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6 aw m*t osi(i(l 3 

PRINCETON, N. J. 

ijrfit .TSVJ.&39.8 

Shflf. Number 



4d(<5,v-J 




MEMORIALS 



OF 



PROTESTANT MISSIONARIES 



TO THE CHINESE 



GIVING 



A LIST OF THEIR PUBLICATIONS, 



AND 



OBITUARY NOTICES OF THE DECEASED. 



WITH COTIOUS INDEXES. 



SHANGIIAE : 

AMERICAN PRESBYTERIAN MISSION PRESS. 

1867. 



PREFACE 



The commencement of the Protestant Mission to China was 
closely connected with a scheme for translating the Scriptures 
into the native language; a work to which the pioneers de- 
voted much time and attention. Their successors in like 
manner, have kept this before them as an object of first im- 
portance; and the continuous application thus bestowed 
from the beginning, on this branch of the enterprise, has 
been productive of results gratifying to every friend of the 
cause. The incipient labours of Morrison, Marshman and 
Milne, brought to completion the two first entire translations 
of the Bible, which appear to have issued from the press 
simultaneously about the year 1822. 

No great period was allowed to elapse till this was follow- 
ed up by revision and amendment, a work which had been 
contemplated by the first translators, even before their own 
productions had been given to the public. The combined 
efforts of Drs. Medhurst, Gutzlaff and Bridgman, in concert 
with the son of Dr. Morrison, led to the respective versions 
of the two first-named missionaries. 

Subsequent to this, the new translation of the New Tes- 
tament by the Committee of Delegates, issued in 18.50, and 
the Old Testament by the members of the London Mission, 
some two or three years later, were followed up by a revision 
of the whole, at the hands of Dr. Bridgman and Mr. Cul- 
bertson. 

Another version of the New Testament had been carried 
on at the same time, by the Rev. J. Goddard, the agent of 
the Baptist churches in America; and his work has been for 
the most part used by the members of that denomination. 

A complete translation of the New Testament into the 
Mandarin dialect, chiefly by Dr. Medhurst, has been widely 
circulated; and a second translation by the resident mission- 
aries at Peking is well on to completion. 

Translations of the whole New Testament have been made 
into the local dialects of Ningpo and Fuhchow, and detached 
portions of the Old and New Testaments have appeared in 
the Shanghae, Canton, Hakka, Amoy and Kin-hwa dialects. 



\[ PREFACE. 

A number of valuable contributions have been made in the 
department of exegesis, but a complete commentary is still 
a desideratum, 

In other departments the press has been largely employed 
disseminating instruction, both religious and secular; and 
probably few are aware of the number of works large and 
small, that have been issued from first to last. The lack of 
an established channel for communicating information on 
this point, lias proved a disadvantage to some; who for want 
of knowing what had been already done, have occasionally 
devoted time and energy to an unconscious repetition of pre- 
vious labours. In order to avoid this, the wish has been 
frequently expressed, that some source of information might 
be made accessible to all; much valuable time might thus 
be saved, and many of the inductions of the past made 
available to present workers. - 

Such is the object of the present publication, in which the 
compiler has been readily assisted by most of the mission- 
aries in the field. Although there must of necessity be some 
omissions, yet it is believed that they are inconsiderable, and 
that the present list contains nearly all that has been pub- 
lished, from the commencement down to the present time. 
It has been suggested that it may be serviceable to Mission- 
ary and Tract Societies also, in placing before them a sum- 
mary of past labours, and enabling them to make selections 
for future publication. 

By referring to the Classified Index, one may see at a 
glance what has been done in the various branches, and the 
several dialects, the figures pointing him to fuller informa- 
tion. In the majority of cases, no author's name is given on 
the book or tract, and publications are frequently met with, 
to the origin of which the possessor can find no clue. On 
turning to the Chinese alphabetical Index, he will find the 
title without difficulty, and at the page indicated, will meet 
with a statement of such particulars as have been thought 
necessary for the identification of the work, with sometimes 
an epitomized history of its production. Many of the early 
missionaries used epithets instead of their proper names on 
their works. A number of these have been pointed out, and 
the dates which they indicate. 

As a tribute of respect to the pioneers in this service, some 
few particulars collected from previous publications, have 
been added to the names of those who arrived within the first 
forty years from the commencement. 

It will be observed that the great majority of the works 
aim at (lie simple literary style of composition as their mo- 
del; being thus available for any part of this extensive em- 



PREFACE. iii 

pire, and even for some of the neighbouring nations. But as 
this style differs more or less from the various spoken dia- 
lects, many missionaries have conceived the idea of transfer- 
ring to paper, the pure colloquial of given districts. 

So far as the Mandarin is concerned, there are precedents 
in the language, and an established usage of the written 
character. 

Other dialects have not this advantage, and much ingen- 
uity has been expended in devising the most appropriate me- 
thods for reducing them to writing. The Chinese character 
has naturally presented itself, and has been employed to 
some extent; but there are so many words in particular dia- 
lects, that are unrepresented by written characters; and so 
many others in which the colloquial sounds differ so widely 
from the reading pronunciation, as to render them altogether 
inapplicable; that it has been found necessary to divert from 
their ordinary application such a large number of the signs 
employed, as in some cases to increase the evil it was propos- 
ed to obviate. This remark applies of course with varying 
force to various dialects. 

The difficulty here alluded to, early suggested the general 
medium of European nations, as most suitable for the trans- 
fer of native sounds, and divers combinations of the Roman 
character have been successfully employed to this end. Not 
a few works have been printed in the Ningpo, Shanghae, 
Amoy, Hakka and Kin-hwa dialects. It must be admitted 
that there is much that is arbitrary, in thus diverting the 
Roman character to represent the Chinese sounds, ami va- 
rious artifices have been resorted to, to meet the require- 
ments of the case. The difficulty of harmonizing the views 
of all concerned however, added to the acknowledged imper- 
fection of the western alphabet for the purpose, have sug- 
gested other devices for attaining the object. 

Foremost among these stands the system invented by Mr. 
Crawford, and used to a considerable extent by the Baptist 
missionaries in Shanghae. This possesses the advanta 
each character representing a single sound without ambigui- 
ty, and a consistent uniformity between the corresponding 
members of the several phonetic groups, while the compon- 
ent strokes are peculiarly adapted to the capabilities of the 
Chinese pencil. 

Other phonetic systems have been proposed, but we have 
not heard of their practical application. 

It is no part of our 2>lau here, to discuss the relative mer- 
its of the literary and colloipiial styles, assuming that each 
is adapted to a useful end. Much thought has been bestow- 
ed upon the subject, by men earnest in the work, devoted to 



IV PREFACE. 

the glory of God, and ardently desirous of the salvation of 
their fellow creatures. We look with respect on anything 
emanating from such motives; and while mere crotchets are 
not to he tolerated, we repudiate that severe standard of 
judgment, by which nothing beyond our own peculiar views 
can be countenanced. As there are diversities of gifts and 
varieties of talent, so the many plans of operation suggested 
by a living faith, may all be working together towards the 
one great end we have in view; and we are ready to say God 
speed ! to every brother who consecrates his time and ener- 
gies to the great cause of humanity. 

Apart from the spread of divine truth, and the general 
influence always attending the progress of Christianity, an 
art of acknowledged potency in the onward course of civiliz- 
ation, has received its practical development under the Pro- 
testant mission. In the early part of last century, a set of 
Chinese types to the extent of more than a hundred thou- 
sand were cut in wood at Paris, but of such huge dimensions 
as to be of little service in ordinary press work; and the prac- 
ticability of ever reducing Chinese to the limits of the found- 
er, was at that time generally disbelieved. Specimens of 
type were executed by private firms in England from time to 
time, and it is nearly half a century since Mr. Watts com- 
pleted a font, very commendable for neatness and accuracy. 
But the extraordinary expense attending such enterprises 
held out little hope of moveable type being applied to com- 
mon Chinese printing. The zeal and devotedness of Mr. Dyer 
of the London Mission, however, triumphed over the initial 
difficulties. By the combination of native labour with Eu- 
ropean art, he succeeded in bringing out a font of unsurpass- 
ed elegance, and at quite a practicable cost. More recently 
electric science has been applied to the perfection of the art 
by Mr. Gamble, and Chinese printing by moveable type is 
now as much a matter of course as any European language. 

Of the three hundred and thirty eight missionaries named 
in the list, the aggregate term of service in China has been 
2511 years, giving an average of nearly seven and a half 
years to each. Or if we subtract from this, 124 mission- 
now in the field, we have a surplus of 214 who have 
completed their term, to an aggregate of 1559 years, making 
an average of about a quarter of a year less to each, than the 
former number. These numbers include the time that mis- 
sionaries have been absent on visits to their native lands or 
elsewhere, g< tierally on account of health. 

The following figures give a comparative view of the num- 
1,1 r ' w ho h served Cor terms of various length, 



PREFACE. V 

Over 35 up to 40 years,. 2 missionaries. 

* 30 „ 35 „ 2 

20 25 4 

„ 15 „ 20 „ 22 

„ 10 v 15 „ — 39 

„ 5 „ 10 „ 70 

» 5 „ ...186 

Of the sixty one who finished their earthly course in the 
service, six suffered violent deaths; Mr. Munson was killed 
by the Battak cannibals in Sumatra, Mr. Walter Lowrie by 
pirates on the way from Shanghae to Ningpo, Mr. Fast by 
pirates on the Min river, Messrs. Holmes and H. M. Parker 
by the neenfei rebels in Shantung, and Mr. Thomas by the 
natives in Corea. Mr. Gaillard was killed by the fall of a 
house in Canton during a typhoon; and Dr. W. Parker 
by a fall through a bridge while on horseback, into a canal 
in the city of Ningpo. Mr. Benham was drowned in the 
river Menam in Siam, Mr. Pohlman in a wreck off the coast 
of China, Mr. Spalding supposed to be during a typhoon on 
the passage to Hongkong, and Dr. James by the capsizing of 
a schooner between Canton and Hongkong. Mr. S. Wolfe 
died onboard ship, at the island of Mindanao, during a cruise, 
Mr. Collie on the passage from Malacca to Singapore, Messrs. 
Doty, French, Richards and Byefs on the passage to America, 
and Messrs. Farmer and Jones on the passage to England. 

We close these remarks with a list of the Missionary So- 
cieties which have had agents among the Chinese, and the 
dates at which they commenced their operations. 

Date. 

1. London Missionary Society, 1807. 

2. Netherlands Missionary Society, 1827. 

3. American Board of Commissioners for Foreign 

Missions, _--. 1830. 

4. American Baptist Board of Foreign Missions, now- 

styled, — American Baptist Missionary Union, ..1834. 

5. Board of Foreign Missions of the Protestant Epis- 

copal Church in the United States, 1835. 

G. Church of England Missionary Society, 183*. 

7. Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian 

Church in the United States, 1> S -'N. 

8. General Baptist Missionary Society, (England) 1845. 

9. Evangelical Missionary Society at Basel, L847. 

10. Rhenish Missionary Society,.. ...1847. 

11. Board of Foreign Missions of the Southern Baptist 

Convention in the United States, 1847. 



VI TREFACE. 

12. Seventh Day Baptist Missionary Society (U. B.), —1847. 

13. American Methodist Episcopal Missionary Society, 1847. 

14. Foreign Mission Board of the Presbyterian Church 

in England, 1847. 

15. Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal 

Church in the Southern States of America, 1848. 

16. Missionary Society at Lund, in Sweden, 1849. 

17. Cassel Missionary Society, 1850. 

18. Berlin Missionary Society, 1851. 

19. Wesleyan Missionary Society, (England), 1852. 

20. Chinese Evangelization Society, (England), 1853. 

21. Netherlands Chinese Evangelization Society, 1855. 

22. Board of Foreign Missions of the Dutch Reformed 

Church in the United States, 1S58. 

23. Mission Union for the Evangelization of China in 

Pomerania, 1858. 

24. English Baptist Missionary Society, I860, 

25. New Connection Methodist Missionary Society in 

England 1860. 

26. French Protestant Missionary Society at Paris, 1860. 

27. American United Presbyterian Mission, 1860. 

28. Chinese Inland Evangelization Society, 1862. 

29. Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in For- 

eign Parts, 1862. 

30. United Methodist Free Church Missionary Society 

in England, 1864. 

31. Mission Board of the United Presbyterian Church 

of Scotland, 1865. 

Besides these, there have been a number of missionaries 
from time to time, unconnected with any society. 







PEIIU 
EOLOGI< 



MEMORIALS 

OF 

PROTESTANT MISSIONARIES 

TO 

THE CHINESE. 



I. JOSHUA MARSHMAN, althoughuot actually enga- 
ged in missionary work among the Chinese, yet devoted so 

much of his time and great talents, to collateral objects in 
direct furtherance of that work, that he may fairly claim a 
place in a catalogue of such agents; and his labours being first 
in point of time, entitle him to he placed at the head of th • 
list. His family traced its descent from an officer in the par- 
liamentary army of England, who retired into private life in 
Wiltshire, after Charles II. disbanded that body, in 1660. John 
Marshman, the father of the missionary was 'a weaver, and 
married Mary Couzener, a descendant of one of the French 
refugees who obtained shelter in England on the revocation 
of the Edict of Nantes. Their son Joshua was born ai V. 
bury Leigh, in Wiltshire, on April 20, 17o'S. At the age of 
seven, he was sent to the village school, kept by one Cogge- 
shall, where he learned reading, an attainment which he after- 
wards exercised to an extraordinary exti at, having read more 
than a hundred volumes by twelve years of age, and more 
than five hundred it is said, before he had reached eighl 
In youth he worked at his father's trade, but ai the age of 
fifteen, he was invited to London by a, bookseller, who took him 
into his employment. His lather recalled him however after 
a few months, to his native village, where he was again enga- 
ged at the loom. In 1791, he was married to Hannah Shep- 
herd, the grandd^ghter of lb' v. .John Clark, for sixty • 
pastor of the Baptist church at Crockerton in Wiltshire. In 
1794, he removed to Bristol, was baptized and became a ne in- 



2 JOSHUA MAKSHMAN. 

ber of the church at Broadmead, Bristol. There he entered 
the acadera /, and devoted five years to the study of the classics, 
together with Hebrew and Syriac. On May 3, 1799, he was 
set apart to the missionary work, at Bristol, in connection 

with the Baptist Missionary Society; and on the 25th of the 
same month, sailed from London in the American ship Crite- 
rion, arriving at Calcutta on October 12; from whence he pro- 
ceeded the following day to Serampore, a Danish settlement 
on the Hoogly. In the division of labour by the three mission- 
aries, Carey, Ward and Marshman, the latter was appointed to 
to superintend the school, and in the church organization, he 
was one of the deacons. About the year 1805, he commenced 
the study of the Chinese language under the tuition of Mr. 
Joannes Lassar, an Armenian born at Macao, who had been 
engaged by the llev. D. Brown, Provost of Fort William 
College, to commence a translation of the Scriptures in the 
Chinese language. To this work Marshman gave himself with 
great perseverance, till he had succeeded in producing the first 
complete translation of the entire Scriptures in Chinese. In 
1827, Carey, Ward and Marshman became dissociated from the 
Baptist Missionary Society. He died at Serampore, December 
7, 1837. 

Of twelve children born to Dr. Marshman, only six survived 
infancy. The eldest son was many years editor of the Friend 
of India newspaper, and is now resident in London. The 
second and third sons were lawyers. The eldest daughter was 
married to Mr. Williams, of the Bengal civil service; the second 
to Dr. Voigt the medical officer at Serampore ; the youngest 
is Lady Havclock. 

Dr. Marshman has left the following published works: — 

CHINESE. 

I- Ufa: Shiny king. The Holy Scriptures. Serampore, 
1822. 

ENGLISH. 

2. The works of Confucius; containing the original text, 
with a translation. Vol. 1. 4to, pp. iv, 4, xxxix, 725, P. S. 17. 
Serampore. 1809. This bulky volume only contains the first 
hall' of the %fo |§ Lun yu. 

3. Dissertation on the Characters and Sounds of the 
Chinese language: including Tables of the elementary Charac- 
ters, and of the Chinese Monosyllables. 4to, pp. cxiii. and 4 
large folding sheets. Serampore, 1809. This appears to have 
been bound up as an Introduction, with slhie copies of the 
preceding work; but it is also found as a separate publication. 

4. 4» PJ "= y£ Chung kwb yen fa. Elements of Chinese 



ROBERT MOBRISON. 

Grammar, with a preliminary Dissertation on the Characters 
and the Colloquial medium of the Chinese, and an Appendix 
containing the Ta-liyoh of Confucius with a Translation. 4to. 
pp. xxiii, 566, 56, Serampore, 1814. This grammar, which 
is generally known as the "Clavis Sinica," is an expansion of 
the preceding Dissertation (3). The ft ^ Ta hyoh is ap- 
pended in the form of a separate work. 



II- J§ fi M } Ia Le-sun. ROBERT MORRISON, the 
actual founder of the Protestant mission to the Chinese, was 
the grandson of a Scotch farmer. His father, James Morrison 
was born near Dunfermline in Fifeshire, Scotland, and in 
early life removed across the border to the neighbourhood of 
Morpeth in Northumberland, the birthplace of his spouse 
Hannah Nicholson. There Robert was born at Buller's Green, 
January 5, 1782, the youngest son in a family of eight child- 
ren. About the year 1785, his parents removed to Newcastle, 
where he was afterwards taught reading and writing, by his 
uncle James Nicholson a respectable schoolmaster; and at the 
proper age was apprenticed to his father, as a last and boot- 
tree maker. While engaged in that humble sphere, he joined 
the church of Christ, in connection with the Rev. J. Hutton 
of Highbridge Chapel, and in 1801, June 19, commenced a 
course of study under the Rev. W. Laidler, a Presbyterian min- 
ister in Newcastle, from whom he acquired the elements of the 
Latin, Greek and Hebrew languages, some systematic theolo- 
gy, and the art of writing short-hand. His zeal as a mem- 
ber of the Friendless Poor and Sick Society about that time, 
attracted the notice of his friends. On the 7th January 
1803, he entered the dissenting academy at Hoxton near 
London. Having been accepted by the London Missionary 
Society in 1805, he was sent by them to pursue his studies 
under the Rev. Dr. Bogue at Gosport. In 1806, he com- 
menced the study of Chinese in London, with the assistance 
of Yong Sam-tak, a Chinese who happened to be then in the 
country. On the 8th January 1807, he was ordained in (he 
Scotch church, Swallow street, London. On the 31st, he 
embarked for China via America, and reached Macao on the. 
4th September, whence he proceeded to Canton. On the 
20th February 1809, he was married to MissMorton, and the 
same day was appointed translator to the Fast India Compa- 
ny. In 1815, his official connection with that body was broken 
off. In 1817, he accompanied Lord Amherst's embassy to 
Peking. On the 24th December of the same year, lie was 
made Doctor of Divinity by the University of Glasgow. In 
1818, he was the means of establishing (he A.nglo-Chinese 
College at Malacca, for the interchangeable communication of 



ROBERT MORRISON". 



the languagi s of England and China, with a view to the pro- 
motion of Christianity in the latter country. In 1821, his 
wife died ; the following year, he visited Malacca and Singa- 
pore ; and in 1824, returned to England. The same year 
he was made a Fellow of the Koyal Society. He took to 
England a very considerable Chinese library, which is now 
deposited in the London University College. The Language In- 
stitution in Bartlett's Buildings, Holborn, London, was also set 
on foot by Dr. Morrison, during his stay in London, to initiate 
missionaries into the languages of the countries where they 
Were to be located. Towards the end of this year, he was 
married to Miss Armstrong, and in 1826 returned to China, 
where he laboured zealously in the mission cause at Canton, 
till his death, which occurred at his lodging, No. 6 in the 
Danish Hong at that city, on the 1st August, 1834. The 
following day his remains were removed to Macao, and buried 
in the private Protestant cemetery there on the 5th, beside 
those of his first wife and child. He left a family of six sur- 
viving children, two by his first wife, and four by the second. 
His only daughter was married to Dr. Hobson a medical 
missionary, in .1847. 

The following works were written by Dr. Morrison: — 

CHINESE. 

1- M J^ tfo H tk 1ft II eiu % ^ Shin ta° u ? un s ^'^ 1 hew 
she tsung shied chin,pun. A true and summary statement 
of the divine doctrine, concerning the redemption of the world. 
(> leaves, Canton, 1811. 

This tract notices briefly, the being and unit}'' of God ; the 
law of God ; the. desert of sin ; future retributions; the mani- 
festation of divine love, by Christ's death ; aids of the Holy 
Spirit ; faith, repentance, and comforts of the Gospel ; judg- 
ment to come; duty of Christ's disciples; — and concludes with 
a form of prayer. 

2 pg %£ gg J£ J$ $£ !£ J£ Wan ta ts'em c7io6 yay soo heaou 
fa. An easy explanation of the doctrine of Jesus, in question 
and answer. 30 leaves, Canton, 1812. 

This Catechism containing in all 97 questions, commences 
with the creation ; then notices the Scriptures ; and the 
perfections of God; being thenceforward in substance, the 
shorter catechism of the general Assembly of divines, a little 
modified. It concludes with the Lord's prayer, the creed, a 
morning and evening prayer, graces before and after meat; the 
LOOth Psalm in verse ; and Cowper's hymn, (l Sweeter .sounds 
than music knows. " 

3. Short abstract relative to the Scriptures. 1 leaf, Canton, 
1814. The Chinese title of this rare tract is lost. 



i-OBERT MORRISON. 



It notices the leading contents of the New Testament, ami 

of the catechisms and tracts issued in 1814. 

4. ■£ fl# in .£ US M M f£ =§- %Koo shejoo te ya hwb Jcth 
tae led cliuen. Outline of Old Testament History. 9 leaves 
1815. 

This notices the writings of the Jews relative to the origin 
of the world ; the descent of all nations of men from one 
common progenitor ; the fall ; the flood ; Abraham, Sodom ; 
oppression of Israel in Egypt ; the giving of the law at Mount 
Sinai; the reigns of David and Solomon; the temple; prophe- 
cies of Isaiah; Babylonish captivity; the coming of Christ; — 
and closes with a metre version of the Hymn, " Take com- 
fort Christians, when your friends — In Jesus fall asleep." 

5- <H >fr # If Yang sin shin she. Hymn-book. 27 leaves, 
1818. 

This contains a short preface — and thirty Hymns, being in 
general prose translations by Dr. M. of Psalms, and Hymns 
commonly used in Christian countries, which were turned in- 
to verse by his Chinese assistants. 

6. £p. 4* % -P- Wi W H $X 5^ Neen chung meijili tsabu 
loan h'e ta6u seu shih. Daily morning and evening prayers of 
the church of England. 30 leaves, Malacca, 1818. 

This is a mere translation from the Common Prayer Book, 
with references to the Psalms, &c. to be read. 

7- |i{i 5c j& W HI M Shin t'e'en taou tsuy tseih ehuen. Mis- 
cellaneous Essays. 17 leaves, Malacca, 1818. 

This is a collection of articles concerning, divine Revelation; 
the visible heavens to be distinguished from the Supreme 
Being ; .Christ the Saviour ; the Holy Spirit ; origin of all 
things ; incarnation of Christ ; a practical address to various 
classes ; the Sacraments ; and worshipping at the tombs. 

8- W : M J& $M \M H Wfr f# & e }fi w 1?* J™ 10 W(l)l &&en led 
cliuen. Tour of the world. 29 leaves, 1819. 

In this geographical brochure, the traveller says, he belongs 
to Sze-chuen province — relates the motives that led him to un- 
dertake his travels — passes through Tibet — and part of India — 
embarks at Calcutta for France — relates the state of education 
in that country and in Europe — studies foreign literature — 
western opinions on the origin of the universe — European 
views of the globe — a map of the world, with explanations — 
division of time in Europe — the sabbath — nature of Fmrope- 
an governments — customs — religion — he returns to China by 
way of America — but is wrecked on the coast of Loo-choo — 
and obtains a passage from thence in a Full-keen ship bound to 
Canton. 

9- ijJ^tHit Shin feen siting shoo. The Holy Bible. 
21 vols. Malacca, 1823. The New Testament of this version 
was made bv Dr. Morrison on the basis of an old version of 



G ROBERT MORRISON. 

the Gospels, Acts and Epistles, which he obtained in England, 
and brought out with him to China. The Acts was revised 
from the old M. 8. and first printed in 1810; Luke was printed 
in 1811 ; most of the Epistles were printed in 1812, the Pau- 
line Epistles being merely revised by Dr. Morrison; the New 
Testament Avas completed in 1813. In the Old Testament, Dr. 
Morrison translated Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, 
Kuth, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Canticles, Isaiah, Je- 
remiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel, Daniel, Hosea, Joel, Amos, 
Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, 
Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi. The remaining books were 
translated by Dr. Milne, under the superintendence of Dr. 
Morrison. 

10. -£• M ^ 1$ H H Jfr M % f !l &oo siting fang si tin teen 
h'e shctauu kea heiin. Domestic Instructor. 4 vols. 413 leaves, 
Malacca, 1832. The 1st and 2nd volumes contain an Introduc- 
tion to the reading of the Sacred Scriptures, with chronological, 
historical, and literary notices, and a system of reference to 
books, chapters, and verses. This is followed by an epitome 
of Church History; together with an exposition of the Devo- 
tional Times, Forms, &c. of the Protestant Church. The 
3rd volume is a translation of the Morning and Evening Pray- 
ers of the Church of England, with the Collects throughout 
the year, and an indication of the Lessons and Psalms for each 
day. At the end is the Church Calendar. The 4th volume 
consists of miscellaneous pieces — on the French revolution, 
Theology, Distinction between God and Heaven, Jesus the 
Saviour, the Holy Spirit the Comforter, the Origin of all things, 
Incarnation of Christ, Admonitions to the world, the Sacra- 
ments , the Celestial sphere, Happiness of Christians, Origin 
of Idolatay, Short discourses on various texts, Letter from 
a Christian, to the members of the Anglo-Chinese College, 
Antiquity of European nations. Remarks on European nations, 
Lament for the improprieties of the age, Exhortations, Letter 
from a Christian friend. 

11- II 3t M Tsd wan peen. Serial Miscellany. Macao, 
1833. There were only 3 numbers of this printed, 4 pages 
each. The contents are: 1. Population of the world, divided 
according to religions. — The Bible — Difference between tradi- 
tion and Scripture — Mutual duties of parents and children. 2. 
Sketch of the history of Moses — Decalogue given at Mount 
Sinai — Difference between the Law and the Gospel — Love to 
(Jed anil man — Method of teaching the deaf and dumb. 3. 
On foreign literature, &c. — Scripture quotations declaring 
God's judgments — Scripture extracts promising salvation. 
20,000 of these were printed. 

12- fjjf lj 3SC Iff f ip W £' e tatiu wchi tsdn shin she. Pray- 
* Tin- preceding i) articles are a revision of No 7. 



ROBERT MORRISON. 7 

ers and Hymns, 60 pages, Macao, 1833. This is the Morn- 
ing Service of the Church of England ; only the Hymns, pp. 
16, being for the most part by Dr, Morrison. 

ENGLISH. 

13. HorsB Sinieae: Translations from the popular litera- 
ture of the Chinese. London, 1812. pp. 70. This contains 
translations of the H ^ |M San tsze king, j$ Q Ta he'd and 
some miscellaneous fragments. The work having soon be- 
come excessively rare, it was republished with some modifica- 
tions by Montucci, at London, 1817, as the second part of a 
quarto volume; the first being a "Parallel between two intended 
Chinese Dictionaries/'" 

14. A Grammar of the Chinese Language. 4to. Serampore. 
181.5, pp. 280. 

15. Translations from the original Chinese, with Notes. 
8vo. pp. 42. Canton, 1815. These are chiefly official paper;-,' 
from the Peking Gazette. 

16. Dialogues and Detached sentences in the Chinese Lan- 
guage ; with a free and verbal translation in English. 8vo. Ma- 
cao, 1816. pp. 262. 

17. A View of China, for philological purposes ; containing 
a sketch of Chinese Chronology, Geography, Government, Re- 
ligion and Customs. 4to. Macao. 1817. pp. vi, 141. 

18. A Memoir of the principal occurrences during an 
Embassy from the British Government to the Court of China 
in the year 1816. 8vo. London, 1819. pp. 6S. This was pub- 
lished in a serial work entitled "The Pamphleteer." 

19. A Dictionary of the Chinese Language. 6 vols. 4to. Ma- 
cao. This great work-is in 3 Parts ; the 1st, t£ Jl Ykx 7 teen, 
comprising 3 volumes, published respectively in 1815, pp. xviii, 
930; 1822", pp. 884;and 1823, pp. 908; and contains the ( Ihinese 
and English, arranged according to the radicals. The 2nd Part, 
.5. 5fi 111 Jrt Woo chay yunfod, 1st volume, which appeared 
in 1819, pp. xx, 1090, gives' the Chinese and English arranged 
alphabetically. Volume 2, published in 1820, pp. vi, 178,_ 
305, contains various Indices and Tables, with a Synopsis of 
different forms of the ancient and seal characters. The 3rd 
Part, published in 1S22. pp, 480, is English and Chinese. 
With regard to the 2nd Part, which Professor JulieD of l'aris 
designates, "without dispute, the best Chinese Dictionary 
composed in a European language," a somewhat singular con- 
troversy has existed for some years, but is now happily set at 
rest. Morrison tells us in his preface: — " The Chinese Work, 
Woo-chay-yun-foo j£ ^|| ){f on which the following par; oi 
the Dictionary is founded, was compiled by Chin Seen-sang 

^ ^t £ wno is sam t0 nave 8 P. ent llis lill> '" makin " l! "' c ? 1 " 
lection of words contained in it ; and to have died Before its 



ROBERT MORRISON. 



publication. He committed his Manuscript to the care of his 
pupil Kan-ylh-hoo & — -$J who travelled over the whole 
empire in order to verify it, and add to it." After this 
explicit statement by Morrison, the public were taken by 
surprise to find Callery in the Introduction to his Systema 
Phoneticum broadly asserting, that "it is nothing else than the 
English translation of a dictionary compiled by the Catholic 
missionaries, of which he himself possesses a manuscript copy." 
The great rarity of Chin Seen-sang's work seemed to give some 
countenance to the above charge. Professor Julien however 
had been making every effort to procure a copy since 1828, 
through members of the Roman Catholic and Russian missions, 
but without effect till 1844; when he wrote to Mr. Thorn the 
English Consul at Ningpo on May 10, quoting a letter from 
one of his pupils then residing at Macao, in these words: — 
"I have just seen to-day the famous dictionary j£ ifi ^ j| jff 
Ou-che-yun-fou, of which Mr. Callery denies the existence. 
The title is not false, for it is continued from one end to the 
other upon every page of the work." The writer of these notes 
can add his testimony to the fact of it being a bona fide work, 
having examined in detail a copy of the same in the possession 
of the Rev. J. Edkins, now in Peking, which he accidentally 
met with not far from Shanghae. 

20. Memoirs of Rev. William Milne. 8vo. pp. 231, Malacca, 
1824, 

21. Translation' of a singular proclamation issued by the 
Foo-yuen of Canton. 4to. London, 1824. 

22. China; dialogues between a father and his two children 
concerning the history and present state of that country. 12mo. 
London, 1824. pp. 120. 

23. Chinese Miscellany ; consisting of original extracts 
from Chinese authors, in the native character; with transla- 
tions and philological remarks. Fol. London, 1S25. pp, 52, 
and plates, pp, 12. 

24. Parting Memorial. 8vo. London. A volume of Ser- 
mons and Discourses published when Dr. Morrison was about 
to leave England the second time for China. 

25. Familiar Lectures on the Philippians, delivered at 
Macao. 

26. f^ jft ^ i f ft *?• fjt Kwang tunc/ sang i'oo hwd tsze 
limy. Vocabulary of the Canton dialect. 3 Parts, 8vo. Macao, 
1828. The 1st Part, pp. 202, is English and Chinese ; the 
2nd Part, pp. 90, is Chinese and English; and the 3rd Part, 
pp. 354, consists of Chinese words and phrases. 

27. jj£ p 35C t « Ji &\ M Yeng hwd wan yufdn le chi:°n. 
A Grammar of the English Language for the use of the An- 
glo-Chinese college. 8vo. pp. \YJ. Macao. This is for teach- 
ing the Chinese to read English. 



ROBERT MORRISON. <j 

28. Lectures cm the Sayings of Jesus. Svo. pp 42 L 
Malacca, 1823. 

29. Notices conceniing China and the Port of Canton, 
tile affair of the frigate Topaz, and the Fire of Canton. 

pp. 07. Malacca, 1823. Some of these papers are reprinted 
at the end of Morrison's Memoirs by his widow. 

30. A Sermon preached on board the American ship 
Morrison; at Whampoa, in China, December 2. 1833. 8vo, 
pp. 17. Macao, 1833. This has an Appendix explanatory 
of the term " Church/' which is republished at the end of 
Morrison's Memoirs. 

31. The Evangelist; audi Miscellanea Sinica. 4to. 4Nos. 
Macao, 1833. This was a periodical commenced by Dr. Mor- 
rison, for the dissemination of evangelical principles in tJhina. 
Only four numbers were published, in May and June of the 
year named, when he was requested by the President of the 
East India Company's Select Committee, at the instam 

the Governor of Macao, in conformity with a representation 
made by the Roman Catholic Vicar general, to suspend all 
further issues, as contrary to the doctrines of the Roman Ca- 
tholic church. Thus prematurely ended the public 
the Evangelist. It was principally filled with papers exhibit- 
ing the doctrines, precepts, and promises of the Grospel. Al 
the same time all matters relating to China and the surround- 
ing nations were also deemed worthy of notice. Each num- 
ber contained also short pieces in the Chinese characl r. 

Besides the above works, Morrison was an extensive con- 
tributor to the periodical literature of the day, and many ar- 
ticles from his pen are to be found in the Journals of Europe 
as well as China. 

• The Indo-Chinese Cleaner, a quarterly magazine, con- 
taining miscellaneous communications on the [ndo-Chinesfi 
nations, published at Malacca, 1817 — 1822, is in great mea- 
sure indebted to the contributions oi Morrison, the joint con- 
ductor with Dr. Milne. 

In the "Evangelical Magazine" for 1825, is a serites of 6 
letters by Morrison, on the Language, History. Religions, and 
Government of China. 

A succession of articles from foe- same hand appeared in the 
first 7 volumes of the Canton Register, and the first 3 volumi 5 
of the Chinese Repository. 

These and similar contributions to Missionary and other 
Magazines, besides numerous Tracts, for English Sailors, and 
Miscellaneous papers on various occasions, go to make up the 
literary labours of this devoted and persevering missionary. 

Mrs. Morrison, the widow of Dr. Morrison, who left Macao 
with her family, on account of health, in December, 1833, and 



10 RORERT MORRISON. 

arrived in London, the 5th of April, 1834, has given an 
important contribution to this department of literature, under 
the title: — "Memoirs of the Life, and Labours of Robert Mor- 
rison, D. D. F. 1!. S. M. R. A. S. Member of the Societe 

Asiatique of Paris, &c. &c. compiled by his Widow ; with 
critical notices of his Chinese works, by Samuel Kidd, and an 
Appendix containing original documents." 2 vols. 8vo. pp. 
ix, 551, vii, 543, 87. London, 1S39. 

Jonx Robert Morrison, the second son of the Rev. Robert 
Morrison, was born at Macao on the 17th of April, 1814, and 
with his mother and sister elder than himself, embarked for 
England on the 21st of January following. On the 23rd of 
August, 1820, he returned with them to Macao ; but in less 
than two years, having meantime been bereft of his mother by 
death, he was sent to England to receive his education. Dur- 
ing the four succeeding years, his time was spent in receiving 
elementary instruction, in the first instance at the academy 
of the Rev. J. Clunie, L. L. D. at Manchester, and subse- 
quently at the Mill Hill Grammar school, near London. 
When his father embarked for China, May 1st, 1826, after 
his two years visit to England, he took his son John with 
him. From that time his attention was chiefly directed to the 
study of the Chinese language, and after a short stay under 
the paternal roof at Macao, he was sent to the Anglo- 
Chinese college at Malacca. In two or three years he rejoined 
his father at Canton, and continued his studies under his im- 
mediate direction. It was shortly after this that he was em- 
ployed as interpreter, first to the British merchants in China, 
and then temporarily to the mission of the United States 
government to Cochin-china, in 1833. On his return to Can- 
ton, from this expedition, he resumed his duties to the mer- 
chants, and at the same time was engaged in aiding his labo- 
rious father, and was gradually introduced to the friendship 
and confidence of the foreign community. After the death of 
his father in 1834, he was appointed his successor, as Chinese 
Secretary and Interpreter to the Superintendents of British 
trade in China. Ever zealous and interested in the mission- 
ary work, shortly after this, it was to his efforts that the na- 
tive Christians were indebted for their release from incarcera- 
tion, to obtain which he had to pay a large sum of money. 
For several years, while the London Missionary Society was 
without any direct agent at Canton, he was entrusted with 
the charge of (heir affairs, and the earnest appeals which lie 
sent t<> the directors from time to time, indicated the warm 
feelings with which he watched the progress of the cause; 
while aiding in the preparation of works for the press, instruc- 
ting and conversing with the natives. Dr. Morrison, shortly 



ROBERT MORRISON. H 

before his death, had proposed that his son should undertake 
the work of revising the Chinese translation of the Scriptures, 

and the American Bible Society had made provision for sus- 
taining him in this undertaking. He was afterwards associ- 
ated with Messrs. Medhurst, Griitzlaff and Bridgman in the 

production of a new version. During the period of conflict 
and difficulty between the English and Chinese governments, 
which began in March 1839, and ended in August 1842, he 
occupied an onerous post in the service of his country, which 
he rilled with much prudence, and satisfaction tohis superiors. 
After a nine days illness, he died at Macao on the 29th of Au- 
gust, 1843. 

He gave to the public one or two works, of essential impor- 
tance for the mercantile community in China. The following 
are from his hand: — 

1. Some Account of Charms, Talismans, and Felicitous 
Appendages worn about the person, or hung up in houses, 
&c. used by the Chinese. 4to. pp. 6. London, 1833. This 
was published in the "Transactions of the Royal Asiatic 
Society," Vol. 3, Part 2; but some copies were issued separ- 
ately. 

2. Companion to the Anglo-Chinese Calendar. 12mo. 1832. 

3. A Chinese Commercial Guide, consisting of a collection 
of details respecting foreign trade in China, pp. 116. Canton, 
1834. This has gone through several subsequent edition's, 
since the author's death, in which the work has been entirely 
remodelled. 

Not long after the death of Dr. Morrison, a noble monu- 
ment to his memory was erected, in the formation of the 
Morkison Education Society, the object of which was to 
improve and promote Education in China by schools and other 
means. John Bobert Morrison was the first Recording Secre- 
tary. Besides the foundation of a seminary in Bongkong, 
the Society has given substantial aid to many educational es- 
tablishments in other parts of China. It has also accumulat- 
ed a library of considerable value. 

Kew A-gang commonly known as Agong, had been con- 
nected with the London Mission as a printer, almost from 
its first establishment, and during- the lffetime of Dr. Milne, 
six.) wed some anxiety to become a Christian, lie was however, 
brought to acknowledge the truth by his fellow-countryman 
Leang Afa, and was baptized by. Dr. Morrison at Macao^abomt 
the beginning of 1830. After his baptism, he received much 
opposition from his wife, who was devoted to idols. The 
same year he itinerated about 2.30 miles in the interior of 
China, in company with Leang Afa, instructing their coun- 



12 WILLIAM MILNE. 

trymen in the knowledge of Christ, and distributing religious 
tracts among them, which had been written and printed by 
themselves. G-oing in a south-west direction, they threw 
themselves into the train of one of the public examiners, and 
passing on from one district to another, they had free access 
to the young literati, among whom they distributed upwards 
of seven thousand tracts on the most important subjects. 
The following year, he was engaged by the London Mission- 
ary Society, as a Native Assistant. Having acquired from 
Mr. J. R, Morrison the art of lithography, he occupied himself 
printing tracts in Macao, and distributing them among his 
kindred and acquaintances, to whom he explained their con- 
tents ; and though exposed to opposition and contempt, he 
rejoiced in thus being able to aid the cause of the Divine 
Saviour. Labouring assiduously to multiply and to scatter 
the word of life, Dr. Morrison felt increasing satisfaction with 
his patient and persevering efforts. Having unwittingly 
offended one of his fellow-countrymen, he was, in 1835, 
reported to the police, as having had connection with foreign- 
ers, and a warrant was issued for his apprehension. Timely 
notice having been given him, he fled to the English ships at 
Lintin, and in 1836 proceeded to Malacca. In the mean 
time his son Ahe, having been decoyed out of Dr. Morrison's 
house at Macao, was apprehended and brought before the 
magistrate; and being found a ready informant, lie w r as detained 
for a long time, but treated well. In 1844, Agong removed 
with Dr. Legge to Hongkong, and was located in the Medical 
Missionary Society's Hospital there, where he preached to, 
and instructed the patients. There he has continued in con- 
nection with Dr. Legge, up to the present time; proclaiming 
the gospel, and expounding the Scriptures from year to year, 
lo his idolatrous compatriots. 

In 1833, Agong published a number of sheet tracts, con- 
sisting of extracts from the Scriptures, with pictures on the 
other side, which ho termed "Picture Tracts." These were 
entitled: — 

_ 1. A Collection of Scriptures on the Being and Perfections 
of the great Creator, in opposition to Idols. 

2. The Beatitudes. 

.'>. Paul's" Speech on Mars hill. 

The naiias of the bthers are not preserved. 



J 1 1 • >fc H Me Lein . W ILLIAM MILNE was born in the 
parish of Kennethmont in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, in 1785. 
His father died when lie was six years of age ; and his mother 
gave Inn) the education common to others in the same con- 
dition of life. When very young, lie was put out to farm 



WILLIAM MILNE. ]JJ 

service, and was afterwards apprenticed to Mr. K. of his native 

parish, to learn the business of a house carpenter, in which 
employment he exhibited great dexterity, and piety of charac- 
ter. In early life, he seems to have distinguished himself by 
his profanity; and though in his youth he had been the sub- 
ject of occasional serious impressions, yet it was not till he 
was sixteen years of age, that he fully knew the value and 
love of the Saviour. In 1804, he was received as a mem- 
ber of the Congregational church at Huntly, in his native 
county. About 1809, he made application to be received 
fey the London Missionary Society, and having been conferred 
with by a committee of ministers in Aberdeen, he was sent 
to (losport, where he went through a regular and successful 
course of studies, under the direction of the Rev. Dr. Bogue. 
In July, 1812, he was ordained to the minis tiy, and dedicated 
to the service of Christ among the heathen. He was soon 
after married to Rachel, the daughter of Charles Cowie, Esqr. 
of Aberdeen. About a month alter his ordination, they em- 
barked at Portsmouth, and after some delays on the passage, 
arrived at Macao July 4th, 1813. Thence he was expelled by 
the authorities in three days, and proceeded to Canton, where 
he gave his undivided attention to the language. With the 
concurrence and advice of Mr. Morrison, after six months, he 
departed to visit Java and the Chinese settlements in the 
Archipelago, and there to distribute books and tracts; after 
whiph he returned to Canton, on September 5th, and spent 
the winter of 1814 there. In the spring of 1815, he com- 
menced a missionary settlement at Malacca ; where he gave 
himself to the care of schools, preaching, and the preparation 
and issue of missionary publications. In January, JNlO'. he 
visited the island of Penang, and established a press there. 
The last three or four years of his life were much devoted to 
the Anglo-Chinese college, of which he was the Principal. 
On the 9th August, 1817, he left Malacca, and landed in 
China on September 3 ; returning to Malacca in the beginning 
of 1818, where he arrived on February 17. Death had already 
taken two of his dear children, and in March, J SI:), his wife 
was called to her rest, November 2(J, 1820, the University of 
Glasgow conferred on Kim the honorary degree of Doctor of Divi- 
nity. He died on the 2nd June, 1822, leaving three surviving 
sons and a daughter. 

The following works are from his pen: — ■ 

CHINESE. 

1. A farewell address. 3 leaves. Batavia, 1814. This is 
a valedictory letter addressed to the Chinese residents at Ba- 
tavia, by Mr. Milne, when he was aboui ft take his departure. 



14 WILLIAM MILNE. 

It indicates briefly the main points of doctrine in the books 
be had been distributing among them. There is a translation 

of it in Philip's "Life and Opinions of the Rev. William 
Milne, I). D." pp. 150-152. 

2. ^ 1!£ $ la fr H- X M, ftl K'&w she chay yen Icing chin 
shake. Life of Christ. 71 leaves. Canton, 1814 The pre- 
face to this treatise notices the creation,* providence, sin and 
misery of man. The hook is divided into twenty sections — 
1. The dispensation before the Gospel, &c. 2. Christ's fore- 
runner, &c. 3. Birth of Christ. 4. Herod and the children 
of Bethlehem, &c. 5. Christ at Jerusalem in the temple. 
6". Baptism. 7. Temptation. 8. Calling the disciple*: 9. 
Charge to the disciples. 10. Doctrines. 11. Doctrines. 12. 
Manner of teaching. 13. Miracles. 14. Holiness of life. 15. 
Institution of the Lord's supper, 16. Jesus betrayed. 17. 
Condemnation and Crucifixion. IS. Resurrection. 19. As- 
cension. 20. Apostles go forth to teach all nations. In this 
as in all his subsequent publications, instead of giving his 
name, Milne signs himself by the epithet j f| ^ ^ Po gae chay, 
" The Catholic Lover." 

3- Jf§ >h f^ 7& ^ $$ M tmt Tsin scabu man tsow tsxli loo 
Jeeae lun. Tract on the strait gate. 10 leaves. Malacca, 1816. 
This notices the moral character of God — the sin and redemp- 
tion of man — explanation of the terms strait gate and narrow 
road — characters of those who walk in the broad way — des- 
truction does not mean annihilation, but eternal misery — 
Repentance urged — Eternal life, different from the transmi- 
gration of souls — human depravity makes man's duty hard — 
in time and in eternity, the righteous and wicked are the 
only real distinctions among men in the eye of God, &c. This 
was reprinted at Malacca in 1832, 9 leaves. Revised and 
reprinted at Singapore, in 1843, 8 leaves; being the 4th in a 
series. Again revised and reprinted at Amoy in 1854 ; and 
at Shanghae, in 1S5G, 6 leaves. In this last, the prefatory 
mattei- is omitted, and a hymn is inserted on the last page. 

4- % JR- u if§ iU lit Bfr Wl- Ts'ung chin shih life Iced Inoang 
led slue o. Tract on the Sin of Lying, and the Importance 
of Truth. 5 leaves. Malacca, 1816. This is founded on 
Ephesians 4: 25, and notices the different kinds of lying com- 
mon among the Chinese — sin and danger of it — injurious to so- 
ciety and to the individual — it excludes men from heaven. &c. 

5. ijj $ $g ftf f% ^ Yew lied ts'een beat wan id. A 
Catechism for Youth. 37 leaves. Malacca, 1617. The preface 
to this work notices the importance of the instruction of 
youth — more accessary for them than mere relative duties. 
The Catechism contains 165 questions — on the difference be- 
n men and brutes — the design of God in creating man 
with a soul — attributes of God — the relations He graciously 



WILLIAM MILNE. 1,", 

sustains towards man — His law — our duly to God — and fa 
men in different ranks of* society — sin — its kinds, source and 
demerit — the Gospel — incarnation, lit'.', death, resurrection and 
intercession of Christ — repentance — faith — the Holy Spiril 
renews the heart — pardon of sin — means of salvation — word 
of God — Baptism — Lord's supper — soul after death — heaven 
— hell — saints and angels not to he worshipped — evil spirits — 
resurrection — general judgment and what follows it — the earth 
to be consumed with lire. It concludes with morning and 
evening prayers for children. This was reprinted at Malacca, 
in 1832; and revised and reprinted at Shanghae in L845, 
with an Appendix of 14 Prayers, including the two original, 
and 18 Hymns, the latter of which are for the greater part a 
selection from Medhurst's work No. 29 infra. The paging 
is carried on uninterruptedly throughout the whole, bu1 the 
running title is altered' for the two parts of the Appendix. 
52 leaves. This last edition with Appendix was reprinted at 
Ningpo in 1846, 38 leaves. It was again reprinted at Shang- 
hae in 1848, 26 leaves, omitting the two last prayers and tin; 
hymns. A thorough revision of the original work, by the 
Rev. W. C. Mihie, Avas published at Shanghae in 1851, with 
the title JE j|jf \ ptj Chin taou juli mun, 16 leaves. This 
last was reprinted at Iiongkong in 1851, 18 leaves; and at 
Amoy in 1854, 

6. jfjjf II |I ££ "!£ $$ K'e ia6u chin fa cho6 keaS. Expo- 
sition of the Lord's Prayer. 41 leaves. Malacca, 1818. This 
contains a preface and ten discourses. 1. Introductory; 
existence of God; obligation of man; salvation by Christ. 
2. Proper object of prayer; dispositions suited to it; its 
various kinds. 3. Name of God explained; how it is to be 
hallowed. 4. Nature and laws of God's kingdom ; thechurch; 
how to be extended; objections answered. 5. The will of 
God, what, &c. 6. How Ave should pray for temporal bles- 
sings. 7. Sin; the pardon of it to be prayed for; mutual 
forgiveness to be exercised. 8. Temptation; kinds of it: 
nature and operations of Satan ; doubts resolved. 9. Deli- 
verance from evil ; natural and moral evil considered ; the evil 
one; we may not seek deliverance, from the idols of the hea- 
then. 10. 'How we are to give glory to God ; his majesty : 
his power, and government of the world; God not to he 
confounded with idols; concluding exhortation. This tract 
forms the groundwork of Medhurst's eight sermons 67 — 74. 
See Medhurst's works. No. 34 intra. 

7. fg m S jjiijt ffo Choo Jcwb a shin ten. Tract on [dolatry. 
7 leaves. Malacca, 1818. This treats of God, the creator and 
preserver, as one only ; various sorts of idolatry prevalent in 
China; folly and sin of it; several classes of meD whosupport, 
or live by idolatry, addressed; an appeal to their reason and 



16 WILLIAM MILNE. 

conscience. This was reprinted at Malacca, in 1832, 7 leaves. 

8- £ M £V ¥ M. it & Sang e hung ping tseu yih fa. 
On justice between man and man. 10 leaves. Malacca, 1818. 
This tract is founded on Deuteronomy 2;3: 3, and notices the 
several kinds of employments among men; the various ways 
of practising injustice which prevail in China, in the respective 
classes of society ; weights and measures ; spoiled commodities ; 
overreaching in bargains ; covenant breaking; bad coin ; aw- 
ful consequences of this sin. This was reprintedat Malacca, 
in 1832, 10 leaves; and again at Ningpo, in 1$47, 8 leaves. 

9' III H fp f£ tH Zl f Ij Shiny shoo tseechoo shih urh hewi. 
Twelve short sermons. 12 leaves. Malacca, 1818. These are 
— a brief explanation of the Unity of God ; Worship of Clod ; 
Depravity of man ; Manifestation of Divine grace ; Faith and 
salvation; Good works; Relative duties; Death; Difference 
between the righteous and wicked in their death ; Resurrection; 
Judgment ; and the Eternal state. 

1 () - J$f ]$ tfl tk M- BH Too po mlnr/ h'm Jed heang. The 
evils of Gambling. 13 leaves. Malacca, 1819. This tract notices 
the variety there is in the condition and pursuits of mankind; 
specifies the several kinds of gaming that abound among the 
Chinese ; the causes from which the disposition to gamble 
proceeds ; points out the pernicious consequences of this prac- 
tice, to individuals, families, communities, &c. This was re- 
printed at Malacca, in 1832, 13 leaves ; at Singapore, in 1840, 
13 leaves; and at Ningpo, in 1847, 11 leaves. Nos. 7 and 3 
supra, with this tract and No. 8 supra, as published at Ma- 
lacca in 1832, were bound togother in one volume also, under 
the title Hfj jfr ~$£ K'euSn she warn,. Admonitions for the Age. 

11- 'jI jH M JyL i$ % k Chang yuen teang yeio seang Inn. 
Dialogues between Chang and Yuen. 20 leaves. Malacca, 1819. 
Chang is a worshipper of the true God, and Yuen is his hea- 
then neighbour. They meet by chance on the road, enter 
into conversation, and afterwards generally meet in the even- 
ings, under the Woo-tung tree. There are twelve dialogues, 
as follows: — 1. Questions proposed by Yuen concerning Chris- 
tian principles and character; the Being of God. 2. Evangeli- 
cal repentance. 3. Character of Christ, and faith in him. 4. 
Good nun seek their chief happiness in heaven; annihilation 
of the sou! considered. .5. Chang relates his first acquaintance 
with the New Testament. 6! Yuen having retired, is struck 
with horror at his own neglect of the true God ; visits Chang 
and finds him with his family at Prayer; the resurrection of 
the dead. 7. Nature and qualities of the raised bodies ; doubts 
and objections. 8. Yuen on visiting Chang in the evening, finds 
him in his closet, which leads to a discussion on the object, 
and kinds of prayer ; worship] ting the dead, &c. 9. The awful 
judgment to come ; a midnight prayer under the Woo-tung 



WILLIAM MILNK, 17 

tree. 10. Yuen objects to Chang's last night's prayer, because 
he confessed himself to be a sinner. 11. Yuen deeply imp) . 
with the ideas of eternity and of sin, spends a whole night in his 
garden, bewailing his miserable, condition. 12. Chang explains 
to him the method of salvation by Jesus Christ ; the felicity 
of heaven ; and misery of hell. Here the colloquies end some- 
what abruptly ; as it was obviously Dr. Milne's design to have 
continued them on to some more definite conclusion. This 
was reprinted at Malacca, in 1831,42 leaves. It was again re- 
printed at Singapore, in 1836, 42 leaves. A revised edition 
was cut at Hongkong, in 1844, 41 leaves. These blocks 
were sent to London, stereotyped and printed there. An 
edition of the same was printed at Shanghae, in 1847. The 
original was reprinted at Ningpo, in 1847, 35 leaves. A 
slightly modified edition was published by the Rev. J. L. 
Shuck, at Shanghae, in 1849, 35 leaves. A revised edition, 
by the Rev. W. C. Milne, was published at Shanghae in 1851, 
with the title J| jg ^ ^ ^0 fjjj}- Ch'dng yuen leang yew seang 
Tun, 24 leaves. This last was reprinted at Hongkong in 1851, 
27 leaves. Another revision was printed at Ningpo in 1851, 
with the title ZL fe ^3 tk Urh yew seeing liin, 30 leaves, An 
improved edition appeared at Shanghae, in 1858, under the 
title ^ ~& ZL /$C tk j$t K&® y^ 1 i tr h U^ w ? ! ' ni s h%h } 22 leaves. 
In this the narrative is compressed into 10 chapters, instead of 
12, the last of which was added by the Rev. J. Edkins, re- 
counting the complete conviction of Yuen, or as he is hen- 
called Yih, his baptism and admission into the church. This 
last was republished at Shanghae in 1861. 

12. -£- <3» H }$l !£ |H A"oo Jem shwg sze he tseth. Sacred 
History. 71 leaves. Malacca, 1819. One volume and part 
of a second were printed of this work, which Dr. Milne pro- 
posed to carry on to the end of the New Testament, and from 
that down to" the present time. The 1st volume contains the 
following 20 sections. — 1. The universe, not eternal, nor the 
work of' chance. 2. The order of the creation. 3. The two 
great progenitors of mankind in Eden. 4. The fall. 5. The* 
consequences of the fall. 6". The promise of a Saviour. 7. 
The institution of sacrifices. 8. Cain and Abel. 9. The 
antediluvian patriarchs. 10. The deluge. 1 I. The traces of 
the deluge still visible in all nations. 12. Concerning Noah's 
three sons. 13. Babel ; the confusion of tongues, and o 

of idolatry. 14. Call of Abraham. 15. Abraham'? journey 
to Canaan. 16. He goes down to Egypt. 17. Abraham and 
Lot. 18. Melchizedec. 19. Sarah,' Hagar, and Lshmaai. 
20. Destruction of Sodom and Gromorrah. 

13. *£*& H H jft jfc-MOv) tsae hed e liin eJiwb. Duty 
of Men in times of jmblic calamity. 131eaves. Malacca, L819. 
This tract is founded on Isaiah 26 : 9. It was inscribed to 



1> WILLIAM MILNK. 

influential Chinese, in a time of general sickness at Malacca; 
notices the extent of the existing calamity; their erroneous 
conceptions relative to the causes of such general afflictions; 
the lessons we ought to learn from the judgments of God; 
the false pleas which the heathen make for putting off all 
concern about their souls ; and concludes with exhortations to 
various classes of persons. 

14. H ^ t 'fT ^ San jyaou jin hwuy ten. Three benevo- 
lent Societies- 32 leaves. Malacca, 1821. The Missiona- 
ry, Tract and Bible Societies; treated according to the order 
of their establishment. In the introduction, the nature of 
the Gospel of Christ; its propagation; introduction into the 
nations of Europe; state of those nations before that time; 
and the numerous benevolent societies in the west, are briefly 
touched upon. 1. The Missionary Society. A translation 
of its rulj3s, with explanatory notes; its resources; its ope- 
rations among the heathen; methods it employs for the 
accomplishment of its object; a variety of doubts and objec- 
tions solved. The existence of other societies of a similar kind 
is noticed. 2. The Religious Tract Society. Translation of 
its plan, with notes; its operations ; nature and qualities of 
the publications it issues; its agents ; the methods of circula- 
tion, &c. 3. The British and Foreign Bible Society. Its 
plan, with notes; its vast and increasing operations; patron- 
age; annual receipts and expenditure; books issued; transla- 
tions, &c. Auxiliary Missionary, Tract, and Bible Societies 
are hinted at in this pamphlet, which closes by shewing that 
though these societies differ in their plans of operation, their 
object is the same; that they are equally founded in true be- 
nevolence; and that they are highly beneficial to mankind. 
Some freedom has been used in rendering the rules of these 
Institutions; one or two of mere temporary or local interest 
are left out — -and in several instances, two rules put together ; 
but the general sense is preserved throughout. 

[r >- & Jife 74* U $L *§- Tseiien t'e wan kwd he led. Sketch 
of the World. 30 leaves. Malacca, 1822. This is a brief out- 
line of Geography according to western notions, dividing the 
world into 4 continents: giving summary notes on the extent, 
population, capitals, government and languages of the several 
parts. 

16. $[5 f) lj j£ -p ~ [Jj] Heaiig heun woo shih urh tsih. 
Twelve Village sermon's. 70 leaves. Malacca, 1824. These 
discourses are as follows: — 1. True Happiness. 2. Christ the 
only Saviour. 3. Why the Heathen make light of the Gos- 
pel. 4. The wandering Shoe]) returned to the great shepherd. 
5. A well-spent Day. • (>. Discourse for the New-year. 7. 
The penitent Sinner seeking for Mercy. 8. Who are excluded 
from the Kingdom of God. 9. Braver. 10. The good man 



WILLIAM MILXK. ]<) 

in Affliction. 11. The happy Death of the Righteous. 12. 

A Thief in the Night. Although there are only twelve ser- 
mons in this hook, the literal translation of the title is "Fifty 
two village sermons ;" indicating that Dr. Milne had the in- 
tention of publishing to the number of one for each week 
throughout the year; hut this was never accomplished. The 
work was reprinted at Singapore, in 62 leaves. It was again 
reprinted at Ningpo in 1845, in 52 leaves. A- revised edition 
was cut at Hongkong, the blocks of which were stereotyped 
and printed from in London, 63 leaves. The same revision 
was printed at Ningpo, in 1845, 52 leaves. A thorough re- 
vision by the Rev. W. C. Milne, was printed at Shanghae, in 
1850, with the title jjig it J| f) jj Full yin hwang heun, 301eaves. 
This was again revised by the Rev. Dr. Medhurst, and printed 
at Shanghae in 1854, 49 leaves. A translation into the man- 
darin dialect was also made by Dr. Medhurst. See Medlmrst's 
works, Nos. 43 — 54 infra. 

17. _fc ^ H %k £V # H Shtmg U slung lcea6u hung 1, wily 
mun. The gate of God's Church. 30 leaves, Malacca. This 
consists of a preface, 20 questions for the candidate, and 
spiritual exercises previous and subsequent to the ordinance 
of baptism. 

18. fg $& M ^C 5^ Ling hwdn peen td iscucn. Treatise 
on the Soul. 183 leaves. Malacca, 1824. This is divided into 
eight chapters. 1. On the nature of the Soul. 2. Immorta- 
lity of the Soul. 3. Value of the Soul. 4. Preservation of 
the Soul. 5. Injury of the Soul. 6. Consequences of injuring 
the Soul. 7. Instruction derived from the doctrine of the 
Soul. 8. Reproof and exhortation from the doctrine of the Soul. 

19. ^ *=•' fjj f$ Shlng shoo tsee heae. Commentary on 
Ephesians. 104 leaves. Malacca, 1825. From the running 
title of this volume, it would appear that Dr. Milne merely 
intended this as an instalment towards a Commentary en the 
New Testament. There is a prefatory introduction often leaves. 

20. jfn(i % H fs Shin t'een shing shoo. The Holy lb' hie. 
Malacca, 1824. This was the joint production of Drs. Mor- 
rison and Milne. The portion translated by Dr. Milne was, — 
Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, 1 Samuel, 2 Samuel, 1 Kings, 
2 Kings, 1 Chronicles, 2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther 
and Job. 

21 fj| -fit; #f |j ft $jg f[} $. Tsa shi suli meiyue t'ung 
Ice chuen. Chinese Monthly Magazine 7 volumes. 524 leaves. 
Malacca, 1815—1821. This Serial was conducted and almost 
exclusively written by Dr. Milne, except some contributions 
to the later numbers by Dr. Morrison, Leang A-i'a the ( Ihinese 
convert, and the Rev. W. II. Medhurst. The contents taken 
generally may be given as, — The importance of knowing the 
true God— summary of the doctrine of Christ— the power of 



20 WIU.IAM MILNE. 

the invisible God — faith in Jesus — idolatry — goodness of God 
in providence and redemption — unity of God — doctrine of the 
Trinity — exhortation at the close of 1815 — explanation of 
passages of Scripture, where members of the human body are 
ascribed to God — a discourse on the spirituality of God, and 
the nature of divine worship, John 4: 24 — curses of the law of 
Moses — view of European principles of Astronomy —the sun 
the centre of the system — the planets — satellites — the earth 
considered as a planet — its spherical form — diurnal motion 
on its own axis — annual motion round the sun — address at 
the commencement of the year 1817 — sermon on being "new 
creatures" — discourse on human depravity — on the moon and 
her phases — comets — fixed stars — what is meant by being 
'•dead in trespasses and sins" — omniscience and omnipresence 
of God — Labour for the meat that endureth to everlasting 
life — Paul's description of charity — exhortations to godliness 
— God so loved the world, &c. — repentance — to have our con- 
versation in the world in simplicity and godly sincerity — 
eclipses of the sun — to die is gain — eclipses of the moon — ■ 
pagan objections against Christianity answered — evils of an 
erroneous adherence to the ancients — explanation of Romans 
1:32 — good men should be zealous to spread knowledge — 
the ancients offered sacrifices to the sun — pagan objections 
answered — on death — the celestial globe, with an interpreta- 
t i< >n of the Latin names of 93 constellations — murder will 
out — things that England does not produce — reflections on 
the Scriptures — God is the Lord — evening conversation be- 
tween two friends — Daniel in the lion's den — steam ships. 
Also a great variety of shorter pieces, things of ephemeral mo- 
ment — anecdotes — news — religious intelligence, &c. Kos. 3, 
4, 8, 11, 12, 13, and 15 supra were originally published 
in this Magazine. 

ENGLISH. 

22. The Sacred Edict, containing sixteen maxims of the 
emperor Kang-he, amplified by his sun, the emperor Yoong- 
ching; together with a Paraphrase on the whole, by a Man- 
darin, pp. 2!)9. London, 817. 

23. A Retrospect of the first ton years of the Protestant 
Mission to China,, (now, in connection with the Malay, deno- 
minated, the Ultra-Ganges Missions.) Accompanied with 
Miscellaneous Remarks on the Literature, History, and My- 
thology of China, &c. pp. viii, 376. Malacca, 1820. 

2 1. The Indo-Chinese Gleaner. Containing miscellan- 
eous communications on the Literature, History, Philosophy, 
togy, &c. of the Indo-Chinese nations, drawn chiefly from 
dative languages. Christian Miscellanies; and general 



WILLIAM MILNE. 21 

news. Malacca, 1817—1822. This Magazine which came 
out quarterly was edited, and for the greater part written bv 
Dr. Milne. J 

Leans Kung-fa, known generally as A-fa, was born in the 
year 1789, about seventy miles distant from Canton, in the 
province of Kwang-tung. His parents being poor, they were 
unable to provide any means of education for him till lie was 
eleven years old. He then entered the village school, where 
he continued three or four 3-ears, during which time he studied 
the canonical Four Books, three of the Five Classics, and the 
Sacred Edict. He was now compelled to leave Ids parental 
In .me, in search of a livelihood, and came to Canton, where 
he tried the trade of a pencil maker, but ultimately took up 
the occupation of cutting wooden blocks for printing; in which 
he continued four years with one master, and shortly after 
left for a neighbouring village. In 1810, he was called home 
on account of his mother's death; but soon after returned to 
follow his trade again in Canton and the neighbourhood. 
About the middle of April 1815, he accompanied Mr. Milne 
to Malacca, to assist in printing Chinese books. About this 
time, he became very anxious about his spiritual state, but 
finding no relief from Buddhist practices, he was led by the 
domestic instructions of Mr. Milne, to place his trust in 
Christ as the Saviour; and on the 3rd of November, 181b', he 
was received into the Christian Church by baptism, adminis- 
tered by Mr. Milne. In April, 1819, he returned to China 
to visit his family; but finding his friends wholly given to 
idolatry, he prepared and engraved a tract for their edifica- 
tion; a work which led to his apprehension Jby the police, 
when the books and blocks were all destroyed. After two 
days Dr. Morrison procured his release; but not before he 
had received thirty blows with the bamboo, and had seventy 
dollars extorted from him. After his release, he spent forty 
days with his family, and then returned to Malacca. 1 a 1821 K 
he again visited China, when he succeeded in gaining over 
his wife to the cause of Christ, and baptized her; after which 
he went back to Malacca in 1821, where he remained till the 
death of Dr. Milne the following year. In 1823, he returned 
again to his native place, and on the 20th of November that 
year, he took his infant son to Dr. Morrison, who bapl 
him, with the name Leung Tsin-tih. A-fa was then employed 
by the London Missionary Society, as a Nati : Dr. 

Morrison having set him apart that year as an Evangel i 
his countrymen, and ordained him more especially to 
of preaching in 1827. lb' had a daughter born in L829; and 
in 1832. he was called to mourn over the :\^i\}i of another 
child. For several years he continued zealously to cine 



22 WILUAM MILHE. 

print ami distribute Christian books among his countrymen 
in the province of Kwang-tang, frequently attending at the 
literary examinations for that purpose, as well in the district 

cities as in the provincial capital. After the death of Dr. 
Morrison in 1834, A-fa and other native Christians were ap- 
prehended and imprisoned fur circulating hooks, their release 
having been subsequently procured by Mr. J. E. Morrison, on 
the payment of a large sum of money. By the advice of his 
friends, A-fa then removed again with a son named Lon to 
Malacca for a time, where he was usefully employed in 
preaching the gospel, and other mission work. In 1837, he 
was attached to the Malacca station; and the following year 
joined the mission at Singapore. In July, 1839, he returned 
to China, and continued stedfast in the faith, proclaiming 
the truth from day to day, to his countrymen, till death 
closed his career A. D. 1855, at the age of 66. 
The following are some o*f his published works: — 

1- ilk i£ $$ Jit U '!- M- ^ w s hz teh t s ° y a 9 u 1™ kea>€. 

Miscellaneous Exhortations. 37 leaves. Canton, 1819. This 
contains a preface concerning Grod as the Creator, and object of 
worship, to which the ten Commandments are attached — 
passages in the 2nd Chapter of the Hebrews — 2 Peter, 2nd 
chapter — whole of the 1st chapter, and part of the 2nd, 3rd 
and 4th of James, explained — 2 Timothy 3: 15 — 1 Peter 3: 
10 to the end— 1 Peter 4: 3 to 10—1 John 1 : 8, 9— James 
5th — three hymns and prayers. As the composition of a 
Christian Chinese mechanic, who was totally unacquainted 
with the gospel six years before, this tract cannot be expected 
to display a deep acquaintance with theology; but it appears 
on the whole evangelical, serious and useful. It was first 
submitted to Dr. Morrison, and having obtained his approval, 
A-fa printed 200 copies for distribution. While thus engaged, 
he was carried off to prison, and the blocks and books seized 
and burnt by the police officers. In all his publications, he 
assumed the epithet of ^ H lied shen, "Student of. Excel- 
lence,'' or .«i || jg -£ Had shen keu sze, "Ketirecl student 
of Excellence." 

2 - !& ^ H M H& tm Shuh hed slang le Jed hin. Perfect 
acquaintance with the Holy Doctrine. 9 leaves. Canton, 1828. 
This is an autobiographical sketch of the author's religious 
life, conversion, baptism, and subsequent circumstances, 
printed about midsummer of the year above named; but there 
was probably a previous edition. 

3. la ;£ii'.J ||r *M M Chin ta6u wan ta ts'een Jceae. A Cate- 
chism (a, the Ten Commandments and the duties of Christianity. 
14 leaves. Malacca, 1829. 

4 - H H t& W % M JfJ Shtng shoo jili Vq ts'oo hed 
peen yung. Scripture Lessons for the young. 3 vols. Canton, 



WILLIAM MILNK. 



1831. This is a translation of the Scripture Lessons of the 
British and Foreign School Society. The blocks were cul and 
a small edition was printed by subscription among tb 

and American residents. A second edition was published in 

1832, at the expense of the British and Foreign School Society. 
5. i$) [it JJL ■= K'euen she leang yen. Good Words exhor- 
ting the Age. This is a collection of 9 tracts, revised by Dr. 
Morrison, and printed at Canton in 1832. It has gain d 
considerable celebrity, as being the work from which Hung 
Seu-tseuen is said to have gained his first knowledge of 
Christianity. The following is a summary of their contents: — 

[1] jE [%. ;|fc -fll ~$£ Chin chuen hew she" wan. A true Ac- 
count of the salvation of Mankind. This contains, — A para- 
phrastic version of the 3rd chapter of Genesis, — An exposure 
of the idolatry of China. — 1st chapter of Isaiah, — and 5th, 
6th, and 7th chapters of Matthew. 

[2.] ^ if. p|j Jj|5 pjn}- Ts'ung chin p'cih seay Inn. Following 
the True and rejecting the False. The contents are — Discour- 
ses on John 3 : lY,— Matthew 19 : 23,— Isaiah 8 : 19,— and 
John 3: 1-21. 

[3.] A collection of various Tracts. These are — jpt $j? |jg 
Jg Chin hin< i shine/ Jc. The Holy Truths contained in the 
true Scriptures. — the last part of which is a discourse on the 
One, Lord, the Creator of the Universe ;— flj [Iff p ;j& %t Tae 
shuli tsriy hew she. On redemption by Christ; — ?M M. W\ ] W 
jH Siring king shin she peen. Psalms from the Scriptures, — 
containing the 19th, and 33: 4-22,— 1| $g J£J S jili Shing 
king e sue yd. Extract from Isaiah, — containing 45 : 5-21, — 
le fn I'J iS m Shiny king cliw&ng she peen, Extract from 
Genesis, — containing the 1st chapter, and an additional ar- 
ticle on original righteousness. 

[4.] |g $j? || jf$ Shing king tsa keaS. Miscellaneous ex- 
planations of Holy Scripture. This contains, — DiscourE 
John 6 : 27, — Romans 2 : 1, — Ecelesiastes 2 : 11, — and the 
Flood, from Genesis 6th and 7th chapters. 

P>-] §? M. $t n'ra SMng king tsa h'm. .Miscellaneous state- 
ments founded on the lloly Scriptures. This contains — Dis- 
courses on Matthew 16: 26, — 2 Corinthians 5: LO,— John 3: 
16,-1 John 1 : 9— James 1 : 20, 21,-2 Peter 3 : 8,— Acts 
17: 24,— Hebrews 12: 6, 7,-1 Corinthians 4: 20- 1 Corin-, 
thians 15: 32, 33,— Matthew 24: 35,-1 Timothy -i : 4.— 
Matthew 6: 31, 32,— Romans 10: 13, 14— and 1 Thessalo- 
nians2: 4, — Paraphrases of R minis 12th and 13th chapl srs,— 
Destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, — and Paraphrases oi 
James 5th chapter. 

[*>•] th #- M- M m Shith heo chin U lun. Perfect acquain- 
tance witn the true Doctrine. 221eaves. This contains— the 
58th chapter of Isaiah,— 5th chapter of Ephesians,— the 



24 V/ILMAM MILNE. 

author's autobiography, being a revision and enlargement of 
the tract No 2 supra, — on suffering reproach, — Acts 22nd 
chapter, with a short preface, — 1 Timothy 2nd and 3rd chap- 
ters, — and Revelation 22nd chapter. 

[?]• ■*£ M f£§ JlM m ® an wel hwofuhpeen. On obtaining 
Happiness whether in Peace or Peril. This contains — Dis- 
courses on Acts 14 : 22, — Matthew 18 : 6, — and Hebrews 
12: 25, — 1 Corinthians 1 & 2 chapters, — 1 Corinthians 13th 
chapter, — 1 John 4th chapter, — Exemption from calamity and 
possession of all good obtained by the righteous in the future 
life, — and the Misery of those who reject the Grospel. 

[S.] W. fg $jf ef Chin king kih yen. Excellent sayings 
from the true Scriptures. — This contains, — Jeremiah 23 : 19 
-33,— Discourses on 1 Thessalonians 5: 21,-2 Peter 3: 10,— 
and 1 John 4 : 5, 6, — Paraphrase of Genesis 4th chapter, — 
and a Discourse on 1 Peter 4:17. 

[•*•] ~£i M. fJ[. 5c K°° hw i 9 tseih yaou, Selections from the 
ancient Scriptures. The contents of this are — Acts 19th 
chapter, — Ephesians Gth chapter, — and 1 Thessalonians 5th 
chapter, — Discourses on James 4': 13, 14, — 1 Timothy 6 : 6- 
8, — and 1 Timothy 1 : 15, — Commentary on Collossians 5th 
chapter, — Refutation of various errors, — and a Discourse on 
the day of Judgment. 

These works were revised and reprinted at Malacca, as 
nine separate tracts. Four of them were again reprinted with 
modifications at Singapore, in a collection, with the title. ^ 
jH m -{It ||. || Keen seuen k'euen she yaou yen. Selection 
of important words to admonish the age, 62 leaves. This 
contains No. [1] supra, with the omission of the three chapters 
in Matthew, and the 1st chapter of Isaiah, except the 2-4 
verses. No. [2] begins with the Discourse on Isaiah 8 : 19; 
after which follows the Discourse on John 3 : 17; the rest 
being omitted. The next is the first section of No. [3]. The 
concluding one is the same in title as No. [5], but consists of 
Discourses on James 1 : 20, 21, — Corinthians 4 : 17, — John 
3: 16, — audi John 1 : 9. Another eclectic compilation, taken 
from most o£ the above tracts was published at Singapore, 
with the title >J£ jiig y& j]]f| 3Jf- fj^ K'avfuh m'een ho yaou Inn. 
Important Discourse on seeking Happiness and escaping Mi- 
isery. 82 leaves. This consists of Discourses on 1 Timothy 
1 : 15, [9]— Romans 10 : 13, 14, [5]— Hebrews 12 : 2.3, [7]— 
1 Thessalonians 5 : 21 [8]— 2 Peter 3 : 10 [8]— the day of 
J iidgment, [9] — Exemption from calamity and possession of all 
good obtained by the righteous in the future life, [7] — Misery 
of those who reject the Gospel, [7]— 1 John 4 : 5, 6, [8]— 
Matthew 6 : 31,32, [5]— 1 Thessalonians 2 : 4, [5]— John 6 : 
27. | -i I Refutation of various errors, [9]— Matthew 1-6: 26, 
[5] Humans 2 : 1, |4J— James 4 : 13, 14, [9]— 1 Corinthians 



WALTER IIENttY MEDIIUUST. 



li.J 



4 : 20 [5]— 1 Corinthians 15 : 32, 33, [51— and Matthew 24 : 
35. [5]. 

6- ifx if 'X IS # pf ^' e ' * a ® M ^ n tsdn shin she. Prayers 
and Hymns. GO pages. Macao, 1833. This is the Morning ser- 
vice of the Church of England; the Prayers being composed 
by Leang Afa, pp. 44; and the Hymns by Morrison and others. 
(See above, Morrison's Works, No. 12). It is printed on 
both sides of the paper, with moveable types, which Dr. Mor- 
rison had cut for the occasion. 

7. A sheet tract on the Vanity of Idols, taken from the 
44th chapter of Isaiah. 

Although these are the only works issued by Afa of which 
we have any record, they clo not by any means comprise the 
whole of what he wrote and published in the missionary cause. 



IV. ^ jgp Jg. Mih Too-sze. WALTER HENRY MED- 
HURST was born in London on the 29th ofApril, 1796, and 
was educated at St. Paul's Cathedral School. He went to 
Gloucester at the age of fourteen, where he was apprenticed 
to a printer named Wood. Some time after, he became a 
member of the Independent congregation meeting in South- 
gate street chapel, under the ministry of the Rev. W. Bishop, 
the immediate agent of his conversion. Having re] died to an 
advertisement for a printer to join the mission at Malacca, he 
was accepted by the Directors of the London Missionary 
Society ; spent a few months prior to his departure at Hack- 
ney College, then under the charge of Dr. Collison, and em- 
barked from England in September, 1S16. The vessel in 
which he sailed being obliged to put in at Madras, which he 
reached the 10th of February 1817, he was detained there 
some months; and in the interim entered into a matrimonial 
alliance with a lady of the maiden name of Elizabeth Martin, 
the widow of Captain Browne an Indian officer. He readied 
his destination at Malacca on June 12th, where he immediate- 
ly relieved Mr. Milne of the duties of the printing office. 
Without an exclusive restriction to this sphere however, he 
gave himself with all diligence to the study of the langi 
and engaged in the duties of teaching and preaching. His first 
son was born March 27, and died May 14, 1818. Early in the 
spring of 1819, he visited Penang, where he distributed I 
and established schools. The aptitude he had shewn in the 
matter of preaching, induced his colleagues to ordain him to 
the sacred office, the rite having been performed at Malacca, 
April 27th of that same year. On November 16th, his daughter 
Sarah Sophia was born. Towards the close of 1820, he again 
visited Penang, from whence, after spending a year in mission 
work, he removed to Batavia, and organized the various 



o(j WALTER 1IKXUV MEtifiUIlST. 

hiancli's of a mission establishment. In the beginning of 
August, '1828, he went to Singapore, from which he took his 

departure in a Chinese junk on the 22nd of that month, and 
visited several places on the Malayan Peninsula, but failing 
to find Messrs. Tomlin and Gutzlalf, of whom he was in search, 
he returned to Singapore on the 6 th i >f October. He next pro- 
d to Borneo, where he visited a number of Chines' sel i Le- 
rnents, and returned to Batavia on the 18th of January, 1829. 
On the 14th November of the same year, he left Batavia in com- 
pany with the Rev. J. Tomlin, on a journey along the north-east 
coast of Java, to the island of Bali, returning to his station 
on the 24th January, 1830. Through his means, the Para- 
pattan Orphan Asylum in Batavia was established in 1833, 
to feed, clothe and educate the orphans of Christian parents. 
Subsequent to the decease of Dr. Morrison, the small com- 
munity of Christians at Canton had been left without a pastor; 
and with a view to ascertain the condition of matters there, 
Mr. Medhurst paid them a visit in the summer of 183.5, reach- 
ing Canton on the 21st July. Thence he embarked on the 
26th of August, in company with the Rev. E. Stevens, for a 
voyage along the coast of China, in order to ascertain the 
facilities for tract distribution and preaching. By the middle 
of September, they were on the north side of the Shantung 
promontory, where they landed at several places, and on their 
way back visited Shanghae, the island of Poo-too and other 
parts, arriving at the anchorage at Lin-tin on the 31st of 
October. Having returned to Batavia without delay, on the 
6th of April 1836, Mr. Medhurst embarked for England via 
Rotterdam, and reached London on the 5th of August. While 
there, he heard of the death of his eldest daughter, the wife of 
the Rev. II. Lockwood at Batavia. July 31st, 1838, he 
sailed from England, and arrived in Batavia on the 5th No- 
vember. The treaty between England and China, having 
come into force in 1843, he left Batavia at the instigation of 
the directors to be present at a conference with his colleagues 
of the London Mission in August, at Hongkong. There 
also he attended a series of general meetings of the missionary 
body, which took place from August 22nd to September 
4th, regarding the translation of the Scriptures, a work in 
which lie was to take a principal part. About the middle 
of December, he took up his residence at Shanghae, in com- 
pany with his medical colleague, Mr. W.Lockhart; and the same 
year he appears to have received the degree of D. D. from a 
university in America. He remained at Shanghae, with the 
exception of occasional excursions in the country, sometimes 
for weeks together, till 1856 ; when being invited by the direc- 
tors of the Society to return to his native land, he left Shanghae 
on the 10th September, and landed at Southend oil the 21st 



VYALTER HENRY MEDHURST. 27 

January 1857, reaching London the next day; and died there on 
the 24th. lie was honoured with a public funeral at Ahney 
Park cemetery, where he was buried on the 30th. Beside:-; 
an afflicted widow, he left a son, then Consul at Fuh-chow, 
and three daughters, Mrs. Hillier, widow of the Consul- 
general at Siam, Mrs. Saul, the widow of a merchant in 
Batavia, and Augusta the youngest of the family 

The following are his principal literary productions: — 

CHINESE. 

1- it M fM m. W& f# T ' c ^ P g en t'ung led chuen. Geogra- 
phical Catechism. 21 leaves. Malacca, 1819. This sum- 
mary contains four maps ; one of the world, one of China, one 
of Asia, and one of Europe. It notices the general divisions 
of the globe, the boundaries, extent, productions, population, 
and religions of the principal countries in the world ; such as 
China, India, Persia, Palestine, Egypt, Russia, Germany, 
England, America, &c. &c. This is a short elementary work 
for the use of schools. It was first published in successive 
numbers of the 5th volume of Dr. Milne's Chinese Magazine. 

2- H ^=f $c 8 an tszelaing. Three character Classic. 17 leaves. 
Batavia. 1823. This popular little tract is formed after the 
model of the Chinese work of the same name, and contains a 
portion of Christian truth, conveyed in a plain and easy man- 
ner. In this and many of his subsequent publications, Mr. 
Medhurst assumed the epithet ^ <$§ ^ Slicing till chay, '"'One 
who esteems virtue." A subsequent edition was issued 
at Batavia in 1828. This was reprinted at Malacca in 
1832, and a small-sized edition appeared at Singapore 
in 1839. It was revised and recut at Hongkong in 1843, 
the blocks being sent to London, stereotyped and printed 
in 1846. A new edition was put through the press at 
Shaaghae in 1845; and a reprint from the stereotype plates, 
at the same press in 1848. The same year, it was reprinted, in 
a smaller type, at the Presbyterian Mission Press at Ningpo. 
In 1851, it underwent a complete and thorough revision by 
Dr. Medhurst, which was printed at Shanghae the same year; 
at Hongkong and also Amoy the following year; and again at 
Shanghaein 1856. The work has been several times published 
with a Commentary ; once by the author, under the title 
H ^ M pi W- & ail t sz e ^ lv 'J c 'J< o6 k ea $, in 43 leaves. Another 
commented edition appeared at Ningpo, in 1847, with the 
title H ^ M. !£ # ® an ts: - l: & n 9 ( ^° 6 s ^h m 16 leaves ; and 
a revision of the same has been more recently published at 
the sana.' press, in 17 leaves, with pictorial embellishments, 
under the title |f ffj M- Si H ^ fM |f P & Cw sedng chin U 
,s<n/ is;:6 Icing cho6 shih. 



28 WALTER HENRY MEDHURST. 

3. >J> ^ % Jg J| f| j£ it $j| Seabu tsze ts'oo full e sM 
die shoo Ic'6. Child's Primer. 14 leaves. Batavia, 1824. 
This small work contains a summary of the elements of 
Knowledge, sacred and secular, somewhat analogous to Blair's 
Preceptor, but written in rhyming lines of four characters 
< ach, and divided into lessons. An augmented edition was 
printed at Batavia in 1836' ; and a revision, at Malacca, with 
the title |g §J # fg Ting urh shoo k'6. 

4- ^ c § p t!i tU piiif K<" nn lewpa tsunglun. History of Java. 
85 leaves. Batavia, 1824. This is illustrated by several maps 
and plates. It was reprinted in 1825, 1829, 1833, and 1834. 

5. ^f £}| m ||f- Ch'e seuen tsb yaou. Monthly Magazine. 
4 volumes. Batavia, 1823-1826. This was intended as a 
continuation of Dr. Milne's Cliinese Magazine, and contains a 
variety of matter, religions, historical and miscellaneous. The 
History of Java, noticed above, was first printed in this by 
monthly instalments. 

6- Wi $1 H fjf M >& M Tabu i%h hlnrj fa yu sin peen. 
Eise and Progress of Religion in the Soul. 40 leaves. Batavia, 
1826. This is a translation of the first nine chapters of Dod- 
dridge's work of the same name, which appeared first in 
successive numbers of the Monthly Magazine. It was re- 
printed in 1828, 1829, 1832, and 1833. 

7 - 4* 1^ : If 5t M ^ if ft ~& Chung hioa choo heung Wing 
ho sin lie wan. Tract on the New year. 7 leaves. Batavia, 
1826. This is an exhortation to the Chinese residents in Java, 
to guard against excesses at the New year season ; specially 
notifying the four sins of Prodigality, Drunkenness, Gambling 
and Superstitious practices. It was first published in the 
Monthly Magazine, and was reprinted at Batavia in 1828, 
1833, and 1834; and again at Singapore. 

8- fp'l ty] Iff/ H ;£. f ifr Ts'ing ming sa6u mo6 che Km. Feast 
of the Tombs. 7 leaves. Batavia, 1826. This is a discussion 
of the practice common among the Chinese, of offering annual 
sacrifices at the graves of their ancestors, on the Tsing-ming 
term day (April 6.) It was first published in the Monthly 
Magazine, and was reprinted at Batavia, in 1828, 1833, and 
1834; and again at Singapore. A thorough revision of this 
tract by the author, was published at Shanghae in 1854, 
with the title J!J- % flij 1f| f p Yay Jcih wan nan ke. and reprinted 
in 1863. 

9. Sayings of Jesus. 7 leaves. Batavia, 1826. This was 
reprinted at Batavia, in J834 and 1836. 

10 - p : lit i: fit P'ob t'06 she sMh che Km. On Feed- 
ing the Gliosis. 8 leaves. Batavia, 1826. This discusses 
the Buddhist custom of setting out feasts for the hungry 
spirits, in the middle of the 7th month. It appeared first 
in fche'Monthly Magazine, and was reprinted at Batavia, in 



WALTER HENRY MEDNL'RST. 2 ( J 

1828, 1833, and 1834; and again at Singapore. 

11. jMM.^&U ^%Ma tsod p'd sang jili die lun. 
Birth-day of Ma-tsoo-poo. 5 leaves. Batavia, 1826. This 
is a discussion of the origin and history of Ma-tsoo-poo, the 
idol worshipped by Chinese sailors, and especially feted on 
the 23rd day of the 3rd month, her reputed birth-day. It 
was first published in the Monthly Magazine, and was re- 
printed at Batavia in 1828, and 1833; and afterwards at Sin- 
gapore. 

12. jjiiji % -f* f£*if£ #f[f£ $j? Shin t'een slali tfeaou siting 
keae dio6 Iceae. Exposition of the Moral Law. 94 leaves. 
Batavia, 1826. This is a detailed explanation of the Deca- 
logue, in sixteen chapters, which had been previously delivered 
in the form of lectures. The preface is followed by an intro- 
ductory chapter; after which is a homily on each of the Ten 
Commandments. This is succeeded by discourses on — The ob- 
ject of the Decalogue, — The Sin of Breaking the Law, — The 
Wages of Sin, — Salvation not by the Law, but by Christ, — 
Kepentance and Faith. It was first published in successive 
numbers of the Monthly Magazine, and was reprinted at Ba- 
tavia in 1828, 1829, 1832, 1833, and 1835; again at Malacca, 
in 1832, having been much altered and improved; and at 
Singapore in 1840, in 128 leaves, with the title, jji$ ^C *L 
-p H? ^ ~£ nj] Shin t'een die skill t'eaou heae clioo ming. 
It was revised and printed at Shangae in 1845, with the 
title -J- f^ jfy ^ BJJ Shih t'eaou hea.e clioo mhig , in 103 leaves. 
The last three discourses were revised and published as a se- 
parate tract in 25 leaves, with the title ilf Ji §£ H fif jj£ Sin 
tsdng siting shoo tse'e cho6. The last one was again revised 
and printed by itself at Shanghae, in 184G, in 9 leaves, with 
the title f^ j^- Jlji fg Jf|J $$ Lun hwuy tsily sin yily soo. After 
another revision, it was again printed at Shanghae by move- 
able type, in 1849, with the 15th chapter of Luke, as an ap- 
pendix, in 8 leaves, with the same title; and again reprinted 
at the same press in 1851, without the appendix, in 7 leaves. 
A greatly modified revision of the 3rd chapter, on Idolatry, 
was published at Shanghae, in 1846, in 8 leaves, with the 
title f ^ fy ffi j^ \% Lun wuli jme gdw sating. This was a- 
gain revised and printed at the same press in 1849, in 8 leaves, 
with some additional matter, and a portion of the 17th chap- 
ter of Acts at the end. 

13. 51 tfc $( g& Heung te sen fan. Fraternal Dialogues. 
26 leaves. Batavia, 1828. This is a series of conversations 
between two brothers, regarding idolatry and other Chinese 
practices. It was first published in parts, in the Monthly 
Magazine, and was reprinted at Batavia in 1832 and 1834. 

14. S$ tKZI&tfo T' ( ~' h° die sze Van. On walking over the 
Fire. 5 leaves. Batavia, 1828. This is a discussion of one 



30 WALTER HENRY MEDiruRST. 

of the fanatical rites of the Taouists. A new edition was 
printed by lithography at Batavia in 1833, in 7 leaves; and 
a third edition in lo leaves was issued at the same press in 
1834, and reprinted in 1835. 

15. Chinese School Book. 1G leaves. Batavia, 1828. This 
was printed by lithography, and reprinted in 1832. It ap- 
pears to be a revis! d and corrected edition of a work written 
originally by the llev. J). Colli*.'. 

16. jjl ~$ j|j fji fn fe Tung se she he J/ 6 lio. Comparative 
Chronology. 40 leaves. Batavia, 1829. This work, which is 
printed by lithography, was again printed the same year 
at Malacca, by wooden blocks. It exhibits the Chinese and 
European accounts in parallel columns. The similarity be- 
tween the more authentic records of the Chinese, and the 
Scripture history, is remarkable. According to both, the 
human race sprang from one individual, the flood occurred 
about the same time, preceded by the. discovery of metals, and 
followed by that of wine. The seven years famine of Egypt 
nearly synchronize with those of China; and Sampson's strength 
and fall have their counterpart in the east. The work was 
drawn up to correct the vain boasting of the Chinese, and to 
shew them that we possess records four thousand years ear- 
lier than the Christian era. It was reprinted at Malacca, in 
1833, in 30 leaves. 

17. M M li^p& Tdy soo skull tsuy die ten. Tract 
on Eedemption. 21 leaves. Batavia, 1829. This was first 
published in the Monthly Magazine, and was reprinted at 
Batavia in 1832. An enlarged edition was published at the 
same press in 1833, and reprinted in 1835. 

18. p p Eeang Lewi. Village Sermons. 39 leaves. Ba- 
tavia, 1829. This series of discourses, on — The Miracles of 
Christ, — Avoiding anxiety, — The knowledge of one's sins. &c. 
was first published in the Monthly Magazine. Bart of it was 
reprinted in 1832, at Batavia, in 14 leaves. 

19- i") ^ & f£ M B M & Wan id ts'een cJwo y&y soo 
keaCufd. Assembly's Catechism. 20 leaves. Batavia, 1832. 
Printed by lithography. This is a much closer translation 
than Dr. Morrison's work with the same title, adhering liter- 
ally to the Westminster model throughout. 

20. jji;|i 38g &§ ffc Shin U tsunglun. Discourse on Theo- 
logy. 100 leaves. Batavia, 1833. Lithography. The founda- 
tion of this work on the Divine attributes, in 29 chanters, is 
grounded on Bogue's Theological Lectures, and Dwight's 
Theology, adapted to the Chinese style as much as possisble. 
It was reprinted the same year at Malacca, in 105 leaves, by 
xylography. A second volume of 108 leaves, was published, 
by lithography at Batavia, in 1834, treating of the Creation 
and Fallot' Man, in 14 additional chapters. The first volume 



WALTER HENRY MEDHURST. 31 

was revised and printed in small sections by lithography, at 
Batavia in 1836. A revision of the same was printed at Shang- 
hai, in ] 844, in 97 leaves, with the title % jljjj Jg£ f^ T'ikn 
leyaoulun. This was reprinted by the Tae-ping insurgents 
at Nanking, with some slight modifications, in 1854. 

21. Important selections. 32 leaves. Batavia, 1834. 

22. 7f(g Of |p§ f a Fnh yin teavu ho. Harmony of the Gospels. 
8 books. 200 leaves. Batavia. 1834. Lithography. Two 
successively revised editions of this work were published at 
the same press, the following year. It was reprinted at Ma- 
lacca in 1835, and at Singapore in 1837, in 180 leaves. 

23. Tract on the being of a God. 8 leaves. Batavia, 1834. 
Lithography. This was reprinted at the same press the fol- 
lowing year. • 

24. tm H ^ A 5E Luii slicn gojin sze. Death of the Good 
and Bad. 6 leaves. Batavia. This, which is a translation of 
"Poor Joseph'' and "Death of Altamont," two tracts issued 
by the British and Foreign Tract Society, was first publish- 
ed in successive volumes of the Monthly Magazine. It was 
revised and printed at Malacca in 1821), and 1835, in 8 leaves ; 
again reprinted at Singapore in 1837, in 8 leaves; again re- 
vised and printed at Hongkong in 1844, in 10 loaves ; and 
this last edition was stereotyped and printed at London in 1847; 
a revisal of the Singapore edition was printed at Ningpo the 
same year, in 7 leaves. A revised edition, forming two tracts, 
was published at Shahghae in 1853, with the titles f4" ^ ffl 
i^ ty) j£L $ k l J(n chay yo silt ming taou hln, 4 leaves, and V& j$ 
P"5 £l 5E ~$k Jf'J tk Yd td n/it/i lin sze iuci Ji ng lun, 5 leaves. 
Both these have an appendix of Scripture texts. 

25. tf ill fH tr Sin e chaou shoo. New Testament, 325 
leaves. Batavia, 1837. Lithography. This version was 
nominally 'the work of a Committee consisting of Messrs Med- 
hnrst, Gutzlaff, Bridgman, and J. E. Morrison, in 1835; but it 
was understood to be chiefly the work of Mr. Medhurst, and 
underwent a final revision by him, when he returned to Eng- 
land in 1836. Modified editions of tins were also published 
at Singapore and Serampore. A new translation of the Old 
Testament was also the result of the joint labours of Messrs. 
Gutzlaif and Medhurst. 

26. fjft f I f If Jj| Lun yu sin tswan. The Lun-yu newly 
modelled. 82 leaves. Batavia, 1840. Lithography. Thisis 
a collection of Moral and Religious Sayings, compiled after 
the plan of the Chinese work Lun-yu; selections from the 
text of that work being given alternately with quotations from 
the Old and New Testaments. It was reprinted by xy! 
pliy, at Singapore, in 1841. 

27. f$ ff< ff m Qow sedng shoo peen. Tract on Idol 

30 leaves. Batavia. Lithography. This consists entirely of 



32 WALTKR HKXItY HKDHCBST. 

quotations of passages from the Old and New Testaments 
against Idolatry. 

28. _£ '7j? ^ ;£ tfo Slicing testing jih che lien. Discourse 
on the Birth-day of Heuen-t'een Shang-te. 4 leaves. Batavia. 
This was first published in the 2nd volume of the Monthly 
M;ej;azine. It was reprinted at Singapore. 

29- 3i| >(j> jji$ ||f Yang sin shin she. Hymn book. 46 leaves. 
Batavia. Lithography. This is a translation of 71 Hymns, 
chiefly from Rippon and Watts, with one from the Olney 
Collection. After a most thorough revision, this was repub- 
lished at Shanghae, with the title ^ '£ |f ^ Tsung choo she 
peen, in 77 leaves, 1856. 

30. j§ l] -fli; jg f£ f^ Gh'ivang she leih tae chuen. Genealogy 
from the Creation. This is the first eleven chapters of Genesis, 
with commentaiy. 

34. H? ;f£ H 2S Shing keaou yaou U. Important Princi- 
ples of Religion. 13 leaves. Shanghae, 1844. This is a brief 
detail of the chief points of Christian doctrine, the Apostles' 
Creed, Ten Commandments, and Lord's Prayer, with a series 
of questions in the catechetical form. 

32. jjjjf H ^ ~$C K'e iaou shih wan. Forms of Prayer. 26 
leaves. Shanghae, 1844. Lithography. This is a form of 
Prayer for the Morning and Evening of each day of the week. 
Another edition was printed the same year, at the same press, 
by xylography, in 25 leaves. A translation of the same into 
the Shanghae dialect, was also published the same year, in 31 
leaves. 

43. $f| ^| Tsd peen. Miscellaneous pieces. 58 leaves. 
Shanghae, 1844. This contains the narrative of Poor Joseph, 
and the Death of Altamont (see No. 24 supra), the 1, 10, 
23, 32, 100, 103, 107, 110, 113, 115, 117, 139, 145, and 146 
Psalms, David's prediction of the Messiah, Birth of Christ fore- 
told by Isaiah, Luke 15th chapter, John 3rd chapter, Hebrews 
1st chapter, and Revelation 20th chapter, with occasional 
remarks. 

34. jBf. J!g 3§ j|f Chin Je thing ta6u. Course of Sermons. 
351 leaves. Shanghae, 1846. This is a series of 74 dis- 
courses, printed weekly by Dr. Medhurst, when he took up 
his residence in Shanghae, and distributed singly among the 
congregation on Sunday, while he delivered the same in sub- 
stance to them in the Mandarin dialect. Together they form 
a system of Theology, under the following heads : — The Be- 
ing of a God, — Refutation of Objections, — Unity of God, — 
Eternit}'- of God, — Omnipresence and Omniscience of God, — 
Omnipotence of God, — Love of God, — Goodness of God, — 
Righteousness of God, — Compassion of God, — Wisdom of 
(Jed, — Creation of the Heavens, — Angels, — Evil spirits,— 
Earth, — Man, — The Soul, — The most important of Human 



WALTER HENRY MEDH0RST. 33 

affairs,— Grod's first Command — The sin of our first Parents, 
— Condemnation of the World, — All Men are Sinners,' — Sin 
of rejecting Religion, — Vanity of seeking self-justification, — 
(lod sent his son to save the World, — Revelation, — Divinity 
of Christ, — Humanity of Christ, — Instruction of Christ, — 
Prevision of Christ, — Priesthood of Christ, — Holiness of Christ, 
— Example of Christ, — Doctrine of Salvation, — Salvation by 
Christ. — Christ's Intercession, — Kingdom of Christ, — Mira- 
cles of Christ, — Resurrection of Christ, — Loveliness of Christ, 
— Justification of Sinners, — -The Holy Spirit, — Doctrine of the 
New Birth, — Conviction of Sin, — Renovation, — Love, — Adop- 
tion, — Purification, — Peace, — Joy. The following sixteen 
discourses area revision of Mr. Medhurst's "Exposition of the 
Moral Law" No. 12 supra. The concluding eight, being a modi- 
fication of Dr. Milne's Tract No. 6, on the consecutive portions 
of the Lord's Prayer, were also published as a separate tract, 
with the title fjlf |H St '^ Jjrj: $jf K'e tauu chin fa cho6 keae, 
32 leaves. A thorough revision of this last was published at 
Shanghae, in 1850, with the title, jgff jgg ^ ^ iff fy K'e tauu 
shih wan shth Iceu. This is not divided into chapters, but is 
one continued treatise, in 24 leaves. A modification of the 25th 
of this scries was printed as a separate tract, in 5 leaves, at 
Sharighae, in 1846, with the title f jfr _fc ^ H -^ ;]& -Jit Lun 
shang te ch' a tsz&kew she, Grod sending his Son to save the 
World. There is a translation of the same in the Shanghae 
dialect, printed in 1847, in 8 leaves, with the title |f. _£. '7J? H 
M ~P '$. t£ $t- _t A Kong sang te tsa urh tszekewsse lea long 
nyin. The 20th, 24th, and 26th were also published in the 
Shanghae djalect, at Shanghae, with the titles respectively 
IS BJC ~~ ' M )hH & ffc M Kong clow ih ho tsoo tsurig tso oh. 
Sin of our First Parents, 6 leaves, 1847. Bt & ^ f@ #? |t il 
$f } j£ Kong se 7ca Jco haoutsu Jcaou fe zdh. The Insufficiency 
of one's own merits, 6 leaves, 1846. j$ _fc % -* ( r pfl* A r )'.W 1% 
Kong sang te haou soonyin tsze sill, Revelation, 8 leaves, 
1846. The 43th in the course was reprinted at Ningpo, in 
1848, in 4 leaves, with Chin-shm substituted for Shdng-te as 
the term for God; the tract bearing the title $fo fj£ j$|f ;> 33g 
Lun fow sin die le, Discourse on Renovation. The 12th, 
15th and 16th were revised and modified by the author, who 
published them in the form of a single discourse in L850, at 
Shanghae, in 9 leaves, with the title % }& A Iff T'een t'ejin 
lun, Heaven, Earth and Man. This was reprinted at the same 
press in 1834, and again in 1853. 

35. JJ|$ j$£ |pC %k- Yay sooTceUouieo. Condensed statement 
of Christianity. 36 leaves. Shanghae, 1846. This was writ- 
ten by Dr. Medlmrst, at FoW-leang in Gan-hwuy, while on 
a visit there to an influential native, who was anxiously 
seeking after truth. It commences with a statement of the 



w.W.TKP HENRY MEDniUlST. 

leading truths of Christianity, drawn from the Old and New 
its; followed by a copy of the Nestorian inscription 

in, A. D. 781, and a discussion of its contents. Next 
is a note on the Jesuit missionary Ricci ; another on his con- 
pert Seu Kwang-ke : and a copy of Seu's Memorial to the 
ror, in favour of the proscribed missionaries, A. D. 1017. 
The whole is concluded by three proclamations by the Intend- 
out of Circuit for Soo-chow, Sung-keang and Tae-ehang, in 
favour of Christianity, A. D. 1845 ; the first on behalf of Ro- 
man Catholics, the second more general, and the third defin- 
ing the distinction between Roman Catholics and Protestants. 
This was reprinted at Ningpo in 1847, in 20 leaves; omitting 
all the part subsequent to the discussion of the Nestorian 
monument. A revised edition was printed at Shanghae in 
1851, in 31 leaves, which in addition to the original issue, has 
a short account of Christ, extracted from the Shin seen t'iing 
keen, a Taouist work of the 17th century ; and a longer memoir 
on the same subject, from the Oiiih fang loae he, a Jesuit 
work published in 1623. Another revision was published at 
Shanghae in 1853, in 43 leaves ; having in addition to the 
above, two inscriptions, from stone tablets in the Jews' syna- 
gogue at Kae-fung-foo, giving an account of the introduction 
and establishment of Judaism in China ; but omitting the 
recent proclamations in favour of Christianity. The work 
was again revised by the Rev. J. Edkins, and printed in 
1858, in 32 leaves; with a short memorial of Dr. Medhurst 
prefixed ; all the part following the Nestorian inscription in the 
preceding edition, being omitted in this, and some explanatory 
details regarding that inscription added by the royisor. This 
was again printed in 1862, with the omission of the memoir 
of Dr. Medhurst. 

36i JffS Hjc g| ill; ($ Yay son Jceang she clmen. Life of Christ. 
Lithography. 191 leaves. Shanghae, 1846. This is a suc- 
cinct narrative of the principal events in the life of our 
Saviour, given entirely in the words of Scripture. The first 
17 leaves had already been published as a small tract by Mr. 
Gutzlaff; but the remainder appears to be a compilation by 
Dr. Medhurst, who appends his designation. 

37. ,*| -Jfc m. jjfg |f ^ Ma Vac clmen fiih y/'n choo. Com- 
mentary on Mat thew's Gospel. Shanghae, 1846. Lithography. 
This does not appear to have been carried farther than the 
5th chapter. 

38- jf'j $8 % M ft fir Yd hdn cJ/nenfuh yin shoo. John's 
Grospel in the Shanghae dialect. 91 leaves. Shanghae, 1847. 

: ' :) - 5^ 'n? v}l u Wt ^''-''n UtsungcMMn. Discourse on the 
Divine Perfections. 22 leaves. Shanghae, 184S. This work; in 
tin' Mandarin dialect, is innine short chapters, on — the Origin 
of the Universe. — Unity and Eternity of God, — God without 



WALTKR IIKNRY MEDHURST. 35 

form, — Omnipresence of God,— Omnipotence of God,— Om- 
niscience of God,— Goodness of God, — God the Creator,— and 
Reliance on God. It is a modification of the first part of 
the Hlft^H Slung ste ts'oo yaou, a Roman Catholic 
work published at the end of last century. It was reprinted 
at Shanghae, in 1849, in IS leaves; having- two additional 
chapters, on — God giving his Son to save men, — and Replies 
to Ten questions regarding the Gospel. 

40. -fc $fc fj| fjjjf SMh t'eqou Jceae lun. Brief exposition 
of the Ten Commandments. 35 leaves. Shanghae, 1S4S. 
This consists of a brief introductory section, followed by ten 
short chapters on the commandments respectively. 

41. iff £>J & Hf Sin yd tseuen shoo. New Testament. 
Shanghae, 1852. This translation was ostensibly the work 
of a Committee of Delegates from various missionary stations 
in China, consisting of the Rt. Rev. Bishop Boone, the Rev. 
Drs. Medhurst and Bridgman, and the Revs. J. Stronach, W. 
Lowrie, and W. C. Milne. The work of the Committe com- 
menced in 1847, and was completed in 1850; the greater part 
having been done by Dr. Medhurst the President ; so that it 
may well be considered his production. 

42. H $j ^ H* K'ew yd tseuen shoo. Old Testament. 
Shanghae, 1855. This translation; was carried on for five or 
six books, by a Committee of Delegates, consisting of the Rt. 
Rev. Bishop Boone, the Rev. Drs. Medhurst and Bridgman, 
and the Revs. J. Stronach, W. C. Milne, and J. L. Shuck ; 
after which it was continued to the end, by the missionaries 
of the London Society, Rev. Dr. Medhurst, and Revs. J. 
Stronach and W. C. Milne ; but as with the New Testament, 
so with this* the execution of the work which Was completed in 
1853, was mainly due to the energy and zeal of Dr. Medhurst. 

43. A #f It ?Jv i£ fM J in so tang k'ew che fuh. True 
Happiness. 6 leaves. Shanghae, 1856. 

44. ;§£ lii: ;=£ jjij£ J||S $fc ~ X Kiio site choo die yuy §oo yili 
jin. Christ the only Saviour. 3 leaves. Shanghae, 1856. 

45. A 7[ fs 105 ,$$ ;£. Wc J' in P u ^ s ' in y tll J so ° c ^ te k° 6 - 
Why the Heathen make light of the Gospel. 6 leaves. 
Shanghae, 1S56. 

46. ^ i£ |f $fc SItih yang kwei mult, The wandering 
Sheep returned to the Shepherd. 4 leaves. Shanghai', 1856. 

47. ^ ^ H H 15 i Keun tszjs chung jih nci sltCn. A 
well-spent day. 7 leaves. Shanghae, 1856. 

48- H #£ |=f H* f f /§ Suy chung tsz6 ch'a lung wei. Dis- 
course for the New Year. 4 leaves. Shanghae, 1856. 

49. >\fa §U fjlf ^ ;£ ^ Hwuy tsuy k'e k'ew che sze. The 
penitent Sinner seeking for Mercy. 6 leaves. Shanghae, 1856. 

50- H £f /£ f# A 5c Wi &° chaypuh tilt juh t'een hiob. 
Who are excluded from the Kingdom of God. 5 leaves 



35 WALTER HENRY MKDnuRST. 

Shanghae, 1856. 

51. If Jli ± ^ £ M K'6 ta6u shdng te the U. Prayer. 
5 leaves. Shanghae, 1856*. 

52. §^'5^SS >S7K7i eZ»<J// s/tcJit? ndn Jnvo ylh. The 
crood Man in Affliction. 5 leaves. Shanghae, 1856. 

53. |§ A^T^ 1nf Shenjinlc'aou chung rriing. The hap- 
py Death of the Righteous. 5 leaves. Shanghae, 1856. 

^54. ^t^Pfyflk. On &%& c ^ t so 2 m ^ 1 k'eih pS. Death 
comes like a Thief" in the Night. 5 leaves. Shanghae, 1856. 
.This and the eleven preceding tracts are translations into the 
Mandarin dialect, of Milne's Village Sermons. 

55. M $1 ^ ~® S' nl yo teuen shoo. New Testament in the 
Mandarin dialect. Shanghae, 1856. 

56. $k WL$i &> ft 5C M W$ IJ " du ting hwdn c siting Veen 
hwb lun. Discourse on saving the soul and ascending to 
Heaven. 6 leaves. Shanghae, 1857. 

57. ft M fli "£J£J ^ ft Z M & Hin 9 fa6u sU cJ<od 
e meen Jiowjih eke king ten. Discourse on avoiding future 
Punishment, by consistent Faith. 4 leaves. Shanghae, 1857. 

58- A $ S M P> ^ %%> ^ tfo J*n tong. ts ™ sdn 9 '$ sUh 
wan tsan ten. Self-examination on partaking of the Lord's 

Supper. 4 leaves. Shanghae, 1857. 

59. $f $j £ ~§f |£ ffl $i n V° tseuen shoo choo head. Com- 
mentary on the New Testament. 122 leaves. Shanghae, 1858. 
This is merely a Commentary on Romans and 1st Corin- 
thians, the only portion that was ever published. 

MALAY. 

60. Catechism of Nature. 112 leaves. Batavia, 1832. 
Lithography. This was printed in the Arabic character; but 
anothor edition of the same was issued in the Roman character, 
in 1835, at the same press, in 50 leaves. 

61. Introduction to the Scriptures. 32 leaves. Batavia, 
1833. Lithography. 

62. Scheme of Christian Doctrine. 76 leaves. Batavia, 

1833. Lithography. 

63. Malay Primer. 48 leaves. Batavia, 1834. Lithography. 

64. Discussion with Mohammedans. 186 leaves. Batavia, 

1834. Lithography. 

65. Search for Sin. 42 leaves. Batavia, 1835. Lithography. 
An edition of this in the Human character was printed at the 
same press, the same year, in 50 leaves. 

66. Persuasive to Public Worship. 24 leaves. Batavia, 
1836. 

ENGLISH. 

67. Journal of a Tour through the Settlements on the 



WALTER IIEXHY MEDIIURST. 37 

Eastern side of the peninsula of Malacca. 12mo. Singapore 
1828. 

68. An English and Japanese and Japanese and English 
Vocabulary. Compiled from Native Works. Batavia: Print- 
ed by Lithography. 1830. pp. viii, 344. 8vo. This which was 
the first and until very recently the only English work, on 
the Japanese language, has been reproduced by the Japanese 
themselves, verbatim et literatim. 

69. Account of the Island of Bali, particularly of Bali 
Balding. London, 1831. When Mr. Medhnrst visited Bali in 
1829, in company with the Rev. Jacob Tomlin, he gathered a' 
fund of information regarding the place and people. His Ac- 
count is published in the July and October numbers of the 
"Transactions of the Missionary Society" for 1831. 

70. A Dictionary of the Hok-keen Dialect of the Chinese 
Language, according to the reading and colloquial idioms: 
containing about 12.000 characters, the sounds and tones 
of which are accurately marked; — and various examples of 
their use, taken generally from approved Chinese Authors. 
Accompanied by a short historical and statistical Account of 
Hok-keen; a treastise on the orthography of the Hok-keen 
dialect; the necessary indexes, &c. Macao, 1832. pp. Ixiv, 
860. 4to. 

71. Translation of a Comparative Vocabulary of the 
Chinese, Corean, and Japanese languages: to which is added 
the Thousand Character Classic, in Chinese and Corean: the 
whole accompanied by copious Indexes, of all the Chinese and 
English Words occurring in the work. Batavia, 1835. pp. 
33, 166. Svo. Printed by Lithography. 

72. Memorial addressed to the British and Foreign Bible 
Society on a New Version of the Chinese Scriptures. London, 
1836. pp. 44. Svo. The object of this pamphlet is to demon- 
strate the necessity for a new translation of the Scriptures 
into Chinese, which the author endeavours to do by pointing- 
out the defects in Morrison's, and drawing a comparison be- 
tween that and the one in which he had been more recently 
engaged. 

73. China: its State and Prospects, with special reference 
to the spread of the Gospel: containing allusions to the anti- 
quity, extent, population, civilization, literature, and religion 
of the Chinese. London, 1838. pp. xvi, 582. Svo. 

74. Dictionary of the Eavorlang Dialect of the Formosau 
Language, by Gilbertus Happart: written in 165(1 Trans- 
lated from the Transactions of the Batavian Literary Society. 
Batavia, 1840. pp. 383. 12mo. The original work of Gilber- 
tus Happart occupies nearly the whole of the 18th volume of 
the "Verhandelingen van bet Bataviaasch Grenootschap van 
Kunsten en Wetenschappenj" but Medhursl's translation 



38 WALTER HENRY MEDHTJRST. 

appeared some time before the completion of the above-named 
volume, which is dated 1842. 

75. Chinese and English Dictionary; containing all the 
words in the Chinese Imperial Dictionary, arranged accor- 
ding to the Radicals. 2 vols. Batavia, 1842-1843. pp. xxiv, 
1486, 29, 28. 8vo. This is printed by Lithography. 

76. Chinese Dialogues, Questions, and Familiar Sentences, 
literally rendered into English, with a view to promote Com- 
mercial Intercourse, and to assist beginners in the Language. 
Shanghae, 1S44. pp. viii, 287. 8vo. A revised and consider- 
ably modified edition, has been recently published by the au- 
thor's son, W. H. Medhurst, Escjr. Shanghae, 1SG3. pp. 225. 
8vo. It is in the Mandarin dialect. 

77. Twenty four Lessons in English and Chinese, pp. 24. 
Shanghae. This is a series of Lessons for children, on the 
elements of knowledge, in English and Chinese, the principal 
words in each lesson being given at the top of the page in 
Chinese and English. The work was never completed, and 
there is no title-tpage. 

78. A Dissertation on the Theology of the Chinese, with 
a view to the elucidation of the most appropriate term for ex- 
pressing the Deity, in the Chinese Language. Shanghae, 
1847. pp. 280. Svo. 

79. English and Chinese Dictionary, in two volumes. 
Shanghae, 1847—1848. pp, vii, 1436. Svo. 

80. An Inquiry into the proper mode of rendering the 
word God in translating the Sacred Scriptures into the Chinese 
Language. Shanghae, 1848. pp. 170. Svo. 

81. Reply to the Essay of Dr. Boone on the proper rend- 
ering of the words 23^?^ and 9E02 into the Chinese lan- 
guage. Canton, 1848. pp. 107. Svo. This was first printed 
in the Chinese Expository, for October, November, and Decem- 
ber, 1848. 

S2. The Chinese Miscellany ; designed to illustrate the 
Government, Philosophy, Religion, Arts, Manufactures, Trade, 
Maimers, < lustoms, History and Statistics of China. Shang- 
hae, 1849. Svo. This serial was begun by Dr. Medhurst, with 
the understanding that it should appear at irregular intervals, 
and that the numbers should not be limited to any particular 
size; depending on his time and opportunities to furnish the 
requisite amount of matter. It only lasted through four 
numbers; all the product of his own pen. These were — 1. A 
({lance at the Interior ®f China : obtained during a Journey 
through the Silk and Green Tea districts. Taken in 1845. 
pp. 192. This is an account of the author's own journey and 
adventures, on a trip to Fow-leang in Can-hwuy province. — 
2. The Chin broad : or a desultory account of the 

Malayan Archipelago, particularly of Java; by Ong-tae-hae. 



WALTER HENRY MTEDHURST. 39 

Translated from the original, pp. 80. — 3. Dissertation on the 
Silk-manufacture, and the Cultivation of the Mulberry ; trans- 
lated from the works of Tseu-kwang-k'he, called also Paul 
Siu, a Colao, or Minister of State in China, pp. 124. — 4. Gen- 
eral Description of Shanghae and its environs, extracted from 
native authorities, pp. lb'S. This is a translation of the prin- 
cipal matters in the _fcV# J H^ Bhang 7iae keen die, a topo- 
graphical history of the city and district of Shanghae. 

83. Reply to the Few Plain Questions of a Brother Mis- 
sionary, (published in the Chinese Repository for July 184S). 
Shaaghae, 1849. pp. 16. 8vo. 

84. On the True Meaning of the word Shin, as exhibit d 
in the Quotations adduced under that Word, in the Chinese 
Imperial Thesaurus, called ^^Ct^Jff the Pei-wan-yun-foo. 
Shanghae, 1849. pp. 8S. 8vo. 

85. An Inquiry into the proper mode of translating Ruach 
and Pneuma, in the Chinese version of the Scriptures. Shang- 
hae, 185!). pp. 75. Svo. 

86. Reply to the Bishop of Victoria's Te% Reasons in fa- 
vour of T'een-shin. Shanghae, 1851. pp. 2. 4to. 

87. Pamphlets issued by the Chinese Insurgents at Nan- 
king; to which is added a History of the Kwang-se^Rebellion, 
gathered from public documents ; and a sketch of the Con- 
nection between Foreign Missionaries and the Chinese Insur- 
rection ; concluding with a Critical Review of serveral of the 
above Pamphlets. Shanghae, 1853. pp. 102. Svo. This was 
first published as a series of papers in the North China H raid 
for 1S53, and afterwards as a separate pamphlet. 

88. Translations from the Peking Gazettes, during the 
years 1853 — 1856. This series of documents appeared first in 
the North China Herald, and afterwards in successive volumes 
of the Shanghae Almanac and Miscellany for 1854 — 1857. 

89. Sketch of a Missionary Journey to Tien-muh-san. in 
Che-keang province. Shanghae, 1854. pp. 6. 8vo. First pub- 
lished in the North China Herald, and afterwards in the 
Shanghae Almanac and Miscellany, for 1855. 

90. Koo-san, or Drum Hill. Shanghae, 1855. pp. 2. Svo. 
This is a short account of a famous hill at Fuhchow, which 
Dr. Medhurst visited that same year. The account first ap- 
peared in the North China Herald, and was afterwards pub- 
lished in the Shanghae Almanac and Miscellany. 

91. Trip to Ning-po and Tdieen-t'hae. Shanghae, i 
pp. 16. Svo. This is an account of a visit to a famous monas- 
tery in Che-keang, which the author made, in company with 
the Rev. R. Qobbold and the Rev. J. Fdkins. It was first 
published in jjhe North China Herald, and afterwards in the 
Shanghae Almanac and Miscellany. 

92. Remarks on the Opium Trade. Shanghae, 1855. pp. 



-10 WALTER HENRY MEDHURST. 

10. 8vo. This was first printed in the North China Herald, 
and afterwards in the Shanghae Almanac and Miscellany. 

93. Memorial of the Roman Catholic Bishop Mouly to the 
Emperor of China; (Printed at Hongkong in November, 1855.) 
Shanghae, 1856. pp. 7. This is a translation with notes, from 
the Chinese of a document issued by Monly, Bishop of Pe- 
king; first printed in the North China Herald, and afterwards 
in the Shanghae Almanac and Miscellany. 

94. Remarkable Cave, situated in the Western Tung-ting- 
san. Shanghae, 1856. pp. 2. 8vo. This short notice of a 
cave in the Great Lake, near Soo-chow, was first published 
in the North China Herald, and afterwards in the Shanghae 
Almanac and Miscellany-. 

Besides the above list, the contemporary periodical press was 
considerably indebted to Dr. Medhurst for occasional contri- 
butions. Many pieces from his pen are to be found in the 
Chinese Repository, the North China Herald, and other 
serials of the day. 

Mrs. Medhurst was also instrumental in adding to the mis- 
sionary literature, having translated "Lloyds Scripture. Cate- 
chism" into the Malay language, which was printed by litho- 
graphy, in 1832 at Batavia, in 208 leaves. It was printed 
the following year, at the same press in the Roman character, 
by typography, in 16 leaves. Referring to this Mr. Medhurst 
remarks, that "an extensive population of professing Christians 
in the Moluccas will be furnished with a system of doctrine 
and precept, drawn entirely from Scripture, which may prove 
widely and lastingly beneficial." 

Mj ill $£ -^ Mu tern nedng neang. Sophia Martin, the 
sister of Mrs. Medhurst, who lived with the missionary fami- 
ly at Batavia, removed to Singapore in 1820 in quest of 
health, where she assisted in conducting the Chinese schools, 
and was afterwards married to Dr. Little of that settlement. 
She has contributed a useful little work in the Chinese lan- 
guage, entitled: — 

f l| ic H ^ M Seun neii son tsze Jciiig. Three character 
Classic, for the instruction of Females. ( J leaves. Singapore, 
1832. 

^v^^/5 C ri0 ° TIii-lang, a native of Kwang-tung province 
in China, accompanied Mr. Medhurst on his return to Eng- 
land in 1836. as amanuensis lor the Sacred Scriptures, which 
the latter was engaged in translating into Chinese. While 
there he resided with Mr. Medhurst at Hackney, near Lop- 
don, being through the kindness of Christian friends, taught 
the English language, and carefully instructed in the truths 



• JOHN' SLATER. 41 

of the gospel. At length, by the blessing of God, a deep 

interest was awakened in his mind, and he gave his heart to 
the study of the word of God. His earnest desire for Christ- 
ian baptism, and his reasons, were expressed to Dr. Burder 
in a letter dated July 6th, 1838. Mr. Medhurstbeinf satisfied 
of his sincerity, baptized him on the 20th of the same month 
at St. Thomas' Square Chapel, Hackney, in the presence of 
a large congregation. On the 3 1st, he left England in the 
George the Fourth, with Mr. Medhurst and Mr. Lockhart 
whom he accompanied to Batavia, arriving- there on the 5th 
of November; from which place he went with the latter to 
Canton, and reached that city about the end of January 
1839. There he had been appointed to labour as Native As- 
sistant, in the service of the London Missionary Society but 
the troubles between the English and Chinese governments 
beginning to break out about that time, he retired to his na- 
tive village, and the engagement has not since been renewed. 



V. JOHN SLATER was a member of the Independent 
Church, in Great George street, Liverpool, where he was or- 
dained, August 27, 1816, as a missionary to the heathen, at 
the same time as John Donaldson. He and Mrs. Slater left 
Europe the following year, in connection with the London 
Missionary Society, together with the Rev. Mr. Thomsen, 
a native of Saxony, who was returning to his mission station 
at Malacca. On the voyage out, they were much encouraged 
by an apparent reformation among the sailors, consequent on 
their efforts for their spiritual good. Reaching Batavia, Mr. 
Slater was attacked by the endemic fever peculiar to that 
place, but after two months, he so far recovered, as to be 
able to undertake the voyage to Malacca. While at Batavia, 
he received great kindness from the Dutch Governor Van der 
Capellan, who expressed his readiness to assist in establishing 
a mission there. He left Batavia on December 10, in compa- 
ny with Mr. Thomsen, arrived at Malacca on the 29th, 
and began the study of the Chinese language on January 1st, 
1818. His daughter Henrietta was born on February 1st. 
While applying himself with ardour to study, the state of 
his health obliged him frequently to desist, and on the 9th of 
August, he left Malacca for China, from whence he returned, 
much benefitted by the change. On the 27th of April, 1819, 
he left for Batavia with his family, which place he reached on 
the 18th of June, having touched at Singapore, Rhio, Ling- 
in, Banca and Pontiano, on the way, and distributed Scrip- 
tures and Tracts at those islands; being provided | with 
about fifteen thousand Chinese and Malay hooks for that 
purpose. Mr. Slater was the first to settle in Batavia, as a 



[J, JOHN IXCE. 

missionary to the Chinese; but he had scarcely provided him- 
self with a house, when it was burnt to theground on October 
2; Mrs. Slater having been confined only a fortnight«before. A 

subscription by the inhabitants, principally English, enabled 
him to repair the damage. While in Batavia, he eng 
regularly In Chinese, Malay and English services, but his 
health failing, he was obliged to undertake a voyage to sea in 
1822. On his returm with partially improved health in 1823, 
he dissolved his connection with the Society. Since then he 
has entered into his rest. 



VI. JOHN INCE was born August 20th, 1795, and 
studied divinity under the Rev-. Dr. Bogue at Gosport. Toge- 
ther with Messrs. Fleming and Mercer, he was ordained to the 
sacred office, in connection with the London Missionary So- 
ciety, at Union Chapel, Islington, London, on the evening of 
January 22nd, 1818. On February 17, he left England with 
Mrs. Ince in the General Graham, but meeting with very 
tempestuous weather, they were driven far to the north and 
anchored in the Downs on March 13. About the close of the 
month, they again put to sea, touched at Simon's Bay on 
June 21. where they remained a few days, left on the 30th, 
and reached Madras on the 10th of August. Sailing from 
thence on the 26th, they arrived at Malacca on the 14th of 
September, having touched at Fenang on the way. On Octo- 
ber 3rd, his daughter Matilda was born. During the time he 
remained at Malacca, he gave himself to the study of the 
Chinese language; but shortly left that settlement for Fen- 
ang, where lie arrived with his family, on the 28th of June, 
1819, that station having been pointed out to him by the 
Directors, before he left England. There he soon established 
schools for Chinese children, with the patronage and assistance 
of the government. In the early part of 1821, in company 
with Mr. Beighton, his colleague for the Malays, he performed 
a missionary tour along the coast of Queda on the Malay 
Peninsula, first visiting Queda Muda, distributing every- 
where copies of the Chinese Scriptures and tracts, and enter- 
ing into conversation with the Chinese. At Pulo Tega, they 
had an interview with the Rajah, who gave them permission 
to visit Queda. Later in the year he paid a visit to Malacca 
with his wife and child, on account of their health. In 1822, 
Mrs. Ince was called away to join her dear children, who had 
preceded her to the heavenly world. In 1824, a neat and 
commodious chapel was built for the use of the mission, to- 
wards which the inhabitants of the settlement subscribed very 
liberally. About that time the health of Mr. Ince declined 
very rapidly, till ultimately the complaint settled on his lungs; 



SAMUEL MILTON. 43 

.and on the 24th of April, 1825, an abscess having formed, he 
was released from his sufferings, after a lingering and painful 
illness of some months duration. He left one daughter, 
Matilda. 

The only record we have of the literary labours of Mr. Ince, 
is a "School book," printed at Malacca, in 1824. 



VII. SAMUEL MILTON, a member of the Independent 
Church, under the pastoral care of the Eev. E. P. Allen, in 
Exeter, was ordained to the office of a missionary to the 
heathen, on January 1st, 1818, under the patronage of the 
local branch of the London Society. He sailed from Graves- 
end with the Eev J. Ince and others in the General Graham 
on the 17th of February, being exposed to the same vicissitudes 
during the voyage, and arrived with them at Malacca on Sep- 
tember 14th, where he had been appointed by the Directors of 
the Society, to assist in the Chinese department of the mission. 
He immediately set about the study of the Chinese language, 
but his health was several times so impaired, as to oblige him 
to cease, and at other times much to abate, his assiduous and 
undeviating application. No sooner was the British flag 
hoisted at Singapore, than a grant of land was obtained for 
the mission there; and Mr. Milton proceeded, in 1819, to 
commence operations for the benefit of the Chinese in that 
island. He appears also to have given some time to the stu- 
dy of Siamese, having actually begun a translation of the 
Scriptures into that language; and on Dr. Morrison visiting 
the station in April, 1823, it was proposed that he should 
become Professor of Siamese in the Anglo-Chinese college 
then about to be removed to Singapore. He took part in the 
service, on occasion of laying the foundation stone of the Shiga- 
pore Institution shortly after. During that year he went to Cal- 
cutta to purchase articles for the Printing Office, lately esta- 
blished in connection with the mission; brought back a com- 
positor with him, and commenced printing the Siamese ver- 
sion of Genesis; at the same time resuming his Siamese trans- 
lation of the Scriptures. He had also composed a tract on 
"Eedemption," in that language, but we do not find that it 
was ever printed, although types were in preparation for the 
purpose. In 1825, his connection with the Missionary Socie- 
ty ceased; but he still continued to reside at Singapore, where 
he died in 1849. 



VIII. EOBEET FLEMING, who had studied under Dr. 
Bogue at Gosport, was ordained as a Missionary:, in connec- 
tion with the London Society, along with Mr. Ince, af Union 



44 GEORGE H. IIUTTMAX. 

Chapel Islington, January 22nd, 1818, and accompanied the 
latter and Mr. Milton in the General Graham, as far as Madras, 
where they landed on the 10th of August. As Mr. Knill the 
missionary there was ojbliged to remove to a milder climate, 
on account of his health, it was agreed by mutual consulta- 
tion among the brethren, that Mr. Fleming should remain for 
a time to supply his place. Accordingly he commenced at 
once the study of the Tamul and Sanscrit languages ; the 
former as necessary for conversing with the common natives; 
the latter as the key to all the Hindoo mythology. During 
his residence there, the mission received much encouragement 
in their work. A new accession arrived in the latter part of 
1819, Mr. Fleming having meantime formed a matrimonial 
alliance at Madras, and being unable to procure a passage 
direct to Malacca, his original destination, he proceeded with 
Mrs. Fleming via Calcutta, which city he left on November 
7th. From various causes, the ship was detained nearly six 
weeks on the north coast of Sumatra, and while there, he had 
the satisfaction of seeing the usurper of the throne of Acheen, 
and the murderer of Sabat, driven from his scene of piracy 
and bloodshed. They stopped three days at Penang, and ar- 
rived at Malacca on the 29th of January, 1820 ; when he com- 
menced the study of Chinese, finding great advantage from the 
introductory books published by Dr. Morrison. Towards the 
end of the year, he took charge of the schools. His connec- 
tion with the mission however was of short duration, for he 
retired from the service in 1823 ; and has since been removed 
to another world. 



IX. GEORGE H. HUTTMAN was engaged by the London 
Missionary Society, to take charge of the printing establish- 
ment at Malacca, which he reached on the 24th of September, 
1820, having stopped at Batavia on the way out from England. 
The superintendence of the printing office there was immedi- 
ately committed to his hands under the direction of Dr. Milne; 
thus relieving Mr. Medhurst from the duties connected with 
it. These duties he continued satisfactorily to discharge till the 
death of Dr. Milne in June, 1822, when he was appointed one 
of the executors, and had the control of the mission committed 
to him, in conjunction with Mr. Humphreys. In February 
1823, when Dr. Morrison visited Malacca, he expressed great 
satisfaction with the management of affairs there. Mr. Huff- 
man voluntarily dissolved his connection with the Society the 
same year; after which he went to Calcutta, where he was 
engaged in the Government Press office. 



JAMES HUMPHREYS. 45 

X. JAMES HUMPHREYS, who had pursued his studies, 
first at Glasgow, and afterwards at G-osport, was ordained as 
an agent of the London Missionary Society, atOxendon Street 
Chapel, London, on February 13th, 1821. Some short time 
after, he embarked with Mrs. Humphreys in the Lonach, 
bound for India ; but they were obliged by contrary winds to 
put in at Falmouth. This port they left in the 21st of March, 
and reached Madras on the 21st of July; whence they pro- 
ceeded to Malacca, their destination, arriving there towards 
the end of the year. On the death of Dr. Milne, Mr. Hum- 
phreys succeeded him, as Principal of the Anglo-Chinese 
college ; and besides the general superintendence, he conduc- 
ted tlie English part of the education of the native students. 
Being then very imperfectly acquainted with the Chinese lan- 
guage, he held an English service in the Dutch Church, every 
Sabbath morning, having been appointed Government Chap- 
lain, which office he held till December, 1823, when he was 
relieved by the arrival of a Dutch Minister. On the cession 
of Malacca to the English in 1825, he was again appointed 
Chaplain to the settlement temporarily. Mrs. Humphreys 
died on the 29th of May, 1827, leaving three motherless chil- 
dren; and his health having been in a precarious state 
for a twelvemonth past, he paid a visit to Singapore shortly 
after, from which he obtained a temporary benefit. Although 
at the first he had given his attention to the Chinese language, 
with a view to active service among that people; yet having 
acquired a competent knowledge of the Malay, and the brethren 
in that quarter considering that the Malays were not suffi- 
ciently attended to, in 1827 he began to devote his attention 
almost entirely to that branch of the mission, at the same 
time resigning his office in the Anglo-Chinese college. A new 
mission chapel was opened on the 14th of April that year, in 
which lie held a Malay service on Sabbath evenings, and the 
Malay and Tamil schools were under his charge, while he was 
accustomed to visit the people in their own houses. He had 
also the superintendence of the English and Malay printing 
presses. In 1828, he again went to Singapore on account of 
his health ; but his continued indisposition obliged him to 
return to England the following year, where he arrived on the 
2nd of November, with his two surviving children ; and his 
connection with the Society ceased shortly after. Since that 
time he has been removed to a better world. 



XI. DAVID COLLIE, who had studied under Dr. Bogue 
at Gospnrt, was ordained in connection with the LondonMis- 
sionarv Society, at Castle Green Chapel, Bristol, on the 28th 
September, 1821. On the 8th of November, he sailed with 



4G DAVID COLLIE. 

his wife from Portsmouth in the Windsor Castle, touched at 
St. Jago on the 5th of December, stopped at Colombo on the 
17th of March, 1822, and left on the 20th, reaching Madras 
on flhe 36th. There Mrs. Collie died on the 24th of May ; 
and Mr. Collie arrived at his destination, Malacca, the 26th 
of June. In 1823, during Dr. Morrison's visits to Malac- 
ca, Mr. Collie enjoyed the benefit of his tuition in the Chinese 
language, in which he made very gratifying progress; and after 
the Doctor's departure, began to deliver a short discourse to 
the Chinese congregation every Sabbath. The same year, he 
was installed Professor of Chinese, and Librarian, in the 
Anglo-Chinese college. In 1826, he was married a second 
time; and in 1827, succeeded Mr. Humphreys, as Principal 
of the Anglo-Chinese college. In 1828, his health began 
to give way, under his arduous and unremitting labours, and 
by medical advice, he embarked for Singapore on the 26th 
of February, but died at sea the following day, his body be- 
ing committed to the deep. He left a widow and one child 
to deplore his loss. 

The following are the principal of his published works: — 

CHINESE. 

1. Tract on Kegeneration. 50 leaves. Malacca, 1824. 

2. Sheet tracts. Malacca. 26 of these sheets were printed 
in 1824, and the series was continued during the two follow- 
ing years. 

3. |g |[£ H H Shing Icing shih e. Help to the Scriptures. 
Malacca, 1825. Reprinted at Singapore, 27 leaves, 1835. 
In this and subsequent tracts, Mr. Collie adopts the signa- 
ture fjf fg Chung tih or @ f* ^ Chung till cliay "Planter of 
Virtue." 

4. Astronomical Catechism. Malacca, 1825. 

5. Commentary on Philippians. Malacca, 1825. 

6. JUS $fc "i* fir M tk Ydy soo yen king tsjmg tun. Life 
of Christ.'" 7 leaves. Malacca, 1826. This is in rhyming 
lines of four words .each. A revised edition of it was printed 
at Ningpo, with the title JJ|$ fjjfa % £ gf fx fl 'X Ya V so ° 
Jceang sang yen king yun icon. 

7- %^^^T'eenkj.ng ming Men. Celestial Mirror. 
2 vols. 70 leaves. Malacca, 1826. This is a brief outline of 
Divine Revelation, intended provisionally as a theological 
text book for the Anglo-Chinese college. It consists of 33 
articles — on Man, — the Origin of all things,— God, — the 




pre-, 
ferinsrs, — Christ's resurrection, — Christ's ascension, — Christ 



'O'-J 



SAMUEL KIDD. 47 

the Redeemer, — the Holy Spirit the Sanctifier, — Faith, — 
Repentance, — Rank of believers, — the Church, — Baptism, — 
Eucharist,— the Huly Spirit the Comforter, — Eternal Life of 
"believers, — Mortality of man, — Resurrection, — Judgment, — 
Heaven, — Hell, — Exhortation to believers, —and Exhorta- 
tion to unbelievers. 

8. M'M MWi^tm Siting slioo p'ing Jceu tsimg Jan. 
Essay on the Evidences of Christianity. 3 vols. 184 leaves. 
Malacca, 1827. This is a translation of Dr. Bogue's work of 
the same title. 

9. H? Il ' 4& |£ Siting shoo sew chin. Scripture Extracts. 
53 leaves. Malacca, 1832. This is a selection of passages from 
the Scriptures, in 16 articles, viz. — an exhortation to the young, 
— against lying, — governing the tongue, — reviling, — anger, — 
indolence, — covetousness, — pride and humility, — drunkenness, 
— righteousness, — holiness, — God's love to man, — obedience 
to. the authorities, — importance of humility, — leniency to 
those who injure us, — and reverence towards God. 

ENGLISH. 

10. An abridgment of Sacred History. 12mo. pp. 40, 
Malacca, 182G. This little work was written for the students 
in the Anglo-Chinese college. 

11. The Chinese Classical works, commonly called the 
Four Books, translated and illustrated with notes. 8vo. pp. 
185. Malacca, 1828. 



XII. SAMUEL KIDD was born at Welton, near Hull, 
on the 19th of June, 1799, and seems to have been the sub- 
ject of religious impressions at an early age. After he left 
the village school, he was instructed by his maternal grand- 
father in English Grammar and Mathematics, before he had 
attained his twelfth year. In October, 1817, he was admitted 
a member of the church in Fish street, Hull, under the Rev. 
J. Gilbert, and shortly after, began to long for an engage- 
ment as a missionary to the heathen. This wish becoming 
known to the church of which he was a member, he was en- 
couraged to consecrate his life to the service. About the end 
of 1820, he begau a course of study under Dr. Bogue at Cos- 
port, in connection with the London Missionary Society. On the 
22nd of April, 1824, he was married to Hannah Irving. On 
the 28th of the same month, he was ordained at Fi si i street 
Chapel, Hull. Proceeding to London, he received his first 
lesson in Chinese, from Dr. Morrison. May 24th, he sailed 
with his wile from Gravesend, in the Pyramus, reached Ma- 
dras on the 30th of September ; sailed from thence on the 



iS SAMUEL KIDD. 

18th of October, in the Helen, got to Penang on the 3rd of 
November, where they remained till the 13th, and arrived at 

Malacca their ultimate destination, on the 21st. He had al- 
ready begun the study of the written language on board ship. 
and commenced the Fuli-keen dialect of the Chinese within 
a week of his arrival at the station; placing himself tinder 
the instruction of Mr. Collie, as a student in the college. After 
the death of Mr. Ince, in 1825, Mr. Kidd went to Penang to 
assist Mr. Beighton, from which place he returned in the earl , r 
part of 1826'. In 1827, he was appointed professor of Chinese 
in the Anglo-Chinese college ; on the death of Mr. Collie in 

1828, he succeeded as principal; and on the 5th of April, 

1829, baptized Tsze Hea a Chinese youth, the first-fruit of the 
college. In December, 1829, he accompanied Mrs. Kidd and 
her three children to Singapore, on their return to England. 
on account of her health, where they arrived on the 24th of 
April, 1830. In the absence of a chaplain, that year, Mr. 
Kidd undertook an English service in the church every Sab- 
bath. In 1831, his health began to suffer, and he was obliged 
to visit Singapore in the early part of the year with a view to 
its restoration; but was ultimately compelled to take a 
voyage to Europe with the same object, in the following year ; 
and arrived in England, in June; and as he never sufficiently 
rallied to admit of his return, his relation to the Society was 
amicably terminated. After a pastorate of three years over 
the congregational Church at Manningtree in Essex, he was 
appointed Professor of the Chinese Language and Literature, 
in University College, London, in 1837, for the term of live 
years, which terminated in October 1842. Pending arrange- 
ments for the renewal of his engagement, he was carried off by 
an epileptic fit, on June 12th, 1843, leaving a widow and 
seven children. 

The following are the principal of his published works: — 

CHINESE. 

1. Sheet Tracts. Malacca. 1826. 

2. On the End of Time. Malacca, 1826. 

3. ' A >tS ?fc M> M tfo Jin sin pun go tsung hin. The fal- 
len state of Man. 57 leaves. Malacca, 1S2S! This is found- 
ed on the second Part of Boston's "Fourfold State.'' In this 
and his other tracts, Mr. Kidd adopts the signature ■fjj? {;£ 
Sew Uli, "Cultivator of Virtue." 

4- 37c T 0f flU T'een he'd sin lean. Universal Gazette. 
Malacca, 1828, 1829. This is a broadsheet newspaper, print- 
ed with moveable type. It was published agreeably to the 
wish of two gentlemen who gave a sum of money to try the 
experiment. The successive numbers contained news from 



.JOHN .SMITH. (!) 

China likely to interest native readers; European intelligence; 
and paragraphs illustrative of European science, history, re- 
ligion, and morals. An extract from Medhurst's Comparative 
Chronology, which throws light on ancient Scripture History, 
was inserted in one of them. 

5. J$ $f i^l IS b* fir ®fc fra £V't cliung peaou tsi : <hi<j yin 
king leu tun. Narrative of a Watchmaker. 10 leaves. Ma- 
lacca, 1829. This was printed with moveable types. Ano- 
ther edition was printed at the same press, the following year, 
with wooden blocks. It is divided into 8 chapters, being a 
translation of the French tract, "Le pauvre Horloger'de 
Geneve." 

6. Wl Tf$ ® M ft filf >fr Lun sliinfung fyan Java sin sin. 
Regeneration by the Holy Spirit. 16 leaves. Malacca, 1830. 
This work is in 3 parts, treating respectively on the Nature, 
Necessity raid Agent of the work ot Regeneration; the first 
under seven heads, and the second under five. 

ENGLISH. 

7. A Tract relating to the Anglo-Chinese College at Ma- 
lacca. 

8. Remarks on a New Version of the Sacred Scriptures in 
Chinese. London, 1836. 

9. Catalogue of the Chinese Library, of the Royal Asiatic. 
Society. Svo. London. 

10. Lecture on the nature and structure of the Chinese 
Language; delivered at University College. Svo. pp. 37. Lon- 
don, 1838. 

11. Critical notices of Dr. Morrison's literary labours. 
Svo. pp. 87. London, 1839. This is inserted at the end ot' 
Dr. Morrison's Memoirs, by Mrs. Morrison, as an Appendix. 

12. China, or, Illustrations of the Symbols, Philosophy, 
Antiquities, Customs, Superstitions, Laws, Government, Edu- 
cation and Literature of the Chinese: derived from original 
sources, and accompanied with drawings from native works. 
8vo. pp. 403. London. 1841. 

Just before leaving China, Mr. Kidd had prepared a small 
work in Chinese on ''The Parables/ 5 but we have no record 
of its having ever been published. 



XIII. JOHN SMITH, an ordained minister, and A. M. 
of the University of Glasgow, Avas, together with the ReA" 
Jacob Tomlin, set apart as a missionary to the heathen, at 
Trevor Chapel, Brompton, near London, on the evening of 
April 19th, 1S26. On May 1st. he sailed from Portsmouth 
with Mrs. Smith, in the Lady Holland, touched at Madeira 



50 JACOB TOML1N. 

on the 21st, and arrived at Madras on the 11th of September; 
from which he embarked in the Euphemia, and reached Ma- 
lacca towards the end of the year. His attention was at first 
given to the Fuh-keen dialect, which he studied under the 
guidance of Mr. Collie. On the 14th of April, 1827, he con- 
ducted the English service at the opening of the new mission 
chapel at Malacca, and almost immediately after, left for Sin- 
gapore, where his service was more needed. On the 24th of 
September, an association was formed, with the designation — 
"The Singapore Conmittee for extending the benefits of Edu- 
cation and the Knowledge of Christianity in Singapore and 
in the neighbouring Countries"; of which Mr. Smith was ap- 
pointed Secretary. On the death of Mr. Collie however, he 
returned to Malacca in April, 1S2S, and occupied the Chinese 
chair in the college. In the latter part of 1829, he was obli- 
ged to leave Malacca on account of his health, and arrived 
in England on the 17th of February, 1830; soon after which 
he retired from his connection with the Society. He has since 
entered into his rest. 



XIV. JACOB TOMLIN, a clergyman, and A. B. of the 

University of Cambridge, Avas set apart to the missionary 
service, together with the Rev. John Smith, at Trevor Chap- 
el, Brompton, April 19th, 1826. On the 20th of June, he 
sailed from the Downs, in the Florentia, and arrived at 
Calcutta, on the 22nd of October. After a stay of about two 
months, he sailed for Malacca, which he reached in the early 
part of 1827, and there commenced the study of the Fuh-keen 
dialect. In April he went to Singapore, in company with Mr. 
Smith. Towards the end of the year, he was induced to visit 
Batavia, on account of his health, Avhere he remained two 
months, and returned to Singapore early in 1828 ; from which 
he made a visit to Rhio, in company with Mr. Giitzlaff. Af- 
ter the death of Mr. Collie, Mr. Tomlin removed to Malacca 
in March, to take charge Of the junior English and Chinese 
classes in the college ; and accompanied Mr. Humphries in, 
some excursions into the interior of the peninsula; but he was 
relieved from that post by Mr. Smith's arrival in April, and 
returned to Singapore. On the 4th of August, he left for a 
visit to Siam with the Rev. Mr. Giitzlaff, and after a voyage 
of fifteerj days, they arrived at Bankok. There he remained 
distributing books, and doing what he could among the Chi- 
nese inhabitants, till the middle of May, 1829, when he star- 
ted for Singapore, arriving after a passage of five weeks; where 
he resumed his labours of teaching and preaching. In autumn 
he embarked for Batavia, where he arrived with Mrs. Tomlin 
on October, 31st and from November to January accompanied 



SAMUEL DYKR. f, I 

Mr. Medlmrst on his tour to the island of Bali, returning to 
Singapore early in 1S30. On June 17th, 1831., he again em- 
barked for Slam in an Arab vessel, in company with Mr. A- 
bcel, and reached Bankok on July 3; where they remained till 
the 14th of January in the following year, and then returned 
to Singapore in about a week. Mr. Tomlin proceeded to 
Malacca, where his wife was residing; and on the departure 
of Mr. Kidd for England, he succeeded him as Principal of 
the Anglo-Chinese college, his connection with the Mission- 
ary Society having in the mean time been dissolved. His 
post in the college, he held till the close of 1833; during 
which time ho introduced a radical reform, abolishing the 
monthly stipend allowed to the students, which rule applied 
to all new candidates for admission. In 1834, ho commenced 
a seminary at Malacca, on a new principle, entitled, "The 
Benevolent Institution, or Christian School for all Nations." 
This embraced English, Malay, Portuguese and Chinese bran- 
ches, in each of which, the youth were instructed in their 
own language, while all were taught English and Malay, 
through the medium of their respective vernacular tongues. 
In 1836, he went to Bengal, leaving the School under the 
charge of a German missionary, recently arrived ; but he still 
took the principal onus of its support. He has since held a 
pastorate in England. 

Although Mr. Tomlin was engaged with Mr. Giitzlaff, in 
translating the Scriptures into Siamese, Ave do not hear of his 
work having been brought to maturity in that department. 
The following are some of his productions in English. 

1. Journal kept during a voyage from Singapore to Siam, 
and while residing nine months in that country. Svo. pp. 67. 
Singapore. This is an account of Mr. Tomlin's first visit to 
Siam, in Company with. Mr. GiitzlarF. 

2. A Missionary Journal kept at Singapore and Siam; 
from May 1830, to January 1832. Svo. pp. 90. Malacca, 1832. 

3. Missionary Journals and Letters. I2mo. pp. 384. Lon- 
don 1845. This embodies much of the information and most of 
the incidents contained in the two preceding pamphlets. 

4. "Shin v. Shan(j-Te"\ antagonistic versions of the 
Chinese Scriptures. A review of the controversy respecting 
the proper rendering of Elohim and GEOS into Chinese, and 
statement of the evidence showing a large majority for "Shin," 
&c. By a life-member of the Bible Society, of thirty years' 
standing. — Ex. xxiii. 13; Isaiah xlii 8; Luke xi. 11. London. 
This is an anonymous pamphlet, published about the year 
1854. 



XV. SAMUEL DYEE, the son of John Dyer, was bom 



52 SAMUEL DYER. 

on the 20th of January, 1804, at the Royal Hospital at Green- 
wich, near London, while his father vyas Secretary of that in- 
stitution. His education was conducted under the parental 
roof, till he was twelve years of age. About that time, he 

was sent to a boarding school at Woolwich, superintended by 
the Rev. John Bickerdike, a dissenting Minister. In 1820, 
his father being appointed to the Chief-clerkship of the Ad- 
miralty, removed with his family to Paddington, where they 
attended the ministry of the Rev. J. Stratten. It was there 
that Samuel was converted, became a member of the Christian 
church in 1822, and devoted himself for several years to the 
work of the Sunday school. At first he studied for the Law, 
but while at Cambridge University, lie first conceived the 
thought of becoming a missionary. This thought maturing 
with time, on the 23rd of June, 1824, he offered himself to 
the London Missionary Society, by whom he was accepted, 
and sent for a time to the missionary seminary at (losport. 
On the 20th of February 1827, he was ordained at Paddington 
Chapel; and was shortly after married to the eldest daughter 
of Joseph Tarn, Esq. with whom he sailed for the Straits of 
Malacca, on the 10th of March, reached Madras on the 17th 
of July, and arrived at Penang on the 8 th of August; where 
finding the mission in a very enfeebled state, he resolved on 
remaining, instead of proceeding to Malacca, his original des- 
tination. Besides the study of the language, the care of 
schools, and preaching, he bestowed much of his time in the 
invention and perfecting of Chinese metal type, with a view 
to the printing of the Scriptures, an object he ever kept in 
view; and he succeeded in the partial formation of two fonts, 
winch have never been excelled for accuracy and beauty. To- 
wards the end of 1828, he went to Malacca, for the purpose 
of visiting the brethren there, and making arrangements for the 
printing of Chinese books. In the earlier part oi 1831, Mr. 
Dyer again visited Malacca, in company with Mrs. Dyer. 
While at Penang he lost a daughter in infancy, his firstborn, 
but he had also some surviving offspring whim he left that 
island. In 1835 he went to reside at Malacca, where he ar- 
rived on the 26th of October, and devoted himself more especi- 
ally to the charge of the Printing office, and type founding. 
During his residence there, he was much encouraged by the 
aspect of affairs, but the state of Mrs. Dyer's health required 
that he should leave Malacca for a time; accordingly he em- 
barked with his family in the John Dugdale from Singapore 
dn the 15th of May, 1839, and arrived in England on the 
19th of September. He sailed again for the East, with his 
family, on the 2nd of August, 1841, onboard the Piantagenet, 
got to Cape Town on the 12th of October, where they made a 
short stay, and reached Calcutta by the middle of December. 



SAMUEL DYER, ;>.'> 

About the 26th of February, 1842, they arrived at Singapore, 
where he was now appointed, having touched at Penang and 
Malacca on the way. There he remained occupied with various 
departments of mission work till July 18, 1843, when he left 
to join the London Mission conference, and also to be present at 
a general convention of missionaries at Hongkong, to consult in 
regard to the translation of the Sacred Scriptures, his family 
meantime remaining at Singapore. He reached Hongkong 
on the 7th of August, was appointed Secretary of the con- 
vention, and continued there throughout the meetings. At 
the close of these he visited Canton, and thence embarked in 
a vessel for Singapore, which touched at Macao on the way. 
There he was attacked so severely with fever, that it was found 
necessary to move him ashore, where he died on the 21st of 
October, and was buried in the Protestant cemetery, by the 
side of Dr. Morrison. He left a son, now in England; and two 
daughters, the eldest of whom, Burella, was married to the 
llev. J. Burdon, a missionary in Shanghae, where she died; 
the youngest, Maria, was married to Mr. J. H. Taylor, a mis- 
sionary in Ningpo, with whom she returned to England, and 
now resides in London. 

Among Mr. Dyer's published works are: — 

CHINESE. 

1. Tract on Heaven. Penang, 1835. 

2- JtM Hf IE pi^ Full yin tsiing Inn. Summary of the Gos- 
pel. 7 leaves. 1839. The wooden blocks for this tract were 
sent to London, where they were stereotyped, and an edition 
printed off by the British and Foreign Tract Society; dupli- 
cates of the plates being also forwarded to China. 

ENGLISH. 

3. Vocabulary of the Hok-kien Dialect. L2mo. Singapore, 
183S. 

4. A selection of Three thousand Characters being the most 
important in the Chinese language. For the purpose of faci- 
litating the cutting of Punches and casting metal type in 
Chinese. 12mo. pp. 8, and 24 Chinese leaves. Malacca, 1834. 

5. Esop's Fables; as translated into Chinese by P. Thorn 
Esqr. rendered into the Colloquial of the dialects spoken in 
the department of Cliiang-chiu, in the province of Hok-kien: 
and in the department of Tie-chiii, in the province of Canton. 
Part first. — Hok-kien. Svo. pp. ii, 40. Singapore, 1843. It is 
only the first part of this work, i. e. on the Hok-kien or Fuh- 
kee'n dialect, that is the joint production of Messrs. Dyer and 
Stronach; the second being altogether that of Mr. Stronach. 



5-4 KARL FRIEDlilCII AUGUST OUTZLAFF. 

Besides the above, Mr. Dye? contributed largely to the 
periodical literature of the time; and many important articles 
from his pen may he found in the Calcutta Christian Obser- 
ver, Chinese Repository, Periodical Miscellany, and other 
popular serials. 



XVI. f$ t ft K° Slah-lee. KARL FRIEDRICH AU- 
GUST GUTZLAFF, the son of Johann Jacob Gutzlaff, a tailor, 

and a pious man, was horn at Pyritz, a small town in Prussian 
Pomerania, on the 8th of July, 1803. He was deprived of his 
mother at the age of four. In early life, he was apprenticed 
to a hrazier, and in 1818, first conceived the idea of becoming 
a missionary to the heathen ; although at one time, he was 
engaged studying the Arahic and Turkish languages, with 
the intention of ultimately joining the Prussian Legation at 
Constantinople. At the age of eighteen he went to study at 
the Missionary Institute at Berlin. In 1823, he repaired to 
Rotterdam, was accepted by the Netherlands Missionary So- 
ciety, and continued his studies there awhile. From Rotter- 
dam he made a journey to Paris and London, in order to gain 
information regarding the requisites for a Missionary to the 
Malayan Archipelago, whither he had decided to go. On the 
20th of July, 1826, he was ordained at Rotterdam, and sailed 
on the 11th of September in the Helena Christina, for Batavia 
where he arrived on the 6th of January, 1827. There he 
lodged for a time with Mr. Medhurst, by whom he was initia- 
ted into the Malay and Chinese languages, in which latter he 
made astonishing progress. Although originally destined for 
the island of Sumatra, the Avarlike state of affairs prevented 
him going there at that time, and he took up his residence at 
Rhio, where he was appointed chaplain in conjunction with 
his missionary duties. His stay in that island however does 
not appear to have been of long duration, for we find him 
at Singapore in 1828. On the 4th of August the same year, 
he left that place with Mr. Tomlin in a Chinese junk for Siam, 
where they landed on the 23rd. In 1829, he left the service 
of the Netherlands Society; went to Singapore, at the invita- 
tion of the Rev. Mr. Smith, and thence to Malacca, where he 
took charge of the London Mission, during the absence of the 
resident missionary; at the same time he married Miss. Mary 
Newell an English lady, and returned with her to Singapore, 
which they left for Siam on the 14th February 1830. In the 
early part of 1831, Mrs. Gutzlaff gave birth to a daughter and 
both mother and babe found a final resting place at Bankok. 
The death of the latter took place some ten days after he had 
gone, on board a junk to proceed to China. They finally 
se1 sail on Hie 18th of June, and after calling at some places 



KARL FRTKDKK'Il AUGUST GUTZLAFF. 55 

along the coast, reached T'een-tsin towards the end of Sep- 
tember, and the following month proceeded northwards up 
the G-ulf of Leaou-tung; whence they returned to the south, 
arriving at Macao on the 13th of December. Mr. Griitzlaff 

had commended himself to the natives, by the practice of 
medicine among them, having also adopted the native garb, 
and assumed one of their clan names; while he distributed 
Christian books to a great extent, on every available occasion. 
On the 25th of February the following year, he again em- 
barked, in the Lord Amherst, a ship chartered by the East 
India Company, for a voyage along the coast of China, Formo- 
sa, Corea, and Loo-choo, in which he acted as interpreter and 
surgeon. Although the object of the projectors failed, in open- 
ing up a new channel for trade, he had an opportunity of dis- 
tributing many books among the people; and returned to Ma- 
cao, on September 5. On the 12th of October, he undertook 
another voyage to the. north in the Sylph, from which he re- 
turned to Canton on the 29th of April, 1833. He continued 
much of the time, for the next year, in various vessels on the 
coast, engaged in distributing Christian books and speaking to 
the people; having received occasional pecuniary grants from 
the London Missionary Society. In March, 1834, he made a 
visit to Malacca, where lie was married to Miss Warnstall, an 
English lady, residing in the family of the Hon. S. Grarling, then 
Eesident of the settlement. In 1835. he was appointed one 
of the Chinese secretaries to the English commission in Chi- 
na. On the 24th June, 1837, he sailed in the British ship 
Ealeigh for Fuh-chow, from which they crossed over to Loo- 
choo, and on the 15th of July he was put on board the 
American ship Morrison, then on a mission to Japan, to take 
back some shipwrecked Japanese. They reached the Bay of 
Yedo, but were unsuccessful in the object of their voyage, 
and returned to Macao on the 29th of August. In 1838, Mr. 
Griitzlaff again made a trip to Fuh-keen ; his home being still 
at Macao till the breaking out of the war in 1839. During 
the period of hostilities, he was employed in a variety of ways; 
a part of the time, be was specially attached to Sir Hugh 
Gough's staff. He was for some time magistrate at Chusan 
in 1842-3; and on the decease of the Hon. J. R. Morrison, 
in August, 1S43, he succeeded, him as Chinese Secretary to 
the government of Hongkong, which post he held till his 
death. In the midst of bis multifarious official duties how- 
ever, he did not forget the mission work ; and among other 
schemes for extending the cause, in 1S44, he established a 
Society of natives, under the name of the p[ fT Hanhwuy 
"Chinese Union, " for the purpose of preaching the Gospel, 
and distributing books far and wide throughout the empire. 
Mrs. Griitzlaff having gone to Singapore for the benilit of her 



56 K.VIU. FRIEDRICH AUGUST CJUTZLAFF. 

health, died there in April, 1849; and in September following, 
he visited Europe, where lie was married to Miss Gabriel, 
an English lady, with whom he returned to China in January, 
1851, and died at Hongkong on the 9th of August the same 
year. 

The following are his principal works: — 

CHINESE. 

1. ^ ^ P $£ ^ Td ying Jcico t'ung cite. History of 
England. JS34. In most of his earlier publications, Mr, 
Giitzlaff designated himself as !%t$L $$ Gfaehan chat/, "Lover 
of the Chinese." 

-■ Wli^ffi'MiM OMng ts'ung paeluy It an. Faithful 
Letters. 60 leaves. 1834. After the preface and a leaf of in- 
troductory matter, this consists of a series of letters from a 
Fun-keen man abroad, to his parents, younger brother, mother, 
elder sister, younger sister, nephew, friend, and grand-nephew. 
These contain the great leading truths of the Gospel, com- 
pared with Heathenism in all its bearings. 

3- UK W %. aE H£ ShUh tsiiy-che. Hto,6u dawn. The Doc- 
trine of Redemption. 246* leaves. 1834. In this the author 
has aimed at a narrative illustration of the great leading doc- 
trine of the gospel; the work being written in the form of a 
novel, in 21 chapters, with a preface and appendix. A re- 
vised and condensed edition of the same was published in 
1836, in 41 leaves. 

4- ^ fi§ ;£ M M Chang hicb cite ta6u cltucn. The doc- 
trine of Eternal Life. 44 leaves. 1834. This is also written 
after the style of a Chinese novel, in which the author en- 
deavours to inculcate Christian principles, by a personal nar- 
rative, in 6 chapters, with a short preface. 

•'->• Jl *rj? ]&• W< M tShdng te chin 7cea6u chuen. Theology. 
27 leaves. 1834. This is a treatise in seven articles, on — The 
sacred name of Jehovah, — Jehovah the only Ruler. — Nature 
of Jehovah, — Jehovah three persons in one God, — Father, — 
Son, — and Holy Spirit. It is written in a sententious 'style. 

C ;Jc lit ^ r* -f t & i$ K6io site choo yen king tseuen 
chuen. Life of Christ. 79 leaves. This work, which is divid- 
ed into eleven books, contains a detailed account of the life, 
words, and actions of our Lord, in sixty-four Sections, com- 
mencing with his genealogy, and ending with an account of 
the preaching of the apostles. It is written in the style of 
historical narrative: and was revised and reprinted in 7.3 leaves, 
by the (jjifi £$C f> Full lian hint//.) Chinese Union, in 1855. 

?• 3§b#:lrimfr Site fei leb bin. Correction of erroneous 
impressions. 38 leaves. Malacca, 1835. This is also a narra- 
tive and conversational tract, in 6 chapters, in which a Canton 



KAKL FR1KDKICII AUGUST GUTZLAKF. 57 

man who lias lived abroad some years, undertakes to rectify 
the mistaken notions of one of his countrymen regarding for- 
eign men and things. 

8- IE f& j£ Fi> Clung TeeaCu gan ivei. Consolations of 
Religion. 82 leaves. Singapore, 1836. This is in 4 hooks, 
the 1st of which contains a summary of the life, sufferings 
condemnation, death, resurrection and ascension of our Lord 
in nine sections; the 2nd book elaborates the successive dis- 
courses of the Saviour, in seven sections; the 3rd hook enters 
into detail regarding the various events in the life of Jesus, 
in eighteen sections; and the 4th relates His resurrection, 
several appearances, ascension to heaven, sending the Holy 
Spirit, with power to work miracles, conversion of men, and 
glory of Christ, in eleven sections. 

9- tk IS 3LW M- £ M till Ktoo sit e chob y&y soo die sh ing 
lieun. Sacred instruction of the Saviour. 18 leaves. Singa- 
pore, 1836. This treatise on the words of. Jesus, is chiefly a 
compilation from the New Testament, with explanatory notes, 
in eight articles, on — the fear and love of G-od, — loving- 
others as ourselves, — striving to enter the kingdom of hea- 
ven, — fitness of prayer, — laying up treasure in heaven, — 
watchfulness, — faith, — and Jesus calling men to enter the 
kingdom of heaven. 

10. Jffi M ii» i! £ f$ Yjty s0 ° shin tseih die cliuen. Mi- 
racles of Jesus. 24 leaves. Singapore, 1836. This records the 
various miracles performed by our Lord, in short paragraphs, 
mostly in Scripture words. It is in seven articles, viz:— 
Introduction, — Jesus raising the dead, — opening the eyes of 
the blind, — casting out spirits, — healing the sick, — feeding 
the multitude. — and concluding words. 

11. ^ A3$ljSi Tse&enjin heu hwb. The perfect man's 
model. 30 leaves. Singapore, 1836. This is a treatise on the 
teachings of the Holy Scripture, in 5 books, on — unfeigned vir- 
tue, — spiritual instruction, — the Saviour, — explanation of the 
law, — theory of prayer, and the doctrine of Jesus true and 
self evident. 

12. jf g -|f ;> ££. ^ Full yin cli e cli in hwe i. G-ospel Precepts. 
18 leaves. Singapore, 1836. This is a selection of portions 
of Scripture truth regarding the relations of life, arranged in 
eight articles, on — spiritual principles, — loving others as our- 
selves, — husband and wife, — father and sou, — master and ser- 
vant, — prince and people, — all men, — and merit. 

13. MM 5L ^ III! Y&y soojiliepaou heiin. Precious words 
of Jesus. 34 leaves, Singapore, 1836. This is a record of 
most of the discourses of Jesus, and some of the apostles; given 
for the chief part in the Scripture phraseology. 

14. J$ M W 1£ £ i% Ya 'J so ° keang she die clmen. Na- 
tivity of Christ. 20 leaves. Singapore, 1S36. This is a 



58 KAllL FIUEDB1CH AUGUST QUTZLAF?. 

narrative of the birth and early life of our Lord, as far as the 
return of his parents to Nazareth, after the death of Herod, 
in eleven sections, given entirely in the words of Scripture. 
It concludes with an exhortation to repentance and faith. 
(See Medhurst's works, No. 36.) 

15. ||| $g j£ jH (!£ Tsin U chmg ia6u chucn. The true 
Religion. 64 leaves. This is an exposition of the doctrines 
of Christianity, and an exposure of false systems, by means 
of a series of conversations between five literary men at Teng- 
chow in Shan-tung. It is divided into nine discourses, with 
a short introductory piece. 

16. IE M- £, tfo Ching taou che Jun. Discourse upon the 
Truth. • "28 leaves. The author introduces his subject by an 
apology for foreigners, and proceeds to expound the doctrines 
of the bible, including a short explanation of the moral law. 

17. )j£ "® # % # H $fr IG fi Tmir J se V dn 9 k ' adu l nel 
yuc t'ung he chucn. Eastern Western Monthly Magazine. 
4 vols. Canton and Singapore, 1833—1837. This periodical 
contains the substance of some works published separately by 
Mr. Grittzlaff, Medhurst's Comparative Chronology, (See Med- 
hursts works No. 16.) and a great amount of other matter, 
religious, political, scientific, commercial and miscellaneous. 
The first number was published in Canton on the 1st of August, 
1833. Subsequently it was published at Singapore, being 
conducted by Mr. Gutzlaif till 1837, when he gave it up to the 
charge of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge 
in China. 

18. J§£ Hf iff % t ^ i¥ -^ se V^ n hi n 9 tseue7i chucn. Life 
of Moses. 68 leaves. Singapore, 1836. This memoir of the 
great legislator, in 7 books, is divided into twenty-seven sec- 
tions, commencing with the genealogy and birth, and detailing 
the principal leading and collateral events in the life of Moses, 
the decalogue, and various laws and institutions introduced 
by him. There is a short introductory preface. 

19. fE JfI5 M ~u ft & i$ T&n ydy U yen nine/ tseuen chucn. 
History of Daniel. 23 leaves. Singapore, 1837. This is di- 
vided into nine sections, viz: — Introduction, — Daniel in the 
palace, — Daniel interprets the dream, — his associates relieved 
from danger,— the king's decree,— God's judgment on the 
monarch, — God delivers Daniel,— Daniel's prayer, — and con- 
cluding remarks. About this time, Mr. Gutzlaif seems to have 
adopted a new designation ; for on this and several other of 
his works, he has assumed the epithet |§ £g % Slien till chay, 
or |f fig Shcn tilt, "Admirer of Virtue," instead of the usual 
one Gae hen chay. 

20. f£ $i "i* fr M Padu Id V tn ] "' nr J Irih - Life of P;lul - 
55 leaves. ' Singapore, 1837. This history, which is divided 
into 13 chapters, enters into the leading incidents of the great 



HAUL KRIEDIUCH AUGUST QUTZLAFF. ,~> | ) 

• 

apostle's career, in a series of twenty-nine sections, commen- 
cing with the birth and education of Paul, embracing his 
labours and adventures, and concluding with a notice of his 
most prominent characteristics. There is a short preface to 
it, and an occassional commentary throughout. This is signed 
Shen Uh chay. 

21. $| $Tir fr Wi to han yen king Uh. Life of John. 
25 leaves. Singapore, 1837. This short memoir of the be- 
loved disciple, is in 4 chapters, which treat of — John the dis- 
ciple of Jesus, and the apostle. — the Apocalypse by John, — 
John's Epistles, — and John's account of Christ. There is a 
short preface. The signature is Shen tih chay. 

22. HI §H j| ^c Bft %% Kwan he chung td led sluoo. Im- 
portant Consequences. 35 leaves. Singapore, 1837. This 
tract is divided into four sections, treating of — the source of 
life, — the source of death, — Jesus giving eternal life, — resur- 
rection of all men, — and relative duties. There is a short 
preface. The signature is SI ten tih chcty. 

23. JE -J5 Jfc ^c Ching se&y p§ Iceaoit. Contrast between 
the true and the false. 35 leaves. Singapore, 1838. This is a 
short treatise against idolatry and false doctrines, written in 
the form of dialogues, and connected into a personal narrative 
in 3 chapters, with a short preface. The author signs himself 
Shen tih. 

24. jj| 5H fj H Chin taou tsae ching. Proofs of the Truth. 
28 leaves. Singapore. This details the evidences of Chris- 
tianity, by way of dialogues between two friends, in 4 books. 
The first, after a short introduction, treats of the Creator; the 
second is on Mankind; the third is on Jesus the Saviour; and 
the fourth is on Man's position in the world. The author's 
signature is Shen tih. 

25. Ji tffr "ft? 1$ ^ ^c ^ Sluing te wan with ehe td choo. 
Clod the Lord of all. 21 leaves. Singapore. This treats of 
the Divine attributes in 2 books. The first commences with 
a short introduction, followed by two articles on the Majesty 
and Eternity of God. The second book has three articles, on 
God the Almighty Creator, the Mercy, and the Justice of God. 
The author signs himself Shen tilt. 

26. $j -g, j$.=§ fj'$f Yd sih/Uh yin hing lull. Life of 
Joseph. 24 leaves. Singapore. After a short preface, this 
tract treats of the various incidents in the patriarch's eventful 
career, in twelve sections; commencing with an outline of his 
ancestral antecedents, and ending with his death. The author 
signs himself Shen till. 

27. $£ i% H "= fx ^ f$ Pi Uh Id yen hing tseilen chui n. 
Life of Peter. 17 leaves. Singapore, 1838. This narrates the 
events in the history of the apostle Peter, as drawn from the 
New Testament, in 2 books. The first book brings the nar- 



BO K.VHL PRIEDRICD AUGUST GOTZLAiFF. 

ration down to his last interview with Jesus; and the second 
gives his subsequent life and labours. 

28. H f£ 55»J jjj| ^ ^ Shing shoo lee tsob tseuen chuen. 
Bible Patriarchs. 62 leaves. Singapore, IS38. This is a his- 
tory of the great ancestors of the Hebrew race, in 5 hooks. 
The first book commences with a brief account of matters 
subsequent to the flood, introductory to the life of Abraham, 
which it carries down to the birth of Ishmael; the second book 
continues the history from Clod's covenant with Abraham, till 
the death of the patriarch; the third book contains the life of 
Isaac; the fourth comprises the life of Jacob, down to the 
death of his wife Rachel; and the fifth continues the family 
history, to the death of Jacob. 

29. 'Ml^f Wt M Suing yen tsdn yu. Eulogy and Praise. 
14 leaves. Singapore, 1838. This treatise sets forth the mo- 
tives and duty of praising Grod. 

30. || jjj® ^ ®g j£ v£ C/nten Ji6 wei full die fa. The 
Way from Misery to Happiness. 5 leaves. Singapore, 1838. 
This tract proclaims the doctrine of Salvation by Christ, in 
the manner of dialogue between friends. 

31. fj| H£ gjjj JH Hivuy mod heun tabu. Instructive Details. 
18 leaves. Singapore, 1838. This is intended to illustrate 
practical Christianity by means of a personal narrative, in 
three chapters. 

32. -fit A $C i Shejin hew cliob. The Saviour of Man- 
kind. 6 leaves. Singapore, 1838. This is a discourse on Jesus 
as the Saviour, professedly delivered at an idol fete at Hang- 
chow. It was afterwards reprinted in a smaller form. 

33. ££, £jj* M |5j| 3nt m Sang ming woo keen woo heang. 
Endless Life. 5 leaves. (Singapore, 1838. This doctrinal tract 
is also detailed in the dialogue form. 

34. -£• <ty ~$? |U |H |g£ Kod kin loan l.icb Irene/ hem. Univer- 
sal History. 244 leaves. Singapore, 1838. This is for the most 
part, a republication of articles which appeared in the Eastern 
Western Monthly Magazine, No. 17 supra. It is in 20 books, 
and has a large folding map of the World prefixed. This was 
reprinted at Ningpo in 1850, in 266 leaves. 

35. ~$ m $& Jjj! $± $t Wan kwo fe le tseuen tselh. Uni- 
versal Geography. This is chiefly a collection of articles first 
published in the Eastern Western Monthly Magazine. 

36. © j£ [U ]£. Yew t'ae kivb she. History of Judea. 
183 leaves. Singapore, 1S39. The substance of this appeared 
first in the Eastern Western Monthly Magazine. It is in 23 
books, and brings the history down to recent times. 

37. j|| 3g ff %t Tsze hwuypb gae. Kindness and Uni- 
versal Love. 5 leaves. Singapore, 1 839. This is a discourse as- 
sumed to have been delivered at a village, in Fuh-keen province. 

38. §i? t|' !£ f§fc Shing shoo chb6 soo. Explanation of the 



KARIi FRTEBRICTI AUGUST GUTZLAFF. o' I 

Scriptures. 92 leaves. Singapore, 1839. This is a simple 
detail of the facts of Scripture history and dod in con- 

versations between a father and his three sons. It is in 5 
chapters, with %short preface. The first chapter embraces 
the Pentateuch : the second is from Joshua to Esther ; the third 
from Job to Malachi ; the fourth includes the four Grospels ; 
and the fifth is from .Acts to Revelation. 

39. -$!j U £ % ^c B& Che hwb cite yitng tu led. On I i 

of Political economy. 24 leaves. This treats of the funda- 
mental principles of good government, in 8 books, on — provi- 
ding - for the people. — money,— revenue,- — state expenditure 
— military, — education, — sources of wealth,— and answers to 
questions. 

40. ^ Jl, 3j| ^ Moiv y'ih t'ung die. Treatise on ('one 
merce. 63 leaves, and a chart. 1840. This is an abstract of 
the principles laid down by Mac-Oulloch : and is divided into 
5 books, as follows, — 1. Antiquity and importance of 
commerce. — the merchant, — companies and free trade. 2. 
Present state of commerce, — China, and neighbouring coun- 
tries, — countries in the Indian Ocean,- -East Indies, — Western 
nations. — European countries, — North America,— and Son th 
America. 3. Transportation of goods, — charts — . — roads, — 
harbours. 4. Currency. — bills, — hanks. — exchange, — insu- 
rance companies. 5 New countries, — trading regulations,— 
tariffs, — protection, — and conl 

41. i\y fgj )J» jpg Sea&u sin seabufuh. Little Faith little 
Happiness. 26 leaves. This is also a narrative trai 
books, chiefly dialogue, illustrative of the doctrine of faith. 
The scene is laid in Soo-chow and Hang-chow, and the tire 
is the Yuen dynasty. It 1ms a short preface. 

42. [& 3f|5 Bf H & $C K a & way kia i 6 ch wan. Aban- 
doning Depravity and turning- to Righ LI 

This is a short tract especially dired 
Opium smoking, in six articles, viz: — Introduction,— G 
looking down on the world, — turning from error, — advancing 
in virtue, — warnings. — and concluding remark-. 

43. Jfj5 $fc Jfc % t± it ! ''// so ° peyit cho6 slnvo. Paral 

of Jesus. 31 leaves. Singapore, 1841. In this tract, after a 
short introduction, the parables of our Lord are classified un- 
der eleven heads; on — The kingdom of heaven, — forgiving 
trespasses, — God pardoning sin,- — Jesus shewing mercy, 
believing prayer, — employment of wealth, — employment 
talent, — Jesus calling men to enter tin.' kingdom of heaven- 
arousing t\ic careless, — Cod chastising his own peoplfi,- 
revelation el the life to come. The several lexis are given in 
the words of Scripture, and followed iveiy h) explana 

lory remarks. 

44. {$ fp £ ^c ^i H u 



62 KARL FLUEDfilCH AUGUST GUTZLAFF, 

peiitance. 62. leaves. in this tract the doetrft^e of repentance 
is elucidated in a series of colloquies, in 4 Looks. The scene 
the narrative is laid in Fuh-keen. 

45. ;!£ jit Jffl j&£ 'Jg ^E ^ f$ ^e^ s ^e ydy soo sh6w szc 
tseuen chuen. Narrative of the death of Jesus the Saviour , 
LO leaves, 1843. 

4b". ill _L jIl *ll Shan shdng s< ?iew ta6u. The Sermon on 
the mount, with Commentary < 7 leaves. 

47. i§=. H' |ff| "if Slung shoo Jc'euen yen. Scripture Ex- 
hortations. J 5 leaves. 

48. j^ $$ ftf jt[" Hwang ch'ing sin slnh. The Augsburg 
Confession of Faith. 14 leaves. 

49. 5c I£ ft ^ P3 ^ M °i3 Tccnhcaoul-b t'eaou wan Id 
Jceae wing. Luther's small Catechism. 4 leaves. 

50. !|| |gf- PpI ^ Kin yaou wan td. Catechism of Essen- 
tials. 2 leaves. 

51 ^ 'iT H 7=?* Shing hwuy ta6u tsze. Selection from the 
English Church Liturgy. 6 books. 51 leaves. 

52. ^ ^ ;£, }$l Siting liwuy cite she. History of the 
Church. 3b' leaves. 

53. ^}% |U j^, fljf- PPVm /t?6-d s/*e chuen. General History. 
53 leaves. 

54. Ji *tfr M jit Shdng ti ch'iv&ng tsaou. '•God created. - ' 
5 leaves. The preceding is the first line of a tract in tetrame- 
trical verse, giving an outline of Christian doctrine, it has 
neither title, date, name of author, nor place wliere printed. 

55. ^B A Wk Wc ■ChaoujinhwbkGio. Men called to receive 
Salvation. 2 leaves. 

5(5. ;j& lij| ftf ^ Kew shuh lid e. The Theory of Kedemp- 
tion. 2 leaves. 

57. ji. JM Ghinle. Truth. 2 leaves. This enforces Scrip- 
ture Truth, by means of a dialogue between two friends. 

58. ff jfi fg U? H K'ew e cha6u siting shoo. Old Testa- 
ment. 665 leaves. This was commenced and carried on asfar 
as the end of Joshua, by Mr. Gtitzlaff, in concert with Messrs. 
Medhurst, Bridgman and J. R, Morrison, in 1836 ; but Mr. 
Medhurst, being obliged then to retire, the committee was 
dissolved, and the completion of the Old Testament appears 
to have been mainly the work of Gtitzlaff. A new edition of 
this was cut by the Chinese Evangelization Society, and pub- 
lished in 1855! 

59. ;£ ill: 3k JRS $fc if ili |g fr %**> sUchooydy soo sin 
e chaoio shoo. New Testament. 303 leaves. This is a modi- 
fication o[' the version published by Medhurst. (SeeMedhurst's 
works, No. 25.) It was several times revised by Gutzlaff, 

* The writer of these notes not, having seen this work, is not sure if the last 
character be correcl a: the title is taken from a lisl published in Holland, in 
Italic eharai lci\ 



KARL FRIEDRICH AUGUST GUTZLAFF. 63 

and ten or more editions published, ostensibly by the Chinese 
Union. Griitzlaff's version of the Old .and New Testament is 
remarkable, as having been republished by the Tae-pino- in- 
surgents ; although in their later editions these latter have 
made considerable alterations. 

GO. H $£ ..£]fe Shtng Jang die she. Scripture History 
41 leaves. This is a translation from the German, of a succinct 
history of events recorded in Sacred writ, in 7 books ; beginning 
with the creation, and continued down to the preaching of the 
gospel throughout the world by the Apostles. A revision of 
this work very much modified was published by the Chinese 
Evangelization Society, in 77 leaves. This is divided into 2 
books. 

61. ;f£ {\fe l&aou t'eaou. Systematic Theology. 55 leaves. 
1849. This is a translation from a German work, and con- 
sists of nineteen articles. These are on — God, the Trinity, 
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, — creation, — angels, — man, — 
government of God, — sin, — the Saviour, — doctrine of redemp- 
tion, — sufferings of Christ, — death of Christ, — resurrection of 
the Saviour. — three fold office of Christ, — kingdom of heaven, 
— grace, — election, — admission to the church, — law of grace, 
— baptism, — the Lord's supper, — the church, — death, — judg- 
ment, — doctrine of the resurrection, — the blessed, — and the 
manifestation of the Saviour. 

JAPANESE. 

62. $j ^ jjig j|r £, i$ Y° hanfuh yin die diuen. 
3^^/"%-%} #~M) 3t?^t£ Yohan ncs' no tayori yorokobi. 
John's Gospel. 60 leaves. Singapore. 

63. £§ |$ _t 4* T Iff Yd hdn sluing diunghe&shoo. The 

Three Epistles of John. 40 leaves. Singapore. Mr. GutzlafT 
learned Japanese from some of tlie natives of that country 
who had been shipwrecked on the coast of America, and were 
brought to China, in order to be returned to their native land. 
This translation and the preceding are entirely in the Kata- 
gana character. In both, the author signs himself Shen tih. 
The first two chapters of the Gospel, and the 2nd Epistle, were 
republished in Paris by Leon de Eosny, in 1854, in 7 leaves. 

SIAMESE. 

64. The Gospels of Luke and John. Singapore. In this 
translation, Gutzlaff had the cooperation and assistance <>f 
Mr. Tomlin. 

DUTCH. 

65. Smeehschrift ten behoeveder Heidenen en Mahomeda- 



64 KARL FRIEDRIGH AUGUST GUTZLAFF. 

. ,'. gerigt aan alle Ghristenen van Nederland. Plea on be- 
half of Heathens and Mohammedans; addressed to the Chris- 
tians of Holland. 8vo. Amsterdan, 1826. 

66. Geschiedenis der uiibreiding van Christus Koningrijk 
op aarde. History ofthe extension of Christ's kingdom in the 
world. 8vo. 2vols. Rotterdam, 1828. This publication was the 
result of information collected by Mr. Gtitzlaif, during his 
visit to Paiis and London, about the year 1825, when a can- 
didate for the missionary service. 

67. Verslag run een driejarig verblijf in Siam en van 
eene r gs de kust van China nam- MantchouTartarije. 
Account of a three year's residence in Siam, and of a voyage 
along the coast of China, to Manchu Tartarv. Svo. Rotter- 
dam. 1833. 

6S. Reizen langs de Jcust&n van China en bezoek op Corea 
en de Loo-choo Eilanden in dejaren 1832 en 1833. Voyages 
along the coast of China, and a visit to Corea and the Loo- 
choo Islands, in the years 1832 and 1833. Svo. Rotterdam, 1835. 

69. Aaan niijnc mede-Christenen in Nederland ; afschei- 
dsiooord ran Dr. K. Gutzlaff. To my fellow-Christians in 
Holland ; Valedictory address by Dr. K. Gutzlaff. Amster- 
dam, 1850. Tin's was delivered on occasion of his visit to 
Europe, when about to return to China. 

GERMAN. 

70. Caul Gutzlaff, Missionar Predigt iiber Apostelgcs- 
chiehte iv. 12. gehalten am 22 Dec. 1822 in Berlin. Oarl 
Gutzlaff, Missionary Sermon on Acts, iv. 12, delivered at 
Berlin. Dec. 22. 1822. Svo. Berlin, 1844. 

71. Gutzlaff's Geschichte des ehinesisclien Reiches von 
den altesten Zeiten, bis ecu/ den Frieden von Nanking. Her- 
emsgegeben von Karl Friedrich Neumann. Gutzlaff 's His- 
tory of the Chinese empire, from the earliest period, down to 
the Peace of Nanking ; edited by C. F. Neumann. Svo. pp. 
viii, 912. Stuttgart and Tubingen, 1847. This Avas trans- 
lated into Dutch, by K. N. Meppen, Svo. 2 vols. Hague 1852. 

72. Gaihan's (Karl Gutzlaff's) Chinesesche Berichte 
van eler Milte des Jahres 1841 bis zum Schluss des Jalires 
1846. Gaihan's (Karl Gutzlaff's) Reports of China, from 
the middle ofthe year 1841, to the close of the year 1846, 
« 'assel, 1850. These Letters were first published in the Calwer 
Monatsblatter. 

73. Dr. C. Gutzlaff, Die Mission in China Vortrage, 
in Berlin gelid I leu, 1 — 6 Vorirag. Dr. C. Gutzlaff, The 
Mission in China. Discourses delivered in Berlin. Discourses 
J— 6. Berlin, 1850. 

74. Dr. C Gutzlaff, Abschiedsworte gesprochen bei der 



KARL FBIEDBICH AUGUST GUTZLAFF. 63 

JaJiresfeier der Preuss. Haupt-Bibel-Gesellschaft ami 9 Gel . 

1850. Dr. C. Gutzlaff, Valedictory address delivered at 
the Annual Meeting of the Prussian Head Bible Society, on 
the 9th of October, "1850, Berlin, 1850. 

75. Dr. C. Gutzlaff, Ueber die Handels verhaltnisse im 
ostlichen Aslen. Vortrag gehaltenm Berlin am 9 Oct. 1850. 
Dr. C. Gutzlaff, On Commercial Relations in Eastern Asia. 
Discourse delivered at Berlin, on the 9th of October, 185". 
Berlin, 1850. 

76. Dr. K. Gutzlaff, Bericht seiner Reisc von Clyina 
nacli England and, durch die verschiedenen Lander Europ&'s, 
im Interesse der Chines. Mission. Dr. K. Gutzlaff, Account 
of a Voyage from China to England, and through the diffe- 
rent Countries of Europe, in the interest of the Chinese 
Mission, Cassel, 1851. This was translated into Dutch, with 
the title — Mijne reis van China naar Engeland, dV. My 
Voyage from China to England, &c. Rotterdam, 1851. 

ENGLISH. 

77. Remarks on the Siamese Language. 4to. pp. 14, and 
3 plates. London, 1833. This was printed in the 2nd Part 
of. the 3rd Volume of the Transactions of the Royal Asiatic 
Society, where it was read on the 16th July, 1831. Sonn' 
copies Were issued separately. 

78. The Journal of Two Voyages along the coast of China. 
L2mo. pp. 322. New Fork, 1833. " The Journal of the first of 
those voyages appeared first in the Chinese Repository, Vol. 1. 

79. A sketch of Chinese History, ancient and modern : 
comprising a retrospect of the foreign intercourse and trade 
with China. Illustrated by a new and corrected Map of the 
Empire. 2 vols. Svo. pp. 436, 463, and 11 folding sheets. 
London, 1834. This was republished in New York. 

80. Journal of Three Voyages along the coast of China, 
in 1831, 1832, & 1833, with notices of Siam, Corea, and the 
Loo-choo islands. To which is prefixed, an introductory 

on the policy, religion, &c. of China, by the Rev. W. 
Ellis, author of '-'Polynesian Researches &c." 12mo. pp. xciii, 
450. London, 1834. 

81. Report of Proceedings on a Voyage to the .Northern 
Ports of China. This forms the concluding portion, pp. 269 — 
296 of -'Report of Proceedings on a Voyage to the Northern 
Ports of China, in the ship Lord Amherst." Svo. London, 
1834. 

82 China Opened ; or, a display of the topography, histo- 
ry, customs, manners, arts, manufactures, commerce, litera- 
ture, religion, jurisprudence, &c. of the Chinese empire 2 vols 
12mo. pp. xvi, 510. vi. 57o. London, 1838. 



GG WILLIAM YOTTNG. 

83. Notices on Chinese Grammar. Pari I. Orthography 

and Etymology. By Philo-Sinensis. 8vo. pp. 148. Batavia. 
1842. This is the only portion of the work that was ever 
printed. It is done by lithography, that being the only 
method available for the Chinese characters. 

84. Memoir of Kang-bi, emperor of China. London 1843. 
This is appended to Allom's Views of China, in 4 vols. 

85. The Life of Taon-kwang, late emperor of China; with 
memoirs of the court of Peking; including a sketch of the 
principal events in the history of the Chinese empire during 
the last fifty years. 12mo. pp. xvi, 279. This was published 
after the author's death. 

Dr. GHitzlaff was an extensive contributor to the Chinese 
Repository, and other periodicals, in English and other Euro- 
pean languages, He left behind him also a large mass of 
manuscript towards an English and Chinese Dictionary. 



XVII. || Yang. WILLIAM YOUNG, born in the Ma- 
layan Archipelago, became a member of the Baptist church; 
and while residing at Batavia in his early days, formed an 
acquaintance with Mr. Medhurst, by whom he was engaged as 
Assistant in the mission work there in 1828. During the ab- 
sence of the latter on his tour to the Malayan peninsula and 
the islands, the affairs of the station were left in the charge 
of Mr. Young, who gave much satisfaction, and made good 
progress in the Chinese and Malay languages. In 1829 he 
preached regularly in Mala} 7 ; to the Amboynese, a service 
which there is reason to hope was attended by a blessing to 
some. The following year he took the superintendence of the 
mission schools, which he sustained in conjunction with other 
duties, with fidelity and perseverance. While Mr. Medhurst 
was absent at Canton, and along the coast of China in 1835, 
the onus of the Batavia station fell entirely on Mr. Young ; 
and he continued to discharge the various duties, aided by 
Mr. Barenstein, while Mr. Medhurst was on a visit to his na- 
tive land, from 1836 to 1838. The severity of the labour 
however told so much upon his health, that on the return of 
Mr. Medhurst from England, it was found necessary for Mr. 
Young to take a sea voyage, and he paid a visit to Macao the 
following year, whence he returned in 1840. greatly improved, 
lie resumed his duties of preaching in Chinese and. Malay and 
superintending the schools; and again took the general charge 
while Mr. Medhurst was absent on a journey to the eastern 
extremity of Java. In 1843, when Batavia was abandoned as 
a mission station by the London Society, and the brethren 
repaired to the conference at Hong-kong, Mr. Young was ap- 
pointed to carry forward the Chinese department of the mission 



WILLIAM VOLiM.. (,7 

at Singapore. There he remained till the .summer of 1844. 
when he removed with his wife to China, and arrived at Amoy 
on July 8th, where he had been appointed as Assistant mission- 
ary. At first he was located with the Rev. J. Stronach on the 
adjoining island of Koo-lang-seu, from which he made occa- 
sional itinerancies on the main land, in company with some 
of the missionaries ; and ultimately they succeeded in procur- 
ing a house, and opened a chapel in the town of Amoy, on 
December 1st. There Mr. Young conducted divine worship 
in Chinese alternately with Mr. Stronach; as also in the chapel 
of the American brethren. In 1846, the health of Mrs. Young, 
who had been assiduous in her labours among the Chinese, 
suffered so severely, that he found it needful to accompany 
her to Hongkong in August, and thence to England, which 
they reached on the 11th of April, 1847. Having been rein- 
vigorated by this visit, they sailed again for China with a largo 
missionary party in the Ferozepore on the 19th of March, 1848, 
reaching Hong-kong in July, and arrived at Amoy on the 2nd 
of September. About this time, he appears to have been or- 
dained to the ministry. In 1850, he found it necessary again 
to visit Hong-kong with his wife, on account of their health : 
and in consequence of the complete failure of Mrs. Young, it was 
deemed expedient to undertake a voyage to Australia in the 
early part of 1854. On the way to Singapore, they suffered 
a disastrous shipwreck, but at length reached Sydney in safety 
on the 9th of September, where Mr. Young commenced preach- 
ing to the Chinese emigrants settled in that city. Although 
unable to return to the scene of his former labours, he con- 
tinued to exert himself for the good of the Chinese ; and after 
the death of Mrs. Young, which occurred early in 1857, he 
still remained in the country, sustaining a connection with the 
Missionary Society till 1858, when it appears to have termi- 
nated. He has since that time been engaged as pastor of a 
Chinese church in Ballarat, in connection with' the Presbyterian 
church in Australia. 

Publications by. A//-. Touitg. 

CHINESE. 

!■ till M. B 1%. Seun rnung jili k'6. Daily lessons for 
Children. 12 leaves. This is a series of twenty eight simple 
lessons, for instructing Chinese children in the English lan- 
guage. The English and Chinese are given side by side in 
horizontal lines and piinted by lithography. 

2- $J $ft f|£ SH Taf Hr Y° l ldn chuenfuh yin shoo. Indjil 
jang tbrsoerat oleii joiiAxxEs. John's Gospel in Chinese 
and Malay. 118 leaves. Batavia. Lithography. This is merely 



68 ELIJAH COL'ESIAN BIUDGMAN, 

Medhurst's version printed in horizontal lines, with the Malay 
hi in the Roman character placed under each vers;'. Mr, 
Young was little more than editor. 

3- <f| Jl? JP$ llf M fU Yang sin shin she sin peen. New 
Hymn Dunk. 10 leaves. Amoy, 1852. This is a collection of 
13 hymns in the Amoy dialect. 



XVIII. f$ ffi £ Pc bhe ican. ELIJAH COLEMAN 
BRIDGMAN was horn April 22nd, "1801. in Belchertown, 

Massachusetts, U. S. A., of pious parents, whose ancestors 
were among the Pilgrim Fathers, and settled in New England, 
— Andrew Warner in 1636 and James Bridgman in 1640. 
He was converted at the early age of eleven, and became a 
communicant of the Congregational Church in his nati've town 
Tinder, the pastorate of the Rev. E. Porter, in his twelfth year. 
Soon after, he hecaine deeply interested in the Missionary 
work, ami it was his desire to carry '-'the glad tidings" to the 
heathen, that determined him, eventually to abandon the 
agricultural pursuits of his early life, and prepare for the 
ministry,. His academical studies were pursued in his native 
town ; his collegiate at Amherst; where he graduated in 1826 : 
and his theological at Andover. He was ordained a mission- 
ary to the heathen on (jot. 6th, 1829. in connection with the 
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, and 
on the 14th sailed, together with the Rev. I). Aheel in the 
Roman for China, where he arrived on the 19th of February 
1830. the first agent of thai; body in the country, and was 
welcomed by Dr Morrison, then the only Protestant mission- 
ary settled within tin 1 empale. From the commencement, and 
throughout his long career, he exhibited not only a do. 
tachmeut to the mission cause, hut a degree of public spirit Id 
all schemes for the amelioration of the condition of his fellow 
beings. On the formation of the Society for fin. 1 Diffusion of 
Useful knowledge in Chi: 5 ;!, in November. 1834. lie was ap- 
pointed joint Chinese secretary with Mr. Gutzlaff. One of 
the originators of the Morrism! Education Society, Dr. Bridg- 
man was appointed Corresponding secretary, from the com- 
mencement, in January L836. When the 1 Medical Missionary 
society was formed at Canton, in February, 1838, lie was 
elected Vice-president. He continued to reside in the foreign 
factories at ( anion, until the outbreak of the political troubles 
"! iquent upon the Avar with the English, commencing in 
1839, when he removed to Macao. On the 14th of July, 1841, 
the degree of 1). 1). was conferred on him by the University of 
New STork.* At the series of general meetings of Missionaries 

* On July 1st, 18tL!lio removed to Hong-kons and in September, lie suc- 
ceeded Mr. Dent, as President of the Morrison Education S< 



ELIJAH COLEMAN BRIDGMAN <\'J 

held at Hong-kong from August 22nd toSeptembei 4th, 1843, 
to consult regarding a new translation of the Scriptures, he 

was present on every occasion, and at the session of August 
25th, was appointed with Mr. Dean, to confer on rendering 
the word Baptizo in Chinese; but they gave in their report 
on the 1st of September, to the effect that they were not pre- 
pared to recommend any term. 

When the American Legation under Caleb dishing arrived 
in China, in February, 1844, Dr. Bridgman was appointed 
joint Secretary with Dr. Parker, and also Chaplain to the Le 
gation. On the 28th of June, 1845, he was married to Eliza 
Jane Gillet, in the Colonial chapel at Hong-kong, and returned 
to Canton on July 3rd. In September, he paid a visit to Hong- 
kong, with Mrs. Bridgman. Having been deputed to represent 
Canton in the Committee of Delegates for the translation of 
the New Testament, he arrived atShanghae June 23rd, 1S47, 
in order to be present at their meetings. He was a regain i 
attendent at these from their commencement on July 1st, 1847, 
till the completion of the New Testament in the Summer oi 
1850. He was then elected to the same post, in the committee 
for translating the Old Testament which commenced on the 
1st of August of that year, and was dissolved on the 12th of 
February, 1851. After that, he still remained in Shanghae 
engaged in translating the Scriptures, till February 3rd, 1852, 
when, on account of ill health, he embarked with Mrs. Bridg- 
man in the Adelaide for New York, where they arrived on the 
16th of June. Eeembarkingin the Wild Pigeon, on Oct. 12th, 
they returned via Cape Horn and San Francisco, reaching 
Canton April 1st, and Shanghae, May 3rd, 1853. In May 
1854, he accompanied the expedition in the U. S. steamer to 
the insurgents at Nan-king, and further on to Woo-hoo, act- 
ing as interpreter on the occasion. In 1856, he paid a hasty 
visit to Fuh-chow ; and in November of the same year, he and 
Mrs. Bridgman made a trip to Ning-po. He was actively 
instrumental in the formation of the North China Branch of 
the Royal Asiatic Society, being chosen President at the com- 
mencement, in 1857, which office he held till September, J 851). 
From the period of his return from America, his time was 
chiefly occupied with a new translation of the Scriptures, in 
concert with the Rev. M. S. Culbertson, up to the last, days of 
his life. He died November 2nd, 1861, in his own house, and 
was buried in the Shanghae cemetery, where a marble monn 
ment has been erected to his memory by his missionarj 
brethren. 

Publications by Dr. Bridgman 

CHINESE. 
1. M {{$ j$ jjj£ pfo ( in. '' i ■ led: ' ■ I ■: 



/U ELIJAH COLEMAN BRIDUMAN. 

Truth and Falsehood. This tract, after two leaves of preli- 
minary matter, teaches and illustrates the natural results, 
advantages and disadvantages of the two courses. It was 
republished at Singapore in 12 pa^es, in 1837. The author 
adopts the designation ^ H ^ Lo shen chay, "One who 
delights in excellence." 

2. lllf^ll^^ MeiUkolw sang kwb dieted. 
Brief geographical History of the United States of America. 
125 leaves. 1838. This is a comprehensive summary of matters 
relating to the United States, in 27 sections, treating of pre- 
liminary and general details, — geographical boundaries, — early 
history — independence, — historical outline, — aborigines, — po- 
pulation, — natural scenery, — productions, — agriculture, — ma- 
nufactures, — commerce, — government, — poor laws, — religion, 
— language, — education, — literature, — charities, — social ties, 
— manners, — and national defences. A revision of this work 
was printed at Canton in 1846, also in 27 sections, with the 
title 55 || H jfig fa ffc Up jg Bft Ya met Id Iced ho chung kwo 
die led, in 75 leaves, with a folding map, the information 
being brought down to the latest period. A greatly improved 
revision by the author, was published at Shanghae in 1862, 
in 2 books, with the title %{$ % ^ B£ Lc'cn pang die leo, con- 
taining in all 107 leaves, including 3 prefaces, notes for the 
reader's guidance, and a table of contents. The first book 
treats of preliminary details — geographical boundaries, — geo- 
graphical features, — roads, — climate and soil, — productions, — 
early history, — independence, — constitution, — government, — 
laws, — language, — education and literature, — religion, — arts, 
commerce, — charities and customs. The second book gives a 
short geographical notice of each of the forty one states and 
territories. 

3. j$C ipM ii tE, Yung fuh die taou. The Way of Eternal 
Bliss. 5 leaves. 1843. This is a short didactic treatise, on the 
attainment of true happiness ; concluding with a brief prayer 
pertinent to the subject. The author signs himself — "The 
American Pe Che-wan. 

4- fit fg HI a Full laco yaou die. Important Facts con- 
cerning the Life to come. 9 leaves. Hong-kong, 1844. This 
simply consists of a literal transcript of the 15th chapter of 
First Corinthians, and the 25 th chapter of Matthew, 31st verse 
to the end, concluding with a short prayer ; but there is a 
lengthy preface of 5 leaves, with the author's signature, as 
"Pe Che- wan of the Far West." 

5. 11 £fc |£ q* Ling saang tseiien yen. Disquisition on 
Spiritual Life. 6 leaves. 1844. This is a discourse on the 7th 
verse of the 3rd chapter of John's Gospel, with a short prayer 
at the end. The signature is the same as the preceding. The 
two preceding tracts and this one are numbered respectively 



ELIJAH COLEMAN BRIDGMAN. 71 

10, 11 and 12, of a published series. 

6. WMM1& fC ± tfo Ydy soo to wei kCw vhod lun. 
Jesus the only Saviour. 6 leaves. 

7- M $l ?k H 8™ V 6 tseuen shoo. New Testament. 254 
leaves. Shanghae, 1863. This is a revision of the Delegates' 
version, undertaken by Dr. Bridgman in 1851, in concert with 
the Rev. M. S. Culbertson, and by them carried on to com- 
pletion. There is a fly leaf of general directions for the reader. 
Detached portions of this version had been previously pub- 
lished at various times : c. g. Paul's Epistle to the Romans 
in 1854, &c. 

8. H f,f| ^ § K'eio yd tseuen shoo. Old Testament. 
1002 leaves. Shanghae, 1SG3. This translation was also the 
joint work of Dr. Bridgman and Mr. Culbertson, it being well 
on to completion, when the Dr. was removed from his work 
on earth. It consists of 39 books, divided into 4 volumes, in 
each of which is 3 pages of general directions for the reader. 

9. Letters on China. ISmo. pp. 124. Boston U. S. 1840. 

ENGLISH. 

10. Chinese Chrestomathy in the Canton Dialect. Royal 
8vo. pp. xxxvi, 698. Macao, 1841. This work, besides the 
Introduction, is divided into 17 chapters, on the arts, sciences, 
and miscellaneous matters. It is printed in three columns, 
giving a succession of sentences and paragraphs in the left 
column, the Chinese translation of the same in the centre 
column, and the pronunciation of the Chinese, in the Roman 
character, in the right column. Much valuable and interes- 
ting matter is comprised, but its general utility is impaired 
by being in a local dialect. The publication was commenced 
under the auspices of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful 
Knowledge in China, being the last work patronized by that 
institution. 

11. The Chinese Repository. 20 volumes. Canton, 1832 — 
1851. This magazine, which appeared monthly, was com- 
menced by Mr. Bridgman in May, 1832, and he continued to 
conduct it, till his departure for Shanghae in 1847. The 
Rev. J. G. Bridgman then succeeded him as editor, till Sep- 
tember, 1848; when Dr. Williams took charge of the work. 
From first to last however, Dr. Bridgman was an extensive 
and constant contributor. Among his translations from the 
Chinese, are the San-tszc-king , or " Trimetrical Classic," the 
Tscen-tszc-ivan, or "Thousand Character Classic," the K'een- 
yun Yew-heo She-tee, or "Odes for Children in rhyme," and 
the Haou-king, or "Felial Duty," in Vol. 4; the first part 
of the Seaou-hco, or "Primary Lessons," in Vol. 5 ; the Syrian 
Monument at Si-ngan-fu, in Vol. 14; and Paul Sii's Apology 
for the Jesuits, in Vol. 19, 



72 DAVID A.BEEL. 

Dr. Biidgman also took an active and responsible part in 
editing the "Journal of the North China Branch of the fto- 
yal Asiatic Society," the "Introductory Address''' being from 
his pen, and also an article of the Meau-tsz' in the 1st volume. 
The Missionary Herald, published at Boston, U. S. being the 
organ of bis society, contains much of his Correspondence; 
and the newspaper press of China was frequently favoured 
with his contributions. 

Eltza Jane Gillet, a member of the Church of the Rev. 
Dr. Milnor, left New York in the ship, Horatio, on the 14th 
of December, 1844, in company with a party of missionaries 
from the American Episcopal Church, and arrived in Hong- 
kong on the 24th of April, 1845, whore she was married to 
Dr. Biidgman on the 28th of June. After her husband's 
death, she returned to the United States, via England, in 
1862, and being somewhat reinvigorated, she returned to 
China with the intention of promoting the cause of female 
education in Peking, where she arrived in June, 18G4. 

Publications by 3Irs. Bridgman. 

ENGLISH. 

1 . Daughters of China ; or, Sketches of Domestic Life in 
the Celestial Empire. 1852. This was published in the 
United States, with a portrait of Mrs. Bridgman's Chinese 
pupil King-meh, as a Frontispiece. It was reprinted in 
Glasgow without the portrait, 12mo. pp. 189. It was written 
dming the short visit of the authoress to her native land in 
1852. 

2. The Pioneer of American Missions in China. The Life 
and Labours of Elijah Coleman Bridgman, With an Intro- 
ductoiy Note, by Asa D. Smith, D. 1). 8vo. pp. xi, 296. New 
York, 1864. This was written by Mrs. Bridgman during her 
last visit to America in 1862, 63. 



XIX. 8H j& M Ya Pe-le. DAVID ABEEL was born at 
New Brunswick, New Jersey, U. S. Juno 12, 1804. His fami- 
ly was originally from Amsterdam in Holland ; and his father 
was an officer in the United States £avy during the revolu- 
tion. His mother Jane Hassert was distinguished for her 
piety. At the age of fifteen he sought admission into the 
Military Academy at West Point, but withdrew his applica- 
tion, on account of the large number who had previously ap- 
plied, and turned his attention to the study of medicine for 
about a year. When about seventeen years of age, his mind 
was seriously arrested by religious truth. After due consider- 



DAVID ABEEL. 73 

ation he devoted himself to the work of the ministry, and in 
1823, entered the Theological Seminary at New Brunswick, 
where lie completed his course in April, 1826. On the 20th 
of the same month he was licensed to preach, and during the 
next month received his commission as pastor in Athens, 
Greene county, New York, where he continued two years and 
a half, labouring with considerable success. In November 
1828, he sailed for St. John's one of the Danish West Indian 
islands, to recruit his energies, and with the expectation of 
proclaiming the Gospel as he found opportunity. The people 
there had enjoyed no regular preaching for thirty-six years, 
but the government prohibited him exercising his sacred call- 
ing, and after holding services for two months, he was forbid- 
den to continue the meetings. He therefore returned to New 
York, in August, 1829, and soon after, a proposition was 
made to him to go to China as chaplain for the Seamen's 
Friend Society, to labour for seamen frequenting the port of 
Canton. This he accepted with the understanding that, after 
one year, he was to enter the service of the American Board 
of Foreign Missions, for the purpose of exploring the islands 
and countries in eastern Asia, to ascertain the best positions 
for mission stations. He sailed for Canton October 14th in 
the Roman, in company with the Eev. E. C. Bridgman, and 
reached his field of labour February 25th, 1830. While 
preaching to the seamen, he gave a portion of his time to the 
study of the Chinese language, intending to devote his life to 
Jaboius for the heathen, according to his original plan. A 
free passage having been offered him to Anjier, in the II. C. 
S. Castle Huntley, he sailed for Java, December 29th, on his 
tour of exploration. From Anjier, he reached Batavia, Ja- 
nuary 20th, 1831, where he was greatly aided by the Rev. W. 
H. Medhurst, in his inquiries concerning the Chinese and 
Malays. From Java, he proceeded on June 4th to Singapore, 
where he arrived on the 14th, and met the Rev. J. Tomlin, 
about leaving for Siam. They sailed together on the 17th in 
an Arab ship for Bankok, where they landed July 2nd. There 
he remained till the 7th of the following January, distributing 
tracts, and exploring the place for a missionary station, re- 
turning to Singapore on the 13th. On March Cth he left for 
a trip to Malacca, in order to recruit his energies, and arrived 
there on the 12th. On the 27th, he again embarked in a na- 
tive brig, and reached Singapore April 2nd. He started again 
on the 18th of the same month, in a Chinese junk for Siam, 
where he landed on the 19th of May. He left that country 
in a schooner on November 5th, and reached Singapore in 
little more than two weeks. On the 28th of the same month, 
he left Singapore in company with the Rev. M. Thomsen, for 
a visit to Rhio, in the ship Dedierike ; and on his return to 



74 DAVID ABEEL. 

Singapore, he supplied by invitation, the place of the English 
chaplain, the Rev. Mr. Burn, who was then ill, and soon after 
died. Failing health however compelled him to leave, and on 
May 25th, 1833, he embarked in the Cambridge, and reached 
England October 21st, with health strengthened and mind 
refreshed. He also visited France, Germany and Switzerland, 
and laboured in Holland to induce the churches to cooperate 
with the Reformed Dutch Church in America, in the cause of 
eastern missions. On September 6th, 1834, he reached New 
York, and remained in the United States about four years. 
He was detained there beyond his original expectation, by 
renewed attacks of disease ; but finally sailed the second time 
from America, October 17th, 1838, in the Morrison, in com- 
pany with the Rev. S. R. Brown, and B. P. Keasbury and 
their wives, a free passage having been given to the whole 
party by the owners of the ship, Messrs. Olyphant & Co. They 
reached Macao February 20th, 1839, and there Mr. Abeel re- 
mained for most of the next two years in the study of the 
Chinese language ; although he suffered from frequent attacks 
of disease of the heart. In April, 1841, he made a trip to 
Singapore, where he remained supplying the vacant pulpit, 
at the request of the residents. In October, he visited the 
mission stations at Sambas and Poutianak in Borneo, in com- 
pany with the Rev. Mr. MacBryde, and returned to Singa- 
pore in December, proceeding thence to Macao. On February 
2nd, 1842, he left that place in company with the Rev. W. J. 
Boone, in a lorcha for Hong-kong, whence they sailed in the 
Australian packet on the 7th, and proceeded to Koo-lang-seu, 
a small island opposite Amoy, where they arrived on the 24th. 
There Mr. Abeel commenced his missionary work among the 
Chinese, and acted for a time as chaplain to the English troops 
stationed on the island. During the year 1843, he took up 
his residence at Amoy, having received some associates in the 
mission cause there. Increasing weakness in the early part 
of 1844, compelled him to leave his work for a little, and 
spend a few weeks at Canton and Hong-kong ; whence he re- 
turned to Amoy in September refreshed by the change. 
During this summer, he received the degree of D. D. from 
Rutger's college in New-Jersey, but wrote to that institution 
declining the honour. In November, the state of his health 
compelled him to stop preaching, and retire from the field. 
He left Amoy December J 9th. remained at Hong-kong and 
Canton for a short time ; after which embarking in the Nat- 
chez, January 14th, 1845, he reached New York on April 3rd, 
so exhausted that he was carried from the ship to his friends. 
He was able however after that to travel from one part of the 
country to another, visiting his numerous acquaintances, and 
having taken a tour as far south as Georgia, he returned in 



["" ,"\ HERMAN' ROTTGER 75 

April ; made a visit to Rhode Island, and to the house of a 
cousin at Geneva, New York. He had reached Albany on his 
return south, when he could proceed no further, and his pro- 
longed sufferings were terminated by death on September 4th 
1S4G. His remains were interred in Greenwood cemetery, 
near New York, where a monument has been erected to his 
memory, partly at the expence of the children of the Sabbath 
schools. 

Publications by Dr. Abeel. 

ENGLISH. 

1. To the Bachelors of India by a Bachelor. Svo. pp. 35. 
This anonymous pamphlet is without date, or any indication 
of the place where printed; but appears probably to have been 
published while the author was residing in the Straits, about 
1833. It is a fervent appeal against the lamentably prevalent 
custom in the East, of Europeans holding illicit connexions 
with the native females. 

2. Journal of a Residence in China and the neighbouring 
countries, from 1830 to 1833. 12mo. pp.378. New York, 1834. 
A second edition appeared in 1836. The work was revised 
and reprinted in London, in 1835, with an Introductory Essay 
by the Hon. and Rev. Baptist Wriothesly Noel, M. A. 12mo 
pp, xxxi, 366. 

A volume of Sermons on the subject of Missions was also 
contemplated by Dr. Abeel, but only two or three detached 
ones were printed. 

A good many articles by him are to be found in the earlier 
numbers of the Chinese Repository. 

Dr. Abeel is said to have written some tracts in Chinese, 
but the only trace we can find of them, is an extract published 
by Dr. Ball in the form of a sheet tract, with the title ^ -ftf; 
F«1 M W ~~* M 1$ Luii she keen to yeioyih chinshin. "Dis- 
course on the Unity of God." 



XX. HERMAN ROTTGER, an ordained agent of the 
Netherlands Missionary Society, came out to the East in 
1832, having been appointed with four other Dutch Mission- 
aries, to the Moluccas. The recent exploits of Mr. Gtitzlaff 
however, along the coast of China, seem to have had a power- 
ful influence, in diverting his sympathy towards that people ; 
and the following year, having determined to give himself to 
the Chinese Mission, he took up his residence at Rhio, on the 
island of Bintang. He was also appointed Chaplain to the 
Dutch government there. In 1841, he made a tour to the 
islands of Lingin, Banca ; Sumatra, &c, distributing Bibles 



76 -John evans. 

among the natives; and had contemplated a more extended 
journey over Borneo and Sumatra, when ill health compelled 
him to return to Europe next year. He appears subsequently 
to have resumed his station however, but retired from the 
missionary service in 184G, and eventually returned to Ger- 
many. 



XXL JOHN EVANS was for many years engaged in the 
work of education in England, and trained a number of pupils 
for Cambridge and Oxford Universities, having been successive- 
ly Professor of Classics, Mathematics, Hebrew and Arabic. He 
was ordained as a missionary for the Chinese department of 
the Ultra-Granges mission, in connection with the London 
Society, at Hertford, on the 14th of December, 1832. Being- 
appointed to Malacca, he sailed from Gravesend with Mrs. 
Evans and their little boy, in the Emma for Singapore, on the 
13th of March, 1833, and reached Batavia on the 7th of July. 
After a week's sojourn therewith Mr. Medhurst, they went on 
to Singapore, where they arrived on the 23rd. Thence they 
proceeded to Malacca in the Forth, where they arrived on the 
8th of August. On May 1st 1834, Mr. Evans succeeded Mr. 
Tomlin, as principal of the Anglo Chinese College. The health 
of Mrs. Evans in 1840 necessitating a change of climate, she 
left Malacca in the Autumn and arrived in London on the 5th 
of November that year. On the 28th of the same month, Mr. 
Evans being called to visit the Kev. J. Hughes, a short distance 
from Malacca, who was in his last sufferings from cholera, was 
himself suddenly attacked by that disease, and died in less 
than five hours from its commencement. 

Publications ly Mr. Evans. 

ENGLISH . 

1. Report of the Anglo Chinese College, for the year J 831 

2. The Periodical Miscellany and Juvenile Instructor. 8v0 
Malacca. This was a serial conducted by Mr. Evans, each 
number containing 24 pages, and was issued on the 5th day of 
each month, beginning with June, 1836, being continued during 
that and the following year. It was intended to be a success- 
or to the Indo-Chinese Gleaner (see Milne's works, supra, 
No. 24.) 



XXII. ffo 3 ^ Wei san ivei. SAMUEL WELLS WIL- 
LIAMS, of Utica in New York, was born in 1814, and having 
learned the arl of printing in his youth, was, in 1832 ap- 



SAMUEL WELLS WILLIAMS. 77 

pointed Printer to the China mission, by the American Board 
of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. He sailed from New 
York in the Morrison, in company with the Rev. Ira Tracy in 
June, 1833, and reached Canton on the 26th of Oct, There 
he entered en his mission labours immediately on his arrival; 
and subsequently he had charge of the East India Company's 
printing office at Macao. On the 3rd of July, 1837, he cm- 
barked with a party in the Morrison, to convey a number of 
shipwrecked Japanese back to their native land, but the expe- 
dition proving unsuccessful, after visiting Loo-choo andYedo, 
they returned to Macao on the 29th of August. In 1842, he 
was chosen Corresponding Secretary of the Morrison Education 
Society. About the end of 1844, he returned to his native 
land, and during his stay received the degree of L.L.D. There 
he formed a matrimonial alliance, and having embarked at 
New York with Mrs. Williams in the Samuel Russell, on June 
1st, 1848, he arrived at Canton in September, to resume his 
duties as Superintendent of the Press. In 1853, he was ap- 
pointed Interpreter to the American expedition to Japan, in 
which capacity he sailed from Macao in the U. S. ship Sara- 
toga, about the middle of May, and reached Loo-choo on the 
26th, where they met the other ships of the squadron. Leav- 
ing Napa on the 9th of June for a visit to the Bonin isles, they 
arrived there on the 14th, returned to Loo-cho > on the 24th, 
and set sail for Japan un the 2nd of July, reaching that conn- 
try on the 8th. Having successfully completed their negotia- 
tions with the Japanese, they returned to Hongkong towards 
the end of August; whence Dr. Williams proceeded to Canton. 
On the 14th of January, 1854, he again accompanied Com- 
modore Perry's squadron, on another visit to Japan, when 
they called at Loo-choo on the way. and reached tin/ Bay of 
Yeclo on the II th of February. Having procured a treaty, 
and arranged all things in a satisfactory manner, Dr. Williams 
left with part of the squadron for Hongkong on the 28th of 
June, arriving there in the latter part of July. In 1856, he 
received the appointment of Secretary of Legation for the U. S. 
and resigned his connection with the Missionary Society the 
following year. In 1858 lie accompanied the Legation to Teen- 
tsin, and was present at the formation of the treaty between 
China and the United States, on June 18th. having visited 
Shanghae and Japan in the same expedition before returning 
to the south. On the arrival in China of Mr. Ward, the 
newly-appointed minister, Dr. Williams accompanied him to 
Shanghae. in May, 1859, when.', after some negotiation with 
the Imperial commissioners, they proceeded northward and 
reached Pekin on the 28th of July. After staying about a 
fortnight in the capital, they returned via, Plh-tang, where the 
treaty was ratified on the 16th of August, and reached Shang- 



SAJLUUEL WELLS WILLIAMS. 



hae on the 22nd, The following year, Dr. Williams visited 
the United States, returning to China in 1862, and arrived at 
Peking on the 24th of July that year, Avhere he is now resident 
with his family. 

Publications by Dr. Williams. 

ENGLISH. 

1- tft $£ ifc $< Skill helh id clung. Easy Lessons in Chi- 
nese : or Progressive Exercises to facilitate the study of that 
language, especially adapted to the Canton Dialect. 8vo. pp. 
lx, 288° Macao, 1842. 

2. ^ ^ fj| M M P£ Ying Hw(1 Yun-fu Lili-hidi. An 
English and Chinese Vocabulary, in the Court Dialect. Post 
8vo. pp. lxxxviii, 440. Macao, 1844. 

3. Chinese Topography, being an alphabetical List of the 
Provinces, Departments and Districts in the Chinese Empire, 
with their Latitudes and Longitudes. 8vo. pp. 103. 1844. 
This useful little manual, which gives all the names in the 
Chinese character, according to the order of the English alpha- 
bet was first printed in the 13th volume of the Chinese 
Repository ; and afterwards published separately. 

4. The Middle Kingdom ; a Survey of the Geography, 
Government, Education, Social Life, Arts, Religion, &c, of 
the Chinese Empire and its inhabitants, with a new Map of 
the Empire, and Illustrations, principally engraved by J. W. 
Orr. 2 vols. Svo. pp. xxii, 590, vii, 614. New York, 1848. 
The first volume has a portrait of the imperial Commissioner 
Keying for the Frontispiece, with his autograph in Chinese 
and Manchu. The second volume has the portrait and auto- 
graph of the missionary Abeel. A fourth edition of the work 
was published in 1857. 

5. ^ ^ ^ h| ft 5^ , Ying c Wd Jan Wan' Ts'ut, hV. A 
Tonic Dictionary of the Chinese Language in the Canton Dia- 
lect. Svo. pp. xxxvi, 832. Canton, 1856. 

6. A Chinese Commercial Guide, consisting of a collection 
of details and regulations respecting foreign trade with China. 
8vo. The first edition of this work, issued in 1834, was by 
J. R. Morrison, (see his works, supra, No. 3.) but although 
his name is modestly retained in subsequent editions, yet it 
has been so entirely remodelled and rewritten, that Dr. Wil- 
liams may well claim it as his own production. A second edi- 
tion appeared at Macao in 1844; and a third at Canton in 
1848. 8vo. pp. viii, 311. A fifth edition, bearing Dr. Wil- 
liams' name, was published at Hongkong in 1863. pp. 378, 
266. 

7. Ann-lo-Chinese Kalendar. The first three numbers of 



IRA TRACY. 79 

this periodical, 1832 — 1834, were drawn up by J. R. Morrison 
(see his works la, in the Addenda.) From 1835, J. Slade, the 
editor of the Canton Press, compiled the work for a time. 
From 1848 to 1856, 8 numbers, it devolved upon Dr. Wil- 
liams, in whose hands it was considerably enlarged and im- 
proved. 

The last three volumes of the Chinese Repository, and three 
months of the preceding were edited by Dr. Williams, who 
was an important contributor to that serial almost from the 
beginning. 

There are two articles from the pen of Dr. Williams, in the 
first volume of the Journal of the North China Branch of the 
Royal Asiatic Society, on "Japan," and the "American Em- 
bassy to Peking." 



XXIII. IRA TRACY, a student of the Theological 
Seminary, Andover, U. S., was ordained as a missionary of 
the Board of Commissioners tor Foreign Missions, at White 
River Village, Vermont, on the 28th of September, 1832; He 
embarked at New York with Mr. S. W. Williams, in the 
Morrison, for China, in June, 1833, and reached Canton on 
the 26th of October. The Board having purchased a printing 
establishment at Singapore about that time, authorized Mr. 
Tracy to remove there, and take the superintendence. He 
arrived accordingly, on the 24th of July 1834, and initiated 
the American mission in that settlement. There he was mar- 
ried to Miss White in 1835, and remained till the time of his 
retirement from the missionary service in 1841, consequent 
upon ill health. 

Publications by Mr. Tract/. 

CHINESE. 

1 ^| ^ jg? jffir tJt Ya p'een siih kae wan. Incentives to 
abandon Opium. 6 leaves. Singapore, 1835. The argument 
against the use of this drug is briefly stated under six heads, 
on the ground that it is contrary to the laws, — it is undntii'ul, 
— it is ruinous to one's family, — it is injurious to the body, — 
it is subversive of good manners, — and destructive to the soul. 
The author's signature is f~ *5§ ^ Jin <jae ohay, "The 
benevolent." This was composed with the assistance of Leang 
A-fa. It was republished at Ningpo, in 1847, with an Ap- 
pendix by Dr. McCartee, shewing the amount of Opium 
imported annually from 1796 to 1842, with the title %% It 7n 
J$ Ya p'een luh keae, in 7 leaves. Another edition was 
printed at Ningpo, with the same title, and a preface and 



SO STEPHEN JOHNSON. 

receipts annexed, also by Dr. McOartee. (see his works, infra, 
No. 2.) A revised edition of the original tract was published 
at Shanghae, in 1847. with the title j| j£ y£ \fc -fc J$ £ Ya 
p'een suit kae ts'eih kea& van. in 5 leaves, containing an ad- 
ditional incentive to abandon the use of Opium, in that it 
tends to Sear the Conscience. 

2. if m m mm^&m^mm^ZA sin ken P > 

tsae cJiung hivuy JcaOu sod chung laob ts6 sax, che Jin. Ad- 
dress of the Singapore Agricultural and Horticultural Society 
to the Chinese Agriculturists. 6 leaves. Singapore, 1837. 
This is the translation of an address read by one of the mem- 
bers of the Society, at the monthly meeting- in April, 1837. 
It professes to he issued by a fc ^V H" Jinjin liioiiy. "Bene- 
volent Society/' Leang A-fa assisted Mr. Tracy in this 
translation. 

There are many contributions from Mr. Tracy in the earlier 
numbers of the Chinese Repository. 



XXIV. STEPHEN JOHNSON was born at Ghriswold, 

Connecticut, received his education at Amherst, Massachu- 
setts, and became a member of the Christian church in 1827. 
He studied for the ministry at Auburn Seminary. New York ; 
after which he was ordained, and appointed a missionary to 
the Chinese, by the American Board of Commissioners for 
Foreign Missions. He was married to Hannah Maria Preston, 
on May 26, 1833, with whom he sailed from Boston on the 
10th of June, accompanied by Messrs. Robinson, Lyman and 
Munson with their wives. On September 30th, they arrived 
at Batavia, and thence, Mr. and Mrs. Johnson with Mr. and 
Mrs. Robinson proceeded to Singapore. On the 14th of Nov. 
Mr. Johnson embarked with his wife in a ship bound from 
that port to Siam, but being driven back by the monsoon, 
they returned to Singapore on the 31st of December. There 
however he advanced with the study of the Chinese language 
under good advantages ; and eventually they reached Bankok 
in company with Mr. Robinson and family on the 25th of July, 
1834. During the year 1835, they lost two children by death. 
In consequence of the state of Mrs. Johnson's health, he left 
with his family for the United States, in the summer of 1838, 
and after being detained for two months at Mauritius by a 
leak in the ship, they reached Philadelphia on December 6. 
Shortly after, he was called to Boston, and during his absence, 
Mrs. Johnson died at' Philadelphia on Januarys, 1839. In 
November, 1840, Mr. Johnson was married to Mary Fowler, 
and soon after embarked for the East. They reached Bankok, 
May 11, 1841, and on July 1st, Mrs. Johnson died of fever, 
supposed to have been contracted at Java, where they called 



SAMUEL MUNSON. 81 

on the way. In 1846, Mr. Johnson left Siam, and arrived at 
Fun-chow, the 2nd of January the following year, the first to 
commence a mission at that port. September 17th, 1849, he 
was married to Caroline M. Selmer, a native of Stockholm 
engaged in missionary work at Ningpo, in concert with Miss 
Aldersey. He left China at the close of 1852, returned to the 
United States, and retired from the missionary services. He 
now resides in St. Lawrence county, New York. 

There is a descriptive account of Fuh-chow by Mr. Johnson, 
in the 16th volume of the Chinese Repositoiy. 



XXV. SAMUEL MUNSON, a student from Andover 
Theological Seminary, was ordained as a missionary of the 
American Board of Commissioners, at Orleans, U. S., on Oct. 
10th, 1822. He embarked for the East with Mrs. Munson, 
at Boston, U. S. on June 10th, 1833, accompanied by the 
Revs. Messrs. Lyman, Johnson and Robinson, with their 
wives, and arrived at Batavia on the 30th of September. The 
special mission of Messrs. Munson and Lyman, was a tour of 
observation and inquiry among the islands of the Indian 
Archipelago, and especially what may be termed the Malayan 
group ; that is Sumatra and some small islands in its neigh- 
bourhood, Java, Celebes, and the Sula islands, the Moluccas 
and Borneo. On reaching Batavia, Mr. Munson devoted his 
attention primarily to the Chinese language, under the guid- 
ance of Mr. Medhurst. Leaving their wives at Batavia, these 
two brethren started on the 8th of April, 1834, for a tour. 
On the 26th, they arrived at Padang, where they remained 
till May 12th, and reached Nias on the 28th. On June 17th 
they reached Tappanovly in the island of Sumatra, from 
whence they started on the 23rd to penetrate into the interior 
of the Battak country. Although friends endeavoured to 
dissuade them from their purpose, on account of apprehended 
danger, they persisted in their original intention, and on the 
afternoon of the 28th, while pursuing their journey, between 
G-oeting and Tobah, they were suddenly surrounded by a 
large party of Battak cannibals and immediately dispatched ; 
Mr. Munson being run through the body with a spear, and 
consumed by the savages on the following day. 



XXVI. fg II Pih Red. PETER PARKER, a medical 
graduate, and student of the New Haven Theological Semin- 
ary, was ordained as a missionary, at Philadelphia, on May 
16th, 1834, with a view to his proceeding to China under the 
American Board of Commissioners. On the 3rd of June, he 
embarked at New York in the Morrison, for China, and 



82 PETER PARKER. 

arrived at Canton on October 26th ; but left again on the 
1 4th of December in the Fort William, to join Mr. Tracy at 
Singapore. There he opened a dispensary for the Chinese on 
January 1st, 1835, and continued it till the following August. 
Soon after that he returned to Canton, and commenced an 
Opthalmic Hospital at that port. In May, 1836, he made a 
temporary visit to Macao, during some repairs of the hospital. 
When the Morrison sailed for Japan, with a party of ship- 
wrecked natives on July 3rd. 1837, Dr. Parker joined the 
expedition as surgeon, and had an opportunity of practising 
among the Loo-chooans at Napa, but the object of the voyage 
having utterly foiled, he returned in the vessel to Macao on 
the 29th of August. Sickness prevented him attending to 
the hospital for another month, and it was reopened on Oct. 
1st. In February, 1838, the Medical Missionary Society was 
formed at Canton, when Dr. Parker was elected Vice-presi- 
dent, and his hospital taken under its patronage. Shortly 
after, his labours there were temporarily interrupted, when he 
went to Macao and established a hospital under the auspices 
of the Society, the same year, which he attended to from July 
5th to October 1st, and then returned to Canton. During 
April and May, 1839, when all foreigners at Canton were 
confined within the factories, the operations at the hospital 
were necessarily suspended, and Dr. Parker merely practised 
on a few cases privately. This plan he continued for a time, 
after the release of the foreigners, till the numbers becoming 
too great for his private apartments, he took possession of the 
Canton Dispensary recently vacated by the English physician, 
which became rather a general than an opthalmic hospital. 
Political troubles increasing at the provincial city in 1840, he 
found it necessary to close the establishment, and embarked 
for New York in the Niantic, on the 5th of July that year. 
While in the United States, it was his aim to advance the 
cause of Medical Missions in China, for which purpose he 
gave many public addresses, at Washington, Philadelphia, 
New York, Boston, and other places ; and sailed for England 
on the 17th of April, 1841. After remaining six weeks in 
London, he visited successively Cambridge, Birmingham, 
Liverpool, Glasgow and Edinburgh, meeting with much 
sympathy and encouragement. At the same time, he paid a 
brief visit to Paris and returned to America, where he spent 
the chief part of the winter in Philadelphia. During his 
absence from China, he contracted a matrimonial alliance, and 
returned with Mrs. Parker, arriving on October 4th, 1842. 
The 5th of following month, they took up their residence at 
Canton, and he recommenced his labours in the Opthalmic 
Hospital on the 21st of November, devoting a portion of his 
time to English preaching. In March, 1844, he was appoint- 



PETER PARKER. 83 

ed joint Secretary with Dr. Bridgman to the American 
Legation, under Caleb Gushing, just arrived in China ; which 
formed the Treaty at Wang-hea, on the 3rd of July, between 
China and the United States. From the duties of this service 
he was temporarily relieved on the departure of the expedition 
in the end of August. On the exchange of treaties, at P wan- 
tang, near Canton, on the last day of 1845, he was present 
as interpreter ; and subsequently acted as Charge d'affaires. 
His connection with the American Board ceased in 1847. On 
the arrival of the United States Commissioner Mr. Davis in 
August, 1848, he resigned his office as Charge d'affaires, and 
continued Secretary and Chinese Interpreter to the Legation. 
Mr. Davis left China on the 24th of May, 1850, when Dr. 
Parker resumed the office of Charge. On the 27th of March, 
1853, he arrived at Shanghae with Commissioner Marshall, 
in the U. S. steamer Susquehanna. April 2nd, they started 
for Nanking, but were prevented by the shallowness of the 
water in the Yang-tsze, and returned to Shanghae on the 4th. 
On the 29th of April, he left in the Larriston steamer for 
Hongkong, which was wrecked at the mouth of the Min river 
near midnight on May 2nd ; he ultimately reached Hongkong 
in safety however. In 1S54, having come to Shanghae with 
the newly arrived American minister, Mr. Maclane, he accom- 
panied him to the mouth of the Pih-ho river, where a joint 
application was made by the English and American ministers, 
to be allowed to discuss treaty matters in the capital. They 
remained from the 15th of October, till the 10th of November, 
during which period, Dr. Parker and Mr. Medhurst the 
English interpreter had repeated interviews with the authori- 
ties on shore. In the spring of 1855 ho went to the United 
States, and while there, was appointed United States Commis- 
sioner, having in the meantime transferred the management 
of his hospital to Dr. Kerr. The post of Commissioner he 
held till the year 1857, when he left China for his native land, 
where he has been since residing. 

Publications by Dr. Parker. 

ENGLISH. 

1. Journal of an Expedition from Singapore to Japan, 
with a visit to Loo-choo ; descriptive of these islands and their 
inhabitants ; in an attempt with the aid of natives educated 
in England, to create an opening for missionary labours in 
Japan. 18mo. pp. 75. London, 1838. 

2. Statements respecting hospitals in China, preceded by 
a letter to John Abercrombie, M. D., V. P. R. S. E., pp. 32. 
London and Glasgow, 1842. 



84 EDWIN STEVENS. 

3. Fifteen Reports of Opthalmic Hospital at Canton. 
These were published at irregular intervals, quarterly, half 
yearly, annually, and at longer periods, at Canton and Macao. 
They were issued in separate pamphlets, and at the same 
time inserted in the Chinese Repository, Vols. 4—20. 



XXVII. EDWIN STEVENS was born at New Canaan, 
Connecticut, U. S. in the year 1802 ; and there received his 
early education. In 1824, he entered Yale College, and hav- 
ing completed a full course, passed with high honours in 
1828. He then spent a year in Aurora, New York, as prin- 
cipal of an academy. Near the close of 1829, he returned to 
New Haven, and there joined the Theological Seminary. In 
1831 and following year he was a tutor in the college, In 
April, 1832, he accepted an appointment from the American 
Seaman's Friend Society, as their chaplain at the port of 
Canton. He was ordained a minister of the gospel at New 
Haven, on June 7th ; and on the 29th of the same month 
embarked at Philadelphia, for China, in the Morrison, reach- 
ing Canton on the 2Gth of October, and began his duties 
forthwith, among the seamen at Whampoa. On the 14th of 
April, 1835, in company with Mr. Gutzlaff and Mr. Grordon, 
he left Lintin in the brig Governor Findlay, on an expedition 
to visit the Bohea hills. On the 6th of May, they reached the 
mouth of the river Min in Fuh-keen ; up which they proceed- 
ed in the ship's boat. Having passed the provincial city, 
they had nearly reached the city of Min-tsing on the 5th day, 
when being, tired on from both sides of the river, they thought 
it prudent to return, and got back to the brig on the 13th, 
in which they made their way south to Macao. On the 26th 
of August, Mr. Stevens again embarked with Mr. Medhurst, 
in the Huron, for a cruise along the coast of China, in order 
to discover the facilities for tract distribution. From this 
tour they returned to Lintin on the 31st of October. In ac- 
cordance with an engagement he entered into before leaving 
America, Mr. Stevens connected himself with the American 
Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, in March, IS36, 
;is a missionary to the Chinese. On the 3rd of December, 
he left Macao in company with Mr. Tradescent Lay, in the 
Himmaleli, bound on a tour to Borneo, and the adjacent 
islands, to ascertain the openings for missionary operations 
They reached Singapore on the 15th, but there he was seized 
by intermittent fever, under the fatal grasp of which, he fin- 
ished his earthly career, January 5th, 1837. 

During his limited term of service, Mr. Stevens Wrote a 
good deal for the periodical press. Some of his papers wen; 
published in America ; and there are several very considerable 



WILLIA3I DEAN. 85 

• 

contributions from him in the Chinese Repository. Anions 

the latter may he-named the Sketch of the Life and Labours 
of Dr. Milne, Vol. 1 ; Account of Formosa, Vol. 2 ; Obituary 
of Dr. Morrison, — History of Chinese pirates, — On the Propa- 
gation of the Gospel in China, Vol. 3 ; Narratives of Voyages 
in the Governor Findlay and the Huron, Vol. 4 ; and an 
Account of Assam, Vol. 5. 



XXVIII. 'p Leen. WILLIAM DEAN was born in the 
United States in 1807, and in due time ordained to the sacred 
office. In the spring- of 1834, he was married to Matilda 
Coman ; and being appointed to Siam, in connection with the 
American Baptist Board of Foreign Missions, he embarked 
with Mrs. Dean at Boston, U. S. in the Cashmere, on July 
2nd, accompanied by a large party of missionaries for the 
East. On December 5th, they reached Amherst, where they 
remained a week ; and then starting with a reduced company, 
another week brought them to Penang. After remaining a 
few days with the missionaries there, they proceeded on their 
voyage, and reached Singapore in four days. There they took 
leave of the Cashmere, in order to wait the change of the 
monsoon, and there Mrs. Dean died, March 5th, 1835, leaving 
an infant daughter. Shortly after his bereavement, Mr. Dean, 
accompanied by Mr. Jones of the same Society, having in 
their charge George Boardman, a child of six years old, took 
a small China boat to go to the Cashmere, several miles out 
at sea, and then about to return to America, when they failed 
in finding the ship, were attacked by Malay pirates, Mr. Jones 
nearly drowned, and Mr. Dean dangerously wounded. Mr. 
Dean commenced the study of the Chinese language at Sin- 
gapore, and on the change of the monsoon, took passage in an 
Arab ship for Bankok. hi December of that year, he organ- 
ized a church there, and baptized the first three Chinese 
converts. About July, 1837, he was compelled by sickness 
to take a voyage, and early in 1838 he visited Macao ; where 
he was married to Miss Barker, a lady living in Mr. Gutzlalf's 
family, on the 27th of March. Soon after this, they returned 
to Bankok and pursued the mission work, till, his health 
failing, they sailed for China in 1841, and arrived at Macao 
in 1842. -There he left his family while he visited Amoy and 
Chusan. In the latter part of October, they removed to 
Hongkong, where Mrs. Dean died of small pox on the 29th of 
March, 1843. Mr. Dean organized a new Chinese church in 
that settlement, on the 28th of May, and planted a new 
station for the class of Chinese speaking the Tie-chiu dialect. 
At the series of general meetings of missionaries, which took 
place that year at Hongkong from August 22nd to September 



86 WILLIAM DEAN. 

4th, Mr. Dean was always present. At the meeting of August 
25th, he was appointed with Dr. Bridgman, to confer on ren- 
dering the Greek word Baptizo into Chinese. They gave in 
their report at the meeting of September 1st, to the effect 
that they were not prepared to recommend any term ; upon 
which it was resolved, to proceed in concert with the version, 
eaeli party supplying his own term, when the work should be 
finished. About the end of 1844, Mr. Dean left Hongkong 
for the United States, and returned in October, 1846, in the 
Cohota, accompanied by the Rev. Messrs. Clopton, Pearcy 
and Jencks, with their wives. In September, 1848, he paid a 
short visit to Sharighae, went to Mngpo via Chapoo, and 
returned to Hongkong. On the 22nd of February, 18.30. he left 
in the U. S. Ship Plymouth, for Cochin-china and Siam, to 
act as interpreter to H. E. Joseph Balestier, then on a mission 
from the United States government. In 1851, he got the 
degree of D. D. from his native country; and*in 1854 went 
to America, having previously married a lady who had been 
for some time in the Siam mission. The impaired state of his 
health, preventing his return to China, he retired from his 
connection with the Missionary Society in 1857. Returning 
vigour however having warranted his again entering the mis- 
sion field, he returned to Hongkong with Mrs. Dean and 
family via Panama and California, in November, 1864, when 
he took occasion to visit Amoy and Swatow. Early in 1865, 
he returned to his old station at Bankok, where he is now 
labouring 

Publications by Dr. Dean. 

CHINESE. 

1 W IS tf'P W K'i ta6u shin she. Prayers and Hymns, 
pp. 22. Bankok, 1840. This is on European paper, printed 
on both sides : neither the leaves nor the pages numbered, 
and no running title. It commences with a short form of 
prayer for public use, then a private prayer, and the Lord's 
prayer, after which are two general forms of prayer. This is 
followed by .']2 hymns, having the time for each marked in 
Roman characters. 

2. j^ ||fj ja f£| J^ >$ fj^ Fung Jc'euen chin Iced jin wuh 
lihi. Exhortation to discriminate between the True and 
False. r fl i is contains a preface, a disquisition on the vanity 
of idols, a short piece on the difference between man and 
other created beings, and another on the practice of church 
members. It, was reprinted at Ningpo in 1845 and 1847, in 
6 leaves. It was also reprinted in the south of China, in 
1847, in 0. leaves. In this edition, the author styles himself. 



WILLIAM DEAN, 87 

iC A neighbour of the Chaou-chow ( or Tie-chid ) church." 
Another edition was printed at Hongkong in 1849, in 12 
leaves ; on which the author is designated by his usual epithet 
$} iZ $ Wei jin chay. '-The Benevolent worker." Another 
edition of the same was printed, the same year at Canton in 
7 leaves. A smaller edition was also printed at Hongkong 
in 8 leaves, with the title |^ {Jg §§ ja K'e hea hioei chin ; 
and the same was printed at Canton in 5 leaves. 

3- By ic Wi II f$ fi W Ma t'aefuh yin chuen choo sliili. 
Matthew's Gospel with Notes. Canton, 1841). 

4- 1£ #£ s* fr f$ She t'oo yen lung chuen. Acts of the 
Apostles. 57 leaves. Hongkong, 1849. A new translation 
by Mr. Dean. 

'5- la Wi A P*J 67/ m £«o^ y?/i mw. First Steps in the 
True Doctrine. 40 leaves. 1849. This consists of a series 
of short articles on various Scripture subjects, with an Ap- 
pendix of the chronology of the Old and New Testaments. 

6"- §}] 1IL i$- |± W Gh'wdng she chicen chooshih. Genesis 
with Notes. Hongkong, 1851. This is a running commentary 
on the book of Genesis, with a preface by the author, who 
signs himself Wei jin chay. 

7. {i{ ^ W f$ li W : Ch'uhmih se chuen choo shlh. Exo- 
dus with Notes. 9b' leaves. Hongkong, 1851. This is uniform 
with the preceding, and has also a preface. The signature is 
Wei jin chay. 

ENGLISH. 

8. First Lessons in the Tie-chew dialect. 4to. pp. 48. 
Bankok, 1841. This is the dialect spoken by the natives of 
Chaou-chow foo, in the province of Kwang-tung, the ancestral 
country of most of the Chinese settlers at Bankok. 

9. The China Mission. Embracing a History of the various 
Missions of all denominations among the Chinese. With 
Biographical sketches of deceased Missionaries. 12mo. pp. vi, 
396. New York, 1859. 

Thf.odosia Ann Barker, the daughter of Edmund 11. 
Barker, was born at Thetford in England, March 29th, 1819, 
the younger of two sisters. In childhood she had the advan- 
tage of the instructions other father, a man of some standing 
in the literary world. From the age of thirteen to sixteen, 
she was an inmate of the boarding school in Bracondale, kept 
by the nieces of Henry Kirke White, and enjoyed the society 
of the poet's mother. At the age of seventeen, she discovered 
such maturity of personal, mental and Christian character, 
that she received from the Society for the Promotion of Fe- 
male Education in the East, an appointment as a missionary 



88 FRANCIS II. HANSON. 

to China, and commenced the study of the Chinese language 
while in England, under the Rev. S. Kidd. On the 10th of 
August. 1837, she left G-ravesend in the Hashemy, and 
reached Macao about the end of the year ; where she found a 
home in the family of the Rev. Mr. G-utzlaff, and persevered 
in the study of the Chinese language. On the 27th of March, 
1838, she was united in marriage to the Rev. W. Dean, at 
Macao ; from which to the time of her death, on the 29th of 
March, 1843, she accompanied him in his various movements. 

Publication by Mrs. Dean. 

CHINESE. 

J£J %£ % "i* fr $L ^ Efa& chay yen hing he led. Story 
of Elijah. This is a narrative of the various events in the life 
of Elijah the Tishbite, in sixteen chapters, taken from the 
Old Testament. The authoress designates herself as ffi £ ~f£ 
-j^ Weijinneusze. " The Female Benevolent Worker." It 
was reprinted at Singapore in 1841, in 13 leaves. A revised 
edition was printed at Hongkong in 1849, in 20 leaves ; the 
signature of which is j&} \zi & ]& Weijin die neu. 



XXIX. HENRY LOCKWOOD, an ordained missionary, 
in connection with the Board of Foreign Missions of the Pro- 
testant Episcopal Church in the United States, left America 
in 1835, and arrived at Canton in autumn, from which place 
he reached Batavia on the 23rd of December, in company with 
the Rev. Mr. Hanson. There he gave himself to the study of 
the Chinese language ; and having formed an acquaintance 
with the family of Mr. Medhurst, was married to his eldest 
daughter Sarah Sophia, on the 17th of February, 1836. From 
Mrs. Lockwood he learned the Malay language, and they en- 
gaged together in the superintendence of Chinese and Malay 
schools, but her brief career was terminated by death on the 
9th of August of the same year, Mr. Lockwood retired from 
the Chinese mission in 1838. By the latest accounts, he ap- 
pears to be now occupied as a missionary, at Pittsibrd New 
York. 



XXX. FRANCIS R. HANSON, an ordained missionary 
connected with the Board of Foreign Missions of the Protes- 
tant Episcopal Church in the United States, arrived in Can- 
ton in the autumn of 1835, in company with Mr. Lockwood; 
with whom he reached Batavia on the 23rd of December. 
There he commenced the study of the Chinese lansruao-e on 



SAMUEL WOLFE. 89 

his arrival, preparatory to future usefulness. His period of 
service however was too limited to admit of his doing much 
direct work, as his connection with the mission terminated in 
1837. According to the latest information, he is now Rector 
at Macon, Alabama. 



XXXI. EVAN DAVIE S, ordained to the sacred office, 
was pastor of the Congregational church at Great Torrington 
in Devonshire. He afterwards left England as a missionary 
to the Chinese, in connection with the London Missionary 
Society, with Mrs. Davies, in the Duke of Sussex, accompa- 
nied by the Rev. S. Wolfe, on the 8th of May, 1835, and 
arrived at Penang, September 11th, where he relieved and 
succeeded Mr. Dyer. There he gave himself to the various 
departments of missionary work among the Chinese, having 
made some extensive tours, during the first year of his resi- 
dence, over the island, and on the main land of Queda oppo- 
site. But his chief efforts were given to the educational 
department, having established a hoarding school for Chinese 
boys, who, besides the English language, were trained in the 
several branches of European instruction. Chiefly on account 
of declining health, he went to Singapore in the latter part of 
1839 ; there he embarked in September, in the Appoline, and 
arrived in London with his wife and children, on the 13th of 
February, 1840. He was soon after called to the pastorate 
of the Independent chapel at Richmond in Surrey. 

Publications by Mr. Davies. 

ENGLISH. 

1. China and her Spiritual Claims. 12mo. pp, ix, 134. 
London, 1845. 

2. Memoir of the Rev. Samuel Dyer, sixteen years Mis- 
sionary to the Chinese. 12mo. pp. xvi, 303. London, 1846. 



XXXII. SAMUEL WOLFE, an ordained missionary, 

in connection with the London Missionary Society, sailed from 
England in company with Mr. and Mrs. Davies, in the Dnke 
of Sussex, on the 8th of May, 1835, and having stopped at 
Penang on the way, arrived at Singapore on the 26th of 
September. While there, he made encouraging progress in 
the Chinese language, but indications of failing health soon 
became apparent ; and in the autumn of the following year, 
he repaired to Penang, with a view to the restoration of his 
energies, remaining there from the 23rd of August till the 



90 JEHU LEWIS SHUCK. 

19 th of November, when he left for Singapore. Towards the 
end of the year, the American ship Himmaleh having arrived 
there on a missionary tour among the neighbouring islands, 
Mr. Wolfe was induced to take a passage, in her for the bene- 
fit of his health. He was accompanied by Mr. Lay the Agent 
of the British and Foreign Bible Society, and Mr. Dickinson, 
an American missionary from Singapore. They left the 
last-named port on January 30th, 1837, reached the island 
of Temakeke on the 7th of February, and Macassar on 
the 10th, where they remained till March 6th. On the 7th, 
they touched at the isle of Bontain, and that of Ternate on 
the 25th. About the 23rd of April, they reached Samboanga, 
a Spanish settlement on the southern coast of the island of 
Mindanao, and there Mr. Wolfe died of pulmonary consump- 
tion, on the 27th. He was buried the following day, by per- 
mission of the padre, in an old Campo Santo on the west side 
of the town. His grave is twelve feet to the west of some 
mango trees growing there. 

There is an article by Mr. Wolfe on the Orthography of the 
Chinese language, in the 5th volume of the Chinese Eepository. 



XXXIII. ||[ Shah. JEHU LEWIS SHUCK, a student 
of the Virginia Baptist Seminary, now Richmond College, 
having been ordained and accepted by the Board of the Bap- 
tist Triennial Convention, as a missionary to China, was 
married to Henrietta Hall on September 8th, 1835. On the 
10th, he and the Rev. R. D. Davenport, with their companions, 
were set apart to their work, in the First Baptist Church, 
Richmond. The following day the missionary party embarked 
for Boston, which they reached on the loth, stopping at Bal- 
timore, Philadelphia and New York, on the way. On the 
22nd, they embarked in the Louvre, with a large company of 
missionaries on board, among whom were the Rev. A. and 
Mrs. Reed, for the Chinese. They reached Kedgeree at the 
mouth of the Hoogley river, on the 4th of February following. 
Having landed some passengers for Calcutta, they set sail 
again on the 6th, and anchored at Amherst on the 20th. 
After spending a week at Maulmain, Mr. and Mrs. Shuck 
resumed their voyage in the Louvre, with a greatly diminished 
number of passengers. On the 15th of March, they touched 
:it Penarjg, where they remained till the 20th, and reached' 
Singapore on the 29th. There Mr. Shuck commenced the 
study of the Chinese language, and also gained some know- 
ledge of the Malay. In September, they reached Macao, where 
they settled, after Mr. Shuck had paid a ten days visit to 
('anion. In the latter part of May, 1838, he took a trip to 
Hongkong, on account of his health. In November, he visited 



JEHU LEWIS SHUCK. 91 

Canton; from which he was recalled, on account of his wife's 
dangerous illness. The following summer, he paid a short visit 
to Hongkong with his family. Hearing of the failure of the 
agents of the Missionary Board with which he was connected 
in the beginning of 1842, he felt it necessary to seek some 
means of temporarily supplying the consequent deficiency ; and 
engaged himself for a time, as joint editor of the "Friend of 
China" newspaper at Hongkong, where he removed with his 
family in March. This did not however prevent him followino- 
his missionary pursuits, for, having raised subscriptions in the 
foreign community, hebuilt/two chapels in Hongkong, formed 
a school, and preached statedly on the Sundays, in Chinese 
and English. At the series of general meetings of missionaries 
which took place in 1843 at Hongkong, regarding the trans- 
lation of the Scriptures, Mr. Shuck was present at all but the 
first, on August 22nd. On occasion of the birth of her fourth 
son Henrie Fuller, Mrs. Shuck finished her earthly course on 
the 27th of November, 1844. Mr. Shuck was under the 
necessity of sending his two eldest children to the United 
States, early in 184.3. With the others he removed to Can- 
ton in the beginning of April, and embarked in the Tonquin 
on the 21st of October, for New York. In October 1S4G, he 
was married to Lizzie Sexton in Alabama, and having trans- 
ferred his connection to the Board of Foreign Missions of the 
Southern Baptist Convention, he returned to Hongkong with. 
Mrs. Shuck in August, 1847, accompanied by the Revs. Messrs. 
Tobey and Yates of the same mission, with their wives. 
Thence they removed to Shanghae, as their permanent station 
the same year. A committee of delegates for translating the 
Old Testament into Chinese having been appointed, in the 
summer of 1850, Mr. Shuck was chosen as one of those for 
Shanghae. The work of translation was commenced there early 
in August, and he continued to attend the meetings of com- 
mittee during that and the following year. In November, 185 L 
Mrs. Shuck died in giving birth to a child. Not very long after 
that, he returned to his native land, where he married a third 
wife. In 1854, he received an appointment from the Baptist, 
Missionary Board at Richmond, as a mil sionary to the Chinese 
at California-, where he remained till about 1859, and even- 
tually died in South Carolina in 1 ,8G3. 

Publications by Mr. Shuck. 

CHINESE. 

1- b i£ -£ ffo Po kwa °h e I' 1 ' 1 "- Discourseon Divination. 
4 leaves. The author signs himself $5 jfe % P± M Hioa Jc'i 
we 67.c shuh. k - Mr. Shuck the American." 



& 



92 JEHU LEWIS SHUCK. 

2. S'-Z-M San tsze king. Three Character Classic. 19 
leaves. Shanghae, 1848. This is a little tract after the model 
of Dr. Medhurst's production of the same name, (see Med- 
hurst's works, No. 2.) The last leaf contains a doxology to the 
Trinity. The tract is signed ~ffc ~fjj£ HJ $£ -j^ \ 3wa k'e kwb 
sliuh szejin. "The American literateur Shuck." 

3 - 1'& ^E P£ ?'<> s *e va. Are you afraid of Death ? 6 
leaves. Shanghae, 1848. This is in the Shanghae dialect. It 
was republished at Shanghae, in 5 leaves, having two doxolo- 
gies at the end. The signature to the second edition is Shuli 
szejin, " Shuck the literateur." 

4- M Jfi5 M tk *$& it To y&y soo kew hwdn ling. Jesus 
the only Saviour of the Soul," 9 leaves. Shanghae. This is 
in the Shanghae dialect ; the last leaf, which forms the cover 
having a doxology in four lines. The signature is Shiih szejin. 

5- ft IS ib "/fo BH Hwa king pe yu kSdng. Pictures Alle- 
gorized. 11 leaves. Shanghae. This is a short series of allegories 
on Christian subjects, illustrated by American wood-cuts. The 
signature is the same as the preceding. 

6. IE fijj [f; fj}| Chin shin shih keae. Commentaiy on the 
Decalogue. 9 leaves. Shanghae, 1849. This has a preface ; 
a doxology is appended, and also a Sabbath Calendar for the 
year 1849. The signature is the same as the preceding. A 
larger sized edition was published at Shanghae in 1851, in 4 
leaves, without the Sabbath Calendar; but after the preface 
is inserted a prayer, which was said to have been composed 
by the statesman Ke-ying, but turned out to be a forgery. 

7- ?j| j|t M ~%L ^U %n Cluing yuen leang yew seang Inn. 
Dialogues between Chang and Yuen. 35 leaves. Shanghae, 
1849. This is a modified edition of Dr. Milne's tract of the 
same title, (see Dr. Milne's works, No. 11.) 

8. IE jjitfi |§, fift Chin shin tsung Inn. Discourse on Grod. 
4 leaves. Shanghae, 1850. This is a revised edition of an 
article in Premare's Notitia Lingiue Sinicaj, with the phrase- 
ology very much modified. 

9. 5||f £f |f§ M ~fc Sin Mien k'euen keae wciii. New year 
Exhortations. Shanghae, 1852. This is a sheet tract, 

10 - ± ^ S % @ Szetdngtsaepunkwb. "(We) Scholars 
in our native land." Such is the beginning of a sheet tract 
without title, signed l>v* the "American scholars, Shuck, To- 
bey and Yates." 

ENGLISH. 

11. Portfolio Chinensis : or a Collection of authentic 
Chinese State Papers illustrative of the Eistory of the present 
position of Affairs in China. Willi a, Translation, Notes and 
Introduction, pp, xvi, 191. Macao, 1840. 



AL ANSON REED. 93 

Henrietta Hall, daughter of the Rev. Addison Hall, 
was born at Kilmarnock in Yirgina, October 26th, I8I7, the 

eldest of six children. In her fourteenth year, she was placed 
in Mrs. Little's school at Fredericksburg, where she was diligent 
and exemplary. She was converted in August, 1831, at a 
Baptist camp meeting in Lancaster county ; and on the 2nd of 
September was baptized by the Rev. J. B. Jeter, pastor 
of the Morattico Baptist church. Having been married to 
Mr. Shuck on the 8th of September, 1835, her fortunes weir 
closely united with his till the day of her death, assisting him 
in his labours, and sympathizing in his joys and sorrows. She 
died on November 27th, 1844, and was buried in the Protestant 
cemetery at Hongkong. 

Publication by Mrs. Shuclc. 

ENGLISH. 

Brief Sketches of some of the Scenes and Characteristics of 
China. This is chiefly compilation. There is a chapter at the 
end from the pen of Mr. Brown of the Morrison Education 
Society. It was reprinted in Great Britain. 



XXXIV. ALANSON REED was born at Cumffiington 

in Massachusetts on June 21st, 1807. When about twenty 
years of age, he gave his heart to Clod, and from the time of 
his conversion, he had strong desires, and a determination, if 
possible, to devote his life to the service of Christ among the 
heathen. But he was the youngest and favourite child of a 
widowed mother, whom he loved witli uncommon ardour, and 
she Avas not willing that he should expose himself to the priva- 
tions and trials of a missionary's life. On her account, he re- 
pressed for a season, his strong desire to enter immediately on 
a course of preparation for the work, and waited with the hope 
that Providence would make his path plainer. But after two 
or three years spent on a farm, he began to feel that his you lb 
w r as wearing away, and that he must enter without delay on 
the path he had chosen. He accordingly commenced study- 
ing for the ministry, at Hamilton Theological Seminary, and 
snbseopuently spent all the wealth of which he was possessed. 
to make comfortable provision for his beloved parent ; but she 
died before his studies were completed in 1835. His mind 
having been for some time directed towards China, he was or- 
dained with a view to that sphere of labour, in connection with 
the American Baptist Board of Foreign Missions. On the 
22nd of September in the above-named year, he sailed with 
his wife from Boston in the Louvre, accompanied by Mr. and 



94 ISSACHAB JACOX ROBERTS. 

Mrs. Shuck, and a large party of missionaries, reached Ked- 
geree "i! February 4th, 1836, Amherst on the 20th, Peuang on 
the 15th of March, and Singapore on the 29th; whence 
he removed to Bankok in July following. There he made 
very encouraging progress with the language during his short 
remaining life, but was much interrupted by sickness; and at 
length on the 29th of August, 1837, he was cut down in the 
prime of life, and found a grave in Siam. He left a widow 
and infant son, the latter of whom died shortly after, on the 
voyage to America. 



XXXV. JAMES T. DICKINSON, an ordained mission- 
ary, in connection with the American Board of Commissioners 
for Foreign Missions, arrived at Singapore in the early part of 
1836. There he was engaged in the preparatory department 
of the Chinese mission, when the American ship Himmaleh 
arrived from China, bound on a missionary tour among the 
islands; and the Rev. Mr. Stevens who was in the expedition, 
dying at Singapore, Mr. Dickinson was appointed to take his 
place. The vessel left that port on the 30th of January, 1837, 
and on reaching the island of Temakeke, he was deputed with 
Mr. Lay on the 10th of February, to go to Macassar for a 
pilot, a^id there they remained till the 6th of March, having 
an opportunity in the interim, of distributing a good many 
copies of the Scriptures, Chinese and Malay. They touched 
at Bon tain, Ternate, Samboanga, — where their fellow pas- 
senger Mr. Wolfe found a final resting place, — and at Borneo, 
returning to Singapore towards the end of June. There Mr. 
Dickinson continued to labour till 1840, when his connection 
with the Board came to an end. He was afterwards a teacher 
in the Singapore Institution for three years. 

There are several contributions from Mr. Dickinson in the 
Chinese Repository. 



XXXVI. $k%&Ld Hca6u-tseuen. ISSACHAR JA- 
COX ROBERTS was born in Sumner county, Tennessee, 
on February 17th, 1802. He was admitted a member of the 
Baptist church, in Bedford county, Massachusetts, in 1821. 
On January 4th, 1830, he was married, in Georgia, but Mrs. 
Roberts died the following year. He was ordained to the 
ministry, on April 27th, 1833; and left the United States, as 
a missionary for China, about the beginning of 1837, in con- 
nection with a special association termed the Roberts Fund 
Society, arriving at Macao on the 1st of May. Sometime 
afterwards he connected himself with the American Baptist 
Board of Foreign Missions, and was the first missionary to 



ISSACHAR JACOX ROBERTS. 95 

settle in Hongkong,, where he located himself in 1842. At 
the series of genera] meetings of missionaries, which were held 
there in 1843, regarding the translation of the Scriptures, he 
was present at all but the last two, on September 1st and 4th. 
During that month, he embarked on a voyage to Chusan, 
but being driven back by adverse winds, the vessel put in at 
Amoy ; which place he left after a short-stay, on October 9th 
in a lorcha, with the Rev. W. M.-Lowrie, for Hongkong, and 
reached that port on the 14th. May 15th, 1844, lie took up 
his residence in Canton, where he adopted the Chinese cos- 
tume, and opened a Chinese chapel. It was while at that 
station, in 1847, that Hung Sew-tseuen, afterwards so famous 
as the insurgent chief Tae-ping wang, visited him, and re- 
mained a few weeks under his instruction; but withdrew with- 
out receiving the ordinance of baptism, in consequence of Mr. 
Roberts wishing to postpone the rite. On August 21st, that 
year, Mr. Roberts relinquished his connection with bis Board, 
and joined the Board of Missions of the Southern Baptist 
Convention. In the middle of January, 1848, he went to 
Macao, and returned to Canton in April. In February, 1849, 
he left for a visit to his native land, where he was married, 
embarked again with Mrs. Roberts in April, 1850, and arrived 
at Canton, August 12th. On October 8th, 1851, his connec- 
tion with the Baptist Board ceased. During a visit to Hong- 
kong in September, 1852, he learned from the Rev. Mr. 
Hamberg, that the latter had been recently visited by a native 
from the interior, who had left some important documents in 
his possession. On examining these, Mr. Roberts discovered, 
that Hung Sew-tseuen his former disciple, had become the 
head of a great religious and revolutionary movement in the 
West of China, all which he detailed at length in a letter to 
the Chinese and General Missionary Gleaner, dated October 
6th, 1852. The native from the interior was Hung Jin, after- 
wards distinguished as the Kan-wang or Shield King, the 
second in power at Nanking. A few days after the capture 
of Nanking by the insurgents, a messenger appeared in Can- 
ton, purporting to be from Nanking, with a letter addressed 
to Mr. Roberts, inviting him to come to that capital, and 
bring a number of brethren with him, to help to propagate 
the gospel. This reached Mr. Roberts on May 11th, 1853, 
and he left Canton accordingly on July 5th. embarked at 
Hongkong on the 13th, taking with him the second son of 
Fung Yun-san, the Southern King, and his cousin A-shn, 
and reached Shanghae on the 30th. From various retarding 
causes, however, the difficulty of getting to Nanking from 
that city being the principal one, he was obliged to dd'rv his 
project; and after remaining there fifteen months, he Left for 
the United States. He returned to China via San Francisco 



96 IS8ACHAB JACOX ROBERT;-. 

and Panama, arriving at Canton in the beginning of 1856, 
unconnected with any society, the necessary funds being raised 
by voluntary contributions. On the outbreak of the troubles 
in the end of 1856, In; was obliged to leave with the other 
foreigners, and wont to reside for a time at Hongkong, return- 
ing to his old station at Canton about the end of 1858. In 
the latter part of 1860 the way seemed to be opening up, the 
insurgents having captured Soo-chow and the principal cities 
between that and Nanking; when Mr. Roberts again arrived 
in Shanghae about the beginning of September, and made his 
way up to Soo-chow by about the middle of the month. There 
he was introduced on the 22nd to Cliung-wang, or the Faith- 
ful King, the Commander in chief of that place, who treated 
him with much friendship, and sent an escort with him to 
Nanking. Leaving Soo-chow on October 4th, they reached 
the capital on the 13th. There Mr. Roberts was well received, 
had apartments assigned him, and was invested by the Prince 
as Minister for Foreign Affairs, which honour Mr. Roberts 
declined. After remaining there however, more than fifteen 
months, he left them on the 20th of January, 1862, thorough- 
ly disgusted with their proceedings, returned to Shanghae and 
thence to Canton. The following year he again paid a visit 
to Shanghae and Soo-chow, while the latter city was still in 
the hands of the insurgents. After that he returned to Can- 
ton, where he now remains occupied with his missionary 
pursuits. 

Publications by Mr. Roberts^. 

CHINESE. 

1. ^ *[5 Jj| $g Tsze poo tselh heal. Explanation of the 
Radical Characters. 1840. 

2. M: JM ± tfc Ohin 11 elie TceaCu. The Religion of Truth. 
10 leaves. Macao, 1840, This consists of a series of short articles, 
in the form of dialogue between two friends, on Jesus, — the 
Gospel, — Faith, — Baptism, — and the Future Life. It is pre- 
faced by a map of Judea. The author signs himself ^ Heuou, 
"The Filial." 

3. pi] ^ f§ p£ Wan ta siih laou. Catechism in the Macao 
Dialect. 7 leaves. Macao. 1840. This is divided into three 
parts; the first is a catechism of Christian truths, prefaced 
by a map of Jerusalem; the second is geographical, with a 
map of Asia; and the third is a collection of Scripture quota- 
tions. The author's signature is Hea6u. 

. 4 - ;ifc i£ £ M B if ! M IS # KM she chod yay soo sin 
e chaou shoo. New Testament of the Saviour Jesus. 32 
Leaves. Macao, 1840. Such is the title of a tract, which is 
in fact Medhurst's version of Mark's Gospel, with Notes by 



F.L1TTU DOTY. 97 

Mr. Roberts, sparingly interspersed. It is illustrated by maps 
of Judea, Jerusalem and Asia, with short descriptions of the ' 
first and last. It bears the signature Heaou. 

5- M IB fj; f$ li # Loo km full yin cliuenchooshih. 

Luke's Gospel v/ith Notes. 35 leaves. Canton, 1860. The 
first leaf contains the title, with a page of introductory mat- 
ter on the back; the second leaf has a map of the world with 
explanation. 

6. ^ JU H |H Klin yung Uung yd. Domestic Medicine. 
40 leaves. Canton. This is a translation of Jayne's Family 
Medical works. 

7- Jf|$ M} I? M Ya U so ° s ^ ln 'J Mug- The Holy Book of 
Jesus. This is a series of four small tracts, numbered respec- 
tively. 

8- iM 1j il 1£ M Full yin tso yaou chuen. Important 
Selections from the (iospel. 10 leaves. Canton. 



XXXVII. M. B. HOPE graduated as M, D. in the United 
States, and having been ordained to the ministry, obtained the 
degree of D. D. He went to Singapore as a Missionary to the 
Chinese, in the latter part of 1836', in connection with the 
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions ; but 
retired from the service in 1838, on account of ill health. . 



XXXVIII. STEPHEN TEACY was a brother of Ira 
Tracy (see XXIII. ), and graduated as M. D. in the United 
States. In the latter part of 1836, he went with Mrs. Tracy, 
as a missionary, to Bankok, in connection with the American 
Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions; but retired 
from the mission in 1839, and returned to America. 



XXXIX. S^^LoCh'e. ELIHU DOTY, an ordained 

minister of the Dutch Reformed Church in the United States 
was married to Clarissa D. Ackley of Litchfield, with whom he 
left New York, in the beginning of June, 1836", as a mission- 
ary to the Chinese, in connection with the American Board of 
Commissioners for Foreign Missions, and reached Batavia in 
September. There he remained for a time and learned the Full- 
keen Chinese dialect. In the autumn of 1838 he was at Singa- 
pore, where he embarked on October 15th, in company with the 
Rev. W. J. Pohlman, in a native schooner for Sambas in 
Borneo, in order to make an exploratory missionary tour. They 
reached that port on the 30th, and after a wearisome journey 
across the country, arrived at Pontianak late on the 24th of 
November. There, learning that a vessel was just about start- 



98 ELIIIU DOTY. 

mg for Singapore, they took passage and sailed on the 27th. 
'The following year he returned to Pontianak, and took up his 
residence, with the intention of establishing a Christian school 
and mission, for which he had obtained thesanction of the Dutch 
government. In the summer of 1844 he removed to Amoy, 
where he arrived on the 22nd of June; and there Mrs. Doty 
died on October 5th, 1845, leaving two daughters. With these 
Mr. Doty left Amoy November 12th, embarked at Hongkong 
towards the end of the year, and arrived in the United States 
in the early part of 1845. While in his' native land, he mar- 
ried a second time, and returned to Amoy with Mrs. Doty in 
August, 1847. But in little more than ten years he was again 
a widower; for his wife died on February 28th, 1858. The 
same year, he seems to have dissolved his connection with the 
American Board, and become an agent of the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Dutch Reformed Church in the United States. 
Having visited his native land shortly after, he returned to 
China with the Rev. E. S. Maclay about the year 1861, and 
again settled at Amoy. Length of service however had so 
exhausted his system, that he found it necessary to retire again 
about the end of 1864, when he left Amoy and embarked at 
Hongkong soon after for America ; but died on the voyage five 
days before reaching New York. 

Publications by Mr. Doty. 

CHINESE. 

*• $i> f'l ~J~ H fi'J Seeing heihi shih san tsih. Thirteen 
Village Sermons. Amoy, 1854. This is merely a revision of 
Dr. Milne's work (see Dr. Milne's works, No. 16.) including 
Milne's tract on the Strait Gate (see Dr. Milne's works, No. 3.) 

2. Iok ham thodn hole im su, John's Gospel, pp. 46. This 
is ia the Amoy dialect, and printed in the Roman character. 
It was translated by Mr. Doty in concert with Dr. Young. 

ENGLISH. 

3. Some Thoughts on the proper Term, to be employed 
to translate Elohini and Theos, into Chinese : by an American 
Missionary in China . 8vo. pp. 28. Shanghae, 1850. 

4. fjj jijg jfc. |j| Jg $g | § 4| Fan yih ying Inoa hea h'eung 
yii ivvy. Anglo-Chinese Manual with Romanized Colloquial 
in the Amoy Dialect. Svo. pp. xv, 214. Canton, 1853. 

In the 8th volume of the Chinese Repository, is a Narra- 
tive of a Tour in Borneo, by Messrs. Doty and Pohlman. 



WILLIAM JONES BOONE. 99 

XL. ELBERT NEVIUS, an ordained minister of the 
Dutch Reformed Church in the United States, left New York 
with Mrs. Nevius, in the beginning of June, 1836, as a mis- 
sionary to the Chinese, in connection with the American 
Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, accompanied by 
Mr. Doty and other missionaries. They reached Batavia in 
September, where he remained for a time, studying the Chinese 
language. He was afterwards associated with Mr. Doty in 
Borneo, which place he was obliged to leave, on account of his 
health in 1843. He tried the effect of a visit to Macao, and 
afterwards went to the Neilgherry hills, but all proving in- 
sufficient to reinvigorate him, he returned to the United Stales 
in 1845. Since his return, he has had the pastoral charge of 
a congregation of the Dutch Reformed Church, in the eastern 
part of the state of New York. 



XLI. # Wan. WILLIAM JONES BOONE was con- 
verted to the truth, while a law student at Charleston in South 
Carolina, during a season of revival in the winter of 1833-4, 
being then about twenty owe years of age ; soon after which 
he removed to Philadelphia. At the first meeting of the 
newly-organized Board of Foreign Missions of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church in 1835, a mission to China was deter- 
mined on, and his mind was immediately drawn to this open- 
ing as a field of duty for himself. He was about concluding 
his seminary course at Alexandria, and having offered himself, 
was accepted by the Foreign Committee for the Chinese mis- 
sion. To prepare himself for this sphere, he commenced the 
study of medicine, and graduated as M. D. He was married 
to Sarah Amelia De Saussure of South Carolina, and being 
ordained to the ministry of the gospel, left the United 
States with Mrs. Boone in 1836. They reached Batavia in the 
early part of 1837, and settled there for a time, where he com- 
menced his missionary labours among the Chinese. In 1840, he 
left Java on account of his health, and took up his residence at 
Macao in November. There he and Mrs. Boone, together with 
the Rev. W. C. Milne rendered important service, in conducting 
the school of the Morrison Education Society, during the. 
absence of Mr. Brown, from April 1st to September 10th, 
1841. In company with Mr. Abeel, he left Macao on the 
2nd of February, 1842, in a lorcha for Hongkong, from which 
place they sailed in the Australian Packet on the 7th, and 
reached the island of Koo-lang sen by Amoy, on the 24th. On 
the 10th of April, Mr. Boone left to return to Macao, for the 
purpose of removing his family to Amoy; on June 7 th, and 
arrived with Mrs. Boone and their two children at, Koo-lang 
sen, aecompaiiied by Mr. and Mrs. MacBryde and Dr. Cum- 



100 WILLTAM JONES BOCWE. 

ming. On the 20th of August, Mrs. Boone was attacked with 
the prevailing fever, and died on the 30th. On February 
10th, 1843, Mr. Boone left with lus children for Macao, 
and sailed from that place on March 1st, 1843, for the 
United States. While in his native land, he received the 
degree of D. I)., and was consecrated Missionary Bishop for 
China in 1844; he married a second time, and embarking with 
Mrs. Boone on the 14th of December, reached Hongkong on 
the 24th of April, 1845, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Wood, 
Mr. and Mrs. Graham, and three single ladies for the same 
mission. On the 24th of May he and Mrs. Boone embarked 
in the Alligator for Shanghae, accompanied by Misses Jones 
and Morse, and the Rev. G. Smith, and reached their destina- 
tion on June lGth. When the Committee of Delegates were 
appointed to meet in Shanghae, for the translation of the 
New Testament, he was chosen, together with Dr. Medhurst, 
to represent Shanghae. The Committee met on July 1st, 
1847, at the house of Dr. Medhurst, but on the 5th, Drs. 
Boone and Bridgman brought forward an objection against, 
the term used for the name of God, in the copy prepared by 
one of the local committees. Tins gave rise to a controversy, 
in which the Bishop took a most prominent part, and which 
reached no unanimous result. Ill health prevented him 
attending the committee after the first few days, till the con- 
clusion of its labours in July, 1850. He was again elected a 
delegate for Shanghae, in the Committee which met for the 
translation of the Old Testament in August of that year, and 
continued till the 12th of February, 1851, when consequent 
upon some changes in the committee the Bishop, in concert 
with other missionaries, commenced a new translation. On the 
31st of January, 1852, Mrs. Boone left for New York on ac- 
count of her health, and he followed her the same year. They 
returned to Shanghae with their two children, by the Gravina, 
accompanied by Mr. J. T. Points of the same mission, arriving 
at that station, April 13th, 1854. On account of failing 
health, he took his family to the United States in 1857, and 
embarked at New York on his return, with a large party of 
new missionaries, on July 13th, 1859, arriving at Shanghae 
on December 22nd. When the Rev. J. Sobson, British Chap- 
lain at Shanghae died, in April, 18o'2, Bishop Boone supplied 
his place in the pulpit for the chief part, till the following 
spring. In April, 1863, he left with Mrs. Boone on account 
of her health, staid for a short time at Macao, and returned 
to Shanghae in June. Shortly after that Mrs. Boone tried 
the effect of a visit to Japan, and the Bishop went over to 
fetch her in October. These means proving insufficient to the 
desired result, they left to proceed to Europe by the mail 
packet from Shanghae on November 9th. After staying a 



WILLIAM JONES BOONE. 10] 

month on the way at Singapore, they continued the voyage 
as far as Suez, where Mrs. Boone died on January 20th, 1864. 
The Bishop then proceeded to England, visited Germany, where 
he left his son at school, and returnd to Shanghae on the- 13th 
of June, exceedingly reduced with dysentery. Ee died <m 
July 17th, and was buried in the Shanghae cemetery. 

Publications by Bishop Bonne 

CHINESE. 

1- : M ft 31 M R3 ^r Tsln JceaCm yaou U van td. The. 
Convert's Catechism. 73 leaves. Shanghae, 1846. This is 
in the mandarin dialect, and is divided into 3 hooks. The 
first hook is a Catechism of the Creed; the second is on the 
Ten Commandments; and the third treats of the Lord's Prayer, 
the Sacraments. Baptism and the Lord's Supper. The author 
signs himself ^ f£ ^ Ts'ung Jceaou chay, "The Bishop." 
It was republished in 1S47, with the term jE jji$ Chin thin. 
substituted for _£ ^ Slidn.g te, as the name for God. A 
version of the same in the Shanghae dialect, was published 
some time later. 

2- }£) ~fc i$- Hi Hr II Ma t'ae clival fuh yin .shoo. 
Matthew's Gospel. 86 leaves. 1850. This is a translation 
into the Shanghae dialect, by Bishop Boone, the Rev. B. W. 
Syle and Rev. P. Spalding, printed at Ningpo. It w is r svised 
by -£|| P4 V fe Chaou Yin-sung, and reprinted at Shanghae, in 
1856, in 80 leaves. 

3. Jfg ^jc £jj J^ Shing kea&a yew lied. Religious Juvenile 
Instruction. 7 leaves. Shanghae, 1855. This is in the Shang- 
hae dialect, and consists of the Creed, the Ten Command- 
ments, two questions on one's duty towards God, and towards 
men, and the Lord's Prayer. 

4. jfjc -^p ;fg ~ff Keaoutsze* yew fang. Method of Instruct- 
ing Children. 4 leaves. Shanghae, 1855. This is an exhorta- 
tion to parents, to train up their children in scriptural know- 
ledge. 

5. ^ ^ jji %% Ch'ang neen ts'aou tame. Morning Pray- 
ers. 14 leaves. Shanghae. This is a selection from the Epis- 
copalian Liturgy, translated into the Shanghae dialect. After 
some introductory verses, is the Exhortation; then follows t he 
Absolution, the Lord's Prayer, Doxology, Creed, prayers for 
Mercy, for Princes and authorities, and for all men, Thanks- 
giving, Prayer and Benediction. 

6- #•! -^t f# II Hf lr Yd han chuen full yin shoo. John's 
Gospel. 64 leaves. Shanghae, 1861. This is in the Shang;hae 
dialect. A transcript of it in the Roman character was print- 
ed at Shanghae in 1861. in 100 pages. 



L02 WILLIAM JONES BOONE. 

7. ¥£. ^ fj| Slung hwuy taoic. Prayers of the Church. 
Shanghae, 1862. This is a translation of the principal part 
of the Book of Common Prayer, used by the American Epis- 
copal Church. It was issued in separate portions, some of 
which appeared much earlier than the above date. It com- 
mences with Preface, Table of Lessons for Sundays and Holi- 
days, and TaLle for finding the Holidays', from A. D. 1863 
to 1880, 11 ieaves. Next follows ^ fj| ^ Tsabu tadu ivan, 
24 leaves; which is a revision of No. 5, supra, including the 
Litany. Then #£ |* jj£ Wan tarn wan, Evening Prayers, 17 
leaves. J| ^ ip. J| fj| ~£ TJh le tsabu shin taOu wan, 
Family Prayers, 8 leaves, $ft #J iH 3t Tsih yung ta6u wan, 
Prayers for various occasions, 8 leaves. =§J JH„ jji* Sedy gan 
tabu, Thanksgivings, 4 leaves. Jf. |EJ |f| Pun jih tana, 
Collects, 27 leaves. |Jg |f Slang she, Hymns, 14 leaves. 
3fr M. !£ §§ 3$t J ^ MW ^>Y/e s^mz^ tsVm wan. Administration 
of the Lord's Supper, 35 leaves. H ^ jg| $fc ^ Iw^ kc 
/mr/ sd wan, Ministration of Infant Baptism, 13 leaves. ^ J\. 
fjjf $fc ^t Tujln ling se wan, Ministration of Adult Baptism, 
14 leaves, jg fg ff[ iTeew sro Ze, Confirmation, 6 leaves, f$£ 
WL ^1 £M ^^ ^' s '' ?w kwvi Iwu, Solemnization of Matrimony, 6 
leaves. H if* 2$£ >§^,7 sze wa??., Burial Service, 11 leaves. 

8. H Pj f# TpS # Hf ^« Ko chuenfuh y hi shoo. Mark's 
Gospel. 47 leaves. Shanghae, 1862. This is in the Shanghae 
dialect. 

9- ^^{fcHitHMAit /Shd t'odpabu 16 fa 16 ma 
Jin shoo. Paul's Epistle to the Romans. 22 leaves. Shanghae, 
1864. This is in the Shanghae dialect. 

ENGLISH. 

10. An Essay on the proper rendering of the words Elohim 
andeEOSinto the Chinese Language. 8vo. pp. 70. Canton, 1848. 

11. A Vindication of Comments, on the Translation of 
Ephesians, I. in the Delegates' Version of the New Testament. 
8vo. pp. 58. Canton, 1852. 

12. A Sermon preached in Trinity Church, Shanghai, 
Sunday, 18th of May, 1862, on the Death of the Rev. John 
Hobson, M. A., (British Chaplain, and Pastor of the Congre- 
gation;) to which are appended Extracts from a Sermon by 
the Lord Bishop of Victoria, preached in the above Church 
on Sunday, the 8th of June, 1862. 

There is a clever article by Mr. Boone, in the 9th volume 
of the Chinese Repository, on the Astronomy of the Shoo- 
king, and another on Long Measure, in the same work. 



XLII. EDWARD B. SQUIRE, a member of the Church 
of England, ordained to the ministry of the gospel, went to 



ALEXANDER STR0>TACIT. 103 

Singapore with Mrs. Squire, towards the end of 1837, as a 

missionary to the Chinese, in connection with the Church of 
England Missionary Society. . Being the first agent of the 
Society in that sphere, his special commission was to ascertain 
what openings existed for the establishment of a mission. 
Soon after his arrival, he become joint secretary with the Rev. 
J. Stronach, of the Singapore Tract and Book Society. In 
the latter part of 1838, he removed to Macao, where he re- 
mained till August, 1839; but in consequence of threatening 
danger from the Chinese, he then took his departure, with 
his wife and children, along with most of the British residents 
there. In 1840, he left China, on account of the delicate 
state of Mrs. Squire's health, and terminated his connection 
with the mission the following year. He was afterwards 
Vicar of Swansea in South Wales. 



XLIII. % $i 1] 55 11 III ± SheTun-kih Ya-kih-sJian- 
ta. ALEXANDER STRONACH was born at Edinburgh, 
A. D. 1800, and having been ordained to the ministry, left 
England with Mrs. Stronach, in the Broxbournbury, on the 
7th of August, 1837, as a missionary to the Chinese, in con- 
nection with the London Missionary Society. On the 12th of 
December, he arrived at Calcutta, but was detained there 
nearly six weeks, and embarked on the 22nd of January. 
1838, in the Brigand, reaching Penang on the 17th of February . 
There he remained seven days, and on the 2nd of March 
touched at Malacca, arriving at Singapore on the 5th. Ha- 
ving spent some time there in the study of the Chinese 
language and other preparatory work, the following year he 
went to succeed Mr. Davies at Penang, where he arrived on 
the 14th of August, and commenced his labours among the 
Chinese settlers, preaching and superintending the schools, 
besides conducting a regular English service. In accordances 
with instructions from the directors, he went to Hongkong in 
1843, where he arrived on the 7th of August, to attend the 
conference of missionaries of the Society that month, and was 
also present at all the meetings of the general convention of 
missionaries which took place there, regarding the translation 
of the Scriptures, from August 22nd to September 4th; after 
which he returned to Penang for a time. In June, 1844, he 
removed with his family to Singapore, and took charge of the 
China mission afi«r the Rev. J. Stronach and Mr. Young 
had left; continuing also the type founding, which had been 
left incomplete by Mr. Dyer. On the 1st of May, lS4b*, hav- 
ing previously closed the affairs of the Chinese department of 
the mission there, he embarked with his family for Hongkong, 
where he arrived on the 6th oi the following month, taking 



!<.)■} JOHN STRONACH. 

with him the printing press formerly at Malacca, the greater 
part of the type, the type-founding apparatus, and several of 
the printers. At Hongkong be continued as at Singapore, to 
superintend the type foundry, and also assisted the Rev. W. 
Grillespie of the same mission, by undertaking the English ser- 
vices. After the arrival of the Rev. J. F. Clelandatthe close 
of August, he proceeded to Araoy as his permanent station. 
Towards the cud of November, 1847, Mrs. Stronach left with 
her three children and embarked in the Monarch at Hongkong 
for England accompanied by the Rev. W. Grillespie. On her 
return to Amoy in the spring of 1850, she cooperated Avith 
Mr. Stronach in carrying on a boarding school he had establish- 
ed, in which the boys were instructed in the Chinese and English 
languages. In this institution which he continued till i860, 
he received much encouragement from the progress and 
demeanour of the pupils. He still continues his labours in the 
mission work at that station. 

Publications by Mr. A. Stronach. 

CHINESE. 

1- 3if >fr fl'$ W Wi HI Yang sin shin site sin peen. New 
Hymn Book. 59 leaves. Amoy, 1857. The first 13 hymns in 
this book, which is in the Amoy dialect, are the collection by 
Mr. Young (see W. Young's works, No. 3.); 35 others are 
from the Presbyterian hymn book (see Douglas' works, No. 
1. ) slightly modified; and the remaining 37 are by Mr. 
Stronach, the compiler. 

-■ $1 tk M M- 2L H Tsung lun yay soo che yung. Gen- 
eral Discourse on the Glory of Christ. 31 leaves. Hongkong. 
1803. The running title of this throughout the work is 
4f!> tk MM $L <o- Tsung lun yay soo che gun. '-'General 
Discourse on the Grace of Jesus." 



XLIV. jjjg ££ -j] $j H She Tun-Uih Yo-hdn. JOHN 
STBONACH, a brother of the preceding, was born at Edin- 
burgh, March 7th, 1810. Having been ordained to the mi- 
nistry, he left England with Mrs. Stronach, in company with 
Mr, A. Stronach, On the 7th of August, 1837, as a mission- 
ary to the Chinese, under the auspices of the London Mission- 
ary Society. On the 5th of March, 1838,-. he reached Singa- 
pore, his destined station, where he commenced the study of 
the Chinese and Malay languages. On the 30th of that 
month, the Singapore Tract and Book Society was organized, 
when he was appointed one of the secretaries. In conjunction 
with his brother, he was instrumental in establishing an 



JOHN STRONACH. 105 

English week-day service, a Sunday school for the children of 
resident Europeans, and a Malay girls' school, which was 
taken under the care of Mrs. Stronach. The following year, 
he undertook the superintendence of the Chinese classes in 
the Singapore Institution, and commenced public preaching 
in the Fuh-keen dialect on August 10th. In 1843, he left 
Singapore for Hongkong, where he arrived on the 7th of 
August, to attend the conference of missionaries of the London 
Society that month; and was also present at all the meetings 
of the general missionary convention, regarding the transla- 
tion of the Scriptures, from August 22nd to September 4th. 
He afterwards returned to Singapore, which he finally quitted 
with his family, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Young, in the 
summer of 1844, and reached Amoy on July 8th. There he 
was able to open a chapel for public preaching on the 1st of 
December, and continued his work in harmonious cooperation 
with the American brethren. The failure of Mrs Stronach's 
health however soon demanded a change, and leaving Amoy 
on November 12th, 1845, she embarked at Hongkong with 
her four children on the 20th for England, accompanied by 
the Rev. Dr. Legge; but before reaching her native land, she 
died at sea, on the 7th of March. 1846. Having been engaged 
since the end of 1844, on the revision of the portion of the 
New Testament allotted to Amoy, he was elected by the 
brethren there, as their representative in the Committee of 
Delegates to be convened at Shanghae. Accordingly he pro- 
ceeded to that station in May, 1847. and took his place at 
the opening meeting on the 1st of July; continuing uninter- 
ruptedly till the completion of the New Testament, about the 
end of July, 1850. He was afterwards elected to till the same 
post in the Committee which met for the translation of the 
Old Testament, in August following, and worked with them 
till the 12th of February, 1851. He then withdrew from 
that committee, and continued the work in concert with Dr. 
Medhurst and the Rev. W.C.Milne, under the auspices of the 
London Missionary Society, till the whole was completed in the 
spring of 1853. During his residence at Shanghae, he opened 
a small chapel, and preached daily to the Fuh-keen men there 
in their own dialect, a work which was not without good result. 
When he had completed his translatorial labours at Shanghae 
he returned to Amoy early in 1853, where he has since been 
occupied with his mission duties. 

Publications by Mr. J. Stronach. 

CHINESE. 

1- H i& tc- flf- fihvu chung che chum. Peace in Death. 



KM; JOHN STRONACH. 

5 leaves. Amoy, 1846. This is t1k j translation of a tract 
published by the British and Foreign Tract Society. It was 
reprinted at Shanghae in 1848. in 7 leaves, bearing the name 
of Mr. Stronach's teacher j^ ^ % Bull Mung-keb. It was 
again reprinted at Shanghae in 1855; and at Hongkong, in 
1863, in 7Jeaves. 

2- IS Hf H "s Fuh yln yaou yen. Important Gospel 
Sayings. 9 leaves. Shanghae, 1847. This was revised and 
reprinted at Shanghae, in 1850, in 8 leaves. It was again 
revised by Dr. Medhurst, and printed at Shanghae in 1853, 
in 9 leaves. Reprinted at Shanghae in 1861. 

3- JflS $fc Wt jt$ P$ Yty so ° kea6u hivb wan. Questions 
about Christianity. 81 leaves. Shanghae, 1855. This is writ- 
ten in a simple style, after the model of a work by the philo- 
sopher Choo He. It was reprinted at Hongkong, in 1863, in 
35 leaves. 

4- M $j| H $J ^ it Iff %. Sin yoteewybtseuen shoo ts$z 
lull. Bible Stories. 2 books. 204 leaves. Amoy, 1857. This is 
a translation of Earth's Bible Stories. 

Mr. Stronach took a prominent share in the Delegates' ver- 
sion of the New Testament ( see Medhurst's works, No. 41.), 
and the London Mission version of the Old Testament ( see 
Medhurst's works, No. 42.). He was also engaged in conjunc- 
tion with Dr. Medhurst, in producing the Mandarin version 
of the New Testament, during the years 1854 and 1855 ( see 
Medhurst's works. No. 55.). 

mala v . 

5. Kitah Alkudus; iya itu Injil Isa Almasih Tuhan lea- 
mi. The New Testament of our Lord and Saviour Jesus 
Christ. 8vo. pp. 423. Singapore, 1853. The printed edition 
contains modifications by Mr. Keasbury. It is in the Roman 
character. 

ENGLISH. 

6. Esop's Fables; as translated into Chinese by R. Thorn 
Esqr. rendered into the Colloquial of the Dialects spoken in 
the Department of Chiang-chiu, in the Province of Hok-kien: 
and in the Department of Tie-chiu, in the Province of Can- 
ton. 8vo. pp. 42, 39. Singapore, 1843. The first part of this 
work, in the Hok-kien dialect, is the joint production of 
Messrs. Dyer and J. Stronach (see Dyer's works, No. 5.). 
The second part, in the Tie-chiu dialect, is entirely the work 
of Mr. Stronach. 

7. The Blessedness of those who die in the Lord, a Ser- 
mon, occasioned by the death of the Rev. Samuel Dyer, Mis- 
sionary to the Chinese, (which took place at Macao 24th 
October 1843:) preached in the new Mission Chapel Singapore. 



DYER BALI.. 107 

November 9, 1843. With a .sketch of Mr. Dyer's Life and 
Character by his Widow. 12mo. pp. 35. Singapore, 1843. 



XLV. ROBERT W. ORR, being ordained to the minis- 
try, and having been accepted by the Board ot Foreign Mis- 
sions of the Presbyterian Church, left the United States with 
Mrs. Orr on December 9th, 1837, and arrived at Singapore 
April 5th, 1838, one of the first missionaries to the Chinese 
in connection with that board. Pie visited Malacca, Penang 
and Province Wellesly, and afterwards went to Siam, where 
lie arrived October 25th, 1838, to explore the field with a view 
to missionary enterprise. He returned to Singapore December 
22nd, 1839, soon after which, on account of failing health, 
ho made a visit to the Neilgherry Hills in India ; but that did 
not restore him, and in 1840, he embarked for the United 
States. His connection with the mission ceased in 1841. 



XLVI. JOHN A. MITCHELL was ordained to the 
ministry of the gospel, and appointed a missionary to the. 
Chinese by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian 
Church. He left the United States on December 9th, 1837, 
in company with Mr. and Mrs. Orr, and arrived at Singapore 
on April 5th, 1838. His missionary career however was but 
of short duration, for he died on the 2nd of October, the same 
year. — — — - — 

XLVII. $£ -ft fl[S PoNae-yay. DYER BALL was born 
at West Boylston, Massachusetts, June 3rd, 1796. In his early 
years, his father removed with his family to Shutesbury ; and 
during his minority, Dyer was engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits. Under the patronage of the American Education 
Society, he commenced his classical studies at Phillips' Aca- 
demy, Andover, in 1822, where he spent two years ; and 
another year was passed in two academic schools in the vici- 
nity of Amherst College. After this he continued his collegiate 
studies at Yale College, and attended lectures in New Haven 
Theological School. The latter part of his course however 
was interrupted by ill health, which made it advisable for 
him to spend the winter months at the South. In 1827, he 
was married to Lucy Mills of New Haven. In 1828, he gra 
duated as A. B. at Union College; and the same year he was 
licensed to preach, by an association of clergymen in Con- 
necticut. Soon after this he went to St. Augustine in Flo- 
rida, at which place and Charleston, he spent two or three 
years teaching and preaching. h\ the spring of 1831. he was 
ordained an evangelist, bv an association that mel ;" Shutes- 



108 DYER BALL. 

bury. Having been appointed to Tallahassee in Florida, by the 
American Home Missionary Society, he spent aboul two years 
in that vicinity; after which he returned to Charleston with 
his family, and there commenced the study of medicine. In 

1836, he graducted as A. M. at Union College; and was ad- 
mitted a member of the Union Presbytery. In the spring of 

1837, he graduated as M. 1).; and having been appointed a 
missionary to the Chinese, by the American Board of Com- 
missioners, he left for New York, expecting then to embark 
for Singapore. The state of the Society's finances however 
occasioned some delay, and he spent the following winter 
among friends in the north; at the same time supplying two 
pulpits, which happened to be vacant. Having obtained the 
loan of De Guigne's Chinese Latin and French Dictionary 
from Vale College Mrs. Ball copied out the Chinese charac- 
ters, and the Dr. translated the Latin and French into English; 
a work which occupied them about three or four months. In 
May, 1838, they embarked at New York in the Albion, and 
reached Singapore in the autumn. There he was successfully 
employed for a time in preaching, printing tracts, and atten- 
ding to the sick; while Mrs. Bail instructed a school of Chinese 
girls. In 1841, in consequence of her health. Dr. Ball found 
it necessary to remove to Macao. In 1843. he took his 
family to Hongkong, where he resumed his missionary labours, 
by superintending the Chinese printing, administering medi- 
cine to the sick, and conducting religious services with the 
natives. At the series of general meetings of missionaries 
held at Hongkong, regarding the translation of the Scriptures, 
he was present on three occasions, August 22nd, 24th and 
25th. Mrs. Ball cooperated with him in his efforts, till a few 
days before her death, which took place there on June 6th, 
1844. Her two little boys soon followed her to the grave. 
In June, IS45, Dr. Ball paid a temporary visit to Canton, 
and on the 29th of August, removed there with his family, 
where he opened a dispensary, established a school, and en- 
gaged in public preaching to the natives. In 1846, he was 
married to Miss. Johnston. In March, 1854, he left Canton 
with Mrs. Ball, made a short stay in Great Britain and 
visited America, where he remained till towards the end of 
1856. He then reembarked for China, which he reached in 
May, 1857; but hostilities having commenced at Canton, he 
remained at Macao till November, 1858, when he returned to 
his old station at the provincial capital, andhasbeen residing 
there ever since. 

Publications by Dr. Ball. 

CHINESE. 

1. JffiJ&#T + ^*3*?EH B \% jg Ik Yty soo ting 



DYER BALL. E09 

sink tsze kcd s7i&io sze san jilt full liwo lun. Discourse on the 

Crucifixion of Jesus, and his Resurrection after Three Days. 
4 leaves. Tins consists of the 19th and 20th chapters of 
John's Gospel, down to the 29th verse of the latter, with 
occasional notes. 

2- # f? JtT ^ Jflil 3t Ts'ung paWydy liwa chuh wan. 
Prayer to Jehovah. 2 leaves. This contains the texts of 
Matthew, 6 : 9 — 13, and Luke, 11 : 2 — 13, with commentary. 
A modification of the same tract was published with the title 
^ ^f- jE jjiijj |^ 38C Ts'ung pae chin shin chuh wan. 
' 3. BUfifc'jgt3&ll«j£flS;£5!& & Ydy soo k'e mh shing 
ling lean hwa che e sze. Jesus teaching the meaning of Reno- 
vation by the Holy Spirit. 7 leaves. This is the text of John's 
Gospel, 3: 1 — 21, with commentary. 

4. ^ 'g J£ |g. B£ Kingfoo pin yaou lea. Important Points 
of Warning to Rich and Poor. 3 leaves. This contains the 
parable of the rich man and Lazarus, as recorded in Luke, 16 : 
19 — 31, with reflections in improvement of the subject, 

5- ^ I f- jj§ ^ £, ?Jt Ch'dng pae ydy Inua che taon Doc- 
trine of the Worship of Jehovah. 3 leaves. This consists of a 
series of axioms on the principles of Christian worship ; con- 
cluding with a prayer. The first portion was published with 
the same title, as a sheet tract. Another edition was published 
with the title % ff- IE jjiifj ;> ^ Ch'&ng pae chin slim che 
taou, in 4 leaves. 

fe ivdn louhjiii luy che tsung. Jesus the Head of Heaven, 
Earth and all Creatures. 3 leaves. This contains the first 
thirteen verses of John's Gospel with a commentary. 

7. {$: fy 1? tM ^ tmJ" Leuh fa shmg keae led hhi. Gener- 
al Discourse on the Commandments of the Law. 7 leaves. 
The substance of this discourse is preceded by the Ten Com- 
mandments; and followed by the Lord's Prayer with notes, 
and a grace to be said at meals. Dr. Ball published the Ten 
Commandments separately as a sheet tract with the title J§ 
^ ~t* §%. ^ Wd Yay hwa shili t'eaou shing keae. He also 
published the Lord's Prayer with notes, as a sheet tract, with 
the title J[|S fi$ Jjjf It j3C Yay soo he taoit wan. 

8. tJC >X H 1l£ 3£ Slaciuj ho lung she wan. Warnings 
to the World from Water and Fire, 4 leaves. This is an address 
regarding the flood, and the New Testament declaration that 
the world shall eventually be destroyed by fire. 

9- M M<- £f + *? y& "*$ tfc Ydy soo ting skill taze /red led 
hhi. General Discourse on the Crucifixion. 15 leaves. Canton. 

10- M M II M. M $p 3t Yay soo shing king seuen tsih 
wdn. Selections from Scripture. This is the title of a series 
of sheet tracts, containing Matthew, 16: 13 — 28; Matthew, 
19: 1—30; Luke 8 : 1—18, &c. 



110 GEOBGB W. WOOD, 

11. $j ?& Wi vfr #$ Yd y?/i7/A ;/?7/,/ s ^ ^- Revelation of 
John. A sheet tract comprising extracts from the 20th and 
21st chapters of the Kevelation, and the 2nd chapter of the 
G-ospel by John. 

12. ^ m M % ^}Jk f& i% -& A % Y& V ],wa chin sUh 
<poo sa gow sedng she /mi with. Jehovah is True, but the Idols 
are Vanity. A sheet tract containing the 115th Psalm. 

13. I§£ ^ f U & pE ifr Swa ylng hd lib t'ung shoo. An- 
glo-Chinese Concord Almanac. The first number of this serial, 
for the year 1843, was published at Hongkong, in 35 leaves, 
with a folding map of the world. The bulk of the work is 
occupied with a comparative Anglo-Chinese calendar, which 
is preceded by a short account of the Creation, ami a brief 
description of the Solar system. The work was continued 
during subsequent years, under the title 1^ # fu & II H 
Hivafan J/6 ho t'ung shoo. The number for 1844 was pub- 
lished at Hongkong, in 59 leaves, with the same map as the 
preceding and a description appended ; besides a variety of 
other matter, religious, moral and scientific. The number 
for 1845 contains 05 leaves and 4 folding maps, forming an 
interesting miscellany, religious and scientific. The issue for 
1846' has 92 leaves and 3 folding plates, and includes the 
English, American and French treaties with China. That 
for 1847 has 6(j leaves and 2 folding plates. In consequence 
of deficiency of funds, the number for 1848 is on a very reduced 
scale, both" as to the size of the page, and the quantity of 
matter, being comprised in 20 leaves, with a folding map of 
the world. The number for 1849 is almost the same in size 
and matter, containing 19 leaves and a map of the world. 
The issue for 1850 has 20 leaves and a folding ma}). In this 
the large-sized pnge is again adopted. That for 1851 has 24 
leaves and 2 folding maps. The one for 1852 has 20 leaves 
and a folding map. That of 1853 has 19 leaves. After 1854, 
Dr. Ball resigned the work for a time, which was carried on by 
Mr. French, "under the title f u fe }§ # Ho ho t'ung shoo, 
Dr. Ball resumed the publication for 1859, which contains 27 
leaves and 2 folding plates. The last number by the same 
compiler was that for 1860, which contains 20 leaves and 2 
folding plates. Since that the work has been continued up to 
1865 by the Rev. D. Vrooman, under the title J|£ # ^U ^ j§ 
H-' T'ang fan ho ho t'ung shoo. 



XLVIII. GEORGE W. WOOD, was ordained to the 
ministry in the United States, embarked at New York, and 
arrived at Singapore with Mrs. Wood in 1838, as a mission- 
ary to the Chinese, connected with the American Board of 
Commissioners for Foreign Missions, accompained by Dr. Ball 



WILLIAM JOUX POHLMAN*. Ill 

• 

and other missionaries. Mrs. Wood died the same year at 
Singapore; and he retired from connection with the Chinese 
Mission, returning- to America in 1840. He was afterwards 
married a second time, and joined the Armenian mission un- 
der the same board, being stationed at Bebek by Constanti- 
nople. He was obliged however to go to the United States 
in 1851, on account of his wife's health, and in 1853, Ins 
connection with that Mission appears to have ceased. Since 
that time he has received the degree of D. 1). and is now- 
Home Secretary to the American Board in New York. 

We do not hear of any publications by Dr. Wood, but in 
the Report of the mission for 1848. the comjtnittee complain 
of being unable to print a Book on Theology by him, for want 
of funds. 



XLIX. WILLIAM JOHN POHLMAN, an ordained 

minister of the Dutch Reformed Church in the United States, 
was married to Theodosia R. Scudder, the sister of Dr. 
Scudder the missionary to India. He left New York with 
Mis. Pohlman, accompanied by Dr. Ball and Mr. Wood, and 
arrived at Singapore in 1838, having been appointed a mis- 
sionary to the Chinese, in connection with the American Board 
of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. On the 15th of 
October in the same year, he took passage in a native schooner 
with Mr. Doty, for Sambas in Borneo, where they arrived on 
the 30th; thence they made their way overland to Pontianak, 
which they reached on the 24th of November, and embarked 
there on the 27th to return to Singapore. After a temporary 
residence at the latter settlement, he removed with his family 
to Pontianak, where lie spent some years among the Chinese 
population, making occasional excursions into the interior. 
In 1844, he went with Mr. Doty toAmoy, where they arrived 
with their families on June 22nd. On the 30th of September 
Mrs. Pohlman entered into her rest, leaving three children, 
one an infant daughter of nine days. In November, 1845, he 
made an excursion to Chang-chow city, with Mr. Hedde, one 
of the French commercial delegates. In the summer of 1 846, 
he found it necessary to go to Canton for two or three months 
for medical aid, and returned to Anioy in September. In 
April, 1848, his sister arrived at Amoyto stay with him. and 
in December he left Amoy to accompany her to Hongkong for 
the benefit of her health ; intending to remain there only a few 
days, and then return to assist in dedicating the church lately 
built by the mission. He embarked at Hongkong on board 
the Omega, on January 2nd ; on the 5th the vessel was wrecked 
on Breaker Point, and Mr. Pohlman was drowned by the cap- 
sizing of the boat, in which a party were attempting to land. 



112 WILLIAM LOCKHABT. ^ 

There are several contributions by Mr. Pohlman, in fche 15th, 

jLO'th and I7l.li volumes of the Chinese Repository. 



L. ftf i| $ Ld Wei Un. WILLIAM LOCKHART was 

•bom at Liverpool, October 3, 1811. In early life, having at- 
tended the medical courses at Meath Hospital in Dublin, and 
Guy's Hospital in Loudon, he passed his examinations at 
Apothecaries' Hall in 1833, and graduated as M. R. C. IS. 

1834. After that he was appointed House Surgeon to the Dis- 
pensary at Liverpool; and subsequently became assistant to 
a practitioner near that city. Having been appointed medical 
missionary to the Chinese, by the London Missionary Society, 
he left Gravesend in company with Mr. Medhurst and family 
in the George the Fourth, July 31st, 1838, and arrived at 
Batavia about the middle of November. Towards the close of 
January 183 ( J. he, reached Canton, and having offered his ser- 
vices to the Medical Missionary Society, was appointed to the 
charge of their hospital at Macao, which was first opened by 
Dr. Parker, during three months of the previous summer. 
After nearly six weeks spent at Canton studying the language, 
lie vent to Macao on a visit on February 28th, but while 
there, political complications arose which prevented his return- 
ing, and he commenced operations in the hospital on July 1st; 
which were discontinued on the 21st of August, in consequence 
of the departure of British residents from that settlement. In 
prospect of the protracted interruption of friendly intercourse 
between the British and Chinese, he left the country on the 
7th of September for Batavia,, where he continued the study 
of the language under Mr. Medhurst, In May, 1840, he re- 
turned to Macao and reopened the hospital on August 1st. 
Shortly before this time, Drs. Hobson and Diver had arrived, 
and the hospital at Macao being placed under their charge, 
Mr. Lockhart proceeded at the end of August to the city of 
Ting-hae in the island of Chusan, then occupied by the English 
troops, where he opened a hospital for the benefit of the na- 
tives, from September 13th, 1840, till February 22nd, 1841. 
In consequence of the evacuation of Chusan by the British 
government, he left the island on the 24th of February and 
arrived at Macao on the Ib'th of the following month ; where 
he was soon after married to Catherine Parkes. When 
the treaty of Nanking was settled in 1842, he went to Hong- 
kong, where he was detained till the spring of 1843, superin- 
tending in the interval the building of the Medical Missionary 
Society's hospital in that colony. He arrived at Chusan on 
the 13th of June, and after a few days, leaving Mrs. Lockhart 
there, accompanied the Rev. W. C. Milne to Ningpo, and re- 
mained till July7th ; when the latter started on his journey 



WILLIAM LOCKHART. 113 

through the interior to Canton, and Mr. Lockbart returned to 
Cliusan, where lie again opened a hospital. On the 8th of 
November, he went up to Shanghae for a visit, returning to 
Chusan on the 20th. He again left the island in company 
with Dr. Medhurst, who visited Chusan on his way up from 
Hongkong ; and after a short trip to Ningpo, arrived at Shano-- 
hae about the middle of December. Returning temporarily 
to Ting-hae, he closed the hospital in the middle of January, 
1844, and taking Mrs. Lockhart with him to Shanghae, com- 
menced another there about the middle of February. In 1846, 
he opened a new and commodious building, by subscriptions 
raised chiefly on the spot, where he continued to prosecute his 
benevolent labours, during the subsequent years of his resi- 
dence in Sbangbae. On March 8th, 1848, he was exposed 
to a murderous attack by a party of junk men at Tsing-poo 
thirty miles from Shanghae, and narrowly escaped with his 
life. In consequence of ill health, Mrs. Lockhart returned to 
England, with her children in 1852. where they arrived on the 
1st of May. In the beginning of December, 1857, Mr. Lock- 
bart left Shanghae for his native land, and proceeding via 
Egypt and Paris, reached England on the 29th of January, 
1858. AVhile there he was made F. R. C. S. of London. He 
remained till the beginning of June, 1861, and then returned 
to China by the Egypt route, reaching Hongkong on the 22nd 
of July, and Shanghae on August 9th; which place he left for 
Teen-tsin on the 30th in the steamer Fei-loong, and arrived at 
Peking in September. There he established a hospital, com- 
menced a mission station, and remained till the spring of 
1864, when he went south to Shanghae, made a hasty visit to 
Hankow in April, returned to Shanghae, took a trip over to 
Japan in May, visited Yokohama and Yedo, and again return- 
ing to Shanghae in the beginning of June, embarked by the 
first mail packet for Europe on the 6th of that month, reach- 
ing England August I4th ; where he has since been actively 
engaged advocating the cause of Chinese missions. 

Publications by Mr. Lockhart. 

ENGLISH. 

1. Eleven Annual Reports of the Chinese Hospital at Shang- 
hae, from 1846 to 1857, inclusive. Svo. pp. 188. Shanghae. 
Also Two Annual Reports of the London Missionary Society's 
Hospital at Peking, from 1861 to 1863. Svo. pp. 44. Shanghae. 

2. The Medical Missionary in China : a Narrative of Twen- 
ty years Experience. Svo. pp. 404. London, 1861. 

There are several translations by Mr. Lockhart, of papers 
on Chinese Medicine in the Dublin Medical Journal. Also No- 
tices of Chusan, and other articles, in the Chinese Repository. 



114 J 081 All GOBDARI). 

Li. ^ jg Kaou-tth. JOSIAH GODDARD, son ofthe 
Rev. David Goddard, was born at Wendell, Massachusetts, 
October 27th, 1813. In 1826 he became imbued with the 
Christian's hope, and in May, 1831, he was admitted a member 
of the Baptist communion by immersion, in connection 
with the clmrch of which his father was the pastor. He 
finished his studies at Brown University in 1835, and after- 
wards passed a course of training at Newton Theological In- 
stitution, which he left in 1838, and was ordained to the work 
ofthe ministry in the following September. In December of 
the same year, he sailed for the East with Mrs. Goddard, as a 
missionary to the Chinese, under the American Baptist Board 
of Foreign Missions, and landed at Singapore in June, 1839. 
After a short stay there, he proceeded to Bankok his destined 
station, where he landed October 16th, 1840. In 1842, he 
succeeded Mr. Dean as pastor of the first Chinese church 
there. In 1848, after a severe bleeding ofthe lungs which 
threatened his life, he so far recovered as to be able to remove 
with his family northward to Shanghae, and thence after a 
short sta} r proceeded to Ningpo, where, in a cooler climate, 
he conld carry forward his work among the Chinese. There 
on September 4th, 1854, he finished his mortal career, leaving 
a widow and several children to lament his loss. Mrs. God- 
dard returned to the United States, and died at Providence, 
Rhode Island, November 28th, 1857. 

Publications by Mr. Goddard. 

CHINESE. 

1- H U 9 it M !lJ.1£.1i Shtng king k'ewechaou 

ch'wdng site chuen. Genesis with Notes. 7 leaves. Shanghae, 
1849. This is the 1st chapter, with interspersed comments, 
prolegomena and appendix. A reprint the following year at 
Shanghae, with the same title, in 17 leaves, contains the first 
five chapters, with revised prolegomena and an appendix. 

2- m n m & m I'J Hi ft Shtng king Weio e chaou 
ch'wdng she chuen. Genesis, 68 leaves. Ningpo, 1850. This, 
which bears the same title as the preceding, is the text of 
Genesis complete, without comments, but having the same 
prolegomena. 

3. Ifc %!} "§" ["] A" J yew piJi wan. A hundred Questions 
for the Young. 12 leaves. Ningpo. 1S50. This consists of a 
hundred questions on doctrinal Christianity, followed by a 
statement of Ten chief points ; after which are forms of prayer 
for morning and evening, grace to be said at meals, and gen- 
eral prayer. It was reprinted in 1855. in 19 leaves, with the 
title J| jg |!SJ ^ Chin taou wan t-i. 



NATHAN BENIIAM. 115 

4. §g $* Jjf jf =g ^ i§' /S'/rmr/ 7cz«^ s//i c chaou tseueii 
shoo. New Testament. 2;3l leaves. Ningpo, 1853. This 
contains a short Introduction, with map of J udea ; also a fold-' 
ing map shewing the journeys of the Apostles. Detached 
portions had been published at previous times. Matthew's 
Gospel was issued at Ningpo, in 1851, in 32 leaves, preceded 
by an Introduction and ma}) of J udea, with the title |g $® $Jf 
jl fp »^ :fc WM H' i$ Shing king sin e chaOu ma t'aefuh yin 
chuen. John's Gospel appears to have been printed while 
Mr. Goddard was at Bankok. It was also printed at Shang- 
hae, in 28 leaves, in 1852, with the title lg $f §f si fg $j $& 
ii Hr M Shing king sin e chaOu yd lianfuh yin chuen. This 
also has a short Introduction and map of J udea prefixed. The 
Four Gospels and Acts were published the same year at Ning- 
po, in 145 leaves, with an Introduction, map of Judea, and 
folding map of the Journies of the Apostles, under the title 
II M ff it ffl m H H f$ Shing king sin e chaou/uh yin 
choo chuen. 

ENGLISH. 

5. A Chinese and English Vocabulary in the Tie chiii 
Dialect. 8vo. pp. ix, 248. Bankok, 1847. 

There is an article by Mr. Goddard, in the 16th volume of 
the Chinese Repository, on the Term for the Holy Spirit in 
Chinese. ■ 

III. WILLIAM BECK DIVER of Philadelphia, United 
States, graduated as M. D. in his native land, and having been 
appointed by the American Board ot Commissioners to labour 
among the Chinese, he left New York on the 11th of May, 
1839, and arrived at Macao on September 27th. On the 1st 
of July, 1840, he offered his services to the Medical Missionary 
Society, which were accepted ; and Mr. Lockhart having re- 
opened the hospital at Macao on August 1st, Dr. Diver gave 
him his assistance, till the removal of the former to Chusan 
at the end of that month, when the hospital was placed under 
the joint care of Drs. Diver and Hobson. In December however, 
Dr. Diver's health failing, he was compelled to take a voyage 
for its recovery ; and finding little benefit from a short trip, 
taken in the first instance, to the Straits of Malacca, lie was 
induced to proceed from Singapore to the United States, and 
did not return to China. 



LIII. NATHAN BENHAM was born at Shardaken, 

Ulster county, New York, August 2 3rd, 1810. He made a 
public profession of religion in Byron, Genessee county, New 
York, in 1830, and soon after commenced his studies for the mi- 



116 LYMAN BIRT PEET. 

nistry. He received his collegiate and theological education 
at Hudson, Ohio, where he also officiated for one year as tutor. 
During the summer of 1 835, he offered himself to the American 
Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, by whom lie was 
appointed a missionary to the Chinese. On the 4th of March 
1839, he was married to Maria A. Nutting of Groton, Massa- 
chusetts, and having been ordained to the ministry, sailed 
with Mrs. Benham and others from Boston. July 6th, arriving 
at Singapore, October 23rd. He reached Bankok, his destin- 
ation, March 3rd, 1840, and entered at once, with great promise 
of success, upon the study of the Chinese language On the 
evening of the 6th of April, the same year, returning from a 
prayer meeting, while crossing the river Menam to his own 
house, the boat was upset, and he was drowned. His body 
was recovered two days after. 



LIV. rf$ Peili. LYMAN BIRT PEET was born at Corn- 
wall, Vermont, United States, March 1st, 1809, and received 
his early education at Middlebury, Vermont. In 1828, he 
joined the Christian church, in the Congregational connection, 
under the pastorate of the Rev. J Bushnell at Cornwall. He 
studied for the ministry at Andover Seminary, Massachusetts ; 
and was ordained to the sacred office at South Dennis in the 
same state, December 13th, 1837. On the 14th of April, 1839, 
he was married to Rebecca Clemens Sherril, at Middlebury, 
Having been appointed an agent of the American Board of 
Commissioners for Foreign Missions, he sailed from Boston 
with Mrs. Feet, July 6th, 1839, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. 
Benham, and reached Singapore on the 23rd of October. The 
following year, May 28 th, Mr. Peet arrived at Bankok, his 
appointed station ; where he was assigned to the Chinese de- 
partment of the mission, in place of Mr. Benham, recently 
deceased. He continued his labours there for the Chinese till 
1846, when by directions from his Board, he removed to Can- 
ton ; the following year to Ainoy, and afterwards to the newly- 
opened port of Fuh-chow, where he arrived with Mrs. Peet on 
the 6th of September. Mrs. Peet died in July, 1856, soon 
after which he made a voyage to the United States with his 
motherless children. There he married a second time, and 
returned to Fuh-chow with Mrs. Peet in March, 1859 ; where 
he is still labouring. 

Publications by Mr. Peet. 

CHINESE. 

■*• St *% M Ling hivan pecn. Treatise on the Soul. 9 
leaves. Fuh-chow, 1853. This is in the Fuh-chow dialect. 



-TAMES LEGGE. 1 17 

2. Genesis in the Fun-chow dialect. 75 leaves. Fuh-chow, 
1854. 

3. Iffi $J %£ H $«* yo tseuen shoo. New Testament in 
the Fuh-chow dialect. Besides four editions of the New 
Testament complete in this dialet t, Mr. Peet has, at different 
times translated and published — Matthew's and Mark's Gos- 
pels, 77 leaves, Fuh-chow, 1853; Acts to Revelation, 207 
leaves, Fuh-chow, 1856. 

4. _£, tffr -\* M l£ W Sitting te slrilt Jceae chooshih. Short 
Commentary on the Ten Commandments. 6 leaves. Fuh-chow, 
1860. This is in the Fuh-chow dialect. 

5. Jt ^ Hh tfji U |^ Sitting te skill keae choOsloh. Short 
Commentary on the Ten Commandments. 5 leaves. Fuh-chow, 
1862. This is in the literary style. 

6- Jl ^ H? IS H Shdng te siring king pi-en. Introduc- 
tion to the Sacred Scriptures. 5 leaves. Fuh-chow. 1862. 
This is a revision and translation into the Ffih-chow dialect of 
Dr. Legge's tract on the evidences. (See Legge's works, No. 8.) 

ENGLISH. 

7. Remarks on the best Term for God in Chinese; also on 
the proper Basis of Compromise on this subject. Addressed 
to the Friends of Protestant Missions to the Chinese. 8vo. pp. 
31. Canton, 1852. 

8. Letter to the Friends of Protestant Missions to the 
Chinese. Fol. pp. 3. Fuh-chow, 1853. 

9. Letter to the Friends of Protestant Missions to the 
Chinese. Fol. pp. 4. Fuh-chow, 1864. - 

In the 16th volume of the Chinese Repository is a publish- 
ed Sermon by Mr. Peet, preached at Canton, December 13th, 
1846, entitled— A Plea on behalf of China. 



LV. Kg $| & Le Ya-lco. JAMES LEGGE, the son of 
Ebenezer Legge, and youngest of a family of seven, was born 
at Huntly, Aberdeenshire, in 1815. His father held a pro- 
minent position there as a tradesman, and influential member 
of the church of the Rev. George Cowie, well known for bis 
independent principles and action; and there James Legge 
received his early education. He passed through a course of 
study, and graduated as A. M. at King's College, Aberdeen. 
Having joined the Christian church, in connection with the 
Congregational body, he entered for a time as student at 
Highbury College, London. Appointed by the London Mis- 
sionary Society, to the Chinese mission at Malacca, he was 
ordained at Trevor Chapel, Brompton, on the 25th of April, 
1839; and on the 30th was married to Mary Isabella, the 



] 18 .T.\MI>' LEGGE. 

daughter of the Rev. John Morison, pus tor of the same chapel 
July 28th, he embarked with Mrs. Legge, in the Eliza Stewart, 
accompanied by the Rev. W. G. Milne and Dr. Hobson; ar- 
rived at Batavia, the L9th of November, whence he proceeded 
to Singapore about the end of December \ and reached Malacca, 
liis appointed station, on the 10th of January. 1840. The 
same year, he succeeded Mr. Evans as Principal of tlie Anglo- 
Chinese College. July 14th. 1841. the council of the Univer- 
sity of New York conferred on him by unanimous vote, the 
degree of D. D. It having been determined to remove the 
Anglo-Chinese College to the newly-racquired colony of Hong- 
kong, he left Malacca on the 6th of May, 1843, for Singapore, 
and thence proceeding to Macao, arrived at Hongkong on 
July LOth, where he attended the conference of missionaries 
of the London Society, which took place the following month. 
By the recommendation of the committee, the Anglo-Chinese 
College was converted into a Theological Seminary, principally 
t'o; tin- purpose of training a native ministry for China; and 
the institution was carried on at Hong-kong, under the su- 
perintendence of Dr. Legge. At the series of general meetings 
of Protestant missionaries, regarding the translation of the 
Scriptures, he was only absent from that of August 28th; 
and was appointed in conjunction with Dr. Medhurst, to 
deliberate on the rendering of the names of the Deity into 
Chinese. Compelled by ill health to leave Ids station for 
a season, he embarked with his family and three Chinese 
youths, in the Duke of Portland, on the 19th of November, 
184.;, and arrived in London on the 28th of March following. 
During his residence in England, the three youths were ad- 
mitted into the Christian church, by the ordinance of baptism, 
at Huntly. On the Pith of April, 1848, he again embarked 
in the Ferozepore with his family and a large missionary par- 
ty, and arrived at Hongkong on July 22nd; where he continued 
to conduct the Theological Seminary, in addition to other 
mission duties. Mrs. Legge, who. had been assiduous in 
school work during her residence at that station, died there 
on October 17th. 18,32. In the beginning of 1858, Dr. Legge 
again left Hongkong for a visit to England, where he arrived 
June 3rd. During his stay, he married a second time, and 
embarked with his family in the Dora, on the 13th of June, 
1859, accompained by the Rev. F. S. Turner, reaching Hong- 
kong on September 21st. There, with the exception of 
occasional visits to the main land from time to time, he 
has continued devoted to the mission work ; having, in ad- 
dition to his various labours among the natives, sustained 
acceptably for many years, the pastorate of an English 
congregation. In the latter part of July 1865, having pre- 
viously sent his family for a change, he left for the north, 



■1AMES LEGCE. I 1 '.* 

visited Swatow. Amoy, Shanghae ami Nagasaki, whore he re- 
joined I\Irs. Legge and children, with whom he sailed in 
August, for the northern parts of Japan. 

Publications by Dr. Legge. 

CHINESE. 

1. Letter addressed to the Chinese residents at Malacca, on 
the subject of the Cholera. Malacca. 1841. 

2. ^ jfr jjiiji BvF Y&ny sin shin she. Hymn Book. Ma- 
lacca, 1842. A revised and enlarged edition was published 
at Hongkong, in 185*2, in 30 leaves, containing 7 ( J hymns 
and 7 doxologies. A later revision was pnblished at Hongkong 
in 1862, under the title ^ ]£ f |p 5p: Tsung chad she chemg, 
in 35 leaves, containing 85 hymns and 7 doxologies. 

3. Jfl$ $#' ill _L Us fll Yay soo shah sluing ch'uy heun. 
Sermon on the Mount, with Commentary. Hongkong, 1844. 
A revision of this was published at Hongkong in 1865, in 24 
leaves. 

4. jfc "H }gj "f|| Ying hwa t'ung shoo. Anglo-Chinese 
Calendar. 9 leaves. Hongkong, 1851. This is prefaced by the 
Ten Commandments, after which is a comparative Chinese 
and English calendar, indicating the Sundays, church meet- 
ings, ami days of administering the Lord's supper; with notes 
at the end explanatory of these institutions, and stating also 
the times of daily service in the chapels at Hongkong. 

5. f.-J ¥£. if'il Kf Yd si h /, ' t " ^'- Brief History of Joseph. 
28 leaves. Hongkong, 1852. This is divided into 6 chapters. 
each preceded by a verse of poetry, and followed by strictures 
on the narrative. It was reprinted at Hongkong in 18G2, 
with pictorial embellishments, in 30 leaves. 

6. £ £ B ft f 't t. & "W II If W ± '1ft fSL £ Ch'wng 

sew le pae fang jin tse <■ kwdn he ta6u .sluing te chuh wan. 
Prayer used at the Reopening of the Chapel and Hospital at 
Hongkong. 6 leaves. Hongkong, 1852. This tract includes 
also the exposition of an appropriate text, and an exhortation 
used on the occasion. 

7- Jffi |$ P*J {£ if\ M- Yay .son mitn t'oo .sin king. The 
Apostles' Creed. 3 leaves. Hongkong, 1854. This has a 
running commentary. It was reprinted at Canton in 1860, 
in 3 leaves; and again reprinted at Hongkong in 1863. in 5 
leaves, the last leaf containing the decalogue with remarks. 

8- &ff $J ^ fr 1£ ff Sin yd tseuenshoo choO shih. Com- 
mentary on Matthew. 128 leaves. Hongkong, 1S54. _ This 
commentary was compiled by Dr. Legge's native assistant 
fiJ M # Ho Tsin-shen, who has added a lengthy preface of 
\) leaves, in reference to the Sacred Scriptures; 2 leaves 



120 JAMES LEGGED 

of prolegomena follow; which are succeeded by 2 leaves of 
preface to the commentary on Matthew. The whole is re- 
vised by, and published under the imprimatur of Dr. Legge. 
The first 14 chapters were issued by themselves at the date 
given above, and the remaining portion in a separate volume, 
at a subsequent period. The general preface to this work was 
published at Canton as a separate tract, with the title $Jf f§ 
$j 1§ It $i 3^ Wi 7$Z Sink' ho yd siting shoo wei t'eenmih she, 
The Scriptures a Revelation from Heaven, in 9 leaves. An- 
other edition was issued at Canton in 1855, with the title fft 
Hr $1 ^ U II M $ in k'cio yd slang shoo ching Jceu. Old 
and New Testament Evidences. A new edition was published 
at Hongkong in 1862, in 9 leaves, under the title H £M fl ^ 
Siting king ching keu. Scripture Evidences. 

9. |fj ^ -j^L ^ B£ "j|f le'euen tsung shiny shoo led yen. In- 
centives to reverence the Scriptures. Sheet tract. Hongkong. 

10. i|5|fi| He'd urh kwcln chin. Chinese Serial. 
This was a monthly magazine, published at Hongkong, un- 
der the auspices of the Morrison Education Society, containing 
from 12 to 24 leaves each number. It was begun in 1853, 
under the editorship of W. H. Medhurst, who was succeeded 
the following year by C B. Hillier; and eventually in 1855 
by Dr. Legge, who conducted it till its cessation in May, 1856. 

11- 4i? M. %&■ H Wk I£ %J\ jp Che hwan k'e mung shiih 
Ic'6 ts'oo poo. Graduated Reading; comprising a Circle of 
Knowledge, in 200 lessons. Gradation 1. 55 leaves. Hong- 
kong, 1856. This is the translation of an elementary educa- 
tional work by Mr. Baker. The English text is given at the 
top, and under it the Chinese translation. The Chinese, 
without the English was published at Canton in 1859, in 51 
leaves. A new edition of the original, revised by Dr. Legge, 
was published at Hongkong, in 1864, uniform with the first. 

12. |g I& H |£ |^p H Shlng shoo yaou shwo seih e. 
Skeleton Sermons. 24 leaves. Hongkong. This contains 
twenty seven scripture texts, with outlines of a discourse on 
each. 

13. 3S f6 %L ^ £» Bft Y&pih la hem ke led. Brief His- 
tory of Abraham. Hongkong, 1857. This is divided into 4 
chapters, each preceded by a verse of poetry, and followed by 
strictures on the narrative. There is .» preface of 2 leaves. 
It was reprinted at Hongkong in 1862, in 26 leaves. 

14- fi 4fc ill H |£ Wang kin shon yaou kens. Advice 
to Emigrants. 18 leaves. Hongkong, 1858. This commences 
with an address to Chinese, who are going to the gold diggings ; 
which is followed by an article on the duty of worshipping 
God, and next on the method of worshipping God; after which 
are a series of prayers, the ten commandments, an article on 
laith, a hvmn and two doxolofnos. 



JAMES LEGGK. 121 

15. ^ 'ft' if* $| Slang hivwj chuti slung. The Faith and 
Practice of a Christian Church. 29 leaves. Hongkong, 1860. 
This is the translation of a small treatise by Dr. De Sanctis 
of Italy. The first part is doctrinal, under nineteen heads. 
The second part treats of church discipline. Scripture au- 
thority is givenTor every statement, in a succession of texts 
quoted under the respective heads. 

16*. $f ^ [Ij |§ f£ /=£ ^£ Wt Sin kin, shan shen tae fang 
kill ten. Address to the Chinese settlers at Sydney. 8 leaves. 
Hongkong, 1862. This is the translation of an address from 
the pastors of Sydney to the Chinese Christians resident in 
Australia; with a preface by the translator. 

17. fH $jf /f ^ Lo loo puh shaou. Unscathed in the 
Furnace. 6 leaves. Hongkong. This tract, which is written 
in the Canton dialect, gives the story of Shadrach, Meshach 
and Abednego, followed by a discourse on the subject. 

18- }j| -J* % 6Jc Lang tsze hwtiy floae. The Prodigal re- 
penting. 6 leaves. Hongkong. This is also in the Canton 
dialect, and gives the parable of the Prodigal Son, followed 
by a discourse on the subject. 

ENGLISH. 

1"9.. A Lexilogus of the English, Malay, and Chinese 
Languages; comprehending the vernacular idioms of the last 
in the Hok-keen and Canton dialects, 4to. pp. 3, 111. 
Malacca, 1841. This is published anonymously. 

20. The Ordinance of the Sabbath. Three Sermons on 
the Institution of the Sabbath, the Christian Sabbath, the 
Sabbath in the Colonies. 8vo. pp. 83. Hongkong, 1850. 

21. An Argument for _fc fffr (Shang-te) as the proper 
rendering of the words Elohim and Theos, in the Chinese 
Language: with Strictures on the Essay of Bishop Boone in 
favour of the Term jjiiji (Shin), &c. &c. 8vo. pp. v, 43. 
Hongkong, 1850. 

22. Letters on the rendering of the name God in the 
Chinese Language. 8vo. pp. 73. Hongkong, 1850. These 
six letters were first published in the " Hongkong Register". 

23. Reports of the Preparatory School, and the Theologi- 
cal Seminary in Hongkong, of the London Society. Victoria. 
These were published annually for 1849 and subsequent years. 

24. The Notions of the Chinese concerning God and 
Spirits: with an Examination of the Defense of an Essay, on 
the proper rendering of the words Elohim and Theos, into the 
Chinese Language, by William J. Boone, D. D., Missionary 
Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church of the United 
States to China. 8vo. pp. vii, 166. Hongkong, 1852. 

25. Lectures on Theology, Science, & Revelation, by the 



122 WILLIAM CHARLES M1L.NL". 

late Rev. George Legge, L. L. D., of {fallow tree gate Chapel, 
Leicester. With a Memoir by .Tames Legge, D. 1). Hong- 
kong (of the London Missionary Society). Edited by James 
Legge, D. D. and John Legge, M. A. 8vo. pp. viii, xeviii, 
420. London, 1863. 

26. The Chinese Classics : with a Translation, Critical 
and Exegetical Notes, Prolegomena, and copious Indexes. 
In seven Volumes. 8vo. Vol. 1., containing Confucian 
Analects, the Great Learning, and the Doctrine of the Mean. 
pp. xiv, 136, 376, Hongkong, 1861. Vol. 2., containing 
the Works of Mencius. pp. viii, 126, 497, Hongkong, 
1861. Vol. 3, in 2 Parts, containing the Shoo King, or the 
Book of Historical Documents, pp. 735. Hongkong, 1865. 
The succeeding volumes of this great work are not yet issued 
from the press. 

LVT. H£fi^J/W Wel-ch'ii. WILLIAM CHARLES 
MILNE, the son of Dr. Milne (see III. supra), was one of 
twins horn at sea, April 22nd, 181"), five days after his 
parents had left Canton on a voyage to Malacca, which they 
reached on the 22nd of May. His first visit to China was at 
the early age of two years, when his parents landed there for 
a temporary sojourn on September 3rd, 1817. returning to 
Malacca on the 17th of February following. He was scarcely 
four years old when he lost his mother, and was soon after 
placed under the training of Mrs. Thompson at Malacca; but 
on the death of his father in the summer of 1822. he was re- 
moved to England. Having received his early education in 
the neighbourhood of his lather's birth-place, and passed his 
theological studies at Marisehal College, Aberdeen, where lie 
graduated as A. M. lie was accepted by the London Mission- 
ary Society, and appointed to China. On the 19th of July, 
1839, he was ordained to the office of a missionary, in Wycliffe 
Chapel; and on the 28th of the same month, sailed in the 
Eliza Stewart, accompanied by Mr. Legge and Dr. Hobson, 
arriving at Macao on the 18th of December. Then 1 he took 
up his residence for a time with Mr. Bridgman at the hospi- 
tal. Subsequently he removed to the house of the Morrison 
Education Society, to assist in the work of the Institution. 
Eaily in 1841, he went, with a party of missionary friends to 
the island of Hongkong, after its cession to the British Crown, 
to ascertain its eligibility for a centre of missionary operations. 
During the absence of Mr. Brown the Superintendent of the 
Morrison Education Society, from April 1st to September 
10th, 1841, in conjunction with Mr. Boone, he took the entire 
charge Of the school and library. In February, 1842, he 
proceeded to Ting-hae on the island of Chusan, where, after 
visiting- the neighbouring cities of Chin-hae and Ningpo, he 



WILLIAM CUAULES MILNE. 123 

made his temporary abode. On the 7th of December he a- 
gain went over to Ningpo, where he remained till the end of 
the year, returned for the first week in January. 1843. to 
Chusan, and again repaired to Ningpo. About the middle 
of June, hearing that Mr. Lockhart was at Chusan, he went 
over there and remained a few days, when both returned to 
Ningpo together. On the 7th of July, he started on a some- 
what hazardous journey of about 1300 miles through the in- 
terior to Canton, which he reached in safety on the 12th of 
August. In two days more, he was at Hongkong, in time to 
attend the conference of the missionaries of his society at 
that station. At the series of general meetings of mission- 
aries, regarding the translation of the Scriptures, he was pre- 
sent at all except those on August, 24th, September 1st, and 
4th. At the meeting of August 25th, he was appointed with 
Messrs. Medhurst and J. 11. Morrison, a committee to consult on 
the rendering of Scripture names. On the 2nd of October, he 
embarked with Mr. Medhurst in the Urgent, bound for the 
north, but encountering a severe storm, after being out near- 
ly three weeks, they had to seek shelter at Manilla. Return- 
ing to Macao, he embarked in the Duke of Northumberland 
with hi.s Chinese teacher, and arrived in England, July 26th 
I S44. While there, he was married to Frances Williamina the 
daughter of Dr. Beaumont, the Wesleyan minister. On the 
10th of April, 1846. he embarked with Mis. Milne in the Mary 
Bannatyne, accompanied by the Rev. J. F. and Mrs. Cleland; 
and arrived at Hongkong on the 25th of August, reaching' 
Shanghae on the 26th of November. The Rev. W. M. Lowrie, 
delegate for the Ningpo station in the Translation Committee 
at Shanghae, having been drowned in the autumn of that 
year, Mr. Milne was elected to supply his place, and took his 
seat at the resumption of the meetings, on the 5th of January, 
184S. The committee having completed the translation of 
the New Testament in July, 1850, he was reelected to till the 
same post in the translation of the Old Testament, which was 
commenced forthwith, and carried on by the delegates as far 
as the middle of Leviticus, when a change took place in the 
committee on, the 12th of February, 1861. After that Mr. 
Milne continued in concert with Dr. Medhurst and Mr. 
Stronach, proceeding to the completion of the Old Testament, 
which was accomplished at the close of 1852. Sanatory con- 
siderations induced him to leave China with his family in the 
beginning of 1854, intending to return to Europe by the Cape 
of Good Hope; but altering his resolution at sea, he joined 
the mail packet at Singapore, and reached England on April 
4th. His connection with the missionary service ceased in 
1856, and in 1858 he returned to China with the appointment 
of Interpreter in the Consular service at Fnh-chow. There 



124 WILLIAM CIIAKLE3 MIL. 

he remained till the establishment of the British Legation at 
Peking, in 1861, when he removed to the capital in October, 
and occupied the post of Teacher to the Student Interpreters 
in the British civil service. On the 15th of May, 1863, he 
died of apoplexy, and his mortal remains are deposited by 
the side of the four recent victims of Chinese cruelty, in the 
unconsecrated portion of the Russian cemetery, outside the 
North gate of Peking. 

Publications by Mr. Milne. 

CHINESE. 

1- £&■ #P fl£ $1 Hf ilr Loo Jcea chuen fuh yin shoo, 
$! %& "ff i$- &h& t'°° hing chuen. The Gospel of St. Luke, 
and the Acts of the Apostles. Translated into Chinese by 
the late Rev. Dr. Robert Morrison. 128 leaves. London, 1845. 
This is a revision of Morrison's translation, made by Mr. 
Milne, while he was in England. It is printed in the style 
of English books, and the whole edition handsomely bound 
in leather, with gilt edges. 

2'. Mj >k &■ % M "Hf Hr ffl& &' a & chuen fuh yin shoo. Mat- 
thew's Gospel. 133 leaves. Shanghae, 1848. This is a trans- 
lation in the Shanghae dialect, the successive chapters of 
which were printed weekly and used in the chapel service on 
Sunday. 

3. fl Hf Jli fll| Full yin kwang heiln. Village Sermons. 
30 leaves. Shanghae, 1850. This is a revision of his father's 
Twelve Sermons (see Dr. Milne's works, No. 16). It was 
reprinted at Hongkong in 1861, in 28 leaves. 

4- M M> A P^ Chin taOicjuh mini. Introduction to the 
True Doctrine. 17 leaves. Shanghae, 1851. This is a revision 
of his father's Catechism for Youth (see Dr. Milne's works. 
No. 5). It was reprinted at Hongkong in 1851, in 19 leaves, 
and at Amoy in 1854. 

5- 'Sfcj&MM 4B tfo Chang yuen ledng yew seang lun. 
Dialogue between two Friends, Chang and i r uen. 24 leaves. 
Shanghae, 1851. This is a revision of his father's tract (see 
Dr. Milne's works, No. 11). The 12 chapters of the original 
are compressed into 11 in this. It was reprinted at Hong- 
kong, in 1851, in 27 leaves. 

6- Iff M M a* Ki- nr J ffd chin ye n - The Sinner's Friend. 
10 leaves. Shanghae, 1854. This is an adaptation of the 
English tract with the same title, by the Rev. Newman Hall. 
Reprinted at Shanghae in 1861. 

Besides the above, Mr. Milne had a share in the translation 
of the Delegates' version of the New Testament (see Me- 
dhurst'e works, No. 41). and also the Old Testament, ar 



BENJAMIN HOBSON. 125 

issued by the London Missionary Society in 1855. (see Med- 
hurst's works, No. 42.) 

ENGLISH. 

7. Life in China. With Four Original Maps. 16ino. 
pp. x, 517. London, 1857. This has gone through several 
editions, and been translated into French. 

There is a lengthy Narrative of a Seven-months Residence 
in Ningpo, by Mr. Milne, in the 13th and 16th volumes of 
the Chinese Repository. 



LVIT. fcf$m-sin. BENJAMIN HOBSON, a medi- 
cal student, who graduated as M. B. at the London Univer- 
sity, and passed his examination as M. R. C. IS. in London, 
was accepted by the London Missionary Society, as Medical 
missionary for China. He was married to Jane Abbey, and 
embarked with Mrs. Hobson in the Eliza Stewart, accompanied 
by Messrs Legge and Milne, on the 28th of July, 1831) ; 
reached Angier on the 12th of November, and arrived at 
Macao on December 18th, where he found a location with Mr. 
Bridgman, then residing in the hospital. Soon after, he 
offered his services and was accepted by the Medical Mission- 
ary Society. When their hospital was reopened by Mr. Loek- 
harton the 1st of August, 1840, he was assisted by Dr. Hobson 
in the duties ; and on the departure of the former fir Chusan 
at the end of the month, the hospital was placed under the 
joint charge of Drs. Hobson and Diver ; but the latter being- 
compelled by failure of health, to leave soon after, it was 
subsequently under the sole management of Dr. Hobson. In 
the early part of 1843, he removed to Hongkong, to take- 
charge of the Medical Missionary Society's hospital there, 
which he opened for the reception of patients on the 1st of 
June. There he was present at the conference of the mission- 
aries of the London Society in August ; and at the series of 
general meetings of Protestant missionaries, regarding the 
translation of the Scriptures, he Avas present at all except 
those of August 28th and September 4th. In 1845, the health 
of Mrs. Hobson having failed to such an extent, a return to 
Europe seemed imperative, and he left Hongkong with her in 
July; but she died within sight of her native land on Decem- 
ber 22nd, when anchored oft' Dungeness, leaving a son and 
daughter under the care of her widowed husband. During 
his stay in England, Dr. Hobson was married to the daugh- 
ter of Dr. Morrison the missionary to China, and embark- 
ed with Mrs. Hobson in the Hugh Walker, accompanied 
by Mr. Hirschberg, on March 11th, 1847, reaching Hongkong 
on the 27th of Julv, where he resumed the charge of the hos- 



12 G BENJAMIN HUDSON'. 

pital. In OctoLor he made a visit with Mr. Gillespie to Can- 
ton, and the following - February took up his residence and 
commenced operations there. In April he opened a dispensary, 
and in June took possession of the house, and initiated the 
complete work of the Missionary Hospital at Kum-le-fow in 
the western suburb. Towards the close of the year 1854, he 
repaired to Shanghae for the benefit of his health, and after 
an absence of five weeks, returned to his labours greatly re- 
cruited. On the outbreak of hostilities in Canton, in October 
1S56, he was compelled to vacate the spot, and sought a tem- 
porary asylum for his family at Hongkong. At the instance 
of his brethren An Shanghae, he repaired to that station in 
February, 1857, and when Mr. Lockhart took his departure 
for England at the close of the year, Dr. Hobson took his 
place in the mission Hospital. Early in 1859, he left Shang- 
hae, with all his family except his eldest son, who remained 
in a mercantile house at that settlement. Proceeding via 
Hongkong in the mail packets, he reached England in March ; 
since which time, his health not admitting of his return to 
China, he resided for a time at Clifton, and has more recently 
taken up his abode at Cheltenham. 

Publications by Dr. Hobson. 

CHINESE. 

1- M '$t H tf» ■*£ IB Siouy gae e Jaodnneen Ice. Annual 
Report of the Missionary Hospital at Canton, for 1850. 

2. ^ fi ;|f fin? Tseuen t c e sin lun. Treatise on Physiology. 
09 leaves. Canton, 185 L The first issues of this work con- 
tained 7 folding sheets of lithographic plates, but these have 
been replaced by woodcuts. It was republished by the father 
of Yeh the celebrated Governor-general of Canton. 

3. Jl ^ $| 1 1 Shdng U peen citing. Theological Evi- 
dences. 9 leaves. Canton, 1852. 

4. $j $fo JE $g p $$ Yd Item chin Icing shih Iccae. Com- 
mentary on John's Gospel. 47 leaves. Hongkong, ] 853. This 
only contains the first 17 chapters with a preface. The sin- 
gle chapters were also published apart in a smaller form as 
separate tracts. 

5- W It J& ~X K'e tarn sldh wan. Forms of Prayer. Can- 
ton, 1854. A revision was published at Canton in 1865. 

6. FhJ %£ K a" Wan tdleang yen. Catechism of Christian 
Principles. 10 leaves. Canton, 1855. Reprinted at Shanghae 
in 1857, in II leaves. 

7 - if* (^ £ f$ Sin tfh che lecae. Explanation of Faith. 
4 leaves. Canton. 

i( - tf ^ ffl II P& w&h sin pecn. Natural Philosophy., 



BENJAMIN' IIOBSOX. 127 

132 leaves. Canton, 1855. This is divided into three parts ; 
the second part 5c ~$C %& t fa T'een wan led lun, i: Digest of 
Astronomy," was first published in 1849, separately ; subse- 
quently the first part on Natural Philosophy, and the third on 
Natural History appeared in succession. 

9. |g H Ip $%f Shing shoo tslh kin. Selections from the 
Holy Scriptures. 71 leaves. Canton, 1856. This is in two 
books, the first of which consists of short extracts from the 
Old Testament*; and the second in two sections, contains the 
Sayings of Jesus, and the Sayings of the Apostles. There is 
a preface by the compiler. • 

10. -j*f =J|| }j| H Koo heun tsily yaou. Important Extracts 
from Ancient Authors. 14 leaves. Canton, 1856. This is a 
selection from the ancient traditional and recorded sayings of 
the Chinese, with a short preface. 

H- jS? If 1^ t£ M Ke tuh keang she chuen. Advent of 
Christ. 8 leaves. Canton. This is a brief narrative of the 
life of our Lord. 

12 |g ffe ;£ J{£ H ^ fjfr Shing t'e puh show fan kuh lun. 
Covetousness excluded from Heaven. Canton. A sheet tract 
printed by lithography. 

i3. m ± m m mi* mm % m a m & m sutng 

choo yay soo k'e she shing chae pa6u 16 full hwo die U. The 
Doctrine of the Resurrection, as revealed to Paul, by the Lord 
Jesus. Canton. A sheet tract printed by lithography. 

14- %% M ^ ie P&en. Hymns. Canton. This is a selection 
of 5 hymns and 3 doxologieS, printed on a single sheet by 
lithography. 

15. fjjjf fn ^ ;£ 1£ Lun jin gae che yaou. The Importance 
of Love. Canton. A sheet tract printed by lithography, 
containing the 13th chapter of the 1st Epistle to the Corin- 
thians ; verses 7 to 11 inclusive, of the the 14th chapter of 
John's 1st Epistle ; the 5th verse of the 1st chapter of the 1st 
Epistle to Timothy ; and the 9th and 10th verses of the 13th 
chapter of Romans. 

16. "jffj |§ B£ ffo Se e led lun. First Lines of the Practice 
of Surgery in the West. 194 leaves. Shanghae, 1857. This 
is divided into three parts, the first and second of which treat 
in detail of the various branches of the surgical art, and the 
third contains a classification of medicinal agents. The first 
issue of this work had a Table of Contents in Chinese and 
English, 8 pages, which was not appended to the subsequent 
issues. 

17. § H |lf ^ Fo6 ylng sin shwb. Treatise on Mid- 
wifery and Diseases of Children. 73 leaves. Shanghae, 1858. 
The last five leaves contain a series of Receipts for making 
Plaisters, Pills, Powders, &c. 

18. ft £{■ §f |$ Nuy k'o sin shwo. Practice of Medicine 



L28 JAMBS 0. HEPBURN. 

and Materia Medica. 2 parts. 112 leaves. Shanghae, 18.38. 
This with Nos. 2, 8, \G and 17, form a series, the latter four, 
profusely illustrated with beautiful wood-cut plates in the first 
style of Chinese art. The whole live have been reproduced by 
the Japanese, in a style of execution worthy of the original. 

ENGLISH. 

19. Dialogues in the Canton Vernacular. Fol. pp. 44. 
Canton, 1850. This is printed by lithography, on Chinese 
paper, anil* in the Chinese book fashion. The Dialogues are 
given in English, and in the Chinese character, but without 
the pronunciation in English letters. 

20. Annual Reports for Nine years of the Missionary 
Hospital at Canton. The reports for the first eight years 
were published at Canton, and contain the history of the 
Kum-le-fow Institution, from April. 1848, till July 1st, 1856. 
The last report is published as an Appendix to that of the 
Shanghae Hospital for the year 1857. (See Lockhart's works, 
No. 1.) 

21. A Medical Vocabulary in English and Chinese, pp. 
75. Shanghae, 1858. 

Dr. Hobson's Reports of the Hospitals at Macao and Hong- 
kong are inserted in the Chinese Repository, vols. 10, 11, 13- 
andl7. 

LVIII. THOMAS L. MACBRYDE, was ordained to 
the ministry of the gospel, and went to Singapore with 
Mrs. MacBryde in 1840, under the Board of Foreign Mis- 
sions of the Presbyterian Church of the United States. From 
that port, he sailed with Mr. Abeel on the 18th of Septem- 
ber, 1841, on a voyage to Borneo, and returned October 30th. 
Early in December he went to Macao on account of his health; 
but left for Hongkong on June 1st, and thence removed 
to Koo-lang seu, where he arrived with Mrs. MacBryde and 
infant child on the 7th of June, accompanied by Mr. Boone 
and family, and Dr. dimming. Compelled by failure of 
health, he left that station on January 13th, 1843, and went 
to Macao; from which he sailed for the United States early 
in July, in the Morrison, and arrived at New York on the 
20th of October. He then retired from .the missionary service. 



LIX. JAMES C. HEPBURN, graduated as M. D. in 
the United States, and having been appointed medical mis- 
sionary by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian 
Church, lie sailed with Mrs. Hepburn in the summer of 1841 
for Singapore, which he reached about the middle of Septem- 



WALTER MACON LOWIUK. 129 

l>er. Ln the summer of 1843 lie removed to Macao; and 
having been accepted by the Medical Missionary Society, he 
proceeded to Amoy in the beginning of October; but driven 
back by adverse weather, he was in Hongkong again on the 
14th, and ultimately reached his destination on November 
25th. In the later part of the following January, he opened 
a hospital in the town of Amoy. The failure of Mrs. Hep- 
burn's health however, rendered a change necessary, and to- 
wards the end of the year, they visited Macao on that account, 
returning to Amoy with the Rev. J. Lloyd on December 6th. 
But this proving insufficient, they again left Amoy for the 
south on June 28th, 1845, and embarked for the United 
States. After that Dr. Hepburn commenced practice as a 
physician in New York, and acquired an extensive connection, 
which he sustained for a number of years till the recent 
openings in Japan, when he again made his way to the East 
as a medical missionary to the Japanese, under the same board 
as before. He reached Shanghae with Mrs. Hepburn in 1859, 
and thence proceeded to Kanagawa in Japan. In September 
and October, I860, he paid a visit to Hakodadi; but returned 
to his station at Kanagawa, where he has been since residing. 



LX. WILLIAM HENRY GUMMING, from Georgia, 
United States, graduated as M. D. in his native land, and 
went to China in the capacity of medical missionary in 1842, 
unconnected with any society. He arrived at Macao in the 
earlier part of the year, and left for Hongkong on June 1st, 
with the Revs. Messrs. Boone, MacBryde and W. M. Lowrie. 
Thence he proceeded with Messrs. Boone and MacBryde to 
Koo-lang seu, where he arrived on the 7th, and opened a dis- 
pensary in the house of Mr. Abeel. There he was joined by 
Dr. Hepburn in November, 1843, and in the latter part of 
the following January, they opened a hospital in the town of 
Amoy, where Dr. Gumming took up his residence. Dr. Hep- 
burn having left in June, 1845, the hospital was placed in 
the entire charge of his colleague, under the auspices of the 
Medical Missionary Society. In 1S47, owing to failure of 
health, he was constrained to leave for A merica, and embarked 
at Macao in the Horatio, on the 17th of Mareh, 1847. Con- 
tinued indisposition prevented his return to China. 



LXI. fg J£ p Leu-U Hwa. WALTER MACON 
LOWRIE, the third son of Walter and Amelia Lowrie, was 
bom in Butler, Pennsylvania, on the 18th of February, 1811). 
The first steps in his education were superintended by his 
mother; and at an early period he was sent to school, where 



130 WALTER MACON LOWRIE. 

he learned the usual branches of a common English training-. 
In his tenth year, his father having been elected to the United 
States Senate, removed to Washington city with his family; 
and for a part of the year instructed Walter in the higher 
rules of arithmetic, in geography, and ancient and modern 
history. In his eleventh and twelfth years, he spent two 
terms in a classical grammar school. In November 1832, he 
entered the preparatory department of Jefferson College at 
Cannonsburg, Pennsylvania, and at tha same time found a 
home in the family of the Rev. Professor Kennedy. He 
joined the freshmen class in October. 1833. In August, 1834, 
he was at his parental home, made one of a family party to 
the Falls of Niagara, and returned with them to Washing- 
ton. In November he resumed his studies at college; soon 
after which, his attention was first permanently fixed upon 
the concerns of religion; and he was led to the decision of 
devoting his life to the missionary cause. On leaving college 
in 1837, he spent the winter at his father's house in New 
York, and in May, 1838, he entered the Theological Seminary 
at Princeton, New Jersey. There he spent the usual term 
of three years, during the last of which his mind was settled 
on Western Africa as his field of labour. In 1840, he was 
received as a missionary of the Board of Foreign Missions of 
the Presbyterian Church, to be sent to Western Africa; but 
afterwards in view of the exigencies of the China mission, the 
executive committee proposed to him a change of destination, 
to which he, after much hesitation consented. On the 5th of 
April, 1841, he was licensed to preach the gospel; and on the 
9th of November, was ordained an evangelist. On the 19th 
of January, 1842, he sailed for China in the ship Huntress, 
and landed at Macao on the 27th of May. On June 1st, he 
accompanied Messrs. MacBryde and Boone and Dr. dimming 
to Hons-kon^. Having; received instructions to proceed to 
Singapore, to assist in removing the mission of the Board 
from that place to some point on the coast of China, he left Ma- 
cao on the 18th of June in the Sea Queen, and after a tedious 
voyage, the ship was obliged to put in at Manilla, where they 
arrived, August 23rd. On the 18th of September he again 
set sail for Singapore in the Harmony, which on the 25th 
struck a hidden rock. After live days sailing in an open 
boat with part of the ship's company, he reached the island 
of Luban, where he remained tor two days, and left in a na- 
tive schooner, October 2nd, for Manilla, arriving there the 
following day. He then abandoned his purpose of visiting 
Singapore, and embarked in the Diana, on the 10th, by which 
he reached Hongkong on the 17th, and thence proceeded to 
Macao. Being in Hongkong at the time, he attended one of 
the series of general meetings of Protestant missionaries re- 



WALTER MACON LOWRIE. 131 

garding the translation of the Scriptures, held on August 28th, 
1843. With the intention of visiting all the newly-opened 
ports, he left that colony on the 31st; but in consequence of 
stormy weather, the vessel put in at Amoyon September 5th. 
Thence he started with Mr. Abeel on October 3rd, for a jour- 
ney to Chang-chow in the interior, from which, they returned 
to Koo-lang seu on the Gth. He left with Mr. Eoberts in a 
lorcha on the 9th, for Hongkong, where he arrived on the 
1 4th, and a few days later at Macao. January 21st, 1845, 
he left Macao for Hongkong, and there embarked for the north 
on the 1 7th of February in the Rob Roy, which anchored at 
Woo-sung in the vicinity of Shanghae on March 11th. Leav- 
ing Shanghae on the 29th, he reached Chusan, April 1st, 
proceeding thence to Ningpo on the 11th, where he took up 
his residence. Much of his time, especially at the commence- 
ment of his residence at Ningpo, was spent in itinerating 
through the neighbouring country with some of the brethren. 
Having been elected to represent Ningpo, in the Committee 
of Delegates for the translation of the New Testament, he 
arrived in Shanghae for that purpose, early in June, 1847. 
While there engaged in the work, circumstances called him 
to visit Ningpo; and lie left Shanghae by the inland route, on 
August lu'th, but was detained at Cha-poo by contrary wind 
till the 19th, when he started to cross the Hang-chow Bay. 
The same day the boat was attacked by pirates, and Mr. 
Lowrie was thrown overboard, no trace of his body having 
ever been discovered afterwards. A cenotaph has been erect- 
ed to his memory in the Ningpo Presbyterian cemetery. 

PulliccAlons by Mr. W. M. Lowrie. 

CHINESE. 

1- if # H ffflf LepaSjih yaou lun. Important Dis- 
course on the Sabbath Day. 8 leaves. Ningpo, 1847. This 
begins with a narrative of the six days of creation ; which is 
followed by remarks on the history and customs of the Sab- 
bath day. " The last two leaves are an Anglo-Chinese Sunday 
Calendar for the year 1847. It was reprinted in 1848, with 
the Sunday Calendar for that year, and a note on the back 
of the title, regarding the term Shang-te for God. 

2 |g J| -g* ff fi| ;=£ p Shlng ch'ae yen king chuen cho6 
sink. Commentary on the Acts of the Apostles. 64 leaves. 
Ningpo, 1847. This has a folding map to illustrate the jour- 
nies of the Apostles. 

3- 15 $ff Ifc W| ifr Ydy soo hedou led lun. Discourse on 
Christianity. 4 leaves. Ningpo, 1848. 

4- $& 1}\\ lM Hr m£ # I J ° 6 l^'f^ 1 V m c ^° 6 s ^ 1 ' ^om- 
montary on Luke. 78 leaves. Ningpo, IS49. 



132 DANIEL JEROME MACGOWAN. 

ENGLISH. 

5. Specimen of the Chinese Type Belonging to the Chinese 
Mission of the Board of Foreign Missions of the Presby- 
terian Church in the U. S. A. 8vo. pp. 41. Macao, 1844. 
An enlarged and revised edition was printed at Ningpo, in 
1852, pp. 38. 

6. The Land of Sinim, or an exposition of Isaiah 49 : 12, 
with a brief account of the Jews and Christians in China. 
18mo. pp. 147. Philadelphia, 1846. This was first printed 
in the 13th volume of the Chinese Repository. 

7. Sermons preached in China. 8vo. pp. viii, 454. New 
York, 1851. These are published from Mr. Lowrie's manu- 
scripts, and edited by his father. The last in the book is the 
last Chinese sermon he preached. It is written in the Ningpo 
colloquial, with the Roman character, and lias an English trans- 
lation by the Rev. M. S. Culbertson printed side by side. 



LXII. $| ^ f& J/ « Kaou-wdn. DANIEL JEROME 
MACGO WAN, a native of the United States, and member 
of the Baptist church, graduated as M. D. in America; and 
having previously visited Paris, he was sent out to China 
as a medical missionary, by the American Baptist Board of 
Foreign Missions. He arrived at Hongkong about the end of 
February, 1843, where he found a home in Mr. Shuck's fami- 
ly. At the general convention of Protestant missionaries 
regarding the translation of the Scriptures, lie was present at 
all the meetings, except those of August 22nd and Septem- 
ber 1st and 4th. Towards the end of September, lie embarked 
for the north; proceeded to Chusan, and afterwards to Ning- 
po, where he took up his residence, and opened a hospital 
early in November. In the former part of 1844, after three 
months practice, he closed the hospital and made a voyage 
to Bengal, where he married Miss Osborne, the sister of an 
English Church missionary there, returning to Hongkong 
Avith Mrs. Macgowan towards the end of the year. Thence 
he sailed on the 20th of February, 1845, in the Isabella Anna, 
and proceeded north to Ningpo where he arrived in April, 
with the Rev. M. S. Culbertson. There he reopened his hos- 
pital the same month, having in the mean time been chosen an 
agent of the Medical Missionary Society. His connection 
with that society was temporarily suspended in 1847, but re- 
sumed the following year. During the summer of 1848, he 
spent a few weeks at Chusan, where he had large opportu- 
nities of administering medical relief among the natives. In 
consecpuence of the state of Mrs. Macgowan's health, he found 
it necessary to remove to the south of China in 1S54, where 



DANIEL JEROME MACGOWAN. 133 

he made a temporary stay at Amoy, Hongkong and Macao. 
In 1859 lie paid a short visit to Japan, and subsequently, on 
account of ill health, took a voyage to England with his fa- 
mily. In the summer of 1861, he went over to Paris for a few 
weeks, returning to London. Having travelled through a great 
part of the United Kingdom delivering lectures on China and 
Japan, he returned to America in the summer of IS(i2; since 
which he has held a commission in the Federal army. 

Publications by Dr. Macgoivan. 

CHINESE. 

1- ff % %. la P° u '^' t ' in/ !J s h°°- Philosophical Alma- 
nac. 40 leaves. Ningpo, 1851. Besictes the calendar, this 
contains a treatise < m the electric telegraph, incorporating a 
short account of Magnetism and Galvanism, illustrated by 
forty five diagrams. 

2 ; p M. Wt Jt]t ' fhili Cod shico. Plate of the Solar 
Eclipse with Explanation. Ningpo, 1852. This is a large 
sheet, containing the elements of the solar eclipse on Decem- 
ber 11, 1852, calculated by Capt. Shadwell, of H. B. M. S. 
Highflyer, for Peking, Shanghae, Ningpo, Fuh-chow, Araoy, 
Canton and Hongkong, translated into Chinese by Dr. Mac- 
gowan, and illustrated by diagrams. Appended are some re- 
marks of a religious character, in improvement of the subjecl 
An English note printed by the side, is a good specimen of the 
Koman character, cut on wood by the Chinese. 

3- %% $£ ik %\ Sang had kin chin.. Treatise on Cyclones. 
35 leaves. Ningpo, 1853. The chief part of this is a trans- 
lation from Colonel Eeid's work on Typhoons. It is in 
three parts, with a preface, and besides five leaves of diagrams, 
a large folding sheet, shewing the course of typhoons in the 
China sea. 

4. 4* %V $f f# Chung wail sin padu. Chinese and For- 
eign Gazette. Ningpo. This serial was commenced in May, 
1854, and appeared twice a month, four leaves in each num- 
ber, giving the news of the day, and articles on religion, 
science and literature. The first volume contains 18 numbers, 
with a table of contents. The second volume, 1855, has 20 
numbers for the twelve months. The following year, it was 
only issued monthly, giving L2 numbers, for the year, In 
1857, there were 13 numbers. The work was continued by 
Dr. Macgowan till he left Ningpo, when he transferred the 
management of it to the Rev. E. B. Inslee. 

LISH. 

5. Claims of the Missionary Enterprise on the Medical 
Profc ■ 24 New York, 1842. This was originally an 



L34 -JAMES (iliAX(,KK BltlDGMAN. 

address delivered before the Temperance Society of the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons in New York, a short time 
before Dr. Macgowan left for China. 

Dr. Macgowan was a verv extensive contributor to the 



North China Herald, most of his articles being republishe< 
in the Shanghae Almanac and Miscellany. There are also : 
number 01 pieces from his pen in the Chinese Repository and 

other periodicals. 



LXIII. JAMES GRANGER BRIDGMAN, was horn 
at Amherst, Massachusetts, in December, 1820. Having 
passed his studies at Amherst College, he left New York in 
the Huntress, October 6th, 1843, accompanied by Dr. Mc- 
Cartee and Mr. and Mrs. Cole, and reached Hongkong an 
February 19th, 1844. The following year he removed to 
Canton, and after pursuing his studies in Chinese and in di- 
vinity for a season, was ordained to the gospel ministry, May 
31st, 1846, by an ecclesiastical council, consisting of the Rev. 
Drs. Medhurst and Bridgman, and the evangelist Leang 
A-fa. Being engaged by the American Board of Commis- 
sioners for Foreign Missions, he occupied himself in usual 
missionary labours and the study of the language, till towards 
the end of 1850. Symptoms of cerebral affection then became 
apparent, and on the 1st of December, in a paroxysm of the 
disease he attempted self-destruction. Reason was restored 
by the loss of blood, he was conscious during the live days lie 
survived, and died on the 6th of that month. 

Publications by Mr. Bridgman. 

ENGLISH. 

1. The Notitia Lingua? Senicse of Premare. Translated 
into English. 4to. pp. 342. Canton, 1847. 

Mr. Bridgman succeeded his relative Dr. Bridgman, as 
editor of the Chinese Repository, from May, 1847, till the 
arrival of Dr. Williams in September, 1848. 



LXIV. J$ Jjjl Kn-lc, RICHARD COLE, of Indianopolis, 
Indiana, a practical printer, at one time conducted a news- 
paper, and was subsequently appointed printer to the China 
mission, by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian 
Church. He sailed from New York with Mrs. Cole in the 
Huntress, on the 6th of October, 1843, accompanied by Dr. 
McCartee and Mr. J. G. Bridgman and arrived at Hongkong 



DIVIE BETHUNE MCCARTEE. 135 

on February/ 19th, 1844; having brought presses and matrices 
witli him. to commence type founding and printihg in the 
Chinese character. The same year, he removed to Macao and 
commenced operations. In the summer of 1845, he went to 

Hongkong, where he embarked for the north with Mrs. Cole 
on July, 5th, in the John Horton, taking his printing appa- 
ratus, and accompanied by the Revs. Messrs. Woods, G-raham 
and Fairbrother, with their wives. He readied Ningpo a- 
bout the end of the month, and remained there till near the 
close of 1847. About that time lie left the Presbyterian mis- 
sion, went to Shanghae, and thence to Hongkong, where he was 
engaged by the London Mission, to superintend their type 
founding and printing. After proceeding far on with tin? 
completion of two fonts of Chinese type and part of a third, 
lie left the service, and went over to California in 1852; where 
he was engaged editing a- newspaper some few years ago. 

Publications by Mr. Cole. 

ENGLISH. 

1. Specimen of Chinese Type, made by the London Mis- 
sionary Society. 8vo. pp. 38. Hongkong. 1849. This is a 
catalogue of the Large font of type made by the London 
Mission. 

2. Specimen of Three-line Diamond Chinese Type made 
by the London Missionary Society. 8vo. pp. 21. Hongkong, 
1850. £ 

LXV. g£ ^ $$ i$ $g Mtfi Kea-U Pei-tioan. DIVIE 
BETHUNE McCAttTEE was born at Philadelphia, January 
13th, 1820. He studied at Columbia College, New York, ami 
afterwards at the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia, 
where he received the degree of A. M. In 1840, he obtained 
the degree of M. D. and practised medicine among the col- 
lieries at Port Carbon in Schuylkill comity, Pennsylvania 
In January, 1841, he was openly received as a member of the 
Christian church there; and in August, 1843, was appointed 
a medical missionary to China, by the Board of Foreign Mis- 
sions of the Presbyterian church. He left New York in the 
Huntress, in company with Mr. and Mis. Cole and Mr. J. C 
Bridgman, on October 6th, and arrived at Eongkong, 1<Y 
bruary 19th, 1844. There he embarked for the north on June 
12th, and reached Ningpo on the 20th, having been appointed 
an agent of the Medical Missionary Society. 'There he laboured 
in the mission cause for many years, intermitted by temporarj 
residences at Chu-san and Chin-hae. On February 1st, 1853. 



[36 D1VIB BETHUNE MCCARTEE, 

he was married toJuana Matilda Knight, sister of Mrs. Rankin 
of the same mission, [n November, 1856, he left for a visit 
to the United States with Mrs. McCartee, and returned in 
May, 1858. In July, 1862, he went to Che-foo in Shan-tung, 
to commence a new mission station, but ultimately retu 
in Ningpo on September 16th, 1805, where he has been since 
residing. 

Publications by Dr. McCartee. 

CHINESE. 

1. H *§* $M iff if' m£ ffl Santszelcing sintsdng 6ho6 keae. 
Commentary on the Trimetrical Classic. 43 leaves. Ningpo, 
184G. This is a commented edition of Dr. Medhurst's tract, 
(See Medhurst's works, No. 2.) A revision of the same was 
printed at Ningpo in 1847, in 16 leaves, with the title H ^ 
£M p£ W ^ an t sz & fc* n 9 c h°° shih. A later edition was issued 
from the same press, with pictorial embellishments, in 17 
leaves, with the title, ff % j& ;gg H ^ % I£ # Sew sedng 
chin le son tsze king choo shih. It was printed at Shanghae 
in 1863. without the illustrations, in 16 leaves, with the title 
iSt JJB H ^ M- p£ IP 67/ m /e srm fee A,-«?7 choo shih. 

"2. j'^r 6£ |j£ Jfl Hwuy lead shiu'6 led. Brief Discourse on 
Repentance and Faith. 10 leaves. Ningpo, 1847. This is in 
the Mandarin dialect. It was reprinted at Ningpo in 1852, 
in 8 leaves, with the title. t!£ '|§ f= 515 jllc jg. jfjfc iiae 7«cw// 
sm yay soo led shwd] and again at Shanghae in 1860, with 
the title. %$£ \% #15 M Wt If. Hwuy &ae sin yay soo slnob 
led. 

3. %% )x f\J$L Ya peen lull keae. Six Warnings against 
Opium, 7 leaves. Ningpo, 1847. This is a reprint of Tracy's 
tract, (see Tracy's works, No. 1.) with an appendix by Dr. 
McCartee. A later edition in 9 leaves, contains also a preface 
from the same hand, and some prescriptions by a Chinese 
physician. The new regulations legalizing the sale of opium, 
having rendered, the six warnings of the original tract inap- 
plicable to the modern state of things, it has been entirly 
remodelled by Dr. McCartee, and printed at Shanghae in 
1864, in 5 leaves, with the title # $j? || Jr Ifr K'ewen kene 
y a peen Inn. 

4- f| if M fr fp ffl 8™ tsdng siring shoo tse'e keae. 
Commentary on the Epistle to the Ephesians 2 books, 130 
leaves. Ningpo, 1848. This is a revision of Dr. Milne's publi- 
cation, (see Dr . Milne's works, No. 19.) the proper names 
and other terms being changed to correspond with the usage 
at the time of publication. The running title through the 
book is jff jhi jiff f|" jji-k f$ Sin c cha6u shoo chod keae. 

5- m A # tk 2. fe Tsfi P -i in tlh sM} J che f d - The 



DIVIE BETHUNE MCCARTEE. 137 

Way of Pardonfor Sinners. Sheet tract. NingpOj 1848. This 
is chiefly a selection from Milne's Commentary on theEphe- 
sians. (see Dr. Milne's works. No. 19.) It was afterwards 
printed in small book form. 

6« Jfl5 $$■ Wt f#J "a* Ytly soo heaou le yen. Christian Cus- 
toms. 7 leaves. Ningpo. Reprinted at Ningpo is 1857, in 4 
leaves ; and again at Shanghae in 1862, in 12 leaves. 

7- Jftf $$ 1^ ^ "i" ff ai ^t Ydy soo keang sang yen king 
yun wan. Life of Jesus in Verse. 6 leaves. Ningpo. This is 
a revision of Collie's tract, (see Collie's works, v No. 6.) It 
was reprinted in 4 leaves ; and again at Shanghae in L863 ,in 
10 leaves. 

8. ft i% j| jjb $% fl %fa Ling laodn Jcwei yn shin t'e Tun. 
The Worth of the Soul. 4 leaves. Ningpo. This is a brief 
discourse on Matthew 10: 28. It was reprinted at Shanghae 
in 1863, in 6 leaves. 

9. HI |H $g Wan hw'o hang keen: Universal History. 
132 leaves. Ningpo, 1850. This is an abridgment of Dr. 
Gutzlaff's publication, (see Gutzlalfs works, No. 34.) 

10- ft i% H %n Ling Juvdn teung Km. Brief Discourse 
on the Soul. 3 leaves. Ningpo, 1848. This is in the Man- 
darin dialect. It was reprinted at Shanghae in 18G3, in 5 
leaves. 

11- ft M p£ H Sin Icing choo sJiih. The Apostle's Creed, 
with Commentary. 4 leaves. Ningpo, 1848. This was after- 
wards remodelled, and the Lord's Prayer and Ten Command- 
ments with comments added, being published at Ningpo, un- 
der the title fg H H llljj Sin ts'aou san hang. Three Sym- 
bols of the Faith, in 16 leaves. It was reprinted at Snanghae 
in 1861, in 22 leaves. 

12- 13 \ Jl. %L M King sliung cite taou. Duty to Superiors. 
Sheet tract. Ningpo, 1848. This is composed of selections 
from Scripture. 

13. ^ $ \ 3£ % Heaou hingfoo mod. Obedience to Pa- 
rents. Sheet tract. Ningpo, ±848. This is composed of 
selections from Scripture. 

14. ffa f# H Lun sliwb hwang, On Lying. Sheet tract. 
Ningpo, 1848. This is a selection from Dr. Milne's tract. 
(see Milne's works, No. 4.) 

15- ~£ >5 ffl It K JJ @ an Sl ' n l cea & n&n le& n 9 f an (J- 
Efficacious Prescription for giving Peace of Mind. Sheet tract. 
Ningpo. This is a form of prayer to God, cut on stone, the 
impressions giving while letters on a black ground. 

i (; - tk i M B f£ 3% W M 5E Kiw chod V'U ■ s "" t . / "' j 

go tsuy iirh sze. Jesus died for our Sins. Sheet tract. Ning- 
po, Reprinted in the book form. 

17. it Hfc Sin ho. The Creed in Verse. Ningpo. This 
was cut, together with a form of prayer in rhyme, on two fan- 



138 DIVIE BETHUNE MCCARTEK. 

shaped sheets, and sometimes mounted on a fan. It was re- 
printed in the book form. The prayer was also published 
separately on a single sheet at Teng-chow. 

IS- M M %> -H Wk Ydy soo l:eaou ijaou heue. * Funda- 
mental Truths of Christianity. 1G leaves. Ningpo, 1849. 
This is a modification and enlargement of a tract previously 
published. It was reprinted in 1857, in 11 leaves; and revised 
and much altered, it was reprinted in 1860, at the same press, 
in 15 leaves, with the title. JJJ5 j$jc jffc |£ ^ Yay soo Jceaou 
yaou die. Twelve leading texts extracted from this were 
published as a sheet tract at Canton, in 1864, without a title. 

19. jfjjf i| APII^ -8T'0 tabujih munyaoukeue. Ma- 
nual of Prayer. 24 leaves. Ningpo, 1849. Reprinted at 
Shanghae in 1863, in 31 leaves. This is an essay on the na- 
ture of prayer, with illustrations from Scripture, and forms 
for various occasions. 

20. . ;jf H ft 2$| JH '^c ^ Sin tsivan ling hwdn peen id 
tseuen. Treatise on the Soul. 1st Part. 66 leaves. Ningpo, 
1850. This is a revision of the first volume of Milne's trea- 
tise, (see Dr. Milne's works, No. 18.) 

21. %J) ^ m Ts'oo lieb peen. Bible History. 3 books. 166 
leaves. Ningpo, 1851. A chronological arrangement of Bible 
history with the dates according to Usher; to which is added, 
a connection of the Old and New Tastament; and an outline 
of church history down to A. D. 1846. 

22. jjff H %$ Tsun met she. Hymns of Praise. 16 leaves. 
Ningpo, 1851. This is a collection chiefly translations, of 23 
hymns and a doxology. It was reprinted at Fuh-chow. 

23. Lu hyiao ts. Frank Lucas, pp. 9. Ningpo, 1852. 
This is written in the Ningpo dialect, and printed in the Ro- 
man character. 

24. tffc ft rfy fj£ Keiv ling It wan shivb. Discourse on the 
Salvation of the Soul. 7 leaves. Ningpo, 1852. This is a 
sermon on John, 3: 16, compiled from Dr. Milne's writings. 

25. IE Jig JJ, %p Chin U 6 cite. Easy Introduction to 
Christian*Doctrine. 16. leaves. Ningpo, 1853. Reprinted at 
Shanghai 1 in 1862, in 21 leaves. 

26. 2Jz % 3|| -jfe Ping gan fung shoo. Peace Almanac. 
Ningpo, 1850 — 1853. This was published annually. The 
first number, for 1850, contains 38 leaves and 7 folding sheets 
of diagrams, astronomical, geographical and mechanical. The 
letter press has a great variety of useful and interesting mat- 
ter. The number for 1851 is on a much larger page, and 
contains 33 leaves and 12 large folding sheets. The matter 
is rearranged and some new added. The number for 1852 
has 42 leaves and one folding plate. This contains most of 
the matter of the preceding year, and some additional. The 



RICHARD QUARTERMAN WAY. 139 

following year's issue has 34 leaves and 3 folding sheets. 
There is a good deal of new matter in this. 

27. St ijl 'H Ling liwdn peen. Treatise on the Soul, 26 
leaves. Ningpo, 1856. This is an abridgment of No. 20, supra. 

28. §?. $g j§£ § Shing kiivg lily shoo. Scripture Collec- 
tion. 2 books. 75 leaves. Ningpo, 1856. This consists of 
texts of passages of Scripture arranged according to subjects. 

29. jjig -f^ <& %§. fjg f|f i'Vt/t ?/m /w £s'aw peen mung. Har- 
mony of the Gospels 142. leaves. 1861. This is in the Man- 
darin dialect. It is divided into 9 books, with preface and 
copious indexes; prefixed to which is the Decalogue. 

30. ffijs JJ|$ ;ffc tk "K 5< ?E ^// s0 ° fceatfi* &e?0 s7*e //""« 
taw. Important Discourse on Salvation. This is composed 
chiefly of Scripture ([notations on the unity and nature of Grod; 
with the way of salvation for sinners. 

31. % jjjj^ 3g. =f Mcen J/6 yoau yen. Important counsel 
to avoid returning to Idolatry. Sheet tract. Ningpo, 1862. 
This is in rhyme. 

32. W i 2fc »i£ li- p& $e szc lac i led Tun. Western 
Scholar's Reasons for coming to China. Teng-chow, 1863. 
Reprinted at Shanghae in 1864, in 6 leaves. Revised and 
again reprinted at Shanghae in 1865. It has been also re- 
printed in the Concord Almanac for 1865. (See Vrooman's 
works, No. 1.) 

33. f£ % P'd sze. The Fear of Death. Che-foo, 1863. 
Printed in two colours. 

34. ^ |p Yew tsuy. Atonement for Sin. Che-foo, 1863. 
Printed in two colours. 



LXVI. || JJ f$ Wei Le-che. RICHARD QUARTER- 
MAN WAY was born in December, 1819, in Liberty county 
Georgia, U. S. He was left an orphan at an early age, and in 
due time commenced to study medicine under his elder brother, 
but after a year thus spent, he changed his plans and entered 
the Theological Seminary at Columbia, South Carolina. In 
1843, he was licensed and ordained to the ministry ; and was 
married to Susan Caroline Quarterman, the sister of the Rev. J. 
Quarterman, (xc infra). Having been accepted by the Board 
of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church, he left New 
York on November 13th, 1843, to embark at Boston with Mrs. 
Way for Batavia enroute for Siam. He arrived at, Batavia, 
March 5th, 1S44, and proceeded forthwith to Singapore ; where 
he found Mr. Buell, the only missionary of the Board stationed 
at Siam, on his way home to the United States; and upon 
consultation with the brethren, Mr. Way resolved to go direct 
to China, and reached Macao in July. He left that, station 
in August, and reached Chu-sau on the 27th, and proceeded 



140 WILLIAM GILLESPIE. 

to Ningpo, his destined sphere of labour on November 6th 
Besides his ministerial engagements, Mr. Way had charge of a 
Boy's Boarding school in connection with the Mission, from 
1845 till 1852." In the latter year, ill health necessitated Mrs. 
Way to pay a visit to the United States with her children, 
from which she returned to Ningpo in the summer of 1854. 
On the 23rd of January, 1856, Mr. Way left Ningpo on a 
visit to Fuh-chow, from which he returned overland with the 
Kev. C. C. Baldwin, starting on the 12th of February, and 
read ling Ningpo on the 27th. From 1853 till 1858, he held 
the superintendence of the Mission Press. In consequence of 
a bronchial affection and general failure of health, he returned 
to the United States with his family in 1851', and retired 
lit mi the missionary service. In ISO" 1 , he had charge of a 
school in his native country, and was preaching to the Negroes. 

Publications by Mr. Way. 

CHINESE. 

1- "M ffl M I3£ f'u Mew i'oo shivu. Illustrated Ge< >gra] ihy. 
53 leaves and a folding sheet of plates, Ningpo, ,1848. The 
first three leaves are cuts of the flags of various nations. The 
work was revised and much enlarged by the author, and 
printed at the same press in 1856, in 114 leaves of a much 
larger size and 6 folding sheets, with the title $|fj J$ f$£ |j. 
T'e h'eit) sliiuo lid. It is profusely embellished with cuts. 

2. Jf[5 W> H # & £f Y&V so ° 1 " / " m ^° 6 l™ 1 chin. The 
Disciple's Guide. 27 leaves. Ningpo, 1856. 

In the North China Herald for 1856 is a Diary of an Over- 
land Trip between Foo-chow-foo and Ningpo, by Mr. Way, 
which was republished in the Shanghae Almanac and Miscel- 
lany for 1857. 



LXVII. WILLIAM GILLESPIE, a native of Scotland 
and member of the United Presbyterian communion, studied 
at Glasgow University, and having been accepted by the Lon- 
don Missionary Society, wasappointed to China as his field of 
labour. He was ordained at Wells Street Chapel London, 
November 1st, 1843, and embarked in the Elizabeth on the 
25th sanatory considerations obliging him to leave Mrs. Gil- 
lespiejat home. On May 10th, 1844, he arrived at Calculi ta ; 
and there embarked in the Rob. Boy, by which he reached 
Macao, on July 26th, and immediately proceeded to Hong- 
kong. In 1845 he endeavoured to commence amission at 
( 'anton, but was driven from his post by the opposition of the 
populace. In October, 1817, he again paid a visit to that city 



GEORGE SMITH. 141 

with Dr. Hobson, to ascertain what might he the prospect for 
an opening, when they were well received. Towards the end 
of November he left Hongkong hy the Monarch for Europe, 
accompanied hy Mrs. A. Stronach and her three children, and 
arrived in England April 12th. 1848. In 1849 he returned 
to China in the Palmyra, but Mrs. Gillespie was again pre- 
vented accompanying him He reached Hongkong on April 
29th, and joined the Canton mission for a time, but finally 
went to Hongkong, and embarked in the P. & 0. Steamer 
Braganza for Europe, on the 24th of July, 18.30, arriving in 
England on September 26th. Some time after this, he was 
initiated as pastor of the United Presbyterian church at Shiels, 
Aberdeen ; and subsequently raised a church and congrega- 
tion of the same denomination in Edinburgh. 

Publications by Mr. Gillespie. 

ENGLISH. 

1. The Land of Sinim, or China and Chinese Missions. 
12nio. pp. xi, 240. Edinburgh, 1854. 



LXVIII. pg ^Sze-mei. GEOPtGE SMITH, a graduate 

(M. A.) of Oxford University, having been admitted into 
priest's orders, was appointed a missionary to the Chinese, 
by the Church of England Missionary Society. He left Eng- 
land for his destined sphere of labour, in the beginning of 
June, 1844, with instructions in the first place to explore the 
capabilities of the various stations in China. He reached 
Hongkong towards the end of September, and spent several 
months in that neighbourhood, at Canton, and Macao. On 
May 25th, 1845, he embarked at Hongkong in company with 
Bishop Boone and his family, and arrived at Shaughae on 
June lGth. After a stay of ten days he left that city for 
Ningpo, where he intended to settle, but within three 
months was compelled by ill health to leave, and returned to 
Shanghae on October 12th, having paid two visits to Chu- 
sau. On the 27th he sailed for the south, with the intention 
of visiting the other treaty ports, remained in the neighbour- 
hood of Chusau till December 9th, and reached Fuh-chow 
on the 15th. On the 10th of January, 1S4G, he arrived at 
Amoy, when; ho remained six weeks, and reached Hongkong 
on February 27th. The following month he- again visited 
Canton, but his health requiring a change of climate, he 
left China in summer, and arrived in England on the 6th of 
October. While in his native land, he received the degree ol 



142 GEORGE SMITH. 

D. D., and on tho 29th of May, 18 40, was consecrated in 
Canterbury Cathedral, as Bishop of the newly-formed see of 
Victoria in China. Having in the mean time married the 
daughter of the Rev. A. Brandram, Secretary of the British 
and Foreign Bible Society, he left Portsmouth on November 
6th, with Mrs. Smith, in the Sir G-eorge Pollock, accompanied 
by the Revs. E. T. R. Moncrieff, P. P. G-ough, and W. Welton, 
with Mr. R. D. Jackson, and arrived at Hongkong on March 
29th, 1850. On September 23rd, he embarked in H. M. 
steam ship Reynard, for an episcopal visit to the consular 
cities in the northern parts of China, and on the way touched 
at Lew-chew, with a view to ameliorate the condition of 
Dr. Betelheim a missionary residing there. On the 14th of 
October he arrived at Shanghae, where after a short stay, he 
embarked for the south, visited Ningpo and Fnh-chow, and 
reached Hongkong on December 19th. In the summer of 18.32, 
lie again visited Shanghae; and in 1853, lie spent five months 
in that neighbourhood, and left for Hongkong on the last day 
of the year. In the latter part of J 854, he again made a visit 
to Fuh-chow and Shanghae. In 1855, he Avent to England 
and returned to China the following year. In 1858, he again 
visited Shanghae and the other ports. On the 4th of March 
1860, he arrived from Hongkong at Shanghae, left that port 
for Japan on April 7th, spent from two to three months in 
that country, at Nagasaki, Kanagawa and Yedo ; embarked 
for California, thence to Panama, took steamer from the Grulph 
to New York, and reached Southampton on October 16th. He 
returned to Hongkong in November, 1861, went north to Pe- 
king in April, 1862, and visited Shanghae on the way south hi 
June. He ultimately retired from tin,', duties of the bishopric, 
returning to England in 1864. 

1'ublications by the Bisltop of Victoria. 

CHINESE. 

P M B 1£ %. fit M M j£ Y&u sbo siting Jceaou si Id 
lauci shili. Adult Baptismal Service. 9 leaves. Hongkong, 
1851. In this, the Prayers, Questions, Answers, &c. are 
printed in black, and the directions in red. as in the ancient 
rubrics. The term 5c f'P 2 7, cew shin is used for (iod. 

2. M $,ft Jfe Wt W "cf ^C Y&y son ehing Jceaou taou Jcaou 
wan. Prayers of the Christian Religion. 21 leaves. Hong- 
kong, 1854. This is merely a selection from the English 
Church Liturgy, as translated by Dr. Medhurst. (see Mc- 
dhurst's works, No. 41* ; among the Omissions.) 



THOMAS T. DEVAN. 14.'j 

ENGLISH. 

3. A Narrative of an Exploratory \ r isit to each of the 
Consular Cities of China, and to the Islands of Hongkono- 
and Chusan, in behalf of the Church Missionary Society, in 
the years 1844, 1845, 1846. Svo. pp. xvi, 532. London, 1847. 
This is illustrated by 12 plates and a folding map. It was 
reprinted at New York. 

4. Hints for the Times; or, the Religions of Sentiment, 
of Form, and of Feeling, contrasted with vital Godliness. 

5. Lew-chew and the Lew-ehewans; being a Narrative 
of a Visit to Lew-chew, or Loo-choo, in October, IS50. 12mo. 
pp. viii, 95. London, 1853. 

6. The National Religion of China, as illustrative of the 
proper Word for translating GOD into the Chinese Language. 
Being an Extract from the Bishop of Victoria's Charge to the 
Anglican Clergy, delivered at Shanghae, China, on October 
20th, 1853. 4to. pp. 12. Shanghae, 1853. This was first 
published in two numbers of the North China Herald. 

7. A Charge delivered to the Anglican Clergy in Trinity 
Church at Shanghae, on March 16th, I860, pp. 19. Shang- 
hae, 1860. 

8. Ten Weeks in Japan. Svo. pp. xvi, 459. London, 1861. 
This is illustrated by 8 plates and a folding map. 



LXIX. c^ ji T'S-fdn. THOMAS T. DEVAN, a mem- 
ber of the Baptist church, graduated as M. D. in the United 
States, and having studied theology, was ordained to the 
ministry of the gospel. He was married to Lydia Hale, and 
being appointed a missionary to the Chinese, by the American 
Baptist Board of Foreign Missions, he left, America with Mrs. 
Devan in 1844, and arrived at Hongkong <>n October 22nd, 
where he found a temporary home in Mr. Shuck's family. 
Soon after his arrival, he established a dispensary in Hong- 
kong. Early in April, 1S45, he removed with his family to 
Canton; at which station Mrs. Devan died on the 18th of Oc- 
tober, 1846, and was buried on French Island near Wham- 
poa. Dr. Devan then went to Hongkong, and shortly after 
proceeded to the United States. He subsequently became 
connected with the Baptist Mission in France. 

Publications by Dr. Devan. 

ENGLISH. 

1. The Beginner's First Book in the Chinese Language 
(Canton Vernacular). Svo. pp. 161. Hongkong, 1847. 



144 ANDREW PATTON HAPPER. 

LXX. Jg ^Loo-yih. JOHN LLOYD was born in Hun- 
tingdon county, Pennsylvania, October 1st, 1813. The first 
fifteen years of his life were spent at home, where he received a 
strict religious training, and as good an education as the district 
schools afforded. From his sixteenth to his twenty-first year, 
he acted as clerk in several establishments, and improved his 
leisure hours in acquiring knowledge, reading with avidity 
such books as came in his way, especially those of a historical 
character. The pursuits of trade, however, were not congenial 
to his mind, and he commenced a course of classical studies 
at Jefferson College, Canonsburgh, in the spring of 1834, un- 
der the presidency of the Eev. M. Brown, D. D. In the second 
session of his collegiate course, there was a powerful revival of 
religion at the institution, which led to his making a public 
profession of religion in March, 1835. In September, 1839, 
he graduated as A. B. at that college; and next year began 
his studies with a private clergyman, preparatory to entering 
the ministry. In 1841, he entered the Theological Seminary 
at Princeton; in 1843. lie received the degree of A. M. ; and 
in 1844, he was licensed to preach the gospel, by the presby- 
tery of New York. Having been appointed missionary to the 
Chinese, by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian 
Church, he left his native land on June 22nd that year, hi 
the Cohota, with Dr. Happer, and Messrs. Culbertson and 
Loomis, reaching Macao on October 22nd. After consulta- 
tion with the brethren of his mission there, he left for Amov 
with Dr. Hepburn about the end of Nevember, and reached 
his destination on December 6. There he remained occupied 
with his missionary pursuits till the time of Ids death, which 
took place December Gth, 1848, exactly four years after his 
arrival. 



LXX I. P£ C %f*0-paGan-ti7i. ANDREW PATTON 
HAPPER pursued his studies at Jefferson College, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he graduated as A. B. in 1835. He afterwards 
studied theology at the Western Theological Seminary, in 
Alleghany city. Pennsylvania, and received the degree of A. M. 
in 1843. In 1844, he graduated as M. D. at the University 
of Pennsylvania; and was ordained to the ministry of the gos- 
pel the same year. Having been appointed a missionary to 
China, by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian 
Church, he left the United States on June 22nd in the Cohota, 
with Messrs. Lloyd, Loomis and Culbertson, and reached Macao 
on October 22nd. From November till the following April, he 
assisted in the Morrison Education Society's school at Hong- 
kong; and opened a mission school at Macao in May, 1845. In 
March, 1847, he removed to Canton, and there on the 11th 



ANDREW PATTON HAPPER. 145 

of November he was married to Catherine Elizabeth Susan Ball, 
eldest daughter of the Rev. D. Ball, (see No. XLVII.) In 
June 1851, he opened a dispensary for the natives. He left 
with his family for a visit to the United States in December, 
1854, and returned to Canton in September, 1859. The de- 
gree of D. I), was conferred on him from Jefferson College in 
1864. Mrs. Happer died on December 29th, 1865, and he still 
continues his mission labours at Canton. 

Publications by Dr. Happef. 

CHINESE. 

1- 5c 2$C [$ ^ T'een tudn wan id. Catechism of Astro- 
nomy. 36 leaves. Ningpo. 1849. 

2- M M M lc M HO %? Y&y soo Jceaou yaou U wan id. 
The Assembly's Catechism. Canton, 1851. Reprinted with 
references, at Shanghae, in 1802, in 21 leaves. 

3. jjiip JH; ;|| Shin tadu geen. Substance of the Gospel. 
8 leaves. Canton, 1843. This is in rhyming stanzas of three 
characters to a line. Reprinted at Canton, in I860, in 20 
leaves. 

4- fjf $} $£ IS $] %? &i n IP shv k8 wan id. Catechism of 
New Testament History. 43 leaves. Canton, 1852. Reprint- 
ed at Shanghae in 1864, in 17 leaves. 

5- H &-J ]£. IB {ifd $] K'ew yd she he t'eaou wan. Ques- 
tions on Old Testament History. 82 leaves. Ningpo, 1852. 
This has a folding sheet, with illustrative map at the begin- 
ning. Reprinted at Shanghae in 1864, in 57 leaves, without 
the map. 

6- HP $fc IE M. fe] %? ^ r "V so ° ching Jeeaou wan id 
Brown's Catechism. Canton, 1852. 

7- 0j ic WS Hf H' F^ ^ ^d t'ae full yin shoo wan id. 
Catechism of Matthew's G-ospel. 176 leaves. Canton, 1853. 
Reprinted at Shanghae in 1864, in 58 leaves. 

8. ijj Jp [JtJ *$£ gg Teio heosze tsze king. Youth's Four 
Character Classic. Canton, L853. Reprinted at Canton in 
I860, in l!) leaves. This is a modification and enlargement 
of Medhurst's "Child's Primer." (see Medhurst's works, No. 
3.) It contains thirty-two stanzas, followed by the Decalogue, 
the Creed, Lord's Prayer, and hymn to l» v used before retir- 
ing to rest. 

9- 'M jII M JjL 'fB %*k Chang yuen leang yew seang hbi. 

Dialogues between Chang and Yuen. 16 leaves. Canton, 
1862. This contains the first five chapters of Dr. Milne's 
tract with the same title, (see Dr. Milne's works, No. 11.) 

adapted to the Canton ilia led. 



I4G MICHAEL SIMPSON CTJLBERTSON. 

10. Jf[5 $ft lE ffc BE 4£ Y&y soo chhig leeaou wan ta, 
Brown's Catechism. 22 loaves. Canton, 1862. This is a ver- 
sion in the Canton dialect, of No. 6, supra. 

11. jE pji J£ fjjjj Chin shin ching lun. Discourse on the 

term for God. 17 leaves. Canton, 1863. This is a controver- 
sial tract, in reference to Mr. Chalmers'' brochure on the term 
for God. (see Chalmers' works. No. 6.) It has two prefaces 
and two appendices. 

Besides the preceding, there is a revision of Mr. Tracy's 
tract on Opium, (see Tracy's works, No. 1.) by Dr. Hap per, 
published in Dr. Ball's Almanac for 1S53, (see Ball's works, 
No. 13.) under the title %% J£ ^ 5$ Ya peen lull Jceae. In 
Vrooman's Almanac for 1862, (see Vrooman's works, No. 1.) 
there is an article against Gambling from the same hand, un- 
der the title W III f If a\ 5$G Yeio too pb lull, heae*. 

Publications by Mrs. Ilapper. 

CHINESE. 

1- If $J ]£. IB P9 %£ K'eio yd she Ice, wdu la. Catechism 
of Old Testament History. G4 leaves. Shanghae, L864. There 
is a preface by the authoress, who signs herself ^ ^ ^ ~f£ 
j|j Gad hae te neil shc } Child-loving authoress. 



LXXII. jg H # K'ih Pe-ts'un. MICHAEL SIMPSON 
CTJLBERTSON was born at Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, 
on January 18th, 1819. He studied at West Point Military 
Academy, and graduated there in June, 1840 ; after which he 
was for a short time Assistant Instructor of Mathematics there. 
He subsequently held a commission as Second Lieutenant of 
Artillery in the United States army ; but resigned his com- 
mand to become a missionary to the heathen. After comple- 
ting his studies at Princeton Theological Seminary, where he 
graduated in May, 1844, he was ordained to the ministry of 
the gospel. Being appointed a missionary to China, by the 
Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church, he left 
America with Mrs. Culbertson in the Cohota, on June 22nd, 
accompanied by Dr. Ilapper and Messrs. Lloyd and Loomis, 
arriving at Macao on October 22nd. Proceeding to Hong- 
kong the following February, he embarked in the Isabella 
Anna on the 20th, accompanied by the Rev. A. W. 
Loomis and Dr. Macgowan, for Chusan, which he reached 
on March 30th, and Ningpo in the beginning of April. When 
the Presbyterian church of Ningpo was organized, on May 18th, 
he was chosen pastor. Having been transferred to the Sliang- 



MICHAEL SIMPSON C (JLBERTSON. 147 

hae station, he removed there with his family in July, 1850, 
and was elected to represent Ningpo, in the Committee of 
Delegates about to meet in that settlement for the translation 
of the Old Testament. He took his seat with his colleagues 
for that purpose on the 1st of August; hut when the trans- 
lators had reached near the middle of Leviticus, an alteration 
•took place in the constitution of the committee, and Mr. Cul- 
bertson in concert with Dr. Bridgman commenced the Old 
Testament de novo. At this and the New Testament, he 
continued till October, 1855, when he left with his family for 
the United States, and returned to Shanghae in June, 1858. 
He then resumed his work on the Sacred Scriptures, prosecut- 
ing the task conjointly, till the death of his venerated colleague 
in November, 1861. About this time he paid a visit to Amoy 
with his family, and returning to Shanghae, completed the 
translation shortly before his own death, which took place 
at Shanghae on the 25th of August, 1862. The degree of D. 
D. was conferred on him by a University in America, but the 
intelligence did not reach Shanghae till he had finished his 
earthly course. He was buried in the Shanghae cemetery, 
leaving a widow and three daughters to mourn his loss. 

Publications by Mr. Culbertson. 

CHINESE. 

1 . jE jjiiji ~\- fjjj( ^fc |^ Chin shin sink keae choo shih. The 
ten Commandments with Commentary. 7 leaves. Ningpo, 
1848. 

2. ^n ^ 1§f ■tT ^ fl£ Jo s ih y^ n hing tseiten chuen. Life 
of Joseph. 27 leaves. Ningpo, 1847. This is divided into 
13 articles, and pictorially illustrated. It was reprinted at 
Shanghae in 1861, in 27 leaves, with the title jfy *§ •= ft £ 
f^ Yb slh yen king tseuen chuen. 

3- iiX M Si W ft f$ E l fi y& y^- 11 hing chuen. Life of 
Elijah. 23 leaves. Ningpo, 1853. This is in 7 sections, with 
a preface and table of contents. It was reprinted at Shanghae 
in 1861, in 20 leaves. 

4- JiM if M RO ^ 'p* Bi Full yin taou wan td ho Icedng. 
Paraphrase of the Shorter Catechism. 14 leaves. Shanghae. 
1861. This comprises the answers to the questions of the 
catechism, thrown together so as to read continuously, with 
explanatory remarks where needed. There is a short preface. 

5. M Hf ?E fwj Hr fM $fr Fuh yin ta6u wan Id keen led. 
The Shorter Catechism of the Westminster Assembly. 19 leaves'. 
Shanghae, 1862. The groundwork of this translation was 
made by a committee of the Presbyterian Mission at Ningpo, 

i 



148 AUGUSTUS WARD LOOMIS. 

and published there in 1849, with the title JflS B Uc M W. PO 
^ Ym7/ soo heaCu ijaou U '/van td, in 24 leaves. The present 
work is a revision by Mr. Culbertson. 

6. ^If $1 ^ is ^" 2 '//" tseuenshoo. New Testament. This 
translation is the joint work of Mr. Culbertson and Dr. Bridg- 
man. (sec Dr. Bridgman's works. No. 7.) 

7- HI &•! ^ ft -^'^y yd tseuen shoo. Oid Testament. This 
is also the joint work of Mr. Culbertson and Dr. Biidgman. 
(see Dr. Bridgman's works, No. 8.) 

ENGLISH, 

8. Reply to the Strictures on the Remarks made on the 
Translation of Genesis and Exodus in the Revision of the 
Chinese Scriptures. 8vo. pp. 25. Canton, 1852. 

9. Essay on the bearing of the Publications of the Tai- 
ping dynasty Insurgents on the Controversy respecting the 
proper term for translating the words Elohim, and Theos in 
the Chinese version of the Scriptures. 8vo. pp. 18. 1853. This 
is published anonymously, and without name of place. 

10. Darkness in the Flowery Land; or, Religious Notions 
and Popular Superstitions in North China. 12mo. pp. xii, 235. 
New York, 1857. 

There are some contributions from Mr. Culbertson in the 
19th volume of the Chinese Repository. 



LXXIII. W>g± Loo Melh-sze. AUGUSTUS WARD 
LOOMIS was ordained to the ministry in the United States, 
and appointed a missonary to China, by the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Presbyterian Church. He left America with 
Mrs. Loomis in the Cohota, on June 22nd, 1844, accom- 
panied by Messrs. Lloyd, Happer and Culbertson, of the same 
society, and arrived at Macao on October 22nd. On the 20th 
of February following, he embarked at Hongkong in the 
Isabella Anna, accompanied by Messrs. Culbertson, and 
Macgowan, and after a voyage of thirty-eight days, reached 
Tinghae on the island of Chusan on March 30th. There he 
took up his abode, and commenced missionary operations, 
continuing on the island till August, 1846, shortly after its 
evacuation by the British forces. The natives then, under 
pretext of alarm regarding an earthquake that occurred on the 
4th of that month, compelled him to quit, and he removed to 
Ningpo. Failing health however rendered it necessary for 
him to leave China, and after spending some months in Chu- 
san, he embarked for the United States with Mrs. Loomis in 
October, 1849. After a protracted residence in his native land, 

• 



SAMUEL WILLIAM BONNEY. 149 

he went to California, where he still continues labouring as a 
missionary among the Chinese. 

Puhlicatons by Mr. Loomis. 

ENGLISH. 

1. Learn to say No. 

2. Scenes in Chusan, or Missionary Labours by the Way 
12mo. pp. 246. Philadelphia. 1857. 

3. How to die Happy. 

4. Scenes in the Indiana country. 



LXXIV. HUGH A BROWN, was ordained to the minis- 
try, and being appointed missionary to the Chinese, by the 
Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church, he 
left New york in the Huntress, about the end of 1844, and 
arrived at Hongkong on the 10th of March, 1845. On the 
6th of May, he reached Amoy his appointed station. Ill health 
however obliging him to leave the place, ho returned to the 
United States in 1847, and settled as a pastor in Virginia. 



LXXV. Qfi\&Pang-ni. SAMUEL WILLI AM BONNEY, 

son of the Rev. William Bonney, was born at New Canaan. Con- 
necticut, March 8th, 1815. At an early age, he was thrown upon 
his own resources to obtain an education. In the year 1832, 
he was in the employ of Messrs. Merriam at Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, the publishers of Webster's Dictionary. In 1837, 
he was engaged at Poughkeepsie teaching. The same year 
he was converted, and on the 28th of January in the following 
year, he joined the Allen Street Church. In 1840 he was a 
student at New York University; but next year removed 
to Lane Seminary, Ohio. By the assistance of friends, he was 
enabled to continue his studies till 1S44. When about finish- 
ing his course, he received an appointment from the American 
'Board of Commissioners, as missionary to India ; but this des- 
tination was afterwards changed from an accidental circum- 
stance. Happening to meet the Rev. J. Addison Carey of the 
Deaf and Dumb Institution, in a New York car, the latter 
mentioned to Mr. Bonney, that the Morrison Education Society 
in China was in want of a teacher, that Mr. Macy had been 
eagaged as assistant to the Rev- S. Brown, but would not be 
prepared to go out for another year, and proposed that Mr. 
Bonney should occupy that post in the interim. Upon due 
consideration, the proposal was accepted by him, having en- 
tered into an understanding with the American Board, that at 
the close of his engagement with the Morrison Education So- 



150 SAMUEL WILLIAM BONNEY. 

ciety, he should continue as a missionary in their service. He 
left New York in the Huntress, about the end of 1844, accom- 
panied bv the Rev. H. A. Brown, and arrived at Hongkong 
on March 10th, 184.3. There he entered immediately on the 

duties of the school, which he sustained for nearly twelve 
months. He was then relieved by the arrival of Mr. Macy, 
and proceeded immediately to Canton, as licentiate, in con- 
nection with the American Board. In 1847, lie was striving 
to obtain a residence outside the foreign factories at Canton. 
In 1848, he was living in the large Buddhist monastery at 
Honam, opposite the. city of Canton, but was not permitted to 
remain. Next year he occupied rooms in the hong of a 
native merchant at Honam. Subsequently, lie rented a house 
below Dutch Folly on the Canton side, and for a time wore 
Chinese costume. Between the years 1850 and 1853, he lived 
at Whampoa and Newtown, where he interested himself es- 
pecially in the welfare of seamen, and on one occasion had an 
interview with the Italian patriot Garribaldi, who had come to 
China as master of a merchant vessel. When Dr. Williams 
joined the Japanese expedition under Commodore Perry, in 
1854, Mr. Bonney returned to Canton, to take temporary charge 
of the Press of the American Board. At the close of the year, 
he left for the United States, and by the way visited Java, 
Germany and England. While in his native land, he was en- 
gaged in reviewing his theological studies, and in preparation 
for the ministry of the gospel, to which he was then ordained. 
In July, 1856, he was married at Albany, New York, to Cathe- 
rine Visscher, the daughter of General SolomanVan Reusselaer, 
and the next month, left for China, where he arrived within 
two years from the time he left it. After a residence of near- 
ly two years at Macao, where his fellow missionaries were 
exiled during the war, he with others returned to Canton at 
the close of the year 1858, to renew his labours, preaching and 
superintending schools. In 1861, in company with the Rev. 
W. R. Beach, Dr. Dickson and Mr. Thorburn, he made the 
inland journey through Hoo-nan to Hankow, where he ar- 
rived on the 19th of May, thirty-nine days after leaving Can-- 
ton. After a brief stay, he returned to Canton, by Avay of 
Shanghae. In March 1862, he paid a visit to Japan with 
Mrs. Bonney, on account of her health. In December of the 
same year, he made a trip into the interior of Kwang-tung 
province, in company with tne Rev. Messrs. Gray and John 
Preston, to the district of Chang-ning, where they were at- 
tacked by a band of robbers, and deprived of their clothes, 
money, horses and baggage; but the natives kindly provided 
them with the means of returning. In 1 863, in company 
with some friends, he made a second trip up the North river, 
as far as Shm-kwan. After a protracted illness of two months. 



RICHARDSON GB UIAM. 151 

of bilious fever and diarrhoea, he died at Canton, July 27th, 
1864. His widow has since then been engaged in educational 
work at Canton, in connection with the mission. 

Publications by Mr. Bonney. 

ENGLISH. 

1. Phrases in the Canton Colloquial Dialect, arrai 
according to the number cf. Chinese characters in a phrase. 

With an English Translation. 8vo. pp. OS. Canton, 1853. 
A second edition was printed. 

2. The Seaman's Compass and Chart; for daily use. af- 
loat or ashore. 12mo. Hongkong, 18G1. d in New 
York. pp. 208. 



LXXVI. HENRY W. WOODS, having been ordained 
to the ministry in the United States, was appointed a mis- 
sionary to the Chinese, by the Board of Foreign Missions of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church. He left New York with 
Mrs. Woods in the Horatio, on the 14th of December, 1844, 
in company with Bishop Boone and a missionary party, and 
arrived in Hongkong on the 24th of April, 1845. He left that 
port on July 5th, in the John Horton, together with the Rev. 
R. Graham, Rev. W. Fairbrother, and Mr. Cole with their wives, 
reaching Shanghae on the 25th. His residence there however 
was but of short duration, for ill health compelled him to leave 
the place after a few months, and he returned to America in 
the early part of 1846. By the latest information, he was 
very recently Rector at Bloomingto in Illinois. 



LXXVII. RICHARDSON GRAHAM, an ordained mi- 
nister of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United 
Stales, was appointed missionary to China, by the Board of 
Foreign Missions in connection with that body. Leaving 
New York with Mrs. Graham, in the Horatio, on the 14th of 
December, 1844, in the party that accompanied Bishop Boone 
on his return to the East, he landed at Hongkong on April 
24th, 1845. There, in company with Messrs. Woods, Fair- 
brother and Cole, he embarked in the John Horton, July 
5th, and reached Shanghae on the 25th. During the follow- 
ing year, his health having failed, he left the station with his 
wife and child, by the Coquett, about the middle of January, 
1847, and arrived at Hongkong bl i month; where he 

embarked for the United States. By the latest information 



152 THOMAS ITALL HUDSON. 

we have respecting him, he was a chaplain in the United 
Stales army, at Chester in Pennsylvania. 



LXXVIII. WILLIAM FAIRBROTHER, a student of 
Springhill College near Birmingham, having boon appointed 
missionary to China, by the London Missionary Society, was 
ordained/ September 3rd, 1844, in Carr's Lane Chapel, Bir- 
mingham. On the 26th of October, he embarked in the Kelso, 
with Mrs. Fairbrother, and arrived at Calcutta, March 15th, 
1845. Thence he sailed soon after in the Dido, and was at 
Singapore on May 21st. The vessel in which they sailed from 
that place, took tire at sea, and after a narrow escape from 
their perilous situation, they were rescued by the ship Ju- 
dith, and arrived at Hongkong on June 28th. On the 5th 
of July, they embarked in the JohnHorton, in company with 
Messrs. Woods, Graham and Cole, and their wives, and 
arrived at Shanghae on the 25th. Within a week or two af- 
terwards, Mrs. Fairbrother was seized with an attack of 
diarrhoea which brought on premature confinement, under 
which she sank, and expired on the 1 8th of September. Scarce- 
ly had the grave closed over the mortal remains of his be- 
loved partner, when Mr. Fairbrother was himself laid aside 
by illness; and it became painfully evident that no measure 
but an immediate return to his native country would avail 
to preserve his life. He accordingly left for England in J anuary, 
1846, and arrived in London on June 18th. After his return 
to England, he was for some time pastor over a congregation 
in Maidenhead; but has also been much engaged travelling 
through Great Britain on behalf of the Society, and in 1863 
was appointed Travelling Secretary of the London Missionary 
Society. 



LXXIX. $ f£ j§ Hod Tih-mae. THOMAS HALL 
HUDSON, an ordained minister of the Baptist communion 
in England, was for several years engaged as a missionary 
in the West Indies, in' connection with the General Baptist 
Missionary Society. He was afterwards appointed to the ser- 
vice in China, by the same board, and studied the Chinese 
language for a time under Professor Neumann. Having pre- 
viously lost his wife, he sailed for the East with his son 
Joseph, in the Duke of Portland, accompanied by Mr. and 
Mrs. Jarrom, and arrived at Hongkong on September 21st, 
1845. The same year he reached Ningpo and commenced a 
mission station. During the early years of the mission he re- 
ceived considerable assistance from his son, who withdrew 
however about the year 1851. Although for the greater part 



THOMAS HALL HUDSON. 153 

of his time he lias been without a European colleague, he has 

esent; but 

society has 



remained uninterruptedly at his post up to the present; but 
for a number of years past his connection with the sc 



ceased. 

Publications by Mr. Hudson 



CHINESE. 



}■ : M~ n iJ ££ f§ i% M tfa Ts'ing ming tsS saoufun moo lun. 
Discourse on Worshipping at the Tombs. 7 leaves. Ningpo 
1S48. This is a revision of Medhurst's tract, (see Medhurst's 

works, No. 8.) 

2. -§£ jjjl %fa Keio liwan lun. Discourse on the Salvation 
of the Soul. 7 leaves. Ningpo, 1849. There is a preface 
of one leaf. 

3. JflS f]c. IE. Seay sing he. Depravity of Human Nature. 
9 leaves. Ningpo, 1849. This has a preface. 

4- =fg lif §f Che nun chin. The Compass Needle. 7 leaves. 
Ningpo, 1849. This is a tract for seamen, with a preface. 

5. j£ 7]ii{J %n Choo shin lun. Discourse on God. 9 leaves. 
Ningpo. 1849. This has a preface. 

6. Bj rT M Hf M ^ ll hof&h yin chuen. Mark's Gospel 
29 leaves. Ningpo, 1850. 

7. ^ % u Chodjih lun. Discourse on the Lord's Day. 
11 leaves. Ningpo, 1851. This is an argument for the obser- 
vance of the Sabbath, by an exhortation to listen to the gos- 
pel, concluding with a sabbath calendar for 1851. There are 
two leaves of preface. 

.8. @ % f£ BM B. Wj A Hr She t'od padu 16 yu Id ma 
jin shoo. Paul's Epistle to the Eomans. 20 leaves. Ning- 
po, 1851. 

9- $ % 1% m$i M fit ± A #' She t'od padu Id yu 
Jcea la t'ae jin shoo. Paul's Epistle to the Galatians. 7 
leaves. Ningpo, 1851. 

10. &&&BM&, #» Wt A » She t'od padu Id yu c 
full so jin shoo. Paul's Epistle to the Ephesians. 7 leaves. 
Ningpo, 1851. 

ll - f % % & $ IIIA W She t'od padu Id yu 
ko Id se jin shoo. Paul's Epistle to the Colossians. 5 leaves. 
Ningpo,' 1851. 

12. © -fa ;£ 5V ^ Yew t'ae die hung shoo. Jude's 
General Epistle. 2 leaves. Ningpo, 1851. 

13. $ |£ tik tt MB ± it A § am *'od padu id yu 

feileihpe'jin shoo. Paul's Epistle to the Philippians. 5 
leaves. Ningpo, 1S52. 

14- $ % f£ $1 J& ^ fj 2fc A * ^ f'od paow &5 yw fie 
pih lai jin shoo. Paul's Epistle to the Hebrews. 15 leaves. 
Ningpo, 1852. 



154 EDWAR] lR. 

Most or all (In' other books of the New Testament have 
been revised and issued by Mr. Hudson at various times. 



LXXX. JJJ5 ft Ydy-lttn. WILLIAM JARROM was or- 
dained to the ministry in England, and appointed a mission- 
ary to the Chinese, by the General Baptist Missionary Society. 
He embarked with Mrs. Jarrom in the Duke of Portland. 
accompanied by Mr. Hudson and his son, and arrived at Hong- 
kong on the 21st of September, 1845. The following year 
he went north and settled at Ningpo. There he was called 
to pass through a severe trial, in the death of Mrs. Jarrom, 
which took place on the 26th of February, 1848. In the year 
1850, finding his own views so different from those of his col- 
league, as to render cooperation impracticable, he left Ningpo, 
and returned to England, retiring from connection with the 
mission. By the latest accounts, he was pastor of a Baptist 
congregation in England. 

00 ° 4 

LXXXI. fjijj M Shwae-le. EDWARD W. SYLE, a native 

of England, was ordained to the ministry in the United s 
and appointed a missionaiy to China, by the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Protestant Episcopal Church. He left Ame- 
rica with Mrs. Syle in the summer of 1845, in the Heber, and 
arrived at Hongkong on the 4th of October; whence they 
sailed again in the Eagle on the 23rd, and reached Shanghae 
on November 19th. There he continued his missionary la- 
bours, preaching and teaching for a number of years, till 
compelled by failure of health, he left with his family in the 
Mandarin for New York, on the 18th of February, 1853. 
After spending some time in California, he returned to Shang- 
hae in 1856. During his residence in China, he was ever 
forward in any public-spirited or philanthropic enterprise. 
He undertook the direction of an Institution for the poor 
Blind, which had been set on foot. He was one of the 
original promoters of the North China Branch of the Royal 
Asiatic Society, and gave it his active- support while he 
remained in Shanghae, being Recording Secretary for the 
year 1859-60. In the year 1859, Mrs. Syle died, and he left 
for America with his three children in the Pursuit, on Decem- 
ber 11th, I860. Soon after his arrival in the United States, he 
received the pastorate of a large church in Philadelphia, and 
married a second time; but in consequence of some differing 
views, he left that place, and has been for some years presiding 
over a charge in Long Island, New York. 

Although there is no separate work by Mr. Syle published, 
yet he rendered considerable service, aiding in the transla- 



SAMUEL CORNELIUS CLOPTON". 155 

: ion of (lie Prayer Book, and portions of the Scriptures. 
There is an article from his pen on the Musical Notation 
of the Chinese, in the 1st volume of the Journal of the North 
China Branch of the Eoyal Asiatic Society. 



LXXXII. JOHN FULLERTQN CLELAND, having 

studied at Cheshunt College, was appointed a missionary 
to China, by the London Missionary Society. He was or- 
dained at Trevor Chapel, Brompton, on December 31st, 1845, 
and embarked with Mrs. Cleland in the Mary Bannatyne at 
Portsmouth, April 10th, 1846, in company with Mr. and Mrs. 
Milne, arriving at Hongkong on August 25th. There in ad- 
dition to his other missionary duties, he superintended the 
mission press for-* time, and also conducted the services in 
the English chapel. In September, 1848, he removed to 
on, to assist Dr. Hobson, who had recently effected a 
settlement there. In 1850 he left for England, arrived in 
London, February 21st, 1851, and retired from the mission. 
He has since gone to Australia., where he has been occupied 
with agricultural pursuits. 



LXXXIII. E.N. JENCKS, a member of the Baptist 

communion in the United States, was married to Susan 
daughter of the Rev. Daniel Baldwin, of Milford, Connecti- 
cut. Being ordained to the ministry, he was appointed mis- 
sionary to the Chilli's.', by the American Baptist Missionary 
Union, this being the same body which was formerly desig- 
nated the American Baptist Board of Foreign Missions. He- 
left New York with Mrs. Jencks on the 29th of June, 1846, 
in the Cohota, in company with the Revs. W. Dean, S. C. 
Clopton, and George Pearcy, with their wives; and on th 
of October arrived at Macao. From Hongkong he proceeded 
to Bankok his destined station, the same year. There he 
made rapid progress with the language, but in a short time, 
the failure of Mrs. Jencks' health compelled them to quit the 
field. They left Bankok in November, 1847, returned to 
China via Singapore, and embarked in the Valparaiso for the 
United States, from Whampoa, April 12th, 1848. Mrs. 
Jencks died at sea June 27th, in latitude 32° 10' south, 
longitude 14° east, and her remains were committed to the 
deep the following day. Mr. Jencks remarried in America, 
where he remained in the prosecution of his ministerial labours, 
having dissolved his connection with the Society. 



LXXXI V. sf/jn g iH Kcd Le%h-tun SAMUEL CORNE- 



156 WILLIAM BPEEE. 

LIUS CLOPTON, the son of a Baptist pastor in Virgina, 
United States, was born in 1S1G. He graduated in the Co- 
lumbian College; and after having been teacher in the pre- 
paratory department of Richmond College, he spent some 
time as a student in the Newton Theological Institution in 
Massachusetts, where he left the reputation of a prayerful, 
godly young man. Being ordained to the ministry, he was 
appointed missionary to the Chinese, by the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Southern Baptist Convention. He left New 
York with Mrs. Clopton in the Cohota, on June 20th, 1846, 
accompanied by the Revs. W. Dean, E. N. Jencks and Or. 
Pearcy, with their wives, arriving at Macao on the 6th of 
October. Thence he removed to Canton on the 9th, where 
he commenced his preparatory missionary labours. It is 
supposed that he contracted a fever by exposure to the hot 
sun, while attending the funeral service of the United ^States 
minister, the Hon. A. H. Everett, on the 30th of June, 1847. 
He died on the 7th of July following, and was buried on French 
Island near AVhampoa. 



LXXXV. $% ± Pe-sze. GEORGE PEARCY, a mem- 
ber of the Baptist church, studied at Washington, and beini 
ordained to the ministry, was appointed missionary to tin 
Chinese, by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Southern 
Baptist Convention. He left New York with Mrs. Pearcy in 
the Cohota, June 29th, 1846, in company with the Revs. W. 
Dean, E. N. Jencks and S. C. Clopton and their wives, ar- 
riving at Macao on October 6th, from which he removed to 
Canton on the 9th. His health failing, he went to Macao in 
June, 1848. In August, he left Hongkong for Shanghae, 
but was driven back by a typhoon; he embarked again in 
September, and reached his destination. He remained at 
Shanghae till 1854, when he was attacked with a severe sick- 
ness, which brought him very low, and rendered a visit to his 
native land necessary; so that he left for the United States, 
with Mrs. Pearcy, about the end of the year. He was anxious 
to return to China, but the Board declined sending him, 
on account of his health. After spending some time as an 
agent for the collection of funds, lie was appointed to the 
mission among (he Chinese in California, left vacant by the 
return eastward of Mr. Shuck. No more recent intelligence 
has been heard regarding him. 



LXXXVL WILLIAM SPEER, a native of the United 
States, studied medicine at Jefferson College, Philadelphia, 
where he graduated as M. D. about the year 1842, He was 



JOHN BOOTH FRENCH. 1j7 

afterwards resident surgeon at Wills' Hospital; and was mar- 
ried to Cornelia the daughter of Alexander Breckenrido-e 
Esq. of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. lie subsequently studied 
for the ministry at the Theological Seminary at Alleghany 
and being ordained to the sacred office, was appointed a mis- 
sionary to the Chinese, by the Board of Foreign Missions of 
the Presbyterian Church. He left New York with Mrs. Speer 
in the Grafton, on the 20th of July, 1846, accompanied by 
the Kevs. J. B. French and J. W. Quarterman, arriving at 
Macao on the 27th of December. There Mrs. Speer died, 
April Jltk, 1847, and was buried in the protestant cemeterv. 
Soon after this Mr. Speer removed to Canton, where he re- 
mained till 1849, and then went to the United States. After 
that he served some time as a missionary to the Indians, and 
was also a missionary in the Western States. In 1851 he 
went to San Francisco, where he laboured for several years 
among the Chinese residents. In 18.37, he retired from' thai: 
service, on account of haemorrhage 1 'rom the lungs, and settled 
in the State of Minnesota. 

Publications by Mr. Speer. 

ENGLISH. 

1. Remarks of the Chinese Merchants of San Francisco, 
upon Governor Bigler's Message, and some common ( Ibjections; 
with some Explanations of the Character of the Chine's*' Com- 
panies, and the laboring class in California. 4to. pp. 1G. San 
Francisco, 1855. The above Bemarks area translation from 
the Chinese, written by Lai Chuu-chuen, a Chinese merchant 
of San Francisco. 

2. An Humble Plea, addressd to the Legislature of 
California, in behalf of the Immigrants from the Empire of 
China to this State. 8vo. pp. 40. San Francisco, 1856. 

Mr. Speer for some time' conducted a newspaper, "The 
Oriental,'"' in English and Chinese, at San Francisco. 



LXXXVII. ftm in Hioa Leen-dhe. JOHN BOOTH 
FRENCH, the son of George French, Esq., a, lawyer by pro- 
fession, was born at Georgetown in Columbia, on September 
26th, 1822. At twelve years of age, Ik; lost his father, and 
was left to the care of his widowed mother, who trained him 
up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord, [n boyhood, 
he was distinguished for filial duty and fraternal affection, 
love of truth, and fondness for study. His early education 
was entrusted to the Rev. James McVean, a classical teacher 
at Georgetown. From this academy he entered the Columbian 



158 JOHN WIXX QUAETEEMAN. 

College at the capital, where he finished his course with 
honour. At the age of eighteen, he became a member of the 
Presbyterian church, and then decided to enter the ministry. 
He was admitted into the Theological Seminary at Princeton 
in 1842. For a time he was in the service of the Tract Society, 
at Richmond in Virginia; and in 1846 was ordained as an 
evangelist by Ihe Presbytery of Baltimore. Soon after his 
ordination, having received an appointment from the Presby- 
terian Board to labour at Canton, he set sail from New York on 
duly 20th, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Speer, and the Rev. 
J. W. Quarterman, reaching Macao on December 27th. Tin; 
following year in spring lie removed to Canton, where he 
mixed freely with the Chinese in the prosecution of his mis- 
sionary duties. In 1851, he was married to Mary L. the 
second daughter of the Rev. Dyer Ball, M. D. In the autumn 
of 1856, on account of his health he paid a visit to Shanghae and 
Ningpo. At the outbreak of the troubles between the English 
and Chinese, Mr. French's premises were burnt down on the 
29th of October, 1856; and on the 4th of November, he re- 
moved with his family in the American steamer Spark to Ma- 
cao, where he continued to labour among the native popula- 
tion; and after an absence of nearly seventeen months, he 
went up to Canton on April 1st in the Spark, but returned 
to Macao in the same vessel on the 10th. After nearly twelve 
years of service, worn by labour, and wasted by disease, he 
embarked with his family in November for his native land, 
as the only hope of preserving his life; but he died at sea soon 
after passing Anjier, on the 30th of the same month, his 
mortal remains being committed to the deep. He left a wi- 
dow and two little boys to mourn his loss. 

Publications by Mr. French. 

CHINESE. 

•1- ?Q / fr %, § H6 ho t'ung shoo. Concord Almanac. 
This was the continuation of Dr. Ball's Almanac, (see Ball's 
works, No. 13,) which Mr. French undertook on the departure 
of Dr. Ball for America. The first number he issued was for 
1855, consisting of 19 leaves, printed at Canton. That for 
1856 contained 22 leaves. The number for 1857 appears to 
have been published at Macao; as also that for 1858, con- 
taining 22 leaves. The following year, the management of 
the periodical was resumed by Dr. Ball. 



LXXXV.III. Q fg nrj Kwa Tth-ming. JOHN AVINN 
QUARTERMAN was born at Clabourne, Alabama, United 



THEODORE HAMBERG. 159 

States, on the 21st of August, 1S21. His ancestors removed 
from Plymouth in England, in 1630, to enjoy religious liber- 
ty in the wilds of America. The colony of which they formed 
a part, built the town of Dorchester in New England. An 
offshoot from this colony removed to the south in 1695, and 
established a colony and church in Liberty county, Georgia. 
The Kev. Robert Quarterman, father of the subject of this 
sketch, was pastor of this church till his death in 1849. At 
the age of sixteen J. W. Quarterman went to college, and 
the following year became a member of the Christian church. 
In 1841, he entered the University of Alabama; and after- 
wards received his theological education in the Columbian 
Theological Seminary, where he remained for three years. 
Having been ordained to the ministry, he was appointed mis- 
sionary to the Chinese, by the Board of Foreign Missions of 
the Presbyterian Church, and embarked at New York on July 
20th, 1846, in company with Mr. and Mrs. Speer and Mr. 
French, arriving at Macao on December 27th. He reached 
Ningpo on the Sth of March, 1847; where his principal 
work was preaching; although he rendered much assistance 
in carrying on the operations of the press, and the different 
schools connected with the mission. In the beginning of 
185G, he accompanied the Rev. C. C. Baldwin on a visit to 
Shanghae overland. With the exception of some such occa- 
sional trips, he remained steadily at his post till 1857, when 
he was attacked by confluent smallpox, and died on the 13th 
of October. His remains were interred in the Presbyterian 
Mission burying; ground at Ningpo. 

Publications by Mr. Quarterman. 

CHINESE. 

1- i& -fl' RO 'H? Shin;/ shoo wan to. Catechism of Scrip- 
ture Doctrine and Practice. 38 leaves. Ningpo, 185.'). This 
translation of .tones' Catechism, consists of five parts: — 1, 
Of God;— 2, Of Angels;— 3, Of Man;— 4, Of the Law of 
God;— 5, Of the Church of God. 

2 - H M M IE 'Shtng king t'oo he. Illustrated Scrip- 
ture Narratives. 40 leaves. Ningpo, 1855. 



LXXX1X, H m £ JLm Shan-wan. THEODORE 
HAMBERG, a native of Sweden, was remarkably gifted with 
vocal power, which was devoloped in his early days. Being or- 
dained to the ministry of the gospel, he was sent to China as a 

missionary, by the Evangelical Missionary Society at Basle, 
to labour in connection with the Chinese' Missionary Union 



160 REV. RUDOLPH LECHLER. 

under the direction of Dr. Gutzlaff. He left Europe in company 
with the Rev. II. Lechler about the end of 1846, and reached 
Hongkong on March I9tb, L847. Being appointed to the 
eastern part of Kwangtung province as his sphere, he early 
began to itinerate with the native preachers, but met with some 
opposition from the authorities at theoutset. When Dr. Gutz- 
laifleft for Europe in September, 1849, Mr. Hamberg took 
charge of the Chinese Union; but on discovering the imposi- 
tions that were being practised, he gave up all connection 
with it. He spent a good deal of time at Pukak, Fungfo 
and Lilong among the Hakkas, a race of Chinese settlers in 
the eastern part of the province, and was the first missionary 
to learn their dialect. He was elected a delegate for Hongkong 
to the committee for translating the Old Testament, which 
met at Shanghae in 1850, but never went to take his place 
there. In 1852, he was married at Hongkong, and returned 
to his station at Pukak, where he remained till the spring of 
1854, -hut was then induced to go to Hongkong on account of 
his health, and there he died on May 13th. Mrs. Hamberg 
returned to Europe shortly after. 

Publications by Mr. Hamberg. 

CHINESE. 

1- Jffi B ff? # '^ ^ II fft Yaij soo sin t'oo show k'oo 
tsung Inn. General account of the Christian Martyrs. 44 leaves. 
1855. This is in 10 chapters, and records the trials of those 
who have suffered for the faith. It was reprinted. 

ENGLISH. 

2. The Visions of Hung-siu-tshuen, and Origin of the 
Kwang-si Insurrection. 8vo. pp v, 63. Hongkong, 1854. 
This was republished by instalments the same, year in the 
North China, Herald, and also in the Shanghae Almanac and 
Miscellany for 1855. It was also republished in London in a 
small volume entitled ''The Insurgent Chief.'' It was again 
reprinted in the 1st volume of The Chinese and Japanese 
Repository, 1863. 

Mr. Hamberg left a M. S. dictionary of the Hakka dialect. 



XC. ft j] g Lc Leih-Jee. Rev. RUDOLPH LECHLER 
was sent to China by the Evangelical Missionary Society 
at Basle, and arrived at Hongkong on March 19th, 1847. 
He visited Germany in 1858, and returned to Hongkong in 
1861, where he still resides. 



FERDINAND GENAHR. 161 

Publications by Mr. Lechler. 

CHINESE. 

1. 3jj| fo jjiifi If Yang sin sMn she. Hymn Book. 61 leaves. 
Hongkong, 1851. This is divided into two parts, the first 
of which in 22 leaves, contains 55 hymns and 7 doxologies, 
being a selection from Dr. Legge's hymn book, (see Legge's 
works, No. 2.) In the second part, Nos. 1 to 44 are taken 
from the hymn book of the American Baptist Mission; Nos. 
45 and 53 are by the Rev. T. Hamberg; Nos. 41 to 52 and 
54 to 61 are taken from a hvmn book in use at Amoy; Nos. 
62, 64, 65 and 67 are by the Rev. P. Winnes; No. 72 is by 
the Rev. W. Louis; and Nos. 63, 68 — 71 and 73 are from a 
hymn book in use at Canton. 

2. Das Evangelium des Matthaeus im Volksdialekte der 
Hakka-Chinesen. Ma, tlt.av tshon,fuk, yim, su, Hah, ha, 
syulc, wa\ 12mo. pp. 92. Berlin, 1860. This is Matthew's 
Gospel in the Hak-ka dialect, printed in the Italic character. 

3. Istf, Jca,tson,fu7c,yim,su,. Luke's Gospel. Hongkong, 
1865. This is in the Hakka dialect, printed in the Italic 
character. 



XCI. HEINRICH KUSTER, a native of Germany, or- 
dained to the ministry of the gospel, was'appointed a mission- 
ary to China, by the Rhenish Missionary Society. He left 
Europe about the end of the year 1846, accompanied by the 
Rev. F. Genahr and reached Hongkong in the spring of the 
following year, where he was put in connection with the 
Chinese Union, under the direction of Dr. Gutzlaff. Soon 
after his arrival, he commenced travelling in the interior, but 
his health gave way, and he died at Hongkong in the au- 
tumn, when he had been only six months in China. 



XCII. ^| §i jft Ye Nd-ts'ing. FERDINAND GENAHR, 
an ordained minister of the gospel, was appointed a mis- 
sionary to China, by the Rhenish Missionary Society. Be 
left Europe towards the close of 1846, accompanied by 
the Rev. H. Kiister, and a; rived at Hongkong in the spring 
of 1847. Having been placed under the direction of Dr. 
Gutzlaff in connection with the Chinese Union, he settled 
at Taiping in Kwangtung province, in November. In the 
following year he commenced a station at Se-heang, a village 
about 20 miles from Hongkong, where he established a school. 
In 1849 he opened an out-station at Woo-shlh-yen, and 
others at Fuh-yung, San-kin and Lan-kiu, and continued to 



162 FERDINAND GENAHR. 

labour for years in that region. In 1853 he was married to 
Miss. Lechler, the sister of the missionary of that name. The 
war with the English in the years 1856 to 1858 caused an 
unavoidable suspension of his labours in the interior for a 
time, but he returned afterwards to his old sphere, where he 
continued his exertions till 1864, when he was cut off by 
cholera on the 6th of August, and one of his sons the same 
day. Another son died of the same disease the following 
day; and Mrs. Grena.hr returned to Europe shortly after, with 
her three remaining children. 

Publications by Mr. Genahr. 

CHINESE. 

1. W M. £. ]fe Shing king die sh§. Scripture History. 
77 leaves. Hongkong, 1850. This is a revision of Gutzlaff's 
History, (see Gutzlaff's works, No. 60.) very much modified. 
It is in 2 books, and the last page contains an abstract of 
Scripture chronology. The same was issued in 1861, with 
the title |g fJE jjj. ft} JJI H Shing Icing she //J (so yaou. 

2. |j? *% ~fc jfl: Shing hwuy td heo. Doctrine of the 
Church. 67 leaves. Hongkong, 1851. This is a compendium 
of Christian doctrine in the form of question and answer. 
divided into 12 books, each of which is subdivided into a 
number of subjects; the whole comprising 870 questions. 
Nearly all the answers have Scripture quotations appended. 
There is a preface and table of contents, and the running 
title throughout the book is ^ ^ fS\ %=? Td heb wan td. Doc- 
trinal Catechism. 

3- Jl M M fH Ki n '^ l ^' in< J e - Thirza the converted 
Jewish girl. 26 leaves. Hongkong, 1852. 

4- M Wt F^ ^ Mea6u chuh wan la. Dialogues with a 
Temple keeper. 9 leaves. Hongkong, 1856. This is in two 
parts, and consists of conversations on the folly of idolatry 
and an explanation of Christian doctrine. It was reprinted 
in L863. 

5. ig M [uj ^ K'an yu wan td. Dialogue on Geoman- 
cy. 4 leaves. Hongkong, 1863. 

6. H $j B ^ M K'etv yb sze tsze" king. Old Testament 
Pour Character Classic. 58 leaves. Bongkong, 1863. This 
contains a narrative of the leading events of Old Testament 
history, in 50 articles, composed of rhyming lines of four cha- 
racters each. There is a, preface. 

7- ilf #'j ? M Sin yb sz& tsze Icing. New Testament 
Four Character Classic. 57 leaves. Hongkong, 1S63. This 
treats of New Testament history, uniform with the above, 
also in r>0 articles. 



REV. EDWARD CLEMENS LORD. 163 

8- H M- Hj ^ Chin taCm hang ping. Balance of the 
True Doctrine. 53 leaves. Hongkong, 18G3. This is a com- 
parison of Chinese and Christian doctrines, in a series of con- 
versations between the author and two Chinese friends. \t 
is divided into 10 chapters, and preceded by three prefaces 
and a table of contents. 



XCITI. BM\t L6 Urh-te. Rev. EDWARD CLE- 
MENS LOUD was sent to China by the American Baptist 
Missionary Union. He arrived at Hongkong- with Mrs. Lord 
on April 28th, 1847, and settled at Ningpo in June. In 
1851 he made a visit to the United States, and returned to 
Ningpo in May, 1854, where he still continues his labours. 

Publications by Mr. Lord. 

CHINESE. 

1. Jfl) 8$ ^ |£ fl$ Tdy soo keaou yaou led. Abstract of 
the Chief Points of Christianity. 7 leaves. Ningpo, 1851. A 
section at the end announces the opening of two Christian 
chapels at Ningpo. The last leaf is a Sunday calendar for 
1851. Three editions of this have been issued*, some of which 
bear the title Jf]J $$ $| ffi f,fc Ydy soo taou yd Kin, 

2. JTIS M & ti %k % % B & # f*9 so ° tdng slum 
keaou tsung yu luh choo skill. Christ's Sermon on the 
Mount, with Notes. 14 leaves. Ningpo, 1851. A second 
edition of this was issued at Ningpo, in L8f>l, in 18 leaves. 

3. m % % mw& * m m^ mm shi rod pa du 

16 1:6 ejilk so siting hwuy shoo cho6. Paul's Epistle to the 
Ephesians with Notes. 15 leaves. Ningpo, 1855. 

4. $i m % m * in tt ± m # # & SM t'° 6 . p adu 

16 Ice kea la t'ac slung hwuy shoo choo. Paul's Epistle to 
the Galatians with Notes. 23 leaves. Ningpo, 185G. 

5. jljf jjujl ^ ip: Tsun, shin yd cha.ng. Hymns and Tunes. 
13 leaves. Ningpo, 1856. In this the Chinese and Roman 
character are combined. 

6. M M fc fit i 1 IS I S Yuy soo keaou seaou tsuy 
tseih fuh chin yen. Forgiveness and Happiness. 6 leaves. 
Ningpo, 1858. This consists of three rhyming stanzas, 
on the law of God, Jesus the saviour and redeemer, and the 
Holy Spirit the sanctifier. These are followed by short pray- 
ers for morning and evening, confession of sins, and grace to 
be said at meals. A fourth edition of this was printed at 
Ningpo in 1865, in 6 leaves. 

7-. ft&ffi!lffffJEtg#*'tt Shi t'od padu 16 



164 REV. NATHAN WARDNER. 

he 16 ma shiug hwuy shoo cho6. Paul's Fpistle to the Ro- 
mans with Notes. 97 leaves. Ningpo. 1859. 

8. M % % Ml W # 1? f At! SJii t'od pabu Id he 
li.r pili laejm shoo chou. Paul's Epistle to the Hebrews with 

Notes. 60 leaves. Ningpo, 18.59. 

9- m m. f& m www^m^ftm it m* m pa d U 

16 he ho Jin to siting hwuy tseen shoo chad. Pauls First 
Epistle to the Corinthians with Notes. 97 leaves. Ningpo, 
1861. 

XCIV. W % fg Ked Pun till. Rev. SOLOMON CAR- 
PENTER was sent to China by the Seventh Day Baptist 
Missionary Society in America. He arrived at Hongkong 
with Mrs. Carpenter on April 28th, 1847, and settled at 
Shanghae during the summer. In 1858 he made a visit to 
the "United States, and returned to Shanghae on July 2nd. 
I860. He again left for his native land in the latter part of 
1864. 

Publications by Mr. Carpenter . 

CHINESE. 

1. ^ / H* §£ i|g FpJ ^ Sliinrj hiouy yaou le wan td. Ca- 
techism of the Essential Doctrines of the Church. 16 leaves. 
Shanghae, 1850. 

2- ?ll Wi tP 35c >§!' H Ching hen show nan seihjih. Evi- 
dence for the Observance of the Sabbath. 13 leaves. Shanghae. 
This is in the Shanghae dialect. 

3- t£c J!* B M Gr an seihjih he. Sabbath Calendar. Sin- 
gle sheet. Shanghae, 1S50- Besides the calendar for the year 
1850, this contains a special exhortation to observe the 
seventh day of the week as the sabbath, and to avoid the 
common error of keeping Sunday. 

4. ^ — {if: jp: -H !g| jH fafy Yew yth heen s?:e she yaou 
lun teih. An important Matter. Single sheet. Shanghae, 
1850. Besides the sabbath calendar for the year, this eon- 
tains an exhortation to think of the concerns of the soul. 

Mr. Carpenter also made a Hebrew Chinese Lexicon, but 
it is still in manuscript. 



NOV. -0 Ilwa. Rev. NATHAN WARDNER was sent 
to China by the Seventh Day Baptist Missionary Society in 
America. He arrived at Hongkong with Mrs. Wardner on 
April 28th, 1847, and proceeded to Shanghae his appointed 
station soon after. He left for the United States in 1857, 
and has not since returned. 



REY. JOHN VAX NEST TALMAGE. 165 

XCVL gR E-^^-cMw. Bev. FRANCIS C. JOHNSON 
was .sent to China by the Board of Foreign Missions of the 
Southern Baptist Convention in the United States, and ar- 
rived at Hongkong on July 25th, L847. On the 21st of August 

he reached Canton his appointed station, at which place, 
Macao and Canton, he laboured till the 24th. of August, 
184!), and then left for America. ' . 



XCVII. HENRI JULIUS HIRSCHBERG, M. E. C. S. 
was sent to China as medical missionary, by the London 
Missionary Society, and arrived at Hongkong on the 29th of 
July, 1847. In 1853 he removed to Amoy. and in 1858 left 
for Europe, since which he has not returned to China. 



XC VI IT. # J§ ^ Ta Ma- tsze. Rev. JOHN VAN NEST 
TALMAGE was sent to China by the American Board of 
Commissioners for Foreign Missions, and arrived at Macao 
on August 4th, 1847. He reached Amoy his destination on 
the 1 9th, and left for the United States in the spring- of 184!). 
He returned to Amoy on July 16th, 1850: on February. 10th, 
1862, Mrs. Talmage died, and shortly after that he left for 
America with his motherless children. He again returned to 
Amoy on June 1st, 1865, where he still resides. 

Publications hy Mr. Talmage. 

CHINESE. 

1. Tng hoanji chho hale. Ti E-Mng Khtk. Amoy Spelling 
Book. 15 leaves. Amoy, 1852. This is a primer printed in 
the Roman character, to instruct those learning to read the 
Amoy dialect in that character. 

2. * Thian Jo We thing. Toe it pun. 3il&M^M% 
(T'een loo leihch'ing Jeetien yih) Ti E-mng Khelc. Pilgrim's 
Progress in the Amoy Dialect. Part I. pp. 77. Amoy, 1853. 
This is a version in the Amoy colloquial, of the first section 
of Mr. Burns' translation of the same work, (see Burns' works, 
No. 2.) It is printed in the Roman character, but the rhyming 
stanzas occasionally introduced are retained in the original 
Chinese character, the Amoy reading sounds of the same 
being also given in the Roman character. 

3. Lo-teJc e chheh. Ti Earning Khelc. Book of Ruth, in the 
Amoy dialect, pp. 20. Amoy. 1853. This is also in the Roman 
character and has a short preface. 

4. Idng sim sin si. Ti E-mng In. Hymn Book in the 
Amoy dialect, pp. 2<>. Amoy, 185!). This is a collection of 



1GG JUDSON DWIGHT COLLINS. 

25 hymns, printed in the Roman character, of which the first 
13 are merely a transliteration of Mr. Young's book, (see 
W.Young's works, No. 3.) Of the remainder some were 
composed by the Rev. C Douglas. 

5- Wl jfc. M M Tito fae t'e fod. Map of Judea. Large 
sheet. Amoy, J 861. 



XCIX. fg ^Hwae-Uh. Rev. MOSES CLARK WHITE 
was sent to China by the American Methodist Episcopal Mis- 
sionary Society, and arrived at Macao with Mrs. White on 
August 4th, 1847. He reached Fuh-chow his destination on 
September 6th, where Mrs. White died on May 25th. 1848. 
In 1853, he left for the United States, and has not since re- 
turned. 

Publications by Mr. While. 

ENGLISH. 

1. The Chinese Language spoken at Fuh-Chau. 8vo. pp. 
32. New York, 1856. This was first published in the Me- 
thodist Quarterly Review. 

There is an article on Chinese philology by Mr. White, in 
the 5th volume of the Journal of the American Oriental 
Society. 



C. ffi $c Ko-Un. JUDSON DWIGHT COLLINS was 

born at Rose in Wayne county, New York. February 12th. 
1822. His parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and their house a home for itinerant ministers. In 
his early years he enjoyed the advantages of family worship, 
the 'Sabbath school, and the gospel ministry. In 1831, he 
emigrated with his parents to Michigan, and settled in the 
town of rittsiield in Washtenaw county, where he laboured 
with his father and brothers on a farm in summer, and at- 
tended the district school in winter. On the opening of the 
academy at Ann Arbor, he walked morning and evening three 
miles and a half to enjoy its benefits.. At the age of fourteen 
years, he became a member of the Methodist Episcopal church ; 
and as he acquired ability, was successfully employed in 
Sabbath school instruction, in Bible distribution, and in acts 
of charily I i the poor, visits of counsel to the erring in prison. 
and words of consolation to the unfortunate in the asylum. 
He was a member of the first class in Michigan University, 
where lie graduated in 1845. The same year he was employ- 
ed as Professor of Natural and Moral Science in the Wesleyan 



REV. MATTHEW T. YATES. 1 G7 

Seminary at Albion. At an early period in his religious his- 
tory, lie seems to have been devoted to the missionary work, 
and his mind was led to China before the Methodist church 
had a mission in that country. After his application to be 
sent on such a mission, he accepted a temporary appointment 
as a circuit preacher, in 1846. Having- been appointed to 
China by the American Methodist Episcopal Missionary So- 
ciety, he took leave of his friends at home on the 3rd of March, 
1847; and proceeded to Rochester, New York, where he met 
his future colleague, the Rev. M. C. White; with whom he 
sailed from Boston in the Heber. on the 15th of April, accom- 
panied also by the Revs. E. Doty and J. V. N. Talmage. 
On the 4th of August they arrived at Macao, and on the 
21st, he took passage in a lorcha at Hongkong, with Mr. and 
Mrs. White, and arrived at Fun-chow on September 6th. 
His first care on arriving was the acquirement of the local 
dialect. In February, 1848, in concert Avith Mr. White, he 
initiated a boy's school, and in the following August, opened 
a place for preaching. In February, 1849, he was brought, 
very low by typhus fever; and on his partial recovery, took a 
trip to Ningpo and Shanghae, returning to his field of labour 
in June, much improved in health. After the departure of 
the Rev. H. Hickok, Mr, Collins received his appointment as 
superintendent of the mission on May 2nd, 1850. Failing- 
health compelled him to relinquish his chosen work however; 
and he left Fuh-chow in April, 1851, embarked in the Ca- 
talpa at Hongkong. May 14th. and crossing the Pacific, land- 
ed in California duly 14th. He reached his home in Michi- 
gan in September, much wasted and worn down by climate 
and disease; but lingered till May, 1852, when he breathed 
his last. His remains rest in the family cemetery at Lyndon 
in Washtenow county, Michigan. 



CL fg Too. Rev. THOMAS W. TOBEY was sent to 
China by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Southern 
Baptist Convention in the United Slates. He arrived at 
Hongkong with Mrs. Tobey in August, 1847, and proceeded 
without delay to his destination at Shanghae. After a short 
visit to Canton on account of his health in 1849, he returned 
to Shanghae, and left for America in July the same year. 
He has not since returned. 



CII. .£ Qdn. Rev. MATTHEW T. YATES was sent 
to China by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Southern 
Baptist Convention in the United States, and arrived at 
Hongkong with Mrs. Yates in August, 1847; soon after which 



IliS REV. WILLIAM MUIRHEAD. 

he reached Shanghae his destination. Long residence ren- 
dering ;t change necessary, he left for America with his 
family in 1857, ami returned to Shanghae in I860. In March 
18(54. he left for a visit to Europe, ami returned to Shanghae 
in November, 1865. 



CIII. 3| H j$ Mod Wei-teen. Rev. WILLIAM MUIR- 
HEAD was sent to China by the London Missionary Society, 
arrived at Shanghae on August 26th, 1847, and has continued 
his labours there ever since. 

Publications by Mr. Muirhead. 

CHINESE. 

1. f f % £M M f$ H ' in( J ]:th ki n 9 Idh cliuen. The Pil- 
grim's Progress. 13 leaves. Shanghae, 1851. This is an 
abbreviated translation of Bunyan's work. 

2. $f #J 'M SI BH %* Kl li with k'eung Ic wan td. Cate- 
chism of Nature. 10 leaves. Shanghae, 1851. This is an ab- 
breviated translation of Martinet's work of the same name, 
as published by Joyce, in twenty three dialogues. 

3. 1& JJH ^ ]& T'e U tseun die. Universal G-eography. 
2 vols. 365 leaves. Shanghae, 1853—1854. The first volume 
of this work, in 5 books, is on Political Geography, in a short 
English preface to which, the author acknowledges his obli- 
gation to the work of Marques of Macao, jfc }][! fgf fg T'e U 
pi Ian; also the ;^ "J|| ^ §. Ting Jiwan die led, by Sen Ke- 
yu, the governor of Fuh-keen; and Milner's ••Universal G-eo- 
graphy'' in English. The second volume, on Physical. Ma- 
thematical and Historical G-eography, in LObooks, was drawn 
up with the assistance of Mrs. Somerville's "Physical Geo- 
graphy." Milner's "Physical Atlas," and Peal's •'•Outlines of 
Geology and Astronomy.*' as stated in the English preface, 
which gives a synopsis of the volume. It is largely illustrated 
with plates, in a very good style of art. 

4- %k ft t't-j %? Xenon, liioity wan td. The Assembly's 
Catechism. 17 leaves. Shanghai 1 , 1855. A translation of the 
Shorter Catechism drawn up by the Westminster Assembly 
of Divines. 

5. tyl M JTfS fjjfc Lac tsiw yay soo. Conic to Jesus, pp. 34. 
Shanghae. 1856. A translation of the popular tract of the 
same name, written by the Rev. Newman Hall. There is a 
preface by the translator. A revised edition was printed at 
Shanghae. in 1861, on a much smaller size page, in 30 leaves. 
In this the original preface is replaced by a short prayer, and 
the hymn "Come to Jesus"s a ipped at the end of the book. 



REV. WILLIAM MUIRHEA.B. 161) 

This last edition was reprinted at Hongkong in 18G3, in 27 
leaves. 

6- 5C M pI Jr- 2*^« /fceatfw cta- t 7 #& Evidences of the 
Christian Religion. 10 leaves. Shanghae, 1856. This is an 
elaboration of the hints thrown out in the 21st of Swan's 
"Letters on Missions." 

7- 5c §> Ift f/ T'eenfuh lun hang. The Golden Balance. 
9 leaves. Shanghae, 1856. This is the translation of a tract 
originally written in Burmese by the Rev. Dr. Judson. 

8- fk H Jt %$ Kew ling seen loo. The Anxious Enquirer. 
72 leaves. Hongkong, 1856. This is a translation of James' 
popular work with the same title. The first chapter was pub- 
lished previously the same year at Shanghae. in 8 leaves. 

9- % JJ +.H M T'ee.% U shih san t'eaou. Thirteen 
Articles on Christian Doctrine. 8 leaves. Shanghae, 1856. This 
is translated from a work of the British and Foreign Tract 
Society. 

10- /fc Uf Wl 1£ 3^C K'&w yu h'euen she" wan. Exhortation 
with regard to Praying for Rain. Sheet tract. Shanghae, 1856. 
This was published and circulated in Shanghae, during a time 
of drought, when there was an unusual display of idolatry. 

11- IS M i$i \% Wi lit % Tseue h'e gbw sedng h'euen she. 
wan. Exhortation to abandon Idols. Sheet tract. Shanghae, 
1856. 

12. '^ 3£ HJ jg Td ying kwo die. History of England. 
2 vols. 322 leaves. Shanghae, 1856. This is a translation from 
Milner in 7 books, with an eighth on theEnglish Constitution 
translated from "Chambers' Information for the People;" 
and a page of plates at the end, shewing certain routes of 
communication between England and France. After the 
preface, follow 4 leaves of instructions for the reader; then 
a genealogical table of the sovereigns of England, and a table 
of contents. 

13- 3i %k ^S fit I k Te'en lcea6u chaoujod lun. Christianity 
superior to Confucianism. 5 leaves. Shanghae, 1856. A revised 
edition was published together with No. 35, infra, under the 
title. JIL ;f£ fyl ||j Chin IceaCu heuen hang. 

14. 5t A HI if?! T'eenjin 6 t'ung. Analogy of Natural and 
Revealed Religion. 6 leaves. Hongkong, 1S56. This is translated 
from Pye Smith's Introduction to Butler's work of the same 
name. 

15. Ten Sermons. Shanghae, 1856. These which are trans- 
lations from a publication of the British and Foreign Tract 
Society, form so many sheet tracts, and there is no general 
title to the collection. The texts of the several discourses 
are, John, 6: 37; 1 John, 3: 4; Hebrews. 12: 14; Matthew, 
16: 26; 1 Peter, 2: 7; Titus, 2: 13: Mark. 1: 15; Romans. 
3: 23; Luke, 11: 13; and Hebrews, 0: 27. 



170 REV. WILLIAM MUIftHEAD. 

16. IE m M $$ ti. *& Tsung Uln ijihj soo cite ta6u. Gene- 
ral View of ' Christianity. 14 leaves. Shanghae, 1857. 

17. if| ^ l|f 1$ Tsdn chob site ko. Hymns of Praise. 38 
leaves.Shanghae, 1858. A subsequent edition was published in 
55 leaves, with the title Jffi ftfc ff -jg; Ydy soo tsdn ko. This is 
a collection of 100 hymns in the Shanghae dialect, prefaced by a 
statement of thirty principal doctrines of the Christian religion, 
with an elaborate detail of pertinent Scripture texts under each. 

18. 31 l£ ^h n*J (■l"' i shing cite nan. Tine Indication of 
the Sage. 12 leaves. Shanghae, 1858. This is a comparison 
between Christ and Confucius. 

19. j^ $& IE $1 if'eew Kftgr e//m 7c. Reverence Truth. 
Sheet tract. Shanghae, 1858. 

- () - H Jfo SUlng ko. Hymns. Single sheet. Shanghae, 1850. 

21. Ji : Mr A [ Jt ] T'&en taoujuh mun. Catechism of Christian 
Doctrine. 5 leaves. Shanghae, 1859. A revision of this cate- 
chism considerably altered was published at Shanghae, in 7 
leaves with the title |g ;fjc f,lj ^ /S7<i/*f/ /ceao/i wira <</. Ano- 
ther revision was published at Shanghae with the same title, 
in 1864, in I* leaves. Another revision was published at Shang- 
hae in 18(15. in 6 leaves. 

22. JJ1$ $$ 3£- ^ r«// soo ya6u che. Important Facts 
regarding Jesus. Shanghae. 1860. 

23. }J^ jit jit •= AT<?w ,s7ij leaiig yen. Good Words about 
Salvation. Sheet tract. Shanghae. 

24. ;j£ ilt ;•=! "■= ATe?y s/te chin yen Pointed Words about 
Salvation. Sheet, tract. Shanghae, 1861. 

25. XTIS $$ |'^ 'Hi* i$- Ydy soo keang she chuen. Life of 
Christ. 88 leaves. Shanghae, 1861. This is a revised edition 
of Medhurst's work of the same title, (see Medhurst's works, 
No. 36.) the quotations being all made from the Delegates' 
version of the New Testament. 

26. M M P s i ^r Ydy son wan td. Christian Catechism, 
f< leaves. Shanghae. 1861. This is a summary of Christian 
doctrine, given in the form of question and answer, in the 
Mandarin colloquial. At the end are given the Apostles' 
Creed, the Lord's Prayer, and a prayer to be used by a new 
convert. Another edition was printed at Shanghae the same 
year on a smaller size page, in 8 leaves. Reprinted at Shang- 
hae, in L862, in a revised form, with the title _L ^ j@l 5H" 
Shdng 16 chin ta6ti. in 8 leaves. 

27. ^ st£ ;/<; ■$, Siting shoo id taou. Great Doctrine of 
the Bible. 57 leaves. Shanghae. This begins with a preface, 
after which the main points of >, the Christian religion are 
treated at length in twenty eight articles, in the form of ques- 
tion and answer, each answer followed by proof quotations 
from the Scriptures. There is a short appendix on the most 
important statements in the Bible. 



REV. WILLIAM MUJRHEAD. 171 

28. ffc <$ H {$ ; Kscuftc /<«,% s7*m# 7.-o. Church Hymns. 
37 leaves. Shanghae, 1861. A collection of 56 pieces. 

- !) - 3& fjc A N Shing Iceaoujuh mun. Entrance to the 
Christian Religion. 22 leaves. Shanghae. This is a revision 
of Dr. Milne's tract, (see Dr. Milne's works, No. 17.) The 
original preface is replaced by a form of prayer. 

30. $fc $£ g| ^ Keio she siting Ico. .Salvation Hymns. 
39 leaves. Shanghae. 1861. This is a collection of 60 hymns. 

31- fill J11 If -^r j$C '$* Peen, yung taOu kauu loan shih. 
Form of Prayer for any occasion. Sheet tract. Shanghae, 
L861. This is preceded by a note on the duty of prayer. 

32. }$ JS$ jjjg -ff Ydy soo full yin. The Gospel of Jesus. 
Sheet tract. Shanghai'. This is a revision of Dyer's "Sum- 
mary of the Gospel." ('see Dyer's works, No. 2.) 

33. fj^ J^ *§fr I/tin shdng te. Predicates of God, Sheet tract. 
Shanghae. Each predicate is followed by Scripture references. 

34. p & 5c Ik Lim t'een fang, jij }& |=| Z/wra £'e yd. Pre- 
dicates of Heaven and Hell. Sheet tract. Shanghae. This is 
treated in the same way as the preceding. 

35. m. fjc ^f| -f^j Chin heaOu Iceuen hang. Balance of the 
True Religion. 5 leaves. Shanghae, 1864. This is a state- 
ment of the corresponding tenets of the Protestant and Ro- 
man 1 Catholic religions, with Scripture references for most of 
the Protestant doctrines. This tract and a revision of No. 
13, supra,, together 12 leaves, with a revised edition of No. 7, 
in 8 leaves, were afterwards published at Shanghae in one 
hook, under the general title jli %% f,fa f!gj Chinlceaoulunhdng. 

36. MM F'j % m %£ Ydy soo mun t'uo wan td. The 
Disciple's Catechism. 10 leaves. Shanghae. In this compen- 
dium, the questions are put by the learner and answered by 
the teacher. It is divided into nine articles, on — God the 
Father. — the Son. — the Holy Spirit. — the Church, — Com- 
munion of Saints, — Forgiveness of Sins. — Resurrection, — ■ 
Eternal Life, — the last being the neophyte's confession, with 
a form of prayer. A short appendix contains an elaboration 
of the Apostle's Creed, and a form of dedication, withablank 
for the disciple's name. 

37. |£ %. T>£ fi] Shing heaou hioo wan. Some Questions 
about Religion. .12 leave's. Shanghae. L864. This is a sim- 
ple enunciation of the leading points of Christianity given in 
a catechetical form, in several sections, on — God,— Man, — 
Jesus Christ, — Religious observances, — and the Future. This 
is followed by a series of short quotations from the Scriptures, 
relative to these several subjects, classed in order; after which 
is the hymn "Come to Jesus," and an exhortation to discri- 
minate between truth and falsehood. 

38. $5 Jf|J ffi$ Jg ffc & # Tsung ydy soo siring heaou hung 
hwiiy. Principles of the Christian' Church. Sheet tract- 



172 BENJAMIN SOUTHWELL. 

Shanghae. At the end is a certificate that the holder is a 
neophyte. 

39. " H jjgjc fp 1 ) %$ /S7ifri# keaou wan td. Catechism of the 
Christian Religion. 6 leaves. Shanghae. This summary of 
Christian truth, in the Mandarin dialect, is concluded by two 
short forms of prayer for morning and evening, the Lord's 
Prayer, and the Ten Commandments. 

ENGLISH. 

40. The Parting Charge. A Sermon preached in com- 
memoration of the death of the Rev. W. H. Medhurst, D. D. 
8vo. pp. 25, Shanghae, 1857. 

41. Christian Missions. A Sermon preached in Trinity 
Church October 11th, 1863. 12mo. pp. 23. Shanghae, 1863'. 

42. Sin discovered. A Sermon preached on Sunday even- 
ing, 18th September, 18 64. In Union Chapel, Shanghae. 
12mo. pp. 16. Shanghae, 1864. 



CIV. BENJAMIN SOUTHWELL was born at Bridg- 
north in Shropshire, on June 12th, 1822. In youth he was 
engaged in secular business, and became a member of the 
Christian church in connection with the Congregational body. 
His thoughts becoming directed ''towards the profession 
of the ministry, he passed a course of study at Spring-hill 
college, near Birmingham, and graduated as B. A. of the 
London University in 1846. Having been accepted by the 
London Missionary Society, he was ordained and set apart 
as a missionary to China, in Ebenezer Chapel, Birmingham, 
on February 10 th, 1847. He subsequently formed a matrimonial 
alliance, and on the 20th of April, embarked with Mrs. South- 
well in the Monarch, at Liverpool, accompained by the 
Rev. W. Muirhead and Mr. A. Wylie. The voyage was 
diversified by a few days stay at Simon's Town, and they 
reached Shanghae on August 26th. On his arrival, Mr. South- 
well set about those preparatory studies needful for his anti- 
cipated labours, but failing health prevented that continuous 
application requisite to success; and disease induced by the 
climate, superadded to the effects of severe mental exercise 
previous to leaving his native land, so completely prostrated 
him, that he died of fever after fifteen days illness, on October 
5th, 1849. He was buried in Shanghae cemetery, where a stone 
marks his place of rest, and a memorial tablet is placed in 
Union Chapel, Shanghae. Mrs. Southwell left for England 
with her daughter towards the end of the month. She was 
married a second time in 1864. 



ALEXANDER WYLIE, 173 

o v . ft JSk 35 ij Wei-m Ya-uJi . Alexander wylie 

was sent to China by the London Missionary Society, and 
arrived at Shanghae on August 26th, 1847, as Superintendent 
of the Society's Press there. He left for England in November, 
[864, and while there his connexion was transferred to the 
British and Foreign Bihle" Society, as whose agent he returned 
to < 'hina in November, 1863. 

Publications by Mr. Wylie. 

CHINESE. 

1. |ft ^ H£ W. S°° 7*eo 7c' d miLiuf. Compendium of Arith- 
metic. 127 leaves. Shanghae, 1853. This is in two books; 
the first, which is preceded by a preface and table of contents, 
contains the rudimentary rules of arithmetic, from Notation 
to Decimal fractions; the second contains the theory of Pro- 
portion in its various forms, besides Evolution and Logarithms. 
A table of logarithms of the numbers 1 to 1000 is given as an 
appendix, followed by a postcript. There is an English 
preface to some of the copies. 

2- Iff M fa M 2fc ^"^ ^ c h° yuen pun. Supplementary 
Elements of Geometry. 401 leaves. Sung-keang. 1857. This 
is a translation of Books vii to xv of Euclid's Elements, in- 
tended as a continuation of Iticci's translation of the first 
six books. There is a preface by the translator, and another 
by his Chinese amanuensis; also a postcript by Han Ying-pe 
the publisher. It was republished together with the first six 
books, at Nanking in 1865, by Tsang Kwo-fan the Viceroy. 

3- a\ ^ H Wi Lull ho ts'ung; fan. Shanghae Serial. 251 
leaves. Shanghae, 1857, 1858. This was a monthly periodical 
continued from January, 1857, to February, 1S58, containing 
articles on Religion, Science. Literature, and the general news 
of the day. Although the chief part was by Mr. Wylie the 
editor, there are many contributions by other hands. There 
is an English table of contents to each number. The greater 
part if not all the numbers were recut in Japan by authority, 
the following year. The reprint is in a handsome style, but 
all the articles on religion are omitted, and the Japanese 
grammatical sio-ns superadded to the original. 

4. "JJ; ^ ^£ %% Chung I/dd ts'ein shwo. Popular .Treatise 
on Mechanics. 14 Leaves. Shanghae, 1858. This is a translation 
from an English treatise. It. was first published in the last 
two numbers of the Shanghae Serial, (No. 3, supra.) and 
afterwards separately. 

5. ^p £j ^ M. t k Si ^'-^ V^ 1 ' lir ^ 1 W iW h' ui shfth. Story 
of the Two Friends Kea and Vi'li. 22 leaves. Shanghae, 1858. 
Tins is merely a revision of Dr. Milne's tract, (see Dr. Milne'- 



174 A.LEXANDEB W 1 LIE. 

works. No. II.) The Last chapter is added by the Rev. ■ 
Edkins, and the whole is compressed into ten chapters. Re- 
printed at Shanghae in 1861. 
6. -ft ± JIB n £ * « 3£ m # # Wo6 chod y&y soo hi 

(ah sin e chaOu shoo. "C^AtO \jtI ^-hilf fa-j&k^ztf 

o -^tr^T-^-T^M "V^-fr'' (V/h Musei eclien isus gherisfos i 

tutapuha itclic ghese. New Testament in Manchu and 
Chinese. Books 1 and 2. 113 leaves. Shanghae, 1859. In 
this, the corresponding sentences in the two versions arc dis- 
posed side by side, Mr. Wy lie having merely collated them 
from the Manchu translation by Lipoftzoff, and the Dele- 
version in Chinese. It includes the G-ospels of Matthew and 
Mark, nothing farther having been published in this form. 

7- ffi Wc ^ Tae soo lied. Treatise on Algebra. 208 leaves. 
Shanghae, 1859. This is a close translation of DeMorgan's 
treatise, in 14 books, with a preface and table of contents. 
There is an English preface to some of the copies. 

8- ft M %k tn M TaC w $ teeth shlh keih. Elements of 
Analytical Geometry and of the Differential and Integra! 
Calculus. 298 leaves. Shanghae, 1859. This is a close trans- 
lation of Loomis' work with the same title, in 18 books. There 
is a preface by the translator, and another by his Chinese 
amanuensis; followed by instructions for the reader, and a 
table of contents. A few of the copies have also an English 
preface, and an index of technical terms, pp. vii. 

9. fjfeJ^T'anfeen. Outlines of Astronomy. 361 leaves. 
Shanghae, 1859. This is a translation of Herschell's popular 
work, in IS books, with an appendix of tables. There is a 
preface by the the translator, and one by his Chinese aman- 
uensis; after which follow, instructions for the reader, and a 
table of contents. It is illustrated by the original steel en- 
gravings used in Herschell's work. There is an English pre- 
face and index of technical terms, pp. ix, attached to some 
of the copies. 

10. 4* W -Mr Hr Chung se thing shoo. Chinese Western 
Almanac. 31+33 leaves. Shanghae, IS59, 1860. This is 
a continuation of the annual commenced by the Rev. J. 
Edkins; (see Edkins' works, No. 7.) which Mr. "Wylie carried 
on for the above two years, while Mr. Edkins was in England, 
without deviation from the original plan. The number for 
1859, contains the Treaty of T'een-tsin, between England 
and China. That for I860, has among other articles, a des- 
criptive catalogue of the languages into which the Bible has 
been translated. 

ENGLISH. 

II. Translation of the Ts'ing wan k'e niunu'. a Chinese 



REV. \\ li,!. I \ J I • 1 /,} 

Grammar of the Manolm Tartar Language; with Entroduc- 
lory Notes on Manchu Literatui'e. 8vo. pp. lxxxii, 328. 
Shanghae, 18:35. 

12. Catalogue of the London Mission Library, Shanghae. 
8vo. pp. 102. Shanghae, 1857. 



CVI. PHINEAS D. SPALDING, an ordained minister 
of the Episcopal church, held a pastorate for some time in 
the United States. Being accepted as an agent of the Board 
of Foreign Missions of the Protestant Episcopal Church, he 
was appointed to China as his sphere of labour; and having left 
America in the spring of 1847, arrived at Shanghae on 
August 28th. He began his missionary career with much 
diligence and zeal, but disease soon undermined his constitu- 
tion, and caused him to quit his post, He embarked in the 
Coquette for Hongkong, August 30th, 1840, intending to 
proceed forthwith' to the United States. The vessel was ne- 
ver heard of afterwards, and it is supposed that all on board 
found a watery grave, during a typhoon which took place on 
the coast on (September 14th. 



OVII. % Pin. Rev. WILLIAM C. BURNS, Peking. 

Publications by Mr. Burns. 

CHINESE. 

1. jjjiji f|jp -^ jH Shin she ho seuen. HyrnnBogtk. 30 leaves. 
Amoy. This is a collection of 64 hymns and 4 doxolo 
with table of contents; the greater part are from Dr. L< 
Hymn book, (see Legge's works, No. 2.) with sligfet modifica- 
tion; of about a dozen additional, two or three are entirely 
new, the remainder being founded on hymns in Dr. Medhurst's 
Hymn book, (see Medhurst's works, No. 29.) but entirely re- 
modelled. Mr. Young's Hymn book (see VV. Young's works, 
No. 3.) is bound up with it as an appendix. 

' 2 - 3c 3& M fl T'een li)G h '' h ch'ing. The Pilgrim's Pro- 
gress. 99 leaves. Amoy, 1853. Tins is a translation of the 
first part of Bunyan's celebrated work. It is in 5 books. A 
reprint was issued at Hongkong in 1856, with a preface and 
ten pictorial illustrations. The same was printed al Shanghae 
the same year, with the addition of Milne's discourse on the 
-■Strait gate" (see Dr. Milne's works, No. 3.) as an appendix, 
in (ifJ leaves. An edition was printedat Fiih-chow in L857, by 
the American Methodist Episcopal Mission, in which (he terms 
for God and Spirit are altered. Theeditionof 1856 was re- 



176 K.EV. ROBERT SAM1 EL M V.CL \Y, D. D. 

printed at Shanghae in 1862, without the appendix, in 63 
leaves, ami appeared at the same time in parts, issued in 
Macgowan's monthly serial, (see J. Macgowan's works. No. I.) 
A new edition of the same was issued at Hongkong in 1863. 
It was again reprinted at Shanghae by the American Presby- 
terian Mission in 1865, in 55 leaves, divided into 5, books, 
with the addition of marginal Scripture references, the terms 
for God and Spirit being altered. 

; J> i'i'5 )]$ %ty IIf Chadu k'eung shin she. Hymns in the 
Chaou-chow Dialect. 21 leaves. Swatow, 1861. This is a 
collection of 29 hymns in the dialect of the people at Swatow 
and the surrounding region. 

4. %U )j'£ jjii|i 1|f Yung k'eung shin she. Hymns in the Fuh- 
chow Dialect. 25 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1861. A collection of 30 
hymns and 3 doxologies, with table of contents and doxology 
appended; besides two hymns on the back of the title-page, 
on the "Sufferings of Chirst," and "Observance of the Sabbath." 

,r >- M. W. f$ W H ea k >eun g s ^ n she. Hymns in the Amoy 
Dialect. Amoy, 1862. This is a collection of 20 hymns, 4 or 
5 of which are new, the remainder having been previously 
published in the Swatow and Fuh-chow dialects. 

6- IE ?E Wi HI Clung taou k'e mung. Peep of Day. 71 
leaves. Peking, 1864. This is a work in the Mandarin dia- 
lect, after the plan of the English publication of the same 
name, with the exception of the interrogatory system there 
adopted. It is composed anew from Scripture, and intended 
for all who have the first principles of Christian truth to 
learn. It is divided into 20 lessons, each of which closes with 
a rhyming stanza,, in the literary style, containing a resume 
of the matter comprised in the preceding lesson. 

7- If f?t 5c S& M fl Kwanhiod t'een lo6 leih cKing. 
Pilgrim's Progress, in the Mandarin Dialect. Peking, 1S65. 
This is a version of No. 2. supra, in the Mandarin colloquial, 



CVIII. £ % $j( % Tsdn-sw&n Yb-han. Rev. JOHN 

JOHNSON was sent to China by the American Baptist 
Missionary Union, and arrived at Hongkong with Mrs. John- 
son on January 5th, 1848. lie left for a visit to the United 
States in L858, and returned in 18,39, when he took up his 
residence at Swatow. 



CIX. #5fijfu MihLe-hd. Rev. ROBERT SAMUEL 
MACLAY, 1>. D. was sent to China by the American 

Methodist Missionary Society, and arrived at Hongkong in 
th< bi '"inning of '848. soon after which he proceeded to his 



REV. ROBERT SAMUEL MACLAY, D. D. 177 

station at FuJb.-ch.ow. He sailed for America at the close of 
185[) ; and returned to Fuh-chow in 1861. 

Publications by Dr. Maclay. 

CHINESE. 

1. John's Gospel in the Fuh-chow dialect. Fuh-chow, 
1854. 

2. Epistles of Peter and John in the Fuh-chow dialect. 
Fuh-chow, 1855. 

3. Sie udng ctiuang ung. Methodist Episcopal Commu- 
nion Service, pp. 14. Fuh-chow, 1856. This is in the Fuh- 
chow dialect, printed in the Roman character. 

4- % lit 2$t K<id she loan. Rousing Admonition for the 
Age. Fuli-chow, 1857. 

5. 'Jg gfc H %. $j Show * e ' & cJ/e V°- The Baptismal 
Covenant. 17 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1857. After a preface of two 
leaves follows a declaration of the candidate for baptism, in 
which he renounces all allegiance to the devil, the world and 
the flesh. The Apostles' Creed is next given, and then a short 
supplication for divine aid to walk worthy of his calling. The 
succeeding portionof the tract is an elaboration of the pre- 
ceding by a great number of Scripture texts in support of the 
successive clauses. It is published with the imprimatur of bhe 
"Jl JL^ :J| Iff, ^ Mel e met tsilng hiviiy, M. E. M. (Methodist 
Episcopal Mission) Society. 

6- Wf H ~$C K'& la6n /l '""- Prayer Book. Fuh-chow, 
1857. 

7. H £X H iffc % fl flr M° l c }llrt 1eea6u hwuy le shoo. 
Ritual of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 13 leaves. Fuli- 
chow. 1858. 

8 Hymn and Tune Book. 6 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1850. 
In this English tunes are given, with Chinese hymns under 
each. 

9- if $F 11 M. 8™ V° :i],lr "J ]: ' ll "J- New Testament. 210 
Leaves. Fuh-chow, 1863. Tin's is in the Fuh-chow dialed . 
the joint work of Dr. Maclay and other members of the mis- 
sion. 

10- il Jy : M Wt ft ii ~$C ^ et e ""'■ /•'<'<">" hwuy le wan. 
Ritual of the Methodist Episcopal Mission Church. 44 Leaves. 
Fuh-chow, 1865. This is chiefly a translation from the 
American liturgy, of the baptismal services for children and 
adults, forms for the admission of neophytes, the celebration 
of the Lord's Supper, marriage and burial services, and the 
dedication of a chapel. The whole is in the Fuh-chow dia- 
1< ct, except the preface. 

11. $ |I f% %j£ E king wan hi. Scriptural Catechi 



178 SENECA CUMMINGS. 

41 leaves. Fun-chow, 1865. This contains 114 questions, 
divided into twelve sections, on so many points of Chris- 
tian faith. Each answer is followed by a number of Scrip- 
ture quotations. There is a preface and table of contents. 

12. Jj& Jj£ jjiiji If Yung Jc'eung shin site. Hymns in the 
Fuh-chow Dialect. 53 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1865. Thirty- three 
of these were originally published by Mr. Burns; (see Burns' 
works, No. 4.) thirteen of the following are by Dr. Maclay, 
and six by the Rev. C. Hartwell, the remaining twenty nine 
being translated by Dr. Maclay from Dr. Legge's Tsung cliod 
she chang. (see Legge's works, No. 2.) There is a preface and 
table of contents. 

13. fg $g $jj tk Bin &h t'ung lun. General Discourse on 
Faith. 20 leaves. -Fuh-chow, 1865. After the preface there 
is a general discourse on the text Hebrews 11: 1; this is fol- 
lowed by a short article on the rules for a professing Christian; 
then a prayer to be used at home, a prayer to be used when 
abroad, prayers for morning and evening, the Ten Command- 
ments with notes, the Apostles' Creed, and the Lord's Prayer. 

ENGLISH. 

14. Life among the Chinese: with characteristic sketches 
and incidents of Missionary operations and prospects in China. 
12mo. pp. 400. New York, 1861. 



CX. § £ He-l-uh. Rev. HENRY HICKOK was sent 
to China by the American Methodist Missionary Society, and 
reached Hongkong with Mrs. Hickok early in 1848, soon af- 
ter which he proceeded to his station at Fuh-chow. At the 
beginning of 1849, he was obliged to retire on account of his 
health, and embarked for 'the United States, from which he- 
lms not since returned. 



CXI. ffg 0JJ Ketn-ming. SENECA CUMMINGS was 
born at Antrim, New Hampshire, United States, May 16th, 
1817. He early discovered a fondness for books, and by the 
progress he made 1 in study at the common school in his native 
place, he was soon employed in teaching himself in winter, 
while he laboured on his father's farm in the summer. In 
consequence of a partial paralysis of one arm, from which he 
never fully recovered, at the age of twenty he was obliged to 
relinquish a life of manual labour, and with the view of 
fitting himself more fully for teaching, entered the Academy 
at Meriden, and there prepared for college. During his first 
ferm there he gave his heart to Grod, and became a member 



BEV. CALEB COOK B .l.nwiX. 179 

of the Presbyterian church in his native town. In 1840 he 
entered Dartmouth College, where he graduated in 1844. 
After that he spent a year as Principal of the Keene Acade- 
my; during which time the death of his mother led him to a 
deeper religious experience, and having resolved to devote his 
life to the Christian ministry, he went in the autumn of 1845 
to Lane Seminary. While at that institution his thoughts 
were turned towards the work in heathen lands, and after 
having spent a year there, he was accepted in 1846, by the 
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, and 
designated to labour at Fuh-chow in China. He spent a 
second year in the study of theology at the Union Theologi- 
cal Seminary. On the 28th of October, 1847, he was married 
to A. M. Stearns, the sister of Mrs. Hartwell, wife of the 
missionary at Fuh-chow, and on the 11th of November em- 
barked with Mrs. Cumming, at Philadelphia in the Valpara- 
iso, in companv with Dr. and Mrs. James. Miss. Pohlman, 
the Eev. C. C. and Mrs. Baldwin, and the Eev. W. L. Rich- 
ards, and landed at Hongkong March 25th, 1848. After 
spending a few days in that colony, lie proceeded on his way 
to Fuh-chow, where he arrived on the 7th of May. In the 
autumn of 1849, he opened a small chapel in one of the main 
streets, and there, besides the superintendence of a school, 
and other mission duties, he continued for years to preach 
Christ to the natives. The health of himself and his wife 
however beginning to fail, they made a voyage to Shanghae 
in the spring of 1855, but finding no benefit from that, they 
soon returned to Fuh-chow, and there embarked in May for 
the United States, where they landed October 10th. He took 
up his abode at New Ipswich, and during the winter his 
health improved. Next year he performed much ministerial 
labour, and in August visited Andover to attend the anniver- 
saries of the seminary. He went fo Boston also to arrange 
for his return to China, but it was otherwise decreed; — he 
died at New Ipswich, August 12th, 1856. 

Publications by Mr. Cummiugs. 

CHINESE. 

1. IE jjii{i $£ %fo Chin shin tsung lun. Discourse on God. 
6 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1856. This appears to I"' a revision of 
Premare's tract, (see Shuck's works, No. 8.) 

CXII. Jg fl M6-lecu. Rev. CALEB COOK BALDWIN 

was sent to China by the American Board of Commissioners 
for Foreign Missions, and arrived at Hongkong with Mrs. 
Baldwin on March 25th, 1848, and at Fuh-chow his ap- 



180 WILLIAM L. RICHABDS. 

pointed station on May 7th. Declining health requiring a 
change of climate, he left for a visit to the United States in 
October, 1857, and returned to Fuh-chowin February, 1860. 

Publications by Mr. Baldwin. 

CHINESE. 

1- {Eft #P M M Hf tfr Lo6 hea chuen full yin shoo. Luke's 
Gospel. 50 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1853. This is a translation 
into the Fuli-chow dialect. 

2. 3g ^ pjj ^ Siting hed wan td. Catechism of Sacred 
Learning-. 63 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1S53. This is in the Fuh- 
chow dialect. 

3. fljJ tfiit Shin Inn. Discourse on God. 15 leaves. Fuh- 
chow, 1853. This is in the Fuh-chow dialect. 

4- A. JJT5 M %k >J> 'JI J&h y&y $oo heaou seaou yin. In- 
troduction to Christianity. 4 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1854. This 
is a revised edition, in the Fuh-chow dialect, of a tract for- 
merly in circulation. 



CXIII. M '{kLelh tsee. WILLIAM L. RICHAEDS, 
son of the Rev. William Richards, one of the first missionaries 
to the Sandwich Islands, was born at Lahaina on the island 
of Maui in that group, December 3rd, 1823, the eldest of 
eight children. During his residence among the heathen, he 
was preserved as far as possible from pagan influence, by his 
parents, from whom he .received his mental and moral training, 
except that one of the other missionaries heard his recitations 
in Latin for a few months. He remained at the islands till 
he was thirteen years old, when he embarked on December 
9th, 1836, with all the. rest of the family for the United 
States. Soon after reaching that country, he entered the 
sophomore class of Jefferson College, at Cannonsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1838, and found a home in the family of its presi- 
dent, the Rev. Dr. Brown. In 1841, the death of a youthful 
associate, which much affected him, seems to have been 
blessed to his spiritual good, and he became a member of the 
Presbyterian church at Cannonsburg that year. After his 
graduation he. served as tutor for a year in the family of 
William Buchanan, Esq., near Wheeling, Virginia. Having 
spent some time in 1843 travelling with his father, who was 
.hen on a second visit to the United States, he entered Union 
Cheological Seminary at New York, in October. While 
fchere, he resolved to devote his life to the extension of Christ's 
cause among the heathen, and offered himself to the Ameri- 
can Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, to go any- 



WILLIAM FARMER. 181 

where they might send him; in answer to which he was ap- 
pointed in the spring of 1847, to join their mission at Fuh 
chow in China. He was licensed by the Brooklyn presbytery, 
April 29th, and ordained by the same body, October 14th, at 
the church of which he was a member, under the pastorate of 
the Rev. Mr. Speer. He embarked at Philadelphia in the Val- 
paraiso, in company with Messrs. Cummings and Baldwin \vi th 
their wives, Dr. and Mrs. James, and Miss Pohlman, on 
November 11th, and landed at Hongkong, March 25th, 1848. 
Leaving that port with Messrs. Cummings and Baldwin, he 
reached Fuh-cnow on May 7th, and gave himself at once to 
the study of the language, in which he made very satisfactory 
progress, and procured a place where he continued to preach 
Jesus to the people. After a brief career, he was attacked 
in September, 1850, by haemorrhage of the lungs, and a 
sea voyage was considered the only hope of prolonging his 
life. He left Fnh-chow on November 12th, spent a little time 
at Hongkong, and proceeded to Canton, where he embarked 
for the United States in the Sea, on the 3rd of March, 1851. 
He died at sea before reaching the end of the voyage, when 
near St. Helena, on June 5th, and his mortal remains were 
committed to the deep. 



CXIV. J. SEXTON JAMES the son of J . E. James, Esq. 
was born at Philadelphia. He obtained his classical educa- 
tion at Brown University, studied theology at Newton, and 
medicine in his native city, where he graduated as M. D. In 
the latter part of 1847, he was married to Miss. Safford; and 
having been appointed a missionary to China, by the Board 
of Foreign Missions of the Southern Baptist Convention, he 
sailed with Mrs. James from Philadelphia in the Valparaiso, 
on November J lth, accompanied by Messrs. Gumming and 
Baldwin with their wives, Mr. Richards and Miss. Pohlman, 
and landed at Hongkong on March 25th, 1848. Their destina- 
tion was Shanghae, and after spending five or six days at 
Hongkong, they visited Canton, from "which they embarked 
to return on April 13th, in the schooner Paradox. As they 
entered the harbour on the 15th, and in sight of the town of 
Hongkong, Dr. James had just left the deck for the cabin, 
where Mrs. James was preparing to go ashore, when a sudden 
gust of wind struck the schooner, and she immediately went 
over on her side, going down in a few seconds, when Dr. and 
Mrs. James found a watery grave, nothing having been seen 
of them afterwards. 



CXV. WILLIAM FARMER graduated as B. A. at on* 



182 REV. ROBERT HENBT COBBOLD. 31. A. 

of the English Universities, aud being admitted into priest's 
orders, wes appointed a missionary to China by the Church of 
England Missionary Society. He left England with Mrs. 
Farmer on November 21st, 1847, accompanied by the Revs. 
R. H. Cobbold and W. A. Russell, and arrived at Shanghae. 
bis destination on April 17th, 1848. His health was consi- 
derably impaired during the voyage, and after a residence of 
several months without any sensible improvement, he made a 
short visit to Ningpo, which produced no benefit, and it was 
determined that he should proceed at once to England. He 
left Shanghae with Mrs. Farmer, about the middle of March, 
1849, for Hongkong, where they took passage by steamer, in- 
tending to proceed by the overland route. Three days after 
his embarkation at the Point de G-alle, he died at sea on the 
23rd of April, and his remains were committed to the deep. 
Mrs. Farmer continued the voyage to England. 



CXV. ^f ffil J§ H Kd-pih P6-6. Rkv. ROBERT HENRY 
COBBOLD, M. A. was sent to China by the Church of Eng- 
land Missionary Society. Pie arrived at Shanghae on April 
17th, 1848, and reached Ningpo on May 13th. In September, 
1851, he left for England, and returned to Ningpo with Mrs. 
Cobbold in January. 1853. He left China with his family 
finally for England in March, 1S57, and is now Rector of 
Brosely in Shropshire. 

Publications by Mr. Cobbold. 

CHINESE. 

1- 1£- li! ffi 1^ Yaou le t'uy yuen. Important Principles 
traced to their Source. 29 leaves. Ningpo, 1853. This is a 
dialogue between two friends on doctrinal questions. It is in 
two parts, and has a preface. 

2- "£ £}■ jjt S j\. ?E K° (> k } ' n show s hfo v i(i * a(3w - The 

Great Doctrine transmitted from age to age. 8 leaves. Ning- 
po, 1S53. After some prefatory remarks, follows the Apostle's 
Creed, with an exposition appended; then some remarks on 
man's relation to God, the Decalogue and an exposition of 
the same. 

3. IS. IjE $$ 4gf- Chin U t'eth yaou. Important Selections 
of Truth. J 8 leaves. Shanghae, 1853. Reprinted at Shanghae. 
in 1856. This is a treatise on the worship of God, and faith 
in Jesus; followed by forms of prayer for morning and even- 
ing, and the Lord's Prayer in conclusion. 

4. M A A B Lijingjih sing. Pilgrim's Progress, pp. 
251. Ningpo, 1855. This is a translation into the Ningpo 



REV. WILLIAM ARMSTRONG RUSSELL B. A. 183 

dialect, printed in the Roman character. There is a preface 
and table of contents, 

5. >J> ^ IE 7H Sea&u hub citing tsung. Correct Views 
of Minor Questions. 30 leaves. Shanghae, 1856. This is a 
treatise in the form of question and answer, on certain Chinese 
customs and Christian dogmas. 

6. Iffj jit 3t Keuen she loan. Exhortations for the Age. 
6 leaves. Shanghae, 1855*. This is a short discourse on the 
subject matter of the Bible. 

7- Wi "cf 3t 5^ Team ka6u wan shili. Forms of Prayer. 
Ningpo. Reprinted at Shanghae in 1861, in 38 leaves. After 
the preface, this contains morning and evening prayers for every 
day in the week, each preceded by a text of Scripture; conclu- 
ding with the Lord's Prayer, and Benediction. 

8. Spelling Book in the Ningpo colloquial dialect. 8 leaves. 
Ningpo. This was drawn up by Mr. Cobbold, in concert with 
other missionaries. 

9. Jih tsili yiiih le. Line upon Line. 2 vols. pp. 272, 
158. Ningpo, 1856, 1857. This is in the Ningpo dialect, 
printed in the Roman character. 

10. ^p £{$ $i§ Cite me peen. Directions for the Misguided. 
15 leaves. Shanghae, 1857. Reprinted at Hongkong in 1863, 
in 7 leaves. This is a tract on the evils of opium. After the 
preface, are two pieces on the cure of opium smoking, a page 
of rhyme on the same subject; then the effects of the use of 
the drug are stated in six articles, as it exhausts the resources 
of the state, it ruins the property of families, it, enslaves wives 
and children, it cuts short the ancestral pedigree, it destroys 
the reputation, and it wastes the constitution; then follows a 
short historical sketch of the introduction of opium into 
China, and a receipt for the cure of smoking. 

ENGLISH. 

11. Pictures of the Chinese, drawn by themselves. 8vO. 
pp. vi, 220. London, 1860. This is profusely illustrated by 
35 lithographic plates, besides numerous wood engravings. 

There are two interesting; accounts of missionary tours by 
Mr. Cobbold in the North-China Herald for 1855 and ISM. 
afterwards published in the Shanghae Almanac and Mis- 
cellanv for 1856 and 1857. 



CXVII. jj$ % fft m Ltili-tsze Yue-Ie. Rev. WILLIAM 
ARMSTRONG RUSSELL. B. A. was sent to China by the 
Church of England .Missionary Society, and arrived at Shang- 
hae on April 17th, 1848, reaching Ningpo his destination on 
Mav 13th. There he remained till 1862. when failing health 



184 REV. W II. II ELM LOBSCIIEID. 

necessitated a change, and he left I'm- England with Mrs. 
Russell, since which he has not returned. 

Publications by Mr. BusselL 

CHINESE. 

1. Ts'ing too yice-su u-sen he. Come to Jesus, pp. 126. 
Ningpo, 1853. This is in the Ningpo dialect, printed in the 
Roman character. 

2. Kong kajih nyi Jcyiin. Twelve Sermons, pp. x. 263. 
Ningpo, 1858. This is in the Ningpo dialect, printed in the 
Roman character. It has a short preface and table of contents. 

3. Singjah djunsJiii. New Testament. 260 leaves. Ning- 
po. This is a revision, principally by Mr. Russell and the Rev. 
H. V. Rankin, of a version in the Ningpo dialect, the greater 
part of which had been translated and published in previous 
years, by Mr. Russell in concert with the Rev. W. P. A. 
Martin and other missionaries. It is printed in the Roman 
character. 

Publications by Mrs. Russell. 

CHINESE. 

1. Se-lah teng Han-nah. Sarah and Hannah, pp. 12. 
Ningpo. 1852. A story in the Ningpo dialect, printed in the 
Roman character. 

2. Ah tia t'i ng-fs son-tsiang. A Father instructing his 
Son on Settling Accounts, pp. 12. Ningpo; This is in the 
Ningpo dialect, printed in the Roman character. 



CXVIII. f§ ^ {&: L6 Ts'un-tih. Rev. WILHELM LOB- 
SCHEiD was sent to China by the Rhenish Missionary Society, 
and arrived at Hongkong on May 22nd, 1848. On March 18th, 
1850, he left for Europe, and returned to Hongkong with Mrs. 
Lobscheid on February 18th, 1853, as the agent of the Chinese 
Evangelization Society. In 1857 his connection with the 
society was dissolved, and on March 2nd, 1861, he left for 
Europe via Demarara. In September, 1862, he again returned 
to Hongkong, where he still resides. 

Publications by Mr. Lobscheid. 

CHINESE. 

*• d f3 JM M & !$C 1''°° t'o° she shih loan. Address on 
the Feast of the Hungry Spirits. 5 leaves. 1851. 



REV. WILHELM LOBSCHEID. 185 

2. H $$a f& pift E twun tsung lun. General Discourse on 
False Doctrines. 26 leaves. This tract which is published by 
the Chinese Evangelization Society (jjjg 7JI f* Full han hwuy), 
is a selection of extracts from the last section of a Roman 
Catholic work entitled $$ ]ik ^ |g Siring she ts'oo yaou, 
published in 179G. It is divided into 7 parts, separately paged, 
and may form so many different tracts, on — Various false 
objects of worship, — Errors of Buddhism, — Lucky and unlucky 
days and stars, — Charms and spells, — Fortune-telling, — Geo- 
mancy, — and Burning paper money. 

3. jjig \& ^ ^ Fah she tsln Uang. Bridge to the World 
of Bliss. 18 leaves. 1854. This tract is also issued by the 
Fuh han hwuy. It consists of three parts and a preface; the 
first part is on Human nature, the second on Spirits, and the 
third on Filial piety. Another edition was published in 19 
leaves, without the preface, but having an additional section 
at the end bearing on filial piety. 

4- |jjj{ fie tT ii Kcae w&rig. Thing lull. Injunctions against 
Depraved Conduct. 6' leaves. This, which is also issued by 
the Fuh han hwj&y, is the translation of a tract by an Eng- 
lish lady, consisting of two parts; the first on the Truth of 
the Holy Spirit, and the second on the Word of God, being 
almost entirely a collection of Scripture texts ranged in order, 
with the reference given to each. 

5- M M M W T'e le sin che. New Treatise on Geogra- 
phy. 19 leaves. 1855. This seems to be but the first part, 
or a specimen of a much larger projected publication. After 
the preface, is a short article on Buddhism, then a plate of 
the eastern and western hemispheres, a treatise on the theory 
of the globe, descriptions of Spain and Portugal, with a 
folding map, and lastly a plate of a locomotive steam engine. 

6. M? jtfr ii il Meaou ling shioang met. The Captive 
Maid. 14 leaves. 1856. This is issued by the Full han lnvuy, 
and is professedly the work of a convert, though published 
under the superintendence of Mr. Lobscheid. It is a narra- 
tive of a captive maiden in the olden times, who was instru- 
mental in bringing the whole of her master's family to the 
knowledge of God and faith in Christ. 

7. =f; t£ j£ Tseen tsze wan. Thousand Character Classic. 
Hongkong, 1857. This is the popular little Chinese work 
of that name, with short notes explanatory of the characters 
and the text, given in a simple half-colloquial style. It was 
prepared for the use of the government schools of Hongkong. 

8. |£ j5j H ^ IS -3^ s ^ g son tsze Icing. Medhurst's 
Trimetrical Classic. 16 leaves. Hongkong, 1857. This is 
Medhurst's tract, (see Medhurst's works, No. 2.) annotated in 
the same maimer as the preceding. It was reprinted at 
Hongkong in 1863. 



TSG REV. WILUELM LOBSCHEID. 

9. if} t£ If |f faYmo Uo she slili hen. Odes for Children 
with Notes. 17 leaves. Hongkong. This is another popular 
little book in Chinese schools, to which Mr. Lobseheid has 

added simple explanations, clause by clause, uniform with 
the preceding, 

10. ptj |f f£ tin Xt M S ?A sIi0n l* yu k'& mting. The 
Four Books with Explanations in the Local Dialect. 31 leaves. 
Hongkong, 1860. This is the ft % Ta heo, or first of the 
Four Books, annotated in the same style as the preceding, 
by one of Mr. Lobscheid's teachers, and published with his 
revision and imprimatur. There is a preface, followed by four 
questions and answers regarding the contents of the books, 
and a note regarding Confucius and his works. 

11- P$ Pf % M if Hi ft 2f ^ «f Ting 7f lh U klc ° s ' ,h 
chuh ch ung t6w h'e ,sho<>. Treatise on the New English Method 

of Vaccination. 7 leaves. Hongkong. This is a modification 
of a tract originally written by Dr. Pearson, translated into 
Chinese by Sir George Staunton, and published at Canton in 
1805. 

12 }[t £1$ |fj Che me pecn. Guide to a Wanderer. Hong- 
kong. 

ENGLISH. 

13. The Beginners First Book, or Vocalulary of the 
Canton Dialect. Svo. pp. ix, 123. Hongkong. 1858. This 
is a second edition of Dr. Devan's book, (see Devan's works, 
No. J.) revised, corrected, enlarged, and toned, by Mr. Lob- 
seheid. A third edition was publishedat Hongkong in 1861, 
12mo. pp. viii. 148. 

14. A Few Notices on the Extent of Chinese Education, 
and the Government Schools of Hongkong; with remarks on 
the history and religious notions of the inhabitants of this 
island. Svo. pp. 48. and a large folding sheet. Hongkong, 1859. 

15. Chinese Emigration to the West Indies. A Trip 
Through British Guiana undertaken for the purpose of 
ascertaining the condition of the Chinese who have emigrated 
under Government Contract. AVith Supplementary Papers 
Relating to Contract Labor and the Slave Trade. Svo. pp. 
xvii, 87. 

16. The Numerical Relations of the Population of China, 
during tin; 4000 years of its Historical Existence; or, the 
Rise and Fall of (he Chinese Population. By T. Sacharoff, 
Member of the Imperial Russian Embassy in Peking. Trans- 
lated into English. Also the Chronology of the Chinese, from 
the Mythological times up to the present Ruler. Svo. pp. v. 
57, 39. Hongkong, 1862. A second edition was published in 
Hongkong in 1864. 

17. Select Phrases and Reading Lessons in the Canton 
Dialect. Svo. pp. 70. Hongkong. 1864. 



REVi JOSEPH EDEINS, B. A. 187 

1S - ^ ii§ 3C & >h 31 ,**"£ ^4' jJBa» #tf, c j8W Taw. 
Chinese-English Grammar. 8vo. 2 Parts, pp. 48, 81. Hong- 
kong, 1864. 

19. Grammar of the Chinese Language. In two Parts. 
Svo. pp. xxxvii, 111. vi, 178. Hongkong, 1864. 

20. ^ 7 J§t ft H fll !l Ting Jiioa king h'ee pecn Ian. The 
Tourist's Guide and Merchant's Manual Being an English. 
Chinese Vocabulary of Articles of Commerce and of domestic 
Use; also, all the known Names connected with the Sciences 
or Natural History. Chemistry, Pharmacy, &c. &c. &c. In the 
Court and Pnnte Dialects Compiled from All Available Sour- 
ces for the Publisher. Narrow 4to. pp. i\\ 148. Hongkong, 
1864. 

21. The Happy Stroll. Single sheet. This is an English 
poetical translation of a German Hymn, Der Segensgang, 
along with the original by Gr. Reuss, and the music by C. 
Straube. 



CXIX. 3£ $j =§ ^ U Gac Yo-sih Telli-ldn. Rev. 
JOSEPH EDKINS, B. A. was sent to China by the London 
Missionary Society, and arrived at Hongkong on July 2nd, 
1848, and at Shanghae his destination on September 2nd. 
In March, 1858, he left for England, and returned to Shang- 
hae with Mrs. Edkins, on September 14th, 1859. In 1860, he 
removed to Che-foo. and the following year to Teen-tsin, 
where he remained till May, 1863, and then took up his abode 
at Pekiiur, where he has been ever since. 



o) 



Publications by Mr. Edkins. 

CHINESE. 



1- JiSI^^t-^ll-HBtt ^.Heenfunrjurh 
nein shVt, ylh yue ts'oo yihjilb jih slifli tan. Elements of the 
Solar Eclipse on December 11th. 1852. A large sheet. Shang- 
hae, 1852. This is the translation of a calculation made by 
Capt, Shadwell of H. M. S. Highflyer, of the elements for 
Peking, Shanghae, Ningpo, Fuhchow, Amoy, Canton and 
Hongkong; with live cuts of the eclipse at the several stations. 
The English original was published in the North China 
Herald for December 4th, 1852. 

2. ^ ?£ 3c 3C ffr HeoM szc t'een foo Un. Discourse 
on Filial Devotion towards the Heavenly Father. S leaves. 
Shanghae, 1854. This is divided into 12 sections, exhibiting 
the motives, duty and advantages of devotion towards God. 
It was reprinted at Shanghae in 1856. 

3 - H fi tk San till bin.. The Three Graces. 17 leaves. 



188 KEV\ JOSEPH EDKINS, B. A. 

Shanghae, 1856. This is divided into three parts, treating 
respectively of Faith, Hope and Charity, translated from 
Adams' "Private Thoughts." There is a preface of two 
leaves. 

4. p- jfjc .IE p3 Bhih keaou ching mew. Correction of 
Buddhist Errors.^31 leaves. Shanghae, 1857. This is divided 
into ten chapters, treating on so many important points in 
the Buddhist religion. It was republished at Hongkong in 
1861, together with the supplement, (see No. 6, infra.) as 
a single treatise in 20 chapters. 

5. ffl M- Wt M- Ydy so ° k ea oM l&d- Condensed State- 
ment of Christianity. 32 leaves. Shanghae, 1858 This is 
merely a revision of Dr. Medhurst's tract, (see Medhurst's 
works, No. 35.) with a short memorial notice of Dr. Medhurst 
prefixed; and all the part following the Nestorian inscription 
in previous issues omitted, while some explanatory details 
regarding that inscription are added. 

6. fjf |f WisEW S'^ 1 s ^ 1 keaou citing mew. Supple- 
mentary Correction of Buddhist Errors. 29 leaves. Shanghae, 
1859. This is a discussion of ten points additional to those 
given in the preceding tract. (No. 4.) 

7. If? J^ Chung heb. Treatise on Mechanics. 226 leaves. 
Sung-keang, 1859. This is a translation of Whewells trea- 
tise, in 17 books, divided into 3 volumes. The blocks for 
the work were engraved at Sung-keang but before ten copies 
hed been printed off, the house where they were deposited 
was burnt down and the whole destroyed. It is now being 
reprinted at Shanghae. 

8. |j£ '^ f [J fe jfllf Hwa ya?ig hd hb thing shoo. Chinese 
and Foreign Concord Almanac. This is the title of the first 
number, for 1852, of an annual which was continued in sub- 
sequent years under the title 4* W Ml Ir Chung se t'ung 
shoo. The first number is in 27 leaves, and contains a preface, 
table of contents, 24 divisions of the year at Peking, equation 
of time for various places throughout the world, eclipses, 
calendar containing phases of the moon, comparative table of 
Chinese and English days, and the various celestial phenomena. 
This is followed by a Chinese and European comparative 
chronology, an exhortation to improve the time, three forms 
of prayer, and five other religious articles. The number for 
1853, in 39 leaves, is a counterpart of the preceding as far as 
the end of the calendar; after which is a historical sketch of 
Judea with a map, six religious articles, two forms of prayer, 
and a series of scientific articles illustrated by figures, on the 
conic sections, the solar system, motion of light, precession of 
the equinoxes, optics, nebuke and the planets, concluding 
with a chronology of scientific discovery. The issue for 1854, 
in 37 leaves, has, in addition to the usual commencement, an 



REV. JOSEPH EDKINSj B, A. 189 

English preface. After the calendar are five articles of a 
religious tendency, followed by short treatises on Gravitation 
and Optics. That for 1855, in 56 leaves, contains five reli- 
gious articles, two on the British and Foreign Bible Society, 
a memoir of Dr. Morrison, an account of Milton's "Paradise 
Lost," and an explanation of the proper names in the four 
Gospels; followed by a treatise on Fluids, and an explanation 
of Solar Eclipses. The number for 1856 has articles on Faith, 
— on going to Zion, — on the corruption of mankind in reli- 
gion and morality before the birth of Christ, — the origin of 
false religions, — Judea the birth-place of Jesus, — a prayer, 
— and an explanation of proper names in the Acts of the 
Apostles; followed by a supplementary treatise on Fluids. The 
number for 1857, in 39 leaves, has a catechism, — explanation 
of the gospel parables, — an article on the oneness of Jesus 
with God, — and one on the blessedness of hearing the truth, 
— eight forms of prayer and adoration, — and a chronology of 
the Christian church, — with a second supplementary treatise 
on Fluids. The one for 1858, in 34 leaves, contains three forms 
of prayer, — articles on the requisites for entering the Chris- 
tian church, — the martyrdom of Cyprian, — the intention of 
Christ's miracles, — and different customs in Judea in the time 
of Christ; after which is a chronology of scientific discovery, 
and a treatise on Comets. Mr. Edkins having transferred the 
management of this serial to Mr. Wylie (see Wylie's works, 
No. 10.) during his absence in Europe, resumed the work on 
his return, in the number for 1861, in 27 leaves. After the 
usual calendar, is a table of the attributes and predicates of 
God, and seven forms of prayer. Omitting the issue for a 
year, the next number appeared for 1863, at Teen-tsin; and 
those for 1864 and 1865 were published at Peking; these last 
three being much reduced in size and matter. 

9- Wi af M M F&h yin seueii peen. Extract from the 
Gospel. 43 leaves. Peking, 1863. This is a specimen of a 
new version of the New Testament in the mandarin dialect, 
consisting of some chapters of Matthew and Romans, with a 
preface in the literary style. This was sent round to the va- 
rious missionaries in China, for examination and criticism. 

10. £j( :£ H f;§ Sung choo sliing she. Hymn Book. Pe- 
king. A collection of 81 hymns. 

11- iife M ^ H T ' 6 ' k' ew ise uen t'oo. Map of the World. 
Large sheet. Peking, 1864. This is a representation of the 
world in two large hemispheres. The corners are filled in 
at the top, with Scripture extracts regarding the creation oi 
the world and Christ's commission to his disciples. At the 
foot are several articles on the navigation of the globe, and 
some imp'ortant matters of information regarding geography 

12. if %& *& ii£ $w» f° faoan Java. New Testament in 



190 REV. JOSEPH EDKINS, B. A. 

the Mandarin Dialect. Peking, I860. This version is the 
joint work of Mr. Edkins with the Revs. Dr. Martin, J. 
Burdon, J. Schereschewsky, T. McClatchie and H. Blodget. 
Only the four Gospels and Acts were printed by him in the 
first edition, using the same terms for God and Spirit as 
in the Delegates' version, when it was agreed by the great 
majority of the missionaries in Peking to issue a version in 
concert, having adopted a new set of terms. An edition of 
the, same gospels with the terms shin and /mr/ for "God" and 
"Spirit," however, appeared simultaneously with the above- 
named, at Shanghae. 

ENGLISH. 

13. Chinese Conversations; translated from Native Au- 
thors. 8vo. pp. iv," 183. Shanghae, 1852. 

14. A Grammar of Colloquial Chinese, as exhibited in the 
Shanghai Dialect. 8vo. pp. viii, 248. Shanghae, 1853. 

15. A Grammar of the Chinese Colloquial Language, 
commonly called the Mandarin Dialect. 8vo. pp. viii, 264. 
Shanghae, 1857. A revised edition in 4to. was published at 
Shanghae in 1S63; pp. viii, 279. 

16. The Religious Condition of the Chinese; with observa- 
tions on the prospects of Christian conversion amongst that 
people. 16mo. pp. viii, 288. London, 1859. This was first 
published as a series of articles in successive numbers of the 
Beacon newspaper. It was again published in 1861, as a 
volume for railway reading. 

17. Progressive Lessons in the Chinese Spoken Language; 
with lists of common words and phrases, and an Appendix 
containing the laws of tones in the Peking dialect. 8vo. pp. 
v, 102. Shanghae, 1862. A revised edition was published at 
Shanghae in 1S64; pp. v, 103. 

18. Notices of Chinese Buddhism. Shanghae. These notices 
first appeared as separate articles in the North-China Herald, 
and were afterwards published in the Shanghai Almanac and 
Miscellany for the years 1855 and 1856. 

19. Road Map from Peking to Kiachta by the Great 
Camel Route based on an English Map chiefly taken from a 
Russian sketch made in IS58. Peking, 1864. This is mounted 
in eight folding sheets. Mr. Edkins has made several addi- 
tions to the English chart; the names of many of the places 
are given in Chinese characters; and there is a small vocabu- 
lary and selection of useful Mongol phrases, with the English. 
equivalents, given on the edges. There is also a good deal of 
geological information, which was contributed by R. Pompelly 
Esq. 

A number of other articles from the pen of Mr. Edkins 



JAMES ETC SLOP. \<J[ 

appeared in the Shanghai Almanac and Miscellany, anion** 
which may be named, — The Chinese Almanac,— On the 
Introduction of European Astronomy by the Jesuits at Pe- 
king, — Keang-nan Keu- jin Examination. — On the Credibili t v 
of Chinese early Chronology, — Notes of an Excursion to Jln- 
cheu snd Hang-cheu, — Notes of an Excursion to the T'ai-hu 
and its neighbourhood, — Description ofLoo-choo, by a native 
of China, (translation) — Chinese worship of the Stars, — On 
Early Tauist Alchemy, — and Account of Kwan-ti, the God 
of War. 

A "Narrative of a Visit to Nanking,'-* by the same hand. 
is published at the end of "'Chinese Scenes and People," 
London, 1863. 

In the Transactions of the China Branch of the Royal Asiatic 
Society, are some articles by Mr. Edkins, on Ancient Chinese- 
Pronunciation, — Tauism, — Sanscrit and Mongolian Charac- 
ters, — and Notice of the Wu-wei-kiau. 

In the Journal of the North-China Branch of the Royal 
Asiatic Society, he has also contributed — A Buddhist Sinis- 
tra, translated from the Chinese, — Notice of the Character 
and Writings of Meh-tsi,— A Sketch of the Tauist Mytho- 
logy in its modern form, — A Sketch of the Life of Confucius, 
— On the Ancient Mouths of the Yang-tsi, — and. A Visit to 
the Agricultural Mongols. 



CXX. Rev THOMAS GILFILLAN was sent to China 
by the London Missionary Society, and arrived at Hongkong 
on July 22nd, 1848. The following year he removed to Can- 
ton; in March, 1850, he settled at Ainoy; and in the summer 
of 1851 he left for England. He was subsequently pastor of 
an Independent congregation in Aberdeen. 



CXXI. Rev. BATTINSON KAY was sent to China by 
the London Missionary Society, and arrived at Hongkong 
with Mrs. Kay on July 22nd, 1848. He had been appointed 
to that station with a more especial view to his undertaking 
the pastorate of the English church and congregation meet] Qg 
in Union Chapel. In 1849, he retired from his connection 
with the society, and went to Australia. 



CXXII. JAMES HYSLOP studied medicine, and gra- 
duated as M. B. in Scotland, lit; was married to Miss James. 
and practised his profession for a time in his native land. 
Being accepted by the London Missionary Society, he was 
appointed a medical missionary to China, and left Portsmouth 



192 REV. BENJAMIN JENKINS. D. D. 

with Mrs. Hyslop, a child and sister, in the Ferozepore, on 
the 19th of March, 1848, accompanied by the Revs. Dr. Legge, 
B. Kay and W. Young with their wives, and the Revs. J. 
Edkins and T. Gilfillan, arriving at Hongkong on July 22nd. 
He reached Amoy on December 5th, and resumed in part 
the medical operations which had been suspended by the 
departure of Drs. Hepburn and Gumming. He sustained that 
duty till 1851, when he retired from the missionary service, 
but still continued to reside in Amoy in private practice. 
In 1853 he left for Australia, and was wrecked on that coast, 
when he fell into the hands of the natives, by whom he was 
massacred. 



CXXIII. ^ ft Tsin Yew. Rev. BENJAMIN JEN- 
KINS, D. D. was sent to China by the Missionary Society 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church in the Southern States of 
America, and reached Hongkong with his family on the 18th 
of August, 1848. He arrived at Shanghae, his destination, in 
May, 1849. The health of Mrs. Jenkins calling for a change, 
he embarked with his family for New York on November 3rd, 
1852, but Mrs. Jenkins died at sea not far from St. Helena. 
While in the United States he was again married, and returned 
to Shanghae in the latter part of 1854. On August 13th, 1861, 
he left for a visit to Europe, and again returned to Shanghae 
on July 3rd, 1864. 

Publications by Dr. Jenkins. 

CHINESE. 

1. The Great Study or '-j* Ip; Ta-hyoh, romanized accor- 
ding to the Shanghai reading sound, and printed in the Roman 
character with all the tones indicated. Shanghae, 1861. 

2. The Middle Way or tf* M Chung-yung, romanized 
according to the Shanghai reading sound, and printed in the 
Roman character, with all the tones clearly marked. Shang- 
hae, 1861. 

3. The Conversations of Confucius or f^ ta Lun-nyii, 
romanized according to the Shanghai reading sound, and 
printed in the Roman character. Shanghae, 1S61. 

ENGLISH. 

4. The Three Character Classic, or H ^ M- San-tsze- 
king, romanized according to the reading sound for the vicinity 
of Shanghai, translated literally, and printed with the Chi- 
nese character and translation interlined. Shanghae, 1860. 



REV. CHAMiES TAYLOR, M. D. 193 

5. The Thousand Character Classic, or ^f* i^ t$£ Tseen- 
tse-wan, romanized according to the reading sound for the 
vicinity of {Shanghai, and printed with the Chinese character 
and translation interlined. Shanghae, 1860. 

6. A List of Syllables for romanizing works according to 
the reading and colloquial sounds of the Shanghai dialect, 
with a selection of more than 4000 Chinese characters suita- 
ble for books in the Colloquial of Shanghai. Shanghae, 1S61. 

In 1844, Dr. Jenkins published at Charleston, S. C. a 
polyglot serial, designed to promote and facilitate the study 
of the languages of modern Europe. 

In the North-China Herald for 1851 and 1852, there is a 
series of humorous and interesting letters on the interior of 
China, from the same hand, with the signature 0. P. Q. ; which 
were republished in the Shanghai Almanac and Miscellany 
for 1852 and 1853, and also as a separate pamphlet. 



CXXIV. I£ Tae. Rev. CHARLES TAYLOR, M. D. 

was sent to China by the Missionary Society of the Methodist 
Episcopal church in the Southern States of America, and 
arrived at Hongkong with Mrs. Taylor on the 18th of August, 
1848, and at Shanghae on September 30th. He left for New 
York on the 3rd of October, 1853, and has since been residing 
in the United States. 

Publications hy Dr. Taylor. 

CHINESE. 

1. jj| jjiip ~J" ,^jS{ Chin shin shih keae. The Ten Command- 
ments. 4 leaves. Shanghae, 1850. This contains, besides the 
Decalogue, the Apostles' Creed, the Lord's Prayer, a long- 
metre doxology, and a Sunday calendar for the year. 

2. H Jjg jijj 3=? Yaou le wan td. Catechism of Important 
Truths. Shanghae. This is in the Shanghae dialect, and 
contains 96 questions, divided into 10 sections. 

3. H Jg $. fij| Yaou le peih t'uh. Indispensable Trea- 
tise on Essentials. Shanghae. This contains an epitome of 
the Christian system, with an appeal against idolatry and Con- 
fucianism, concluding with a prayer to be used by a penitent. 

4- JfIS M 2fc M i$ Y&1/ so ° toe ^ l cliuen. Harmony of 
the Gospels. 164 leaves. Ningpo, 1854. This is in the Shang- 
hae dialect. 

exolish. 

5. Five Years in China, with some account of the Great 



194 HENRY VAN VLEOE RANKIN. 

Rebellion and a description of St. Helena. 12mo. pp. 405. 
New York, 1860. 

There are a number of contributions from Dr. Taylor in 
the North-China Herald for 1852 and J 853, on the Feast of 
Lanterns, — The Chinese Ceremony of Welcoming the Spring, 
— Welcoming the Gk>d of Joy, — A Trip to Nanking, — and 
Papers on the Shanghai dialect; all which were republished 
in the Shanghai Almanac and Miscellany for 1853 and 1854. 
Most of them are embodied in the preceding narrative, (see 
No. 5, supra.) 



CXXV. W. Lan. HENRY VAN VLECK RANKIN 
was born at Newark in New Jersey, U. S. in September, 1825. 
He pursued his studies at Princeton College, and was appointed 
a missionary to China by the Board of Foreign Missions of the 
Presbyterian Church. He Avas married to Mary Greenleaf 
Knight, and being ordained to the ministry, left New York 
with Mrs. Rankin in the Valparaiso, on October 9th, 1848, 
accompanied by the Revs. J. K. Wight and B. W. Whilden, 
and arrived at Hongkong on February 13th, 1849. Proceeding 
northward, he arrived at Ningpo in August, and was for several 
years actively engaged in mission work there. In I85G Mrs. 
Rankin's state of health rendered a change necessary, and he 
went to Shanghae in March, where he embarked with his 
family in the N. B. Palmer, for the United States, accompanied 
by Dr. and Mrs. Kelly. He returned to Ningpo in July, 185S, 
and remained there till 1863 when he went to Teng-chow with 
his family, and died at that city on July 2nd. His remains 
were interred on a green spot at the head of a cliff to the 
north-east of the city. Mrs. Rankin returned to Shanghae the 
following year, and embarked with her family for the United 
States in July, having recently formed another matrimonial 
alliance. 

Publications by Mr. BanMn,. 

CHINESE. 

1- ^ $? ± W ftf ^ Nying-po t'u-wo ts'ii-'ok Primer 
of the Ningpo colloquial Dialect', pp. 92. Ningpo, 1857. This 
is a development, by successive increments from several of the 
missionaries, of Cobbold's Spelling book, (see Cobbold's works, 
No. 8.) It begins with the forms and powers of the Roman 
letters; formation of syllables follows: then spelling and rea- 
ding lessons, proceeding from words to sentences; sectionsoti 
geography. Chinese history, arid Scripture readings; finishing 
with 'i table of conBSuguinity. If is intended ta teach Chinese 



REV. BRAYFIELD W. WTI1LDKN. 195 

to read books written in the Ningpo dialect, and printed in 
the Roman character. 

2. Foh-ing tsccn di. Synopsis Gospel Harmony, pp. 6. 
Ningpo. This is a translation of a work by Robinson, into 
the Ningpo dialect, printed in the Roman character. 

3. Ts'ong skit hyi. Genesis, pp. 86. Ningpo. A transla- 
tion into the Ningpo dialect, printed in the Roman character. 

4. G'ih Yiai gyih- Exodus, pp. 72. Ningpo. A transla- 
tion into the Ningpo dialect, printed in the Roman character. 

5. Tsmi-mc s. Hymn Book. pp. 155. Ningpo, 1860. This 
is a translation, selection, and compilation of 166 hymns in 
the Ningpo dialect, printed in the Roman character; a large 
number being taken from a hymn book Tscen-mc s, printed 
in 1857, iu 122 pages, containing 111 hymns, by various of 
the Ningpo missionaries. The measure and the subject is 
given at the head of each hymn. At the end there is an 
alphabetical index, and an index of subjects, followed by 9 
doxologies. 

Mr. Rankin also took part with Mr. Russell in the comple- 
tion of the New Testament, (see Russell's works, No. 2.) 

Publications by Mrs. Ranlciv. 

CHINESE. 

1. Jing-tsia lilt djiin. The Young Cottager, pp. 45. 
Ningpo 1858. This is a translation into the Ningpo dialect, 
printed in the Roman character. 



CXXVI. <!i Hivae. Rev. JOSEPH K. WIGHT was 

sent to China by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Pres- 
byterian Church in the United States, and arrived at Hong- 
kong with Mrs. Wight on February 13th, 1849. He reached 
Ningpo his destination in Jul)', and in July 1850 was trans- 
ferred to Shanghae. In consequence of ill health lie made a 
voyage to his native land in 1854, and returned to Shanghae 
on February 26th, 1856. A renewal of his complaint how- 
ever obliged him to relinquish the work, and he left finally 
lor the United States in January, 1857. He has since been 
settled as a pastor, on the Hudson River. New York; 

Mr. Wight contributed an article to the Princeton Review 
on the Religions of China. 



CXXVIT. Rev. BRAYFIELD W. WHILDEN was 
sent to China by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Sou- 
thern Baptist Convention, and arrived atHongkofig with Mrs. 
Whilden on February 13th, 1849. On the 23rd of the same 



19G JOHN HOBSQN 

month he joined the mission at Canton, but left for the U oiled 
States on*March 27th, "1850. He returned to Canton in 1853, 
and again left for America on November 15th, 1854; but lias 
not since returned to China. 



CXXVIII, 1ft fg Ko-tili. MOSES STANLEY COUL- 

TEE was born in Brooke county, Virginia, U. S. May 30th, 
1824. He afterwards removed with his parents to the state 
of Illinois, where, at the age of sixteen, he became a member 
of the Presbyterian church. He graduated at Hanover College, 
Indiana, in July, 184S. About that time he was invited by 
the Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church to 
take charge of their printing establishment at Ningpo, which, 
upon due deliberation and counsel he assented to. On the 1 st of 
January, 1849, he was married to Caroline East Crowe, daugh- 
ter of the President of the above-named college, and sailed 
for China with Mrs. Coulter in the Samuel Russell, on the 
24th of February. After spending a few weeks at Hongkong 
and Canton, they proceeded northward, arriving at Ningpo 
their destination, on August 24th. In addition to the superin- 
tendence of the press, he prosecuted the study of theology and 
also of the'Chinese language; but had scarcely entered upon 
his duties when he was attacked with fever and chronic diarr- 
hoea, which afterwards turned to dysentery. In October, 1852, 
he sought relief by a change to Shanghae, where he was re- 
commended a voyage to his native land. After returning to 
Ningpo, preparatory to his embarkation for the United States, 
he suffered a renewed attack, and died on the 12th of Decem- 
ber. Mrs. Coulter left with her children soon after for the 
United States. 



CXXIX. %■ ^ £ Saou Pah-sang. JOHN HOBSON, a 

native of England, was at an early age deeply interested in 
the missionary work, and with an ardent desire to preach the 
gospel to the heathen, he offered his services to the Church of 
England Missionary Society. Being accepted, he entered the 
College of St. Bees in Cumberland, where he pursued his 
theological studies; and having graduated as M. A. he was 
ordained to the ministry by the Bishop of London in 1848. 
He left England with Mrs. Hobson for China early in 1S49, 
and arrived at Shanghae on the 30th of July. In September 
he was requested temporarily to take the duties of the British 
Chaplain Mr. Lowder, during the absence of the latter on a 
visit to Ningpo. On the death of that gentleman off the island 
of Pootoo on the 24th of the same month, urged by the com- 
munity, and strongly advised by the Church Missionary Society, 



REV. A. 1LGQUIST. 197 

Mr. Hobson undertook the permanent duties of the chaplain- 
cy the following year. He still continued to sympathize and 
cooperate with the Chinese mission however, and was instru- 
mental in establishing a large boarding school for Chinese 
boys, in connection with the society. In 1857, he paid a 
visit with his family to his native land, where he zealously 
advocated the claims of the China mission, and returned to 
his duties at Shanghae in 1858. In April and May, 1861, 
he was temporarily absent at Hankow; and in the beginning 
of April, 1862, he again sought relaxation by a trip to Japan, 
arriving with Mrs. Hobson at Kanagawa on the 16th. On 
the 19th he returned from an excursion to Yedo, greatly ex- 
hausted by the lung ride; and the same evening embarked 
for Nagasaki. During the voyage of seven days, fever came 
on, and after landing he gradually sank till the evening of 
the 30th, when he calmly resigned his spirit to Him who gave 
it. His widow returned to Shanghae on May 12th with his 
mortal remains, which were interred in the cemetery there on 
the 1 3th. Mrs. Hobson embarked soon after for England, 
where she has been since residing. 

Publications by Mr, Hobson. 

ENGLISH. 

1. Discourses to a Christian Congregation in a Heathen 
Land. 8vo. pp. vii, 336. London, 1858. 



CXXX. & ± Fa-sze. KARL JOSEF FAST, an or- 
dained minister of the gospel, was appointed a missionary 
to China, by the Missionary Society at Lund in Sweden, and 
reached Hongkong about the end of the year 1849. Thence 
he proceeded to Fuh-chow, where he arrived on January Sth, 
1850, and commenced a mission station. On November 12 th, 
he went down the river Min in a small boat with his colleague 
Mr. Elgquist, to negotiate some bills at the receiving ships. 
Returning the following morning, they were attacked by pirates 
at the Kin-pae pass, when Mr. Fast was killed and thrown 
overboard, while his companion escaped by swimming. No- 
thing was seen of his body afterwards. 



CXXXI. J*Jffi Keih-sze. Rev. A. ELGQUIST 
was sent to China by the Swedish Missionary Society at Lund, 
and arrived at Fuh-chow on August 14th, 1850. He removed 
to Hongkong in the early part of 1851, and embarked for 
Europe in 1852, since which the mission has not been renewed. 



198 REV. FREDERICK FOSTER GOUGH, B. A. 

CXXXII. ^ Yang. JAMES H. YOUNG-, a native of 
Scotland, studied for the medical profession, and graduated as 
M. D. He arrived in China in 1846, and Avas for several 
years engaged in practice in Hongkong. In the beginning of 
1850 he became connected with the Mission of the English 
Presbyterian Church, and accompanied Mr. Burns to Canton, 
where he arrived on February 28th, and remained a few months. 
During the summer he went to Amoy, and opened a dispen- 
sary for the Chinese. In 1851, he was married to Sarah Har- 
vett, who was previously engaged in educational work among 
the native girls there. Several day schools were afterwards 
conducted under their united superintendence; but Mrs. Young 
died on December 3rd, 1853, and was buried in the mission- 
ary cemetery on Koo-lang-seu. The following year Dr. Young's 
faculties were so far impaired as to render a change necessary; 
and he left China with Mr. Burns, returning to England by 
the Egypt route; but died soon after in his native land. 

Publications by Dr. Young. 

CHINESE. 

1. History of Joseph. An extract from Genesis, trans- 
lated into the Amoy dialect. 



CXXXIII. % Neadu. Rev. CARL VOGEL, PH. D. 

was sent to China by the Cassel Missionary Society, and 
arrived at Hongkong on March 2nd, 1850. He left for 
Europe in 1852, and has not since returned to the service. 



CXXXIV. £ Yd. Rev. FREDERICK FOSTER 
GOUGH, B. A. was sent to China by the Church of England 
Missionary Society, arrived at Hongkong on March 29th, 
1850, and soon after at Ningpo his destination. In the be- 
ginning of October, 1852, he left that station for England, 
and returned with Mrs. Gough in October, 1854. He again 
left for Europe in the autumn of 1860, in consequence of his 
wife's health, but she died about a week after their arrival 
in London, in February, 1861. 

Publications by Mr. Gough. 

CHINESE. 

1. Tli-pcTsiu. A Cup of Wine. pp. 12. Ningpo. 1852. 



WILLIAM WELTON. 199 

A didactic narrative written in the Ningpo dialect, and print- 
ed in the Roman character, 

2. Yin-meo liyuing-ts. The Mother at Home. pp. 103. 
Ningpo, 1858. A tract for the guidance of mothers, trans- 
lated into the Ningpo dialect by Mr. G-ough, with the assis- 
tance of Mr. Nevius, and printed in the Roman character. 

3. Catechism. Ningpo. This a translation into the Ning- 
po dialect of a short catechism by the Rev. J. Brown of Had- 
dington. It is printed in the Roman character. 

Mr. Gough has been occupied for several years in London, 
assisting Mr. Taylor to translate the New Testament into the 
Ningpo dialect. 



CXXXV. i^-gt Wan-tun^ WILLIAM WELTON, a 

native of England, having studied for the medical profession, 
was made M. R. C. S. in London. After a time spent in pri- 
vate practice, he went through a course of theological study 
at Caius College, Cambridge, where he graduated as B, A. 
He received priest's orders, was appointed a missionary to 
China by -(he Church of England Missionary Society, and left 
Portsmouth in the Sir George Pollock on November Gth, 1849, 
accompanied by the Bishop of Victoria with Mrs. Smith, the 
Rev. F. F. Gough, Rev. E. T. R. Moncrieff, and Mr. R. D. 
Jackson, arriving at Hongkong, March 29th, 1850. He soon 
after paid a visit to Canton, where he spent ten days with 
Dr. Parker, and proceeding by an early opportunity, reached 
Fuh-chow in May, to initiate a branch of the English Church 
Mission. After some considerable trouble and opposition, he 
succeeded in locating himself within the city walls, where he 
opened a dispensary and hospital for the natives. Year after 
year he continued his benevolent labours in the city and sur- 
rounding country, meeting with much to dishearten, but not 
without encouragement also; till at length his health gave 
way, and he found it necessary to seek a change of climate. 
He went to Shanghae in the autumn of 1856, and embarked 
in the Anglo-Saxon on September 10th, in company with Dr. 
Medhurst and family, arriving at London on the 22nd of 
January, 1857. He died suddenly in England in 18f;8. 

Publications by Mr. Welton. 

CHINESE, 

1- Wl ?$* %% ir Mf K'tuZn lwa& ya p'een ten. Dissuasive 
from Opium-smoking. 10 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1856. This is a 
translation into the Fuh-chow dialect. 

2. M M if $J m >>\\ 2J 5 l§ SMng king sin ybfuh chow 



200 EDWARD T. It. MONCRIEFF. 

ping hiod. New Testament in the Fuh-chow Dialect, Fuh- 
chow, 1856. The Gospel of Mark was first published separ- 
ately, in 41 leaves, including one leaf of introductory matter. 



CXXXVI. EDWARD T. R. MONCRIEFF pursued 
his studies at Trinity College, Dublin, where he graduated 
as A. B. He was ordained a priest uf the Church of England, 
and received the degree of L. L. D. from King's College, Ab- 
erdeen. For a time he held a curacy at Oundle in North- 
amptonshire, and in 1849 was appointed a missionary to 
China, by the Church of England Missionary Society. On 
the 6th of November he embarked at Portsmouth, in the Sir 
George Pollock, in company with the Bishop of Victoria, Mrs. 
Smith, and Messrs. Gough, Welton and Jackson; and after 
some short delay, finally left Torquay on the 17th, arriving 
at Hongkong on March 29th, 1850. The colonial chaplain 
there having left for England almost immediately after, Mr. 
Moncrieff occupied his place pro tern. He was also appointed 
Senior Tutor in St. Paul's College at Hongkong, an institution 
for training native youth, under the control of the Bishop. He 
resigned his pastoral connection with the community about 
the end of 1851, and soon after the post of Tutor also. He 
returned to England early in 1852, where he was married, 
ami afterwards went to India as a chaplain in the army. Be- 
ing there during the great mutiny, he fell a victim to Hindoo 
ferocity, and was massacred with his family at Cawnpore in 
1857. 

Puhlications by Mr. Moncrieff. 

CHINESE. 

1- % fi; & it Statin fa tseuenshoo. A Treatise on Arith- 
metic in the Chinese Language, for the use of St. Paul's 
College, Hongkong. 38 leaves. Hongkong, 1852. After the 
preface and table of contents, the book commences with Nu- 
meration and the four initial rules, proceeding to the various 
branches of Fractions and Decimals; after which are Involu- 
tion and Evolution, concluding with Proportion. The five 
last leaves contain a key to the preceding exercises. Some of 
the copies have an English preface of two leaves. 

Dr. Moncrieff also prepared a little Catechism on the Evi- 
dences of Christianity, in 1852, which Avas used in St. Paul's 
College, but we have no information whether it was printed 
or not. 



REV. JUSTUS DOOUTTLE. 201 

OXXXVII. %l jfc Ghd-cMng. Rev. ROBERT DAVID 
JACKSON was sent to China by the Church of England 
Missionary Society, and arrived at Hongkong on March 29th, 
1850, proceeding to Ftth-chow his destination in May. In 
the beginning of 1852 he removed to Ningpo, and embarked 
at Shanghae for Europe, on December 13th, 1853. He has 
since held a curacy at Stilling-ton near York. 



CXXXV1II. M.fcty\Loo Kung-ming: Rev. JUSTUS 
DOOLITTLE was sent to China by the American Board of 
Commissioners for Foreign Missions. Ho arrived at Hong- 
kong with Mrs. Doolittle on April 10th, 1850, and at Fuh- 
chow on May 31st. h\ February, 1864, he left China for a 
visit to the United States, on account of his health. 

P-ubli cations by Mr. Doolittle. 

CHINESE. 

1- Wl J$ <fl? )t piflf K'eic&n Izead ya pern fun. Exhortation 
to abandon Opium. 10 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1853. A. revision 
of Tracy's tract, (see Ira Tracy's works, No. 1.) translated 
into the Fuh-chow dialect. 

2. $j|J fplj Heang J/cun. Village Sermons. 7 leaves. Fuh- 
chow, 1853. This is the first sermon in Milne's series, (see 
Dr. Milne's works, No. 16'.) revised and translated into the 
Fuh-chow dialect. 

3. fi}i -J- gj| :}£ ^ 5p£ Shin shlh Irae k'echoo shlh. Com- 
mentary on the Ten Commandments. 10 leaves. Fuh-chow, 
1853. 'This is in the Frth-chow dialect. 

4- 'Ife W- it* Jf!$ W> tk Him'uj tsuy sin yay soo bin. Re- 
pentance and Faith. 10 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1854. This is a 
revision and translation into the Fuh-chow dialect of Dr. 
Medhurst's tract, (see Medhurst's works, No. 12.) 

5. 'Ji 'X P»j '& T'em wan wan td. Catechism of Astro- 
nomy. 23 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1854. A revision of Dr. Hap- 
pens book, (see flapper's works, No. 1.) translated into the 
Fuh-chow dialect. 

6. John's Gospel. 41 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1854. This is a 
version in the Fuh-chow dialect. 

7- i% jfill ^ piii? Ma tsoo p'6 Inn. Discourse on Ma-tsoo- 
po. 6 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1855. This is a revision in the 
Fuh-chow dialect of Dr. Medhurst's tract on the patron god- 
dess of the sailors, (see Medhurst's works, No. 11.) 

8- <]r II ^ El tk Show U pat jih Inn. Discourse on 
Keeping the Sabbath. 8 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1855. A revi- 
sion of Lowrie's tract, (See W. M. Lowrie's works. No. 1.) trans- 



202 REV. JUSTUS dooijttle. 

lated into the Fuh-chow dialect. This and all the preceding, 

except No. 5, together with Mr. Baldwin's "Discourse on 
God," and "Introduction to Christianity,'" (see C. C. Bald- 
win's works, Nos. 3 and 4.) and a translation into the Fuh- 
chow dialect of Dr. McCartee's tract on the Soul, (see McCar- 
tee's works, No. 27.) with the same title, were all published 
in one volume at Fuh-chow in 1856, by the American Board 
Mission, with the title Ifjj |§ J|l "g| K'euen shen leang yen. 
"Good Words exhorting to Virtue." 

9. 5c f£ ^5 IJu T*een IcTch mlng shwb. Exposition of the 
Decalogue. 84 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1855. This appears to be 
a revision of Dr. Medhurst's work on the Moral Law. (see 
Medhurst's works, No. 12.) 

10. |ff| J§L ?.! Jr fit K'euen Iceae ya peen lun. Exhorta- 
tion to abandon Opium. 11 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1855. A re- 
vision of Tracy's tract in the literary style, (see No. 1. supra.) 

11- Hi J£ Vrc ty\ fit S&n sliih ts'ing mlng lun. Discourse 
on the Feast of the Tombs. 6 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1855. A 
revision of Dr. Medhurst's tract, (see Medhurst's works, 
No. 8.) 

12. §1 iile £: tit Chung peadu tsedng lun. Story of a 
Watchmaker. 10 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1855. This is a revi- 
sion of Kidd's tract, (see Kidd's works, No. 5.) 

13. jji$ -f* j|j]| ^ fj| Shin sluh Iceae cJtoo sMh. Commen- 
tary on the Ten Commandments. 8 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1855. 
A version in the literary style of the preceding colloquial 
tract, (see No. 3 supra.) 

14. ||f ]$ Wl fit Tod po mlng lun. Discourse on Gam- 
bling. 7 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1S56. A revision of Dr. Milne's 
tract, (see Dr. Milne's works, No. 10.) 

15. 4 1 #h F*0 ^ Chung wac wan til. Dialogue between a 
Native and a Foreigner. 10 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1856. 

16. JfI5 M Wx >h *}\ Yuy soo keaOu seam yhi. Introduc- 
tion to Christianity. 2 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1856. A revision 
of a tract previously published. 

17. £ #, A ^ JM j£t }£ Sang e Jen szc kiuang yih fa. 
Laws of Trade. 6 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1S57. This appears to 
be a revision of Milne's tract, (see Dr. Milne's works, No. S.) 

18. |f pfc. pf* $$£ jjfj sg-' Se ydng chung hiva t'ung shoo. 
European Chinese Almanac. 36 leaves. Fun-chow, 1857. 

19. |j| % jjiifi ffo Pe.cn luce! sldn lun. Disquisition on 
Heathen Gods. 3 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1858. This is a revision 
of a tract previously published. 

20. jjf. f£ fit P&n sing lun. Disquisition on Human 
Nature. 6 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1858. This is a revision of a 
tract previously published. 

21. f% ^ fj| Peen hwuy pang. Disquisition on Slander. 
3 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1858. 



RUV. SAMUEL NEWELL D. MA11TIN. 203 

22. l^ A M M- £ '$C Hmajkipin leu che lco6. Causes 
of Poverty among the Chinese. 3 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1858. 

23. jfjjf %% j^ % ICe tdou shih wan. Forms of Prayer. 
6 leaves. Fuh-chow., 1858. This is a reprint of a tract for- 
merly published. 

24. H '± B£ 5E -ji fflj ^' e ' chad Im sze loeihing. Fear of 
the Wicked on the Approach of Death, if, ^ j?fr $fc ||J; || 
Sin chod tin sze wet lb. Joy of the Believer on the Approach 
of Death. 4 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1858. This is a revision of a 
tract originally published by Dr. Medhurst. (see Medhurst's 
works, No. 24.) 

25. fjf ^ %n Peen Itcaou lun. Disquisition on Filial Piety. 
6 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1858. This is a revision of a tract pre- 
viously published. 

26. |£ ffa f% $fo E tiodn 'peen lun. Discussion of False 
Doctrines. 18 leases. Fuh-chow, 1858. This appears to be 
a revision of the excerpts made by Mr. Lobscheid from a Ro- 
man Catholic work, (see Lobscheid's works, No. 2.) 

ENGLISH. 

27. Social Life of the Chinese. 2 vols. New York, 1865. 
This consists chiefly of the republication of a long series of 
articles by Mr. Doolittle, containing- a vast amount of origi- 
nal information, on subjects connected with China, most of 
which were published in the China Mail, under the title 
"Jottings on the Chinese." 



CXXXIX. ^ "J* x .Hang Ting-yuen. Rev. SAMUEL 
NEWELL D. MARTIN arrived at Hongkong on April 10th, 
1850, as an agent of the Board of Foreign Missions of the 
Presbyterian Church in the United States, and soon after 
reached Ningpo his destined station. There he remained till 
April, 1858, when declining health rendering a change neces- 
sary, he left with his family for America, and has not since 
returned to China. 

Publications by Mr. Martin. 

CHINESE. 

1. Hymn Book. pp. 32. Ningpo, 1S55. This is in the 
Ningpo dialect, printed in the Roman character. 

2. Hyiling iic yi'iing veng. Instructive Verses for Chil- 
dren, pp. 126. Ningpo, 1858. This is in the Ningpo dialect, 
printed in the Roman character, and illustrated byagreai 
many \vood-cu(s. 



204 REV. WILLIAM A. P. MARTIN D. D. 

3. Ji ?ti H ^ T"eew fooK Aw/ ?/aow. Silmmaiy of Scrip- 
ture Truth. 3 books, 97 leaves. Ningpo, 1858. The first 
book, in 8 chapters, treats of Old Testament History; the 
second, in 9 chapters, is on the life, character and sufferings 
of Jesus; and the last book, in 8 chapters, is on the dogmas 
of Christianity. At the commencement is a small map of the 
world, with compendious description, an introduction, and 
notes for the reader, followed by a table of contents, occupy- 
in all 5 leaves. 



CXL. 7* g | J[ Ting Wel-leang. Key. WILLIAM A. 
P. MARTIN D. D. was located at Ningpo, as an agent of the 
Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States, from 1850 to 1860, when he revisited America. 
Returning to China in August, 1862, he laboured in Shang- 
hai for nearly a year, and then removed to Peking. 

Publications by Dr. Martin. - 

CHINESE. 

1 . Di-li shii lin van-koh hwu-Teying z-tn yiu-tin kdug-tsing. 
Geography. 4 books, pp. 185. Ningpo, 1852. This is in the 
Ningpo dialect, printed in the Roman character. Each book 
is divided into chapters, each chapter concluding with a series 
of questions pertinent to the subject. The first book was re- 
printed at Ningpo in 1859, in 52 pages, with two large fol- 
ding plates. 

2. Di gyiu du. Ng da-tsiu di-d\i. Peng-koh, peng-^sahg, 
peng-fit, Scm-folt di-du, iva-yiu. Sing-hying di-du, lin. Di- 
li veng-teh. Di-ming tsiao ying-ivan-ts Halt. Atlas and 
Geographical Catechism, pp. 10, and 10 large folding maps. 
Ningpo, 1853. This is divided into 24 chapters on the ele- 
ments of geography, composed in the Ningpo dialect, and 
printed in the Roman character. 

3. Son-fall k'a-tong. Arithmetic, pp. 63. Ningpo, 1854. 
This is in the Ningpo dialect, printed in the Roman character 
with Arabic numerals. 

4- Ji M. ?$J )$. T'cen tabu soo yuen. Evidences of Chris- 
tianity. 3 books, 77 leaves. Ningpo, 1854. The first book, 
in 6 chapters, treats of the evidence of natural objects; the 
second, in 7 chapters, is on historical and literary evidence; 
and the third in 9 chapters, is doctrinal and practical. There 
are two prefaces and a table of contents. A revised edition 
of the work was printed at Ningpo in ] S58, in 91 leaves. In 
this the first preface is exchanged for one by another hand. 
The first book has an additional chapter, on the Elements; and 



REV. WILLIAM A. P. MABTIN, D. D. 205 

the third book lias an additional and concluding- chapter on 
the Trinity. Another edition, still further revised was print- 
ed at Ningpo in 1860, in 118 leaves. 

5. Sings. Psalms, pp. 72. Ningpo, 1857. This is a 
selection of the Psalms of David, consisting of 1 — 34, 42, 46, 
50. 51, 63, 65, 72, 84, 90, 91, 95, 96, 100, 103, 104, 110, 
115—118, J 21, 130, 139 and 145, translated into the Ningpo 
dialect, and printed in the Roman character. 

6. f 1fr ?li i$- Y'' 1 tabu chuen. Religious Allegories. 48 
leaves. Ningpo, 1858. This consists of sixteen short narra- 
tives, with a short piece at the end of each by a Chinese 
scholar, in improvement of the subject. Two prefaces and a 
table of contents occupy 4 leaves at the beginning; and there 
is a short appendix with a grace to be sung at meals, and a 
form of prayer for morning and evening. It was reprinted at 
Shanghae in 1863. 

7. H H M S an V aou teh. The Three Principles. 22 
leaves. Ningpo, 1858. After a general statement of the 
subject, this treats in 3 chap ters, of God, Man and Jesus; 
followed by a metrical stanza on ten points of belief, and an- 
other embodying the decalogue, both by Dr. McCartee, the 
Lord's prayer, a penitent's confession, form of prayer, and 
grace to be said at meals. It was revised and reprinted at 
Ningpo in 1859, in 28 leaves, having a short introduction, 
and the arrangement of the articles somewhat altered. 

S- f$ IP II fl| Pccou Id ch'uy licun. Paul's Discourse at 
Athens. 9 leaves. Ningpo. This is an exposition of the apos- 
tle Paul's celebrated address on Mars Hill; concluding with a 
grace and form of prayer. It was reprinted at Ningpo in 
1859; and a third edition appeared at Shanghae in 1861. 

9. ^V 11" l$C \u Rung htouy dung die. Form of Church 
Government. 24 leaves. Ningpo. This wis afterwards revised 
and enlarged by other members of the presbytery, and re- 
printed at Ningpo in 1860, in 72 leaves. 

10. Foh-ing dao-li ling-hying veng-teh. The Assembly's 
Shorter Catechism, pp. 22. Ningpo, 1859. This is a trans- 
lation into the Ningpo dialect, printed in the Roman character. 

11- $k i£ 3£ IniJ' A'tH.' she yaou ten. Important Discourse 
on Salvation. 4 leaves. Ningpo, 1860. Reprinted at Shang- 
hae in 1862, in 5 leaves; and again at Shanghae in 1864, in 
4 leaves. This is a modification of the introductory section 
to the "Evidences of Christianity," (sec No. 4, supra.) con- 
cluding with a prayer in tetrametrical verse. 

12. B2 ^f* ^ 3t Shiv'ang ts'een tszi wait. The Two Thou- 
sand Character Classic. 26 leaves. Shanghae, 1865. This is a 
treatise on the Christian verities, in tetrametrical verse, con- 
sisting of 2000 characters, no two of which are the same. It 



206 RUDOLPH KRONE; 

was ^originally published in the Analytical Reader, (see No 
15, infra.) with an English translation. 

13. $j [H Q fy Wan lewd hung fa. International Law. 
4 books, 1228 leaves. Puking, 1S64. This is a modified trans- 
lation of Wheaton's well-known work, executed by Dr. Mar- 
tin, under the patronage and with the assistance of members 
of the imperial government. There are two prefaces by na- 
tive scholars, a section of notes for the reader's guidance, 
plates of the two hemispheres with compendious description, 
and a detailed table of contents, the preliminary matter occu- 
pying in all 28 leaves. It has been reprinted by the Japanese. 

14. *^ pi§ f.-l $& Wi ^ ilr Kwan hwd yohan full yin shoo. 
John's Gospel in the Mandarin Dialect. 22 loaves. Shanghae, 
1864. This is part of a new version of the New Testament 
in the mandarin dialect, now being made at Peking, by Dr. 
Martin, in concert with Messrs. Edkins, Schereschewsky, Bur- 
don and Blodget. (see Edkins' works, No. 12.) 

ENGLISH. 

15 ■ M 3* if 8s Jin tszC sin fa. >% ^ % ^ Oh'dng tsze 
shioang ts'een. The Analytical Reader. A Short Method for 
Learning to Read and Write Chinese, pp. 143. Shanghae, 1863. 

16. *fj£ ^ ;§j£ ^f- fj| ^ Ch'ang tsze shioang ts'een slrih e. 
A Vocabulary of Two Thousand frequent Characters with 
their most common significations, and the sounds of the Pe- 
king Dialect, pp, 57. Shanghae, 1863. Although this has a 
separate paging and title, it is always bound up with the 
preceding, and forms an appendix to it. 

Some articles on the political condition of China, by Dr. 
Martin, appeared in the North-China Herald for 1856, and 
were republished in the Shanghai Almanac and Miscellany 
for the following year. 

A paper by the same author, on the Ethical Philosophy of 
the < !hinese may be found in the Princeton Review for April, 
J 862. 



' ' SLI. ^ '[I H Kaon Uwac-6. RUDOLPH KRONE, 
a native of Germany , ordained to tin 1 ministry of the gospel, 
was appointed a missionary to China by the Rhenish Mission- 
ary Society. He arrived at Hongkong in 1850, and early in 
the following year took up his residence on the main-land, 
having charge of the Society 's stations at Fuh-yungand San- 
kin, while located with Mr. Gena.hr at Se-heang. At the 
same time he itinerated a good deal among the people, adop- 
ting the native costume and conforming to many of their habits. 
in 1855 he was married at Hongkong, and resided successively 



REV. GEORGE PIERCY. 207 

at Fuh-yung and Ho-au. Being obliged to retire to Hong 
kong for a time, during hostilities between the English and 
Chinese, he returned to the main-land in 1858, and made his 
residence at Pu-kak. In 186*0 he left China on a visit to 
Europe, where he spent a good detal of time travelling through 
Germany and Russia. In 1864 lie embarked on his return to 
China by the Egypt route, but. died at Aden on the way. 

There is a long article by Mr. Krone, descriptive of the dis- 
trict of Sin-gan in the province of Kwang-tung, published in 
Part 6 of the "Transactions of the China Branch of the Ro- 
yal Asiatic Society." 



CXLII. Rev. WILLIAM ASHMORE was sent out as a 
missionary to the Chinese, by the American Baptist Mission- 
ary Union, and arrived at Hongkong in February, 1851, 
reaching Bankok his destination on April 14th. In 1858 he 
went to Hongkong where he remained for several years, and 
is now engaged at Swatow. 



CXLIII. f# ± Fe-sze. Rev. GEORGE PIERCY arrive,! 
in China in 1851, and became an agent of the Wesleyan Mis- 
sionary Society the following year. He paid a visit to Eng- 
land in the spring of 1864, and returned to Canton with his 
family in 1866. 

Publications by Mr. Piercy. 

CHINESE! 

1. f/J I| [IS] £r Ts'oo heb -wan fa. Wesleyan Methodist 
Catechism. Nos. 1,2,3. 3 books. Canton. The first two 
parts of this catechism were among Mr. Piercy's earliest 
translations. No. 1 was republished at Canton in 1861, in L8 
leaves, containing 104 questions, in six sections; two short 
morning prayers for children, and two evening prayers; also 
two for Sunday morning and evening, and graces to be said 
before and after meals, [t was again reprinted in 1863. No. 
2 was republished at Canton in 1861, in 541eaves, containing 
an elaboration of the Christian doctrines in nine sections, 
comprising 154 questions, each answer being followed by a 
Scripture quotation. No. 3 Was republished at Canton in 1.864, 
in 27 leaves, comprising L15 questions, in two sections, on 
Old and New Testament History respectively; concluding with 
two forms of prayer for youth, tor morning and evening use. 

2. f£ J\>. $j ;*§; Pinjin yd seih. Poor Joseph. 4 leaves 
Canton" This is a retranslation of the British and Foreign 



20S RJBV, ROBERT NEUMANN. 

Tract Society's tract of the same title, which had been pre- 
viously translated by Mr. Medhurst. (see Medhurst's works, 
No. 24.) A revision was printed at Hongkong in 3 leaves. 

3- /$, IE *L \ii Citing shiny the fa. Rules for Holy Liv- 
ing. 11 leaves. Macao, 1857. This is the translation of an 
English tract by the Rev. Robert Newstead, at whose request 
and expense, it was put into Chinese and published. It is 
almost entirely composed of short scripture extracts classified 
under 21 heads, bearing on one's daily conduct, with a short 
preface. . At the end is a series of admonitory texts from 
scripture. 

4- Wc H" ?j£ 1£ Kea6u liwtiy fa yaou. Rules of Church 
Government. 3 leaves. Canton. 

5- Wf H 2SC & llr K'v ta6u ivan tseuen sJwo. Prayer 
Book. 12 leaves. Canton, 1859. This is an excerpt from the 
Anglican liturgy as translated by Dr. Medhurst, (see Me- 
dhurst's works, No. 41* in the Omissions.) revised and modified 
by Mr. Piercy, assisted by Mr. Hutton. It contains the 
morning prayers and the litany, the responses being printed 
in red after the ancient rubric form. 

6- iU JJ If- p& T ' G I* K° 1^ Digest of Geography. 33 
leaves. Canton, 1859, There is a short preface to this, in 
which the author states it to be merely an abstract of Mr. 
Muirhead's geography, (see Muirhead's works, No. 3.) 

7- HH %)) §l| ?E Hcaou ts'oo heun tabu. Peep of Day. 
95 leaves. Canton, 1862. This is a translation in the Canton 
dialect, of the English work under the same title. There is 
a preface printed in red and a table of contents. 

8. £J M 55 $E M> E u V (l l 't Mo. Memoir of Elijah. 19 
leaves. Canton, 1863. Tiiis is divided into 6 chapters, each 
chapter prefaced by a rhyming stanza of four lines, and 
followed by strictures on the -narrative. There is a preface 
by the author. 

9. |$? $£ ^ i£ p^ fift Shing Icing tsih yaou tseang lun. 
Wesley's Sermons. 56 leaves. Canton, 1863. This is a trans- 
lation of six of Wesley's Sermons. They were also issued 
separately as six different tracts. 

1^- W> f M. Bt 5pi K° sun 9 s ^ ie chtifrg. Hymns of Praise. 
20 leaves. Canton. 1863. There are altogether 34 hymns in 
this collection, with the measure marked to each. 

11- Wl W. It Wi K'& '"<i<u(/ she ho. Simple Hymns. 53 
leaves. Canton, 1863. This is a collection of 116 hymns in 
the*Oanton dialect. 



CXLIV. ^ Wan. Rev. ROBERT NEUMANN was 
sen) to China by the Berlin Missionary (Society, and arrived 
at Hongkong on the 28th of March, 1851. In 1855 he went 



CLEVELAND KEITH, 209 

to Europe, and lias not since returned to China, 



CXLV. ^ |f Kaou-Ie. Rev. JAMES COLDER was 
sent to China by the Methodist, Missionary Society of the 
United States, and arrived at Hongkong on June 17th. 1851, 
reaching his destination at Enh-chow on July 9th. In the 
beginning of 1853 he removed to Hongkong, and sailed from 
Whampoa for America, on the Gth of January, 1854, since 
which he has not returned to China. 



GXLVI. g| || Hwae-le. Rev. ISAAC WILLIAM WI- 
LEY, M. D. was sent to China by the Missionary Society of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church in the United States; he 
arrived at Hongkong on June 17th, 1851, and reached Enh- 
chow his destination on July 9th. His health failing, he 
went to America in 1854, and has not since returned to China. 

Publications hy Dr. Wiley. 

ENGLISH. 

1. The Mission Cemetery and the fallen Missionaries of 
Euh-Chan, China. With an Intioductory notice of Fuh 
Chau and its Missions. Svo. pp. 374. New York, 1858. 



CXLVII. •£ Keih. CLEVELAND KEITH, second son 
of the Rev. Reuel Keith, D. D. professor in the Episcopal 
Theological Seminary at Alexandria in Virginia, was born in 
that city "on April 16th, 1827. During his early childhood 
his mother died, and lie lost his stepmother, and afterwards 
his father, while yet a hoy. His education was conducted 
partly in the Northern States and partly in the South, a large 
portion of his early years having been spent in the latter. 
Having studied for the ministry, he was ordained a deacon on 
July 12th, 1850; and being appointed a missionary to China, 
by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, he was admitted into priest's orders on July LOth, 
1851. Shortly after that he sailed for China in the Oriental, 
in company with Mr. and Mrs. Nelson and Mr. Points, and 
arrived at Shanghae on December 25th, 1851. There he took 
part with the other members of the mission in the -various du- 
ties of the station, under the guidance of Bishop Boone. On 
the 27th of April, 1854, he was married to Miss. Tenney of 
of the same mission. In September he was attacked by a 
severe and protracted sickness, from which he recovered 



210 CLEVELAND KEITH. 

g,fter several weeks, ami was enabled to resume his duties. 
The continued effect of the climate however, and close appli- 
cation to their work, began to tell very severely on both, 
rendering necessary a more complete change, and they em- 
barked for the United States in the White Swallow, on the 
"21st of January, 1857, arriving at New York on May 2nd. 
After spending two years in their native land, and having vi- 
sited several water establishments, they reembarked at New 
York in the S. H. Talbot, on May 4th, 1859, and arrived at 
Hongkong on the 31st of August. They remained there three 
weeks and then sailed for Shanghae, which they reached on 
October 19th. Besides his former duties, Mr. Keith then ad- 
ded the charge of a printing press which he had brought out 
to facilitate the printing of colloquial books in the Roman 
character. Mrs. Keith's health however soon began to break 
down again, in consequence of which Mr. Keith accompanied 
her to Kanagawa in J apan in February, 1862. They left that 
port about the end of May, and reached San Francisco on the 
27th of June, Mrs. Keith being extremely reduced. There 
they were hospitably entertained at the house of Bishop Kip, 
where Mrs. Keith died on July 11th. On the 21st, Mr. Keith 
left for Panama in the Golden Gate steamer, which took fire at 
sea, and proved a total wreck, on the 27th, when he was 
drowned while humanely assisting some of his fellow passengers. 

Publications by Mr. Keilli. 

CHINESE. 

1. _£. if$ i 13 A P^j Zong-ha: t'oo bah zceh mung. Primer 
of the Shanghae Dialect, pp. 76. Shanghae, 1855. This is 
for the instruction of Chinese to read and write the Shanghae 
dialect in the Roman character. It commences with two pages 
of prefatory matter in the Chinese 'character, followed by a 
a few rules for using the book. The letters of the alphabet, 
large and small, Roman and Italic, with their powers in the 
Chinese character are given; then the numerals, typographic 
signs, and examples of syllables, with the equivalent in the 
Chinese character. The subsequent part of the book is entirely 
in the Roman character, giving a complete list of all the syl- 
lables, monosyllabic words, dissyllables, trisyllables, examples 
of the numeratives and idioms; after which are specimens of 
the dialect, consisting of an outline of the government of the 
province, the dynasties of China, summary of the Old and 
New Testaments, a discourse on the Lord's prayer, and the 
creed. A new edition was issued at Shanghae in 1860, in 77 
pages of a smaller size, in which the Chinese preface is repla- 
ced by an English one. 



CLEVELAND KEITH. 211 

2- 1$! # fT f# S/ict'odhinc/ chuen. Acts of the Apostles. 
60 leaves. Shanghae, 1856. This is in the Shanghae dialect. 

3. Loo ha dzanfoh iung sa. Luke's G-ospel.pp. 128. Shang- 
hae^ I860. This is a translation into the Shanghae dialect, 
printed in the Roman character. 

4. B'-doo ywng'-dzan'. Acts of the Apostles, pp. 112. 
Shanghae, 1860. This is a transliteration in the Roman cha- 
racter, of No. 2, supra. 

5. 'Sung wd koong yoong' tan' vung; tali ts' too TiaiC c le- 
Icica huh suit vung. Prayers of the Church.pp. 160. Shanghae, 
1861. This is a transliteration in the Roman character, of 
Bishop Boone's translation, (see Boone's works, No. 7.) as far 
as the Psalms. A portion of it containing the Morning Prayers 
had been published at Shanghae in 1860, with the title 'Tsaio 
tau' -vung, in 33 leaves. 

6. Ts'ctlt ycc-jih hie'. Exodus, pp. 103. Shanghae, 1861. 
This is in the Shanghae dialect, printed in the Roman cha- 
racter. 

7. Tsing' hiau' iau' He vu?ig'-t(Ji. The Convert's Cate- 
chism, pp. 61. Shanghae, 1861. This is a transliteration in 
the Roman character, of Bishop Boone's catechism in the 
Shanghae dialect, (see Boone's works, No. 1.) 

S. 'Mo-t'a' dzaPfbhiung su. Matthew's Gospel, pp. 124. 
Shanghae, 1861. This is a transliteration in the Roman cha- 
racter, of the translation into the Shanghae dialect, made by 
members of the same mission, (see Boone's works, No. 2.) 

9. Ju'-iah sii. Ze n -Ts'ih Kion. Mung-tceli. Catechism of the 
Old Testament. Shanghae, 1863. This is a transliteration in 
the Roman character, of a series of catechisms translated into 
the Shanghae dialect by Miss. Fay, from the Union Sunday 
School Question Book, and published in the Chinese charac- 
ter: i. e. Catechism of Genesis, Ts'ong'-s-hie' vimg'-tceh, pp. 
18; of Exodus, Ts'ali ym-jih lrie\ pp. 30, and Leviticus, Le- 
ve'-kie', pp. 4; also Numbers, Ming-soo' hie,', pp. 20, Deutero- 
nomy, Vok-dza n lih-W, pp. 2, Joshua, Iah-su- c a-Icic, pp. 9, 
and Judges, Z'-s hie', pp. 1 5. 

10. Sung' hiau' yu'-yah. Religious Juvenile Instruction. 
pp. 7. Shanghae. This is a transliteration in the- Roman cha- 
racter, of Bishop Boone's tract, (see Boone's works, No. 3.) 

Mr. Keith had nearly completed a dictionary in Chinese and 
English of the Shanghae dialect, the manuscript of which was 
lost with his other papers in the Golden Gate. 

Caroline Phebe Tenney was born at Newmarket in the 
county of Rockingham, New Hampshire, U. S. on May 13th, 
1821. Her father was a mem her of the New Hampshire bar. 
His ancestors were of the Puritan stock, the first of the name 
in that country, being members of a colony who emigrated 



212 CLEVELAND KEITH. 

from Yorkshire in England, about the year L639, and settled 
in Essex county, Massachusetts. Miss Tenney's education 
was conducted mainly at home up to her Kith year; and her 
parents being Congregationalists, such were her religious as- 
sociations to that period. In the summer of 1836 she was 
sent to the Adams' Female Seminary in Deny, New Hamp- 
shire, where she completed the regular course of study, and 
received her diploma in October, 1837. On the 23rd of April 
in the following year she lost her mother, and in the middle 
of September her father also died. In 1839, she continued 
her studies under the direction other brother at Cambridge, 
and in September united herself to the Unitarian church in 
Danvers. In November, 1841, she entered upon an engage- 
ment as private teacher in a family at Charleston in South 
Carolina, which she retained for a year. Early in 1844, she 
commenced a similar engagement in a family near Charlestown 
in Jefferson county, Virginia, and terminated the same at mid- 
summer of the following year. In the spring of 1846, in conse- 
quence of a change in her religious views, she left the Unita- 
rian body, and joined the Episcopal church. In November, 
1847, she again took an engagement as private teacher at Port 
Conway, King George county, Virginia; where she remained 
till the summer of 1849, and then removed to New York; 
shortly after which she resolved to devote her life to mission- 
ary work among the heathen. The call for female agency at 
Shanghae was urgent, and Miss. Tenney was soon engaged for 
that sphere, by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Protes- 
tant Episcopal Church. She left New York in the Tartar, on 
March 16th, 1850, and arrived at Hongkong on July 6th. On 
the 2nd of August she reached Shanghae, and after no very 
lengthened period was actively engaged in school work. From 
the period of her marriage with Mr. Keith, on April 27th, 1854, 
she zealously cooperated with him in all his engagements, and 
was affectionately tended by him in her dying moments. Her 
body was deposited in the cemetery of San Francisco on July 
12th, 1862, but was taken by ship to New York in the follow- 
ing spring, and interred in Greenwood Cemetery, where a me- 
morial marble tablet to herself and her husband, has been 
erected by their missionary board. 

Publications by Mrs. Keith. 

CHINESE. 

1- W % !l H &f Hang U shili lull. Henry and his Bearer. 
35 leaves. Shanghae, 1856. This is a translation into the 
Shanghae dialect, of the popular little book of the same title 
in English. 



JOHN' TEVIS POINTS. 213 

2. Hang-le zmh-ldh. Henry and his Bearer, pp. 65. 
Shangliae. This is a transliteration in the Roman character, 
of No. 1, supra. 

3. HI Jl flj Mung t'ung heun. Line upon Line. 87 leaves. 
Shanghae, 1857. A translation into the Shanghae dialect of 
the English work of the same name. 

4. De-le-ts vung-tah. Geographical Catechism, pp. 114. 
Shangliae. This is in the Shanghae dialect, printed in 
the Roman character, and has seven folding maps, of the 
World, the five Continents and China. It was reprinted at 
Shanghae in 1861, on a much smaller-sized page, without the 
maps, pp. 135. 

5. Kiau' Hs Idle. Child's Book on the Soul. pp. 123. 
Shanghae, 1861. This is a translation into the Shanghae 
dialect of Gallaudet's hook of the same name, printed in the 
Roman character. 



CXLVIII. ^ Sun. Rev. ROBERT NELSON was sent 
to China by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church in the United States. He arrived at Shang- 
hae on December 25th, 1851, where he remained till 1859, and 
then left with his family for America. 

Publications by Mr. Nelson. 

CHINESE. 

1. U £{j *: jgij -{jl |[i K'ew yd shoo ch'wdng she ke. Ge- 
nesis, pp. 94. Shangliae, 1854. This is in the Shanghae 
dialect, 



CXLIX. JS^$r P'ang.-Tae-wuli. JOHN TEV1S 
POINTS, a native of Virginia in the United States, was ap- 
pointed by the Board of Missions of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, to take the superintendence of the mission schools in 
Shanghae. He sailed in the Oriental in the latter part of 1851, 
in company with Mr. and Mrs. Nelson and Mr. Keith, and ar- 
rived at Shanghae on December 25th. Ill health compelled 
him to leave for a visit to his native land early in 1853, and 
he returned in the Gravina, accompanied by Bishop and Mrs. 
Boone, arriving at Shanghae on April 13th, 1854. Again 
brought very low by sickness, it was found necessary for him 
finally to quit China in 1856, when he sailed for America. 
While there he entered into holy orders, was married, and 
obtained a pastoral charge : lint did not live long to. sustain 
this connection. 



214 KEV. TARLETON P. CRAWFORD. 

Publications by Mr. Points. 

CHINESE. 

1. 4 1 #Mil It? Chung wae t'ung shoo. Chinese and For- 
eign Almanac. 43 leaves. Shanghae, 1856. After the preface 
and table of contents, this contains an Anglo-Chinese Sabbath 
calendar, with times of sunrise and sunset, and equation of 
time, after the model of the Peace Almanac published by Dr. 
McCartee; next follow Remarks on Eclipses, taken from the 
same publication; (see McCartee's works, No. 26.) Notes on 
the Decalogue, a tract by Mr. Doolittle; (see Doolittle's works, 
No. 13.) the Sermon on the Mount, from Bridgman and Cul- 
bertson's version of the New Testament; (see Bridgman's 
works, No. 7.) Inspiration of the Scriptures, a tract by Mr. 
Hartwell; (see C. Hartwell's works, No. 6.) Jesus the only 
Saviour, and Remarks on passing the New Year, two of Milne's 
Sermons; (see Dr. Milne's works, No. 16.) Fundamental 
Principles of Christianity, being Hartwell's revision of Mc- 
Cartee's tract; (see C. Hartwell's works, No. 7.) and Doolit- 
tle's revision of Tracy's tract on Opium, (see Doolittle's 
works, No. 1.) 



OL. If ^ 3S Kaou T6-pci. Rev. T A RLETON P. CRAW- 
FORD was sent to China by the Board of Foreign Missions 
of the Southern Baptist Convention in the United States, and 
arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Crawford on March 28th, 1852. 
In August, 1858, he left for a visit to America, on account of 
ill-health, and returned to Shanghae in 1860, soon after which 
he removed to Teng-chow in Shan-tung. 

Publications by Mr. Crawford. 

CHINESE. 

!• v$k %$ ft Tsdn, shin she. Hymn Book. Shanghae, 
1855. This is in the Shanghae dialect. 

2- 1 i i f ? S £fc Sluing hae t'oo yin tsze siidy fa. 
Phonetic Primer. 22 leaves. Shanghae, 1855. This is an 
elementary work to teach the Chinese the use of the new 
phonetic character invented by Mr. Crawford, for writing the 
Shanghae dialect. A second edition was printed. 

3 *p| rpT ^ Vung j. ceu hhm s c i en tific Manual. 15 
leaves. Shanghae, 1856, This is in the Shanghae dialect, 
printed in the new phonetic character. 

4. ffi T^l /f> Zyf Sungltiungtsihloh. Bible Stones. 93 
leaves. Shanghae, 1857. This contains eight narratives from 



REV. DANIEL VROOMAN. 215 

the Old Testament, written in the Shanghae dialect, and 
printed in the new phonetic character. 

5- fi %r PU : M Ken kih wan ta6u. The Enquirer. 25 
leaves. Shanghae, 1858. 

ENGLISH. 

6. A few thoughts in reply to a short essay on the ques- 
tion: "What term can be Christianized for God in China?" 
8vo. pp. 10. Shanghae, 1866. This is published with the 
signature Theophilus. 

Publications by Mrs. Crawford. 

CHINESE. 

1. f* T^ ^ff ^ffc San huh siau tsla, Three School Girls. 
25 leaves. Shanghae, 1856. This is in the Shanghae dialect, 
printed in the new phonetic character. 

^- jit & Wi ll? Tsabu yanc/ fan shoo. Foreign Cookery 
in Chinese, with a Preface and Index in English. 29 leaves. 
Shanghae, 1866. This is in the Mandarin dialect, and con- 
tains receipts for the preparation of 27 L articles. 



CLI. H Pod. GEORGE W. BURTON, M. D. was sent 
to China by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Southern 
Baptist Convention, and arrived at Shanghae on March 25th, 
1852. In consequence of illness he left for America towards 
the end of the year, and returned to Shanghae with Mrs. 
Burton in 1854. He finally left China about 1861. 



CLII. & £ Fo6-ivan. Rev. DANIEL VROOMAN was 

sent to China by the American Board of Commissioners for 
Foreign Missions, and arrived in the country on March 6th, 
1852, reaching Canton his destination on the 15th. In Feb- 
ruary, 1857, he left for the United States, and returned to 
Canton in 1860. In June, 1865, he left with Mrs. Vrooinan 
for San Francisco. 

Publications by Mr. Vrooman. 

CHINESE. 

1. @ ^ f II ^ ^i. ^-' T'ang fan hd ho t'ung shoo. Chinepp 
Foreign Concord Almanac. Canton. This is the continuation 
of Dr. Ball's almanac, (see Ball's works, No. 13.) The tirsf 



216 REV. PHILIP WINNES. 

number issued by Mr. Vroornan was for the year 1861, con- 
taining 24 leaves of miscellaneous matter; the numbers for 
18G2 and 1863 bore the same title, the latter containing 25 
leaves; that for 1864 is also in 25 leaves; and the issue for 
1865, which resumes the title f q fe j§ || Ho ho t\mg shoo, 
contains 31 leaves, comprising besides the calendar, McCartee's 
tracts, Nos. 32 and 8, a revision of the first of Milne's Ser- 
mons, McCartee's tract No. 6, Legge's tract No. 17, McCar- 
tee's tract No. 3, Jesus the Saviour of the world, the Holy 
Spirit the Comforter, the Lord's Prayer, the Penitent's Con- 
fession, Form of Prayer, Grace before meals, McCartee's tract 
No. 17, and the Decalogue. 

ENGLISH. 

2. Map of the City and entire Suburbs of Canton. Large 
sheet. Canton, 1860. 

3. Phonetic Alphabet, for the Canton Dialect of the 
Chinese Language. 8vo. pp. 8. Canton, 1863. This is a 
brief account with illustrations of a system invented by Mr. 
Vroornan, for writing the Canton colloquial Chinese. 



CLIII. it P jl Wei Fei-leih, Eev. PHILIP WINNES 

was sent to China by the Evangelical Missionary Society at 
Basel, and arrived at Hongkong on May 15th, 1852. A con- 
siderable part of his time was spent at the stations of Pukak, 
Chonglok and Lilong on the main-land, and he left for 
Europe in February, 1865. * 

Publications by Mr. Whines. 

CHINESE. 
» 

1. JfJ$ $$ >Jg ^ H $g Ydy soo sh6w h'od tsin yuen. Trea- 
tise on the Sufferings of Christ. 18 leaves. Hongkong, 1863. 
This is divided into three sections; the first of which contains 
an outline of the life of Christ; the second contains a more 
pai ticular account of the events connected with the sufferings 
and death of the Saviour, related in the words of Scripture, 
with references throughout; the third section contains a brief 
statement of the various occurrences on record, from the re- 
surrection to the ascension of our Lord. 

2. §| "If i$] Jjl fpj ^ Siting liwiiy yew heb wan td. Lu- 
ther's Small Catechism. 18 leaves. Hongkong, 1864. The 
translation of the text of Luther's Catechism slightly modi- 
fied, is followed by three quotations from the New Testament, 
entitled the Keys of the Kingdom of Heaven, in reference to 



REV. JOHN' CHALMERS, A. M. 217 

the authority of ministers to grant absolution. The work is 
concluded by a translation of the Nicene and Athanasian 
Creeds. There is a preface by the translator. 

In Lechler's Hymn book (see Lechler's works, No. 1.) are 
4 hymns by Mr. Winnes. 



CLIV. ?t $j $& Ohan Yo-han. Rev. JOHN CHAL- 
MERS, A. M. was appointed a missionary to China, by the 
London Missionary Society, and arrived at Hongkong on June 
28th, 1852. In the latter part of 1859, he removed to Can- 
ton, where he has been since residing. 

Publications by Mr. Chalmers. 

CHINESE. 

1. itf Jj£ -!§. tl •!$ H Ts'oo he'd yue yin ts'ee yaou. A 
Chinese Phonetic Vocabulary, containing all the most com- 
mon characters, with their sounds in the Canton Dialect. 33 
leaves. Hongkong, 1855. The characters are arranged ac- 
cording to the radicals, and the sound of each is given by two 
other characters selected as initial and final. There is a 
Chinese and an English preface, and the initial and final 
characters are repeated throughout, at the top of every leaf, 
with a transcript in Roman letters. 

2- _L ^ ifE Wt Sluing te tsimg Km. General Discourse 
on God. 6 leaves. Canton, 1856. This is a revision of the 
article in Premare's Notitia Linguae Sinicaa. The Ten Com- 
mandments, in 2 leaves, with the title _£ *$? -\* {\^ ^ M 
Sluing te shih t'eaou shing keae, is bound up with it. It was 
reprinted at Hongkong. 

3- Wi Wc /Jc JH She soo h'eio chin. Arithmetical Ques- 
tions. 6 leaves. Hongkong, 1856. 

4- £n ^ %% M Tsung choo she chang. Hymn Book. 60 
leaves. Canton, 1860. This contains nearly the whole of Dr. 
Legge's Hymn Book, (see Legge's works, No. 2.) set to music, 
according to the European notation. There are 81 hymns 
and 7 doxologies. 

5- 5c fM llr A Teen Icing hang jin. Men tried by the 
Celestial Mirror. 20 leaves. Hongkong, 1862. This consists 
of extracts from Thomas a Kempis' "Imitation of Christ." 
It is in 15 chapters, with a prologue, a preface, a hymn and 
table of contents. 

6- IE 35 H tfo Gliing ming yaou Km. Important Discourse 
on the Correct Name. 16 leaves. Hongkong, 1863. This is 
an essay on the proper term for "God" in Chinese, with an 
English translation. At the end are given various synonymes 



218 JOHN BYERS. 

used by different authorities, an extract shewing the distinc- 
tion between Shin and Shdng-te, quotations from native books, 
shewing that shin refers to the human spirit, quotations on 
the use of Chin Shin, and two postcripts by natives. 

7. $$ £j ~|j* *g T'oio Inu&n show tseih. Exposure of Ido- 
latry. 28 leaves. Hongkong, 1863. This traces the history 
of the Buddhist idol Ytih-hwang, of Pih-te, of the tutelary 
spirits, and of Kwan-yin. The last section revised was pub- ' 
lished separately as a large sheet tract, with the title fjfr 1! ar 
)M ^7 ^ W* Lun lavun yin hen hxodn che yuen. 

8- i£ i$ fit ^ %& H tk $he suh ts'ing ming tse moo lun. 
Discourse on Ancestral Worship. 6 leaves. Canton. This 
has special reference to the spring festival of worshipping at 
the tombs, with strictures on geomancy. It is an enlarge- 
ment of a sheet tract bearing the title i^ f£ j^f BJj ^ ^ "^ 
She suh ts'ing ming pae moo lun. 

9. Wi I5i ^ ?!$ tk Citing hwdng fei shin lun. The pa- 
tron deity of the city has no spiritual existence. Canton, 1865. 

10. 4* #|* jfiff | 4i f| Chung wae sin wan ts'eih jrh 
lull. Chinese and Foreign Weekly News. Canton. This 
serial, which is edited by Mr. Chalmers, consists of a single 
sheet published every seven days, in book form, containing 
articles of news, science, religion and miscellanies. It was 
begun the first week of the Chinese new year, February 7th, 
1865. 

ENGLISH. 

11. ^ J®, ijl M Yrng yue tsze teen. An English and 
Cantonese Pocket Dictionary, for the use of those who wish 
to learn the spoken language of Canton Province, pp. 161. 
Hongkong, 1859. 

There is an article by Mr. Chalmers, entitled "Astronomy 
of the Ancient Chinese," inserted in the prolegomena to the 
3rd volume of Dr. Legge's Chinese Classics, pp. 90 — 104. 
(see Legge's works, No. 26.) 



CLV. JOHN BYEKS, a native of the United States, was 
ordained to the ministry, and appointed a missionary to China 
by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church. 
He embarked at New York with Mrs. Byers, in the Nestorian, 
in the summer of 1852, and arrived at Shanghae on August 
22nd. But he had scarcely reached his station when his 
health gave way, and he sailed again on November 9th, for 
his native land; which he never reached however, for he died 
on the passage, and his remains were committed to the deep. 



REV. A, B. CABANISS. 219 

CLVI. $JiM M Kdn 9 Hivily-Uen. Rev, WILLIAM 
a. E. CUNNYNGHAM, was sent to China by the Mission- 
ary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church in the United 
States, and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Cunnyngham on 
October 17th, 1852. He left with his family for America in 
the beginning of October, 1861, and has not since returned 
to China. 

Publications by Mr. Cunnyngham. 

CHINESE. 

1- M Hf H JS Fej ^ Fuh, i i in chin lewantd. Catechism 
of Gospel Truth. 26 leaves. Shanghae, 1855. This is in the 
Shanghae dialect, and consists of 96 questions on the leading 
points of Christianity, divided into 10 sections. At the end 
is a doxology, and a hymn of prayer and praise. A third edi- 
tion was printed at Shanghae in 1861, in 18 leaves, contain- 
ing 90 questions, and concluding with four forms of prayer 
for morning and evening. 

Publications by Mrs. Cunnyngham. 

CHINESE. 

1- SH <H Mi $J Miimj yang h'e ming. Peep of Day. 83 
leaves. Shanghae, 1860. This is in the Shanghae dialect. 



CLVII. FREDERICK H. BREWSTER was ordained 

to the ministry in the United States, and appointed a mission- 
ary to China, by the American Board of Commissioners for 
Foreign Missions. He sailed from Boston with Mrs. Brews- 
ter on the 31st of July, 1852, and reached Canton early in 
1853, but died within a month of his arrival. 



CLVIII. $$ ^ J£ Kea Gae-2Jc. Rev. A. B. CABANISS 

was sent to China by the Board of Foreign Missions of the 
Southern Baptist Convention in the United States. He ar- 
rived at "Shanghae with Mrs. Cabaniss in 1853, and left for 
America about the year 1859. 

Publications by Mr Cabaniss. 

CHINESE. 

1. *3? ft ^3 P ^ T*/ soo boo huh bifong. Selections 



220 REV. WILLIAM ROBERTS BEACH. 

from iEsop's and other Fables. Translated into the Shang- 
hai Dialect. With a Moral to each Fable, by the Translator. 
78 leaves. Shanghae, 3 856. This is printed in the new pho- 
netic character invented by Mr. Crawford. There is a preface 
and table of contents. 

2. ;)? "P^ T^ T^l ffiLoohazenfohyungm. Luke's 
Gospel. 106 leaves. Shanghae, 1859. This is a transcript in 
the new phonetic character, of a translation into the Shang- 
hae dialect made by the Kev. C. Keith, (see Keith's works, 
No. 3.) 

3. ^•^jj2 7scm %wn( J z ' Hymn Book. 26 leaves. 
Shanghae, 1859. This is a compilation of 21 hymns and 3 
doxologies, from translations by members of the mission and 
other sources. It is in the Shanghae dialect, printed in the 
new phonetic character. There is an index and table of con- 
tents. 

4- fjff jp$ f*F Tsdn shin she. Hymn Book. 25 leaves. 
Shanghae, 1860. This is merely a transcript of the preceding, 
in the Chinese character, without the index. 

Publications by Mrs. Cabaniss. 

CHINESE. 

1. -^H* ~^ 'in Sen oh lumg. Sources of Good and Evil. 
75 leaves. Shanghae, 1856. This is a collection of short 
pieces in the Shanghae dialect, printed in the new phonetic 
character; prefaced by 3 leaves in the Chinese character, ex- 
planatory of the new system of writing. 



CLIX. % I |f m Ko Sew-le. Kev. JOSIAH COX was 

sent to China by the Wesleyan Missionary Society, and ar- 
rived at Hongkong on March 12th, 1853, proceeding forth-- 
with to Canton his appointed station. In March 1860 he 
left for England on account of his health, and returned to 
Hongkong on October 24th, 1861. About the end of the 
year he paid a visit to the insurgents at Nanking, but finding- 
it impracticable to settle there, he returned to Shanghae, and 
in February went to Hankow, where he commenced a mission 
station. In 1865 he removed to Kew-keang, being the first 
Protestant missionary to commence a station there, where he 
still resides. 



CLX. Rev. WILLIAM ROBERTS BEACH was sent to 
China by the Wesleyan Missionary Society, and arrived at 



REV. CHARLES HARTWELL. ' 221 

Canton in April, 1853. In 1855 he left the Wesleyan con- 
nection, and entered the Church of England, being appointed 
Missionary Chaplain at Macao. In 1857 he was made War- 
den of St. Paul's College at Hongkong, and Chaplain to the 
Bishop of Victoria. In 1859, he became Acting Military 
Chaplain to the Hongkong garrison; and in 1861 joined the 
expedition under Sir Hope Grant, as Chaplain to the Forces. 
The following year he returned to England. 



CLXI. M&M Seu Cha-le. Rev. CHARLES HART- 
WELL was appointed a missionary to China, by the Ameri- 
can Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. He ar- 
rived at Fuh-chow with Mrs. Hartwell on June 9th, 1853; 
where he remained till the spring of 1865, and then left with 
his family for the United States, via Hongkong. 

Publications by Mr. Hartwell. 

CHINESE. 

1- IE. 5fc t$ W Sze seen peen mew. Errors of Ancestral 
Worship. 7 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1862. This is a revision of 
Mr. Nevius' tract (see J. L. Nevius' works, No. 2.) 

2. $| %, flff fjfr Pecn kivel shin lun. Disquisition on 
Heathen Gods. 3 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1862. This is a revision 
of a tract published by Mr. Doolittle. (see Doolittle's works, 
No. 19.) 

3- |$ j!k. Wt Peen sing lun. Disquisition on Human Na- 
ture. 6 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1862. This is a revision of a tract 
previously published by Mr. Doolittle. (see Doolittle's works, 
No. 200 " 

4. J]jJf MM ^ ~$C -K'c ia6lc sh' 1 ? 1 wan. Forms of Prayer. 6 
leaves. Fuh-chow, 1862. This is a revision of a tract pub- 
lished bv Mr. Doolittle. (see Doolittle's works, No. 23.) 

5. J: ^ |§J. fro Shdng U tsung lun. Discourse on God. 6 
leaves. Fuh-chow, 1862. This is a revision of a tract pre- 
viously published by Mr. Cummings. (see Cummings' works, 
No. 1.) 

6- M H $J W$i H 7fr tk Si n k'& w U° shoo wei t'een 
she lun. Introduction to the Sacred Scriptures. 10 leaves. 
Fuh-chow, 1862. This is a revision of Dr. Legge's tract on 
the evidences, (see Legge's works, No. 8.) 

7. Jfl$ M- Wd 5? h Y&y soo keaou yaou die. Fundamen- 
tal Principles of Christianity, 13 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1863. 
This is a revision of Dr. McCartee's tract, (see McCartee's 
works, No. 18.) 

8 - 11^ £H Chin le e eke. Easy Introduction to Chris- 



222 REV. JAMES HUDSON" TAYLOR 

tian Doctrine. 14 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1863. This is a revision 
of Dr. McCartee's tract, (see McCartee's works, No. 25.) 

ENGLISH. 

9. A Few Thoughts on the Question. What Term can 
be Christianised for God in Chinese? Fol. pp. 3. Shanghae, 
1864. 



CLXII. £J $j ^ Paou Yo-hdn, Rev. JOHN SHAW 
BURDON was appointed a missionary to China by the Church 
of England Missionary Society, and arrived at Shanghae on 
September 18th, 1853. In the latter part of 1861, he went 
to Peking as Chaplain to the British Legation, which office 
he sustained in conjunction with his missionary duties. In 
the spring of 1864 he went to Shanghae, and embarked for 
Europe in the mail steamer on June 6h. In October 1865 
he returned to Hongkong, and after a few weeks stay, sailed 
for the north, reaching Peking in April, 1866. 

Publications by Mr. Bur don. 

ENGLISH. 

1. Christian Joy. A Sermon, Preached in the London 
Mission Chapel, Shanghai, 25 November, 1858, the last 
Thursday in the Month, usually observed in the United States 
of America, as Thanksgiving Day. Published by Request. 
8vo. pp. 25. Shanghae, 1858. 



CLXIII. s£ §g Le-fe. Rev. HENRY REEVE was ap- 
pointed a missionary to China by the Church of England 
Missionary Society, and arrived at Shanghae on September' 
18th, L853. In consequence of the failure of Mrs. Reeve's 
health, he left for England in 1857, and has not since return- 
ed to China. 



CLXIV. %$ fj| Jin-sin. Rev. JAMES JOHNSTON was 

appointed a missionary to China by the Foreign Mission 
Board of the Presbyterian Church in England, and arrived at 
Amoy in 1853. In consequence of declining health he left 
for England in 1857, and has not since returned to China. 



CLXV. H m ft Tai Yo.-U. Rev. JAMES HUDSON 



REV. ARTHUR TAYLOR. 223 

TAYLOR was appointed a missionary to China, by the Chinese 
Evangelization Society, and arrived at Shanghae, on March 
1st, 1854. In 1856 he was engaged for some months at Swa- 
tow in cooperation with the Rev. \y. C. Burns. Returning 
to Shanghae, he went to Ningpo the same year. In 1858, he 
was married to the daughter of Mr. Dyer the missionary. 
(see No. XV.) The complete failure of his health in 1859 
rendering a change necessary, he embarked at Shanghae for 
England on the 25th of December; and returned to China with 
a number of new missionaries in the autumn of 1866. 

Publications by Mr. Taylor. 

CHINESE. 

1. Ali-lah hyiu-cu Yi<z-su Kyi*toh~go Sing I ah shit; 
pcng-veng fan Nying-po t'u-ivd. Feng p'in-tang-p'in: yih- 
pin cii siang-te-go tslh-tsong. Zdng-hyun S Foh-ing teng 
s-du ying tljiin. New Testament in the Ningpo Dialect. 
Part 1. 8vo. pp. 227. London, 1865. This includes the four 
Gospels and Acts of the Apostles. It is printed on English 
paper, in a handsome style, with marginal references. The 
remaining portion of the New Testament was partially carried 
through the press, by the British and Foreign Bible Society. 
Mr. G-ough has been associated with Mr. Taylor in the work, 
almost from the beginning. 

There is a series of articles by Mr. Taylor on the Language, 
History, Antiquities and Religion of China, in the Baptist 
Magazine for 186 J. 

Publications by Mrs. Taylor. 

CHINESE. 

1. Siao Veng-tch. Little Catechism, pp. 36. Ningpo, 
1860. This small work, in the Ningpo dialect, contains the 
elements of Christian truth in a catechetical form, divided 
into seven sections. 



CLXVI. Rev. ARTHUR TAYLOR was appointed a 
missionary to China by the Chinese Evangelization Society, 
and arrived at Hongkong with Mrs. Taylor in March, 1854. 
The following year he severed his connection with the society, 
and after remaining several years engaged in school work in 
Hongkong, he went to Vancouver's Island about the year 1858. 



224 REV. JOHN L. NEVIUS. 

CLXVII. \% $£ Jg Ne Wei-sue. Rev. JOHN L. NEVIUS 
was appointed a missionary to China, by the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States, 
and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Nevius on March 14th, 
1854, proceeding immediately to his station at Ningpo. In 
1861 he removed to Teng-chow in Shan-tung, and on ac- 
count of Mrs. Nevius' health, he left China . with her for 
America in July, 1864. 

Publications by Mr. Nevius. 

CHINESE. 

1- 5c !%" -Ha rfr T'een loo die nan. Guide to Heaven. 73 
leaves. Ningpo, 1857. This work was prepared primarily for 
church members and enquirers. Its object is to incite, direct, 
encourage, and warn those who are desirous of leading a Chris- 
tian life; being divided into 18 chapters, on Repentance, — 
Faith, — Love, — Self-examination, — Hindrances to a Chris- 
tian life, — Backsliding, — Nature of Prayer, — Practice of 
Prayer, — Reading the Scriptures, — Diligence in business, — 
Fasting, — Preparation for the Lord's supper, — Trials of God's, 
people, — Providing things honest in the sight of all men, — 
Avoiding the appearance of evil, — Observance of the Sab- 
bath, — Preparation for death, — and Heaven. The last five 
leaves contain a series of questions on the subjects of the 
several chapters. There are two prefaces by native scholars, 
a short introduction and table of contents. It was reprinted 
at Shanghae in 1861, in 97 leaves. 

2- It! 5fc M W &ze s ^ en P^ n m( ' w - Errors of Ancestral 
Worship. Ningpo, 1859. Reprinted at Shanghae in 1864, in 
11 leaves, having been revised and considerably enlarged by 
the author. 

3- Mj pT i% H- ffl Ma &'o chuenledJceae. Notes on Mark. 
52 leaves. Shanghae, 1862. There are two prefaces, the se- 
cond concluding with the Lord's Prayer. Reprinted at Shang- 
hae in 1866. 

4. T'inlutsnen. Guide to Heaven. Ningpo. A version in the 
Ningpo dialect of No. 1, supra, printed in the Roman character. 

5- Is : M. tfa %% Seuen ta6u che Jewel. Manual for native 
Evangelists. 57 leaves. Shanghae, 1862. This contains rules 
and incentives for native preachers, being divided into 7 chap- 
ters, on Self-examination, — Love to God and man, — Aim and 
object of preaching, — Means of regeneration, — Continuance 
in the use of appointed means, — and a Desire to please God, 
the great incentive. An appendix gives rules for conducting 
social and public religious meetings. There is a short intro- 
duction and table of contents. 



REV. JOHN L. NEVIUS. 225 

6- #1 fi? iH f 11 ! 1 Wl Sung ydng chin, shin ho. Hymn Boole. 
87 leaves. Shanghae, 1862. This is a version in the Man- 
darin dialect of 100 hymns from Mr. Rankin's hymn book, 
(see Rankin's works, No. 5.) and 10 doxologios. They are 
for the most part, translations of favourite English hymns. 
There is a preface by a native scholar, and a table of contents. 
A second edition carefully revised, with 24 hymns added 
from other sources, was published at Shanghae in 1865, in 
111 leaves. There is a preface to this edition by Mr. Nevius, 
in addition to the other. 

7. % Jjf ZL % Teen yew iirh hwang. The Two Lights. 
19 leaves Shanghae, 1864. This contains an elementary and 
succinct view of the teachings of the Scriptures with reference 
to God, man, spirits, a future state of rewards and punish- 
ments, the pardon of sin, and reformation and virtuous living, 
compared with the doctrines relating to these subjects derived 
solely from the light of nature. There is a preface, and an 
introduction shewing the insufficiency of the teachings of the 
sages, and the necessity of a revelation from heaven. It was 
reprinted at Shanghae in 1865. 

8- flji : M IE tk SJtin t a6u tsung Km. Compendium of 
Theology. 3 books. Shanghae, 1864. This is part of a work, 
which the author intends to comprise three more books. The 
first book, in 96 leaves, treats of the genuineness and inspira- 
tion of the Scriptures, in 14 chapters. There is a table of 
contents and an introduction. The second book, in 46 leaves, 
treats of the Being and attributes of God, and the doctrine 
of the Trinity, in 9 chapters. It has a table of contents. 
The third book, in 83 leaves, treats of the origin of men and 
things, in 12 chapters, and has a table of contents. 

9- $1 % ff i$ p£ M She l'°6 l>i nc J chuen choo Jceae. 
Commentary on the Acts of the Apostles. 105 leaves. Shang- 
hae, 1865. The Commentary on Acts by Dr. Addison Alex- 
ander of Princeton has been largely used in preparing this 
work. The running title through the book is ^ ^ ff {$. 
fU; lp She foo Icing chuen choo shlh. 

1^- §H 1U fit H If Wh M WS K'e &ea tsung chin chuen 
li6 weifuh. Rejection of falsehood and reception of truth, 
converting calamity into happiness. Sheet tract. Ningpo. 

Publications by Mrs. Nevius. 

CHINESE. 

1. lu dong ts'u hyiao. Peep of Day. pp. If 5. Ningpo. 
This is a translation into the Ningpo dialect, printed in the 
Roman character. 

2 - M M fflt ft W P9 ^ Y & V s0 ° teaO* hwan hwA wan 



226 REV. CHARLES FINNEY PRESTON. 

td. Christian Catechism in the Mandarin Dialect. 21 leaves. 
Shanghae, 1863. The running title through the book is JflJ 
$S %. F^J %=* Y&y soo IceaCu wan td. 



CLXVIII. £ ,S ft Pei Szc-ye. Rev. CHARLES FIN- 
NEY PRESTON was appointed a missionary to China, by the 
Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States, and arrived at Hongkong on May 12th, IS54. 
He proceeded at once to his station at Canton, where he has 
been since engaged in missionary labours. 

Publications by Mr. Preston. 

CHINESE. 

1- M) "iC fS Wm Hf Hr Ma t'ae chuen fuh yin sJwo. Mat- 
thew's Gospel. 40 leaves. Canton. A translation into the 
Canton dialect. 

2- $j $$ i$- "ifiS Hf Hr Yd hdn chuenfuh yin shoo. John's 
Gospel. 38 leaves. Canton. A translation into the Canton 
dialect. 

3. fjj Jj* f$ ^ Ts'oo lied wan td. Shorter Catechism. 
15 leaves. Shanghae, 1862. There is a short preface. This 
is published under the auspices of the Canton presbytery. 

4- M $$ a" 17 ]§. ^c f& W Yay soo yen king tsd yaou 
silh Incd. Important Selections from the Life of Christ, in 
the Canton Dialect. 108 leaves. Canton, 1863. This consists 
of a hundred passages selected from the gospels, giving in a 
consecutive form the various events in the history of our Lord. 

5- Uf |j| jjilfi %%Tsdnmel shin she. Hymn Book. 47 leaves. 
Canton. This is a collection of 81 hymns and 2 doxologies, 
translated into the Canton dialect, prefaced by a tribute of 
paternal affection, in a notice of a daughter of the author, 
who died in childhood, a remarkable instance of early piety. 
A later edition was published at Canton, in 51 leaves, with 
6 additional hymns. The prefatory notice, was published in 
a modified form as a separate tract, with the title ^ j| £§ 
J(f$ ffcjc Hae t'ung Icwei ydy soo, "A Child's Attachment to 
to Jesus," in 4 leaves. 

6- Hr ffr JL fiffr $Jk 1< Slung shoo woo Urn tsd yaou. Se- 
lections from the Scriptures on the Five Relations of Society. 
20 leaves. Shanghae, 1864. This consists entirely of Scrip- 
ture extracts with references, divided into five sections, on the 
relative duties of Prince and Subject, Father and Son, Elder 
and Younger Brothers, Husband and Wife, and Mutual 
Friends. 

7- II 'H 3JL *fjj ^Jt ^ Shing shoo woo ch'dng tsd yaou. 



JOHH GLASGOW KERB, M. D. 227 

Selections from the Scriptures on the Five Constant Virtues. 
19 leaves. Shanghae, 1864. This is on the same plan as the 
preceding, and is divided into five sections, treating of Bene- 
volence. Justice, Decorum. Prudence and Fidelity. 

8. ^ f£ % ,%, :Jj| |g Siting shoo gan sciltjthtso yaou. 
Selections from the Scriptures on the Sabbath. 12 leaves. 
Shanghae, 1864. 

9- 1^ flr : M M }1 H Siting shoo tsew keae tso yaou. Se- 
lections from the Scriptures on Intemperance. 6 leaves. Shang- 
hae, 1864, 

10. ||^ U" -£S J^ }J| §g Siting shoo sih keae tso yaou. Se- 
lections from the Scriptures on Lust. 10 leaves. Shanghae, 
1864. 

11- IB llr ^L ^ Jii H Siting shoo k'e keae tso yaou. Se- 
lections from the Scriptures on Anger. 7 leaves. Shanghae, 
1864. 

12. |g f§£ |fj- 5$ }j| || Siting shoo tsae keae tso yaou. Se- 
lections from the Scriptures on Avarice. 10 leaves. Shanghae, 
1864. 



CLXIX. H $j §& iTea Fdf-ftd». JOHN GLASGOW 
KERR, M. D. was sent to China as a medical missionary, by 
the Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in 
the United States, and arrived at Hongkong with Mrs. Kerr 
on May 12th, 185-1, reaching Canton his destination on 
the 15th. In February, 1857, he left for America and re- 
turned to Canton in November, 1858, where he has been since 
residing. 

Publications by Dr. Kerr 

CHINESE. 

1. Tract on Vaccination. 

2- fifr H 1$ >J> Jllr jlJSj M ^E Liin fa Icing seabu ch'ang 
shan leung citing. Tract on Hernia and Intermittent Fever. 
6 leaves. Canton, 1859. This has a prefatory article on the 
Scripture doctrine of sin and its consequences. 

3. % fM j$ }Jm % ■$> King yen Ice citing led shah. Re- 
port of the Medical Missionary Society's Hospital at Canton 
for the year 1859. 9 leaves. Canton, 1860. 

4- ?tf %E % $£ K'e citing led shuh. Reports of the Medi- 
cal Missionary Society's Hospital at Canton, for the years 
1863 and 1865. 2 numbers. 10+21 leaves. Canton, 1864. 
1866. 

ENGLISH 



228 REV. MILES JUSTUS KNOWLTON. 

5. Medicine in China, pp. 16. This was first published 
in the North American Medico-Chirurgical Review forMareh, 

1859, and afterwards issued as a separate pamphlet. 

6. Eight Reports of the Medical Missionary S Hos- 
pital at Canton. — Report for the year 1855 — 56, pp. 24: 
Macao. 1857;— for 1858 and 1859, pp. 23: Macao, I860;— for 

1860, pp. 21: Canton. 1861;— for 1861, pp. 22: Canton, 
1862;— for 1862, pp. 26: Hongkong, 1863;— for 1863. pp. 
31: Hongkong 1864;— for 1864, pp. 30: Hongkong, 1865: 
—for 1865, pp. 45: Hongkong, 1866. 



CLXX. ||$ ^ $£ N6 Urh-tun. Rev. MILES JUSTUS 
KNOWLTON was appointed a missionary to China, by the 
American Baptist Missionary Union, and arrived at Hongkong 
with Mrs. Knowlton in May, 1854; proceeding immediately 
via Shanghae to his destination at Ningpo. He still resides 
there. 

Publications by Mr. Knowlton. 

CHINESE. 

1. J£ %§ -f- fj$ Chin shin shlh heae. The Ten Command- 
ments, pp. 2. Ningpo, 1855. These two pages are published 
in the form of a card; one side containing the decalogue, and 
the other JfJJ j&fc fg -|f IE J^ |£ H Y&y soo full yin chin le 
yaou che, "Important principles of Jesus' gospel," and ffi jjiijl 
3L ?£ P a & diin die fa, "Rules for worship." 

2. 1^ $g fnl %? Shing Icing wan td. Scripture Catechism. 
158 leaves. Ningpo, 1861. After a short introduction and 
table of contents, this contains a scries of questions on theolo- 
gy, divided into eight chapters, comprising 69 sections on so 
many different subjects. Most of the answers have Scripture 
references annexed. The last four leaves contain a detail of 
the articles of Christian faith and Church covenant. 

3. ift %& %U $j ~$C Sin tsiing seeing yd wan. Articles of 
Faith and Church Covenant. 8 leaves. Ningpo, 1863. This 
is the republication as a separate tract, of the two articles at 
at the end of the preceding work. 

Publications by Mrs. Knowlton. 

CHINESE. 

1. Hyuing-mong sing-hying Icong-ko. Scripture Lessons 
for Children. 55 leaves. Ningpo, 1860. This is in the Ning- 
po dialect, printed in the Roman character. 



WILLIAM • AITCHISON . ±2U 

CLXXI. £j g| JS PrhHdn-le. Rev. HENRY BLOD- 
GET was appointed a missionary to China, by the American 
Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, and arrived at 
Shanghae with Mrs. Blodget on August 3rd, 1854. In No- 
vember I860 he went to Teen-tsin, and in 1864 to Peking, 
where he still resides. 

Publications by Mr Blodget. 

CHINESE. 

1- f$ Ml 1$ H Wj A fSr Paouldyuldmajinshoo, Paul's 

Epistle to the Romans. 35 leaves. Shanghae, 1859. This is 
in the Shanghae dialect. 

2. Threshing the Floor. Shanghae. 

3. Henry and his Bearer, translated into the Mandarin 
dialect. Peking. 



CLXXII. ^ Gae. WILLIAM AITCHISON was Lorn 
in Scotland on January 1st, 1826. In early life he went to 
the United States, where he studied for the ministry, and was 
ordained to the sacred office. He was appointed a missionary 
to China by the American Board of Commissioners for For- 
eign Missions, left America in 1854, accompanied by Mr. 
and Mrs. Blodget, and arrived at Shanghae on August 3rd. 
During the years 1855 and 1856, he spent much of his time 
travelling through the adjacent country in boats, accompanied 
by the Rev. J. S. Bunion, and about the end of the latter 
year settled at the city of Ping-hoo in Che-keang, where he 
made a short stay, and afterwards visited Ningpo. On the 
arrival in China of Mr. Ward the United States minister, for 
the exchange and ratification of the Teen-tsin treaty, Mr. 
Aitchison was appointed Assistant Interpreter to the em- 
bassy. He left Shanghae with the squadron in June, and 
reached the mouth of the Pih-ho on the 21st. On the 2Sth 
of July they arrived at Peking, where it was his intention to 
have remained as a missionary if practicable. 13 at this scheme 
failing entirely he left the capital with the embassy on 
the 11th of August, having been for some time suffering se- 
verely from dysentery. His weakness continued to increase 
during the journey, and he died in the litter in which he was 
being borne, on the 15th, a few hours after leaving Pih-tsang, 
to which he had travelled by boat. His body was carried to 
Pih-tang, and there consigned to the deep. A marble 
obelisk to his memory, uniform with that of Mr. Macy has 
been placed side by side with it in the Shanghae cemetery. 



230 JAMES S. BELTON. 

CLXX1II. g #: Ke-leuh. CHARLES WASHINGTON 
GAILLARD was born in South Carolina, and studied for the 
ministry at Union University, Murfreesboro in Tennessee.' He 
joined the Baptist church in the state of Mississippi, and hav- 
ing been ordained to the ministry, was appointed a missionary 
to China, by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Southern 
Baptist Convention at Richmond in Virginia, in 1853. On 
March 14th, 1854, he was married to Eva M. Mills, left New 
York with Mrs. Gaillard in April, and arrived at Hongkong 
in August. Shortly after, he went to Macao, proceeding to 
Canton in September. There he remained till the outbreak 
of tjie troubles in 1856, when he went to Macao with his fa- 
mily, returning to Canton in March, 1858. On account of 
rumoured hostilities in June, he again went to Macao, and 
returned to Canton in September. There he continued his 
missionary labours till the summer of 18G2, when a terrific 
typhoon took place, during which his house was blown down, 
and he was killed in the ruins, on July 27th. His widow was 
afterwards married to the Rev. R. H. Graves. 

Publications by Mr. Gaillard. 

CHINESE. 

1- IIS ^ fr \% I£ IP She t'°6 hing chuen cltoo shih. Notes 
on the Acts of the Apostles. 35 leaves. Canton, 1860. 



CLXXIV. If ± H Luy Td-p'cih. Rev. DAVID CAMP- 
BELL KELLY, M. D. was appointed a missionary to China, 
by the Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
in the Southern States of America, and arrived at Shanghae 
with Mrs. Kelly on September 17th, 1854. In consequence of 
his wife's ill health, he left for the United States in March, 
1856, and has not since returned to China. 



CLXXV. Jg: || # T'wifj Ya-Jcd. JAMES S. BELTON, 
a member of the Wesleyan Methodist body in the United 
States, was ordained to the ministry of the gospel, and ap- 
pointed a missionary to China, by the Missionary Society of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church in the Southern States. He 
left America with Mrs. Bel ton in 1854, accompanied by the 
Revs. Dr. Jenkins and family, D. C. Kelly, and J. II. Lam- 
buthj with their wives, and reached Shanghae on September 
17th. Within a year of his arrival however, Mr. Belton's 
health gave way, and he left Shanghae for the United States 



REUBEN LOWRIE. 231 

on November 17th, 1855. He died in New York on March 
17th, 1856. 



CLXXVI. H |? J| Lan Hwuy-Uen. Rev. JAMES 
WILLIAM LAMBUTH was appointed a missionary to China 
by the Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
in the Southern States of America, and arrived at Shanghae 
with Mrs. Lambuth on September 17th, 1854. On account of 
ill health he left for the United States on September 3rd, L861, 
and ruturned to Shanghae on February 9th, 1865, where he 
still resides. 

Publications by Mr. Lambuth. 

CHINESE. 

1- H &vf iff $1 Fr) ^ K'&v yo s i n yu wan td. Catechism 
of the Old and New Testaments. This is in the Shanghae 
dialect. 

2- Wt ^t H l§ Tsan met shing she. Hymns of Praise. 74 
leaves. Shanghae, 1861. This is a collection of 100 hymns 
translated into the Shanghae dialect. The measure is marked 
to each in Roman letters. 



CLXXVII. H Loo. REUBEN LOWRIE the brother of 
Rev. Walter Lowrie the missionary, (see No. LXI.) was born 
in the United States, on the 24th of November, 1827. He 
studied for the ministry in his native land, and was in due 
time ordained to the sacred office. After having been for a 
short time engaged as a missionary to the American Indians. 
he was appointed to China by the Board of Foreign Missions 
of the Presbyterian Church. He was married to Miss. Tuttell 
and left New York with Mrs. Lowrie in the summer of 1854, 
arriving at Shanghae on September 30th. He continued zea- 
lously devoted to the mission work at that station till 1859, 
when his health became so much affected that it was deemed 
best for him to spend a few months in Japan. After a short 
residence at Yokohama, he returned to Shanghae in 1S60; 
but sinking under the protracted sufferings of long-standing 
disease, he died on April 26th, and was buried in the Shang- 
i hae cemetery, where a monument has been erected to his me- 
mory, uniform with his brother's cenotaph at Ningpo. Mrs. 
Lowrie left with her family in the beginning of July, for the 
United States, via Fuh-chow. 

Publications by Mr. Lowrie. 



232 REV:- EtOBERO TELFORD. 

CHINESE. 

1- jjifi Hf >J* ^ Fuh yin seaou Mo. Elementary Gospel 
Instruction. 25 leaves. Shanghae, 1855. This consists of a 
series of nine Scripture themes, followed by a number of Scrip- 
ture texts, illustrating the respective subjects. 

2. ^L Sp. $!£ San tsze l-iwj. Trimetrical Classic. 10 leaves. 
Ningpo. Printed also at Shanghae in 7 leaves. This is in the 
Shanghae dialect, and is divided into 6 chapters, on the ele- 
ments of Christian truth. 

3 Mj j& f§ WS I3 llr !£ M Mm t'uz chuen fuh yin shoo 
cJioo leeae. Commentary on Matthew's Gospel. 102 loaves. 
Shanghae, 1865. This is in the Shanghae dialect. 



CLXXVIII. E, #j? If Pa Klh-urh. WILLIAM PAR- 
KER was born at Glasgow, in September, 1S24, where he studi- 
ed for the medical profession, and graduated as M. D. having 
also received his diploma as L. F. Ph. S. G. He was married to 
Mary Williamson in 1848; and after some years of practice in 
his native land, was appointed a medical missionary to China, 
by the Chinese Evangelization Society. On June 6th, 1854, 
he left Liverpool with his family in the Swiftsure, and arrived 
at Shanghae on November 27th. There he remained till No- 
vember, 1855, when he removed to Ningpo. and established a 
missionary hospital at that city. On the 26th of August, 
1859, Mrs. Parker died of cholera, and Dr. Parker leaving 
Ningpo shortly after, embarked at Shanghae with his family 
for England. On the 26th of November, 1861, he was married 
again at Glasgow, to Alison, the third daughter of the Rev. 
Dr. Napier, and left Southampton with Mrs Parker by the P. 
and 0. Company's steamer on January 4th, 1862, reaching 
Hongkong about the end of February. After a short stay at 
that port, he embarked in the steamer Aden, and arrived at 
Shanghae on March 20th, proceeding at once to Ningpo, where 
he resumed his work among the Chinese. In January, 1863, 
while crossing a stone bridge in the city on horseback, one of 
the slabs gave way, and he was precipitated with his horse 
into the stream. He died a few days after, on February 2nd, 
from the effect of the injury thus received. Mrs. Parker left 
for England in April, 1866. 



CLXXIX. Rev. ROBERT TELFORD was appointed a 
missionary to the Chinese,by (lie American Baptist Missionary 
Union, and arrived at Bankok with Mrs. Telford in 1854. 
About the year 1860 he accompanied Mr. Ashmore to Swatow, 



REV. HENDRIK '/.. KLOEKERS. 233 

where lie remained till 1864, and then left for America, since 
which he has not returned to China. 



CLXXX. p$ ± Me-szc. WILLIAM ALLEN MACY 
was born in the United States, on January 27th, 1825. In 
1844 he was engaged as Assistant to the Rev. S. R. Brown, 
Master of thfi Morrison Education Society's school in Hong- 
kong, but was unable to go out for a year after. Having 
studied at Newhaven, he left New York in the Lucas about 
the end of 1845, and arrived at Hongkong on the 12th of 
March, 1846. He immediately commenced his duties in the 
school under Mr. Brown, but the latter being obliged to leave 
the same year from sanitary considerations, the whole charge 
then devolved on Mr. Macy. On April 28th, 1847, his mother 
arrived from America to reside with him; and he continued to 
sustain the responsibility of the school, till it was finally 
closed in 1849. He left for the United States in 1850, and 
while in his native land was ordained to the ministry, being- 
appointed a missionary to the Chinese, by the American Board 
of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. He sailed from New 
York on November 8th, 1854, and in due time reached Canton, 
where he entered upon his labours. In 1858 he removed to 
Shanghae, where he died of smallpox on April 9th, 1859, and 
was buried in the Shanghae cemetery. A neat obelisk is 
erected to his memory there. 

The Lists of Surnames and Radicals with Index of Charac- 
ters, forming the concluding portion of Williams' Dictionary, 
(see Dr. Williams' works, No. 5.) pp. 729 — 842, are from the 
jien of Mr. Macy. 

There is also on article by him in the 3rd volume of the 
Journal of the American Oriental Society, — "On the mode of 
applying the Electric Telegraph in connection with the Chinese 
Language;" and another in the 6th volume, on Chinese 
Dictionaries. 



CLXXXI. •£ j& t£ K <>° Loo-Jcelh. Rev. IIENDRIK Z. 
KLOEKERS was appointed a missionary to China, by the 

Netherlands Chinese Evangelization Society, and arrived at 
Shanghae with Mrs. Kloekers in the early part of 1855; but 
she died in November of the same year. In L858, Mr. Kloekers 
went to Europe, when his connection with his society having 
ceased, he was appointed to China by the Baptist Missionary 
Society in England, and having married again, returned to 
Shanghae with Mrs.' Kloekers oa, March 23rd, 1860. In L862 
he went to Che-foo. where he commenced a mission station, 
remaining there till the spring of 1865, and then left for 



234 REV. SAMUEL HUTTON. 

England, since which he has not returned to China. 



CLXXXII. $£ i± fa Hdn Sze-piJi. Rev. AUGUST 
HANSPACH was appointed an agent of the Berlin Mission- 
ary Union for China, and arrived at Hongkong in the early 
part of 1855. His labours have been chiefly in the interior 
having travelled over a great part of Kwang-tung province, 
preaching and promoting educational efforts. 

Publications by Mr. Hanspacli. 

ENGLISH. 

1. Report for the Years of 1863 & 1864 of the Chinese 
Vernacular Schools, established in the Sinon, Kiushen, Fayuen, 
and Chonglok Districts of the Qnangtung Province, superin- 
tended by the Eev. Aug. Hanspach, of the Berlin Mission- 
ary Society, China. 8vo. pp. 15. Hongkong, 1865. 



CLXXXIII. %l fe £ Kd Neen-sctn. Rev. HEINRICH 
GrOCKINGr, M. D. was appointed an agent of the Berlin Mis- 
sionary Union for China, and arrived at Hongkong in the 
early part of 1855. He lived in that neighbourhood for some 
years, and afterwards went into the interior of the pro- 
vince, where he remained till 1864. He then left for Europe, 
and has not since returned to China. 



CLXXXIV. •§ ip Keth-tun. Rev. SAMUEL HUTTON 

was appointed a missionary to China, by the Wesleyan Con- 
ference in England in 1854. He arrived at Hongkong on 
May 16th, 1855, and proceeded to Canton his destination the 
following day. In 1858 he was married at Macao; and in con- 
sequence of failing health left with his family for England 
on May 23rd, 1865! 

Publications by Mr. Hutton. 

CHINESE. 

1- H $1 & 1st H )$ Wi @ K'eio yd tsciien shoo peen scu 
peaou mah. Townsend's Arrangement of the Old Testament. 
78 leaves. Canton, 1861. This gives the classification of the 
sacred record according to the subjects, chronologically ar- 
ranged, from Townsend, the text being indicated by references. 
It is divided into 8 books. 



REV. ERASTUS WENTWORTH, D. D. 235 

2. iff $i & ir $1 & Wi @ Sin y<> tseuen shoo peen seu 
peaou vritli. Townsehd's Arrangement of the New Testament. 
58 leaves. Canton, 1S61. This is the New Testament, arranged 
uniform with the preceding. It is divided into 15 books. 

Mr. Hutton also assisted Mr. Piercy with the Prayer Book, 
(see Piercy 's works, No. 5.) 



CLXXXV. ^ Pclh. Kev. JOHN PRESTON was ap- 
pointed a missionary to China by the Wesleyan Conference, 
and arrived at Hongkong on May 16th, 1855, proceeding at 
once to his station at Canton. He was married at Macao in 
1858, and remained at Canton till June 5th, 1866, when he 
.left with his family for England. 



CLXXXVI. f] 3f ^ Sze Moo-pun. Kev. SAMUEL 
JOSEPH SMITH was appointed a missionary to China, by 
the Wesleyan Missionary Society, and arrived at Hong- 
kong on May 16th, 1855, proceeding immediately to Can- 
ton his distillation. He was married at Macao in 1858, 
and remained at Canton till June 22nd, 1865, when, in con- 
sequence of failing health, he left with his family for England. 

Publications by Mr. Smith. 

CHINESE. 

1- i'J "tfe IB "H* ^ $M tk Gh'ivdng she he shdiv ehang soo 
lun. Ten Readings on the First Chapter of the Book of 
of Genesis. 53 leaves. Canton, 1864. This is a series of ex- 
pository discourses on the introductory portion of Genesis. 
After a preface of two leaves, the first chapter and first three 
verses of the second chpter are printed in red. 



CLXXXVII. ;H ffi Wan-wei. Rev. ERASTUS WENT- 
WORTH, D. D. was appointed a missionary to China by the 
Methodist Episcopal Missionary Society in the United States, 
and arrived at Hongkong with Mrs. Wentworthon May 23rd, 
1855. Proceeding by an early opportunity to Fuh-chow, lie 
reached that city about the 19th of June, and remained till 
December, 1862, when he left for the United States, and has 
not since returned. 

Publication* by Dr. Wentworth 

CHINESE. 



236 KRANCIS MCCAW. 

1- Ml J| i IX § T't k'eiu t'od shwo led. Compendium 
of Geography. 2 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1807. 

2. A Map of the City and Suburbs of Fuh-chan. including 
the Foreign Settlement: from actual Surveys. A Large sheet. 
Fuh-chow. 



CLXXXVIII. g Jfg Ke-slmn. Rev. OTIS GIBSON was 

appointed a missionary to China, by the Methodist Episcopal 
Missionary Society, and arrived at Hongkong with Mrs. Gib- 
son on May 23rd, 1855. He soon after reached his destination 
at Fuh-chow, where he remained till February 22nd, 18G5, 
when failing health requiring a change, he left with his fami- 
ly for his native land, via Hongkong and California. 

Publications by Mr. Gibson. 

CHINESE. 

1. $ft $j »fS ^ Sin yd chuen choo. Reference Testament. 
280 leaves. Fuh-chow 7 1865. This is the Delegates' version 
of the New Testament slightly modified, with, marginal refer- 
ences all given in Arabic numerals. It is prefaced by some 
general instructions for the reader, after which is a table of 
the books of the New Testament, with the number of chapters 
in each; then a list of the several discourses of our Lord, with 
references; a table of abbreviated titles for the several books 
in the Bible; explanation of the use of the Arabic numerals; 
and a map of Palestine. Each book is headed by an intro- 
ductory note. The running title through the book is ^Jf jf>§ ^ 
f|£ Sin yd tseuen shoo. The gospel of Matthew with the above 
prefatory matter was issued in 1864, in 40 leaves, with the 
title $| -fc jjjg ^ j^j |^ Ma t'aefuh yin chuen choo. 

2. "jii [U 3f[ ^ Se kivo swan he'd. European Arithmetic. 
44 leaves. Fuh-chow, 1866. This gives the four initial ari- 
thmetical mles, simple and compound, with fractions vulgar 
and decimal, the Arabic numerals being substituted for the 
Chinese. The first 22 leaves, as far as simple division were 
issued in 1864, prefaced by a notice in English, in which the 
author says the work is sent forth for inspection and trial. 



CLXXXIX. pt ^ Mth-l-aou. FRANCIS McCAW 
studied at Trinity College, Dublin, where he graduated as 
B. A. He was admitted into priest's orders, and being ap- 
pointed a missionary to China, by the Church of England 
Missionary Society, he embarked at Gravesend with Mrs. 
McCaw on February 3rd. 1855. accompanied by the Rev. M. 



REV. GRIFFITH JOHN. 237 

Fearnley. They reached Hongkong in June, and left on the 7th 
of that month for Fun-chow, where they arrived on the 1 7th. 
Mrs. McCaw died there on October 7th, after giving birth to 
a son; and within the brief term of two years more Mr. McCaw 
was also removed to his final rest on the 30th of August, 
1857. They are buried side by side in the foreign cemetery 
at Fuh-chow. 



CXC. jf m Fang-tt. Eev. MATTHEW FEARNLEY 

was appointed a missionary to China by the Church of 
England Missionary Society, and arrived at Hongkong in 
June, 1855, reaching Fuh-chow his destination, on the 17th. 
In November, 1859, he left for England, and has not since re- 
turned to China. 



CXCI. $r Yu, MELANCTHON W. FISH, M. D. was 

appointed a medical missionary to China, by the Board of 
Foreign Missions of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
United States, and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Fish in 1855. 
The following year he retired from his connection with the 
mission, and accepted the office of United States Vice-Consul. 
In 1857 he was appointed one of the three foreign Inspectors 
of the Imperial Maritime Customs at Shanghae. The same 
year he left for the United States, but returned to Shanghae 
in 1858. In the summer of 1861, he again left for the United 
States, and has not since returned to China. 



CXCII. || ifjJF ^ Yang Kili-feh Eev. GRIFFITH 
JOHN was appointed a missionary to China, by the London 
Missionary Society, and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. John 
on September 24th, 1855. In September 1861 he removed to 
Hankow, and commenced a mission station there, where he 
has been since residing. 

Publications by Mr. John. 

CHINESE. 

1- Lfc % ^ tt M M M m m- 5t m ft Shdng U tseuen 
ndng keen chou yufuh yin taou Ic nuy. God's Omnipotence 
revealed in the Gospel. Sheet tract. Shanghae, 1860. 

2. JUS & ifr & m. f± it 3i T f# M # Jdysoo mingk'i 
t'oo wang p'oo t'een h'td chuen/Uh yin, Christ's Commission 
to his Disciples to go into all the World and preach the Gos- 
pel. Sheet tract. Shanghae, 1860. 



238 REV. ALEXANDER WILLIAMSON, B. A. 

■ 3. ia m ;s m m ± * £ ± ^ fr * © s & z"«v 

jiw ?»7i fco e/w £'wi<7 silting te tsae sluing te tseen pUk till ivei e. 
God must be obeyed rather than Men. Sheet tract. Shang- 
hae, 1860. 

4. ^C^C-t^^^f^nb T'eenfoo slidng te woo so puh 
ndng. Omnipotence of G-od. Sheet tract. Shanghae, 1860. 

5. A W H. H BU «7* w 1 J^ W san yaou wan. Three Impor- 
tant Questions. Sheet tract. Shanghae, 1S60. 

6- P9 J{|$ §f< ± ?t fnj J^Jt, ffi II H Jf&» ?/«'/ ' 50 ° cAe taow 
7io e iveifuh yin. Why is Christ's Doctrine called Good News ? 
Sheet tract. Shanghae, 1860. 

7. |g jjffc ||£ |5$ #7i2w0 fceadw &eit ^w. Essential Truths of 
Religion. 13 leaves. Shanghae, 1862. After a preface, this 
commences with a discourse entitled fe ^ |g =§* i/d s7ac yaou 
yen, ''Important words for the times," which is followed by 
Nos. 2, 6, 3, 4 and 5 supra, concluding with an article on 
Prayer, a form of prayer, a Hymn and a Doxology. 

8. ^ £ !§ n§L Tsung chod she cluing. Hymn Book. 30 
leaves. Hankow. This is a collection of 50 hymns. 

9- 5c J?fr ia ^M T'een loo che ming. Clear Indication of the 
Heavenly Way. 38 leaves. Hankow, 1862. After a preface 
and table of contents, this contains 20 discourses on the car- 
dinal truths of Christianity, followed by the Ten Command- 
ments and the Lord's Prayer. 

10. ||J|| ^ f$ ^ Heun tsze wan td. Child's Catechism. 
22 leaves. Shanghae, 1864. This has a preface of two leaves, 
after whioh is the catechism, divided into 15 sections. The 
work concludes with the Lord's Prayer, forms of prayer for 
morning and evening, graces to be used before and after meals, 
the Ten Commandments, and a metrical version of the same. 

ENGLISH. 

11. The Chinese Rebellion— The Rev'd. Griffith John's 
Experience of the Insurgents. 8vo. pp. 15. Canton, 1861. 
This is the concluding portion of a lengthy account of Mr. 
John's visit to Nanking, which was published in several issues 
of the Friend of China newspaper. It is published as a sepa- 
rate pamphlet. 

There is an article by Mr. John on the Ethics of the Chinese, 
in the 2nd volume of the Journal of the North China Branch 
of the Royal Asiatic Society. A translation of this into 
Welsh was published in a Welsh periodical, Y Beirniad, vol. 
3, at Llanelli, in 1862. 



CXCIII. :t Jg gj Wei Leen-cMn. Rev. ALEXANDER 
WjLLIAMSON, B. A. was appointed a missionary to China, 



REV. CARSTAIRS DOUGLAS. 239 

by the London Missionary Society, and arrived at Shanghae 
with Mrs. Williamson on September 24th, 1855. After more 
than two years spent in that neighbourhood and at Ping-hoo 
his health imperatively required a change for a time, and he 
left for his native land in November. After some years spent 
in Scotland, he was appointed the Agent for China of the Na- 
tional Bible Society of Sotland, and arrived at Shanghae with 
his family the first week in December 1863. He took up his 
abode at Chefoo shortly after, from which point he has been 
since extending his operations through the surrounding region. 

Publications by Mr. Williamson. 

CHINESE. 

1- f jt % ^ Chih wuhheb. Treatise on Botany. 101 leaves 
Shanghae, 1859. This treatise is in eight books, the matter 
being compiled from the works of Lindley and others. The 
last book was added by Mr. Edkins, after Mr. Williamson had 
returned to England. There is a preface and table of contents. 

There are a number of contributions by Mr. Williamson 
in the Shanghae Serial; (see Wylie's works, No. 3.) but 
these being all of a specially religious character, were omitted 
in the Japanese reprint. 



CXCIV, #: ^ fi Tod Kea-tzh. Rev. CARSTAIRS 
DOUGLAS was appointed a missionary to China by the Foreign 
Mission Board of the Presbyterian Church in England, and 
arrived at Amoy in the early part of 1856. In 1862 he paid 
a visit to England, and returned to Shanghae in the first week 
of December, 1863, from which he proceeded to his former 
station at Amoy, and has been since engaged in that neigh- 
bourhood. 

Publications by Mr. Douglas. 

CHINESE. 

1- W- ^ Tfftff f# Chang tseuen shin she. Chang-chow and 
and Tseuen-chow Hymns. 39 leaves. Amoy, 1862. This is 
in the dialect used in the Amoy region. The first 25 hymns 
are an edition of Mr. Talmage's hymn book (see Talmage's 
works, No. 4.) in the Chinese character. The remainder arc 
by Mr. Douglas the compiler, and other members of the Pres- 
byterian Mission. 



240 REV. ROSEWELL IIOBART GRAVES. 

CXCV. Mifom Jang Yo-hnn, Rev. JOHN S. JOR- 
ALMON, a member of the Dutch Reformed Church iu the 
United States, was appointed a missionary to China, by the 
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. He 
arrived at Amoy with Mrs. Joralmon in the early part of 1856; 
but induced by sanitary considerations, he left for America in 
June, 1858, and has not since returned to China. 



CXCVI. Rev. WILLIAM KNIBB LEA was appointed 

a missionary to China, by the London Missionary Society, and 
arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Lea in January, 1856, reach- 
ing Amoy his destination on February 11th. Mrs. Lea's health 
having completely failed, he left with her for England in the 
beginning of 1863, and has not since returned to China, 



CXCVII. jjjjfc ,f, % Ohuh Gdn-tsze. JOHN JONES was 
born in England, in 1825, and became a member of the Christian 
body known as the Plymouth Brethren. He was appointed a 
missionary to China, by the Chinese Evangelization Society, 
and left England in the Afghan with Mrs. Jones and family, 
in September, 1855. He reached Hongkong in the spring 
of 1856, where he remained a few months, and arrived at 
Shanghae in August. After a short visit to Ningpo with Mr. 
Taylor, he returned to Shanghae at the end of September, and 
removed to Ningpo with his family the following month. With 
the exception of a temporary absence at Shanghae, in the 
spring of 1857, in consequence of apprehended trouble with 
the natives, he remained at his station till the failure of his 
health imperatively required a change of climate. In the be- 
ginning of 1863 he left his with family for England, but died 
at sea on May 4th, seven hundred miles off St. Helena. His 
remains were committed to the deep. 

Publications by Mr. Jones. 

CHINESE. 

1. Hymn Book. pp. 18. Ningpo, 1857. 



CXCVIII. ffi M W} Ke Hadu-peih. Rev. ROSEWELL 
HOBART GRAVES was appointed a missionary to China, 
by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Southern Baptist 
Convention at Richmond in Virginia, United States. He arrived 
at Hongkong on August 15th, ] 856, and two days later at 
Canton his destination. After several attempts to settle in 



REV. C. M. WILLIAMS. 241 

various parts of the country, he finally gained a looting at 
the city of Chaou-king on the West River in February, 1860; 
since which his time for the chief part has been alternately 
occupied between that station and Canton. 

Publications by Mr. Graves. 

CHINESE. 

1. @§ jjt m -§= Sing site yaou yen. Important Words to 
arouse the World. 9 leaves. Canton, 1859. A hortatory tract, 
concluding with a form of prayer and a grace. 

2- M |£ Fp] ^ Chin keaou wan td. Questions on the true 
Doctrine. 9 leaves. Canton. 1859. A Catechism divided into 
7 sections, on the leading points of Christian doctrine. 

3. t|F H Mt A lr 1£ If K $ 16 majin shoo choo sMi. Notes 
on the Epistle to the Romans. 20 leaves. Canton, I860. The 
first leaf contains the title and a preface. 



CXCIX. % ffi |& Lin Yo-han. Rev. JOHN LIGGINS 

was appointed a missionary to China, by the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United 
States, and arrived at Shanghae in the latter part of 1856. 
After a residence of some motnhs at the city of Chang-shuh, 
he removed to Japan early in 1859, and commenced a mission 
station at Nagasaki in concert with the Rev. C. M. Williams. 
Failure of health however compelled him to leave in less than 
two years, and he sailed for England in the summer of 1860, 
since which he has not returned to the East. 

Publications by Mr. Liggins. 

ENGLISH. 

1. Familiar Phrases in English and Romanized Japanese. 
8vo. pp. 53. Shanghae, 1860. 

CC. If, Hwu}\ Rev. C. M. WILLIAMS # was appointed 
a missionary to China, by the Board of Foreign Missions of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States, and 
arrived at Shanghae in the latter part of 1856. In concert 
with the Rev. J. Liggins he commenced a mission station at 
the city of Chang-shuh; but on the ratification of the Ame- 
rican treaty with Japan, they both removed to Nagasaki in 
the beginning of 1859. There" Mr. Williams remained in his 
missionary capacity till the beginning of J 866, when he left 



242 DAVID SANDEMAN. 

for America, via Shanghae, on the invitation of his Mission 

Board. 



CCI. [1] ^ ||J Shan Td-p'eih. DAVID SANDEMAN, 
second son of Grlas Sandeman Esqr. of Bonskied, was born at 
Perth, on April 23rd, 1826. In his infancy he was somewhat 
more sedate than children usually are; and in boyhood, was 
distinguished by perseverance, along with regularity in all his 
habits, and a strong sense of duty. At the age of fifteen he 
was sent to the Pestalozzian Institution at Worksop in Not- 
tinghamshire, where besides other acquirements he began to 
learn French and German. In the years 1839 and 1840, the 
ministry of Mr. Millar, then ])astor of St. Leonard's church, 
Perth, and next that of Mr. Milne his successor, produced a 
considerable impression on his mind, which was deepened by 
attending the services conducted by Mr. W. C. Burns during 
a season of revival. In 1842, he went to Glasgow to learn 
the mercantile business. His mind having been long turned 
towards spiritual things, it was on the 7th of April, 1844, 
that he first openly united himself with the people of God, in 
connection with the congregation of St. Leonard's Free-church, 
Perth, under the pastorate of the Kev. Mr. Milne, and he dated 
his. conversion from that period. About the end of July he 
left his parental home, and entered a mercantile establishment 
in Manchester, where he found many opportunities of shewing, 
his zeal for Christ. While there a desire sprang up to enter 
the ministry, and in" furtherance of that view he left for Edin- 
burgh, where he arrived on November 27th. There he began 
to attend the various classes in the Free Church college, when 
his attention was given to Latin, Greek, Natural Philosophy 
and the higher Mathematics, besides other pursuits of a less 
severe kind. He studied Logic under Sir. William Hamilton, 
Moral Philosophy under Professor McDougall, and Theology 
in all its branches under Dr. Bannerman, Dr. James Buchan- 
an and Principal Cunningham; while he pursued at the same 
time the study of Hebrew, and made progress in the cognate 
dialects, under Dr. John Duncan. During the period of his 
student life he twice enjoyed the opportunity of a short visit 
to France and Switzerland. On January 11th, 1855, he was 
licensed to preach, and his first sermon was delivered the fol- 
lowing Sunday in the church of Mr. Somerville at Anderston, 
Glasgow. A few days afterwards his services were requested 
at Hillhead, a station about three miles from Glasgow, where 
he commenced his ministry in February. His mind however 
had been for five or six years set on China as a field of labour, 
and he had not been quite three months at Hillhead, when he 
became decided as to his duty regarding it. In May he again 



REV. ELI AS B. INSLEE. 243 

paid a visit to tlie continent; from the 19th to the 26th, he 
was in Kome; afterwards at Naples, visited Vesuvius and 
Pompeii, returned by Turin, and over Mount Cenis to Paris, 
reaching Loudon about the middle of July. His ordination 
was delayed for a time on account of his father's death; but 
having been appointed a missionary to China, by the Foreign 
Mission Board of the Presbyterian Church in England, the 
ceremony took place at the Scotch church in Regent Square, 
London/ on April 26th, 1856. He afterwards visited Birming- 
ham, Newcastle, Liverpool, Stafford and Matlock, preaching 
and exhorting at all these places. At Lowick he crossed to 
Holy Island where he preached to the fishermen; and was at 
Kilsyth on August 21st. On the 6th of September he left 
Springfield bis parental home, after which we find records of 
his untiring zeal, at Edinburgh, Westfield, Hillhead and Lon- 
don where he arrived on the 22nd. On October 1st he was 
on a visit to Torquay, and within a day or two after left Eng- 
land for the continent, where visiting Berlin on the way, he 
proceeded thence to Marseilles. He sailed from that port on 
the 11th via Malta to Alexandria, and was at Suez on the 
21st; on November 8th he was at Point cle Gralle, on the 18th 
at Singapore, and on December 1st arrived at Hongkong. On 
the" 6th he embarked for Swatow, where he stopped on the 
way, and reached Amoy on the 9th. His career there how- 
ever Avas a short one; for while diligently preparing for future 
usefulness, he was cut off by cholera on July 31st, 1858. His 
remains were interred in the missionary cemetery on the island 
of Koo-lamr sew. 



CCII. M S M Yll ".l SserU. Rev. ELIAS B. INSLEE 
was appointed a missionary to China, by the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United Stales. 
and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Inslee on December 25th, 
1856, reaching Ningpo his destination on January 1st, 1857. 
There he remained till 1861, when he left with his family on 
April 27th, for America. While in that country his connec- 
tion with the Mission Board ceased, and he returned to China 
unconnected with any society, arriving at Hongkong on De- 
cember 26th, 1864. He proceeded immediately to Shanghae, 
which he reached on January 3rd, 1865, and entered into an 
engagement with the London Mission, taking charge of one 
of their stations at Sung-keang. There he remained till about 
the end of the year, and then removed to Shanghae on account 
of Mrs. Inslee's health, but she died on February 10th, 1866; 
after which he removed from the Sung-keang station and was 
engaged in missionary efforts in the neighbourhood of Shang- 



244 HWANG FUN, M. D. 

hae till June, when he left with his family by the mail steamer, 
to return to America via London. 

Publications by Mr. Inslee. 

CHINESE. 

1- H lli ti Wl Sing-scen-yice-ko. Hymns set to Music, 
pp. x 80. Ningpo, 1858. In this the music is printed in the 
European form, and the hymns interlined, first in the Chinese 
character, the two lower lines being a translation of the same 
into the Ningpo dialect, printed in the Roman character. The 
first page contains a short advertisement; next follow, a table 
of contents, a table of metres, with alphabetic index and five 
pages of instructions, all in the Ningpo dialect and Roman 
character. The last five leaves contain the counterpart in the 
Chinese character, with another table in the Roman. 

2. 4* #S M f# Chung ivae sin paou. Chinese and For- 
eign Gazette. Ningpo, 1859, 1860. This was the serial com- 
menced by Dr. Macgowan, (see Dr. Macgowan's works, No. 4.) 
which Mr. Inslee took charge of when the latter went to Ja- 
pan, and continued the publication after Dr. Macgowan left 
for England. 

.3. :gg jffc $g |j. Siting heaou keen led. Church History. 
38 leaves. Ningpo, I860. This is divided into 18 chapters, 
with three postcripts on the national religion of the Chinese, 
the religion of the long-hair insurgents, and the true religion. 
There are two prefaces. 



CC1II. g J^ H Leu Wei-leen. Rev. WILHELM LOUIS 

was appointed a missionary to China, by the Rhenish Mis- 
sionary Society, and arrived at Hongkong about the end 
of 1856. After the conclusion of the difficulties between the 
Chinese and English at Canton in 1858, he took up his resi- 
dence in the interior of the province, and for some years past, 
has been living at the city of Shih-lung. 

There is a hymn by Mr. Louis in Mr. .Lechler's hymn book, 
(see Lechler's works, No. I.) 



CCIV. ^ ■%> HWANG FUN, M. D. a native of China 
was trained to the medical profession in Edinburgh. Having 
been appointed a medical missionary to China, by the London 
Missionary Society, he arrived at Hongkong in January, 1857. 
The following year he removed to Canton, where he had 
charge of the Society's hospital till 1860, when he resigned 



SAMUEL R. GAYLEY. 245 

his connection about the end of the year, but still continued 
to reside in Canton. 

Publications by by Dr. Hwancj. 

ENGLISH. 

1. Keport of the Missionary Hospital at Kum-lee fow, in 
the western suburbs of Canton, for the year 1858 — 59. 8vo. 
pp. 12. Hongkong, 1859. 



CCV. j£ J! ^fMeiLe-sze. Rev. CHAELES R. MILLS 

was appointed a missionary to China, by the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States, 
and arrived at Shanghae on February 8th, 1857. In the 
summer of 1862, he removed with his family to Teug-chow in 
Shan-tung, where he has been since residing. 



'O) 



Publications by Mr. Mills. 

CHINESE. 

1. Tsa ma s. Hymn Book. pp. 48. Shanghae, 1862. 
This is a selection from the Ningpo hymn book, (see Rankin's 
works, No. 5.) of 54 hymns, translated into the Shanghae dia- 
lect, and printed in the Roman character. A second part was 
added by Mr. Farnham. There are 9 doxologies at the end. A 
version of the same was printed in the Chinese character, at 
Shanghae in 1864, with the title j|f H |§ Tsa ma s, 1st Part, 
in 39 leaves, and doxologies, 2 leaves. 



CCVI. -ft* Kan. SAMUEL R. GAYLEY was born in 
the United States in 1828, and being ordained to the minis- 
try, was appointed a missionary to China, by the Board of 
Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church. Shortly after 
his marriage with Miss Mills, a sister of his future colleague, 
he left his native laud with Mrs. Gayley, accompanied by the 
Rev. C. R. and Mrs. Mills, and arrived at Shanghae on Febru- 
ary 8th, 1857. There he remained till April, 1861, when he 
removed with his family to Teng-chow in Shan-tung, and 
died at that city, on July 26th, 1862. His remains wore in- 
terred in the missionary burying ground at the top of the 
cliff. On the 5th of August following, his youngest child, 
aged 20 months, died there also; shortly after which Mrs. 



246 REV. GEORGE SMITH. 

G-ayley left for England, and has since been married to a Pres- 
byterian minister in Ireland. 

Publications by Mr. Gayley. 

CHINESE. 

1. i$£ffii%B^W~W% A^lnf ^She t'od pa6u Id he 
ho lin to jin tseen shoo. Paul's First Epistle to the Corin- 
thians. 22 leaves. Shanghae, 18G4. This is in the Shanghae 
dialect. 

2- $ % % H % W # % A f& H She t'od pa6u 16 he 
ho Un to jin how shoo. Paul's Second Epistle to the Corin- 
thians. 14 leaves. Shanghae, 1864. This is in the Shanghae 
dialect. This and the jd receding were revised and put to press 
by the Rev. J. S. Roberts. A version of the same was print- 
ed in the Roman character. 



CCVIL J[ |i Hea-le. CHARLES J. HALL, a member 

of the Baptist body in England, became connected with the 
Chinese Evangelization Society in 1855; and under the pat- 
ronage of that institution, he prosecuted a course of medical 
studies at the London Hospital. Having studied for the mi- 
nistry he was ordained to the sacred office, and appointed a 
missionary to China. Shortly after his marriage to Miss 
Smith he sailed from London with Mrs. Hall on October 1st, 
1856, in the Charlotte Jane; and after putting back to Fal- 
mouth for repairs, left that port on December 12th, reaching 
Shanghae on June 8th, 1857, and arrived at Ningpo their 
destination on the 20th. After a residence of about two years, 
they removed to Shanghae, and Mr. Hall soon after became 
connected with the English Baptist Missionary Society. In 
1861 they went to Chefoo, where he commenced a mission, but 
was not long permitted to continue the work, for within a few 
days of each other, he and two of his children were carried off 
by cholera in July, 1862, and were buried on the slope of the 
hill that gives name to the town Yen-tae. Mrs. Hall return- 
ed to Shanghae at the end of the month, and embarked for 
England via Hongkong; but her remaining child died during 
the voyage, and she reached her native land early in 1863. 



CCVIII. PRUIN M. D. settled in Penang as an agent of 
the Chinese Evangelization Society in 1857. 

CCIX. % f| ^ She Jaou-le. Rev. GEORGE SMITH 



REV. GEORGE EVANS MOUEE, B. A. 247 

was appointed a missionary to China, by the Foreign Mission 
Board of the Presbyterian Church in England, and arrived at 
Amoy on November 19th, 1857. After nearly a year's resi- 
dence there, he removed to Swatow on November 13th, 1858; 
where he remained till the latter part of 1865, and then left 
for a visit to Europe. 

Publications by Mr. Smith. 

CHINESE. 

1- ^ ^ HO Gan seihjiJi k'e. Sabbath Calendar. This 
is a sheet tract published annually. The calendar is preced- 
ed by the fourth commandment and some quotations from 
Scripture; being followed by a brief statement of the elements 
of gospel truth, and concluding with a notice of the different 
stations belonging to the Swatow mission, where worship is 
conducted on Sundays. 



OCX. H H |£ Moo Kea-kuh. Rev. GEORGE EVANS 
MOULE, B. A. was appointed a missionary to China by the 
Church of England Missionary Society, and arrived at Ning- 
po with Mrs. Moule in February, 1858. He has recently 
commenced a mission station at Hang-chow, between which 
and Ningpo his time has been chiefly divided. 

Publications by Mr. G. E. Moule. 

CHINESE. 

1. Cong tao-kao vcng teng si-li. van-ts<zn, lin kong-we so 
ding-go ih-ts'ih coh-veng. Wa-yiu Da-bih-go s-p'in teng 
bih-yiang s-dz, ko-fu, keh-sing. Prayer Book. pp. iv, 163. 
Ningpo, 1860. This is a selection from the Anglican Litur- 
gy, translated into the Ningpo dialect, and printed in the 
Roman character. After the preface, follow the Morning 
Prayers, Evening Prayers, Litany and Communion Service. 

2- ^ IS -a" ^C Chung tabu kaou wan. Prayer Book. 
Ningpo, 1861. This is a version with extension of the pre- 
ceding, printed in the Chinese character. It is divided into 
several sections. The preface is translated into the literary 
style, in 5 leaves, and a leaf of explanatory matti r is added. 
Next follow the JfL J| |j| ^ 3$C Tsadu shin tabu ka6u loan. 
"Morning Prayers," in 22 leaves; "^ ^ I if 't-f ~$t &&& ivo6 
tabu kaou wcin, "Evening Prayers," in 20 leaves; £fa f|f ^ 7£ 
Tsimg tabu kaou wan, "Litany," 13 leaves; B& g jfjf fjj jjjj£ ^ 
Wan ts'aii U tseechUhwdn, "Communion Service," 32 leaves: 



•248 IIE1NRICII EDUARD JULIUS VOBGLER. 

j5S 7|i ^P J3fe H Wt ~$C 8h G chwang neen se le chrdi wan, "A- 
dult Baptismal Service," 16 leaves; and if f^ jpf §£ £ 

/S'/ie ?/»?£/ A«e se le chiih wan, "Infant Baptismal Service," 
15 leaves; all in the Ningpo dialect. 

3. S tsong-nyin si-li teng s ing- c a si-It coli-veng. Adult 
and Infant Baptismal Services, pp. 35. Ningpo, 1866. This 
is a transliteration into the Roman character of the two last 
sections of No, 2, supra; being supplementary to No. 1, supra. 



CCXI. MMM Ko ° Hivuy-Uen. Rev. WILLIAM H. 
COLLINS, M. R. C. S. was appointed a missionary to China, 
by the Church of England Missionary Society, and arrived at 
Shanghae with Mrs. Collins in the early part of 1858. To- 
wards the close of I860, Mrs. Collins left with her children 
for England, and returned to Shanghae in 1863; Avhen Mr. 
Collins removed with his family to Peking the same year, and 
has been residing there ever since. 

Publications by Mr Collins. 

ENGLISH. 

1. The Thirteenth Annual Report of the Chinese Hospi- 
tal, at Shanghae, from January 1st, 1859, to April 23rd, 
1860. Svo. pp. 8. Shanghae, 1860. 

Publications by 31rs. Collins. 

ENGLISH. 

1. China and its People. A Book for young readers, by a 
Missionary's Wife. 16 mo. pp. v, 137. London, 1862. This 
contains a large number of spirited woodcut illustrations. 



CCXII. fg Yen. Rev. ALEXANDER GRANT was 

appointed a missionary to China, by the Foreign Mission 
Board of the English Presbyterian Church. He arrived at 
Amoy in 1858, and remained there till 1861, when he made 
a voyage to Penang for the benefit of his health. Meeting 
there with some of the Plymouth Brethren, he was induced 
to join their communion; when he resigned his connection with 
the Presbyterian mission, and commenced his missionary la- 
bours in the island, in concert with his new associates. 



CCXIII. ft Fo6. HEINRICH EDUARD JULIUS 



WILLIAM GAMBLE. 249 

VOEGrLER, a native of Prussia, was ordained to the minis- 
try after passing through the usual course of study; and 
having been appointed a missionary to China, by the Mission 
Union for the Evangelization of China, in Pomerania, he 
arrived at Shanghae with his sister in 1858. The failure of 
his health however, soon indicated the necessity of a change, 
and he left Shanghae on July 2nd, 1860, in in the Excel- 
sior, for a visit to Japan, in company with Mr. Wylie, re- 
turning to his station after a residence of about two months 
at Nagasaki. This proving insufficient to restore him, he 
left soon after for the south; and having made a short stay 
at Canton, he took passage to New York. In the latter part 
of 1S61, he sailed from the United States direct to Ham- 
burg, and thence proceeded to his native place near Stettin. 
Symptoms of pulmonary disease continuing to increase, he 
went to Karlsbad for a few weeks in the summer of 1862, for 
the benefit of the waters. Having returned to his parental 
residence at Balm, he died there in the latter part of the same 
year, the event having been hastened by a cold caught in re- 
moving one night that the house in which he was living had 
taken fire. 



CCXIV. ^Keanrj. WILLIAM GAMBLE was appoint- 
ed by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States, to superintend their Mission 
Press in China. He arrived at Hongkong on June 13 th, 1858, 
and proceeded to his destination at Ningpo, where he took 
charge of the printing operations. In 1861 he removed his 
establishment to Shanghae, and has since continued to carry 
on the work there. 

Publications by Mr. Gamble. 

ENGLISH. 

1. Two Lists of Selected Characters, containing all in the 
Bible and Twenty seven other Books, With Introductory Re- 
marks. Shanghae, 1861. Reprinted at Shanghae in 1865, 
in 50 leaves. 

2. List of Chinese Characters formed by the Combination 
of the Divisible Type of the Berlin Font used at the Shanghai 
Mission Press of the Board of Foreign Missions of the Pres- 
byterian Church in the United States of America. 82 leaves. 
Shanghae, 1862. 

3. Statistics of Protestant Missions in China for 1864. 
Folio sheet. Shanghae, 1865. 



250 GEORGE SMITH. 

CCXV. % ffi Pabu-llng. Rev. STEPHEN LIVING- 
STONE BALDWIN was appointed a missionary to China, 
by the Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
in the Southern States of America. He arrived at Shanghae 
with Mrs. Baldwin in the latter part of 1S5S, and proceeded 
forthwith to his station at Fuh-chow, which he reached early 
in 1859. In the beginning of 1861 he left with his family for 
the United States in consequence of Mrs. Baldwin's health, 
but she died on the voyage, fie married again in America, 
and returned to Fuh-chow with Mrs. Baldwin in 18G2. 

Publications by Mr. Baldwin. 

ENGLISH. 

1. Directory of Protestant Missionaries in China. Janu- 
ary 1st, 1865. l6mo. pp. 20. Fuh-chow, 1865. 

2. Directory of Protestant Missions in China. June 15th, 
1866. Including also a list of Protestant Missionaries in Ja- 
pan and Siam. 12mo. pp. 32. Fuh-chow, 1866. 

CCXVI. ^ JR. H Lai T'an-le. Rev. DANIEL RAP- 
ALJE was appointed a missionary to China, by the Board of 
Foreign Missions of the Dutch Reformed Church in the United 
States. He arrived at Amoy in 1858, where he continued his 
labours till the summer of 1866, and left for the United States 
on May 31st. 

CCXVII. #§ M $fc H oo Lt-mln. Rev. ALVIN OSTROM 

was appointed a missionary to China by the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Dutch Reformed Church in the United States. 
He arrived at Amoy in 1858, but in consequence of failing 
health was obliged to leave about the year 1860, when he re- 
turned to America. 

Publications by Mr. Ostrom. 

CHINESE. 

1. Md-hho Uoh-im toan, Mark's Gospel. 80 leaves. Amoy. 
This is in the- Amoy dialect, printed in the Roman character. 



CCXVIII. % Meih. GEORGE SMITH was born in 
England, on February 23rd, 1832, and having been ordained 
a deacon of the Church of England, he was sent to China by 



J. L. HOLMES. 251 

the Church Missionary Society. He arrived at Fuh-chow 
with Mrs. Smith in February, 1859. In February 1860 he 
went to Shanghae, where he was admitted into priest's orders 
in Trinity Church, on March 17th, by the Bishop of Victoria, 
and returned to his station at Fuh-chow. In 1863 he paid a 
visit to Ainoy on account of his health, where he died on Oc- 
tober 18th, and was buried in the missionary cemetery on 
Koo-lang sen. Mrs. Smith left for England in February, 
1864. 



CCXIX. ffi jjjft H Hae Ya-se. Rev. JESSE BOARD- 
MAN HARTWELL was appointed a missionary to China, 
by the Foreign Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention, and arrived at Shanghae with. Mrs. Hart well on March 

30th, 1859. In December I860, he removed with his family 
to Chefoo; and in March 1861, commenced the first Protes- 
tant mission at Teng-chow, where he still resides. 



CCXX. ^ {£ Kaon Hew. Rev. HUGH COWIE was 

appointed a missionary to China, by the London Missionary 
Society, and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Cowie on Septem- 
ber 14th, 1859. He left for England on October 23rd, 1861, 
and arrived in London the following February. His connec- 
tion was then transferred to the Mission of the English Pres- 
byterian Church, under whose auspices he returned to China, 
arriving at Ainoy early in 1863, where he still continues his 
labours. 



CCXXI. ft Hwa. J. L. HOLMES was born in the United 
States of America; and having been ordained to the ministry 
of the gospel, was sent to China, by the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Southern Baptist Covnention. He arrived at 
Shanghae with Mrs Holmes in the latter part of 1859; and 
during the following year made several adventurous visits to 
the insurgent camps at Soo-chow. Sung-keang and Nan-king. 
In September he removed to Chefoo and carried on his missii m- 
ary labours in that neighbourhood till October, 1861. The 
local rebels having been then for some weeks devastating the 
surrounding country, had reached within four or five miles of 
Yen-tae, when Mr. Holmes in company with Mr. Parker of the 
American Episcopal mission, rode out to meet them on the 
6th, but were never seen alive by their friends afterwards. Ru- 
mours of ther death having reached the foreign settlement, 
Mr. Holmes' brother went out with a friend in search, and 
found their bodies on the 15th, about thirty miles from Che- 



252 REV, ELLIOT H. THOMSON. 

foo. They were immediately removed to Yen-tae. and interred 
on the 16th. 

In the North-China Herald for September 1st, 1860, there 
is an expose of the Tae-ping insurgents by Mr. Holmes. 

Publications Ly Mrs. Holmes. 

CHINESE. 

1. p| §J jf| :|§j Heim urh chin y$n. Peep of Day. 59 leaves. 
Shanghae, 1865. This is in the Mandarin dialect, and has 
nine pictorial illustrations. 



CCXXII. Eev. F. S. TURNER, B. A. was appointed a 
missionary to China, by the London Missionary Society, and 
arrived at Hongkong on September 21st, 1859 ; a few days after 
which he proceeded to Canton with Mr. Chalmers to commence 
a mission there. In the summer of 1864 he left with his family 
for England, and returned to Canton in February, 1866. 



CCXXIII. ^ Kb. Rev. DAVID D. GREEN was appointed 
a missionary to China, by the Board of Foreign Missions of 
the Presbyterian Church, in the United States, and arrived at 
Shanghae with Mrs. Green on December 21st, 1859. Thence 
he proceeded without delay to Ningpo, his destination, where 
he has since continued occupied with his missionary labours. 



CCXXIV. ^ Tan. Rev, JOSHUA A. DANFORTH 

Avas appointed a missionary to China, by the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States, 
and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Danforth on December 
21st, 1859; proceeding without delay to his destination at 
Ningpo. In 1861 he removed to Teng-chow in Shan-tung; 
soon after which it was found necessary for him to leave China, 
and he embarked at Shanghae for America during the sum- 
mer of 1862. 



CCXXV. ?§ Tang. Rev. ELLIOT H. THOMSON 
was appointed a missionary to China, by the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United 
States, and arrived at Shanghae on December 22nd, 1859. 
He still continues his missionary labours there. 



REV. JOSEPH J. SCHERESCHEWSKY. 253 

CCXXYI. H. M. PABKE&studied for the ministry, and 
was ordained to the sacred office in the United States. Being- 
appointed a missionary to China, by the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Protestant Episcopal Church, he sailed from 
New York with Mrs. Parker in the Golden Rule, on July 
13th, 1859. in company with Bishop Boone and family, Revs. 
D. D. Smith and T. Yocum with their wives, Revs. E. H. 
Thomson, H. Purdon, and J. J. Schereschewsky, Messrs. 
Doyen and Huhbeil, and Mrs. Doyen. He arrived at Shang- 
hae on December 22nd, and remained there till 1861, when 
he removed to Chefoo. In October of that year, the local 
rebels having been for some time threatening that neighbour- 
hood, Mr. Parker rode out with the Rev. J. L. Holmes on the 
Gth to hold a parley with them. The next authentic infor- 
mation was the discovery of their mangled bodies on the 15th, 
about thirty miles from Chefoo. His remains were interred 
at Yen-tae on the 16th. Mrs. Parker immediately left with 
her infant son, and embarked at Shanghae shortly after for 
Europe, en route for America. 



• CCXXVII. Rev. D. D. SMITH was appointed a mission- 
ary to China, by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Pro- 
testant Episcopal Church in the United States, and arrived 
at Shanghae with Mrs. Smith, on December 22nd, 1859. In 
1861 he removed to Chefoo, where Mrs. Smith died in the 
summer of the following year. Soon after that Mr. Smith 
left for America, and has not since returned to China. 



CCXXYIII. Rev. THOMAS YOCUM was appointed a 
missionary to China, by the Board of Foreign Missions of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States, and ar- 
rived at Shanghae with Mrs. Yocum on December 22nd, 1859. 
In the autumn of 1860 he left for Hongkong, and after a few 
weeks stay there embarked for the United States, since Avhich 
he has not returned to China. 



CCXXIX. $£ She. Rev. JOSEPH J. SCHERESCHE W- 
SKY was appointed a missionary to China, by the Board 

of Foreign Missions of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the United States, and arrived at Shanghae on December 
22nd, 1859. In the summer of 1862 lie went to Peking, where 
lie has been since residing. 

Publications by Mr. Schereschewsky. 



254 REV. THOMAS S. FLEMING. 

CHINESE. 

I- $] W ft! *iT U Ch'w&ng she l;e hwan hiud. Genesis in 
the Mandarin dialect 39 leaves. Shanghae, 186G. 



COXXX. Kkv. H. PUKDON was appointed a mission- 
ary to China, by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Pro- 
testant Episcopal Church in the United States, and arrived 
at Shanghae on December 22nd, 1859. In autumn of the 
following year he left for America, and has not since returned 
to China. 

CCXXXI. J. T. DOYEN was appointed by the Board of 
Foreign Missions of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
United States, to take the superintendence of the mission 
school at Shanghae, and arrived at that station on December 
22nd, 1859. In 1861 his connection with the mission was 
dissolved, and after being for a time engaged in secular busi- 
ness in China, he returned to America about the year 1865. 



CCXXXII. E. HUBBELL was appointed to the Shanghae 
mission, by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church in the United States; his commission being- 
more especially connected with the secular affairs of the station 
He arrived at his destination on December 22nd, 1859, but 
left within about two years of his arrival. 



CCXXXIII. JOHN CAENEG1E, M. A. M. D. was ap- 
pointed a medical missionary to China, by the Foreign Mission 
Board of the Presbyterian Church in England, and arrived at 
Amoy with Mrs. Carnegie about the end of 1859. His con- 
nection with the Mission Board was dissolved at an early period 
of his residence there, but he continued to conduct a hospital 
under the auspices of the Medical Missionary Society, till the 
spring of 1865, when he left with his family for Europe. 

Publications by Dr. Carnegie. 

ENGLISH. 

1. Four Annual Reports of the Medical Missionary Hospital 
at Amoy: 1861—1864. Svo. Hongkong, 1862—1865. 



CCXXXIV. BJ Ming. Rev. THOMASS. FLEMING was 



EEV. WILLIAM NELTHORPE HALL. 250 

appointed a missionary to China, by the Church of England 

Missionary Society, and arrived at Ningpo in January, I860. 
He left for England on February 16th, 1863, and has not since 
returned to China. 



CCXXXV. _ J% Woo. Rev. SIMEON FOSTER WOOD- 
IN was appointed a missionary to China by the American 
Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, and arrived at 
Fuh-chow with Mrs. AVoodin on February 7th, I860, where 
he still continues to reside. 



CCXXXVI. ffi Fan. Rev. J. M. W. FARNHAM was ap- 
pointed a missionary to China, by the Board of Foreign Mis- 
sions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States, and 
arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Farnham on March 9th, 1860, 
where he has been since residing. 

The second part of the Shanghae Hymn Book Tsa ma. s 
(see Mills' works, No. 1.) is by Mr. Farnham. This consists 
of 53 hymns in the Shanghae dialect, and in the edition of 
1862 is printed in the Roman character, in 42 pages, with the 
title Tsan once s poo ye. In the edition of 1864 in the Chinese 
character, it bears the title Poo ye de nie Jcionzong-hce 's tsalc 
iau } in 39 leaves. 



CCXXXVII. ^^Tsin-chhtrj. Rev. HORACE JENKINS 

was appointed a missionary to China, by the American Baptist 
Missionary Union, and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Jenkins 
on March 9th, 1860. He proceeded without delay to his des- 
tination at Ningpo, where he has been chiefly residing since; 
having in the mean-time also established a mission station at 
Kin-hwa in the interior. 

Publications by Mr. Jenkins. 

CHINESE. 

1. A-da hyiu-cil yee-su-geh sin-yi kyiao shit. Iah-cen 
djuafoh-ing shit. Gospel of John. j>p. 118. Shanghae, 1866. 
This is in the Kin-hwa dialect, printed in the Roman character. 



CCXXXV1II. Rev. WILLIAM NELTHORPE HALL 
was appointed a missionary to China by the New Connection 
Methodist Missionarv Society in England, and arrived at 
Shanghae on March 23rd, I860. In the latter part of 1861 



256 REV. JOHN MACGOWAN, 

he removed to Teen-tsin, where he still continues his mission- 
ary labours. 



CCXXXIX. ££ ffi $ft Tin To-hdn. Rev. JOHN INNO- 
CENT was appointed a missionary to China, by the New Con- 
nection Methodist Missionary Society in England, and arrived 
at Shanghae with Mrs. Innocent on March 23rd, 1860. In 
the middle of May, 1861, he removed to Teen-tsin, where he 
still resides. 



CCXL. ROBERT WILSON was born in the north of 
England in 1829, and having been accepted by the London 
Missionary Society, he studied for a time at New College, 
St. John's Wood, London, and graduated as B. A. In due 
course he was appointed to China as his sphere of labour, and 
was ordained in the Congregational church at Egham Hill near 
London, on August 31st, 1859. Shortly after, he was united 
in marriage to Miss Bruce of Camden Town, and embarked 
with Mrs. Wilson at Gravesend in the Heroes of Alma, on Oc- 
tober 21st, accompanied by the Revs. W. N. Hall, J. Innocent, 
J. Macgowan, R. Dawson and H. Z. Kloekers, with their wives, 
and Dr. Henderson. They sailed finally from Portsmouth on 
November 9th, and arrived at Shanghae on March 23rd, 1860. 
In June, 1861, Mr. Wilson made a preliminary visit to Han- 
kow with Mr. John, but on his- return to Shanghae his health 
was so much enfeebled, as to render a change of climate neces- 
sary, and he went to Japan with Mrs. Wilson in the autumn. 
Returning to Shanghae they removed to Hankow where they 
arrived on January 18th, 1862. His health however was never 
fully reestablished, and he died on August 11th, 1863. His 
remains were interred in the foreign cemetery at Hankow, 
and Mrs. Wilson left with her family for England soon after. 



CCXLI. ^% $)J Mih Kea-hoo, Rev. JOHN MACGOW- 
AN was appointed a missionary to China by the London 
Missionary Society, and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Mac- 
gowan on March 23rd, 1860. In the summer of 1863 he re- 
moved to Amoy; and on account of Mrs. Macgowan's health, 
they sailed for England via New York, in the beginning of 
September, 1864, but she died at sea on October 29th. Mr. 
Macgowan 'returned to Amoy on June 2nd, 1866, where he re- 
sinned his missionary labours. 

Publications by Mr. Macgowan. 



REV. ROBERT DAWSON, B. A. 257 

CHINESE. 

1. tf* %b fH I* ( 'hung wad tsd che. Shanghae Miscellany. 
Shanghae, 1S62. This was a monthly serial of about twelve 
or fifteen leaves each number, consisting of religions, scientific 
and literary articles, besides news of general interest. It was 
begun in the summer of 1862 and continued about 6 months. 

2. 3f£ | g- j£ -If Ting liwd ching yin. Vocabulary of the 
English Language. 2 books. 125 leaves. Shanghae, 1862. 
In this, each term is first given in Chinese, then in English, 
followed by the pronunciation in Chinese characters. The 
first book is divided into 28 sections, according to the usual 
Chinese classification; the second book is arranged according 
to the length of the phrases. There are three prefaces, followed 
by notes for the student, a table of contents, and four forms 
of the English alphabet. 

3. ^ *£ fflfc #Jc Ting tsze yuen Uw. Spelling Book of the 
English Language. 60 leaves. Shanghae, 1863. This is an 
elementary work for the instruction of Chinese who wish to 
learn the English language; in which the method of combining 
the letters into syllables and syllables into words, is expressed 
in detail through the medium of the Chinese character. There 
are two prefaces, an introduction, notes for the reader, and a 
table of contents. 

ENGLISH. 

4. A Collection of Phrases in the Shanghai Dialect sys- 
tematically arranged. 8vo. pp. 196. Shanghae, 1862. 



CCXLII. Rev. ROBERT DAWSON, B. A. was appointed 
a missionary to China, by the London Missionary Society, and 
arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Dawson on March 23rd, 1860. 
His health failing, he sailed for England on October 23rd, 
1861. In 1863 he was initiated pastor of the Congregational 
church at Devizes in Wiltshire, where he has been since 
labouring. 

Publications by Mr. Daivson. 

ENGLISH. 

1. Homeward Bound; A Seaman's Sunday Book. Con- 
taining plain and practical sailing directions for the quarter- 
deck and forecastle. By a Sailor's Friead. 12mo. pp. 126. 
London, 1863. 

2. The London Missionary Society and its Supporters. A 



258 JAMES HENDERSON. 

Letter to the Pastors and Members of the Independent 
Churches of Great Britain and Ireland. By a Returned Mis- 
sionary. 12mo. pp. 16. London, 1863. 



CCXLIII. ft JJf ft Hdn Ya-ko. JAMES HENDER- 
SON was born at Huntley in Aberdeenshire, and studied for 
the medical profession at Edinburgh, where he graduated as 

M. D. Having been accepted by the London Missionary So- 
ciety, he was appointed a medical missionary to China, and 
spent some time in the study of theology at Walthamstow in 
Essex. On October 21st, 1859, he embarked at G-ravesend in 
the Heroes of Alma, accompanied by the Revs. W. N. Hall, 
J. Innocent, R. Wilson, J. Macgowan, R. Dawson and H. Z. 
Kloekers, with their wives; and having put in at Portsmouth, 
from which they sailed on November 9th, he reached Shanghae 
on March 23rd, 1860. Immediately on his arrival he took 
charge of the Chinese Hospital there, which had been tempo- 
rarily held by Mr. Collins. On the 8th of January, 1862, he 
left for Europe by the Cadiz steamer, and arrived in England 
on February 26th. While there he was married to Emily 
Rawson of Leeds, the sister of Mrs. Dawson of Shanghae; he 
embarked with Mrs. Henderson at Glasgow in theLotus steamer 
on April 29th, and having made a short stay at Hongkong, 
arrived at Shanghae on September 8th. In October, 1864, 
indications of failing health induced him to make a trip to 
Hankow; and in the spring of 1865 he was again attacked by 
sickness, which so utterly prostrated him, that as a last re- 
source he embarked with Mrs. Henderson for Japan about, the 
end of June. Arrived at Nagasaki, after lingering for a few- 
weeks he died on July 30th, and was buried in the European 
cemetery there. Mrs. Henderson returned to Shanghae, where 
she was still further afflicted by the loss of her infant child, 
and after a few weeks returned to England by the overland 
route. 

Publications by Dr. Henderson, 

CHINESE. 

1- ± iM H 1% : $% % + H ffl Shdng hue e yutn sluli 
liio te slah sze tsih. Fourteenth Report of the Shanghae Hos- 
pital. 12 leaves. Shanghae, 1861. This is a summary of Dr. 

Henderson's Annual Report in English for the year 1860. 

ENGLISH. 

2. Shanghai Hygiene. Or Hints for the preservation of 



REV. HUE L1BERTAS MACKENZIE. 259 

health in China. 8vo. pp. iv, 100. Shanghae, 18G3. 

3. Five Annual Reports of the Chinese Hospital for the 
years 1860 to 1864 inclusive. 8vo. pp. 126. Shanghae 1861 
—1865. 

In the Journal of the North-China Branch of the Royal 
Asiatic Society, New series, No. 1, there are two articles by 
Dr. Henderson: — "Notes on some of the Physical causes which 
modify Climate,'"' and "The Medicine and Medical Practice of 
the Chinese." 



CCXLIV. £ Fll,, Rev. JOHN SOWTER PARKES 
was appointed a missionary to China, by the Wesleyan Mis- 
sionary Society, and arrived at Hongkong on March 27th, 1860, 
whence he proceeded at once to Canton his destination. On 
February 15th, 1865, he left for England with his family. 



CCXLV. Rev. OSCAR RAU was appointed a missionary 
to China, by the French Protestant Missionary Society at Paris, 
and arrived at Shanghae in May, 1860. In December he went 
to Chefoo, and soon after removed to Teen-tsin, returning to 
( !hefoo in the latter half of the year 1861. The following year 
his health gave way, and he left fur Shanghae in September; 
soon after which he embarked at that port for Europe, reach- 
ing Switzerland his native land in the early part of 1863. 



CCXLVL Rev. BONHOURE was appointed a mis- 

sionary to China, by the French Protestant Missionary Society 
at Paris, and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Bonhoure in May, 
1860. In 1861 he removed to Chefoo where Mrs. Bonhoure 
died in the summer of tin.' following year. In September, 1862, 
In- left for Shanghae, and embarkedat that port soon after for 
Europe, reaching France early in 1863. 



CCXLVII. >U % % Sewn Wet-Jin. Rev. WILLIAM 
SUTHERLAND SWANSON was appointed a missionary to 
China, by the Foreign Mission Board of the Presbyterian 
Church in England, and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Swan- 
son on June 1st, 1860. lie left the same month for Ainoy, 
where lie has been since engaged in missionary work. 



CCXLV] II. £ M\ W Kin Fo6 ~ &rJl ■ 11,: v - BLUR LI BER- 
TAS MACKENZIE was appointed a, missionary to China, by 
the Foreign Mission Board of the Presbyterian Church in En- 



260 REV. YOUNG JOHN ALLEN. 

gland, and arrived at Shanghae on June 1st, I8G0. He left 
the same month for Ainoy, where he remained about six months 
and then took up his residence at Swatow, at which station he 
still continues his labours. 



CCXLIX. BE p Ne-yun. Rev. JOSEPH C. NEVIN 
was appointed a missionary to China at the General Assembly 
of the United Presbyterian Church in the United States, 
and arrived at Hongkong witli Mrs. Nevin on June 9th, 1860. 
He removed to his destination at Canton on the 11th, since 
which he has been residing there. 



CCL. |£ Muh. Rev. WILLIAM T. MORRISON was 

appointed a missionary to China, by the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States, and 
arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Morrison on July 2nd, 1860. 
Shortly after, he proceeded to Ningpo his destination, where 
he remained till the beginning of 1865; but the complete failure 
of his health then rendered a change necessary, and he left for 
the United States. 



CCLI. ^ H g Hwa Mei-he Rev. MARQUIS LAFAY- 
ETTE WOOD was appointed a missionary to China, by the 
Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church in the 
Southern States of America, and arrived at Shanghae with 
Mrs. Wood on July 30th, 1860. He has continued at that 
station ever since. 

Publications by Mr. Wood. 

CHINESE. 

1- Jl : M iff % K Shdng hae sin paou. Shanghae Gazette 
Shanghae, 1866. This is a Chinese newspaper published three 
times a week, which had been conducted for several years when 
Mr. Wood undertook the editorship, in the early part of 1866. 



CCLII. ;]$ Lin. Rev. YOUNG JOHN ALLEN was ap- 
pointed a missionary to China, by the Missionary Society of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church in the Southern States of 
America, and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Allen on July 
13th, 1860. He has been since engaged in missionary labours 
there up to the present time. 



REV. JOHN GRIFFITH SCHILLING. 261 

CCLIII. ft fg Keang-Wi. Rev. IRA MILLER CON- 
DIT was appointed a missionary to China by the Board of 
Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
States, and arrived at Hongkong with Mrs. Condit on August 
1st, 1860. He proceeded immediately to his station at Can- 
ton, where he remained till October 5th, 1865; and then left 
for San Francisco on account of Mrs. Condit's health. She 
died in the United States in 1866. 

Publications by Mr. Condit 

CHINESE. 

1. J[$ ^ fjl| (Jl $? Peihfung gbw sedngJeeae. Denounce- 
ment of Idolatry. 5 leaves. Shanghae. This is composed of 
a selection of Scripture extracts. 

2- M 1h %L "b Fuh yin die yen. Gospel Words. 8 leaves. 
Shanghae. This is a selection of Scripture extracts. 

3- M $$ ;£, 5* Ydy soo die yen. Words of Jesus. 6 leaves. 
Shanghae, 1864. This is a selection of Scripture extracts. 

4- ft JS FpJ ^ T*e le ivdn td. Catechism of Geography. 
51 leaves. Canton, 1865. This is in 82 chapters, illustrated 
by numerous maps and other plates. The page is divided 
into two sections in the height. 



CCLIV. jfa ft She-ling. Rev. JOHN GRIFFITH 
SCHILLING was appointed a missionary to China, by the 
Richmond Board of the Southern Baptist Convention in the 
United States, and arrived at Hongkong with Mrs. Schilling 
on August 1st, 1860. He proceeded to Canton his destination 
without delay, where Mrs. Schilling died on January 24th, 
1864; and he left with his two children for New York on March 
1st, since which he has not returned to China. 

Publications by Mr. Schilling. 

CHINESE. 

1- f¥- H4 £, f£ P a * s ^ lin oJie/a. The way to Worship 
God. 5 leaves. Canton. This is a simple treatise on the 
Christian duty of Prayer, followed by four injunctions to the 
practice of prayer, privately, at meals, in the family, and in 
the public congregation. 



262 REV. ARTHUR EVANS MOULE. 

CCLV. W%tJ§.'&f*(}hHng-g.dn. Rev. NATHAN SITES 
was appointed a missionary to China, by the American Me- 
thodist Episcopal Missionary Society, and arrived at Fuhchow 
with Mrs. Sites in 1861, being resident there ever since. 



CCLVI. Rev. Mr. SAWTELLE was appointed a mis- 
sionary to China, by the American Baptist Missionary Union, 
and arrived at Swatow in 1861; but left for the United States 
after a few months. 



CCLVII. & ffi ^ Kung-sun Hiouy. Rev. ADAM 
KROLCZYK was appointed a missionary to China, by the 
Rhenish Missionary Society at Barmen, and arrived at Hong- 
kong on April 10th, 1861. Since that time he has been liv- 
ing at Ho-an, Shin-lung and other places in the interior, much 
of his time being occupied in travelling through the province, 
combining medical practice with his other missionary labours. 

There is a report by Mr. Krolczyk of his medical operations 
for the year 1865, appended to Dr. Kerr's report for the same 
year, (see Kerr's works, No. 6.) 



OCLVIII. ff Foo. JOHN FRYER arrived in Hong- 
kong on August 6th, 1861, and was for a time engaged as 
Tutor in St. Paul's College. In 1863 he went to Peking, in 
connection with the Church of England Missionary Society, 
and there replaced Mr. Burdon as Master of the Chinese Gov- 
ernment School for training native youth in the English lan- 
guage. In the summer of J 865, having become disconnected 
with the Society, he went to Shanghae, and took the charge 
of an educational establishment, which was commenced about 
the end of the year. 

Publications by Mr. Fryer. 

CHINESE. 

1- Jl $? $ff fit Shung hae si?i padu. Shanghae Gazette. 
Shanghae, 1866, 1867. This is the Chinese newspaper which 
was conducted by Mr. Wood, (see M. L. Wood's works, No. 
1.) whom Mr. Fryer succeeded as editor. 



CCLIX. |£ |5jiJ '0 Mo6 O-tih. Rev. ARTHUR EVANS 
MOULE was appointed a missionary to China, by the Church 
of England Missionary Society, and arrived at Ningpo via 



J. R. CARMICHAEL. 263 

Shanghae, with Mrs. Moule in August, 1861. He has been 
since labouring in the city and surrounding region. 

Publications by Mr. A. E. Moule. 

CHINESE. 

1. Kbng-ha. Di-ih peng. Sermons. Vol.1, pp. viii. 89. 
Ningpo, 1866. This contains five sermons, with a short pro- 
face and table of contents. These were also published separ- 
ately, each sermon forming a tract. 



CCLX. fU T'aou. Kev. SAMUEL DODD was ap- 
pointed a missionary to China, by the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States. 
He arrived at Niagpo via Shanghae, in the autumn of 1861, 
and still continues to reside there. 



CCLXI. pt fl H Keth U-lan. > Rev. LEONARD 
WILLIAM KIP was appointed a missionary to China, by 
the Board of Foreign Missions of the Reformed Dutch Church 
in the United States. He arrived at Shanghae in the au- 
tumn of 1861, and proceeded at once to his destination at 
Amoy, where he still resides. 



CCLXII. % Loo. Rev. J. S. ROBERTS was appointed 
a missionary to China, by the Board of Foreign Missions of 
the Presbyterian Church in the United States, and arrived 
at Hongkong with Mrs. Roberts on February 1st, 1862. 
After a few weeks lie left for Shanghae, where lie arrived on 
May 1st, and remained till February, 1865. He then went 
south for the benefit of his health, but after a few months 
stay at Hongkong and Canton, the change proving insuffi- 
cient, he left for America during the summer, and lias not 
since returned to China, 



CCLXIII. J. R. CARMICHAEL, M.D., M.R.C.S., was 
appointed a medical missionary to China, by the London 
Missionary Society, and arrived at Canton in February, 1862. 
There he took charge of the Society's Hospital till March, 
1863, when he dissolved his connection with the society, 



264 REV. JONATHAN LEES. 

went north and settled in medical practice at Chefoo, where 
lie still resides. 

Publications by Dr Cuvmielioel. 

ENGLISH. 

1. Report of the Missionary Hospital at Kura-li-fau in 
the western suburbs of Canton, for the years 1862-63. 8vo. 
pp. 17. Canton, 1863. 



CCLXIV. m — jfi Le Yih-sJie. Rev. JONATHAN 
LEES was appointed a missionary to China, by the London 
Missionary Society, and arrived at Hongkong- with Mrs. Lees 
in February, 1862. He reached Shanghae on the 21st, and 
proceeded thence to Teen-tsin in March, where he has been 
since residing. 

Publications by Mr. Lees. 

CHINESE. 

1- H ffit fvl ^ fl? @ M K'&w sin yO tseuen shoo mult lull. 
Catalogue of the names of the books in the Old and New 
Testaments. Single sheet. Teen-tsin, 1864. This is a 
scheme for abbreviating the names of the books in quota- 
tions. 

2- ^ H "jfi] f$ Tslh shrn urli tsung. Choose the good 
and follow it. 10 leaves. Teen-tsin, 1865. Two short sto- 
ries of missionary experience in India. This is in the man- 
darin dialect. 

3. Yf \}\\ i]^ %fc Ling le seabu hoe. The young Gideon. 
11 leaves. Peking, 1866. Translation of an English tract, 
into the mandarin dialect. 

4 - M & $S $& Ling ch'fth me loo. The Lost Child 
brought home. 15 leaves. Peking, 1866. Translation of a 
tract, issued by the English Weekly Tract Society. It is in 
the mandarin dialect. 

5. H£ 3: ifi ^ LLeen loang e sze. Remains of the Wise 
King. 10 leaves. Peking, 1866. This is a narrative of 
events in the life of King Solomon, from the Old Testament, 
written in the mandarin dialect. 

ENGLISH. 

6. Sacred Songs lor Home and School. Manchester, 1S58. 
This is a compilation of 2.33 hymns, a lew of which are ori- 



REV. FRANCIS R0L0N MICHELL. 265 

ginal. In a 4th edition, issued at Manchester in 1863, lGmo. 
pp. 145, there are 75 new hymns added by the publishers. 



CCLXV. Bfl ]E M Ming CJring-le. Rev. SAMUEL 
LYBRAND BINKLEY was appointed a missionary to 
China^by the Methodist Episcopal Missionary Society in the 
United States, and arrived at Fuhchow with Mrs. Binkley in 
March, 1862. He left for America in December, 1863, and 
has not since returned to China. 



CCLXVI. p± PT 35 Sue Thuj-ya. Rev. THOMAS 
STRINGER was appointed a missionary to China, by the 
Church of England Missionary Society, and arrived at Hong- 
kong with Mrs. Stringer on April 9th, 1862. In March, 1865, 
he withdrew from the missionary service, and took the post 
of chaplain to the British community at Canton, vacated for 
the time by Mr. Gray. He has since returned to England. 



CCLXVIL f% Hod. Rev. JOHN RICHARD WOLFE 

was appointed a missionary to China, by the Church of Eng- 
land Missionary Society, and arrived at Fuh.-ch.ow in April, 
1862, where he has been since residing. 



CCLXVIII. \$_ T 5& Fod Ya-fb. Rev. ARTHUR 
FOLSOM was appointed a missionary to China, by the Board 
of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
States, and arrived at Hongkong on June 1st, 1862. The 
following day he went to Canton, where he has been since 
residing. 



CCLXIX. fe Meih. JAMES MEADOWS was sent to 
China as an agent of the Chinese Inland Evangelization So- 
ciety, and arrived at Ningpo on June 6th, 1862; since which 
time he has been engaged in missionary labours in that city 
and the surrounding country. 



CCLXX. % Meih. Rev. FRANCIS RODON MICHELL 
was appointed a missionary to China, by the Society for the 
Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts. He went to 



2()G REV. CHARLES A. STANLEY. 

Singapore in the summer of 1862, and remained till autumn 
of the following year, when he wont to Hongkong iti Sep- 
tember, and thence to Peking, where he commenced a mis- 
sion station together with Dr. Stewart. In the summer of 
1864 lie resigned the mission work and went to Shanghae. 
The following year he went to India, where he received an 
appointment as British Chaplain. 

• 



CCLXXI. % Pin. Rev. HE1NRICH BENDER was ap- 
pointed a missionary to China, by the Evangelical Missionary 
Society of Basel, and arrived at Hongkong in 1862; since 
which he has been residing chiefly in the district of Chong- 
lok and department of Kea-ying, in the north-eastern part of 
Kwang-tung province. 



CCLXXII. Rev. ERNST J. EITEL was appointed a 
missionary to China, by the Evangelical Missionary Society 
of Basel, and arrived at Hongkong in 1862; soon after which 
he took up his residence on the main laud, having been sta- 
tioned at Li-long in the district of Sin-gan. In April, 1865, 
he transferred his connexion to the London Missionary So- 
ciety, since which he has been attached to the Canton mis- 
sion, having the superintendence of the station at Pok-lo in 
the interior. 



CCLXXIII. gft ]f # Lb Fei-leih. Rev. RICHARD 
FREDERICK LAUGHTON was appointed a missionary to 
China, by the Baptist Missionary Society in England, and 
arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Laughton on March 13th, 
1863. Thence he proceeded by an early opportunity to Yen- 
tae in Shan-tung, where he has been since residing. 



CCLXXIV. ]k%Z& Slum Kea-leik Rev. CHARLES 
A. STANLEY was appointed a missionary to China by the 
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, and 
arrived at Teen-tsin with Mrs. Stanley in the spring of 1S63, 
since which he has been residing there. 

Publications by Mr. Stanley. 

CHINESE. 

'■ M A Wi "a Leang jin hwang yen. Story of Two 



ROBERT JERMA1N THOMAS. 2G7 

Liars. 8 leaves. Teen-tsin, 1866. This is a narrative of 
Annanias and Sapphira with reflections, written in the man- 
darin dialect. A hymn is appended. 



CCLXXV. ft |£ % Keang Tac-Uh. Rev. LYMAN 
DWIG-HT CHAPIN was appointed a missionary to China, 
by the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Mis- 
sions, arrived at Teen-tsin with Mrs. Chapin in the spring 
of 1863, and has been since residing there. 



CCLXXVI. JOHN STEWART, M.D., was appointed 
a medical missionary to China, by the Society for the Propaga- 
tion of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, and arrived at Hongkong 
in the spring of 1863. After a few weeks stay there, he went 
north to Peking, where he commenced the first mission sta- 
tion of the Society in China. In the summer of 1864, he 
left for Shanghae, and his connection with the society ceased. 
After a few months he settled in private practice at Fuh- 
chow, where he still resides. 



CCLXXVII. it $jg $£ Loo Tivan-chwang. Rev. 
AUGUSTUS BLAUVELT was appointed a missionary to 
China, by the Board of Missions of the Dutch Reformed 
Church in the United States, and arrived at Amoy with Mrs. 
Blauvelt in 1863. In the latter part of the following year 
he left for America, and has not since returned to China. 

• 



CCLXXVITI. J% Woo. WILLIAM GAULD, M.D., was 

sent to China by the Foregn Mission Board of the English 
Presbyterian Church, and arrived at Swatqw in September, 
1863, where he lias since been engaged in medical missionary 
labours anions; the Chinese. 



CCLXXIX. $g yfc H jft Twan-muh Lo-cUh. ROBERT 
JERMAIN THOMAS, sou of the Rev- R. Thomas of Hanover, 
near Abergavenny in South Wales, studied for the ministry 
at New College, St. John's Wood, London, and graduated as 
B. A. He was appointed a missionary to China, by the Lon- 
don Missionary Society, and was ordained to the ministry at 



2G8 ' JOHN DUDGEON. M-D. 

his father's chapel on June 4th, 1863. A few days after 
he was married to Caroline Godfrey, and embarked for China 
"with Mrs. Thomas in the Polmaise, at Gravesend, on Jnly 
21st, accompanied by the Revs. A. Williamson, J. Williamson 
and W. H. McMechan, with their wives, Rev. C. Douglas, 
Dr. and Mrs. Dudgeon, Drs. Maxwell and Gentle, and Miss 
Gamble. They arrived at Shaiighae the first week in Decem- 
ber. In March, 1864, Mr. Thomas paid a visit to Hankow, and 
during his absence Mrs. Thomas died at Shanghae on the 
24th of that month. In the summer he visited Peking, and 
returned to Shanghae after a few weeks. In December he 
resigned his connection with the Missionary Society, and ac- 
cepted a secular engagement at Chefoo. This latter however 
he voluntarily relinquished in less than a year, and on appli- 
cation was again admitted into the London Mission. Before 
receiving the decision of the Missionary Board, he left Chefoo 
in the autumn of 1865, in a Chinese junk for Corea, where he 
touched at several places on the coast, and afterwards made his 
way to Peking, via Manchuria. Early in 1866, he took charge 
of the Chinese government Anglo-Chinese School there, while 
Dr. Martin was absent at Shanghae. In consequence of rum- 
oured difficulties in Corea the following year, he was induced 
to leave the capital for Chefoo, with the intention of offering 
his assistance as interpreter for the French squadron, expected 
shortly to proceed to that coast. In the interim, an American 
trading vessel, the General Sherman, being about to visit 
Corea on a commercial enterprise in the autumn of 1866, 
Mr. Thomas resolved to join it. Proceeding some distance 
up one of the Corean rivers, the ship went aground, and in 
this position was set fire to by the natives; when Mr. Thomas 
and all on board, were mercilessly put to death by the hands 
of the people. 



CCLXXX. if || ft Wei Ya-ko. Rev. JAMES WIL- 
LIAMSON, brother of the Rev. Alexander Williamson (No. 
CXCIII), was sent to China by the London Missionary So- 
ciety, and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Williamson, the first 
week in December, 1863. A few days after they left for the 
north, spent the winter months at Chefoo, and removed to 
Teen-tsin in the spring of 1864, where he has been since 
located. 



CCLXXXI. $§ ffi ^ Tih Yo-han. JOHN DUDGEON, 

M. D. was sent to China by the London Missionary Society, 
and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Dudgeon, the first week 
in December, 1863. A few days after they left for the north, 



REV. CALVIN W. MATEER. 269 

spent the winter months at Chefoo, and removed to Peking 
in the beginning of March, 1864, where he has been since en- 
gaged carrying on the hospital initiated by Mi - . Lockhart. 

Publications by Dr. Dudgeon. 

ENGLISH. 

1. The Third and Fourth Annual Reports of the Peking 
Hospital. Svo. The Report for 1864 was printed at Peking, 
pp. 27, 1865. The one for 1865 was printed at Shanghae, 
pp. 50, 1866. 



CCLXXXII. B§ ff m Ma Wei-lee. Rev. WILLIAM 
HENRY McMECHAN 'was sent to China by the Baptist 
Missionary Society in England, and arrived at Shanghae with 
Mrs. McMechan the first week in December, 1863. The same 
month he removed to Chefoo, his destination, where he re- 
mained till the beginning of 1865, and then consequent on 
the failure of 'his health, left for England with his family 
on January 8th. 



CCLXXXIII. Wj Ma. JAMES L. MAXWELL, M.D., 

was appointed a medical missionary to China, by the Foreign 
Mission Board of the Presbyterian Church in England, and 
arrived at Shanghae the first week in December, L863. He 
soon after left for Amoy, and paid a visit to Formosa the 
following autumn. Towards the end of May, 1865, he left 
Amoy to commence a mission on the island of Formosa, 
where lie landed at the port of Ta-kow on the 29th. Since 
that time he has been occupied with missionary labours in 
the same neighbourhood. 



CCLXXXIV. W%'%T'ciliICabu-wdn; Rev. CALVIN 
W. MATEER was sent to China by the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States, 
and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Mateer about the end of 
the year 1863. By an early opportunity they left for Chefoo, 
where they arrived on January 8th, 1864, and a few days 
after removed to the city of Teng-chow, where they have been 
since residing;. 



CCLXXXV. fPJgtjg KoHeen-tXh. Rev. HUNTER 



270 FREDERICK PORTER SMITH, M.B., M.R.C.S. 

CORBETT was sent to China by the Board of Foreign Mis- 
sions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States, and 
arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Corbett about the end of 
1SG3. Shortly after they removed to Chefoo, where they 
arrived on January 8th, 1864, and are now engaged in mis- 
sionary labours at that port. 



CCLXXXVI. £j Pili. Rev. HENRY PARKES was 
sent to China by the English Wesleyan Missionary Society, 
and arrived at Canton on March 18th, 1864, where he still 
resides. 



CCLXXXVII. f£ Fa. Rev. JARVIS DOWNMAN 

VALENTINE was sent to China by the Church of England 
Missionary Society, and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Val- 
entine on April 26th, 1864. A few days after he left for 
Ningpo, where he remained till the spring of 1867, and 
then removed to Hangchow, to take charge* of the station 
left^vacant by the return to England of the Rev. G. E- Moule. 

Publications by Mr. Valentine. 

CHINESE. 

1- H ~$C M. Wt Tabu loan king Jceae. Prayer, Creed and 
Commandments. 6 leaves. Hangchow, 1867. This con- 
tains the Lord's Prayer, Apostles' Creed and Ten Command- 
ments in the Hangchow colloquial dialect, with Scripture 
proofs. 



CCLXXXVIII. gjjj <ff ff Sze Wuy-sMn. FREDERICK 
PORTER SMITH, M.B., M.R.C.S., Associate of King's 
College, London, was appointed a medical missionary to 
China, by the English Wesleyan Missionary Society, and 
arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Smith, on April 26th, 1864- 
He reached Hankow on May 16th, and opened a dispensary 
there in the latter part of June, since which he has been en- 
gaged in labours among the natives. 

Publications by Dr. Smith. 

CHINESE. 

!• H FM f$ 15 E yuen Juh yaou. Hospital Report. 12 



EEV. WILLIAM MACGREGOR. 271 

pages. Hankow, 1867. A prospectus and report of the 
missionary hospital at Hankow. 

ENGLISH. 

2. Two Annual Reports of the Hankow Medical Mission 
Hospital, in connection with the Wesleyan Missionary Society. 
8vo. First Report.— From July 1st, 1864, to June 30th, 1865. 
pp. 13. Shanghae, 1865. Second Report. — From July 1st, 
1865, to June "30th, 1866. pp. 17. Hankow, 1866. 



CCLXXXIX. |5 fj Jod-lih. Rev. JOHN THOMAS 
GULICK arrived at Hongkong about the year 1863, and 
went to Peking with Mrs. Gulick in 1864, as an agent of the 
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. In 
1865 they went to Kalgan, at the Great Wall, where they 
commenced a mission station, and still continue their labours. 



CCXC. ££ H Jfg King E-tih. Rev. EDWIN FRANK 
KINGDON was sent to China by the English Baptist Mis- 
sionary Society, and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Kingdon 
on October 14th. 1864. He reached Chefoo, his appointed 
station, on November 1st, and remained there till the spring 
of 1867, when the state of his health compelled him to relin- 
quish the work, and he left for Shanghae on April 30th. 
There he embarked on May 18th for San Francisco, en route 
for England via Panama. 



CCXCI. § Fo6. Rev. WILLIAM ROBERT FULLER 

was sent to China by the United Methodist Free Church Mis- 
sionary Society in England, arrived at Ningpo with Mrs. 
Fuller in October, 1864, and left again for England in Feb- 
ruary, 1866. He returned to Hongkong in June, 1867, and 
reached Ningpo via Shanghae on the 25th of the same month. 



CCXCII. \% ffi fp E Wti-lin. Rev. WILLIAM MAC- 
GREGOR was appointed a missionary to China, by the For- 
eign Mission Board of the Presbyterian Church in England, 
and arrived in China with Mrs. Macgregor in October, 1864. 
He proceeded shortly after to Amoy, his destination, where 
he still resides. 



272 JOHN PARKER, M.D. 

CCXCIII. ^t Hioiiy. Rev. JOHN WHERRY was ap- 
pointed a missionary to China by the Board of Foreign Mis- 
sions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States, and 
arrived at Shanghai with Mrs. Whery on November 19th, 
1864. He still resides there. 



CCXCIV. Rev. WILHELM BELLON was sent to China 
by t lie Evangelical Missionary Society of Basel, and arrived 
at Hongkong about the end of 1864, soon after which he took 
up his residence at Li-long, in the interior of the province. 



CCXCV. Rev. CHARLES PH. PITON was appointed 
a missionary to China by the Evangelical Missionary Society 
of Basel, and arrived at Hongkong about the end of the year 
1864. He proceeded at once to a station in the interior of 
the province, and now resides in the department of Kea- 



CCXCYI. Rev. CHARLES F. WARREN was appointed 

a missionary to China, by the Church of England Missionary 
Society, and arrived at Hongkong with Mrs. Warren on Jan- 
uary 21st, 1S65. He still resides there. 



CCXCVII. # g[ % Kin Yd-m. Rev. ARTHUR 
WILL [AM CRIBB was appointed a missionary to China 
by the Church of England Missionary Society, and arrived at 
Fuh-chow with Mrs. Cribb early in 1865. He still resides 
there. 

Publications by Mr. Cribb. 

CHINESE. 

1- M $J ^ £jc iSin yd cJmin clioo. New Testament with 
Marginal References. 



CCNCVIII. £ Pa. JOHN PARKER, M.D., younger 
brother of William Parker (No. CLXXVHL), arrived in 
China in the early part of 1.863, and established himself in 
medical practice at Ningpo; at the same time taking charge 
oi the missionary hospital which had been commenced and 



REV. JOHN HOWARD VAN DOREN. 273 

carried on by his brother. In 1865 he became the recognized 
agent of the United Presbyterian Church of Scotland. In 
the beginning of May, 1867, he left Ningpo, and embarked 
at Shanghae in the P & 0. Steamer on the 7th, on his way 
to England. 



CCXCIX. $E Lc. Rev. DAVID HILL was appointed 
a missionary to China by English Wesleyan Missionary So- 
ciety, and arrived at Shanghae in March, 1865. On April 
3rd he reached Hankow, where he still resides. 



CCC. ty Ska. Rev. WILLIAM SCARBOROUGH 

was appointed a missionary to China by the English Wes- 
leyan Missionary Society, and arrived at Shanghae in March, 
1865. On April 3rd he reached Hankow, where he still 
resides. 



CCCI. SIGISMUND HANFF, a native of Revel in 
Russia, was ordained to the ministry, and appointed a mis- 
sionary to China by the Evangelical Missionary Society of 
Basel. He left England in the Arab Steed, in company with 
the Rev. E. Faber, on September 26th, 1864, and arrived at 
Hongkong on April 25th, 1865. He soon after took up his 
residence at Fuk-wing in the district of Sin-gan, where he 
died on J uly 20th of the same year. 



CCCII. Rev. E. FABER was appointed a missionary to 
China, by the Evangelical Missionary Society of Basel, and 
arrived at Hongkong on April 26th, 1865. Shortly after 
that he went to reside in the interior of the province, where 
he is still engaged. 



CCC1II. H ^ f« Wan Heaou-ivdn. Rev. JOHN HOW- 
ARD VAN DOREN was appointed a missionary to China 
by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Dutch Reformed 
Church in the United States. He arrived at Shanghae with 
Mrs. Van Doren in May, 1865, and reached Anioy on June 
1st, where he still resides. 



274 JAMES GENTLE. 

CCCIV. ^ Foo. Rev. CHAUNCEY GOODRICH was 
appointed a missionary to China, by the American Board of 
Commissioners for Foreign Missions, and arrived in China 
with Mrs. Goodrich in the summer of 1865. He reached Pe- 
king in July, and still continues to reside there. 



CCCV. ft Keang. GEORGE CROMBIE was appointed 
a missionary to China, by the Chinese Inland Evangelization 
Society, and arrived at Ningpo on July 24th, 1865. He has 
since taken up his residence at the city of Fung-hwa in the 
same prefecture. 



CCCVI. & Pili. S. P. BARCHET was appointed a 
missionary to China, by the Chinese Inland Evangelization 
Society, and arrived at Ningpo on July 24th, 1865 ; since 
which he has been residing in that vicinity. 



CGCVII. ^ Met. Rev. JOHN MARA was appointed a 
missionary to China by the United Methodist Free Church 
Missionary Society in England, and arrived at Shanghaewith 
Mrs. Mara in August, 1865. He reached Ningpo on Sep- 
tember 2nd, where he still resides. 



CCCVIII. Rev. T. LORCHER was appointed a mission- 
ary to China by the Evangelical Missionary Society of Basel, 
and arrived at Hongkong on October 31st, 1865, being still 
connected with that station. 



CCCIX. Rev. U. TAGGENBURGER was appointed a 
missionary to China by the Evangelical Missionary Society of 
Basel. He arrived at Hongkong in company with the Rev. 
T. Lorcher on October 31st, 1865, and died there on January 
23rd, 1866. 



CCCX. |5|£ Ch'in. JAMES GENTLE, a native of Scot- 
land, studied for the medical profession in Edinburgh, where 
he graduated as M. D. He sailed from Gravesend in the 
Polmaise on July 21st, 1863,. in company with the Revs. A. 
Williamson, J. "Williamson, R. J. Thomas and W. H. Mc 



REV. GEORGE SYDNEY OWEN. 275 

Median with their wives, Dr. and Mrs. Dudgeon, Rev. C. 
Douglas, Dr. Maxwell and Miss G-amhle, and arrived at 
Shanghae the first week in December. He removed to Chin- 
keang shortly after, where he commenced practice among the 
foreign residents, and at the same time opened a dispensary 
for the benefit of the Chinese. In the autumn of 1865 he 
was appointed medical officer to the Chinese Hospital at 
Shanghae, being provisionally received into connection with 
the London Missionary Society, an arrangement which was 
afterwards ratified by the Board in London. He took charge 
of the hospital on November 1st; but his health failing, he 
left for a visit to Singapore in February, 1866. From that 
port he went on to Penang, and took up his residence with a 
brother who was settled there. Consumption with which he 
was afflicted, there made a rapid inroad on his system, and 
he died on April 25th. 

Publications by Dr. Gentle. 

ENGLISH. 

1. The Annual Report of the Chinese Dispensary, at 
Chin-kiang, from June 23rd, 1864, to June 30th, 1865. 
8vo. pp. 5. Shanghae, 1865. 



CCCX1. J5pJ 0. Rev. W. ATKINSON was appointed 
a missionary to China, by the Church of England Mission- 
ary Society, and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Atkinson in 
December, 1865. He removed to his destination at Peking 
in the spring of 1866, and still resides there. 



CCCXII. Rev. JAMES ANDERSON was 'appointed a 
missionary to China, by the London Missionary Society. 
He arrived at Hongkong with Mrs. Anderson on December 
27th, 1865, and removed to Canton in 1867. 



CCCXIII. £ Wdn. Rev. GEORGE SYDNEY OWEN 

was appointed a missionary to China, by the London Mis- 
sionary Society, and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Owen on 
February 5th, 1866, where he still resides. 



276 REV. JOHN H1SOOCK ROGERS. 

CCCXIV. £j H ffl'Pth E-wan. Rev. EVAN BRY- 
ANT was appointed a missionary to China, by the London 
Missionary Society, and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Bry- 
ant on February 5th, 1866. He left for Hankow a few days 
after, where he now resides. 



CCCXV. f Tsaou. GEORGE STOTT was appointed 
a missionary to China, by the Chinese Inland Evangelization 
Society, and arrived at Ningpo, via Shanghae, on February 
10th, 1866. He has been since stationed at the city of 
Fmiii'-hwa. 



CCCXVI. jft Fan. JOHN W. STEVENSON was ap- 
pointed a missionary to China, by the Chinese Inland Evange- 
lization Society, and arrived at Ningpo with Mrs. Stevenson 
on February 10th, 1866. He has been since stationed at the 
prefeotural city of Shaou-hing. 



CCCXVII. If ^ lAty Yin-pili. Rev. JOSEPH 
ANDERSON LEYENBERGER was appointed a missionary 
to China, by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Presby- 
terian Church in the United States, and arrived at Hong- 
kong with Mrs. Leyenberger on March 1st, 1866. He reach- 
ed Shanghae on April 5th, and on the 10th was at Ningpo, 
where he has been since residing:. 



_ CCCXVIII. Rev. A. C. HOHING was appointed a mis- 
sionary to China, by the Board of Foreign Missions of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States, and ar- 
rived at Shanghae with his family in the spring of 1S66. 
After a few weeks stay there, he removed to Peking, where 
he still resides. 



CCCXIX. Rev. JOSEPH GIBSON was sent to China 
by the English Wesleyan Missionary Society, and arrived at 
Canton on March 31st, 1866. 



CCCXX. Rev. JOHN HISCOCK ROGERS was sent to 



LEV. MARK WILLIAMS. 277 

China by the English Wesleyan Missionary Society, and ar- 
rived at Canton on March 31st, 1866. 



CCCXXI. Rev. CARL T. KREYER was appointed a 
missionary to China by the American Baptist Missionary 
Union, and arrived at Ningpo with Mrs. Kreyer in May, 
1866, since which he has gone to reside at Hangchow. 



CCCXXII. Rev. V. C. HART was appointed a mis- 
sionary to China, by the American Methodist Episcopal Mis- 
sionarv Society, and arrived at Fiih-chow with Mrs. Hart on 
May 27th, 1866. 



CCCXXIII. Rev. L. N. AVHEELER was appointed a 
missionary to China, by the American Methodist Episcopal 
Missionary Society, with a special view to the superinten- 
dence of the Mission press. He arrived at Fith-chow with 
Mrs. Wheeler on May 27th, 1866. 

Publications by Mr. Whechr. 

ENGLISH. 

1. The Missionary Recorder : a repository of intelligence 
from eastern missions, and a medium of general information. 
Fuh-chow,. 1867. This is a monthly journal. The first four 
numbers were each a folio sheet; subsequently it appeared in 
4to. of 16 pages. 



CCCXXIV. Rev. Mr. NO YES was appointed a missionary 
to China, by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Presby- 
terian Church in the United States, and arrived at Canton 
with Mrs. Noyes in the summer of 1866. 



CCCXXV. $ ffi jjjg Ma Wet-le. Rev. MARK WIL- 
LIAMS was appointed a missionary to China, by the Ame- 
rican Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, and ar- 
rived at Hongkong with Mrs. Williams in July, 1866. He 



278 WILLIAM RUDLA.ND. 

reached Shanghae on August 7th and Teen-tsia on the 20th. 
In the beginning of March, 1867, he left for Kalgan, and 
after stopping a few days at Peking en route, reached his 
destination on the 14th, and now resides there. 



CCCXXVI. f|j at £ Wei Yang-sang. JAMES WIL- 
LIAMSON was appointed a missionary to China, by the Chi- 
nese Inland Evangelization Society, and arrived at Shanghae 
on October 1st, 1866; soon after which he removed to Hang- 
chow. 



CCCXXVII. \% H %i M E-lae. LEWIS NICOL 
was appointed a missionary to China, by the Chinese Inland 
Evangelization Society, and arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. 
Nicol on October 1st, 1866; soon after which he removed to 
Hano-chow. 



COCXXVIIL £ jat p; Shi Hung-tabu. JOHN RO- 
BERT SELL was appointed a missionary to China, by the 
Chinese Inland Evangelization Society. He left London in 
the Lamermoor, in the summer of J 866, in company with the 
Rev. J. H. Taylor and family, Mr. and Mrs. Nicol, Messrs. J. 
Williamson, G-. Duncan. W. Rudland and J. Jackson, and 
Misses J. Maclean, S. Barnes, E. Blatchley, L. Desgraz, E. 
Rose, J. Faulding, M. Bowyer, M. Bell, and M. Bausuni. He 
arrived at Shanghae on October 1st, removed to Hangchow 
shortly after, made a brief residence there and subsequently 
went to Ningpo, where he died of small-pox on May 18th, 
1867. 



^ CCCXXIX. J| g& jjig Tung Kdn-fuh. GEORGE DUN- 
CAN was appointed a missionary to China, by the Chinese 
Inland Evangelization Society, and arrived at Shanghae on 
October 1st, 1866; soon after which he removed to Hang- 
chow. 



CCCXXX. jft gr ll Lo6 Hwwy-U. WILLIAM RUD- 
LAND was sent to China, by the Chinese Inland Evangeliza- 



JOHN MCCARTHY. 279 

tion Society, and arrived at Shanghae on October 1st, 18GG; 
soon after which he removed to Hangchow. 



CCCXXXI. ?g •% % Ts'ae Wdn-tsaL JOSIAH 
ALEXANDER JACKSON was appointed a missionary to 
China, by the Chinese Inland Evangelization Society, and 
arrived at Shanghae on October 1st, 1866; soon after which 
he removed to Haim-chow. 



CCCXXXII. |£ Tung. Eev. WILLIAM DANIEL 
THOMPSON was appointed a missionary to China, by the 
New Connection Methodist Missionary Societj r , and arrived 
at Shanghae in November, 1866. He left shortly after for 
Teen-tsin, where he arrrived on November 30th, and still 
continues to reside. 



CCCXXXIII. ^ Hwa. Rev. WILLIAM BRAM- 
WELL HODGE was appointed a missionary to China, by 
the New Connection Methodist Missionary Society, and ar- 
rived at Shanghae in November, 1866. He left in a short 
time for Teen-tsin, where he arrived on November 30th, and 
still resides there. 



CCCXXXIV. Rev. THOMAS BRYSON was appointed 
a missionary to China, by the London Missionary Society, 
and arrived at Shanghae on January Ilth, 1867; from which 
he proceeded without delay to Hankow, and took up his re- 
sidence shortly after in the provincial city of Woo-chang. 



CCCXXXV. Rev. JAMES SADLER was appointed a 
missionary to China, by the London Missionary Society, and 
arrived at Shanghae with Mrs. Sadler on January 11th, 1867; 
from which he removed by the earliest opportunity to Anioy, 
and now resides there. 



CCCXXXVI. g£ jjv % Mill Kca-tc. JOHN MCCAR- 
THY was appointed a missionary to China, by the Chinese 



2S0 REV. JAMES BATES'. 

Inland Evangelization Society, and arrived at Shangliae with 
Mrs. McCarthy early in 18G7; soon after which he removed 
to Hangchow. 



CCCXXXVII. •§ Keih. Rev. HENRY' GRETTON 

was appointed a missionary to China, by the Church of Eng- 
land Missionary Society, and arrived at Shanghae on Janua- 
ry 18th, 1867. He proceeded forthwith to Ningpo, remained 
there a few days, and reached Hangchow on February 2nd, 
where he now resides. 



CCCXXXVIII. §| Pel Rev. JAMES BATES was ap- 
pointed a missionary to China, by the Church of England 
Missionary Society, arrived at Shanghae on January 18th, 
18(17, and reached Ningpo his destination on the 22nd. 



OMISSIONS. 2SI 

WORKS OMITTED IN THE FOREGOING PAGES. 



Rev. Robert Morrison D. D. 

12*. ^IIAII Wt Ta ying lewbjin sze Ub sit wo. 
Summary of English affairs. Malacca, 1833. This is a trans- 
lation of an English tract, written by C. Marjoribanks, Esq.; 
intended to give the Chinese some useful information in a 
small compass, about the government and commerce of Britain. 
It was first printed from wooden blocks, and afterwards by 
metal type, in 4 leaves. 

Rev. Walter Henry Mcdhurst, D. D. 

30*. ptj ££ f£ 3£ Sze tsze king wan. Four Character 
Classic, 

30f. M M fM Wt Ydy soo tshng Un. Life of Christ in 
verse. 

41*. | |f # ~% Tabu ham loan. Book of Common Prayer. 
Hongkong, 1855. A translation of the Anglican ritual. 

41 f- if # ~$C Taouhaou wan. Book of Common Prayer. 
Hongkong, 1855. This is a translation of the preceding into 
the Mandarin dialect. 

77*. Ancient China. |f fg The Shoo King, or the His- 
torical Classic: being the most ancient authentic record of the 
annals of the Chinese empire: illustrated by later commenta- 
tors. Svo. pp. xvi, 413. Shanghae, 1846. 

Rev. Samuel Kidd. 

7*, The Thousand Character Classic. Svo. pp. 31. 8, 
Malacca, 1831. This translation is published as an appendix 
to the Report of the Anglo-Chinese College, for that year. 
The original text is given at the end. 

Rev. William Young. 

4. Khui gin-d e sim-Jioc e clilieh. Child's Primer in the 
Amoy dialect, pp, 17, Amoy, 1853. This is printed in the 
Roman character. 

Rev. Herman Rottger. 

1. Thien-ti-hoih — Geschichte cler Briiderschaft des Him- 
inels und d<T Erdendercommunistischen Propaganda China's. 
Berlin, 1852. 

Rev. Josiah Goddard. 

4,* mm m m mm m m ai m r< m simgungviw 

p eh noil, ch'wdng she i;c ctiuh yae heth he. Genesis and Exodus. 
: 13 leaves Ningpo, 18C0 



282 OMISSIONS. 

4t- m B H 53 !B mIJ^T *J * IB ^ 7 "'».7 **«S" ^ & cliaou 
yu le ice he. Leviticus, 29 leaves. Ningpo, 1861. 

James C. Hepburn, A. 31., M. I). 

1. A Japanese and English Dictionary; with an English 
and Japanese Index, 4to. pp. xxii, 558, 1 32. Shanghae, 1867. 

Rev. Thomas Hall Hudson. 

15. Christian Baptism explained, and modern evasions of 
of Believers' Baptism examined and refuted. 12mo. pp. 28. 

IG. A brief sketch of the doctrine and discipline of the 
General Baptist Churches, 12mo. pp. 4. 

17. Important Considerations, relative to English trans- 
lations, in reply to the proposal for a new version of the Sa- 
cred Scriptures into the Chinese language. 8vo. pp. v, 31. 
Shanghae, 1866. 

Alexander Wylie. 

13. Notes on Chinese Literature: with Introductory Re- 
marks on the progressive advancement of the art, and a list of 
Translations from the Chinese, into various European lan- 
guages. 4to. pp. xxxvi, 260. Shanghae, 1867. 

llev. William C. Burns. 

G*- £3 z£ 11 ft Sting cliob siting she. Hymn Book. 42 
leaves. Peking, 1864. A collection of 54 hymns, with table 
of contents. 

8- III ^ $$ M frG *£* W £>M l fiien lo6 lelh citing kwan 
Mod. Supplement to the Pilgrim's Progress in the Mandarin 
dialect. 6. books, 113 leaves. Peking, 1866. This is a trans- 
lation of Bunyan's second part, containing the adventures of 
Christiana. 

9. If jfi-j If j| 1_t t&K'&oyd she peenlcwanhwa. Psalms 
in the Mandarin dialect. 127 leaves. Peking, 1867. This 
translation has copious heading notes to each psalm, and oc- 
casional references in the body of the text, which is composed 
in sentences of four characters throughout. 

Rev. Wilhelm Lobscheid. 

22. Anglo-Chinese Dictionary; with Punti and Mandarin 
Pronunciation. 4to. Only two out of four parts are yet pub- 
lished. It is advertized to be completed about December, 
1868; the whole comprising 2000 large quarto pages. 

Rev. Joseph Edkins. 

s *- W- ffc Pi] ^ Shing l-cciou wanla. Christian Catechism. 
9 leaves. Peking, LS62. Appended are the Lord s Prayer and 
a general prayer. 



12* 



omissions. 283 

I I*. |j| |§f H ££ |g $a«<7 ?/w /.sft« s<w# £e. Conversion in 
old age. 8 leaves. Peking, 18(55. This is a translation of 
an American tract into the Mandarin dialect. 

/-s _^ Arikhon sorkhaJflioli yin hsa&lioko outchiko bitchik. 

""^ ^Christian Catechism, 26 leaves. Peking-, 18Gb'. This 

is a translation into the Mongolian language of No. 8° supra. 

Rev. Jol lii Chalmers. 

12. The Origin of the Chinese: ah attempt to trace the 
connection of the Chinese with western nations in their reli- 
gion, superstitions, arts, language, and traditions. Svo. pp. 
SO. Hongkong, 1S6C 

Rev. Josiah Cox. 

1- W W 3t ik HI K'etaouiv&ntseuenshoo. Prayer Book. 
Hankow, 1865. This is a translation of a portion of the 
Anglican liturgy into the colloquial dialect of Hankow. 

Rev. John JShaiv Burdon. 

!*■ 3$ Hfc M Jffc : & % Ydy soo slung Icecum fa citing.. 
Rules of the Christian Religion. 10 leaves. Peking, J 86*4. 
A summary statement of the aim, characteristics and doc- 
trines of Christianity, followed by the Decalogue, Lord's 
Prayer, Morning and Evening Prayers, and Grace to be said 
at meals, It is in the Mandarin dialect, A revised edition 
in 12 leaves was published at Peking in 1867. 

2. (fe ffl H 3$t Kung yung tabu wan. Prayers for Ordinary 
Use. 8 leaves. This consists of litanies for morning and even- 
ing family devotion, in the Mandarin dialect. It is usually 
bound up as an appendix to the preceding. 

3- |S i ~$C 5t Yu cliob wan shih. Prayer Book, 77 
leaves. Peking, 1864. This is a translation of a portion of 
the Anglican liturgy, containing the Morning and Evening 
Prayers, Litany, Baptismal and Communion Services, preced- 
ed by a preface and notes for the reader. It is in the Man- 
darin dialect, and was drawn up with the assistance of Mr. 
Scheresehewsky. 

4 - II ii^ Yu choowan shih. Prayer Book. 69 leaves. 
Hongkong, 1866. This is a version of the preceding in the 
Canton dialect, without the preface and introductory notes. 

5. Jig fjg %fi H Shing king tsing e. Scripture History. 
Vol. 1. 52 leaves. This consists of forty chapters, beginning 
with the creation, and extending be the death of Joshua; be- 
ing yet incomplete. 

6'- Jf|> §j" II' Tib j[f 1£ Yitij soo shing ham die i/aoic. Im- 



OMISSIONS. 

portant points of tlie Christian Religion. Peking, IS67. An 
abstract of Christian doctrine, in twelve chapters, written in 

the Mandarin dialect. 

Rev. Henry Rlodgct. 

2*. j§5 Hf ^t M M ^ -^"^ Z/ ; ' ;i c ^*& ^ waiita. Catechism 
of Gospel Truth. 18 leaves, Teen-tsin, 1863. 

2f. H ^ IM £ara teze *t»gr. Trimetrical Classic. 9 leaves 
Teen-tsin, 180.']. This is a version of Mr. Lowrie's tract, (sec 
R. Lowrie's works, No. 3.) adapted to the Mandarin dialect. 

Rev William Ivnibb Lea. 

1. Cassar or Christ? A sermon preached in the foreign 
chapel, Amov, January 11th, 1864, 12mo. pp. 26. Hongkong,. 
1863. 

Rev George Evans Moule, B. A. 

4. Iao-Ii veng-teh. Catechism, pp. 15. Ningpo, 1SG6. 
This is the Catechism of tho Anglican ritual, translated into 
the Ningpo dialect, and printed in the Roman character. 

5. Kyin-sing U, Order of Confirmation, pp. 9. Ningpo, 
1866. This is also a portion of the liturgy, translated into 
the Ningpo dialect, and printed in the Roman character.. 

6. Hioeng-p'e li-tsih, Form for the Solemnization of Mat 
rimony. pp. 21. Ningpo, 1866. This is another portion of the 
liturgy, translated into the Ningpo dialect, and printed in 
the Roman character. 

Rev. William II. Collins, M, R. C. S. 

1* Wi af in T*J Fah yin die nun. Gospel Guide. 7 leaves. 
Peking, L865. (Statements of Christian truth, concluding 
with forms of prayer for morning and evening. This is in the 
Mandarin dialect. 

2- Ii f£ Ptij %£ Siting ling wan td. Scripture Catechism... 
15 leaves, Peking, 1867. 

Mrs. Collins. 

I** M 3i £1 "a K' 111 V Xt h ledng y&n. Precious Words. 
25 leaves. Peking. A collection of Scripture extracts, with 

references. 



INDEX I. 



NAMES OF MISSIONARIES. 



Abeel, David. 72. 

Aitchison, William. 229. 

Allen, Young John. 200. 

Anderson. James. '21'). 

Ashmore, William. 207. 

Atkinson - , W. 275. 

Baldwin, Caleb Cook. 179. 

Baldwin, Stephen Livingstone. 250. 

Ball, Dyer. 107. 

Baronet, S. P. 274. 

Bates, James. 280. 

Beach, William Roberts. 220. 

Bellon, Wilhelin. 272. 

Belton, James S. 280. 

Bender, Heinrich. 266, 

Benliam, Nathan. 115. 

Binkley, Samuel Lybrand. 2f35. 

Blauvelt, Augustus. 267. 

Blodget, Henry. 229. 

Bonhoure. 259/ 

Bonne}', Samuel William. 149. 

Boone, William Jones. 99. 

Brewster, Frederick H. 219. 

Bridgman, Elijah Coleman. 68. 

Bridgman, James Granger. 134. 

Brown, Hugh A. 149. 

Bryant, Evan. 276. 

Bryson, Thomas. 279. 

Burdon, John Shaw. 222. 

Bums, William C, 175. 

Burton, George W. 215. 

Bvers. John. 218. 

Cahaniss, A. B. 219. 

Carmichael, J. R. 263. 

Carnegie, John. 254. 

Carpenter, Solomon. 1G4. 

Chalmers, John. 217. 

Chapin, Lyman Dwight. 267. 

Cleland, John Fullerton. 155. 

Clopton, Samuel Cornelius. 156. 

Cobbold, Robert Henry. 182. 

Colder, James. 2U9. 

Cole. Richard. 134. 

Collie, David, 45. 

Collins. Judson Dwight. 166. 

Collins, William H. 248. 

Cmi. lit. Ira Miller. 261. 

Corbett, Hunter. 270. 

Coulter, Moses Stanley. 196. 

Cowie, Hugh. 251. 



Cos, Josiah. 220. 

Crawford, Tarleton P. 214. 

Cribb, Arthur William. 272, 

Crombie, George. 274. 

Culbertson, Michael Simpson. 146. 

dimming, William Henry. 129. 

Cummings, Seneca. 178. 

Cnnnyngham, William G. E. 219. 

Davies, Evan. 89. 

Dawson, Robert. 257. 

Dean, William. 85. 

Devan, Thomas T. 143. 

Dickinson, James T. 94, 

Diver, William Beck. 115. 

Dodcl, Samuel. 263. 

Doolittle, Justus. 201. 

Doren, John Howard Van. 273. 

Doty, Elihu. 97. 

Douglas, Carstairs. 239. 

Doyen, J. T. 254. 

Dudgeon, John. 268. 

Duncan, George. 27.S. 

Dyer, Samuel. 51. 

Edkins, Joseph. 187. 

Eitel, Ernst J. 266. 

Elgquist, A. 197. 

Evans, John. 76. 

Faber, E. 273. 

Fairbrother, William. 152. 

Fanner, William. 181. 

Farnham, J. M. W. 255. 

Fast, Karl Josef. 197. 

Fearnley, Matthew. 237. 

Fish, Melancthon W. 237. 

Fleming, Robert. 43. 

Fleming, Thomas S. 254, 

Folsom, Arthur. 265. 

French, John Booth. 157. 

Fryer, John. 261. 

Fuller, William Robert. 27 I . 

Faillard, Charles Washington. 230. 

Gamble, William. 249. 

Gauld, William. 267. 

Gayley, Samuel R. 215. 

Genahr, Ferdinand. 161. 

Gentle, James. 274. 

Gibson, Joseph. 276. 

Gibson, Otis. 236. 

Gilfillan, Thomas. 191. 

Gillespie, William. 1 10. 



2S(J 



INDEX I. 



Cocking. Heinrich. 234. 

Goddard, Josiah. 11-4. 

Goodrich, Chauncey. 274. 

Gough, Frederick Foster. 198. 

Graham, Richardson. 151. 

Grant, Alexander. 248. 

Graves. Rosewell Ilobart. 240. 

Gretton, Henry. 280, 

Gulick, John Thomas. 271. 

Gutzlaff Karl Friedrich August. 54. 

Hall. Charles J. 246-. 

Hall, William Nelthorpe. 255. 

Hamherg, Theodore. 159. 

Hanffi Sigismund. 2~:J. 

Hanson, Francis It. 88. 

Hanspach, August. 2:i4, 

Happer, Andrew Patton. 144. 

Hart, V. C. 277. 

Hartwell, Charles. 221. 

Hartwell, Jesse Boardman. 251. 

Henderson, James. 258. 

Hephurn, James C. 128. 

Hickok, Henry. 178. 

Hill, David. 273. 

Hirschberg, Henri Julius. J 65. 

Hobson, Benjamin. 125* 

Hobson, .lull]):.. 196. 

Hodge, William E-ramwell. 279. 

Hohing, A. C. 270. 

Holmes, J. L. 251. 

Hope, Matthew Boyd. 97. 

Hubbell, E. 254. 

Hudson, Thomas Hall. 1-32. 

Humphreys. James. 45. 

Huffman, George H. 44. 

Hutton, Samuel. 2:>4. 

Hwang, Fun. 244. 

Hyslop, James. 191. 

Ince, John. 42, 

[nnocent, John. 250. 

Inslee, Elias 13. 243. 

Jackson, Josiah Alexander. 279. 

Jackson. Robert David. 201. 

James, J. Sexton. 181. 

Jarrom. William. 154. 

Jencks, E. N. 155. 

Jenkins, Benjamin. 192. 

Jenkins, Horace. 255. 

John, Griffith. 237- 

Johnson, Francis C. 165. 

Johnson, John. 170. 

Johnson, Stephen. 80. 

Johnston. James. 222. 

Jones, John. 240. 

Kay. Battinson. 191. 

Keith, Cleveland. 209. 

Kelly, David Campbell. 230. 

Kerr, John Glasgow. 227. 

Kidd, Samuel. 17. 

Kingdon, Edwin Frank. 271. 

Kip. Leonard William. 20:J. 

Kloekers, Hendrik X. 233. 

t n Iton Miles Ju !u-. 228. 



Kreyer, Carl T. 277. 
Krolczyk, Adam. 202. 
Krone, Rudolph. 200. 
Kuster, Heinrich. 161, 
Lambuth, James William. 201, 
Laughton, Richard Frederick. 
Leaj William Knibb. 240. 
Leehler, Rudolp . 100. 
Lees, Jonathan. 204. 
Legge. James. 117. 
L.evenberg.er, Joseph Anderson 
Liggins, John. 241. 
Lloyd, John. 144. 
Lobscheid, Wilhelm. 184. 
Lockhart, William. 112. 
Lockwood, Henry. 88. 
Loomis, Augustus Ward. 148. 
Lorche' - , T. 274, 
Lord. Edward Clemens. 10:1, 
Louis, Wilhelm. 244. 
Lowrie. Reuben. 231. 
Lowrie, Walter Macon. 129. 
Macbryde, Thomas L. 128. 
McCartee, Divie Bethune. 135. 
McCarthy, John. 279. 
McCaw, Francis. 230. 
Macgowan, Daniel Jerome. 132. 
Macgowan, John. 250. 
Macgregor, William. 271. 
Mackenzie, Hur Libertas. 259. 
Maclay, Robert Samuel. 170. 
McMechan. William Henry. 2G9. 
Macy, William Allen. 2:J:j. 
Mara, John. 274. 
Marshman, Joshua, 1. 
Martin, Samuel Newell. D. 203. 
Martin, William A. P. 204. 
Mateer, Calvin W. 209. 
Maxwell, James L. 209. 
Meadows, James. 205. 
Medlunst, Walter Henry. 25. 
Miehell. Francis Rodon. 205. 
Mills, Charles R. 245. 
Milne. William. 12. 
Milne,' William Charles. 122. 
Milton, Samuel. 43. 
Mitchell, John A. 107. 
Moncriett; Edward. T. R. 200. 
Morrison, Robert. 3. 
Morrison. William T. 200. 
Moule, Arthur Evans. 202. 
Moule, George Evans. 247. 
Muirhead, William. 108. 
Minison. Samuel. 81. 
Nelson, Robert. 213. 
Neumann, Robert. 208. 
Nevin. Joseph C. 200. 
Nevius, Elbert. 99. 
Xevius, John L. 224. 
Nicol, Lewis. 278. 
Noyes, Henry V. 277. 
oir. Robert W. 107. 
Ostrom, Akin. 250. 



200. 



276. 



INDEX I. 



2S7 



Owen, George Sydney. 275. 

Parker, John. 272. 

Parker, H. M. 253. 

Parker, Peter. 81. 

Parker, William. 232. 

Parkes, Henry. 270. 

ParkeSj John Sowter. 259. 

Pearcy, George. 150. 

Peet, Lyman Dirt. 116. 

Piercy, George. 207. 

Piton, Charles Pli. 272. 

Pohlman, William John. 111. 

Points, John Tevis. 213. 

Preston, Charles Finney. 22G. 

Preston, John. 235. 

Pruin. 240. 

Purdon, II. 254. 

Quarterman, John Winn. 158. 

Rankin, Henry Van Vleck. 194. 

Rapalje, Daniel. 250. 

Rau, Oscar. 259. 

Peed, Alanson. 93. 

Reeve, Henry. 222. 

Richards, William L. 180. 

Roberts, Issaehar Jacox. 94. 

Roberts, J. S. 203. 

Rogers, John HiscocK. 27G. 

Rottger, Herman. 75. 

Rudland, William. 278. 

Russell, William Armstrong. 183. 

Sadler, James. 279. 

Sandeman, David. 242. 

Sawtelle. 2G2. 

Scarborough. William. 273. 

Schereschewsky, Joseph J. 253. 

Schilling, John Griffith. 261. 

Sell, John Robert, 278. 

Shuck, Jehu Lewis. 90. 

Sites, Nathan. 202. 

Slater, John, 41. 

Smith, D. I). 253. 

Smith, Frederick Porter. 270, 

Smith, George. 141. 

Smith, George. 246. . 

Smith, George., 250. 

Smith, John. 49. 

Smith, Samuel Joseph. 235. 

Southwell, Benjamin. 172. 

Spalding, Phineas D. 175. 

S[ieer, William. 150. 

Squire, Edward B. 102. 

Stanley, Charles A. 266. 

Stevens, Edwin. 84. 

Stevenson, John W. 270. 

Stewart, John. 207. 



Stott, George. 270. 

Stringer, Thomas. 265. 

Stronach, Alexander. 103. 

Stronach, John. 104. 

Swanson, William Sutherland. 25'.). 

Syle, Edward W. 154. 

Taggenburger, U. 274. 

Talmage, John Van Nest. 1G5. 

Taylor, Arthur. 223. 

Taylor, Charles. 193. 

Taylor, James Hudson. 222. 

Telford, Robert. 232. 

Thomas, Robert Jermain. 207. 

Thompson, William Daniel. 279. 

Thomson, Elliot II. 252. 

Tobey, Thomas W. 107. 

Tomlin, Jacob. 50. 

Tracy, Ira. 79. 

Tracy, Stephen. 97. 

Turner, F. S. 252. 

Valentine, Jarvis Downman. 270. 

Voegler. Heinrich Eduard Julius. 218. 

Vogel, Carl. 198. 

Vrooman, Daniel. 215. 

Wardner. Nathan. 104. 

Warren, Charles, F. 272. 

Way, Richard Quarterman. 139. 

Weiton, William. 199. 

Wentworth, Erastus. 235. 

Wheeler, L. N. 277. 

Wherry, John. 272. 

Whilden, Brayfield W. 195, 

White, Moses Clark. 166. 

Wight, Joseph K. 195. 

Wiley, Isaac William. 209. 

Williams, C. M. 241. 

Williams, Mark. 277. 

Williams, Samuel Wells. 70. 

Williamson, Alexander. 238. 

Williamson, .James. 208. 

Williamson. James. "278. 

Wilson, Robert, 25G. 

Winnes. Philip. 2 Hi. 

Wolfe, Samuel. 89. 

Wolfe, John Richard. 205. 

Wood. George W. 110. 

Wood, Marquis Lafayette. 200. 

Woodiu, Simeon Foster. 255. 

Woods, Henry W. 151. 

Wylie, Alexander. 17;!. 

Yates, Matthew T. 107. 

locum, Thomas, 253. 

Young, .lames 11. 198, 

Young, William. 66. 



INDEX II. 

^TITLES OF PUBLICATIONS, ALPHABETICALLY 
ARRANGED. 



CHINESE. 



A-da kyiu-cu yse-su-gek sin yi kyiao sku. Iah-'aen djiia foh-ing shii. 255. 

Ak-lak kyhi-cii yiae-su Kyi-toli-go Sing Iah shii. 223. 

.\h (in ti ng-ts son-tsiang. 184. 

UH lit $$ /pC ^H PHU Chang ynen leang yew seang liln. 1G, 92, 145. 

$£ ^ jjilp p|f Ckang fcseuen shin ske. 239. 

Vfi !§■ ^ ?ll fS Ch'ang kwo eke tabu chnen. 5G. 

ffj jp. IfL jji-^f Ck'ang nSen ts'adu taou. 101. 

'ftj fk ^ Wfy £. ?ll Ch'ang pay ckin skin eke taou. 109. 

'frj ?• ifis -l' L - *£* 3kt Ch'ang pae yay kwa cke taou. 109. 

:H i& M />£ 4 ; 3 pifa Ch'ang yuen leang yew seangjhan. 17, 121. 

}S A W $k Ckaoujinkwo kew. 62. 

; M W& W'i* p'IF" Ckaou k'eung shin ske. 176. 

^? £ft A$C 3fc H p?c %J] jp Che hwan k'e mung skuk k'6 ts'oo poo. 120- 

■$1 M £, M ^C ^ Clie kwo eke yung ta leo. 61. 

M i? £i ]& Che sking eke nan. 170. 

^B 3$S III Che me peen. 183, 18G. 

}|f Tft ff Che nan ckin. 153. 

^§ ill Vm H Ck'e seuen tso yaon. 28. 

|j| ^ ^ Chili wall keo. 239. 

ja i$- $k t£ 3$C Chin chuen kew ske wan. 23. 

Jil f|!i M i$ PM? Chin kea leang k6 hin. G9. 

Jji j$C $1 ftf Chin keaon keuen hang, -1G9, 171. 

JBl IfJC W l|-J Chin keaou liin hang. 171. 

M: WX \»\ %* Chin keaou wan ta. 241. 

J^ M ffr fj Chin king kih yen. 24. 

Itli Chin king sking le. 23. 

jit J§}1 Cliin le. 02. 

S iH £ UC Chin le eke keaou. 96. 

M BH M #0 Chin le e cke. 138, 221. 

jft i'i! .r. ^ $g |£ iff Chin le san ts/.e king ekoo skik. 136. 

M 9= •}$ y£ Chin le t'eih yaou. 182. 

^ ill -M j& Chin le fe'ung taou. 32. 

H Jjili 1 IE m Ckin skin eking lun. 146. 

ifit f'l' T* p)|1{ Ckin shin skik keae. 92, 193, 228. 

H JP'1 1 T Ml P-t ffl Chin shin skik keae ckoo .shlh. 147. 



INDEX II. 289 

JfiL jjilff |1 fift Chin shin tsung lun. 02, 179. 
Si- ?£l -ff-J ^P 1 Chin tauU hang ping. 163. 
M 1 A H Chiu taoujuh mini. 15, 87, 124. 
iR- ytl 1=J SS Chin taou tsze ching. 59. 
r^ ?E $j HP Cliin taou wan ta. 114. 
M ?"E PpJ ^ i'^ f$ Chin taou wan ta ts'gen keae\ 22. 
Iw 9x? f^ fl llj Ching ts'ung pa6 liiy han. 56. 
IE H£ ^C HJ Ching keaou gan wei. 57. 
IE 33 H Fin}' Ching ming yaou lun. 217. 
IE ^[5 J.'t $3C Ching seay pe keaou. 59. 
IE ?!t ;£, pm? Ching taou che lun. 58. 
IE ?tl Wt HC Chins taou Ire mung. 176. „ 
M. "HI t? ^C *§!' Ching keu show gan selh jlh. 164, 
J5& H i* fi Ching shing che fa. 208. 

jfelt |5i §J£ jp$ PfflJ Ch'ing hwang fei shin lun. 218. » 

ifj HI |?- jjiljf Ff% Choo kwo 6 shin lun. 15. 
3t pm} Choo jih lun. 153. 
rfr. f$ fi^ Choo shin lun. 153. 

II )T# ^ M 2, fi Chuen ho wei fuh che fa. 60. 
tt{ ^ W f§. |£ |^ Cli'ah mih se chuen choo shih. 87. 
iM. ^ HE Inn Cung peaou tseang lun. 202. 
4 , ^f|J^JlEJt$fft35C Chung hwa choo hcung k'ing ho sin lie 

wan. 28. 
4* "M 3§. !r Chun se t'ung shoo. 174, 188. 
4* #f» ffl #j* Chung wad sin paou. 133, 244. 
4* &b if M Aj $i Chung wae sin wan tseih jih Iuh. 218. 
4* #MH W Chung wae tsa che. 257. 
4* #h ?S Hr Chung wae t'ung shoo. 214. 
4 1 $b [$ ^ Chung wae. wan ta. 202. 
4* ill Chung yung. 192. 

4 #i Chung heo. 188. 

5 -1- ^ !>u Chung heo ts'een shwo. 173. 

I! (if Jl ?£ ^ t & i§ fg If IS ± # SJE £ Ch'ungsewlepae 

t'ang jin tse e kwan ke ta u shang te cho wan. 119. 
IK II •# 3$C Cung taou kaou wan. 247. 
j|lj 1ft f|f- p£ fl^ Ch'wang she chuen choo shih. 87. 
%i 1ft l£ IT fe Ch'wang she ke kwan hwa. 254. 
^lj 1ft IH if D|£ fern Pi^" Ch'wang she ke show ohaiig soo lun. 235. 
'M 1ft M f£ f# Ch'wang she leih tae chuen. 32. 
C'ih Yiai gyih. 195. 
<_'on^ tao-kao veng. 247. 
De-le-ts vung-taeh. 213. 
Di gyiu du. 204. 

I)i-li sliu lin vsen-koh kwu kying z-t'i yiu tin kong-tsing. 204. 
i$i M i$ ^ Eking wan ta. 177. 
H fee M ^ E yuen -uh yaou. 270. 
yj* ^ '$i 5* fa ft! ^ 1 ? - lae chay yen hing ke loo, 88. 



290 INDEX II. 

n JFlJIE $i ^EteyakelSo. 208. 
i-X M 35 3* f7 f$ E 16 ya yen hing chum. 147. 
J| jj r ?,; ; peen lun, 203. 

ft i/i *& III E twan tsung lun. 185. 
Foh-ing tsaen di. 195. 
Foh-ing dao-li ling-kying veng-teh. 205. 
M -51 fft p'Foo j two. 127. 

JPS 1£ ^ ^!c Fuh she tsin leang. 
$S 1=f j£ k&, :tS Fuh y™ c]ie cl « n kwei. 57. 
iS "W «£, g§ Fuh yin clie yen. 26 1 . 
iM llf ^b PfJ Full yin die nan. 284. 
% S 1? Jft $1 ["] ^ Fuh yin chin le wan la.. 219, 281. 
iS "W ^ ^ fjS W. Fuh yin ho ts'an peen niung. 189. 
iS 1? M M Fuh J'in kwang heun. 19, 124. 
W\ "W >J* ^ Fuh yin seaou hea 231. 
iS W 3&§ Mi Fuh yin seuen peen. 189. 

iS W *fl 1$ -^ / n* Plf Fun yin tabu wan ta. ho keang. 147. 
IS If zE f!5J ^T faj |$- Fuh yin taou wan la keen loo. 347. 
IS la 7w] fll Fuh yin teaou ho. 31. 
iS Iff M IS M Fuh yin tso yaou chuen. 97. 
iS "fcf w pM Fuh yin tsung lun. 53. 
II W J "s Fuh yin yaou yen. 106. 
'fit ?S 1? It Fuh hwo yaou che\ 70 
fy }'M i& ^1 3>C Fun p'ae shing ts'an wan. 102. 
^!'i p 4a ffi A ^ gift Fungkeuen chin keajin wuh lun. 80. 
^C >% B |lj] Gan seihjihke. 164,247. 
j£C >!J> W Hfl M- ~fl Gan SU1 ^eae n '^ u leang fang. 137. 
^£C /[£ Qit iS /Ere Gan we i nwo fuh peen. 24. 
H ^" ^ f# A 5C Hi Go chaypuhtihjuht'eenkwo. 35. 
f$ fH la II G6> seang shoopeen. 31. 
^ it Bfl ills fft Hae t'ung kwei yay soo. 220. 
i§fc J£ iff D J3 1% Han shih ts'ing ming lun. 202, 
$% W & §f Hang hae kin chin. 133. 
Hang-le zsen-lok. 213. 

-•? % ] \ M. p Hang 16 shih lull. 212, 220. 
I iifl InF Hea k'eun° shin she. 176-. 
!E Jffi H" 3^ Hea. urh kwan chin. 120. 
M p| Heang heun. 30, 201. 
M W\ *i* ^1 R ! J Heang heun shih san tsih. 98. 
•M\ M 5E "i* Zl l\}] Heang heun wob shih urh tsih. 18. 
I!ro 7 dl lilil 3ti Heaou ts'«-o heun taou. 208. 



-2£ ^ ^ 'PJ: Heaou king foo 11106. 137. 

<r- -i\i- ^C ^C Pffl He sn foo lun. 187. 

Jill !i Zl ^ +— ^ ^ — l!fe it Heen fling urh neen l 

yih yue ts'oo ylhjihjlh shih tan. 187. 
.i'l T. '"!':' ' 201 



INDEX II. 291 

fM 'M EI |H Heun mung jih k'6. G7. 

pjij j$C -^ ^F* <|M Heun neu san tsz6 king. 40. 

PI ^P R9 ^ Heun tsze wan ta. 238. 

iM 5i Mil* Heun urh cliin yen. 252. 

51 M Si tk Hevng to sou fan. 29 

fT ^ l| M fil Hingkih kihg leih chuea; 168, 

fS ?H iK ^ )c\ V& (li El j£ ^'J Plli? Hing taou sin/hod' e m6en hbw 

jih che hing lun 36. 
f D ^ affi. "fir Ho ho t'ung shoo. 110, 158, 216. 
^ # fO & 3§ # Hwa fan ho ho. t'ung shoo, 110. 
Wt A M iSt £, 13t Hwa jin pin keu che koo. 203. 
sp i* tQ 'p* 313. 18* Hwa rang ho ho t'ung shoo. 188. 
§P 3^ f Q 'p* jjfi llf Hwa ying ho ho t'ung shoo, 110, 

II IM it % BS Hwa king pe yu keang. 92. 
Jar. M i?< M Hwang ch'ing sin shih. 62. 
Hweng-p'e li-tsih. '. 

M %t H ft ^ IS Hwuy gaeekwanneenke.- 126. 

p# ^fe dI'I 5a Hwiiy moo heun taou. 60. 

'\U Bt Wt B (l Hwuy kae shwo leo. 136. 

Iff" Bfc ff JUS M Wt fl W Hwuy kae sin yay soo shwo. lea. 136. 

III P 2. j$ ^F Hwuy tsuy che ta leo. 61. 

'Jg. |p Jjjjf ?J£ ;£ J? Hwuy tsuy k'e k'ew che sze. 35. 
iU W ifi M $& Wt Hwuy tsuy sin yay soo lun. 29, 201 . 
Hyiiing iu yiiing veng. 203. 
Hyuing-mong sing-king kong-ko. 228. 

jb i^ ^3 ~P ~f* *!* x so bo ° kuh bi fong " 2ia ' 

Iao-li-veng-teh. 281. 
Ih-pe Tsiu. 198. •*. 

Iok-Mn thoan hok-ini su. 98. 
long sim sin si. 165. 
Iu (long ts'u hyiao. 225. 
El ^ El t^ Jih shih t'oo shwo. 133. 
Jih I h yuih le. 183. 

A ^ TS UI5 M> *L lik Jin puh sin yay soo che koo. 35. 
A jfr ^ M $1 Bra? Jin sin pun go tsung lun. 48. 
A #f ^ 5$ £ WS Jin so tang k'ew die fuh. 35. 

A eh Pi^J^J^Hiftai PH8 Jin tang tsze sang e shih wan tsan lun. 36. 
A W -^ H< P*] Jin y~'W san yaou wan. 238. 
Jing-tsia lili djiin. 195. 

35" yZ* s* tT ^ ]# Jo sIli yen lung tseuen chuen. 147. 
Ju'-iak su. Zen-Ts'ih Kion. Mung-tash. 211. 
A M) fflfc Hlk >J"> 5! Juh yay soo keaou seaou yin. 180. 
SC H- ^ ^15 |$ Rft lit Kae hwuy sin yiy soo leo shwo. 136. 
LX ^'P Sifj ^% «£. ~%. Kae seay kwei 6 che wan. 61. 
if K i^ ^ K'anyuwanU. L62. 
S 1f W lii f' 1 } Ke ir.h keang she" chuen. 127. 
W Wi ® A ^ I |V I ' ' -■ jin shoo choo shih. 241. 



292 INDEX II. 

W P IX : & li 15? K'e taou chin fa choo keag. 15, 33. 

}$){ Wft A. I j -z^: iia: K'e tauii juh iin A .n yaon kouc, 138. 

pT li Jl ^fr £, M K'e taou shang te che 16. 30. 

If $1 5^ 3£ K'e taou shlh wan. 32, 120, 203. 221. 

W flf ~$t 3t # "Pj K'e taou shlh wan shxh k6u. 33. • 

iff Wl JP'r 5 Bt K'e taou shin she. 80. 

Iff fif '$£ K'e taou wan. 177. 

Iff WS ~3t lit I 1 ! 1 uf K'e taou wan t.san shin she. 0, 25. 

Iff fS 35C ^ § K'e taou wan tseuen shoo. 208, 283. 

^ ^ K^ ^ ^ ^f'J K 'e choo lin sze wei hing. 203. 

§H fi£ Bf M K'e kea kwei chin. 87. 

^ ff!| p M II J#J ^ WM K'e kea tsung chin chuen ho wei fuh. 215. 

%fc W. pt Wi K'e mung she ko. 208. 

^y ?& ^ &S K'e ching leo shuh. 227, 

M ffl H fp Kea yung leang yo. 97. 

{i; ^ feJ ^ Kea kill wan taou. 215. 

^P 2* ZI /^C Pliil j® Kea yih urh yew kin shih. 17, 173. 

pj$ ISc ^T i^ Keae wang hing luh. 185. 

If ± 'rtf 4 S£ ^ $C "It | f- ± A Keang shang te ch'a urh tsze 

kew she keae shang jin. 33. 
1H _fc. 'd? 'cf I^P A- ^3 lul Keang shang te kaou soo jin che shih. S3. 
|f M "~* f @ SB. 5K ffc IB Keang t'ow yih ko tsoo tsung tso go. 33. 
tiff il ^ f@ *? IM £$■ 5& ^t Keang tsze kea ko haou choo kaou fuh 

cho. 33. 
P^C Hi PE $1 lift Keaou lew pa tsung lun. 28. 
% k # ^ i Keaou hwuy fa yaou. 208. 
Jlk Hf IE Hfc Keaou hwuy shlng ko. 171. 
5$fe # FpJ 3=T Keaou hwuy wan ta. 108. - 
^ ffe Keaou teaou. 03. 
2?£ "~P W ^f Keaou tsze yew fang. 101. 
J? f^ H Keen sin le. 102. 

|^ j|5| 0J "[Ir ^ "g" Keen seuen k'euen she yaou yen. 24. 
Jjg £]'£ JEL Jjg K'een king chin le. 179. 
^ -[11* }£ KeGshewan. 177. 

Itll i$G $* Jr H& K'euen keae ya peen lun. 199. 201. 202. 
Wi H? ^ ^ W K'euen keae ya peen lun. 136. 
Hj "H^ ^ B* K'euen she leang yen. 23. 
Wi "lit "& K'euen she wan. 16, 183. 
Wi "H J4 " K'euen shen leang yen. 202. 
Ij'J/j 6\': i{? -S* ^ W K'euen tsung shing shoo leo yen. 120. 
^" ~£* t& ^ W Keun tsze chung jih wei sh^n. 35. 
i$£ $:. JJJ5 M fi* ?ii P M 5E Kew choo yay soo taego tsiiy urhsze. 137. 
»|iC ^a lii^ Kew hwan lun. 153. 
# IS E^ HJu Kew ling hwan shwo. 138. 
life ^ ^'c ^ K6w ling seen loo, 109. 
?Jjfe "fe ^* e* ^T IX j£ BG Kew she ehay yen hing ehin she ke. 14. 



INDEX II. 293 

$C 1!£ fik W Kew sin' chin yen. 170. 

# i!t i i£ JfiS ffc — A Kew she choo che yay soo yih jin. 35. 
$k \& 3E 3115 $fc & §? ll'I Kew she. choo yay soo che siring heun. 57. 
$C 1^ j£ Xfl$ Hfc ffl iS p3 If Kew she choo yay soo sin a chaou shoo. 

52, 9(3. 
<EX "UE 3E "a* -fT ^ f* Kew she choo yon lung tseuen chuen. 56. 
}$£ lk Ji, W Kew she leang yen, 170. 

;jt 1tt f$ II H 0| 15? Kew she luh tso yaou 155 keae. 22. 
<M IS M vjjfc Kew she siring ko. 171 
$fe fe H I k Kew she yaou lun. 205. 

tfk 1£ JTfS $$C 'S* ^E ^ f$ Kew she yay soo show sze tseuen chuen. G2. 
$k {Iff ipj H Kew shuh ho 6. 02. 
M ill PP ^ s" K'ew 6, chaou siring shoo. 62. 
W 01" $J ^ M P >£$ K'ew sin yo tseuen shoo mull lull. 2G4. 
E3 'Ty pW M B ph K'ew yo she peen kwan hwa. 282. 
la &*J ]£ Bu lUl Fp] K'ew yo she ke teaou wan. 145. 
H >T# jfe f£ f$ ^ K'ew yo she ke wan ta. 146. 
II %l H !'J IS IS K'ew yo shoo chVang she ke. 213. 
m &"J M »T>*j [pj -^ K'6w yo sin yo wan ta. 230. 
If t§ 13 £j£ fl K'ew yo sze tsze king, 162. 
It f»«j a* ft- K'ew yo tseuen shoo. 35, 71, 148. 

itfr >$ 2* W i$3 /^ Tire P K'ew yo tseuen shoo peen sen peaou muh. 234. 
?I£ 7HS ^, lf5 H llf K'ew fiih meen ho yaou lun. 24. 
?fcWWl'\!k'$C K'ew yu k'eucn she wan. 169. 
Khiu gin-a e sim-hoe 6 chheh. 281. 
Kiau' 'ts Idle. 213. 

^T ^ M H PeJ ^ Kih wuh k'eung le wan ta. 168, 
^ Jl H fH Kin uh king e. 162. 
^ Hi i€ m Kin ytili leang yen. 284. 
M lc F pt I ^ Kin yaou wan ta. 62. 
M |§j ^ f\E ®$ }& Kin yen k'e ching leo shuh. 227. 
WL _E. ^ 5a King slicing che taou. 137. 

^/,5f rfr» <?> ■gjj' mAf . 

-m m M %£; ^TT King foo pin yaou leo. 109. 

tbJt 7© |& 5 King go chin yen. 

plX $1 pff yf- Ko sung she chang. 208. 

uk 4l 1=1 f^J K'6 yew pill wan. 114. 

Kong-ka. Di-ili peng. 263. 

Kong ka jih nyi kyiin. 184. 

pf si'l m -^ Koo heun ts5 yaou. 127. 

"fr 4* i^ ill IS ^ Koo kin siring she ke tseih. 17. 

"^T ^ i'st 'jt ^C JE Koo kin show show ta taou. 182. 

"tl 'y 0i Wl lll'll Koo kin Man kwo kang kiieu. 60. 

"6" M. -#f ^- Ko6 king tseih yaou. 24. 

1l i$i\l&}&mm ft t ft Koo she joo te ya kw5 leih tae leo 
chuen. 5. 

"&li^ l ; l' 5C ^ 7J^ 7 K 1 % PI Koo shing fnng shin t'een k'e she 
taou kea heun. 6. 



294 INDEX 11. 

5V ft \& \\i Kong hwuy ching die. 205. 

'A JH II i Rung yungtaou wan. 283. 

In IS 1 #'J #fr WM W H Kwan hwa yo han full yin shoo. 20C. 

H M "M. J^ ^ pit Kwan he chting ta 1l ; u shwo. 59. 

Kyin sing li. 284. 

%* M M M Lag tsew yay soo. 1G8. 

M ~P 1& G£ Lang tsze hwuy ka& 121 

IS f? fe l# Lepaejlhyaouluti. 181. 

f^ A H *S Eeangjinhwangyen. 266. 

fiH 2fi iS 1- Leen i ian ? ch6 ls6 - 70 - 

# ji S Ifc ^fr It Letth fa shing kea6u leo lun. 109. 
1lfc A A B Lijingjihsmg. 182. 
fa Iff >J^ ^k Ling le seaou hae. 2G4. 
fil [ii ?§ £8" Ling ch'tih me loo. 2G4. 

5 ?l "M K ^ f ^ ^ Ling hwan kwei yu shin fc'e lun. 187. 
H *% M Ling lnvan peen. 116, 139. 

ffl $& M ^C ^ Ling hwan peen ta tseucn. 19. 
H i% ft It Ling lnvan tsung lun. 137. 
IS ^fe. f^ l=f Ling sang tseuen yon. 70. 
Lo-tek e cliheli. 1G5. 

6 &1 ^ SS Lo loo puh shaou. 121. ' 
Loo ka dzsen fok iung su. 211. 

rhf T^ rffi Ty ^T -ft* Loo ka zon foh yung zu. 20. 
Kfr /JP f$ WS "El" ft Loo kea cliuen i'Cih yin shoo. 124, 180. 

jffr i/u SI Hf p£ W Lo6 k6a mh >' in cho6 shub - 13L 

Su* ?JP WS "E? f^ p£ PP Loo kea full yin chuen choo sluh. 97. 

Ku hyiao ts. 138. 

Lu, ka, tshon, fuk, yim, su,. 161. 

7^ / p* at tM. Luh ho Es'ung fan. 178. 

tm If <$ >h Wi ^IH $9 ^ Lun fa lang seaou ch'angahanleangch 

fit fll #ft £ Sft Liin full sin die 16. 83. 

£ IS- P fi Bl$ |$ Lun hwuy tsiiy sin yay soo. 29. 

fft £ ^ £ S Lun.jin gae che yaou. 127. 

P ft If /jl &J £ I£ Lun kwan yin heu hwan che yuen. 218. 

m Jm Lun nyu. 192. 



■ 'v 



Jt *r|5" Lun shang t6. 171. 



fun) _*_ ... - - — 

PTO _L ^ M ~fr ;j^( IS Lun shang te ch'a tsze kew sh,'. do. 

fit 'lit fi£j $| ^ — - ^ jpljl Lun she keen to yew yih chin shin. 

iniit |i IS A ^E Lun shen go jin sze. 31. 

'im ijilp M. iiiE ^|j f# >jj» Lun shin fang kin hwa sin sin. 49. 

Ht ^)u w£ Lun shwo hwang. 137. 

6 it ^ Lun fe yo. 171. 

pji^ 5C 5?-* Lun feen fang. 171. 

f& fyj =ff- fr?i ffi Lun wall pae gow seang. 29. 

niiii' vu ^f 3^c Lun yu sin tswan. 31. 

MS kho hok-im toaii. 250. 



INDEX 11. 295 

£§ Hf i$ Wru H #' Ma k'6 chuen fuh yiu slioo. 102. 

$j PJ" ft "ft ffl Ma k'6 chuen leo keac. 224. 

H PT WB H f$ Ma k'6 fuh yiu chuen. 153. 

£| "iC M JfM W pl£ Ma. t'ae chuen full yiu choo. 

M} ~i<. i$ Wi W U Ma. t'ae chuen fuh yin shoo. 101, 124, 22G. 

£j d<. 1$ Wp W Hf Bi $? Ma t'ae chuen fuh yin shoo choo keac. 232. 

$J 7&C WS W f$ pi P£ Ma t'ae fuh yin chuen choo shih. 87. 

$/ ^C f M H* ^» % Ma, t'ae fuh yin chuen choo. 23G. 

$J iC SH W H' ft*] ^ Ma t'ae fuh yin shoo wan ta. 345. 

Ma, thai' tshon, fuk, yim. su, Hak, ka, syuk, wa'. 161,. 

#f p ^M tk Ma tsoo ]>'.') lun. 201. 

M M. SI 4 H £ efo Matsoop'osangjlheheliin. 20. 

#1? Ifr H =)t Meaou ling shwang mei. 185. 

j|} ffljt fo] |? Meaou chuh wan ta. 1G2. 

% f® il 5 Meen ho yaou yen. 139. 

|Jt $X ii ^ HT p£ iB" M ei e me i keaou hwuy le shoo. 177*. 

f§| J[^. it ?JC HT H 3>C Mei e mei keaou hwuy le wan. 177. 

H S& pF 'n* ^ II ic? ^ Mei le ko ho sang kwo che leo, 70. 

H* J% ^£ ^ £1 Mill she san tsze king. 185. 

'Mo-t'a' dzasn fok iun'g su. 211. 

^ W W ft ^ f$ M(i se yen hing tseucn chuen. 58. 

"M H/ 5H /u? Mow ylh t'ung che. 61. 

Ik JL pl'l Mung t'ung heun. 213. 

HI <H £JC ^ Mung yang k'e ming. 219. 

4£ 4* # H -^ H& ff II $( S Neen chung mei jih tsaou wan k'e 

taou sen shih. 5. 
F*J f4 §T Ift Nuy k'o sin shwo. 127. 
^ : M i p1i ^ "H Nying po t'u-wo ts'u 'oh. 194. 
1'fi ^E T'a sze. 139. 
fa 5E PS P'6 sze va. 92. 
ff" "# £ "?£ Pae shin che fa. 228, 261. 
S |p H IJIj Paou 16 ch'uy heun. 205. 
{& #H B ff £1 Paou 16 yen hing lull. 58. 
f$ $1 $| II £y A H Paouloyulomajinshoo. 229. 
W II 5^, JLU 5t 5C [H PTO Paou ling hwan e shing t'een kwo lun. 30. 
^ ?# || g ft* ^ f$ Pe till 16 yen hing tseuen chuen. 59. 
I^E ^ it ^ ^C 5^ Peen yung taou kaou wan shih. 171, 
i/t "^ plfl) Peen heaou lun. 203, 
P Ux W Peen hwuy pang. 202 
^if ^. "P'P Wf%" Peen kwei shin lun, 202, 221. 
ffl fe fro P; ; en sing lun. 202, 221. 
J$ M HSi \% M Peih fung gow scans keae. 261. 
M "« jfi'j ^ 0J3 "ill pi^ Pin chay yo selh ming taou lun. 31. 
f$ A ifi-J j^ Pin jinyo selh. 207. 
^P :^C ?E "ft"' Ping gan t'ung shoo. 138. 
h # il MW P6 kwa che lun. 91. 
f'J] ^ "Sf# li I'" wuh sin peen. 126. 



29G INDEX II. 

M '$J ML II 1Vl v,llh t'«ng shoo. 133. 
s pi jlc iHi J£ £ f ifr P'oo t'oo she shlh die luii. 28. 
H J^ iS ^ ~X P'oo t'oo she shlh wan. 184. 
/fc 1| Pirn jih taou, 102. 
S-doo yung-dzsen. 211. 

S tsong-nyin si-li teng s ing-'a3 si-li coh-veng. 248. 
San kuk sian tsia, 215. 



H ^ fH # f ll San paoujin hwiiy lun. 18. 

H % %k San till lun. 187. 

_E ^ fM San tsze king. 27, 92.. 252, 284. 

Zl ^ tM. Il£ M San tsze king choo keae. 27. 

£if:|| # San tsi5e king choo shlh. 27, 136. 

H ^ M. M fe P± ffl San tsze king sin tsang choo keae. 136. 

H ^ $jc San yaou lull. 205. 

| f j 4 | Sang yu tsae sang kg. 283. 

^| ^ 3$C Sang sze wan. 102. 

^IAf IS ?£ Sang e jhi sze kwang yih fa. 202. ' 

^ t & ¥ I S S Sang g knng ping tseii yih fa. 16. 

& {>$ $Pi FJI $k $Js Sang ming woo heen woo ke'ang. 60. 

Se-lah teng Hsen-nah. 184. 

W H ^F fft Se e loo lun. 127. 

1 |f § Se kwo swan hcu. 236. 

W ± 2fc S ^ tm Se sze lac e leo lun. 139. 

"jjjij ^ tfj ^| 3j| ^| Se yang chung hwa t'ung shoo. 202. 

M 3$§ M ?M 09 Jl M- f# Se yew t'6 kew wan keen leo clmen. 5. 

^ ^ JE 37^ Seaou he 5 ching tsung. 183. 

>]■» fr^ >J> f :?i Seaou sin seaou full. 61. 

'J> "? fy r| Jtf Pl$ ^ ft lift Seaou tsze ts'oo t'iih g shih che shoo 
k'6. _ 28. 

M >1- II Seay gan taou. 102. 

3f[S »I4 f ti Seay sing kg. 153. 

Ati. -^ f|Sf Sen oh knng. 220. 

Jfl *& ^u Sir Seuen taou che kwei. 224. 

m f$ II Si .n ^ fM ij # Sew seang chin le san tsze king choo 
shih, 27, 136. 

W .X 1L &£ Shan shang seuen taou. 62. 

± W W \f6 j$ H W + K flU Shang hae e yuen shuh leo te shih 
sze sih. 258. 

JL W $Jf ^Jc Shang hae sin paou. 260, 262. 

-f ^ tb Jf "f? ^ J ^ Shang hae t'oo yiu tsze seay fa. 214. 

-j~ W H 1| f$ Shang to chin keaou chuen. 56. 

-£ ^U" ill jf| Shang tc chin taou. 170. 

X '_"l^ ilj\ iijC Shang tg ch'wang tsaou. 62. 

jl 'Mj' Pf p|f Shang tg peen ching. 126. 

X W J£ U ^ nrii" Shang te sang jib che Jlun. 32. 

JL '•!>' T ciijil v-i : . W Shoing te shlh keae choo shih. H7. 



index ii. 297 

-fc ^ "Y M II M Shang te sHh feaou shing keae. 217. 

Jl 't? i I & <& # P^ Shang te shing keaou kung hwuy miin. 19. 

Jl & H IE It Shang fce^hing kins pgen. 117. 

± ^ £ it, M M ffl m "W M M ft Shing te tseuen nang hcen 

choo yu full yin tauu le miy. 237. 
Jt ^ It fifr Shang te tsung lun. 217, 221. 
Jl ^ $1 '\fa £ Jt ^ Shang te win wiih die fca choo. 59. 
pf m She peen. 127. 
^ ^ M* 1 & She fei lefi km, 50. 
Ut A $fc ^ She jin kew choo. GO. 

Ui ra" '{fi *y) Tr H: W She suh ts'ing ming pae moo lun. 218. 
Hi m" ffj ™ &; S pTO She suh ts'ing ming tse moo lun. 218. 
H£ # ft 1$ She t'oo lung chuen. 124, 211. 
® ^ ft M Ii $? She t'oo hing chuen choo keae. 225. 
$L $i ft M Ii # She t'oo hing chuen cho6 shih. 280. 
1&tfei%ffliW &% WrMlk H Ii She t'oo paou 16 ke e iuli so 

shing hwuy shoo choo. 163. 

H ^ iS H ' itF # (6 3$ A H Ii She t'oo paou 16 ke he plh la6 

jin shoo choo. 161. 

$! $; fS H p? M ££ -k M fT H Ii She t'oo paou 16 ke kea la 
t'ae shins hwuy shoo choo. 163. 

H % i% ft I? IF # ^ A ^ H She t'oo paou 16 ke ko lb to jin 

how shoo. 246. 

Hi % f$ $1 kF IF # J> A H % flr She t'oo paou 16 ke ko lin to jin 

tseen shoo. 216. 

^ % $ ft # W # ^ ^ # "flt # |£ She t'oo paou 16 ke ko 
lin to shing hwuy tseen shoo choo. 161. * 

18L % f$ $1 If II £! M # § Ii She t'oo paou 16 ke 16 ma shing 
hwuy shoo choo. J 63. 

f^ % fe $1 1 I .1 A f She t'oo paou 15 fa 16 ma jin shoo. 102. 
f t^il^llJIfAf She t'oo paou 16 yu 5 fun so jin 
shoo. 153. 

^ % % B M B JL^AS She t'oo paou 16 yu fei lelhpejin 
slioo. 153. 

^ H {£ ii $£ # f & 2fc A H' She t'oo paou 16 yu he pihlaejin 

shoo. 153. 

TfcffizUfcfflkf&to&JkAWt She t'oo paou 16 yu kea?a t'ae jin 

shoo, 153. 
$1 l£ f$ $1 $£ iF $1 W A 11 She t'oo paou 16 yu ko 16 so jin 

shoo. 153. 
"BH p f£ |l $ II ^ A H She t'oo paou 16 yu 16 ma jin shoo. 153. 
ill! ^ n" ^T M She t'oo yen hing chuen. 87. 

Jj^F ii ^ E a" ff If Pi She chung peoou tesang yen hing leo hin. 49. 
PX WC /K JS; She soo k'ew chin. 217. 
H ^ ^ Ml ^f|| S Shen chay show nan hwo yih. 30. 
f§ f ; f P>c ; It? Shen chung che chuen. 105. 



•23T 



A r v=r n:? w Shen jin k'aou chung ming. 30. 



298 



INDEX II. 



ft 
f 



if 



m 



m 



$X IE W Slrih> keaou ching mew. 183 

M $4 •$£ ^ Sllih t?eaou keae ch0 ° min S- 29. 

fife m& P™ Shih t'eaou keae lun. 35. 

tfc ^«'|f $C Shih yang kwei rauh. 85. 

3U l§ P& Shin le tsung lun. 30. 

pnj Shin lun. 180. 

p* "a* dH Shin she ho seuen. 175. 

T || |ii 5fjp Shin shih keae choo shih. 202. 

T M ^ p£ ft Shin shih keae k'e choo shih, 201. 

jk tk US ik "tft H lj£ M* ^ Shin taou lun shuh kew she tsung 

shwfl chin pun. 4. 

3S /fiii Shin taou peen. 145. 

?fl $, l S pro Shin taou tsung Km. 225. 

3^ ^ ~Y fni fpjl r£ SJj Shin t'een che shih t'eaou keae choo ming. 29. 

7< "T ftl» 3& Uw pi Bt Shin t'een shih t'eaou shing keae choo 

keae. 29. 

y< i& W Shin t'een shing shoo. 5, 19. 

J\, *lt $£ ^ 1# Shin t'een taou tsuy tseih chuen. 5. 

-3a a -fT iIf pi ft Shing ch'ae von hing chuen choo shih. 131. 

± M \B Wi fr. m M % m ft M 2. JJ Shing choo yay soo 

k'c she shing chae pa6u 16 fuh hwo che 16. 127. 

^ \v\ %? Shing heo wan te. 180. 

la ^ i& Shing hwuy che she. 62. 

# ip |il| Shing hwuy chun shing. 121. 

# >*C ^ Shing hwuy ta heo. 1G2. 

# if Shing hwuy taou. 102. 

# if ^ Shing hwuy taou tsze. 02. 

# l< *£ P$ ^ Shing hwuy yaou le wan ta. 164. 

# ^f ^ Fp] ^ Shing hwuy yew heo wan ta. 216. 
~t$> 2% l |J J Shing keaou hwo wan. 171. 

#X A Pj Shing keaou jtth mun. 171. 

%k H ^ Shing keaou keen leo. 244. 

|X %l |>$ Shing keaou keu yu. 238. 

Tfk f''J ^ Shing keaou wan ta. 170, 172, 282. 

it H HI Shing keaou yaou le. 32. 

WX tfj ^ Shing keaou yew heo. 101. 

jgg Shing king. 2. 

$S £ ^ Shing king che she. 63, 162. 

$2 p3£ $i Shing king ching keu. 120. 

M. ^'J U£ Ifif Shing king ch'wang she peen. 23. 

fkx: yJ> §£ illi Shing king 6 sac ya. 23. 

M IS JS 6"S I'J 1S f# Shing king k'ew e chaou ch'wang she 
chuen. 114. 

$& II 5t fg |lj iS E Hi ^ ^ IB Shing king k'ew 6 chaou 
ch'wang she ke chvih yae keih ke. 281. 
M. H JU f8 ft ^lj t£ fi^ Shim 



li ;U'i ^ Shing king luy shoo. 139 



g king k'ew 6 chaou yu le we ke, 282. 



INDEX II. 



299 



m 



JE? 



M ]£. IB It 1< Shin- king she ke too yaou. 
Wx W M Shins king shih e. 46. 



102. 



chuen. 



prF Jffi Shinsr king shin she pcen. 23. 

^ iS $5 llf tit fi!£ Shing king sin 6 chaou fuh yin choo 
115, 

jS 1 3 $J ^ ^3 H f# Shin S kin S sin 6 chaou ma t'ae fuh 
yin chuen. 115. 

fM j$T ill n H ^ fit" Shing king sin e chaou tseucn shoo. 112. 
M. tk iS IH $1 S SM a 1 M Shing king sin 6 chaou yo han fuh 
yin chuen. 115. 
|M Kft $J Sfi j'I'l -r 1$ Shing king sin yo fuh chow ping hwa. 199. 



a? 



S0 



f 



jjl Shing king t'o6 ke. 159. 



$S $t M Shing king tsa keae. 23. 

f£ it flfr Shing king tsa kin, 23. 

$M IP ^ p=£ pinj' Shing king tsih yaou tseang lun. 208. 

M. %k H Shing king tsing e. 283. 

M f4 ^ Shing king wan te. 228, 284. 

Uft Shing ko. 170. 

If Shing she. 102. 

fl§- pi iy<U Shing shoo choo soo. 60. 

f| 3$C »§!> H }§ H Shing shoo ganseihjih tso yaou. 227. 

§ Wk %Jl ^ fM $5 Shing shoo jih k'6 ts'oo hc5 piien yung. 

H 5& ?$i III l^l Shing shoo k'6 keae tso yaou. 227. 

§|j g Shing shoo k'euen yen. 62. 

fir j^'J fill & f§ Shing shoo lee tsoo tseuen chuen. 60. 



■m m 



pM Shiug shoo p'ing keu tsung liin. 47. 



m 



s 
^ 






e" tw ^ Shing shoo sew chin. 47. 

ifr €L 5$ III 15 Shing shoo sxh keae tso yaou. 227. 

^ ^ Jl Shing shoo ta taou. 170. 

tB" Ht ?W fix 1< Shing shoo tsae keae tso yaou. 227. 

1=1 ii5|pi "f* Zl pjll Shing shoo tsee choo shih urh heun 

fr IS $$ Shing shoo tseo keae. 19. 

§ }S }| 11 H- Shing shoo tsew keae tso yaou. 227. 

iff IP 3rjj Shing shoo tsih kin. 127. 

llr fjij ^ Sliing shoo wan ta. 159. 

m J ^ II ■* Sliing shoo woo ch'ang tso yaou. 22G. 

la 2l itt§ iki 1< Shing shoo woo lun tso yaou. 226. 

ei -^ fi% OT ^S Shing shoo yaou shwo seih 6. 120. 

ii!i /f» ^ ^ 'H* pl^ Sliing t'e puh show fan kuh lun. 

'&t jjf £ ffy Show se le che yo. 177. 

^< ^ spl PTO wt Show tsae heo 6 kin shwo. 

W. ff : fro Show lepaejlh lun. 201. 

^ jE. Jg fffr Shuh heo chin le kin. 23. 

^ H Si $- P i^ Shuh heo shing le leo kin. 

fp ^. 5a) f^ Shuh tsiiy che taou chuen. 56 

~T* ~j- 'ji, Shwang ts'een tsze w5n. 205. 



16. 



127. 



17. 



300 INDEX II. 

7jC >X -3 ft 3t Shwuy ho king she wan. 109. 

Biao Veng-teh. 223. 

Sie wang ch'uang fing. 177. 

if 5K mei & Sin e chaou shoo. 81. 

if h?£ Kn Hi" pi W Sin e chaou shoo choo keae. 136. 

if S Jft jR ft # & DF 4» 19 ft /! £ A Sin kea p'o tsae 

chung hwuy kaou soo chung kwo tso san che jin. 80. 
if If #vf ?B # pI It Sin k'ew yo shing shoo ching ken. 120. 
if H $k H H ' M 5C lit JTI Sin k'ew yo shing shoo wei t'een mih 

she. 120. 
m m &§ &l ^ 5^ TJX W Sin k'ew yo shoo wei t'een she lun. 221. 
iff & \h # f# ^ 5§? f U" Sin kin shan shen tae t'ang kih lun. 121. 
if ^P H& fjl jjJC Sin noun k'euen keae wan. 92. 
iff if || f=-' flJ f£ Sin tsang shing shoo tsee choo. 29. 
iff jf |g H fi $3? Sin tsang shing shoo tsee keae. 13G. 
^f II M ?S /il ^C ^ Sin tswan ling hwan peen ta tseuen. 138. 
if $J *$ ¥& Sin yo chuen choo. 235, 272. 

iff $j If $1 ^ #" l?J M Sin yo k'ew yo tseuen shoo tsee lull, 106. 
iff $J it fe Sin yo kwan hwa. 189. 
iff ^ £ IB $J ^ Sin yo she ke wan ta. 145. 
iff fe §§ fe Sin yo shing king. 177. 
iff %h P3 ^ M Sin yo sze tsze king. 1G2. 
iff M ^ Hr Sin yo tseuen shoo. 35, 36, 71, 117, 148, 236. 
iff £>j & flf m£ I? Sin yo tseuen shoo choo keae. 36. 
if W) ^ T§" pi ?H^ Sin yo tseuen shoo choo shlh. 119. 
iff $*! ^ Ifi" $Jfl if» t^ @ Sin yo tseuen shoo peen seu peaou iniih. 235. 
0? i fa 5E !£ M Sin choo lin sze wei 15. 203. 
fis H m£ If Sin king choo shlh 137. 
fs lift Sin ko. 137. 
ff« f;§ £ j§? Sin tih che keae. 126. 
fw fj§ $jj fifr Sin tih t'ung lun, 178. 
Trt fe ^1 jpjfljl Sin ts'aou san kang. 137. 
\f\ 1a£ TO &*f j$C s in tsiing sean'g yo wan. 228. 
Sing ja djun slui. 184. 
Sing-s. 205. 

H III ft M Sing ssen yias ko. 244. 
If ^f Sing she yaou yen. 241. 
Son-fah k'se-tong. 204. 
I& 41 !fc HI Soo he5 k'e mung. 173. 
f-n it f'V H $ Suh ko ho yuen pun. 173. 
In # ^ JE If Snli shlh keaon ching mew. 188. 
£u~ 3? I& P $| tj mJ* Stih t'een loo leili ch'ing kwan hwa. 282. 
r M i ife- ]i'$ Sung choo shing she. 189, 282. 
fijl ^J ^f Tplfi £PX Sang yang chin shin ko. 225. 
£F{ E 3 Pl f m Sung yon ts;m yu. 60. 

^|* 1^ ^" "J^ ''""" , ' hi "- fs ' b '"''• - 1 " 1 - 
■ Li. in' \ a' srak'. 211. 



INDEX II. 301 

'Sung was' koong yoong 1 tau' vung; tah ts' too hau'le'-kwaekuksukvung. 2 11. 

iM t% @ §j$ ff $J Suy chung tsze cli'a hmg wei. 35. 

^^^jf Swan fa tseuen shoo. 200. 

r± %£ $; Tfc M Sze tang tsae pun kwo. 92, 

=g§ IS |f Jg£ Jg Sze shoo 16 yu k'e mung. 1SG. 

J3 $ $£ 3fc Sze tsze king wan, 281. 

Jlfi #i i# H Sz6 seen peen mew. 221, 221. 

5E S W sfc % ffl Sze che tso puh k'elh pe. 3G. 

fc ^ fpj ^ Ta heo wan ta. 1G2. 

b/C ^ Ta-hyoh. 192. 

^C A f M i3fe ^ Tajin ling se wan. 102. 

^/C ^ |l ^ Ta ying kwo che. 169. 

^C ^ [U A ^ !!■ it Ta ying kwo jin sze leo shwo. 281. 

bfc ^ HI f^C ^ Ta ying kwo t'ung ehe. 66. 

Ml 'K Z.'i*' tfo Ta ho che sze lun. 29. 

f^ H p ^JC ift Tae shuh tsuy kew she. 23. 

f£ § J£ Tae soo heo. 174. 

f£ ^fc ft tfr IS Tae we tseih shih kelh. 174. 

& M ¥l is ft & M Tan yay le yen hing tseuen chuen. 58. 

pM. 5c T ' au ^en. 174 - 

H # f Q 'o* ML fr T'ang fan ho hd t'ung shoo. 110, 215. 

If & jit Taou kaou wan. 281. 

fS -^f 35C 5^ Taou kaou wan shih. 183. 

fH ~$£ $?n |j| Taou wan king keae. 270. 

^ iM H It ^ )fr It Taou tlb hing fa yu sin peen. 28. 

}& ffl Ift |§ T '« k ' ew shw6 Ie6 - 14 °- 

J& 3$ 11 1& T'e k'ew t'oo shwo 140. 

$& jjc HI f# ^ T'e k'ew t'oo shwo leo. 235. 

iife ffl ^ III T'e k'ew tseuen t'oo. 189. 

}& JM Aft Ira T'e le leo lun. 208. 

Ji Jjfi fjg g |Q$ f$ T'e 15 peen t'ung leo chuen. 27. 

Ml H ft f£ T'e le sin che 185. 

J& JJi jk J& T'e le tseuen che. 1G8. 

M S fili ^ T'e le wan ta. 261. 

7C i^ Jl ^ $& 0f ^f» Hfb T'een foo sluing 16 woo so puh nang. 238. 

5C $& piiiT Sr T'een ffih lun hang. 1G9. 

3t T jjjlf |j|j T'een hea sin wan. 48. 

5^ A J& [HJ T'een jin e t'ung. 1G9. 

X &>C ;£§ 'jff finf T'een keaou chaou joo lun. 1G9. 

5C Ifc If jg. T'een keaou ching leo. 169. 

5C l£ # j$S fJJ ^ |^ P/j T'een keaou ko t'eaou wan ta keae ming. 62. 

5C §? f© A T'een king hang jin. 217. 

5C 1^ ^] |^ T'een king ming kwu. 4G, 

5C Si ~i" H. $M T'ceu le shih sau t'eaou. 1G9. 

5C li ^ Wt T'een le yaou lun. 31. 

5C f4i PfJ M T'een leuh ming shwo. 202. 

^31$$ $U ty\ Teen loo che ming. 238. 



302 INDEX II. 

5C l§ fn ffi T'een loo die nan. 221. 

5C 1$ M ill T'iien loo leih ch'ing. 175. 

^C $fr M $£ W f?l T'een loo leih ch'ing kwan hwa. 176. 

5C ?ll A. P^ Toon ta6u jtik mun, 170. 

5C i& M 1£ T'een ta6u king yaou. 204. 

S?C IE Hi M T'een taou soo yuen. 204. 

Jl ft 7& ft* pi^ T'een te tsung chc lun. 34. 

5C }& A f ^ T'iien t'ejin lun. 83. 

5C 35C Et ffo T'een wan leo lun. 127. 

ITC it P<5 3§T T'een wan wan ta. 145, 201. 

31 iff Zl %, T'een yew urh kwang. 225. 

5C IM $1 ^ 3 Tbian lo ^ k fcheng- Toe it pun. 1G5. 

T'in lu ts nen. 224. 

mAMih m m ± ft # ± ft -m * % n m ***&*& 

ko yu t'ing shang te tsae shang te tseen pub till wel e. 238. 
Tng hoan jl chho hak. 165. 
Wl M ®R Ifo Too po mmg lun. 202. 
H§ f-9J $J pW &• Iffi Too po ruing lun leo keang. 10. 
|-j- £j "M* 4i T'ow hwan show tselb. 218. 
Tsa mse s. 245. 

^ IS ft? 4$ 5\ fife IE f§ Tsa. she suh niei yue t'ung ke" chuen. 19. 
$t ^ Tsa peen. 32. 
$t 2JC fSl Tsi win peen. 6. 
ill jfl I S 25C Tsa yung taou wan. 102. 
Tsa-, yre-jih kie'. 211. 

M- 4^| 4 J Tsan zung z. 220. 

PjR 3l pIf h!a Tsan choo she ko. 170. 
Pit H If Tsan mei she. 138, 245. 
pM H 7P 1 !* nip Tsan mei sMn she. 22G. 
Pit ^ l& p* Tsan mei shing she. 230. 
pt Pr* 1# Tsan shin she. 214, 220. 
lit %ty ISI ^ Tsiin sllil i y 5 chang. 163. 
Tsaen-me s. 195. 

33, V^ |H w Tsaou yang fan shoo. 215. 
■^ It jSC Tsaim Ta6u wan. 102. 
Tsan tau'-vnng. 211. 
"^ ^ 3t Tseen ts/.,' wan. 185. 

$§ II 1f§ ff< Hi 111: ^C Tsene k'e gow seang k'euen she wan. 169. 
^E AlE £'<> Tseuen jin keu hwo. 57. 
^ life 7% M 111 ^ Tseuen t'e wan kwo ke leo. 18. 
& "nl §T Slfo Tseuen t'e sin lun. 126. 
P # M #£ Tsil. si, en urh tsung. 264. 
3l| %% H 3 P'] # Tsin keaou yaou le wan ta. 101. 
?il ^J^ PI 7^ ^ K& 1^ pra Tsin seaou miin tsow tsih loo keae liin. 14. 
•''11 IE ill f\'> Tsin 16 ching taou chuen. 58. 
r iau' -1" \rung' taeh. 211 . 
ii'J ty\ i'lfi iis <2> Pi'iJ Ts'ing ming sacu moo che lun. 28. 



INDEX II. 303 

fit rH %> W JM H iW Ts'ing ming tse saou fun moo kin. 153. 

Ts'ing tao yiae-su u-sen ke. 184. 

1$ §1 M fcg Tso ts'in kwei keu. 102. 

Ts'ong sliii kyi. 195. 

M ^ $M Ts'oo hed peen. 138. 

/$} ^ fv] %? Ts'oo lick") wan ta. 207, 226. 

^j J^ ffl. -^ U ^ Ts'oo bed yuc yin ts'ee yaon. 217. 

£rJ i 1*If "M- Tsung cbod she chang. 119, 217, 238. 

>f; x pf /i Tsnng choo she peen. 32. 

# ffl §R ^ 1>C 5V HT Tsung yay soo shiug keaou kung kwuy. 171. 
$1 Ira ffl$ §£ i£ ip. Tsung lun yay soo che gan. 104. 

IH pmj Jffi $$ ;£ *ll Tsung lun yay soo che taou. 170. 

&!■ pinj Jfl5 $fc £i 9& Tsung lun yay soo che yung. 104. 

£r? JBl Isl <3f[5 rW Ts'ung chin p'elh seay lun. 23. 

^ M: M HI | H DiC ^- IJu Ts'ung chin shih k'6 kea hwang Ieo shwo. 14. 

# f^ M W§ 1$L 3t Ts'ung pae chin shin chiih wan. 109. 

# # ff ^ |)£ ^C Ts'ung pae yay hwa chuh wan. 109. 
f£ A # gc ;£ $£ Tsuyjin tin shay die fa. 136. 

M M W "St Tsze liwu y P° S a e- GO. 

^ p!5 flf $j? Tsze poo tselh keae. 96. 

M M M tk $L H T'uh yay soo kew hwan ling. 92. 

^C W ^L ISi f G 'n* Tung se she ke ho ho. 30. 

^C IS W M % M Wt I& M Tung se yang k'aou mei yuc t'ung ke 

chuen. 58. 
M 31 ■*?• Jl H 2& Uh 15 tsaou shin taou wan. 102. 
/%. t9 pro Urh yew seang hin. 17. 
pi fP^ ^Tf Yung keen loh. 214. 

Rjfc II 3fc Wan taou wan. 102. 

?d| HI |!| $g Wan kwo kang keen. 137. 

^11 &S Wan kwo kung fa. 206. 

74' HI jfe ft Wan kwo she chuen. 02. 

$| H J| 3® ^ J| Wan kwo t'e le tseuen tselh. 60. 

fpj -fir J^ "g" Wan ta leang yen. 126. 

P3 ^ f& p £ Wan ta siih hwa. 96. 

R3 ^ £§ li $1$ $$ 15: ?£ Wan ta ts'een choo yay soo keaou fa. 4, 30. 

P9 M M £. lk f Pj Jbl 'M Jfw It Wan yay soo che taou ho e wei fun 

yin. 238. 
fife ^ ill I? tfe Wang kin shan yaou keue. 120. 
"a" i -H5 M jH: 'M' ^f 5l£ IS el Woo choo yay soo ke tuh sin 6 chaou 

shoo. 174. 
IS H M Ji ^ ^ il iS K^Ya mei le kea ho chung kwo che lco. 70. 
Si m t& ^ ^ f$ Ta pih la han ke 165. 120. 
55 ^C H Eft 5E ^4; 5f'J Wt ^'atainunlinszewelliinglun. 81. 
S /r AN 5^ Ya pCen luh keae. 79, 130, 146. 
<£! ^T M St -^ 5^5 3t Ya ])'een suh kae tseih keau wan. 80. 
Il )t 3*E S>C ^3C Ya pY-eii suh kae wan. 79. 



304 INDEX II. 

3C )fr W'P p^F Yang sin shin she. 5, 02, 119, 161. 

51 'I? S'i 1 p^ ^f &S Yang s ' n s ^ n s ' ie SU1 peen. 08, 104. 

3£ M >J& 11 Yaoulepeih t'uh. 193. 

H Si #£ I'jC Yaou 15 t'uy yuen. 182. 

H 3g fUJ ^ Yaou le wan ta. 193. , 

IFf '& J") ft 16 Yay kih wan nan ke. 2S. 

M 4 : ]ft M H H $3 ff« ^ ^ #/ Yay ***» chin shlh poo sa gow 

seang sh6 hen wiih. 110. 
Iffi "M ~Y M ^ 1$ Yay hwa shlh t'eaou shing keae. 109. 
Hl$ ft ii 55? I)') Yay soo che paou heun. 57. 
HI5 ft 2 E3 Yay soo die yen. 261. 

JJIJ ft JE M ?$ ^ Yay soo ching keaou wan ta. 145, 140. 
El) ft fn "W Yay soo fuh yin. 171. 

BP ft Wfi Jf Jft M 15 H Yay soo fuh yin chin le yaou che. 228. 
JJTS ft Jlj/f if 3t Yay soo ke taou wan. 109. 
M ft jifc 5& H M ii it 2 'M & YSy soo k'e telh shing ling kan 

hwa che e sze. 109. 
UTS ft P$ 3i itf fT R^ j$C Yay soo keang sang yenhingyun wan. 40, 13 7 
J{J$ ft (5p "fir ;£ fig-. Yay soo keang she che chuen. 57. 
Jftf ft 1^ IS f¥ Yay soo keang she chuen. 34, 170. 
J05 ft W< fi£ ?<h Yay soo keaou hwo wan. 106. 
HI) ft %k }& 1S ?< 3ia Yay soo keaou kew she yaou taou. 139. 
JRS ft ffc If f£ fpj ^ Yay soo keaou kwan hwa wan ta. 225. 
W> ft !& f#J W Yay soo keaou le yen. 137. 
JTT5 ft %k H YRy soo keaou leo. 33, 188. 
Jf|5 ft %k [flfr %n Yay soo keaou leo kin. 131. 

M ft 1£ \k P ^ WS Jit B* Yay soo keaou seaou tsiiy tseih fuh chin 
yen. 103. 

Jffi ft %k >J> 5| Yay soo keaou seaou yin. 202. 

105 ft W*. fp] 3f Yay soo keaou wan ta. 226. 

Jffi ft jffc 1c H* Yay soo keaou yaou che. 138, 221. 

HP ft ffk 3< jfjv Yay soo keaou yaou keue. 138. 

HIS ft ffl ^ M F4) ^? Yay soo keaou yaou le wan ta. 145,' 148. 

HR ft IJC H W fr Yay soo keaou yaou 1S5. 103. 

JJI5 ft ^If Yay soo lae leih chuen. 193. 

M ft i^ : Jt # fi ii 5c T f# $3 "a Yay soo ming k'e t'oo wang 
p'o6 t'ron hea chuen fuh yin. 237. 

^ ft P 1 ] p ^T ff Yay soo mun t'oo kin chin. 140. 

Jfl5 ft P^ $i ff? $S Yay soo mun t'oo sin king. 119. 

W ft P^ ^ RO ^ Yay soo mun t'oo wan ta. 171. 

W15 ft It % p£ |jt Yay soo pe yu choo shwo. 61. 

JH5 ft ll] Jl Ig fl| Yay soo shan shang ch'uy heun. 119. 

M ft te: 5C M ^ % A M 2. 5^ Yay soo she t'een t'e wan with 
jin luy che tsung. 109. 

M M J\4 Wl 2 i$ Yay soo shin tseih che chuen. 57. 

JUS ft M %k in 3£ Yay soo shing keaou che yaou. 283. 

M ft ^> $1 j^ fvg Yay soo shing keaou fa ch'ing. 283. 



INDEX II. 305 

1U5 M M T& ft H M *l Yay soo shing keaou so le kwei shih. 142. 

JOS $$ 5? ffc JHft "cf 35C Y3y soo shing keaou taou kaou wan. 142. 

JfJ5 &fc |g $g Yay soo shing kin.-. JJ7. 

JIB Wf !? |M }§ P 3t Yay so<» shin- king seuen tsih wan. 109. 

30^ B/f- !§ l^.'f |^ $# Yay soo sh6w*k'od tsin yuon. 210. 

IflJ f$ HI P £ nra Y^y soo s'kuh tsuy eke lun. 30. 

Jf|5 $k fK $; ':£ Z B l& fft ya J T s0 ° siu t; ° 6 sh6w k '°' : ' ts " n s lun - 1G0 - 

JUS fe 5£ 111 1JC ^= f§ is l£ P Yay soo ting skan keaou ckung yfi 

luk ehoo shlk. 163. 
3$ ® Wi |ej tfo Yay soo taou yo lun. 163. 

JIB ft tT ~f ^ ^ "ft f& Yay soo tin- sink tsze kea leo lun. 109. 
JIB g$ IT + ^ ^ IS ^E H ft ?£ ImT Yay soo ting slab tsze 

kea show sze san jih fuh hwo lun. 108. 
HB $$ pM Uk YSy soo tsan ko. 170. 
M $$ M it Yay soo tsung Km. 281. 

30$ ,ffc ® $r $C i PM Yay soo t'uk wei kew choo lira. 71. 
JflS M piJ ^ Yay soo wan ta. 170. 
JTSS $$ || Jj£ Y?.y soo yaou eke,. 170. 

3115 M "if fT ^fi H f# f§ Yay soo yen king tso yaou. siik hwa. 226. 
J05 $$ 5* ff IE pifr Yay soo yon king tsung lull. 46. 
ij] Jfl ff p ^] Yew heo she shin k'eu. 185. 
#J l| P9 ^ fS Yew kef. sze" tsze king. 145. 
if] #i f|| 15? fe ^ Y,'w heo ts'een keae wan ta. 14. 
W [!§" til 7^ ?&~ Yew too po luk keae. 146. 
4\ p Yew tsuy. 139. 

fi — f/h ^i; J^ g f£ ft{| Yew yik keen sze she" yaou kin teih. 164. 
ifEl "JX. ^L ^V V.f Yew t'ae elie kung skoo. 153. 
Wi i M l <k Yew t'ae kwo she. 60. 
M iC ii!i II Yew fafi t'e t'oo, 1G6. 
Yin-meo hyuing-ts. 199. 

HI 3% fl $fc jSC Ying hae ling se wan. 102. 
W: §1 H lie Ying urh skoo k'6. 28. 
tt Pf Pf'i 19 if UJ fl fl ^ # Ying keih 16 kwo sin ckuk ehuag 

toW k'e shoo. 186. 
~$k ~-^ ?S. ffr' Ying hwa t'ung shoo. 119. 
•jfe i'n JH f? Ying hwa ching yin. "257. 
~}fe ^ $?- Hi Ying tsze yuen lew. 257. 
illlll Yo han chin king shih keae. 126: 
M ft f# Win tf # Yo han ckuen fuh yin skoo. 34, 07, 101, 226. 
i-) ft J$E 3* '$ Y5 han mlk she luk. 110. 
fr-J ft B* fT If Yo han yen king luh. 59. 
fe S. !$» e" fT ti Yo slh fuh yen hing ldh. 59. 
tk M fe ^ Yo sih ke 166. 119. 

ft'J 4^ W -fT ^ i& Yo sih yon hing tseuen chuen. 147. 
fS ^ 2Jt 5^ Yu choo wan shih. 2, :. 
"(^ iii \% Yu taou ckuen. 205. 
^r JJ$ jji'j 1 It Yung k'eun; hin he. 170. 178. 



30G INDEX II. 

7)< M 2. id Yung Wh die taou. 70. 

Jl \f$ i ^1 A P^ Zong hse t'o'o liak zseh mung. 210. 



CHINESE PUBLICATIONS, 

ihe Chinese titles of which could not he ascertained. 

A Collection of Scriptures on the Being and Perfections of the great Creator, 

in opposition to Idols. 12. 
A Farewell address. 18. 
A sheet tract on the Vanity of Idols. 25. 
Astronomical Catechism. 4G. 
Catechism. 199. 
Chinese School Book. SO. 
Commentary on Philippians. 46. 

Epistles of Peter and John in the Fuh-chow dialect. 277. 
Genesis in the Fuh-chow dialect. 117 
History of Joseph. 198. 
Hymn and Tune Book. 177. 
Hymn Book. 203, 240. 
Important Selections. 31. 
John's Gospel. 201. 

John's Gospel in the Fuh-chow dialect. 177. 
Letter addressed to the Chinese residents at Malacca, on the subject of the 

Cholera. 119. 
On the End of Time. 48. 
Paul's Speech on Mars Hill. 12. 
Sayings of Jesus. 28. 
Sheet tracts. 46, 48. 

Short abstract relative to the Scriptures. 4. 
Spelling Book in the Ningpo colloquial dialect. 183. 
Ten Sermons. 1G9. 
The Beatitudes. 12. 
Threshing the Floor. 229. 
Tract on Heaven. 53. 
Tract on Regeneration. 46. 
Tract on the being of a God. 31. 
Tract on Vaccination. 227. 



ENGLISH. 

Abrief sketch of the doctrine and discipline of the General Baptist churches. 282. 
A Charge delivered to the Anglican Clergy in Trinity Church at Shanghae. 113. 
A Chinese and English Vocabulary in the Tie-chiu Dialect. 115. 
A Chinese Cbrestomathy in the Canton Dialect. 71. 
A Chinese Commercial Guide. 11, 78. 

A Collection of Phrases in the Shanghai Dialect systematically arranged. 257 
A Dictionary of the Chinese language. 7. 

A Dictionary of the Hok-kcen Dialect of the Chinese language. 3'7. 
A Dissertation on the Theology of the Chinese. 38. 

\ Few Notices on the Extenl of Chinese Education, and the Government Schools 
of Hongkong. 186. 



index h. 307 

A few thoughts in reply to a short essay on the question: "What term can he 
Christianized for God in China." 215. 

A few Thoughts on the Question What Term can be Christianized for God in 
Chinese] 222. 

A Grammar of Colloquial Chinese, as exhibited in the Shanghai Dialect. 190. 

A Grammar of the Chinese Colloquial Language, commonly called the Man- 
darin Dialect. 190. 

A Grammar of the Chinese Language. 7. 

A Grammar of the English Language for the use of the Anglo-Chinese college. 8. 

A Japanese and English Dictionary. 282. 

A Lexilogus of the English, Malay, and Chinese Languages. 121. 

A List of Syllables for romanizing works according to the reading and collo- 
quial sounds of the Shanghae dialect. 193. 

A Map of the City and Suburbs of Fuh-chau. 230. 

A Medical Vocabulary in English and Chinese. 128. 

A Memoir of the principal occurrences during an Embassy from the British 
Government to the Court of China in the year 1816. 7. 

A Missionary Journal kept at Singapore and Siam. 51. 

A Narrative of an Exploratory Visit to each of the Consular Cities of China. 
143. 

A Retrospect of the first ten years of the Protestant Mission to China. 29. 

A selection of Three thousand Characters being the most important in the 
Chinese language. 53. 

A Sermon preached in Trinity Church, Shanghai, Sunday, 18th of May, 1802. 
102. 

A Sermon preached on board the American ship Morrison. 9. 

A sketch of Chinese' History, ancient and modern. 65. 

A Tonic Dictionary of the Chinese Language in the Canton Dialect. 78. 

A Tract relating to the Anglo-Chinese College at Malacca. 49. 

A View of China for philological purposes. 7. 

A Vindication of Comments, on the translation of Ephesians, I. in the Dele- 
gates Version of the New Testament. 1 02. 

A Vocabulary of Two Thousand frequent Characters with their most common 
significations, and the sounds of the Peking Dialect. 206. 

Account of the Island of Bali, 37. 

An abridgment of Sacred History. 47. 

An Argument for _L" ^ (Shang-te') as the proper rendering of the words 
Elohim and Theos, in the Chinese Language. 121. 

An English and Chinese Vocabulary in the Court Dialect. 78. 

An English and Cantonese Pocket Dictionary. 218. 

An English and Japanese and Japanese and English Vocabulary, 37. 

An Essay oh the proper rendering of the word, Elohim and GEOi into the 
Chinese Language. 102. 

An Humble Plea, addressed to the Legislature of California, in behalf of the 
Immigrants from the Empire of China to this State. 157. 

An Inquiry into the proper mode of rendering the word God in translating 
the Sacred Scriptures into the Chinese Language. 38. 

An Inquiry into the proper mode of translating lluach and Pneiuna, in the 
Chinese version of the Scriptures. 39. 

Ancient China, 281. 



308 index «• 

Anglo-Chiuese Dictionary. 282. 
Anglo-Chinese Kalendar. 78. 

Anglo-Chinese Manual with Romanized Colloquial in the Amoy Dialect. 98. 
Annual Reports for Nine years of the Missionary Hospital at Canton. 128. 
Driet Sketches of some of the Scenes and Characteristics of China. 93. 
Caesar or Christ. 284. 

Ca talogue of the Chinese Library of the Royal Asiatic Society. 40. 
Catalogue of the London Mission Library. 175. 
China and her Spiritual Claims. 89. 
China and its People. 248. 

China : dialogues between a father and his two children. 8. 
China : its State and Prospects. 37. 
China Opened. 65. 

China, or Illustrations of the Symbols, Philosophy, Antiquities, Customs, 
Superstitions, Laws, Government, Education and Literature of the 
Chinese. 49. 
Chinese and English Dictionary. 38. 
Chinese Conversations. 190. 
Chinese Dialogues. 38. 

Chinese Emigration to the West Indies. 180. 
Chinese-English Grammar. 187. 
Chinese Miscellany. 8. 
Chinese Topography. 78. 
Christian Baptism explained. 282. 
Christian Joy. A Sermon Preached in the London Mission Chapel, Shanghai, 

25th November, 1858. 222. 
Christian Missions. 172. 

Claims of the Missionary Enterprise on the Medical Profession, 133. 
Companion to the Anglo-Chinese Kalendar. 11. 

Critical notices of Dr. Morrison's literary labours. 49. 

Darkness in the Elowery Land. 148, 

Daughters of China. 72. 

Dialogues and Detached sentences in the Chinese Language. 7. 

Dialogues in the Canton Vernacular. 128. 

Dictionary of the Favoilang Dialect of the Formosan Language. 37. 

Directory of Protestant Missionaries in China. January 1st, 18(15. 250. 

Directory of Protestant Missionaries in China, June 15th, 1866. 250. 

Discourses to a Christian Congragation in a Heathen Laud. 197. 

Dissertation on the Characters and Sounds of the Chinese language. 2. 

Easy Lessons in Chinese. 78. 

Eight Reports of the Medical Missionary Society's Hospital at Canton. 228. 

Elements of Chinese Grammar. 2. 

Eleven Annua! Reports of the Chinese Hospital at Shanghae from 184G to 
1857 inclusive. 113. 

English and Chinese Dictionary. 38'. 

Esop's Fables. 53, 10G. . 

on the bearing of the Publications of the Tai-ping dynasty Insurgents. 
148. 

Familiar Lectures on the Philippians. 8. 

Familiar Phrases in English and Romanized Japanese. 211, 

Fifteen Reports of Opthalmic Hospital at Canton. 8 1. 



INDEX II. 309 

First Lessons in the Tie-che^ dialect. 87. 

Five Annual Reports of the Chinese Hospital. 2-30. 

Five Years in China. 193. 

Four Annual Reports of the Medical [Missionary Hospital at Amoy, 254. 

Grammar of the Chinese Language. 187. 

Hints for the Times. 143. 

Homeward Bound. 257. 

Horae Sinicse. 7. 

How to die Happy. 149. 

Important Considerations, relative to English translations. 282. 

Journal kept during a voyage from Singapore to Siam. 51. 

Journal of a Residence in China and the neighbouring countries. 75. 

Journal of a Tour through the settlements on the Eastern side of the penin- 
sula of Malacca. 30. 

Journal of an Expedition from Singapore to Japan, with a visit to Loo-choo. 83. 

Journal of Three Voyages along the coast of China. G5. 

Koo-san, or Drum Hill. 39. 

Learn to say no, 149. 

Lecture on the nature and structure of the Chinese Language. 49. 

Lectures on the Sayings of Jesus. 9. 

Lectures ou Theology, Science, & Revelation. 121. 

Letter to the Friends of Protestant Missions to the Chinese. 117. 

Letters on China. 71. 

Letters on the rendering of the name God in the Chinese Language. 121. 

Lew-chew and the Lew-chewans. 143. 

Life among the Chinese. 178. 

Life in China. 125. » 

List of Chinese Characters formed by the combination of the Divisible Type 
of the Berlin Font. 249. 

Map of the City and entire Suburbs of Canton. 210. 

Medicine in China. 228. 

Memoir of Kang-hi, emperor of China. 66. 

Memoir of the Rev. Samuel Dyer. 89. 

Memoirs of Rev. William Milne. 8. 

Memorial addressed to the British and Foreign Bible Society on a New Ver- 
sion of the Chinese Scriptures. 37. 

Memorial of the Roman Catholic Bishop Mouly to the Emperor of China. 10. 

Missionary Journals and Letters, 51. 

Notes on Chinese Literature. 282. 

Notices concerning China and the Port of Canton. 9. 

Notices of Chinese Buddhism. 190. 

Notices on Chinese Grammar. C6. 

On the True Meaning of the Word Shin. 39. 

Pamphlets issued by the Chinese Insurgents at Nanking. 39. 

Parting Memorial. 8. 

Phonetic Alphabet, for the Canton Dialect of the Chinese Lan^ua^e. 216. 

Phrases in the Canton Colloquial Dialect. 151. 

Pictures of the Chinese, drawn by themselves. 183. 

Portfolio Chinensis. 92. 

Progressive Lessons in the Chinese Spoken Language. 190. 



310 INDEX II. 

Remarkable Cave, situated in the Western Tung-ting san. 40. 

rks of the Chinese Merchants of San Francisco, upon Governor Bigler's 
Message and some common Objections. 157. 

Remarks on a New Version of the Sacred Scriptures iu Chinese. 49. 

Remarks on the best Term for God in Chinese. 117. 

Remarks on the Opium Trade. 39. 

Remarks on the Siamese Language. 65. 

Reply to the Bishop of Victoria's Ten Reasons in favour of Teen-shin. 39. 

Reply to the Essay of Dr. Boone on the proper rendering of the words Q^T") /*N\ 
and QEOS into the Chinese Language. 88. 

Reply to the Few Plain Questions of a Brother Missionary. 39. ' 

Reply to the Strictures on the Remarks made on the Translation of Genesis 
and Exodus in the Revision of the Chinese Scriptures. 148. 

Report for the Years of 18G3 & 1804 of the Chinese Vernacular Schools, estab- 
lished in the Sinon, Kiushen, Fayuen, and Chonglok Districts of the Quang- 
tung Provinces. 234. 

Report of the Anglo-Chinese College, for the year 1834. 76. 

Report of the Missionary Hospital at Kum-lee fow, in the Western suburbs of 
Canton. 245, 204. 

Report of Proceedings on a Voyage to the Northern Ports of China. 65. 

Reports of the Preparatory School and the Theological Seminary in Hongkong, 
of the London Society. 12 1 . 

Road Map from Peking to Kiachta by the Great Camel Route. 190. 

Sacred Songs for Home and School. 2G4. 

Scenes in Chusan. 149. 

Scenes in the Indiana country. 149. 

Select Phrases and Reading Lessons in the Canton Dialect. 286. 

Sermons preached in China. 131. 

Shanghai Hygiene. 258. 

"Shin v. Shang-Te:" antagonistic versions of the Chinese Scriptures. 51. 

Sin discovered. 172. 

Sketch of a Missionary Journey to Tien-muh san, in Che-keang province. 39. 

Social Life of the Chinese. 203. 

Some Account of Charms, Talismans, and Felicitous Appendages worn about 
tlic person, or hung up in houses, &c, used by the Chinese. 11. 

Some Thoughts on the proper Term, to be employed to translate Elohim and 
Theos, into Chinese. 98. 

Specimen of Chinese Type, made by the London Missionary Society. 135. 

Specimen of the Chinese Type Belonging to the Chinese Mission of the Board 
of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A. 132. 

Specimen of three-line Diamond Chinese Type made by the London Mission- 
ary Society. 135. 

Statements respecting hospitals in China. 83. 

Statistics of Protestant Missions in China for 1864. 249. 

Ten Weeks in Japan. 1 l'l. 

The Analytical Header. 206. 

The Annual Report of the Chinese Dispensary, at Chin-kiang. 275. 

The Beginner's First Book in the Chinese Language. 143. 

The Beginner's First Book, or Vocabulary of the Canton Dialect. 186. 

The Blessedness of those who die in the Lord. 106. 
"t he China Mission. 87. 



INDEX II. 311 

The Chinese Classical works, commonly called the Four Books. 47. 

The Chinese Classics. 122. 

The Chinese Language spoken at Fuh-Chau. 1G6. 

The Chinese Miscellany. 88. 

The Chinese Rebellion. 238. 

The Chinese Repository. 71. 

The Evangelist. 9. 

The Happy Stroll. 187. 

The Indo-Chinese Gleaner. 20 

The Journal of Two Voyages along the coast of China. 65. 

The Land of Sinim, or an exposition of Isaiah 49, 12. 132. 

The Land of Sinim, or China and Chinese Missions. 141. 

The Life of Taou-kwang, late emperor of China. 06. 

The London Missionary Society and its Supporters. 257, 

The Medical Missionary in China, 113. 

The Middle Kingdom. 78. 

The Mission Cemetery and the fallen Missionaries at Fuh-Chau, China. 209. 

The Missionary Recorder. 277. 

The National Religion of China. 143. 

The Notions of the Chinese concerning God and Spirits. 121. 

The Notitia Lingua; Sinicse of Premare. 134. 

The Numerical Relations of the Population of China, during the 4,000 years 
of its Historical Existence. 186. 

The Ordinance of the Sabbath. 121. 

The Origin of the Chinese. 283. 

The Parting Charge. 172. 

The Periodical Miscellany and Juvenile Instructor. 76. 

The Pioneer of American Missions in China. 72. 

The Religious Condition of the Chinese. 190. 

The Sacred Edict. 20. 

The Seaman's Compass and Chart. 151. 

The Third and Fourth Annual Reports of the Peking Hospital. 269, 

The Thirteenth Anuual Report of the Chinese Hospital at Shanghae. 248. 

The Thousand Character Classic. 281. 

The Thousand Character Classic, romanized according to the reading sound 
for the vicinity of Shanghai. 193. 

The Three Character Classic, romanized according to the reading sound for 
the vicinity of Shanghai. 192. 

The Tourist's Guide and Merchant's Manual Being an English Chinese Voca- 
bulary of Articles of Commerce and of domestic use. 187. 

The Visions of Hung-siu-tshuen, and Origin of the Kwang-si Insurrection. 160. 

The works of Confcuius. 2. 

To the Bachelors of India by a Bachelor. 75, 

Translation of a Comparative Vocabulary of the Chinese Corean, and Japa- 
nese languages 37, 

Translation of a singular proclamation issued by the Foo-yuen of Canton. 8. 

Translation of the Ts'ing wan k'e lining. 174. 

Translations from the original Chinese. 7. 

Translations from the Peking Gazettes, during the years 1853 — 1856. 39. 

Trip to Ningpo and T'heen t'hae. 89. 

Twenty four Lessons in English and Chinese. 88. 



312 INDEX II. 

Two Annua] Reports of the Hankow Medical Mission Hospital. 
Two Lists of Selected Characters. 249. 
Vocabulary of the Canton Dialect. 8. 
Vocabulary of the Ilok-kien Dialect. 53. 



GERMAN. 
Carl Gutzlaff, Mis sionar, Predigt uber Apostelgeschiohte iv. 12 gehaltenjam 

22 Dec. 1822 in Berlin. 64. 
Dr. 0. Gutzlaff, Abschiedsworte gesprochen bei der Jahresfeier der Preuss. 

Haupt-Bibel-Gesellschaft am 9 Oct. 1850. 64. 
Dr. C. Gutzlaff, Die Mission in China. 64. 

Dr. C. Gutzlaff, Ueber die Handelsverhaltnisse im ostlichen Asien. 65. 
Dr. K. Gutzlaff, Bericbt seiner Eeise von China nach England unci durch die 

verschiedenen Landen Europa, im Interesse der Chines Mission. 65. 
Gaihan's (Karl Gutzlaff's) Chinesische Berichte von der Mitte des Jahres 

1841 bis zum Schluss des Jahres 1846. 64. 
Gutzlaff's Geschichte des chinesischen Reiches von den altesten Zeiten, bis auf 

Frieden von Nanking. 64. 
Thien-ti-hoih — Geschichte der Bruderschaft des Himmels unci der Erden den 

comnxunistischen Propaganda China's. 281. 



DUTCH. 
Aan mijne mede-Christenen in Nederland: afscheidswoord van Dr. K. Gutzlaff. 

64. 
Geschiedenis der uitbreiding van Christus Koningrijk. 64. 
Mijne reis van China naar Engeland, &c. 65. 

i langs de kusten van China en bezock op Corea en de Loo-choo Eilan- 
den in de jaren 1832 en 1833. 64. 
Smeekschrift ten behoeve der Heidenen en Mahoinedanen gerigt aan alle 
Christenen van Nederland. 64. 

ag van een driejarig verblijf in Siam en van eene reize langs de kust van 
China naar Mantchou-Tartariie. 64. 



MONGOLIAN. 



Christian Catechism. 283. 



MALAY. 
Msiii of Nature. 36. 
Discussion with Mohammedans. 36. 
Introduction to the Scriptures. 36. 
Lloyd's Scripture Catechism. 40. 
Malay Primer. 36. 
Pen uat Lve to Public Worship. 36. 
' Ihristian Doctrine. 36, 
■■ Sin. 38. 
Ti "' '' rv Te tamenl of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. 106. 



INDEX II. 113 

JAPANESE. 



John's Gospel. G3. 

The Three Epistles of John. 63. 



SIAMESE. 

The Gospels of Luke and John. 03. 



INDEX III. 



CLASSIFIED ARRANGEMENT OF CHINESE 
PUBLICATIONS. 



Translations of the Sacred Scriptures. 



Ta^e. 



Acts of the Apostles, --..----87 

Genesis, - - - - - - - - 114 

Genesis and Exodus, -.__.-- 281 

John's Gospel in Chinese and Malay, ----- 67 

Jude's General Epistle, .___--- 153 

Leviticus, ------- -282 

Mark's Gospel, - - - - - - - -153 

New Testament, 31,35,62,71,115,148 

New Testament in Manchu and Chinese, - - - - - 174 

Old Testament, 35, 62, 71, 118 

Paul's Epistle to the Colossians, - - - - - - 153 

Paul's Epistle to the Ephesians, - 153 

Paul's Epistle to the Galatians, - -0 _ . - 153 

Paul's Epistle to the Hebrews, ----- 153 

Paul's Epistle to the Philippians, - - - - - - 153 

Paul's Epistle to the Romans, - - - - - - 153 

The Gospel of St. Luke and the Acts of the Apostles, - - - 124 

The Holy Bible, 5^9 

The Holy Scriptures, ....... 2 



Commentaries, §c. on the Sacred Scriptures. 
Commentary on Ephesians, - - - - . - -10 

Commentary on John's Gospel, - - - - . . 126 

Commentary on Luke, - - . . _ _ -131 

Commentary on Matthew, - . . . _ _ j]$ 

Commentary on Matthew's Gospel, .... 34 

Commentary on Philippians, ---.__ 46 

Commentary on the Acts of the Apostles, ... - 131,225 

Commentary on the Epistle to the Ephesians, - 136 

Commentary on the New Testament, - - - - - 36 

Exodus with Notes, ---.._. £7 

Genealogy fromjfche Creation, ------ 32 

Genesis with Notes, - - - • _ - 87 114 

Harmony of the Gospel, ------- 81 

Luke's Gospel with Notes, ------ 117 

Matthew's Gospel with Notes - s7 

fe ■ Te tamenl of the Saviour Jesus. - - - 96 



INDEX III. 31 J 

New Testament with Marginal References, ----- 272 

Notes on Mark, - 22 1 

Notes on the Acts of the Apostles, ------ 230 

Notes on the Epistle to the Romans, - - - - - 241 

Paul's Epistle to the Ephesians with Notes, ----- 163 

Paul's Epistle to the Galatians with Notes, - 163 

Paul's Epistle to the Hebrews with Notes, ----- 163 

Paul's Epistle to the Romans with Notes, - 163 

Paul's First Epistle to the Corinthians with Notes, - 104 

Reference Testament, ------- 246 

Townsend's Arrangement of the New Testament, - - - - 2:;"> 

Townsend's Arrangement of the Old Testament, ... •j.'M: 



Theology. 
A Collection of Scriptures on the Being and Perfections of the great 

Creator, in opposition to Idols, - - - - - 12 

A farewell address, - - - - - - - 13 

A sheet tract on the Vanity of Idols, ----- 2-5 

A true and summary statement of the divine doctrine concerning the 

redemption of the world, ---..- 4 

Abandoning Depravity and turning to Righteousness, - - - 01 

Abstract of the Chief Points of Christianity, _ . - „ ] 63 

Address on the Feast of the Hungry Spirits, - - - - 184 

Address to the Chinese settlers at Sydney, - - • - 121 

Advent of Christ, ----____ 127 

Advice to Emigrants, - - - - - - - 12t> 

An important Matter, - - - - - - - 161 

Analogy of Natural and Revealed Religion, - 169 

Articles of Faith and Church Covenant, - 228 

Atonement for Si :i, ----.._ 139 

Balance of the True Doctrine, _.-_.. j^g 

Balance of the True Religion, - - - - - - 17 1 

Bible Stories, - - - _ _ - _ -106 

Birth-day of Ma-tsoo-poo, ------ 29 

Bridge to the World of Bliss, - - - - - - 185 

Brief Discourse on Repentance and Faith, - 136 

Brief exposition of the Ten Commandments, - 35 

Celestial Mirror, ----..._ 45- 

Christian Customs, ----... 137 

Christianity superior to Confucianism, - 1 ( ;<) 
Christ's Commission to his Disciples to go into all the World and preach 

the Gospel, -------- 007 

Christ's Sermon on the Mount, with Notes, - 163 

Clear Indication of the Heavenly Way, - 2:18 

Come to Jesus, - - - - - - . - 108 

Commentary on the Decalogue, - 92 

Commentary on the Ten Commendments, .... 202 

Commentary on the Trimetrical Classic, - 186 

Compendium of Theology, ------- 225 

Condensed Statement of Christianity, - - 83, 188 
Consolations of Religion, -------57 



31G 



INDEX III. 



Contrast between the true and the false, - 

I Views of Minor Questions, .---'- 
Correction of -Buddhisl Errors, ----- 

< lourse of Sermons, ------- 

Covetousness -excluded from Heaven, - - - - 

Death of the Good and Bad, ------ 

mncement of Idolatry, ----•,-- 

Depravity of Human nature, - 

1 )i;il<>^ue between a Native and a Foreigner, . - - 

Dialogue between two friends Chang and Yuen, - 

rue on Geomancy, ------- 

Dialogues between Cliang and Yuen, - 

Dialogues with a Temple keeper, - 

Discourse on avoiding future Punishment by consistent Faith, 

Discourse on Ancestral worship, - 

Discourse on Christianity, ------ 

Discourse on Divination, - - 

Discourse on Filial Devotion towards the Heavenly Father, 

Discourse on Gambling, - - 

Discourse on God, - - - - - - 92, I 

Discourse on saving the soul and ascending to Heaven, 
Discourse on the Birth-day of Heuen-t'een Shang-te, 
Discourse on the Crucifixion of Jesus, and his Resurrection 
Three days, ---..__ 

Discourse on the Divine Perfections, - 
Discourse on the Feast of the Tombs, - 

Discourse on the Lord's Day, - 
Discourse on the Salvation of the Soul, - 
Discourse on Theology, ------ 

Discourse on Worshipping at the Tombs, - 

Discourse upon the Truth, - 

Discussion of False Doctrines, - 

Disquisition on Filial Piety, - 

Disquisition on Heathen Gods, - 

Disquisition on Human Nature, ----- 

Disquisition on Slander, ------ 

Disquisition on Spiritual Life, - - - - - 

Doctrine of the Worship of Jehovah, - 

Duty of Men in times of public calamity, ... 

Duty to Superiors, ------- 

Easy Introduction to Christian Doctrine, ... 

cious Prescription for giving Peace of Mind, 

ntary Gospel Instruction, - - - - - 

Endless Life, -------- 

Errors of Ancestral Worship, - 

on the Evidences of Christianity, .._..-. 

tial Truths of Religion, - 
Eulogy and Praise, ---.___ 

of Christianity, - 

Evidences of the Christian Religion, - 

Exhortation to abandon [dols, - 



59 

- 183 
188 

32 
127 

- 31 
20 1 

- 153 
202 

- 124 
162 

1G, 92 
102 

- 3f> 
218 

- 131 

91 

- 187 
202 

53, 179, 221 
3(3 



after 



- 109 



- 


34 


- 


202 


- 


153 


136, 


, 153 


- 


30 


- 


153 


- 


58 


- 


203 


- 


203 


202, 


221 


- 202, 


221 


- 


202 


- 


70 


- 


109 


- 


17 


- 


137 


- 138, 


221 


- 


137 


- 


232 


- 


GO 


- 221, 


224 


- 


47 


- 


238 


- 


GO 


- 


204 


- 


169 


- 


199 



INDEX III. 



317 



Exhortation to discriminate between the True and Fa.se, 

Exhortation with regard to Praying for Rain, 

Exhortations for the Age, - - - - 

Explanation of Faith, .--.-- 

Explanation of the Scriptures, - 

Exposition of the Decalogue, - - - - 

Exposition of the Lord's Prayer, - 

Exposition of the Moral Law, . - 

Exposure of Idolatry, .-.-.-■ 

Extract from the Gospel, - 

Faithful Letters, .... 

Fear of the Wicked on the Approach of Death, and Joy of the Belh 

on the Approach of Death, 
Feast of the Tombs, 
First Steps in the True Doctrine, 
Forgiveness and Happiness, 
Four character Classic, . , 

Fraternal Dialogues, 
Fundamental Principles of Christianity, 
Fundamental Truths of Christianity, , . 
General Account of the Christian Martyrs, 
General Discourse on Faith, 
General Discourse on False Doctrines, 
General Discourse on God, 

General Discourse on the Commandments of the Law 
General Discourse on the Crucifixion, . 
General Discourse on the Glory of Christ, . 
General View of Christianity, 
"God created," .... 

God must be obeyed rather than Men, . 
God the Lord of all, .... 
God's Omnipotence revealed in the Gospel, 
Good Words about salvation, 
Good Words exhorting the Age, 
Gospel Guide, ..... 
Gospel Precepts, .... 
Gospel Words, .... 

Great Doctrine of the Bible, 
Guide to a Wanderer, 
Guide to Heaven, 

Help to the Scriptures, .... 

Illustrated Scripture Narratives, 
Important Consequences, .... 
Important Counsel to avoid returning to Idolatry, 
Important Discourse on Salvation, 
Important Discourse on the Sabbath Day, 
Important Extracts from Ancient Authors, 
Important Facts concerning the Life to come, 
Important Facts regarding Jesus, 
Important Gospel Sayings, 
Important Points of Warning to Rich and Poor. 



8G 
169 

183 
126 

60 
202 

15 

29 
218 
J 89 

56 



318 



INDEX 111. 



Important Principles of Religion, , 

Important Principles traced to their Source 

!; ipoi tani Selections, 

Important -Selections of Truth, 

Important Selections from the Gospel, 

Important Words to arouse the World, . 

Incentives to reverence the Scriptures, 

Injunctions against Depraved Conduct, . 

Instructive Details, 

Introduction to Christianity, 

Introduction to the Sacred Scriptures, 

Jehovah is True, but the Idols are Vanity, 

Jesus died for our Sins. 

Jesus teaching the meaning of Renovation by 

Jesus the Head of Heaven, Earth and all Creatu 

Jesus the Only Saviour, . . , 

Kindness and Universal Love, . 

Laws of Trade, .... 

Letter addressed to the Chinese residents at 

the Cholera, .... 
Life of Christ, : 

Lite of Christ in verse, 
Life of Jesus in verse, . 
Little Faith little Happiness, 
Manual for native Evangelists, . 
Manual for Prayer, .... 
Medhurst's Trimetrical Classic, 

Men called to receive salvation, . 

Men tried by the Celestial Mirror, 

Method of Instructing Children, . 

Miracles of Jesus, 

Miscellaneous Essays, 

Miscellaneous Exhortations, 

Miscellaneous Pieces, 

Narrative id'a Watchmaker, 

Narrative of the death of Jesus the Saviour, 

Nativity of Christ, 

New year Exhortations, . 

Obedience to Parents, . 

Omnipotence of God, 

On Feeding the Ghosts, . 

(injustice between man and man, 

On Lyings .... 

On the End of Time, 

On walking over the Fire, 

Parables of Jesus, .... 

Paul's Discourse at Athens, , , 

Paul's Si ch on Mars hill, 

Peace in Death, .... 

Perfect acquaintance with the Holy Doctrine 
Ules cecl, 



the Holy 

:'es, 



Malacca 



Spi 



the 



subject of 
, 34, 4G, 57, 



180 



182 

81 

182 

97 
241 
120 
185 

Of) 
202 
221 
110 
137 
109 
109 
71 
60 
202 

119 

170 
281 
137 

01 
224 
138 
185 

02 
217 
101 



22 
32 
49 
02 
57 
02 
137 
288 
28 

it; 

137 

48 
29 
01 
205 
12 
105 
.i.i 



INDEX 111. 



319 



Pointed Words about Salvation, . 
Poor Joseph, .... 

Prayer to Jehovah, , 

Prayer used at the Reopening of the Chapel and Hospital at Hongkon; 

Precious Words, 

Precious Words qf Jesus, 

Predicates of God, 

Predicates of Heaven and Hell, . 

Principles of the Christian Church, 

Proofs of the Truth, 

Questions about Christianity, 

Regeneration by the Holy Spirit, 

Rejection of falsehood and reception of truth, converting calamity into 

happiness, 
Religious Allegories, 
Revelation of John, 
Reverence Truth, . 
Rise and Progress of Religion in the Soul 
Rousing Admonition for the Age, 
Rules for Holy Living, 
Sacred instruction of the Saviour, 
Sayings of Jesus, 
Scripture Collection, 
Scripture Exhortations, 
Scripture Extracts, 
Scripture Lessons for the young, 
Selections from Scripture, 
Selections from the Holy Scriptures, . 
Selections from the Scriptures on Anger, 
Selections from the Scriptures on Avarice 
Selections from the Scriptures on Intemperance, 
Selections from the Scriptures on Lust, 

Selections from the Scriptures on the Five Constant Virtues, 
Selections from the Scriptures on the Five Relations of Society, 
Selections from the Scriptures on the Sabbath, . 
Self-examination on partaking of the Lord's Supper, 
Sermon on the Mount, with Commentary, 
Sheet tract, ...... 

'■acts, ..... 

Short abstract relative to the Scriptures, 
Short Commentary on the Ten Commandments, 
Skeleton Sermons, ..... 

Story of a Watchmaker, .... 

Story of the Two Friends Kea and Yih, 
Substance of the Gospel, .... 

Summary of Scripture Truth, 

Summary of the Gospel, 

Supplementary Correction of Buddhist Errors, 

S\ i tcmatic Theology, .... 

Ten Readings on the Firs! Chapter of the Book ofGe 
Ten Sermons, ..... 



225 
205 
110 
170 

28 
177 
208 

57 

28 
139 

G2 

47 

22 
109 
127 
227 
227 
227 
227 
22G 
226 
227 

36 
119 

92 

40, 48 

4 

117 

120 
202 
178 
145 
204 

53 
188 

63 
235 
169 



320 



INDEX III. 



The Anxious Enquirer, 

TIk' Apostles' Creed, .... 

The Apostles' Creed, with Commentary, 

The Augsburg Confession of Faith, 

The Baptismal Convenant, 

The Beatitudes, ..... 

The Captive Maid, .... 

The Compass Needle, .... 

The Creed in Verse, .... 

The Disciple's Guide, .... 

The doctrine of Eternal Life, . 

The Doctrine of Redemption, .... 

Tin' Doctrine of the Resurrection, as revealed to Paxil, by the 

The Enquirer, ..... 

The evils of Gambling, . . , 

The Faith and Practice of a Christian Church, 

The fallen state of Man, 

The Fear of Death, .... 

The Golden Balance, .... 

The Gospel of Jesus, .... 

The Great Doctrine transmitted from age to age, 

The Holy Book of Jesus, . . . , 

The Importance of Love. 

The Lun-yu newly modelled, , 

The patron deity of the city has no spiritual existence, 

The perfect man's model, . . 

The Pilgrim's Progress, .... 

The Religion of Truth, .... 

The Saviour of Mankind, . 

The Sermon on the mount, with Commentary, 

The Sinner's Friend , .... 

The Ten Commandments, . 

The Ten Commandments, and Important principles of Jesus 

The Ten Commandments with Commentary, 

The Theory of Redemption, 

The Three Graces, .... 

The Three Principles, .... 

The True Religion, 

The Two Lights, . . . 

The Two Thousand Character Classic, 

The W;iy from Misery to Happiness, 

The Way of Eternal Bliss, 

The Way of Pardon for Sinners, 

The Way to Worship God, 

The Ways of Truth and Falsehood, 

The "Worth of the Soul, 

Theological Evidences, .... 

Theology, ..... 

Thirteen Articles on Christian Doctrine, 

Thirteen Village Sermons, . 

Thir/.a the converted Jewish eirl. 



Lor< 



Gos 



pel, 



169 

119 
137 

62 
177 

12 
185 
153 
137 
140 

56 

56 
lesus, 127 
215 

16 
121 

48 
139 
169 
171 
182 

97 
124 

31 
218 

57 
168, 175 

96 

60 

62 
124 
193 
228 
147 

62 
187 
205 

58 
225 
205 

60 

70 
137 
261 

69 
137 
126 

56 
169 

98 
162 



INDEX III. 



821 



Threo character Classic, ..... 

Throe Important Questions, .... 

Treshing the Floor, ..... 

Tract on Heaven, ..... 

Tract on Idolatry, ..... 

Tract on Redemption, ..... 

Tract on Regeneration, , 

Tract on the being of a God, .... 

Tract on the New Year, ..,.»,; 

Tract on the Sin of Lying, and the Importance of Truth, 
Tract on the strait gate, .... 

Treatise on Repentance, ...... 

Treatise on the Soul, , 

Treatise on the Sufferings of Christ, . 

True Indication of the Sage, , 

Truth, 

Twelve Sermons, ..... 

Twelve short Sermons, ..... 

Twelve Village Sermons, .... 

Village Sermons, ..... 

Warnings to the World from Water and Fire, 
Wesley's Sermons, .-.••.■,. 

Western Scholar's Reasons for coming to China, 
Why is Christ's Doctrine called Good News, 
Words of Jesus, 



Brief History of Abraham, 

Brief History of Joseph, 

History of Daniel, 

Life of Elijah, 

Life of John, , 

Life of Joseph, 

Life of Moses, 

Life of Paul, 

Life of Peter, . , 

Memoir of Elijah, . 

Story of Elijah, . , 



Sacred Biography, 



. 27, 92 

. 238 

22 ( .J 

. 53 

15, 31 

30 

. 4G 

31 

. 28 

14 

14 

61 

19, 138, 130 

216 

. 170 

(',2 

. 184 

IB 

. 18 

. 30, 124 

. 109 

208 

. 139 

238 

. 2G1 



120 

, 119 

58 

. 147 

59 
59, 147 

58 
. 58 

59 
. 208 

88 



Catechisms, 

A Catechism on the Ten Commandments and the duties of Christianity, 22 
A hundred Questions for the Young, . . . . .111 

An easy explanation of the doctrine of Jesus, in question and answer, 4 

Assembly's Catechism, ....... 30 

Brown's Catechism, . . . . . , .1-15 

Catechism, ....... . 284 

Catechism for Youth, . . . . . . . 14 

Catechism of Christian Doctrine, ...... 170 

Catechism of Christian Principles, ..... Pit; 

Catechism of Essentials, ....... 02 



322 



INDEX III. 



Catechism of Gospel Truth, 

1 chism of- New Testament History, 

Catechism of Old Testament History, 

Catechism of Scripture Doctrine and Practice, 

Catechism- of the Christian Religion, 

Catechism of the Essential Doctrines of the Church, 

Chihl's Catechism, .... 

Christian Catechism, : 

Doctrine of the Church, 

Entrance to the Christian Religion, 

Introduction to the True Doctrine, 

Luther's small Catechism, 

Paraphrase! of the Shorter Catechism, .. 

Questions on Old Testament History, . 

Questions on the true Doctrine, 

Scriptural Catechism, . . 

Scripture Catechism, .... 

Shorter Catechism, . . . . . 

Some Questions about Religion, 

The Assembly's Catechism, 

The Disciple's Catechism, 

The gate of God's Church, 

The Shorter Catechism of the Westminster Assembly 

Wesleyan Methodist Catechism, 



Prayers. 
Adult Baptismal Service, 

Book of Common Prayer, .... 

Daily morning and evening prayers of the church of England, 
Form of Prayer for any occasion, . 

FOfms of Prayer, .... 

Prayer Book, ..... 

Prayers and Hymns, ... 
Prayers of the Christian Religion, 
Ritual of the Medthodist Episcopal Church, 
Selection from the English Church Liturgy, 



219, 284 

145 
. 140 

159 

. 172 

. 104 

. 238 

282 
. 1 02 

171 

124 
02, 210 

147 
. 145 

241 
. 177 

228 
. 220 

171 
145, 108 

171 
. 19 

147 
. 20 



. 142 

281 

5 

171 

120, 183, 203, 221 

177, 208 

0, 25, 80 

142 

. 102 

02 



Church Hymns, 
Hymn and Tune Book, 
Hymn Book, 
Hymns, . . 

Hymns and Tunes, 
Hymns of Praise, 
Hymns set to Music, 
BalVation Hymns, 



]il/!H)IS. 

- 171 

177 

5, 32, 119, 101, 175, 189, 217, 238, 282 

. " . . 127, 170 

103 

... . . . 138, 208 

244 

...... .171 



Miscellaneous. 
Catalogue of the names of the books in the Old ami New Testaments, 
Causes of Poverty among the Chinese: .... 



2H4 
203 



INDEX III. 



323 



Correction of erroneous impressions, . 

Directions for the Misguided, • 

Domestic Instructor, , . . . ' . , 

Exhortation to abandon Opium, ..... 

Form of Church Government, ...... 

Foreign Cookery in Chinese, with a Preface and Index in English, 
Incentives to abandon Opium, ....-, 

Rules of Church Government, ..... 

Serial Miscellany. ....... 

Six Warnings against Opium, . . . . J 

Three benevolent Societies, ...... 



Educational and Linguistic. 

A Chinese Phonetic Vocabulary, containing all the most common cha 

racters, with their sounds in the Canton Dialect 
Child's Primer, ........ 

Chinese School Book, ....... 

Daily lessons for Children, ....... 

Discourse on the term for God, ..... 

Explanation of the Radical Characters, ..... 

Graduated Reading; comprising a Circle of Knowledge, in 200 lessons. 
Important Discourse on the Correct Name, .... 

Spelling Book of the English Language, .... 

Vocabulary of the English Language, ..... 

Youth's Four Character Classic, ..... 



History. 



Bible History, . . . . 

Bible Patriarchs, . . • . 

Church History, . . . . 

Comparative Chronology, . . 

General History, . . 

History of England, . . , 

History of Judea, .... 
History of the Church, . 
New Testament Four Character Classic, . 
Old Testament Four Character Classic, 
Outline of Old Testament History, 
Sacred History, ... 
Scripture History, , . 

Universal History, 



56 

18;; 

6 

202 
205 
215 

70 

208 

6 

13G 

18 



217 

28 

30 

07 

146 

90 

120 

217 

257 

257 

145 



Government. 



International Law, 

Outlines of Political economy, 

Treatise on Commerce, . 



138 

: . 60 

244 

. 30 

02 

50, 169 

60 

. 02 

1G2 

. 102 

i 5 

. 17 

03, 102, 383 

00, 137 



200 
01 
01 



Geography. 
Brief Geographical History of the United States of America, 



324 



INDEX III. 



Catechism of Geography, . 
Compendium of Geography, 
Digest of Geography, 
Geographical Catechism, 
History of Java, 
Illustrated Geography, . 
Map of Judea, 
.Map of the World, 
New Treatise on Geography, 
Sketch of the World, 
Tour of the World, . 
Universal Geography, . 



. . 




261 


. 


, 


238 


. . 




208 


. 


. 


27 


. 




23 


. 


, 


14d 


. 




]<;<; 


• • . 


. 


189 


■• 


• . 


185 

IS 


. 




5 


. • • 


66 


168 



Mathematics, 
A Treatise on Arithmetic in the Chinese Language, for the use of St. 

Paul's College, Hongkong, ...... 

Arithmetical Questions, 

Compendium of Arithmetic, . 

Elements of Analytical Geometry and of the Differential and Integral 

Calculus, ......... 

European Arithmetic, ....... 

Supplementary Elements of Geometry, . 

Treatise on Algehra, ....... 

Treatise on Mechanics, ....... 



Astronomy. 
Astronomical Catechism, .... 

Catechism of Astronomy, .... 
Digest of Astronomy, . . ... 

Elements of the Solar Eclipse on December 1 f, 185:2, 
Outlines of Astronomy, . . . . 

Plate of the Solar Eclipse with Explanation, 



Medicine. 
Annual Report of the Missionary Hospital at Canton. 
Domestic; Medicine, ... 

First Lines of the Practice of Surgery in the West, . 
Fourteenth Report of the Shanghae Hospital, . 
Hospital Report, ..... 

Practice of Medicine and Materia Medica, 
Report of the Medical Missionary Society's Hospital at 

year 1859, 

Reports of the Medical Missionary Society's Hospital at 

years 1863 and 1865, .... 

Tract on Hernia and Intermittent Fever, , 

Tract on Vaccination, ..... 
Treatise on Midwifery and Diseases of Children, 
Treatise on Physiology, ..... 
Treatise on the New English Method of Vaccination. . 



Canton 
Canton, 



for the 

for the 



200 

217 
173 

174 
236 

173 

171 

188 



40 
145 
127 
187 
174 
133 



120 
07 
127 
258 
270 
127 

227 



227 
227 
127 
126 
186 



INDEX 11. 



323' 



Botany. 
Address of the Singapore Agricultural and Horticultural Society to the 
Chines.6 Agriculturists, ....... 

Treatise on Botany, ....... 



Catechism of Nature, . 
Natural Philosophy, 
Popular Treatise on Mechanics; 
Treatise on Cyclones, 



Physics. 



SO 
239 



ins 

126 

133 



Almanacs. 
Anglo-Chinese Calendar, 
Anglo-Chinese Concord Almanac, 
Chinese and Foreign Almanac, 
Chinese andfForeign Concord Almanac, 
Chinese Foreign Concord Almanac, . 
Chinese Western Almanac, 
Concord Almanac, 
European Chinese' Almanac, 
Peace Almanac, 
Philosophical Almanac, 
Sabbath Calendar, 



Serialt. 



Chinese and Foreign Gazette, . 

Chinese and Foreign Weekly News, 

Chinese Monthly Magazine, 

Chinese Serial, 

Eastern Western Monthly Magazine, 

Monthly Magazine, 

Shanghae Gazette, . , 

Shanghae Miscellany, . . 

Shanghae Serial, . , . 

Universal Gazette, 



104. 



119 

no 

214 
188 

215 
174 

158 
202 
138 
133 
247 



133, 244 

218 

19 

. 120 

58 

. 28 

260, 262 

257 

173 

. 48 



PUBLICATIONS IN VARIOUS DIALECTS. 



MANDARIN DIALECT. 



Sacred Scriptures. 
Genesis in the Mandarin dialect, 
John's Gospel in the Mandarin Dialect, 
New Testament in the Mandarin Dialect, 
Psalms in the Mandarin dialect, 



Harmony of the Gospels, - 



Harmony. 



254 

201 > 

30 

282 



139 



32G 



INDEX III. 



Theology. 
A well-Bpent day, ------ 

Brief Discourse on the .Soul, - 

Choose the good and follow it, - 

Conversion in old age, ------ 

Christ the only Saviour, ----- 

Death comes like a .Thief in the Ifight, ... 

Discourse for the New Year, - - - - - 

Gospel Guide, ------- 

Henry and his Bearer, ------ 

Important points of the Christian Religion, ... 
Peep of Day, ------- 

Pilgrim's Progress, in the Mandarin Dialect, - 

Prayer, -------- 

Remains of the Wise King, - 

Rules of the Christian Religion, - - 

Story of Two Liars, ------ 

Supplement to the Pilgrim's Progress in the Mandarin dialect, 

The good Man in Affliction, - 

The happy Death of the Righteous, - - - - 

The Lost Child brought home, - - - - - 

The penitent Sinner seeking for Mercy, ... 

The wandering Sheep returned to the Shepherd, 

The young Gideon, ------ 

Trimetrical Classic, (Teen-tsin) - - - - - 

True Happiness, ------ 

Who are excluded from the Kingdom of God, - 
Why the Heathen make light of the Gospel, 



17G, 



137 

12(14 

283 

35 

30 

35 

28-4 

22<J 

283 

,252 

17G 

36 

2G4 

283 

266 

282 

30 

30 

264 

35 

35 

204 

284 

35 

35 

35 



Catechisms. 
Christian Catechism, -• 

Christian Catechism in the Mandarin Dialect, 
Scripture Catechism, - 

The Convert's Catechism, 



Book of Common Prayer, - 
Prayer Book, (Han-kow) 
Prayers for Ordinary Use, 



Prayers, 



170 

225 
284 
101 



281 

283 
283 



Hymn Book, 



Hymns, 



225 



CANTON DIALECT. 



John's Gospel, 
Matthew's Gospel, 



Sacred Scriptures. 



226 
220 



INDEX 111. 327 

Theology. 

Dialogues between Chang and Yuen, - - - - - M5 

Important Selections from the Life of Christ, in the Canton Dialect, - 226 

Peep of Day, 2US 

The Prodigal repenting, - - - - - - -121 

Unscathed in the Furnace, ...--- 121 



Catechisms 
Brown's Catechism, ... - 

Catechism in the Macao Dialect, - - 



CHAOU-CHOW DIALECT, 



AMOY DIALECT, 



96 



Prayers. 
Prayer Book, ^ 6 



Hymns. 

Hymn Book, 

Simple Hymns, --------- 208 



Educational. 
The Four Books with Explanations in the Local Dialect, (Hongkong) - 186 
Thousand Character Classic, (Hongkong) - - - - 185 



HAKKA DIALECT. 

Sacred Scriptures. 
Luke's Gospel, 1G1 

Matthew's Gospel in the Hakka dialect, - - - - - 161 



Hymns. 
Hymns in the Chaou-chow Dialect, ------ 176 



Sacred Scriptures. 

Book of Ruth, in the Amoy dialect, (Roman) - - - 165 

John's Gospel, (Roman) - - - - - - - 93 

Mark's Gospel, (Roman) ----._- 250 



Theology. 
Child's Primer in the Amoy dialect, (Roman) ... - 2S1 

Pilgrim's Progress in the Amoy dialect, (Roman) - 165 

Sacred Biography. 
History of Joseph, ...--.. 198 



Efymns. 
Chang-chow and Tseuen-chow Hymns, ----- °.19 



3*38 INDEX 111. 

Hymn Book in the Amoy dialect, (Roman) ... 165 

Hymns in the Amoy dialect, -.-_-. i~c, 

New Hymn Book, - - - . - - - - 68, 104 



Educational. 
Amoy Spelling Book, (Roman) ..... 1G5 



FUH-CHOW DIALECT. 



Sacred Scriptures. 

Epistles of Peter and John in the Fuh-chow dialect, ... 177 

Genesis in the Fuh-chow dialect, - - - - - Il7 

John's Gospel, - - - - - - - - 201 

John's Gospel in the Fuh-chow dialect, ----- 177 

Luke's Gospel, --__.... l£Q 

New Testament in the Fuh-chow dialect, ... H7 ] 199 



Theology, 

Commentary on the Ten Commandments, .... 201 

Discourse on God, - - - . . _ . -180 

Discourse on Keeping the Sabbath, - - - - _ 20 1 

Discourse on Ma-tsoo-po, ---.... 201 

Introduction to the Sacred Scriptures, - - - - - ]]7 

Repentance and Faith, - - - - - - - 20! 

Short Commentary on the Ten Commandments, ... 117 

Treatise on the Soul, - - - - - - - -110 

Tillage Sermons, - - - - -'- - - 201 



Catechism. 
Catechism of Sacred Learning, - - - - - - 180 

Prayers. 

Methodist Episcopal Communion Service, (Roman) ... 177 



Hymns. 
Tlymns in the Fuh-chow Dialect, - 176,178 



Miscellaneous. 
Dissuasive from Opium-smoking, ---.-. 199 

Exhortation to abandon Opium, ------ 201 



Astronomy. 
Catechism of Astronomy, -.__.._ 201 



N1NGPO DIALECT. 



Sacred Scriptures. 
E odus, (Roman) * - .... 195 



JNDEX HI. 329 

Genesis, (Roman) ---.... 195 

New Testament in the Ningpo dialect, (Roman) - 223 

Psalms, (Roman) -----.. 205 

Harmony. 

Synopsis Gospel Harmony, (Roman) - - - . 595 



Theology. 

A Cup of Wine, (Roman) - - - - - - - 198 

A Father instructing his Son on Settling Accounts, (Roman) - 184 

Come to Jesus, (Roman) - - - - - -184 

Frank Lucas, (Roman) ---... 138 

Guide to Heaven, ------. . 224 

Guide to Heaven, (Roman) ---... 224 

Instructive Verses for Children, (Roman) ... . 203 

Line upon Line, (Roman) - . 133 

Peep of Day, (Roman) ----- . . 225 

Pilgrim's Progress, (Roman) - - - . . 132 

Sarah and Hannah, (Roman ) - - 184 

Scripture Lessons for Children, (Roman) - . 228 
Sermons, (Roman) - ... 263 

The Mother at Home, (Roman) - . . . _ 199 

The Young Cottager, (Roman) - - - . . .195 



Catechisms. 

Catechism, (Roman) ---._. 199 284 

Little Catechism, (Roman) ----.. 223 

The Assembly's Shorter Catechism, (Roman) - - 205 



248 



Prayers. 
Adult and Infant Baptismal Services, (Roman) 

Form for the Solemnization of Matrimony, (Roman) - - - 284 

Order of Confirmation, (Roman) ----- 284 

Prayer Book, ... 

Prayer Book, (Roman) .... 



247 
247 



Hymns. 
Hymn Book (Roman) - . . . - 195 203 240 

Hymns set to Music, (Roman) - , . '. 044 



Educational. 
Primer of the Ningpo colloquial Dialect, (Roman) - - - J94 

Spelling Book in the Ningpo colloquial dialect, (Roman) - - 183 



Geography. 
Geographical Catechism, (Roman) - 2 o4 

Geography, (Roman) . - - 204 



.1 



30 INDEX 111. 



Mathematics. 
Arithmetic, (Roman) ---..._ 204 



KIN-HWA DIALECT. 



Sacred Scriptures. 
Gospel of John, /'Roman) ---.-.. 255 



HANG-CHOW DIALECT. 



Theology. 
Prayer, Creed and Commandments, ---.„_ 270 



SHANGHAE DIALECT. 



Sacred Scriptures. 

Acts of the Apostles, - - - - - - - 211 

Acts of the Apostles, (Roman) - - - - - - 211 

Exodus, (Roman) -.-_ ---211 

Genesis, - - - - - - - - -213 

John's Gospel, - - - - - - - - 101 

John's Gospel, (Roman) - - - - - - -101 

John's Gospel in the Shan^hae dialect, - 34 

Luke's Gospel, (Roman) - - - - - - -211 

Luke's Gospel, (Phonetic) ------ 220 

Mark's Gospel, - - - - - - - - 102 

Matthew's Gospel, - .... . ioi ? 124 

Matthew's Gospel, (Roman) - - - - - -211 

Paul's Epistle to the Romans, - - - - - 102 

Paul's First Epistle to the Corinthians, ... - - 246 

Paul's Second Epistle to the Corinthians, - 246 

Paul's Two Epistles to the Corinthians, ( Roman) - 246 



Harmony. 
Harmony of the Gospels, - - - -'- - -19C 



Theology. 

Are you afraid of Death ?.....,. 92 

Bible Stories, (Phonetic) ...... 214 

Child's Book on the Soul, (Roman) . .... 213 

Evidence for the Observance of the Sabbath, .... 164 

Henry and his Bearer, ....... 212 

Henry and his Bearer, (Roman) . . . . .213 

Jesus the only Saviour of the Soul, ..... 92 

Line upon line, ...... . 213 

Peep of Day, , 219 
Religious Juvenile Instruction, . . , . , .101 

Religious Juvenile Instruction, (Roman) . 211 

Sources of Good and Evil, (rhonetic) ..... 220 



INDEX III. 331 

Three School Girls, (Phonetic) 215 

Trimetrical Classic, ..... ... 232 



Catechisms. 
Catechism of Important Truths, ...... 103 

Catechism of the Old and New Testaments, .... 231 

Catechism of the Old Testament, (Roman) . . . . .211 

The Convert's Catechism, ...... 101 

The Convert's Catechism, (Roman) . . . • . .211 



Prayers. 

Forms of Prayer, ........ 32 

Morning Prayers, ..... . . 101 

Prayers of the Church, .:..... 102 

Prayers of the Church, (Roman) ..... 211 



Hymns. 
Hymn Book, .... ... 214, 220, 245 

Hymn Book, (Phonetic) ...... 220 

Hymn Book, (Roman) ....... 245 

Hymns of Praise, . ... . . . . . 170, 231 



Educational. 
Phonetic Primer, (Phonetic) ...... 214 

Primer of the Shanghae Dialect, (Roman) . , , 210 

Selection from JSsop's and other Fahles, (Phonetic) . . .219 



Geography. 
Geographical Catechism, (Roman) .... 213 



Science. 
Scientific Manual, (Phonetic) 214 



SHANGHAE BEADING PRONUNCIATION. 

The Conversations of Confucius, ...... 192 

The Great Study, 192 

The Middle Way, 192 






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