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Full text of "Memorial of Mrs. Catherine Waldo Douglas: A Discourse Delivered at the Funeral at Trenton Oneida ..."

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The Arthur and Elizabeth 

SCHLESINGER LIBRARY 

on the History of Women 
in America 

RADCLIFFE COLLEGE 




Gift of 
Lois B» Merk 



! 



^ 



DISCOURSE, 

IMihertd at the fimeral of 



^11. Catharine Waldo Douglas. 



— AT— 



TrentoTiy Oneida County^ New York^ 

^RIDAT, y\lARCH 99, 1878, 
—BY THK— 

Rev. Thomas Thomas, 

—WITH AN— 

Jl^TF^ODUCTORY ^KETCH OF J4eF( JalfE 



—BY THB— 



REV. JOHN A. TODD, D.D. 



9ublt0ti(^ b9 1l(qu(0t. 



NEW YORK: 

Board ol PnDlication ol ae Reldmed Clmrck in America. 

1879. 



^4/ 
V13 



^)l/ 



O when this corruptible shall have put on incorruption,. and this 

mortal shall have put on immortality, then shall be brought to^ 

pass the saying that is written, Death is swallowed up in victory. 

[ Death, where is thy sting ? O Grave, where is thy victory ? The- 

j sting of death is siij ; and the strength of sin is the law. But thanks 

I fee to God, which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus 

Christ. TherefcM-e, my beloved brethren, be ye steadfast, unmove- 

able, always abounding in the work of the Lord, forasmuch as ye: 

know that your labor, is not in vain in the Lord 



INTRODUCTORY SKETCH. 

Mrs. Catharine Waldo Douglas, whose char- 
acter and life, in her various relations of daughter, 
wife, mother, and friend, are so appropriately com- 
memorated in the following pages, was descended 
from an old and honorable stock. Her father, Cal- 
vin Waldo, bearing two remarkable and suggestive 
names, traced his lineage back to the celebrated 
Peter Waldo, or, as the French were accustomed to 
call him, Pierre de Vaux, an opulent citizen of Lyons, 
who became immortal in history as the founder of 
the Waldenses or Vaudois. They were a noble band 
of Reformers, to whom the Christian world owes a 
debt of gratitude which it can never forget. 

Calvin Waldo, was born at Mansfield, Con- 
necticut, March 12th, 1759. ^^ graduated at Dart- 
mouth College, in 1785, after which he studied law 
with Judge Sedgwick, of Stockbridge, Massachu- 
setts. In 1798, he removed to Dalton, in the same 
State, where he practised his profession, and from 
which he was for several years a representative at 



8 



the General Court in Boston. His wife, whose maid- 
en name was Judith Graves, was born at Hatfield, 
Massachusetts, in 1 764. 

The subject of this sketch, Catharine Waldo, 
their third child and daughter, was born at Pitts- 
field, Massachusetts, March 17th, 1791. No features 
of her character were more striking in childhood and 
youth, than her gentle loveliness of spirit, and the 
reverence and fond affection which she always man- 
ifested toward her parents. At the age of six she 
was placed under the tuition of Miss Nancy Hins- 
dale, who, for a long period, was a teacher in Miss 
Willard's Seminary at Troy, N. Y., where she died 
at an advanced age not many years ago. Miss Hins- 
dale retained an honorary position in that Seminary 
up to the time of her death. The attachment thus 
early formed between the scholar and the teacher, 
continued unbroken to the end of life. Catharine 
was afterwards sent, with her sisters, to the Academy 
at Westfield, Mass., a school of high reputation, 
where she enjoyed excellent advantages, and where 
she won the esteem and love of all who knew her. 
One of the most vivid memories of this early portion 
of her life, was the burning of her father's house at 
Pittsfield, in 1797, an event to which she frequently 
recurred in later years, and their consequent removal 
to Dalton. 

In i8o8'her mother died, leaving a large family. 
the youngest being only two years old. Much of 



the care of these younger children devolved, of 
course, upon Catharine. Although she was but 
seventeen herself, the responsibility developed in her 
thus early that depth of love and rrkaternal tenderness 
which so wonderfully characterized her through life. 
She became, at the same time, her fathers trusted 
confidant and friend, la 1809. however, her father 
was married a second time, to Mrs. Clarissa Dwight 
Whitney, of Westfield, Massachusetts. Catharine 
accepted the new relation in a most becoming and 
lovely spirit. A large family of new brothers and 
sisters were added to her own, and the attachment 
which grew up in her heart toward them was, through 
long lives, warmly reciprocated by them all. 

Placed as she was in these new relations, it is 
interesting to read, at this distance of time, the testi- 
mony in regard to her spirit and demeanor, given 
by a member of the household who had daily occa- 
sion to observe her in all her ways. The following 
letter from Mrs. Sarah Whitney Marsh, who is still 
living, was written from North Amherst, Mass., July 
2d, 1878. It is a loving tribute from one who en- 
joyed her companionship and inspiring influence in 
early life. Mrs. Marsh says : 

" In the death of Mrs. Catharine Waldo Douglas, 
I feel that I have parted, for a little season, with one 
of my best and most valued friends. A few days 
before my thirteenth birthday, with my mother and 
two others of her children, I entered her father's 



10 



house as a daughter and sister. It was a very large 
family — two families, indeed, blended into one — 
many sons and daughters, one grand-mother and 
♦one grand-child. There were about twenty in all, 
,much of the time the first year. With my ardent 
temperament and my childhood inexperience, I soon 
found, in my new situation, I needed just such a 
friend and counsellor as my dear sister Catharine. 
Her warm heart ever flowing out in good words and 
wishes, she was ready to listen to the recital of my 
girlhood perplexities and misadventures. As she 
was more than five years my senior, *^nd to the 
manor born,' I held her judgment in high esteem. 
She was sympathetic, candid and unselfish. I could 
sometimes go to her rather than to my dear mother, 
whom I tenderly loved, and for whom I cherished an 
exalted opinion. Indeed, it was said she resembled 
.my mother in character ; there was a gentle, digni- 
fied self-possession characteristic of both- She was 
a favorite at home, and in the village no young lady 
was held in so high estimation. She was ever ready 
to seek out the sorrowing, and to care for the sick 
and poor. 

When at a later date she became a wife and 
head of a family, and took the difficult station of 
second mother, I think her influence for good was 
almost unparalleled. I often visited in her beauti- 
ful home at Trenton, and think she won more golden 
opinions than any one I know. She was a woman 



11 



of prayer, and prayed much with and for others. 
When a widow she conducted family worshipper- 
self. She was very fond of children, of flowers, and 
of poetry, and was tasteful in everything. Her house 
was the happy gathering place for all the children 
and . children's children, and for other friends. I 
thank my God \ have this beautiful memory of her 
— 'tis almost like the living presence ; and I humbly 
hope to spend eternity with her in heaven." 

During the three years previous to her dear 
fathers deaths he was in a slow decline. Catharine 
was his companion, his secretary, his nurse. She 
rode with him, took several long journeys with him 
through New England in a chaise, and her love, her 
reverence, and her devotion to him ceased only with 
her life. He died August 25th, 181 5, passing away 
unexpectedly to Kis friends. On the following Sab- 
bath both the father and the daughter had intended to 
make a public profession of their faith in Christ, and 
to sit down together at the table of the Lord. The 
father was called to go up higher, and the daughter 
went forward alone, to seal her consecration at the 
sacramental board. 

On June 12th, 1817, a new relation was formed. 
Miss Waldo was married to James Douglas, of Tren- 
ton, Oneida county. New York, by this event becom- 
ing a second wife and mother to a family of seven 
* children. Beautifully did she accept the position. 
With a heart full of hope and trust, she went for- 



/^ 



12 



ward, endeavoring to do the work committed to her 
hands. She was so kind, so cordial, her piety was so 
simple and sincere, her convictions of right so strong, 
and her determination to adhere to them so unswerv- 
ing, that her daily life was an impulse to all around 
her. God blessed her as the happy instrument of 
giving to his Church, the five daughters she had 
received as her own, and her husband — whose faith 
was so different from hers when they were married 
— was at length won over to accept and to love her 
Saviour, the Lord Jesus Christ. He united with the 
Presbyterian Church by a public profession in 1829. 
In 1 83 1, Mrs. Douglas became the founder of a 
Maternal Association. Ever watchful and active in 
doing good, she gathered the children of all denom- 
inations into the infant school, and taught the little 
ones to sing God's praise. And thus her life passed 
on, filled with prayer, and filled with thanksgiving. 
Awake to all the beauties of the outer world, she 
drank in its sunshine, she listened to its singing 
birds, she gathered and she strewed its fragrant 
flowers along all the paths of life. 

In 1 85 1 her husband was suddenly called away 
from earth, leaving her in the overwhelming sorrow 
of bereavement, but the God in whom she had always 
trusted, was faithful to his promises now. His grace 
was sufficient for her, his strength was made perfect 
in her weakness. And no small part of her comfortf 
did she find in the service of Christian love and 



13 



well-doing to others. As her memory became less 
vigorous with the flight of years, her heart over- 
flowed with a never-failing fountain of kindness and 
affection, so that it seemed like a benediction even 
to be with her. 

She had long been in the habit of keeping a 
diary, in which she wrote down sometimes the events 
of the day that specially concerned her, and some- 
times the thoughts and feelings that had occupied 
her mind and heart. At last, however, under the 
increasing weight of infirmities, she was obliged to 
give it up, so that after the year 1873 there are no 
further entries in her diary to be found. But her 
ruling spirit, as shown in loving devotion to God, 
her Heavenly Father, and in tender desire for the 
salvation of kindred and friends, and indeed of all 
around her, is brought out in clear and attractive 
light in the brief entries written by her in 1871 and 
1872. Of these the following may serve as ex- 
amples : — 

"March 17, 1871 — Friday — Have had as com- 
fortable a night as I could expect. Have this day 
entered upon my eightieth birth-day. Surely good- 
ness and mercy have followed me through long years 
of my life, and I would bless the name of the Lord 
forever. I would dwell under the shadow of his 
wings, and in the secret place of the Most High. I 
renewedly dedicate to thee, my God, and to thy ser- 
vice, all that I have, soul and body, for time and 



14 



eternity. My heart s desire and prayer to my God 
and Saviour is that my sons and daughters may live 
before the Lord — children and grand-children." 

" April 2 — New York — I am still an invalid, and 
confined mostly to my bed. I have great cause for 
gratitude to my Heavenly Father, that my life is 
still prolonged. Oh that it may be spent to his 
glory, and the salvation of precious souls ! * Guide 
me, O thou Great Jehovah!'" 

" April i6 — Tarrytown — Have put my things 
into my trunk to leave in the morning. May the 
Good Spirit take possession of the hearts of the 
dear ones I leave behind, to dwell richly in them, 
imparting wisdom and grace. May the dear sweet 
babe early receive the image of her Saviour in 
her young heart. * Bless the Lord, O my soul, and 
all that is within me, bless his holy name ! ' " 

The deep sincerity and earnestness of spiritual 
feeling, so manifest in these words, were marked 
characteristics of her closing years, as they had been 
of all her previous life. They bear witness to her as a 
"dear child of God, guileless and loving in all her ways. 

From the winter of 1870 and 1871, the strength 
of Mrs. Douglas seemed to decline. On her return 
from New York, ^n May, she did not resume the 
cares of her household, and never indeed took them 
up again. Her place at the head of the table she 
filled with pleasure and efificieLcy, until she entered 
her eighty-first year, and even then res:;^ned it ap- 



15 



pafently but for a limited season. So lightly did the 
coming events throw their shadow upon her path. 

Although in June, 1873, ^ painful attack of neu- 
ralgia in the head, of four weeks' duration, impaired 
her memory, she still kept up the family altar and 
the habit of grace at the table, so that those about 
her were unconscious almost ta the last that she was 
passing from them. Filled with the continual sense 
of God's love and goodness, in pain always patient, 
and sweetly enduring, it was a joy to be with her, 
and to feel the inspiring influence of such a life. 
Only a few days before her last illness when re- 
quested to say grace at the table, she went beyond 
the usual limit and offered a long and fervent prayer. 
The desire for the salvation of her children had so 
completely taken possession of her mind that she 
yielded to its impulse almost without being aware of 
it, and spontaneously poured out her soul in deeply 
earnest petitions to God. 

A character so peculiar in its symmetry and 
spiritual beauty, and so warmed with Christian love, 
could not but have made a deep impression upon 
others, and drawn out their sincerest admiration and 
regard. The writer of these lines can testify to his 
own cherished memories of Cbrrstian association 
with her in the h^use of God, at the residence of 
her son in Tarrytown at different times during the 
later years of her Jife, and especially at her own 
beautiful Ji^^me at Trenton, Oneida county. New 



_> 



i> 



16 



York, where in August. 1877, he enjoyed the privi- 
lege of being a gue^. It was a visit that will leave 
its pleasant impression as a long-continued fragrance 
in his heart. 

So her life passed on to its close, filled with the 
spirit 6f her Saviour, useful to others, and bright and 
happy to herself. When she drew near to the river 
of death she still continued to love and to pray. To- 
ward the close, in her deep fervor of supplication, 
she exclaimed : " God has been good to me all my 
life. I shall pray for my dear children as long as I 
live. My dear children, how I love you !" Even at 
the very last, when apparently unconscious, sweet 
expressions such as, " Jesus — white robes — love, 
were the words that passed from her lips, ere they 
were closed to speak no more on earth. Thus, on 
Saturday, March 23d, 1878, at the age of eighty-seven 
years and six days, the long life-journey came to its 
end, and she was not, for God took her. 

So beautifully did she sleep in death, that it 
seemed hard to yield the grave its own. As she lay 
in her casket, clothed in her wrappings of fleecy 
white, the same sweet smile and expression which for 
many yeiars had endeared her very presence to her 
children and friends, still lit up her peaceful face. 
As the eye looked into the spirit realm, it could al- 
most see the dear sainted mother there, clothed in 
those shining robes of white, which had so often 
been the theme of her conversation in life, and which 



17 



she so fully believed would be her own beyond the 
river of death — see her there,' among those ransomed 
ones on the mount of God, singing the new song 
which the angels can never sing, " Thou art worthy 
to take the book, and to open the seals thereof ; for 
thou wast slain, and has redeemed us to God by thy 
blood out of every kindred, and tongue, and people, 
and nation." 

On a lovely spring day, bright and fragrant with 
the resurrection of nature from its wintry sleep, her 
children and friends gathered at her now desolate 
home to pay their last affectionate offering of respect. 
Some sweet, favorite hymns of hers were sung, rever- 
ently and tenderly the stricken company bowed to- 
gether in prayer, and then the tribute to her memory 
and worth to be found on the ensuing pages was 
given by her beloved Pastor. 

In silence and with many tears, all of her that 
was mortal was borne from her late home by her 
sons and grand-sons, and committed to the grave, 
earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust, to await 
the glorious resurrection at the last day. " It is sown 
in corruption, it is raised in incorruption ; it is sown 
in dishonor, it is raised in glory; it is sown in weak- 
ness, it is raised in power; it is sown a natural body, 
it is raised a spiritual body." 



DISCOURSE. 



The tribute to the memory and worth of Mrs. 
Douglas, referred to in the preceding sketch, was 
delivered by her pastor, the Rev. Thomas Thomas, 
to a large assembly of friends and neighbors, at her 
late residence in Trenton, N. Y., on Friday, March 
29, 1878. He took as the basis of his discourse the 
words of Paul in Philippians, 1:21, ** For to me to 
live is Christ, and to die is gain." After an appro- 
priate introduction he presented in clear and im- 
pressive development the chief points of practical 
interest and value, which the passage naturally 
suggested, and the occasion required. In showing 
how Christ is the life of his people, the Rev. Mr. 
Thomas considered him in relation to all spiritual or 
Christian life among men, as ist — Its Author; 2nd — 
Its End/, 3d — Its Model ; and 4th — Its quickening 
Impulse. Having thus unfolded the sense and spirit 
of his text he proceeded to speak in the following 
words, which are as true as they are kind and tender : 

Seeing, then, that Christ was at once the Au- 
thor, the End, and the Model of P^auFs life, and his 



19 



love its inspiring Motive, with what truth and pro- 
priety could he say, ** To me life is Christ." 

With equal truth and propriety, he could and 
did add, " and death is gain." The latter clause is 
but the corollary of the former, dependent on it, 
inseparably connected with it. Conscious that Christ 
was his life, and confident that death was gain, he 
had long been willing to become ** absent from the 
body, and present with the Lord." And here we are 
reminded what he considered death to be — simply, 
absence from the body, and presence with the Lord. 
If so, there is the absence also of everything of a 
painful nature consequent on presence in the body. 
They who have gone forth from the body, having 
lived to Christ, while present in it, have "gone up 
from all tribulation, and have washed their robes, 
and made them white in the blood of the Lamb. 
They shall hunger no more, neither thirst any more. 
There shall be no more sorrow, nor sighing, nor pain. 
God has wiped away all tears from their eyes." 
If such is death, absence from the body, and pres- 
ence with the Lord — with him who is the life of all 
his followers, then who can estimate or calculate its 
amount as gain ; being, in fact, neither more nor less 
than the attainment of that "more abundant" life 
he came to give.^^ Present with him ! How must 
that life grow and flourish ! Like a plant removed 
from cold and darkness, into the genial light and 
warmth of the sun, it must put on far brighter and 



20 



more lovely hues than was possible amidst the gloom 
and chilling blasts of this lower world. If beholding 
his glory here, as seen through a glass darkly, has 
power to change the soul into the same image, how 
complete and glorious the transformation there — 
where he is ever present, seen as he is, *' the King in 
his beauty!" Present with him, whom having not 
seen they loved ; how must that love glow, what 
force and fervor it must acquire there, where he is 
seen, and where the unsearchable riches of his love 
are unfolded, and unfolding for evermore ! If "joy 
unspeakable and full of glory," can be produced by 
faith in him while absent and unseen, what must it 
be to dwell in the radiance of his glory as it floods 
and pervades, like a summer sunshine, the whole 
world of ransomed souls ! From that world, there 
come to us here, as to John in Patmos, strains calm, 
sweet, and sublimely beautiful, saying, " Blessed are 
the dead that die in the Lord, from henceforth : yea, 
saith the Spirit, for they shall rest from their labors, 
and their works do follow them." " To die is gain." 
The sentence comes to us to-day with a new force, 
as from the lips of a new, but known and faithful 
witness. 

I need not say why I selected this passage of 
scripture as the basis of my remarks on this occasion. 
While I have been speaking, two figures have been al- 
most constantly before my mind, Paul, the great Apos- 
tle and model Christian, in the distance, and nearer. 



21 



that noble Christian woman, the loved and honored 
friend and mother, who has just left us, striving, in her 
own sphere, to follow him, as he followed Christ. I have 
no hesitation in expressing my belief, that the words 
might have been taken as her life's motto, — that they 
might have been inscribed, as the running title, on 
every page of her daily life. And yet, in speaking 
of her — of her life and character, I feel a degree of 
restraint, a restraint imposed by my regard to what I 
am sure would have been her wish, had she been 
consulted. Were I to attempt anything that might 
properly be called an eulogy of her, I feel as though 
I might almost expect to be checked, by a gentle 
touch of her hand, or a kind, but deprecating look ; 
and to hear her voice, tremulous with emotion, say- 
ing, " Not unto us ! not unto us ! but unto him that 
loved us ! " No ; her unfeigned humility, her delicate 
and sensitive modesty and piety, would not permit 
us to place a wreath upon her brow, or, ere it touched 
her brow, she would take it and cast it at her Sav- 
iours feet. 

But there are other claims that certainly should 
not be disregarded — the claims of that Saviour, who 
made her life, as well as PauTs, what it was ; and of 
Christianity, which, in his life, received such a full 
and complete, and in hers, so rarfe and beautiful an 
exemplification. And my wish is, that what I have 
said or may say, commendatory of her life and char- 
acter, should be understood as said to the Saviour's 



22 



praise, and in commendation of Evangelical religion. 
Catharine Waldo Douglas was a native of Pittsfield, 
Mass. When she was but a child, her parents re- 
moved from Pittsfield to Dalton, where they both 
died and were buried. Born of religious parents, 
hers was the precious privilege of receiving religious 
training and instruction in childhood and youth. 
And it has been a pleasure to picture her while yet 
a child, or little maiden, going to the house of God, 
in company with her parents and other children, and 
sitting there beneath the sound of the glorious Gos- 
pel, listening with an attentive mind, a receptive 
heart, and tearful eyes, to the touching story,, so old, 
and yet so new, of the " man of sorrows," till lured, 
won and drawn to sit, like Mary, at his feet, and lean 
on his Cross, as the only resting place of a burdened 
and contrite spirit This, I believe, is not mere fancy. 
We know that when about seventeen years old, she 
became a member of the Congregational Church at 
Dalton. Then, in the beautiful bloom of her youth, 
she gave her heart to God, and declared herself a 
follower of the Lamb. And what goes far to prove 
the correctness of the picture is, the firmness of her 
religious principles, the 3trength — I might almost 
say, the maturity, of her Christian character, when 
she first became known to the inhabitants of Trenton. 
That was in the year 1817, when she was married to 
Mr. Douglas, and came with him to this house, this 
home, which, for upwards of sixty years she made so 



23 



attractive and so delightful ; and which she has but 
just left, but left only for that home still more de- 
lightful — her Fathers house above. None that knew 
her can doubt that when she came, she came with 
the high and holy resolution to be, and earnest 
prayer that she might be enabled to be, in the new 
and important sphere she was entering, " a living 
epistle of Christ" — a living witness of his saving 
grace and power. Her prayers were heard. Such 
an epistle she was. That epistle was read, and its 
effects became manifest. Her life, permeated by the 
spirit of her Divine Master, and adorned by meek- 
ness, gentleness and Christian love — the steady ex- 
hibition in her life, of a devout regard to the will of 
God as her law, of delight in his Word, and in all 
religious exercises, combined with the sweetness and 
serenity of her spirit, amidst the cares and little vexa- 
tions and annoyances of life, became a power deeply 
felt by those who witnessed it — an argument, the 
force of which they could not evade, that Christian- 
ity is not mere form and pretence, but a living power 
of inestimable worth. In her manner of working for 
Christ and his Kingdom, there was nothing obtrusive, 
imposing, or ostentatious. It was remarkably gentle 
and quiet. But such are some of the most potent 
agencies that are known. Think of the dew — re- 
freshing the parched and thirsty ground, and cloth- 
ing it with verdure and beauty ; but falling so gently 
that the most tender blade of grass and delicate 



24 



flower is not bruised. Think of the morning light, 
rousing and raising all nature as from death to life, 
without in the least startling or disturbing the sleep- 
ing babe. These are fit emblems of those who are 
" the light of the world, and salt of the earth," of 
whom, we are very confident, she was one. 

As illustrative of her influence, I hope I may, 
without offence, mention some facts communicated 
to me, many years ago, by parties who were in no 
way connected with this family. When she came 
here, her religious principles were subjected to z. 
severe test. But hers was a "house founded on a 
rock." Not only was she enabled to remain firm and 
steadfast in her adherence to Evangelical truth, and 
in her loving trust in Christ, as her Saviour, but was 
made by him the instrument of leading the husband 
and father, and the greater number of the children, 
to receive the same truth, to trust and rejoice in the 
same Saviour. Let us accept it as a proof of God's 
fidelity to his promise, " Them that honor me, I will 
honor." 

I shall take the liberty to mention one thing I 
noticed very soon after coming to this place. I men- 
tion it because I think it may be of some benefit to 
others, while it serves to show the fusing, cementing 
and assimilating power of her love. There were two 
families — children of the same fathef, but not of the 
same mother. But if a stranger had been left to 
discover that fact, by the perception of any difference 



25 



in her feelings and conduct towards them, or in theirs 
towards her, or towards each other, I question whether 
he ever would have made the discovery. 

The light that shone with such beneficent effect 
in her own household, was not confined to it, like 
that in a room with doors and shutters closed, and 
curtains drawn ; it rather resembled that which shines 
through open doors and windows, and lights the path- 
way of those without. How many, seeing that light, 
were guided by it and led, more or less directly, to 
glorify their Father in Heaven, he only knows, and 
will, in his own time, reveal. How often might she 
be seen beside the sick and the dying, not simply to 
express her sympathy, but, if possible, to impart con- 
solation, or inspire hope, by directing the mind to 
Jesus and his love. 

The love of the pure and the beautiful in nature, 
which gave her so much delight, appeared in her 
case enhanced and ennobled by a higher love. The 
rose and the lily derived additional loveliness from 
association with him who is ** the Rose of Sharon, 
and the Lily of the Valley." The pleasure she took 
in gathering, arranging and presenting to others the 
flowers she so much loved, was characteristic of her, 
indicative of her thorough unselfishness, her generous 
wish that others might share the pleasure which she 
herself enjoyed. 

There was no quality of her character more 
remarkable than her love for children. This, while 



26 



it could hardly be called maternal love, seemed to 
partake of all its tenderness and fervor. She loved 
to gather them about her, and they loved to be 
gathered, and to listen — while, in her own gentle, 
pleasant manner, she. would tell them something 
adapted, not only to please and gratify them for the 
time being, but also to benefit them for all time and 
eternity ; and many there are who will never forget 
the impressions she thus produced on their young 
and tender hearts. But, may we not here recognize 
the Spirit of her Divine Master — the Good Shepherd 
who " gathers the lambs in his arms, and carries them 
in his bosom ? " This strong, and constantly flowing 
current of love to children, received additional force, 
as well as its character and direction, from the deep 
and strong under-current of the love of Christ in her 
heart. 

Her patience, even cheerfulness in affliction, her 
gratitude for every little attention, service or assist- 
ance rendered, the generous impulses of her loving 
heart, retaining all its wealth and fervor to the last, 
how have all these things endeared her to those 
whose privilege it has been to be near her in her last 
days on earth. I feel that it is a privilege, but one to 
which much responsibility is annexed, to have had 
such a neighbor ; much more to have had such a 
friend ; but how much more to have had such a 
mother! May the blessed Saviour, who made her. 
life what it was, enable you, her children, to follow 



27 



her, as she followed Christ — make her life to you, 
and to us all, an inspiring example, that our lives 
may become more pure, more Christ-like, more 
peaceful ; and death prove to us, as to hef, the 
greatest gain. 

She, " being dead, yet speaketh ; " — absent, and 
yet how near ! This house, this hall, these apart- 
ments, those surrounding grounds — what hallowed 
associations have they all ! What fond memories of 
the past will they awaken ! How suggestive of her 
devotion, her counsels, her prayers, and the yearn- 
ings of her heart for the joy of seeing all the chil- 
dren whom God gave her, walking in the truth 1 
You will say, here she used to retire with her Bible 
and her Hymn Book, to hold communion with her 
God. Here she spent portions of her Sabbath in 
instructing a young or an aged domestic in the way 
of life. Here she gathered us when children, drawing 
us by the magnetic power of her purity and love, 
from pleasures she did not approve, and prayed with 
us before we left. What room, what spot will not 
seem fragrant with the incense of her prayers ? 
And when the thought, at once so painful, and yet so 
sweet comes, She is not here, but with her God and 
Saviour, can the breathings of your hearts be any 
other than : 

" Nearer, my God, to Thee, 
Nearer to Thee." 




ND I heard a voice from heaven saying unto me, write, Blessed 
are the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth : Yea, saith 
the Spirit, that they may rest from their labors ; and their works do 
follow them. And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes ; 
and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow nor crying, neither 
shall there be any more pain : for the former things are passed away. 
And there shall be no night there ; and they need no candle, 
neither light of the sun ; for the Lord God giveth them light ; and 
they shall reign forever and ever. 



:M'ir, 31 



\ 



mm 



ACME 

BOOKBINDING CO.. INC. 

APR 2 71985 

100 CAMBRIDGE STREET 
CHARLESTOWN, MASS. 



26 



it could hardly be called maternal love, seemed to 
partake of all its tenderness and fervor. She loved 
to gather them about her, and they loved to be 
gathered, and to listen — while, in her own gentle, 
pleasant manner, she. would tell them something 
adapted, not only to please and gratify them for the 
time being, but also to benefit them for all time and 
eternity ; and many there are who will never forget 
the impressions she thus produced on their young 
and tender hearts. But, may we not here recognize 
the Spirit of her Divine Master — the Good Shepherd 
who " gathers the lambs in his arms, and carries them 
in his bosom ? " This strong, and constantly flowing 
current of love to children, received additional force, 
as well as its character and direction, from the deep 
and strong under-current of the love of Christ in her 
heart. 

Her patience, even cheerfulness in affliction, her 
gratitude for every little attention, service or assist- 
ance rendered, the generous impulses of her loving 
heart, retaining all its wealth and fervor to the last, 
how have all these things endeared her to those 
whose privilege it has been to be near her in her last 
days on earth. I feel that it is a privilege, but one to 
which much responsibility is annexed, to have had 
such a neighbor ; much more to have had such a 
friend ; but how much more to have had such a 
mother! May the blessed Saviour, who made her. 
life what it was, enable you, her children, to follow 



27 



her, as she followed Christ — make her life to you, 
and to us all, an inspiring example, that our lives 
may become more pure, more Christ-like, more 
peaceful ; and death prove to us, as to hef, the 
greatest gain. 

She, " being dead, yet speaketh ; " — absent, and 
yet how near ! This house, this hall, these apart- 
ments, those surrounding grounds — what hallowed 
associations have they all ! What fond memories of 
the past will they awaken ! How suggestive of her 
devotion, her counsels, her prayers, and the yearn- 
ings of her heart for the joy of seeing all the chil- 
dren whom God gave her, walking in the truth 1 
You will say, here she used to retire with her Bible 
and her Hymn Book, to hold communion with her 
God. Here she spent portions of her Sabbath in 
instructing a young or an aged domestic in the way 
of life. Here she gathered us when children, drawing 
us by the magnetic power of her purity and love, 
from pleasures she did not approve, and prayed with 
us before we left. What room, what spot will not 
seem fragrant with the incense of her prayers ? 
And when the thought, at once so painful, and yet so 
sweet comes. She is not here, but with her God and 
Saviour, can the breathings of your hearts be any 
other than : 

" Nearer, my God, to Thee, 
Nearer to Thee." 




ND I heard a voice from heaven saying unto me, write, Blessed 
are the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth : Yea, saith 
the Spirit, that they may rest from their labors ; and their works do 
follow them. And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes ; 
and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow nor crying, neither 
shall there be any more pain : for the former things are passed away. 
And there shall be no night there ; and they need no candle, 
neither light of the sun ; for the Lord God giveth them light ; and 
they shall reign forever and ever. 



:M'ir, 31 



ACME 

B09KBIND:NS CO.. INC. 

APR 2 71985 

100 CAMBRIDGE STREET 
CHARLESTOWN, MASS. 




ND I heard a voice from heaven saying unto me, write, Blessed 
are the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth : Yea, saith 
the Spirit, that they may rest from their labors ; and their works do 
follow them. And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes ; 
and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow nor crying, neither 
shall there be any more pain : for the former things are passed away. 
And there shall be no night there ; and they need no candle, 
neither light of the sun ; for the Lord God giveth them light ; and 
they shall reign forever and ever. 



:i4ir. 31 



M* 



ACME 

B09KBIND;N8 CO., INC. 

APR 2 71985 



L 



100 CAMBRIDGE STREET 
CHARLESTOWN. MASS.