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Full text of "A memorial history of the Campbells of Melfort, Argyllshire, which includes records of the different highland and other families with whom they have intermarried"

A MEMORIAL HISTORY 






Campbells 0f 



ARCVI.LSIilKK. 




THE PASS OF MELFORT 




A MEMORIAL HISTORY 




01 







ARGYLLSHIRE. 

IV 111CII INCLUDES RECORDS OF THE Dll-FEREXT 11 K',11 l.AXl> AX]), 
OTHER FAMILIES WITH WHOM TIf/-Y II All. 
INTERMARRIED. 



BY Y 



M. 






-AIR A' inriiiKAtiii) CHAOMH so nir IIIAI.I:H r\i\i." 

"OF III! l.KI AT \\|i (,OOD WHO ARK CON ' 



for Subscribers anil 



(Tirtulation. 



LONDON. 

SIMMONS it HOTTKX. SHOE LAM-.. K.C. 




[882. 





Campbells of M.-lfort, Aixyll.sM,.-, .. v^fil,,., .),i,.|, i,,,-i,,,i. 

Highland nu.l ..tli.-r Kmnili.'* with whom t> . with 

l.y M. i). ( ;,,,, i.||, i,,,rf,, 
and cloth, I'rinl.'il f,,r mf,*-, 




PREFACE. 




HE desire to preserve some record or memorial of the origin and 
descent of the Family of Campbell of Melfort, has been inspired 
by the wish to perpetuate the noble and patriotic duty of a race 
during all time remarkable for their fidelity to their sovereign and 
to the chief of their clan. We are instructed by the Highest 
Authority that the glory of children are their fathers ; in this belief, and in expressing 
the hope that the honourable devotion to duty in the past may be emulated in future 
generations, I have been induced to undertake this labour of love, and to collate the 
materials I have put on record. 

In my researches, finding frequent mention of intermarriages between the families 
of Campbells of Melfort, Achalader, Barcaldine, Lochend, Kinloch, Dunstaffnage, 
and Duntroon, MacDougall of MacDougall, Maclachlan of Maclachlan, and Cameron 
of Lochiel, I thought it might interest were some mention of each included in this 
memorial of the Melfort family. 

In bidding my worthy clansmen and fair clanswomen farewell, I do so with hearty 
thanks for their sympathy in my labours, wishing prosperity and happiness to all who 
may be sufficiently interested to devote a moment to the perusal of these, I fear, but 
imperfect records of a family, whose lands, now possessed by strangers, might otherwise 



vi PREFACE. 

be forgotten. We may say with Ossian, " The chiefs of other times are departed ; 
another race shall arise." 

Lastly, I beg to express my thanks to my friend, I may say kinsman, Mr. 
J. R. Scott, F.S.A., for his kind advice and valuable help. The first idea of 
collecting these Melfort records was awakened by the perusal of his valuable and 
standard work both of family and historical interest in which he perpetuates the 
records of the Scott (Baliol) family of Scots Hall, Kent. 

To members of my own family, my recognition of their kind assistance is also 
due, and hereby tendered. 

MARGARET OLYMPIA CAMPBELL. 
December, 1881. 




CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

HISTORY, LINEAGE, AM) PEDIGREES I. VII. OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT . i 

RECORD, LINEAGE, AND PEDIGREE VIII. OF THE CAMPBELLS OF ACHALADER . . 20 

RECORD, LINEAGE, AND PEDIGREE IX. OF THE MACDOUGALLS OF MACDOUGALL . 50 

RECORD, LINEAGE, AND PEDIGREE X. OF THE CAMPBELLS OF LOCHEND . . .56 

RECORD, LINEAGE, AND PEDIGREE XI. OF THE CAMPBELLS OF KINLOCH . . 63 

SHORT NOTICES OF THE FAMILIES OF CAMPBELLS OF BARCALDINE, MACLACHLAN 
OF MACLACHLAN, CAMERON OF LOCHIEL, AND THE CAMPBELLS OF DUNSTAFF- 
NAGE AND DUNTROON . ... . . 72 

PEDIGREES OF THE DESCENDANTS IN THE FEMALE LINE OF THE CAMPBELLS OF 

MELFORT, XII. XVIII. . . 85 

APPENDIX. 

CHARTERS AND DOCUMENTS . . .109 

A LAMENT . . . . ... .117 

NOTES . .123 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



THE PASS 01 MKLFORT . . Frontispiece. 

i KKST, ARMS, AND liAIXiKS OK TIIK CAMPBELLS OF ARGYLL To face page I 

MKMORIAL CROSS . . ' . ,,6 

I.IKKNKSSKS 01 SOME MIMIIKRS OF THK MKLFORT FAMILY .. "8 



ERRATA. 

Page 13, for 1264, read 1254. 

19, Pedigree III., for Handon, read Hendon. 
28, Pedigree IV., for 13 read 16. 
34, Note IV, for 1842, read 1846. 



dust, Jtrms, anfr Hatops nf tb Campbells of 




THE P><><; MVRTLE IS THE BADGE OF THE CAM I'llKI.I.S. 
A FlSH IS ALSO BORNE BY THEM AS A BAI1C.E. 

THE MAGPIE is THE BIRD OF THE CLAN ; 

TRADITION SAYS, OF EVII. OMEN. 





A HISTORY 



OF THE 



CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT 

( PATRONYMIC, MACNIELL), 

%ohring Bfswnt from tlj* (Elan CampbHl of 



This History is compiled from CHARTERS, RECORDS, and HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS. 




HE lands and Barony of Melfort were granted by King David Bruce 
to Sir Archibald Campbell, Knight of Lochaw, for his loyalty and 
faithful service, to be held by the said Archibald and his heirs male 

of the king and his heirs for service usual and wont, dated at Aberdeen, 

2nd May, 1343. 

There is also a confirmation of the same, dated i4th March, 1368. In this last 
Charter there is notice of Duncan MacDuine, Baron of Lochaw, as progenitor of the 
Earls of Argyll. 

Extracts from Royal Commission on Historical .l/.S'.S'.j/rtfw Argyll MSS., 
by W. Fraser, Esq. 



2 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 

The progenitor of the Campbells of Kenmor (now Melfort) is described in the 
Argyll records as Niel, grandson of Sir Kiel Campbell, and son of Sir 
by a daughter of Ildhui of Mull ; a lineal descent from father to son is clearly 
shown until the death of Colonel John Campbell in 1861, who was succeeded by 1 
nephew. 

Colonel John Campbell sold the lands of his forefathers in 1 838. The lands in the 
lordship of Melfort were bestowed on Niel and his descendants. There is no record of 
the exact date. 

The first charter now in possession bears date ist September, 1502. It is by Sir 
Archibald Campbell, in favour of Nigel, who on the decease of his father, Dugald, 
surrendered the lands to his chief of clan, according to the then usage ; each heir, on 
succeeding, received a fresh charter granting him the lands. 

In each charter a minute description of the different farms and islands is given. 
The charter of 1 502, by its details, clearly shows that earlier charters existed. The 
chief of clan never renewed the grant of lands without the legal deeds showing titles to 
them. As the lands of Argyll were twice forfeited to the crown, many of the older 
charters and MSS. have been lost in transfer ; have perished by age or lack of 
due care. 

According to the Melfort charters and deeds, it would appear that the lands of 
Melfort were strictly entailed, and that failing the Campbells of Melfort, they would 
revert to the chief of clan and his heirs. They were held, as was the usage in those 
times, on the tenour of military service ; the Campbells of Melfort had also in addition 
to provide, fully manned, a galley of six oars (afterwards eight), for the service of 
their chief. 

It was usual for those who held their land from their chief to pay a tribute in kind. 
The Melforts were exempt from this ; but the heir on succeeding had to throw down a 
glove at the cross of Inverary, in token of fealty, and that he would support his chief 
and fight in his service. These ancient customs and usages became obsolete when the 
Duke of Argyll resigned his feudal privileges into the hands of the sovereign, about 
the, time of the union of the two countries. 

One of these ancient feudal customs was revived to do honour to the present Duke 
of Argyll when he brought home his bride. Twelve of the clan who had held their 
lands of their chief of clan, amongst them Colonel John Campbell of Melfort, held each 
a halbert in front of the castle, in presence of the Duke and Duchess, on their arrival, to 
show they were ready to defend the interests of their chief to the last. 



A HISTORY 01 THE CAM IT.KI.I.S (>! MI-.I.H >]; I . 3 

It may be interesting now to record an old custom peculiar to the Campbells ol 
Dunstaffnage, Duntroon, and Mdfort. When the head of the family died, the chid 
mourners would be the other two lairds ; one supported the head to the grave, the other 
walked before the corpse. In this manner friendship took the plan- of the nearest con- 
sanguinity, for even the eldest son was not permitted to interfere with this arrangement. 
This legendary custom was carried out, for the last time, at the funeral of Colonel John 
Campbell, 1861, when Dunstaffnage took his placet as chief mourner. 

From historical records, it is shown that the descendants of the Argylls followed 
the fortunes of their chief, and we find John Campbell of Melfort disinherited, and land- 
forfeited to the crown and bestowed on the Earl of Perth, 1681, reign of James II. 
of England. The Earl of Perth still holds the title of Earl of Melfort. At this period 
the chief of clan was the Earl of Argyll, who was beheaded in 1685 ; he was son of the 
good Marquis who suffered a like fate in 1661. John Campbell the younger, of 
Melfort, Lord Niel Campbell, of Ardmaddy, brother of the Earl, and others, \\ 
likewise condemned for treason, 1681. In 1669 Campbell of Melfort, with others, were 
appointed to raise supplies in Argyllshire. 

In 1689 the title of Earl and the lands were restored to Lord Lome, 
son of the late Earl. He was one of the few Scots peers who came from Holland and 
landed at Torbay, 1688, with the Prince of Orange, afterwards William III. In 1690 
a petition was sent up to Parliament for compensation for losses sustained by ravages 
committed by the troops of the Duke of Gordon, Marquis of Athol, and others. Amongst 
the sufferers a long list is given of damages and losses sustained in cattle and other pro- 
perty by the Melforts (or Kenmors, as then designated). In this list is given tin- 
names of the followers of the Melforts the MacDermits, MacColls, MacCallums, 
MacOran, and others who occupied the different farms. These names are now there 
unknown ; they have all passed away. 

We have also a record of John Campbell of Melfort, and his son Dugald, sending in 
estimates of their losses in 1643 by the raid of Alister Macdonald, called Colkitto, from 
being left-handed, a Scoto- Irishman, who landed from Ireland on the west coast of 
Scotland, with a large body of auxiliaries, to join Montrose. The following story is 
related of this raid : Colkitto and his men devastated the whole country, burning and 
destroying all before them, and overrunning the lands of Melfort. On arriving at the 
house of Ardinstur, they found only the lady of Melfort and her attendants; all the 
men were out with their chief, and were then lying in wait for Montrose. The lady 
received Colkitto with courtesy and hospitality, and he was so won by her fearlessness 
and kindness, that on taking leave he gave orders that her house and possessions should 
be held sacred. What was his dismay when upon ascending a hill at some distance, he 
saw the house in flames ! One of his men had remained behind, and had thus rewarded 
the hospitality she had shown them. Colkitto, furious that his promise to the lady 



4 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 

should be broken, caused the miscreant to be hanged on the top of the hill ; it is still 
known in Gaelic as " Tom na crocken," viz., " hill of hanging." 

The house of Ardinstur was rebuilt. It was occupied by the family until 1808, 
when a new house, on a different part of the property, was erected by Capt. Archibald 
Campbell. The first house was called Fernoch ; it was situated on the part of the 
estate of that name ; some of the old letters and papers are dated from it. 

In the charters and deeds they are called Campbells of Kenmor in the lordship ot 
Melfort. Kenmor is a conspicuous height overlooking the inner margin of the loch. 
They were probably known as Campbells of Kenmor from this feature. 

Also in old histories and records we find Loch Melfort called " Loch na Meal- 
phord," which in Gaelic signifies the " Loch of the smooth round bay :" the surrounding 
lands no doubt took their name from it. " Mael," in Gaelic, also means something 
shining, pleasant, sweet, bright ; it well describes the lands lying round the loch, under 
the wooded heights, which enjoying a southern and western aspect, nestle in the bright 
warm sunshine. 

There still remains in the possession of the family the small property of Kilchoan, 
situated at the western extremity of the estate. In order to facilitate the sale of the 
lands by her son, Colonel John Campbell, his mother accepted Kilchoan as her dower_ 
in exchange for lands originally forming her marriage settlement, which lay in the centre 
of the estate. This small property came into the possession of Lieut. Archibald \Y. 
Frederick Campbell, nephew to Colonel John Campbell. He left it to his mother ; on 
her death, in 1880, it reverted to her daughter, now Mrs. Paterson. Kilchoan, according 
to tradition, was, in the days of old, held by the Bards of Argyll, the MacEwens, in 
virtue of their office. After these times, history records that holy men from lona, sent 
by Columba to Christianize the inhabitants, settled on this spot. A religious house was 
built by them, surrounded by a wall enclosing a garden, the earth for which was brought 
from lona. Into the wall were introduced flues for the conveyance of hot air to ripen 
the fruit. A fine avenue of trees marked the road leading up to the gateway, and near 
the gateway still flourishes a fine old yew tree, beneath which stood a stone for holy 
water. 

There are traces of the road and avenue, and also remains of the wall and of 
the house ; the latter is now occupied as a barn and stable. It is beautifully situated on a 
steep slope, which descends from the wild moorland down to Melfort Cottage. Its site 
commands an extensive view over Loch Melfort and the ocean beyond, with its beautiful 
islands of Scarba, Soel, Shuna, Luing, and others ; the high hills of Jura in the distance. 
Some part of Kilchoan was originally included in the estate of Melfort ; the remainder 
came into possession by purchase from the Maclachlans, whose property it then was. It 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OK MELFORT. 5 

is said a Maclachlan was the last Bishop of the olden times. We find the Maclachlans 
held Kilchoan by charter from the Earls of Argyll ; the first charter is dated 1669, the 
second and last elated 1729. 

On the shore, close to the loch, were a chapel and burial ground ; the foundations 
of the chapel, in the form of a cross, were discovered a few years ago, when the Ordnance 
Survey was being carried out, and many stones and other relics have from time to time 
lieen found. The prefix " Kil" denotes a burial-place. 

Amongst other features of interest is a commanding height, situated on the steeps 
lying back from the shore of the loch on which, it is said, stood a beacon tower, lighted 
up in times of danger to warn the followers and neighbours of the laird to arms. This 
eminence is called in Gaelic the " Moulachandoon." viz., big round height ; it also signifies 
the Pig's Back. 

The property was sold by Colonel John Campbell to a powder manufacturing com- 
pany ; its fine trees of various kinds being valuable to them. The cutting down of these 
trees destroyed one of its attractive features ; but nothing could efface the natural beauty- 
derived from its situation. These woods were once a famous covert for deer. 

The Pass of Mejfort, which forms the entrance to the estate from the north, is wild, 
picturesque, and romantic ; its rocky heights, on either side, partially clothed by trees, 
ferns, and mosses, form a barrier to the river Oude, which leaping and foaming over its 
rocky bed, discourses sweet music, as it at length quietly glides into the loch below. In 
iS^4 a road was cut through the Pass ; hitherto the only access to the estate from the 
north was by a rugged pathway over the hills and moors. 

The property was subsequently sold by the powder company to Keith MacLellan. 
Esq., 1874, in whose possession it now remains, 1881. 

No account of a Highland family would be thought complete which could not tell 
some story of second sight or other mystery ; but there is little of this kind to relate of 
the Melforts. Possibly, as all the old people are gone, many stories and traditions of 
the kind are lost. There remains, however, one perfectly authenticated ghost story. 
Mrs. Campbell, of Melfort, four of whose sons were at the time (1801 3) serving in 
India, was one night startled by seeing her youngest son, Lorn, standing by her 
bedside, looking sadly at her. She marked down the month and the day. Some Ion- 
time after, she received the mournful tidings that her son had fallen on that day, in the 
battle of Assaye. 

The only mystery left to record is of a light which appears, at times, over one spot 
on a bank near the river Oude. and which, on approaching, disappears, to the terror of 



6 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 

the beholder. Curious to relate, when the present possessor of the estate was making a 
new road, it necessitated a cutting through this bank, which brought to light two stone 
coffins, of which the stones were simply placed together without any fastenings. One of 
these coffins was square, and contained the ashes of v. man ; the skull and some of the 
bones remained unburnt. In the coffin was a flint, such as was used in very ancient days 
for striking a light. 

The other coffin was long in shape ; in it were the remains of a female and her 
ornaments, a necklace and bracelet. The necklace was of jet, with ; pattern engraved 
on it. Its design was remarkable, of an Oriental character; it is said to be the most 
perfect of that description ever discovered. This jet is found on the sea coast. The 
bracelet is of copper, ornamented with tracery. 

It is over this spot the light is seen. A bridge has been built there, across the 
river, but the light still remains. No further search was made, in deference to the super- 
stitious feelings of the work-people. The coffins and their contents were buried in 
the Kilmelfort churchyard. 

This mystery is not to be solved ; but it points to very ancient times, probably 
to the days before Arthur, knight of the round table, or of the clan MacDuimhn. 

According to old custom, the burial-place of the family remains in their possession. 
It is situated not very distant from the house and grounds. Captain Archibald Campbell 
was the first of the family who was laid in it. 

The old burial-place of the Melforts is in the churchyard at Kilmelfort. In it 
the Melforts and their followers found their last resting-place. There is an old tra- 
dition that here was once the chancel of a church ; no trace of it remains. 

In 1873, on this spot, was erected an lona cross, by the surviving members oi 
the family, to the memory of the MacNeill Campbells of Melfort. The inscription 
placed on it is as follows : 




THE MEMORIAL CROSS. 



A HISTORY OK THE CAMPBELLS OK MELKORT. 



MACNIELL 



Gaelic Malta. Cioi) r. SIN Dt TSH (Nil. Tim). 



<0l& Burial $la of tfc Campbells of 

They were descended from NIEI.L, son of SIR COI.IN OF LOCIIAWF. (died 1340), and held the Lands of Melfort from that lime 
until 1838, when they were sold by LIEUT. -COLONEL JOHN CAMPBELL. 



In Jlttmor of 



I III I 1 \ VNT-COLONEL JOHN CAMPBELL (OF MELFORT), a distinguished Officer of the Black Watch, and Governor 

of Fort George, died 1790. 

CAPTAIN KIEL CAMPBELL (Black Watch), died 1799. 
CAPTAIN ARCHIBALD CAMPBELL (OK MEI.FORT), gist Regt., died 1823. 
LIEUT. JOHN, 

LORN, V Killed in India. 



ALEXANDER, ; 

ADMIRAL SIR PATRICK CAMPBELL, died 1841. 
GENERAL SIR COLIN CAMPBELL, died 1847. 
CKVKRAL KKF.DERICK CAMPBELL, R.A., died 1866. 
LIEUT. -COLONEL JOHN CAMPBELL (OF MELFORT), died 1861. 
CAPTAIN FREDERICK < A MPP.KLL, 6 4 th Regt., died 1840. 

V \ U fill It A I It ^ A \IPRF I T 

COMMANDER PATRICK CAMPBELL, R.N., died 1859. 
P. ARCHIBALD \V. F. CAMPBELL (OK MELFORT), died 1863, Son of CAPTAIN FREDERICK CAMPBELL 

CAPTAIN COLIN A. CAMPBELL, R.N., died 1869, Son of SIR PATRICK CAMPBELL. 
< Al'TAIN ARTHUR CAMPBELL, I4th Regt., Killed in India, 1846, Son of SIR COLIN CAMPBELL. 
M y|()R PATRICK SCOTT CAMPBELL, R.A., died 1871. , goNS Qf ( ; FNERAL 

COLONEL EDMUND CAMPBELL, H.M. 3rd Bombay N.I., died 1870. { FREDERICK CAMPBELL. 



ALL SERVED THEIR COUNTRY. SOME DIED FOR IT. 



is JHonument foas crcctrt iu 1873 fco tijc remaining JHemucrs of tfje JFamilg. 



The Male Representatives of the Family were at that date 

JOHN FREDK. MELFORT CAMP..KI .. ., Head of the Family. ^ Sons of Commamlcr Patrick Campbell 
PATRICK ARCIIIIIAI.D C \\IIT.KI.L. j (both Minors). 

COLONEL PATRICK JOHN CAMPBELL, R.H.A., Son of Sir Patrick Campbell. 

LlEUT.-COLONEL P. FlTZROY WEI.LESI.KY CAMPHELI. > 

AI.MIRAI. FREIIERICK ARCHIBALD CAMPBELL, R.N. I 

CAPTAIN AI.KA \M>I:K A. MI;LIMKT CAMI'HEI.L. 
LIEI-T.-GEN. SIR FREDERICK ALEXANDER CAMPHELI., K.C.I!., R.A., Son of Gen. Frederick Campbell. 

FREDERICK LORN CAMPBELL, Grandson of Sir Colin Campbell. 
WILLIAM FREDERICK CAMPBELL. \ 

FREDERICK WILLIAM C \MIMII 11. Grandsons of General Frederick Campbell. 

EDMUND ARTHUR CAMPBELL. \ 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMI'BELLS OF MELFORT. 

Although there exist no authentic records of collateral branches, yet the late Sir 
James Campbell of Stracathro traced his descent from a Campbell of Melfort. In a 
letter written in 1870 to Colonel P. J. Campbell, R.H.A., he gave the following account 
of the tradition of their descent which was held by the family. 

A young Campbell of Melfort was outlawed for killing, or being supposed to have 
killed, a man in a duel or quarrel. He came in disguise to Monteith, and was received 
into the service of the Earl of Monteith ; he had rapid promotion, and soon came to 
have a principal charge of the Earl's household. It was believed from the first that the 
Earl was aware who the stranger was. He then married Miss Haldane, a niece of the 
Earl of Monteith and a daughter of Haldane of Landreck Castle, who were afterwards 
the Haldanes of Airthray. 

The young couple were settled on the farm of Inchanoch, which belonged to the 
Earl of Monteith, where they and their descendants bore the name of MacOran ; so the 
name was spelt latterly, but it is believed to have had a slightly different form at an 
earlier period. It is said to be the contraction of a Gaelic name, signifying " Son of an 
honest man." In accordance with the belief that MacOran was only an assumed name, 
many of the family who left the district adopted that of Campbell. Sir James's father, 
the last of the family who occupied Inchanoch, resumed the name of Campbell on 
removing to Glasgow with his family. Such had been the relations of the family with 
the Earl of Monteith, that Sir James's grandfather was the first who paid any rent for 
the land. At the death of the last Earl of Monteith it passed into the hands of the 
Gartmore family. 

According to calculation made by the family, they suppose the Melfort of this 
romantic story was born about 1649. 

To corroborate their connection with the family, two of their farms, redeemed from 
the Moss, were called Eastern and Western Lome. Sir James's elder brother John 
purchased property in the State of New York, where he has established himself. 

In the lifetime of Sir James's father and grandfather, Captain Niel Campbell of 
Melfort was a frequent visitor at Inchanoch. On the invitation of Captain Niel 
Campbell, Sir James Campbell's father, when a young man, paid a visit to the family of 
Melfort ; he had a promise of a commission from them if he would enter the army. 
When his first son was born (Sir James's eldest brother), Captain Niel expressed a wish 
that the child should be called Niel, but the father, for family reasons, preferred John as 
the child's name. It was said Captain Niel took the choice amiss, and never visited at 
Inchanoch afterwards. 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMl'BELLS OF MELFOKT. 9 

The Campbells of Melfort bore the arms of their chief of clan ; their crest was the 
same, with a distinctive motto. The Melforts in later days quartered the arms of those 
families with whom they were connected by marriage. They are thus described : 

Quarterly; first, Gyrony of eight, tinctures, or and sable, for Campbell ; on a dexter canton, 
or, a lion rampant, gules, as descended in the female line from Maclachlan of Maclachlan ; 
second, argent, a lymphad (ancient galley) sable, her oars in action ; third, or, a fess checkey, azure 
and argent (Stewart) ; fourth, Gyrony of or and sable ; on a dexter canton, gules, two bars, or, 
as descended in the female line from Sir Ewen Cameron of Lochiel. 

CREST. Boar's Head, erased. 
MOTTO. Nil Tibi. 
BADGE. Bog myrtle. 

The Highland clans had each its distinctive badge, of a kind that would not fade 
or cast the leaf, which they wore as a tuft stuck in the bonnet. Each clan had its own 
war-cry, and each was further distinguished by its tartan, marked by the particular dis- 
position or set of the different colours. 

It may be interesting to relate some of the stories and traditions connected with 
these arms. Malcolm, son of Paul-an-Sporran, on his marriage with the heritrix of 
Beauchamp, took the coat-of-arms of the family of Beauchamp, viz., " Gyrony of eight," 
or shield cut in eight pieces, as an emblem of his shield having been hacked and 
slashed in many engagements ; tinctures, or and sable. It is said Gillespic or Archibald 
was allowed to assume the name of Campus-bellus (Campbell), to perpetuate the memory 
of a noble piece of service performed by him for the crown of France. 

The Galley in their arms, for Lome, is borne by all the Campbells descended from 
the first Earl of Argyll ; few before his time had it in theirs. 

The Fess came into the Melfort arms through marriage with the Campbells of 
Achalatler, who bear the arms of the Breadalbane branch. Sir Colin of Glenorchy, pro- 
genitor of the Campbells of Breadalbane, married Margaret, one of the three daughters 
and co-heiresses of John Stewart, third Lord of Lome. By her he possessed one-third 
of the lands of Lome ; he quarters the arms of the Stewarts of Lome with his own. 
His nephew, Colin, first Earl of Argyll, married Isabel Stewart, and with her received 
one-third of the lands. The Earl afterwards came into possession of the other third by 
exchange of the lands of Otter, with Archibald, half brother of Sir Colin of Glenorchy. 
He thus acquired the superiority over two-thirds of the lands of Lome. By his uncle's 
advice these lands were resigned into the hands of the king, from whom he received 
them again as his chief. He then assumed the title of Lord Lome. 



10 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 

A hardy achievement of Diarmid MacDwine gave rise to the crest of the " boar's 
head," carried in the arms of the family of Argyll since his time. The circumstance 
alluded to was a memorable hunting of the wild boar in Glenshie, in Perthshire, where 
Diarmid killed a wild boar of monstrous size, by which he was so severely wounded that 
he soon after died. The place where he is buried is known to this day as the " Boar's 
Bed" and Uie Diarmid, or Grave of Diarmid. Another story connected with the boar's 
head is as follows : That Duncan, the fourteenth Knight of Lochaw, killed a boar in 
France, and took off its head, for which reason the Earls of Argyll have a boar's head, 
erased, on their shield. It is more than probable that there may be truth in both 
accounts. In the old West Highland songs and legends, Diarmid is celebrated as a 
hunter of the wild boar, which abounded in those days. 

We close our story of the Campbells of Melfort with a Gaelic song (translated), 
composed by a herd-boy on the Melfort estate, in honour of young Melfort (John), about 
the year 1819 or 1820. We must claim indulgence for the rather rough rendering into 
English of the original, which we offer as given to us. Gaelic is a most poetic language, 
even in its prose ; to translate its poetry is almost impossible ; even an ordinary idea is 
clothed in some poetic simile, and its beauty lost in translation. 



THE SONG. 

I must begin a song 

To the youthful heir of this land, 

With taste, heart, and tune. 

CHORUS. 

Here is a hearty health, 
And let us drink it with mirth, 
The young MacNiel's health, 
He does not live that would slight it: 

I. 

Pleasant is thy place of residence, 
Where early the mavis sings, 
And where sings the tuneful lark 
In the calm misty morning. 

II. 

When with powder and gun 
You climb the hill, 
The deer falls in the thicket, 
And your men return burdened. 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBKLLS OF MELFORT. 



I I 



III. 

I luntcr of wild game and swan, 
Whose aim -is sure 
With your double-barrel gun, 
That strikes, and does not miss. 

IV. 

The little spotted roe, 
Continually bounding apace, 
The youth in haste early pursues. 

V. 

Well does the most costly cloth become you, 
Nor worse the plain kilt, 
Floating behind your white knees. 



VI. 

A part of your time was spent in the army, 
Where you, like your ancestors bold and hardy, 
Bravely bore your arms. 

VII. 

Thou hast sprung from noble blood, 
And excellent is thy extraction, 
Young MacNiel of Fernoch, 
Whom I heartily praise. 





xtf tip f Htttpblb nl 





'S some notice of the early history of the clan may be acceptable, a few points 
of interest have been selected, taken from historical and other records. 

The Campbells were of old, in the Irish or Erse language, called Clan 
o' Duimhn, sometimes spelt Duine or Dwin, the posterity of Duimhn. 
Although the ordinary method of reckoning is to begin at Arthur of the 
Round Table, King of the Britons, yet it may begin some years earlier. In 420 
Constantine was grandfather to King Arthur, from whom the Campbells o' Duimhn are 
descended ; from which it is clear they can trace their predecessors, from father to son, 
for upwards of thirteen hundred years. In these early times, a Diarmid MacDuimhn, 
or Duine, is recorded as one of Ossian's most famous heroes. In 943, Diarmid Mac- 
Duimhn was fourteenth in succession from Constantine, from whom the Campbells were 
called Siol Diarmid, or offspring of Diarmid MacDuimhn. He was contemporary with 
Malcolm I., sixty-sixth King of the Scots. He married a niece of one of the O'Niels. 
Kings of Ireland, 977. Diarmid had two sons, Arthur Armderig, the eldest, and Duine 
(also called in Gaelic White-toothed). Arthur Armderig MacDuimhn had several sons. 
His eldest, Sir Paul MacDuimhn, the first Knight of Lochaw, called Paul-an-Sporran, 
from holding the office of Treasurer to Kings Duncan and Malcolm Canmore, married 
Marion, daughter of Godfrey, King of the Isle of Man, by whom he had one daughter. 
Evah, his sole heir. 



A HISTORY OK TIIK CAMl'IiKI I.S <>F MKLFORT. 13 

i 

Duine, second son of Diarmid, married a daughter of the Lord of Carrick, and had 
three sons, one of whom, Malcolm, after the death of his first wife, went to Normandy, 
where he married the heritrix of Beauchamp or Campus- Bellus, by whom he had three 
sons. She was the sister-daughter, supposed niece, of the Duke of Normandy, after- 
wards William the Conqueror. 

Uionysius, or Duncan, eldest son of Malcolm MacDuimhn, continued in France, 
from whom Marshal Tallard ; of the third son, Duine, is descended Beauchamp, Earl 
of Warwick ; he and his second brother, Gillespic or Archibald, came over to England 
in the Conqueror's army. Archibald went to Scotland to visit his kinsmen, and there 
married Evah, heritrix of Lochaw. Evah, fearing lest her heritage should fall into the 
hands of any other clan, determined to marry none but a kinsman, 1066. Thus the 
MacDuimhns assumed the surname of Campbell, and Archibald MacDuimhn was 
the first Campbell, and became, by his marriage, second Knight of Lochaw. The 
Campbells, with their chiefs, under the designation of Knights of Lochaw, before they 
were nobilitated, were famous for their fealty to the crown in all the histories of King 
Robert Bruce and Sir William Wallace. 

From Archibald and Evah Campbell MacDuimhn are descended the succeeding 
Knights of Lochaw and their posterity : 

Duncan, second Campbell, and third Knight of Lochaw ; Colin ; Archibald ; 
Duncan ; Dougal ; Archibald. 

1 264. Colin or Cailen, called Mor, or the Great, either from the bulk of his person 
or the valour of his achievements, more probably the latter, as he was celebrated for his 
deeds and enterprises ; he was contemporary with Alexander III. To the present day 
the Duke of Argyll is called " The MacCailen Mor," viz., son of the great Colin. 

1266. Sir Niel, the first who was called MacCailen Mor, was created Knight 
Banneret by Alexander III. He was one of Bruce's Worthies, a man full of valour, 
courage, and devotion to his King and country. King Robert gave him his sister 
Marjory in marriage. 

1318. Sir Colin Oig viz.. Young Colin MacCailen Mor. Of him it is said, 
" He nothing degenerated from the valour and loyalty of his father, Sir Niel." Sir 
Colin, besides his heir, had a son Niel, whose mother was Nic Ildhui of Mull ; Nic 
in Gaelic signifying daughter. Niel was the progenitor of the Campbells of Melfort, 
known in early times as MacNiell Campbells (sons of Niel), the record of whose 
descendants will be found in the following Pedigrees. 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 



No. I. 



PEDIGREE OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 



NIEL (Note I), Progenitor of the Family, 

Son of Sir Colin Campbell, I Ith Knight of Lochaw, by Nic Iklhui, viz., daughter of Ildhui of Mull, 
(died 1340.) | 

NIEL. 



I 

DOUGAL. 



NIGEL. = 

I )n the death of his father surrendered lands to 
chief of clan, as was usual, receiving a fresh 
charter. Nigel probably fell at Flodden, 1513. 

(Charter 1502.) | 

DUNCAN". 
(Charter 1514.) 



DOUGAL. 



DOUG A i . 



(Charter 1548.) | 

JOHN.=JANET NAYN DONACIIIE MACEWIR, 
(Charter 1566.) | probably of the Ashnish family. ) 



NIGEL.- KATHERINE MAcDouoALL, 
{Charter 1618.) | of Raray. 

JOHN. = ISA HELL A MACLACHI.AN, 
(Charter 1633.) | of Craigentreve. 



ALEXANDER. 



ALEXANDER. 



DOUGAL. 



( Charter 
1669.) 

(last 

Charter. ) 


Duc.ALD,- 
<l. 1708. 

(Note 2. ) 

r- 1 - 

JoiIN, 


NMIKI.I.A CAMPBELL. 


JOHN 
(Note 3. 


=KATHERINE, dan. 
of Archibald Mac- 
Allister, of Tarbert. 


BARBARA.=DUNCAN MACEACHAN, 
of Tangie, Argyllshire. 


And other 
children. 


- ANN, dau. of 
Maclachlan, 
of 
Maclachlan. 

i 


DUNCAN. ARCHIBALD. 


MARGARET. = DUNCAN MACCORQUADALK. 
of Fhantilands, Argyllshire. 
(Note 4.) 



See Fed. 2. ARCHIBALD, = ANNABEL, dau. of Patrick Campbell, 
' 1773- of Barcaldine, Argyllshire. 



See Fed. 3. JonN, = Coi.iNA, dau. of John Campbell, 
d. 1790. I of Achalader, Perthshire. 
(Note 6.) | 

1 1 

J'eil. 4 and 16. ARCHIBALD, = CHRISTIAN BRUCE, dau. of 





d. 1823. 
(Nate 7.) 


John Campbell, 


of Lochend. 


GERTRUDE, 
dau. of 
Barnes, Esq , 
Major Royal 
Artillery. 


1 
JOHN,=LOUISA, dau. 
d. of Charles 
1861. RicketLs, Esq. 
S.I'. 
(Note 8.) 


I 
FREDERICK, = 
1838. 


=ANN MOORE, dau. 
of I hmcan 
Campbell, 
of Achlian. 


PATRICK, 
d. 1859. 


. i 
ARCHIBALD \v. FREDERICK, 
d. 1863. (Note 9.) 



JOHN FREDERICK MKI.FORT. 

d. 1879, in Afghanistan. 

(Note 10.) 



PATRICK ARCHIBALD, 

the present 

Head of the Melfort 

Family, 1 88 1. 

(Note II.) 



L 



i. 

THE loss and destruction of the earlier Charters and MSS. leave us, after the first record 
of Niel, progenitor of the Campbells of Melfort, without any certain accounts, until the 
Charter of 1502, wherein mention is made of those whose names appear in the Pedigree 
prior to that date. When the lands of Craignish reverted to the Argylls by failure of 
direct heirs male, Archibald, fourth Earl of Argyll, with consent of Dame Katherine 
Maclean, his spouse, feued the lands of Soroba, Elian MacNiven, and Ellannahuisaig. 
by Charter dated nth January, 1549, to Dugald MacEan, Vic Nail, viz., Uugald, son of 
John, posterity of Neil, of the family of Campbells of Melfort. From a copy of an 
original Argyll MS. we have this extract : " Colin was succeeded by his son Niel, who 
was succeeded by his son Colin (known as Colin Og, or young Colin), the nephew of 
Bruce. He was succeeded by his son Gillespie (or Archibald). He (Colin Og) left 
another son called Niel, by Nic Ilduaile of Mull, from whom the Campbells of Melfort 
are descended." 

II. 

Lieutenant Dugald was sworn Burgess of Linlithgow, 1650. From the terms of 
the Charter, he was much esteemed by the Earl of Argyll. He is described as a man 
of uncommon strength. According to tradition, he is said to have felled an ox by a 



single blow of his hand. 



III. 



MacAllister of Tarbert was in those days next in rank to the chief of the clan. 
They were Hereditary Keepers of the Castle of Tarbert. The Campbells of Stonefield 
now possess the lands they originally held. In the muniment chest exist many docu- 
ments and papers relating to a long and tedious law suit, date 1680, between John of 
Kenmore, his heir, Dugald, and his second son, John, and Katherine, his spouse, also 
the younger children of John of Kenmore. It would seem the cause of dispute was 
the non-fulfilment of contract of marriage, by which John, her father-in-law, granted 
land to said Katherine, also for money due to his younger children. John contracted a 
second marriage with Margaret MacDougall ; her name appears in the Charter. There 
was also a law suit between Dugald and his sister, Barbara McEachen. 



1 6 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 

IV. 

The family of MacCorquadale of Phantilands, said to be the most ancient in 
Argyllshire, is now extinct. They held the title of Baron, and were so called. This 
title was granted to those who held their lands solely from the Crown. 

v. 

Archibald was an officer in the Dutch Guards, In the Argyll records, it is stated 
that at this date the then Earl of Argyll raised from amongst his clan a force to fight in 
Flanders. 

VI. 

Lieutenant-Colonel John Campbell was at the time of his death Colonel of the 
Argyllshire Fencibles and Lieutenant-Governor of Fort George, Inverness-shire, which 
appointment he received for his services. He held it from 1779 until his death. He 
entered the army young, receiving a commission in the 42nd Regiment (Black Watch). 
He served with it in the West Indies and North America. In the records of the 
regiment he is mentioned as an active and intelligent officer. He was wounded at the 
attack of Ticonderoga, a fort on Lake Champlain. He left the army at the conclusion 
of the war. He died at Bath, where he had gone for his health. 

Amongst the family papers exists a long correspondence with the Government of 
the day, relating to lands in the State of New York, which were granted to those 
officers who served in America. Those to whom they were granted had had them 
surveyed, but having some difficulty in gaining possession, appealed to Government. 
Their claims were acknowledged, and promises were made, but they were never put in 
possession. 

VII. 

Captain Archibald Campbell entered the army in 1785. He joined the 85th 
Regiment, and served with it in India. In 1792 he raised a company for the gist 
Regiment from his own estate, " The Followers of the Melforts," which he joined as 
Captain, and served with at the Cape. He returned to England in 1797, and left the 
service in 1803. He afterwards entered the Argyllshire Militia, in which he remained 
until the end of the war. He died at Melfort in 1823. 

VIII. 

Lieutenant-Colonel John Campbell entered the army in 1816, receiving his com- 
mission in the 85th Regiment. He exchanged into the 46th on being appointed Aide- 
de-Camp on the staff of his grand-uncle, Sir Alexander Campbell, commandino- the 
forces in Madras. He left India on the death of his father and was on half pay till he 



/ 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. I 7 

joined the 92nd Regiment. He received the appointment of Extra Aide-de-Camp on 
the staff of Lord \\Yllesley in Dublin. He was for some years an unattached Major. 
In 1845 he again joined the army, and served in the 3<Sth Regiment in Gibraltar, 
Jamaica, Halifax, and Ireland. He was Colonel of Argyllshire and Bute Militia from 
1855 to 1857. He sold out of the army in 1860; died at Melfort Cottage, and 
laid in the family burial ground on the Melfort estate. 



IX. 

Lieutenant Archibald W. Frederick Campbell entered the Royal Academy at 
Woolwich, 1856, from which he received his commission in the Artillery, 1859 ; joined 
at Portsmouth, and exchanged to go to India, at the end of the same year; served at 
Dum-Dum, near Calcutta; was ordered home from India in ill health, April, 1862; 
died in Edinburgh, much regretted. He was a young officer of great promise. 



X. 

Lieutenant John Frederick Melfort Campbell was educated at the Royal Naval 
School, New Cross, from which he passed out seventh at the 'competitive examination 
for the army, thereby obtaining a direct commission. He was appointed to the ;oth 
Regiment, which he joined in India, 1875. 

In 1877 he entered the Bombay Staff Corps, and was attached as probationer to his 
own regiment (the 7Oth) at Jacobabad. Wishing to be actively employed, he joined the 
2nd Beloochees. In 1879 he passed his final examination with great credit. On the 
ist August he left Kokeran, in command of two companies of his regiment, to escort a 
battery of artillery to the Pishin ; the men of the battery suffered from cholera on the 
march. On arriving at Chunan, where is a fort just out of the Khojak Pass, he was 
attacked by cholera, and died on the igth, after a few hours of severe suffering. He 
was laid to rest on a hill close- to the fort, now in British territory. A cross was placed 
on the grave, which is surrounded by a wooden railing. 

Subjoined are a few extracts from letters addressed to his mother, expressing the 
regret felt at his loss, and the esteem in which he was held : 

[EXTRACT.] 

" KHOTAL, October ^th. 

" Your son had only been with us for one year, but it was long enough to endear him to us all. 
He was the only officer with me on detached duty last year in Pishin. I then learned to know his 
good qualities, both as an officer and as a companion ; he could be fully trusted on any duty, and 
lie had a larger share of responsibility, with only himself to depend on, and in an enemy's country, 

3 



1 8 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 

than usually falls to the lot of so young an officer. I can only say he was highly thought of by 
our late Commandant (who also fell a victim to cholera). I have received letters from officers of 
the ;oth, his late regiment, which show how much he was loved in his old corps. 

(Signed) "J. GALLOWAY, 

" Colonel Commanding 2nd Heloochee Regt." 

[EXTRACT.] 

" CHUNAN, AFGHANISTAN, August 24^. 

" It is with extreme regret that I am forced to be the writer of such bad news as the death of 
your son. He had not been very long in the regiment, yet all loved him for his quiet, gentle- 
manly manner and refined mind. Quiet as he was, yet there could be no doubt of his very- 
considerable talents ; and as to his courage, the quiet, steady manner in which he faced his end 
excited the greatest admiration from those about him. It appears he got ill three marches from 
here, and he certainly looked very ill on arrival. Next day cholera set in. He at once declared 
he could not live. He kept up so well, that we had hopes for some time ; but he died at one 
o'clock a.m., on the ipth. He was sensible to the last. Two months before he had written out a 
paper of instructions ; expressed in it was his special desire that the tidings of his death should be 
carefully broken to his mother. 

(Signed) " G. SAKTORIUS, 

" Major 3rd Beloochees." 

Extract of letter from a young officer to one of the masters of the Naval School, a 
schoolfellow : 

" I am sorry to say the old school has contributed one to the many poor fellows who have 
died. Poor Campbell died a couple of marches away from here, last Sunday. He had not been 
well for a long time, consequently very weak. He is greatly missed in his regiment ; and, as one 
of his brother officers said the other day, ' his quiet and unassuming manner had endeared him to 
all.' He is buried near the road. I shall look out anxiously for the grave, to leave some small 
token in memory of our dear schoolfellow." 

XI. 

Patrick went to India in 1877, and is now (1881) on a tea estate at Cachar, 
Bengal. 




Captain ARCHIBALD CAMPBELL. 





Admiral Sir PATRICK CAMPBELL, K.C.B. 



Lieut. -Colonel JOHN CAMPBELL, 
Governor of Fort George. 





Captain NIEL CAMPBELL. 







General Sir COLIN CAMPBELL, K.C.B. 



General FREDERICK CAMPBELL, R.A. 



A HISTORY OK TDK ( AMI'DKII.S o| MF.LFOR'I . 



'9 



No. II. 

PEDIGREE OF THE DESCENDANTS OF ARCHIBALD AND 

ANNABEL CAMPBELL. 



.S,v Ped. i. Note 5. 



Set /',-,/. i, 
Note 6. 



ARCHIBALD,== ANNABEL, dau. of Patrick Campbell, of Barcaldine, Argyllshire, 
m. 1729; I and his wife, Lucia Cameron, dau. of Sir Kwen Cameron, 
(1. 1773. ofLochiel. 



JOHN, -L'OI.INA, dau. 



h. 17.50: 
m. 1767 ; 
d. 1790. 



of John 

Campbell, 

of Achalader. 



T 

.V,v Fed. 3. 



NIKL, 
d. 179?; 
received his com- 
miision in the 42nd 
(Black Watch), after- 
wards Capt. in t he- 
Argyllshire Fencibles. 



LOUISA. =MACLACIII.AN, 
of Craigcntreve. 



Set re J. 12. 



ISABELLA. ^CAMPBELL. 
I of Kintarbert. 

Y 
Set fed. \ 2. 



ist, J. GILLIS. --MARCARET. =2nd, MACLACHI.AN, 
I I Lieut. R. \ 

See Fed. 12. 3rd, CAMPBEM 

Caddleton, S.P. 



No. III. 

PEDIGREE OF THE DESCENDANTS OF JOHN AND 

COLINA CAMPBELL. 



See Ped. I, Noted. 



JOHN CAMPBELL,^COLINA, dan. of John Campbell, Esq. , of Achalader, 



b. 1730; m. 1767. 
d. 1790. 



Perthshire, and Isabella, dau. of Patrick Campbell, 
of IJarcaldine, Argyllshire ; b. 1753 ; d. 1806. 





ARCHIBALD, 


^CHRISTIAN BRUCE, 


i 
JOHN, 


I 
ALLAN, 


SIR PATRICK, MARGARET, 


I 
SIR COLIN,=JANE, 


See 


b. 1767 ; 


d. 1840, 


b. 1768; 


b. 1770; 


K.C.U., 


d. 1850 at Lea- 


K.C.B., 


d. 1838 at 


Ped. i. 


m. 1797 ; 


dau. of John 


killed in 


d. an 


b. 1773: 


mington, dau. of 


b. 1776; 


Leaming- 


Note 7 


d 1823. 

\ 


Campbell, Esq., 
of Lochend. 


India 1801. 
(Note I.) 


infant. 


m. 1825 ; 
d. 1841. 


A. Wauchope, 
Esq. , of Niddrie, 


d. 1847. 
(AW; 3.) 


ton, dau. 01 
Ham- 


.S',V /V,/. 4 <ZH</ 1 1. 






(Note 2.) 


late Captain 1st 


Y dan, Esq. 












V 


/ Royal Dragoons. 


See Ped. 6 and 17. 












See Ped. 5. 





NlEl., 

') "777: 
d. an 
infant. 



FREDERICK, 
b. 1780; 
in. 1807; 
d. 1866. 
(Note*.) 



MARIA, 
b. 1791 : 

d. 1832 at 
Woolwich, 
dau. of George 
Scott, Esq., 
Lieut. -Col. 
'Royal Artillery. 
See Ped. ^ and 18. 



A I I XANDER, 
b. 1781 ; 

killed 
in India 

1801. 

(Notes-) 



GEORGE 

LORN, 
b. 1784; 
killed in 
India 1803. 

(Note 6.) 



ISABELLA, 
b. 1771 ; 
m. 1791 ; 
d. 1850 at 
Treeton, 
Inver- 
ness-shire^ 

See fe.l. 14- 



DR. ROY, M.D., 

b. 1765; 

d. 1822 

at Treeton, 

Inverness-shire. 

(Not.- 7.) 



ANABELLA.-JOHN CAMP- 
b. 1774; BELL, of 
m. 1798; Lochend. 
d. 1826. b. 1771 ; 

Y d- 1827. 
See Ped. 10. 
Both died in Australia 



MARY MEREDITH, 
b. 1779; 

d. an infant. 



LOUISA, 
l>. 1783; 

d. 1855, mini., 
at Hampton 
Court I'alare. 



ANN TRAPAUD, JOHN CAMI-IIF.I.L, JANK A THOL = THOMAS FORTYE, 

i Of . ~ i _fI':_l^_U f~^f\n r\f\\3 fi*csv \f t\f\r in 



b. 1786; 
m. 1804; 
d. 1841. 



Y 

See Pc<i. n. 



of Kinloch, 

Perthshire, 
d. 1839. 



GORDON, 
b. 1787; 
m. 1809; 
,!. i ^04. at To- 
ronto, Canada.N 

See Ped. 15. 



Esq., Afajor in 

the Army ; d. 1837 

at Halifax, N.S. 

(Note*.) 



CATHERINE MARGARET=C. KAM , KM]., M.D., 

OI.VMI-IA, I ofH.E.I.C>., 

b. 1789; m. 1818; d. 1851. 

d. |S63 'at Aberdeen. x (Note 9.) 

See PcJ. 16. 



N'IKLINA, 
b. 1791, after her 

father's death ; 
d. 1855 at Hampton 
Court Palace, unm. 



tn irirtm III. 



i. 

CAPTAIN JOHN CAMPBELL served in the 74th, or Argyllshire Highlanders. He was 
wounded at the storming of Fort Pungullamcouchy, April, 1801. He died of his wounds 
1 6th July the same year. 

Extract from the Duke of Wellington's Despatches : 

" Upon this occasion Campbell, of the 74th (Jack's brother), was killed, and, I believe, all the 
officers of the 74th were either killed or wounded, among others Jack Campbell himself, who has 
since died of his wounds. He is a loss to the service, for which, in my opinion, all the Polygars in 
India cannot compensate." 

In another letter, the Duke says : 

" These Polygar wars are terrible. We lose in them our best men and officers. I think that 
Campbell (John) is the greatest loss the army has sustained for a length of time. He always 
performed his duty with the utmost ability, and with advantage to the public." 

II. 

Admiral Sir Patrick Campbell, K.C.B., entered the Royal Navy at an early age, 
before 1792. In 1799 he was in command of the " Dart," sloop of war; on the I5th of 
October of that year, assisted at capture of four armed vessels. 

In July, 1801, the French had a squadron of frigates lying in Dunkirk Roads, which 
Captain Inman, commanding " Andromacha," was entrusted to capture or destroy. 
Captain Patrick Campbell, commanding " Dart," of twenty guns and one hundred and 
thirty men, taking advantage of a dark night, ran the gauntlet of the whole squadron, 
and cut out and carried, by boarding, " Desiree," a French frigate of forty guns and 
three hundred men. Lord St. Vincent pronounced this to have been one of the finest 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMI'HKI.I.S OF MKLFORT. 21 

instances of gallantry on record. In his despatch he alludes to the unparalleled 
bravery of Captain Campbell. He used to call him " the little man with the big heart.' 
He was immediately advanced to post rank, and appointed to command "Ariadne." 
twenty guns. In 1805, was in command of the " Doris," frigate. On January 2ist. 
1806, it struck on a sunk rock in Quiberon Bay, and had to be abandoned. A f w 
days after this disaster, while accompanying Captain Jervis in a boat, the boat was upset, 
and Captain Jervis and a man drowned. Captain Campbell, regardless of his own life, 
urged the men to endeavour to save Captain Jervis. In 1807, commanded " Unite " in 
the Mediterranean ; captured several privateers, and, landing his crew, stormed and 
destroyed the batteries of Languille. In 1811, commanded "Leviathan." In 1815, 
was made C.B. ; the same year commanded a company of seamen on shore, at the 
taking of Cape of Good Hope. Commanded "Ganges" and "Ocean." His last 
command was the South African station, flag ship "Thalia," from 1834 to 1837; was 
made K.C.B. in 1834. Sir Patrick died at Leamington, I3th October, 1841. 



III. 

Lieutenant-General Sir Colin Campbell, K.C.B., the account of whose career and 
services are taken from his own notes. In a small note-book he thus relates his early 
life :- 

" I left Perth Academy in February, 1792, arrived in London in March, set sail for the Island 
of Jamaica April the same year, arriving in May ; joined the ' Blonde ' frigate, Capt. W. Afflick ; 
sailed for England 28th of May, and was paid off at Chatham July, 1792." 

So determined was he to go to sea, it seems, that he ran away from the Academy, 
and entered himself on board a vessel bound for the West Indies. He was met in the 
fruit market of Jamaica by his brother Patrick, a midshipman on board the " Blonde." 
who carried him off to that vessel, and had him rated on the ship's books. His note 
thus continues : 

" I then went to Moor's Navigation Academy, and remained there till November, when I went 
as midshipman on board the ' Earl of Chesterfield,' which set sail from the Downs 27th December, 
and arrived at Bombay in May, set sail for China, and arrived in Whampoa igth of October, and 
at Macoa January, 1794. We sprung a leak at sea off the Cape of Good Hope in March ; arrived 
at St. Helena in a distressed condition 2oth April ; after taking out cargo for repairs, set sail for 
England with eighteen other East Indiamcn, and arrived at Galway in Ireland in July ; waited 
there for convoy. In April we sailed for the Downs under a convoy of ' Alexander,' ' Ganges,' and 
four other men-of-war. Arrived on the 29th, when all hands were pressed out of us. I entered on 
board the ' Alexander, 1 Captain Bligh, who gave me leave to go to London for three weeks. Hut the 
' Alexander ' was ordered to sea before my leave expired ; she was taken by four French ships of 
the line and two frigates, after gallantly defending herself for two hours, sinking one frigate, with 
all on board, and making complete wrecks of the ships of the line." 



A HISTORY OK THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 

Having happily escaped the misfortune of being taken prisoner, he gave up the sea, 
and in February, 1795, received his commission as Lieutenant in the 3rd Battalion ol 
Breadalbane Fencibles, then quartered at Ayr, and commanded by his uncle, his mother's 
eldest brother, Colonel John Campbell, of Achalader ; they afterwards served in Ireland, 
lie left the Fencibles in 1799 on receiving a commission in the ist West Indian 
Regiment, and proceeded to St. Vincent to serve as Brigade Major, on the staff of his 
uncle (his mother's younger brother, Brigadier-General Archibald Campbell). In 1801 he 
received a commission as Lieutenant in the 35th Foot, from which he exchanged into the 
/8th Highlanders in 1802, and proceeded immediately to Bengal. At the end of the 
year he accompanied the regiment to Bombay, it forming part of a corps which joined 
the army under General Wellesley (afterwards Duke of Wellington), and proceeded to 
Poonah. On their way they reduced several forts, held by different chiefs, situated 
below the Ghauts. 

On the 8th of August of the same year, 1803, the flank companies of the ;8th 
formed part of the detachment ordered to storm Ahmednuggur, in the Deccan. Lieu- 
tenant Campbell was at that period in the Light Company. They carried the place by 
escalade. General Wellesley, who was watching the escalading party, on observing the 
gallantry and determination of Lieutenant Campbell, who led the party, and who arrived 
first at the top, inquired the name of the young officer. The following morning he sent 
for him, and appointed him Brigade Major on his own staff. Lieutenant Campbell was 
present with General Wellesley, as such, at the Battle of Assaye, September, 1803, 
where he had two horses killed under him. He was also present at the Battle of 
Argaum and at the storming of Guzzalgum. 

Lieutenant Campbell quitted the army of the Deccan with General Wellesley, 
1804. On General (now Sir Arthur) Wellesley's departure for England, 1805, he was 
appointed Aide-de-Camp to the Marquis of Wellesley, who recommended him to Lord 
Lake for promotion. He was promoted to a company of the 75th Regiment, and 
accompanied the Marquis to England. In 1806 he was again placed on the staff of 
Sir Arthur Wellesley as Brigade- Major ; joined at Hastings in Sussex, 1807. He 
accompanied Sir Arthur to Zealand and Copenhagen, and was thanked by him in 
General Orders after the Battle of Keoze. In 1808 Captain Campbell accompanied Sir 
Arthur Wellesley as Aide-de-Camp to Portugal ; was present at the Battles of Rolleia 
and Vimiera, and had the honour to be sent to England with despatches of these actions. 
Captain Colin Campbell records that on the 24th August, having embarked, to be the 
bearer of the despatch of the victory gained on 1 7th, hearing a cannonade, which led 
him to believe that the enemy were attacking our position at Vimiera, he immediately 
returned on shore and joined Sir Arthur Wellesley in the field. From this circum- 
stance, Sir H. Barnard did him the honour to select him to convey to England also the 
account of the action of the 2ist at Vimiera. He was in consequence promoted to the 



A HISTORY OK Till: LAMl'UKI.I.S OK MKI.IOK'I. 23 

Majority of the 7oth Regiment, and to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel in the army. 
On 1 5th December of the same year he accompanied Sir Arthur \\YlIeslry to Portugal 
as Assistant-Adjutant-General. In 1809 was present at the expulsion, a second time, of 
the FYench under Marshal Souk from Portugal; was present at the Battle of Talavera. 
In 1810 at Busaco, where he was wounded. In iSn was present in the retreat to the 
lines at Torres Vedras, and in Massena's retreat from the front of our lines from Por- 
tugal, and all the different affairs that occasioned. In the same year was present at tin- 
Battle of Fuentes D'Onores. At this date he received the appointment of Deputy 
Adjutant-General at Malta. He did not proceed there, not wishing to leave active 
service. In 1812 was appointed Assistant Quartermaster-General at Head-quarters. 
The same year was present at the Battle of Salamanca, the entry into Madrid in August, 
the storming and siege of Badajos, and a retreat into Portugal : was appointed Lieutenant- 
Colonel of the 65th Foot the same year. In 1813 the advance into Spain, and all the 
different affairs prior to the Battles of Vittoria, Pyrenees, Neville, Nive, and other minor 
actions. In 1814, present at the Battle ofOrthez, the crossing of the Gare and Garonne, 
and at the memorable Battle of Toulouse, where tidings were received of the Allies 
having entered Paris, Buonaparte having resigned his usurped throne, and the restoration 
of the Bourbons. June, 1814, was promoted to the rank of Colonel in the army, and 
Captain and Lieutenant-Colonel of the Coldstream Guards. From 1815 to 1819, 
served in the Netherlands and France as Colonel on the Staff and Commandant of 
Head-quarters ; was with the Duke of Wellington at Quatre Bras and at the memor- 
able Battle of Waterloo, i8th June, where he had a horse killed under him ; entered 
Paris with the Allied Army, 6th July, 1815. Did duty with his regiment in England 
and Ireland from 1819 to 1826, when he received rank as Major-General, and was 
placed on the Staff as commanding the South-west District and Governor of Ports- 
mouth. In 1835, Colonel of the ggth Foot, and of the ;2nd in 1836; Lieutenant- 
General, August, 1836. He was appointed Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia, 
which he held from 1833 to 1839. On his return from Halifax, N.S., he received the 
appointment of Governor and Commander-in-Chief of Ceylon. Left for Ceylon. 
September, 1839 ; returned to England in June, 1847 ; died in London, after a few 
days' illness, June I3th of the same year. His remains were placed in a vault in the 
churchyard of St. James's, Piccadilly. 

Sir Colin was appointed Prize Agent for the booty taken in the Peninsula, ami 
also for that at Waterloo. He received from his sovereign eleven medals, and was 
made Knight Commander of the Military Order of the Bath. He received the foreign 
orders of Maria Theresa of Austria ; Knight of St. George of Russia ; of Maximilian 
Joseph of Bavaria ; and Knight Commander of the Portuguese Military Order of the 
Tower and Sword. 

I add to this account of Sir Colin's services a short extract of a letter received by 



24 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 

him when in Ceylon, from the Duke of Wellington ; also extracts from letters in Sir 
Colin's possession, showing the estimation in which he was held. 

Extract from private letter received from Duke of Wellington : 

" We are both getting old ; God knows if we shall ever meet again. Happen what may, I 
shall never forget our first meeting under the walls of Ahmednuggur." 

Sir Arthur Wellesley's letter to the Marquis of Wellesley's Secretary, Colonel 
Shaw. 

[EXTRACT.] 

"FORT ST. GEORGE, March $t/t, 1805. 

" Upon my departure from India, I am extremely anxious about the fate of my Brigade- 
Major, Lieutenant Campbell, of the ;8th Regiment, who has been with me, and from whom I have 
received great assistance. You are aware that he is the nephew of Colonel Campbell, of the 
74th Regiment. He has already interested the Governor-General in his favour by the accounts of 
the losses of his family in the sea and land services. To my certain knowledge, he lost two 
brothers and a cousin, Colonel Campbell's son, in the campaign against the Southern Polygars, and 
a brother in the Battle of Assaye. I did not know him by name when I saw him distinguish 
himself in the storming of Ahmednuggur, and immediately appointed him my Brigade-Major. At 
Assaye he had either two or three horses shot under him. He has ever rendered me most 
important assistance." 

Letter to the Right Honourable Lord Lake : 

" FORT WILLIAM, August 2Qth, 1805. 

" MY DEAR LORD, The object of this letter is to solicit your lordship's favourable notice of 
Lieutenant Colin Campbell, of H.M.'s /8th Regiment, whom I lately appointed one of my Aide-de- 
Camps. Lieutenant Campbell for a long period of time held a confidential situation in the family 
of Sir Arthur Wellesley, and served during the whole of the late campaign in the Deccan. His 
conduct was highly approved by Sir Arthur Wellesley, on whose earnest recommendation I 
appointed him to be Aide-de-Camp to the Governor-General. Lieutenant Campbell has been many 
years in the army, and is anxious to obtain a company without purchase in any regiment in India. 
I understand there is a vacant company in the 75th, and that Lieut. Campbell will be very accept- 
able to the present commanding officer. My intended departure from India makes me particularly- 
solicitous to obtain for Lieut. Campbell the honour of your lordship's protection ; at the same time, 
I am unwilling to embarrass your lordship by any request which may prove inconvenient to you. 
But I am extremely anxious to promote Lieut. Campbell's success, and I shall acknowledge with 
gratitude any mark of favour which you may be pleased to confer upon him. It will be satisfactory 
to me to be enabled, previously to my departure, to signify to Lieut. Campbell your lordship's 
intention in his favour. 

" Ever, etc., etc., 



(Signed) " WELLESLEY." 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 25 

Extract from General Orders by General the Hon. Sir Arthur Wellesley, on 
resigning the political and military powers with which he had been lately entrusted in 
the Deccan : 

"FORT ST. GEORGE, March, 1805. 

" lie cannot avoid to express the regret which he feels upon taking leave of officers and troops 
with whom he has served so long. In the course of the period of time which has elapsed since 
Major-General Sir A. Wellesley was appointed to the command of a division of this army, various 
services have been performed by the troops, and great difficulties have been surmounted, with a 
steadiness and perseverance which have seldom been surpassed. On every occasion, whether in 
garrison or in the tent, the Major-General has had reason to be satisfied with their conduct. 

He earnestly recommends the officers of the army never to lose sight of the 

great principles of the military service, to preserve the discipline of the troops, and to encourage in 
their respective corps the spirit and sentiment of gentlemen and soldiers, as the certain road to the 
achievement of everything that is great in their profession. Major-General Wellesley cannot avoid 
to notice and record the assistance which he has received from officers commanding districts and 

divisions under his orders, and the officers of the Staff appointed to assist him 

But in noticing the assistance he has received from the Staff, he must recall particularly his obliga- 
tions to and Lieutenant Campbell, of the 78th Regiment. 

[The remainder of the Order refers to the prize money.] 

(Signed) " BARCKLEY, 

" Deputy Adjutant-General, Mysore." 

"DUBLIN CASTLE, October, 1807. 

" MY DEAR COLONEL, If I had had an opportunity of seeing His Royal Highness again 
previous to my departure from London, I intended to have taken the liberty of recommending to his 
favour and protection Captain Campbell, of the 75th, who has been for some years the Brigade- 
Major attached to me. I originally recommended that he might be appointed to that situation from 
having witnessed his conduct on a trying occasion, and I have always had reason to be satisfied 
with him, and to applaud him. He belongs to a family distinguished for their gallant conduct. 
His brother is the Captain of the Navy who, with the sloop of war, cut a frigate out of Dunkirk the 
last war. He lost three brothers in action in India, all belonging to the 74th Regiment ; and for 
intelligence, gallantry, and activity he is equal to any officer of his rank in the army. 

" Under these circumstances I venture to recommend him to His Royal Highness for pro- 
motion, and will consider his attention to this recommendation as a mark of favour and kindness to 
myself in addition to the many I have received from him. 

" Ever, my dear Colonel, etc., etc., 

(Signed) "ARTHUR WELLESLEY. 
" To Lieut.-Col. Sir W. Gordon." 

There are many other letters from which extracts might be taken ; but those 
selected are sufficient to show the opinion entertained of Sir Colin, and the esteem in 
which he was held by His Grace the Duke of Wellington and all who served with him, 
and whose friendship and acquaintance he enjoyed. His private letters show kindly 



26 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 

and attached feeling towards all the members of his family. They are also full of 
interest, written during the period of his active service. These official and private 
letters are now in the possession of his grandson, Frederick Lorn Campbell, Captain 
in the Scots Guards. 



IV. 

General Frederick Campbell, at the time of his death, was Colonel-Commandant of 
the 6th Battalion Royal Artillery. He entered the Royal Artillery from the Royal 
Military Academy, Woolwich, 1797 ; served in Egypt under Sir Ralph Abercrombie in 
all the actions of the campaign ; was appointed to Royal Horse Artillery for his services ; 
held the appointment of Garrison Quartermaster at Woolwich (now Assistant-Ouarter- 
master-General) from 1810 to 1828 ; commanded Royal Artillery in Jamaica from 1833 
to 1837, when he returned to do duty at Woolwich. On the breaking out of the 
rebellion in Canada, was selected to take the command of the Royal Artillery in 
Canada, and placed on the Staff. He left for Canada, January, 1838, remaining in 
command till 1847, when he returned to Woolwich as Superintendent of Royal Military 
Repository, which appointment he held from 1847 to 1852, when he became Colonel- 
Commandant. 

Died at Woolwich 4th April, 1866, and was laid in the Scott Family Vault, Plum- 
stead Churchyard, Kent. Received Egyptian Gold Medal ; War Medal and Clasp. 



V. 

Alexander entered the 74th Regiment; served in India, and fell at the storming of 
the Fort Pungullamcouchy, Madras Presidency, ist April, 1801. 



VI. 

George Lorn served in the 74th Regiment; was killed in the memorable Battle 
of Assaye, 23rd September, 1803. 

In the records of the 74th Regiment, it is related: "The two nephews of Sir 
" Alexander Campbell, who commanded the regiment, Captain John and Lieutenant 
" Alexander Campbell, were killed in detached service against the Southern Polygars in 
" the beginning of 1801. At a siege, where the storming party to which they belonged 
" being recalled from an impracticable breach, John, having missed his brother Alexander, 
" and being informed that he had fallen, returned to the breach, and succeeded in 
" bringing him off, but was wounded in doing so. They both died in the same tent. 
' The third and youngest of these brothers, Lieutenant Lorn, was killed at Assaye." 



A HISTORY OF TI1F, CAMrUKI.I.S o] MI I.IORT. 27 

The fact here related was well known in the family. John, after his wound, returned 
too soon to his duty, which caused his death. 

Extract from the Duke of Wellington's Despatches, in one of which then- is a 
long letter from Sir Colin Campbell relating to the Battle of Assaye. He says : 

" Lorn " (his brother) " was twice wounded in the leg, but persisted in going on. He at last, 
poor fellow, I believe, fainted, and was left behind when the troops were returning, and was picked 
up by the cavalry." 



VII. 

Dr. James Roy held the appointment for many years of Staff Surgeon, Fort 
George, Inverness. 

VI II. 

Major Fortye served in Holland, Africa, and America ; also in Egypt, 1801. He 
there lost his arm, for which he received a pension. He afterwards entered the ist 
Veteran Battalion ; was Governor of Shetland, and held the appointments of Barrack- 
master in Dublin, Guernsey, and Halifax, N.S., where he died. 



IX. 

Doctor C. Kane entered the East India Company's service, Bombay Presidency, 
and was at the time of his death Surgeon-General of the Bombay Army. 



28 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 















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'.P. Capt. 7th Fusiliers, ol 
house, Sutherland, S. 
d. 1876. (Note 3.) 
2nd, ALEXANDER PATERSC 
General H.M.I. Arm 
(Note 4.) 


=W. F. DITMAS, MARY= 
Esq., ofWymaad JANE, 
Estate, m. 
Manantodili, 1878. 
Madras. 


GERTRUDE 
ISABELLE. 


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was a daughter of 
rawe, descended f 
Lochaw (Argyll). 


COLINA, ANNE MOORE, 
d. an m. 1861. i 

infant. 


E, GERTRUDE, LOUISA= 
li- d. young. MELFORT, 
of m. 1876. 


KENNETH FRANCIS 
CAMPBELL, ARCHIBALD 
b. 1875. ALLISTER. 
d. an infant. b 1880. 


6 d w u G 
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BALDWIN, ISABELLA^ 
Capt. Ma- LOUISA, 
Artillery, m. 1837 ; 
847 in India. 


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i. 

CAPTAIN WILLIAM FREDERICK CAMPBELL sailed for India 1824, receiving his commission 
in the 64th Native Infantry. In 1834 was appointed Interpreter and Quartermaster 
to his regiment. He served at Dacca, Agra, Saugur, Allyghur, and Delhi, at which 
latter place he died of fever in 1840. His company of Sepoys requested to be allowed 
to carry his remains to the grave, which they did, a most unusual thing. 

Lord Raglan, when told of the circumstance, was so struck by it, that he said his 
son should have a nomination to enter the Royal Academy at Woolwich, which he 
received in due time. 

The following appeared in the Delhi Gazette, August, 1840 : 

" Sad gloom has been thrown over our little society at Delhi by the sudden death of Captain 
W. F. Campbell, of the 64th Regiment, who expired after an illness of a few days. He is not only 
regretted for his great worth and high merit by his brother officers, but by the whole of the civil 
and military residents, and all the society of the Station." 



II. 

Commander Patrick Campbell entered the Navy December, 1824, as first-class 
Volunteer ; joined the " Ganges," commanded by his uncle, then Captain Patrick 
Campbell ; served as Midshipman in the " Cyrene " and " Bombay," on the East India 
Station, both commanded by Captain Alexander Campbell ; served in the " Ocean," 
Captain P. Campbell commanding ; also the " Rattlesnake," in the Mediterranean ; 
passed his examination 1831, and was promoted from Mate in the " Thalia," bearing the 
flag of his uncle, Sir Patrick Campbell, at the Cape, to the command of the " Buzzard." 
in which he captured eight slavers. 



30 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 

In consequence of a severe attack of fever, he invalided in 1837, and for a short 
time rejoined the "Thalia" as Flag- Lieutenant. The same year, appointed to the 
command of the " Dolphin" on the same station. In 1838 his health obliged him to 
return to England. In 1840, appointed to the "Southampton," at the Cape, bearing 
the flag of Sir E. Durnford King. August, 1841, served as First Lieutenant in the 
" Rose," while detached from which vessel, in charge of Pinnace, in order to 
intercept a slaver, he was taken prisoner by a party of Brazilians, who subjected him, 
during a captivity of six days, to what he describes "as the worst of treatment." In 
1844, after two years' half pay, he was appointed to the command of the Revenue 
cutter, " Prince Albert," employed on the west coast of Scotland. At the expiration of 
the five years' command he was appointed to the Coastguard on the west coast of 
Ireland as Inspecting Commander. He died at Connemara, while holding this com- 
mand, in 1859. 

III. 

Captain George Mackay served in the 62nd Regiment in Burmah ; in the ;th 
Fusiliers at home and Gibraltar ; Turkish Contingent in the Crimea ; Crimean Medal ; 
Medjidie. 

IV. 

General Alexander Paterson served throughout the Punjaub Campaign, 1848-9; 
Medal and Clasps for the Battles of Chillianwallah and Gozrat. Burmese Campaign, 
1863 ; Medal and Clasps for Pegu. Bhootan Campaign, 1865-6; Medal and Clasps 
for Bhootan. Afghan Campaign, 1878-9 ; Medal. 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 



No. V. 

PEDIGREE OF DESCENDANTS OF SIR PATRICK AND 

LADY CAMPBELL. 



SIR PATRICK. -MARGARET WAUCHOPE. 



PATRICK JOHN, 
R. H. Artillery, 

b. 1828. 

(Note I.) 



COLIN ANDREW, 
Royal Navy, 

1). 1831 ; 
d. 1869 at sea on 
H.M.S. " Ariadne." 
(Note 2.) 



FREDERICK, 

1.. at the Cape, S. A., 1835, 

where he died, an infant, 

in 1836. 



No. VI. 

PEDIGREE OF DESCENDANTS OF SIR COLIN AND 

LADY CAMPBELL. 



SIR COLIN. =JANE HARNDEN. 



r 
PATRICK FITZROY = 
WELLESLEY, 
b. 1808 ; m. 1848 ; 
died 1875 in 
London. 
(Note I.) 


MARY, dau. of 
Reynolds, Esq. , 
and widow of 
R. Curteis, Esq., 
of Windmill Hill, 
Rye, Sussex. 


ARTHUR WELLINGTON, 
1 4th Regiment, 
b. 1815; killed 
in India in 1846. 
(Note 2.) m. 

=W. T. CHAMBERLYNE, 
Esq. 


i 
FRKDERICK= 
ARCHIBALD, 
Royal Navy, 
b. 1817; 
1849; d. 1874. 
(JVo/O-) 

FREDERICK 
Scots Guai 
b. 1850; m. 
(Note 5. 


-EMMA ROSAMUND, ALEXANDER 
dau. of G. MILLING, AUGUSTUS 
Esq., Connaught MKI.FORT, 
Place, London. b. 1828. 
(Nott*.) 

LORN, CAROLINE, 
ds, 1 dau. of J. Smith, Esq., 
1879. widow of Capt. Briscoe, 
I Royal Artillery. 

1 
COLIN FREDERICK 
FITZROY, b. 1880. 


KIT/ROY COLIN, MARY EVELYN, = 
1). 1849; m. Feb., 1874. 
d. 1850. 


HENRY FITZROY, WILLIAM 
b. Nov., 1874. THOMAS 
b. 1877. 


F. MARY DOROTHEA 
, EVKI.YN. 



t, Hon. CHARLES= MARIA =2nd, Hon. EDMUND 



NORTON, Capt. LOUISA, 
52nd Regiment, m. 1832. 

A.D.C. to Sir Colin 

Campbell, Halifax, y 

where he died. Pud. 17. 



Pmri's, m. 1837; 
d. 1856. 



1st, GEORGE=AMELIA=2nd, W. 1>IM, 

MACLEAN, JANE, Esq., m. 1863; 

Col. Royal m. 1842. d. 1867, son of 

Artillery, S.P. W. Dem, EJ H 

d. 1862; late E.I.C.S. 
Cadet of Ardgour, 
Argyllshire. 



ISABELLA, = JOHN CAMP- 



ID. 1852 ; 
d. 1861. 



BELL, Esq., 
of Achaladcr. 



4 Sons. 
See Achalader Pedigree. 



i. 

COLONEL PATRICK JOHN CAMPBELL, R.H.A., joined the Royal Artillery in October, 
1847; proceeded soon afterwards to the Cape of Good Hope, served a year in 
Natal, and then joined the army in Kaffraria soon after the outbreak of the Kaffir war 
of 1851-2-3; was employed in numerous engagements and skirmishes, including the 
attack on Meromo's stronghold, when the 74th Regiment suffered so severely, losing 
their Colonel (Fordyce) and three officers killed, and many officers and men wounded. 
On his commanding officer, Major Eardley Wilmot, being killed in action, he suc- 
ceeded to the command of the Royal Artillery in the King Williams town Division ; 
was frequently mentioned in despatches, and was slightly wounded ; at the conclusion of 
the war returned to England ; was appointed to Royal Horse Artillery, joined Chestnut 
Troop at Canterbury ; promoted to Captain in 1854. Went to Crimea as Adjutant to 
Colonel Maclean, March 9, 1855 ; was present in the trenches in both attacks on 
Redan iSth June and 3rd September. Appointed Captain Royal Horse Artillery, and 
joined H Troop in Dublin. On the outbreak of Indian Mutiny, accompanied 
the troop commanded by Colonel J. Turner, to India, but the troop was landed at 
Madras, and took no part in the suppression of the Mutiny. Served afterwards 
at Corfu, Chatham, Shorncliffe, and Aldershot ; again re-appointed to Royal 
Horse Artillery, and commanded Battery at Umballa and Peshawur. Promoted 
to Lieut-Colonel, October, 1871 ; soon re-appointed to Royal Horse Artillery, and 
commanded Royal Horse Artillery at Meerut, Rawal Pindee ; succeeded to the 
command of A Brigade at Head Quarters, and three Batteries in 1875. Promoted 
regimental Colonel, March, 1880. Medals, Cape; Crimea, with Clasp; Turkish. 
Serving in Royal Horse Artillery 1881. 



II. 

Captain Colin Andrew Campbell entered Royal Navy June, 1844 ; served in Her 
Majesty's ships " St. Vincent," "Vindictive," and "Powerful." Lieutenant 1852, 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 33 

appointed to " Leander ;" served with Naval Brigade before Sebastopol. Commanded 
" Opossum " gunboat in China, took part in action at Zatshun Creek and capture <>! 
Canton. Afterwards commanded flag-ship "Bombay," which was burnt off coast of 
Monte Video ; he returned to England, was honourably acquitted, and highly com- 
mended for his courage and energy during the time of trial, and was appointed to 
command H.M.S. "Narcissus," which replaced the "Bombay." Served in the 
Abyssinian expedition. In 1868 was selected to command H.M.S. " Ariadne," which 
conveyed the Prince and Princess of Wales to Egypt, etc., etc. ; becoming seriously 
ill at Malta, had to resign his command, to which his cousin, Captain Frederick A. 
Campbell, was appointed. He remained in hospital at Malta until he embarked on board 
the "Ariadne" on her return voyage to England, which he unhappily was not destined 
to reach ; he died on board after leaving Gibraltar, igth May, 1869. 

Knight of Legion of Honour; 5th Class Medjidie ; Medals for Crimea, China, 
and Abyssinia. 



YI. 



i. 

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL P. FiTZROv WELLESLEY CAMPBELL was educated at Eton, and 
the Royal Military College, Sandhurst. In January, 1825, was gazetted to the 2nd 
Battalion Rifle Brigade ; in July, entered the 3rd or Scots Fusilier Guards (now called 
the Scots Guards). In 1828, was appointed Aide-de-Camp to his father, Sir Colin 
Campbell, at Portsmouth ; he was promoted the following year as Lieutenant and 
Captain. He accompanied his father to Halifax, being placed on his Staff as Military 
Secretary. In 1838, received his promotion as Captain and Lieutenant-Colonel. In 
1849, Lieutenant-Colonel Campbell retired from the service. In 1853, he accepted the 
command of the ist Surrey Militia, which he held till 1856. 

Colonel Campbell died suddenly in London, August, 1875, fr m neart disease. He 
was buried in Brompton Cemetery. 



;( \ HISTORY ov nil- i'AMruru> 01 ICKLFORT, 

11. 

Captain Arthur WeUington Campbell received his military education at the Royal 
Military Collar. Sandhurst. He was gazetted in 18.^5 w tlu- ' -H h l ; ^t- receiving his 

promotion as Captain in iS.j.v IK- \\as on his father Sir Colin Campbell's stall" in 
Halifax: also in Ceylon as Military Secrctarx . Ho there unfortunately broke his leg, 
which \vas followed In an attack of fever. On recovering, ho went for change to India, 
joined Sir Harry Smith at the front, and while acting as his Aide-do Camp was killed 
by a cannon-shot at lUidowal, January :ist, iS 



111. 

Admiral Frederick Archibald Campbell entered Royal Naval College. 1'ortsinoiith, 
February ;,oth. i8,;i; left it the same year. In iS;.\ was appointed to 11. M.S. 
Madagascar." as College volunteer, serving in the Mediterranean. In August ot 
the same year joined 11. M.S. " Harham " till iS;.}, when, in April of that year, he 
was appointed to the " President," which conveyed his father. Sir Colin Campbell 
to Mali: iovernor. In August of the same year was appointed to the " Thalia," 

Captain Robert Wauchope. bearing the flag of his uncle. Sir Patrick Campbell, Rear 
Admiral of the Pluc ; sailed for the Cape. Served in the " \Vater\vitch " on the 
coast of Africa: was appointed Pri/emaster of the slave schooner "C.alana Josefa." 
captured by the %> Waterwitch " off Popoo, March, 1836; invalided home on account 
of fever; passed for Mate the same year, and rejoined the "Thalia," In 
|8 % ;-. promoted to Lieutenant, and appointed to H.M.S. "Scout," which was 
employed looking out for slavers. In 1840 was appointed additional Lieutenant ot 
H.M.S. "Winchester," Sir J. Harvey, llag ship on the North American and West 
India station. In 1841 was First Lieutenant of H.M.S. " Cleopatra," on the same 
:ion ; invalided home. 

In 1842. appointed to the " Cornwallis," flag ship of Sir W. Parker, in the Fast 
Indies: appointed t Harlequin," and then to the "Cambria." From this ship he 

twice jumped overboard to save life; on the second occasion succeeded in saving 
the life of a man. In 184; was appointed to the command of H.M.S. " Fspicgle." in 
China. During his command of the " Fspiegle," he twice received the acknowledgment of 
Lord Palmerston on the first occasion, for the manner in which he conducted a delicate- 
and difficult mission to Nankin : on the second occasion, for affording protection to 
Chinese vessels against piracy. In 1851 was appointed to the " Rosamond ;' sailed for 
the West Indies. In 1854 was promoted to post rank, and appointed to the " 1 lornet ; " 
in 1850 to the " Vulture." left for the Mediterranean. At Fanciers, embarked four 
Moorish princes and their suite, sons of the Fmperor of Morocco, for conveyance to 
Alexandria, on pilgrimage to Mecca : they also returned in the "Vulture" to Tankers. 
Captain Campbell was allowed to accept a jewelled sword, presented to him by the 



\ MIMOKN i>i 1 111 . \\in.i LL8 Ol MI I I OK I . 

I mperor <>f MoTOCCO, ai.ompanied l>\ .1 i omplimen;ar\ l.-ii. r .-I ih.ml,. In i 
.i|>|inintril tu "Neptune;" -.cut I" Sidon on .u <. -1.11111 >l ill-n ,.iv.> "I I hir.tians l>\ tin 
1 ) ruses. In i So ; was appointed to command ilu " Ko\ .il ( >ak ;" ;< i \ i -I in tin- Me dihi 

ranean ; gave up the command <>n i>ein>.; appointed l'ri\.u<- Secretar) i" tin- hnke "i 

Somerset, l-iist I on I ol the .\<lmir.ill\ . ( >n clian-e ol ministry, lie lost the s< ( ietar\ 
ship. In [866 \\.r- appointed \a\al Aide dc ( .imp to I In M.i|< -i\. In J.niii.ii-. 

be joined the " Ariadne " at I ucoeoding bis cousin, Captain Colin Campbell, in 

i-oinin. ind, lie l.eiii;; l.iiil up ill at Malta. I'lie " \i ia.lne " \\.is appointeil lor pat ticnlar 
SIT\ ire, anil lilted up lor the use ol the I'rince and l'i mr. ,s ol \\ .ill , In i .', . < a plain 
Campbell received hil promotion as K<-ai Admiral. Ill iS;-i \\asollered the seroiid in 
Command Of thfi Channel Meet; lla- ship " Av.in.-oarl." In iS;j accepted the command 
ol the I'Uin;.; Squadron, joined it at the (ape, hoisied hi. lla;; on l.oaid II.M.S 
" Nari is'.ns." In i S;-^ proceeded to \ i : .;o \\iih th. Flying ^'[nadion; in l>...ml" 

tin 1 sam< year he waa succeeded bj Admnai Kandolph. Admiral Campbell hoisted ins 

lla-; on l.oard I I. M.S. " Anroi a." arri\ ed at I'orismDiilh December ilh, hanle.l do\\ n 

hr, lla;; on the ^..|h. I'his l.roiijdit hi i-. .. i \ i. . . |.. a . I. . l'he"\a on In i 

voyage to \'i-o. met \\ith evere wreather, encountering a teniM.- itorm, dw 

which Admiral I ampliell was thrown aCTOSS his calun. The .shock In received caused 
an injiirx. Iroin which he m \er r< all\ : d. Alter some month-, ol di lii ale health 

and Suffering, h. w.r. lak. n ill Ma\ -Sth. at his iv,id< in . . I'., auloii t.aid.n.. ll< 
expired on June null, iS;.|. 1 |e was laid in the same \anlt as his latin r in la\\, I iodlre\ 
Miillin . Esq., I 'inr.lord I'hnrchyard, ( .odalmiii;;, Sun 

I le received Medal lor ( hina. 



IV. 

ptain Alexander \ . Mellort ( amphell joined, as a Cadi I. tin slli I 

( a\alr\ in t alcuiia. i N.| j ; appointed Corn, t in ;rd I .i;.;ht DragOOM, (846; r< tinned lo 

, 1847 ; joined the Carabiniers, (849; ati.-r\\.ud ; tiom the > \\ 



Alter leaving the army, he received tin- appointment <>i PI. .i.iem oi Nevis ami 

lurk'-, Island, \\ i Bf Imli. I, I le [| now ( ollector ol R. \, HIM- at ( .ilnaltar, iSSi. 



V. 

( aptain I'l-edenck Lorn Campl.ell entered tin- $00tl (iuards . '-'nd. i 

He received tin appointim-m ,,| r,ii ;; ade- Major to the Brigade Oi l.uanls, m tin- llonn 
district, ist January. iS;y: Serving tl 



;n \ HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 



VI. 

Colonel George Maclean passed from the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, as 
Lieutenant, August, 1828. In 1 842 was Aide-de-Camp to Sir Colin Campbell, in Ceylon ; 
was appointed Assistant Commissary, ultimately Commissary-General, 1848. Was 
Staff Officer at Colombo, and also Point de Galle. Served in the Crimea. Commanded 
Royal Artillery at St. Helena, where he succeeded Colonel Vigors as Commander of the 
Forces, and was Member of Council. He also commanded Royal Artillery in Malta. 
Died in London 1862. He received Medal for Crimea with clasp; also Turkish 
Medjidie. 




A HISTORY OF THE CAMI'IJEI.I.S <>l MI.l.FORT. 



37 



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THE 



CAMPBELLS OF ACHALADER, 

PERTHSHIRE. 



These Records are copied from PRIVATE DOCUMENTS in possession of the Family ; also f ran, 

HISTORICAL SOURCES. 





IE Achaladers show descent from the clan Campbell of Argyll 
through the line of the most honourable family of Breadalbane. 
The Campbells of this family claim as their progenitor Sir Colin 
Campbell, sixth Laird of Glenorchy, who died in 1513. He was 
the great-grandson of Sir Colin, first Laird of Glenorchy, who was 
the second son of Sir Duncan Campbell, Knight of Lochaw, who 
was created Lord Campbell of Argyll. Sir Duncan bestowed upon his son, Sir Colin, 
the lands of Glenorchy, which had come into the family tempo David II., by marriage 
of John Campbell with Margaret, heiress of Glenorchy. Sir Colin Campbell, third 
Laird of Glenorchy, had three sons. Duncan, the eldest, succeeded his father, but 
dying without male issue, was succeeded by his brother John, who also died leaving no 
son. Colin, the third son, thus became the sixth Laird of Glenorchv. 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 41 

In the family papers of the Campbells of Achalader we have the following 
record: "Sir Colin Campbell of Glenorchy married a daughter of Graham of Inch- 
brakie (her mother was the daughter of Allister, Bishop of Inverary, son of the Earl of 
Mar). Sir Colin had by her a son, Archibald (Gillespie Dow), born at Ancharn. The 
mother died at the birth of the child. It was sent privately to Mull with a nurse named 
MacLean, and a servant lad, Macintosh. After two years in Mull, he was brought to 
Achalader, and fostered with the Macintoshes, till he was seven years old, and from 
thence sent to some obscure place in the Low Country, where he remained till he was 
twenty. When Sir Colin married Inchbrakie's daughter, he was the youngest of three 
brothers. By the death of his brothers, who died before his lady, there stood nothing in 
the way that could probably obstruct his ambition of getting a match suitable to his new 
rank, but to bury the new-born babe in oblivion, which was done in the above manner, 
after which he married Catherine Ruthven, daughter of the Earl of Gowrie." 

The estate of Ballied was purchased by John Campbell of Achalader, who married 
Katherine, daughter of Cameron of LochieL 

In 1729 there was a baronetcy created called the Barony of Achalader, and a 
charter was granted in the same year ; the entail is dated 1 788. The Campbells of 
Achalader possessed all the privileges of the owner of a barony, and would in days of 
yore have been called Barons of Achalader. 

The Castle of Achalader, now a picturesque ruin, was, according to tradition, 
attacked by the Fletchers of Dunans, and by them partially destroyed and burnt. 
They carried away with them the heavy door of the Castle, as a trophy. It has 
remained in their possession. 




No. 
PEDIGREE OF THE CAMPBELLS 



SIR COLIN CAMPBELL, sixth Laird of Glenorchy. = lst, MARGARET, dau. of Graham of Inchbrakk-. 

ARCHIBALI>. = MARY, dau. of John Downa Launa, alias 
(Gillespie Dow. ) | MacGregor of that ilk. (Note I.) 

I ' 

JOHN Dow. = MARY, dau. of Donald Stewart, 
Invernayle. (Nolc 2.) 

ARCHIBALD. = MARGERY, dau. of Colin MacPher.v.n. 
of Bear. (Note 3.) 

Au.lSTER Du\v. = AGNES, dau. of John MacNab, 
of Borane. (Note 4.) 

r ' 

JOHN, = KATHERINE, dau. of Sir E wen Cameron, 



m. 1713. 



of Lochiel. 



JOHN. = 



ISABELLA, his cousin, 

dau. of Patrick 
Campbell, of Barcal- 
dine. 



ARCHIBALD, Old 78th 

Regiment, killed in 

the German war, 1762. 

(Note 5.) 



PATRICK. Loudoun 
Highlanders, died 
in America. 
(Note 6. ) 



JOHN, Lieut. -Col. Breadalbane 
Fencibles, d. 1799, unm. 
(Note }.} 



PATRICK, = ANN, dau. of LivingUm. 



1811 

at Rallied. 



Esq. She died in Edinburgh 
at an advanced age. 



JOHN LIVINGTON,=ANN, d. 1875, dau. of Reginald MacNiel, Esq.. 
Coldstream Guards. 



d. 1820 in Edinburgh. 
(Note 8.) 



of Barra. 
2nd marriage. Douglas, Esq., of 



Glenfinart. 



1st, GERALDINE,- JOHN LiviNGTON, = 2nd, ISABELLA MARGARET, ist, THOMAS BURNS, Esq. = JANE, = 2nd, T.MURRAY ALLAN, Esq., 

_1 _f c.' t*_i:.. / _.t T> !_. l.Ir- ...n. Iii i^oti r~,f Cit- f*/-i1tn nf A\rnMrlnlf fl nf C\ \ f*n(e*c\f\\ -in 



dau. of St. Felix, 
Esq. 



6?th Regiment, 
retired ; present 
representative of 
S.P. the Achaladers. 
(Note 9.) 



his cousin, dau. of Sir Colin 
Campbell, K.C.B., m. 1852 ; 
d. 1861 of diphtheria caught 
from her children. 

=3rd, MARY, dau. Blackett, Esq., 
of Wylam, Northumberland. 



of Avondale, 
m. 1837 ; d. 1847. 



1 
IOHN LlVINGTON, 


"T 

FREDERICK COLIN 


i 
GERALD, 


n 
COLIN, 


R, 


E., b. 


1853- 


LlVINGTON, R. 


N., 


d. 


young 


d. 


young 




(Note 


10.) 


b. 


1854. 


(Note 


n.) 




1861. 




1862. 



of Glenfeochan, 
m. 1851. 



I 1 I H 

JOHN MARGARET MARY=R. PALMER JENKINS, Esq. ANNA 

GEORGE, ALICE, CAMPBELL, yr.,of Beachley, LOUISA. 

b. 1857 ; b 1852; m. 1876. Gloucestershire, 

d. 1864. d. 1864. late Bengal C.S. 



THOMAS 
REOCH, 
30th Foot, 
b. 1846; 
d. 1878 
at Glen- 
feochan . 



JANE CAMPBELL, = WILLIAM L. SHEPHERD, 
m. 1871. | of a Yorkshire family. 

r- i "- 1 1 1 

WILLIAM RONALD ANNIE LUCY MARY 
C. AIKIN, BURNS, CAMPBELL JANE EVELINE 
b. 1877. b. 1881. FFARDE. 



MARGARET=EDMUND EMU. 



RONALD, 
m. 1869; 
d. 1870. 



JACGER, of the 

Wurtemberg 

Army. 



JANET JAMES STEWART ROBERTSON, Esq . 
BEATRICE, of Colquhalzie, and yr. of 

m. 1880. Edradynatc, Perthshire. 



FREDERICK 
E. RONALD 
CAMPBELL. 



ALICE 
MARGARET. 



i 
LUCY 
CAMPBELL. 



JOHN MORSHEAD, 
74th Regiment, 
b. 1 784; killed 
at Assaye 1803. 



ALLAN WILLIAM. 

Lieut.-Col. 74th 
Regiment, b. 1786 ; 
fell 1813 at Battle of 
Pyrenees. (Note 16.) 



who with her husband and 
two children were lost at sea 
off the coast of Africa, near 
Natal, when under the con- 
voy of H.M.S. " Blenheim," 
Sir T. Truebridge, Vice- Admiral, 
commanding, also lost, 1808 or 9 



OLYM PI A, = ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Esq.. 



of Gartsford, Ross-shire, 
Banker, Madras. 



ist, MARGARET CHARLOTTE, = Sir ALEX. THOMAS COCKUURN-CA.MPUELL,= 

eldest dau. of second baronet, d. 1871 at Albany, 

Sir J. Malcolm, G.C.B., | West Australia, 

m. 1827. 



J, GRACE, dau. of J. Spence, Esq. 

= 3rd, SOPHIE J. TRIMMER. 
S.P. 



CHARLOTTE OLYMPIA. =2nd, FREDERICK 
ISABELLA, PALLNIT/., 

unm oflppesheim. 



\VOI.I--GA.NG. HILHEGOND. 



I 
LALI.A. 



r 
Sir ALEXANDER, 
3rd Baronet, 
b. 1843; d. 1871, 
unm. 


T 

Sir THOMAS, ; 
present Baronet, 
Member of Legis- 
lative Council, 
West Australia, 
m. 1870. 
AL 


-LUCY ANN, dau. of 
Arthur Trimmer, Esq., 
West Australia. 


i 
CECILIA. 
unm. 


i ~ 
:XANDER THOMAS, Oilier 
b. 1872. children. 



VIII. 

OF ACHALADER, PERTHSHIRE. 



l.orisA.= (' wriiF.i.L, Esq., 
I of Aclilinc. 
Y 



JANE = CAMERON, Esq., her 

^ cousin, of K.issifern. 
Their oldest son became 
Sir 1C. Cameron, of Lochiel. 



ANNK. = CAMPHKI.L, I 
of Auch. 

Y 



MARGARET, 
d. unm. 



1 1 1 
AK< ALI>. MARUARET, dan. of ist, OLYMriA=Sir ALEXANDER, K.C.B.,=2nd, ELIZABETH ANN, dau. COLINA. Lou ISA MAXWELL. 
.1. 1825 in Admiral Edwards, El.i/AMETli, i>tl!art., of Rev. F. Pemberton, SceMclfort See Macdougall 
London, of Rhy-d-Gorse, dan. of William d. 1824 at Madras, Com- m. 1808 ; d. 1870. Pcd. Fed. 


Soth Regt. ofCartuther, Forces. (Note 15.) ARTIH-K 


FLORA 
ELIZABETH, 
m. 1833 ; 

.1. 1852. 

j 


= Hon. and Ven. Archdeacon 
11. R. VORKK, M.A., 
Canon of Ely, d. 1871. 

-PHILIP SIDNEY, b. 1834. 

-HENRY ELIOT, b. 1841 ; 
d. 1864. 

-REGINALD BEAUCHAMT, 
b. 1844; m. CAROLINA, 
dau. of Curwen Boyde, 
d. 1881. 

-HORATIO ARTHUR, li. 
1848. 

-ALEXANDER CAMPBF.I i , 
b. 1852. 




LEY, d. an 
infant. 


JOHN EDWARDS, SARAH JANE, dan. of ISABELI,A,=ALDERSON HODSON, Esq., 4th Dragoon 
1). 1798 ; m. 1828; William Lougham, Esq., d. 1840. Guards; served in the campaigns of 
d. 1871 ; Colonel Lieut. 62th Regiment. 1811-12 ; d. 1859. 

<>f Gordon High- S.P. 

landers. 

{ A'(j//r 1 * \ i . i 


Am IIIIIAI.I) K[>WARr>s, = Lucv, dau. of JOHN, d. an WILLIAM 
1). 1834 ; m. 1861 ; Capt. Garden, infant. FREDERICK, 
Lieut.-i ,,]. II.M.I.A. R.E. 1>. 1844 ; Captain 
(Note 14.) Royal Marines. 


JOHN, ANNIE. CECILIA, = CARL S. BAYLEY, Esq., ALICE. FLORENCE. EMILY. 
d. an m. 1880. Under Secretary Bengal 
infant. Revenue Department, 
India. 


MIETH, ------ TOWEL J. COMYN, S. JANE MARGARETTE,=GEORGE WATSON, Esq., 
m. 1848. Cajn. Il.M I.A., m. 1864. Admiral R.N. 
d. in India. 




l-'KEi>K.RU-K, 111.1878. R.N., son of Major-Gen. CAMPBELL, BATSCH. 
l>. 1850. Burke, R.E., of Marble b. 1866. 
Hill, co. Gahvay. 

JAMES H. C. ULICK, 
b. 1879. 


Fl.ORA= 

CAROLINE, 
m. 1859. 

^ 


= \V. CURRIE, Esq., SUSAN=C. HAMBRO, 
of Rushden AMELIA, Esq., of 
Mouse, Higham m. 1857. Milton 
Ferrers, Abbey. 
Northamptonshire. 

/ N' 



ISABELLA CHAKI...I IK. Sir Jons MALCOLM. G.C.B., H.K.I.C.S., AMELIA. =SlR JOHN KINNIER MCDONALD, K.C.B, 



m. 1807 ; 
d. 1867. 


b. 1769 ; d. 1833 in London ; late HARIETTE. 
Envoy to Persia and ( lovernor of Bombay d. 1860. 
(Note 17.) ^. 


of Sanda, N.H., d. 1830; British 
Envoy to Persia. 
P. 






i , C.B. 
ilonel i>f IO5th 
Regiment, 
m. 1845. 
(Note 18.) 
.$. 


Gr.OKHIANA V'ERNON, M ARC.ARET = Sir A. T. COCKBURN-CAMPBEI.L, OLYMl'IA, 
dau. of Archbishop CHARLOTTE. her first cousin. 01.1849. 
Harcourt. 

N 
/'. HlLDI 


^Count USEDOM, 
of the Island of 
Rugen, Pomerania, 
his property. 

OOKD. 


i 

AMELIA 

ANN, 
d. 1873, 
unm. 


CATHERINE 
WEI.LESLEV. 




YIIL 



i. 

THE mother of Mary MacGregor was Catherine Stewart, of Bonspeil. Catherine's 
mother was daughter of Duncan MacGregor ; her grandmother a daughter of Stirling of 
Keir. The grandfather of John Stewart of Bonspeil was David Moir, son of the Earl 
of Mar. 

II. 

Donald Stewart's grandmother, on the father's side, was a daughter of Cameron of 
Lochiel; his mother was Fimule, daughter of Clanranald by Marian, daughter of Maclean 
of Ardgour. 

III. 

Colin MacPherson's mother was daughter of Hugh Fraser of Lovat ; Margery's 
mother was daughter of MacLeod of Harris. 

IV. 

The mother of Agnes MacNab was Mary, daughter of Duncan Campbell, of Glen- 
lyon ; Mary's mother was Jane Ogilvie, daughter of the Laird of Powrie ; her grandmother 
was Mary, daughter of the Earl of Dundee. The mother of John MacNab of Borane 
was Catherine Campbell, daughter of Sir Duncan Campbell, of Glenorchy ; her mother 
was Mary Graham, daughter of Sir James Graham, of Bran ; her grandmother was 
Catherine, daughter of Sir J. Rollo. 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 45 



V. 

Major Archibald Campbell was recommended by the Earl of Breadalbane for a 
commission as Captain in the Keith and Campbell Highland regiments, known as the 
Old 77th and 78th, raised for service in Germany in 1759. These two battalions joined 
the campaign under the Hereditary Prince of Brunswick 1760. 

Major Campbell was wounded at Zierenberg, and killed, July, 1762, at the battle of 
Fclinghausen. He received his majority a few days before he fell in battle. The reason 
of his promotion is thus recorded : " He having, with a party of Highlanders, rescued 
General Griffin, afterwards Lord Howard of Walden, from a strong detachment of the 
enemy. Major Campbell was brother of Achalader, who by his classical learning and 
acquirements attracted the notice of Lord Lyttelton." (See " Highland Clans and 
Regiments.") 

VI. 

Lieutenant Patrick Campbell joined the Loudoun Highlanders, raised in 1745. This 
regiment took part in quelling the rebellion which then broke out. After its suppression 
they embarked for Flanders 1747. At the peace of 1748 they returned to Scotland, 
and were reduced the same year. Lieut. Patrick Campbell died in America ; we may 
presume he joined one of the Highland regiments serving there during the war. 



VII. 

Lieut.-Colonel John Campbell commanded the third battalion of Breadalbane 
Fencibles in Ireland, where he died 1799. 

VIII 

John Livington entered the Coldstream Guards, and served with them in Egypt, 
1 80 1, under Sir Ralph Abercrombie. He left the army at the termination of the 
expedition. 

IX. 

John Livington joined the 67th Regiment in 1838 ; served with it in Canada. In 
1 842 was promoted into the 5th Regiment ; he retired from the service the following year. 

X. 

Lieutenant John Livington entered the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, 1870; 
received his commission in Royal Engineers 1872. Served in Jouaki Campaign and 
Afghan Campaign from 1878 to 1880; medals. Serving iSSi. 



46 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 



XI. 

Lieutenant Frederick Colin Livington, Naval Cadet, 1868; Midshipman, 1869; 
Lieutenant, 1876. Serving 1881. 

XII. 

General Archibald Campbell entered the army in the Breadalbane Fencibles ; he 
was from them placed on the Staff, and in 1799 and 1800, commanded, as Brigadier- 
General, at the Windward Islands, stationed at St. Vincent. When the rank of 
Brigadier-General was done away, he returned to his former rank as Colonel. He held 
a command in Ireland, and as Major-General was attached to the Portuguese Brigade in 
the Peninsula. At the time of his decease he was General and Lieut-Colonel of the 
6th Foot. He died in London 1825 ; and was laid in a vault in St. James's Church, 
Piccadilly ; in the church is a mural tablet to his memory. Our record is not so full or so 
exact as we could wish ; but access to his private papers and documents relating to the 
Achalader family has been prohibited by his son, the late General John Edwards 
Campbell, until a certain period, not yet elapsed. 



XIII. 

General John Edwards Campbell entered the Army as Ensign in the 46th Regiment 
January, 1812. Served with his regiment in the Waterloo Campaign; was wounded at 
Quatre Bras. He was appointed Aide-de-Camp to SirW. MacBean in the first Burmese 
War, and was present at the taking of Rangoon, and in some subsequent actions. He 
was ordered out to Canada during the rebellion of 1838, on particular service, and was 
appointed to the command of the Beauhanois District. In 1839 he was promoted for his 
services to the rank of Brevet Lieut.-Colonel. Colonel, 1851 ; General, 1857 ; Colonel of 
the 97th Regiment, 1861; succeeded Lord Strathnairn as Colonel of the Gordon High- 
landers, 1864. Died at Plymouth, 1871. Medals, Burmah ; and Waterloo Campaign. 



XIV. 

Lieut.-Colonel Archibald Edwards Campbell, Deputy Commissioner 2nd Grade, 
Seebsaugor, Assam. He served with the 3 ist Bengal Native Infantry during the Sonthal 
Campaign of 1855-56; also at Saugor in Central India during 1857 and 1858. Present 
at numerous engagements in the district of Saugor, and was severely wounded on the 
1 8th September, 1857 in the attack on the fortified village of Nurricoulee (medal, with 
clasps). Serving in Assam, 1881. 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 47 

XV. 

General Sir Alexander Campbell, Bart., K.C.B., entered the army in 1776 as an 
Knsign in the Royal Scots. \Y;is present at the memorable Siege of Gibraltar ; served 
in India, commanding the 74th Regiment, which took part in the storming of Seringa 
pat. tin, 1799, and the battle of Assaye, 1803, when his eldest son, John MorsheadCamp 
hell, was killed. After the battle of Assaye, it was thus recorded in General Orders : 
"The very spirited attack led by Colonel Alexander Campbell, of the 74th Regiment, 
which tended so greatly to secure the position our troops had attained in the enemy's 
works, claimed the strongest approbation of the Commander-in-Chief." Sir Alexander 
commanded the Fourth Division of the army at the battle of Talavera ; he was severely 
wounded, and had three horses killed under him. In 1812 he had the honour of 
officiating as proxy for the then Earl of Wellington at his lordship's installation as 
Knight of the Bath, and received himself the honour of knighthood. He was Governor 
of the Island of Mauritius in 1815, and was afterwards appointed Commander-in-Chief of 
the Forces at Madras, where he died in 1824. 

Sir Alexander, in acknowledgment of his services in the field, was created a Baronet 
in 1815. Having lost both his sons in the service of their country, he received in 
1821, by Royal favour, a renewed patent for the purpose of extending the limitation to 
the sons of his daughters. Sir Alexander was Colonel of the 8oth Regiment at the time 
of his decease. He was allowed to bear on his arms, over all, a chief argent, charged 
with a rock, subscribed, " Gibraltar." He received from the Supreme Government of 
India a silver medal for Seringapatam ; for his services at Talavera, a gold medal. He 
was succeeded in the baronetcy by the only son of his eldest daughter, Mrs. Cockburn, 
who thus became Sir Alexander Cockburn-Campbell, which latter name he was required 
to assume. 

XVI. 

Brevet Lieut.-Colonel Allan William Campbell received his commission in the 74th 
Regiment. During the Peninsular War he was attached to the 4th Portuguese regiment. 
He fought with it at the battle of Vittoria, and was severely wounded while leading it 
into action at the battle of the Pyrenees, July 28, 1813 ; fever supervening after the 
amputation of his leg, he died the following October at Bilbao, to which place he was 
carried on the shoulders of his men for embarkation to England. He was Major of the 
~4th Regiment, and received for his services the rank of Brevet Lieut.-Colonel in the 
Mritish army. After his death his family received a letter written by command of His 
Majesty King George IV., then Prince Regent, accompanied by the medal for Vittoria, 
which he wished them to receive in token of his recognition of the distinguished services 
of this gallant young officer. A stone has been placed over his grave at Bilbao by his 
relatives. 



48 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 



XVII. 

Major-General Sir John Malcolm, G.C.B. and F.R.S., was the fourth son of George 
Malcolm, of Burnfoot, Eskdale, Dumfriesshire. He received a commission in the 
Honourable East India Company's service, 1 781, when only thirteen years of age. Kaye, 
in his life of Sir John, relates " that when taken to the India House to appear before the 
Directors, fears were entertained that his youthful appearance would make rejection 
probable. When one of the Directors said to him, ' Why, my little man, what would 
you do if you were to meet Hyder Ali ? ' ' Do, sir why out with my sworcl and cut off 
his head ! ' ' You will do,' was the rejoinder ; and let him pass." A wise decision. The 
life of Sir John was one of honourable and chivalrous devotion to his country, he has left 
an indelible mark on India's history. He was at once a soldier, a statesman, a politician, 
a diplomatist, and was possessed of unusual literary ability. From his youth he was con- 
fidentially employed in India in the highest political and military affairs, and while serving 
his country he did his utmost to improve the condition and happiness of the natives of 
India, by whom his memory is gratefully cherished. He was Envoy to Persia, of which 
country he wrote a history. In 1827 he was appointed Governor of Bombay, which 
appointment he held till 1830, when he left India, never to return. A farewell banquet 
was given to him by the Directors of the East India Company, on his departure for 
Bombay. The Duke of Wellington, in returning thanks on his own account, spoke 
proudly and kindly of his old comrade and friend, saying, " It is now thirty years since 
I formed an intimate friendship with Sir John Malcolm ; during that eventful period 
there has been no operation of consequence, no diplomatic measure in which my friend 
has not borne a conspicuous part, alike distinguished by courage and by talent. The 
history of his life during that period would be the history of the glory of his country 
in India." 

The last days of his life were employed in the interests of the East India Company. 
Placing himself at the head of the Conservative party, he defended their position with all 
his ability. He died in London, after a short illness, in 1833. Sir John received the 
Grand Cross of the most honourable order of the Bath, and was made Knight of the 
Persian order of the Lion and the Sun. An obelisk was erected to his memory by his 
countrymen, " The men of Eskdale," and there is a fine statue of him by Chantrey in 
Westminster Abbey ; this was raised by voluntary subscriptions. The " Life and Corres- 
pondence of Sir John Malcolm," written by the historian J. W. Kaye, is well worthy 
of notice. 

XVIII. 

General George Alexander 'Malcolm, C.B., entered the 6th Foot as Ensign, 1825 ; 
Lieutenant in the 3rd Buffs, 1827; Captain in the 6oth Rifles, 1831 ; Major 3rd Light 
Dragoons, 1839 ; Lieutenant-Colonel, 1842 ; retired on half-pay in consequence of illness 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS < >K M l-I.I-'i iRT. 49 

contracted in China; Major -General, 1858; Lieutenant-General, 1867; General, 1874. 
General Malcolm was Aide-de-Camp to his father, Sir John Malcolm, when Governor of 
Bombay, from 1827 to 1830. In 1841 he was appointed Secretary to the Embassy sent 
by her Majesty to China, and when the war of 1841 1843 broke out he acted as 
Aide-de-Camp to Sir Hugh (late Viscount) Gough ; for his services during the war in 
China he was made C.B., and promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. At the 
conclusion of the war he was sent home by Sir Henry Pottinger with the treaty of peace 
signed by the Emperor of China. A few days after his arrival in England, loth December, 
1842, his name, with those of many other officers, appeared in the Gazette for promotion, 
and other acknowledgment of services. Concluding that this was for having been the 
bearer of the treaty, he waited on Lord Aberdeen to tender his thanks. His lordship 
replied, " that he had nothing to thank him for, as he had written by Her Majesty's desire, 
stating her wish that he should receive some promotion for his civil services, but was 
informed that Major Malcolm's name had been returned on the list to be promoted for 
military service, he having been mentioned in the Despatches of Sir Hugh Gough." 
Lord Aberdeen then added, " We therefore still remain in your debt." His lordship then 
stated that Lieut.-Colonel Malcolm would be required to return to China immediately to 
be the bearer of the treaty signed by Her Majesty. Lieut.-Colonel Malcolm pleaded that 
the state of his health and the warning of his medical men rendered it almost impossible for 
him to return, as he was suffering from fever, the effects of the climate. Lord Aberdeen 
replied, he was sorry to hear this, as he had no one who could supply his place, and 
added, " Her Majesty expects that you will return." This left him no alternative. He 
replied that he would start as soon as required, which he did in ten days, just twenty- 
three days after his arrival in England. 

On his reporting this conversation to His Grace the Duke of Wellington, the Duke 
observed, " You have done quite right ; take my word for it, the Government will not 
forget you." Unfortunately, these hopes were never fulfilled, as notwithstanding Her 
Majesty's gracious intentions, expressed to Lord Aberdeen, no recognition of his 
services was ever received by him, although his rank as Secretary of Legation would 
have justified his nomination to almost any appointment. 

On his return to China he suffered severely from fever. He remained there a 
few months, and then returned to England with the Commercial Treaty, so entirely 
broken in health that he was obliged to resign his appointment as Colonial Secretary of 
Hong Kong, and also to go on half pay, thus losing the opportunity of commanding his 
regiment, the 3rd Light Dragoons, during the war in the Punjaub. 

In 1858 Colonel Malcolm was appointed Deputy Adjutant-General at Alexandria, 
to superintend the transit of troops across Egypt to India; while in Egypt he became 
Major-General. He was appointed Colonel of the iO5th Regiment, March, 1866, and 
was placed on the retired list 1880. 

7 




THE 



MACDOUGALLS OF MACDOUGALL, 

OF DUNOLLIE CASTLE, ARGYLLSHIRE. 

CHIEF OF CLAN. The Chief of Clan was entitled to wear in the bonnet, according to usage, an eagle's feather, 

to mark his rank. 



Taken from FAMILY RECORDS and HISTORICAL SOURCES, 





1 HE MacDougalls of Lorn were anciently Lords of Argyll " de Argerdie," and 
are so designated in very early writs. Lorn was originally a petty kingdom, 
the residence of its king being the Castle of Dunolla (now Dunollie). It 
subsequently became a lordship, and was often excepted from terms with 
England. At one time it included within its boundaries the west part of Athol. 
About the beginning of the twelfth century, Sommerled ruled in Argyll ; by a daughter 
of Olans (Skene, in his "Celtic Scotland," calls this king Olave), king of Man 
and the Isles, he had four sons, Dougal, Reginald, Angus, and Alan. The eldest 
son, Dougal, who erected his inheritance into a principality, was grandfather of 
Alexander MacDougall, of Lorn, who fought and defeated King Robert Bruce at 
Dalree in Perthshire, 1306; his son, John MacDougall, was succeeded by his son, 
Ewen MacDougall, father of John MacDougall of Dunollie, whose son, John Mac- 
Dougall, entered by Charter from Argyll in 1536, and another in 1547 ; he was father 
of Dougal MacDougall, who entered to his lands by Charter from Argyll in 1562 and 
1567 ; his son, Duncan MacDougall, obtained a Charter from King James IV., dated 
1590. He was succeeded by his son, Sir John MacDougall, who married and had two 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 51 

sons, Duncan, who died S.P., and Allan, who succeeded his brother and obtained from 
King James VII. a Charter of the greater part of the lands of Lorn, dated at Windsor, 
1686. His son and heir joined the rising in 1715, and suffered forfeiture in conse- 
quence ; he married Mary, daughter of Sir John MacDonald, of Sleat, by his wife, the 
Lady Margaret Douglas, second daughter of Robert, eighth Earl of Morton, and left 
two daughters, the eldest of whom married John MacLaine, of Lochbuy, and a son and 
successor, Alexander MacDougall, who was restored to the greater part of his father's 
forfeited estates by Charter from the Duke of Argyll, 1745 ; he married Mary, daughter 
of Campbell of Barcaldine. 

In historical records we find that the MacDougalls, with their cousins, the 
Comyns, supported the cause of Baliol, and in a Parliament held at Ardchattan, at which 
MacDougall, then Lord of Lorn, was present, his estate was forfeited and given to his 
uncle, Duncan MacDougall, for his fidelity to Bruce in the contention between Bruce 
and Baliol for the crown of Scotland. It was at this time that the superiority and 
lands of Lorn, or part of them, were bestowed upon the Stewarts of the family of 
Inversneith ; these lands afterwards became, by marriage, the possession of the 
Argylls. Their estates were partly restored to the MacDougalls in the direct line after 
some years, about 1562. 

The story of the brooch of Lorn is interesting, and must not be omitted. King 
Robert Bruce, as he fought against the MacDougalls, whose chief was then Lord of 
Lorn, at Dalree in Strathfillan, was in his hasty retreat in great danger of his life, a 
MacDougall having caught him by the mantle or plaid, and held him so strongly, that 
the king was obliged to loosen the buckle of his brooch which fastened it. The 
king turning round, knocked his enemy on the head with a steel hammer made in 
the form of an axe, who nevertheless tore away, with his dying grasp, both mantle and 
brooch ; they were kept by the MacDougalls as a token of their victory. The later 
vicissitudes of the brooch are as follows: In the year 1674 the Castle of Gylan in the 
island of Kerrara, belonging to the MacDougalls, was taken and burnt by General Leslie 

Campbell of Inverawe is said to have possessed himself of the brooch, and it 
remained in that family until it passed into the possession of a cadet of the house, who 
appointed it by will to be sold, and the proceeds to be divided amongst the younger chil- 
dren. It was offered for sale in London, but the price wanted could not be obtained ; 
some say George IV. offered ^"500 for it. Ultimately, in 1825, General Campbell, of 
Lochnell, purchased or became possessed of the brooch in some way ; he presented it 
to Admiral Sir John MacDougall at Inverary at a County Meeting. 

The old Castle of Dunollie remains still a picturesque feature of the surrounding 
scenery. Standing on its rocky height as a watch tower overlooking the sea, the keep of 
the old castle, with its thick wall, is well preserved, and all is cared for ; for many years 
an eagle had its home there. In the avenue, as you approach the house, is a large rock 
known as the Dog Stone. Tradition says that to it Ossian fastened his dog, Bran. 

The " Cypress" is the badge of the MacDougalls. 



No. 



PEDIGREE OF THE MACDOUGALLS OF 



SOMMERLED MACDOUGALL.=A daughter of Olans, 



He ruled in Argyll about the beginning 
of the twelfth century. 

i 

DOUGAL,= 
succeeded his father ; 
he was followed by 
his grandson, ALEXANDER, of Lorn. = 
He fought and conquered King 
Robert Bruce at Dalree in 
1306. 



King of Man and 
the Isles. 



REGINALD. ANGUS. ALAN. 



JOIIN.=- 
EWIN.= 



JOHN, = 
of Dunollie. | 

i ' 

JOHN,= 

entered by Charter 
from Argyll 1536 
and 1547. 

DOUGAL, = 

entered by Charter I 

from Argyll 1562 and 1567. | 

DUNCAN, = 
obtained Charter from King James IV. 1590. | 

Sir JOHN, = 
left two sons. | 



I 

DUNCAN, 
died s.p. 



ALLAN, = 

succeeded his brother ; he obtained 
from King James VII. a Charter of the 
greater part of Lorn, dated 1686. 



JOHN, = MARY, dau. of Sir James MacDonald, of Sleat, 

he joined the rising in 1715, and suffered by his wife, the Lady Margaret Douglas, 
forfeiture in consequence. 

ALEXANDER, = MARY, dau. of Patrick Campbell, of 



b. 1713 ;m. 1737; 

was restored to the greater part of his father's 
forfeited estates 1745. 



Barcaldine, by his wife, Lucia, dau. 
of Sir Ewen Cameron, of Locheil. 



r r i 
SUSIE, JOHN, MARY, 
(Old style. ) b. 1738; b.1739; b. 1741. 
d. 1763. d. young. 


PATRICK, = LOUISA MAXWELL, ALLAN, DUNCAN,=A daughter of 
b. 1742; d. 1841 ; dau. of b. 1743; of Ardentrive, Captain Niel 
m. 1782; John Campbell, Esq., d. young. b. 1744. Campbell, 
d. 1825. of Achalader. Y ofDuntroon. 


ALEXANDER, (Note i.) Sir JOHN, K.C.B.,= 
b. 1785 ; of Dunollie, 
killed at Ciudad Vice-Admiral R.N., 
Rodrigo 1812. b. 1789; m. 1826; 
d. 1865 at Dunollie. 


ELIZABETH SOPHIA, PATRICK, ALLAN ELIZABETH=MACDOUGALL, her 
d. June, 1881, only b. 1791 ; DUNCAN, SUTHERLAND, I cousin, killed at 
child of Charles d. 1851, unm. b. 1798; b. Jan., 1783. Cattalla in Spain 
Timins, Esq., of Major in the d. 1876, i ' during the war. 
Oriel Lodge, Chel- Army; served unm. LOUISA, = H. JOY, Esq. 
tenham. in India. W. S. of Edinb. m. 1833^ 


ALEXANDER,= 
Capt. R.A., 
b. 1827 ; 
m. 1867 ; 
d. one month 
after 5. 
his marriage. 


i 1 I 
= ANNA, dau. 5. F - " "^ P* n a"~o HENRY- 
of Bar- 3--3-H 3.5,0 > S? ROBERT 
clay, Esq. ;o"'-. M 2 3 < * 2 2.? LAWRENCE, 
= 5-.fg ?"a,S ^p- Indian 
rFlP" ^O ~ Medical 
/* L, " 3, r 5 %; -T ^ %* Serv ice. 

4* t 5' .T - M-^S''' > 


I i 
=CAROLINE, ..JF'g 1 SOPHIA= 
dau. ofj. N. g2j| ELIZA- 
Forsyth, ^ a g g BETH, 
Esq., of |g.S m. 
Quinifh, MO, M 1853 ; 
Mull. , 5 ' S a d. 

" a'- 


= Sir ANGUS t" 1 B 
CAMPBELL, 
Bart., Cap- 
tain.ofDun- * 
staffnage, 
d. 1863. 

H 

a 



ALEXANDER JOHN SOPHIA WINNIFRED 

JAMES, PATRICK, MAGDALINE. JULIA. 
b. 1872. b. 1875. 



2. 
W 



ACDOUGALL, OF DUNOLLIE CASTLK, ARGYLLSHIRE. 



1 
JEAN, 


1 i 
ALEXANDER 


I 
ANNA, 


i 
JEAN, 


ELIZABETH, 


COLINA, 


ALEXANDER, 


JAMES, 


'. 1745 : 


and ALLAN, 


b. 1748. 


b. 1750. 


b. 1751. 


b. 1753. 


b. 1754. 


b. 1756. 


1. young. 


b. 1747; Alex- 








new style. 








ander d. young. 















,', and ISABELLA, MAcDoucALL, MARY, LOUISA ALICE COLINA, = ist,D. CAMPBELL, MARY JANE, CHARLES HALE 



b. Dec., 1783; 

d. young. 



her cousin, of 1x1784, MAXWELL, b. 1799; 
the Ardentrive d. young. b. 1795; d. 1856. 

family. d. 1843 

unm. 



of Balliveolan, 
Argyllshire. 



m. 1828; 
1. 1856. 



= 2nd, Lock, Esq. 



DONALD PATRICK, 

of Balliveolan, 
retired as Captain 

from 
92nd Highlanders. 



HARRIET ELIZABETH HALE, 

m. 1855, his cousin, 
dau. of Chas. Hale Monro, Esq. 



DONALD, MARY LOUISA, = HERBERT NAPIER 
d. 1863. m. 1858. | BUNBURY, Esq., 
. . ' late Royal Artillery. 



EDITH. 



MABEL 
STEWART. 



PATRICK, 
b. 1869. 



RICHARD, 
b. 1880. 



MONRO, Esq., 

of Ingsdon, 

South Devon, 

d. 1867. 



r, 

H 



\\ I X \NDER 

IAMF.S HALF., 

b. 1828 ; 

m. 1855 ; 

retired from 

I ho 36th 

Regiment as 

Captain 1855; 

now of 

Ingsdon. 



MARION, 

dau. of 
('.. \Vhitting- 

ton, Esq., 
ofParkfield, 
Lancashire. 



SEYMOUR 

VASSALL 

HALE, g8th 

Highlanders, 

d. 1853 at 

Poonah. 



Ai KXANDEK = GEORGIANA, LouisA=Rev. JAMES WARNER BARTON, 



P. HALF., 
b. 1834; 
d. 1868. 



S: YMOUR 

I'll ARLES 

HALF.. 
b. 1856 ; 

Lieut. 72nd 

Highlanders. 

(Note 3.) 



HELEN COLINA 
LOUISA MARION 
HALE. HALE. 



dau. of C. 
Symonds, 

Esq., 
Oxfordshire. 



CAMPBELL, 
HALE. 



eldest son of Rev. H. J. Barton, 
of Wicken Rectory. 



HARRIET 
ELIZABETH 

HALF.. 
See above. 



CHARLES 
JAMES, 
b. 1857. 



GEOR<;F 

SEYMOUR, 

b. 1863. 



MARY 

KATHERINK. 



ARCHIBALD 

V \-*v\i i HALE, 

b. 1868. 



GEORGE 

A. HALE, 

b. 1870. 



JOHN 

R. HALE, 

b. 1874. 



BEATRICE 
M. HALE. 



CHRISSIA 
T. HALF.. 



IX. 



i. 

(Abridged from his own statement.') 

VICE ADMIRAL SIR JOHN MACDOUGALL, K.C.B., entered the navy 1802. In June, 
1803, ne captured and took, after an engagement of an hour and a half, an armed brig 
and schooner off Boulogne. In 1804 joined the "Doris," Captain Campbell (after- 
wards Sir Patrick Campbell, K.C.B.) remained with that vessel till she was wrecked 
in Quiberon Bay; then joined the "Hero;" was in the action of 23rd July off Cape 
Finisterre, where the " Hero " led the fleet under Sir R. Calder, and bore a conspicuous 
part in the action. Joined the " Unite" (Captain Campbell) in 1806 ; commanded one 
of the boats in an attack on five vessels under a battery on the coast of I stria. In 1807 
assisted at the reduction of the island of Pedro de Minbo ; also in June the same year 
commanded division of boats at the capture of several vessels in the river Po. Com- 
manded one of the boats of the "Unite" at the capture of a French privateer 
off Ancona after a severe action ; also took with the eight-oared cutter a French 
privateer with two guns and thirty-six men. In May, 1808, captured "Italia," 
sloop of war. ' Commanded one of the boats of the "Unite" when they attacked 
three Turkish ships and several small vessels ; boarded and carried them after a 
desperate resistance, boats suffering severely, and the Turks having upwards of thirty 
killed. He was given an acting order as Lieutenant for the action of 23rd April, 1805. 
Received a wound in the head in an endeavour to cut off some vessels full of troops 
near Corfu. In 1809 several actions with boats ; cut out two large vessels from under 
a fort, when the boats suffered much ; the same year joined the " Ville de Paris " on the 
, return of the " Unite" to England. Was promoted by Lord Collingwood to the rank of 
Lieutenant for volunteering services at the attack of armed vessels in the Bay of Rosas. 
Wounded when boarding a vessel of fourteen guns. In June, 1812, when again in the 
" Unite," was strongly recommended to the Admiralty for destroying, with the boats 
of the squadron, several armed vessels off Cape Otranto. Appointed in 1813 to the 
" Leander," and came several times into action with the enemy on the coast of North 
America.' In 1815 to the " Superbe," Captain Elkin, in which ship received two 



A HISTORY OK THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 55 

wounds at the bombardment of Algiers, 1816. August, 1818, appointed Flag Lieutenant 
to Rear Admiral Donald Campbell, on the West India Station. Received the thanks 
of the King of Denmark for saving the crew of a Danish vessel during a hurricane. In 
1833 appointed to the " Nimrod " during the revolutionary commotion. Appointed to 
" Salamanda," 1836, and promoted to rank of Captain. In 1845 appointed to H.M. 
Steam-ship " Vulture," and proceeded to China ; whilst in command of her and as senior 
officer in China, captured the Bogue Forts in the Canton River, spiking 879 large guns. 
In 1849 commanded the " Hogue," and attended Her Majesty to Scotland. In 1855 
was appointed Superintendent of the Mail and Transport Service at Southampton during 
the Russian War. Vice- Admiral MacDougall was made K.C.B. in 1862. He had 
the War Medal and three clasps. He died at Dunollie 1865. 

II. 

Colonel Charles Alan MacDougall served with the 79th Highlanders during the 
Indian Mutiny. He was present at the final siege and capture of Lucknow ; served as 
Adjutant to Ross's Camel Corps ; was at the taking of Calpee near Cawnpore, and when 
with this corps was wounded in an engagement with the rebels in the Jugdipore district, 
October, 1858 ; also wounded in 1854 in an engagement with the frontier tribes near 
Peshawur. Medals, Indian Mutiny, two clasps; Frontier Medal. Retired from the 
Service in February, 1870. 

III. 

Lieutenant Seymour C. Hale Monro served in the 72nd Highlanders with the 
Wurmn Column in the Afghan Campaign of 1878-9. Was present at the recon- 
naisance in force at the Peiwar Kotal on 28th November; the assault of the Peiwar 
Kotal 2nd December (wounded and mentioned in Despatches), and the passage of the 
Chappin Defile on i3th of the same month ; also the Afghan Campaign of 1879-80 ; was 
present at the action of Charasiab and subsequent occupation of Cabul, the operations 
in and around Cabul, and final repulse of the enemy 23rd December, 1879. Accom- 
panied, as Adjutant 72nd Highlanders, the Cabul- Kandahar field force under command 
of Sir Frederick Roberts, G.C.B., in the march from Cabul to Kandahar. Was present 
at the reconnaissance in force at Kandahar 3ist August, and battle of Kandahar on ist 
September, 1880 (very severely wounded and mentioned in Despatches). Medal, with 
four clasps ; Bronze Star for the Cabul- Kandahar march. Serving 1881. 




THE CAMPBELLS OF LOCHEND. 



FORMERLY KNOWN AS ALSO OF 



ARDEONAIG AND KILPUNT, PERTHSHIRE. 



Anangedfrom LEGAL DOCUMENTS and PRIVATE PAPERS in possession cf the Family. 





ATRICK, known as Para-dhu-mpre, viz., Big-black-Patrick, was 
the progenitor of the Campbells of Ardeonaig in Killin, Perth- 
shire. He was a younger son of Sir Duncan Campbell, 
seventh Laird and first Baronet of Glenorchy, who is described 
by the name of Donacha-dhu-na-Curich, or Duncan with a 
Cowl. Patrick Campbell received from his father the lands of 
Mulagenbeg in Glenlochy, parish of Kenmore ; also lands in 
Edinkip. In 1617 Sir Duncan Campbell was appointed 
heritable keeper of the forest of Mamlorn, and in 1623 we find 
Patrick Campbell, of Mulagenbeg, forester thereof. This 

Patrick Campbell was slain in the hills of Ardeonaig by a party of the clan MacGregor, 
but not before he had killed eighteen of them with his own hand. In the burial-ground 
at Killin, Perthshire, there is a stone with this inscription : " The burial place of the 
descendants of Para-dhu-more." He was succeeded by his son Alexander, who married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Campbell, of Glenlyon ; he was the officer in command 
of the Military at the massacre of Glencoe, 1692. Janet, the youngest daughter of this 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 57 

Robert, became the wife of Robert Campbell, of Boreland ; she was the mother of 
Campbell of Carwhin, grandfather of the second Marquis of Breadalbane. John, the 
grandson of Alexander, married Alice, eldest daughter and heiress of Campbell of 
Kinpunt, or Kilpunt as usually called. By this marriage the family of Ardeonaig and 
Lochend was united to that of Kilpunt. 

The Campbells of Kilpunt claim descent from Sir John Campbell, of Lawers, who 
was descended through the line of Breadalbane from the Black Knights of Lochawe 
(Argyll). Sir John was knighted at the coronation of Anne, consort of James VI., 
1 590 ; he had by his wife Beatrix, eldest daughter of Sir Colin Campbell of Glenorchy, 
three sons : viz., Sir James Campbell, father of John, the first Earl of Loudoun ; Colin, 
his second son, ancestor of the Campbells of Aberuchill ; and Archibald, Prior of 
Strathfellan. The Prior was a confidential agent of the Earl of Argyll. In 1614 he 
rendered himself very active against the Clanronald rebels in I slay, and we are 
told that " many images connected with the Catholic form of worship were destroyed 
by his zeal." We may assume that at this date he had changed his faith. He 
married Elizabeth Napier ; their son Archibald was styled Superior of the Lands 
and Barony of Kilpunt in Linlithgowshire, dated 1673. Archibald Campbell of Kilpunt 
married for his second wife Janet, daughter of Sir William Gray, of Pittendrum. 
Alexander of Kilpunt, the great-grandson of Archibald the Prior, had for his second 
wife Margaret, daughter of Sir Alexander Dalmahoy, second baronet and fifteenth 
Laird of Dalmahoy. He married Alicia, daughter of the Right Reverend John 
Paterson, Archbishop of Glasgow ; they had three daughters, Alice, Mary, and 
Elizabeth, and one son, who died young. Mary and Elizabeth both married ; Alice, 
the eldest, and heiress of Kilpunt, married Captain John Campbell, of Ardeonaig and 
Lochend ; he was in the 88th Regiment. Several letters to his wife, dated 1761 and 
1 762, from different places in Germany, are in possession of the family. Their eldest 
surviving son, John, who married Margaret Fogo, sold Lochend on Loch Monteith, and 
bought the estate of Kinlochlaich in Appin, Argyllshire, for which name he substituted 
Lochend ; this property was afterwards also sold. His eldest son was married at 
Ardmaddy, where they then resided, to Annabella, daughter of Archibald Campbell, of 
Melfort. After their marriage they lived at Kingsbrough in the Isle of Skye, and in 
1821 they emigrated to New South Wales with their family, receiving from Government 
a large grant of land, as was usual then to give to those who settled in the Colonies. 
They lived at Bunyarabee, between Sydney and Paramatta. Their eldest son, 
John, afterwards Sir John, as he received the honour of knighthood for special services 
rendered in India, had entered the army at this date ; two of his brothers also served 
in the army, and died in India. 

The family is now represented by the eldest son of Sir John, Colonel John 
Alexander Campbell. 



No. 
PEDIGREE OF THE CAMPBELLS 



SIR DUNCAN CAMPBELL, seventh Laird and first Baronet of Glenorchy, 
from whom their Progenitor is descended as a younger son ; d. 1631. 

PATRICK, = GRISSEL, dan. of Duncan 



called Para-dhu-Mor, 
b. before 1623. 



Campbell, of Glenlyon. 



succeeded his father before 1661 
d. before 1721 ; m. 1666. 



ALEXANDER, = EI.IZABETII, dau. of Robert 



Campbell, of Glenlyon. 



COI.IN, = KATHERINE, dau. of 



of Ardeonaig. 



Duncan Campbell, 
of Duneaves. 



JOHN, baptized 1677 ; he married Elizabeth, youngest daughter of 
Alexander Campbell, Esq., of Kilpunt. She became afterwards 
the second wife of Mungo Campbell, of Crigaws ; his first wife was 
his cousin, Anne, dau. of Campbell of Kinloch, Perthshire. 



(Note I.) JOHN,=Al,iCE, eldest dau. and heiress of 
of Ardeonaig and Lochend, I Alexander Campbell of Kilpunt. 
Capt. 88th Regt. ; m. 1732. 

I . . 



PETER. 



ALEXANDER. 



JAMES. 



ARCHIBALD. 



ALEXANDER, 
b. 1734. 



COLIN, 
b. 1736- 



(Note 2.) JOHN, => MARGARET, dau. of William Fogo, 



of Ardeonaig and Lochend ; 
b. 1738; Royal Marines. 



Esq., of Killorn. 



of Lochend, 

b. 1771 ; 

d. 1827 in 

N. S. Wales. 



JOHN, =ANNABELI.A, dau. of 



John Campbell, Esq. , 

of Melfort, b. 1774 ; 

m. 1801 ; d. 1826 

in N. S. Wales. 



WILLIAM, Capt. in 

Sir John Moore s 
regt., the Montgomery 

Highlanders ; d. in the 
West Indies 1805. 



BARBARA. = JOHN CAMPBELL, 
of Bragleen, 
Captain in the 

Army. 
S.P. 



ALICE. = DUC,ALD CAMPBELL, 
Y Esq., of Achlian. 



ELIZA, = SIR JOHN, C.B. = ELIZABETH, 



dau. of John 
Harrington, 

Esq., 

Madras C.S., 

d. 1846 in 

India. 



and K.C.S.I., 

b. at Kingsburgh, 

Isle of Skye, 1802; 

m. 1831 ; d. 1877 

in Edinburgh. 

(Note 4) 



d. 1865, 
dau. of 

J. Monro, 
of the 
Kilpunt 
family. 



ALEXANDER 

ARCHIBALD, 

killed in 

action at 

Ava 1825. 



WILLIAM 

Lieut. 
Bombay 
Army ; 
d. 1826. 



PATRicK=Miss SINGLETON. 
FREDERICK, 



CHARLES, ^MARTHA 



d. in 
N. S.Wales. 



-JOHN. 

-PATRICK. 
-BENJAMIN. 
-GEORGE. 
I-ANNABELLA. 
I- LORN. 
UMARY. 

LLUCY.=T. MANN, Esq., 
Y C. Engineer. 



of S. 

Australia, 

d. 1859. 



LEV i. 



Two sons. 



(A'o/^s-) JOHN 
ALEXANDER, 
the present 
representative 
< if the family, 
b. 1831 ; 
m. 1858; 
Colonel in 
11. M. I. Army, 
retired. 



=ANNA, dau. of W. H. C. 
Brett, Esq. , Madras C. S. 

-JOHN, b. 1863 ; d. 1863. 
-HARRY ALEX., b. 1863. 
I-ARCHIBALD, b. 1864. 
-ALLAN JOHN, b. 1867. 
-CECIL, b. 1869; d. 1871. 
-ERIC, b. 1871. 
-ELIZA. 
-CHARLOTTE. 
-ANNA. 
-CECILIA. 



WILLIAM=ELI.EN 



HENRY, 

Captain in 

H. M.I. A., 

d. 1871 in 

Edinburgh. 

JOHN. 
b. 1871 



MAGDALENA, 

dau. of 
Gen. Mein, 
R. Artillery. 



CECILIA=GEORGE M. MARTIN, ANNABELLA=ALEX.C.MACNIEL, 



COCKBURN, 

m. 1851 ; 
d. 1876 at 

Mentone. 



Capt. H. M. I. A., 

now retired. 



I-GEORGE KELSO, = AMY, dau. of 



I-EDWARD HAR- 
j RiNGTON.b. 1859. 
[-HERBERT MAX- 
I WELL, b. 1864. 
[-ARCHIBALD MAC- 
NIEL, b. 1869. 
LCLAUDE KENNEDY, 
b. 1862. 



b. 1852 ; 
m. 1875. 
I-FREDK. CAMP- 

] BELL, b. 1853. 
[-CHARLES W., 

b. 1857. 



Rev. A. Fennell, 
retired Chap- 
lain, Madras. 



-FRANK KELSO, 
b. & d. 1877. 
-ARTHUR FENNELL, 

b. 1879 ; d. 1880. 
-MARGARET CECILIA. 



MARIA, d. 1876, 

m. 1865. C.S. of India, Col. 
H. E. I. C. S. Ma- 
dras Army, of the 

Colensay family, 
son of late Bri- 
gadier-General 
Malcolm MacNiel. 

MALCOLM, b. 1866. 
J-CECILIA=LORN A. 



LOUISA, 
m. 1875. 



ARTHUR 
WKLI.ESI.EY 

\VF.I.I.INGTON, 
d. young in 

X. S. Wales. 



COLINA.=ARCH. MAC- 
I LEOD. 



CAMPBELL, 
Esq., 3rd son 
-1 of James Ar- 
chibald Campbell, 
Esq., Inverawe. 

j-Al.LAN,b. &d. 1879. 

LETHEL. 

-| 1 / 

ist, ROBERTSON, =MARGARET.=2nd, WILLIAMS, 1st, PETER OGLEVIE,=ISABEI.LA, Major B. SULLIVAN'. 



[-GRACE ELIZABETH. . 

LGERTRUDE ELI/A. 



p 



|-NORMAN = 

Y 

|-ANNABELLA=T. BUCHANAN, 
And other Chi'dren. of Roseneath. 



Esq. 



Esq., d. 1841, of 



Wellamby, Australia, 
of Government Survey Department. 



JAMES, ANNABELLA, = 
d. in Australia. m. 1845 ! 
d. 1871 in 
London. 


=JOHN ALEX. MARGARET, 
CAMPBELL, d. unm. 
Major Madras 
Cavalry, b. 1816 ; 
d. 1863 in India. 


ALEXANDER, LORN, RODERICK, CONSTANCE. 
b. 1846 ; igth d. young. in Agra Bank. 
Captain of Dunstaffnage, 
succeeded 1879. 



twin sister 

to 
William. S.P. 



Police Magistrate of 



Wellamby. 



ANNABELLA, ist, DE MOULINE,=FRANCES=BENJAMIN SULI.I- 
d. young. Esq. Y MARY. VAN, Esq., d. 1854, 

son of Major B. 

Sullivan, of South 

Australia. 



X. 



01 LOCHEND, PERTHSHIRE. 



JEAN. MAR v. = Bow AND, Esq., 

Y of Glasgow. 



JAMES, b. 1740; d. 1762 in 
Germany during the war, an 
officer in the army. (Note 3.) 



MARGARET, MARY, 

CATHERINE, b. 1744. 

ALICE, died infants. 



CHRISTIAN. 

See Mtlfort 

Fed. 



ARCHIBALI> CAMPBELL, Esq., 
of Meifort. 



MARY, 
d. unni. 



MARGARET=Sir JOHN CAMPBELL, Bart., ANN = DUNCAN CAMPBELI 



MA.XUH i ., 
m. 1803 ; 
d. 1865 at 
Woolwich. 



DAI .MA HOY, CATHERINE GOODSIER. 
m. 1840 



at Sidney, 



-JOHN.=GERTRUDE, dau. of 
Y L)r. Paterson, late 
of Downham, Norfolk. 

-JAMES. 

'DAI.MAHOY. 
-COLIN MEI.FORT. 

\VlI.l.lAM. 

-KATHERINE. = LONGMORE, Esq. 



MOORE= FANNY DE LISLE. 
NEIL. 



-JOHN. = Miss FITZGERALD. 

-PHILIP. 

-CHARLES. 

-MOORE. 

-FANNY. 
-ANAHEI.I.A. 
-ELI/.A. 

ANNIE. = Married. 
-SARAH. 



Ki i/ \ = FRANCIS T. ROMILLY 



I > A u KARA 
i OLINA, 
m. 1868. 



Kr.NNKHY, Esq., of 
Dalquharron, Ayrshire, 

only child of the late 
Right Honourable T. F. 

Kennedy, Esq. 

THOMAS, b. 1872. 
-JOHN CAMPBELL, 

b. 1873. 
-FRANCIS HOWARD, 

b. 1875. 
-WILLIAM HENRY, 

b. 1878. 
-SAMUEL ROMILLY, 

b. 1880. 
-ELIZA GEORC.INA. 

1 1 IK- ROM II. l.Y. 

LFRANCES LORNE. 



FRANCES=JAMES MAKGILL HERIOT 



LORNE 

MARY, 

m. 1872 ; 

d. 1876. 



MAITLAND, Esq., 

Major Royal 

Engineers. 



-JAMES DALGLISH HERIOT, 
-JOHN CAMPBELL HERIOT, 
twins, b. 1874. 



of Nova Scotia, d. 1834, 

of Ardnamurchan 

and Airds. 



MOORE. 



Cadet of Achlian. 
His first wife was his 
cousin, Mary Camp- 
bell, of Inverawe, 
descended from the 
Argylls. 



ANNE- 
MOORE. 



=VV. F. CAMPBELL. 

See Meifort 

fed. 



MARGARET, 

d. unm. 

1875. 



Sir JOHN, 7th Baronet, = HANNAH, d. 1873, dau. of 
b. 1807 ; m. 1833 ; d. 1853 at 
Kingston, St. Vincent, l>eing 
then Lieut. -Governor of the 
Island. He sold the property. 



MacLeod, Esq., of Rasay. 
= 2nd, H. MAULE, Esq. 



Sir JOHN, WILLM.=CATHERINE LYONA 



8th Baronet, b. 1836 ; 

m. 1867 ; Lieut. -Col. 

'Royal Artillery. 

(Note 7.) 



SOPHIE, dau. of 
W. Cavie, Esq. 



JOHN B. STUART, 
b. 1877- 



LIA 

ETHELI.A. 



AGNESE 
ELEASUR. 



LOUDOUN 

FRANCIS, 

Major 

Madras 

Army. 

MARY 
E. BERYI.E. 



FREDERICK, = EMILIA GUII.I.AUMINE, 



T 



m. 1869 ; 
late Captain 
R. Artillery: 
- retired. 



dau. of D. Maclaine, 
of Lochbuy, Argyllshire. 



DUNCAN, =GR ACE 
Royal HALL. 
Engineers. 



JOHN MAXWELL, b. 1870. 
-CHARLES STEWART, b.i875. 
-FRDK. WM.I.M. B., b. 1878. 
-EDWARD TASWELL, b. 1879. 
-EMILIE MACLAINE. 
-ROSE MARY. 
Two daus. died in infancy. 



G. LORN MORSHEAD, GEORGE INNIS, Esq., 



b. at Kingsburgh, 

Isle of Skye, 1806; 

m. 1825 ; d. 1877 

in Ayr. 



of Yarrow, near Bathurst, 
son of J. Innis, Esq., of 
Thrumstcr, Caithness, 
N.B. 



ANNAHELLA J. CAMERON, = ARTHUR RANKIN, Esq. 



m. 1837 at Bathurst, 
N. S. W. 



ANNAHKI.LA 

A. CAMPBELL, 

m. 1856 at 

Newcastle, 

N. S. W. 



PATRICK C. D. 
BOSWXLL, 

now of 

Ciarrall.in, 
Ayrshire. 



nag 

= > 

SO 71 

*> 



o 



MAR(1ARET = HUGII HAMILTON, Esq., Son of 
C., m. 1853 J. Hamilton, Esq., of 

at 1'aramatta, Sundrum, Ayrshire. 

N. S. W. 

i t-HOGH MONTGO-= ADELAIDE 

MERIE, b. 1854; M. E. 

m. 1880. NORTHCOTT. 

-GEORGE INNIS, b. 1856. 
-JAMES DUNDAS, b. 1860 at sea. 
-CLAUD L. CAMPBELL, b. 1874. 
-LILLIAS ANNA. 
-MARGT. ELIZA, d. 1877. 
-ROMA FLORENCE, b. at Rome. 
-SELENA FRANCES. 



of Lockyersleigh, Carrick, Goulburn, 
X. S. W., son of C. Rankin, Glen 
Logan, Ayrshire. 

-GEORGE LOGAN. 
-JOHN CAMPBELL. 
-ARTHUR. 

[AMES LoRN.=Married. 
CHARLES DALMAIIOY, d. young. 
ANDREW COLIN. 
WILLIAM TAYt.OR.=Married. 
WALKER BLACKWOOD,=HKI KN 
m. 1879. YGREEN. 

ANNABELLA. = BOYDD. MOREHEAD, 
Y Esq., Member of 
the Legislature, 
Queensland. 



MAR<;AREI 

FLORIANNE. 

m. 1876 ; 

d. 1878 at 

Simla. 
R. CLAYTON, | 

Esq., S.f. 
R. Artillery. 



HANNAH 

JEMIMA, 

m. 1862. 

= ROBERT 

BROOKES 

CLARKE. 

Esq., of 

Stuston 

House, 

Suffolk, 

late Capt. 

4Oth Regiment. 




X. 



i. 

CAPTAIN JOHN CAMPBELL entered the 88th Regiment, and served with it in Germany 
during the Seven Years' War. He was present in the actions near Ham, 1761, where 
he was wounded in the left shoulder. 



II. 

John Campbell entered the Royal Marines, and served at the siege of Belleisle in 
1761. He was afterwards Chamberlain to the Earl of Breadalbane. He sold the lands 
of his forefathers. 

III. 

James Campbell was an officer in the army. He served in Germany, and died of 
fever at Appelhausen, 1762. 

IV. 

Major-General Sir John Campbell, C.B. and K. C.S.I., joined the army in 1819 as 
Ensign in the igth Regiment. In 1820 he entered the Honourable East India 
Company's service. He served in the 4ist Regiment. As Captain in the regiment, 
during the suppression of an insurrection amongst the Hill Tribes of the ancient 
kingdom of Orissa, he fell, by the death of the Major, into the command of the troops 



A HISTORY OF TIIK CAMl'IiKI.I.S OK MELFORT. 6 1 

during a critical juncture. From an extract in General Orders, Madras, 1834, we quote 
as follows : 

"The 4ist Regiment deserves particular notice. This was the only corps employed in 
Kimedy at the commencement of the insurrection of the Hill Chiefs ; it afforded effectual protection 
to the inhabitants, and made successful attacks on several strong posts held by the enemy before 
the arrival of any reinforcements. Captain Campbell, who succeeded to the command, has greatly 
distinguished himself by his firm and judicious conduct at that critical period, and by the ability 
and energy he has evinced on all occasions of active service." 

From his knowledge of these tribes, Captain Campbell was appointed to the 
Revenue and Magisterial charge of these districts, with special charge over the Khond 
inhabitants, and to use every effort for the suppression of human sacrifice and female 
infanticide, practised by them. He remained in this appointment four years, his efforts 
in a great measure proving successful. In 1842, his regiment being ordered upon active 
service, he applied to join it, and taking leave of his Khond subjects,' went with his 
regiment to China. For his services during this campaign he received the C.B., and 
the rank of Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel. In 1847 he was again appointed to the scene 
of his late labours, the Government being dissatisfied with the state of affairs since his 
absence, disturbances having occurred, which, on his arrival, he suppressed without 
delay. In 1849 he was ordered to the Cape for the recovery of his health. In 1851 
he returned to his post, where he remained till 1855, when his health obliged him to 
return to England. Before he left, he had the great satisfaction of knowing that his 
labours for the suppression of these sacrifices had been crowned with perfect success. 
On leaving, he received a letter from the private secretary of the Governor-General of 
India, as follows : 

" Lord Dalhousic desires me to express to you his regret at learning that the state of your 
health is such as to cause the loss to the Government of India of services which he has frequently 
had occasion to appreciate so highly, and approve so cordially, as those which you have rendered 
to the Hill Tracts of Orissa." 



Also in a local paper, The Friend of India, is this tribute to his services : 

"To sum up, in eighteen years a worse crime than any known in Europe has been eradicated. 
Twelve hundred and sixty human beings have been preserved from a horrible death, and a district 
as large as Wales has been raised a whole grade in the career of civilisation. 

"Captain Campbell has been concerned in these operations from the first. His firm gentleness 
has made them successful to the end. He has spent no small portion of a life away from 
civilisation, and in a scene where his efforts have been honoured only by philanthropists. Had he 
destroyed in battle the number he has saved from immolation, he would have received honours, 
which should not be denied only because of his modest appreciation of his own success." 



62 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 

In 1866, Major-General John Campbell received from Her Majesty the Star of 
India (as Knight Commander), for his services in the suppression of human sacrifices 
and female infanticide in the Hill Tracts of Orissa. 

Sir John published, in 1860, an interesting narrative of his operations in Orissa. 
He died in Edinburgh, 1877, and was laid in the Dean Cemetery. 



V. 

John Alexander Campbell entered the Madras army in 1849, and joined the 
52nd Madras Native Infantry. He was appointed to the Mysore Commission 1856. 
Retired from the service in 1878. 



VI. 

Captain William Henry Campbell joined the 45th Madras Native Infantry in 
1854; he also did duty with the 5Oth Madras Native Infantry and with the i2th at 
Bungalore. In 1855 was appointed to do duty with the D company of Sappers and 
Miners by the officer commanding the Pegu Division. In 1857 was appointed to the 
Mysore P. W. Department. He joined the Madras Staff Corps in 1861. Captain 
Campbell was obliged in 1871 to return to England on account of his health. He died 
1 in Edinburgh, in December of the same year. 



VII. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Sir John William Campbell, Baronet, entered the Royal Artillery 
from the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, October, 1854. Served in the Crimea, 
1854 to 1856, and in Afghanistan from 1877 to 1880. For his services during the 
Afghan campaigns he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. Medal for 
Crimea ; Medal with Clasps for Afghanistan. 





THE CAMPBELLS OF KINLOCH, 

PERTHSHIRE. 
$Ijoimng Descent from tlje (Earls of ftoiiaoun, tljrougb &ir lames Campbell of latoers. 






(Taken from FAMILY RECORDS ami HISTORICAL SOURCES.) 





HE lands of Loudoun, in Ayrshire, from which the title is taken, were 
possessed in the reign of David I. by Lambinus, whose son, James de 
Loudoun, left an only daughter, Margaret. She married Sir Reginald 
Crawford, Heritable Sheriff of Ayr. 

The descendants of Sir R. Crawford continued Lords of Loudoun 
for four generations, when the line ended in Susanna, the sole representative. 
She married Duncan, grandson of Hugh Campbell, who was the third son of 
Dugal, seventh Knight of Lochaw. By this marriage, Duncan obtained the 
Barony of Loudoun and the Hereditary Sheriffdom of Ayr, 1214; in this line it 
continued for ten generations. In 1622, Margaret, daughter of George Master, of 
Loudoun, succeeded her grandfather, Sir Hugh, created, in 1601, Lord Campbell, Baron 
of Loudoun. Margaret, Baroness of Loudoun, married, in 1620, Sir John Campbell of 
Lawers, whose progenitor was a younger son of Sir Colin Campbell, first Laird of 
Glenorchy by his fourth wife, Margaret, daughter of Luke Sterling of Keir. Sir John 
was created Earl of Loudoun in 1641. He was one of the Lords appointed to treat 



64 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 

with Charles I., in the Isle of Wight, 1647. After the Battle of Worcester he retired 
into the Highlands, and, together with his son, was excepted out of Cromwell's Act of 
Grace. He was succeeded by his only surviving son, James, second Earl of Loudoun, 
who, besides four daughters, had three sons Hugh, the third Earl ; John, a Colonel in 
the army, who died unmarried ; and Sir James Campbell of Lawers, a distinguished 
officer, Colonel of the Royal Scots Greys. This Sir James was killed by a cannon-shot 
at the Battle of Fontenoy, 1 745. By his wife, Jane Boyde, daughter of David, first 
Earl of Glasgow, whose mother was Jean, daughter and heiress of William Mure, of 
Rowallan, Ayrshire. He had, besides other children, James, who became fifth Earl of 
Loudoun. James, the second Earl, died in 1684, and was succeeded by his son Hugh, 
the third Earl. Hugh was one of the Commissioners of the Union. He resigned his 
estates into the hands of his sovereign in 1709, obtaining a new charter of them to 
himself and his heirs, which failing, to the heirs whatsoever of the first Earl. Hugh 
left one son, John, who succeeded his father in 1731, and dying unmarried in 1782, the 
title and lands devolved upon his cousin James, who became, the fifth Earl of Loudoun. 
He was born in 1726. He assumed the name of Mure on succeed''*^ to the estate of 
his grandmother, the Countess of Glasgow. H- lliarr ied, in 1777, Flora, eldest 
daughter of John Macleod of Rasay. ^y ner he had one daughter, Flora, at whose 
birth the mother died, 1780. Fl-- a Mure-Campbell succeeded her father as Countess 
of Loudoun in 1786, in r/- '.^ormity with the renewed patent of 1709. The Countess 
married, in i8cu ( f^ncis Rawdon, first Marquis of Hastings. 

John Campbell of Kinloch, who succeeded his brother Joseph, on taking possession 
of his estate, went to visit his relative, James, fifth Earl of Loudoun, who acknowledged 
him as his next heir, failing his daughter, saying, " Nothing stands between you and the 
earldom but this little delicate girl, my daughter." 

The history of Charles Campbell of Kinloch, the father of Joseph and John, is 
both interesting and romantic. Charles espoused the cause of the Stuarts, and fought 
at Culloden. After the defeat he fled to Portugal, where he married a near relative of 
the Portuguese royal family, the Braganzas. The lady had been placed in a convent 
to take the veil, there being no royal bridegroom available for her. The handsome 
young Jacobite, Charles Campbell, persuaded her to run off with him. Her uncle, the 
Bishop of Oporto, to save scandal, procured pardon for them. They were sent to the 
Brazils, where a handsome property was assigned as her dower. After his wife's death 
Charles returned to Scotland, as the lands of his forefathers were restored after 
attainder. On his return, he found himself a stranger in his own country, and had 
become so much of a foreigner, that he had difficulty in proving his identity. It is 
related that when taking refreshment in a coffee-room, his voice attracted the attention 
of a gentleman at another table, who, rising, exclaimed, " That must be Charles 
Kinloch ! " On approaching him, he turned away, not recognizing him in the least. 



A HISTORY or TIII: CAMI-BELLS OF MELFORT. 65 

Charles, however, knew him, and, touching his arm, said, " Don't you know me ? I 
was your schoolfellow," mentioning the gentleman's name ; " you are the very person I 
am in search of." His former schoolfellow was the only witness to his identity, save 
his nurse, now a very old woman. She, on appearing in court, said, " If he's my bairn, 
he will have on his breast a large mole like a mouse." Her assertion proving correct, 
his identity was established ; and his claims being acknowledged, he received back his 
estates. He did not, however, long enjoy them, being shortly succeeded by his eldest 
son, Joseph. Charles died at Kinloch. His two sons, Joseph and John (or Juan, as he 
called himself), were summoned to his death-bed ; the Kinlochs were at that time the 
Roman Catholic branch of the Loudouns. Charles was attended by the priests from 
Crieff. Before his sons arrived they had administered extreme unction, and told the 
sons " all was over for him ; " but they insisted that their father was faint for food, and 
that he would live if nourishment were given. There was a scuffle between them, but 
the priests prevented his getting anything, and he died. The sons then and there fore- 
swore the Roman Catholic Church, and became Protestants. 

Joseph lost his life in a mysterious manner. His people always believed he was 
poisoned by a foreigner, supposed to be a monk, who appeared late one night to visit 
him. The following morning he was found dead in the room he had occupied. The 
stranger had disappeared, carrying away with him family diamonds and other jewels of 
value. 

John, always known as " Don John," succeeded his brother. He was intended for 
a priest, and had been sent to Oporto to study, but having no vocation for that office, he 
fled secretly to Scotland. -He entered one of the Highland regiments, but could never 
reconcile himself to the kilt. His father would not allow him to exchange into a 
regiment the dress of which was more to his taste ; he wished to punish him for giving 
up the priesthood. John became acquainted, when in the army, with Lieutenant Colin 
Campbell (afterwards Sir Colin), of the Melfort family, fell in love with his friend's 
sister, Ann Trapaud, and eventually married her. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Robert B. Patricia Price Campbell is the present representative 
of the family, 1881. 




No. 
PEDIGREE OF THE CAMPBELLS 



SIR JOHN CAMPBELL, of Lawers,=MARGARET CAMPBELL, Baroness 
(created Earl of Loudoun, 1641). | Loudoun, m. 1620. 



JOHN. = JANETTA, clau. of John Dow, 
of Arnhall. 



JOHN.=ANNABELI.A, dau. of Patrick Campbell, 
of Barcaldine. Her mother was a dau. 
of Campbell of Dunstaffnage. 

MONGO. CATHERINE, dau. of Patrick Murray, of Ard- 
benie. His grandfather was of Ochtertyre. 



JOHN. 



=MARGARETTA, clau. of Charles Stewart, of 
Ballechan. 



CHARLES,- 

was out in 1745 ; his estates at- 
tainted ; afterwards restored. 



EUPHROSIA MARIA FERREIRA, 
of the Royal Family of 
Portugal, the Braganzas. 



JOSEPH, d. at 

Kinloch, unm. 

Supposed to have 

been poisoned. 
He succeeded his father. 



JOHN, of Kinloch,=ANN TRAPAUD, dau. of John 



b. 1762; d. 1839; buried 

at Chean, Kinloch. Served 

in a Highland regiment. 



Campbell of Melfort, 
b. 1784 ; m. 1804 ; d. 1841 at 
Portobello. 



1st, MARGARET,=JOHN (Note 3),=The Princess VICTORIA GOIJRAMMA (Note 4), 



of Kinloch, 
b. 1805; m. 1829; 
d. 1879 in London; 
Major-General of 
Bengal Army. 


d. 1841 in India, dau. of 
James Wemyss, Esq., 
of Wemyss Castle, 
Fifeshire ; 
of Bengal C.S. 


m. 1837 ;d. 1844 
atjaulnah, Madras, 
dau. of Dr. P. 
Mathews, Bengal 
Army, Physician 
to the King of 


b. 1810; not 
heard of 
since 1876 ; 
Colonel Madr; 
Army. 


of 
is 


Coorg dau ofH.R.H. The 


Maharajah of Coorg, 
m. 1862 ; d. 1864. 




VICTORIA GOURAMMA. 


(AV/V2.) JOHN CAROLINE,=F. PEARSON, 
WEMYSS, m. 1852. Esq., 
b. 1834 ; Bengal 
d. 1863 in C.S. 
India ; 
H.M.I. Army. 


ANNE. 




(Note 6.) ROBERT= 
BYNG 
PATRICIA P., 
the present Head 
of the Family, 
b. 1838 ; 
m. 1874 ; 
Brevet Lt. -Colonel 
Commanding 
(Queen's Own) 
Corps of Guides. 


=ADA (Note 7. 
MURRAY, 
dau. of 
L. Granville 
Alex. Camp- 
bell, Esq., 
of Fairfield, 
Argyllshire. 


) COLIN- 
CHARLES, 
b. 1841 ; 
d. 1856 
from an 
accident. 


(Note?,.} JOHN= 
RONALD, 
b. 1843; 
m. 1872 ; 
Major 
Bengal 
Staff Corps. 


=LouisA PATRICK. 
SUTHERLAND (Note 9.) 
dau. of 
\Valter Angus 
Bethune, 
Esq., of 
Dunrobin, 
Tasmania. 


FRANCIS LAWRENCE. 
CAMPBELL, 
b. 1853; 
Lieut. 4th 
(Queen's Own) 
Hussars. 


RONALD MARGARET, HELEN ADA 
AUGUSTUS, b. 1873 ; MARY. LOUISA. 
b. 1881. d. an infant. 




RONALD PATRICK, 
b. 1876; 
i . an infant. 


HECTOR, EDITH 
b. 1877. IRENE. 



ANN=HOI>E DICK, Esq., CHARLOTTE= 

LIVINOTON, Major-General Bengal Army.. OLYMPIA 
m. 1828. Served in the Maharattah and COCKIIURN, 
Pindarre Wars, 1813 and m. 1832 ; 

1817-18 ; he commanded 56th d. 1879. 

Native Infantry at the battle 
of Maharajpore ; received Bronze 
Star and Brevet Colonel for services. 



LORN ANNA 
WILLIAM, LORNE, 
d. 1845, d. 1870. 
young, in India. 



ELIZABETH, =DICKENSON, Esq. 



m. 1862. 



only son of 
Gen. Dickenson. 



n 

r 



I I I I | 1 

MF.I.VII.I.E EVELYN THOMAS ALINA VIOLET. MURIEL, 

HOPE C., PALMER, WILLIAM, LOUISA. 

b. iS6j. b. 1865. b. 1865. 



CHAS. WILLM. CAMPBELL, 
d. Jan., 1861, of Boreland ; JANE, 
Cadet of Glenfalloch, m. 1842. 

(Second wife. ) 



LOUISA=WII.LIAM PENNY, Esq., d. Oct. 30, 

1872, Advocate, Edinburgh, 
afterwards Lord Kinloch (Lord 
of Session). 



WILLIAM, JOSEPH FRANCIS FREDERICK LOUISA. 
b. 1849 ; CAMPBELL, LORNE, GORDON, 
Ceylon C.S. b. 1851 ; b. 1853 ; b. 1856 ; 

Chartered late of of Straits Settle- 
Accountant, the Cape ment Civil Service. 
Mounted Rifles. 



(Note 10.) CHARLES 
WILLIAM, 
b. 1836 ; 

Lieut .-Colonel 2nd 
Bengal Cavalry. He 
claimed the Earldom 
of Breadalbane ; it 
was decided against 
him in the House of 
Lords, 1867 ; proved 
himself next in entail 
after the present Earl 
anil his brother. 



X 

u 

A 






n ' 

rO 

3. 

II 



CiiARLOTTE=W. S. VANDERBYL, 
ELIZA. Esq., 

Cape of Good Hope. 



I. 



F KINLOCH, PERTHSHIRE. 



IRII. : in Holy Orders of the 

:i Catholic Church, to which 

faith the family then belonged ; 

went to Koine, was never heard of 

afterwards, 



MAKV. 



i 
AX.NK. 



(Notts-) COL IN, ist, AMELIA, 



1816; 
m. 1853 ; 

Major 

1st Madras 

Cavalry ; 

retired. 



d. 1856 in India, dan. of 
Sir Archibald Galloway, 

Chairman Hoard of I >iuv- 
tiM> 11. E. I. Company. 

= 2nd, the widow of 
I', liurt, Indian Army. 



GEORGINA=JAMKS N. JARVIS, Esq., 



COLIN-LORN, 
m. 1831 ; 
d. 1879 
at Bath. 



Lieutenant K. N., 
afterwards entered the 
Colonial service ; was 
Judge of the Island of 
Tobago at the time of 
his death, 1842. 



El I'HROSIA 

MARIA 

FERREIRA, 
m. 1846. S'.f. 



Dr. WHITE, d. 1857, 

1 6th Lancers, 

Inspector-General 

of Hospitals. 

Served through 

Cabul Campaign 

of 1839-40. 



( ;<JI IN. b. 1855 ; joined 
9 1st Ki-ghm-nt ; n 
went to New Zealand. 



THOMAS,=ANMK, 



b. 1835 ; 
m. 1863 ; 

d. 1876 at Antigua, 

succeeded his uncle 

in his West India 

Estates. 



dau. of CAUPBXLL 

Sir Stephen m. 1851. 

Hill, 

Governor 
of Antigua. 



ANNE=ISI, CHAS. JULIAN MAKGILL JANE=CHARLES 



-JOHN. 

-BERTIE. 

-THOMAS. 

-HERBERT. 

-EDWARD. 

-BEATRIX. 

-ANNIE. 

-EMILY. 

-ALICE. 



CRICHTON, Esq., of Rankei- RACHEL, 
lour, Fifeshire. d. 1858. m. 1856. 

=2nd,E. RusnwORTH,Esq., 

Colonial Secretary, d. 1877 

in Jamaica from yellow fever, 

when Lt.-Gov. of Jamaica. 



DAVID: 

MAITLAND, 

b. 1 8 54 ; 

m. 1875; 

now of 

Rankeilour, 

late 73rd 
Highlanders. 



r 



PATRICIA, died in India 

shortly before her intended 

marriage to Hon. R. llyng, 

Madras Cavalry. 

d , 



CHARLES JULIAN, 
h. 1880. 



1 TT 

I )aughters. 



=EMILY, dau. WILLIAM JAMES ANNA. 
of I. C. D. MAITLAND, BERTIE CHARLES. 
Bailey, Esq., b. Jan., MAITLAND, 
ofCharlton 1856; b. Nov., 1856; 

Musgran, d. young, d. 1877 in Jamaica 

Somersetshire. of yellow fever. 

l 1 1 L - 

JAMES LORNE, GEORGE, JOHN L. 
b. 1858 ; served b. 1864. MAITLAND, 
in the Afghan Cam- b. 1865. 
paign ; Medal and Clasp for Cabul. 



MAITLAND 

GO VAN, 

Colonel K.A. 
Served in China 

Campaign of 
1841 and 1842 ; 
Medalnnd Clasp 
for Tagu Forts. 
Serving in India 
1881. 






MARY 

MAITLAND. 



MARc.ARET,=Rev. WII.I.M. MEIKLEJOHN, d. 1850; Chap- LENA, 
m. 1842. I lain of St. Andrew's Kirk, Calcutta. m. 1842. 



WILLIAM, b. 1825 ; 
Captain Bengal Army. 



I )Avm, b. 1847 ; 
Bengal C. S. 



CAMPBELL, 

m. 1870 ; 
d. 1876. 



AXNE=\V. ALLAN, Esq., 



of Hillside, 

Col. 4lst Ki'gt 



WILLIAM LI-AVIS CAMPHEI.L, 
b, 1X71. 



I >NE 
CAMl'DELL, 

m. 1876 ; 
d. 18*1. 
(Second wife.) 



Sir PATRICK KEITH MURRAY, Bart , 
of Ochtertyre, Perthshire. 



LENA. 



PATRICK, 
b. 1879. 



JOHN, 
b. 1881. 



l 

I |>N I . 



;Sir JOHN SPENCER LOGIN, K.C.B. 
d. 1863 ; Bengal Medical Service ; 
employed in the Political Depart- 
ment. (Note 12.) 



EDWARD, b. 1843 ; 
d. in India of dysentery, 
1876; Finance Depart- 
ment, India ; educated 
at Kum ; went to India 
with Sir John Lawrence 
when appointed (Jov.- 
General. 



SPKNCKK HKNKV, 
1). 1851 ; educated 
at Wellington College ; 
entered Royal Navj 
1864.; Lieutenant 1881 ; 
Medal for theAshantee 
War. 



I i 

LOUISA. EDITH. 



LENA. MABEL. 

Both died at Pau, 

South of France, 

in the winter of 

1865-66. 




s tn 



XL 



i. 

GENERAL CHARLES CAMPBELL entered the Honourable East India Company's service, 
and was appointed to the 42nd Bengal Native Infantry. In 1835 he joined the Staff, 
and received the appointment of Paymaster of the Cawnpore Division, which he held 
until 1842, when, owing to misrepresentations made by native merchants to Lord Ellen- 
borough, about the occupation of some cantonment bungalows, he was ordered back to 
his regiment. General Campbell at once obtained furlough, and came to England. He 
laid the matter before the Directors, who were satisfied with his explanations. On his 
return to India he was appointed Paymaster of the Punjaub Division. He retired 
1860. 



in 



General Charles Campbell sold the lands of Kinloch in 1868; they had been 
possessed by his forefathers for many generations. He died in London in 1879. 



II. 

Captain John Wemyss Campbell entered Her Majesty's Indian army, served in a 
Punjaub Irregular regiment; died in India of cholera, 1863. 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 69 

III. 

Colonel John Campbell began life in the Royal Navy, serving under his uncle, 
Admiral Sir Patrick Campbell ; but a sea life seems to have been distasteful to him, as 
he spent a considerable portion of his leisure hours at the mast-head. He then tried 
the army as a profession, and entered the service of the Honourable East India 
Company, receiving a commission in the 38th Madras Native Infantry. He was after- 
wards appointed to the Remount Department at Oossor. While holding this appoint- 
ment, he, on three occasions, received the thanks of Government for his efficiency. He 
retired in 1860. 

Colonel John Campbell disappeared mysteriously the ;th of August, 1867, and has 
not since been heard of. He was residing in London at the time. 

IV. 

The Princess Victoria Gouramma was brought to England by her father, His 
Royal Highness the Maharajah of Coorg, when only seven years of age. Her Majesty 
the Queen adopted the little Princess, became her godmother, and had her educated 
and brought up in the Christian faith. His Royal Highness the Maharajah of Coorg 
claimed compensation from the British Government for his country being annexed, but 
died before he had established his claim. 

V. 

Major Colin Campbell served in the British Legion in Spain, under Sir De Lacy 
Evans, from 1835 to J 836. He received in 1836 a commission in the ist Madras 
Light Cavalry, from which he retired in 1862. 

VI. 

Brevet Lieut-Colonel Robert Byng Patricia P. Campbell received a direct com- 
mission for the Indian army. He served through the Indian Mutiny, and was recom- 
mended for a Victoria Cross, he having rescued the body of a brother officer of the 
name of Sandford. 

From October, 1877, to 1878, he was engaged in the Jowaki Campaign under Sir 
C. Keyes, K.C.B., in command of his regiment, the (Queen's Own) Corps of Guides. 
In 1878, as second in command of his regiment, was with the force that entered the 
Kyber Pass, and was present at the taking of AH Musjid. In the second Afghan 
Campaign, was engaged in the fighting that took place round Cabul, prior to Sir 
Frederick Roberts's retirement into Sherpore. Lieut.-Colonel Campbell was mentioned 
in despatches on three occasions. In the first Afghan Campaign he received his pro- 
motion as Brevet Lieut.-Colonel for his services. Received the Jowaki Clasp, Afghan 
Medal, with Clasp for Ali Musjid. Serving iSSi. 



y o A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFOKT. 

VII. 

Colin Charles met with an accident which caused his death, when only sixteen 
years of age. The boy was bird's-nesting, and fell on a spiked fence .; he survived only 
a few hours. 

VIII. 

Major John Ronald Campbell passed from Addiscombe into the army, serving for 
a few years in the 23rd Welsh Fusiliers, from which he changed into the Punjaub 
Frontier force. He commanded a squadron of his regiment, the second Punjaub 
Cavalry, in the Jowaki campaign, 1877 and 1878. In November, 1878, served with his 
regiment, forming part of the force that marched from Quetta to Candahar with Sir 
Donald Stewart, K.C.B. Major Campbell remained in Southern Afghanistan till April, 
1880, when he marched with Sir D. Stewart's force from Candahar to Cabul, and was 
present at the Battle of Ahmed Khyl igth April of the same year. He was twice 
mentioned in despatches. Received the North West Frontier Medal and Jowaki Clasp. 
Afghan Medal with Clasp for Ahmed Khyl. Serving 1881. 

IX. 

Patrick Campbell emigrated to New Zealand in 1866. 

X. 

Lieut.-Colonel Charles William Campbell, 2nd Bengal Cavalry was present at the 
mutiny of the Native troops at Lucknow in 1857. He joined the Volunteer Cavalry, 
and was engaged in several reconnaissances prior to the Battle of Chinhut, and present 
also at that action (severely wounded). Served through the defence of the Residency 
of Lucknow (wounded), and afterwards at the re-capture of Cawnpore from the Gwalior 
contingent (Medal with Clasp and a year's service). Served with Fane's Horse 
throughout the Campaign of 1860 in China, including the capture of the Taku Forts, 
and subsequent operations, up to the surrender of Pekin. Medal with two Clasps. 

XI. 

Colin G. L. Campbell, Deputy Assistant Commissary General of Ordnance, 
received his military education at Sandhurst. He served in the Perak expedition of 
1875 79, in charge of the Control Department; also in the Zulu War of 1879. He 
was mentioned in the despatches as having given great assistance on the line of march. 
He was in consequence attached as Orderly Officer to the General Commanding, and 
followed him into action. He received promotion for his services. Serving iSSi. 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 



XII. 

Sir John Spencer Login, Bengal Army, entered the Hon. East India Company's 
Service as a Surgeon ; but was employed in the Political Department, having been sent 
on the Mission to Herat with the Envoy, Major D'Arcy Todd, where he remained 
three years. He was then appointed Surgeon to the Commander-in-Chief ; afterwards 
to Sir Charles Metcalf, acting Governor-General of India (created Lord Metcalf). He 
went through the first Cabul Campaign, and was the last man who came through the 
Bolan Pass safe, just before the massacre at Cabul. After this Campaign, Sir John was 
the Residing Surgeon and Assistant President at the Court of Oude. After going 
through the Seikh Campaign, he was selected by the Governor-General (Lord Dalhousie), 
on the strong recommendation of Sir Henry Lawrence, for the post of Guardian and 
Governor of the deposed King, H.H. Maharajah Duleep Singh, then only ten years old. 
All the crown jewels and treasure were placed under his charge, including the famous 
Koh-i-noor, the amount and value being quite unknown. When it was determined by 
Lord Dalhousie to send the Koh-i-noor to the Queen as a gift from Duleep Singh, 
his guardian could not be spared to take it to England, so it was made over to the 
Governor-General himself, he giving Sir John Login a formal receipt for it, which 
is retained by his family. 

Sir John brought up and educated in his own family the deposed king, until he 
became of age ; but during that period the boy expressed the desire to be a Christian 
like his guardian, and after long probation he was baptized and brought to England, 
where he has settled as a naturalized Englishman, and has since married. On Sir John 
returning to England, Her Majesty, to show her appreciation of his services and the 
faithfulness with which he had administered the untold wealth placed under his charge, 
bestowed on him the honour of knighthood ; he declined a baronetcy, not considering 
his means adequate to its support. Sir John Login died in 1863. 




THE CAMPBELLS OF BARCALDINE. 



itntage. 




c*ATRICK, in 1595, was the first of the Campbells of Barcaldine. He was a 
.-A^Y* younger son of Sir Duncan Campbell, of Glenorchy, ancestor of the 
most noble house of Breadalbane. Patrick married, first, Annabel, 
daughter of Campbell of Dunstaffnage, by whom he had, besides 
others, a son and heir, John ; he married, secondly, Bethia, daughter of 
Murray of Ochtertyre. John, who succeeded his father 1678, married 
Margaret, daughter of Campbell of Classie, by whom he had a son, 
Alexander, his heir ; by his second wife, a sister of Sir Ewen Cameron, of 
Lochiel, he had another son, ancestor of the Campbells of Balliveolan. Alexander 
succeeded about 1699 ; he married Mary, daughter of Campbell of Lochnell. 
Alexander dying in 1720, was succeeded by his son Patrick; he married, first, Ann, 
daughter and last representative of the Campbells of Kilmun, by whom he had a son, 
John, and a daughter, Ann, who married Charles Campbell, of Ardchatten ; he married, 
secondly, in 1/07, Lucia, daughter of Sir Ewen Cameron, of Lochiel. John had a 
son, Alexander, who married a sister of Sir John Sinclair, Bart., of Ulbster ; their 
daughter married the Earl of Cathness. Alexander was a Colonel in the army, and 
Lieut.-Governor of Fort George, Inverness-shire. John had also two daughters : Ann 
married Captain Trapaud ; Matilda, Captain Niel Campbell, of Duntroon. 

Patrick had by his second wife, Lucia, four daughters, and several sons. Of the 
daughters, Isabella married John Campbell of Achalader ; Mary, MacDougall of 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 73 

Dunollie ; Annabella, Archibald Campbell of M el fort ; and Jane, Campbell of Edinchipp. 
Colin of Glenure, the eldest son of Patrick and Lucia, married Janet, daughter of Colonel 
the Hon. Hugh Mackay, of Bighouse, Sutherlandshire ; Colin Glenure was killed by 
one of the Stewarts of Appin, 1752 ; he left three daughters, the youngest, born after 
his death, was named Colin. Louisa, the eldest daughter, inherited the estate of Big- 
house on the death of her maternal grandfather, 17/0; she married her cousin, George 
Mackay. Patrick died 1738. He was succeeded by Duncan, the fourth son of his 
second marriage, who purchased the estate from his half-brother John ; he thus became 
Campbell of Barcaldine and Glenure. Duncan married Mary, daughter of Alexander 
Macpherson, Esq. He died in 1784, and was succeeded by his son Alexander, who 
married Mary, daughter of John Campbell, of Edinburgh ; he died in 1800, and was 
succeeded by his son Duncan, the first Baronet, created in 1831. Duncan was a Captain 
in the Scots Fusiliers ; he served in Copenhagen and in the Peninsula, where he was 
Aide-de-Camp to his cousin, Sir Alexander Campbell (of the Achalader family), who 
commanded the fourth division of the army at Talavera. Sir Duncan married, in 1815, 
Elizabeth Dreghorn, daughter of James Dermistoun, of Dermistoun, Dumbarton- 
shire. He died in 1842; was succeeded by his son Alexander, born 1819, died 
iSSi at Wimbledon. Sir Duncan was laid with his forefathers in the old burial 
place of the family, the Ardchattan Monastery, Argyllshire. Sir Alexander married, in 
1X55, Harriette, daughter of Henry, Vice-Admiral Collier. He left two sons, the 
present Baronet, Sir Duncan Alexander, born 1856, in the Royal Perth Militia; Eric 
Reginald Duncan, born 1857, who entered the Sgth Regiment; two daughters. 
Harriette and Flora. They possessed lands in Perthshire, and Barcaldine Castle, 
Argyllshire. These have passed out of the family. 



10 



THE 

MACLACHLANS OF MACLACHLAN, 

OF STRATHLACHLAN, ARGYLLSHIRE. 



Arranged from ARGYLL CHARTERS and MACLACHLAN INVENTORIES. 




^ACLACHLAN, of that Ilk, is supposed to have possessed the 
lands of Strathlachlan about the eleventh century. The 
Strath derives its name from the principal heritors of the 
district, " Maclachlan, or Lachlan's Son." Tradition records 
that the progenitor of the family was Lachlan, who came 
from Norway, and was related to the royal family of that 
country ; that from it they derive the lion rampant borne by 
them in their arms. It is also affirmed that many of this 
family filled offices, and ministered as bishops in the Church of those days. 

"In 1290 Edwin Maclachlan (Eugene fig Laghlane) swore fealty to King 
Edward I. In 1305 or 1306 Gillespec Maclachlan requested from that king the 
Barony of Molbride, ' the young ;' which was called ' Strat,' Molbride having been 
taken in arms against the king's allegiance. 

"Between the years 1306 and 1322, Gillespie Maclachlan had from King 
Robert Bruce a grant of the tenpenny lands of Schyrwaghtheyne and other lands. In 
1 309 his name appears on one of the seal tags of the well-known letter of the Scotch 
barons to King Philip of France ; but the seal which was attached to that tag is gone. 

"In 1314 Gillespec Maclachlan, in Ergyle (or Gillespie, as sometimes spelt), by a 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMl'BEI.I.S OI- MKI.FORT. 75 

I 

charter, dated at his castle in Ergyle, which was called Castle Lachlan, granted to the 
' Friars Preachers' of Glasgow forty shillings sterling yearly from the fi-rmes of his penny- 
land of Kylbryd beside Castle Lachlan." Gillespec was dead in 1322. "In 1456 the 
above grant was confirmed by his descendant, Donald Maclachlan. 1 ' In 1474 Donald 
Maclachlan witnessed a grant to the same friars by Colin Campbell, Ormadale. In 1507 
Archibald Maclachlan, son of John of Strathlachlan, had a grant of land from Archibald, 
Earl of Argyll. Tradition, supported by an extant custom, places a church at Strathlachlan 
at the period of the Crusades ; but there appears to be no record of the church before the 
year 1543, when Lachlan Maclachlan of that Ilk, and Katherine Tayt, his wife, granted 
to Archibald, Earl of Argyll, the right of reversion to certain lands, when he should pay 
them in one day the sum of two hundred marks, "upon Sanet our Ladye alter situate 
within the kirk of Stralachlan ; due warning to be given to the Earl by Maclachlan 
otheir pertly, or at our dwelling-place for the tyme, and at our parische kirk on ane 
solemsanet day." 

From 1511 to 1570 successive Maclachlans are recorded. "In 1635 King 
Charles I. confirmed to Archibald Maclachlan of that Ilk the lands of Kilbryde, 
Kilmour, and others. In 1680 King Charles II. granted anew and erected into a 
barony in favour of Archibald Maclachlan and his heirs, bearing the same surname and 
arms the lands of Kilbryde with the castle and fortalice, the lands of Kilmary, with 
all privileges appertaining thereto, appointing Castle Lachlan to be the principal 
messuage of the barony. Also was granted the advowson, rectory, and vicarage of the 
church of Kilmary. The church stood on Lochfyne, apparently at some distance from 
the present church, built in 1792. Its ruins remain, and its cemetery continues to be 
the burial place of the Maclachlans. 

" The chapel of Kilbryde, now grassed over, lies within half a mile of the old castle 
on the shore of Lochfyne. On the death of the laird of Strathlachlan, or the laird of 
Strachur, it has long been the custom that the survivor lays his neighbour's head in the 
grave. Its origin is dated by tradition at the period of the Crusades; each solemnly 
engaged with the other to lay him in his family burial-place if he should fall in battle. 
In the burial-ground of Strathlachlan is a large cross, supposed to have been erected as 
a monumental stone by some of the Maclachlans, but not long ago used as a market 
cross. 

" Castle Lachlan, a high square tower of the usual form, which appears under its 
present name in the reign of King Robert Bruce, stands on a peninsula in Lochfyne ; 
there exist also the remains of the old fortalice of Kilbryde on the shore of the same 
loch. This all belonged to the Maclachlans." 

In the later history of the Maclachlans we find that in 1719 Lachlan, the then chief 
of the Maclachlans, left two sons : Lachlan, who succeeded his father, and Robert, the 



76 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 



representative of the younger branch, called of Fiorline, a " kindly tenant," on the lands 
of the Maclachlans. Fiorline seems to have been the portion of the cadets of the family. 
Lachlan, the chief of clan, fell mortally wounded i6th April, 1745, at the battle of 
Culloden, gallantly fighting in the cause of the Stuarts, whilst in command of a regiment 
composed of his own clansman and the men of the Macleans. He married a daughter 
of Stewart of Appin ; was succeeded by his son, who married a daughter of Campbell 
of Airds. Donald succeeded his father, and had for his wife a daughter of Campbell of 
Park. They left two sons : Robert, the eldest, convener of County Argyll, died at 
Bournemouth, without issue ; he was succeeded by his nephew, the eldest son of 
his brother, George W. S., who left also other children. Robert, cousin of the chief 
who fell at Culloden, was, it appears, disinherited as " kindly tenant " of Fiorline ; he was 
Captain in the 43rd Light Infantry. He married Mary Campbell ; they left four sons. 
He was buried at Strachur, the family burial place, and is described as kirk treasurer. 
James, the eldest son, born 1775, died 1835, a retired Lieut.-Colonel of Royal Artillery, 
unmarried. Archibald, born 1780, died 1854, Lieut. -General in the army ; he married 
Jean, second daughter of Captain Niel Campbell, of Duntroon and Oib. Robert, 
Captain in the 43rd Light Infantry, died in Spain during the war, 1809, was unmarried. 
Alexander married the widow of Captain Harvey, Royal Artillery; he died 1866, 
Lieut.-General Royal Artillery, and Commandant of 2nd Brigade. Lachlan, died 
1849 in Galway, where he had property, and was M.P. for Galwayin 1833. Archibald 
and Jean Maclachlan had three children. James Campbell, born 1815, Lieutenant in 
the 82nd Regiment, died in Jamaica. Archibald Niel Campbell, in Holy Orders, Vicar 
of Newton Valence, .Hants, 1881, called of Earls Island and Knocknakerna, co. Galway, 
married Mary, daughter of Charles Sidebottom, Esq., Elm Bank, county of Worcester ; 
they have sons and daughters. Failing the present chief and his brothers, Archibald 
N. Campbell Maclachlan would be the chief of the Maclachlans of Strathlachlan. Their 
sister, Jean, married her first cousin, Archibald Dyce, Lieut.-General, and Colonel of 
the 105th Madras Light Infantry; she died 1838 in India, leaving two daughters. 

The " Rowan" (Mountain Ash) is the Badge of the Maclachlans. 



THE CAMERONS OF LOCHIEL. 




'ONALD DHU is famous in the history of the clan as 
its deliverer from the depressed state caused by the 
incursions of the Lords of the Isles. He regained 
for the clan Cameron, which is one of the most 
ancient of the Highland clans, the lands and property 
they formerly possessed. In 1564 Donald, a direct 
descendant of Donald Dhu, received from Queen 
Mary, for his loyalty, a charter for himself and heirs, confirming to him and his heirs 
the lands and estates, with the Barony of Lochiel. The great Sir Ewen succeeded his 
grandfather, Alan, and was the son of John Cameron, who married a daughter of Lord 
Glenorchy, ancestor of the Breadalbane family. Sir Ewen, or " Eveerdhu," as called in 
the Highlands, was born in 1629. He surpassed the fame of his predecessors in his 
devotion to the House of Stuart, of which he was a staunch adherent. He was the 
first to take up arms in their cause ; he also fought, although then an old man, at the 
Battle of Killiecrankie. He died in 1718, aged ninety years. Sir Ewen married three 
times. By his first wife he had no children ; by his second wife, a daughter of 
Maclean of Dowart, he had three sons and four daughters ; and by his third, a daughter 
of Barckley of Urie, one son and seven daughters. The eleven daughters all married 
Highland proprietors ; the eighth daughter, Lucia, married Patrick Campbell of Barcal- 
dine ; the ninth daughter, Katherine, married John Campbell of Achalader. Sir Ewen 
was succeeded by his eldest son, John, who joined Mar in 1/15, and was attainted and 
his estates forfeited ; he died in 1748, and was succeeded by his son, Donald. Donald, 
known as the "gentle Lochiel" of the '45, joined Prince Charles, and after Culloden 



78 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 

retired to France ; he was succeeded by his son John, who returned to Scotland in 
1759; he died 1762, and was succeeded by his brother Charles. The estates were 
restored to Donald, the son of Charles, at the amnesty of 1775. The Camerons of 
Lochiel were devoted adherents of the House of Stuart, in whose cause they fought and 
suffered. 

The Oak is the Badge of the Camerons. 

In 1815, we find record of Colonel John Cameron of Fassifern, a younger branch 
of the Camerons of Lochiel, who served in the 92nd Highland Regiment at the battle 
of Waterloo. He was killed at the head of his regiment on that memorable day. 

In the despatches of the Duke of Wellington he is thus mentioned : 

"Amongst others, I cannot forbear to mention Colonel Cameron, of the 92nd, and , to 

whose conduct I have frequently called your Lordship's attention, and who at last fell, distinguishing 
themselves at the head of their brave troops, which they commanded. Notwithstanding the glory 
of the occasion, it is impossible not to lament such men, both on account of the public and as 
friends. 

(Signed) "WELLINGTON." 




THE 



CAMPBELLS OF DUNSTAFFNAGE. 



tutsagt. 




ATHERED from historical records, we have the history 
of the Campbells of Dunstaffnage given thus : " Dugald- 
Mor, of over Lochawe, from whom the Campbells of Dun- 
staffnage, and Duncan-Mor, his brother, of whom the family 
of Duntroon, sons of Sir Colin Campbell, twelfth knight of 
Lochawe." 

We find in the charters of the family that Dugald was 
the second son of Sir Colin. Also from the charters, private 
documents, and other authorities, we have the following 
interesting history of the royal castle of Dunstaffnage and other family records. The 
castle was called in Gaelic Dun-agus-ta-inish, or the fortified place with the two islands. 
In Grose's " Antiquities of Scotland," he says, "The builder of this castle and time of 
its construction are unknown. It is certainly of great antiquity, and was once the seat 
of Pictish and Scottish princes. Here for a long time was preserved the famous stone, 
the palladium of Scotland, brought, as the legend has it, from Spain. It was afterwards 
removed by Kenneth II. to Scone." This castle, Pennant has observed, " is fabled to 
have been founded by Kwin. a Pictish monarch cotemporary with Julius Qesar." In 
Camden Britt. Addit., vol. i\ ., it is said, "that some of the ancient regalia preserved 
here till the eighteenth century were, in consequence of the infirmity of the keeper, 
embezzled by the servants, who could not withstand the temptation excited by the silver 



80 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 

that adorned them." We are informed that " they left a battle axe, nine feet in length, of 
beautiful workmanship, and embossed with silver." Pennant has given the drawing of 
a small ivory figure found here, " which he thinks was certainly cut in memory of the 
celebrated chair, and appears to have been an inauguration sculpture. It is beau- 
tifully carved ; its supposed date 942. A crowned monarch is represented sitting in it, 
with a book (rather a scroll) in one hand, as if going to take the coronation oath " (see 
Pennant's " Hebrides"). The ivory king, the battle axe, spur and stirrups of Robert 
the Bruce, are now in possession of the family. In the Chronicles of the Picts, it is 
related that "about the year 843 Kenneth Mac Alpine transferred the seat of govern- 
ment from Dunstaffnage to the palace of Forteviot in Perthshire." 

We lose sight of Dunstaffnage for several centuries, till it again rises up to view 
during the eventful reign of Robert the Bruce. It was then possessed by Alexander 
of Argyll, father of John, whom Barbour calls the Lord of Lorn. In other histories of 
this period, and from other authorities, we find the MacDougalls were at that date Lords 
of Lorn ; also in the family records of the MacDougalls it is so stated. The Argylls 
came into possession of the lands of Lorn, and assumed the title, about 1460. But to 
continue. John, called the Red Comyn, whom Bruce had slain at Dumfries, was 
" Erne," that is, uncle to John of Lorn ; this Alexander of Argyll having married 
Comyn's daughter (?), Alexander adhered to the interests of Baliol. Bruce was 
defeated at the battle of Dalree, near Tyndrum, but afterwards, A.D. 1308, having 
obtained a victory over the army of John of Lorn, he besieged Alexander in the fortress 
of Dunstaffnage. Bowan, in his continuation of Fordoun's " Chronicles," says that 
" Alexander rendered the castle to Bruce, but refusing to do homage to him, he received 
a safe conduct for himself and all who wished to retire with him, and fled into England, 
where he died." 

Robert the Bruce granted to Sir Colin-Oig Campbell (son of Sir Neil and Marjory, 
sister of Bruce), his nephew, the keepership of the castle as an hereditary office. He 
was succeeded in this, as in his other titles, by his eldest son, Gillespic-Mhor (great 
Archibald), who was succeeded by Colin longantach, or Wonderful Colin, who granted 
the office of deputy keeper or captainship of Dunstaffnage to his second lawful son, 
Dugald-Mor, or Mhor, about the year 1436. 

David II. confirms a charter granted by his father to William de Vetere Ponte, viz., 
of " The Old Bridge" (Vipond), dated at Dunstaffnage in the fourth year of his reign, thus 
proving its use as a royal residence. There is also a charter in possession, dated 1 2th July, 
1490, by John Lord, of Drummond, to Alexander Campbell, Captain of Dunstaffnish and 
Bailie of Glengray, of the four merk lands of his (Lord Drummond), lands of Blayrdarg, 
and other lands lying in the Earldom of Strathern and Sheriffdom of Perth. Also a 
charter by Archibald, Earl of Ergyle, Lord Campbell and Lorn, to his cousin, Alexander 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OK MELFORT. Si 

Campbell- Ker (Ciar ; Gaelic, stern), Captain of Dunstaffnish, and heirs male of his body, 
of the lands now held by them, and other lands which were sold about 1790, and of the 
keeping of the castle of " Dunstafynche," office of Marnycht, fishing, etc. This charter 
is dated 25th June, 1502. From Angus, who succeeded his father, Alexander, in 
1502, or about this time, the family take the patronymic of Mich Aonghuis an 
Dun (Mac Angus of the Fort), by which it is known to this day. 

The Duke of Argyll is hereditary keeper of the castle, Campbell of Dunstaffnage 
deputy keeper or captain, as he is styled. The present representative is the nine- 
teenth captain in succession. In virtue of his office he bears the key of the castle ; 
it is of silver, of curious antique design and handsome workmanship, a facsimile of the 
one which perished in the fire by which the castle was partially destroyed about eighty 
years ago. The castle until then was the residence of the family. The chapel and 
greater part of the castle are said to have been built in the twelfth century, though 
some part of the castle, now standing, is, from its architecture, older. 



Alexander, father of Angus, already mentioned, was direct ancestor of Kiel 
Campbell, of Dunstaffnage, who died in 1751, and was succeeded by his son, Donald 
Campbell, born 1722, who married Anne, daughter of Dugald Campbell, of Clana- 
mackrie, and had, with five daughters, five sons. The eldest, Dugald, died s.p. Niel, 
his brother, succeeded him. Angus, born 1770, married Lilias, daughter and heir of 
J. Buchanan, Esq. ; they left an only son, Donald, who succeeded his uncle, Niel. 
Alexander died 1842 ; he was Captain in the East India Company's Naval Service ; 
by his wife, Anne Wallace, he left an only son, John Alexander, Major in the 7th 
Madras Cavalry. John, the fifth son, was in the medical service of the East India 
Company. He left three sons ; the eldest died without issue ; the second was an officer 
in the East India Company's service he married, and left two sons and a daughter; 
the third, Captain Osborne Campbell, married Isabella Louisa, daughter of Archibald 
Campbell of Melfort he died, leaving daughters only. Niel died in 1829, and was 
succeeded by his nephew, Donald, afterwards Sir Donald, who was the first baronet, 
created in 1836. Sir Donald married, in 1825, Caroline Eliza, daughter of Sir W. 
Plomer, of Snaresbrook, Essex ; he left four sons and one daughter. Sir Angus, his 
eldest son, born 1827, succeeded his father. He entered the Royal Navy; married 
Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Sir John Macdougall of Dunollie ; she died in 1857, 
without children. Sir Angus died in 1863, and was succeeded by his brother, Sir 
Donald, who married, in 1862, the only daughter of William Moore, Esq., of Grimeshill, 
Westmoreland. They had one little girl, who died in infancy. Lady Campbell died in 
1877, Sir Donald in 1878. William, the third son, was drowned at Dunstaffnage 1834. 
George, a Captain in the 7ist Regiment, died 1869, unmarried. Their sister, Laura 
I slay, died unmarried in 1880. 

ir 



8 a 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 



The baronetcy became extinct, being limited to the heirs in the direct line. The 
estate became the inheritance, by entail, through his great-grandfather, of Alexander 
Campbell, eldest son of Major John Alexander Campbell, 7th Madras Cavalry, who 
married Annabella Robertson, a grand-daughter of John Campbell, Esq., of Lochend. 
Major John A. Campbell left three sons : Alexander, now " Captain of Dunstaffnage ;" 
Lorn, who died young ; Roderick ; and one daughter, Constance. 




THE PICTISH IVORY KING. 




THE CAMPBELLS OF DUNTROON. 




k UNCAN-MOR CAMPBELL, brother of Dougal-Mor, of Dunstaffnage, 
received from his father, Sir Colin Campbell, twelfth Knight of 
Lochaw, the lands and castle of Duntroon, as his patrimony. The 
Campbells of Duntroon were established for centuries on their wild 
and rocky stronghold overlooking Loch Crinan. 

Duntroon. signifies " The Castle of Turrets." Niel Og of the 
Turrets, was in olden time the patronymic of the Laird. The castle was 
remarkable for its strength and the thickness of its walls ; it is said to have 
resisted the ravages of Allister Macdonald (known as Colkitto), who, landing at 
Kantyre, overran the country. It is related that Colkitto intended to attack the castle 
from the sea. To gain information, he sent his piper by land ; he was admitted into 
the castle, but being suspected, was confined in one of its turrets. Perceiving that the 
castle was of sufficient strength to repel the invaders, he, as Macdonald and his men 
approached, gave them warning by playing on his bagpipes the well-known pibroch of 
" Dearest Coll, shun the tower ! shun the tower ! " (now known as the " March of 
Duntroon Castle"). Macdonald passed on, leaving his faithful piper to his fate. 

We have related elsewhere the tie of friendship that existed between the Campbells 
of Dunstaffnage, Duntroon, and Melfort ; also between the Campbells of Glenorchy and 
Duntroon existed an ancient treaty, that the heir of the chief of the Breadalbanes 
should be fostered at the. "Castle of Turrets," often a wise precaution, as the rightful 
heir was not always acknowledged as such. 

Captain Niel Campbell of Duntroon and Oib was the last who held the lands of his 
forefathers. He married, for his first wife, Matilda, daughter of John Campbell of 
Barcaldine ; his second wife was Jean, daughter of Archibald Campbell of Blandfield, 



84 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 

of the family of Craignish. By both wives he left a family. Captain Niel Campbell 
served in the Montgomery Highlanders, and was present at the taking of the Havannah 
in 1762. He afterwards commanded a company in the Argyllshire Fencibles. In 1786 
he accepted the offer of an appointment in the Madras Presidency, East Indies, pro- 
cured for him through the interest of a relative. His motive for leaving his country 
was to endeavour by this honourable exertion to retrieve the paternal inheritance, " To 
save the old bark," as he called Duntroon, from debt incurred by the failure of the Ayr 
Bank, and by liberal pecuniary engagements for others. The absconding of one of the 
Bank directors with money and valuable securities was the cause of its failure. He had 
induced Captain Niel Campbell to become a shareholder. The honourable endeavours 
of Captain Niel were unfortunately not crowned with success, as he died in 1791 at 
Madras. Duntroon Castle was sold by the trustees and Oib by Niel (afterwards Sir 
Niel Campbell). 

Captain Niel Campbell left three sons and three daughters ; he had also four 
daughters by his first marriage ; one of whom married MacDougall of Arden- 
trive, another Grant of Duthel ; she was the mother of Sir Hope Grant, K.C.B. 
The eldest by the second marriage was Frederick Mary Meredith, who married, 
in 1797, General Alexander Dyce, of the Madras army; Jean, who married Archi- 
bald Maclachlan, a General in the army ; Elizabeth, the youngest, died unmarried 
in 1878. James, the eldest son, fell mortally wounded at the battle of the Helder, 1799, 
while gallantly leading the Grenadier Company of the>79th Highlanders. The second 
son, who became Major-General Sir Niel Campbell, K.C. B., was a very distin- 
guished officer. Sir Niel was selected to attend Napoleon at Elba as British Commis- 
sioner. He was appointed Governor at Sierra Leone, where, falling a victim to the 
climate, he died in 1827. General Patrick Campbell entered the Royal Artillery. He 
served in Egypt under Sir Ralph Abercrombie. He saw much service. From 1833 to 

1840 he acted as Her Britannic Majesty's Agent and Consul-General in Egypt and Syria. 

He was born 1779, and died 1857, in London. The three brothers died unmarried. 

The family of Duntroon is now represented in the female line by the Rev. 
Archibald N. Campbell Maclachlan, only surviving son of the late Jean Campbell, 
widow of General Maclachlan, and daughter of the late Captain Niel Campbell. In 
the church of Kilmartine, Argyllshire, in whose churchyard is the ancient burial-place 
of the family, are three mural tablets. The sons placed one to the memory of their 
father and brother ; the other two record the services of Sir Niel and General Patrick 
Campbell ; that to Sir Niel was erected by his brother, that to General Patrick by his 
two remaining sisters, Mrs. Maclachlan and Miss Campbell. He was the last male 
representative of the family. The castle and land is now possessed by the Malcolms 
of Poltaloch. In the olden times it was a proverb that Duntroon Castle never wanted 
a hero, a bard, or a piper. The Campbells of " The Castle of the Turrets " are now a 
memory of the past. 



in t tmak line 



OF THE 



CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT 



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XII. 



i. 

THE grandson of John Bell Maclachlan is the sole male representative of the family. 
He is heir to the property of Craigentreve. Of age in 1881: 

II. 

Five of the sons were in .the 57th Regiment. Dougald fell at the battle of the 
Pyrenees. Walter was wounded at Badajos. Margaret, the last survivor of the family, 
died at Inverary in 1875. 

III. 

The title of Baron was given to those who held their lands from the Crown. 
Allan MacDougall sold the estate of Ardincaple in 1877, it having been five hundred 
years tradition says eight in the possession of his forefathers. 



IV. 

Rear-Admiral John MacDougall entered the Navy 1824. He was first appointed 
to H.M.S. " Ganges," afterwards to the " Ocean," both commanded by Sir Patrick 
Campbell (then Captain). He served in the " Tribune," and as Mate on board the 
"Vernon," bearing the flag of Sir George Cockburn, K.C.B. Joined the "Thalia" 
1834, bearing the flag of Sir Patrick Campbell, commanding on the Cape station. On 
the "Thalia" being paid off, he was promoted by Sir Patrick to a death vacancy 
as Lieutenant, 3oth April, 1837. He was then appointed to H.M.S.' " Pique," 
Captain Boxer commanding; and afterwards, under Sir Montague Stopford, K.C.B., 



A HISTORY OF TIIK CAMI'IiEI.I.S ()F MKI.FORT. 89 

served as Senior Lieutenant on board. On the " Pique " being paid off, he was 
appointed to the rank of Commander, July, 1846. Commander MacDougall then 
joined the "Asia," bearing flag of Sir Philip Hornby, K.C.B. ; was promoted by him 
to 11. M.S. "Aphrodite," 1850, as Captain. She was paid off by Captain MacDougall 
the same year, which brought his services to a close. As Lieutenant of the " Pique," 
he was at the taking of Caiffa Tower ; was severely wounded. He was at the 
bombardment of St. Jean d'Acre in 1840. For these services he received the Turkish 
Medal ; also the War Medal with Clasp for Syria. He died at Oban, 1870. The 
local papers thus record his loss : 

" In our Obituary of to-day will be found the death of Rear-Admiral John MacDougall, of 
Ardencaple, a gentleman who was widely known and much respected and esteemed for his upright 
character and kindly disposition. He was in active service for upwards of twenty-six years. On 
retiring, he became Captain Commandant of the 1st Easdale Argyll Artillery Volunteers, and 
continued so until failing health obliged him to resign. He was laid to rest in Kilbrandon church- 
yard. Not only a large number of his friends, but also the volunteers, spontaneously attended, as 
a tribute of respect and esteem towards their late commander." 




ta 



XII. 



I. 

THE grandson of John Bell Maclachlan is the sole male representative of the family. 
He is heir to the property of Craigentreve. Of age in 1881; 

II. 

Five of the sons were in .the 57th Regiment. Dougald fell at the battle of the 
Pyrenees. Walter was wounded at Badajos. Margaret, the last survivor of the family, 
died at Inverary in 1875. 

III. 

The title of Baron was given to those who held their lands from the Crown. 
Allan MacDougall sold the estate of Ardincaple in 1877, it having been five hundred 
years tradition says eight in the possession of his forefathers. 



IV. 

Rear- Admiral John MacDougall entered the Navy 1824. He was first appointed 
to H.M.S. "Ganges," afterwards to the "Ocean," both commanded by Sir Patrick 
Campbell (then Captain). He served in the " Tribune," and as Mate on board the 
"Vernon," bearing the flag of Sir George Cockburn, K.C.B. Joined the "Thalia" 
1834, bearing the flag of Sir Patrick Campbell, commanding on the Cape station. On 
the " Thalia " being paid off, he was promoted by Sir Patrick to a death vacancy 
as Lieutenant, 3oth April, 1837. He was then appointed to H.M.S.- " Pique," 
Captain Boxer commanding; and afterwards, under Sir Montague Stopford, K.C.B., 



A HISTORY OF T11F. CAM IT.F.I.I.S OF MKI.FOKT. 89 

served as Senior Lieutenant on board. On the " Pique " being paid off, he was 
appointed to the rank of Commander, July, 184.6. Commander MacDougall then 
joined the "Asia," bearing flag of Sir Philip Hornby, K.C.B. ; was promoted by him 
to H.M.S. " Aphrodite," 1850, as Captain. She was paid off by Captain MacDougall 
the same year, which brought his services to a close. As Lieutenant of the " Pique," 
he was at the taking of Caiffa Tower; was severely wounded. He was at the 
bombardment of St. Jean d'Acre in 1840. For these services he received the Turkish 
Medal ; also the War Medal with Clasp for Syria. He died at Oban, 1870. The 
local papers thus record his loss : 

" In our Obituary of to-day will be found the death of Rear-Admiral John MacDougall, of 
Ardencaple, a gentleman who was widely known and much respected and esteemed for his upright 
character and kindly disposition. He was in active service for upwards of twenty-six years. On 
retiring, he became Captain Commandant of the ist Easdale Argyll Artillery Volunteers, and 
continued so until failing health obliged him to resign. He was laid to rest in Kilbrandon church- 
yard. Not only a large number of his friends, but also the volunteers, spontaneously attended, as 
a tribute of respect and esteem towards their late commander." 



90 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 



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i. 

GEORGE ADAMS, Assistant Surgeon 2ist Regiment, afterwards Surgeon I4th Regiment, 
served in Mediterranean 1813 to 1817. 

II. 

Kenneth M. Adams, Surgeon 3151 Regiment Madras Native Infantry, died at 

Trichinopoly. 

III. 

Robert Roy Adams entered the Bengal army as Ensign i2th Regiment. In 
1844, appointed to Scindioli's Contingent. In 1850, appointed second in command of 
Guide Corps. In 1854, Brigade Major in Punjab Frontier Force. In 1856, entered 
Punjab Commission as Assistant Commissioner. In 1858, appointed Deputy Commis- 
sioner. In 1864, was Deputy Commissioner at Peshawur, where he was assassinated 
by a fanatic near the Caboola gate of the city, isth January, and died on 22nd January, 
1865. He served in the Battle of Maharajpore, and in several expeditions, as Brigade 
Major to Sir N. Chamberlain. In 1857, was on the staff of Brigadier John Nicolson 
at the Battle of Goordaspore. For his services received the Bronze Star, the Frontier 
War Medal, and the Indian Mutiny Medal. . 

IV. 

Andrew Fraser entered the army in 1796, in the Scotch Brigade (old 94th). He 
served at the Cape and in the East Indies ; was Fort Adjutant at Poonamola for 



92 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPIUCI.LS OF MELFORT. 

several years; returned to England invalided in 1807; was transferred to Royal 
Veterans in 1810; appointed Fort Major at Fort George, and afterwards officiating 
Governor there, till his death. 

V. 

Leopold Sax Coburg Fraser entered the army as Ensign in the 7oth Regiment ; 
served in the West Indies ; exchanged into the Ceylon Rifles in 1841 ; was on the staff 
of his uncle, Lieutenant-General Sir Colin Campbell. 



VI. 

James George Fraser entered the army in 1844 as Assistant Surgeon ; served in 
China; afterwards entered the Bombay Medical Service ; retired in 1864. 



VII. 

Charles Ross Fraser entered Madras army 1839; served in Scindioli's Contingent ; 
transferred to 2nd Punjab in 1851 ; appointed Commandant, 1857; served in Trans- 
Indus Frontier Field Force for several years; retired invalided in 1859. Received 
Frontier War Medal. 



A HISTORY OK Till < 'AMI-HELLS OK MK.LKORT. 



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i. 

LIEUTENANT FREDERICK FORTYE served in the 44th Regiment ; he fell in the first 
Afghan War at the Khyber Pass, 1842. 



II. 

Lieutenant Lome Fortye served in the Canadian Rifles. Died at Niagara, 
Canada. 

III. 

Dr. Humfrey entered the Service as Assistant Surgeon of the 95th Regiment ; 
served in the West Indies, Canada, and the Crimea ; died at Malta while holding the 
appointment of Inspector-General of Hospitals. Had several Medals and Clasps. 



IV. 

Captain Le Marchant Carey entered the Service in the 66th Regiment ; sold out 
as Captain in the 78th. 


V. 

Captain Grey, as Captain, sold out of the 5th Fusiliers. 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMFB! MM.DKT. 



VI. 

Captain Charles Humfrey served with the 92nd Highlanders in the Indian 
Mutiny; wounded in an engagement near Mhow ; mentioned in I >rspatcl.- 
exchanged into the 4th West Indian Regiment; served in it on the West Coast of 
Africa ; received Medal. Retired from the Service, and settled in \Yw X 



VII. 

Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel Frederick Humfrey served with the sist King's Own 
Light Infantry during the Umbeyla Campaign, 1863-4, with Colonel Bright's Division, 
guarding the ford of Derbrund on the banks of the Indus. Not having been engagi-d. 
the force received no medal. Commanded the escort of Major Sandeman (Political 
Officer), sent up to Khelat in 1876, consisting of Artillery, Cavalry, and Infantry, about 
one thousand men in all. When on the march, a severe epidemic of cholera broke out 
crossing Cutchee ; received the thanks of Government for his services during that 
trying time. Served with the joth Bombay Native Infantry, Jacob's Rifles, in the 
Southern Afghan Field Force, from the commencement of the war ; received Brevet 
Lieutenant-Colonelcy for having, with eighty men of Jacob's Rifles and thirty-three men 
of ist Punjab Cavalry, attacked and driven out of a strong position three thousand 
Pathans, who had come to attack them at Syndboot in Shorawack. Went home on sick 
leave when Afghan Campaign was supposed to have ended, 1880; returned immediately 
on hostilities again breaking out ; arrived after the unfortunate Battle of Maiwand. 
Serving 1881. Medal, Afghanistan. 

VIII. 

Captain John C. T. Humfrey, Army Pay Department, from gth Foot. Served 
with i gth Regiment, Hazara Campaign, in 1868, including the expedition against the 
tribes in the Black Mountain, also with the gth Foot in Jowaki Campaign, 1877 an< J 
1878. In 1880 he was placed on the Staff as Field Treasurer and Provost Marshal 
with the Northern Afghan Field Force. Received two Medals. Serving 1881. 



IX. 

Captain Benjamin G. Humfrey, serving in the loth Bombay Native Infantry. In 
Southern Afghanistan, 1880. Serving 1881. 



96 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 

X. 

Captain James Le Marchant Carey entered the army in the ;ist Regiment; served 
in the Frontier India War. Received Medal. Sold out of service as Captain. 

XI. 

Adrian Carey holds a Civil medical appointment in Ceylon. 



XII. 

Captain Dobree served in the Indian Staff Corps. On active service during the 
Indian Mutiny. Received the thanks of Government. Died atWallair, whilst holding 
the appointment of Deputy Assistant Quartermaster- General. Medal. 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMI 1:1 I I .s OK MM, 






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i. 

COMMANDER COLIN C. ABERCROMBIE KANE entered the Royal Navy in 1834 as First 
Class Volunteer on board H.M.S. " Thalia," then bearing the flag of his uncle, Rear- 
Admiral Sir Patrick Campbell, Commander-in-Chief at the Cape, in which ship he 
served until 1837. In 1838 proceeded to the East Indies to join the " Wellesley," flag 
ship of Rear-Admiral Sir F. Maitland, K.C.B. In 1840 he joined the " Algerine," in 
which vessel he was present at the taking of Cheeson, and was engaged single-handed, 
and silenced the Cho Foo batteries, mounting 130 guns. Assisted in the survey of the 
Yang-tse-kiang river. In 1840 was appointed to the " Conway," and proceeded in her to 
Canton. Commanded the " Mortar Jung," employed in shelling the city, was officially 
noticed in "Gazette," and in 1841 was promoted for services in China. In 1842, 
appointed to "Caledonia," flag ship, at Plymouth, 1843 to the " Thunderer," and in 
May of that year joined the " Lily," sixteen-gun brig, at the Cape. In 1844 appointed 
to H.M.S. " Cornwallis," flag of Sir W. Parker, K.C.B., Commander-in-Chief, in China. 
Served as additional Lieutenant to "Agincourt," Flag-Admiral Sir T. Cochrane, 'till 
1845, when he was appointed Senior Lieutenant to the " Osprey," and proceeded to 
New Zealand, where he was landed in command of a party of Blue Jackets and Marines 
to co-operate with the troops against the rebel natives. His services obtained for him 
most complimentary letters from the Governor, Senior Naval Officer, and Military 
Officer in command. On the wreck of his ship on that coast, was appointed Super- 
numerary Lieutenant to H.M.S. " Caliope," and was present as Senior Lieutenant of 
the flotilla of boats employed at Wangauni during the rebellion of the natives. In 1848 
was invalided home ; the same year was appointed to the " Ocean," flag of Vice- 
Admiral G. Elliot, at the Nore. In 1850 was appointed to the coastguard at Fraser- 
burgh. He volunteered for active service during the Russian War ; commanded gun- 
boats both in the Baltic and Black Sea. In 1856 was appointed First Lieutenant of 



A HISTORY OK TUT CAMPHKI.I.S OF MI-UFORT. 99 

H.M.S. "Termagant," Commodore Kellet, then in the West Indies, when- h- 
until the ship was paid off. He was for a short time First Lieutenant of H.M.S. 
"Centurion." In iS^S was promoted to the rank of Commander. In iX,o 
appointed to the Coastguard, which appointment he held till the time of his deer 
III- died at Aberdeen. 1X64. 

II. 

Major Frederick A. Campbell Kane entered the Honourable East India Compa: 
service at the age of sixteen ; was appointed to the I5th Bombay Native Infantry, of 
which he became Adjutant. During his service he held various civil ami military 
appointments. In June, 1X54, returned to Europe on sick certificate. Being anxious 
to see service, obtained a recommendation from Lord Elphinstone, the then Governor 
of Bombay, to Lord Raglan, for employment in Turkey during the Anglo-Franco 
Russian and Turkish War. He was attached by Lord Raglan to the ist Brigade, 2nd 
Division, commanded by Major-General Pennefather, who appointed him his Extra 
. \ide-de-Camp. He served in the Crimea till the end of 1854, when he was invalided. 
During the Indian Mutiny he organised a military transport train, over four hundred 
miles of road, in connection with the Central India F'ield Force ; was recommended for 
his services by Lord Straithnairn and the Bombay Government In 1862 he retired on 
half pay as Regimental Major, owing to bad health, and was granted an addition to his 
retirement. Received Turkish Medal ; Medjidie ; Crimean Medal with four Clasps ; 
Indian Mutiny Medal. 

Major Kane has in his possession several letters bearing testimony to his services. 
We give a short extract from that of His Royal Highness the Duke of Cambridge, 
who, in writing to Major Kane, says " I have no hesitation in bearing testimony to 
your gallant conduct at Inkerman. That conduct attracted my attention on several 
occasions. During that memorable day, no officer could have conducted himself with 
more coolness when sent, under very heavy fire, to observe the position of the Russian 
guns." 

III. 

Major Cockayne Frith entered the army in 1837. Served in the 38th Regiment 
in the Mediterranean, West Indies, and Canada ; sold out 1852. Was Adjutant of th 
Argyll and Bute Militia from 1855 to 1863, when his health obliged him to retire. 



IV. 

Lieutenant and Adjutant Frederick Cockayne Frith was educated at Haileybury : 
entered Sandhurst, 1875; obtained his commission in the army, 1876; was gazetted 



1OO A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 

Sub-Lieutenant in the ;th Lancers, 1877. On obtaining his Lieutenancy the following 
year, was ante-dated in consequence of having left Sandhurst with a first class 
certificate. He was appointed Adjutant, and went out as such with his regiment to the 
Cape at the time of the Zulu War, where he was unfortunately killed in a skirmish with 
the enemy, June 5th, 1879. His sad fate was much lamented. He was a young officer 
of great promise. 



V. 

Arthur Galloway, of the Bombay Civil Service, youngest son of Sir Archibald 
Galloway, K.C.B., was killed at Delhi, the first day of the Indian Mutiny, 1857, while 
defending the Treasury. 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS ol Ml.I.IORT. 



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BRUCE CAMPBELL. 

(See Fed. 4. ) 
LL.=CHRISTIAN BRUCE CAM 

_L 


tACDOUGALL, Esq. 

-THOMAS KENTON-LIVINGSTONE, 
of West Ou.irter, Stirlingshire. 
(Note 2.) 
1 1 
OIIN XH;F.I., GEORGE KREHK 
b. 1859; 1,. i86a 
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m. 1837 

AI.ICE=\V. STRICKLAND, EM., 
HRISTIAN, 1 ofSansSouci, Naples, 
m. 1872. | 
CHARLES WALTER CAMPBELL, 
1'. 1873. 


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i. 

COLONEL ARCHIBALD THOMAS BALDWIN entered the Honourable East India Company's 
service as a Cadet in 1843 ; joined the 27th Regiment; served in the 4gth, 2Oth, and 
35th Regiments. After the reorganisation, was sent to Madras, and attached to the 
2/th, and then to the i4th Regiment. Acted as Assistant Quartermaster-General for 
two years at Bellary. He then served in the i6th, 25th, and 4ist Regiments. Is now 
commanding the 7th Madras Native Infantry. Served in the Burmese War of 
1852-3 ; was present at the defence of Martaban and recapture of Billing. Medal with 
Clasps for Pegu. Serving 1881. 

II. 

Thomas L. Fenton-Livingstone, Esq., of Westquarter, is the heir of line of the 
\Yestquarter and Cultree branch of the old and historic family of the Livingstones, as 
well as of the Hon. Sir George Livingstone, of Ogleface, Bart., through his uncle, the 
late Admiral Sir Thomas Livingstone, who dying childless, his nephew, son of his sister, 
Mrs. Fenton-Livingstone, became the representative and chief of the family in the 
female line. 

The founder of the family in Scotland, Livingus, said to have been of noble Hun- 
garian descent, settled in West Lothian at the end of the eleventh century. 

The family of Livingstone acquired in the male line three distinct Earldoms 
Linlithgow, Callender, and Newburgh ; two Viscounties, with numerous Baronies and 
minor honours. They attained to great power, and possessed extensive estates. With 
James, Earl of Linlithgow and Callender, terminated the whole descendants in the male 



A HISTORY 01 TlIK CAMI'I'.Kl.l S Ml MI1LFORT. 

line of Alexander, the seventh Earl. The chieftainship of the family parsed to the 
\\ i-sKiuarter branch, as the representatives and heirs in general of the hoiiv of Living 
stone, and entitled, were the attainder removed, to the Karldoms of Linlithgow and 
Callender. The recovery of the Westquarter estate is quite a rom.r told by Sir 

Alexander Livingstone, who was the nephew of Sir (ieor^e Livingstone, and of his 
brothers, Sir Alexander and Sir William, in succession the representatives of the famiK 
after the attainted Earl. Sir Alexander, on the death of his uncle, Sir William, travelled 
from London to Edinburgh to settle his affairs. He arrived at the inn of a small town 
betwixt Alnwick and Berwick, on Christmas afternoon, and was detained there by a heav\ 
snowstorm. To while away the time, his landlady, whose library contained nothing 
of interest to Sir Alexander, in despair pointed out to him a cupboard full of old law 
papers, which had belonged to her father. Sir Alexander's curiosity was roused |,\ 
perceiving frequent mention of the names of Livingstone and Westquarter. He perused 
the papers carefully, and great was his surprise to find he held in his hand the title 
deeds of the estate of Westquarter. By this fortunate discovery he recovered the estate. 
which had been illegally alienated, contrary to the family deed of settlement, and which 
had been purchased by Lord Napier. William, the sixth Lord Livingstone, \\ ady 

and firm adherent of Queen Mary. He joined her after her escape from Lochleven. 
and fought gallantly in her cause. He was the brother of Mary Livingstone, one of the 
Queen's Marys. She was the Me of the old poem, " And Mary Fleming and M<\" 

In possession of the Livingstones of Westquarter is an antique and beautiful 
cabinet which belonged to Queen Mary, the panels of which are richly adorned with 
flowers traced in bead-work, the work of the four Marys. This cabinet the Quren 
bequeathed to Lord Livingstone. For a more full and interesting record of the 
Livingstones, Burke's " Vicissitudes of Families " gives ample details. 



io 4 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 



No. XVII. 

PEDIGREE OF DESCENDANTS IN THE FEMALE LINE OF 
SIR COLIN AND LADY CAMPBELL. 

(See Fed. 6.) 



SIR COLIN CAMPBELL. =JANE HENDON. 



ist, Hon. CHARLES NORTON, =MARIA LouisA,=2nd, Hon. EDWARD Pinrrs, 





in. 


1832. 


m. 1837. 


-MARIA JANE, dau. of 
Alfred Miller-Munday, 
Esq., of Shipley Hall. 
Derbyshire. 

1 
ERIC, 
b. 1875. 


CHARLES GRANTLY=KATHERINE, 
CAMPBELL, | dau. of 
b. i835;Capt. S.P. Mac Vicar, 
23rd R. \V. Fusiliers, of New York, 
when he left the U.S. Navy. 
Service. This marriage 
was dissolved 
in 1879. 


1 i 
CAROLINE=J. GOODBEHERE. CONSTANTINE= 
JOSCELYNE. | m. 1871. HENRY, 
S.P. b. 1840; 
m. 1863. 
In Diplomatic Service. 



ISABELLA. =JOHN CAMPBELL, 
MARGARET, of Achalader. 
m. 1852; 
d. 1861. 

Four sons. 

(See Achalader Fed., 

page 42.) 



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IN THE FEMALE LIN 

(See Pid. 7.) 


REDERICK CAMPBELL.=MAKIA .' 




w ELIZABETH, FRANCIS BARTH&LKMON 
873, dau. of Civil Engineer, India. 

Webster. 


[cic EDMUND, EVA COI.IN. 
>. 1877 at 
lydrabad. 


\\.~ ALEXANDER MARY JANE, Rev. F 
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adham College, Shirin 
Oxford; son of - 
1848; d. 1879. Carlct 


FREDERICK PI.UMPTRE, ARTI 
b. 1863. 

d 


Rev. JAMES STEWART, Rector of 
Little Slukeley, Hunlingdonshire, 
son of the Hon. Montgnmen ' 
Stewart. 


PERCY ARCHIBALD HORATIA 
MARL- J. PARKER, GEORGE, 
BOROUGH, h. 1874. Win 
b. 1871. b. 1877. 


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LlEUTENANT-CoLONEL PATRICK JOHN FuAxcis HENSLOWU entered Her Majesty's 
Indian army, 1857 ; joined the 3rd European Regiment, Bombay, and served with it 
during the Indian Mutiny; was present at the siege of Ratghur and Gunakota ; 
engagement at Baroda and Mudelenpore; battle of Betwa ; storm and capture of 
Jhansi. In 1859, joined the 2/th Light Infantry, or ist Belooch Regiment; served 
with it in Abyssinia ; took part in the assault and capture of Magdala, 1868. Captain, 
1869; Major and Lieutenant-Colonel, 1874; in command of Station, Hyderabad, 1876 
till 1879, when he returned to England on sick leave. Returned to India, 1881. 
Medal and Clasp, Central India; Medal, Abyssinia. Serving 1881. 




APPENDIX. 



APPENDIX. 



(Eljartm anir D^is nnto fetant, Relating tn 

JHdfnrt 



(CWK OF TRANSLATION.) 

No. II. LANDS OF KENMOIR, ETC. 

I \\T.\TORY No. 5. Charter l<y Archibald, Earl of Argyle, in favour of Nigel Campbell, 

2nd September, \ 502. 

Tin's is a Charter by Archibald, Karl of Ergile, Lord Campbell and Lome, in favour of Nigel 
Campbell and his heirs male, whom failing, to the heirs of Dugald Campbell (MacN'cill), whom 
failing, to revert " to us and our heirs." Of the five merk lands of Kenmour, two and a half (cum 
demcdia) mcrk lands of Barquhcill (quc vocatur kedpdyng), six merk lands of Fernach, and live 
merk lands of Ardinstuyr and Arevddcwane lying in Earldom and Shcriffdom of Ergyle, resigned 
by Dugald, father of said Nigel, "in our hand," as Lord Superior at Invcrara. Tcnendas of us and 
our heirs in fee (fcode) and heritage for ever, like as any lands in similar form arc granted by <>r 
held of any baron within the kingdom of Scotland, more tcncndric (Reddendo) Inde annuatim. 
homagium servitium debitum et consuetum, ct military and personal service, as usual under the 
ward of an ancient military holding, with the casualties of superiority, and maintaining for the 
service of us and our heirs a boat of six oars as often as cause requin 

There is no Precept of Sasine inserted likely at this date ; it ua> a -oparatc document. 

Scaled at Invcrara, i6th September, 1502. Witness Colin Campbell of Barbrcck; Alexander 
Campbell of Invcrara; Alexander Makhcuye of Pennymour ; Lord Malcolm MacGilcvcr, f. >r 
Archibald MacCaller; and John Herd. 



IIO A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 



INVENTORY No. \\.-Reccpt of Clare Constat by the "Earl of Ergylc to Nigel Campbell" date 

illegible. 

This is a simple Recept (not of C. C.) by Archibald, Earl of Ergylc, Lord Campbell and Lome, 
directed to bailies, most of whom were witnesses to No. 5, authorising them to give sasine (statum 
ct sasinum hereditarier) in terms of his said Charter to Nigel Campbell of Keanmoir, Barquheill le 
Kilpdyng, Obernoch, Ardinstuyr, and Arvddewan. 

Scaled at Inverara, 2ist September, 1502, and subscribed Erl of Ergyle. 

This Receipt has been by mistake numbered 1 1 in the Inventories. 



INVENTORY No. 6. Precept of Clare Constat by the Earl of Argyle, 1514. 

This, like the preceding, is a simple Precept to bailies, following on a Charter referred to in it 
by Colin, Earl of Ergadie, Lord Campbell and Lome, directing them to give sasine (hereditariam) 
to Duncan MacNeil and his heirs male, whom failing, to revert to ourselves and our heirs, and of 
five merk lands of Kenor (sic), two merk lands of Barquhil, six mcrk lands of Fernok, and five 
merk lands of Ardinstur and Ardynen. 

Sealed at Dunoun, ipth November, 1514. Witness-Colin Campbell of Ardkynglass ; Evan 
Campbell of Strogr. ; j o hn Campbell of Drusyne ; and Duncan MacCaller of Ardare. Subscribed 
Erl of Ergyle. 

INVENTORY No. 7. Sasine, 1515. 

Sasine following upon the preceding Precept on nth December, 1514. In favour of Duncan 
MacNeil, etc., etc. Lands as described in No. 6. 

Witness Lord John MacCaller ; Duncan MacLean Lergacone ; Dugald Ewan Maclllesa ; and 
Donald Macranald. Notary Public, John MacCallum. 



INVENTORY No. %. Precept of Clare Constat by the Earl of Argyle, dated 8t/i April, 1 548. 

This is a Precept of Clare Constat, granted by Archibald Campbell, Master of Ergadie, and 
Lord fiar of Earldom of Ergadie, Campbell, and Lome, with consent of his father, Archibald, 
Earl of Ergadie (ac domini liberi tenementi exeundem tcrrarum ac etiam nostri Icggittime tutoris), 
and of Colin Campbell (nostri indubitati ceerateris). In favour of Dugald Campbell, as lawful son 
and nearest heir of Duncan Campbell, formerly of Melfort. Instructing bailies to give him sasine 
(hereditariam), the symbolical delivery being of terre ligni et lapidis of five merk lands of Kenmor, 
as in No. 5, etc., in Lordship of Melfort and Sheriffdom of Ergyle, quequidem dc nobis tenentur in 
capite. 

Sealed (sigillum nostrum sigille pres nostri) at Carrik, 8th April, 1548. Witness Hector 
Makclanc of Doward ; Colin Campbell', Ardkinglass ; Dugald Campbell, son and heir-apparent of 
Archibald Campbell of Kylmccpacll ; Archibald Campbell of Gawnan ; Mr. Nigel Campbell, Rector 
of Kylmcrtin ; and Archibald Campbell of Clachane. Subscribed Erl of Ergylc and a Master of 
Ergylc. 



A HISTORY OK THE CAMHiU.I s OP Ml I. FORT. 



IN YEN PORV No. 9. Charter by the Earl of A rgyle to Jo/in Campbell, dated September, \ 

This is a Charter by Archibald, Karl of Argaclic, Lord Campbell and Lome, to John ('ampln-ll. 
son and heir-apparent of Dugald Campbell of Kcnmoirancl his heirs male, hcrcditaric, whom failing 
to Alexander Campbell (son of Duncan), his uncle, to Nigel Campbell, Dugald Campbell, to Ardr,' 
Campbell (MacGillspittc VAne), and their heirs male in order, whom all failing, to : 
five mcrk lands of Kcnmoir, two merk lands of Harquhil and Sukkochc, with part of the loch, six 
mcrk lands of Phairnoch and Sukkochc, and five mcrk land- of Aidinsture and Arevdewan, with 
the bank or isle called Skcir Callytfyncn (in Nos. 2$ _''>, Skcirchalliphinan , lying in Lordship of 
Melphort and Sheriffdom of Argilc, and which formerly pertained to Dugald Campbell heredi: 
(The above description is better than the previous ones, and is generally adopted in siiccee. 
writs.) Tencndas ; fee and heritage for ever. Raddendo ; scrvitium warde relini ct hcrcdum 
maritagia cum contigerit, and in time of war maintaining at expense of John and his heirs one 
boat of eight (octo) oars within the kingdom of Scotland. Sasine as given on Kenmoir, sufficient 
for all the lands and islands (terris et insula). There is in this Charter the usual Precept of .Sasine 
(hcrcditarum), the life-rent rcntall (vital! rcdditie et libcre tcncmento) of Dugald Campbell for all 
the days of his life being reserved. 

Sealed at Dunonc, 22nd September, 1566. Witness James Campbell of Ardkinglass ; John 
Campbell (preposito) of Kilmun ; Archd. Campbell of Clachane ; Dugald Campbell of Acha- 
mollyn ; and Colin Leech of Craiginterf. Subscribed Argadic. 



INVENTORY No. 10. Instrument of Sasine following thereon, dated 6th January, 1566. 

This is the Sasine following on Charter No. 9, dated as above. 

John Campbell compeared in person, etc. Description of lands is shorter, but the same. 
Witness Allan Murdosun MacLene ; Alex. Campbell; Gilbert MacChallum ; John 
MacDermitt ; Dugald Campbell, alias MacGillespcrt Vdan ; and Malcolm MacChallum. Patrick 

Hyndanc, N.P. 

At this period the year began with March. 



INVENTORY No. 11. See after INVENTORY No. 5. 



INVENTORY No. 12. Sasine in favour of Mrs. Katlierine M.icDoitgall or Campbell, 
\<)th Xirrembcr, 1612. Sasine dated \<)t/i .\orember, 1612. 

Nigel Campbell of Kcndmoir compeared personally rcspectur and successive on his lands of 
Harphwill, Fcrnocht Melphoirt, and Ardstwir, lying in bailliary or stewartry of Mclphoirt and 
county of Argyle ; and, suis propriis manibus, gave sasine (vitalcm) of all and whole the two mcrk 
lands of Harphwill, also of half (dicmidietatis) of all and whole the lands of Fcrnok Melphort, and 
also of half the lands of Ardsture in warrandicc of Harphwill. In favour of Catherine MacDougall, 
his spouse, in terms of a contract of marriage and Charter, etc. 

(Alexander MacDougall, full brother of John MacDougall of Rageray, Procurator for said 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 



Kathcrinc.) Witness Alexander MacNcil, Dugald McNeil, alias Campbell, brothers of said 
Nigel Campbell ; Duncan MacAllcn ; MacEan MacDougall ; and Alexander Merschell, tailor. 
James Kyncard, N.I 1 . 



INVENTORY No. \s-Sasinc in favour of John Campbell, 1618, dated 22nd October, 1618. 

Nigel Campbell of Kendmoir appears personally, respective ct successive, on his lands of 
Fcrno 1 Mclphort, Ardstuir, and Kendmoir, and suis propriis manibus grants sasine (vitalem) of all 
and whole 5 m. 1. of 6 m. 1. of Fcrnoch, with parts and oatsetts and scheelings lying, and for 
principal and of all and whole the just and equal half of 5 m. 1. of Ardstur, etc., in warrandice. 
In favour of Isabella MacLauchlan, daughter of Archibald MacLauchlan, of Craiginterve, future 
spouse of John Campbell, son of Nigel, according to marriage contract referred to in No. 15, this 
Sasine being of even date with said Charter. To be registered in libero secretary in 60 clays. 

Witness as in No. 15, and Nigel Campbell, alias Maclllespt VcEan, in Ormaig. James 
Kyneard, N.P. November 10, 1618. Registered in Register Book of Sheriffdom of Dumbarton, 
Argylc, Tarbart, and Bute. 

INVENTORY No. 14. Sasine. 

This Sasine is also dated 22nd October, 1618, and follows on Charter 15. 

Nigel Campbell of Kendmoir appears personally, respective and successive, on his lands of 
Kendmoir, Fernoch, Melphort, Ardstur, and Barphwill, lying, etc., etc. ; and suis propriis manibus 
grants sasine (hereditarium) of lands described in No. 15, the only addition being the astricted 
multures of the mill. To his son John in terms of Marriage Contract No. 15. Reserving as in 
No. 15. 

Witness and N.P. as in No. 13, and registered on same date in same register. 

Inventories 13 and 14 should follow Charter marked 15 in the Inventories. 



INVENTORY No. 15. Charier by Nigel Campbell to John Campbell, dated October, 1618. 

This is a Charter granted by Nigel Campbell of Kendmoir, in fulfilment of a marriage contract 
between said Nigel, for himself, and taking burden on him for John Campbell, his son and heir- 
apparent, on the one part, and Archibald MacLauchlan of Craiginterve, for himself, and taking 
burden for Isabel MacLauchlan, his eldest lawful daughter, on the other part. Dated at Kilmartin, 
.Sth August, 1618. 

Also for certain large sums of money paid by said Archibald MacLauchlan to said Nigel 
Ik- gives, grants, sells (vendere) to John, his son and heir-apparent, and his sons and assignees 
(hereditarie), all and whole the following 1 8 merk lands : 6 merk lands of Fernot Mclphoirt, 3 
m. 1. of Ardstur, 5 m. 1. of Kendmoir, and 2 m. 1. of Barphewill, with the mill, etc., etc., lying in 
bailiary or stewartry of Melphoirt and Sheriffdom of Argyle. 

Tencdas hereditarie a me et hcrcdibus meis de nobili et domino, Archibald, Earl of Argyll, 
etc., and my Lord Superior in fee and heritage, etc., etc. Reddendo said John to said Earl the 
duties, profits, etc. (fermas proficua), contained in the ancient infeftments. Reserving his life-rent 
(liberi tenemcnto semisec vital!) of the 18 m. 1., unless 5 m. 1. of Fernoch Melphort, given by 



\ HISTORY OK TIIK CAMI'Iil.l.I.s o] Ml ,,, 

him to Mid John, his son, and Isabel M;u-I,-iuchlan, his future for their MM.-nancc. 

(sec No. 13). Reserving also the marriage contract pmviM.ms of : jm- 
MarDougall {see No. i_>). and his mother, Janet Xayn Donadm- McKuir, providing that ll 
his present wife's death any other second wife might be infeft by him in her life-rent p 

Scaled and signed at Kcndmoir, 22nd October, 16 ,s. \\ (lf 

Craiganich ; Archibald Campbell of Kilmdpoirt ; Duncan Ma. iMigall ,,f Stamiddil! -,dei 

MacDougnll, his son and heir-apparent. James Kyneaid. \.I>. Subscri! [>be|| ( ,f 
Kendmoir, and \Vitm 



INVENTORY No. \f>. I'rofiiratory of Resignation, Xsill Campbell to John Campbell; date blank: 

This Letter of I'rocuratory is subscribed by Nigel Campbell, and Witnessed as at X,,. 15,31 
Kendmoir. In it he refers to marriage contract referred to in No. 15, and appoints procurators to 
compear for him before his superior, Lord Archibald, Karl of Ar-ylc, etc., to resign the 1 
described in Nos. 14 and 15. In special favour of his son John and for new infcffmcnt, to be 
granted by said Earl to said John. Reservations as in No. 15. 

This should have been placed before Nos. 13, 14, and 15. 



INVENTORY No. \iProcnratory of Resignation by Xeili Campbell to his son John, 1633. 

This is extracted from the books of Counsall and Session. The extract is dated at Edinburgh, 
2nd September, 1634 (date of ingiving of Writ). 

Ncill Campbell of Kenmoir, heritable proprietor of lands in No. 9, appoints procuratoi 
compeir in his name before his lawful superior, Lord Archibald, Lord Lome, fiar of the Earldom 
of Argyle, and having full right to the life-rent of Archibald, Earl of Argylc, etc., his father, and 
resigns, etc., in special favour, and for new heretable and irredeemable Infcftmcnts, to be given by 
said superior to his son John. To the Reservations in page 10 is added new the provisions for 
Isabel MacLauchlan, spouse of his son John. 

Dated at Inverara, 7th November, 1633. Witness Ewen MacDougall of Craiganich ; 
McDonald Campbell Persone of Kilmartin ; Archd. MacLauchlan of Craigintrive ; and Colin 
MacLachlan, his eldest son, fiar thereof. 



INVENTORY No. \$>. Instrument of Resignation in favour of John Campbell, date \6th June, 1634. 

On 1 6th June, 1634, compeared proc of Ncill Campbell of Kenmoir, hcrctablc proprietor in 
virtue of special letters of proT, dated at Inveraray, 7th November, 1633. In presence of Lord 
Lome, his superior, of lands described in No. 9, and resigned in his hands in favour and with 
resignation as before. Whereupon, in the Palace of Halyruidhouse, in that chamber where the 
Lord Superior remained for the time, he disponed to said John Campbell and his heirs male, etc., 
etc., heritably and irredeemably said lands, and subscribed a sufficient Charter of Resignation 
containing a new gift, in favour of John and his heirs male and in tailzic. 

Witnesses Alexander Campbell of Lochenzel ; Archibald Campbell, Captain of Dunstaff- 
nyche ; Andrew Darling, Writer in Edinburgh ; and Robert Shaw. George Campbell, N.I'. 



U4 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 



INVENTORY No. 19. Sasine following thereon, yh July, 1634. 

This Sasine is in usual form, and in terms of No. 18. It was given on lands of Kenmoir, 
1634. In it the line of descent is restricted to those bearing the insignia and surname of 
Campbell. 

Registered at Edinburgh, 2Oth August, 1634, in General Register at Session appointed for 
registration of Saisingis Reversions, Book xl., leaves 301 312. 



INVENTORY No. lo.Burgiss Ticket for Linlithgow, in name of Lieutenant Campbell, 

2dth July, 1650. 

At Linlithgow, 2Oth July, 1650. The pth day, in presence of the Provost and Baillies of the 
Court of Linlithgow, Lieutenant Dougall Campbell was maid and created Burgis of the said Court 
and Gild brother of the samen, efter that he had given his aith of fedeleti, etc, etc. Extracted 
furth of the court buikis of the said court, etc., etc. Witnessing my subscription. The seill of 
cause of the said court is hereto appended. 

(Signed) A. KER, Clr. 



INVENTORY No. 21. Tack by John Campbell to John Campbell, his Son, 1651. 

John Campbell, fiar of Kendmoir, etc., etc., setts and in tack and assedation setts. To 
his lawful son, John Campbell, his assignees and subtennants. The just and equal half of his lands 
of Barwhiyill, in Bailiary of Melphort, parochen thereof, and sheriffdom of Argyle. For the haill 
space of said John's lifetime. Term of entry to houses, grass, and arable lands next \Yhitsun y and 
Mart 5 immediately following my discease, and thenceforth to be possessed, laboured, set, and 
reset. Paying yearly each Mart 5 to his heirs 2os. Scots ; first payment first Mart 5 following 
John Campbell of Kendmoir's decease, and so forth during Tack. Astricting tenant to leave 
biggings as sufficient as on his entry. 

Subscribed at Kelmephoirt, i/th March, 1651. Witnesses Duncan Campbell of Inverlever ; 
Dugald VGilleis, eldest son of Archid MacCool V c Gilleis in Glenveig ; and Duncan MacArthoire 
of Mealackie. Duncan Duncanson, N.P. Inscribed by command for John Campbell (scribere 
nescren). Other attesting Co-Notary, Hugo MacDougall. 



INVENTORY No. 22. Obligation to grant Charter by the Earl of Argyle to Dugald Campbell, 

dated 2\st July, 1659. 

[COPY.] 

We doe by these promeis to subscrybe ane Charter to Dugald Campbell, fiar of Kenmoir, off 
the landcs holdine be his father of us, and that on his said father's dispositionne, resigndone, or 
confirmdne, to be holdine of us as the said Dougall, his said father, and predecessors held the 
samen of us and our predecessors whensoever the said Charter shall be presented to us, and the 



A HISTORY OF Tin: CAMPB1 LL& 01 KXLFOXT. i 15 

bokJing instructed, and that frielie, without any compowtionne to be payed thcrcfocr.be. 

doc the samcn out of the respect and favour \ve bear to tin- -aid Dougall. 

Subscribed at Inveraray, the twcntie sixt day "f Jti! : . -I fTyiftie nyiv 

tied) 



I \\ I \ I. \X\ No. 23. Charter by said Earl of . Ir^r/,- to said Dongal! Campbell, \()t/i I-'ebriian; i 
Charter by Archibald, Earl of Argyle, Lord Kin tyre, Campbell, and Lome. 

To Dugald Campbell, eldest lawful son of John Campbell, of Kemnoir, and his heirs male 
whom failing, to revert to nearest male heirs of said John his father, whom failing, to ; 
nearest male descendants of deceased Dugald Campbell, formerly of Kt-nmoir, ! mn-^ and 

surname of Campbell, whom failing, to revert to Karl and his heirs hercditaire, of lands as in 
No. 9. Resigning to John Campbell his free life-rent of six m. 1. of I'hairnoch and Sukkoch, anil 
half (dimiedatatus) of 5 m. 1. of Kcnmoir, with half of the fishing thereof (cum dimidia 
piscationis). Resigning also to Margaret Campbell, spouse of said John Campbell, her life-rent i.f 
4 m. 1. and 6 m. 1. of Phairnoch and Sukkoch. Resigning to Isabel, spouse of said I Hig.ild, her 
life-rent of parts and portions, both principal and warrandicc, in which she, etc., which lands 
pertaining formerly to said John Campbell, hereditaric, were held from deceased Archibald, Marquis 
of Argyle, our father, who forfeited them to the Crown, a gift from which (donatarium) is our title. 
Tcnendas of us, etc., in fee and heritage for ever. Reddendo servitium relevej et maritagie cum 
contigerit, and supplying a boat, etc., etc. Paying forty scots for each hcrezcld, and reset ving 
proprias hcrczeldets duti Dugalli. 

Reccpt of Sasine (hereditarium) hcredibus suis masculus tailliequc (male and of taillie . 
Subscribed and sealed at Inveraray, igth February, 1669. 

Witnesses John Campbell, of Downstaffniche ; Duncan Campbell (valivo de Jura) ; Mr. John 
MacLauchlan, of Kilquhoun ; John Zull, in Invcrarey. Nicholas Zull, N.P. 

Registered i6th October, 171 1, in Sheriff Court Books of Argyle at Inverarey as a Probative 
Writ 

INVENTORY No. 24. Instrument of Sasine, following gth April, 1669. 

Sasine is precisely in terms of Charter No. 23. Reservations are identical. Dugald Campbell 
compearcd personally on lands of Kenmoir, etc. 

Dated gth April, 1669. Witnesses Donald MacKawcs, in Ardinsture ; Ludovic Macllchrcist ; 
John MacLauchlan ; Gilbert MacKirow. Nicholas Zull, N.P. 

27th April, 1669. Registered in Vol. xxi., New General Register of Sasines, Reversions, etc. 



I N VENTORY No. 25. Recept of Clar Constat by Elizabeth, Ducliess of Argyle, in favour of John 

Campbell, dated 2 \ v/ October, 1711. 

Recept of Clar Constat, granted by Klizabcth, Duchess Dowager of Argyle ; Lord Campbell 
of Arkinglas, Bart. ; Colonel Alexander Campbell, of Finnab ; Mr. Patrick Campbell, of Monzic. 
Advocate ; John Campbell, Merchant, F.dinburgh : Ronald and Robert Campbell, W.S., and Jame- 
Campbell, of Stonefield, Commissioners appointed by John, Duke of Argyle, Marquis of Kintyre. 



Il6 A HISTORY OK THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFOHT. 

Karl Campbell, Cowan, Cowall, and Grccnich, Viscount Lochow and Glcnyld, Lord Inveraray, 
Mull, Morven, and Tiree, Baron Chattam, Hereditary Justice-General of Argyle and Islands, etc., 
Ditto Grand Master of Royal Household, Ditto Lieutenant Sheriff of Argyle, Knight of Most 
Noble Order of Garter, Ambassador Extraordinary of Queen of Great Britain to King of Spain, 
and Commandcr-in-Chief of Royal Forces, etc. Superiority of lands referred to Commission. 

Commission dated 2Oth March, and registered in Books of C. and Session, iSthJuly, 1/71. 
Power of entering " vassals, granting Charters, Rccepts of Clar Constat," etc., etc. 

Precept in favour of John Campbell, of Mcllphort, son of Dugald Campbell. (It is much frayed.) 
Lands as in No. 9. Sasinum hercditarium. Seal of Duke appended, and subscribed by Duchess, 
and five other Commissioners, at Inveraray, 3ist October, 171 1. 

Witnesses Archibald Campbell, junr., of Clcuchan ; Donald Campbell ; George Gordon, 
\Y.S., and John Sinclair, his clerk. 



I\\ KNTOKY No. 26. Instrument of Sasine following thereon, dated St/i October, and Registered at 
Dumbarton, in Ncis Perticnlar Register of Sasines, 6tk November, 1712. 

Sasine (heteditarium), dated 8th October, 1712. John Campbell of Kcnmoir appeared 
personally. Reference is made in it also to No. 23. Tcnendas wardae relevij, etc., as in No. 23. 

Witnesses Duncan Campbell, of Clisknish ; Archibald Campbell, of Huntingtour ; Angus 
Campbell, nephew of said Duncan ; James MacGilechrist. Alex. Campbell, N.P. 

Registered at Dumbarton, 6th November, 1712, in Vol. iv. of New Particular Register of 
Sasine, etc., etc., for Shires of Argyle, Bute, and Dumbarton, Leaves 166, 167. 






MARBH-RANN 



ON 

N' ULRRAMACH GILEASBUIG CAIMBEUL 
TIGHEARNA MHEALAIRD. 

Le Patric Mac n't Ihyr. 



E, O, Horon, O, s'nco shunlach am bron 

Adfhag sinne fo Icon 's fo leireadh, 
Ti cha n 1 ioghnadh mo rear, bhur cinn a d'fhas liath 
Is Mac Neil am bliadhna fo n'fhoid 

Ti cha n'ioghna, etc. 

Bha do chalpaiche Ian mur bhradan air sal. 
Troigh shocair air sraide m'broige 
Bha do chalpaiche, etc. 



II. 

Bu leat arram thair sloigh aig am'dhuit bhi beo 

S'tu nach eumadh achoir bho n'fheumach 
Dheanamh teisteis do thuath is gach ncach tha mu'ncuairt 
Na thubhairt mi fior nis leor 

Dheanamh teisteis do thuath, etc. 
Thuair thu gliocas is tur, agus foghlum mar Dhuie 
Stha thu n' duigh anns an nir gu'ndeo 
Thuair thu gliocas is tur, etc. 



III. 

Bu tu am fear fuighanta mor ann ad luchairt 's ad stor 
Ghubhta branndu, is beor is Cedai 
Gheibhta sud, agus fion 's gach deoch am biodh brigh 
S, bhiodh greanachas fial mo'd bhord 

Gheibhta sud agus fion, etc. 

Bhiodh do Ghillean gu ciin gad fhreasdal gudlu 
Sad chichin bhoidh suird air Ion 
Bhiodh do Gheillean, etc. 



16 



1(8 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 

IV. 

Nam cuirt san Tigh Mhoid is na Cuisan air Bord 

'Stu dheanamh gu foil au leughadh 
Is nach cumadh a bhaigh vi caraid seach namhaid 
Ach ccartas do n laimh do n coir 

Is nach cumadh, etc. 

Thear bu mhaisichi snuadh, caol mhala gun ghruaim 
Beul tanna 's gruaidh mur rose 
Fhir bu mhaisiche, etc. 

V. 

Bu tu am flur thar gach ros leat a chuntadh an tor 

Cneas mar chanach an Ion si gle gheal 
Bha iochd ann ad chom vi bochdau's vi lorn 
Och nan Och gur mur luaidh trom am bron 

Bha iochd ann adchom, etc. 

Sann sa n Earnich so shios ann au caolaraidh miu 
Tha thu n' tasgaidh fuidh dhion nam bord 

Sann sa na Earnich so shios, etc. 

VI. 

Slionar meanglain is meoir tha doid, dhream san Roinn Eorp 
Nam baithne dhomh n toirt racheile 
Achachaladair mor is Maclachain nam bo 
Mac Ian is Mac Dhuill oig 

Achachaladair mor, etc. 

Agus Tigh cheann Loch lal far an leagte am Fiadh 
S, cha d, aithus mi trion no choir. 

Agus Tigh cheonn Loch lal, etc. 

VII. 

Bhan Duic is Duntreoin air ancunntadh do d sheors 
Sliochd nan Curiean mor nach geilleadh 
Agus Fear Assifhearn ceann feadhna nan Gaidhal 
Chuir so saighead nan sail romh, m, broig. 

Agus Fear Assifhearn, etc. 

Nuair chualas litir dobhais ga leughadh aig each 
Thuit mo chridhe gu lar lem dheoir. 

Nuair chualas litir dobhais, etc. 

VIII. 

Chaidh Sir Calaim a Icon s cha bann le claidhe no Ord 

Sann chaidh scolbsan fhcoil nach treige 
Tha e na Sheneral mor na dhion aig Righ Deors 

Strom acan gach la air doigh. 

Tha e na Sheneral mor, etc. 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMl'IU.I.I.S OK MELFORT. 119 

Tha an Caiptain an traths a scoladh air sail 
Sruth don fhior fhuil don Uaimail gloir. 
Tha an Caiptain an traths, etc. 

IX. 

Fear Dhunstainish nan ob teaglach fiachail gun bhrod 
Tigh co seau 's tha donseors 's leir domh 
Se bha caradh do chiun fo lie anns a chill 
Fhir nam brataiche gunn 's na srol. 

Se bha caradh do chinn, etc. 

Schan urrain domh innse gach buaidh bha ruit sinnte 
Ged thcanain ri scriobh lem mhcoir. 

Is chan urrain domh innse, etc. 

x. 

Coille gun chrionach gun chroic anns do chinn thu o doig 

Far an goireadh na h coin sa cheilcan 
Gheibht thus agus blaths fo dhubhar do sgail 
Dhalbh Gileasbuig se fa mobhroin. 

Gheibht thus agus blaths, etc. 

Oighre Mheilaird nan cruoch nan achiabhs 'nau raon 
'Sgum ba lionar crobh laoidh mu'd chro. 

Oighre Mheilard nan craobh, etc. 

XI. 

N, duigh ged chluinn mi piob mhor agus smeorach an loinn 

Cha tog m'intinn gu ceol gan eisteachd 
Ghabbh an Uilm as an stuir agus bhrist am meoir cuil 
Stha sinne mur luing ann an ceo. 

Dfhalbh an Uilm as an stuir, etc. 
Chaidh gach rop as an ait anns an robhiad an sas 
Mari bharc si gun ramh gun seol. 

Chaidh gach rop as an ait, etc. 

XII. 

Ach bheir mi comhairl air choir air an Oighre tha beo 

Chau 'eil thu Ian ach og s 'bi treubhach 
lar an gliocas as airde bhi gad stuiradh gach trath 
Scrun duit maitheas is gradh fadheisdh. 
Ian an gliocas as airde, etc. 

Dean mar d aithrichean gniomh scha n aithreach dhuit feiu 
Gheibh thu onia on Righ bhios ma. 

Dean mar d aithrichean gniomh, etc. 



A CHRIOCII. 



(Translation of the foregoing by the REV. ALLAN SINCLAIR, of Kenmore^ 

LAMENT 



FOR 



THE HONOURABLE ARCHIBALD CAMPBELL, 
LAIRD OF MELFORT. 

BY PATRICK MACINTYRE. 1823. 



I. 

Eh ho horo! oh! cheerless the sorrow, 

That us has distracted and wounded full sore ; 

No wonder to-day, our heads are turned gray 

For under the sod MacNeil is laid low. 

So perfectly formed, and so full were thy limbs, 

As a salmon come fresh from the sea. 



II. 



Honored 'bove many, in thy lifetime you were, 
Justice dispensing to needy and poor, 
Thy tenants will willingly all will attest, 
That what I do say is perfectly true. 
With sagacity gifted with wisdom endowed, 
Framed like a Duke, now in dust you dwell. 



III. 

Generous-wealthy and grand in thy palace 

Where brandy, and beer, and cider abounded. 

And wine that was good and all kinds of viands, 

Liberal cheerful at table you were. 

Thy gillies well trained they thee did attend, 

While in thy kitchen provisions were profusely prepared. 



A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OK MELFORT. 



IV. 

When thy court in thy court-house was held, 
Each case was with patience considered ; 

To friend or to foe justice will go 

In the way that it ought to go, 

Thou fairest, serenest of face, 

Sweet was thy mouth, thy checks as the rose. 



V. 

Thou blossom of blossoms ! so free of thy gold, 
Thy skin was as white as white mountain down, 
Thy heart full of pity to the naked and poor. 
Alas ! oh ! alas ! that our sorrows abound, 
For treasured thou art in the smooth, narrow house 
Eastward in Earnich, in boards 'neath the ground. 



VI. 

Of thy kindred in Europe there is many a branch, 

If enumerate them I could ; 
Achalader great, and Maclachlan of state, 

Macian and MacDougall of Lorn, 
And the Chief of Lochiel, where deer they do kill 

The third of them I cannot recount. 



VII. 

The Duke and Duntroon are both of thy line, 

Descendants of men that were brave ; 
And he of Fassifern, a chief among Gael ; 
Thy death, like an arrow, has pierced their heel ; 
And I, when report of thy death came to me, 
My heart sank within me, my tears fell to ground. 



VIII. 

Sir Colin is wounded nor with hammer or sword, 
There's a dart in his flesh that he cannot remove, 

Though a general great in the host of King George, 
He sighs and sorrows each day for thee ! 

And also the Captain that sails on the main, 

With the blood of the brave flowing fast in his veins. 



122 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 

IX. 

The Laird of Dunstaffnage, of noble descent, 
The most ancient that's known to me, 

Thy head he laid down 'neath the sward in the ground, 
Thou of beautiful banners of silk. 

I cannot recount thy virtues throughout, 
Though record them in writing I would. 

x. 

In a flourishing wood thou didst grow in thy youth, 

Where songsters in May were oft heard, 
Affection and warmth 'neath thy shadow were found, 
But Gilesbuig is gone, and my sorrows abound, 
Heir of Melfort, of fields, of flocks that are choice, 
Of milk kine that filled thy folds. 

XI. 

Though the bagpipes I hear, and the song of the thrush, 

To their music I cannot respond ; 
Our rudder is gone, and gone is our strength, 
We're driven about as a ship in a mist, 
With its cordage all broken and carried away, 

Without oar, or compass, or sail. 

xn. 

To the heir that succeeds thee let me now give advice, 

You are tender of years, yet valorous be, 

From on high seek thou wisdom ahvay thee to guide, 

Then goodness and love shall thee always adorn ; 

As thy father do thou, thou will not it repent, 

And thy king shall with honour thee crown. 



This Lament was composed on the death of Captain Archibald Campbell. Mr. Allan Sinclair, who kindly 
undertook its translation from the Gaelic, calls the poem an Elegy, for which we have ventured to substitute the word 
Lament, as it has hitherto been so called by the members of the family. The translator writes thus of the poem : " I 
have tried to put this Elegy into verse, but I found I could not do this without substituting ideas and phrases of the 
original not in it, so I have given as literal a translation as possible, combined with a little euphony, without which 
it would appear bare and bald. The subject, as you see, is decidedly good," etc., etc. The Lament has been intro- 
duced in the Appendix, as it was received too late to be placed amongst the records of the Melfort family. 



SINCE concluding the Notes on the services and career of Licutcnant-Gencral Sir Colin Campbell, 
some incidents connected with the attack on the fort of AhmednuggUT have been brought to our 
notice, which we give, as they may prove of interest. Extract from the Quarterly .' 
vol. xcii., under the head of " Wellington : His Character and Writings, by J. Maurcl." 

"The important fort of Ahmednuggur was taken by a most gallant escalade. In the thick 
of the assault, General Wcllcsley saw a young officer, who had reached the top of the very lofty 
wall, thrust off by the enemy, and falling through the air from a great height. General WclK 
had little doubt that he must have been severely wounded or killed by the fall, but hastened t<> 
inquire the name and fate of the gallant young fellow, and had the satisfaction of seeing him .1 
moment after, comparatively little injured, again mounting to the assault 

" Next morning the General sent for him, and offered to attach him to his staff as Brigade- 
Major ; and from that hour, through all his fields and fortunes, even down to the conquest of ]'. 
continued him in his personal family and friendship, and used sometimes to observe that the first 
time he had ever seen him was ' in the air,' " etc. 

The following details were also repeatedly told by the Duke : 

" Young Colin not only mounted the ladder at the Indian fort a second time, but getting 
within the place, forthwith contrived to arrange his company into perfect order, so as to hold in 
check the still numerous garrison. General Wellesley, on himself entering the town, rccogni/cd 
him by his bloody handkerchief round his head, and admired his steady conduct till all was over." 

In the notes recording Sir Colin's services we find it omitted that in 1821 he served as General 
on the staff of the Marquis of Wellesley when Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. 



In our notice of the services of Captain Alexander Augustus Mclfort Campbell, we find he 
entered the army in 1846 (not 1842, as stated). He was attached to the 5th Bengal Cavalry. The 
same year he was granted a Cornetcy in the King's Own Light Dragoons, the old Duke of 
Gloucester, who was his godfather, having promised him a commission in the Guards, but he 
preferred the Cavalry. The Duke requested that he might be named after him, William 
Frederick, which name he received when christened at Portsmouth, December, 1831 (the certificate 
exists in the baptismal registry books of the Garrison), it having been overlooked that when quite 
an infant he had been baptised at St. James's Church, Piccadilly, by the name he had eventually 
to adopt. This circumstance is here stated, as hereafter it may be supposed that he had a twin 
brother. He joined the Carbineers in 1848, sold out of the service in 1855, and entered the 
Colonial service in 1867. 



We find it recorded that Lorn Campbell, who fell at Assaye, was cut down by the 
enemy's cavalry. 



124 A HISTORY OF THE CAMPBELLS OF MELFORT. 



Jiote to lotta Cross. 



In 1881 were added the names of Lieutenant-Colonel P. F. W. Campbell, Admiral Frederick 
A. Campbell, and Lieutenant J. F. Melfort Campbell, who died since the erection of the Cross in 
1873- 



to prtisb Kijorji IRing. 



There can be little doubt that this Ivory King represents a king of the Picts, erroneously by 
late historians of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries called Scots. It is possible it may have 
been carved in commemoration of the first Christian coronation of a king of the Picts, seated on 
the celebrated stone (in Gaelic Lial Fail, or the Stone of Destiny), which originally came from 
Scotia-Ireland, in right of descent of the Pictish kings from the kings of Ireland, and subsequently 
removed from lona to Dunstaffnage, a Pictish fortress ; afterwards to their capital, Scone ; and 
from thence by Edward I. to Westminster Abbey, where it now remains, the most interesting relic 
in the kingdom. 

There were no kings of Scots in 574 distinct from the king of the Picts, whose capital was at Scone. The Celtic 
Scots of that time were of Irish descent, and took their name of Scots (Gaels) from Scotia, Ireland, in the sixth 
century. The Scoti of the kingdom of Alban were simply subjects of the Pictish kings, whom it had been the 
fashion of historians since the thirteenth century erroneously to term Scots. Scotland, as a kingdom from 
Tweed to John o' Groats, did not exist until the middle of the twelfth century, and included then the Danes of 
Northumbria (or Lowlander Scots;, the Scoti from Ireland (the modern Gael or Highlander), and the Pict, the 
dominant race until the eleventh century, the descendants of the Celto British race in the North. These, in the twelfth 
century, were all merged in one dynasty under David, surnamed Scotus, a name that king inherited from his father- 
in-law, Waltheof, and the Scots as a mixed race were first recognized, and Scotland as an united kingdom firstly so 
called. It may, however, be mentioned that the Christian Albanian or Pictish kings were allied to and descended 
from the royal Scythian race of Scoti of Ireland, and thus were called Scots. The Picts or Picti the painted men 
of Roman historians were the last of the Celto British driven from the South by the encroachments of the 
Romans and the Saxons, to the inaccessible Highlands of the North. [We are indebted for this note to J. R. 
Scott, Esq., F.S.A.] 



PLEASE DO NOT REMOVE 
CARDS OR SLIPS FROM THIS POCKET 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LIBRARY 



CS Campbell, Margaret Olympia 
79 A memorial history of the 

C3 Campbells of Melfort 
1882 



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MIB