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Full text of "Memorial record of the counties of Faribault, Martin, Watonwan and Jackson, Minnesota"

111 



I 







MEMORIAL RECORD 



OF THE 



C01LJ]>^'riE;S OF" 



Faribault, Martin, Watonwan and Jadson, 



MINNESOTA. 



■ILLUSTRATEO. 



CHICAGO. 
THH LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY. 

1895. 






i(o\C\A 



|0 



\ 



i 







d^ ^^^/r/ 



MEMORIAL RECORD. 



V-— rf ON. DANIEL F. GOODRICH, 
I^^W deceased, was a native of the State 
£ , * of Maine, born November 13,1836; 
he received his education in the 
common schools and at Waterville Academy 
and Waterville College, now Colby Univer- 
sity, where he graduated in 1859. Afterhis 
graduation he engaged in teaching and in 
the study of the law, in the latter of which 
he was directed by Hon. R. Foster, of 
Waterville, Maine. 

In July, 1862, he enlisted in the military 
service of the United States, and was ordered 
South with his regiment. He enlisted as a 
private, but was rapidly promoted first to 
Sergeant, then Sergeant Major, Second 
Lieutenant and First Lieutenant, and for a 
time commanded the company. He was in 
the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, 
North Anna, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Win- 
chester, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek, and 
Petersburg again, and Sailor's Creek. He 
was in twenty-two battles all told, besides 
skirmishes. He served until the close of 
the war. He was a loyal, brave and active 
soldier. 

After his discharge from the service he 



returned home in 1865, and was admitted to 
the bar in March, 1866, at Augusta, 
Maine, and went into practice with Mr. 
Foster, then of that city, for a short time. 
In 1867 he came to Minnesota and located 
in Rice county for some months, engaged in 
teaching school. Then he came to this 
county, in 1868, and located at Blue Earth 
City, where he engaged in the practice of 
law. Here he resided until the time of his 
death. He held various minor offices at 
Blue Earth City, was Justice of the Peace 
three or four terms, and Deputy Register, 
as above stated. Mr. Goodrich was elected 
State Senator in 1877, and attended the 
session of 1878. He was again elected to 
the Senate in 1882, for four years, and 
attended the sessions of 1883 and 1885, and 
he was again elected in 1886, for four years, 
and attended the sessions of 1887 and 1889. 
He was chairman of the Judiciary Committee 
during the session of 1889. 

Mr. Goodrich was a well read, trust- 
worthy and conscientious lawyer. After a 
protracted illness, he died, at Blae Earth 
City, in September, 1889. He was never 
married. 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



«^— rf ON. HENRY M. HUNTINGTON, 

[''"X of Winnebago City, is one of the 
\ W early settlers and large land-owners 
of Faribault county. 

He is a native of Yates county. New 
York, born in 1835, and belongs to an old 
New England family that was founded in 
Norwich, Connecticut, in 1635. His parents 
were James and Cynthia Huntington, the 
former born in Connecticut and the latter 
in New York State. Henry M. grew to 
manhood on his father's farm, and received 
his primary education in the common schools, 
supplementing it by a few years' attendance 
at Starkey Seminary. On attaining his 
majority, he decided to seek a home and 
fortune in the then young and growing 
West, and in 1856 visited Iowa and a num- 
ber of other States, and the following year 
came to Faribault county. Minnesota, and 
pre-empted 160 acres of land on section 6, 
Verona township, and at once began to de- 
velop and improve the land. He continued 
thus employed until August, 1862, when he 
enlisted in Company D, Sixth Regiment of 
Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, and served 
until the close of the war, participating in 
all the engagements in which his regiment 
took part, and being mustered out in Sep- 
tember, 1865. 

After his return from Southern battle- 
fields, he resumed his agricultural pursuits 
and continued his residence here until 1879, 
when he went back to his native State, and 
remained until 1892, since which time he 
has resided in Winnebago City, looking 
after his landed interests and dealing in 
real estate. 

Mr. Huntington was formerly Republi- 
can in politics, but since the close of the 
civil war he has not favored the trade policy 
of that party, and has supported the Democ- 



racy. In 1872 he was elected to the State 
Legislature, serving one term, and has held 
various local offices. He devotes much 
time to reading and keeps himself well 
posted on the public questions of the day. 



aAPTAIN EDWARD F. WADE. 
real-estate dealer, Fairmont, Min- 
nesota, is one of the most enter- 
prising and public-spirited men of 
the town, and some personal mention of him 
is appropriate in this work. 

Hon. David \\'ade, the Captain's father, 
was born in New Jersey in 1S08, son of 
David Wheeler Wade, who was of English 
descent. Hon. David \\'ade was married in 
New Jersey to Miss Joanna Wade, also a 
native of that State, and they remained there 
until about 1855 or '66, when they emigrat- 
ed with their famih' to Rock county, Wis- 
consin. In the fall of i 862 they moved to 
Trempealeau county, same State, and there 
passed the residue of their lives and died. 
They were the parents of nine children, all 
of whom grew to maturity. Si.x are now 
living, namely: William T., of Sumner, 
Iowa, is married and has two children; Julia 
E. Dunning, of Primghar, Iowa, has one 
child; Sarah Y. Meeker, Sumner, Iowa, 
has two sons; Robert H., Jackson county, 
Minnesota, is married and has three sons; 
Stephen O., Trempealeau, Wisconsin, has 
a wife and a son and daughter; and Ed- 
ward F. is the immediate subject of this re- 
view. The names of the deceased are Re- 
becca P. Winans, Hannah A. Crane and 
David W. While residents of New Jersey, 
Mr. and Mrs. Wade were members of the 
Presbyterian Church, but after coming West 
they united with the Congregational Church, 
in which the\' remained consistent members 



FARIBALL1\ MARTIX, WATOXWAX AXD JACKSON. 



until the time of their death. He was a 
Deacon in both churches. By trade he was 
a harnessrnaker. Politically he was a Whig 
in early life and later was a Republican, al- 
ways taking an acti\e interest in public af- 
fairs. He was elected to and served as a 
member of the New Jersey State Legisla- 
ture. 

The subject of our sketch was born in 
Essex county, New Jersey, February 28, 
1839, and was fifteen years of age at the 
time he moved with his parents to Wiscon- 
sin. In his native State and in Wisconsin 
his education was received. After he be- 
came a man he went with an emigrant party 
to Trempealeau county, Wisconsin, and 
there bought a tract of wild land, settling 
upon it and devoting his time to its cultiva- 
tion and improvement. 

Mr. Wade was married in April, i860, 
to Amelia A. Sherwood, a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, daughter of A. L. and Philena (Par- 
sons) Sherwood. She was born December 
28, 1839, came West with her parents when 
she was small, and was educated in Wiscon- 
sin. Her father was a teacher. Mr. and 
Mrs. Wade are the parents of eleven chil- 
dren, brief record of whom is as follows: 
Mary E., wife of Elmore Houghtaling, Fair- 
mont, has five children; Frank E., who 
married Georgiana St. John, and has two 
children, resides in Sheldon, Iowa; Bert C, 
Ottumwa, Iowa, married Ella Staughton, 
and they have two children ; David S. , unmar- 
ried; Dewey W., Winona, Minnesota, is book- 
keeper for a Dakota grain company; Arthur 
L. , at home; Carrie A., a teacher; Edith M., 
a clerk in Fairmont; Minnie T. and Myrtle 
T. (twins); and Julia I., at home. 

After his marriage Mr. W'ade lived on his 
farm until August, 1S62, when he enlisted 
in Company C, Thirtieth Wisconsin Volun- 



teer Infantry, as a private. He was detailed 
as clerk in the office of the Assistant Pro- 
vost Marshal General, at Madison, Wiscon- 
sin, where he remained during the winter of 
1862-3. The following spring he was de- 
tailed as clerk in the Headquarter Depart- 
ment of the Northwest, under General Pope, 
continuing as such until January, 1865. At 
that time he received a conditional commis- 
sion as Second Lieutenant, to raise a com- 
pany. He went to La Crosse, Wisconsin, 
raised a company of eighty-eight men, and 
was made its Captain. This was Company 
K and was attached to the Forty-si.xth Wis- 
consin Volunteer Infantry. They went to 
Athens, Alabama, and were put on patrol 
duty. In May, 1865, Captain Wade was 
detailed to serve on a military commission 
at Huntsville, Alabama, by order of Major 
General Thomas, and served as such until 
the last of September, 1S65, when he was 
mustered out and came home to his family. 
Before he reached home Captain Wade 
was elected a County Commissioner of 
Trempealeau county, and he served as such 
one year. Then he was elected County 
Treasurer, which office he filled four years, 
and after that served one year as Under 
Sheriff. In 1872 he came to Minnesota 
and took a homestead claim in Cedar town- 
ship, Martin county, where he made his 
home until 1878. That year he moved to 
Cedarville and opened a general store. In 
1880 he was elected County Commissioner 
of Martin county, and served as such two 
years, being chairman of the Board one 
year. In the fall of 1881 he was elected 
Clerk of the District Court, and in the fall 
of the following year moved to Fairmont, 
where he has since resided. For nine con- 
secutive years he filled the office of Clerk of 
the Court, He has also served in various 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



minor offices: since 1886 has been a Justice 
of tile Peace; has filled the offices of 
Assessor and Supervisor, and is now Town 
Clerk. He has always been deeply inter- 
ested in educational matters, and for six 
3-ears served on the School Board of Fair- 
mont, being a member of the same at the 
time the present school building was erected. 
When he was only twenty-one he was Con- 
stable and Overseer of Highways in Wiscon- 
sin. At the expiration of his term as Clerk 
of the Court, Captain Wade gave his 
attention to the real-estate and insurance 
business, in which he is still engaged. 
He is secretary of the Fairmont Build- 
ing & Loan Association. Politically he is 
identified with the Republican party, and 
has always been an active worker in the 
same. He is a member of Phil Kearney 
Post, No. 18, G. A. R. , of which he was 
Commander three years and Adjutant a 
number of years. He is also identified with 
the Masonic order, blue lodge and chapter. 
He is a member of the Church of Christ 
(Scientist), being Clerk of the same. 



>nr*OHX THOMPSON SWEARINGEN 

m is identified with the official interests 
A 1 of Martin county, having for more 
than seven years served as County 
Register of Deeds. His long continuance 
in this office certainly indicates fidelity to 
dutj' and the confidence reposed in him by 
his fellow citizens. He has resided in Mar- 
tin county since the age of eight j'ears; 
hence many of his supporters have known 
him from boyhood and are familiar with his 
straightforward upright life which makes him 
worthy of the honors conferred upon him. 
Mr. Swearingen is a native of De Witt 
county, Illinois, born on the 14th of Octo- 



ber, 1854. The name was originally spelled 
Van Swearingen. Members of the family 
emigrated from Holland to the New World 
in Colonial days. The grandfather of our 
subject, John B. Swearingen, was born in 
Lewis county, Kentucky, on the 25th of 
July, 1803, and made farming his life work. 
In 1828 he removed with his family to 
Adams county, Ohio, and, after one year, 
went to Vermillion county, Illinois, casting 
his lot with its early settlers. His son James, 
the father of J. T., was born in Lewis 
county, Kentucky, July 25, 1824, and was 
a child of only four summers at the time of 
the removal to the Buckeye State. He was 
reared amid the wild scenes of frontier life 
in Illinois and was married in De Witt 
county, that State, March 19, 1846, to Miss 
Eliza A. Crum, a daughter of Peter Crum, 
one of the pioneers of that county. Mr. 
and Mrs. Swearingen began their domestic 
life upon a farm, and there the mother 
passed away on the 26th of March, 1S55, 
leaving three children, of whom our subject 
is the youngest. After the death of his first 
wife, the father was again married, his sec- 
ond union being with Mariette Freer. The 
wedding took place November 16, 1862, 
and they have one daughter, Jessie L. 

Mr. Swearingen, of whom we write, was 
brought to Minnesota when a child of only 
two years, the family settling in Blue Earth 
county in 1857. Four years later they came 
to Martin count}', and he here attended his 
first school. In 1862, during the New Ulm 
massacre, many of the settlers left their 
homes, and the Swearingen family among 
the rest. With his father John remained 
until nineteen 3-ears of age, and during that 
time spent one year in the printing office of 
the Fairmont Chain. At the age of nine- 
teen he went to Dodge county, this State, 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



and served a regular three-years apprentice- 
ship in the office of the Dodge County Re- 
publican, learning the business in all its 
details and becoming a proficient workman. 
Going to Blue Earth City, he was there em- 
ployed as a printer and as Deputy Post- 
master, and in 1879 returned to Fairmont. 
Entering upon a somewhat different line of 
business he became a salesman in a general 
store, and was also Deputy Postmaster for a 
period of two j'ears. In the month of August, 
1885, he embarked in business for himself, 
— purchasing the Fairmont News, an inde- 
pendent paper, of which he was editor and 
proprietor until August, 1887, when he sold 
out, having conducted the paper just two 
years. 

In the month of September of the same 
year Mr. Swearingen entered upon his offi- 
cial career, being appointed Register of 
Deeds for Martin county by the Board of 
County Commissioners to fill a vacancy 
caused by the death of J. B. Frazier. So 
well did he discharge the duties of that office 
that when his time expired he was nomi- 
nated by the Republican party for a regular 
term, and triumphantly elected, not only in 
that year, but also for four successive terms, 
— 1888, 1890, 1892 and 1894. He is now 
serving in the fourth regular term, and only 
commendatory words are heard concerning 
his administration of affairs. In a summary 
of his life we note a strict and unswerving 
attention to the matter in hand, whether it 
be business or pleasure, and this has done 
much toward winning him success. He is 
also systematic and painstaking, and his 
fidelity to duty is manifested by the confi- 
dence and trust reposed in him by his fel- 
low citizens, who without exception respect 
and esteem him. 

On the 3d of November, 1880, Mr. 



Swearingen was joined in wedlock with Miss 
Kate A. Crooker, a native of Minnesota, 
born June 25, 1858, and a daughter of 
Simeon F. and Sarah F. Crooker. They 
have four children, three sons and a daugh- 
ter, — Lea R. , Ray E. , Nina M. , and Fred H. 
Since attaining his majority Mr. Swear- 
ingen has been a stalwart supporter of the 
principles of the Republican party and does 
all in his power to promote its growth and 
insure its success. In connection with the 
office before mentioned he has served both 
as City Clerk and Assessor. In his social 
relations, he is connected with the Odd Fel- 
lows Society, being a charter member of 
Fairmont Lodge No. 70, I. O. O. F., in 
which he has passed most of the chairs, and 
a member of the Grand Lodge and Grand 
Encampment of the same fraternity. 



EON. REUBEN MORGAN WARD, 
deceased. — Martin county has had 
no more prominent citizen than the 
gentleman whose name begins 
this review. He was a leader in business, 
social, church and political circles, and his 
name is inseparably connected with the his- 
tory of this community. He was one of the 
founders of Fairmont, which owes much of 
her prosperity, advancement and material 
progress to him, and the entire county is in- 
debted to him for her growth and promotion. 
His friends were as numerous as his acquaint- 
ances, and they were many; and to them 
and his family we dedicate this sketch, 
hoping that we may pay a slight tribute to 
the memory of him so deser\-ing of honor. 

A native of New York, Mr. Ward was 
born in Conewango, Cattaraugus county. 
May 6, 1832; was a son of Luke and Char- 
lotte (Morgan) Ward, both of whom were 



lO 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



natives of the Empire State. The Ward 
family is probably of Irish and English lin- 
eage, and the Morgan family were pioneer 
settlers of Cattaraugus count}-. The father 
of our subject was a farmer by occupation, 
and in his family were si.x children — two 
sons and four daughters — all of whom 
reached years of maturity. 

I-ieuben M. Ward, the oldest son and 
third child, was reared in the county of his 
nativity, upon the old homestead, acquiring 
his education in the common schools and in 
the Randolph Academy. Having attained 
to man's estate he was married, on the 3d of 
March, 1857, to Miss Mary S. Conroe, who 
was born in the town of Bryant, Erie county. 
New York, on the 26th of January, 1837. 
Her paternal grandparents were natives of 
Germany, and her father, Solomon Conroe, 
was a native of the Empire State. Her 
mother, who bore the maiden name of 
Nancy Coding, was a native of Connecticut 
and a daughter of Liscom Coding, who was 
born in the same State, and in an early day 
removed to New York, where he carried on 
agricultural pursuits. Mr. and Mrs. Conroe 
were married in New York and located on a 
farm, although he was a mason by trade and 
was engaged in that business in Fredonia. 
He died in Cattaraugus county, at the age 
of seventy-eight; and his wife, who survived 
him some years, passed away at the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-three. In their family 
were thirteen children, nine of whom grew 
to man and womanhood, Mrs. Ward being 
the twelfth child, and the only one who be- 
came a resident of Minnesota. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ward celebrated their 
marriage in Cattaraugus county and located 
upon a farm which they made their home 
for about eight years; in 1864 they sought a 
home in the West. Severing their business 



connection in New York, they bade adieu to 
friends and emigrated to Minnesota, settling 
in Fairmont, Martin county, which at that 
time was composed of only a few rude shan- 
ties temporarily erected. The land around 
was all wild and unimproved, and the county 
gave little evidence of the growth and ad- 
vancement which would soon transform it 
into one of the rich regions and leading coun- 
ties of the State. Mr. Ward built the first 
dwelling and store in the place, and was the 
first permanent merchant of the frontier 
town, establishing a general merchandise 
business which constantly grew in volume 
and importance until the little establishment, 
suited to the needs of a pioneer region, was 
one of the largest general stores in the North- 
west. He formed a partnership with Mr. 
A. D. Cadwell, which was terminated only 
by the death of Mr. Ward, after which time 
Mrs. Ward served as vice-president of the 
company during the remainder of her life. 
The business methods followed brought suc- 
cess. Systematic and careful management, 
earnest application and unflagging industry, 
supplemented the small capital which Mr. 
Ward brought with him to the West, and at 
length made him one of the substantial citi- 
zens of the county. For many years he was 
recognized as the leading business man of 
Fairmont, — a reputation well deserved. 

With other interests that promoted the 
welfare of Fairmont Mr. Ward was promi- 
nently associated. He erected some twenty 
substantial residences, and did not withhold 
his support from any enterprise calculated 
to benefit the community. He was also well 
known in business circles in Chicago as well 
as in his adopted countj', and made two 
trips to that city each year in the interest of 
his affairs here. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Ward were born four 




cyf^u. cy/. :^'. {Jfa-u/. 



PARI HAUL T. MART/X, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



'5 



children, a son and three daughters, namely: 
Bertha A., the eldest, born March 20, 1859, 
became the wife of J. D. Young, of La 
Crosse, Wisconsin, and they have four chil- 
dren, Catherine, Mary, Frederick C. and 
John ^^^ Emma B. , born Jul}- 7, 1862, is 
the wife of Bert W. Da}-, editor of the 
Hutchinson Leader, of Hutchinson, Minne- 
sota, and they have three children, — Leona, 
Ward and Majel. Beecher H., born De- 
cember 16, 1867, married Lillian Mills, of 
Mankato, and with their daughter, Fannie 
Lenore, they reside in Fairmont, where he 
is engaged in the lumber business. Dena I., 
born October 24, 1874, is the wife of D. G. 
Henneberr}-, who was formerly engaged in 
the machine business in Fairmont and was 
also manager of the Martin County Demo- 
crat and the Martin County Zeitung of Fair- 
mont, but is now living retired. The family 
has taken a very important part in public 
affairs and its representatives hold an envi- 
able position in social circles. 

Afr. Ward gave his earnest support to 
the Republican party and stanchly advocated 
its principles. He served as County Com- 
missioner, and in November, 1882, was 
elected to the State Senate, representing 
the district composed of Jackson and Martin 
counties. He never sought political pre- 
ferment, — in fact did not wish office, and 
with him it was a case of the position seek- 
ing the man, instead of the more common 
way of to-day, when the man seeks the 
office. It is needless to say that he proved 
a wise legislator and careful consideration 
and calm judgment influenced his ballot on 
all questions. 

Mr. Ward affiliated with the Masonic 
fraternity, and in 1873 was elected as Sec- 
retary of Chain Lake Lodge, No. 64, A. F. 
and A. M., in which capacity he served un- 



til the time of his death. In religious belief 
he was a Congregationalist, — a prominent 
member and very active worker in thesociety 
at Fairmont. He united with the church 
in 1 87 1, became Trustee and Deacon, and 
in all possible ways aided in the advancement 
of the cause of Christianity. He made no 
great pretensions, but all recognized his 
fidelity to his faith, and honored him there- 
for. In April, 1891, he went to Chicago on 
a business trip and died in the Palmer House, 
of that city, on the 9th of April. This sad 
event caused the deepest grief throughout 
the community. He was honored as a busi- 
ness man, respected as a legislator and loved 
by family and friends, but no one felt more 
keenly his loss, besides his wife and children, 
than the poor and needy, who gave him 
their deep gratitude for many kind and 
benevolent acts performed in a quiet, un- 
ostentatious manner, that called no atten- 
tion to himself but brought happiness to the 
recipient. His family still resides in Fair- 
mont, and the noble lady, who for so many 
years traveled life's journey by the side of 
her honored husband, was called to her 
reward January 27, 1895. 



HLBERT LUKE WARD needs no 
special introduction to the readers 
of this volume, but the work would 
be incomplete without the record of 
his life. No man in Martin county has been 
more prominently identified with the com- 
mercial and political history of the com- 
munity or has taken a more active part in its 
upbuilding and progress. His support has 
ever been cheerfully given to those enter- 
prrises that tend to public development, and 
with hardly an exception he has been con- 
nected with every interest that has pro- 



i6 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



moted the general welfare. His name is 
a synonym of honorable business deal- 
ing, he is always mentioned as one of 
the invaluable citizens of the State, and on 
the roll of Martin county's most honored 
pioneers his name should be found among 
the foremost. 

Mr. Ward was born in Conewango, Cat- 
taraugus county. New York, January 14, 
1843, and is the fifth in a family of six chil- 
dren, whose parents were Luke and Char- 
lotte (Morgan) Ward. He was reared in his 
native town, attended its common schools 
and was afterward graduated at Randolph 
Academy, now the Chamberlin Institute, 
in the class of i860. His mind and incli- 
nation tended toward the study of jurispru- 
dence, and in the same year he entered the 
law office of Hon. C. B. Green, under whom 
he pursued his studies for two years. 

Mr. Ward was a close student of the 
signs of the times and had watched with in- 
terest the attitude of the South prior to and 
during the early progress of the war of the 
Rebellion. In 1S62 he enlisted in the Union 
service, becoming a member of Company B, 
and was afterward transferred to Company 
I, of the One Hundred and Twelfth New 
York Volunteer Infantry, in which he faith- 
fully served until the spring of 1863, when 
on account of physical disability he was 
honorably discharged. 

Mr. Ward then returned to his home in 
Cattaraugus county, New York, and entered 
the law office of Judge Henderson, of Ran- 
dolph, where he pursued his studies for one 
year, being admitted to the bar in the win- 
ter of 1863-4. In 1864 he emigrated to 
Minnesota and homesteaded land on section 
9, Fairmont township, now within the city 
limits, on which he has since continued to 
reside. About six months after his arrival 



he embarked in general merchandising in 
Fairmont, becoming the pioneer merchant 
of this now thriving city. The following 
year his brother Reuben, of whom mention 
is made elsewhere in this work, came to 
Fairmont, and was admitted into partner- 
ship in the mercantile business under the 
firm name of A. L. & R. M. Ward. This 
connection continued for three years, when 
Mr. Ward of this notice sold his interest to 
A. D. Cadwell, the firm becoming Ward & 
Cadwell, and the business is still carried on 
under the name of Ward & Cadwell Com- 
pany. 

On withdrawing from the mercantile 
business Mr. Ward devoted his active ener- 
gies to agricultural pursuits, to the practice 
of law and to the real-estate business. In 
1874 he sold out his interest in the law busi- 
ness to his partner, H. M. Blaisdell, and 
entered the banking business, establishing 
the Martin County Bank, and he was elected 
its president, which position he has filled con- 
tinuously since in a most acceptable manner. 
This is one of the conservative and solid 
financial institutions of the county, and its 
success is due entirely to the able manage- 
ment and careful methods of him who has so 
long been at its head. 

In connection with Mr. Ward's banking 
business he is the largest landholder in Martin 
county, his possessions aggregating from six 
to seven thousand acres. The farm on which 
he lives comprises 3,000 acres, 800 acres of 
which lies within the corporation limits of 
Fairmont, and 1,200 acres of the farm is 
operated under his personal supervision. He 
has it well stocked with a large number of 
horses, 300 head of cattle, and on the other 
farms he also has about 300 cattle. He was 
one of the founders of the firm of J. V. Kline 
& Company, dealers in live stock, and he 



FARIBAULT. MART/X, U'ATONWAJV AA'£> JACKSON. 



17 



raises only good grades of animals. Mr. 
Ward is one of the men who have done 
much to make farming the honored calling 
it is to-day, and to do away with the old 
mistaken idea that the farmers are not the 
equals of the men of other pursuits and pro- 
fessions in intelligence and business ability. 
In 1885 he established what is known as the 
Ward Machine Company, and in 1886 
opened branch offices in Welcome and Sher- 
burne, Martin county, of which he was sole 
proprietor until 1892, when the business 
was incorporated. The capital and surplus 
of the Qompany amounts to $40,000, and he 
owns all of the stock, save shares to the 
value of $500. He is the heaviest stock- 
holder in the Fairmont Elevator Company, 
is president of the Afartin County Democrat 
Publishing Company, which publishes the 
Martin County Democrat and the Martin 
County Zeitung, and owns all of its stock 
save $100. He is the president of the Jack- 
son County State Bank of Lakefield, Minne- 
sota, capitalized at $25,000, is the president 
and principal stockholder of the Sherburne 
State Bank of Sherburne, Minnesota, and a 
member of the law firm of Ward, Dunn & 
Ward. The last named company has a 
large share of the legal practice of this sec- 
tion of the State, its members being men 
whose standing in the profession is among 
the foremost. Our subject is a man of mul- 
titudinous and varied interests but to the 
matter in hand he always gives his close and 
undivided attention, and this characteristic 
has been an important factor in his excellent 
success. 

In 1873 Mr. Ward was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Charlotte Jennings, a native 
of New York and a most estimable lady 
whose culture, refinement and natural graces 
of character have made her a social favorite 



as well as the light of her husband's home. 
Their union has been blessed with four 
children, as follows: May is now the wife 
of U. J. Piffner, of Fairmont; De Forest, a 
graduate of the Fairmont High School and 
of the law department of the University of 
Minnesota, is now a member of the law firm 
of Ward, Dunn & Ward; Charlotte and 
Lydia, who complete the family, are still 
with their parents. The Ward household 
is noted for its hospitality, and the members 
of the family hold a high position in social 
circles where true worth and intelligence, 
and not wealth alone, are received as the 
passports into good society. 

In his political views Mr. Ward has long 
been a Democrat, and though his life has 
been devoted to so many business interests 
he has yet found time to faithfully discharge 
his duties of citizenship and to serve his fel- 
low townsmen in a number of offices. He 
was County Attorney of Martin county for 
six years, was County Auditor and Register 
of Deeds, Superintendent of Schools and 
Postmaster of Fairmont under Presidents 
Lincoln, Grant and Cleveland, and was one 
of the Commissioners representing Minne- 
sota at the World's Fair held in Chicago in 
1893. 

Above we have given an outline of the 
career of Mr. Ward, but the details and 
minor incidents which go to make up much 
of the real life of an individual have been but 
slightly touched upon. To the many friends 
who know him well, mention of the subject 
would seem almost superfluous, but as this 
volume will be read and treasured in future 
generations, we wish to speak of his pleas- 
ant, genial manner, his strict integrity and 
his almost blameless life. It is not the men 
that occupy seats in the council chambers of 
the nation that have made this great Repub- 



i8 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



lie. They have borne their part, and an 
important part, but their labors would have 
been almost worthless had it not been for 
the sustaining and supporting influences of 
the true and loyal citizens at home, who give 
their time and attention to business and 
to the building up of the respective com- 
munities in which they reside. Thus it is 
that Mr. Ward has played his part in the 
drama of events that go to make up the na- 
tion's history. In the affairs of life he has 
been conservative, but progressive. His 
laudable ambition has been tempered by 
sagacity and coolness, his enterprise by a 
steadying perseverance; and an excellent 
legal knowledge has guided him in all things. 
He is free from ostentation and dislikes 
great display, but it is certainly just to say 
in his praise that no man has done more for 
Martin county and its interests than Albert 
Luke \\'ard. 



? 



D. STANTON was for many years a 
leading representative of the agricul- 
tural interests of Faribault county, 
and is now living a retired life in 
Blue Earth City, enjoying the rest which he 
has so truly earned and richly deserves. It 
is eminently consistent that he should find 
representation in this volume, and with 
pleasure we present to our readers this rec- 
ord of his life, recognizing the fact that it 
will prove of interest to many. 

A native of Montgomerj' count}', New 
York, where he was born on the 1 7th of 
August, 181 5, Mr. Stanton is descended 
from stanch old Revolutionary stock, his 
ancestors having been heroes in the war for 
independence. The Stanton family was 
founded in .\mcrica in i'')32 and became 
quite prominent in the historj- of New En- 



gland. The grandfather of our subject, 
Nathan Stanton, Sr. , was born in Connecti- 
cut, December 10, 1749, and served as Or- 
derly Sergeant of a company of minute-men 
during the Revolution, and was also at 
White Plains, New York, with General 
Washington. When the traitor, Benedict 
Arnold, after the burning of the town of 
New London, Connecticut, led his forces 
across the Thames river, and brought about 
the infamous massacre at Fort Griswold, 
Nathan Stanton was Orderly of a company 
of 300 minute-men, and he escapedby mere 
accident, three members of the family being 
victims of said massacre, namely: Captain 
Amos, Phineas and Daniel. His son, Nathan 
Stanton, Jr., was born on the 24th of Jul\-, 
1779, in Stonington, New London county, 
Connecticut, where he wedded Mary Deni- 
son, who also was a native of Stonington, 
and the daughter of Peleg Denison, who 
came of an old New England family that 
was founded in the New World in 1632. 
Their marriage was celebrated June 11, 
1804, and they became the parents of three 
children, — two sons and a daughter, all of 
whom reached maturity, though our subject 
is now the only survivor. Benjamin F. , 
who was honored in the granting to him, by 
Governor James D. Doty, of a commission 
as Captain of the Wisconsin militia, died in 
April, 1S92, at the age of eighty years; 
and Mary, wife of John Blood, of Amster- 
dam, New York, died at the old homestead 
in the same room where her birth occurred 
seventy-four years previous. The parents 
were married in their native State. He 
served as Captain of a militia company, and 
in his political views was an old- line \N'hig. 
Both he and his wife adhered to the faith of 
the Presbyterian ("hurrh and lived honor- 
able, upright lives, leaving to their family an 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



•9 



untarnished name. The father died April 
4, 1838, at the age of fifty-nine, and the 
mother was called to eternal rest in Decem- 
ber, 1 846, when sixty-four years of age. 

In taking up the life record of Mr. Stan- 
ton we present to our readers the biography 
of one who is both widely and favorably 
known throughout Faribault county. His 
youth was passed on his father's farm, and 
his education was acquired in the common 
schools. Within the year following his 
father's death the old homestead was sold, 
and in 1840 Mr. Stanton, then a young man 
of twenty-five years, emigrated to the West. 
He believed that on the broad prairies of 
the Mississippi valley he would have better 
opportunities than in the older and more 
thickly settled States of the East, and .ac- 
cordingly took up his residence in the State 
of Wisconsin. He traveled by the way of 
the Erie canal to Buffalo, where he boarded 
the vess3l Great Western, bound for Mil- 
waukee. Going to White Water he secured 
near there a tract of 160 acres of Govern- 
ment land, but in 1846 left that farm and 
removed to Columbia county, where, as- 
sociated with his brother, he secured and 
operated 800 acres of land. There he car- 
ried on agricultural pursuits for twenty 
years, and was known as one of the leading 
and influential citizens of the community, 
being honored with a number of local offices 
of trust. 

In the year 1867 Mr. Stanton came to 
Faribault county, Minnesota, where he pur- 
chased large tracts of land, including a quar- 
ter-section which he bought of Archie Mor- 
ris and which he made his home during the 
time that he followed farming here. He 
placed his land under a high state of culti- 
vation, transforming the wild prairie into 
rich and fertile fields, and making upon the 



homestead valuable and substantial im- 
provements, which stood as monuments to 
the thrift and enterprise of the owner. At 
length he decided to lay aside business cares, 
and removed to Blue Earth City, where he 
has since made his home. He yet owns 240 
acres of arable land, and the fine farm yields 
to him a good income. 

In the year 1839 Mr. Stanton was united 
in marriage with Miss Elizabeth De Graf, a 
native of Amsterdam, Montgomery county, 
New York, and a daughter of John De Graf, 
who was of Holland descent. They became 
the parents of seven children: Daniel, a 
resident of Faribault county; Samuel, who 
is living in Pipestone county, Minnesota; 
Caroline, wife of B. S. Mills, of \\'inona, 
Minnesota; Charlotte, wife of C. C. Good- 
now, of Pipestone county; Harriet, wife of 
John McCoy, of Faribault county; Mary, 
who became the wife of James Craig, and 
died January 10, 1879; and Emma, a 
teacher in the public schools. The five 
daughters were all teachers of recognized 
ability in this and surrounding counties. 
Two sons went forth in the defence of the 
Union at the time of the late war, Daniel 
serving as a member of the Forty-second 
Wisconsin Regiment, and Samuel as a mem- 
ber of the Thirty-sixth Regiment. The lat- 
ter enlisted when onlj- sixteen years of age 
and served until the close of the war. He 
was wounded at the battle of Cold Harbor 
by a ball which struck him in the right foot, 
but remained at the front until the old flag 
waved over a conquered South. 

Mr. Stanton lost his first wife in 1863, 
and in Lowell, Dodge county, Wisconsin, 
on the 2 2d of September of the same year, he 
was joined in wedlock with Jane M. Clifford, 
a native of Berkshire, Tioga county. New 
York, and a daughter of James and Harriet 



20 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



(Walter) Clifford, who removed from Massa- 
chusetts to New York and thence to Wiscon- 
sin. The mother died at the age of thirty- 
four years, after which the father was again 
married. 

In early life Mr. Stanton was a supporter 
of the Whig party, but when the Republi- 
can party sprung into existence he joined its 
ranks and supported it by his ballot until 
1892, when he voted the Populist ticket. 
Both he and his wife hold membership with 
the Presbyterian Church and contribute 
liberally to its support. In his business 
dealings his well directed efforts and indus- 
try won him the prosperity which now en- 
ables him to lay aside business cares and 
live retired, enjoying the fruits of his former 
toil. His life has been a long and useful 
one, and he has gained the high regard of 
many friends, with whom we join in wish- 
ing that many years may yet elapse ere he 
shall be called to his fathers. 



m. 



•ashington perry hill.— 

Martin county has no more effi- 
cient or trustworthy official than 
this gentleman, who since 1888 
has served as Sheriff. His frequent re- 
election is a high testimonial to his fidelity, 
the people manifesting by their votes their 
confidence in him, and all speak of his man- 
agement of the affairs of the office in terms 
of highest praise. His many friends will 
receive with interest this record of his life, 
we feel assured, and therefore gladly give it 
a place in this volume. 

Mr. Hill was born in Mercer county, 
Pennsylvania, on the 8th of March, 1849, 
and is of Scotch and Irish lineage. His pa- 
ternal grandfather, William Hill, was a na- 
tive of the North of Ireland, and when a 



young man crossed the Atlantic to America, 
taking up his residence in the Keystone State. 
The maternal grandfather, John Cum- 
mings, was born in Scotland, and also came 
to the New \\'orld in his younger years. In 
Pennsylvania was born James Hill, the father 
of W. P. , and in the usual manner of farmer 
lads of that day and section, he was reared 
and educated, following agricultural pursuits 
throughout his entire life. He married 
Sarah Cummings, who was born and spent 
her maidenhood days in Pennsylvania, and 
in the State of their nativity they resided 
until 1865, which year witnessed their ar- 
rival in Martin county, Minnesota. They 
first located in Fairmont, but afterward went 
to Burt county, Nebraska, where the mother 
departed this life, at the age of sixtj'-six 
years. The father subsequently returned to 
Fairmont and spent his last days in this 
place, passing awaj' at the ripe old age of 
sevent\-four. To Mr. and Mrs. Hill were 
born a family of nine children, of whom four 
are yet living, — Summerville, who makes 
his home in Fairmont; W. P., of this sketch; 
Hannah M., wife of John Driscoll, of Craig, 
Nebraska; Lucinda J., wife of Nort Bard- 
well, a resident of Tekamah, Nebraska. 

Mr. Hill, of this sketch, the third in or- 
der of birth in the family, wai^ reared in the 
Keystone State and the public schools af- 
forded him his educational privileges. He 
remained at home with his parents until af- 
ter the breaking out of the late war, when, 
prompted by patriotic impulses, he responded 
to the country's call for troops and was as- 
signed to Company D, Fifty-seventh Penn- 
sylvania \'olunteer Infantry. He was only 
fifteen years of age at the time of his enlist- 
ment, but the Union cause had no more true 
or loyal defender than the boy who left home 
and offered his services, and if need be his 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



21 



life, for the preservation of the country. He 
served until the close of the war and re- 
ceived an honorable discharge, July 6, 1865, 
in Washington, District of Columbia. 

In 1864, while in the service, Mr. Hill 
secured a claim to a quarter section of land 
in Rolling Green township, a part of which 
he broke in 1866, locating on it the follow- 
ing year. Later he sold out and bought a 
farm in Rutland township. He engaged in 
farming until 1874, when he left the farm 
and went to the eastern part of the State, 
and worked at his trade, of painter, for three - 
years, and returned to this count}', and has 
since been a resident of Fairmont. In 1876 
he sold his farm to the county and it is now 
used as the county farm. 

Mr. Hill has been twice married. In 
1878 he was joined in wedlock with Lina 
Older, a native of New York, and to them 
was born one child, now deceased. The 
mother passed away in 1879, and for his 
second wife our subject chose Miss Mattie 
Swanson, a native of Rice county, Minne- 
sota, by whom he has two sons, Edward H. 
and Clarence R. 

Since attaining his majority, Mr. Hill 
has been a supporter of the Republican 
party. Even before he had attained the 
age when the right of franchise is granted 
man, he cast his vote for Abraham Lincoln, 
being at that time in the army, all soldiers 
being allowed to vote. Of Republican prin- 
ciples, he is a warm and earnest advocate 
and does all that he consistently can to pro- 
mote the interests and insure the success of 
his party. In the year 1888 he was elected 
to the office of County Sheriff, and has 
served in that position continuously since. 
He was again elected in 1894, so that he 
will be the incumbent up to 1897. He 
takes quite an active interest in civic socie- 



ties, and is a member in good standing of 
several organizations. He belongs to Chain 
Lake Lodge, No. 64, A. F. & A. M., Fair- 
mont Chapter, No. 50, R. A. M. , and to 
Appollo Commandery, No. 12, of Albert 
Lea, Minnesota. He also holds a member- 
ship in the Fairmont Lodge, A. O. U. W., 
and is a comrade in Phil. Kearny Post, G. 
A. R., in which he has passed all the 
chairs. 



HNDREW OATHOUD, Huntley, 
Minnesota, one of the pioneer 
farmers of Verona township, Fari- 
bault county, landing here in the 
year 1863, has been identified with this 
place ever since; and of his life we make 
biographical mention as follows: 

Andrew Oathoud was born in New York 
State July 11, 1826, son of Alexander and 
Belinda (Sykes) Oathoud, both natives of 
the Empire State and representatives of 
families who settled there at an early period 
in its history. The Oathouds trace their 
ancestry back to Holland. Some members 
of the family were in the Revolutionary war, 
and the father of our subject was a soldier 
in the war of 1812. In 1852 Ale.xander 
Oathoud and his family came west to Co- 
lumbia county, Wisconsin, and settled eigh- 
teen miles south of Portage, on the old stage 
road between Portage and Madison. They 
continued to reside there until 1863, when 
they came further west and settled in Vero- 
na township, Faribault county, Minnesota. 
Here the father took claim to a tract of 
land, and here he passed the closing years 
of his life and died at the advanced age of 
eighty-nine years. His wife lived to a still 
greater age, she being ninety-two at the 
time of her death, which occurred in Man- 



22 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF 7'HE COUNTIES OF 



kato, Minnesota. This worthy couple were 
the parents of ten children, \\z. : Augustus, 
Clarissa, Charlotte, Andrew, Alexander, 
Caroline, Amos, Addison, Almiram and 
George. The father was engaged in farm- 
ing nearly all his life, and for some time also 
carried on merchandising. In politics, he 
was first a Whig and afterward a Republi- 
can. He and his wife belonged to the Bap- 
tist Church in early life, but later united 
with the Protestant Methodists. 

The subject of our sketch, Andrew Oat- 
houd, was reared on a farm in New York and 
received his education in that State. He 
was with the rest of the family when they 
located in Columbia county, Wisconsin, in 
1852, and came with them in 1863 to his 
present location. He owns eighty acres of 
land on section 32, Verona township; has a 
nice frame residence, good barn, four-acre 
grove, orchard, and various other improve- 
ments; and here he is successfulh' carrying 
on farming operations. 

Mr. Oathoud has been twice married. 
When he wls twenty-three he wedded, in 
New York, Miss Rebecca Coats, daughter of 
Martin and Cyntha Coats. Her parents 
died in New York. Mrs. Rebecca Oathoud 
was a most estimable woman fn every re- 
spect, — a devoted wife and loving mother. 
She passed away in 1877, leaving a family 
of seven children, namely: Adelbert, De- 
loris, Martin, Sarah, Frank, Adason, and 
George. February 14, 1S82, Mr. Oathoud 
married Miss Mary Nelson, a native of 
Chautauqua count}'. New York, and a 
daughter of George and Sarah (Wakefield) 
Nelson. Mrs. Nelson was a cousin of e.\- 
Governor Wakefield of Blue Earth City, 
Minnesota. Mr. Nelson died in Faribault 
county, at the age of seventy-six years. Mrs. 
Oathoud is the youngest of a family of thir- 



teen children, the others being as follows: 
Jane, Oirilla, George, Victoria, Naomi, 
John, Albert, Alexander, Sarah, James, 
Harvey and Georgiann. Two of her brothers, 
Alexander and Albert, were in the Union 
army during the late war. By his second 
marriage Mr. Oathoud has two children, 
Andrew Morton and Veron Augustus. 

Although nearing the close of his three- 
score years and ten, Mr. Oathoud shows that 
Time has dealt gently with him, and appears 
much 3'ounger than he is. He is a Deacon 
of the Verona Freewill Baptist Church, and 
votes with the Republican party. He has 
served as Township Supervisor and for 
twelve years has been a member of the School 
Board. 



@EORGE BARTLEY SWEAR- 
INGEN, a farmer of section 4, 
Rolling Green township, Martin 
county, is a son of I. G. and Lorain 
(Allen) Swearingen, of Fairmont, this 
count}'. The mother taught the first school 
in Martin county. Mr. and Mrs. Swear- 
ingen were the parents of two children, — 
George B., our subject; and Lena, widow of 
Irving Crissinger. 

George B. Swearingen was born in Silver 
Lake township, Martin county, October 27, 
1864. He remained on his father's farm 
until 1887, when he found employment in 
the office of the Fairmont News. In 1890 
he located on the farm he now owns, which 
consists of I I I acres, all under a fine state of 
cultivation. In his political relations, Mr. 
Swearingen affihates with the Republican 
party, and has served as Treasurer of Dis- 
trict No. 66. Socially, he is a member of 
the A. O. U. W. 

July 24, 1888, our subject was united in 




Ly/(). J2>^l^. Cy//M.i/ky//r/. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



marriage with Miss Lottie M. Canright, 
born in Martin county Jul}' 24, iS6<S, a 
daughter of J. E. Canright, of Fairmont. 
She received her education in this county, 
and taught school six terms before her mar- 
riage. Mr. and Mrs. Swearingen have three 
children, — Warren Alfred, Helen Irene, and 
an infant daughter. They are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church of Fair- 
mont, and Mr. Swearingen is an active 
worker in the Sunday-school. 



EON. MOSES KIMBALL ARM- 
STRONG.— It affords us great 
pleasure to present to our readers 
the life record of this gentleman, 
knowing how gladly it will be received and 
how eagerly perused; yet we enter upon our 
task with reluctance caused by the fear 
that we may not do justice to one so deserv- 
ing of honorable mention. He is a man not 
of St. James, or even of Minnesota, but a 
man of the nation, and largely through his 
efforts the great Northwest, with its vast re- 
sources and advantages, has been opened 
up to civilization. With a devotion and 
self-sacrifice that is seldom equaled, he has 
given the greater part of his time and ener- 
gies to a work that has made this region of 
our county a habitable place, and his labors 
can never be requited; but we can hold him 
in grateful remembrance for what he has 
done and tell to our children the story of his 
true heroism that they may honor him even 
though " the place that has known him shall 
know him no more." 

Moses K. Armstrong was born in Milan, 
Erie county, Ohio, September 19, 1832, and 
comes of an old New England family of 
Scotch-American origin. The grandfather, 

Augustus Armstrong, was born in Connecti- 
2 



cut and spent his entire life in that State, 
engaging on a whaling vessel. He lost his 
life by being dragged overboard into the sea 
while harpooning a whale. The father of 
Moses K. also bore the name of Augustus, 
and he, too, was a native of the Nutmeg 
State; was reared in Stonington, was a 
farmer by occupation, and in his early life 
served as Captain of the militia in northern 
Ohio. During his pioneer days he settled 
in Erie county, Ohio, and improved one of 
the first farms within its borders. He mar- 
ried Phoebe Higbee, who was born and 
reared in the same locality as her husband, 
and like him was of Scotch lineage. They 
became the parents of five sons and three 
daughters, and with the exception of one, 
who died in infancy, all reached j'ears of 
maturity. The father died at the age of 
seventy years, and the mother was called to 
the home beyond in the sixty-seventh year 
of her age. Thomsa H. Armstrong, one of 
the sons, has been Lieutenant-Governor of 
Minnesota, and another son, Augustus, was 
United States Marshal of the State. 

M. K. Armstrong was educated in Huron 
Institute and in the Western Reserve Col- 
lege of Ohio, and held high rank as a math- 
ematician. When only eighteen years of 
age, he moved westward and engaged in the 
land surveys of northern Iowa. From that 
time up to the present he has been identified 
with the wonderful development of the 
Northwest, and his life on the frontier has 
been such as try men's souls. He neces- 
sarily became a man of wide influence, but, 
instead of using his power for self-aggrand- 
izement or personal advancement, he has 
practically given his life for others, in after 
years, with an unselfishness deserving of all 
commendation. 

After two years spent in Iowa he came to 



28 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Minnesota, then a Territory, wild and un- 
improved, and surveyed much of the land in 
the southern aud western part of the State. 
In 1856 he was elected Surveyor of Mower 
county, and while traveling with chain and 
compass through pioneer localities he gath- 
ered material and wrote a history of the 
community. He was one of the delegates 
to the first Democratic State convention 
held in Minnesota, which nominated Gen- 
eral Sibley as Minnesota's first State Gov- 
ernor. The first Surveyor-General ap- 
pointed him as one of his deputies and as- 
signed to him the survey of Government 
land in southwestern Minnesota, and in 1858 
he surveyed into sections the land of the 
county in which he now makes his home — 
Watonwan. His friend, D. Bearup, a New 
York investor, in Watonwan county securi- 
ties, writing to him concerning this county, 
said: " But what is a still greater source of 
gratification is that as a pioneer in Waton- 
wan county you have watched it and sus- 
tained it in its tottering infancy and have 
done much to put it safely and firmly upon 
its feet. This is an achievement that few 
men could accomplish, and still fewer would 
so far divest themselves of selfishness as to 
accomplish it if they could. Watonwan 
county is making its material for history. In 
that history you cannot be a mere incident, 
but it will have to be very largely based on 
you to be history at all; and it is a great 
pleasure to us to believe that the patriotism, 
generosity and faith which you have devoted 
to the struggling settlers will be gratefully 
remembered long after you have left the 
scene. " 

When Dakota was made a Territory 
separate from Minnesota, Mr. Armstrong 
made his way into that unorganized region 
and surveyed some of the first claims and 



town sites for the new settlers on the land 
which the Yankton Indians had just ceded 
to the United States in Southern Dakota. 
He was a member of the first Territorial 
Legislature of Dakota on its organization in 
1 86 1, was re-elected for a second term and 
became Speaker of the House when Dakota 
embraced, besides the territory included in 
North and South Dakota, also the Terri- 
tories of Wyoming, Montana and Idaho. 
For many years following he was prominent 
in public life, but whether in office or out 
he was always laboring for the develop- 
ment and advancement of the Northwest. 
The Northern Pacific Railroad, which has 
become the national highway of this region, 
was established by a company which num- 
bered him among the incorporators by act 
of Congress in 1862. 

During the war Mr. Armstrong was a sup- 
porter of the Democracy and edited the 
Dakota Union in the interest of that party. 
In 1864 he was appointed Clerk of the Su- 
preme Court of Dakota, and the following 
year was elected Treasurer of the Territory. 
He was sent as a Senator to the Legislature, 
where he served as presiding officer in 1867, 
and in 1870 he was elected by the Demo- 
crats of the Territory as a delegate to Con- 
gress. He gave his first term's salary for 
the purchase of a printing-press with which 
was founded the Dakota Herald, the first 
prominent Democratic newspaper in the 
Territory, ami to-day the oldest party organ 
in the State! In 1872 he was again elected 
to Congress, and in 1 874 was nominated for 
a third term but declined to become a can- 
didate. No man has done more effective 
service for the Northwest in the halls of 
Congress, and through his labors and devo- 
tion he forwarded the interests of this sec- 
tion in a way that has brought material 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, IVATONWAA^ AND yACKSON. 



ip 



prosperity and rapid progress to a region 
that is now becoming a power in the coun- 
try. While a member of the Forty-third 
Congress he secured an appropriation of 
$33,000 to reimburse the Dakota vohinteers 
in the Indian war of 1862. The following 
extract from his speech before the house on 
that bill is taken from the Congressional 
Record, and will be read with interest: 

" If there is any class of American citi- 
zens, Mr. Speaker, who are entitled to the 
same regard from Congress that is bestowed 
upon the soldiers who fought the battles of 
our country, it is the hardy pioneers of the 
West, who ventured into the wilds defying 
danger, subduing the plains, establishing vil- 
lages and planting upon the confines of the 
public domain the beacon lights of pro- 
gress and civilization. Rude cabin homes, 
uncultured lands, bridgeless streams, uncer- 
tain mails, isolated schools, distant markets 
and Indian dangers are few of the many 
troubles encountered by the early pioneers of 
our great West. And what grand results 
have they accomplished since the early set- 
tlement of Dakota! Sir, they have main- 
tained the outposts of frontier civilization 
while harassed by Indians in their fields, at 
their homes and on the highways; they have, 
by steady and increasing industry overcome 
their disasters, and are fast becoming a pro- 
ducing and prosperous people. They have 
subdued the plains, opened farms and pub- 
lic thoroughfares, established schools and 
churches, founded most beautiful villages 
and organized flourishing counties. They 
have built railroads and telegraph lines and 
constructed bridges and steam ferries; they 
have established depots of trade and induced 
steamboats of traffic to the navigable rivers 
of the great Territory. In fact they have 
converted the wild plains into blossoming 



grain fields and happy homes. ^^'hat peo- 
ple, I ask. Sir, has done more or deserved 
better from the hands of Congress.'" 

One of the most important acts in the 
life of Mr. Armstrong is his negotiation with 
the Indians in securing the lands belonging 
to the Sioux tribe. He was fitted for this 
work by his study of the habits, customs and 
beliefs of the red men, and knew how to 
deal advantageously with them. He lived 
through the attacks which were made on the 
settlers by the treacherous savage, and his 
able pen has given to the world a graphic 
account of those trying times. He acted as 
recording secretary for the Indian Peace 
Commission in 1867 and visited every tribe 
of Sioux Indians on the Missouri river as far 
north as the Yellowstone country. He was 
the first man to frame a bill and introduce it 
in Congress, in 1 87 1 , whereby the Secretary 
of the Interior should have the authority to 
treat with the Sioux Indians and purchase 
from them their rights to the Black Hills 
country. He knew, no one better, of the 
vast resources, the mineral wealth, the cli- 
matic advantages, the fine agricultural dis- 
tricts of the region over which the Indians 
had control, and through his instrumentality 
this valuable and desirable region was finally 
secured to civilization. 

Up to 1 870 Mr. Armstrong had each year 
been engaged in tlie United States land sur- 
veys, and had established most of the merid- 
ian and standard lines in southern Dakota 
and on the Red River of the North. While 
thus engaged he discovered an error in the 
old international boundary post near Pem- 
bina, and by its correction added several 
thousand acres of land to the American do- 
main, including the Hudson's Bay Trading 
Post. He was afterward selected to exe- 
cute for the Government the difficult re-sur- 



3° 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



vey of the State boundary of Nebraska near 
Sioux City, Iowa, where the Missouri river 
had cut a large island into the State from 
the Dakota border. In 1875 he took charge 
of the survey of the Cuthead Indian reserva- 
tion on the south shore of Devil's lake. 

A paper published in Fort Pierre, the 
capital of South Dakota, speaks of the 
recent changing, by the Legislature, of the 
name of Pyatt county to Armstrong county, 
in honor of Moses K. Armstrong, and then 
gives an extended notice concerning his his- 
tory of Dakota, which we insert entire: 
" But the work which gives Mr. Armstrong 
the strongest claim to the esteem and grati- 
tude of Dakotans is his history of Dakota, 
published in 1866. One may suppose that 
Dakota could not have had much history up 
to that date, but a perusal of Armstrong's 
book will show that the history of Dakota 
reaches back to the earlier years of the pres- 
ent century, when Napoleon sold to the Gov- 
ernment of the United States the Territory 
of Louisiana, in which the Dakotas were in- 
cluded. Lewis and Clarke's expedition in 
1804 was the beginning of Dakota's history, 
and starting from that exploration Mr. Arm- 
strong gleans a valuable harvest of historical 
material. Bonneville's adventures in 1832 
also contribute much that is interesting and 
profitable, particularly concerning the Bad 
Lands region, all of which Dakota's first 
historian uses to the best advantage. The 
book recites the various preliminary as well 
as the later and successful steps taken to se- 
cure a cession of the lands to the United 
States Government preparatory to organiz- 
ing the Territory, the earliest settlements 
and the names of the pioneers. It also con- 
tinues the record up to the time when the 
political government of the Territory is 
firmly established, officers appointed and the 



law-making bodies installed. All the diffi- 
cult historical work of the Territory has been 
thoroughly performed by the author, and 
subsequent historians have but to build upon 
this broad and safe foundation." 

Mr. Armstrong, while in Congress, also 
received from the Government a charter for 
the first national bank established in the 
Territory once embraced within Dakota's 
boundaries and was afterward made its 
president, the bank being located at Yank- 
ton. In 1876 he was appointed by the 
Governor of Dakota to prepare and deliver 
at Philadelphia the Centennial address on 
the resources of the Territory, which after- 
ward appeared in pamphlet form, having 
been published by the Lippincott Publishing 
Company. In 1877 he began to concen- 
trate his business affairs which before had 
been scattered over a wide range, and the 
following year, being appointed railroad 
land agent, he removed to St. James, where 
he established what is known as the Old 
Bank, which has a capital stock of $150,- 
000, and of which he is sole proprietor 
and manager. He is now practically retired 
from public life and is devoting himself to 
private business interests. Since his arri- 
val in Watonwan county, however, he has 
served for two years as County Treasurer — 
1 88 1-2, and is now serving his eleventh 
term as City Treasurer. He is one of the 
largest property owners in Watonwan county, 
and donated the ground for many of the 
public buildings which adorn St. James. 
He is an honored life member of the State 
Historical Society, and one of Minnesota's 
charming lakes bears the name of Lake Arm- 
strong. The domestic relations of Mr. 
Armstrong have been most pleasant. He 
was happily married in 1872 to a most esti- 
mable lady, Martha Bordeno, who was 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



born in Detroit, Michigan, in 1833, and is a 
daughter of Antoine and Victoria Bordeno, 
who were of French descent. Friends and 
neighbors hold them in the highest regard 
(or their many acts of kind generosity, and 
the circle of their friends is limited only by 
the circle of their acquaintance. 

With almost every line of enterprise and 
industry that tends to development and pro- 
gress, Mr. Armstrong has been prominently 
identified. He was instrumental in the 
establishment of the early railroad system 
of the Northwest; the aid of Congress in 
securing the wealth and privileges to a race 
that could utilize them was advanced by 
him; and in procuring wise legislation he has 
played a conspicuous part, and the North- 
west is truly his debtor. A life well spent, 
a talent well used, deserves the reward that 
ever comes to the just and honorable. We 
cannot better close this review than with 
words spoken of him by one who has known 
him long and intimately, John F. Meagher, 
who is president of the National Citizens' 
Bank of Mankato, Minnesota. He says, "I 
glory in the man, who, after a long business 
career, surrounded by continuous vicissi- 
tudes and those of the kind that try men's 
souls, when such a man can stand erect and 
look all men in the face and say honestly 
before God, I have done you no wrong. 
What more could any man do to deserve 
the crown.' Such I believe your life to be. 
'Well done, thou good and faithful ser- 
vant !'" 



aOLONEL J. W. POLLEYS, of 
Wells, is one of the well-known 
and prominent men of the place. 
He was born near Halifax, Nova 
Scotia, March 11, 1826, a son of Abner 



Polleys, a native of the same place, whose 
father also was named Abner. Both the 
father and grandfather mentioned were 
hotel-men most of their lives. They came of 
a long line of American ancestors, some of 
whom are mentioned in Longfellow's poems. 
Mr. Polleys' mother, Jane, was the daugh- 
ter of William Dickey, of an old, prominent 
family of Scotch ancestry. In 1852 the 
parents of our subject moved to Dodge 
county, Wisconsin, where they died, on the 
same day, after a short illness, the father 
past sixty years of age, and the mother 
about fifty-one years old. They had seven 
sons and seven daughters, namely: John, 
David, William, J. W. (subject of this 
sketch), Abner, Ephraim, Thomas (a soldier 
and a member of the Sixth Wisconsin In- 
fantry in the last war, in which he was 
killed, in front of Petersburg), Lucy, 
Johanna, Jemima, Martha, Emma (a 
teacher), Jane, and a babe, deceased. The 
parents were reared as Scotch Presbyterians. 
Colonel Polleys was brought up in Nova 
Scotia, receiving a good education, which 
has since been greatly enhanced by travel 
and experience. In 1847 he settled on the 
St. Croix river, just within the United States, 
where he followed lumbering. In 1850 he 
removed to Portage, Wisconsin, and later 
to Appleton, same State, on Fox river. May 
10, 1851, he located on a claim six miles 
northeast of La Crosse, being a pioneer 
there. In 1852 he was elected Sheriff of 
La Crosse county, which then comprised 
what is now embraced within six counties, 
those besides the present La Crosse being 
Monroe, Trempealeau, Jackson, Clark and 
Buffalo. In the office of Sheriff he served 
in all about eleven years. His first prisoner 
he took to State prison all the way by team. 
Altogether he took J02 men to that institu- 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



tion. Jeremiah Rusk was Sheriff of an ad- 
joining county, and he and man}" other 
prominent citizens were friends of Mr. 
Polleys in those days. 

During the last war Colonel Polleys 
raised Company D of the Fourteenth Wis- 
consin Infantry, of which he was elected 
Captain and subsequentl}-, for gallant con- 
duct, was promoted to the rank of Major, 
and finally to that of Lieutenant Colonel of 
the regiment, which body of energetic 
patriots made a brilliant record. Breaking 
camp at Fond du Lac, it was ordered to St. 
Louis, Missouri, and then to the assistance 
of the Army of the Tennessee, under Gen- 
eral Grant, as a part of which army it was 
engaged in the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, 
luka, siege of Vicksburg, and was with Gen- 
eral Rosecrans in his attack on Knoxville. 
After a furlough it was with General A. J. 
Smith's command, to assist General Banks 
on the Red river expedition, was with Gen- 
eral Sturgis at Guntown, and went up White 
river after the retreat of Generals Price and 
Marmaduke, with the intention of capturing 
the latter. Returning, they proceeded by 
way of Nashville to Fort Fisher. On one 
occasion the Colonel received a blister in the 
back of the neck from the concussion of a 
ball, and on another a severe wound in the 
leg from a minie ball. He was also injured 
in the ribs and sciatic nerves, from which he 
never recovered. 

After the close of the war he returned to 
La Crosse, and was again elected Sheriff of 
that county. In his political principles he 
was a Democrat, and as a candidate for 
Sheriff he received 233 majority where 
Washburn, the Republican candidate for 
Governor of the State, received a majority 
of Soo. 

In 1 87 1 he came to Wells, taking charge 



of the Clark-Thompson estate, comprising 
several thousand acres of land, and this he 
has been administering for the last twenty- 
four years, with credit to himself and the 
best interests of all parties concerned. He 
has been President of the village of Wells. 

The Colonel was initiated into the mys- 
tic science of Freemasonry at La Crosse. 
At the age of twenty-two, at Milton, Maine, 
he married Margaret Hough, a native of 
New Brunswick, and they have three chil- 
dren living, namely: Ada, wife of Emery 
Ladue, of Wells; Frances, now Mrs. F. A. 
Watson, who is president of the Wells 
Bank; and Mona, now Mrs. John E. Green, 
of Fargo, North Dakota. Mrs. Polleys, the 
faithful wife and mother, departed this life 
January 28, 1892. She was an amiable 
woman, and her loss is keenl}- felt by all 
who knew her. 

Colonel Polleys is a gentleman of intel- 
ligence and is broad and progressive in his 
views, and very affable and companionable. 
He has seen much of this world, and has 
had the wisdom to discipline himself with 
the experiences and opportunities of life, 
which statement cannot be made concern- 
ing man}' men. 



>Y*OHN A. ARMSTRONG, proprietor 
m of the Winnebago City Bank, is a 
/• ■ native of Washington county. New 
York, born in 1S34, son of Archibald 
and Nancy (Donaldson) Armstrong, both 
natives of the Empire State. 

The branch of the Armstrong famih- of 
which our subject is a member, was founded 
in the United States by Archibald Arm- 
strong, who was born in North Britain, 
Brunswickshirc, Scotland, September, 1757. 
In his native country, December 30, 1786, 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



33 



he married Alison Purves, and emigrated to 
America in 1795. Their family consisted 
of two daughters and three sons, namely: 
Elizabeth, born May 31, 1791; Margaret, 
December 28, 1793; John, January 26, 
1797; Archibald, February 19, 1800; and 
George, July 14, 1802. The mother of this 
family died June 2, 1835, aged seventy-five 
years. Her husband survived her several 
years, and passed away December 26, 1843, 
in the eighty-seventh year of his age. 

Archibald Armstrong, the father of the 
gentleman whose name heads this article, 
was a farmer by occupation. By his union 
with Nancy Donaldson, he had a family of 
nine children, viz. : Jane E. Mack, Archi- 
bald, Mrs. Alice Robertson, Mrs. Christina 
McFarland, Mrs. Martha H. Reid, Mrs. 
Mary Veridge, Mrs. Margaret McCollum, 
Mrs. Isabel Edie, and John A. With the 
exception of the last named, all are resi- 
dents of Washington county, New York. 
The parents were faithful members of the 
Presbyterian Church, in which society they 
wielded an influence for good. The father 
died in i860, and the mother survived until 
1887, when she, too, passed away. 

John A. Armstrong was reared on a farm 
in his native county and received a good 
common-school education. In early life he 
engaged to some extent in mercantile busi- 
ness, and in 1857 came West, locating in 
the city of Owatonna, Minnesota, where he 
spent two years engaged in the drug and 
grocery business. He then returned to the 
East and was engaged in mercantile business 
in Washington county. New York, for two 
years, after which he returned to Owatonna. 
In the spring of 1861 Mr. Armstrong was in 
New York city, buying goods for his store 
in Minnesota, when the first gun was fired 
on Fort Sumter. After resuming business 



in Owatonna, he continued in that city, do- 
ing a successful trade until 1868, when he 
sold out. 

While a resident of Owatonna, Mr. Arm- 
strong was active in promoting the material 
advancement and prosperity of the place, 
and erected a number of fine buildings. He 
built the block formerly occupied by the 
First National Bank, also a beautiful resi- 
dence where Pillsbury Hall now stands. In 
real estate he dealt somewhat largely, and 
in his various business ventures was suc- 
cessful. 

In 1870 he came to Winnebago City, 
Faribault county, and opened a hardware 
store, in connection with which he did a 
banking business. A few years later he 
sold out the hardware and gave his entire 
attention to the banking business, and in 
1877 erected his present neat bank building. 
This was the first bank established in the 
place, and the conservative business meth- 
ods of its proprietor made it one of the solid 
financial institutions of the county, and 
won for it a liberal patronage. . Since com- 
ing to Winnebago City, he has taken an 
active interest in public improvements, and 
owns one of the finest residences in the 
village. He is a trustee of Parker College, 
and has been its treasurer since it was 
founded, and is a member of the Presby- 
terian Church. Public-spirited and gener- 
ous, he is one of the most enterprising and 
prominent men in Faribault county, and is 
widely and favorably known throughout 
southern Minnesota. 

Mr. Armstrong was married in 1859 to 
Miss Carrie Carl, of Washington county, 
New York. She died in June, 1S74, at 
Winnebago City, leaving two sons, viz. : 
James C. , a resident of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 
a traveling salesman for the Chicago White 



34 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Lead & Oil Company; and George C. , who 
is accountant and assistant cashier in his 
father's bank. In December, 1875, Mr. 
Armstrong married Miss Frances, daughter 
of C. B. and Ellen (Piatt) Miner, of Winne- 
bago City. By this union he has one son, 
J. Archibald, who is the fourth generation 
in direct descent bearing the name of Archi- 
bald. 



aHARLES OTIS TRUE is a worthy 
representative of the agricultural 
interests of Martin county and 
now makes his home on section 36, 
Westford township. He is the youngest 
child of Simeon S. True, whose sketch 
appears elsewhere in this volume. His birth 
occurred July 26, 1838, in Center Harbor, 
New Hampshire, and he was there reared 
until eighteen years of age. His early edu- 
cation, acquired in the common schools, 
was supplemented by study in Kendall 
Academy of Manchester, New Hampshire, 
and at the age of eighteen he started out in 
life for himself, learning the machinist's 
trade and building locomotives in the Amos- 
keag Machine Shops. He applied himself 
assiduously to his work and soon mastered 
the business in all its details. 

True to the Union, with patriotic 
impulses aroused, Mr. True responded to 
the President's call for volunteers to aid in 
crushing out the Rebellion, and in 1862 be- 
came a member of Company I, Twelfth New 
Hampshire Infantry; but his lungs were 
affected and he was rejected before he was 
mustered into the service. He then returned 
to his home and engaged in the butchering 
business at Lowell, Massachusetts, until 
1864. At that time he again enlisted, be- 
coming a member of Company B, First Bat- 



talion of Massachusetts Cavalry, which was 
afterward consolidated with four companies 
from New York and four from Vermont, 
under the name of the Twenty-sixth New 
York Cavalry. These troops were en- 
camped at Reedville, Massachusetts, then 
sent to guard the Canadian frontier, and 
afterward guarded the city of Ogdensburg, 
New York, until the close of the war. They 
were constantly on the move with the Sev- 
enth United States Infantry under Colonel 
Jackson, and Mr. True wore the blue until 
July 16, 1865, when, hostilities having 
ceased, he was mustered out. When he 
entered the service the second time the 
troops were encamped before the old Con- 
cord battle-ground of the Revolution. He 
emulated those honored warriors in his 
bravery and fidelity to duty and brought no 
dishonor to the worthy name he bears. 

When the war was over our subject was 
again engaged in business for a short time in 
Lowell, Massachusetts, and in 1 868 he came 
to Martin county, purchasing a farm to 
which he removed his family the following 
year, having since made it his home. He 
here has 240 acres of rich and arable land, 
upon which he has placed all the improve- 
ments, and, neat and thrifty in appearance, 
the farm is one of the best in the neighbor- 
hood. In connection with general farming 
Mr. True makes a specialty of stock-raising 
and keeps on hand only good grades of cat- 
tle, horses and hogs. 

On the 8th of January, 1861, Mr. True 
united in marriage with Sarah A. Page, a 
native of Lowell, Massachusetts, born De- 
cember 12, 1 84 1, and a daughter of James 
Y. and Mary A. (Cambridge) Page. Her 
father was born in Deerfield, New Hamp- 
shire, in 1 8 16, and was a son of Edward 
Page, who belonged to an old New England 




(^//{va ;//(/('/ (y'/r/f/(^'J 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



37 



family of English origin. Her maternal 
grandparents, Charles and Anna (Langdell) 
Cambridge, were natives of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, and Mount Vernon, New Hamp- 
shire, respectively, and the former was an 
officer in the State militia and served in the 
war of 1 812. His business was that of steel 
engraver. Mr. Page died in 1872, and his 
wife, who was born in 1821, is still surviv- 
ing. They had but two children — Mrs. 
True, and Henry J., the latter now a resi- 
dent of Deerfield, New Hampshire. 

To Afr. and Mrs. True have been born 
four children: Jay W. , who married Mary 
E. Bottomly, by whom he has one child, 
and resides in Mankato, Minnesota; Fred 
O., Sturdevant P. and Leila H. The chil- 
dren have all been provided with e.xcellent 
school privileges. Jay W. and Fred O. 
were graduated at the State Normal School 
of Mankato in the class of 1891, and the 
latter has since completed a course in Man- 
kato business college. Sturdevant is now 
attending a business college and Leila is 
pursuing her studies in the schools of Fari- 
bault. Thus the children have been well 
fitted for the practical and responsible duties 
of life, and in the social circles in which they 
move they hold a high position. 

Mr. True has been a member of Mechan- 
ics Lodge, No. II, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, at Lowell, Massachusetts, 
since 1865. 

He is an honored comrade of Phil Kear- 
ny Post, G. A. R,. and in his political 
views is a Democrat, having supported that 
party since attaining his majority. As every 
loyal American citizen should do, he takes 
a warm interest in political affairs and keeps 
himself well informed on the issues of the 
day. When called to public office he has 
discharged his duties in a most prompt and 



able manner, winning the confidence and 
commendation of all concerned. He has 
been Chairman of the Town Board of Su- 
pervisors for many years, two months after 
his arrival in Martin county was elected 
Justice of the Peace and has filled that po- 
sition continuously since. By Gen. Grant 
he was appointed Postmaster of Westford, a 
position which he filled for nineteen consec- 
utive years. No man is more faithful to a 
trust reposed in him or is more deserving 
the confidence given him or the esteem in 
which he is held than the subject of this 
review. His life has been well and worth- 
ily passed, and in his business dealing he has 
won the success which now numbers him 
among the substantial farmers of this section 
of Minnesota. 



KON. ALEXANDER FIDDES is one 
of the most favorably known citi- 
tizens of Jackson county, Minne- 
sota. Until recently he has en- 
gaged in the hardware business in the town 
of Jackson, and was recognized as one of 
the leading merchants of that place, but now 
he is living retired, enjoying the rest which 
is the fitting reward of a long life of useful 
labor. He has been a conspicious figure in 
the upbuilding and development of this local- 
ity, and in the history of the community he 
well deserves honorable mention. 

A native of Scotland, Mr. Fiddes was 
born in Campsie, Sterlingshire, March 15, 
1S40, and his parents, James and Jessie 
(Nisbit) Fiddes, were natives of the same 
locality. The son resided in the village of 
his birtji until si.\teen years of age, attend- 
ing the public schools and assisting his 
father in various employments. He then 
severed home ties and made his way to 



38 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Glasgow, since which time he has been en- 
tirely dependent upon his own resources. 
He served a five-years apprenticeship to the 
trade of engineer, and then went to sea as 
an engineer on a steamship. For four years 
he cruised among the East India islands, 
went to India, then to Rangoon in Burmah, 
and during the war between England and 
Abyssinia he was engaged in conve3ing 
troops and dispatches between India and 
Abyssinia, being in the latter country during 
the bombardment of Magdala and at the 
time of the capture of King Theodore. He 
was for three years chief engineer for the 
Bombay and Bengal Steamship Company, 
which sold the vessel on which he was 
serving to the Persians with the condition 
attached that Mr. Fiddes was to remain 
w^ith the ship for six months. On the ex- 
piration of that period he left the ship at 
Bagdad on the river Euphrates. He had 
spent some seven years in a seafaring life, 
and in going from Bagdad to Bombay, he 
proceeded thence up the Red Sea to Suez 
and crossed the desert to Alexandria. Taking 
ship he then went down the Mediterranean 
sea, to Marseilles, thence to Paris and 
London, and on to 'his home in Campsie, 
Scotland. 

On reaching the place of his nativity 
Mr. Fiddes learned that two of his brothers 
had emigrated to Canada, and he, too, de- 
termining to try his fortune in the New 
World, crossed the Atlantic to the Eng- 
lish dominions on this continent. He did 
not tarry long in Canada, however, and in 
1869 came to Jackson county, Minnesota. 
He located in the village of Jackson, then 
an unpretentious place, and in the fall of 
he same year another important event in 
his life also occurred. He was married on 
the 1 6th of September, the lady of his 



choice being Miss Agnes Hunter, daughter 
of James and Agnes (Cook) Hunter, natives 
of Scotland. Mrs. Fiddes was born in 
Perthshire, Scotland, and by her marriage 
has become the mother of the following 
children: Jessie Nisbit, the wife of A. B. 
Cheadle, cashier of the State Bank; James 
Hunter, who occupies the position as 
stenographer and collector for the News- 
Tribune of Duluth; John Stirling, David 
Hunter and Alexander Torrance. Their 
home is a pleasant and comfortable dwell- 
ing, standing in the suburbs of the town, 
and the grounds comprise a tract of five 
acres, and are all well laid out and of attrac- 
tive appearance. 

On settling in Jackson Mr. Fiddes em- 
barked in general merchandising in com- 
pany with his wife's brother, J. W. Hunter, 
and the partnership continued until the fall 
of 1S72, when by mutual consent it was dis- 
solved and Mr. Fiddes opened a hardware 
establishment, which he carried on until his 
retirement from active business life a short 
time since. In his dealings he was ever 
honorable and upright and had the confi- 
dence and regard of all with whom he was 
brought in contact. 

Mr. Fiddes is one of the valued citizens 
of Jackson county. No man in the com- 
munity has taken a more prominent place in 
general matters than has he. He has in- 
terested himself heartily in all matters per- 
taining to the building up of his village and 
of the entire county, and has rendered 
valuable aid in the affairs of local govern- 
ment. In the fall of 1S77 he was elected to 
the State Legislature from his district, and 
was again chosen for that office in 1884. 
On both occasions he served his constituents 
with a fidelity and promptness which won 
him high commendation. He was elected 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



39 



Treasurer of the School Board in 1871, and 
with the exception of some two years has 
held that office continuously since. He 
was President of the Village Council four 
years, Postmaster from 1877 to 18S5, and 
again from 1889 to 1893. Of Republican 
principles he is a stanch advocate, one of 
the party leaders in this locality, and at this 
writing, in the spring of 1895, is a member 
of the Republican State Central Committee. 
Mr. Fiddes was made a Mason in Renfrew, 
Scotland, in June, 1865, in Prince of Wales 
Lodge, No. 426, and during the ensuing 
autumn he was elected Junior Warden of 
the lodge. Shortly after that he left for the 
East Indies. After coming to America he 
joined Fairmont Royal Arch Chapter, No. 
50, at Fairmont, Minnesota. He received 
the Knight Templar degrees at Mankato, in 
the Mankato Commandery, No. 4, and in 
February, 1893, the Shrine degrees, in Os- 
man Temple, at St. Paul. On the organiza- 
tion of Good Faith Lodge, No. 90, at Jack- 
son, he was elected its first Senior Warden. 
After the first year he was elected its Wor- 
shipful Master, which office he held for ten 
years. For two years he was Senior Grand 
Steward of the Grand Lodge of Minnesota. 
He has attended the Grand Lodge for more 
than twenty years. He is also a member 
of the A. O. U. W. , of Jackson Lodge, No. 
49, and was its first Past Master. He is a 
leader, — a leader in political, commercial, 
social circles, — merit and fidelity winning 
him this well deserved prominence. He is 
a gentleman of the highest character, pos- 
sessed of a wide knowledge of men and the 
world, and his varied experiences, gained in 
his travels, has made him a most interest- 
ing converser. When Mr. Fiddes left home 
and started out in life for himself he had no 
capital save that with which nature endowed 



him. He possesses an energetic, determined 
disposition and resolved to win success, — 
a resolution which he has carried out. He 
has now considerable property, including a 
fine brick store building and an excellent 
farm of over 400 acres, one and a half miles 
from the town, and under a high state of 
cultivation. All this is a monument to his 
thrift and enterprise, a substantial memorial 
to a well-spent life. 



>T^OHN KREMER is familiar with pio- 
Jj neer life in its various phases. He 
/• 1 has seen the Indians on the frontier; 
and wild game of all kinds, native 
in this section in an early day, has found its 
place upon his table, brought down by his 
unerring rifle. He has witnessed the trans- 
formation of the wild lands into beautiful 
homes and farms, towns and villages have 
sprung up, and primitive improvements have 
given place to all those of modern civiliza- 
tion. In the work of advancement and pro- 
gress he has ever borne his .part, and for 
many years was recognized as a leading rep- 
resentative of the farming interests of Fari- 
bault county and Blue Earth City. 

Mr. Kremer is now living retired, enjoy- 
ing a well earned rest. He was born near 
the beautiful city of Metz in Lorraine, 
France, November 29, 1842, and is the sixth 
in order of birth in a family of seven chil- 
dren, five sons and two daughters, whose par- 
ents were John and Elizabeth (Gouvion) 
Kremer. During his early youth he accom- 
panied his parents on their emigration to 
America and the greater part of his educa- 
tion was acquired during the residence of 
the family in Alden, Erie county. New York. 
He was eight years of age at the time of the 
arrival there, and in 1855, with the family. 



40 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



he went to Wisconsin. At the af;e of four- 
teen he found himself in Faribault county 
and entered upon a life of usefulness. To 
his father he gave the benefit of his services, 
and was of great assistance to him until, 
feeling his country's call the strongest that 
came to him, he laid aside plow and harrow 
for the musket and marched forth to the 
defense of the Union. At Fort Snelling, 
Minnesota, he enlisted as a member of Com- 
pany E, Second Minnesota Regiment, join- 
ing the army on the i 5th of February, 1864. 
From there the company went to Mankato, 
Minnesota, where he continued until May, 
when it was ordered to Fort Ridgely, Min- 
nesota, and thence sent to do frontier ser- 
vice. They were detailed in squads over a 
section of the country, and Mr. Kremer was 
stationed at Pipe Lake, Minnesota. The 
members of the company carried mail from 
Fort Ridgely to Sauk Center, a distance of 
over a hundred miles. There our subject 
remained until the i 5th of November of the 
same year, when the cavalry was relieved 
by infantry troops, and the regiment with 
which Mr. Kremer was connected was 
ordered to Sauk Center, Minnesota, con- 
tinuing at that place until March, 1865, do- 
ing general guard duty. At the last men- 
tioned date the company was ordered to 
march to Fort Ripley, and two weeks later 
returned to Fort Ridgely, upon receiving in- 
formation of the Indian uprising. During 
the summer Mr. Kremer was detailed to 
drive a commissary train, and subsequently, 
in June, 1865, was assigned for guard duty 
at Fort Ridgely and sent with several head 
of cattle to Fort Wadsworth. 

This company was formed of si.\ mem- 
bers of Company E, with several half-breed 
scouts. In the fall of 1865 the company 
was ordered to Fort Snelling, where, on the 



22d of November, 1865, he was honorably 
discharged. His duty was arduous, and had 
not the excitement of battle to spur him on, 
but he was ever faithful to his duty and the 
cause which he had pledged himself to serve. 

Mr. Kremer at once returned to Minne- 
sota and resumed farming, which he made 
his life-work, continuing this until he had 
acquired a sufficient capital to enable him to 
live retired. 

On the 3d day of November, 1874, Mr. 
Kremer was united in the holy bonds of 
matrimony, in Danville, by the Rev. Father 
Weissler, to Miss Mary Barbara Mosser, 
daughter of Caspas and Mary (Lavengood) 
Mosser. Her parents were pioneer settlers 
of this section of the State, having arrived 
in Mankato, Minnesota, May 10, 1857, at 
which time the town contained but three 
small buildings. An uncle, George Mosser, 
had previously emigrated to the West and 
located a claim which adjoins the Kremer 
farm. In his log cabin lived the parents of 
Mrs. Kremer and their six daughters until 
their own log house, 18x24 feet, was 
erected. Mr. Mosser passed away at the 
age of fifty-five years, and the mother died 
January 6, 1885, being laid by the side of 
her husband in the burying-ground of St. 
John's Church, where a monument has been 
erected to their memory. Five children sur- 
vive them, the eldest of whom is Mrs. Kre- 
mer; Frances became the wife of Jacob 
Hosher, a farmer residing in Danville town- 
ship, and her death occurred on the ist of 
May, 1886; Josephine is the wife of Joe 
Hanley, a farmer residing on the old Mosser 
homestead; Rosa is the wife of Armor Esch- 
bach, an agriculturist of Washington; Te- 
ressa is the wife of Edgar Stevenson, a depot 
agent at Long Prairie, Minnesota; and Lena 
is the wife of Charley Koonze, a dealer in 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



41 



furniture and machinery in Long Prairie, 
Minnesota. 

Mrs. Kremer was born in Buffalo, New 
York, September 2, 1848, and first met her 
husband in Alden, New York, where hved 
her grandfather, Joseph Lavengood. Since 
that time the Mosser and Kremer famihes 
have usually lived near each other, and our 
subject now owns the homestead farms of 
both in this locality. To our subject and 
his wife have been born six children, four 
sons and two daughters, and four of the 
number are yet living: William J., who 
for several years was in the employ of the 
Great Northern Railroad Company, is now 
at home; Helena Rosina, familiarly known 
to her friends as Lena, attends the public 
schools of Minnesota Lake and is quite pro- 
ficient in instrumental music; Martin E. and 
Charley Ott are at home; Frank O. died at 
the age of four months; and Ida Theresse 
died at the age of seven years and two 
months. Of kind and generous impulses, 
Mr. and Mrs. Kremer gave a home to an 
adopted son, Andrew Petrock, who became a 
member of the family at the age of nine and 
is still living with them, at the age of twenty- 
four. He is an engineer in the employ of 
Mr. Apley, and owns a steam thresher, 
which he operates during harvest season. 

For eleven years Mr. Kremer filled the 
office of Constable, and no higher testimo- 
nial of his ability could be given than the fact 
of his long continuance in office. He cast 
his first presidential vote for Abraham Lin- 
coln, and has since been identified with the 
Democracy. He is a charter member of 
Minnesota Lake Post, No. TJ, G. A. R., and 
has served as Senior Vice Commander. The 
family is connected with the Catholic Church. 
The life of Mr. Kremer is in many respects 
well worthy of emulation. In business deal- 



ings he is ever straightforward and honor- 
able, and in social relations he is a genial, 
pleasant gentleman of kindly disposition and 
worthy of the high esteem in which he is 
held. He has managed his affairs success- 
fully and by well-directed efforts and perse- 
verance he has acquired a handsome com- 
petence, so that he is now living retired in 
Minnesota Lake, enjoying the fruits of his 
former toil. 



>^ULIUS KIESTER, a farmer of sec- 
m tion 20, Rutland township, was born 
a1 in Prussia, Germany, July 12, 1855, 
a son of Charles Kiester, born in the 
same place January 19, 181 8. The latter 
followed agricultural pursuits in the old 
country. Julius received his education in 
Germany and at Janesville, Wisconsin, 
coming to this country in 1866, and studied 
telegraphy in the Business College of Janes- 
ville, and for some time attended the Busi- 
ness College of Davenport, Iowa. He next 
spent three years in Pinkerton's detective 
force, under Allen Pinkerton, in the Ameri- 
can and European secret service. After his 
marriage he was employed as section fore- 
man and assistant road-master on the Chi- 
cago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad for 
eleven years. Mr. Kiester then sold his 
farm of eighty-six acres in Proviso township, 
Cook county, Illinois, for $350 per acre, and 
in 1890 purchased his place of 345 acres in 
Rutland township, Martin county, Minne- 
sota, and he also owns 200 acres of well 
improved land in Eraser township, and 160 
acres in Rolling Green township, same 
county. 

Our subject was married in 1880, to 
Lena Seegers, born in Proviso, Cook county, 
Illinois. To this union have been born five 



42 



MEMORIAL RECORD OP THE COUNTIES OF 



children — Eddie, Julius, Minnie, Adolph 
and Malinda. The family are members of 
the St. Paul Lutheran Church at Fairmont. 
Mr. Kiester is actively identified with the 
Republican party. He was appointed Chair- 
man of the Board of Supervisors in 1S93; 
he was elected to the same position in the 
following year, and has been a member of 
the School Board of District No. 1 1. 



K^^ S. JACKSON, Postmaster of Fair- 
I /^ mont, Martin county, was born in 
M . r New York, September 2, 1S44. In 
I S45 he located in Wisconsin, and 
in 1882 came to Fairmont, Martin county, 
Minnesota, where he was appointed Post- 
master March 17, 1894. Mr. Jackson spent 
four years as clerk in the hardware store of 
Houghtaling & Coults, was with Ward & 
Cadwell for a time, and served sixteen 
months as clerk under Postmasters Bullard 
and A. L. Ward. 

In 1863 our subject enlisted for service 
in the late war, entering Company D, Thirty- 
ninth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. He 
is now a member of Phil Cummins Post, 
G. A. R. , Fairmont, and of the Masonic order. 
Chain Lake Lodge, No. 64. 



^^^ EORGE WOHLHETER, secretary 
■ G\ =inJ treasurer of the Ward & Cad- 

\^_^ well Company, dealers in general 
merchandise, Fairmont, Minnesota, 
is one of the enterprising business men of 
the town. 

The members of this firm were originally 
R. M. Ward, now deceased, and A. D. Cad- 
well. They were among the pioneer mer- 
chants of Fairmont, began business here 
long before the days of railroads, and for 



years hauled their goods with teams from 
St. Paul. From a small beginning the es- 
tablishment has grown until now it is one of 
large proportions. The firm has been in- 
corporated since 1884. Its success is largely 
due to its efficient secretary and treasurer, 
and we take pleasure in presenting the fol- 
lowing sketch of his life in this work. 

George Wohlheter was born near Stras- 
burg, France, now a province of Germany, 
the date of his birth being October 8, 1854. 
His father, Philip Wohlheter, was also a 
native of that province, and was b}' occupa- 
tion a farmer. He emigrated to America in 
1867, and settled in Freeborn county, Min- 
nesota, being one of its earliest pioneers. 
He is now eighty-eight years of age, and 
lives with his youngest daughter, in Martin 
county. The names of his children are as 
follows: John, Philip, Fred, Sally, George 
and Magdalina. 

George was educated in French, German 
and English. He began life a poor boy and 
had to work out in order to get the means 
with which to educate himself. When he 
was twenty-two he entered the emplo}- of 
the firm with which he has ever since been 
connected, beginning as bookkeeper. He 
is now one of the stockholders of the com- 
pany and has occupied his present position 
since its incorporation. In addition to his 
interest here he owns half of a hardware 
concern at Albert Lea, Minnesota, the busi- 
ness there being conducted under the firm 
name of J. F. Wohlheter & Conipan}-, and 
he is also vice-president of the Martin 
County Bank. 

Mr. Wohlheter was married in 1879 to 
Minnie Peton, a native of Germany, who 
died April 30, 1893, at the age of thirty- 
three years, leaving him with four children, — 
Lucy, Carrie, Sadie and Chester, — who are 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



43 



being educated in both German and En- 
glish. 

Mr. Wohlheter is a member of the Ma- 
sonic order, bhie lodge and chapter, of Fair- 
mont, having served as King in the latter; 
Apollo Commandery, No. 12, of Albert Lea, 
in which he has also held official positions; 
and Osman Temple, Mystic Shrine, St. 
Paul. He organized the A. O. U. W. of 
Fairmont and was the first Master Work- 
man of the same. Politically he is a stanch 
Republican and an active worker in the 
ranks of his party. For a number of years 
he has been a member of the City Council, 
and he has also served on the School Board. 
Religiously he is identified with the German 
Evangelical Church. 



ERCY WOLLASTON, a prominent 
banker and leading citizen of Fair- 



^ mont, Minnesota, is one of the 

oldest business men in the town. 
Of his life and ancestry, we take pleasure in 
presenting the following sketch: 

The first trace of the name Wollaston 
was in 1320, and it was then spelled with 
two s's. Rev. William Charles Wollaston, 
the father of our subject, was born in Cam- 
bridge, England, in 1795, son of Rev. 
Charles Hyde and Sarah (Willett Ottley) 
Wallaston. Rev. Charles Hyde Wollaston 
was born in 1772, son of Francis Wollaston, 
LL. D., born in 1731, and Rector of Chisel- 
hurst, England. The latter was a son of 
Francis Wallaston, born at Charter House 
Square, London, in 1694, son of William, 
born at the same place in 1659, son of Will- 
iam, born in 15S9. The last named Will- 
iam was a son of Henry, born in 1525. 
Henry was a citizen of London, and to him, 



in 1616, was granted a coat of arms. He 
was a son of Henry Wollaston of Perton, 
son of William of Trescott Grange, Staf- 
fordshire, son of William of Perton. The 
last named William was probably born 
in 1450. He was a person of rank in the 
reign of Henry VHI. The late head of 
the family was Frederick, Colonel of the 
Twenty-second Light Dragoons and High 
Sheriff of the county of Leicestershire. 

The mother of Percy Wollaston was be- 
fore her marriage Miss Charlotte Jane Faw- 
cett. She was born in Leeds, England, 
daughter of Rev. Richard Fawcett, vicar of 
Leeds. Her marriage occurred at Leeds in 
1 81 7, and they continued to reside there un- 
til 1 84 1, when they removed to Norfolk. 
For twenty-six years Rev. William C. Wol- 
laston was second master of the grammar 
school at Leeds. He was rector of East 
Dereham until his death, in 1872. His wife 
died in 1S56. They were the parents of five 
children: Charles Richard, who was in 
military service, died in India; William Ott- 
ley James, deceased; Charlotte, wife of Dr. 
Willliam Locke, Ipswich, Suffolk, England; 
Drewry Ottley, also a resident of Ipswich; 
and Percy. 

Percy Wollaston was born in Leeds, En- 
gland, December 21, 1825, and received 
his education there. In 1848 he married 
Miss Catherine Mossop, a native of Cumber- 
land, England, born in 1826, daughter of 
Dr. Isaac Mossop. Soon after their mar- 
riage they sailed for America, landing at 
New York November 9th, of that year. 
After spending a few weeks in that city 
they went to Charleston, South Carolina, 
and remained there until the following 
spring, when they returned to New York, 
and a few weeks later went to Syracuse, New 
York, and spent a few months in that city, 



44 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



and then removed to St. Catherines, Ontario, 
where for about a year Mr. Wollaston was 
employed in a flour mill. In 1851 they 
went back to England. 

From 1 85 5 until 1872 he was connected 
with a shipping business in Liverpool. In 
1876 he again came to America, and since 
that date has been identified with the inter- 
ests of Fairmont. The year following his 
arrival here he erected a store on the corner 
of North avenue and Second street. There 
were then only five small buildings here. 
As soon as his building was completed he 
opened up a stock of general goods, and 
continued in the mercantile business here 
till i8gi. In 1882 he established the Mer- 
chants & Farmers' Bank in Fairmont, of 
which he is now sole owner, doing a general 
banking business. Mr. Wollaston was for 
some years largely interested in farming 
operations, owning 460 acres of land in 
Martin county, which he recently sold. 

In connection with Mr. Wollaston's busi- 
ness career it should further be stated that 
he was for some years interested in milling. 
In 1S77 he erected a large flour-mill, oper- 
ated by a sixty-foot wind wheel, on the site 
of the present steam flouring-mill, and he 
ran it from 1877 to 1889, when he sold out. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wollaston are the parents 
of thirteen children and have a large num- 
ber of grandchildren, their complete family 
record being as follows: (i) Catherine 
Agnes, who was born at St. Catherines, On- 
tario, is the wife of Cecil Sharpe, who re- 
sides in Fairmont. Their children arc Em- 
ily Catherine, Cecil Granville, Constance 
Irene, Marian Victoria and Dorothy Agnes. 
(2) William Charles, born in Streatham, 
England. (3) Charlotte Jane, a native of 
London, is the wife of Clement Royds. 
They have eight children, Clement Leopold, 



Lilian Dorothy, Florence Eleanor, Maurice 
Thalluson, Gladys Mary, Sybil Gertrude, 
Dulcibella and Noel Bondy. (4) Percy, 
born in London, married Alice Mary Rams- 
dale, and they have four children — Kenneth 
Percy, Alice Margery, Mary Josephine and 
Phyllis Byam. (5) Margaret Emily, born at 
Wellington Road, Liverpool, England, is 
the wife of Henry W. Sinclair, their chil- 
dren being Agnes Winnifred, Edith Mar- 
garet, John Archibald, Katharine Elizabeth, 
Nora Frances and Mary Beatrice. (6) Fran- 
cis Henrj', born in Liverpool, England, is 
now a resident of Colorado. (7) George 
Hyde, born at Wellington Road, Liverpool, 
married Lilian Maude Ramsdale, and they 
have five children, Esther Mildred, Charles 
Hyde, Harriet Lilian, William George 
Henry and Francis. (8) Richard Fawcett, 
born at Wellington Road, Liverpool, mar- 
ried Mabel Ann Ramsdel, and their two 
children are Eleanor Frances and Arthur 
Launcelot. (9) and (10) Annie and Henri- 
etta, twins, born in the parish of Roby, six 
miles from Liverpool. Henrietta is the wife 
of John Alfred Sinclair, and has five chil- 
dren, Harold Percy, Wilfrid, Helen Caro- 
line, Alfred Theodore and Alice Margaret. 
(11) Frederick, born in the parish of Roby, 
is unmarried. (12) Lucy Eleanor, born at 
Roby, is the wife of A. G. T. Broun, of 
Sherburne, Minnesota. They have two 
children, Archibald Campbell and Percy 
Hamilton, (i 3)Edward Luard, born at Roby, 
England, is unmarried. All the children were 
educated in England, and the whole family 
are members of the Episcopal Church. In- 
deed, Mr. Wollaston may be termed the 
father of this church at Fairmont. Their 
house of worship was erected here in 1876, 
it being the first church in the town. Since 
that date he has served as Vestryman. 




^ ©/ ^/'ej/ei. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



47 



Politically Mr. Wollaston is affiliated 
with the Republican party. He was the 
first President of the village of Fairmont, 
and at a later date again filled that office. 



•y— ' ON. JACOB ARMEL KIESTER. 
lf\ The name of this worthy gentle- 
M. ^ r man is inseparably connected with 
the hist(3ry of Fairbaiilt county, — 
with its professional, social and official in- 
terests, — and the prominent part which he 
has played in its upbuilding places him 
among the county's founders. His reputa- 
tion is not limited by the bounds of county, 
but throughout the State he is known and 
honored. 

A native of Pennsylvania, Mr. Kiester 
was born in Mt. Pleasant, Westmoreland 
county, April 29, 1832, and on both the 
paternal and maternal sides is descended 
from German ancestry, who braved the 
dangers of an ocean voyage in the early days 
and sought a home in the American colonies. 
The families were established in the eastern 
part of the Keystone State, whence the 
paternal grandparents, Conrad and Susanna 
Kiester, removed to western Pennsylvania 
in their youth, locating in the then frontier 
region of Westmoreland county. There was 
born the father of our subject, David Kies- 
ter, who was married in 1831 to Miss Lydia 
Armel, by whorH-he had two children, Jacob 
A. and Daniel B. The mother died in 1883, 
at the age of seventy-one years, and the 
father passed away in 1S88, aged eighty- 
one. He spent his entire life at Mt. Pleas- 
ant and there served as Chief l^nrgess and 
Justice of the Peace. He was a man of fine 
education and extensive reading, always 
took a deep interest in political matters, was 
a prominent and consistent churtdi iiiend>er 



from his youth until his death and was ever 
highly respected for his unquestioned integ- 
rity and ability. 

Jacob A. Kiester's early education was 
acquired in the common schools and by 
study in the Mt. Pleasant and Dickinson 
Colleges of Pennsylvania, where he pursued 
the usual college course, with the exception 
of a few studies, although he did not gradu- 
ate. His business training was received 
under the instruction of his uncle, Jacob 
Armel, for whom he was named and with 
whom he became familiar with mercantile 
business and with bookkeeping, but his 
tastes were in the direction of a pro- 
fessional career, and while still in col- 
lege he commenced the study of law. 
Removing subsequently to Madison, Indiana, 
he there continued reading law in the office 
of Hon. S. C. Stevens, formerly one of the 
Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of 
the State, and was admitted to the bar in 
Madison in 1854. Desiring to thoroughly 
fit himself for the work, not content with 
a mediocre career, after his return to the 
State of his nativity he continued his legal 
studies. His place of residence was changed 
in 1857. The t'de of emigration which was 
steadily drifting Westward carried him on 
its waves to Minnesota in the spring of that 
year. He saw that the West, with its rap- 
idly growing cities, was a good field for the 
labors of an ambitious young man who had 
his own way to make in the world, and he 
cast his lot with Minnesota citizens. He 
had intended to locate in St. Paul, but the 
capital removal bill had been passed, remov- 
ing the capital to St. Peter and he went to 
that city. The bill, however, proved a fail- 
ure, and as the prices of real estate in that 
place were very enormous, he came to the 
Blue Earth \alh'v. 



4S 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Blue Earth City, which is now his home, 
then consisted of a few log cabins, but was 
situated in the midst of rich lands which he 
believed would soon be claimed and trans- 
formed into one of the most valuable regions 
of this great State, whose arable prairies are 
the envy of the world. In this he demon- 
strated his sagacity and farsightedness, for 
the anticipated result has come to pass. 
Blue Earth City has since been his home 
and with its progress and development he 
has since been closely identified. He at 
once opened a law office, being the second 
attorney in the town, and in April, 1857, he 
served as the plaintiff's attorne}' in the first 
lawsuit instituted and tried in the county, 
winning the case for his client. Soon his 
worth and ability were recognized by his 
fellow-citizens, who manifested their confi- 
dence in him by making him County Sur- 
veyor, which position he filled two terms. 
Thus he entered upon an official career 
which has won him an enviable reputation, 
a well deserved prominence and the com- 
mendation of all concerned. A number of 
the leading roads of the county to-day were 
laid out by him, and also the boundary lines 
of many farms, several additions to Blue 
Earth City and other works pertaining to 
his office. In the fall of 1857 he was elected 
Register of Deeds, the most important 
county office in those days, and after serv- 
ing for eight consecutive years refused fur- 
ther honors along that line. In consequence 
of his incumbency in that office he became 
also the principal conveyancer for many 
years in the south half of the county, serv- 
ing long after he left the office of Register. 
One of the townships of p-aribault county 
has been named in his honor. The cause 
of education has ever received his hearty 
support, and he was for so"ine time officially 



connected with the schools, — serving for 
many years as a member of the Board of 
Education of the Blue Earth City independ- 
ent school district and acting as President 
of the board for two 3'ears. 

In the legislative halls of Minnesota Mr. 
Kiester has represented his district, being 
elected to the General Assembly in 1865 
and representing a district comprising a 
large portion of southwestern Minnesota. 
Not long after he was appointed County At- 
torney for Faribault county, but resigned 
before the expiration of his term. In 1869 
he was elected Judge of the Probate Court, 
and was re-elected in 1871, with slight 
opposition, and thereafter was re-elect- 
ed for eight terms, by the unanimous 
vote of the electors, serving in this 
office for a period of over twenty 
years. Though so long in office, no appeals 
were ever taken from his decisions, for their 
wisdom and justice were always recognized. 
They were announced after careful and cool 
deliberation and represented the embodied 
wisdom attained through years of close, 
earnest study. Mr. Kiester was elected 
State Senator in 1890 for four years, and 
attended the sessions of the Senate in 1891 
and 1893, his term of office expiring in 1895. 
His career, whether in local office, in the 
legislative halls, or in other positions, is 
without a stain, and naught is said by any 
against his strict honesty of purpose and high 
moral worth. 

In 1859 was celebrated the marriage of 
Judge Kiester and Miss Caroline Billings, 
daughter of Levi Billings, one of the early 
settlers of Faribault count}'. To them have 
been born six children, five of whom are yet 
living, — Charles C. , May F., Grace L. , 
Oliver A. and Gertrude. 

Judge Kiester was made a Mason in 1859 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND yACKSON. 



49 



and was Worshipful Master of the Blue 
Earth City Lodge, No. 57, in 1876 and 
1877. He was mainly instrumental in se- 
curing for this lodge the largest Masonic 
library, and the first in southern Minnesota, 
— a library of purely Masonic books. In 
1882 and 1883 he was Deputy District Grand 
Master and was Grand Orator of the Grand 
Lodge of Minnesota in 1885; subsequently 
twice served as Senior Grand Warden, twice 
as Deputy Grand Master, and in 1889 was 
placed in the highest office in Masonry in the 
State, that of Grand Master, and was re- 
elected for a second term. His being thus 
honored by his brethren of the fraternity 
shows his standing among them and the high 
regard in which he is universally held in their 
ranks. Mr. Kiester was the first Worthy 
Chief of the Good Templar Lodge of Blue 
Earth City, which was organized in i860, 
being the first temperance society of Fari- 
bault county, and for several terms held that 
office. In practice and precept he is a tem- 
perance man, and religiously he and his 
family are communicants of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church, of which he has for some 
years been lay reader. His political con- 
nection is with the Republican party, in the 
organization of which in Faribault county 
he was the mover in calling the first county 
and legislative convention in 1857, and 
which organization continues to this day. 
He was at one time a member of the Re- 
publican State Central Committee, and dur- 
ing the late war he was an earnest supporter 
of the Union cause. He has always taken 
an active part in all public enterprises of a 
local character, and devoted much time and 
labor to securing the construction of a rail- 
road to Blue Earth City. 

Judge Kiester has always manifested a 
deep interest in litcrar}' matters and is a 



diligent reader of the leading magazines of 
the day and of the standard and classical 
works of all ages. Since early age he has 
contributed numerous articles to various 
newspapers and periodicals, usually under 
some iioiii dc pliimc. I'or a number of years 
he has employed his leisure time in writing 
a complete history of Faribault county, the 
first volume of which is now finished and 
will be published at no distant day. Cer- 
tainly no one is more fitted to compile such 
a work than he, for he has not only wit- 
nessed the growth and development of the 
count}', but has connected himself with all 
interests and enterprises calculated to ad- 
vance the general welfare, and in his life 
record is given a brief but true picture of 
Faribault county's history. 

He follows fearlessly the dictates of his 
own conscience and gives to religious, edu- 
cational and fraternal institutions his hearty 
support. 



E 



ENRY HARRISON BOXNEY, 
Treasurer of Martin county, Min- 
nesota, is a leading citizen of Fair- 
mont, as well as one of its oldest 
residents. 

Mr. Bonney's father, Daniel Bonney, 
was born in the State of New York about 
the year 1804; and his mother, iicc Harriet 
Brace, was a native of Hartford, Connecti- 
cut, and a daughter of a Captain in the war 
of 1 8 13. They were married in Pennsyl- 
vania, and spent the rest of their lives on 
the homestead farm which had been located 
by Grandfather Brace. The father died in 
1852, and the mother in September, 1891. 
The}' were the parents of eight children, 
three of whom grew to maturity and two of 
wJKim are now living — Henr}' H. and Will- 



50 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



iam, the latter residing at the old home in 
Pennsylvania. Two of the sons, Wilbert 
and Henry H., served in the late war. Wil- [ 
bert was a member of the Eighty-third Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers, and was killed on the 
last afternoon of the seven days' battle at 
Malvern Hill, in July, 1862. Religiously 
Daniel Bonney was a Universalist, while his 
wife was a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. 

Henry H. Bonney was born on his 
father's farm in Pennsylvania, August 23, 
1842, and there grew to manhood, receiving 
his education in the district school and in 
the academy at Waterford, Pennsylvania. 
He came West to Chatfield, Fillmore county, 
Minnesota, in August, 1862, making the 
journey hither by team. On the 17th of 
December, that same year, he enlisted in 
Company F, First Minnesota Cavalry, un- 
der Captain Daniels and Colonel McPhail. 
During that winter his regiment was quar- 
tered at Fort Snelling. Afterward they were 
sent from point to point in Minnesota, and 
finally, under General Sibley, against the 
Siou.x Indians, participating in several en- 
gagements and killing over a hundred red 
men. Mr. Bonney was injured by a horse 
falling upon him, and also while in the service 
he contracted a severe cold, which resulted 
in inflammatory rheumatism, from the 
effects of which he has never recovered. 
His company was one of four that were sent 
on an expedition to Snake river, and while 
on that expedition they ran short of provis- 
ions and came near starving. After their 
return to Minnesota Mr. Bonney was on 
guard duty and for two months was mail 
carrier. In December, 1863, at the expira- 
tion of his term of enlistment, he was hon- 
orably discharged. 

Returning to ChatfieKl, Mr. ISoimey was 



married there in January, 1864, to Marcella 
E. Lowth, a native of Wisconsin, born 
Februarj- 19, 1845, daughter of John Lowth, 
one of the early settlers of Wisconsin. In 
February of the same year he returned 
with his bride to the old home place in 
Pennslyvania, and was engaged in farming 
there until 1868. That year Mr. Bonney 
again came West, this time to Lowell, W'is. , 
where he worked at the carpenter's trade a 
year and a half, after which he came to Mar- 
tin county, Minnesota, and homesteaded a 
tract of land three and a half miles north- 
east of Fairmont, where he settled, devot- 
ing his time to its cultivation and improve- 
ment. Three years later came what has 
since been known as "grasshopper year." 
He then moved to Grand Meadow and for 
over a year worked at his trade, and after 
that returned to his farm. Since 1875 he 
has been a resident of Fairmont. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bonney have five children 
— Sarah, Chester H., Wilbert L., Jessie and 
Rhoda. Sarah is the wife of William Wes- 
sell, and lives in Chicago, Illinois. All have 
had good educational advantages, and Wil- 
bert L. is a graduate of Hamline Universit\'. 

Mr. Bonney is one of the most public- 
spirited and enterprising men of Fairmont, 
always taking a deep interest in all that per- 
tains to her welfare. He helped to organize 
Fairmont as an independent school district 
and for six years has been a member of the 
School Board. Fraternally he is identified 
with the Chain Lake Lodge, No. 64, Y. &. 
A. M. , of which he was Tyler for many 
years; Fairmont Chapter, R. A. M.; Juneau 
Lodge, I. O. O. F. ; and Phil Kearny Post, 
No. 18, G. A. R., of which he was Com- 
mander for two years, and is at present Offi- 
cer of the Day. Politically Mr. Bonney is 
a Republican. He has served as Constable 



FARIBAULT, MARTIX, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



of Fairmont township, and is now, as above 
stated, Treasurer of the county, having been 
elected to this office in 1892. Recently he 
has been renominated for the same office by 
the Republican convention. Few men in 
Martin county are better known or more 
highly respected than is Henry H. Bonney. 



@EORGE TANNER, a retired farmer 
now residing in Fairmont, is num- 
bered among the honored pioneer 
settlers of Martin county. From 
an earl}' day he has not only witnessed the 
growth of this section of the State, but has 
aided in its progress and advancement and 
his name is therefore inseparably connected 
with its history. He has seen the wild lands 
transformed into beautiful homes and farms, 
has seen the growth of towns and villages 
and has watched the onward march of civil- 
ization, which has brought in its train all 
the comforts and evidence of culture, and 
refinement known to the older-settled East. 
He is certainly deserving of representation 
in this volume, and with pleasure we present 
to our readers this review of his life, know- 
ing that it will prove of interest to man\', for 
he is both widely and favorably known. 

Mr. Tanner was born in Morgan county, 
Ohio, April 2, 1818, and is descended from 
good old Revolutionary stock. The grand- 
father, Benjamin Tanner, was a native of 
England, and when a young man braved the 
dangers of an ocean voyage in order to found 
a home in the New World. He landed in 
Philadelphia, whence he made his way to 
New Jersey, and when the Colonies at- 
tempted to throw off the yoke of British 
tyranny, he aided in the struggle. 

The parents of our subject were John and 
Ann Tanner, the former ti native of New 



Jersey and the latter of Chester county, 
Pennsylvania, of Welsh descent. Within 
his younger years John Tanner removed to 
Chester county, and there the parents of 
George Tanner were married and began 
their domestic life upon a farm, where they 
made their home about eight years. They 
then moved westward, settling in Washing- 
ton count}', of the Keystone State, where 
upon a farm they lived until 181 3, which 
year witnessed their arrixal in Muskingum 
county, Ohio. The last days of their lives 
were passed upon a farm in Morgan county, 
Ohio, where each died at the age of seventy- 
one years. They had long been fellow- 
travelers on life's journey, and, when sum- 
moned hence, their remains were interred 
side by side in the Wolf Creek cemetery in 
Morgan county. They had so lived as to 
win the confidence and high regard of all, 
and their loss was deeply and sincerely 
mourned. 

John and Ann Tanner were the parents 
of a family of ten children, — six sons and 
four daughters, — who grew to maturit}-, but 
most of them have now passed away. Ben- 
jamin, Hannah, Lydia, Jacob and John are 
all deceased; Nancy is the wife of Moses 
Smith; George is the next younger; Simon 
is also deceased; Mary Ann is the wife of 
George Tanner; William is a farmer of 
Morgan county, Ohio. 

George Tanner of this sketch was reared 
upon his father's farm in a locality which 
was then not far removed from a frontier set- 
tlement, and in later life he went through 
the experiences of pioneer life. He conned 
his lessons in a log schoolhousc, which was 
furnished with rude slab benches and heated 
by an immense fireplace, taking up nearly 
the entire end of the room, the smoke 
1 making its escape through a mud-and-stick 



52 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



chimney. In such a building he became 
famiHar with the common English branches 
of learning, continuing his studies through 
the winter months, while during the remain- 
der of the year he aided in the labors of the 
fields and farm. Like a dutiful son he gave 
his father the benefit of his services until 
tvvent}--one years of age, when he started 
out in life for himself, beginning to earn his 
livelihood by work as a farm hand. 

Not long after Mr. Tanner chose a com- 
panion and helpmeet on life's journey. He 
was married April 17, 1839, to Miss Ann 
Powell, and to them was born a son, George, 
who now resides in St. Paul, Minnesota, a 
printer and bookbinder of that city. For 
his second wife, Mr. Tanner chose Miss 
Catherine Wolf, and the wedding ceremony 
was performed on the 1st of February, 1842. 
The lady is a native of Greene county, Penn- 
sylvania, and with her parents went to Mor- 
gan county, Ohio, when only a year and a 
half old. Her father, John Wolf, was born 
in Greene county, Pennsylvania, was a far- 
mer by occupation and became one of the 
early settlers of Morgan county, Ohio. His 
wife, who bore the maiden name of Mary 
Caseman, was born in Maryland and there 
made her home until fifteen years of age. 
Both the paternal and maternal grandfath- 
ers of Mrs. Wolf were natives of Germany. 
She is the eldest an a family of four chil- 
dren and was reared in Morgan county, not 
far from the home of him who became her 
husband. 

After their marriage they first located in 
Morgan county, where Mr. Tanner carried 
on general farming until 1864, at which 
time, accompanied by his family, he came 
to Minnesota. In Martin county, one mile 
north of Fairmont, he located a claim and at 
once began the dcvelojimcnt of his land, 



which at that time was still in its primitive 
condition. It was not long before the place 
began to assume a very different appearance: 
in place of the barren prairie were seen 
rich and fertile fields, and good buildings 
erected gave evidence of the thrift and enter- 
prise of the owner, whose practical and pro- 
gressive spirit is well known throughout this 
community. He successfully operated his 
farm, deriving therefrom a good income, 
until 1889, when he laid aside all business 
cares, removed to Fairmont and has since 
lived retired. He yet owns, however, 400 
acres of fine land, which he rents. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Tanner have been born 
four sons and five daughters: Thomas, who 
died at the age of a year and a half; Mary 
Ann, now the wife of Dr. J. W. Dill, of 
Benton, Butler county, Kansas; John, who 
married Cora Edwards and is now living in 
Blaine, Washington; Matilda, who died at 
the age of thirty-four years; Jacob K. , who 
married Lillian Fowler, of Fairmont, where 
they reside; Davis W., who wedded Anna 
Holmes and is located in ^^'ichita, Kansas; 
Emelius, a practicing physician of F"airmont; 
Stephen A., of the same city; and Nancy, 
now the wife of Nelson Pratt, who is living 
near Spokane, Washington. The children 
were all provided with good educational 
privileges which would well fit them for the 
duties of life, and all have become useful and 
respected members of society in the com- 
munities in which they reside. 

Mr. Tanner served for many years as 
School Director and also served for one 
term as Justice of the Peace. The first 
house in Fairmont formerly stood upon the 
farm of our subject and was hauled from 
there to the village where it was used as a 
store. It is still standing — one of the land- 
marks of pioneer times. A part of Fairmont 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



53 



is located on the claim which Mr. Tanner 
entered from the Government thirty years 
ago. He and his wife have been members 
of the Christian church for many long years 
and their lives have been in harmony with 
their profession — earnest, helpful and con- 
sistent. In Martin county there is none 
more deserving of high regard than this 
worthy couple, who in their declining 3'ears 
are now resting after life's hard labor, en- 
joying the fruits of their former toil. 



E GRACE MORTIMER KEELER, 
an early pioneer and prominent 
farmer of section 34, Fairmont 
township, Martin county, was born 
in Bradford county, Pennsylvania, May 29, 
1842, a son of Newell Keeler, born and 
reared in the same place. His father, Charles 
Keeler, a native of Connecticut, was a son 
of John Keeler, born in 1723, and died in 
1795- The mother of our subject, iicc Mary 
Canfield, was born and reared in Susque- 
hanna county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of 
Amos Canfield, a native of Connecticut, a 
farmer by occupation, and a soldier in the 
Mexican war. Newell and Mary Keeler 
were married in Susquehanna county in 
1 840, and located on a farm in Bradford 
county, Pennsylvania, where they remained 
about eight years. They then returned to 
Susquehanna county, where the father died 
at the age of fifty-seven years, and the 
mother at the age of sixty-five years. They 
were the parents of six children, — Horace 
M., the subject of this sketch; Oscar S., of 
Pennsylvania; Eunice, wife of Frank Ter- 
rell; George M., of Washington; Annice 
Victoria, wife of R. B. Leet, of Fairmont 
township; and Alice Viola, her twin sister, 
died in infancy. 



H. M. Keeler remained in his native 
county until twenty years of age. In 1864 
he enlisted in the Fifth New York Cavalry, 
was appointed to the position of Corporal, 
and took part in the battle of the Wilder- 
ness, where his regiment fired the first shot, 
and our subject saw the first man wounded. 
They were then sent to headquarters at 
Mulford Station, and the regiment was then 
detailed as guard to General Sheridan, and 
afterward participated in the battles of Ash- 
land Station, White Oak Swamps, Wilson's 
Raid, Cedar Creek, and many other engage- 
ments, continuing in the capacity of guard to 
General Sheridan until the spring of 1865. 

Receiving his discharge early in July, 
1865, Mr. Keeler returned to Pennsylvania, 
and went thence to Madison county, New 
York, where he was engaged in milling nearly 
a year. He next had charge of an engine in 
a mill in Oneida county, that State, one year. 

December 18, 1867, Mr. Keeler was 
united in marriage with Sarah Garlick, who 
was born in Oneida county. New York, Jan- 
uary I, 1845, a daughter of Joseph and 
Catherine (Scoby) Garlick, the former a 
native of Manchester, England, born in 18 12. 
He came to America in 1824, when twelve 
j-ears of age, locating in Oneida county, 
where he learned and followed the trades of 
machinist and millwright, and is still living. 
Catherine Scoby was born in Glasgow, Scot- 
land, in 1 8 14, and also came to the United 
States when twelve years old. They were 
married in Oneida county in 1832, and had 
six children, namely: George, of Oneida 
county. New York, Theodore J., of Coffey- 
ville, Kansas; Adeline F., wife of Harry Lan- 
ders, of Missouri; Sarah, wife of Mr. Keeler; 
William, of Oneida county, New York; and 
Matilda, dccea.sed, who was the wife of A. A. 
Raymond. Mrs. Keekr was reared in her 



54 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



native count}', and received a good educa- 
tion in the Cleveland and Camden high 
schools. She began teaching school when 
fifteen years of age, and taught in all nine 
terms, or about four years. 

Three months after their marriage, having 
decided to seek a home in the West, Mr. 
and Mrs. Keeler came to Martin county, 
Minnesota, the trip having cost him just one 
cent a minute from the time they left their 
Eastern home until their arrival in Fairmont 
township. The journey from the Mississippi 
river was made by stage. Mr. Keeler farmed 
on rented land the first year here, and on 
the 6th of October, 1868, located on the 
place he now owns. They first moved into 
a sod house, only three sides of which were 
completed when one of the most terrible 
blizzards known in that locality occurred. 
His first team was a yoke of oxen, for which 
he paid $150, and not having a wagon he 
used a sled both summer and winter the first 
year. In the spring of 1868 he paid $1.25 
per bushel for seed wheat, and sold his crop 
of 135 bushels in the fall for twenty-five 
cents per bushel, and had to haul it forty- 
five miles to market. This experiment im- 
pressed him with the idea that farming in 
Minnesota was not a rapid way to acquire a 
fortune. They endured all, if not more, 
of the hardships than usually fall to the 
lot of pioneer settlers. During the first 
three years of their residence in Fairmont 
township they could scarcely obtain the 
necessaries of life, having only pure cold 
water to drink, and were without a light in 
the evenings. 

Encouraged by the kind words of his 
estimable wife, and assisted by her ever will- 
ing haiuis, Mr. Keeler continued the im- 
provement and cultivation of his new farm, 
and by rigid economy and untiring industry, 



on the part of both, they succeeded in 
making for themselves a comfortable and 
pleasant home, and now have 1 20 acres of 
good farming land supplied with good resi- 
dence and outbuildings. In May, 1887, Mr. 
Keeler sold his farm, and traveled over the 
North and Southwest in search of a favor- 
able location, but finding no place equal to 
Martin county he returned a month later 
and again purchased his old farm, where the 
family now resides, enjoying all the com- 
forts and many of the luxuries of life. 

In all things pertaining to the public 
good Mr. Keeler takes a lively interest. 
Mr. and Mrs. Keeler have had six children: 
Newell, born in 1869, and is at home; 
Katie, who was born in 1871, and died in 
1 891, having been married to Alonzo E. 
Partlow just four weeks before her death; 
George M., who was born February 15, 
1872, married Hannah Erricson, and resides 
in Martin county; Esme, born October 2, 
1874; Howard, born November 20, 1876, 
died April 3, 1890; and Grace C, born 
October 26, 1884. Mr. Keeler supports the 
Republican party. He has held the position 
of Assessor longer than any other man in 
the township, has served as Supervisor many 
years, and is now a member of the School 
Board. In 1890 he was appointed Govern- 
ment Inspector of Boilers for the Sixth Con- 
gressional District, but declined to accept 
the position. Socially, he is a member of 
the G. A. R., Phil Kearny Post, No. 19. 



at 



ILL I AM HENRY SWEAR- 
IN G E N, of Martin county, 
Minnesota, was born in De Witt 
ronntw Illinois, September 11, 
1S40, a son (if I dim B. and Jane (Brown) 
Swearingen. William H., the sixth of eleven 




/ 



-*l--1J 



yyf^<^. 



c/< 




%U. j3^ B. ^fiw/aj/J 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



59 



children, seven sons and four daughters, 
was reared in his native place until 1857, 
when he came with his parents to Shelby- 
ville, Blue Earth county, Minnesota, and in 
the spring of i 860 to Martin count}', and re- 
mained with them until August i", 1862. 
He then enlisted in Company D, Ninth 
Minnesota \'olunteer Infantry, and took part 
in the battles of Nashville, Spanish Fort, and 
many other smaller engagements. While 
guarding the frontier in Martin county Mr. 
Swearingen received a sunstroke, which 
rendered him perfectly unconscious for forty- 
eight hours, and on account of which he now 
draws a pension of $72 per month. He 
afterward served two years in the South, 
receiving his discharge August 24, 1865. 
After returning from the army Mr. Swear- 
ingen resumed agricultural pursuits in Martin 
county. In i860 he assisted in building the 
first mill in the county, on his farm in Silver 
Lake township, and this he and his father 
conducted for many j'ears. 

October 15, 1865, he was united in mar- 
riage with Caroline A. Page, born in New 
Hampshire, December 24, 1847, a daughter 
of William H. and Dru/ella (Lamphy) Page, 
natives also of that State. They had two 
daughters, — Mrs. Swearingen and Emma 
Larson, of Oregon. Our subject and wife 
have had nine children: those living are: 
Ida May, born March 5, 1871, is the wife of 
Ed. L. Lewis, who is engaged in the jewelry 
business at South West City, McDonald coun- 
ty, Mo.; Charles L. , born May 24, 1873, 
is at home; George W. , born November 26, 
1876; Lillie, born January 7, 1879; Herbert 
W., January 9, 1882; Edna Maud, born 
August 23, 1891. Their eldest two and 
their eighth child, all died in childhood. In 
his political relations, Mr. Swearingen affili- 
ates with the Republican party. Socially, 



he is a member of Phil. Kearny Post, No. 18, 
at Fairmont, and Mrs. Swearingen is a mem- 
ber the Phil Kearny Relief Corps, No. 41, of 
Fairmont. 



E 



ENRY P. CONSTANS, the genial 
and popular proprietor of the Con- 
stans House, the leading hotel of 
Blue Earth City, is one of the 
leading men of Faribault county, and his 
name is inseparably connected with its his- 
tory. He has resided here since the county's 
organization, and aided in the laying out of 
the city, which is the seat of justice. From 
that time he has been identified with its 
most prominent interests, and probably no 
man is more familiar to the citizens of the 
community than our honored and respected 
subject. 

Mr. Constans is a descendant of one of 
the old and prominent families of France, 
which country is the land of his birth. He 
was born in Deimirigen, department du Pas 
Rhein, April 29, 1834, and his early years 
were there passed. His grandparents were 
Phillip and Catherine (Young) Constans, the 
former a baker by trade, and also an exten- 
sive grain-dealer. The father of our subject, 
George Constans, was a government official, 
and after the Franco-Prussian war he lived 
retired until called to the home beyond, dy- 
ing in I 884, at the age of seventy-one years. 
His wife, Louise, was a daughter of Henry 
Junker, who served the government of 
France as general superintendent of forests, 
his title being Guard General. This posi- 
tion he held during the active part of his 
life, and in his last years he was retired on 
a pension. Mrs. Constans died about the 
year 1873. Henry P. is tlie eldest in their 
family of li\e children, the others being. 



6o 



MEMORIAL RECORD OE THE COUNTIES OF 



George, a resident of Mankato, Minnesota; 
Ciiristian, who is living in France, where he 
has served as Captain in the Fourth Regi- 
ment of Artillery and also as Aide-de-camp 
to General Maalsharbe; Mrs. Caroline Kunz; 
and Louise. 

In his parents' home Henr\- P. Constans 
spent his youthful years and in the public 
schools of his native land he obtained his 
education. Hearing of the advantages af- 
forded young men in the New World he 
determined to try his fortune beyond the 
Atlantic, and, at the age of seventeen, em- 
barked from Havre, France, on the sailing 
vessel Lexington, which, after forty-seven 
days spent upon the bosom of the deep, 
dropped anchor in the harbor of New Or- 
leans, on the 13th of April, 185 1. The 
following June he came North to Minne- 
sota and found employment in St. Paul, 
where he continued until 1854, at which 
time he removed to the village of Shakopee, 
twenty-five miles south of St. Paul, and 
opened a mercantile establishment, the sec- 
ond store in the place. This he conducted 
until early in 1856, when, in company with 
ex-Governor Wakefield, S. Spencer and 
Samuel Hibler, he came to Faribault county, 
which was then unorganized. They came 
to this place for the purpose of laying out 
a town, with a view of making it the county 
seat, and on the 7th of February, 1856, 
arrived on the beautiful site of Blue Earth 
City, and within that winter had the county 
organized. 

With the above named gentlemen, Mr. 
Constans laid out the town upon a tract of 
320 acres, part of which was afterward sold 
to George Kingsley. They built a log house 
on the town site in which they made their 
home until the following August, when he 
erected a two-story hewn log housj, 20 x 40 



feet with an additional 18x24 feet. He 
therein opened a hotel, conducting it for 
twelve years, when he built his present 
commodious hotel. For thirty-nine years 
he has engaged in business along this line 
and has made the Constans House one of 
the most popular hostelries in the State, 
not only a favorite with the citizens of this 
community, but wirh the traveling public at 
large. He puts forth every effort in his 
power to make the house attractive and 
homelike, and it is neatly and tastefully fur- 
nished, well ventilated and arranged, and the 
the table is always supplied with the delica- 
cies of the season. In all his labors he has 
been ably seconded and assisted by his es- 
timable wife, and the success of the hotel is 
due in no small degree to her, a fact which 
Mr. Constans is not slow to recognize or 
acknowledge. 

The marriage which made Miss Barbara 
Hebeison Mrs. Constans was celebrated 
November 4, 1856. The lady came from 
Carver county, Minnesota, a daughter of 
Christian and Barbara (Jaberg) Hebeison, 
natives of Berne, Switzerland. Her father 
was a manufacturer of medicines and was 
also engaged to a limited extent in farming. 
In 1854 the family emigrated to America, 
landing in New York city, and after six 
months spent in Ohio removed to Indiana. 
In 1856 they came to Minnesota, settling on 
Government land, and later went to Carver 
county, where the father spent his last days, 
his death occurring in 1882. His wife died 
in Switzerland in 1846. They were the par- 
ents of live children: Christian, deceased; 
Maggie, now Mrs. Hostetter; Mrs. Constans; 
John, of Carver City; and Frederick. Mrs. 
Constans is a lady of culture and refinement 
and enjojs the high esteem of all with whom 
she has been brought in contact. By her 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAX AND JACKSON. 



61 



marriage she has become the mother of four 
sons: Charles \V. , a traveUng salesman, 
married Elizabeth J. Anderson and they 
have one son, Victor A. : they reside in Blue 
Earth City; Henry E. is a druggist of Blue 
Earth City; George F. is assistant cashier of 
the City Bank, and his home is in Blue 
Earth City; he married Eva Z. Ouayle and 
has two children, George M. and W'illard A. ; 
Frank E., who is a graduate of Carlton Col- 
lege, of Northfield, Minnesota, also of Hah- 
nemann College of Philadelphia and Ward's 
Hospital, of New York city, is a practicing 
physician of Brockton, Massachusetts, and 
married Emily Packard of that place. The 
children were provided with good educa- 
tional privileges and thus fitted for the prac- 
tical and responsible duties of life. 

In settling the new town of Blue Earth 
City its founders were extremely liberal in 
holding out inducements to parties to locate 
here, donating lots to those who would build 
homes or business houses upon them. They 
also gave a block for school purposes and 
another as a site for the court-house. Mr. 
Constans has always been a leader in all 
public matters that would be of benefit and 
improvement to the communit}', and the 
progress and development, as well as the 
material prosperity, of the county are due in 
no small degree to his labors in its behalf. 
The cause of education has ever found in 
him a warm friend and earnest supporter, 
and more than twenty years he served on the 
School Board, doing effective service for the ; 
schools of the city, which have been placed 1 
on a high plane. His influence has been 
felt in political matters, and he has served 
as chairman of the county democratic Com- 
mittee for many years. He was appointed 
Sheriff of the county on its organi;;ation and 
filled the office for four years in a most ac- 



ceptable manner, but has since declined all 
political preferment, save when elected to 
the first City Council. His loyalty to duty 
and his faithful citizenship have never been 
questioned and he well may be called one 
of the founders of the county, in whose ad- 
vancement and welfare he feels a just pride. 

Mr. Constans was made a Mason in 1858, 
in Blue Earth \'alley Lodge, No. 27, at 
Winnebago City, and was a charter mem- 
ber of the Blue Earth City Lodge, No. 57, 
of Blue Earth City. He is a member of 
the Mount Horeb Chapter, No. 21, R. A. 
M., at Winnebago City, and he has held of- 
ficial preferments in the order as I\ing and 
Scribe of the Chapter, and as Senior Dea- 
con of the blue lodge. 

Mr. and Mrs. Constans passed through 
the hardships and trials of life on the front- 
ier and have lived to see their own possess- 
ions increase from a limited capital to a 
comfortable competence. In addition to his 
hotel property they have a fine farm of 200 
acres and some real estate in Blue Earth 
City and St. Paul. In social, life they are 
highly respected, and their large circle of 
warm and admiring friends extends from 
ocean to ocean. They are faithful and con- 
sistent members of the Presbyterian Church, 
in which he is serving as Elder, and their 
well spent lives are worthy of emulation. 



m. 



^ILLIAM HUBBARD is a repre- 
sentative farmer of Martin county 
living on section 14, Tenhassen 
township, and with pleasure we 
present to our readers this record of his life. 
Biography is one of the most profitable stud- 
ies to which man can devote his attention. 
We learn of the means which have been 
used to win success, of commendable meth- 



62 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



ods, and have thus laid before us an example 
which may profitably be followed. The 
gentleman whose name heads this record is 
a self-made man, and there is much in his 
life that might teach others a useful lesson. 

The Hubbard family was probably 
founded in the Empire State at an early 
day in the history of this country, though we 
have but a limited record of the ancestry. 
The father of our subject, James Hubbard, 
was a native of Columbia county, New 
York, and in that State was born the lady 
whom he married, — Miss Catherine Hamil- 
ton, — their wedding being celebrated in Ot- 
sego county. New York. Prior to the war of 
the Rebellion they moved to Wisconsin, set- 
tling in Green Lake county, where the 
mother's death occurred. The father after- 
ward went to Meeker county, Minnesota, 
where he made his home until he, too, was 
called to his final rest. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Hubbard were well known people, whose 
well spent lives won them high regard. In 
their family were eight children, seven of 
whom are yet living, and one son, Charles, 
served in the army during the Civil war. 

In taking up the personal history of W'ill- 
iam Hubbard we present our readers the 
record of one of the popular and influential 
farmers of Martin county. He was born in 
Columbia county. New York, on the 4th of 
October, 1827, and the days of his bo3hood 
and youth were quietly passed in the Em- 
pire State, where a steadiness of character 
and self-reliance were developed to aid him 
in the coming struggles. He continued with 
his parents till twenty-one years of age, and 
gave his father the benefit of his labors upon 
the farm. 

In 1848 occurred one of the most im- 
portant events in the life of Mr. Hubl)ard, 
— his marriage to Miss Minerva Clark, a 



native of Otsego county, New York, and a 
daughter of William and Katie (Truax) 
Clark, who also were natives of the Empire 
State, in which they spent their entire lives. 
Both have now passed away. Their family 
numbered eleven children, five of whom are 
yet living. Mrs. Hubbard was born Novem- 
ber 10, 1829, and the days of her maiden- 
hood were passed in the county of her birth, 
its public schools affording her good educa- 
tional privileges. The union of Mr. and Mrs. 
Hubbard was blessed with a family of ten 
children, six of whom still survive. John, 
the eldest, married Eliza Manley and is liv- 
ing in Tenhassen township, Martin county; 
Adelbert, married Elizabeth Donaldson and 
also resides in Tenhassen township; Willie 
led to the marriage altar Bertha Donaldson 
and carries on agricultural pursuits in Ten- 
hassen township; Kate is the wife of James 
Huntsinger, of Iowa, and thej' have six 
children; Charles is the next younger; Mag- 
gie is the wife of H. Wadsworth, a resident 
of Brown county, Minnesota, ami four chil- 
dren grace this union. 

Upon their marriage, Mr. Hubbard set- 
tled upon a wild farm in Wisconsin and cul- 
tivated the land for a time. In the year in 
which the homestead law was passed, he be- 
came a resident of Minnesota, and Martin 
county thereby gained a valuable citizen. 
He located upon a farm in Lake Belt town- 
ship, devoting his mergies to its cultivation 
until 1867, when he came to his jiresent 
farm, then a tract of wild land, upon which 
not a furrow had been turned or an improve- 
ment made. This region was then sparsely 
settled, his nearest neighbors being miles 
distant, and he had to go to market in Win- 
nebago county. For a time his home was 
little more than a shanty, but as the years 
have passed and his financial resources have 



FARIBAULT, MARTIX, WATONWAN AN' J) JACKSON. 



63 



increased, he has added all the comforts 
known to civilized life to his pleasant resi- 
dence, — one of the substantial dwellings. 
The family passed through man}' hardships 
and privations, and when Mr. Hubbard went 
to war the family were left in desperate 
straits, at one time having only one biscuit 
to divide between seven children. The loy- 
al and faithful mother, however, made the 
best of everything, and though often her 
heart failed her she bore up for the sake of 
her children. 

Mr. Hubbard was greatl}- attached to 
his fainil}', but in 1864 he felt that duty re- 
quired his services at the front, and in con- 
sequence he bade adieu to wife and little 
ones, going to the front. The date of his 
enlistment was February 20, 1864, and he 
became a private of Company C, Si.xth 
Minnesota Volunteer Infantry. He was 
sent to Helena, Arkansas, where he re- 
mained for some time doing guard duty, 
although he suffered much from ill health, 
resulting from the rigor and hardships of 
arm_\' life. He afterward went to St. Louis, 
Missouri, where on the 19th of May, 1865, 
he was honorably discharged. 

He returned at once to his home, but for 
some time was unable to W(jrk. He has 
since lived upon his present fine farm, where 
he now owns 240 acres of rich land under a 
high state of cultivation and improved with 
all modern conveniences. He raises grain 
of all kinds, also cattle and hogs, and his 
able management and perseverance have 
brought him prosperity. He may truly be 
called a self-made man, for his success has 
come to him through his own efforts unsup- 
plemented by financial aid or infiuence. 
Working his way upward and overcoming 
the obstaces and difficulties in his path, he 
has triumphed over discouragement an(f ad- 



verse circumstances; and where many a man 
would have given up he has pushed his way 
forward. 

In his political views Mr. Hubbard is a 
Republican, and warmly advocates the prin- 
ciples of his party, which he has supported 
since its organization. He has held a num- 
ber of township offices, and the duties were 
discharged with the same fidelity and loyal- 
ty that he manifested when in the South he 
defended the old flag which now so proudly 
floats over the united nation. He holds 
membership in Estherville Post, G. A. R., 
of Estherville, Iowa, and has ever been a 
warm friend of education and of all enter- 
prises calculated to promote the general wel- 
fare. 



EON. DAVID PERRY WASGATT, 
deceased, was for several years 
a prominent citizen and business 
man of Winnebago City, Faribault 
county, Minnesota. 

He was born in the town of Mt. Desert, 
Hancock county, Maine, April G, 1830, and 
was the si.xth in a family of twelve children 
of Asa and Sarah (Gott) Wasgatt, both of 
whom were natives of the Pine Tree State. 
Asa Wasgatt was by trade a mason, owned a 
small farm in Hancock county, and for sev- 
eral years preached for the Methodist de- 
nomination, in which church he was a lead- 
ing member. 

The early life of David P. Wasgatt was 
spent on his father's farm and in attendance 
at the public schools, where he acquired a 
good education for those times. He taught 
school for a few years, and for two years 
worked in a ship-yard at Mount Desert. At 
the age of twenty-two he engaged in mer- 



64 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



chandising in his native town, and contin- 
ued that business successfully for twelve 
years. For four years he represented his 
county in the State Legislature, and while 
there was associated with United States Sen- 
ator Hale; and for two years wf.s employed 
by the Prohibitionists as Marshal of his 
county, to assist in enforcing the Maine liquor 
law. 

In 1 87 1, accompanied by his wife and 
three sons, he came to Minnesota, settling 
at Winnebago City, where he soon after 
opened a real-estate and loan office, and 
diligently applied himself to his business 
interests until his death, which occurred at 
his home in Winnebago City, September 
16, 1894. 

Mr. Wasgatt was a man of strongly 
marked individuality and pleasing presence. 
He always took a lively interest in public 
affairs and kept himself well informed on 
the questions of the day. A man of decided 
opinions, having the courage of his convic- 
tions, he as fearlessly opposed wrong as he 
defended right. He cast his first presiden- 
tial vote for John C. Fremont, and contin- 
ued to support the Republican party until 
after the close of the Civil war; but, being 
in favor of a tariff for revenue only, he was 
not in accord with Republican principles, 
and gave his support to the Democratic 
party. While a resident of Winnebago 
City he never sought political preferment, 
but held the office of justice of the Peace 
for two terms and always counseled disput- 
ing parties to settle their differences with- 
out litigation, and his advice was usually 
acted upon. He was a friend of education, 
and for several years a member of the 
School Board. He was one of the incor- 
porators of the Winnebago Building & Loan 
Association, and its success was due in a 



great measure to his business sagacity. He 
served as president of the association until 
his death. 

In religious thought, he was broad and 
liberal, and, although not a member of any 
visible church, he did much by example to 
further the cause of true Christianity. For 
some years he was Superintendent of the 
Presbyterian Sabbath-school, and a Trustee 
in that church, contributing liberally to its 
support. 

At Mount Desert, Maine, May 20, 1855, 
Mr. Wasgatt married Miss Sophia Winter 
Richardson, daughter of John and Rhoda 
W. Richardson, natives of Maine and of Eng- 
lish descent. This union resulted in the 
birth of four children, namely: William M., 
a resident of Winnebago City; Andrew 
Johnson, assistant Auditor of St. Louis 
county, Minnesota; Frank Guy, who is con- 
tinuing his father's business and studying 
law; and Charlotte Josephine. Mrs. Was- 
gatt and family are members of the Presby- 
terian Church, and enjoy the respect and 
confidence of the communitv. 



* y ^ ON. GEORGE D. McARTHUR, 
^"^ president of the Merchants & 
\ ^ P Farmers' Bank of Blue Earth City, 
Minnesota, has been prominently 
identified with Faribault county and with its 
important interests since 1856. He has been 
a leading figure in the commercial history 
of this section of the State and the prosperity 
and progress of this locality is largely due to 
his untiring efforts, his sagacity and excel- 
lent managerial ability. His life has been 
purely a business one, and he possesses that 
indomitable perseverance that enables him 
to carry forwtrd to successful completion 
whatever he undertakes. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



65 



Mr. McArthur is a native of New York, 
born in Columbia county on the 2 2d of Au- 
gust, 1834. The family was founded in 
America about the time the English took 
Holland, and for many years the Mc Arthurs 
have lived in the Empire State. The grand- 
father, N. McArthur, crossed the Atlantic 
with the Hoags, the maternal ancestors of 
our subject. The father, Duncan McAr- 
thur, was born in New York, in 1799, and 
there married Anna Hoag, who was born in 
Putnam count}', New York. Her death oc- 
curred in 1834. Six children had been born 
of that union, namely: Caleb, who is living 
in Faribault county; William N. ; Ward, who 
died in New York; Jane and Mary, who died 
in Wisconsin; and George D., of this sketch. 
After the death of his first wife, Duncan 
McArthur was again married, his second 
union being with Catherine Van Dusen, by 
whom he had four children, — Elizabeth, 
Cordilla, Martha and Floyd. In the year 
1849 the family left their New York home 
and emigrated to Wisconsin, which only the 
year previous had been admitted to the sister- 
hood of States. The father purchased a farm 
in Waukesha county, but was not long per- 
mitted to enjoy his new home, for the final 
summons came in 1851. 

The gentleman whose name heads this 
record lost his mother during his early in- 
fancy, and was only fifteen years of age 
when his father died. His youth was spent 
in attending the common schools, and he also 
spent two terms in Carrol College, acquiring 
a practical English education which has been 
of great value to him in his business career. 
In 1854 he returned to the State of his na- 
tivity, and after a year passed there came to 
Minnesota in 1855, locating in Winona 
county. The following year he came to 
Faribault county, first settling on a stock- 



farm in the town of Elmore. It was an un- 
improved tract of land, but he transformed 
it into a rich and fertile tract and extensively 
engaged in stock-raising, doing a large and 
most profitable business. He possesses ex- 
cellent executive ability, and his diligence, 
careful management and close attention to 
details made him most successful. 

In 1S64 he became identified with the 
commercial interests of Blue Earth City and 
for many years was one of its leading gen- 
eral merchants, doing business as the senior 
member of the well-known firm of McArthur, 
Hill & Company. They built up a very ex- 
tensive trade, securing a liberal patronage 
by straightforward and honest dealing, court- 
eous treatment and earnest desire to please 
their customers. They carried a splendid 
grade of goods and had but one price for all 
people, — a course which commanded uni- 
versal confidence. In 1869, Mr. McArthur 
embarked in the agricultural-implement 
business, and again prosperity attended his 
well directed efforts, he increasing his stock 
to meet the constantly increasing demand. 
He also established branch houses in Fair- 
mont, Winnebago City, Elmore and Wells. 
On August 7, 1890, in company with An- 
thony and Alexander Anderson and S. Pfef- 
fer, he organized the Merchants and Farm- 
ers' Bank of Blue Earth City, of which he 
was elected president, and in that capacity 
he has since served. Although new to the 
banking business, his administration of 
affairs has made this one of the solid finan- 
cial institutions of the county and has added 
to his high and well deserved reputation as a 
business man. As his financial resources 
increased he made careful and judicious in- 
vestments in real estate and now has some 
very valuable property. 

Mr. McArthur was married July 17, 1859, 



66 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



to Miss Anna S. Drake, a daughter of Will- 
iam S. Drake and a native of Orange county, 
New York. They have no children of their 
own, but out of the kindness of their hearts 
they have given a home to an adopted son, 
Guy S. Cliff, who lived with them from the 
age of three years and who is now engaged 
in farming in Faribault county. He married 
Kate Hunter and they are now comfortably 
situated in life. Both Mr. and Mrs. Mc- 
Arthur hold membership with the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, and are earnest Christian 
people, generous and benevolent, in whom 
the poor, needy and distressed find true and 
faithful friends who give them not only sym- 
pathy and advice, but also more mate- 
rial aid. 

Mr. McArthur was made a Mason in St. 
James Lodge of East Troy, Wisconsin, in 
1858, and is a charter member of Blue Earth 
City Lodge, No. 57, A. F. & A. M. He 
also belongs to the Veteran Lodge. In his 
political views he is a stalwart Republican 
and the principles of that party receive his 
earnest support, although he has never been 
a politician in the sense of office-seeking. In 
1858 he was elected to represent his dis- 
trict in the General Assembly and from that 
time forward steadily refused to accept office 
until 1894, when he was elected to the State 
Senate, in which he is now acceptably serv- 
ing. It is such men as Mr. McArthur that 
are needed to form the law and administer 
the affairs of the nation, — men f)f common 
sense, broad and liberal views, who are citi- 
zens and not politicians, and who know and 
understand what is required for good govern- 
ment and labor to secure it. As has been 
said his life has been a purely business one, 
yet this district has sent no one to its legis- 
lative halls that has more carefully looked 
after its interests. Praise is distasteful to 



him and display and ostentation are repug- 
nant, but it is just to say that no man has 
been a more important factor in the busi- 
ness history of Fairbault county or has done 
more for the best interests of this section of 
the State. 



eLMORE HOUGHTALING, a hard- 
ware merchant of Fairmont, Min- 
nesota, is a son of the late Jere- 
miah A. Hoiightaling. 
Jeremiah A. Houghtaling was born in 
Esopus, Ulster county. New York, Novem- 
ber 23, 181 5, son of Abram and Sarah 
(Veile) Houghtaling, both natives of the 
Empire State. The first twenty-two years 
of his life were spent in attending school 
and working on his father's farm. After that 
he turned his attention to boating on the 
Hudson river and ere long owned an inter- 
est in a boat. He continued on the river 
until 1856, when he removed to Ottawa, 
Waukesha county, Wisconsin, purchasing a 
farm near that place and residing upon it 
for two years. At the end of that time he 
sold out and moved to Milwaukee, where 
for a short time he ran a dray line. In 1859 
he again went to farming, which he con- 
tinued for eight years, and after that made 
his home in Milwaukee until 1875, having 
the management of a coal yard. In 1879 
he came to Fairmont, Minnesota, and estab- 
lished himself in the hardware business. 
Soon afterward Mr. ]. A. Sinclair became 
an equal partner with him, and in 1881 he 
sold his interest in the business to Mr. Colby, 
and during the three years following was 
engaged in farming. At the end of the three 
years he returned to Fairmont and bought 
from Mr. Colby two-tifths of the hardware 
establishment, and in I'ebruary, 1887, 




(//.' X:^/^'. ^/^//r/r/. 



FARIBAULT, MAIi77X, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



69 



bought the rest of Mr. Colby's interest, — 
one-fifth. He continued in the hardware 
business up to the time of his death, Sep- 
tember 28, 1890, carrying a large stock of 
goods and having an extensive trade. His 
farm, above referred to, is located six miles 
northwest of Fairmont and comprises 360 
acres. Mr. Houghtaling was prominent in 
local affairs wherever he lived, and was a 
man who was universally respected. He 
was President of Fairmont three terms, and 
while a resident of Wisconsin was chair- 
man of the Township Board, and also served 
as Assessor. Politically, he was a Democrat. 

He was married in Esopus, New York, 
December i, 1836, to Miss Catharine El- 
tinge, daughter of Ruloff and Dina (Eltinge) 
Eltinge, natives of Ulster county. New York. 
She was born in that county, April 13, 
1 8 19, and is now deceased. This worthy 
couple had a large family of children, 
namely: Dina, deceased; Abram, who mar- 
ried Barbara Miffley, resides in Fairmont; 
Ambrose, deceased; Sarah Jane, deceased; 
Magdaline, wife of Byron E. St. John, re- 
sides in Martin count}', Minnesota; Victoria, 
deceased wife of E. G. Comstock; Kate, 
deceased; Burns, deceased; Elmore; Lillian; 
and Richard, deceased. 

From the biography of Jeremiah A. 
Houghtaling, we turn for a sketch of the life 
of his son Elmore, with whose name we be- 
gan this article. 

Elmore Houghtaling was born at Bosco- 
bel, Wisconsin, June 23, i860. He was 
educated in the public schools of Milwaukee, 
and worked for his father, removing with 
him from place to place, as above recorded, 
until the latter's death. In 1890 he became 
a member of the firm of Houghtaling & 
Coult, dealers in general hardware, and has 
since been doing a prosperous business in 



this line. They also do a plumbing busi- 
ness. 

Mr. Houghtaling was married in 1888 to 
Miss Mary E. Wade, daughter of Captain 
E. F. Wade and a native of Trempealeau 
county, Wisconsin, the date of her birth be- 
ing December 16, i860. They have five 
children — Elma, J03', Eltinge, Lyn, and an 
infant. 

Mrs. Houghtaling is a believer in Chris- 
tian Science. Mr. Houghtaling is a member 
of the Congregational Church, being a 
Trustee and an active worker in the same. 
He is also active in fraternal organizations: 
is Recording Secretary of Fairmont Lodge, 
No. 70, L O. O. F. ; a member of the Pil- 
grim Encampment, No. 32, in which he has 
passed all the chairs; and is a member of 
the Modern Woodmen of America. He is 
a director of the Building and Association of 
Fairmont, and also a director of the Martin 
County Bank of Fairmont. Politically, he 
is a Democrat. 



V ^ Y^ ILLIAM HAMPTON BUDD.— 
Mm I After having spent a long and 
\jL^ useful career as a farmer and hav- 
ing accumulated some means and 
gained an enviable reputation for honor and 
integrity, the gentleman whose name we 
have just given is now living a retired life in 
Fairmont, Martin county, Minnesota. He 
is the son of Abraham D. and Margaret F. 
(Goble) Budd, natives of New Jersey. The 
place of the nativity of the subject of our 
sketch is in Roxbury (now Mount Olive) 
Morris county. New Jersey, where his birth 
took place March 28, 1829. On the farm 
where his father was born, and where he 
died July 31, 1 867, William H. was reared 
and in the ctMumon schools' he acquired his 



70 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



education. On attaining his majority he 
went to Dodge county, Wisconsin, and for 
six months engaged in days' labor. In 
March and April of 1 851 he took a trip 
through western Wisconsin, to within twenty 
miles of La Crosse, and there were but three 
houses on the present site of Sparta. After 
leaving Reedsburg, on the Little Baraboo 
river, there were a few houses scattered 
along for ten miles, and thirty miles beyond, 
on the Ivickapoo river, was a logging shanty, 
twenty miles from where the trail struck 
the Prairie du Chien and Black Falls road. 
Mr. Budd looked around for a day or two 
but the country was mostly timber land and 
he left for Prairie du Chien. Ne.xt he went 
to Iowa, traveling through some of the north- 
ern counties of that State, which was mostly- 
wild prairie with some timber on the streams. 
There were but few settlers, and the houses 
were frequently from ten to twenty miles 
apart and much of the traveling to and fro 
was done on foot. 

Returning to Dodge county, Wisconsin, 
in the course of a month and a half, Mr. 
Budd purchased a farm on which he lived 
part of the time until 1854. He then came 
to Minnesota and engaged in carpentering 
and other w'ork in Mankato, after which he 
took a trip east and northeast to find some 
people with teams and stock, who came 
across the countr}' and should have reached 
their destination two weeks previous. The 
country was not surveyed, and the company 
being lost had to travel over a part of the 
road twice. It was four or five days before 
Mr. Budd succeeded in finding them, but 
at last came up with them about ten miles 
from Faribault, Rice county. He also 
worked ill Kasota and St. Peter for some 
time, being variously employed until Decem- 
ber II, 1855. He visited Mankato and St. 



Peter when there were but seven houses in 
the former and one in the latter. At times 
there were large numbers of Indians en- 
camped on the bottom lands along the Min- 
nesota river, sometimes numbering into the 
thousands, and they often proved a great 
nuisance to the white settlers. On the i ith 
of December, 1855, he started for Dodge 
county, Wisconsin, traveling on foot from 
Kasota to Winona and La Crosse, Wiscon- 
sin. The morning of the second day was 
foggy and about one o'clock it began raining, 
but after two hours the wind shifted and the 
rain changed into a driving snow, which was 
blown before a strong northwest wind, and 
not only covered his clothes with a sheet of 
ice but also obliterated the road, and it re- 
quired skill and a clear headto find the way. 
He spent the night in Owatonna, and the 
next day started out again wading through 
snow from twelve to eighteen inches deep. 
It was a hard journey. After four days he 
I reached Winona, and the water was flowing 
] along in its regular course, but after two 
i days, the weather turning so intensely cold, 
he crossed the river on ice one mile below 
La Crosse. At the last named place he was 
forced to remain two days, for the stage 
company would not take their teams out of 
the stable, the weather being so bitterly 
cold. Mr. Budd remainsd at the New En- 
gland House, kept by a Mr. Robinson, one 
of John Jacob Astor's men who went across 
the continent to Astoria on the Columbia 
river to secure furs. Four days later our 
subject reached his destination and there re- 
mained until March, selling the land which 
he owned there. 

We next find Mr. Budd in Milwaukee, 
whence he went to Chicago, then by the 
way of Springfield, Illinois, to St. Louis, 
Missouri, where he took a steamer for Kan- 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAX AND JACKSON. 



71 



sas City. From that place he went to 
Lawrence, Kansas, which was in the midst 
of the border warfare of 1856. In the few 
daj-s which he passed there he had some ex- 
perience in defending the town from ruf- 
fians of the slave-State faction. Mr. Budd 
was a free-State man. He went through 
to the Delaware Indians' country and had 
to pass one night with the Indian farmers, 
after which he proceeded to Leavenworth 
on the Missouri River, but after a few days 
he went up the river to St. Joseph, where 
he joined a company of five that traveled 
across the country to Council Bluffs, Iowa, 
to attend a land sale, then went by stage to 
Dubuque. Six of the party left Council 
Bluffs in a heavy rain-storm and frequently 
had to bridge over marshy places along the 
road. The second day they had to walk 
part of the way and help lift the coach out 
of the mud, but Des Moines was at length 
reached and after a night passed there 
they proceeded to Iowa City, then the State 
capital, and after a long and tedious jour- 
ney reached Dubuque. Mr. Budd went up 
the Mississippi on a steamer and the river 
was so high that the house in which he had 
passed the night in December was in water 
up to the window sashes. That was one of 
the greatest overflows of the Mississippi that 
has ever been known. 

From St. Paul Mr. Budd went by 
steamer to Mankato and in a few days start- 
ed for the Winnebago Agency, where he was 
employed as assistant overseer of the Indian 
reservation until July i, 1856, when he 
came to Martin county to assist several fam- 
ilies in securing locations. He had no team 
and had to travel the entire distance on foot. 
This part of Martin county was then a part 
of Brown county, which was divided in May, 
'857, b)- the Legislature into nine new coun- 



ties. Mr. Budd here bought a squatter's 
right to a claim on which was some native 
timber, for he expected the families before 
referred to would soon be in need of this 
for fuel and he did not mistake. He paid 
$50 for his place and could at that time 
have secured any claim to the north or west 
for twenty miles. He also purchased a 
team and for some time continued to hold 
his claim, a part of which is now platted 
within the city limits of Fairmont, and upon 
the tract is situated his present home. He 
passed through all the hardships and difficul- 
ties peculiar to life on the frontier and has 
borne an important part in the development 
of this region. In March, 1857, the chief, 
Inkpaduta, with a band of Indian braves 
made an attack on the village of Springfield, 
now Jackson, Minnesota, and not satisfied 
with their depredations there went to Spirit 
Lake and Oakoboja, killing eight persons 
and wounding more at Jackson and about 
thirty-six at Oakoboja, and capturing four 
women and girls. Some of the Indians 
passed through the county and camped near 
Fairmont, but were prevented from com- 
mitting any more depredations here by 
some volunteers from Iowa. Mr. Budd, in 
company with a few neighbors, fortunately, 
had gone to Iowa for provisions at that time, 
or his own home would probably have 
been attacked. 

This journey into Iowa, made with sev- 
eral ox teams, was fraught with many hard- 
ships. They were detained by a snow- 
storm which lasted sixty hours, and snow 
fell to the depth of three to five feet. The 
storm turned to rain, which freezing formed 
a crust on the snow making it difficult to 
travel. Places of entertainment were scarce, 
and at times he was obliged to pay $1 for 
sleeping on the floor on his own blankets. 



72 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



and fifty cents each for feed and shelter for his 
oxen. Owing to scarcity of hay, they had 
to take the oxen farther south to find a suit- 
able place to leave them for a few weeks. 
When he returned to Iowa for his oxen he 
was obliged to break the crust on the snow 
for four miles, to enable the oxen to get to a 
beaten road where they could travel! 

Mr. Budd now again went to Dodge 
county, Wisconsin, but after a short time 
returned to his home in Martin county. In 
the summer he improved some of his land, 
and on the 22d of July received information 
of another Indian attack on the troops on 
the Indian land, caused by their not having 
received their pay and supplies from the 
Government. Mr. Budd, with some of his 
neighbors, built a fort and prepared to with- 
stand any attack, and he was elected Lieu- 
tenant and given charge of the little garri- 
son. There was much excitement and one 
man was shot, receiving a flesh wound. 
After a month passed in the fort, all danger 
being over, they returned to their farms and 
homes. 

In December, 1857, the county of Martin 
was organized and Fairmont nametl as the 
county seat. By the Governor Mr. Budd 
was appointed one of the first County Com- 
missioners, and in October, 1858, he was 
appointed Postmaster of Fairmont, — a posi- 
tion which he held until the spring of i860. 
At that time the village of Fairmont (or a 
jiortion of it) was surveyed and platted in 
the vicinity of our subject's farm, and in all 
these matters he took an active part, assist- 
ing materially in the development of all pro- 
jects tending toward the advancement of 
this locality. He continued in the office of 
County Commissioner until the spring of 
i860, when, in the month of June, he went 
to Rice rountv, working in the ha\' and 



harvest fields, afterward going to Mason 
county, Illinois, but after a few weeks re- 
turning to Minnesota, stopping at Chatfield 
and Winona through the winter and a part 
of the succeeding summer, employed at the 
carpenter's trade. In the fall of 1861 he 
returned to his claim in Martin county and 
was elected to the office of County Commis- 
sioner for the Second district, entering upon 
the duties of that office in January, 1862, 
and serving until February 20, 1864. He 
has served as County Clerk and filled other 
official positions, but again he turned from 
the affairs of peace to those of war, and in 
the fall of 1862 and the spring of 1863 acted 
as scout and guide to the various parties. 
During the Indian outbreak in September, 
1862, he helped to organize and joined the 
Home Guards of Winnebago City, being in 
the company one month. He was instru- 
mental in having the State form a line of 
military posts and garrisons from Fairmont 
to Madelia and Fort Ridgely and to the 
north, for protection of the settlers from the 
red men. 

On the 20th of February, 1864, Mr. 
Budd enlisted in Company C, Sixth Minnesota 
Infantry, serving faithfully until August 19, 
1865, when he was honorably discharged. 
He participatetl in the battles of Spanish 
Fort and Fort Blakely, together with num- 
erous skirmishes and battles of minor im- 
portance. When the war was over and the 
country no longer needed his services he re- 
turned to his farm and his home, and during 
the years that followed was engaged princi- 
pally in agricultural pursuits, although he 
worked to some extent at carpentering. For 
nearly nine months after his return from the 
war he was able to perform but little work, 
his health being broken by disease contracted 
while in the service. In 1876 he sold a 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



73 



part of his land — 220 acres — to Mr. Percy 
Wollaston for $20 per acre, but still retains 
possession of part of it. 

Mr. Budd was married in Martin county, 
March 31, 1864, to Lydia Jane Swearin^en, 
daughter of John B. and Jane (Brown) 
Swearingen, natives of Kentucky and Penn- 
sylvania, respectively. Mrs. Budd was born 
in Illinois and first married Z. Allen by 
whom she had two children, Zelpha and 
Amy Jane. The former is the wife of D. B. 
Edwards, and the latter married D. A. Dale 
and both live near the Budd homestead. 
Mr. and Mrs. Budd had two daughters, 
Edith May, wife of Charles Getty, and Amy 
Jane, and both make their home with their 
father. In 1893 Mr. Budd was called upon 
to mourn the loss of his wife, who died on 
the 22d of August and was buried in Fair- 
mont cemetery by the side of her parents. 
They had traveled life's journey together for 
twenty-nine years, and her loss is deeply 
mourned. 

Mr. Budd is a member of Phil Kearny 
Post, No. 18, G. A. R., Department of Min- 
nesota, of which he has been Chaplain and 
Quartermaster, serving in the latter posi- 
tion at the present time. His life has been 
well and worthily passed, and in addition to 
the offices which have been mentioned he has 
served two terms as President of the Village 
Board, and in the fall of 1866 was again 
elected County Commissioner, continuing in 
that office until 1873 as chairman of the 
board. During 1867, the board had to 
secure from the Governor a loan of $3,000 
to assist the needy throughout the county. 
He has discharged his duties with a prompt- 
ness and fidelity that has won him high com- 
mendation, and no more faithful officer 
could be found. The part which he has 
played in the history of this State makes him 



worthy of honorable mention in this volume 
among the honored pioneers and the found- 
ers of the county. The .story of frontier 
life is familiar to him not from hearsay but 
from experience, and in the development 
and progress of the county he has been an 
important factor. When the danger of 
Indian hostilities was imminent, he bravely 
prepared for the defense of those who were 
helpless; when the destruction of the Union 
was threatened he donned the blue and fol- 
lowed the stars and stripes. When his fel- 
low-townsmen called him to office he was 
again true to his duty, and in all the rela- 
tions of life he has ever been the same hon- 
orable, upright gentleman that is now known 
far and wide in southern Minnesota, and is 
respected alike by 3'oung and old, rich and 
poor. 



>^OHN H. JOICE.— This is an age of 

m progress, and America is the most 
A J lively exponent of the age. In the 
beginning of this century our coun- 
try was in its infancy, and history shows 
no parallel for its growth and achievements. 
No other country has made as great advance- 
ment in the same period, and though the 
East was the first in the work the younger 
and newer West is now not far behind and 
marching on with strides that will soon 
bring it abreast with the older section. 
Each community has its progressive citizens 
who are aiding in this work, and among 
those in Faribault county is John H. Joice, 
the well known banker of Wells. We feel 
assured that this record will prove of inter- 
est to many of our readers and gladly give 
it a place in this volume. 

A native of the town of Pleasant Springs, 
Dane county, Wisconsin, he was born near 



74 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



the city of Stoughton, December i, 1857, 
and springs from a sturdy family of Norway, 
" tlie land of the midnight sun." The 
family to which he belonged was comprised 
of the six children of Errick T. and Henri- 
etta (Rissnasj Joice, both of whom were 
natives of the city of Bergen, Norway. The 
father was brought up as a cooper and fol- 
lowed that trade for a number of years in 
his native land. He was born in 1829, and 
in 1849 was married, after which he brought 
his bride to the new world, locating first in 
the city of Chicago, where he lived for two 
years, employed as a cooper. He then came 
to the new State of Wisconsin, journeying 
overland from Chicago with an o.x team and 
settling in Dane county, where he lived for 
some six years, removing then to Monroe 
county, where he remained seven years. 
Tiring of farming, he then abandoned agri- 
cultural pursuits and settled in the city of 
Stoughton, where he resumed the old trade 
of coopering, carrying on a shop for fifteen 
years and doing a profitable business. The 
year 1 878 he became a resident of Forest 
City, Iowa, and established a lumber busi- 
ness which he successfully followed from that 
time until called to his final rest. He 
died in January, 1889, at the age of sixty 
years. He had prospered in his under- 
takings and had made investments in val- 
uable farm lands as well as in city prop- 
erty. He was a man of noble qualities, hon- 
orable in all dealings and the respect of all 
who knew him was cheerfully given him. He 
was public-spirited and took a commendable 
interest in everything pertaining tp the wel- 
fare of the community in which he made his 
home. During his residence in Iowa he was 
for a time a member of the City Council, 
and for some years was a member of the 
School Board, taking a deep interest in the 



cause of education. In politics he was al- 
ways an ardent Republican, fully believing 
in the principles of that party. From early 
life he was imbued with an earnest religious 
spirit, and after reaching mature years was 
ordained as a minister of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, preaching the gospel at vari- 
ous times and in various places in Wiscon- 
sin and Iowa, purely as a labor of love, 
seeking no remuneration for his services. 
His wife died in May, 1892, at the age of 
sixty-eight. She belonged to one of the 
leading and representative families of Nor- 
way, her brother being at the present time 
a member of the Parliament of that country. 
The surviving children of the Joice family 
are: Margaret, wife of Lewis Larson, of 
Britt, Iowa; Petra, wife of M. J. Pihl, of 
Forest City, Iowa; P. M., of Lake Mills, 
Iowa; and John H., of this sketch. 

Mr. Joice, of whom we write, was edu- 
cated in Stoughton, Wisconsin, and at Al- 
bion College, of Albion, that State. At the 
age of fifteen he began teaching school in 
the winter season, and continued that work 
through his collegiate course, which he com- 
pleted by his graduation at the age of nine- 
teen. He then entered upon his business 
career as bookkeeper for the Lumber, Sash 
& Door Company of Stoughton, remaining 
with that concern for five years. During 
that time he was married, — being joined in 
wedlock October i i, 1880, in Stoughton, to 
Miss Emily K. Asbjornson, a native of that 
city. They have now two living children, — 
Earl H. and Clyde M. 

In 1S82 Mr. Joice removed with his lit- 
tle family to Forest City, Iowa, where for 
one year he engaged in the lumber business 
with his father, and in 1883 he removed to 
Wausau, Wisconsin, where he purchased an 
interest in the First National Bank, and 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



75 



served as its teller and bookkeeper. For 
seven years he continued in Wausau, when 
in the spring of 1 889 he came to Wells, Min- 
nesota, and under the firm name of Joice, 
Law & Company established a private bank, 
which was conducted under the name of the 
Citizens' Bank. A fine lot was purchased in 
the center of the city and a first-class bank 
and office building erected. Mr. Joice was 
the active manager of the enterprise, which 
from the start was attended with success. 
In January, 1892, a re-organization was ef- 
fected under the name of First National 
Bank, capitalized for $50,000, with the fol- 
lowing officers: A. L. Taylor, president; P. 
M. Joice, vice-president; J. H. Joice, cash- 
ier; and A. O. Oleson, assistant cashier. 
This bank is one of the successful and flour- 
ishing financial institutions of the county, 
and is doing a constantly increasing busi- 
ness, conducted on a safe, conservative, yet 
progressive basis. 

Mr. Joice, of this sketch, is the largest 
stockholder in the institution, and in con- 
nection with his interest therein he is vice- 
president of the Security State Bank of Min- 
nesota Lake, organized in September, 1894. 
Since its organization in the spring of 1892, 
he has been president of the Wells Building 
& Loan Association, a concern which has 
not only been a prosperous one but has also 
been the means of promoting the welfare of 
the community by enabling people to build 
homes of their own who could not have 
done this had they been compelled to 
advance the ready money out of their own 
pockets. Of the Farmers' Co-operative As- 
sociation Mr. Joice is secretary, and he is 
also secretary of the School Board. He has 
at heart the best interests of the community, 
working for the ad\ancement of public en- 
terprises which are calculated to promote 



the general welfare, and is one of those pro- 
gressive men to whom the West owes its 
rapid advancement. 

In politics Mr. Joice is a Republican of 
pronounced views, and has served as a mem- 
ber of county and State conventions. He is 
a leading member of a number of civic so- 
cieties, holding membership in Walnut 
Camp, No. i960, Modern Woodmen of 
America, of which he is Venerable Consul, 
and is one of the leading promoters of the 
order in Minnesota. He is one of two dele- 
gates from this Congressional district ap- 
pointed to attend the Head Camp, at Madi- 
son, Wisconsin, in the summer of 1895. 
He also belongs to the Knights of Pythias 
fraternity, the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. He is known as one of the 
leading young business men of southern 
Minnesota, but his prominence is not alone 
in business circles, for his genial, pleasant 
manner and his sterling worth have made 
him a social favorite, and we see in J. H. 
Joice one of Wells' most popular citizens. 



BKANKLIN SEYMOUR TOOTH- 
ACKER, a farmer of section 9, 
Rutland township, is a son of Allen 
Toothacker, born in New Hamp- 
shire, in 1 784. His father, Roger Tooth- 
acker, was a Revolutionary soldier, of Eng- 
lish descent, and Allen Toothacker was a 
soldier in the war of 181 2. The mother of 
our subject, ncc Sallie Sloper, was born in 
New Hampshire in 1796, a daughter of 
Joshua Sloper, a native also of that State, 
of Welsh descent. Allen and Sallie Tooth- 
acker were married in Vermont, and re- 
mained there until 1831, when they made a 
permanent settlement in Pitcairn township. 



76 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



St. Lawrence county, New York, the father 
dying there in 1864, and the mother sur- 
vived until 1889. They were the parents 
of nine children, seven sons and two daugh- 
ters, and three are now living, — Roswell S., 
of Ottawa county, Michigan; Franklin S. , 
the subject of this sketch; and James S., of 
Kent count)-, Michigan. Two of the sons 
were soldiers in the Civil war, Samuel (de- 
ceased) and James S. 

Franklin S. Toothacker was born in 
Vermont, February 16, 1827, but was 
reared and educated in St. Lawrence county, 
New York. He began life for himself at 
the age of twenty-one 3ears. After his 
marriage he resided on a farm in St. Law- 
rence county until the spring of 1 860, then 
spent six years on a farm in Fond du Lac 
county, Wisconsin, next located on unim- 
proved land in section 9, Rutland township, 
Martin county, Minnesota, was driven from 
there one year afterward by the grasshop- 
pers, spent one year in Faribault county, 
and in 1876 located on the farm he now 
owns, then wild land. His place, consist- 
ing of 160 acres, is now under a fine state 
of cultivation. In his political relations 
Mr. Toothacker was formerly a Republican, 
but is now identified with the Prohibitioni.sts. 

Our subject was married in 1853 to 
Nancy Ann Siber, born in Oneida county. 
New York, July 11, 1837, a daughter of 
George Henry and Eliza Ann (Ostrander) 
Siber, natives of the Mohawk Valley, New 
York, the father born in 1812 and the 
mother in 181 i. They were married in St. 
Lawrence county, where they spent the 
remainder of their lives, the mother dying 
in 1877, aud the father survived until 1892. 
They were the parents of thirtcrn cliildren, 
si.\ now li\'ing, viz. : Aurilla, Nancy Ann, 
John, William, George and Julia. Three of 



the sons were soldiers in the Civil war, — 
James (deceased), ^^'illiam and John. Mr. 
and Mrs. Toothacker have had si.xteen chil- 
dren, ten now living, namely: Lucia, wife 
of David Barker, of Rutland township; 
Horace G., also of this township, married 
Katie Davis; Carrie M., wife of Sylvester 
Cooper, one of the Superviscirs of Center 
Creek township; Abraham L. , married Addie 
Palmer, and resides in Westford township; 
Benjamin Franklin, Clerk of Rutland town- 
ship; Emma F., wife of Emery Sickler, of 
Eraser township; Nettie Isabel; Pearl Ethel, 
wife of Christian Hansen, of this township; 
Laura Estell and Myrtle Ma}'. The family 
are members of the Christian Church, in 
which Mr. Toothacker has served as a 
Trustee. 



(D 



ARTIN SAILOR, a well-known 
farmer and stock-raiser of Fari- 
bault county, Minnesota, resides 
on his farm in section 29, Blue 
Earth City township. He was born in Elk- 
hart count}', Indiana, June 17, 1835, third 
in the family of the fifteen children of Jacob 
and Elizabeth (George) Sailor, his father a 
native of Monroe county, Ohio, and son of 
Jacob Sailor. Elizabeth George was a native 
of Virginia and a daughter of John George. 
Jacob Sailor and his wife were among the 
pioneers of Elkhart county, Indiana, and 
there he passed the greater part of his life, 
and died, being sixty-eight years of age at 
the time of his death. His wife survived 
him until 1894, when she died at the age of 
eighty-four years. 

On his father's frontier farm Martin Sailor 
spent the first sixteen years of his life, and 
from the time he was sixteen until he was 
twenty he worked out by the month. In the 







Q^ 







p 




FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



fall of 1855 he started for Minnesota with a 
horse team, and after a journey of twenty 
daj's landed at the home of his uncle, Moses 
Sailor, mention of whom is made elsewhere 
in this work. After remaining;- here a few 
days he went to Nashua, Iowa, to winter. 
In the spring of 1856 he came back to Min- 
nesota, arriving the second day of May. 
Being willing to work, he soon secured em- 
ployment, and here be it recorded that he 
helped to build the first house in Blue Earth 
City. This was the log hotel for H. P. Con- 
stans. In 1857 the subject of our sketch 
pre-empted 160 acres of Government land in 
section 29, Blue Earth Cit}' township, where 
he has since resided, and by hard work and 
good management his labors have been 
crowned with success. He now owns 245 
acres of tine land near Blue Earth City, 
where he has been prominently identified 
with the raising of fine stock. In connec- 
tion with his farming pursuits he has also 
practiced veterinary surgery for some years. 

During his early experience in this coun- 
ty, Mr. Sailor made many trips with o.\ 
teams to Nashua, Bradford and Elkader, 
Iowa, for provisions and milling. There 
were then no roads, and in crossing the 
streams great difficulty was encountered. He 
would have to unload his wagon and carry 
his load across, wading waist deep in the 
mud and water. This operation would have 
to be gone through from ten to twenty-five 
times in making the trip. On his last trip 
he started with two yoke of oxen and they 
got stuck in the mud with an empty wagon. 
From seven to ten days were required in 
making these trips. 

Mr. Sailor was married February 14, 
1858, to Miss Phebe Louisa Blancher, a 
native of Chautaucjua c(junt\'. New York, 
whocamewest to Iowa in 1857. They have 



two children: Martha Jane, wife of Peter 
LaDuke, and Oscar Edwin, who married 
Ella Sulli\an. Besides their own children, 
they reared a boy and gave him a start in 
life when he reached his majority. Mrs. 
Sailor is a member of the Presbyterian 
Church. 

Politically, Mr. Sailor is an independent 
in his voting. 



* y ^ OX. MICHAELEZEKIELLEWIS 

I'^^k SHANKS, a prominent attornc}' of 
J ^ * Fairmont, was born in Berkeley 
county, Virginia, now West Vir- 
ginia, October 3, 1835, and descended from 
good old Revolutionary stock. His grand- 
father, Joseph Shanks, a native of Ireland, 
emigrated to America in Colonial times. 
He served the Colonies during their entire 
seven-years struggle for independence, and 
was with Washington at Valley Forge. The 
father of our subject, Michael Shanks, was 
born in Pennsylvania, and at the age of six- 
teen years, accompanied his parents on 
their removal to Virginia. He married 
Martha Cleaver, a native of Virginia, and 
daughter of Beason Cleaver, who was of 
Scotch and Welsh descent, and a member of 
the society of Friends. Mr. and Mrs. Shanks 
began their domestic life in the Old Domin- 
ion, where he followed the trade of mill- 
wright for thirty years, removing on the 
expiration of that period to Ohio, where 
they spent one year, and then went to 
Indiana, locating on a farm in Jay county, 
in 1842. There he jarried on farming dur- 
ing the remainder of his life, dying when 
past the age of eighty-ti>'e years. Mrs. 
Shanks also died in Jay county, Indiana, 
when in the eighty-third year of her age. 



82 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



They had four sons and four daughters, 
namely: AHce J. G., who grew to woman- 
hood and mairied, but is deceased; Joseph 
E. B., who served as a soldier during the 
Mexican war, and died of cholera at Fort 
Brown, Texas, while on his way home from 
the war; Sarah E. died in infancy; John P. 
C, a prominent lawyer and politician of 
Portland, Indiana, who served in the State 
Legislature, and in the United States Con- 
gress a number of years. He was appointed 
Colonel at the beginning of the Civil war, 
raised the Tenth Regiment of Indiana Cav- 
alry, and served during that struggle, being 
a member of Fremont's staff while in Mis- 
souri, and is now living at Portland, Indiana; 
Martha M. B. became the wife of Billingsly 
McCoy, a farmer of Jay county, Indiana, 
who served in the Union army during the 
Civil war, and died soon after; Lydia H. 
M. married Enoch Hartley, a farmer of Jay 
county, Indiana; M. E. L. , of this sketch; 
and Stephen B. H. became a member of 
the One Hundredth Indiana \V)lunteer In- 
fantr}', was wounded at the battles of Chat- 
tanooga and Lookout Mountain, and now 
lives in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Mr. Shanks, of this mention, obtained his 
primary education in the common schools of 
Jay county, Indiana, walking a distance of 
two and a half miles to the little schoolhouse. 
At the age of seventeen, he went to live 
with his brother John, and while residing 
there attended Liber College, near Portland, 
Indiana, where he took a three-years' scien- 
tific course, after \\hich he studied law in 
his brother's office. He was admitted to the 
bar in 1856, and a few years later came to 
Minnesota in search of a suitable place in 
which to practice his chosen profession. In 
Januar}', 18G0, Mr. Shanks located at Fill- 
more, Fillmore county, wlieie he engaged in 



practice, continuing until 1866, when he 
came to Fairmont. 

On his arrival here Martin county was 
but sparsely settled, and the now prosper- 
ous city of Fairmont contained less than 
half a dozen houses. He has not only wit- 
nessed almost the entire growth and devel- 
opment of Martin county, but has also been 
an important factor in its material advance- 
ment, and with its political history his name 
is inseparably connected. The first public 
office to which he was elected in Martin 
county, was that of Judge of the Probate 
Court. For seven years he served as County 
Attorney, and then declined a re-nomina- 
tion. A stanch supporter of Republican 
principles, he was elected by that party to 
the State Legislature, representing the dis- 
trict then comprising Faribault, Martin, 
Jackson, Noble and Rock counties, in the 
session of 1870. In 1879, he was again 
elected to that office, a representative from 
the district composed of Martin and Fari- 
bault counties. While a member of the 
house he served on the Judiciary and other 
important committees, and labored earnestly 
and faithfully to secure wise and beneficial 
legislation. In 1880, Mr. Shanks was elected 
County Auditor, and served six consecutive 
years, when he refused further political 
honors, and his son, E. B., the present in- 
cumbent, was chosen as his successor. On 
retiring from public office Mr. Shanks re- 
sumed the practice of his profession, which 
has since occupied his time and attention, 
and he now enjoys a large and lucrative 
business. 

On the iith of August, 1859, at New 
Corydon, Indiana, Mr. Shanks married 
Martha E. Tyson, a native of Ohio, and 
daughter of Harper and Charlotte (Jones) 
Tyson. Mrs. Shanks was reared by an uncle, 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WAI^ONWAN AND JACKSON. 



S3 



her mother having died when she was a child. 
Her father settled in Fillmore county, this 
State, in 1S57, where he lived until the time 
of his death, which occurred in his eighty- 
eighth year. Her brother. Job R. Tyson, 
was a member of the Minnesota Mounted 
Rangers, and died at Fort Snelling, this 
State, while in the service. Rachel Tyson, 
a sister of Mrs. Shanks, was attending 
school at McConnellsville, Ohio, at the time 
of her death. Mrs. Shanks' father and uncle 
purchased " Woodlawn " mansion in Vir- 
ginia, which was built and occupied by 
George Washington, where they resided for 
a time, subsequently removing to Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania, where Mrs. Shanks 
spent the most of her girlhood. She was a 
student for a time in the saine college which 
Mr. Shanks attended, and there the acquaint- 
ance was formed which ultimatelj- resulted 
in their marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Shanks 
have a family of si.\ children, viz. : Edgar 
B., the present County Auditor; John B., a 
graduate of the University of Michigan at 
Ann Arbor, is now principal of one of the 
city schools in Detroit, Michigan; Harper A. 
lost his hearing at the age of two yeari, was 
graduated at the Deaf and Dumb Institute 
of Faribault, Minnesota, is a shoemaker by 
trade, also a printer, and resides with his 
parents; Lewis E., who was educated in 
Hamline University and the Northwestern 
University at Evanston, Illinois, is serving 
as Deputy County Auditor; Cora B., who is 
well educated in music and delights in that 
science, still brightens the home of her par- 
ents in Fairmont; and Abbie F., a well edu- 
cated and accomplished young woman who 
studied music in the Northwestern University 
at Evanston, Illinois, is the wife of J. E. 
James, of Jackson, Minnesota. 

Fraternally, Mr. Shanks is a member of 



Chain Lake Lodge, No. 64, A. F. & A. M., 
in which he filled the office of Worshipful 
Master a number of years, and of Fairmont 
Chapter, No. 50, R. A. M., in which he is 
serving as High Priest. 

Mr. and Mrs. Shanks are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in re- 
ligious and social circles enjoy the confidence 
and respect of a large number of friends 
where they have so long made their home. 



*-|r^ E\T NELSON DRAKE, a farmer 
I r of section 14, Tenhassen township, 
1^^^ Martin county, is a son of Zepha- 
niah and Phoebe (Middaugh) Drake. 
The father was born in Sullivan county, 
New York, a son of Daniel Drake, a native 
of the same place. The mother was born 
in Pike county, Pennsylvania, as was also 
her father, Levi Middaugh. The parents 
were married in Pond Eddy, New York, and 
they then resided on a farm in Pike county, 
Pennsylvania, until the father's death, in 
1843. The mother departed- this life in 
1893. They were the parents of si.\ chil- 
dren, three now living, — Levi N., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; William J., of Minnesota; 
and Maggie J. Buchannan, of New York. 

Levi N. Drake was born in Pond Eddy, 
New York, August 15, 1832, and remained 
with his grandmother Drake until twenty- 
one years of age. In 1854 he removed to 
Waupaca county, Wisconsin, where he pur- 
chased and improved a claim. In 1858 he 
located in Blue Earth county, Minnesota, 
purchased fifty-five acres of land near Shel- 
byville, and followed agricultural pursuits 
there until 1866. In 1863 Mr. Drake began 
carrying United States mail from Garden 
City to Tenhassen, three years afterward 
carried the mail from Blue Earth City to 



84 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Spirit Lake, Iowa, next from Tenhassen to 
Winnebago City, thence from Wells toMan- 
kato, and in 1886 from Fairmont to Esther- 
ville, Iowa. During his Government service 
he experienced many hardships from storms 
and other trials. In 18C3 Mr. Drake pur- 
chased his claim in Martin county, and he 
now owns 572 1-2 acres of well improved 
land. 

November i, 1861, Mr. Drake enlisted for 
service in the late war, entering Company 
I, Fifth Iowa Cavalry. He was sent to 
Fort Donelson, afterward became sick with 
measles at St, Louis, rejoining his regi- 
ment at Fort Henry, was engaged in guard- 
ing telegraph lines at Camp Lowe, and then, 
on account of sickness, was sent to a hos- 
pital eight miles from Corinth, remaining 
there about four weeks. He received his 
discharge from Keokuk, Iowa. Mr. Drake 
is now a member of the G. A. R. , Phil. 
Kearny Post, No. 18, and has also held 
offices in the Masonic order. In his politi- 
cal relations, he acts with the Republican 
party. He has held the positions of Treas- 
urer, Constable and Supervisor of Tenhas- 
sen township, and has been a member of the 
School Board in District No. 79. 

Mr. Drake was married January i, 1889, 
to Sophia Basset, born in Canada, March 
22, 1846, a daughter of Judge Thomas and 
Harriet (Lawrence) Nichols, natives of 
England. They came to America when 
young, were married in Canada, and during 
the war removed to Chicago, Illinois. They 
afterward went to Wisconsin, and in 1862 
came to Minnesota, spending six months in 
Owatonna, and then located in Pleasant 
Prairie, Martin county. They now reside in 
Spokane, Washington. While in Martin 
county, Mr. Nichols ser\e(l as PiuIkiIi' Judge. 
They had six children, — Soi)liia, John, 



Thomas, Delia, Amy (deceased) and Hattie. 
Mrs. Drake is a member of the Seventh-Day 

Advcntists. 



@EORGE WASHINGTON SMITH, 
a farmer of section 20, Rolling 
Green township, is a son of Chris- 
topher C. and Nancy (Letson) 
Smith. They moved from Vermont to Clin- 
ton county. New York, thence to Wiscon- 
sin, and in 1X65 came to Minnesota, stop- 
ping for a short time in Dodge county. In 
August, of the same year, they came to 
Martin county, locating in Nashville town- 
ship, and their nearest neighbor was two 
miles distant. Mr. Smith improved his 
farm and remained there about nine years, 
when he located on unimproved land in the 
northwest quarter of section 20, Rolling 
Green township. Eight years afterward he 
moved to Washington, where he still resides. 
Mrs. Smith departed this life in 1 880. They 
were the parents of seven children, three 
now living, — George W., Nancy, Lelila 
Cross and Hattie M. Oakland. By his first 
marriage to Miss Douglas, Mr. Smith had 
one daughter, Elsie Chamberlain. 

George W. Smith, the subject of this 
sketch, was born in \'ermont, June 29, 
1852, and came to Minnesota at the age of 
thirteen years. From the age of eighteen 
to twenty-four years he assisted in the sup- 
port of his parents. In 1 877 he located on 
the farm he now owns, consisting of 160 
acres, all under a fine state of cultivation, 
and he is engaged in general farming. Mr. 
Smith spent the year of 1890 in Wash- 
ington. 

January 12, 1876, he was united in mar- 
riage witii Lillian K. Higgins, a native of 
I'ond du Lac county, Wisconsin, and a 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



85 



daughter of Proctor ami Juliaette (Willis) 
Higgins, who has made his home with our 
subject for the past three years and is now 
in the eighty-third year of his age. To 
this union have been born five children, 
namely: Martin Earl, born June 24, 1879; 
Charles Irving, born January 9, 1S81; Mabel 
Clare, November 28, 1882; George Frank- 
lin, June I, 1885; and Lela Ruby, July 8, 
1889. The family are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church at Welcome, 
in which Mr. Smith holds the position of 
Trustee, and they are regular in attendance 
at the Sunday-school. In political matters 
Mr. Smith afifiliates with the Prohibition 
party, and has served as Director of School 
District No. 51. 



*| ^ ON. BASIL SMOUT, a prominent 
W "% pioneer of Faribault county, re- 
\ ^ r siding at Wells since 1870, was born 
in London, England, March 20, 
1835. His father, M. J. Smout, a tailor by 
trade, married Ann Ichman. These par- 
ents, both natives of Albion's isle, brought 
up to years of maturity five children, — Will- 
iam, Charles, Basil, Peter and Catharine 
Margaret. The last mentioned married John 
Robertson, of Cornwall, Canada West. 
William died in Madras, India, was a sol- 
dier in Her Majesty's service, the Forty- 
third Light Infantry; Peter is now in Ever- 
ett, Washington; and Catharine resides at 
Austin, Minnesota; but it is not known where 
Charles is. 

Mr. Basil Smout, concerning whom this 
sketch is written, was five years old when 
his parents emigrated to Canada. His 
father was a master tailor in the Sixty- 
seventh Infantry of Her Majesty's service. 
On emigration to this country the family set- 



tled in Cornwall, Canada West, where they 
resided for a number of years. Young Basil 
was educated in the public schools. When 
si.xteen years of age he went to Oswego, 
New York, and was employed there as a 
clerk in a grocery store for a year. Return- 
ing to Canada, he learned the trade of 
tinner, in Cornwall; then went to Potsdam, 
New York, and afterward to Fulton, same 
State, and landed at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
in May, 1855. In August following he went 
to Prairie du Sac, in that State, where. May 
31, 1857, he was married. 

During the civil war he enlisted as a pri- 
vate in Company K, Twenty-third Wiscon- 
sin Volunteer Infantry, for three years, and, 
having aided in the enlistment and organiza- 
tion of the company, he was elected Orderly 
Sergeant, and served as such for a period of 
seven months, when he was promoted to 
the rank of Second Lieutenant. He was 
with his company through the Vicksburg 
and Red river campaigns. March 28, 1864, 
he was detailed and took command of the 
Pioneer company of the Fourth Division, 
Thirteenth Army Corps, when with his men 
he helped to construct the famed Bailey 
dam on Red river at Alexandria, Louisiana, 
for which service he with others received the 
thanks of the United States Congress. He 
was in fourteen engagements altogether, 
and was honorably discharged for disability 
in December, i S64, hax'ing served twenty- 
eight months. 

Shortly after returning to Prairie du Sac 
he mo\'e(l to Austin, Minnesota, where he 
and W. L. Austin engaged in the hardware 
trade under the firm name of Austin & 
Smout. In 1870 he moved to Wells, Fari- 
bault county, where he carried on the hard- 
ware business for many years; he is now en- 
gaged in trade in agricultural implements, etc.- 



86 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Mr. Sinout has always been a Republi- 
can, having voted for General John C. Fre- 
mont in 1856, and his capacity (or public 
service and his integrity have ever been 
recognized by his fellow citizens, who have 
kept him in office so far as they could per- 
suade him to accept. He has twice repre- 
sented his district in the State Legislature, 
has held various town offices, and is at pres- 
ent chairman of the town board. 

For his wife he married Emma L. Aus- 
tin, who was born in Boscawen, New Hamp- 
shire, a daughter of William L. and May 
W. Austin. Mr. and Mrs. Austin were na- 
tives of Vermont. 



>Y*OHN CLABAUGH, deceased, was 
m one of the pioneer settlers of Fari- 
m J bault county, Minnesota, and one of 
its most highly respected citizens. 
Some personal mention of his life and family 
is herewith presented. 

John Clabaugh was born in Bedford 
county, Pennsylvania, December 2, 1812, 
and was reared to farm life and educated in 
the public schools. His parents were James 
and Elizabeth Clabaugh, both of German 
descent. After his marriage, which event 
occurred in 1842, Mr. Clabaugh continued 
fanning in his native State a short time, 
from there removing to Crawford county, 
Ohio, where he rented land four years. At 
the end of that time he again turned his face 
westward and took up his abode in Fayette 
county, Iowa, near West Union. On a 
rented farm at that place he continued to 
reside until 1856, when he came to Fari- 
bault county, Minnesota, and settled on 
section 10, Winnebago City township, pre- 
empting 160 acres of land and buying eighty 
acres adjoining his pre-emption claim. To 



the cultivation and improvement of this farm 
he devoted his energies, was successful in 
his operations, and at his death, December 
20, 1889, left to his widow and children a 
nice propert}'. Mr. Clabaugh was a man of 
many sterling traits of character, and was 
honored and respected by all who knew him. 
Politically he was in early life a Whig, and 
after the organization of the Republican 
party he gave his support to it. He was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
March 10, 1842, Mr. Clabaugh married 
Miss Mary Jane Jemison, a native of the 
same county in which he was born, and a 
daughter of Joseph and Susan (Ritchie) 
Jemison, both natives of Pennsylvania. Mrs. 
Clabaugh is still living at the old homestead. 
They had a family of seven children, all of 
whom grew to maturit}'. James, the eldest 
son, enlisted August 17, 1862, in Company 
D, Ninth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, and 
served nearly two years, participating in all 
the engagements in which his regiment took 
part. He was taken prisoner at Guntown, 
Missouri, and was imprisoned for a time at 
Mobile, and was then taken to Anderson- 
ville, where he was incarcerated. He had 
had a partial sunstroke the day of the bat- 
tle, and he did not long survive the starva- 
tion and neglect of that terrible prison life, 
dying July 17, 1864. He was a young man 
of noble character, and that he was held in 
high regard by his comrades is evinced by 
the fact that they named the G. A. R. post 
at Winnebago City James Clabaugh, in 
honor of him. The other members of the 
family are as follows: Winnie, wife of 
Thomas White, resides in Spencer, Iowa; 
Susie, wife of John Nichols, resides on a 
farm in this township; Cornelia, wife of Ben- 
jamin F. Pierce, lives in Winnebago City 
t(>wnshi[\ Mr. Pierce being a carpenter; 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



S? 



Emma is the wife of John Goldsworthy, a 
stock dealer of Spencer, Iowa; Luther, who 
died October 8, 1893; and Elgie, wife of 
Victor Resche, lives at the old Clabaugh 
homestead. 



m 



ARTIN V. CARPENTER, who 
has been one of those indomitable 
men who assisted in the reclaim- 
ing of Fairbault county from the 
primitive wilds and who is recognized as one 
of the representative agriculturists and most 
honored residents of said county, well merits 
consideration in the compilation of such a 
volume as the one at hand. 

A native of Cattaraugus county. New 
York, Martin V. Carpenter was born on 
the 7th of August, 1839. The Carpenter 
family were early settlers of the Empire 
State, and John Carpenter, the grandfather 
of our subject, was a soldier in the war of 
1 81 2, as were also two of his sons. Grand- 
mother Carpenter was before her marriage 
a Miss Avery, and she, too, was a native of 
New York. The most of their lives, how- 
ever, was passed in Ashtabula county, Ohio, 
where they died. Their son, John, the 
father of our subject, was reared in Oneida' 
county, New York. He married Miss Sally 
Aniidon, a native of Readsboro, Vermont, 
and a daughter of Rev. Ezra Amidon, a 
clergyman in the Reformed Methodist 
Church. He died at Waupun, Wisconsin. 
The younger John Carpenter and his wife 
lived in Cattaraugus county, New York, for 
over forty years. In 1867 they came to 
Minnesota, and here passed the closing years 
of their lives. The mother died at the age 
of seventy-six years, and the father at eighty- 
six. He was a Democrat in politics, and 
while in New York took an active part in 



public affairs. He served efficiently as 
Sheriff of Cattaraugus county. Fraternally 
he w-as a Mason, and was buried by the 
order he loved and of which he was an hon- 
ored member. He and his wife had seven 
children, namely: Ruth, who died in Ohio; 
lantha Darling, of Wisconsin; Avery, who 
died when young; Sarah Franklin, who died 
in Dodge county, Minnesota; T. J., a resi- 
dent of Verona township, Fairbault county; 
James. Monroe, a member of the One Hun- 
dred and Fifty-fourth New York Infantry, 
died at Chattanooga, Tennessee; and Martin 
v., the immediate subject of this review. 
Martin V. Carpenter was reared to farm 

, life and was educated in the common schools. 

I He has been identified with Verona town- 
ship since September 22, 1867, and since that 
time he has owned his present farm, which 
was all wild land at the time he assumed 
possession thereof. He now has 330 acres, 
well improved, with good house, barn, wind- 
mill, etc., and everything in fine order. 
During the past four years he has been a 
resident of Blue Earth City, where he has 
an elegant residence, erected at a cost of 
$3,000, but he returned to the farm in the 
fall of 1894. 

Mr. Carpenter was married July 4, 1861, 
to Sylvia Macomber, who was born and 
reared in Wyoming county. New York, 
daughter of William H. and Harriet (Bal- 
com) Macomber, the former a native of On- 
tario county. New York, and the latter of 
Williamstown, Massachusetts. Mrs. Macom- 
ber is a daughter of William and Sally 
(Laribee)Balcom, and her grandfather Lari- 
bee was a soldier in the war of the Revolu- 
tion. William H. Macomber and his wife 
came to Faribault county, Minnesota, in 
1868, and here he died in 1890, at the age 
of seventy-three years. Mrs. Macomber is 



ss 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



still a resident t)f the county, hiuing attained 
her seventy-third year. She is a member of 
the Baptist Church. Mrs. Carpenter is their 
only child. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter have three chil- 
dren living, namely: Mabel, Mina May and 
Eugene M. They lost one child in infancy; 
Hattie died at the age of ten years; Ada 
Belle, wife of Moses Leonard, died in 1S92, 
at the age of twent3'-tvvo jears; and Erma 
Myrtle died December 10, 1894, at the age 
of fourteen years and seven months. The 
eldest surviving daughter is a popular and 
successful teacher. 

Fraternally Mr. Carpenter is identified 
with Blue Earth City Lodge, No. 57, A. F. 
& A. M., and with Orient Lodge, No. 34, A. 
O. U. W., of Blue Earth City. Politically he 
is a Democrat, and while he has never been 
an office-seeker he has served acceptably as 
Supervisor and as a member of the School 
Board. Mrs Carpenter and daughters are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 



eDGAR BEASON SHANKS 
is well known throughout Martin 
county and is now serving as County 
Auditor. He has the honor of 
being a native of Minnesota, for he was born 
in Fillmore count}-, July 31, i860. He is 
the eldest son of Hon. M. E. L. and Martha 
E. (Tyson) Shanks, and came to Fairmont 
with his parents when a child of si,x years. 
Here he began school at the age of nine 
years and pursued his studies until eighteen 
years of age, acquiring a good practical 
knowledge, which has been of much use to 
him in his business career. Between the 
ages of sixteen and nineteen years he carried 
the mail from Blue Earth City to Fairmont, 
and in this wav earned his first monc\'. He 



afterward spent eight months at work upon 
the railroad, receiving one dollar per day, 
and the money he thus earned was used to 
pa}' his tuition in a business college in St. 
Paul, at which he was graduated in the spring 
of 1 88 1 . Realizing the need of a good busi- 
ness education, he made strenuous efforts to 
obtain one, and by industry and perseverance 
accomplished this. 

On his return home Mr. Shanks received 
the appointment of Deputy County Anditor, 
in March, -1 88 1, and for five years served in 
that capacity, discharging his duties in a very 
prompt and efficient manner, so much so 
that on the e.xpiration of that period, in 1 886, 
he was elected to the superior office and has 
since been County Auditor. When elected 
he was the youngest man filling such a posi- 
tion in the State, which certainly was a com- 
pliment to his ability and indicated his per- 
sonal popularit}' and the confidence reposed 
in him. .\t each succeeding election he has 
been chosen his own successor, and in 1894 
was again elected, so that when his present 
term expires he will have served for ten years 
as County Auditor, while his connection with 
the office will cover a period of fifteen years 
— a record of which he may well be proud. 

In 1882 Mr. Shanks became a member 
of Company D, Second Minnesota National 
Guards, and served as Corporal for a time. 
He was afterward made First Sergeant, later 
Color Sergeant, then Second Lieutenant, 
and, in December, 1894, he was elected to 
the Captaincy of the company, which position 
he still retains. His company occupies sec- 
ond rank in the regiment, and under the able 
leadership of Captain Shanks it will no doubt 
win higher honors. Our subject is also serv- 
ing as a member of the Board of Education, 
to which position he was first elected in July, 
1891, his re-election dating July, 1894. In 




-^i 



//////V// 



FARIBAUL7\ MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



May, 1891, and at each succeeding election, 
he has been chosen a member of the board of 
directors of the Fairmont Buildinf( & Loan 
Association. He affiHates with Fairmont 
Lod^e, No. 70, I. O. O. F. , in which he has 
passed all the chairs and was sent as the 
representative of his lodge to the Grand 
Lodge in 1892, being at present Captain of 
the Degree Team. 

On-the 15th of April, 1883, was celebra- 
ted the marriage of Captain Shanks and Miss 
Lilly Meteer, who was born near Springfield, 
Illinois, July 4, 1857, and who, when about 
ten years of age became a resident of St. 
Charles, Minnesota, removing thence to 
Martin county eight years later. To our 
subject and his wife were born four children, 
two sons and two daughters, namely: Ivan, 
Etta, Mabel, and Marc. Wherever Cap- 
tain Shanks is known he is honored and re- 
spected, whether in social, political or mili- 
tary circles and wherever he goes he wins 
friends. His long continuance in public 
office, his advancement to the Captaincy of 
his company and his connection with edu- 
cational interests show that he has the high 
regard of all, and therefore we take great 
pleasure in presenting to our readers this 
brief record of his life. 



aHARLES S. DUNBAR, who carries 
on general fanning on section 17, 
Foster township, Faribault county, 
claims New York as the State of 
his nativity, Seneca, Ontario county, as the 
locality of his birth, and May 16, 1831, as 
the date. The Dunbar family was founded 
in America in early Colonial days by mem- 
bers of the family who emigrated from 
county Merle, Scotland. The great-grand- 
father of our subject, Asa Dunbar, was born 
5 



in Massachusetts, about the year 1730, and 
was a man of prominence in the community 
in which he made his home. Of gigantic 
stature, si.x feet and a half in height, every 
one knew Asa Dunbar, and his sterling worth 
commanded the respect of all. The grand- 
father, Joshua Dunbar, was born in the old 
historic town of Barnstable, on Cape Cod, 
in the year 1763, and during the last two 
years of the Revolutionary war aided the 
Colonies in their struggle for independence. 
He was for one year a privateer and the re- 
mainder of the time a member of the mili- 
tia. After the war was over he married 
Lydia Odle, and in 1790 emigrated with his 
family to New York, settling in the town of 
Seneca. The journey was made with an ox 
cart, which contained the household effects 
as well as the family. Mr. Dunbar entered 
land and settled in the wilderness, becoming 
one of the pioneers of that region. He spent 
his life in clearing away the forest and de- 
veloping his land, and a fine farm resulted 
from his labors; and there he and his wife 
were buried. From a feeling of pride he 
would receive no pension for his services in 
the war of the Revolution, but after his 
death one was granted his widow through- 
out the remainder of her life. 

Joshua Dunbar, father of our subject, 
was born on the family homestead in Seneca, 
New York, on the 28th of October, 1802, 
and in 1834 removed to Niagara county. 
New York, settling in the town of Royalton, 
where he lived until 1846, at which time, 
accompanied by his family, he emigrated to 
Rock county, Wisconsin, and lived in Mag- 
nolia township until 1859. Then he re- 
moved to Freeborn county, Minnesota, tak- 
ing up his residence in the town of IJancroft, 
where he continued for twenty years, and in 
1S79 he came to I'oster townshi]), Faribault 



92 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



county, spending his last days in the home 
of his son, dying in 1885, at the age of 
eighty-three years. During his active busi- 
ness hfe he carried on farming and won sac- 
cess in his undertakings. He was a man of 
more than average intelHgence, a great 
reader who through hfe kept himself well 
informed on all the questions and events of 
the day. Broad-minded and progressive, 
there was nothing little or contracted in his 
nature, and his many excellencies won him 
high esteem. In his early manhood he mar- 
ried Jane Marble, who was born in \'ienna, 
New York, a daughter of Ephraim Marble, 
a native of Massachusetts, whose remote 
anscestors were of English birth. The great- 
great-grandfather of Mrs. Dunbar, Abraham 
Marble, emigrated to this country from old 
Albion and settled in the Massachusetts 
Colony in the memorable year of 1776, 
which saw the birth of this nation. 

The onl}" son of Joshua and Jane Dunbar 
is the gentleman whose name introduces this 
review. He lived in the county of his na- 
tivity until two years of age, and was then 
taken by his parents to Niagara county. New 
York, where he remained until fifteen years 
of age, — the time of his arrival in the Missis- 
sippi valley. From 1846 until 1850 he was 
a resident of Wisconsin, and in the latter 
year went to California, attracted by the 
discover}' of gold on the Pacific slope. Like 
thousands of others he was thrilled with the 
thought that he might rapidly acquire a for- 
tune in the newly discovered Eldorado, but 
only varying success came to him during 
the four years in which he engaged in min- 
ing in the Golden State. Thinking that the 
opportunities of the East equaled those of 
that region, he returned to his old home in 
Wisconsin, was married and settled down to 
the routine of farm life. 



It was in September, 1854, that Mr. 
Dunbar led to the marriage altar Miss Ellen 
Maria Thomas, daughter of Asaph Upham 
and Mary C. (Flint) Thomas, the former 
born in New Jersey in 18 12. The mother 
of Mrs. Dunbar was a sister of the mother 
of the celebrated Ben Wade. His wife's 
people were of Connecticut, and her father 
was one of the heroes of the Revolution, 
serving as an officer in that ever memorable 
struggle for independence. His uniform is 
now in possession of his descendants. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Dunbar have been born ten 
children, who are yet living, namely. Edna, 
wife of W. J. Taylor, of Wells; Thomas Jay, 
a farmer of Foster township, Fairbault 
county; Oscar, a painter, of W'ells; Ada 
Ruth, at home; Nellie, wife of J. C. Stearns, 
of Wells; Hattie A., wife of L. A. Rice, of 
South Dakota; Grant, who is now serving 
as City Marshal of Wells; Mark Asaph, also 
living in Wells; May Centennial, at home; 
and Delos Flint, who completes the family. 

Upon his marriage Mr. Dunbar settled 
in the Badger State, where he continued for 
four years, when in 1858 he came to Minne- 
sota, settling in Bancroft township, Free- 
born county, where he lived for three years. 
The year 1861 witnessed his arrival in Fari- 
bault county. He pre-empted 160 acres of 
Government land on sections 17 and 20, and 
afterward homesteaded the same, and he was 
the first settler south of Rice lake. He has 
since lived on his farm and has transformed 
the once wild tract of land into rich and fer- 
tile fields, and many improvements in the 
way of fences and buildings add to the value 
and attractive appearance of the place. 

His farm labors were suspended for a 
time in 1863, when he offered his services to 
his country and was assigned to Company 
K, Second Minnesota Cavalry. His duty 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



93 



was on the frontier, fighting the Indians antl 
building stockades, forts, etc. He wore the 
blue until May, 1866, when he was honor- 
ably discharged and returned at once to his 
home. He has always been deeply inter- 
ested in the development of this region, re- 
alizing its vast resources and aiding in bring- 
ing these forth. He .has been frequently 
called to public office and has ever dis- 
charged his duties with a promptness and 
fidelity that has gained him the confidence 
of all concerned. Whether on the frontier 
in Indian warfare, in public office or in pri- 
vate life, he is true to the trust reposed in 
him. In 1862 he was chairman of the Town 
Board of Supervisors of Foster township, 
was also Town Assessor, and after his re- 
turn from Government service he was again 
made chairman of the Town Board, in 1867. 
The following year he was elected Justice of 
the Peace, and has since filled that position. 
No higher testimonial could be given of his 
efficient service than his long continuance in 
office, and his just rulings and unbiased 
judgments are commended by all. In 1875 
he was elected to the State Legislature and 
served in what was known as the Centen- 
nial session. His views are in harmony with 
the principles of the Republican party, with 
which he has been connected since its or- 
ganization. Socially he is connected with 
Ransom Post, No. 165, G. A. R., and is an 
honorary member of the Modern Woodmen 
of America, to which his sons also belong. 
Mr. Dunbar has been quite active in his 
attempts to develop the dairy resources of 
Faribault county, and in the spring of 1894 
was instrumental in establishing the Foster 
Co-operative Dairy Association. A cream- 
cry was built upon his land and the plant is 
fitted up with the best modern appliances, 
while from the beginning the enterprise has 



been a pronounced success. There are at 
present some forty-two stock-holders, and 
the business is prosecuted on quite an exten- 
sive scale. Excellent executive ability and 
managerial power he brought to the under- 
taking, and the prosperity of the concern has 
been largely secured through his well- 
directed efforts. 



aAPTAIN ALEXANDER ANDER- 
SON, one of the honored veterans 
of the late war, is now the popular 
and efficient cashier of the Farm- 
ers and Merchants' Bank of Blue Earth 
City, and is one of the representative busi- 
ness men of the place, having been identified 
with various enterprises and interests which 
have added materially to the prosperity and 
progress of the community. 

Captain Anderson was born in Putnam, 
Washington county. New York, November 
28, 1 83 1, and is a son of William and Jean 
(Best) Anderson, the former a native of En- 
gland and the latter of Scotland. About the 
year 1826 they crossed the briny deep to the 
New World, settling in Washington county 
where the father cleared and improved a farm 
of 140 acres. As his financial resources 
were increased he added to that place from 
time to time until his landed estate aggre- 
gated 300 acres. He was an cnter])rising 
man, and his well directed efforts brought 
him a prosperity which he richly deserved. 
Upon the old homestead both he and his es- 
timable wife sptnit their remaining days, his 
death occurring at the very advanced age of 
ninety-three years. In their family were 
eleven children, and the circle was unbroken 
until after all had attained to years of ma- 
i turitv. Four sons and a daughter still sur- 



9t 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



vive. The parents were devout Christian 
people, long holding membership with the 
United Presbyterian Church, and for many 
years the father served as one of its Elders. 

Captain Anderson spent the first nine- 
teen years of his life on the old home place, 
aiding in the labors of the fields and attend- 
ing the public schools where he acquired a 
fair English education. He then started out 
in life on his own responsibility and his first 
independent effort was as a clerk in a store 
in Benson, Rutland county, Vermont, where 
he remained for two years, during which 
time he obtained a good knowledge of busi- 
ness methods. Going thence to Champlain, 
Clinton county. New York, with his em- 
ployer, he was again in a store for two years, 
after w-hich he returned to Benson and em- 
barked in business for himself, purchasing, 
in company with his brother, James, the old 
store in which he had first served as a sales- 
man. The partnership, which continued for 
two years, was terminated by the death of 
the brother, after which our subject was 
alone in business at Benson for a year. Then 
removing his stock of goods to Champlain. 
New York, Captain Anderson was one of its 
enterprising merchants for three years, at 
the end of which time he sold out, and in 
company with his brother, Anthony, pur- 
chased a saw and grist mill at Putnam, New 
York, which they operated until nur subject 
entered the army. 

It was as a private of Company D, One 
Hundred and Twenty-third New York \'ol- 
unteer Infantry that he enlisted, and prior to 
being mustered into the service, he was de- 
tailed in the recruiting service. On the 14th 
of August, 1862, after recruiting his com- 
pany, he was commissioned First Lieutenant. 
The troops were mustered in at Salem, and 
after two weeks' drill at that place were 



sent to the front. He continued in active 
service until the close of the war, participat- 
ing in some of the most important engage- 
ments of the long struggle, and wherever 
duty called he was alwa}s found faitiiful to 
the old flag and the cause it represented. 
At Kulp's farm he was hit in the shoulder- 
blade by a grape shot, but as he was the 
only officer on duty there he did not leave 
his post although he suffered severe pain. 
At Peach Tree Creek he was struck by a 
spent ball and had to be carried off the field, 
but soon recovered and was again in active 
service. His meritorious conduct on the 
field of battle and his well known loyalty 
won him promotion to the rank of Captain, 
and he continued in command of his com- 
pany until the w-ar was over, when he was 
honorably discharged. To the brave boys in 
blue the countr\' owes a debt of gratitude 
which can never be repaid, but their valorous 
deeds will live on the pages of history when 
the veterans are sleeping beneath the sod. 
In 1865 Captain Anderson returned to 
the North, and going to New York city 
accepted a position as salesman in a whole- 
sale boot and shoe house, \\\i\\ which lie 
continued his connection three years. Since 
1868 he has been a resident of Blue Earth 
City, Minnesota, and one of its most influ- 
ential citizens. Ere coming to the West he 
was married, having, in 1857, led to the 
altar Miss Charlotte Ladd, a native of Ver- 
mont, and a daughter of P. G. Ladd. Her 
death occurred in 1861, and on the 19th of 
March, 1869, he was again married, his sec- 
ond union being with Miss Elizabeth Easton, 
a native of Putnam, New York, and a 
daughter of George and Mary (Ledgerwood) 
Easton, the former a native of the Empire 
State and the latter of Scotland. The 
children of this union, two in number, are 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



95 



Fred W. , who is a clerk in the bank of 
which his father is cashier, and who mar- 
ried, July 1 8, 1894, Miss Grace Reynolds, 
of Putnam, New York, a daughter of Rev. 
Dr. J. .'\. Reynolds; and Annie E. The Cap- 
tain and his wife are memljcrs of the Pres- 
byterian Church and are people of promi- 
nence in the community, devoted to what- 
ever tends to promote its moral worth and 
educational interests. He is identified with 
Blue Earth City Lodge, No. 57, F. & A. 
M., and politically he affiliates with the 
Republican party. 

Upon his arri\al in Blue Earth City, 
Captain Anderson opened a general mer- 
chandise store in connection with his brother 
John, and they successfully carried on that 
business for five years, when, in 1S73, he 
sold out and turned his attention to a col- 
lecting and loan business. From 1875 un- 
til 1 88 1 he was proprietor of a grocery 
store, and in the latter year he began opera- 
tion in the insurance, loan and real-estate 
business, which he continued until 1890. It 
was then that he aided in the organization 
of the Farmers & Merchants' Bank, asso- 
ciated with G. D. McArthur, S. Pfeffer and 
Anthony Anderson. On its formation he 
became its cashier and has since occupied 
that position, discharging the duties devolv- 
ing upon him in a most acceptable manner. 
Owing largely to his earnest efforts it has 
become one of the solid financial institu- 
tions of southern Minnesota with a sure and 
conservative policy and careful management. 
The Captain possesses indomitable persever- 
ance and energy and his well directed efforts 
enable him to carry forward to successful 
completion whatever he undertakes. His 
life has been a business one, strictly honor- 
able and upright, and naught can be said 
against the dealings of Captain Anderson, 



<V^EV. JOHN NEWTON LONG- 
I ^r STREET, a farmer of section 32, 
\ . P I\olling Green township, Martin 
count\', is a son of Ivichard Long- 
street, born in New York in 18 16. His 
father, John Longstreet, was also a native 
of that State, as was his father, Orrin Long- 
street. The grandfather moved to Canada 
at the age of seventy years. The mother of 
our subject, ncc Nancy Warden, was a na- 
tive of Nova Scotia, and a daughter of 
Samuel Warden, born in 181 2. The par- 
ents of our subject were married in Erin 
township, near Acton, Ontario, Canada, 
but afterward located in Wellington Square, 
Halton county, Ontario, and four years 
later removed to Norwich Gore, Oxford 
count}', Ontario, where the father died at 
the age of si.xty years. The mother now 
lives in Hawtrey, Canada. 

John N. Longstreet, the eldest of eight 
children, seven now living, was born in 
Wellington Square, Canada, August 12, 
1839. He remained in the Province of On- 
tario until twenty-five years of age, and 
then, in 1865, came to the United States, 
locating in Fillmore county, Minnesota. In 
1868 he came to Martin county, and ob- 
tained his present farm from the Land Office 
then at Winnebago City. He owns 160 
acres, mostly under culti\'atit)n, and, having 
killed a native wild elk here in 1873, the 
place is now called Elk Horn Farm. Mr. 
Longstreet is a member of the Freewill 
Baptist Church, but was formerly a " close- 
communion," and has been engaged in min- 
isterial work here since 1872. He has also 
been prominent in Sunday-school wirk, 
having organized many schools, and has 
been Superintendent and teacher ever since 
his boyhood days. He is now teacher of the 
Bible class at Welcome. In political mat- 



96 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



ters, Mr. Longstreet is a Prohibitionist, in 
which he has taken a leading part, having 
served as a delegate to State, Senatorial and 
district conventions. At the organization of 
the township he was the author of its name. 
Rolling Green. 

In February, i86g, our subject was 
united in marriage with Serena Rebecca 
Malone, a native of Vermillion county, In- 
diana, and a daughter of Thompson and 
Mary Malone. who lived in Indiana for many 
years, and where the mother died. The 
father afterward married, and now resides in 
southern Kansas. He had seven children, 
three now living. Mrs. Longstreet was born 
January i, 1847, and located in Fillmore 
county, Minnesota, at the age of twelve 
years. Mr. and Mrs. Longstreet have had 
five children, — Eda A., wife of George W. 
Rainy, of Martin county; Ida L. , a successful 
teacher; Richard Newton; Nancy Olive; and 
Charles H., who died in infanc}'. 



HLLEN CORY, one of Easton's 
leading business men and repre- 
sentative citizens, is a native of St. 
Lawrence county. New York. He 
was born July 4, 1845, in a little old frame 
house i8.\24 feet, which was studded with 
heavy timbers, while the rafters were hewn 
out of the neighboring forests by the father, 
one of the pioneer settlers of that locality. 
The parents were George W. and Mary 
E. (Town) Cory. The former was born in 
Grafton county. New Hampshire, in 1814. 
The family was founded early in New Eng- 
land, for his grandfather was also a native 
of the old Granite State. Early in the pres- 
ent century George W. Cory removed to St. 
Lawrence count}-. New York, where he pur- 
chased land and carried on farming until his 



emigration to Faribault count}-, in the 
spring of 1866, accompanied by his wife and 
all but two of his children — Samuel and Lu- 
cinda, who had previously come to this State. 
Here Mr. Cory secured a 200-acre farm on 
section 13, Lura township, and upon it 
spent the remainder of his life, passing to 
the spirit world in May, 1889, when in the 
seventy-fifth year of his age. He was laid 
to rest in the Lura cemetery and many 
friends mourned his death. He never sought 
official distinction, preferring to give his 
time to business. He was always scrupu- 
lously honest and e.xact, and his life was one 
well worthy of emulation. His wife, who 
was born May 5, 18 14, still survives her hus- 
band, and makes her home with her daugh- 
ter, in Minnesota Lake. She is still in pos- 
session of her mental faculties, her years 
resting lightly upon her. She and her hon- 
ored husband were friends to the poor and 
needy and their lives were fiilled with many 
good deeds. 

The record of their children is as fol- 
lows: Lorinda, who died in Louisville, 
St. Lawrence county. New York, the wife 
of Robert Smith, who enlisted at Ogdens- 
burg. New York, in Company G, Si.xticth 
New York Infantry, served under Joe 
Hooker, participated in the battle of Look- 
out Mountain and found a soldier's grave; 
Samuel, who carried on a furniture store in 
Winnebago City for a number of years, and 
is now Superintendent of the water 
works of that place; he was also a 
member of Company G, Si.xtieth New 
York Regiment, enlisting in 1S61, in Ogdens- 
burg, and serving fcnir years; participated in 
the battles of Lookout Mountain and Mis- 
sionary Ridge, and after the war, in 1865, 
came to Faribault county, where he has 
since made his home; Lucinda, who is the 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



97 



wife of Jesse Wilson, for the past quarter of 
a century making her home in the Golden 
State; Allen, the next younger; Elvira, the 
wife of George A. Clark, who was one of 
the early educators of Blue Earth county, 
where he taught school for several years, 
and is now living in Mapleton, Minnesota; 
Harriet, who is the wife of S. A. Bradley, 
and for more than twenty-five years has 
lived in southeastern Minnesota, and is now 
located in Minnesota Lake township, Fari- 
bault county; Ellen, the wife of Allen Cat- 
lin. County Commissioner of Martin county, 
and one of its old-time residents; Louisa, 
who married Jam.es Wilson; Mr. Wilson is 
engaged in business in Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia; Malvina, the youngest, who died in 
childhood. 

Allen Cory acquired his literary educa- 
tion in a log schoolhouse near his home. 
School was held for about five months 
during the year, and the remainder of the 
time he aided in the labors of the farm, but 
much of his spare time he devoted to study, 
and in that way, and through contact with 
the world and through observation, he has 
made himself a well informed man. On the 
20th of Februarj', 1865, although not yet of 
age, he responded to the country's call for 
troops and enlisted in Company B, one 
Hundred Ninety-third New York Infantry, 
under Captain E. C. I-inapp. He continued 
at the front until after the close of the war, 
and was honorably discharged at Harper's 
Ferry January 18, 1866, and mustered out 
in Albany, New York. 

Returning to his home in the spring of 
that year, Mr. Cory came to Faribault county 
and two months later, on attaining his major- 
ity, he purchased 200 acres of wild prairie 
land on section 24, Lura township. This 
once barren tract he m^de to bloom and 



blossom as the rose, and the farm be- 
came one the most attractive and desir- 
able in this community. He successfully- 
carried on general farming and stock-rais- 
ing until i88g, when he left the old home- 
stead and removed to Easton, purchasing 
an interest in the hardware store which 
is now conducted under the firm name of 
H. P. Edwards & Company. His pleasant, 
affable manner and liis well-known veracity 
have gained him a liberal patronage, and the 
proprietors of the store are now enjoying a 
large trade. He is never so busy that he 
has not time to devote to public interests 
calculated to promote the moral and intel- 
lectual welfare of the community and to 
faithfully discharge his duties of citizenship. 
On the 5th of April, 1867, Mr. Cory 
wedded Miss Ella Bradley, a daughter of 
Andrew and Catherine Bradley, and a native 
of Ontario, Canada, born July iS, 1846. Her 
father comes of Irish parentage, while her 
mother is a native of New York. The}- emi- 
grated to Watonwan county, Minnesota, in 
1866, but both have now passed away. Mr. 
and Mrs. Cory have two children: George 
A., the eldest, named for his grandfather, 
was born in Lura township, July 13, 1868, 
received good educational privileges, and is 
now the junior member of the firm of H. P. 
Edwards & Company. He is a practical 
tinsmith and hardwaie man, and possesses 
good business ability. He married Rebecca 
Quimby, one of Faribault county's daugh- 
ters, and they have two interesting chil- 
dren, — Ella and Marian M. Minnie W., 
born January 21, 1872, attended the common 
schools, and was well educated in both vocal 
and instrumental nnisic, as washer brother. 
She is now the wife of Sherman C. Arm- 
strong, who is engaged in operating the Cory 
homestead, 



98 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Mr. Cory has served as a member of the 
School Board of the Twenty-eighth district 
and does all in his power to promote the 
cause of education. In his political views 
he is a stanch Republican, having supported 
the men and measures of that party since 
casting his first presidential vote for Gen. 
U. S. Grant. He is a charter member of 
Easton Lodge, No. 197, I. O. O. F., and 
his son is also connected with the same 
organization. Reared in the East upon a 
new farm, supporting the Union cause during 
the Civil war, carrying on agricultural pur- 
suits on the western frontier and now devot- 
ing his energies to merchandising in Easton, 
— such, in brief, has been the life of Mr. Cory, 
but this tells nothing of his enterprise, his 
industry, his perseverance and his earnest 
efforts to win success, save as we read be- 
tween the lines; yet his prosperity has been 
won through his own labors and is the just 
reward of honest toil. 



K^^ SOLON KING, one of the pros- 
I /^l perous farmers of Rolling Green 
\ . P township, Martin county, Minne- 
sota, dates his birth in Clayton 
county, Iowa, December 16, 1845. 

Mr. King's father, John E. King, was a 
native of England and a son of John King. 
John E. King was married in his native land 
to Eleanor Harland, who was born in York- 
shire, and in 1829 they emigrated to Amer- 
ica and settled first in Sangamon county, 
Illinois, where they remained until 1845. 
That year they became pioneers of Clayton 
county, Iowa. He improved a farm in Clay- 
ton county and continued his residence on it 
until 1854, when he came to Minnesota and 
took up his abode on 160 acres of Govern- 
ment land in Fillmore county, being one of 



the earliest settlers in the county. There 
he and his wife passed the residue of their 
lives and died, her death occurring in 1879 
and his in 18S5. They were the parents of 
thirteen children, eight of whom are now 
living, namely: Mary A., widow of Philo 
Bradley; Robert H. ; John S. ; Alice J., who 
married Amos Steere; Sarah E., widow of 
Francis D. Gilbert; OrphaJ., Mife of Mat- 
thew King; R. Solon; and Edwin. 

R. Solon King was nine years of age at the 
time he came with his parents to Minnesota, 
and in this State he grew to manhood. In 
January, 1867, he married Lois E. Morrill, 
a native of Perth county, Ontario, Canada, 
born January 28, 1846, daughter of John 
and Bede (Turner) Morrill, natives of New 
Hampshire and Vermont respectivel}'. About 
1844 her parents removed to Canada, where 
they made their home until i860, that year 
coming to Minnesota and settling on a farm 
in Fillmore county, where the family re- 
sided for a number of years. The mother 
died in i860. In 1865 the father moved to 
Minnesota Lake, Faribault county, and 
died in Moore county, Minnesota, August, 
1882. In their family were eight children, 
seven of whom reached maturity: William 
H. ; Sarah J., wife of Johnson Stout; Mrs. 
King, Benjamin F., Margaret A. Kemore, 
Mary Graves, and John. Mr. and Mrs. 
King have si.x children, namely: Fred O., 
born April 9, i S69, is principal of the high 
school at Sherburne, Minnesota, and he and 
his wife, whose maiden name was Lydia O. 
Whitney, have one child, Morrill; Albert G., 
born February 12, 1871, is a clerk in the 
Martin County Bank at Fairmont; Arthur 
A. , born August 9, 1 873, is engaged in teach- 
ing; Orpha J., born August 3, 1875; Har- 
land E., February 3, 1877; and Miles S., 
October 26, 1879. 







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G^h^ue/J (j/ie^ejj 





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FARIBAULT, MARTIX, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



In 1869 Mr. King settled on his present 
farm, 240 acres of land, now ail under cul- 
tivation and fenced with barb wire. At the 
time he located here this was all wild land, 
and his home was far removed from any 
other habitation. Under his efficient man- 
agement his farm has been inipro\ed and 
developed into one of the most jn'olific ones 
in the vicinity. 

Mr. King and his wife are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a 
Trustee in the church and an active worker 
in the Sunday-school. Fraternally, he is 
identified with the A. O. U. W., at Fair- 
mont. Politically he is a Republican, and 
takes an active interest in local affairs. He 
is now serving his third term as Township 
Clerk, was chairman of the Board of Super- 
visors for many years, and has also filled 
the offices of Township-Treasurer and Town- 
ship Assessor. He has always taken a deep 
interest in educational affairs, and for twenty- 
two years has served his school district in 
some official capacity. 

Such is a brief sketch of the life of one 
of Martin county's prosperous farmers and 
most worthy citizens. 



BKAN'CIS ELWESS, one of the e.\- 
tensive farmers and stock-raisers, 
residing on section 14, Silver Lake 
township, claims England as the 
country of his nativity. Yorkshire was the 
place of his birth, and the date June 22, 
1839. His parents, Francis and Elizabeth 
(Lindley) Elwess, were natives of Lincoln- 
shire, England, and the father was a farmer, 
who followed that occupation throughout 
his life in pursuit of fortune. His death 
occurred in his native land, at the age of 
seventy-eight years, and his wife passed 



away in the same locality at the age of six- 
ty-nine. 

Our subject was the eighth child in their 
family and was reared on the old homestead 
farm until fourteen years of age, when he 

j started out in life for himself. Since that 
time he has Ijeen dependent upon his own 
resources, and therefore deserves the com- 

1 mendatory title of a self-made man. He 
began serving an apprenticeship in a grocery 
and confectioner's store and worked for six 
weeks, after which he went to another 
place and accepted a position as clerk in a 
grocer\', confectioner)' and high-wines store, 
being thus employed for two years, in Shef- 
field. He then returned to his home and for 
one year engaged in the butchering business 
and learned that trade in all its details. On 
the expiration of that period he embarked 
in business for himself, but after eleven 
months sold out and began working for his 
father for fifteen shillings per week. His 
earl}' life was anything but a period of 
luxury, and industry has been his most 
noticeable characteristic through all these 
years. 

In 1856, before he was eighteen years 
of age, Mr. Elwess was united in marriage 
with Miss Sarah R. Fowler, a native of 
Lincolnshire, England, then sixteen years 
of age. She is a daughter of George and 
Sarah Rebecca Fowler, the former born in 
Lincolnshire, England, and the latter in 
South Wales. In July of the following year 
they came to America, landing at Castle 
Garden, New York city, from the steam- 
ship Washington City, in which they took 
passage. Their family numbers three chil- 
dren, a son and two daughters: William 
F., manager of the New Home sewing-ma- 
chine business, of St. Paul, Minnesota; 
Louisa Elizabeth, wife of G. H. Barber, 



104 



MEMORIAL RECORD OE THE COUXTIES OF 



who also resides in St. Paul; and Annie 
Lillian, wife of George Ehvess, of Martin 
county. 

On landing in this country the parents 
made their way to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
thence to Fairwater, Fond du Lac county, 
that State, where they made a location. 
Mr. Ehvess worked for his brother as a farm 
hand for seventy-five cents per day, and 
afterward entered the employ of Captain 
Plocker, owner of a large farm, receiving in 
compensation for his services only $5 per 
month. Subsetiuently he began keeping 
house and worked on a farm for Mr. Board- 
man, contracting to grub twelve acres of 
land for a yoke of steers. Later he entered 
the emplo\- of Dr. Egleston on a farm, 
working for $20 per month in the harvest 
fields, while his wife received $3 per week 
for services in the Doctor's home. Thus 
they labored together and at length suc- 
ceeded in getting a start in life. Returning 
to Fairwater they there began keeping 
house, and Mr. Ehvess worked by the day 
for fifty cents per day. 

Mr. Ehvess removed from Fond du Lac 
county, ^^'isconsin, to Minnesota, with a 
yoke of steers, drawing a borrowed wagon, 
which contained their few personal effects, 
the journey occupying two weeks. He 
located at High Forest, Olmsted county, 
where he was for a time in the employ of 
Richard Chatficld. Buying forty acres of 
Governmen: land, he built a small shanty 
and began making improvements. Not long 
after, his little shanty was destroyed by fire, 
with its contents. Not having the necessary 
money with which to build again, he ex- 
changed his land for stock and started with 
three yoke of oxen, thirty heail of other cattle 
and one horse, for Martin count}-, arri\ing 
here August 29, 1861. Securing a home- 



stead on section 14, Silver Lake township, 
he and his good wife began housekeeping in 
genuine pioneer st}le, and were among the 
first settlers in this part of the county. They 
lived in a dugout the first two winters, and 
in summer devoted their energies to break- 
ing, improving and culti\'ating their land. 
Notwithstanding the numerous losses of his 
stock by disease, which have been many, and 
going security for friends, he has been suc- 
cessful. With the exception of a little finan- 
cial assistance received on the death of his 
father, and 960 pounds sterling at his moth- 
er's death in 1S75, his entire possessions are 
the fruits of his own untiring industry and 
good management. He is the owner of 800 
acres of good land, which is supplied with 
good buildings, and stock of all kinds, and 
he is accounted one of the substantial citizens 
of the community in whicji he makes his 
home. 

During the late war Mr. Ehvess mani- 
fested his loyalty to the Government and the 
Union cause by enlisting, in March, 1864, as 
a member of Company G, First Minnesota 
Infantry, in which he served until after the 
South had laid down its arms and peace was 
once more restored. He then returned to 
his famil}- and his farm work, and the story 
of his labor may be read in the record of his 
success. On one occasion he laid aside 
business cares and went to his old home in 
England, where he spent four months in 
viewing noted points of interest in that coun- 
try and in visiting the scenes of his boyhood 
and renewing the acquaintances of his youth. 
He exercises his right of franchise in support 
of the Rt!publican party and its principles, 
and has served as School Treasurer, hut has 
never sought public office, preferring to give 
his time and attention to his business in- 
terests. 



FARIBAULT, MARTI X, WATONWAX AND JACKSON. 



aHARLES PENNINGTON, a farmer 
of section 30, Rolliiif; Green town- 
ship, is a son of Niles and Eliza- 
beth Pennington, natives of En- 
gland, the former of Yorkshire and the lat- 
ter of Norfolkshire. They located in Canada, 
where they spent the remainder of their 
lives, the father dying in 1852, and the 
mother surviving until 1875. They were 
the parents of four cliildren, — Thomas J., 
of Ontario, Canada; Henry, of this town- 
ship; Charles, the subject of this sketch; 
and Miles Joseph, of Canada. 

Charles Pennington was born in Oxford 
county, Ontario, Canada, August g, 1S44, 
where he grew to manhood and received his 
education. In 1865 he came to the United 
States, spending the first four j'ears in Fill- 
more county, Minnesota, and in 1869 lo- 
cated on the farm he now owns in Martin 
county, which was then w-ild land. The 
place consists of 160 acres, eighty acres of 
which is under cultivation, and he is en- 
gaged in general farming. In his political 
relations Mr. Pennington was formerly a Re- 
publican, but is now a Prohibitionist. He 
has served as Township Supervisor, Road 
Overseer and School Director. 

June 2, 1873, he was united in marriage 
with Mary Rutledge, born in Indiana Feb- 
ruary II, 1844, a daughter of William and 
Mary (Ford) Rutledge, natives respectively 
of Delaware and Ohio. They were pioneer 
settlers of Allen count}', Indiana, remain- 
ing there until 1856, then spent nine years 
in Dodge county, Minnesota, and in 1865 
settled in Tcnhassen township, Martin coun- 
ty, the countr\' at that time being compara- 
tively a wilderness. They now reside in 
Fairmont. Ten children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Rutledge. Three sons: John, Moses 
and Aaron served in the Civil war, and the 



last named died from the effects of his ser- 
vice. Our subject and wife have nine chil- 
dren, — William Henry, Dorcas Elizabeth, 
James Albert, Ella May, Phcebe Emma, 
John Adelbert, Frances Grace, Mary Ann 
and Ruth Adeen. 



(D 



RS. CHARLES RATH. —To the 
pioneer ladies as well as to tho 
sturdy sons, are the development 
and prosperity of a county due. 
Their work is different, for while husbands 
and fathers make farms, the wives and 
mothers make homes. Each labor supple- 
ments the other; and who can say which is 
the more important.' The lady of whom we 
write has borne her share in the upbuilding 
of this community, and has aided in bring- 
ing about an atmosphere of culture and re- 
finement which makes \\'estern cix'ilization 
equal to that of the East. 

Mrs. Rath was born in Mockern, Sax- 
Altenburg, in the province of Prussia, Ger- 
many, December 20, 1834, and is a daugh- 
ter of John and Christine Broehl, who had 
a famil)' of five children, as follows: Gott- 
friet, who was born August 10, 1822, and 
died abroad July 5, 1892; Michael, who 
was born August 8, 1824, and is now an 
agriculturist of Howard county, Nebraska; 
Gottlieb, who was born October 2, 1826, 
and is a resident of Bradshaw, York county, 
Nebraska; Anna, who was born December 
22, 1 83 1, became the wife of Gottfriet Tou- 
bert, and with her husband and two chil- 
dren crossed the Atlantic, locating in Illi- 
nois. Her death occurred March 20, 1858, 
at Pekin, that State; Mrs. Rath is the 
youngest. The father of this family was 
born in Sa.x-Altenburg, Germany, in 1800, 
and devoted his entire life to farming. His 



io6 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



wife was born in Zenia, a neighboring ham- 
let, in 1801, and died in her native land 
January 2, 1849, in the faith of the Luther- 
an Church, of which she was a consistent 
member. In 1853 he and several of his 
children, including Mrs. Rath, set sail from 
Bremen on a three-masted vessel — the Ern- 
est Moritz Arndt, which, after seventy-five 
days on the bosom of the Atlantic, reached 
the harbor of New Orleans. Two weeks 
were passed in the Crescent City, and they 
then went up the Mississippi to St. I^ouis 
and up the Illinois river to Pekin, Illinois, 
where the father secured employment in a 
sawmill. Being taken ill with typhoid fever, 
that disease terminated his earthly career in 
August, 1853, and he was laid to rest in the 
Pekin cemetery. 

Mrs. Rath acquired her education in the 
common schools of her native land, and was 
always considered a good scholar. She re- 
mained at home with her parents during her 
maidenhood days, and on Palm Sunday of 
1848 she was confirmed in the Lutheran 
Church. \\'ith her father she came to 
America, and on the 19th of October, 1858, 
she became the wife of Jacob Ziemer, a 
native of Hessen Darmstadt, Germany, who 
on emigrating to the New World in 1856 
settled in Pekin, Illinois, where he was pro- 
prietor of tonsorial parlors. Their happy 
married life was of short duration, for the 
husband was called to the home beyond 
September 10, 1859. They had one son, 
Theodore J. , who was born in Pekin, October 
2, 1859, and is now a popular merchant of 
Easton, Minnesota, and a member of the 
firm of Ziemer & Rath Brothers. He also 
owns 320 acres of fine land in Walnut Lake 
township, under a high state of cultivation, 
and is secretary of the Easton Creamery 
Company, which conducts a creamery owned 



by the mercantile firm. He wedded Miss 
Hattie James, who was born March 27, 1864, 
and they have become the parents of four 
children, three living: Florence May, who 
spends much of her time with her grand- 
mother; Celia Viola and Edna Harriett. 
Their only son, Charles J., who was born in 
Easton, died in his fifth year. 

On the 27th of October, 1863, the lady 
whose name heads this record became the 
wife of Charles Rath, a native of Wittenberg, 
Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Germany, born Sep- 
tember 14, 1822. He comes of a long line 
of German ancestors. His father was a 
man of prominence in the comnumity in 
which he lived, and served as Mayor of his 
village. Charles Rath obtained a good edu- 
cation, and when a boy served an appren- 
ticeship to a weaver in his native village. 
He then went to Copenhagen, where he had 
better opportunities of following that busi- 
ness, and there spent six years, when he de- 
termined to come to America. In the spring 
of 1852 he sailed from Hamburg to New 
York, and after a voyage of six weeks made his 
way across the countr\' to Kentucky, where 
some of his friends preceded him. After a 
year passed there he went to California, and 
in the Sacramento valley entered a claim 
and began prospecting in the foothills of the 
Sierra Nevadas. He and his partner were 
making money there when the reservoirs 
above them burst and filled their shaft with 
water. This caused them considerable loss, 
and Mr. Rath estimated that his net gains 
for five years were $800. During his resi- 
dence on the Pacific slope he visited the 
British domain and Vancouver's island, and 
later returned to New York by way of the 
isthmus of Panama, thence to Illinois. 
Renting a farm for two years, he next gave 
his attention to agricultural pursuits, and it 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



107 



was during that time that he met and mar- 
ried the lady who now bears his name. In 
1 869 they came to Faribault county, and he 
secured 160 acres of school huid in Lura 
township. He erected a frame dwelling 
26x28 feet, bordering the village of Easton, 
and soon his land was transformed into one 
of the fine farms of the county. To his 
possessions he added from time to time until 
he was the owner of 730 acres — a valuable 
estate which he left to his family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rath became the parents 
of five children, viz: Mary Ann, who is 
now the wife of J. L. Herring, a druggist of 
Easton; Charles J., who was born in Logan 
county, Illinois, January 10, 1867, attended 
the common schools and the high school of 
Mankato, and is now a member of the well- 
known firm of Ziemer & Rath Brothers, 
which he helped to establish in September, 
1890; Frederick W., born in Logan county, 
Illinois, March 6, 1869, and is also a mem- 
ber of the firm and is a prominent and pop- 
ular merchant; Emma G. , born in Faribault 
county, December 11, 1872, is an accom- 
plished scholar in instrumental music, and 
is now the wife of Dr. L. S. O. Lockwood, 
formerly of Minneapolis, but now a practic- 
ing physician of Easton: he is a graduate 
of the Minneapolis Medical College; Edward 
J., born April 8, 1874, in Faribault county, 
is the junior member of the above-mentioned 
mercantile firm, which has the largest estab- 
lishment in the town. 

Mr. Rath was a member of the Masonic 
lodge of Wells, and was a leading" member 
of the Odd Fellows society of Pekin, Illi- 
nois. His sons Charles J. and Fred W. be- 
long to Easton Lodge, No. 197, I. O. O. F. , 
and Charles J. also to Wells Lodge, No. 87, 
F. & A. M., of Wells, Minnesota, and Fred 
W. belongs to the Modern Woodmen lodge 



of Easton. He was elected to the State 
convention of that order, which convened in 
St. Paul December 27, 1894. Fred W. 
was an infant when he was brought to this 
county, and his boyhood days were passed 
on the frontier farm and attending school. 
His early education was obtained in the 
common school, and he graduated in 1888, 
at the Northwestern Business College at 
Mankato, Minnesota, at the age of nineteen, 
after which he was assistant cashier of the 
Wells Bank. Upon attaining his majority 
he engaged m the mercantile business at 
Easton as a member of the firm of Rath 
Brothers. The brothers are all stanch Re- 
publicans in their political views. The 
second son married Miss Ella Guyette, Oc- 
tober 3, 1894, daughter of Joseph and Flora 
Guyette, of French descent. The daughter 
was born in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, March 
9, 1865. 

Mr. Rath was a stalwart Republican and 
took an active interest in everything per- 
taining to the welfare of the community and 
its upbuilding. He was a man of many ster- 
ling qualities, whose honorable upright life 
won him the confidence and esteem of all. 
He passed away September 26, 1889, and 
his death was mourned by many, — by a com- 
munity that suffered the loss of a valued 
citizen, by friends who missed his compan- 
ionship, and by wife and children, who lost a 
loving husband and tender father. Mrs. 
Rath is now living in Easton, in a pretty 
brick building which was erected in 1892 and 
the lower part of which is occupied by the 
store owned by her sons. She is most highly 
esteemed for her man}' excellencies of char- 
acter, and her many acts of kindness have 
endeared her to all with whom she has been 
brought in contact. She well deserves men- 
tion among those honored pioneer ladies who 



loS 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



have long been connected with F"aribault 
county's history, and with pleasure we pre- 
sent to our readers this life record. 



^^^USTAVE SCHNEIDER now re- 
■ rT\ sides upon a farm on section 27, 
^LB Blue Earth City township, but has 
been prominently connected with 
the business interests of the county seat, re- 
cognized as the leading contractor and builder 
of Faribault county. Born in the province 
of Posen, Germany, on the i ith of Novem- 
ber, 1855, he is a son of John and Wilhel- 
mina (Meinke) Schneider, who also claimed 
that province as the place of their nativity. 
The father was a contractor and carried on 
operations along that line throughout his 
entire life. His death occurred in 1867. In 
the family were six children, namely: Julius, 
who is now living in Wisconsin; Ferdinand, 
twin brother of Julius and a resident of 
Faribault county; Matilda, wife of Carl 
Krause, still living in the Fatherland; Ed- 
ward, who is located in Montevideo, Minne- 
sota; Emma, wife of Carl Keller of Blue 
Earth City; and Gustave of this sketch. 

The last named spent his youth in assist- 
ing his father and thus learned the trade 
which has given him such prominence in 
the business world of this locality. He re- 
mained in German}' until nineteen years of 
age, when, in 1874, he sailed for America, 
hoping to benefit his iinancial condition in 
the land where he believed better opportu- 
nities were afforded ambitious young men, 
and he has not been disappointed in this 
hope. Locating first in Appleton, Wiscon- 
sin, he there engaged in carpentering for 
two years, after which he crossed the Missis- 
sippi into Minnesota. Since 1S76 he has 
been identified with the upbuilding of Fari- 



bault count}-, both in the line of his chosen 
calling and in other ways. For a time he 
made his home with Mr. Gartzke, working 
at carpentering, and when he had actpiired 
a sufficient capital he purchased his present 
farm, comprising 160 acres of land on sec- 
tion 27, Blue Earth City township Here 
he has since made his home, but his time 
has been given largely to contracting and he 
is known as the leading man in his line of 
business in the locality. His expert work- 
manship and able management and the 
fidelity with which he fulfills his part of a 
contract has won him a most liberal and 
well deserved patronage, and he has been 
the architect and builder of the greater num- 
ber of the fine buildings of Faribault county. 
He took the contract for the erection of the 
Baker Block, the Baptist Church, the Brady 
residence, the German Evangelical Church, 
all of Blue Earth City; also erected the Ger- 
man State Bank building and the Barnes 
Hotel of Wells. Thus on all sides stand 
monuments to his handiwork, while his 
many patrons attest the efficiency of his 
skiil and labor. His own home is a fine resi- 
dence, — one of the best in his neighborhood. 
In connection with his other interests he 
holds stock in the sash and blind factory of 
Blue Earth City, which was established in 
1 89 1 and is now on a good paying basis. 

On the 2d of December, 1880, was cel- 
brated a marriage which united the destinies 
of Mr. Schneider and Miss Louisa Fenske, 
and their union has been blessed with six 
children, namely: Eugenia, Emma, Martin, 
Mary, Arthur and Albert. With this family 
also lives the mother of our subject, who 
became a member of the household on her 
emigration to America in 1890. 

Socially Mr. Schneider is a member of 
the Orient Lodge, No. 34, A. O. U. W., 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



109 



and his wife is connected with the Evangel- 
ical Church. He came to this country with- 
out means, but resolved to win success if 
he could accomplish it by energ}' and perse- 
verance. These have characterized his en- 
tire career. His diligence and continued 
application brought him prosperity, and 
from an obscure workman he became the 
leading contractor of his adopted county. 
His example may well serve to encourage 
others, who like himself, have to start out 
in life empty-handed, for he has demonstra- 
ted what can be done by those who are not 
afraid to work. Through his entire business 
career he has so conducted himself as to win 
the confidence and regard of all with whom 
he has been brought in contact, and with 
pleasure we present his sketch to our readers. 



Vj'AMES FRANCIS HINES, one of 
■ the leading and influential citizens of 
A 1 Martin county, is now living on a 
farm in Westford township and is 
serving as chairman of the Town Board of 
Supervisors. He is respected and honored 
throughout the community, and we feel as- 
sured that the record of his life will prove 
of interest to many of our readers. A na- 
tive of the State of Wisconsin, he was born 
on the 20th of May, 1864, and is of Irish 
lineage. His parents, John and Mary 
(Mackey) Hines, were both natives of the 
Emerald Isle, the former born in county 
Queens, the latter in county Mayo. When 
twenty-four years of age the father bade 
adieu to home and friends and crossed the 
Atlantic, settling in New Brunswick, where 
he remained for three jears. In 1837 he 
came to the United States anil for some 
years was a resident of Dane county, Wis- 
consin. Thirty years ago he removed to 



Owatonna, Minnesota, and the following 
year came to Martin county, settling in 
Pleasant Prairie township upon a wild farm. 
He was one of the three tirst men to locate 
in that township, and there made a perma- 
nent home, devoting his time and energies 
to general farming. The once wild and 
waste prairie was transformed into rich and 
fertile fields, and good improvements were 
added to the place. His life was well and 
worthily passed, and in .April, 1894, he was 
called to the home beyond. His wife still 
survives him and has reached the age of 
seventy- eight years. 

In the famil}' of this worthy couple were 
ten children, se\'en of whom are yet living, 
namely: Mrs. Mary Hayden, Edward, 
Thomas, John, Mrs. Julia Cool, Mrs. Cath- 
erine Walker and James. One son, Ed- 
ward, was a soldier in the Civil war. The 
parents both held membership in the Cath- 
olic Church. 

During his early childhood Mr. Hines of 
this sketch was brought by his parents to 
Martin county and was reared to manhood 
upon the old home farm, while his educa- 
tional privileges were those offered b\' the 
district schools of the neighborhood. When 
his youthful 3'ears were over, desiring to see 
more of the country, he made a trip to the 
West, visiting the Black Hills, Miles City 
and western Montana, remaining a year and 
a half. Since his return he has followed 
farming, and is now the owner of 160 acres 
of good land, comprising one of the best 
farms of the county. The owner is a young 
man possessed of a laudable ambition, un- 
tiring energy and perseverance, and his life 
work will undoubtedly be crowned with 
prosperity. 

In 1888 was celebrated the marriage of 
Mr. Hines and Minnie A. Murphy. Mrs. 



no 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Hiiies was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, 
August 14, 1864, and is a daughter of John 
and Catharine (Thornton) Murphy, both of 
whom were natives of county Cavan, Ire- 
land. Her father came to America when a 
youth of fourteen summers and was married 
in Manchester, New Hampshire. He after- 
ward removed with his family to Lowell, 
Massachusetts, where he remained for four 
years, and then came to Martin county, in 
May, 1865, settling on a tract of wild land 
on which not a furrow had been turned or 
an improvement made. Mr. Murphy died 
in April, 1893, surviving his wife a very 
short time, her death having occurred in 
February of the same year. They were 
communicants of the Catholic Church and 
had two children, Mrs. Hines and John. 
The wife of our subject is a cultured and re- 
fined lady, was educated in the Mankato 
Normal School of Mankato, Minnesota, and 
was a successful teacher prior to her mar- 
riage. Her father long served as Postmas- 
ter of Horicon, and in 1894 she was ap- 
pointed to the same position, which she is 
now acceptably filling. Mr. and Mrs. Hines 
are the parents of three interesting children 
who are the h'ght and life of their home, — 
Theodore John, Mar\' Lillian and William 
Harry. 

Mr. Hines exercises his right of franchise 
in support of the man and measures of the 
Democracy and takes quite an active inter- 
est in local politics. He has for some time 
served as a member of the Town Board of 
Supervisors and is now chairman of that 
body. Devoted to the best interests of the 
community, he discharges iiis duties with a 
promptness and fidelity that has won him 
the commendation of all concerned and at- 
tests his loyalty as a citi;?en. Both he and 
his wife hold membcrsliii) in the Catholic 



Church and sustain an enviable position in 
social circles where true worth and intelli- 
gence are received as the passports into 
good society. 



eLMEI-i H. FRANIxLIN, a worthy 
representative of the agricultural 
interests of Faribault count}', now 
follows farming and stockraising on 
section 19, Blue Earth City township, where 
he owns and operates 228 acres of valuable 
land, which is under a high state of cultiva- 
tion and improved with all modern conven- 
iences and accessories. The rich fields, well 
tilled, yield to the owner a golden tribute in 
return for the care and cultivation he bestows 
upon them, and in addition to general farm- 
ing he makes a specialty of the breeding of 
hogs. Thus busily his life is passed, and 
labor has brought to him its reward. 

Mr. Franklin claims New York as the 
State of his nativity, for he was born in 
Cattaraugus county, January 7, 1849, and 
is the second son of John Franklin. When 
he was three years of age his parents re- 
moved to Wisconsin, locating in Columbia 
count}-, and hence the W'est has been his 
home during the greater portion of his life. 
He remained in the Badger State until four- 
teen years of age, since which time he has 
resided mostly in Minnesota. His education 
was obtained in the common schools, and 
he gave to his father the benefit of his ser- 
vices upon the home farm until sixteen years 
of age, when he started out to make his own 
wa\' in the world. He learned the black- 
smith's trade, serving a two-years' appren- 
ticeship, and then worked as a journeyman 
for four years in Iowa and Kansas City, 
Missouri, also spending a similar period in 
the State of Kansas. 




^f. j^.' J^'f/mcm. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



"3 



Mr. Franklin then abandoned his trade, 
and, going to Texas, embarked in the stock 
business, driving stock to Idaho and then 
returning to the Lone Star State. He was 
tiius employed during the succeeding seven 
years, after which he returned to Jackson 
county, Minnesota, spending at that time 
nearly one year in the State. Going to the 
Black Hills, he next embarked in mining 
and also engaged in hunting, being one of 
the first white men to go to that country. 
It was in the year 1875 that Mr. Franklin 
went to the Black Hills, and there among 
the pioneers, living the life of the typical 
frontiersman, he continued until 1882, when 
he purchased a part of his present farm in 
Faribault county. A part of his present 
landed possessions was also at one time 
owned by his father. The past twelve years 
he has here passed, successfully carrying on 
agricultural pursuits, and he is now num- 
bered among the well-to-do farmers of the 
community. 

Mr. Franklin was married on the 6th of 
September, 1889, to Miss Jennie Scott, one 
of Wisconsin's daughters. Her father, 
Hugh Scott, formerly lived in Pilot Grove, 
Minnesota. Two children have been born 
to them — Catherine and Ida. 

Mr. Franklin is a member of Blue Earth 
City Lodge, No. 57, A. F. & A. M., and 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen. 
His wife holds membership with the Presby- 
terian Church. In politics he is an uncom- 
promising Republican and for three years he 
served as Marshal of Blue Earth City, dis- 
charging his duties with a promptness and 
fidelity which won him the confidence of all 
concerned. Such in brief is the history of 
his life, but the details are unwritten, — the 
story of his early struggles, his interesting 
and ofttimes thrilling experiences in the un- 



settled West, and the efforts to achieve 
prosperity which have at length been crowned 
with success. 



E 



ON. HORACE HENRY OILMAN 
has been identified with the inter- 
ests of Winnebago City township, 
Faribault county, Minnesota, since 
1S57, and is one of the representative farm- 
ers and public-spirited citizens of southern 
Minnesota. 

He is a native of the town of Effingham, 
New Hampshire, born October 31, 1833, a 
son of Joshua and Sarah (Warren) Oilman, 
the former a native of New Hampshire and 
the latter of Maine. His maternal grand- 
father. Major James Warren, served in the 
war of 1812, and was wounded at Lundy's 
Lane. General Joseph Warren, who was 
killed at the battle of Bunker Hill, was the 
great grandfather of our subject's mother. 
The Warrens were among the very earliest 
settlers of New England. Joshua Oilman 
was a tanner and shoemaker, and spent his 
entire life in New Hampshire; he also served 
in the war of 1812, for which he received a 
land warrant for 160 acres. He had six 
sons and six daughters, all of whom grew to 
maturity and became heads of families ex- 
cept two. Their names are as follows: 
William Warren, residing at Great Falls, 
New Hampshire; Sarah, wife of John War- 
ren, Standish, Maine; Lorenzo, who was 
commissioned Captain in the Union army 
during the war, and is deceased; Caroline, 
widow of Ranslea Towle, at Freedom, New 
Hampshire; Charles, who was wounded in 
the Civil war and died from the effects of the 
same; Cynthia, unmarried; Freeman, a rail- 
road man, who died in 1893; Emeline, wife 
of Freeman Gowen, lives in Maine; Horace 



114 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Henry, whose name appears at the head of 
this article; Isabella, the deceased wife of 
Captain John White, of Bangor, Maine; 
John P. , who was shot througii the lungs at 
Chancellorsville, and died in consequence; 
and Victoria, wife of Charles Parsons, re- 
sides at the old homestead at Effingham, 
New Hampshire. 

Mr. Oilman, whose name introduces this 
article, spent his boyhood days upon the 
farm. The training he received in the com- 
mon schools was supplemented by two 
years' attendance at North Parsonsfield 
Academy, Maine. After leaving the acad- 
emy he taught school several terms, remain- 
ing at home until he was of age. In the j 
spring of 1857 he left the old Granite State 
for the new and growing West, his intention 
being to locate in Kansas. That State, how- 
ever, at that time was having serious trouble, 
and before arriving so far West he was per- 
suaded to stop at Fulton, Illinois, where he 
was employed as a farm hand until October. 
He then came to Minnesota and pre-empted 
120 acres of land on section 12, Winnebago 
City township. He had to go to Chatfield 
to buy a land warrant of Gilbert & Easton, 
the distance to that place being about 125 
miles, and he made the trip on foot, in the | 
month of March; that was in 1858. The 
creeks were high and he well remembers 
having to swim two or three of the swollen 
streams. 

Returning to Faribault county, he de- 
voted his energies to the cultivation and im- 
provement of the land, and he afterwards 
took up 1 60 acres under the horiiestead law 
this latter tract being the one upon which 
he now lives. During all the years that 
have passed since 1857 Mr. Gilman has not 
only been a witness to the development of 
the county, but has also done nobly his 



share toward assisting in its progress. In 
all public improvements he has taken an act- 
ive part. He now owns 240 acres of fine 
farming land, and has a pleasant home, sur- 
rounded by a grove of twenty-five acres, 
which he himself planted. 

Mr. Gilman is a man of more than or- 
dinary intelligence, keeps well posted on the 
issuea of the day, and is broad and liberal 
in his views on all subjects. His first presi- 
dential vote was cast for Fremont, and he 
has ever since voted with the Republican 
party, except when he supported Greeley. 
His principles concerning political freedom 
he formed when a youth, on account of his 
associations. Early in life he came in con- 
tact with the early founders of the ' ' grand 
old party," his father being an "old-time 
Free Soiler, " and thus belonging to a class 
of men rarely found in the '40's. He re- 
members clearly the thick-set figure of John 
P. Hale, who often stopped at his father's 
house when stumping New Hampshire, and 
loved to hear his grand speeches in defense 
of free soil. He also recollects well — for he 
was an eye witness — the mob's attempt to 
rescue the slave Burns from the United 
States marshal while confined in the court- 
house on Courthouse Square in Boston. 
Every window was broken in, the doors 
smashed to pieces and the Deputy United 
States marshal shot dead as he was keeping 
the mob at ba\-. He participated in the 
naval celebration of laying the keel of that 
fine cruiser, the Merrimac, built at Charles- 
ton Navy Yard by the United States and 
sailed the old flag in all parts of the known 
seas; but in an evil hour, at the dawn of the 
rebellion, was caught, in company with 
many a gallant ship, in the inhospitable 
Norfolk Navy Yard, and was burned to the 
water's edge, scuttled and sunk, in order 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



"5 



to keep it out of rebel hands. The merits of 
that tine cruiser were so well known to the 
Southern naval officers that they raised the 
hull and sheeted it over with railroad iron, 
in order to use it as a rebel ram in the de- 
struction of Northern commerce and North- 
ern cities. For that fine vessel to float the 
"Stars and Bars" was a great disloyalty. 
After a feeble attempt to show its former 
power, sending the Cumberland to the bot- 
tom of the harbor and stranding the gallant 
Minnesota, it la}- waste all before it until 
the little ^fonito^, despised by the once noble 
Merrimac, sent a solid shot through itsxitals 
and the once proud >f errimac now lies 'neath 
the placid waters of the James. 

Mr. Gilman has held various township 
and county offices, and in 1 877-8 was elected 
to the State Legislature, and was re-elected 
in 1878, serving two terms. 

He has been twice married — first, in 
October, 1880, to Miss Sophia Ouiggle, who 
died two years later, in August, 1S82, leav- 
ing one child, William. In 1883 Mr. Gil- 
man married Johanna Shatz, and they have 
three children — John, Lorenzo and Horace 
Henry. 



^ly-yiLLIAM BAUGHMAN, a farmer 
■ ■ I "^ section 22, Rolling Green town- 
^J^^_^ ship, Martin county, was born in 
Athens county, Ohio, Jul)- 22, 
1850, a son of John and Elizabeth Ann 
(Jones) Baughman, natives respectively of 
Pennsylvania and Ohio. They made a per- 
manent home in Athens county, where the 
father died in 1878 and the mother still re- 
sides on the old farm there, aged si.xty- 
eight years. They were the parents of ten 
children, all now living. 

\\'il!i:ini Baughman, our subject, was 



reared and educated at his native place. 
I-'rom 1879 to 1882 he farmed on rented 
land in Gentry county, Missouri. In 1883 
he located on his present farm of 320 acres 
in Martin county, Minnesota, 200 acres of 
which is under a fine state of cultivation, 
and he has erected a good residence, barns 
and made many other improvements. In 
his political relations Mr. Baughman affiliates 
with the Republican party, and has held the 
positions of Supervisor and Treasurer of the 
school district No. 42. Socially, he is a 
member of the I. O. O. F. 

Mr. Baughman was married in 1872, to 
Eliza A. Knowlton, born in Pomeroy, Ohio, 
July 26, 1854. To this union were born 
three children, — Elmina, L. Mary and ason. 
The wife and mother died August 18, 1891, 
and in the following September the son also 
departed this life. Mrs. Baughman was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 



HLFREI) CHARLES FREY, the 
efficient and popular cashier of the 
Martin County Bank, has the honor 
of being a native of Minnesota, 
his birth having occurred in Minneapolis, on 
the 1st of February, 1872. He is the sec- 
ond in the family of eight children, three 
sons and five daughters, — of Rev. Leonard 
F. and Rosa (Kreeb) Frey. The parents 
are natives of Germany and came to Amer- 
ica about 1868. Further mention of them 
is made on another page of this work. 

A. C. Frey went from his native city to 
Lewiston, Minnesota, and began his educa- 
tion in Shakopee, Minnesota, attending the 
parochial and public schools and afterward 
pursuing his studies in a parochial school of 
Stillwater, this State, learning both English 
and German. At the age of thirteen he 



lit 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



entered Martin Luther College, at New Ulm, 
where he became familiar with the natural 
sciences, mathematics and ancient and mod- 
ern languages. From that institution he 
was graduated in 1891, successfully passing 
the examination in the above-named studies, 
also in German, English, Latin, Greek and 
Hebrew, and receiving his diploma and the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. His musical 
talent was recognized while in school and 
he acted as leader of a string orchestra and 
of a brass band from the age of sixteen. 

In the meantime Mr. Frey's parents re- 
moved to Fairmont, Minnesota, whither he 
now made his way. They had wished him 
to study theology and enter the ministry, 
but on account of a chronic throat trouble 
he postponed his theological studies, as he 
supposed for a year, but as his throat diffi- 
culty grew worse he gave up the idea of 
ministerial work. During his first year in 
Fairmont he pursued his studies at home 
and also taught German and music. In May, 
1S92, he entered the Martin County Bank 
as clerk, and his adaptability for the work 
and his prompt and faithful performance of 
duty rapidly won him promotion. In 1893 
he was made assistant cashier and in 1894 
he was promoted to the position of cashier, 
in which capacity he is acceptably serving. 
The popularity of the institution is due in 
no small degree to the courteous and ever 
pleasant manner of the cashier. The Martin 
County Bank was established in 1874 and 
its present officers are A. L. Ward, presi- 
dent; George Wohlheter, \ice president; 
and A. C. Frey, cashier. 

Our subject attends strictly In his busi- 
ness, paying little attention to politics, but 
votes with the Republican party. In his 
habits he is temperate and economical and 
represents the best class of Fairmont's 



young men. Throughout the county he is 
favorably known, especially among the Ger- 
man people. He attends his father's church, 
— the German Evengelical, — in which he is 
serving as organist, and is a member of the 
Public Library Board. The best interests 
of the community receive his support, and 
he is recognized as one of the leading and 
representative citizens of his adopted count}'. 



eD KATZUNG, a prosperous farmer 
of Prescott township, Faribault 
county, Minnesota, was born in 
Hesse Cassel, Germany, January 
6, 1836, son of Joseph and Margaret (Hoff- 
man) Katzung, both natives of Germany. 
He was reared on a farm in his native land, 
and attended school until he was fourteen. 
In 1854, in company with his parents and 
the other members of the family, he set sail 
from Bremen for America, and after a voy- 
age of six weeks landed at New York city. 
From there they directed their course to 
Rockford, Winnebago county, Illinois, where 
they made their home on a farm for seven 
years. The mother died in Winnebago 
county. The four children composing the 
Katzung family are as follows: Ed, \'alen- 
tine, Bernhardt and Elizabeth. Valentine 
was a Union soldier in the late war and is 
now a respected citizen of Freeborn county, 
Minnesota. 

Ed Katzung remained in Illinois until he 
was twenty-five years of age. He then went 
to Columbia county, Wisconsin, and in 1863 
came from there to his present location in 
Faribault county, making the journey b}' 
wagon. Here he took claim to 160 acres 
on section twenty-nine, Prescott township, 
and secured title to the same under the 
homestead act. His farm now comprises 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



'•7 



320 acres, and is one of the finest in the 
township. The Httle log shanty that he built 
when he first located here has long since 
been replaced by a modern two-story resi- 
dence, located on a natural building site, 
and among the other improvements we note 
a nice barn, granary, machine and wagon 
house, and a fine grove of three acres. The 
general appearance of the whole place is in- 
dicative of thrift and at once stamps the 
owner as a thoroughgoing farmer. His farm 
is well stocked with cattle, horses and hogs, 
and his crops are diversified. 

Mr. Katzung was married March 3, 
1 86 1, to Miss Anna Dora Lodena Eberlein, 
daughter of Christopher and Elizabeth Eber- 
lein, her parents now being residents of this 
township. They have had nine children, 
all living except their fifth born, which died 
in infancy, their names being as follows: 
Louisa W., of Minneapolis, Minnesota; 
Amanda, wife of J. C. Lewis, of Minneapolis; 
Anna K. , wife of R. E. Cummings, Blue 
Earth City, has two children; and Edwin M., 
Marguerite Lorenda, Frederick C, George 
H. and Carl G., at home. 

Politically, Mr. Katzung is an independ- 
ent. He has served his township two years 
as Supervisor, and has also rendered efficient 
service as a member of the School Board. 
Both he and his wife are members of the 
Lutheran Church, and are highly esteemed 
in their community. 



>Y'0HN HARVEY WELCH, of Winne- 

^ bago City, Minnesota, was born in 
n 1 Niagara county. New York, March 
21, 1833, a son of Nathan and Amy 
(Lake) Welch, natives respectively of New 
York and Connecticut. The father was ex- 
tensively engaged in farming during his en- 



tire life, and his death occurred in 1835. 
His wife survived him forty years, dying in 
1875. Of their four children, two are now 
living, — Daniel L. and John H. The grand- 
father of our subject, William Welch, was 
a native of Connecticut, of English descent, 
and the maternal grandfather, Daniel Lake, 
was a native also of Connecticut. 

John H. Welch, the subject of this 
sketch, grew to manhood on the home farm, 
and his common-school education was sup- 
plemented by a course in the high school of 
Lockport, New York. On attaining his 
majority, he came West to Wisconsin, 
where he spent three years in civil engineer- 
ing on the Milwaukee & St. Paul and the 
Milwaukee & Beloit Railroads. In 1857 
Mr. Welch pre-empted a quarter section of 
land in Verona township, Faribault county, 
Minnesota, where he made a number of im- 
provements, and located there in 1861. In 
May, of that year, he was appointed by 
President Lincoln as Register of the United 
States Land Office at Chatfield, Minnesota, 
and in the following October the office was 
moved to Winnebago City, Mr. Welch con- 
tinuing to fill that position until the fall of 
1866. From that time until 1887 he was 
engaged in the hardware business. In 1889 
he was appointed Postmaster of this city by 
President Harrison, and acceptably filled the 
position until May, 1893. He is now largely 
interested in real estate, having laid out a part 
of Easton's addition to the village, built a 
large brick block, and has done much to ad- 
vance the material interests of the place. Mr. 
Welch has always taken an active interest in 
public affairs and has servedas chairman of 
the Board of Supervisors and as Township 
Clerk. He was President of the village for 
a time, and for a number of years was Presi- 
dent of the village Board of Education. 



ii8 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Mr. Welch has not only witnessed the 
growth and development of Faribault county 
from an almost unbroken prairie to the pres- 
sent prosperous condition, but has been an 
important factor in bringing about this trans- 
formation. In every position in life, whether 
public or private, which he has been called 
upon to fill, he has been found true to every 
trust and has faithfully performed every 
duty. A man of good business ability, su- 
perior intelligence, strict integrity, and cor- 
rect habits, he enjo3"S, as he deserves, the 
confidence and respect of Faribault county's 
best citizens. He cast his first presidential 
vote for John C. Fremont, and has ever 
since been an ardent supporter of the Re- 
publican party. 

Mr. Welch was married in 1859, to Miss 
Martha Jane Hazeltine, a native of Madison 
county, New- York, and a daughter of W'ill- 
iam and Sarah (Blisset) Hazeltine, natives 
of England. They came to America before 
their marriage, and resided at Utica, New 
York, for several years. Mr. Hazeltine was 
then engaged in the boot and shoe business 
in Madison county, same State, for about 
nineteen years, and they then located on a 
farm in Dodge county, Wisconsin, where 
Mr. Hazeltine died September 28, 1878, 
his wife surviving until January 23, 1884. 
They had seven children, namely; William 
B., of Baraboo, Wisconsin; Elizabeth, wife 
of Albert De Garmo; Mary A., wife of 
Josiah Andrews, a farmer of Wisconsin; 
John T. , who was a soldier in the First Wis- 
consin Cavalry, and died while in service; 
Martha J., now Mrs. Welch; George S., a 
farmer of Clark county, Wisconsin; and 
Burdctt B., of Minneapolis. Mr. and ^frs. 
Welch have had three children, — Herbert 
N., who married Nellie E. Jordon, and is a 
hardware merchant of Pine City, Minnesota; 



Frances A., wife of Dr. Beebe, a dentist of 
Winnebago City; and Fallie, deceased De- 
cember 9, 1893, was the wife of Theodore 
Williams, of Mankato, this State. She left 
two children, Ruth and Wheaton. Mrs. 
Welch is a member of the Presbyterian 
Church, and is an earnest worker in all 
church and benevolent enterprises. 



EOWARD HARRISON DUNN, of 
the firm of \\'ard, Dunn & Ward, 
is a prominent attorney success- 
fully engaged in the practice of law 
in Fairmont, and has in the years of his 
connection with the business interests of 
Martin county built up a very large practice, 
which indicates his ability in the line of his 
chosen profession. He is possessed of keen 
perceptive power, is quick to grasp and make 
use of a point and labors untiringly in his 
client's interest. 

Mr. Dunn is one of Minnesota's honored 
sons, of whom the State may well be proud. 
He was born in Jackson county, October 28, 
1867, and is a son of James ^^'. Dunn, who 
was born in Eastport, Maine, and was of 
English descent. He remained in the Pine 
Tree State until 1858, when, emigrating 
Westward, he located in Minnesota. He 
first took up his residence in (jreeleaf, Meeker 
county, and in i 867 went to Jackson county, 
where he spent his remaining days, his death 
occurring at the age of si.xty years. The 
mother of our subject, who bore the maiden 
name of Elizabeth M. Seeley, was a native 
of St. John, New Brunswick, and there re- 
mained until the time of her marriage. She 
was called to the home beyond at the age of 
fifty-nine jears, and her loss was mourned 
by many friends, who held her in high es- 
teem. Her father, James J. Seeley, was 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WAI^ONWAN AND JACKSON. 



1 19 



born in Enj^laiid, and when a yonng man 
crossed the Atlantic, settling in New Bruns- 
wick. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dunn were the parents of 
fi\e children, four sons and a daughter, all 
of whom arc yet living. Helen A. is now 
the wife of E. F. Logue; Marshall B. is a 
dealer in agricultural implements in Jackson, 
Minnesota; Arthur \\'. is a member of the 
editorial staff of the Associated Press, of 
Washington, D. C. ; Sherman J. is one of 
the editors and proprietors of the Jackson 
Republic, a paper published in Jackson, this 
State. 

H. H. Dunn, who is the youngest of the 
family, was reared in the county of his nativ- 
ity and began his education in the district 
schools. His primary advantages were sup- 
plemented by study in the La Crosse Busi- 
ness College in La Crosse, Wisconsin, in 
1886, and in 1887 he took up the study of 
law under the direction of T. J. Knox, of 
Jackson. For five years he remained with 
that gentleman — for three years as a stu- 
dent, then as a partner for two years. He 
was admitted to the bar in 1890, and the 
partnership was then formed, continuing 
until 1892. In that year he came to Fair- 
mont, opened an office and has since engaged 
in practice in Martin county. His present 
business connection was formed January i , 
1895. 

Turning from the public to the private 
record of Mr. Dunn, we note that on the 3d 
of October, 1894, was consummated his 
marriage with Miss Eva Nicholas, daughter 
of H. B. Nicholas, of Emmetsburg, Iowa. 
The lady was born in England, and when a 
maiden of seventeen summers came with her 
parents to America. The young couple 
have a pleasant home in Fairmont, and their 
friends throughout the community are many. 



Mr. Dunn is a supporter of the Republican 
party and its principles, and is ct)nnected 
with both the Masonic and Odd Fellows 
fraternities, holding membership with Des 
Moines Valley Lodge, No. i 56, L O. O. F. ; 
the Encampment, of Fairmont, and East 
Chain Lakes Lodge, No. 64, A. F. & A. M., 
of Fairmont. Mr. Dunn is yet a young 
man, but the ability he has already displayed 
in the practice of his profession argues well 
for a successful future. He is held in high 
esteem throughout the county and is recog- 
nized as a progressive and valued citizen who 
supports all worthy enterprises calculated 
to promote the general welfare. 



VV'^R. GEORGE HENRY REED is 
I I successfully engaged in the prac- 
/^^_^ ticeof dentistrj' in Fairmont, where 
he has a well-appointed office, fit- 
ted up with ever3'thing which is found in a 
first-class establishment of the kind and 
which will make his work the more perfect. 
His skill and ability are recognized by a 
liberal patronage, such as is usually accorded 
merit, and he is ranked high in professional 
circles. 

The Doctor was born in Belmont, Mas- 
sachusetts, January 22, 1859, and is of Eng- 
lish descent. His paternal grandfather was 
a banker of Gardiner, Maine, and a promi- 
nent and influential citizen of that place. 
Alonzo Reed, the Doctor's father, was born 
in Gardiner and became a carriage-maker 
and blacksmith by trade, owning the smithy 
which Longfellow made famous in his beau- 
tiful poem entitled "The Village Black- 
smith. " He married Adelia White, a daugh- 
ter of America White, a descendant of the 
Peregrine White who came to this country 
in the Mayfiowcr. Mr. and Mrs. Reed 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



were married in the East and lived for some 
j'ears in Maine and Massachusetts, but are 
now living retired in Santa Rosa, Califor- 
nia. They became the parents of five chil- 
dren, three sons and two daughters, all yet 
living: Rev. Clarence, a minister of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church; Luella, who 
is foreman of one of the largest book-bind- 
ing establishments in Boston, Massachu- 
setts; Hannah, wife of Arthur Stewart, who is 
living in Cambridge, Massachusetts; George 
H. of this sketch; and Walter, who is also 
living in Cambridge. 

Doctor Reed was reared in the State of 
his nativity and acquired his literary educa- 
tion in the schools of Cambridge. He re- 
mained at home until he began the study of 
dentistry, which work he took up in 1881, 
entering the Boston Dental College and pur- 
suing a two years' course. In the year 
1883 he arrived in Minnesota, going direct 
to Cannon Falls, where he at once opened 
a dental office, continuing to there prosecute 
his chosen profession for a period of nine 
years. In 1892 he came to Fairmont, where 
he has since made his home, and where in 
professional circles he has won a foremost 
place. 

While living in Cannon Falls he married 
Miss Harriett E. Smith, the wedding being 
celebrated in 1884. The lady is a native of 
Minnesota and a daughter of Charles Smith, 
a prominent resident of Cannon Falls, a 
large stock-farmer, also doing an extensive 
fire-insurance business. He married Eliza- 
beth Dodson, a native of England. The 
Doctor and his estimable wife have an inter- 
esting family of three children, a son and 
two daughters, — Walter, Lue and Elizabeth. 

Dr. Reed is a member of the Minnesota 
State Dental Society and in his social rela- 
tion affiliates with the Masonic order, be- 



longing to Chain Lakes Lodge, No. 64, A. 
F. & A. M. ; the Chapter of Fairmont, of 
which he is Scribe, and also belongs to the 
Modern Woodmen of America of Fairmont. 
His ballot supports the men and measures 
of the Republican party. 



@EORGE MURRAY CHASE, 
chairman of the Board of Super- 
visors of Rolling Green township, 
was born in Seneca county. New 
York, April 10, 1862, a son of George and 
Eliza (RobinsonJ Chase, natives also of that 
State. The father died there in 1862, and 
the mother now resides in the State of Wash- 
ington. They were the parents of seven 
children, five now living — Hattie Ingalls, 
Charles, Luella Douglas, George M. and 
Marvin. 

George M. Chase, the subject of this 
sketch, located in Webster count}', Nebraska, 
at the age of thirteen \-ears. In 1881 he 
worked by the month on a farm in Smith 
count}', Kansas, and in the following year 
came to Minnesota, where he worked out by 
the month for several years. In 1886 he 
purchased his farm of 120 acres, sixty- 
five acres of which is improved, and he 
located on this place in 1890. In his polit- 
ical relations Mr. Chase acts with the Re- 
publican party. He was elected to the 
position of Supervisor in the spring of 1893, 
was appointed chairman of the board in the 
following spring, and has also served as 
Pathmaster of his township several terms. 
Mr. Chase was married in the fall of 
1885 to Miss Mattie Frisbie, born in Louisa 
county, Iowa, July 15, 1862, a daughter of 
Ichabod Frisbie, of Webster county, Nebras- 
ka. To this union have been born four chil- 
dren, two now living — Charles LeRov and 




(^ ©^.' (^c//c////6^. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



123 



Fannie. Mrs. Chase is a member of the 
Methodist Church. Mr. Chase is a mem- 
ber of the I. O. O. F. at Sherburne. 




• HOMAS IvENWORTHY BOT- 
TOMLEY has for almost a third 
of a centur}' been connected with 
the history of Martin county. He 
has aided in its upbuilding, borne an im- 
portant part in its development and been 
associated with its progress and advance- 
ment. His name, therefore, should find a 
place on its annals as one of the honored 
pioneers. 

Afr. Bottomley is a native of England, 
born eight miles from the city of Manches- 
ter on the 1st of January, 1832. His par- 
ents, Robert and Ann (Kenworthy) Bottom- 
lej% were also natives of England, and in 
that country the mother died, while the 
father, having crossed the Atlantic, spent 
his last days in Martin county. They were 
the parents of twelve children, our subject 
being the fourth child and third son. He 
was reared in the place of his nativity, remain- 
ing there until twenty-five years of age. He 
began life for himself in a cotton factory at 
the early age of ten and a half years and 
has since been dependent on his own re- 
sources, so may truly be called a self-made 
man, and for his success deserves great 
credit. For eight years he worked for 
twelve hours per day; thus it will be seen 
his early years formed a period of labor, in- 
terspersed with but few idle moments. Ere 
coining to America his hours of work were 
decreased to ten and a half per day, he be- 
ing employed as a weaver and dresser of 
cotton cloth. 

In 1856, at the age of twenty-five, he 
determined to try his fortune in America, 



and crossing the Atlantic sought a home in 
Cass county, Illinois, after which he went 
to Clark county, Missouri, where he worked 
by the day and month until 1862, which 
year witnessed his arrival . in Minnesota. 
Spending a year in Winona county he then 
came to Martin county and from that time 
has been indissolubly connected with its ad- 
vancement. He first secured a claim of 
160 acres, the farm on which he 3'et resides, 
and in company with William Schofield 
lived in a covered wagon until a little board 
shanty could be erected. The wild land 
under the plow and harrow became fertile, 
and waving fields of grain rewarded his 
labors, while the once barren tract began to 
take on the appearance of a highly improved 
farm and is now one of the valuable prop- 
erties of the township. He lived alone for 
some time, not marrying until 1890, when 
he wedded Jennie Gaskill. Her death oc- 
curred in July, 1893, and in November fol- 
lowing he was united in marriage with Mrs. 
Emma Edson Knode, who was born in Wis- 
consin and reared in Steele county, Minne- 
sota. 

Mr. Bottomley is a stalwart Republican, 
warmly advocating the principles of that 
party. For sixteen years he has served as 
Justice of the Peace, the oldest Justice in the 
township, and has been officially connected 
with the schools of the neighborhood since 
aiding in the organization of the school dis- 
tricts. He was also one of the organizers 
of Nashville township, for three years 
served as its Assessor, and is now Town- 
ship Treasurer, in which capacity he 
has served for six years. Before his 
election as Justice he was for four 
years Constable, and since his arrival 
in Martin county he has been continuously 
in office, a fact which indicates his personal 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



jjopularity and the confidence and trust re- 
posed in him by his fellow townsmen — a 
trust that has never been betrayed. 

Mr. Bottomley was treasurer of the first 
Farmers' Stock Company of Faribault, Blue 
Earth and Martin counties, is now secre- 
tary of the Nashville Township Stock Com- 
]iaiiy, and was one of the orj^anizers and 
directors of the Nashville Co-operative Store. 
Whatever tends to benefit the community 
or to advance the public welfare receives his 
hearty support and co-operation, and Martin 
county owes not a little of her prosperity 
and progress to his untiring efforts in her 
behalf. He has walked in the path of 
rectitude and honor, and his example is one 
well worthy of emulation. He holds mem- 
bership in the United Brethren Church, is 
one of its Trustees and has taken a most 
active part in its work. For many years he 
has been a teacher in the Sunday-school, 
and also its treasurer, and his Christianity is 
that which recognizes the brotherhood of 
mankind and has a broad sympathy and 
charity for his fellow man. 



V-7*OHN P. HUMES, M. D., is a lead- 
m ing physician and surgeon of Winne- 
/• ■ bago City, and one of the pioneer 
settlers of I'aribault count}-, Min- 
nesota. 

He was born in Crawford count}' Penn- 
sylvania, January i6, 1837, ^"d 'S :i son of 
John C. and Mary E. (Griffith) Humes, na- 
tives of Pennsylvania and of Scotch descent. 
The father was a member of one of the old 
families of Crawford county, and was exten- 
sively engaged in farming, continuing his 
residence in his native State until his death. 
In politics he was a Democrat, and in re- 
ligious belief he was a Methodist, in which 



church he held an official position for man\- 
years. Of the seven children born of his 
union with Mary E. Griffith, three are liv- 
ing, namely; James B., a dentist of Cam- 
bridge, Pennsylvania; Julia A., now Mrs. 
Win. A. Miller of Prescott township; and 
John P., whose name heads this article. 
W^illiam W., who farmed the old homestead, 
is deceased, besides three others. 

Dr. Humes spent his boyhood days upon 
the home farm, and in the public school of 
the neighborhood began his education. At 
the age of fifteen he entered an academy at 
Waterford, Pennsylvania, where he was a 
student one year, after which he was for 
two terms in a similar institution at Kings- 
ville, and, later, one year at Meadville 
Academy; and in the intervals between the 
terms he engaged in teaching, which profes- 
sion he followed for a time in the Keystone 
State, after completing his studies at Mead- 
ville. In 1856 he came west to Fulton 
county, Illinois, and there taught school 
four months. The following year, 1857, he 
came to Faribault county, Minnesota, and 
pre-empted a quarter section of land a mile 
and a half east of the village of Winnebago 
City, when that now thriving place was a 
mere hamlet containing only a few small 
shanties. On this land he lived in true 
pioneer style for about four years, enduring 
many of the hardships incident to life on the 
frontier. For a time he lived in a board 
shanty, 12 x 14 feet, but in 1859, keeping 
pace with the progress of the times, he built 
a frame house of larger dimensions and 
much more pretentions in appearance, and 
further improved his farm by breaking about 
eighty acres of land and fencing the entire 
tract. In May, 1861, he left the farm and 
returned to Pennsylvania, where he entered 
into partnership with his brother, James B., 



rA RIB A UL T, MA R TIX, I ( 'A TON \ I yl N A ND J A CKSON. 



'25 



in the manufacture of oil barrels. During 
this time he devoted all his leisure hours to 
the study of medicine, in which direction he 
had been reading for some years. He re- 
mained in Pennsylvania, carrying on various 
business enterprises, until August, 1864, 
when he returned to Winnebago City and 
entered the office of Dr. Alvin Lockwood, 
as a medical student. In May, 1866, he be- 
gan the practice of his profession, and in 
1867 completed a course at Rush Medical 
College, Chicago, and immediately after re- 
sumed his practice in W'innebago City. Not 
satisfied with his medical attainments, and 
desiring to become more proficient in the 
science, in 1873 he attended a course of lec- 
tures at the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons and also at the University of Medi- 
cine in New York city, after which he again 
returned to his practice. 

Dr. Humes is essentially a self-made 
man. Early in life he learned the import- 
ant lessons of self-reliance, and has always 
made the most of his opportunities, acquir- 
ing his literary and professional knowledge 
through his own unaided efforts. He in- 
herited a robust constitution that is char- 
acteristic of his Scotch ancestors, which 
eminently fitted him for the laborious duties 
of a country practice. By devoting himself 
assiduously to the study and practice of 
medicine and surgery, he has ever kept 
abreast of the times, and met with a well 
deserved success. His kindness and gener- 
osity are proverbial. He drives long dis- 
tances to visit his poor and needy patients 
as readily and faithfully as he responds to 
the call of the rich. He is a member of the 
Minnesota State Medical Society, and is not 
only the oldest resident physician of the 
county, but also one of its most jirominent 
and respected citizens. 



In all matters pertaining to the public 
welfare, the Doctor takes a commendable 
interest; is a trustee of Parker College, hav- 
ing rendered substantial aid in building that 
institution, and has contributed toward the 
building of all the church edifices in the vil- 
lage. He supports the Republican party, 
but has never sought political preferment 
for himself. For one year, however, he 
served acceptably as Mayor of Winnebago 
City. In 1865 Dr. Humes was made a 
Mason in Blue Earth Valley Lodge, No. 27, 
A. F. & A. M., in which he now fills the 
office of Treasurer; and took the Chapter 
degrees in Mt. Horeb Chapter, No. 21, R. 
A. M., and has been its Treasurer ever since 
it was chartered. He is also a member of 
the I. O. O. F. 

During all the years of his residence in 
Faribault county. Dr. Humes has been in- 
terested in farming and real-estate trans- 
actions, and is at present a large land owner. 
He has accumulated a handsome compe- 
tency, and his pleasant home in Winnebago 
City is the abode of refinement and hospi- 
tality. 

Dr. Humes was married in 1867 to Miss 
Emma McColley, a native of Ashtabula, 
Ohio. They have an interesting family of 
five children, namely: Alice, wife of Clar- 
ence Baker, a farmer of Winnebago City 
township; Ella, who is a graduate of the high 
school and Parker College, is now a success- 
ful high-school teacher; and Gertie, Edith 
and James Portus. Mr. Humes and daugh- 
ters are members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church, to the support of which the Doc- 
tor contributes liberally. 

Mrs. Humes' parents were Alexander 
and Polly (Kazey) McColley, both natives of 
Ohio, of Scotch-Irish descent and farmers 
by occupation. In 185 1 they left their na- 



126 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



tive State, with their family, and took up 
their abode in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
whence, four years later, they removed to 
Portage, same State, where they engaged in 
farming. On the breaking out of the Civil 
war, the sons all enlisted in the Union army, 
and in 1865 Mr. McColley sold out and re- 
moved to Faribault county, Minnesota, set- 
tling on a farm which Dr. Humes entered 
from the Government in Delevan township, 
where he passed the residue of his life and 
died. His wife survived him some years, 
dying December 16, 1892. Their children 
are James, George, Electa, Charlotte, Na- 
thaniel, Emory and Emma, twins, and 
Elizabeth. All are living except Emory, 
who died from disease while in the army. 



K^^ OSWELL O. ARMSTRONG, a 

I /^ progressive and enterprising agri- 
\ , y culturist, makes his home on sec- 
tion 10, Nashville township, Martin 
county. He has many friends in this com- 
munity and on account of his extended ac- 
quaintance we feel assured that this record 
of his life will prove of interest to many of 
our readers. 

A native of Wisconsin, he was born in 
Waukesha county on the 29th of Novem- 
ber, 1 86 1, and is a son of John A. and Laura 
V. (Hollinback) Armstrong, a leading and 
influential man, now residing in Winnebago 
City, Minnesota. The parents removed to 
Martin county when our subject was only 
two years of age, and here he was reared 
and educated, the district schools affording 
him his early educational privileges. He 
afterward pursued his studies in the schools 
of Fairmont, and a practical knowledge 
fitted him for the duties of life. When he 
was seventeen years of age the family re- 



moved to the farm upon which he now 
resides and which has since been his home. 
He now owns a half section of land, rich 
and arable, and has placed nearly the en- 
tire amount under a high state of cultiva- 
tion. He successfully carries on general 
farming and stock-raising, and his careful 
supervision is shown in the well tilled fields 
and the thrifty appearance and the air of 
neatness which pervades every corner of his 
cozy home. 

On the 1 2th of November, 1883, Mr. 
Armstrong led to the marriage altar Miss Ida 
J. Bursell, one of Minnesota's fair daughters, 
born in Fillmore county, April 23, 1863. 
They at once located on the old homestead, 
and have made it their place of abode con- 
tinuously since. 

Our subject is a warm advocate of the 
temperance cause and expresses his princi- 
ples by his support of the Prohibition party 
at the polls. In 1890 he served as Census 
Enumerator of Nashville township, but has 
never been an aspirant for public office. He 
holds membership with the Freewill Baptist 
Church, and his life has been well spent, 
his honorable, upright course winning him 
the confidence and high regard of all with 
whom he has been brought in contact. 



>nr'OSEPH SCHIMEK, one of the e.\- 
m tensive land owners of Faribault 
A J county, is a self-made man, whose 
excellent success in life justly crowns 
earnest labor and perseverance. He is now 
living retired on his farm near Blue Earth 
City, with the interests of which he has 
long been identified. He was born in Bo- 
hemia in March, 18 16, and his parents, John 
and Rosina (Bickner) Schimek, were also 
born in the same country. There he spent the 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



127 



first fourteen years of his life in his father's 
home, after which he began serving an ap- 
prenticeship of three years to the weaver's 
trade. He was then employed as a weaver 
in various places, including Hungary, and in 
that country, in 1 844, he was united in mar- 
riage with Anna Pahl, a Hungarian by birth. 
His labors at his trade were continued dur- 
ing his residence in the Old World, but at 
length he determined to seek a home beyond 
the Atlantic. 

It was in 1853 that he took passage on 
a sailing vessel which, after a voyage of 
thirteen weeks, dropped anchor in the har- 
bor of Boston, in the month of February. 
From the "hub of the universe" he made 
his way to Illinois, locating in Cedarville, 
where he was employed as a farm hand for 
a few months. In the spring of the follow- 
ing year he removed to Osage, Iowa, and 
made a claim of Government land, but did 
not long remain in that neighborhood. He 
came instead to Minnesota and near Ovva- 
tonna entered another claim, which he at 
once began to clear and place under the 
plow. Much of it was cultivated by him 
and he operated it for seven years, when he 
came to the county which has since been 
his home, — Faribault. Agricultural pur- 
suits again engrossed his attention; he pur- 
chasing 160 acres of land, of which a quit- 
claim of twentj'-six acres had been broken. 
The further work of development was prose- 
cuted by him, and in course of time the once 
wild land was made to bloom and blossom 
as the rose. As his financial resources were 
increased he added to his farm from time to 
time until his landed possessions now aggre- 
gate 870 acres. In addition to his farming 
pursuits he built, in 1882, the first steam 
mill in Blue Earth City, which he operated 
about si.\ years, when, on the 5th of June, 



1888, the property was destroyed by fire, 
causing a loss of $13,000. Later he built a 
brewery in the same city and successfully 
carried on business along that lin.e until a 
decade had passed, when he sold out to his 
son-in-law. 

Si.x children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Schimek, who in order of birth are as fol- 
lows: Tracy, the eldest, now the wife of 
Paul Flakenstein, of Blue Earth City; 
Anna, wife of Michael Taylor, a resident of 
Merriam Park, near St. Paul; Joseph, who 
makes his home in Faribault count}-; George, 
who resides on the old homestead; and John 
and Paul, who are also residents of Fari- 
bault county. The mother of this family 
was called to her final home in March, 1893, 
and her loss is deeply and sincerely mourned, 
not only by her family but also by a 
wide circle of friends and acquaintances. 
She was a consistent member of the Catho- 
lic Church, and her life was replete with 
good deeds. 

In politics Mr. Schimek and his sons are 
supporters of the Democratic party. Mr. 
Schimek came to this county in limited cir- 
cumstances and the early years of his resi- 
dence here formed a period of hard labor, 
but he thus secured a start in life and has 
steadily worked his way upward, overcom- 
ing the difficulties in his path by indefati- 
gable labor and surmounting all obstacles 
which served to impede his progress. As 
time passed the result of his labor was no- 
ticeable in his increased possessions, and he 
is now one of the wealthy citizens of the 
community in which he has so long made 
his home. His best work, however, is 
probably in the line of church work. He 
was prime mover in organizing the Catholic 
Church in Blue Earth City, which society 
met for worship when it had a membership 



128 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



of only nine. They built a small frame 
house of worship and in that services were 
held for some time, but in i88i it was re- 
placed by the fine brick structure which now 
graces the city and of which the Catholic 
membership may well be proud. Of his 
means he has always given most liberally 
for church and benevolent work, and to no 
man in Faribault county is the success and 
growth of the church due as to Mr. Schimek. 



•^ERMAN B. FRANKLIN, Auditor 
■ ^j\ of Faribault county, Minnesota, is 
\^^9 a native of the State of New York, 
born in Cattaraugus county, April 
4, 1844, oldest son of John and Ann M. 
(Amadou) Franklin. 

John Franklin was also a native of New 
York, as was his father, James Franklin, 
they being representatives of one of the old- 
est families of the Empire State. James 
Franklin was a soldier in the war of 1812. 
His son John was reared, educated and mar- 
ried in his native State. Mrs. Franklin was 
born in Vermont, daughter of Bailey Ama- 
don, who settled in New York when she was 
a child. In 1853 John Franklin emigrated 
with his family to Wisconsin and located in 
Columbia county, where he was engaged in 
agricultural pursuits for ten years. In 1863 
he followed the tide of emigration still fur- 
ther West and settled in Blue Earth town- 
ship, Faribault county. Here he purchased 
a partially improved farm and was engaged 
extensivel}' in farming and stock-raising un- 
til the time of his death, July 23, 1880. 
Politically he was first a Whig and afterward 
a Republican. His family comprises six 
children, viz.: German B., whose name 
heads this article; Isabcll M., wife of M. B. 
Parker, of this county; li. H., of this ct)unt\-; 



T. H., of Montana; Ida M., wife of F. A. 
Kennard, of St. Paul; and Oscar, who died 
in childhood. Mrs. Franklin departed this 
life June 17, 1891, at the age of seventy- 
two years. 

German B. Franklin was nine years of 
age when he renio\ed with his parents to 
Wisconsin, and his youthful days were spent 
in assisting his father on their frontier farm. 
While his opportunities for acquiring an edu- 
cation were limited to three terms in the 
public school, he by his own energy and 
perseverance acquired a good practical edu- 
cation. During the late war he enlisted, in 
September, 1864, in Company F, First Min- 
nesota Heavy Artillery, in which he served 
until the close of the war. He then returned 
home and secured employment as clerk in a 
store in Blue Earth City, and later became 
a partner in the establishment, the firm 
name being McArthur, Hill & Franklin and 
continuing as such for five years. At the 
end of this time he and Mr. McArthur began 
dealing in farm implements, to which busi- 
ness they ga\e their attention for three years 
in Blue Eartli City. Then Mr. Franklin 
went to Jackson county, this State, where he 
conducted the same business several years. 
In 1878 and '79 he served as Auditor of 
Jackson county. At the expiration of his 
term there, he returned to Blue Earth City, 
and for three years was engaged in the fur- 
niture business, after which he followed 
farming until he was elected to his present 
office, in 1892. With such satisfaction and 
ability has he tilled this office that in 1894 he 
was nominated l)y acclamation for re-elec- 
tion, by the Republican party, and was en- 
dorsed by all parties. 

Mr. Franklin was married September 16, 
1872, to Miss Sarah E. Drake, a native of 
New York and a daughter of William S. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



129 



Drake, now a resident of F"arlbault county, 
Minnesota. Mrs. Franklin was a most 
amiable woman, a true Christian, and a con- 
sistent member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. She died July i, 1890, leaving six- 
children, namely: Clarance, Anna E., 
Elmer J., Laura G., John D. and Grace E. 
Mr. Franklin is a member of the King 
David Lodge, No. 179, F. & A. M., in 
which he has passed all the chairs, having 
served as Master of the lodge for six years. 
He is also a member of the A. O. U. W. , 
and the G. A. R. His first presidential vote 
was cast for Lincoln and he has e\'er since 
been an uncompromising Republican. 



eLI JOHN READER, a farmer of 
section 28, Westford townsfiip, 
Martin count}', is a son of George 
and Maria (Cox) Reader, nati\es of 
Dorsetshire, England. The mother, who 
had been previously married, came to Amer- 
ica in 1850. The father came to this coun- 
try later, locating in Waukesha county, 
Wisconsin, spent nine years in Adams county, 
that State, removed to Illinois, thence to 
Olmsted county, Minnesota, and in 1870 
located in section 28, Westford township, 
Martin county. The parents were married 
in Wisconsin. Mrs. Reader departed this 
life in 1S91, and the father now lives with 
his son. They had two children, —Eli John, 
the subject of this sketch, and Mary Eliza- 
beth, deceased. 

E. J. Reader was born in Wisconsin, 
September 18, 1855. He came to this 
county with his father, where he now owns 
120 acres of well improved land. In 1877 
he was united in marriage with Jane Booth, 
born in Middlesborough, England, June 19, 
1857, a daughter of Peter Booth, an early 



pioneer of this township. Mr. and Mrs. 
Reader have eight children, — Mary Lucy, 
Annie Maria, Edith Jane, Elizabeth, John 
William, Susan, Dorothy and George Edwin. 
The family are members of the Christian 
Church, in which Mr. Reader has served as 
Elder, and has been a teacher in the Bible 
class in the Sunday-school. 

In his political relations, our subject 
affiliates with the Republican party. He 
has served as Supervisor of Westford town- 
ship, as Road Overseer, and until the past 
year served as Clerk of school district No. 
74 since its organization. 



>Y»AMES BROWNLEE, a farmer of 
m section 1, Westford township, is a 
/• 1 son of John Brownlee, born in the 
Province of Quebec, Canada, in 
1 8 19. His father, James Brownlee, was a 
native of Edinburgh, Scotland, but located 
in Montreal immediately after his marriage, 
and his death occurred on a farm- in Hem- 
mingford township, Huntington county. 
Province of Quebec, having resided in that 
place about seventy years. Both he and 
his son were volunteers in the Canadian 
Rebellion of 1837. The mother of our 
subject, Mary A. (Hadley) Brownlee, was a 
native of Hemmingford township, a daugh- 
ter of Henry Hadley, a native of England, 
but located in Canada in an early day, and 
he improved a farm and died there. He 
was also a volunteer in the Canadian Rebel- 
lion. John and Mary Brownlee were mar- 
ried and resided in Quebec eighteen years. 
April 15, 1872, they located on an unim- 
proved farm in section 2, Martin county, 
Minnesota, where they were among the 
early pioneers. Mr. Brownlee improved 



IJO 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



and resided on that farm until his death, 
April 15, 1881, and the mother still resides 
there. They have ten children living, 
namely: James, John, Henry, Margaret 
Aldrich, Matthew, Robert R., Elizabeth J. 
Hindman, William A., Isaac R. and Mary 
S. Abbott. Mr. and Mrs. Brownlee are 
members of the United Brethren Church. 

James Brownlee, the subject of this 
sketch, was born in Canada April 22, 1855. 
He came to this State at the age of seven- 
teen years, and assisted on the home farm 
until his marriage, when he located on his 
farm of 120 acres. In addition to general 
farming, he and his brother have operated a 
threshing machine for the past fifteen years. 
In political matters Mr. Brownlee affiliates 
with the Republican party. He has served 
as Chairman of the Board of Supervisors of 
Westford township two years, as Township 
Clerk ten years. Justice of the Peace thir- 
teen years. Treasurer of School District No. 
24, and now holds the position of Notary 
Public. Socially he is a member of the A. 
O. U. W. at Fairmont. 

In 1880 Mr. Brownlee was united in 
marriage with Adaline Hindman, born in 
Wisconsin July 4, 1857, a daughter of Rev. 
J. H. and Sarah (Polk) Hindman, natives 
respectively of Ohio and Indiana. They 
were among the early pioneers of Wiscon- 
sin, and in 1864 located in Blue Earth 
county, Minnesota. Their house was raided 
by Indians during the second massacre, and 
Squire Mack, who was working for them, 
was shot dead. Mr. Hindman now lives in 
Waterville, Le Sueur county, this State. 
He is a prominent W(jrker in the United 
Brethren Church. Mr. and Mrs. Brownlee 
have si.\ children, — Fred G., Arthur E., 
Annie S., Harry M., Bessie H. and Florence 
J. Their eldest child, Clarence Edgar, is 



deceased. Mr. Brownlee is Trustee and 
Secretary of the Board of Trustees of the 
United Brethren Church. 



^"V'AMUEL C. MOORE, a dealer in 
•^^^^ baled ha\-, and engaged in a general 

h<_y insurance business, at Elmore, 
Minnesota, is one of the wide- 
awake, stirring young business men of Fari- 
bault county. 

In Green Springs township, Seneca 
county, Ohio, January 26, 1863, Mr. Moore 
first saw the light of day. He is the eldest 
of the five children of George D. and Lizzie 
D. (Myers) Moore; and of the other members 
of the family we record that John P. was 
killed in a railroad accident at Lake Crystal, 
at the age of seventeen years; that Alberta 
L. , is the wife of Andrew More, of Pilot 
Grove township, this county; and Winnie V. , 
who graduated at the Blue Earth high school 
when she was seventeen, is now a student 
at McAllister College, St. Paul, being an elo- 
cutionist of marked ability. George D. 
Moore, the father, was born in Ohio and 
lived there until T869, when he came west 
and settled in Goodhue county, Minnesota. 
For four years he was engaged in farming 
on a large scale in that county, and in 1873 
he came to Pilot Grove township, Faribault 
county, at first buying 160 acres, and later 
forty acres more. On this place he and his 
family resided five years, he being exten- 
sively engaged in stock-raising, in connec- 
tion with his farming, and here he set out 
one of the largest groves ever planted in the 
county. After living on his farm five years, 
he moved to Blue Earth City to give his 
cliiklren a good education, and has continued 
to reside in town ever since. He is now 
state agent for the Inter-State Building and 




S. J. "^ay^enM. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



■33 



Loan Association, of Minneapolis, Minne- 
sota. 

Of Mrs. Moore, be it recorded tiiat she, 
too, is a native of Ohio. Her parents, Sam- 
uel and Catharine Myers, were Pennsylvan- 
ians, and among the early pioneers of Ohio, 
and died there in old age. The paternal 
grandfather of our subject, John Moore, was 
also a native of Penns}lvania. He was one 
of the first settlers of the Western Reserve, 
took claim to a tract of Government land 
there, and was for many years a leading citi- 
zen of his community, being largely engaged 
in farming and sawniilling. He is still liv- 
ing in Ohio, hale and hearty at the age of 
ninety-eight years, and attends personally to 
the management of his own affairs. 

Samuel C. Moore started out in life on 
his own responsibility when he was twenty 
years of age, having received a high-school 
education and also taken a thorough course 
in a business college at St. Paul. For one 
year he was engaged in the hay business on 
the farm, then in 1885 he went to Elmore 
and there increased his operations, handling 
a large amount of hay aimually. In 1888 
we find him in St. Paul and Minnesota, where 
he was employed as clerk and bookkeeper. 
These occupations, however, not being con- 
genial to his taste, he returned to Elmore 
and again began dealing in hay, which he 
has continued successfully up to the present 
time. Not long after his return to Elmore 
he purchased the home farm in Pilot Grove 
township, which he now owns, keeping upon 
it three men, while he himself superintends 
its operations. Here he raises cattle and 
hogs as well as grain and hay. His hay 
business has so increased that he now em- 
ploys no less than twenty-tive men duringthe 
summer season, and duringthe fall and a part 
of the winter furnishes employment to six- 



teen men. In 1893 he handled 3,000 tons 
of hay. During that year he shipped twenty- 
one car-loads of hay t(j Paris, France, it 
being loaded on an ocean vessel at Bruns- 
wick, Georgia. The past year, 1 894, he 
cut over 1,500 acres of hay, and this year 
expects to far surpass that. Since 1890 
Mr. Moore has also been engaged in the in- 
surance business. He represents some of 
the leading companies of the country, and 
in this, as in his other ventures, he is meet- 
ing with deserved success. In 1894 his 
premiums were in advance of $5,000. 

Mr. Moore is a member of King David 
Lodge, No. 179, F. & A. M., of which he 
is Junior Warden; and he is also identified 
with the A. O. U. W^ at Elmore, being a 
charter member. 




HOMAS J. CARPENTER, one of 
the prominent men of Verona town- 
ship, Faribault county, Minnesota, 
dates his arrival here in 1868, and 
since that time has been identified with the 
agricultural interests of the county. 

He was born in Cattaraugus county. New 
York, November r, 1S33. His father and 
grandfather were both named John Carpen- 
ter. The latter was born either in Vermont 
or New York, — it is not known which, — and 
was a soldier in the war of 1812, as also 
were two of his sons. He married a Miss 
Avary, and after living in New York for some 
years they moved to Ohio, where they spent 
the rest of their lives and died. Their son 
John, above alluded to, was born in Onon- 
daga countv. New York, May 17, 1803, and 
was reared on a farm in his native State. 
When he was twenty-one he married Miss 
Sally Amidon, a native of Readsboro, Ver- 
mont, and a daughter of Rev. Ezra Amidon, 



'34 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



a minister of the Reformed Methodist Church. 
For forty-one years they made their home 
in Cattaraugus county, New York, and there ! 
reared their family. They had seven chil- 
dren, viz. : Ruth, lantha, Avary, Sarah, 
Thomas J., James Monroe and Martin V. 
Avary died at the age of two years. James 
Monroe was a Union soldier in the late war, 
and died at Chattanooga, Tennessee, leav- 
ing a widow and daughter, Emma. He and 
his brother, Thomas T., married sisters. The ; 
parents of this family came out to Minne- I 
sota in 1867, and here passed the residue of ' 
their lives, the mother dying October 3, 
1878, and the father April 11, 1889. John 
Carpenter was a prominent man in his day. 
While in the East he was for a number of 
years engaged in the lumber business. He 
was an active politician, affiliating with the 
Democratic party, and served as Sheriff of 
Cattaraugus county, and while serving in 
this capacity he arrested the first murderer 
ever taken by an officer in this county, a 
man named Bohall, who murdered a Mr. 
and Mrs. Brown. Mr. Carpenter first ar- 
rested a son-in-law of Mr. Brown, who 
proved himself innocent, and next he arrested 
the real murderer, who confessed his crime 
while being locked into a cell with Mr. Car- 
penter. He first killed Mr. Brown with an 
ax, and then Mrs. Brown with a stick, — 
which latter weapon Mr. Carpenter kept 
in his possession as a relic for many 
years. For committing this horrible crime 
Bohall received only $30, which he hid in 
the woods, and to this place they repaired 
together just as it became dark, to recover 
it. Bohall committed suicide while in prison. 
For over forty years Afr. John Carpenter 
was a zealous Mason, was buried by the 
order, and his funeral was the largest ever 
held in the county. 



Thomas J. Carpenter was reared in his 
native county, remaining there until 1868, 
when he came to Minnesota, and on the 
broad prairie purchased a tract of wild land, 
where he has since lived. As the result of 
his energy and good management, he is now 
the owner of a fine farm of 270 acres, — one 
of the best farms in the county. His two- 
story residence stands on a natural building 
site and commands a magnificent view of 
fine farming country. His large barn, other 
substantial buildings, nice grove and fine 
stock, all give evidence of the success which 
has attended the owner. 

Mr. Carpenter was married April 13, 
1859, to Miss Almira Wilcox, a native of 
Cattaraugus county. New York, daughter of 
Hosea and Eliza (Noyes) Wilcox, both na- 
tives of Vermont, the former a son of James 
Wilcox and the latter a daughter of James 
Johnson Noyes. Hosea Wilcox and his wife 
had ten children, seven of whom reached 
adult age, namely: James Johnson, Almira 
Carpenter, Sarah Carpenter, Timothy, 
Francis, Delia and Etta. The father died 
in Cattaraugus county at the age of sixty- 
two years, and the mother is still living 
there, having attained her seventy-ninth 
year. Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter have had five 
children, viz. : Walter, the first born, who 
died at the age of three years; Pearly, wife 
of A. A. Johnson, of this township; Ketta, 
wife of Charles Nichols, of this township; 
and Etta and Monroe, at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter are members of 
the Methodist Church, and in politics he is 
Democratic. He has been a Justice of the 
Peace and a member of the School Board 
for a number of years. 

Such, in brief, is a sketch of the life of 
one of \'erona township's well-known and 
highly-respected citizens. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



'35 



Sr-» ORD BYRON TRUE, who curries 
I I o" general fanning on section 20, 
^i^J Center Creek township, Martin 
county, has the honor of being a 
native of Minnesota. His birth occurred in 
Blue Earth county on the 17th of May, 
1856, and is the eldest son of Lewis F. and 
Clara H. (Gould) True, highly respected 
people of this locality. When he was only 
four years of age he was brought by his par- 
ents to Martin county and has here since 
made his home. He was reared amid the 
wild scenes of the frontier, for during his 
boyhood this county was a pioneer region. 
He acquired his education in the common 
schools, and the first school which he at- 
tended was held in a building upon his 
father's farm. He remained at home, as- 
sisting in the labors of the farm, until he 
had attained his majority, and the days of 
his boyhood and youth were quietly passed 
midst play and work. 

On the 4th of April, 1872, Mr. True was 
joined in marriage with Miss Emma J. 
Edwards, daughter of C. M. and Mary J. 
(Rice) Edwards. The lady was born in 
Tama county, Iowa, November 18, 1857, 
and from the age of four years was reared in 
this State. They began housekeeping in 
Westford township, Martin county, where 
they resided for four years, then located on 
section 8, Center Creek township, where he 
improved a good farm of 200 acres. He was 
successfully engaged in its cultivation until 
1890, when he sold that property and pur- 
chased his present farm in Center Creek 
township, — 160 acres of rich and arable 
land. He carries on general farming and 
stockraising and keeps on hand good grades 
of horses, cattle and hogs. The buildings 
upon his place are substantial structures, 
the fences are well repaired and an air of 



neatness prevades the place, while the 
owner is accounted one of the practical and 
progressive farmers of the county. 

In politics, Mr. True is independent with 
Prohibition tendencies. He is a strictly 
temperate man, having used neither intoxi- 
cants nor tobacco, and therefore by example 
as well as precept he endeavors to promote 
the temperance cause. He has never been 
an aspirant for office, but \\as elected a 
member of the town Board of Supervisors 
and Justice of the Peace, serving in the lat- 
ter position for six \ears, with credit to him- 
self and satisfaction to all concerned. In his 
social relations he is connected with Chain 
Lake Lodge, No. 64, A. F. & A. M. 

The True famil}' numbers, besides our 
subject and his estimable wife, eight chil- 
dren, as follows: Addie, Mary, Bertie, Laura, 
George, David, Effie and Harry. The 
family is one of prcjminence in the com- 
munity, its members holding an enviable 
position in social circles and their home is 
noted for its hospitalit\'. 



Vj*ACOB LINDER, County Commis- 
m sioner of Faribault count}', Minne- 
nk J sota, owns and occupies one of the 
best farms in Barber township, and 
has been identified with this place since 
November 3, 1S66. Like many of Minne- 
sota's best citizens, Mr. Linder is of German 
birth. 

He was born in Bavaria, Germany, 
October 22, 1837, son of Frank Joseph and 
Barbara (Trunk) Linder, both natives of 
Bavaria. Frank Joseph Linder was a soldier 
under Napoleon at Waterloo. He was a 
member of a large and respected famih', one 
of his brothers being a carpenter, another a 
wine dealer, and several of them farmers. 



136 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



He and his wife were l)ri)iij;lit up in the 
CathoHc Church and in that faith reared 
their familj". They had four sons, namely: 
George, a resident of St. Louis, Missouri; 
Frank Joseph, of Bavaria, Germany, 
Charles, an engineer at Indianapolis, Indi- 
ana; and Jacob, whose name heads this 
article. 

Jacob Linder was reared on a farm in 
his native land, and until he was fourteen 
attended school. He then sailed from 
Havre, France, on the ship Riehn for New 
York, and landed at his destination after a 
voyage of forty-se\'en days. From New 
York he came West to Columbia county, 
Wisconsin, where he worked out by the 
month on farms for eight years. When he 
was twenty-two years of age he married 
and rented a farm, and continued to make 
his home in Wisconsin until 1866. That 
year, as above stated, he took up his abode 
in Minnesota. Here he took claim to 160 
acres of wild land, built a sod shanty, bought 
a yoke of oxen, and in this primitive way 
began life on the frontier; and here for 
twenty-eight years he has lived and pros- 
pered. To his original claim he has since 
added until now he has 283 acres, one of 
the best farms in the township. A modern, 
commodious two-story residence has taken 
the place of the sod house. A large barn, 
other farm buildings, windmill, ten-acre 
grove, etc., are among the improvements he 
has placed here, and these, together with his 
well-cultivated fields, broad pastures and 
fine stock, all give evidence of the prosper- 
ity that has attended his earnest efforts. 
His herd of Durham cattle are among the 
best in the township. 

Mr Linder was married in Columbia 
county, Wisconsin, to Mary A. Damm, also 
a native of Bavaria, daughter of John W. 



and Thessa (Ackerman) Damm. Her pa- 
rents died in Columbia county, Wisconsin, 
and she died December 24, 1891, leaving a 
family of nine children, namely: Jacob, 
Jr., Helene M., Mary, Frank Joseph, Caro- 
line, Barbara, Francis, William T. and 
Otto G. After the death of his first wife, 
Mr. Linder married her sister, Margaret 
Damm, who was born and reared in Colum- 
bia county, Wisconsin. 

Mr. Linder is Democratic in his political 
views and is one of the "wheel-horses" of 
the party in his county. He has served as 
delegate to county and Congressional con- 
ventions, was for years chairman of the 
Board of Supervisors in his township, served 
eight years as Assessor, and since 1888 has 
been County Commissioner, filling all these 
positions with credit to himself and also to 
his constituents. Personally, Mr. Linder is 
frank and genial, and is as popular as he is 
well known. 



BT. MOORE, Count}' Commissioner 
of Faribault county, was born at 
Crown Point, Essex county. New 
York, July 5, 1840, son of John 
Moore and grandson of William Moore, both 
natives of New Hampshire. William Moore 
was a veteran of the war of 181 2 and a son 
of a Revolutionary soldier. The latter's 
father was born in the north of Ireland, of 
Scotch-Irish parents. John Moore was 
reared in Essex county, New York, and was 
there married to Miss Luthera Taft, a na- 
tive of that county and a daughter of Tim- 
othy Taft, who was born in Vermont. John 
Moore and wife were the parents of ten 
children, namely: Franklin T. , Henry, 
Adalet, Jane, Ellen, Thomas, Ida, Sanford, 
Harriet, and Edwin. The mother died in 



FARinAULT, MARTIX, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



137 



Essex county in 1S73, at the age of fifty- 
five years; ami the father is now residing at 
the same place, at the age of seventy-seven. 
He was a farmer, miller and lumberman, 
and on his father's farm and in the mill the 
subject of our sketch spent his boyhood 
days, and when he grew up he learned the 
trade of blacksmith. 

In 1863 Mr. Moore volunteered for ser- 
vice in the Union army, enlisting as a mem- 
ber of Company M, Fifth New York Cav- 
alry, under Colonel Hammond. He was in 
the battles of \\^inchester, Cedar Creek, 
Five Forks, the Wilderness, and in many 
lesser engagements, and was honorably dis- 
charged July 25, 1865, coming out of the 
ranks as Corporal. After his return home 
from the army, he resumed work at his 
trade, and continued to reside in New York 
until 1870. 

In 1870 he came west and took up his 
abode in Faribault county, Minnesota. That 
year he bought his present farm, 160 acres, 
on section nine, Verona township, of B. F. 
Forbes, one of the prominent and early set- 
tlers of the county. This farm is well 
adapted for both grain and stock, is watered 
by Center creek, and is well improved and 
under a high state of cultivation. It has a 
comfortable and attractive cottage, two 
barns, other farm buildings, good fences, 
etc. In the milkhouse is a never-failing 
spring. Mr. Moore makes it a rule to keep 
the very best grade of stock, and both in his 
farming and stock-raising he has been uni- 
formly successful. 

At Crown Point, New York, Jan 5, 
1864, Mr. Moore married Miss Amelia M. 
Mclntyre, who was born and reared in 
Essex county, daughter of Artemus and 
Louisa (Pond) Mclntyre. Her father, also 
a native of that county, was of Scotch-Irish 



origin, and died at the age of fifty years. 
Her mother was born in Medfield. Massa- 
chusetts, March 8, 18 16, and died at the 
age of fort\'-six years. Artemus Mclnt>re 
and his wife had a family of children, as 
follows: Elizabeth, Simon, Amelia, David, 
Oliver, Foster, Ann Eliza, Alfred, and El- 
verton. Mr. and Mrs. Moore have three 
children, Ellen L. , Irene L. and Ed Earl, — 
all at home. 

Mr. Moore is a stanch and active Re- 
publican, has served as Assessor and a mem- 
ber of the School Board, and in the fall of 
1894 was elected to his present office, that 
of County Commissioner. He is a member 
of the G. A. R. and the I. O. O. F. His 
frank and genial manner, together with his 
many sterling traits of character, make him 
a favorite of all who have come in contact 
with him, either in a business or a social 
way. 



>^OSEPH TEUBNER has long been 
B officially connected with the interests 
/> 1 of Nashville township, in which com- 
munity he follows farming and stock- 
raising. Martin county numbers him among 
her leading citizens, and especially is he a 
worthy representati\e of her agricultural 
interests. 

A native of Austria, he was born on the 
24th of June, 1839, and spent the first fifteen 
years of his life in that country, during which 
time he attended the conmion schools and 
learned the cabinet-maker's trade. In the 
year 1854 he determined to seek a home 
this side the Atlantic. Experience has made 
him old beyond his years, and his sagacity 
was manifested by the carrying out of this 
resolution. He knew that better oii]>ortuni- 
ties were afforded young men here, anil w ith 



'3''^ 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



no capital save a 3'oung man's bright hope 
of the future, a determination to win suc- 
cess and a laudable ambition, he took up 
his residence in Wisconsin in the year before 
mentioned. He first located in Milwaukee, 
where he worked at his trade of cabinet- 
making, also followed carpentering, and in 
this way he got a start in life. In 1S59 he 
removed to Berlin, Wisconsin, where he 
turned his attention to general farming, but 
after a short time h'is labors in that direction 
were suspended. 

On the i6thof April, 1861, Mr. Teubner 
offered his services to his adopted countr}'. 
He had watched with interest the progress 
of events which preceded the opening of the 
late war, and resolved that if the South 
attempted secession he would strike a blow 
in defense of the Union. Accordingly, 
when Fort Sumter w;is fired ujion, he donned 
the blue, joining Company G, Fifth W'iscon- 
sin Volunteer Infantry, at Berlin, April 16, 
1 86 1, — only three days after the first rebel 
shot was fired. After going into camp at 
Madison, Wisconsin, he was transferred to 
Company C, of the same regiment, and 
served until August, 1S64, in the .\rmy of 
the Potomac, and Si.xth Army Corps. He 
was mustered into the State service May 13, 
and into the United States service July 13. 
Left for Washington, District of Columbia, 
July 24; for Fortress Monroe, March 23, 
1862, and took part in the siege of York- 
town; was engaged in the following battles: 
Lee's Mills, April 16, 1862; Williamsburg, 
May 5; Golden Farm, June 27; Savage 
Station, June 28; White Oak Swamp, June 
29; Malvern Hill, Jul}' i ; Cramjiton Gap, 
September i 5; Antietam, September 17 and 
18; Fredericksburg, December 12 and 13 
(all the foregoing in 1862), and also at 
Fredericksburg again, May 2 and 3 follow- 



ing; Gettysburg, July 2-4; Rappahannock 
Station, November 7; Wilderness, Novem- 
ber 26, — the last four in 1863; Wilderness, 
May 5 and 6 following; Spottsylvania Court 
House, May 8, 9, 10, 12; Hanover, May 
28; Cold Harbor, June i and 3, — the last 
four in 1864; and also during this year he 
participated in the operations around Peters- 
burg, and during a part of July, in the bat- 
tle before \^'ashington, when General Ewell 
made his famous invasion into Maryland. 
All the above battles took place in Virginia 
excepting the one at Antietam, Maryland, 
and Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Teubner left Washington for Madi- 
son, Wisconsin, July 22, 1864, and was 
mustered out of service August 4 following. 
While driving the rebels from Williamsburg 
in a charge upon them, Afay 5, 1862, he 
was wounded; and also May 3, 1863, while 
charging Mary's Heights at Fredericksburg, 
whers, getting into close quarters within the 
rebel works, he received a severe injury in 
the chest; also, June i, 1864, at Cold Har- 
bor, while charging the rebel works, and in 
the terrible hand-to-hand struggle that fol- 
lowed, he received a severe injur}' over the 
head from a musket blow, .\lways at the 
post of dut}', he faithfully defended the old 
flag. His generals were McClellan, Burn- 
side, Hooker and Meade. 

.■\fter a tvvo-wee1<s sojourn at home Mr. 
Teubner came to Martin county, Minnesota, 
and settled upon the farm where he now re- 
sides, — then a tract of wild land entirely 
destitute of improvement. He built a board 
shanty, I2x 14 feet, containing only one 
room, and also luiilt a little straw stable for 
the shelter of his few head of stock. Then 
began the work of improving and develop- 
ing his lanil. With characteristic energy he 
took up the work, plo\\e(l and planted the 



FAR1];AUL'I\ martin, WATONWAN and JACKSON. 



■39 



fields, and in course of time abundant har- 
vests were garnered as the reward of his 
labors. He now owns 200 acres, and the 
improvements upon the place stand as 
monuments to his thrift and enterprise. A 
beautiful grove of si.\ acres adds to the value 
and attractive appearance of the place, and 
good buildings are seen where once stood 
the rude structures before described. The 
owner has prospered in his directed efforts, 
and is now successfully engaged in general 
farming and stock-raising. 

The lady who now bears the name of 
Mrs. Teubner was in her maidenhood Miss 
Elizabeth Sherman. She was born and 
reared in Vermont and is a daughter of 
Joseph and Patience (Rising) Sherman, also 
natives of the Green Mountain State. The 
union of Mr. and Mrs. Teubner, which was 
celebrated June 9, 1861, has been blessed 
with seven children, — one daughter and si.\ 
sons, — as follows: Florian J., at home; 
Charles W. , one of the professors in the 
business college in Winnebago City, Minne- 
sota; George W., an engineer; Orville M., 
Wilson E., Windom E., and Florence M., 
who are still under the parental roof. The 
mother of these children died September 5, 
1893. The family holds a high position in 
the circles of society in which they move. 

Politically Mr. Teubner says he is a 
" strong Republican." Th° party which was 
formed to prevent the further extension of 
slavery and which was really the salvation of 
the Nation through the war has always 
found him a stanch advocate, and he does 
all in his power to promote its growth and 
insure its success. During nearly his entire 
residence in Martin county he has served as 
a member of the town Board of Supervisors, 
and has also been a member of the School 
Board, — the cause of education finding him 



a warm friend. He is an honored member 
of Claybaugh Post, No. 54, G. A. R., of 
Winnebago City, in which he has served as 
Quartermaster and Commander, and de- 
lights to renew his old army acquaintance- 
ships. Whether on the field of battle, in 
local offices or as an untitled citizen, Mr. 
Teubner has ever been found true to the land 
of his adoption, and no truer American citi- 
zen resides in Martin county. He needs 
never have occasion to regret the determina- 
tion he formed at the early age of fifteen, — 
seeking a home in the United States; for 
here he has not only found many warm 
friends, but has also gained a comfortable 
home and secured a handsome competence 
which supplies him with all the comforts of 
life. 



t>^ EV. C. G. EISENBERG.— The 
I /"^ German Evangelical Lutheran 
^ , P Trinity Congregation at Welcome, 
Minnesota, was organized in the 
year 1876, by the Rev. L. M. Reck, a mis- 
sionary of the Lutheran Synod of Iowa and 
other States. Nine members signed the 
constitution at that time, na»iely, Henry 
and Fred Hulseman, Henry D. Finke, Au- 
gust Borchardt, Carl Roloff, H. A. Miller, 
Val. Wohlhuter, St. Schuelein and Chris. 
Virgens. They built a parsonage, 18x22, 
on section 36, Fox Lake township, the upper 
story being used as a place of worship and 
the first floor as a dwelling for the minister, 
the Rev. E. O. Giesel. In 1884 this house 
was moved to the newly laid out town of 
Welcome, consisting of a post-office and a 
grain warehouse; and the following year a 
church building was erected on a lot pre- 
sented by D. D. Bunn. 

At the time of the dedication of the new 



HO 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



church the Rev. C. G. Eisenberg took 
charge of the congregation, and has held 
this position to date. The congregation 
has kept pace with the growth of the popu- 
lation of the county, as well with member- 
ship as with the increasing wealth of the 
members; for to-day the congregation has a 
very convenient parsonage, built in 1891, 
besides a spacious, well-equipped school- 
house, built in 1894. In March, 1895, the 
church was presented with a large, fine bell, 
by Fred Wedenkamp, of Millwaukee, \\'is- 
consin. 

Mr. Eisenberg was born in Hessen- 
Nassau, Germany, October 21, 1862; came 
to this country in 1881; graduated at the 
College of the Synod of Iowa at Mendota, 
Illinois, in 1884, and came to this county 
in the fall of 1885. He was married to 
Miss Mary Gottschalk May 9, 1886, and has 
now four children. His parochial field com- 
prehends not only Welcome and neighbor- 
hood, but also Lake Belt and Galena, where 
he conducts services ever}' alternate Sunda\', 
in Stone and Osborn schoolhouses. 




iHOMAS ALLAN was for many 
years identified with the agriciil- 
tural interests of Martin count}', 
but is now living a retired life in 
Fairmont. He was one of the first set- 
tlers of this section of the State, locating 
here when the Indians were frequent visitors 
in the neighborhood and when the work of 
progress and civilization was scarcely begun. 
He has labored long and earnestly through 
the years wiiich have since come and gone, 
and now, in the evening of life, he can lay 
aside all business cares and rest in the en- 
joyment of a well merited competence. 



The Allan family is of English lineage. 
The parents of our subject, Joseph and 
Elizabeth (Sykes) Allan, were both na- 
tives of Yorkshire, England, and spent their 
entire lives in the land of their birth. They 
had a family of seven children who grew to 
j mature years, of whom three are }'et living, 
— George, now a resident of McHenry 
j county, Illinois; Thomas, of this sketch; and 
Mary E., wife of Peter Booth, who is living 
in Westford township, Martin county. 

Thomas Allan opened his eyes to the 
light of day October 30, 1833, in Yorkshire, 
England, and was reared upon a farm, 
spending his boyhood days midst play and 
j work. Determining to seek a home and 
I fortune beyond the Atlantic, he carried out 
i this resolution, in 1856, by becoming one of 
the passengers on a sailing vessel, from 
which he afterward landed on American soil. 
He made his way at once to McHenry 
county, Illinois, where he spent two years, 
and in 185S he came to Minnesota, taking 
up his residence upon what is now section 6, 
Center Creek township, Martin county. His 
house was the first erected in the township 
and the entire county was but sparsely set- 
tled. The prairies were covered with tall 
wild grasses, the forests were uncut and the 
whole locality was waiting for the transform- 
ing influences of sturd\' pioneers who would 
brave the trials and difficulties of frontier 
life to secure a home and open up to civiliza- 
tion a new locality. He settled amid the 
timber on Elm creek. His nearest neighbor 
on the east was Eugene Himtington, who 
lived si.\ miles away; to the west was a set- 
tlement five miles distant and the nearest 
market, Mankato, was thirty-five miles dis- 
tant. 

Mr. Allan built a log cabin, thatched 
with ha\', and for some time kept bachelor's 




^La/'A 




'{>drMf/j ^^m/^mo 



J. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIX, U'A7^0N\VAN AND JACKSOX. 



hall. He first secured a quarter section of 
land and after a time obtained a homestead 
claim of i6o acres, thus becoming owner of 
an extensive farm. In 1869 he married 
Lydia A. Sperry Baker, who was born in 
New York in 1832, daughter of Jeremy 
Baker, of the liinpire State. Mrs. Allan 
was one of the early settlers of Blue Earth 
county and b}' her marriage became the 
mother of two children, — Maud, now de- 
ceased, and Ivah. 

The land which Mr. Allan obtained was 
a barren tract when it came into his posses- 
sion, but his unceasing efforts soon worked 
a decided change in its appearance. Early 
morning found him in the fields, and the 
plow and reaper were abandoned only when 
the shades of night falling around him made 
it no longer possible for him to work; into 
the furrow was dropped the seed and in 
course of time the combined labors of man 
and nature produced rich and abundant 
harvests. Capable management of his busi- 
ness interests and close attention to all de- 
tails, won to Mr. Allan a well deserved 
prosperity, and he is now living retired. He 
has met with difficulties, and, like his neigh- 
bors, had his crops destroyed by the grass- 
hoppers, but diligence and perseverance at 
length triumphed over all obstacles and he 
is now the possessor of a comfortable com- 
petence. In all his labors he has been ably 
assisted and seconded by his estimable wife, 
who has indeed proved to him a helpmeet. 
The Indians frequently visited his pioneer 
home. At one time, while he was threshing 
his grain with a flail, six Indians came to 
him asking him for straw upon which to 
sleep. He gave them some and accom- 
panied them to their camp in the woods, 
which was the first time he saw full-blooded 
Indians. His uniform kindness to them 



won their regard, and he had many true 
friends among the Winnebagoes. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Allan are members 
of the society of Christian Scientists of Fair 
mont. The cause of education has ever 
found in him a warm friend, and he has 
served as a member of the local School Board. 
In his political views he has been a stalwart 
Republican since he became a resident of 
Martin county, and keeps well informed on 
the questions of the day, but has never 
sought or desired political preferment, for 
his time has been closely taken up with his 
business interests and the enjoyment of 
home life. 



>^OSEPHUS COWING, one of the 
m representative citizens of Martin 
A I county, was born in Orleans county, 
New York, August 23, 1834, a son 
of Dr. John Cowing, a native of Onondaga 
county, that State. He was prominently 
engaged in the practice of medicine and 
surgery until eighty-seven years of age, his 
practice having extended into Canada and 
Rochester, New York. He was well known 
throughout the country. His father. Dr. 
John Cowing, was born in Vermont, of Eng- 
glish and Scotch descent, and was a prac- 
ticing physician in New York. He was a 
son of Dr. John Cowing, a native of Scot- 
land, who graduated in a medical college 
there. He came to America at the age of 
twenty-eight years, locating in Vermont, 
where he followed the practice of medicine. 
He afterward located near Albany, New 
York. The mother of our subject, iicc Eliz- 
abeth Burgiss, was born and reared in New 
York. Her father, Lewis Burgiss, was a 
teamster from Albany to Buffalo before the 



144 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Erie Canal was built, and he afterward lo 
cated on a farm near Batavia, New York. 
The mother of Mrs. Cowing, Elizabeth 
Burgiss, was born near Troy, New York. 
They lived to the advanced ages of I02 and 
103 years, the mother dying the day after 
the father's death, and the funeral was held 
on the same day, and they were buried in 
the same grave. John and Elizabeth Cow- 
ing had seven children, namely: Jerusha, 
deceased; John, of Pine county, Minnesota; 
Martha A., deceased; Anna M., deceased; 
David, of Kansas; Josephus, the subject of 
this sketch; and George R. , of Kent county, 
Michigan. 

Mr. Cowing was reared in his native 
place until nineteen years of age, when he 
])urchased and located on i 20 acres of land 
in Kane count}', Illinois. While there he 
was employed in cutting ties and railroad 
timber about one and a half years. He 
then sold that place and purchased 160 
acres in Will county, same State, which had 
been partially improved. His wife died 
there September 15, 1854, and Mr. Cowing 
then took his little child and returned to his 
old home in New York. Lea\ing his daugh- 
ter there, he came again to Will county, 
rented his farm, and removed to Cedar 
Falls, Iowa. He conducted a grocery store 
there until 1856, when he sold out and pur- 
chased a farm of 320 acres near the city, 
but rented his place and remained in Cedar 
Falls. Mr. Cowing next embarked in the 
real-estate business. In i 862 he enlisted in 
Company B, Thirty-First Iowa \'olunteer 
Infantry; took part in the battles of Vicks- 
burg, Arkansas Post and many smaller en- 
gagements, and was slightly wounded in the 
right shoulder. After the close of the strug- 
gle, Mr. Cowing returned to Cedar Falls, 
where he was engaged in the real-estate 



business. He next purchased 200 acres of 
land one mile north of that city, which was 
known as the Deacon Ashley farm, and on 
which he resided about live years. For the 
following five 3-ears our subject was engaged 
in the grocery business in Cedar Falls, and 
since 1S78 has resided on the farm he now 
owns in Center Creek township, Martin 
county, Minnesota. For eight years he was 
engaged in logging and lumbering in Carl- 
ton county, and during that time cut six 
million feet of lumber. At one time Mr. 
Cowing owned 480 acres of land, but has 
since given to his sons until the place now 
contains 320 acres. In 1887 he built his 
present residence and farm buildings. Since 
1889, in connection with agricultural pur- 
suits. Mr. Cowing has been engaged in the 
implement business in Huntley. 

In 1852, at the age of eighteen years, 
he was united in marriage with Mary Grant, 
a native of New York. They had one child, 
Addie, now at' home. December 9, 1855, 
he married Delsena Smelcer,born and reared 
in Indiana. She removed with her parents 
to Benton count}'. Illinois, when eleven 
years of age, and afterward went to Cedar 
Falls, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Cowing have 
eight children, namelj': George R.. a prom- 
inent farmer of Center Creek township; 
Henry, of this State; Mary, wife of John H. 
Round, of Kansas; Alice, deceased; Alta, 
wife of F. L. \'ance, of Itasca count}', Min- 
nesota; and Allie, at home. Mr. Cowing 
is a stanch Rejiublican. and has served three 
times as Chairman of the Board of Super- 
visors and as president of the Huntle}' Hard- 
ware Association. Socially, he is a member 
of James Clabaugh Post, No. 54, G. A. R. , 
of Winnebago City; of Blue Earth Valley 
Lodge, No. 27, A. F. & A. M., at Winne- 
bago City; of Mount Horeb Chapter, No. 



FARIBAULT, MARTI X, WATOXWAN AND JACKSON. 



145 



21, R. A. M., of the same place; of the A. 
O. U. W. at Cedar Falls, Iowa; and of the 
Winnebago City Lodge, No. 30, I. O. O. F. 



at 



II.LIAM EBERLEIN, a prosper- 
ous farmer residing near Blue 
Earth City, in Prescott township, 
Faribault county, has been a resi- 
dent of this county for more than three dec- 
ades. 

He was born in Columbia county, Wis- 
consin, October 14, 1853, son of Christo- 
pher and Elizabeth (Frabel) Eberlein, na- 
tives of Germany. After their emigration 
to America, his parents lived for some years 
in Wisconsin, and from there came to Fari- 
bault count}', Minnesota, where they still 
live, both being in the octogenarian ranks. 
They have lived together as man and wife 
for nearly sixty years, and sons and daugh- 
ters have grown up around them, the names 
of their children being as follows: Lodema, 
Ferdinand, Ed, George, Minnie, Amanda, 
Charlie, Albert and William (twins), and 
Henry and Clara. Three of the sons, Fer- 
dinand, Ed and George, served in the Union 
army during the civil war, and Ferdinand 
and George died of disease while in the ser- 
vice. 

William Eberlein was eleven years old 
when he came with his parents to Minnesota, 
and here he was reared to farm life and 
received his education in the public schools. 
He continued a member of the home circle 
until the time of his marriage, in i<S87, after 
which he located on his present farm, 240 
acres, where he has since been engaged in 
general farming and stock-raising. On this 
farm are good buildings, including a two- 
story residence, barn, stable, machine-house, 
granary, modern windmill, etc., and the 



land is conveniently divided into fields for 
cultivation and pasture, the whole of it well 
fenced. A ten-acre grove is not among the_ 
least of its attractive features. 

Mr. Eberlein was married September 13, 
1887, to Jennie Nelson, a popular and suc- 
cessful teacher of Verona township, this 
county. She was reared and educated in 
Winnebago City, and is a daughter of 
George Nelson, a native of Chautauqua 
county. New York, and one of the earliest 
pioneers of this county, the date of his ar- 
rival here being 1858. It was in this house 
that the election was held which decided 
that Blue Earth City should be the county 
seat of Faribault county. He died in 1885 
and his wife in 1 893. They had six chil- 
dren, viz. ; Anna, Henry, George, Jennie, 
Charles and Mamie. All are living except 
George. Mr. and Mrs. Eberlein have four 
children — George Lee, Cecil Christopher, 
Elzade and William. 

Mr. Eberlein has served his fellow-citi- 
zens as Supervisor and Constable, being 
elected to these offices by the ■ Democratic 
party, with which he affiliates. He is a 
member of Orient Lodge, No. 34, A. O. U. 
W. Personally, he is of fine physique, is 
frank and jovial by nature, and by all who 
know him he is respected and esteemed. 



>^ASPER M. SPENCER, a farmer of 
m Prescott township, Faribault county, 
A J was born in Allegany county, New 
York, May 26, 1830, a son of Abner 
and Elizabeth (Getchel) Spencer. The 
father was a native of Otsego county. New 
York, and was a son of John Spencer, Sr. 
The mother was also born in New York, nf 
German descent. In 1844 the family lo- 
cated near Woodstock, McHenry county, 



146 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Illinois, where they were among the early 
pioneers, and where the father purchased 
and improved a farm. In 1854 they re- 
moved to ^^'inona county, Minnesota, where 
thev were also pioneer settlers. The father 
afterward took a claim in this county, next 
resided in South Dakota for a time, and 
then returned to Faribault county, where 
he resided with his son Jasper until his 
death, at the age of eighty-nine years. The 
mother departed this life in 1845. Mr. and 
Mrs. Spencer were the parents of eight chil- 
dren, namely: Jasper, the subject of this 
sketch; Bryan; Anson was a soldier in the 
late war, and was confined in a Rebel prison; 
Daniel served in the First Minnesota Infan- 
try; Rinalda was a member of the Fifteenth 
Illinois Infantry; John, Marinda and Zil- 
pha S. 

Jasper M. Spencer located with his par- 
ents in the wilds of Illinois at the age of fif- 
teen years. In 1864 he came to Faribault 
count}', Minnesota, and located on a home- 
stead of 160 acres of wild land. The place 
is now under a fine state of cultivation, and 
is one of the best improved farms in the 
county. 

Mr. Spencer has been three times mar- 
ried. At the age of thirt\- years he was 
united in marriage with Hannah Peterman, 
a daughter of John Peterman. To this 
union were born three children, — Frederick, 
Ouincy and Rebecca Parker. The latter 
died at the age of twenty-eight years, leav- 
ing one child, Mabel Parker. Hannah 
Spencer died in 1879. The father then 
married Mrs. Hannora Sulivan, a native of 
Ireland, and a daughter of Patrick and 
Bridget (Daily) Sulivan. After her death 
he married his present wife, Mrs. Sarah 
Reynolds, a native of Brockton, Massachu- 
setts, and a daughter of Thomas and Nancy 



(Pike) Reynolds. The father died in 1876, 
and. the mother survived until 1885. Their 
son, Oren, was a bugler in the late war, and 
died from injuries received on the battle- 
field while trying to save the life of Captain 
Vetch. Mrs. Sarah Spencer's grandparents 
were descendants of the Perkins who came 
over in the Mayflower in 1620. In political 
matters Mr. Spencer affiliates with the Re- 
publican part}'. 



HP.RAM HOUGHTALING, of Fair- 
mont, Minnesota, was born in Eso- 
pus, Ulster county, New York, 
June 27, 1840, the second child 
and eldest son of Jeremiah A. and Catherine 
(Eltinge) Houghtaling. Abram moved with 
his father to Wisconsin in 1856, locating in 
Waukesha county, and later the family re- 
moved to Boscobel, Grant county, same 
State, where he learned and followed the 
carpenter's trade. August 7, 1862, he en- 
listed as a private in Company C, Twentieth 
Wisconsin Volunteers. He was sent with 
an independent division, under General Her- 
ron, to Springfield, Missouri, and afterward 
took part in the battle of Prairie Grove, 
Arkansas, where he was wounded by a niinie 
ball. It passed through his left leg just 
below the knee, shattering the bone, and he 
lay from Sunday, December 7, 1862, until 
the following Thursday without any atten- 
tion, when he was placed in the hospital at 
Fayetteville, Arkansas, until March, 1863, 
and from that time until October, 1863, he 
was in a hosjiital at Springfield, Missouri. 
Then, by way of New Orleans, Mr. Hough- 
taling joined his regiment, reaching Browns- 
ville, Texas, in February, 1864, where he 
was engaged in guard duty until he took 
part in the siege of Fort Morgan. He next 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



'47 



did guard duty at the marine hospital, New 
Orleans, until May 22, 1865, when he was 
honorably discharged. Returning home, Mr. 
Houghtaling followed the carpenter's trade 
with his father until his marriage, after 
which he resided at Boscobel, Wisconsin, 
until April, 1875, and since that time has 
been an honored citizen of Fairmont, Min- 
nesota, following the carpenter's trade. 

Mr. Houghtaling was married at Bosco- 
bel, Wisconsin, August 22, 1867, to Barbara 
Muffley, a native of Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, and a daughter of Joseph and 
Eliza Muffley, who came to Wisconsin about 
1856. Our subject and wife have five chil- 
dren, — -Ben, Lena, Archie Guy, Alice and 
Jay A. The family are members of the 
Congregational Church, in which Mr. Hough- 
taling has served as Deacon for many years, 
and has also been a teacher in the Sunday- 
school. Socially he has been a member of 
the I. O. O. F. for twenty-two years, in 
which he has passed all the chairs, and was 
a representative to the Grand Lodge at its 
session in 1894. He is also member of Phil 
Kearny Post, No. 18, G. A. R. In poli- 
tical matters, Mr. Houghtaling is identified 
with the Democratic party. He has been 
a member of the School Board since its 
organization as an independent district, and 
at one time was a candidate for County 
Auditor. 



>^AMES J. COULTER, a successful 
A farmer of Prescott township, Fari- 
/• 1 bault county, was born in Chemung 
county. New York, June 24, 1833, a 
son of John and Miranda (Rawson) Coulter, 
natives respectively of Palmyra and Roches- 
ter, New York, and of Irish and English 
descent. The father died in 1838, leaving 



a widow and eight children, two sons and 
six daughters. One son, William, was a 
soldier in the civil war, a member of the 
One-Hundred and Seventh New York In- 
fantry, and he died in Chemung county, after 
the close of the struggle, leaving a family. 
Mrs. Coulter married Ed. McAdams, and 
they had one daughter. Only two of the 
family now survive, — our subject and Mary 
Bently, of Horseheads, New York. 

J. J. Coulter was early inured to farm 
labor, and at the age of fourteen years he 
was employed to cook for twent3'-five men 
in a lumber camp. At the age of twent}'- 
one years he located in Fond du Lac county, 
Wisconsin, where he followed agricultural 
pursuits until 1875, and since that time has 
resided in Prescott township, Faribault 
county, Minnesota. Mr. Coulter purchased 
I 54 acres of land three miles from Winne- 
bago City, only sixty acres of which was 
broken, but the farm is now under a fine 
state of cultivation, and is one of the best 
in the township. In political m;;tters, he 
affiliates with the Democratic part}-, and 
has served as a member of the School Board. 

In Fond du Lac county, \'\'iscon3in, at 
the age of twenty-five years, Mr. Coulter 
was united in marriage with Emma C. Allen, 
a native of Connecticut, and a daughter of 
John A. and Cordelia (Fern) Allen, who 
were also natives of that State, and both of 
whom are now deceased. Our subject and 
wife had six children, viz.: Marinda, wife of 
Orren Hazelton, of Racine, Mirmesota; Eu- 
gene, deceased at the age of four years; 
Mary, wife of Elbert Miller, of this town- 
ship; Laura, wife of F. Hines, of Delavan, 
Minnesota; and \\'illie R. and Relief L. , at 
home. December 9, 1892, Mr. Coulter 
suffered the loss of his beloved wife. She 
was blessed with a simny disposition, having 



148 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



always looked on the bright side of life, and 
saw the silver linings of the dark clouds as 
they rolled by in times of trouble. She was 
a member of the Congregational Church in 
Wisconsin. 



KOUSEMAN BROTHERS, proprie- 
tors of a livery, sale and feed barn, 
\\'innebago City, Minnesota, are 
among the popular and reliable 
business men of this place. Their establish- 
ment is located one-half block west of the 
Doud House, the leading hotel of the city, 
and added to their desirable location is every 
convenience for carrying on their business 
successfully. Their barn, which was known 
as the Rink building, is 50 x 100 feet in di- 
mensions, and is well arranged for livery 
purposes, having a large floor for carriages, 
plenty of stall room, and a nice office. The 
Messrs. Houseman take a just pride in their 
fine driving horses, keep a nice lot of car- 
riages, buggies, etc. , and are always prepared 
to furnish careful drivers. 

E. E. Houseman, the senior member of 
the firm, was born at Lowden, Cedar county, 
Iowa, June 20, 1867, son of Jacob and 
Mary (Tevis) Houseman. His grandfather 
Tevis was a sailor for many years, and died 
at the advanced age of eighty-eight years. 
Jacob Houseman was born in Pennsylvania. 
Before the ci\il war he removed with his 
family to Iowa, and during the war served 
three years as a member of Company K, 
Thirty-fifth Iowa Infantry. He and his 
wife are now residents of Conrad Grove, 
Grundy county, Iowa. They had a family 
of nine children, six of whom are now living, 
viz.: J. H., J. F., E. E., Mary L., J. T. 
and Josephine Maude. J. T. is the junior 
member of the firm of Houseman Brothers. 



Of the parents, we further record that the 
father is an expert mechanic, having followed 
the trade of millwright all his life, and that 
the mother is a member of the Church of 
God. 

E. E. Houseman was reared in Cedar, 
Keokuk and Grundy counties, Iowa, and 
educated in the common schools of the towns 
in which he lived. His first business ven- 
ture was as a liveryman in Gladbrook, Tama 
county, Iowa, where he remained two years. 
From there he went to Armstrong, Iowa, 
where he was in the hotel business until he 
came to Winnebago City, in 1894. 

Mr. Houseman was married at the age 
of twenty-five years to Miss Artie O. Powell, 
of Marshalltown, Iowa, daughter of Joseph 
Powell. 

Politically, he affiliates with the Repub- 
lican party. 



>^OSIAH SMITH, of Fairmont, is a 
m son of Aretus H. and Mercy P. (Her- 
f% 1 rick) Smith. The father was born 
in Maine December 4, 1801, a son 
of Josiah Smith, also a native of that State, 
and of English descent. Two of his sons 
were soldiers in the war of 18 12. The 
mother was born in Maine, April 13, 1803, 
and her father, Joseph Herrick, was also a 
native of that State, of English descent. 
Aretus H. Smith and Mercy P. Herrick were 
married, in Maine, June 14, 1835, and lo- 
cated in Parkman, Piscataquis county, that 
State. In 1849 the family settled on un- 
improved land in Green Lake county, Wis- 
consin, five years afterward sold that place 
and moved to a farm on Grand prairie, 
same county, and in the spring of i860 
came to Minnesota, locating on a farm one 
and a half miles west of Blue Earth City, 



FARIBAULT, MARTIX, Jl\l 7'OJVIVAJV AND yACKSON. 



'49 



Faribault county, and in 1870 removed to 
Oregon, and in the following year came to 
Martin county. Mr. Smith died at the home 
of our subject, August 6, 1874, and Mrs. 
Smith died at the home of her daughter, in 
Portland, Oregon, May 15, 1891. They 
had three children, one of whom died in in- 
fancy. Their daughter, Sarah P. , is the 
wife of W. D. Belding, of Portland, Oregon, 
and they have three children. 

Josiah Smith, the youngest in order of 
birth, was born in Maine July 30, 1838, and 
received his education principally in Wis- 
consin. In October, 1862, he enlisted for 
service in the late war, entering Company 
K, First Minnesota Mounted Rangers. They 
went into camp at Kasota, Minnesota, then 
joined Sibley against the Indians, chasing 
them to the Missouri river, went thence to 
Fort Abercrombie, later to Fort Snelling, 
and was mustered out of service. Return- 
ing home in the spring of 1865, he sold his 
farm in Faribault county and moved to 
Martin count}', locating on wild land on sec- 
tion 30, Fairmont township, remaining there 
five years. Mr. Smith then spent one sum- 
mer in Oregon, and then resided on a farm 
on section 31, Fairmont township, until the 
fall of 1892, since which time he has lived 
in the city of Fairmont. He still owns 292 
acres of land. In 1893 he erected a fine 
city residence. During the first year of his 
residence here Mr. Smith paid $9 per barrel 
for salt, $1 1 for a common coat, and $1 for 
three and a half pounds of sugar. He had 
to go twenty miles to get his plowshares 
sharpened, and Mankato was the nearest 
market; and the few settlers lived principally 
by trapping. During the summer of 1866 
Mr. Smith raised no bushels of wheat and 
320 bushels of oats, and was probably the 
lirst man to raise wheat in the southern part 



of the county. In 1865 they bought flour, 
delivered at their house, for $2 per 100 
pounds, and in 1867, wheat sold at $3 per 
bushel, and oats brought from $1 to $1.50 
per bushel at the granarx'. 

December 4, 1861, he was united in mar- 
riage with Melissa Chute, born in Nova 
Scotia, April 26, 1842, a daughter of Burton 
and Harriet (Chute) Chute, natives also of 
that place. They located in Elgin county, 
Ontario (then Upper Canada), in 1S42, seven 
years afterward removed to a farm in Green 
Lake count}', Wisconsin, and since 1859 
have resided three miles west of Blue Earth 
City, Faribault county, Minnesota. 

Mr. and Mrs. Smith have three children, 
viz.: Albert A., at home; Ensley J. married 
Hattie Whitney, of Rolling Green township; 
and Winnifred T. , at home. In political 
matters Mr. Smith is a stanch Republican, 
and has served as Supervisor of liis town- 
ship and as School Director. 



@EORGE WIRT, Winnebago City, 
Minnesota, is one of the substan- 
tial farmers and highly respected 
citizens of Faribault county. We 
take pleasure in presenting in this work the 
following sketch of his life: 

George Wirt was born in Ba\aria, Ger- 
many, February 2, 1S37, son of Michael 
and Christena (Miller) Wirt, both natives of 
Bavaria. Michael Wirt was by occupation 
a blacksmith and farmer, and for three years 
was a soldier in the German army, being 
connected with the cavalry and the king's 
body-guard. He was afterward employed 
as surveyor, and ended his service to his 
native land as County Commissioner. In 
1 85 1 he came with his family to America, 
landing at New York city about the middle 



ISO 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



(if Jiiiu', after a voyage of seven weeks, and 
from tliere going to Richland ccnmty, Ohio, 
where he settled on a farm near Lexington. 
There the parents passed the residue of 
their lives and there died, the father passing 
awa\' at the age of sixty years and the mother 
living to the advanced age of ninety-one. 
Four children comprised their family, — John 
L., George, Christena and Margaret. John 
L. still resides in Richland county. The 
family are Lutherans in their religious beHef. 
Soon after the arrival of the Wirt family 
in America, George, following the advice 
given by Horace Greeley, came West. Near 
West Union, in Fayette county, Iowa, he 
worked on a farm and in a brickyard for two 
years. July 4, 1856, he arrived in Faribault 
county, Minnesota, and with this county he 
has since been identified, having participated 
in all those vicissitudes which marked the 
life of the early settlers on what was then 
the frontier. He took part in the Indian 
war of 1857, and during the civil war he was 
in the Union service four years and seven 
months. He enlisted, in October, 1861, in 
the second company of cavalry that went out 
from the State of Minnesota. This regi- 
ment was afterward transferred to the Fifth 
Iowa Cavalry, which was commanded by 
Colonel Lowe, who had been one of the 
regular army's best officers, and by reason 
of this redoubtable colonel's vigorous efforts 
in offering to the "Johnnies" in his prox- 
imity no peace, he gained to his regiment 
the title of "Colonel Lowe's Bloodhounds." 
The early part of Mr. Wirt's service was in 
the South and began with the burning of a 
very long railroad bridge, near Fort Donel- 
son, Tennessee. For the purpose of cutting 
off re-enforcements and retreat of the rebel 
army during the three days' battle at Fort 
Donelson of February 10, 11 and 12, 1S62, 



and afterward, the First Union Cavalry went 
through the rebel line into Corinth, Missis- 
sippi, which at that time was a very strong 
and well fortified rebel center, and captured 
many of the Confederates and several trains 
loaded with army supplies, and also routed 
General Beauregard from his commodious 
headquarters, the Sheminggo House, the 
finest structure in the cit)'. 

Our subject participated in many import- 
ant engagements, and later he was with the 
forces that were sent to suppress the hostile 
Indians of the North and West. He was 
honorably discharged, at Fort Snelling, June 
6, 1866, with the rank of Sergeant. 

Like most of the early-comers to Min- 
nesota, Mr. Wirt secured a pre-emption 
claim. To this claim he later secured title 
under the homstead act, and on this land he 
still lives, being now the owner of 320 acres. 
Among the improvements on his farm we 
find a comfortable frame house, good barn, 
modern windmill, and ten acres in grove, 
while everything is kept in first-class order. 

Februarys, 1868, Mr. Wirt married Miss 
Catherine Carlton, a native of Iroquois 
county, Illinois, and a daughter of James P. 
and Rebecca (Walker) Carlton, natives re- 
spectively of Troy, New York, and New 
Hampshire. Mr. and Mrs. \\'irt have eight 
children, namely: Allen J., George J., 
Clarence D., Fred D., Amanda C, Orpha 
J., William Henry and Harry M. 

Mr. Wirt utilizes his right of franchise 
in the support of the Republican party, and 
fraternally he stands as one of the charter 
members of James Clabaugh Post, No. 54, 
G. A. R. , and a member of Blue Earth Val- 
ley Lodge, No. 27, F. & A. M. He has 
rendered efficient service as Township Treas- 
urer, member of the School Board, and Su- 
pervisor. He is a man who keeps himself 





W/^^^f Cyffi^/^^ 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



153 



well posted on the topics of the day, is broad 
and liberal in his views, and by his frank and 
jovial nature he ingratiates himself with all 
who come in contact with him, either in a 
business or social way. 



^^TEPHEN TURNER, the genial and 
•^^^k* popular host of the Park Hotel, 

K^_^ of Wells, Minnesota, has a wide 
acquaintance not only in this com- 
munity but also with the traveling public 
who visit this section of the State, and his 
friendship is prized most by those who know 
him best, a fact which indicates sterling 
qualities of genuine worth. 

Mr. Turner was born in the city of Rich- 
mond, Virginia, February 14, 1855, ^nd 
comes of an old Virginian family, his parents 
having emigrated from Amherst county of 
the Old Dominion to the Badger State at an 
early day. He spent his childhood days in 
his home near the river's bank and attended 
school until fifteen years of age, when, wish- 
ing to earn his own livelihood, he sought 
and obtained employment of W. D. Fox, 
the affable landlord of the Fo.x House, of 
Portage. Thus during the greater part of 
his life he has been connected with the hotel 
business. Being the possessor of a sunny 
disposition, he soon won favor with his em- 
ployer and popularity with the guests of the 
house, so that he was soon given full charge 
of the dining department of the hotel, in which 
capacity he capably served until 1879, when 
he left home and went to La Crosse, Wis- 
consin, having obtained a similar position in 
the large hotel which was conducted there 
under the name of the Cameron House. He 
had entire charge of the dining room and 
everything connected therewith, and during 



the six years of his service there he won ad- 
ditional friends and again secured the appro- 
bation and good-will and confidence of his 
employer. 

In 1885 he embarked in the hotel busi- 
ness for himself, and purchased, in Wells, 
Minnesota, the old Wells House. His pre- 
vious experience stood him in good stead, 
and his success was assured from the begin- 
ning. For a period of over eight years 
Stephen Turner was the manager of that 
hotel, and it became the favorite stopping 
place with the public. In 1893 he removed 
further West, this time locating in Madison, 
South Dakota, where he leased the Park 
Hotel, giving to it his personal supervison 
and attention for a year. He then returned 
to Wells and erected the Park Hotel at this 
place, which is to-day one of the best hotels 
in Southern Minnesota, with accommoda- 
tions for over half a hundred guests. The 
house is built in a modern style of archi- 
tecture and everything is arranged for the 
greatest convenience and pleasure of its pat- 
rons from the well lighted and well venti- 
lated chambers to the comfortable parlors 
and dining room, where all the luxuries of 
the season are found. 

On the 14th of July, 1880, Mr. Turner 
led to the marriage altar Miss Ada E. Chat- 
wood, the wedding being celebrated in La 
Crosse, Wisconsin. Her father, William 
Chatwood, was born in Shropshire, while 
the mother was a native of Lincolnshire, 
both in England, and they came to this 
country many years ago. Mrs. Turner is an 
intelligent and accomplished lady. She has 
been of great assistance to her husband and 
shares in the high esteem which is rendered 
him. To them has been born one child, 
Grace Frances, a maiden of twelve summers, 
who is quite gifted in vocal and instrumental 



154 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



music and a thorough student in the EngHsh 
branches. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Turner is 
a Republican and stanchly advocates the 
principles of his party, but has never sought 
office, preferring to give his time and ener- 
gies to his business interests. He is a char- 
ter member of Camp i960, M. W. A., of 
Wells, and he has served as one of its Trus- 
tees, while at this writing he is the efficient 
secretary of the Driving Park Association, 
being a great lover of fine horses. Few 
residents of this community have a wider 
acquaintance and none are more highly re- 
garded, for his pleasant, courteous and genial 
manner makes him a great favorite. 



^rj'OHN EVANS, an honored pioneer 
m farmer of Lura township, Faribault 
A 1 county, now living a retired life, has 
been connected with this locality 
since the early days when the land was wild 
and largely in possession of the Government, 
when the now thriving towns and villages 
had not yet sprung into existence, when the 
railroad and telegrajih were unknown here 
and when the entire country in that section 
of the State seemed just opened up to civil- 
isation. In the work of development and 
cultivation he has ever borne his part, and 
among the founders of Faribault county he 
well deserves mention. 

A nati\'e of Wales, he was born in Mont- 
gomeryshire, October 14, 1832, and is a son 
of John and Catherine (Jones) Evans. His 
grandparents emigrated from Ccernarvon- 
shire, Wales, to Montgomeryshire, early in 
the last century, and the grandfather, who 
bore the name of John, served as an excise 
officer. Both he and his son John were men 
of prominence in the communities where 



they lived and were honored for their ster- 
ling worth. To John and Catherine Evans 
were born three children: Edward, the 
eldest, died in his native land, in his 
eighteenth year; our subject is the second; 
and Mary, the only daughter, became the 
wife of David Jehu, an auctioneer of Mont- 
gomeryshire. Her death occurred there at 
the age of forty-seven years. The mother 
of this family also passed away in Mont- 
gomeryshire, after which the father wedded 
Mary Jones, a native of that shire. They 
had two children: Samuel, who is still liv- 
ing in his native county; and Hannah, who 
died in the eighteenth year of her age. The 
former has visited this country, crossing the 
Atlantic and spending about a year with our 
subject. 

Born in a modest home, John Evans 
spent the days of his boyhood and youth in 
a quiet manner, attending the national 
schools until his thirteenth year, when he 
entered a general store, in which he was em- 
ployed for four years, receiving as a com- 
pensation for his services only his board; but 
he acquired a good knowledge of business, 
which has proven of incalculable benefit to 
him in his later years. He next went to 
Chester, England, where he engaged as a 
clerk, and a year later he left that place, 
and after drifting around aimlessl)' for a 
time he reached the home of his uncle 
Samuel in Montgomeryshire. At this period 
he determined to seek a home in America 
and cmbarkeil on a three-mast sailing vessel, 
the Cultivator, which after a voyage of five 
weeks reached New York, on the ist day of 
July, and was there amid the celebration of 
Independence Day. He lingered not, but, 
by way of Philadelphia, went to Pittsburg, 
where he had some cousins, who hail pre- 
ceded him 111 this country some years. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



155 



Mr. Evans was now an American citizen. 
He secured emplo3-ment in a grocery store 
in Pittsburg, and obtained a further insight 
into mercantile affairs. In October, 1854, 
he made his way to Green Lake county, 
Wisconsin, then a part of Marquette county, 
where he arrived in November. There he 
learned carpentering under John Haynes, a 
finished workman from London, England, 
who had emigrated to America in 1S50 and 
located in the Badger State. With that 
gentleman our subject continued until the 
latter's death, which occurred in Lura town- 
ship, Faribault county, ' Minnesota, in the 
forty-ninth year of his age. 'He was a well 
known citizen of this locality, and was the 
first white man to find a resting place in 
Lura cemetery. He was a man of noble 
Christian character, and will be remembered 
by many old settlers who held him in high 
regard. The friendship which existed be- 
tween Mr. Evans and Mr. Haynes was an 
almost ideal one. For a quarter of a cen- 
tury they were companions in business and 
in social life, and as the years passed their 
mutual confidence and respect increased. 
They shared pioneer life in Wisconsin to- 
gether, and in Maj', 1865, they came to- 
gether to Minnesota. They were accom- 
panied by Alfred Haynes, a brother of John, 
and driving two yoke of oxen they at length 
reached Lura township on the 17th of June, 
having passed through Portage, New Lisbon 
and La Crosse, while en route. The Mis- 
sissippi was crossed at La Crescent, and they 
passed through St. Charles, Rochester, 
Owatonna and Wilton. 

On reaching Lura township Mr. Evans 
secured a claim of 160 acres of Government 
land, located on section 29, and erected a 
frame house, 14x16 feet, from lumber 
which was hauled by oxen from the mill on 



Cobb river. He was assisted in this work 
by Mr. Haynes, and then the two friends 
built a log house for the latter on section 
33, Lura township. They endured the 
hardships of pioneer life and went through 
the difficulties which come to frontier set- 
tlers. 

John Haynes had a family of seven chil- 
dren, four sons and three daughters, of 
whom five are still living: Maria wedded 
Orlando Holmes, better known among his 
friends as "George." He is a native of 
New York and resides at Stevens Point, 
Wisconsin, being employed as engineer on 
the Wisconsin Central, his division being 
between Stevens Point and Portage, Wis- 
consin. William O., born in Green Lake 
county, Wisconsin, August 13, 1856, has 
for the past thirty years been a close neigh- 
bor and a bosom friend of his uncle, the 
subject of this sketch. He has been quite 
an important factor in the development of 
this section of the country and has taken 
part in man}' enterprises calculated to prove 
of public benefit to Lura township-. 

He married Emeline Wood, a native of 
the Badger State, and to them were born 
three children, — Sadie, Florence and Eme- 
line. David is a farmer on section 33. Lura 
township; Sarah is the wife of William 
Chaffee, who carries on agricultural pur- 
suits on section 9, Lura township; Joseph, 
who is engaged in clerking in Delavan, Min- 
nesota; and those who have passed away 
are Elizabeth and Edward. 

On the loth of October, 1S58, Mr. 
Evans married Miss Maria Owens, daughter 
of William and Elizabeth (Evans) Owens. 
The lady was born in Liverpool, England, 
August 29, 1834, and is the youngest of 
nine children, three sons and six daughters, 
of whom only two survive, — Mrs. Evans, and 



156' 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Margaret, widow of James Beard, who came 
from Manchester, England, and married 
Miss Owens in New York in 1838. They 
had five children, four living: Owen James, 
a farmer of Prescott township; Harrietta, 
wife of Griffith M. Jones, of Blue Earth 
City, Minnesota; Mary, wife of Frederick 
Dolliver, who is living in northern Iowa; and 
Anna, wife of Edward Dolliver, who is 
also living in Iowa. The parents of Mrs. 
Evans emigrated to America in 1844, 
locating first in Syracuse, New York, and 
then removing to Rochester, that State, 
whence they went to Green Lake county, 
Wisconsin, in 1848. Mr. Owens erected 
a frame house in the village of Kingston, and 
there the father died at the age of seventy- 
four. His wife came with the family to Min- 
nesota in 1865. She was a native of Wales, 
and died in Lura township at the advanced 
age of eighty-four, her remains being in- 
terred in Lura cemetery. 

Si.x children have been born to our sub- 
ject and his wife : William J., the eldest, 
born October 31, 1859, in Green Lake 
county, Wisconsin, is now engaged in farm- 
ing and stock-raising in Lac-qui-parle coun- 
ty, Minnesota; Edward O., born April 29, 
1 86 1, in Green Lake county, is now manag- 
ing the Evans estate, comprising 720 acres 
of the best farming land in Faribault coun- 
ty; Samuel, born in Green Lake county, 
April 12, 1863, owns a farm on section 28, 
Lura township; Richard E. , born in Lura 
township, September 23, 1867, is operating 
a farm of 160 acres on section 32 of the 
same township; David, born on the old 
homestead, September i, 1872, makes his 
home with his parents; Henry, born on the 
home farm, March 19, 1877, completes the 
family. Mr. and Mrs. Evans have reared a 
family of sons of whom thej- may well be 



proud, all having become honorable, up- 
right and useful citizens. 

In his political views Mr. Evans is a Re- 
publican. He cast his first Presidential vote 
for James Buchanan, but has since voted 
for the men and measures of the Republi- 
can party. He is a charter member of the 
lodge of the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men and also of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, located in Delavan, Minnesota. 
In 1879 he returned to the land of his birth 
and spent five very pleasant months in visit- 
ing friends and relatives, and in again look- 
ing upon the scenes among which his youth 
was passed. He is, however, content with 
his American home. His once wild claim 
has been transformed into one of the fine 
farms of Faribault county. A pretty frame 
residence is now surrounded by beautiful 
shade trees, which were planted bj- his own 
hands, and his possessions have all been ac- 
quired by his earnest and commendable la- 
bors. His life has been well spent, honor- 
able and upright in all things and the worthy 
pioneer is esteemed by all who know him. 



* » ^ UMPHREY METCALF BLAIS- 

If^ DELL, attorney-at-law, Fairmont, 
\ , r is a son of Alfred Metcalf Blaisdell, 
who was born in Orland, Maine, 
May 12, 1S03. He was a son of Daniel and 
Anna (Saunders) Blaisdell. Daniel was a 
son of Moses and Anna (Sanborn) Blaisdell. 
The father of Moses Blaisdell was born in 
Glasgow, Scotland, and came to America 
in 1740, locating in either Massachusetts or 
New Hampshire. He moved from New- 
buryport to Amesbury, Massachusetts, where 
Moses was born. He next located in Pictou, 
Nova Scotia, and in 1783 removed to Penob- 
scot valley, now Hancock count}', Maine, 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



'57 



where his death occurred on Orphan's isle. 
The mother of our subject, //<■<• Judith How- 
ard Gray, was born in Sedgwick, Maine, 
December 22, 1801, of Enghsh descent. 
She saw old Fort Castine blown up by the 
Americans to keep it from falling into the 
hands of the British. Her father, Joab Gray, 
was born at Sedgwick, Maine, and died there 
May 12, 1 821; and her mother, whose 
maiden name was Abigail Willcome, was 
born at Cape Ann, Massachusetts, and died 
in Orland, Maine, in May, 1856. 

Alfred M. Blaisdell and Judith H. Gray 
were married at Sedgwick, Maine, January 
8, 1824, and located in Orland, Maine, 
where the former was a seafaring man and 
later a farmer and lumberman. They after- 
ward moved to Dedham, Maine, and ne.xt 
to Otis, that State, where he died February 
23, 1878, his wife surviving him until Febru- 
ary 3, 1886. In political matters he was 
first a Democrat, and afterward, on account 
of the slavery issue, was identified with the 
Republican party. He was a member of 
the Maine Legislature in 1 847, held the office 
of Justice of the Peace, and served as Post- 
master of Otis, from 1 86 1 until his death. 
Mr. and Mrs. Blaisdell had nine children, 
namely: Harriet Ann, wife of Daniel Con- 
den, of Dedham, Maine; William Saunders, 
who died at sea; Elizabeth Saunders, wife 
of D. S. Winchester, of Holden, Maine; 
Abigail Gray, who married Lewis Jordan, of 
Hancock, that State; Charles Osgood, a 
resident of Otis; Mary Augusta, wife of W. 
H. Weatherbee, of Bangor; Ricardo Alvonia, 
wife of Eben Kingman, of Otis; Humphrey 
Metcalf, the subject of this sketch, and one 
son who died at the age of nine months. 

H. M. Blaisdell was born at Otis, Maine, 
September 10, 1841. He remained there 
until April, 1861, when he enlisted for serv- 



ice in the late war, entering Company H, 
Second Maine \'olunteer Infantry, as a pri- 
vate, and his was the first regiment from 
Maine in Washington, D. C. At the battle 
of Bull Run, July 21, 1861, Mr. Blaisdell 
was wounded by a musket ball in the left 
leg, and lay on the field two weeks, when 
he was carried by the enemy to Richmond, 
Virginia. He remained in Libby prison 
until December, 1861, was then in the rebel 
prison at Tuscaloosa, Alabama, until March, 
1862, and from that time until June, 1862, 
remained in the prison at Salisbury, North 
Carolina, when he was paroled, and after- 
ward joined the Army of the Potomac. In 
November, 1862, he was discharged on ac- 
count of the wound received at Bull Run. 
Remaining at his home in Maine until the 
following July, Mr. Blaisdell enlisted as 
Sergeant in Company C, First Maine Heavy 
Artillery, and was on detached duty until 
the summer of 1864. He next attended the 
military academy on Chestnut street, Phila- 
delphia, participated in the defense of Wash- 
ington, D. C. , against Generals Early and 
Breckenridge; July 11, 1864, was examined 
at Washington by the board of which Major 
General Silas Casey was president, and was • 
commissioned First Lieutenant in the Twelfth 
United States Colored Heavy Artillery July 
23d of the same year. Mr. Blaisdell did 
duty in Kentucky and Tennessee, and was 
captured January 8, 1865, at Big Spring, 
Kentucky, by General Lyon's cavalry; was 
part of the time in command of Company 
E, of that regiment, until April 24, 1866, 
when he was mustered out of service by 
reason of the reorganization of the army. 
Four days afterward Lieutenant Blaisdell 
passed an examination for a commission in 
the regular army before the board of which 
Colonel Charles G. Bartlett, U. S. A., was 



iss 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



president; but, owing to heart disease con- 
tracted during his five years' service, he was 
obliged to rehnquish the idea, and returned 
to Maine. 

Our subject graduated at East Maine 
Conference Seminary at Bucksport, that 
State, and while a student there represented 
his district in the Maine Legislature in 1868. 
Up to that time there had been but two Re- 
publicans in the Legislature from the town 
of Otis, the first having been the father of 
our subject, in 1847. ^^i"- Blaisdell next 
read law with Hon. Eugene Hale, of Ells- 
worth, Maine, and was admitted to the bar 
of Hancock county in 18O8. In the follow- 
ing spring he came to Fairmont, Minnesota, 
where he has since resided, engaged in the 
active practice of law. In 1887 he pur- 
chased the Fairmont News, and published 
the same until the spring of 1894, when he 
gave the editorship to his eldest son, Josiah 
Crosby Blaisdell. The paper has always 
been independent in political matters, and 
has one of the best plants of any country 
paper in the State. Although a Republican, 
our subject is somewhat inclined to the in- 
dependents in political affairs. Socially, he 
has been a member of the Loj-al Legion 
since its organization in June, 1885, has 
been a member of the Masonic order since 
1866, and has served as Commander of Phil 
Kearny Post, No. 18, G. A. R. , and served 
on the staffs of Commanders in Chief Fair- 
child and Rea, of the National G. A. R. 

August 27, 1 87 1, Mr. Blaisdell was 
united in marriage with Henrietta Hill 
Crosby, born in De.xter, Maine, February 
18, 1850, a daughter of Hon. Josiah Crosby, 
who was born in New Hampshire, Novem- 
ber 25, 1817, and now resides in Dexter, 
where he is the second in point of age now 
in active law practice in the United States. 



He graduated in Bowdoin College in 1835, 
and, among other prominent positions, 
served as Lieutenant Governor of Maine in 
I 868, and for several years in the Legisla- 
ture of that State, both in the House and 
Senate. The mother of Mrs. Blaisdell, ncc 
Mary Bradbury Foss, was born in Maine 
March 22, 1834, and still resides at her 
home in Dexter, that State. Mrs. Blaisdell 
received her education at Dexter, Maine, 
and at Antioch College, in Yellow Springs, 
Ohio. Our subject and wife have three 
sons, — Josiah Crosby, editor of the Fair- 
mont News; Alfred, and Arthur. 



SIAL B. JOHNSON, retired, a well- 
known citizen of Blue Earth City, 
Faribault county, Minnesota, was 
born in Grafton, New Hampshire, 
October 22, 1827, third in the family of 
seven children, of Jesse and Dorothea 
(Smith) Johnson. His grandfather, Nathan 
Johnson, was of English descent, and was 
a member of one of the early New England 
families. Rial B. spent the first sixteen 
j-ears of his life on a farm, receiving his ed- 
ucation in the common schools, and at six- 
teen entered upon an apprenticeship to the 
trade of shoemaker. After completing his 
trade he worked as a journeyman for several 
years. In 1850 he engaged in business for 
himself at Rutland, Vermont, and while 
there accumulated considerable property, at 
one time owning a good share of the prop- 
erty on the north side of Center street in 
that town, near where the Government 
building now stands. 

In 1856 Mr. Johnson came west to Wis- 
consin, and located in Berlin, where he 
carried on business two years, at the end of 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



'59 



that time coming to Minnesota, crossing the 
Mississippi river May 5, 1858, the day Min- 
nesota was admitted into the Union. He 
located at Winnebago City and entered 160 
acres of Government land in the township 
of Vernon, on section eight. This place he 
improved, and remained upon it until the 
Indian outbreak in 1S62. He then moved 
into the village, and carried on business 
there four years. In 1866 he was elected 
on the Republican ticket to the office of 
Treasurer of Faribault county. This office 
he filled for twelve years, serving with credit 
both to himself and his constituency. While 
Treasurer of the county he compiled a set 
of abstract books, which have become very 
valuable. 

When he was elected Treasurer he sold 
out his interests in Winnebago City and 
moved to Blue Earth City, where he has 
since remained. At the expiration of his 
long term of office, Mr. Johnson turned his 
attention to the real-estate business, in 
which he was engaged for ten years, and 
since then he has been practically retired 
from active business. In 1879 he was 
elected to the State Senate, and served four 
years, being a member of the Court of Im- 
peachment of Hon. E. St. Julien Cox, Judge 
of the Ninth Judicial District, in 1882; and 
he has also held many local offices of prom- 
inence and trust. 

Mr. Johnson was married, in 1858, to 
Miss Ellen Davlin, a native of Addison 
county, Vermont, and a daughter of Lewis 
Davlin, who came from Ireland to this 
country and settled in the Green Mountain 
State, where he married a native of the 
Emerald Isle. Subsequently Mr. Davlin 
removed to Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. 
Johnson became the parents of two children: 
Minnie, wife of S. A. Conklin, of Blue Earth 



City ; and Don C. , a prominent farmer of Blue 
Earth City township. Mr. and Mrs. Conk- 
lin have two children, Rial T. and Floyd 
Ray. Don C. Johnson was born December 
31, i860, and October 4, 1882, married 
Miss Minnie Carpenter. Their children are 
Claud G. and Burnett. He has a fine farm 
of 245 acres, well improved and in a high 
state of cultivation. For five years he has 
served as Supervisor. Mrs. Johnson, the 
devoted wife of our subject, departed this 
life September 29, 1889, at the age of fifty- 
three years. She was most amiable woman, 
a true Christian, and a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Johnson is identified with the F. & 
A. M., Blue Earth City Lodge, No. 57, and 
is also a Royal Arch Mason. 



>T^OHN NEWTON KNUTSON, 
■ a druggist of Winnebago City, Fari- 
A 1 bault county, was born in Nicollet 
county, Minnesota, August 12. 1865, 
a son of K. R. and Rhoda Knutson, natives 
of Norway. They were married in Iowa, 
and for several years successfully carried on 
farming in Nicollet county, since which 
time they have lived retired in St. Peter. 

J. N. Knutson grew to manhcod on his 
father's farm, and received a good education 
in the district school and at the high school 
at St. Peter. On attaining his majority he 
entered a drug store in that city for the pur- 
pose of learning the business, and a few 
years afterward took a regular pharmaceu- 
tical course at Minneapolis, under the tutor- 
ship of Dr. Drew, the State Chemist, pass- 
ing a creditable examination, and receiving 
his diploma March 4, 1890. In 1888 Mr. 
Kmitson came to Wiimcbago C'ilv, and on 



i6o 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



January i, 1889, opened a drug store, which 
under his careful and judicious management 
has steadily increased until he now carries a 
large stock and has a profitable trade. He 
is an energetic and enterprising young man 
and takes a lively interest in all matters 
pertaining to the public good. He cast his 
first presidential vote for President Harrison, 
having since been an ardent Republican, 
and one of the active workers of the party. 
In 1893 he served in the village Council, 
and in 1894 was a representative from this 
county (Faribault) to the State Republican 
convention held at St. Paul in July of that 
year. Mr. Knutson was made a Mason in 
1893, in Blue Earth Valley Lodge, No. 27, 
A. F. & A. M., and in 1894 received the 
Royal Arch degrees in Mount Horeb Chap- 
ter, No. 21, R. A. M., and is Noble Grand 
in the I. O. O. F. 

March 6, 1891, our subject was united 
in marriage with Miss Sarah Delia Moulton, 
a native of Winnebago City, and eldest 
daughter of George K. and Susan C. (Cogs- 
well) Moulton. Mr. and Mrs. Knutson have 
two children, — Alice May and Harry Moul- 
ton. 



aHARLES CLARENCE DONALD- 
SON, M. D., stands in the front 
rank of the medical fraternity of 
Martin county and is now enjoying 
a large and lucrative practice in Fairmont, 
— a tribute to his skill and ability. Hardly 
any class of men exercise a greater influence 
in a community than those belonging to the 
medical profession, and among those who 
have made this influence a power for good 
is the gentleman whose name initiates this 
review. 

Dr. Donaldson, who is of Scotch descent, 



has the honor of being a native of Minne- 
sota, his birth having occurred in Rice 
county, about four miles from Faribault, on 
the 5th of December, 1858. The family was 
probably founded in America during early 
Colonial days. The grandfather, Charles 
Donaldson, was a native of Pennsylvania, 
and his son, R. F., the father of our sub- 
ject, was born in the Ligonier valley of the 
Keystone State. There the days of his boy- 
hood and youth were passed and in his earlier 
years he learned the tailor's trade. The 
year 1856 witnessed his emigration West- 
ward and saw him located in Rice county, 
Minnesota, where he took up a claim and 
also established a general store. In con- 
nection with his brothers, he built a large, 
double brick store-building in Dundas, and 
for a number of years successfully carried 
on general merchandising, securing a large 
trade, which yielded to him a good income. 
In the year 1890 he came to Fairmont, 
where his last days were passed, and where 
he passed away at the age of sixty-five years. 
He wedded Mary J. Stuart, who was born 
and reared in Ohio and was of Irish lineage. 
She died at the age of forty years. Mr. and 
Mrs. Donaldson had a family of eight chil- 
dren, five sons and three daughters, all of 
whom are yet living. 

The eldest son and third child of the 
family is the Doctor, and with pleasure we 
turn to personal mention of this worth}' citi- 
zen of Fairmont. He was reared in the 
county of his nativity and began his educa- 
tion in the district schools. His early priv- 
ileges were afterward supplemented by study 
in Carlton College, in Rice county, and at 
the age of twenty he went to Pennsylvania, 
entering the Elder Ridge Academy, from 
which he was in due time graduated. 

Wishing to enter the medical profession 




~^. jj. X2/f^r/a///a/r 



FARIBAULT, MART/X, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



163 



and make its practice his life work, he began 
fitting himself for that calling in Xorthfield, 
Rice county, in the office and imder the di- 
rection of Dr. \\'illiam Greaves. At Iowa 
City he attended medical lectures for one 
term, and in 1887, after a thorough course 
of study, he was graduated from the West- 
ern Reserve University, of Cleveland, Ohio. 
The degree of M. D. was conferred upon 
him and he at once located in Goodhue 
county, Minnesota, where he opened an 
office. In the autumn of the same year he 
went to Clark county. South Dakota, where 
he continued in practice for three years, 
coming to Fairmont in 1 890, since which 
time he has made this city his home. He 
has ever been a close student of his profes- 
sion and keeps abreast with all the discov- 
eries and theories connected with the science 
of medicine, being one of the best-informed 
practitioners in this section of the State. He 
had not long been in Fairmont when he 
began to receive frequent professional calls, 
and his practice has constantly grown in 
proportions until now he has a liberal pat- 
ronage. 

The lady who now bears the name of 
Mrs. Donaldson was in her maidenhood Miss 
Sarah Hine. She was born in Indiana 
county, Pennsylvania, and is a daughter of 
Peter Hine. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. 
Donaldson has been blessed with three inter- 
esting children: Samuel, Laviniaand Robert. 

The Doctor exercises his right of fran- 
chise in support of the men and measures of 
the Republican part}'. Socially he is con- 
nected with the Odd Fellows Society, the 
Modern Woodmen of America and the An- 
cient Order of United Workmen, also the 
Southern Minnesota Medical Society, and 
in these various organizations is a valued 
and honored representative. His entire life 



has been passed in Minnesota, and those 
who have known him from his early youth 
are numbered among his warmest friends. 



HMISON JACKSON HODGMAN 
has been identified with the growth 
and upbuilding of Martin county 
since the days cf its infancy, aided 
in the organization of the township in which 
he now makes his home, — Pleasant Prairie, 
— and has not withheld his support and co- 
operation from any enterprise calculated to 
promote the general welfare. This volume 
would be incomplete without the record of 
his life, and we are glad thus to perpetuate 
his memory by written record. 

Mr. Hodgman was born in Onondaga 
county. New York, November 4, 1829, and 
comes of a family of German and French 
lineage. His grandfather, Samuel Hodg- 
man, was one of the pioneer settlers of both 
Saratoga and Onondaga counties. New York. 
By trade he was a blacksmith and located 
on a farm on which the town of East Syra- 
cuse, New York, was afterward built. He 
erected the first house in that place and 
there made his home until his death at the 
age of forty-seven years. The father of our 
subject, Daniel Hodgman, was a native of 
Saratoga, but was reared in Onondaga coun- 
ty, whither he rcmo\-ed with his parents 
when a child of four years. Having reached 
maturity he married Miss Mary Rotnour, a 
native of New York, born in Montgomery 
county. Her father, Henry Rotnour, was 
of Holland descent. Mary Rotnour's mother 
was a daughter of General John A. E\er- 
hart. Daniel Hodgman and his wife first 
located on the old homestead in Onondaga 
county, and in 1824 removed to Chautauqua 
county, New York, but after two and a half 



,64 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



years passed there they returned to the 
former county. There the father died, at 
the age of sixty-four years, in 1861, and the 
mother passed away at the advanced age of 
eighty-seven jears. 

In the family of this worthy and esteemed 
couple were four sons and four daughters: 
Harrison S., who is Hving in Onondaga 
county; Jeanette H., who became the wife 
of Herman C. Finch and had iive children, 
but her husband and children are all now 
deceased, Marien S., deceased; A. J., of this 
notice; Henry, a resident of Laramie City, 
Wyoming; Christiana E. , wife of Simon 
Reals, of Onondaga county; Harriet L. , 
wife of Ward Eaton of Onondaga countj'; 
and Daniel I , of Idaho. 

A. J. Hodgman spent the days of his 
childhood and youth in his parents' home, 
and attended the common schools of the 
neighborhood, obtaining a fair English edu- 
cation. His first independent effort in life 
was as a farm hand, working in that ca- 
pacity for $7 per month, and afterward 
ha\ing his wages raised to the munificent 
sum of $13. He early became familiar with 
all the duties that fall to the lot of the agri- 
culturist, and following the occupation to 
which he was reared he has won a handsome 
competence in his business dealings through 
life. 

As a companion and helpmeet on life's 
journey Mr. Hodgman chose Miss Louisa 
Walrath, the wedding taking place in 185 i. 
The lady was born in Montgomery county, 
New York, and was a daughter of Peter I. 
Walrath and a descendant of an old Mo- 
hawk Dutch family. By that union were 
born eleven children, eight yet li\ing: Will- 
iam H., of Handy, Martin county, Minne- 
sota; Lydia A., wife of Robert E. Hill, who 
resides in Pleasant Prairie township; Lillie, 



wife of J. D. Drake of Center Creek town- 
ship, Martin county; Jennie, wife of Judson 
Parks of the same county; Rose, wife of 
J. T. Tinker of Center Creek township; 
Inez, wife of Ed Older, who makes his 
home in Fairmont; Nellie, wife of William 
Hensler. of Handy, Minnesota; Franklin, 
at home. The mother of this family died 
October i, 1872. Mr. Hodgman was again 
married in 1876, his second union being 
with Henrietta De Crush, widow of William 
De Crush. She was born in Ohio, and 
when about three years old went to Illinois. 
Three children grace this union, — Minnie 
D., MaryL. , and Zora May. Mrs. Hodg- 
man died July 3, 1883, aged thirty-nine 
years. 

In the year 186 1 Mr. Hodgman emi- 
grated to the West, settling in Columbia 
county, Wisconsin, where he engaged in 
farming for three years, coming then to 
Martin county, in 1864, and arriving here 
on the 1 8th of October; and he has since 
been identified with the history of this com- 
munity. He secured a homestead, built a 
sod house with a dirt roof and took up his 
residence upon the farm, being one of the 
oldest settlers now living in the township. 
The land was still in its primitive condition, 
not a furrow having been turned or an im- 
provement made upon the place, but with 
characteristic energy he began its develop- 
ment and in course of time the wild prairie 
was made to \ield its wealth and blossom 
as the rose. His farming operations were 
interrupted, however, in i 865, by his enlist- 
ment in the service of his coimtry as a mem- 
bea of Company H, First Minnesota Heavy 
Artillei)-. The regiment was stationed at 
Chattanooga, Tennessee, and he continued 
with that command until after the cessation 
of hostilities, when the South, having laid 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



down its arms, he was mustered out at Nash- 
ville, and received an honorable discharge 
at Fort Snelling, Minnesota. Throughout 
his service he held the rank of Corporal. 

Returning at once to his home Mr. 
Hodgman has since devoted his time and 
attention to agricultural pursuits. The 
early da3-s were a period of hardship. The 
farm yielded small returns, and he had to 
chop wood and engage in trapping in order 
to support his family; but as time has passed 
his untiring labors and his good business 
ability have brought him prosperity, and he 
is now an extensive land owner, his posses- 
sions aggregating 480 acres, all under a 
high state of cultivation and improved with 
the conveniences and accessories of a model 
farm. In connection with general farming 
he carries on stock-raising, keeping on hand 
good grades of cattle and hogs. A man of 
steadfast purpose he carries forward to suc- 
cessful completion whatever he undertakes, 
and he certainly deserves great credit for 
his success in life. He may truly be called 
a self-made man, and merits all the praise 
indicated by that term. 

On questions of State and national im- 
portance, Mr. Hodgman votes with the 
Democracy, but at local elections, where no 
political issue is involved, he supports the 
man whom he believes best qualified, re- 
gardless of party affiliations. His fellow 
citizens, appreciating his worth and abilitj', 
have frequently called him to public office, 
and in the positions he has filled his prompt 
and faithful discharge of duty has won him 
high commendation. He was for three years 
Town Treasurer, has been side Supervisor 
and Chairman of the Town Board, and was 
one of the organizers of the township. He 
holds his social membershiji in Phil Kearny 
Post, G. A. K., of Fairmont, and in social 



circles he occupies an enviable position. 
Martin county has reason to be proud of 
him for the important part which he has 
taken in her work, and to him owes a debt 
of gratitude for his untiring labors in her 
behalf. 



aMANSIvE is one of the honored 
pioneers of Faribault county and a 
practical and progressive farmer 
who now owns and occupies 425 
acres of rich and valuable land. His farm 
is pleasantly located on section 11, Blue 
Earth City township, and its neat and thrifty 
appearance well indicate the enterprise and 
progressive spirit which are so characteristic 
of the owner. Among the well-known citi- 
zens of Faribault county none are more de- 
serving of representation in this volume than 
the gentleman whose name introduces this 
review. 

Mr. Manske was born in Padstolide- 
Posen, on the 25th of December, 1833, and 
is a son of Ernest and Christina (Smidt) 
Manske, who were also natives of the same 
locality, — the mother having been only 
fifteen years of age at the time of her mar- 
riage. The father was a miller by trade and 
carried on that occupation throughout his 
entire life. He also owned and managed a 
farm of thirty acres, which was regarded as 
quite an extensive tract of land in that 
locality. Ernest Manske was born in 1 801 
and died in 1840. His children were as fol- 
lows: August, who is now living in the 
Fatherland; Adolph; Christian; Ludwig.who 
came to America in i860 and served in the 
Union army from 1861 to 1863, during 
which time he was wounded in the leg, at 
the battle of Huntsville, his death resulting 
from this injur}'; and Samuel, who died in 



1 66 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



childhood. After the death of her first hus- 
band Mrs. Manske became the wife of Mr. 
Seaford and by that union was born one 
child, Isabel. Mr. Seaford died four years 
after this marriaf(e and the mother of our 
subject married a Mr. Guest by whom she 
had three children: Ernest, Lena and 
Augusta. 

C. Manske remained at home until nine- 
teen years of age and then entered the army, 
serving as a member of the Guards from 
1853 until 1856. From the time he was 
sixteen years of age he had a strong desire 
to come to America, but the laws of his na- 
tive land enforced his military service. After 
three years he was granted a year's leave of 
absence and on the 8th day of May, 1857, 
in company with an old schoolmate, Christ 
Metz, he set sail from Bremen on a steamer 
bound for New York. Neither of the young 
men could speak a word of English and this 
occasioned many incidents which at that 
time were very perplexing and troublesome, 
but which, in the lapse of years, have be- 
come amusing. 

On leaving New York, Mr. Manske in- 
quired the way to Milwaukee, and his com- 
panion how to reach Wisconsin. The con- 
sequence was that the former was put on 
board a boat and the latter was sent by rail, 
but the next morning they met in Albany, 
New York, and continued their journey to- 
gether on the train. On reaching Milwau- 
kee they began looking for work, but were 
unsuccessful in their search. I3y this time 
Mr. Metz was out of money and the capital 
of Mr. Manske also was nearly exhausted, 
so that employment as a means of securing 
further funds was an absolute necessity. 
Packing their clothing in a little bundle they 
started out on foot with no destination in 
view and spent the first night in a freight- 



car which was standing on aside-track. The 
following morning they again resumed their 
journey and in the afternoon secured work 
at ditch-digging, receiving in compensation 
for their services one dollar per day. Feel- 
ing encouraged by their success in getting 
the needed employment, when their task 
was completed they once more started out 
and the following night they had to sleep 
out of doors, but their perseverance was at 
length rewarded and they secured a position 
at $10 per month. Subsequently they 
worked in the harvest fields at $1.50 a day 
and afterward for $12 per month. 

The following winter the subject of this 
sketch attended school and in the spring en- 
gaged in "driving" logs on the Mississippi 
river. In i860, accompanied by his old 
companion and countryman, he came to 
Faribault county, casting his lot with its 
early settlers. He made the journey on 
foot, — a distance of 300 miles, — and after 
he had arrived at his destination entered 
from the Government t6o acres of land, on 
which not a furrow had been turned or an 
improvement made. On this he built a 
small house and then returned to Wisconsin 
and made another trip down the Mississippi 
as far as Dubuque. 

Mr. Manske's next trip took him to Mar- 
quette county, Wisconsin, where on the 
loth day of June, 1S61, he was united in 
marriage with Miss Caroline Celmer, a na- 
tive of Prussia who came to this country 
within the same year that her iuisband 
crossed the Atlantic. In Marquette county 
Mr. Manske purchased a yoke of oxen, and 
with his young wife started for their home- 
stead in Minnesota, but on airi\ing here he 
found his house, which had been rudely con- 
structed, blown down. They lived in their 
wagon-box until an"ther dwelling could be 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



167 



built. Their home was furnished witii fur- 
niture of Mr. Manske's manufacture and 
they began their domestic life in true pioneer 
style, passing through all the privations and 
hardships incident to a residence on the 
frontier. In 1862 they and their neighbors 
were compelled to leave their homes on ac- 
count of trouble with the Indians, but soon 
returned. Their first dwelling continued to 
be their place of abode for seventeen years, 
and though it was not supplied with the 
luxuries of many homes, many happy hours 
were passed there. Mr. Manske has im- 
proved his land and added to his farm until 
now within its boundries are comprised 425 
acres of the best soil of Faribault county, 
and his labors have transformed it into rich 
and fertile fields which yield to him a good 
return for the care and labor he bestows 
upon them. 

In those early days the pioneer home 
was brightened by the presence of three 
children, — Edward; Elizabeth, now the wife 
of John Franks, a resident of Blue Earth 
City; and Henry. The parents are faithful 
and consistent members of the Lutheran 
Church and are actively interested in its up- 
building. In his political views Mr. Manske 
is a Democrat. 

In 1885 he returned to his native land on 
a visit to his aged mother, who died the fol- 
lowing year at the age of seventy-three. 
The trip was a pleasant one and he enjoyed 
the time spent among the haunts of his 
youth and in renewing the acquaintances of 
his childhood, but he does not regret his emi- 
gration to America, and this community has 
no more loyal or faithful citizen than he. 
Success had here attended his efforts and 
by good management, perseverance and 
well-directed efforts he has added to his 
possessions until he is now regarded as one 



of the wealthiest farmers of Faribault coun- 
ty. As a pioneer he has witnessed much of 
the growth and development of this region 
and has aided in its upbuilding and progress, 
withholding his support from no enterprise 
calculated to promote the general welfare. 



» _ rf ON. JOHN FRANKLIN DAN- 
W'^\ lELS, of Fairmont, Martin Conn- 
ie J' ty, is a son of Levinus L. and Abi- 
• gail (Spaulding) Daniels, natives of 

New Hampshire. The father was born 
June 14, 1798, a son of John Daniels, a na- 
tive of Connecticut. The mother was born 
December 28, 1801. The were married in 
New Hampshire, and located in Hartland, 
Vermont, where they resided many years. 
They were the parents of eleven children, 
ten of whom grew to years of maturity, and 
six are now living, — Norman Curtis; John 
Franklin; Helen M., wife of Elias R. Stick- 
ney; George Hamden; Henry Herbert and 
Joseph Warren. One son, James W., was 
a soldier in the civil war. Mr. Daniels was 
a member of the Universalist Church, and 
his wife was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

John F. Daniels, the subject of this 
sketch, was born in Hartland, Windsor 
county, Vermont, August 15, 1827, and was 
reared to farm life until nineteen years of 
age. He then began railroad carpentering, 
which he continued until May 18, 1858, 
when an accident occurred on the Great 
Western Railroad of Canada (now a part of 
the Grand Trunk system), that rendered 
him totally blind for three years. Two op- 
erations were performed, one in 1861 and 
another in 1862, which were partially suc- 
cessful. Mr. Daniels then began sawing 
wood and working at whatever else he could 



1 68 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



find to do, and in 1866, poor and almost 
blind, he arrived in Fairmont, Minnesota, 
where he sawed wood during the winters 
and dug wells, cisterns, etc., in the summer. 
October 9, 1878, our subject was united 
in marriage with Lucy A. Eldred, born in 
Becket, Massachusetts, January 5, 1830, a 
daughter of Martin Luther and Lucy (Smith) 
Blair, natives also of that State, the father 
born February 11, 1 804, and the mother 
July 3, 1806. The father was of Scotch- 
English descent. In 1832 they removed to 
Rochester, Lorain county, Ohio, where Mr. 
Blair followed carpentering. Both are now 
deceased. Si.\ of their thirteen children are 
now living, namely: Lucy A. ; Sarah A. wife 
of Henry L. Benedict; Franklin H. ; Luke 
P. ; Emily A. ; and Mary E. , who married 
Raymond Stoughton. Mr. and Mrs. Blair 
were members of the Congregational Church. 
Mrs. Daniels is a member and active worker 
in that church, in v^'hich she is President of 
the Ladies' Aid Society and ex-President of 
the Missionary Society. 

Mr. Daniels affiliates with the Republi- 
can party. He served as President of the 
School Board of Fairmont for a number of 
years before its organization into an inde- 
pendent district. He was elected to the 
State Legislature in 1873. in which he served 
witli credit one term. Mr. Daniels is now 
totally blind. 



>T^ OH N WHIPPLE GOULD, D. V. S., 
M a successful veterinary surgeon and 
/• 1 real-estate dealer of Fairmont, Min- 
nesota, is a native of the Green Moun- 
tain State, his birth having occurred in 
Orleans county, on the ist of May, 1844. 
His father, George Gould, was a native of 
New Hampshire, was of ICnglish descent and 



throughout his entire life followed the occu- 
pation of farming. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Mary Daniels, was also of Eng- 
lish descent and was a native of Vermont. 
They became the parents of ten children, 
seven sons and three daughters, all of whom 
reached adult age. In order of birth they 
are as follows: George, who is living in 
Salem, Oregon; Ralph, who died at the age 
of thirty years; Nathan, who resides in Mill- 
bank, South Dakota; Samuel, who laid 
down his life on the altar of this country 
while in the Union army; John W. , of this 
sketch; Nathaniel, who died in California at 
the age of about forty years; Charles, of 
Kansas; Mrs. Olive Brown, of Brainard, 
Minnesota: Hannah, deceased; and Alferette, 
wife of Eli Swetland. 

Under the parental roof Dr. Gould was 
reared to manhood. The first twelve years 
of his life were passed in the State of his 
nativity and in 1856 he accompanied his 
parents on their removal to Dodge county, 
\\'isconsin. In 1859 the family went to 
Goodhue county, Minnesota, where, in 1S61, 
our subject offered his services to the Gov- 
ernment, enlisting in Company K, Second 
Minnesota Volunteer Infantry. He was then 
only seventeen years of age. He was with 
his compau}' for onl^' nine mouths, when on 
account of disability he was discharged. He 
then returned home, but in 1862 re-enlisted, 
joining the valiant troops of Company C, 
Sixth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, in 
which he served until the close of the war. 
He participated in some of the most im- 
portant engagements of the war and con- 
tinued in the service for a little more than 
four years. For two years he was in the 
Indian service in the West, but wherever 
duty called he was al\va\s found, — a faith- 
ful defentlcr of the old Hag ami the cause 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



169 



it represented. While engaged in service 
against the Indians, he was located in Fair- 
mont in 1863, and at that time he took up 
a claim in Tenhassen township, Martin 
county. After the war closed he came to 
this place, in November, 1865, and located 
on the land which he had secured two years 
previous. With characteristic energy he be- 
gan its development and placed the once 
barren tract under a high state of cultiva- 
tion, continuing its improvement until 1881, 
when he abandoned agricultural pursuits and 
came to Fairmont, embarking in the real- 
estate business and also practicing veteri- 
nary surgery. For fifteen years he success- 
fully practiced and then, in order to further 
perfect himself, he went to Chicago and 
after pursuing a two years' course was grad- 
uated, in 1892, from the Chicago Veterinary 
College. He thoroughly understands his 
business and in the prosecution of his pro- 
fession has secured a good income, for his 
ability has won him a liberal patronage. 

In the year 1866 Dr. Gould married Miss 
Charlotte Babcock, a native of Hillsdale 
county, Michigan, and they have three 
children: Dr. James N., the eldest, gradu- 
ated from the Chicago Veterinary College 
in the same class with his father, and is now 
engaged in practice in Worthington, Minne- 
sota; Clara is the wife of Fred Rouse, a resi- 
dent farmer of Martin county; and John H. 
is at home. 

In his social relations the Doctor is con- 
nected with the Odd Fellows society, hold- 
ing membership with Fairmont Lodge, No. 
70, I. O. O. F. , and is also a member of 
Phil. Kearny Post, No. 18, G. A. R. He 
votes with the Prohibition party and is a 
warm friend of the temperance cause. Dur- 
ing nearly his entire residence in Tenhassen 
township he served as a member of the town 



Board of Supervisors, and part of the time 
was chairman. Real estate is the minor 
branch of his business and yet he has been 
largely interested in it. He has at one time 
owned as high as 700 acres of farm land and 
has handled other valuable property. His 
business has been ably conducted and his 
enterprise, diligence and sagacity have made 
him one of the substantial citizens of the 
community. 



>T^EHU HAYWORTH, of Fairmont, is 
m a son of Jehu and Elizabeth (Chan- 
A 1 dler) Hayworth, natives of V'irginia. 
They were married in their native 
State, and shortly afterward located in Ken- 
tucky and later removed to Vigo county, 
Indiana, where they were among the early 
pioneers. The mother departed this life in 
1835, and the father died two years after- 
ward. Both grandfathers of our subject 
were soldiers in the Revolutionary war, and 
his father, with two bi others, served in the 
war of 1812. 

Jehu Hayworth, the only one surviving 
of fifteen children, eight of whom grew to 
maturity, was born in Vigo county, Indiana, 
November 22, 1828, and remained there 
until seventeen years of age, having been 
obliged to earn his own living after his ninth 
year. He then spent one year in Green 
county, Wisconsin, worked one year in De 
Kalb county, Illinois, worked for $8 per 
month for two years in Winnebago county, 
that State, and in 1850 returned to Wiscon- 
sin. Mr. Hayworth purchased Government 
land in La Crosse county, which he partially 
improved and then sold. He also bought 
and improved another claim in that county. 
In 1863 he located on wild land in Martin 
county, Minnesota, which he improved and 



170 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



on which he lived for twelve years. He 
then lived in Elm Creek eight years, since 
which he has resided in Fairmont. 

In February, 1865, Mr. Hayworth en- 
listed for service in the late war, entering 
Company I, Second Minnesota Cavalry, and 
was engaged in guard duty until November, 
of the same year, when he was honorably 
discharged. In 1883 our subject began 
carrying United States mail over the star 
route, from Fairmont to Pleasant Prairie, 
Pixley and East Chain Lakes. His route 
was afterwards changed from Fairmont to 
Bancroft, which he retained for one year 
and three months. In 1891 he again took 
up that occupation, carrying the mail three 
times a week. 

In 1849, at Beloit, Wisconsin, Mr. Hay- 
worth was united in marriage with Amanda 
F. Segar, born in Berkshire county, Massa- 
chusetts, April 30, 1832, adaughter of Julius 
and Abigail (Targee) Segar, natives also of 
that State. In 1836 they located in Warren 
county, New York, four years afterward re- 
moved to Winnebago county, Illinois, in 
1848 to Marquette county, Wisconsin, thence 
to La Crosse county, that State, and next to 
Wabasha county, Minnesota. Mrs. Segar 
died in 1838, and her husband survived until 
1887. They were the parents of eight chil- 
dren, four now living. Of Mr. and Mrs. 
Hayworth's seven children, four are now 
living,- — Emsley, who married Lovina Jones, 
and resides in Frazer township, Martin 
county; George, of Fairmont, married Ellen 
Stewart; Dudley, of ()uincy, Illinois; and 
Jehu, who married Anna Hurr, and resides 
in California. In his social relations Mr. 
Hayworth is a member of Chain Lake Lodge, 
No. 64, A. F". & A. M., of Fairmont, in 
which he has served as Junior Deacon for 
seven years, and as a member of the G. A. 



R. he has filled some of the offices in his 
post. Politically he is an active worker in 
the Republican party, and has held the po- 
sitions of Supervisor, Constable, Assessor 
and School Director. 



aAPTAIN HENRY ROBERT 
WALKER, a farmer of Fari- 
bault county, was born at Oxford, 
Maine, March 7, 1830, a son of 
Clariden Walker, a native of Worcester, 
Massachusetts. His father and uncle, Will- 
iam and Abram Walker, were of Scotch 
parentage, and were soldiers in the Revolu- 
tionary war. The mother of our subject, 
ncc Ruth Bisbee, was a native of Maine, 
and her grandparents were from Plymouth, 
Massachusetts, of Puritan stock. Her death 
occurred in 1840, and she left six children, 
two sons and four daughters. In 1852 the 
father and children removed to Fond du Lac 
count}', Wisconsin, and the former died 
there at the age of seventj'-nine years. He 
was a farmer and mason by occupation, and 
was identified with the Democratic party 
until 1856, when he voted for Fremont. 

Henry R. Walker, the subject of this 
sketch, was reared at his native place, and 
for a number of j'cars was engaged at the 
mason's and shoemaker's trades. At the age 
of twenty-two years he located in Wiscon- 
sin, where he worked at his trades and farm- 
ing, and in 1855 came with Henry Stod- 
dard to Faribault county, Minnesota. Dur- 
ing the winter of 1855-6 there were only 
five white men in the county. At Lincoln's 
call for 30,000 men, Mr. Walker enlisted 
in Company D, Ninth Minnesota Infantry, 
was elected Second Lieutenant of his com- 
pany, and took part in the battles of Price's 
Cross Roads, Tupelo, Nashville, etc. He 




S:Q'rs4a/. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



173 



afterward received a commission as Captain 
of his company, and was mustered out of 
service August 23, 1865. Returning to this 
county he located on his present farm, where 
he has 160 acres under a fine state of culti- 
vation. 

September 7, 1856, Mr. Walker was 
united in marriage with Adelia Mason, a 
native of Orleans county. New York, and a 
daughter of Elliott and Caroline (Duning) 
Mason, the former a native of Connecticut, 
and the latter of Fort Ticonderoga, Ver- 
mont. They located in Fond du Lac coun- 
ty, Wisconsin, in 1850, and in 1863 came 
to this county. The father died while on a 
visit in Newark, New York, and the mother 
died in Faribault county, in 1878. They 
had five children, four daughters and one 
son. Mr. and Mrs. Walker have had six 
children, namely: Clarendon, married and 
living on the farm at home; Ada, wife of 
John E. Snider, of this county; Carrie, wife 
of Ed Clark, of this township; Alice, wife 
of Charles Bassett, also of Prescott town- 
ship; Charles H., of Martin county; and 
George, who is attending school. In politi- 
cal matters Mr. Walker affiliates with the 
Republican party. In 1866 he was ap- 
pointed Postmaster of this place, and has 
served as Township Super\isor and Clerk a 
number of years. 



BR AN KLIN W. CADY is ranked 
with the leading pioneers and prom- 
inent and highly respected citi- 
zens of Faribault county. His beau- 
tiful rural home in Verona township, near 
Winnebago Cit}', is the abode of culture and 
refinement, and is one of the most delightful 
places in southern Minnesota. 

Mr. Cady descended from some of the 
g 



prominent old Puritan families of Massa- 
chusetts. He was born in Lake county, 
Ohio, January 15, 1826, son of William and 
Louis (Mi.xer) Cady, both natives of the old 
Bay State. William Cady was born in 
Springfield, Massachussetts, and was reared 
on a farm and received a good education. 
At the age of twenty-five, and unmarried, 
he sought his fortune in the Western Re- 
serve, making the journey by wagon to Lake 
county, Ohio, where he became a pioneer 
settler. There he was subsequently married 
to Miss Louis Mi.xer. She was born in Dal- 
ton, Massachusetts, and when fourteen years 
of age removed with her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Phineas Mixer, to Ohio. Her mother, 
whose maiden name was Fobes, descended 
from a titled family of England. Both the 
Mixer and Fobes families were among the 
pioneers of Ohio. In Lake county William 
Cady and his wife spent their lives and died, 
he dying at the age of sixty years, and she 
at seventy-six. By occupation he was a 
farmer. They had four children, viz. : 
Augusta R. Colby, of Kansas; Cornelia A. 
Reed, who died at Austinburg, Ohio; Fran- 
cis B., who died at St. Louis, Missouri; and 
Franklin W. 

Franklin W. Cady was reared in Lake 
county, Ohio, and received his education in 
the district schools and Grand River Insti- 
tute. It was his good fortune to study pen- 
manship under the instructions of Professor 
P. R. Spencer, author of the Spencerian 
system. At the age of twenty we find young 
Cady teaching school and also having a 
writing class. 

Like his father before him and like many 
another ambitious young man, he was seized 
with a spirit of cmigratinn, the boundless 
West offering many attractions. Accord- 
ingly, in 1850, we find him on his way to 



174 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Wisconsin, Columbia county being liis des- 
tination. Near Portage, that county, he 
settled on a tract of wild land, and there im- 
proved a good farm. In 1859 he was a vic- 
tim of the Colorado gold " fever," and that 
year made the trip with an ox team to 
Pike's Peak, passing through Denver when 
that now magnificent city contained only a 
few log cabins. He remained in Colorado, 
engaged in mining, for eighteen months, at 
the end of which time he returned to Wis- 
consin. That was in 1861; and in June of 
that year he came to his present location - 
and purchased 160 acres of the place upon 
which has since been the home farm. To 
his original purchase he has since added un- 
til now he has 400 acres, a beautiful tract 
of land, through which South creek mean- 
ders. His modern residence, built in 1888, 
by its furnishings and surroundings gives 
every evidence of wealth and luxury and of 
taste and refinement as well; and near by, 

• 

as a relic of pioneer days, still stands the 
primitive log house of the family, which at 
the time they settled here was one of the 
best log houses of the county, and which 
served as their home for a number of years. 
Mr. Cady has substantial barns and other 
farm buildings, and everything about his 
premises is kept up in the best of order. In 
connection with his farming operations, he 
has given considerable attention to stock- 
raising, making a specialty of Durham cat- 
tle and Poland-China hogs. 

Mr. Cady was married in Columbia 
county, Wisconsin, July 20, 1851, to Ellen 
C. Waterhouse, a popular teacher and a 
lady of rare accomplishments. She was 
born in Cattaraugus county. New York, 
daughter of James and Anna (Wise) Water- 
house, both natives of Vermont. Her 
grandfather, William Waterhouse, was also 



a native of the Green Mountain State. 
Both her parents died in Wisconsin, her 
mother at the age of sixty-eight years, and 
her father at ninety-four. The latter was a 
mason by trade, but was for many years 
engaged in farming. In politics he was a 
Republican and in religion a Baptist and an 
active worker in the church. Mrs. Cady is 
the youngest of three children, the others 
being Anna and Milo J. Milo J. was a sol- 
dier in the Third Wisconsin Infantry, and 
died at the age of thirty-three years, from 
the effect of wounds received in the battle 
of Antietam. He left a widow and two 
children. Mr. and Mrs. Cady have had 
four children, as follows: Francis M., de- 
ceased at the age of four years; Alta, who 
married Arthur W. Silsbee, was in 1889 left 
a widow with one child, Nanon E. ; Louisa 
A. Durkee, who has a family of three chil- 
dren, —Harold, Victor and Avis Ward; and 
Bertram L. All have had excellent educa- 
tional advantages, and, like their parents, 
have followed the profession of teaching. 
Mrs. Silsbee taught in the Blue Earth City 
schools four years, and Mrs. Durkee is now 
teaching, being well known as a popular 
and successful educator. Bertram L. has 
• also been a popular teacher. 

In his political views, Mr. Cady is in 
harmony with the principles of the Repub- 
lican party, and has for many years been 
active in its support. He has served in 
all the township offices, was County Auditor 
for two terms, from 1865, and has also 
served as Superintendent and Examiner of 
Schools for the township. For more than 
thirty consecutive years Mr. Cady has been 
a correspondent for the Department of 
Agriculture. In every position to which 
he has been called Mr. Cady has served 
with the strictest fiilelit}-, reflecting credit 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



175 



both upon himself and those whom he 
served. Faribault county has few, if any, 
men who are more worthy of the confidence 
and esteem of their fellow citizens than 
Franklin W. Cady. 



K./^ YRON EATON ST. JOHN, pro- 
l(''^ prietor of a foundry and machine- 
J^^3 shop at Fairmont, was born near 
the city of Rock Island, Illinois, 
July 27, 1S45, and is the second in a family 
of four children whose parents were E. M. 
and Matilda (Addison) St. John, the former 
a native of New York and the latter of New 
Hampshire. In an early day they left their 
home in the East and traveling toward the 
setting sun at length reached Rock Island 
county, Illinois, where they took up their 
abode and spent a number of years. Both 
have now passed away. The father was a 
farmer by occupation and was of English 
descent. 

Until eleven years of age Mr. St. John was 
reared in Pecatonica, Illinois, and then ac- 
companied the family on their removal to 
Wisconsin, where he made his home until 
his removal to Minnesota. In the year 187 1 
he became a resident of Martin county, and 
has since been identified with the interests 
of this locality. He actjuired his education 
in the common schools and fitted himself 
for the profession of teaching, which he suc- 
cessfully followed for twenty terms, in Mar- 
tin county and in Wisconsin. He was a 
teacher of recognized ability, and his capable 
management and able instruction always 
made his school one of the best in the com- 
munity where it was located. He has the 
faculty of easily and readil)- imparting his 
knowledge to others, could maintain dis- 
cipline and always roiiimandcd the respect 



of his pupils. In his youth he also learned 
the trade of carpentering, and possesses con- 
siderable mechanical genius. 

In the year 1868 Mr. St. John was mar- 
ried, the lady of his choice being Miss Mag- 
dalene Houghtaling, a sister of Elmore 
Houghtaling. Their union has been blessed 
with eight children, as follows: Victor, 
Harrj', Byron E. , Nina, Roscoe, Oscar, 
Clason and Hazel. The family circle yet 
remains unbroken, the children being still 
with their parents, and around the happy 
fireside gathers an interesting familj'. 

Mr. St. John has led a busy and useful 
life, characterized by industry and persever- 
ance, and these qualities have brought him 
a well deserved success. He is now super- 
intendent of the Electric Light and Water 
Works of Fairmont, also proprietor of a 
foundry and machine-shop, in connection 
with his son Victor. As his financial re- 
sources have increased he has made judicious 
investments of his capital in 'his business 
and otherwise, and therefrom derives a good 
income. In connection with his other prop- 
erty he owns 160 acres of land in Frazer 
township, the same constituting a good farm, 
which he rents. Indolence is utterly for- 
eign to his nature and idleness has no part 
in his composition, and it is not through in- 
heritance or the combination of fortunute 
circumstances, but through capable manage- 
ment and enterprise that he has gained the 
prosperity which has crowned his efforts. 

Mr. St. John exercises his right of fran- 
chise in support of the Democracy, and has 
been honored with a number of local offices 
of trust. He lived for twenty years in Fra- 
zer township and one half of that time served 
as Town Clerk, — a fact which indicates 
fidelity to duty and also the confidence re- 
posed in him. In his social rt'lations he is 



176 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



a United Workman, holding membership 
with Fairmont Lodge, A. O. U. \V. , in 
which he is now serving as Recorder for the 
third year, and also belongs to the I. O. O. 
F. , Fairmont Lodge, No. 70. Public- 
spirited and progressive, he is actively inter- 
ested in ever\thing pertaining to the wel- 
fare of the community and its upbuilding, 
and does all in his power for the best inter- 
ests of the town and county in which he 
makes his home. His residence here covers 
a period of almost a quarter of a century, 
and his well spent life, honorable and up- 
right in all things, has won him the high 
regard of all with whom business or social 
relations have brought him in contact. 



Vj'OHN EMORY CANRIGHT, a re- 

m tired farmer now living in Fairmont, 
A 1 has led a busy life and as the result 
of his industry, perseverance and 
good business ability he has secured the 
competence which now enables him to lay 
aside all care, and rest in the enjoyment of 
the fruits of his former toil. 

Mr. Canright was born in Ulster county. 
New York, on the 3d of February, 1833, and 
is a son of Solomon Canright, al.so a native 
of the Empire State. He was a tanner and 
currier by trade and for some time carried 
on business along that line. His wife was 
in her maidenhood Permelia Pecor. She 
was born in \'ermont, near I^akc Champlain, 
and remained there until twelve years of 
age, when she went to New York and was 
married there. Her people were of French 
descent, while the Canrights are of (ierman 
lineage. To Mr. and Mrs. Canright were 
born ten children, all of whom grew to ma- 
turity and all of whom, with one exception, 
arc yet living. In the jear 1845 the father 



of our subject, accompanied by his family, 
removed to Wisconsin and located in the 
town of Brookfield, Waukesha county, on a 
place for which he paid $1 50 in addition to 
the usual price of $ i . 2 5 per acre. He came 
into possession of iGo acres, which he culti- 
vated until the fall of 1856, at which time 
he sold out for $4,900. He then bought for 
$4,000 a farm in Pewaukee township, same 
county, upon which he made his home until 
called to his final rest, in the year i860. His 
wife departed this life at the advanced age 
of eighty-five years. 

John E. Canright was their fifth child 
and fourth son. He spent the first thirteen 
years of his life in the county of his nativity 
and then accompanied his parents on their 
emigration to Wisconsin, where he attended 
school and aided in the arduous task of open- 
ing up a new farm. He gave his father the 
benefit of his service until eighteen years of 
age and then started out in life for himself, 
working as a farm hand for $12 per month. 
He was thus cmplo\'ed for two years, after 
which he removed to Bureau county, Illinois, 
where he remained until 1854, when he re- 
turned to Wisconsin and went to work for his 
father, with whom he continued until 18157. 

On the 1st of May, 1855, Mr. Canright 
was joined in wedlock with Miss Delia H. 
\\'albridge, a native of St. Lawrence coun- 
ty. New York, born May 26, 1837. Her 
father. Rev. Orlo J. Walbridge, was for 
many years a minister in the Wesleyan 
Methodist Church. He married Maria A. 
Packard, who was born in New York, her 
parents being from Vermont. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Walbridge were born si.\ children, four 
sons and two daughters. In the autunm of 
1855 they became residents of Wisconsin, 
settling in Pewaukee, where they spent their 
remaining (la>s. The father was called to 



FARIBAULT, MARTiy, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



^Ti 



the home beyond at the age of sixty-two 
years and the mother departed this Hfe at 
the age of seventy-seven. Earnest, Chris- 
tian people, all who knew them held them 
in high regard and their loss was deeply 
mourned. Mrs. Canright is a cultured and 
refined lady, highly educated. She pursued 
her studies in a select school in New York 
and afterward engaged in teaching for two 
terms in the Empire State and one term in 
Wisconsin. 

The year 1864 witnessed the arrival of 
Mr. Canright and his family in Minnesota. 
He settled in Goodhue county, where he 
rented a farm, but his labors in that direc- 
tion were interrupted on the 5th of Febru- 
ary, 1865, by his enlistment in the Union 
army, as a member of Company I, First 
Minnesota Heavy Artillery. In March the 
regiment reached Chattanooga, Tennessee, 
where it was stationed during the summer, 
doing guard duty, and on the 12th of Sep- 
tember, 1865, our subject was mustered out, 
at Nashville. Immediately he returned to 
his family and home and in the same year 
he came to Martin county to seek a location, 
securing a claim, in Rutland township, to 
which he removed his family in 1866. Their 
first home was a log house covered with a 
dirt roof, but he at once began to improve 
the place and the fine farm of to-day bears 
little resemblance to the claim which he se- 
cured almost thirty years ago. The farm is 
185 acres in extent and a beautiful grove 
and fine orchard add to the value and at- 
tractive appearance of the place. These 
were set out by him and his labors continued 
until 1893, when he sold his property to Mr. 
Kankin and removed to Fairmont, where he 
is now living retired. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Canright have been 
born nine children: Dr, Orlo Solomon, of 



East Troy township, Walworth county, 
Wisconsin; Charles E., a practicing attorney 
of Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Francis M. ; 
W'innette, who died at the age of thirteen 
years; Lottie May, wife of George B. Swear- 
ingen, a farmer of Bowling Green township, 
Martin county; Alice P., who became the 
wife of S. \\'. Wheeler, and who is now de- 
ceased; Delia H. ; Amy M. and Harry, all 
at home. The children, carefully reared, 
have all become respected men and women, 
who occupy positions of usefulness and re- 
sponsibility in the \arious communities in 
which they reside. 

For many years Mr. Canright was a sup- 
porter of the Republican party, but for the 
past fifteen years has been a supporter of 
the men and measures of the Prohibition 
party. His fellow-citizens, appreciating his 
worth and ability, have frequently called 
him to public office. For four years he 
served as County Commissioner, has been 
Justice of the Peace, and a member of the 
Town Board of Supervisors, of which he 
acted as chairman. He has also been offi- 
cially connected with the schools, and in 
these various positions he has ever been 
found true and faithful. No confidence re- 
posed in him has ever been betrayed, and 
he has therefore won the esteem of all who 
know him. Both he and his wife are con- 
sistent members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, and in its work take a deep and 
abiding interest, while he is serving as 
Church Trustee. 



^^y w' 1^- SMITH, editor and proprie- 
■ ■ I tor of the Winnebago City Enter- 
^J^^J prise, Winnebago City, Minne- 
sota, was born May 32, 1857, at 
Princeton, Bureau county, Illinois, and 



178 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



comes of good old New England ancestry. 
His parents, L.L. and Delia (Dwight) Smith, 
are natives of Massachusetts, the former of 
Scotch parentage and the latter a descend- 
ant of the Snows and Dwights of Mayflower 
fame. 

When Mr. Smith was only two years of 
age his parents moved from Illinois to New 
Hartford, Iowa, where they have ever since 
resided. In the graded school of that town 
he commenced his education, and completed 
it, so far as books go, at the Iowa State 
Agricultural College, Ames, Iowa, being a 
member of the class of '79. When he was 
eighteen he commenced teaching, and by 
this means worked his way through college. 
He taught in all thirty-six terms, and for a 
number of years held a high place among 
the leading educators of Iowa and Minne- 
sota. He was principal one year each at 
Aplington and Butler Center, Iowa, Heron 
Lake and Edgerton, Minnesota, and four 
years each at Jackson and Adrian, Minne- 
sota. In 1 88 1 and 1882 he was an institute 
instructor. Mr. Smith is also a practical 
surveyor, and while thus engaged in educa- 
tional work he spent his summer vacations, 
for several years, in surve3'ing, and for four 
years was County Surveyor of Nobles coun- 
ty, Minnesota. 

In 18S9 Mr. Smith commenced the pub- 
lication of the Lamberton Leader, a weekly 
sheet, which he continued successfully for 
three years, after which he closed out his 
business there and came to Winnebago City. 
Here in May, 1893, he established the 
Winnebago City Enterprise, which he has 
since ably conducted and which is now in a 
nourishing condition. 

Politically he is a stanch, loyal Repub- 
lican. He has been delegate to many State 
conventions both in Iowa and Minnesota, 



I 



and is an earnest and energetic worker in 
the ranks of his party. 

Mr. Smith is a man of family. He was 
married at Jackson, Minnesota, March 16, 
1884, to Miss Marion A. Matteson, a popu- 
lar and successful teacher of that county, 
and they have two children, a son and 
daughter. 



eDWARD EBERLEIN.— One of 
the thrifty German farmers of Pres- 
cott township, Faribault county, is 
found in the subject of this sketch. 
Mr. Eberlein was born near Hesse, Ger- 
many, October 27, 1839, son of Christopher 
and Elizabeth (Frobel) Eberlein, both na- 
tives of Germany and the father for some 
time a soldier in the German army. In 
1853 the Eberlein family sailed from Bremen 
to New York, being nine weeks on the sea, 
and from New York came west to Columbia 
! county, Wisconsin, settling on a farm near 
Portage. There the parents lived until 
1864, when they came to Faribault county, 
Minnesota. They are now residents of Pres- 
cott township, and both have passed their 
eightieth milestone. In their family were 
seven sons and four daughters. Three of the 
sons, Ferdinand, George and Edward, served 
in the late war, the last two djing of disease 
while in the service. Ferdinand was a mem- 
ber of Company C, Fifth Minnesota Infan- 
tr}', and his death occurred near Vicksburg. 
George was in Company F, Twenty-ninth 
Wisconsin Infantry. He died in Texas. 
Edward enlisted in 1862, and as a member 
of the Mounted Rangers was sent in pursuit 
of the hostile Indians, going as far west as 
Camp Atchison, Dakota. In 1863 he was 
with General Sibley's expedition against the 
Sioux. He was honorably discharged Noveni- 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



179 



ber 28, 1863, and January 24, 1865, he 
af^ain entered the service, this time becom- 
ing a member of Company F, First Minne- 
sota Heavy Artillery, and being stationed 
near Chattanooga, Tennessee, until the close 
of the war. September 22, 1865, he was 
discharged at Nashville, Tennessee, coming 
out with the rank of Orderly Sergeant. 

The subject of our sketch was reared to 
farm life, and received a fair education. The 
year before the war broke out he came to 
Minnesota and began working by the month 
for L. W. Brown, in Faribault county. In 
1866 he homesteaded 160 acres of the land 
on which he now lives, and to his original 
claim he has since added until now his farm 
comprises 320 acres, all choice land, well 
impro\ed and under a high state of cultiva- 
tion. He has a good house and barn, the 
latter being 40 x 64 feet in dimensions; wind- 
mill for pumping water and grinding feed for 
stock; and ten acres in grove. 

Mr. Eberlein was married in June, 1866, 
to Augusta Bohlke, a native of Germany 
and a daughter of Michael and Eve (Mor- 
quardt) Bohlke, the family having emigrated 
to America when Mrs. Eberlein was eighteen 
years of age. Her father is now deceased, 
and her mother is a resident of Faribault 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Eberlein have six 
children, namely: Emma (wife of C. Weg- 
ener), Laura P., Walter F., Adolph H., 
Lena A., and Edward A. Emma and Laura 
are well known as popular and successful 
teachers. 

Mr. Eberlein's political views are in 
harmony with the principles of the Republi- 
can party, and is a member of Sully Post, 
No. 10, G. A. R. He has served his fel- 
low-citizens as Supervisor for several years, 
and also as Treasurer. As a member of the 
School Board of district No. 36, in which he 



resides, he has served as Clerk, Director and 
Treasurer. Reared by Lutheran parents, he 
still adheres to that faith. 



EENRY RIPPE, a well-known grain 
dealer of P^airmont, Minnesota, 
dates his birth in Dubuque, Iowa, 
September 23, 1853. 
His father, Henry Rippe, was born in 
Germany, in 1821, and died in La Crosse, 
Wisconsin, in 1890. The widowed mother, 
whose maiden name was Hannah Snelle, 
and who was likewise a native of Germany, 
is now seventy years of age and is a resident 
of Hokah, Minnesota. They had a family 
of eleven children, six of whom are living, 
namely: Henry, Mary Hartman, Hannah 
Lang, E. A., Otto, and Charles. 

The year following his birth the subject 
of our sketch was taken by his parents from 
Iowa to Brownsville, Minnesota. At the 
age of sixteen he left home and secured em- 
ployment in an elevator at Winona, Min- 
nesota, where he remained two years. 
Then he was in the same business at Browns- 
ville one year and at Dodge Center two 
years. After this he was successively at 
Brownsville one year. New Albin, Iowa, one 
year, and Lansing, Iowa, two years, in the 
employ of Alexander McMichael, grain 
dealer. In the fall of 1876 he went to work 
for W. W. Cargill cS; Company, and contin- 
ued with this company for a few years, lo- 
cated at different points in Wisconsin, Min- 
nesota and Iowa. Then he spent a year 
and a half in the employ of A. & T. Mc- 
Michael, at Dubuque, Iowa, in 1880 re- 
sumed work for W. W. Cargill & Company 
at La Crosse, Wisconsin, superintending 
their cleaning elevator for one year, then 
representing them at Delavan and Grand 



I So 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Meadow, Minnesota, and still later acting 
as their traveling agent, serving in this last 
named capacity three years. At the end of 
that time he engaged in business for himself 
at Grand Meadow. That was in the fall of 
1885. After carrying on business on his 
own account for three years, he again en- 
tered the emplo\- of Cargill & Company, and 
traveled for them the next three years. In 
1 89 1 he established himself in business at 
Fairmont, under the firm name of Rippe 
Brothers, which association continued until 
May I, 1894, since which time he has been 
alone. He deals exclusively in grain and 
seeds, and is doing an extensive business. 
At this writing he has representatives at ten 
points on the South Minnesota Railroad, 
namely: Grand Meadow, Easton, Winne- 
bago City, Huntley, Fairmont and Welcome, 
Minnesota; and Wentworth, Howard, Ros- 
well and Woonsocket, South Dakota. And 
at Grand Meadow he also has a cleaning 
elevator. 

Mr. Rippe was married in 1881 to Kate 
Walter, a native of Minnesota, and a daugh- 
ter of Jacob Walter, an early settler of 
Brownsville. They have four children: 
Robert, Lucinda, Larena and Katie. Mrs. 
Rippe is a member of the Episcopal Church. 

In his political views Mr. Rippe is inde- 
pendent. Fraternally he is identified with 
the Masonic order at Grand Meadow, Min- 
nesota. 



^"V'.VMUEL BACON, a retired mer- 
•^^^kT chant of Winnebago City, Minne- 
J\,_3 sota, was born in Livingston coun- 
ty. New York, in 1832, son of 
George W. and Jemima (Sparks) Bacon, 
both of whom were natives of the Green 



Mountain State. Mr. Bacon was reared to 
farm life and received a fair education in the 
public schools of his native State. 

In 1849 George W. Bacon and his 
family came West and settled at Princeton, 
Green Lake county, Wisconsin, where he 
engaged in farming, remaining there until 
1863, when the famil}- removed to Minne- 
sota, locating on a farm in Nashville town- 
ship, Martin county, where the parents re- 
sided until their death. They had a family 
of two sons and five daughters who grew to 
maturity, and six of the number are living 
at this writing (1894). 

Samuel Bacon followed farming a num- 
ber of years, and made the business a suc- 
cess. He is still the owner of 300 acres of 
good land in Martin county. About 1877 
he gave up farming and engaged in mer- 
chandising in Nashville, and continued in 
business at that place until August, 1891, 
when he sold out. He then came to Winne- 
bago City and opened a general store, which 
he conducted with success until March, 
1894, when he sold out and retired from 
active business pursuits, and now lives at 
ease in his pleasant home on H0II3' street. 

Since casting his first presidential vote for 
Abraham Lincoln, he has been an uncom- 
promising supporter of the Republican party, 
but has never been an aspirant for political 
honors. For several years he served as 
Postmaster at Nashville, receiving his first 
appointment from President Grant. 

April 10, 1855, at Ripon, Wisconsin, he 
married Miss Frances E., daughter of Will- 
iam and Rebecca (Parsons) Clark, both of 
whom were natives of the town of Sterling, 
New York. Mr. and Mrs. Bacon have no 
children of their own, but ha\e raised a 
number of orphan children. 

In religious faith they are Free Baptists. 




-kJ/M//^^/ Jr////^r . 




-^ 



//.ia// '<Jrm/^e. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 1S5 



^'^TEPHEN SANTEE is the owner 
•^^^* of one of the finest farms of Martin 
K^^ county, located on section 30, 
Fairmont township, and is num- 
bered among the most inlUieiitial agricul- 
turists of the community. The record of 
his life will doubtless prove of interest to 
many of the readers of this volume, and we 
take pleasure in giving it a place on these 
pages. 

The family from which he sprung is of 
German and French origin. His paternal 
grandfather, Philemon Santee, was a native 
of Berks county, Pennsylvania, and there 
followed the occupation of farming. His 
son, Simon, the father of our subject, was 
also born in the Keystone State, and carried 
on agricultural pursuits throughout the 
greater part of his life. Having arrived at 
years of maturity he was joined in wedlock 
with Mary Hoffecker, a native of Penns}!- 
vania, as was her father, Jacob Hoffecker, 
who came of a family of German descent. 
Mr. and Mrs. Santee spent their entire lives 
upon a farm in the Keystone State, where the 
father's death occurred, at the age of sev- 
enty-one, while the mother passed away at 
the age of seventy-four. In their family 
were si.x children, four sons and two daugh- 
ters, who reached mature age. 

Stephen Santee is the third son and fifth 
child. He was reared upon his father's 
farm, and the days of his boyhood and youth 
were quietly passed, unmarked by event of 
special importance. When he had become 
a man he chose a companion and helpmeet 
on life's journey Miss Susan Uplinger, their 
wedding being celebrated on Christmas day 
of 1863. The lady was born in Pennsylva- 
nia, September 25, 1S46, and is a daughter 
i)f John Uplinger, a farmer whose birth oc- 
curred in Luzerne county, Pennsylvania. Her 



grandfather, Henry Uplinger, was born in 
Berks county, and was of German lineage. 
Her mother, who bore the maiden name of 
Elizabeth Wood, and was a native of that 
State, came of a family of German and 
English descent, and her father was a na- 
tive of Philadelphia. Mrs. Santee was the 
third in order of birth in a family of thirteen 
children and was reared in the place of her 
nativity. 

Mr. Santee was a young man of twenty- 
two years at the time of his marriage, for 
his birth occurred in Luzerne county, April 
30, 1 84 1, and now with the responsibilities 
of a household resting upon him he began 
life in earnest. He continued his residence 
in the East until 1867, when he decided to 
try his fortune in the Mississippi valley, lo- 
cating in De Kalb county, Illinois, upon a 
farm of 120 acres which he purchased. To 
its cultivation he devoted his time and en- 
ergies, successfully carrying on the business 
until 1886, when he resumed his westward 
journey. Coming to Martin count)-, Minne- 
sota, he purchased the farm upon which he 
now resides and moved into a little log cabin 
built by a previous occupant. He has since 
greatly improved the place by the erection 
of good buildings, including a pleasant home 
and substantial barns and other necessary 
outbuildings. His farm comprises 43 5 acres 
of valuable land, of which 300 acres is under 
a high state of cultivation, while the re- 
mainder is timber and pasture land. The 
owner devotes his time and attention to gen- 
eral farming and stock-raising, and his hon- 
orable dealings and good management have 
made him very prosperous. The home is 
beautifullj' located on the west shore of Lake 
Amber, and with the fertile liclds which sur- 
round it it is nunibcrctl among the best and 
most valuable farms of Martin county. 



iS6 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



To Mr. and Mrs. Santee have been born 
nine children, namely: Ario B., who form- 
erly engaged in teaching in Fairmont; 
Amelia, wife of Kirtland Brown, of Fair- 
mont, where they both engage in teaching; 
Simon and Ida (also a teacherj, at home; 
Mary, who formerly taught school in Fair- 
mont and is now the wife of Arza Fancher; 
Clara and Eva, who are teachers of recog- 
nized ability in Martin county; and John H. 
and Franklin, who are attending school. 
The children were all provided with good 
educational privileges, which they improved 
and several of them became successful teach- 
ers. The family is one of prominence in the 
community, the household is the abode of 
hospitality and its members rank high in the 
social circles in which they move. 

On questions of national importance Mr. 
Santee supports the Republican party, but 
at local elections, where no political issue is 
involved and the fitness of the candidate is 
the only question to be regarded, he votes 
independently. He has been honored with 
a number of offices, having served for five 
years as a member of the town board of 
Supervisors, as School Treasurer and as 
Pi;thmaster, discharging his duties with a 
promptness and fidelity that won him the 
commendation of all concerned. 



EON. JACOB ALEXANDER LATI- 
MER, a well-known and highly re- 
spected citi/en of Fariliault county, 
Minnesota, may rightly be classed 
with the self-made men of his county. We 
take pleasure in presenting the following 
sketch of his life to the readers of this work. 
Jacob Alexander Latimer was born in 
Madison county, Tennessee, April 20, 1827, 
son of Jonathan and Nanc}' (West) Latimer, 



the former a native of Tennessee and a son 
of Connecticut parents, and the later born 
in North Carolina. When he was three 
years of age his parents removed from Ten- 
nessee to Sangamon county, Illinois, and 
three years later to Knox county, same 
State, where the father and mother passed 
the residue of their lives and died. Jonathan 
Latimer was among the pioneer farmers of 
Illinois, and he was also for some years en- 
gaged in mercantile business. And while he 
was occupied in the store, his eldest son, 
Jacob A., took charge of the farm, having 
the entire management of it when he was 
fifteen, and continuing in charge until his 
marriage, which event occurred in 1850. 

After his marriage Mr. Latimer farmed 
for a few years, and then turned his atten- 
tion to the lumber and livery business at 
Abingdon, Illinois, in which he was engaged 
for some time. In April, 1857, he came to 
Minnesota and bought 160 acres on section 
II, Winnebago City township, Faribault 
county, where he now lives. Soon after- 
ward he pre-empted an adjoining 160 acres 
in the same section, and later bought more 
land adjoining him until he at one time 
owned a whole section. He has since 
divided with his children, and at this writ- 
ing his farm comprises 230 acres of choice 
land, all well improved. At the time he 
located here Mr. Latimer had but little 
means and for some years he and his family 
lived in true pioneer style, meeting with 
many difficulties and enduring not a few pri- 
vations. His first house, a log cabin, built 
on the site of his present residence, was 
roofed with bark and clapboards, while the 
ground served for the floor and hay for a 
carpet. 

In early life Mr. Latimer was an Aboli- 
tionist, and when the Republican party 



FARIBAULT, MARTIX, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



187 



sprang; into existence he allied himself with 
it and assisted in its local organization. He 
was a member of the first Republican State 
Convention in Illinois. He has always been 
a prohibitionist in principle, and of recent 
j^ears has been identified with the Prohibi- 
tion party. At one time he was prominently 
connected with the Farmers' Alliance. In 
1858 he was elected to the State Legisla- 
ture by the Republican party, and in i860 
was re-elected, but served one term only; 
and in 1S62 was elected to the Senate, in 
which honorable bod}' he served one term. 
Previous to that he filled various local offices. 
Mr. Latimer is a member of the Presby- 
terian Church at Amboy, and for many years 
has been an Elder in the Church. 

He was married February 21, 1850, to 
Miss Julia Ann Meek, a native of Knox 
county, Illinois, and a daughter of Daniel 
and Nancy (Killim) Meek, the former of 
German and the latter of Swiss descent. 
Their happy union has resulted in the birth 
of seven children, six of whom are living, 
namely: Daniel A., a farmer of Winnebago 
City township; Nancy, wife of Phenias F. 
Bornt, a farmer of same township; Mary E., 
wife of William Sanders, also a farmer of 
this township; John, of Minneapolis; Frank, 
who has charge of the home farm; and 
Edith, wife of Harry Stoner, of Amboy. 



m. 



'ILLIAM ORLANDO BASSETT, 
a retired farmer now living in 
Fairmont, is numbered among 
the honored early settlers of Mar- 
tin county, his residence here covering a 
period of nearly a third of a century. He 
has therefore witnessed the greater part of 
its development and progress, and has aided 
in its upbuilding and advancement. The 1 



best interests of the community have ever 
found in him a friend, and to such men the 
county owes its present prosperity. 

Mr. Bassett is descended from an old 
New York family. His grandfather, Isaac 
Bassett, lived for many years in Cortland, 
New York, and the father of our subject, 
William Bassett, claimed Connecticut as 
the State of his nativity. He was drafted 
for service in the war of 18 12, but it was 
difficult for him to go and he sent a substi- 
tute. He married Samantha Powers, a na- 
tive of Dutchess county. New York, and a 
daughter of Peter Powers, a local Methodist 
preacher. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. 
Bassett was celebrated in the State of their 
birth, and there the father died November 
5, 18 16, at the age of twenty-eight years, 
his birth having occurred January 17, 1787. 
His wife was born September 2, 1789. 
After her husband's death she lived with her 
family in Tompkins county, New York, 
rearing her children as best she might, al- 
though her financial resources were some- 
what limited. Her last days were passed in 
Middleville, Michigan, at the home of her 
son, Charles Wesley, and she was called to 
her final rest when more than sixty years of 
age. In the family were four children, — 
George, Charles and Nelson^; all now de- 
ceased, and William O. , whose name heads 
this record. 

The last named w-as born October 18, 
181 5, in Tompkins county, New York, and 
when he was little more than a year old his 
father died. He then went to live with his 
grandfather, Peter Powers, with whom he 
remained during the greater part of his boy- 
hood and youth. The common schools of 
the neighborhood afforded him his educa- 
tional privileges, and he made his first inde- 
pendent effort in life at farm work, being 



iSS 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



employed as a farm hand for several }-ears. 
His industry and perse\erance, which have 
been important factors in his life's success, 
were early manifested, and he worked 
long and earnestly to get a start in life. 

On the 1st of January, 1839, Mr. Bas- 
sett was united in marriage with Miss Ivatie 
Marie De Coudress, a native of Drydcn, Cort- 
land county. New York, and a daughter of 
Christian and Katie (Powers) De Coudress, 
the former a native of France and the latter 
of Dutchess county. New York. Their mar- 
riage was celebrated in the Empire State 
and they located in Dutchess county, remov- 
ing thence to Dryden. On leaving the East 
they became residents of Wisconsin, the date 
of their emigration being 1851. They set- 
tled in Port Washington, where both died 
of cholera. In their family were nine chil- 
dren, including Mrs. Bassett, who was born 
March 31, 1818. To our subject and his 
wife have been born four children, as fol- 
lows: Ashley M., born July i, 1840, wedded 
Mary Garner and they ha\e five living chil- 
dren: William J., who married Katie 
Personius; Nellie, wife of George Cham- 
pine, by whom she has two children, 
Mabel and Sybil; Ila Maud, wife of 
Chester Personius; Daisy Dean, wife of 
Leaver Champine, by whom she has 
two children, Ashley and Madeline; and 
Solomon C, who married May Palmer. 
Jerome, the second of the family, is now 
deceased. Mary lantha, born March 31, 
1844, is the wife of Walter Person, and their 
children, four in number, are: Katie, wife of 
William Beach and the mother of five chil- 
dren, — May, Carrie, Earl, Burns and Linn; 
Annie, wife of Frank Rooncy, by whom she 
has two children, Frank and Tressa; Burns 
and fcssc, bnlh at home. Jerome, born 
January 23, 1S47, marrieil Sophia Nichols 



and afterward wedded I. N. Drake; his five 
children are: Annie, wife of George Clark 
and themotherof fourchildren, — Georgiana, 
Harry, Archie and Rosie; George; Freder- 
ick; and Ada P., who married James Lam- 
pord, and has a daughter, Miriam Alice. 
Jessie completes the Bassett family. 

Upon his marriage Mr. Bassett, whose 
name heads this article, located in New 
York, removing after a few years to Port 
Washington, Wisconsin, where he made 
his home until 1863, which year witnessed 
his arrival in Martin county. He settled in 
Tenhassen township and began the develop- 
ment of a farm, living in true pioneer style. 
The few settlers of the locality were widely 
scattered and the people were quite fearful of 
the Indians about the time of his arrival. 
He broke his land and transformed the raw 
prairie into rich and fertile fields, also added 
many improvements to the place in the way 
of good buildings and the other accessories 
of a model farm. He lived on the farm for 
thirty-one years, successfully conducting 
and managing his business affairs, and then 
removed to Fairmont, where he has since 
lived a retired life, enjoj-ing a well-earned 
rest and the fruits of his former toil. 

During the late war Mr. Bassett respond- 
ed to his country's call for troops, thus 
manifesting his loyalty to the Union and the 
northern cause. He was assigned to Com- 
pany F, Sixteenth Wisconsin Infantr}', and 
at the battle of Shiloh was seriously wound- 
ed by a gunshot in the right forearm, which 
disabled him for further duty, and in conse- 
quence of his physical disability he was hon- 
orably discharged in Madison, Wisconsin. He 
is now a member of the Grand Army Post of 
Fairmont. When the Republican party 
was formed to prevent the further extension 
of slavery he joined its ranks and is still one 



^FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



189 



of its stalwart supporters. He has served 
as Supervisor of Tenhassen township, but 
has never aspired to pubHc office, preferring 
to give his entire time to his business inter- 
ests. The cause of education has ever 
found in him a warm friend, and he gave 
land on which to build a schoolhouse. The 
best interests of the conununity have ever 
received his earnest support and co-opera- 
tion, and he is widely recognized as a wide- 
awake, progressive citizen. 



eMORY COKDELO STOWE, 
president of the Ward & Cadwell 
Company, Fairmont, Minnesota, is 
one of the most prominent young 
business men of the city. 

The Ward & Cadwell Company was 
formed into a stock company in 1884, the 
original officers being R. M. Ward, president; 
A. D. Cadwell, vice-president; and George 
Wohlheter, secretary and treasurer. The 
business of the firm is done through a board 
of three directors, the present board being 
composed of the following members: George 
Wohlheter, Mrs. R. M. Ward, J. D. Young 
(La Crosse, Wisconsin), and E. C. Stowe. 
They have a capital stock of $50,000 and 
do a business of about $25,000 annually, 
their business being exclusively retail. 

Mr. Stowe, the efficient president of this 
enterprising company, dates his birth in 
Sycamore, Illinois, September i, 1857. His 
father, W. H. Stowe, was a native of the 
Empire State and of English descent. His 
mother was also a native of New York. Her 
maiden name was Electa Ward and she was 
a daughter of Luke Ward. In 1849 W. H. 
Stowe and his wife moved to Sycamore, 
Illinois, where they lived for twenty-five 
years, from there removing t(.) Minnesota and 



locating in Fairmont, where they now live, 
retired. They have six children living, 
namely: Harriet Holcomb, Lottie M. Tay- 
lor, Cyrus, Emory C, I'^red A. and E. L. 
The mother is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

Emory C. Stowe was educated in the 
public schools of his native town and at 
Fairmont. After leaving school he accepted 
a position as clerk in a general merchandise 
store in Fairmont, and later entered the 
employ of the Ward & Cadwell Company, 
at first as clerk, and for ten years has been 
connected with this firm. Since 1892 he 
has been president of the company. 

Mr. Stowe was married i.i 1878 to Miss 
Cora A. Snow, a native of Jefferson county, 
Wisconsin, born February 11, 1859, daugh- 
ter of E. S. Snow. They have two chil- 
dren, Maurice E., born September 8, 1879, 
and Lloyd H., born January 15, 1886. 

Mrs. Stowe's father, E. S. Snow, was 
born in Canandaigua, New York, December 
12, 1822. He was an educated man and 
for some years followed the profession of 
teaching. In 1853 he came West to Jeffer- 
son county, Wisconsin, and settled on a 
farm. That same year he was married, in 
Jefferson county, Wisconsin, to Elizabeth 
Delight Peck, who was born in Jefferson 
county. New York, September 2, 183G, 
daughter of Daniel H. and Marilla (Tousley) 
Peck. Mr. Peck was born in 1800, and in 
1840 he moved from New York to Wiscon- 
sin and settled on a farm in Jefferson county, 
where he and his wife passed the rest of 
their lives and died. In 1861 E. S. Snow 
enlisted in the Twelfth Wisconsin Volun- 
teers, and was on active duty, with the rank 
of Sergeant, until January, 1863, when he 
was discharged on account of disability. He 
was a member of the G. A. R. Post at He- 



190 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OP 



bron, Wisconsin. He died July 6, 1876, 
leaving a widow and four children, namely: 
Albert L. , Marilla Billiard, Cora A. Stowe 
and Ethleen D. Mrs. Stowe came to Fair- 
mont with her parents in 1868, where she 
completed her education, and taught school 
three terms in Martin county. She is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
is president of the Sewing Society of the 
church, and is one of the teachers in the 
Sunday-school. 

Mr. Stowe is identified with the I. O. O. 
F. , and has passed all the chairs in both the 
subordinate lodge and the encampment. 
Politically, he is a Republican, and is a 
member of the \illage Council. 



Vy w ^ ALTER DOLLEN, a prominent 
Mm I farmer of section 3, Silver Lake 
^JL^ township, was born near Des 
Plaines, Cook county, Illinois, 
August 23, 1854, a son of John Dollen, a 
native of England. He came to America 
when a young man, locating in New York, 
and was there married to Emma Strong, a 
nati\e also of England. Two \ears after 
his marriage Mr. Dollen Uicated in North- 
field township. Cook county, Illinois, but 
afterward removed to Main township, where 
he died July 2, 1894. Mrs. Dollen still 
resides on the old homestead there. They 
were the parents of ten children, all still 
living. 

Walter Dollen, the second child and 
second son, was reared to farm life in Main 
township. Cook county. At the age of 
twenty-one years he went to Will county, 
Illinois, where he followed agricultural pur- 
suits about three years, returned to Cook 
county, and in the spring of 1884 came to 
Martin county, Minnesota. After spending 



four 3'ears in Fairmont township Mr. Dol- 
len located on the farm he now owns, which 
consists of a quarter section of land. 

In political matters, he supports the 
measures of the Republican party. He has 
served as Assessor of both Fairmont and 
Silver Lake townships, and has held the 
position of School Treasurer since his resi- 
dence in this county. Socially Mr. Dollen 
is a member of the A. O. U. W., No. 152, 
of Fairmont. 

March 18, 18S5, in Martin county, our 
subject was united in marriage with Magda- 
lena Wohlheter, born in Germany, August 
12, 1865, a daughter of Phillip and Christian 
(Atzel) Wohlheter, natives also of that 
country. They came to America in 1869, 
spending eight years in Freeborn count}', 
Minnesota, four years in Fayette county, 
Iowa, and then came to Martin county. 
Mrs. Dollen and George were the only chil- 
dren by Mr. Wohlheter's second marriage. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dollen have three children, — 
Lillie M., Emma C. and Julia E. 



at 



ILLIAM VIEBAHN, P.lue Earth 
City, Minnesota, is one of the 
prosperous farmers and leading 
citi/cns of Prescott township, 
Faribault county. He is what may be 
called a thoroughly Americanized German. 
Mr. \'iebahn was born near Cologne, 
Prussia, September 8, 1830, son of Peter 
and Wilhelmina (Deitenbach) \'iebahn, both 
nati\'cs of Prussia, the former a son of 
Adolph Viebahn and of Holland descent. By 
trade, Peter Viebahn was a cooper and car- 
penter, and for three years was a soldier in 
the Prussian army. He and his wife emi- 
grated with their family to America, and in 
Faribault countw Minnesota, both passed 



FARIBAULT, MAR-TIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



191 



the closing years of their life and died, he 
being sixty-five years of age at the time of 
death, and she seventy. In their family 
were three sons, one of whom, C. F. Vie- 
bahn, is one of the leading educators of 
Wisconsin, at this writing being principal of 
the schools at Watertown. 

In his native land the subject of our 
sketch was reared and educated, and for 
three years worked at the baker's trade. In 
1850 he sailed from Bremen to New York, at 
which port he landed after a voyage of nine 
weeks. From New York he came west to 
Sauk county, Wisconsin, and there for two 
years worked at the carpenter's trade and 
went to school. In 1853 he went to Juneau 
county, same State, and near Mauston was 
employed as a farm hand until 1863, when 
he came to Faribault county, Minnesota. In 
Prescott township he took claim to 160 acres 
of land, and settled down to the work of 
improving a farm. As the years passed by 
prosperity attended his efforts, and he now 
has a fine farm, well improved with com- 
fortable residence, good barns and other 
buildings and a windmill, and everything 
about his premises is kept up in first-class 
order. Besides this farm he owns 280 acres 
located in Martin county, this State. 

Mr. Viebahn has a wife and si.x children. 
The children have had good educatit)nal ad- 
vantages, and his son Ed. is now serving as 
Township Clerk. The other members of his 
family are Mrs. J. Shutelworth, Charles, 
Frank, Frederic and Minnie. Frank and 
Fred are now in California, and Frederick is 
attending commercial college. 

When he first came to America, Mr. Vie- 
bahn was in sympathy with the Free Soil 
party. In 1856 he voted for John C. Fre- 
mont, and in 1872 for Horace Greeley. He 
is now a Populist. He has served his fellow- 



citizens as Township Clerk for a number of 
years, and for ten years as Assessor. Few 
men in Prescott township are better known 
or more highly respected than is William 
Viebahn. 



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ILLIAM MICHAEL HOFFMAN, 
Postmaster and proprietor of a 
general store at East Chain 
Lakes, was born in Frankfort, 
Germany, December 29, 1835, a son of 
John and Mary Hoffman, nativ'es also of 
that country. The father was a distiller by 
trade, and his death occurred in his native 
place. The mother died in Kansas, at the 
age of about ninety years. She was twice 
married, and by the first union there were 
four children, namely: Conrad, of Buffalo, 
New York; Mary, wife of Casper Wagner, 
also of that city; John, of Kansas; and Will- 
iam M., the subject of this sketch. By her 
second marriage she had one daughter, 
Kate, wife of John Rosa, of Fairmont town- 
ship, Martin county. 

William M. Hoffman, the youngest 
child by his mother's first marriage, re- 
mained in his native place until seventeen 
years of age, when he came with his mother 
to America, landing in New York city. 
They went thence to Buffalo, New York, 
and William left his mother four years after- 
ward and located in Rock county, Wiscon- 
sin, where he farmed on rented land. He 
next removed to Dane county, Wiscon- 
sin, purchased a farm and followed agricul- 
tural pursuits there until 1866, and since 
that time has been a resident of Martin 
county. Mr. Hoffman purchased 160 acres 
of land in Pleasant Prairie township, fi\e 
acres of which was improved and contained 
a small frame house. Six months after- 



19Z 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



ward he bought i6o acres in Fairmont town- 
ship, which he improved and remained there 
about four years. Mr. Hoffman now owns 
440 acres of fine farming land in East Chain 
Lai<es township, where he is proprietor of a 
general store. He was also appointed 
Postmaster under Cleveland's administra- 
tion and still holds that position. 

In 1854 our subject was united in mar- 
riage with Kate Murry, a native of Ireland. 
For his second wife he married, August 13, 
1882, Josa Lilly, a native of Stephenson 
county, Illinois, but reared in Ogle county, 
that State. His parents, J. P. and H. M. 
(Dawson) Lilly, were natives respectivelj' of 
Pennsylvania and New York. Mrs. Hoff- 
man was the fourth of their ten children. 
Our subject and wife have two daughters — 
Lillia M. and Ida E. Mr. Hoffman affili- 
ates with the Democratic party, and has 
served as Treasurer of the School Board. 



HUGUSTUS AGNEW TAYLOR, 
of Fairmont, is a son of Asahel and 
Hannah (Roberts) Taylor, the 
former a native of Springfield, 
Massachusetts, and the latter of Bucks coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania. They were married in 
Tecumseh, Michigan, and afterward moved 
to Hastings, that State, where the father 
died. He was a wagonmaker by trade. 
The mother now resides in Hopedale, Mas- 
sachusetts. They were the parents of four 
children, vi/. : Theodore, who was a soldier 
in Company C, Fifty-seventh New York 
Volunteer Infantry, and was killed in the 
battle of the Wilderness; Augustus A., the 
subject of this sketch; Frank was a soldier 
in the Si.xty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, 
and now resides in Philadelphia, that State; 



and Mary, wife of Henry Steere, of Hope- 
dale, Massachusetts. 

Augustus A. Taylor was born in Tecum- 
seh, Michigan, February 5, 1847. Septem- 
ber 14, 1863, he enlisted for service in the 
late war, entering Company C, Eleventh 
Michigan Volunteer Cavalry, and was soon 
afterward appointed to the position of Cor- 
poral. He took part in the following battles: 
Pound Gap, Hazel Green, Mount Sterling, 
Lexington, Georgetown, Cynthiana, Point 
Burnside,McCormick's Farm, Laurel Mount- 
ain, in both battles of Bowen's Farm, Salt- 
ville, Sandy Mountain, Western, Hazel 
Green, McCormick's Farm, Morristown, 
Slate Creek, Mt. Sterling, Clinch River, 
Russellville, Morristown, Cobb's Ford, 
Bristol, Paperville, Abingdon, Wytheville, 
Mt. Airy, Marion, Seven Miles Ford, Salt- 
ville, Jonesboro, Clinch River, Morristown, 
McCormick's Farm, Mt. Sterling, Hazel 
Green, Flemingsburg, Boone, Yadkin River, 
Mt. Airy, Hillsville, Salem, Christiansburg, 
Jonesboro, Danburg, Slatesville, Salisbury, 
Morgantown, Swananoa Gap, Henderson- 
ville, Asheville, Ward's Farm, Cftsar's 
Head, Pickens\ille and .Anderson Court 
House. The regiment became so reduced 
in numbers by battles, sickness, deaths, etc., 
that they were consolidated with the Eighth 
Michigan Cavalry, and served as such until 
the close of the struggle. Mr. Taylor was 
discharged September 22, 1865, at Jackson, 
Michigan, as First Sergeant. 

He immediately returned to his home, 
and soon afterward went to Syce.more, Illi- 
nois, where he found work in a hotel until 
1873. He then located on a farm in the 
corporate limits of Fairmont, which was 
partially improved, and during the first two 
years there the grasshoppers destroyed his 
crops. Mr. Taylor was ne.xt employed by 




^c^. 



|>. aeaKe. 



FARIBAULT,, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



'95 



R. M. Ward one year, spent one year in the 
lumber yard of Ward & Cadwell, worked in 
their store two years, and since 1878 has 
found employment in the store of Wollston 
& Lounsberry. In 1891, in company with 
Frank Johnson, Mr. Taylor laid out the 
Taylor & Johnson Addition to the village of 
Fairmont, located in section five, in the 
north part of the village, and comprises 
forty acres. In his political relations, our 
subject acts with the Republican party. He 
has served as Treasurer of Fairmont town- 
ship twelve years, has been a member of the 
City Council, a member of the School Board 
eight years, and was Treasurer of the school 
district seven years. Socially, he is Past 
Commander of Phil. Kearny Post, No. 18, 
G. A. R., has passed through the chairs in 
the I. O. O. P., and is a member of the 
A. O. U. W. 

In 1 87 1 Mr. Taylor was united in mar- 
riage with Lottie M. Stowe, born in 1848, a 
daughter of W. H. and Electa (Ward) 
Stowe. To this union have been born five 
children, namely: Anna E., born Novem- 
ber 25, 1871; Harriet May, September 26, 
1873; Erma B., April 18, 1877; Laura A., 
July 16, 1886; and Harry S., September 27, 
1888. Mrs. Taylor is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 



KON. F. M. PEIRCE, a most promi- 
nent and influential citizen of 
southern Minnesota, now living in 
Winnebago City, dates his resi- 
dence in Faribault county from May 17, 
1856, at which time the county was in its 
infancy and gave little promise of the devel- 
opment and progress which was to place it 
among the leading counties in this great 

connnonwealth. He was born in Putne}', 
10 



Windham county, Vermont, and comes of 
good old Revolutionary stock. The family 
is originally of English origin and was 
founded in America during the early Colo- 
nial days by ancestors who settled in Massa- 
chusetts. The paternal grandfather, Eze- 
kiel Peirce, was for seven years in the Colo- 
nial army, bravely and valiantly aiding in the 
struggle to secure American independence. 
His son and namesake, the father of our 
subject, was also born in Putney, Vermont, 
and after he had reached }ears of maturity 
he wedded Miss Mary Burdett, a native of 
the same State. They became the parents 
of six children: Densmore, Ira, Martha, a 
son who died in infancy, F. M. and Wal- 
ter. The mother of this family died when 
our subject was only six years of age, after 
which the father was again married, his sec- 
ond union being with Keziah Cudworth, by 
whom he had one son, Frank B., who 
served in the late war in Kilpatrick's cav- 
alry and is now living in De Soto, Missouri. 
The father came to Minnesota in the fall of 
1856, and subsequently removed to Ogle 
county, Illinois, where he died at the ripe 
old age of eighty-four years, respected by 
all who knew him. He was a farmer by oc- 
cupation, and throughout his entire life fol- 
lowed that pursuit. In early life he sup- 
ported the Whig party, but after the organ- 
ization of the Republican party he joined 
its ranks and ever after fought under its 
banner. He held membership with the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

The personal history of F. M. Peirce, to 
which we now turn the reader's attention, 
will prove of great interest to many of our 
readers, for he has a wide acquaintance 
throughout this community and has gained 
the esteem of all with whom he has been 
brought in contact. In early youth he at- 



196 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



tended the common schools, but his educa- 
tion obtained in the common-school room 
forms but a small part of his knowledge, 1 
which has been greatly supplemented by 
reading, observation and experience, until 
he is now a well informed man. He first 
started out in business as an apprentice to a 
marble cutter and followed the trade which 
he learned until 1854, when he came to the 
West on a prospecting tour, looking over 
the country with the view of choosing a place 
of location. At Rock Island he crossed the 
Mississippi, \\hich at that time was spanned 
by no bridge in this region, and continued 
his journey by stage to Cedar Rapids. After 
about four months he returned East, and in 
1855, in company with his father and 
brother, again came to Iowa, and, as above 
stated, in May, 1856, he came to Minnesota, 
and took up a claim on the east bank of the 
Blue Earth river, where he built a log cabin, 
made a home and began the development 
of a farm. It was a tract of virgin soil, but 
he at once began its transformation and in 
course of time rich fields were yielding to 
him altundant harvests. After carrying on 
the farm for several years he removed to 
Winnebago City, where he opened a general 
merchandise establishment, and during the 
succeeding twelve j'ears was identified with 
the commercial interests of the place. On 
selling his store, he again went to the farm, 
comprising 260 acres of valuable land, 
which he has placed under a high state of 
cultivation. It is improved with good build- 
ings, including substantial barns and sheds 
and a tasteful and comfortable dwelling, 
which is located on a natural building site 
and is surrounded by a beautiful grove of 
forest trees. This is a very valuable place, 
and in addition to general farming the en- 
terprising owner also successfully carries on 



stock-raising, making a specialt}' of the 
breeding of Red Polled cattle. He became 
an enthusiast on the question of artesian 
wells and bored the first on Blue Earth 
river, which supplies his home and barns 
for stock, and the public for water on the 
road. 

Mr. Peirce was married in Mankato, 
Minnesota, Maj- 14, 1 8G6, to Miss Hattie 
Wetherell, who was born in Windham 
county, Connecticut, and is a daughter of 
Marshall and Roxy (Carder) Wetherell, both 
of whom were natives of Connecticut. The 
lady was reared and educated in the Nutmeg 
State and became a popular and successful 
school teacher, her ability of imparting 
knowledge to others making her service very 
desirable. To Mr. and Mrs. Peirce have been 
born four children, as follows: C. M., who 
has a position of trust as bookkeeper with 
the North Dakota Milling Asrociation of 
Grand Forks, North Dakota; Walcott, at 
home; Arthur F., a druggist of Chicago, 
Illinois; and Ella May, the only daughter, 
now in her fifteenth jear. The sons have 
been provided with good educational privi- 
leges and thus fitted for the practical and 
responsible duties of life. 

Mr. Peirce is a warm and true friend of 
the cause of education and does all in his 
power to promote its interests. In politics he 
was formerly a stalwart Republican and a 
leader of his party in his locality. He zealously 
works in its interests, for he believes its 
principles are calculated to benefit the 
greater number, and whenever his judgment 
sanctions anything as right neither fear nor 
favor can prevent him from upholding his 
ideas. He has been honored with several 
offices of trust, for his fellow townsmen 
recognize his worth and ability. He has 
filled all the township offices in a manner 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



'97 



creditable to himself and with satisfaction to 
the public, and in 1875 he was called upon 
to represent his district in the legislature of 
Minnesota. He and his most estimable wife 
hold membership in the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church, contribute liberally to its sup- 
port and do all in their power for its upbuild- 
ing. They are charitable and benevolent 
people, and their good deeds, quietly and 
unostentatiously performed, have won them 
the gratitude and respect of many. Mr. 
Peirce is a man of broad and liberal views 
and progressive spirit, firm in his convictions 
and stanch in support of what he believes to 
be right. His fidelity and lo\'alty have thus 
won him universal confiilence, and his genial 
and friendly manner has made him a popular 
and valued citizen. His public and private 
life alike are above reproach and the name 
of F. M. Peirce deserves an honored place 
on the pages of Faribault county's history. 



at 



ILLIAM ROBERT LIVINGS- 
TON, a prominent and progress- 
ive agriculturist of Martin coun- 
ty, living on section 20, Silver 
Lake township, was born in Clarion county, 
Pennsylvania, September 6, 1834, descend- 
ing from Scotch ancestry who came to 
America more than 200 years ago. The 
grandfather. Dr. Benjamin Livingston, was 
a native of New York; and the father of our 
subject, John J. Livingston, was born Oc- 
tober 19, 1798, in Washington county of 
the Empire State. He married Maria Rice, 
a native of Pawlet, Rutland county, Ver- 
mont, whose father was one of the earliest 
settlers of the Green Mountain State and 
belonged to a famil\' that had been founded 
in America in the early da\s of the Colonies 
and was of Scotch and I'-nglish origin. 



Mr. and Mrs. John J. Livingston were 
married in Rutland count}' in 1828, and 
after a few years removed to Schoharie 
county. New York, thence to Clarion county, 
Pennsylvania, then known as Venango 
county. The mother died in that county, 
after which the father married Elizabeth J. 
Whitehill. By the first marriage were born 
four sons and three daughters, three of 
whom are yet living: Dr. James B., a 
practicing physician of Mercer county, Penn- 
sylvania; Mary L., wife of Isaac Lacy, of 
Warren county, Pennsylvania; William R. ; 
Hattie E. , of Jamestown, New York. By 
the second union there was one son. Dr. 
Afford T. , also of Jamestown. The father 
of this family was a well educated man of 
much more than average intelligence. He 
was a surveyor for many years and also a 
student of medicine, of Greek, Hebrew, 
Latin, German and English, all of which 
languages he taught. He was widely known 
as a man of prominence throughout north- 
western Pennsylvania, and his last days were 
passed in Jamestown, New York, where he 
died, in August, 1890, at the ad\anced age 
of ninety-two years. His father passed 
away at the age of ninety-six. He was a 
stanch friend of Horace Greeley and was a 
correspondent for the New York Tribune. 
In 1850 he took the census of Clarion coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, which at that time had a 
population of 45,000. He possessed a most 
amiable disposition, and during the fort_\- 
years our subject lived with him he never 
saw his father angry. Mr. Li\ingston was a 
member of the Presbyterian Church in early 
life, and afterward joined the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, in which he was an earn- 
est worker. He belonged to the Sons of 
Temperance, and was a stalwart friend of 
the temperance cause. When he was 



198 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



eighty-four years of age he walked twenty- 
five miles, and could do as much work as a 
man in the prime of life. 

Our subject was reared in the county of 
his nativity and attended the district schools 
until twelve years of age, but the greater 
part of his education has been acquired 
through his own exertions at home and 
through reading and observation in later 
years. At the age of fourteen, in 1849, he 
began learning the printer's trade in the 
office of the Clarion Register, a Whig paper, 
and in 1852 he went to Jamestown, New 
York, where he was employed on the James- 
town Journal, edited by Frank Palmer, 
afterward editor of the Iowa State Journal 
and the first proprietor of the Inter Ocean 
of Chicago. He remained in Jamestown 
working at the printer's and millwright's 
trades until the fall of 1856, when he came 
to Minnesota, working as a millwright in two 
of the largest gristmills in Rochester until 
the winter of 1857. He was then employed 
in the same capacity in Houston county, 
Minnesota, until March, 1858, when he came 
to Martin county and pre-empted a tract of 
timber land in Silver Lake township, a tract 
of 160 acres, constituting the farm which is 
now his home. He first lived in a block 
house, known as Fort Britt, until the fall 
of 1858, when he returned to Clarion coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, which was his place of. 
residence until 1861. 

In that \ear Mr. Livingston entered the 
service of his country as a member of Com- 
pany E, Pennsylvania Reserves, and was 
with his regiment for three years and one 
month, participating in many important en- 
gagements, including the battle before Rich- 
mond, South Mountain, Antietam, the sec- 
ond battle of Bull Run and Fredericksburg, 
where on the 2d of December he was wounded 



by a ball in the thigh. This kept him from 
active service for four months, but as soon 
as possible he rejoined his regiment, being 
again with his compan}' in June, 1863. They 
started for Gettysburg, and at Crampton 
Pass he received a sunstroke, but continued 
on the march. In May, 1864, he started 
on the Wilderness campaign, and at Spott- 
sylvania, on the 8th of May, was again pros- 
trated by sunstroke; but continued at the 
front until June, when, on the 17th of that 
month, he was honorably discharged, at 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. He was always 
found at his post of duty, and the Union 
cause found in him an able defender. He 
next hired out to the Governor of the Key- 
stone State and was sent to Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, where he remained for a year, re- 
turning then to Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Livingston was married July 11, 
1865, to Brittania J. Smith. Her grand- 
father, Jonathan Smith, was born on the 
the seashore in Massachusetts, anil was a 
sailor. Her maternal grandfather, Walter 
Seaman, was a native of the Mohawk val- 
ley of New York, descending from Mohawk 
Dutch ancestry. Mrs. Livingston is a daugh- 
ter of J. P. and Susan (Seaman) Smith, the 
former born in Rhode Island, the latter in 
Warren county, Pennsylvania. Her birth 
also occurred in Warren county, and she is 
the eldest of their ten children. She was 
reared in the count)' of her nativity, and 
when fifteen years of age began teaching 
school, which profession she successfully 
followed for seven years. 

In the fall of 1865 Mr. Livingston took 
his young wife to La Porte, Indiana, and 
the following year came to Martin county, 
locating on the farm where he has since 
made his home. His first residence was a 
log cabin, 14 x 14 feet, and eleven people 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



'99 



lived in it through one winter. In connec- 
tion with the cultivation and improvement 
of his farm he has engaged in building mills, 
working on the Washburn mills and also 
aiding in the erection of the cavalry bar- 
racks at Fort Abe Lincoln, occupied by 
Custer's cavalry staff from the fall of 1871 
to 1872. His farm comprises 270 acres of 
rich land, and all his possessions have been 
acquired through his own efforts. His life 
has been a busy and useful one, yet he has 
foimd time to devote to public duties and 
faithfully served as Supervisor, Treasurer 
and Assessor of his township. His political 
views are in harmony with the principles of 
the Republican party, and socially he is 
connected with Phil Kearny Post, No. 18, 
G. A. R. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Livingston have been 
born eight children, — Roy R., who is a 
graduate of the business college of Mankato, 
Minnesota, and is now living in Fairmont; 
John J., who graduated from the State Nor- 
mal School at Mankato, is a member of the 
United States Army; Guy C., who also 
graduated at the same institution, in the 
same class with John J., is now engaged in 
teaching; Louise G., a nurse in St. Peter's 
Hospital; James V., who graduated in Man- 
kato and follows teaching; Robert W. , who 
is a student in Fairmont; and Nora K., at 
home. 



"^Y* O H N C. F E N S K E, a prosperous 
fl farmer and stock-raiser, residing on 
/• J section 29, Emerald township, Fari- 
bault county, Minnesota, is a native 
of Germany, and possesses to a marked de- 
gree that thrift and energy which are so 
characteristic of his countrymen. 

Mr. Fenske was born in Prussia, Febru- 



ary 21, 1829, son of Joseph and Teresia 
(Hintz) Fenske, natives of the same province 
in which he was born. Both parents died 
in Prussia, — the mother in 1835 and the 
father in i 847. Their family was composed 
of four sons and three daughters. In 18.51 
John and his eldest brother, Andrew, emi- 
grated to America, making the voyage from 
Hamburg, via Liverpool, to New York, and 
being seven weeks on the ocean. From 
New York they traveled by rail to Albany, 
thence by boat to Albany and on across the 
lakes to Milwaukee, Wisconsin. At Mil- 
waukee they hired a team and drove to 
Princeton, and from there to Neshkoro, on 
the White river, where our subject was em- 
ployed by Carl Farnum, at $12 per month. 
His brother had a family, and he took a 
homestead claim, upon which he settled and 
where he lived until 1S63, when he removed 
to Green Lake county, same State, where 
he still resides. After remaining with his 
brother for a short time the subject of our 
sketch went to Oak Grove and secured em- 
ployment on a farm, working for a man by 
the name of Fuller for one j'ear, at a stipu- 
lated remuneration of $60, accepting for his 
pay two steers, valued at $40, and the re- 
mainder of the amount in clothing. He 
then hired to another man to do farm work 
at $12 per month. He afterward sold his 
steers for $45 in gold, and this amount, to- 
gether with a year's wages, afforded him a 
start in life. Going to Stevens Point he 
bought forty acres of timber land for $50, 
and subsequently sold it for double that 
price. With his $100 he then bought eighty 
acres of timber land. 

Mr. Fenske was married April 5, 1856, 
to Louise Kruger, a native of the same place 
where he was born, daughter of John G. and 
Willimena Augusta (Dotzauer) Kruger, the 



200 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



date of her birth being 1835. Her father 
died in 1839, and her mother afterward be- 
came the wife of John Henning. B}- the 
first marriage there were two daughters, — 
Mrs. Fenske, and Rosa, wife of Adam 
Friday, of this county. By the second 
marriage there was one child, Carrie, wife 
of John Friday, of Wisconsin. In March, 
1843, three years after her marriage to Mr. 
Henning, the mother died. Mr. Henning 
afterward married her sister, with whom 
Mrs. Fenske hved and with whom, in 1852, 
she came to America. They were fifty-six 
days in making the voyage from Hamburg 
to New York, landing in the latter city Sep- 
tember 2d. From New York they came to 
Milwaukee, and soon afterward located in 
the town of Crystal Lake. There Mrs. 
Fenske worked in a country tavern, at fifty 
cents per week, until her marriage. 

After their marriage Mr. Fenske and his 
wife settled down near Green Lake, where 
for nine months he worked for a farmer, re- 
ceiving $17 per month wages and the use of 
a log house in which to live, Mrs. Fenske 
doing her part by boarding the farm hands. 
He next effected the purchase of a yoke of 
oxen, and cultivated the farm of Harrison 
Applebee, — this being in the year 1857. 
The next year he worked the farm of Daniel 
Stoples on shares. He then sold his eighty 
acres of land for $200, and bought forty 
acres within one mile of Manchester, Wis- 
consin, paying $350 for the same and taking 
up his residence thereon January 16, 1859. 
He there made his home until September, 
1866, when he sold it for $950. At that 
time he bought two horses and a covered 
wagon and started for Faribault county, 
Minnesota, reaching his destination October 
8th. Here he purchased 1 12 acres of land, 
on which was a log house, 9X ii feet, the 



purchase price being $1,150, and here he 
made his home for seven years. Then he 
sold out for $1,600 and purchased 160 acres 
of partially improved land, for $1, lOO. This 
farm he still owns and occupies. He has 
six acres in grove, has his land all fenced, 
and his farm buildings are among the best 
in the township. In addition to his home 
place he owns eighty acres in Rome town- 
ship. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fenske are the parents of 
eleven children, namely: Mary, wife of 
William Oelke; Louise, wife of Gustavus 
Schneider; Albert; Sarah, wife of Rudolph 
Gartze; William F. ; Emma Amelia, who 
died in infancy; Lydia, wife of Fred G. 
Livenick; Lillie, wife of John F. Zupp; Eva 
May, wife of Paul Meyer, of Elmore; Joseph 
S. ; Andrew M. ; and Edward J. 

Mr. Fenske has held the office of Super- 
visor for many years, and has served as Jus- 
tice of the Peace and Constable. He and 
his wife are members of the Evangelical As- 
sociation, in which he has been a Trustee 
for twenty-one years and for many j-ears 
served as Class-leader. He may be truly 
classed with the self-made men of the coun- 
ty. By his own honest industry and good 
management, assisted and encouraged by his 
worthy companion, he has accumulated a 
nice propertj^ and is surrounded with all the 
comforts of life. 



OP. FOSS, a venerable citizen of 
\'erona township, Faribault county, 
Minnesota, has been identified with 
this county since 1866. A sketch 
of his life will be found of interest to many, 
and is as follows: 

Mr. Foss comes of an old and highly re- 
spected New England family. His grand- 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



father, Ebcn Foss, was born in Massachu- 
setts, and was a soldier for seven years in 
the Revohitionary war, the most of that 
time servinp; under General Washington. His 
son John H., the father of O. P., fought in 
the war of 1812. John H. Foss married 
Edith Chase, who, like himself, was a native 
of New Hampshire, and they became the 
parents of twelve children, six sons and six 
daughters: James, O. P., Jacob, William, 
John, Wellington, Caroline, Louisa, Judith, 
Ann, Sarah (who died in iidanc}) and Sarah 
(2d). The mother died at the age of sixty 
years and the father lived to be eighty. He 
was by trade a blacksmith, was in politics a 
Jacksonian Democrat, and in religion was a 
believer in universal salvation. 

O. P. Foss was born at Compton, New 
Hampshire, April 2, 1817, and was reared 
on a farm. In his father's shop he learned 
the trade of blacksmith, and in early life 
became a proficient mechanic. In 1S49 he 
came West, through Chicago, and on to 
W^atertown, Jefferson county, Wisconsin, 
Chicago at that time being a small town and 
with little promise of ever becoming the 
magnificent city it is to-day. He was one 
of the pioneers of Watertown, and there for 
ten years carried on the blacksmith and car- 
riage business. At the end of that time he 
sold out and engaged in farming in Dane 
county, Wisconsin, where he remained until 
1866. In 1866 he disposed of his Wiscon- 
sin property and came to Faribault county, 
Minnesota, at first settling near \Vinnebago 
City, and from that place coming, in 1877, 
to his present location. Here he bought 
170 acres of land of a Mr. Williams, and on 
it has resided since and given his attention to 
agricultural pursuits. His farm has a com- 
fi)ital)le cottage home, other good buildings, 
modern windmill, and three acres in grove. 



At the age of twenty-two Mr. Foss was 
married to Miss Arvilla M. Bruce, a native 
of Vermont and a daughter of Dana and 
Marcia (Royce) Bruce. They became the 
parents of two sons, Ahnon E. , a newspaper 
man of Winnebago City, and Herman A., 
who resides on the home farm. Mrs. Foss 
was a loving mother and devoted wife and 
in every respect a most estimable woman. 
She departed this life in 1891, at the age of 
seventy-three years, after having shared the 
joys and sorrows of life with Mr. Foss for 
over fifty years 

Mr. Foss has been a supporter of the 
Republican party since it was organized. 
Years ago, when a young man in the East, 
he was a member of the militia and received 
a Captain's commission from Governor Hill 
of New Hampshire. During the whole of 
his life he has kept himself well informed on 
the topics of the day, is a man of generous 
impulses and genial manner, and has always 
made many friends wherever his lot has been 
cast. 




UFFIEL TIBADEAUX, Delavan, 

Minnesota, has been identified 
with the interests of Faribault 
county for thirty years, and it is ap- 
propriate that some personal mention be 
made of him in this work. A rcsniiic of his 
life is as follows: 

Tuffiel Tibadeaux was born in Canada, 
June 15, 1845, son of Oliver and Mary Lou- 
isa (Seor) Tibadeaux, both natives of Can- 
ada, the former of French descent. In 1850 
the Tibadeaux family located in Fond du 
Lac county, Wisconsin, where the mother 
died at the age of thirty-live years. The 
father came to Faribault county, Minnesota, 
in 1867, and here remained until his death, 



203 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



in 1885, at the age of seventy-three years. 
He was a farmer by occupation, in politics 
was a Democrat, and in rehgion both he 
and his wife were Cathohcs. He was a sol- 
dier in the patriot war in Canada. Their 
family was composed of five children, 
mamely: Philemon, Tuffiel, Isadora, Rosa 
and Joseph. 

The subject of our sketch spent the first 
si.xteen years of his life on a farm. He then 
worked some time in the timber regions, 
making a full hand, and afterward was em- 
ployed as packer for a surveying party, 
carrying a pack of 100 pounds on his back, 
and camping out in the snow. This was in 
1862, and he went with the party to the ore 
mines, after which, in 1863, he resumed 
work in the woods. September 5, 1864, "he 
enlisted in Company A, Second Wisconsin 
Cavalry, and was with his regiment until 
the close of the war, participating in a num- 
ber of prominent engagements. While near 
Jackson, Mississippi, he had an attack of 
pneumonia, and upon his recovery he came, 
in September, 1865, to his home in the 
North. That same fall he made the trip 
with horses and a wagon to Minnesota. 
Upon his arrival in Faribault county he 
took a homestead claim on section 25, in 
Prescott township, and on it he built a 
house, 14 .\ 16 feet, of elm and boxwood 
lumber, and out of straw he improvised a 
stable for his horses. Here he went to work 
in earnest, and by honest industry and per- 
severance he has attained a success of which 
he may justly be proud. He is now the 
owner of three good farms, including a total 
of 650 acres of fine land, well improved 
with good buildings, etc. Since 1891 he has 
resided on his present farm of 160 acres, lo- 
cated a mile and a half south of Delavan. 
Here he has a nice two-story residence, 



good barn, windmill, grove, and everything 
conveniently arranged, and here he and his 
family are surrounded with all the comforts 
of life. 

Mr. Tibadeaux was married September 
5, 1865, to Miss Rosa D. Guj-ette, a native 
of Canada, and a daughter of Joseph and 
Madaline (La Valley) Guyette, of Canada. 
This happy union resulted in the birth of 
eleven children, ten of whom are living, viz.: 
Ellen, Solomon, Tuffiel, Louise, Rosa D., 
Joseph C, Lovina, Maggie E., Madaline M., 
Nora, and Michael. The mother of this 
family died May 15, 1881, and September 
23, 1883, Mr. Tibadeaux married his pres- 
ent companion. Her maiden name was 
Edwige Better and she was born in Franklin 
county. New York. Her parents, Peter and 
Mary (Sampson) Better, died in Fond du 
Lac county, Wisconsin, each at the age of 
seventy-three years. Mr. Tibadeaux and 
his present wife have five children — Israel 
E., Eva Agnes, Anna Belle, Florence E. , 
and Blanche Malissa 

Politically, Mr. Tibadeaux is a Repub- 
lican, and has served as Supervisor and a 
member of the School Board. He is a 
member of the G. A. R. His frank and 
genial nature together with his many ster- 
ling traits of character have won for him a 
larire circle of friends. 



eDWARD JONES, retired, Winne- 
bago City, Minnesota, was a pio- 
neer of Martin county. He is a 
native of England, born near Man- 
chester, August 28, 1835, ^"" of Charles 
and Jane (Fielding) Jones, both natives of 
England. About 1S41 they emigrated with 
their family of fi\c children to America, and 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



207 



settled six miles west of Racine, Wisconsin, 
where the father gave his attention to agri- 
cultural pursuits. Six years later he re- 
moved to Oshkosh, or near there, where he 
resided until his death, his wife having died 
at Racine. They had si.\ children born in 
this country, making eleven in all, seven of 
whom are still living. 

Edward Jones grew to manhood on his 
father's farm, receiving only a limited edu- 
cation in the common schools. After at- 
taining his majority he was for two years 
engaged in the lumber business. Septem- 
ber 18, 1 86 1, he enlisted in Company K, 
Eleventh Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, for 
a term of three years or during the war. At 
the end of the three years he was detailed 
to guard rebel prisoners at New Orleans and 
go with them to Fort La Fayetle, New 
York, which duty he faithfully performed. 
He was honorably discharged at Madison, 
Wisconsin, in January, 1865. 

September 29, 1 866, at Winchester, 
Wisconsin, he married Miss Ellen M. John- 
son, a native of that place, and after his 
marriage at once came to Minnesota. Upon 
his arrival here he took a homestead claim 
on section 22, Nashville township, Martin 
county, and upon it built a log house and 
began married life in true pioneer style. He 
itnproved his farm and made his home upon 
it until the fall of 1894, when he retired and 
moved to Winnebago City, leaving the old 
homestead in charge of his son. As a farmer, 
Mr. Jones was very successful. To his 
original claim he added another 160 acres 
adjoining it, the whole making one of the 
finest farms in the vicinity. In the early 
days of his settlement in Martin county he 
endured many hardships and privations, but 
by industry, perseverance and careful econ- 
omy he overcame every obstacle, and is to- 



i 



day enjoying the fruits of his early years of 
toil. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jones have si.x children 
living, namely: Lena, wife of Frederick 
Lathrop, a farmer of Faribault county; 
Edith, wife of William Bottomly, a farmer 
of Nashville, Martin county; Clifford, on the 
home farm; Sanford and Manford, twins; 
■and Ethel, at home. Their first born, Jus- 
tin, died at the age of five years. 

Mr. Jones is a Republican in politics, 
and has served in most of the township 
offices. He is a member of James Clabaugh 
Post, No. 54, G. A. R., at Winnebago City. 



«-|-» EWIS FELCH TRUE, a lead- 
I i ing and influential farmer located 
^^^j^ on section 5, Center Creek town- 
ship, is numbered among Martin 
county's honored pioneers. He has lived 
within the borders of this county for more 
than a third of a century and has witnessed 
its development from the days of its early 
infancy. He has seen its wild lands trans- 
formed into beautiful homes and farms, its 
hamlets grow into thriving towns and vil- 
lages, has seen the introduction of the tele- 
graph and railroad, and the hillsides and 
plains dotted with churches and schools, in- 
dicating an advanced civilisation. In the 
work of public improvement he has ever 
borne his part, and on the annals of Martin 
county's history his name should occupy an 
honored place. 

Mr. True was born in Belknap county. 
New Hampshire, April 2, 1836, and is of 
English descent on the paternal side and of 
German lineage on the maternal side. His 
grandfather True was born in the old Granite 
State, as was tlic father of our subject, 
Simeon S. True, whose birth occurred April 



2oS 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



i6, 1802. He made fanning his life occu- 
pation, and in the state of his nativity he 
married Lucy Sturtevant, who was born in 
New Hampshire, August 26, 1802. Her 
father was born in Germany, and became 
the founder of his family in America. Mr. 
and Mrs. True located on a farm near the 
homes of their childhood and there spent 
the remainder of their lives, the father pass- 
ing away January i i, 1S45, and the mother 
in 1889. Their family numbered ten chil- 
dren, nine of whom reached adult age, 
while six are yet living, as follows: John 
N. and David M. are still living in New 
Hampshire; George W. is deceased; Hosea 
S. resides in Martin county, Minnesota; 
Juliett is also deceased; Sarah J. is now 
Mrs. Carr of New Hampshire; Lewis F. is 
the next younger; Charles O. is located in 
Martin county; Gillman S. has also passed 
away, as has Wesley, the youngest of the 
family. 

L. F. True was reared in the county of 
his birth and his early education, obtained 
in the district schools of the neighborhood, 
was supplemented by one term's attendance 
at the high school. \\'hen eighteen years of 
age he started out to make his own way in 
the world, going to Manchester, New Hamp- 
shire, where he learned the machinist's trade, 
working for two years and eight months, 
when, on account of failing health, he was 
obliged to leave the shop and seek an occu- 
pation less confining, ^^'hile in that city, 
on the 4th of March, 1854, he married Miss 
Clara H. Gould, who was born in the State's 
prison in Concord, New Hampshire, her 
father being at that time Warden in the 
prison. When she was about twelve years 
of age her mother died, and she went to 
live \\itli her uncle, Amos Pillsbury, a war- 
den in the .Mbany penitentiary, and during 



the next three years she was in that penal 
institution, after which she returned to Con- 
cord. 

After two years of married life in the 
East Mr. True brought his wife to Minne- 
sota, going first to Mankato, but after a few 
days passed there he removed to \''ernon 
Center, Blue Earth county, where he made 
a claim of 160 acres. After cultivating that 
for two years he sold out and came to Mar- 
tin county among its first settlers. Secur- 
ing a farm in Westford township he con- 
ducted it for a short time, but found that it 
was school land and then obtained a home- 
stead claim, constituting the farm on which 
he now lives. He built a small dwelling, 
12x16 feet, and during its construction he 
was drafted into the army. Going to 
Rochester he paid $300 to secure a release, 
but afterward, when his affairs would per- 
mit him, he joined Company H, Eleventh 
Minnesota Volunteer Infantry. This was in 
1864, and he served until iifter the cessation 
of hostilities, when he was honorably dis- 
charged and returned to his home. 

Mr. True has since devoted his time and 
attention to his farm and has become 
the owner of a valuable tract of 320 acres. 
On this is a fifteen-acre grove of his own 
planting, and its leafy banners arc evidence 
of his progressive spirit. Many other good 
improvements have been made on the place, 
which add to its value and attractive appear- 
ance, and the home of this worth)- pioneer is 
one of the best farms of his adopted county. 

Around the fireside once gathered an in- 
teresting group of ten children, but several 
have now left the parental roof for homes 
of their own. The eldest. Lord Byron, is 
living in Center Creek township, Martin 
county; Gillman S. is deceased; Ida May is 
the wife of E. M. Bohall, of Washington; 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



209 



Minnie L. is the wife of Paul Anthonj-, of 
Rutland township, Martin county; the next 
two children died in infancy; Edward L. is 
living in Center Creek township; Wesley 
S., Jessie B. and Julia are still with their 
parents. 

Mr. True has long supported the De- 
mocracy and was one of the first County 
Commissioners of Martin County, serving 
in that capacity for about four years. He 
was Postmaster of Waverly post office, was 
for four years Assessor, two years Justice of 
the Peace, also served as Constable and was 
Clerk of the School Board for the long 
period of twenty- one years. His public 
and private life are alike above reproach 
and his prompt and faithful discharge of his 
official duties won him high connnendation. 
In his social relations he is a Mason, belong- 
ing to Chain Lake Lodge, No. 64, A. F. & 
A. M., and the Chapter of Fairmont, and is 
also a member of Phil Kearny Post, G. A. 
R., of Fairmont. 



>^OHN HENRY SMITH, an honored 
m pioneer settler and an enterprising 
A 1 and progressive farmer of Nashville 
township, Martin county, resid- 
ing on section 3, was born in Steuben 
county. New York, on the 2d of De- 
cember, 1836. His father, R. B. Smith, 
was also born in the Empire State 
and came of Holland Dutch ancestors 
who settled in America at an early day in 
the history of the country. He married 
Elizabeth Swartout, who was born in this 
country, but her father was a native of 
Scotland and her mother belonged to a 
Holland Dutch family. The parents were 
married in New York and there located on a 
farm which they made their home until i 838, 



i when they emigrated westward. After re- 
; siding in Michigan for a time they removed 
to Illinois, and in the year 1849 came to 
Wisconsin, which only the previous year 
had been admitted to the Union. They lo- 
cated in Marquette county, making their 
home within its borders until i860, which 
year witnessed their removal to Brown 
county, Minnesota. Their next place of 
abode was Rochester, Minnesota, and sub- 
sequently went to Amboy, this State, where 
they still reside. In the family were four 
children, three sons and a daughter, all of 
whom are living and married, no death 
ever having occurred in the family. The 
eldest is J. H., of this sketch; Alvira is the 
wife of E. G. Cross, and they ha\e three 
children who are married and have families. 
Loren wedded Ella Bornt and has one child; 
and Loami married Clara Rouse, by whom 
he has two children. 

Under the parental roof, J. H. Smith 
remained until eighteen years of age, when 
his father gave him his time and he started 
out in life for himself. From early youth 
he aided in the labors of the field, and was 
familiar with all the duties of farm life, and 
during the greater part of his business career 
he has carried on agricultural pursuits. He 
accompanied his parents on their removal 
to Michigan, Illinois and the Badger State, 
and in Wisconsin was married, December 
27, 1857, to Miss Candis Amelia Clark, a 
native of New York. Two children came 
to grace their home and brighten their pio- 
neer abode. The elder, Frances, is now 
the wife of Frank Clay and has three chil- 
dren, Elna, Chester and Jessie. Loren 
Adclbert married Dclila Hall, and their 
children are Lura and Harrold. 

Mr. and Mrs. Smith began their ilomes- 
tic life upon a farm in Wisconsin and con- 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



tinned their residence in that State until 
i860, when they removed to Brown county, 
Minnesota. The following year they went 
to Rochester, and in 1863 our subject be- 
came a farmer of Nashville township, Mar- 
tin county. He secured from the Govern- 
ment a tract of wild land, one of the first 
claims made in the township. The county 
was but sparsely settled, and seemed just 
opening up to civilization. There were only 
eleven voters in the north part of the county, 
the greater part of the land had never been 
placed under the plow, many of the now 
thriving towns and villages had not yet 
sprung into existence and the county was 
waiting for the developing powers and or- 
ganizing forces of such men as our subject. 
He has ever borne his part in the upbuild- 
ing of this region and has done much for 
its advancement and progress. Mr. 
Smith built upon his farm a shanty 
made with poles driven into the ground and 
covered with boards. He has always lived 
upon his farm with the exception of about 
five years spent in Amboy engaged in mer- 
cantile business. As the years passed, wild 
land was transformed into beautiful homes 
and farms and pioneer improvements were 
replaced by substantial buildings in keeping 
with the improvements of a model farm. 

In 1864 Mr. Smith enlisted in Company 
D, First Minnesota Heavy Artillery, as a 
private, and served until the South had laid 
down its arms and peace was once more re- 
stored. He was always found faithful to 
the old flag and the cause it represented, 
and when the war was over he was honor- 
ably discharged, in 1865. When the I\epub- 
lican party was formed to prevent the further 
extension of slavery he joined its ranks and 
has since fought under its banner. He was 
serving as a member of the Town Board of 



Supervisors when the township was organ- 
ized, and at the time of his enlistment in 
the army. He also served as Justice of the 
Peace while in Amboy for both the town- 
ship and city. He took part in the organi- 
zation of Nashville township and has ever 
been active in advancing the best interests of 
town, count}- and State. He has been a 
member of the Grange and a most promi- 
nent and consistent member of the Freewill 
Baptist Church. He aided in the establish- 
ment of the church, was instrumental in 
securing the house of worship and had the 
honor of laying its corner-stone. From the 
organization of the society he has served as 
Deacon, and in the Master's vineyard he has 
been an earnest laborer. His Christianity 
is of that practical kind that recognizes the 
brotherhood of mankind, and has a broad 
charity and warm sympathy for his fellow 
men. He was also at one time church Trus- 
tee. The life of Mr. Smith has been well 
spent and has won him the respect and con- 
fidence of all. He has also gained, through 
straightforward, honorable effort, a hand- 
some competence which now enables him to 
lay aside all business cares and live retired 
in the enjoyment of a well earned rest. 



>T^OHN DICKERSON DRAKE, a farm- 
m er of section 32, Center Creek town- 
A 1 ship, was born in Indiana, December 
7, 1852, a son of Kelley and Sarah 
(Ashby) Drake. The mother is supposed to 
have been born in Indiana. The father 
died when our subject was four years old. 
They were the parents of four children — 
Jane, wife of J. P. Vantlike, of Iowa; James 
W., also of that State; John I)., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; and Elizabeth, deceased. 
J. D. Drake, the youngest son and third 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



211 



child, was taken by his parents to Benton 
county, Iowa, at the age of nine months, 
where he was reared to farm life and at- 
tended the district schools, also spending 
one winter in the Irving School. At the 
age of fifteen years he began life on his own 
account, coming to Martin county, Minne- 
sota, where he worked at farm labor for a 
year and a half, returned to Benton county, 
in 1876 located on a rented farm in Fair- 
mont township, Martin county, remaining 
there six years, spent one year in Faribault 
county, and in 1882 bought the place where 
he now resides, consisting of 320 acres, all 
under a fine state of cultivation. Mr. Drake 
assisted in the organization, and is presi- 
dent, of the Center Creek Creamery Associa- 
tion. He is identified with the Republican 
party, and has served five years as chairman 
of the Board of Supervisors, and for a time 
was a member of the School Board. 

Mr. Drake was married in 1875 to Lil- 
lian Hodgman, born in Onondaga county, 
New York, August 30, 1858, a daughter of 
A. J. and Louisa (Walrath) Hodgman. She 
was brought by her parents to Martin coun- 
ty when quite young. Our subject and wife 
have four children — Alta, Millie, Alvin and 
Nettie. One son, Amason K., died at the 
age of twelve years. 




• HOMAS W. JENNESS, who re- 
sides on a farm in section 17, Win- 
nebago City township, is one of the 
first actual settlers of Faiibault 
county, the date of his arrival here being 
1856. 

Mr. Jenness is a native of Deerfield, 
Rockingham county, New Hampshire, born 
November 25, 1823, son of Joseph and Sal- 



lie (Pearson) Jenness, both of English de- 
scent. Joseph Jenness was a farmer and 
spent his entire life in the Granite State. 
Thomas W. was reared on the farm and ed- 
ucated in the common schools, his early ed- 
ucation being largely supplemented by home 
reading and study. He remained with his 
parents until he attained his majority, when 
he accepted a position as clerk in a general 
store at Manchester, New Hampshire, con- 
tinuing there about a year, and for a short 
time . engaged in business on his own ac- 
count, being occupied in mercantile pursuits 
until 1855, when he came west to Story 
count)', Iowa. In 1856 he landed in Fari- 
bault county, Minnesota, and homesteaded 
160 acres of land in section 35, Winnebago 
City township. Upon a part of this land 
the village of Winnebago City has been built. 
He subsequently sold out to J. C. Easton, 
and bought land on sections twenty-one and 
twenty-two, but later sold that property and 
bought his present farm of iGo acres in sec- 
tion 17. Here he has built a good house 
and barn, and, indeed, all the improvements 
upon this place have been put here by him, 
and in his farming operations he is making 
a success. 

In 1864 Mr. Jenness enlisted in Com- 
pany L, Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, 
and from August 18 until the close of the 
war was on active duty. He is a man who 
is well posted on the general topics of the 
day, is Republican in his political views, 
and favors all movements for the promotion 
of the best interests of the community. He 
has never sought for official honors, and the 
only office of any kind he ever held was that 
of Treasurer of his school district. Person- 
ally, he is frank and genial, and is an in- 
telligent and interesting conversationalist. 
He is unmarried. 



212 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



at 



'ILLIAM KDWAKD LEPIXE, a 
farmer of section ii, Rolling 
Green township, is a son of John 
and Elizabeth (Pitman) Lepine, 
natives of England, where they spent their 
entire lives. The father was a cabinetmaker 
by trade. W. E., the eleventh of thirteen 
children, seven sons and six daughters, was 
born on the ocean on the journey from Lon- 
don to Sydney, June 9, 1822. He was 
raised in England, and when six years of 
age was sent to a boarding school, where he 
remained for about a year. He went to sea 
as cabin boy on the ship "Robinson," 
bound for Quebec and Montreal, having 
made two trips during that year. In the 
following year he went from Greenock to 
New York city. He was about fifteen years 
of age. Leaving that ship, our subject went 
to Montreal, where he learned and followed 
butchering for a few years. Two years af- 
terward he went to New York, returned to 
Canada for two years, and later crossed the 
Rocky mountains with Sir George Simpson \ 
to Vancouver, remaining there two and a 
half years. Mr. Lepine was next employed 
on the steamship Beaver, which was en- 
gaged in the fur trade between Vancouver 
and Victoria island, and along the north- 
western coast, and was made second engi- 
neer of the ship. He then followed the 
butcher's trade in Montreal and I^altimore 
until 1858, from that time until 1875 resided 
in Ciiicago, and then located on the farm he 
now owns in Martin county, Minnesota. 
He now owns 280 acres of well improved 
land. 

In I 866 Mr. Lepine was united in mar- 
riage with Addie Wilson, a native of Iowa, 
of Danish parents. They have had three 
children, two now living: Elizabeth, wife of 
Dr. James IJird, of St. James, Minnesota; 



and William, at home. Mr. Lepine sup- 
ports the Republican party, and has served 
as Director of school district No. 35 for six 
years. Socially, he is a member of the 
I. O. O. F. 



,>^()BERT VEITCH HES- 
1/^ SELGRAVE, a retired farmer 
\ _ P of Winnebago City, was born in 
Potsdam, St. Lawrence county, 
New York, September 10, 1834, a son of 
William and Elizabeth (\'eitch) Hesselgrave. 
His father was a native of Yorkshire, En- 
gland, and the mother of Scotland, both 
coming to America when young, and were 
married in New York, where Mr. Hessel- 
grave followed farming the remainder of his 
life. 

Robert V. remained on the home farm 
until fifteen years of age, receiving his edu- 
cation in the district schools. He then en- 
tered the office of the Potsdam Courier, and 
served a three-years apprenticeship at the 
printer's trade. At the expiration of that 
time he came West to Chicago, and was for 
two years employed in the office of the 
Tribune, after which he went to St. Paul, 
Minnesota, and worked at his trade in the 
Pioneer Press office for two years. Subse- 
quently he went to Henderson, Sibley coun- 
ty, Minnesota, and was for a few years in 
the employ of Joe Brown, in the office of 
the Henderson Democrat. 

About 1859 Mr. Hesselgrave determined 
to turn his attention to agricultural pursuits, 
and he pre-empted a quarter section of land 
in the town of Arlington, Sibley county, 
which he immediately began improving and 
cultivating, making it in time a fine farm, 
and that place was his home for about four- 
teen years. In Fcliniary, 1865, he was ap- 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



213 



pointed to the position of Second Lieuten- 
ant in Company M, First Regiment Minne- 
sota Heavy Artillery, continuing in service 
until honorably discharged in November of 
that year. After his return from the army 
he resumed his farming operations, which 
he successfully carried on until 1873, when 
he sold out and mo\ed to St. Paul, again 
taking up his trade, and the succeeding four 
years were spent in the office of the Pioneer 
Press. In 1877 Mr. Hesselgrave purchased 
360 acres of land in sections 21 and 22, 
Verona township, Faribault county, and con- 
tinued that occupation until November, 
1894, when he left the farm in charge of his 
son and moved to Winnebago City, where 
he is now living a retired life, enjoying the 
fruits of former toil. 

Mr. Hesselgrave is a man of enterprise 
and more than ordinary intelligence, is a 
great reader, and keeps himself well in- 
formed on the topics of the times. He be- 
came a voter about the time the Republican 
party was organized, and has ever since 
supported the men and measures of that 
party. He has held most of the local town 
offices, and was for some years County 
Commissioner in Sibley county. He is a 
member of the A. O. U. W. , the I. O. O. 
1"., and James Clabaugh Post, No. 54, G. 
A. R., of which he was one of the charter 
members. 

October 3, 1858, our subject was united 
in marriage with Miss Amanda, daughter of 
Abraham and Louisa (Smith) Livingston. 
Mr. Livingston was of Scotch descent and 
was born on one of the Thousand Islands in 
the St. Lawrence river, and Mrs. Livings- 
ton was born in Franklin county, New York, 
of English ancestry. Mr. and Mrs. Hessel- 
grave have five daughters and two sons, 
namely: Ella E., wife of J. H. Sawyer, 



of St. Paul; Emma H., now Mrs. William 
A. Nichols of Everett, Washington; Frances 
M., wife of C. C. Ives, of Blue Earth City; 
William E., who married Miss Ina Hall, 
and resides on the home farm ; Carrie T. , 
wife of H. L. Bullis, of Winnebago City; 
Sherman S., a practicing physician of St. 
Paul; and Minnie V., at home. 



HLFRED TILTON FRENCH, a 
farmer of section 36, Waverly 
township, Martin county, is a son 
of Columbia and Mary Ann (Tilton) 
French, natives respectively of Canada and 
New York. They were married in Ohio, 
and afterward located in Chatfield, Fillmore 
county, Minnesota, where the father fol- 
lowed the carpenter's trade. They next re- 
moved to Spring Valley, that county, sub- 
sequently went to Dakota, and then came 
to Martin county, Minnesota, where the 
father died in iSgi. The mother departed 
this life in 1864. They were the parents 
of nine children, four now living, — Ade- 
line, Frank and Sarah, in Oregon; and the 
subject of this sketch. Two of the sons, 
William and Charles, were soldiers in the 
late war, the former having died in service, 
and the latter was killed by Indians near 
Ft. Ridgely. The father also was a soldier 
in the late war, a member of the Minnesota 
\'olunteers. 

Alfred T. French, the subject of this 
sketch, was born at Chatfield, Minnesota, 
March 30, 1858. He came to Martin county 
in 1879, locating on his present farm of 520 
acres, 1 50 acres of which is under a fine 
state of cultivation. He is engaged in gen- 
eral farming and stock-raising, owning 500 
head of fine wool sheep, 30 head of cattle, 
16 horses and 40 head of hogs. Politically, 



214 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Mr. French acts with the Kepubhcan party, 
and has served as Township Assessor five 
years, as Constable of Waverly, and as 
Clerk of the school district No. io6. So- 
cially, he is a member of the A. O. U. W. 
In 1882 Mr. French was united in mar- 
riage with Mary Hackney, born in Canada 
in 1863, a daughter of William Hackney, 
now of St. James, Minnesota. To this 
union have been born four children, — Charles 
C, Nellie May, Leslie Sylvester and Elmer. 
Mr. French is a Deacon in the Congrega- 
tional Church, and has also served as Super- 
intendent of the Sunday-school. 



aECIL SHARPE, cashier of the 
Merchants and Farmers' Bank, of 
Fairmont, Martin county, Minne- 
sota, is a native of Colsterworth, 
Lincolnshire, England, born October 4, 1850. 
His father. Rev. Robert Matthew Sharpe, 
was born in Kingston, Jamaica, June 4, 1816; 
and his mother, ncc Emily Pratt, at Paston, 
Northamptonshire, England, October 14, 
181 5. The latter was a descendant of very 
old and somewhat distinguished English 
families, her genealogy being traced back 
through a long line of ancestors to Simon 
Cowper, who was born in 13 10 and was for 
a time sheriff of London. Robert Cowper 
was prominent during the reign of Henry 
v., and John Cowper during that of Henry 
V'l. William Cowper, who was clerk of the 
English parliament in 1740, was uncle to 
William Cowper, the poet, who was born in 
1 73 1. Major Cowper, son of William and 
cousin to the poet, married Maria, daughter 
of Colonel Martin Madan, M. P., and their 
daughter, Frances Cecelia, became the wife 
of Rev. Joseph Stephen Pratt, vicar of 
Peterborough and prebendary. Their son. 



Rev. Joseph Pratt, who was born July 29, 
1784, was rector of Paston for upwards of 
fifty years, and the father of Emily Pratt, 
the mother of the gentleman whose name 
initiates this review. 

Rev. Robert M. Sharpe and Emily Pratt 
were married in 1842, at Paston, while he 
was curate at Hathern, whence he removed 
to Colsterworth and took charge of that 
parish. From 1862 until 1865 he had a 
parish in London, and at the time of his 
death, which occurred April 16, 1886, he 
was vicar of Anslow, Staffordshire. His 
good wife survived him a few years, dying 
in November, 1893. They were the parents 
of five children, all of whom reached ma- 
turity, namely: Frederick Robert, who has 
held an official position in the India office, 
London, England, for the past thirty years, 
married Marian Rowell, and they have one 
child, Beatrice; Constance Emily and her 
husband, Captain \\'. H. Cockell, are both 
deceased, and left one child, Constance; 
Georgiana Marian, wife of Dr. Poyntz 
Wright, of Saint Neots, England, has four 
children, — Ethel, Hubert, Muriel and Eric; 
Granville, who married Alice Marian Hooper, 
has one child, Granville Cecil, is a resident 
of Ware, England; and Cecil, who is the 
immediate subject of this sketch. 

Cecil Sharpe attended school in London 
until he was thirteen years of age, and from 
that time forward for eight years was em- 
ployed in a bonded warehouse in London. 
He then returned home and gave his atten- 
tion to farming. In 1874 he came to Amer- 
ica, direct to Fairmont, Minnesota, in com- 
pany with three others, — the four being the 
first Englishmen to locate in this vicinity. 
At this writing Mr. Sharpe is the only one of 
the number who retains a residence here. 
He located on a tract of wild prairie land, 




^fH 



'Mr/J. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



217 



six miles south of Fairmont, and as soon as 
possible had the soil broken. That win- 
ter he returned to England, where he re- 
mained until the following spring, when he 
once more retraced his way to Minnesota 
and on his land put in a»crop, utilizing for 
the same 400 acres. Here misfortune over- 
took him, his entire crop being swept away 
by the grasshoppers, leaving nothing in their 
train but devastation and denuded fields. 
After this experience our subject devoted his 
attention for some time to chopping wood 
in the timber districts and other pursuits. 
Returning finally to Fairmont, in February, 
1876, he located land for some of his coun- 
trjTnen, and personally gave his attention to 
building. From 18S0 until 1882 he dealt in 
farming machinery and implements, and in 
this venture was unsuccessful. He was not 
discouraged, however, but went to work 
with a will, and gave his attention to build- 
ing operations until 1886, in which 3'ear he 
was offered and accepted the position as 
cashier of the Merchants and Farmers' 
Bank, which incumbency he has since filled 
most efficiently. Since 1874 he has made 
three visits to England. 

Mr. Sharpe was married in 1880 to 
Catherine Agnes Wollaston, who was born 
at Saint Catherines, Ontario, Canada, July 
31, 1850, eldest daughter of Percy Wollas- 
ton. They have five children: Emily 
Catherine, Cecil Granville, Constance Irene, 
Marian Victoria, and Agnes Dorothy. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Sharpe are members 
and communicants of the Episcopal Church 
at Fairmont. Our subject has been Treas- 
urer of the church since 1880, and is now fill- 
ing also the office of Jimior Warden. He is 
a member of the blue lodge and chapter, 
Free and Accepted Masons, being Treasurer 

of the latter; and he is also identified with 
11 



the Modern Woodmen of .America. He is 
serving his second term as Treasurer of the 
municipality of Fairmont. 

Such, in brief, is a review of the life 
history of one of the most worthy and most 
highly respected citizens of Martin county. 



a HANDLER C. BRIGGS, who 
carries on general farming on sec- 
tion 23, Jo Daviess township, Fari- 
bault county, was born in the town 
of Concord, Erie county, New York, on the 
20th of July, 1830, and is the youngest in a 
family of eleven children, whose parents 
were Ephraim Allen and Sallie (Townsend) 
Briggs. The grandfather of our subject, 
Captain Samuel Briggs, was born in Taun- 
ton, Massachusetts, before the Revolution- 
ary war. He was a seafaring man and for 
many years sailed on a New Bedford whal- 
ing vessel, of which he was Captain. He 
was very successful in his chosen line of 
work and was a man highly respected by all 
who knew him. He was accidentally killed 
in middle life, leaving a wife who long sur- 
vived him, her death occurring at the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-five years. She bore 
the maiden name of Ruth Paul. 

Ephraim A. Briggs, the father of our 
subject, was born in the historic old town of 
Taunton, Massachusetts, on the loth of 
March, 1783, and lived in his native State 
until after the war of 1812. While there 
he was married, in 1808, to Miss Sallie 
Townsend, who was born in Franklin 
county, Massachusetts, on the ist of June, 
1785, a daughter of Jonathan Townsend, of 
that State. Mr. P>riggs was a farmer by 
occupation, and in middle life removed to 
I New York, settling in the town of Concord, 
where, for man_\' j-ears, he kept a ta\ern. 



2l8 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



His old brick tavern was for a long period a 
landmark in that locality and its f^'enial pro- 
prietor was known far and near. He lived 
to a ripe old age and at length passed peace- 
fully away. In the family of Ephraim and 
and Sallie Briggs were the following children : 
Mary, who was born May, 9, 1808, and 
died in March, 1846; Ephraim, who was 
born January 8, 1810, and died September 
II, 1847; Sylvia, who was born August 5, 
181 1, and died August 26, 1886; Thomas 
M., who was born March 23, 1813, and 
died February 11, 1890; Jonathan, who 
was born February 12, 181 5, and is now 
living in Wisconsin; Erasmus, who was born 
August I, 1 818, and died January 4, 1892; 
Suel, who was born April 7, 1821, and died 
October 24, 1893; Sallie, who was born 
March 7, 1823, and now makes her home 
in Janesville, Minnesota; Cinderella, who 
was born October 5, 1825, and died July 5, 
1874; and Christopher, who was born March 
21, 1828, and resides in Cattaraugus county. 
New York. 

The youngest member of the famil}- is 
the gentleman whose name heads this rec- 
ord, — one of the honored anil highh' es- 
teemed citizens of Faribault county. He 
lived in the town of his birth until 1861, at- 
tending in boyhood the schools of his native 
State and working on his father's farm. As 
soon as old enough to handle the plow he 
began work in the fields and at an early 
age became familiar with all the duties of 
farm life. He continued to aid in the work 
on the old homestead for some time after he 
attained his majority, but at length left 
New York for the West, and in the summer 
of 1 86 1 lived in southern Illinois. He ne.xt 
went to Wisconsin, locating in La Crosse 
county, where he remained until 1865, at 
which time he remoNed to Wauseca, Min- 



nesota, — his place of abode until 1870. His 
arrival in Faribault county dates from that 
year. He settled on section 27, Jo Daviess 
township, and from that time to the present 
has been one of its leading and representa- 
tive agriculturists. His land is always under 
a high state of cultivation, an air of neat- 
ness and thrift pervades the place, and its 
thrifty appearance indicates the careful su- 
pervision of the owner. 

On the 5th of October, 1853, Mr. Briggs 
was united in marriage with Miss Phcebe 
Jane Woodward, daughter of Levi and 
Hannah (Southwickj Woodward, a native 
of Erie county. New York, and one of a 
family of eleven children. She died De- 
cember 20, 1 89 1, leaving two children, Ar- 
thur Allen and Suel Christopher, the latter 
now living on the family homestead. Mr. 
Briggs lived on the old homestead from 1871 
until 1 89 1, when he built a new residence 
on a farm which he owned on section 23, 
Jo Daviess township. He subsequently sold 
that place, and in i 894 built a fine residence 
on section 23, also. This is one of the most 
delightful country homes in Faribault coun- 
ty, tastefully furnished and supplied with all 
the comforts of life. On the i8th of July, 
1894, he was again married, his second union 
being with Mrs. O. E. W'hite, of Martin 
county. They are now living at the abo\e 
mentiiined place, ami the fruits of his former 
toil afford them the comforts and many of 
the lu.xuries of life. 

In politics Mr. Briggs has been a stal- 
wart Republican since the organization of 
the party, and does all in his power to pro- 
mote the growth and insure the success of 
his party. He is a public-spirited and pro- 
gressive citizen, deeply interested in town 
and county matters which are calculated to 
adsance the general welfare. He has served 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



219 



as a member of the Town Board of Super- 
visors, was its chairman for many years and 
since resigning that position he has served 
as Town Treasurer, being the present in- 
cumbent in that office, the duties of which 
he discharges with a promptness and fidelity 
which have won him universal commenda- 
tion. Some ten years ago he was elected 
County Commissioner, serving for two 
years. In all the relations of life he is the 
same honorable, upright man, that he is in 
public office, and is true to every trust re- 
posed in him, whether public or private. 
He is recognized as one of the strong, re- 
liable citizens of Faribault county, and has 
the respect and good will of all. 



HBRAHAM ROBERTS TOWNE, 
a farmer of section 12, Martin 
count}', is a son of Elihu and Ann 
(Roberts) Towne, natives respect- 
ively of Massachusetts and New York. The 
mother was a daughter of Abraham Rob- 
erts. The parents were married in the lat- 
ter State, and were among the first settlers 
of St. Lawrence county. In 1839 they re- 
moved to Ashtabula county, Ohio, where 
the mother died, at the age of forty-five 
years, and subsequently the family removed 
to Wood county, Ohio, where the father 
died, at the age of eighty-five years. Elihu 
Towne and wife had twelve children, 
namely: Huldah, Mary Cary, Horatio (de- 
ceased), Abraham R. , Caroline, Luther, 
Jane Johnson, Phoebe Wade, Erastus, Ma- 
ria Whiting, Alvira Foster, and Philo. 

A. R. Towne, the subject of this sketch, 
was born in St. Lawrence county. New York, 
December 6, 18 17, where he was reared and 
learned the blacksmith's trade. .After his 



marriage he located on a farm there and 
built a log house, but in i860 came to Minne- 
sota, spending five years in Goodhue county, 
and then located in Minnesota Lake town- 
ship, Faribault county. In 1870 Mr. Towne 
came to the farm he now owns, consisting 
of eighty acres, all of which is under a fine 
state of cultivation. In December, 1863, he 
enlisted for service in the late war, entering 
Company D, Brackett's Battalion of Cavalry, 
and was appointed the company's black- 
smith. He took part in five battles against 
the Indians, and was discharged in March, 
1865. In his political relations, Mr. Towne 
affiliates with the Republican party, and has 
held the position of School Director, Justice 
of the Peace, Assessor, Supervisor, etc. 
Socially, he is a member of the G. A. R. 
Post at St. James. 

May 28, 1836, our subject was united in 
marriage with Jerusha Cory, born in New 
Hampshire, June 10, 1820, a daughter of 
Daniel and Millie (Morse) Cory, natives of 
Massachusetts. They were married in New 
Hampshire, and in 1836 removed to St. 
Lawrence county. New York, where they 
afterward died. Daniel Cory was enrolled 
in the war of 1812. The grandfathers of 
Mrs. Towne, Samuel Cory and James Morse, 
served seven years in the Revolutionary 
war. They were among the first settlers in 
New Hampshire. Mrs. Towne has one 
brother now living, Martin Cory. Our sub- 
ject and wife have four children, — Millie 
Ann, widow of David Catlin, of Minnesota 
Lake township, Faribault county, and has 
five children; Benjamin A. married Frankie 
Slocum, and resides in Watonwan county; 
Mary J., wife of Silas Mills, of this town- 
ship; and David C, who married Annie 
Rhodes. Mr. and Mrs. Towne arc believers 
in Spiritualism. 



J20 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



BRANCIS BASSETT has been iden- 
tified with Faribault county since 
1866, and, as one of its most 
prominent citizens, is deserving of 
more than a passing notice on the pages of 
this work. The follo\\ ing rcsiinic of his Hfe 
will be of interest to many: 

Francis Bassett was born in Lewis 
county, New York, June i, 1821, and is a 
descendant of English ancestors. Barachiah 
Bassett, his father, was born on Martha's 
Vineyard, as also was Nathan Bassett, his 
grandfather. His mother, whose maiden 
name was Nancy Butler, was a native of 
Massachusetts, a member of a prominent 
Puritan family and was related to the well- 
known Benjamin F. Butler. Barachiah 
Bassett was a soldier in the war of 18 12. 
After his marriage he lived for some years 
in Lewis county, New York, where he kept a 
hotel, and from there moved to Jefferson 
county, same State, where he and his wife 
passed the rest of their lives, she dying at 
the age of sixty years and he at eighty. Mr 
Bassett was a man of prominence in his 
day. In politics he was first a Whig and 
later a Republican, and religiously he was a 
Methodist and an active worker in the 
church. He and his wife had a family of 
eleven children, some of whom died in in- 
fancy, the others growing up to occupy 
honorable and useful positions in life. 

Their son Francis, with whose name we 
head this article, spent the fiist si.xteen 
years of his life in his native count)', and 
there received a fair education. He learned 
the trade of tinner when a young man, and 
worked at his trade for some years. In 
1846, like many an ambitious young man, 
he was seized with a desire to "go West," 
and before the end of that year we find him 
in Fond du Lac countv, \^'isconsin, located 



on a tract of wild land three miles from 
Fond du Lac. There he developed a farm 
and on it continued to reside imtil i866, 
when he sold out and came to Minnesota. 
Arrived in Faribault county, he purchased 
what was known as the Carlton farm. This 
place he sold a year later. He then bought 
of Mr. D. Mason the farm on which he has 
since made his home, located on section 13, 
Verona township, Winnebago City being 
his postoffice address, and here he now 
owns 300 acres of fine land. His two-story 
residence is located on a natural building 
site and is surrounded with native forest 
trees. He has two barns, one 38 x 40 feet, 
and the other 20 x 40 feet; granary, carriage 
house, modern windmill, good fences, etc. 
Indeed, this farm is in many respects a 
model one. Besides his property here Mr. 
Bassett owns valuable real estate in Cali- 
fornia. He has spent two seasons in the 
sunny climate of the Golden State, — 1887 
and 1890. 

Mr. Bassett is a man of family. He 
married Miss Mary Catharine Boyer, a most 
amiable woman who has shared his joys and 
sorrows for many years, and to whose assist- 
ance and cheerful companionship he owes 
much of the success he has attained in life. 
She was born in Jefferson county. New 
York, September 10, 1S25, daughter of 
Solomon anil Sarah (Fultz) Boyer, both 
natives of the Empire State. Her father 
was born in Herkimer county, son of 
Michael Boyer, of that State, the Boyers 
being of Holland Dutch origin and early 
settlers of New York. Mr. antl Mrs. Boyer 
had four children, — Mrs. Ba.ssett, Diana, 
Julia A. and Jerome. The parents lived in 
Minnesota for some years and went from 
here to Creston, Union county, Iowa, where 
they died, the father at the age of eighty- 



FARIBAULT, MARTIX, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



four and the mother at eighty-six. Mr. 
Boyer was a veteran of the war of 1812 and 
the recipient of a pension for services 
rendered in that war. Both were members 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bassett have five children, namely: 
Sara, wife of Charles Andreas, of Creston, 
Iowa; James and Jerome, who reside on 
fruit ranches in Santa Cruz county, Cali- 
fornia; Jason, who married Miss Carrie 
Holliday and resides in this county; and 
Nancy, wife of William Haliday, of Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota. All have been well edu- 
cated, and Mrs. Andreas was before her 
marriage a successful teacher. 

Both Mr. Bassett and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
In politics he is a Republican and has filled 
several township offices, and he is a mem- 
ber of the I. O. O. F., Winnebago City 
Lodge, No. 30. 



EP. EDWARDS needs no special 
introduction to the readers of this 
volume, for he is one of the best 
known merchants of Faribault 
county. He is numbered among the hon- 
ored pioneers of Minnesota, and for some 
years has been prominently identified with 
the commercial history of Easton, being 
now at the head of the leading hardware 
establishment of this place. 

A native of Ashtabula county, Ohio, Mr. 
Edwards was born on the 6th of December, 
1846, and is a son of that sterling pioneer, 
James S. Edwards, who found his way to 
the Gopher State in the days when travel 
was by stage coach, and when settlers in 
this locality wer€ not a few rods but many 
miles apart. He and his father were both 



born on the eastern coast of Maine, of Eng- 
lish parentage, and probably descended from 
Jonathan Edwards. In the primitive days 
of Ashtabula county, ere a railroad crossed 
the territory or a telegraph pole had been 
planted there, James S. Edwards made a 
home on the soil of the Buckeye State, and, 
cutting down the stately oak and maple 
trees, he built in the midst of the forest a 
cabin home. He had wedded Miss Mary 
C. Miller and she shared with him in the 
experiences and hardships of frontier life, 
and was ever the light of his household. She 
was born in East Lyme, Connecticut, ^[arch 
2, 181 2, and was a daughter of Joseph Mil- 
ler, also a native of the Nutmeg State. Mr. 
and Mrs. Edwards made their home in Ohio 
until 1852, when he came to Minnesota. He 
had learned cabinet-making in his youth, 
but during the greater part of his life car- 
ried on agricultural pursuits. When the 
wild flowsrs showed the advent of spring in 
the year 1852 he started for the West, and 
after many days' travel by rail and boat he 
reached the home of Henry .L. Edwards, 
his first-born son, who the previous year 
had come to Minnesota, locating in the 
Money creek country of Houston county. 
The father was not exactly pleased with that 
locality and he settled near Chatfield, where 
he pre-empted 160 acres of Government 
land. He then returned to his home in 
Ohio, and during the SLimmer his son built 
a house on the claim. The heavy timber 
was hewn out of the surrounding forest and 
the lumber was hauled from Winona, — a 
distance of forty miles. In the fall, accom- 
panied by his family, James S. Edwards 
took up his abode in this Slate and again 
went through the experiences of pioneer life. 
He carried on farming and stock-raising, and 
by practicing economy and working early 



222 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



and late he soon got a good start, and as 
the years passed his possessions were in- 
creased until, in 1869, he was enabled to lay 
aside all business cares and enjoy a well- 
earned rest. At length he sold his large 
farming interests and purchased a home in 
Chatfield, where he lived until called to the 
life eternal. Born on the 24th of October, 
1800, he passed away December 13, 1883, 
at the ripe old age of eighty-three, respected 
by all who knew him. 

In business dealings James S. Edwards 
was scrupulously fair, never swerving from 
the path of justice and right; as a citizen 
he was devoted to the best interests of the 
community in which he made his home and 
was an important factor in its upbuilding. 
The excellencies of his character were many 
and the old settlers and many of the more 
recent arrivals hold him in loving remem- 
brance. The lady who in early life became 
his wife and lung traveled life's journey by 
his side was ever his faithful companion 
and helpmeet, and her kindness and 
charity endeared her to all. She could 
tell many very interesting stories of pio- 
neer life, both in Ohio and Minnesota, 
and could vividly recall the wonderful 
Christmas day of 1852, when in her little 
home, 16x24 feet, she threw both windows 
and doors wide open to admit the balmy 
air, for nature had bestowed a foretaste of 
spring upon them as her gift on the day 
when the Christian world celebrates its 
great gift by kindly remembrances to those 
near and dear. Mrs. Edwards passed to the 
reward prepared for the righteous February 
4, 1888, and lies beside her husband in 
Chatfield cemetery. 

The Edwards family numbered twelve 
children: Caroline became the wife of John 
C. Way, a farmer of Ashtabula county, 



Ohio, and both have now passed away. 
Henry L., before mentioned, figured quite 
prominently in Minnesota's Territorial his- 
tory, being a Representati\e in the first 
Legislature. When the guns of Fort Sum- 
ter awakened the echoes that were heard 
throughout the country he was living in the 
South and saw that he would be forced to 
leave the Southern territory and lose his 
property or join the Confederate Army. 
This he did, holding the important position 
of paymaster with the rank of Major, but 
his friends and family were in the North 
and beyond the Mason and Dixon line was 
the place of his nativity; so, after sixteen 
months' service, he escaped to the North. 
On reaching the Union lines he met Captain 
Plumb, in whom he recognized an old 
schoolmate, and through his intervention 
Henry Edwards was passed into the Union 
lines and returned to the old home in Min- 
nesota. He then went to Omaha, Ne- 
braska, where he raised a company of cav- 
alry for service against the Sioux Indians 
and was made its Captain. On the close of 
hostilities he returned to the South, and by 
way of Indian Territory went to Texas, where 
he is supposed to have died some years since. 
Phcebe Jane, deceased, the third of the Ed- 
wards family, was the wife of the David W. 
Morse, who was formerly a popular dentist 
of Chatfield, Minnesota, but is now in Den- 
ver, Colorado. George W. was reared in 
Ashtabula county, served his country during 
the Rebellion and died in Austin, Mower 
county, Minnesota. Charles A. carries on 
farming in Ashtabula county. He was for 
three years in the Union army and was 
wounded at the battle of Chickamauga. 
Ezra M., who in 1862-3 ^^'is in the Union 
army, fighting the Indians on the western 
frontier, is now connected with the Spring 



FARIHAULT, MARTIX, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



223 



Valley Bank of Spring Valley, Minnesota. 
Mary C. is the wife of Dr. Allen, now of 
Centerville, Alameda county, California. 
He is a native of New Hampshire, and dur- 
ing the Civil War served as a surgeon in the 
army. The subject of this sketch is the 
next younger. Edwin A. is a promi- 

nent fruit-grower near Hollister, California. 
Richard A. has for many years been engaged 
with the Experimental State Farm Com- 
pany of Oregon. Lillie R. is the wife of 
the Rev. Alfred A. Stead, a minister of 
Michigan. Frank V., the youngest of the 
family, is a native of this State and is now 
serving as cashier in the Spring Valley 
Bank. 

H. P. Edwards, whose name heads this 
record, while his parents made theirpilgrim- 
age to Minnesota, made his home with his 
brother-in-law, John C. Way, in Ashtabula 
county, and later accompanied that gentle- 
man on his removal to Olmsted county, 
this State. Mr. Way afterward returned to 
Ohio, where he died. The first school- 
house in Orient was a log building with seats 
along the wall, and there twenty pupils, in- 
cluding our subject, were trained in the com- 
mon English branches by a Miss Brainard. 
He lived with his father until eighteen years 
of age, when he responded to the country's 
call for aid and on the lOth of March en- 
listed in Company E, First Minnesota In- 
fantry, from which he received an honora- 
ble discharge July 14, 1865, for the war had 
then closed. Upon his return home Mr. 
Edwards engaged in school-teaching in Fill- 
more county, and also attended school in 
Chatfield. In the fall of 1867 he removed 
to Walnut Lake, Faribault county, and se- 
cured a clerkship in one of the general stores 
of that place. Two years later that stock, 
by purchase, became his property, and he 



entered upon a career as a merchant, which 
still continues. He successfully carried on 
the store for two years, and then came, in 
1 87 1, to Easton, where he opened a general 
store, which he conducted until 1877. Sell- 
ing out he for a time engaged in bu\ ing and 
shipping stock. In 1885 he embarked in the 
hardware business and is now at the head of 
the well known firm of H. P. Edwards & 
Company, proprietors of one of the largest 
and best conducted establishments of the 
kind in Faribault county. Their business 
has steadily increased in volume until it has 
now assumed extensive proportions and un- 
der the able management of our subject the 
firm has secured a well merited prosperity. 

On the 28th of April, 1870, Mr. Edwards 
was united in marriage with Miss Ophelia 
L. Tousley, who was born in Jefferson coun- 
ty. New York, and is a daughter of Hiram 
Tousley. They have five interesting chil- 
dren and lost one, Florence M., who died 
in her fifteenth year. Those who survive 
are Grace Blanche. Frank T. , Mary M., 
Harrison P. and Ruth Ophelia. The family 
occupies an enviable position in social circles 
where not wealth alone but also true worth 
and intelligence are received as the passport 
into good society. Their home is noted for 
its hospitality and a hearty welcome is ever 
extended to their many friends. 

In his political views Mr. Edwards is a 
stanch Republican. He cast his first presi- 
dential vote for General U. S. Grant and has 
deposited a ballot for each ]iresidcntial can- 
didate of his party since. For several years 
he served as town clerk, but has never cared 
for official preferment. He holds member- 
ship in the Methodist Episcopal Church and 
his well spent life has been in harmony with 
his profession. His (^hristianit}' is of that 
practical kind, not shown by protestations 



H 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



of goodness, but manifested in honorable 
business dealings and in a straightforward 
life in all relations. 



Vj'OHN A. L. SHUTTLEWORTH, 

m who follows farming and stock-rais- 
/• J ing on sejtion 4, Blue Earth City 
township, has been identified with the 
interests of Faribault county since 1865, 
and has through all these years borne his 
part in the development and upbuilding of 
the communit}', — being therefore numbered 
among its valued citizens. 

He was born in Nottinghamshire, En- 
gland, November 23, 1836, and comes of 
an old family of English origin, which for 
many generations had resided on the "Mer- 
rie Isle." His parents were William and 
Ann (Stevenson) Shuttlcworth, the father a 
stone-mason by trade. In 1844, accom- 
panied by his family, he sailed on the Lean- 
der, for the New World, and after five 
weeks and three days spent upon the briny 
deep, landed in Quebec. The vessel had 
weighed anchor at Liverpool with 450 pas- 
sengers on board and without accident made 
the voyage in the time mentioned. The 
Shuttleworth family proceeded at once to 
Wisconsin, settling on a farm in Milwaukee 
county, and afterward removed to a farm 
in Lisbon township, Waushara county, 
where they resided two years. During 
much of this time the father worked at 
his trade in the city of Milwaukee. Remov- 
ing to Fond du Lac county, Wisconsin, they 
located on a farm in Byron tON\'nship, where 
the parents spent their remaining days. The 
mother died there at the age of seventy-six 
years and the father's death occurred, at the 
the home of our subject, in 1887, he also 
having attained the age of seventy-six years. 



No event of special importance marked 
the bo\hood and jouth of John Shuttle- 
worth. The first eight years of his life were 
passed in the land of his nativity, and he 
then accompanied his parents on their emi- 
gration to America, and with them made 
his home until he had attained his majoritj-, 
giving to his father the benefit of his serv- 
ices. In the common schools he obtained 
a good English education, and by reading 
and studying in later years has become a 
well-informed man. 

\\'hen he had attained to man's estate 
he left home and purchased eighty acres of 
land adjoining his father's farm, and in 
course of time the once wild land was made 
to yield to him a good return. He contin- 
ued its cultixation until June, 1865, when 
he sold, and came to Faribault county, en- 
tering a quarter-section of land, in Barber 
township, which he owned and operated for 
three years. On the expiration of that 
period he bought 160 acres of wild land in 
Blue Earth City township, the same consti- 
tuting his present farm, and in addition to 
this he owns another 160-acre tract, four 
miles from the city of Wells, which he has 
improved, making it a valuable property. 
One quarter-section which he bought he 
gave to his son. 

Mr. Shuttleworth has been twice mar- 
ried. On the 8th of May, i S60, he was 
joined in wedlock with Miss Mary Jane 
Golden, a native of Illinois, born of English 
parentage, — her father, James Golden, be- 
ing a native of England. By this union were 
born two children: Lydia, wife of John W. 
Squires, of Montana; and ^^'illiam F., a 
farmer of IMuc Earth City township. The 
mother of this family was called to the home 
beyond on August 28, 1 886, and on the i ith 
of September, 1889, Mr. Shuttleworth led 




^\ 12^. -^/fi//y. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIX, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



to the marriage altar Miss Emma Viebahn, 
a native of Juneau county, Wisconsin, 
daughter of William Viebahn, whose sketch 
appears elsewhere in this volume. Mrs. 
Shuttleworth is a most estimable lady, hav- 
ing many friends, and has resided in this 
county since five years of age. 

Mr. Shuttleworth affiliates with the An- 
cient Order of United Workmen, and in his 
political connections is a Republican. A 
self-made man, the success of his life is due 
entirely to his own efforts and has been 
achieved by diligence, perseverance and 
careful attention to all the details of busi- 
ness. He now has a comfortable compe- 
tence, and his farm is one of the best in the 
neighborhood, highly cultivated, improved 
with good buildings and neat and thrifty in 
appearance. 



OLIVER HAZZARD SPERRY, 
one of the honored pioneers of Mar- 
tin county, residing on section 28, 
Nashville township, has resided in 
this locality since 1864, or for almost a third 
of a century. The memory of such men, 
who are the founders and builders of a county 
and to whom the county owes its prosperity 
and progress, should be perpetuated in writ- 
ten record, that their names maygti down to 
posterity and that their character may live 
and be cherished long after the place which 
once knew them shall know them no more. 
Mr. Sperry was born in Cortland county, 
New York, May 2, 1819, and comes of one 
of the old New England families. His grand- 
father, Elijah Sperry, a native of Connecti- 
cut, learned the blacksmith's trade in his 
jouth, and for forty years worked in one 
shop. The Sperrys are of W'clsh descent 
and are noted for longevity. The father of 



our subject, Merrett Sperry, was born in 
New Haven, Connecticut, and during his 
youth learned blacksmithing in his father's 
shop. W^hen a young man he removed to 
Cortland county. New York, where he mar- 
ried Polly Blodgett, a native of Massachu- 
setts, who had gone to that county in her 
girlhood days, the family settling near 
Homer, New York. Her father, Paul Blod- 
gett, was born in the old Bay State, was 
supposed to be of English lineage and by 
occupation was a fanner. Upon their mar- 
riage Mr. and Mrs. Sperry located on a farm 
in Cortland county, but afterward removed 
to Cayuga county, where they spent their 
remaining days. The father died in Auburn 
at the advanced age of ninety years, and the 
mother passed away in the si.xty-eighth year 
of her age. They were the parents of thir- 
teen children, eleven of whom reached years 
of maturity, while four are still living, name- 
ly: Diantha, widow of Edmond Howe and a 
resident of Belmont, Allegany county. New 
York; Miles P., who is living near W'ells- 
ville in the same county; Lovinia, widow of 
John Harrington and a resident of Bradford, 
Pennsylvania; and Oliver H., who was the 
fifth child and fourth son of the famih'. 

Midst play and work his childhood days 
were passed upon his father's farm, assist- 
ing in the labors of the fields through the 
summer months while in the witer season he 
attended the public schools of the neighbor- 
hood. To his father he gave the benefit of 
his services until twenty-five years of age, 
and during that time became familiar with 
all the duties of farm life, so that when he 
took up the work in his own interest he did 
not lack experience. 

On the isth of May, 1845, Mr. Sperry 
was united in marriage with Miss Augusta 
Williams, a native of Homer, Cortland 



ziS 



.UEA/OR/AL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



county, New York, born January 4, 1824, 
and a daughter of Thomas and Ohve (Blod- 
gett) Wilhams, who were natives of Massa- 
chusetts. She was the tenth in their family 
of twelve children, and was reared in the 
place of her nativity. For a year the par- 
ents of our subject lived in Troopsville, New 
York, and then located on a farm near 
Cayuga Lake, where he passed two years. 
Three years he was sick, unable to work, 
and the family thus had a hard time, but 
all things must have an end, and his illness 
was no exception to the rule. In 1852 he 
removed with his family to Allegany county, 
New York, where he resided until 1858, 
which year witnessed his removal to Sauk 
county, Wisconsin. Securing land he there 
engaged in farming for si.x years, and then 
came to Minnesota in 1864, making a claim 
in Nashville township, the farm upon which 
he now lives. He first secured 160 acres of 
land and upon it built a shanty of only one 
room, having what is called a shed, — that 
is, roof, the boards all ran one way; and 
there were only two windows. There was 
not a tree upon the place, and he had to 
haul his lumber for a distance of twelve 
miles. He went to mill at Mankato, thirt\- 
five miles away, and for one week the family 
lived on potatoes and hulled corn, for he 
could not get to mill, — the roads being im- 
passable. In connection with his son he 
now owns and cultivates 480 acres of rich 
and arable land. All the improvements on 
the first quarter section were made by him. 
He has planted a fine grove of five acres, 
has good improvements and a pleasant and 
substantial residence, all of which add to 
the valuable and attractive appearance of 
the place. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Sperry have been born 
five children, who in order of birth are as 



follows: Mary, wife of Andrew Bailey, a 
resident of California; Frank, who married 
Rusha Edwards and had two children, Maud 
and Guy, and after her death wedded Kittie 
Shaw, who also bore him two children, 
Ralph and Harrold N. ; Fred, who wedded 
Mary Brady; Byron, who married Alice 
Hinton and had two children, Elmo and 
Elno; and Alice, who became the wife of 
C. H. Dorothy, and died in 1884, leaving 
five children, Orrcn, Frank, Edith, George 
and Cora. 

In his political views Mr. Sperry is a Re- 
publican and warmly advocates the princi- 
ples of that party, doing all in his power to 
promote its growth and insure its success. 
For twenty-nine years he has served as Post- 
master of the Sperry post office, which was 
the first post office established west of the 
Blue Earth river in Martin county. It was 
through his instrumentality that it was se- 
cured, and the office has always been at his 
house. With the exception of two years he 
has also served as Assessor of his township 
since 1866, the oldest Assessor in years of 
continuous service in the county. It is 
needless to say that he is true and faithful 
to his duties, for all who know him arc 
familiar with his trustworthiness and loyalty 
to an}- confidence reposed in him. His life 
is pure and honorable, and he is a strong 
temperance man who uses neither tobacco 
or intoxicants. His example is one well 
worthy of emulation and he will leave his 
children an untarnished name. 



at 



ALTER JAY RICHARDSON, A. 
B. , M. D., a leading physician 
of Fairmont, Martin county, Min- 
nesota, was born near Rochester, 
New York, November 17, 1856, descending 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



229 



from very old and prominent New Enj^land 
families. The Richardson family in this 
country was founded in early Colonial times 
by three brothers who emigrated from En- 
gland and first settled in Massachusetts; one 
of them afterward went to New Hampshire, 
and another to the State of Maine. Benja- 
min Allen Richardson, the great-grandfather 
of the gentleman whose name heads this no- 
tice, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, 
and was dangerously wounded while board- 
ing an English man-of-war off New York 
harbor. He was given up for dead, but sur- 
vived, and married Miss Abigail Larkin, 
settled on a farm in Pownal, Maine, where 
he reared a family. 

Joseph Richardson, the father of Walter 
Jay, was born in O.xford county, Maine, in 
1822, a son of Bradbury ;.nd Jennie (Ride- 
out) Richardson, both of whom were na- 
tives of the Pine Tree State. The Doctor's 
mother, ncc Lydia Phelps Reed, is also a 
native of Oxford county, Maine, born in 
1826. Her father, Sampson Augustus Reed, 
a native of that State, was a wealthy cattle- 
drover and a prominent man in his locality; 
and her great-grandmother on her father's 
side, — whose maiden name was Sally Brad- 
ford, — was a lineal descendant of Governor 
William Bradford, of Plymouth Colony, who 
came over in the Mayflower. Joseph Rich- 
ardson and Miss Lydia Phelps Reed were 
married in Maine, subsequently moved to 
Boston, Massachusetts, and later to Roch- 
ester, New York. He assisted in establish- 
ing the Rochester Brick cS: Tile Company, 
and was one of the organizers of the Vacuum 
Oil Company, being its first president. In 
1873 he came to Minnesota aiid settled in 
Glencoe, McLeod count}', where he en- 
gaged in a general merchandise and grain 
business, which he continued for several 



years, with good success, but is now living 
retired. Mr. and Mrs. Richardson brought 
up a family of children, as follows: Ella, 
widow of L. A. Pixley of Bird Island, Min- 
nesota; Dr. \\'. J., of this notice; Lydia, 
wife of G. R. Crosb}-, of St. Cloud, Minne- 
sota; Axel J., Bird Island, Minnesota; Lill- 
ian May, wife of C. M. Tifft, of Glencoe, 
Minnesota; and Emma D. The parents are 
both active members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church and contribute liberally to its 
support. 

Dr. Richardson was educated at Carlton 
College, Northfield, Minnesota, and at Am- 
herst College, Amherst, Massachusetts, 
graduating at the last named place with the 
class of 1 88 1 and with the degree of A. B. 
After completing his classical course at Am- 
herst, he began the study of medicine at 
Harvard in 1882, and while there he was a 
student under the late Dr. Oliver Wendell 
Holmes. He completed his medical course 
at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
the medical department of Columbia Uni- 
versity, New York, where he graduated in 
1885. Having thoroughly equipped him- 
self for his chosen profession, he entered 
upon its practice at Minneapolis, Minne- 
sota. Afterward he removed to Hutchin- 
son and from there came to Fairmont, 
where he has been successful in establishing 
a good practice; and both as a gentleman 
and a physician he has gained the confi- 
dence of the people. 

He was married in 1886 to Miss Sarah 
Sagar, and has three children living: Ralph 
J., Marion, and Ruth Ordway. Mrs. Rich- 
ardson is a native of England, born in 1862, 
and when very joung came to America. 
She is a lady of more than ordinary amia- 
bility and intelligence. She was educated 
in the high school at Hampstead, New 



230 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Hampshire, and Mt. Holv'oke Female Col- 
lege, Massachusetts. She is a member of 
the High School Examining Board, an act- 
ive member of the Congregational Church, 
and has been president of the Ladies' Aid 
Society, and is president of the Ladies' 
Missionary Society. Politically the Doctor 
is a Republican. Fraternally he is con- 
nected with both the A. F. &. A. M. and 
the A. O. U. W., being a Past Master 
Workman and District Deputy in the latter 
organisation. He is also a member of the 
Fairmont Board of United States Pension 
Examiners. 



* w * EON'ARD LANE resides on section 
I r 16, Blue Earth Citj- township, 
I A where he is engaged in general 
farming and dairying. In 1888 he 
purchased ninety-nine acres of wild land and 
at once began to improve and develop it. 
He now has it under a high state of cultiva- 
tion, and the well tilled fields indicate to the 
passer-by his careful supervision. In con- 
nection with the raising of cereals adapted 
to this climate he is successfully engaged in 
the dairy business and for this purpose keeps 
on hand fifteen cows. The products of his 
dairy on account of their excellent qualit\' 
are readily disposed in the market of Blue 
Earth City and bring the highest price. 

The gentleman of whom we write is a 
native of the Empire State. He was born 
in Lewis count\'. New York, on the 20th of 
Decemlier, 1847, ^ son of Samuel and Tur- 
sey (Cummings) Lane, also -natives of New 
York. In the East they remained until 1856, 
at which time they started Westward, locat- 
ing first in Lorain county, Ohio. Subse- 
cpicntly the}' removed to Huron comity, that 
State, and afterward to Erie county, where 



they continued to make their home until 
1882, which year witnessed their arrival in 
Minnesota. The mother was called to her 
final rest in 1890, at the age of seventy- 
three years, but the father is still living and 
now makes his home with our subject. Dur- 
ing the war of the Rebellion, prompted by a 
spirit of patriotism, he offered his services to 
the Government and with the Eastern army 
went to the front, but after eleven months' 
service he was mustered out on account of 
physical disability. He has always been 
faithful to his duties of citizenship and is a 
highly respected man. 

In taking up the personal history of 
Leonard Lane we present to our readers the 
life record of one who is both widely and 
favorably known in Faribault county. He 
belongs to a family of eleven children, nine 
of whom are living at the time of this writ- 
ing. He was only nine years of age at the 
time of the removal to the Buckeye State, 
and made his home in Ohio during his 
youth, no event of special importance mark- 
ing his life during that period. He received 
the training which fitted him for his own 
business career and became familiar with 
the English branches of learning in the pub- 
lic schools. When only sixteen years of age 
he joined the boys in blue of Company H, 
Eighty-eighth Ohio Infantry, and during the 
first year of his service was engaged in guard- 
ing prisoners at Camp Chase. He was taken 
with the measles, afterward suffered an at- 
tack of lung fever, and subsequently had the 
smallpox, so that he was in the hospital for 
six months. He continued in the service 
until the close of the war, when, the coun- 
tr}- no longer needing his services, he re- 
ceived an honorable discharge and returned 
at once to his home. 

The year 1874 witnessed the arri\al of 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



231 



Mr. Lane in Minnesota. He first located in 
Brown count}-, where he engaged in farming 
and in railroading for about nine \ears, 
coming thence to Faribault county. Here 
he settled upon a rented farm, which he con- 
tinued to cultivate until 1888, at which time 
he became owner of his present property. 
Diligence has characterized his business 
career and he is a progressive, practical 
farmer. 

On the 12th of May, 1888, Mr. Lane led 
to the marriage altar Miss Nettie Werner, a 
native of La Porte, Indiana, and a daughter 
of James and Cordelia (Shedd) Werner, the 
former a native of New York and the latter 
of Michigan: they met and married in the 
Hoosier State, and in 1865 came to Minne- 
sota, where their remaining days were passed, 
both havmg now departed this life. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lane now have a bright little 
daughter, Gladys, in whom they take great 
delight. 

Since attaining his majority I\fr. Lane 
has given his support to the Republican 
party and his duties of citizenship are dis- 
charged with the same loyalty which prompt- 
ed him to enter his country's service when 
the Union was imperiled. His life has been 
one of quiet business, commanding the re- 
spect of all. 



^y^ILLIAM HOSMERWILLSONis 

■ ■ I ^ prominent and iuHuential citi- 
mj^^l zen of Martin county and a 
worthy representative of the agri- 
cultural interests. He resides on section 
28, Waverly township, where he owns a 
valuable farm of 480 acres, which has been 
his place of abode since 1885. This is one 
of the most highl}' improved farms of the 
communitv, with its well tilled liclds, its 



substantial buildings and its modern machin- 
ery. When he took up his residence here 
only eighty acres was under cultivation, but 
now 300 acres yields to the owner a golden 
tribute in return for the care and cultivation 
he bestows upon it. 

The life record of Mr. Willson is herewith 
given. He was born in St. Lawrence coun- 
ty. New York, on the 2d of October, 1848. 
The family is of English origin and was 
founded in America at an early day in the 
history of the country. His grandfather was 
Samuel Warner Willson and his father also 
bore the name of -Samuel Warner Willson. 
The latter was born in St. Lawrence county, 
in I 8 19, and after he had arrived at j'ears of 
maturity he married Miss Lucy O. Hosmer, 
a native of the same locality, the date of 
her birth being 1822. Her father, Otis G. 
Hosmer, was born in the Green Mountain 
State, became one of the early settlers of 
New York and served his country in the war 
of 1812. The parents of our subject began 
their domestic life in the count)' of their na- 
tivity and there resided until 1869, when 
they emigrated westward, their destination 
being Minnesota. Locating upon a partly 
improved farm in Minnesota I^ake township, 
Faribault county, the father devoted his 
energies to its further cultivation and im- 
provement until his death, which occurred 
in the year 1871. His wife still survives 
him and is now well advanced in years. In 
the famil}- of this worthy couple were four 
children, three of whom are living at the 
time of this writing, in the winter of 1894. 
They are Edwin D., William H. and Eliza- 
beth, wife of Edwin O. Shoen. 

Like most of the farmer boys of the Em- 
pire State at that time, our subject passed 
the days of his chiUlhoml and \outh li\ing 
with his parents am! accompanying them on 



2.3- 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



their removal to the West. He was mar- 
ried in the year 1866, the ladj- of his choice 
beinpf Miss Ellen R. Stearns, a- native of St. 
Lawrence county. New York, and a daugh- 
ter of Clark and Mary (Wadsworth) Stearns, 
both of whom were born in Vermont, but 
became pioneer settlers of the Empire State. 
One child graces the union of Mr. and Mrs. 
Willson, a daughter, Libbie I. , now the 
wife of Albert Grover of Martin county, by 
whom she has one child, Mary. 

After residing in Faribault county for 
two years, the subject of this sketch re- 
turned with his family to New York, where 
he resided for seven years. He then again 
came to Minnesota, settling in Sibley coun- 
ty, where he was engaged in teaching school 
until 1883, which year witnessed his re- 
moval to Mapleton, at which place he en- 
gaged in hotel-keeping for two years. In 
1885 he came to Martin county, locating 
upon the farm which has since been his 
home. At that time the buildings were 
somewhat dilapidated, but he has remodeled 
them and added other substantial im- 
provements, making his place one of the 
finest equipped farms in the northern part of 
the county. He follows general farming, 
raising the different cereals which are adapt- 
ed to this climate, and throughout the com- 
munity he is accounted one of the wide- 
awake and enterprising agriculturists. 

Mr. Willson, since attaining his majority, 
has been a supporter of Democratic princi- 
ples and takes quite an active interest in lo- 
cal political affairs. His fellcjw townsmen, 
appreciating his worth and ability, have fre- 
quently called him to public office, and his 
duties have ever been discharged with the 
tulelity of a loyal citizen, devoted to his 
country's interest. He was County Super- 
intendent of Schools in Sibley countv, has 



been Town Clerk of Waverly township for 
the long period of six years, was the candi- 
date of Martin and W'atonwan counties in the 
fall of 1894 for the office of State Senator, 
and in 1888 was nominated for the office of 
Sheriff: but the strong Republican majority 
could not be overcome. In his social rela- 
tions Mr. Willson is a Mason, holding his 
membership in the blue lodge and chapter 
of Fairmont, and has been Senior Warden 
in the former and Treasurer in the latter. 
In the various walks of life he has ever been 
found upright and honorable, true to every 
trust reposed in him, and his public and pri- 
vate life are alike above reproach. Such in 
brief is the record of one of Martin county's 
leadinif farmers. 



at 



ILLIAM OELKE, a prosperous 
farmer and stock-raiser, of Blue 
Earth City township, Faribault 
county, Minnesota, dates his birth 
in Germany, August 27, 1848, his parents 
being William and Earnestana (Maenke) 
Oelke. 

In 1S65 the Oelke family, consisting of 
father, mother and seven children, emi- 
grated to America, being seven weeks and 
three da\s on the ocean ami landing in 
safety at New York. From that city they 
came direct to Faribault county, Minnesota, 
where the father entered 160 acres of Gov- 
ernment land in section 6, Rome township, 
after\\ard purchasing forty acres and thus 
having a fine farm of 200 acres, which, with 
the help of his sons, he improved, and 
where he resided the rest of his life. He 
died in 1886, at the age of sixty-five years. 
His widow now resides on the old home 
place. Of their seven children, we make 
record as follows: William Rudolph, of 



FARIBAUIT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



233 



Olmsted county, Minnesota; Leapold, of 
Rome township, this county; OtteHa, wife 
of JuHus Block, of Blue Earth City; Matilda, 
deceased, was the wife of Gustave Rechow, 
of this county; Emma, wife of William D. 
Fenske, this county; Emiel, deceased; and 
Gustave, at the old homestead with his 
mother. 

William Oelke spent his youthful days 
in farm work and in attending school. He 
came to this county with his parents and for 
two years after their arrival here assisted 
his father in improving the frontier farm on 
which they settled. Then he worked out 
and ran a threshing machine for some years. 
In 1876 he purchased 160 acres of his pres- 
ent farm, to which he has added by subse- 
quent purchase until now he has 293 acres 
of Faribault county's best soil, well culti- 
vated and nicely improved. He has four 
acres planted in trees which serve both as a 
protection from the severe winds in winter 
and for shade in the hot summer days. His 
barn, built in 1886, is 36.\92 feet, and his 
granary is 1 8 x 30 feet. A windmill fur- 
nishes power by which feed is ground for 
his stock. 

Mr. Oelke was married June 5, 1876, to 
Miss Mary Fenske, a native of Green Lake 
county, Wisconsin, and a daughter of John 
C. and Louisia (Kreiger) Fenske. Mr. and 
Mrs. Oelke are the the parents of seven 
children, — Walter H., Fred W., Carrie L., 
Jolm R., Albert E., Lillie E. and Edward L. 

In politics Mr. Oelke is a Republican 
and has served the public as Supervisor for 
six years. He is truly a self-made man. 
By his own industry and good management 
he has accumulated a fine property' which 
he uses to the best advantage by surround- 
ing his family with the comforts as well as 
the necessaries of life. 



^"^ FORGE AZRO MOORE, a farmer 
■ ^\ of section 22, Eraser township, 
^^3 Martin county, is a son of German 
R. and Elmina (Orcutt) Moore, 
natives of Vermont, the former born on 
Lake Champlain. They were married 
January 10, 1838, near the Canada line, 
and afterward located in Allegany county. 
New York. In 1870 they located on the 
farm now owned by our subject in Martin 
county, Minnesota, then wild land, but the 
entire place is now under a fine state of cul- 
tivation. Mr. Moore departed this life 
March 26, 1888, at the age of seventy-two 
years, and the mother survived until April 
13, 1892, dying at the age of seventy-eight 
years. They were the parents of nine chil- 
dren, five now living, — Ulysses, Marilla, 
Ellen, John and George A. One son, 
Samuel, was a soldier in the Civil war, and 
is now deceased. 

George A. Moore, the subject of this 
sketch, was born in Allegany county, New 
York, July 4, 1857, and was fourteen years 
of age when he came to Minnesota. He 
assisted his father on the farm until twenty- 
one years of age. In 1882 he removed to 
Miles City, Montana, in 1887 went to 
Oregon, next roamed over the west for a 
time, then came to Martin county, Minne- 
sota. Mr. Moore now owns 1 20 acres of 
fine farming land. He is independent in 
his political relations, and has held the 
positions of Township Assessor and Treas- 
urer of school district No. 98. 

In 1 890 Mr. Moore was united in mar- 
riage with Phoebe Adell Leigh, born in New 
York in i860, a daughter of Reuben Leigh, 
an early pioneer of Minnesota. He first 
located on section 26, Eraser township, but 
afterward removed to Kansas, where he 
subsequently died. Mr. and Mrs. Moore 



23 + 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE C0UN77ES OF 



have three children, — Gu}', Marilla and 
Stanley. Mrs. Moore is a member of the 
Baptist Church. 



aHRISTIAN PIRSIG, who carries 
on general farming on section 34, 
Blue Earth City township, Fari- 
bault county, is one of the worthy 
citizens that the Fatherland has furnished 
to the Gopher State. He was born in the 
Province of Posen, on the 30th of Septem- 
ber, 1847, and is a son of Christian and Ma- 
ria (Longer) Pirsig, who also were natives 
of the same land and there spent their entire 
lives. The father died ere the birth of our 
subject and the children of that union were 
two in number. The mother afterward 
married again and her family, by this union, 
was increased by the birth of four children. 
Within the borders of his native prov- 
ince Christian Pirsig spent the days of his 
boyhood and youth, and in the common 
schools of the neighborhood he obtained his 
education. He continued in Germany until 
after he had attained his majority, in fact 
was twenty-seven years of age ere he left 
the Fatherland to seek home and fortune 
beyond the briny deep. He sailed in 1875, 
and on reaching American shores at once 
continued his journey across the country to 
Minnesota, where he has since made his 
home. For two years he lived in Blue 
Earth City, working at any honest employ- 
ment that he could secure which would yield 
him a living. It was in this way he really 
secured a start in life. At length he rented 
land and engaged in fanning in his own in- 
terests, continuing to operate land belong- 
ing to others luitil 1S82, when with the cap- 
ital he had ac(iuired through his own efforts 
iio made the purchase of 160 acres, — a part 



of his present farm. This was wild land 
which had never been placed under the 
plow, but with characteristic energy he be- 
gan its development and soon it was made 
to yield to him a golden tribute in return for 
the care and labor he bestowed upon it. He 
not onl}' improved this, but added to it an 
adjoining tract of forty acres and also pur- 
chased 160 acres in Rome township, Fari- 
bault county. His possessions therefore now 
aggregate 360 acres, — all the result of his 
own well-directed and able efforts. Indus- 
try has been the chief feature in his prosper- 
ity, but has been well supplemented by per- 
severance and frugality. His farm has be- 
come one of the valuable properties in the 
county and is supplied with all modern con- 
veniences which are found upon a model 
farm of the nineteenth century. 

In the year 1S69 was consummated the 
marriage of Mr. Pirsig and Miss Caroline 
Earthman, a native of the province of West 
Preussen, Germany. They have a family 
of nine children, as follows: Tillie, now 
the wife of Ferdinand Erdmann, who is liv- 
ing in Rome township; Charlie, Gustave, 
Ernest, Albert, Otto, Lena, Ida and Bertha, 
all of whom are still under the parental 
roof. They have a pleasant home and Mr. 
Pirsig is now able to surround his family 
with many of the comforts and lu.xurics of 
life. 

In religious belief the members of this 
famil}' are Lutherans, adhering to the faith 
which has been that of their ancestors for 
many generations past. Mr. Pirsig is truly 
a self-made man and deserves all the credit 
which that term implies. His worth is 
widely recognized, for it is such men as he 
to whom the county owes her progress 
and advancement, men who arc true to the 
liutics of citizenship while attending to their 







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FARIBAULT, MARTI X, W A TON WAX AND JACKSON. 



237 



own interests and thus promoting the gen- 
eral prosperitj' and placing the county in 
the front rank among the leading counties 

of this great commonwealtli. 




• HOMAS BLAIR, one of the lead- 
ing farmers and stock-raisers of 
Delavan township, Faribault coun- 
ty, Minnesota, was born in Argyle- 
shire, near Clyde, Scotland, Octobers, 1825. 
Mr. Blair spent the first twenty-three 
years of his life in his native land, and then, 
in 1848, emigrated to this country, locating 
first in the State of Maine, in the shipbuild- 
ing town of Camden. There he served an 
apprenticeship of three years to the trade of 
shipcalker. Having mastered his trade, he 
went to New York city, where he could find 
employment at remunerative wages during 
the entire year, and continued there for 
about six years. In 1856 he joined a colony 
of New York and Connecticut people seek- 
ing homes on the wide prairies of southern 
Minnesota, and, w hile the colony settled in 
Blue Earth county, Mr. Blair and another 
of the party struck off to the south into 
Faribault county and located in Delavan 
township, which was first named Guthrie, 
they being the first settlers in that township. 
Mr. Blair pre-empted a claim on section 
nine, locating in the woods adjoining the 
water, with the prairie lying conveniently 
near, — an ideal place for a home. Here he 
proceeded to build a log cabin, and as soon 
as it was done, which was that same year, 
he took to himself a wife and they went to 
housekeeping in their frontier home. 

Mr. Blair began life as a pioneer farmer 
with but little knowledge of the local methods 
necessary to success, but he had plenty of 
pluck and energy and a determination to 

12 



succeed. To-day he is the owner of a fine 
farm of 500 acres, has an elegant brick resi- 
dence, and has other commodious and sub- 
stantial buildings upon his land. While he 
has been successful in his farming opera- 
tions, he is best known as a breeder of fine 
stock, and in this way has done much to ad- 
vance the interests of southern Minnesota. 
For many years he has given special atten- 
tion to the breeding of shorthorn cattle, his 
young stock finding a ready market through- 
out this region of country. At this writing 
his herd of shorthorn cattle numbers some 
seventy head. He is also an extensive 
breeder of Berkshire hogs. 

Mr. Blair was married in 1856 to Miss 
Agnes Kirk, a native of New York city, and 
a daughter of Andrew and Agnes Kirk, of 
that State, formerly of Newburg. She has 
shared with him the hardships and priva- 
tions of their early pioneer life, and together 
they are enjoying the prosperity which has 
resulted from their years of earnest and hon- 
est toil. They have seven children living, 
namely: John R., a farmer of this township; 
Thomas D., a farmer of Iowa; Donald L., 
also of Iowa; Mary, an accomplished and 
successful teacher; Emma, wife of Frank 
W. White, of Amboy, Minnesota; Fannie, 
wife of Thomas J. Jones, of Mankato, Min- 
nesota; and Lizzie, also of Mankato. 

In his early life here Mr. Blair rendered 
valued service in several official capacities. 
In 1858 he was elected a member of the 
Township Board of Supervisors, and was 
retained as such for a number of years. 
Later he was a member of the County 
Board of Commissioners for several years. 
The duties of those positions were then ar- 
duous and often trying, and the offices-were 
not remunerative. In church matters, earn- 
est and devoted, Mr. Blair has been for 



i38 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OP 



many years an honored Elder of the Presby- 
terian Church at Winnebago City, and for 
thirty years he has been an earnest worker 
in the Sunday-school: always has at least 
one school, and often two, over which he has 
officiated as Superintendent. 



k/^ EV. LEONARD FREDERICK 
I <^ FREY, pastor of the German 
1 , P Evangelical Church of Fairmont, 
has the respect of not only the peo- 
ple of his own church but also of all other 
denominations. He was born Ma}- 21, 1838, 
in Boertlingen, Wurtemburg, Germany, 
where his father Johann Frey, owned an es- 
tate and for the greater part of his life held 
the offices of Assessor and Burgomeister. 
He studied theology in the land of his birth 
and in September, 1868, he bade adieu to 
home and friends, sailing for the New 
World, where he believed was a fruitful 
field for Christian labor. He came at once 
to Minnesota, his destination being St. Paul, 
and his first pastorate was in Minneapolis. 
Mr. Frey was married the following 
year to Miss Rosa Kreeb, to whom he had 
pledged his troth ere leaving the Fatherland, 
and their union has been blessed with a fam- 
ily of eight children, three sons and five 
daughters; but one son, born in Stillwater, 
died in infancy. 

From Minneapolis Mr. Frey was called to 
the church in Lewiston, Minnesota, where 
he remained about two and a half years, 
when he became the Lutheran pastor at 
Shakopee, at the same time preaching each 
alternate Sunday in Stillwater, where his 
labors were continued for a period of six 
years. For a few jears subsequent he trav- 
eled over this State and the Dakotas in the 
interest of the Minnesota Synod, which had 



just completed the building of its college at 
New Ulm, Minnesota, and in 1891 he ac- 
cepted the call extended to him from the 
church in Fairmont, where he has since re- 
sided, engaged in his holy calling. In his 
various charges he has labored with good 
success and is an untiring worker in the 
Master's vineyard. The congregation at 
this place has been increased by thirty fam- 
ilies since his arrival here, and he has the 
confidence and love of his parishoners, — a 
fact which is indicated by his continuance 
as pastor of the Fairmont church. His life 
has been one of great usefulness, and during 
his entire residence in America his field of 
labor has been Minnesota. 



EENRY AUGUST MILLER, a hard- 
ware merchant of Welcome, Min- 
nesota, was born in Prussia, No- 
vember 30, 1848. 
Peter Miller, his father, was a farmer in 
the old country. He emigrated to America 
in i860, coming via Quebec, his destination 
being Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Near that 
city he bought a farm, and on it spent the 
rest of his life, and died in August, 1888. 
Of his children, we make record as follows: 
Minnie, who married Jacob Black, lives at 
Grafton, Wisconsin; Bertha, wife of Henry 
Carson, died shortly after her marriage; Otto 
is married and living on the old home farm 
in Wisconsin; Emily, wife of Ferdinand 
Ragenkop, resides at Chippewa Falls, Wis- 
consin; and Reka, the youngest, who died 
when young. 

Henry A., the subject of our sketch, 
began working for wages when he was nine- 
teen, working in Wisconsin and Michigan. 
In March, 1879, he came to Martin county, 
Minnesota, and stopped for a time at Fair- 



FARIBAULT, MARTIX, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



239 



mont, at first working for wages and later 
renting a farm which he cultivated. Still 
later he homesteaded a tract of land, the 
southeast quarter of section 26, township 
103, range 32; and farmed the same until 
1888, when he let it to a tenant and moved 
to Welcome. All the improvements upon 
this place were put here by him. In 1890 
he sold the property to Chris Tenfe'rt, and in 
August of that same year he built his fine 
store room in Welcome. As soon as his 
building was completed he opened up a new 
stock of hardware and established himself 
in his present business, which, under his 
able management, has continued to prosper. 

Mr. Miller was married, February 28, 
1 87 1, to Annie I-fulsemann, daughter of 
Henry Frederick and Mary Lena Hulsemann, 
and the children of this union are Otto Peter, 
Frank, Minnie, Annie, Frances and David. 
The oldest son is employed as clerk in a store 
in Welcome. 

Politically, Mr. Miller is a Republican; 
religiously, a member of the Lutheran 
Church. 



EERMANN CHRISTOPHER 
BLANCK, Welcome, Minnesota, 
is one of the prosperous Germans 
engaged in farming in Fox Lake 
township, Martin county. 

Mr. Blanck was born in Hanover, Ger- 
many, August 17, 1846, son of Christopher 
and Katrina (Cordes) Blanck. His father 
was born January i, 181 3, and died May 10, 
1864; his mother, born November 17, 18 19, 
died April 26, 1856. They lived and died 
in Germany. The father was a wagon- 
maker by trade. He was twice married, 
the children by his first wife being as fol- 
lows: Katrina Matalina Elizabeth, born 



January 16, 1S44, niarrii'd Henry Juergen 
Luehr June 3, 1870. They emigrated to 
America, and now reside on a farm adjoining 
that of our subject. Their children are: Em- 
ma Katrina Martilena,born October 17, 1874; 
Henry Christopher, November 7, 1876; John 
George, February 15, 1880; Christopher 
Henry Hermann, February 9, 1884; and 
Peter William Gerherdt, September 24, 
1890. Hermann Christopher was the sec- 
ond born in his father's family. Peter 
Henry, the third child, was born August 24, 

1854. He emigrated to America, and is now 
living in Fairmont. His first wife, >tcc Dora 
Luetchen, bore him two children, Mary and 
Minnie. By his .second wife, )icc Hannah 
Luebbenow, he has four children, Hermann, 
Lydia, Ida and Mary. Anna Katrina, the 
fourth and youngest child of Christopher 
Blanck by his first wife, was born April 19, 

1855. She married Henry Bruin, and they 
lived in Chicago up to the time of her death. 
She left one child, a son. The second wife 
of Christopher Blanck was Dorothea Wick- 
ofT, and their only child, George, is now liv- 
ing in Fairmont, Minnesota. 

Hermann Christopher Blanck, with whose 
name we began this sketch, emigrated to 
America in April, 1867, landing at New 
York city, and was immediately employed 
there as gardener by George Hildebrand, re- 
maining with him fourteen months, receiv- 
ing $9 the first month and .$12 thereafter, 
with accommodation. In the meantime he 
had corresponded with an old friend, John 
Drewes, who lived in I^'illmore county, Min- 
nesota, and, at the end of the time above 
stated, determined to try his fortune further 
west. Accordingly he landed in Fillmore 
i county, in the sunnner of 1868, where he se- 
1 cured work and remained until the spring of 
i the following \ear, when he came to Martin 



240 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



county and located his present place. He 
at first took a pre-emption on a quarter sec- 
tion, but fearing he might not have the nec- 
essary cash to pay upon this, he gave over 
the south half of it to his brother-in-law, 
Henry J. Luehr, and retained for himself 
the north half, on which he had placed his 
house. This is the north half of the south- 
west quarter of section 2, Fo.x Lake town- 
ship. August 23, 1884, he purchased of the 
railroad company a forty-acre tract, the 
northeast quarter of the southeast quarter of 
section 3, same township; and May 2, 1893, 
he purchased another forty, the southwest 
quarter of the southeast quarter of section 3, 
Fo.x Lake township; and now has a fine tract 
of land, to the cultivation and improvement 
of which he is devoting his energies. 

Mr. Blanck was married June 11, 1878, 
to Ottilie Bursack, who was born in Crystal 
Lake county, Wisconsin, November 14, 
1852, daughter of William and Henrietta 
Bursack. The children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Blanck are George Armo Wilhelm, born 
April 24, 1 880; Jesse Hermann Arthur, No- 
vember 2, 1882; and Bruno Lewis Irvin, 
March 18, 1S86. 

Mr. Blanck was confirmed in the Luth- 
eran Church, April 15, i860, by Rev. E. H. 
Halven. He united with the Evangelical 
Church while living in Fillmore county, 
March 16, 1869, and still retains his mem- 
bership in that denomination. 



^~V*n.AS D. HOBER, of section 29, 
•^^^T Walnut Lake township (postoffice 
J\^^3 W'ells), became a resident here in 
Octob.er, 1864. 
He was born at Troupsburg, Steuben 
county, New York, June 5, 1833. His 
father, Joseph Hoher, was born near Sche- 



nectady, that State, a son of Frederick Hober, 
who was a soldier in the war of 18 12. His 
parents were Holland Dutch, of the Mohawk 
Valley, who spelled their name Hauber. 
Joseph Hober married Afartha Rogers, a 
native of New York and a daughter of Jona- 
than Rogers, who also was a soldier in the 
war of 181 2, and married Miss Daring; her 
father was a Revolutionary soldier. Mr. 
Joseph Hober had nine children, as follows: 
Frederick, deceased, who was Brigade Sur- 
geon, with the rank of Major, in the Con- 
federate army; Silas D., whose name intro- 
duces this sketch; Salem J., for four years 
a Union soldier, a member of the Eighty- 
sixth New York Volunteer Infantry; Jona- 
than M. ; Martha; Hiram A., for three j-ears 
in the Union army, also in the Eighty-sixth 
New York; Darius W. ; Melissa E. ; and 
Perry Leroy, deceased. Joseph Hober 
raised a company for Colonel Sickles' 
brigade, and after being in the army service 
for a time he was sent back to his home 
district as a recruiting officer. He was a 
successful farmer, a public-spirited man, a 
Jackson Democrat, but one of the first 
members of the Republican party, and (with 
his wife) was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. He died at the age of 
sixty years, and his widow is still living, 
now with her daughter, Mrs. Martha Moore, 
at Canisteo, Steuben county, New York, 
aged eighty-two years. 

Mr. Hober was brought up on a farm 
and received his education at the common 
schools and an academy. At the early age 
of seventeen years he commenced teaching 
and continued for nine terms, in the East 
and in Minnesota. In 1 864 he left New 
York and stopped at Baraboo, Sauk county, 
Wisconsin, and in October of that year 
came to Faribault county and took a home- 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



241 



stead, where he now lives and has 160 acres 
of land comprised in one of the best farms 
in the township. His dwelling is 16x27 
feet in dimensions, two stories high, with L 
16 X 22, and an addition 14 x 18, furnished in 
good taste, etc. , and the beautiful lawn 
is graced with ornamental trees, modern 
windmill, barn and other outbuildings, etc. 
He is a No. i farmer. 

He was married in Steuben county, New 
York, January 11, 1863, to Nancy A. Row- 
ley, a native of Canisteo, same State, where 
she was brought up. She was a daughter 
of John S. Rowley, a native of Gorham, 
New York, and a son of John S. Rowley, 
Sr. , who was a soldier of the war of 1 8 1 2 ; 
his widow drew a pension. Mrs. Hober's 
mother before marriage was Nancy Van 
Houton, who was born in Wayne county. 
New York, a daughter of Isaac Van Houton, 
who was born in New Jersey, of an old and 
prominent German family of that State. 
John S. Rowley had thirteen children, — 
nine daughters and four sons, namely: 
George T. , James V., Martin V., Emeline, 
Sylvia J., Mary, Nancy A., Maria, Sarah 
M., Ambrosia, Olive (deceased), and two 
others. The father died in 1874, at the 
age of fifty-nine years. He was a business 
man, running a saw and grist mill and a 
blacksmith shop; was one of the first to 
join the Republican party at its formation, 
and was a member of the Christian Church. 
His widow is still living, now aged seventy- 
seven years. The children were all so 
reared that they became respected citizens. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hober have three children: 
h'red C. , who has an excellent farm of 240 
acres, married Hattie Odette, and has three 
children, — Clarence Leroy, Florence Lillian, 
and a babe; Fannie L. , wife of James A. 
Dixon, of Dunbar township, and has three 



children, — Joseph S., Esther A., and Ethel 
May; and Leroy, at home. Besides, Mr. 
Hober has reared a boy, by name John 
Silas Hober, as an own son. 

Mr. Hober has a line farm of 160 acres. 
In politics he is a Republican; he has been 
Supervisor and chairman of the Board of 
Supervisors, and Assessor for twelve years. 
He has been delegate to Republican Con- 
gressional and other conventions, and is a 
zealous worker for his party. He was in- 
itiated into Freemasonry in 1856, and is 
now a member of Lodge 353, at Woodhull, 
New York. He is an influential citizen. 



>Y* L- HERRING, the popular and 
fl esteemed druggist of Easton, Minne- 
A 1 sota, has the honor of being a native 
of this State. He was born in 
Houston county, in a log cabin near Cale- 
donia, October 14, i860, and is a son of 
William A. and Rebecca E. (Bailey) Her- 
ring. The family is of German extraction. 
The great-grandparents of Mr. Herring, 
natives of Germany, came to this country 
in an early day, settling in Pennsylvania. 
The great-grandfather, Lewis Herring, par- 
ticipated in the Revolutionary war, serving 
as Captain throughout that long struggle, 
and died either in 1837 or '8, at the age of 
eighty-five years. His wife died a few 
years after. The grandfather of our sub- 
ject, Lewis Herring, was born December 
14, 1794, in the State of Pennsylvania, 
where he engaged in lumbering and agricul- 
tural pursuits. He volunteered as an 
infantry private in the war of 18 12, and 
took part in the battle of Lake Erie. 
Spending his declining years with his son, 
William A., he died in Faribault county, 
in the spring of 1857. He married Eleanor 



242 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Armstrong and to them were born the fol- 
lowing children: Mary Ann, who became 
the wife of Daniel Cook, and they came to 
Minnesota in Territorial days, locating in 
Walnut Lake township. Faribault county; 
both are now deceased; Sarah, who is the 
widow of Silas Powell and makes her home 
in South Dakota; Sophia, who wedded 
Henry Knox, for many years identified with 
Houston county; Hannah, the wife of Silas 
Parsons, a resident of Charles Mix county, 
South Dakota; Joseph A., who makes his 
home in Chase count)', Kansas; Louis, who 
lived in Houston county, was a soldier of 
the Union army and died May 9, 1865, 
while returning to his home from the hospi- 
tal in Nashville, Tennessee, and his remains 
are interred at the Soldiers' Home ceme- 
tery in New York; Samuel, who died in 
Clarion county, Pennsylvania, August 10, 
1829; George W., who died in the same 
county September 20, 1833; Daniel, who 
served in the late war, died in Houston 
county, Minnesota, November 20, 1 865 ; 
Nancy Eleanor, who died May 7, 1855. 
William A., father of our subject, is the next 
younger; Louisa died in Clarion county, 
Pennsylvania, July 9, 1841. The mother of 
this family was born on the Emerald Isle, 
September 28, 1797, and died in Houston 
county, Minnesota, August 18, 1862. 

On his emigration in 1855 to the 
Gopher State William Herring began farm- 
ing in Houston county, and there on the 
I ith of March, 1858, he married Miss 
Elizabeth Bailey, daughter of Jesse and 
Margaret (Pennebecker) Bailey. She was 
born in Ohio, February 20, 1836. and 
accompanied her parents to Minnesota in 
1851, the family settling in Hiniston county, 
where her father died; he was a \'irginian 
by birth. His remains were interred in 



Sheldon cemetery, where by his side was 
laid his estimable wife. In 1862 William 
A. Herring came to Lura township, Fari- 
bault county, and located a homestead on 
sections 24 and 25. 

Subsequently he returned to Houston 
county, where he was enrolled as a private 
of Company K, Eleventh Minnesota Infan- 
try, August 31, 1864. He entered the serv- 
ice at Fort Snelling and was honorably 
discharged at Gallatin, Tennessee, June 26, 
1865, by order of the War Department at 
^^'ashington. 

Upon his return to Houston county he 
made preparations to take up his residence 
on the claim in Faribault county, and in 
August this was done. He hauled the lum- 
ber a distance of forty miles in order to 
erect a little home 14x16 feet, and secured 
what was thought to be a very good home 
in the primitive days of Minnesota. His 
means were limited, and the family lived 
economicalh' and went through the experi- 
ences of frontier life, but at length the wild 
claim became one of the best farms in the 
county and well-tilled fields brought to the 
owner a handsome income. His death oc- 
curred June 3, 1879, and he was buried in 
Lura township, where a monument marks 
his last resting place. He served for many 
years on the Town Board of Supervisors, 
and also acted as its chairman, but never 
sought political preferment though often 
solicited by his friends to become a candidate 
for various offices. He was a stanch Re- 
publican and cast his first Presidential vote 
for Abraham Lincoln. His wife, a noble 
Christian lady, now shares the home of our 
subject in Easton. His children are Sarah 
Ellen, burn January 11, 1859, in Houston 
countw Minnesota, eighteen months after- 
ward; J. L. , subject of this sketch; Hannah 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



243 



E., born August 12, 1862, in Houston 
county, and Mr. Parsons; Ulysses Grant, 
born April 22, 1866, and died July 14, 1882, 
and is buried by his father's side in Lura 
cemetery. 

During his earl}' boyhood days J. L. Her- 
ring became a resident of Faribault county, 
and the history of its frontier life is there- 
fore familiar to him. The common schools 
of the neighborhood afforded him his only 
educational privileges, yet through experi- 
ence and observation he has become a well- 
informed man and does all in his power to 
promote the intellectual development of the 
community. 

On the 30th of March, 1886, Mr. Her- 
ring was united in marriage with Miss Mary 
A. Rath, daughter of Carl and Sophia 
(Broehl) Rath, at whose home the wedding 
was celebrated, the ceremony being per- 
formed by Justice George Lamby, one of 
Minnesota's pioneers. Their union has 
been blessed with four children, a son and 
three daughters: William E., born March 
18, 1887; Clara May, born September 20, 
1888, and died on the 9th of November fol- 
lowing; Elvira Edna, born December 25, 
1889; and Grace Levern, born January i, 
1S92. This is an interesting family, and 
the children and grandchildren cheer the 
declining years of Mr. Herring's mother. 

On attaining his majority, he was called 
to public office, being elected Pathmaster. 
He afterward served for three years as a 
member of the Town Board of Supervisors, 
and in 1893 he was sent as a delegate to the 
county convention of the Republican party, 
with which he has affiliated since casting 
his first presidential vote for James A. Gar- 
field. Socially he is connected with Easton 
Lodge, No. 197, I. O. O. F. , and also the 
society of the Modern Woodmen of Aiuerica 



of the same place. A few years since he 
left the farm and is now engaged in the drug 
business in Easton, where he has a well ap- 
pointed store, supplied with a good stock, 
and from the public he receives a liberal 
patronage. He is a public-spirited and pro- 
gressive man, devoted to the best mterests 
of the community in which he makes his 
home, and is numbered among the valued 
citizens of Faribault county. 



HLFRED MUDGETT WELCOME, 
a well-known farmer of Martin 
county, Minnesota, is the gentle- 
man in honor of whom the town of 
Welcome was named. He was born at 
Bangor, Maine, January i, 1842, son of 
Michael and Phidelia (Spear) Welcome. 

Tradition says that three brothers by the 
name of Welcome emigrated from Scotland 
to America and settled in New England. 
Timothy Welcome, grandfather of our sub- 
ject, was a jeweler and watchmaker. He was 
born in Maine, and when well along in 
years moved to Green Lake county, Wiscon- 
sin, and later to Waushara county, same 
State. In 1857 he came to Blue Earth 
county, Minnesota, and made his home at 
Garden City, where he died. He married 
his wife, Mary, in Maine, and their children 
were Michael, Isaac Gumming, Jacob W. B., 
Solomon C, Mary and Cyrus. 

The maternal grandfather of our subject, 
Mr. Spear, died in Maine, at the age of 
about thirty-five years. His two children 
were Phidelia and John. 

Michael Welcome was a minister in the 
First Day Adventist Church. He was born 
in Maine, on his father's farm, August 12, 
1 81 7. In 1847 he emigrated westward to 
Green Lake county, Wisconsin, and pre- 



244 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



empted a tract of land, and in 1851 he 
moved to Waushara county, Wisconsin, 
where he continued to farm, and also to ad- 
minister in a clerical capacity to the fol- 
lowers of his faith, wherever duty called. 
In June, 1867, he joined a small company 
and came west to Garden City, Blue Earth 
county, Minnesota. He bought city property 
and also a farm near town. In the fall of 
1876, in response to a call, he moved to 
Monticello, Minnesota, and took charge of a 
congregation of First Day Adventists. In 
March, 1892, he visited his son Frederick 
at Santa Cruz, California. Mrs. Welcome 
was at the time sick with erysipelas, and in 
caring for her he contracted blood poison- 
ing, from which he died May i, 1892. He 
was married in 1 840, and he and his wife 
had children as follows: Alfred Mudgett, the 
subject of this article; William, a furniture 
dealer at Hancock, Minnesota; Garaphelia, 
widow of George W. Oxreider; John C, a 
farmer of Lincoln county, Kansas; George, 
who died in infancy; George M., a farmer 
of this county; Laurie and Florie, twins, the 
former the wife of E. P. Willington and the 
latter the wife of G. Bailey; Sarah, wife of 
Robert Kreis; Frederick, who has charge of 
the electric-light system of Santa Cruz, Cali- 
fornia; Mary, wife of Jefferson Clark; and 
Nellie, wife of Walter Wilder. 

A. M. Welcome remained under the 
parental roof until the breaking out of the 
late war. August 21, 1862, he enlisted at 
Oasis in Company G, Thirteenth Wisconsin 
\'olunteer Infantry, A. I^. Swain being cap- 
tain. He saw his first service in Kentucky, 
and from there was sent to Minnesota to 
fight Indians. The Indian trouble having 
been settled, he was ordered back to Louis- 
ville, and shortly after started for Nashville, 
but stopped at Bowling Green, and later re- 



turned to Louisville, where he was dis- 
charged September 20, 1865. In the sum- 
mer of 1865 he was made orderly of Bar- 
racks No. I, Louisville. At the close of 
the war Mr. Welcome returned to his home 
in Wisconsin, and engaged in teaming for a 
year or so, and he also ran an express. In 
1867 and '68 he had charge of his father's 
farm. 

In the spring of 1869 a company of four 
set out for Garden City, Minnesota, for the 
purpose of joining a party at that point to 
go to California. These four Wisconsin 
boys were A. M. Welcome, Charles J. 
Decker, Alva Watterman and Robert Milli- 
gan. They drove through to Garden City, 
and upon arriving there found that the Cali- 
fornia project had been abandoned. Mr. 
Welcome remained in Garden City two 
months, and then, in company with Mr. 
Decker, visited the States of Missouri, Ken- 
tucky and Tennessee, and returned to 
Minnesota in the fall, and soon afterward to 
Wisconsin. But having once seen the 
broad and fertile prairies of Minnesota, he 
could not rest away from this State, and 
accordingly returned to Minnesota, accom- 
panied by Mr. Decker, landing in Martin 
county June 4, 1890. Mr. Welcome built a 
sod house and settled down im the tract of 
land which he still owns. A filing was not 
made immediately owing to the fact that it 
was generally believed the land would go 
back to the Government from the railroad 
company. This occurred in due time and 
the filing was placed in 1871. This tract 
of land comprises the southwest quarter of 
section 2, township 102, range 32. To it 
Mr. Welcome has since added an eighty- 
acre tract on the soutli, which he secured 
under the timber-culture act, and now has 
in one body a fine farm t^f 240 acres. His 



1 1 


'^^M 







^^^^^ C^igf/Jlaj/. 



Ha^ 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



247 



elegant residence was built in 1883. About 
three acres of this land are covered with 
trees, the oldest of which were planted in 
1873. The past year he had twenty acres 
in wheat, seventy in oats, and forty-five in 
corn, and at present his place is stocked 
with thirty hogs, twelve cattle and eighteen 
horses. 

Mr. \\'clcoine was married April 4, 1874, 
to Miss Mina Baum, daughter of John and 
Mary (Shear) Baum. Mr. and Mrs. Wel- 
come have two children: Charlie Decker, 
born September i, 1876, and Earl M., May 
8, 1882. The older son is now pursuing a 
business course in the Breck School at Wil- 
der, Minnesota. 

Politically Mr. Welcome is a stanch Re- 
publican, and has frequently been honored 
by his neighbors with township offices. As 
above stated, the town of Welcome was 
named for him. It was platted and located 
on a section owned by his brother-in-law, 
S. L. Campbell, a railroad attorney. 



@r:ORGE MURRAY, the first set- 
tler of Rolling Green township, 
Martin county, Minnesota, is one 
of the substantial farmers and 
highly respected citizens of his community. 
Alexander Murra}-, the father of this 
gentleman, was born in Scotland, son of 
John and Nancy Murray, and came with 
them across the Atlantic in 1803, their set- 
tlement being in Nova Scotia. There John 
Murray and his wife passed the residue of 
their lives and died. Alexander Murray was 
married, in Nova Scotia, to Merron Camp- 
bell, a native of the Highlands of Scotland, 
and a daughter of Duncan Campbell, who 
came to America in 1822 and made per- 



manent settlement in Nova Scotia. The 
parents of our subject both passed their 
lives in the country of their adoption, and 
died and are buried there, the father's death 
occurring in 1882, and the mother's in 1889. 
They were members of the Presbyterian 
Church, and were among the most highly 
respected people of their communit)-. In 
their family were fourteen children, of whom 
the following named are still living: John, 
Adam, George, Robert, Janet Berry, Nancy 
McKay, Margaret Southerland, and Ellen 
McKenzie. Three of the sons served in the 
late war, — Duncan, James and George. 

George Murray was born in Nova Scotia, 
January 24, 1841, and was reared to man- 
hood there, receiving only a limited educa- 
tion in the common schools. His father be- 
fore him was a farmer, and all his life has 
been spent in agricultural pursuits. In 1862, 
at the age of twenty-one, Mr. Murray came 
to Minnesota, and the following year settled 
on his present farm. This part of the country 
was then all wild land, and, as above stated, 
he was the first settler in the' township of 
Rolling Green. Here he has 380 acres, 300 
of which are under cultivation, and all the 
improvements on this farm have been placed 
here by him. In February of the year fol- 
lowing his location here, he enlisted as a 
private in the Union army, and, as a mem- 
ber of Company K, First Minnesota Heavy 
Artillery, went to the front. He was sta- 
tioned at Chattanooga, Tennessee, until Sep- 
tember, 1865, when he was honorably dis- 
charged and returned to Minnesota. 

February 28, 1867, Mr. Murray was 
married to Miss Sarah Jones, daughter of 
Richard Jones, one of the early settlers of 
Rolling Green township. They have four 
children: Catharine Ann, wife of Lovell 
Whitnev, has two children: Richard A.; 



248 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Lavina, a graduate of the Fairmont school; 
and Gladys I. 

Mr. Murray is a member of the Protest- 
ant Methodist Church, in which he has 
served as an official, and he is also identi- 
fied with the G. A. R., Phil. Kearny Post, 
No. 18. While his early advantages for 
schooling were limited, he has always taken 
an active interest in educational affairs and 
for over twenty years has been an officer in 
his school district. Politically he is a Pro- 
hibitionist. He has served the public as 
chairman of the Board of Supervisors and 
has filled the offices of Assessor, Township 
Treasurer, and Justice of the Peace. 



I 



<>^ F. LATOURELL has for at least 
l/**^ twelve years been engaged in busi- 
J^^^J ness in Minnesota Lake, and is one 
of its leading merchants, now at 
the head of a well appointed establishment, 
in which he carries a stock of general mer- 
chandise. He receives from the public a 
liberal patronage, for he is honorable and 
upright in all dealings, is courteous and 
pleasant in manner and earnestly desires to 
please his many patrons.. 

Mr. Latourcil was born near Ottawa, On- 
tario, Canada, on the 5th of November, 
1845, and is a son of Francis D. and Mary 
A. (Tusaw) Latourell, — the seventh born in 
their family of nine children. The father 
when but three years old lost both his par- 
ents and was adopted by Sisters of Mercy 
and reared in Montreal. He learned the 
trade of mason and later in life engaged in 
plastering, doing this work on many fine 
buildings in Ottawa and vicinity, including a 
church in that city, where the remains of 
the members of his family rested tempo- 
rarily. He also followed farming for many 



years, and worked as a mechanic, being an 
expert along that line. In 1855 he emi- 
grated to Wisconsin, locating in Green Lake 
county, and after three years he removed 
to Blue Earth county, Minnesota, where he 
secured from the Government a homestead 
claim of 160 acres on sections 8 and 9, 
Danville township. He died in December, 
1882, at the advanced age of seventy-three, 
honored and esteemed by all who knew him. 
His wife was also a native of Ontario. Her 
father received in recognition of some infor- 
mation of the movements of the French, 
during the French and Indian war, a tract 
of land of sixteen acres, situated on a little 
island, on which Mrs. Latourell was born. 
When about six years of age she was left 
an orphan. Reared on Canadian soil, she 
there met and married in that country 
Francis Latourell. His death occurred on 
the old homestead at the age of sixty-seven, 
and a nice granite shaft marks the last rest- 
ing place of Mr. and Mrs. Latourell, two of 
the honored pioneers of Blue Earth county. 
This worthy couple were the parents of 
the following children: Charles W., a na- 
tive of Ontario and a leading citizen of the 
communit)' in which he made his home, 
died in the sixty-second year of his age; 
Julia A., the wife of S. S. Spaulding, an 
agriculturist, who for three years served the 
Union as a member of the Thirty-second 
Wisconsin Infantry; Alexander, in the fall 
of 1S59, came from Green Lake county, 
\\'isconsin, to Blue Earth county, Minne- 
sota, and purchased on section 8, Danville 
township, a tract of laud adjoining the old 
homestead. He was a member of Gov- 
ernor Austin's company of mounted rangers 
and fought against the Sioux Indians in 
August, 1862. He has served as Chairman 
of the Town Board of Supervisors, has been 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



249 



School Trustee for many years, and in his 
poHtical connections is a Democrat. John 
Wesley resides on a part of the old home 
farm, and the place is improved with fine 
modern buildings and conveniences. He 
also served in Company B, mounted rangers, 
against the Siou.x. He is well known 
throughout the county and is highly es- 
teemed among men. Angeline is the wife 
of B. A. Cooper, who follows farming near 
Fairmont, Martin count}'. He was a mem- 
ber of Company B, mounted rangers. R. 
O. , usually called Oscar, is extensively en- 
gaged in farming near Salem, Oregon. He 
served under General Sherman in the war 
of the Rebellion, as a member of the First 
Minnesota Infantrj-, and was mustered out 
at Fort Snellingat the close of the struggle. 
He has been a resident of Salem for the 
past four years. B. F. , whose name heads 
this record, is the ne.xt in order of birth. 
Washington, who is successfully engaged in 
agricultural pursuits, resides in Danville, 
where he has extensive real-estate interests, 
and also owns the finest home in the city. 
Lucy A. is the wife of a Mr. Pfister, and 
for some years has carried on a millinery 
establishment in Salem, Oregon. 

In taking up the personal history of our 
subject, B. F. Latourell, we present to our 
readers the record of one of the best known 
and highly respected citizens of Faribault 
county. He was a child of only .twelve 
years when with his parents he removed to 
the Badger State, and a few years later he 
accompanied them to Blue Earth county. 
Reared amid the wild scenes of the frontier, 
he went through the vicissitudes of pioneer 
life with its many hardships and trials. He 
aided in the arduous task of developing the 
wild land, and his boyhood was a busy one. 
When he came to this State there was not 



a school in Danville township, and his 
school life was therefore ended by his 
removal from Wisconsin. The first school 
there was a log structure and was erected 
about 1863. He has, through reading, 
experience and observation, become a thor- 
oughly well informed man. He has not 
only studied the common branches, but has 
familiarized himself to some extent with the 
classics, and always keeps himself well 
informed on the questions of the day, politi- 
cal and otherwise. Though farming was 
his pursuit from early boyhood he did not 
desire to make it a life work. On coming 
to Minnesota Lake he rented a building 
from Peter Kremer, almost opposite the 
present site of Fish Brothers' store, bought 
out the stock of N. J. Vance and opened a 
general merchandise store, which he has 
since conducted most successfully. He has 
since erected a good store building and now 
carries a fine line of goods, while his court- 
eous treatment and earnest endeavor to 
please his customers has gained him a 
large share of the public patronage. 

During the late war Mr. Latourell mani- 
fested his loyalty to the Government by 
enlisting in Company C, Eleventh Volun- 
teer Infantry of Minnesota, enrolling his 
name in the old Clifton House parlor on the 
29th of August, 1864. He served under 
Captain Theodore E. Potter, of Garden 
City, Minnesota, and Colonel Gilfillen. The 
regiment was largely engaged in detached 
duty. From Fort Snelling the command 
was sent to St. Paul, thence by steamer to 
La Crosse, and by rail to Chicago, whence 
they were ordered to the front, but were re- 
called to quell an election uprising. They 
then went to Louisville, Nashville and Fort 
Negley, where they were encamped twentv 
days. The company was ordered to Rich- 



250 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



land on guard duty, there remaining from 
November until the following summer, 
when they returned to Fort Snelling and 
were mustered out on the 26th of June, 
1865. 

On the 14th of October, 1866, Mr. La- 
tourell was united in marriage with Miss 
Irene Annis, daughter of Ira and Brilla 
(Cor\") Annis, who was born in Craftsbury, 
Orleans county, Vermont, February 28, 
1 848. She is the fourth in a family of ten 
children, four sons and six daughters, six of 
whom are yet living. Richard S. of Maple- 
ton, Minnesota, is now living retired, but 
for eight years was engaged in mercantile 
pursuits in Brainerd, Minnesota. Mrs. La- 
tourell is the next younger. lone is the 
wife of C. F. Wallace, who for about three 
years resided near Chattanooga, Tennessee, 
but is now located in Lura township, Fari- 
bault county. Ira D., who owns the old 
family homestead near Mapleton, has for 
four years been engaged in merchandising, 
in the line of hardware, in South Shore, 
Coddington county. South Dakota. Flora 
E. is the wife of Albert H. Heath, a farmer 
of Medford, Minnesota. Sarah M. is the 
wife of J. H. Quinn, County Attorney of 
Faribault county, residing in Wells. The 
father of this family was a native of Vermont 
and emigrated to W'isconsin early in the 
'50s with a colony from the Green Mountain 
State. He came to Minnesota in 1856, 
settling in Mapleton. He was for some 
time officially connected with that locality 
and was a prominent factor in promoting 
the educational interests. He held member- 
ship with the Baptist Church, was an earn- 
est Christian gentleman and contributed lib- 
erally of his means to church and benevo- 
lent work. He died October 10, 1882. 
His wife, a native of Vermont, died on the 



17th of January, 1862, and thus ended a 
consistent Christian life. They were laid to 
rest side by side in Mapleton cemetery, where 
a monument has been erected to their 
memory. 

Mr. and Mrs. Latourell have a pretty 
and commodious home in Minnesota Lake, 
which is the abode of hospitality. Their 
family numbers eight children, five sons and 
three daughters: Luella May, born April 
17, 1868, in Danville, Blue Earth county, 
attended the Mankato Normal School, and 
became a teacher of recognized ability, being 
employed for six successive terms in one 
district. She is now the wife of Fred Gil- 
man, a farmer of Medford township. Ira 
E., born in Danville, January 16, 1S70, has 
since 1893 been a member of the firm of 
Latourell & Son, and is a deservedly popu- 
lar young business man; Horace Greeley, 
born in Danville, March 23, 1872, is a 
student in the law department of the State 
University of Minnesota, having read law 
for three years. Richard Albert, born July 
19, 1874, is now employed in the public 
librar\' as an artist, and many of his works 
adorn his parents' home. Willie Leslie, 
born August 4, 1876, died February 6, 1877. 
Earl, born September 2, 1878, died April 
25, 1885. Stella B., born February 5, 
1880, is now attending school. Myrtle E., 
born February 14, 1885, completes the 
family. 

Mr. Latourell was appointed Postmaster, 
serving during the Harrison administration. 
He has also been a member of the School 
Board and takes a deep interest in every- 
thing tending to promote the moral, social 
or material welfare of the community. He 
aided in building the Methodist church of 
Minnesota Lake, and has liberally helped to 
maintain it. He is an honored pioneer, was 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



^51 



a valiant soldier, is a progressive and public- 
spirited citizen and a straightforward busi- 
ness man. His long residence in this sec- 
tion, dating from 1858, has made him famil- 
iar with almost the entire history of southern 
Minnesota, and in this volume, devoted to 
the record of the early settlers and best cit- 
izens, he well deserves mention. 



*-j-» INNAEUS HARVEY HAND, who 
I r carries on general farmingon section 
1 A 29, Silver Lake township, Martin 
county, was born in New Lebanon, 
Massachusetts, October 5, 1839, and is a 
son of Harvey and Martha (Twentymen) 
Hand. The paternal grandfather, Jesse 
Hand, was born in New York and was one 
of the heroes of the Re\-olution who val- 
iantly fought in the struggle for independ- 
ence. The father of our subject was born 
in the Empire State, as was also his wife. 
Her father was born in England and came 
to America as an English soldier when this 
country was endeavoring to throw off the 
yoke of British tyranny. When the war 
was over he located in America, and fol- 
lowed his trade of tailoring as a means of 
livelihood. In the old Bay State was cele- 
brated the marriage of the parents of our 
subject, and after two years' residence there 
they emigrated to Walworth county, Wis- 
consin, locating on a farm which was their 
place of abode throughout their remaining 
days. The father passed away at the age of 
seventy-five and the mother's death oc- 
curred when fifty-three years of age. To 
them were born six children who grew to 
years of maturity, namely: L. H. ; Lacon 
J., who is living in Walworth county; Berna- 
dottc, a resident of Lyons, Walworth 



county; Eleanor, wife of James Cole; Elery 
C, who makes his home in Oberlin, Kan- 
sas; and Arthur W., who is located in 
Lyons, Wisconsin. 

L. H. Hand was only about a year old 
when his parents removed to the Badger 
State, and in Walworth county he was 
reared and educated, working on the farm 
through the summer months and attending 
the public schools of the neighborhood in 
the winter season. His labors were given 
to his father until his marriage, which took 
place in 1866, the lady of his choice being 
Miss Sarah F. Short, a native of Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, born in 1847, and a daughter of 
Richard and Amelia M. (Barnes) Short, the 
former a native of Virginia and the latter of 
New York. She is the second of four chil- 
dren who grew to years of maturity. Her 
grandfather, Lewis Barnes, was born in 
New York, and was a minister of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church. He married Louie 
Page, who was born in New York. Her 
great-grandmother Barnes lived to the very 
advanced aged of 1 10 years ! 

Upon his marriage Mr. Hand located in 
Lyons, Wisconsin, upon a farm which he 
there purchased, and which he made his 
home until his arrival in Minnesota in 1878. 
For two years he worked a farm on shares 
and then removed to his present farm, — a 
tract of sixty-four acres in Silver Lake town- 
ship, which he has placed under a high state 
of cultivation. He is also agent for the 
Centennial windmill. Although his farm 
duties engross the greater part of his time 
and attention, he never neglects his public 
duties, and has served in several olificial posi- 
tions. For fourteen years he has been the 
efficient Postmaster of Centre Chain, under 
both Republican and Democratic adminis- 
trations, has been a member of the Town 



252 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Board of Supervisors, was Justice of the 
Peace and Township Treasurer, and is now 
Notary Public. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Hand has 
been brightened and blessed with a family of 
six children, Elery L. , a carpenter by trade; 
Clarence E. , who is a farmer of Eagle town- 
ship, Kossuth county, Iowa; Ernest R. ; 
Franklin, deceased; Hattie M. , and Ellen 
I., who are still under the parental roof and 
aid in making the household one of the most 
hospitable homes in this locality. The 
members of the family rank high in social 
circles and their friends throughout the com- 
munity are many. 



* y ^ ENRY CHRISTOPHER KRUSE, 

1''^^ a highly respected citizen of Wel- 

\ . r come, Minnesota, is local agent for 

Hodges & Hyde, prominent grain 

dealers. A sketch of his life is appropriate 

in this work, and, briefly, is as follows: 

Henrj' Christopher Kruse was born near 
the city of Humboldt, Germany, August 6, 
1847, son of John Henry and Mary (Myers) 
Kruse. His father lived and died in Ger- 
many, his death occurring in 1882, at the age 
of sixty-six years. He and his wife had two 
children, the subject of this sketch and a 
daughter, Mary, who is the wife of Rinehart 
Grams, a farmer of Faribault county, Min- 
nesota. 

Henry C. had the advantage of a com- 
mon-school education only. At the break- 
ing out of the Franco-Prussian war, not 
wishing to participate in that struggle, Mr. 
Kruse determined to come to America, 
which he did, landing in New York, Octo- 
ber 23, 1869. From there he went to New 
Jersey and immediately secured work on a 



farm. Six months later he came West as 
far as Chicago, and shortly afterward joined 
a party of laborers that were sent to \'icks- 
burg, Mississippi, to work in the marshes of 
that vicinity. He was there until the spring 
of 1872, when he came to Freeborn county, 
Minnesota, he having acquaintances in that 
county who had emigrated there from Ger- 
many. From 1872 until 1875 he was em- 
ployed as a farm hand, and the latter year 
he married and settled down on a rented 
farm. Later he bought a quarter section 
of land, which he sold to Frederick Lempke, 
and moved to Lakefield, Jackson count}', 
this State. There he entered the employ 
of Bonner & Hyde, which firm has since 
changed to Hodges & Hyde, and he has ever 
since acted as their local agent, buying 
grain. From Lakefield he was sent to Rap- 
idan. Blue Earth county, and in August, 
1 88 1, was transferred to Welcome, Martin 
county, where he has since remained. 
When he felt that he was permanently lo- 
cated at Welcome he moved his family from 
Freeborn county to this place, and in 1883 
he built the residence he has since occupied. 
Also, soon after his arrival here, he pur- 
chased a 160-acre tract of land, the south- 
west quarter of section 26, township 103, 
range 32; and now has a tenant on his 
farm. 

Mr. Kruse was married August 10, 1875, 
to Lauretta Adelia, daughter of George W^ 
Sanders. She was born March 12, 1857. 
Their children are as follows: Henry 
Newell, born August 10, 1877; Orren 
Adrian, October 17, 1880; Ellen Margaret, 
February 7, 1882; Ida Joel, November 23, 
1884; Gertrude May, March 20, 188"; and 
George Harold, June 2, 1889. 

Fraternally, Mr. Kruse is identified with 
the Masonic order at Fairmont, and A. O. U. 



FARIBAULT, MARTJX, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



2 5.-^ 



W. at Welcome; politically, he is a Repub- 
lican, and, religiously, he is a believer in the 
doctrines of the Lutheran Church. 



HNDREW EATON, Postmaster at 
Wells, has been a resident of this 
village ever since 1872. He is a 
native of Windsor, Hartford county, 
Connecticut, born September 18, 1824, a 
son of Joshua Eaton, who was a native of 
Union, Tolland county, same State, where 
the father of the celebrated Philip D. 
Armour of Chicago, was born; they were 
friends and neighbors. Joshua's father, 
Josiah Eaton, was a Revolutionary soldier 
under General Putnam, and was at the 
battles of Bunker Hill and Long Island and 
served seven years. General Eaton, of 
Massachusetts, was of the same family. 
Joshua Eaton was married at Windsor, 
Connecticut, to Miss Jane Stiles, a daugh- 
ter of Captain Stiles, who was a soldier in 
the Revolutionary war and wintered with 
Washington at Valley Forge. He was a 
prominent citizen of Windsor. Joshua was 
in the war of 1812, engaged by the United 
States Government in hauling supplies from 
Hartford, Connecticut, to Portland, Maine. 
In 1 83 1 the Eaton family moved to Stock- 
bridge, Madison county. New York, by 
team and wagon. In their family were four 
sons and four daughters, named as follows: 
Cornelia; William, a graduate of Hamilton 
College, of Clinton, New York, became a 
teacher, and died at Beaufort, South Caro- 
lina; Asahel Knowlton, also a graduate of 
Hamilton College and now a chemist in 
Brooklyn, New York; Andrew and Ann 
Blackman, of Iowa, twins; Caroline Frost; 
Samuel Chapin, assayer in the United 
States mint at New York, and during the 



war a civil engineer for the United States 
Government; and Emeline, wife of J. K. 
Jessup, of New York city, employed in the 
United States mint. 

The subject of this sketch was reared at 
Stockbridge, receiving a general education 
in the public schools and at an academy at 
Clinton, under Professor Strong. At the 
age of twenty years he engaged in trade, 
buying and shipping grain and produce at 
Oneida, New York. In i860 he went to 
Woodstock, Canada, where he was engaged 
in the milling business until 1872, when he 
came to Faribault county, locating upon a 
farm in Kiester township. In the autumn 
of 1873 he moved to Wells, entering the 
grain trade, which he has now followed here 
for nearly twenty years. For a time he was 
also engaged in milling. He was appointed 
Postmaster of Wells in 1889, under Presi- 
dent Harrison's administration, and in 1891 
the office was made a presidential office, when 
he received his second appointment, having 
held the office for more than five years at 
this writing. 

December 5, 1850, is the date of his mar- 
riage, at Stockbridge, New York, to Sarah 
F. Wood, daughter of David Wood, an 
old merchant of that place. Mrs. Eaton 
was educated at Cazenovia Seminary, New 
York. Mr. and Mrs. Eaton have live chil- 
dren, viz. : Frances, a graduate of the musi- 
cal department of Grinnell College, Iowa, 
and now a music teacher; Samuel E., a com- 
mercial traveler and grain buyer, living at 
Wells; Charles A., also in the grain busi- 
ness, purchasing and shipping grain, in North 
Dakota; Clark Stiles, engaged with the 
Hager Music Company, of Wells; Rose, a 
student at the State University at Minneap- 
olis, a member of the graduating class of 
1895. 



254 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Mr. Eaton is a Republican, and has been 
President of the Village Council; is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic order, and a highly es- 
teemed gentleman for his fine intellectual, 
business and social qualities. 



aH. DRAPER, a leading and wide- 
awake young business man of 
Wells, now carrying on a drug 
store, was born in the township of 
Colon, Michigan, on the 29th of April, 1865, 
and is a son of Moses R. and Sarah (Hamp- 
sey) Draper. They had two children, one 
being Calista, now living with her parents in 
Michigan. The father also was born on the 
old homestead in the Peninsular State, 
where our subject's birth occurred, in 1843. 
He has made farming his life work, and now 
carries on agricultural pursuits in Michigan 
where, with his wife and daughter, he has a 
pleasant home. The paternal grandfather, 
Hiram Draper, was born in New Hampshire, 
in 1808, emigrated to Michigan in an early 
day, and settled in the southern peninsula, 
where after an active life he is now spending 
his declining years in retirement. He has 
reached the ripe old age of eighty-seven. 

In the first twenty years of his life C. 
H. Draper was upon the home farm, aiding 
in the labors of the fields and attending the 
public schools of the neighborhood. On 
leaving the high school, and thus complet- 
ing his literary education, he entered the 
business college in Kalamazoo, Michigan, 
at which he was graduated, in the class 
of 1884. He then spent one year in teach- 
ing school and in the spring of 1885 he 
started westward. Chance led him to Wells, 
and after a short time he went to South Da- 
kota, where he continued for a year, en- 
gaged in the drug business. On the expira- 



tion of that period, not being favorably im- 
pressed with the outlook for Dakota, he re- 
turned to Wells and purchased a half inter- 
est in a drug and stationery store, his part- 
ner being J. M. Nye, the present County 
Superintendent of Schools of Faribault 
county. The connection between the two 
gentlemen continued for four jears, when 
Mr. Draper bought out his partner's interest, 
and has since been sole proprietor of the 
leading drugstore of Wells. He has a well 
appointed establishment, supplied with 
everything found in his line, and is now en- 
joying a fine trade, his patronage having 
constantly increased from the beginning. 

On the 31st of October, 1889, Mr. 
Draper led to the marriage altar Miss Julie 
Hall, a native of Quincy, Michigan, and one 
of the three children of A. D. and Emogene 
(Leland) Hall. Her father was born in the 
Empire State, although his life was mostly 
passed in Michigan. He subsequently re- 
moved to Minnesota, became one of the 
first settlers of Wells after the town was 
platted, and built the Wells Hotel, one of 
first buildings of the city. After spending a 
few years here he removed to Chicago, and 
soon afterward his wife died. He survived 
her a few years, and then he, too, was called 
to the home beyond. He is well remem- 
bered by many of the pioneer settlers of 
this locality, and his daughter, Mrs. Draper, 
has resided in Wells longer than any other 
lady. Two children grace the union of our 
subject and his wife, — Dorothj' and Marjorie 
Draper. 

Socially Mr. Draper affiliates with several 
secret societies, and in politics he is an in- 
flexible adherent of the principles of the 
Republican party. He does all in his power 
to promote its growth and insure its success, 
and is a man of firm convictions which he 




j^ec^^ae 'O/ (/M-. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIX, WArONWAAr AND JACKSON. 



257 



upholds with all the ardor of an enthusiastic 
and true nature. He possesses good busi- 
ness ability and has therefore prospered in 
his undertakings, and his sterling worth has 
gained him the confidence and good will of 
*inany friends. 



y^^ EORGE A. WEIR is the owner of 
■ ^g ;i^ fine farm of lOO acres, and his 

\^^^ home is within the village limits of 
Winnebago Citj'. His residence 
in Faribault county dates from 1S57, and 
during the long period of thirty-eight years 
he has witnessed the growth and develop- 
ment of this region from a wild tract to one 
of the prosperous localities of Minnesota. 
In the work of advancement he has ever 
borne his part and has long been recognized 
as one of the valued citizens of the commun- 
ity. The record of this sterling pioneer is 
as follows: 

A native of Tennessee, he was born in 
Robertson county, on the 31st of January, 
1834, and is a son of William Weir. The 
family was founded in America by three 
brothers who emigrated from the north of 
Ireland (their father having been a native of 
Scotland) at a day when an ocean voyage 
was attended with considerable danger, and 
located on Virginia soil, in the days when 
the Old Dominion was still a colony under 
the sway of Great Britian. The grand- 
father of our subject, a native of Ireland, 
located in Virginia and from that State 
removed to South Carolina, and subsequent- 
ly to Kentucky. The father of George A. 
was born in South Carolina and was a child 
of only seven summers when with his parents 
he went to Georgia. He accompanied them 
to Kentucky and after reaching the age of 
maturity went to Tennessee, and in the last 

13 



named State was married to Elizabeth Lat- 
imer, daughter of Joseph Latimer, a native 
of Connecticut and a son of Col. Jonathan 
Latimer, who with seven sons and two 
daughters emigrated to Tennessee about the 
year 1788. He was a Colonel in the Revo- 
lutionary war and had eight sons in the serv- 
ice at the time. Joseph's wife bore the 
maiden name of Anne Dobbins, and her 
birth occurred in North Carolina. Mrs. 
Weir was born in Tennessee. Throughout 
his entire life William Weir carried on agri- 
cultural pursuits and at the age of 58 years, 
after a useful career, passed to his rest. 
He was a member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church, and his strict integrity and ster- 
ling worth made him one of nature's noble 
men. His wife survived him for some time 
and died in Faribault county, Minnesota, at 
the age of sixty-seven. They had a famil\- 
of nine children, si.x sons and three daugh- 
ters, who in order of birth are as follows: 
James C, Joseph L. , John W. , Hester A. 
Ballandi, of Winnebago City township; 
Susan C, wife of George Hart; George A., 
of this sketch; David T. , Dan P. and \'an- 
delia, who is now keeping house for our 
subject. 

The gentleman of whom we write was 
reared to manhood upon a farm, spending his 
days in the usual manner of farmer lads, work- 
ing in the fields through the summer, while 
during the school year he pursued his studies. 
He is now a man of broad general informa- 
tion, and of knowledge acquired through ex- 
perience, reading and observation. In his 
earlier years he tnade a study of surveying 
and applied himself until he became quite 
proficient in that line of work. When a 
young man of twenty-three years he deter- 
mined to try his fortune in the West, for he 
believed better opportunities were afforded 



i58 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



young men than in the older and more 
thickly settled States nearer the Atlantic 
coast. This led to his emigration to Min- 
nesota in the year 1857, and he cast his lot 
with the pioneers of Faribault county. He 
secured a claim on section 23, Winnebago 
City township, afterward his present farm, 
and upon the farm which he developed has 
since made his home, — one of the old-time 
and highly respected farmers of the neigh- 
borhood. With characteristic energy he 
began to place the barren tract under the 
plow and prepare for the sowing and reaping 
of crops, and as earnest and faithful labor is 
ever rewarded he in course of time reaped 
his reward in the shape of bounteous harvests 
of golden grain. Upon the place is now a 
fine bearing orchard. There are good barns 
and sheds, a windmill and a tasteful and 
pleasant residence, which is now within the 
corporation limits of the village, that has 
extended its borders until it embraces the 
farm upon which he settled almost forty 
years ago. 

Mr. Weir is ever busy, devoted to his 
farming interests, yet he has found time to 
faithfully discharge all public duties. For 
about fourteen years he was County Sur- 
veyor, his frequent re-election resulting from 
efficient and faithful service. He was first 
called to that office in i860, and his prompt- 
ness and fidelity to duty won him high com- 
mendation. In politics he was formerly a 
Democrat, but now by his ballot supports 
the Prohibition party. He was made a 
Mason at the age of twenty-two, while still 
in Tennessee, and is now a member of Blue 
Earth Valley Lodge, No. 27, F. & A. M. 
He is broad and liberal in his views, accords 
to others the privileges of upholding their 
own ideas, and is strong in support of his 
own convictions. He is frank and warm- 



hearted, genial and pleasant in manner and 
honorable in business dealing, and is one of 
the popular and honored pioneers of Fari- 
bault county. 



aHARLES PEABODY ANDROSS, 
a retired farmer, has long been a 
resident of Martin county, and de- 
serves mention among her early 
settlers. His connection with the official 
interests of the community also entitles him 
to recognition in this volume, and we take 
pleasure in presenting his life sketch to our 
readers. 

A native of Massachusetts, he was born 
near Boston, — the hub of the universe, — on 
the 1 2th of August, 1S22. On the paternal 
side he is Scotch descent. His grandfather 
Andross was born in Scotland, and when a 
young man crossed the briny deep to the 
New World, locating in Orange county, Ver- 
mont, where Mills D. Andross, the father of 
our subject, was born and reared. He 
learned the painter's trade, then went to 
Boston, where he followed that occupation 
for some time. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Elizabeth Peabody, was a native 
of the Bay State, and a distant relative of 
Peabody of the noted bank of England. 
The wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Andross was 
celebrated in Massachusetts, and there they 
made their home for an extended period, or 
until the father's death, which occurred 
about 1825. The mother later took her 
family to Orange county, Vermont, where 
she subsequently became the wife of Noah 
Newell. The children of the first union 
were C. P., of this sketch, and William, 
who is living in Union county, Oregon. 

Mr. Andross, whose name begins this 
article, was only two and a half years of age 



FARIBAULT, MARTIX, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



259 



at the time of his father's death, at which 
time he was taken by Dr. Hunking, who 
gave him a home until he was twenty years 
of age. The Doctor had only two children, 
and our subject was permitted to obtain a 
good common-school education, and received 
fair and kindly treatment. In the year i 843 
he emigrated westward, hoping to benefit 
his financial condition in a country where 
he had heard better opportunities were 
afforded than in the older and more thickly 
settled States of the East. He located in 
La Porte, Indiana, where for two years he 
was engaged in clerking in a store, when in 
1845 he removed to Rock county, Wiscon- 
sin, where he worked by the month on a 
farm, also engaged in teaming. 

In Rock county, on the 27th of March, 
1847, Mr. Andross married Miss Elsie A. 
Dykeman, a native of Schoharie county, New 
York, born on the 8th of June, 1830, daugh- 
ter of Cornelius and Julia (Van Wormen) 
Dykeman. The}', too, were natives of the 
Empire State and became early settlers of 
the Badger State. Mrs. Andross is their 
youngest daughter and third child, and she 
has become the mother of eight children, — 
G. Frank, who is represented elsewhere in 
this work; Charles, who is supposed to be 
dead; Julia, wife of T. J. Williams, an ex- 
tensive farmer of Faribault county, Minne- 
sota; Mary J., wife of Albert Wise, who car- 
ries on agricultural pursuits in the same 
county; John C, who is living in Center 
Creek township, Martin county: Hattie, wife 
of Lewis Becker, also of Center Creek town- 
ship; Gertie, wife of William Wood, of the 
same township; and Maud, wife of H. A. 
Winzenburg, a prominent farmer, living on 
section 20, Center Creek township. 

Upon his marriage Mr. Andross located 
upon a farm in Rock county, Wisconsin, and 



in 1850 removed to Washington count\-. 
Minnesota, where he made a claim of 200 
acres, cultivating it two years. He then sold 
out and went to Walworth county, Wiscon- 
sin, where, by purchase, he obtained posses- 
sion of 120 acres of land, that constituted 
his farm until after the breaking out of the 
Civil war, when he disposed of the property 
in order to enter his country's service. 
Alarmed by the attitude of the South and 
fearful for the stability of the Union, he 
offered his services for its preservation, and 
in September, 1861, became a member of 
Company D, Thirteenth Wisconsin Infantry. 
He enlisted as a private, but was promoted 
to the rank of Sergeant before the company 
was organized, in which work he assisted. 
He served for three j'ears and fifty-si.x days, 
and then received an honorable discharge at 
Nashville, Tennessee, in November, 1864. 
Among the brave boys in blue he was always 
found, faithful to the old flag and the cause 
it represented. 

Mr. Andross at once returned to the 
North and again bought a farm in Walworth 
county, Wisconsin, which he conducted until 
1866, when he bought a farm in Martin 
county, Minnesota, — a tract of 160 acres of 
land on sections 29 and 32, Center Creek 
township. About thirty acres had been 
placed under the plow, and the only im- 
provements upon the place were a small 
house 12 X 22 feet and a straw barn. There 
was not a tree or bush, and the farm did not 
present the pleasant attractive appearance 
which to-day characterizes it. The boun- 
daries ha\e been extended until it comprises 
200 acres, and the fine improvements which 
have been added stand as monuments to the 
thrift and enterprise of the owner. He is 
now living retired and rents his land, while 
he is enjoying a well earned rest. 



26o 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Mr. Andross exercises his right of fran- 
chise in support of the men and measures of 
the Republican party, and has been hon- 
ored with offices of trust. For seven years 
he served as County Commissioner, elected 
for three successive terms, was also Town 
Treasurer and for thirteen years Town As- 
sessor. He has long been officially con- 
nected with the schools of the neighborhood, 
and the cause of education finds in him a 
stalwart advocate. Socially Mr. Andross is 
connected with Phil Kearny Post, No. i8, 
G. A. R. 



HF. HOWARD, editor and proprie- 
tor of the Wells Advocate, arrived 
here in 1890. He was born in 
Lavalle, Sauk county, Wisconsin, 
August 4, 1 86 1, a son of Harry Howard, 
who was born in Pennsylvania, in 1831, 
reared and educated there, and in 1853 
moved to Lavalle, where he followed farming. 
In 1865 he removed to Goodhue county, 
Minnesota; in 1872 to Marshall, this State, 
where he died, Januarj' 28, 1890; his wife 
also is deceased. 

Mr. A. F. Howard, one of their four 
children, was brought up to farm life, receiv- 
ing a common-school education. At the 
age of eighteen years he was employed in 
the printing-office of the Messenger at Mar- 
shall. Afterward he conducted the Canby 
(Minnesota) News until 1890, when he came 
to Wells and purchased the Advocate. 

He was married at Canby, to Miss Lena 
Michaelson, of that place, and his children 
are Millie and Ethel. He is a member of 
Lodge No. 39, A. O. U. W. Mr. Howard 
is a aealous and efficient worker in the inter- 
ests of Wells and vicinity, ably conducting 



the Advocate. He knows that the people 
want news, wit and instruction, and sup- 
plies what they want. 



^V^^ ELSON GLEASON, who carries on 
I \ general farming on section 21, 
\ \ Nashville township, Martin county, 
was born in Genesee county (now 
Wyoming county) New York, September 
30, 1 8 16, descending from good old Revolu- 
tionary stock. His grandfather, Moses Glea- 
son, a native of Connecticut and of Irish de- 
scent, aided the Colonies in their struggle for 
independence, and the maternal grandfather 
was also a soldier in the Revolution, serving 
for seven years under the immediate com- 
mand of Washington. He, too, was a na- 
tive of the Nutmeg State. The parents of 
our subject, Thomas R. and Martha (Holli- 
da}') Gleason, were both natives of Con- 
necticut, and were married on the Holland 
purchase, where they located and made their 
home until 1836, when they removed to 
Kendall county, Illinois, where the father 
secured a forty-acre farm. His last days 
were passed in Lapeer county, Michigan, 
where he died at the advanced age of eighty 
years. His wife departed this life in Illi- 
nois, having reached the age of sixty years. 
Their family numbered fourteen children, 
thirteen of whom grew up to manhood or 
womanhood, while four are supposed to be 
yet living. 

Our subject is the third child and son. 
He remained under the parental roof until 
fourteen years of age, when he started out in 
life for himself, working as a farm hand by 
the month and paying his father for his time 
out of his earnings. When a young man of 
twenty years he left the Empire State and 
made his way to Clinton county, Michigan, 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



261 



where he again worked as a farm hand. He 
purchased forty acres of land in Eaton coun- 
ty, Michigan, and retained possession of it 
for seventeen years before locating upon it. 

On the 14th of February, 1846, Mr. 
Gleasou was united in marriage with Miss 
Mary Teman, a native of Dutchess county. 
New York. She was born March 20, 1821, 
and is the youngest child of a family of three 
sons and two daughters, whose parents were 
William and Maria (Pitcher) Teman, the for- 
mer a native of Germany and the latter of 
New York. Soon after his marriage the 
young couple located on the forty-acre farm 
before mentioned, and for fourteen years 
made it their home, removing thence to 
Illinois, where they resided for three 
years. On the expiration of that period 
they came to Martin county, and Mr. Glea- 
son secured the farm upon which they now 
live. It was all raw prairie, but he at once 
began to improve it and made a good home 
for his family. The pioneer dwelling was 
blessed with the presence of seven children, 
three sons and four daughters, namely: Lo- 
raine, now deceased; Addie, now the wife 
of John Brady, of Martin county; William, 
who died at the age of two years; Betsy A., 
wife of Lester Dann, of Martin county; 
Thomas R. ; Wilber N. ; Dora, wife of Sam- 
uel Boler, of Martin county. 

Mr. Gleason is one of the oldest settlers 
of Martin county and one of the first to 
make a permanent home in Nashville town- 
ship. In those days the family, numbering 
nine members, including Mrs. Gleason's 
mother, lived in a little sod and board 
shanty. He now has a well developed farm 
of eighty acres, and though he passed 
through all the hardships and difficulties of 
pioneer life, he overcame the obstacles in his 
path and worked his way upward to a posi- 



tion among the substantial citizens of the 
community. In his political views he is a 
Prohibitionist and an earnest worker for the 
temperance cause. 



*» ^ ANS GILBERTSON, a lumber 
1''"^ dealer of Wells, was born in east- 
\_^r ern Norway on the i 5th of Janu- 
ary, 1 846, and is one of a family 
of twelve children, nine of whom are yet 
living, the others being Ole, who makes his 
home in Alexandria, Minnesota; Marie, wife 
of Albert Johnson, of Madison, Wisconsin; 
Andrew, who is living in Wells; Bertha, wife 
of George Jurgenson, who is located in Free- 
born county, Minnesota; Iver, a resident of 
Fillmore county, Minnesota; and Martin, 
Laura and Gilbrand, who are living in Nor- 
way. The parents are still in their native 
land, and both have reached the age of 
seventy-eight years. The family is probably 
noted for longevity, for the grandfather died 
when past the very advanced age of ninety 
years. 

When quite young Mr. Gilbertson, of 
this sketch, began working at the carpenter's 
trade, and followed it in the land of his birth 
until twenty years of age, when in 1866 he 
bade adieu to home and friends and sailed 
for the ' ' land of the free. " He did not tarry 
long on the eastern coast, but made his way 
across the country to Dane county, Wiscon- 
sin, where, however, he remained but a 
short time. He then came to Minnesota, 
locating in Fillmore county, where he con- 
tinued for a year, at which time he removed 
to Austin, which was his place of abode for 
a year and a half. In September, 1869, he 
became a resident of Wells and has since 
been identified with its interests. Here he 
resumed work at his trade which he followed 



262 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



successfully for seven years and on all sides 
s^and evidences of his handiwork. He was 
the architect and builder of a number of the 
best residences in this place, also erected 
the Methodist church and the second school 
building which was built here. He has seen 
the growth of Wells from a hamlet contain- 
ing onh' three shanties, and has been an 
important factor in its progress, both in the 
line of his trade and otherwise. In the year 
1876 he became identiiied with the lumber 
industry as agent for C. D. Colman and is 
now successfully devoting his time and at- 
tention to work along that line. He has 
managed his affairs in a capable manner and 
is now one of the substantial business men 
of Wells. 

On the 15th of June, 1872, Mr. Gilbert- 
son was united in marriage with Miss P. 
Ensrud, a natixe of Norway, who came to 
this country in 1 866 with her father's fam- 
ily. Ole Ensrud died in Wells in 1893, at 
the age of seventy-seven years; and his wife, 
the mother of Mrs. Gilbertson, is now living 
in Freeborn county, this State. She is the 
mother of eight children, six of whom are 
yet living. Both Mr. and Mr. Gilbertson 
are widely known in this community and 
have many warm friends who hold them in 
high esteem for their many excellencies of 
character, while their true worth and intelli- 
gence have served them as passports m 
introducing them into the best society. 

In his political views Mr. Gilbertson is a 
stalwart Republican, earnestly advocating 
the principles of his party and in local affairs 
he is a leader. He has frequently been 
called to office, having served as a member 
of the City Council, while for many years 
he has been promincntlj- connected with the 
educational interests. He has long served 
on the School Board, and at this writing is 



its president and largely through his instru- 
mentality the schools of Wells have been 
raised to their present high standard. What- 
ever tends to advance the public welfare or 
to aid in the work of progress and upbuilding 
receives his hearty support and co-opera- 
tion, and Faribault county numbers him 
among its valued citizens. From boyhood 
he has been a consistent member of the 
Lutheran Church, to the support of which 
he contributes liberally, and it was largely 
through his instrumentality that the present 
house of worship in Wells was erected. Mr. 
Gilbertson came to this country with the 
hope of bettering his financial condition, and 
in this hope has not been disappointed, for 
prosperity has attended his well directed 
efforts, and, although not a wealthy man, 
he is the possessor of a comfortable compe- 
tence. Highl}' esteemed by all who know 
him, he is a credit both to the land of his 
birth and the land of his adoption. 



>^OHN MURRAY HINTON. a retired 
m farmer who has long resided in Mar- 
A 1 tin county and now makes his home 
on section 10, Nashville township, is 
deserving of mention in this volume, and we 
feel assured that the record of his life will 
be received with interest by our readers, for 
he has many friends throughout the com- 
munity. 

A native of the Keystone State, Mr. 
Hinton was born in Erie county, on the ist 
of July, 1836, and is a son of William Hin- 
ton, a native of South Wales, who came to 
America in 1801, when about fourteen years 
of age, with his brothers, Thomas and Grif- 
fin. They located in Erie county, where 
he learned the shoemaker's trade, which he 
followed for some years. He and his brothers 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



263 



all served their adopted country in the war 
of 1 8 12. He wedded Mary D. Jones, who 
was born in North Wales in 1808, and when 
about twenty years of age came to America 
with her sister Jane Jones, locating first in 
New York city and removing thence to 
Erie county, Pennsylvania. They were 
married in 1832, and in 1844 emigrated to 
Wisconsin, locating in Waukesha county, 
which was their place of abode until 1854, 
at which time they removed to Waushara 
county. In 1864 they became residents of 
Brown county, Minnesota, where the father 
died at the age of seventy-seven years, 
while the mother passed away when seventy- 
three years of age. Of their family, number- 
ing four sons and four daughters, all grew 
to manhood or womanhood, and were mar- 
ried, namely: Robert B., of Renville county, 
Minnesota; John M. ; Ann, who died in 
1858; Jane, wife of Levi Burch of Nash- 
ville township; Ellen, wife of Silas Black- 
man, who is located in Cottonwood county, 
Minnesota; Henry C, of Nashville town- 
ship, Martin county; William B., who is 
living in the same township; and Mary, wife 
of Philip Jackson, who makes his home in 
Oregon. 

In taking up the personal history of J. 
M. Hinton we present to our readers the 
life record of one who is both widely and 
favorably known in this community and 
whose example is well worthy of emulation, 
a fact which justifies the compilation of such 
a volume. He was about eight years of 
age when, with his parents, he went to 
Wisconsin, and from the age of nine years 
he has practically made his way in the 
world unaided. He was cast upon his own 
resources and therefore deserves great credit 
for the success which he has achieved. He 
began working as a farm hand by the 



month, and in consequence his educational 
privileges were very meager, he attending 
school for only about si.\ months. At the 
age of fourteen he began working on the 
lakes under Captain Truesdell, and was 
with him on Lake Michigan and on the 
Lower Fox river for about seven years. He 
was first employed as fireman, and when he 
quit the lakes held the rank of second mate. 
His wages were given to his parents to aid 
in their support until he had attained his 
majority. His early career was one of hard 
labor, in which there were very few idle 
moments. Even after his marriage he 
worked for $5 a month and chopped stove 
wood for $.20 per cord and hauled it three 
miles. 

On the 2 1 St of August, 1862, Mr. Hin- 
ton donned the blue and went to the front 
to aid in the preservation of the Union. He 
was assigned to Company G, Thirtieth Wis- 
consin Infantry, in which he served until 
the 1 8th of January, 1865, when he received 
an honorable discharge at Fort Snelling, 
Minnesota, on account of physical disability, 
and was confined in the hospital for some 
time. He was engaged in Indian warfare 
most of the time, and on provost duty and 
in building forts, and though he took part in 
none of the noted battles of the war his serv- 
ice was none the less arduous, — in fact 
was the more difficult, for the Confederate 
soldiers practiced the tactics of war known 
to civilized nations, while the red men em- 
ployed their own strategic and wily methods. 

Mr. Hinton at once returned to his home 
in Martin county and has since resided upon 
the farm which is yet his home. He was mar- 
ried on the 8th of April, 1858, to Miss Sarah 
J. Bacon, who was born in Morris township, 
Livingston county. New York, March 9, 
1842. Her father, George W- Bacon, was 



264 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



born in Vermont and for many years resided 
in New York, where he was married. He 
was a carpenter by trade, and in 1851 emi- 
grated to Green Lake county, \\'isconsin, ! 
and in 1856 removed to Marquette county, 
that State. In 1 863 he came to Martin 
county, Minnesota, and located upon the 
farm which is now the home of our sub- 
ject, and on which he spent his last days, | 
his death occurring when he had reached 
the ripe old age of eighty-three years. His 
wife, who bore the maiden name of Jemima 
Sparks, was born and reared in the Empire 
State, and died at the home of her daughter 
at the age of eighty-two. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bacon had a family of eight children, two 
sons and six daughters, all of whom reached j 
mature years except one daughter, Fidelia, 
who died at the age of five years. Mrs. 
Hinton is the sixth child of the family, and 
was a little maiden of seven summers when 
the family went to Wisconsin, where she 
was reared and married. From the time | 
she was married she had to work for her ] 
own living. Her father was one of the 
first settlers of Martin county, and both he 
and his wife were prominent members of the 
Freewill Baptist Church, as were also the 
parents of Mr. Hinton. 

To our subject and his wife have been 
born three children, — two sons and a daugh- 
ter, viz.: George H., who married Susie 
Bottomly and follows farming in Nashville 
township, Martin county; \\'illiam A., who 
married Miss Minnie Hall and in connection 
with L. A. Smith is proprietor of a general 
store and also extensively engaged in farm- 
ing: is now serving as the efficient Post- 
master of Nashville Center, and also Town 
Clerk and Notary Public; Eva is the wife of 
J. H. Schofield, a leading and influential 
agriculturist of Martin count\-. 



In his business dealings Mr. Hinton has 
won a well deserved success. He is saga- 
cious and farsighted, and by systematic bus- 
iness methods and well directed efforts he 
has become one of the substantial citizens 
of this community and the owner of 240 
acres of rich land, all of which is under a 
high state of cultivation and well improved. 
Laying aside business cares and living a re- 
tired life, he now rents his farm. His duties 
of citizenship have never been slighted, and 
he is actively interested in everything pertain- 
ing to the welfare of the community and its 
upbuilding. Inhis political views he is a stanch 
Republican, a firm believer in the principles of 
his party, but has never sought office and 
has never served except as Justice of the 
Peace, a position \N'hich was forced upon 
him. In the various walks of life his career 
would bear the closest investigation and 
scrutin}', and under the search-light of truth 
no flaws could be detected. Throughout 
his entire life he has been a very strict tem- 
perance man, never tasting anj' intoxicants, 
and thus by example as well as precept he 
teaches a temperance lesson. He is an 
active worker in the Freewill Baptist Church, 
is chairman of the Church Board, and con- 
tributes liberally to the support of the 
gospel. The poor and needy find in him a 
friend and the distressed receive his hearty 
sympathy. Thus he makes Christianity a 
part of his life and not a garment to be 
donned on the day set apart for worship. 



>nr*AMES HENRY HAND, a farmer of 
^ section 26, East Chain township, was 
/• J born in Clinton county. New York, 
l'"ebruary 15, I 850, a son of Stephen 
Hand, a native also of that State, and a 
farmer by occupation. His father, Stephen 




Qe^nah/ j^(?M)/////^. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



267 



Hand, was born in New York, of Dutch de- 
scent. The mother of our subject, ncc 
Amanda Ackerson, was a native of Vermont, 
but was reared in Chnton county. New 
York. Mr. and Mrs. Hand were the parents 
of three sons and three daughters, all of 
whom grew to years of maturity, the youngest 
son having died at the age of fifteen years. 

James H. Hand, the eldest child in order 
of birth, remained in his native place until 
twenty years of age. In 1870 he came to 
Martin county, Minnesota, where he worked 
by the month at farm labor, and imma- 
diatel)' after his marriage he located on the 
farm he now owns, consisting of 280 acres. 
In political matters Mr. Hand is a stanch 
Republican. He is serving his fourth term 
as Chairman of the Board of Supervisors of 
East Chain township, has been Assessor of 
his township, and has been a number of 
years a member of the School Board. 

In May, 1875, Mr. Hand was united in 
marriage with Emily Cordill, born in Miami 
county, Indiana, February 2, 1857, a daugh- 
ter of J. W. and Harriett (Whitman) Cor- 
dill, natives respectively of Indiana and 
Ohio. Mrs. Hand, the eldest of their ten 
children, was reared in Indiana until eight 
years of age, then removed with her par- 
ents to Fillmore county, Minnesota, one 
year afterward to Faribault county, and then 
came to Martin county. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hand have three children, — Hattie, Perry 
and Eva. 



*-|-» EONARD GOLDSMITH, a farmer 
I I of section 18, Rolling Green town- 
^l^j ship, was born in Chemung county. 
New York, July 9, 1835, a son of 
Brewster and Sarah (Shoemaker) Goldsmith, 
the former a native of New York, of English 



descent, and the latter of Scotch-Irish de- 
scent. They spent their entire lives in New 
York. Leonard, one of nine children, eight 
now living, remained in his native place 
until twenty-one years of age. He then 
went to Indiana, in the following spring re- 
moved to Iowa, returned to Indiana, and in 
1858 located on wild land in Faribault 
county, Minnesota. 

November i, 1861, Mr. Goldsmith en- 
listed for service in the late war, entering 
the second company which left Minnesota. 
They were sent to St. Louis and attached 
to Curtis' regiment of cavalry, of which our 
subject was appointed saddler, and they re- 
mained at Fort Henry after its surrender. 
Eleven months afterward the company was 
merged into the Fifth Iowa Cavalry, Com- 
pany I, took part in the battles of Guy's 
Gap and Sugar Creek, operated at Forts 
Hymen and Donelson until May or June, 
then went to Murfreesboro, under General 
Crook, and in November, 1864, re-en- 
listed for service. After a thirty-days' fur- 
lough he was transferred to Brackett's bat- 
talion, and served two years and five months 
on the plains against the Indians, participat- 
ing in two battles. While in West Ten- 
nessee Mr. Goldsmith was severely wounded 
by falling from his horse. He was honor- 
ably discharged June i, 1S66, having served 
four years, seven months and one day. 

From the fall of 1S66 until the spring of 
1869, he was employed in the woods of 
Wisconsin, and in 1870 located on his farm 
of 180 acres. Mr. Goldsmith acts with the 
Republican party, and has held the position 
of Supervisor of this township. Socially, 
he is a member of Phil Kearny Post, No. 
18, G. A. R. , of Fairmont. 

December 24, 1873, our subject was 
united in marriage with Miss Emma J. Good- 



268 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



fellow, born in Onondaga connty, New 
York, June 15, 1852, a daughter of Ezra 
and Elizabeth (Launders) Goodfellovv, na- 
tives of Syracuse, that State. From 1853 
to 1 862 they resided in Fond du Lac county, 
Wisconsin, from that time until 18S0 were 
residents of Martin county, Minnesota, and 
since that time have resided in Holt county, 
Nebraska. They have had seven children, 
three now living. One son, Levi C, died 
from starvation at Andersonville prison. 
Mr. and Mrs. Goldsmith also have seven 
children, namely: Ezra Curtis, Sarah E. 
(wife of Joseph Ralph), Nora Inez, Millie 
May, Leonard Guy and Lyman Roy (twins) 
and Cora Dell. 



@EORGE WASHINGTON GARRI- 
SON, a farmer of section 3, Pleas- 
ant Prairie township, was born in 
Tioga county. New York, January 
7, 1 83 1, a son of D. C. and Cynthia (Wood) 
Garrison, natives also of that State. They 
were married in their native State, and were 
the parents of eight children, five daughters 
and three sons. 

G. ^^^ Garrison, the si.xth child of the 
above family, moved with his parents to 
Tompkins county. New York, where he was 
early inured to farm labor, .\fter reaching 
his n:ajority, about 1857, he located in 
Marquette county, Wisconsin, where he 
operated a threshing-machine until i860, 
then spent a short time in Faribault county, 
Minnesota, and then returned to Buffalo, 
New York. In 1863 Mr. Garrison came 
again to this State, and in the following 
year purchased a claim in Pleasant Prairie 
township, where he still resides. May 21, 
1 893, his house and barns were destroyed 
hy a cyclone, the former having been only 



just completed. His farm contains 320 
acres, and he is engaged in general farming 
and stock-raising. Mr. Garrison is a car- 
penter by trade, and has erected many of 
the buildings in Martin county. 

In 1 864 our subject enlisted for service in 
the late war, entering Company G, Sixt}'- 
fourth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, and 
served until the close of the struggle. He 
affiliates with the Republican party, and has 
served as a member of the Board of Super- 
visors. 

Mr. Garrison was married in Buffalo, 
New York, in 1862, to Ellen Russell, who 
was born in Washington county. To this 
union has been born five sons and two 
daughters, namely: Clinton, Clarence, 
George, Fredrick, Nellie (wife of Ed 
Schleninger, of Pleasant Prairie township), 
Franklin and Emma. 



HLBERT NUTT, a prominent farm- 
er of section 26, East Chain town- 
ship, was born in Clinton county, 
New York, September 9, 1856, the 
youngest of four children of George and 
Electa (Ackerson) Nutt, natives also of that 
State. Albert came with his parents to 
Martin county, Minnesota, at the age of 
nine years, and at the age of eighteen years 
began work for himself. The following year 
he began farming on rented land in Pleasant 
Prairie township, Martin county. After his 
marriage he settled on the place he now 
owns, then wild land. Mr. Nutt's farm of 
194 acres is now under a fine state of culti- 
vation, has also erected a good residence 
and barns, and is engaged in general farm- 
ing and stock-raising. 

In 1873 he was united in marriage with 
Rose Clemmings, born and reared in Illinois, 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



269 



and a daughter of Matthew and Lanay 
Clemmings. Mr. Nutt is a RepubHcan in 
political matters. 



at 



'ILLIAM FRANKLIN ED- 
WARDS, a prominent old set- 
tler and farmer of Fairmont town- 
ship, Martin county, residing on 
section 20, was born in Jefferson county, 
New York, December 14, 1834. The fam- 
ily is of Welsh origin and was founded in 
.\merica by the grandfather of our subject. 
Pierpont Edwards, the father, was born in 
Jefferson county and became a carpenter 
and joiner, following that trade for a num- 
ber of j'ears. He married Miranda Wheeler, 
a native of Vermont, whose father was born 
in Scotland. The parents of our subject 
celebrated their marriage in the county of 
his nativity, and located there. In 1839 
they removed to Painesville, Lake county, 
Ohio, where they made their home for seven 
years. Removing thence to DeKalb county, 
Illinois, they located at Paw Paw, where 
their remaining days were passed, each be- 
ing called to the home beyond when seven- 
ty-four jears of age. They were the parents 
of three sons, all of whom are yet living: 
Orrin, who is living in La Salle county, Illi- 
nois; Edward, who makes his home in Par- 
sons, Kansas; and W. F., who completes 
the family. 

The gentleman whose name heads this 
record was a child of only five summers 
when with his parents he left the Empire 
State and went to Ohio. At the age of 
twelve years he became a resident of Illi- 
nois, and in Paw Paw he attended school, — 
his privileges, however, being sorrewhat 
limited. He remained under the parental 
roof, and to his father gave the benefit of 



his services until he had attained his major- 
ity, when he started out for himself, fol- 
lowing the occupation to which he had been 
reared. 

In 1857 Mr. Edwards was united in 
marriage, in De Kalb county, Illinois, with 
Miss Harriett Newton, who was born and 
spent her maidenhood days in Ottawa, Illi- 
nois. They began their domestic life upon 
a farm in the county where the wedding 
was celebrated, and resided there until 1872, 
Mr. Edwards successfully cultivating his 
land and placing it in an excellent condi- 
tion. At length he decided to try his for- 
tune beyond the Mississippi and in 1872 
came to Minnesota, settling in Martin 
county, where he has since made his home, 
— one of the progressive and valued citi- 
zens of the community. He purchased a 
farm on Silver Lake, comprising 200 acres 
of good land, which at that time was mostly 
in its primitive condition. At the time of 
his purchase a log cabin was the only build- 
ing upon the farm, and the place bore little 
resemblance to the present highly cultivated 
farm which we see to-day with its well tilled 
fields, substantial buildings, well-kept 
fences, improved machinery and all the 
other accessories and improvements found 
upon a model farm of the nineteenth cen- 
tur\'. There Mr. Edwards resided until 
1886, when he sold the property and re- 
moved to Fairmont, where he has since 
lived retired. He now owns 132 acres of 
land, surrounding his home, but expects to 
sell this property soon. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Edwards have been 
born two children, a son and daughter: 
Cora, now the wife of John K. Tanner, who 
is living in Fairmont; Edward, who is en- 
gaged in the drug business in Fairmont and 
is also serving as Alderman. 



270 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Our subject supports the men and meas- 
ures of the Democracy and served as Clerk 
of Lake township for many years, discharg- 
ing his duties in a capable manner, in no 
wise betraying the trust reposed in him. 
He belongs to Chain Lake Lodge, No. 64, 
A. F. & A. M., and is held in the highest 
regard in the order and by all who know 
him, for he possesses many excellencies of 
character. His life has been well and 
worthily passed, devoted to his various du- 
ties, and his close attention to his business 
interests, his capable management, unflag- 
ing diligence and his commendable persever- 
ance have won him a well merited success, 
which now enables him to live retired, — en- 
joying the rest which he has truly earned 
and richly deserves. 



eLI SISSON, an early pioneer, and a 
prominent farmer of section 28, 
East Chain township, Martin coun- 
ty, was born in Erie county, Penn- 
sylvania, May 24, 1838, a son of Putman 
Sisson, a native of New York and a farmer 
by occupation. His father, Aaron Sisson, 
was of English descent. The mother of our 
subject was formerly Sally M. Mariman, 
born and reared in New York, and of Scotch 
descent. Putman and Sally Sisson were 
married in New York, and located on a farm 
in Erie county, Pennsylvania, where the 
latter died. Mr. Sisson came to Minnesota 
about 1867, locating on a homestead in East 
Chain township, Martin county, where his 
death occurred in 1879. They had eleven 
children, ten of whom grew to years of 
maturity. By his second marriage Mr. 
Sisson had four children. 

Eli Sisson, the subject of this sketch, re- 
mained at home until twenty-one years of 



age, when he found employment in a saw- 
mill. He came to Martin county, Minne- 
sota, in 1868, purchasing a partially im- 
proved claim in section 7, East Chain town- 
ship, all of which is now under a fine state 
of cultivation. When he came here only 
about nine or ten families resided in the 
township. 

In 1862 our subject enlisted for service 
in the late war, entering Company B, 145th 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and took 
part in the battles of Gettysburg, Fredricks- 
burg, and many other smaller engagements. 
He was wounded in the left wrist by a minie 
ball at the battle of Gettysburg, and, 
after spending some time in the hospital, was 
transferred to the Si.xth Regiment, Veteran 
Reserves, in which he remained until the 
close of the struggle, receiving his discharge 
at Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1865. 

Mr. Sisson supports the Republican 
party, and has served as Supervisor many 
years and as Assessor of East Chain town- 
ship two years. 



Ky~\ ANIEL WEBSTER WILKINS, a 
I B prominent farmer of section 6, East 
/f^^^ Chain Lake township, was born 
in Columbia county, Wisconsin, 
December 12, 1855, a son of Alden Wilkins, 
born in Vermont iu 181 5. When a young 
man he located in White Water, Wisconsin, 
and was there married to Mariah Harris, 
born and reared in Fort Edward, New York. 
About 1846 Mr. Wilkins located on a farm 
in Columbia county, Wisconsin, but in 1853 
sold that place and removed to Columbus, 
that county, and subsequently returned to 
White Water. In 186 1 he enlisted in Com- 
pany I, Thirteenth Wisconsin Volunteer In- 
fantry, and in 1 864, at the close of his term 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



271 



of service, he re-enlisted in the same com- 
pany, in which he served until his death, 
March 3, 1865. He was buried at Hunts- 
ville, Alabama. Mrs. Wilkins survived until 
1879, dying at the age of fifty-three years. 
They were the parents of eight children, 
namely: Lucy, wife of Henry Flory, of 
Michigan; Edgar, of Colby, Wisconsin; 
Eliza, deceased, was the wife of John Root; 
Emily, wife of Thomas Lowe, of Fairmont 
township; Alice, wife of Milo Leffingwell, of 
Fairmont; Daniel W. , the subject of this 
sketch; Lewis, a painter at Chicago, Illi- 
nois; and George, engaged in the same oc- 
cupation in that city. 

Daniel W. Wilkins remained with his 
parents until twelve years of age, receiving 
his education in the common schools and at 
the Columbus high school. He then began 
work for himself, at farm labor, and spent 
seven years with one man. For four years 
after his marriage he resided on a large farm 
near Janesville, Wisconsin. In 1882 he 
came to Martin county, Minnesota, locating 
on his present farm of 220 acres, which now 
contains all the modern farm improvements. 

In political matters, Mr. Wilkins affil- 
iates with the Republican party. In 1888 
he was elected to the position of County 
Commissioner, but would not accept the sec- 
ond nomination. He was Chairman of the 
town Board of Supervisors from 1882 to 
1888, was Township Assessor three years, 
and for many years was a rnember of the 
School Board. 

January 22, 1878, our subject was 
united in marriage with Florence Westing- 
house, born in Walworth count}', Wiscon- 
sin, June II, 1857, a daughter of John and 
Laura (Potter) Westinghouse, natives of 
Vermont, but early pioneers of Wisconsin. 
Mrs. Wilkins is a cousin of the gentleman 



who invented and patented the Westing- 
house air-brake. She was reared in her na- 
tive place, receiving her education in the 
college at Allen's Grove, and taught school 
three terms. Mr. and Mrs. Wilkins have 
three children, — Tracy, Leola and Glad3's. 



<>^EV. ALEXANDER CLENDEN- 
I /^ ING, an early pioneer in Martin 
\ y county, was born in Sheldon town- 
ship, Franklin county, Vermont, 
November 24, 1824, a son of John Clenden- 
ing, a native of Ireland and of Scotch de- 
scent. He came to America when a young 
man, locating in Quebec, Canada, for a 
short time, and afterward removed to Ver- 
mont. He was a carpenter and farmer by 
occupation. Mr. Clendening was married 
in Ireland to Ann McCussick, who was born 
and reared in that country. Her death oc- 
curred at the age of forty-eight years. Mr. 
Clendening lived to the age of seventy 
years. They were the parents of si.x chil- 
dren, the subject of this sketch' being the 
eldest of the family. 

A. Clendening was reared in his native 
place, where he first attended the common 
schools, and attended a course of lectures 
on the sciences given by Prof. Mitchell, of 
St. Louis, Missouri. After studying law 
and medicine for a time he began work at 
the millwright's trade in Indiana. In i860 
Mr. Clendening went to Canada on a visit, 
and in the spring of 1861 he located in 
Jackson county, Minnesota. After the 
dreadful massacre there he went to Esther- 
ville, Emmet county, Iowa. In the spring 
of 1864 came to Martin county, Minne- 
sota, and in the following fall located on his 
present farm of i 54 acres. He erected the 
East Chain mill in 1864. In political mat- 



272 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



ters Mr. Clendening is independent. At 
one time he took an active part in polit- 
ical meetings, having made many stump 
speeches. He has served as Justice of the 
Peace, and is now Clerk of his school dis- 
trict, having assisted in building the school- 
house located on his farm, and also assisted 
in the erection of three other schools. 

In November, 1862, Mr. Clendening was 
united in marriage with Mariah A. Baker, 
born in Steuben county. New York, July 8, 
1825, a daughter of Daniel and Eliza (Sly- 
ter) Baker, natives also of that State, the 
father of English and the mother of Holland 
Dutch descent. 

Our subject served as a local minister in 
the Methodist Episcopal Church about six 
years. October 10, 1875, he was ordained 
as an Elder in the Wesleyan Methodist 
Church of Minnesota, and was actively en- 
gaged in ministerial work until within a few 
years past. He was one of the first min- 
isters in the church, the oldest resident min- 
ister in Martin county, and one of the oldest 
Wesleyan ministers in Southern Minnesota. 



K^/~\ ENJAMIN F. FORBES, whose 
■ (''^ post-office address is Winnebago 
J^^_^ City, Minnesota, is one of the early 
settlers of Faribault county. He 
was born in Erie county, Pennsylvania, 
June 28, 1 83 1. His father, B. F. Forbes, 
Sr. , was a native of Middlebury, Vermont, 
and his grandfather, Frank Forbes, was 
born in Massachusetts. The maiden name 
of our subject's mother was Julia Nims. 
She was born in Chautauqua county, New 
York, daughter of Rual Nims. Her grand- 
father Nims was a soldier in the war of 
1812. The Forbes family removed from 



Pennsylvania to Ohio, and for some time 
made their home in Geauga county. Later 
they located in Racine county, Wisconsin, 
at Burlington, and in 1857 came to Fari- 
bault county, Minnesota. Here the mother 
died in 1863. The father survived her un- 
til 1 88 1, when he passed away, at the age of 
seventy-seven years. He was a tanner and 
shoemaker by trade, and led an exemplary 
Christian life, being a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church. They had eight 
children,- — B. F. , C. H., Julia, Lotta, 
Mar}-, Florence, Theodore and Emma. 
Florence is deceased. 

B. F. Forbes was reared on a farm, and 
and has been a resident of Minnesota since 
1857, when he came to Faribault county 
with the rest of the family. August 17, 
1862, he enlisted in Company D, Ninth 
Minnesota Infantry, and went to the front, 
being with the forces that operated in the 
West. In May, 1865, he was honorably 
discharged, with the rank of Corporal, and 
came home. 

Mr. Forbes settled on his present farm 
in Verona township in 1880. Here he and 
his son have 160 acres of fine land, well 
improved. He has a comfortable cottage 
home, a barn 46 x 56 feet in dimensions, an 
orchard and a grove of native trees. From 
the residence is obtained a fine view of the 
college and Winnebago City. 

Mr. Forbes married Miss Sophrona 
Williams, daughter of T. J. Williams, and 
they have four children, namely: Dudley J.; 
Charles H., who is in partnership with his 
father in farming operations: George A., 
attending college; and Fred E. They lost 
two children, Edwin and Lucy, who died at 
the ages of fifteen and sixteen years re- 
spectively. 

Politically Mr. Forbes is a Prohibitionist, 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



m 



and is a man who keeps well posted on the 
topics of the day. He has served as Town- 
ship Clerk and Treasurer. 



'^-^OYi'^ BOYCE, a farmer of section 
m 30, Rutland township, Martin county, 
/% 1 is a son of Elijah and Betsey (Scott) 
Boyce, natives of New York, the 
former born September 13, 1801, and the 
latter born March 2, 1808. They were 
married August 5, 1825, and spent the 
remainder of their lives at Lisbon, St. Law- 
rence county. New York. The father died 
October 28, 1853, and the mother May 23, 
1854. They were the parents of eight chil- 
dren, — William E. , Eliza (deceased), George, 
Samuel, Ira, John, Charles and Mary. 
Three of the sons were soldiers in the Civil 
war, — Samuel, Charles and John. 

John Boyce, the subject of this sketch, 
was born at Lisbon, New York, April 3, 
1840, where he was reared and educated. 
He was left an orphan in early life, and was 
obliged to work for his own living. In i860 
he located in La Crosse county, Wisconsin, 
and September 6th of the following year 
enlisted in the First Wisconsin Battery of 
Light Artillery, was sent to Louisville, 
thence to Lexington and Cumberland Gap 
and into East Tennessee, participating in 
the battle of Tazewell. At Cumberland 
Gap he was obliged to live on half rations 
for one month, and owing to lack of pro- 
visions they were obliged to vacate the 
place. Mr. Boyce next went to Greenups- 
burg, Kentucky, and Gallipolis, Ohio; was 
with General Cox on Kanawha river in 
November, 1862, thence went to Cincinnati 
and Memphis, and in December, 1862, was 
with General Sherman in the attack on 
Vicksburg. Mr. Boyce also took part in the 



battle of Chickasaw Bluff. He went by 
steamer to Arkansas Post, where his Battery 
assisted in capturing 6,000 prisoners and 
eleven cannon. January 11, 1863, they went 
thence to Young's Point and camped till 
March ist; then to Milliken's Bend; then 
joined Grant's army and marched south to a 
point opposite of Grand Gulf, and witnessed 
the battle at that place between the gun- 
boats and the fort; took part in the battles 
of Port Gibson, Raymond, Jackson, Cham- 
pion Hill, Edward's Station, Black River, 
in the siege of Vicksburg, which lasted 
forty-seven days, and after the surrender of 
that place went under Sherman and 
besieged Jackson, and after the capture of 
that city returned to Vicksburg, and then 
went to New Orleans, where he spent 
two months in a hospital. The battery 
remained in that city during the winter, then 
went up the Red river by steamboat as far 
as Alexandria and crossed the country to 
join General Banks; then returned to Alex- 
andria, and, going east to the Mississippi, 
took part in the battle of Yellow Bayou. 
They next went to Baton Rouge, on an 
expedition for a few days, and then returned, 
took barracks at that place, and later went 
to New Orleans, and from there to New 
York by steamship, having in charge about 
250 prisoners. Mr. Boyce received his dis- 
charge at Madison, Wisconsin, in October, 
1864, and in January of the following year 
came to Martin county, Minnesota, and 
homesteaded his present farm. This locality 
was then sparsely settled. His farm now 
contains about 300 acres, all of which is 
under a fine state of cultivation. 

Mr. Boyce was married March 10, 
1868, to Hannah E. Rutherford, born in St. 
Lawrence county, New York, August 20, 
1840, a daughter of William and Mary 



274 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OP 



(Dawley) Rutherford, natives respectively 
of Scotland and England. They came to 
this country when young, and were married 
in St. Lawrence county, New York, where 
they improved a new farm. The father was 
born August 21, 1812, died January 15, 
1S79. The mother was born August 5, 1818, 
and died March 24, 1891. They were the 
parents of ten children, — Hannah E., Mary 
A., Joseph, Sarah J., William D., Margaret, 
Thomas, Isabel, Nettie and one who died in 
infancy. Mrs. Boyce received her educa- 
tion at Ogdensburg Academy, and afterward 
taught school si.x terms in St. Lawrence 
county. Our subject and wife had five chil- 
dren, namely: Ella May, born January 5, 
1869, is the wife of George Bullock, clerk 
of Eraser township; William R. , born June 
4, 1870, married Lillie Osborn; Irving John, 
born January 22, 1872; Nettie Belle, born 
August 21, 1873, died September 19, 1873; 
and Addie E,, born August 17, 1879. They 
have all taught school except the youngest. 
The family are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church at Fairmont; Irving is now 
president of the Epworth League, and Will- 
iam is the present chairman of Rutland. 
Mr. Boyce affiliates with the Republican 
party, and has served as Supervisor, Chair- 
man, Treasurer and Justice of the Peace of 
his township. In his social relations, he is 
a member of Phil. Kearny Post, G. A. R. , 
and Mrs. Boyce is a member of the \\'. R. C. 



BREDERICK ARTHUR BRYANT 
PATERSON is one of the lead- 
ing and influential business men, — 
prominent in commercial circles. 
He was born in the county of Surrey, En- 
gland, on the 1st of January, 1853, descend- 
ing from some of the most illustrious and 



noble houses of his native land. His is of 
the 25th descent from William, the Con- 
queror, 20th from Robert Bruce, King of 
Scotland, 1 5th descent from the Plantage- 
nets, 1 3th descent from the House of Stuarts, 
5th from Earl of Kilmarnock Boyd, and 2d 
from Porterfields of that ilk. The grand- 
father of our subject, John Floyd Paterson, 
was a native of England and served as Major 
General in the East India service, while his 
father, Captain Frederick Thomas Paterson, 
was also born in the same country and won 
his title in the East India war. 

The gentleman whose name heads this 
record was a matriculated student in King's 
College, London, — general literature and 
sciences, — and when his literary education 
was completed he entered the Internal Reve- 
nue Department, Somerset House, of his na- 
tive land, being therein employed for a 
period of four years. At length he de- 
termined to seek a home this side the At- 
lantic, and in 1875 boarded a westward 
bound steamer, Scythia, of the Cunard line, 
which carried him safely to American 
shores. He did not tarry long in the East, 
but came at once to Minnesota, locating in 
Fairmont, near where he purchased a farm, 
continuing its development and improve- 
ment for a period of eight years. Prefer- 
ring, however, to give his time and energies 
to other pursuits, he sought and obtained a 
position as assistant cashier in the Martin 
County Bank. After two years spent in that 
way he was promoted to the cashiership and 
served in that capacity for seven years with 
! credit to himself and satisfaction of all con- 
cerned. He was a popular and safe bank 
officer and did much for the prosperity of 
the institution. In the year 1892 he retired 
from the bank and embarked in the real-es- 
tate and insurance business in connection 




j3^//. Cr/mu <^/del^// a^/c/ i/h/e. 



FARIBAULT, MAIiTIX, UATOXU'AX A\D JACKSON. 



279 



with C. N. Peterson, under the firm name 
of Peterson & Paterson, and the connection 
still exists. 

In the }"ear 1873 was celebrated the 
niarriapje of Mr. Paterson and Miss Marie E. 
Forde, daughter of Colonel William Forde, 
a native of Devonshire, England. She is 
a lady of culture and refinement, highly 
educated, having completed her studies in a 
private school, and for eleven years she suc- 
cessfully engaged in teaching in the public 
schools of F"airmont. Her ability was 
widely recognized, as is indicated by her 
long connection with the schools of this 
place. 

In his political views Mr. Paterson is a 
Democrat, and has served as Court Com- 
missioner and as Justice of the Peace, dis- 
charging his duties with promptness and 
fidelity. He is a member of the Odd Fel- 
lows society, holding his membership in the 
Fairmont Lodge, No. 70, I. O. O. F. In 
connection with his other business interests 
he is Secretary of the Fairmont Elevator 
Company, President of the Board of Trade, 
Treasurer of the Fairmont Building and 
Loan Association, President of the Martin 
County Agricultural Society, and in 1893 he 
was made and is still acting as Director of 
the Martin County State Bank. He is a 
man of excellent business and executive 
ability, and his careful management and 
well directed efforts have not only brought 
him success but have also won him a promi- 
nent place in business matters. 



*| ^ ON. EDWIN BERRY, who is now 

w^^ living on a farm on section 32, 

K . r Fraser township, Martin county, 

has been prominently connected 

with the political and religious history of this 

14 



comuiunil} for sonic time and is an impor- 
tant factor in the upbuilding and develop- 
ment of this locality. His prominence and 
influence make him widely known, and we 
feel assured that many will receive with in- 
terest this record of his life. 

He comes of an old New England family 
that was probably founded in this country at 
an early day in the history of the Colonies. 
His parents, Alonzo and Annise (Leonard) 
Berry, were both natives of Vermont, and 
after their marriage removed to Franklin 
county, New York, thence to Cattaraugus 
county of the same State, where their last 
days were passed. The father was a farmer 
and followed that occupation throughout his 
entire life. He served his country as a sol- 
dier in the war of 18 12. Seven children 
graced their union, five sons and two daugh- 
ters, but only three sons are now living, — 
Alonzo, Edwin and Milo. 

Edwin Berry was born on the 5th of 
July, 1825, in Cattaraugus county. New 
York, and was there reared to manhood, the 
daj's of his boyhood and youth being passed 
midst play and work like that of most boys. 
The common schools afforded him his edu- 
cational privileges, but extensive reading, 
study and observation have added greatly to 
his knowledge; and, possessing an observing 
eye and retentive memory, he has made 
himself one of the best informed men in this 
section of Minnesota. 

In 1846 Mr. Berry was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Caroline W. Simmons, who 
was born in Chenango county. New York, 
on the 17th of March, 1827, and is a daugh- 
ter of Samuel and Statira (Simons) Sim- 
mons, the former a native of Vermont and 
the latter of Connecticut. Her parents, 
after some years' residence in New York, re- 
moved to Jefferson, Wisconsin, where both 



28o 



MEMORIAL RECORD OE THE COUNTIES OP 



the father and mother died. In their family 
were seven children, three sons and four 
daughters, of whom one son and the daugh- 
ters are \et living, namely: Mrs. Elizabeth 
West, Mrs. Berry, Mrs. Catherine Beach, 
Mrs. Marion Newton and Joseph L. Two 
sons of the family served in the Civil war, 
— the one just named and Rodolphus, now 
deceased. 

In the year of their riiarriage Mr. Berry 
removed with his young wife to Wisconsin, 
settling in Waukesha county, where for 
twenty-one j'ears he engaged in farming. 
He was one of the pioneer settlers of that 
locality, and, as in all communities where he 
has lived, he took an active and commend- 
able interest in everything pertaining to its 
welfare and was recognized as a valued citi- 
zen. His labors as an agriculturist were in- 
terrupted in 1864 by his enlistment in the 
service of his country. In August of that 
year he joined Company I, Forty-third Wis- 
consin Volunteer Infantry, and served with 
the rank of Corporal. After a few months 
his health failed him, he was sent to the 
hospital, and in May, 1865, he was honorably 
discharged. The following year he came to 
Martin county, Minnesota, and settled on 
section 34, Fraser township. He prepared 
himself for the practice of medicine, but feel- 
ing that the soul and not the body of man 
was most in need of his ministrations he 
entered the ministry. He began preaching 
about 1856, and in 1858 was ordained as a 
preacher of the Baptist faith by Rev. Rich- 
ard Carey, Rev. J. E. Davis, Rev. J. G. 
Hull, and Rev. J. R. Pope. For twenty- 
seven years he was engaged in active work 
as a pastor and evangelist, but failing 
health at length forced him to retire from 
the active ministry. Since that time he has 
given his time to agricultural pursuits, — and 



finding the outdoor exercise beneficial. In 
1^84 he removed to his present farm, where 
he is now quietly living, — an honored and 
respected citizen, who has the good will of 
all with whom he has been brought in 
contact. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Berry have been born 
two children, yet living, as follows: Wells, 
who married Ida Ryder and is living in 
Fraser township with his wife and adopted 
daughter, Hattie R. ; Eugene, who also re- 
sides in Fraser township, and married Annie 
Roe, and they have four children. The sons 
were provided with good educational advant- 
ages and thus were fitted for the practical 
and responsible duties of life, and are worthy 
citizens of Martin county. 

Mr. Berry belongs to the Grand Army of 
the Republic, but has never been connected 
to any extent with civic societies. In his 
political views he is a Republican and has 
been honored with public positions of trust 
and importance. In 1872 he was nominated 
and elected on an independent ticket to a 
seat in the House of Representatives of Min- 
nesota, and so well and faithfully did he 
discharge the duties devolving upon him, 
that he was not only re-elected, but was 
also chosen lor a third term. He was one 
of the prominent and influential members of 
the General Assembly and labored earnestly 
for the best interests of the district which 
he represented. At that early day, when the 
question was but slightly agitated, he intro- 
duced a bill providing for the extension of 
suffrage to women and succeeded in having 
it pass the house; but in the Senate it was 
defeated. He has strong prohibition prin- 
ciples, stanchly supporting the temperance 
cause. His life has been devoted to good 
works, and while actively engaged in the 
work of the ministry he never accepted a 



FARIBAULT, MARTI. \\ WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



a pastorate where he did not double the 
membership of the church within two years. 
He has baptized over 400 individuals, and 
during the twenty-seven years that he was 
in the pulpit he averaged two sermons each 
week in addition to the man}- which he de- 
livered at revival services. He will pass 
away from this earth, but his work will 
linger and his memor\' will live in the hearts 
of many that he has led to the higher and 
better life, long after he has been called to 
the home beyond. 



A^ HERMAN H. TAYLOR, the pop- 
•^^^2r ular young banker of Elmore, Fari- 

h\,^_y bault county, Minnesota, is the 
only child of George A. and Jane 
(Vining) Taylor, and was born on his 
father's farm adjoining the town of Elmore, 
January 12, 1862. His father, a native of 
Ohio, emigrated with his parents to Wiscon- 
sin when he was a boy, and lived there until 
1 86 1, when he married and came to Minne- 
sota, settling on section 32 in Elmore 
township, Faribault county. He is one of 
the leading men of this part of the county 
as well as one of its earliest settlers. 

Sherman H. spent his early boj'hood 
days on the farm, attending the local 
schools. He was then for five years a stu- 
dent at Blue Earth City, the family moving 
there for that purpose. In 1881, having 
completed a high-school course, and learned 
telegraphy, he accepted a position in the 
railroad office at Elmore, as telegraph oper- 
ator, and remained thus occupied two years. 
At the end of that time he went to work in 
a lumber yard, where he was employed un- 
til 1888. That year the Exchange Bank of 
Elmore was organized by George A. Taylor, 
Sherman H. Ta\'lor, Charles H. Carev, and 



Z. Roberts. Mr. Roberts retiring soon af- 
ter, the bank has since been owned and op- 
erated by Messrs. Taylor and Charles H. 
Carey. The firm also does a large business 
in buying and shipping hay, cattle and hogs: 
deals in real estate extensively, owning sev- 
eral fine farms; and conducts a large busi- 
ness in agricultural implements. The senior 
Mr. Taylor and Mr. Carey attend to the 
buying and the other outside work, while 
the subject of our sketch has full charge of 
the banking interests. The company is well 
known as one of the foremost, enterprising 
business firms of Faribault county. 

September 11, 1883, Sherman H. Tay- 
lor married Miss Mary M. Bay, a native of 
Columbia county, Wisconsin, and a daugh- 
ter of Samuel Wilson Bay and Mary fuf 
Campbell, both natives of Ohio. Mr. and 
Mrs. Taylor have two children, Leila B. 
and Effie M. 

Mr. Taylor is identified with both the 
F. & A. M. and the A.O. U. W. of Elmore, 
and at this writing is Master of King David 
Lodge, No. 179, of the former order. He 
is a good representative of the able young 
men of the day .who stand at the front of 
affairs in Faribault county. 



>^AMES H. OUINN occupies a very 
M prominent position at the bar of Far- 
A J bault county and is now serving as 
the efficient County Attorney, and 
also engaging in private practice both in 
Blue Earth City and in Wells, as a member 
of the firm of Quinn & Putnam. Theirs 
is an extensive practice and their reputation 
is second to none in this localit\'. 

The gentleman whose name heads this 
record is a native of Wisconsin, his birth 
having occurred in Kilbourn City, Columbia 



282 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



county, on the 23d of June, 1857. He is 
the second son and third child in the fam- 
ily of Andrew and Hannah (Mountford) 
Quinn. His father, a native of county 
Tyrone, Ireland, emigrated to America 
when a youth of sixteen years, first locating 
in Ohio, whence he afterward removed to 
Kilbourn City, following agricultural pur- 
suits in that locality. There he was mar- 
ried to Miss Mountford, a native of Eng- 
land, who was brought to this country dur- 
ing her girlhood by her parents, William and 
Eliza Mountford. In 1863 Andrew Quinn 
and his family removed to Blue Earth coun- 
ty, Minnesota, where the parents have since 
resided. Their family numbered ten chil- 
dren, eight of whom are living. 

The childhood and youth of our subject 
were passed on his father's farm, where he 
early became familiar with all the duties 
and cares which fall to the lot of the agri- 
culturist, and the common schools afforded 
him his educational privileges. Not wishing, 
however, to follow farming throughout his 
life, he took up the study of law in 1882 in the 
office of William N. Plywate, at Mapleton, 
Minnesota, where he remained two years 
applying himself diligently to the work in 
hand and gaining a thorough knowledge of 
the best commentaries and text books. At 
Mankato, Minnesota, he was admitted to the 
bar, — the Hon. M. J. Severance being the 
presiding Judge. Opening an office in Min- 
nesota Lake, this State, he there began 
practice and successfully prosecuted his 
profession for two years. On the expira- 
tion of that period he removed to Wells, 
then a small hamlet, and has been identified 
with its progress and development, promot- 
ing its interests until it has become the 
second city in Faribault county. On his 
arrival here "he formed a partnership with 



Frank E. Putnam, and the connection has 
since continued with mutual pleasure and 
profit, the firm having extensive practice 
throughout the county, with an office lo- 
cated both in Blue Earth City and Wells. 

In connection with his work at the bar, 
Mr. Quinn has been identified with other 
business enterprises, which have not only 
added to his income but have also aided in 
the material advancement of the community 
in which he makes his home. He was one 
of the organizers, and is one of the 
directors of the First National Bank 
of Wells, — the first national bank estab- 
lished in the county. In 1888 he was nom- 
inated and elected to the office of County 
Attorney of Faribault county, and has been 
three times re-elected, with large majorities. 
No higher testimonial of his efficiency could 
be given than the fact of his long continu- 
ance in office, which also indicates his per- 
sonal popularity. Politically he is an un- 
swerving Republican who loyally aids his 
party in all honorable ways possible, for he 
believes that the adoption of its principles 
would promote the best interests of the 
country. 

The marriage of Mr. Quinn was cele- 
brated on the 19th of September, 1882, the 
lady of his choice being Miss Sarah M. 
Annis, a native of Blue Earth county, 
Minnesota, and a daughter of Ira and Brilla 
(Corey) Annis, who removed to that county 
in an early day from Vermont. One child 
graces this union, Cecil L. ; and the family 
occupies an enviable position in circles 
where true worth and intelligence are re- 
ceived as the passports into good society, 
while their pleasant home is the abode of 
hospitality. 

As a lawyer at the bar Mr. Quinn is an 
able advocate, logical, clear and convincing 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



283 



in argument, and his eloquence is of that 
kind which convinces, carrj'ing great weight 
with the jury. His public and private life 
are alike above reproach, and men of worth 
recognize him as their equal and oftentimes 
superior. 



'^Y'OSEPH SPEIER, prominent in public 
m affairs. in Silver Lake township, Mar- 
A J tin count}-, and one of its influential 
citizens, was born in Poland on the 
4th of March, 1S53, and in his native land 
spent the days of his boyhood and youth, 
no event of special importance occurring 
during that period. At the age of twenty 
years he bade adieu to friends and home and 
crossed the broad Atlantic to the New World, 
landing at New York city. He went direct 
to La Salle, Illinois, where for twelve years 
and one month he made his home, being 
employed there in a zinc furnace. He came 
to Martin county, Minnesota, in 1885 and 
located on the farm which has since been his 
home. Upon it was a little house, 14 x 18 
feet; eighteen acres had been placed under 
the plow, and these were all the improve- 
ments upon the place. In the years which 
have since passed a great transformation has 
been wrought. There is now a pleasant and 
substantial dwelling, good barns and sheds 
and around these lie fields of waving grain 
which tell of bounteous harvests. The farm 
now comprises 360 acres of the rich soil of 
Minnesota, and this valuable and desirable 
property has been acquired entirely through 
the efforts of our subject and the assistance 
of his estimable wife and children. 

Mr. Speier has been twice married. In 
La Salle, Illinois, he wedded PaulenaSwick, 
a native of Poland, who died May 5, 1891. 
The children born to them, ten in number. 



are Johnnie, Joseph, Frank, Anna, deceased; 
Tracey, Neto Medista, deceased; Mary, 
Cassnear, Martha, and Elizabeth, deceased. 
For his second wife Mr. Speier chose Catha- 
rine Burgdell, and they have one child, Eva. 
Our subject exercises his right of fran- 
chise in support of the Democracy, but hss 
never been an aspirant for office, although 
he served as School Treasurer for seven 
years. In connection with Mr. Gaworski he 
built the schoolhouse in his district, and has 
ever been a warm friend of educational in- 
terests. He holds membership with the 
Polish Church of East Chain township, in 
which he is now serving as Treasurer. He 
aided in building the house of worship, was 
prominent in the organization of the church 
and is a prominent and faithful worker in its 
interests. He came to this country a poor 
young man without capital save a young 
man's bright hope of the future and a de- 
termination to succeed, and has steadily 
worked his way upward to a position of af- 
fluence. His success is well deserved, being 
the reward of honest, industrious effort, and 
his example should serve to encourage others, 
who like himself have neither wealth nor in- 
fluential friends to aid them as they start out 
in the world for themselves. 



*-j-» E. FOWLER, proprietor of the 
I I 'bus and transfer business in Win- 
I \ nebago City and agent for the 
United States Express Company, 
is one of the thoroughgoing and reliable 
men of the city, running baggage wagons 
and a first-class "bus," and by his prompt 
and efficient service has won great popu- 
larity in his line. He is a pioneer here, 
having been identified with its interests- for 



2S4 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



a quarter of a century, — ever since Septem- 
ber, 1870. 

He was born in Washington county, 
Vermorrt, July 18, 1842, a son of L. C. and 
Elsie 'Cady) Fowler, both natives of the 
Green Mountain State. He was reared on 
a \'ermont farm and received his education 
in the public schools of the neighborhood in 
which he lived. When he was nineteen 
years of age he came to Waukesha county, 
Wisconsin, where he was employed for 
some time in a grain warehouse for John 
Mile, a native also of Vermont. In 1857 
the family emigrated to Minnesota and 
located temporarily at Owatonna. Steele 
county, where they resided until the spring 
of 1858; then they removed to Freeborn 
county, taking a homestead, but, after a 
year of great privation and suffering there 
they sold out their claim. Leaving his wife 
at the homestead, Mr. Fowler had to go a 
distance of seventy-five miles awa\' from 
home to find work, which he did, in the 
harvest-field, and thus, by cradling grain, 
for the remuneration of two bushels of 
wheat per day, he earned twenty-two and a 
half bushels ol wheat. In 1859 he moved 
to Dodge county, where he cultivated rented 
farms; in i860 he moved to Winona county 
and rented a farm at St. Charles for three 
)'ears, and was there at the time of the be- 
ginning of the war. Then he moved to 
Wasioja, Dodge county, and was there a 
year; then, entering 160 acres at Peddles 
Grove, in Waseca county, on the Winne- 
bago reservation, and proceeded to improve 
the place. (His father also entered a tract 
adjoining him.) 

In the spring of 1865 he enlisted in 
Company H, First Minnesota Volunteer In- 
fantry, was mustered in at Fort Snelling, 
Minnesota, ordered to Chicagt) at the time 



of President Lincoln's funeral, and attended 
the memorial services there; next was or- 
dered to the front at Alexandria, Virginia, 
where he was taken sick, and was discharged 
from the hospital June 25, 1865. 

Arriving home on the 4th of July, he 
resumed agricultural pursuits for a year. 
He then engaged in driving stage for the 
Minnesota Stage Company, from \\'aseca to 
Mankato, with four-horse vehicles, — the out- 
fit requiring five men and twenty horses. 
His fellow drivers were Al Long, Billy 
Maloney, Lon Cale and John Donaldson. 
He followed this occupation for four }ears. 

In September, i 870. he moved to Win- 
nebago City, Faribault count}', where he 
first engaged in business with a one-horse 
dra\. In June, 1871, he purchased A. R. 
Davis' "bus," and his business in the trans- 
fer line increased until he now employs five 
horses, two busses and a baggage wagon. 
In March, 1894, he was appointed agent for 
the United States Express Company, and 
the business of that office is now attended to 
by his son, Frank. 

Mr. Fowler has passed through many 
hardships and suffered man\' privations in- 
cident to frontier life, but has successfully 
withstood them all until he is now engaged 
in a remunerative business, for which he is 
so well qualified. 

He was married at the age of twenty- 
two years, Waukesha county, Wisconsin, to 
Miss Adelia Buck, a lady of marked intelli- 
gence and of good family, a native of New 
York and a daughter of Mr. C. Buck. They 
have had four children, three of whom are 
living, namel)': Frank W., Fred E., a bar- 
ber of Wiiuiebago City; and Laura, wife of 
Ed. Babcock, a grain-dealer in the same 
town; and George, their first-born, died in 
his second \'car, of membranous croup. The 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



285 



three children living have had a good edu- 
cation. 

Politically Mr. Fowler is a Republican, 
and has served efficiently and acceptably as 
the first Marshal of the town, holding that 
office for one year. He is a gentleman of 
the strictest integrity, genial and accom- 
modating, making friends of all who make 
his acquaintance, either in a business or 
social way. 



HL. TAYLOR, president of the First 
National Bank of Wells.— The 
name Taylor, as borne by the fam- 
ily of which the subject of this 
sketch is a member, was derived from Tail- 
lefer, belonging to a Norman ancestor who 
was a Baron holding an office of trust under 
William the Conqueror and who partici- 
pated in the battle of Hastings in 1066. 
Since that time the ancestors in the male 
line have been, in succession, William, John, 
William, John, John, John, Matthew, Ed- 
ward, T. C. , Lucerne Curtis, the father of 
our subject. Edward, the first of the family 
in this country, settled in Middletown, New 
Jersey, in the latter part of the seventeenth 
century, namely, in 1692, afterward locating 
at Garrett's Hill, where his descendants 
were still occupying a part of the original 
homestead in 1880. He married Eunice 
Curtis, was an officer in the war of 18 12, 
and, being an ardent admirer of good horses, 
had considerable valuable stock in that line. 
He died at Gloversville, New York. His son, 
T. C, born in 1781, died in 1866. John 
Taylor, great-grandfather, was born at Up- 
per Freehold, New Jersey, in 1749, and 
married Chloe Cott, who was born in May, 
1752. He was a prominent citizen, and for 



nine years was Judge of Saratoga county. 
The family came into possession of large es- 
tates in Kent, England, and a hundred 
years afterward we find John Taylor, of this 
family, still on the old homestead, in Scho- 
doshchurch, county Kent, England. 

Lucerne Curtis Taylor, born in Saratoga 
county, in 181 2, married Hannah Platner, 
a native of Otsego county. New York, and 
a daughter of William Platner, of an old and 
prominent family, pioneers of the Mohawk 
valley. In 1853 he settled in Rosendale, 
in Fond du Lac county, Wisconsin, where 
he resided until 1857, and he is now one of 
the honored pioneers of Faribault county, 
Minnesota, aged eighty-three years. 

Mr. Taylor, the subject of this sketch, 
was born in Saratoga county. New Y'ork, 
February 2, 1840. In 1856, in company 
with a brother, he came to Dunbar town- 
ship, this count}', as one of the first settlers 
there, with a span of horses and eight yoke 
of oxen, entered 800 acres of land, broke 
160 acres and raised a sod crop of corn. 
Building a pine shanty, lined, with sawdust, 
they occupied it for a dwelling. The next 
season the remainder of the family came out 
to remain with them. 

Of the children there were eight sons and 
four daughters, as follows: Eunice, wife of 
Ezra Stearns, of Eagle Lake, Minnesota; 
Ed. H., of Kent, Nebraska; he was a soldier 
in the Second Minnesota Battalion; P. R., 
of Wells; was a member of the Fourth Min- 
nesota Infantry; A. L. , (subject); also a mem- 
ber of the Fourth Minnesota Regiment; 
Martha A. , who married Judson Taylor, of 
Wells; A. A., a merchant of Wells, who also 
was a soldier in the last war; J. W^, en- 
gaged in the livery business at Kasson, Min- 
nesota; E. H., of Kent, Nebraska; Ida M., 
who became the wife of Joy Tellet, of this 



2S6 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



county; L. C, Jr., in the grain business at 
Wells; W. J., also in the grain business 
here; and Hattie J., now Mrs. J. Dunbar, of 
Foster township. Four of these are teach- 
ers, — P. R., Eunice, Hattie and Ida M. 
Their mother died in 1893, at the age of 
seventy-nine years, a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, as is also their sur- 
viving father. 

During the war, October 11, 1861, Mr. 
A. L. Taylor enlisted in Company F, Minne- 
sota Infantry, and served four years. After a 
short camp life at Fort Snelling, this State, 
the men were ordered to St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, and thence to the front in the rebell- 
ious South, and were engaged in the battles 
of luka. Holly Springs, and Corinth, were 
two days at Memphis, and then engaged 
throughout the siege of Mcksburg, were 
with Sherman in the siege of Atlanta and on 
to the sea, and thence northward through 
the Carolinas to Richmond, \'irginia, and to 
the grand review at Washington. Altogether, 
Mr. Taylor engaged in thirty-seven battles. 
On one occasion his cartridge-box was shot 
from him, his clothing was torn by a ball; 
but he never received any wound in action. 
Honorably discharged, he returned to the 
farm of 480 acres, which he prcjccoded to 
put into good condition. 

In 1870 he came to Wells, as one of the 
pioneers here, entering the business of sup- 
plying the people with meat, and also the 
livery business. For some time also he was 
engaged in trade in live stock and land. In 
1882 he went to Larimore, South Dakota, 
and spent one season in Antelope \alley, 
Benson county. North Dakota. There he 
opened a valuable farm of 640 acres, good 
land, which ht' still owns. He also has 240 
acres in Dunbar township. His homestead, 
comprising a $7,000 house and a grove of 



four acres (with thirty-seven kinds of tim- 
ber) is the finest in the county. 

On returning from Dakota to Wells, 
Mr. Taylor engaged extensively in the grain 
trade, in which he became signally success- 
ful. He is also an extensive dealer in coal, 
lumber and all kinds of building material. 
His grain elevator was erected in 1895, with 
a capacity of 25,000 bushels. At the organ- 
ization of the First National Bank of Wells 
in 1 89 1, he was elected a member of the 
Board of Directors and the Vice President; 
was elected President in 1894 and re-elected 
in 1895. 

He is a i^ealous worker for the Repub- 
lican party; has been County Commissioner 
four years, serving with credit and honor; 
has also been President of the Village 
Board of Trustees. In his social relations 
he is a member of Lodge No. 87, F. & A. 
M., of Lodge No. 39, A. O. U. W., and of 
Post No. 165, G. A. R. Both himself and 
wife are members of the Presbyterian 
Church. 

In March, 1868, in Wells township, he 
married Miss Ida M. Thomas, a highly cul- 
tured ami refined lady, a daughter of A. J. 
Thomas, who was a pioneer here of 1855, 
and died in this county. Mr. and Mrs. Tay- 
lor have two children: Pearl E., now the 
wife of J. T. Owens, of Wells; and A. L. , 
attending the high school. 



tV^VRON HERBERT CURTIS, a 

l/**^ farmer ol section 30, Fairmont 
J^,_J township, Martin county, was born 
in \'ernon county, Wisconsin, Au- 
gust 17, 1861, a son of Thomas S. Curtis. 
The latter was born in \'ermont, December 
25, 1830, where he remained until seven- 
teen years of age, and then engaged in the 




C^ J/. J2^(^emtr 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



289 



boot and shoe business in Massachusetts. 
He was married there in December, 1848, 
to Mar}' Campbell, born in the north of 
Ireland June 17, 1832. She came to America 
with her mother at the age of fourteen 
years, locating first in Boston, Massachusetts, 
and afterward in Hopkinton, that State, 
where she died at about the age of eighty 
years. Her mother died in Ireland. After 
their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Curtis located 
in Mendon, Massachusetts, where he was 
engaged in the boot and shoe business. 
From there, in 1854, they moved to Vernon 
county, Wisconsin, and ten years afterward 
came to Martin county, Minnesota, locating 
in what is now Rolling Green township, 
where Mr. Curtis died, at the age of forty-six 
years. They were the parents of eight chil- 
dren, nameh : Ida, wife of D. P. Sackett, 
of Lament, Martin county; Ella, wife of 
Henry Mills, of Dakota; Florence; Eugenie, 
deceased; Byron H., the subject of this 
sketch; Emma, wife of John Berry, of Da- 
kota; Thomas, deceased; and Augusta, 
deceased. 

Byron H. Curtis was three years of age 
when he came to Martin county, and was 
raised on his father's farm. After his mar- 
riage he spent five years on the old home- 
stead in Rolling Green township, and then 
moved to and purchased a half interest in 
the store of S. D. Tanner of Fairmont. Si.\ 
months afterward he sold his interest to his 
partner and purchased the place where he 
now resides, consisting of 260 acres, where 
he is engaged in general farming and stock- 
raising. In political matters Mr. Curtis 
sui)ports the Republican party. He was a 
member of the Board of Township Super- 
visors in Rolling Green township from his 
t\vent\-first vcar until he left the township, 
and was chairman of the board during the 



last three years. In Fairmont township he 
has served as a member of the Board of 
Supervisors two years and as Clerk of the 
School Board. Socially he is a member of 
the I. O. O. F., Fairmont Lodge, No. 70, 
and of the Modern Woodmen of America. 
In September, 1885, Mr. Curtis was 
united in marriage with Emily Merritt, born 
in Canada, August 11, 1861, a daughter of 
John and Martha (Dease) Merritt, natives 
also of Canada. Mrs. Curtis, the third of 
their si.x children, came to Martin county, 
Minnesota, at the age of eleven years. Our 
subject and wife have two sons,— Thomas 
Henry and Benjamin John. 



^y^^ J. KREMER has been longer identi- 
1 ■ fied with Faribault county than 
\ ^ almost any of its citizens, and the 
story of its frontier life is very 
familiar to him. He gave to the biog- 
rapher a graphic description of the con- 
dition of affairs here in pioneer times, 
and as far as possible we reproduce an 
account of these facts, knowing that they 
will prove of interest to many of our 
readers. He has played an important part 
in the county development from the days 
when Indians still visited the settlement, 
from the time when Minnesota was yet a 
Territory. 

Mr. Kremer was born in Lorraine, 
France, near the beautiful city of Metz, 
January 14, 1834, and is the eldest of seven 
children, five sons and two daughters, whose 
parents were John and Elizabeth (Gouvion) 
Kremer. The others were Catherine, who 
became the wife of Adolph Brecht, a pioneer 
of Rice Lake, Dodge county, Wisconsin, 
who removed to Blue Earth county, Minne- 
sota, some years ago, and both died there; 



390 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



John P., who came to Faribault county in 
1856 and afterward went to Blue Earth 
county, was there elected County Treasurer, 
but after serving for five days his career was 
ended by death; John, born November 29, 
1843, for many years resided on the old 
home farm in Danville township, Faribault 
county, but for the past years has lived 
retired in Minnesota Lake, enjoying a rest 
which he has truly earned; Edward con- 
tracted an illness on board the ship while 
the family were coming to America, and 
died in Alden, Erie county, New York, 
about a year after their arrival; Peter, born 
March 7, 1839, is President of the Village 
Board of Minnesota Lake, also of the Secur- 
ity State Bank of that place, and is a most 
prominent and honored citizen; Margaret 
died in France, at the age of ten years. 

The father of this family, John Kremer, 
Sr. , was a leading man in political circles in 
his native land, and many times saw the 
Emperor Napoleon at the head of his vic- 
torious armies. He was born at Coume, 
Canton Boule}', Metz, France, in Novem- 
ber, 1800, and was laid to rest in the bury- 
ing-ground of St. John's Church in March, 
1 88 1, when death ended a long and useful 
life. The conditions of France in 1850 led 
to his emigration to America. He sailed on 
the 30th of April on the three-mast vessel 
Gallea, and on the voyage some very severe 
storms were encountered, the terrible waves 
dashing over the vessel with such force that 
no man could stand on the deck, but New 
York harbor was at length reached in safety, 
and the family made their way to Alden, 
Erie county, New York, where the father 
secured fifty-five acres of land, on which 
stood a frame house. He made many im- 
provements upon his farm, and in the spring 
of 1855 sold it at a good profit, preparatory 



to removing to Wisconsin, where he hoped 
to get a larger farm. The journey was 
made by rail to Chicago, thence by team to 
Fond du Lac county, where Mr. Kremer 
secured 160 acres of partially improved land 
and a rude log cabin. In June that was 
replaced with a more substantial log struc- 
ture, and here the family began life in the 
West in true pioneer style. Leaving them 
there engaged in the cultivation of the land 
and adding the much needed improvements 
to the place, we will return to our subject 
and follow his fortunes through the South. 
In March, 1853, Mr. Kremer, whose 
name heads this record, left Alden, New 
York, and made his way to Cincinnati, Ohio, 
and four miles east of that place secured 
employment in a road house where he 
served as clerk, bar-tender and general 
utility man. After three months he set out 
across the bay to Marblehead, where he 
secured employment with his uncle Tobie 
in a stone quarry, getting out stone for 
canals. He was later employed at various 
pursuits until November, 1854, receiving $30 
per month. He was then sent to Toledo to 
do some work, but found the cholera raging 
there in a very malignant form, and after 
four days returned to Marblehead. He was 
then sent by his uncle to look after interests 
in Sault Ste. Marie, but found that the 
cholera had preceded him there and he 
returned to Marblehead without delay, 
intending there to spend the winter, but 
destiny ordered otherwise. In the quarries 
he had met a sturd}', honest Scotchman, 
Davie Jones, and these two young men 
became part of the crew of the Natchez, a 
new boat just starting for the city of that 
name. It left Cincinnati January i, 1855, 
and on reaching Poddington a cargo of 
negroes were taken aboard for the Memphis 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



slave market. Here for the first time 
indeed the two young men, whose fortunes 
we are now following, realiiied what slavery 
was, and it was all that Mr. Kremer could 
do to restrain his more hot-headed friends 
from trying to prevent the rough handling 
of slaves at the market building. Fleecy 
cotton was taken aboard for the New 
Orleans market, and they saw Southern life 
in its various phases in those days. From 
the Crescent City Mr. Kremer came up the 
river on a packet as deck hand, saw the 
plantations along the streams and heard the 
songs of the negroes in the fields, mellowed 
by distance. He was called upon to take 
the soundings on that trip and his friend 
"Davie" was placed on the lookout. Not- 
withstanding his warnings of shoals ahead 
the craft ran her prow deep into the sand 
and for ten hours w^as thus held. On the 
same \'essel Mr. Kremer afterward made 
another trip to New Orleans, and that time 
returned b}' way of the river to Covington, 
Kentucky, where he visited a cousin, John 
Gouvin. There were very few points along 
the Mississippi at that time, below the 
Ohio, with which he \\as not familiar, and 
he also made a trip to the Kansas ri\er and 
the Missouri to Omaha and Council Bluffs. 
After three months he found himself in 
St. Louis, and while wandering aimlessly 
around chanced to meet some of his old 
friends from the stone quarries, and with 
one of these he came to Minnesota, then 
known as the Big Slough country. Cholera 
broke out on the boat and several died, but 
our subject escaped the disease and for a 
time worked at rafting on the river. Not 
satisfied with this, howe\er, he went to 
Wabasha, this State, thence on foot to the 
site of the present town of Plainview, then 
marked by a single log cabin. He was here 



advised by an old friend, John Walker, to 
secure a claim, and after doing this he 
returned to his parents' home in Wisconsin 
to induce his father to come to Minnesota. 
The two then went to New York, where the 
father mortgaged some of his property in 
order to get money to make the contemplated 
change. 

N. J. Kremer and his family traveled by 
way of Chicago to Dunleith, then by water to 
Hastings, Nebraska, where an ox team prairie 
schooner were secured, with which they con- 
tinued on their way. Near the shores of 
Cobb river lived the honored pioneer 
Frances Phillips, with whom they remained 
until their own cabin, on section 17, was 
built, — a structure 16 x 20 feet. Nick Kre- 
mer subsequently returned to Olmsted 
county, only to find that his claim had been 
taken by another; so in June, 1856, he se- 
cured the papers for 160 acres of prairie 
land and also for a timber tract. The 
Kremer family lived in a log cabin in true 
pioneer style and passed through the memor- 
able severe winter of 1856-7. The country 
around was bleak and barren, and neighbors 
were miles away, and it seemed a cheerless 
situation, but with the advent of spring 
work began in the fields and labor drove 
away all loneliness. During the Indian 
outbreak, like the other families, they fled 
from home, stopping near where now stands 
the Franklin postoffice, and in numbers 
sought safety, for they had little to fortify 
themselves with. While the party were 
discussing the advisability of the plan of 
crossing the river for further protection Mrs. 
Samuel Merrick came with the news that the 
Indians had returned to their reser\ation, 
and the settlers gladly went again to their 
homes, for the danger was now over. On 
account of the dreaded trouble with the Red 



292 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Men the father determined to move near the 
other settlers, and sent his son Nick to 
secure a location for him in Blue Earth 
county. This the latter finally obtained 
after traveling over many miles of territory, 
obtaining a location about ten rods from 
Cobb river in Danville township in May, 
1857, comprising 160 acres, on which was 
some fine natural timber. There John Kre- 
mer made his home until 1870, when he de- 
termined to spend his declining days in his 
native land. He again went to France, but 
Lorraine was then ravaged by the Prussians 
and he could not bear to see the devastation 
of his beloved country, so again sailed for 
America, where were his children. He 
spent his remaining days in the home of his 
esteemed son Nick, and died in the faith of 
the Roman Catholic Church, of which he 
was long a faithful member. The cemetery 
in which he now rests was given by him to 
the church for that purpose. His faithful 
wife, who shared with him in all life's vicis- 
situdes and was also a consistent Catholic, 
preceded him to the home beyond. She 
was born June 6, 1804, and died March 10, 
i860. 

Nick Kremer aided in all the labors of 
the farm and in the arduous task of devel- 
oping wild land. In December, 1894, he 
sprained his shoulder, and at this writing 
has not recovered from the injury. He was 
one of the first merchants of Minnesota Lake 
and long a member of the popular firm of 
Kremer & Apley, hardware merchants and 
dealers in farm implements, and has carried 
on a successful business. He brought the 
three first threshers to Minnesota Lake, — 
the Massillon, Eclipse and J. L Case. 

On the nth of July, i860, N. J. Kremer 
married Elizabeth Wagoner, daughter of 
Anthony and Elizabeth Wagoner, and a 



native of Alsace, France, born Jul}' 22, 1839. 
Their eight children are as follows: Eliza- 
beth, born November 29, 1861, died De- 
cember 9, 1879, and was buried by the side 
of her grandparents; Peter, born May 16, 
1864, attended the Northwestern Business 
College of La Crosse, Wisconsin, and the 
College of the Sacred Heart of Prairie du 
Chien, has been for some years a merchant 
of Minnesota Lake and was formerly in the 
mail service, running between La Crosse 
and Woonsocket, South Dakota; Julia, born 
April 13, 1866, is the wife of Thomas Keo- 
gan, an attorney of Minnesota Lake; Lena, 
born November 23, 1868, died April 16, 
1876; Edward N., born April 22, 1870, 
operates the old homestead; Ida, born March 
7, 1873, died February 12, 1885; Martha, 
born November 27, 1874, died April 30, 
1875; Rosa, born June 20, 1877, is now a 
student in St. Mary's Institute of Prairie du 
Chien, Wisconsin. 

Mr. Kremer was an important factor in 
the organization of the Town Board of Dan- 
ville township. Blue Earth county, in 1858 
was town clerk and served six years as 
chairman of the Town Board of that town- 
ship; also served on the Village Board of 
Minnesota Lake; was treasurer of the 
school board when the prett}' brick school 
building was erected. In all offices he has 
labored earnestly for the welfare of the com- 
munity. Since casting his first presidential 
vote for Stephen A. Douglas he has sup- 
ported the Democracy, and he and his fam- 
ily belong to the Catholic Church. His life 
has been a varied one. Born in France, 
reared in New York, starting out in business 
in Ohio, witnessing Southern scenes while 
on the Mississippi and experiencing all the 
vicissitudes of frontier life in Minnesota, he 
is now living a quiet life, honored and re- 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



293 



spected by all who know him. The nobler 
qualities of manhood are seen in his nature 
and many excellencies of character have 
brought to him many warm friends. 



* y ^ ON. ALLEN SHULTIS, the effi- 

l'^^^ cient Postmaster of Elmore, Fari- 

\ W bault county, Minnesota, was born 

in Columbia county, New York, 

January 20, 1832, son of Adam and Clara 

(Williams) Shultis. He is one of a family 

of ten, eight sons and two daughters. The 

sons are all still living and are scattered in 

different parts of the United States, the 

youngest at this writing being fifty- three 

years of age. 

Adam Shultis was born on the old Shul- 
tis homestead in Columbia count}'. New 
York, March 4, 1792, and his father was 
born and passed his life in that county. 
The ancestor of the Shultis family in 
America emigrated from Germany and settled 
in New York in 1740. Adam followed 
farming during his active life. In 1842 he 
moved from his native county to Wisconsin 
and settled in Waukesha county, where he 
spent the rest of his life. He was a man of 
strong individuality, and was successful in 
life. In his early days he was a stanch 
adherent of the old Whig party, but later 
was an enthusiastic Republican. He was 
a veteran of the war of i8i;2. In Wiscon- 
sin, in December, 1870, at the age of 
seventy-eight years, he quietly passed away. 
Of his wife, whose maiden name was Clara 
Williams, we record that she was born in 
Columbia county. New York, in the year 
1796, and died in 1871. Her people were 
of English origin and were among the early 
settlers of this country. 

Allen Shultis was about ten years of age at 



the time his parents moved to Wisconsin, and 
in that State he remained until 1855, when 
he started out in life for himself. Coming 
over into Minnesota, he located in Winona 
county, on Monej' creek, and made his home 
there for one year. At the end of that time, 
not being satisfied with his surroundings, he, 
in company with Mr. George D. McArthur, 
came further West and settled in Faribault 
county, in Elmore township. That was in 

1856. At the time of his settlement here 
there were but si.K actual settlers in the 
township, and of this number he is the only 
one left, the others having died or moved 
away. He has been actively engaged in 
farming in Elmore township until two years 
ago, when he moved into the town of 
Elmore. He owns 200 acres of land near 
the village, a portion of his farm having 
been inclosed within the town site. 

Mr. Shultis was married January 15, 

1857, to Elizabeth McArthur, daughter of 
Duncan and Catharine (Van Deusen) McAr- 
thur, she, too, being a native of Columbia 
county, New York. The McArthurs are of 
Scotch descent and have been residents of 
America since before the Revolution. Mr. 
and Mrs. Shultis have three children, viz. : 
Mrs. Elliot Mason, of Elmore township; 
Kate, wife of C. H. Stein, St. Paul, Minne- 
sota; and Floyd, at this writing a student 
in the commercial department of Parker 
College, Winnebago City, Minnesota. 

Mr. Shultis has been active in promot- 
ing the best interests of the county ever 
since he took up his abode here. He was 
for many years chairman of the Township 
Board of Supervisors and was for two terms 
a member of the County Board. As a 
Republican, he, served in 1859 and '60 as a 
member of the Minnesota State Legislature. 
During the Greeley campaign he joined the 



294 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Democratic party, and has ever since sup- 
ported it. He has three times been the 
choice of his party as candidate for the Legis- 
lature. In 1893 he was appointed Postmast- 
er at Elmore by President Cleveland, and on 
September of that year took charge of the 
office. He enjoys the confidence and good 
will of the people at large, and is recognized 
as one of the energetic, public-spirited men 
of the count\'. 



>T^OHN H. VANBUREN, residing on 

■ a farm in section 24, Elmore town- 

(% J ship, Faribault county, Minnesota, 

is one of the prosperous and highly 

respected men of his vicinity. 

He was born in Schoharie county, New 
York, April 12, 1830, one of the five chil- 
dren of Martin and Julia Ann (Neff) Van 
Buren. His father was born at the Van 
Buren homestead, seven miles from Canajo- 
harie. New York, and in 1833 moved seven 
miles from Fort Plain, Montgomery county. 
For some years he was a boatman on the 
Erie canal. He was poor and proud, and 
for that reason, when President Van Buren 
went to Fort Plain, hearing of his second 
cousin and namesake living near, and sent 
an invitation for the young boatman to visit 
him, the latter declined to go, and they 
never met. In 1850 he moved with his 
family to Princeton, Green Lake county, 
Wisconsin, and settled on a farm, being one 
of the pioneers of that region. His subse- 
quent life was spent there, where he died 
in 1892, at the age of ninety-two years. 
His wife, ncc Julia Ann Neff, was born in 
Port Jackson, now a part of the city of Am- 
sterdam, New York, in the year 1797, 
daughter of Timothy Neff. The Nefis orig- 
inated in England, but for many years were 



residents of New York. She died at the 
age of eighty-eight years. The paternal 
grandfather of our subject was Peter Van 
Buren. His whole life was passed in New 
York. The \'an Burens trace their ances- 
try back to the Holland Dutch. 

John H. Van Buren was just merging 
into young manhood when he went with his 
parents to Wisconsin, and there he lived 
for sixteen years, during the last ten of 
which he owned and operated a farm in 
Dodge county. In 1866 he sold his Wis- 
consin farm, and in the spring of that year 
came to Minnesota and settled in Elmore 
township. Here he bought a tract of unim- 
proved land, with a sod shanty on it, in sec- 
tion 24, the same spot upon which his pres- 
ent comfortable home is located, and here 
for many years he endured all the trials and 
hardships incident to life on the frontier. 
But notwithstanding the grasshopper scourge 
and the many other drawbacks with which 
he had to contend, by his honest industry, 
his courage and his perseverance he came 
safely through and is to-day the owner of 
240 acres of as good land as there is in the 
State of Minnesota. He raises fine crops of 
grain, and has for a number of years been 
extensivelj' engaged in stock raising. Be- 
sides his home farm, he owns six valuable 
building lots in the center of Elmore. 

Mr. Van Buren has always taken a com- 
mendable interest in local affairs. He be- 
came a member of the Township Board 
soon after locating here, and served in that 
capacity ten years. He was elected Town- 
ship Assessor twenty-two years ago, and for 
more than two-thirds of the time since then 
has filled the office, being its incumbent at 
this writing. He has been a member of the 
School Board ever since coming here, with 
the exception of three years when he was a 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND yACKSON. 



295 



member of the building committee, and he 
served as Clerk of the Board for many years. 
In politics, he has been a stanch Republican 
ever since the formation of the party. He 
is a member of the Masonic order, affiliating 
with King David Lodge, No. 179, of El- 
more, since 1888. 

Mr. Van Buren was married February 
22, 1855, to Hannah Maria White, a native 
of Erie county, New York, and a daughter 
of Stephen H. and Cheney (Percy) White, 
both natives of Vermont. Mr. and Mrs. 
Van Buren have five children living, — four 
daughters and one son, namely: Martin, at- 
tending the business college at Mankato; 
Francis C, the wife of Lepold Oelke, of 
Rome township; Ada Jane, wife of Lee 
Dolliver, of Iowa; Jessie, wife of William 
H. Stubbs, Eagle Grove, Iowa; and Hattie 
Belle, at home. Annie, the second daugh- 
ter, became the wife of Curtis Dolliver, of 
Iowa, and died at the age of twenty-nine 
years and eight months, leaving a husband 
and four children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Van Buren are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of El- 
more village. 



<y^ANIEL D. ALTON, who resides 
I I on section 17, Fairmont township, 
/^^_^ is one of the prominent and pros- 
perous farmers of Martin county, 
who has long been identified with the agri- 
cultural interests of this section of the State 
He was born in Jefferson county, New York, 
February 2, 1843, descended from a hardy 
family of the Emerald Isle. His grand- 
father, Lawrence Alton, and his father, 
Christopher Alton, were both natives of 
county Limerick, Ireland, and when the 
latter was twelve years of age he was brought 



by his parents to America, the family locat- 
ing in Jefferson county, New York. After 
he had attained to man's estate, he led to 
the marriage altar Miss Ann Montgomery, 
who was born in county Antrim, Ireland, 
and came with her parents to the New 
World when a young lady of seventeen 
years. Her father died while on board the 
ship. The daughter became a resident of 
Kingston, Canada, and there the parents of 
our subject were married, removing thence 
to Jefferson county. New York, where they 
resided for some years. In 1848 they emi- 
grated to the new State of Wisconsin, which 
in that year had been admitted to the Union, 
and located in Washington county upon a 
claim which was pre-empted by Mr. Alton. 
The father died in the Badger State, when 
about si.Kty-three years of age: the mother's 
death occurred in Jersey City, New Jersey, 
in 1862. Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Alton 
were the parents of five children, four sons 
and a daughter, all of whom reached years 
of maturity. Adam is now living in Minne- 
sota; Elizabeth is deceased; Daniel D. is the 
next younger; and Michael and Joseph are 
living in Monroe county, Wisconsin. 

The gentleman whose name heads this 
record is the third child of the family. He 
was a little lad of only four summers when 
brought by his family to the West. For 
some time afterward he was a resident of 
the Badger State. He may truly be called 
a self-made man, for he started out in life 
for himself at the age of sixteen years, work- 
ing on farms through the summer months 
and attending school during the winter 
seasons. His early life was therefore not a 
season of ease and lu.xury, but a period of 
labor, but he developed thereby a self-reli- 
ance and force of character which have been 
of incalculable benefit to him in later years. 



296 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



In 1 86 1 Mr. Alton responded to the call 
of President Lincoln for troops to aid in 
crushing out the Rebellion, and became a 
member of Company K, Sixth Wisconsin 
\'olunteer Infantry. He took part in several 
important battles, including the engage- 
ments at Beaver Mound, Rappahannock. 
White Sulphur Springs, Warrington and the 
second battle of Bull Run. At the last 
named he was wounded, the ball passing 
through his right thigh, and on account of 
the injuries thus sustained he was honorabl}" 
discharged April 14, 1863. He had always 
been found at his post of duty and was a 
valiant and loyal soldier, true to the old flag 
and the cause it represented. 

Mr. .\lton at once returned to his home 
in Juneau county, Wisconsin, where he was 
employed in the lumber woods and at farm- 
ing until 1864, when he removed to Olm- 
sted county, Minnesota. The following 
spring he came to Martin county and secured 
a homestead claim of 160 acres of land in 
Tenhassen township, which he at once be- 
gan to clear and improve. About this time 
he chose as a companion and helpmeet on 
life's journey Miss Mary E. Dennett, their 
marriage being consummated on the 22d of 
March, 1 866. The lady was born in Alle- 
gany count}'. New York, November 5, 1846. 
Her father, Jacob Dennett, was a native of 
the Empire State, and a son of David Den- 
nett, and was of English descent. Her 
mother, who in her maidenhood was Cor- 
neHa Alvoid, was also a native of New 
York and a daughter of Captain Alvoid, 
who was of English descent and served in 
the Continental army during the Revolution- 
ary war with the rank of Captain. Mr. 
and Mrs. Dennett removed to the State of 
Wisconsin when Mrs. Alton was onlj- about 
ten years old, and there engaged in farming. 



They located first in Sauk county, and after 
two years went to Monroe county. The 
mother died in New York, at the age of six- 
ty-five years, and the father is now living 
three miles from Lowell, Massachusetts. 
They were the parents of five children; Jo- 
sephine, wife of Liberty Dennett, a lawyer 
of Portland, Maine; Lafayette, who is em- 
ployed in the post office of New York city; 
Mary E. , the wife of our subject; W. Eu- 
gene, aBaptist minister now living in Rhode 
Island; and Alonzo G., a practicing physi- 
cian of fronton, Sauk county, Wisconsin. 

Mrs. Alton was educated in Monroe and 
Juneau counties, Wisconsin, and is a lady of 
culture and refinement, who presides with 
grace over her hospitable home. For seven 
3'ears she successfully engaged in teaching 
school, and her ability was widely recog- 
nized. To Mr. and Mrs. Alton have been 
born seven children, five sons and two 
daughters, who in order of birth are as fol- 
lows: Lorenzo D., now deceased; Carrie 
C, who is now taking a course as a trained 
nurse in Battle Creek, Michigan; Alfred D., 
a teacher; Josephine, who is engaged in 
teaching in Tenhassen township; Alonzo E., 
who is a student in Battle Creek College of 
Battle Creek, Michigan; Herbert D., a stu- 
dent in the schools of Fairmont; and Lester, 
1 who completes the family. 

Shortly after his marriage Mr. Alton lo- 
cated upon a farm in Tenhassen township 
and began its development, continuing its 
cultivation for a period of twentj'-eight 
years. He first moved into a log house, but 
it was replaced by a substantial frame resi- 
dence. The boundaries of the farm were 
extended until it now comprises a half sec- 
tion of land, — a rich and valuable tract which 
is now operated by his sons. In 1 893 Mr. 
.\lton purchased the Hazelmere place, which 




^ -^. Siu/a. 



FARIBAULT, .MARTI X, W A TON WAX AND JACKSON. 



299 



he now makes his home, living in a beauti- 
ful dwelling, three stories in height, situated 
on the bank of the lovely "Hall Lake." 
The home is supplied with many evidences 
of the taste and culture of its inmates, and 
the many friends of the family are always 
sure to receive a hearty welcome there. 
The seventy-five acres of the farm adjoins 
the lake and not only adds to the beauty of 
the home but also to its pleasure in various 
ways. 

For many years Mr. Alton was a sup- 
porter of the Republican party, but has now 
severed his allegiance to the same. He 
has served as a member of the Board of Su- 
pervisors of Tenhassen township, and for the 
long period of sixteen years was Clerk of 
School District No. 17. He has also filled 
other minor offices, and has ever faithfully 
discharged the trust reposed in him. fn the 
Seventh Day Adventist Church he holds his 
religious relations. The life and efforts of 
Nfr. Alton have been crowned with a high 
degree of success. He has steadily worked 
his way upward, overcoming the difficulties 
and obstacles in his path by determined 
effort and perseverance, and his good business 
and executive ability have brought to him a 
prosperity of which he is well deserving. 
His name is on the rolls of Martin county's 
most prominent agriculturists and citizens, 
and among its representative citizens he well 
deserves mention. 



X^EORGE SELDEN FOWLER, a 
■ ^^ well known farmer and stockraiser 
\^P residing ou section 32, Westford 
township, Martin county, was born 
on the 1 8th of May, 1834, in Northford, 
Connecticut, descending from good old Rev- 
olutionary stock. The Fowler family was 

16 



founded in America by three brothers who 
came from England to this country at an 
early day in its history. His grandfather, 
Maltby Fowler, and his father, De Grasse 
Fowler, were both natives of Connecticut. 
The latter married Sophronia Austin, who 
was born in the same State, as was her 
father, Enos Austin. Her grandfather was 
one of the heroes of the Revolution. The 
parents of our subject spent their entire 
lives in the Nutmeg State. The father died 
suddenly in 1863, at Hamilton, Fillmore 
county, Minnesota, while visiting his son at 
that place, and the mother passed away in 
1894. In their family were five children, 
three of whom are yet living, namely: Malt- 
by, George S. and Herbert E. One son, 
De Grasse, was a soldier in the Civil war, 
and his death resulted from the hardships 
and exposures incident to army life. The 
father of this family was an inventor and 
machinist, and he invented the first solid- 
head pin ever manufactured. His father 
and all his brothers were also inventors and 
were the originators of many useful and in- 
genious articles. 

In taking up the personal history of 
George S. Fowler, we present to our readers 
the hfe record of one of Martin county's 
most prominent and influential citizens. 
He was reared in Waterbury and Walling- 
ford, Connecticut, and acquired an excellent 
education, pursuing liis studies in New Brit- 
ain in his native State. He then entered 
his father's factory in Wallingford, where he 
remained until January, 1857, when he emi- 
grated westward. Coming to Minnesota, 
he took up his residence upon his present 
farm with Holmes F"owler, a sketch of whom 
appears elsewhere in this work. He now 
owns here 240 acres of rich and arable land, 
and his wife has in her possession 143 acres. 



%oo 



MEMORIAL HE CORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



The entire amount is cleared and cultivated 
and well tilled fields yield to the owner a 
golden tribute in return for the care and 
cultivation he bestows upon them. The 
buildings are neat and substantial structures 
and are well kept up, showing no neglect or 
carelessness on the part of Mr. Fowler. He 
devotes his time and attention to general 
farming and to stock-raising, making a spe- 
cialty of the breeding of sheep and hogs. 

In 1 86 1 Mr. Fowler wedded Susan E. 
Booth, a native of Newtown, Connecti- 
cut, and a daughter of Daniel L. Booth, 
one of the early settlers of Fillmore county, 
Minnesota, who located there in 1856. 
Her parents are both now deceased. She 
had three brothers who enlisted in the 
United States regular army and served 
through the Civil war. One brother, Jus- 
tin S. , was killed at the battle of Weldon 
Railroad in 1865; Nathan R. wore the blue 
throughout the entire conflict; and Daniel 
T. after serving for some time was honor- 
ably discharged on account of physi- 
cal disability. He is now an Episcopal 
minister of Minnesota. The Booth family 
is of English origin and was probably es- 
tablished in America during early colonial 
days. 

Mrs. Fowler was born November 15, 
1843, and by her marriage has become the 
mother of nine children, eight of whom are 
yet living, as follows: Justin Herbert, at 
home; Lillian Emma, wife of J. K. Tanner 
of Fairmont, by whom she has two chil- 
dren; Edith, wife of Harry St. John and the 
mother of one child; Edwin, twin brother 
of Edith; Mary S., George Fred, Grace and 
William W., who are still under the paren- 
tal roof. Three of the daughters have suc- 
cessfully engaged in schoolteaching, and all 
the children are well educated. Miss Mary 



is proficient in music, while Fred is now 
a student in the Agricultural College of Min- 
nesota. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fowler were reared in the 
faith of the Episcopal Church, but are not 
now communicants. In his political views 
he was formerly a Republican, but now sup- 
ports the Populist party. He has taken 
quite an active interest in local politics, and 
has been called upon to fill a number of 
offices of honor and trust in this commu- 
nity. He served as County Auditor of Mar- 
tin county, and for three years served as 
County Commissioner. He was elected 
Probate Judge, but refused to qualify for that 
office. He has been Chairman of the Town- 
ship Board and is Clerk of the school district. 
He is a public-spirited and progressive man, 
who gives his support to every enterprise 
calculated to prove of public benefit, and is 
numbered among the valued citizens of his 
adopted county. He is also one of the pio- 
neer settlers, and has been an important 
factor in the upbuilding and advancement 
of the community; and in the long years of 
his residence here his life has ever been 
such as to win him the confidence and es- 
teem of all with whom he has been brought 
in contact. 



a 



HARLES H. CAREY is one of the 
leading citizens of Elmore. The 
records of the lives of our fore- 
father's are of interest to the mod- 
ern citizen not alone for their historical 
value but also for the inspiration and ex- 
ample they afford the present generation. 
Yet we need not look to the past for this, 
for although surroundings may differ the es- 
sential conditions of human life are ever the 
same and a man can learn from the success 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



301 



of others if he will heed the ob\ious lessons 
contained in their history. Study the life 
of Mr. Carey and you will see the plans and 
methods which have been followed by one 
who has gained prosperity through his own 
efforts — through enterprise, sagacity and 
keen perception. 

Mr. Carey is a Western man and pos- 
S2sses the energetic and alert spirit which 
characterizes the citizens of the Mississippi 
valle}'. He was born in Fox Lake, Wis- 
consin, and is the eldest in a family of 
five sons, whose parents were Francis E. 
and Matilda (Jennings) Carey. The grand- 
parents, Joseph and Elizabeth (Rawdon) 
Care}', were both natives of Quebec, Can- 
ada, and descended from French ancestors. 
The father of our subject was born in Ver- 
mont, April 16, 1828, and when nine years 
of age he started out to make his own living, 
working on a farm until fifteen years of age. 
He then began to learn the shoemaker's 
trade in Brandon, Vermont, and success- 
fully followed that pursuit for fifteen years, 
carrying on business in Salisbury, Vermont. 
About this time the Mississippi valley was 
becoming rapidly settled, emigrants from 
the East taking advantage of the splendid 
resources afforded in this section of the 
country. In 1855 Francis E. Carey re- 
moved to Wisconsin, settling in Columbia 
county, where he secured a tract of Govern- 
ment land, which he cultivated until 1867, 
at which time he came to Faribault county, 
Minnesota. In August, 1867, he located on 
section 6, Blue Earth City township, and 
has since devoted his time and attention to 
general farming and stock-raising. He is 
extensively engaged in the raising of sheep, 
and his business interests have been so man- 
aged that he has acquired a most comfort- 
able competence. His farm, comprising 



320 acres of rich land, is one of the best in 
the county. 

Francis E. Carey was married November 
23, 1854, in Salisbury, Vermont, to Ma- 
tilda N. Jennings, a native of that place 
and a daughter of Lathrop and Eliza 
(Thomas) Jennings, the family being of 
English and Welsh descent. Five sons 
have been born to perpetuate the family 
name and bring honor to a family that has 
ever furnished most highly esteemed citizens 
of society. The eldest, Charles H., is fol- 
lowed by Clarence E. , who is now living in 
Blue Earth City; Walter Scott, who oper- 
ates the home farm; William F. , a grain 
buyer of Elmore, Minnesota, and Lathrop 
M. , a well-known carpenter of the county 
seat of Faribault county. 

On the 22d of May, 1856, Charles H. 
Carey was born, and in 1867 he became a 
resident of Minnesota. The first eleven 
years of his life were passed in the county 
of his nativity, and in its public schools he 
began his education, which, was completed 
in the schools of Blue Earth City. In 
May, 1879, an adventurous spirit, a desire 
to see more of the world, led him to 
enter upon an independent business career, 
— for hitherto he had carried on farm- 
ing with his father, — and he went to 
California, where he spent a year and a 
half engaged in prospecting and merchan- 
dising. In the latter part of 1880 he re- 
turned home and continued there until 
1882. at which time he began business for 
himself, dealing in hay in Blue Earth City. 
In the following year he built a residence in 
the village of Elmore, where he has since 
made his home, and the progress and ma- 
terial development of that place is very 
largely due to his efforts. At the time of 
his arrival here there were but two stores in 



30- 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



the village and but few residences. He has 
since been engaged in bu) ing and putting up 
hay, and is now doing business on a large 
scale, his trade having reached extensive 
proportions. He is also a large stock 
dealer and has other commercial interests 
which make him one of the leading business 
men of his adopted county. About six 
years ago the Exchange Bank of Elmore 
was established by George W. Taylor, S. H. 
Taylor, C. H. Carey and Z. Roberts. The 
last named gentleman soon retired, and the 
business has since been conducted by Messrs. 
Taylor and Carey, — a solid financial institu- 
tion whose conservative and safe methods 
inspire confidence and have gained a good 
volume of business. This company is also 
engaged in buying stock and shipping hay, 
and does an extensive business in the sale of 
agricultural implements. 

On the 24th of January, 1884, was cele- 
brated the marriage of Mr. Carey and Miss 
Louise Constans, one of the six children of 
George and Annie (Rousch) Constans, of 
St. Paul, Minnesota, which city the lady 
claims as the place of her nativity. Their 
home is brightened by the presence of a lit- 
tle son, Mark Henry. 

In politics Mr. Carey is a Republican of 
pronounced views, energetic and forceful, 
and in the counsels of his party his views 
and opinions are received with consideration 
and carry weight with them. He has been 
chosen a member of every county convention 
since coming to Elmore, and has also been 
a delegate to Congressional and State con- 
ventions. In local matters he is deeply in- 
terested and ever labors for the welfare of 
his town and county. For several years he 
has served as Supervisor, and at this writ- 
ing is President of the village. He was the 
first man initiated in King David Lodge, No. 



179, F. & A. M., is one of the most promi- 
nent members of the society, and is now 
acting as its Secretary. He also belongs to 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen. 
Mr. Carey is well known as one of the fore- 
most among the broad-gauged and able busi- 
ness men of Faribault county, and is a citi- 
zen that Faribault county could ill afford to 
lose. 



x^/^ OBERT G. GILLSON, of Minne- 
I /^ sota Lake, a resident of Faribault 

\ _ P county for thirty years, is a native 
of Lincolnshire, England, born 
November 2, 1852, a son of George and 
Mary (Gimber) Gillson, and is the third in 
the family of ten children, as follows: W. 
G., who was born in Lincolnshire, England, 
died in the forty-fifth year of his age; Mary 
E., who married W. H. Billington, is now 
deceased; Robert G., the next younger; 
James, born in New York, died in Dodge 
county, Wisconsin; Phoebe Ann, widow of 
Louis Goodchild; James Prior, a resident of 
Walnut Lake township, where he is engaged 
in farming with his brother Lafayette; 
Susanna Charlotte, who is the wife of John 
Scott, of Wells, Minnesota; Lafayette and 
and Janette, twins: the former is farming on 
the old homestead, while the latter is the 
wife of Williard Hunt, a farmer of Walnut 
Lake township; Bertha Amelia, who is the 
deceased wife of Joseph Allen, of Wells, 
Minnesota. 

The father of our subject was a native 
of Lincolnshire, England, born in 1827. 
He was the first of the family to come to 
the United States, and for a time resided in 
New York, removing thence to Dodge 
county, Wisconsin. Politically he was a 
Republican, but never sought or held ottice. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



303 



He lost his life in a sawmill at Beaver 
Dam, Wisconsin. His widow subsequently 
removed to Walnut Lake township, Fari- 
bault county, and on the 6th of March, 
1895, celebrated her seventy-sixth birthday. 

On the 1 8th of April, 1875, Robert Gill- 
son was united in marriage with Miss Isa- 
bella M. Smith, a native of Fulton county, 
New York, born July 11, 1847. She is the 
daughter of Christopher and Betsey (Ped- 
rick) Smith. On her father's side she is of 
Holland descent, and on her mother's side 
is of Scotch extraction. Her mother is 
yet living in Clark county, Wisconsin, and 
is now in the eighty-seventh year of her age. 
Her father died at the avanced age of 
ninety-six years. The wedding of Mr. and 
Mrs. Gillson was celebrated at Walnut 
Lake, Rev. Mr. Eldred, a Methodist divine, 
officiating. After their marriage the young 
couple moved to Minnesota Lake township, 
where they remained one year, Mr. Gillson 
conducting the farm belonging to his uncle 
John. They then went to Danville town- 
ship and spent two years, returning to 
Minnesota Lake township, where they 
have since resided. Mr. Gillson, in addi- 
tion to farming, for a period of six years 
represented the McCormick Machine Com- 
pany. He was also for a time engaged with 
J. T. Clark, representing the Grover, Steele 
& Austin Buggy Company. On the iSth of 
October, 1 891, he purchased the dray outfit of 
Oscar Barber, and has since been engaged 
in that line of business. 

Two children have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Gillson: Marvin Edward, born Janu- 
ary 21, 1878; and Rose Belle, born Novem- 
ber 7, 1882. 

Wliile residing on the farm of his uncle 
John, in 1875, Mr. Gillson had two 
\'aluable gray horses taken from his stable. 



On discovering his loss he applied to Q. J. 
Adams, then Deputy Sheriff of Faribault 
county, and in his company started on a 
search for the thieves and stolen property. 
After nearly six weeks the Deputy Sheriff, 
who had covered several thousand miles of 
territorj', abandoned the search. Through 
an advertisement in a St. Paul paper Mr. 
Gillson was led to believe that his horses 
were in Moorhead, Clay county, this State, 
near the Red river of the North. He at 
once went to St. Paul and there found his 
property, which he secured after a long par- 
ley with the man who had innocently pur- 
chased them. The thieves were captured 
and sentenced to a term of imprisonment in 
the Minnesota penitentiary. On his home- 
ward trip, being out late in the evening of 
the first day, between Moorhead and Breck- 
enridge, with the horses, he was twice 
fired upon, presumably by relatives of the 
thieves, but escaped injury. 

Mr. Gillson is a member of the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen and also of the 
Mordern Woodmen. Politically he is a Re- 
publican, and has served two terms as vil- 
lage Marshal. His wife is a member of the 
Methodist Church of Minnesota Lake. 



@EORGE WESLEY OTT, one of 
the representative farmers and 
early settlers of Martin county, 
dates his residence here from 1867, 
and during the years which have since come 
and gone he has always lived at his present 
place of abode in Fairmont township. Mr. 
Ott is a western man, and his interests have 
always been identified with the Mississippi 
valley. He was born in Harrison county, 
Indiana, on the 12th of May, 1835, and 
comes of a family of German lineage. His 



304 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



grandfather was a native of Kentucky and 
his father, Ninrod Ott, was a native of the 
same State. There he spent the days of his 
boyhood and youth and learned the black- 
smith's trade, which he followed more or 
less for some years. He removed from Ken- 
tucky to Indiana, and after residing for a 
time in Harrison county went to Menard 
county, Illinois, locating in Petersburg, 
where he still resides, at a \ery ad\anced 
age. His work through life has been black- 
smithing and farming, and he has led a busy 
and useful life. His wife, who bore the 
maiden name of Purlina Gum, was born in 
Kentucky, and is a daughter of Jehu Gum, 
a native of the same State and an early set- 
tler of Indiana. This worthy couple are the 
parents of eleven children, of whom our sub- 
ject is the third in order of birth. 

George W. Ott remained in the Hoosier 
State until sixteen years of age, and then 
accompanied his parents on their removal to 
Illinois, where he remained until coming to 
Minnesota. No event of special importance 
occurred during his boyhood and youth, 
which was quietly passed in his parents' 
home, midst play and work. He was reared 
to agricultural pursuits and has made that 
occupation his life work. As before stated 
he arrived in Minnesota in 1867, and located 
upon the farm which has since been his place 
of residence. He raised the first crop ever 
cultivated upon the farm, and with charac- 
teristic energy began to transform the wild 
land into rich and fertile fields. He now 
owns 230 acres, of which 100 acres is under 
the plow, the remainder of the land being 
pasture and meadow. In connection with 
general farming he carries on stock-raising, 
and keeps on hand a good grade of cattle, 
horses and hogs. 

In Menard county, Illinois, Mr. Ott was 



united in marriage with Miss Sarah Haden 
Parker, who was born in Kentucky, and dur- 
ing her early girlhood went with her mother 
to Illinois. To them have been born three 
children, all sons, — Horatio Seymour, Jesse 
Monroe and George Henry; and the family 
circle yet remains unbroken. They have a 
wide circle of friends and acquaintances 
throughout the community and the Ott 
household is the abode of hospitality. 

In political connection Mr. Ott is a 
Democrat, supporting by his ballot the men 
and measures of that party, but, though he 
takes an active interest in political affairs as 
every true American citizen should do, and 
keeps well informed on the issues of the 
day, he has never sought or desired political 
preferment. In his business dealings he has 
been very successful. His life has not been 
passed midst scenes of excitement, but fol- 
lowing the even tenor of his way he has, 
by his straightforward dealing and honesty, 
won the confidence of all with whom busi- 
ness or social relations have brought him in 
contact, and has gained a comfortable com- 
petence, being now numbered among the 
substantial citizens of the community. 



el). WILLSON, an honored pioneer 
of Faribault county, and for many 
years a recognized and prominent 
factor in the commercial world of 
this locality, is a resident of Minnesota Lake. 
He is a native of Louisville, St. Lawrence 
county, New York, born November 7, 1842, 
and is a son of Samuel Warner Willson. He 
too was born in St. Lawrence county, on the 
old family homestead. His father, for whom 
he was named, emigrated to that county at 
an early da)' from New England. The region 
in which he settled was then primitive in- 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



305 



deed, unmarked by few evidences of civiliza- 
tion, and in the midst of a dense timber belt 
he erected a log cabin in which he began 
life in true pioneer stj-le. ^^'ith character- 
istic energ}' he began felling the trees that 
the sunlight might fall upon his little home. 
In that county he was married, and of the 
union were born six sons and three daughters, 
including the father of our subject. 

Samuel W. Willson, Jr., devoted much 
of his life to the carpenter's trade but also 
found time to till the acres of the old home 
place. Over a quarter of a century ago, he 
emigrated from the county of his nativity 
to Faribault county, Minnesota, settling on 
section 18, Minnesota Lake township, where 
he purchased of Samuel Cor}' a quarter sec- 
tion of land. There he made his home 
throughout his remaining days, his death 
occurring January 6, 1871. His remains 
were interred in Oak Grove cemetery of 
Danville, Blue Earth county, where a mon- 
ument has been erected to his memory. In 
his political views he was a pronounced 
Democrat. In early life he married Lucy 
O. Hosmer, who was born in Louisville, 
New York, July 7, 1822, and to her husband 
she was a faithful companion and help-mate. 
She is still living in this county, at the age 
of seventy-two, and is in possession of all her 
faculties unimpaired. She holds member- 
ship in the Universalist Church, and her 
pure Christian life is well worthy of emula- 
tion. The eldest child of the family is E. D. , 
of this sketch, with whom the mother resides. 
Ira, born April 26, 1 845, died and was buried 
in Louisville, New York; William H., born 
October 2, 1848, in Louisville, now resides 
in Waverly township, Martin county, Min- 
nesota, and is Postmaster of North Star 
post office. He was also candidate for the 
office of State Senator, was chairman of the 



Town Board of Supervisors and is a promi- 
nent citizen of the community in which he 
resides. He was also secretary of the Farm- 
ers' Mutual Fire Insurance Company of 
Martin county, and was County Superintend- 
ent of Schools of Sibley county, when a res- 
ident of Henderson, Minnesota. Elizabeth, 
the 3'oungest of the family, was born Octo- 
ber 4, 1850, and is the wife of E. O. Shoen, 
a carpenter of Goldsfield, Wright county, 
Iowa. He was born in St. Lawrence 
county. New York, for some years resided 
in Minnesota Lake and for four years past 
has lived at his present place of abode. 

E. D. Willson, the immediate subject of 
this review, remained with his parents dur- 
ing his boyhood and youth, accompanied 
them to the Gopher State and allied his 
business interests with his father's, supple- 
menting the latter's labors with his own and 
working with him for the interests and sup- 
port of the family. He was married June 
6, 1865, to Miss Sarah Deuel, a daughter of 
Cornelius Deuel, of Louisville, New York, 
where Mrs. Willson was born, October 29, 
1845. Her mother is still living and has 
now reached the advanced age of eighty-five 
years. The children born of the union of 
our subject and his estimable wife are the 
following: Ira, who was born September 
5, 1866, and died August 26, 1867, being 
laid to rest in the cemetery in Louisville, 
New York, where sleeps so many of his an- 
cestors; Lulu C. , who was born in Minne- 
sota Lake, March 18, 1869, is now the wife 
of John Sill, an agriculturist, who is now 
living near Grant's Pass, Oregon, whither he 
went for the benefit of his health; and 
Edna, who was born May 20, 1877, and is 
still under the parental roof. There are also 
two little grandchildren, Elda and Lloyd 
Sill, the former now in her seventh year, 



3o6 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



the latter in his fifth year. They are bright, 
interesting children, and are now sharing 
the home of their grandparents, — the light 
and joy of the household. 

Few men are better or more favorably 
known than E. D. Willson. He began life 
at the lowest round of the ladder and has 
steadily worked his way upward until he 
has gathered the fruits that can be obtained 
only by climbing. He long followed farming 
and his successfully conducted affairs made 
him one of the leading agriculturists of the 
community. For many years he also en- 
gaged in threshing, and in this way added 
not a little to his income. About six years 
since he removed to Minnesota Lake and is 
now a member of the firm of Townsend & 
Willson, dealers in flour, grain and machin- 
ery. In connection with his other property 
he owns the beautiful drug store in Minne- 
sota Lake, and has several hundred acres of 
valuable land in Minnesota Lake township. 
All has been acquired through his own 
efforts, and demonstrates what can be ac- 
complished through industry, energy and 
perseverance. Near his warehouse he has 
a pretty and comfortable home and his days 
are now spent in comparative ease. He, 
however, will never be an idle man, for his 
nature is too enterprising and energetic. 
He has served his fellow citizens as a mem- 
ber of the Town Board of Supervisors, also 
served as its chairman, but has ne\er been 
a politician in the sense of office-seeking, 
preferring to give the greater part of his 
time and attention to his business interests 
and the enjoyment of his home. He votes 
with the Democratic party, but is not 
an aggressive politician. In the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen he takes an ac- 
tive interest and is one of the charter mem- 
bers of Minnesota Lake Lodge, No. 131. 



He is recognized as one of the most honored 
pioneers of this section of the State, and 
his well spent life has gained for him the 
confidence and good will of all with whom 
he has been brought in contact. Pleasant 
and genial in manner, his friends are many 
and all have for him the highest regard. 



s 



OREN NIELSEN, an influential 
and respected citizen of Petersburg 
township, has resided in Jackson 
county for eleven j-ears. He was 
born in Denmark October 11, 1833, and is 
a son of Niels Lauridsen and Mette (Greg- 
ersen) Nielsen and is the fifth in the family 
of nine children, as follows: Ingeborg, yet 
residing in the old country; Laurids, also in 
his native land; Gregis, who emigrated to 
America in 1870, located on Manhattan 
island, where he died. He was a sexton in 
the famous Greenwood cemetery. Mary 
died in her native land. Soren is the next 
younger. Abbelone still makes his home in 
Denmark. Merton died abroad. Chris- 
tian, who is one of the substantial business 
men of Brooklyn, New York, conducts a 
large carriage manufactory. He has been 
a resident of the Empire State since 1865. 
Neils is still living in Denmark. 

The good Christian father of our sub- 
ject was born in Denmark and devoted his 
life to agricultural pursuits. He was a 
members of the Danish Lutheran Church 
and died in the fifty-second year of his age. 
His wife died in her native land, in the 
fifty-seventh year of her age. 

Soren Nielsen was reared on his father's 
farm and received his education in the com- 
mon schools in the neighborhood of his 
birth-place. On the i 8th of October, i 86 1 , 
he \\as united in marriage with Miss Mette 




j^^i'i'iae G?f. -/ja/z/e-i. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



309 



Marine, a native of Denmari<, a daughter of 
Thue and Carrie (Sorenson) Hansen, born 
November 15, 1S36. They have had six 
children, — the first four in Denmark and 
the others in Brooklyn, New York. Carrie 
is now the wife of Hans Lauridson, of Lara- 
mie City, Wyoming. Her first husband 
was Anders Peter Hansen, who died in. 
Omaha, Nebraska. Mette Johanne is the 
wife of Henry Olsen of Jackson. Nils 
Lauridson is a farmer of Petersburg town- 
ship. The fourth child, Thue, died in in- 
fancy and was buried in Greenwood ceme- 
tery, of Brooklyn, New York. Mathias 
Adolf resides on the old homestead. Theo- 
dore died in Brooklyn, New York, and was 
laid to rest in Greenwood cemetery. 

The father of Mrs. Nielsen, Thue Han- 
sen, died when seventy-five years of age. 
Her mother passed away when the daughter 
was but ten years old. They were both de- 
vout members of the Danish Lutheran 
Church. 

On the 4th of May, 1873, Mr. Nielsen 
with his family sailed from Copenhagen, 
Denmark, and after a voyage of thirty days 
landed in New York. They came to this 
country on a steamer of the Inman line, 
named the New York. Arriving on Manhat- 
tan island, a brother of our subject met 
them at Castle Garden and took them to 
his residence in Brooklyn. Before coming 
Mr. Nielsen had served an apprenticeship 
to bricklaying and carpentering, and on his 
arrival here commenced work at bricklaying, 
which he followed for about six months and 
then worked about four months at carpenter- 
ing. After this he entered the carriage works 
where his brother was employed as foreman, 
spending seven years there. After an ill- 
ness of his wife and indisposition of himself 
the\- determined to come West with the 



hope of enjoying better health. They first 
located at Omaha, Nebraska, where they 
remained about three years engaged in 
hotel keeping. In 1883, through the in- 
fluence of Mr. Johnson, Mr. Nielsen deter- 
mined to purchase a farm in Petersburg 
township, Jackson county, Minnesota. On 
this farm, which is located on section 11, 
he has since resided and made many im- 
provements. During the eleven years of his 
residence here he has secured many warm 
friends and has won the esteem of all with 
whom he has come in contact. No one 
ever doubted his integrity and honesty and 
all the business and representative men of 
of Jackson know that his word is as good as 
his bond. 

Politically he is independent, and has 
served in several local offices. He is a 
warm friend of the public schools and is 
ever ready to do all in his power for the ad- 
vancement of his adopted town and county. 
The family are members of the Danish 
Lutheran Church, and Mr. Nielsen is also a 
member of the Knights of Honor. 



©EORGE A. BARNES, deceased, 
settled in Wells in the spring of 
1 87 1, and from that time until his 
death was closely identified with 
her growth and progress. In social and 
business circles he was prominent, and as a 
citizen he was most valued. In the history 
of this section of Minnesota he well deserves 
honorable mention, and to this family and 
the many friends he left behind we respect- 
fully dedicate this record. 

Born in the old town of Newton, now a 
part of Boston, Massachusetts, on the 17th 
of January, 1822, he was the youngest in a 
family of six children whose parents were 



3IO 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Andrew and Sarah (Dean) Barnes. The 
Barnes family is of English origin and was 
one of the first to locate in Boston. The 
great-grandfather of our subject was a sea 
captain and the grandfather and father were 
prominent merchants in Boston for many 
years. The latter died when George A. was 
only six months old. In the public schools 
of his native city, — the center of learning in 
this country, — he received a most excellent 
education, and when his school life was 
ended he served an apprenticeship at the 
furrier's trade. In 1842, when twenty years 
of age, he went to Manchester, New Hamp- 
shire, and erected a building at the corner 
of Elm and Hanover streets, and extensively 
engaged in the manufacture of hats, caps 
and fur articles, and did a lucrative business 
in that line for twenty-seven years, in con- 
nection with which was extensively engaged 
in the mercantile business. 

On the 30th of August, 1849, he was 
united in marriage with Miss Sarah Jane 
Stevens, a native of Manchester and daugh- 
ter of Hibbard and Eliza (Nutt) Stevens, 
both of whom were born and reared in 
Manchester, and a part of that beautiful 
city now stands on the farm which was 
formerly owned by Mr. Stevens. The 
Stevens family came from England to 
America many years prior to the Revolu- 
tionary war, and the great-grandfather of 
Mrs. Barnes was a soldier in the French and 
Indian war. It is very probable that the 
grandfather was one of the heroes of the Re- 
volution, for he was a very patriotic man. 
The Nutt family also came from England in 
early Colonial days. 

After an era of successful business in the 
old Granite State, in 1869 Mr. Barnes and 
his wife bade adieu to their old home in the 
East and removed to Green Bay, Wisconsin. 



Soon after, however, they took up their 
residence in Minneapolis, Minnesota, whence 
they came to Wells in 187 1. At that time 
this now flourishing city was a small village 
with little promise of future development, 
and it is due to the enterprise and energ}' of 
such men as Mr. Barnes that it is now the 
second city in the county. He was public- 
spirited to an eminent degree and always 
did much in behalf of the national interests 
and general welfare of his resident com- 
munity. No interest calculated to promote 
the general welfare sought his help in vain, 
and he may truly be numbered among the 
benefactors of Faribault, his adopted county. 

The business which engaged the atten- 
tion of Mr. Barnes after coming to Wells 
was that of insurance, real estate and loans, 
and in his undertakings he prospered, win- 
ning as the result of perseverance, resolute 
purpose, good management and business 
ability, a handsome competence. He also 
served the people of this community as Jus- 
tice of Peace for many years. 

In his political views Mr. Barnes was 
first an old-line Whig, and upon the organi- 
zation of the Republican party he joined its 
ranks and was ever afterward one of its stal- 
wart supporters. While in New Hamp- 
shire he was regarded as one of the leaders 
of the party in the community which was 
his home, and wielded a great influence in 
its behalf, but owing to his large business 
interests could never be induced to accept 
office. This influence was also felt after his 
arrival in Minnesota, and he was invariably 
called upon to preside at all public gather- 
ings and political meetings, for he under- 
stood parliamentary law usages and was a 
dignified and capable presiding officer. So- 
cially he was a member of Lafayette Lodge, 
F. & A. M., of Manchester, New Hamp- 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



31' 



shire. At the age of seventeen he united with 
the old Federal Street Baptist Church, of 
Boston, and ever afterward adhered to that 
faith. His life was in harmony with his 
professions, and many acts of kindness and 
deeds of charity did he perform in a quiet, un- 
assuming manner, after the example of Him 
who said, "Let not your right hand know 
what your left hand doeth." Of large brain 
and kindly heart, he was interesting and in- 
structive in conversation, courteous and 
genial in deportment and a true gentleman 
at all times. In the various relations of 
hfe, whether as a citizen, merchant or Chris- 
tian, was always faithful and true, and on 
no part of his life was there a mark of 
wrong or a suspicion of evil doing. For 
four years prior to his death he was a suf- 
ferer from paralysis, but bore all with Chris- 
tian fortitude and at last passed peacefully 
away, — called to the home prepared for the 
righteous, — October 21, 1892. 

He died leaving a widow and one son to 
mourn his loss. The latter, George A. 
Barnes, is now engaged in the machinery 
business at Wells, and is the only male 
representative of one of the oldest Ameri- 
can families. Mrs. Barnes still resides 
in Wells and is honored by all who know 
her. Like her husband, she is a con- 
sistent member of the Baptist Church, 
and like him delights in doing good. Her 
friends are many and have been won by the 
manv excellencies of her character. 



tV^ ENJAMIN ADAMS, a farmer of 
|/*=C section 9, Pleasant Prairie town- 
J^^__^ ship, was born in Oxfordshire, Eng- 
land, May 12, 1842, a son of 
George Adams, a native of the same place. 
He came to America in 1851, locating on a 



farm in Douglas county, Wisconsin, where 
he remained until his death, at the age of 
sixty-five years. The mother of our sub- 
ject, nee Ann Walker, also a native of Eng- 
land, died in the town of Lowell, Douglas 
county, at the age of sixty-three years. 
They were the parents of thirteen children, 
twelve of whom grew to years of maturity, 
namely: James, Edward (a soldier in the 
late war, now deceased), Susan, Benjamin, 
Thomas (deceased), Alfred, George W. , 
Annie E., Martha, Sarah, William (who 
was killed in the army), and Joseph. 

Benjamin Adams, the subject of this 
sketch, came to America with his parents at 
the age of nine years, and was reared in 
Wisconsin. In 1863 he enlisted in Com- 
pany C, Sixteenth Wisconsin Volunteer In- 
fantry, and served until the close of the 
struggle. At the battle of Kingston he nar- 
rowly escaped death. Receiving his dis- 
charge at Davenport, Iowa, in the fall of 
1865, Mr. Adams returned to his home in 
Wisconsin. In 1863 he purchased the farm 
he now owns in Martin county, Minnesota, 
on which he located in 1865, being one of 
the early pioneers of the township. His 
first residence was a small log cabin, built 
in 1866. In an early day he successfully 
followed trapping, and since then has been 
engaged in general farming and stock-rais- 
ing. He now owns 540 acres of good farm- 
ing land, all in one body, on which he has 
made all the improvements. In political 
matters Mr. Adams acts with the Repub- 
lican party. He has been a member of the 
Board of Supervisors eleven years and a 
member of the School Board eight years. 

In 1865, in Wisconsin, our subject was 
united in marriage with Hannah Nickerson, 
who was born and reared in New York. To 
this union have been born thirteen children, 



312 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



viz.: Susan, deceased; Laura A., wife of 
Adelbert Moore, of Martin county; George 
H., of Dakota; Alpheus, deceased; Will- 
iam E., at home; Joseph A.; Edsill, de- 
ceased; Susan; Jennie B. ; Sidney L. ; 
James A. ; Frederick, and Cora A. 



He. LANE, one of the pioneers of 
Faribault county, is well-known 
through this part of Minnesota, 
the date of his first arrival here 
being in July, 1857, the day of the memor- 
able Spirit Lake massacre in Iowa. We 
take pleasure in presenting the following 
sketch of his life in this work. 

Mr. Lane was born in Cattaraugus 
county. New York, April 10, 1832, son of 
Amos and Lucy (Sanders) Lane, the former 
a native of New York, and the latter born 
at the foot of Bald Mountain in Vermont. 
Amos Lane was a mechanic, a worker in 
hardwood. He died in Cattaraugus county, 
New York, at the age of forty-seven years, 
leaving a widow and eight children, four 
sons and four daughters, viz. : Augustus C, 
Harry Cyler, deceased, William, Mehetabel, 
Amos L. , Sarah, died in Oshkosh, Wiscon- 
sin, Mandy, Malissa and Caroline. The 
mother still lives at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, at 
the advanced age of eighty-five years. 

A. C. Lane was reared in his native 
State, his early life being spent in work on 
the farm and in the lumber woods. When 
he was twenty-one he came West to Osh- 
kosh, Wisconsin, making the jcurney from 
New York on horseback, via Buffalo, Cleve- 
land, Chicago and Milwaukee. He assisted 
in making the first brick that were used in 
building the wing of the prison at Waupun. 
He then made a visit to Dodge county, 
Minnesota, and soon afterward returned 



East, and spent ten months in New York. 
At the end of that time he came back to 
Wisconsin and Minnesota. In 1857, as 
above stated, he arrived in this county, and 
here he took claim to a tract of land on 
section 18, Verona township, where he re- 
sided two years, and then sold out and 
returned to Waupun, Wisconsin, remaining 
there two years. In 1 860 he took up his 
abode in Blue Earth county, and was there 
in 1863 at the time of the massacre at New 
Ulm, which horrible affair he witnessed. 
The year 1863 he spent in Waupun, Wiscon- 
sin, and in 1864 he settled on his present 
farm, at first living in a log cabin. His 
nice farm of 200 acres is now well improved 
with cottage home, good barn and granary, 
and a six-acre grove. 

Mr. Lane was married, in i860, to Miss 
Elizabeth Fairbanks, a native of Cattarau- 
gus county. New York, daughter of Theo- 
polis Fairbanks and Susan nee Sykes, both 
natives of New England, and both deceased, 
her father passing away at the age of eighty 
years, and her mother at eighty-two. They 
had fourteen children, viz. : ApoUos, Frinda, 
Dorcas, Evaline, James, Wesley, Roseppa, 
Semando, Elizabeth, Sarah, Elijah, Julia, 
Mary, and Alfred. Mr. and Mrs. Lane have 
five children, record of whom is as follows: 
Minnie, who died at the age of twenty-five 
years; Sarah, wife of Melvin Foss, of this 
township, has four children, — James, Stella, 
Cyril and Cecil, twins; Semando, who mar- 
ried Cora Hack, and they have one son, 
Severn D. ; Alton, who married Miss Glee 
Wise; and Charlie. 

Mr. Lane is an ardent Prohibitionist, 
and for twenty-five years he and his good 
wife have been active members of the Prot- 
estant Methodist Church, he serving as a 
Class leader twenty years of this time. In 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



313 



1895 they united with the Freewill Baptist. 
He has also been active and earnest in Sab- 
bath-school work for many years. This 
worthy couple have e.xperienced both the 
hardships and the pleasures of pioneer life, 
their hospitality has been unbounded, and 
they are well-known to a large circle of 
friends, including both the early settlers and 
those who came later. During their life on 
this farm they have suffered from wet and 
drouth and grasshoppers, and while they 
have had many discouragements they have 
bravely met and overcome them all, and are 
now enjoying that peace and prosperity which 
comes after faithful, honest toil. 



"^Y'^^'IES F. hill, who owwi and oc- 
Jj cupies a fine farm three miles south- 
A 1 west of Winnebago City, Minnesota, 
is one of the respected citizens of 
Faribault county. He was born in Brad- 
ford county, Pennsylvania, January 18, 
1850, son of Felix and Julia Ann (Hoover) 
Hill, natives of New York. Both his 
grandfathers, Ira Hill and Cornelius Hoover, 
were also natives of the Empire State. 
After their marriage, Felix Hill and his wife 
settled in Bradford county, Pennsylvania. 
Some years later they returned to New 
York, and in 1856 moved out west to Wis- 
consin, coming via the lakes, and locating 
on a farm in Green Lake county. There 
they resided until 1863. That year, bent 
on securing a home still further west, they 
came over into Minnesota and located on a 
tract of wild land in Verona township, Fari- 
bault county, the journey hither being made 
with ox teams. Here Felix Hill developed 
a valuable farm, and on it passed the closing 
years of his life and died, his death occur- 
ring in 1887, at the age of sixty-four years. 



His widow still resides at the old home 
place. He was a man of many sterling 
characteristics, and was a true pioneer. In 
politics, he was a Democrat; fraternally, 
was identified with the I. O. O. F. , No. 30, 
of Winnebago City. The children com- 
posing his family are as follows: Ira C. ; 
Roscoe, South Dakota; James F. ; Sarah 
E. Park, for some years a popular teacher, 
is now a resident of Martin county, Minne- 
sota; Orpha Hall, of this township; Louis 
A., a farmer of this township; Josephine 
Colton, of Martin county; W. H. ; and 
Charles M., on the home farm. 

James F. Hill was thirteen years of age 
at the time of their removal to Minnesota. 
Here and in Green Lake county, Wiscon- 
sin, he received his education in the district 
schools. In 1877 he purchased his present 
farm of Charles Ring, it having very few 
improvements upon it at that time. Here 
he has lived and prospered for sixteen years. 
The small frame residence that was here 
when he took possession, now, serves as a 
granary, and in its stead is a modern, two- 
story dwelling, located on a natural building 
site, and overlooking a broad and beautiful 
farming region. This house was erected in 
1892. 

Mr. Hill was married December 11, 
1878, in Blue Earth City, to Jeannette L. 
Ring, a native of Clayton county, Iowa, 
and a daughter of David Ring, a native of 
Maine, and now a resident of Winnebago 
City, Minnesota. Her mother, nee Susan 
Pardee, was born in Michigan. Mr. and 
Mrs. Ring are the parents of seven children: 
Mrs. Hill, C. W., George W., Frank, Ethel, 
Merton, and Nelly. Mr. Hill and his wife 
have four children, — Howard J., Arthur W., 
Laurence M. and Mary F. 

Mr. Hill supports the Republican party 



3H 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



and has served his fellow citizens as Super- 
visor of the county and president of the 
School Board. He is a member of the 
I. O. O. F. 



fi 



ATRICK CORCORAN, one of the 
highl}' esteemed citizens of Easton, 
is now living a retired life, enjoy- 
ing a rest which he has truly earned 
and richly deserves. His life has been an 
industrious one, and his energy, persever- 
ance and good management have brought to 
him a comfortable competence. His pretty 
home in Easton stands as a monument to 
his labor and is a haven of rest to him in 
his declining years. 

This gentleman was born and reared 
on the beautiful isle of Erin. He 

opened his eyes to the light of day Feb- 
ruary 2, 1826, as the fourth child in a 
family of twelve born to John and Brid- 
get (Donnelly) Corcoran. The parents, 
too, were born there, and the children 
were all natives 6f that land. James, 
the eldest, died in New York city when 
about fifty years of age; Mary became the 
wife of Frank Fielden, a soldier of the 
Mexican war, and both have now passed 
away; Margaret wedded John Sullivan and 
died in Ulster county. New York; Patrick is 
the next younger; Peter, who was a soldier 
of the late war, died in Fond du Lac count}-, 
Wisconsin; Thomas died in Ulster county, 
New York; Michael, who has been a thrifty, 
hard-working man, is now living retired 
in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin; William 
is a stone-cutter residing in Ulster coun- 
ty; John died in New York city a few 
years since; Richard, who was determined 
to enter the service of his adopted country 
during the Civil war, was prevented by his 



sweetheart, who went after him and made 
him return, shortly after which they were 
married, and she is now his widow, his death 
having occurred in Ulster county; Mathew, 
who was a stone-cutter, died in the South; 
and Frank, who was one of the boys in blue 
in the war of the Rebellion, fell at the bat- 
tle of Fair Oaks, Julys, 1862. The father 
of this family spent his entire life in the land 
of his nativity, and was both a farmer and 
mechanic. He was born in county Meath, 
and died there at the age of sixty years. 
His wife, who was born in the same 
county in 1800, left Ireland in 1852 and 
sailed from Liverpool to New York, accom- 
panied by her sons, Frank and John. She 
continued her journey to Ulster county, New 
York, where her son Patrick was living, and 
she made her home with her children during 
her remaining years. She lived part of the 
time with our subject, who in 1873 went 
to the East and brought her to his home in 
Faribault county. Her death occurred at 
the home of her son Peter in Fond du Lac. 
Wisconsin, when in the eightieth year of her 
age. She was a tender and loving mother, 
and her children will ever hold her in grate- 
ful remembrance. 

In the land of his birth Patrick Corcoran 
spent the first nineteen years of his life, and 
in the public schools obtained his education. 
He then determined to seek a home in the 
"land of the free" and embarked on the 
three-mast sailing vessel Frank Corniac, 
which in the English Channel had a collis- 
ion with another vessel and its bows were 
stove in and it was towed into harbor for 
repairs. Again weighing anchor, it sailed 
the Atlantic in six weeks, again reaching 
New York harbor. Our subject went to the 
home of his brother James, who had previ- 
ouslv come to the United States, and se- 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



315 



cured work at polishing steel, but after six 
weeks he went to Ulster county, New York, 
where he served an apprenticeship to the 
stone mason's trade. 

It was while there that Mr. Corcoran 
met and eloped with his employer's daugh- 
ter, a young lady of sixteen years, and by 
the parish priest in Chambers street church, 
New York, Patrick Corcoran and Miss Mary 
Elizabeth Corcoran were united in the holy 
bonds of matrimony, the date of this impor- 
tant event being September 3, 1848. Her 
father was very indignant, but found that 
the young couple's happiness depended upon 
their union, and forgiveness followed. Un- 
like many elopements, this has resulted in 
true happiness, and for almost half a cen- 
tury the worthy pair have traveled life's 
journey together, their mutual confidence 
and love increasing as the years have passed, 
and together they have shared the prosper- 
ity and adversity, the sorrows and joys, 
which checker the arena of every one's life. 
Their home has been blessed with the pres- 
ence of fourteen children, five sons and nine 
daughters, as follows: Bridget, born July 
5, 1849, died in infancy; Margaret, born 
October 30, 1850, died in her second year; 
John, born October 30, 1852, died in Fari- 
bault county, in the twenty-second year of 
his age; James D., born January 7, 1855, 
is a grain-buyer of Minnesota Lake; Mary 
Ann, born August 2, 1857, is the wife of 
Modus Lutz, a farmer of Barbara township, 
Faribault county; Ellen, born June 15, 
1859, is the wife of Joseph Lutz, a cousin 
of Modus, and a resident of South Dakota; 
Richard, born July 19, i860, is engaged in 
teaming in East on; Teressa, born August 2, 
1862, is the wife of William Terhurne, pro- 
prietor of a saloon of Easton; William H., 
born Sebtember 9, 1864, wedded Anna 



Moran, a native of Watertown, Wisconsin, 
and a graded-school teacher, and they are 
now living in St. James, Minnesota; Eliza, 
born January 3, 1867, is the wife of Martin 
Leary, of Walnut Lake township; Lucy, 
born December 31, 1868, is the wife of Mer- 
vil Peterson, of Minnesota Lake; Loretta, 
born February 28, 1871, is the wife of C. 
W. Mead, editor of the Tribune of Minne- 
sota Lake; Alice, born May 19, 1873, died 
in the eighth year of her age; and one child 
died in infancy. This is an interesting fam- 
ily, bringing credit upon their parents, who 
may be justly, proud of their sons and 
daughters, now valued citizens of the re- 
spective communities in which they reside. 

The mother of this family was born in 
county Meath, Ireland, September 14, 1832, 
and is a daughter of Patrick and Bridget 
(Carrolin) Corcoran, who were the parents 
of ten children, two sons and eight daugh- 
ters, the tv^'o youngest born in America. In 
order of birth they are as follows: Margaret; 
Peter; Jane, deceased; Mrs. Corcoran, of 
this sketch; Bridget; Ann, a widow; Cath- 
erine, of New York city; Patrick; Alice and 
Eliza, both deceased. The father was born 
in county Meath, Ireland, March 17, 1800, 
and the mother was born February 12, 
1804. Mrs. Corcoran, wife of our sub- 
ject, now has in her possession an old 
Bible — a family heirloom — which contains 
a record of her father's family in a line 
hand-writing equal to that of the most ex- 
pert penman. He was a man of more than 
ordinary attainments and his life was well 
spent. He died in Ulster county, New 
York, April 11, i860, and his most estim- 
able wife, who survived him several years, 
passed away August 12, 1876. 

The year 1 864 witnessed the arrival of 
Mr. Corcoran and his family in Faribault 



3i6 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



county. He located in Barbara township, 
and began farming and stock-raising, which 
he followed with excellent success for a 
quarter of a century. As his financial re- 
sources increased, as the result of his earn- 
est efforts, he added to his farm until his 
landed possessions aggregated 520 acres, 
and he still retains possession of 200 acres. 
He has disposed of part of his property, wish- 
ing to live retired, and in 1889 he came to 
Easton, where he has since made his home. 
He and his family are members of St. Mary's 
Catholic Church of Easton, and he is prom- 
inently identified with the moral and intel- 
lectual welfare of the community. Reared 
in the green Isle of Erin, crossing the At- 
lantic when a young man, securing a start 
in life at hard labor and after working stead- 
ily at farming, he is now resting in the 
evening of life, and by his side is the faithful 
companion who left father and mother to 
share his fortunes and his name forty-seven 
years ago. 



aHARLES ROE is a self-made 
man who has won success in life 
through persistent effort, good 
management and fine business abil- 
ity. He makes his home on section 24, 
Nashville township, Martin county, and is 
accounted one of the leading farmers of the 
community. Of English birth, he claims 
Bedfordshire as the place of his nativity, and 
the date January 19, 1834. He comes of 
an old family of that country and is a son 
of Mark Roe, also a native of England and 
a farmer by occupation, who spent his en- 
tire life in the land of his birth. His wife, 
who in her maidenhood was Nancy Barnett, 
was born in the same place and has also 
passed away. In their family were eight 



children, seven of whom reached years of 
maturity, but none, save our subject, be- 
came residents of America. 

No event of special importance occurred 
during the childhood and youth of Charles 
Roe, and he began to earn his livelihood by 
work as a chore and errand boy. From an 
early age he has depended upon his own re- 
sources, and at the age of twenty years he 
sought home and fortune in America. The 
accounts which he heard of the privileges 
and opportunities here afforded young men 
led to his emigration. He had to borrow 
the money to pay his passage, and arrived 
with only two English shillings in his pocket. 
The vessel in which he sailed dropped an- 
chor in the harbor of New York, and he 
made his way to Auburn, in the Empire 
State, removing thence to Huron county, 
Ohio, where he remained for several years, 
but the new and unsettled West attracted 
him, and the year 1863 witnessed his ar- 
rival in Minnesota. His first home was in 
Rice county, which he occupied until 1864, 
when he came to Nashville township, Mar- 
tin county, and secured a claim on section 
24, upon which he built a plank house 16 x 
24 feet, also adding other improvements as 
his time and means would allow, until he 
has transformed the once wild and barren 
land into one of the finest farms in this sec- 
tion of the State. He continued its opera- 
tion until 1886, when he removed to the 
farm adjoining the one on which he now re- 
sides. He now owns 420 acres of land, 
which is divided into fields of convenient 
size, and the waving grain gives evidence of 
abundant harvests and tells of the careful 
supervision of the owner. Farming and 
stock-raising has been his principal occupa- 
tion, and he is a worthy representative of 
the agricultural interests of Martin county. 




(y . -0. (&eum?/. 



FARIBAULI\ MAKIIW W A l'0.\ W A X A .\ / > 



( Aso.y 



;ii9 



Mr. Roe was nianied in i S(i.| in Miss 
Maiv Ann Kccd wlin was luuii in Kock 
county, Wisconsin, March 2^. 1X4(1, and is 
a dauj;chtei" of Freeman W. and Liicina 
(Cole) Keed. Her parents were both na- 
tives of New York State. They became pio- 
neer settlers of Rock count}', and \\ere par- 
ents of six children, of whom Mrs. Roe is the 
second in order of birth. Fifteen children 
formed the family of oin- subject and liis 
wife, namely: Alice, wife of William 
Moore, by wlioni she has one child, Leo 
Russell; Mary, wife of Frank Adams, b\ 
whom she has one child, Harry; Minnie, at 
home; Charles and Henr\-, twins; Annabel, 
wife of Albert Bottomley, Barnett; Edith; 
Grace; Mable; John; Bertha and Burton, 
twins, both deceased; I^ucy; and Archie, de- 
ceased. All were born in Martin county and 
twelve of the family are yet living. The house- 
hold is noted for its hospitality and its mem- 
bers rank high in social circles, their friends 
throughout the community being many. 

In his political relations Mr. Koe is a I-ie- 
publican. He cast his first presidential vote 
f(jr John C. Fremont, on the organisation 
of the party, and has supported most of the 
candidates of that party, but for some years 
has been independent. b"or the long period 
of twent}' years he has served as a member 
of the School Board, and has done effective 
service for the cause of education, lielieving 
it an important factor in producing good 
government. His earnest Christian life is 
worthy the emulation of all, and in the 
Master's vineyard he has been a faithful 
laborer. He holds membership with the 
United Brethren Church, and is Assistant 
Superintendent of the Sunday-school. He 
contributes liberally to the support of the 
church, sparing neither time nor means from 
the advanceinent of the cause. He has 

10 



walked in tlu' path ol leetililde, and the 
eonnnuinty in wliirli he has so long resided 
recogiii/es hiui as one of its hot citi/cns. 



OB. TENNEY, who successfully car- 
ries on farming on section 13, Lma 
township, l'"aribault county, is a 
native of the Empire State. He 
was born in the town of Ontario, Wayne 
county. New York, December 9, 1S2S, and 
is a son of Meshach and Eliza S. (Bush) 
Tennev, being the second in their family ol 
si.xteen children. The father was born m 
the town of Hancock, Hillsboro count). 
New Hampshire, July 22, 1792, and died at 
the age of se\'ent\-si\ years. His father, 
Daniel Tenney, was a soldier in the war of 
1S12 and departed this life in the old Cranite 
State. He was a man of inori» than ordinary 
intelligence, was a very \mc penman, and 
when in the army his services were recjuired 
to make a sketch of one of the battles. 

The Tenne\' family is of- i",nglish origin 
and was founfied in .America in the earl\ part 
of the sex'enteenth century b\ Thomas 
Tenney, who was one of <a part\' o| twenty 
families who crossed the .Atlantic m the 
autumn nf 1 6:^8, arriving in Salem, .Massa- 
chusetts, in December. The Tenneys had 
lived in Ivowlew on the Aorkshire Wolds in 
the East I-iiding of the county of York, Eng- 
land. Thomas Tenney first settled in Salem, 
but spent his declining years at Bradford. 
Massachusetts, where his death occurred 
Febrnarx 20, 1699. His son. Deacon John 
Tcnuew was born December 14, 1640, and 
died .\|)ril 13, 1722. The lu-xt in the line ol 
direct descent, Samuel Tenney, was l)orn in 
P)radford. Massachusetts, November 20,. 
1667, and jiassed away Febrnar\- .,, 1747- 
Sannu'l Tennev , of the fourth generation, was 



•^20 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



born in Bradford, Massachusetts, now Grove- 
land, December 17. 1697, and departed this 
Hfe in Littleton, Massachusetts, in 1777. 
His son, Samuel, was born in Bradford, May 
25. 1725, and died in Hancock, New Hamp- 
shire, February 11, 1795. He was the 
father of Daniel Tenney, who was born in 
Littleton, July 7, 1756, and died in Han- 
cock, March 24, 1S12. The next of the 
family also bore the name of Daniel, and 
was born in Marlborough, New Hampshire, 
March 1 1, 1788, while his death occurred in 
Juneau, Wisconsin, September 21, 1849. 
Shadrack Tenney, the second son of Daniel 
Tenney, of the seventh generation, was born 
in Marlborough, New Hampshire, April 16, 
1790, and died in Ontario, Wayne county. 
New York, December 15, 1868. 

Meshach Tenney, the father of our sub- 
ject, was reared on a farm and followed 
agricultural pursuits through much of his life. 
On his removal to Ontario, New York, he 
became interested in the iron ore mines and 
there remained until his removal to Fond du 
Lac county, Wisconsin, in 1854. He there 
purchased an eighty-acre tract of land, 
partly timber and partly prairie, bought a 
house which he removed to the farm and 
there he carried on agricultural pursuits 
until the fall of 1864, when he came to 
Minnesota. Here his remaining days were 
passed and in the community he was ac- 
counted a valued citi/en. 

Meshach was first married in \'ermont, 
the lady of his choice being Phoebe Crane, 
of New Hampshire, and to them was born 
a son, Nathan C. , who went to St. Johns, 
New Mexico, where he met his death. On 
a certain occasion there arose .some trouble 
between the Mexicans and cowboys, and 
while trying to quell the riot he was killed 
bv a bullet intended for another, that came 



from the gun of a cowboy firing from the 
window of an adobe house. He was noted 
for his braxery and fearlessness and his 
noble qualities of mind and heart. The sur- 
viving children born to the parents of our 
subject are: H. D., who came with his 
parents to Faribault county in 1864 and is 
now living in Spring \'alley, Fillmore coun- 
ty, Minnesota; S. B., a practicing physician 
of South Dakota; Nancy A., widow of 
George Booth and a resident of Lane coun- 
ty, Oregon; Eber J., who is now a preacher 
of the Mormon faith and resides in Ramah, 
Valencia county, New Mexico; Avarilla, 
wife of James Ivers, an honored veteran of 
the late war, now residing in Baileyville, 
Nemaha county, Kansas; Ann Augusta, wife 
of John Goff, a farmer of Mapleton town- 
ship, Blue Earth county, Minnesota; Sally 
F. , wife of Horatio Wickes, of Cottonwood 
county, Minnesota; George, who now owns 
and operates the Tenney homestead on 
which his brother Ambrose located ere the 
family came to the West and on which he 
and his parents all spent their last days; 
and Lovina, wife of Nathan F"rakes, who is 
owner of a large stock ranch of Warner, 
Lake county, Oregon. 

O. B. Tenney was reared and educated 
in his native State, and in 1850 first started 
westward. He made his way to Fond du 
Lac county, where he had relatives living, 
among whom was Acy F. Bush, an uncle, — 
one of the pioneers of Racine county, but 
%\ho later moved to Fond du Lac county. 
In the fall of 1850 he returned to \\'ayne 
county. New York. Mr. Bush had pros- 
pered in his pioneer home and advised our 
subject to persuade his father to come to the 
Badger State. Before doing this the father 
had contracted to clear fifteen acres of land, 
and that work was performed by our subject 



FARIBAUL'J', MAimW WATiKWVAX AXP J'ACA'SOX. 



fiiul his brothers, H. D. and Ambrose. 
Throufjh the instrumentality of Mr. ISiish, 
O. B. Tcnney secured eighty acres of land 
in Alto township and began to make a farm, 
transforming the wild land into rich and 
fertile fields. He erected good buildings 
and so increased the value of the propertj- 
that when he was ready to sell in the fall of 
1864 he secured the price of $3,200. He 
came at once to Faribault county and pur- 
chased the farm of Charles Marples, where 
he now resides. The place to-day is adorned 
with a beautiful natural gro\'e of twenty-fi\e 
acres, and on it are two flowing wells, one on 
the north side of the farm and the other in 
the milk-house. His pleasant and substan- 
tial residence was erected in 1884. There 
are good barns and other impro\ements 
upon the place, and these are surrounded by 
fields of waving grain. 

On the 15th of October, 1854, Mr. Ten- 
ney married Lovicy A. Booth, daughter of 
Isaiah and Hannah Booth, the \\edding being 
celebrated in Wajne county. New York. 
The lady was born May 28, 1836, and be- 
came the mother of three children: Sylves- 
ter, who was born December 2, 1855, and 
died Januar\- 30, 1S56, being interred in 
Fond du Lac count}-; Ellen Jane, born Ma\' 
27, 1857, the wife of Edwin Cook, a farmer 
li\ing four miles west of Wells, Minne- 
sota; and Mittie T., who was born Oc- 
tober 7, 1859, and became the wife 
of Albert Herring, who died December 18, 
1885, at his home in Walnut Lake town- 
ship. Their daughter. May, now resides 
with her grandfather, Mr. Tenney, \\'hile 
Florence is living with George Herring in 
Cottonwood count}-, Minnesota; and ime 
child died in infancy. The mother was mar- 
ried a second time, being now the wife of J. 
T. Hammett, a painter, residing in Man- 



kalci, Minnesota. Mr. Tenne}- lost his lirst 
wife in b'ond du Lac count}', Wisconsin, 
her death occurring Ma\- 28, 1863. On the 
2ist of May, 1865, he wedded Dette Ma.\- 
son, daughter of Austin and Melissa Maxson. 
She was born in the Badger State, December 
I 4, 1847, and of this marriage four children 
were born; Edith May, who was born 
August 30, 1867, has been a successful 
school-teacher of Faribault counts' and is 
now the wife of Arthur Cook, who for the 
last twehe years has been station agent and 
operator on the Omaha Railroad and is now 
serving in that capacity in Mountain Lake, 
Cottonwood county; Kittie I., born April 
19, 1874, has also been a school-teacher and 
is now the wife of Frank Ba.xter, a fanner 
of Cottonwood count}'; Oliver I)e Estaing, 
born April 19, 1874, is a well-known and 
popular }'oung man of Mountain I^ake, 
where he is serving as assistant in the rail- 
road office; and Helen Permelia, born Oc- 
tober 17, 1876, now a school-teacher of 
Mountain ],ake. Mr. and 'Mrs. Tenney ob- 
tained a legal separation January 21, 1889, 
and she has since married John 15rennan. 
On the 6th of .September, 1890, Mr. Ten- 
ne}' wedded Mrs. Cordelia A. Bennett, a 
daughter of Henr}' P. and Hannah (Chase) 
Brown, born November 25, 1837. in Parish- 
ville, St. I, awrence county, New\ork. Her 
father was born in Windsor, N'ermont, in 
1 8 1 4, and with his ]')arents remi>\e(l to the 
Empire State. In 1867 he took \\\) his 
residence in Mankato, this State, but his 
death occurred in Potsdam, New ^'ork, May 
19, 1888. He was a thirty-third degree 
Scottish rite Mason, — one of the highest 
orders in the United States. His wife, who 
was born in Windsor, X'ermont, Ma}' (>, 
1 81 3, went to the Empire State in tlu' 
same year as her husband. ;iiiil died 



.5-«- 



M/:ML>h'/.\/ h'licnni) oi- ■////■: ( orx/y/ss of 



in St. Lawrence county, April 17, 1858. 
Tlie picseul Mrs. Teniuy i^ llic eldest 
of si.\ children, one son and live daugh- 
ters, of whom three are now living. Her 
brother, Ira, lost his life on board the North 
.America, December 18, 1863. Her first 
marriage, to Mr. Bennett, was celebrated in 
Potsdam, January 29, 1862. Mr. Bennett 
was born December 7, 1822, and died in 
Winnebago City, Minnesota, December 27, 
1885. He also was a thirty-third-degree Scot- 
tish rite Mason. They became the parents of 
Hve children, tw(j yet living. Jennie, the 
elder, was born in Mankato, this State, August 
9, 1 867, was graduated at the Normal School 
of that city in 1886, successfully followed 
teaching for a time, and is now the wife of 
John Johnston, Jr., of Mapleton, Minnesota. 
James I. Bennett was born October i, 1869, 
in Mankato, and is now the one-half owner 
of the Rocky Flour Mill of that place. He 
wedded Miss Mamie Nelson, of \\'innebago 
City. 

-Mr. Tenncy has served on the Town 
Hoard of Supervisors, and as Appraiser of 
the school lands. He supported Pierce for 
the presidency and since the organization of 
the Republican party has been one of its 
stalwart advocates. His wife holds mem- 
bershi|) with the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. These worthy people ha\e man\' 
friends in Faribault county, and our subject 
is numbered among the pioneers who laid 
the foundations for the prosperity and prog- 
ress of the countw 



a 



HARLES L. COLBY, a very popu- 
lar druggist of Jackson, Minnesota, 
claims Denmark as the land of his 
birth, which occurred on the 23d 
of March, 1861. He is the son of C. M. 



and Caroline fOstergord) Colby. He emi- 
grated to .\merica in the twentj-fifth jear 
of his age, sailing from Copenhagen to Bos- 
ton on the steamship Capolonia, leaving 
Copenhagen August 22, and arriving at Bos- 
ton September II, 1882. He continued his 
journey westward to Albert Lea, Minnesota, 
where his uncle, Peter Colby, resided. On 
his arrival at Albert Lea he engaged with the 
drug firm of Wedge, Spicer& Jensen. This 
wasin the spring of 1883, and there he spent a 
3'ear and a half. Leaving that place, he went 
to Lanesboro, Minnesota, where he con- 
tinued in the drug store of Cook & Hawle}-. 
Here he met and married Miss Mary Blicker, 
— the wedding ceremonj- being performed 
at the home of Hans Clausen, on the 15th 
of August, 1885. Three children ha\-e been 
born of this union, namely: Martha, born 
June 3, 1887, in Lanesboro, Fillmore 
county; Hans, born November 30, 1889, in 
Jackson; and one child who died in infancy. 
Mr. Colby came to Jackson in the fall of 
1886 and shortly after secured a position in 
the drug store of J. W. Cowing, and after a 
service of two years and two months bought 
out his employer. He rented a store-room 
from Mr. Cowing, in \\hich he carried on 
the business for one j^ear, and then moved 
into H. G. Anderson's building, formerly 
occupied by the Berge Brothers as a general 
store. He has now one of the largest and 
neatest drug stores in Jackson county. In 
addition to the general drug business he 
carries a fine line of wall paper, stationer}', 
perfumes, paints, oils, and in fact every 
article usuallj' found in a store of this kind. 
He is a thorough business man and a com- 
petent druggist. With his family Mr. Colby 
resides in a verj' pretty residence on one of 
the thoroughfares of Jackson. His wife is 
an accomplished lady of pleasing address. 



^ FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



323 



— a native ot l)rniiiaik. Sin: has excellent 
ability as an artist, and in her beantiful 
liunie are some rare specimens of art. Her 
father was a portrait painter, and Mrs. 
("dlhy inherited from him her marked ar- 
tistic taste. She is also an accomplished 
vocalist. Mr. Colby has abilit\' as a nnisi- 
cian, and in his home is an instrument made 
in Copenhagen and imported by him some 
years ago. His daughter Martha has de- 
veloped considerable talent both in vocal 
and instrumental music. Mr. Colby is 
a member of Good Faith Lodge, No. 90, 
F. & A. M. 



^^^EORGE A. BRADFORD, the effi- 
■ ^^ cient and popular Clerk of the 
^lM Courts of Watonwan county, now 
living in Madelia, is a native of 
Indiana, his birth having occurred in Switz- 
erland county, on the 28th of June, 1847. 
He traces his ancestry back in a direct line 
to Governor I^radford, of Massachusetts, 
and still farther back to the nobility of Eng- 
land. The grandfather of our subject, 
William Bradford, was a native of Massa- 
chusetts, and in early life came West with 
his father's family, who settled in Indiana, 
— one of the first families in Switzerland 
county. While en route he stopped for one 
season on the farm of William Henry Har- 
rison, afterward President of the United 
States, and there raised a crop of corn. 
His death occurred in Minnesota, at an ad- 
\anced age. 

The father, Morris Bradford, was born 
in Switzerland county, in January, 1823, 
and was one of the hve children — the only 
son — of William and Anna (Webster) Brad- 
iiird. He lived in the State of his nativity 
until iSf'i", and then came to Minnesota, 



settling in Ri\erdale township, \\ atonwan 
county, where he secured 160 acres of Go\- 
ernment land and soon after purchased an- 
other quarter section. He became one ot 
the most prominent and influential farmers 
of this region, sjiending twenty-four years 
in agricultural pursuits upon the farm which 
I he then located. He was a public-spirited 
I num. devoted to whatever was calculated 
to prove of public benefit, and for some 
time he served as County Commissioner. 
He was the first man in this region to engage 
extensively in the cultivation of corn, and 
for some years supplied the western part of 
the county with that cereal. In 1891 he 
sold his farm, retired from active business 
life, and is now spending his declining years 
in the village of Madelia. 

Morris Bradford married Olive Bliss, a 
native of Herkimer county. New York, and 
a daughter of Thomas and Anna (Buttlesj 
Bliss. Her grandfather, Ebenezer Bliss, 
was a native of Massachusetts, and settleil 
in the Empire State in early life. Later 
Thomas removed to Indiana, where he died 
in 1 8/ 5, at the age of seventy-five years. 
To Morris and Olive Bradford were born five 
children: George A., of this review; O. M., 
a lumber dealerofWeiner, Arkansas; Thomas 
B., a cattle man who is living in Caspar, 
Wyoming; Anna, wife of Alphcus liocock, 
who is li\ing in Riverdale, Minnesota; and 
M. B., a fanner of Riverdale, Minnesota. 

In taking up the personal history of 
George A. Bradford, we present to our read- 
ers the life record of one who is both widely 
and favorably known in this locality. He 
spent the first twenty years of his life in the 
State of his nativity, reared upon a farm, 
and in the common and high schools of that 
region he obtained his education. In the 
vear 1867 ho came with his father's fainiU 



3-4 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



t(i this State and spent tlie first \\inter after 
his ani\al in \\'abasha county, teaching 
school. In the spring of 1 86S he came 
to Watonwan count}', locating in Riser- 
side township, and for six years con- 
tinued teaching tlirough the winter months, 
while in the smniner season he engaged in 
hnin woik He was a capable instructor 
and won success in that undertaking. In 
1874 he came to Madelia, where he secured 
a position as salesman in a general store. 
The following year he entered the employ of 
Josiah M. Cheney as clerk, and after a few- 
years )nnchased an interest in the business 
with which he was connected from 1S7S until 
18S2. He then sold out and went to .Mon- 
tana, but not long after returned to Madelia 
and re-entered the store, where he continued 
until 18S7. Ha\ing purchased a fine farm 
a mile west of Madelia, he operated it for a 
year and in 1891 he became a member and 
secretary of the Medelia Mercantile Com- 
l^any. Thus he de\oted his energies tt) com- 
mercial jjursuits until 1S94, when he dis- 
posed of his interest in the concern. 

In December, 1S77, a marriage ceremou) 
was performed which united the destinies of 
Mr. Bradford and Miss Flora J. Cheney, 
one of the four children of Josiah M. and 
.\ngie (Darling) C'heney. The father is 
numbered among the pioneers of this section 
of the State, having located in Blue Earth 
county in 1856, — when Minnesota was yet a 
Territory, — and built the first house in 
Ciarden Cit\-. He died in 1891, at the age 
of "si.xty-three years. Fi\e children grace 
the union of our subject and his nmst estim- 
alijc wife, as follows: ()li\e 1)., Horace 
and Howard, twins; Zina M. and Everett O. 

Mr. Bradford is \ery familiar with the 
history of this locality through the past 
twenty-eight j'ears, and ran relate man\- in- 



teresting incidents concerning it. He took 
an important part in the capture of the noted 
Younger Brothers and Charle\- Pitts after 
the Northfield Bank Robbery, the four des- 
peradoes being surrounded in a thicket. Mr. 
Bradford was one of the seven men who 
volunteered to capture them, a desperate 
venture considermg the nature of the rob- 
bers. These men were fired upon by the 
criminals and in the return fire Pitts was 
killed and the three brothers were all 
wounded and captured and imprisoned for 
life. Bob Younger died in prison, and Jim 
and Cole are still in the prison in Stillwater. 
For several \ears Mr. Bradford was sec- 
retary of the Farmers' Mutual Insurance 
Company, and was also clerk of Madelia 
township. In his political \iews he has al- 
ways been an earnest Republican, strong in 
his party affiliations, and has frequently 
served as a delegate to county and other 
conventions. In the fall of 1894 he was 
elected to serve as Clerk of the Courts of 
Watonwan county, term extending for four 
3ears from Januar\\ 1896, and he was ap- 
pointed by the court to fill out an unexpiretl 
term in 1895. ^^^ is true to every trust re- 
posed in him, whether public or private, is 
an intelligent and public-spirited man, and 
his man}' sterling qualities ha\e won him 
the highest regard of all with whom he has 
been broujj;ht in contact. 



aH.VKLFS HERMAN CHIPMAX, 
a farmer of Center Creek town- 
ship, Martin county, was born in 
Essex. Chittenden coimt}', \"er- 
mout, October 11, 1845, '' son of Thomas 
Chipman, who was born and reared in that 
State. His father, Thomas Chipman, also 
a native of Xernmnt, descended from one of 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 325 



three brothers who came from England in 
an early day- One located in Vermont and 
another in Connecticut. The mother of 
our subject, ncc Lucy Nichols, was born in 
Richmond, \'ermont, July 24, 1821, a 
daughter of Charles H. Nichols, a native of 
Harden, Connecticut, and of English de- 
scent. He died when Mrs. Chipman was 
ten years of age. Her mother, )icc Rachel 
Peck, was born in Clarendon, Vermont, of 
English descent. Thomas and Lucy Chip- 
man were married in Vermont, and were 
the parents of two children, — Charles H., 
the subject of this sketch, and Laura M., 
wife of Wilford Jodoin, of Vergennes, Ver- 
mont. 

Charles H. Chipman attended an acad- 
emy at Essex until nineteen years of age, 
and in the following year came to Fillmore 
county, Minnesota, where he farmed on 
rented land one year. In June, 1866, he 
purchased a claim in Center Creek town- 
ship, Martin county, and two years after- 
ward removed to section 30, same township. 
His first residence was a sod house, and his 
farm was wild prairie land. Mr. Chipman 
now owns eighty acres of well-improved 
land, having also given his two sons each 
eighty acres. He was engaged in general 
farming until 1890, when he became an 
agent for farm machinery, continuing the 
same four years. He owns one of the best 
residences in the village, and two business 
buildings. Mr. Chipman affiliates with the 
I^epublican party. He has served as Town- 
ship Assessor, as a member of the Board of 
Supervisors, and Clerk of the school district 
for twelve years. In his social relations he 
is a member of the Masonic order, Chain 
Lake Lodge, No. 64, of Fairmont. 

March 20, 1869, Mr. Chipman was united 
in marriage with Mahala Hill, a nati\e of 



Vermont, and a daughter of Robert Hill, a 
native also of that State. He removed to 
Wisconsin in 1857, and in 1866 came to 
Martin county, where his death occurred, at 
the age of sixty-three years. Mrs. Chip- 
man's mother, formerly Polly Parcher, war. 
born in Vermont, and now resides with her 
son in Center Creek township. Mrs. Chip- 
man was six years of age when she went 
with her parents to Wisconsin, remaining 
there until fifteen years old, and then came 
to Martin county. Our subject and wife 
have had six children, namely: George H., 
who married Belle Fleming, and resides in 
Center Creek township ; Guy, also of this 
township; Cora, Burr, Lucy and Ra}-. 



>Y*OHN HENRY SHERIN is the senior 

m member of the firm of Sherin & 

nt 1 Foss, proprietors and publishers of 

the Press-News, of Winnebago City, 

Minnesota. 

He is a native of Canada, born in Brook- 
lyn, Whitby township, Ontario, June 20, 
1850, eldest in the family of four children 
of Robert and Susan (McCarl) Sherin, both 
natives of Ontario and both of Scotch-Irish 
descent. 

When John H. was eight years of age 
the family emigrated to Fox Lake, Wiscon- 
sin, where he received a good common- 
school education. At an early age he com- 
menced working at the newspaper business, 
being employed in the Gazette office at Fox 
Lake for about three years. He then f(.)l- 
lowed the trade of journeyman printer for 
several years, working in many of the large 
cities of the United States. 

In 1873 Mr. Sherin went to Canada to 
visit his father's family and the scenes of 
his childhood days, and while there, June 



MEMORIAL RE C OKU OE THE COUNTIES OE 



lo. 1S7S. inanifcl Miss \'. Postlewaito, a 
native of of Colmrg, Ontario, and a dauj^'h- 
ter of Thomas Postlewaite, and they have 
two suns, liothborn in Winnebago Citj'. \\z. : 
Robert, Deceinbn 7, iS~y, and Henry, 
Howard, June :?9, 1 SS 1 . 

Complying with the re(inest of friends, 
Mr. S. decided to go into Imsincss in Can- 
ada, and in .\ngust, i<'^74. founded the 
News, at Laketield, Peterliorougli coiintj", 
and continued its publication ft>r two years, 
and then sold out. Fii i^''i he located at 
Winneliago Cit\, Mnniesota. and the follow- 
ing January established the News at this 
])lace, issuinj; the tirst nund)er (it the paper 
on the lyth of that month, and continued 
it alone for three years. His present part- 
nei , Mr. Foss, was then owner and ]Hib- 
lisher of the Press, and in i88j; the\ 
consolitiated tile two papers, entered into 
partnership, and ha\e since published a 
weekly paper under the name of the Press- 
News. This ji.iper is independent Republi- 
can in i)olitics, and is devoted to furthering 
the best interests of the city and count}'. 

Mr. .Sherin is a member of Inith the 
Masons and the Odd Fellows. 



@ 



:()Kc.K Knn^>.\LL .mofltox. 

deceased, was the jiioneer mer- 
chant of Winnebago City, and was 
lor many years one of its most 
prominent business men. He was born at 
Hopkinlon, Merrimac county. New Hamp- 
shiie, 1835. ■' ^"" "^ Caleb and Mary (Mar- 
den) Moulton. nati\es also of that State. 
Our subject |)assed the early years of his 
life witli his parents, receiving a good edu- 
cation. .\l the age of nineteen he came 
West to Burlington, Iowa, remaining there 
but a fi'W months, howexcr, and th(Mi w<Mit 



to St. Paul, Minnesota, where he was em- 
ployed as clerk in a mercantile establish- 
ment a short time, after which he returned 
on a \isit to the Cranite State. In the 
sjjring of 1857 Mr. Moulton came to Winne- 
bago City, and purchased a small stock of 
goods, consisting chiefly of groceries and 
provisions, from Tom Fole\'. As the vil- 
lage increased in population and the sur- 
rounding country became settled he in- 
creased his stock to meet the increasing 
demands of his mnnerous customers, his 
ha\ ing been the ijnly store in the place for 
a number of years. His business increased un- 
til he kept se\eral clerks almost constantly 
employed, .\bout 1863 J. H. Welch became 
a partner in the store, but this connection 
continued only about two years, when Mr. 
Welch sold his interest and withdrew from 
the firm. I'or some year the merchandise 
had to be haided from St. Paul with teams. 
Mr. Moidton was very prosperous in his 
liusiness relations for many years, but, being 
an exceedingly generous man, of whom it 
could be truly said, "He was generous to a 
fault," he gave liberally to the need}' and 
trusted his goods out indiscriminately, and 
eventually became a hea\'}' loser. Mr. 
Moulton continued mercantile pursuits un- 
til 1874, and afterward entered the Govern- 
ment ser\'ice as mail agent between Winne- 
bago Cit}' and La Crosse, Wisconsin, which 
he continued ft)ur }ears. He also served as 
Postmaster of the city for many years. His 
death occurred at his home in Winnebago 
Cit}', October 9, 18S0, and in his demise 
the village lost one of its ohlest settlers and 
most resjiected citi/;ens. 

September 7, 1859, at Heiimkcr. New 
ll.impshire, Mr. Moulton was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Susan C. Cogswell, a native 
of that cit}' and a daughter of [onathan and 




^^. ^^. <^r/fm. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIX, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



y-9 



Susan (Choate) Cogswell, natives of Essex, 
Massachusetts. Mr. and Mrs. Moulton 
liad fi\e children, namely: Edward Clin- 
ton, cashier in the Winnebago City Bank; 
Sarah Delia, wife of J. X. Knutson, a drug- 
gist of Winnebago City; Mary Alice, de- 
ceased; Charles Henry and George Morse. 
Mrs. Moulton is a member of the Presby- 
terian Church, and is a woman of manj' 
e.xcellencies of character. 



^V^.WID D. BUNN, a well-known 
I I farmer of Martin county. Minne- 
/^^J sota, and the father of the town of 
Welcome, claims Somerset county, 
Xew jersey, as the place of his nativit\', the 
date of his birth being February 8, 1823. 

Mr. Bunn's parents. David and Ida (Van 
Dyke) Bunn descended from Holland Dutch 
and Scotch-Irish ancestors rcspectivel)'. 
Martin Bnim, the grandfather of our subject, 
was, it is supposed, born in Holland. The 
greater part of his life, however, was spent 
in Somerset county. New Jersey, where he was 
engaged in agricultural pursuits. He mar- 
ried Esther Crater, and their children were: 
Morris, Conrad, David, William, Esther and 
Mary. He died about 1850. Politically he 
was a \Miig, and religiously a Presbyterian. 
Abraham Van Dyke, the maternal grand- 
father of Mr. Bunn. was born in Somerset 
couut\. Xew Jerse\-, and died there in 1S54, 
at the agt: of eighty years. Grandmother 
\'an Dyke was before her marriage Miss 
Sarah Honeyman. Her father was a spy of 
Washington's in the Revolutionary war. He 
came to America in the English army, was 
at the siege and fall of Ouebec, and it was 
ill his arms that the noted General Wolfe 
died. During the Revolution he was inti- 
matelv associated with General \\'ashin'?ton, 



and rendered valuable service to the patriot 
cause. His children were: Margaret, wife 
of William Henry; Mary, wife of Matthias 
Lane; Sarah, John and James. The eldest 
child of Abraham Van Dyke and his wife 
was John, who was a prominent jurist and 
politician, and served as Judge of the Circuit 
and Supreme Courts of New Jersey, and 
served four years in the U. S. Congress, 

, being an intimate friend of Abraham Lincoln. 
He came to Wabasha, Minnesota, in 1868, 
after which he served one term in the State 
legislature, and filled out the unexpired term 
of Judge Waterman, and died about 1877. 

. The other children were: Isaac, Marj , and 

I Ida, the last named being the mother of our 
subject. Abraham Van Dyke, the great- 
grandfather of our subject, married Ida 
Striker, and their children were: Abraham, 
John, Isaac, Charity, and Elsie. 

Botli the paternal and maternal great- 
grandfathers of Mr. Bunn were prominent 

; in Revolutionary affairs, and he has just 
reason to be proud of his ancestry. He has 
in his possession a flint-lock rifle that was 
used b)- his great-grandfather \'an Dyke all 

[ through that struggle. 

David Bunn, the father of our subject, 
was born in Somerset county, New Jersey, 
and died in 1822, of dysentery, when he was 
scarcely twenty-one and before the birth of 

' his only child, I)a\id I). His widow was 
born in Hunterdon county. New Jersey, and 
some time after his death she became the 
wife of Richard S. Vliet. Her death oc- 
curred in Somerset count} . 

I)a\id D. Bunn began teaching school 

; when he was nineteen years of age, and 
taught four years. After that he was en- 
gaged in mercantile business at Vliet's Mills, 
owned by his stepfather, which he continued 
until Ecbruary. 1853. .\t that time In- came 



33° 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



west to Henry, Marshall county, Illinois, 
where for one year he was engaged in farm- 
ing. The following year he had charge of 
the Planters' House in Henry, and at the 
end of the \ear he left the hotel business and 
returned to fanning, which he continued in 
that county until i85c>. Then he sold out 
and entered the employ of D. C. Hull, a 
hardware merchant of Henry. Mr. Bunn 
remained with this house for se\en years, a 
short portion of that time being on the road. 
In October, 1868, he removed to \\'abasha, 
Minnesota, and during his residence there he 
was engaged in various callings, principally 
farming; and while there he formed the ac- 
quaintance of S. L. Campbell, with whom 
he was afterward so intimately associated in 
business. In April, 1880, he came to Mar- 
tin county, Minnesota, and bought the west 
half of section 31, township 103, range 31. 
This was purchased of the railroad company 
at $7 per acre, with a $2 rebate if forty 
acres of the land was broken within a year. 
Subsequently he sold this land to the Cramer 
Bros. In the fall of 18S2 he took charge of 
S. L. Campbell's interests in Martin county. 
He has been identified with the property 
upon which the thriving village of Welcome 
is built, — situated on section i, township 
102, range 32. The house which he now 
occupies was built in the fall of 1884, and 
the large fine barns have been added from 
time to time. The timber on this place has 
grown from seed that was planted in 1884. 
Mr. Bunn was married October 10, 1849, 
to Miss Rebecca Schenk Conover, daughter 
of Garrett and Nancy (Harris) Conover, of 
Germantown, New Jersey. Their children 
are Ida and John Van Dyke. The former 
is the wife of Harry B. Jewell, a hardware 
dealer of Wabasha, Minnesota, and they 
lia\c two rliilthcn,- Phitbe and Harr\' H. 



John \ an Dyke Bunn is publisher of tlu' 
Bunn Director)' at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and 
surrounding towns. 

Mr. Bunn joined the I. O. O. F. at Ger- 
mantown, New Jerse}', being one of the 
charter members of the order in that town. 
His first presidential vote was cast for Henry 
Clay, and since the organization of the Re- 
publican party has supported its men and 
measures. Mr. Bunn is a man who is highly 
respected wherever he is known, and his 
friends are only too willing to honor him 
with political preferment were it possible to 
gain his consent; but, while he has filled 
nearly all the township offices, he will not 
allow his name to be used for a higher 
office. 



^^^EORGE FRANK ANDROSS, a 
■ ^^\ retired farmer, was born in Rock 
^^^M county, Wisconsin, March 7, 1849, 
a son of C. P. and Elsie (Dikeman) 
Andross, natives respectively of Massa- 
: chusetts and New York. They were mar- 
j ried in \\'isconsin, where they remained on 
; a farm until 1867, and then located in Mar- 
I tin county, Minnesota. They were among 
the early pioneers of Center Creek town- 
ship. 

G. F. Andross, the eldest of eight chil- 
dren, three sons and five daughters, was 
reared in Rock and Walworth counties, Wis- 
consin, attending the district schools, and 
also spent one jear in the Allen Grove 
school. He came with his parents to Mar- 
tin county, Minnesota, in 1867. He pur- 
chased his farm of 240 acres from the Gov- 
ernment, located on sections 32 and 33, 
which is now under a fine state of cultiva- 
tion. Mr. Andross is now retired fromact- 
i\c labor. He is identifieil with llic Re- 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



33' 



jiublican party, and has ser\-ed in all town- 
ship offices excepting those of Justice of the 
Peace and Assessor. He also held the posi- 
tion of County Commissioner of Martin 
count}' three years. 

In I S/S Mr. Andross was united in nuir- 
riaf,'e with Mary Barnes, a native of New 
Hampshire, but reared in Iowa. To this 
union has been born three chiKlren, --Car- 
rie, George and \'erna. 



HLMOX E. FOSS, junior member 
of the tirm of Sherin & Foss, pub- 
lishers of the Press-News, of Win- 
nebago City, Minnesota, was born 
in Campton village, Grafton county, New 
Hampshire, October i8, 1842, son of 
Oliver P. and Arvilla M. (Bruce) Foss, the 
former a native of New Hampshire and the 
latter of Royalton, Vermont. They were 
married in Montpelier, Vermont. Oliver P. 
Foss in early life learned the blacksmith's 
trade, at which he worked for several years. 
In 1849 he came West, bringing his family, 
locating at Watertown, \\'isconsin, where 
for some years he carried on the manufac- 
ture of w'agons and buggies, having at that 
time the largest manufactory of the kind in 
the State, and employing about thirty men. 
In 1866 he removed to Winnebago City, 
Faribault county, Minnesota, and subse- 
quently bought land in N'erona township, 
where he is now engaged in farming, and 
where his wife died in 1891. 

Almon E. Foss was educated in the public 
schools of Watertown, Wisconsin, and com- 
menced learning the printer's trade in that 
place, in the office of the Watertown Demo- 
crat. After two years spent in that office, he 
worked ill various places as- a journej'man 



printer. In 1876 he located at Wells, Fari- 
bault county, Minnesota, and started the 
Wells Advocate, which he sold out two 
years later, and in the fall of 1878, in com- 
pany with W. W. Woodard, purchased the 
Mankato Free Press, continuing that busi- 
ness connection and the publishing of that 
paper for one year. He then sold out and 
again located at Wells, where he published 
a paper until the spring of 1884. In the 
last named year he came to Winnebago 
City and purchased the Press, which was 
the oldest newspaper plant in the county. His 
present partner was then publishing the 
News. They entered into a partnership, con- 
solidated the two papers, under the title 
Press-News, and have since continued its 
publication, doing therewith a general job 
printing business. 

October 3, 1883, Mr. Foss married Miss 
Maggie Shields, a native of the State of 
New York. Their children a:re Myrtle Ar- 
villa and Pearl Marcia. Politically, Mr. 

. Foss is a Republican. He is a member of 

\ the A. O. U. W. 



HSA DE ALTON PACKARD, grain 
dealer, Sherburne, Minnesota, dates 
his birth in Genesee county, New 
York, March 20, 1 841. Mr. Pack- 
ard is descended from Scotch ancestry on 
his father's side, and from Welsh on his 
mother's. His paternal grandparents were 
William and Cynthia Packard. \\'illiani 
Packard was a soldier in the war of 18 12, 
jKirticipatcil in the battle of Lundy's Lane, 
and it is supposed he was killed in that 
battle, as he was never heard from after- 
ward. His children were Lewis, the father 
of our subject; Cjnthia. who married a Mr. 



332 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Campbell and li\e(l in New York State, near 
Buffalo; and Annie, who was the wife of a 
Mr. Young, and spent her whole life in 
Genesee county, New York. Lewis Pack- 
ard was a nati\e of Genesee count\'. New 
York. He moved his family to Ashtabula 
county, Ohio, in 1845, and there tilled the 
soil until 1855, the year of his decease. The 
year previous to his death, however, he had 
visited Wisconsin, and purchased a farm in 
Winnebago county, located near Waukau. 
In 1856 his widow and children moved to 
the Wisconsin farm, and there she is still 
living, having attained the ripe old age of 
eighty-four years. Her maiden name was 
Emeline Crane, and her father was a native 
of Connecticut. She was married to Mr. 
Packard in 1833. The names of their chil- 
dren are as follows: Abel Mitchell, James 
Monroe, Asa De Alton, Sarah, Allen, Jo- 
sephine, Walter, Emma, Oscar and Frank. 
All are living e.xcept Allen, and are occupy- 
ing honorable and useful positions in life. 

Mr. A. D. Packard, whose name heads 
this article, remained on the farm with his 
mother until he was twenty-three years of 
age, having charge of the farming opera- 
tions during the latter years of his stay 
there. He then opened a hotel at Waukau, 
Wisconsin, which he conducted for about 
seven j'ears, after which he purchased an in- 
terest in a woolen mill in that town, and 
disposed of his hotel i)ropertj'. The mill 
was operated under the firm nann' of K. D. 
Paris & Company, and Mr. Packard was 
identified with this industry for about eight 
years. While rinming his hotel he was also 
engaged in farming, and after disjiosing of 
his interest in the mill he again turned his 
attention to farming, which he continued 
until his removal to Minnesota. July 6, 
18S7, Mr. Packard \isited Sherburne, Mar- 



tin county, Minnesota, and shortl}- after- 
ward purchased a lot on which he erected a 
flat-house for the purpose of storing grain, 
with a capacity of 7,000 bushels. In 1889 
this building was turned into the elevator 
as it now stands, with a capacity of 25,000 
bushels, and at this writing an addition is 
being erected which will increase the capac- 
ity to 45,000 bushels. A feed mill will also 
be added. 

A year following Mr. Packard's first 
\isit to Sherburne, he moved his family to 

I this place, and has since made it his home. 
He was married May 16, 1863, to Miss 
Margaret Avery, eldest of the five children 

I of George and Margaret S. E. (Willes) Av- 
ery, and he and his wife have the following 
named children: (leorge De Alton, who is at 
present associated with his father in his ex- 
tensive business at Sherburne; Lilly Belle, 
wife of Clark Bagley, of Welcome, Minne- 
sota, Mr. Bagley now being engaged in the 
construction of an elevator at that place; 
and Maggie, wife of Reed Alsworth, a lum- 
ber dealer of Sherburne. 

Politically, Mr. Packard has always been 
a Republican. In him- is a fine type of the 
successful Western man. .Mthough it has 
been but a few years since he came to Min- 
nesota, he is now one of the strongest men 
financialh' in the western part of Martin 
count)-. While he makes a specialty of the 
grain business, he does not by any means 
confine himself to this line, but conducts a 
large business in agricultural im])lements 
and machinery, and also deals considerably 
in cattle and hogs. 

Mr. Packard has but recently passed his 
fifty-third birthday, is in the prime of life: 
is highly respected, and, as stated above, is 
one of the most substantial business men of 
the count\'. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, U'ATOX II .1 \ A.\/> yAChSOX. 



?,X\ 



>^AMES W. MORE, Treasurer of 
m Faribault county, Minnesota, was 
/• 1 liorn near Glasgow, Scotland, No- 
vember 28, 1 85 1, son of Andrew R. 
and Janette (Weir) More, and one of a 
famil}' o-f seven children, the others being 
as follows: Robert, a resident of Pilot 
Grove township, and at this writing County 
Commissioner; Jessie, wife of Wayne B. 
Silliman, Blue Earth City, Minnesota; 
Christina, wife of Daniel McLeod, Pilot 
Grove township; Andrew R., Blue Earth 
City; Marion, deceased; and Edward T., 
engaged in farming and still residing with 
his parents. 

The Mores belong to the sturdy Scotch 
race, the family having resided in Scotland 
as far back as their history can be traced. 
Andrew R. More emigrated with his family 
to America in 1850, locating at first in Wis- 
consin, and in 1858 coming from that State 
to Minnesota and settling in Pilot Grove 
township, where he has since resided in the 
midst of peace and plent}-, the Mores being 
one of the representative families of this 
region of countr}'. 

James W. was eight years of age at the 
time his parents came to Minnesota, and on 
his father's farm in Pilot Gro\e township he 
grew to manhood, receiving his education in 
the district schools, remaining a member of 
the home circle until he attained his twenty- 
second year. He then accepted a position 
as clerk in a drug store at Dela\an, and 
shortly afterward went to Blue Earth City 
in the same capacit}'. Later he spent four 
years at Winnebago City, in company with 
McDonald & Miller, engaged in buying and 
shipping grain and stock, doing an extensive 
business and shipping to the great markets 
of Milwaukee and Chicago. We ne.xt find 
liiui engaged in the grocerv !)usiness at Blue 



Earth City, and at the end of two years 
thus spent at that place he came to what is 
now the thri\ing town of Elmore. That 
was in 1881. At that time there were only 
two buildings in the town, and he erected 
the first store here. He has since been 
identified with its interests and has been one 
of the leading spirits in bringing about the 
present development of the town. He con- 
tinued his mercantile business here until 
January, 1894, when he sold out to Mr. L. 
L. Olsen. 

Always a stanch Republican, fully be- 
lieving in the principles represented by that 
party, he has taken an active part in the 
politics of Faribault county. For more 
than ten years he has sersed as Town Treas- 
urer and also as School Treasurer, and is 
still filling these offices. At the county con- 
vention of September, 1894, he was nomi- 
nated as candidate for County Treasurer, 
and was elected over the Democratic and in- 
dependent candidates bj- a very handsome 
majority. 

Mr. More was married September 6, 
1882, to Miss Ellen Sharp, daughter of Levi 
Sharp, and the\' have three children. 



^^ w ^ ILLIAM FRANCIS BRUNDAGE 

■ ■ I i^adealer in farm machinery, Sher- 
mjLyl burnc, Minnesota, and was born 
in Malta, lUiiiois, July 19, 1864, 
his parents being Frederick Hungerford and 
Kate Ann (Townsend) Brundage. 

Francis Brundage, the grandfather of our 
subject, was probably of French ancestry, 
although it is not known in what generation 
the American branch of the family was estab- 
lished. His children were Charles Jona- 
than, Frederick Hungerford, Phoebe and 
Sarah. Joshua Townsend, the maternal 



334 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



great-grandfather of Mr. Brundage, was 
born in New York State. He reared a large 
famil}', and in 1S37 moved to De Kalb 
county, Illinois. There he and his two sons, 
Stephen and Charles, took up claims, they 
being among the early pioneers of De Kalb 
county. His son, Stephen, was born in New 
York State, June 30, 1S07, and died in Illi- 
nois, in March, 1883. He married Ann 
Denman, and they had a family of ten 
children, those who reached maturity being 
as follows: Amos W. ; Ellen, wife of Luther 
Jackman; Nancy, wife of Orrin West; Kate 
Ann, the mother of our subject; William 
Henr}'; and Hattie E. Mr. Stephen Town- 
send was radical in his views regarding 
slavery, and was prominentl)- associated with 
what was known as the • ' Under-ground 
Railway," that is, with helping slaves escape 
to the North. He also served as Captain 
in the New York State militia. The Town- 
sends are of English descent. 

Frederick Hungerford Brundage, the 
father of our subject, was born in Ulster 
county, New York, November 1, 1835. He 
came west to Illinois in 1853, and first re- 
sided in Sycamore, De Kalb county, from 
there remo\ing to Malta, where he still 
makes his home. He was married June 5, 
1863, to Miss Kate Ann Townsend, who was 
born August 10, 1S42. Their chiklren are 
William Francis; Ella; Daniel, deceased; 
Charles Jonathan; Frederick Hungerford, 
jr. ; .\rcher Merritt; Hattie Rosalie, deceased; 
Martin Denman; Kat\- Ann; and Alice. 

William F. Brundage attended the com- 
mon schools of his native town and later at- 
tended the high school at Sycamore, Illi- 
nois. He practically began life for himself 
March 13, 18S1, when he left home and 
worked for wages on a farm. October 28, 
1 886, he jiurc-hased of W. T. Hansen, of 



Chicago, the southwest quarter of section 7, 
township 103 (Elm Creek), range 33, Mar- 
tin county, Minnesota; and April 19, 1887, 
he moved west to this farm, which he has 
since disposed of. Later he bought the 
northwest quarter of section 18, township 
102, range 32, and known as the '• old Call " 
place. In October, 1890, Mr. Brundage 
was made manager of the Alliance Ware- 
house Company, and November 25, 1S90, 
moved to Sherburne, where he has since re- 
sided. In March, 1891, he was elected 
secretary of the same companj', and filled 
this position till December, 1893. In Feb- 
ruary, 1893, he started his present business, 
which he has conducted successfully, and to 
which he is now giving his entire attention. 
Mr. Brundage was married June 15, 1893, 
to Miss Francis Alma Reynolds. Socially 
he is identified with the I. O. O. F. and 
the M. W. of A. ; and, religiously, is a mem- 
ber of the Congregational Church. 



>^OHN NORTON SILVERTHOKX, 
f a retired farmer of Sherburne, Min- 
A 1 nesota, was born on his father's farm 
in Erie county, Pennsylvania, Sep- 
tember 5, 1840, his parents being John and 
Caroline (Davis) Silverthorn. 

The genealogy of the father's side of the 
house can not be traced, although it is 
known that the Silverthorns are of German 
origin. He descends from a Scotch ances- 
try on the maternal side. John Silverthorn, 
the father of our subject, was born in Erie 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1 800, operated a 
farm and lived there all his life. His death 
occurred May 6, 1854. His wife, also a 
nati\e of Pennsjlvania, was born in April, 
1807. After the death of her husband she 
nu)\ed to Lake count \, Ohio, where she 



fAJilBAULT, MARTIN, IVATONWAN AND JACKSOX. 



.\r=; 



died, in March, 1859. All the children of 
Mr. and Mrs. John Silverthorn were born 
in Erie county, Pennsj-lvania, their names 
being as follows: Esther, wife of Henry 
Luther; Myron; Harriet, wife of Charles 
Strong; Elvira, wife of Julius Beals; Erne- 
line, wife of Josiah Blair; Synthia, wife of 
Amander Hale; John Norton, whose name 
heads this article; Levi; and three that died 
in infancy, — Helen, Pressley and one un- 
named. 

John Norton Silverthorn began working 
for wages when he was fourteen years of 
age. The public schools of his day were 
not of the best, and he had little time to 
give even to such as he had access to. 
Hence his education was obtained chiefly by 
his home stud}-. In 1856 he moved to 
Lake county, Ohio, engaged in farm work, 
and continued there till 1859, when he 
removed to Winnebago county, Wisconsin. 
In April, 1864, he enlisted in Company F, 
Eighteenth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, 
and was immediately sent South. While 
guarding a railroad bridge on the Atlantic 
road in Georgia, he was taken prisoner, 
September, 1864, and sent to Milan. Later 
he was transferred to Florence, South Caro- 
lina, where he was paroled and discharged, 
being sent to the hospital at Milwaukee, and 
from there returned home. 

In September, 1865, in company with 
his brother-in-law, Cyrus Weber, he drove 
through to Martin county, Minnesota, 
reaching this point October 12, 1865. Mr. 
Silverthorn located on the north side of 
Fo.\ Lake, lots i and 2, and the south half 
of the northwest quarter of section 33,. 
township 103, range 32, comprising in all 
163.55 acres. Here he built a small earth 
house, and two years later a log cabin, 
the logs being obtained from the forest 



around tlie lake. In 1884 he built the 
frame house which still stands on the place, 
being now occupied by his son, who farms 
the land. In 1 888 Mr. Silverthorn gave up 
the active management of his farm and 
moved to Sherburne, where he has since re- 
sided, and in the fall of 1889 he built his 
present residence. 

Mr. Silverthorn was married in Winne- 
bago county, Wisconsin, July 4, 1862, to 
Miss Permelia Weber. Their children are 
Cyrus Eugene, born July 19, 1864, and now 
a resident of Day county. South Dakota, 
married Emma Ritter, and has two chil- 
dren. Fay and Norton; Edwin VanCleve, 
born November 20, 1866, died when he was 
three months old; Peter Sheridan, born De- 
cember 29, 1 868, and now living on his 
father's farm, married Catharine Eiden, and 
has two children, Clare and Ruth; and Iva 
Luella, born September 27, 1874, presides 
over her father's home. Mrs. Silverthorn 
departed this life November 9, 1893. She 
had shared with her husband the jnys and 
sorrows of pioneer life in a Western State, 
by her timely assistance and cheerful com- 
panionship was largely instrumental in 
bringing about their prosperity, and after 
over thirty years of happ)' married life she 
passed to her last rest. 

Politically Mr. Silverthorn is a stanch 
Republican. He has served as a member 
of the township Board of Trustees, and for 
the past three years has been a member of 
the Town Council. 



>^OHN M. GRAHAM, proprietor of 
m the leading livery business of Blue 
A J Earth City, Minnesota, is one of the 
enterprising and public-spirited citi- 
zens of the town. 



xV' 



MEMORIAL RECORD OE THE COLX/IES OE 



Mr. Graham was born in Janesville, 
Wisconsin, June 13, 185G, secoml in tlie 
family of six children of Michael and Mary 
Graham. For a number of 3'cars the Graham 
family were resitients of Fort \\'ayne, Indi- 
ana, and of the State of Wisconsin. \\'hen 
John was a small boy they removed to 
Minnesota and located at Mankato, where 
they lived until the death of the father, in 
that place, in 1865, at the age of forty-five 
3'ears. Soon after his death the family 
moved to a farm owned by them, which 
had been secured by him under the home- 
stead law, this farm being located in Jo 
Daviess township, Faribault county; but, 
after living on it one year, the children be- 
ing too young to work, the family moved 
into Blue Earth Cit\\ which has since been 
Mr. Graham's home. The mother died at 
the age of fifty-four years, at the home of 
her daughter, Mrs. Anna Finn, at Colorado 
Springs. 

When he \vas fourteen years of age, 
John M. Graham began learning the trade 
of harness-maker and served an apprentice- 
ship of four years. After that, for a few 
years, he worked at the livery business dur- 
ing the sunnner and found employment at 
his trade in different shops during the win- 
ter. In 1S77, in company with others, he 
went on an expedition to the Black Hills. 
That was during the height of the gold 
fever. Six months, howe\er, were suffi- 
cient to satisf}- him that mining was not his 
forte, and he returned to Minnesota. Since 
1879 Mr. Graham has been proprietor of 
the leading liverj establishment in Blue 
Earth City. He keeps about twenty horses 
and a number of fine vehicles of various 
kinds, runs a " bus " to all trains coming 
into the city, and also carries the mail. 
Separate from this livery business he owns 



I a large feed stable. For years he has been 
engaged in the purchase ami sale uf line 
horses, largely for Eastern markets, and he 
has also dealt successfulh' in real-estate. 
In his \arious business ventures he has met 
with uniform success, and is to-daj' ranked 
with the substantial men of the town. 

Mr. Graham was married June 1 1. 1884, 
to Kate Gorman, a native of Minnesota 
and a daughter of Edward K. and Bridget 
(McCabe) Gorman. Mr. and Mrs. Gorman 
reside on a farm in Jo Da\iess township, 
this county. They have a famil\- of nine 
children, all of adult age. Mr. and Mrs. 
Graham have three children, namely: Annie, 
William and George. They reside in the 

I pleasant home on Second street, which he 
built some four j'ears ago. 

Mr. Graham is a member of the A. O. 
U. W., Oriental Lodge, No. 39; the K. of 
P. and the Modern W^oodmen of America. 



?■ 



'OHN PETER CLEMMENSEN, boot 
and shoe dealer, Sherburne, Minne- 
sota, was born in Fuen county, Den- 
mark, July 13, 1864, son of Nels 
Peter and Christina fjorkensen) Clemmen- 
sen. 

When he was nine years of age Mr. 
Clemmensen emigrated with his parents to 
.\merica, their location being near West 
Point, Nebraska. He remained with them 
until he was fourteen, receiving a fair edu- 
cation, and then became an ajiprentice in 
the shoe shop of Charles Jenkle, of West 
Point, with whom he learned the trade and 
remained until 1SS3. .\pril 13, 1885, he 



came to Sherburne 
a cobbler's shop, 



scale 



and 



Minnesota, and opened 
beginning on a small 
eradnalK enlargiii" his busi- 




^^ailfJon. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIX, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



339 



ness until he now has a fine store and car- 
ries a $2,000 stock. In the summer of 1894 
lie erected his present large brick store 
building. 

Mr. Clemmensen was married December 
22, 1885, to Miss Christina Matson, daugh- 
ter of Christian and Hannah Matson. Their 
onl}' child, Christina, was born November 
25, 188S. 



(D 



RS. HELEN M. HARRISON is 
a most estimable lady residing in 
Minnesota Lake. The influence 
of a woman is often like the deep 
under current of a mighty stream, — a power 
strongly felt if not seen. Among the worthy 
pioneer ladies who quietly but strongly have 
done so much for southern Minnesota, is the 
lady whose name introduces this review. In 
the refining and civili;?ing work she has 
borne an important part, and on the pages 
of this history she well deserves mention. 
She came with her husband to this State, 
and with him shared in the hardships and 
privations of pioneer life. 

Alexander R. Harrison was for some 
time one of the most prominent and best 
known men of Faribault county. He was 
born in Rochester, New York, December 
15, 1829, and was a son of Rev. [ohn and 
Alice Harrison, the former a minister of the 
Methodist Church. He crossed the Atlantic 
from England and located in New York. 
His wife was of Scotch descent and their 
marriage was celebrated in the Empire 
State. In the family were nine children, 
five sons and four daughters, and the par- 
ents died in New York some years ago. 
During his early life Alexander Harrison be- 
gan learning the carriage-maker's trade and 
spent some years with his first employer, 

17 



engaged in making the bodies of carriages. 
When a young man he followed the advice 
of Horace (ireeley to the youth of this land 
and started westward. Reaching Geneva, 
Illinois, he secured work at his trade, and 
while there, at a ball given by the Odd Fel- 
lows scjciety, he first met Miss Helen M. 
Pitney, who was visiting with a party of 
friends from Aurora. The friendship thus 
begun ripened into love and in April, 1831, 
their marriage was celebrated in Geneva, 
Kane county, Illinois, the ceremony being 
performed at the hotel by a Scotch minister 
of the Methodist Church. The lady is a 
daughter of Owen Davis and Mariette (Lake) 
Pitney. Her father died when she was. 
only a year and a half old, and her mother 
was thus left a widow with four children. 
The family were then living in Painesville, 
Ashtabula county, Ohio, and Mrs. 
Harris()n was six years of age when the 
mother married John Barker, a native 
of New York and one of the earlj- school- 
teachers of Ohio. Removing to Kane coun- 
ty, Illinois, a farm was purchased and he 
carried on agrirultin ;il pursuits. The chil- 
dren of this fannly were Lodrick Pitney, a 
native of Ohio, who died in Iowa; Charles, 
who was born in the l)uckeye State and 
died on the homr farm in Kane: county, 
Illinois; Louise, who died at the age (jf six- 
teen; and Mrs. Harrison. The half brother, 
Ldwaiil I). Barker, was Ixnn in Chicago, 
Illinois, where the family located in 1836, 
there spending the winter. It had been the 
intention to settle at Joliet, Imt an uncle of 
Mrs. Harrison, Za])hna Lake, who laid out 
the city of .\urora, Illinois, induced them to 
settle near his home, where were born two 
other children, —Joseph and Sylvia Barker. 
The former served in the late war, then 
went to the West, but for some years no 



34t> 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OP 



news has been received of him. The latter 
died in Hastings, Minnesota, where the 
family located at an early day and where 
Edward Barker laid out an addition to the 
town. Mrs. Barker, mother of the lady 
whose name heads this record, died at the 
home of her daughter in the seventy-third 
year of her age. She was an intelligent, 
cultured lady of a happy temperament and 
all who knew her held her in high esteem. 
Her husband, Mr. Barker, died in Hastings, 
Minnesota, at an advanced age. 

In 1853 Mr. Harrison, accompanied by 
his family, went to California, sailing from 
New York on the Prometheus of the Vander- 
bilt line to San Francisco, where he arrived 
after a journey of thirty-two days. On 
reaching the Golden State he went into the 
Sacramento valley to a place then called 
Hangtown (now Placerville), where he en- 
gaged in wagon-making and blacksmithing. 
After about a year he was induced to try 
mining and purchased, for $700, a claim in 
a section known as Deadwood, north of 
Sacramento. It was a beautiful part of the 
country and he carried on operations there 
with moderate success, securing a capital of 
$5,000, which he brought to Minnesota. 
The year 1857 witnessed his arrival in this 
State. On the bank of the beautiful Minne- 
sota Lake, to the northwest, was erected a 
little frame house, 16. \ 24 feet, a story-and- 
a-half structure, — quite a fine dwelling in 
those days. However, the snow sifted 
through the sides and roof. That building 
stood until the fall of 1894, when it was 
torn down. It was one of the landmarks 
of the region, and in those early frontier 
days it was noted for its hospitality, the 
latch-string being always out. 

Mr. Harrison purchased a sawmill on the 
northeast corner of the lake, and amidst the 



first lumber sawed were boards used in the 
construction of the kitchen floor of their cab- 
in. The boiler of this mill was the only part 
of the machinery under shelter at the time of 
his purchase, but he soon had a good build- 
ing, and successfully carried on the business 
for a number of years. He paid about 
$2,000 for the property, but on entering the 
army it was sold for but little more than a 
tenth of that amount. 

This business Mr. Harrison abandoned on 
the 26th of February, 1864, at which time 
he enlisted in Company F, Tenth Minne- 
sota Infantry, at Rochester, Minnesota. He 
was wounded at the battle of Norville waged 
against the forces under General Hood, be- 
ing shot through the thigh, and also receiv- 
ing a slight flesh wound in the elbow. He 
had the first two fingers of his left hand 
completely shot away, and the remaining 
fingers were badly injured. They finally 
withered, and the arm was affected in the 
same way to the elbow. Mr. Harrison was 
a brave soldier, never flinching, though shot 
and shell rained thick around him. He did 
no leave the front until the wound in the 
thigh became so serious that he was sent to 
the hospital. On the same day his cap- 
tain, George F. White, met his death. 

When his wounds were partially healed 
Mr. Harrison returned to this home on pa- 
role, with form bent by disease and suffer- 
ing, but under the tender care and nursing 
of his loving wife he improved, and, faithful 
to his duty, he rejoined his regiment as soon 
as possible, continuing in the service until 
honorably discharged at Fort Snelling, after 
peace had been again restored. Few men 
who wore the blue representing Minnesota 
were better known than Alexander Harrison, 
and the many friends who survive him have 
named in his honor a Grand Army Post of 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



34' 



Minnesota Lake, which is known as Harri- 
son Post, No. 71. 

When the town of Minnesota Lake was 
being laid out inducements were offered to 
Mr. Harrison to bring his mill to this place, 
the conditions being that he and William 
Craig, now of Mankato, were to have ' ' every 
other lot." The warranty deed is on jecord 
in Blue Earth county. From that time for- 
ward he was prominently identified with 
Minnesota Lake, taking an important part 
in its development and progress. He with- 
held his support and co-operation from no 
worthy enterprise, and was recognized as 
one of the representative citizens of Fari- 
bault county. He passed away on the 2ist 
of June, 1874, and was laid to rest in the 
new cemetery at Danville, where a monu- 
ment has been erected to his memory. He 
was reared in the East, lived for a time on 
the Pacific slope, and then became identified 
with the great Mississippi valley. His life 
was one of vicissitude, marked with many 
interesting and some thrilling e\ents. He 
ever lived so as to command the respect and 
confidence of those whom he knew, and 
many friends mourned their loss when he 
was called to the home beyond. His wife 
still survives him, and is now living in her 
comfortable and beautiful residence in Min- 
nesota Lake, which was erected in 1875 ^"^ 
is supplied with all the comforts of life. 
She was to her husband a faithful com- 
panion and helpmeet, and is a true type of 
the worthy pioneer women who braved the 
hardships of frontier life to share with hus- 
bands and fathers the homes of the west, 
and their work in development, though 
more quiet, has been none the less import- 
ant, than that of the sturdy men who trans- 
formed the land into a rich farm and built 
thriving towns and villages. 




liOMPSON LABAN RECORDS, 

Justice of the Peace, and dealer in 
real estate, Sherburne, Minnesota, 
was born in Shelby county, Indi- 
ana, October 27, 1843, son of Laban and 
Elizabeth Ann (Barnett) Records. 

Spencer Records, the grandfather of this 
gentleman, and his brother Laban emigrated 
from Wales to the United States when they 
were young, that being before the Revolu- 
tion. Both served during the last years of 
that war, and Spencer attained the rank of 
Captain while in service. They settled in 
Virginia. Subsequently Spencer moved 
west to Kentucky and located at Limestone 
(now Marysville). It is presumed that his 
removal to Kentuck}- was for the purpose of 
locating land warrants obtained for service 
in the Revolution. Following the tide of 
emigration of that day, he proceeded north, 
and located near Chillicothe. Ohio. It 
may be he was influenced bv the fact that 
Kentucky was a slave State, and he desired 
to rear his famih" under the influence of free 
institutions. He died in Shelb\' county, In- 
diana, in 1850, aged eighty-eight years. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Elrod, 
died there in 1854, at the age of eighty- 
three years. She was a sister of the mother 
of Henry Clay. Their children were as fol- 
lows: Josiah; John; James: Laban; Will- 
iam; Susan, wife of Tunis Quicks; Matilda, 
wife of Josiah Hendrickson; Hannah, wife 
of John Wilson; Lucinda. wife of James 
Barnett, and Rachel, wife of Milton Nelson. 
Several of the daughters died when young. 
Mr. Spencer Records was a man of great 
vitality and will power. He was of medium 
height and in the prime of manhood weigh- 
ed about 160 pounds. At the time of his 
death he was a member of the Baptist 
Church. 



342 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Mr. Barnett, the maternal grandfather 
of our subject, emigrated from Ireland to 
this country prior to the Revolutionary 
war, through which he fought; after the war 
he settled in Virginia and there married a 
Miss Self. Their children were Spencer, 
William, George, John, Thomas, James, 
Ambrose, Mi'S. Lucy Townsend, and Mrs. 
Elizabeth Ann Records. One son, name 
not given, died in infancy. 

Laban Records, the father of our subject, 
was born in Kentucky, September 6, 1799, 
and died in Siielby county, Indiana, Febru- 
ary 2, 1865. He followed agricultural pur- 
suits all his life. His first wife, whose 
maiden name was Bailey, died shortly after 
their marriage, and their only child died 
when quite young. His second wife, Eliz- 
abeth Ann, was born August 15, 1806, and 
died July 1 6, 1 8 59. They were married Febru- 
ary 24, 1825, and their children are as fol- 
lows: Elizabeth Ann, born January 26, 
1826, died August 17, 1846; Lucy, born 
March 14, 1828, died January 15, 1830; 
Spencer Columbus, born September 27, 
1829, is a farmer and teacher of San Pierre, 
Indiana, he and his wife, nee Nancy Ann 
Hagerman, having three children living, — 
Fanny, John and William; John Barnett, 
born December 22, 1831, died August 24, 
1853; Hiram Barticy, born September 26, 
1833, died April 6, 1866; Ambrose Dudley, 
born August 15, 1835, died August 22, 
1837; Hannah, born August 3, 1837, has 
been twice married and is now the widow 
of a Mr. Stevenson, the children by her 
first husband (John S. Baker) being two 
sons and four daughters; Lydia, born Janu- 
ary 7, 1840, died April 24, 1872; Rachel 
Ann, born December 27, 1842, died April 
30, 1867; Thompson Laban, whose name 
appears at the head f)f this article; and 



Harriet Virginia, born October 28, 1845, 
died May 9, 1870. Harriet V. was the wife 
of John H. Burgess, and their only child, 
Elmer E., died September 28, 1870. For 
his third wife Mr. Laban Records married a 
widow, Mrs. Ruth Moore, and their only 
child died when a year old. 

Mr. T. L. Records was just merging 
into young manhood when the civil war 
broke out. August 14, 1862, he enlisted 
in the Twenty-si.xth Indiana Battery, Light 
Artillery, Captain Rigby commanding. His 
first engagement was at the siege of Har- 
per's Ferry, where he was captured and pa- 
roled. In February, 1863, he was ex- 
changed, and joined his battery in Ken- 
tucky, where he shortly afterward partici- 
pated in several skirmishes. In August he 
crossed the mountains and was with Burn- 
side in the occupation of Eastern Tennes- 
see. He helped in the defense of Knox- 
ville during the three-weeks siege of that 
town by Longstreet. In January, 1864, he 
visited home on a thirty days' furlough. In 
March, 1865, he was . assigned to duty with 
the heavy artillery at Fort Sanders. Later 
he joined the Light Artillery again, and ac- 
companied General Stoneman on his expe- 
dition against Salisbury, North Carolina. 
That point, however, surrendered before 
Stoneman's force reached it, owing to the 
close of the war, and the troops retired to 
Greenville, Tennessee, thence to Knoxville, 
and finally to Indianapolis, where Mr. 
Records was discharged Ju'y 19, 1865. 

The war over, Mr. Records returned to 
his old home in Shelby county, where he 
visited until August, 1866. He then came 
westward to near Mankato, Minnesota, 
bought the northwest quarter of section six, 
Leray township, Blue Earth count}', and 
lived on the farm for one year, and in that 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



343 



neighborhood until July, 1875, occupying 
himself the most of the time in teaching 
school. He then came to Martin county 
and located a homestead — the northwest 
quarter of section 12, township 102, range 
'^l, located one mile west of Sherburne. 
He built on this tract of land, and made 
his home there until August, 1879. He 
was absent, however, during the school 
year beginning in 1877, being engaged in 
teaching near Mankato. In January, 1880, 
he moved his family to Sherburne, Minne- 
sota, and opened a land and law office. 
Mr. Records served as Justice of the Peace 
for four years during his residence in Blue 
Earth county, and it was there that his at- 
tention was first given to the study of law. 
He was elected Justice at Sherburne in 
1 88 1, and has served continuously since 
that time. 

Mr. Records was married July 13, 1875, 
to Miss Ida Viroqua Cook. She was a 
daughter of Frank and Elizabeth (Cornell) 
Cook; was born in Sandusky, Ohio, Octo- 
ber 21, 1857, and died August i, 1879. 
Her father was one of the pioneer settlers 
of Martin county. The children of this 
first marriage are: Thompson Frank, born 
July 3, 1876, is engaged in teaching in this 
county; Ida Irene, born September 25, 
1S77, isalso teaching in this county; and 
Lydia Elizabeth, born July 8, 1879, died 
September 15, 1879. Mr. Records' present 
wife was Miss Julia Sanford, daughter of 
Jacob and Jane Sanford. She was born in 
the town of Durand, Pepin county, Wiscon- 
sin, February i, 1862, and they were mar- 
ried November 16, 1881. Their children 
are Spencer Ray, born March 15, 1886; 
Albert Jay, July 17, 1888, and Ruby May, 
July 8, T890. 

.Mr. Records is a member of Sherburne 



Lodge, No. 182, I. O. O. F., and of the 
H. H. Edwards Post, No. 135, G. A. R. 
Politically he is a Republican. From a re- 
ligious standpoint he believes (as his fore- 
fathers did) in the tenets of the Freewill 
Baptist Church. 



y'~Y'DWARD R. GORMAN, a farmer of 
B I Jo Daviess township, Faribault 
^^^ county, is numbered among the 
early settlers of southern Minnesota, 
dating his residence here from the month of 
June, i860. He has therefore witnessed the 
greater part of its growth and development, 
has seen its wild lands transformed into 
beautiful homes and rich farms, while towns 
and villages have sprung up and are the sites 
of thriving manufactories and industries. 
Churches and schools denote an advanced 
civilization of which the East might be proud, 
and in all the work of development and prog- 
ress Mr. Gorman has ever borne his part as 
far as opportunity offered. 

A native of the Emerald Isle, Mr. Gor- 
man was born on the 26th of August, i8i>S. 
and is the son of Roger and Ann (Moran) 
Gorman, whose family numbered five chil- 
dren. He spent his childhood and youth in 
the land of his birth, his days being unmarked 
by any event of special importance. At the 
age of twenty-seven, in 1845, he crossed the 
Atlantic to America, with the hope of more 
rapid advancement, and in this hope has not 
been disappointed. He first settled in Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island, where he remained for 
five years, then he was five years in Orange 
county. New York, engaged in carrying on 
a dairy. That county is noted for its excel- 
lent dairy products, and Mr. Gorman did 
not lower the high reputation; but, not en- 
tirely satisfied with his surroundings, in the 



344 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



year 1855, he came to the West. Wiscon- 
sin attracted him and he cast his lot with 
the early settlers of Janesville, where for five 
years he continued to reside, when he crossed 
the Father of Waters into Minnesota. Thus 
Faribault county gained one of its best citi- 
zens, — a man who in his lonjj residence here 
has ever lived so as to win the respect and 
confidence of all with whom he has been 
brought in contact. 

Mr. Gorman first secured 160 acres uf 
land under the pre-emption act, where he 
built his home, and later a similar tract 
under the homestead law. It is hard for 
those of the present generation to realise that 
the prosperous and well developed township 
of Jo Daviess as we to-daj- see it was then, 
thirty-four years ago, a tract of wild prairie 
on which li\ed not more than three or four 
faniilies. To the pioneers is due a debt of 
gratitude that can scarcely be repaid for what 
they have done for this communit}-, placing 
it under tiic sway of civilization and making 
the wonderful prosperity of the present pos- 
sible. Not long after his arrival here Mr. 
Gorman secured another eighty acres of 
land. In his business undertakings he suc- 
ceeded from the first, and as his financial 
resources were increased he made additional 
purchases of real estate, and for man\ years 
he also made a specialty of stock-raising as 
well as large crops of grain. Some years 
since he ga\e up active life, leaving the 
work of the farm to his sons. The farm, 
comprising 240 acres, produced in 1894 
some 4.000 bushels of wheat, oats, barley 
and flax, besides a fine crop of corn. He 
also raises about 100 head of hogs each 
year, and this adds not a little to his income. 

In June, 1850, Mr. Gorman was united 
in marriage with Miss Bridget McCabe, a 
native of Providence, Rhode Island, and 



they had nine children, four sons and five 
daughters, namely: James, who is now en- 
gaged in farming in Jo Daviess township; 
John, who makes his home in Fairmont, 
I Martin county; Mary Ann; Edward, who is 
located in Elmore township, Faribault 
county; Margrett, wife of Moses Hudiman, 
of Blue Earth City, Minnesota; Thomas, 
engaged on the home farm; Ellen, wife of 
James Corcoran; Kate, wife of John M. 
Graham, of Blue Earth City; and Sarah, 
wife of Michael Kelley. 

Mr. Gorman is well known throughout 
this region as one of the substantial, repre- 
sentative pioneers of Faribault county, and 
during the thirty-four years of his residence 
here he has not only been a valued citizen 
of the community, true to all duties, but has 
so conducted himself in all the affairs and 
relations of life that his honorable, upright 
career, well worthy of emulation, has gained 
him the high regard of all with whom he has 
been brought in contact. 



tV^ENNIS M. RODNEY, of Sher- 
I I burne, Minnesota, was born in She- 
^^^J boygan county, Wisconsin, Feb- 
ruary 1. 1862, son of John and 
Mary (Rooney) Rooney. Both his paternal 
and maternal grandfathers were named 
Dennis Roone) , although his parents were 
not even distantly related. 

Stephen Roone\-. the maternal great- 
grandfather of our subject, was born in Ire- 
land and lived there all his life, engaged in 
farming. He was twice married, the chil- 
dren by his first wife being Peter, Mary and 
Dennis, and those by the second wife, 
Daniel and Rodger. His son Dennis was 
born in Ireland, and when sixteen years of 
age enlisted in the English infantrj- and was 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



345 



sent to the East Indies. He was in the serv- 
ice for a period of twenty-six years, was in 
many hard-fought battles, and after retiring 
from the army received a pension of one 
shilling per day from the English Govern- 
ment. He married Mary McConville, and 
their children were: Mary, the mother 
of our subject; Stephen, who died when 
young; Rose, who died in early life; Dennis, 
a pioneer settler of Martin county, Minnesota; 
Bridget, widow of Henry Gibson, has had a 
family of six sons and one daughter. The 
father of this family died in Ireland. 

John Rooney, the father of Dennis M., 
was born in county Down, Ireland, June 22, 
1808, and died in Martin county, Minnesota, 
April 19, 1888. Shortly after his father's 
death, in June, 1845, John Rooney, with the 
other members of his mother's family, emi- 
grated to Canada and located near Kings- 
ton. September 17, 1856, he moved to 
Sheboygan county, Wisconsin, and engaged 
in farming, and in November, 1867, he 
moved still further west, to Saratoga, Wi- 
nona county, Minnesota. The following year 
he located in Martin county and here made 
a permanent home, his homestead being 
the east half of the southwest quarter of sec- 
tion twenty-two, township 103, and range 
thirty-two. John and Mary Rooney were 
married in Ireland, May 15, 1842. She, 
too, was a native of the Emerald Isle, the 
date of her birth being April 12, 1825. 
She continued to occupy the home farm in 
Martin county for two years after the death 
of her husband, and in 1890 built her pres- 
ent residence in Sherburne, where she still 
resides, with her son. Her children are as 
follows: Daniel, born June 22, 1844, and 
died in December, 1850; Patrick, born 
April 25, 1848, and died in December, 1853; 
Daniel, born April 27, 1850, and died in 



August, 1855; Mary, born June 9, 1852, is 
the wife of Henry Billion, an undertaker of 
Sioux Falls, Iowa, and they have a family 
of three sons and three daughters; Thomas, 
born March 9, 1855, married Miss Augusta 
Summerfeldt, and is living on his mother's 
farm; Francis, born March 9, 1855, married 
Miss Anna Parsons, and they have two chil- 
dren; John, born October 11, 1859, is en- 
gaged in farming in this county; Dennis M., 
whose name appears at the head of this ar- 
ticle; and James, born April 20, 1864, mar- 
ried Elizabeth Rooney, and lives in Sher- 
burne. 

Dennis M. Rooney remained on the 
home farm for some time after his father's 
death, having charge of its operations. In 
1892 he bought the interest of J. D. FoUett 
in the harness business at Sherburne, and, 
with Daniel Peddie for a partner, conducted 
business under the firm name of Peddie & 
Rooney until the spring of 1893. At that 
time he bought out his partner, and has 
since continued alone, meeting with pros- 
perity. 

Mr. Rooney is a member of the I. O. O. 
F. , and in politics is a Democrat. He 
served as President of Sherburne in 1894, 
and is at present a member of the village 
Council. 



? 



1838. 



AMES PARKER FARMER, a pio- 
neer merchant of Sherburne, Minne- 
sota, was born in Redfield, Oswego 
county, New York, November 24. 



The Farmers have been residents of 
America for a number of generations. 
Samuel Farmer, the grandfather of James 
P., was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. 
He married a Miss Bailey, and thev had 



346 



MEMORIAL RECORD OE THE COUNTIES OF 



eight children, tive sons and three daughters. 
One of these sons, Silas Spaulding Farmer, 
the father of our subject, was born in Green- 
field, New Hampshire, September i i, 1803, 
and moved to Jefferson county. New York, 
when he was twenty-five years of age. 
I^ater he moved to Ossvego county, same 
State, and when James P. was about twelve 
years of age, he and his family went back to 
Jefferson county. In 1890 he took up his 
abode in Michigan, and on the 21st of 
March of that same \ear his death occurred. 
He was married in New Hampshire to Miss 
I^ois White, and a record of their children 
is as follows: W'illiam M.. born March 18, 
1831, dieil June 18, 1831; Mary Irene, born 
April 24, 1833, died February 6, 1888; 
Reuben White, born August 25, 1835, died 
[uly 27. 1868; |ames Parker, whose name 
heads this article; and W^illiam F., born 
May 6, 1847, died May 19, 1892. Mrs. 
Farmer was born October 10, 181 i, and 
died July 14, 1856. 

James P. Farmer remained at home 
with his parents till the breaking out of the 
("i\il war. Responding to his country's 
call, he enlisted in May, 1861, in Company 
B, Fifty-ninth New York Volunteer Infan- 
try. He was actively engaged in the bat- 
tles of South Mountain. Malvern Hill, Sec- 
ond Bull Run, and Antietam. At the last 
named engagement he was wounded in the 
left hand by a ball, the second finger being 
carried away. This necessitated his doing 
hospital service for a time, and in the early 
part of January, 1863, he received an hon- 
orable discharge from the service, and re- 
turned to his New York home. The follow- 
ing August he enlisted in Comjiany F, First 
New York Veteran Cavalr)-, ami began 
service immediately in Maryland and the 
Shenandoah \ allow .\mong the man\' en- 



j gagements in which he participated before 
I the close of the war may be mentioned the 
' battles of Piedmont and Winchester. He 
j was finally mustered out of the service at 
Charleston, West Virginia, and discharged 
at Rochester, New York, in August, 1865. 
The war over, Mr. Farmer visited home 
a short time, and in January, 1866, in com- 
pany with an old army chum, W. B. Sted- 
man, set out for the broad and inviting 
country of the West. Reaching Owatonna, 
Steele county, Minnesota, they concluded 
to stop. There Mr. Farmer worked for 
wages until the following April, and then 
came to Tenhassen, Martin count}', and, in 
partnership with W. B. Stedman, opened a 
small store. Two years later he purchased 
his partner's interest, and continued mer- 
chandising here till 1871. The following 
\ear he moved his business to Owatonna, 
but returned a year later to Tenhassen, 
and continued in business at that place until 
his removal to Sherburne. In November, 
1879, he opened the first store in Sherburne, 
on the site he still occupies, his present 
building being partly composed of the old 
store building used at Tenhassen. and 
moved to the Sherburne site. He has since 
conducted a successful and increasing busi- 
ness at this stand; from a $600 stock he has 
enlarged his operations until now he carries 
nearly $6,000 worth of goods. 

Mr. Farmer was married June 21, 1869, 
to Miss Celestine M. Bailey, daughter of 
Henry Bailey, of Jefferson county, New 
York. Their children are Robert, born 
May 22, 1871, is now assisting his father in 
the store; Myrtle, born September 19, 1875; 
Jessie, born June 24, 1880, died September 
28, 1883; and Bessie, born December 25, 
1884. 

^^'hil(' a resident of Tenh;issen, Mr. 




j^^/. j3^ C^". ^^k. 



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FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



351 



Fanner served for tea years as its Post- 
master, and he was the first postmaster of 
Sherburne, filhng the office until the first 
election of Cleveland as President. Politic- 
ally he is a Republican, though not an act- 
i\e politician. His family attend the Con- 
gregational Church, and he is one of the 
principal supporters of that denomination in 
this section. 



KON. HENRY NICKEY RICE, 
M. I)., is an honored veteran of 
the late war and a most promi- 
nent and influential citizen of 
Martin county, his home being in Fairmont. 
He is also proprietor of a beautiful summer 
resort on his farm, known as the Silver 
Lake Ranch, which has become very popu- 
lar and is a delightful retreat. 

Dr. Rice claims Indiana as the State of 
his nativity, his birth having occurred in 
Whitley county, on the 2d of September, 
1843. His grandfather, Abner Rice, was a 
nati\'e of New York, and the father of our 
subject, D. B. Rice, was born in Oneida 
county, New York, September 14, 181 5. 
In the Empire State he remained until 1840, 
when he sought a home in Indiana, settling 
on a farm near Fort Wayne. In that local- 
ity he married Rosanna Nickey, a native of 
Pennsjlvania and a daughter of David 
Nicke)-, who was born in Germany and was 
the founder of the family in the New World. 
In 1866 D. B. Rice came to Minnesota, but 
is now living in Eagle Gro\e, Iowa. He is 
yet well preserved, of strong constitution and 
robust health and is a self-made man, who 
through his own efforts has won success. 
In his political views he is a stalwart Demo- 
cral, and has served as County Commis- 
sioner. In the community where he resides 



he is a prominent citizen and has many 
warm friends. His wife passed awaj' in 
1862. Their family numbered eight chil- 
dren, four sons and four daughters, and 
four of the number reached mature years, 
while two are still living, — Henry N., of 
this sketch and Ezra A., a banker and lead- 
ing citizen of Luverne, Rock county, Minne- 
sota. 

The gentleman whose name heads this 
record was the second child of the family. 
He obtained his literary education in the 
common schools and remained at home, 
giving his father the benefit of his services, 
until eighteen years of age, when he 
responded to the president's call for troops 
to aid in crushing out the rebellion of the 
South. In the year 1862 he joined Com- 
pan}- B, Seventy-fourth Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, and continued with that command 
until the close of the war. After the battle 
of Perryville.he was sent to Ouincy, Illinois, 
\\here he remained about a year, after 
which he rejoined his regiment prior to the 
march of Sherman to the sea, participating 
in that ever memorable expedition. He 
was also in many hard-fought battles, but 
was never seriously wounded, although he 
was struck in the shoulder at the battle of 
Lovejoy's Station. Faithfully he followed 
the old flag until it was planted victoriously 
in the capital of the Southern Confederacy, 
after which he received an honorable dis- 
charge at Washington, D. C, on the 22d of 
June, 1865. 

Dr. Rice at once returned to his Indiana 
home and entered a commercial college at 
Fort Wayne, after which he spent the win- 
ter in teaching school. In 1866 he came to 
Minnesota and located on a homestead near 
East Chain Lakes, which at that time was 
all wild land, — still in its primitixe condi- 



352 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



tion. At length he began the study of 
medicine with Dr. D. G. Winch, of Blue 
Earth City, and in 1 872 he entered the 
Medical College of Keokuk, Iowa, where he 
continued his studies until fitted for practice. 
He then located in Fairmont, where he suc- 
cessfully engaged in the prosecution of his 
profession until 1886, in which year he was 
graduated from the Rush Medical College 
of Chicago. At once he returned to Fair- 
mont and has since made this city his home, 

Aside from his professional duties. Dr. 
Rice has been otherwise connected with the 
business interests of this locality. Opening 
a drug store he carried on business for 
twelve years, — one of the leading and pros- 
perous merchants of the place. He is now 
the owner of a large stock-farm, known as 
the Silver Lake Ranch, which comprises 
370 acres of rich land, delightfully located 
and beautifully situated on Silver Lake, ten 
miles south of Fairmont. A part of this 
farm has been fitted up as a summer resort 
and is patronized by people who come from 
all directions to spend the hot summer days 
in a cool and shaded retreat. Boating, 
fishing and other pleasures are furnished the 
guests and every effort put forth for their 
entertainment. 

Dr. Rice was married in 1866 to Miss 
Sarah E. Reed, a native of Ohio, who came 
to the West during her early girlhood. She 
is a scholarly woman of more than average 
intelligence and ability, a good speaker and 
takes a very prominent part in the work of 
the Woman's Relief Corps. She organized 
in Fairmont a corps with 100 members, 
served as president during the first and 
second terms of its existence and is now its 
secretary. She is also a leader in the Re- 
becca Lodge, Order of the Eastern Star, 
and is a cultivated and refined lady whose 



graces of character win her friends wherever 
she goes. The family is one of prominence 
in the community and the Rice household 
is the abode of hospitality and good cheer. 
The home has been blessed with six chil- 
dren, two sons and four daughters, namely: 
Estella, the eldest, now the wife of F. D. 
Gould, of Fairmont; Rosa, wife of Ed. J. 
Edwards, a druggist of Fairmont; Stanley, 
Genner, Lena and Daisy. 

By his ballot, labors and influence the 
Doctor supports the Republican party, and 
has been honored with a number of public 
positions of trust. In 1876 he was elected 
to represent his district in the State Legis- 
lature, and for eight years he served as 
Mayor of Fairmont, the interests of the city 
being greatly promoted under his able ad- 
ministration of affairs. In 1880 he was 
appointed surgeon of the Chicago, Milwau- 
kee & St. Paul Railroad and still holds that 
position; is also Pension Examiner, having 
served in that capacity since 1888. He is 
very prominent in Masonic circles, belonging 
to Apollo Lodge, No. 12, A. F. & A. M., 
to the commandery and to the Zurah Shrine 
of Minneapolis. He also holds membership 
with the Odd Fellows society, and is a 
valued member of these various organiza- 
tions. He was a faithful soldier, is a 
straightforward business man, a trustworthy 
official, and in all relations of life his course 
has commanded the high respect of all with 
whom he has been brought in contact. 



V-— rf ON. A. H. BULLIS, Delavan town- 

I'^^V ship, Faribault county, has for many 
\ ^ P years been prominently identified 
with the various interests of south- 
ern Minnesota. We take pleasure in pre- 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



353 



senting the readers of this work the follow- 
ing resume of his life : 

A. H. Bullis was born in East Otto, 
Cattaraugus county, New York, February 
8, 1832, son of Dr. Levi and Sallie (Adams) 
Bullis, and one of their family of six chil- 
dren, four of whom are living, the three 
besides himself being as follows : Cathar- 
ine, wife of J. J. Scott, East Otto, New 
York ; Josephine, wife of B. J. Ward, Fre- 
donia, New York ; and Lewis, of Dodge 
county, Minnesota. 

Dr. Levi Bullis was born in Factory 
Point, Vermont, about the year 1796, and 
in the Green Mountain State passed the 
first twenty-five years of his life. He was 
well educated, and when a young man began 
the study of medicine. After practicing a 
few years in his native State he removed to 
New York, where he had a long and suc- 
cessful professional career. In 1821 he 
settled in Erie county. New York, and some 
years later removed to Cattaraugus county, 
where he passed the rest of his life and 
where his death occurred, at the age of 
eighty-six years. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Sallie Adams, was a native of 
Massachusetts, her ancestry being a branch 
of the family of which John and John Ouincy 
Adams were members, and its history being 
traced back to the earliest settlement in 
Massachusetts. Henry Bullis, the Doctor's 
father, lived and died in the State of Ver- 
mont. He was the father of a large family. 
Seven of his sons participated in the battle 
of Plattsburg, New York, during the war of 
1812. 

A. H. Bullis remained in the Empire 
State until he attained his majority. He 
then started out in life on his own responsi- 
bility. As early as 1854 he came to Minne- 
sota and settled in Rice county, there being 



then only twenty settlers in the county. 
First he was engaged for a short time on 
the Government survey, subdividing a por- 
tion of this county. He pre-empted a claim, 
but did not, however, engage in farming, 
his attention at first being directed to mer- 
cantile pursuits. He was the first man to 
sell goods in Rice county, was in partner- 
ship with another young man, and was very 
successful. But the business was not con- 
genial to his taste and he soon retired from 
it, and for five years afterward served as 
County Surveyor of Rice county; later he was 
largely interested in real-estate transactions; 
and while living in Rice county he was 
twice elected to the State Legislature and 
served efficiently in that honorable body. 
After coming to Faribault county, he was 
three )ears in the United States Land Office 
at Winnebago City, and on coming out of 
that office he again gave his attention to the 
real-estate business. 

About twenty-five years ago Mr. Bullis 
bought his present home in Delavan town- 
ship. His residence is located on section 
thirty-one of this township, while the greater 
part of his farm, comprising in all some 800 
acres, is situated in Prescott township. 
This is one of the most delightful rural 
homes in all the country round, is within 
easy reach of Winnebago City, and is a 
model of comfort and convenience. Mr. 
Bullis has for many years been noted for 
his interest in improving the breeds of cattle 
in the county. About the year 1868 he 
brought the first short-horn cattle that came 
to this region, and from that time until 1875 
made a specialty of raising this breed. He 
then changed to the Hereford stock, bring- 
ing to his farm the first Hereford cattle that 
crossed the Mississippi. He is still breed- 
ing Herefords, with uniform success, now 



354 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



having a herd of about lOO head, and is 
recognized throughout this and adjoining 
counties as an authority on the science of 
breeding and raising blooded stock. In ad- 
dition to his fine cattle he also raises and 
markets other stock. 

Mr. Bullis was married October 15, 
1859, to Ellen L. Pierce, a native of Otto, 
New York, and a daughter of Lewis and 
Eliza (Smith) Pierce, both natives of the 
Empire State. Mr. and Mrs. Bullis have 
three sons, viz. : Otto L. , a successful far- 
mer of Prescott township; Harry L. , en- 
gaged in the practice of law in Winnebago 
City; and Lewis L, attending the State Uni- 
versity of Minnesota. 

In addition to his other public service, 
already mentioned, Mr. Bullis has served 
two terms of three years each as a member 
of the Covmty Board of Commissioners, and 
during that time was chairman of the board. 
He is one of the most public-spirited and 
generous men of the county. 




IHOMAS \V. HALL is one of the 
extensive land-owners of Eraser 
township, Martin county, and is- 
now its oldest settler. With the 
history of this section of the State he is 
familiar, having witnessed the growth and 
development of the county from the time 
when it was a frontier settlement, contain- 
ing few inhabitants, when the greater 
part of its land was wild and uncultivated 
and when sites of now thriving towns and 
villages were unmarked by a single cabin. 
He has seen the raw prairie transformed into 
beautiful homes and farms, has aided in the 
progress and development of the entire com- 
munity, and in all public works pertaining to 



the welfare of the connnunity he has ever 
borne his part. 

Mr. Hall claims New Hampshire as the 
State of his nativity, his birth having oc- 
curred in Barrington, July 18, 1842. His 
father, Stasa Hall, was also a native of that 
place, and the grandfather, Daniel Hall, 
was a soldier in the war of 1812. The 
mother of our subject, who was born in the 
same town, bore the maiden name of Sallie 
Hayes and was a daughter of Captain John 
Hayes, who won his title in the second war 
with England, — the war of 1812. Mr. and 
Mrs. Stasa Hall spent their entire lives in 
New Hampshire and became the parents of 
nine children, seven of whom are living at 
the time of the compilation of this work, in 
the winter of 1894-5. John W. , the eldest, 
resides in the Granite State; Alonzo H. 
makes his home in Winnebago City, Minne- 
sota; Thomas W. is the next younger and is 
followed by Leslie S. ; William H. and Sam- 
uel H. are citizens of Minneapolis, Minne- 
sota; and Calista is the wife of I. F. Bick- 
ford, who is living in Seattle, Washington. 
In taking up the personal history of 
Thomas W. Hall we present to our readers 
the life record of one who is widely and 
favorably known throughout the county. 
He spent the first fourteen years of his life 
in New Hampshire, then went to Virginia, 
where he remained two years and a half on 
account of his health. Returning then to 
the North, he located in Massachusetts, 
where he began business for himself, learn- 
ing the shoe-cutter's trade, which he followed 
until the breaking out of the war of the 
1 Rebellion. 

I In 1862 Mr. Hall responded to the Pres- 
I ident's call for troops to aid in crushing out 
the Rebellion, and, donning the blue, be- 
came a member of Company I, Eighth 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 355 



Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, for nine 
months. With the regiment he went to 
Newbern, North CaroHna, where he re- 
mained until June, 1863, at which time, 
with his command, he was transferred to 
Fortress Monroe, then to Baltimore, doing 
guard duty. The regiment then joined the 
Army of the Potomac, chasing the rebels 
under General R. E. Lee. The term of 
service expired in June, 1863, but it was not 
until late in the summer of that year that 
Mr. Hall and his comrades were mustered 
out of the service. He at once returned to 
his home and worked at his trade for a few 
months, and the succeeding winter was 
passed in Spring Valley, Minnesota. In the 
spring of 1864 he came to Martin county 
and located upon the farm which has since 
been his place of residence. He first built 
a rude log cabin and for five years kept 
bachelor's hall. At the end of that time he 
hired some one to care for his home, and 
thus lived until his marriage. 

In 1880 Mr. Hall was joined in wedlock 
with Miss Martha E. Brand, a native of 
Wisconsin and a daughter of Benjamin 
Brand, an early settler of Martin county, 
now deceased. Five children have been 
born to them, — Charles E., Frank W., 
Mabel, Lynn and an infant. In connection 
with his brother Leslie, Mr. Hall owns and 
operates 680 acres of land, and each owns 
eighty acres separately. The greater part 
of this land is under a high state of cultiva- 
tion, and the improvements seen thereon 
were placed there by our subject, and are 
proofs of his enterprise and his progressive 
spirit. The farm is now a valuable one, 
and through his capable management, per- 
severance and good business ability its 
owner has become one of the substantial 
citi;;ens of the community. 



Mr. Hall holds membership with the 
First Congregational Church of Eraser, is 
serving as one of its Deacons and takes a 
very active part in its work and upbuilding. 
He is also an earnest worker in the Sunday- 
school and in the Christian Endeavor So- 
ciety, and in the latter organization is serv- 
ing on several important committees. His 
influence is ever exerted for the cause of 
right and his well spent life is one deserving 
of emulation. The cause of education also 
finds in him a warm friend, for he believes it 
to be an important factor in producing good 
citizens. Socially he is connected with the 
Grand Army Post of Fairmont, and in his 
political connections he is a Republican. 
He is quite prominent in local politics and 
has filled several offices of honor and trust, 
discharging his duties in a prompt and faith- 
ful manner. He was a member of the town 
board of Supervisors for a number of years, 
served as its chairman, has also been Town- 
ship Clerk and Road Overseer. .-\t one 
time he was also elected Justice of the 
Peace, but refused to qualify. Mr. Hall is 
a wide-awake, progressive citizen, an enter- 
prising farmer and an honored pioneer, and 
the history of Martin county would be in- 
complete without this record of his life. 



at 



ILLIAM S. DRAKE, Sr., one 
of the well-to-do and highly re- 
spected farmers of Elmore town- 
ship, Faribault county, Minne- 
sota, was born m Orange county, New 
York, July 27, 181 3, one of the two sons of 
Nathaniel and Annie (Seward) Drake. Na- 
thaniel Drake was a native of New Jersey, 
born near the city of Morristown, and early 
in life removed from there to Orange 
rountv, New York, where he lived until the 



356 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



outbreak of the war of 1812. He served as 
a soldier all through that war, and died soon 
after its close. His widow spent her latter 
years in Minnesota, dying at the home of 
Mr. George D. McArthur, at the great age 
of ninety-nine years and eight months. She 
was a second cousin of the Hon. William 
H. Seward, formerly of New York. Jere- 
miah Drake, the grandfather of our subject, 
was of English descent and was for many 
years a resident of Orange county, New 
York; but little, however, is known of his 
personal history. 

William S. Drake, Sr. , spent the first 
thirty-seven years of his life in the Empire 
State. He there learned the trade of car- 
riage-maker and worked at it for some 
time. In January, 1 840, he was married, 
in New York, to Emeline Thompson, daugh- 
ter of George Thompson, of Orange county, 
she being one of a family of five children. 
Mr. and Mrs. Drake have had children, as 
follows: Anna, wife of George D. McArthur, 
of Blue Earth City, Minnesota; Sarah, de- 
ceased wife of German B. Franklin, Auditor 
of Faribault county; Elizabeth, wife of 
James R. Snyder, of Elmore township; and 
William S., Jr. 

In 1850 Mr. Drake moved with his fam- 
ily from New York State to Wisconsin, set- 
tling in Waukesha county, where they lived 
until 1868, he being engaged in farming 
during that time. In the year 1868 he 
came to Minnesota and settled in Elmore 
township, Faribault county, on a half sec- 
tion of land purchased of George D. McAr- 
thur. To this tract he added by subsequent 
purchase until he now has some 800 acres 
of splendid farming land, and he is ranked 
among the wealthiest farmers of this sec- 
tion of the country. For many years he 
has made a specialty of raising sheep, his 



flock averaging no less than 500 head; and 
he also raises a large number of hogs each 
year. 

Mr. Drake was a Whig in his early life. 
When the Republican party was organized 
he gave his support to it and has ever since 
been an ardent Republican, though never in 
any sense of the word a politician. 



k/^ OBERT MORE, County Commis- 

I /^r sioner of Faribault county, Minne- 

\ . P sota, is one of the leading farmers 

and stockmen of the county, his 

residence being in Pilot Grove township. 

Mr. More was born July 7, 1839, in 
Hamilton, Scotland, which was the birth- 
place of the Mores for many generations, he 
being the eldest of seven children of Andrew 
R. and Janette (Weir) More. When he 
was eleven years of age his parents emi- 
grated with their family to America, settling 
first in Waukesha county, Wisconsin, and 
later in Jefferson county, that State. In 
1857 they came to Minnesota and took 
up their abode on a farm in Pilot Grove 
township, Faribault county, this region of 
country then being an unbroken prairie and 
abounding in game. For sixteen winters 
our subject was engaged in hunting and 
trapping, a sport in which he took great 
delight and which afforded him not only 
pleasure but also profit, the pelts bringing 
high prices. In all this part of the country 
he was noted as an expert hunter and 
trapper, and, while he was unoccupied in 
this way during the winters, he spent his 
summers in farm work. He early began to 
buy and raise cattle for market and in this 
business has been more or less extensivel}' 
engaged ever since, his operations extend- 
ing over a wide territory. For several years 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



357 



past he and his brother Edward have been 
in partnership in the stock business, buying 
and selling both cattle and hogs. They 
annually feed for market about 125 head of 
steers and no less than 100 hogs, and they 
farm about 1,300 acres of land, raising 
large crops of corn, which they feed to their 
stock. They ship to the Chicago market. 
After his marriage, which occurred in 1886, 
Robert More settled on 160 acres of land, 
the farm he still occupies. For ten years 
he lived in a log house, he and his wife 
bearing the hardships incident to life on the 
frontier. Fortune smiled upon their honest 
and earnest efforts as the years rolled by, 
and to-day Mr. More is recognized as one of 
the substantial, progressive men of Fari- 
bault county. 

He was married January 27, 1866, to 
Elizabeth C. Kendall, daughter of Charles 
and Ann (Aspey) Kendall, natives of Eng- 
land. Upon their emigration to this coun- 
try, her parents settled at Gravesend, Kings 
county, New York, where her birth oc- 
curred. After a residence of nine years 
in New York, they came west to Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, and in 1864 came from there to 
Minnesota, settling in Lura township, Fari- 
bault county, where they still reside. Mr. 
and Mrs. More have five children, namely: 
Andrew R. , Jr., a farmer of Pilot Grove 
township; Charles K., engaged in farming 
operations with his father; George K. , at- 
tending commercial school at Des Moines, 
Iowa; Elwin D., and Clarence, at school. 

Always a public-spirited man, Mr. More 
has served his township long and well in va- 
rious capacities, acting as Township As- 
sessor and later as Township Treasurer, fill- 
ing both offices a number of years. Yield- 
ing to the urgent request of his many friends, 
he in 1886 allowed his name to be used as a 



candidate for County Commissioner, and 
was duly elected to that office by the Re- 
publican party, with which he has always 
affiliated, and since 1886 has been serving 
efficiently as Commissioner. The magnifi- 
cent county courthouse has been erected 
during his term of office, and for the deep 
interest he took in the matter he is deserving 
of thanks from the people. 

More might be said of the life of this 
worthy citizen, but enough has been given 
to serve as an index to his character, and 
place him, where he belongs, among the 
representative men of his day and place. 



@EOKGE J. NUTT is one of the 
most prosperous and prominent 
agriculturists of Martin county. 
He resides on section 32, East 
Chain township, and has one of the finest 
farms in this section of the State, — a region 
noted for its excellent land and splendid 
farms. He made his start in life with a 
homestead claim of 120 acres, but his landed 
possessions now aggregate 800 acres, all 
fenced and the greater part under a high 
state of cultivation. Of this 200 acres con- 
stitutes the place on which he resides, and 
the remaining 600 lies just across the line 
in Kossuth county, Iowa. The improve- 
ments are such as are found on a model 
farm of the nineteenth century. A pleasant 
and substantial dwelling is supplemented 
with barns and outbuildings which are 
models of convenience, and these are sur- 
rounded by waving fields of grain and in 
harvest times the yellow fields tell of 
just reward for the labors of the owner. In 
connection with general farming he success- 
fully carries on stock-raising and keeps on 
hand a large herd of fine cattle and Poland 



358 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



China hogs. His success in life has come 
to him through close attention to the details 
of business, systematic management and un- 
tiring industry. 

It is with pleasure that we present to 
our readers the life record of so prominent 
a citizen as the gentleman whose name in- 
troduces this record. Mr. Nutt was born 
in Clinton county, New York, January 24, 
1849, and is a son of George Nutt, a native 
of the same county. His mother, who bore 
the maiden name of Electa Ackerson, was a 
native of the Green Mountain State and a 
daughter of Daniel Ackerson, who was born 
in New Jersey and was of German descent 
and served as a soldier in the war of 1812. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Nutt were born four chil- 
dren, three sons and a daughter: Alonzo, 
who is living in Oregon; George J., our sub- 
ject; Alice, wife of William Nutter, also of 
Oregon; and Albert, who completes the fam- 
ily. 

In the Empire State George J. Nutt 
spent the first sixteen years of his life, 
during which time he attended the public 
schools, acquiring a practical English edu- 
cation. He then came with his parents to 
Martin county, Minnesota, — the year of 
their arrival being i 865, — and has since been 
identified with this region. He began to 
earn his own livelihood, chopping cord-wood 
by the day, being thus employed for one 
winter in Boone county, Iowa, and receiving 
$.65 per cord for his work. He gave his 
parents his earnings, for they were in limited 
circumstances and needed his aid. On 
attaining his majority he resolved that his 
labors should benefit himself, for he had now 
reached the lime when a young man begins 
to think of providing for his future and of 
securing a home of his own. By his first 
purcha.se of land he became the owner of a 



tract of eighty acres in Pleasant Prairie 
township, Martin county, and upon it raised 
two crops. Subsequently he sold that prop- 
erty, and as before stated secured a home- 
stead of 120 acres. His career has since 
been an era of prosperity, yet has not been 
without its obstacles and difficulties, but 
these he has overcome by persistent effort, 
and they have seemed to serve but as an im- 
petus for renewed and more persistent labor. 
In 1874 a marriage ceremony was per- 
formed which united the destinies of Mr. 
Nutt and Miss Ida F. Roberts, who was 
born and reared in Walworth county, Wis- 
consin, and is a daughter of Alanson W. 
and Amarilla (Nimicksj Roberts. Mr. 
Roberts was born in St. Lawrence county. 
New York, and Mrs. Roberts is also a native 
of that State. They were married in the 
Empire State, and a few years later came 
West, locating in Walworth county, and 
engaged in farming, where both are living at 
this writing. Mr. and Mrs. Nutt located 
on the farm which is now their home and 
which has since been their place of abode 
continuously ; and four children have come 
to bless their union, two sons and two 
daughters, \\i. : Cora, born November 7, 
1875 ; Alfred, born January 5, 1878; Wil- 
bur, born November 25, 18S1; and Grace, 
! born November 2, 1889, completes the fam- 
' ily. Their home is the abode of hospitality 
I and many friends delight to gather there 
I and share in the good cheer which is always 
extended them. 

In his political views Mr. Nutt is a Repub- 
1 lican, but has never been an aspirant for 
office. Almost his entire life has been 
passed in Martin county, and those who 
have known him from boyhood are num- 
; bered among his warmest friends, — a fact 
which indicates a well spent life. 




^daim -^/}/e//. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAX AND JACKSON. 



■jfii 



aHARLES SIEBERT.— Among the 
intelligent, prosperous and highly 
esteemed merchants of Wells is the 
gentleman who forms the subject 
(jf this re\'iew, and the history of the com- 
munity would be incomplete without the 
record of his life. He was born in the 
province of Brandenburg, near the city of 
Berlin, German}-, on the 21st of December, 
1849, and belongs to a family of six chil- 
dren, whose parents were William and 
Dorothea (Heuer) Siebert. The grandfather, 
Jacob Siebert, was born in Lenten, on the 
Elbe, and was one of the prominent and 
influential men of his day in the community 
in which he made his home. He died at 
the ripe old age of eighty-seven. The 
father of our subject was born in Len- 
zen, in the year 18 14, and was in the Go\- 
ernment postoffice service in his native city 
during his active business career. He, too, 
was a leading citizen, taking an active part 
in public affairs. In 1871, when fifty-seven 
3'ears of age, he was called from this life and 
many friends mourned his death. He was 
a man of much more than average intelli- 
gence and gave to his children superior edu- 
cational advantages, thus fitting them for 
any duties which might come to them in 
after life. His wife also was born in Lenzen, 
in 18 I 7, and is now living in the old home 
where occurred the birth of her children, 
having reached the advanced age of seventy- 
seven. Her parents were William and 
Sophia (Richter) Heuer, and her father car- 
ried on a large shoemaking establishment, 
employing a number of men. 

Of t"he family of William and Dorothea 
Siebert, four are yet living, including Henry, 
who is now living in Berlin and is employed 
in the Government service as a telegraph 
operator; Adolph, who is occupying a very 

18 



important position as assistant in the office 
of the Government Treasury in Berlin; Wil- 
helmina, wife of Louis Giesenschlag, of 
I Lenzen-on-the-Elbe; and Charles, of this 
record. 

The last named spent the days of his 
boyhood and youth under the parental roof 
and attended the common schools of his 
native city. Later he learned the saddlery 
trade, which he followed until nineteen 
years of age. In 1869 he was called to 
serve the Government as a soldier, and was 
in the army for three years, or until 1872, 
being a member of the Si.xth Light Battery 
of the Third Field Artillery Regiment. He 
was all through the Franco-Prussian war 
and did faithful service in his country's 
cause. In the spring of 1872 the battery 
was detached from the regiment with which 
it was first connected, and was then attached 
to the Fifteenth Field Artillery Regiment, 
stationed in Metz, Strasburg, and in Alsace- 
Lorraine. He received his discharge in 
Metz in 1872, and after two weeks visit 
with his family he executed his long contem- 
plated plan of coming to .America. He 
reached the United States in the month of 
November and at once made his way to 
Manteno, Kankakee county, Illinois, where 
he spent the winter attending school and 
making himself familiar with the English 
: language. He desired to make thorough 
I preparation for a successful business career 
in America, and recognized th(^ value that 
this school course would be to him. 

In February, 1873, Mr. Siebert secured 
a position as salesman in a mercantile estab- 
lishment in Kankakee, his services being 
wanted for the German and French trade. 
After six months spent in that capacity he 
\ went on a visit of two weeks to Chicago, 
■ and while there engaged with the leather 



363 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OP 



firm of Blackburn Brothers, first filling the 
position of shipping and corresponding clerk 
for three months, when he was promoted 
to house salesman. So faithful was he and 
so valuable were his services that after a 
half year he was again promoted, being put 
upon the road as a traveling salesman and 
thus he served for three years, covering the 
territory comprised in Illinois, Wisconsin, 
Minnesota and eastern Iowa. In the mean- 
time he was determined to engage in busi- 
ness for himself, and in 1877 severed his 
connection with the firm of Blackburn 
Brothers, a connection which had been 
mutually pleasant and profitable. He had 
already selected Wells, as in his judgment 
the best point in the West for a location. 
Here he embarked in general merchandising 
and has since carried on operations along 
this line. In order to meet the demands of 
his constantly increasing trade he enlarged 
the store which he now occupies, and 
stocked it with a fine line of goods, such as 
is found in a first class establishment of the 
kind. From the beginning his trade has 
constantly increased in volume and import- 
ance, and Mr. Siebert is now at the head of 
the leading general mercantile stores in 
Wells. To carry on the business he has 
the service of ten employees, and the pa- 
trons always receive courteous treatment, 
and the dealings are always fair and honor- 
able on the part of the store. 

Mr. Siebert has ever taken a deep and 
abiding interest in what pertains to the wel- 
fare of the community and its upbuilding, 
and it was largely through his instrumen- 
tality that the German Lutheran Church 
was established in Wells. His efforts have 
done much to bring into this locality the 
large German population which is to-day 
found here, and they form a class of citizens 



devoted to the country's interests and worthy 
of all regard. Mr. Siebert is a member of 
the Masonic fraternity, belonging to Doric 
Lodge, of Wells; also to Olympia Lodge, 
No. 477, I. O. O. F., of Chicago; the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen and the 
Modern Woodmen of America. Prosperous 
in a high degree, he is recognized as one of 
the energetic, broadminded business men of 
the day. Success comes not alone as a 
result of taking advantage of opportunities 
presented, but is also the result of opportuni- 
ties created. He has both made and used 
opportunities, taking advantage of everything 
that would aid him in his career. Thus he 
has worked his way steadily upward, climbing 
to heights which can only be reached through 
earnest application, untiring industry and 
straightforward, honorable dealing. 

The domestic relations of Mr. Siebert 
have been most pleasant and he takes great 
delight in his home. He was happily mar- 
ried August 6, 1876, in Chicago, to Minnie 
Helweg, a native of St. Louis, Missouri, 
and a daughter of Gottlieb and Wilhelmina 
Helweg, of Chicago. In their family were 
three children, the brothers being Charles 
H., a merchant of Fulda, Minnesota, and 
Frederick, of the same place. The union 
of Mr. and Mrs. Siebert has been blessed with 
seven children, — Louisa, Emma, Charles, 
Minnie, Marie, Dorothea and Leonora, — 
and the family circle yet remains unbroken 
by the hand of death, while all are still under 
the parental roof. 



EON. ANDREW R. MORE, a well- 
known farmer of Pilot Grove town- 
ship, Faribault county, Minnesota, 
was born in the town of Hamilton, 
near Glasgow, Scotland, June 21, 181 3. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



363 



He was one of a family of twelve children, 
four of whom are now living, all in old age. 
Their parents were Robert and Christina 
(Wilson) More. The father, also a nati\-e 
of Hamilton, was by trade a weaver of 
cambric, which trade he followed success- 
fully through his active life. He died in his 
native town, at the age of seventy-three 
years. His wife, Christina, likewise a na- 
tive of Hamilton, was a daughter of Alex- 
ander Wilson, a tailor by trade. The 
grandfather. Thomas More, lived and died 
in that same place. He wa.s engaged largely 
in dairying, and lived to the extreme old 
age of ninety-two years. 

Andrew R. More learned the trade of 
lace-maker in early life and worked at that 
trade for a number of years He was also 
a manufacturer of lace for some time, re- 
maining in Scotland until 1850. That year 
he emigrated to America. Upon his arrival 
in this country he first settled in Waukesha 
count}-, Wisconsin, and three years later 
moved to Jefferson county, same State, 
where he remained five years, trying to 
learn farming. Not satisfied, however, 
with his success in Wisconsin, he decided 
to come further west, and in May, 1858, 
landed in Pilot Grove township, Faribault 
county, Minnesota, and located on the spot 
which has since been his home. Three 
others, — James and David Ogilvie and Archi- 
bald Cardie, located in this same neighbor- 
hood iX the time Mr. More did, and all are 
still living here. They made the journey 
hither from Wisconsin in wagons, and after 
their arrival Mr. More and his family lived 
in their wagons for several weeks, until they 
could build a log house. This done, he 
began breaking the prairie. He took a 
squatter's claim and later secured title to 
the same under the homestead act, occupy- 



ing 1 50 acres at fust. Herf he has since 
lived and prospered, farming and stock-rais- 
ing on a large scale, and also buying and 
selling cattle and hogs, and dealing to some 
extent in real estate. To-day he is ranked 
with the wealthy men of the county. 

Mr. More was married in his native 
land, October 1. 1838, to Jeanette Allen 
Weir, who was one of a familv of eleven 
children and daughter of James and Jean- 
ette fReston; Weir. They have six chil- 
dren, viz. : Robert, County Commissioner, 
a resident of Pilot Grove township: Jean- 
ette, wife of Wayne B. Silliman, of Blue 
Earth City, Minnesota; Christina, wife of 
Daniel McLeod, Pilot Grove; Andrew, Blue 
Earth City; James W. . County Treasurer; 
and Edward, engaged in farming and stock- 
raising on the home place. 

In township and county affairs Mr. More 
has always taken an active part. In the 
fall of the same year in which he located 
here, when the Township Board was first 
formed, he was made Township Treasurer 
and Justice of the Peace, and for many 
years he served as Chairman of the Board. 
When he first landed in this country Mr. 
More gave his support to the Whigs, but 
has affiliated with the Republican party ever 
since it was organized. For six years he 
served as County Commissioner, during 
three of which he acted as Chairman of the 
Board. In the convention of 1876 he was 
nominated for the Legislature, and was 
afterward elected by a splendid majority. 
Religiously, Mr. More has been a faithful 
member of the Presbyterian Church all his 
life. In the year 1869, when a Presby- 
terian Church was established in Blue Earth 
City, he was chosen Elder, being the first 
Presbyterian Elder in Faribault county, and 
has held that office continuouslv to the 



364 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



present time; and for thirty years he has 
been the only Postmaster in Pilot Grove. 

Surrounded by children and grandchil- 
dren and friends without number, living in 
the midst of peace and plenty, this worthy 
pioneer and his good wife are spending the 
evening of happy and useful lives. 



aYRUS WEBER, a respected farm- 
er of Martin county, residing near 
Sherburne, was born in ^^'aterloo 
county, Ontario, Canada, June 9, 
1833, son of Peter and Catharine (Baer) 
Weber. 

Both the grandfather and great-grand- 
father of Mr. Weber were named John 
Weber. The latter lived and died in Bucks 
county, Pennsylvania. The family origin- 
ated in old Bavaria, Germany, and it is 
more than likely they emigrated to Penn- 
sylvania about the time of the establishment 
of the Penn colony there. John Weber, 
the grandfather of our subject, was also 
born in Bucks county. In 18 15 he moved 
from there to Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, 
and in 1 829 to Canada, where Cyrus was 
born. This John Weber died in Canada in 
1845, at the age of sixty-seven years. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Gayman, 
died about 1856, aged eighty-five years. 
Her father was brought to this country by 
his parents when he was four years old, 
their emigration being from Switzerland to 
Bucks county, Pennsylvania. Mr. Gayman 
was always closely identified with the 
Quakers, but was himself a Mennonite 
preacher. He reared a family of seven sons 
and nine daughters, all of whom had fami- 
lies of their own. He lived to the advanced 
age of ninety-six years, and at the time 
of his death was considered a wealthy man. 



having acquired a large amount of land and 
having by his own efforts cleared much of 
it. He was large of stature, and was unusu- 
ally strong physically. John Gayman, the 
great-grandfather of C3'rus Weber, when 
about ninety years of age, had a family re- 
union, when 305 of his descendants were 
entertained by him for about a week. The 
children of Mr. and Mrs. John Weber, 
grandparents of our subject, were six in 
number, three sons and three daughters, 
the sons being Joel, Peter and John. 

Mr. Weber's maternal grandfather, Mar- 
tin Baer, was born in Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, and descended from German 
ancestors who had emigrated to this coun- 
trj' from Switzerland. Martin Baer moved 
from Lancaster count}' to Kentuck)', but 
subsequentl}' returned to Penns}lvania and 
was married there. After his marriage he 
joined a colony of Mennonites that located 
in Canada. He died about the year 1845, 
aged sixt\- years. Of his family, which 
consisted of fourteen children, ten reached 
maturity, and of this number three are still 
living: John Baer, a Mennonite preacher 
of Canada, and now ninetj' years of age; 
George Baer, and Mrs. Weber, mother of 
our subject, living in Le Sueur county, this 
State. 

Peter Weber, the father of our subject, 
was born in 18 10, and married in Canada. 
In January, 1838, he moved his family to 
Erie county. New York, a few miles east of 
Buffalo. Here Mr. Weber worked at his 
trade, that of carpenter and millwright. In 
the summer of 1 849 he moved to Winne- 
bago county, Wisconsin, and in 1871 or '2 
came to Rock county, Minnesota, where he 
passed the remainder of his days and died, 
his death occurring in the fall of 1875. His 
widow resides at Ottawa, Le Sueur county, 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



365 



Minnesota. The children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Peter Wober are: Cyrus, the subject of 
this article; David, a millwright of Minne- 
apolis, is married and has a family; Martin, 
who died in infancy; Leah, who died at the 
age of five years; Mary Ann, who married 
.\aron Baer and has a son and daughter, 
their home being in Rock county, this State; 
Rachel, who died at the age of five years; 
Permelia, who married John N. Silver- 
thorn and died in 1894; George, a farmer 
of Rock county, is married and has seven 
children; Andrew, residing on the home 
farm with his mother; Martin, of Luverne, 
Minnesota, has a wife and four children; 
and Ella, wife of a Mr. Allen, of Fergus 
Falls, Minnesota, has four children. 

Cyrus Weber remained at home and 
worked with his father at the carpenter and 
millwright trades until he was twenty years 
old. Then, having become a proficient 
workman, he engaged in contracting on his 
own account, and continued in contract 
work for the next seven years. 

In September, i860, he enlisted at Ber- 
lin, Wisconsin, in the Third Wisconsin 
Battery. He participated in the battles of 
Crab Orchard, Kentucky, and Stone River, 
Chickamauga and Mission Ridge. He was 
final!}' discharged at Madison, Wisconsin, in 
August, 1865, having served all through the 
war, and during the whole of his service he 
was never taken prisoner or wounded, al- 
though his clothes were pierced with balls. 

In September, 1865, in company with 
his brother-in-law, J. N. Silverthorn, an- 
other veteran of the late war, he set out for 
Minnesota, and after a tedious drive reached 
Martin county, October 12. Here he at 
once located a homestead claim, and upon 
it he has since lived and carried on fanning 
operations. This place comprises lots 2, 3, 



5 and 6, section 31, township 103, and 
range 32, and is on the north side of Fox 
Lake. Some years after securing this tract 
of land he planted the trees which surround 
his residence. The house he now occupies 
was erected in 1888. 

Mr. Weber is a member of the G. A. R. 
and is a Republican in politics. He has 
never married, and lives a quiet life on his 
farm. 



>T^ACOB SANFORD.— This gentleman 

m is one of the respected farmers of 

A 1 Martin county, his home being on 

the southeast quarter, section 5, 

township 102, range 32. 

Mr. Sanford was born in the town of 
Berne, Albany county. New York, and is of 
Scotch and English extraction. Caleb San- 
ford, his grandfather, a native of Connecti- 
cut, was of Scotch origin, while grandfather 
Seth Fancher descended from the English. 
The latter served in the war of 181 2. The 
children of Caleb Sanford were Appollas, 
Amos, David, Mrs. Betsey Frohman and 
Mrs. Shaw. David was the father of our 
subject. He and his wife, whose maiden 
name was Nancy Fancher, moved from 
Berne, New York, to Schoharie county, that 
State, in 1836. Their children are Caleb, 
who married Maria Rivenburg, and has a 
family of three sons and three daughters, is 
engaged in farming at Catskill, New York ; 
Jacob, whose name appears at the head of 
this article ; Chancell, who married Malissa 
Clough and has one son, is a machinist and 
lives in Massachusetts ; Cynthia, wife of 
Stephen Dickinson, a farmer in Iowa, has 
three daughters and four sons ; Rufus, 
an engineer of Ann Arbor, Michigan, mar- 
ried Julia Ludlow and has two children. 



366 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



Jacob Sanford remained at home with his 
parents until he was twent}-one years of 
age. Before attaininj^ his majority he 
worked for a time in a brick yard and after- 
ward on a sail boat, turning a portion of his 
wages over to his father, who was afflicted 
with lameness. During the Me.xican war 
the subject of our sketch was emploj'ed in a 
cotton mill in Chicopee Falls, Massa- 
chusetts. Shortl}- after beginning work 
there he determined to join a company that 
was going to the seat of war. Owing, how- 
ever, to the fact that his employers required 
three weeks' notice prior to his quitting 
work, he was prevented from carrying out 
his purpose, the company having received 
its full quota of men and started for the 
scene of action before he was able to get a 
release. 

Mr. Sanford remained in .Massachusetts 
until -April. 1855. when he came west to 
Beaver Dam, Dodge count), Wisconsin, 
where he rented and operated a farm for 
two years. He then moved to German- 
town, Juneau county, that State, and en- 
gaged in shingle-making, rafting logs and 
general work. October 9, 1S58, he mo\ed 
to Buffalo county, Wisconsin, and rented a 
farm of eighty acres, which, three years 
later, he purchased, and to which he soon 
afterward added fortj' acres, making a fine 
farm of 120 acres. In March, 1879, Mr. 
Sanford visited Martin county, Minnesota, 
and looked carefully over the territory. He 
determinctl tu locate here, and, placing his 
family in a wagon, dro\e through. arri\ing 
on the claim which he now occupies, .\pril 
25 of the same year. This claim, the loca- 
tion of which is stated above, was railroad 
land, and Mr. Sanford paid $8 an acre for 
it. All the improvements up^on it have been 
placed here by him. 



Mr. Sanford was married May 13, 185 1, 
at Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts, to Miss 
Jane Giddings. Mrs. Sanford was born 
September 8, 1834. Her father, John Gid- 
dings, a farmer, was born March 24, 17S3, 
and died in Massachusetts in 1855. Her 
mother, whose maiden name was Mary 
Shaw, was born May 4, 1793, and died in 
October, 1 869. Mr. and Mrs. John Gid- 
dings had eight daughters and three sons. 
The children of Mr. and Mrs. Sanford are 
as follows: Nettie, born June 3, 1853, is the 
wife of Peter Bennett and has three sons 
and two daughters; Maria, born December 
9, 1857, is the wife of DeWitt Madison 
Reynolds, a furniture dealer of Sherburne, 
and has one child; Julia, born February 3, 
1861, is the wife of T. L. Records; Ella, 
born .August 17, 1863, is the wife of Jo- 
seph Berg, of Omaha, Nebraska, and has 
three daughters and two sons; John, born 
June 26, 1867, is a farmer of Martin county; 
Albert Welcome, born April 3, 1869, has a 
half interest in the home farm and is giving 
his attention to its cultivation; and Otillie, 
born June 26, 1872, is at present emploj'ed 
on the Sherburne .Advance. 

Politically, Mr. Sanford is a Republican. 
Although having nearly reached his "three- 
score years and ten " he is still an active 
man. This is owing largely to his temper- 
ate habits. He is highly respected in his 
communitj' and is one of the leading citi- 
zens of Manyaska township. 



fi 



ber 



KEXTISS D. WORTHLEY, one of 
the substantial farmers of the vicin- 
ity of Sherburne, Minnesota, was 
born near Bangor, Maine, Novem- 
20, 1850, son of Conrad Cokely and 



Esther Ann (Bradbury) Worthlej-. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



367 



But little is known of the ancestry of 
this gentleman. One of his uncles, William 
Worthley, was a ship carpenter, and married 
and lived in Maine. His father, Conrad 
Cokely Worthley, was born in Maine in 
October, 1801, and died in De Kalb county, 
Illinois, September 29, 1877; his mother was 
born October 11, 1804, and died May 11, 
1884. They had a family of si.x children, 
all of whom grew up to occupy honorable 
and useful positions in life, their names being 
as follows: Arvida Hefford, Elmira, Arthur, 
Helen, Albert Holton and Prentiss D. 

When he was five years of age, Prentiss 
D. Worthley removed with his parents to 
Michigan City, Indiana, and two years later 
to Porter county, that State. After a resi- 
dence of twelve years in Porter county, he 
went to McHenry county, Illinois, and in 
the spring of 1870, to De Kalb county, same 
State, locating in Kingston township. He 
was the first of the family to take up his 
abode in De Kalb county. There he farmed 
140 acres of land, and continued to reside 
until September, 1885, when he came to 
Minnesota. At that time he purchased in 
Martin county the northeast quarter of sec- 
tion 31, township 102, range 32, and in 1892 
bought the northwest quarter of section 32, 
same township and range, and now has a 
fine farm of 320 acres. He built his hand- 
some residence shortly after his arrival, and 
his large barns in 1892. 

Mr. Worthley was married December 10, 
1878, to Amelia Uplinger, daughter of John 
and Elizabeth (Wood) Uplinger She was 
born in Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, April 
8. 1857, and her parents were also natives 
of that county. Her father was born No- 
vember 12, 1 8 19; moved to Kingston, Illi- 
nois, in 1866, and located on a farm of 240 
acres near town, where he lived until 1882, 



when he moved into Kingston; and he died 
there October 6, 1893. Her mother, born 
June 2, 1823, is still living at Kingston. 
They were married July 31, 1840, and the 
names of their children, in order of birth, 
are: Mary, born May 27, 1843; Jacob, 
February 17, 1845; Susan, September 25, 
1846; Charles, April 15, 1848; Sarah, May 
25, 1850; John, July 15, i852;Elmina, June 
25, 1854, died January 7, 1880; Amelia, 
April 18, 1857; Franklin, September 10, 
1859; Margaret, August 27, 1861 ; Elizabeth, 
April 17, 1863; Amanda, October 27, 1865; 
Martha, June 30, 1868. The children of 
Mr. and Mrs. Worthley are: Ralph, born 
October 26, 1879; Charlie, April 15, 1886; 
and Alvin Franklin, April 18, 1894. 

In politics, Mr. Worthley is a Republi- 
can. Both he and his wife are members of 
the Lake Belt Congregational Church, atid 
they are among the most highly respected 
people of their community. 



(D 



RS. JOHN HENRY TER- 
H U R N E, who since the pio- 
neer days has resided in Fari- 
bault county, was born in the 
kingdom of Prussia, Germany, September 
28, 1838, on a farm belonging to her par- 
ents, William and Adelaide Rauenhorst. 
They also were natives of Prussia, and in 
1846 sailed from the Fatherland, reaching 
New York after a voyage of six weeks upon 
the bosom of the Atlantic. They did not 
linger on Manhattan island but went at once 
to Wisconsin by way of the Hudson river 
and the Erie canal. The father located in 
Racine county, in the midst of a dense tim- 
ber tract, and erected a log cabin and cut 
down the trees that the sun might shine 
upon thtj little pioneer home. When the 



-,6S 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



wild flowers began to send forth their tiny 
blossoms in the spring he began to prepare 
for his first crop, and the plowing and plant- 
ing resulted in bounteous harvests of golden 
grain. 

An interesting event in the h\es of these 
[lioneer people was the marriage of the 
flaughter of the household, W'ilhelmina, 
who on the 25th of August, 1857, became 
wife of John Henry Terhurne. the wedding 
ceremony being performed by Rev. Father 
^^'issbauer, of Burlington, Wisconsin. Mr. 
Terhurne was born in Prussia, September 
12, 1830, and in 1852, bidding good-by to 
friends and country, he sailed for America, 
locating in Wisconsin, where he became 
acquainted with and married Miss Rauen- 
horst. 

The other members of her father's fam- 
ily are as follows: Henr\' is a farmer of 
Iowa; Bernard resides on the old famih- 
homestead in the Badger State; Theodore 
is a farmer of Barber township, Faribault 
county; Herman follows agricultural pur- 
suits in the same township; Mrs. Terhurne 
is the next younger; and Henrietta, who 
completed the family, w as born in i S30 
and died in November, 1 884, her remains 
being interred in the burying-ground of St. 
Mar3's church. She was the wife of Bern- 
ard Stevemer, who resides in Barber town- 
ship. In the spring of 1857 Mr. Henry 
Terhurne and his wife removed to Barber 
township. The latter erected a log house, 
in which his famih- lived for some time in 
the primitive style of the frontier. As the 
family circle was increased their home was 
enlarged. Mr. Terhurne devoted himself to 
the cultivation of his land and placed 240 
acres under a high state of cultivation. 
After ten years he sold his first purchase and 
bought 320 acres, on which he resided until 



his removal to Easton in 1873. Previous to 
this time he conducted a small mercantile 
establishment at Wissner's Grove, and on 
coming to Easton Mr. Terhurne and Adam 
Scheid erected a modern store and opened a 
fine line of general merchandise. This was 
the first store of the place, but it soon grew 
in j)opularity and received a good trade from 
the smrounding country. Mr. Terhurne did 
much toward making the new settlers wel- 
come and in aiding them to secure homes. 
He was a popular man, highly esteemed for 
his excellencies of character, and his friends 
were man\-. 

During the late war he manifested his 
lovalty to his adopted country by respond- 
ing to the President's call for troops, and on 
the 1 I th of November, 1 864, he became a 
member of Company D, First Regiment of 
Minnesota Heav\- Artillerj-. He was honor- 
ably discharged at Nashville, Tennessee, 
September 27, 1865, and he returned home 
with the consciousness of duty well done, 
for he was alwa_\s found at his post, faith- 
fully defending the old flag and the cause it 
represented. Public-spirited and progres- 
sive, he was acti\'ely interested in all that 
pertained to the welfare of this community 
and its upbuilding. In business dealing he 
was strictly honorable and straightforward, 
and a pleasant, genial manner won him many 
friends. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Terhurne were born 
ten children, si.K sons and four daugh- 
ters: John William, born September 6, 
1858, has for a number of years con- 
ducted a saloon in the thriving village 
of Easton; John Herman, born August 16, 
i860, is a hardware merchant and grain- 
buyer of Easton; Anna Maria, born January 
21, 1862, was married April 11, 1879, in 
Easton. to Cicorge Smith, an agriculturist of 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



369 



Minnesota Lake township; John Bernhard, 
born December 2 I, 1.S63, is a farmer of Lac- 
qui-parle county, Minnesota; Anna Eliza- 
beth, born September 26, 1866, is the wife 
of John Pope, of Easton; John George, born 
March 16, 1S68, is hving in the same place; 
Maria Sophia, born July 15, 1870, is the 
wife of Charles Probart, a telegraph line re- 
pairer, of Perr}-, Iowa; John Henry, born 
December 23, 1872, and John Theodore, 
born March 10, 1S76, are at home; Minnie 
Catherine, born June 5, 1878, died March 
15, 1892, and was buried in St. Mary's 
cemetery by the side of her father. She 
possessed considerable musical abilit\-, had 
a very good voice and was a member of the. 
choir of St. Mary's Church. She had a 
sunny disposition, was loving and consider- 
ate, and her death proved an irreparable loss 
to her mother and the other members of the 
family, also to many of her dear companions. 
Mr. Terhurne continued his business in- 
terests in Easton until 1884, and was a 
prominent and influential citizen of the 
community. On the 1 8th of December of 
that year he departed this life, and now lies 
sleeping in St. Mary's cemetery, — the ground 
for which was donated by him. His absence 
is keenly felt by wife and children, and 
only his likeness looks down from the wall 
of the pleasant home, which was erected by 
him and of which he was once the head, the 
loving counselor and the tender guide. His 
widow still survives him and is yet living in 
Easton. Her influence is strongly e.xerted 
for the best interests of the town, and all 
who know her love and revere her. She 
went through the experiences of pioneer life 
and has played an important part in produc- 
ing the atmosphere of culture and refine- 
ment which pervades the pleasant little \il- 
lagc in which she makes her home. 



HNDREW CARLSON.— In the days 
when living in Martin county was 
not a pleasure but a hardship on 
account of the unsettled condition 
of the country, this being a frontier 
locality, Mr. Carlson came to Lake Fre- 
mont township. He has since been 
identified with its best interests and is ac- 
counted a progressive and valued citizen. 

A native of Sweden, — of Scarsboro 
Land,- — he was born on the 24th of January, 
1836, and is a son of Carl Anderson, who 
was born in the same country, in November, 
1806. Having arrived at years of maturity 
he married Annie Johnson, who was born 
January i, 1807. The father never came to 
America, but died in the land of his birth 
on the 31st of March, 1861. In the family 
were the follosving children: Andrew, of this 
sketch; John, who was born May 3, 1839, 
and came to America, where he married. 
His wife died leaving two children, Selma 
and Frank. He is now engaged in farming 
in Martin county. Augustus, born Novem- 
ber, 1843, married Louisa Larson, and is 
now living in Kansas City, Missouri, his 
business being railroading. His children 
are Betsy, Eugenia, Hilda, Theresa, Frank, 
Walter and Hening. Frederick, who was 
born in November, 1847, is a cook and is 
now living in Florida. Fredrica, born 
March 3, 1850, was married October 26, 
1873, to Alfred Wenberg, and they had nine 
children. Julia Luella, the eldest, born 
July 31, 1875, died October 18, 1877; Mar- 
tin William, born June 16, 1877, died on 
the 6th of October following; Joseph Rich- 
ard, born July 28, 1878; Louisa Lorina, 
born October 6, 1880, died November 20, 
1880; Elmer Cleander, born April 3, !882, 
died on the 24th of May of the same jear; 
Oscar Leonard, born September 2, 1884, 



7,1° 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



died August 2i, 1885; Maud Eugenia, born 
August 2, 1887; Adolph Fritz, bom Feb- 
ruary 19, 1890; Ruth Loretta, born Feb- 
ruary 20, 1892. Mr. Wenberg died Novem- 
ber 8, 1892, and his widow is now living on 
a farm. 

The first of this family to come to 
America was John Carlson, the date of his 
emigration being 1863, at which time he 
located in Rockford, Illinois. Two j^ears 
later the mother with her children, Andrew, 
Frederick and Fredrica, came to the United 
States, landing in New York on the 2Sth of 
June, 1865. They were so unfortunate as 
to fall into the hands of some sharpers in 
New York, who robbed them of nearly all 
their money, and this kept them on the 
Atlantic coast for three months, as they 
had not the funds necessary to continue 
their journey. John then sent them 
some money and they came on through 
to Chicago, where they were met by the 
son already here. They had intended 
to locate in Iowa, but could find no 
land there to suit them, and finallj- they 
came to the Gopher State. Here the 
mother lived to a ripe old age, and had the 
satisfaction of seeing her children well set- 
tled in life. Her death occurred August 4, 
1893, and was mourned by all who knew 
her. 

For three years after his arrival in this 
country Andrew Carlson worked at what- 
ever he could find to do that would yield him 
an honest living, and thus he obtained a 
start in life. In May, 1869, he came to 
Martin county and located the homestead 
where ho now lives. He built a sod house 
and moved his family into it the following 
September. The title to this tract was re- 
ceived April 5, 1876, and the farm com- 
prised 120 acres of land. In 1886 he pur- 



chased forty acres additional, the deed being 
executed May 25, 1891, and thus he obtained 
possession of the entire quarter section. 
February 17, 1889, he purchased eighty 
acres of land in section 12, and November 
26, 1890, another eighty acres on section 
23. Of this tract about si.xty acres is slough 
land, and 135 acres is under the plow, being 
very highly cultivated. The owner is suc- 
cessfully engaged in stock-raising, and now 
has twenty-eight head of hogs, twenty-four 
head of cattle and ten horses. In 1890 he 
erected a large barn, and his outbuildings 
are models of convenience, splendidly adapted 
to the use for which they are intended. In 
the summer of 1893 was erected a fine resi- 
dence, one of the most pleasant country 
homes of Martin county, and this he has 
been enabled to supply with all the neces- 
saries and many of the luxuries of life. 

On the 27th of December, 1861, Mr. 
Carlson was joined in wedlock with Miss 
Carrie Johnson, daughter of John and Ber- 
tha Johnson and a native of Sweden, born 
January 4, 1832. By this marriage have 
been born the following children: Emma 
Charlotta, who was born August 8, 1862, 
and died June 18, 1865; Augusta Christina, 
who was born January 8, 1865, and died on 
the 8th of June of that year; Emma Char- 
lotta, who was born November 8, 1866, was 
married January 24, 1890, to John Freder- 
ick Nelson, and they are now living in Mar- 
tin county with their little family. Alma, 
who was born January 27, 1891, died at the 
age of three weeks; Oscar Leonard, born 
February 17, 1892, and Voctor Robert, 
born October 23, 1894, are with their par- 
ents. Matilda Josephine, born June 21. 
1870, was married November 16, 1891, to 
Henry Dirl, and they are living in Fair- 
mont, Minnesota. Their children are Es- 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



37' 



ther Lena, who was born June 24, 1S92, 
and Roy Arthur, born March 17, 1894. Ida 
Sophia, born June i, 1872, and Frank 
Samuel Edwin, born September 17, 1874, 
are still with their father. Mrs. Carlson 
died on the 8th of February, 1895, after a 
short illness, and her remains were interred 
in the Swedish cemetery in Lake Fremont 
township. 

Mr. Carlson is a member of the Lu- 
theran church, and in his political views is a 
Republican. ?ie is at present serving as 
School Director, and has filled all the town- 
ship offices, discharging his duties with a 
promptness and fidelity that has won him 
high commendation. Probably no pioneer 
settler of Martin county presents a better 
example of the self-made man than does 
Mr. Carlson. He had practically nothing 
when he built his sod house a quarter of a 
century ago, and to-day he is recognized as 
one of the most substantial farmers in the 
county, and his buildings and surroundings 
are of the best. He has had to contend 
with difficulties which would have over- 
powered a man of less resolute purpose and 
determination, but the obstacles he has en- 
countered have seemed to serve as an im- 
petus for renewed effort, and he has labored 
the more industriously and earnestly. Work- 
ing his way steadily upward he has achieved 
the success for which he was striving and is 
now the possessor of a comfortable compe- 
tence. 



t^^ANIEL McCARTIN, a venerable 
I I citizen residing on a farm near 
/^^J Sherburne, Minnesota, was born in 
count)- Down, Ireland, December 
24, 1814, or, about that year, son of John 
and Mar\' ^O'Harei .McCartin. He is the 



youngest of a large family, the other mem- 
bers being as follows: Mrs. Catharine 
Fanning, Hugh, James, Mrs. Mary McCaf- 
frey, John, Mrs. Rose McGowan, Antony, 
Patrick and Edward. Mr. McCartin's 
parents spent their lives and died on the 
Emerald Isle. Their son John was the first 
of the family to emigrate to America. He 
was a baker by trade, and settled in Fort 
Wayne, Indiana, about the year 1831. 
Antony, a shoemaker, was the next to emi- 
grate, his location being Troy, New York, 
where he died soon after his arrival. 

Daniel McCartin, accompanied by his 
brother Patrick, landed in New York, in 
May, 1866. Two years later Patrick went 
back to Ireland, and died soon after. Dan- 
iel came west immediately after his arrival 
in New York, and for two years and a half 
worked for a man by the name of Oliver 
Jones, in Fillmore county, Minnesota, re- 
ceiving $20 per month. At the end of that 
time he went to Todd county, this State, 
and located a claim of 160 acres. This 
land was covered with a growth of small, 
scrubby timber, and did not altogether 
please him, but he went back to Fillmore 
county with the intention of returning to it, 
and in due time started. On going, he 
thought to pass through Martin county and 
visit the Kidds and Rooneys, whom he had 
known in Ireland; and when he reached 
Martin county he found much vacant land, 
and was so well pleased with the country 
that he determined to abandon his Todd- 
county claim and locate here. This was in 
May, 1 87 1. He has lived here ever since, 
and has never regretted his choice of lo- 
cation. He selected the southeast quarter 
of section 22, Fox Lake township, and in 
time secured title to the same. In 1889, an 
additional eighty acres lying in section 26, 



372 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



and purchased of George Wohlheter, was 
added to the place. The house in which 
Mr. McCartin now resides was moved here 
from Twin Lakes. Of the 240 acres in the 
farm, 180 are under cultivation, and at pres- 
ent the place is stocked as follows: 34 hogs, 
20 cattle and 14 horses. 

Mr. McCartin was first married to Betty 
Flannagan, the children of this marriage 
being Edward, John and Daniel. The 
eldest son, Edward, followed the sea. His 
vessel touched at Pensacola and other 
American ports, and the last heard of him 
was at Gloucester, Massachusetts, where he 
was engaged in the fisheries. His corres- 
pondence, which had always been regular, 
ceased suddenly, and it is supposed he went 
down off the Massachusetts coast. John, 
the second son, was born in November, 1854. 
He is his father's stand-by, and one of the 
leading farmers of Martin county, he having 
charge of the home place. Daniel, born in 
December, 1856, married Annie Doyle, and 
is now living at Fergus Falls, Minnesota, 
his children being Mary, Alice, Daniel 
Henry, Lewis Edward, and Sadie. The two 
younger sons, John and Daniel, joined their 
father in America in 1866. Mr. McCartin's 
second and present wife was Ellen O'Neil, 
and their children are Mary, Ellen and Cath- 
arine Ann, all born in Ireland. When Mr. 
McCartin came to America he left his fam- 
ily in Ireland; and, the means of communi- 
cation being not as good in those days as 
now, he bought tickets and forwarded 
them to his daughters. The first he sent 
were never received; so he sent again, and, 
in the latter part of 1883, his daughters 
landed safely in Minnesota. Then, in 1885, 
Mrs. McCartin joined her husband here, and 
thus the family that had been so long sepa- 
ratc<l were happily united. In addition to 



the above named children, Mr. McCartin 
has an adopted son, Frank McCartin, whom 
he took from the Sister's Home in Minne- 
sota, the date of his birth being July 17, 
1882. 

Possibly no settler in this broad State 
has had a more discouraging experience than 
has Mr. McCartin. He not only suffered 
from the four-3'ear plague of grasshoppers, 
but he also has had losses from fire and 
cyclone. About the time he got nicely 
fi.xed, — a large rick of wheat, a barn, stock, 
etc., — a fire swept over all and left him 
without anything except his land. This fire 
was lighted by one Seymore, and, although 
Mr. McCartin obtained judgment against his 
property to the amount of his loss, he never 
succeeded in recovering a cent. He is now, 
after many privations and hardships, com- 
fortably well off himself, sees his children in 
a fair way to prosperity, and is honored and 
respected by all who know him. That he 
is held in high esteem is shown by the fact 
that his neighbors, irrespective of party or 
church, have given him office in the town, 
as a member of the Township Board. He 
is now about eighty years old, is remarka- 
bly well preserved in body, and his mind is 
perfectly clear. The wish of his numerous 
friends is that he may live many years to 
come. 



>T^OSEPH M. NYE is Superintendent 
■ of Schools of Faribault county, and 
/• J the educational interests of this sec- 
tion of the State have been greatly 
advanced through his untiring and capable 
efforts in their behalf. Well fitted for this 
responsible position, his fidelity to duty and 
the confidence reposed in him by his fellow 
townsmen was demonstrated by his re-elec- 



PARIBAULT, martin, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



373 



tion. He makes his home in Wells, which 
has been his place of residence since 1871. 

A native of the province of Quebec, Can- 
ada, he was born November 29, 1843, and 
is a son of David T. R. and Emily B. (Mun- 
son) Nye. The father was born in St. Al- 
bans, Vermont, and was a son of Rev. Jon- 
athan Nye, one of the first ministers of the 
gospel at St. Albans and a high Mason. In 
Wareham, New Hampshire, David T. R. 
Nye was reared and educated, and after at- 
taining to years of maturity made his home 
chiefly in Philipsburg, Province of Quebec. 
He served as Colonel of militia and was a 
prominent member of the Episcopal Church, 
in which he held office. After a long and 
well-spent life he passed away, at the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-three, and his wife was 
called to the home beyond at the age of 
eighty-one. In their family were four chil- 
dren, as follows: George T. , who died in 
Newbern, North Carolina, while in the serv- 
ice of the Government; Mary, wife of 
George S. Jones of Philipsburg, Canada; Jo- 
seph M. , the subject of this review; and 
Jessie M. , who died at the age of eleven 
years. 

The gentleman whose name introduces 
this sketch received an academic education, 
and at the age of sixteen left home to make 
his own way in the world. He has since 
been dependent upon his own resources, so 
that whatever success has come to him is 
due to his own efforts. He was first em- 
ployed as telegraph operator at Berthier, on 
the St. Lawrence river below Montreal, 
then went to Rutland, Vermont, and a year 
later engaged as a military telegraph opera- 
tor at Washington. He later served in the 
same capacity at Hilton Head, South Caro- 
lina, and at Fort Pulaski, Georgia, after 
which he returned to Montreal and was em- 



ployed by the Grand Trunk Railroad for one 
year. Mr. Nye, on again coming to the United 
States, located in New York, where he was 
employed in the Stock E.xchange for three 
years, coming thence to the West and tak- 
ing up his residence in La Crosse, Wiscon- 
sin, where he was manager of the erection 
of the telegraph line for the Southern Min- 
nesota Railroad Company, the line to extend 
from La Crosse to Winnebago City, Minne- 
sota. From 1868 to 1871 he held the 
position of train dispatcher for that division, 
with headquarters at La Crosse, after which 
he spent a half year in Winnebago City, two 
years at Wells and two years at Hokah, in 
the same capacity. Mr. Nye was much 
pleased with Wells, and on leaving Hokah 
returned to this city, where he engaged in 
the banking business and in merchandising 
for eighteen months. Subsequently he 
established a drug store, which he con- 
ducted from 1879 until 1893, when he sold 
out. Since the ist of January of the latter 
year he has served as County Superintend- 
ent of Schools for Faribault county, and 
under his able leadership and guidance the 
standard of the schools has been greatly 
raised, and the county may well be proud 
of her educational facilities. 

On the 24th of April, 1871, in Philips- 
burg, Canada, Mr. Nye was joined in wed- 
lock with Miss Esther Roberts, an educated 
and refined lady, a daughter of Chester and 
Hannah (Russell) Roberts. Mr. and Mrs. 
Nye have three children: Jessie M. , a highl\- 
honored teacher in Wells; Charles M., also 
a successful teacher, and Frank C, who is 
a student in the high school. 
j In politics Mr. Nye is now a supporter 
J of Republicanism. He was first elected to 
office on the Democratic ticket and after- 
ward on an independent ticket, by a major- 



374 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



ity of 346. He has served as Town Clerk, 
has been a member and president of the 
Village Council and of the School Board. 
He holds membership in Lodge No. 87, F. 
& A. M., in which he is now serving as Sec- 
retar)-; and also belongs to Lodge No. 39, 
A. O. U. W. , of which order he is Past 
Grand Master of the State, while in the 
Knights of Pythias he is Past Chancellor. 



>^OHN STEPHEN SCHULEIN, a 
■ well-known and much respected 
/• 1 farmer residing near Welcome, Min- 
nesota, dates his birth in Bavaria, 
Germany, September 11, 1842. He is a 
son of George and Barbara (Nasser) Schulein. 

George Schulein, also a native of Ger- 
many, was born in October, 1 8 1 2. He came 
to America in 1881 and settled in Freeborn 
county, Minnesota, where he still lives. The 
mother of John S. died in April, 1853, aged 
forty-one years. They had four children, 
namely: John S., whose name heads this 
article; Barbara, who married G. Reim, a 
farmer of Freeborn county, Minnesota; Mar- 
garet, wife of Christian Virgens, a farmer of 
Martin county; and Eva, wife of Michael 
Nasser. After the mother of these children 
died, Mr. Schulein was married again. He 
had no children by his second wife, and it 
was shortly after her death that he came to 
America. 

The subject of our sketch was the first of 
the Schulein family to come to the New 
World. He landed in New York in October, 
1869, and immediately came west to Free- 
born count)', Minnesota, where he worked 
for wages at railroading, farming, and what- 
ever he could find to do. May 1, 1871, he 
came to Martin county and located his pres- 
ent farm, the north half of the northeast 



quarter, section 26, Fox Lake township. 
Later he took the south half of the same 
quarter, under the homestead law, and finally 
secured title to the entire quarter. In May, 
1888, he bought an additional 120 acres 
from the railroad company, thus making 280 
acres all told. Of this tract i 50 acres are 
under cultivation. The fine grove which 
surrounds the house and which is an attrac- 
tive feature of the place, was set out in 1872. 
Mr. Schulein's farm is stocked as follows: 
Eighty head of hogs, thirty of cattle, and 
nine of horses. 

November 14, 1869, Mr. Schulein was 
married, in Germany, to Mary Barkhard, 
and they have children as follows: Eva, 
born November 13, 1870, was married to 
Herrman Gottschling, November 13, 1894; 
George, born December 17, 1872; John, 
born April 18, 1875, is now attending college 
at Albert Lea; William, born April 3, 1878; 
Amelia, January 12, 1881; Rosina, January 
18, 1885; Edwin, February 23, 1889; and 
Harry, January 8, 1892. 

After years of honest and arduous toil, 
Mr. Schulein has succeeded in acquiring a 
competency and in surrounding himself and 
family with all the comforts of life. He is 
a member of the Lutheran Church at Wel- 
come, and he and his family are among the 
most highly esteemed people of their com- 
munity. 



eHILIP WOHLHUTER devotes his 
time and energies to farming on 
section 24, Fox Lake township, 
Martin county, where he owns 240 
acres of valuable land. His fine farm, neat 
and thrifty in appearance, denotes his care- 
ful supervision and tells to the passer-by of 
the busy life of the owner. 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, \V A TON WAX AND JACKSON. 



375 



Mr. Wohlhuter was born on the 5th of 
February, 1856, in Alsace, Germany, and is 
a son of Valentine and Eva (Wohlhuter) 
Wohlhuter. The paternal grandfather, 
Michael Wohlhuter, had a family of six chil- 
dren, namely: Mae, Lawrence, Valentine, 
Kate, George and Michael. The father, 
Valentine Wohlhuter, was born in Germany, 
November 10, 1823, and after arriving at 
years of maturity was married, on the lOth 
of October, 1848, to Miss Eva, daughter of 
Philip Wohlhuter, who, though of the same 
name, was not a relative. The latter had 
a family of six children, — Philip, Lena, 
Paul, Sarah, Eva and Valentine. The 
mother was born December 23, 1819, and 
died on the 2d of January, 1885. Ere the 
parents left their native land four children 
were born to them, as follows: Valentine, 
who was born August 18, 1849, and is now 
living in Fairmont, Minnesota; Eva, wife of 
F. Barge, also of Fairmont; Philip; and 
Frederick, who was born January 18, 1862, 
and is now living in Kingsboro county, 
South Dakota, where he is acting as agent 
for C. L. Coleman, the extensive lumber- 
man. He married Lily Carrot, and they 
have two children, Eva and Albert. 

The first of the family to seek a home 
beyond the Atlantic was the eldest son, who 
in 1868 sailed for the United States. Re- 
porting favorably concerning this country, 
the following year the parents, accompanied 
by Philip, sailed from Havre, France, reach- 
ing New York on the 2d of April. They 
continued their journey across the country 
to Freeborn county, Minnesota, where the 
father engaged in farming until 1871. On 
the 29th of September of that year he ar- 
rived in Martin county and secured a home- 
stead, comprising the south half of the 
northwest quarter of section 24, Fox Lake 



township, where he has since lived, being 
now an inmate of the home of his son 
Philip, who in his father's declining years 
now repays him in part for the care which 
he received in his youth. 

Philip Wohlhuter was a lad of only ten 
summers when he sought a home in Amer- 
ica, and with his parents he lived until after 
he had reached man's estate. He made his 
first purchase of land in 1885, becoming 
owner of eighty acres, — the west half of the 
northeast quarter of section 24, Fox Lake 
township. This he at once began to culti- 
vate and improve, and as his financial re- 
sources increased he added to the first an- 
other eighty acres, buying the other in 1890. 
He is now the owner of 240 acres, of which 
I 50 acres is broken, and, highly cultivated, 
yields to the owner a golden tribute in re- 
turn for the care and cultivation he bestows 
upon it. There are a beautiful grove of two 
acres and neat and well-kept buildings, all 
of which go to make this one of the valuable 
farms of the neighborhood. In addition to 
the cultivation of grain he also engages in 
stock-raising to some extent, and now has 
eight horses, twenty-seven head of cattle 
and thirty-six hogs. 

The lady who bears the name and graces 
the home of Mr. Wohlhuter was in her 
maidenhood Miss Agnes Gottschling, daugh- 
ter of August and Christina (Schultz) Gott- 
schling. She was born October 26, 1873, 
and the marriage was celebrated November 
27, 1 89 1. Their children are Arthur Her- 
mann Philip, born November i, 1892, and 
Alvina Mary, born February 12, 1894. 

The parents hold membership in the 
Lutheran church. Mr. Wohlhuter was con- 
firmed in the church then located at Fox 
Lake, December 10, 1876, by Rev. Ernst 
Giesel, and his wife was confirmed in Wei- 



37^ 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



come, in the spring of 1889, by Rev. C. G. 
Eisenberg. In politics he is a stalwart ad- 
vocate of Republican principles, and uses 
his influence and support to insure the suc- 
cess and promote the growth of the party. 
At this writing, in the spring of 1895, he is 
serving as a member of the Town Board of 
Supervisors, and was recently Constable. 
Although his life has been quietly passed he 
has lived to merit the esteem of those with 
whom he is brought in contact, and his 
friends in the commnnity are many. 



a 



HRISTOPHER LUEDAMAN, a 
prosperous and respected farmer 
residing near Welcome, Minne- 
sota, was born in Hanover, Ger- 
many, December 31, 1841, son of John and 
Lena (Jergens) Luedaman. The father was 
a carpenter by trade and died in Germany 
in 1845. He was twice married. His first 
wife was Lena Jergens, who died leaving 
three children, Henry, Christopher and 
Peter. The children by his second wife, 
whose maiden name was Lucretia Beakman, 
were as follows: Mary, wife of Henr}' 
Bruins; Lena, deceased, who was the wife 
of Henry Drewes; Katy, wife of Christo- 
pher Huelot; and Caroline, who married 
Henry Berkman, is also deceased. 

Christopher Luedaman left his native 
land April 4, 1869, and landed in New York 
on the 17th of that month, from there coming 
directly we.st to Preston, Fillmore county, 
Minnesota, where the Drewes family, his 
cousins, lived. In July of the .same year, 
in compan\' with Messrs. Hermann Black 
and Heinrich Drewes, he came to Martin 
county and located his homestead, — the east 
half of the southeast quarter, section 10, 
Fox Lake township. He secured title to 



this tract of land April 21, 1877. In the 
summer of 1S69 he put up a small house on 
his claim, and after doing so returned to 
Fillmore county and worked for wages si.x 
months. Then he came back to his land 
in Martin county and has resided on it ever 
since, devoting his earnest efforts to its cul- 
tivation and improvement. In 1884 he 
bought forty acres adjoining it on the north, 
and now has 120 acres, sixty of which are 
under cultivation. That same year, 1884, 
he built his present residence. His grove 
was set out in 1870. 

Mr. Luedaman was married June 1 5, 
1879, to Katy Muehler, daughter of Henry 
and Mary (Drewes) Muehler. She came tc 
this country when a child, with the Drewes 
family. Her married life covered only a 
few years, her untimely death occurring April 
22, 1884, and she left two children: Mary 
Lena, born June 25, 1880; and Anna Mary, 
March 8, 1882. June 27, 1884, Mr. Lueda- 
man married Mrs. Dora Koukal, widow of 
John Koukal. Her maiden name was Peter- 
son, she being a daughter of John and Mary 
(Womdraw) Peterson. Her marriage to 
Mr. Koukal occurred in November, 1872, 
and by him she had two children: Will- 
iam, born August 7, 1875; and Anna, born 
March 31, 1877. She and Mr. Luedaman 
have one child, Sophia Wilhelmina, born 
April 17, 1885. 

Mr. Luedaman united with the Lutheran 
Church when cjuite j'oung, and still worships 
with this denomination. 



EEINRICH DREWES, who is en- 
gaged in farming near Welcome, 
Minnesota, is another one of the 
thrifty German settlers of Martin 
countv. He was born in Hanover, Ger- 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



379 



many, September 7, 1846, a son of John and 
Mary (Hendricks) Drewes, the other mem- 
bers of the family being Katrina, deceased 
wife of Henry Kruse, who left two children, 
Mary and Peter; and Hermann, who died in 
Chicago, Illinois. Heinrich and Hermann 
were the only ones of the family that came 
to America. 

The subject of our sketch and his friend, 
Hermann C. Black, a respected citizen of 
Martin county, were born in the same year, 
grew up together, and when they reached 
manhood emigrated to this country in order 
to avoid serving for a term of years in the 
German army. Landing in New York, they 
secured positions as gardeners in that city, 
and subsequently came west to Minnesota, 
first locating in Fillmore county and later 
coming to Martin county. Here they located 
adjoining homesteads, Mr. Drewes' land 
being the south half of the northwest quarter 
of section 2, Fo.\ Lake township. Later he 
bought an additional eighty acres, and now 
has 160 acres in one body, and here he is 
successfully carrying on farming and stock- 
raising. 

Mr. Drewes was married March 7, 1875, 
to Caroline Kleimenhagen, daughter of Jacob 
and Mary (Heimel) Kleimenhagen. Her 
father was born November 3, 18 16, and died 
February 22, 1891, and her mother, born 
November 9, 1824, died March 12, 1871. 
Mrs. Drewes was their second child, the 
date of her birth being January 2, 1849. 
Mr. and Mrs. Drewes have children as fol- 
lows: Henry Hermann, born Septemer 29, 
1875; Ida Wilhelmina, October 4, 1876; 
Lydia Selma, January 24, 1878; William 
Bernhardt, July i, 1881; Hannah Mary, 
December 28, 1882; Alvin Ctesar, October 

18, 1884; and Elmore Richard, August 

19, 1 888. 

19 



Mr. Drewes united with the Evangelical 
Church in Fillmore county, and transferred 
his membership to Martin county on the 
erection of a church here. 



^V^ETER KREMER has probably 
1 m been the most important factor in 
^ the upbuilding of Minnesota Lake, 

an honored pioneer of southern 
Minnesota and a business man whose enter- 
prising efforts have largely promoted the 
material prosperity of this section of the 
State. A native of France, he was born in 
Lorraine, not far from the beautiful city of 
Metz, on the 7th of March, 1839, and ac- 
quired his education in the common and pa- 
rochial schools of Alden, Erie county. New 
York, and in the Catholic Institute in Lan- 
caster, of the same county. The days of 
his boyhood and youth were passed in his 
parents' home, and he became familiar with 
all the duties of farm life. He followed the 
fortunes of his father until 1874, at \\hich 
time he became a resident of Minnesota 
Lake, which was incorporated in 1872. Mr. 
Kremer took an active part in the organiza- 
tion of the town board, and has been identi- 
fied with all interests calculated to promote 
the general welfare. 

For many years Mr. Kremer has been 
engaged in grain dealing, shipping to Mil- 
waukee and Chicago, and is doing a good 
business, which is constantly increasing. He 
was also an extensive dealer in hogs and cat- 
tle, sending many car-loads to St. Paul and 
Sioux City, also to Chicago. His business 
interests have been very capably and suc- 
cessfully managed, and thereby he has won 
a handsome competence. In August, 1892, 
was organized a private bank in Minnesota 
Lake, and in .August, 1894. upon its re-or- 



38o 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



ganization, it received its present nameof the 
Security State Bank. It is capitalized for 
$10,000, and its present officers are Peter 
Kremer, president; J. H. Joice, vice presi- 
dent; and Myron Godding, cashier. It has 
become one of the safe and substantial con- 
cerns of the county and is of great conven- 
ience to the residents of this section as well 
as a source of income to those interested. 

Mr. Kremer was married on the 6th of 
November, 1893, to Miss Millie Zabel, a 
daughter of August and Louise (Klingbeil) 
Zabel. Mrs. Kremer is a native of Wash- 
ington county, Wisconsin, and a woman of 
rare intellectual ability, who accompanied 
her parents on their removal to Blue Earth 
county, Minnesota, in 1876. The parents 
of Mrs. Peter Kremer are now enjoying a 
much needed rest in retirement in their very 
pretty home in Danville, Blue Earth county. 
The father has celebrated his sixty-fourth 
birthday, while the truly Christian mother 
has passed her si.xty-secoiid. Herman Za- 
bel, brother of Mrs. Kremer, manages a 
large mercantile house in Minnesota Lake, in 
which Mrs. Kremer and her brother are 
equally interested. 

In politics Mr. Kremer is a Democrat on 
questions of national importance, but at 
local elections, where no issue is involved, 
he does not consider himself bound by party 
ties. He has creditably filled \arious posi- 
tions of honor and trust, and for the past 
twelve years he has been the popular and 
efficient President of the Village Board of 
Minnesota Lake, devoted to its best inter- 
ests, and his efforts have been very success- 
ful in promoting its growth and prosperity. 
He has served for three successive terms as 
County Commissioner and then nominated 
his own successor; has been a member of the 
Town Board of Supervisors; was elected 



Assessor of Danville township in 1861, fill- 
ing that position for fourteen years, has 
been Town Marshal for nine years, and in all 
these various offices has discharged his 
duties with a promptness and fidelity that 
has won him the commendation of all con- 
cerned. The cause of education finds in 
him a warm friend, and he has done all in 
his power for its advancement. For some 
years he has served as School Treasurer, 
and the high standard of excellence of the 
schools of this community is largely due to 
his efforts. 

For many years Mr. Kremer has been 
one of the most familiar figures on the 
streets of Minnesota Lake, and is also one 
of the best known citizens of this locality. 
He is very popular, for he possesses a whole- 
souled geniality and worth of character that 
wins him high esteem. His friends are 
many, and his home is the abode of hos- 
pitality. A man of fine physique he stands 
five feet, eleven and a half inches in height 
and weighs 220 pounds. 



BRANKLIN L. PARK, an early 
pioneer and prominent farmer of 
section 23, Martin countj', was 
born in Cattaraugus county. New 
York, April 6, 1842. He removed with his 
parents to Wisconsin when fourteen years 
of age, and four years afterward came to 
Martin county, Minnesota. He remained 
at home until reaching his majority, assist- 
ing in clearing and improving the farm. In 
I 863 he located on the farm he now owns, 
then wild land, but his place of 203 acres is 
now under a fine state of cultivation. Mr. 
Park also owns 160 acres on section 3, same 
township. He has always been extensively 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



3S. 



engaged in stock-raising^, and still owns 
about seventy-five head of cattle. 

In I 862 Mr. Park offered his services as 
a soldier, but was rejected. In 1863, how- 
ever, he was drafted and paid the bounty of 
.$300, and immediately after enlisted, be- 
coming a member of Company A, Eleventh 
Minnesota \'olunteer Infantrv, serving until 
the close of the Civil war. He is now a 
member of Clabaugh Post, G. A. R. , of 
Winnebago City. 

Mr. Park was first married in 1S70 to 
Marinda Ayers, a native of Cayuga county, 
New York. To this union were born five 
children, viz. : Fred, who married Hattie 
Wheeler; Minnie, wife of John Willet; 
Chancey, attending school; Frankie and 
Allen. Mrs. Park died March 10, 1889. 
In 1890 our subject was united in marriage 
with Elizabeth Hill, a native of Chemung 
county. New York, and a daughter of Feli.x 
and Julia (Hoover) Hill. Mrs. Park was 
twelve years of age when she came to Fari- 
bault county, Minnesota. She was first 
married to William Greenman. In political 
matters Mr. Park affiliates with the Repub- 
lican part}-, and has held all the township 
offices. 



*y ^ ON. JOHN HENRY BURMES- 
|f\ TER is president of the German 
\ P American State Bank and one of 
the leading merchants of Wells. 
In the trying times which preceded the Rev- 
olution Patrick Henry said, "The battle is 
not to the strong alone: it is to the vigilant, 
the active, the brave." This is ecpially true 
of him who would win the victory in com- 
mercial life. Success comes to the "vigi- 
lant," who watches opportunities and ad- ' 
vantages; to the " active," who ntili/es the 



opportunities as they are presented; and to 
the •' brave," — the man who dares to follow 
honorable, straightforward principles, scorn- 
ing to employ any underhand measures. 
Such a man as Mr. Burmester, who has 
been identified with Faribault county since 
1 856, ^one of its most honored and highly 
esteemed citizens. 

He was born in the Province of Han- 
over, Gern>any, February 8, 1850, and is 
the only child of Henry (better known as 
Henry Burmester, Sr.,) and Elizabeth (Mil- 
ler) Burmester, who were also natives of 
the same province, where their ancestors 
had lived for many generations. The father 
worked as a farm laborer in Germany until 
the spring of 1856, when, accompanied by 
his wife and little son, he embarked at Ham- 
burg on the sailing vessel Deutschland, 
bound for the New World. .After seven 
weeks on the ocean anchor was dropped in 
the harbor of New York, and the familj' 
went thence to Illinois, locating near Chi- 
cago, where they resided until the following 
autumn, when they came to Foster town- 
ship. Faribault county, Minnesota. The 
father entered from the Government 160 
acres of land, for which he had to pay $1.25 
per acre. This was during President Bu- 
chanan's administration, when money was 
scarce. As he had not the ready capital, he 
was obliged to borrow the money at a high 
rate of interest, l)ut later was enabled to pay 
off all indebtedness and to add to the farm 
eighty acres more. Our subject has also 
extended its boundaries by the additional 
purchase of eighty acres, and the old home- 
stead now comprises 320 acres of rich farm- 
ing land, which is under a high state of cul- 
tivation and is improved with all modern 
accessories and conveniences. Besides his 
home farm, Mr. Burmester has a landed 



3S2 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



estate of about 1,000 acres. The farm is a 
monuiiient to the thrift and enterprise of the 
father and son, for it was acquired and im- 
proved through their earnest efforts. Henry 
Burmester has been frequently called upon 
to till public offices of honor and trust, and 
is numbered among the honored pioneers 
and valued citizens of the community. In 
May, 1876, he was called upon to mourn 
the loss of his wife, and since that time has 
made his home with his son. In politics 
he is a thorough Republican, and religitjusly 
is a consistent member of the Evangelical 
Association, to which his wife also be- 
longed. 

John Henry Burmester was a little lad 
of only si.\ summers when brought b\' his 
parents to this countrj'. The greater part 
of his life has therefore been passed in Fari- 
bault county, and with its development he 
has been prominently identified. He has 
seen its wild lands transformed into beauti- 
ful homes and farms, its hamlets become 
thriving towns and villages, with manufac- 
tories and industries and business interests 
which would do credit to the older cities of 
the East. In all the work of advancment 
Mr. Burmester has ever borne his part, and 
the community owes much to his efforts in 
its behalf. 

On the 2 1st of June, 1876, was cele- 
brated his marriage with Miss Bertha Mid- 
dledoff, daughter of Fred and Dorothea 
(Miller) Middledoff, and the first white child 
born in the vicinity of Blue Earth City. 
Her father died while she was an infant, 
and her mother afterward marrietl George 
Middledoff. The young couple, upon their 
marriage, took up their abode on the old 
home farm, and Mr. Burmester continued its 
cultivation with excellent success until 1892, 
when he abandoned agricultural pursuits to 



enter commercial life, and came to Wells. 
The previous year he had erected his pres- 
ent fine brick store building, and on coming 
here embarked in merchandising under the 
name of Oehler, Schroeder & Company, 
which firm carried on the business until the 
fall of 1894, when it was succeeded by the 
present firm of Burmester & Miller. They 
carry a large stock of general merchandise 
and have a well-appointed store. Their 
trade comes from the best class of people 
and they receive a liberal patronage. In 
connection with this enterprise Mr. Burmes- 
ter was one of the organizers of the Ger- 
man American State Bank, was elected its 
first president, and has since filled that posi- 
tion most acceptably. Through his able 
administration it has become one of the 
substantial monetary concerns of the 
county, and it pays to the stockholders a 
good dividend. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Burmester have been 
born six children: Ernest A.. Amanda Eliz- 
abeth, Henry George and Helen Bertha. 
They also lost two, Walter Richard and 
Emma E., who died in childhood. The 
parents are active workers and consistent 
members of the Evangelical Association, 
and are devoted to all worthy interests 
which are calculated to promote the social, 
educational or moral welfare of the com- 
munity. 

In his political views our subject is a Re- 
publican who warmly advocates the princi- 
ples of his party. His worth and ability 
have frecjuently caused him to be the peo- 
ple's choice for office, and for ten years he 
served as Chairman of the Township Board 
of Supervisors, while in 1879 he was elected 
to the office of County Commissioner, serv- 
ing three years. In 1882 he was elected to 
the State Legislature, being the farmers' 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



3S3 



candidate, and again he was put on their 
ticket, but at that election suffered defeat. 
His public duties are faithfully performed, 
and unselfishly he labors for the best inter- 
ests of the community and the people he is 
serving. ^^^hen the Farmers' Warehouse 
Company was organized in 1887 he was 
chosen president, and lie has also served as 
president of the Farmers' Insurance Com- 
pany and been identified with all movements 
which would be of advantage to agricultural 
classes. A splendid success crowns the ef- 
forts of Mr. Burmester. He is now one of 
the wealthy men of the county, j'et his pos- 
sessions have all been obtained through his 
own diligence, perseverance, and well-man- 
aged enterprises. In all he has adhered 
closely to honorable business methods and 
principles, and the word of Mr. Burmester 
is known to be as good as his bond. All 
who know him trust and respect him, and 
he is certainly worthy of the high regard in 
which he is held. 



BRANKLIN BARNES, who resides 
on section 10, Jo Daviess township, 
Faribault county, is prominently 
connected not only with the agri- 
cultural interests of southern Minnesota, 
but is also a leading representative of the 
commercial interests. His connection with 
public affairs has been of benefit to the 
community in various ways, promoting pub- 
lic progress and advancing the material 
development. 

Mr. Barnes was born in the old town of 
Bovvdoin, Sagadahoc county, Maine, on the 
/th f)f February, 1843, and descends from 
one of the old New England families which 
was founded in America in early Colonial 
days. The grandfather, John Barnes, was 



born near Harpswell, Maine, in the latter 
part of the eighteenth century, and served 
in the war of 18 12. He was joined in wed- 
lock with Miss Mary Blanchard, who was a 
native of Woolwich, Maine, and their entire 
lives were passed in the Pine Tree State. 
The former was a tanner by trade and fol- 
lowed that pursuit and farming as a means 
of livelihood. His career was a useful one, 
and was terminated by death when he 
reached the age of seventj'-four years. His 
wife was called to the home beyond at the 
age of fifty-two. The father of our subject, 
Elbridge G. Barnes, was born in Bowdoin, 
Maine, on the 5th of January, 181 3, and 
when he arrived at years of maturity he was 
joined in wedlock with Miss Abigail Hall, 
who was born in Litchfield, Maine, Novem- 
ber 8, 1 8 14. Like the Barnes family, the 
Halls early settled on the coast of Maine 
and were worthy citizens. Elbridge G. 
Barnes is still living, and his years rest 
lightly upon him, he enjoying a hearty old 
age. His wife passed away many years 
ago, her death having occured on the 5th of 
May, 1S45. They were the parents of si.\ 
children, but only two of the family still sur- 
vive, — Franklin, of this sketch, and E. L. , 
a resident farmer of Jo Daviess township, 
Faribault county. 

The member of the family in whom the 
readers of this volume are most interested 
is the gentleman whose name introduces 
this review, and it gives us pleasure to record 
the sketch of his life. Under the parental 
roof he spent the days of his boyhood and 
youth, and at the age of nineteen he began 
to earn his own living. His first inilepend- 
cnt effort in life was as a farmhand, he hav- 
ing become familiar with that labor by assist- 
ing his father in the fields of the old home 
farm. For several years he was thus em- 



384 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



ployed. At length he decided to try his for- 
tune in the West, for he believed he might 
thereby better his financial resources. In 
1869 he emigrated to Wisconsin, locating 
on Grand Prairie, Green Lake county, 
where for two years he made his home. 
For almost a quarter of a centur}' he has lived 
in Faribault county, dating his arrival here 
from 1 87 1, and in the fall of the latter year 
his father emigrated from the State of Maine, 
and is still living, with his son. 

In 1 87 1, Mr. Barnes of this sketch, on 
his arrival here, located on section 10, Jo 
Daviess township, on a portion of his pres- 
ent farm. He first purchased eighty acres 
of land which had been broken but otherwise 
unimproved. In a log cabin here he began 
life, and with characteristic energy devoted 
himself to the further cultivation of his land, 
which in course of time was transformed 
into rich and fertile fields that yield to the 
owner a golden tribute in return for the care 
and cultivation bestowed upon them. The 
boundaries of his farm have since been e.\- 
tended by additional purchase and he is now 
the owner of 160 acres, besides 160 acres in 
Martin county, Minnesota. His barns and 
outbuildings are models of convenience: he 
has the latest improved machinery and all 
the accessories and conveniences of a first- 
class farm of the nineteenth century. He 
manages his affairs most admirably. To 
successfully carry on a business one must 
study and plan, and no detail of the work is 
unfamilliar to Mr. Barnes, notwithstanding 
his other extensive interests. This is cer- 
tainly the cause, in a great degree, of his 
prosperity. 

In his early life Mr. Barnes learned the 
carpenter's trade, and for several years he 
was a builder and contractor for building in 
this region, following that pursuit until 



1883. He enjoyed an extensive patronage, 
and the large trade added materially to his 
income. In the year just mentioned he 
abandoned his work as contractor in order 
to engage in the windmill business, which he 
has followed since in connection with the 
Elgin Wind Power & Pump Companj', of 
Elgin, Illinois. It has been thoroughly 
demonstrated that this is the only windmill 
able to really stand against the tremendous 
winds of Minnesota, and in consequence Mr. 
Barnes has prospered in this undertaking. 
During the past eleven years he has put up 
over 400 of these windmills, and the\' are 
scattered throughout this State and northern 
Iowa. Mr. Barnes is also interested in 
one of the thriving mercantile establish- 
ments in Blue Earth City, and like all the 
other interests with which he is connected 
it is enjoying a fine patronage. 

Mr. Barnes has been twice married. He 
first wedded Miss R. M. Towle, a daughter 
of Samuel and Martha (Norton) Towle. 
She was born December 23, 1847, and 
died on the 31st of December, 1878, leav- 
ing one son, J. F. Barnes, who is now en- 
gaged in merchandising in Blue Earth Cit\'. 
Our subject was again married May n, 
1879, his second union being with Miss 
Martha Towle, a sister of his first wife. 
Her father was born in Maine, November 
15, 181 3, and was for many years engaged 
in school-teaching, — an educator of recog- 
nised abilit}' and prominence. Late in life 
he moved to \\'isconsin, where he died, at 
the advanced age of seventy-nine years, 
September 22, 1892. 

Franklin Barnes is a member of the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen. A 
broad-minded, broad-gauged man, there is 
nothing narrow or mean in his nature. He 
is possessed of remarkable energy and busi- 



FARIBAULT, MARTIN, WATONWAN AND JACKSON. 



385 



ness ability, and is well known as one of the 
most successful and profjressive business men 
of this locality. His sagacity and far-sight- 
edness enable him to fully understand a situ- 
ation and enable him to take advantage of a 
favorable opportunit)- for promoting his own 
interests and those of the county, which are 
very dear to him. The present advanced 
condition of this section of Minnesota is due 
to such men as Mr. Barnes, who exercises 
his influence for the best welfare of the 
community. The men who occupy seats in 
the legislative halls of the State are promi- 
nent factors in the conmionwealth, yet their 
services would avail little were it not for the 
sustaining and upholding influence of the 
men who remain at home devoted to the 
business and material interests of their re- 
spective communities. They form the bone 
and sinew of the nation and to them all 
credit is due. 



ty~\^ ELS PETER CLEMMENSEN, 
1 I one of the enterprising men and 
\ y leading farmers of Martin county, 
Minnesota, is located on the north- 
west quarter of section 18, township 103, 
range 32. A sketch of his life is appro- 
priate here, and is as follows: 

Nels Peter Clemmensen was born in 
Fuen county, Denmark, May 11, 1840, son 
of Lois and Martelena (Clemmensen) Clem- 
mensen. He was reared in his native land 
and was there married, December 9, 1862, 
to Christina Jorkensen. April 21, 1873, 
accompanied by his family, then consisting 
of wife and five children, Mr. Clemmensen 
left Denmark, and on the 17th of the fol- 
lowing month landed at Boston. From 
there he at once proceeded to West Point, 
Cumniings county. Nebraska, where he 



rented 160 acres of land from Hans Peter- 
son, which he farmed two years. He then 
leased a quarter section of school land and 
cultivated it till his removal to Martin 
county, Minnesota, in July, 1883. Im- 
mediately upon his arrival here he pur- 
chased the farm on which he now lives of 
R. M. Ward. This tract was then in its 
virgin state, not a furrow turned on it. He 
at once built his house and barn and estab- 
lished his residence upon the premises. In 
1885 he began planting trees, and now has 
a fine grove. He has over a hundred trees 
of the Russian niulberrj' variety, the only 
trees of the kind in the county, and they 
seem well adapted to the climate. In May, 
1893, Mr. Clemmensen purchased of Valen- 
tine Wohlhuter 106 acres of land located in 
Elm Creek township, section 13, range 33, 
and adjoining his present farm. Of his 
original quarter section, he now has 130 
acres in cultivation. His farm is stocked with 
twenty-seven head of cattle, sixteen hogs 
and fourteen horses. The past year, 1894, 
he had the following grain acreage: wheat, 
10 acres; oats, 30 acres; barley, 10 acres; 
corn, 32 acres. In addition to this he 
rented a tract of sixty acres, which was 
planted in flax. 

Of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Clem- 
mensen, we make record as follows: Jo- 
hannah Margaret, born February 14, 1863, 
is now living in Fairmont; John Peter, a 
boot and shoe dealer of Sherburne; Hans 
Christian, born March 19, 1867, and died 
September 25, 1887; Mary, born November 
12, 1870, died January 24, 1875; Andrew 
Robert, born March 2, 1871, has recently 
spent some years in California and is now 
assisting his father on the home farm ; Ed- 
win, born in Nebraska, October 5, 1874, 
died at Sherburne May 29, 1891; Morris, 



386 



MEMORIAL RECORD OF THE COUNTIES OF 



born in Nebraska, August 3, 1877, is a 
member of the home circle. 

Politically, Mr. Clemmensen has been 
identified with the Republican party ever 
since he became an American citizen. 



BRANK McCLELLAN CAN- 
RIGHT, foreman of the Martin 
County Democrat and a well 
known citizen of Fairmont, who 
has spent almost his entire life in Martin 
county, was born in Waukesha county, Wis- 
consin, on the 25th of October, 1863, and is 
a son of J. E. and D. H. (Walbridge) Can- 
right. When our subject was only two 
years of age his parents came to Martin 
county, settling on a farm about three miles 
from Fairmont, where Frank M. was reared 
to manhood. As soon as he was old 
enough to handle the plow he began work 
in the fields and early became familiar with 
all the duties of farm life. The district 
schools of the neighborhood afforded him 
his early educational privileges, and later he 
attended the schools of Fairmont. At the 
age of eighteen years he left the farm, not 
desiring to carry on agricultural pursuits 
throughout his entire life, and began learn- 
ing the printer's trade with Frank A. Day, 
editor of the Sentinel, of Fairmont, with 
whom he served three years' apprenticeship, 
during which time he thoroughly mastered 
the business, becoming familiar with it in all 
its details. 

On the expiration of that period Mr. Can- 
right left his Minnesota home and returned 
to the State of his nativity, locating in Mil- 
waukee, where he was employed for two 
years on the force of the Milwaukee Sentinel, 
then spent three years in doing job printing. 
Returning to Fairmont he wa's offered and 



accepted the position of foreman of the Mar- 
tin County Democrat and has since filled 
that position with credit to himself and 
satisfaction to the owners of the estab- 
lishment. Through his instrumentality the 
paper has been kept up to a high standard 
and he de\otes himself untiringly to his 
work. 

In the year 1889 Mr. Canright was 
united in marriage with Miss Kattie M. 
Moran, the wedding taking place in Mil- 
waukee. The lady was born and spent her 
maidenhood days in Prairie du Chien, Wis- 
consin, and attended the schools of White 
Water. She is a lady of culture and re- 
finement, highly educated, and has made 
many friends since her arrival in Fairmont. 
To our subject and his wife has been born 
one child, a son, Emory, born in 1891. 

On questions of State and national im- 
portance Mr. Canright supports the Repub- 
lican party, but at local elections where no 
issue is involved he votes for the man whom 
he think