(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "A memorial of Francis Cook : one of the "First comers" of the Plymouth Colony, December 22, 1620 and of his immediate descendants"

M 



i 





0>v 



Page 6th, 4th line should read — "owners or occupants:" 
At this time or previous, the two brothers carried on business 
as Mercers in London. 

H. C. 

Page 10:— Died Apr. 7th, 1GG3. His will is dated 7th, 
Dec. He appointed his wife Hester and son John executors. 

H. C. 

Page 15 : — ''John Cook was, with one exception, the last 
survivor of the first comers of the "Mayflower." 

H. C. 



Page 17: — Josias Jr. married Debroah Hopkins, 27th. 
July, 1668. His children were Elizabeth, born 12tb, October, 
1669; (died 1670.) Josias, 12th, Nov., 1670; Richard, 1st. 
Sept., 1672; Elizabeth; 16th, June, 1674; Calib, 15th, Nov. 
1676 ; Debroah, 28th, Apr., 1679 ; Joshua, 4th, Feb., 1683 ; 
Benjamin, 28th, Apr., 1687. 

H C. 



Page 18: — Jacob Sen. married the widow Shurtliffe for 
his second wife : — not his son Jacob Jr. as stated in the work. 
Jacob Jr. married Lydia Miller, daughter of John Miller, 29, 
Dec. 1681. Jacob Cook married for his first wife, Damaris, 
(laughter of Stephen Hopkins, 1647. Martha, his daughter 
married Elkana Cushman ; she died 17th Sept. 1722. Jacob Jr. 
had children— William, born 5th, Oct., 1683 : Lydia, 18th, 
May, 1685 ; Rebecca, 19th, Nov., 1688 ; Jacob, 16th, June, 
1690 ; Margaret, 3d Nov., 1695 ; Josias, 16th, May, 1699. 

H. C. 

Page 20 : — John Thompson died on the old homestead, 
(given him b\ r Francis Cook, and situated in the present town 
of Middleborough.) 16th, June, 1696; Mary, his wife died 
21st. March, 1715 ; Jane married Experience Mitchel, the 
founder of the family of that name in the old colony in 1028. 
Richard Wright who married Hester Cook, early settled in 
Marshfield, where his descendents are still numerous. 

H. C. 



A MEMORIAL 



FRANCIS COOK, 



ONE OF THE 



"First Corners" of the Plymouth Colony, 



DECEMBER 22, 1620, 



OF HIS IMMEDIATE DESCENDANTS. 



By HENRY COOK. 



BOSTON: 

PRINTED FOR PRIVATE DISTRIBUTION. 
1870. 



BOSTON 
RAND, AVERY, & FRYE, PRINTERS. 



^.nn IFF LIBRARY 




HE following brief memoir of one of the founders 
of Plymouth Colony, a Pilgrim of "The May- 
flower," is prepared with the sole object of per- 
petuating the memory, and keeping alive in the 
family of his descendants, one whose name and history should 
never be forgotten. For this purpose, fifty copies have been 
printed, for private distribution only, one of which is hereby 
presented to 



with the best wishes of 

THE AUTHOR. 



Memorial. 




|RANCIS COOK, the founder of the 
family of this name in the Old Ply- 
mouth Colony, was, with his oldest 
son John, the first-comers in "The 
Mayflower," and signed, with others 
of the company, the compact on board that vessel in 
Cape-Cod Harbor, Nov. n, 1620. 

From researches that have been instituted by his 
descendants within the few past years, it has been 
ascertained that he belonged to the family of Cooks 
of the parish of Blyth, of York and Nottingham, Eng- 
land, adjoining to Austerfield, the residence of Brad- 
ford and Brewster, the leaders of the Puritans into 
Holland, and ultimately to the shores of the New 
World. 



6 MEMORIAL. 

In Rev. Mr. Baines's " History of the Parish of 
Blyth," froquora fr mention is made of the two families 
of Cooks, — Richard and Stansfield. The parish 
records attest to their ownership of the old convent 
and manor of Blyth as early as 1540 ; and also of the 
births, deaths, and marriages which took place in their 
respective families to a much later date. 

The subject of this memoir was born in 1577. 
Of his becoming a convert to the doctrines of the 
Separatists, and at what time he joined the congrega- 
tion composed of Bradford, Brewster, and others of 
the Puritans of that place, it is unknown. When, to 
enjoy their religion free from persecution, they were 
obliged to leave their native land, he departed with 
the others for Holland. Here he resided with the 
Rev. Mr. Robinson's society, and was, early after his 
settlement here, married to Hester, a Walloon woman, 
a people inhabiting the southern provinces of Belgium ; 
a people, who, like the English Puritans, had left their 
native land on account of religious persecutions. 
Bradford mentions him as one of the first-comers who 
had attained to a great age ; " having seen his chil- 
dren's children have children," &c. 

The others of his family — wife, sons, and daugh- 



Page Gth, 4th line should read — "owners or occupants :" 
At this time or previous, the two brothers carried on business 
as Mercers in London. 

H. C. 



MEMORIAL. 7 

ters — came over in " The Ann ; " landing at Plymouth 
in July, 1623. The names of his children were John 
(who came with his father in " The Mayflower "), 
Josias, Jacob, Hester (married Richard Wright, 21 
Nov., 1644), Mary (married John Thompson, 26 Dec, 
1645), J ane > an d Elizabeth. 

In the old plan of the settlement, and among the 
lots, I find Francis Cook's as the third on Leyden 
Street, and adjoining those of Edward Winslow and 
Isaac Allerton. Afterwards, when his family had 
joined him, and the settlement had considerably in- 
creased, he was granted a tract of land at Jones River, 
at a place called Rocky Nook (now comprised within 
the limits of Kingston) ; which grant was increased 
from time to time. Here many of his descendants 
still live. At the time of his death, according to the 
Old Colony Records, his place was known as Cook's 
Hollow. Of the early history of the family in the Old 
Colony, we have a very meagre account ; depending 
mostly upon the old records, and the few contempo- 
rary histories. That he was a prominent member of 
the Plymouth colony, is evidenced by the many posi- 
tions of honor and trust to which he was from time 
to time elected, or appointed by the Court, until old 



8 MEMORIAL. 

age incapacitated him from active participation in the 
affairs of the colony. 

In, this connection, I am induced to transcribe from 
the Old Colony Records in relation to so much of his 
history ; being only a part. 

1633, the commencement of the records, I find his 
name among the list of freemen. In that year, and 
1634, was appointed referee in the settlement of 
various affairs between the different members of the 
colony ; and surveyor for laying out highways about 
Plymouth, &c. In 1636, received an apprentice, John 
Harmon, son of Edw. Harmon of London, tailor, for 
seven years. Details are given in regard to his cloth- 
ing, and his pay at the end of his service ; which was 
to be a double suit of clothing, and seven bushels of 
corn. 

From 1636 to 1640, his name constantly appears in 
some capacity or other, performing important duties 
under the government. In 1640, he was associated 
with Howland, Pratt, and Cushman, in deciding the 
boundaries of the land of Mr. Thomas Prince and 
Clement Briggs, at Eel River ; and in the same year 
received a large grant of land, with his son John, 
" bounding on the North River;" and in 1642 con- 



MEMORIAL. 9 

tributed, with the same son, one pound sixteen shil- 
lings towards building a bark of " forty or fifty tons." 

From 1642 to 1648, he seems to be constantly in 
some office or other connected with the administra- 
tion of affair's. In these years, he also received 
another grant of land at " North Meddow," by Jones 
River. In 1648, he was appointed by the government, 
as juryman, to inquire into the murder of the child 
of Richard Bishop, found with its throat cut in its 
father's house. This was a child of four years, mur- 
dered by its mother, who afterwards confessed, and 
was hung for the crime. 

In 1650, as one of the committee, he made their 
report on the laying-out of a highway to connect with 
the Massachusetts-Bay Colony. 

In 1659, was again appointed by the Court as ref- 
eree in the settlement of numerous accounts and 
boundaries of land between different members of the 
settlement. 

In 1662, with his son John and others, was allowed 
to settle upon a tract of land lately purchased for a 
new settlement (this tract comprised the old town of 
Dartmouth, now comprising Dartmouth, New Bedford, 
&c). I have no record that he ever removed thither : 



IO MEMORIAL. 

the probability is, that he was only one of the proprie- 
tors, but never settled there, as, according to the 
records, he died the following year, aged 86. By his 
will, he left the homestead to his son-in-law, Richard 
Wright, who married his daughter Hester. 

John Thompson (son-in-law), William Crow, and 
John Barker were appointed by the Court to adminis- 
ter upon his estate. . 

^ - - - y /.j 

Page 10:— Died Apr. 7th, 1GG3. His will is dated 7th, 
Dec. He appointed his wife Hester and son John executors. 

H. C. 




MEMORIAL. ll 



JOHN COOK, the oldest son, early appears upon 
the records as a prominent personage in colo- 
nial affairs, and in after-years as a most noted 
member of the company while residing at Plymouth, 
and particularly after his removal to the new purchase 
of Dartmouth, in 1662. March 28, 1634, he married 
Sarah Warren. From this time, through a long life, 
he seems to have been engaged in official business. 
In 1639, was elected one of the governor's assistants, 
— an office, in those days, of much honor and im- 
portance. 

When the schism arose in the church at Plymouth 
(of which he was at the time an elder), in regard to 
baptism, he took sides with the opposition, afterwards 
known as Baptist, and was excommunicated. In 1662, 
as above mentioned, he removed to Dartmouth, and 
was appointed by the Court the first magistrate of the 
town, an office which he held for many years ; and, as 
the records show, was deputy from that town to the 
General Court for a long succession of years. Pre- 
viously, he had held the office of deputy from Plymouth 
for a number of years,— from 1640 until his removal. 



12 MEMORIAL. 

On the breaking-out of Philip's War, the town of 
Dartmouth was one of the first to feel its effects, and 
the house of John Cook was the first to suffer ; being 
burned to the ground. I can learn of none of the 
family being killed. The probability is, that, knowing 
of their danger beforehand, they had early removed to 
a place of safety. On the division of Capt. Church's 
force in this neighborhood, when in pursuit of the 
savages, soon after, one party was ordered to " rendez- 
vous at the ruins of John Cook's house." As a 
prominent person in colonial affairs and in the new 
settlement, it is very probable that he had increased 
the hostility of the Indians, having had much to do 
with them in the purchase of lands, &c. ; as in 1665 I 
find he was appointed by the Court, with the Treasurer, 
to treat with King Philip about the sale of some lands 
in behalf of the colony. In the same year, he pur- 
chased for other parties the Island of " Nakatay ; " and 
the Court ordered, that, unless they pay him for his 
trouble and expense in the same, he was to have it for 
his own use. 

In 1637, he volunteered in Capt. Prince's company, 
for the Pequot War. 1654, as one of the deputies of 
Plymouth, he made the report of the Committee on 



MEMORIAL. 13 

the Affairs between the Plymouth and Massachusetts 
Bay Colonies. 

In 1668, he was ordered by the Court to establish 
and maintain a ferry between Dartmouth and Rhode 
Island ; and in the same year he took the testimony 
of parties, and established the boundaries of the town, 
which had long been in dispute with the Indians. 
1668, he was ordered to appear at court, and answer 
for trespass upon the lands of Samuel Fuller. I men- 
tion this case as something to the credit of the family, 
as, in a long course of years, this appears to be the 
only instance of any one of this name being engaged 
as defendant, for any cause whatever, in any of the 
courts. In 1672, he seems to be in a controversy with 
some of the settlers of the town. I transcribe from 
the records : — 

"July 1, 1672 at this court, in the controversay be- 
tween John Cook and several of the purchasers of 
Dartmouth, the court appointed Samuel Hicks, John 
Smith, and Pelig Trip, to settle the differences. They 
ordered that John Cook should have Ram Island, be- 
fore given him by the town for former services, also 
1 1 pounds for his services and disbursments, and 3 
pounds for his damages and trouble, which 14 pounds 



14 MEMORIAL. 

shal be paid to him or his order in good merchantable 
Pork, Beef and corn, in equal proportions, at or before 
the middle of Oct. next, or otherwise to his content, 
and in return he should deliver up the deeds of the 
lands to whoever the Town should appoint to receive 
them." 

That he was not at variance with his neighbors, I 
would mention, that in the following year, 1673, he 
was again elected one of the two selectmen of the 
town, and deputy to the General Court at Plymouth. 
1674, he settled the estate of Mrs. Elizabeth Warren, 
his mother-in-law. Same year, he had liberty of the 
Court, with Capt. Bradford and Joseph Bradford, to 
look out for more land for their accommodation. 

In this " looking-out for more land," I imagine, is 
to be found one of the great sources of the constant 
trouble with the Indians. In regard to the almost 
total destruction of the town at the breaking-out of 
Philip's War, I find this year, 1675, Oct. 5, "John 
Cook, as magistrate of the town of Dartmouth, is 
ordered by the Court to communicate to the inhabit- 
ants their orders in regard to rebuilding and settling 
the town again." 1677, he was appointed by the town 
to receive their portion of the funds raised for the 



MEMORIAL. 15 

relief of the Colony by " divers Christians " in Ireland 
(occasioned by the wars). In the controversy of the 
town with Dr. Cooper of Newport, R.I., for his at- 
tendance and services on William Dio, a pauper, John 
Cook, as Magistrate, is ordered by the Court, March 5, 
1678, to call a town-meeting of the inhabitants, for the 
purpose of receiving money to pay the bill, some time 
before October. His daughter Sarah married Arthur 
Hathaway, Nov. 20, 1652. He died, according to 
Dartmouth Records, Nov. 23, 16^5. Bradford men- 
tions him in the Appendix to his History, as one of the 
first-comers, still living, 1694 ; so that his death oc- 
curred the following year. Of his children, the records 
mention Hester, born Aug. 16. 1650 ; Sarah, who mar- 
ried Arthur Hathaway; Mercy, born Jan. 12, 1657; 
John. 

These are all that are mentioned ; but the proba- 
bility is that there were several more. 





„ ge ,!", : ^" J ° HN C ° 0K WaS ' With 0,le ^ception, the last 
survivor of the first comers of the "Mayflower." 

H. C. 



1 6 MEMORIAL. 



JOSIAS COOK, son of Francis, came over with 
his mother, and other younger members of the 
family, in " The Ann ; " landing at Plymouth July, 
1623. 

In 1634, I find him rated as a tax-payer; and in the 
following year, Sept. 16, was married to Mrs. Elizabeth 
Dean, widow. From this time, until 1641, I find his 
name often mentioned in the old records, receiving 
grants of land, being chosen several years as deputy 
to the General Court, and as occupying other offices 
of trust in the colony. About this time, he joined 
the party of Gov. Prince, for the settlement of Naw- 
sett (Nauset), on Cape Cod ; and June 1, 1647, was 
elected first deputy of the town to the General Court. 
1648, he was appointed register of the town by the 
Court, and also as " agent to sell wine." From this 
period, to 1671, I find his name constantly occurring 
in the records as magistrate and deputy from East- 
ham, selectman of the town ; and, on several occasions, 
was appointed by the Court to examine the accounts 
of the treasurer of the colony, and as agent of the 
colony to treat with certain Indians in the purchase 
of land, &c. 



MEMORIAL. iy 

Josias Cook was one of the first proprietors of the 
present town of Abington, having, June 8, 1664, re- 
ceived, in company with Lieut. Joseph Rogers, Giles 
Hopkins/Henry Sampson, and Experience Mitchell, 
a grant of the Court " of all that tract of land lying 
between Bridgewater and the Mass. Bay Company," 
now comprising the above-mentioned town ; a part of 
its history which its two historians have entirely over- 
looked. He died 1673 ; and his widow, Elizabeth, ad- 
ministered on his estate. 

His daughter Ann married Mark Snow, Jan. 18, 
1654, and died in child-bed, July 24, 1656. Of his 
other children, besides the above, mention is only 
made of Bethya, who married Joseph Harding, all of 
Eastham ; and Josias, born Nov. 12, 1670. 




/ / / / Jf J 

Page 17 : — Josias Jr. married Debroah Hopkins, 27th. 
July, 1668. His children were Elizabeth, born 12th, October, 
1669; (died 1670.) Josias, 12th, Nov., 1670; Richard, 1st. 
Sept., 1672; Elizabeth, 16th, Jane, 1674; Calib, loth, Nov. 
1676 ; Debroah, 28th, Apr., 1679 ; Joshua, 4th, Feb., 1683 : 
Benjamin, 28th, Apr., 1687. 

H. C. 



18 MEMORIAL. 



JACOB COOK, son of Francis, is first mentioned 
in the colony records as a volunteer in Capt. 
Prince's company for the Indian War, June, 1637 ; 
and in 1648 was made a freeman. The records make 
frequent mention of his name in the colonial affairs, 
as holding offices in the town of Plymouth, &c. 
r * On the removal of Gov. Prince to Eastham, he sold 
^ his house and lands at Rocky Nook, adjoining the 
Va land of his father, Francis Cook, and removed with 
>8 the governor's party to the above town, where he 

resided until his death, which occurred July 7, 1676. 

^ Of his children, there are records of Elizabeth, born 

C (^ Jan. 18, 1647 ; married Daniel Wilcockes, Nov. 28, 

* f Uv 1 66 1 (this is according to the record ; but I think it 

* ^ must be a mistake in the date, as she would be only 

J ^ fourteen years of age in 1661). Caleb, born March 

29, 165 1. Jacob, March 26, 1653 (married Elizabeth 

Shirtleffe, widow, Nov. 18, 1669). Mary, born Jan. 

12, 1657. Martha, born March 16, 1659. Francis, 

born Jan. 5, 1662. Ruth, born Jan. 17, 1665. 

Caleb Cook, above mentioned, was the one known 
^S^ ^n> in after-years as the friend and companion of Capt. / 

Pago 18: — Jacob Sen. married the widow Shurtliffe for 
his second wife : — not his son Jacob Jr. as stated in the work. 
Jacob Jr. married Lydia Miller, daughter of John Miller, 29, 
Dec. 1681. Jacob Cook married for his first wife, Damaris. 
daughter of Stephen Hopkins, 1047. Martha, his daughter 
married Elkana Cushman ; she died 17th Sept. 1722. Jacob Jr. 
had children— William, born 5th, Oct., 1683 ; Lydia, 18th, 
May, 1G85 ; Rebecca, 19th, Nov., 1G88 ; Jacob, J6th, June, 
1090 ; Margaret, 3d Nov., 1G95 ; Josias, 16th, May, 1699. 

H. C. 



> .~ 



MEMORIAL. 19 

Church in all his campaigns, both in Philip's wars, 
and afterwards at the eastward ; in the last of which 
he bore a captain's commission. At the time of 
Philip's death, when the English had surrounded his 
hiding-place, Caleb Cook was stationed with an Indian 
called Alderman on the outskirts of the swamp where 
Philip was concealed ; and, on the appearance of that 
noted chief, Cook leveled his gun, but it missed fire. 
Alderman then took his turn, fired, and shot Philip 
directly through the heart. After this noted exploit, 
Cook induced Alderman to change guns with him ; 
and for many generations this piece remained an heir- 
loom with his descendants. Some years ago, they 
were induced to give the lock to Mr. Lothrop, who, 
I believe, presented it to the Antiquarian Society ; 
and more recently the gun itself was deposited in 
Pilgrim Hall, Plymouth, where it can now be seen by 
the curious. 

For other and more extended accounts of Caleb, I 
would refer to "Church's Indian Wars," and other 
writers on the same subjects. 

Of the remaining children of Francis Cook, Hester, 
Mary, Jane, and Elizabeth, I find but a very meagre 
record. Hester married Richard Wright, Nov. 21 



20 MEMORIAL. 

• 1644, who, by will of his father-in-law, inherited the 

*> v - old homestead at Jones River, known in those times 

v as Cook's Hollow, now included, as I have before men- 

's* • 

\ tioned, in the present town of Kingston. Besides the 

homestead, Kfanois -Cetok divided equally between 



I 



Ridharcf Wright and John Thompson a large tract 



1 

51 

^ of land, granted to him by the Court, at Nemassa- 

S kett. 



^ Mary married John Thompson, Dec. 26, 1645. No 

5^ particular record of him is found until 1665, when I 

find him approved by the Court as one of the select- 
men of Barnstable j£ (^s^^^*^^ — ) 

Of the remaining daughters, Jane and Elizabeth, I 
find no record of them, other than being daughters of 
Francis. 

In Hobart's "History of Abington" (Boston, 1868) 
may be found a partial genealogy of the family, refer- 
ring particularly as it does to that one branch (Levi 
Cook, the sixth in descent from Francis) who settled 
there, 1772. 



4 



=$& .,. ^ / / 



Page 20 : — John Thompson died on the old homestead, 
(given him by Francis Cook, and situated in the present town 
of Middleborough.) lGth, June, 1696; Mary, his wife died 
21st. March, 1715 ; Jane married Experience Mitehel, the 
founder of the family of that name in the old colony in 102<S. 
Richard Wright who married Hester Cook, early settled in 
Marshfield, where his descendents are still numerous. 

H. C. 







^£^4~^/~ 






s*rt <r<~rzn- <-* * 






•r- 



M, 



<^K 



Ol^2^/L^ 



' jrfL- *^ aU "" ,A,JJ 



W. c*.