by tenderly watching over the Doctor in his declining 
years. Both the Doctor and his estimable wife were earnest and sincere 
Christians in the true sense of the term. Though they were connected with 
the Congregational church of Hopkinton for a period of fifty years, they 
worked harmoniously with the Baptist and Methodist Episcopal churches of 
Contoocook. In 1890 Dr. Wilson had a cataract, which threatened his sight, 
successfully removed from his eye. In the last years of his life his chief 
enjoyment was the reading of the leading newspapers and medical journals 
of the day as well as the choice works of the library. He died in Contoocook, 
April 30, 1896, having outlived by a full decade the Scriptural limit of human 
life. 



s 



Ceorge Augustus ifWarben 

EORGE AUGUSTUS MARDEN, son of Benjamin Franklin 
and Betsey (Buss) Marden, was born in Mont Vernon, New 
Hampshire, August 9, 1839. He was descended from Richard 
Marden, who took the oath of fidelity at New Haven, Con- 
necticut, in 1646, and is supposed to have come direct from 
England. The name Marden is said to have been originally 
"mass-y-dwr-dn," a Welsh combination, signifying "field of 
the water-camp." By contraction this became Mawarden and Marden. 
George A. Marden's preparatory education was obtained in Appleton Acad- 
emy in Mont Vernon, afterwards McCollom Institute. In later life he 
became president of the board of trustees of this school. In boyhood he 
was taught the shoemaker's trade by his father. He worked at that inter- 
mittently, and during vacations from the age of twelve till he was through 
college. He was graduated from Dartmouth in 1861, being the eleventh in 
rank in a class of fifty-eight. Among his classmates was Rev. William 
Jewett Tucker, afterwards president of the college. In 1875 Mr. Marden 
was commencement poet of the Phi Beta Kappa society, and in 1877 deliv- 
ered the commencement poem before the Dartmouth Association Alumni. 
He was president for each of these societies for the term of two years. 

Mr. Marden served three years during the Civil War. In November, 
1861, he enlisted as a private in Company G, Second Regiment of Berdan's 
United States Sharpshooters, and on December 12 of that year was mus- 
tered into the United States service as second sergeant. In April, 1862, he 
was transferred to the First Regiment of Sharpshooters, and served during 
the Peninsular campaign under McClellan from Yorktown to Harrison's 
Landing. On July 10, 1862, he was made first lieutenant and regimental 
quartermaster, which duty he held until January, 1863, when he became 
acting assistant adjutant-general of the Third Brigade, Third Division, 
Third Corps. He served in this position until the fall of 1863, taking part 
in the battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Wapping Heights, and 
was then ordered to detached service on Riker's Island, New York. Soon 
after, by his own request, he was sent back to his own regiment, with which 
he remained until it was mustered out in September, 1864. 

Coming back to New Hampshire, Mr. Marden entered the law office 
of Minot & Musgridge, at Concord, and also wrote for the Concord "Daily 
Monitor," then just established. In November, 1865, Mr. Marden pur- 
chased the Kanawha "Republican," a weekly paper at Charleston, West 
Virginia, which he edited until April, 1866. He then returned to New 
Hampshire and worked for Adjutant-General Head in compiling and editing 
the histories of the State's military organizations during the Civil War. 
In the meantime he was finding his true vocation in journalism. He wrote 
for the Concord "Monitor," and in July, 1866, became the Concord corre- 
spondent of the Boston "Advertiser." January i, 1867, he was made assist- 



312 (George 3u0ustu0 Q^atDen 

ant editor of the Boston "Advertiser," which position he held until the next 
September. At that time, in partnership with his classmate, Major E. T. 
Rowell, he purchased the Lowell "Daily Courier" and the Lowell "Weekly 
Journal," which he continued to conduct until his death, nearly forty years 
later. The partnership of Messrs. Marden and Rowell lasted for a quarter 
of a century, or until the Lowell Courier Publishing Company was formed, 
when both partners retained their interest in the corporation. In January, 
1895, this became the Courier-Citizen Company by consolidating with the 
paper of that name. The "Citizen" was made a one cent morning paper, and 
Mr. Marden continued in editorial charge of both papers. 

Mr. Marden soon became known as a speaker as well as a writer. His 
first vote was cast for Abraham Lincoln, and since 1867 there has been no 
election, State or National, when he did not appear on the platform. During 
the presidential campaign of 1896, in company with Major-General O. O. 
Howard, Major-General Daniel E. Sickles, General Russell A. Alger, and 
others, he addressed more than a million people. They travelled over eight 
thousand miles on a platform car, and spoke in fifteen different States of the 
Middle West. Mr. Marden's ready wit, which caused the Lowell "Courier" 
to be quoted all over New England, soon made him in demand as an after- 
dinner speaker, and for various celebrations like Dartmouth banquets. Old 
Home Week observances. Memorial Day or Grand Army reunions. In 1889 
and 1892 he spoke at the banquets of the New England Society held in New 
York on Forefather's Day. He considered these invitations the greatest 
honor ever accorded him. In 1873 Mr. Marden was elected to the Massachu- 
setts Legislature. He became clerk of the House in 1874, which office he 
held until he became speaker in 1883 and 1884, and in 1885 he was chosen 
to the State Senate. In 1885 he was appointed trustee of the Agricultural 
College at Amherst, Massachusetts. In 1888 he was elected treasurer of 
the Commonwealth, which office he held for five consecutive years, the con- 
stitutional limit. In 1899 he was made assistant treasurer of the United 
States at Boston, which office he held until his death, December 19, 1906. 
He became vice-president of the Hancock National Bank in Boston in 1895. 
Mr. Marden always retained a great love for the place of his birth, Mont 
Vernon, New Hampshire. Although his newspaper and legal residence was 
at Lowell, Massachusetts, he kept a summer home at Mont Vernon, which 
he visited every year. He owned much property there, built many fine 
houses, and was always the first to take hold of anything which promised 
to help the town. At the time of his lamented death, he was editing a his- 
tory of Mont Vernon, begun by C. J. Smith of that place. 

George A. Marden married, at Nashua, New Hampshire, December 10, 
1867, Mary Porter Fiske, daughter of Deacon David Fiske, of Nashua. 
They had two sons: Philip Sanborn, born in Lowell, January 12, 1874, who 
was graduated from Dartmouth College in 1894, and from Harvard Law 
School in 1898. He married, June 12, 1902, at Goffstown, New Hampshire, 
Florence Sophia Shirley, of Shirley Hill, Goffstown. Robert Fiske, born 
at Lowell, January 14, 1876, who was graduated from Dartmouth in 1898, 
married, June 12, 1901, Ella B. Pote, of East Boston. 



CDtotn ilurbanfe ^tfee 




^DWIN BURBANK PIKE was born in Haverhill, New Hamp- 
shire, April 7, 1845, the son of Isaac and Sarah Morse 
(Noyes) Pike, and the youngest of six children. He died 
at Pike, New Hampshire, August 24, 1908. Mr. Pike was 
a descendant, ninth in line, from John Pike, of Longford, 
Oxfordshire, England, who came to this country in 1635 
and settled in Newbury, Massachusetts. 
Owing to the death of his father, when he was about fourteen years of 
age, Edwin B. Pike was thrown upon his own resources, but he managed to 
study for a time at Haverhill Academy, Haverhill, New Hampshire, and 
also at Newbury Seminary, Newbury, Vermont. When he was about seven- 
teen years old he made his first trip selling whetstones, but thinking there 
was not enough opportunity in that line at the time, he took up other busi- 
ness. After selling specialties in the hardware and mill supply line for a 
few years, he became associated in the early seventies with the Enterprise 
Manufacturing Company, of Philadelphia, then in its infancy, but which 
since has become one of the largest concerns of its line in the world. He 
was the first travelling salesman for this company, and later, as their busi- 
ness increased, remained at the head of their sales force, representing the 
company at the famous Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia in 1876, and 
later at the Paris Exposition of 1878. On his return from the Paris Expo- 
sition in 1878, he suffered a severe attack of rheumatic fever and was 
obliged to give up travelling for a time. He had previously sold scythe- 
stones made by his brother, A. F. Pike, and after his illness decided to 
devote his time to the scythestone business. His unbounded energy and 
ability as a salesman resulted in the immediate and steady expansion of the 
scythestone business, and in the incorporation in 1884 of the A. F. Pike 
Manufacturing Company, with Alonzo F. Pike, president, and Edwin B. 
Pike as vice-president. Through his initiative a general line of oilstones, 
razor hones, and other sharpening, grinding and polishing stones was added. 
In 1889 the company was again enlarged by taking over the eastern scythe- 
stone quarries and properties of the Cleveland Stone Company, and in 1891, 
upon the failing in health of his brother, Alonzo F. Pike, he became president 
of the Pike Manufacturing Company, which ofiice he held until his death. 
Under his direction, driven by his tireless energy, the modest scythestone 
business established by his father and continued by his brother developed 
into the largest business of its kind in the world, until to-day the Pike name 
and trademark are known in every market of the civilized world. 

Mr. Pike's business activities demanded too much of his time to permit 
of his active participation in politics, although he had always a keen interest 
in public affairs. He was a member of the New Hampshire Constitutional 



314 dBDtaJin IButbanb pike 

Convention in 1902. He was instrumental in the establishment of a ceme- 
tery commission in the town of Haverhill, and was chairman of the commis- 
sion from its establishment in 1905 until his death. He was a lifelong 
Republican. Mr. Pike endeavored to enlist in the Union army at the age of 
eighteen, but was prevented by his mother from entering the service. Later 
he went South and served with the commissary and railroad department 
until the close of the war. Mr. Pike was vice-president, for New Hamp- 
shire, of the National Association of Manufacturers, and a member of the 
American Hardware Manufacturers Association. He was one of the char- 
ter members of the Pike Station Grange, No. 291. He was also a member 
of the Hardware Merchants' and Manufacturers' Club, of New York. In 
his religious affiliation he was a member of the Congregational church, of 
Haverhill, New Hampshire, and later one of the charter members and chief 
supporters of the Bethany Congregational Church, of Pike, New Hamp- 
shire, which was organized through his efforts. 

Mr. Pike married (first) in Salem, Massachusetts, Adelaide A. Miner, 
who died in 1887, leaving three children: Edwin Bertram, born July 24, 
1866, resident of Pike, New Hampshire; Winifred Alta, born May 21, 1869, 
later Mrs. Walter L. Emory, of Honolulu, Hawaii; and Archie Florence, 
born September 24, 1873, died December 15, 1887. Mr. Pike married 
(second) September 10, 1890, Harriet D. Tromblee, of Montpelier, Vermont. 
Their children were: Mary Dorothy, born May 20, 1892, died February 14, 
1896, and Harriet Katherine, born December 13, 1895, married, September 
25, 191 5, William V. M. Robertson, Jr., of Birmingham, Alabama. 

Mr. Pike was a man of very strong personality and of a most genial, 
generous disposition. He was a genuinely public spirited man, interested in 
everything that affected in any way the life of the community and town, 
and always worked for its betterment. The attractive school house and 
the store block in the little village of Pike are evidences in part of his 
generous interest in the welfare of the community. He took great pride in 
his business, often saying that he felt his company were producers in the 
best sense of the word, for they went into the earth and took from it that 
which did not impoverish it, but added in many ways to the benefit and 
comfort of his fellowmen. A quotation from an address delivered by Mr. 
Pike at one of the annual conferences of salesmen and department heads of 
the Pike Manufacturing Company expresses briefly the purpose actuating 
him in personal and business life: "It has been my intention and effort for 
years that whatever I touched should be benefited by my connection with 
it. * * * And that is a principle that I want to carry out in my own life 
and in the life of the Pike Manufacturing Company. Whatever we do let 
it be a benefit to all those with whom we come in contact. I want to put 
honesty and kindness, as well as push and perseverance, into our business." 



3(of)n Cpler 




[OHN TYLER, well known in Claremont as an inventor and 
builder, was a son of John Tyler and a grandson of Benjamin 
Tyler, both eminent mechanics. Benjamin, who settled in 
Claremont in the spring of 1776, built the first dam across 
the Sugar river at West Claremont, and was for many years 
one of the most public-spirited men in town. 

John Tyler was born in Claremont, March 26, 1818. He 
learned the trade of millwright, serving an apprenticeship of seven years, 
and was then for eight years foreman of the shop where he learned his trade 
in Barre, Vermont. He went to West Lebanon in 1850, and for several years 
did a large business in building mills, sometimes employing fifty men. He 
returned to Claremont in 1872. He was engineer and superintendent in 
building the Sugar River paper-mill, and was a principal stockholder and 
the president of the company. 

Mr. Tyler was the inventor of the Tyler turbine water-wheel, which he 
had patented in 1856, and which he manufactured for many years. His was 
the first iron water-wheel made, and nine different patents were subse- 
quently granted him for improvements upon it. These wheels found their 
way all over the country, some of them also finding their way abroad ; and 
for years they were considered the best turbine wheels manufactured, this 
fact being thoroughly developed some years ago by a comparative and com- 
petitive test of the products of other makers of similar wheels. He was also 
the inventor and patentee of Tyler's copper cylinder washer for washing 
paper stock. In 1874 he built the reservoir known as the Bible Hill Aqueduct, 
which supplies over two hundred families in Claremont village with pure 
fresh spring water for household purposes. He was a stockholder of the 
Ben Mere Inn at Sunapee Lake, also in the Woodsum Steamboat Company. 
In both of these enterprises Mr. Tyler was deeply interested. He not only 
used his influence to make Sunapee Lake what it is to-day, but he opened his 
purse wide to aid in its improvement. He was a far-seeing and sagacious 
business man. If he started into any kind of business that was backward 
in getting on to a paying basis, he labored the harder for it. He was a 
staunch Republican. He was a member of the Legislature in 1891-92, and his 
record was a clean one. He was a public-spirited, genial man; and in his 
death Claremont lost a most worthy citizen. He was a lover of good horses 
and in his stables could always be found the best blooded and handsomest 
to be had. In religious convictions he leaned toward the Universalist faith; 
and he always attended divine worship at the First Universalist Church, 
although never uniting with the society. He was a most liberal man and no 
worthy cause was brought to his notice that failed to receive assistance at 
his hands. He died at his home, November 28, 1896. 



3i6 



31of)n Cplet 



While a young man working at his trade in Barre, Vermont, he married 
Roxalana Robinson, of that town, who died on the first anniversary of their 
marriage. Not long after he married Miss Mary J. Smith, of Rutland, Ver- 
mont, with whom he lived for fifty years, she passing away at their home on 
Pleasant street. Mr. Tyler married for the third time, October 31, 1894, 
Miss Anna Maria, daughter of Taylor and Sybil (Lawton) Alexander, who 
survived him. 




Samuel Bmitl) ^age 




[AMUEL SMITH PAGE, who for more than forty years was 
one of the most esteemed residents of Hopkinton, was born 
September 30, 1822, in Dunbarton, New Hampshire. He 
was a descendant of Benjamin Page, who was born in 1640, 
in Dedham, fifty-seven miles northeast of London, England. 
In 1660, on account of religious differences, Benjamin came 
to America, locating in Haverhill, Massachusetts, where on 
September 21, 1666, he married Mary Whittier, who belonged to the family 
from which the poet, John G. Whittier, sprang. Their son, Jeremiah, the 
eldest of a family of sixteen, born September 14, 1667, was the next ancestor. 
He married Deborah Hendrick, of Newburyport, Massachusetts, July 2, 
1696; and they reared seven children, two sons and five daughters, the sons 
being Caleb and Joshua. He died in 1752. 

Caleb Page, the next in line of descent, was born August 16, 1705. and 
died in 1785. He married in 1728 or 1729 Ruth Wallingford, of Boston, 
who died in 1738. In 1740 he married a widow Carleton, of Newburyport, 
who weighed three hundred and fifteen pounds. She, together with a huge 
arm-chair, now in the possession of the Stark family, had to be carried to 
meeting on an ox sled. In 1749 Caleb Page removed from Haverhill, Massa- 
chusetts, to Atkinson, New Hampshire, where he is said to have owned 
land measuring one mile in opposite directions from the site of the present 
academy. In 1751 he sold his lands in Atkinson for his wife's weight in 
silver dollars, and located in Dunbarton, this county. The country was then 
infested with Indians; and his daughter Elizabeth, who later became the 
wife of General John Stark of Revolutionary fame, often stood, musket in 
hand, as guard at the rude block-house. In 1758 Governor Wentworth 
appointed Caleb Page captain of Provincials. The commission given to him 
on this occasion is copied in full in the "History of Dunbarton." Caleb, who 
is said to have had a noble and benevolent spirit, had ample means to indulge 
his generous impulses. His money, comprising golden guineas, silver 
crowns and dollars, was kept in a half-bushel measure under the bed. He 
owned many slaves. His house was the abode of hospitality and the scene 
of many a happy gathering. In 1753, previous to receiving his captain's 
commission, the governor sent him as a guide with Colonel Lowell, of Dun- 
barton, Major Talford, of Chester, and General John Stark, to mark out the 
road from Stevenstown, now Salisbury, to Coos. He was a firm patriot, and 
in 1775 was the first delegate from Dunbarton and Bow to the Provincial 
Congress. His children were: Caleb, Jeremiah, Elizabeth, and Molly. 
Caleb Page, Jr., who held a lieutenant's commission in the French and 
Indian War, together with his company was ambushed by Indians between 
Crown Point and Ticonderoga, and killed in the ensuing massacre with 



3i8 Samuel %mitb page 

several of his men, January 21, 1757. Elizabeth, born in 1736, who died in 
1817, married General John Stark, by whom she had eight children; namely, 
John, Caleb, Archibald, Charles, Ellen, Polly, Sophia, and Frank. Molly 
married Deacon James Russell, of Bow. 

Jeremiah Page, born in August, 1730, died November 29, 1807. I" I745 
he bought land in Dunbarton, and from that time until his death was actively 
identified with local afifairs. He served as justice of the peace, and did most 
of the surveying for Hillsborough county. In 1784 he was appointed judge 
of the New Hampshire courts. In 1752 he married Sarah Merrill, of Bil- 
lerica, Massachusetts, who was born in 1732, and died September 5. 1807. 
Their children were : Caleb, the grandfather of Samuel Smith Page ; Sarah, 
born in Dracut, Massachusetts, December 24, 1754, who married A. Stinson, 
and died in 1835. Jeremiah, a native of Dunbarton, born in 1756, who died 
in 1842; Achsah, born September 25, 1759, who died in 1831, and whose suc- 
cessive husbands were first B. Plummer, Esq., who died in 1816, and Captain 
C. Coffin; Elizabeth, born August 2, 1765, who married William Tenney, and 
died August 22, 1838; John, born in 1767, who married M. Story in 1810, and 
died August 14, 1837; and Ruth, born in 1770, who married Dr. S. Sawyer, 
and died June 27, 1804. Caleb Page, the third bearer of the name, was born 
in Dracut, Massachusetts, in April, 1751, and died June 3, 1816. His wife, 
Hannah, bore him seven children, three of the sons being named Caleb, 
John, and Peter Carleton. Peter Carleton Page, the father of Samuel S. 
Page, was born July i, 1783, and died October 15, 1858. He married Miss 
Lucy Smith, who was born November 26, 1792, in Hopkinton. They reared 
three sons ; namely, Caleb, Samuel Smith, and George. 

Samuel Smith Page received his education in Pembroke^ Hopkinton, 
and New Hampton. Ill health forced him to abandon further study; and at 
the age of eighteen years he began teaching school in Weston, Massachu- 
setts, where his mathematical ability was well displayed. A pupil relates that 
when the text-book was completed the young teacher propounded questions 
that, he said, had baffled Dartmouth professors, the class often spending its 
energies for a whole week on some of them. After his marriage he bought 
the Greenough homestead on Dimond Hill, on the dividing line between 
Concord and Hopkinton, and there successfully carried on general farming 
until his death, which occurred on Thursday, October 22, 1896. 

In 1852, June 10, Mr. Page married Miss Ellen Maria Cutter, of Weston, 
Massachusetts, one of his pupils, who was five years younger than himself. 
He was a man of great intelligence and force of character, having the , 
courage of his convictions, which he was never unwilling to express or 
defend. He served several terms as moderator of Dunbarton, was a member 
of the superintending school committee, and in 1864 and 1865 was one of the 
selectmen of Hopkinton. In 1840 he united with the Baptist church of his 
native town, having been converted during a revival, and for more than half 
a century after was devoted to the Christian work of that denomination as 
well as to the broader needs of humanity, his large and loving heart beating 



Samuel %mitb Page 319 

in sympathy with those of every sect and clime. Throughout his long illness 
he was a most patient and cheerful sufferer, trusting serenely in the good- 
ness of the Divine Master. His death was a sad loss, not only to his imme- 
diate family, but to the community in which he had so long lived. The only 
child of Mr. and Mrs. Page was a daughter — Lucie Elizabeth, who became 
the wife of Arthur Borden, of Denver, Colorado. 




Herman HM. 6xttm 




ERMAN WELLS GREENE, formerly a lawyer of consider- 
able note in Hopkinton, was born there, April ii, 1836, son 
of Herman H. and Ellen Chase (Little) Greene. After 
receiving- his early education in the public schools of Hop- 
kinton and at Pembroke and Gilmanton Academies, he 
became interested in the legal profession, and read law with 
George & Foster, of Concord, and later with Beard & Nick- 
erson, of Boston, Massachusetts. On his twenty-first birthday he was 
admitted to the Suffolk county bar. At first he practised with Charles E. 
Pike, afterward with Ithmar W. Beard and James P. Sullivan. Subse- 
quently, on account of failing health, he returned to his native place, and did 
not practise for about seven years. On resuming his profession he was for 
a time associated with Carlos G. Hawthorne. In politics he was an enthu- 
siast, and he held various offices of trust. He was moderator of the town 
meeting for over twenty years all together, was superintendent of schools 
for five years, and State Representative in 1881, 1889, and 1891. In 1891 he 
took an active part in the debates of the legislature, and served on the judi- 
cial and railroad committees. He was county solicitor of Merrimack county 
five years, during which period he was obliged to be in Concord much of 
the time. In early life a Democrat, he afterward became a Republican, and 
served on the Republican State Committees, and generally attended the 
conventions. He was for a number of years curator of the Hopkinton Anti- 
quarian Society, and was chairman of the library trustees. 

Before he was of age, Mr. Greene married Miss Frances Adeline Willard, 
of Hopkinton, who was brought up by her grandmother, Mrs. Sophia Teb- 
bets. Mrs. Greene died March 2, 1873, leaving one son, Willard T. On Sep- 
tember 18, 1877, Mr. Greene married for his second wife Miss Anstice Irene 
Clarke, daughter of Daniel W. and Ruhamah (Cochran) Clarke, of Canaan, 
New Hampshire. Mrs. Clarke, who was left a widow by the death of her 
first husband, married Judge Horace Chase when Anstice was but nine years 
old ; and they went to Hopkinton to live. 

Mr. Greene was an accomplished public speaker, ready with telling 
argument and bright repartee. He was versatile and quick to discern the 
drift of legislation. The important positions intrusted to him showed that 
he had the esteem and confidence of all. For years he was president of the 
State Republican League, and with that body attended the Baltimore Con- 
vention. Throughout his own State he was a noted speaker. In making 
public addresses he used no notes except for headings, and never wrote but 
one address. In his legislative career he was associated both in an official 
and warmly personal way with Dr. Gallinger, of Concord, the well-known 
United States Senator. 



i^ctman m, (2)tecne 



321 



Mr. Greene died of apoplexy, March i, 1896, at the age of sixty years. 
He had felt that death was impending, and had shortly before made the 
most orderly settlement of all his affairs. He was a tall, well-proportioned 
man. in manners affable and courteous, and in disposition calm and cheerful. 
Always a man of correct habits, his life was well-nigh blameless. He was 
an unusually well-read man; and he had strong tendencies to art, especially 
to music. A warm affection existed between him and his mother, partly 
because he was the only son left her. He remained with her for this reason, 
and these family ties kept him from going elsewhere and opening a law 
office. While he was not a member of any secret society, he belonged to St. 
Andrew's Episcopal Church, of which he was warden. The latter church 
contains a beautiful family memorial window designed by his niece, a noted 
artist. Miss Elsie Roberts, of Philadelphia. 




'Mm 



3o{)n g), Ittmball 




OHN SHACKFORD KIMBALL was an enterprising lawyer 
of Boston and a business man of Burlington, Iowa. A son 
of David and Abigail (Perkins) Kimball, he was born at 
Pembroke, New Hampshire, April 28, 1812. His descent 
from Michael Kimball, who married Bettie Runnells, came 
through David Kimball of the second generation and David 
Kimball of the third, who married Abigail Perkins. Mr. 
Kimball's parents died at Pembroke when he was thirteen years old, leaving 
nine children — Betsey, Asa, Perkins, John Shackford, Abigail, Sarah Towle 
(widow of Timothy Colby, of Concord), Joseph, Mary Lewis (widow of 
Samuel B. Wright, of Burlington, Iowa), and Harriet. Mary, who was about 
five years old at the death of her parents, subsequently lived in the family 
made famous at that time by the noted Prescott murder. Perkins, after 
spending some time in the printing business, was later employed in the 
Boston custom-house, and then kept a store in partnership with J. Frank 
Hoyt in Concord. On retiring from business, he returned to Hopkinton, 
and died there December 15, 1876. He first married Lydia Reed Wilde, of 
Boston, a sister of Joseph Wilde, of the well-known firm of Lawrence, Wilde 
& Co., furniture dealers, Cornhill, Boston. His second marriage was made 
with Savalla Mason, of Grafton, New Hampshire, who survived him. with 
one daughter, Sarah Underwood Kimball. 

When a young man, John Shackford Kimball went to Concord and 
worked in a bakery. Afterward he entered Hill & Sherburne's printing 
office, and there learned book and job printing. While yet new in this occu- 
pation, he gained considerable fame as a card printer by the introduction of 
enamel work. In his school life at New Hampton, New Hampshire, he was 
an associate of the Hon. John Wentworth, and was one of the founders of 
the Social Fraternity Library. He was clerk in the old Franklin book 
store in Concord for a time, and was associated in the printing business with 
his brother Perkins. 

From Concord he went to New Haven, Connecticut. Later he was for 
three years a night clerk in the post-office at Portland, Maine. While there 
he read law with District Attorney Haynes. Afterward he took the law 
course at Harvard College, and was associated in practice with the noted 
Robert S. Rantoul, of Boston. In 1838 he went to Burlington, Iowa, where 
his youngest brother, Joseph, was conducting a general store in company 
with Nathaniel Chase from Warner, New Hampshire. Mr. Chase soon 
dying. Mr. Kimball bought out the latter's interest in the business; and he 
and Joseph were partners till the latter's death. The firm then became 
J. S. Kimball & Co., the company being his brother-in-law, S. B. Wright. 
Shortly after starting the business, prompted to the step by his failing 



31ot)n ^. mmbm 323 

health, he retired from the legal profession, and came east in the capacity of 
buyer for the firm. The sales of the firm in the course of time increased 
from eight or nine thousand dollars a year to more than one million dollars, 
this being the largest business of the kind in the State. In 1863 the business 
cleared above all expenses one hundred and ten thousand dollars upon an 
investment of three hundred thousand dollars. In 1864 quarters were 
secured in Chicago, but owing to Mr. Kimball's ill health nothing was done 
there. He, however, outlived all the partners he ever had except Mr. 
Wyman, formerly a clerk of the firm, and Erastus Chamberlain, who was 
sent to the firm from Massachusetts. In 1866 Mr. Kimball sold out to 
William Bell, a Scotchman, and retired from the business. In 1854 he pur- 
chased a summer residence at Hopkinton, which became his permanent 
home, but his business interests were still with the Burlington firm. He 
spent much time in Boston, especially during the winter. Another of his 
associates in the law business was General N. P. Banks, who had been one of 
his fellow-students. His services in the legislature were mainly on the judi- 
ciary and banking committees. He was an able, persistent, and forcible 
speaker. He was a careful student, was well read in history, and had 
attained considerable knowledge of German, so that in his later life he was 
able to undertake translations from the German. He paid a bounty to the 
first ten men who enlisted in Hopkinton, besides advancing the money for 
the State bounty. 

Mr. Kimball married Mary E. Stevens, daughter of Dr. John Stevens, 
of Goflfstown, New Hampshire, afterward a noted physician of Charlestown 
and Boston. She was brought up in Boston and was married there. The 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Kimball were: John Stevens, Robert Rantoul, 
George Alexander, Mary Grace, and Kate Pearl. 

Mr. Kimball contributed liberally to all the churches, while he had no 
professed creed. He did much to assist in local developments, and was most 
active in all progressive movements. His burial place is in Forest Hills 
Cemetery, Boston, Massachusetts. 



INDEX 



INDEX 



Abbott, Amos, 282 

Hannah M., 282 

John, 282 
Amidon, Charles J., 262 

Jacob, 262 

Mary J., 263 

Philip F., 262, 263 
Atwood, Ada F., 250 

Daniel G., 119, 120 

Daniel W., 121 

David, 119, 120 

Isaac, 120 

John C, 249 

Joseph, 249 

Margaret A., 120 

Mary D., 250 

Warren B., 250 

William H., 250 

Balcom, Cortez, 143 

George E., 145 

James E., 143 

Sarah M., 145 
Batchelder, Annie M., 86 

Frederick W., 86 
Blanchet, Bertha A., 142 

Celina Z., 142 

Emile A., 142 

George, 140 

George A., 142 

Norbert, 140 
Blood, Aretas, 26, 27 

James, 26 

Lavinia K., 29 

Nathaniel, 26 

Sewall, 26 
Boynton, Charles H., Dr., 21S 

Ebenezer, 218 

Mary H., 220 

William, 218 
Branch, Oliver E., 302, 304 

Sarah M., 306 

William, 302 

William W., 303 
Briggs, Frank O., 135 



James, 293 

James F., 133, 293, 294 

John, 133 

Mary E., 295 

Roxanna, 134 

Carpenter, David M., 48 

Georgia B., 49 

John, 47 

Josiah, 47, 48 

William, 47 
Cass, Arthur T., 297 

Benjamin, 296 

Mary E., 297 

William T., 296 
Chandler, Adam, 59 

Fanny R., 62, 66 

Flora A., 62 

George B., 59, 66 

Nathan S., i 

William, 59 

William E., i 
Cheney, Benjamin P., 210, 211 

Benjamin P., Jr., 213 

Charles W., 290 

Charles W., Jr., 289, 290 

Elizabeth, 213 

Jesse, 211 

John, 211 

Lizzie J., 292 
Churchill, Cassandra S., 68 

Henry, 67, 68 

Samuel, 67 
Clark, Belinda, 109 

Edward W., 109 

Elizabeth M., no 

John, 103, 104 

Lois C, 105 

Lorana, 105 

Mary, 104 

Noah, 103, 104 

Noah S., 106 
Cody, Ellen, 79 

Mary G., 79 

Michael, Tj 



328 

Walter, y] 

Walter F., 79 
Corbin, Austin, 307 

Austin, Jr., 307 

Hannah M., 308 
Coughlin, John, Gen., 80 
Cummings, Harriet S., 257 

Isaac, 255 

Joseph, 256 

Mary R., 257 

William H., 255, 256 
Currier, Hannah A., 253 

Lucretia, 253 

Mary, 253 

Moody, 251 

Delaney, Edward J., Dr., 151 

Emma P., 151 

Katherine E., 151 

Martin H., 151 

Patrick, 150 
Dennett, Abbie H., 173 

Abigail, 172 

Alexander, 171 

Charles, 171 
Drake, Abraham, 52, 53 

Betsey, 54 

Frank J., 54 

James, Col., 52, 53 

James, Maj., 53 

Nathaniel S., 54 

Robert, 52 

Simon, 53 
Drew, Amos W., 244, 245 

Benjamin, 245 

Julia E., 246 

Samuel, 244 
Duffy, Dominic S., Rev., 154 

Francis P., 152 

James B., Dr., 154 

John M., 154 

Mary A., 153 

Rose M., 154 
Dwinell, Demas, 56 

George P., Dr., 57 

Harvey, 56 

Minnie L., 57 

Eaton, George R., 277 
John, 277 



SnDci 



Sarah J., 278 

Stephen W., 277 
Egan, Jennie, 150 

Maria, 150 

Martin, 149 

Martin H., Rev., 149 
Elliott, Albert, 14 

Alonzo, 14, 15 

Alonzo, Jr., 17 

Ella R., 17 

Joshua, 14 

Medora, 17 

Faulkner, Charles S., 155, 156 

Edmund, 156 

Francis, 155 

Mary J., 157 

Sallie E., 157 
Felton, Aaron, 40 

David D., 130 

Frank P., 42 

James B., 131 

Mary E., 42 

Mary F., 131 

Silas A., 40, 130 
French, Emma, 24 

Leonard, Dr., 23 

Leonard M., Dr., 23 
Puller, Carl S., 24 

Margaret L., 24 

Gallinger, Jacob, 3 . 

Jacob H., 3 

Mary A., 3 
George, Cyrus A., 204 

Edgar W., 204 

James, 203 

James G., 203, 204 

Rebecca P., 204 
Gilbert, Alice, 299 

Colgate, 298 

Frederick M., 298 
Goodell, David H., 259 

Emma S., 261 

Hannah J., 261 
Graves, Caroline E., 285 

David J., 284 

Leland J., Dr., 284 
Green, Harry D., 275 

Henry, 274 



JnDtE 



3*9 



Henry F., 274 

Jennie M., 275 
Greene, Anstice I., 320 

Frances A., 320 

Herman H., 320 

Herman W., 320 
Guild, George A., 97 

John E., 97 

Julia S., 98 

Hayes, Charles W., 199, 200 
Clara C, 201 
Cora B., 169 
Elihu, 200 
Ellen M., 201 
Harry T., 169 
Hezekiah, 200 
John, 169, 199 
Jonathan, 200 
Joseph, 168 
Joseph O., 168, 169 
Samuel D., 199, 200 
Hill, Anna S., 45 
Bushrod W., 43, 44 
Caleb, 238 
Carrie R., 239 
Gardner C, Dr., 238 

Helen M., 46 
J. Frank, 45 

Rebecca F., 239 

William H., 239 
Hodge, Jeremiah, 19 

John, 19 

Judith A., 22 

Lucy E., 22 
Holt, David, 138 

Ralph J., 138 

Sally A., 138 
Howe, Charles, 176 

Ellen P., 176 
Howes, Benjamin A., 138 

Benjaman T., Capt., 136 

Maria A., 138 

Ralph H., 138 
Hoyt, Ellen O., 10 

Sarah A., 10 

Sarah F., 10 

William G., 8 
Hubbard, Abel, 70 

Clara, 71 



Isabella M., 71 

William F., 70, 71 

William W., 70 
Hussey, Celia A. E., 162 

Freeman A., 161 

John, 161 
Hyde, Mary E., 33 

Theodore M., 33 

Jordan, Chester B., 214 
Chester B., Jr., 216 
Gladstone, 216 
Ida R., 216 
Johnson, 214 

Kelly, Harriett N., 185 

John, 184 

John P. P., 184 
Kimball, Benjamin, 116 

Caleb, 116 

Charles C, 221 

Charlotte, 1 18 

Clara M., 118 

David, 322 

Edward P., 127 

Edward T., 129 

Gazilda C, 221 

John, 88, 116 

John S., 322 

Joseph, 116 

Louis M., 221 

Maria, 118 

Martha J., 128 

Martha S., 129 

Mary E., 323 

Maurice E., 221 

Newell S., 88 

Reuben, Rev., 127 

Richard, 116, 127 

Roy E., 221 

Ladd, Catharine S., 228 

Daniel, 226 

Edward W., 226 

Gideon, 226 

Seneca A., 226, 227 

Susan, 228 

Virginia B., 228 
Lombard, Darwin, 235 

Ellen L., 235 



330 



Sndei 



John, 234 
Joseph E., 234 
Lyman, Dr., 234 
Lyman M., 235 

Magoon, Charles S., 146 

Naomi, 147 

Stewart, 146 
Marden, Benjamin F., 311 

George A., 311 

Mary P., 312 

Philip S., 312 

Robert F., 312 
Martin, Benjamin F., 64 

Mary A., 66 

Truman, 64 
Meader, Benjamin, 187 

Daniel, 187 

Effie, 188 

John, 187 

Levi, 187 

Stephen, 187 

Stephen C, 187 
Moseley, Abbie, 95 

Franklin, 93 

John, 93 

John F., 93, 94 

Samuel, 94 
Moulton, Andrew M., 181 

Caleb, 181 

Caroline A., 181 

Helen G., 182 

Walter H., 181 

Noyes, Clara L, 242 
Gertrude, 242 
Michael, 241 
Parker J., 241 

Oliver, Alice, 220 
William W., 220 

Page, Benjamin, 317 
Caleb, 317. 318 
Ellen M., 318 
Jeremiah, 317, 318 
Peter C, 318 
Samuel S., 317, 318 

Patterson, Alexander, 267 
David N., 267 



John, 267 

Maria, 268 

Sarah W., 268 
Perkins, Anna M., 281 

George H., Com., 279 

Hamilton E., 279 
Phipps, Ellen M., 248 

James M., 247 

James S., 247 
Pike, Adelaide A., 314 

Edwin B., 313 

Harriet D., 314 

Isaac, 313 

John, 313 
Poore, Caroline F., 92 

Darwin M., 90, 91 

Fred H., 92 

George, 90 

John, 90 

Joseph, 91 
Pope, Elizabeth P., 195 

John P., 195 

Susan A., 195 
Prescott, Judith C, loi 

Stephen, 100 

Stephen, Jr., 100 

Ramsdell, Anne M., 39 

Arthur D., 39 

Charles T., 39 

Eliza D., 39 

George A., 35 

Harry W., 39 
Ray, John C, 31, 32 

Sarah A., 33 
Rollins, Carie E., 192 

Daniel G., 190 

Daniel G., Jr., 194 

Edward A., 191 

Franklin J., 191 

George F., 191 

John, 190 

Mary P., 192 

Susan B., 191 
Rutledge, Annie M., 12 

Arthur, 11 

Arthur J., 13 

Hugh E., 13 

James, 11 

James H., 12 



3nD« 



331 



Sawyer, Charles H., 269, 270 
Frederick T., 265 
Jabez, 265 
Jonathan, 269 
Sarah S., 266 
Susan E., 271 
Thomas, 269 
Shaw, Amantha C, 75 
Elijah M, 73, 74 
Elijah R., 76 
Irving C, 75 
Mary H., 75 
Roger, 73 
Sleeper, Eugene H., 230 
Finlay P., 230 
Francis S., 230 
Hannah, 230 
Helen E., 231 
Hiram, 230 
Jane F., 230 
Smith, Ammi, 205 
Archibald L., 208 
Charles C, 182 
Emma, 208 
John B., 205 
Josiah C, 182 
Norman S., 208 
Thomas, 205 
Stearns, Henry C, Dr., 223 
Joseph P., 224 

Josiah H., 223 

Mary L., 224 
Straw, Charlotte S., 288 

Ezekiel A., Gov., 286 

James B., 286 
Sturtevant, Ada E., 237 

Edward H., 236 

Ezra T., 236 

Hiram, 236 

Lemuel, 236 

Tessier, Anna, 124 

Charles, 123 

Charles F., 122, 123 

Ernest F., 124 

George O., Dr., 124 

Leon A., 124 
Thayer, David, 5 

Herbert F., S 

Minnie F., 6 



Tibbitts (Tibbetts), Avie E., 166 
Charlotte F., 166 
Clarinda W., 166 
Henry, 164 
Ichabod, 165 
Jeremiah, 164, 165 
John, 165 
John W., 164, 165 
Samuel H., 164, 165 
Titus, Augustin C, 272 
Jeremy, 272 
Judith H., 273 
Tuck, Amos, 11 1 

Catherine P., 115 

Edward, iii 

John, III 

Jonathan, iii 

Robert, 11 1 

Sarah A., 115 
Twitchell, Adams, 232 

Cassius M. C, 232 

Cyrus, 232 
Tyler, Anna M., 316 

Benjamin, 315 

John, 315 

Mary J., 316 

Roxalana, 316 

Varney, David B., 83, 84 
Emma L., 86 
Harriet B., 86 
Luther, 84 
William, 84 

Walker, Andrew, 174 

Ann M., 176 

Charles K., 174, 176 

George, Rev., 174 

Henrietta C, 176 

James, 174. i75 

James, Capt., 175 
Wallace, Albert, 196 

Ebenezer G., 196 

Fannie S., 197 

Louis B., 197 

Rosalie K., 197 
Webster, Daniel, 125 

Ebenezer, 125 

Thomas, 125 
Westgate, Lucretia M., 301 



33* 

Nathaniel W., 300 
Phebe J., 301 
Tyler, 300 
Wheat, Arthur F., Dr., 159 
Irene A., 159 
Nathaniel, Dr., 158 
Thomas, Dr., 158 



Intti 



Whitehouse, Charles S., 178 

Ellen F., 179 

Nicholas V., 178 
Wilson, Elizabeth, 310 

Jeremiah W., Dr., 309 

Job, Dr., 309 

Thomas, 309 




2375 






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