(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Men and women of America; a biographical dictionary of contemporaries"

I 



MEN AND WOMEN 
OF AMERICA 



A BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY OF CONTEMPORARIES 

>.) i, Y 



L. R. HAMERSLY & COMPANY 

ONE WEST THIRTY-FOURTH STREET 

NEW YORK CITY 

1910 



L I/13MOW Q I/! A /I3J 



AOIH3MA 



COPYRIGHT, 1909, BY 

L. R. HAMERSLY & COMPANY 

NEW YORK 






PREFACE 

When, two years ago, the publishers of this present volume brought out " Men 
of America " as a one-volume biographical dictionary of American contempora 
ries, it was in contemplation to issue a companion volume under the title of 
" Women of America/ and some considerable work of a tentative character was 
done along that line. It soon developed, however, that the outlook for the 
success of such a volume was at least quite doubtful. Some had found fault 
with " Men of America " because it excluded women ; still more expressed dis 
approval of the idea of putting the Women of America off in a biographical 
reservation by themselves. 

As a result " Men and Women of America " has been made. It is a diction 
ary dealing with the life histories of the men and women who in many and 
divers avenues of activity and usefulness have attained prominence or leader 
ship, and are representative of the progress and development of the age. It 
is not claimed that all who deserve to be included in such a volume are among 
those whose sketches are contained in this one. There are many who would 
have been included if data for a proper sketch could have been obtained in 
time, and there are probably some few sketches included which might better 
have been left out. Errors of judgment, where the selection involves thou 
sands of names, are inevitable. 

It is believed, however, that taken as a whole, " Men and Women of Amer 
ica " may claim with confidence to be the best one-volume biographical diction 
ary of living Americans. It is, in effect, a second edition of " Men of Amer 
ica," although about half of the biographies in the present volume are entirely 
new, and as to the other half there has been such revision and recasting as 
make them practically original sketches. The biographies of women, included 
in the present publication, add a feature of great interest to the book. 

Another feature which enhances the value of the book is the inclusion of 
full-page portraits to accompany some of the most interesting biographical 
sketches. Nothing can surpass a portrait in the amount of interest which it, 
as a human document, inspires, and it is believed that those included in this 
volume will be appreciated by its readers. 

A large proportion of those whose sketches are included in " Men and Women 
of America " are people about whom it would be difficult to find satisfactory 
notice elsewhere, and even of those who are included in other publications it 
may be confidently claimed that the data have been brought up to date, and 
that the sketches are later and fuller than those of any other biographical 
dictionary of living Americans covering the National field. It is a reference 
book full of interesting and valuable personal data about eminent American 

282010 






^3MOW QUA 



A3IH3MA HO 




10 JAOI! 

COPYRIGHT, 1909, BY 

L. R. HAMERSLY & COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



- 



PREFACE 

When, two years ago, the publishers of this present volume brought out " Men 
>f America " as a one-volume biographical dictionary of American contempora- 
ies, it was in contemplation to issue a companion volume under the title of 
Women of America," and some considerable work of a tentative character was 
lone along that line. It soon developed, however, that the outlook for the 
success of such a volume was at least quite doubtful. Some had found fault 
dth " Men of America " because it excluded women ; still more expressed dis- 
ipproval of the idea of putting the Women of America off in a biographical 
eservation by themselves. 

As a result " Men and Women of America " has been made. It is a diction- 
iry dealing with the life histories of the men and women who in many and 
livers avenues of activity and usefulness have attained prominence or leader 
ship, and are representative of the progress and development of the age. It 
s not claimed that all who deserve to be included in such a volume are among 
;hose whose sketches are contained in this one. There are many who would 
lave been included if data for a proper sketch could have been obtained in 
ime, and there are probably some few sketches included which might better 
lave been left out. Errors of judgment, where the selection involves thou- 
;ands of names, are inevitable. 

It is believed, however, that taken as a whole, " Men and Women of Amer- 
ca " may claim with confidence to be the best one-volume biographical diction- 
iry of living Americans. It is, in effect, a second edition of " Men of Amer- 
ca," although about half of the biographies in the present volume are entirely 
lew, and as to the other half there has been such revision and recasting as 
nake them practically original sketches. The biographies of women, included 
n the present publication, add a feature of great interest to the book. 

Another feature w r hich enhances the value of the book is the inclusion of 
lull-page portraits to accompany some of the most interesting biographical 
iketches. Nothing can surpass a portrait in the amount of interest which it, 
is a human document, inspires, and it is believed that those included in this 
rolume will be appreciated by its readers. 

A large proportion of those* whose sketches are included in " Men and Women 
>f America " are people about whom it would be difficult to find satisfactory 
lotice elsewhere, and even of those who are included in other publications it 
nay be confidently claimed that the data have been brought up to date, and 
;hat the sketches are later and fuller than those of any other biographical 
lictionary of living Americans covering the National field. It is a reference 
>ook full" of interesting and valuable personal data about eminent American 

282010 



PREFACE 

men and women whose careers are of interest as illustrating and explaining the 
remarkable national development of our country along every line of material 
and intellectual endeavor. 

This is a book of the living, except in the case of a few individuals who have 
died while the book was being printed. But the publishers, believing that a 
book, along similar lines but dealing wholly with the illustrious dead, would 
meet with approval, have begun the preparation of such a volume. It will in 
clude biographical sketches of those not now living, who by their lives have, 
from the founding of the Nation to the present era, contributed to its progress 
and welfare. 

Doubtless many of those who own or use the present volume have some re 
lationship or connection with deceased persons whose biographies should be 
included in this projected volume. Suggestions of names and data for that 
purpose will be gladly welcomed. 



MEN AND WOMEN OF AMERICA 



ABBATT, William: 

Editor and publisher; born in New 
York City, Nov. 16, 1851; son of William 
D. and Agnes Alice (Dean) Abbatt. He 
was educated in the Harrington Academy 
at West Chester, N. Y. Mr. Abbatt wa s 
formerly editor of the Inter-State, New 
York City, and assistant editor of the 
New York News Letter, and is now editor 
of the Maga/ine of History, with Notes 
and Queries. He is author of The Crisis 
of the Revolution and of The Battle of 
Pell s Point; and is editor of: Memoirs of 
General William Heath; Sai gent s Life of 
Major Andre; Codman s Arnold s Expedi 
tion to Quebec; Winfield s Blockhouse by 
Bull s Ferry, and Johnson s Traditions of 
the Revolution. Residence : West Chester. 
N. Y. Office: 141 East "25th Street. Now 
York City. 

ABBE, Cleveland: 

Meteorologist; born in New York City, 
Dec. 3, 1838; son of George Waldo and 
Charlotte (Colgate) Abbe. He was grad 
uated from the College of the City of New 
York, A.B., 1857, and A.M., 1860, studied 
in the University of Michigan, 1858-1859, 
and Harvard University, 1860-1864, receiv 
ing from the latter the degree of B.S. " as 
of 1864." He also received the degree of 
LL.D. from the University of Michigan, 
1886, and from the University of Glasgow 
on the occasion of the Kelvin Jubilee, 1896. 
He was assistant to Dr. B. A. Gould, of 
the U. S. Coast Survey, 1860-64, engaged 
in the computation of longitudes, star cata 
logues, etc.: was assistant at the Imperial 
Central Astronomical Observatory at Poul, 



kova, near St. Petersburg, Russia, 1864- 
1866, assistant at the U. S. Naval Observa- 
jtory 1867-1868, and director of the Cin 
cinnati Observatory, 1868-1873. There he 
inaugurated a system of daily weather 
maps of the United States, with a forecast 
of the weather for Cincinnati. This was 
soon followed by the establishment of daily 
weather service by the Government, and 
since 1871 he has been professor of meteor 
ology, first in the U. S. Signal Service, and 
since 1891 in the Weather Bureau of the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. In 1875 
he inaugurated the system of Standard 
Time Meridians, subsequently perfected by 
W. F. Allen for the use of American rail 
roads and the general public. He has 
served as representative of the U. S. 
Weather Bureau in various national and 
international conferences and on astro 
nomical expeditions: is a member of the 
National Academy of Science, a fellow of 
the American Association for the Ad 
vancement of Science and of other scien 
tific societies in the United States, and is 
also a member of the meteorological so 
cieties of London, Paris, Berlin, and 
Vienna, of the Astronomical Societies of 
England and Germany, the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society and the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity. 
He has made many contributions to the 
literature of technical meteorology. Dr. 
Abbe married in Cincinnati, May 10, 1870, 
Frances Martha Neal, who died July 24, 
1908; and has three children. Address: U. 
S. Weather Bureau, Washington, D. C. 

ABBEY, Edwin Austin: 

Artist; born in Philadelphia, April 1, 
1852. He was educated at the Academy of 
Fine Arts of Philadelphia, is an honorary 



-. MEN OF AMERICA. 



M.A. of Yale and LL.D. of the University 
of Pennsylvania, honorary associate of the 
Royal Society of British Architects and 
fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of 
London. In 1871 he was engaged by 
Harper Brothers, and in 1878 went for 
them to England, where he now resides. 
He soon made an international reputation 
as an illustrator of Shakespeare and the 
old comedies, to be followed by equally 
international fame as an artist. His first 
picture, A May-Day Morning, was exhib 
ited at the Eoyal Academy in 1890. and 
many other notable pictures have followed 
and have given Mr. Abbey a distinguished 
place among the chief artists of Britain 
and America. In 1901 he painted the offi 
cial picture of the Coronation Scene. In 
1895 lie painted the frieze, The Quest of 
the Holy Grail, for the Boston Public 
Library; painted, in 1906, a reredos for the 
American Church of the Holy Trinity, in 
Paris, and in 1907 he painted eight paint 
ings for the dome of the Pennsylvania 
Capitol at Harrisburgh. Mr. Abbey is a 
Royal Academician of England, a National 
Academician of the National Academy of 
Design, New York, member of the Royal Ba 
varian Academy, American Water Color 
Society, Society of Mural Painters of New 
York, associate of the Royal Water Colour 
Society. London, Societe" des Beaux Arts. 
Paris, chevalier of the Legion d Honneur 
of France, president of the Bath and West 
of England Society of Artists, honorary 
member of the Madrid Society of Artists, 
and corresponding member of the Insti- 
tut de France. He has, since its forma 
tion, been president of the Artists Cricket 
Club of London, and he is a member of 
the leading clubs of London and New York. 
Mr. Abbey married, in 1890, Mary Gertrude 
Mead, of New York. Addresses: Morgan 
Hall, Fairford, Gloucestershire, England, 
and Chelsea Lodge, Tite Street, London, S. 
W., England. 

ABBOT, Charles Greeley: 

Director of the Smithsonian Astrophysi- 
cal Observatory since March 1, 1907; born 
at Wilton, Hillsboro County, N. H., May 



31, 1872: son of Harris Abbot and Caro 
line (Greeley) Abbot. He was prepared 
at Wilton High School and Phillips Acad 
emy. Andover, Mass., and was graduated 
from the Massachusetts Institute of Tech 
nology as B.S. in 1894 and M.S. in 1895. 
Immediately following his graduation he 
became an assistant in the Smithsonian 
Astrophysical Obesrvatory until 1896, then 
was an aid. acting in charge, until 1906; 
acting director in 1906. and in 1907 until 
his promotion to director. Mr. Abbot is a 
fellow of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, of the American 
Astronomical and Astrophysical Society, 
and of the Washington Philosophical So 
ciety, is especially distinguished for re 
searches on the infra-red solar spectrum, 
the sensitive galvanometer, and osmotic 
pressure, and is a writer of numerous pa 
pers on solar physics. Address: 36 Q 
Street, Washington, D. C. 

ABBOT, Edwin Hale: 

Lawyer and railway official; born in 
Beverly, Mass., Jan. 26, 1834, son of 
Joseph Hale and Frances Ellingwood 
(Larcom) Abbot. He was graduated from 
Harvard in 1855 and from Harvard Law 
School in 1862, and afterward practised 
law in Boston and also for some years had 
an office in Milwaukee, Wis. Mr. Abbot 
has been actively identified with corpora 
tion matters, especially with affairs relat 
ing to the finances of railroads. He was 
trustee of the Wisconsin Central Railroad 
and is especially known as the author of 
the Wisconsin Central plan of 1879, of cor 
porate organization, by which the control 
of the corporation was vested in the bond 
holders through the reservation to them of 
the voting power on the stock. This was 
the first and original scheme out of which 
various forms of trust administration for 
the benefit of the holders of securities were 
evolved. Mr. Abbot has been a frequent 
contributor to law journals. He married 
Martha T. Abbot, of Portland, Me., Sept. 
19, 1886. Residence: 1 Follen Street, Cam 
bridge, Mass. Office: 14 Beacon Street, 
Boston. 



\ 



MEN OF AMERICA. 







ABBOT, Henry Larcom: <v,^ i 

they have had four children. Address: 23 

Retired engineer officer. U. S. Army ; ! Ber keley Street, Cambridge, Mass, 
born in Beverly, Mass.. Aug. 13. 1831; 
son of Joseph Hale and Frances Ellingwood ABBOTT Alexander Crever: 

(Larcom) Abbot; was educated at the Physician and hygienist; born in Balti- 
Boston Latin School and graduated from more. Md.. Feb. 26, I860; son of Alexander 
West Point in 1854. subsequently receiving and Elizabeth (Beatty) Abbott. He was 
the degree of LL.D. from Harvard. Pro- educated in the Baltimore City College and 
fessor of hydraulic engineering. George in the Medical Department of the Univer- 
Washington University, Faculty of Gradu- sity of Maryland, where he received his 
ate Studies, since May, 1905. He served i medical degree in 1884, after which he 
in the Corps of Engineers of the United j pursued post-graduate studies in Johns 
States in all grades to colonel, inclusive, Hopkins University and in the Universities 
retiring in 1895, and was promoted to the of Munich and Berlin. He engaged in 
rank of brigadier-general U. S. A., retired, i medical practice in Philadelphia and has 
April 23. 1904. He rendered distinguished attained much prominence as a hygienist, 
service in the Civil War as colonel of the now being chief of the Bureau of Health 
1st Connecticut Artillery from Jan., 1863, and president of the Board of Health of 
and commanded the Siege Artillery Bri- Philadelphia, and also professor of hygiene 
gade, serving the siege train of both and director of the Laboratory of Hygiene 
armies under General Grant until the end in University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Abbott 
of the War, and accompanying General is author of two text-books: The Prin- 
Terry as his chief of artillery at the tak- t-iples of Bacteriology and The Hygiene of 
ing of Fort Fisher. He received five reg- Transmissible Diseases, both of high au- 
ular and two volunteer brevets for gallant thority in the profession, and is a member 
services, including brevet brigadier-general of the most important medical and several 
U. S. A. and major-general U. S. V. Gen- scientific societies. He married Aug. 30, 
eral Abbot designed the system of sub- 1892 - Georgina Picton Osier, daughter of 
marine defenses and vigorously advocated Hon - Justice Osier, of the Court of Ap- 
that of the mortar batteries now adopted P eals of Ontario. Address: 4229 Balti- 
by the United States, and has been a mem- niore Are.. Philadelphia. 
ber of the board of judges on military 

exhibits at several expositions. He was ABBOTT, Augustus I.: 

president of the board of consulting en- Lawyer; born in Weymouth, Mass.. Aug. 
gineers of the ship canal projected from 6, 1858; son of Rev. L. A. Abbott, D.D. and 
Pittsburgh to Lake Erie in 1896, and was Mary A. (Preston) Abbott. He was edu- 
also a member of the technical committee cated in Brown University, from which he 
and consulting engineer of the Xew Pan- was graduated as A.B. in 1880, and re- 
ama Canal Company from 1897 to 1904, ceived the degree of A.M. in 1883. He was 
and of the board of consulting engineers instructor in mathematics at Shurtleff Col- 
to plan the American Panama Canal. He lege. Upper Alton, 111.. 1881-1884. mean- 
is a member of the National Academy of Avhile studying law, and he was admitted 
Sciences, of the American Philosophical to the Missouri bar in 1884, and was grad- 
Society and of other scientific societies, of uated from the Law Department of Wash- 
the Military Order of the Loyal Legion and ington University as LL.B. in 1885. He 
of the Society of Cincinnati in the State of has been engaged in the practice of law in 
Connecticut (representing Nathan Hale). St. Louis since 1884, and since 1902 has 
General Abbot has written many works on been senior member of the law firm of 
military and civil engineering, including ! Abbott, Edwards & Wilson. Mr. Abbott is 
articles for encvclopsedias and magazine ; a member of the American Bar Association, 
articles. He married in Cambridge. Mass., and of the Missouri and St. Louis Bar As- 
April 2, 1856, Mary Susan Everett, and sociations. He married at Alton, 111., in 



L 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



1887, Annette Blair, and they have three 
children. Residence: 5449 Maple Avenue. 
Office: 909-915 Times Building, St. Louis. 

ABBOTT, Charles Conrad: 

Author. naturalist and archaeologist, 
writer of books on familiar animal life; 
born in Trenton, X. J.. June 4, 1843; son 
of Timothy and Susan (Conrad) Abbott. 
He was graduated with the degree of M.D. 
from the University of Pennsylvania in 
1865. and made a large archaeological col 
lection which is now in the Peabody 
Museum at Cambridge. Mass., and later 
one of the Delaware Valley exclusively, now 
at Princeton University. He was assistant 
in the Peabody Museum from 1876 to 1889. 
and from 1889 to 1904 was professor of 
American prehistoric archaeology in the 
University of Pennsylvania. Besides nu 
merous books relating to nature. Dr. Ab 
bott has written several novels and three 
exhaustive treatises on the archaeology of 
the Valley of the Delaware, the last, 
Archoeologia Nova Ca?sarea, in three num-- 
bers, 1907, 1908 and 1909, summing up the 
various objections that have been raised 
to his view of the one-time existence of 
man in that valley when glacial conditions 
prevailed. He married at Princeton, N. J.. 
Feb. 13, 1867, Julia Boggs Olden, and has 
three children. Address: " Three Beeches." 
Trenton. X. J. 

ABBOTT, Edville Gerhardt: 

Physician, born in Hancock, Maine, Nov. 
6, 1871; son of Alonzo and Maria B. 
(Mercer) Abbott. He was graduated from 
Bowdoin College with the degrees of A.B. 
and A.M. pro merito, and from the Maine 
Medical School as M.D., 1898. He served 
one year as house physician at the Maine 
General Hospital, studied six months in 
Boston hospitals and six months in New 
York hospitals, then went to Europe for a 
year, attending the Friedrich Wilhelm 
Universitat at Berlin, 1900-1901, and de 
voting the entire year to the study of or 
thopedic surgery under the most eminent 
men in this specialty. Since then he has 
given his entire attention to the practice of 
orthopedic surgery, at Portland, Maine, and 



fie lias contributed frequently to the lead 
ing medical journals on subjects connected 
with his specialty. He is surgeon-in-chief 
to the Children s Hospital, orthopedic sur 
geon to the Maine General Hospital, visit 
ing surgeon to St. Barnabas Hospital, con 
sulting surgeon to the Sisters Hospital, 
consulting surgeon to the Webber Hospital, 
consultant to the Maine State Sanitorium 
and surgeon to the Maine Central Rail 
road; and he is instructor in orthopedic 
surgery in Bowdoin Medical College. He 
is a member of the American Medical Asso 
ciation, Maine Medical Association, Cum 
berland County Medical Society, Patholog 
ical Club, the Maine Natural History 
Society, and the Psi Upsilon and Phi Chi 
fraternities. Dr. Abbott is a director in the 
Fidelity Trust Co., is a member of the Port 
land Board of Trade and of the Cumber 
land, Country, Fraternity and Athletic 
Clubs of Portland ; and he is chairman of 
the Republican City Committee. He mar 
ried in Bucksport, Maine, in March. 1892, 
Sara Sargent, of Prospect Harbor, Maine. 
Residence: 14 Dearing Street. Office: Y. 
M. C. A. Building, Portland, Maine. 

! ABBOTT, Howard Strickland: 

Lawyer: born, in Farmington, Minn., 
Sept. 15, 1864: son of Abiel Howard 
and Mary Ellen (Strickland) Abbott. He 
was graduated from the University of Min 
nesota, B.L., 1885, and was admitted to 
the bar upon oral examination by the Su 
preme Court of Minnesota in 1887. He 
was assistant general counsel of the Min 
neapolis and St. Louis Railway and " Soo " 
Railway, 1887-1889; attorney for the Atchi- 
son, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company, 
1889-1897; special master in chancery in 
the Union Pacific Railroad receivership, 
1897-1901; master in chancery of the 
United States Circuit Court for the District 
of Minnesota since 1897. Mr. Abbott has 
been lecturer on public and private corpora 
tions since 1898, and is also lecturer on 
civil law and mortgages in the Law College 
of the University of Minnesota. He was 
secretary of the Wisconsin, Minnesota and 
Pacific Railway Company, 1887-1889, and 
since 1904 has been a director of the Min- 


















"!*- "^1 

JjhnnT a- s 



TUP 

** -? 



r 

^ 

TUiT^ -iifc- 

^ r 



u. ^-^- 

. I I 



6 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



The Great Companion, 1!)05; Personality 
of God, 1905; Industrial Problems, 1905: 
Christ s Secret of Happiness, 1907; Im- 
l>n>sions of a Careless Traveller, 1907; The 
Home Builder, 1908. as well as articles in 
The Outlook and other magazines which 
cover many subjects, religious, theological, 
social and historical. He married in Bos 
ton, October 14. 1857, Abby F. Hamlin, 
daughter of Hannibal Hamlin (vice-presi 
dent of the United States from 1861 to 
1805), and they have five children. Ad 
dress : The Outlook, 287 Fourth Avenue. 
New York City. 

ABBOTT. Nathan: 

Professor of law: born in Norridgewock, 
Me.. July 11, 1854; son of Abiel and Sarah 
S. Abbott. He was educated in Phillips 
Andover Academy, Yale College, A.B., 1877, 
and Boston University Law School, LL.B., 
1892. Mr. Abbott was Tappan professor oi 
law in the University of Michigan, 1891- 
1892; professor of law in Northwestern 
University, 1892-1895; in Leland Stanford 
University, 1895-1907, and since 1907 pro 
fessor of law in Columbia University. He 
married in 1884, Frances Field. Address: 
Columbia College Law School, New York 
City. 

ABERCROMBIE, John William: 

President of the University of Alabama 
since 1902; born at Kelly s Creek, Ala., May 
17, 1866; son of Henry M. and Sarah A. 
(Kendrick) Abercrombie. He was gradu 
ated from Oxford College, Ala., 1886, and 
has received degrees of LL.D. from the 
University of Alabama and the South Caro 
lina College. Since 1886 he has b( en en 
gaged in educational wnrk, having been 
president of Ashland College, Ala., prin 
cipal of Cleburne Institute, Ala., presi 
dent Bowdon College, Ga., superintendent 
of city schools of Anniston, Ala., president 
of Southern Female Seminary (now Annis 
ton College for Young Ladies), and for 
four years State superintendent of edu 
cation of Alabama, before he became pres 
ident, of the University of Alabim. Krom 
1896 to 1899 he was a member of the 
Alabama State Senate and has been a 



leader in promoting the educational legisla 
tion of the State. He is a member of the 
National Educational Association and a 
prominent member of the Knights of Pyth 
ias. For several years he has been chair 
man of the committee on legislation of the 
Alabama Educational Association, and was 
formerly president of the Southern Edu 
cational Association. Dr. Abercrombie is 
the author of several pamphlets on educa 
tional subjects. He married at Edwards- 
ville, Ala., Jan. 8, 1891, Rose Merrill. Ad 
dress: University, Ala. 

ABERCROMBIE-MILLER, Frederick Au 
gustus : 

Commander, United States Navy, retired; 
born at Klkton, Cecil County, Maryland, 
June 12, 1842; son of Frederick Augustus 
Muhlenberg and Martha Mason (Abercrom 
bie) Miller. He was educated in the Epis 
copal Aculemy in Philadelphia, Thompson s 
Military Academy and Trinity College. 
Hartford, Conn. He entered the Navy as a 
volunteer in 1861, declining an appointment 
to the U. S. Naval Academy, and was trans 
ferred to the Regular Navy, at the close of 
the Civil War, having been recommended 
| for promotion three times by F. A. Parker, 
j executive of the Washington Navy Yard, 
I I. A. M. Craven, commanding the Tus- 
| carora, and M. B. \Yoolsey, commanding 
i the Princess Royal. He served on varied 
| duties and stations, as a Naval officer up 
| to and including the rank of lieutenant- 
i commander, with which rank he retired, 
Nov. 30, 1885. for incapacity resulting from 
incidents of service. On July 22, 1905. a 
bad fall caused paralysis, and the complete 
withdrawal from all work, and June 29. 
i ii)06. he was advanced in rank to com- 
i mancler. Commander Miller has been twice 
! around the world, cruising for twenty odd 
j years, and traveled in Europe. He was a 
I director of the American Security and Trust 
j Company, Washington, D. C., and of the 
j Sanitary Housing Company of Washington 
1 until his recent resignation because of 
| physical disability. Commander Miller was 
also until recently treasurer of St. .John s 
Hospital, president of the Children s Aid 
Association, and vice-president of the 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Emergency Hospital. He is a member of 
the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of 
the United States, the Society of American 
Wars, the Cosmos, Metropolitan and Chevy 
Chase Clubs of Washington, and the Corin 
thian Yacht Club of Philadelphia. He mar 
ried in Brooklyn, N. Y., May 18, 1882, Alice 
Tovvnsend, and they have three children. 
Address: 2201 Massachusetts Avenue, 
Washington, D. C. 

ACHESON, Edward Goodrich: 

Inventor, manufacturer; born at Wash 
ington. Pennsylvania, March 9, 1850; son 
of William Acheson and Sarah D. (Euple) 
Acheson. He was educated in the public 
schools, and for one year attended the 
Bellefonte Academy, Pennsylvania, and he 
received the degree of Sc.D. from the Uni 
versity of Pittsburgh in February, 1909. 
He was assistant to Thomas A. Edison, from 
1880 to 1883, and he is the inventor of car 
borundum, Egyptinized clay, Acheson graph 
ite, siloxicon and deflocculated graphite. 
He is president of the International Ache- 
sori Graphite Company and of the Acheson 
Company; director of The Acheson Oildag 
Company, and the Carborundum Company. 
He is a fellow of the American Association 
for the -Advancement of Science and member 
of the American Institute of Electrical En 
gineers, the Franklin institute of Philadel 
phia, the Society of Arts of London, Eng 
land, and president of the American Electro- 
Chemical .Society. Mr. Acheson married in 
Brooklyn, N. Y." Margaret Maher, and they 
have five boys and four girls. Residence: 
Grafilla, Lundy s Lane, Niagara Falls, On 
tario. Business address: Niagara Falls, 
N. Y. 

ACHESON, Ernest Francis: 

Congressman and editor: born in Wash 
ington, Pa., Sept. 19, 1885; son of Alexan 
der Wilsoir and Jane (Wishart) Acheson. 
He was graduated from Washington and 
Jefferson College, as A.B. in 1875, and was 
admitted to the bar of Pennsylvania in 1877. 
In 1879 he bocame editor of the Observer, 
of Washington, Pa., with which lie has ever 
since bi-vn connected. Mr. Acheson has al 



ways been an active Republican, and was 
for ten years a member of the State Repub 
lican Committee of Pennsylvania. He was 
a delegate to the National Republican Con 
vention at Chicago in 1884 and at St. 
Louis in 1890. He was elected to the Fifty- 
fourth Congress in 1894, and was six times 
reflected, serving until March 3, 1909. He 
was elected president of the Pennsylvania 
Editorial Association in January, 1893, and 
recording secretary of the National Edi 
torial Association in June, i893. Mr. Ache- 
son is author of: The Congressional Party 
in Hawaii, 1907. He married at Washing 
ton, Pa., Nov. 22, 1882, Janine B. Stewart. 
Address: Washington, Pa. 

ACKER, Charles Ernest: 

Manufacturer and inventor; born at Bour 
bon, Ind.. March 19, 1808; son of William 
James Acker, a manufacturer. Mr. Acker 
was educated at Wabash College and Cornell 
University, from which he was graduated 
as Ph.B. in 1888. He developed the first 
electrolytic process for the manufacture of 
caustic soda by electrolysis of molten salt, 
known as the Acker process; and the Elliott- 
Cresson gold medal of the Franklin Insti 
tute of Philadelphia and several other med 
als were conferred upon him for his inven 
tion. He built the works of the Acker 
Process Company at Niagara Falls, which 
utilizes 4,000 electrical horse-power; origi 
nated processes for tetra chloride of tin, 
carbon tetrachlorido, etc., which are also in 
use at Niagara Falls, and was the first to 
manufacture carbon tetrachloride in Amer 
ica. Mr. Acker is a director of the Niagara 
Falls Trust Company and The Tin Products 
Company of Now York. He is a director of 
the American Electrochemical Society; a 
member of the Society of Arts (London), 
the Farad:-! y Society (London), the Society 
of Chemical Industry (London), the Ameri 
can Electrochemical Society, the American 
Institute of Electrical Engineers, and the 

American Chemical Society. Mr. Acker 
married, in 1892, Alice Reynolds, daughter 
of William I!. !5oal, of N ew York, and 11 icy 
have four children. Address: Niagara 

Falls, N. Y. 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



ADAIR, John A. M.: 

Congressman, banker; born on a farm in 
Jay County, Indiana, Dec. 22, 1863; son of 
James G. and Sarah (Hudson) Adair, and 
since 1880 he has been a resident of Port 
land, Ind., county seat of his native county, 
in the high school of which city he received 
his education. He was elected city clerk of 
Portland, clerk of Jay County in 1890, and 
while in that office studied law. He was ad 
mitted to the bar in 1895 and practised law 
until he was elected president of the First 
National Bank of Portland, since which time 
he has devoted his attention to the banking 
business. In 1902 he was elected to the 
General Assembly of Indiana., and was made 
chairman of the Democratic Caucus in the 
session of 1903. In 1906 he was elected to 
the Sixtieth Congress, and in 1908 he was 
reflected to the Sixty-first Congress from 
the Eighth Indiana District. Mr. Adair 
married, in 1890, Grace R. Johnson, and has 
one son. Address: Portland, Ind. 

ADAM, James Noble: 

Mayor of Buffalo, N. Y.; born in Peebles, 
Scotland, March 1, 1842; son of Rev. 
Thomas and Isabella (Borthwick) Adam. 
He was educated in the Edinburgh parochial 
schools until 1854, when he was apprenticed 
to the dry goods business with Thomas 
Cooper and Company, of Edinburgh, and in 
that employ he rose from bundle-boy to 
clerk, remaining with that house ten years. 
He was then in business for himself in Edin 
burgh for seven years. In 1872, upon the 
advice of his brother, the late Robert Borth 
wick Adam, who had already established 
himself in the dry goods business in Buffalo, 
he came to the United States and started a 
store in New Haven, Conn., but in 1881 he 
closed out his business there and founded at 
Buffalo the firm of J. N. Adam and Com 
pany, which in a few years became the lead 
ing department store of that city, and which 
he conducted with great success until 1906, 
when he retired from business. Mr. Adam 
is a Democrat, and in 1895 he was elected 
to the City Council of Buffalo. In 1905 he 
was elected mayor of Buffalo for a four- 
year term. He reformed the police depart 



ment and put all of the departments on a 
business basis. He is a member of the 
Fine Arts Academy, the Buffalo Historical 
Society, the Chamber of Commerce and the 
Buffalo and Saturn Clubs, and is also a 
member of the Advisory Board of the Chil 
dren s Hospital. Mr. Adam married, in 
Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1872, Margaret L. 
Paterson (now deceased). Address: 60 
Oakland Place, Buffalo, N. Y. 

ADAMS, Alva: 

Merchant and ex-governor of Colorado; 
born in Iowa County, Wis., May 14, 1850; 
son of a Kentuckian, who was a farmer. 
He attended the common country schools; 
went to Colorado in 1871 and first engaged 
in hauling ties, but from that developed into 
a successful merchant, first at Colorado 
Springs, and afterward at Pueblo. He was 
a member of the first State Legislature of 
Colorado in 1876, was elected governor of 
Colorado as a Democrat in 1886 and 1896, 
serving two two-year terms; was again the 
Democratic candidate for governor in 1904 
and was declared elected and inaugurated 
three months later; but, though elected by 
over ten thousand majority, he was ousted 
by a hostile Legislature, and the lieutenant- 
governor became governor. He has been 
president of the Pueblo Savings Bank since 
1891. Address: Pueblo, Colo. 

ADAMS, Arthur Lincoln: 

Consulting hydraulic engineer; born near 
Greensburg, Ind., Sept. 15, 1864; son of Ja 
cob Clendemie and Nancj^ (Hamilton) Ad 
ams. He was graduated from Kansas State 
University, B.S., 1886, with membership 
in the Sigma Xi honor society. From 1886 
to 1890 he was engaged on railroad con 
struction in Nebraska, Oregon and Washing 
ton, and from 1890 to 1896 in the design 
and construction of various water works 
for municipalities, irrigation and other hy 
draulic projects in the Western States; since 
1896 he lias been practising as a consulting 
hydraulic engineer, as chief engineer of large 
undertakings and municipal water-supplies, 
and as manager of water works properties 
in the Western States. Mr. Adams is a 



MEN -OF AMERICA. 



member and director of the American Soci 
ety of Civil Engineers; member of the 
Franklin Institute of Philadelphia, Tech 
nologieal Society of the Pacific Const, Amer 
ican Academy of Political and Social Science 
and. the National Geographic Society. He 
is a trustee of the First Presbyterian Church 
and of the Young Men s Christian Associa 
tion of Oakland, California; president of 
the San Francisco Association of Members 
of the American Society of Civil Engineers. 
In 1397 he was awarded the Thomas Fitch 
Rowland prize of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers. He is author of numerous 
professional papers and discussions con 
tributed to the Transactions of that society, 
and to the technical press. He married at 
Tapeka, Kan., Dec. 1!), 1889, Mary Young 
Geninell, and they have four children. Res- 
idence: 650 Oakland Avenue. Office: 1014 
Broadway, Oakland, Calif. 

ADAMS, Brooks: 

Lawyer and author; born in Quincy, 
Mass., June 24, 1848; son of the late Charles 
Francis Adams. He was educated in va 
rious schools in this country and abroad and 
was graduated from Harvard College in 
1870. He was secretary to his father when 
the latter was one of the arbitrators of the 
Alabama claims at Geneva, and took a per 
sonal part in other historic events. He was 
admitted to the bar and practised law until 
1881, when he retired, giving his time to 
travel and study for several years, but later 
resuming practice. He is author of: The 
Emancipation of Massachusetts; The Law of 
Civilization and Decay; America s Economic 
Supremacy; The New Empire; Centraliza 
tion and the Law. He married, in 1889, 
Evelyn, daughter of Rear Admiral C. H. 
Davis, U. S. N. Residence: Quincy, Mass. 
Office: 84 State Street, Boston, Mass. 

ADAMS, Charles Francis: 

Historical writer and publicist; born in 
Boston, Mass., May 27, 1835; son of Charles 
Francis Adams, diplomat. He was gradu 
ated from Harvard as A.B. in 1856, was 
admitted to the bar in 1858; served in the 
Union Army through Civil War from first 
lieutenant to lieutenant-colonel of Massa 
chusetts Cavalry and was brevetted briga 



dier-general. He was appointed a member 
of the Board of Railway Commissioners of 
Massachusetts in LS69, and declined reap- 
pointmeiit in 1870, became president of the 
I mon Pacific Railway in 1884 and resigned, 
90. He served as president of the Massa 
chusetts Historical Society in 1895. Mr. 
Adams is author of: Chapters on Erie and 
>ther Essays; Railroads, their Origin and 
Problems; Notes on Railway Accidents; 
Massachusetts, Its Historians and Its His 
tory; Three Episodes of Massachusetts His 
tory; Life of Charles Francis Adams; 
Richard Harry Dana, a Biography; Lee at. 
Appomattox, and Other Papers; Three Phi 
Beta Kappa Addresses; Lee s Centennial, 
1907. Mr. Adams received from Harvard 
the degree of LL.D. in 1895. He married, 
Nov. 8, 1805, Mary Ogden. Address: 23 
Court Street, Boston. 

ADAMS, Charles Josiah: 

Clergyman, author; born at New Lisbon, 
Ohio, Oct. 31, 1850; son of Rev. Josiah and 
Sarah A. (Ford) Adams. He was gradu 
ated from Mount Union College, Alliance, 
Ohio as A.B. in 1871; studied at Yalo 
in 1873, and Boston University, in 1874. 
He was ordained priest in the Episcopal 
Church in 1875, was canon of St. John s 
Cathedral, Denver, Colo., 1882 to 1885; 
dean of Wichita, Kansas, 1885 to 1888; 
rector of St. Luke s Church, Chicago, 1888 
to 1891; rector of the Church of the Holy 
Spirit, Rondout-bn-Hudson, N. Y., 1891 to 
1890, and since May 1, 1896, he has been 
rector of St. Luke s Church, Rossville, 
Staten Island, N. Y. He received the de 
gree of D.D. from Mount Union College. 
Mr. Adams was the organizer and is the 
manager and lecturer for the Church Think 
ing Bureau and The Bureau of Biophilism, 
or Animal Psychology. He is author of: 
Where is My Dog? or., Is Man alone Im- 
lortal ? ; The Matterhorn Head and Other 
Poems ; How Baldy Won the County Seat, 
tc. He was formerly chaplain of the New 
York Press Club. Dr. Adams married, 
Vlarch 22, 1876, Jennie E. Holloway, and 
has a son. Residence: Rossville, Staten 
Island, N. Y. Address: 29 Lafayette Place, 
New York City. 



10 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



ADAMS, Cyrus Hall: 

I! Hived merchant; born at Kerr s Creek, 
Kockbridge County, Va., Feb. 21, 1849: son 
<>f Hugh and Amanda (McCormick) Adams. 
His mother was a daughter of Robert Mc 
Cormick of Virginia. The family having 
removed to Chicago, young Adams received 
his education in the public schools of that 
city and at the old University of Chicago. 
He entered the employ of Cyrus H. McCor 
mick & Co.. grain merchants. 18(17; became 
partner, 1871, in the reorganized firm of Mc 
Cormick. Adams & Co.. and in 1883 became 
head of the linn of Cyrus 11. Adams & Co.. 
which position he held until 1880, when he 
i: tired on account of ill health. During the 
period from 1^71 to 1889 lie was a member 

I the Arbitration Committee, a member of 
the Appeals Committee and a director of the 
Chicago Board of Trade. He was also a 
director of the National Bank of America. 
Among the positions of trust he has held 
are those of trustee of the McCormick Theo 
logical Seminary, member of the Board of 
(Governors of the Presbyterian Hospital, 
and governing member of the Art Insti 
tute of Chicago; member of Union League, 
Omventsia, and Saddle and -Cycle Clubs of 
Chicago. Mr. Adams is an Independent 
Democrat in politics and a member of the 
Presbyterian Church. He marrird in Chi 
cago, Sept. 26, 1878, Emma J.. daughter of 
Lyman Blair, and lias one sou, Cyrus H. 
Adams, Jr. Address: 155 Rush Street, Chi 
cago, 111. 

ADAMS, Edward Dean: 

Banker; born in Boston. April 9, 184(5; 
son of Adoniram Judson and Harriet Lin 
coln (Norton) Adams. He was educated 
in Norwich University, Northfield, Vt., re 
ceiving from it the degree of B.S. in 1864. 
and later those of M.S., LL .D. and M.A. 
He was a bookkeeper, I860 to 1870, and 
from 1870 to 1878 a member of the banking 
firm of Richardson, Hill & Co.. of Boston; 
was of the banking firm of Winslow, Lanier 

* Co. from 1878 to 1893. and since then has 
been the American representative of the 
Deutsche Bank of Berlin. Mr. Adams has 
been actively connected with the organiza 
tion and reorganization of railway and in 



dustrial corporations, and is president and 
director of the Bullock Electric and Man 
ufacturing Co. and of the Cataract Con 
struction Co.. is a director and chairman 
of tne executive committee of the Em 
pire Engineering Corporation: director and 
member of the executive committee of the 
Cataract Power and Conduit Co., of Buf 
falo, Niagara Development Co., Niagara 
Junction Railway Co. and Niagara Falls 
Power Co.; director of the Allis-Chal- 
mers Co.. Allis-Chalmers-Bullock. Limited, 
of Montreal, American Cotton Oil Co., East 
Jersey Water Co. (president), Guatemala 
Railway Co. of New Jersey, General Se 
curity Co.. Tonawanda Cataract Power Co.; 
president, of the Rumson (N. J. ) Im 
provement Company (water company). 
Mr. Adams is chairman of the medal com 
mittee of the American Numismatic So 
ciety, trustee of the American Scenic and 
Historic Preservation Society, vice-president 
of -the Germanistic Society of America, 
trustee and chairman of the finance* com 
mittee of the Metropolitan Museum of 
Art; trustee of Norwich University, Mili 
tary College of Vermont; trustee and vice- 
president of the School of Musical Art of 
New York City, life member of the Ameri 
can Geographical Society, fellow of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers, fellow 
in perpetuity of the National Academy of 
Design and member of many scientific, ar 
tistic and patriotic societies, national and 
local, of the Oesterreichisclie Gesellschaft 
fur Medaillenkunst, the Societe des Ami de 
la Medialle Franeaise, and of many leading 
clubs in New York City and elsewhere. He 
is vestryman and treasurer of St. George s 
Episcopal Church of Rumson Hills, N.\L. 
and a member of St. Thomas Episcopal 
Church of New York. Mr. Adams married 
in 1872, Frances Amelia Gutterson, and they 
have one daughter. Residence: 445 Madison 
Avenue. Address: 71 Broadway, New York 
City. 

ADAMS, Edward LeGrand: 

Consul-general ; born at Clarence, Erie 
County, N. Y., Jan. 3. 1851; son of Benja 
min T. and Janet (Gibson) Adams. He was 
I educated at the Clarence Academy* the State 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



! ! 



Normal School at Brockport, N. Y. and the 
University of Rochester. He engaged in 



for the Eighth Judicial Circuit. Judge 
Adams has |, ; ul the degree O f LL.TJ con 



newspaper work on the editorial staff of the term! ,,,,,, hi,,, by the University of 
^^^^L^*"?*^* % wLllton UaiveTsi^ 



p818S3 - 

Pa., 1880-1883; and was editor of the El- ! the Revolution and of tin- New England 

mira Da.lv Advertiser, 1883-1898. Mr. Ad- | Society of St. Louis. Residence 2 f West 
ams was an assistant m the literary bureau rnoreland Place, Si. Louis. Official ad- 
at the National Republican headquarters at dress: Custom House Buildin- St Lou* 
New York in the campaigns of 1896 and ! Mo. 
1900. He lias filled various important of 
ficial positions, having been deputy collector AD AMS, George Bethune: 

"Li Un 4 ted v ta !n- h ; te ?V Revenue for the Iud - c f th " u - s - District p^tj i"- 

28th *ew \ork District from 1890 to 1894, ] in Philadelphia. April 3, 1845; son of Vh- 
and a member of the New York State Tax drew W. and Mary A. Adams He was 
Commission from 189 , to 1898. In June, j educated in public ami private schools in 
02, he was appointed secretary of the Philadelphia. He served in the Civil War 
American Legation and consul-general at : from May to Au-ust. 1801, and again dur- 
Stockholm, Sweden, was charge d affaires ing Lee s invasion of Pennsylvania in 1863 
for four months in 1902-1903, and is now and in the Quartermaster s Department of 
consul-general of the United States at Stock- I the Regular Army. 1804-1871. He was ad- 
holm. Mr. Adams married at Elmira, in ! mitted to the Pennsylvania Bar in 1S7S : 
1879, Kate L, Atwater, daughter of Dwight | removed to New York City in 1883. and 
Atwater. Address: American Consulate- practised law, chiefly in admiralty cases, 
General, Stockholm, Sweden. ; until he was appointed by President Me 

Kinley to be district judge for the Soul hern 

ADAMS, Elmer Bragg: District of New York , in August, 1901. He 

United States circuit judge; horn at Pom- was veappointed by President. Roosevelt and 
fret, Vermont, Oct. 27, 1842; son of Jarvis I ^onfirnu d in December, 1901, and since then 
Adams and Eunice (Mitchell) Adams. He : llns entinued in that ollice. He is a nii in- 
was graduated from Yale College as B.A. ! l>(>1> of tlu Association of the P>ar of the 
in 1805. and soon after went to Georgia as i Cit y of X( w York - iuul ()f th(l l i<> l^igm- 
the representative of the American Union j aml Ardsley Clubs. He married, -July 12. 
Commission, and there inaugurated at At- i 1904 < Helen J. Malfour. Address: 27 West 
lanta and Milledgeville a system of free > s ti-eet, Xew York (Mty. 
schools for white children. He returned to 

Vermont in 1800, began the study of law, ADAMS Geor ^ e Evere tt: 
and afterwards attended Harvard Law Lawyer; born at Keene. X. 11.. June. 
School and in 1808 he was admitted to the 1840, son of IScnjamin Franklin and Louise 
Vermont Bar. He removed to St. Louis. (Ruth) Adams. He removed with his fam- 
Mo., in the same year and established in ily to Chicago in 1853. was prepared for 
general law practice until elected judge of j college at Phillips Exeter Academy, and was 
the State circuit court for a term of six j graduated from Harvard University. T>..\. 
years. At the end of his term in 1885 in 1800, and LL.B. in 1805. Returning 1<> 
he declined reelection and re-mined prac- | Chicago, lie was admitted to the bar ami 
tice in which he continued until appointed j began to practise his profession, in which 
by President. Cleveland in 1895 United j he still continues. Mr. Adams is a Republi- 
States district judge for the Eastern Dis- j can in politics and as such was elected to 
trict of Missouri in which office he served i the Illinois State Senate in 1880, continuing 
until May, 1905. when he was nominated j from 1881 until 1883 when he resigned to 
by President Roosevelt and confirmed by ! take -the seat in Congress to which he had 
the Senate as United States Circuit Judge) been elected. Here he served four terms, 



12 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



I icing member of the Forty-eighth, Forty- 
ninth. Kiflieth ami Fifty-first Congresses. 
He was formerly one of the overseers of 
Harvard College, is a trustee of the. New- 
It* Try Library and of the Field Columbian 
Museum and a member of the Chicago, 
I iiion League, University, Onwentsia and 
Harvard Clubs. Mr. Adams married in 
Chicago, in 1871, Adele Foster, and they 
have two daughters. Residence: 530 Belden 
Avenue. Address: Oil The Temple, Chi 
cago, 111. 

ADAMS, Henry: 

Author; born in Boston, Mass., Feb. 10, 
1838; son of Charles Francis Adams, the 
diplomat. He was graduated from Harvard, 
lsr>s, and was private secretary to his 
father while the later was American minis 
ter to London, 1861-1808. At the expiration 
of his father s service at the Court of St. 
-lames, Mr. Adams became assistant profes 
sor of history at Harvard University, serv 
ing from 1870 to 1877 in that position. 
During six years of this period he was edi 
tor of the North American Review. Mr. 
Adams chief fame rests upon his History 
of the United States in nine volumes, but he 
is also author of a large number of histori 
cal essays; Essays on Anglo-Saxon Law, 
and his compilation of Documents Relating 
to New England Federalism is a standard 
on that topic. He has also written several 
volumes of biography and is among the 
leaders in American historical research and 
writing. Address: 1003 H Street, Wash 
ington, D. C. 

ADAMS, Henry Carter: 

Political economist, statistician and edu 
cator; born at Davenport, Iowa, 1851; son 
of Ephraim and Elizabeth S. A. (Douglass) 
Adams. He was educated at Denmark 
(Iowa) Academy and Iowa College, from 
which he was graduated as A.B. in 1874. 
He afterwards took post-graduate work at 
Johns Hopkins University, from which he 
received the degree of Ph.D. in 1878, after 
which he continued his special studies in 
Heidelberg, Berlin and Paris. Iowa College 
conferred upon him the degree of LL.D. in 
1898, and the University of \\ iseonsin con 



ferred the same in 1903. He was a lecturer 
on economic subjects at Cornell University, 
the Johns Hopkins 1 niversity and the Uni 
versity of Michigan from 1880 to 1887, and 
since-* 1887 has tilled his present chair as 
professor of political economy and finance 
in the University of Michigan. Dr. Ad 
ams was statistician of the Interstate Com 
merce Commission from 1887 to 1900, and 
is now expert in charge of statistics and ac 
counts, in the employ of the commission and 
engaged in formulating a system of standard 
accounts for railways of the United States. 
He was director of the Division of Transpor 
tation for the Eleventh Census. Since 1!)OG 
he has worked out a uniform system of rail 
way accounting for the railways of the 
United States, as also for the express com 
panies, electric railways, and sleeping-car 
companies for promulgation by the Inter 
state Commerce Commission. He has writ 
ten extensively upon his special subjects, 
and is author of: Outline of Lectures on Po 
litical Economy, 1881 (second edition, 
1880) ; The State in Relation to Industrial 
Action, 1887; Taxation in the United States 
from 1787 to 1810, 1884; Public Debts, 
1887; The Science of Finance (both books 
translated into Japanese), 1888; Statistics 
of Railways from 1888 to 1900; Economics 
and Jurisprudence, 1897; Commercial Valu 
ation of Railways (which appeared as Bul 
letin 21 of the Census in 1904), and he was 
joint editor of the Digest of Senate Com 
mittee Hearings on Regulation of Railway 
Rates, 1905. Dr. Adams married, in 1890, 
Bertha II. Wright, of Port Huron, Mich, 
Address: Ann Arbor, Mich. 

ADAMS, Herbert: 

Sculptor; born in Concord, Vt., 1858; son 
of Samuel M. and Nancy A. (Powers) Ad 
ams. He was educated in the public schools 
of Fitohburg, Mass.. at the Institute of 
Technology, Worcester, Mass., at the Mass. 
Normal Art School, Boston, and at art 
schools in Paris, where ho was a pupil of 
Me-rcie and others. He received awards 
from the World s Columbian Exposition, 
1893; Paris Exposition, 1900; and the 
Louisiana Purchase Exposition. He is 
president of the National Sculpture Soci- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



ety, vico-president of the National Academy 
of Design, and first vice-president of the 
American Federation of Arts; is a member 
of the Art Commission of the City of New 
York, the Architectural League of New 
York, and the Century and Players Clubs. 
Among his works are: The FitChbUrg 
fountain, Fitchburg; statue of Win. Ellery 
Channing, Boston; statue of Jerome Whee- 
lock, Graf ton; Jonathan Edwards Memor 
ial, Northampton; Welch Memorial, Au 
burn; bronze doors and marble tympanum, 
St. Bartholomew s church, New York: 
Hoyt Memorial.. Judson Memorial church , 
New York; Pratt Memorial, Ehiamiel Bap 
tist church, Brooklyn; statue of Joseph 
Smith and Matthias Baldwin, Philadel 
phia; statue of Joseph Henry and numer 
ous other sculptures, Library of Congress, 
Washington; statue of (Jen. Humphreys! 
Fredericksburg ; the Tevis Memorial, San 
Francisco: besides numerous busts and re 
liefs. Address: 131 West llth St., New 
York City. 

ADAMS, Maude: 

Actress; !x>rn in .Salt Lake City. Utah, 
Nov. 11, 1872; daughter of James and An 
nie (Adams) Kiskadden. Her father was a 
business man and her mother an actress, 
playing under her maiden name of Annie 
Adams, and engaged as leading woman in 
the stock company of the Salt Lake Theatre. 
During her early childhood in San Francisco 
she appeared several times on the stage in 
children s parts, but from the ages of six 
to sixteen applied herself to her studies, and 
then, in 1888. entered upon her career as an 
actress in the part of a schoolmistress in 
Hoyt s A Midnight Bell at the Madison 
Square Theatre in New York. About a year 
later in the part of a crippled girl in The 
Lost Paradise her talents aroused the in 
terest of the critics and the public. Several 
other successes followed, and from 1892 to 
1897 she was leading woman with John 
Drew, and since 1898 has been starring as 
" Babbie " in The Little Minister, as " Ju 
liet " in Romeo and Juliet, in L Aiglon. 
Quality Street, The Pretty Sister of Jose, 
Hop o My Thumb, Peter Pan, and, more 



13 

recently, in What Every Woman Knows 
Address: 01 West 36th St., New York City. 

ADAMS, Milton Butler: 

Officer Corps of Engineers, United States 

Army; born at Beaver Falls, Pa., April 11, 

345; son of Samuel P. Adams and Ellen 

Barker) Adams. He was educated at the 

CalVin Moor Seminary, Salem, Ohio, and the 

uted States Military Academy, in which 
he was an honor man in the class of 1865. 
He has been an officer of the Corps of En 
gineers, U. S. Army, continuously sine;, 
June, 1805; being commissioned first lieu 
tenant of engineers, June 23, 1865; captain, 
Jan. (j. 1870: major, July 3, 1883; lieuten 
ant colonel, July 5, 1898, and colonel in the 
Corps of Engineers, April 23, 1904. Colo 
nel Adams is a member of the Military Or 
der of the Loyal Legion and of the Sons of 
the American Revolution. Residence: 154 
Washington Street. Office: U. S. Engineer 
Office, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

ADAMS, Oscar Fay: 

Author and lecturer; born Worcester, 
Mass., graduate of the New Jersey State 
Normal School. Mr. Adams is the Ameri 
can editor of the Henry Irving Shakespeare 
and he has produced a considerable number 
of original works together with many lit 
erary compilations, including a Dictionary 
of American authors (now in its sixth 
edition) and selections from the poets. He 
is a well-known and a popular lecturer upon 
literature and architecture. Mr. Adams is 
secretary of the Boston Authors Club. Ad 
dress: The Hermitage, Willow St., Boston. 

ADAMS, Samuel Hopkins: 

Journalist and author; born at Dunkirk. 
New York, Jan. 20, 1871; son of Myron 
and Hester Rose (Hopkins) Adams. He 
received his education at the Rochester 
Free Academy, from which he was grad 
uated in 1887, and at Hamilton College, 
graduating as A.B. in 1891. He was a re 
porter and special writer on the New York 
Sun from 1891 to 1900; managing editor of 
McClure s Syndicate, 1900 to 1902; adver 
tising manager for McClure, Phillips & Co., 



1 1 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



publishers, 1902 to 1904; on the editorial 
-ia IV .if \!r< lure s Magazine in 1004 and 
1 !H).">; general magazine writer on public 
health and other topics from 1905. Mr 
Adams was author of the Great American 
I i.iud series (patent medicines), in Col 
lier s Weekly, published in collected form 
1>\ the American Medical Association; au 
thor of The Flying Death (fiction), 1908; 
joint author, with Stewart Edward White 
f The Mystery (fiction), 1907, and is au 
thor of short stories in McClure s, Every 
body s, Collier s, etc. Mr. Adams is a trus 
tee of Hamilton College, Clinton, N. Y.. 
and in political views is a moderate Social 
ist. He is a member of the Alpha Delta 
Phi fraternity. He married at Charleston, 
Weal Virginia, October 19, 1898, Elizabeth 
IJuiln-T Noyes and they have two children. 
He has his summer home at Ensenore, N. 
Y . Address: 32 Chedell Place, Auburn,. 
X. Y. 

ADAMS, Washing-ton Irving Lincoln: 

One of the leading writers of the United 
States on subjects connected with photogra 
phy; born in New York City, Feb. 22, 1865; 
son of Washington Irving, and Marion L. 
(Briggs) Adams. He has been prominently 
connected with the development of modern 
photography, having been president of the 
Scovill and Adams Co. for three years, and 
editor of the Photographic Times over ten 
years. He was for several years editor of 
the American Annual of Photography and 
was one of the leaders in the development 
of the scientific and artistic possibilities of 
photography. He is a life member of the 
American Institute and honorary member 
of a large number of photographic societies 
and camera clubs. Mr. Adams is a member 
of the Sons of the American Revolution, 
Huguenot Society, the Society of Colonial 
Wars, and the Founders and Patriots of 
America. He has written several works on 
photography. He is the president of Styles 
and Cash, stationers and printers, the Pho 
tographic Times Publishing Association and 
the* Montclair Trust Co.. and officer and di 
rector in other corporations. He married 
at Montclair. N. J.. Nov. 21, 1889, Grace 
Wilson, and they have five children. Resi 



dences: Montclair, N. J., and Littleton, N. 
II. Office: 135 West 14th Street, N. Y. 
City. 

ADAMS, William Forbes: 

Bishop of Easton, Maryland; born in 
Ireland, Jan. 2, 1833, and came to the 
United States in 1841. After completing 
an- academic education he engaged in sec 
ular pursuits for a time, then studied law 
and was admitted to the bar in Mississippi 
in 1858; and entering upon the study of 
theoolgy was ordered deacon. Dec. 27, 1859, 
and ordained priest July, 1860, in Jackson, 
Miss. He began his ministry in Mississippi, 
and was afterward for nearly ten years 
rector of parishes in New T Orleans until 
his consecration in 1875 as bishop of New 
Mexico and Arizona. Ill health led to his 
resignation of his sees in the following 
year, and he reentered parochial work as 
rector for eleven years of Holy Trinity 
Church, Vicksburg, Miss., until 1887, when 
he returned to episcopal labors on his elec 
tion to the see of Easton, Md., of which 
diocese he has since been bishop. The de 
grees of D.D. and D.C.L. and LL.D. have 
been conferred upon Bishop Adams by the 
University of the South at Sewanee, Tenn., 
St. Johns, Annapolis and Washington Col 
lege, Md. Address: Easton, Md. 

ADAM30N, William Charles: 

Congressman; born at Bowdon. Georgia, 
Aug. 13, 1854. He spent his youth alter 
nately in working on the farm and in haul 
ing goods and cotton between Atlanta and 
Bowdon; took the collegiate course at 
Bowdon College, graduating with the de 
gree of A.B. in 1874. the degree of A.M. 
being conferred a few years later by the 
same institution. He read law in the office 
of Hon. Sampson W. Harris; was admitted 
to the bar October. 1870, and has lived at 
Carrollton, Georgia, ever since, practising 
law in the circuit and supreme courts of 
the State, and the Federal courts. He w,as 
judge of the city court of Carrollton from 
1885 to 1889, was attorney for the city of 
Carrollton for several years; was a presi 
dential elector in 1892; .was elected to the 
Ffty-fifth Congress in 1896, has since been 






MEN OF AMERICA. 



biennally reelected, and is now serving in 
the Sixty-first Congress from the Fourth 
Georgia District. He was representative 
from the Georgia Annual Conference of the 
Methodist Protestant Church, to the Gen 
eral Conference at Pittsburgh, Pennsyl 
vania, in 1880, at Atlantic City in 1900, and 
at Washington, D. C., in 1904. He was 
elected by the General Conference at At 
lantic City in 1900 as one of the represen 
tatives of that Church to the Ecumenical 
Council, at London, but did not attend. He 
was one of the commissioners of Methodist 
Protestant Church to confer with commis 
sions from other churches with a view to 
organic union. Address: Carrollton, Ga. 

ADDAMS, Jane: 

Social economist, author; born at Cedar- 
ville, 111., Sept. 6, 1860; daughter of Hon. 
John H. Addams. She was graduated 
from Rockford College in 1881, and | 
after post-graduate study in Europe and 
the United , States she became active 
in social reform work. She inaugurated 
in 1889, at Chicago, the establishment 
known as Hull House, which is a develop 
ment of the social settlement idea to the 
conditions as Miss Addams found them in 
the section of Chicago in which Hull House 
is situated, and has been, with increasing 
effectiveness, the leading factor in social 
betterment in that city. Miss Addams in 
order to help the neighborhood, acted as 
street-cleaning inspector in the Hull House 
district, with most gratifying results, and 
through lectures all over the United States 
and elsewhere, and by her writings, has in 
fluenced modern thought along the lines of 
social betterment. She is author of: De 
mocracy and Social Ethics (Macmillan), 
and Newer Ideals of Peace (Macmillan) ; 
monographs on the Objective and Subjec 
tive Value of Social Settlements, the Sub 
jective Necessity for Social Settlements, and i 
papers on the improvement of the condi- j 
tion of the poor in great cities. Her 
executive ability has brought her member- | 
ship in the managing boards of national 
and local societies of philanthropic pur 
pose, and of organizations for municipal 
reform, and she is also one of the leading 



members of the Woman s Club of Chicago. 
Address: 335 South Halsted Street, Chi 
cago. 

ADE, George: 

Humorist and playwright; born at Kent- 
land, Indiana, February 9, 1866. He was 
graduated from Purdue University in 1887 
and began in newspaper work in Lafayette, 
Indiana, from 1887 to 1890, thence going 
to Chicago, where he was on the staff of 
the Chicago Record from 1890 to 1900. 
Since 1900 his attention has been chiefly 
devoted to work as author and playwright. 
He first attracted attention by his " Fables 
in Slang," and similar writings in the ver 
nacular, among which were those describ 
ing the " Artie " type of modern young man, 
and his early success in writing the li 
bretto of a comic opera led to the produc 
tion of a number of plays, several of which 
have been very successful. His best known 
books are the Artie and Fables in .Slang 
series and his most successful operas and 
plays are: The Sultan of Sulu, Peggy 
from Paris, The County Chairman, The 
Sho-Gun, The College Widow, Father and 
the Boys, Just Out of College, and The Fair 
Co-Ed. Address: Hazelden Farm, Brook, 
Ind. 

ADEE, Alvey Augustus: 

Second assistant secretary of State; born 
at Astoria, N. Y., Nov. 27, 1842; son of 
Augustus A. Adee, fleet surgeon in the 
United States Navy. He was privately 
educated. He entered the diplomatic serv 
ice as secretary of legation at Madrid, 
September 9. 1870, and was at different 
times charge d affaires there. He was trans 
ferred from Madrid to the Department of 
State in July, 1877; and he became chief 
of the Diplomatic Bureau July 11, 1878; 
third assistant secretary of State July 18, 
1882, and second assistant secretary of 
State since August 3, 1896. He was secre 
tary of Stale ad interim in September, 1898, 
and acting secretary of State for a time 
during the Chinese troubles of 1900. Sec 
retary Adee is the leading expert in diplo 
matic precedents and usages in the United 
States as well as a very high authority on 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



all matters of Governmental etiquette, 
Mr. Adee is practially a permanent un- 
der-secretary of State and formulates a 
large proportion of the diplomatic and 
state papers of the United States. Resi- 
dencc: 1019 Fifteenth Street, N. YV. Of- 
iice: Department of State. Washington, 
D. C. 

ABLER, Cyrus: 

President of Dropsie College for Hebrew 
and Cognate Learning, Philadelphia; born 
at Van Buren, Ark., Sept. 13, 18(53; son of 
Samuel Adler and Sarah (Sulzberger) 
Adler. He was graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, A.B., 1883, A.M., 
1886. He was scholar, fellow, instructor 
and associate in Semitic languages in Johns 
Hopkins University, 1884-1893, receiving 
the degree of Ph.D. in 1887. He was libra- 
rian and later assistant secretary of the 
Smithsonian Institution to October, 1908, 
and .curator of the Collection of Historic 
Archseology and Historic Religions in the 
United States National Museum. He is 
president of the American Jewish Histor- 
ical Society; trustee of the Jewish Theo- 
logical Seminary at New York and of 
the Gratz College at Philadelphia and 
chairman of the Board of Editors of a new 
translation of the Bible. Dr. Adler is a 
member of the American Philosophical 
Society; the Archaeological Institute of 
America; Washington ^Academy of Sci- 
ences; American Oriental Society. and 
others. He is author of numerous papers 
on Oriental, philological and archaeological 
subjects, and American Jewish history, 
Dr. Adler married Racie Friedenwald. 
Address: 2041 N. Broad St., Philadelphia. 

ADLER, Felix: 

nv l tuJ;, 1<"T^ " n \ ^ Zey 1 Ger ; 
in,inv, August U, 18.)]; son of Samuel and 

Henrietta (Frankfurter) Adler. He re- 
ceivod his preparatory education nt the Co- i 
lunibia Grammar School of New York City, 



versity from 1873 to 1876; has been profes- 
sor of social and political ethics at Colum- 
bia University since 1902, and he founded 
in 187(5, and has since been leader of the 
Society for Ethical Culture. He has been 
director and a trustee of the Ethical Cul- 
ture School, since 1880. He founded the 
; Ethical Society in Berlin, Germany, in 
18i)l; founded the United Relief Works, 
ant | g rs t introduced trained nurses for the 
poor in 1877; and lie was at the head of 
the Cooperative Colonization Society from 
1878 to 1885. He served as Roosevelt pro- 
fessor at the University of Berlin in 1908- 
1909. He has been chairman of the Na- 
tional Child Labor Committee since 1906; 
member of the Tenement House Commis- 
sion, 1885; organized the Tenement House 
Building Company, 1886; introduced free 
Kindergartens in 1876; organized the first 
Society for Teaching of Crippled, 1887 ; and 
he was politically active as a member of the 
Committee of 15 in 1902. Dr. Adler is au- 
thor of: Creed and Deed; The Moral In- 
struction of Children; Life and Destiny; 
Marriage and Divorce; The Religion of 
Duty; Essentials of Spirituality. He mar- 
ried in Brooklyn, N. Y., May. 24, 1880, 
Helen Goldmark. Address: 33 Central 
Park West, New York City. 

AGASSIZ, Alexander: 



ppa honors in 1870, 

PhD ?871 w % Heidelberg as 

. in 18.3. He was professor of Sem- 

.tic languages and literature at Cornell Uni- 



! m Neufchatel, Switzer- 
1835 5 ^ of Professor Louis 

^ He m * to the United States in 
^ *J aduat f i d from Harvard, A.B., 
i ? , and from the Lawrence Scientific 
^ l f th Sa e institution, B.S., 1857. 
" w ^ Distant on the U. S. Coast 
mvey in 1859, and superintendent of the 
Calumet and Hecla Copper Mines on Lake 
Superior, 1800-1809. He surveyed Lake 
Titica > Per > in 1875, and was afterward 
curator and director and is now director 
emeritus of the MusTm of ^ a v 
Zoology at Harvard University He was 
assistant on the United States F^li Cornmfs 

sion in 1891; *^^*^^P- 

son in the examination and classification of 
the collections of The Challenger expedi- 
tion ; took part in three dred-hio- ex pedi 
tions of the steamer Blnk e rf the U S 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



It 



Coast Survey, 1877-1880; the explorations 
of the coral reef of the Hawaiian Islands, 
1899; the Great Barrier Reef of Australia, 
1898 ; expedition in the steamers Croydon 
and Yaralla in the Fiji Islands, 1897; deep 
sea explorations of the Panamic Region 
on the Albatross to the tropical Pacific in 
1900; the Eastern Pacific, 1904-1905; ex 
plorations of the Florida Reef, 1876, 1882 ! 
and 1890; of the Bahamas in 1893; the 
Bermudas in 1894; Cuba, Jamaica and 
other West Indian Islands, 1876 and 1896. 
He received the degrees of LL.U. from Har- ! 
vard in 1885, and from Saint Andrew s Uni- ! 
versity, Edinburgh, in 1901, and the honor- i 
ary degree of S.D. from the University of 
Cambridge in 1887, and from the University 
of Bologna in 1888. He is president of 
the National Academy of Sciences at Wash- | 
ington; foreign member of the Royal So 
cieties of London and Edinburgh ; foreign 
associate of the Institut de France, Paris; j 
oilicier de la Legion d Honneur; knight of 
the Prussian Order of Merit; foreign and 
corresponding member of the Academies at 
Berlin, Vienna, Stockholm, Copenhagen, 
Munich and Rome and all the leading 
zoological societies. Prof. Agassiz is recog 
nized as the pioneer of modern biological 
work in this country. The biological sta 
tions at Woods Hole, Mass., and other 
points owe their existence to his enthusiasm 
in biological research and his name has for 
years been the foremost in America in this 
form of scientific investigation. Address: 
Cambridge, Mass. 

AGNEW, George B.: 

State senator; born in New York City, 
1868; son of A. G. Agnew. He was gradu 
ated from Princeton University, A.B., 1891, 
and since then has been engaged in business 
in New York City. He has always been ac 
tive in politics as a Republican, was elected 
for four terms as representative from the 
Twenty-seventh Assembly District of New 
York County, and in 1906 was elected to the 
State Senate from the new Seventeenth 
Senate District of New York County, and in 
1908 was reflected from the same district. 
He was in 1905 appointed a member of the 
Special Committee of the Legislature, to 



investigate the gas and electric situation in 
the City of New York. Senator Agnew is 
a member of the Republican County Com 
mittee of New York County. He has been 
a member of the National Guard of the 
State of New York for the past fifteen 
years, most of the time being a member of 
Squadron A; served as aide-de-camp on 
Governor Morton s staff. Address: 29 Wil 
liam Street, New York City. 

AGNUS, Felix: 

Editor and publisher of the Baltimore 
American; born in Lyons, France, July 4, 
1839. He received a collegiate education 
in France, and spent four years in travel 
around the world ; served in the war of 
Napoleon 111 with Austria; came to the 
United States in 1860, and became a mem 
ber of the Fifth New York Zouaves in 
1861 ; was promoted second lieutenant for 
bravery in saving the life of General Jud- 
son Kilpatrick at Big Bethel. He distin 
guished himself in the Peninsular cam 
paign, and afterward in Louisiana; was 
wounded at Games Mills and at the siege 
of Port Hudson; he afterward was pro 
moted to major and colonel, serving under 
Sheridan; was brevetted brigadier-general 
of Volunteers and honorably mustered out 
Aug. 22, 1865. He. became connected soon 
after the war with the Baltimore American 
as business manager, and for years has 
been its editor and publisher. He mar- 
| ried Dec. 13, 1864, Miss Fulton, of Balti- 
I more. Address: The Baltimore American. 
Baltimore. 

AIKEN, Wyatt: 

Congressman and farmer; born in Abbe- 
j ville County, S. C., Dec. 14, 1863; son of 
! Hon. D. Wyatt Aiken (member of Con- 
igress) and Virginia Caroline Aiken. He 
I was reared on a farm in Abbeville County 
(in that section now embraced in Green- 
! wood County) ; received a common school 
education at Cokesbury, S. C., and Wash- 
ington, D. C., while there with his father, 
Hon. D. Wyatt Aiken, who was representa 
tive from the Third South Carolina District 
for ten years. While at Washington he ac- 
| quired the art of writing shorthand, and in 



IS 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Jan., 1884, was appointed, an official court 
stenographer in South Carolina, and held 
the position for nineteen years. He 
takes a keen interest in everything pertain 
ing to agriculture. During the war with 
Spain he was a soldier in Company A 
(Abbeville Volunteers), First South Caro 
lina Regiment of Infantry. He never held 
a political office before his election to Con 
gress, but has been a delegate to several 
Democratic State Conventions. He was 
elected from the Third South Carolina Dis 
trict to the Ffty-eighth Congress, in 1902, 
and selected in 1904, 1906 and 1908 to the 
Fifty-ninth, Sixtieth and Sixty-first Con 
gresses. Address: Abbeville, S. C. 

AILES, Milton Everett: 

Financier; born in Shelby County, Ohio, 
Aug. 19, 1807. He was graduated from the 
National University Law Scool at Wash 
ington, D. C., and was admitted to the 
bar of the District of Columbia in 1890. 
Receiving an appointment to a minor posi 
tion in the Treasury Department in 1887, 
lie served through the grades of the 
classified service, and in 1897 he was 
appointed private secretary to the secre 
tary of the Treasury. In 1901 he was 
appointed assistant secretary of the Treas 
ury, performing a large portion of the 
work relative to the finances of the coun 
try which comes under the immediate 
charge of the secretary of the Treasury. 
In April, 1903, he resigned this position 
in order to become vice-president of the 
Riggs National Bank, the leading financial 
institution of the National Capital. Mr. 
Ailes is a fine example of the opportunities 
open to young men who enter the Govern 
ment service and seek to improve them 
selves by means of the educational facil 
ities afforded for the benefit of Govern 
ment clerks in their spare time by the 
educational institutions of Washington. 
By his industry, thrift, and far-sighted 
ness he has become one of the leading 
financiers of Washington and is an admit 
ted authority on banking law and practice, 
on which he has written several maga 
zine articles. He married, in Washington, 



Nov. 25, 1891, Mary E. Gowans. Address: 
Riggs National Bank, Washington, D. C. 

AILSHIE, James Franklin: 

Jurist; born in Green County Tenn., 
June 19, 1808, son of George W. and 
Martha (Knight) Ailshie. Judge Ailshie 
was reared on a farm and was educated 
in the public schools of the vicinity of 
his birth until he was nineteenth years of 
age, when he went to Oregon, teaching 
in the public schools and taking a colle 
giate and law course at Willamette Uni 
versity, at Salem, Ore. He was admit 
ted to the Oregon bar in 1891, and re 
moved to Idaho, where he was admitted 
to the bar of the Supreme Court of that 
State in 1892. He afterward practised law 
in Idaho until Jan. 1903, when he be 
came associate justice of the Supreme 
Court of that State. Judge Ailshie is re 
garded as one of the leading of the 
younger jurists of the West, and has been 
strongly urged for appointment to a Fed 
eral judgeship on several occasions. He is 
a prominent member of the Republican 
party and has been a delegate to the Re 
publican National Convention. He is presi- 
dent of several financial institutions and 
public service corporations in his own city. 
He married at Spokane, Wash., June 19, 
1894, Lucie Bundren. Residence: Grange- 
ville, Idaho. Office: Boise City, Idaho. 

AINSWORTH, Fred Crayton: 

Major-general U. S. Army; born at 
Woodstock, Vt., Sept. 11, 1852. He was 
educated in the schools of Vermont, nad 
afterward entered the Medical Department 
of the University of New York, from which 
he was graduated as M.D. in 1874. He 
; was appointed from Vermont as first lieu 
tenant and assistant surgeon, U. S. Army, 
| Nov. 10, 1874, promoted to major and sur- 
: geon, Feb. 27, 1891; colonel and chief of 
the Record and Pension Office, May 27, 
1892, to brigadier-general and chief of the 
| Record and Pension Office, March 2, 1899, 
and major-general and the military secre- 
I tary of the Army, April 23, 1904. He 
| devised and introduced many improved 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



19 
records of business, including the index- | honor societies. He received the Lalande 

-n C nnann a n -T tem ^ "^ UpW ^ rds of Mcdal of the French Academy of Sciences 
50,000,000 index record cards have been in 1906 for double star discoveries. He 
prepared and placed on file. His excallent married at Oakland, Calif June 19 1888 
work in this department effected a valuable Jessie L. Thomas, and has four children 
saving, by making the full record of every j Address : Lick Observatory, Mount Ham- 
soldier immediately available, and it is esti- ilton, Calif. 

mated that the Government makes a per- ! - . . 

inanent saving of not less than half a mil- AITKEN, Robert Ingersoll: 
lion dollars by having adopted the system. , Sculptor; born in San Francisco, Calif 
Since the date above given, by a legislative ! May 8, 1878; son of Charles H. and Kath- 
reorganization, Mr. Amsworth has been arine (H ig gins) Aitken . H e entered the 



made adjutant-general of the Army and as 



Mark Hopkins Institute of Art in 1896, 



such, in addition to his former duties, has and at the end of the first year received 
charge of all the business previously trans- j a medal for mode i lin and w ^ iven hon . 
acted in the Adjutant-General s office, in- Lrable mention for drawing. Mr. Aitken 
eluding the issuance of orders to the Army, j was the sculptor of a number of the chief 
and all other matters relating to the record- ! monuments on the Pacific Coast, including 
ing authenticating and distributing of offi- j the McKinley monument at Golden Gate 
cial papers. Address: War Department, Parkj San Francisco and the Bret Harte 
\\ ashington, D. C. j monument at San Francisco, and has made 

j a large number of busts of prominent per- 
AITKEN, Robert Grant: sons . He hag been professor of 8Culpt Vr 

Astronomer; born in Jackson, Calif., a t the Mark Hopkins Institute of Art con- 
Dec. 31. 1864; son of Robert and Wilhel- nected with the University of California, 
mina (Depinau) Aitken. He was graduated an( l is a member of the National Sculpture 
from Williams College, A.B., 1887, A.M.. i Society and of other art associations. Ad- 
1892, and received the degree of Sc.D. from j dress: 798 Van Ness Avenue, San Fran- 
the University of the Pacific, 1903. He cisco, Calif, 
was instructor in mathematics at Liver- 
more College, Calif., 1888-1891; professor ; AKED Charles Frederic: 
of mathematics and astronomy, University j Clergyman; born at Nottingham, Eng- 
of the Pacific, 1891-1895; assistant astron- land, Aug. 27, 1864; son of Charles Aked 
omer at Lick Observatory, 1895-1907, and of Nottingham. He was educated in Mr. 
became astronomer at Lick Observatory Lee s Commercial School, the Midland Bap- 
in 1907. He has published numerous arti- tist College and in the University of Not- 
cles in American and German astronom- ] tingham and later received the degree of 
ical journals, relating to comets, satellites, D.D. He was articled to a firm of auc- 
double stars, etc., and he has discovered tioneers at Nottingham and was afterward 
2000 new double stars. He represented auctioneer to the sheriff of Derbyshire until 
Lick Observatory at the Congress of Arts he entered Midland College. He began his 
and Sciences at Saint Louis in Sept. 1904. ministry as pastor of a Baptist Church at 
He was editor of the Publications of the Sysion in Leicestershire, England, in 1886. 
Astronomical Society of the Pacific from While minister of one of the leading Bap- 
1897 to 1908. He is a member of the tist churches of Liverpool, Eng., he was 
American Association for the Advancement 1 called to the Fifth Avenue Baptist Church 
of Science; Astronomical and Astrophysical of New York City, upon which pastorate he 
Society of America; Astronomical Society entered in April, 1907. He has made fre- 
of the Pacific ; American Geographical So- quent trips to the United States, preaching 
ciety, and is honorary member of the Mex- and lecturing since 1893. In England he 
ican Astronomical Society, and is a mem- attained a position of much distinction in 
ber of the Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi his denomination and in public affairs. 



L>o MEN OF AMERICA. 

Ho has IKTMI -.HI extensive contributor to for several years and in institutions of 

the literature of sociology and religion, be- higher, grade in Indiana, Rhode Island and 

ing author of: Changing Creeds and Social Missouri. He was a College president and 

Struggles; The Courage of the Coward ; Old professor from 1879 to 188*5 ; pastor of the 

Evelit* mul Modern Meanings, and also of First Methodist Episcopal Church. Moline, 

many published sermons and pamphlets. Illinois, and First Methodist ^Episcopal 

Dr. Aked married in 1880, Annie, daughter Church, Utica, N. Y., from 1887 to 1893. 

of James Hithersay, of llkeston, Derby- He was an honorary and corresponding 

shire, England. Residence: Central Park member of the World s Congress Auxiliary 

View, 2 West 8(>th St. Address: Fifth of the World s Columbia Exposition of 1893. 

Avenue Baptist Church, West 4(>th St., He was field secretary of the New York 

New York City. State Sabbath Association from 1894 to 

1898. and has been general secretary of the 

AKINS, Thomas Jasper: American Reform Association since 1898. 

Assistant treasurer of the United States; Dr. Albro was chaplain of the Senate of New 

born in Cedar County. Missouri, Aug. 14. York in 1893. and chaplain of the Michigan 

1852; son of John and Mary J. (Halbert) Military Academy from 1901 to 1903. He 

Akins. He was educated in public and pri- is editor of the Reform Magazine, and au- 

Vate schools in his native State, then taught thor of: History of Our Country s Flag; 

in country schools until 1872, Avhen he be- Genealogy of the Allm> Family; and on the 

gan his business life. He has ever sinca Editorial Staff of United Editors Ency- 

been identified with merchandising and clopedia. He was a delegate to the Na- 

banking in Humansville, Mo., as head of tional Republican Conventions of 1880 and 

the T. J. Akins & Son Mercantile Co., and 1900. He is a Mason, Scottish Kite, 33d- 

as director of the Bnnk of Humansville. of degree, and a Knight Templar; a member 

which he was president from 1892-1899. of the Baronial Order of Runnemede; the 

Mr. Akihs has always been an active Repub- Society of Colonial Wars; Sons of the Amer- 

lican, was for several chairman of the ican Revolution; Founders and Patriots of 

Missouri Republican State Committee and America ; Mayflower Descendants; Descend- 

member of the Republican National Com- ants of Colonial Governors; and a member 

mittee. In Jan., 1904. he was appointed by of the Michigan Club of Detroit. He mar- 

President Roosevelt to his present office of ried at Schoharie, New York, Feb. 19, 1878, 

assistant treasurer of the United States at Mary Alice Scribner (born April 0, 1859, 

St Louis, and was reappointed in Doc., and died Aug. 12, 1905). Of that union 

1908. He married in Humansville, Mo., there were five children: Addis Bliss Albro, 

Nov. 23, 1871, Sarah Elizabeth Green, and of New York City, born March 22, 1879; 

they have three children. Residence: 4116 Iva Dell Albro, born April 20, 1881, (died 

Westminster Place. Office: 210 Custom May 24, 1883) ; Ames Scribner Albro. born 

House, St. Louis. Oct. 7, 1882; Ruth Albro. born April 20, 



ALBRO Addis- l888 5U1( * ^ ai d Sloan Albro, born Sept. 27, 

1889. Married second at Redlands. Calif.. 

lorgyman. educator, lecturer: born in Nov. 7. 1907, Miss Jane Evelvn Harrison, of 

Middlelmrg. Sclmharie County, N. Y., Feb. Indiana. Issue: Ursula, born Jan. 31, 1909. 

1855; son of William Bliss and Ann Eliz- Missionary to New Mexico, appointed by the 

eth (\\ood) Albro. He was educated at 1Mroit Conference of the Methodist Episco- 

I ort Edward (New York) Collegiate Insti- pal church. Address: Columbus, N. Mex. 

tttte | Lawrence University (1880) B.S. and 

M.S. (1882); and Union "University, LL.B.. ALDEN Henry Mills: 

188(5. Ho pursued several post-graduate Editor, author-, born at Mount Tabor, 

courses of study and he received the degree near Danby, Vt., Nov. 11, 1836; son of 

of D.D. from Grant University. He taught Ira and Elizabeth Packard (Moore) Alden. 
in the public schools of New York State I His early education was obtained in the 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



ft] 



schools of Hoosick Falls, N. Y., after which 
he entered Williams College, from which he 
was graduated A.I).. 1857, and received the 
decrees of A.M., 18(50, L.H.D., 189.1), and 
LL.D., 1U07. He was graduated from tlie 
Andover Theological Seminary in 18110, hut 
never took orders. Mr. Alden was a Lowell 
Institute, lecturer, 1803-1864, on the suhject 
of The Structure of Paganism. He was edi 
tor of Harper s Weekly, 1863-1860, and has 
bee-n editor of Harper s Magazine since 1869. 
Mr. Alden is author of God and His World, 
1890; A Study of Death, 1895; Magazine 
Writing and the New Literature, 1908; 
and Harper s Pictorial History of the Great 
Rebellion (with A. H. Guernsey). He has 
heen twice married, first in 1861 to Susan 
Frye Foster, of North Andover, Mass., by 
which marriage he has three daughters, and 
second in 1900 to Ada Foster Murray, of 
Norfolk, Ya. Address: Care Harper & 
Brothers, Franklin Square, New York. 

ALDERMAN, Edwin Anderson: 

President of the University of Virginia; 
horn in Wilmington, N. C., May 15, 1861; 
son of James and Susan J. Alderman. He 
was graduated from the University of North 
Carolina as Ph.B. in 1882; was superintend 
ent of the Goldsboro City schools from 1884 
to 1887, assistant State superintendent oi 
North Carolina from 1889 to 1892; profes 
sor of English in the State Normal College in 
1892, and in the same year professor of edu 
cation in the University of North Carolina, 
of which lie became president in 1896. He 
was president of the Tulane University of 
Louisiana from April, 1900, until he was 
called in 1904 to the presidency of the 
L T niversity of Virginia. He received in 1898 
the degrees of D.C.L, from the University of 
the South and of LL.D. from Tulane Uni 
versity of Louisiana, Johns Hopkins Uni 
versity, 1902, Yule and Columbia, 1905, the 
University of North Carolina. 1900 and 
Williams College, 1908. Dr. Alderman is 
a member of the Southern Education Board 
and the General Education Board ; and is 
regarded as one of the leading authorities 
on pedagogical questions. He is vice-presi 
dent of the National Civil Service Reform 
League, and a member of the Virginia State 
Geological Commission, the National Coun 



cil for Industrial Education and the Coun 
cil of International Conciliation. He is 
author of a School History of North Caro 
lina; and of a volume of biography of Wil 
liam Hooper, signer of the Declaration of 
Independence; and he is well known as a 
speaker and lecturer on professional and 
historical subjects. Address: Chariot te^- 
ville, Ya. 

ALDRICH, Edgar: 

Jurist; horn at Pittsburg, N. H., in 1848. 
He was educated at Colebrook Academy, 
was graduated from the University of 
Michigan as LL.B. in 1868 and was ad 
mitted to the New Hampshire Bar in Aug., 
1868. He practised law at Colebrook, N. 
H., until 1881, and then at Littleton, N, H., 
until 1891, was solicitor of Coos County, N. 
H., 1872-1874, and 1876-1879, ami was a 
member and speaker of the New Hampshire 
Legislature in 1885. In 1891 he -was ap 
pointed to his present position as U. S. 
judge for the District of New Hampshire. 
Judge Aldrich was a member of the New 
Hampshire Constitutional Convention in 
1902. He received the degrees of A,M. in 
1801 and of LL.D. from Dartmouth College, 
1901, and the University of Michigan 1907. 
He married in 1872, Louise M. Remiek. Ad 
dress: Littleton, N. H. 

ALDRICH, Nelson Wilmarth: 

United States senator; born at Foster, R. 
I., Nov. 6, 1841. He received an academic 
education, and is engaged in mercantile pur 
suits, being thg head of a large firm of 
wholesale grocers. He has been an active 
Republican from his first vote; was presi 
dent of the Providence Common Council. 
1871-1873; was a member of the Rhode Is 
land Legislature, 1875-1876, and its speaker 
in 1876. He was elected a member of Con 
gress in 1878, and reflected in 1880, but re 
signed from the Forty-seventh Congress, 
having been elected Oct. 5, 1881, United 
States Senator from Rhode Island. He was 
reflected in 1888, in 1892, in 1898 and 
1905, and his present term will expire 
March 3, 1911, He is chairman of Com 
mittee on Finance, and the Republican 
leader in the Senate. Address: Providence, 
R. I. 



22 

ALDRICH. Orlando Wesley: 

Lawyer; born in Clarence, N. Y., March 
30, 1840; son of Rev. Sydney and Lydia 
Ann (York) Aldrich. Tic was educated in 
the Clarence Academy, graduated from lli- 
nois Wesleyan University, B.A., and after 
ward received from it the degrees of M.A., 
Ph.D.. and D.C.L.. and from Toronto Uni 
versity the degree of LL.D. He served in 
the Civil War in Company 1), 14th New 
York Infantry. Mr. Aldrich has been ad 
mitted to the bars of Illinois. Ohio, West 
Virginia, District of Columbia, and the 
Supreme Court of the United States, ami 
served as chairman of committee of ex 
amination for the bar of the Supreme 
Court of Illinois, and the Supreme Court 
of Ohio. He was professor of law in Illi 
nois Wesleyan University, 1870-1881. and 
in Ohio State University 1801-1800, ami 
was editor of the Weekly Jurist. Bloom- 
ington, 111.. 1878-1881. lie has been 
president of the Columbus and Clinton- 
ville Electric Railway Company, Worth - 
ington, Clintonville and Columbus Street 
Railway Company; secretary of the Co 
lumbus, Delaware and Marion Electric 
Railway Company, and an officer in other 
corporations. Mr. Aldrich is a member of 
the Royal Society of Arts, London, fellow, 
North British Academy, American Institute 
of Civics, National Geographic Society and 
the American Political Science Association, 
is a 32-degree Mason, Knight Templar and 
member of the Mystic Shrine ; post com 
mander and department judge-advocate, 
Grand Army of the Repulrtic; member of 
the Union Veteran Legion; past president 
of the Ohio Society Sons of the Revolution. 
and president of the Ohio Society of the 
War of 1812. He edited the First American 
edition of Anson on Contracts; compiled 
the Supplemental Volume of the Ohio Stat 
utes, and wrote the article on Elections in 
the first edition of the American and Eng 
lish Encyclopedia of Law. He married first 
at Hudson, 111., Nov. 25. 1863. Roselia O. 
Jewell, and second, at Mt. Vernon. Ohio, 
July 25, 1878. Sarah A. Taylor, nee Coulter, 
suid has two living sons. Residence: Ma- 
plehnrst. Station B, R. F. D.. Columbus. 
Office: Wesley Block, Columbus, Ohio. 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



ALDEICH, Richard: 

Journalist; born in Providence, R. I., 
July 31, 1863; son of Elisha Smith and 
Anna Elizabeth (Gladding) Aldrich. He 
was educated in the Providence High School 
and Harvard College, being graduated A.B.. 
1885. He became connected with the Provi 
dence Journal in Aug., 1885, and was suc 
cessively reporter, musical and dramatic 
editor and editorial writer until 1889; pri 
vate secyetary to L T . S. Senator Dixon, 1889- 
1891. He joined the stall of the New York 
Tribune as reporter, 185)1, and was succes 
sively telegraph editor, assistant day editor 
and assistant literary editor of that paper 
until entering in Oct., 1902, upon his pres 
ent position as musical editor of the Xew 
York Times. Mr. Aldrich translated into 
English the book of Mine. Lilli Lehman 11. 
How to Sing; and he is author of: A Guide 
to Parsifal. 1904; A Guide to the Nibelung s 
King, 1905; also articles in various maga- 
xines on musical subjects. Address: care 
The New York Times. New York City. 

ALDRICH, William Sleeper: 

Educator and engineer; born in Philadel 
phia, March 3. 1863; son of George Wells 
and Sal lip Edith (Sleeper) Aldriclf. He 
was graduated from the U. S. Naval Acad 
emy in 1883, and from the Stevens Insti 
tute of Technology as M.E. in 1884, and 
afterward engaged in teaching and engi 
neering practice. He taught drawing and 
mechanical engineering in Johns Hopkins 
University, 1889-1892, was professor of me 
chanical engineering in the University of 
West Virginia. 1892-1899; professor of elec 
trical engineering in the University of Illi 
nois from 1899-1901, and in the latter year 
became director of the Thomas S. Clarkson 
Memorial School of Technology at Potsdam. 
N. Y v where he has built up an institution 
of technical education which is of high re 
pute and efficiency. During the Spanish- 
American War he served as passed assistant 
engineer (with the relative rank of lieuten 
ant) in the U. S. Navy, being attached to 
the U. S. S. Vulcan, with Admiral Samp 
son s fleet in Cuban waters. He is a fellow 
of the American Association for the Ad 
vancement of Science; member of the Amor- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



23 



lean Society of Mechanical Engineers, Amer 
ican Institute of Electrical Engineers and 
Society for the Promotion of Engineering 
Education. Mr. Ahlrich married in Phila 
delphia. July 1, 1886, Mary Lavinia Purdy, 
and has four children. Address: Pots 
dam, N. Y. 

ALERDING, Herman Joseph: 

Roman Catholic bishop of Fort Wayne; 
born in Newport. Ky., April 13, 1845. He 
was educated at Vincennes, Ind., St. Thomas. 
Ky., and in St. Meinrad s Abbey, Spencer 
County, Ind. He was ordained as priest, ! 
Sept. 22. 18(58. and was consecrated as 
bishop of Fort Wayne, Tnd., Nov. 30. 1900, 
in the cathedral at Fort Wayne. Besides 
his distinguished services to the church, 
Bishop Alerding is the author of several 
historical works including the comparison 
entitled, " Plymouth Rock and Maryland," 
a history of the Catholic church in the dio 
cese of Vincennes, published in 1883, and a 
history of the diocese of Fort Wayne, Ind., 
published in 1!M)7. Address: Fort Wayne, 
Ind. 

ALESHIRE, James Buchanan: 

Quartermaster general, U. S. Army; 
born in Gallipolis, Ohio, Oct. 31, 1856; son 
of Reuben and Margaret (Shepard) Ale- 
shire. He was graduated from the U. S. 
Military Academy, in 1880, and was as 
signed to duty with the Cavalry arm. In 
1895 he was transferred to the quartermas 
ter s department, and in the Spanish-Amer 
ican War was chief quartermaster of volun 
teers as major and lieutenant-colonel. He 
was discharged from the volunteer service 
May 1, 1901, and reached his majority in 
the quartermaster department of the regu 
lar service Feb. 2, 1901. In 1907, upon the 
retirement of Quartermaster-General Hum 
phrey he was appointed quartermaster-gen 
eral of the army with the rank of brigadier- 
general. General Aleshire has had a bril 
liant career in active service, having served 
against the Apache Indians, 1881-1882; in 
the Crow or " Swordbearer " Campaign, 
1887; in the operations in Cuba and on the 
China Relief Expedition. He also served 
two vears and six months in the Philippines. 



He married in Dubuque, Iowa, Nov. 3, 1886, 
Harriet A. Dana. Residence: 1719 18th 
Street. X. W., Washington, D. C. 

ALEXANDER. Charles Beatty: 

Lawyer; born in New York City. Dec. 6, 
1849; son of Henry Martyn and Susan 
Mary (Brown) Alexander. After prepara 
tion in the collegiate school of M. W. Lyon 
and by private instruction, he entered 
Princeton University, whence he was gradu 
ated A.B.. 1870, then attended the law school 
of Columbia University and was graduated 
LL.B.. 1872. He received the degrees of 
A.M., 1873 and LL.D., 1895 from Princeton 
University, and LL.D. from Washington and 
Jefferson College. 1902. He was admitted 
to the bar in New York City, June 17, 1872, 
to the California Bar, Dec. 19, 1888, and to / 
the bar of the Supreme Court of the United 
States Nov. 5, 1884, and since his admission 
to the bar has been continuously in practit, x 
as a member of the firm of Alexander and 
Green. He is also a director of the Equit 
able Life Assurance Society of the United 
States, the Equitable Trust Company, the 
Flocking Valley Railroad and the Mount 
Morris Bank. Mr. Alexander is author of a 
legal treatise on the New York Law of Life 
Insurance. He is a hereditary member of 
the Society of the Cincinnati in Pennsyl 
vania, the Association of the Bar of the City 
of New York, and the Union. University. 
Riding, Tuxedo, Metropolitan, Army and 
Navy, New York Yacht and Princeton Clubs 
of New York. Mr. Alexander married in 
San Francisco, Calif., April 26, 1887, Har 
riet, daughter of Charles Crocker of Cali 
fornia, and they have three daughters, Har 
riet, Janette and Mary Crocker. Residences : 
Tuxedo Park, N. Y. and 4 West 58th Street. 
Office: 120 Broadway, New York City. 

ALEXANDER, De Alva Stanwood: 

Congressman, lawyer; born at Richmond, 
Maine, July 17, 1846; son of Stanwood 
Alexander and Priscilla (Brown) Alexan- 
1 der. He entered the Union Army at the 
age of fifteen, serving as a private soldier. 
1862-1865. He was prepared for college at 
Edward Little Institute, Auburn, Maine; 



24 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



was graduated from Bowdoin College as A. 
I!., in 1870. and A.M. in 1873, and received 
from the same college the honorary degree 
of LL.i). lie located at Indianapolis, .hid., 
where lie engaged in law practice. He was 
a delegate to the National Republican Con 
vention in 1872; secretary of the Indiana 
Republican State Committee, 1874-1878; 
and was appointed, in 1881, fifth auditor of 
the Treasury. He removed to Buffalo and 
became law partner of his college classmate, 
Hon. James A. Roberts, formerly comptrol 
ler of the State of New York. He was 
United States attorney for the Northern 
District of New York, 1889-1903; was 
elected as a member of the Fifty-fifth Con 
gress from the Thirty-third New York Dis 
trict, 189G, reflected from that district in 
1898 and 1900, and in 1902-1904-1906 and 
1908 from the Thirty-sixth New York Dis 
trict. He is an overseer of Bowdoin College 
and is author of Political History of. the 
State of New York (two volumes). Mr. 
Alexander lias been twice married; first 
Sept, 21, 1871, to Alice Colby, and second, 
Dec. 18, 1892, to Annie L. Bliss. Address: 
:U North Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

ALEXANDER, George: 

Clergyman; born in West Charlton, N. 
Y., Oct. 12, 1843; son of Alexander F. and 
Margaret (Bunyan) Alexander. He was 
graduated from Union College, A.B., 1866, 
and received from that college the degree of 
D.D. in 1884. He was pastor of the East 
End Avenue Presbyterian Church, Schenec- 
tady, N. Y., 1870-1883, and has been pastor 
of the Presbyterian Church on University 
Place, New York City, since 1884. Dr. 
Alexander is vice-president of the Council 
of ^ew York University; president of the 
Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyter 
ian Church; president of the Board of Di 
rectors of the New York College of Dentis 
try; a trustee of Union College and a di 
rector of Princeton Theological Seminary. 
Address: 47 University Place, New York 
City. 

ALEXANDER, James Waddel: 

Former president of the Equitable Assur- 
nnee Society of the United States; born in 



Princeton, N. J., July 19, 1839; son of Rev. 
Dr. James W. Alexander, pastor of the Fifth 
Avenue Presbyterian Church, of New York 
City, lie was graduated from Princeton, 
A.B. in 1860, and later A.M.; was admitted 
to the New York Bar, in 1862, and practised 
law until 1866. After that he was in the 
Equitable Life Assurance Society of the 
United States, becoming president on the 
death of Henry B. Hyde, and so continuing 
until his resignation in 1905. He is a trus 
tee of Princeton University; and was for 
merly president of the Society of the Virgin 
ians. He is author of: Princeton, Old and 
New, 1898. Mr. Alexander is a member of 
the Century Association, and a member and 
was president eight years of the University 
Club of New York City, and a member and 
was president for six years of the Princeton 
Club of New York City. He married at 
Elizabeth, N. J., Nov. 24, 1862, Elizabeth 
Beasley Williamson. Address: 4 East 64th 
Street, New York City. 

ALEXANDER, John White: 

Artist; born in Allegheny City, Pa., Oct. 
7, 1856; son of John and Fanny (Smith) 
Alexander. He received his art education 
at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Mu 
nich; and received the degree of A.M. from 
Princeton University, 1892. He is Cheva 
lier of the Legion d Honneur, Soeietaire of 
the Societe Nationale des Beaux Arts, is an 
Academician of the National Academy of 
Design, elected 1902; member of the Society 
of American Artists, Fine Arts Federation 
of NeAV York, Fine Arts Society of New 
York, Architectural League, Society of 
Mural Painters, National Institute of Arts 
and Letters; Societe Nouvelle of Paris, In 
ternational Society of London; honorary 
member of the Society of Austrian Painters, 
honorary member of the Secession of Mu 
nich. He has received numerous medals and 
prizes from exhibitions in the United States 
and Europe. The names of his paintings in 
public museums follow: The Pot of Basil, 
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; A Quiet 
Hour, Pennsylvania Academy, Portrait of 
Fritz Thaulow, Wilstach Collection; Por 
trait of Rodin, Cincinnati Museum; Woman 
in Grey, Luxembourg Gallery, Paris; The 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Mirror, St. Petersburg Gallery; The Black 
Cat. Odessa Gallery; series of decoration 
illustrating the Evolution of the Book, Li 
lu-ary of Congress, Washington; Portrai 
of Governor Norton, City Hall, Albany. Hi 
is also represented by portraits in th< 
Chamber of Commerce at New York, Prince 
ton University, Harvard University, Car 
uegie Institute, Pittsburgh, and in many pri 
vate collections; portrait of Walt Whitman 
in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New 
York City and portrait of President Loubet 
at the Elysee Palace, Paris. Mr. Alexandei 
married, Nov. 2, 1887, Elizabeth Alexander. 
Residence: 116 East 65th Street. Studio: 
123 East 63d Street, New York City. 

ALEXANDER, Joshua W.: 

Lawyer and congressman; born in Cincin 
nati, Ohio, Jan. 22, 1852; son of Thomas W. 
and Jane (Robinson) Alexander. He was 
graduated from the Christian University 
of Canton, Mo., A.B. (valadictorian), 1872. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1874 at Gal- 
latin, Mo.; was elected public administra 
tor of Daviess County, Missouri, in 1876 and 
reelected in 1880. He was elected to the 
General Assembly in Missouri in 1882, and 
served until 1888, being speaker of the 
House in the 34th Assembly, 1886-1888. He 
was mayor of Gallatin, Mo., for two terms, 
and judge of the 7th judicial circuit of 
Missouri from 1900 to 1906, when he re 
signed, having been elected to the 60th Con 
gress from the 3d Missouri District as a 
Democrat. He was reelected in 1908 to the 
61st Congress. Judge Alexander was for 
more than 20 years a member of the Board 
of Education and he has always been active 
in church and charitable work. He is senior 
member of the law firm of Alexander & 
Alexander; is a member and has served 
several terms as vice-president of the Mis 
souri Bar Association, twenty years a mem 
ber of the Gallatin School Board; and has 
several times served as president, secretary 
and member of the Board of Trustees of 
Christian University. He is a member of 
the Missouri Society of Washington, D. C. 
He married in Gallatin, Mo., Feb. 3, 1876, 
Roe Ann Richardson, daughter of the late 
Judge Samuel A. Richardson, and has five 



sons and three daughters. Residences: Cal- 
latin, Mo. and Washington. Office: Suite 
11, House of Representatives Office Build 
ing, Washington, D. C. 

ALEXANDER, Samuel: 

Surgeon; born in New York City, April 
2, 1858; son of Henry M. and Susan Mary 
(Brown) Alexander. He was graduated 
from Princeton University, A.B., 1879, A. 
M., 1882, and from Bellevue Hospital Med 
ical College, M.D. 1882. He served as house 
physician to Bellevue Hospital, 1882-1883; 
studied at London, Leipzig and Vienna in 
1883; was appointed attending surgeon at 
Bellevue Hospital in 1888; professor of 
surgery of the genitourinary system at 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College" in 1889, 
and has been professor of clinical surgery 
in the department of genito-urinary dis 
eases at Cornell University Medical College 
from 1900. He is a fellow of the American 
Association, member of the New York 
Academy of Medicine, the American Asso 
ciation of Genito-Urinary Surgeons, the So 
ciety of Alumni of Bellevue Hospital, Inter 
national Surgical Society, International 
Urological Association, French Surgical So 
ciety, and the University and Princeton 
Clubs. Address: 68 West 55th Street, 
New York City. 

ALEXANDER, William DeWitt: 

Ethnologist, historian; born in Honolulu, 
Hawaiian Islands, April 2, 1833; son of 
William Patterson Alexander (of Ken 
tucky) and Mary Ann (McKinney) Alex 
ander. He was educated at the Punahou 
School until 1849, and in November of that 
vear sailed for New Bedford, Mass., via 
2!ape Horn. He made his home for several 
years with Rev. W. R. DeWitt, D.D., at 
rlarrisburg, Pa. He \vas graduated from 
Yale College, B.A. and salutatorian, 1855, 
ml received from Yale the degrees of M.A., 
lSf>8. and LL.D., 1903. He taught for a 
ear in Beloit College, Wis., and after that 
n an academy in Vincennes, Ind., and he 
eturned to the Hawaiian Islands in 185S. 
r ia Panama. He was professor of Greek 
n Oahu College, 1858-1864, and its presi- 
ient 1864-1871, and has been a trustee of 



2i\ MEN OF AMERICA. 

that same institution since 1875. He was I Algebra, The Geometry of the Triangle, and 

Mi.vryor-^eneral of the Hawaiian Islands, | other mathematical works and revisions. 

L87M900, and from 1001 to 1907 was as- | Prof. Aley was Democratic candidate for 

sistant in the U. S. Coast and Geodetic Sur- superintendent- of public instruction of Indi- 

vey. In 1878 he accompanied his brother ana in 1906 and 1908 and elected to that 

on* a trip through Europe, Palestine and office in Nov., 1908. He married at Spencer, 

Egypt. He went to Washington as a com- Ind., Aug. 28, 1884, Nellie A. Archer. Ad- 

missioner from the Kingdom of Hawaii to dress: Bloomington, Ind. 
the International Meridian Conference in 

1SS4. and again for the Hi-public of Hawaii, ALGER, P 

ls!i:M894. He was a member of the Ha- Professor of mathematics, with rank of 
waiian Privy Council, 1884-1893, of the captain, U. S. Navy; born in Boston, Sept. 
Board of Education of Honolulu, 1887-1905; 29, 1859. He prepared for college in the 
and was decorated with the Order of Kala- Boston Latin school but just before he was 
kaua in 1884. He is distinguished for his ready for entrance, he was give"n an appoint- 
researches and writings in the history, Ian- ment at large to the Naval Academy, from 
guagcs and ethnology of Polynesia, and par- which he was graduated in June, 1880, 
ticiilarly of the Hawaiian Islands, and has Number One in a class of sixty-two mem- 
written several volumes on the history and bers, and was promoted to ensign June 26, 
language of Hawaii. Dr. Alexander is a 1884. On Nov. 1, 1890, he was made pro- 
member of the Social Science Association, fessor of mathematics in the Navy and 
the Polynesian -Society, the Astronomical stationed in the Bureau of Ordnance as an 
Society of the P.idfic, the Koyal Geographi- ! ordnance expert. In Nov., 1899, he was as- 
cal Society of Lo:ulon, Washington Academy signed to the United States Naval Academy, 
ol Sciences. He married at Lahaina, Maui, and became head of the Department of Me- 
Ha waiian Is aii.fs, July 16, I860, Abigail chunics, which place he retained until 1907, 
Charlotte T? ild-.vin, and lias four children, when that department was consolidated with 
Address: J ,OS Puir.ihou Street, Honolulu, the Department of Mathematics. Since 
T- H. 1890 he has ben almost constantly on special 

duty in connection with matters pertaining 

ALEY, Robert Judson: to ordnance. Prof. Alger is the author of 
Mathematician; born at Coal City, Ind., works on exterior ballistics and the elastic 
May 11, 1863; son of Jesse J. and Paulina stren g th of tf as well as many articles 
(Mover) Aley. He attended Valparaiso Col- on Professional subjects, and is one the 
lege, and was graduated in the teacher s leadin g ordnance experts of the world. His 
course in 1880; was graduated from Indi- emulations and researches have been the 
ana University, A.B., 1888, and A.M., 1890; * )ilsis of mucn of the progress in naval gun- 
took post-graduate work in Leland Stanford n( r - v . since the Spanish War. He has been 
University, and the University of Pennsyl- for six vears the secretary and treasurer of 
vania, receiving the Ph.D., 1897 from the thc United States Naval Institute, and has 
latter. Besides a successful career as a etli ted its Proceedings and made many trans- 
teacher of mathematics, Mr. Aley was for lations of technical and professional mat- 
years mathematical editor of the Inland ters He is at present on special duty with 
Educator and Educator-Journal, and since ; re gard to ordnance in the Navy Department, 
1903, has been editor-in-chief and director of i at Washington. He is married and has five 
the Educator-Journal, and is now president c ^ lil(iren - Address: U. S. Naval Academy, 
of its publishing company. He has been | Aim apolis, Md. 
professor of mathematics in Indiana Uni 
versity since 18!)1. He is a member of sev- AL:L EE, James Frank: 

era! mathematical societies in the United Jeweler and former U. S. Senator; born 

s and abroad, and is a 32d-degree Ma- in Dover, Del., 1857. He succeeded his 

He w the author of: Essentials of father in the watch-making and jewelry 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



27 



business which he now conducts. In 1898 
and again in 1902 lie was elected to the 
State Senate of Delaware as a " Union " Re 
publican. That faction of the Republican 
party constituted the force in Delaware 
politics, which together with the fact of a 
small Democratic minority, made it possible 
to carry on an indecisive contest, covering 
a series of years, for the election of United 
States senator. Mr. Allee was chairman of 
the Union Republican forces and in 1903 
was elected to fill a vacancy in the repre 
sentation of the State of Delaware in the 
U. S. Senate, which had been one of the 
subjects of the contest referred to. Mr. 
Allee served as U. S. Senator until the expi 
ration of his term,March 4, 1907, but was 
not reflected. He married, at Camden, Del., 
Jan. 18, 1882, Lizzie Stevens. Address: 
Dover, Del. 

ALLEN, Amos Lawrence: 

Lawyer and member of Congress; born at 
\Yaterboro, York County, Maine, March 17. 
1837. He prepared at Whitestown Semi 
nary, Whitestown, N. Y.. and from there 
entered the sophomore class of Bowdoin Col 
lege, from which he was graduated as A.B. 
in I860. He studied law at Alfred, Maine, 
and afterward attended the Law School of 
Columbian (now George Washington) Uni 
versity. He was admitted to the bar of 
York County, Maine, in I860; was a clerk in 
the U. S. Treasury Department, three years ; 
clerk of the courts of York County, Maine. 
1871-1883; clerk of the Judiciary Com 
mittee of the U. S. House of Representa 
tives. 1883-1884; special examiner of the 
Pension Bureau, 1884-1885; member of the 
Maine Legislature, 1886 and 1887; delegate 
at large, and member of the committee on 
resolutions of the Republican National Con 
vention at St. Louis, 1896; private secretary 
to Speaker Thomas B. Reed, in the 51st, 
54th and 55th Congresses. In 1899 he was 
elected as a Republican to the Fifty- sixth 
Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the 
resignation of Hon. Thomas B. Reed, has 
been fleeted biennially since and is now 
serving in the Sixty-first. Congress. Ad 
dress: Alfred, Maine. 



I ALLEN, Andrew Hussey: 

Lawyer and author; born in New York 
City, Dec. 6, 1855; son of Julian and Mary 
A. (Hussey) Allen. He was educated at 
Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and at 
Harvard College, graduating A.B., 1878, and 
1 at tlie Law School of Columbia College, 
New York. Mi . Allen was admitted to the 
bar in North Carolina, in 1888, and has 
I filled various non-political positions in the 
| public service. He was chief of the Bureau 
of Rolls and Library of the Department of 
State of the United States for thirteen 
years; number of the United States Board 
on Geographic Names for eleven years, and 
was chairman, secretary, and member of the 
Executive Committee of that board at dif 
ferent times. He inaugurated and edited 
the Bulletin of the Bureau of Rolls and 
Library; edited the Documentary History of 
the Constitution of the United States hi 
five volumes; and is author of The Diplo 
matic Relations between the United States 
and Hawaii; Recognition of Foreign Gov 
ernments by the Government of the United 
States; and, Historical Archives of the De 
partment of the State of the United States. 
Mr. Allen has contributed verse, etc., to 
magazines; and was a member of the edi 
torial staff of the Chicago Tribune for some 
months, and resigned from public service 
Dec. 2, 1905. He is a member of the Ameri 
can Historical Association, the Society of 
Authors, and other associations. He was 
treasurer and one of the organizers of the 
Harvard Club of Washington, D. C., and 
has been a member of the University Club 
of Washington, D. C., since its organiza 
tion. Address: Care Second National 
Bank, New York City. 

ALLEN, Charles: 

Retired justice^ Supreme Judicial Court 
of Massachusetts; born in Greenfield, Mass., 
April 17, 1827. He was graduated from 
Harvard University in the class of 1847 and 
received the degree of LL.D. in 1892. Judge 
Allen studied and practised law in Green- 
tiehl. remaining in that town until 1862, 
when he removed to Boston. lie was the 
reporter of the decisions of the Supreme 



L S MEN OF AMERICA. 

Judicial Court of Massachusetts for six , Amherst College, Amherst, Mass., and of 

tears, 1801-1807, being the author of Al- j Smith College, Northampton, Mass. Gov- 

IrnV Massachusetts Reports, in fourteen | ernor Allen married, Nov. 10, 18/0, Har- 
volumes. covering the period from 1861 to ! riet Coleman Dean, and has two daughter^. 

1809. He was attorney-general of Massa- Residence : 48 W. 40th Street. Office : 38 
chusetts, 1867-1872, and was chairman of Nassau Street, New York City, 

the committee appointed to revise the stat- ; 

utes of Massachusetts in 1881. In 1882 he ALLEN, Edmund Thompson: 

\\si- appointed to the Supreme Judicial Lawyer; born in Fairhaven, Mass., Aug. 

Court of Massachusetts, serving until his 10, 1830; son of Edmund and Sarah Rus- 

rrtirement in 1898. Judge Allen is the sell (Freeman) Allen. He was educated in 

author of: Report on the Telegraph Cases, Friends Academy, New Bedford, Williston 

1873, and has also published a volume on Seminary, Easthampton, Mass., and Yale 

the Bacon-Shakespeare question. Address: College (A.M), Class of 1857. He was ad- 

The Charlesgate, Boston. mitted to the Massachusetts Bar in 1850; 

practised law in New Bedford, Mass., until 

ALLEN, Charles Herbert: 1863 . was shorthand writer in the military 

Bankei ; born in Lowell, Mass., April courts in St. Louis, 1863-1806, and after 

13, 1848; son of Otis and Louise (Bixby) that practised law in St. Louis, now beintr 

Allen. He was graduated from Amherst senior of the law firm of E. T. and C. B. 

College in 1869, the degree of A.M. being Allen. Mr. Allen has also taken a position 

later conferred upon him, and in 1900 he of some prominence in the business World, 

received the degree of LL.D. from his alma and was a director and the secretary of 

mater. Mr. Allen s early business life was the Crystal Plate Glass Company, and a 

spent as a lumber merchant at Lowell, director of the South St. Louis Iron Com- 

and while so engaged he was elected mem- pany and of the Union Dairy Company, 

ber of the Massachusetts General Court, He is a member of the St. Louis and Mis- 

1881 to 1882; member of the Massachusetts souri Bar Associations, the St. Louis Law 

State Senate, 1883; was elected member Library Association, New England Society, 

of Congress, 1884, and served two terms, and the St. Louis., Union and Noonday 

holding important place on the committees Clubs of St. Louis. Mr. Allen married in 

on Indian Affairs and Post Offices. He Boston. Jan, 13, 1803, Sylvia T. Bowen 

was the Republican candidate for Governor (now deceased) and has two sons and a 

of Massachusetts in 1891, but defeated by daughter. Residence: 2805 Russell Ave- 

a small majority by Governor Russell. He nue, Office: Wainwright Building, St. 

succeeded Theodore Roosevelt as assistant Louis, Mo. 
secretary of the Navy, 1898, and served 

during the war with Spain; was, in 1900, ALLEN. Edward .: 

made first civil governor of Porto Rico Roman Catholic Bishop of .Mobile: born 

under American authority and organized in Lowell, Mass,, March 17, 1853; son of 

the new Government, and for these serv- John and Mary (Egan) Allen. He was 

ices was offered by President McKinley the graduated from Ml." St. Mary s College, 

choice of several diplomatic appointments, Emmetsburg, Md.. June 20, 1878. After^a 

but preferred to return to private life, four-year course in theology, he was or- 

1902 he has been president of the dained a priest. Dec. 17, 1881. He did 

Appleton National Bank at Lowell, and not enter at once on a pastorate but re- 

since Feb., 1904, vice-president and director inaim-d at Mt, St. Mary s College as one 

the Morton Trust Company, in Now of the faculty until the spring of 1882. 

City. He is also director of the hi thai year he became an assistant at the 

National Hunk of Commerce, the American cathedral at, Boston and liter was assiom-d 

Surety Company, Union Exchange Bank, to service at Framingham, Mass. In 1884 

Industrial Trust Co. He is a trustee of he was made acting president of Mt St 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



29 



Mary s College, and in June, 1885, he was 
elected president, serving until May 16, 
1897, when he was consecrated the fifth 
bishop of Mobile. Address: Mobile, Ala. 

ALLEN, F. Sturges: 

Lexicographer and law writer; born in 
Nor walk, Conn., Oct. 1, 1861 ; son of Al 
fred Burr and Caroline (Sturges) Allen. 
He was graduated with the degree of A.B. 
from Yale in 1884, and from the Yale Law 
School in 1892 with the degree of LL.D. 
From his graduation from Yale until 1890, 
he was employed as an editor on Webster s 
International Dictionary, and he has edited 
or abridged various smaller Webster s dic 
tionaries. He was chief editor, under Dr. 
W. T. Harris, of the supplement to Web 
ster s International Dictionary published 
1900. He was admitted to the bars of 
Connecticut and New York in 1892, and 
practised law until 1902, when he began 
to devote his entire time to editorial work 
and writings. He was meanwhile contrib 
utor to and editor of the law articles in 
Johnson s University Encyclopaedia, and 
was a contributor to the *aw department 
of Appleton s Universal Encyclopaedia Sup 
plement. He was also editor of the law 
department of the New International Ency 
clopaedia, and contributed to the depart- [ 
ment of pronunciation in the same 
publication. Mr. Allen has also been a 
frequent contributor of articles to various 
publications in the lines above indicated, | 
and is author of Principles of Spelling Re 
form, 1907. He is a member of the Mod 
ern Language Association, American Phil- : 
ological Association, American Bar Associa- j 
tion, International Law Association. British ! 
Modern Language Association, Phi Beta I 
Kappa Society, Association of the Bar of ; 
the City of New York and Yale Club of New I 



York. He married at North Adams, Mass., 



April 9, 1895, Annie M. White. Address: j 
Yale Club, New York City. 

ALLEN, Frederick Innes: 

Former United States commissioner of j 
patents; born in Auburn, N. Y., Jan. 19, j 
1859; son of William Allen. He was edu- j 
cated at the Auburn High School and at 



Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and 
from there entered the Sheffield Scientic 
School of Yale University, from which he 
was graduated with the degree of B.S. in 
1879, reciving the class prize in mineralogy 
on graduation. He studied law and was 
admitted to the bar in 1882, and practised 
patent law at Auburn until March, 1901, 
when he was appointed as U. S. Commis 
sioner of Patents, resigning in 1908 to re 
sume the practice of patent law in Au 
burn. He represented the United States 
at the Congress of the International Asso 
ciation for the Protection of Industrial 
Property at Berlin, and at Berne, Switzer 
land, in 1904. He married at Auburn, N. 
Y., June 3, 1884, Cornelia Margaret, daugh 
ter of General William H. Seward. Ad 
dress: Auburn, N. Y. 

ALLEN, Henry Crosby: 

Lawyer and ex-congressman ; born in 
Paterson, N. J., May 13, 1872; son of 
Samuel Coit Morgan and Josephine Amelia 
(Crosby) Allen. He was graduated from 
Saint Paul s School., Garden City, Long 
Island, in 1889; from Yale, with the de 
gree of B.A. in 1893, and from the New 
York Law School as LL.B. in 1895, since 
which year he has been engaged in the 
practice of law at Paterson, N. J. He 
is a Republican in politics, and in 1904 was 
elected from the Sixth New Jersey District 
(which is normally Democratic) to the 
Fifty-ninth Congress, in which he served 
from 1905 to 1907. He is a member of the 
Hamilton and North Jersey Country Clubs 
and various political organizations of Pater 
son. Residence: Little Falls, N. J. Of 
fices: Silk City Trust Building, Paterson, 
N. J. 

ALLEN, Henry Tureman: 

Army officer; born at Sharpsburg, Ky., 
April 13, 1859. He was prepared at Peeks- 
kill Military Academy and Georgetown Col 
lege, Kentucky, and was graduated from 
{.he United States Military Academy in 
1882; and he received from Georgetown 
College, Kentucky, the degree of A.M. in 
1898. He was appointed second lieutenant 
of the Second United States Cavalry, June 
13, 1882; first lieutenant, June 22, 1889. 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



and captain Gth Cavalry, 1898; major 8th j 
Cavalry. 1907. He was engaged in the! 
exploration of Alaska in 1885 and 1886. i 
In the Spanish-American War he became j 
major and assistant adjutant-general of 
volunteers, June 3, 1898, participated 
throughout the Santiago Compaign, and ; 
was honorably discharged June 13, 1899; 
he was commissioned major of the Forty- 
third United States Infantry Volunteers, j 
August 17, 1899; lieutenant-colonel, May j 
31, 1901, and honorably discharged June j 
30, 1901, serving in the Philippines. He ! 
was governor of the Island of Leyte, in the j 
Philippines, from April to July, 1901, and 
July, 1901, was appointed chief of the 
Philippines Constabulary, and by Act of 
Congress, approved Jan. 30, 1903, he was i 
appointed, Jan. 31, 1903, chief of the Philip- j 
pines Constabulary, with the rank of briga- j 
dier-general. He resigned as chief of con 
stabulary, June 30, 1907. He served as 
military attache at St. Petersburg, Russia, ; 
1890-1895; military attache at Berlin, 1897- 
1899; military attache at Seoul, Korea,! 
1904, while engaged in watching the Japa- j 
nese operations against Russia. He is the j 
author of a Report on the Reconnaissance I 
of Copper, Tanana and Koyukuk Rivers, i 
published in 1880; and a work on the 
Military System of Sweden, published in 
1895. He is a member of the American ! 
Geographical Society, and medallist of the 
Imperial Russian Geographical Society. 
General Allen married in Chicago, July 12, 
1887, Dora Johnston. Address: War De 
partment, Washington, D. C. 

ALLEN, Horace Newton: 

Diplomat and missionary; born in Dela 
ware, Ohio, April 23, 1858; son of Horace 
and Jane M. (Riley) Allen. He was grad 
uated from Ohio Wesleyan University, 
B.S., and from Miami Medical College, 
M.D., and then went as a medical mission 
ary one year to China and three years to 
Korea, under the Presbyterian P>oard. 
Having saved the life of a wounded Korean 
prince by his surgical skill, he was, in 
1884, appointed court physician and ad 
viser to the Korean Government, lie wns 
appointed in charge of the Korean Em- 



bassy to Washington, 1888, was secretary 
of the American Legation at Korea, 1890- 
1897; minister resident and consul-general, 
1897-1901, and envoy extraordinary and 
minister plenipotentiary to Korea, 1901- 
1905. He was twenty-one years a resident 
of Korea, and fifteen years in the United 
States diplomatic service. Dr. Allen was 
honorary commissioner of Korea to the 
World s Columbian Exposition, 1893. He 
received the highest decoration of the 
Korean Government, as well as four lesser 
ones, and he is an extensive traveler, having 
crossed the Pacific twelve times and the 
Atlantic twice. He is a director in several 
mining companies, a member of the Phi 
Beta Kappa Society, the National Geo- 
graphic Society, the Toledo and Country 
Clubs of Toledo, the Seoul Club and the 
Chemulpo Club. He is the author of: 
Korean Tales, 1889 ; Chronological Index 
of Korean Foreign Relations from the Be- 
ginning of the Christian Era to the T\ven- 
tieth Century, 1900, and Supplement to 
Same, 1903; Korea Fact and Fancy, 
1904; Things Korean, 1908. Dr. Allen inar- 
ried in Clarksfield, Ohio, May 17, 1883, 
Frances Ann Messenger, and they have two 
sons. Address: Toledo Club, Toledo, Ohio. 
ALLEN James 1 

Brigadier-general and chief signal officer. 

1 A ; born at La P orte > Tnd -> Feb - 13 < 

1849; son of Mark and Matilda Allen. He 
was graduated from the U. S. Military 
Acadeill y in 1872, and after that served as 
a cavalry officer until 1890. Since then 
he has been in the Signal Corps in all 
ranks from captain to his present position 
as brigadier-general and chief signal f- 
ficor , io which hfi waa inted Fek 10 

1000 . H e served as lieutenant-colonel and 
colonel chief si } officcr of Volunteers 
in Cuba and Porto RioQ in 1898 al|rl ^ 

and aS briffadier-goneral of Volunteers in 
tho Philippillps in 1!)()L Opneral A]kn haa 

<listinguished record in the corps in which 
e is now the chief officer. Address: War 
Department, Washington, D. C. 

ALLEN James Lane: 

Author; born near Lexington, Ky., in 
1849; youngest child of Richard and Henry 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



;; i 



(Foster) Allen. His education was ac 
quired in Transylvania University, where 
he received the degrees of A.B. and A.M. 
The death of his father when he was twen 
ty-one placed the support of his mother 
and sister in his hands, and he taught in 
public schools and was later a private tutor, 
and afterward taught Latin and higher 
English in Bethany College, West Virginia, 
for two years, and since then has been en 
gaged in literature. His published volumes 
include: Flute and Violin and Other Ken 
tucky Tales and Romances; The Blue Grass 
Regions of Kentucky, and Other Kentucky 
Articles; John Gray, a Kentucky Tale of 
the Olden Time; A Kentucky Cardinal; A 
Summer in Arcady; The Choir Invisible; 
The Increasing Purpose; Aftermath (Sec 
ond Part of a Kentucky Cardinal) ; The 
Mettle of the Pasture; The Reign of Law; 
The Bride of the Mistletoe. The Choir In 
visible was dramatized in 1899. Ad dress: 
Care of Macmillan and Company, 60 Fifth 
Av., New York City. 

ALLEN, Joel Asaph: 

Naturalist; born in Springfield, Massa 
chusetts, July 19, 1838; son of Joel and 
Harriet (Trumbull) Allen. He was edu 
cated at Wilbraham Academy and Law 
rence Scientific School, Harvard, from 1862 
to 1867, specializing in zoology under Agas- 
siz, and was Humboldt scholar of the same 
in 1871 ; and later he received the degree 
of Ph.D. from Indiana University. He was 
assistant to Professor Agassiz on the scien 
tific expedition to Brazil in 1865, made 
scientific researches in Florida in 1869 and 
was chief of the scientific staff of the Gov 
ernment Expedition, on the Northern Pa 
cific Railroad Survey in 1873. He was 
special collaborator of the United States 
Geological Survey, under Hayden, 1878 to 
1883. He was assistant in ornithology in 
the Museum of Comparative Zoology at 
Harvard, 1871 to 1885, and has been cura 
tor of mammalogy and ornithology in the 
American Museum of Natural History, New 
York City, since 1885. Dr. Allen was editor 
of the Bulletin of the Nuttall Ornitholog 
ical Club, 1876-1883; The Auk. ornitholog 
ical quarterly, 1888-1906, and the Bulletin 



and Memoirs (zoological series) of the 
American Museum of Natural History since 
1887. He has written a large number of 
monographs, reviews and contributions re 
lating to mammalogy and ornithology, more 
especially on geographical zoology, North 
American Rodentia and Pinnipedia, the 
; mammals of Patagonia, the mammals and 
j birds of Northeastern Siberia and of Co- 
| lombia, and on the genus Didelphys. Dr. 
| Allen is a fellow of the American Ornithol- 
I ogists Union (president, 1883 to 1891); 
, has been a member of the National Acad 
emy of Sciences since 1876; is an honorary 
member of the British Ornithologists 
Union, the Deutsche Ornithologische Ge- 
sellschaft, the New York Zoological So- 
| ciety and the Zoological Society of London, 
j and is member of the American Society of 
Naturalists, American Society of Geog- 
i ra pliers, American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences, American Philosophical Society, 
New York Academy of Sciences (vico- 
president in 1891), the Linnesen Society of 
Natural History of New York (president, 
1890 to 1897), and of the Washington 
Academy of Sciences. Dr. Allen was 
awarded the Walker Grand Prize of the 
j Boston Society of Natural History in 1903. 
j He married first at Cambridge, Mass., Oct. 
6, 1874, Mary Manning Cleveland (who 
died April 17, 1879), by whom he has a 
son. He again married at Cornwall-on- 
Hudson, N. Y., April 27, 1886, Susie Au 
gusta Taft. Address: American Museum 
of Natural History, New York City. 



ALLEN, John Mills: 

Lawyer and ex-congressman; born in 

Tishomingo County, Miss., July 8, 1846; 

I son of David M. and Sallie Ann (Spencer) 

Allen. He enlisted in the Confederate army 

i shortly after the opening of the war, and 

I served as a private for four years. He re- 

I ceived his legal education at Cumberland 

| University, Lebanon, Tenn., and at the Uni- 

| versity of Mississippi, LL.B., 1870. He was 

admitted to the bar in that year and has 

since practised law at Tupelo. In 1876 he 

was elected prosecuting attorney in the 

First Mississippi district, and in 1885 was 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



elected to Congress as a Democrat from the 
l- irst Mississippi district, serving until 
r.mi, when he voluntarily retired. During 
hi- service in Congress he became nationally 
famous as an orator and humorist, and 
was known as " Private John Allen " as a 
result of his humorous allusions to his 
service in the Civil War and to the num 
ber of military titles which had been de 
veloped from that contest. Mr. Allen re 
tired from Congress to devote his time to 
law practice and to a considerable num 
ber of financial interests with which he is 
connected, among them being banking in 
stitutions- of Tupelo, the Tupelo Cotton 
Mills, and the Tupelo Fertilizer Factory. 
Mr. Allen was a member of the National 
Commission of the Louisiana Purchase 
Exposition. He married in Tupelo, Miss., 
Dec. 24, 1872, Georgie Taylor. Address: 
Tupelo, Miss. 

ALLEN, Robert McDowell: 

Lawyer; born in Edinburg, Mo., Oct. 29, 
1878 ; son of Eeverend Nelson McDowell 
and Caroline Josephine (Pe)ly) Allen. He 
was graduated from Kentucky State Col 
lege, A.B. in 1900, and taking up the study 
of law was admitted to the bar of Ken 
tucky the following year. At the time of 
his graduation he was appointed to a posi 
tion in the pure food inspection work of 
the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Sta 
tion and was later made the head of the 
Division of State Food Inspection of the 
Station ; was special counsel for the State of 
Kentucky in the prosecution in 1907 which 
broke up still-slop dairying throughout the 
State; special counsel for the State in de 
termining the constitutionality of the Ken 
tucky food law before the State and Fed 
eral courts in 1906 and 1907. Special 
counsel for the U. S. Government in litiga 
tion under Federal Food and Drugs Act, 
and in certain Internal Revenue cases, since 
Feb., 1908. Has been secretary and a mem 
ber of the Executive Committee of the 
Association of State and National Food 
and Dairy Departments since 1901, and as 
such represented the Association in its fight 
for national pure food legislation. He was 
secretary of the International Pure Food 



Congress of the Louisiana Purchase Exposi 
tion; member of the committee appointed 
by the State Food Commissioners to draft 
a uniform State food and drug law. He 
lias written numerous reports and addresses 
on food control work. Address: Lexing 
ton, Ky. 

ALLEN, Thomas: 

Artist; born at St. Louis, Mo., Oct. 19, 
1849. He attended Washington University, 
St. Louis, was graduated from the Royal 
Academy at Dusseldorf, Germany, 1877, 
and also studied three years in France. He 
has attained distinction as a painter 
of landscapes and animal pictures, exhib 
iting at the National Academy of Design 
in New York in 1877. He has resided in 
Boston since 1880. Mr. Allen exhibited 
at the Paris Salons in 1882, 1887 and 1889, 
has been a member of the Society of Amer 
ican Artists since 1880, and associate of the 
National Academy since 1884; is president 
of the Paint and Clay Club and the Bos 
ton Society of Water Color Painters; vice- 
president of the Copley Society of Boston; 
chairman of the Council of the School of 
Drawing and Painting at the Boston Mu 
seum of Fine Arts. He received medals 
from the Pan- American Exposition at Buf 
falo and at Boston, was judge of awards at 
the World s Columbian Exposition, Chi 
cago, in 1893, and chairman of the Inter 
national Jury of Awards at the Louisiana 
Purchase Exposition at St. Louis in 1904; 
also chairman of the Department Jury of 
Fine Arts at St. Louis in 1904. Mr. Allen 
has been twice married, first in 1880 to 
Eleanor G. Whitney, daughter of Professor 
J. D. Whitney, of Harvard, and second, in 
1884, to Alice Ranney, daughter of the 
Hon. A. A. Ranney of Boston. Address: 
12 Commonwealth Av., Boston, Mass. 

ALLEN, Viola: 

Actress; born in Huntsville, Ala., while 
her parents were en tour. She is the daugh 
ter of C. Leslie and Sarah (Lyon) Allen, 
her father being one of the best-known 
actors on the American stage for more than 
fifty years. Miss Allen was educated at 
Wyckham House, Toronto, Canada, and in 



MEN OF AMERICA. 33 

private schools in New York City. The ALLEN, William Frederick: 

talent for the stage which she inherited v.iu. 

fro,,, 1,er father tt! indicated in early life, , l( ,,^! V T nVT^ ? T 

=~ 



T , the Protestant Episcopal 4cademv Phila- 

she made an immediate success. After a : delphia> and in ^^ d ^* f , 
season on the road Miss Allen became lead- ; WM conferred w P ? inceton JS 

ing lady for John McCullough m what ; YcrBit He 8erved Rg fi ^ lieilt J nt U of 
proved to be his last season, and with him New -j Mmti 1861 . 18Q4< Mr Alleu 

appeared as "Virginia " Desdemona," eng d J ^ ^ & 

Parthema," and as < Julia > m Dr. Bird s was rodman F and ^.^ ineer 



version of The Gladiator. After that she ; Camden and AtTlb Rai i roftd , 1802-1808; 
played most of the fehakeserean rdles with : 



played most of the Shakesperean roles with ; rcaJdcnt ens?ineer o / the West Jersey _,. 
lomasso Salyim. the Italian tragedian. , roadj i 868 . 1872 . assigt ant editor" 1872- 
Later she joined Lawrence Barrett in a 1873? and 8ince 1873 editor of the Official 
special production of The Blot on the Railway Guide and manager and director 
Scutcheon, and then, after a season in the I o f the National Railway Publication Corn- 
Boston Museum Stock Company, in which pnil v. Since 1875 he has been secretary of 
she created in America the part of " Mrs. the General Time Convention and its suc- 
Errol" in Little Lord Fauntleroy, Miss cossor, the American Railway Association. 
Allen supported Joseph Jefferson and Wil- i I n April, 1883, he proposed the detailed 
Ham Florence in their joint starring tour \ system of Standard Time now in use, and 
in The Rivals and The Heir at Law. 1889; ! was appointed to secure its adoption by 
appeared in a special company in Bronson the General Time Convention, which result 
Howard s Aristocracy, 1892; leading lady followed Nov. 18, 1883. Mr. Allen was a 
at the Empire Theatre in New York City, ! delegate of The American Railway Associa- 
1893, where she created and was very sue- j tion to the International Railway Con- 
cessful in roles in Liberty Hall, The Mas- j gresses, London, 1895, Paris, 1900, and 
queraders, Sowing the Wind, The Con- Washington, 1905. He was secretary of 
querors, and Under the Red Robe. In 1898 the American Section and associate secre- 
she withdrew from the Empire Company in J tary-general of the International Railway 
order to star in The Christian, by Hall Congress in 1905, and delegate of the U. S. 
Caine, in which she first appeared in Al- j Government to the International Meridian 
bany, N. Y., and after two years of sue- Conference at Washington, 1884, and to the 
cess in that play she starred in The Palace International Railway Congress at Paris, in 
of the King, 1900, and The Eternal City, j 1900. Besides his distinguished services 

1902. After that Miss Allen began a series in planning and securing the adoption of 
of Shakespearean revivals, producing, in the present system of Standard Time in 

1903, Twelfth Night in which she played i Nortn America in 1883, he has rendered 
the part of " Viola," and in 1904 A Win- j valuable service in securing uniformity in 
ter s Tale,, in which she played the two i rules for the operation of American rail- 
parts of " Hermione " and " Perdita." ways. He was a member of the Board of 
In following seasons she produced Cym- j Assessment and afterward of the Board of 
beline, As You Like It, The School for j Trustees of the Village of South Orange, N. 
Scandal, The Merchant of Venice, The J., and was a delegate from the Eighth 
Toast of the Town, and Irene Wycherly. i New Jersey Congressional District to the 
Her dramatic work has run the gamut of National Republican Convention in Chi- 
comedy, tragedy, modern classic and cngo, 1908. He founded and laid out the 
Shakesperian roles. Address : 2 West 38th j plan of the town of Wenonah, Gloucester 
Street, New York City. i County, N. J. He is a trustee of the 

3 



34 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



South Orange Free Library; secretary- 
treasurer of the American Railway Asso- 
ciaiion; secretary and treasurer of the 
Hi in -an for the Safe Transportation of 
K\ plosives; director and manager of the Na 
tional Railway Publication Company; vice- 
pi evident and chairman of the Board of the 
Hallway Equipment and Publication Com 
pany; treasurer of the American Railway 
Supply Company; president of the Knicker 
bocker Guide Company, and Manhattan Fire 
Alarm Company; vice-president of the New 
York Transfer Company, and president of 
the Meadow Land Society of South Orange. 
He was decorated by the Belgian Govern 
ment as a chevalier of the Order of Leo 
pold, is an honorary member of the Royal 
and Imperial Geographical Society of 
Vienna, and a member of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers, American Asso 
ciation for the Advancement of Science, 
American Meteorological Society, Amercian 
Geographical Society, National Geographic 
Society, American Economic Association, 
the Navy League, New Jersey Historical 
Society, American Statistical Association, 
American Forestry Association, American 
Academy of Political and Social Science, 
and Washington Academy of Science, is 
past master of the American Railway 
Guild; member of the Municipal Art So 
ciety; New England Society of Orange, N. 
J. ; Pennsylvania Society of New York ; 
Companion of the Military Order of the 
Loyal Legion; and a member of the Masonic 
Order. Mr. Allen is also a member of the 
Lawyers , Transportation, Engineers , and 
Kail road Clubs of New York, Union League 
Club of Chicago and the South Orange Field 
Club. Mr. Allen married, at Salem, N. J., 
April 20, 1871, Caroline Perry Yorke, and 
has four sons. Residence: 180 Scotland 
Road, South Orange, N. J. Address: 24 
Park Place, New York City. 

ALLEN, William Harvey: 

Social worker, secretary of the New York 
Bureau of Municipal Research; born at 
Le Roy, Minn., Feb. 9, 1874; son of John 
I), and Joanna (Corbett) Allen. He was 
graduated from the University of Chicago, 
B.A., 1897 ; was a graduate student of the 



Universities of Leipzig, Berlin and Penn 
sylvania, and received the degree of Ph.D. 
He was an instructor in the University of 
Pennsylvania; secretary of the New Jersey 
State Charities Aid Association; editor of 
the New Jersey Review of Charities and 
Corrections; editor of Charities; general 
agent of the New York Association for im 
proving the Condition of the Poor; secre 
tary of the National Municipal League 
Committee on Instruction in Municipal 
Government; * instructor in New York 
School of Philanthropy; instructor in the 
Correspondence Study Department of the 
University of Chicago; secretary of the 
Committee on Hospital Needs and Hospital 
Finances of New York City; secretary of 
the Committee on Physical Welfare of 
School Children of New York City, and 
contributor to magazines on social topics. 
He is a member of the American Academy 
of Political and Social Science; the Amer 
ican Sociological Association; National 
Municipal League; member of the Chi Psi 
fraternity, of the Faculty Council of the 
School of Philanthropy and of the Century 
Club of New York City. Mr. Allen is au 
thor of: Efficient Democracy; Rural Sani 
tary Administration in Pennsylvania; Civ 
ics and Health; and joint author of School 
Reports and School Efficiency. He mar 
ried, Oct. 28, 1903, Isabel Dangaix and they 
i have two sons. Address: 201 Broadway, 
New York City. 

ALLEN, William Vincent: 

Former United States senator; born in 
Midway, Madison County, Ohio, Jan. 28, 
1847, and removed with his family to Iowa 
in 1857. He was educated at the Upper 
Iowa University, and was a private in the 
32d Iowa Infantry in the Civil War. Mr. 
Allen was admitted to the bar, May 31, 
1869, and practised law in Iowa until 1884, 
when he moved to Nebraska and practised 

1 law until he was elected judge of the 9th 
Judicial District of that State, in 1891. He 
became prominent in the Populist, or Peo- 

! pie s party in Nebraska, and was elected 
United States senator 1893, serving as the 

. result of this election, and of a subsequent 
appointment, until March 27, 1901. While 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



85 



he was a member of the Senate, he was the 
chief exponent of the doctrines of the Pop 
ulist party in that body, and attracted na 
tional attention by his advocacy of those 
tenets. Mr. Allen was president of the 
State Convention of Populists in Nebraska 
in 1892, 1894 and 1900, and was permanent 
chairman of the Populist National Conven 
tion of 1896. He has continued to main 
tain his affiliation with the political party 
named, and is now a member of the Ex 
ecutive Committee of the Populist National 
Committee. Address: Madison, Neb. 

ALLPORT, Frank: 

Physician and surgeon; born at Water- 
town, N. Y., Feb. 22, 1856. He received 
his education at the Chicago University 
and at Racine (Wis.) College, when, com 
pleting his academic studies, he took up 
that of medicine at the Chicago Medical 
College, where he received the degree of M. 
D. in 1876. This he followed by two years 
of post-graduate work at Heidelberg, Ger 
many, after which he returned to the Unit 
ed States and in 1878 began to practise at 
Sycamore, 111. In 1883, he removed to 
Minneapolis, Minn., where he began to prac 
tise in his specialty, diseases of the eye 
and ear, in which he is widely known. He 
was also professor of ophthalmology ana 
otology at the Minneapolis State Uni 
versity, and surgeon of diseases of the eye 
and ear at numerous hospitals and insti 
tutions. He went in 1898, to Chicago, and 
was called to the chair of professor ol 
ophthalmology and otology in Northwestern 
University Woman s Medical School, which 
he held until that school went out of exist 
ence. He was also professor of ophthal 
mology in the Chicago Polyclinic, from 
which he resigned some years ago. He was 
professor of otology and clinical professor 
of ophthamology and otology in the North 
western University Medical School but has 
recently resigned. He is also surgeon of 
diseases of the eye and ear at St. Luke s 
Hospital and various other institutions. 
He is, besides, consulting eye and ear sur 
geon for the Board of Education of Chi 
cago. Dr. Allport is one of the best known 
and most successful specialists in the 



United States. He was married at Syca 
more, 111., to Kate A. Ell wood. Residence: 
2108 Prairie Avenue. Address: Chicago 
Savings Bank Building, Chicago, 111. 

i ALTSHELEE, Joseph Alexander: 

Editor; born in Three Springs, Ky., April 
29, 1862; son of Jose ph A. and Lucy 
(Snoddy) Altsheler. He was educated at 
Liberty College, Glasgow, Ky., and at Van- 
derbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. Upon 
leaving the university he entered journal 
ism, and was connected with the Louis 
ville Evening Post and the Louisville 
Courier-Journal. He entered the service 
of the New York World in 1892, and for 
the past fourteen years has been manager 
and editor of the Thrice-a-week edition of 
that newspaper. He is the author of: The 
Sun of Saratoga; In Hostile Red; A Sol 
dier of Manhattan; A Herald of the West; 
The Last Rebel; In Circling Camps; The 
Wilderness Road; My Captive; Before the 
Dawn; Guthrie of the Times; The Candi 
date; The Young Traders; The Forest 
Runners; and The Recovery. He married 
in Glasgow, Ky., May 30, 1888, Sarah Boles, 
and has one son. Residence: 320 Manhat 
tan Avenue. Office: Pulitizer Building, 
New York City. 

ALVORD, John Watson: 

Hydraulic and sanitary engineer; born 
in Newton Center, Mass., Jan. 25, 1861; 
son of Rev. John Watson and Myrtilla 
Mead (Peck) Alvord. He was educated at a 
preparatory school in Washington, D. C., 
and fitted himself by study and practical 
experience for the profession of engineer 
ing, in which he has become an expert in 
hydraulic sewerage and sewage disposal 
practice. He was assistant engineer of con 
struction of the Hyde Park and Lake View 
pumping stations of the Chicago Water 
Works, and was chief engineer of surveys 
at the World s Columbian Exposition. 
Since 1894 he has been consulting engineer 
for over one hundred municipalities, on 
water supply and besides has served power 
companies,, been a member of many ap 
praisal boards on water properties. Among 
other important undertakings he has been 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



ponsulting engineer on the Illinois and 
Michigan Canal, and designed and con 
structed the Water Supply and Sewerage 
works of the city built by the United 
SI Mies Steel Corporation at Gary, Ind. 
He is a member of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers. Society for Municipal Im 
provement, 1st vice*-president of the Ameri 
can Water- Works Association; past presi 
dent Illinois Society of Engineers; mem 
ber New England Water- Works Associa 
tion; the American Academy of Political 
and Social Science, Past vice-president 
Western Society of Engineers, and member 
of the Engineers club of Chicago. Mr. 
Alvord is a frequent contributor on engi 
neering subjects to the technical press. He 
married in Chicago, Sept. 4, 1880, Helen C. 
Cornell. Residence: 5203 Hibbard Ave 
nue. Addres: 1212 Hartford Building, Chi 
cago. 
AMATEIS, Louis: 

Sculptor; born in Turin, Italy, Dec. 13, 
1855; son of Paul and Carolina Amateis. 
He was educated at the Institute of Tech 
nology at Turin, and studied art at Paris 
and Milan. He came to New York in 
1883, and has executed a large number of 
busts from life, including President Arthur, 
Generals Hancock and Logan, Secretaries 
Elaine and Bayard, Andrew Carnegie, and 
others. He executed historical bronze doors 
for the Capitol and a considerable number 
of memorial monuments. From 1892 to 
1899 he was head of the department of 
fine arts, of Columbian, now George Wash 
ington, University. One of the prominent 
exhibits made by him was the group El 
Caney at the Buffalo Exposition. He has 
also exhibited at all the principal exhibits 
and art exhibitions in the United States 
and abroad, and has been a leading com 
petitor in Governmental competitions for 
memorials at Washington. Mr. Amateis is 
a member of the National Art Society. He 
married in New York City, Feb. 24, 1889, 
Dora Ballin. Residence: 1719 19th Street, 
Washington, D. C. 

AMEND, Edward B.: 

Jurist; born in New York City and edu 
cated in St. Francis Xavier College, from 



(which he was graduated A.B., 1877, A.M., 
1878; and was graduated from Columbia 
Law ^School, LL.B., 1879. He engaged in 
the practice of law until 1902, when he was 
elected on the Democratic ticket to the 
office of justice of the Supreme Court of 
the State of New York for the term expir- 
ino- Dec. 31, 1916, in which lie now serving. 
Address: 38 West 74th Street, New York 
City. 

AMES, Adalbert: 

Brigadier-general and ex-governor; born 
in Rockland, Knox County, Maine, Oct. 
31, 1835. He was appointed to the 
United States Military Academy at West 
Point, from which he was graduated in 
the class of 1861. Upon his graduation 
he was assigned to the Fifth Regiment 
of United States Artillery, and was pro 
moted through the intermediate grades to 
brigadier-general of volunteers and brevet- 
ted major-general of volunteers. He was 
mustered out of the volunteer service in 
April, 1866, and commissioned in July, 
1866, lieutenant-colonel of the Twenty- 
fourth United States Infantry. He was ap 
pointed provisional governor of Mississippi, 
July 15, 1868, under the reconstruction 
acts; was elected United States senator in 
1870 and elected Governor of Mississippi in 
1873, resigned in 1876, when he removed 
to New York. Later he removed to Lowell, 
Mass., where he became identified with im 
portant interests. He was appointed briga 
dier-general of United States Volunteers, 
June 20, 1898, serving during the war with 
Spain. He married at Boston, July 21, 
1870, Blanche, daughter of the late General 
Benjamin E. Butler. Address: Lowell, 
Mass. 

AMES, Butler: 

Congressman; born in Lowell, Mass. Aug. 
22, 1871; son of Major General Adelbert 
and Blanche (Butler) Ames, and grandson 
of Major General Benjamin F. Butler. He 
was educated in the Lowell schools, at 
Phillips Exeter Academy in the class of 
1890, and was graduated from the United 
States Military Academy at West Point in 
1894. He resigned from the United States 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



87 



Army after appointment to the Eleventh 
United States Infantry for the purpose of 
returning to Massachusetts to take a post 
graduate course at the Massachusetts In 
stitute of Technology, graduating in 1896 
as a mechanical and electrical engineer. He 
has since been agent of the Wamesit Power 
Company of Lowell. At the commencement 
of the Spanish War, he was made lieuten 
ant and adjutant of the Sixth Massachu 
setts Volunteers at Camp Alger, near Wash 
ington. He was appointed as acting engi 
neer of the Second Army Corps, under 
General Graham, in addition to his duties 
as adjutant, and went from Charlestown to 
Cuba and Porto Rico, under General Miles. 
He was at the landing at Guanica and the 
skirmish at Yuaco Road in July, was pro 
moted to lieutenant-colonel of his regiment 
in August and was civil administrator of 
the Arecibo district of Porto Rico until 
Nov., 1898. He served as a member of the 
Massachusetts State Legislature for three 
years from 1897 to 1899, and in that body 
was chairman of the committee on street 
railways. He was elected as a Republican 
in 1902 from the Fifth Massachusetts 
District to the Fifty-eighth Congress, and 
reflected in 1904, 1906 and 1908 to the 
Fifty-ninth, Sixtieth and Sixty-first Con 
gresses, his present term expiring in 1911. 
Address: Lowell, Mass. 

( 
AMES, Herman Vanderburg: 

Authority on Federal and State relations ; 
born in Lancaster, Mass., Aug. 7, 1805; son 
of Rev. Marcus Ames. He was graduated 
from Amherst, 1888, receiving degrees of 
A.M., and of Ph.D. from Harvard in 1890 
and 1891 respectively. He took post-grad 
uate courses at Columbia, Harvard, Leip 
zig and Heidelberg, and returning to the 
United States after the latter courses, re 
sumed the teaching of history, in which he 
had been engaged at the University of 
Michigan from 1891 to 1894. He became 
connected witli the Ohio State University 
and later with the University of Pennsyl 
vania, in which he is professor of American 
constitutional history, and since 1907 dean 
of the Graduate School. He has been especi 
ally distinguished for his writings and com 



pilations on the relations between the 
United States and the States. He has 
been chairman of the Archives Commission 
of the American Historical Association 
since 1902, and, for several years was 
secretary of the Association of Col 
leges and Preparatory Schools of the 
Middle States and Maryland. His works 
include a large number of monographs 
and contributions to the literature of 
American history. He edited: State Doc 
uments on Federal relations; The State 
and the United States, and is author of: 
The Proposed Amendments to the Constitu 
tion of the United States; and of Outline 
of Lectures on American Political and In 
stitutional History during the Colonial and 
Revolutionary Periods. Residence: 210 
South 37th St., Philadelphia. 

AMES, James Barr: 

Dean of Harvard Law School; born in 
Boston, Mass., June 22, 1846. He was 
graduated from Harvard in 1868, receiving 
the degree of A.M. in 1871, and from Har 
vard Law School, as LL.B., in 1872. He has 
been successively, instructor in a private 
school in Boston, tutor in French and Ger 
man at Harvard, instructor of history at 
Harvard, associate professor of law, and 
since 1877, professor of law in the Har 
vard Law School, and dean of that insti 
tution since 1895. The degree of LL.D. has 
been conferred upon him by the University 
of New York, University of Michigan, Uni 
versity of Pennsylvania, Northwestern Uni 
versity, Williams College, Harvard and Uni- 
j versity of Cincinnati. Dean Ames has com 
piled collections of cases which are leading 
American authorities on torts, pleadings, 
bills and notes, partnership, trusts, surety 
ship, admiralty and equity jurisdiction. He 
is also author of numerous articles in the 
Harvard Law Review and other law publi 
cations. His position, authority on mat 
ters of law, and personal intercourse with 
large numbers of men now in the legal pro 
fession of the United States, give Dean 
Ames a very great influence which has al 
ways been exerted for the best interest of 
the profession and of American jurispru 
dence. He married, June 29, 1880, Sarah 



38 

Russell, of Boston. 
Mass. 



Address : 



AMIDON, Charles Fremont: 

Jurist; born at Clymer, 
County, N. Y., Aug. 17, 1856. 



MEN OF AMERICA. 

Cambridge, Desert Transit Company. He is also a 
nember of the Somerset Club, Country Club 
if Brookline, Eastern Yacht Club, and the 
Boston Athletic Club. Dr. Amory married 
in Boston, May 8, 1864, Marianne Apple- 
ton Lawrence, by whom he has a daughter. 



Chatauqua 
After his 



graduation from Hamilton College in 1882. 
he went to Fargo, Dakota, where he studied 
law and was admitted to the bar in 1886. 
He practised law at Fargo until 1896, was 
one of the members of the Code Commission 
of North Dakota in 1893, and was appointed 
Aug. 31, 1896 to his present position as 
judge of the United States Court for the 
District of North Dakota. Address: Fargo, 
N. Dak. 

AMORY, Robert: 

Retired physician; born in Boston, May 
3, 1842. He was graduated from Harvard 
University, A.M. in 1863, and continuing 
his studies at the Harvard Medical School, 
took the degree of M.D. after a course of 
three years. In his studies and researches 
Dr. Amory has given special attention to 
physiology and the physiological action of 
medicines and has written and taught much 
on these subjects. In 1869 he became lec 
turer at the Medical School of Harvard Uni 
versity on the physiological action of drugs, 
and some years later was called to the chair 
of physiology at Bowdoin College. He 
translated as a text-book, Kiiss Physiology 
and is author of several treatises on the ac 
tion of certain drugs and a volume on 
Poisons in Wharton and Stille s series of 
Medical Jurisprudence. He is a member of 
the American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences, the Massachusetts Medical Soci 
ety, and various other local and national 
medical associations. Dr. Amory is a di 
rector of the Bar Harbor Water Company 
the Ipswich Mills, the Mount Desert Tran 
sit Company of Bar Harbor, Maine (of 
which he is secretary and clerk). He is a 
vestryman of Trinity Church, Boston, presi 
dent and trustee of the Vincent Memorial 
Hospital, director of the Young Men s Chris 
tian Association of Boston; president of the 
Kebo Valley Club, at Bar Harbor; director 
of the Property Owners Association of Bar 
Harbor, director and secretary of Mount 



He again married in Sept., 1884, Katherine 

Leighton Crehore, and they have four chil- 

Iren. Summer Home: The Eyrie, Bar 

Harbor, Me. Address: 279 Beacon Street, 

Boston. 

ANDERSON, Albert Barnes: 

Judge of the United States District Court 
i ? or the District of Indiana; born near 
Zionsville, Boone County, Ind., Feb. 10, 
1857 ; son of Philander Anderson and Emma 
A. (Duzan) Anderson. He was graduated 
from Wabash College as A.B. in 1879 and 
afterward A.M.; studied law and was ad 
mitted to the bar at Crawfordsville, Ind., 
where he was elected for two terms as pros 
ecuting attorney of Montgomery County, 
Ind. He had the LL.D. degree conferred by 
Wabash College in 1907. He was appointed 
United States district judge Dec. 8, 1902. 
He married at Crawfordsville, Ind., Nov. 14, 
1882, Rose Campbell. Residence: 1325 
North Penn Street. Office: Federal Build 
ing, Indianapolis, Ind. 

ANDERSON, Alexander Pierce: 

Botanist; born in Red Wing, Minn., Nov. 
22, 1862; son of John and Britta M. 
(Gustafson) Anderson. He was graduated 
from the University of Minnesota as B.S. 
in 1894, received its degree of M.S. in 1895, 
and that of Ph.D. from the University of 
Munich, 1897, where he pursued post-gradu- 
ute studies in biology and chemistry. He 
was connected with Clemson College, S. C., 
1896-1899, and became assistant professor 
of botany in the University of Minnesota in 
the following year. In 1901 he was ap 
pointed curator of the herbarium of Colum 
bia University, which position he resigned 
in 1902 and took up the study of the econ 
omic uses of cereal grains and starch ma 
terials. Several American and foreign pat 
ents for improvement in processes of treat 
ing these commodities have been granted 
him. He is a contribute!- to American and 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



39 



foreign biological journals and a member of 
American and foreign scientific associa 
tions. He married at Highlands, N. C., 
Aug. 11, 1898, Lydia Johnson. Address: 
5463 Washington, Avenue, Chicago. 

ANDERSON, Carl Carey: 

Manufacturer and congressman; born at 
Bluffton, Allen County, Ohio, Dec. 2, 1877; 
removed in early boyhood to Fremont, Ohio, 
where he took a partial high school course. 
Went to work early in life, and engaged 
successfully as a business man. He estab 
lished in 1904 a large underwear factory at 
Fostoria, Ohio, of which he is still owner, 
and he is a director in several manufactur 
ing enterprises. He has had a successful 
political career as a Democrat, was twice 
elected mayor of Fostoria, Ohio, and in 
1908 was elected to the Sixty-first Congress 
from the Thirteenth Ohio District. He is 
president of the Board of Trade of Fostoria, 
president of the City Hospital Board, and a 
member of various fraternal orders. He 
married in Sept., 1904, Nellie Ford of Fre 
mont, and has a son. Address: Fostoria, 
Ohio. 

ANDERSON, Charles Palmerston: 

Bishop of Chicago; born in Kemptville, 
Ont., Can.; son of Henry and Maria (Sex 
ton) Anderson. He was educated at Trin 
ity College, Port Hope, Ont., and Trinity 
College, Toronto, and he received the de 
gree of D.D. from Trinity College, Toronto, 
in 1900, and S.T.D. from the Western Theo 
logical Seminary at Chicago. He was or 
dered deacon in the Church of England in 
1887, and the following year was ordained 
to the priesthood by the bishop of Ontario. 
He was rector of the church at Beachburg, 
Ont., 1887-1891, and rector of Grace Episco 
pal Church, Oak Park, 111., 1891-1900. In 
the latter year he became bishop-coadjutor 
of Chicago, 111. He became bishop of Chi 
cago upon the death of Bishop McLaren in 
1905. Bishop Anderson married at Belle 
ville, Ont., in 1889, Janet Glass, and they 
have five children. He is author of: Con 
firmation, 1898, and The Christian Ministry, 
1902. Address: 1612 Prairie Avenue, Chi 
cago. 



ANDERSON, Edwin Hatfield: 

Librarian; born at Zionsville. Ind., Sept. 
27, 1861; son of Philander and Emma A. 
(Duzan) Anderson. He was graduated 
from Wabash College as A.B. in 1883, later 
receiving the degree of A.M., and he spent 
a year at the N. Y. State Library School. 
Albany, N. Y., in 1890-1891. After work 
at the Newberry Library, Chicago, and as 
librarian of the Carnegie Free Library at 
Braddock, Pa., he organized and was the 
first librarian of the Carnegie Library of 
Pittsburgh, Pa., from 1895 until he resigned 
in Dec., 1904. He was engaged in zinc and 
lead mining at Carthage, Mo., during i<)05 ; 
director of the New York State Library 
and Library School, 1906-1908, resigning 
June 1, 1808, to take his present appoint 
ment as assistant director of the New York 
Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilclen 
Foundations. He was president of the 
Keystone State Library Association, 1901- 
1902; was member of the Public Records 
Commission of Pennsylvania and of the His 
torical Archives Commission of Pennsyl 
vania, 1903-1904; and was first vicc>-presi- 
dent of the American Library Association, 
1899-1900 and 1906-1907; and president of 
the New York Library Association, 1907- 
1908. Mr. Anderson married at Glencoe, 
111., Dec. 22, 1891, Frances R. Plummer. 
Residence: 240 West 104th Street. Office: 
425 Lafayette Street, New York City. 

ANDERSON, John: 

Publisher of the Skandinaven, the leading 
Norwegian paper of the United States. Mr. 
Anderson was born in Voss, Norway, in 
1836, but was brought to the United States 
by his parents when he was eight years old. 
His family settled in Chicago, and at the 
age of twelve, owing to the death of his 
father, Mr. Anderson became the chief 
breadwinner of the family. He learned the 
printer s trade and in 1866 established the 
Skandinaven. The great fire in Chicago de 
stroyed his entire property, but he re-es 
tablished the paper on borrowed money, 
and has achieved not only a great financial 
success, but a leading position in the esti 
mation of his fellow-countrymen of the same 
nativity as himself. His paper, which is 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



issued in daily, Sunday and semi-weekly edi 
tions, circulates through the Scandinavian 
population of the Northwestern States. 
Ki sitlence: 046 Cleveland Avenue, Chicago. 

c 

ANDERSON, Thomas H.: 

Associate justice of the Supreme Court 
of the District of Columbia; born in Bel- 
inont County, Ohio, June 6, 1848; son of 
John and Amelia (Dallas) Anderson. He 
was educated at Mt. Union College, Ohio, 
and after leaving that institution, taught 
in public schools; became principal of the 
Cambridge, Ohio, -High School, until he was 
admitted to the bar in 1871, and practised 
law there until 1889, when he was ap 
pointed minister resident and consul-general 
to Bolivia, his mission being later advanced 
to the rank of envoy extraordinary and 
minister plenipotentiary. He completed 
his term of service in Bolivia in 1893, and 
returned to the United States, beginning 
the practice of law in Washington. During 
his residence in Bolivia, he published a vol 
ume of information on that country, and 
prepared a very large number of reports 
and papers of its characteristics and re 
sources. In 1899, Judge Anderson was ap 
pointed United States district attorney for 
the District of Columbia, and served for two 
years, or until his appointment to his pres 
ent position as associate justice of the Su 
preme Court of the District. He mar 
ried at Addison, Pa., Oct., 1879, Laura B. 
Augustine. Address: 1531 New Hamp- 
shire Avenue, Washington, D. C. 

ANDERSON, Thomas McArthur: 

Army officer and land owner; born in 
Chillicothe, Ohio, Jan. 31, 1830; son of Wil 
liam Marshall and Eliza (McArthur) An 
derson; and descendant in the sixth genera 
tion of Robert Anderson, of New Kent 
County, Virginia. He attended the Cliilli- 
cotho Academy, was graduated from Mount 
St. Mary s College, Maryland (from which 
he afterward received the degree of LL.D.). 
was graduated from Cincinnati Law School, 
LL.B., 1858, and practised law until 1801. 
He was mustered in as private in the 6th 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry, April 20, 1861; 
was commissioned second lieutenant 5th U. 



,8. Cavalry, May 7, 1861; captain 12th U. 
i 8. Infantry, May 14, 1861, and subsequently 
| served in all the grades of military service 
to brigadier-general U. S. A., and was a 
major-general of Volunteers in the Spanish- 
American War, retiring from active service 
by limitation of law, Jan. 31, 1900. After 
I serving in one campaign in the Cavalry, he 
raised his own company of the Twelfth In- 
i fantry. After the battle of Cedar Mountain, 
| he served as acting field officer in the 5th 
I Corps of the Army of the Potomac, and 
i was in nearly all the battles of that corps. 
I He was twice wounded and twice brevetted ; 
j assisted in organizing the Invalid Corps un 
der the provost-marshal general; was com 
missary of musters of the Department of 
the Ohio, 1865; mustered out the Anderson- 
villc prisoners at Camp Chase, Ohio. He 
I served as Reconstruction officer and commis 
sioner of registration in Virginia, 1867- 
1808; commanded posts at Petersburg, 
| Yorktown and Williamsburg, Va. ; Mcln- 
tosh, Ringgold Barracks, and Fort Mc- 
Kavett, Texas ; Columbus Barracks, Ohio ; 
McKenny, Bridger and D. A. Russell, Wy 
oming; commanded the first expedition to 
i Cavite, Luzon, and commanded the post 
! there ; also commanded the District of Lynn 
I Canal, Alaska, Department of Columbia and 
me Department of the East. In the Philip- 
; pines he was in command of the 1st and 
i 2d Divisions, 8th Army Corps, and of the 
Island of Luzon,, South of the Pasig River. 
He was in administrative charge of the 
Virginia Asylum for the Insane at Wil 
liamsburg, 1808; was admitted to the Texas 
Bar, 1809; was attorney for the United 
I States Government in Mexican claims un- 
| der the treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, Texas, 
: 1872-1873; and was in administrative 
j charge of the Ohio Soldiers and Sailors 
! Home, 1891-1894. He was vice-president 
and director of the Commercial Bank of 
! Vancouver, Wash., 1889-1895. He is a 
j member of the Cincinnati Literary Society, 
of societies iu Sandusky, Ohio, and Port- 
| land, Ore., and of the National Geographic; 
I Society, a comrade of the Grand Army of 
j the Republic, companion of the Oregon Com- 
i mandery Military Order of the Loyal Le- 
! gion, compatriot of the Sons of the Ameri- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



11 



can Revolution, a 33d-degree Scottish Rite 
Mason, honorary member of the Society of 
Foreign Wars and the Society of the War 
of 1812, member of the Arlington and Com 
mercial Clubs of Portland, Ore., Columbus 
Club, Columbus, Ohio, and Union League 
Club, Philadelphia. He marVied in Rich 
mond, Va., Feb. 8, 1809, Elizabeth Van 
Winkle, and they have had six children. 
Residence: Vancouver, Wash., R. F. D. 1. 
Office: 717 Board of Trade, Portland, Ore. 

ANDERSON, William Franklin: 

Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church; born in Morgantown, Va., April 
22, 1800.; son of William and Elizabeth 
(Coombs) Anderson. He was graduated 
from the Ohio Wesleyan University with 
degree of A.B., in 1884, and from Drew 
Theological Seminary, as B.D. in 1887. He 
took a post-graduate course in philosophy 
at the New York University from 1895 to 
1899, and received the degree of D.D. from 
Wesleyan University (Connecticut) , in 1902, 
and of LL.D. from Ohio Wesleyan Univer 
sity and from the Upper Iowa University in 
1907. Dr. Anderson entered the ministry 
of the Methodist Episcopal church in 1887, 
and has been pastor of important churches 
in New York City and State. He was an 
officer of the Board of Education of the 
M. E. Church from 1898, having been re 
cording secretary until 1904, and corres 
ponding secretary from 1904 until elected 
by the General Conference at Baltimore, 
May, 1908, and consecrated a bishop of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. Bishop An 
derson has written extensively for the relig 
ious press, including the Outlook. He 
edited the publication, The Christian Stu 
dent, until elected bishop, and is author of 
a book: The Compulsion of Love. Dr. An 
derson married at Cincinnati, Ohio, June 
9, 1887, Jennie Ketcham. Address: Fort 
Wood, Chattanooga, Term. 

ANDREWS, Alexander Boyd: 

Railway official ; born in Franklin 
County, N. C., July 23, 1841. He entered 
the Confederate States Army in June, 186 1. 
and AVas second lieutenant in the First 
North Carolina Cavalry; and he was . 



wounded at Jack s Shop, Va., in Sept., 1863. 
He began his railway career with the Blue 

1 Ridge Railroad in 1859. After the close of 
the war,, he leased, equipped and operated 
a railway ferry at Gaston, N. C., until July, 
1807, when he became superintendent of the 

I Raleigh and Gaston and Raleigh and Au 
gusta Railroads until Nov., 1875, then super- 

! intendent until 1883 of the North Carolina 

j Division of the Richmond and Danville Rail- 

I road. In 1881 he was elected president of 
the Western North Carolina Railroad, 
which he completed. He was also superin- 

; tendent of the Atlantic and North Carolina 
Railroad from 1878 to 1880. From 1883 to 
1880 he was assistant to the president 
of the Richmond and Danville Railroad; 
was third vice-president from 1880 to 1889, 
second vice-president from 1889 to 1894, and 
from July, 1892 to July, 1894, also general 
agent of the receivers of the same road. He 
became second vice-president June 30, 1894, 
and Oct. 1, 1895, became first vice-president 
of the Southern Railway in which position 
he continues; and he is also first vice-presi 
dent of the Mobile and Ohio, and Alabama 
Great Southern Railroads. Address: Ra 
leigh, N. C. 

ANDREWS, Champe Seabury: 

Lawyer; born at Yazoo City, Miss., May 
13, 1875; son of Colonel Garnett and Rosa 
lie Champe (Beirne) Andrews. His father 
was a distinguished member of the Missis 
sippi Bar and author of Andrews Missis 
sippi Digest, and his grandfather, Judge 
Garnett Andrews, was a justice of the Su 
preme Court of Georgia. His maternal 
great-grandfather, Andrew O Beirne of Vir 
ginia, represented the" Greenbrier District 
for many years in the United States Con 
gress. Mr. Andrews was graduated, with 
first honors and the B.S. degree, from the 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute, in 1894, 
then studied hnv, and after admission to 
the bar practised with his father, at Chat 
tanooga. Tenn., in the firm of Andrews and 
Andrews. In 1899 he settled in the practice 
of law in New York City. He is president 
and director of the A. B. Andrews Company, 
director of the Acme Box Company., and 
identified with other business interests. He 



42 MEN OF AMERICA. 

hM rontributed frnpipiitly to the Forum, , ated from the University of Virginia with 
(CTpolitan, Yale Law Journal, Journal the degree of M.A in 1881 Mr. Andrews 
of the American Medical Association, Medi- \ moved to New York City from Baltimore 
A] News, New York Times, and other news- in 1884, and has been a member of the New 
papers and magazines, largely on legal top- Yor* Stock Exchange since 188,, and he is 
ics and more particularly to the law in now a member of the firm of De Coppet & 
relation to physicians and surgeons, the un- Dorenms. He enlisted m the First 
lawful practice of medicine, the dangers of I talion of New York Naval Militia m 1892, 
num-kery, and other topics related to public i and rose to the rank of lieutenant, resign- 



quacker; 

liealth; and has also written extensively on 
foreign travel, having made many visits to 
Europe and also having visited Japan and 
China. During his residence in the South, 
Mr. Andrews was actively in military serv 
ice, having been certified to the War Depart 
ment as first honor military graduate of the 
Alabama Polvtechnic Institute in 1884; and 



ing in 1903. He was appointed ensign in 
the United States Navy in April, 1898, and 
served during the Spanish-American War 
on board the U. S. S. Yankee, receiving an 
honorable discharge in Sept., 1898, when the 
hostilities were over. Mr. Andrews is a 
member of the Southern Society of New 
York, the Maryland Society of New York, 



he was captain of the Third Tennessee In- I the Military Order of Foreign Wars, the 
fantry, U. S. Volunteers, 1898-1899, and | Naval and Military Order of the Spanish- 

J...J . ,..;;,,,, 4 4-V r\ /\moviron \\7av "i~Tia T^pltii TCil n nn TiiTlsillnTI 



was recommended for a commission in the 
regular army, but declined. He is now an 
officer in the 9th Coast Artillery, National 
Guard of New York. Mr. Andrews is a 
Democrat, and a member of the Law Com 
mittee of Tammany Hall. He was for eight 



American War, the Delta Kappa Epsilon 
fraternity, and the Union, Army and Navy, 
and Manhasset Bay Yacht Clubs. Mr. An 
drews married in Brooklyn, New York, in 
1893, Edith Walden, and they have three 
children. Address : 42 Broadway, New 



years counsel to the Medical Society of the i York City. 
County of New York, and he first suggested ; 

the idea resulting in the formation of the ! ANDREWS, Clement Walker: 
Public Health Defense League and was the < Librarian; born at Salem, Mass., Jan. 13, 
first chairman of its Board of Directors; | 1858; son of Joseph and Judith (Walker) 
also was the first secretary of the Com- | Andrews. He was graduated from Har- 
mittee of One Hundred on National Health, I vard College, A.B., 1879, with honors in 
appointed by the American Association for : chemistry, and A.M., 1880. He was in- 
the Advancement of Science, is a member of 1 structor in chemistry at the Massachusetts 
the Medical Jurisprudence Society, the As- Institute of Technology, 1883-1895; was li- 
sociation of the Bar of the City of New j hrarian of that institution from 1889 to 
York, and numerous local societies and ; 1895, and since 1895 has been librarian of 
lodges, member of council of the Naval and j The John Crerar Library, at Chicago. Mr. 
Military Order of the Spanish W r ar, past 1 Andrews was secretary of the Society of 
commander of the New York Department, Arts of the Massachusetts Institute of 
Spanish War Veterans, vice-president of the j Technology and editor of the Technology 
Tennessee Society of New York, member of Quarterly from 1893-1895. He is a mem- 
the Army and Navy Club of New York, and j oer of the Society of Chemical Industry, 
past president of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon American Chemical Society, Deutsche Chem- 
Association. Pvesidence: Hotel Royalton, I ische Gesellschaft, American Library Asso- 
44 West 44th Street. Address : 34 West I ciation, Illinois State Library Association 
15th Street, New York City. j and others, and was a trustee of the 

! Rainabai Association about five years. He 



was councillor 1898-1908, and president for 

Stock broker; born in Baltimore, Md., | 190G-1907 of the American Library Asso- 
Oct. 28, 1858; son of Richard Snowden and i ciation. Mr. Andrews is a member of the 
Mary C. (Lee) Andrews. lie was gradu- j Phi Beta Kappa Society, the Pi Eta Society 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



and the Chicago Literary Club. He is a 
trustee of Unity Church, Chicago, a member 
of the University Club, Union Club, and 
Cliff Dwellers of Chicago and the Onwent- 
sia Club at Lake Forest, 111. Residence: 
Union Club. Office: The John Crerar Li 
brary, Chicago, 111. 

ANDREWS, Elisha Benjamin: 

Educator, clergyman, author; born at 
Hinsdale, N. H v Jan. 10, 1844; son of 
Erastus Andrews. His preparatory educa 
tion was interrupted by service in the Union 
Army, 1861-1864, attaining the rank of 
second lieutenant of U. S. Volunteers. He 
afterwards entered Brown University, from 
which he was graduated as A.B. in 1870, 
and received the degree of A.M. and D.D.. 
1900, and the D.D. degree was also con 
ferred upon him by Colby University in 
1884, and that of LL.D. by the University 
of Nebraska in 1884, and by the University 
of Chicago in 1901. After service of two- 
years as principal of the Connecticut Liter 
ary Institute at Suffield, Conn., he entered 
the Newton, (Mass.) Theological Institu 
tion, and on his graduation there in 1874 
was ordained in the ministry of the Baptist 
Church, becoming pastor of the First Bap 
tist Church of Beverly, Mass. In 1875 he 
was called to the presidency of Denison 
University, and served in that capacity 
until 1879, after which he was for three 
years professor of homiletics and pastoral 
theology at Newton Theological Institution. 
In 1882 and 1883 he pursued graduate stud 
ies in history and economics in the Uni 
versities of Berlin and Munich and from 
1882-1888 was professor of history in 
Brown University; professor of economics 
and public finance in Cornell University, 
1888-1889, and from 1889 to 1898 was presi 
dent and professor of moral and intellectual 
philosophy in Brown University. He was 
superintendent of schools of Chicago, 111., 
1898-1900, and chancellor of the University 
of Nebraska from 1900 to the end of 1908, 
when he became chancellor emeritus. Dr. 
Andrews was a U. S. Commissioner to the 
International Monetary Conference at Brus 
sels in 1892; is a member of the American 



43 

Economic Association, the New England 
Historical-Genealogical Society, the Rhode 
Island Historical Society, and the Military 
Order of the Loyal Legion. He is author 
of numerous theological and historical 
works, among which is a five-volume history 
of the United States, as well as a work on 
bimetalism in which he expressed views on 
the subject of the use of silver as money 
which brought him into national attention 
owing to the controversy which they 
aroused. His fearless course while superin 
tendent of schools of Chicago also brought 
him prominently into public notice. Chan 
cellor Andrews has gained distinction as a 
progressive educator and able executive 
whose administration of university affairs 
has been eminently successful. Address: 
University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. 

ANDREWS, Eliza Frances: 

Author, botanist, lecturer; born in Wash 
ington, Ga. } Aug. 10, 1840; and is of Revo 
lutionary ancestry through all four of her 
grandparents, her parents being Judge Gar- 
nett and Annulet (Ball) Andrews. Her 
brother, the late Col. Garnett Andrews, was 
a Confederate officer of distinction and 
formerly mayor of Chattanooga, Tenn. Miss 
Andrews was graduated from La Grange 
College, Georgia, and has had an interesting 
career as educator, author, lecturer and a 
warm advocate of socialism. She has al 
ways devoted her leisure to the study of 
botany, with the result that her book Bot 
any All the Year Around has become a 
text book in schools in all parts of the 
country and has had an international cir 
culation. Her earlier novels: A Family 
Secret; A Mere Adventurer; and Prince 
Hall, were published by the Lippincott 
Company of Philadelphia, and two: The 
Mistake of his life, and How He Was 
Tempted, have appeared as serials. She is 
also author of humorous sketches, short 
stories, and political and scientific papers; 
of A Memorial Day Ode, Haunted, and 
other poems; and her most important work 
is The Wartime Journal of a Georgia Girl, 
1908 (Appleton). Address: 310 Mildred 
Street, Montgomery, Ala. 



44 

ANDREWS, George: 

Colonel and adjutant-general, U. S. A.; 
born in Providence, R. I., Aug. 26, 1850; 
son of Brigadier-General George Lippitt An 
drews, U. S. A., and Alice Beverly (Potter) 
Andrews. He was graduated from the 
United States Military Academy in the 
class of 1876; served as lieutenant and cap 
tain 25th U. S. Infantry, 1876-1898; pro 
moted major and adjutant-general, Feb. 26, 
18u8; lieutenant-colonel, Feb. 2, 1901 colo 
nel, Aug. 7, 1903. He was adjutant-gen 
eral, Department of the Missouri, of the 
4th Independent Division, and of the De 
partment of the East, 1898-1899, of the 
Department of Santiago, Cuba, 1899-1900, 
Department of California, 1902-1904, of the 
Pacific Division to 1905, the Philippines 
Division, 1907, the Department of the Colo 
rado, 1908-1909, and the Department of the 
Lakes, 1909. Colonel Andrews is a mem 
ber of the Military Order of the Loyal Le 
gion (2d class), Sons of the American Rev 
olution, Union Club of Cleveland, Ohio; 
Denver and Denver Country Clubs, Denver, 
and the Army and Navy Club of Manila. 
Address: Army Headquarters, Chicago, 111. 

ANDREWS, Lorrin: 

Attorney-general of Hawaii; born, Staten 
Island, N. Y., July 29, 1870; son of William 
and Adele M. (Oscanyan) Andrews. Mr. 
Andrews is a graduate of New York Uni 
versity and of the law school of that in 
stitution. After practising law in New 
York, where he was also prominent in 
Republican politics, he removed to the 
Hawaiian Islands, being admitted to the 
Hawaiian Bar in 1899. He occupied a 
prominent position in politics and in the 
affairs of the island during his life there 
previous to 1903 when he was elected at 
torney-general of Hawaii, in which position 
he is still serving. Mr. Andrews, in addi 
tion to his membership in the New York 
and Hawaiian bars, is a member of the bar 
at Shanghai, China, and of the Supreme 
court of the United States. In 1904 he was 
the governmental delegate from Hawaii to 
the Universal Congress of Lawyers and jur 
ists at St. Louis. He married Estelle Lin- 
wood in 1893. Address: Honolulu, T. H. 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



ANDREWS, William H.: 

Delegate to Congress; born in Youngs- 
ville, Pa., Jan. 14, 1842. At an early age 
Mr. Andrews became a prominent figure 
in the Republican party in Pennsylvania. 
In 1889-1890 he was chairman of the Re 
publican State Committee, and during his 
residence in Pennsylvania took an active 
part in all of the Republican campaigns. 
He served in the House of Representatives 
of the Legislature of Pennsylvania from 
1889 to 1890 and from 1901 to 1902, and was 
a*member of the State Senate from 1895 to 
1898. In 1902 he removed to New Mexico 
and the following year was elected a mem 
ber of the Territorial Council. In 1904 he 
was elected delegate to Congress, where he 
took a prominent part in the movement for 
the admission of New Mexico as a State, 
and was reflected delegate to the Sixtieth 
Congress in 1906. He has large farming 
and mercantile interests in New Mexico, and 
is president of the Santa Fe Central Rail 
way Company, and connected with other 
large New Mexico enterprises. Address: 
Albuquerque, N. M. 

ANDREWS, William Loring: 

Merchant, author; born in New York City, 
Sept. 9, 1837; son of Loring and Caroline 
C. (Delmater) Andrews. He was educated 
in private schools and engaged in business 
in New York until 1877, when he retired 
from active business. Yale University con 
ferred upon Mr. Andrews the honorary de 
gree of M.A. in 1893. He is a trustee of 
the Bank for Savings, director of the Conti 
nental Insurance Company and was form 
erly for eleven years one of the managers 
of the House of Refuge, on Randall s Is 
land. Mr. Andrews is a trustee, a member 
of the executive committee and honorary li 
brarian of the Metropolitan Museum of Art ; 
member of the council of New York Univer 
sity; honorary member of the Eleventh 
Army Corps Association; member of the 
National Academy of Design, New York 
Historical Society., American Geographical 
Society, New York Chamber of Commerce. 
He was founder and president of the Society 
of Iconophiles of New York. Mr. Andrews 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



is author of several books, among them; 
New Amsterdam, New Orange, N. Y. ; Old 
Booksellers of New York; Fragments of 
American History; Prospectus of Colleges 
in Cambridge; Sexto Decemos et Infra; A 
Trio of French Engravers; Portraiture of 
the American Revolutionary War; James 
Lyne s Survey; Gossip About Book Collect 
ing; Paul Revere and his Engraving; Castle 
Garden; Bibliopegy in the United States; 
Treatise of Fysshine Wyth an Angle, from 
the Book of St. Albans; Historical Sketch 
of the Continental Fire Insurance Com 
pany of the City of New York; New York 
as Washington Knew It After the Revolu 
tion; An English XVIII Century Sports 
man; Bibliopole and Binder of Angling 
Books. Mr. Andrews is a member of the 
Century Association, was one of the found 
ers, the second president and still a member 
and one of the council of the Grolier Club; 
member of the Union League Club of New 
York and the Savile Club of London. Mr. 
Andrews married in New York City, Oct. 17, 
1860, Jane Elizabeth, daughter of Theodore 
Crane. Address: 16 East 38th Street, 
New York City, and The Pepperidges, West 
Islip, L. I., N. Y. 

ANDREWS, William Shankland: 

Jurist; born in Syracuse, N. Y., Sept. 25, 
1858; son of Charles and Marcia (Shank- 
land) Andrews. He was graduated from 
Harvard, A.B., 1880, and from the Law 
School of Columbia College, LL.B., 1882. 
He practised law in Syracuse, N. Y., until 
elected, in 1899, a justice of the Supreme 
Court of the State of New York for the 
term expiring Dec. 13, 1913. Address: 404 
Oak Street, Syracuse, N. Y. 

ANDRTJS, John Emory: 

Congressman, manufacturer; born at 
Pleasantville, Westchester County, N. Y., 
Feb. 16, 1841; son of Loyal B. Andrus and 
Ann (Palmer) Andrus. He was educated 
at Wesleyan University, at Middletown, 
Conn., from which he was graduated as A. 
B. in 1862. He taught school in New Jer 
sey four years; engaged as a manufacturer 
of medicinal preparations, and is president 
of the Palisade Manufacturing Company, 



treasurer of the Arlington Chemical Com 
pany and president of the New York Phar 
maceutical Association. He was elected 
mayor of Yonkers, in 1903, and to the 
Fifty-ninth Congress in 1904, as a Republi 
can from the Nineteenth New York Dis 
trict and reflected in 1906 and 1908 to the 
Sixtieth and Sixty-first Congresses. He is 
! a trustee of Wesleyan University. He mar- 
I ried at Yonkers, N. Y., June 23, 1869, Julia 
j M. Dyckman. Address: Yonkers, N. Y. 

ANGELL, James Burrill: 

President of the University of Michigan; 
born at Scituate, R. I., Jan. 7, 1829; son 
of Andrew Aldrich and Amy (Aldrich) 
Angell. He was graduated from Brown 
University as A.B., with Phi Beta Kappa 
honors, in 1849, following his graduation 
with travel and study in Europe. He was 
professor of modern languages in Brown 

j University, 1853-1860, editor of the Provi 
dence Journal, Providence, R. L, 1860-1866, 

I president of the University of Vermont, 
1866-1871, president of the University of 

j Michigan since 1871. He has received the 
honorary degree of LL.D. from Brown Uni 
versity, Columbia University, Rutgers Col 
lege, Princeton University, Yale University, 
Johns Hopkins University, the University 
of Winconsin, Harvard University, Uni- 
veristy of Vermont, and Michigan Agricul 
tural College. President Angell, in addi 
tion to his services to education has also 

| taken an important part in American diplo- 

i macy, having served as envoy extraordinary 
and minister plenipotentiary of the United 

| States to China, 1880-1881, and to the Otto 
man Empire, 1897-1898. He was a member 
of the International Commission of the 
United States and Great Britain on Fisher 
ies Questions in 1887-1888, and chairman of 
the International Commission of the United 
States and Canada on Deep Waterways in 
1895-1896. He is a regent of the Smithson 
ian Institution, a member of the American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Ameri 
can Philosophical Society, American Anti 
quarian Association, American Historical 

1 Association, and American Society of Inter 
national Law. He married in Providence, 
R. L, Nov. 26, 1855, Sarah Swope Caswell, 



40 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



daughter of Alexis Caswell, D.D., LL.D., 
for many years professor and president of 
Brown University. They have three adult 
children. Address: Ann Arbor, Mich. 

ANGELL, James Rowland: 

Professor of psychology; born in Burling 
ton, Vt., May 8, 1869, son of James Burrill 
Angell, LL.D., president of the University 
of Michigan since 1871, and Sarah Swope 
(Caswell) Angell, daughter of Alexis Cas 
well, D.D., LL.D., for many years professor 
and at one time president of Brown Uni 
versity. He was graduated from the Uni 
versity of Michigan, A.B., 1890, A.M., 1891; 
took post-graduate work at Harvard, re 
ceiving the degree of A.M. in 1892, and at 
the Universities of Berlin and Halle in 1893. 
He was instructor in philosophy in the 
University of Minnesota, 1894, and since 
1895 has been of the faculty of the Uni 
versity of Chicago, where he was assistant 
professor of experimental psychology, 1895- 
1901, associate professor, 1901-1904. and pro 
fessor and head of the Department of Psy 
chology since 1904. He became dean of the 
Senior Colleges in 1908. Professor Angell 
was lecturer on psychology in the Uni 
versity of California in 1903, and in Wel- 
lesley College in 1904. He is a member and 
ex-president of the American Psychological 
Association, and a member and former vice- 
president of the Western Philosophical As 
sociation, and a member of the Scientific 
Society of the Sigma Xi. He has made ex 
tensive researches in experimental psychol 
ogy, and has contributed extensively to the 
literature of psychology and particularly 
in reference to the psychology of attention, 
the organic accompaniments of conscious 
processes, auditory localization, reaction- 
time, the effect of partial tones on the lo 
calization of sound, dermal space-perception 
and functional psychology. He is a mem 
ber of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. 
Professor Angell married in Des Moines, 
Iowa, Dec. 18, 1894, Marion Isabel Watrous, 
and they have two children. Address : Uni- 
Versity of Chicago, Chicago. 

ANGLIN, Margaret Mary: 

Actress; born in Ottawa, Canada, April 
3, 1876; daughter of Hon. Timothy Warren 



Anglin, speaker of the Dominion Parlia 
ment, and Ellen (McTavish) Allen. She 
was educated in Loretto Abbey, Toronto, 
and at the Convent of the Sacred Heart in 
Montreal. Having met with success as an 
amateur reader, she went to New York City, 
when she was seventeen years old, and be 
came one of the first pupils in Nelson 
Wheatcroft s Empire School of Dramatic 
Art, and in the public performance on 
graduation in 1894 her acting made such a 
favorable impression on Mr. Charles Froh- 
man that he engaged her for the part of 
" Madeline West " in Shenandoah, in which 
she made her professional debut at the 
Academy of Music in New York City in 
September, 1894. After a year on the road, 
Miss Anglin became leading lady with 
James O Neill for the season of 1896-1897, 
playing " Ophelia " in Hamlet, " Virginia " 
in Virginius, " Julie de Mortemar " in 
Richelieu, and " Mercedes " in Monte Cristo. 
She was leading lady with E. H. Sothern, 
1897-1898, with Richard Mansfield, 1898- 
1899, and in the Empire Theatre Stock 
Company, 1899 to 1905. The following 
year she starred in Zira, a dramatization of 
Vvilkie Collins novel, The New Magdalen, 
and afterward, jointly with Henry Miller, 
in The Great Divide. Address: Care of 
The Lyric Theatre, New York City. 

ANKENY, Levy: 

United States senator and banker; born 
near St. Joseph, Mo., Aug. 1, 1844. In the 
year 1850, w r ith his parents, he crossed the 
plains to Oregon, where he attended the 
public schools of Portland. He afterward, 
with his father, Captain Ankeny, engaged 
in the transportation business to and from 
the mines. He was agent for the Wells- 
Fargo Company, and later engaged in the 
mercantile business at Lewiston, Idaho. 
He was the first mayor of Lewiston, the 
Government having deeded to him, as trus 
tee, the public land on which that town 
was located. Later he moved to Walla 
Walla, Wash., and engaged in the banking 
business,, being president of seven banks in 
Washington and Oregon. He became a can 
didate for the United States Senate in 1895, 
but was defeated, and was again defeated 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



47 



in 1899. He was selected as the member, 
of the Republican National Committee from 
the State of Washington in 1904, and elect 
ed United States Senator from the State 
of Washington, Jan. 29, 1903, to succeed 
George Turner, Democrat, and took his seat> 
March 5, 1903, for the term expiring March 
3, 1909. He married Oct. 2, 1867, Jennie 
Nesmith, daughter of the. late Senator 
James W. Nesmith, of Oregon. Address: 
Walla Walla, Wash. 

ANSBERRY, Timothy Thomas: 

Member of Congress; born in Defiance, 
Ohio, Dec. 24, 1871; son of Edward and 
Elizabeth (Fit/patrick) Ansberry. He was 
educated at the University of Notre Dame, 
of which he is LL.B. of 1893. He was ad 
mitted to the Ohio bar. and lias since prac 
tised his profession at Defiance. In 1895 
and again in 1899 he was elected prosecut 
ing attorney of Defiance County, serving 
a two-year term in each case. In 1904 he 
was an unsuccessful Democratic candidate 
for Congress from the Fifth Ohio District, 
but was elected in 1906 to the Sixtieth 
Congress and reflected to the Sixty-first 
Congress in 1908. He married in Cleve 
land, Ohio, Dec. 26, 1898, Nellie Kettering. 
Address: Defiance, Ohio. 

ANSEL, Martin Frederick: 

Governor of South Carolina; born in 
Charleston, S. C., Dec. 12, 1850; son of 
John J. and Frederika (Bowers) Ansel. 
After completing a common school educa 
tion he studied law, and was admitted to 
the bar Nov., 1870, engaging in practice. 
He also became active in politics as a Demo 
crat; was elected to the South Carolina 
Legislature, serving from 1882 to 1888, then 
became solicitor of the Eighth Judicial Dis 
trict of South Carolina for twelve years; 
was an unsuccessful candidate for governor 
of South Carolina in 1902, but in 1906 was 
elected to that office, and reflected in 1908 : 
for the term expiring in January, 1911. 
Governor Ansel married first in February, j 
1878, Ophelia A. Speight, who died Dec. 25, 
1895, and second, at Pickens, S. C., Aug. 
24, 1898, Addie R. Harris (nee Hollings- 
worth). Address: Columbia, S. C. 



ANTHONY, Brayman William: 

President of Adrian College; born in 
Leray, N. Y., Feb. ]<>, 1854; son of George 
W. and Mary L. (Loskaj Anthony. He 
was graduated from Adrian College, .Mich., 
Ph.B., 1880, and received the degree of 
D.D. from Kansas City University, Kansas, 
1901. He was in the ministry of the Meth 
odist Protestant Church from 1877 to 1904, 
was recording secretary of the Board of 
Ministerial Education of that church, 1896 
1900, and member of the Methodist Protest 
ant Board of Home Missions, 1900. Since 
1904 he has been president of Adrian Col 
lege. President Anthony was a member of 
the Tri-Church Council in Chicago, 1907. 
When he took charge of Adrian College, in 
1904, the institution was greatly discour 
aged by a heavy debt, which had embar 
rassed it for many years. During his presi 
dency the debt has been paid, the endow 
ment increased, and the attendance more 
than doubled. He married at Red Creek, 
N. Y., Aug. 12, 1879, Frances DeLameter, 
and they have two children. Address: 
Adrian, Mich. 

ANTHONY, Daniel Read: 

Member of Congress; born in Leaven- 
worth, Kan., Aug. 22, 1870; son of Col. 
Daniel Read Anthony, founder of the Leav- 
enworth Times. He was educated at the 
Michigan Military Academy and the Uni 
versity of Michigan, of which he is an 
LL.B., 1891. He entered the newspaper 
business, and is now editor and manager of 
the Leavenworth Times. He has been post 
master of Leavenworth, and was mayor 
from 1903 to 1905. In 1907 he was elected 
as a Republican to the Sixtieth Congress 
and he was reflected in 1908. He married 
in Leavenworth, Kan., in 1897, Elizabeth 
Havens. Residence: Leavenworth, Kan. 

APPLEBY, Thomas Henry Montague Vil- 
liers: 

Superintendent of Indian Missions of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church; born in Re 
gent s Park, London, England, Oct. 28, 
1843; son of Thomas and Lady L. M. (Vil- 
liers) Appleby. He was educated at King s 
College, London; Exeter College, Oxon 



48 

scholar to St. Augustine s College, Canter 
bury, England; A.M. 1866; studied in hos 
pitals in London and received from the State 
Medical Board of the University of Minne 
sota, the degree of M.D., 1877; Seabury 
Divinity School, Minnesota, D.D. 1900; St. 
John s College, Maryland, LL.D. 1901. He 
ordered deacon in 1865; priest, 1866; 
was rector at Clarksburg, Ontario, from 
!S(i() to 1876; at Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, 
from 1876 to 1881; and at St. Vincent, 
Minn., 1881 to 1888. After coming to the 
United States he took up work among the 
Indians, and in 1877 was adopted into the 
Ojibway Tribe of Indians by the name of 
Shu-na-we-whah-doon (silver tongue). He 
was appointed first archdeacon of Minne 
sota in 1888, and was the first general 
archdeacon in the American church; arch 
deacon of North Dakota in 1898 and of 
Duluth in 1899. He was deputy to the 
General Convention from 1892 to 1898, and 
was appointed general superintendent of 
Indian missions in 1900. Dr. Appleby has 
taken an active interest in the civic affairs 
of the communities in which he has lived, 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



APPLETON, Francis Henry: 

Born in Boston, Mass., June 17, 1847. 
General Appleton is one of the most public 
spirited and best known citizens of Massa 
chusetts, and has for many years been 
prominent in the promotion of a large num 
ber of interests, principally those relating 
to agriculture. He was graduated from 
Harvard College with the degree of A.B. in 
1869, and took up the study of scientific 
agriculture, being one of the earliest stu 
dents and workers along the lines which 
have developed into the national and state 
agricultural departments and bureaus. He 
was curator of Bussy Institute from 1873 
to 1875, and declined the secretaryship of 
the Massachusetts State Board of Agricul 
ture, although he has been for many years 
connected in official capacities with the lead 
ing agricultural and horticultural societies 
of Massachusetts. He has been president of 
the Essex County Agricultural Society; 
president of the Massachusetts Horticul 
tural Society, and secretary of the Bay 
State Agricultural Society, and is now sec 
retary of the old Massachusetts Society for 



and in 1884-1888 was probate and county the p romotion of Agriculture. He was also 



judge. Residence: 1616 East Superior 
Street, Duluth, Minn. 

APPLETON, Daniel: 

Publisher; born in New York City, Feb. 
24, 1852; son of John A. Appleton and 
grandson of Daniel Appleton, founder of 
D. Appleton & Company. He was educated 
in New York City and Carlsruhe, Germany, 
and entered Harvard, but did not continue 
the course, leaving in 1871 to enter busi 
ness. He was a clerk in the publishing 
house of D. Appleton & Company until 
1879, and since then has been member of 
the firm; and he is now vice-president of 
the company. He entered the Boston Ca 
det Corps in 1867, enlisted Oct. 31, 1871, as 
a private in Company F of the Seventh 
Regiment, National Guard of New York; 
was promoted captain in January, 1879, 
and elected colonel of the regiment July 18, 
1889, since which date he has continued at 
the head of that famous military organ 
ization. Residence: Hotel Astor. Business 
address: 35 West 32d Street, New York 
City. 



president of the New England Agricultural 
Society, and had a leading part in the pro 
motion and management of some of the 
most successful agricultural expositions 
held in Massachusetts and New England. 
He has also been reporter on foreign agri 
cultural matters, at Vienna, for the Massa 
chusetts State Board, and was for many 
years a member of the Massachusetts Board 
of Agriculture, of the Board of Control of 
the Massachusetts Experiment Station, and 
a trustee o f . the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College. General Appleton is a prominent 
member of the Republican party of Massa 
chusetts and has served two terms in each 
branch of the Legislature. He has, since 
1887, taken an active interest in the Massa 
chusetts volunteer militia, and in 1896 was 
appointed commissary general by Governor 
Wolcott, with the rank of brigadier-general; 
and he was retired with the rank of major- 
general. Tie is also prominent in affairs 
relating lo patriotic societies, and was 
president-general of the Sons of the Ameri 
can Revolution in 1905-1906. Address: 251 
Marlboro Street, Boston. 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



APPLETON, Francis Randall: 

The leading figure in the watch-selling 
business of the United States, being a mem 
ber of the firm which handled the product 
of the first successful American watch fac 
tory and made it possible for that success 
to be attained. He was born in New York 
City, Aug. 5, 1854; son of Daniel Fuller 
and Julia (Randall) Appleton. He was 
educated at Anthon Grammar School, at 
Phillips Andover Academy, at Harvard Col 
lege, graduating as A.B. in 1875 and Col 
umbia College, graduating with the degree 
of LL.B. in 1877. He practised law in 
New York until 1883, and in 1884 became 
a member of the firm of Bobbins & Apple- 
ton, general agents of the Waltham Watch 
Company of Waltham, Mass. He is a di 
rector of The National Park Bank, the 
Mount Morris Bank and the Manhattan 
Trust Company, and is vice-president and 
director of the Waltham Watch Company, 
of Waltham, Mass. For thirteen years he 
was a staff officer of the First Brigade of 
the National Guard of the State of New 
York. He is a trustee of the General Me 
morial Hospital in New York, and a mem 
ber of the Board of Overseers of Harvard 
College. Mr. Appleton married at Lenox, 
Mass., Oct. 7, 1884, Fanny Lanier, and they 
have five children. Residence: 26 East 
37th Street, New York City, and Ipswich, 
Mass. Business address: 21 Maiden Lane, 
New York City. 

APTHORP, William Foster: 

Dramatic and musical critic; born in 
Boston, Oct. 24, 1848, and graduated from 
Harvard, 180. He studied pianoforte, 
harmony, and counterpoint under J. K. 
Paine, and pianoforte under B. J. Lang. 
He taught in various musical colleges in 
Boston until 1884, and since 1872 has been 
writing dramatic and musical criticisms for 
the Atlantic Monthly and the Boston Sun 
day Courier, and since 1881 for the Bos 
ton Transcript. He was critical editor of 
Scribner s Encyclopaedia of Music and Mu- i 
sicians, and besides a large number of 
papers on musical and dramatic matters, 
is author of: Hector Berlioz, Autobiogra- 
4 



49 

|pliy and Musical Grotesque; Musicians and 
! Music Lovers; Jacques Damour and Other 
i Stories, ( translated from Zola ) ; By the 

Way; and The Opera, Past and Present. 

M-. Apthorp married in 1876, Octavie Loir 
i lasagi. Residence: 14 Otis Place. Office: 
| 324 Washington Street, Boston. 

ARBTJCKLE, John: 

Head of the coffee interests of the well- 
i known Arbuckle Bros. Mr. Arbuckle was 
: born in Allegheny, Pa., and in 1871 re- 
; moved with his brother Charles, now de- 
I ceased, to New York City, where they es- 
1 tablished the firm of Arbuckle Bros. They 
were pioneers in the practice of roasting 
coffee to be put up in packages for sale 
under an extensively advertised name to 
consumers, their business intended to take 
the place of the very large trade in ready- 
ground coffee, which had been highly adul 
terated during the high price of coffee 
i during the Civil War, and also to take 
the place of the domestic practice of roast - 
; ing and grinding coffee. The firm came to 
be the largest concern in the country in its 
line, and eventually came into competition 
with large sugar refineries, owing to the 
i advantage offered by their system for the 
marketing of sugar products in connection 
with their own goods. A bitter warfare 
was carried on for a number of years and 
ended in an adjustment which was in the 
nature of a compromise. Mr. Arbuckle is 
the head of the great firm which was thus 
built up and is a director of the Importers 
and Traders Bank and Kings County Trust 
Co. He is president of the Royal Horse 
Association, which owns large ranches in 
Wyoming and other states. Mr. Arbuckle 
maintains a fresh-air home for children on 
Lake Mohonk, N. Y. He married at Pitts 
burgh, Pa., in 1808, Mary Alice Kerr, who 
died June 24, 1907. Residence: 315 Clin 
ton Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Office: 71 
Water Street, New York City. 

ARCHBALD, Robert Wodrow: 

United States district judge; born at 
Carbondale, Pa., Sept. 10, 1848; son of 
James Archbald and of Augusta T. ( Froth- 
ingham ) Archbald, daughter of Major 



50 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Tlmums Frothingham, of the Continental | 
Army. Ho entered Yale College, where he | 
was graduated in 1871, as A.B.. and Dick- | 
inson College conferred upon him the de 
gree of LL.D. in 1908. For two years he ; 
read law in the ofliee of Hand & Post, 
of Scranton, Pa., and was admitted to the 
bar of Pennsylvania, Sept. 23, 1873. After 
practising law at Scranton for eleven years 
lie was elected in 1884 additional law 
judge of the Forty-fifth District of Penn 
sylvania. He became president-judge Aug. 
l . 1888. and was reflected in Nov., 1894, 
for a second term of ten years. On April 
1. 1001, lie was appointed by President 
McKinley United States district judge for 
the newly-formed Middle District of Penn 
sylvania. He is of Scotch descent through 
his father who was born on the little Cum- 
bray Isle off the west coast of Scotland 
and derives his given name from Rev. 
Robert Wodrow. an ancestor, who was a 
prominent Presbyterian divine, the author 
of The Sufferings of the Church of Scot- | 
land. Among the societies to which he | 
belongs are the St. Andrew s Society of 
Philadelphia, the Scroll and Key Society 
of Yale and the Psi Upsilon frternity. 
Judge Archbald married at Oxford, X. Y., 
Jan. 21, 1875, Elizabeth Baldwin Cannon 
and has three children. Residence: 236 
Monroe Avenue, Scranton. Address: Post 
Office Building, Scranton, Pa. 

ARCHBOLD, John Dustin: 

Vice-president of the Standard Oil Com- j 
pany ; born at Leesburg, Highland County, j 
Ohio, July 26, 1848. He was educated in 
the schools of Ohio and in 1864 he went 
to the Pennsylvania oil regions, remaining 
there until 1875. and becoming president 
of the Acme Oil Company. In 1875 he 
became a resident of Syracuse, N. Y., and 
ho has boon a director since 1875 and is | 
now vice-president of the Standard Oil 
Company. Mr. Archbold is president of 
the board of trustees of Syracuse University | 
and a director of the Post-Graduate Hos 
pital and Training School. He is a mem 
ber of the American Geological Society 
and the American Museum of Natural His 
tory. He has for years been the active 



force in the administrative details of the 
Standard Oil Company and has especially 
come into notice with reference to various 
legislative and legal proceedings in which 
the spokesman for the company has most 
often been Mr. Archbold. He has been 
identified with various philanthropies and 
gave the new building at 454 West 42d 
Street, New York City, to the New York 
Kindergarten Association as a memorial 
to his daughter, Mrs. Frances Dana Arch- 
bold Walcott. Mr. Archbold married An 
nie M. Mills. Residence : Tarrytown-on- 
Hudson, N. Y. Office: 26 Broadway, New 
York City. 

ARCHIBALD, James F. J.: 

War correspondent; born in Chautauqua, 
N. Y., Sept. 22, 1872; son of Dr. F. A. and 
Martha W T . ( Jewell ) Archibald. He was 
graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University 
in 1888, and since that time has had per 
sonal experience in most of the armed con 
tests throughout the world. He served in 
the Chinese-Japanese War, and was with 
General Miles through the Sioux campaign 
and in the last Apache campaign. Mr. 
Archibald accompanied the first scouting 
expedition that landed in Cuba about a 
month before the Santiago expedition, and 
was wounded at that time. He was a 
volunteer aide-de-camp in the Fifth Army 
Corps in the Santiago campaign, and was in 
the Soudan in 1899, and with the Boer 
Army during the South African war until 
1he occupation of Pretoria, having been 
w r ounded in the battle of Pretoria. He also 
witnessed the last three campaigns in Vene 
zuela and in the Philippines; in the Rus 
sian-Japanese War was with the Russian 
Army as correspondent of an illustrated 
weekly; and was with the French forces in 
Northern Africa, 1908. Mr. Archibald has 
received a number of orders from various 
nations, and is a member of several societies 
of the wars of the United States, an honor 
ary member of the American Red Cross, 
and of the Red Cross of Japan and of 
Spain; and is a fellow of the Royal Geo 
graphical Society of England. He is the 
author of a large number of articles on 
military subjects, and of the books, Blue 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Shirt and Khaki, and Tales from the 
Trenches. Address: Army and Navy Club, 
Washington, D. C. 

ARDEN, Edwin Hunter Pendleton: 

Actor; born in St. Louis, Feb. 13, 1864. 
He left his native place for the Western 
States in 1881, and after a series of expe 
riences in different lines of activity, went 
on the stage in 1882. For nine years he was 
a star playing in Eagle s Nest and other 
dramas, dealing with the romantic aspects 
of Western life, the plays being, in whole 
or in part, of his own authorship. With 
the waning popularity of the Western 
drama, Mr. Arden entered into the general 
work of his profession, and has achieved 
a distinguished success as a skilful actor, 
especially on legitimate comedy lines. Ow 
ing to his long and varied experience, he is 
especially efficient in stock company work, 
with its trying demand upon the resources 
and versatility of the actors, and he is an 
especial and personal favorite in many 
of the large cities of the country. Address: 
130 West 44th Street, New York City. 

ARENS, Franz Xavier: 

Composer; born at Neef, Rhenish Prus 
sia, Oct. 28, 1856. He emigrated to the 
United States when he was ten years of 
age, but returned to Germany to study 
music, and graduated from the Royal Con 
servatory of Music in Dresden, in 1885. 
He returned to the United States to be 
come conductor of the Cleveland, Ohio, 
Philharmonic Orchestra and Gesangverein 
and conducted the series of American Com 
posers Concerts in Berlin, Dresden, Ham 
burg, Leipzig and other cities in Europe, 
fiom 1890 to 18i>2, and the American Com 
posers Concerts at the Vienna International 
Musical and Theatrical Exhibition. Studied 
voice with Professor Julius Hey, Berlin, 
1890-1892. He conducted a series of May 
festivals in Indianapolis, Ind., until 1897, 
when he removed to New York, and in 
1898 was chosen conductor of the New 
York Manuscript Society concerts. In 1900 
he founded the New York People s Sym 
phony Concerts, and has since been the con 
ductor of those popular series, and con 



ducts the Arens Vocal Studio, New York 
City. He is a member of the Lambs Club, 
the Manuscript Society and the American 
Music Society, and a director of the Young 
Men s Orchestra. He married at Canal 
Dover, Ohio, May 15, 1885, Emma Huegel. 
Address: 308 West 56th Street, New 
York City. 

ARENTS, Albert: 

Mining engineer and metallurgist; born 
in Clausthal, Germany, March 14, 1840. 
He was graduated from the School of Mines 
of his native place, and studied at the 
University of Berlin for two years. Mr. 
Arents came to the United States in 1865 
under engagement to treat lead ores in 
Hampton County, Mass., but shortly after 
wards removed to the W T est. He has since 
been prominently connected with the lead 
mining and smelting development of the 
Western States, and has introduced a large 
number of improvements in smelting prac 
tice, especially in Nevada, where he intro 
duced the rectangular, large-sized lead fur 
naces which are the type now used by 
lead-smelters throughout the United States 
and also invented the modern " siphon tap " 
for lead blast furnaces. Mr. Arents is a 
member of the American Society of Min 
ing Engineers. Address: 561 Railroad 
Avenue, Alameda, Calif. 

ARMBRECHT, William Henry: 

Lawyer; born in Port Chester, N. Y.. 
Feb. 9, 1874. He was educated in the pub 
lic schools of Knoxville, Tenn., and studied 
law under E. L. Russell, general counsel 
of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, at Mo 
bile, Ala. After a few years service as 
attorney for that railroad, he was apponited 
United States district attorney for Mobile 
in 1904, and from 1907 to 1908 he was in 
charge of the prosecution of the Honduras 
National Lottery, resulting in pleas of 
guilty of thirty-five defendants, and the 
assessment and collection, by the United 
States Government, of fines aggregating 
$280,000, the largest fine ever collected by 
the Federal Government. He was reap- 
pointed to his office as U. S. attorney in 
1907. In 1902, Mr. Armbrecht was nomin- 



52 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



ated by the Republican Party for attorney 
general of Alabama. He is a member of 
the firm of Inge and Armbrecht, attorneys, 
Mobile, director, vice-president, and gen 
eral counsel of the Meridian Light and 
Railway Company, Meridian, Miss., and 
director of the Southern Construction Com 
pany, Mobile, and the Miazza- Woods Build 
ing Co., Meridian, Miss. He is a member 
of the Tri-State Board of the Y. M. C. A., 
which comprises the States of Alabama, 
Mississippi and Louisiana. He is a 32d- 
degree Mason, an Elk, and a Knights of 
Pythias. Mr. Armbrecht married at Mobile, 
Ala., Dec. 1, 1897, Anna B. Paterson, and 
they have four children. Residence: 1073 
Government Street. Office: 106 to 107 
City Bank Building, Mobile, Ala. 

ARMOUR, Jonathan Ogden: 

Merchant, capitalist; born in Milwaukee, 
Wis., Nov. 11, 1863; son of the late Philip 
Danforth Armour and Melvina Belle 
( Ogden ) Armour. He entered Yale, but 
left before completing the course because 
of the desire of his father that he should 
join him in business and relieve him of part 
of the executive burden. With that view 
he returned to Chicago and has ever since 
been engaged in the business of Armour 
and Company succeeding to the presidency 
of that company upon the death of his 
father in 1901. He is also director of the 
Armour Car Lines, Armour Grain Com 
pany, the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul 
Railway, the Continental National Bank of 
Chicago, the Northwestern National Insur 
ance Company of Milwaukee, Wis., the 
National Packing Company, Omaha Pack 
ing Company, Illinois Central Railroad 
Company, and of other corporations. Mr. 
Armour married, in New York City, Lolita 
Sheldon, and they have one daughter, 
Lolitia. Residence: 3724 Michigan Ave 
nue. Office: Home Insurance Building, 
Chicago. 

ARMOUR, M. Cochrane: 

Merchant and manufacturer; born in 
Auburn N. Y., Jan. 11, 1851; son of John 
and Lillias (Cochrane) Armour. He was 
educated in the public schools and then 



became a clerk at Marshall, Mich., in the 
grain and milling business, and afterward, 
at the same place, was associated with his 
father in the grain and grocery business un 
der the name of J. and M. C. Armour. He 
removed in 1876 to Chicago where he was 
for some years a department manager for 
the Adams and Westlake Company, and 
from there went to Cincinnati, where he 
was vice president and general manager of 
the Radford Pipe and Foundry Company, 
and became also a partner in the firm of 
Rogers, Brown and Company, leading pig 
iron merchants. Since 1895 he has again 
lived in Chicago, as resident partner of 
that firm in that important market. He 
is also director of the Chicago Short Line 
Railway; president and director of the 
Iroquois Iron Company; vice president and 
director of the Rogers Iron Mining Com 
pany, and a director of the Rogers-Brown 
Ore Company, and Chescaytawney Ore 
Company. He is a member of the Union 
League Club of Chicago, the Country Club 
of Evanston, Illinois, and the Glen View 
Golf Club. He married at Hyde Park, 
Chicago, in June, 1888, Minnie T. Huggins, 
1 and they have four children. Residence: 
1608 Ridge Avenue, Evanston, 111. Office: 
Corn Exchange Bank Building, Chicago. 

ARMSBY, Henry Prentiss: 

Director of the Institute of Animal Nutri 
tion of The Pennsylvania State College 
from 1907; born at Northbridge, Mass., 
Sept. 21, 1853; son of Lewis and Mary A. 
Armsby. He was educated at Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute, graduating with the 
degree of B.S. in 1871; Yale, graduating 
with the degree of Ph.B. in 1874, and did 
post-graduate work at Leipzig in 1876, and 
at Yale, receiving the degree of Ph.D. in 
1879; also receiving from the University 
of Wisconsin the honorary degree of LL.D. 
in 1904. He was chemist and instructor 
in agricultural chemistry in several insti 
tutions and director of The Pennsylvania 
State College Agricultural Experiment Sta 
tion 1887 to 1907, and dean of the School 
of Agriculture of the Pennsylvania State 
College, 1890 to 1902. He was chairman of 
the Committee on Cooperative Experiment 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Station Exhibits at the World s Columbian 
Exposition, 1893, and at the Paris Exposi 
tion, in 1900, also member of the Com 
mittee on Dairy Tests at the World s Colum 
bian Exposition; and he has been expert in 
animal nutrition in the U. S. Department 
of Agriculture since 1898. He is a fellow 
of the American Association for the Ad 
vancement of Science, and member of the 
American Chemical Society, American Phys 
iological Society, American Society of Bio 
logical Chemists, Society for the Promotion 
of Agricultural Science (president 1905 to 
1907), and of the Association of American 
Agricultural Colleges and Experiment Sta 
tions (president 1898 to 1899). He is au 
thor of Manual of Cattle Feeding, 1880; 
Principles of Animal Nutrition, 1903; also 
of various scientific papers on the utiliza 
tion of the potential energy of the food of 
domestic animals. Mr. Armsby married, 
Oct. 15, 1878, Lucy A. Harding. Address: 
State College, Centre County, Pa. 

ARMSTRONG, Frank C.: 

Member of the Commission to the Five 
Civilized Tribes. Mr. Armstrong was born 
at the Choctaw Agency, Indian Territory, 
in 1835; son of Frank W. and Annie M. 
(Millard) Armstrong. He was educated 
at, Holy Cross College at Worcester, Mass,, 
and in 1854, went to Texas. He was ap 
pointed lieutenant in the United States 
Dragoons for gallantry in a fight with In 
dians during a trip made across that State, 
and served until 1861, when he resigned 
and joined the Confederate Army. He had 
a distinguished service during the Civil 
War, attaining the rank of brigadier-gen 
eral, C.S.A.. and at its close, engaged in 
the overland mail service of Texas, until 
appointed United States Indian Inspector 
in 1885. He was assistant commissioner of 
Indian affairs from 1893 to 1895, and later 
appointed to his present position. Besides 
his work on the commission, he is inter 
ested in mining, etc., in Mexico. Address: 
1912 Sunderland Place, Washington, D. C. 



I (Milligan) Armstrong. He was graduated 
| from the St. Louis University, Ph.B., 1879, 
I from the St. Louis Medical College (Medi- 
j cal Department of Washington University), 
I M.D., 1879; and in 1886 the degree of 
, Ph.D. was conferred upon him by St. Louis 
! University. Dr. Armstrong served as assist- 
j ant physician of the St. Louis City and 
| Female Hospitals, 1879-1880, and then en- 
I tered the U. S. Marine Hospital Service, 
| serving at New Orleans, La., Key West, 
| Fla., Memphis, Tenn., New York City, 
Cleveland, Ohio, then was in the United 
I States Army General Hospital, Key West, 
j Fla, ; was chief sanitary inspector of the 
I Fourth Corps, chief surgeon, Department 
of Puerto Principe, Cuba, of District of 
Negros, Department Visayas, and of the 
Third District, in Southern Luzon, Philip- 
j pine Islands. He was commissioned as as- 
I sistant surgeon U. S. Marine Hospital Serv 
ice, Feb., 1881; promoted to passed assist 
ant surgeon, U. S. Marine Hospital Service. 
March, 1884; resigned commision, July, 
1890; then was major and brigade surgeon, 
U. S. Volunteers, 1898 and resigned June 
30, 1901, coming to New York City and 
| engaging in practice. He has attained dis- 
I tinction in his profession and especially as a 
; hygienest -and sanitarian. He is an honor- 
| ary member of the Memphis (Tenn.) and 
I New Rochelle (New York) Medical Socie- 
I ties, member of the New York Academy of 
Medicine, New York Historical Society, 
I New York Geographical Society, New York 
| Academy of Sciences, Metropolitan Museum 
of Art, American Museum of Natural His- 
j tory, New York Botanical Society, British 
I Medical Association, Societe Franchise 
d Hygiene, etc. He is a companion of the 
I Naval and Military Order of the Spanish- 
| American War, and of the Order of Foreign 
Wars, and a member of the Army and 
Navy Club of New York. Dr. Armstrong 
, married at New Orleans, Dec. 6, 1882, 
Alice, daughter of J. H. Cobin, and they 
j have four children. Address : The Rock- 
ingham, 1744 Broadway, New York City. 



ARMSTRONG, Samuel Treat: ARNOLD, Bion Joseph: 

Physician; born at St. Louis. Mo., Nov. Electrical engineer and inventor; born in 
2, 1859; son of David Hartley and Laura j Cazenovia, Mich., Aug. 14, 1861; son of 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Josepli and Gernldine (Reynolds) Arnold. 
He was educated at the University of Ne 
braska, and Hillsdale (Mich.) College. 
graduating B.S., 1884, A.M., 1887, and M. 
Ph., 1889. He took post-graduate work at 
Cornell University in 1889 and in 1897 re 
ceived the degree of E.E. from the Uni 
versity of Nebraska. In June, 1907, the 
Armour Institute of Chicago conferred upon 
him the honorary degree of Doctor of 
Science. He was consulting engineer with 
the General Electric Company at Chicago, 
1889-1893, and since then has been in inde 
pendent practice as consulting electrical en 
gineer. He designed and built the power 
plant, and was consulting engineer for the 
Intramural Railway which operated at the 
World s Columbian Exposition, consulting- 
engineer of the Chicago and Milwaukee 
Electric Railway, the Chicago, Burlington 
and Quincy Railroad and Chicago Board of 
Trade; member of the commission whiclt 
devised plans for the electrical operation of 
the New York Central trains in and out 
ol New York City: consulting engineer of 
the City of Chicago on traction matters; 
consulting engineer to the New York Cen 
tral and Hudson River Railroad on their 
electrification plans. He invented the di 
rect connected power station system, using 
magnetic clutches, storage battery improve 
ments, a magnetic clutch, and new devices 
and systems for electric traction, and was 
the first to put into operation the high ten 
sion transmitting rotary converter sub-sta 
tion system for electric railways. He is a 
past president of the American Institute of 
Electrical Engineers and of the Western 
Society of Engineers ; was vice-president 
and chairman of the Executive Committee 
of the International Electrical Congress of 
St. Louis in 1904, and represented the 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers 
at the Paris International Electrical Con 
gress in 1900. He is president of the Ar 
nold Company, and a director of the Elgin 
& Belvidere Electric Railway Company of 
Illinois. He is now chief engineer and 
chairman of the- Board of Supervising En 
gineers in charge of reconstruction of the 
street railway systems of Chicago, upon 
which is to be spent $40,000,000, and con 



sulting engineer to the Public Service Com 
mission of the State of New York, First 
District; and he has acted in a similar ca 
pacity for the State Railway Commissioners 
of Wisconsin and for the City of Toronto. 
Mr. Arnold is a trustee of Hillsdale Col 
lege, Mich. He married at Reading, Mich., 
Feb. 14, 1886, Carrie Estelle Berry, who 
died Feb. 1, 1907, leaving mm three chil 
dren. Addresses: 181 La Salle Street, Chi 
cago; 314 Madison Avenue, New York City. 

ARNOLD, Conway Hillyer: 

Rear admiral, U. S. Navy; born in New 
York City, Nov. 14, 1848; son of Henry N. 
T. Arnold, commander U. S. N., and Corne 
lia Van Vleck (Sleight) Arnold. He en 
tered the U. S. Naval Academy as midship 
man Sept. 30, 1863, and was graduated in 
1867. He went on a special cruise in the 
Minnesota, 1867-1868, and was promoted 
to ensign in 1868; master, 1870; lieutenant, 
1871; lieutenant-commander, Jan. 10, 1892; 
commander, May 11, 1898; captain, Sept. 
17, 1902; rear admiral, Jan. 30, 1908. He 
served in the Powhatan, Pacific Fleet, 1868- 
1870; flag-ship Severn, North Atlantic Sta 
tion, as aide to Rear-Admiral Poor, 1870- 
1871; receiving ship Vermont, 1871; aide 
to Port-admiral Stringham, 1871-187,2; 
Wasp, South Atlantic Station, 1872-1874, 
Naval Observatory, 1874-1875; Hartford, 
flagship of the North Atlantic Station 1875- 
1877; Powhatan, North Atlantic Station, 
flag lieutenant and secretary to Rear- 
Admiral Trenchard, 1877-1878; command 
ing the Wyandotte, Navy Yard, Washing 
ton, 1878-1881; Lancaster, European Sta 
tion, secretary to Rear-Admiral Nicholson, 
1881-1882; Miantonomah, special service, 
1882-1883; Nipsic, South Atlantic Station, 
1883-1886; Navy Yard, New York, 1886- 
188*, ; secretary to Rear-Admiral Gherardi, 
1889-1893, in Galena, Kearsarge, Dolphin, 
Baltimore, Philadelphia; on Board of In 
spection of Merchant Vessels, New York, 
1893; aide to Rear- Admiral Gherardi, 
Navy Yard, New York, 1894; in charge of 
branch of the Hydrographic Office at New 
York, 1894-1896; executive officer of the 
battleship Massachusetts, 1896; command- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



55 



ing the Bancroft, European Station, 1897; 
lighthouse inspector, Sixth District, 1898, 
commanding the Fifth Coast Defense Dis 
trict; commanding the Glacier and Ben- 
nington, 1899-1901, Asiatic Station and 
Philippines; president of the Wireless 
Telegraphy Board, 1902-1903; member of 
the Examining and Retiring Board; com 
manding U. S. receiving ships, Puritan 
and Lancaster, Navy Yard, League Island, 
Pa.; general inspector of U. S. S. West Vir 
ginia; in command of the West Virginia, 
flagship of the Armored Cruiser Division, 
Atlantic Fleet, and flagship of the Pacific 
Fleet. President of the general court-mar 
tial at New York 1907; Naval War Col 
lege; annual board of five admirals, 1908; 
president of the Naval Examining and Re 
tiring Boards; appointed, Sept. 26, 1908, to 
command the Third Squadron of the At 
lantic Fleet, flagship Dolphin, and later, 
the battleship Maine, and special service 
squadron. Rear-Admiral Arnold is holder 
of the naval Civil \Var and Philippine 
Campaign badges; is a member of the So 
ciety of Naval Architects and Marine En 
gineers, the Society of the Cincinnati, Aztec 
Club of 1847, Military Order of the Cara- 
bas, the New York Yacht and the Army 
and Navy Clubs. He married in New York 
City, Nov. 17, 1870, Fanny, daughter of 
Engineer-in-chief William W. W. Wood, U. 
S. N. x and they had two sons : Captain C. 
H. Arnold, Jr., U. S. Artillery, and William 
Wood Arnold (both now deceased). Ad 
dress : Care Navy Department, Washing 
ton, D. C. 

ARTHUR, Chester A. : 

Capitalist; born New York City, July 25, 
1864; Ron of Chester A. and Ellen Lewis 
(Herndon) Arthur. He was educated at 
Columbia and Princeton, class of 1885, B.A. 
He is a member of the Psi Upsilon frater 
nity (Columbia), the Union, The Brook, 
and Racquet and Tennis Clubs of New York; 
Travelers Club, Paris; El Paso and Coun 
try Clubs, Colorado Springs; Denver and 
Denver Country Clubs. He married at Ve- 
vey, Switzerland, May 8, 1900, Myra Towns- 
end Fithian, and has a son, Chester A. Ar 
thur, 3d. Address: Colorado Springs, Colo. 



ARTHUR, Helen: 

Lawyer; born in Lancaster, Wis., March 
29, 1879; daughter of Lemuel John and 
, Mary Emma (Ziegler) Arthur. Miss Ar- 
! tlmr was prepared in the Evanston (111.) 
Township High School, graduating thence 
in 1897, studied in Northwestern Univer 
sity, class of 1901, and was graduated from 
New York University Law School as LL.B., 
1901. She was admitted to the New York 
bar in 1902, and has since been practising 
law in New York City. Miss Arthur was 
director of the Research Department of the 
Woman s Municipal League, 1906-1907, is a 
member of the High School Sorority of 
Zeta Beta Psi, and of the University Soror 
ity Alpha Omicron Pi, and is editor of "To 
Dragma " official publication of the last 
i named sorority. She is also dramatic edi- 
: tor of the National Magazine. Miss Arthur 
is co-author of the pamphlet issued during 
the city campaign of 1905, Why New 
1 York Women Stand Back of William Trav- 
ers Jerome. She is a member of the 
| woman s Trade Union League, Twelfth 
Night Club, Northwestern University Club, 
: New York University Alumnae, New York 
! State Child Labor Committee, and the Col- 
j legiate Equal Suffrage Association. Ad- 
j dress : 220 Broadway, New York City. 

ASAKAWA, Kwan-Ichi: 

Educator and author; born in Nohon- 
j matsu, Japan, Dec. 20, 1873 ; son of Masa- 
i zumi Asakawa and Uta Sugiura. He was 
graduated from Waseda University, Japan,- 
1895, Dartmouth College, B. L., 1899, Yale 
| University, Ph.D., 1902, and attended the 
Imperial University at Tokyo, Japan, 1906- 
1907. Dr. Asakawa was lecturer on East 
i Asiatic history at Dartmouth College, 
1902-1906; professor in English, Waseda 
University, 1906-1907; and since then has 
; been instructor in the history of Japanese 
| civilization in Yale University, and cura 
tor of Japanese and Chinese collections in 
the Yale University Library. He is author 
; of: The Early Institutional Life of Japan. 
| 1903; The Russo-Japanese Conflict, 1904; 
Supplementary Chapters to Brinkley s " Ja 
pan," 1905 ; is editor of the volume on Ja 
pan in the History of Nations series, 1906; 



56 MEN OF AMERICA. 

also writer of articles in various journals. I land Railroad, and afterward entered the 
Dr. Asakawa made book-collecting tours of works of the Maryland Steel Company. His 
Jsipan, 190G-1907, for the Library of Con- work as a librarian began in 1895 m con 
gress and the Yale University Library. He nection with the West Philadelphia branch 
is a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, of the Free Library of Philadelphia. In 
the Asiatic Society of Japan, Tokyo, Ameri- 1901 he was elected librarian of the Mercan- 
can Historical Asociation, American Ori- tile Library of Philadelphia, and quickly 
ental Society, and the Graduates Club of did much towards restoring this moribund 
\r\v Haven". He married in New York institution to public favor. In 1904 he 
City, Oct. 12, 1905, Miriam Dingwall. Ad- was elected assistant librarian of the Free 
dress: Yale University, New Haven, Conn. ! Library of Philadelphia. He is a member 

I of the American Library Association, Key- 

ASHBROOK, William Albert: i stone State Library Association. Pennsyl- 

Member of Congress; born in Johnstown, i vania Library Club (president 1904-1905), 
Ohio, July 1, 1867; son of William and Philobiblion Club (secretary since 1898), 
Lucy (Pratt) Ashbrook. He entered the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, and 
newspaper business at an early age and in University Club of Philadelphia. Address: 
1885 became publishing editor of the Johns- 2000 De Lancey Place, Philadelphia, 
town (Ohio) Independent. He is also , 

prominent in the financial affairs of Johns- j ASHHURST, Richard Lewis: 
town and neighboring towns, being cashier Lawyer, postmaster; eldest son of John 
of three banks in that section, and the di- land Harriette (Eyre) Ashhurst and grand- 
recting officer of the local Building and j son of Manuel Eyre, all of Philadelphia. 
Loan Association for many years. He was He was born at Naples, Italy, where his 
postmaster at Johnstown from 1893 to 1897, parents were sojourning, Feb. 5, 1838. He 
and a member of the 77th General Assembly was graduated with the highest honors 
of Ohio, and was elected in 1906 as a Demo- | from the University of Pennsylvania, 1850, 
erat to the 60th Congress from the 17th ; delivering the Greek salutatory oration; 
Ohio district, and reflected in 1908 to the ! studied law with Hon. W. M. Meredith, and 
61st Congress. Mr. Ashbrook has taken a was admitted to the Philadelphia bar in 
prominent part in national organizations of June, 1859, and has been engaged in the 
newspaper workers, and he was secretary \ practice of the law in that city since that 
of HIP National Editorial Association of the time (except during his service in the 

United States Volunteers during the Civil 
War). He entered the Army of the Union 



United States, 1902-1906. He married in 
Johnstown, Ohio, Dec. 24, 1896, Jennie B. 



Willison. Address: Johnstown, Ohio. ; as adjutant of the 150th Pennsylvania Vol- 

. _ T unteers, Aug. 11, 1862 and served in the 

Aoiixi u Jioi , Jonn: 4 ,. ,, _ 

Army of the Potomac until his honorable 

Librarian; born in Philadelphia, Dec. 31, discharge for wounds received at Gettys- 
18G5, being the third in succession of his burg, Sept. 5, 1863; he was brevetted cap- 
name. He was prepared for college at the tain for meritorious services at Chancellors- 
Episcopal Academy of Philadelphia, and ! ville and major of United States Volunteers 
entered the class of 1887, of the University l for distinguished gallantry at Gettysburg, 
of Pennsylvania, He was connected with a He is the author of a Biography of William 
number of college organizations, and was a \ Morris Meredith; Contemporary Evidences 
member of the cast of the Acharnians of of Shakespeare s Identity, and other pam- 
AriRtoplmnes, and of the editorial staff of j phlets and articles on Shakespearean and 
the University Magazine. Leaving the Uni- j military subjects. He is a member of the 
iity during his senior year, he entered i Phi Beta Kappa, the American Philosophi- 
the service of the Philadelphia and Reading j cal Society, Pennsylvania Historical Soci- 
way Company; in 1891 joined the con- ety, Loyal Legion, Sons of the Revolution, 
struction department of the Western Mary- 1 Pennsylvania Bar Association; he is vice- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



57 



dean of Shakespeare Society of Philadel 
phia and vice-president of the Philadelphia 
Law Association. He has always been a 
Republican in politics. Mr. Ashhurst was 
appointed, in Feb., 1906, by President 
Roosevelt, postmaster of Philadelphia, en 
tering upon his duties as such March 1, 
1906. He married, May 30, 1861, Sarah, 
daughter of Professor John Fries Frazer of 
the University of Pennsylvania. Residence, 
321 South Eleventh Street. Office: 225 
South Sixth Street, Philadelphia. 

ASHLEY, Clarence Degrand: 

Lawyer; born in Boston, July 4, 1851; 
son of Ossian D. Ashley and Hariett A. 
(Nash) Ashley. He was graduated from 
Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., in 1869, 
from Yale University, A.B., 1873 ; studied 
at the University of Berlin (Prussia), 
1875-1876, was graduated from Columbia 
Law School, LL.B., 1880, and received from 
New York University the degrees of LL. 
M., 1895, and J.D., 1903, and the degree of 
LL.D. from Miami University, 1898. He 
was admitted to the New York Bar in 1880 
and has been in active practice since. He is 
now senior member of the law firm of Ken- 
neson, Emley and Rubino. Mr. Ashley was 
professor of law at the Metropolis Law 
School, 1891-1895, and has been professor 
at the New York University, since 1895. 
He was vice-dean of the Law Faculty, 1895- 
1896, and has been dean of the Law Fac 
ulty, since 1896, in New York University, 
and non-resident lecturer of law in Bryn 
Mawr College, since 1899. Mr. Ashley 
married in Geneva, Switerland, Aug. 12, 
1880, Isabella Heyward Ripley, and they 
have two daughters. Address : 32 Waverly 
Place, New York City. 

ASHMEAD, William Harris: 

Entomologist; born in Philadelphia, Sep 
tember 19, 1855, son of Captain Albert 
S. and Elizabeth (Graham) Ashmead. He 
started in life in the publishing house of 
the J. B. Lippincott Company in Philadel 
phia, but in 1876 went to Jacksonville, Fla.. 
where he and his brother established a 
publishing house for an agricultural week 
ly, and also started a daily. While editing 



the Scientific Department of the weekly, 
he devoted himself to investigations of in 
jurious insects, and became connected with 
the United States Department of Agricul 
ture as a special field entomologist in 
1887, and after a course of special studies 
in Berlin returned to the Department of 
Agriculture, with which he remained con 
nected until July, 1897, when he was ap 
pointed assistant curator of the division of * 
insects of the National Museum, a position 
which he now holds. He is specially known 
for his investigations into and writings on 
insects affecting the orange culture, and 
has also written a monograph on the North 
American Proctotryphidae. He has also 
contributed a large number of papers to 
entomological publications. He is a fel 
low of the American x\ssociatioii for the 
Advancement of Science ; corresponding 
member of the American Entomological So 
ciety of Philadelphia; vice-president of the 
Washington Biological Society; was presi 
dent of the Cambridge Entomological 
Society; was vice-president of the Wash 
ington Academy of Sciences; is an 
honorary member of the Entomological 
Society of Ontario; and has been vice- 
president of the Association of Economic 
Entomologists. He married in 1878, Har 
riet Holmes of Jacksonville. Residence: 
J.-807 Belmont Avenue. Official address: 
U. S. National Museum, Washington, D. C. 

ASHMOKE, Sidney Gillespie: 

Professor of Latin; born in London, in 
1852; son of Sidney and Maria Ellsworth 
(Phelps) Ashmore. He came to New York 
at the age of six years, and was a student 
from 1863-1868 in the schools of Charles d 
Urban Morris (who was a fellow of Oriel 
College, Oxford, and afterward a professor 
at Johns Hopkins University). Mr. Ash- 
more was graduated from Columbia Uni 
versity, B.A., 1872, M.A., 1875, and received 
the honorary degree of L.H.D. from Hobart 
College, 1887. He was instructor in Latin 
and Greek, Lehigh University, 1873-1876; 
instructor in Latin, Columbia University, 
1876-1881, and is professor of Latin at 
Union University, since 1881. He spent 
nearly a year in Italy and Greece, 1895- 



,18 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



1896; studied at the University of Bonn, 
and has been much in England also. He 



Cleveland. Dr. Ashmun is a veteran of the 
Civil War, serving as musician in the Sec- 
Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, 



ress: 
Ohio. 



1965 East 101st Street Cleveland, 



ASPINWALL, J. Lawrence: 

Architect; born in New York City, June 



member of the American Philological j ond Regiment, 

UcSn the Archaeological Institute of ! Aug., 1861 to Sept. 1862 and as serge^ 
America; the Classical Association of Eng- j and lieutenant m Union Ligh Q <f uard 
land- the New York Latin Club; the Clas- (Seventh Independent Company, Ohio Cav- 

,,l Association of the Atlantic States, Phi airy), an escort to President Lincoln, Nov., 
Beta K^ppa Society and Delta Phi frater- 1863 to Sept., 1865. He was also surgeon 
nYty. Mr Ashmore is author of several col- ] and major, Fifth Regiment, Ohio National 
le-e text books and other writings on clas- j Guard, 1889-1898; and is a member of the 
Bical subjects, including an edition of the j Military Order of the Loyal Legion Dr. 
comedia of Terence. Mr. Ashmore married Ashmun married first May 20, 1881 Laura 
Fanny Hart Vail, daughter of the late | J. Post, and second, Nov. 27, 1888 Alice 
Samuel M Vail of Troy, New York, and I Ford, of Cleveland, and by the last mar- 
they have two children. Address: Schen- riage has three sons and a daughter. ^ Ad- 
ectady, N. Y. 
ASHMUN, George Coates: 

Physician; born in Tallmadge, Ohio, Jan. 
31, 1841; son of Russell Atwater and Mar- 
cia (Wright) Ashmun. He received his ;;, 1854; son of James Scott and Margaret 
general education in the common schools (Maxwell) Aspinwall, his mother being a 
and academy of Tallmadge, Ohio, and was j native of Dumfries, Scotland. He was edu- 
graduated from the Medical Department of j cated at Dwight s Day School, and after- 
Western Reserve University, M.D., 1873. ward at the Lyons School, and at the school 
He was appointed United States examiner of Prof. Collain, in New York City. Mr. 
for pensions at Cleveland, Ohio, in Feb., j Aspinwall entered the office of James Ren- 
1873, and served in that capacity until \ wick, architect, in 1875, and in 1880 became 
June, 1886; and since March, 1873, he has a member of the firm of Renwick, Aspin- 
been engaged in the practice of medicine at ! wall & Russell, which later changed to its 
Cleveland. Dr. Ashmun has been profes- present style of Renwick, Aspinwall & 
sor of hygiene and preventive medicine in Tucker. He was architect of the second 
the Medical Department of Western Reserve Stock Exchange, the American Society for 
University, since 1893; and was registrar the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, and 
of the Faculty, 1894-1908. He has also, that of the Society for the Prevention of 
since 1904, been lecturer on hygiene of the ; Cruelty to Animals; a large number of hos- 
Case School of Applied Science. Dr. Ash- pitals (Scarlet Fever and Department Hos- 
mun was a member of the Board of Health pitals. New York City, Stony Wold Sani- 
of Cleveland, 1880, city health officer, 1881- tarium, Arirondack Cottage Sanitarium, 
1891; member of City Council, 1897-1898 New York Infirmary for Women and 
and 1902-1903, and president of City Coun- Children), office buildings, apartment 
cil 1902-1903; was elected secretary of the houses, etc. He was also associated with 
Ohio State Board of Health, 1888, but did James Renwick in working out much of the 
not serve; and was a member of the Ohio detail of St. Patrick s Cathedral and the 
State Commission for the investigation of stone spire of Grace Church at Broadway 
State Hospitals for Tuberculosis. He has and 10th Street. He was one of the origi- 
been for over twenty years a director of the nal members of Troop A., now Squadron A, 
Children s Fresh Air Camp of Cleveland, of the New York State Guard. Mr. Aspin- 
and is a member of the Academy of Medicine wall is treasurer of the St. Luke s Associ- 
of Cleveland. He is a director of the East ation of Grace Church, New York City; a 
End Savings and Loan Company and of member of the General Society and New 
the Union Savings and Loan Company of York Chapter of the American Institute 




JOHN JACOB ASTOB 
Capitalist 



MEN OF AMERICA. 59 

of Architects the Architectural League of He served in Southern camps and in Cuba 
New York City, and a trustee of the New including the battle, siege and surrender 
York Infirmary for Women and Children, of Santiago de Cuba, and was detailed by 
He is also a member of the Union, Engi- Major-General W. R. Shafter to deliver the 
neers and Atlantic Yacht Clubs of New . official terms of capitulation to the Secre- 
York. Mr. Aspmwall married, in 1891, tary of War and was mustered out of vol- 
May Morris Carnochan, of New York City, ! unteer service, Nov. 1, 1898 Colonel Astor 
who died April 22, 1892. Address: 320 is the inventor of a pneumatic machine to 

HlT"fn AtTAVtltA "\Totir "V^vl*- Oi4-^T 



remove worn-out material from the roads 
before the new stone is laid dawn, which re- 



fth Avenue, New York City. 

ASPINWATT Tn^h- 
AbPINWALL, J 

Jurist; born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1854. | bian Exposition in 1893; and is also in- 
He was graduated from the Law School of ventor of a practical turbine engine and 
Columbia University, LL.B., 1875 and en- other mechanical devices. He is a director 
gaged in the practice of law. He was gen- ! of numerous large financial, railroad and 
eral attorney for the National City Bank of , other corporations, member of the Cham- 
Brooklyn and for other large institutions, ber of Commerce of New York, the New 
He was a member of the General Assembly York Botanical Gardens, the New York 
of New York, 1888-1889 and 1891, State j Zoological Society. Society of Colonial 
senator, 1892, and was elected on the Re- | Wars, the Military Order of Foreign Wars, 
publican ticket in 1892 justice of the Su- and of the leading New York and London 
preme Court of the State of New York for Clubs. Colonel Astor married, at Philadel- 
the term expiring Dec. 31, 1920. He is ! phia, Feb. 17, 1891, Ava L. Willing, and 
president of the Garfield Club, a 32d-degree I by that union has two children, William 
Mason and Shriner, and is a member of the Vincent Astor. born Nov. 15, 1891, and Ava 
Union League and other clubs of Brooklyn. Alice Muriel Astor (born July 7, 1902). 
Office: 44 Court Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ! Residences: Ferncliff, Rhinebeck, N. Y., 

and 840 Fifth Avenue, N. Y. City. Ad- 
ASTOR, John Jacob: [dress: (secretary s office) 23 West 26th 

Capitalist, soldier and inventor; born at Street, New York City. 
Ferncliff, Rhinebeck, N. Y., July 13, 1864; 

son of William and Caroline (Schermer- ATHERTON, Gertrude Franklin: 
horn) Astor; grandson of William B. and Author; born in San Francisco, Calif.; 
great-grandson of John Jacob Astor, the daughter of Thomas L. and Gertrude 
founder of the family in America. Colonel j ( Franklin ) Horn, the latter being a collat- 
Astor was educated at St. Paul s School, eral descendant of Benjamin Franklin. 
Concord, N. IT., and Harvard University. | Mrs. Atherton was educated at home and in 
Colonel Astor s time is chiefly occupied in various day and boarding schools, and she 
the management of his vast inherited estate married, at San Jose, Calif., George Henry 
and its improvement, under which has been Bovven Atherton, who is now deceased. 
included the building of some of the finest j She lives, much of the time, abroad, her 
hotel structures in the metropolis. He com- J travels extending over the most of Europe, 
pleted that- part of the Waldof- Astoria j the West Indies and North America, and 
Hotel known as the Astoria in 1897; com- is a life member of the American Historical 
pleted the Hotel St. Regis, in 1905, and the Association and of the Author s Societey 
Hotel Knickerbocker, in 1906. He was of London, England, an honorary, but not 
commissioned inspector-general with rank active, member of several clubs in San 
of lieutenant-colonel, United States Volun- i Francisco, and is a member of the Ladies 
teers, May 15, 1898, and he gave a com- Athenaeum and of the Writers Club of 
plete and fully equipped battery of artillery London, and of the Touring Club de France. 
to the Government of the United States on Mrs. Atherton s novels are of international 
the breaking out of the war with Spain, circulation, the list including: Before the 



GO 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Gringo Came; The Doomswoman; A Whirl 
Asunder; Patience Sparhawk and Her 
Times; His Fortunate Grace; American 
Wives and English Husbands; The Cali- 
fornians; A Daughter of the Vine; The 
Valiant .Runaways; Senator North; The 
Aristocrats; The Conqueror; The Splendid 
Idle Forties (revised and enlarged edition 
of Before the Gringo Came) ; A Few of 
Hamilton s Letters; Rulers of Kings; The 
Bell in the Fog; Mrs. Pendleton s Four in 
Hand; The Travelling Thirds; Rezanov; 
Ancestors; The Gorgeous Isle. Address: 
The Macmillan Company, New York City. 

ATHERTON, Percy Lee: 

Composer; born in Roxbury, Mass., Sept. 
25, 1871; son of William and Mary Ed 
wards (D wight) Atherton. He was edu 
cated at Harvard College, A.B., 1893, at 
the Royal High School, Munich, completing 
with honors the course in theory of music 
in Harvard; spent two years and also stud 
ied with leading teachers in Berlin, Paris 
and Rome. He is the composer of music 
for two operas, and of several suites, so 
natas and song cycles, etc., besides about 
sixty songs for the solo voice. Address: 
144 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston. 

ATKINSON, Fred Washington: 

President of the Brooklyn Polytechnic 
Institute; born in Reading, Mass., May 23, 
18G5; son of George W. and Eliza Atkin 
son. He was educated at the Massachusetts 
State Normal School and at Harvard Col 
lege, also studied at Berlin, Halle, Leipzig, 
and Jena Universities and the Sorbonne in 
Paris, and is a Ph.D. of Leipzig, 1893. He 
was a successful teacher and principal of 
high schools when he was selected in 1900 
for the responsible position of general su 
perintendent of education of the Philippine 
Islands. His duties in connection with this 
position required a high order of ability 
in selecting teachers and aranging methods 
of instruction which have developed into 
the highly successful system of American 
schools in the Philippine Islands, and which 
is rapidly bringing the natives of those Is 
lands to a higher level of civilization. Af 
ter three years of service in the Philippines, 



Profesor Atkinson returned to the United 
States, and after a short period of service 
as superintendent of schools of Newton. 
Mass., he was chosen July i, 1904, as 
president of the Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn. Profesor Atkinson is the author 
of a well known volume on The Philippine 
Islands and is a frequent contributor to 
magazines and educational journals. He 
maried in Waltham, Mass., Aug. 27, 1890, 
Wirinifred G. Whitford. Address: Poly 
technic Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ATKINSON, George Wesley: 

Jurist and ex-governor; born in Charles 
ton W. Va., June 29, 1845. He was gradu 
ated from Ohio Wesleyan University, A.B., 
1870, and three years later he received the 
degree of A.M.; afterward taking post 
graduate studies for which he received the 
degree of Ph.D. pro merito from Mount Un 
ion College, at Alliance, Ohio. He was 
graduated from Howard University as LL. 
B., and engaged in the practice of law. He 
became prominent at the bar and also in 
politics as a Republican, and was succes 
sively elected member of the Legislature of 
West Virginia, member of the Charleston 
Board of Education, assistant county super 
intendent of public schools, and was post 
master of Charleston, W. Va., for six years, 
United States internal revenue agent for 
four years, U. S. marshal of West Virginia 
for four years, member of the Fifty-first 
Congress, 1889-1891, governor of West Vir- 

j ginia, 1897-1901, U. S. attorney for the 

I Southern District of West Virginia, 1901- 
1905, and in 1905 was appointed judge of 
the United States Court of Claims at Wash 
ington, D. C., in which office he is now serv 
ing. Judge Atkinson is prominent in the 
Masonic Order, in which he was Grand 
Master in 1876-1877, and was secretary of 

I the Grand Lodge of West Virginia for 
twenty consecutive years, during which time 
he was the writer of the Reports on Foreign 

| Correspondence. He has been twice mar 
ried. He has received the degree of LL.D. 
from the- University of Nashville, Ohio 
Wesleyan University, and the U. S. Grant 
University, and of D.C.L. from the Uni 
versity of West Virginia. He is author of: 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



til 



History of Kanawha; The West Virginia 
Pulpit; The A. B. C. of the Tariff; Don t, 
or Negative Chips from Blocks of Living 
Truths; Revenue Digest; Prominent Men 
of West Virginia; After the Moonshiners; 
Psychology Simplified; volume of Public 
Addresses, and a volume of poems entitled 
" Chips and Whetstones." Residence: 
Charleston, W. Va. Office: 1000 Thirteenth 
St., N. W., Washington. 

ATWATER, Edward W.: 

Manufacturer; born in Rochester, N. Y., 
Jan. 5, 1842; son of Stephen and Mary L. 
(Weaver) Atwater. He was educated in 
the public schools of Providence, R. I., and 
was graduated from the high school there 
in 1859, immediately thereafter beginning 
his business career as clerk to the Commer 
cial Steamboat Company, of Providence, in 
which he continued until 1862. He served 
as private in Company I, Eleventh Regi 
ment, Rhode Island Volunters, in the Civil 
War, 1 802-1863, and after that was for 
eight years cashier of the American Wood 
Paper Company, of Royer s Ford, Pa. Mr. 
Atwater engaged in fruit farming at Pal 
myra, N. Y., 1874-1878; was bookkeeper 
for H. A. De" Land & Co., Fairport, N. Y., 
and De Land, Fla., 1878-1885, and since 
1880 he has been connected with The 
Johnston Harvester Company, Batavia, N. 
Y., of which he is now president, treasurer 
and trustee. He has also, since 1888, been 
accountant for the Dean Richmond Estate. 
Mr. Atwater is treasurer of the First Bap 
tist Church of Batavia, N. Y., a trustee of 
the Rochester Theological Seminary. He 
married in Seneca Falls, N. Y., Sept. 17, 
1872, Fanny A. Langworthy, who died in 
1885, leaving two sons and two daughters. 
Address: 401 East Main Street, Batavia, 
N. Y. 

ATWELL, William Hawley: 

United States district attorney; born in 
Sparta, Wis., June 9, 1809; son of Capt, 
Benjamin D. and D. E. Emma (Green) 
Atwell. He was educated at the South 
western University of Georgetown, Tex., 
A.B., B.S., 1889, and in the law department 



j of the State University of Texas, where he 
I received the degree of LL.B. in 1891, in 
j which year he was admitted to the bar, 
I later receiving the LL.D. degree from the 
j University of Texas. In 1898 he was ap- 
! pointed United States attorney for the 
| Northern District of Texas, and he has suc- 
j cessfully administered the duties of that 
j office, having been reappointed in 1902 and 
in 1900. He is a well-known speaker and 
writer, and one of the leading Republicans 
of the southwest. He married in George 
town, Tex., Dec. 7, 1892, Susie Snyder. 
Address: 510 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Tex. 

ATWELL, William P.: 

Consular official; appointed consular 
i agent at Schiedam, May 14, 1883, and re 
tired from that office in July, 1885. He 
was appointed commercial agent at Rou- 
baix, June 27, 1890, and retired in June, 
1893; reappointed commercial agent at 
Roubaix, May 28, 1897; promoted to con 
sul May 31, 1899; appointed consul at 
Ghent, June 22, 1906. Address: Ghent, 
Belgium. 

ATWILL, Edward Robert: 

Bishop of Kansas City ; born at Red 
Hook, N. Y., Feb. 18, 1840; son of Edward 
R. and Margaret Atvvill. He was gradu 
ated from the academic course at Colum 
bia College in 1862 and at the General 
Theological Seminary, New York City, in 
1804, and he received from the University 
of Vermont the degree of D.D. in 1882. 
He was ordered deacon of the Episcopal 
Church in 1864 and a year later was or 
dained priest by Bishop Horatio Potter. 
He was consecutively assistant of St. Luke s 
Church, New York City, rector of St Paul s 
Church, Williamsburgh, L. I., assistant at 
St. Paul s Church, Burlington, Vt., and its 
rector from 1867 to 1882, and rector of Trin 
ity Church, Toledo, Ohio, from 1882 to 1890. 
He was consecrated Bishop of Kansas City, 
Mo., in 1890. He is author of A Tract on 
Confirmation and various addresses and 
sermons. Bishop Atwill married Mary 
Whiting. Address: 1709 East 32d Street, 
Kansas City, Mo. 



62 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



ATWOOD, Isaac Morgan: 

General superintendent of the Universal- 
ist Church in the United States and Can 
ada; born in Pembroke, N. Y., March 24, 
1838; son of Orsamus Isaac and Nancy 
(Shearer) Atwood. He was educated at 
St. Lawrence University, receiving the de 
gree of M.A., and at the divinity school 
of Tufts College, and the degree of LL.D. 
was conferred upon him by Buchtel Col 
lege. He was ordained in 1861 to the min 
istry of the Universalist Church and served 
with marked success in various pastorates. 
He has been editor of the Christian Leader 
and president of the Canton Theological 
Seminary, and is now associate editor of 
the Universalist Leader of Boston and gen 
eral superintendent of the work of the 
Universalist Church in the United States 
and Canada, his official position being sec 
retary of the Universalist General Conven 
tion. He is in executive charge of the 
measures decided upon by that organiza 
tion for the furtherance of the work of 
the Universalist Church. He is a member 
of the American Social Science Associa 
tion and the Phi Beta Kappa Society, 
and the author of Have We Outgrown 
Christianity?; Latest Word of Universal 
ism; Walks About Zion; Episcopacy; Rev 
elation; Balance Sheet of Biblical Criti 
cism and A System of Christian Doctrines, 
rie married in Clarendon, N. Y., Oct. 29, 
1861, Almira Church. Address; 189 Har 
vard Street, Rochester, N. Y. 

AUDENEJED, Charles Young: 

Jurist; born in Philadelphia, Dec. 9, 
1863 ; son of John T. Audenried, a success 
ful merchant and coal mine operator. He 
was educated in Rugby Academy and the 
University of Pennsylvania, from which he 
was graduated as A.B., 1883, and LL.B., 
1886. Following the last graduation he 
was admitted to the bar and engaged in 
practice in Philadelphia, and from 1887 to 
1896 he was secretary and treasurer of the 
Macungie Iron Company. He was a mem 
ber of the Common and Select Councils of 
Philadelphia from 1891 to 1896, resigning 
from the Select Council upon his appoint 
ment as judge of the Court of Common 



I Pleas No. 4, of Philadelphia, to which 
: position he was elected in 1897 for a full 
term of ten years, and in 1907 was re- 
! elected for another term of ten years from 
i Jan. 1, 1908. Address: 6331 Lancaster 
! Avenue, Philadelphia. 

AUDSLEY, George Ashdown: 

Architect; born in Elgin, Scotland, Sept. 
6, 1838. He came to the United States in 
1892, when he began the practice of his 
profession in New York in conjunction 
with his brother, Willian James Audsley. 
The firm has built a number of conspicu 
ous structures, among th em being the Lay- 
ton Art Gallery of Milwaukee, the Bowl 
ing Green office building in New York, the 
Church of St. Edward, Philadelphia, and 
others. Mr. Audsley is widely known as 
an author and an authority on polychro 
matic decoration and is a student of the 
historic art of illumination, and of the 
other mediaeval arts. He has also written 
extensively on other art topics. His spe 
cialties are best illustrated by his published 
works, among which are: Keramic Art 
of Japan, Ornamental Arts of Japan, The 
Art of Chromolithography, The Practical 
Decorator and The Art of Organ Building. 
He has also written, in conjunction with 
his brother, Illuminated Sermon on the 
Mount, Illuminated Prisoner of Chillon, 
Guide to Illuminating and Missal Painting, 
Handbook on Christian Symbolism, Cot 
tage, Lodge and Villa Architecture, Poly 
chromatic Decoration Applied to Buildings 
in the Gothic Styles, Outlines of Ornament 
in all Styles, Taste versus Fashionable Col 
ors and Popular Dictionary of Architecture 
and the Allied Arts (unfinished). Resi 
dence: Lowerre, N. Y. Office: 18 West 
27th Street, New York City. 

ATJLLS, Samuel D.: 

Lawyer; born in Wheeler, Steuben Coun 
ty, N. Y., April 9, 1875; son of Thomas 
and Ellen (Williams) Aulls. He was grad 
uated from the Preparatory School at Dun 
dee, N. Y v in 1893, and took post-gradu 
ate courses there and at Lowville (N. Y.) 
Academy, and two years in Albany Law 
School. He taught school in Steuben and 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



63 



Yates Counties. New York, 1893-1895, 
studied law in the office of Hon. Amasa J. 
Parker at Albany and Col. Gabriel L. 
Smith of Elmira, and was admitted to the 
bar in 1898. He became clerk and later I 
partner with Judge Smith, and he was 
admitted to the bar of the United States 
Supreme Court in 1902. Mr. Aulls is 
counsel for a large number of corporations, 
including the Listed Securities Company of 
New York. He is author of Aulls Quizzer 
on the Code. He is a member of Masonic 
and other lodges, the Chemung County 
Bar Association, the Young Men s Club of 
Elmira and the Empire State Society of I 
Sons of the American Revolution. Ad 
dress: 214 East Water Street, Elmira, 
N. Y. 

AUSTIN, Henry: 

Lawyer; born in Boston, Mass., Dec. 21, 
1858; son of William and Rachel A. Aus 
tin. He was graduated from Harvard Law 
School in 1879 and was admitted to the bar 
of Massachusetts in 1880. He has been 
a commissioner of insolvency for six years, 
and is an associate justice of the West 
Roxbury district of the Boston Municipal 
court. Mr. Austin lias made a specialty of 
the study of law involving the rural dis 
tricts of New England and is author of: 
American Farm and Game Laws; Liquor 
Law in New England; and other publica 
tions. Address: 84 State Street, Boston. 

AUSTIN, Oscar Phelps: 

Statistical!; born in Illinois. He is a 
newspaper man by profession, but for many 
years has been one of the best known sta 
tistician economists in the United States. 
As Washington correspondent for metro 
politan dailies he became known for his 
writings on finance and commerce, and in 
1898 was appointed chief of the Bureau of 
Statistics, formerly under the Treasury De 
partment but later transferred to the De 
partment of Commerce and Labor, having 
held that office continuously since 1898, a 
longer term of service than any other oc 
cupant of the position. Since 1896 he has 
prepared the quadrennial text-book for the 
Republican National Committee, and is the 



leading authority in the United States on 
the matters relating to government policies 
and finance to which that book is devoted. 
He is a member of the International Colo 
nial Institute; International Union for 
Study of Jurisprudence and Political Econ 
omy; the American Association for the Ad 
vancement of Science; the American Eco 
nomic Association; the National Geograph 
ic Society (secretary) ; an incorporator and 
honorary member of the American Cham 
ber of Commerce in Paris; and a member 
of the Commission Centrale de Statistique 
of Belgium. He is the author of: Uncle 
Sam s Secrets; Uncle Sam s Soldiers; Un 
cle Sam s Children (series of historical and 
statistical novels for youth) ; Steps in Our 
Territorial Expansion ; Colonial Systems of 
the World; Colonial Administration; Com 
mercial China; Commercial Japan; Com 
mercial Philippines; Commercial India; 
Commercial Africa; Commercial South and 
Central America ; Commercial Orient ; Sub 
marine Telegraphs of the World; The 
Great Canals of the World; The National 
Debts of the World; etc. He married 
Anna M. Richardson. Residence: 1020 
Massachusetts Avenue, Washington, D. C. 
Official address: Department of Commerce 
and Labor, Washington, D. C. 

AUSTIN, Richard Wilson: 

Lawyer and Congressman; born at De- 
catur, Ala., Aug. 20, 1857. He was edu 
cated in the Loudoun High School and the 
University of Tennessee, and was admitted 
to the bar of Tennessee. He was assistant 
doorkeeper of the House of Representatives 
in the Forty-seventh Congress; U. S. Mar 
shal for the Eastern District of Tennessee, 
1897-1900; American consul at Glasgow, 
Scotland, July, 1900 to 1907, when he re 
signed to make the race for the Sixty- 
first Congress, to which he was elected in 
1908 from the Second Tennessee District as 
a Republican. Address: Knoxville, Tenn. 

AVES, Henry Damorel: 

Episcopal bishop of Mexico; born in 
Huron County, Ohio, July 10, 1853; son of 
Frederick William and Francis Elizabeth 
(Damorel) Aves. He received his educa- 



04 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



tion at Kenyon College, graduating with 
the degree of Ph.B. in 1878, and taking the 
degree of B.D. in 1883. He also received 
I he degree of D.D. from his alma mater 
in 1004 and an honorary LL.D. from Ruth 
erford College, N. C., in 1001. He took 
orders as a deacon of the Episcopal 
Church in 1883, and was ordained priest 
the following year by Bishop Bedell. He 
wag connected with St. Paul s Parish, Mt. 
Vernon, Ohio, 1883-1885, first as deacon, 
then officiating as priest. In 1885 he went 
to Cleveland, Ohio, as priest at St. John s 
Church, and after seven years was called 
to the rectorship of Christ s Church, Hous 
ton, Tex. He remained here until 1904 
when he was elected Bishop of Mexico. 
He was consecrated by Bishops Garrett, 
Brown, Brooke, Howe, Johnson and Mills- 
paugh. He married Mary Gertrude Smith, 
at Kenton, Ohio, Sept. 11, 1883. Address: 
Torreon, Mexico. 

AXTELL, Decatur: 

Railway official; born at Elyria, Ohio, 
Feb. 8, 1848; son of Almon and Sophronia 
(Boynton) Axtell. He was educated in 
Illinois College, and from March 10, 1864, 
has been in railway service, serving in en 
gineering capacities on various roads; and 
is a member of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers. He became general man 
ager of the Richmond and Allegheny Rail 
road in July, 1880, and vice-president and 
general manager of the same road in April, 
1882. He was receiver and manager of the 
Richmond and Allegheny Railroad from 
1883-1889; became second vice-president of 
the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway in May, 
1889, and since February, 1900, has been 
vice-president of the same road. He was 
also president of the Toledo and Ohio 
Central Railroad and vice-president of the 
Kanawha and Michigan Railway from 
1889-1903, and since 1903 has been chair 
man of the Boards of Directors of those two 
roads. Address: Richmond, Va. 

AYER, Clarence Walter: 

Librarian; born in Haverhill, Mass., 

32; son of Walter Ayer and Abby West 

(Stevens) Ayer. He was educated in pub 



lic schools of Haverhill, and at Harvard 
College, A.B., 1885, (magna cum laude, 
with second year honors in classics, final 
honors in music), A.M., 1888 (in English 
and Italian). He was instructor at Dum- 
mcr Academy, near Newburyport, 1885- 
188G; private tutor at Cambridge, from 
1886 to 1891; professor of English in Wit 
tenberg College, Springfield, Ohio, 1892- 
1893; instructor in English in the College 
for Women, Western Reserve University, 
Cleveland, Ohio, from 1893-1895; instructor 
in the Volkmann private school for boys, 
Boston, 1895-1896; assistant in Harvard 
College Library from 1896-1899; librarian 
of Brockton Public Library from 1899- 
1904, and of the Cambridge Public Library 
since 1904. He compiled a shelf classifi 
cation of music for the Harvard College 
Library in 1896, which was published in 
the Library Journal in 1902; and in 1908 
he collaborated with Dr. William J. Rolfe 
in the preparation of a "History of the 
Cambridge Public Library." He is a mem 
ber of the Massachusetts Library Club, 
(vice-president 1900-1901; president 1909- 
1910), American Library Association, New 
England Historical Genealogical Society, 
Harvard Musical Association, of Boston, 
director of the Cambridge Social Union, 
and a member of the Pi Eta Society of 
Harvard College. Mr. Ayer is a Republi 
can in politics and a Universalist in reli 
gion. He married in Brockton, Mass., Oct. 
1, 1902, Grace Stand wood Blackwell, and 
they have one son, Donald Blackwell, born 
April 3, 1904. Residence: 5 Cutler Ave 
nue, Cambridge. Office address: Public 
Library, Cambridge, Mass. 

AYER, Edward Everett: 

Capitalist and bibliophile; born at Har 
vard, MeHenry County, 111., Nov. 16, 1841; 
son of Elbridge Gerry and Mary (Titcomb) 
Ayer. After leaving the public schools, he 
became interested in the lumber business, 
and especially in that branch of it con- 
nected with supplying the demands of rail 
ways for cross-ties and in that line built 
up, in the firm of Ayer & Lord, now the 
Ayer & Lord Tie Company, one of the most 
extensive tie contracting enterprises in the 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



country. From its inception in 1893 until 
1898 he was president, and is still a di 
rector, of the Field Columbian Museum; 
and he is also a director of the Newbury 
Library, the Chicago Art Institute, and the 
Chicago Historical Society. He is deeply 
interested in American literature and his 
tory, and his library, which ranks as one 
of the best and most valuable in private 
hands in this country, is especially rich in 
its collection of Americana. Mr. Ayer mar 
ried, Sept. 7, 1865, Emma August Burbank, 
by whom he has one daughter. Address: 
Railway Exchange Building, Chicago. 

AYER, Francis Wayland: 

Advertising agent; born in Lee, Berk 
shire County, Mass., 1848. He was edu 
cated in the schools of Western New York. 
Mr. Ayer started in the advertising busi 
ness in 18G9 at Philadelphia in association 
with his father, under the firm name of 
N. W. Ayer & Son, and upon the death of 
his father in 1873, Mr. Ayer became head 
of the firm. The yearly aggregate of the 
firm s payments to publishers now exceeds 
four million dollars. Mr. Ayer, in addi 
tion to conducting the large advertising 
business, is president of the Merchants 
National Bank of Philadelphia. He is also 
senior partner of the firm of Ayer & Mc- 
Kenny, who have a large stock farm in 
New York State. Mr. Ayer is superintend 
ent of the Sunday-school connected with 
the North Baptist Church in Camden, New 
Jersey, and is a director in large banking 
and commercial institutions. Residence: 
Camden, N. J. Office: 300 Chestnut St., 
Philadelphia. 

AYER, Frederick Fanning: 

Lawyer; born in Lowell, Mass., Sept. 12, 
1851. He was graduated from Harvard 
College as A.B. in 1873, and studied at 
Harvard Law School. He was admitted to j 
the Massachusetts bar in 1875, and since j 
the death of his father, James C. Ayer, has | 
managed the great properties of the Ayer 
estate. He presented the Ayer Memorial 
Library, costing $40,000, to * the town of 
Ayer, Mass. Mr, Ayer is a director of the 



Lake Superior Ship Canal, Railway and 
Iron Company, the Portage Lake and River 
j Improvement Company, the Lowell and 
I Andover Railroad, and J. C. Ayer Company, 
and he is a large stockholder in the New 
York Tribune Association, the Tremont and 
Suffolk Mills, and other corporations. Res 
idence: 5 West 57th Street. Address: 
Mills Building, New Fork City. 

AYERS, Howard: 

Morphologist; born in Olympia, Wash., 
May 21, 1861. He was graduated from 
Harvard University as B.S. in 1883, and 
from the University of Freiberg, Germany, 
as Ph.D. in 1885. He also studied at the 
universities of Strasburg .and Heidelberg, 
and has received the degree of LL.D. from 
the University of Missouri. Since 1889 he 
has been engaged in investigations into the 
structure of animal bodies and is one of 
the leaders in morphological work in the 
United States. He was director of the 
Lake Laboratory from 1889 to 1893, and has 
been a member of the staff of instruction 
at the Marine Biological Laboratory of 
Wood s Hole since 1889. In 1899 he be 
came president of the University of Cin 
cinnati, holding that position until 1904. 
Dr. Ayers is a member of the American 
Society of Naturalists; the American 
Morphological Society ; the American As 
sociation for the Advancement of Science ; 
and the National Educational Association. 
He is the author of "The Vertebrate Ear," 
and other papers on the morphology of ani 
mals. President Ayers has also made a 
scientific study of the problems of educa 
tion and is the author of numerous vol 
umes and papers on this subject. Resi 
dence: 907 Lexington Avenue. Office: 
15 West Second Street, Cincinnati. 

AYERS, Rufus Adolphus: 

Lawyer; born in Bedford County, Va., 
May 20, 1849. His early education was in 
terrupted by the Civil War, in which he 
took part as a member of an independent 
command in eastern Tennessee, western 
North Carolina and southwestern Virginia. 
After the war he engaged in farming and 



06 

completed his education by personal study, 
and was admitted to the bar in 1872. He 
was active in the development of large 
areas of coal land in Wise County, Va., 
and in the construction of the railroad 
which handled the output of the mines so 
developed. Mr. Ayers was attorney-gener 
al of Virginia from 1885 to 1890. He has a 
large practice at the bar, and important 
financial interests, being director in several 
coal corporations and banks. He married 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Estillville, Va., June 8, 1870, 



Victoria 

Louisa Morison. Address: Big Stone 
Gap, Wise County, Va. 

AYME, Louis Henry: 

Consul-general; born in New York City, 
May 29, 1855; son of Dr. Henry Ayme 
(surgeon, U. S. A.) and Elizabeth Ger- 
aldine (Fitzgerald) Ayme. He was pre 
pared at Trinity School and graduated 
from Columbia College, A.B. in 1871, fol 
lowing with two terms at the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia Uni 
versity. He was scientific assistant with 
the United States Transit of Venus Expe 
dition, New Zealand Station, in 1874. He 
was appointed United States consul at 
Merida, Yucatan, Mexico, in 1880, and 
served there until 1884, and then became 
connected , as a special ethnologist, with re 
search work for the Smithsonian Institu 
tion, 1884-1886. He became a member of 
the editorial staff of the Chicago Inter- 
Ocean in 1886, remaining until appointed 
in 1891, foreign press editor for the World s 
Columbian, Exposition. Upon the fulfil 
ment of his duties there he engaged in 
newspaper work. Mr. Ayme was appoint 
ed by President McKinley Jan. 6, 1898 
United States consul at Guadaloupe, Wesl 
Indies, where he served until June, 1903 
when he was transferred to Para, Brazil 
where he served until appointed in 190f 
Amrican consul-general at Lisbon, Portu 
gal, where he is now serving. He was 
serving at Guadaloupe when the Marti 
nique disaster occurred, and he was th( 
first on the spot, going as special repre 
sentative of the United States Governmem 
and special representative of the Associ 
ated Press, arriving May 11, 1902. He is 



i member of the American Archeological 
Society; the American Antiquarian Society; 
ind various historical societies; a member 
he Sons of Veterans; and a member by 
nheritance of the Military Order of the 
,oyal Legion of the United States, also a 
nember of the American Association of 
International Law, Optimist Club of Amer- 
ca, Theosophical Society, Consistory of the 
City of New York, Scottish Rite Masons 
(32d-degree), Mystic Shrine, and Patri- 
irchs Militant (Odd Fellows) having re 
ceived the grand decoration for loyalty and 
hivalry. He is author of Notes on Mitla, 
L, valuable contribution to American arch- 
:ology; and has published numerous arti 
cles on the Great Pyramid as a great metro- 



ogical and mathematical monument. 



Mr. 

Ayme married at Chicago, Feb. 19, 1890, 
Mary Stuart. Address: American Consu 
late-General. Lisbon, Portugal. 

AYRES, Brown: 

President of the University of Tennessee; 
born in Memphis, Tenn., May 25, 1856; son 
of Samuel W. and Elizabeth (Cook) Ayres. 
He took the engineering course in Washing 
ton and Lee University, and then went to 
the Stevens Institute of Technology, at Ho- 
boken, N. J., from which he was gradu 
ated as B.S. in 1878, and received the de 
gree of Ph.D. in 1888. He was a fellow in 
Johns Hopkins University, 1879-1880, and 
received the LL.D. degree from Washington 
and Lee University, 1904, from South Car 
olina College 1905, from Tulane Univer 
sity of Louisana, 1905, -and from the Uni 
versity of Alabama,, 1906; also the degree 
of D.C.L. from the University of the South, 
He joined the faculty of the Tu 
lane University of Louisana in 1880 as pro 
fessor of physics, holding that chair for 
twenty- four years, and also being dean of 
the College of Technology from 1894 to 1900, 
dean of the Academic College and vice- 
chairman of the faculty from 1900 to 1904, 
and was acting president of that university 
when, in 1904, he was called to his present 
position as president of the University of 
Tennessee. He was a member of the Elec 
tric Jury of the World s Columbian Expo 
sition in 1893, the Atlanta Exposition in 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



87 



1895, and the Nashville Exposition in 1897. 
He is fellow of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science ; and a 
member of the Society for the Promotion 
of Engineering Eduation; and the Ameri- 
cm Physial Society. Dr. Ayres married 
at Lexington, Va., July 5, 1881, Katie A. 
Anderson. Address: Knoxville, Tenn. 

AYRES, Philip Wheelock: 

Forester; born in Winterset, Iowa. May 
20, 1801. He was educated at Cornell Uni 
versity and Johns Hopkins University, of 
which he is Ph.D. 1888. Mr. Ayres has 
become nationally known in two lines: for 
estry work and charity organization work. 
In 1889 he became secretary of the Associ 
ated Charities of Cincinnati, serving in this 
position until 1895, when he went to Eu 
rope to study penal and charitable institu 
tions. In 1895 he became general secretary 
of the Bureau of Associated Charities in 
Chicago, and later went to New York, 
where he became assistant secretary of the 
Charity Organization Society, serving until 
1900. He was for seven years superintend 
ent of the Summer School in Philanthropic 
Work of the New York Charity Organiza 
tion Society. He took the course in for 
estry at Cornell University, and in 1900 
he became forester of the Society for the 
Protection of New Hampshire Forests, and 
of Dartmouth College. He is a director of 
the American Forestry Association and the 
Society of American Foresters, and has 
contributed to the magazines. He married 
in Newton, Mass., Aug. 8, 1899. Alice Stan 
ley Taylor. Residence: Franconia, N. H. 
OHice: Concord, N. 11. 



BABB, Washington Irving: 

Lawyer; born in DCS Moines County, 
Iowa, Oct. 2, 1844; son of Miles and Mary 
(Mover) Babb. His studies at the Iowa 
Wcsleyan University were interrupted by 
his enlistment, in 1803, in the Eighth Iowa 
Cavalry, but after the Civil War closed 
he returned to the University, from which 
he was graduated A.B. in 1800, received the 



A.M. degree in 1809, and the honorary de 
gree of LL.D. from it in 1898 and from the 
State L niversity of Iowa in 1907. He was 
admitted to the bar of Iowa in 1808, and 
practised there for thirty-eight years ex 
cept the period from 1891 to 1895, when he 
served a full elective term as district judge 
in Iowa. For years he was one of the recog 
nized leaders of the Democratic Party in 
Iowa, was elected to the House of Repre 
sentatives of that State, and was Democrat 
ic nominee for governor of Iowa in 1895, and 
the nominee of the Democratic caucus for 
United States senator in the legislative ses 
sion of 1890. He became a leader of the 
Gold Democrats of Iowa, being one of the 
strongest supporters of sound money while 
the free silver agitation existed and chair 
man of the Sound Money Democratic Con 
vention in Iowa in 181JO. He was made a 
regent of the State University of Iowa in 
1898, and held that ollice until 1900, when 
he removed from the State to become gen 
eral counsel for several large manufactur 
ing corporations, with otlice at Chicago. 
He is a member of the Union League Club 
of Chicago. He married at Mt. Pleasant. 
Iowa, Oct. 9, 1873. Alice Bird, and lias 
three children. Residence: 255 West 
Park Av., Aurora, 111. Otlice: 1329 Man 
hattan Building. Chicago. 

BABCOCK, Harmon Seeley: 

Lawyer, author; born in New Lebanon, 
N. Y., April 11, 1849. He was graduated 
from Brown University, valedictorian of 
class, A.B.. 1874, A.M., 1877, receiving 
Mathematical and Rhetorical prizes. He 
became a teacher in the University Gram 
mar School, Providence, 1874-1870; was 
admitted to the bar and began practice in 
Providence, 1877; superintendent of pub 
lic schools, East Providence, R. 1., 1879- 
1882; town solicitor of East Providence, 
1884-1887; and again from 1900 to the 
present time. He has also been coroner 
of East Providence since 1884. Mr. Bab- 
cock was treasurer of the Watchemoket 
Fire District, 1892-1905; president of the 
East Providence Business Men s Associa- 
. ton, 1903-1905; and he was for several 
! years treasurer of the Franklin Lyceum. 



os 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Mr. Babcoek is author of: Trifles, 187!); A 
Poultry Compendium, 1SS.1; Philosophy of 
Judging, 1SS9; The Indian dame, 1891; 
The Argonaut. IS!)]; Fi iendship of Learn 
ing, 1893; also numerous articles in peri- 
odicals. lie was poet at the convention of 
Beta Thcta Pi fraternity in Cincinnati, and 
delivered a poem before the Alumni of 
Brown University. Mr. Babcoek is a mem 
ber of the Rhode Island Bar Association, 
and president of the Bo ml of Trustees of 
the Haven M. E. Church of East Provi 
dence; and he is a member of the Beta 
Theta Pi fraternity. He has been a candi 
date for representative to the General As 
sembly of Rhode Island, but not elected; 
and has been a delegate to State Republi 
can conventions, president of campaign 
clubs, etc. He has been twice married: 
first at Lenox, Mass., June 11, 187!), to 
Eva S. Belden, and second, April 17, 1902, 
at East Providence, R. I., to Julia E. 
Buckminster ; and he has a daughter and 
a son. Address: 77 Summit Street, East 
Providence, R. T. 

BABCOCK, James Woods: 

Physician, specialist in mental diseases; 
born in Chester, S. C., Aug. 11, 1850; son 
of Sidney E. and Margaret (Woods) Bab- 
cock. He was prepared for college at 
Phillips Exeter Academy, and was gradu 
ated from Harvard College as A.B. in 1882, 
and from Harvard Medical School as M. 
D. in 1880, and in 1905 the honorary de 
gree of LL.D. was conferred upon him by 
South Carolina College. He was appoint 
ed assistant physician of the McLean Hos 
pital at Somerville, Mass., in 1885 and he 
held that positon until 1891, when he re 
ceived appointment to his present office as 
physician and superintendent of the South 
Carolina State Hospital for the Insane. 
Dr. Babcoek, in addition to this State of 
fice, has served on the Board of Health and 
as chairman of the Sewerage Commission 
and member of the Water Commisson of 
Columbia, S. C., and also as member of tli? 
State Commission to erect a monument to 
General Sumter of the American Revolu 
tion. He has written a history of the 
South Carolina Hospital for the Insane and 



! various professional papers. Dr. Babcock s 
i most important contributions to medicine 
! are: (1) directing attention to the preva 
lence and prevention of tuberculosis in 
American Insane Asylums in 1894; and 
(2) calling attention to the existence of 
pellagra in Southern asylums in 1907. He 
is a member of the American Medical As 
sociation, the American Medico-Psychologi 
cal Association and of State and local med 
ical societies. He has attained a positon 
of much distinction among American alien 
ists. Dr. Bahcoek married at Lincolnton, 
N. C., Aug. 17, 1892, Katharine Guion. 
Address: Columbia, S. C. 

BABCOCK, Joseph Weeks: 

Manufacturer and ex-congressman; born 
at Swanton, Franklin County, Vermont, 
March 0, 1850. He removed with his par 
ents in 1855 to Iowa, in which State he re 
sided until 1881. when he moved to Nece- 
dah, Wis., where he has since resided. He 
was for many years engaged there in the 
manufacture of lumber, and he has long 
been active in political afl airs as one of the 
leaders of the Republican party in his State 
and the Nation. He was elected a member 
of the Wisconsin Assembly in 1888, and 
reflected in 1890. In 1802 lie was elected 
to the Fifty-third Congress from the Third 
Congressional District of Wisconsin, and bi 
ennially elected thereafter up to and in 
cluding the Fifty-ninth Congress. He was 
also the Republican nominee for the Six 
tieth Congress from that district in 1900, 
but failed of election. Mr. Babcoek was 
chairman of the National Republican Con 
gressional Committee in 1894, 1890, 1898. 
1900, 1902 and 1004; having full charge of 
these campaigns and making a unique 
record among the managers of American 
political campaigns for efficiency of method 
and success in securing results. He was 
a delegate at large to the National Republi 
can Convention in 1904, and was appointed 
in 1905 to the National Republican Com 
mittee, to succeed the Late Henry C. Payne. 
Mr. Babcoek was for twenty years chairman 
of the Committee on the District of Colum 
bia of the House of Representatives and 
was a member of the Ways and Means 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



es 
scans 



Committee in the Fifty-sixth, Fifty-sev- j chairs of clinical medicine and of diseas 
enth, Fifty-eighth and Fifty-ninth Con- j of the chest in the College of Physi 
greases. He married at Lyons. Iowa, in ! and Snr.o-prms. Tin i* ^^^.-.iKr ^ 
1807, Mary 
dah, Wis. 



Lyons, Iowa, in and Surgeons. He is especially " distin- 



A. Finch. Address: Nece- 



guished in connection with researches in 



BABCOCK, Kendric Charles: 

University president; born at South 
Brookfield, N. Y., Sept. 8, 1804; son of 
Gideon Perry and Lydia (Macomber) Bab- 
cock. After his graduation from the Uni 
versity of Minnesota as B.Litt. in 1889 he ! son and St. Anthony of Padua hospitals 



and treatment of diseases of the heart and 
lungs, and is author of text-books on Dis 
eases of the Heart and Arterial System 
(1903), and Diseases of the Lungs (1907) 
as well as numerous contributions to med 
ical publications. He is consulting physi- 
to the Cook County, Mary Thomp- 



remained with that institution 
structor in history and English until 1894, 



and to the Marion Sims Sanitarium, 
formerly president of the American Clima- 



and then took up graduate work at Har- j tological Association and is a member of 



vard University, from which he received 
the degrees of A.M. in 1895 and Ph.D. in 
1890. For two years he was instructor in 
history and political science and for five 
years assistant professor of history in the 



the principal National, State and local med 
ical associations. lie married at Mont- 
clair, N. J., June 12, 1879, Lizzie C. \Yos- 
ton, of New York City, and has two chil 
dren. Address: 92 State St., Chicago. 



University of California, and during his I 
service on that Faculty was president of BABCOCK, Washington Irving: 
the University of California Students Co- | Naval architect and engineer; one of the 
operative Association and for five years a j leading figures in the ship-building inter- 
director of the San Francisco Settlement j ests on the Great Lakes which has con- 
Association. Since 1903 he has been presi- structed for the interior carrying trade of 
dent of the University of Arizona, in which the United States one of the most remark- 
he also holds the chair of history and po- able fleets known to the history of the 
litical economy. He is the author of The : world. A specific type of vessel has been 
Pvise of American Nationality (Harpers. j developed for the particular needs of this 
1900), and a contributor to magazines and trade and the magnitude of the ship-build- 
reviews on historical and economic subjects. ; ing enterprises at different points along the 
Dr. Babcock is a prominent fraternity man, j CO ast of the great interior seas by far 
was president of Delta Tau Delta fraternity i eclipses that of the ocean coasts of the 
from 1893 to 1899, and is a member of the United States. Mr. Babcock was born in 

Stonington, Conn., Sept. 21, 1858. He was 
graduated from the Brooklyn Polytechnic 
Institute in 1870, and at the Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute, at Troy, N. Y., in 
1878. His apprenticeship at ship-building 
was served at Morgan s Iron Works, New 
York City, and John Eoach s shipyard at 



Phi Beta Kappa Society. He is also a 
member of the American, Minnesota and 
Arizona Historical Societies. Address: 
Tucson, Ariz. 



BABCOCK, Robert Hall: 

Physician ; born at \Vatertown, N. Y., 

July 20, 1851; son of Jiobert S. Babcock, j Chester, Pa., where he remained until 1885, 

when he became connected with the Provi 
dence and Stonington Steamship Company. 
He was superintendent of the Union Dry 



of Kalamazoo, Mich., and Emily (Hall) 

Babcock. Following his graduation from 

Chicago Medical College in 1878, Dr. Bab- 

coek spent a year in the College of I liysi- j Dock Co., Buffalo, N. Y., from 1887 to 1889, 

cians and Surgeons (Columbia University ), i and was manager ien years and president 

in New York, and three years in graduate 

study in Germany. Since 1883 he has 

practised medicine in Chicago, in which 



in 1889-1900 of the Chicago Ship-building 
Company, this period covering the years of 
the great initial development of the ship- 
city he formerly held, for fifteen years, the i building industry on the Great Lakes. He 



70 MEN OF AMERICA. 

married in New Orleans, Jan. 1, 1890, Grace ;ain; Lays from Over Sea; The Bride of 
W., daughter of the Hon. H. P. Kernochan. the Tiger; An Invention of the Enemy, etc. 
Residence: 374 Fifth Avenue. Oilice: 8 lie has twice married, first in June, 1874, 
Bridge St. New York City. to Anne Johns Earle, and second, Aug. 18, 

1897, to Mrs. Gertrude Lee Mahood, of 

BABCOCK, William: Richmond, Va., and he has nine children. 

c \ Residence : Rock Haven, Ridge Road, near 
Banker; born m Canton 111.; son ^ of ; ^ D c Office; 6Q4 F gtreet 

William and Elizabeth A. (Kmsey) Bab- * Washington, D. C. 

cock. He was educated in public and high 

schools, Canton, 111. Mr. Babcock has been ; BABCQCK winnifrea Eaton: 
engaged in banking and in the organization 

and management of banks, financial insti- : Author; born in Nagasaki, Japan, 1879; 
tutions, and industrial and other corpora- \ daughter of Edward and Grace (Trapesis) 
tions since 1873; now president of the , Eaton. She received her education in the 
American Fiscal Corporation, New York | public schools of Montreal and Toronto, 
City. He engaged in mining business in j Canada, supplemented by courses in Eng- 
Southern Nevada, with headquarters at ! lish in Columbia University; and she was 
Goldfield, his legal residence, for the past married in New York City, July 16, 1901, 
twenty years, being in New York City. He j to B. W. Babcock. Since 1894 she has been 
is a member of the American Bankers As- j identified with literary work as a writer 
sociation. Mr. Babcock is a Republican in ; of short stories for magazines, and of books, 
politics, and is a Mason and Knight Temp- ! and the years spent in Japan guvc her an 
lar. His father and latter s only brother, j intimate acquaintance with the picturesque 
A. C. Babcock, were both colonels in the j Hfe and quaint manners and customs of its 
Union Army during the Civil War, and j people, which has made her prominent as 
both prominent in Illinois politics; both j an exponent of Japan in fiction. Her books, 
went from New York State to Illinois, and written under the pen-name of " Onoto Wa- 
took active part in building up that State tanna," include: The Old Jinriksha; Miss 
to its present greatness. Address: 35 Nume of Japan; A Japanese Nightingale; 
Nassau St., New York City. Temporary , The Wooing of Wistaria; Heart of Hya- 
address: Lock Box 63, Goldfield, Nev. cinth ; Daughters of Kings; The Love of 

r, A/alea; A Japanese Blossom; The Diary of 

BABCOCK, William Henry: Delia. The story of a Japanese Nightin- 

Lawyer and solicitor of patents; born \ ale was dramatized in 1903 and produced 
in St. Louis, Mo., Jan. 1, 1849- son of i Wlth success both in America and England. 
Welles J. and Catherine (Smith) Babcock, Address : Mamaroneek, N. Y. 
He was educated in divers private schools 

of New York and Washington, D. C., and i BABSON Thomas M : 

the Preparatory Department and Law Lawyer; born in Wiscasset, Maine, May 
School of Columbian (now George Wash- i 28, 1847. He was graduated from Har- 
ington) University. He was three years in ] vurd Law School in 1868, and admitted to 
the Patent Office Examining Corps at j the Suffolk Bar in 1869, and since then has 
Washington and since then for about thirty- ; practised law in Boston. For thirty years 



one years has been in practice as a law 
yer and solicitor of patents. Mr. Babcock 
was formerly an extensive contributor of 
stories, verse and articles to magazines and 
periodicals, and he is author of: The Tower 
of Wye; Kent Fort Mano; Cian of the 
Chariots j Cypress Beach; Lord Stirling s 



he has been continuously connected with 
the Boston Law Department, of which he is 
now the head, his first appointment being 
received from Mayor Prince, in April, 1879, 
as fourth assistant city solicitor. He was 
promoted to second assistant solicitor 1881, 
first assistant solicitor, 1885, and in 1891 
Strand ; The Two Lost Centuries of Brit- I was appointed corporation counsel of the 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



City of Boston by Mayor Mathews. In 
1895 the Law Department of the City of 
Boston was placed under the joint charge 
of the corporation counsel and the city so 
licitor, and he was appointed by Mayor Cur 
tis as city solicitor and served as such un 
til July 1904, when that office was abol 
ished, and he was appointed to his present 
office of corporation counsel of Boston and 
head of the city s Law Department. Ad 
dress: Corporation Counsel s Office, Bos 
ton. 

BACHELDER, Nahum Josiah: 

Former governor of New Hampshire, and 
master of the National Grange, Patrons of 
Husbandry; born in Andover, N. H., Sept. 
3, 1854; son of William A. and Adeline 
E. B. Bachelder. He was educated in var 
ious academies in his native State and 
since leaving school has been engaged in 
farming. Taking an active part in political 
affairs and becoming a Republican leader, 
he was nominated by his party, in 1902, 
and elected governor of New Hampshire 
for the two-year term beginning in Jan., 
1903. Governor Bachelder has for years 
been a prominent member of the Patrons of 
Husbandry, and upon the expiration of his 
term as governor of his State he accepted, 
in 1905, the presidency of the National 
Grange which he has held ever since. 
Dartmouth College conferred upon him, in 
1887, the degree of A. M. Residence: 
Andover, N. H. Office: Concord, N. H. 

BACHELLER, Irving-; 

Author; born in Pierpont, N. Y., Sept. 
26, 1859; graduated from St. Lawrence 
University as B.S. in 1882, and has since 
received the degree of M.S. and A.M. from 
his college. Mr. Bachelder was actively 
connected with the press of New York for 
many years, and was the proprietor of the 
BachelJer Syndicate, furnishing special ar 
ticles and material to the newspapers and 
magazines of the country. In 1900 he at 
tracted national attention by his story, 
Eben Holden. a study in character which 
vied in popularity with the celebrated 
" David Harum," which was in vogue about 



71 

that time. Mr. Bacheller is also author of 
D ri and I, a story of the War of F812; of 
Barrel of the Blessed Isles, Silas Strong, 
and several other popular novels. He was 
formerly one of the editors of the New 
York World. He married at Brooklyn, 
Dec. 10, 1883, Anna Detmar Schultz. Res 
idence: Sound Beach, Conn. 

BACON, Alexander Samuel: 

Lawyer; born in Jackson, Mich., Nov. 20, 
1853; son of John A. and Harriet (Smith) 
Bacon. He was graduated (in the 
"Stars") in 1876 from the United States 
Military Academy, in which he was the 
first captain in the corps of cadets, and 
served as lieutenant in the 1st United 
States Artillery, from which he resigned. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1879, and he 
has a wide practice, extending to London, 
Tokio and Central America; is a director 
and vice-president of the Webster Piano 
Company, the Lima Oil Company, Reserva 
tion Oil Company and the New York and 
Osage Oil Company; and he is treasurer of 
the American Sabbath Union. He served 
in the New York Legislature as Assembly 
man, 1887, and in the National Guard of 
the State of New York, as captain, major 
and lieutenant-colonel of the Twenty-third 
Regiment, and as colonel of the Second Pro 
visional Regiment. Colonel Bacon is a 
member of the Aurora Grata, Quill and 
Winter s Night Clubs of Brooklyn. He 
married in Denver, Colo., Sept. 1, 1886, 
Harriet Whetelsey Schroter, and they have 
two children. Residence: 101 Rugby 
Road, Brooklyn. Office: 37 Liberty Street, 
New York City. 

BACON, Augustus Octavius: 

United States senator; born in Bryan 
County, Georgia, Oct. 20, 1839. He re 
ceived a high school education in Liberty 
and Troup counties and. was graduated 
from the University of Georgia, in the lit 
erary and classical department, in 1859, 
arid in the law department in 1860. He 
entered the Confederate Army at the be 
ginning of the war and served during the 
campaigns of 1860-1862 as adjutant of the 



72 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Ninth Georgia Regiment in the Army of 
Northern Virginia, and subsequently thereto 
was commissioned a captain in the Pro 
visional Army of the Confederate States 
and assigned to general staff duty. At the 
close of the war he resumed the study of 
law and he began to practice in 18G6 at 
Macon. He was several times candidate for 
the Democratic nomination for Governor 
of Georgia. He is a trustee of the Uni 
versity of Georgia and also a regent of the 
Smithsonian Institution at Washington. 
He was elected to the United States Senate 
in Nov., 1894, and reflected in 1900 and 
1907, his present term expiring March 4, 
1913. Since his election as United States 
Senator he has traveled extensively in the 
dependencies of the United States and in 
foreign countries, where he has been a close 
student of languages, manners and customs. 
He is a forceful debater and one of the 
leading members of the minority of the 
Senate. Address: Macon, Ga. 

BACON, Benjamin Wisner: 

Professor in Yale University; born in 
Litchfield, Conn., Jan. 15, I860; son of 
Rev. Leonard Woolsey Bacon, D.D., and Su 
san Bacon. He was graduated from Yale 
as B.A. in 1881, B.D. in 1884, and M. A. in 
1890, and received the degrees of D.D. from 
Western Reserve University in 1892, Litt. 
D. from Syracuse University in 1894, and 
LL.D. from Illinois College in 1905. He 
was ordained in the ministry of the Con 
gregational Church in 1884, and was pastor 
of the. First Congregational Church of Old 
Lyme, Conn., until 1889, then at Oswego, 
N. Y., until called to his present chair of 
New Testament Criticism and Exegesis in 
1890. Dr. Bacon has been an extensive con 
tributor to critical and exegetical litera 
ture, translated into English Wildeboer s 
Kanon des Ouden Verbonds; contributed to 
Haupt s Sacred Literature of the Old Tes 
tament and to various periodicals and re 
views, and he is the author of: The 
Genesis of Genesis; The Triple Tradition 
of the Exodus; Introduction to the New 
Testament; The Sermon on the Mount, and 
The Story of St. Paul. Dr. Bacon married 
at Norwich, Conn., May 27, 1884, Eliza 



, Buckingham Aiken; and they have two 
children, Dorothy Buckingham, and Benja- 

| min Selden. Address: 244 Edwards Street, 
New Haven, Conn. 

! BACON, Charles W.: 

Lawyer; born at Natick, Mass., March 4, 
1850; son of John W. and Amelia A. (Jef- 
fers) Bacon. He was prepared at Phillips 
Academy, Exeter, N. H., being graduated 
in 1875, and then entered Harvard Uni 
versity, from which he was graduated as 
A.B. in 1879. Mr. Bacon has been engaged 
in the practice of law from 1881, and he 
was assistant United States attorney for 
the Southern District of New York from 
April 1, 1905, to Jan. 31, 1906. He is a 
member of the Society of Medical Juris 
prudence of New York City, of the Papyrus 
Club of Boston, and of the Harvard and 
Republican Clubs of New York City. Mr. 
Bacon married at Cambridge, Mass., May 
28, 1888, Rena E. Mattis, and they have 
two sons: John W. Bacon, born in 1892, 
and Ross M. Bacon, born in 1894. Resi 
dence: 460 E. Fourth Street, Mount Ver- 
non, N. Y. Address: 31 Nassau Street, 
New York City. 

BACON, Edward Rathbone: 

Lawyer; born in New York City, Nov. 
22, 1846. He was educated at Phillips Ex 
eter Academy, and admitted to the New 
York bar at Buffalo, N. Y., in Nov., 1869. 
He was counsel for various railroad com 
panies for eighteen years; became vice- 
president of the Cincinnati, Washington & 
Baltimore Railroad 1881 and its presi 
dent 1890-1902, and has been vice-president 
since 1902 of the Baltimore & Ohio South 
western Railway. He was one of the re- 
organizers, and is now a director, of the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. He is also 
director of the Knickerbocker Apartment 
Company, the Farmers Loan & Trust 
Company, and Consolidated Coal Company. 
Mr. Bacon is a member of the Union, Man 
hattan, Metropolitan, City, Midday, Tux 
edo, Racquet and Tennis, Down Town and 
New York Yacht Clubs. Residence: 247 
Fifth Avenue. Office: 2 Wall Street, New 
York City. 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



BACON, Josephine Dodge Daskam: 

Author; born in Stamford, Conn., Feb. 
17.1870: daughter of Horace Sawyer and 
Anne (Loring) Daskam. She was gradu 
ated from Smith College, A.I)., 1898, being 
class orator on graduation. While in col 
lege she was editor-in-chief of the Smith 
College Monthly, and since graduation has 
been continuously occupied with literature 
as contributor of stories and poems to 
magazines, and as author of books: 
Sister s Vocation, and Other Stories, 1000; 
Smith College Stories, 1900; The Imp and 
the Angel, 1901; Fables for the Fair, 1901; 
Whom the Gods Destroyed, 1902; Poems, 
1903; Middle- Aged Love Stories, 1903; 
Memoirs of a Baby, 1904; Domestic Adven 
tures, 1907; Ten to Seventeen, 1907; An 
Idyll of All Fools Day, 1908. She was mar 
ried at Stamford, Conn., July 25, 1903, to 
Selden Bacon,, and has two daughters: 
Anne and Deborah. Address: Beech Hill, 
Pleasantville, Station, N. Y. 

BACON, Robert: 

Former assistant secretary of State. 
He was graduated from Harvard College 
with the degree of A.B. in 1880 (classmatae 
of President Roosevelt). He was engaged 
in banking and became a member of the 
firm of J. P. Morgan & Company, of New 
York, and was director in various large 
corporations. He was appointed assistant 
secretary of State of the United States, 
from Oct. 1, 1905, jyitil March 4, 1909. 
Mr. Bacon was an overseer of Harvard 
from 1889 to 1901, and was again ap 
pointed a member of the Board of Over 
seers in 1902, and is now serving. Mr. 
Bacon married Martha Cowdin. Resi 
dence: 1333 Sixteentli Street, Washing 
ton. Official address: Department of 
State, Washington, D. C. 

BACON, Selden: 

Lawyer and law author; born in New 
Haven, Conn., Sept. 28, 1801; son of Rev. 
Dr. Leonard Woolsey Bacon, distinguished 
Congregationalist clergyman and author, 
and Susan Bacon. Mr. Bacon was edu 



cated in Yale College, Carleton College, 
Minnesota, A.B. 1882, A.M. 1885, Univer 
sity of Wisconsin, LL.B. 1884. Ho was ad 
mitted to the Minnesota bar, 1884, and 
practised law in Minnesota until 1S94, 
since which year he has practised in New 
York City. Mr. Bacon was professor of 
civil procedure in the Law School of the 
University of Minnesota from 1889 to 1894, 
and is author of a volume on Equity Plead 
ing and Procedure. He is a member of the 
American Geographical Society, and of the 
Archaeological Institute of America. He 
married first, at Madison, Wis., Oct. 24, 
1894, Sally Blair Fairchild, who died in 
1902, leaving two daughters, and married, 
second, July 25, 1903, Josephine Dodge 
Daskam, the well-known author, by whom 
he has two daughters. Residence: Briar- 
cliff Manor, N. Y. Office: 00 Wall Street, 
New York City. 

BADE, William Frederic: 

Professor of Semitic literature and lan 
guages; born at Carver, Minn., Jan. 22, 
1871; son of William and Anna (Voigt) 
Bade. He was graduated from Moravian 
College, as A.B. in 1892, from the Moravian 
Theological Seminary as B.D. in 1894, and 
from the Divinity School of Yale Univer 
sity, as B.D. in 1895, having studied Arabic 
there for a year. He took post-graduate 
work at Moravian College and Lehigh Uni 
versity from 1890 to 1898, receiving the 
degree of Ph.D. (his doctor s thesis being 
on The Babylonian Deluge Legends), and 
took special studies at the University of 
Berlin, Germany, in 1905. He was assistant 
professor of Greek and German at Mora 
vian College from 1890 to 1898; professor 
of Hebrew and Old Testament Introduction 
at the Moravian Theological Seminary from 
1898 to 1902; and has been professor of Old 
Testament Literature and Languages at 
the Pacific Theological Seminary (affili 
ated with the University of California) 
since 1902. During 1909 he was engaged 
on an exploring expedition in Asia Minor. 
He was editor of the Moravian, official 
organ of the American Moravian denom 
ination in 1899 and 1900. He was 



74 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



dean of the Federate Summer School 



d.&h 



of i BAER, George F. 

President of the Philadelphia and Read- 
! Railroad ; born in Somerset County, 



Theology, at Berkeley, Calif., in 11)07. Tie 

is a member of the. Society for Biblical 

Lit. -ratim and Exegesis, and the American j Pennsylvania, near the Village of Lavans- 

I hilulogical Association. Dr. Bade married j v iH e> Sept. 20, 1842; of German ancestry; 

of Solomon and Anna Baer. He was 
educated at the Franklin and Marshall 
College. At the age of thirteen he entered 
the office of the Somerset Democrat, where 
he remained for two years, and afterward 
was engaged as employee and later book- 



at Berkeley, Calif., Sept. 26, 1006, Evelyn 
Marianne Ratcliff (B.S. University of Cali 
fornia), who died Sept. 18, 1907. Resi 
dence: 2616 College Avenue. Address: 
222:) Atliert^n Street, Berkeley, Calif. 



BADGER, Charles Johnston: 

Captain of the United States Navy; born 
Aug. 6, 1853. He was appointed at large 
to Naval Academy, June 1809. After 
graduation he served on the various naval 
stations and was executive of the U. S. S. 
Alert, of the Greely Relief Expedition of 
1884. For participation in this expedition, 
lie received, by name, the thanks of Mary 
land as tendered in joint resolutions of the 
Senate and House of Delegates, assembled 
at Annapolis. He performed a tour of duty 
with conspicuous success as commandant of 
cadets at the Naval Academy under Super 
intendent Bro \vnson and after sea service 
as captain of the U. S. S. Chicago returned 
to the Naval Academy as Superintendent, 
July. 1J)07. Address: U. S. Naval Acad 
emy, Annapolis, Md. 

BAENSCH, Emil: 

Lasvyer; born at Manitowoc, Wis., June 
12, 1857; son of August and Gesine 
Baensch. He was educated at the Univer 
sity of Wisconsin, and, returning to his 
home town and taking up the study of 
law, was admitted to the bar of Wisconsin 
in 1882. He is a Republican, and has been 
elected to various offices, including that of 
county judge and two terms as lieutenant- 
governor of Wisconsin. Besides his law 
practice, Mr. Baensch is editor and pub 
lisher of the Manitowoc Post. He has been 
vice-president of the Wisconsin Bar Associ 
ation, and three times president of the Wis 
consin .Press Association; is identified with 
various historical associations, and makes 
a specialty of the history of Germans in 
colonial and revolutionary times. He mar 



ried, in 1882. Ida Koehler. 
to woe, Wis. 



Address: Mani- 



keeper for the Ashtola Lumber Mills, near 
Johnstown, Pa., joined the Union Army at 
the battle of Bull Run ; participated in all 
the engagements up to and including Chan- 
cellorsville, when he was the adjutant- 
general of the Second Brigade. Resuming 
his legal studies, he was admitted to the 
bar in 1804. In 1808 he removed to Read 
ing, Pa., and became an active practitioner 
at the Berks County bar. He became prom 
inent, in connection with Mr. J. P. Morgan, 
in the reorganization of the Philadelphia 
and Reading Railroad, 1893 ; and was 
elected president of the Reading Company, 
and of the Central Railroad of New Jersey, 
in 1901. Mr. Baer is a member, and was 
formerly president, of the Pennsylvania 
German Society; is a member of the Read 
ing Park Commission, and took an active 
part in the establishment of the Reading 
Public Library. He is interested in litera 
ture and in historical research, and is the 
author of various papers on the early his 
tory of the Pennsylvania Germans. Ad 
dress: 1718 Spruce^. Street, Philadelphia. 

BAILEY, Edward: 

Banker and iron manufacturer; born in 
1861; son of 
(Doll) Bailey. 
He was prepared in Phillips Academy, An- 
dover, Mass., and graduated from the" Shef 
field Scientific School of Yale University as 
Ph.B. in the class of 1881. Mr. Bailey is 
president of the Harrisburg National Bank, 
the Harrisburg Trust Company and the 
Harrisburg Traction Company. He is a 
trustee of the Pennsylvania State Asylum, 
a member of the American Institute of 
Mining Engineers, and of the University 
Club of New York City, and the University 



Harrisburg, Pa.. Oct. 19, 
Charles L. and Emma H. 




GEORGE F. BAER 
President Heading Railroad 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



75 



and Art Clubs of Philadelphia. He mar 
ried at Harrisburg, Oct. 2, 1880, Elizabeth 
H. Reily, and they have three children. 
Residence: 1517 N. Front Street. Office: 
Harrisburg National Bank, Harrisburg, Pa. 

BAILEY, Elijah Prentiss: 

Editor; born in Manlius, N. Y., Aug. 15, 
1834. He was educated in public and Latin 
and grammar schools of Utica. and has re 
ceived the honorary degrees of LL.D. from 
St. John s College and of A.M. from Colgate 
University. He has been connected with 
the Utica Observer continuously since 1853, 
being city editor until 1867. when he be 
came managing editor and part proprietor; 
and has been editor-in-chief since 1883. 
Mr. Bailey was postmaster of Utici, N. Y., 
for two terms under President Cleveland ; 
school commissioner of Utica for six years ; 
president of the New York State Civic Serv 
ice Commission, 1892-1894, and Government 
commissioner of the Northern Pacific Rail 
road, 1880. He married first, in 1857, 
Julia S. Wetherby, who died in 1860; and, 
second, in 1868, Hannah Chapman. Resi 
dence: 326 Genesee Street. Office: The 
Observer, Utica, N. Y. 

BAILEY, Joseph Weldon: 

United States Senator; born in Copiah 
County, Miss., Oct. 6. 1863. He was admit 
ted to the bar in 1883; served as a district 
elector on the Cleveland and Hendricks 
ticket in 1884; removed to Texas in 1885 
and locnted in the practice of law at 
Gainesville, where he has ever since resided. 
He served as an elector for the State at 
large on the Democratic ticket in 1888; 
was elected to the Fifty-second. Fifty-third, 
Fifty-fourth, Fifty-fifth and Fifty-sixth 
Congresses, and on the organization of the 
Fifty-fifth Congress, March 15, 1897, was 
the Democratic nominee for Speaker of the 
House of Representatives. He was chosen 
United States Senator Jan. 23, 1901, to 
succeed Senator Horace Chilton. and took 
his seat March 5 of that year; and was 
elected Jan. 23, 1907. for the term expiring 
March 3, 1913. Senator Bailey was for 
several years regarded as the leader of the 
minority in the Senate, but owing to severe 



attacks made upon him alleging his connec 
tion with corporate interests, especially 
those of the Standard Oil Company, he was 
compelled to give his at tent ion to a success 
ful defense against these aspersions during 
the first session of the Sixtieth Congress. 
Address: Gainesville, Texas. 

BAILEY, Liberty Hyde: 

Educator, author, editor, lecturer; born 
at South Haven, Mich.. March 15, 1858; 
son of L. H. Bailey and Sarah (Harrison) 
Bailey. He was graduated with the degree 
of B.S. and later of M.S. from Michigan 
Agricultural College, and received the 
LL.D. degree from the University of Wis 
consin and from Alfred University. He 
was professor of horticulture and landscape 
gardening at the Michigan Agricultural 
College from 184 to 1888; professor of 
horticulture at Cornell University from 
1888 to 1903. and has been director of 
the New York State College of Agricul 
ture at Cornell University from 1903. 
President Roosevelt appointed Professor 
Bailey president of the Commission on 
Country Life, organized in 1908. Dr. 
Bailey is a lecturer on educational, scien* 
tific and social topics ; is editor of the 
Cyclopedia of American Horticulture (four 
volumes), Cyclopedia of American Agricul 
ture (four volumes), and the Rural Science 
Series; was first editor of Country Life in 
America; was formerly editor of American 
Garden, and he is author of: Survival of 
the Unlike; Evolution of Our Native 
Fruits; Elementary Textbook of Botany; 
Lessons With Plants; First Lessons With 
Plants; Principles of Agriculture; Princi 
ples of Fruit-Growing ; Principles of Veg- 
table-Gardening; Outlook to Nature; The 
Nature-Study Idea ; Horticulturist s Rule- 
Book; Nursery-Book; Plant-Breeding; 
Forcing-Book; Garden-Making; Pruning- 
Book; Practical Garden-Book; The State 
and the Farmer, and other books, and of 
botanical contributions. Dr. Bailey is a 
fellow of the American Academy of Arts 
and Sciences ; and a member of the Ameri 
can Philosophical Society. He married, 
June 6, 1883, Annette Smith, and he has 
two children. Address: Ithaca, N. Y. 



70 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



BAILEY, Leon Orlando: 

Lawyer; born on a farm near Wellsboro, 
Tioga County, Pa., June 21, 1857; son of 
Job n AY. and Margaret (Lewis) Bailey, 
lie was entered as a student in tlie classical 
course at Cornell University in tbe class 
of 1880, but left at the end of tbe sopho 
more year, then entering the Indiana Law 
School, from which he was graduated LL.B. 
1881. He began the practice of law at 
Indianapolis in 1881; has been admitted to: 
all the courts of Indiana and New York, 
and all the Federal courts, including the 
Supreme Court of the United States. Mr. ! 
Bailey removed to New York City perma 
nently in 1902, and has since practised 
there; and he has made a specialty of 
corporation law. He was a member of the 
Indiana State Senate from Indianapolis for \ 
four years; was chief assistant attorney- j 
general of Indiana for four years; assist- ; 
tant United States attorney two years, and 
designated by President Cleveland as 
United States attorney for the district of 
Indiana at the close of the hitter s first j 
term. He was also corporation counsel of 
the City of Indianapolis for one term, and 
Democratic nominee for Congress from the 
Indianapolis district in 1898. He is now 
general counsel and director of the Ameri 
can Finance and Securities Company; 
counsel for the New Jersey Steel Company, 
and counsel and director of the Guanajuato 
Reduction and Mines Company, with plant 
at Guanajuato, Mexico. Mr. Bailey is a 
member of the Association of the Bar of 
the City of New York, the Indiana State 
Bar Association, Indianapolis Bar Asso 
ciation, and Delta Kappa Epsilon frater 
nity. Mr. Bailey has been twice married, 
first at Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, in 1877, 
to Rosamond Paty Coggeshall, who died ; 
Sept. 1C, 1892 and second, at Martha s ! 
Vineyard, Mass., Sept. 1, 1901, Gertrude ! 
May Stein, by whom he has a son and twin 
daughters. Residence: Bronxvillo, N. Y. i 
OHice : 5 Nassau Street, New York City. ; 

BAILEY, Pearce: 

Physician, neurologist; born in New I 
York City, July ] 2 , 1805. He was gradu- | 



ated from Princeton, A.B. 1880, afterward 
receiving the A.M. degree, and was gradu 
ated from the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, New York City. M.D. 1889. 
Since then lie has been practising medicine 
in New York City, now being a specialist 
in diseases of the mind and the nervous 
system. Dr. Bailey is consulting neurolo 
gist to the St. Luke s and Roosevelt hos 
pitals. He is author of: Diseases of the 
Nervous System Resulting from Accident 
and Injury. He is a member of the Cen 
tury and University Clubs. Dr. Bailey 
married Edith L. Black. Address: 52 W. 
53d Street, New York City. 

BAILEY, Theodore Layton: 

Lawyer; born in New York City, June 
7, 1878; son of Edward Henry and Irene 
(Clifford) Bailey. He was graduated from 
Cornell University, Ph.B. 1899, and from 
New York Law School, LL.B. 1901. He was 
admitted to the bar in 1901, and has since 
practised law in New Y T ork City, now being 
a member of the firm of Roelker, Bailey 
and Curtis. He is a member of the Associ 
ation of the Bar of the City of New York, 
the New York County Lawyers Associ 
ation, the Alpha Delta Phi and Phi Delta, 
Phi fraternities, Squadron A of the Na 
tional Guard of New York, and the Alpha 
Delta Phi and Underwriters Club of New 
York City. He married in New York City, 
April 20," 1907, Gillian Webster Barr, and 
they have one daughter. Residence: 15.3 
E. 74th Street. Cilice: 02 William Street, 
New York City. 

BAILY, Joshua L.: 

Merchant; born in Philadelphia, June 27, 
1820; son of Joshua Baily, Jr., and Eliza 
beth (Lloyd) Baily. He was educated at 
the Friends Select School in Philadelphia 
and at Westtown Boarding School in Penn 
sylvania. He entered the dry goods busi 
ness at the age of 1(5 and is now senior 
member of Joshua L. Baily & Company, of 
Philadelphia and New York. He is presi 
dent of the Philadelphia Society for the 
Employment and Instruction of the Poor; 
of the Philadelphia Fountain Society, and 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



7V 



of the Pennsylvania Prison Society. He is 
also vice-president of the American Peace 
Society, the National Temperance Society 
and the American Tract Society, and a 
manager of the American Bible Society, 
and a director of the American Forestry 
Association. He is a member of the Histor 
ical Society of Pennsylvania; the National 
Geographic Society; the American Academy 
of Political and Social Science; an original 
member of the Committee of One Hundred 
organized in 1879, and was a member of 
the National Relief Commission during the 
Spanish-American War, and is a trustee 
and director of many charitable and other 
institutions. He is also a member of the 
Contemporary Club, the Merion Cricket 
Club and the City Club. Mr. Baily married 
in 1850, Theodate, daughter of John D. 
Lang, of Vassalboro, Me., and they have 
live sons, four of whom are partners with 
him in his business. Residence: "Lang- 
mere," Ardmore, Pa. Office address: 32 
South Fifteenth Street, Philadelphia. 

BAIN, George Grantham : 

Journalist; born in Chicago, Jan. 7, 
1865. Mr. Bain is one of the leading syfe- 
dicate and special writers for the American 
press. Mr. Bain was graduated from the 
St. Louis University in 1883, and received 
the degree of M.A. from that University 
in 1890. He was formerly one of the best- 
known of Washington correspondents, but 
of late years has been located in New York, 
and contributes New York letters to a 
large number of papers. He is also a 
writer of short stories for the leading mag 
azines. Office: 32 Union Square, East, 
New York City. 
BAIN, Robert Edward Mather: 

Passenger agent and amateur photogra 
pher; born in Chicago, Aug. 9, 1858, and 
was educated at the Washington University, 
St. Louis. He has had a successful career 
as passenger agent for various lines of 
transportation, and is at present general 
passenger manager for the Southwest of 
the International Mercantile Marine Com 
pany, having held this position since Feb., 
1903. Mr. Bain is, however, most generally 
known as one of the leading amateur pho 



tographers of the United States. He has 
traveled through the Holy Land extensively 
and the results of his travels appear in his 
illustration of several works on the Bible 
from photographs made during his jour 
neys. Mr. Bain was a member of the 
Missouri legislature from 1881 to 1883, and 
for ten years was president of the St. 
Louis Photographic Club. He married, 
Nov. 3, 1880, Mary Valle. Office: Cen 
tury Building, -St. Louis. 

BAINBRIDGE, Oliver: 

Lecturer, author and explorer. Mr. Bain- 
bridge is British-born, but aptly desig 
nated a " citizen of the world whose heart 
is no island cut off from other lands but a 
continent that joins them." He has traveled 
200.000 miles and penetrated the unfamiliar 
regions of the earth, mingled with every 
color, sort and condition of mankind. He 
enjoys the personal acquaintance of nearly 
every ruler in the world, has received many 
honors from various countries and fellow 
ships from geographical, literary and scien 
tific societies for his notable contributions 
to the world of science. He discovered the 
Black Jews in the Gulf of Papua. Mr. 
Bainbridge was the first scientist to visit 
the Chinese Jews in Raifengfu the ancient 
capital of China, where he discovered a 
! sepher, sepher Torah and an old , long, nar 
row stone in the side of an empty mud hut 
j which bore traces of an inscription, dealing 
I with these strange -people. He is author of 
| Hidden Jewish Tribes ; The Devil s Note Book ; 
| Pacific Kindred, etc., and is an occasional 
j contributor to leading magazines arid jour- 
I nals throughout the world on Travel and 
i Education. Mr. Bainbridge lectures before 
I educational institutions and learned societies 
in the principal countries on these subjects 
and has cooperated with nearly every de- 
\ partment of public instruction in existence. 
! He owns the largest collection of auto- 
I graphed photographs and letters from digni- 
; taries and celebrities in the world. Acl- 
: dress: 2227 Maplewood Ave., Toledo, Ohio. 

BAINBRIDGE, William Seaman: 

Physician and surgeon; born in Provi- 
I dence, R. L, Feb. 17, 1870; son of William 



78 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Fohvell and Lucy Elizabeth (Seaman) 
B^iinbridge. He was educated at the Mo- 
hegan Lake School at Peekskill, N. Y., and 
he received the degree of A.M. from Shurt- 
leff College, and M.S. from Washington 
and Jefferson; was graduated from the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons of New 
i ork (Medical Department of Columbia 
University) with the degree of M.D. in 
1890. In June, 1907, the Western Univer 
sity of Pennsylvania conferred upon him 
the degree of Sc.D. He was for over two 
years on the house staff of the Presbyterian 
Hospital of New York City, and later was 
physician of the Sloane Maternity Hos 
pital. He was a graduate student of Co 
lumbia University, for one winter, in 
bacteriology, and has been abroad seven 
times, several times professionally, and 
twice to study. In all he has spent about 
four years abroad, part of the time in 
China, Japan and India. He was quiz 
master at the College of Physicians and Sur 
geons, 1894-189(5, and he volunteered as 
surgeon in the Spanish-American War, 
but did not see any active service. He was 
formerly for years adjunct professor of 
gynecology at the New York Post-Gradu 
ate Medical School and Hospital; and is 
no\v surgeon and gynecologist to the New 
York Skin and Cancer Hospital; attending 
surgeon to the Ne\v York City Children s 
Hospitals and Schools; is clinical professor 
of surgery, New York Polyclinic Medical 
School and Hospital ; consulting gynecolo 
gist to St. Andrew s Convalescent Hospital 
and St. Mary s Hospital, Jamaica, Long 
Island, and consulting surgeon to the Man 
hattan State Hospital, Ward s Island, and 
to the New York Home for Dependent 
Crippled Children; associate surgeon Wom 
an s Hospital. Dr. Bainbridge, when a 
student, was graduated as senior captain 
from the Mohegan Lake School; served one 
year in Cadet Company of the Thirteenth 
Regiment, National Guard of the State of 
New York, years ago; and was for a time 
Burgeon-general, with rank of brigadier- 
general, of the Boys Brigade of America. 
He is a member of the Delta Upsilon fra 
ternity, of the American Medical Associa 
tion, of the New York Academy of Medi 



cine, New York State Medical Society, 
Greater New York Medical Association, 
Alumni Societies of the Presbyterian Hos 
pital and Sloane Maternity Hospital, etc., 
and was honorary president of the Heidel 
berg Congress on Cancer, held in Septem 
ber, 1907. He has been an extensive con 
tributor to medical and scientific literature, 
and is author of: Life s Day; Guide Posts 
and Danger Signals in Health; Our Unseen 
Foes, a work on bacteriology, and The 
Growing Years (both based on lectures de 
livered at Chautauqua, and populo-scientific 
in character) ; also of a Compond of Opera 
tive Gynecology, published by the Grafton 
Press, New York City, and many scientific 
papers. Dr. Bainbridge is a bachelor, and 
a member of the Quill and Students Club. 
Address: (summer) Hotel Athenaeum, 
Chautauqua, N. Y.: (winter) 34 Gramercy 
Park, New York City. 

BAIR, Joseph Hershey: 

Professor of psychology; born at Hall, 
Pa., in 187-~>; son of Daniel and Anna 
(Hershey) Bair. He studied at Lafayette 
j College, and at the University of Michigan, 
j ffom which he was graduated in 1899 
j with degree of A.B. He also received the 
advanced degrees of A.M., in 1900, from 
the University of Michigan, and Ph.D., in 
! in 1902 from Columbia University. In 
j 1901 he took up work as a research fel 
low in the Carnegie Institute, in which he 
j continued until 1902, when he went to 
| Columbia University as assistant in an- 
| thropology. From 1903 to 1907 he was 
professor of psychology in the University 
I of Colorado, at Boulder, and in 1907 he 
| retired from active university work, and 
is devoting himself to research and to the 
publication of several books upon which he 
has been working for several years. He 
is also connected with several mining, pow-. 
er and other enterprises. In 1902 he was 
elected to membership in the Columbia 
Chapter of the Sigma Xi honor society, 
and in the same year became a fellow of 
the American Association for the Advance 
ment of Science. He is also a member of 
the American Psychological Association, the 
Western Association of College Teachers of 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Education, the Colorado Scientific Society 
and the Boulder Commercial Association. 
Dr. Bair married at Jersey Shore, Pa., 
July, 1904, Elizabeth B. Hill, and they 
have two sons. Address: 4224 Chestnut 
Street, Philadelphia. 

BAIRD, George Washington: 

Engineer and rear admiral U. S. N., re 
tired; born in Washington, D. C., April 22, 
1843; son of Matthew and Ophelia (Cau- 
thorn) Baird. He was educated in public 
and private schools in Washington, D. C., 
and in 1862 entered the U. S. Navy as third 
assistant engineer. He served through the 
grades in the Engineer service of the Navy, 
becoming chief engineer in 1892; was trans 
ferred to the Line in 1891; and retired 
with the rank of rear admiral, U. S. N., 
1905. He invented Baird s fresh water 
distiller, an evaporator, steam trap, steer 
ing gear, steam heater, etc.; designed the 
first steam capstan used in the U. S. Navy; 
he also designed the system of ventilation 
by aspiration. He served in the Missis 
sippi, Calhoun, Kensington and Pensacola, 
during the Civil War, and was under fire 
twenty-three times. During the Spanish 
War he was superintendent of the State, 
War and Navy Building, but did Navy 
duty in examining mechanical recruits. 
Rear-Admiral Baird was formerly presi 
dent of the Board of Education, of Wash 
ington, D. C. ; is past president of the 
Navy Mutual Aid Association; past presi 
dent of the American Society of Naval 
Engineers; past grand master of Freema 
sons; member of the National Geographic 
Society, the Washington Society of Engi 
neers, Society of Naval Architects and 
Marine Engineers, Sons of the American 
Revolution and the Cosmos Club of Wash 
ington. He married in Washington, Nov. 
20, 1873, Lyle J. Prather. Address: 1505 
Rhode Island Avenue, Washington, D. C. 

BAIRD, Henry Carey: 

Publisher and bookseller; born at Brides- 
burg, Pa,, (Frankfort! Arsenal), Sept. 10. 
1825; son of Captain Thomas James of the 
U. S. Artillery and of Eliza Catherine 
(Carey) Baird, daughter of Mathcw Carey. 



79 

He was the pioneer publisher of industrial 
books in America. He is a writer on eco 
nomic questions, and lecturer, and has been 
a pamphleteer for half a century at his 
own cost. He is an ardent unflagging Pro 
tectionist, claiming that through this pol 
icy diversified industries are built up, 
the natural law of association and combi 
nation among men complied with, through 
which alone civilization can be assured. 
| Mr. Baird has served as an expert witness 
before Committees of the House of Repre 
sentatives on Currency, and on Ways and 
Means, and also before the Monetary Com 
mission of 1876. He was Greenback candi 
date for mayor of Philadelphia, and was 
nominated by the Greenback Convention for 
| State treasurer of Pennsylvania, but de- 
j clined. He is head of the firm of Henry 
j Carey Baird & Company, publishers. Mr. 
| Baird married in Philadelphia, Sept. 26, 
1 1850, Elizabeth Davis, daughter of John 
Pennington (she died, 1901), and they 
have had one daughter. Address: 810 
Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

BAIRD, Julian William: 

Chemist and educator; born in Battle 
Creek, Mich., Feb. 14, 1859; son of Abram 
Henry and Sarah Elizabeth (W T agoner) 
Baird. He was graduated from the Uni 
versity of Michigan as A.B. in 1882 and 
as M.A. and Ph.C. in 1883. He then at- 
I tended Harvard University Medical School 
I from which he was graduated as M.D. in 
j 1890. Dr. Baird was assistant in quanti- 
| tative chemical analysis in the University 
of Michigan, in 1882-1883, instructor in 
| charge of qualitative chemical analysis and 
in assaying in Lehigh University from 
1883 to 1886, and has been professor of ana 
lytical and organic chemistry, since 1886, 
I at the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 
at Boston, of which institution he has also 
been dean since 1897. He is a member of 
! the American Chemical Society; American 
i Pharmaceutical Association; American 
I Medical Association; the Society of Chem- 
! ical Industry (London); Massachusetts 
i Medical Society, and Boston Society of 
i Medical Science; and he is honorary mem- 



MEN OF AMERICA, 



her of the Masachusetts State Pharma 
ceutical Association. He married at La- 
eonia, N. H., Oct. 25, 1897, Hattie Bell 
Ellin wood, and they have one daughter. 
Residence: 102 St. Botolph Street. Of 
fice: Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 
Boston. 

BAKER, Alfred L.: 

Banker and broker; born in Boston. 
Mass., April 30, 1859; son of Addison and 
Maria (Mudge) Baker. He was educated 
at the Lynn High School, Lynn, Mass., and 
was admitted to the bar of Essex County, 
Mass, at Lynn, in 1881, removed to Chi 
cago in 188G, and practised law under the 
firm name of Baker & Greeley until he 
went into stocks and bonds in 1896; and 
he purchased in Oct.,, 1896, a membership 
in the New York Stock Exchange, of which 
he is still a member, also vice-president of 
the National City Bank of Chicago. He 
is vice-president and director of the Chi 
cago and Calumet Canal and Dock Co. 
Mr. Baker was president of the Chicago 
Stock Exchange three years, from 1898 to 
1900, and is still a director of that body, 
and was president of the Merchants Club 
of Chicago in 1905. He was president for 
five years of the Onwentsia Club, and is 
president of the Board of Trustees of Lake 
Forest University, governor of the Soci 
ety of Colonial Wars, and a member of 
the Society of Mayflower Descendants. Mr. 
Baker married at Chicago, 111., June 6, 
1894, Mary Corwith, and they have two 
children: Isabelle, born in 1897, and Mary 
Landon, born in 1901. Residence: Lake 
Forest, 111. Oflice: 209 La Salle Street, 
Chicago. 

BAKER, Charles Whiting: 

Editor, civil engineer; born at Johnson, 
Lamoille County, Vermont, Jan. 17, 1865; 
son of Thomas Jefferson Baker and Mat- 
tie (Whiting) Baker. He was educated at 
the Vermont State Normal School and the 
University of Vermont, from which he was 
graduated as C.E. in 1886. He was a 
draughtsman at the Baldwin Locomotive 
Works, Philadelphia, 1886-1887, and has 
been on the editorial staff since 1887, and 



chief editor since 1895 of the Engineering 
News, New York City, and is vice-president 
and a director of the Engineering News 
Publishing Company. He is a Congrega- 
tionalist in religious affiliation; a member 
of the American Society of Mechanical En 
gineers, the American Economic Associa- 
I tion, and the Phi Delta Theta fraternity. 
! He is author of Monopolies and the People 
I (Putnam). He married, June 4, 1890, Re- 
bekah Wheeler, of Burlington, Vermont, 
! and they have two sons. Residence : Fern 
i Hill, 20 South Mountain Avenue, Mont- 
clair, N. J. Address : 220 Broadway, New 
York City. 

BAKER, Fisher A.: 

Lawyer; born in Dedham, Mass., Feb. 
8, 1837; son of John and Patty (Ellis) 
Baker. He was graduated from Dartmouth 
College, A.B., 1859. and studied in the Al 
bany Law School. He served, during the 
Civil War, in the 18th Massahusetts Volun 
teers with the Fifth Corps of the Army of 
the Potomac. Mr. Baker was admitted to 
the bar in 1860, and has practised law in 
New York City from 1865. He is a trus 
tee of the Bankers Safe Deposit Company; 
and director of the First Security Com 
pany, First National Bank of the City of 
New York, and the New Jersey General 
Security Company. He is a trustee of the 
Hackley School at Tarrytown, N. Y., mem 
ber of the Alpha Delta Vhi fraternity, Phi 
Beta Kappa Society, Military Order of the 
Loyal Legion and the Unitarian Club of 
New York. He married, May 25, 1869 
Catherine W. Fisher. Residence: Yonkers, 
N. Y. Office: 2 Wall Street, New York 
City. 

BAKER, Francis E. : 

LTnited States circuit judge; born in 

Goshen, Ind., Oct. 20, 1860; son of Judge 

John H. and Harriet (Defrees) Baker. He 

| was educated in the Indiana State Univer- 

j sity and at the University of Michigan, from 

j which he was graduated A.B., 1882, being 

class poet, and he was literary editor of 

the University Chronicle during the last 

two years at college. He entered his fath- 

er s law office in 1882, and in 1885 be- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



81 



came his partner in the firm of linker & 
Baker at Goshen, Ind., until his father he- 
cune United States judge in 18!)2. and 
after that as bond of the firm of linker and 
Miller, who were attorneys for the Lake 
Shore and Michigan Southern Railway and 
other corporations, until he was elected a 
judge of the Supreme Court of Indiana in 
1899 and lie held that office until appointed, 
Feb. 4, 1902. to his present oih ce of judge 
of the United States Circuit Court for the 
Seventh Circuit. Judge Baker is a mem 
ber of the Columbia and Marion Clubs at 
Indianapolis, the University Club and Chi 
cago Atheletic Association of Chicago, and 
an honorary member of the Union League 
Club of Chicago. Residence: Goshen, hid. 
Official addresses: Chicago and Indianapo 
lis, Ind. 

BAKER, Frank: 

Superintendent of the well-known xot>- 
logical gardens in Washington, D. C., which 
are under the direction of the Smithsonian 
Institution. Mr. Baker was graduated 
from the National Medical College, now a 
part of George Washington University of 
Washington, in 1880. Since 1883 he lias 
been professor of anatomy at Georgetown 
University, and for many years superin 
tendent of the National Zoological Park. 
He has written a large number of articles 
on anatomy for text and reference books. 
He is secretary of the Washington Aca 
demy of Sciences, and a member of the 
American Naturalists Association, Society 
of American Anatomists, National Geo 
graphic Society, Sons of the American Revo 
lution, and several scientific societies in 
Washington. He married at Sedgwick, 
Maine, Sept. 13-, 1873, May E. Cole. Address : 
1728 Columbia Road, Washington. 

BAKER, Frank Collins: 

Zoologist; born in Warren, R. L, Dec. 14, 
18G7. He studied at Brown University, 
1888-1889, was Jesup scholar at the Aca 
demy of Natural Sciences at Philadelphia 
1889-1890, was in charge of the Inverte 
brate Department of Ward s Natural 
Science Establishment at Rochester, N. Y. 
1891-1892; curator of zoology in the 
6 



Field Columbian .Museum. Chicago, in 1894, 
and was curator 181)4-18!)!) and since then 
has been director of the Chicago Academy 
of Sciences, of which he was also secretary. 
LS!)1-18!)2. He is a member of the Ameri 
can Association of Museums; the Natural 
ist Society of the Central -States ; Illinois 
State Academy of Sciences, American Asso 
ciation for the Advancement of Science, 
and the. Illinois Audubon Society, of which 
he has been vice-president from 1896, and 
he is a fellow of the Rochester Academy of 
Sciences, and was its secretary in 1891- 
1892. He has Avritten extensively on mol- 
lusca and on museum administration. 
Residence: 717 Pine Grove Avenue. Of 
fice: Chicago Academy of Sciences, Lin 
coln Park, Chicago. 

BAKER, Franklin Thomas: 

Educator and author; born in Hagerstown, 
Md.. Sept. 12, 1804; son of .John Henry and 
Julia (McCoy) Baker. He was graduated 
from the high school at Hagerstown, Md., 
then entered Dickinson College from which 
lie was graduated as A.B. in 1885. He af 
terward received the degree of A.M. both 
from Dickinson College and Columbia Uni 
versity, and the degree of Litt.D. fro n 
Dickinson College. He was a teacher in 
Ihe Dickinson Preparatory School from 
18S7 to 1892: instructor in Teachers Col 
lege, from 1892 to 1893; and has been pro 
fessor of English in Teachers Collcu . 
Columbia University, since 1893. He was a 
lecturer at the Brooklyn Institute 1898- 
1900. Mr. Baker has contributed nu 
merous papers to educational periodi 
cals. He edited De Quincey s Revolt of -the 
Tartars (Sibley & Company) ; Browning s 
Shorter Poems (Macmillan) ; Macaulay s 
Poems (Macmillan) ; Tennyson s Princess 
(Appleton); The De Coverley Papers (Ap 
plet on). Mrs. GaskelPs Cranford (Long 
mans), and he is joint author of: The 
Teaching of English (Longmans) the Lan 
guage Reader Series (Macmillan), and an 
English Composition (Holt). Professor 
Baker married in Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 
15, 1896, Emilie A. Kip, and they have 
three children. Address: Park Hill, Yon- 
kers, N. Y. 



82 

BAKER, George Fisher: 

Banker; born in Troy, N. Y., March 27, 
1840. He is president of the First National 
Bank; a director of the Astor National 
Bank, the Long Island Water Supply Com 
pany, and the New York and Long Branch 
Railroad Company; vice-president and di 
rector in Bankers Safe Deposit Co., and 
director in various railroad and financial 
corporations. He is a member of the Met 
ropolitan, Lawyers, New York Yacht, Tux 
edo and Riding Clubs, and of the Music 
Art Society. Residence: 258 Madison 
Avenue. Office: 2 Wall Street, New York 
City. 

BAKER. James Hutchins: 

President of the University of Colorado; 
born at Harmony, Somerset County, Maine, 
Oct. 13, 1848; son of Wesley and Lucy 
(Hutchins) Baker. He was graduated from 
Bates College, A.B., 1873, and received 
from that college the degree of LL.D. in 
1892. He was principal of the Yarmouth 
(Maine) High School, 1873-1875; principal 
of the Denver High School, 1875-1892, and 
since then has been president of the Uni 
versity of Colorado. Dr. Baker was presi 
dent of the National Council of Education, 
1892; president of the National Associa 
tion of State Universities, 1907, and has 
served as a member of the National Com 
mittee of Ten on Secondary Education; 
and he is a fellow of the American Asso 
ciation for the Advancement of Science, 
and a member of the Colorado Scientific So 
ciety and of the University Club of Den 
ver. He is author of: Elementary Psychol 
ogy; Education and Life; American Prob 
lems. He married in Denver, June 20, 
1882, Jennie V. Hilton, and they have two 
children. Address: Boulder, Colo. 

BAKER, Jennie Van Holland: 

Physician and surgeon; born in Brook 
lyn, N. Y., May 25, 1851 daughter of James 
and Eliza Jane (Harned) Van Holland. 
She was educated in the Brooklyn public 
schools and was graduated from the New- 
York Medical College and Hospital for 
Women with the degree of M.D. She mar 
ried in Brooklyn, June 20, 1877, Mills P. 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Baker, Jr., who died in 1879, and since 1882 
she has been practising medicine in Brook 
lyn; and she is now chief of staff of the 
Memorial Hospital for Women and Chil 
dren, Brooklyn, a member of the Board of 
Managers of that institution and a trus 
tee of the Memorial Dispensary for Women 
and Children. Dr. Baker is a member of 
the Kings County Homeopathic Medical 
Society, New York State Homeopathic Med 
ical Society, American Institute of Hom 
eopathy, and of the Alumni Association of 
the New York Medical College and Hospi 
tal for Women, a member of the National 
Woman Suffrage Association, the Brooklyn 
League and the Brooklyn Woman s and 
Chiropean Clubs. Address: 512 Bedford 
Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

BAKER, Ray Stannard: 

Writer, editor; born in Lansing, Mich., 
April 17, 1870; son of Joseph Stannard 
and Alice (Potter) Baker. He was edu 
cated at the Michigan Agricultural College 
from which he was graduated as B.S. in 
1889; and he took a partial literary and 
law course at the University of Michigan. 
He was formerly associate editor of Mc- 
Clure s Magazine, and is now associate edi 
tor of The American Magazine. He is a 
director of Phillips Publishing Company. 
Mr. Baker is the author of several books, 
notably: Following the Color Line, a study 
of the Negro race in the United States; 
Seen in Germany; The Boys Book of In 
ventions; New Ideals in Healing and oth 
ers. He has also written many series of 
magazine articles, being one of the coterie 
of magazine writers who helped to create 
the social and economic agitation of 1905- 
1907. Mr. Baker married at Lansing, 
Mich., Jan. 2, 1896, Jessie I. Beal, daugh 
ter of Dr. W. J. Beal, and they have four 
children. Address: Care of Phillips Pub 
lishing Company, 341 Fifth Avenue, New 
York City. 

BALDWIN, Evelyn Briggs: 

Arctic explorer; born in Springfield, Mo.. 
July 22, 1862. He was graduated from 
Northwestern College, Naperville, 111., and 
was in early life a teacher and superin- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



83 



tendent of schools. In 1892 he became con 
nected with the United States Weather Bu 
reau, serving as an observer for eight years. 
While connected with the Bureau he ac 
companied the Peary North Greenland Ex 
pedition, 1893-1894, as meteorologist, and 
in 1897 attempted to join the Andre polar 
expedition, but arrived at Spitzbergen too 
late to do so. In 1898 he accompanied the 
Wellman Polar Expedition to Franz-Josef 
Land as meteorologist, and in connection 
with that expedition discovered and explor 
ed Graham Bell Land. On his .return to 
the United States he severed his connec 
tion with the Weather Bureau and began 
the development of independent polar ex 
peditions, organizing the Bald win- Ziegler 
polar expedition in 1901-1902, which estab 
lished depots of supplies for use in pro 
posed attempts to reach the Pole. He con 
tinues to be engaged in matters relating to 
arctic research, and has added materially to 
the knowledge of arctic conditions by his 
explorations and by his numerous writ 
ings and reports. Pie is a member of the 
National Geographic Society and is a 
32-degree Mason, and a member of the New 
York Yacht Club. Address: 37 \Y. 44th 
Street, Xew York City. 

BALDWIN, James Mark: 

Psychologist and educator ; born in Co 
lumbia, S. C., Jan. 12, 1861; son of Hon. 
Cyrus H. Baldwin, U. S. sub-treasurer, and 
of Lydia Eunice (Ford) Baldwin; descend 
ant of the Buckinghamshire (England) 
family of Baldwins. He was graduated 
from Princeton as A.B. in 1884, and re 
ceived from the same college the degree of 
A.M. in 1887 and Ph. I), in 1889; stud 
ied in the Universities of Leipzig and Ber 
lin in 1884-1885; received from the Uni 
versity of Oxford the degree of Sc.D. in 
1900 (this being the first honorary degree 
in science ever conferred by that univer 
sity), and degrees of LL.D. from the Uni 
versity of Glasgow, 1901, and the Univer 
sity of South Carolina, 1905. He was fel 
low and instructor in Princeton, 1885-1887. 
professor of philosophy in Lake Forest Uni 
versity, 1887-1890; professor of logic and 
metaphysics in the University of Toronto, 



I 1890-1893; Stuart professor of psychology 
in Princeton University, 1893-1903; since 
I 1903 professor of philosophy and psychol- 
! ogy in Johns Hopkins University. Dr. 
| Baldwin has an international reputation as 
I a teacher and writer on psychology; is edi- 
I tor of a three volume Dictionary of Philos 
ophy and Psychology which is probably the 
most frequently consulted reference book on 
i those subjects ; has edited other reference 
! books on psychology and philosophy, and 
I has been editor of the Psychological Review 
I since 1894. He is author of the Handbook 
| of Psychology (two volumes) ; Elements of 
! Psychology; Mental Development in the 
j Child and the Race; Social and Ethical 
! Interpretations; Story of the Mind; Devel- 
I opment and Evolution; Fragments of Phi- 
I losophy and Science; Thoughts and Things, 
i or Genetic Logic (three volumes) and of 
! a translation of Ribot s German Psychology 
i of To-day. Dr. Baldwin was vice-president 
of the International Psychological Con 
gresses held in London in 1892 and at Mu- 
| nich in 1896; honorary president of the 
Congress of Criminal Anthropology, held at 
Geneva in 1896; president of the American 
Psychological Association in 1897; and is a 
member of the American Philosophical So 
ciety; London Aristotelian Society, London 
i Sociological Society, the Paris Institute of 
Sociology (one of three American mem 
bers), Belgian Pedagogical Society, and the 
Southern Society of Philosophy and Psy 
chology, of which he was president, 1904- 
| 1907. He was awarded the gold medal of 
j the Royal Academy of Science of Denmark 
in 1897 (never awarded to anyone else in 
America, before or since). His books have 
been translated into several foreign lan- 
; guages. An estimate of Dr. Baldwin s con 
tributions to science, from the pen of Pro- 
I fessor of A. T. Ormond, is to be found in 
: the volume "A Score of Years, 1884-1904" 
(Scribner s, 1904). He married, in 1888, 
1 Helen Hayes Green, daughter of Rev. Wil- 
! liani Henry Green, D.D., president of 
i Princeton Theological Seminary, and they 
i have two daughters, known to the readers 
of their father s books as "H" and " E." 
Address: Johns Hopkins University, Bal 
timore, Md. 



1865- 
Olive 

in th 



S4 

BALDWIN, Leroy Wilbur: 

Hanker; l.orn in Rutland. VI., Oct. 31, 
son of Warner 11. Haldwin and Mary 
(Hatch) IV.ildNYin. Ho was educated 
Hut hind High School and private 
schools, lie Logan his business career in 
1880, and he is now president and directo 
of the Empire Trust Company, and the 
Rutland & Woodstock Company, and is a 
director of the Wisconsin Central Railway 
Company, Hungarian American Bank, Cen 
tury Bank, American Automatic Weighing 
Machine Company Limited, of England; 



the Rutland Railway, Light and Power 
Company: the Union Ferry Company of 
Brooklyn, the American Mutoscope and Bi- 
ograph Company. Mr. Baldwin married in 
New York City, 1 in 1890, Ettie Lucile Field. 
Residence: 8 East Seventieth Street. Of 
fice: 42 Broadway, New York City. 

BALDWIN, Simeon Eben: 

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of 
Errors of Connecticut; born in New Haven, 
Conn., Feb. 5, 1840; son of Hon. Roger 
Sherman Baldwin, LL.D., governor of Con 
necticut and United States Senator, and 
grandson of Hon. Simeon Baldwin, judge 
of the Supreme Court of Errors. He was 
educated in Hopkins Grammar School of 
New Haven, at Yale College, from which 
he was graduated as A.B. in 1861. and at 
Yale and Harvard Law Schools, and he re 
ceived the degree of A.M. from Yale and 
in 1891, the degree of LL.D. from Harvard 
University. He engaged in the practice of 
law in New Haven, and was a member of 
State Commissions to revise the Education 
Laws, 1872, and General Statutes in 1873- 
1874, the Civil Procedure Laws, in 1878- 
1S79, Taxation in 1885-1887. He was asso 
ciate justice of the Supreme Court of Con 
necticut from 1893 to 1907, becoming chief 
justice of that court in 1907. He has been 
professor of constitutional and private in 
tornational law in Yale University since 
1872. He was president of the New Haven 
Colony Historical Society, 1884-1896; of 
the American Bar Association, 1890; of the 
American Social Science Association, 1897- 
1899; of the Connecticut Archreological 
Society, 1899-1901; of the International 



MEN OF AMERICA. 

.aw Association of London, 1899-1901; of 
he Association of American Law Schools, 
902-1903; of the American Historical As- 
ociation in 1905, etc. He is a member of 
he American Antiquarian Society, and of 
he National Institute of Arts and Letters 
Hid corresponding member of the Massa- 
ihusetts Historical Society. He is author 
>f Baldwin s Connecticut Digest; Modern 
^olitical Institutions; Baldwin s lllustra- 
ive Cases on Railroad Law; American 
lailroad Law; The American Judiciary; 
ind co-author of: Two Centuries Growth 
)f American Law. He is a member of the 



l ale Club of New York City and the Grad- 
mtes, Club of New Haven. Judge Baldwin 
named, in 1865, Susan Winchester, of Bos 
ton. Address: 44 Wall Street, New 
EEaven, Conn. 
BALDWIN, William James: 

Mechanical engineer and expert on hea*,- 
ng and ventilating. Mr. Baldwin was born 
m shipboard, June 14, 1844, his father hav 
ing been a shipmaster. His birth was re 
corded at Waterford, Ireland. He received 
special training in marine architecture, 
liul, during the Civil War, was engaged in 
special work in naval construction, having 
begun his career as mechanical engineer 
in 1862. He is now lecturer and professor 
of engineering at the Brooklyn Polytech 
nic Institute, and is best known for his ex 
tensive writings on subjects connected with 
the heating and ventilating of buildings, 
his work on steam-heating and on the ven 
tilation of schoolrooms, and those on the 
mechanical details of heating and ventilat 
ing problems being the standard works on 
such subjects. He is a member of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers, Amer 
ican Society of Mechanical Engineers, and 
an associate member of the American Insti 
tute of Architects. From 1881 to 1890 he 
was associate editor of the Engineering 
Record. Residence: 151 Halsey Street, 
Brooklyn. Office: " World Building," New 
York. 
BALL, James Mocres: 

Physician; born at West Union, Towa, 
Sept. 4, 1862; son of Dr. James Moores 
and Martha (Glover) Ball. He studied 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



medicine at the Iowa State University, 
Iowa City, Iowa, graduating with the de 
gree of M. I), in 1884 and inking further 
work in New York City and abroad. Dr. 
Ball has made a speciality of diseases of 
the eye, to which lie now gives his entire 
time and on which topic he holds the chair 
at the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
in St. Louis, Mo.; having been appointed 
in 1894. He has also been oculist to Jef 
ferson Hospital, to the City Hospital, and 
to the Convent of the Good Shepherd in 
the same city. He is a member of the 
American Medical Association and of num 
erous other American professional socie 
ties. He has published a number of arti 
cles on his specialty, and is the author of 
Ball s Modern Ophthalmology (1904). He 
was for two years editor of the Annals of 
Ophthalmology. Residence: 4374 Wash- 
ington Boulevard. Address: 4500 Olive 
Street, St. Louis, Mo. 

BALL, Thomas: 

Painter, sculptor; born in Charlestown, 
Mass., June 3, 1819; son of Thomas Ball 
and Elisabeth Wyer (Hall) Ball. He was 
educated in a public school at Boston, 
Mass.. and he received the honorary de 
gree of A.M. from Dartmouth College in 
1800. He was sculptor of the equestrian 
statue of Washington in Boston; the Wash 
ington Monument in Methuen, Mass., and 
statues of Daniel Webster. He resided for 
many years in Florence, Italy. He became 
an honorary fellow of the National Sculp 
ture Society in 1890. Mr. Ball is author 
of My Three Score Years and Ten, an au 
tobiography, and also various poems. He 
mnrried in Boston, in 1854, Ellen Louisa 
Wild, and they have a married daughter. 
Residence: 105 Upper Montclair Av., 
Montclair, N. J. Studio: 205 East 17th 
Street, New York. 

BALLANTINE, William Gay: 

Former president of Oberlin College; 
born in Washington, D. C.. Dec. 7, 1848; 
son of Prof. Elisha Ballantine, LL.D. He 
was graduated from Marietta College, Ohio, 
as A.B. in 18(18, and from the Union Theo 
logical Seminary in New York in 1872; and 



he took post-graduate work at the LTniver- 
sity of Leipzig in 1872-1873. He was a 
member of the American Palestine Exploring 
Expedition in 1873; professor of chemistry 
and natural science at Ripon College, 1874- 
187(5; assistant professor of Greek in the 
University of Indiana, 187G to 1878. From 
1878 to 1881 he was professor of Greek 
and Hebrew in Oberlin Theological Semi 
nary, and was professor of Old Testament 
languages and literature from 1881 to 
1891; and president of Oberlin College 
from 1891 to 1896, when he resigned and 
went to Greece to study. Since 1897 pro 
fessor of the Bible at the International 
Y 7 . M. C. A. Training School, Springfield, 
Mass. He received the degree of D.D. from 
.Marietta College in 1885, and of LL.D. 
from the Western Reserve University in 
1891. He was editor of the Bibliotheca 
Sacra from 1884 to 1891. He is author of 
a work on Inductive Logic. Address: 
Springfield, Mass. 

BALLINGER, Richard Achilles: 

Secretary of the Interior; born at Boones- 
boro, Iowa, July 9, 1858; son of Richard 
H., and Mary E. (Norton) Ballinger. He 
was graduated from Williams College in 
1884 with the degree of A.B., and taking 
up the study of law at Chicago, was ad 
mitted to the bar of the State of Illinois 
in 188(5. In 1890 he was made United 
States Court Commissioner at Port Town- 
send, Washington, and in 1894 was elected 
judge of the Superior Court of Jefferson 
County. Mr. Ballinger is a Republican, 
and was elected in 1904 as mayor of Seat 
tle for a term of two years; arid he was ap 
pointed by President Roosevelt, March 4, 
1907, as commissioner of the General Land 
Office of the United States, which he re 
signed early in 1908, resuming the prac 
tice of law, until called into the Cabinet by 
President Taft, March 4, 1909, as Secre 
tary of the Interior. He is a member of 
the Loyal Legion. Mr. Ballinger is author 
of numerous legal works, among them be 
ing: Ballinger On Community Property; 
and Ballinger s Annotated Codes and Stat 
utes of Washington. He married Oct. 2(5, 
188(5, Julia A. Bradley, of Lee, Mass., and 



si; 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



has two children. Address: Department 
of the Interior, Washington, D. C. 

BAMFORD, Mary Ellen: 

Author; born at Hcaldsburg, Calif., Dec. 
10, 1857; daughter of Dr. William and 
Cornelia Elizabeth (Rand) Bamford. Her 
father was a pioneer physician who went 
across the plains in the early 50s, and her 
mother, a native of New Hampshire, went 
to California, 1854-1855, by a long voyage 
around Cape Horn. Miss Bamford was 
educated in the high school of Oakland, 
Calif., and was for four years an assistant 
in the Oakland Free Public Library. Her 
father was a contributor to the Western 
Lancet, and her mother wrote a good deal 
for the New York Independent, New York 
Observer and other papers. Miss Bamford 
is author of twenty books: L T p and Down 
the Brooks, My Land and Water Friends; 
The Look About Club; Second Year of the 
Look About Club; Her Twenty Heathen; 
In Eclitha s Days; Jessie s Three Resolu 
tions ; Three Roman Girls ; Miss Millie s 
Trying; Father Lambert s Family; A 
Piece of Kitty Hunter s Life; Thoughts of 
My Dumb Neighbors; Out of the Triangle, 
(first published serially, winning first 
prize of $250 for serial, offered by David 
C. Cook Co., Chicago) ; Ti ; The Donby Chil 
dren at the Fair; Eleanor and I; Marie s 
Story; Talks by Queer Folks; Janet and 
Her Father; Number One or Number Two; 
also a pamphlet on Burma; the Work and 
tlie Workers, (published by the Woman s 
Baptist Foreign Missionary Society), and 
much writing for the Youth s Companion 
(Boston), Cook s publications (Chicago) 
and the publications of the different de 
nominational boards. Miss Bamford is 
secretary for North and Central Cali 
fornia for the Woman s Baptist Foreign 
Missionary Society of the West, (head 
quarters, Chicago). Address: 621 East 
15th Street, East Oakland, Calif. 

BANCROFT, Edgar Addison: 

Lawyer; born at Galesburg, 111., Nov. 20, 

1857; son of Addison N. and Catherine 

Blair) Bancroft. He was graduated in 

1878 with the degree of A.B. from Knox 



College at Galesburg, and from the law 
department of Columbia University as LL. 
B., in 1880. He was admitted to the bar of 
Illinois in 1880 and began to practise law 
at Calesburg. In 1892 Mr. Bancroft gave 
up the general practice of law and, becom 
ing counsel for Illinois of the Atchison, 
Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad Company, 
held that position for three years. This 
was followed by nine years as general 
counsel, and at the same time vice-presi 
dent, of the Chicago and Western Indiana 
Railroad Company, and The Belt Railway 
Company. In 1904 he severed his connec 
tion with these, and became a member of 
the law firm of Scott. Bancroft & Stephens, 
with which he is still connected. Since 
May, 1907 he has also been general counsel 
of the International Harvester Company. In 
1888 Mr. Bancroft was presidential elector 
of the Republican party and voted for Ben 
jamin Harrison. Pie is author of several 
monographs on legal and political ques 
tions. He was married in New York City. 
April 18. 1896, to Margaret Healy. Resi 
dence: 64 Cedar Street, Chicago. Ad 
dress: 206 La Salle Street, Chicigo, 111. 

BANCROFT, Frederic: 

Historian; born in Galesburg, 111., Oct. 
30, 1860. He was graduated from Am- 
herst as A.B. in 1882, and received the de 
grees of Ph.D. from Columbia, in 1885, -and 
LL.D. from Knox College in 1900. He 
studied law and political science at 
Columbia; studied history, political econ 
omy, and diplomacy at Gottingen, Berlin, 
Freiburg (Baden), and at Ecole des 
Sciences Politiques, Paris; lectured on the 
political history of the Civil War and re 
construction at Amherst in 1888, and was 
chief of the Bureau of Rolls and Library 
of the Department of State, 1888-1892. He 
las also lectured on diplomatic and polit- 
cal history at Columbia, Johns Hopkins, 
and Chicago Universities, has contributed 
:o most of th^ leading reviews and maga 
zines, and has long been on the literary 
staff of the New York Nation. He was a 
lelegate to the Paris Congress of Histor 
ians in 1900, lectured before the Lowell In 
stitute at Boston, in 1903, on Life in the 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Confederacy, and made several trips 
through the Southern States for historical 
purposes. He is author of: The Negro in 
Politics; Life of William IT. Seward (in 
collaboration with Win. A. Dunning) ; A 
Sketch of the Public Life of Carl Schurz, 
and is writing an elaborate history of the 
Southern Confederacy. Address: Wash 
ington, D. C. 

BANCROFT, Hubert Howe: 

Author of West American Histories, 
Book of the Fair, Book of Wealth, Re 
sources of Mexico. The New Pacific, etc.; 
born May 5, 1832. in Granville, Ohio, a 
New England settlement, his mother s 
father, Curtis Howe, coming from Ver 
mont, and his father from Granville. Mass. 
Worked on his father s farm and attended 
the academy until sixteen years of age. 
when he entered, as clerk, a bookstore in 
Buffalo, N. Y.. whose proprietor, three 
years later, sent him with a stock of goods 
to open business in San Francisco, where 
lie arrived in March. 1852. While build 
ing up a large book-selling and publishing 
house, Mr. Bancroft became interested in 
gathering material for the history of this 
new and fascinating land, until his collec 
tion numbered 00.000 books, maps and man 
uscripts, when he erected for it a library 
building on Valencia Street, where it re 
mained until it passed into the possession 
of the University of California, at Berke 
ley. Ambitious at length to reduce this 
vast wealth of material to forms of prac 
tical utility, Mr. Bancroft put at work 
a dozen and more men to sort out, extract, 
and classify the essential facts of history 
and place the results in his hands in 
proper form for writing a series of his 
tories covering the western half of North 
America from Alaska to Panama which 
he had planned. This work covered a 
period of thirty years, and the result was 
the publication of the series, as follows: 
The Native Races of the Pacific States, 
5 vol.; History of Central America, 3 vols.; 
History of Mexico, vols. ; North Mexican 
States and Texas, 2 vols. ; California, 7 
vols. ; Arizona and New Mexico, 1 vol. ; 
Colorado and Wyoming, 1 vol.; Utah and 



87 

Nevada, 1 vol.; Northwest Coast, 2 vols.; 
Oregon, 2 vols.; Washington, Idaho, and 
Montana, 1 vol.; British Columbia, 1 vol.; 
Alaska. 1 vol.; California Pastoral, 1 vol.; 
California Inter Pocola, 1 vol.; Popular 
Tribunals, 2 vols.; Essays and Miscellany, 
1 vol.; Literary Industries, 1 vol. Mr. 
Bancroft married at New Haven, Conn., 
in 1876, Matilda Griffing. and has four 
children, Paul, Philip, Griffing, and Lucy. 
Address: 2898 Jackson Street, San Fran 
cisco. 

BANCROFT, William Amos: 

President of the Boston Elevated Railway 
Company, and the chief factor in the local 
transportation situation in that city. Gen 
eral Bancroft was born in Groton, Mass,, 
April 26, 1855. He was educated at Law 
rence Academy. Phillips Exeter Academy 
and Harvard College, being graduated from 
the last named institution in 1878. He stud 
ied in the Harvard Law School from 1879 to 
1881 and was admitted to the Suffolk bar 
in 1881. Before his connection with the 
Boston Elevated Railway and the transit 
problem in Boston, General Bancroft was 
best known as the best exponent of the 
militia system of Massachusetts. Enlist 
ing in 1875 as a private, he served in all 
grades to major-general, and by his influ 
ence and example, and his untiring work 
in behalf of the Massachusetts Volunteer 
Militia, materially assisted in maintaining 
the efficiency and standing of that branch 
of the service of the United States. Dur 
ing the war with Spain his abilities as a 
military officer were recognized by an ap 
pointment as brigadier-general of the Unit 
ed States Volunteers. General Bancroft 
las taken an active part in the politics of 
Cambridge, where he took up his residence 
on his admission to the bar, and after a 
number of years of service in the city 
government, was elected mayor, serving for 
four years in that position. He has, since 
1885, been in almost continuous connection 
with the surface railway enterprises in and 
around Boston, and in October, 1899, was 
chosen president of the Boston Elevated 
Railway Company, a corporation which, 
with its affiliated and associated concerns, 



ss 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



o-irried on (lie tremendous transportation 
undertaking of carrying to Boston and re 
turning to their more or less suburb;! n 
homes. Hie crowds of people who constitute 
Boston s business and industrial popula 
tion. The marked ability and success with 
which these problems have been met, is 
largely due to General Bancroft s skillful 
direction and to the confidence in his man 
agement which is felt by the patrons of the 
roads under his control. General Bancroft 
has been for many years an overseer of 
Harvard College, and is a director of the 
United States Trust Company, and trustee 
of Norwich University, Vermont, Lawrence 
Academy, Groton, Mass., and Phillips 
Academy, Exeter, N. H. His services are 
frequently in demand for arranging and 
directing the ceremonies on notable public 
occasions. H. is a member of the Cincin 
nati, The Order of Foreign Wars, Order of 
the Spanish War, and of a large number 
of clubs and associations. He married in 
Boston, in 1878, Mary Shaw. Residence: 
12 Ware Street, Cambridge, Mass. Office: 
101 Milk Street, Boston, Mass. 

EANDELIER, Adolph Francis Alphonse: 

Archaeologist; born in Berne. Switzer 
land, Aug. 6, 1840, but came to the United 
States in his youth. From 1880 to 1885 
he was commissioned by the Archaeological 
Institute of America to travel among the 
native races of New Mexico, Arizona, Mexico 
and Central America, and in 1892 went to 
Peru and Bolivia on a scientific expedition 
for Henry Villard. Since that time he has 
continued in exhaustive archaeological, eth 
nological and historical researches in the 
countries named for individuals and insti 
tutions, and the last, from 1894 to 1903, 
was in the employ of the American Mu 
seum of Natural History, for which he 
gathered an extensive collection of Peru 
vian and Bolivian antiquities. He has writ 
ten a large number of books on various 
scientific matters which have been the sub 
ject of his investigations, and has lectured 
on these subjects as his work permitted. 
He returned from Bolivia to North Amer 
ica in 1903, and is now connected with, the 
Hispanic Society of America, Columbia 



University, and with the Cathoiic Cyclo 
pedia. Mr. Bandelier married, first, in 
Highland. 111.. Jan. 10, 1862, Josephine 
Huegy, and second, in Lima, Peru, Dec. 
30, 1893, Fanny Ritter. Address: Care of 
the Hispanic Society of America, 156th 
Street, near Broadway, New York. 

BANGS, John Kendrick: 

Humorist; born in Yonkers, N. Y., May 
27, 18G2; son of Francis N. Bangs and 
Amelia Frances (Bull) Bangs. He was 
graduated from Columbia College as Ph.B. 
in 1883 and studied one year at the 
Columbia Law School. He was associate 
editor of Life from 1884 to 1888; editor 
The Drawer, in Harper s Magazine in 1888 
and 1889, and of Literary Notes in the 
same magazine in 1898 and 1899; w 7 as 
editor of Literature in 1899, and of Har 
per s Weekly from 1898 to 1900, and editor 
of the Metropolitan Magazine in 1903. Mr. 
Bangs is author of: Coffee and Repartee; 
A House Boat on the Styx; R. Holmes & 
Company; A Rebellious Heroine; Mr. 
Bonaparte of Corsica; The Jimmieboy 
Books; Lady Teazle (a comic opera) ; To- 
morrowland, a Musical Fantasy, and many 
other works. Mr. Bangs has been twice 
married, first on March 3, 1886, to Agnes 
Lawson Hyde, and second, April 27, 1904, 
to Mary Blakeney Gray. By his first mar 
riage. Mr. Bangs has three sons. Address : 
Cape Neddick, Me. 

BANKHEAD, John Hollis: 

United States Senator; born in Moscow, 
Ala., Sept. 13, 1842; son of James Greer 
and Susan (Hollis) Bankhead. He is self- 
educated, and from boyhood was engaged as 
a farmer. He served for four years in the 
Confederate Army, as lieutenant and cap 
tain, and was wounded three times. He 
represented Marion County in the General 
Assembly of Alabama in the sessions of 
1865, 1866 and 1867, and was a member of 
the State Senate in 1876 and 1877, and of 
the House of Representatives of Alabama 
in 1880 and 1881. He was warden of the 
Alabama Penitentiary from 1881 to .1885, 
was elected in 1886 to the Fiftieth Con 
gress, and biennially elected thereafter up 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



S .l 



to and including November, 1904, when he 
was elected to the Fifty-ninth Congress 
from Sixth Alabama District. For the 
Sixtieth Congress, in 1900, he was defeated 
by Richmond P. Hobson, but having been 
nominated by the Democratic primary, he 
was appointed in June, 1907, by Governor 
Comer, as United States Senator to succeed 
the late John T. Morgan, and afterward 
elected by the Legislature for the remain 
der of the term expiring March 4, 1913. 
Senator Bankhead is prominent in the Ma 
sonic Order, and was Grand Master of the 
Alabama Grand Lodge in 1880 arid 1881. 
He married at Montgomery, Ala., Nov. 13, 
1800, Tallulah J. Brockman, daughter of 
James Brockman, of the Greenville Dis 
trict, South Carolina. Address : Favette, 
Ala. 

BANKSON, Lloyd: 

Naval Constructor, U. S. Navy; born in 
Philadelphia, Nov. 15, 1857; son of John 
Palmer and Anne Catharine (Ash) Bank- 
son. He was graduated from the Univer 
sity of Pennsylvania (College Depart 
ment), B.Sc. 1877; was graduated from 
the United States Naval Academy as cadet- 
engineer in 1881, and from the Ecole d Ap 
plication du Genie Maritime, France, with 
the degree of Ingenieur, in 1890. He made 
a two years cruise as a cadet on men-of- 
war in European and South American 
waters, served as cadet-engineer, 1881-1883. 
assistant engineer, 1883-1889, assistant 
naval constructor, 1889-1890, arid since 
June 30, 1890, has been naval constructor. 
He w r as assistant engineer in the Philadel 
phia Water Department, 1883-1880, with 
Major William Ludlow of the Corps of En 
gineers of the U. S. Army. He is a mem 
ber of the Institution of Naval Architects 
of England, the Association Technique 
Maritime of France, and Society of Naval 
Architects of the United States, and of the 
University Club of Philadelphia. Resi 
dence : 4211 Chester Avenue, Philadelphia. 
Address: Care of Navy Department, 
Washington, D. C. 

BANNARD, Otto T.: 

President of the New York Trust Com 
pany; born in Brooklyn, N. Y., April 28, 



1854; son of John W. and Eliza Landon 
(Stone) Bannard. He was graduated from 
Yale as B.A. in 1870, and from Columbia 
as LL.B. iri 1878. He is president of the 
New York Trust Company; is a director of 
the Niagara Fire Insurance Company, the 
Securities Company, the Dolphin Jute 
Mills, and the Herring-Hall-Marvin Safe 
Company. Mr. Bannard is vice-president 
of the Charity Organization Society; trus 
tee of the United Charities Building, and 
treasurer and trustee of the Provident 
Loan Society (philanthropical pawn shop). 
He is a Republican in politics and was a 
commissioner of the Board of Education of 
New York City Hinder Mayor Strong. Mr. 
Bannard is a member and ex-secretary of 
the University Club; ex-president of the 
Yale Club; member of the Union, Century, 
Republican and City Midday Clubs. Ad 
dress: 20 Broad Street, New York City. 

BANNON, Henry Towne: 

Congressman and lawyer; born in Scioto 
County, near Portsmouth, Ohio, June 5, 
1807; son of James W. and Mary E. 
(Smith) Bannon. He attended the Ports 
mouth schools, and in 1885 and 1880 at 
tended the Ohio State University. He 
entered the University of Michigan in 1880, 
and was graduated therefrom as A.B. in 
1889. He was admitted to the Ohio bar in 
1891, and was prosecuting attorney of 
Scioto County from 1897 to 1902. He is 
a Republican in politics, and in 1904 he 
was elected from the Tenth Ohio District 
to the Fifty-ninth Congress, and reflected 
in 1900 to the Sixtieth Congress, expiring 
March 3, 1909. He is a director of the 
First National Bank of Portsmouth, Ohio. 
Mr. Bannon married at Portsmouth, Ohio, 
May 25, 1893, Jessie Damarin. Address: 
Portsmouth, Ohio. 

BARBER, Amzi Lorenzo: 

Contractor; born at Saxton s River, Vt., 
June 22, 1843. He removed with his fam 
ily to Bellevue, Huron County, Ohio, in 
1852; to East Cleveland in 1850 and later 
to Austinburg, Ashtabula County, Ohio. 
He was graduated from Oberlin College as 
B.A. in 1807 and later A.M.; and from 
Columbian (now George Washington) Uni- 



90 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



versity at Washington, D. C., as LL.B. in 
1876. He was principal of the preparatory 
department in 1868, and later professor of 
natural philosophy in Howard University, 
Washington, D. C., and in the real estate 
business in 1872, and since 1883 has been 
president of the Barber Asphalt Paving 
Company. Since 1888 he has been presi 
dent of the Trinidad Asphalt Company; in 
1887 he negotiated the concession with 
Great Britain for Pitch Lake of Trinidad 
for forty-two years. Mr. Barber is a trus 
tee of Oberlin College; director of the 
Washington Loan and Trust Company, etc. 
He is a fellow of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers. Mr. Barbw has been twice 
married; first at Geneva, Ohio, in 1868, to 
Celia X. Bradley, and second, at Harris- 
burgh, Pa., in 1871, to Julia Louis Lang- 
don. Address : 7 East 42d Street, New 
York City. 

BARBER, Edwin AtLee: 

Director of the Pennsylvania Museum 
and School of Industrial Art, Philadelphia; 
born in Baltimore, Aug. 13, 1851; son of 
William Edwin and Anna E. (Townsend) 
Barber. He was graduated, from Williston 
Seminary, at East Hampton,, Mass., in 
1869 ; entered Lafayette College, at Easton. 
Pa., in 1869, and remained three years, and 
from there afterward received the degrees 
of A.M. and Ph.D. He was naturalist on 
the United States Geological and Geo 
graphical Survey of the Territories in 1874 
and 1875, and since 1901 has been curator 
and secretary of the Pennsylvania Museum 
and School of Industrial Art, and was 
made director of the Museum in 1907. He 
is author of about 200 illustrated articles 
in various magazines, and the following 
books: Pottery and Porcelain of the Unit 
ed States; Anglo-American Pottery; Amer 
ican Glassware, Old and New; Tulip Ware 
of the Pennsylvania-German Potters; 
Marks of American Potters; Salt Glazed 
Stoneware; Tin Enameled Pottery; Arti 
ficial Soft Paste Porcelain; Lead Glazed 
Pottery; The Maiolica of Mexico, etc. Mr. 
Barber is a member of important scien 
tific and historical societies, home and for 
eign. He married in Philadelphia, in 1880, 



Nellie Louise, daughter of Major William 
H. Parker, of the U. S. Marine Corps, and 
they have one daughter, Louise AtLee 
Barber. Residence: 236 E. Biddle Street, 
West Chester. Address: Pennsylvania Mu 
seum, Memorial Hall, Fairmount Park, 
Philadelphia. 

BARBER, Ohio Columbiis: 

Capitalist; born in Middlebury,. Ohio, 
April 20, 1841; son of George and Eliza 
(Smith) Barber. He became associated 
in the match manufacturing business of his 
father, who had established the business in 
1847, and in 1861 was admitted to part 
nership. He organized, with others, in 
1881, the Diamond Match Company, which 
was a consolidation of about 85 per cent of 
the match manufacturing business of the 
country, this being one of the earliest and 
most successful of the consolidations which 
have characterized the evolution of modern 
business methods, and still remaining one 
of the best exemplars of the wisdom of the 
policy of industrial concentration. To Mr. 
Barber, who was vice-president of the Com 
pany from its incorporation until 1888 and 
has since been its president, is chiefly due 
the completeness of its organization and 
its continued success. Mr. Barber is also 
chairman of the General Fire Extinguisher 
Company, president of the First National 
Bank of Akron, Ohio, and director in vari 
ous other business corporations. He found 
ed, in 1891, Barberton (near Akron), Ohio, 
which has grown to be a town of 9,000 in 
habitants. He married at Akron, Ohio, 
Oct. 10, 1866, Laura L. Brown, who is now 
deceased. Addresses: Akron, Ohio, and 
111 Broadway, New York City. 

B ARBOUR, Edwin Hinckley: 

State geologist of Nebraska since 1891. 

He was born near Oxford, Ohio, and was 

graduated from Yale, in 1882, receiving the 

degree of Ph.D. in 1887. After a number 

of years service with the United States 

Geological Survey and of professorship in 

Western colleges, he became connected with 

| the geological work of the State of Ne- 

| braska, where he is now professor of geol- 

| ogy in the State University; the State 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



geologist; curator of the Nebraska State 
Museum, and geologist of the Nebraska 
State Board of Agriculture. He also has 
charge of the Merrill annual geological ex 
peditions, and is engaged from time to time 
on United States geological and hydro- 
graphical survey work. Professor Barbour 
is the author of more than a hundred pub 
lished papers on geology, paleontology, and 
zoology. He is a fellow of the Geological 
Society of America, and of other National 
and State scientific societies. He married 
Dec. 1, 1887, at New Haven, Conn., Mar 
garet Roxanna Lamson. Address: 1234 R 
Street, Lincoln, Neb. 

BARBOUR, Ralph Henry: 

Author; born at Cambridge, Mass., Nov. 
13, 1870; son of James Henry Barbour and 
Elizabeth M. (Morgan) Barbour. He was 
educated in Waltham (Mass.) New Church 
School, and at Highland Military Acad 
emy, Worcester, Mass. He is author of: 
Phyllis in Bohemia (with L. H. Bickford) ; \ 
The Half Back; For the Honor of the 
School ; Captain of the Crew ; Behind the j 
Line ; The Land of Joy ; Weatherby s In 
ning; On Your Mark; The Arrival of 
Jimpson; The Book of School and College 
Sports; Kitty of the Roses; An Orchard 
Princess; Four in Camp; Four Afoot; The 
Crimson Sweater; A Maid in Arcady; Four 
Atloat; The Spirit of the School; Tom, 
Dick and Harriet; Harry s Island; Cap 
tain Chub; Forward Pass; Double Play; 
Holly; My Lady of the Fog. Mr. Barbour 
is a member of the Colonial Club of Cam 
bridge, Mass. He married in Denver, Colo., 
in 1805, Mabel Latshaw King. Summer 
address: East Gloucester, Mass. Ad 
dress: Appleton Court, Cambridge, Mas. 

BARCIIFULD, Andrew Jackson: 

Physician, congressman; born in Pitts 
burgh, Pa., May 18, 1863. He attended 
Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, 
where he was graduated as M.D. in 1884, 
and since then has been engaged in the 
practice of medicine in Pittsburgh. He 
was nominated for Congress in 1902 on 
: the Republican ticket, but after a hard 
i fouht battle was defeated by a narrow 



margin by a combination of Democrats and 
dissatisfied Republicans. He was again 
nominated in 1904, and was elected from 
the Thirty-second Pennsylvania District to 
the Fifty-ninth Congress and in 1906 and 
1908 was reelected to the Sixtieth and 
Sixty-first Congresses. He was a delegate 
to the Peace Congress at Brussels in 1905, 
and a delegate to the International Inter- 
Parliamentary Union at Berlin, Germany, 
1908. Address: 106 Eighteenth Street, 
Pittsburgh. 

BARCLAY, Charles F.: 

Lumberman and congressman; born in 
Owego, N. Y., May 9, 1844; son of George 
A. and Eliza (Allen) Barclay. He was 
educated in public and high schools, in 
Belfast (N. Y.) Seminary, and in the law 
department of the University of Michigan. 
He enlisted as a private in Company K, 
149th Pennsylvania Infantry (" Second 
Bucktails"), served three years, rising 
through successive promotions to captain, 
was a prisoner of war for seventeen months 
> and eleven days, and was mustered out in 
1 1865. After leaving the law school he did 
; not engage in practice, but with an elder 
! brother formed the firm of Barclay Broth- 
i ers, at Sinnamahoning, Pa., where they 
I have since been engaged in an extensive 
| lumber business. Mr. Barclay has been 
for many years active in politics, as a 
; Republican,; was a presidential elector in 
I 1882; alternate delegate at large and as 
i such voted in the Republican National Con 
vention of 1900. He was elected to the 
I Sixtieth Congress in 1906, and in 1908 was 
! reelected to the Sixty-first Congress from 
I the Twenty-first District of Pennsylvania, 
and is now serving. He is a member of 
the Manufacturers Club of Philadelphia 
and the Pennsylvania Club of Washington, 
and is a 32d-degree Mason. Mr. Barclay 
married at Sinnamahoning, Pa., Aug. 22, 
| 1872, Margaret A. L, daughter of John 
Brooks. Address: Sinnamahoning, Pa. 

BARD, Thomas Robert: 

Railroad man, former United States 
Senator; born at Chambersburg, Pa., Dec. 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



8, 1841, was graduated from Chambersburg 
Academy and studied law in his home 
town. He became connected with the rail 
road business in 1801, and during the war 
was a strong Union man and closely con 
nected with Colonel Thomas A. Scott, who 
was in charge of transportation of the 
Union army. He was sent by Colonel 
Scott, in 1865, to look after Colonel Scott s 
large landed interests in southern Cali 
fornia, and has since resided in that State, 
where he is largely interested in oil devel 
opments and in land enterprise. In 1900 
lie was elected as a Republican to the 
United States Senate and served five years. 
He married in San Francisco, April 17, 
187C, Mary B. Gerberding. Address: Hu- 
eneme, Ventura County, Calif. 

BARDEEN, Charles William: 

Editor and publisher of the School Bul 
letin since 1874. Mr. Bardeen was born in 
Groton, Mass., Aug. 28, 1847, and gradu 
ated at Yale in 1869. He served in the 
First Massachusetts Volunteers from July, 
1862, to May 25, 1864, and was a success 
ful teacher and school director until he be 
came editor and publisher of the School 
Bulletin in the years above named. Be 
sides being a contributor to magazines on 
educational and literary subjects, Mr. Bar 
deen has written a large number of school 
books and text books on various subjects, 
including technical works for the use of 
teachers, and has compiled a number of 
song books. He was president of the Edu 
cational Press Association of America from 
1900 to 1906, and has been prominently 
connected with the educational societies of 
the United States, having been in charge 
of the educational publications of the In 
ternational Congress in 1893, and has 
taken part in numerous meetings of educa 
tional workers. He married at New 
Haven, Conn., 1868, Ellen Palmer Dicker- 
man. Residence: 1109 E. Genesee Street. 
Office: 406 S. Franklin Street, Svracuse, 
N. V. 

BARBEL, William: 

Consular official; appointed commercial 
agent at Bambcrg, Dec. 13, 1900; promoted 



consul at Hamburg, Dec. 17, 1902; promoted 
consul at Rheims, France, June 8, 1908. 
Address : American Consulate, Rheims, 
Franca. 

BARKER, Albert Smith: 

Rear admiral U. S. Navy, retired; born 
in Massachusetts, March 31, 1843; son of 
Josiah Barker. He was appointed to the 
Naval Academy Oct. 25, 1859. In 1861 
went into active service in the West Gulf 
Squadron and was on the steam frigate 
Mississippi, participating in its engage 
ments until the destruction of that vessel 
during the attack on and attempted pas 
sage of Port Hudson, March 14, 1863, and 
afterward in service on the Monongahela 
and other vessels to the end of the Civil 
War. He commanded the Enterprise from 
1882 to 1886 and ran a line of deep-sea 
soundings around the world, making casts 
at intervals of about 100 miles. At the 
outbreak of the Spanish-American War he 
was a member of the War Board. In May, 
1898, he commanded the cruiser Newark, 
taking part in bombardment of batteries at 
Santiago de Cuba. He relieved Admiral 
Dewey as commander-in-chief of the Asiatic 
squadron on May 20, 1899, retaining com 
mand until the arrival of Rear Admiral 
Watson. He was commander-in-chief, 
North Atlantic fleet from April 1, 1903, to 
March 31, 1905, when he retired for age. 
He married, in 1894, Mrs. Ellen Blackmar 
Maxwell. Address: 1716 N Street, N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 

BARKER, Ellen Blackmar: 

Author: born in West Springfield, Erie 
County. Pa.; daughter of John Simmons 
and Rebecca M. Blackmar. She was edu 
cated in Edinboro, Pa., and married, in 
1879, Rev. Allen Maxwell, who died in 
1890, at Lucknow, India. In 1894 she 
married Captain (now Rear Admiral) 
Albert S. Barker, of the V. S. Navy. Mrs. 
Marker has written (under the name of 
Fllen Blackmar Maxwell) several books, 
including: The Bishop s Conversion; 
Three Old Maids in Hawaii; The Way of 
Fire. Address: 1716 N Street, N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



BARKER, Lewellys Franklin: 

Physician; born at Norwich, Ontario 
Canada, Sept. 10, 18(57; son of James F 
and Sarah Jane (Taylor) Barker. He 
studied medicine at the University of To 
ronto, where he was graduated in 1890 
with the degree of M.B. He took further 
courses of study at Leipzig in 189o. and at 
Munich and Berlin in 1905. Following his 
graduation at the University he became 
for n. short time resident physician in the 
Toronto General Hospital, after which lie 
went, to Baltimore, where he was appointed 
assistant in Johns Hopkins Hospital. 
After a year in this position, he became 
fellow in pathology at Johns Hopkins Uni 
versity, becoming in 1804 associate in 
anatomy, and at the same lime assistant 
resident pathologist at the Hospital. 
Three years later he was appointed asso 
ciate professor of anatomy, and in 18!)9 
associate professor of pathology. In 1900 
he resigned from Johns Hopkins to accept 
the Chair of Anatomy at the Rush Medical 
College in the University of Chicago, but 
after live years in this position he returned 
to Johns Hopkins, where he became pro 
fessor of medicine and was made physi- 
cian-in-chief of the Hospital. Honorary 
degrees: M.D., University of Toronto; 
LL.D., Queen s University, Kingston. He 
is author of various books and articles, 
among the former of which are: The Nerv 
ous System and Its Constituent Neurones; 
Laboratory Manual of Human Anatomy, 
etc. Dr. Barker was married in October, 
1903, to Lilian IT. Halsey, of New York 
City. Address: Johns Hopkins Univer 
sity, Baltimore, Md. 

BARKER, Wharton: 

Financier, economist, publisher; born in 
Philadelphia, May 1, 184G; son of Abra 
ham and Sarah (Wharton) Barker. He 
was graduated from the University of 
Pennsylvania as A.B. in 18GO. and A.M. in 
1809. He was founder of the Investment 
Company of Philadelphia (capital, $4,000,- 
000), and the Finance Company of Penn 
sylvania (capital, $5,000,000). was special 
financial agent of Imperial Russian Gov 
ernment in 1878 and 1879, and frequently 



N 

since. He served as lieutenant of the Third 
Regiment of United States Colored Troops, 
in 1803. He was a prominent leader in 
the Independent movements in Pennsyl 
vania in 1881, 1882 and 1890, and presi 
dential candidate of the People s Party in 
1900. He was the proposer, in 1879, of the 
American Commercial Union of all Ameri 
can Nations, with a common tariff against 
European and Asiatic Nations, and fail- 
distribution of customs receipts among 
Nations within the Union. He is an advo 
cate of National money and an opponent of 
bank money, also an advocate of the Na 
tionalization of the railroads, direct tax 
ation, income tax, the public ownership of 
enterprises which in their nature or by law 
must become monopolies, and American 
Commercial Union of all American Na 
tions, with free trade on the American 
Continent and tariff protection in all 
against European and Asiatic competition 
and the restoration of the Philippines to 
the Filipinos by the joint guarantee of 
European, Asiatic and American Nations. 
Mr. Barker believes that neither the Re 
publican nor the Democratic party re 
sponds to or corresponds with the needs of 
the American people, and that a new politi 
cal party must be, and will be, organized 
soon to secure to the people restoration of 
rule by the people and overthrow of the 
monied oligarchy now in control of Na 
tional, State and local governments, and 
through such control in possession of 
almost all lines of finance, production, dis- 
ribution and transportation. In 1809 he 
founded the Penn Monthly, and in 1880 
nerged it with the American, a weekly 
Daper. He has been a trustee of the Uni 
versity of Pennsylvania, since 1880. He 
eceived the Order of St. Stanislaus, in 
1879, at St. Petersburg, conferred by Em- 
jei or Alexander II. Mr. Barker is a inem- 
>er of the American Philosophical Society, 
and the American Academy of Political 
and Social Science; the Academy of Natu- 
al Sciences; the Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania. He had for a time uncom 
mon relations with high Chinese officials; 
the Chinese Imperial Government sending 
to America a special Imperial commission 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



in 1887 for consultation with him upon 
economic and industrial problems of para 
mount importance to China, and in 1895 he 
visited China upon invitation of Li Hung 
Chang. At this time no other American 
lias the relations of confidence of Russians 
and Chinese Mr. Barker has. He married 
Oct. 10, 1807, Margaret Corlies Baker, and 
he has three sons, Samuel H., Rodman and 
Folger. Address: 008 Chestnut Street, 
Philadelphia. 

BARKLEY, Henry L.: 

Bishop of the United Brethren Church; 
born in Adams County, Indiana, March 19, 
1858, and graduated from the Bryan. Ohio, 
High School. Subsequent to his graduation 
he engaged in educational work, from which 
lie entered into the ministry, having a suc 
cessful career in the pastorate of several 
important churches of his denomination. 
He was chosen as bishop of The United 
Brethren Church for the Pacific Coast Dis 
trict, and took up his residence in Oregon. 
He became interested in the political wel 
fare of the State, and as a result for two 
terms was elected a member of the Oregon 
Legislature. Address: Woodburn, Oregon. 

BARNABEE, Henry Clay: 

Retired operatic comedian; was born in 
Portsmouth, N. H., Nov. 14, 1833. His 
early life was spent as clerk in retail and 
wholesale dry-goods houses, but in 1854 he 
began to appear in entertainments in Bos 
ton, developing talents as a comedian, vo 
calist and mimic. He received his training 
in music as a member of choirs in Boston, 
and in 1865 he gave up business and de 
voted himself to public entertainment. He 
was a popular attraction in the Lyceum 
courses until 1879, when the Boston Ideal 
Opera Co., was organized to play the then 
popular success, Pinafore. In 1887 he or 
ganized the Bostonians with Tom Karl and 
W. H. McDonald, and until the dissolution 
of that company in 1904, was one of the 
leading favorites of the comic opera stage. 
He is chiefly remembered in the character, 
which he created among many others, of 
the Sheriff of Nottingham in the Opera of 



Robin Hood. Address: Players Club, Gra 
in ercy Park, N. Y. 

BARNARD, Charles: 

Writer; born in Boston, Mass., Feb. 13. 
1838; son of Rev. Charles F. and Sarah 
(Holmes) Barnard. He is practically self- 
educated by extensive travel and study. 
Mr. Barnard is a contributor to leading 
magazines on teclmic.il, educational and 
scientific subjects; wrote many children s 
stories and a large number of books upon 
many subjects. He is contributing editor 
to the Century Dictionary on tools and ma 
chines. He is author of: The County Fair 
(play) ; Tools and Machines; The Door in 
the Book; The Tone Masters; the Soprano; 
Ten-Rod Farm; Light (in collaboration 
with late Prof. Meyer). He maintains at 
his residence a housekeeping laboratory for 
experimental research, testing of new cook 
ing, heating and other domestic appliances, 
etc. He married, May 17, 1881, Mary E. 
Knight. Address : Cedar Gate, Darien, 
Conn. 

BARNARD, Edward Chester: 

Topographical engineer; born in New 
York City, Nov. 13, 1863; son of Owen 
Howard and Anne Eliza (Lenny) Barnard. 
He was educated in the College of the City 
of New York and the School of Mines of 
Columbia Colege, from which he received 
the degree of E.M. in the class of 1884. He 
was appointed assistant topographer of the 
United States Geological Survey, after leav 
ing college in 1884, and was made topogra 
pher in 1886. He mapped portions of Vir 
ginia and West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennes 
see, and New York; and went West in 1894 
for the United States Geological Survey 
and mapped areas in Montana, Oregon. 
Washington, and California. He went to 
Alaska in 1898 and 1900, and mapped areas 
in the Forty Mile and Nome Districts for the 
United States Geological Survey; was chief 
topographer of the United States and Can 
ada Boundary Survey, 1903-1906; lo 
cated the International boundary line be 
tween the United States and Canada, west 
of the summit of the Rocky Mountains, and 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



is now geographer in charge of the Rock} 
Mountain Division of Topography of the 
United States Geological Survey. He has 
traveled much over the United States, twice 
to Alaska, down the Yukon and to Nome, 
also once in Europe. He is a Republican 
in politics. Mr. Barnard is a member of 
the National Geographic Society, the Geo 
logical Society of Washington, D. C., the 
American Institute of Civil Engineers, 
Washington Society of Engineers, the Amer 
ican Forestry Association, and the Cosmos 
Club of Washington, D. C. He married at 
St. Paul, Minn., March 31, 1904, Virginia 
Townsend Grover, now deceased. Address: 
United States Geological Survey, Washing- 
1 ton, D. C. 

BARNARD, Edward Emerson: 

Astronomer; born in Nashville, Tenn., 
Dec. 16, 1857. He graduated from Vander- 
bilt University in 1887, and has received 
the Sc.D. degree from this university and 
the A.M. degree from the University of the 
Pacific. He began his career as astronomer 
with the Lick Observatory, where he re 
mained until 1895, and is now professor 
of practical astronomy at the University of 
Chicago and astronomer in the Yerkes Ob 
servatory. Professor Barnard is the discov 
erer of the fifth satellite of Jupiter, which 
was discovered in 1892,, and has discovered 
sixteen comets. He is one of the foremost 
workers in celestial photography, having 
made photographs of the Milky Way, the 
comets, nebulae, etc. He has received sev 
eral medals, including the Lalande gold 
medal of the French Academy of Sciences in 
1892, the Arago gold medal in 1893, gold 
medal of the Royal Astronomical Society of 
Great Britain in 1897. and the Janssen 
gold medal of the French Academy of 
Sciences in 1900, also the Janssen Prize 
of the French Astronomical Society in 
1907. He is a fellow and foreign associate 
of the Royal Astronomical Society of Eng 
land, and also of many American and for- j 
eign scientific societies. He is one of the 
leading contributors of the United States to 
astronomical journals. Address: Yerkes 
Observatory, Williams Bay, Wis. 



95 



BARNARD, Job: 

Jurist; born in Porter County, Ind., June 
8, 1844; son of William and * Sally (Wil 
liams) Barnard. He was educated in the 
district school and at the Valparaiso (Ind ) 
Male and Female College; served in the 
Civil War, 1861-1865, becoming first ser 
geant of Company K, 73d Indiana Volun 
teers. After the war he took the law course 
in the University of Michigan, from which 
lie was graduated as LL.D. in 1867, and re 
ceived the honorary degree of LL.D. He 
engaged in the practice of law until appoint 
ed by President McKinley to the office of jus 
tice of the Supreme Court of the District of 
Columbia. Justice Barnard is president of 
the Audubon Society of the District of Co 
lumbia; president of the Board of Trustees 
of Howard University; vice-president of the 
General Convention of the New Church 
IS \\rdenborgian) in the United States. He 
is deputy governor of the Society of Colo 
nial Wars, and a member of the Grand Army 
of the Republic and the Society of the 
Army of the Cumberland. He married, at 
Berrien Springs, Mich., Sept. 25, 1867, 
Florence A. Putnam, and has three sons. 
Residence 1306 Rhode Island Avenue. Of 
fice address : United States Court House, 
Washington, D. C. 

BARNES, Albert Crane: 

Jurist; born at Addison, Vermont, June 
28, 1853; son of Asahel and Ellen S. 
(Crane) Barnes. He was graduated from 
the University of Vermont with the degree 
af A.B. in 1876, and completed a course of 
a\v studies at the Albany (New York) 
,aw School in 1877, receiving the degree of 
J..B. He was admitted to the New York 
State bar in 1877, and after further stud- 
es at Keesville and Plattsburg, N. Y., went, 
n 1879, to Washington, D. C., where he 
ook the civil service examination and en- 
ered the employ of the Government in the 
General Land Office. There he was engaged 
for four years in writing decisions upon 
contested mining claims and contested land 
claims within the railroad grants. In 1883 
he went to North Dakota, where he was 
appointed by the Governor as one of the 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



commissioners to organize Bottineau Coun 
ty, of which in 1884 he was elected dis 
trict attorney. In 1885 he removed to Chi 
cago, 111., and engaged in general practice 
of the law. For several years he was as 
sociated in his practice with S. M. Millard, 
Esq. In 1896 he received the appointment 
of assistant State s attorney of Cook Coun 
ty, under State s Attorney Deneen, and was 
his first assistant from 1900 to 1904 when 
Mr. Deneen was elected Governor; and he 
was elected judge of the Superior Court 
of Cook County for the term which will 
expire in 1910. He is a Republican and a 
member of the Hamilton, Homewood Golf 
and Union League Clubs of Chicago. He 
married in Chicago in May, 1895, Jessie 
Welles Griswold. Residence: 204 East 
Fiftieth Street, Chicago, 111. 

BARNES, Benjamin F. : 

Postmaster of the City of Washington. 
Mr. Barnes was born in Yarmouth, Nova 
Scotia, Dec. 3, 18G8. He was educated in 
the public schools of New Jersey and the 
law department of Georgetown University, 
and was appointed clerk in the Post Office 
Department in Washington in 1887. After 
service as private secretary to several of 
the higher officials of the Post Office De 
partment, he was appointed stenographer 
at the White House, Jan., 1898, and execu 
tive clerk in July of that year. In 1900 
he was appointed assistant secretary to the 
President by President McKinley, and was 
reappointed by President Roosevelt. After 
several years service in this position he was 
appointed to be postmaster of the City of 
Washington, the position he now holds. 
Residence: 48 R St., N. E., Washington, 
D. C. Office: General Post Office Build 
ing, Washington, D. C. 

BARNES, Charles Reid: 

Botanist; born at Madison, Ind., Sept. 7, 
1858; son of Charles and Sarah (Reid) 
Barnes. He was educated at Hanover 
(Ind.). College, with first honor and A.B. 
degree, 1877, A.M., 1880, Ph.D. 1880, and 
engaged in private research work at Har 
vard 1885-1880, and 1892. He taught in 



public and high schools until 1880, when 
he entered Purdue University as instructor 
in natural history, and he was professor of 
natural history, 1882-1885, and professor 
of botany and geology, 1885-1887, in that 
university; professor of botany in the Uni 
versity of Wisconsin 1887-1899, and since 
1898 has been professor of plant physiology 
in the University of Chicago. He is a 
fellow and was general secretary 1895-1 89G, 
and vice-president of Section G (botany), 
189D, of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science; was secretary 
1894-1899, president, 1902, and is a life 
member of the Botanical Society of Amer 
ica; life member of the Wisconsin Academy 
of Sciences and member of the Beta Theta 
Pi fraternity. He has been editor of the 
Botanical Gazette since 1883. He married 
at Lafayette, Ind., Dec. 25, 1882, Mary 
King Ward, and they have had two sons 
( one now deceased ) . Residence : 306 
East 56th Street, Chicago. 

BARNES, James: 

Author; born in Annapolis. Md., Sept. 
19, 1866; son of Lieutenant Commander 
John Sanford Barnes, U. S. N., and Susan 
Bainbridge (Hayes) Barnes. Mr. Barnes 
was educated in St. Paul s School, Concord, 
N. H., and after spending two years, 1885- 
1887, as civil engineer on construction work 
with the Missouri Pacific Railroad, entered 
Princeton College, from which he was grad 
uated A.B., 1891, and was editor of the 
Nassau Literary Magazine. After his 
graduation he was associated with Scrib- 
ner s Magazine, and he was assistant editor 
of Harper s Weekly, 1894-1895; special cor 
respondent of the Outlook during the Boer 
War, and in 1903 at the Venezuela block 
ade; now editor of Appleton s Magazine 
and literary adviser for D. Appleton & Co. 
Mr. Barnes is author of: For King or Coun 
try; Naval Actions of the War of 1812; A 
Princetonian ; Midshipman Farragut; A 
Loyal Traitor; Commodore Bainbridge; 
Yankee Ships and Yankee Sailors; The 
Hero of Erie; With the Flag in the Chan 
nel; The Great War Trek; The Giant of 
Three Wars; Drake and His Yeomen; The 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



D7 



Son of Light Horse Harry; The Block - 
nders; Outside the Law. Address: 10 
East 79th Street, New York City. 

BARNES, Thurlow Weed: 

Negotiator, of contracts ; born in Albany, 
N. Y., June 28, 1853; son of William and 
Emily P. (Weed) Barnes; grandson of 
Thurlow Weed, and descendant in the 
eighth generation of Thomas Barnes of 
Hartford, 1630, who was a soldier in the 
Pequot War. He was graduated from 
Harvard, A.B.. 1876; spent several years 
in Albany in editorial and political work, 
then joined a publishing firm in Boston; 
but for the past twenty years has been en 
gaged in business in New York City. Mr. 
Barnes has been around the world twice, 
made five trips to Russia, spent two win 
ters in India and made a special study of 
China. He negotiated the famous Hankow- 
Canton contracts, constituting the only 
governmental concession ever obtained by 
an American from the Chinese Empire. 
As a Republican of prominence, he has been 
a delegate to numerous political conven 
tions, including the National Convention at 
St. Louis, 1896, and has been chairman of 
the Albany County Committee. Mr. Barnes 
is author of a Life of Thurlow Weed, 1884, 
and a contributor to various periodicals. 
He is a member of the Metropolitan, Aero 
and Circumnavigators Clubs of New York, 
and of the Union Society of the Civil War. 
Residence: 236 West Fifty-fifth Street. 
Office: 43 Exchange Place, New York 
City. 

BARNES, William Henry: 

Riilway official; horn in Philadelphia, 
July 12, 1829; son of Henry, of Marlborough 
Mass.. and Marilla (Weldon) Barnes of 
New Britain, Conn. He was educated at 
private schools. From 1848 to 1856 he 
served on surveys and construction of the 
Western Division of the Pennsylvania Rail 
road, and 1856-1863 he was assistant su 
perintendent, secretary and comptroller of 
the Pittsburg, Fort Wayne and Chicago 
Railway. He was in the service of the Un 
ion Railroad and Transportation Company 
7 



land Empire Transportation Comp-uiy. 

11863-1871; and in 1871 ho was director 
and treasurer of the Pennsylvania Com 
pany. He was receiver of the Allegheny 
Valley Railroad Company, 1884-1802. 
and then he became president of the com 
pany under its reorganization as the Alle- 

| gheny Valley Railway Company. He has 

I also been president of the Western New 

: York and Pennsylvania Railway, New York 
and Penns} T lvania Railway Company, since 
Jan. 14, 1901 ; and is a director of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad; Pennsylvania Com 
pany, Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago and 
St. Louis ailway, and allied corporations. 
Mr. Barnes married at Allegheny City, Pa., 
Oct. 27, 1857, Eva Hampton. Residence: 

j 1727 Spruce Street; summer: Devon, Pa. 

I Office: 256 Broad Street Station, Phila- 

I delphia. 

BARNES, William: . 

Lawyer; born in Pompey, Onondaga 
County, N. Y., May 26, 1824; son of Orson 
Barnes, superintendent .of Schools of Onon 
daga County, and Eliza (Phelps) Barnes. 
He is seventh in descent from William 
Barnes, who settled near Hartford, Conn., 
about 1630; was one of its original pro 
prietors; and was a soldier in the Pequot 
War. The family can be traced in England 
to William Barneis, A. D., 1203. Mr. 
Barnes was educated in the common and 
select schools and at the Manlius Academy 
at Manlius, N. Y. He taught school. 
" boarding round " and making his own 
fires, 1840-1843, and in 1843 and 1844 organ 
ized and managed, in connection with his 
father, at Baldwinsville and Syracuse, N. 
Y.. the first teachers institutes ever held in 
the state. He studied luw, 1840-1846, was 
admitted to the bar July, 1846, and was 
long a member of the law firm of Hammond, 
King & Barnes, of Albany, N. Y. He was 
appointed special counsel of the Banking 
Department of the State of New York; 
special commissioner to examine the con 
dition of several insurance companies of 
New York City, 1855. The results of this 
examination embodied in his reports, led to 
the passage of the Act to organize the In- 



OS 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



surance Department in 1859, and he was 
appointed the first superintendent of insur 
ance of* the State of New York, serving 1860- 
1870. He compiled elaborate insurance sta 
tistics, and his ten annual reports and six 
volumes of condensed insurance reports are 
established authorities in this country and 
Europe, and he contributed largely to the 
development of fire, marine and life insur 
ance during his term of office. Great abuses 
existed among the insurance companies 
when he entered the Insurance Department, 
and were ended by his valuable public serv 
ice, and an article by Hon. John K. Porter, 
judge of the Court of Appeals, giving a de 
tailed sketch of Mr. Barnes insurance ca 
reer, ended with the statement that " it is 
no undue commendation to say that he has 
reformed the insurance system of the civil- 
i/ed world . He has achieved an American 
and an European reputation in this depart 
ment such as no one had previously attained 
on either side of the Atlantic." After 1870 
Mr. Barnes acted as consulting counsel and 
actuary for several life insurance compa 
nies; in 1873 and subsequent years as spe 
cial counsel for the City of New York. He 
acted as counsel for several hundred life in 
surance policy-holders, was appointed by 
President Grant one of the U. S. official 
delegates to the Eighth International Sta- 
tisticil Congress at St. Petersburg, in 1872, 
pnd was presented with a diamond ring with 
the imperial monogram, as a souvenir of 
services at this Congress, by Czar Alexan 
der II.. and appointed a member of the 
permanent commission. Mr. Barnes became 
a member of the Liberal Party in 1843 : 
spoke for Birney in 1844; supported Martin 
Van Buren for President in 1848; and was 
one of the leading organizers of the first 
Republican State Convention at Saratoga 
Springs in 1854. He organized the New 
York State Kansas Aid Society, and two 
National Kansas Conventions at Cleveland 
j nd Buffalo in 1850; and he was one of the 
chief organizers of the Semi-Centennial 
Celebration of the Republican party, held in 
September, 1904, at Saratoga Springs. He 
prepared the article on the Early History of 
the Republican Party at the Fremont Semi- 



Ceiitennial at Philadelphia in June, 1900; 
was a member of the Peace Congress held 
at Boston, in Oct., 1904, and at New York 
City, April, 1907. Mr. Barnes has been 
an honorary fellow of the Royal Statistical 
Society of London, since 1872; js a member 
of the Albany Institute, the American 
Geographical Society, the National Geo 
graphic Society, and the Law Institute of 
New York, the American Society of Inter 
national Law. At the January, 1907, meet 
ing of the society at Washington, he ear 
nestly advocated the immunity of private 
property (not contraband) at sea in ma 
rine w r arfare, and the application of the 
Drago doctrine to the collection of all in 
ternational contractual debts. He was one 
of the founders and first president of the 
Society of Medical Jurisprudence of New 
York ; is a member of the New Y"ork State- 
Bar Association, and a member and one 
of the founders of the Fort Orange Club 
of Albany, New York. He was a stump- 
speaker for temperance in the forties, and 
has consistently held the views he then ex 
pressed and hopes to live long enough to 
see all of the States in the "dry" column; 
is an advocate of the right of married 
women to their own property and believes in 
equal suffrage rights for the sexes. As earlv 
as 1850 he developed a taste for historical 
research and composition, having written a 
competitive prize essay (gold medal) for the 
Young Men s Association, on The Settle 
ment and Early History of Albany. N. Y. 
Mr. Barnes married, July 10, 1849, Emily 
P. Weed, a daughter of Thurlow Weed, and 
by that union has five children, all living: 
Mrs. Catherine Weed Barnes Ward, of Lon 
don, England ; Thurlow Weed Barnes, of New 
York City; Mrs. George C. Hollister, of 
Rochester; Mrs. Rufus Hildreth Thayer, of 
Washington, and William Barnes, Jr., of 
Albany, New York. Mrs. Barnes died in 
February. 1889, and Mr. Barnes was again 
married, June 1, 1891, to Mrs. Lizzie Bal- 
mer Williams, widow of Samuel Williams, 
editor of the Albany Evening Journal and 
of the San Francisco Evening Bulletin. Ad- 
j dress: The O Conor-Barnes Homestead, On- 
the-Cliff, Nantucket Island, Massachusetts. 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



BARNES, William, Jr.: 

Publisher; born at Albany, N. Y., Nov. 
17, 1866; son of William Barnes and Emily 
Peck (Weed) Barnes. He was educated at 
Albany Academy and at Harvard, graduat 
ing as A.B. in 1888. He is proprietor of 
the Albany Evening Journal; United States 
Surveyor of Customs of Albany, N. Y. ; a 
member of the Republican State Committee 
since 1892, and chairman of its executive 
committee from 1898. Mr. Barnes has tak 
en a prominent and influential part in the 
Republican politics of the State of New 
York and by virtue of this activity is a 
factor in national political affairs. Mr. 
Barnes married at Cincinnati, Ohio, June 
12, 1888, Grace Davis, and they have two 
children. Address: Albany, N. Y. 

BARNETT, George: 

Colonel U. S. Marine Corps. Appointed 
from Wisconsin. Graduated from Naval 
Academy, and transferred to Marine Corps 
as second lieutenant, 1883. Commissioned 
first lieutenant, Sept, 1, 1890. Commis 
sioned captain Aug. 11, 1898. Commis 
sioned major, March 3, 1901. Nov. 20, 
1897, ordered to U. S. S. San Francisco; 
reported on board at Smyrna, Dec. 12; as 
fleet marine officer, European fleet. March 
27, at Gravesend, England, transferred to 
the Amazonas, afterwards the New Orleans ; 
came home on board New Orleans as 
watch officer; rejoined San Francisco, in 
New York, April 14; April 17, ordered to 
the New Orleans; as marine officer and 
served on her throughout the war first 
in Flying Squadron at Hampton Roads, 
then in Sampson s Squadron on north coast 
of Cuba, and then on south coast at Santi 
ago, under Schley and Sampson; took part 
in bombardments, May 28, June 6, 14, 15. 
and at Daikari during landing of army; 
blockaded San Juan and Porto Rico, July 
17, to August 14; entered San Juan and 
present during transfer. Promoted to 
captain to take rank from Aug. 11, 1898; 
joined U. S. S. Chicago, Dec. 1, 1898, and 
served on board until April 16, 1901, as 
fleet marine officer South Atlantic fleet, de 
tached and ordered home. Examined for 



promotion and promoted major to date 
from March 3, 1901; granted leave one 
month ; Fleet marine officer of Asiatic Fleet, 
11)03-1904; commanded marine brigade in 
Philippines, Nov., 1904, to April, 1905; pro 
moted to lieutenant-colonel Feb. 28, 1905; 
commanded Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, 
Washington, from July, 1905; promoted 
colonel, May, 1909. Address: Care of the 
Navy Department, Washington, D. C. 

BARNETTE, William Jay: 

Rear-Admiral. U. S. N. ; born in Morris- 
ville, Madison County, N. Y., Feb. 2, 1847. 
He was graduated from the Naval Academy 
in 1868, and has served his terms of sea- 
duty on all of the naval stations of the 
United States and has had several import 
ant commands, including the command of 
the battleship Kentucky. He is, however, 
best known as one of the most useful of 
ficers of the navy on matters connected 
with organization and strategy for the 
navy, as developed by the operations of the 
General Board in Washington, an organiza 
tion of officers established by regulation, 
which performs the duties, to a certain ex 
tent, of a general staff. Rear-Admiral 
Barnette has been for years, whether on 
shore duty or afloat, one of the leading 
minds among the officers who take especial 
interest in this aspect of the work of the 
navy, and has generally been assigned, dur 
ing his terms of shore duty, to membership 
of the board, during which time he is also 
member of the joint army and navy board, 
established to bring about military coopera 
tion between the two branches of the serv 
ice. Rear-Admiral Barnette has been deep 
ly interested in the proposed establishment 
of the general staff form of organization for 
the administration of the navy of the Unit 
ed States, and assisted in preparing tfie 
various propositions which have been ad 
vanced to this end. He married in San 
Francisco, Nov. 20, 1877, Evelyn G. Hutch- 
ins. Address: Care of Navy Department, 
Washington, D. C. 

BARNHART, Arthur Middleton: 

Type founder; born in Hartfield, Chau- 
tauqua County, N. Y v Feb. 7, 1844; son of 



100 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Peter and Sarah (Herrick) Barnhart. In 
association with his three brothers he was 
in early life engaged in the publication of 
four papers in the State of Iowa, extend 
ing over the period from 1865 to 1873. He 
removed to Chicago in 1868, and with his 
brothers engaged in the advertising agency 
business. In 1869, with his brothers, War 
ren, George W., and Alson E. and Charles E. 
Spindler, he established the type foundry, 
which was subsequently incorporated under 
the name of Barnhart Brothers & Spindler. 
He is now president of the company and 
of several other type foundry and printers 
supply companies throughout the country. 
Mr. Barnhart is on the advisory board of 
the Civic Federation, and a member of the 
American Association for the Advance 
ment of Science. Mr. Barnhart has been 
twice married; first in 1869, to Angie B. 
Stein, who died in 1895, and second, at Chi 
cago, in 1900, to Stella I. La Zelle. He 
has one son living. Residence: 4455 Drexel 
Boulevard. Office: 183 Monroe Street, Chi 
cago. 

BARNHAUT, John Hendley: 

Editor and librarian; born in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., Oct. 4, 1871; son of Rev. John Wes 
ley and Ellen Frances (Miller) Barnhart. 
He was graduated from Wesleyan Univer 
sity A.B., 1892, A.M., 1893, and from the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, Colum 
bia University, M.D., 1896. Dr. Barnhart 
has gained distinction as a botanist, is a 
member of the Torrey Botanical Club of 
New York and has been its vice-president 
since 1908, and was editor-in-chief of the 
Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 1903- 
1907. He was editorial assistant, 1903- 
1907, and has been librarian since Oct. 1907 
of the New York Botanical Garden, and 
was delegate from that institution to the 
International Botanical Congress held in 
Vienna in June, 1905. Dr. Barnhart is 
also one of the three editors of North 
American Flora (in thirty-two volumes) 
now being published in parts by the New 
York Botanical Garden. He is a fellow of 
the American Asociation for the Advance 
ment of Science; a life member of the 



New York Botanical Garden, American 
Museum of Natural History, the New York 
Genealogical and Biographical Society and 
the New York Historical Society, and a 
member of the Biological Society of Wash 
ington and the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity. 
Dr. Barnhart married in Jessamine, Fla., 

| May 5, 1897, Emma Gertrude Platt, of 
Southampton, N. Y. Residence: 31 Win- 

j die Park, Tarrytown, N. Y. and 2690 Mor 
ris Avenue, Bronx, New York City. Of 
fice: New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, 
Park, New York City. 

BARNUM, Charlotte Cynthia: 

IMitor and mathematician; born in 
Phillipston, Mass., May 17, 1860; daughter 
of Rev. Samuel Weed and Charlotte (Betts) 
Barnum. She was educated in the public 
schools of New Haven, Conn., at Vassar 
College, from which she was graduated as 
A.B., 1881, and afterward pursued gradu 
ate studies two years in Johns Hopkins Uni 
versity, and three in Yale University, from 
which she received the degree of Ph.D. in 
mathematics in 1895. She taught in Betts 
Academy, Stamford, Conn., in Bradford, 
(Mass.) Academy, in Hillhouse High 
School. New Haven, Conn., in Smith Col 
lege, and in Carleton College, Northfield, 
Minn. She w r orked as a computer for 
Yale Observatory, on Dana s Mineralogy, 
in the actuarial departments of the Massa 
chusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co., and 
of the Fidelity Mutual Life Insurance Co., 
of Philadelphia; in the U. S. Naval Observ 
atory, and 1901-1908 on the U. S. Coast 
and Geodetic Survey. Dr. Barnum is a 
contributor to periodicals and has done im 
portant literary and scientific work. She 
was assistant editor of pronunciation in 
Webster s International Dictionary and as 
sistant editor of its Australian Supple 
ment; computer of the angles of crystals 
in Dana s Mineralogy, and has done editing 
and critical proof-reading on publications 
of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 
D. C., and is now editor of the Biological 
Survey, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 
She is a member of the American Mathe 
matical Society, a fellow of the American 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Association for the Advancement of Science, 
and a member of the National Geographic 
Society, the Phi Beta Kappa Society, the 
Council of the Civic Center of Washington, 
Association of Collegiate Alumnae, and 
the National Council of Charities and 
Correction. Her father was an author and 
editor of standard reference books, includ 
ing Webster s Dictionary (1847 edition); 
Webster s International Dictionary, Smith 
and Barnum s Comprehensive Dictionary 
of the Bible, Romanism as It Is, and Vo 
cabulary of English Rhymes. Address: U. 
S. Department of Agriculture, Washington 
D. C. 

BARE,, Albert J.: 

Publisher of the Pitsburgh Post and a 
prominent member of the Democratic party 
in Pittsburgh. Mr. Barr was born in Pitts 
burgh, Jan. 12, 1851, and was educated 
at the Western University. On graduation 
he became interested in the newspaper bus 
iness and has, since 188G, been the publish 
er of the Pittsburgh Post. As director of a 
leading Democratic paper he occupies a 
prominent position in the councils of the 
Democratic party of the city of Pittsburgh 
and of that section of Pennsylvania. He 
married at Lancaster, Pa., July 28, 1884, 
Mary A. McDevitt. Address: The Post, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BARR, Amelia Edith: 

Novelist; born in Ulverston, Lancashire, 
England, March 29, 1881; daughter of Rev. 
William Henry and May (Singleton) 
Huddleston. She was educated in private 
schools, and July 11, 1850, she married, at 
Kendal, Westmoreland, England, Robert 
Barr, son of Rev. John Barr, D.D., of 
Glasgow, Scotland. She came to America in 
September, 1853, and from 1856 to 1868 lived 
at Austin and Galveston, Texas. Her hus 
band and three sons died in Galveston in 
1867, of yellow fever, and in 1868 she came 
to New York, and in 1870 began to write. 
She is author of fifty-seven novels, all of 
which have been republished in England, 
and most of them have been translated into 
German, Dutch and other languages. She 



| has five daughters and four sons still liv- 
| ing. Residence : " Cherry Croft." Corn- 
j wall-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

, 
BARR, Frank: 

Railway official; born in Nashua, N. II., 
and educated in the public schools of that 
place. He began railway service March 1, 
1869 as freight and ticket clerk and tele 
graph operator of the Worcester and Nash 
ua Railroad at Nashua, N. H., and was gen 
eral agent of the same road, 1873-1892. 
He was appointed Nov. 1, 1892, superin 
tendent of the Worcester, Nashua and Port 
land Division of the Boston and Maine 
Railroad at Nashua; Dec. 1, 1896, assist 
ant general manager, Boston and Maine 
R. R. and since July 16, 1903, has been 
third vice-president and general manager of 
the Boston and Maine Railroad. Address: 
Union Station, Boston, Mass. 

BARRETT, Harrison D.: 

One of the leading exponents of the be 
lief as to the future life known as spirit 
ualism. Mr. Barrett was born in Canaan, 
Me., April 26, 1863, and graduated at the 
Meadville Theological Seminary in 1889. 
He was, for twelve years, teacher in the 
common schools, and for three years there 
after, supervisor of the public schools in 
towns of Pennsylvania. He became inter 
ested in spiritualism, and, upon conviction 
of the truth of its teachings, lectured 
throughout the United States for several 
years, and became editor of the Banner of 
Light, a, spiritualist paper published in 
Boston, in 1879, continuing with that pa 
per until 1904. In 1893 he was elected 
president of the National Spiritual Associa 
tion, and has since occupied that position. 
For a number of years he was chairman of 
the Cassadaga Spiritualist Camp Associa 
tion, which controls the place of the sum 
mer meetings of spiritualists. Mr. Barrett 
is the author of a work on the purposes of, 
and the results obtained at, the annual 
meetings at Cassadaga, and of several other 
works on spiritualism. He married, Oct. 
13, 1897, Margaret Coffyn. Address: 600 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Pennsylvania Avenue, S. E., Washington, 
D. C. 

BARRETT, John: 

Diplomat; born at Grafton, Vt., Nov. 28, 
18G6; son of Charles and Caroline (San- 
ford) Barrett. After graduation from the 
Worcester Academy at Worcester, Mass., he 
went to Nashville, Tenn., and attended 
Vanderbilt University, but finished his col 
lege work in Dartmouth College, where he 
was graduated as A.B. in 1889, receiving 
the honorary degree of M.A. in 1899. Mr. 
Barrett became a teacher in Hopkins Acad 
emy at Oakland, Calif., and soon afterward 
became assistant editor of The Statistican, 
a financial and industrial publication of 
San Francisco. He was afterward editor 
ially connected with newspapers in San 
Francisco, Tacoma, Seattle and Portland, 
Ore., and while associate editor of The 
Telegram at Portland, was appointed 
American minister to Siam, where he se 
cured the settlement by arbitration of 
claims amounting to three million dollars 
and settled important questions of extra 
territoriality. He remained in that post 
until 1898, and in addition to the duties of 
the mission to Siam had charge of special 
diplomatic and commercial investigations 
in that country, Japan, Korea, Siberia and 
India. He was a war correspondent in 
the Philippines, 1898-1899, and American 
plenipotentiary to the International Confer 
ence of American Republics, at Mexico, in 
1901-1902. He was commissioner-general 
of foreign affairs for the Louisana Pur 
chase Exposition, 1902-1903, American min 
ister to the Argentine Republic, 1903-1904, 
American minister to Panama, 1904-1905; 
American minister to Columbia, 1905-190*5; 
is now director of the International Bureau 
of American Republics. He is author of: 
Admiral George Dewey, 1899, and is also 
a contributor to magazines on Oriental and 
Latin American subjects. He is a member 
of the University and Lotos Clubs of New 
York; The Metropolitan, University and 
Chevy Chase Clubs of Washington, the Uni 
versity Club of Chicago, and the University 



Club of San Francisco. Address: Pan 
American Bureau, Washington, D. C. 

BARRON, Elwyn Alfred: 

Dramatist and novelist; born in Lima, 
N. Y., March G, 1855; son of Alfred Love- 
joy and Ellen Elizabeth Barren. He was 
educated in Robert College, Tennessee, and 
afterward engaged in newspaper work in 
Chicago; and from 1887 to 1895 he was dra 
matic critic and editorial writer on the 
staff of the Chicago Inter Ocean. He lived 
in London and Paris from 1895 to 1907. 
Mr. Barren s first two plays were written in 
collaboration with Morgan Bates, including 
A Mountain Pink, produced at the Grand 
Opera House, Chicago, in 1883, and A Mor 
al Crime, produced at the Columbia Thea 
tre, Chicago; and his subsequent plays, of 
which he is sole author, with the dates of 
their production, are: Lady Ashley, 1886; 
When Bess was Queen, 1894; Punchinello 
(produced by Edward S. Willard), 1900; 
The Ruling Power (New York), 1904; A 
Prince of the People, (produced in Eng 
land), 1905. Mr. Barron is also author of: 
The Viking (drama in blank verse), 1888; 
Lawrence Barrett, a biography, 1887, and 
the novels (published in London and Amer 
ican editions) : Manders, 1899; In Old New 
York, 1900; Marcel Levignet, 190G. Mr. 
Barron married in Chicago, Sept. 9, 1884, 
Hannah Lee Bird, and they have a son and 
daughter. Address : 107 W^averly Place, 
New York City. 

BARRON, Ernest R.: 

Inventor, especially identified with the 
I development of the typewriter; born in 
I Meadville, Pa., May 23, 1844. He was in 
charge of the assembling and aligning de 
partment of the Remington Typewriter Co., 
in 1874, and personally prepared the first 
Remington typewriter used. He was later 
connected with the manufacture of the Cali- 
graph typewriter and with the Densmore, 
Densmore-Franklin, and other makes of 
writing machines. His last employment 
j was witli the Franklin Typewriter Co., with 
1 whom he was superintendent of the align- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



ing and assembling department, and ex 
pert on inventions. Since his retirement 
from that company, lie has lived on his in 
come from royalties on the Remington ma 
chine. He has made a large number of in 
ventions relative to typewriters which are 
used on the standard make of rnachines 
Mr. Barron is a step-son of the late James 
Densmore, one of the early typewriter ex 
perts. He married, March 18, 1809, Rachel 
R. Wyman, Cochranton, Pa. Address: 519 
Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, X. Y. 

BARRY, Edward Buttevant: 

Rear- Admiral United States Navy; was 
born in Vatrick Place, in Xew York City, 
Oct. 20, 1849; son of Garrett Robert and 
Sarah Agnes (Glover) Barry. He was ed 
ucated at the Lespinasse School in Clinton 
Place, and at St. Francis Xavier s College 
and was graduated from the United States 
Xaval Academy in June, 1869. He took three 
practice cruises while cadet, on the Mace 
donian and Savannah, and after graduation 
a special cruise on the Sabine, 1869-1870; 
was promoted to ensign, 1870, and to master, 
1872; commissioned lieutenant, 1875; lieu 
tenant commander, March, 1897; comman 
der, March, 1900, captain, March 31, 1905, 
and rear-admiral, Feb. 1, 1909. He served on 
many duties and stations as a naval officer ; 
aboard the Wachusett, European station, 
and then at Key West during the Virginius 
trouble with Spain, 1873-1874; aboard the 
Alaska, 1878-1880; he witnessed the Chil 
ian torpedo-boat attack on the Peruvian 
man-of-war Union, at Callao, and two 
of the bombardments of Callao, and also the 
blowing up of the Chilian Steamer Loa; 
Cincinnati, 1897 to Feb. 1899; on South 
Atlantic Station until war with Spain be 
came imminent; then at Key West, from 
March, 1898, to Feb., 1899. in the Span 
ish-American War he was participating in 
the blockade of Havana, the attack on Ma- 
tanzas; scouting off Cape Antonio when 
the Spanish lleet was reported at Curac.oa; 
Bahama Channel and in the blockade of San 
Juan, Porto Rico, July, 1898. He had two 
interviews witli Governor-general Macias at 
the time the armistice was proclaimed, 
and endeavored to secure the surrender of 



San Juan; convoyed the Maria Theresa to 
the eastern end of Cuba; the Cincinnati was 
in Havana when the United States flag was 
hoisted there, Jan. 1, 1899. He afterwards 
served on the receiving-ship Franklin, and 
the gunnery training-ship Amphitrite, and 
commanded the collier Marcellus, January- 
May, 1900. He commanded the gun-bo it 
.Vicksburg, Aug., 1900, and took her to the 
Asiatic Station., Xov., 1900, serving there 
until 1903, the Vicksburg forming the 
naval part of the expedition, under Briga 
dier-General Funston, resulting in the c.ip- 
ture of Emilio Aguinaldo. in conjunction 
with Brigadier-General Kobbe, he occupied 
for the first time, the islands of Palawan 
(Paragua), Kulion and Cuyo; and later, 
on the Saniar Station, served in connection 
with Brigadier-General Smith during part 
of the insurrection. He was ordered by the 
Department, ten days too late, by cible 
from Samar, to winter in Xew Chvvang 
(China), but succeeded in getting there, 
2,000 miles against the X. E. monsoon. 
He was attached to the Navy Yard, Xew 
York, April, 1903, as aide to the command 
ant ; was a member of the Labor Board 
and Board of Inspection, Oct., 1904; com 
manded the battleship Kentucky, 1:06- 
1907; detached Xov., 1907, and ordered to 
1 Xew York as recruiting officer, from which 
! duty he was relieved Dec. 19th and became 
I Supervisor of Xaval Auxiliaries with head- 
i quarters in Xew York, Dec. 31st; May 7, 
I 1909, was detached from that duty and 
! ordered May 17th to command second divi- 
! sion, first squadron of the Pacific fleet. He 
is a member of the Order .of Foreign Wars 
; (Pennsylvania Commandery), the Naval 
i Order of the United States (Xew York 
i Commandery), ami of the University and 
| Army and Navy Clubs of Xew York City. 
: He was married, April 7, 1875, to Mary 
Wycliff Clitz, and has one daughter living, 
Mary Agnes (now Mrs. L. A. Waters). 
Address : Care Navy Department, Wash 
ington, D. C. 

BARRY, Thomas Henry: 

Major-General U. S. Army; born in Xew 
i Y r ork City, Oct. 13, 1855; son of David and 



104 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Margaret (Dimond) Barry. In 1873, after, 
a competitive examination, he was appoint- ! 
eel by Hon. Robert B, Roosevelt, a cadet at | 
the U. S. Military Academy, from which he 
was graduated in 1877. He served at vari- , 
ous frontier posts and in several campaigns j 
against Indians, and on other duties prior j 
to the Spanish- American War, when he was 
assigned as adjutant -general of the PJiilip-. j 
pine forces. He served as brigadier-gen- j 
eral of U. S. Volunteers with the China ! 
Relief Expedition, in Aug., 1900, observer 
with the Russian Army during the Russo- 
Japanese War, to Dec., 1905; assistant chief ; 
of staff, U. S. Army, and president of the ; 
Army War College from . Dec., 1905, to 
Feb., 1907, when he was assigned to the j 
command of the Army of Cuban Pacifica- | 
tion, on which duty he continued till April 
1, 1909. General Barry attended the ma 
neuvers of the German Army in Sept., j 
190(5. He married, at Washington, D. C., ! 
Jan. 23, 1884, Ellen Bestor. Address: j 
War Department, Washington, D. C. 

BARRYMORE, Ethel: 

Actress; born in Philadelphia, Aug. 15, 
1879, of a distinguished theatrical family, i 
her father,, the late Maurice Barrymore, 
having been one of the leading actors of 
his time, and her mother, Georgina Drew j 
Barrymore, her uncle, John Drew, and her j 
grand-parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Drew, of 
Philadelphia, all being people of mark on 
the American stage. She was educated in 
the Convent of Notre Dame, in Philadel 
phia. Her first recorded experience on the 
stage was Sept. 23, 1895, at the Empire 
Theater, New York City, when she ap 
peared as " Katharine " in That Indepen- ; 
dent Young Person. In 1896 she became a 
member of the Empire Theater Stock Com 
pany, headed by her uncle, John Drew, and ; 
played with it in New York and London, j 
and in 1897 she entered Sir Henry Irving s 
Company, in which she remained until \ 
1900, when she returned to the Charles j 
Frohman management, as a star, first in 
Captain Jinks of the Horse Marines, j 
and afterward in Cousin Kate; Sunday; | 
" Nora," in Ibsen s A Doll s House ; Alice- i 



Sit-by-the-Fire ; Lady Frederick, etc. She 
married in March, 1909, Russell G. Colt. 
Address; Empire Theater, New York City. 

BARSE, George R., Jr.: 

Artist; born in Detroit, Mich., 1861; son 
of George R. and Susan B. (Peironnet) 
Barse. After completing the public school 
courses in Kansas City, he studied in the 
Chicago Art Institute, and afterward went 
to Paris and entered the ficole des Beaux 
Arts, where he was a pupil of Cabanel, and 
also studied in the Academic Julian under 
Gustave Boul anger and Jules LeFebvre, re 
maining in Paris five years. He had a 
studio in Boston, 1883-1885, was in Italy, 
1887-1892, and since then has lived in New 
York City in winter, and in summer at his 
country home, " Lone Pine," near Katonah, 
N. H. Mr. Barse is a figure painter, and is 
also prominently known for his mural and 
decorative work. He painted eight deco 
rative panels in the. Library of Congress 
at Washington, and many mural paintings 
in private residences, and he is represented 
by paintings in many public galleries. Mr. 
Barse has been an academician of the Na 
tional Academy of Design since 1899, and 
is a member of the Society of American 
Artists, and of the Century Club of New 
York. He was awarded the first prize of 
the National Academy of Design in 1895, the 
Shaw Fund prize of the Society of Amer 
ican Artists in 1898, and the medal of the 
Pan-American Exposition at Buffalo in 
1901. He married in Rome, Italy, in 1890, 
Rosa Ferrara. Address: Katonah, N. H., 
or 7 W. 43d Street, New York City. 

BARSTOW, Frank Quarles: 

Capitalist; born in Waukesha, Wis., 
Oct. 24, 1847. Mr. Barstow is best known 
in connection with the later history of the 
operations of the Standard Oil Company, 
of which he is director, especially with 
regard to the transportation of oil and 
its products. He has, however, taken a 
prominent part in the development of the 
work of increasing the number of commer 
cial products of corn and of introducing 
them to international use. In connection 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



with this work he is one of the hest known 
of those active in this work. He is a direc 
tor of the Corn Products Refining Company 
and the New York Glucose Company. Mr. 
Barstow is also a director of the Railway 
Steel Spring Company, the Thompson-Star- 
rett Company, the Hegeman Company, the 
Union Tank Line Co., the People s Bank, 
and Savings Investment and Trust Com 
pany. Residence: East Orange, 1ST. J. Ad 
dress: 20 Broadway, New York City. 

EARTH, Charles George: 

Stock broker; born in Ohio, Aug. 19, 
1840; son of John M. Barth and Elizabeth 
(Helbig) Barth. He was educated in the 
public schools of New York and Michigan. 
Mr. Barth was a general merchant at St. 
Joseph, Mich., 1805 to 1808, and grain, 
flour and provision commission merchant 
in the Chicago Board of Trade, 1808 to 
1891. He has been a member of the Board 
of Trade for thirty-three years, and a mem 
ber of the Chicago Stock Exchange since 
1883. He organized and was a director and 
cashier of the Lemont State Bank, of Le- 
mont, 111., 1891 to 1897. He is now presi 
dent and director of the American Angora 
Coat and Live Stock Company; director 
and treasurer of the Chicago, Hobart and 
Valparaiso Electric Railway, and a direc 
tor of the National Oil Company, the 
Western Construction Company, the Colo 
rado, Oklahoma and Chickasha Railway 
Company and the Lemont Electric Light 
and Power Company. He served on the 
staff of Generals D. A. Russell, Pierson, 
Sickles and Chamberlain as aide and com 
missary of subsistence with rank of cap 
tain and major by brevet, during the Civil 
War, in the Army of the Potomac, and par 
ticipated in all the battles from and includ 
ing Antietam until the surrender at Appo- 
mattox. He is a Republican in politics 
and a Congregationalist in his religious 
affiliation. Major Barth has served as a 
school trustee. He is a member of the 
Western Society of the Army of the Po 
tomac and of the Military Order of the 
Loyal Legion of the United States. He 
married at St. Joseph, Mich.., in June, 1864, 



105 

| Emma F. Swartwout, and they had two 
children: Harry Arlington Barth and Nel- 
|lie Ristori Barth, the latter now deceased. 
j Residence : 309 Oak Street. Chicago, 
j Office address: 153 La Salic Street, Chi- 
;cago, 111. 

BARTHOLDT, Richard: 

Congressman, editor; born in Schleiz, 
| Thuringia, Germany, Nov. 2, 1853. He 
came to this country while a mere boy, 
going to St. Louis in the early 70 s; and 
| afterwards went East and was connected 
I with several New York and Brooklyn 
j newspapers. He returned to St. Louis and 
took charge of the Tribune, a daily Repub 
lican newspaper. In 1891 he was president 
of the Conference of German- American So 
cieties, held in Washington, D. C. In 1892 
he was elected to Congress as a Republican 
from the Tenth Missouri district. He was 
reflected in 1894, 1896, 1898, 1900, 1902 
and 1904, and 1900. He is chairman of 
the Committee on Public Buildings and 
Grounds, and the second member on the 
Commitee on Labor. He presided over the 
International Parliamentary Congress in 
1904, and it was though his influence that 
the Congress was held in the United States. 
He is one of the leaders of the peace move 
ment in this country. Address: 3319 S. 
Ninth Street, St. Louis, Mo. 

BARTLETT, Charles Lafayette: 

Lawyer and congressman; born at Mon- 
ticello, Jasper County, Ga., Jan. 31, 1853. 
He removed in 1875 from Monticello to 
Macon, GA., where he has ever since re 
sided. He was educated at the University 
of Georgia, graduating as A.B. in 1870, and 
studied law in the University of Virginia. 
He was admitted to the bar in Aug., 1872; 
was appointed solicitor general, for the 
Macon Judicial Court, Jan. 31, 1877, and 
served in that capacity until Jan. 31, 1881. 
He was elected to two terms in the House 
of Representatives of Georgia and one in 
the State Senate, was elected judge of the 
Superior Court of the Macon Circuit, Jan. 
1, 1893, and resigned that office May 1, 
1894. He became the Democratic nominee 



106 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



for Congress i n 1894, and was elected to 
the Fifty-fourth Congress, and he has been 
reflected biennially since and is now serv 
ing in the Sixty-first Congress. Address: 
Macon, Ga. 

BARTLETT, Charles W.: 

Lawyer; born in Boston, Aug. 12, 1845. 
He was graduated from Dartmouth College 
in 1800, and from the Albany Law School 
in 1871. He was admitted to the bar in 
Boston, and Avith a constantly increasing 
practice has come to be one of the leading 
members of that bar, being regarded espe- 
cally strong as a pleader and trial lawyer. 
In the past few years he has taken a 
prominent part in the Democratic politics 
of Massachusetts, and made an unsuccess 
ful campaign for lieutenant-governorship, 
and was also an unsuccessful candidate for 
the nomination of governor. He married, 
first in Franklin, N. H., to Mary L. Mor 
rison, and second, in Acushnet, Mass., in 
Aug., 1897, to Annie M. White. Resi 
dence: 39 Melville Avenue. Office: 244 
Washington Street, Boston. 

BARTLETT, Edward Theodore: 

Jurist; born in Skaneateles, N. Y., June 
14, 1841; son of Dr. Levi Bartlett, who 
practised as a physician and surgeon at 
Skaneateles for over fifty years. He is of 
Norman-French ancestry, the family name 
having originally been Bartelot, and his 
first American ancestor came from England 
to New Hampshire in early Colonial days; 
and he is a great-grandson of Josiah Bart 
lett (signer of the Declaration of Inde 
pendence and the Articles of Confedera 
tion, and first governor and chief justice 
of New Hampshire). He received a classical 
education, then studied law and was admit 
ted to the bar at Skaneateles in Oct., 18G2. 
He practised law at the Onondaga County 
Bar until 1808, when he removed to New 
York City, and practised there until 1894. 
He was Republican nominee for justice of 
the Supreme Court of New York in 1891, 
and in 1893 he was nominated and elected 
associate justice of the Court of Appeals 
of New York, which office he holds by re^ 



election, his present term expiring Dec. 
31, 1911. Judge Bartlett is a member of 
the Association of the Bar of City of 
New York, the New York Law Institute, 
.New England Society, Sons of the Ameri 
can Revolution, and the Union League and 
Republican Clubs of New York City. 
Address: LTnion League Club, New York 
City. 

BARTLETT, George A.: 

Lawyer and congressman; born in San 
Francisco, Calif., Nov. 30, 1869. He has 
lived in Nevada from his infancy, was edu 
cated in the common schools of that State, 
and was graduated from the Law Depart 
ment of Georgetown University, Washing 
ton, D. C., LL.B., 1894. He was admitted 
to the bar, and has been engaged in prac 
tice in Nevada since 1894; was elected 
and served as district attorney of Eureka 
County, Nov., and in 1906 he was elected, 
as .a Democrat, to the Sixtieth Congress. 
and in 1908 was reelected to the Sixty-first 
Congress from the State of Nevada at large. 
Address: Tonopah, Nev. 



BARTLETT, Homer Newton: 

Organist and composer; born in Olive, 
N. Y., Dec. 28, 1845; son of Henry B. and 
Hannah C. (Hall) Bartlett. descendant of 
Josiah Bartlett (signer of the Declaration 
of Independence, and first governor of New 
York). He received a classical education 
and then pursued his musical studies under 
the tutelage of Mills, Guyon, Braun, Jacob- 
sen and other prominent teachers, and for 
a number of years has been organist of the 
Madison Avenue Baptist Church of New 
York. He is a director and former presi 
dent of the Manuscript Society and a na 
tionally known teacher of the organ, be 
sides having an international reputation 
as a composer, his compositions including 
more than 225 original works and arrange 
ments. Among these are a symphonic 
poem for orchestra, entitled Apollo, illus 
trating part of Homer s Iliad; Legende 
(meditation for orchestra) ; Concerto in 
G for violin and orchestra ; two pieces for 
string orchestra; several cantatas (chorus 



MEN OF AMERICA. 107 

aixl piano); Ballade (violin and orches- , managing director of the Societv for Fs 

x r Jsz^^ =S~gZ 



Mr. Bartlett was one of the founders of 
the American Guild of Organists. Address: 
272 Manhattan Avenue, New York City. 

BARTLETT, John R.: 

Organizer of corporations; born in Fred- 
ericton, New Brunswick, May 17, 1839. He 
has for the past thirty years been the mov 
ing spirit in the creation and reorganiza 
tion of many large corporations. An illus 
tration of his peculiar creative ability may 
be found in his conception and creation of 
the great water system now supplying 
Newark, Jersey City, Paterson, Passaic, the 
Oranges and other towns in New Jersey 
with pure water, which, in spite of stren 
uous opposition, was brought to a success 
ful completion in the year 1890. He 
reorganized and rehabilitated the manufac 
turing and commercial business of The 
American Cotton Oil Company in this coun 
try and Europe. This company embraced 
thirty-five separate corporations, located 
in seventeen States of the Union, with a 
capital of $33,000.000. On the successful 
completion of this work, Mr. Bartlett was 
elected to the chairmanship of the Nica 
ragua Canal Company. The reorganization j 
of this company was a complicated prob- j 
lem, but the plan formulated by Mr. Bart- | 
lett fulfilled the requirements of the situ- I 
ation. Perhaps the most remarkable of his 
works, was the consolidation in England | 
of the British Oil & Cake Mills, Limited, 
which company embraced twenty-eight 
mills and twelve refineries, engaged in man 
ufacturing and refining cotton seed and | 
linseed oil and cake throughout Great j 
Britain. This enterprise was organized on I 
a cash basis, and is unique from the fact 
that it is the only large industrial com- 
bination in Great Britain or Europe organ 
ized bv an American. Mr. Bartlett was 



>f the East Jersey 
Water Company; director of the Pas- 
I saic Water Company and the Acquachanonk 
I Water Company ; president of the Draw- 
| baugh Telephone & Telegraph Company, 
The American Cotton Oil Company of New 
Jersey, The American Cotton Oil Company, 
! of Ohio, The National Cotton Oil Company, 
Union Oil Company (of Rhode Island), 
The N. K. Fairbank Company of Chicago, 
and director of the W. J. Wilcox Lard and 
Refining Company; president of the Union 
Oil Company of New Orleans, and of the 
Bay State Gas Company of Delaware; di 
rector of the Siemens & Halske Electric 
Company, Chicago, the Pennsylvania Iron 
Works Co. of Philadelphia, and the Mari 
time Canal Company, and president of the 
Nicaragua Canal Company. He is a mem 
ber of the New England Society and of the 
Union League and Lawyers Clubs of New 
York. Address: 2 Wall Street, New York 
City. 

BARTLETT, Paul Wayland: 

Sculptor; born in New Haven, Conn., in 
1865. He began the study of sculpture 
while a boy and at the age of fourteen ex 
hibited a bust in the Paris Salon. In 1880 
he entered the Ecole des Beaux Arts, where 
he became a pupil of Cavelier. He attained 
an early and considerable success and is 
best known for his equestrian statue of 
Lafayette in the Square of the Louvre, 
Paris, the gift of the school children of the 
United States to France. Among his other 
works are the equestrian statue of General 
McClellan, Philadelphia; statue of Gen 
eral Joseph Warren, Boston; statues of 
Columbus and Michelangelo in the Con 
gressional Library at Washington, and the 
north front of the Capitol, Hartford, 
Conn. He is also represented in the Lux 
embourg Gallery and the Musee des Arts 



108 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Decoratifs, Paris, Metropolitan Museum, ] 
New York, the Boston Museum, the Phila 
delphia Academy of Fine Arts, and the Chi 
cago Art Institute. He is an officier of 
the Le"gion d Honneur of France, and has 
been a member of the jury of awards at 
several sculpture exhibits connected with 
international exhibitions. Address: South 
west corner of Third Street and Randolph 
Place, N. E., Washington, D. C. 

BARTLETT, Willard: 

Jurist; born in Uxbridge, Mass., Oct. 14, 
1846; son of William 0. and Agnes E. H. 
(Willard) Bartlett. He was graduated 
from Columbia University, A.B., 1869, and 
from the Law Department of New York 
University, LL.B., 1868, and the degree of 
LL.D. has been conferred upon him by 
Hamilton College, 1894, New York Univer 
sity, 1904, and Columbia University, 1904. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1868; prac 
tised la\v in association with Hon. Elihu 
Root, from 1869 to 1883, when he was 
elected a justice of the Supreme Court of 
the State of New York, and he was re- 
elected in 1897. He served in the Appel 
late Division of the New York Supreme 
Court until 1906, when he was appointed 
associate justice of the Court of Appeals 
of New York, and in Nov., 1907, was 
elected to the same office, in which his term 
will expire Dec. 31, 1916. Judge Bartlett 
has been professor of medical jurisprudence 
in Long Island College Hospital since 1898. 
He is a member of the Society of Colonial 
Wars, the Sons of the Revolution, the 
University and Century Clubs of New York 
City, and the Brooklyn and Hamilton 
Clubs of Brooklyn, N. Y. He married in 
Brooklyn, Oct. 26, 1876, Mary Fairbanks 
Buffum. Residence: 21 Pierrepont Street, 
Brooklyn. Official address: Albany, N. Y. 

BARTON, Clara: 

Philanthropist; born in Oxford, Mass., 
Dec. 25, 1821 ; daughter of Captain Stephen 
and Sally (Stone) Barton; was graduated 
from Clinton Liberal Institute, and studied 
languages and art in the Art Institute at 
Worcester, Mass. She taught school for 



ten years, afterward becoming the first 
woman clerk in a Government office in 
Washington, having charge of the caveats 
in the Patent Office; which position she 
ave up at the opening of the Civil War 
for work in the field. She was in the 
Franco-German War, serving with it on the 
fields of Hagenau, Metz, Strassburg, Bel- 
fort, Woerth, the Baden hospitals, Mont- 
belard, and in Paris after the fall of the 
Commune. Miss Barton spent the seven 
years from. 1875 to 1882 in making the 
International Red Cross work known to 
the United States^ and in 1881 organized 
the American National Red Cross. She 
was nominated to its first presidency by 
President Garfield, and secured the ad 
hesion of the United States to the Treaty 
of Geneva, March 2, 1882. Under her 
direction the American National Red Cross 
took charge of relief work in the Michigan 
forest fires of 1881; the floods of the 
Mississippi and Ohio Valleys in 1882, 1883 
and 1884; the Texas famine of 1885; the 
cyclone at Mt. Vernon, 111., 1888; Florida 
yellow fever, 1888; Johnstown disaster, 
1889; the Russian famine of 1892; the 
hurricane and tidal wave on the South 
Carolina Islands in 1893-1894; the Armen 
ian massacres of 1896; the Cuban Recon- 
centrado relief work of 1898-1900, in which 
about $500,000 worth of supplies, etc., 
were distributed; the Spanish- American 
War ($800,000), 1898, and the Galveston 
hurricane and tidal wave, 1900, besides 
many minor disasters. Miss Barton rep 
resented the Government of the United 
States at the International Red Cross Con 
ferences at Geneva, 1884; Carlsruhe, 1887; 
Vienna, Austria, 1897, and St. Petersburg, 
Russia, 1902. She has been the recipient 
of decorations and honors from many na 
tions, including a gold cross of remem 
brance from the Grand Duke and Grand 
Duchess of Baden, 1870; the Iron Cross, 
of Prussia, conferred by Emperor William 
I, and Empress Augusta, 1871; medal of 
the International Committee of the Red 
Cross of Geneva, Switzerland, 1882; Red 
Cross by Queen of Servia, 1884; silver 
medal by Empress Augusta of Germany, 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



100 



1884; flag voted by the Congress at Berne, 
Switzerland, 1884; jewels by the Grand 
Duchess of Baden, 1884-1887, and from 
the Queen of Prussia, 1887; diplomas and 
decorations by the Sultan of Turkey, and | 
the Prince of Armenia, 1896; Diploma | 
of Gratitude, and decoration, by Spain, and 
vote of thanks by the Spanish Cortes, 1899; 
decoration of the Order of the Red Cross 
by the Czar of Russia, 1902, and decoration 
by Belgium, 1902; besides resolutions of 
the Central Relief Committee, Galveston. 
1900, and votes of thanks from the Portu 
guese Red Cross, 1900; and the Texas Leg 
islature, 1901. Miss Barton added to the 
work of the Red Cross in America, by per 
mission of the other nations, the feature 
of relief in National qalamities other than 
War, since known as the " American 
Amendment " to the Red Cross, and adopt 
ed by all nations. She is the author of: 
The Official History of the Red Cross, 
printed by the Government, 1883; The Red 
Cross, 1899; A Story of the Red Cross, 
1904; The Story of My Childhood, 1907, 
and many pamphlets and reports. She re 
signed the presidency of the American Red 
Cross in 1904, after having brought it to 
a place of assured strength in the judg 
ment and affections of the American peo 
ple, accomplishing by a rare combination of 
noble impulses, clear brain and high ex 
ecutive ability, a work for her country 
and her age such as has been given to few 
women to achieve. Address: Glen Echo, 
Md. 

BARTON, Enos M.: 

Chairman of Board of Directors of the 
Western Electric Company; born at Lor 
raine, New York, Dec. 2, 1842; son of Sid 
ney William and Fanny (Bliss) Barton. 
He was educated at the public and private 
schools of Lorraine, and attended a course 
at the University of Rochester, N. Y. His 
entry into a business life was as a tele 
graph messenger boy, and his rise was 
rapid. In 1869 he transferred his activities 
to Chicago, where in 1872 he became secre 
tary of the Western Electric Company; 
later he became vice-president and from 



1887 to 1908 was president of the com 
pany; since then chairman of the Board 
of Directors. He is also a director of the 
Merchants Loan and Trtist Company, and 
is a trustee of the University of Chicago, 
and an associate member of the American 
Institute of Electrical Engineers. He is a 
Republican in politics and is a member of 
the Chicago, Union League, Commercial 
and Quandrangle Clubs of Chicago, and 
the Hinsclale Club of Hinsdale, 111. He 
lias been twice married. His first wife was 
Katherine S. Richardson, to whom he 
was united at Rochester in 1869, and who 
died leaving three children, Alvin L., Kath 
arine S. (Mrs. Robert W. Childs) and 
Clara M.. His second marriage was to 
Mary C. Rust, of Chicago, in 1899, and 
they have three children: Malcolm S., 
Evan M. and Gilbert R. Residence: His- 
dale, DuPage County, 111. 

BARTON, George Be Forest: 

Real estate ; born in New York, March 
23, 1841; son of William Barton and Eliza 
Phillips (Whittemore) Barton. He was 
educated in the private schools of New 
York City and South Williamstown, Mass. 
He was appointed paymaster in the United 
States Navy, June 5, 1861, and served in 
the United States ships Monticello, Sassa- 
cus, St. Louis, Supply, Swatara, and Ports 
mouth. On the Monticello was present at 
the bombardment and capture of Forts Hat- 
teras and Clark at Hatteras Inlet, N. C., 
Aug., 1861, the first naval success in the 
War of the Rebellion. In the Sassacus was 
aide and signal officer to Commander Fran 
cis A. Roe, U. S. Navy, in the celebrated 
encounter betwen the Sassacus and the 
Confederate iron-clad, Albemarle, in Albe- 
marle Sound, May, 1864, when Commander 
Roe hurled at top speed the light, wooden 
Sassacus on the iron-clad Albemarle, dis 
abling and driving the latter back to her 
port at Plymouth, N. C., where she was 
afterward torpedoed and destroyed by 
Lieutenant Gushing. In 1866 was in the 
Swatara in the Mediterranean Squadron, 
and chased to Alexandria, Egypt, and cap 
tured there, John H. Surratt, the friend of 



110 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



John Wilkes Booth and one of the Lincoln 
conspirators, and brought him to Wash 
ington, D. C., in Feb., 1867. Resigned from 
the Navy and in 1871 engaged in the real 
estate business in New York City, with 
his cousin, William Lawrence Whittemore, 
under the firm name of Barton and Whitte 
more. He was treasurer of the Real Estate 
Exchange in 1893 and 1894, and president 
in 1895 and 1896. He is a Republican in 
politics and an Episcopalian in religious 
adherence. He is a companion, and treas- 
urer-in-chief, of the Military Order of the 
Loyal Legion; a companion of the Military 
Order Foreign Wars; vice-commander of the 
Naval Order; member of the Sons of the 
Revolution; the Society of 1812; vice-presi 
dent Nineteenth Army Corps; member of 
the Army and Navy and Union League 
Clubs of New York City. Mr. Barton mar 
ried at Garrison-on-Hudson, Dec. 28, 1876, 
Anna Dudley Ward, only daughter of the 
late Colonel Thomas William Ward, U. S. 
V. Address: 122 West 74th Street, New 
York City. 

BARTON, James Levi: 

Foreign secretary of the American Board 
of Commissioners for Foreign Missions; 
born in Chittenden County, Vt., Sept. 23, 
1855. He was educated at Middlebury 
College and at Hartford Theological Sem 
inary. In 1885 he was sent to Turkey as 
a missionary of the American Board for 
Foreign Missions, and in 1888 became a 
professor in the Theological Seminary at 
Harpoot. In 1893 he became president of 
Euphrates College at Harpoot, and in 
1894 he was appointed foreign secretary 
for the American Board, which office he 
now holds. He has traveled extensively 
in connection with the work of the Ameri 
can Board of Missions, having been chair 
man of the respective deputations to Japan, 
Ceylon and India, and secretary of the 
deputation to China. He is author of: 
The Missionary and His Critics; The Un 
finished Task; Daybreak in Turkey, etc. 
He married in West Winfield, N. Y., Flora 
E. Holmes. Residence: Newton Centre, 
Mass. Office: 14 Beacon Street, Boston. 



BARUS, Carl: 

Professor of physics; born in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, Feb. 19, 1856; son of Carl and Sophia 
(Mollman) Barus. He was educated in 
; Woodward High School, Cincinnati, Colum 
bia University, 1874-1876, and the Univer 
sity of W 7 iirzburg, Bavaria, 1876-1880, re- 
i ceiving the Ph.D. degree, and in 1907 the 
LL.D. degree was conferred upon him by 
Brown University. He was assistant to 
Professor Kohlrausch, at Wiirzburg, in 
1879 and 1880; was a physicist on the 
U. S. Geological Survey, 1880-1892; pro 
fessor of meteorology in the U. S. Weather 
Bureau, 1892-1893; physicist of the Smith 
sonian Institution, 1893-1895; since then 
Hazard professor of physics at Brown Uni 
versity, where, since 1903, he has been 
Dean of the Graduate Department. H 
served on the committee appointed by 
Congress in 1895 to determine the elec 
trical standards of the Government, and 
was speaker for American physics at the 
World s Congress of Scientists, held in St. 
Louis in 1904. Dr. Barus is a fellow of 
the American Association for the Advance 
ment of Science, and was vice-president, 
and chairman of the Section of Physics in 
1897; is a member of the National Acad 
emy of Sciences; corresponding member of 
the British Association for the Advance- 
i ment of Science ; honorary member of the 
! Royal Institution of Great Britain ; fellow 
j (Rumford medallist, 1900) of the Ameri- 
i can Academy of Arts and Sciences (Mass.) ; 
member and ex-president of the American 
Physical Society, and member of the French 
| Physical Society, Paris. He has been, 
| since 1902, a member of the Advisory Com- 
| mittee of the Carnegie Institution. Dr. 
I Barus has, since 1879, been a regular con- 
I tributor to the standard magazines of phys 
ical research throughout the world, and 
his original investigations are embodied in 
about two hundred and forty original arti- 
: cles, and numerous books on physical sub- 
I jects. He married in Boston, in Jan., 1887, 
Annie Gertrude Howes, and they have two 
I children. Residence : 30 Elrngrove Ave 
nue. Office : Brown University, Provi- 
| dence, R. I. 



MEN OF AMERICA. Ill 

BASCOM, Florence: , the American Forestry Association. Ad- 

Geologist; born in Williamstown, Mass.; i dre * S: Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

daughter of John and Erama (Curtiss) ^ AC ^ , 

Bascom. She was graduated from the Uni- BASH Bertha Runkle: 

versity of Wisconsin, receiving the degrees Author; born at Berkeley Heights, N. J. ; 
of A.B. and B.L., 1882, B.S., 1884, and I daughter of Cornelius A. and Lucia (Gil- 
A.M., 1887; was a graduate student of ] ^ert) Runkle. Her father, who died dur- 
Johns Hopkins University, with the degree * n g ner childhood, was a well-known law- 
of Ph.D. in 1893. Miss Bascom was assist- | J 61 "? ft nd her mother is known as one of the 
ant in geology in the Ohio State University I editors of Charles Dudley Warner s Library 
at Columbus, Ohio, 1893-1895; since 1895 : of the World s Best Literature, and for 
she has been lecturer and professor of geol- many essays and critical articles. The 
ogy at Bryn Mawr College. She is an daughter was educated at Miss Brackett s 
assistant geologist of the United States School, in New York City, and travelled 
Geological Survey, was associate editor of in Europe and the Orient, but had her 
the American Geologist from 1896 to 1908. home in New York until her marriage, at 
Miss Bascom s contributions to geological j San Francisco, Oct. 26, 1904, to Captain 
literature include Bulletin No. 136 of the Louis H. Bash, U. S. A., after which she 
U. S. Geological Survey. The Ancient Vol- spent three yours in the Philippines, and 
canic Rocks of South Mountain, Pa., 1896, is now (1909) living at San Antonio, Texas. 
No. 150, pp. 343-349. The Aporhy lite, 1898; She still uses her maiden name Bertha 
No. 106., The Water Resources of the Phila- I Runkle, as a pen-name, and is author of: 
delphia District, 1904. She is also author The Helmet of Navarre, 1901; The Truth 
of: The Structure, Origin and Nomencla- | About Tolna, 190(5. Mrs. Bash is a member 
ture of the Acid Volcanic Rocks of South i of the Barnard Club of New York. Ad- 
Mountain, 1893, and A Pre-Tertiary Nephe- I dress: Care of the Century Company, New 
line-bearing Rock, 1896 (Journal of Geol- | York City, 
ogy) ; Aporhylite of South Mountain, Pa., | 

1896. and The Piedmont Plateau of Penn- BASHFORD, James Whitford: 
sylvania, 1905 (Bulletin of the Geological Bishop of the Methodist Episrop-il 
Society of America); The Geology of the . church; born at Fayette, Wis., May 2.1, 
Crystalline Rocks of Cecil County, Md. 1849; son of Rev. Samuel Bashford and of 
(Maryland Geological Survey Publica- Mary Ann (M Kee) Bashford. He was 
tions) ; Anhydritzwilling von Ausse, with graduated in the classical course from the 
V. Goldschmidt, 1907 (Groth s Zeitschrift University of Wisconsin as A.B. in 1873; 
fur Krystallographie, Leipzig) ; A Geologic the theological course at Boston University 
Map of the Crystalline Rock Formations of as 8.T.B. in 1876 and from the School of 
the Philadelphia Belt, with text, 1909. Oratory of Boston University in 1878, and 
Also, in the American Geologist : The Rela- from the course in all sciences of Boston 
tions of Streams in the Neighborhood of Univeristy as Ph.D. in 1881. He was pas- 
Philadelphia to the Bryn Mawr Gravel, tor of Methodist Episcopal churches in Bos- 
Jan. 1897; On Some Dikes in the Vicinity ton and Auburndale, Mass., Portland, Me., 
of Johns Bay, Maine, 1899, also reviews and Buffalo, N. Y., 1878-1889; president 
and editorials. Dr. Bascom is a fellow of of the Ohio Wesleyan University from 1889- 
the Geological Society of Americi, and the to 1904, and was elected a bishop of the 
American Association for the Advancement Methodist Episcopal Church at the General 
of Science; member of the Academy of Conference held in Los Angeles in 1904. He 
Natural Science and the Geographical So- received the degree of D.D. pro honore, from 
ciety of Philadelphia; of the National Geo- Northwestern University in 1890, and LL. 
graphic Society, the Seismic Society, and D. from Wesleyan University, in 1903. 



112 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Bishop Bashforcl is author of: Outlines of 
the Science of Religion, for class use, and 
Wesley and Goethe. He also published re 
cently : The Awakening of China ; China and 
Methodism; and God s Missionary Plan for 
the World. In connection with his Episco 
pal duties he has visited India and made a 
study of mission work in India and Malay 
sia, including the Philippines. He has also 
visited Russia and Siberia and fifteen of the 
provinces of China witnessing a large in 
crease of the missionary force and of mis 
sion work in connection with his Church in 
China, of which- he now has oversight. 
Bishop Bashford married in 1878, Jane M. 
Field, daughter of Hon. W. W. Field, of 
Madison, Wis. Address: Peking, China. 

BASS, John Foster: 

War correspondent; bom in Chicago, in 
18GG. He was educated at Harvard Uni 
versity and pi Harvard Law School, gradu 
ating frov.i the latter in 1893 and being ad 
mit tec], to the bar in 1894. In 1895 he went 
tQ Egypt as a war correspondent and since 
that time has observed the Cretan insurrec 
tion, the Armenian massacre, the Greek 
war, the Spanish-American war, the Philip 
pine insurrection, the Boxer insurrection, 
the Bulgarian uprising, and the Russo- 
Japanese war, thus having taken the com 
prehensive range of all of the armed con 
flicts that have taken place in the world 
since the adoption of his profession. Dur 
ing the Russo-Japanese war, he was in the 
field for six months with Kuroki. He is a 
fellow of the Royal Geographical Society 
of London and a member of the Explorers 
Club of New York. Residence: 125 Lin 
coln Park Boulevard. Office: 189 La 
Salle Street, Chicago. 

BASSETT, Adelaide Florence: 

Author; born in Boston in 1845; daugh 
ter of Emanuel and Abbie (Zanca) Sam 
uels. Her father was a naturalist of note, 
and was one of the naturalists sent by the 
Smithsonian Institution across the conti 
nent when the Pacific Railroad was being 
surveyed. She was educated in the dis 
trict school of Milton, Mass., and was mar 



ried at Milton, Mass., in 1891 to Orville 
Bassett. She wrote four books for girls, 
1872, and four books for boys, 1874, pub 
lished by Lee & Shepherd, of Boston; Daisy 
Travers, or the Girls of Hive Hall, same 
publishers, 1896; Father Gander s Melo 
dies, 1894 (Little, Brown & Co.); also 
many magazine articles. Address: Ham- 
monton, N. J. 

BATEMAN, James Rice: 

Manufacturer; born in New York City, 
June 26, 1867; son of Benjamin Baternan 
and Louisa H. (Smith) Bateman. He was 
educated in private schools. He is director 
of the Colonial Roofing Company and vice- 
president of the Acme Roofing Company, 
president and director of the Dyett Sand- 
Lime Brick Co., director Dyett Machine Co. 
His maternal granduncle was David T. Val 
entine, author of Valentine s Manual, of 
the City of New York, and an authority 
on the older city. Mr. Bateman s father 
was born in the old historic town of Eden- 
ton, N. C., and was of English descent. He 
is a Democrat in politics and an Episcopal 
ian in religion. He is member of the St. Da 
vid s Society, and the Masonic order and 
. the Economic Club of New York City Mr. 
I Bateman married at Evart, Mich., M. Emma 
: Ardis. Address: 156 Fifth Avenue, New 
York City. 

BATES, Arlo: 

Author; born in East Machias, Me., Dec. 
16. 1850. He was graduated from Bow- 
I doin College in 1876, and began newspaper 
and literary work. He was editor of the 
Boston Sunday Courier from 1880 to 1893, 
| when he was appointed professor of Eng- 
j lish literature of the Massachusetts Insti- 
| tute of Technology, a position he still holds. 
: He is best known for his books on the study 
! of literature and on writing English, hav 
ing the faculty of pointing out to the pri- 
vate student methods of improvement which 
are particularly helpful. He is also regard- 
! ed as a master of English style in prose 
j and verse. Among his books are: Patty s 
Perversities; Mr. Jacobs; The Pagans; A 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Wheel of Fire; Berries of the Brier; Son 
nets in Shadow; A Lad s Love; The Phil 
istines; Albrecht; The Poet and His Self; 
A Book o Nine Tales; Told in the Gate; 
In the Bundle of Time; The Torch Bearers; 
Talks on Writing English; Talks on the 
Study of Literature; The Puritans; Under 
the Beech Tree; Love in a Cloud; Talks on 
Writing English; The Diary of a Saint; 
and Talks on Teaching Literature. He 
married, in 1882, Harriet L. Vose, deceased. 
Address: 4 Otis Place, Boston. 

BATES, Arthur Laban:. 

Lawyer and congressman; horn in Mead- 
ville, Pa., June 0, 1859; son of Samuel P. 
Bates, LL.D., and S. Josephine Bates. He 
was educated in Allegheny College at Mead- 
ville, receiving the degrees of A.B., 1880, 
and A.M., 1883, and Phi Beta Kappa hon 
ors. He was admitted to the bar in 1882, 
has practised his profession continuously 
ever since, and served as city solicitor of 
Meadville, 1887-1895. He was elected 
to Congress from the Twenty-fifth District 
of Pennsylvania in 1900, and has since been 
biennially reflected., receiving the largest 
majorities ever given in that district. Ad 
dress: Meadville, Pa. 

BATES, Blanche: 

Actress; born in Portland, Ore., in 1873; 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Bates, well 
known actors, her father being manager of 
the Oro Fino Theatre in Portland at the 
time of her birth. The family removed to 
San Francisco in her infancy and she was 
educated in the public schools of that city. 
Miss Bates made her first appearance on 
the stage at a benefit performance in Stock- 
well s Theatre in San Francisco, in This 
Picture and That, a one-act play by Bran- 
der Matthews. After that she played gen 
eral utility parts in a company managed 
by T. Daniel Frawley, afterward being ad 
vanced to leading woman and later to joint 
star, making a notable success in 1895 as 
Mrs. Hilary in The Senator, and afterward 
in an extensive repertorie, including 
" Nora " in Ibsen s A Doll s House. Miss 



113 

] Bates played in Shakesperian drama in Au- 
gustin Daly s Company in 1898, later re 
turning as a star under Frawley s manage- 

j ment for a short time, then played " Mi- 
ladi " in Liebler & Co. s production of the 

j Musketeers, and since then under manage- 

I ment of David Belasco in Madame Butter- 

j fly, " Cigarette " in Under Two Flags, 
" Princess Yo-San " in The Darling of the 

| Gods, " The Girl " in The Girl of the Gol 
den West, and more recently in The Fight- 

I ing Hope. Miss Bates married Lieutenant 
(now Captain) Milton F. Davis, of the 
Tenth Cavalry, U. S. A. Address: Belasco 
Theatre, New York City. 

BATES, Charles Austin: 

Writer on business and finance; born at 
| Indianapolis, Ind., April 18, 18GO; son of 
Charles A. H. Bates and Margaret Holmes 
! (Ernsperger) Bates. He was educated in 
the public schools of Indianapolis. He is 
president of the Security National Bank 
and of the Knickerbocker Syndicate, of 
New York City, and vice-president of the 
Colorado- Yule Marble Company, of Marble 
City, Colorado. Mr. Bates married in Chi 
cago, Sept., 11, 1890, Belle Brandenburg, 
and they have two children. Summer resi 
dence: Camp Cabates (Fourth Lake), Old 
Forge, N. Y. Address: 109 Riverside 
Drive, New York City. 



BATES, John Coalter: 

Former chief of Staff of the Army; born 
in St. Louis, Mo., Aug. 20, 1842. He was 
educated in the Washington University of 
St. Louis, from which he received the honor 
ary degree of LL.D. in 1904. He was ap 
pointed first lieutenant of the llth United 
States Infantry from Missouri May 14, 
1861, serving with marked credit through 
the Civil War, and in the Spanish-American 
War was made brigadier-general of United 
States Volunteers, and subsequently pro 
moted to be major-general. His services in 
the Philippines were specially meritorious, 
and in 1900 he was promoted to be lieu 
tenant-general and chief of staff of the 
army, subsequently retiring April 14, 1906, 



114 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



after over forty years of service. General 
Bates received numerous brevets and promo 
tions for distinguished service during his 
career. Address: 1313 Massachusetts Ave 
nue, X. W., Washington, D. C. 

BATES, John Lewis: 

Lawyer and ex-governor; born at North 
Easton, Mass., Sept. 18, 1859; son of Kev. 
Lewis Benton and Louisa D. (Field) Bates. 
He was graduated from Boston University 
in 1882 with the degree of A.B.; taught 
school one year and then taking up the 
study of law at the Law School, received 
the degree of LL. B. in 1885, and in that 
year he was admitted to the bar. Mr. Bates 
is identified with the Republican party and 
in 1893 was elected to the lower house of 
the Massachusetts Legislature; was rcelect- 
ed for five other successive terms, serving 
as speaker of the house during his three 
last sessions. In 1899 he was elected lieu 
tenant-governor of Massachusetts and was 
twice reflected until 1902, when lie was 
nominated and elected governor. He was 
reflected the following year, but was de 
feated for a third term. Governor Bates is 
a director of several banking institutions 
and is president of the board of trustees of 
Boston University. He is a thirty-third de 
gree Mason, and an Odd Fellow, and a mem 
ber of the Beta Theta Pi fraternity. He 
married at Jamestown, N. Y., July 12, 
1887, Clara Elizabeth Smith and has two 
children. Residence: Monmouth Square. 
Office: 73 Tremont Street, Boston. 

BATES, Katharine Lee: 

Author and educator; born at Falmouth, 
Mass., Aug. 12, 1859; daughter of Rev. 
William and Cornelia Frances (Lee) Bates. 
She was graduated from Wellesley College 
as A.B., in 1880, and after graduation 
taught in the Natick High School and after 
ward at Dana Hall, Wellesley, Mass., until 
1885, when she entered the teaching staff 
of Wellesley College as instructor in Eng 
lish literature, becoming associate profes 
sor. 1888, and since 1891 professor in 
charge of the Department of English Litera 



ture. Professor Bates has edited numerous 
editions of English classics, and is author 
of: The College Beautiful, and Other 
Poems; Rose and Thorn (a prize story); 
Sunshine, and Other Verses for Children; 
Hermit Island (story) ; The English Re 
ligious Drama (a course of lectures; Amer 
ican Literature; Spanish Highways and 
Byways; From Gretna Green to Land s 
End; The Canterbury Pilgrimage Retold 
for Children; also various booklets and 
magazine articles. She is a member of the 
Phi Beta Kappa Society and of the Boston 
Authors Club. Address: Wellesley Col 
lege, Wellesley, Mass. 

BATES, Lindon Wallace: 

Contractor; was born at Marshfield, Vt., 
Nov. 19, 1858; son of William Wallace and 
Marie (Cole) Bates. He took the Yale Uni 
versity technical course, finishing in 1879. 
He went west as assistant engineer on the 
Northern Pacific, Oregon Railway and 
Navigation Company, and Oregon Pacific 
Railways. He was afterwards engaged as 
contractor on various works on the Pacific 
Coast, and built several dredges on im 
proved plans. He prepared reports and 
projects for the improvement adopted for 
the port of Antwerp, 1896-1902; executed 
a series of work on the Suez Canal in behalf 
of its enlargement; was retained by the 
Russian Government to design improve 
ments for the ports and channels of the 
Black Sea; the Sea of Azov; the rivers Dnie 
per, Volga and Bug, and the Canal Marie; 
also by the Queensland Government to pro 
ject and direct harbor works at Brisbane, 
and six other Colony ports. He prepared 
projects also (many since executed), at the 
request of the South Australian Govern 
ment, for Adelaide, for four other harbors 
and rivers, and for extension of railroad 
system. He designed a system of regula 
tion for the Hugli in behalf of the Calcutta 
Port Board; and was also one of the engi 
neers on the International scheme for the 
improvement of the port of Shanghai, 
China. Mr. Bates was the contractor in the 
work of raising the grade of Galveston 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



115 



City and Island, and another company, of 
which he is president has contracts aggre 
gating some twenty-five miles of the New 
York barge canal from the Hudson River 
to Lake Erie and Black Rock harbor at 
Buffalo, X. Y. Mr. Bates was awarded the 
Grand Prix and a decoration by the French 
Government in 1900 for distinguished serv 
ices to science,, and has two other Govern 
ment decorations. He is a member of the 
leading engineering societies in the United 
States and Europe. Mr. Bates married at 
Chicago in 1881, Josephine White, and has 
two sons. Address: 14 East 60th Street, 
Xew York City. 

BATES, T. Towar: 

Banker; born in Jersey City, X. J., Feb. 
10, 1874; son of Alfred W. and Cephise 
C. Bates (nee Towar). He was graduated 
from the Berkeley School of Xew York 
City and from Columbia University, 1895. 
He started in business with the dry goods 
commission house of Faulkner, Page & 
Co., of Xew York City and Boston, of 
which firm his father had been a member 
for about twenty years. After some years 
in the dry goods business he engaged in 
the bond and investment security busi 
ness, and Jan. 1, 1905, with Henry W. and 
William B. Shoemaker (sons of Henry F. 
Shoemaker), started the banking house 
of Shoemaker and Bates. The present firm 
of Shoemaker, Bates & Co. was formed Jan. 
1, 1907, and does an extensive banking and 
general bond and stock business, with of 
fices in Chicago and Philadelphia, as well 
as in Xew York City. He is- a member of 
the Xew York Stock Exchange. April 1, 
1905 he received a full and honorable dis 
charge from the Xational Guard of the 
State of Xew York, having served ten years 
as a member of Troop 2, Squadron A, Xa 
tional Guard of Xew York. He is a Re 
publican and Episcopalian, and a member 
of the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity. Mr. 
Bates married in Xew York City, Bertha 
Schefer, daughter of Carl Schefer, a promi 
nent banker and dry goods importer of Xew 
York City. Residence: Woodlands, Con- 



jvent, X. J. Office: 37 Wall Street, Xew 
York City. 

BATTLE, William James: 

Professor of Greek; born in Raleigh, X. 
C., Xov. 30, 1870; son of Kemp Plummer 
and Martha Ann Battle. He was graduated 
I from the University of North Carolina, A. 
|B., 1888; was instructor in Latin there, 
1889-1890; then entered upon graduate 
study in Harvard University, from which 
he took the degrees of A. M., 1891, and Ph. 
D., 1893. He took the Greek prize, edited 
the College Magazine, was president of one 
of the two literary societies, and delivered 
the classical oration at graduation, in the 
i University of North Carolina ; and held the 
( Thayer Scholarship one year and the Mor 
gan Fellowship two years at Harvard. He 
! was elected tutor in Latin in the University 
of Chicago, 1893, but later in the same year 
i resigned to become associate professor of 
| Greek in the University of Texas. In 1908 
! he was made professor of Greek in the Uni- 
| versity of Texas, and, in 1908, dean of the 
College of Arts. Professor Battle is a 
I member of the Texas Academy of Science, 
! the American Philological Society, the 
Archaeological Institute of America, the 
j Hellenic Society of England, the Archseo- 
| logical Society of Athens (Greece) ; the Zeta 
Psi fraternity, and the University and 
{ Town-and-Gown Clubs of Austin. Address: 
i 2200 San Antonio Street, Austin, Texas. 

BAUER, Louis Agricola: 

Director Department of Terrestrial Mag- 
I netism of the Carnegie Institution of Wash 
ington; born in Cincinnati, Ohio, Jan. 26, 
1865; son of Ludwig and Wilhelmina 
(Buehler) Bauer. He was graduated from 
the University of Cincinnati, as C.E. in 
1888, and received its degree of M.S. in 
! 1894, and Ph.D. and M.A. from the Uni 
versity of Berlin in 1895. He was assistant 
civil engineer, Walnut Hills Cable Road , 
and of Cincinnati, >,ew Orleans and Texas 
Pacific R. R., Cincinnati, Ohio, 1886-1887; 
i was next computer in the United States 
I Coast and Geodetic Survey, 1887-1892; and 



110 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



from 1892 to 1805 he pursued special studies | 
and investigations in physics and geophys 
ics at the University of Berlin and at the 
Potsdam Magnetic Observatory; engaged 
as decent of mathematical physics and in 
structor of geophysics, University of Chi 
cago, 1895-1897; and as assistant professor 
of mathematics and mathematical physics 
at the University of Cincinnati, 1897-1899. 
From 1899 to 1906 he was Chief of the Divis 
ion of Terrestrial Magnetism and inspector 
of magnetic work in the U. S. Coast and 
Geodetic Survey, during which period a 
general magnetic survey of the United 
States was completed. He became director 
of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism 
of the Carnegie Institution of Washington 
in 1904. He was also chief of the Division 
of Terrestrial Magnetism of the Maryland 
Geological Survey from 1896-1899; astrono 
mer and magnetician of the Boundary Sur 
veys of Maryland, 1897-1898, and has been 
lecturer on terrestrial magnetism at the 
Johns Hopkins University since 1899. He 
is editor-in-chief of Terrestrial Magnetism 
and Atmospheric Electricity founded by 
him in 1896. He has been a member of the 
International Meteorological Conference 
since 1898, as a member of the Permanent 
Committee on Terrestrial Magnetism; also 
member of the Committee on Terrestrial 
Magnetism of the International Associa 
tion of Academies, since 1904. Dr. Bauer 
is a fellow of the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science, (vice-presi 
dent, Section Physics, 1909), and a mem 
ber of the American Physical Society; the 
American Astronomical and Astrophysical 
Society; National Geographical Society; As 
sociation of American Geographers, (first 
vice-president, 1909) ; Washington Academy 
of Sciences; Washington Philosophical So 
ciety (president for 1908) ; Washington 
Literary Socity; Sociedad Cientifica An 
tonio Alzate of Mexico; International Con 
gress of Arts and Sciences; corresponding 
member of the Konigliche Gesellschaft der 
Wissenschaften zu Gottingen since 1906; 
and a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity 
and of the Cosmos Club of Washington. 
Address: The Ontario, Washington, D. C. 



BAUGH, Daniel: 

Manufacturer; born in Chester County, 
Pa., Oct. 22, 1836. He was educated at pri 
vate seminaries. His family, for several 
generations, has been engaged in the tan 
ning business or connected with the leather 
industry, but in 1853 his father decided tc 
turn his attention to the manufacture of ar 
tificial fertilizers by chemical and othei 
means, converting the power and machinery 
of the old works to use in the new. Ir 
1855 he associated with him his sons Danie: 
and Edwin, under the firm title of Baugr. 
& Sons, and the manufacture of super-phos 
phate was begun and diligently developed 
In 1860 the plant was removed to Philadel 
phia, and the Delaware River Chemica 
Works established, new lines of manufactur 
ing being added till the business became 
one of great importance. In 1862, during 
the Civil War, Mr. Baugh, being a private 
in the ranks of the Gray Reserves, weni 
with his regiment to the defense of the 
State when it was menaced by Genera 
Lee s Army, the regiment crossing into 
Maryland about the time of the battle o 
South Mountain, but not coming into ac 
tion. In 1888, his father and brother hav 
ing died, Mr. Baugh became president o 
the Baugh & Sons Company, incorporatec 
the year before, and he is still at iti 
head. He was for ten years president o 
the Art Club of Philadelphia and of tin 
Sanitarium Association, and is now presi 
dent of the Pennsylvania School of Desigi 
for Women, a director of the Girard Na 
tional Bank and of a number of other finan 
cial, educational and charitable organiza 
tions in Philadelphia. Address: 1601 Lo 
cust Street, Philadelphia. 

BAUMANN, Gustav: 

Hotel proprietor; born in Saint Gall 
Switzerland, in 1853; son of J. G. Baumani 
and A. B. Baumann. He lived in Sain 
Gall until 1871 and at Neufchatel from 1871 
1875, in London from 1875-1881, and cam 
to the United States in 1881. He becam 
connected with Kinsley s, then the leadiiij 
restaurant at Chicago, in which he wa 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



LI 



partner and manager until he removed to 
New York City, where he is now of H. M. 
Kinsley & Baumann, proprietor of the 
Holland House. In religious affiliation he 
is a Presbyterian; and he is a member of 
the Lotos, Swiss, Larchmont Yacht and 
Fail-field County Golf Clubs. Address: 
Holland House, Fifth Avenue, and Thirtieth 
Streets, New York City. 

BAXTER, Irving Franklin: 

Lawyer ; born at Liverpool, Onondaga 
County, N. Y., Jan. 11, 1803; son of George 
and Amie C. (Sitts) Baxter. After study 
ing law at Syracuse, N. Y., he was admitted 
to practise law in the courts of that state. 
He removed to Omaha, Neb., in 1887, and 
began his legal practice there. Mr. Baxter 
soon showed himself to be an able lawyer 
and he was given various public offices and 
has been before the public eye continually. 
In 1892 he was made attorney for the 
Omaha Board of Education, and was elect 
ed the following year by the Republican 
party of which he is a member, county 
judge of Douglas County, Neb., and served 
three terms, in all six years. This was fol 
lowed by five years as judge of the fourth 
judicial district of Nebraska. In 1904 he 
resigned the judgeship and became United 
States attorney for Nebraska, which office 
he held for two years, having prosecuted 
land frauds and various other kind of cor 
ruption. He has since been a member of 
the firm of Baxter and Van Dusen, attor 
neys. On Sept. 20., 1888, he married at 
Liverpool, N. Y., Mary C. Gleason. Resi 
dence: The Madison. Address: New 
\ork Life Building, Omaha, Neb. 

BAXTER, Sylvester: 

Author; born in West Yarmouth, Mass., 
Feb. G, 1850. He was educated in Leipzig 
and Berlin, and entered newspaper work 
in Boston, subsequently going to Mexico 
where he was correspondent of American 
papers and editor of the Mexican Financier. 
He attended the Pan-American Conference 
at Rio Janiero in 1900 as special corre 
spondent. In Boston he has taken an active 
part in municipal affairs. He was the first 



to suggest the organization of the Boston 
Metropolitan Park System, and was secre 
tary of the preliminary commission that 
| brought about the cooperation of Boston 
j with the surrounding municipalities in the 
development of a park system and leading 
to other metropolitan improvements. Mr. 
Baxter s writings cover a wide scope, eco 
nomic, sociological, imaginative and in 
verse. They include, among others, the fol 
lowing works: Cruise of a Land Yacht; 
Berlin A Study in Municipal Government; 
The Boston Park Guide; The Old New 
World, statement of the Hemenway South 
western Archaeological Expedition; Great 
er Boston, monograph; Spanish Colonial 
Architecture in Mexico; The Quest of the 
Holy Grail; and Old Marblehead. He mar 
ried in East Bridgewater, Mass., Sept. 24, 
1893, to Lucia Allen Millett. Address Mai 
den, Mass. 

BAYLIES, Edwin: 

Lawyer and author; born in Clinton, N. 

I Y., Aug. 23. 1840. He was graduated from 
Hamilton College as A.B., 1802, and from 

I Hamilton College Law School, as LL.B. in 
1870, and has received the honorary de- 

| gree of LL.D. from his alma mater in 1901. 

: Mr. Baylies has resided in Johnstown, N. 
Y., since his admission to the bar in 1870 
and has been constantly engaged in the 
study and practice of the law and the 
preparation of text-books both original and 

I edited from the works of earlier writers. 

j Among his books are: Questions and An 
swers for Law Students; Sureties and 
Guarantors; Trial Practice; New Trials 

; and Appeals ; Code Pleading and Forms ; 
and Supplement to Wait s Actions and De 
fenses. He is editor of the Revised Edi 
tion of Edwards on Bailments, American 

I Edition of Addison on Torts, and Wait s 
Law and Practice. He was married in Mar- 
cy, N. Y., May 2, 1871, to Agnes E. Nutter. 
Address: Johnstown, N. Y. 

BAYIOR, James Bowen: 

Geodetist; born in Mirador, Va., May 30, 
1849. He was educated in the University 
of Virginia and has received the honorary 



118 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



degree of LL.D. from Baylor University. 
Tn 1874 lie was appointed an aide to the 
United States Coast and Geodetic Survey 
and has since been a field officer of that 
service, having determined the elements of 
the earth s magnetism from Canada to Mex 
ico in almost every State of the Union. He 
has also done a large amount of geodetic, 
astronomical and hydrographic work, es 
pecially in connection with the division of 
the limits of oyster grounds as a means to 
the ascertainment of the rights of individ 
uals and of the various States in such 
grounds and for the purpose of preventing 
the waste of such public reserves. As a 
part of this work, he made oyster surveys 
in Louisiana and the " Baylor Survey " of 
the oyster grounds of Virginia, together 
with work relating to the oyster legisla- 
ion of Maryland. He was the commissioner 
of the United States Supreme Court for the 
boundary of Virginia and Tennessee from 
1900 to 1!)02; has been boundary engineer 
on the Virginia and Maryland division, the 
Pennsylvania and New York boundary, and 
the United States and Canada boundary 
survey. He has contributed to various re 
ports of the United States Coast and Geo 
detic Survey. Mr. Baylor is a member of 
the Society of the Cincinnati, National Geo 
graphical Society, and the Philosophical 
Society of Washington. He married at 
Staunton Hill, Va., Jan. 5, 1881, Ellen 
C. Bruce, who is now deceased. Residence: 
Newmarket, Milford Postoffice, Va. Office: I 
United States Coast and Geodetic Survey, 
Washington, D. C. 

BAYNE, Samuel Gamble: 

Banker; born at Ulster, Ireland, 1844; \ 
son of Peter and Margaret Bayne. He was | 
educated at the Royal Academy School and , 
Queen s College at Belfast, Ireland. He be 
gan his business life in the office of Sir j 
James Hamilton. Belfast, and later became I 
a linen manufacturer in Belfast. He came 
to the United States in 1869, and went to 
the oil regions in Pennsylvania in 1870, 
drilling 400 we lls there. He made i tour 
of the world in 1874-1875. Mr. Bayne or 



ganized First National Bank of Bradford, 
Pa., becoming its president; and subse 
quently organized National banks in Texas, 
Kansas, Mississippi, Minnesota and Ohio. 
He organi/ed the Seaboard National Bank, 
New York, in 1883, and is no\v its presi 
dent. He is treasurer of Produce Exchange 
Deposit Vaults and president of the Atlas 
Improvement Company, and Riverside Drive 
Property Association. He is author of: 
Pith of Astronomy, 189(5; On an Irish 
Jaunting Car Through Donegal and Conne- 
mara, 1902; Quicksteps through Scandina 
via, 1908. He is a member of the New York 
Athletic Club. Mr. Bayne married in New- 
York City, October, 1874, Emily Kelsey. 
Residence: (winter) Riverside Drive and 
108th Street, New York City; (summer) 
White Plains, N. Y. Office 18 Broadway, 
New York City. 

BEACH, Amy Marcy Cheney (Mrs. H. H. A. 
Beach) : 

Composer; born in Henniker, N. H., Sept. 
5, 1867; daughter of Charles Abbott and 
Clara Imogen (Marcy) Cheney. She began 
her education at home under her mother s 
tuition, studied piano and harmony under 
Junius W. Hill, Carl Baermann and Ern 
est Parabo, and afterward studied fugue, 
counterpoint, form and instrumentation from 
text-books. She married in 1885, Dr. Henry 
Harris Aubrey Beach. As Miss Cheney she 
attained much distinction as" a pianist, 
playing in concerts and recitals, and since 
her marriage she has done much in musical 
composition, taking a place in the foremost 
rank of American composers and enjoying 
an international musical reputation. Mrs. 
Beach has composed music written to Brown 
ing s poetry, and in recognition of her 
work in this direction has been made an 
honorary member of the Boston Browning 
Society, and she has composed many songs, 
cantatas, masses, concertos, and other com 
positions, for voice, piano and orchestra, 
some of the best known of her published 
compositions being: Mass in E-flat, sung by 
the Boston Handel and Haydn Society in 
1892; Concerto for piano and orchestra, 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



119 



which she played with the Boston Svm- 
phony Orchestra; the cantatas The Rose 
of Avontown ( for female voices ) , Sylvania, 
wedding cantata for mixed voices, The Sea 
Fairies ; The Chambered Nautilus ; Quintet 
for piano and strings; Part-songs for fe 
male voices; Service in A; many pieces for 
the piano. Address: 28 Commonwealth 
Avenue, Boston. 

BEACH, Frederick Converse: 

Editor and patent attorney ; born in New 
York City, March 27, 1848; son of Alfred 
Ely and Harriet E. (Holbrook) Beach. He 
was graduated from Sheffield Scientific 
School, Yale University, as Ph.B. in 1808. 
He was patent solicitor in Washington. D. 
C. in 1868-1869; was afterward engaged as 
assistant superintendent in construction of 
the Beach pneumatic tunnel under Broad 
way, and was a manufacturer of electrical 
instruments until 1877, when he entered 
the office of The Scientific American, of 
which he later became and still is one of the 
editors; also editor-in-chief of Encyclopaedia 
Americana. He is secretary and treasurer 
of Munn & Company, patent attorneys and 
publishers of The Scientific American; 
treasurer of the Union Waxed and Parch 
ment Paper Company; president and treas 
urer American Photographic Publishing 
Company, and is a well known amateur 
photographer. Mr. Beach married, at 
Stratford, Conn.., June 16, 1875, Margaret 
Allen Gilbert, and they have two children. 
Address: 361 Broadway, New York City. 

BEACH, Henry Harris Aubrey: 

Physician and surgeon; born at Middle- 
town, Conn, Dec. 18, 184-3; son of Elijah 
Beach and Lucy Smith (Riley) Beach. He 
was educated in the Cambridge public 
schools. During the Civil War he enlisted 
in the regular army and served two years 
in the hospital corps until the close of 
hostilities, becoming then surgical house 
officer of the Massachusetts General Hos 
pital. At the same time he took up the 
study of medicine at Harvard University 
and was graduated M.D. in 1868. Besides 



| his private practice, Dr. Beach was appoint - 
| ed in 1868 assistant demonstrator of anat- 
i omy at Harvard University and demonstra 
tor and member of the Harvard Faculty 
! in 1879, and in 1899 he became instructor 
| in clinical surgery, holding this position 
until 1900, when he became lecturer on the 
same subject. For thirty-five years he has 
served at the Massachusetts General Hos 
pital, first for one year, as house surgeon, 
then consecutively for six years as surgeon 
to out patients; twenty-eight years as visit 
ing surgeon, and from 1907 as consulting 
surgeon. Dr. Beach has rendered valuable 
service in surgery and the results of his 
work are embodied in various articles and 
medical papers. He was president of the 
Boylston Medical Society of Harvard Uni 
versity, 1873-1874; is a member of the 
American Medical Asociation, the Massa 
chusetts Medical Society, Boston Society 
for Medical Sciences, Boston Society for 
Medical Improvement, Biological Society 
of Washington, American Association for 
the Advancement of Science and is honor 
ary member with medal of the first class of 
the Academia Fisico-Chimica Italiano of 
Palermo, Italy. He is a Republican in poli 
tics, and an Episcopalian in religion. He 
has been twice married, first, June 7, 1871, 
to Alice C. Mandell, of New Bedford, Mass., 
who died July 30, 1880. and second, Dec. 
2, 1885. to Amy Marcy Cheney, of Boston, 
Mass. Mrs. Beach has attained great dis 
tinction as a musical composer. Address: 
28 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston. 

BEACH, Rex Ellingwood: 

Author; born at Atwood, Mich., Sept. 
1, 1877; son of Henry Walter and Eva 
(Canfield) Beach. He was educated at 
Rollins College, Winter Park, Florida, the 
Chicago College of Law, and Kent College 
of Law at Chicago. 111. He is author of: 
Pardners; The Spoilers; The Barrier; The 
Silver Horde. He also dramatized The 
Spoilers and The Barrier and has written 
various articles and stories for American 
and English magazines and periodicals. 
Address: 259 W. 70th St., New York, N. Y. 



120 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



BEAL, Junius Emery: 

Regent of the University of Michigan; 
born at Port Huron, Mich., Feb. 23, 1860, 
of New England parentage, his grandfather 
Field, great-grandfather and great-great 
grandfather, having been Yale graduates. 
His mother died when he was eleven months 
old and he was adopted by his uncle Rice 
A. Beal. He received his education at the 
Ann Arbor high school and University of 
Michigan, being graduated A.B. in 1882. 
During vacation, he worked in his father s 
printing office at the case and in the press 
room, getting familiar with the mechanical 
part of the business, and on graduation he 
assumed the editorship of the Ann Arbor 
Courier. When R. A. Beal died in 1883 he 
took up the work and carried on book pub 
lishing in connection with the newspaper 
for twenty years, when he sold out. The 
Dr. Chase Recipe Book published by him 
had a sale of a million copies in its various 
editions. Mr. Beal has been a member of 
the Ann Arbor School Board for twenty 
years, and was president of the Michigan 
Press Association in 1893. He has traveled 
extensively through Europe, including Rus 
sia, and ahout the Caribbean Sea. He is 
a member of various Masonic orders and a 
director of the Detroit F. & M. Insurance 
Co., and on other boards. Mr. Beal has 
always been an active Republican, a presi 
dential elector in 1888; president of the 
Michigan League of Republican clubs, 1889- 
1890, and was elected to the Legislature in 
1904, by 711 majority, the largest the First 
District had ever given. In April, 1907, he 
was elected Regent of the University of 
Michigan by over 105,000 majority. He is 
married and has two children, a boy and a 
girl. Address: Ann Arbor, Mich. 

BE ALE, Joseph Henry, Jr.: 

Educator; born in Dorchester, Mass., Oct. 
12, 1861. He was educated at Harvard 
College, A.M. 1882 and LL.B. 1887; Univer 
sity of Wisconsin, LL.D. and the University 
of Chicago. After a number of years prac 
tice of the law in Boston he became teacher 
of law at Harvard Law School, and has 



been professor of law there since 1897. He 
was also for two years, 1902 to 1904, dean 
of the law school of the University of 
Chicago. Professor Beale has taken a 
prominent part in the modification of legal 
I practice through his writings, and in 1900 
was a member of the Massachusetts State 
Commission for Simplifying Criminal 
Pleadings. He is the author of numerous 
standard text-books on the law, including: 
Cases on Criminal Law; Cases on Dam 
ages; Cases on Carriers; Criminal Plead 
ings and Practice; Cases on the Conflict of 
Laws; Cases on Public Service Corpora 
tions; Foreign Corporations; Innkeepers; 
and Railroad Rate Regulation (with Bruce 
Wyman). He married in Barnstable, 
Mass., Dec. 23, 1891, Elizabeth C. Day. 
Address : 29 Chauncy Street, Cambridge, 
Mass. 

BEALE, Truxton: 

Diplomat, author; born in San Francisco. 
Calif., March 6, 1856; son of Edward F. 
and Mary (Edwards) Beale. He was grad 
uated from the Pennsylvania Military Col 
lege at Chester, Pa., in 1874, and from the 
Law School of Columbia University, in New 
York, as LL.B. in 1878. He engaged in 
law practice and made a special study of 
international questions, and was appointed 
by President Harrison envoy extraordinary 
and minister plenipotentiary of the United 
j States to Persia, and from the legation at 
I Teheran was transferred to the post of 
American minister to Greece. After his 
i service at Athens he became an extensive 
j traveler in the Orient, and particularly in 
Siberia, Chinese Turkestan and other parts 
of Central Asia. Mr. Beale is now de 
voting his attention to the management of 
large estates in California. He is a writer 
in leading reviews and magazines of arti 
cles on Oriental and international subjects, 
and is a member of the Asiatic Society. 
Mr. Beale has been twice married, first to 
Harriet Elaine, daughter of the late James 
G. Blaine, and second, at New York City, 
April 23, 1903, to Marie Oge, of San Rafael, 
Calif., a granddaughter of the late Salmon 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



P. Chase, chief justice of the Supreme 
Court of the United States. Address: 222 
Sansome Street, San Francisco. 

BE ALL, Jack: 

Lawyer and congressman ; born in Ellis 
County, Texas, Oct. 25, 1806; son of Rich 
ard and Adelaide (Pierce) Beall. Both of 
his parents were Kentuckians and were 
among the early settlers of Texas. He was 
reared upon a farm and attended the old- 
fashioned country schools; taught school in 
1884 and 1885; in 1886 entered the literary 
department of the University of Texas and 
in 1889 the law department, graduating 
therefrom in 1890, and has since been en 
gaged in the practice of law. He served 
as a member of the Texas House of Repre 
sentatives for three years; and in the Texas 
Senate for four years. Mr. Beall received 
the Democratic nomination in 1902 and was 
elected to the Fifty-eighth Congress, and 
in 1904, 1906 and 1908 was reflected to the 
Fifty-ninth, Sixtieth and Sixty-first Con 
gresses, and is now serving in the latter. 
He married, in 1898, Patricia Martin. Ad 
dress: Waxahachie, Texas. 

BEALL, Mary Stevens: 

Secretary of the Columbia Historical So 
ciety; born in Philadelphia; daughter of i 
James and Georgiana G. (Haines) Stevens; 
graduated with honors and valedictory 
from the Girls High and Normal School 
of Philadelphia ; married in Philadelphia, 
Alexander E. Beall, of Washington, D. C., 
and they have a daughter, Blanche Carroll I 
Beall (now Mrs. T. Magruder Hughes). 
Her paternal ancestors came from England 
and settled in Talbot County, Mel., in 1652; 
the first, William Stevens, holding the 
office of King s justice. Her grandfather 
Stevens died when her father was a lad 
13 years old, arid as soon as the latter 
attained his majority., he freed all the 
slaves he had inherited, and about ten 
years before the Civil War he gave $10,000 j 
to help build the ship Mary Caroline, for 
carrying freed slaves to Liberia and estab- i 
lishing them there. Her maternal ancestors 
came from Germany, the first, Peter 



121 

Snyder, being one of the first settlers of 
Gerinantown, Pa. Author of: Military 
and Private Secretaries of George Washing 
ton (Volume I, records of the Columbia 
Historical Society) ; Story of the Washing 
ton Coaches and of the Powel Coach now 
at Mount Vernon; also historical sketches 
and short stories in various papers and 
magagines. Mrs. Beall has been secretary 
of the Columbia Historical Society since 
1895, and is an associate member of the 
National Alumni. She has classes each 
winter in the study of Shakespeare, is a 
lecturer on "The Merchant of Venice as 
Shakespeare Saw It Played " and other 
Shakespearean subjects, and has also pre 
pared a series of art lectures covering the 
records from the earliest specimens of 
Egypt, Greece and Rome, down to the 
Christian Era. Mrs. Beall is active in the 
institutional and charitable work of St. 
John s Episcopal Church of Georgetown, 
D. C. Address: 1643 Wisconsin Avenue, 
Washington, D. C. 

BEAN, Tarleton Hoffman: 

Fish culturist and /.ob logist; born at 
Bainbridge, Pa., Oct. 8, 1846; son of 
George and Mary (Smith) Bean. He was 
graduated from the State Normal School at 
Millersville, Pa., in 1866, later entering the 
medical department of Columbian (now 
George Washington) University, from 
which he was graduated as M.D. in 1876, 
and lie received the degree of M.S. from 
Indiana University in 1883. He was editor 
of proceedings and bulletins of the United 
States National Museum from 1878 to 
1880, and curator of fishes there from 1880 
to 1895, also editing the reports and bul 
letins of the U. S. Fish Commission from 
1889 to 1892; and he was assistant in 
charge of the Division of Fish Culture of 
the U. S. Fish Commission from 1892 to 
1895. He was director of the New York 
Aquarium from 1895 to 1898 3 and acting 
curator of fishes in the American Museum 
of Natural History, 1897-1898; was chief 
of the departments of Fish, Game and 
Forestry at the Louisiana Purchase Expo 
sition from 1902 to 1905, and is now State 



122 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



fish culturist of the State of New York. 
In recognition of his distinction as an ich 
thyologist and fish culturist he received 
from France in 1901 the decoration of chev 
alier of the Legion of Honor, from Germany 
in 1005 that of Knight of the Red Eagle, 
and from Japan in 1905 the Order of the 
Rising Sun. Mr. Bean is the author of 
several standard works on fish and fisheries. 
He married in Washington, D. C., Jan. 1, 
1878, Laurette H. Van Hook. Address: 1 
Madison Avenue, New York. 

BEARD, Adelia Belle: 

Artist and author; born in Painesville, 
Ohio; daughter of James Henry Beard, 
X.A., celebrated animal painter, and Mary 
Caroline (Carter) Beard, daughter of Colo 
nel Thomas and Debora (Bartlett) Carter, 
and, through the Bartletts directly related 
to Josiah Bartlett, signer of the Declaration 
of Independence. Miss Beard was educated 
in private schools in Covington, Ky.; stud 
ied art in Cooper Union, Art Students 
League, and Wyatt Eaton s studio, portrait 
painting under William M. Chase, life under 
Walter Shirlaw, and water colors under 
Rhoda Holmes Nichols. Miss Beard s first 
picture, submitted to the Academy of De 
sign, entitled " In the World but Not of 
the World," was accepted, hung on the line, 
and sold immediately. Her works have 
been exhibited in various prominent exhi 
bitions; also in the American Water Color 
Society of New York. For one year Miss 
Beard was supervisor of drawing in the 
public schools of Flushing, L. I., and for 
several years she carried on a private art 
school in her own studio. She is joint 
author, with her sister, Lina Beard, of: 
The American Girls Handy Book; What a 
Girl Can Make and Do; Recreation for 
Girls; Things Worth Doing; and Home 
Mission Handicraft (all published by 
Charles Scribner s Sons) ; and she is a con 
tributor to various magazines and news 
papers. Miss Beard is interested in all that 
makes for the betterment of mankind spirit 
ually, mentally and physically, in all new 
inventions and discoveries; also in art, 



especially as related to painting and illus 
trating, handicrafts of all kinds, manual 
training, and everything pertaining to out 
door life. Miss Beard is a member of the 
National Child Labor Committee, charter 
member of the Good Citizenship League of 
Flushing, L. L, in which she has been re 
cording secretary, and chairman of the Art 
Committee, and she founded, for the 
League, the Building Fund, which has now 
materialized into a fine club-house, an in 
spiration for other women s clubs. Ad 
dress: 100 Jaggar Avenue, Flushing, N. Y. 

BEAED, Daniel Carter ("Dan Beard"): 

Illustrator, author, editor; born in Cin 
cinnati, Ohio, June 21, 1850; son of James 
H. (National Academician and distin 
guished artist) and Mary Caroline (Cart 
er) Beard. He was educated as civil en 
gineer, and graduated second in class, and 
studied art under Beckwith and Sartain. 
He made detailed maps of most of the 
cities, towns and villages east of Mississippi 
River for a map publishing company, and 
later started as professional illustrator. 
He illustrated Mark Twain s " Yankee in 
King Arthur s Court," Ernest H. Crosby s 
" Captain Jenks, Hero," John Jacob Astor s 
and many other books; and has done work 
for Life, Scribner s, Harper s, Century and 
the Cosmopolitan. He was formerly editor 

| of Recreation, and contributor (in charge 
of a department) in Outing and Ladies 

i Home Journal and Circle; is associate edi 
tor of The Arena, but is especially known 
for the books and articles written and 
illustrated by himself, explaining various 
lines of out door work and play especially 
attractive to boys. Mr. Beard was an in 
timate friend of the late Henry George, 

! and has been continuously active as worker 
and speaker in the single-tax propaganda. 

i He is member of the Academy of Science, 
Ornithologists Union, Biological Society, 

i Linnean Society, Zoological Society, Scien 
tific Alliance; fellow of Society of lllus- 

| trators (succeeded Charles Dana Gibson as 

i president of latter). His favorite recrea- 

! tions are traveling in the Northwestern 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Wilderness, fishing and sketching wild ani 
mals; and he has recently published a book 
of these sketches and notes. Mr. Beard 
married at Newton, L. I., Aug. 15, 1894, 
Beatrice Alice Jackson, and they have two 
children. Address: 87 Bowne Avenue, 
Flushing, Long Island, N. Y. 

BEARD, Lina: 

Author and illustrator; born in Cincin 
nati, Ohio; daughter of James Henry 
Beard (National Academician and celebrat 
ed animal painter) and Mary Caroline 
(Carter) Beard., who was a daughter of 
Col. Thomas and Debora (Bartlett) Carter, 
and through the Bartletts directly related 
to Josiah Bartlett, signer of the Declara- 
ion of Independence. Miss Beard was edu 
cated in Mrs. Collins private school at 
Covington, Ky., Wesleyan College, Cincin 
nati, and by Dr. Charles West at Brooklyn 
Heights Seminary, Brooklyn, N. Y. She 
studied drawing at Cooper Union and the 
Art Students League in New York City. 
In collaboration with her sister, Adelia 
Belle Beard, she has written and illustrated 
four books: The American Girls Handy 
Book; What a Girl Can Make and Do; 
Recreation for Girls; Things Worth Doing; 
and Home Missions Handicraft (all pub 
lished by Charles Scribner s Sons). She is 
also a contributor to magazines and does 
special work for newspapers. The Bureau 
of Education of the U. S. Department of 
the Interior has solicited examples of Miss 
Beard s work (which she has furnished) for 
use in the Government exhibit at Seattle, 
1909. Miss Beard is interested in all that 
makes for development and advancement, 
also in nature, out door life, antiques and 
handicrafts of all kinds; was one of the 
organizers and directors of the Brooklyn 
Primitive Art Club, and one of the founders 
; and directors of the Good Citizenship 
League ( first woman s club organized in 
Flushing, L. L), originated and for several 
years was chairman of its Art Committee, 
later chairman of the Political Economy 
Committee and of the Board of Directors 
of the League, and was its delegate to the 
First National Arbitration and Peace Con- 



123 

| gress, which was held in New York City in 

April, 1907. Miss Beard is also well known 

! as an active and ardent single-taxer. Ad- 

i dress : 100 Jagger Avenue, Flushing, N. Y. 

BEATTY, Robert Chetwood: 

Lawyer; born in New York City, May 
18, 1872; son of John Cuming Beatty and 

j Hetty (Bull) Beatty. He was graduated 
from Columbia University Schools of Law 
and Political Science, as LL.B. in 1894 and 
LL.M. in 1895. He was junior assistant to 
corporation counsel, New York City, in 
1897; special counsel to city, in charge of 
grade damage claims, from 1898 to 1903; 
member of the bar of courts of New York 
State, United States Supreme Court and 
other Federal courts, and a master in chan 
cery of the United States Circuit Court for 
the Southern District of New York. He is 
member of the law firm of Beatty and Bur- 
lingame (with Frederic Anson Burlin- 
game). He is member of the Association of 
the Bar of the City of New York, Society 
of Colonial Wars, Sons of Revolution. He 
is member of the Lawyers Club and the 

| Century Association. Mr. Beatty married 
in New York City, Jan. 30, 1901, Jean 
Burlingame, and they have two daughters. 
Address : 43 Cedar Street, New York City. 

|B2ATJPB,, Arthur M. : 

Lawyer and diplomat; born at Oswego, 
111., July 29, 1853. After receiving an 
education in the public schools of Oswego, 
Tie removed in 1874 to Aurora, 111., where 
j lie studied law, and he was admitted to 
practise by the Supreme Court of Illinois. 
He practised law at Aurora, and in 1886 
was elected to the office of county clerk of 
Kane County, 111. He was appointed by 
President McKinley to the office of consul- 
general and secretary of the legation at 
Guatemala, in Oct., 1897, was transferred 
1 to Colombia in the same capacity in Oct., 
! 1899, was appointed United States minister 
i to Colombia, in Feb., 1903, and served 
there during the pendency of the Panama 
I Canal Treaty in the Colombian Congress, 
j and in March, 1904, he was appointed by 
! President Roosevelt, envoy extraordinary 



124 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



and minister plenipotentiary to the Argen 
tine Republic., in which office lie served 
until his appointment to his present post as 
American minister to the Netherlands. 
Mr. Beaupre married, in De Kalb, 111., 
Oc. 20, 1880, Mary F. Marsh, daughter of 
Hon. C. W. Marsh. Residence: Aurora, 
111. Official address: American Legation, 
The Hague, Holland. 

BECK, Carl: 

Surgeon; born in Neckargemuend, Ger 
many, April 4, 1856; son of Wilhelm and 
Sophia (Hohler) Beck. After attending an 
institution conducted by his granduncle, 
Rev. August Hohler, and in the Gymna 
sium of Heidelberg, lie pursued his profes 
sional studies in the Universities of Heidel 
berg, Berlin and Jena, receiving his medical 
degree at Jena in 1879. Coming to the 
United States in Feb., 1882, he has since 
practised surgery in New York City, where 
he has attained a position of distinction in 
his profession, and an international au 
thority on the surgical and therapeutic uses 
of the Rontgen ray. He is author of valued 
surgical text-books and various professional 
papers, and also a contributor to general 
literature, among the more prominent of his 
writings being: Manual of Surgical Asep 
sis; Text-book on Fractures; Die Rontgen- 
strahlen im Dienste der Chirurgie; Rontgen 
Ray Diagnosis and Therapy; Surgical Dis 
eases (English and German editions) ; 
Rontgenlehre; Der Schwedenkonrad (a 
novel of the Neckar Valley), Amerikanisch e 
Streiilichter; Feuchtfroehliches und Feuch- 
tunfroeliches; Sonnenblicks vom latinischen 
Amerika, etc. Dr. Beck is president of St. 
Mark s Hospital and visiting surgeon to 
that institution and to the German Poli- 
klinik. He is also president of the American 
Therapeutic Society and of the German 
Medical Society of New York, and a mem 
ber of other important medical societies in 
the United States and Germany, and is 
professor of surgery in the New York Post- 
Graduate School and Hospital. Dr. Beck is 
also president of the Union of Old German 
Students of America. He married, in Ger 



many, Hedwig S., daughter of Chief Justice 
Friedrich Heinrich von Loeser. Address: 
37 E. 31st Street, New York City. 

BECK, James M.: 

Lawyer; born in Philadelphia, July 9, 
18G1. He was educated in the Moravian 
College in Bethlehem, Pa., graduated with 
the degree of A.B. in 1880, received the 
degree of LL.D. from Muhlenberg College 
in 1892, and from Moravian College in 
1894. He was admitted to the bar at 
Philadelphia in 1884, was a partner with 
William F. Harrity from 1885 to 1898; 
assistant United States attorney of the 
Eastern District of Pennsylvania from 1888 
to 1892 and from 1896 to 1900; and as 
sistant attorney-general from 1900 to 1903. 
He has been prosecutor of many important 
criminal cases in the State and Federal 
Courts. As master, appointed by the 
United States Court, he sold in April, 1902, 
the Philadelphia Record for three million 
dollars, the highest price ever obtained for 
an American newspaper at public sale. In 
1902 he entered the law firm of Sherman 
and Stirling of New York City, removing 
there, but remains also senior member of 
the firm of Beck & Robinson of Philadel 
phia. Mr. Beck has delivered many notable 
orations on patriotic and other important 
occasions. Mr. Beck married Lilla, daugh 
ter of James Mitchell of Philadelphia. Ad 
dress: 44 Wall Street, New York. 

BECKER, Frederick Walter: 

Lawyer; born in Ann Arbor, Mich., Oct. 
27, 1844; son of Hiram and Sophia (Mil- 
lard) Becker. He was graduated from the 
Ann Arbor High School, 1861, from the 
University of Michigan, A. B., 1866 and 
LL.B., 1867, and afterward attended lec 
tures at the Sorbonne, Paris, for two years. 
He was admitted to the Illinois bar, 1869, 
and was a member of the firm of Carter 
and Becker (in partnership with Walter S. 
Carter) until 1874, of the firm of Becker 
and Dale (in partnership with Samuel E. 
Dale) until 1880, and is now of the firm 
of MacChesney, Becker and Bradley (in 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



125 



partnership with Nathan William Mac- 
Chesney and Herbert E. Bradley). Mr. 
Becker has been admitted to practise in the 
Federal Courts, including the Supreme 
Court of the United States, as well as to 
the Illinois bar. He is a Republican, a 
Presbyterian, a member of the Chicago Law 
Institute, the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity 
and the Twentieth Century Club. He mar 
ried, in 1882, Clara, daughter of Judge D. N. 
Cooley, of Dubuque, Iowa, and they have 
two sons, Walter C. and Harlan A. Resi 
dence: 4169 Berkeley Avenue. Office: 108 
La Salle Street, Chicago. 

BECKER, Sherburn Merrill:, 

Capitalist; born in Milwaukee, Wis., 
Nov. 13. 1876. Mr. Becker is one of the 
leading citizens of the City of Milwaukee, 
being prominently identified with the finan 
cial and civic affairs of that city. He is 
president of the Hansen-Schmidt Tobacco 
Company and interested in a considerable 
number of financial and industrial institu 
tions. He has for many years been actively 
interested in the government of the munici 
pality and was for several years a member 
of the Board of Aldermen, and in 1906 be 
came mayor of the city, serving with 
marked ability. He is a member of the 
leading clubs of the city. He married in 
Milwaukee, in 1899, Irene Booth Smith. 
Residence: 87 Prospect Avenue, Milwaukee. 

BECKER, Tracy Chatfield: 

Lawyer; born in Cohoes, N. Y., Feb. 14, 
1855. He was educated at Union College 
and Albany Law School, and has received 
the degree of LL.B. from Union College. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1876, and 
began the practice of law in Buffalo. In 
1894 he was president of the New York 
Bar Association, also a member of the 
New York Constitutional Convention of 
that year. For several years he was pro 
fessor of criminal law and medical juris 
prudence of the University of Buffalo, and 
is the author of Witthaus and Becker s 
Medical Jurisprudence, Forensic Medicine 
and Toxicology, in two editions, In 1907 



1 he was appointed special assistant to the 
! attorney-general of the United States for 
I the purpose of carrying on proceedings in- 
| tended to test the rights and responsibili- 
| ties of the holders of certain land grant 
I titles in the Northwest and was also as- 
| signed to carry on the prosecutions arising 
I out of land frauds. This work having 
i brought him into close contact with the 
| legal profession of the Pacific coast he de- 
[ termined to remove his interests there, and 
I he has established himself at Los Angeles 
in the practice of law. He married in 
Cohoes, N. Y., Dec. 27, 1876, Minnie A. 
LeRoy. Address : Los Angeles, Calif. 

BECKHAM, J. Crepps Wickliffe: 

Former governor of Kentucky; born near 
Bardstown, Ky., Aug. 5, 1869; son of Wil 
liam N. and Julia (Wickliffe) Beckham. 
He received his education at the Central 
University of Kentucky, from which he re 
ceived the degree of LL.D. He was ap 
pointed principal of the Bardstown High 
School in 1888 and taught school for three 
years. In 1893 he commenced the practice 
of law, the same year being elected member 
of the Kentucky House of Representatives 
and serving in the session of 1894. He was 
twice reflected and was elected speaker of 
the House in 1898. In 1899 he was elected 
lieutenant-governor, becoming governor at 
Governor Goebel s death, Feb. 3, 1900. He 
was elected that year over John W. Yerkes 
to fill the rest of his term, ending Dec. 8, 
1903. He was reflected governor in 1903, 
over M. B. Belknap, to serve a full term 
ending Dec. 10, 1907. On Nov. 6, 1906, he 
was nominated in a State primary by the 
Democratic party as candidate for United 
States Senator from Kentucky over James 
B. McCreary, the incumbent, the election 
to be held in the General Assembly in 
Jan., 1908, but as that Assembly had a 
Republican majority on joint ballot, he 
failed of election. He was chairman of 
the Board of Trustees of Kentucky State 
College and various other institutions, and 
is a member of the college fraternity, Sig 
ma Alpha Epsilon. He is a Mason, a 



126 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Knight Templar, and an Elk, and a member 
of the Ancient Order of United Woodmen. 
He married at Owensboro, Ky., Nov. 21, 
1900, Jean Raphael Fuqua, and has two 
children. Address: Frankfort, Ky. 

BECKINGTON, Alice: 

Miniature painter; born in St. Charles, 
Mo.; daughter of Charles and Adeline 
(Cheney) Beckington. She studied draw 
ing at the Art Students League of New 
York for two years; then went to Paris and 
remained for four years as a student in the 
Academie Julian and under Charles Lazar. 
She has exhibited miniatures in the Paris 
Salon and in all the best exhibitions in the 
United States; received honorable mention 
at the Pan-American Exposition at Buffalo, 
and a bronze medal from the Louisiana 
Purchase Exposition at St. Louis. Miss 
Beckington is instructor in miniature paint 
ing in the Art Students League, and is 
one of the founders of the American Soci 
ety of Miniature Painters. She has her 
summer residence at Scituate, Mass. 
Studio: 157 Carnegie Hall, New York City. 

BECKWITH, Charles Minnigrode: 

Protestant Episcopal bishop; born in 
Prince George County, Va., June 3, 1851. 
He was educated at the University of 
Georgia and the Berkeley Divinity School, 
and received the degree of D.D. from the 
University of the South, where he was 
master of grammar schools until 1881, 
when he was ordained deacon and priest. 
He was rector of Trinity Church of Gal- 
veston, and in 1902 was consecrated bishop 
of Alabama. Bishop Beckwith is the au 
thor, among other works, of The Trinity 
Course of Church Instruction; The Teach 
er s Companion to the Trinity Course; and 
Rightly Instructed in God s Holy Word. 
He married in Galveston, Texas, May 11, 
1897, Mary Belle Cameron. Residence: 
Anniston, Alabama. 

BECKWITH, Isbon Thaddeus: 

Clergyman, theologian; born at Old 
Lyme, Conn., in 1843; son of William and 
Caroline (Champion) Beckwith. He was 



graduated from Yale as A.B. in 1868, 
and Ph.D. in 1872, took graduate work at 
Leipzig and Gottingen, 1872-1874, and 
received the degree of D.D. from Trinity 
College, Hartford, in 1898. He was in 
structor in Greek at the University of Ten 
nessee, 1868-1870; at Yale 1870-1872, and 
1874-1879; professor of Greek at Trinity 
College, Hartford, 1879-1898; professor of 
New r Testament interpretation in the Gen 
eral Theological Seminary in New York 
City, 1898-1906, and from 1907 lecturer 
in biblical studies at Trinity College, Hart 
ford, Conn. He was ordered deacon in 1875 
and ordained priest in 1876, in the min 
istry of the Episcopal Church. Dr. Beck 
with is a member of the Biblical and Ex- 
! egetical Society, the American Philological 
! Society, and the American Archaeological 
Society. Address: Hartford, Conn. 

BECKWITH, J. Carroll: 

Artist; born at Hannibal, Mo., Sept. 23, 
1852; son of Charles Henry and Martha 
Melissa (Owen) Beckwith. He commenced 
studying art in Chicago in 1869, and in 
1871 came to New York City, studying at 
the National Academy of Design for two 
years. Thence he went to Paris, France, 
where he entered the Ecole des Beaux Arts, 
later becoming a pupil of the famous 
French artist, Carolus Duran, for five years. 
In 1878 he established himself as a portrait 
painter in New York City. He has been 
instructor in the schools of the Art Stu 
dents League of New York City for eight 
een years; also at the Cooper Institute, 
and in the schools of the Metropolitan Mu 
seum of Art, New York City. He has oc 
cupied the offices of president Na 
tional Free Art League; vice-president of 
the Fine Arts Commission of the City of 
New York; treasurer of the Society of 
American Artists, and secretary of the 
National Academy of Design. He has been 
an exhibitor in all the important art ex 
hibitions of the past thirty years. He rep 
resents the principles of conservative art 
as opposed to impressionism. He has lived 
many years in Europe and has traveled 
extensively through France, Germany, 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



127 



Italy, England, Spain, Egypt and Greece. | 
He is a National Academician ; a member 
of the corporation of the Metropolitan 
Museum of Art; of the American Water 
Color Society and other art societies. He 
married in New York City, June 1, 1887, 
Bertha Hall. Country address: Onteora 
Club, Tannersville, N. Y. Residence: 8 
East 58th Street. Studio: 58 West 57th 
Street, New York City. 

BEDE, J. Adam: 

Congressman and journalist; born on a 
farm in Lorain County, Ohio, in 1856; his 
father being a Welshman by birth, and his 
mother of New England stock and Scotch J 
extraction. He was educated in the pub- | 
lie schools of Ohio; taught school, learned j 
the printer s trade and engaged in newspa 
per work as a profession. He has lived in 
most of the Western and Southern States 
and did reportorial work in- Washington. 
He supported Grover Cleveland in 1888 
and 1892, and was appointed United States 
marshal for the district of Minnesota in 
1894. He served through the great rail 
road strikes of that year and resigned. 
He returned to the Republican party on the 
financial issue in 1894, campaigning in 
several states that year, and in 1898 and 
1900. He decided to go to Congress as a 
Republican and was elected from the Eighth 
Minnesota District to the Fifty-eighth Con 
gress, and reflected to the Fifty-ninth and 
Sixtieth Congresses serving until March 4, 
1909. He has lectured extensively on po 
litical and patriotic subjects under lead 
ing bureaus. Address: Pine City, Minn. 

BEDFORD, Edward Thomas: 

Capitalist; born in Brooklyn, N. Y., Feb. 
19, 1849; son of Frederick Thomas and 
Mary Ann Elizabeth (Pace) Bedford. He 
was educated in the public schools and at 
Maplegrove Academy, Westport, Conn. 
He is president and director of the New 
York Glucose Company, the Bedford Petro 
leum Company of Paris, France, the Colo 
nial Oil Company of New Jersey, and the 
Self -Winding Clock Company; is vice-pres 
ident and director of the State Safe Depos 



it Vaults; trustee of the Title Guarantee 
and Trust Company; director and member 
of the executive committee of the Stand 
ard Oil Company, the Atlantic Refining 
Company, the Thompson-Starrett Company, 
and the Manufacturers Trust Company. 
He is a member of the Riding and Driving 
and Parkway Driving Clubs of Brooklyn, 
and of the Bridgeport Yacht, Black Rock 
Harbor, and Hokanum Golf Clubs of Con 
necticut. Mr. Bedford married at Bronx- 
ville, N. Y., Dec. 1871, Mary Ann Dingee, 
and they have five children. Residence: 
181 Clinton Avenue, Brooklyn. Address: 
26 Broadway. New York City. 

BEER, William: 

Librarian of the Howard Memorial, Li 
brary. Mr. Beer is a native of England, 
having been born in Plymouth, Devon, May 
1, 1849. He was educated at the Newcas- 
tle-on-Tyne School of Physical Science, 
and studied medicine in Paris, 1872-1878. 
Mr. Beer came to the United States in 1886 
and for several years practised as a min 
ing engineer, but in 1890 was appointed 
librarian of the Topeka (Kan.) Public 
Library, from which he went to the How 
ard Memorial Library in New Orleans, 
In 1896 he created the New Orleans Public 
Library and was librarian of both institu- 
i tions fill 1906 when he resigned the latter 
i and remains librarian of the Howard Me- 
I morial Library. Mr. Beers is a member 
of the American Antiquarian Society, the 
i Societe des Americanistes, the Socie"te 
j Geographique de France, the Grolier Club 
I of New York, the American Historical So- 
| ciety, the Louisana Historical Society, The 
| American Folk-Lore Society, the American 
I Economic Association, and the American 
I Library Association, as well as of several 
State historical societies. He is a recog 
nized authority on library and historical 
I subjects. Residence: 1003 Camp St., New 
; Orleans. La. 

; BEERS, Henry Augustin : 

Educator; born at Buffalo, N. Y., July 2, 
i 1847; son of George Webster and Elizabeth 



128 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Victoria (Clerc) Beers. He was graduated 
from Yale College with the degree of A.B., 
1809. Following his graduation, he went 
to Xew York City, and was admitted to 
the bar in 1870. For a year he practised 
law, but in 1871 lie returned to Yale as 
tutor in English, subsequently becoming as 
sistant professor and. in 1880, professor of 
English literature, which chair he con 
tinues to hold. He is a member of the 
Alpha Delta Phi fraternity and of Skull 
and Bones. He is author of numerous 
books on English and American literature, 
among them being: Life of N. P. Willis, 
1885; From Chaucer to Tennyson, 1890; 
Initial Studies in American Letters, 1891; 
A History of English Romanticism in the 
Eighteenth Century, 1899, and A History 
of English Romanticism in the Nineteenth 
Century, 1901, also of several volumes of 
fiction, essays and verse. He married at 
Covington, Ky., July 7, 1873, Mary Heaton, 
and they have eight children. Residence: 
(55 York Square. Address: Yale College, 
Xew Haven, Conn. 

BEHBEND, Bernard Arthur: 

Electrical engineer; born in Pomerania, 
Germany, May 9, 1875; son of Royal Coun 
selor M. Behrend. He was educated by 
private tutor, and at the University and 
Polytechnic Institute of Berlin, graduating 
in 1894; came to the United States and has 
since then keen engaged in engineering 
practice with specialization in electrical | 
engineering, being connected with the Bui- ! 
lock Electric Manufacturing Company, of 
which he was chief engineer for nine years, i 
He has been non-resident lecturer on engi- j 
neering subjects to several universities, and 
chief electrical engineer and consulting en 
gineer to Allis-Chalmers Company and affil- j 
iated corporations. He is a member of the 
Society of Civil Engineers, Germany, Ameri 
can Society of Mechanical Engineers, | 
the American Institute of Electrical Engi- j 
neers; and a fellow of the American Asso- i 
ciation for the Advancement of Science, i 
He is inventor of numerous electrical de- 
vices, and machinery which received a grand i 



| prize from the Louisiana Purchase Exposi- 
J tion at St. Louis, in 1904, which he served 
i as a member of the International Commit 
tee of organization and from which he re 
ceived a gold medal. He is author of: The 
Induction Motor Its Theory and Design, 
1900 (French translation, 1901), (German 
translation, 1902); The Debt of Electrical 
Engineering to C. E. L. Brown, 1901; En 
gineering Education, 1907, and is contribu 
tor of over thirty monographs to leading 
American and European journals and 
transactions on engineering subjects and on 
the theory of alternating currents, mo 
tors and generators, and other scientific 
subjects. He is now advisory engineer of 
the Westing-house Electric and Manufactur 
ing Company. Mr. Behrend is a member of 
The Engineers Club of New York. Resi 
dence: Pittsburgh, Pa. Office: Westing- 
house Electric and Manufacturing Com 
pany, East Liberty. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BELASCO, David: 

Manager, playwright; born in San Fran 
cisco, California. July 25, 1859; son of na 
tives of England. He received his early 
education under Catholic prieets at Van 
couver, British Columbia, and was gradu 
ated from Lincoln College, California, in 
1875. He early showed a predilection for 
tlie stage; was stage manager of the Bald 
win Theatre, in San Francisco in 1878, and 
later stage manager of the Grand Opera 
House and Metropolitan Theatre^, at San 
Francisco. During this time he was also 
engaged in dramatizing novels, adapting 
foreign plays and doing original work. 
He went East in 1880, and took charge of 
the productions of Mallory Brothers at 
the Madison Square Theatre. He joined 
forces with Charles Frohman in 1887, and 
later w r as manager of Mrs. Carter in his 
own version of Berton & Simon s Zaza, and 
lias been manager and proprietor of the 
Belasco Theatre from 1902; also since 1908 
proprietor and manager of the Belasco- 
StiiyTesant Theatre in Xew York. He is 
also proprietor of the Belasco Theatre in 
Washington and directs the production of 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



120 



his plays in different cities, having been for 
several years engaged in a contest with 
the " Theatrical Trust " so-called, in which 
he has championed an independent stage. 
He is author and co-author of a large num 
ber of plays, most of which have been artis 
tic and financial successes and is especially 
noted for his skill in stage production and 
direction. Address: 115 West 44th St., 
New York City. 

BELDING, Alvah N. : 

Silk manufacturer; born at Ashfield, 
Mass., March 27, 1838; son of Hiram and 
Mary (Wilson) Belding. Mr. Belding was 
one of the founders of the firm of Belding 
Brothers, and is now vice-president and 
secretary and manager of the manufactur 
ing part of the business of Belding Broth 
ers & Company. He is also president of the 
Belding Land and Improvement Company; 
vice-president of the Belding Savings Bank, 
and director of the Spencer Electric Light 
and Power Company, and the Belding Gas 
Company, all of Belding, Mich. ; director 
of the James I. Regan Company, of 
Rockville, American Mills Company, the 
Rockville National Bank and People s Sav 
ings Bank, all of Rockville, Conn. ; mem 
ber of and director of the Belding, Paul 
Company, Limited, Montreal, Canada, and 
director of the Carison-Currier Company, 
San Francisco,, Calif. He married at 
Shelburne Falls, Mass., Jan. G, 1870, Liz 
zie S. Merrick, and has two children. Ad 
dress: Rockville, Conn. 

BELL, Alexander Graham: 

Inventor; born in Edinburgh, Scotland, 
March 3, 1847; son of Alexander Melville 
Bell. He was educated at Edinburgh, and 
at London University, of which he is LL.D., 
Ph.D., and M.D. He has also received a 
large number of degrees from American 
and European universities, and in 1907 re 
ceived the degree of Sc.D. from Oxford 
University. Professor Bell came to Ameri 
ca in 1870, studying in Canada for a year, 
when he came to Boston as professor of 
vocal physiology at Boston University. His 
earlv work was in connection with attempts 



to teach persons to speak who are mute 
because of having been deaf from birth, 
so that they had no incentive to imitate 
the voices of normal persons. In the course 
of experiments arising out of his investi 
gations he invented the telephone, a pat- 
nt for which was granted February 14, 
187G. The great financial success of this 
invention has enabled Professor Bell to 
devote the remainder of his life to study 
and experimentation and he has not only 
perfected numerous devices of great value 
to humanity, but has carried on experi 
ments which have enabled others less fortu 
nately situated to complete inventions 
which been of very considerable advantage 
to the inventors of the world. He was as 
sociated with C. A. Bell and Sumner Tain- 
tor in the invention of the graphophone, 
and for a number of years has been engaged 
on experiments in the art of flying, having 
applied the tetrahedral unit to the construc 
tion of aeroplanes, making such progress in 
the application of this particular princi 
ple to aerial flight that it is confidently 
believed that the first flying machine which 
will solve the dangers of heavier than air 
flight will be developed along the lines 
of Professor Bell s method. He is ex-presi 
dent of the American Association to Pro 
mote Teaching of Speech to the Deaf; the 
National Geographical Society, and regent 
of the Smithsonian Institution. He was 
awarded by the French Government in 1880 
the Volta prize, and in 1902 received a 
medal from the London Society of Fine 
Arts. He is an officer of the French Legion 
of Honor ; founder of the Volta Bureau ; and 
is a member of the National Academy 
of Sciences, and other scientific organiza 
tions. He has writen many papers on 
scientific and educational subjects, includ 
ing a Memoir on the Formation of a Deaf 
Variety of the Humane Race. He married, 
in 1887, Mabel Gardiner, daughter of 
G. G. Hubbard. Dr. Bell has two daugh 
ters; the oldest, Elsie, married Gilbert H. 
Grosvenor, editor of the National Geograph 
ic Magazine, in 1900, and the younger, Ma 
rian, married David Fairchild, in charge of 
Agricultural Explorations of the Depart- 



1 30 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



inent of Agriculture, in 190"). Address: 
1331 Connecticut Avenue, Washington, D. C. 

BELL, Charles James: 

Ex-governor and fanner; born in Walden, 
Vermont, March 10, 1845; son of James 
Dean and Caroline (Warner) Bell. He 
was educated in the common schools and at 
Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and he 
received the degree of LL.D. from Norwich 
University at Northfield, Vt. He served in 
Vermont infantry and cavalry regiments 
during the Civil War, and since then has 
been continuously engaged in agriculture. 
He was secretary of the State Board of 
Agriculture of Vermont for eight years; 
railroad commissioner of Vermont for two 
years; has served in the House of Repre 
sentatives and Senate of the Vermont Leg 
islature, and was governor of Vermont, 
1905-1906, being elected on the Republi 
can ticket. Governor Bell was master of 
the State Grange of Vermont, 1894-1906, 
and is now a member of the Executive Com 
mittee of the National Grange, and he is a 
director of Phillips Academy and a mem 
ber of the Grand Army of the Republic. 
He married at Cabot, Vt., Oct. 4, 1870, 
Mary Louise Perry, and they have two 
daughters. Address: East Hardwick, Vt. 

BELL, Clark: 

Lawyer; born in Whitesville, Jefferson 
County, N. Y., March 12, 1832; son of 
Philander F. and Sylvia (Jones) Bell; ed 
ucated at Franklin Academy; LL.D., Tay 
lor University, Indiana, and Rutherford Col 
lege, North Carolina. Admitted to bar, 
Rochester, N. Y., 1853; practised at Ham- 
mondsport, N. Y., 1853-1861; Bath, N. Y., 
1861-1864; in New York City, since 1864; 
attorney Union Pacific Railway, 18(54, and 
drew the act and had charge of the legisla 
tion which passed Congress to aid its 
construction; attorney for Pacific Mail 
Steamship Company. President Medico- 
Legal Society, fourteen terms; founder 
American International Congress on Tuber 
culosis in 1900 (honorary president, St. 
Louis, 1904; treasurer and secretary Coun 



cil of Congress, New York City, 1906). 
Editor and publisher, since 1883, of Medico- 
Legal Journal. Editor of Medico-Legal 
Papers (three volumes); Bulletin Amer 
ican Congress on Tuberculosis (four vol 
umes) ; Proceedings Medico-Legal Congress 
of 1889 and 1895; Government delegate of 
the U. S. A. to the Paris International 
Medical Congress, 1900. and honorary presi 
dent of the section of medical jurispru 
dence. Government delegate to the Lis 
bon International Medical Congress of 
1906 at Lisbon, Portugal. Author: Bell s 
Medico-Legal Studies (eleven volumes; 
Spiritism, Telepathy and Hypnotism; His 
tory of the Supreme Court of the States 
and Provinces of North America (New 
York and fifteen other States), two vol 
umes. He married Sept. 8, 1875, Helene 
S. Taylor. Residence: 170 W. Seventy- 
fifth Street, Union League Club. Address: 
39 Broadway, New York City. 

BELL, Digby: 

Actor; born in Milwaukee, Wis., in 1849. 
He received a musical education at Na 
ples and had a foreign debut. He returned 
to the United States and entered comic 
opera, playing the leading baritone parts, 
and subsequently entered the field of light 
comedy, making a great success in the play 
" The Education of Mr. Pipp," in which 
he appeared in the title role at the head of 
his own company. He married, in 1882, 
Laura Joyce, a prominent comic opera 
contralto, who died in 1904. Address: 
1476 Lexington Avenue. New York City. 

BELL, Hill McClelland: 

President of Drake University; born in 
Ohio in 1860; son of J. H. and Elmy A. 
(Cooper) Bell; removed with parents to 
Iowa in 1865. He was educated in Hazel 
Dell Academy, Newton, Iowa., the Western 
Normal College at Shenandoah, Iowa, and 
at Drake University from which he re 
ceived the degrees of A.B. in 1890 and A. 
M. in 1899; and the degree of LL.D. was 
conferred upon him by Simpson College, in 
1905. IJe began his career as an educator 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



131 



at the age of 18. as teacher of a country [ lands in July, ISO!); commanding the reg- 
school. soon after becoming principal of iment to December, 1899, and was awarded 



the village schools of Linnville. Iowa. 
He was superintendent of schools at Kellogg, 
Iowa. 1885-1888, teacher of mathematics in 
the Normal College of Drake University, 
1888-1890; teacher of English in Highland 
Park College, Iowa, 1890-1894; teacher 
1894-1897, and president 1895-1897, of 
Lincoln Normal College, Lincoln, Neb. He 
returned to Drake University in 1897, serv 
ing as dean of the Normal College from 
1897 to 1900, vice-chancellor of Univer 
sity, 1900-1901, dean of the College of 
Liberal Arts 1901-1903 and acting chan 
cellor of the University for the year 1902. 
In 1902 he was elected to his present posi 
tion as president of the University. Presi 
dent Bell is a member of the Board of Trus 
tees of the Carnegie Foundation for the 
Advancement of Teaching; a member of the 
Iowa Committee of Selection for the 
Rhodes Scholarship, and during the year 
1906 was president of the College Section 
of the Iowa State Teachers Association. 
He has at different times filled various im 
portant positions in the educational world, 
and is author of some popular text-books 
in English. He married at Kellogg, Iowa, 
Sept. 2, 1886, Edith L. Orebaugh, and 



the Congressional Medal of Honor for most 
distinguished gallantry in action, Sept., 
9, 1899, near Porac, Luzon, Philippine Is 
lands, while in advance of his regiment 
charging seven insurgents with his pistol 
and compelling the surrender of the captain 
and two privates, under a hot and close fire 
from the remaining insurgents concealed in 
a bamboo thicket. He performed useful 
service in the pacification and control of 
the Philippines, and returned to the United 
States in 1903, and then became com 
mandant of the Infantry and Cavalry 
School and Staff College at Fort Leaven- 
worth Kansas. He was promoted to ma 
jor-general of the United States Army, Jan. 
3, 1907, and is now serving as chief of the 
General Staff. Address: Room 224, War 
Department, Washington. 



they have five children. Residence: 1091 tinning until 1868, when on attaining his 

* , -i i j i n 



James S. : 

Merchant miller; born in Philadelphia, 
June 30, 1847; son of Samuel and Eliza 
beth (Faust) Bell. He was educated in the 
public schools of Philadelphia and the Phil 
adelphia Central High School until 1863, 
when he began business life as a clerk, con- 



majority he became a partner in the firm 
of Samuel Bell & Sons, in which connec 
tion he continued for twenty years. In 
1888 he became a partner in the firm of 
Washburn, Martin & Company, and the 
following year became president of the 
Washburn-Crosby Company, the great flour 
milling corporation of Minneapolis, and 
has continued at the head of that company 
ever since. He is . also president of the 
Royal Milling Company, vice-president of 
the St. Anthony Elevator Company, the 
St. Anthony and Dakota Elevator Company 
and the Barnum Grain Company, and is 
a director of the Northwestern National 

the Cavalry and Light Artillery School. Bank of Minneapolis. Mr. Bell is a Re- 
from 1891 to 1894. He was appointed colo- publican in his political views. He is a 



Twenty-sixth Street. Office : 
versify, Des Moines, Iowa. 

BELL, James Franklin: 

Major-general, United States Army; born 
in Shelbyville, Kentucky, Jan. 9, 1856; 
son of John Wilson and Sarah Margaret 
Venable (Allen) Bell. He was appointed 
to the United States Military Academy, 
from which he was graduated in the class 
of 1878. He captured a band of half-breed 
Cree Indians near Fort Buford, South 
Dakota, 1883; was in the Sioux campaign 
at Pine Ridge, South Dakota, in 1891; was 
adjutant of the regiment and secretary of 



nel of volunteers, July 5, 1899. He organ- 
ized the Thirty-sixth Infantry of United 
States Volunteers in the Philippine Is- 



member of the Union League Club of Phil- 
adelphia and the Minneapolis Club of Min- 
neapolis. Mr. Bell married at Philadel- 



132 

phia. Jan. 8, 1873, Sallie Montgomery Ford. 
Residence: 2215 Park Avenue. Office ad 
dress: The Washburn-Crosby Company, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 



BELL, Lilian (Mrs. Bogue) : 

Author; born in Chicago, 1807; daughter 
of Major William W. and Nancy Caroline 
(Brown) Bell. She was educated at home 
by a governess, and afterward in Dear 
born Seminary, Chicago, from which she 



MEN OF AMERICA. 

lirsl polyphase plants for power, light 
ing and railway service used in the United 
States. Since 1895 he has been consulting 
engineer engaged mainly on work in con 
nection with electrical power transmission. 
He has taken out twenty-five patents relat 
ing to power transmission apparatus. He 
was technical officer of the Volunteer Elec 
trical Corps in the Spanish-American War, 
is a fellow of the American Academy of 
Arts and Sciences; member of the American 



was graduated. She married in New York 
City, May 9, 1900. Author Hoyt Bogue, 
and has a daughter, but retains her maiden 
name for literary purposes. She began her 
career in authorship in girlhood as a con 
tributor to magazines, which she has con 
tinued ever since. She has also given many 
author s readings, notably in 1897, when 
she read in association with James Whit- 
comb Riley and John Fox. Jr.; and she 
spent four years in European travel. She 
is author of: Love Affairs of an Old Maid, 
1893; A Little Sister to the Wilderness, 
1895; The Under Side of Things, 1897; 
The Instinct of Stepfatherhood, 1898; 
As Seen By Me, 1900; The Expatriates, 
1900; Sir John and the American Girl, 
1901; Abroad with the Jimmies, 1902; 
Hope Loring, 1902; The Dowager Countess 
and the American Girl, 1903; The Inter 
ference of Patricia, 1903; A Book of Girls, 
1904 ; At Home with the Jardines, 1905 ; Car 
oline Lee, 1900; Why Men Remain Bache 
lors, and Other Luxuries, 1900. Address: 
Tarrytown, N. Y. 
BELL, Louis: 

Consulting electrical engineer; born in 
Chester, N. H., Dec. 5,. 1804. He was edu 
cated in Dartmouth College and Johns Hop 
kins LTniversity. In 1888 he became pro 
fessor of applied electricity at Purdue Uni 
versity, and organized the electrical course 
there, leaving to become editor of the Elec 
trical World, New York. On the organiza 
tion in 1892, by the General Electric Com 
pany of its electric power transmission de 
partment, he became chief engineer of that 
department and designed and installed the 



Institute of Electrical Engineers; vice-presi 
dent of the Illuminating Engineering So 
ciety, and was a member of the Internation 
al Electrical Congress at the Louisiana Pur 
chase Exposition. He is the author of: 
The Electric Railway (with U. T. Crosby); 
Power Distribution for Electric Railroads; 
Electric Power Transmission; The Art of 
Illumination; Boston Electrical Handbook. 
Residence: Brookline, Mass. Office: 120 
Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 



BELLAMY, Charles Joseph: 

Publisher; born in Chicopee Falls, Mass., 
May 1, 1852. He was educated at Harvard 
College, and was admitted to the bar in 
1870. He practised law for five years. Mr. 
Bellamy founded the Springfield Daily 
News, in 1880 which he continues to pub 
lish. He is a brother of the late Edward 
Bellamy, author of " Looking Backward," 
who was associated with him on the Daily 
News for three years and has himself writ 
ten several novels, works on sociological 
subjects and several children s books. 
Among his publications are: The Breton 
Mills; An Experiment in Marriage; Were 
They Sinners; A Moment of Madness; The 
Way Out; Return of the Fairies; and The 
Wonder Children. He married October 
14, 1879, Imogen A. 
Springfield, Mass. 



Cooper. Address: 



BELLAMY, John D.: 

Lawyer and ex-congressman; born in Wil 
mington, N. C., March 24, 1854; son of 
Dr. John D. Bellamy and Eliza M. (Har- 
riss) Bellamy. He was graduated from 
Davidson College, North Carolina, A.B. 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



133 



1873, studied German and modern literature 
at the University of Virginia in 1874 and 
was graduated from that University as B. 
L. in 1875. He has served as county at 
torney of Brunswick County, city attorney 
of Wilmington, N. C., district counsel of the 
Seaboard Air Line and local counsel of the 
Southern Railway and one of the local coun 
sel of Atlantic Coast Line, of the Atlantic 
National Bank, counsel for the Western 
Union Telegraph Company, Postal Telegraph 
& Cable Co., The Southern Bell Telephone 
Company, the Wilmington Homestead and 
Loan Association, the North Carolina Home 
Building Association, and other corpora 
tions. He is a prominent Democrat, was 
a member of the State Senate of North Car 
olina 1891-1892, and a member of the Fifty- 
sixth and Fifty-seventh Congresses, 1899- 
1903. Mr. Bellamy is a member of the 
Theta Delta Chi fraternity, has been grand 
master of Odd Fellows, and is a Knight of 
Pythias, and a member of the Cape Fear 
Club. Mr. Bellamy has a very large ad 
miralty practice in the United States courts, 
has also a general law and equity prac 
tice in all the State and federal courts. He 
is author of: Sketches Historical; Life of 
Major-General Robert Howe, and Life of 
General Alexander Lillington. He married 
at Townesville, N. C., Dec. 0, 1870, Emma 
May Hargrove, and they have five children. 
Residence: G02 Market Street, Wilmington. 
Office: 416 Southern Building, Wilming 
ton, N. C. 

BELLEW, Kyrle: 

Actor; born in Calcutta in 1857; son of 
the chaplain of the cathedral in that city. 
He was for seven years a junior officer in 
the English navy/ He left the navy and 
went to the Australian gold fields and was 
also in newspaper work. He made his 
stage debut at the Theatre Royal in Brigh 
ton, and after a successful career in London 
came to the United States in 1895 as lead 
ing man in Wallace s Theatre. He subse 
quently toured the world as a joint star 
with Mrs. James Brown Potter, and in 
1900-1902 headed an exploring expedition 



in Northern Queensland. Since 1902 he has 
been on the stage in the United States as 
i star at the head of his own company. He 
has marked literary talents and is the au 
thor, among other works, of the plays 
Yvonne, lolande. Hero and Leander, and 
, harlotte Corday, and several adaptations. 
Address: Care Liebler & Company, 1402 
Broadway, New York City. 

BELMONT, August: 

Banker; born in New York City, Feb. 18, 
1853; son of the late August and of Caro 
line Slidell (Perry) Belmont. He was ed 
ucated at the Rectory School at Hampton, 
Conn.; Phillips Exeter Academy, and Har 
vard University, being graduated as A.B., 
1874. In 1875 he entered his father s bank 
ing house and is now head of the firm of 
August Belmont & Company, bankers, 
which, in addition to its own large inter 
ests, is the accredited representative of the 
Rothschilds in America. He is also chair 
man of the Board of Directors of the In- 
terborough-Metropolitan Company, and the 
Interborough Rapid Transit Company; di 
rector of the Louisville and Nashville Rail 
road; director National Park Bank, Man 
hattan Trust Company, and many other cor 
porations. He is president and director of 
the National Civic Federation. Mr. Bel- 
ir.ont is a Democrat in politics. He is 
president of the American Kennel Club; 
chairman of the Jockey Club, and is ac 
tively identified with turf interests in New 
York State. He is also a member of the 
Union, Knickerbocker, Manhattan and 
Country Clubs, and the New York Athletic 
Club, of which he was formerly president. 
He married in 1881, Bessie H. Morgan, who 
died in 1898. Residence (country) : Hemp- 
stead, L. L, (city) : 44 East -34th Street. 
Office: 23 Nassau Street, New York City. 

BELMONT, Perry: 

Lawyer, capitalist; born in New York City, 
Dec. 28, 1851; eldest son of the late August 
Belmont, financier, and of Caroline Slidell 
(Perry) Belmont. He was graduated from 
Harvard as A.B. in 1872, taking special 



134 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



honors in history and political economy, 
and following with a course in civil law 
at the University of Berlin, then went to 
the Columbia Law School, graduating as 
LL. B. in 187(i. He was admitted to the 
bar in 187C, engaged as counsel for impor 
tant corporate interests, and practised until 
1881. Becoming active in political matters 
he was elected in 1880 as a Democrat to 
the Forty-seventh Congress from the First 
New York District, and was reflected to the 
Forty-eighth, Forty-ninth and Fiftieth 
Congresses, serving vmtil 1887, and as chair 
man of the Committee on Foreign Affairs 
during the Forty-ninth and Fiftieth Con 
gresses. He was appointed United States 
Minister to Spain in 1887, serving until 
1889. During the Spanish-American War 
he volunteered for service and was ap 
pointed inspector general with the rank of 
major. Mr. Belmont is a director in sev 
eral corporations and a member of the New 
York Chamber of Commerce. He is also a 
member of the Metropolitan, Knickerbocker, 
University, New York Yacht, Army and 
Navy, Jockey, Turf and Field Coaching, 
National Democratic, Manhattan and Union 
Clubs of New York. Mr. Belmont mar 
ried, in 1899, Jessie Bobbins. Address: 
580 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

BEMIS, Edward Webster: 

Economist; born in Springfield, Mass., 
April 1, 1800. He was graduated from 
Amherst College as A.B. 1880, A.M. 1884, 
and Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D., 1885. 
After a successful service in professorships 
of political economy at Vanderbilt Univer 
sity and the University of Chicago he be 
came assistant statistician of the Illinois 
Bureau of Labor Statistics. He subsequent 
ly became professor of economic science in 
the Kansas State Agricultural College and 
later was appointed director of the Depart 
ment of Municipal Monopolies of the Bu 
reau of Economic Research in New York. 
His service in this position was marked by 
excellent results and brought him into na 
tional notice as an expert on questions 
relating to municipal ownership. He gave 
up his position in New York to become 



uperintendent of the Water Works of 
Cleveland, Ohio. There his annual reports, 
his system of accounts and the checking 
by meters of the waste of water have at 
tracted much attention. Mr. Bemis has 
written extensively on labor and municipal 
questions, his works including: Municipal 
Monopolies; Municipal Ownership of Gas 
\\orks in the United States. He was a mem 
ber of the committee of the National Civic 
Federation investigating municipal owner- 
hip. He married in Clearwater, Minn., 
Oct. 28, 1889, Annie Louise Sargent. Ad 
dress: 1847 E. 03d Street, N. E., Cleve 
land, Ohio. 

BENEDICT, A. L.: 

Physician; born in Buffalo, N. Y., 1865; 
son of Nathan Gregory Benedict, Jr., and 
Gracia Skinner (Smith) Benedict. He was 
graduated from the University of Michigan, 
A.B., from the University of Buffalo, M.D., 
from the University of Pennsylvania, 
M.D. and the Ohio Wesleyan University 
conferred upon him the degree of A.M. He 
was appointed to the United States Marine 
Hospital Service in 1890, but did not 
serve; he held various teaching positions in 
professional schools, including professorship 
in physiology in the Dental Department, 
university of Buffalo, from 1896 to 1901; 
superintendent of ethnology at the Pan- 
American Exposition, 1900-1901; associate 
editor Medical and Surgical Reporter, and 
editor of the American Therapist of New 
York. Dr. Benedict has been a vice-presi- 
uent of the Medical Academy of Medicine, 
councillor of the American Gastro-entero- 
logic Association ; is a member of the Ameri 
can Medical Association (gold medal in 
nieuicme), Medical Society of the fetate 01 
^sew iork (twice prize essayist) ; member 
01 the Historical Society, Society of Natural 
sciences, .buffalo, Delta Upsiioii iraternity 
( president of Michigan Chapter and West 
ern .isevv York Alumni Association). His 
lavorite recreation is American archeology, 
ne is a member of the University Club, the 
ijuffalo Historical Society and the Sons of 
the Revolution. Residence: Raleigh Hotel. 
Ollice: 354 Franklin St., Buffalo, N. Y. 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



BENEDICT, Elias Cornelius: 



Banker and stock-broker; born at Som- 
ers, Westchester County., N. Y., Jan. 24, 
1834. He was educated in the schools of 
New York until 1850, when he became a 
clerk in a stock-broker s office. He em 
barked in business for himself in 1857 and 
has continued ever since. He originated 
the Gold Exchange Bank, which grew out 
of gold speculation during and after the 
Civil War, and in recent years his specialty 
has been the handling of gas stocks. He 
is president of the Commercial Acetylene 
Company, the Marine Engine and Ma 
chinery Company, and he is a director of 
the United States Rubber Company and the 
Columbia Trust Company. His favorite 
recreations are hunting and yachting. Mr. 
Benedict is a member of the Players , the 
Seawanhaka Corinthian Yacht and New 
York Yacht Clubs. He married Sarah 
Hart. Residence: 10 West 51st Street. 
Office: 80 Broadway, New York City. 

BENEDICT, James Sackett: 

American consul; born at Aurelius, Ca- 
yuga County, N. Y., March 5, 1856; son of 
Newton and Asenath (Chapin) Benedict. 
He was educated in the public schools and 
private school, Washington, D. 0. He was 
draftsman and cleik, for fouv years, in 
architect s office in Washington, D. C., and 
received a temporary appointment in the 
Engineer s Office, War Department; was 
American consular agent at Stratford, Ont., 
1879-1887; American commercial agent at 
Moncton, New Brunswick, 1887-1897; 
transferred to commercial agency at Camp- 
bellton, New Brunswick, Jan. 25, 1897. On 
reorganization of the Consular Service by 
Act of Congress, April 5, 190G, the commer 
cial agency was abolished and he was ap 
pointed American consul at Campbellton. 
In April,, 1907, he was promoted as Ameri 
can consul at St. John s, Newfoundland. 
He is a Royal Arch Mason, Knight Templar, 
charter and life member of the Ontario 
Grand Lodge of the Royal Arcanum. He 
is an honorary member of the Campbellton 
Club, also a number of other clubs. Mr. 



135 

Benedict married at Washington, D. C., 
1879, Cora Blanche Chase, and they have 
two children. Address: American Consul 
ate, St. John s Newfoundland. 



BENEDICT, Robert Dewey: 

Lawyer; born at Burlington, Vt., Oct. 
3, 1828; son of George Wyllys and Eliza 
(Dewey) Benedict. He was graduated 
from the University of Vermont in 1848 as 
B.A. and received also the degrees of A.M. 
and LL.D. Mr. Benedict was admitted to 
the bar in New York City in 1851. He is 
a Republican in politics. He is author of 
Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in 
the District Courts of the United States 
within the Second Circuit (ten volumes) ; 
and of various pamphlets; and he was edi 
tor of Benedict s Admiralty, third edition. 
He is a member of the Society of Colonial 
Wars, the Military Order of Foreign Wars, 
and the Order of Settlers and Defenders of 
America (first vice-president). Mr. Bene 
dict married at Winooski Falls, Vt., in 
1854, Frances A. Weaver. He retired from 
active business in 1906 and removed to 
Burlington. Address: Burlington, Vt. 

BENJAMIN, Charles Henry: 

Professor of mechanical engineering; 
born at Patten,, Maine, Aug. 29, 1856; son 
of Samuel E. and Ellen M. (Fairfield) Ben 
jamin. He was graduated from the Uni 
versity of Maine as M.E. in 1880. He was 
instructor, 1880 to 1883 and professor 1883 
to 1886, of mechanical engineering in the 
University of Maine ; mechanical engineer 
of the McKay Heeling Machine Association, 
1886-1889; professor of mechanical engi 
neering at the Case School of Applied 
Science, 1889-1907, and in 1907 was ap- 
j pointed dean of the Engineering Schools of 
Purdue L^niversity. He was supervising 
engineer for smoke inspection of the City 
of Cleveland, 1900 to 1902. In 1908 he 
received the degree of Doctor of Engineer 
ing from the Case School of Applied 
Science. Professor Benjamin is a member 
of the American Society of Mechanical En- 



1 30 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



gineers, the Society for the Promotion of 
Engineering Education, and is an honorary 
member of the Engineers Society of the 
City of Cleveland, member of the Society of 
Sigma Xi and of the Tan Beta Pi frater 
nity. He is author of: Modern American 
Machine Tools, published in London, and of 
text-books on Machine Design and on the 
Steam Engine. He married at Oakland, 
Maine, August 17, 1879, Cora Louise Ben 
son, and they have two daughters. Ad 
dress: Lafayette, Ind. 

BENJAMIN, Marcus: 

Editor, U. S. National Museum; born in 
San Francisco, Calif., Jan. 17, 1857; son of 
Edmund Burke Benjamin, a prominent 
merchant, and Sarah (Mitchell) Benjamin. 
He was educated in the College of the City 
of New York and was graduated from the 
chemical course in Columbia University, 
Ph.B., 1878; afterward receiving the hon 
orary degrees of A.M., Lafayette College, 
1889; Ph.D., University of Nashville, 1889; 
Sc.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1905. He 
engaged in business pursuits four years, 
was editor of the American Pharmacist, 
1882, and later of its successor, the Weekly 
Drug News; was chemist in the laboratory 
of the U 1 . S. Appraisers Stores in New 
York, 1883-1885; sanitary engineer to New- 
York City Board of Health, 1885; lecturer 
on chemistry in the New York Women s 
Medical College, 1880. Dr. Benjamin has 
been connected with leading encyclopedias 
and reference books, in an editorial capac 
ity, including Appleton s Cyclopedia of 
American Biography, Appleton s Annual 
Cyclopedia, Johnson s Universal, and the 
New International Cyclopedias, the Stand 
ard Dictionary and many others, and since 
1890 has been editor of the Proceedings, 
Bulletins and Annual Reports of the U. S. 
National Museum. He is author of: Brad- 
dock s Rock, a Study in Local History, 
1899; Memoir of Rear Admiral Francis 
Asbury Roe, 1903 ; Memorial of John Henry 
Boner, 1905; John Bidwell, Pioneer, a 
sketch of His Career, 1900, etc. He is also 
a contributor to magazines. Dr. Benjamin 



was a member of the Jury of Awards of the 
World s Columbian Exposition, 1893; Ten 
nessee Centennial Exposition, 1897; Trans- 
Mississippi Exposition, 1898; Pan-American 
Exposition, 1901; South Carolina Inter 
state Exposition, 1902; Louisiana Purchase 
Exposition, 1904, and Jamestown Exposi 
tion, 1907; and he was a member of the U. 
S. Assay Commission, 1896, 1899, 1904 and 
1900. He was secretary of the Section of 
Technical Chemistry, in the International 
Congress of Arts and Sciences, St. Louis, 
1904, is a life fellow of the London Chem 
ical Society, is a fellow and has been vice- 
president of the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science, member of the 
American Chemical Society, the Society of 
Chemical Industry, National Geographic 
Society, Society of the Sigma Xi; member 
of the Hudson-Fulton Celebration Commis 
sion, president of the AKimni Association of 
Columbia University in the District of Co 
lumbia. Dr. Benjamin was governor of the 
Society of Colonial Wars, 1905-1907, secre 
tary, 1094-1907, of the Sons of the Revolu 
tion in the District of Columbia, president 
of the Society of the War of 1812, 1898- 
1908, and member of other patriotic socie 
ties; also of the Authors Club of New 
York City and the Cosmos Club of Wash 
ington, D. C. He married June 16, 1892, 
Carolyn, daughter of J. Loring Gilbert, of 
New York City. Residence: 1703 Q Street, 
N. W. Office: U. S. National Museum, 
Washington, D. C. 

BENJAMIN, Park: 

Patent lawyer, author; born in New York 
City May 11, 1849; son of Park Benjamin 
(poet) and of Mary (Western) Benjamin. 
He was graduated from Trinity School, 
New York City, in 1862, and from the 
United States Naval Academy in 1867. He 
made several cruises; was with Admiral 
Farragut, European station, 1868; promot 
ed to ensign, 180^., nd resigned in 1809. 
He was graduated from Albany Law School 
as LL.B., 1870, was admitted to the bar 
same year and received the degree of Ph.D. 
from Union College in 1877. He was as- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



137 



sooiato editor of the Scientific American 
from 1872 to 1878, and is a scientific ex 
pert and counsel in patent matters. He 
was editor-in-chief of Appleton s Cyclopedia 
of Applied Mechanics, from 1878 to 1891. 
He is associate member of the Society of 
Naval Architects and Marine Engineers; 
foreign member of the British Chartered 
Institute of Patent Agents, and member of 
the American Institute of Mechanical Engi 
neers, American Institute of Electrical En 
gineers. He is author of numerous books 
and magazine contributions. He was the 
first to advocate a United States Naval R,2- 
seiwe. He collected, with R. M. Thompson 
and E. J. Berwind, a valuable library of 
rare works relating to electricity and pre 
sented it to the United States Xaval Acad 
emy. Mr. Benjamin has been counsel to 
leading inventors and corporations in vari 
ous proceeding and litigations. He is presi 
dent of the Naval Architects Association 
of New York. He married at Yonkers, 
N. Y., in 1891, Ida E. Crane. Residence: 
270 West 73d Street (winter); The 
Barnacle, West Hampton Beach, Long 
Island (summer). Office: 165 Broadway, 
New York. 

BENJAMIN, Samuel Greene Wheeler: 

Author, artist and art critic; born in 
Argos, Greece,, Feb. 13, 1837. He was edu 
cated at the English College, Smyrna, 
Turkey, and at Williams College. He read 
law and studied art, and for several years 
followed the sea, developing his abilities in 
marine painting, among his early work in 
this line being a number of marine draw 
ings connected with the Crimean War sent 
to the London Illustrated News in 1854; 
studied art at home and abroad, receiving 
honorable mention. He opened a studio in 
Boston in 1870 and in 1883 he was ap 
pointed the first United States minister to 
Persia, where he prepared a code for extra 
territorial practice, and as a result of his 
service there settled questions of land tenure 
by foreigners in Persia, and won honorable 
mention for exhibit of Persian products 
at New Orleans Exhibition. He is the 
author of: Constantinople, Isle of Pearls 



and Other Poems; Ode on the Death of 
Abraham Lincoln; The Turk and the 
Greek; Tom Roper, A Yarn for Boys; The 
Choice of Paris, a Romance of the Toad; 
Advice of Father to Son (translated from 
Latin poem; Contemporary Art in Europe; 
What is Art? The Atlantic Islands; Art 
in America; Our American Artists; The 
Multitudinous Seas; The World s Para 
dises ; Troy. Its Legend, Literature and 
Topography; A Group of Etchers; Cruise 
of the Alice May ; Persia and the Persians ; 
The Story of Persia; and Sea Spray. Con 
tributor to Atlantic Monthly, London Art 
Journal, Harper s, Century, etc. He is a 
member of the Sons of the Revolution; 
Society of Colonial Wars; Phi Beta Kappa 
Society; Boston Art Club; American Free 
Art League; National Geographic Society; 
American Forestry Association, and vice- 
president Society of American Authors. 
He married, first^ Oct. 20, 1863, Clara Stow- 
ell, and second, Nov. 16, 1882, Fannie 
Nichols Weed, the author. Address: Bur 
lington, Yt. 

BENNESON, Cora Agnes: 

Lawyer and writer; born in Quincy, 111.; 
daughter of Robert S. and Electa Ann 
(Park) Benneson. She was graduated from 
the University of Michigan as A.B., 1878, 
LL.B., 1880, and A.M., 1883, and was fellow 
in history at Bryn Mawr College, 1887- 
1888. She was admitted to the bar in 
Michigan and Illinois in 1880, and in Mas 
sachusetts in 1894; has been special com 
missioner in Massachusetts since 1895, and 
is now actively engaged in law practice in 
Massachusetts. Miss Benneson edited law 
reports for the West Publishing Company, 
St. Paul, Minn., in 1886; gave the alumni 
poem at the University of Michigan, June 
27, 1889, printed in the Commencement An 
nual; wrote Executive Discretion in the 
United States, printed in Volume 47 of 
the Proceedings of the American Associa 
tion for the Advancement of Science; and 
Federal Guaranties for Maintaining Re 
publican Government in the States, in 
Volume 48 of same; also many articles in 
maga/.ines and other periodicals on law, 



138 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



education and political science. She took 
a trip around the world. 1883-1885, and 
during the two following years lectured on 
her travels. She is a fellow of the Ameri 
can Association for the Advancement of 
Science; member of the American Histori 
cal Association, and American Political 
Science Association, and is sole trustee of 
the Edward Everett Estate. Address: 4 
Mason Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

BENNET, William S. : 

Lawyer and congressman; born at Port 
Jervis," Orange County, N. Y., Nov. 9, 1870; 
son of James Bennet and Alice Leonora 
(Stiles) Bennet. He was graduated from 
the Albany Law School as LL.B. with hon 
ors in 1892, and was admitted to the bar 
of the State of New York in May of that 
year. Mr. Bennet had a brief experience in 
the newspaper business on the staff of the 
Port Jervis Gazette, but has practised law 
continuously since his admission to the 
bar. He removed to New York City in 
1893. He was a member of the Assembly 
of New York State in 1901 and 1902 and 
justice of the Municipal Court of the City 
of New York. 1903. He was elected, as a 
Republican, from the Seventeenth Congres 
sional District of New York to the Fifty- 
ninth Congress in 1904, and was reflected 
in 1906 and 1908 to the Sixtieth and Sixty- 
first Congresses. During his service in 
Congress he has taken an especial interest 
in matters relating to immigration and he 
is a member of the Immigration Commis 
sion. Mr. Bennet is an elder in the Fourth 
Presbyterian Church of New York City. 
He married, June 30, 1896, Gertrude Wit- 
schief, and they have four children. Office: 
60 Wall Street, New York City. 

BENNETT, Charles Edwin: 

Professor of Latin in Cornell University; 
born in Providence, R. I., April 6, 1858; 
son of James L. Bennett and Lucia (Dyer) 
Bennett. He was graduated from Brown 
University as A.B. in 1878; was a gradu 
ate student of Harvard University in 1881- 
1882, and student at Leipzig, Berlin and 



and Heidelberg, 1882-1884, and he received 
the degree of Litt.D., from Brown Univer 
sity in 1904. He was principal of the public 
school at Milton, Fla., 1878-1879; classical 
master at Sing Sing, N. Y., 1879-1881; head 
of the preparatory department at the Uni 
versity of Nebraska, 1884-1889; professor of 
Latin at the University of Wisconsin, 1889- 
1891; professor of classical philology at 
Brown University, 1891-1892, and professor 
of Latin at Cornell University, from 1892. 
He edited numerous Greek and Latin texts 
and is author of: Bennett s Latin Gram 
mar, 1895; and Appendix, 1895; Latin 
Composition, 1896; The Foundations of 
Latin, 1898; Criticism of Some Recent Sub 
junctive Theories, 1898; The Quantitative 
Reading of Latin Poetry, 1899; The Teach 
ing of Greek and Latin in Secondary 
Schools, 1900; Sounds and Inflections of 
the Cyprian dialect, 1888; Latin Lessons, 
1901; Preparatory Latin Writer. 1905; 
Latin Language, 1906; also of numerous 
articles in philological and other journals. 
Editor of Cornell Studies in Classical Phi 
lology. Professor Bennett is a member of 
the American Philological Association, the 
Delta Upsilon fraternity, Phi Beta Kappa 
Society and the City Club of New York. 
He married at Lincoln, Neb., June 29, 1886, 
Margaret Gale Hitchcock, and they have 
four children. Address: Ithaca, N. Y. 

BENNETT, Charles Goodwin: 

Secretary of the United States Senate; 
born, and has always resided, in the old 
Bennett homestead in Brooklyn, N. Y. He 
was admitted to the bar, and graduated as 
LL.B. from the University of New York. 
He is chairman of the Broadway branch 
of the Mechanics Bank, and trustee of the 
Kings County Savings Institution. Un 
successful candidate in the Fifth New York 
Congressional District for the Fifty-third 
Congress; elected to the Fifty-fourth and 
Fifty-fifth Congresses from 1895 to 1899, 
serving on the Committee on Interstate and 
Foreign Commerce. Unsuccessful candidate 
for the Fifty-sixth Congress, and elected 
secretary of the Senate of the United 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



130 



States, Jan. 20, 1000. Address: United 
States Senate, Washington, D. C. 

BENNETT, James Gordon: 

Journalist; born in New York City, May 
10, 1841 ; son of James Gordon and Hen 
rietta Agnes (Crean) Bennett; ediicated by 
private tutors ; unmarried. He was care 
fully trained in journalism, and on the 
death of his father, 1872, succeeded to the 
proprietorship and management of The 
Herald, which he has ever since continued. 
Mr. Bennett fitted out, at personal expense, 
the Jeannette Polar Exploring Expedition; 
sent Henry M. Stanley to Africa to find 
Livingston; for a time conducted a London 
edition, and for years has conducted, and 
still conducts, a Paris edition. He inaugu 
rated in England the plan of publishing 
storm warnings telegraphed from the Unit 
ed States, and he joined John W. Mackey. 
in 1883, in the organization of the Commer 
cial Cable Company, which laid an entirely 
! new cable between America and Europe 
(the Mackey-Bennett cables), greatly in 
creasing the volume and reducing the cost 
of transatlantic communication between the 
i Old and the New Worlds. He won an in- 
i; ternational yacht race from Sandy Hook to 
the Needles, Isle of Wight, against two com 
petitors, with his schooner yacht, the Henri 
etta, 1860, and sailed a similar race, 1870, 
from Queenstown to New York Harbor, 
but was beaten by the English yacht Cam 
bria. He resides, the greater part of the 
time, in Paris. Address: 120 Champs 
Elysees, Paris, France, or New York Her 
ald, New York City. 

BENNETT, Joseph Bentley: 

Lawyer and congressman; born on a farm 
in Greenup County, Ky., April 21, 1850; 
son of Benjamin Franklin and Sarah Ann 
(Snodgrass) Bennett. He was educated in 
the common schools of Greenup County and 
at the Greenup Academy. He taught for 
a short time in the common schools of 
Greenup County while studying law, and 
he was admitted to the bar Aug. 30, 1878, 
since then practising law at Greenup, Ky. 



He was nominated by the Republicans for 
county attorney of Greenup County in 1882 
and in 1880, each time being defeated by a 
small majority. He was elected in 1804 
and reflected in 1807 for two three-year 
terms as county judge of Greenup County, 
and again for a foifr-year term in 1001. 
While holding that office he received the 
Republican nomination for circuit judge of 
the Nineteenth Kentucky District and was 
defeated by 88 majority. He was elected 
from the Ninth Kentucky District in 1004 
to the Fifty-ninth Congress, and reflected 
in 1006 and 1008 to the Sixtieth and Sixty- 
first Congresses, expiring March 3, 1000. 
He was elected in 1000 and reflected in 
1004, and is still serving as a member of 
the Republican State Central Committee of 
Kentucky from the Ninth District. He 
married at Greenup, Ky., Aug. 30, 1883, 
Annie Louise Mytinger. Address: Green- 
up, Ky. 

BENNETT, William H.: 

Steamship broker; born in New York 
City, April 17, 1852; son of Thomas and 
Susan S. Bennett. He was educated in the 
public schools and Free Academy. New 
York City, and at Jon s College, England. 
After leaving college he was a pilot on the 
Mississippi River, and later served as offi 
cer and captain of ships under British and 
foreign flags, holding British certificate No. 
8007, American shipmaster s certificate, 
United States certificate for command of 
mercantile steamships and various others 
in foreign navies. Since 1884 he has been 
senior partner in the firm of Bennett, 
Walsh & Co., steamship brokers. He is 
also a director in the Atlantic Fruit Com 
pany, H. A. Kessel Company, the Tacas 
Company, Santa Catalina Company, Amal 
gamated Paint Company, Cordova Land 
Company, Bennett Steamship Company, and 
others. Mr. Bennett is a member of the 
New York Produce Exchange, the New York 
Maritime Exchange, Merchants Associa 
tion, Marine Society of "New York, Master 
Mariners Steamship Association, the Met 
ropolitan Museum of Art, and other organi- 



140 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



nations. Ho is a life member of the Ma 
sonic Veterans, a 32d-degree Mason. Knights 
Templar and member of the Mystic Shrine; 
and is also a member of the New York, New 
York Yacht, Coney Island Jockey and other 
clubs. Mr. Bennett married Helen Eliza 
beth Harvey. Residence: 693 West End 
Avenue, New York City; and (winter) 
Nipi, Cuba. Office: 18 Broadway, New 
York City. 

BENOLIEL, Sol D.: 

Electro-chemical engineer; born in New 
York City, June 1, 1874; son of David J. 
and Pauline (Wassermann) Benoliel. He 
was graduated from College of the City of 
New York, as B.S. in 1893, Columbia Uni 
versity School of Mines as E.E.. in 1896, 
and from the Columbia School of Pure 
Science, with the degree of A.M. in 1896. 
In 1901 and 1906, as general manager and 
electro-chemist of Roberts Chemical Com 
pany, Niagara Falls, N. Y., he perfected a 
new process for the production of caustic 
potash and chemically pure muriatic acid by 
means of the electric current; rebuilt com 
pany s entire plant after their fire on Sept. 
14, 1905. He resigned from Roberts Chem 
ical Company, Oct., 1896, to become general 
manager of the International Chemical Com 
pany of Camden, N. J. He is a member of 
the American Institute of Electrical Engi 
neers, National Geographic Society, and 
American Electro-Chemical Society. Mr. 
Benoliel married in New York City, June 
1, 1897, Therese L. Lindeman, and they 
have three children. Address: 4508 Lo 
cust Street, Philadelphia. 

BENSEL, John A.: 

Civil engineer; born in New York City, 
1863; son of Brownlee and Mary Maclay 
(Hogg) Bensel. He was graduated from 
the Stevens Institute of Technology, with 
the degree of M.E. in 1884, and was for 
some years engaged as engineer for the 
Pennsylvania Railroad, and later engaged 
in consulting practice, becoming consulting 
engineer for the City of Philadelphia and 
the Girard Estate in connection with im 
provement along the Delaware River in 



Philadelphia. He was afterward engineer- 
in-chicf of the Department of Docks of New 
York City, and afterward was appointed 
dock commissioner of New York City, which 
office he held until 1908, when he was ap 
pointed to his present office as commissioner 
on the Board of Water Supply of New York 
City. He is a member of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers, the Institution, 
of Civil Enginers of Great Britain, the 
Chamber of Commerce of New York, and of 
the University, Union and various other 
clubs. Residence : Marie Antoinette Hotel. 
Office: 299 Broadway, New York City. 

BENSEL, Walter: 

Physician and sanitarian; born in New 
York City, Jan. 22, 1869; son of Brownlee 
and Mary Maclay (Hogg) Bensel. He re 
ceived his general education in private 
schools in New York City and was gradu 
ated with honors and a prize, and the M.D. 
degree from the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons of New York. After graduation 
he became successively interne, junior as 
sistant, senior assistant and house surgeon 
of Bellevue Hospital, serving eighteen 
months there, and then three months in 
Sloane Maternity Hospital, and then en 
gaged in private practice. Dr. Bensel was 
assistant surgeon to the Vanderbilt Clinic 
for five years, and clinical assistant, in 
structor and lecturer on surgery in the New 
York Polyclinic Medical School and Hos 
pital for five years. He was appointed 
medical inspector of the Department of 
Health of New York City in 1892, served 
through the various grades until appointed 
assistant sanitary superintendent of the 
Department in 1903, and promoted to sani 
tary superintendent of the Department July 
1, 1907. To meet an emergency, Dr. Bensel 
resigned July 8, 1907, to accept appoint 
ment as commissioner of street cleaning of 
New York City, but resigned that office 
Nov. 25, 1907, to resume his position as 
sanitary superintendent of the Department 
of Health, in which he continues. Dr. Ben 
sel is a member of the American Medical 
Association, the New York State Medical 






MEN OF AMERICA. 



Society, New York County Medical Society, 
West End Medical Society, Physicians 
Mutual Aid Association, Medical Associa 
tion of the Greater City of New York, and 
the Alumni Societies of the College of Phy 
sicians and Surgeons, the Bellevue Hos 
pital and the Sloane Maternity Hospital, 
and the St. Andrew s Society of New York. 
He married at Newport, R. I., June 19, 
1894, Alice Cooper, a grandniece of, James 
Fenimore Cooper, the author, and they have 
a daughter. He has a country home on 
Great South Bay, Amity vi lie, L. I. Ad 
dress: 135 W. 87th Street, New York City. 

BENSON, Frank Weston: 

Painter; born in Salem, Mass., March 24, 
1862. He received his art education at the 
School of Drawing and Painting in the 
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the 
Academie Julian, Paris. Since 1889 he 
has been instructor in drawing and paint 
ing at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, 
and lias created a succession of paintings 
which has given him a foremost place 
among the younger American artists. 
Among his Avell known works are the four 
panels in the Congressional Library at 
Washington. He has painted a large num 
ber of portraits, and received a medal from 
the Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 
1893; a medal from Carnegie Institute in 
Pittsburg in 1899; two prizes from the 
Boston Art Club; two prizes from the Jor 
dan Gallery in Boston; a prize from the 
Cleveland Art Association; the Shaw Fund 
Prize, Society of American Artists, New 
York; the Clark Prize, and the Hallgarten 
Prize, from the National Academy of De 
sign; Ellsworth Prize from the Art Insti 
tute of Chicago; silver medal from the Par 
is Exposition in 1900; gold medal from 
Carnegie Institute in 1903; Lippincott 
Prize, Philadelphia, in 1904; two gold med 
als from the Louisiana Purchase Exposi 
tion, St. Louis, in 1904; gold medal from 
the Philadelphia Art Club in 1900; and the 
silver medal from the Corcoran Gallery at 
Washington in 1907. He married in Salem, 
Mass., Oct., 1888, Ellen Perry Peirson. 



141 

Residence: Salem, Mass. Studio: 12, 
St. Botolph Street, Boston. 

BENSON, R. Dale: 

President of the Pennsylvania Fire In 
surance Company of Philadelphia; born in 
Philadelphia, Dec. G, 1841. At the out 
break of the Civil War lie enlisted in a 
Pennsylvania Regiment, and was mustered 
out as brevet major of volunteers in July, 
1805. He served as colonel of the First 
Regiment of Infantry, National Guard of 
Pennsylvania during the Pittsburgh riots 
in 1877. For many years Colonel Benson 
identified himself with fire underwriting 
and was previously engaged in mercantile 
business as an importer and jobber of teas 
in connection with the China trade. He 
was elected vice-president of the Pennsyl 
vania Fire Insurance Company, in 1881, 
and in 1890 became its president. He is a 
member of the Military Order of the Loyal 
Legion. Residence: 1120 Spruce Street. 
Office: 510 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

BENTLEY, Rev. Walter E.: 

Protestant Episcopal rector of the 
Church of the Ascension, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; 
born in Sheffield, England, Sept. 29, 1864. 
Coming to this country in early life he 
entered business but finally entered the 
dramatic profession and for several years 
traveled throughout the country playing 
various Shakespearian roles. Moved by 
Bishop Phillips Brooks of Massachusetts, 
he studied for Holy Orders and was or 
dained by Bishop Huntington in Syracuse, 
N. Y., in 1891. After serving in the Dio 
cese of Central New York he was called to 
St. Mark s Church New York City as vicar 
and later became assistant to Dr. Heber 
Newton. In 1899 he became the founder 
of the Actor s Church Alliance and as its 
national secretary and organizer he estab 
lished chapters in many of the largest cities 
of the country. He also helped to establish 
the Actors Church Union throughout Great 
Britain and Ireland. With Professor 
Charles Sprague Smith he aided in founding 
the Peoples Club and became its first sec- 



142 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



retary. In 1905 he entered his present 
work, where, in addition to the Church he 
has a regularly appointed theatre wherein 
he produces Shakespearian and other class 
ical plays. In 1892 he married Harriott 
Faye Chamberlin of Syracuse and in 1893 
their only son, Cyril E. Bently, was born. 
Address: Church of the Ascension, Kent 
Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

BENTLEY, Wilson A.: 

Meteorologist ; born at Jericho, Vt., Feb. 9, 
1865. He is self-educated in the technical 
branch in which he has become distinguish 
ed, now being internationally known among 
meteorologists for his studies of snow-crys 
tals and other forms of water. After a 
short period of teaching music he took up 
the study of snow-crystals, and has made 
1500 photomicrographs of such crystals; 
360 of frost and 200 of ice and ice crystals, 
besides many of dew, clouds, raindrops, 
etc. He is the author of the articles on 
snow and frost in the Encyclopaedia Amer 
icana, and of illustrated monographs on 
snow crystals and frost and ice crystals 
published by the U. S. Weather Bureau. 
He has also followed out the study of rain 
drops by means of their impressions in 
flour and has had a unique career among 
the meteorologists in the character and mi 
nuteness of his investigations. Besides be 
ing the author of various magazine articles 
on snow, ice and the various forms of 
water, he has lectured with much success 
on the same subjects. He is a member of 
the National Geographical Society and of 
the American Association for the Advance 
ment of Science. Address: Jericho, Vt. 

BENTON, Frank: 

Apiculturist; born in Coldwater, Mich., 
July 5, 1852. He was educated at the Mich 
igan Agricultural College, and attended lec 
tures at the universities of Munich and 
Athens. Since 1901 he has been apicultur- 
al investigator for the United States De 
partment of Agriculture. Mr. Eenton 
spent eleven years, previous to 1891, in 
vestigating the honey bees of Europe, Af 



rica and Asia, and has recently completed 
similar investigations in the Caucasus, Per 
sia, India and the Philippine Islands. He 
was the first American importer of Orien 
tal races of bees, and has invented a wide 
range of appliances for bee culture, in 
cluding the transport cage for sending 
queen bees by mail, artificial queen cells, 
etc. He has lectured throughout the 
United States on apiarian topics, and is the 
author of the books : The Honey Bee, 
Bee Keeping, and a large number of ar 
ticles on subjects connected with his speci 
alty. He married in Angelica, N. Y., 
Dec. 17, 1879, Harriet M. Wheeler. Resi 
dence 925 N. Street, N. W., Washington, D. 
C. Office : Department of Agriculture, 
Washington, D. C. 

BENTON, George Alden: 

Jurist; born in Tolland, Conn., May 7, 
1848; son of Azariah L. and Louisa W. 
(Alden) Benton, his mother being a de 
scendant of John Alden and Priscilla Mul 
lens, of the Mayflower. He was graduated 
from Cornell University, A.B. with Phi 
Beta Kappa honors, 1871, and from Colum 
bia College Law School, LL.B., 1874. He 
engaged in the practice of law in Monroe 
County, N. Y., immediately upon his ad 
mission to the bar in 1874, was district at 
torney 1886-1892, surrogate, 1896-1905, 
county judge, 1906-1907, of Monroe Coun 
ty, and since Jan. 1, 1908, has been a jus 
tice of the Supreme Court of New York, 
serving in the Seventh Judicial District. 
He is a prominent member and campaign 
speaker of the Republican party; a 32d-de- 
gree Mason, Knight Templar and Shriner, 
and honorary life president of the Roches 
ter Masonic Temple. Residence: Spencer- 
port, N. Y. Office: Rochester, N. Y. 

BENTON, Guy Potter: 

President of Miami University; born in 
Kenton, Ohio, May 26, 1865; son of Daniel 
Webster and Harriet Maria (Wharton) 
Benton. He was educated in Baker Uni 
versity, Kansas, receiving from it the de 
grees of A.B., A.M., and D.D., and at Ohio 






MEN OF AMERICA. 



Wesleyan University from which he re 
ceived the A.M. and D.D., and received the 
degree of LL.D. from Upper Iowa Univer 
sity. Dr. Benton was superintendent of 
schools of Fort Scott, Kan., 1890-1895; as 
sistant State superintendent of public in 
struction for Kansas, 1895-1896; professor 
of history in Baker University, 1896-1899; 
member of the Kansas State Board of Ed 
ucation, 1899; president of Upper Iowa 
University, 1899-1902, and since 1902 presi 
dent of Miami University. President Ben- 
ton is an ex-president of the Southeastern 
Kansas Teachers Association, the Ohio Con 
ference of College Deans and Presidents 
and the Ohio College Association, and a 
member of the American Historical Associ 
ation and the Phi Delta Theta fraternity. 
He married at Arcadia, Kan., Sept. 4, 1889, 
Dora Konantz, and they have two daugh 
ters. Address: Oxford, Ohio. 

BENTON, Maurice Erickson: 

Assistant-secretary of The Land Title and 
Trust Company; born at Sudlersville, 
Maryland, Oct. 27, 1865; son of George 
Vincent and Eleanor J. (Downs) Benton. 
He was educated in the public schools of 
Philadelphia and at the University of Penn 
sylvania. In 1884 he was connected with 
the firm of J. Washington Miller and Sons, 
dealers in druggists supplies, and two years 
later entered the banking establishment of 
Grant & Grant, Philadelphia, being the fol 
lowing year transferred to the New York 
office. In 1888, however, he resigned to 
take a position with The Land Title and 
Trust Company, Philadelphia, of which he 
is now assistant secretary. He is trustee 
of the Masonic Life Association, and also 
the Philadelphia Clinic for Home Treat 
ment of Chest and Throat Diseases. He is 
a member of Melita Lodge of Masons, also 
the Philadelphia Consistory, Scottish Rite, 
(32d-degree) and the Royal Arcanum (Ion 
ic Council). He is also member of the City 
Club of Philadelphia. He has traveled 
much throughout the United States, Canada 
and Europe. Mr. Benton is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in 



143 

politics is a Republican. He married at 
Philadelphia, April 15, 1905, Mary Eliza 
beth Upperman. Residence: 2355 East 
Susquehanna Avenue, Philadelphia. Office 
address: The Land Title and Trust Com 
pany, Philadelphia, Pa. 

BERARD, Eugene Michel: 

Lawyer; born in Brooklyn, N. Y., July 
27, 1855; son of Joseph Eugene and Mary 
Roche (Grim) Berard. He was educated 
at home and in public and private schools 
and was graduated from Columbia Law 
School, LL.B., 1876. Since then he has 
been engaged in the practice of law and 
he is now a partner in the law firm of 
Hoppiii and Berard and is director and 
treasurer of the Eastern Kentucky Coal 
Lands Corporation. He is a member of the 
American Academy of Political and Social 
Science; the American Economic Associa 
tion; National Geographic Society, and an 
associate member of the National Child La 
bor Committee, and councilor of the Amer 
ican Civic Association, member of the Play 
ground Association of America, New York 
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Children, American Association for Labor 
Legislation, New York Botanical Garden, 
National Municipal League, and the Amer 
ican Association for the Advancement of 
Science, and is a member of the Hackensack 
*olf Club. Residence: Prospect Avenue, 
Hackensack, N. J. Office : 55 Liberty 
Street, New York City. 

BERGEN, Caroline McPhail: 

Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., Aug. 1, 1859; 
daughter of Leonard Cassell McPhail, M. 
D., and Caroline (Speir) McPhail. She 
was educated first in the kindergarten and 
after that by private instruction at home. 
She married in Brooklyn, Jan. 26, 1881, 
Tunis G. Bergen. Mrs. Bergen has taken a 
great interest in movements for civic bet- 
;erment, and by request of two succeeding 
jorough presidents made a report as to the 
leed for public baths in certain congested 
icighborlioods in Brooklyn, and suggested 
sites for them which were approved and 



144 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



purchased by the city. Two public bath 
houses on these sites are now in use and 
others are in course of construction. Mrs. 
Bergen also, at the request of the city con 
troller, reported on the playground needs 
of Brooklyn, and selected places appropri 
ate for public playgrounds, which are now 
being developed for the use of the children. 
She served, by appointment of Governor 
Higgins, as a member of the State Proba 
tion Commission; as member of the Com 
mittee on School Census of New York City, 
and on the Committee on Physical Welfare 
of School Children of New York City. Mrs. 
Bergen served as volunteer probation officer 
of the Children s Court of Brooklyn, and 
received a gold badge from the attaches of 
that court in May, 1906. She is president 
of the Brooklyn Free Kindergarten Society; 
vice-president of the Brooklyn Division of 
the American National Red Cross; member 
of the State Charities Aid Association, and 
president of its committee for the boroughs 
of Brooklyn and Queens; trustee of the 
Brooklyn Society for Parks and Play 
grounds; member of the Executive Com 
mittee of the National Playgrounds Asso 
ciation of America; director of the Metro 
politan Parks Association of New York 
City; acting president of the Brooklyn 
Barnard Club; and member of the New 
York State Association Opposed to the 
Extension of Suffrage to Women, and of 
the Woman s Civitas and Twentieth Cen 
tury Clubs of Brooklyn. Her summer resi 
dence is " Fir Tower," Anteora, in the 
Catskills. Residence: 101 Willow Street, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

BERGEN, Tunis G.: 

Lawyer; born in Brooklyn, N. Y., May, 
1848; son of Garret G. and Mary (Hub- 
bard) Bergen. He was educated in Brook 
lyn Polytechnic Institute, and at Rutgers 
College, was graduated A.B., 1867; after 
ward went to the University of Heidelberg, 
from which he received the degree of Doctor 
in Public Law in 1871. He afterward took 
post-graduate work at the Universities of 
Berlin and Paris, and then took the regular 
law course in Columbia University, being 



graduated as LL.B. in 1874. Mr. Bergen 
was attached to the headquarters of the 
German Crown Prince in the Franco-Prus 
sian War in 1870. Since his graduation in 
law, he has been engaged in practice in the 
State and United States courts, and he is 
also extensively identified with South 
American railroads and other enterprises. 
He was a member of the Brooklyn Board 
of Education twelve years, and its president 
from 1881 to 1886, and a New York State 
Commissioner of Charities, 1895-1900; 
and is a Republican in politics. He is 
president of the Bogota City Railway Com 
pany of South America, the Chapinero 
Company of South America, the College 
Heights Land Company of Niagara Falls; 
a director of the New York and South 
Brooklyn Ferry Company. He is a member 
of the Reformed (Dutch) Church in Amer 
ica and is ex-president of the Holland So 
ciety of New York, and of the St. Nicholas 
Society of Nassau; president of the Board 
of Trustees of the Brooklyn Heights Semi 
nary; a trustee of Rutgers College; direct 
or of the Long Island Historical Society. 
He has delivered numerous historical ad 
dresses and has done much research work 
and writing on early American (New, 
Netherlands) history. Is now actively en 
gaged as chairman of Committee, etc., of the 
Hudson-Fulton Celebration Commission. 
Mr. Bergen married at Brooklyn, Jan. 26, 
1881, Caroline, daughter of Dr. Leonard 
Cassel and Caroline (Speir) McPhail. Res 
idence: 101 Willow Street, Brooklyn. Ad 
dress: 55 Liberty Street, New York. 

BERKLEY, Henry J.: 

Physician; born in Baltimore, Md., July 
17, 1860; son of Edris Berkley and Virginia 
(Endres) Berkley. He was educated in the 
University of Maryland, the University of 
Vienna, graduating as M.D. from the Uni 
versity of Maryland in 1881 and receiving 
from it the honorary degree of Sc.D. in 
1907. He engaged in the practice of medi 
cine in Baltimore after his return from 
Europe in 1888. He is professor of 
psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University, is 
a member of the Association of American 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



145 



Physicians and Surgeons and of the Medico- 
Psychological Association and the Johns 
Hopkins Club. He married in Baltimore, 
July 13, 1886, Ella Linthicum, and they 
have a daughter. Address: 1305 Park 
Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

BERLINER, Emile: 

Inventor; born in Hanover, Germany, 
May 20, 1851; son of Samuel and Sally 
(Friedman) Berliner. He wa-s graduated 
from the Samson School at Wolfenbuttel 
in 1864, and came to the United States in 
1870. Became a close and assiduous stu 
dent of physics, and in 1877 invented the 
loose contract telephone transmitter or 
microphone; discovered that a loose contact 
will act as a telephone receiver in April, 
1877, and was the first to use an induction 
coil in connection with transmitters, pat 
enting this feature in January, 1878; also 
made other inventions in telephony. He in 
vented, in 1887, the gramophone, which is 
the first talking machine which utilizes a 
groove of even depth and varying direc 
tion, and in which the record groove not 
only vibrates but also propels the stylus 
across the record. For this invention Mr. 
Berliner received the John Scott Legacy 
medal of the Franklin Institute of Philadel 
phia. He was founder and secretary 
(1900) of the Society for Prevention of 
Sickness, having for its aim the improve 
ment of the milk supply in Washington, D. 

C. He proposed, planned and was a mem 
ber of the Washington Milk Conference of 

1 1907. Mr. Berliner married at Washington, 

D. C., Oct. 26, 1881, Cora Adler. Address: 
1458 Columbia Road, Washington, D. C. 

BERRY, James Henderson: 

Former United States Senator; born in 
Jackson County, Ala., May, 15, 1841, and 
removed to Arkansas in 1848. He entered 
the Confederate Army in 1861 and was sec 
ond lieutenant in the 16th Arkansas Infantry, 
and lost a leg at Corinth, Miss., Oct. 4. 
1862. After leaving the army he studied 
law and was admitted to the bar in 1866, 
becoming a member of the Arkansas legisla- 
10 



ture in that year. In 1874 he was speak 
er of the lower house, and in 1876 elected 
judge of the Circuit Court. He served a 
term as governor of Arkansas, being elect 
ed in 1882. and in 1885 he was elected to 
the United States Senate, serving until 1907, 
when lie was defeated by Senator Davis. 
Address: Bentonville, Ark. 

BERRY, Joseph Flintoft: 

Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church; born in Alymer, Canada, May 13, 
1856; son of Francis and Anna L. Berry. 
He was educated in Milton Academy, Ontario, 
and has received the honorary degree of 
D.D. from Lawrence University and of LL. 
D. from Upper Iowa University and from 
Syracuse University. He entered the Meth 
odist Episcopal ministry in 1874, and from 
1884 to 1890 he was associate editor of the 
Michigan Christian Advocate. In the year 
last named he was selected as editor of the 
Epworth Herald, the organ of the Epworth 
League of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
serving as such until May 18, 1904, when 
he was elected bishop by the General Con 
ference at Los Angles. He married, in 
1876, Olive J. Johnson. Address: 455 
Franklin Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

BERRY, William H.: 

Consulting engineer; born in Edwards- 
ville, 111., Sept. 9, 1852. Mr. Berry re 
moved to Buffalo when he was 17 years old, 
and learned the machinists trade, fitting 
himself for the profession of mechanical 
engineer by night study. He later removed 
to Chester, Pa., where he established a suc 
cessful business which became the Berry 
Engineering Company, of which Mr. Berry 
is president and manager. He served for 
a term as mayor of Chester, and in 1905 
was elected State treasurer of Pennsylva 
nia. During his incumbency he brought 
about the disclosures which led to the in 
vestigation into the details of the building 
of the new Pennsylvania State Capitol and 
to- the charges of extravagance and fraud 
and the prosecutions which followed. He 
is a Democrat in politics. He married in 



146 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Philadelphia, Oct. 1, 1879, Sue Schofield. 
Address : Chester, Pa. 

BERRYHILL, Virginia Joynes: 

Born in Fairfield, Iowa, Nov. 23, 1857; 
daughter of Christian Wolff and Nancy 
Maria (Seward) Slagle. She was gradu 
ated from the State University of Iowa 
with the degrees of A.B. in 1877 and M.A. 
in 1880, and Phi Beta Kappa honors, and 
was married at Fairfield, Iowa, Jan. 19, 
1881, to James Guest Berryhill, graduate 
of the collegiate and law departments of 
the State University of Iowa, who has serv 
ed two terms in the Iowa State Legislature, 
and is an influential business man and 
citizen of Des Moines, Iowa. Mrs. Berry- 
hill has taken a deep interest in woman s 
club work, is an ex-president and director 
of the Des Moines Women s Club, ex-pres 
ident of the Des Moines City Federation 
of Women s Clubs, first president and hon 
orary president of the Iowa State Federa 
tion of Women s Clubs, and an ex-member 
of the Board of Directors and Executive 
Committee of the General Federation of 
Women s Clubs. She is also a member of 
the Women s Press Club of Des Moines, a 
trustee of the Associated Charities of Des 
Moines, and a member of theArchaeological 
Institute and the Society of Psychical Re 
search. She has travelled extensively in 
Europe and America, and her recreations 
are archery, motoring, golf and country 
club social life. Her publications and lit 
erary work have been chiefly connected with 
club work. Her children are James Guest 
Berryhill, Jr. and Katherine Berryhill; and 
her son, who was graduated from the State 
University of Iowa, is the first student, 
of any university to take both Sigma Xi 
and Phi Beta Kappa honors on graduation. 
Address: Des Moines, Iowa. 

BERWIND, Edward J.: 

Financier; born in Philadelphia, June 17, 
1848. He was graduated from the United 
States Naval Academy in 18G9; appointed 
ensign, July 4, 1870; master, March 24, 
1872; and retired, May 14, 1875; title 



changed to lieutenant (junior grade), 
March 3., 1883, and resigned from the re 
tired list, 1905. He is president of the 
Berwind-White Coal Mining Company, and 
the International Coal Company, the Ha 
vana Coal Company, Ocean Coal Company, 
and the Wilmore Coal Company; and is 
one of the leading coal supply men in the 
country having for years made a specialty 
of supplying coal for steam vessels; is a 
member of the Board of Managers of the 
Girard Trust Company (Philadelphia) ; 
trustee of the Fifth Avenue Trust Compa 
ny; vice-president and director of the New 
York and Porto Rico Steamship Company; 
director of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa 
Fe Railway Company, the Cuba Company, 
International Mercantile Marine Company, 
the Interborough-Metropolitan Company, 
the Morton Trust Company, National Bank 
of Commerce, Newport Trust Company, 
New River and Pocahontas Consolidated 
Coal Company, Republic Iron and Steel 
Company, and various banking, railroad 
and mining corporations. He is a member 
of the United States Naval Academy Alum 
ni Association, the Metropolitan Museum 
of Art, American Geographical Society, 
American Museum of Natural History, and 
the Union, University, Riding, Metropoli 
tan, New York Yacht, Racquet and Ten 
nis, Army and Navy, and Turf and Field 
Clubs of New York City; the Philadelphia 
Club of Philadelphia, the Metropolitan 
Club of Washington, D. C., and the Union 
Club of Boston. He married Herminie Tor- 
rey. Residence: 2 East 64th Street. Ad 
dress: 1 Broadway, New York City. 

BESSEY, Charles Edwin: 

Botanist; born at Milton, Wayne Coun 
ty, Ohio, May 21, 1845; son of Adnah and 
Margaret ( Ellenberger ) Bessey. He was 
educated in the public schools, and at the 
Seville and Canaan Academies of Ohio; 
then entered the Michigan Agricultural 
College, graduating with the degree of 
B.Sc. in 1869, and M.Sc. in 1872. He stud 
ied under Dr. Asa Gray at Harvard Uni- 
veristy, and received the degrees of Ph.D. 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



147 



and LL.D. from the University of Iowa, 
and Iowa College. Early in 1870 he be 
came professor of botany at the Iowa Agri 
cultural College, filling this position for 
fifteen college years, until appointed to 
head of the same department at the Univer 
sity of Nebraska in 1884. While at Iowa 
Agricultural College, he was acting presi 
dent during the year 1882, and from 1888- 
1891 was acting chancellor of the Univer 
sity of Nebraska, again occupying this po 
sition during 1899-1900, and in 1907-1908. 
He has been dean of the Industrial College 
of the University of Nebraska, 1884-1888, 
and again since 1895. From 1888 to 1891 
he was dean of the College of Literature, Sci 
ence, and Arts, at the University of Ne 
braska. He is trustee of Doane College, 
Nebraska ; is a life member of the Botani 
cal Society of America (president in 1896- 
1897); fellow of the American Associa 
tion for the Advancement of Science (vice- 
president in 1893, 1902 and 1907) ; member 
of the National Educational Association 
(vice-president in 1896), the American 
Microscopical Society (president in 1902), 
the American Forestry Association, etc. 
He is also a member of the Phi Beta Kappa 
and the Sigma Xi societies, and of the 
Schoolmasters Club. He spends his leisure 
hours in mountain tramping and botaniz 
ing, and has traveled for observation and 
study, throughout the principal countries 
of Europe, the Steppes, Transcaucasia, etc. 
In politics he is an independent Republi 
can; and he is a member of the Congrega 
tional Church. He married at West Tis- 
bury, Mass., Dec. 25, 1873, Lucy Athearn, 
and they have three sons. Residence: 1507 
R. Street. Address: The University of 
Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. 

BESTOR, Arthur Eugene: 

Director of Chautauqua Institution ; 
born in Dixon, 111., May 19, 1879; son of 
Orson Porter and Laura Ellen (Moore) 
Bestor. He was graduated from the Uni- 
veristy of Chicago, A.B., 1901; was pro 
fessor of history and political science in 
Franklin College, Franklin, Ind., 1901-1903, 
and since 1904 has been lecturer in political 



science in the Extension Division of the 
University of Chicago. Mr. Bestor was as 
sistant general director of Chautauqua In 
stitution, 1905-1907, and has been its di 
rector since 1907, spending his summers at 
Chautauqua, N. Y. He is a member of the 
American Historical Association, the Phi 
Beta Kappa Society, Delta Upsilon fra 
ternity and the City and Quadrangle Clubs 
of Chicago. Address: 5711 Kimbark Ave 
nue, Chicago, 111., and Chautauqua, N. Y. 

BETHTJNE, Louise Blanchard: 

Architect; born in Waterloo, N. Y., July 
21, 1856; daughter of Dalson Wallace and 
Emma M. (Williams) Blanchard. She was 
educated in Buffalo Central High School, 
and was married in Buffalo, N. Y., Dec. 10, 
1881, to Robert Armour Bethune, and has 
a son, Dr. Charles W. Bethune, born in 
1883. After leaving high school she studied 
architecture, and she was engaged at 
draughtsman work in Buffalo from 1876 to 
1881, when she established an independent 
office and became the first woman archi 
tect in the United States. Since her mar 
riage she has practised in partnership 
with her husband, who is also an architect; 
now member of the firm of Bethune, Beth 
une & Fuchs. Mrs. Bethune was for nine 
teen years a fellow of the American Insti 
tute of Architects, and is the only woman 
who was ever a fellow of that society. She 
is a member of the Buffalo Historical So 
ciety and the New York State Historical So 
ciety; president of the Buffalo Genealogical 
Society; treasurer of the National Society 
of New England Women, Colony II; mem 
ber of the Revolutionary Records Commit 
tee of the Buffalo Chapter of Daughters of 
the American Revolution. Address 215 
Franklin Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

BETTS, James Albert: 

Jurist; born at Broadalbin, Fulton 
County, N. Y., March 18, 1853; son of 
Isaiah and Margaret A. (Hoes) Betts. He 
wsa graduated from the State Normal 
School at Albany, N. Y., taught school in 
Saratoga County, N. Y., 1871-1873, was 
principal of a public school in Kingston, 



148 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



N. Y., 1875-1877, la\v student and law 
clerk, 1877-1880, and in 1880 was admitted 
to the New York bar, practising at Kings 
ton. X. Y., 1880-1898. He was secretary of 
the Civil Service Commission of New York 
State, 1883-1884; member of the Board of 
Education of Kingston, N. Y., 1885-1898: 
surrogate of Ulster County, N. Y., 1892- 
1898. and was elected on the Democratic 
ticket, 1898, justice of the Supreme Court 
of the State of New York for the Third 
Judicial District; for the term expiring 
Dec. 31, 1912. He is also president of the 
Kingston Savings Bank, and vice-president 
of the City Hospital of Kingston, N. Y. 
Justice Betts married in Kingston, N. Y., 
Oct. 16, 1884, Frances M. Hill. Address: 
Kingston, N. Y. 

BE VAN, Arthur Dean: 

Physician and surgeon; born in Chicago, 
111.. 18(51; son of Thomas and Sarah (Ram 
sey) Bevan. After taking a year s work at 
the Sheffield Scientific School of Yale Uni 
versity, he became, in 1879, a medical stu 
dent at Rush Medical College (now the 
medical department of the University of 
Chicago), graduating in 1883 with the de 
gree of M.D. In tha-t year he was appoint 
ed surgeon in the United States Marine 
Hospital service in Oregon, remaining there 
for four years, holding also in the last year 
the chair of anatomy at the medical de 
partment of the University of Oregon, at 
Portland. In 1887 he was offered a similar 
position at the University of Chicago, and, 
leaving the United States service, ^turned 
to Chicago. Two years later he became pro 
fessor of surgical anatomy and at the same 
time associate professor of surgery, in 
Rush Medical College, where, in 1902, he 
was made professor of surgery. He is 
president of and surgeon at the Presbyter 
ian Hospital of Chicago, and a prominent 
member of various medical associations, be 
ing president of the Chicago Medical So 
ciety in 1899; fellow of the American Sur 
gical Society since 1900, etc. Dr. Bevan is 
also a member of the University, Chicago 
Athletic, Glen View and Chicago Golf Clubs 
of Chicago. He married at Akron, Ohio, 



February, 1890, Anna L. Barber. Resi 
dence: 2917 Michigan Avenue. Office ad 
dress: 100 State Street, Chicago, 111. 

BEVERIDGE, Albert J.: 

United States Senator; born on a farm 
in Highland County, Ohio, Oct. 0, 1802. He 
was graduated from De Pauw University. 
Greencastle, Ind., B.A., 1885; was admitted 
to the bar in 1880. He has been an active 
Republican from the time he became a vot 
er, and he was elected to the Senate of the 
United States by the Sixty-first General 
Assembly of Indiana, Jan. 17, 1899, for the 
term beginning March 4th following, and 
was reflected in 1905, for the term of serv 
ice, expiring March 3, 1911. He is author of 
a number of works dealing with foreign 
affairs and with moral topics including The 
Russian Advance; The Young Man and the 
World; the Bible as Good Reading; Amer 
icans of To-day and To-morrow; The Mean 
ing of the Times, and has frequently con 
tributed to the magazines. Among other 
matters he has become prominently identi 
fied in the Senate with the movement for 
the national child labor bill. Address: In 
dianapolis, Ind. 

BICKHAM, Warren Stone: 

Surgeon; born at Shreveport, La., 
Aug. 23, 1801 ; son of Dr. Charles Jasper 
and Annie Augusta (Gray) Bickham. He 
received his preparatory education in the 
academies of the University of the South 
(Sewane?, Tenn.), and the University of 
Louisiana, until 1882; he was graduated 
from the Medical Department of Tulane 
University of Louisiana, Phar. M., M.D., 
1880; College of Physicians and Sur 
geons (Columbia University), M.D., 1887; 
followed by post-graduate study in New 
York, Berlin, Vienna, London and Paris, 
residing more than two years abroad. 
He practised as surgeon in New Or 
leans; was interne and later visiting 
surgeon of the Charity Hospital, in 
New Orleans; then located in New York 
City in practice of surg;>ry. He was 
instructor in surgery in the Post-graduate 
Medical School and Hospital; assistant 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



140 



instructor of operative surgery, College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, New York City; 
instructor of surgery. New York Polyclinic. 
He was visiting surgeon of the Northwest 
ern Dispensary, and is now surgeon of the 
Manhattan State Hospital. Dr. Bickham is 
author of a text-book on Operative Surgery, 
and numerous contributions to medical 
journals on surgical topics. He is a fellow 
of the New York Academy of Medicine; 
member of the New York County Medical 
Society, New York County Medical Associa 
tion, New York State Medical Association, 
American Medical Association, Medical As 
sociation of Greater New York, and the Col 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons Alumni. 
He married in London, 1895, Flora Sabina 
Brandon. Address: 448 Madison Avenue, 
New York City. 

BICKMORE, Albert H.: 

Securities ; born in Martinsville, Me., 1809 ; 
son of William H. and Margaret A. (Mar 
tin) Bickmore. He was graduated from 
Colby University, A.B., 1893. He has 
since been engaged in financial business, 
and is now senior member of the firm of 
A. H. Bickmore & Company, investment 
securities; director of the National Light, 
Heat & Power Company, Atlantic Shore 
Line Railway, Union Securities Company 
(president), Atlantic Construction Com 
pany, Southern Maine Steamship Company. 
Taylorville Gas and Electric Company, 
Pana Gas and Electric Company, Marshall 
Gas and Electric Company, Lexington Gas 
and Electric Company, City Gas and Elec 
tric Company, of Paris, Jersey ville Il 
luminating Company, Charleston Illumi 
nating Company, Hoosick Falls Illuminat 
ing Company, Bennington Electric Compa 
ny, Springfield Coal Mining Company. Mr. 
Bickmore is a member of the Delta Upsilon 
fraternity, Phi Beta Kappa, and of the 
Union League, St. Nicholas, City, Gradu 
ates , Lawyers , Indian Harbor Yacht Clubs 
of New York. Mr. Bickmore married in 
Camden, Maine, Oct. 2, 1901, Myrtle L. 
French. Residence: 300 West 71st Street. 
Address: 30 Pine Street, New York City. 



BICKNELL, George Augustus: 

Rear- Admiral, U. S. N. ; born on the 
estate of Jesse Richards, his maternal 
grandfather, at Batsto, Burlington Coun 
ty, N. J., May 15, 1840; son of George A. 
Bicknell. then a lawyer of New York City, 
and who later settled at New Albany, Ind., 
and Elizabeth Haskins Richards Bicknell. 
He received his early education in private 
schools in Indiana, was appointed acting 
midshipman from Indiana, December 2, 
1861; served as first lieutenant in the Unit 
ed States volunteer infantry during ths 
Morgan Raid, until the regiment was mus 
tered out; graduated United States Naval 
Academy, I860; served in the Iroquois, U. 
S. Asiatic fleet, 1867-1870; was at the 
opening of the ports, Kobe and Osaka, Ja 
pan, to trade; in landing party repelling 
attack of Prince Hizen at Kobe; was sec 
ond in command of the marines of two 
ships on outpost duty protecting Yokohama, 
about ten days, the fleet being absent. He 
was promoted to ensign, April, 1868; to 
master, March, 1869; to lieutenant, March 
21, 1870; naval academy instructor, 1870- 
1871; in the Worcester, flagship of North 
Atlantic Station, 1872-1875; torpedo sta 
tion and hydrographic office, 1875; in the 
Omaha, South Pacific Station, 1875; in the 
flagship Richmond, South Atlantic Station, 
1876; navigator of the Wachusett, South 
Atlantic Station, 1879, going up the Miss 
issippi one hundred miles above Vicksburg; 
navigator of the Marion, 1880-1882; cruised 
from Montevideo to Heard s Island, about 
seven thousand miles, seeking and rescu 
ing about thirty survivors of the ship 
wrecked bark. Trinity; inspector of ma 
terial for the Advisory Board, and for 
several bureaus, at Chester Rolling Mills 
and other steel works; at Roach s Ship 
building Works, for the Dolphin, Atlantic, 
Boston and Chicago, then building there, 
1883-1886. Promoted to lieutenant com 
mander, 1886; executive officer, Essex, 
Asiatic Station, 1886-1889; assistant in 
equipment, navy yard, New York, May 
1SS9 to May, 1891; executive officer, U. S. 
receiving ship Franklin, Jan. to Dec., 1892; 



150 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



executive officer, U. S. S. Atlanta, Dec., 
181)2, to July. 1893; executive officer, U. 
S. R. S. Franklin, 1893-1894; commanding 
the Fern, 1894-1896; captain of the yard, 
naval station. Port Royal, S. C., Feb. 1, 
1896; attending torpedo station and war 
college, 1896. Promoted to commander, 
1896. Inspector of Fourteenth Lighthouse 
District, Cincinnati, Ohio, Aug., 1897, to 
April 14, 1898; detached from lighthouse 
district, April 14. 1898, ordered to com 
mand the steamer Niagara, commissioned 
that vessel at New York, April 16, 1898, 
arrived at Key West in May, coaled vessels 
of Sampson s Squadron, while on their way 
to the bombardment of San Juan; took 
station during the bombardment off Point 
Salinas, to guard against the approach of 
gunboats from the westward; towed moni 
tor Terror to Key West, arriving there May 
19, having delivered nearly all of cargo of 
this collier at sea under way ; took the 
Niagara to Norfolk navy yard and left her 
May 30, to command Saturn ; cruised in 
Saturn in Porto Rican and Cuban waters 
until Sept., 1898, returned to Norfolk; com 
manded the Monocacy at Shanghai, China, 
Dec. 25, 1898; cruised to Han Kow and 
river ports, taking the Hon. E. H. Conger 
and suite to visit the two Viceroys of the 
river provinces; detached from the Mono 
cacy and ordered home, May 30, 1900; 
reported at Mare Island, June 30, 1900; de 
tached from navy yard, July 5, to home; 
to War College, July 20; to Norfolk navy 
yard, Oct. 4; inspector of ordnance, navy 
yard, Norfolk, Va., till July, 1902. Pro 
moted to captain in April, 1901. Com 
mandant, naval station, Key West, Fla., 
and commandant of the Seventh Naval 
District, from Aug., 1902, until Aug., 1904. 
Oct. 17, 1904, commanding the flagship 
Texas, United States Coast Squadron, 
under the flags of Rear-Admirals J. H. 
Sands and F. W. Dickens, until June 21, 
190(5; during this cruise, the sumn 
maneuvers of the coast squadron, then 
consisting of about sixteen vessels, demon 
strated the incompleteness of the shore de 
fenses of Chesapeake Bay; commandant of 



[T. S. Navy Yard and Station, Pensacola, 
<1a., and also of the Eighth Naval Dis- 
rict, July 1, 190<i, to Feb. 12, 1907. Pro- 
noted to rear admiral, Feb. 8, 1907; coin- 
nandant of the First Naval District and 
commandant of the U. S. Navy Yard, 
Portsmouth, N. H., from Feb. 18, 1907, 
intil May 14, 1908. and retired May 15, 
1908, having attained the age of 62 years. 
lie is a member of the U. S. Naval In 
stitute and the Army and Navy Clubs of 
Washington -md New York. He married 
n New Albany, Ind., May 22, 1878, Annie 
Sloan, daughter of John Sloan, M.D., and 
they have had one son, who died in in- 
Residence : 604 E. Main Street, New 
Albany, Ind. 

BIDDLE, A. J. Drexel: 

Author, explorer and lecturer; bovn in 
Philadelphia, Oct. 1, 1874; son of Edward 
and Emily (Drexel) Biddle. After a num 
ber of years residence in the Madeira 
Islands he returned to the United States 
in 1891. joined the staff of the Philadelphia 
Public Ledger and two years later he sev 
ered his connection with the Ledger, and 
contributed to magazines and humorous 
journals. He revived the Philadelphia Sun 
day Graphic in 1895, and became its editor, 
and lie was at the head of the publishing 
house of Drexel Biddle, in New Y.ork, 
Philadelphia, and San Francisco, from 1897 
to 1904. He is author of the following 
books: A Dual Role, 1894; All Round Ath 
letics, 1894; An Allegory and Three Es 
says, 1894; The Froggy Fairy Book, 1896; 
The Second Froggy Fairy Book, 1897; 
Shantytown Sketches, 1898; Word for 
Word and Letter for Letter, 1898; The 
Flowers of Life, 1898; The Madeira Is 
lands, two volumes, 1900; The Land of the 
Wine, two volumes, 1901. His favorite 
recreations are automobiling and boxing. 
He has contested successfully in several 
amateur boxing tournaments and boxed 
exhibition bouts with many of the leading 
professional pugilists. He is a fellow of 
the Royal Geographical Society of England. 
He married in 1895, Cordelia Rundell 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



151 



Bradley, of Pittsburgh, and they have two 
sons and a daughter. Address: 2104 Wal 
nut Street, Philadelphia. 

BIDDLE, Craig: 

Jurist; born in Philadelphia, Jan. 10, 
1823; son of Nicholas Biddle, notable as 
the president of the Bank of the United 
States from 1823 till its failure in 1841. 
He Avas graduated from Princeton College 
in 1841. He was admitted to the Phila 
delphia bar in 1844 and was elected to the 
Pennsylvania Legislature in 1849, serving 
one term in the House. On the outbreak 
of the Civil War in 1861 he became a major 
on the staff of General Robert Patterson, 
and saw service in the Shenandoah Valley; 
he was afterward appointed on Governor 
Curtin s staff, and was detailed to organize 
new regiments. In 1863, when General Lee 
invaded Pennsylvania, Mr. Biddle went to 
the front as a private in a militia regiment 
for State defense. As a lawyer he won 
reputation for learning and ability, and 
built up a large and lucrative practice, 
which continued till 1845, when he was ap 
pointed a judge of the Common Pleas 
Court of Philadelphia. In November of th;it 
year he was elected by the Republicans to 
this position by a large majority. The 
Republicans and Democrates united in nom 
inating and electing him in 1885, and he 
received a practically unanimous third 
election in 1895. He is now presiding 
judge of the Common Pleas Courts, in 
which bench he has sat over thirty years. 
Judge Biddle has been much interested in 
agriculture, and has served as president 
of the Philadelphia Agricultural Society; 
he has also been vice-president of the His 
torical Society of Pennsylvania. Address: 
2033 Pine Street, Philadelphia. 

BIDDLE, William Phillips: 

Colonel, U. S. Marine Corps; born. in and 
appointed from Pennsylvania. He was 
commissioned a second lieutenant, U. S. 
Marine Corps, in June, 1875; was pro 
moted first lieutenant in 1884; captain in 
1894, major in 1899, lieutenant-colonel 



March 3, 1903, and colonel Feb., 1905. He 
has served on the varied duties and sta 
tions ashore and afloat, of an officer of 
marines. In Aug., 1877. during the rail 
road riots, he was with a battalion of ma 
rines in Washington. Baltimore, Martins- 
burg, \V. Va v and Fort McHenry, which 
opened up the traffic on the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad. In June, 1890, he made 
a forced march with a detachment of ma 
rines and sailors from Chemulpo to Seoul, 
Corea, to protect our legation. He com 
manded the marines on the Olympia during 
the battle of Manila Bay, May 1, 1898, 
and in May and June, 1898, was holding 
Cavite Navy Yard with a detachment of 
marines, and on the Olympia, blockading 
Manila till its bombardment and fall in 
August. In 1899 and 1900, he was in 
charge of recruiting district of Pennsyl 
vania and Western New Jersey, and in 
Aug., 1900, he commanded the First Regi 
ment of Marines of the China Relief Expe 
dition, during the march from Tientsin to 
Pekin, for the relief of the Legations. He 
commanded the marines in the battle of 
Pietsang, Aug. 5, Yangtsun, Aug. 6, and 
in the fighting on the walls around Peking, 
Aug. 15, when the Chinese were finally 
driven from the Sacred City by the Ameri 
can forces ; president Marine Corps Exam 
ining Board for entrance and promotion, 
1903; commanded a regiment of marines 
stationed on the Isthmus of Panama at 
Empire, 1904; commanded the First Bri 
gade of Marines in the Philippines, 1906- 
1908. Address: Care Headquarters Ma 
rine Corps, Washington, D. C. 

BIDWELL, Daniel D.: 

Journalist ; born in East Hartford, 
Conn. ; son of Charles M. Bidwell and 
Emma W. (Brewer) Bidwell. He was edu 
cated in the East Hartford grammar 
schools, the Hartford high school and Yale 
College, graduating as A.B. in 188(5. He 
has been engaged on newspapers in Jack 
sonville, Fla., New York City and Hart 
ford, Conn., since 1886. He was a member 
of the Connecticut General Assembly in 



152 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



100-1 and 1007; representative of the town 
of East Hartford. He is a vice-president 
of the Mid well Family Association. Mr. 
Midwell is a member of the Vale Alumni 
Association of Hartford; a director of tlio 
Raymond Library at East Hartford, Conn. 
He is an Odd Fellow, a Knight of Pythias, 
a Mason, and a member of the University 
Club of Hartford. He was collaborator 
with Herbert Wan! in publishing Five 
Years with the Congo Cannibals, and is a 
contributor to several magazines. He mar 
ried at Brooklyn, N. Y., April 10, 1801, 
Edith M. Ross, and they have, two children: 
Pauline B., born in 1803, and Joseph, born 
in 1902. Residence: Fast Hartford, Conn. 
Office address: The Hartford Times. Hart 
ford, Conn. 

BIEN, Morris: 

Lawyer and civil engineer; born in New 
York City, April 17, 1859; son of Joseph 
and Theresa (Leipoldt) Bien.. He was 
graduated from the University of Cali 
fornia as Ph.B. in 1879; from George 
Washington University, Washington, D. C., 
as LL.B. in 1895, and from the National 
University, Washington, D. C., as LL.M. in 
1800. He was in charge of topographic 
surveys in various States in the East and 
West in the United States Geological Sur 
vey from 1870 to 1803; was engaged in 
special irrigation surveys for the United 
States Geological Survey from 1888 to 
1803; in the General Land Office at Wash 
ington, D. C., from 1803 lo 1002 in charge 
of irrigation and the Railroad Right of 
Way Section ; and in the United States 
Reclamation Service since 1002, as super 
vising engineer in charge of land and legal 
matters. In the General Land Office he 
prepared many reports on Irrigation and 
Right of Way matters, and drafted much 
legislation on these subjects which was 
passed by Congress and is now in force. 
Jn 1004 he prepared the draft of a code ol 
State Irrigation Law, which has been en 
acted by several State legislatures. He is 
a member of the National Geographic Soci 
ety of Washington, D. C., and of the Uni 
versity Club of Washington. I). C. He 



married at Hillsboro. Ohio. March 25, 1880, 
I. ilia V. Hart, and they have two children. 
Residence: 1130 Lamont Street, N. W. 
Ollice: United States Reclamation Service. 
Washington. 1). C. 

BIERBOWER, Austin: 

Lawyer and author; born at Shelly s Is 
land, Dauphin County. Pa., son of Casper 
and Lydia (Herman) Bierbower. He was 
graduated from Dickinson College A.B. and 
A.M., and the honorary degree of LL.D. 
was conferred upon him by Iowa Wesleyan 
University in 1002. After graduating from 
Dickinson College he was appointed pro 
fessor of Latin and Greek at Iowa Wes 
leyan University, holding this position 
three years, and spending two years in 
graduate work at the University of Berlin, 
Germany. In the meantime, taking up the 
study of law, he was admitted to the bar 
of Baltimore in 1874 and subsequently prac 
tised over twenty years in Chicago. He 
was attorney for Rev. H. W. Thomas, D.D., 
in his famous heresy trial; and among his 
important cases tested the High License 
law of Illinois in the Supreme Court. He 
has participated as a speaker in several 
political campaigns. He was for some time 
European correspondent of the Chicago 
Tribune and the Cincinnati Times Star, 
and an editorial writer of the Chicago 
Daily News. Among the writings for which 
he is known, besides various articles in the 
magazines, are the following books: The 
Morals of Christ; The Socialism of Christ; 
The Virtues and Their Reasons; From 
Monkey to Man; How to Succeed; Ethics 
for Schools; The Training of Lovers; 
Thoughts for the Rich, etc. Residence: 
1810 Michigan Avenue. Address: 87 
Washington Street, Chicago, 111. 

BIERCE, Ambrose: 

Journalist; born in Ohio in 1842. Mr. 
Bierce saw distinguished service in the 
Civil War, being breveted major, and after 
its close went to California and subse 
quently to London. After a successful 
literary career in England lie returned to 
California, where he contributed to the 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Overland Monthly, and at different times 
edited the Argonaut and Wasp, besides 
doing a large amount of other journalistic 
work. He at present conducts the depart 
ment of the Cosmopolitan Magazine of 
caustic comment on literary and other mat 
ters. He is the author of a considerable 
number of books on English literature, in 
cluding: Cobwebs from an Empty Skull; 
The Monk and the Hangman s Daughter 
(with Dr. A. Danziger) ; Black Beetles in 
Amber; Can Such Things Be?; In the 
Midst of Life (former title Tales of Sol 
diers and Civilians) ; Fantastic Fables; 
Shapes of Clay; and The Cynic s Word 
Book. Address: Army and Navy Club, 
Washington, D. C. 

BIGELOW, Edward Fuller: 

Naturalist; born in Colchester, Conn., 
Jan. 14, 1860. After a preparatory educa 
tion Mr. Bigelow undertook a comprehen 
sive course of special studies at the biologi 
cal laboratories of Yale University and Cold 
Spring Harbor; the Nature Study School 
of the College of Agriculture, Kingston, 
K. I.; at the Marine Biological Laboratory 
at Woods Hole, Mass., and at the Nature 
Study School of Cornell University. He 
lias received the degrees of A.M. and Ph.D. 
from Taylor University. L T pon the comple 
tion of these courses he entered upon his 
well known career as a lecturer and writer 
on nature subjects, was for eight years edi 
tor of the Nature and Science department 
of the St. Nicholas Magazine, and for three 

i years was editor of Popular Science. He 
was also for several years editor of 
The Observer, a naturalist magazine. In 
connection with his lecture work he has for 
twenty-five years taken yearly several thou 
sand boys and girls on natural history 
excursions, and has lectured on topics re- 

lilating to his special work before the leading 
nature classes of the country, Chautauquas, 
issemblies, colleges, schools, etc. He has 

i >een instructor of nature study in summer 
schools in many of the States of the Union. 
He is a member of the American Associ 
ation for the Advancement of Science; the 

Jrooklvn Institute of Arts and Sciences; 



the New York Microscopic Society; the 
Audubon Society of Connecticut; and was 
elected president of the Agassiz Association 
in 1907. He is the author (and designer) 
of Bigelow s Descriptive Plant Analysis; 
How Nature Study Should be Taught; 
Walking, A Fine Art; and the Spirit of 
Nature Study. He is also the editor of 
Our School Out of Doors, and the inventor 
of chemical tablets for artificial nutriment 
of plants. He married at Portland, Conn., 
July 2. 1882, Mary Augusta Pelton. Ad 
dress: Arcadia, Sound Beach, Conn. 

BIGELOW, Frank Hagar: 

Astronomer, meteorologist, clergyman; 
born in Concord, Mass., Aug. 28, 1851; son 
of Francis Edwin and Ann (Hagar) Bige 
low. He was prepared at the Boston Latin 
School, was graduated from Harvard as 
A.B. in 1873 and received its degree of 
A.M. in 1880. He engaged in scientific 
work and later studied theology, was gradu 
ated from the Episcopal Theological School 
at Cambridge, Mass., as S.T.B., in 1880, 
and received the degree of L.H.D. from Co 
lumbian (now George Washington) Univer 
sity in 1898. After his graduation at Cam 
bridge he took holy orders in the Episcopal 
Church, and in 1881 was rector of St. Paul s 
Church, at Natick, Mass. This position 
he resigned to engage in scientific work, in 
which he has continued ever since, but has 
also, since 1892, been assistant minister of 
St. John s Church, Washington, D. C. He 
was assistant astronomer at the Argentine 
National Observatory at Cordoba, 1873-1876 
and 1881-1883; assistant at the U. S. 
Naval Observatory 1876-1877, professor of 
mathematics at Racine College, Wis., 18S4- 
1889; assistant at the Nautical Almanac 
Office, 1889-1891. Since 1891 he has been 
professor of meteorology in the U. S. 
Weather Bureau, and since 1894 professor 
of astrophysics in the C,eorge Washington 
University. Dr. Bigelow has been a mem 
ber of the International Cloud Commission, 
Commission on Solar Physics, and chair 
man of the Conference Bo.ird on Evapora 
tion, and is now in charge of the climatol- 
oo-v of the United States. He was a mem- 



154 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



her of the U. S. Eclipse Expeditions to 
West Africa in 1889, to South Carolina 
in 1900 and to Spain in 1905. He is a 
member and former president of the Wash 
ington Philosophical Society; member of 
the Society for Philosophical Inquiry, 
Washington Academy of Science, Deutsche 
Meteorologische Gesellschaft, American As 
sociation for the Advancement of Science, 
Sons of the Revolution, etc. He is author 
of more than one hundred and thirty 
papers, monographs and volumes in solar 
physics, terrestrial magnetism and meteor 
ology. He married, Oct. 0, 1881, Mary 
Ellen Spalding, and they had a daughter, 
who died in 1884. Residence: 1625 Mas 
sachusetts Avenue. Address : United 
States Weather Bureau, Washington, D. C. 

BIGELOW, John: 

Lawyer, author and publicist; born in 
Maiden, Ulster County, N. Y., Nov. 25, 
1817. He was graduated from Union Col 
lege as A.B., 1835, and received the LL.D. 
degree from his alma mater in 1886, from 
Racine College in 188G, and from the Uni 
versity of the City of New York in 1889. He 
was admitted to the New York bar, 1839. 
He was appointed by Governor Silas 
Wright one of the inspectors of Sing Sing 
prison, and served until inspectors were 
made elective by the new constitution of 
1846; was editor of the New York Evening 
Post from 1849 to 1861. He was appointed, 
by President Lincoln, United States Consul 
to Paris, 1861, and to succeed William L. 
Dayton as United States minister to 
France, in 1864-1867; secretary of State of 
New York, 1875-1876, under the administra 
tion of Governor Tilden, having before that 
been chairman of the Canal Investigating 
Committee appointed by Governor Tilden. 
By Governor Tilden s will Mr. Bigelow was 
appointed one of the executors and trustees 
of his estate. He is president of the Tilden 
Trust; president of the Board of Trustees 
of the New York Public Library, Astor, 
Lenox and Tilden Foundations; is trustee 
of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and ex- 
ollicio member of the Art Commission of 
the City of New York. Mr. Bigelow, while 



a man of affairs in the largest sense, has 
also made for himself an enduring place in 
American literature. He is the author of: 
Jamaica in 1850, of The Effect of Sixteen 
Years of Freedom on a Slave Colony, 1852; 
Life of Fremont, 1856; Les fitats-Unis d 
Amerique en 1863 (Paris) ; The Wit and 
Wisdom of the Haytiens, 1876; Monograph 
on Molinos the Quietist, 1882; France and 
the Confederate Navy, 1888; Writings and 
Speeches of Samuel T. Tilden (two vol 
umes), 1885; Life of William Cullen Bry 
ant, 1890; Life of Samuel J. Tilden (two 
volumes), 1875; Life of Franklin (three 
volumes) ; and is editor of complete works 
of Franklin (ten volumes). He also wrote: 
The Mystery of Sleep, 1897; which has 
already reached a third edition and has also 
been translated and published in the 
French, German and Russian languages; 
The Supreme Court and the Electoral Com 
mission An Open Letter to the Honorable 
Joseph H. Choate, 1903; Lest we Forget 
Gladstone, Morley and the Confederate 
Loan of 1863, a Rectification; The Useful 
Life a Crown to the Simple Life, 1905; 
Some Recollections of Edouard Laboulaye; 
Our Ex-Presidents, What Shall We Do For 
Them, What Shall They Do For Us?, 1906; 
The Propium, or What of Man is Not His 
Own. He was one of the early members 
and is president of the Century Association. 
Mr. Bigelow married, in 1850, Jennie 
Poultney, of Baltimore, and has six chil 
dren: two sons, Major John Bigelow and 
Poultney Bigelow and four daughters: 
Miss Grace Bigelow, Mrs. Charles E. Tracy, 
Mrs. Butler K. Harding, and Honorable 
Mrs. Lionel Guest. Address: 21 Gramercy 
Park, New York City, or Highland Falls- 
on-Hudson, N. Y. 

BIGELOW, Melville Madison: 

Dean of Boston University Law School; 
born at Eaton Rapids, Mich., Aug. 2, 1846; 
oldest son of Rev. William E. and Daphne 
F. Bigelow. He was graduated from the 
University of Michigan as A.B. in 1866, 
LL.B. in 1868, and A.M. in 1871; and 
studied at Harvard University, receiving 
its degrees of Ph.D. and A.M. after exam- 






MEN OF AMERICA. 



ination in 1879; and also receiving the 1 
degree of LL.D. from Northwestern Univer 
sity in 189G. He is professor of law and 
dean of the Law School of Boston Univer 
sity; also lawyer and author. He is a 
member of the Massachusetts Historical 
Society, the Harvard chapter of Phi Beta 
Kappa and other learned societies. He is 
author of: The Law of Estoppel, which 
has gone through five editions; Leading 
Cases in the Law of Torts; The Law of 
Torts (eight American and three English 
editions) ; Placita Anglo- Normanica ; His 
tory of English Procedure; The Law of 
Fraud on the Civil Side : Law of Bills, 
Notes and Checpues (two -editions) , and The 
Law of Wills. He is also author of two 
chapters (VI and Vll) in the seventh vol 
ume of the Cambridge Modern History. 
Professor Bigelow married in 1898, Alice 
Bradford Woodman. Residence: 200 
Brattle Street, Cambridge, Mass. Office: 
Boston University Law School, Ashburton 
Place, Boston. 

BIGELOW, Poultney: 

Journalist; born in New York City, Sept. 
10, 1855; son of John and Jane Tunis 
(Poultney) Bigelow. He was graduated 
from Y ale as B.A. in 1879, and then at 
tended the Columbia Law School, and later 
received the honorary degree of M.A. from 
Yale, lie was admitted to the New York 
bar in 1882. Mr. Bigelow is author of: 
The German Emperor and His Eastern 
Neighbors (German translation) ; Down 
the Danube, from the Black Forest to the 
Black Sea ; The Borderland of Czar and 
Kaiser; History of the German Struggle 
for Liberty (1800 to 1848), four volumes, 
1895 to 1905; White Man s Africa, 1897; 
Children of the Nations, 1900. He has 
visited the principal tropical colonies in 
.search of information on colonial adminis 
tration and three times circumnavigated 
the globe. In 1905 and 1900 he was lee- 
direr on National Expansion in the Law 
School of Boston University. He was cor- 
[j respondent of the London Times in the 
; panish-American War, and has lectured 



at the principal universities on colonial 
administration and modern history. He is 
honorary member of the Royal United 
Service Institution, and of the Royal Artil 
lery Institution (life), and a life fellow 
of the Royal Geographical Society, and of 
other kindred societies at home and abroad, 
and is a life member of the Imperial 
Y acht Club of Kiel, Germany, and Royal 
Corinthian of London. Address: Malden- 
on-Hudson, N. Y 7 . 

EIGELOW, Rofcert Payne: 

Zoologist and librarian; born at Bald- 
winsville, N. Y., in 1803; son of Otis Bige 
low and Margaret (Payne) Bigelow. He 
was graduated from Harvard as S.B. in 
1887 and from Johns Hopkins University 
as Ph.D. in 1892, and was Adam T. Brice 
fellow at Johns Hopkins from 1891 to 
189, ). He was editor of the American Natu 
ralist in 1897 and 1898, editor of the Tech 
nology Quarterly from 1895 to 1908. Has 
published various papers on zoological sub 
jects. He is instructor in biology and 
librarian at the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. He is a member of the Ameri 
can Society of Naturalists, the American 
Society of ZoiUogists, fellow of the Ameri 
can Association for the Advencement of 
Science, and a member of the Saint Botolph 
Club and Commonwealth Country Club of 
Boston. Residence: 3 Spruce Street. 
Office: Massachusetts Institute of Tech 
nology, Boston. 

BIGELOW, Willard Dell: 

Chemist; born at Gardner, Kan., May 31, 
1800; son of William I. and Jennie (Lytle) 
Bigelow. He was graduated from Amherst 
College in 1889, and went to Oregon, where 
he was professor of chemistry in the Ore 
gon State College for a year, then instruc 
tor in chemistry in the high schools of 
Washington, D. C., for a year; and in 
July 1, 1891, he became chemist in the 
l<. S. Department of Agriculture in which 
position he has ever since continued, now 
being chief of the Division of Foods in that 
Department He was professor of chemistry 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



in the National University at Washington 
from 1803 to 1898. Professor Bigelow 
married at College Park, Md., April 9, 
1896, Nancy M. Nesbit. Address: De 
partment of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

BILLINGS, Cornelius K. G.: 

Capitalist; born in Saratoga Springs, 
N. Y., Sept. 17, 1802; son of Albert M. and 
Augusta S. (Farnsworth) Billings. He 
removed to Chicago with his parents in 
1864, and was educated at Racine College, 
graduating as A.B. in 1879. He entered the 
office of the People s Gas Light and Coke 
Company of Chicago, of which his father 
was president, in 1879, and he has been 
president of that company since the death 
of his father in 1887. He is also president 
and director of the Kings County Lighting 
Company; director of the Union Carbide- 
Company, the Home National Bank and the 
Home Savings Bank of Chicago. He was a 
director of the World s Columbian Exposi 
tion from 1892 to 1904, and was West Park 
Commissioner of Chicago in 1889. He is a 
member of the Metropolitan, Racquet and 
Tennis, Seawanhaka-Corinthian Yacht, New 
York Yacht, Turf and Field and Down 
Town Clubs of New York, and the Chicago 
and Union League Club, Chicago. He mar 
ried in 1885, Blanche, daughter of Andrew 
MacLeish, of Chicago. Residence, 921 
Madison Avenue. Address: 170 E. 75th 
Street, New York. 

BILLINGS, Frank: 

Physician, educator; born at Highland, 
Iowa County, Wis., in 1854; son of Henry 
M. and Ann (Bray) Billings. He studied 
medicine at Northwestern University, being 
graduated in 1881 with the degree of M.D., 
and receiving the honorary degree of M.S. 
in 1890. He has since his graduation prac 
tised in Chicago, and is connected with 
various hospitals and institutions. He has 
been physician of the Presbyterian Hos 
pital sine;- 1898, and of St. Luke s since 
1892. lie is also consulting physician to 
the Cook County, Children s Memorial, 
Michael Reese, and Provident Hospitals. He 



was teacher of anatomy, of physical diag 
nosis, and of the practice of medicine in the 
Northwestern University School of Medi 
cine, 1882-1898. In 1898 he was appointed 
to the chair of medicine in Rush Medical 
College (now the Medical School of the 
University of Chicago), and in 1900 became 
dean of the Medical School. He is a prom 
inent member and was president in 1902- 
1903 of the American Medical Association, 
and member and ex-president of the Asso 
ciation of American Physicians, and the 
Chicago Medical Society; also a member of 
the Illinois State Medical Society and vari 
ous other local professional organizations. 
He edited Diseases" of the Digestive System 
(1906). Dr. Billings married at Washing 
ton, D. C v May 26, 1887, Dane Ford Braw- 
ley, by whom he has a daughter. Resi 
dence: 35 Twenty-second Street. Office: 
100 State Street, Chicago. 

BILLINGS, John Shaw: 

Librarian, physician; born in Switzer 
land County, Ind., April 12, 1838; son of 
James and Abbie (Shaw) Billings. He was 
graduated from Miami University, Ohio, 
as A.B., 1857; received the degree of A.M. 
from the same college, 1860, and was gradu 
ated from the Medical College of Ohio, as 
M.D., 1860. He afterward received the de 
gree of LL.D. from the University of Edin 
burgh, in 1884; from Harvard University 
1886; M.D. from the University of Munich, 
1889; D.C.L. from Oxford University, 1889; 
was made a member of the Royal College 
of Physicians, of Ireland, and Royal College 
of Surgeons, of Ireland, in 1892; M.D., 
Dublin, in 1892 and Budapest in 1896 
LL.D., Yale, in 1901, and LL.D., Johns Hop 
kins University, 1902. He was resident 
physician of the Commercial Hospital at 
Cincinnati, Ohio, 1859-60; demonstrator of 
anatomy of the Medical College of Ohio 
I860-1H61. Dr. Billings was appointed act 
ing assistant surgeon U. S. Army, Nov., 
1861 ; promoted assistant surgeon April 16, 
18(52 ; brevetted lieutenant-colonel U. S. 
Army, March 13, 1865; captain and as 
sistant surgeon, U. S. Army, July 28, 1866; 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



major and surgeon. Dec. 2, 1870; lieuten 
ant- colonel and deputy surgeon-general 
United States Army, June 10, 1894; am 
retired from active service, at his own re 
quest, 1895. He was in charge of hospitals 
at Washington, D. C., and West Philadel 
phia, 1801-03; served with the Army of the 
Potomac, 1803, and was with the Fifth 
Corps at the battles of Chancellorsville and 
Gettysburg; was on hospital duty, David s 
Island and Bedloe s Island, N. Y., Oct. 
1S03, to Feb., 1804; acted as board of en 
rollment, and then was medical inspector 
Army of the Potomac, until Dec., 1864: 
then in Surgeon-General s Office, Washing 
ton, in charge of the organization of Vet 
eran Reserve Corps, until 1875, and of the 
Library of the Surgeon-General s Office un 
til Dec. 28, 1883; after which he served as 
curator of the Army Medical Museum and 
Library, 1885-1895. He was engaged in the 
reorganization of the United States Marine 
Hospital Service, 1870; had charge of the 
Division of Vital Statistics, eleventh cen 
sus; was medical adviser to board of trus 
tees of Johns Hopkins University and Hos 
pital, Baltimore; vice-president of the Na 
tional Board of Health, 1879-82; professor 
of hygiene in the University of Pennsyl 
vania, 1891-96; and since 1890, director of 
the New York Public Library, Astor, 
Lenox, and Tilden Foundations. Dr. Bil 
lings is a member of the Academy of Natu 
ral Sciences, Philadelphia, the Philosophical 
Society, of Washington (ex-president), the 
American Medical Association, American 
Social Science Association, American Asso 
ciation for the Advancement of Science, the 
National Academy of Sciences, the Ameri 
can Statistical Association, and also of the 
Congress of American Physicians and Sur 
geons (ex-president), American Academy of 
Political and S<?cial Science, International 
i Statistical Institute and Committee of 
Fifty to Investigate the Liquor Problem. 
He was president of the New York Library 
Club, 1899-1900, and again in 1900-1907; 
president of the American Library Associa 
tion, 1901-1902; director Carnegie Institu 
tion, and chairman since 1903. Dr. Billings 
has distinguished himself as a writer on 



157 

medical, hygienic and bibliographical sub 
jects, including among his works: A 
Bibliography of Cholera. 1875; Medical 
Libraries in the United States, 1870; In 
troduction to a Treatise on Hygiene and 
Public Health; Principles of Ventilation 
and Heating, 1884, second edition, 1893; 
Mortality and Vital Statistics of the United 
States, 1885; Index Catalog of the Library 
of the Surgeon-General s Office of the 
United States Army, Washington, D. C., 
1880-1894; also various professional m- 
ports and papers. Address : 425 Lafayette 
Street, New York City. 

BINGHAM, Henry Harrison: 

Lawyer and congressman; born in Phila 
delphia, Dec. 4, 1841. He was graduated 
from Jefferson College in 1802, receiving 
the degrees of A.B. and A.M., and later the 
degree of LL.D. from Washington and Jef 
ferson College. He studied law, entered the 
Union Army as a lieutenant in the One 
Hundred and Fortieth Pennsylvania Volun 
teers; was wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., in 
1863, at Spottsylvania, Va., in 1804, and at 
Farmsville, Va. in 1865. He was mustered 
out of service in July, 1866, having been 
brevetted for distinguished gallantry as 
major, lieutenant-colonel, colonel, and brig 
adier-general, and he received the Medal 
of Honor for special gallantry at the Battle 
of the Wilderness. He was appointed post 
master at Philadelphia in March, 1867, and 
esigned December, 1872, to accept an elec- 
ion to the clerkship of the Courts of Oyer 
ind Terminer and Quarter Sessions of the 
:*eace at Philadelphia. He was reflected 
ilerk of the courts in 1875; was a delegate- 
it-large to the Republican National Con- 
-ention at Philadelphia in 1872, also dele 
gate from the First Congressional District 
o the Republican National Convention at 
Cincinnati in 1870, at Chicago in 1884 and 
888, at Minneapolis in 1892, St. Louis in 
890, at Philadelphia, 1900, and Chicago, 
904. He was elected to the Forty-sixth 
ingress from the First Pennsylvania 
District in 1878, beginning his services 
larch 4, 1879, and has been in continuous 
service by biennial elections since, and is 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



now serving in the Sixty-first Congress, ex 
piring March I!. 1911. Address: 315 
South Twelfth Street, Philadelphia. 

BINGHAM, Theodore Alfred: 

r>rig;idier general United States Army, 
retired: born at Andover, Tolland County, 
Conn., May 14, 1858; son of Joel Foote 
and Sarah (Grew) Binghani. He spent 
three years at Yale, in the class of 1876, 
and received from that college the degree 
of M.A. in 1896; and he was graduated 
from the United States Military Academy 
in 1879. He was appointed as second lieu 
tenant of engineers, in June, 1879. He was 
military attache of the United States Em 
bassy at Berlin from 1889-1892, and at 
Rome from 1892-1894; military aide to the 
President of the United States, with rank 
of colonel, from 1897-1903; having charge 
of the public buildings and grounds in 
Washington. While on engineering duty in 
Buffalo, N. Y., he met with a severe acci 
dent; was promoted brigadier-general in 
the United States Army, July 11, 1904, and 
was retired for disability in line of duty, 
July 12, 1904. General Bingham was police 
commissioner of New York City, from 1906 
to 1909. General Bingham is a Royal Arch 
Mason, and he is a Commander of the Le 
gion of Honor of France; member of the 
Society of the Cincinnati; a member of the 
Society of Colonial Wars, and the Sons of 
the American Revolution. He married in 
St. Louis, Mo., Dec. 15, 1881, Lucille Ruth- 
erfurd, and they have a son. Address: 
300 Mulberry Street. New York. 

BINNEY, Charles Chauncey: 

Lawyer; born in Philadelphia, Oct. 20, 
1855; son of Horace Binney, Jr., and Eliza 
Frances (Johnson) Binney. He was grad 
uated from Harvard as A.B. in 1878. stud 
ied law in the office of William Henry 
Rawle in Philadelphia; also at the Law 
School of the University of Pennsylvania, 
and was admitted to the bar. He was as 
sistant attorney in the Department of Jus 
tice of the United States, 1893-1897; arid 
from Sepember, 1897, was special attorney 



for the same department until June 1, 1907, 
although he resumed practice in Philadel 
phia in November. 1901. He is a member 
of the Society of Colonial Wars, Historical 
Society of Pennsylvania, the American For 
estry Association, the Pennsylvania For 
estry Association, the University and City 
Clubs of Philadelphia and the Cosmos Club 
of Washington, D. C. He is author of: Re 
strictions Upon Local and Special Legisla 
tion in State Constitutions, 1894; Life of 
Horace Binney, 1903; and a contributor to 
legal periodicals. Mr. Binney has been 
twice married; first at Englewood, N. J., 
June 4, 1885, to Sarah Cook Dawes, who 
died Dec. 28, 1900, and second, at Provi 
dence, R. I., Nov 29, 1904, to Isabell Nich 
ols. Residence: St. Martin s, Chestnut 
Hill. Address: 703 North American 
Building, Philadelphia. 

BINNEY, Harold: 

Lawyer; born in New York City, 1867; 
son of Amos (of Boston) and Elizabeth N. 
(Talbot) Binney. He w r as educated in the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Bos 
ton, Columbia Law School, Washington, D. 
C., and the New York University Law 
School. He was assistant examiner of pat 
ents at Washington, 1887-1890, and has 
been practising in New York City since 
1890; member of the firm of Binney, Brick- 
enstein & Ogden, patent lawyers. He is 
a member of the Players , Calumet, Engi 
neers , Strollers , New York Y T acht, Chem 
ists and Lawyers Clubs. Mr. Binney mar 
ried, 1895, Gertrude A. Miles and they have 
two daughters: Constance, born in 1897 
and Frederika, born in 1892. Address: 2 
Rector Street, New York City. 

BINNIE, John Fairbairn: 

Surgeon; born in Stirling, Scotland, 
April 22, 1863. He was educated at the 
University of Aberdeen, and studied in 
London, Glasgow;, Gottingen and Berlin, re 
ceiving the degree of A.M. in 1882 and his 
medical degrees in 1886 from Aberdeen. 
Since 1889, Dr. Binnie has been engaged in 
practice as a surgeon in Kansas City, and 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



1 r>n 



has an international reputation not only 
among the members of his profession but 
among laymen as well. He is professor of 
surgery at the University of Kansas; fol 
low of the American Surgical Association; 
member of the Societe Internationale de 
Chirurgie; and of the American Society 
of Clinical Surgery. He is the author of a 
Manual of Operative Surgery. Residence: 
3001 Main Street. Office: Argyle Build 
ing, Kansas City, Mo. 

BIOREN, John S.: 

Banker; born in Philadelphia, Jan. 29, 
1863; son of John and Anna J. (Maull) 
Bioren. He was educated in private schools 
and the Central High School of Philadel 
phia. Mr. Bioren is senior member of 
Bioren and Company, bankers, of Philadel 
phia. He is president of the Delaware In 
surance Company, the Cape May (New Jer 
sey) Illuminating Company, and the Fidel 
ity Shareholders Company, and is a direc 
tor in the American Gas Company, The Na 
tional Gas. Electric Light and Power Com 
pany, The American Railways Company, 
the Easton Consolidated Electric (Street 
railway) Company, and the Merchants 

Trust Company. He served in councils of 
Riverton, N. J., for a period of seven years, 
having been elected by good majorities over 
opponents representing the dominant local 
party. His own political views are Demo 
cratic. He has been connected at various 

I times as director, manager or governor 

with nearly all of the local institutions of 
Riverton, N. J. His favorite recreations 

I are cricket, golf, tennis, rowing and horse 
back riding. He is a member of the Rac- 

i quet and City Clubs of Philadelphia, and of 
the Delaware River, Moorestown Field and 
Riverton Country Clubs. Residence: Riv- 

jerton, N. J. Office address: 314 Chestnut 

I Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



BIRCKHEAD, Hugh: 

Clergyman; born in Newport, R. I., 
Sept. 7, 1876; son of William H. Birck- 
head, M.D., and Sarah G. (King) Birck- 
head. He was educated in St. Paul s School 
at Concord, N. H. ? Columbia University, A. 



B.. 1801), Episcopal Theological School, 
Cambridge, Mass., H.D.. 1902. He was or 
dered deacon in 11)02, and ordained priest 
in 11)03,, and he entered upon his ministry 
in St. George s Parish in New York City as 
assistant minister, 1902-1905, becoming 
minister-in-charge, 1905, and rector of the 
same parish in 1906. Address: 209 East 
16th Street. New York City. 

BIRD, Abraham Calvin: 

Traffic director of the Gould Railway Sys 
tem; born in Pittsfield, 111., March 4, 1843. 
He enlisted early in the Civil War, and 
served throughout that conflict in the 22d 
Illinois Infantry and the 4th United States 
Cavalry. In 1865, after leaving the army, 
he became connected with the St. Louis, 
Alton & Terre Haute Railway, and by suc 
cessive promotions became general traffic 
manager of the Wabash Railroad in 1895. 
In 1901 he was made 3d vice-president of 
the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul, and 
since March 1903 has been vice-president in 
charge of traffic, of the Gould Lines, com 
prising the Wabash, Missouri Pacific, Den 
ver & Rio Grande, Texas and Pacific, In 
ternational and Great Northern and the 
Wheeling and Lake Erie railroads. Resi 
dence: Evanston, 111., Office: Western 
Union Building, Chicago. 

BIRGE, Edward Asahel: 

Zoologist, educator; born at Troy, N. Y., 
Sept. 7, 1851; son of Edward White Birge 
and Ann (Stevens) Birge. He received his 
preparatory education at Troy High School 
and entering Williams College, was gradu 
ated in 1873 with the degree of A.B., receiv 
ing that of A.M. three years later. The 
honorary degree of LL.D. was conferred 
upon him by his alma mater in 1903. He 
studied zoology at the Museum of Compar 
ative Zoology, Harvard University, and re 
ceived the degree of Ph.D. in 1878. The 
Western University of Pennsylvania con 
ferred on him the honorary degree of Sc.D. 
in 1897. He spent the year 1880-1881 in 
study at Leipzig under Professors Gaule 
and Ludwig. In 1875 he became instructor 
of natural history at the University of 



100 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Wisconsin, and in 1879 became professor 
and head of the department of Zoology in 
that university. Since 1891 he has been 
dean of the College of Letters and Science, 
and was acting president of the university 
from 1900 to 1903. Besides his connection 
with this institution he has been Commis 
sioner of Fisheries of the State of Wiscon 
sin since 1895; director of the Wisconsin 
Geological and Natural History Survey 
since 1897; Forestry Commissioner since 
1905; on State Conservation Commission 
since 1908. He has been a director of the 
Madison Free Library since 1890 and presi 
dent of the Board of Directors since 1893. 
In 1904 he was a member of the Interna 
tional Jury of Awards at the Louisiana 
Purchase Expedition. In his active life, Dr. 
Birge has found time to be connected with 
various associations, professional and other. 
He is fellow of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science; member 
of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences 
Arts, and Letters (president, 1890-91), of 
the American Microscopical Society (presi 
dent 1902-1903), of the American Society of 
Naturalists ; the American Society of Zoolo 
gists (president, Central Branch, 1907-09), 
the Washington Academy of Sciences, the 
American Fisheries Society (president, 
1906-07), and the National Geographic So 
ciety. He is also member of the Phi Beta 
Kappa Society and Senator, 1904-10. He 
is a member of the Congregational Church. 
Dr. Birge married at Troy, N. Y., July 15, 
1880, Anna W. Grant, and they have two 
children: Edward G., born in 1881, and 
Anna G., born in 1883. Residence: 744 
Langdon Street, Madison, Wis. Address : 
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 

BIRKHIMER, William Edward: 

Brigadier-general U. S. Army, retired; 
born in Somerset, Ohio, March 11, 1848; son 
of Nathan and Temperance (Hood) Birk- 
himer. He was educated in the Denmark 
( Iowa ) Academy, and was graduated from 
the United States Military Academy, 1870; 
honor graduate from the United States 
Artillery School, 1872, and was graduated 
from the Law School of the University of 
Oregon, LL.B., 1888. He was commis 



sioned second lieutenant of the Third Artil- 
lerv. June, 1870, first lieutenant, 1879, and 
captain, 1898, colonel 28th U. S. Volun 
teers, 1899-1901, major and lieutenant-col 
onel, Artillery Corps, 1901-1905; promoted 
brigadier general and retired at his own re 
quest after forty years service, Feb. 10, 
1906. He was awarded the Congressional 
Medal of Honor for most distinguished gal 
lantry at San Miguel de Mayumo, Luzon, 
May 13, 1899. He served as judge advo 
cate of the Department of The Columbia, 
1886-1890, and he was associate justice 
of the Audencia (or Supreme Court) of the 
Philippines at Manilla in 1899. Brigadier- 
General Birkhimer is an authority on mil 
itary law., and is author of: The Law of 
Appointment and Promotion in the Army 
of the United States, 1880; Historical 
Sketch of the Organization, Administration, 
Material and Tactics of the Artillery, Unit 
ed States Army, 1884; Military Govern 
ment and Martial Law, 1891-1904. He 
married at Sackets Harbor, N. Y., Sept. 22, 
1876, Geraldine, daughter of R. V. W. How 
ard, U. S. A. Address: 1427 20th Street, 
Washington, D. C. 

BIRNEY, Arthur Alexis: 

Lawyer; born in Paris, France, May 28, 
1852; son of William and Catherine (Hoff 
man) Birney. He studied law at the Uni 
versity of Michigan, and was graduated 
in 1873 with the degree of LL.B. He was 
admitted in 1873 to the bar of Washington, 
D. C., and there began to practice in part 
nership with his father. In 1875 he was 
appointed assistant United States district 
attorney, but resigned two years later to 
accept the appointment of assistant corpo 
ration counsel of the City of Washington. 
In 1893 he was appointed by President 
Cleveland United States attorney for the 
District of Columbia, and held that office for 
four years, during which time he prosecut 
ed many notable cases. He is now in pri 
vate practice at Washington, as senior 
member of the firm of Birney & Wood 
ward. In 1878 he was appointed to a pro 
fessorship in the Law Department of How 
ard University, and continues to hold that 
position. He is a director of the Washing- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



ton Market Company, the National City j BISCHOFF, Henry Jr 

Dairy Company, and the Congressional Ho- 

fpl f nmnsinv TTn a TV,,. Jurist; born in New York Cih 



tel Company. He is a Trustee of the Na 
tional Homeopathic Hospital Association; 
and past master of Pentalpha Lodge of Ma 
sons. He married, Nov. 3, 1875, Helen 
Con way, of Baltimore, Md. Residence: 
1510 Twenty-second Street. Office: 602 
Eleventh Street, Washington, D. C. 

BISBEE, Horatio: 

Lawyer; born at Canton, Me., May 10, 
1831); son of Horatio Bisbee and Sarah 
(White) Bisbee. He received his education 
at Tufts College, \vhere he was graduated 
in 1803 with the degree of A.B., the degree 
rtf A.M. being conferred upon him in 1872. 
He left college and unlisted in Company E 
of the Fifth Massachusetts Volunteer In 
fantry, April 17, 1801. for three months 
service, Ami then joined a company of the 
Ninth Maine Regiment and his gallantry 
won him rapid promotion through the ranks 
of capiain, lieutenant-colonel and colonel in 
the Ninth Maitie Regiment of Volunteer In 
fantry, with which he was discharged in 
1803. He then took up the study of law 
and was in 1804 admitted to the bar at 
Cnicago, HI., and commenced practising 
at Jacksonville, Fla., which he had adopted 
for his home in 1805. In 1809 he was ap 
pointed United States distl-ict attorney for 
the Northern District of Florida, and held 
the position for four years, declining a re- 
appoihtment; and he \vas attorney-general 
rtf Florida for a short time in 1872. In 
1870 he was elected by the Republican 
party, with which he is identified, to a 
seat in Congress and was reflected for 
three successive terms, being member of 
the Forty-fifth, Forty-sixth, Forty-seventh 
and Forty-eighth Congresses. lie is a 
member of the New York Commandery of 
the Military Order of the Loyal Legion. 



ik City, Aug. 10. 

L852; son of Henry and Amalie Bischoff. 
He was graduated from Columbia Law 
School, LL.B., 1871, was admitted to the 
bar of New York in 1873, was attorney for 
the collection of arrears in personal taxes 
for the city of New York, 1889-1890; judge 
of the Court of Common Pleas of New 
York from 1890-1895, and since then jus 
tice of the Supreme Court of New York in 
the First Judicial District, his present term 
expiring Dec. 31, 1917. Justice Bischoff is 
a member of the American Bar Association 
and the New York State Bar Association, 
and of the Manhattan, Lotos and National 
Democratic Clubs. He married first in 
New York City, Oct. 20, 1873, Annie Louise 
Moshier, who died in February, 1897; and 
second, in April, 1902, Elizabeth, widow of 
Oilman Collamore. Residence: 180 West 
8()th Street. Office: County Court House, 
New York City. 

BISHOP, Emily M.: 

Lecturer, dramatic reader; born in For- 
estville, N. Y., Nov. 3, 1858; daughter of 
Asa L. and Ann Elizabeth (De Witt) Mul- 
kin. She was educated in public and high 
schools, followed by special studies in dra 
matic art, and she taught for several years 
in the Silver Creek (N. Y.) High School, 
and later studied dramatic art under Steele 
Mackaye s direction in New York City. 
She was married at Silver Creek, N. Y., 
Dec. 31, 1884, to Coleman E. Bishop, and 
moved to Rapid City, S. D., where she be 
came superintendent of the public schools. 
In 1888 she first lectured at Chautauqua 
Institution, Chautauqua, N. Y., and in 
1889 she established there the department 
of Health and Self-Expression, of which 
she has been principal ever since, having 
had thousands of adult students. In 1894, 
He married at Fernandina. Fla., April 5, j she organized, in connection with S. If. 
1803, Florida Plotard, and of that union | Clark of the University of Chicago, the 
lias four children; and married a second j Chautauqua School of Expression, of which 

she is still co-principal. Since beginning 
her platform work at Chautauqua in 1888, 



time, June 11, 1891, Lottie R. Beasley, of 
New York City. Address: 318 West Bea- 
ver Stt-eet, Jacksonville, Fla. 
11 



she has given over fifty dramatic readings 



102 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



iiuil many public lectures at Chautauqua, 
besides reading and lecturing extensively 
in the United States generally, and in Can 
ada. She has been a lecturer at Drexel 
Institute, Pratt Institute, and for the past 
seven years dramatic reader and lecturer 
on health at the Mechanics Institute, 
Rochester, N. Y. She is author of: Health 
and Self-Expression; Interpretative Forms 
of Literature; Seventy Years Young. Ad 
dress: 509 West 112th St., New York City. 

BISHOP, Louis Faugeres: 

Physician; born in New Brunswick, N. 
J., March 14, 1864; son of James and Mary 
F. (Ellis) Bishop. He was educated in St. 
Paul s School, Concord, N. H., and was 
graduated from the Rutgers College as A. 
B. in 1885, and A.M. in 1889, and from the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons (Co 
lumbia University) in 1889. He was resi 
dent physician of St. Luke s Hospital, 1889- 
1892; was eight years secretary of the New 
York Academy of Medicine, and part of 
that time chairman of the section on Prac 
tice of Medicine. He is now professor of 
diseases of the heart and circulation, Ford- 
ham University, Medical Department; and 
visiting physician to the Lincoln Hospital ; 
in 1904 he established the Laboratory of 
Clinical Observation, for cooperative study 
of disease by general practitioners; chiefly 
occupied in general family and consulting 
practice in New York City, and in summer 
at York Harbor, Me. He is author of: 
Heart Disease and Blood Pressure (E. B. 
Treat) ; also numerous papers on the cir 
culation, diagnosis and clinical pathology. 
He is a specialist in disorders of the heart 
and circulation. He is trustee of the Good 
Samaritan Dispensary, and member of the 
American Medical Association, American 
Academy of Medicine, Pathological Society, 
Neurological Society, Society of Alumni St. 
Luke s and Sloan Maternity Hospitals, 
Delta Phi, Yew York Historical Society. 
He is a Mason. His favorite recreations 
are golf, automobiling and travel. He is a 
member of the Calumet, Columbia Univer 
sity, Chemists Clubs, and Automobile Club 
of America. Dr. Bishop married in New 



York City, 1899, Charlotte Dater, and they 
have one son. Address: 54 West Fifty- 
fifth Street, New York City. 

BISHOP, Seth Scott: 

Physician and surgeon; born at Fond du 
Lac, Wis., Feb. 7, 1852; son of Lyman and 
Maria (Probart) Bishop. He attended 
Pooler Institute, and Beloit College, where 
he took a three-year course. For a time he 
was identified with the Fond du Lac Daily 
Commonwealth, but afterwards took up the 
study of medicine, and after completing 
two courses in the medical department of 
the University of the City of New York, 
and studying with Dr. S. S. Bowers, he 
was graduated from the medical school of 
Northwestern University as M.D. in 1876. 
Subsequently he practised in Fond du Lac; 
since 1879 he has resided in Chicago, where 
he has won for himself an extensive repu 
tation as a specialist and has made several 
hundred contributions to medical science. 
Sixty instruments of his invention have as 
sisted greatly in operative surgery. In 1881 
he was elected to the medical staff of the 
South Side Free Dispensary; he was also 
surgeon to the Illinois Charitable Eye and 
Ear Infirmary, the Post-Graduate and Illi 
nois Hospitals; consulting surgeon to the 
Illinois Masonic Orphan s Home, the Mary 
Thompson Hospital, the Silver Cross Hos 
pital, and the School for Nervous and Deli 
cate Children, and is now a professor of 
diseases of the nose, throat and ear in the 
Illinois Medical College, and the Chicago 
Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospi 
tal. He is author of: The Ear and Its 
Diseases; also Diseases of the Nose, Throat 
and Ear, and Their Accessory Cavities. He 
is editor of the Illinois Medical Bulletin; 
is on the editorial staff of The Laryngo 
scope, and is a contributor to various peri 
odicals. Dr. Bishop is a member of the 
International Medical Congress, the Pan- 
American Medical Congress, the American 
Medical Association, the State Medical So 
cieties of Wisconsin, Minnesota and Illinois, 
the Chicago Pathological Society, the Mis 
sissippi Valley Medical Association, and 
the United States Hay Fever Association. 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



He is a 32d-degree Mason and a Templar 
and a Mystic Shriner. In politics he is a 
Republican. He married at Chicago, 111., 
March 23, 1885, Jessie Button, and they 
have two daughters: Jessie Elizabeth, born 
in 1886, and Mabel, born in 1888. Resi 
dence: 1726 Ridge Avenue, Evanston, 111. 
Office address: 103 State Street, Chicago 
111. 

BISHOP, William Henry: 

United States consul; born in Hartford, 
Conn., Jan. 7, 1847. He was educated at 
St. John s College at Fordham, New York, 
and at Yale College, of which he is A.B., 
1867. After leaving college Mr. Bishop 
studied architecture but entered the field 
of journalism., becoming editor and propri 
etor of the Milwaukee Commerical Times. 
His first short story was published in 1876, 
and since that time he has been a prolific 
author of fiction both in the form of short 
stories and of novels as well as of historical 
works. In 1893 he became instructor in 
modern languages at Yale, but resigned in 
1902 to live abroad. In the following year 
he was appointed United States consul at 
Genoa, Italy, and was subsequently trans 
ferred to Palermo, where he now holds the 
position of United States consul. He mar 
ried in New York, July 29, 1886, Mary 
Dearborn Jackson. His address is Ameri 
can Consulate, Palermo, Italy; or New Ha 
ven, Conn. 

BISPHAM, David S.: 

Musician and opera singer; born in Phil 
adelphia, Pa., Jan. 5, 1857; son of William 
D. and Jane (Scull) Bispham. He was 
educated at Haverford (Pennsylvania) Col 
lege, in the class of 1876. He began his 
musical career as an amateur; studied for 
the operatic stage, and made his first ap 
pearance as a professional as the " Due de 
Longueville " in The Basoche, by Messager, 
at the Royal English Opera in London, in 
November, 1891. Since then he has been 
singing the principal baritone roles in Ger-. 
man, French and Italian with the Royal 
Opera Company, Covent Garden, London, 
and the Metropolitan Opera Company in 



163 

New York City. He entered into theatrical 
management in London, in November, 1906, 
producing and singing the title role in the 
romantic opera, " The Vicar of Wakefield," 
the music by Liza Lehmann. Mr. Bisp- 
ham s recitals of classical songs are famous 
throughout the musical world. Address: 
Carnegie Hall, New York City. 

BISPHAM, Harrison Augustus: 

Commander, U. S. Navy; born in Phil 
adelphia, Pa., Feb. 10, 1865; son of Samuel 
Augustus Bispham and Cornelia (Koons) 
Bispham. He was educated in the private 
schools of Philadelphia, of which William 
Fewsmith was principal, and in the United 
States Naval Academy, from which he was 
graduated in the class of 1885. He has 
been promoted through the intermediate 
grades to commander, receiving his present 
commission Oct. 25, 1908, and is now In 
spector of the Fourth Light House District. 
He married, first, June 30, 1893, Barbara 
Carr Graff, and second, Augusta R. Wood 
ward at Hong Kong, China, Dec. 11, 1902, 
and by his first marriage he has two chil 
dren: Barbara Carr, born in 1894, and Ed 
ward Koons, born in 1896. Address: Phil 
adelphia, Pa. 

BISSELL, George Edwin: 

Sculptor; born at New Preston, Conn., 
Feb. 16, 1839; son of Hiram and Isabella 
(Jones) Bissell. He was educated in the 
Northville Academy, and the famous school 
known as The Gunnery, at Washington, 
Conn., enlisted as a private in Company 
A in the Twenty-third Regiment of Connect 
icut Volunteers, was taken prisoner at 
Brashear City, Louisiana, paroled and on 
the expiration of term of service in 1863, 
was appointed assistant paymaster in the 
Navy. After the war, with his father and 
brother, he engaged in the monument 
business at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., where he 
began his career as a sculptor. In 1875 and 
1876 he traveled in Europe, studying art 
in Florence, Rome and Paris, and had a 
studio in the later city for about six 
years at different periods between 1883 and 
1896, and in Florence in 1904 and 1905, 



164 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



and 1908 and 1909. Among his more prom 
inent public works are soldier s monuments 
and portrait statues, and exposition sculp 
ture at the Buffalo and St. Louis Exposi 
tions; was one of the contributing sculptors 
to the Naval Arch in Madison Square, New 
York City, giving to this work the Navy 
Group. Of his Soldier s Monuments the 
one in Waterbury, Conn., is the most im 
portant. He is the sculptor of the statue 
of Chancellor James Kent, Congressional 
Library, Washington, and of President Ar 
thur and Col. Abraham de Peyster in New 
York City. He is also the sculptor of the 
bronze relief of the parting of Burns and 
Highland Mary at Aye; and statue of Lin 
coln and Slave in Edinburg, Scotland. Mr. 
Bissell is a member of the National Arts 
Club, the National Sculpture and Munici 
pal Art Societies of New York, and is act 
ively identified with the movement for dec 
oration of public schools, inaugurated by 
the latter society. He has contributed ar 
ticles to magazines and press on sociolog 
ical and art subjects. Mr. Bissell married, 
Aug. 16, 1865, Mary E. Welton, of Water- 
bury, Conn., and has three children living. 
Address: Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

BISSELL, Herbert Porter: 

Lawyer; born in New London, Oneida 
County, N. Y., Aug. 30, 1856; son of Amos 
Alanson and Susan Amelia (Willse) Bis 
sell. He was educated in lie Veaux Col 
lege, Suspension Bridge, N. Y., the Gymna 
sium Catharinarium, Braunschweig, Ger 
many, and Harvard College, whence he was 
graduated A.B., 1880, afterward studying 
law. He was admitted to the bar in 1883 ; 
was a member of the firm of Bissell, Sicard, 
Bissell & Carey until 1896, and is now head 
of the firm of Bissell and Riley, corporation 
lawyers. He is vice-president of The Ni 
agara Gorge Railroad Company; presi 
dent of the New York Potoer Security Co., 
and interested in other companies. Mr, 
Bissell was the Democratic candidate for 
mayor of Buffalo in 1901, and is now presi 
dent of the Board of Education of East Au 
rora, N. Y., and was formerly a trustee of 
De Veaux College. Mr. Bissell was major 



and judge advocate of the New York Na 
tional Guard, on the Eighth Brigade Staff, 
1885-1893. He is a member of the New 
York State Bar Association, Sons of the 
American Revolution, the Lawyers, Buffalo 
Saturn and Transportation Clubs of Buffa 
lo, and the University Club of New York 
City. He married in 1883, Lvicy Agnes 
Caffey, and they have three daughters. Ad 
dress: 714 Ellicott Square, Buffalo, N. Y. 

BISSELL, Hezekiah: 

Chief engineer of the Boston & Maine 
Railroad; born in East Windsor, Conn. 
Mr, Bissel, who is one of the best known 
railway engineers in the United States, was 
educated at the Sheffield Scientific School 
at Yale, from which he graduated in 1861. 
He was a civil engineer on the Union Pa 
cific Railroad during its construction and 
also on railroad construction in Peru, 
South America. Returning from the latter 
work he became connected with the Cleve 
land, Chicago, St. Louis and Cincinnati 
Railroad, from which road he went to the 
Eastern Railroad of Massachusetts, which 
was later amalgamated with the Boston & 
Maine system, of which Mr. Bissell was 
made chief engineer. Address : West Bed 
ford, Mass. 

BITTER, Karl Theodore Francis: 

Sculptor; born in Vienna, Austria, Dec. 
6, 1867. He studied art in the Academy of 
Fine Arts of his native city, and came to 
the United States in 1889 to take a posi 
tion connected with architectural sculpture. 
Mr. Bitter has taken a prominent part in 
the execution of the sculptures for the chief 
buildings of several expositions. He was 
one of the prize winners in the competition 
for the Astor memorial gates of Trinity 
Church, New York, and executed important 
sculptures for the residences of Collis P. 
Hunting-ton and Cornelius Vanderbilt. He 
has been an exhibitor at all of the leading 
world exhibitions, and was awarded the 
silver medal at the Paris Exposition in 
1900; the gold medal at the Pan-American 
Exposition in 1901, Philadelphia in 1902, 
and St. Louis in 1904. Mr. Bitter is es- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



165 



pecially well known for his services as di 
rector of sculptor of expositions, having 
been director of sculptures for the Pan- 
American Exposition in 1901 and chief of 
the department of sculpture at the St. 
Louis Exposition in 1904, both positions 
having been filled with distinct credit He 
is an academician of the National Academy 
of Design and a member of the Fine Arts 
Council appointed by President Roosevelt. 
Address: 44 West 77th St., New York City. 

BITTING, William Coleman: 

Clergyman; born in Hanover County, Va., 
Feb, 5, 1857; son of Charles Carroll and Caro 
line (Shadinger) Bitting. He was educated 
in Richmond College, Richmond, Va., being 
graduated as philosophy medallist and re 
ceiving the degree of M. A., in 1877; was 
graduated from Crozer Theological Semina 
ry, Chester, Pa.. 1880, and he has received 
the degree of D.D. from Howard College, 
Ala., and from Richmond College, Va. On 
leaving the seminary he supplied the Lee 
Street Baptist Church, Baltimore, Md., 
from June, 1880, to Feb. 1881, then was 
pastor at Luray, Front Royal and Riverton, 
Va., until Dec., 1883, then pastor of the 
Mount Morris Baptist Church, New York 
City, Jan. 1, 1884 to Oct. 31, 1905. He be 
came pastor of the Second Baptist Church, 
St, Louis, Mo., Nov. 1, 1905. Dr. Bitting 
is corresponding secretary of the Northern 
Baptist Convention, is active on boards of 
managers of many organizations, education 
al and philanthropic, national and local, 
and is now a trustee of the Crozer Theologi 
cal Seminary, and frequently a preacher at 
colleges and universities. He is author 
of: Earthly Blooms from Heavenly Stems; 
Bible Study Union Sunday School Lessons; 
Foundation Truths; and many nr.Jgazine 
i and religious newspaper articles. He is a 
I Scottish Rite Mason and Knight Temp 
lar, a member of the Beta Theta Pi fratern 
ity, and of the Mercantile, Glen Echo, 
Country, Town and Gown, and Chi Alpha 
Clubs of St. Louis. He married in Balti 
more, Md., Nov. 17, 1886, Anna Mary Bied- 
ler, and they have two sons. Residence: 
5109 McPherson Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 



BJXBY, Tarns: 

Former Indian Commissioner; born in 
Staunton, Va., Dec. 12, 1855. He removed 
with his parents to Minnesota, where he 
was educated in the public- schools of Red 
Wing. On arriving at manhood he entered 
the newspaper business, and became editor 
and proprietor of the Daily Republican at 
Red Wing. He was active in the Republi 
can politics of the State, and an oilicer in 
its organization for many years. In 1888 
he was appointed secretary of the Railroad 
and Warehouse Commission of the State, 
and from 1889 to 1897 was private secre 
tary to the several governors of the State 
in those years. In 1897 he was appointed 
chairman of the Commission to the Five 
Civilized Tribes, which undertook the im 
portant work of determining the rights of 
persons claiming enrollment on the tribal 
list, such enrollment entitling the success 
ful claimants to allotment of land and 
share in the tribal funds. This arduous 
duty was performed by Mr. Bixby and his 
associates with marked ability and success, 
and upon the completion of the main part 
of the work in 1905 Mr. Bixby was ap 
pointed sole commissioner, serving until 
1907, when he terminated his work and be 
came connected with the Pioneer Press 
Company of St. Paul, of which he is 
general manager. He is also president 
of the newspaper company localized at 
Muskogee, Okla. Mr. Bixby has for 
many years been a stockholder and offi 
cer in numerous Minnesota corporations. 
He married April 27, 1886, Clara Mues. 
Address : The Pioneer Press, St. Paul, 
Minn. 



BIXBY, William Herbert: 

Colonel of the Corps of Engineers of 
the U. S. Army; born in Charlestown, 
Mass., Dec. 27, 1849; son of Clark Smith 
Bixby and Elizabeth (Clark) Bixby. He 
was educated in the Brookline and Cam 
bridge, Mass., public schools, the Massa 
chusetts Institute of Technology, 1866- 
1867, the United States Military Academy, 
1869-1873, and the French National School 



166 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



of Bridges and Highways at Paris, 1879- 
1881. He was assistant professor of mili 
tary and civil engineering in the United 
States Military Academy, 1875-1879, lec 
tured on Coast Defenses in the United 
States Naval War College in 1887, and has 
served all grades of the Corps of Engineers 
of the United States Army from second 
lieutenant to colonel, from 1873 to date. 
He was on special duty examining iron 
fortifications in Europe, 1881-1882, was 
adjutant of the Battalion of Engineers of 
the U. S. Army, 1882-1883; and was in 
charge of the United States river and har 
bor improvements in Virginia, North Caro 
lina and South Carolina, 1884-1891, Con 
necticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts, 
1891-1895, in the Ohio River, 1897 to 1901, 
on the Ship Channel on the Great Lakes, 
1902-1904, and in Illinois and Indiana, 
1905-1907; and division engineer north 
western United States in 1905-1908; and 
of western United States since 1908, in 
addition to being in direct charge of the 
U. S. improvement of the Mississippi River 
from St. Louis to Cairo and being presi 
dent of the Mississippi River Commission 
since 1908. He was a member of the 
Army Board on Long Span Suspension 
Bridges in 1894, and of the Army Board 
on Portland and Slag Cements in 1899, and 
of the Lakes to the Gulf Deep Waterway 
Boards of 1905 and 1907; and o? many 
other river, harbor, bridge, and engineer 
special boards. He was United States 
Lighthouse Engineer, 1895-1901, and United 
States lighthouse inspector, 1898-1899, and 
again lighthouse engineer since 1908. He 
was chief engineer of the Departments of 
the Lakes, Dakota and Missouri, of the 
United States Army in 1907-1908. He is a 
Unitarian in religion. He has traveled in 
England, France, Belgium, Holland and 
Germany on United States Army duty; and 
in the same countries and Switzerland and 
Italy for pleasure, and was sent by the 
United States War Department to witness 
the maneuvers of the French Army in 1880, 
and to inspect buildings at Charleston, 
S. C., after the earthquake in 1887 He 
is a Chevalier of the Legion d Honneur of 



France; member of the American Society 
of Civil Engineers, American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers, the British Associ 
ation of Civil Engineers and the French 
Society of Civil Engineers, the United 
States Naval Institute, United States Mili 
tary Service Institution, Naional Geo 
graphic Society, Washington Academy of 
Sciences, the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, British Associa 
tion for the Advancement of Science, Amer 
ican Society for the Promotion of Engi 
neering Education, American Economic As 
sociation, American Academy of Political 
and Social Science, and the International 
Congress of Navigation. He is also a mem 
ber of the Missouri Athletic Club and the 
New York University Club. He married at 
Washington, D. C., Dec. 27, 1893, Lidey H. 
Rogers. Address : 428 Customhouse, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

BJERREGAARD, Carl Henry Andrew: 

Librarian, author, lecturer; born in Fred- 
ericia, Denmark, May 24, 1845; son of 
Janus Bagge Friis Bjerregaard, Ph.D., etc., 
who was president of the Fredericia Col 
lege. He was educated in Fredericia Col 
lege and University of Copenhagen from 
which he was graduated in 1863; was vol 
unteer scout in the Prusso-Danish War in 
1863 and 1864, and graduated as officer 
from the Royal Military Academy, in Den 
mark, in 1867. He served as lieutenant in 
the- Danish Army and was later of the 
Danish Legation to Russian Court. He 
came to America for political reasons; was 
teacher and lecturer from 1873 to 1879; 
since 1879 has been librarian at the Astor 
Library, now Astor Branch of the New 
York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and 
Tilden Foundations. He is an extensive 
writer and lecturer on Oriental subjects 
and mysticism, was a collaborator on the 
Standard Dictionary, The New Interna 
tional Encyclopaedia, the Encyclopedia 
Americana, and the Jewish Encyclopedia, 
is a contributor to magazines, and lecturer. 
He has been associate editor of Mind (New 
York City), from Jan. 1, 1905, and is au 
thor of Mysticism and Nature Worship, 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



107 



two volumes; A Sufi Interpretation of 
Omar Khayyam and Fitzgerald; and is now 
engaged on History and Doctrine of Mysti 
cism and Occultism. Mr. Bjerregaard mar 
ried, in 1868, Matilda J. Thompson. Ad 
dress: Astor Library, New York City. 

BLACK, Frank Swett: 

Lawyer; born in Limington, Maine, 
March 8, 1853. He was educated at Dart 
mouth College, from which he was gradu 
ated in 1875 and from which he received 
the honorary degree of LL.D. in 1898. Mr. 
Black s early work was in the newspaper 
business at Johnstown and Troy, New York. 
He was for a time attached to the post- 
office at Troy. In 1879 he was admitted to 
the bar and has since been in the successful 
practice of law except when holding public 
office, having been elected to Congress in 
1895, and as governor of New York in 1897. 
He is a prominent member of the Republi 
can party of the State of New York, and 
as such a national figure in Republican 
politics, also enjoying marked distinction 
for exceptional oratorical ability. Ad 
dress : Troy, N. Y 7 . 

BLACK, Hugh: 

Theologian; born in Rothesay, Buteshire, 
Scotland, March 26, 1869. He was edu 
cated at Glasgow University and at the 
Free Church College of Glasgow. He was 
ordained in Scotland in 1891, and after a 
successful pastorate in Paisley, Scotland, 
and ten years at St. George s United Free 
Church in Edinburgh, he came to the Unit 
ed States in 1906 as professor of practical 
theology at the Union Theological Sem 
inary in New Y 7 ork. Professor Black is the 
author of: Friendship; Culture and Re 
straint; Work; The Practice of Self-Cul 
ture; Listening to God (Edinburgh Ser 
mons) ; and Christ s Service of Love; and 
The Gift of Influence (University Ser 
mons ) . He married in Paisley, Scotland, 
June 28, 1898, Edith Margaret Kerr. Resi 
dence : Upper Montclair, N. J. Office : 
700 Park Avenue, New York City. 



BLACK, John Charles: 

President of the United States Civil 
Service Commission; born at Lexington, 
Miss., Jan. 27, 1839. He removed with 
his mother, in boyhood, to Danville, 111., 
and was educated at Wabash College, Craw- 
fordsville, Ind. He enlisted on April 14, 
1861. At the expiration of his first enlist 
ment he went to Danville, 111., and re 
cruited a company for the Thirty-seventh 
Illinois Volunteers, of which regiment he 
became major, and took part, with his regi 
ment, in thirteen battles and two great 
sieges. He served until Aug. 15, 1865, and 
being brevetted brigadier-general of United 
States Volunteers for gallantry in action 
at the storming of the Blakely batteries. 
After the war ended he studied law, and 
was admitted to the bar in 1867, engaging 
in the practice of law at Danville, Vermil 
ion County, 111., and at Champaign, III. 
He received several unsuccessful nomina 
tions on Democratic tickets in Illinois and 
was appointed by President Cleveland, 
March 4, 1885, to be United States Com 
missioner of Pensions, which office he held 
until the close of the administration in 
1889, when he removed to Chicago. He was 
elected in Nov., 1892, as a Democratic can 
didate from Illinois at large, to the Fifty- 
third Congress, but resigned his seat Dec. 
12, 1894, to become United States Attorney 
for the Northern District of Illinois, 1895- 
99. He was nominated for governor of 
Illinois by the National (Gold-Standard) 
Democracy, but declined the nomination; 
he returned to private practice, 1899 to 
1903, and was appointed, Dec., 1903, United 
States Civil Service Commissioner, and 
elected president of the board, still holding 
that office. General Black married at Ur- 
bana, Champaign County, 111., Sept. 28, 
1867, Miss Adaline L. Griggs. He received 
the honorary degree of M.A. from Wabash 
College, and that of LL.D. from Knox Col 
lege, Galesburg, 111. He is a companion 
and past commander of Military Order of 
the Loyal Legion, Commandery of the State 
of Illinois; was department commander of 
the Grand Army of the Republic for Illi- 



I 68 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



nois, 1902-3, and commander-in-chief of the 
Grand Army of the Republic of the United 
States, 1003-04. Address: 1717 S Street, 
N. W., Washington. D. C. 

BLACK, John Clark: 

.Hanker, capitalist; born at Middlebury. 
Addison County, Vt., July 3, 1837; son of 
Daniel and Jean (Lawrence) Black. He 
received his education in the public schools 
of Vermont. At nineteen years of age he 
removed to Chicago, where he was employed 
as a bookkeeper and cashier for the firm 
of Ross and Rainber, dry goods merchants, 
and later with Armour & Company, with 
whom lie remained until 1881, when he 
entered into business on his own account. 
In 1883 lie was one of the organizers and 
incorporators of the Chicago Continental 
Bank, of which he has been the president 
for many years. He is also president and 
a director of the Northwestern Safe and 
Trust Company, a member of the Western 
Board of Control of the Audit Company of 
New York, trustee of the Prussian Na 
tional Insurance Company of Stettin, Ger 
many; trustee of the Art Institute of Chi 
cago and of the Armour Mission. He is 
a member of the Chicago Board of Trade; 
also a member of the Chicago, Union 
League, Bankers , Saddle and Cycle Clubs. 
He married in New York City, Sept. 25, 
1875, Elenor Clarke. Residence: 9 Wal 
ton Place. Office 218 La Salle Street, 
Chicago. 

BLACK, William Harman: 

Lawyer; born in Forsyth, Ga., June 10, 
1868; son of Eugene Pinckard and Zac 
(Harman) Black. He was educated in 
the public and high schools of Atlanta, 
Ga., until 1884, afterward studied law and 
engaged in practice, first in Georgia and 
later in New York City, where he is presi 
dent of and counsel for the Corporations 
Organization of New York and the Account 
ing Company of New York. While residing 
in Georgia he was special master for the 
U. H< District Court for the Northern Dis 
trict of Georgia, and was also president of 
the Young Men s Democratic League of 



Fulton County, Ga., and secretary of the 
Georgia Cleveland Club. Since removing 
to New York City he has given special 
attention to the law of corporations and 
he is author of: Black on New York and 
New Jersey Corporations, and of The Real 
Wall Street. Mr. Black was commissioner 
of accounts of the City of New York, 1904- 
1905, arid he organized in 1903 and has 
since been vice-president of the Citizen s 
Independent Democracy of New York City. 
In 1909 he organized The Association for 
New York, which has for its object the 
advertising of the advantages of New 
York, and the challenge of indiscriminate 
abuse of the city. He is a member of the 
Southern Society of New York, the Metro 
politan, Lawyers, and National Democratic 
Clubs, and the Kane Lodge of Masons. 
Residence: 18 E. 32d Street. Office: 111 
Broadway, New York City. 

BLACK, William J.: 

Passenger traffic manager of the Santa 
Fe Railroad; born in St. Louis, Mo., Oct. 3, 
1864. He entered the railway service in 
1879 as office boy, and since 1887 has occu 
pied responsible positions in the traffic pas 
senger department of the Santa Fe system, 
having been appointed general passenger 
agent in 1897 and on Oct. 10, 1905, pas 
senger traffic manager of the entire system. 
Address: Railway Exchange, Chicago, 111. 

BLTCKBTJRN, Edmond Spencer :""" 

Lawyer; born in \Vatauga County, N. C., 
Sept. 22, 1868. He received an academic 
education, and after studying law was ad 
mitted to the bar in 1890, since which time 
he has practised his profession at Wilkes- 
boro. N. C. He is a Republican in poli 
tics, and has been for fifteen years promi 
nent in the councils of his party in North 
Carolina. T-l c was a member of the Legis 
lature in 1896-1897, being speaker pro tern., 
and assistant United States attorney of 
North Carolina, in 1900-1901. In the latter 
year he was elected to Congress, and again 
elected in 1 <)()-). Mr. Blackburn is a trustee 
of the University of North Carolina. He 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



married, Dec. 18, 1002, Louise Le Vavm. 
Address: Wilkesboro, N". C. 

BLACKBURN, Joseph Clay Styles: 

Lawyer and ex-United States Senator; 
born in Woodford Oounty. Ky., Oct. 1, 
1838. He was graduated in 1857, from 
Centre College, Danville, Ky., from which 
he afterward received the degree of LLJX 
He was admitted to the bar in 1859 and 
went to Chicago, where he practised law 
until the Civil War broke out, when he 
returned to the South, and served through 
the war in the Confederate Army. After 
the war he embarked in the practice of 
law in Kentucky. He has long been active 
in politics as a Democrat, and was a mem 
ber of the House of Representatives of the 
Kentucky Legislature from 1871 to 1875. 
He was elected a member of the Forty- 
fourth Congress in 1874, and was biennially 
elected, serving until 1885, when he was 
elected United States Senator. He was re- 
elected in 1801, serving until 1807, and in 
1001 was again elected United States Sen 
ator for the term which expired in March, 
1007. At the conclusion of his service he 
was appointed to the Panama Canal Com 
mission and assigned to the governorship 
of the Canal Zone. Address: Ancon, 
( aim! Zone, Panama. 

BLACKLOCK, Henry: 

Clergyman; born in England; son of 
George and Ellen (Sawyor) Blacklock. He 
is a lineal descendant of Sir Thomas Gres- 
ham (1510-1570), the founder of the Royal 
Exchange, London; and on his paternal 
grandmother s side, he is a cousin of the 
Duke of Buccleueh and, through his mother, 
a cousin of Viscount Milner, of African 
fame. He was educated in Saint Paul s 
College, Burgh, College of Saint Augustine, 
Canterbury, and at Oxford University, 
where he won a mathematical scholarship 
in 1886, a Greek scholarship in 1880, and 
was Hebrew prizeman for the year 1801. 
He was rector of Saint Andrew s Episcopal 
Church, Wellington, Out., in 1801; was 
ctirate of Saint Thomas Church, Belleville, 
Ont., 1894-1005, and of St. Luke s, Kings- 



1(10 

ton, Ont,, in 1800, and was at Oxford Uni 
versity in 1807 and 1898. He was curate 
of St. Johns, Yonkers, in 1898, but in Sep 
tember was called to be rector of St. Mary s 
Church, Charleroi, Pa., which he accepted 
and where he did a great work of thor 
oughly-organizing and building up this new 
and important field. In Sept., 1900, he 
became rector of Grace Church, Mohawk, 
and while recuperating from the strain of 
overwork in Charleroi, built up the parish 
from thirty-three families to eighty-four 
and also built the most beautifuf rectory, 
purchased a house for Parish Hall, and 
made other important improvements. With 
the return of health he accepted, in May, 
1005, the curacy of St. Peter s Church. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. He is a member of the 
American Academy of Political and Social 
Science, Mohawk Valley Lodge of Masons. 
and Mohawk Chapter Order of the Eastern 
Star, and the Herkimer County Historical 
and other societies. His recreations are 
mountain climbing, walking tours and art 
works and books. Residence: 405 Pacific 
Street. Office address: 347 State Street,, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

BLACKMAR, Abel Edward: 

Jurist; born in Newark, N. J., Aug. 21, 
1852. He was graduated from Hamilton 
College, A.B., 1874, and from Columbia 
College Law School, LL.B., 1878. He was 
admitted to the bar in 1878 and practised 
in New York City and Brooklyn, was 
counsel for the New York Produce Ex 
change and a member of the law firm of 
Baldwin & Blackmar until nominated by 
the Republican party and elected in 1008, 
a justic? of the Supreme Court of the State 
of New York for the Second District for 
the fourteen-year term expiring Dec. 31, 
1022. He is a member of the Association 
of the Bar of the City of New York, and of 
the Union Club of Brooklyn. Residence: 
1072 Bergen Street, Brooklyn. Office: Su 
preme Court. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

BLACKMER, Henry M.: 

Lawyer; born in Worcester, Mass., July 
25, I860; son of Francis T. and Abbie E. 



170 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Blaekmer. Tie was educated in the Worces 
ter (Mass.) High School, studied law and 
was admitted to the bar of Colorado, and 
practised in Colorado Springs in that State 
until 1902, when he removed to New York 
City. He was district attorney of El Paso 
County, Colo., 1894-1897. He is president 
of the Cripple Creek Central Railway Com 
pany; and vice-president of the United 
States Reduction and Refining Company. 
He is a member of the Society of Colonial 
Wars, the Sons of the Revolution, the 
Union League, City Lunch and Whist Clubs 
of New York, Denver Club of Denver and 
the El Paso Club of Colorado Springs, 
Colo. Mr. Blackmer is married and has 
two children, a son and a daughter. 
Residence: New Rochelle, N. Y. Office: 
49 Exchange Place, New York City. 

BLACKMORE, Henry Spencer: 

Industrial chemist and chemical engineer; 
born in Yonkers, N. Y., March 10, 1868; son 
of Isaac and Hannah M. (Dean) Blackmore. 
He was educated in the schools of Mt. Ver- 
non, N. Y.. and in the New York College of 
Pharmacy (Columbia University), being 
graduated Ph.G., 1888. He makes prac 
tical chemical and metallurgical investiga 
tions, demonstrations, tests analysis and 
synthesis; is an expert in patents relating 
to chemistry, metallurgy, electro-chemistry 
and electro-metallurgy, and is a registered 
attorney of the U. S. Patent Office. Mr. 
Blackmore is a member of the International 
Congress of applied chemistry, and the In 
ternational Electrical Congress. He is the 
inventor of processes for reducing alu 
minium and other metals, electric smelting, 
making alkali from feldspar, making caus 
tic soda from common salt, sulphuric acid, 
etc., has taken out over one hundred and 
fifty patents. He is the discoverer, inventor 
and patentee of a process for making sub 
stances which are unstable at elevated tem 
peratures but which evolve heat on their 
formation; and this process has economized 
and revolutionized the manufacture of these 
products, one of which is sulphuric acid. 
He has also discovered what is believed to 
be two new chemical elements of non-metal- 
Mc nature, found associated or combined 



with sulphur, for which the names " Azivr- 
eon " and " Vernon " have been suggested. 
He is consulting chemist of the Consolidated 
Aluminum and Reduction Company, the 
General Industrial Alcohol Company, Phoe 
nix Electrolytic Alkali Company, American 
Automatic Disinfectant Company, Chemical 
Engineering and Construction Company and 
Mexican National Leather Company; and he 
is vice-president of the Black-Ford Utility 
Oil Company. He is a fellow of the Chem 
ical Society of Great Britain; member of 
the American Geographical Society, Nation 
al Geographic Society, American Chemical 
Society, Society of Chemical Industry of 
Great Britain, American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, American Pharma 
ceutical Association, New York State 
Pharmaceutical Association, Scientific Con 
gress, Franklin Institute (Philadelphia), 
Alumni Association of the College of Pharm 
acy of Columbia University, Chemists Club, 
U. S. Navy League, Veteran Association of 
the 71st Regiment, National Guard of New 
York, and he is a 32d-degree Mason, Knight 
Templar and Shriner. Mr. Blackmore mar 
ried in New York City, June 2, 1904, Isa- 
belle Rostosky. Residence: Mt. Vernon, N. 
Y. Offices: 612 F Street, N. W., Washing 
ton, D. C., and 60 Wall Street, New York 
City. 

BLACKWELL, Alice Stone: 

Editor of the Woman s Journal ; born in 
Orange, N. J., Sept. 14, 1857; daughter of 
Henry B. Black well and Lucy Stone. She 
was educated in Boston University, being 
class president of the Class of 1881, and 
was chosen one of the commencement speak 
ers by the faculty. Since graduation she 
has been editorially connected with the 
Woman s Journal, first in association with 
her parents and since her mother s death 
in 1893, as co-editor with her father, also 
a director of the proprietary corporation 
of that journal. Miss Blackwell follows in 
the footsteps of her parents, who were both 
prominent in the movement for the enfran 
chisement of women, and is recording secre 
tary of the National American Woman Suf 
frage Association; chairman of the Execu 
tive Committee of the New England Woman 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



171 



Suffrage Association and of the Massachu 
setts Woman Suffrage Association, and is 
a director of the corporation of the latter 
association ; also a director of the Susan B. 
Anthony Memorial Fund (incorporated), 
vice-president of the College Equal Suffrage 
League of Massachusetts, and a member of 
the Board of Trustees of Boston University. 
She has taken a great interest in the cause 
of the Armenians, and received the Order 
of Melusina from Prince Guy de Lusignan. 
She is author of three books of transla 
tions : Armenian Poems ; Songs of Russia ; 
and Songs of Grief and Gladness, from the 
Hebrew and Yiddish; also joint compiler 
with Rev. Anna H. Shaw and Miss Lucy E. 
Anthony, of the Yellow Ribbon Speaker. 
Miss Blackwell is a member of the Penta 
gon and Epsilo,n college societies and of 
Phi Bet Kappa, and an honorary member 
of the New England Women s Club. Resi 
dence: 45 Boutwell Avenue, Dorchester. 
Mass. Office: 6 Beacon Street, Boston, 
Mass., Room 1018. 

BLACKWELL, Antoinette Louisa Brown: 

Minister, lecturer; born at Henrietta, 
N. Y., May 20, 1825; daughter of Joseph 
and Abby (Morse) Brown. She was edu 
cated in Monroe Academy until 1844, then 
went to Oberlin, where she took a some 
what unusual course of study, was entitled 
to the literary degree in 1847, but did not 
take it, but afterward received the A.M. 
degree. She took the full three years 
course in theology to 1850; and at the 
75th Anniversary of Oberlin College, the 
degree of D.D. was conferred upon her. In 
Jan., 1856, she married, at Henrietta, N. 
Y., Samuel Charles Blackwell, and she has 
four living daughters, three married. She 
was ordained in 1853 (ten years in ad 
vance of any other well-known woman), as 
pastor of the (orthodox) Congregational 
Church of South Butler, N. Y., and in the 
same year was the first woman to perform 
the marriage ceremony. Mrs. Blackwell 
afterward became a Unitarian, and is now 
pastor emeritus of All Souls Church, Eliza 
beth, N. J v preaching monthly, and still 
frequently speaking elsewhere. Her first 



public address in a church was at Roches 
ter, Mich., where she was teaching during 
a long vacation before her first graduation 
in 1847. She was one of the earliest advo 
cates of the equal rights of women, and she 
is also the last survivor among the speak 
ers at the first National Woman s Rights 
Convention, held in Worcester, Mass., in 
1850. She has, in her busy public career, 
been active in the American Purity Alli 
ance and other progressive movements, as 
suffrage and temperance and peace socie 
ties, and the Association for the Advance 
ment of Women, of which Mrs. Julia 
Ward Howe was president, and is a mem 
ber and honorary member of numerous so 
cieties and clubs. Has been a member of 
the Association for the Advancement of 
Science. She is author of: Shadows of 
Our Social System, 1855; Studies in Gen 
eral Science, 1869; The Market Woman, 
1871; The Island Neighbors, 1871; The 
Sexes Throughout Nature, 1875; The Phys 
ical Basis of Immortality, 1876; The Phi 
losophy of Individuality, or the One and 
the Many, 1883; Sea Drift, a Parable in 
Verse, 1903. Her summer home is at Chil- 
mark, Mass. Address: 348 Bay Way, 
Elizabeth, N. J. 

BLACKWELL, Francis Ogden: 

Consulting engineer; born in New York 
City, June 23, 1867; son of James and 
Augusta (Mills) Blackwell. He was grad 
uated from Princeton University with the 
degree of C.E. in 1887, and immediately 
thereafter began practice as an engineer, 
and he is now a member of the firm of 
Viele, Blackwell & Buck, consulting engi 
neers. He has been identified as electric 
and hydraulic engineer in the construction 
and equipment of many large power plants. 
Mr. Blackwell is a member of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers, British Insti 
tution of Civil Engineers, American Insti 
tute of Electrical Engineers, American 
Institute of Mining Engineers, and the 
University, Princeton and Engineers Clubs. 
He married Anita Searles of New York 
City. Residence*: Englewood, N. J. Of 
fice: 49 Wall Street, New York City. 



172 

BLAIR, Charles H.: 

Lawyer; born in Zanesville, Ohio, July 
5, 1851 ; son of John A. Blair, a Virginian 
by birth and a distinguished lawyer of 
Ohio, and of Theresa (Van Voorhees) 
Blair. He was educated in the public 
schools of Zanesville, at Kenyon College, 
and Cornell University, from which he 
graduated with honor (commencement ora 
tion), as A.B. in 1872, and A.M. in 1876. 
He was admitted to the Ohio bar in 1873. 
He was in the railroad business at Ithaca 
from 1873 to 1875 as director, secretary 
and assistant to president of the Geneva 
and Ithaca and Ithaca and Athens Rail 
roads, now the Lehigh Valley. He was 
admitted to the New York bar in 1876, and 
practised at Ithaca until 1882; since 1882 
in New York City. He has been president 
of the Hanover Land and Dock Company 
since 1905. He was captain in the New 
York National Guard in 1875 and 1876, 
assistant adjutant general of the Twenty- 
eighth Brigade in 1877 ; colonel and engi 
neer of the Seventh Division of the New 
York National Guard from 1878 to 1885. 
He was the Republican candidate for Con 
gress from the Twelfth District of New 
York in 1890. Colonel Blair is a member 
of the Masonic fraternity of high rank; 
the Psi Upsilon fraternity; the Metropoli 
tan Museum of Art; and Municipal Art 
Society, and one of the founders of the Ohio 
Society of New York. He is vice-president 
of the Staten Island Chamber of Commerce, 
and chairman of the Park Committee. He 
is the author of the " National Railway 
Act," a proposed amendment of the Inter 
state Commerce Law, N. Y., 1888, and 
of a " Report on the Proposed Park System 
for the Borough of Richmond," New York 
City, 1902. He has been attorney and coun 
sel in a number of noted cases; in the case 
of Drawbaugh against Bell, which involved 
the telephone patents; counsel for Brown, 
Howard & Company, builders of the New 
York Aqueduct; the Cornell accounting 
case, and others of great importance; and 
is trustee for several large estates. He is 
an ardent Republican artd has taken an 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



. ..._-- - - -- 

active part in Union League Club affairs, 
serving on several committees, and in 1906 
as chairman of the Committee on Admis 
sions. He is a member of the Union 
League, Republican and Cornell University 
Clubs. He married at Ithaca, N> Y., Dec. 
11, 1873, Emma P. Cornell, and they have 
three children: Ezra C. Blair, Charles H. 
Blair, Jr., and John Hamilton Blair. Resi 
dences: Serpentine Road, Grymes Hill, 
S. 1., N. Y., and Llenroc, Ithaca, N. Y. 
Address: Mills Building, 15 Broid Street, 
New York City. 

BLAIR, Clinton Ledyard: 

Banker; born in Belvidere, N. J., July 
16, 1867; son of DeWitt Clinton and Mary 
Anna (Kimball) Blair. He was graduated 
from Princeton University nvith the degree 
of A.B. in 1890; and after leaving college 
became one of the organizers of the house 
of Blair & Company, bankers, of New York 
City. He is a director of various large cor 
porations, including the Belvidere National 
Bank, the Green Bay and Western Rail 
road \ Kewaunee, Green Bay and Western 
Railroad; Lackawanna Steel Company; 
National Bank of Commerce; St. Louis 
and Hannibal Railway; Securities Com 
pany; Sussex Railroad; is president of the 
Sussex Realty Company. He is a member 
of the Board of Managers of the Post- 
Graduate Hospital, one of the managers of 
the New York Zoological Society and the 
Cooper Union Museum; is a member of the 
American Geographical Society; the Sons of 
the Revolution. Mr. Blair has membership 
in several of the most important clubs, in 
cluding the Metropolitan, Union and Uni 
versity Clubs, the New York Yacht Club, 
(of which he is vice-commodore), City Mid 
day Club> Riding Club, Jekyl Island Club, 
Morris County Golf Club, Racquet and Ten 
nis Club, Princeton Club, Somerset Hills 
Country Club, The Pilgrims Club, Coaching 
Club of New York, the New York Farmers 
and the Whippany River Club. Mr. Blair 
married, Oct. 1, 1891, Florence Osborn Jen 
nings, and by that union there are four 
daughters: Marjory Bruce, Florence Led- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



173 



yard, Edith Dodd and Marie Louise. Res 
idence: Peapack, Somerset County, N. J. 
Address: 24 Broad Street, New York City. 

BLAIR, Frank Preston: 

Lawyer; born in St. Louis, Mo., in 1856; 
son of Major General Frank Preston Blair, 
a distinguished officer of the U. S. Army 
-(United States Senator from Missouri, and 
Democratic nominee for the Vice-Presidency 
with Seymour) and Apolline (Alexander) 
Blair. He entered the Military Academy 
at West Point and was graduated from 
that institution in 1877. He served in the 
army at various posts for several years, 
graduating in law from Columbia Law 
School while stationed at Fort Hamilton 
and in medicine at the University of Mis 
souri, while stationed at Columbia, Mo. In 
1881 he resigned from the army and was 
admitted to the St. Louis bar, but shortly 
afterward, in 1891, removed to Chicago, 
111., where he has been engaged in active 
practice to the present time. He has been 
a lecturer on medical jurisprudence in 
Rush Medical College for some time. He 
is a member of the American Bar Associa 
tion, the Selden Society of England, and 
of the University Club. He married in 
Columbia, Mo., in 1882, Florence Price 
and has one daughter. Address: 36 Cedar 
Street, Chicago. 

BLAIR, Henry Augustus: 

Banker, financier; born in Michigan City, 
Ind., July 1852; son of Chauncey Buckley 
and Caroline O. (De Graff) Blair; he re 
ceived his education at Williston Seminary. 
East Hampton, Mass. He left school in 
1871 and entered the Merchants National 
Bank of Chicago, of which his father was 
founder and president, eventually becoming 
vice-president. He retired from the bank 
upon its consolidation with the Corn Ex 
change National Bank in 1903. He subse 
quently became a director and receiver of 
the North Chicago Street Railway Com 
pany; he is also in the directorates of the 
Calumet and Chicago Canal and Dock Com 
pany, the Elgin National Watch Company, 
the West Division Railway Company, and 



ihe Chicago Edison Company. He is a 
member of the Chicago Union League (di 
rector), Washington Park, Chicago Athletic, 
Midlothian, Chicago .Golf, Caxton, Saddle 
and Cycle, and the Onwentsia Clubs. He 
married in Chicago, Feb. 19, 1878, Grace 
E. Pearce, and has two daughters. He has 
a summer residence at Jefferson, N. H. Ad 
dress: 2735 Prairie Avenue, Chicago. 

BLAIR, Henry William: 

Former United States Senator; born in 
Campton, N. H., Dec. 6, 1834. He received 
an academic education and the degree of 
A.M. from Dartmouth College. He was ad 
mitted to the New Hampshire bar in 1859 
and on the breaking out of the Civil War 
went to the front with the 15th New Hamp 
shire Volunteers, being promoted from cap 
tain to lieutenant-colonel. Immediately af 
ter the war he was a member of the New 
Hampshire legislature for three years, and 
in 1875 was elected to Congress, serving, 
with but two years interim, as representa 
tive and senator until 1895. He was au 
thor of the bill to extend Federal aid to 
education in the States, which, however, 
passed the Senate but failed in the House, 
and the bill establishing a United States 
Labor Department. He was also active in 
the formulation of bills under which pen 
sions are now paid to soldiers of the Civil 
War. Ex-Senator Blair is a prominent tem 
perance advocate, and a leader in economic 
defense. Since leaving Congress he has 
practised law, chiefly in Washington, D. C. 
He is the author of several works on the tem 
perance question and a frequent contribu 
tor to the press. He married, Dec. 20, 1859, 
Eliza Nelson. Residence: Manchester, N. 
H. Office : Colorado Building, Washington, 
D. C. 

BLAKE, Francis: 

Inventor of the Blake Transmitter; born 
at Needham, Mass., Dec. 25, 1850; son of 
Francis and Caroline (Trumbull) Blake. 
He was educated in public schools and the 
Brookline, Mass., high school, and received 
the honorary degree of A.M. from Harvard 
in 1902. He served on the United States 



174 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Coast Survey for thirteen years, having been 
engaged in the work of determining the 
differences in longitude between the observa 
tories at Greenwich, Paris, Cambridge and 
Washington. He devoted his leisure to ex 
perimental physics, and in 1878 invented 
the Blake Telephone Transmitter. He has 
since patented many other electrical de 
vices. He is a director of the American 
Telephone and Telegraph Company; a fel 
low of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, and the American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences : a member of 
the American Institute of Electrical Engi 
neers, Archeological Institute of America, 
American Folk-lore Society, American For 
estry Association; National Geographic So 
ciety, and a member of the corporation of 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
He is a member of the Boston Society of 
Civil Engineers, and the American Anti 
quarian Society, and a trustee of the Mas 
sachusetts General Hospital, the Boston 
Museum of Fine Arts, etc. He married, 
June 24, 1873, Elizabeth L., daughter of 
Charles T. Hubbard, of Weston. Address: 
Keewaydin, Weston (Auburndale P. 0.), 
Mass. 

BLAKE, James Henry: 

Lecturer, zoological artist; born in Bos 
ton, Mass., July 8, 1845; son of James 
Henry and Louisa Maria (Russell) Blake. 
He was educated in the Lawrence Scientific 
School of Harvard University. He entered 
business in early life with his stepfather, 
the Hon. N. E. Atwood, and continued till 
1869 when he studied for four years in 
the Scientific school of Harvard University, 
after which he became assistant to Pro 
fessor Louis Agassiz and curator in the 
department of conchology, at the Museum 
of Comparative Zoology at Cambridge. Mr. 
Blake was with Professor Louis Agassiz on 
his last expedition in the steamer Hassler; 
later he became connected with the United 
States Fish commission, the United States 
Geological Survey and Geological Survey of 
the State of Mississippi. He has lectured 
in various cities and towns in the United 
States and illustrated many books on. nat 



ural history. He is a member of the Mas 
sachusetts Society of the Cincinnati. His 
work has taken Mr. Blake to many parts of 
the world on collecting trips, and on dredg 
ing expeditions in the Atlantic and Pacific 
Oceans. He married at Provincetowri, 
Mass., July 20, 1871, Lucinda Smith Critch- 
ett, arid has two sons: Allen Hanson Blaice, 
M.D. and Mr. Ralph Julian Blake, mer 
chant. Address: 18 Prentiss St., Cam 
bridge, Mass. 

BLAKE, Joseph Augustus: 

Physician; born in San Francisco, Calif., 
Aug. 31, 1864; son of William P. and Char 
lotte (Hayes) Blake. He was graduated 
from Yale as B.A. in 1885, and Ph.B. in 
1886, and from the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons of Columbia University as 
M.D. in 1889. He was formerly attending 
surgeon to St. Luke s and Harlem Hos 
pitals, now of the Roosevelt Hospital. He 
was assistant demonstrator of anatomy, 
1891-1900, instructor in surgery, 1900-1903 
and since 1903 professor of surgery in the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Co 
lumbia University He is a member of the 
American Medical Association, Association 
of American Anatomists, American Surgi 
cal Association, American Society of Clini 
cal Surgery, New York Academy of Medi 
cine; fellow of the New York Academy of 
Sciences: member of the New York County 
and State Medical Societies, and the New 
York Surgical Society, and of the Yale. 
Metropolitan, University and Riding Clubs 
of New York City. He married in 1890, 
Catherine Ketchum, and they have two 
sons: Joseph A., Jr., and Francis H., 2d. 
Address: 601 Madison Avenue, New York 
City. 

BLAKE, Katherine D. Umsted: 

Educator, writer ; born in New York City, 
July 10, 1858; daughter of Frank Geoffrey 
Quay Umsted and his wife, Lillie Devereux 
(afterwards Mrs. Lillie Devereux Blake). 
She was educated in Miss W T alker s School, 
and St. Mary s School, and graduated from 
the Normal College, 1876, and studied at the 
School of Pedagogy, New York University, 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



175 



1887-1888. Miss Blake became principal of 
Public School No. 6,, in 1894, and organized 
the First Evening High School, for Women 
in New York City, 1897. She was chairman 
of the Committee of Teachers and Princi 
pals that framed and presented to Mayor 
Grace the monster petition asking for the 
appointment of women on the Board of 
Education, which resulted in the appoint 
ment of Miss Dodge and Mrs. Agnew as 
Commissioners of Education ; called together 
the committee of women teachers and prin 
cipals who made the first effort to secure 
adequate salaries for city teachers; spoke 
in reply to President Roosevelt when he 
addressed the National Educational Asso 
ciation; compiled the first statistics show 
ing the number of dark and badly lighted 
rooms in public schools, and called the at 
tention of superintendents and the Board of 
Education to them. Miss Blake is a con 
tributor to periodicals in verse and prose. 
She is vice-president of the Association of 
Women Principals of New York City; mem 
ber of the Special New York City Committee 
of the National Educational Association; 
charter member of the Society for Political 
Study and member of the Executive Com 
mittee of the Normal CoLege Alumnse. Ad 
dress: The Roslyn, 104 West 84th Street, 
New York City. 

BLAKE, Lillie Devereux: 

Author; born in Raleigh, N. C., Aug. 12, 
1833 ; daughter of George Pollock and Sarah 
Elizabeth (Johnson) Devereux. Her father 
died when she was three years old, and af 
ter that her home was in New Haven, 
Conn., where she was educated at Miss 
Apthrop s School and later took a course of 
study under tutors of Yale College. She 
married first, at New Haven, Conn., 1855, 
Frank G. Q. Umstead, a lawyer of Phila 
delphia, who died in 1859, and has two 
daughters by that marriage; and in 1866 
she married at Stratford, Conn., Grenfill 
Blake, who died in 1896. Since her mar 
riage to Mr. Blake, she has been a resident 
of New York City. She became deeply in 
terested in the movement for the enfran 
chisement of women in 1869, and lias ever 
since been a leader in that movement. Mrs. 



Blake was the founder in 1886 and has ever 
since been president of the New York Leg 
islative League, she is honorary president 
of the New York City Mothers Club, and 
honorary president of the Society for Po 
litical Study. She has conducted many leg 
islative campaigns and secured the enact 
ment of many statutes of benefit to her sex, 
was influential in the passage of the school 
suffrage act, the police matron act, the act 
giving seats to saleswomen and other laws 
for the benefit of women. She has ad 
dressed the Legislatures of New York, Con 
necticut and North Carolina, and is a lectur 
er of power and distinction, and is author of : 
Southwold, 1859; Rockford, 1863; Fettered 
for Life, 1874; Woman s Place To-day, 
1883; A Daring Experiment, 1894, and 
numerous stories and articles. Address: 
The Roslyn, 104 West 84th Street, New 
York City. 

BLAKE, William Phipps: 

Geologist, mineralogist; born in New 
York City, June 1, 1826; son of Elihu and 
Adeline N. (Mix) Blake. He was educated 
in the schools in New York and at Yale 
(Sheffield Scientific School) graduating as 
Ph.B. in 1852. He has received the honor 
ary degrees of M.A. from Dartmouth and 
Sc.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, 
and LL.D. from the University of Arizona. 
He was geologist and mineralogist for the 
United States Pacific Railway exploration 
and surveys, 1853; editor of the Mining 
Magazine and Journal of Geology, 1856- 
1860; was engaged in the exploration of 
the Comstock Lodge of Nevada in 1860; 
was mining engineer to the Japanese Gov 
ernment in 1862; made explorations in 
China and Alaska in 1863, and was pro 
fessor of geology and mining at the College 
of California in 1864. He organized the 
School of Agriculture and the College of 
Mechanic Arts for the College of California 
and was professor of geology and mining, 
1895-1904, and since 1905 has been pro 
fessor of geology emeritus of the Univer 
sity of Arizona. He has been connected of 
ficially with the great international expo 
sitions from 1853-1904. Received the deco- 



170 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



ration of chevalier of the Legion of Honor 
in 1878. He is author of numerous papers 
and articles on scientific and professional 
topics. Mr. Blake is a member of the 
American Philosophical Society; Territor 
ial Geologist Arizona; fellow of the Geolog 
ical Society of London, and of America; a 
corresponding member of the Geological So 
ciety of Edinburg; fellow of the American 
Association for the Advancement of Science, 
and a member of the American Institute of 
Mining Engineers. lie married at South 
Berwick, Me., Dec. 25, 1855, Charlotte 
Haven Lord Haves, and they have three 
sons living: Francis IL, Joseph A., and 
Theodore Whitney. Address: Mill Rock, 
New Haven., Conn., and (winter) Tucson, 
Ariz. 

BLANCHARD, Amy Ella: 

Author; born in Baltimore, Md., June 
28, 185G; daughter of Daniel Harris and 
Sarah L. (Reynolds) Blanchard. On her 
father s side she is of old Huguenot stock, 
represented in this country since 18o9, and 
her maternal descent is from ane of the 
early settlers of Lord Baltimore s colony. 
She was educated in Baltimore, principally 
at home, but also at private schools, and a 
year in high school. She studied also in 
Art schools in New York and Philadelphia, 
and took the first prize in the life class of 
the Metropolitan Museum Art School in 
1885. She taught drawing and painting 
at a seminary at Plainfield, N. J., for two 
years, and afterward moved to Philadelphia, 
where she engaged in literary work. She 
has for years been ranked with the most 
popular writers of books for girls of which 
she has written a large number, including: 
A Journey of Joy ; The Four Corners ; The 
Four Corners in California; Four Corners 
at School; Janet s College Career; Two 
Maryland Girls; Thy Friend Dorothy; 
Taking a Stand; Little Grandmother Jo; 
Little Sister Anne; A Little Tomboy; Lit 
tle Miss Oddity; A Dear Little Girl; A Sweet 
Little Maid; Dimple Dallas; Mistress May; 
Mabel s Mishap; Kittyboy s Christmas; and 
\Yoi-th His While (all ^George W. Jacobs 
& Co., Philadelphia); also A Girl of 70; 



A Revolutionary Maid; A Daughter of 
Freedom; A Heroine of 1812; A Loyal 
Lass; A Gentle Pioneer; Bonny Lesley of 
the Border, and A Frontier Knight (all 
published by W. A. Wilde Company, Bos 
ton) ; and Two Girls; Girls Together; Bet 
ty of Wye; Three Pretty Maids; An Inde 
pendent Daughter; Miss Vanity; Because 
of Conscience; Her Very Best (all publish 
ed by J. B. Lippincott Co., Philadelphia). 
Miss Blanchard s summer residence is on 
Bailey s Island, Me. Address: 4102 Pine 
St., Philadelphia. 

BLANCHARD, Charles A.: 

President of Wheaton College; born in 
Galesburg, 111., Nov. 8, 1848; son of Jona 
than Blanchard, Jr., and Mary Avery 
(Bent) Blanchard. He was educated at 
Wheaton College, from which he was grad 
uated and received the degree of A.B. and 
A.M. He was a student of Chicago Theo 
logical Seminary, but did not graduate; he 
has received the degree of D.D. from Mon- 
mouth College, 111. Dr. Blanchard has been 
a teacher since he was fifteen years of age. 
In the fall of 1872 he went to Wheaton 
Academy as principal ; taught two years in 
the Academy as principal and eight years 
in the College and was in 1882 elected pres 
ident of Wheaton College, which office he 
has filled ever since. He is an ordained 
minister of the Congregational Church. 
President Blanchard is also president of the 
National Christian Association, was presi 
dent for twenty years of the Sabbath Asso 
ciation of Illinois, is president of the Col 
lege Section of the Illinois State Teachers 
Association, is a member of the National 
Geographical Society; of the American 
Peace Society and of the National Educa 
tional Association. Dr. Blanchard has done 
considerable work in the lecture field, hav 
ing addressed many audiences on the sub 
jects of Secret Societies, Intemperance, Sab 
bath Observance, The Bible, the Word of 
God; Arctic Explorations, etc. He married 
in 1873. Ella Milligan, who died in 1884; 
in 188(5, he married Jeannie Carothers, who 
died in February, 1894; and he again 
married at St. Louis, Mo., Feb. 11), 189(5, 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



177 



Dr. Frances C. Cai others; and he has seven 
children. Address: Wheaton College. 
Wheaton, 111. 

BLANCHARD, James Armstrong: 

Jurist; horn at Henderson, Jefferson 
County, N. Y., Aug. 16, 1845; son of Philip 
and Catharine (Drummond) Blanchard. 
He was graduated from Ripon College, at 
Ripon, Wis., A.B., 1871, and from the Law 
School of Columbia University, LL.B., 
1873; and he rec?ived the LL.D. decree in 
1902, from Ripon College. He engaged in 
the practice of law in Xew York City until 
appointed by Governor Roosevelt as judge 
of General Sessions,, serving one year. In 
September. 1900, he was appointed a jus 
tice of the Supremo Court of the State of 
New York, by Governor Roosevelt, and 
elected, November, 1901, to the same offic? 
for the term expiring Dec. 31, 1915. Jus 
tice Blanchard is a veteran of the Civil 
War, having enlisted in 1804, and served 
one year in Company I, of the Second Wis 
consin Cavalry. He is a member of the As 
sociation of the Bar of the City of New 
York, Lafayette Post, Grand Army of the 
Republic, the Union League Club and Re 
publican Club of New York City, and a 
trustee of St. John s Guild. Justice Blanch 
ard married in 1881, Sallie Medbery, and 
they have one son. Residence: 11 East 
92d Street. Address : County Court House, 
New York City. 

BLANCHARD, Newton Grain: 

Ex-Governor of Louisiana.. 1904-1908 
born in Rr.pides Parish, La., Jan. 29, 1849; 
son of Carey H. and Frances Amelia 
(Grain) Blanchard. He was educated in 
Louisiana State University and in the Tulane 
University of Louisiana, Law Department, 
from which he was graduated in LL.B. in 
1870. After graduation he practised law 
at Shreveport, La. Governor Blanchard was 
a member of the Louisiana State Constitu 
tional Convention of 1879; was a represent 
ative in Congress from the Fourth District 
of Louisiana for seven consecutive terms 
from 1880-1893; was United States Senator 
from Louisiana from 1893-1897; and a jus- 
12 



tice of the Supreme Court of Louisiana from 
1897-1904, resigning from the bench when 
elected Governor of Louisiana in 1904, serv 
ing until 1908. He is a Democrat in poli 
tics and an Episcopalian in religion. Gov 
ernor Blanchard married at Shreveport, La., 
Dec. 10, 1873, Mary Emily Barret; and 
they have two children. Address: Shreve 
port, La. 

BLASHFIELD, Edwin Howland: 

Decorative artist; born in New York, 
Dec. 15, 1848. He studied in Paris under 
Leon Bonnfit, and had the benefit of the 
advice of Gerome and Chapu. He was an 
exhibitor at the Paris Salon for nearly ten 
consecutive seasons and for several years 
at the Royal Academy in London. His 
work since returning to America in 1881 
has been frequently exhibited and widely 
recognized and has achieved marked pub 
licity. Among his paintings are: Christ 
inas Bells and The Angel with the Flaming 
Sword. Mr. Blashfield s highest distinction 
lias been obtained in the field of decorative 
art. He decorated one of the domes of the 
Manufacturers Building, World s Colum 
bian Exposition, Chicago; central dome of 
the Congressional Library, Washington ; 
Bank of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh; Senate 
Chamber, State Capitol of Minnesota (St. 
Paul) ; Iowa State Capitol, Des Moines; 
ceiling of great ball room in Waldorf-As 
toria Hotel., and Gothic supper room, house 
of W. K. Vanderbilt, New York City; li 
brary, house of W. C. Drexel, Philadel 
phia; drawing room, in house of C. P. Hunt- 
ington, and house of Adolph Lewisohn, New 
York City; courthouse of City of Balti 
more; Appellate Court New York City; 
ceiling and three lunetts in the Board Room 
of the Prudential Life Insurance Company, 
Newark, N. J. ; court room in the Court 
House at Baltimore, Md., chancel of Church 
of the Saviour, Philadelphia, and many oth 
ers. He collaborated with Mrs. Blashfield 
and A. A. Hopkins on Vasare s Lives of 
the Painters, and is co-author with his wife 
of the book on Italian Cities. Since 1888 
he has been an academician of the National 
Academy of Design; and he is an honorary 



178 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



member of the American Institute of Archi 
tects, and a member of the Society of Amer 
ican Artists, the Architectural League, So 
ciety of Mural Painters and Society of 
Painters in Water Colors. He has lectured 
on art at the leading institutions of the 
United States. Mr. Blashfield married in 
Paris, France, in 1881, Evangeline Wilbour 
of Rhode Island. Residence: 49 West 59th 
Street. Studio: Carnegie Building, New 
York City. 

BLATCH, Harriot Stanton: 

Writer and lecturer; born at Seneca 
Falls, N. Y., Jan. 20, 1856; daughter of 
Henry Brewster and Elizabeth (Cady) 
Stanton. She was educated at Vassar Col 
lege, from which she received the degree 
of B.A. in 1878 (with honors in mathe 
matics), and elected to the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society, and received the degree of M.A. 
(on thesis) in 1893; and she also pursued 
graduate studies in Boston in 1879, in Ber 
lin in 1880, and the University of Paris 
in 1882. She was married in 1882, in Lon 
don, England, to William Henry Blatch, 
and she has a daughter, Nora Stanton 
Blatch, who was born in 1883, was gradu 
ated from Cornell as Civil Engineer in 1905, 
and is a member of the American Society 
of Civil Engineers. After her marriage, 
Mrs. Blatch lived for twenty years in Eng 
land, where she was active in the Women s 
Industrial Union, the suffrage organiza 
tions, the Liberal Association, and on the 
executive of the Fabian Society. She was 
a trustee of evening schools, and was asso 
ciated with Charles Booth, the statistician 
in collecting facts on village life which 
formed the basis for her thesis for the de 
gree of M.A. Mrs. Blatch is president of 
the League of Self-Supporting Women, 
founded in 1907; member of the executive 
board of the Women s Trade Union League; 
and she is a member of the Society for 
Ethical Culture. She is a member of the 
Pioneer Club of London, and of the 
Women s University Club of New York. 
She has written extensively in mpgazines 
on economic and educational questions. Ad 
dress: 103 East 19th Street, New York City. 



BLENK, Hubert: 

Catholic archbishop of New Orleans; 
born in Neustadt, Bavaria, Aug. 6, 1856; 
son of James and Catherine (Wiedemann) 
Blenk. He was educated in St. James Col 
lege, Baltimore at Jefferson College, Con 
vent, La.; entered the Society of Mary in 
1874, and took the theological course at 
the Marist Houses of Studies in France and 
Ireland, and a course at the Catholic Uni 
versity, Dublin, Ireland. He was ordained 
priest in 1885, and became the same year a 
professor in Jefferson College, Convent, La., 
serving in that capacity until 1890, and 
after that for six years president of the 
college. He was rector of the Church of the 
Holy Name of Mary, at Algiers, La., in 
1897-1898; auditor of the Apostolic Dele 
gation to Cuba and Porto Rico, 1898, and 
was consecrated bishop of Porto Rico, July 
2, 1899 and became archbishop of New Or 
leans July 2, 1906. Address: 1205 Es 
planade Avenue,, New Orleans, La. 

BLETHEN, Alden J.: 

Editor; born at Knox, Waldo County, 
Me., Dec. 7, 1846; son of Alden and Abbie 
L. Blenthen, of an old American family 
whose first New England ancestor settled 
at Ipswich, Mass., in 1680. He was gradu 
ated from Wesleyan Seminary and College, 
1868, and from Bowdoin College, M.A., 
1872, and was lessee and principal of the 
Abbott Family School at Farmington, Me., 
1869-1873, during which period he also 
finished the study of law began in 1868, 
being admitted to the Maine bar in 1873. 
He practised law at Portland, Me. until 
1880, when,, on account of ill-health he re 
moved to Kansas City, Mo., where he en 
tered journalism and for four years was 
manager of the Kansas City Times. From 
there he removed to Minneapolis, where he 
purchased an interest in two papers, The 
Tribune and The Journal, serving as edi 
tor and manager of The Tribune and mana 
ger of The Journal until 1888, when he 
sold his interest in both for two hundred 
and fifty thousand dollars cash. The fol 
lowing year he repurchased the Minneapolis 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



170 



Tribune, but fire destroyed the building and 
contents in November, 1889, and he thus 
suffered a loss of one hundred thousand dol 
lars. He set to work to rebuild in 1890, 
and erected the New Tribune Building in 
Minneapolis at a cost of $100,000 but the 
panic of 1893 followed so closely after his 
large losses and expenses, that he lost all 
he had saved. While in Minnesota he serv 
ed as colonel on the staffs of Governor Nel 
son and Clough. In 1896, desiring to be 
gin again in the newspaper field he went 
to Seattle,, where he purchased the plant of 
a bankrupt newspaper, with a circulation 
of thirty-five hundred. He increased this 
56 per cent in the first year, and it has 
since constantly grown until The Times now 
has a circulation of 69,000 each evening and 
81,000 Sunday morning, occupies its own 
building and has the largest plant in the 
Northwest. Colonel Blethen is editor-in- 
chief of The Times, and president of the 
Times Printing Company. His oldest son, 
Joseph, is business manager and his young 
est son, C. B., managing editor. He mar 
ried at Farmington, Me., March 2, 1869, 
Rose, daughter of Captain David F. Hunter, 
and they have two sons and two daughters. 
Address: Seattle, Wash. 

BLISS, Cornelius Newton: 

Dry goods commission merchant; born 
at Fall River, Mass., Jan. 26, 1833; son of 
Asabel Newton and Irene Borden (Luther) 
Bliss. He was educated at the Academy of 
Fall River, Mass., and the high school of 
New Orleans, La. He commenced business 
life in New Orleans; later removed to Bos 
ton, and thence to New York in 1866. He is 
a member of the firm of Bliss, Fabylan & 
Company, dry goods commission merchants 
of Boston, New York City and Chicago; is 
a director of the Fourth National Bank of 
New York, the Home Insurance Company; 
a trustee of the Central Trust Company; 
also a director in various manufacturing 
companies in Massachusetts. He was sec 
retary of the Interior in President McKin- 
ley s first administration, from March 4. 
1897 to Feb. 20, 1899, and was treasurer of 
the Republican National Committee in 1892, 



1900 and 1904. He is a Congregationalist, 
and president of the trustees of Broadway 
Tabernacle, New York City; and is gover 
nor of the Society of New York Hospital. 
Mr. Bliss is president of the Union League 
Club of New York City, and a member of 
the Metropolitan, Century and Republican 
Clubs of Washington, and the Jekyl Island 
Club of Georgia. He married in Boston, 
Mass., March 30, 1859, Elizabeth Mary 
Plummer; and they have two children. 
Residence: 198 Madison Avenue. Ad 
dress: 117 Duane Street, New York City. 

BLISS, Walter Phelps: 

Capitalist ; born in New York City, 
March 10, 1870; son of George Bliss and 
Augusta H. (Smith) Bliss. He was gradu 
ated from Yale as A.B. in 1892, and after 
ward attended the New York Law School. 
He is a director of the Chicago, Milwaukee 
and St. Paul Railway Co., Cleveland, Cin 
cinnati, Chicago and St. Louis Railway 
Co., Manhattan Trust Co., Continental In 
surance Co., Quincy Mining Co. (vice-presi 
dent), Gauley Mountain Coal Co., Loup 
Creek Colliery Co., Candelaria Mining Co., 
Corralitos Co., Herzog Telephone Systems 
Co., and Commercial Union Assurance Co., 
Limited, of London. He is a trustee of the 
Union Trust Co., Consolidated Gas Co., and 
Caledonian Insurance Co. of Scotland. 
Mr. Bliss is a member of the Union, Rid 
ing and Racquet and Tennis Clubs, New 
York City. He married in Detroit, Mich., 
April 29, 1897, Katharine Baldwin. Ad 
dress: No. 71 Broadway, New York City. 

BLISS, William Henry: 

Lawyer; born at Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, 
Oct. 27, 1844; son of Philemon Bliss and 
Martha W. Bliss. He was educated in the 
public schools. He was admitted to the 
bar in 1871, assistant United States attor 
ney, 1872-1876, and United States attorney, 
1876-1887, at St. Louis, Mo. He was after 
ward vice-president and general solicitor of 
the St. Paul and Duluth Railroad Com 
pany, and associate counsel of the North 
ern Pacific Railroad Company, at St. Paul, 
Minn., and Has been practising at New 



180 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



York City from 1893. He is a member of 
the Association Bar of the City of New 
York; the Metropolitan Museum of Art; 
the Municipal Art Society; the American 
Geographical Society; Society of Biblio 
philes; the Ohio Society, and the Union 
League, Metropolitan, Grolier, Players , 
Down Town, of New York City; the Metro 
politan and Chevy-Chase Clubs of Washing 
ton; the St. Botolph Club of Boston. Mr. 
Bliss married first at St. Louis, April 6, 
1874, Annie Louise Woods, and second at 
New York City, April 14, 1894, Mrs. Anna 
Blaksley Barnes, secretary of the Ameri 
can Legation at Brussels; and has a son 
and a daughter. Address: East 65th 
Street, New York City. 

BLOSSOM, Henry: 

Author and playwright; born in St. 
Louis, Mo., May 10, 1866; son of Henry 
Martyn and Susan (Brigham) Blossom. 
He was educated in Washington Univer 
sity, St. Louis. Mr. Blossom is author of 
the Books: The Documents in Evidence; 
and Checkers,, a Hard-Luck Story. He has 
been especially successful as a dramatic au 
thor, his list of plays including: Check 
ers (dramatized by him from his book of 
the same title) ; The Yankee Consul; M lle 
Modiste; The Red Mill; The Prima Donna; 
Miss Philura. Mr. Blossom is a member of 
The Lambs, The Players and the Larch- 
mont Yacht Club of New York City, and 
the St. Louis Club of St. Louis. Address: 
The Lambs, 128 W. 44th Street, New York 
City. 

BLUE, Victor: 

Commander, U. S. Navy; born in Rich 
mond County, N. C., Dec. 6, 1805; son of 
John G. and Annie M. (Evans) Blue. He 
was appointed from South Carolina, Naval 
Cadet, May 17, 1883; commissioned assist 
ant engineer, July 1, 1889; ensign, Dec. 12, 
1892; lieutenant (junior grade), Dec. 5, 
1897; lieutenant, March 3, 1899; Peiisa- 
cola, 1889; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1892; 
Bennington, 1893; Naval Academy, 1896; 
Kentucky, 1898; inspection duty, Bureau 
of Equipment, 1901 to 1903; inspection 



duty, Bureau of Ordnance, since 1905. 
During the war with Spain he performed 
distinguished service in connection with 
the intelligence work of the Navy, his 
service including difficult and dangerous 
missions in the collection of information on 
Spanish soil. He was promoted and ad 
vanced in his grade for distinguished gal 
lantry in this war. Address: Care Navy 
Department, Washington, D. C. 

BLUNT, Stanhope English: 

Colonel, U. S. A. ; born in Boston, Mass., 
Sept. 29, 1850; son of Charles E. and 
Penelope B. (English) Blunt. He was 
graduated from the high school at Oswego, 
N. Y., in 1868, and from the United States 
Military Academy, in 1872. After gradua 
tion he served as second and first lieuten 
ant in the Thirteenth Infantry, and on 
explorations and surveys west of the One 
Hundredth meridian in Utah, Wyoming, 
Colorado, and New Mexico. He was trans 
ferred to the Ordnance Department, Nov. 
1, IS 74., and promoted through various 
grades to colonel in the Ordnance Depart 
ment, June 25, 1906. He served at Frank- 
ford Arsenal, Springfield Armory, Water- 
vliet Arsenal; from March, 1897, to Aug., 
1907, was in command of the Rock Island 
Arsenal at Rock Island, 111., and since 
Aug., 1907, has been in command of the 
Springfield Armory, Springfield, Mass. He 
was at the Military Academy from 1876 
to 1880 as instructor in mathematics and 
also ordnance and the science of gunnery. 
He was chief ordnance officer of the Depart 
ment of Dakota, 1880-1884, and at the 
headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. 
C., 1884-1889, as inspector of small arms 
practice and as colonel and aide-de-camp 
on the staff of General P. H. Sheridan. 
He is author of: Rifle and Carbine Firing, 
adopted 1885, for the use of the Army and 
National Guard, and of Small Arms Firing 
Regulations, 1889; and is also author of 
various articles in encyclopedias, and other 
papers upon small arms and their use. 
Colonel Blunt is a member of the Univer 
sity Club of New York City, the Metropoli 
tan, and Army and Navy Clubs of \Vash- 



MEN OF AMERICA 



181 



ington, D. C. ; the Troy Club of Troy, N. Y., 
and the Nayasset and Winthrop Clubs of 
Springfield, Mass. He married at Clinton, 
N. Y., Nov. 18, 1873, Fanny Smyth, and 
they have three daughters: Katharine, 
Kvelyn Bethime (who married Arthur D. 
Fieke, of Davenport, Iowa), and Frances 
Smyth Blunt. Address: Springfield Arm 
ory, Springfield, Mass. 

BLYTHE, Samuel George: 

Newspaper man; born in Geneseo, N. Y., 
May 19, 1868, and educated at the Geneseo 
State Normal School. He has had a bril 
liant career in the newspaper business, 
among his many positions being those of 
managing editor of the Buffalo Express, 
editor-in-chief of the Buffalo Courier and 
Enquirer, and Washington correspondent 
of the New York World. He was also 
managing editor of the Cosmopolitan in 
1899 and was in charge of the literary 
bureau of the Republican State Committee 
of New York in 1898. Since 1907 Mr. 
Blythe has been engaged in general literary 
work, and has written numerous sketches 
of foreign travel; and he conducts the 
weekly department of " Who s Who and 
Why " of the Saturday Evening Post, Phil 
adelphia, besides furnishing matter on 
other topics. During his servics as a 
Washington newspaper correspondent he 
was chairman of the standing committee of 
correspondents in Washington, and presi 
dent of the Gridiron Club. He married at 
Rochester, N. Y., Sept. 19, 1888, Carolyn 
Hamilton Oak. Address: 1509 Thirteenth 
Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

BOARDMAN, Albert B.: 

Lawyer; born in New York, Feb. 6, 1853. 
He was educated at Yale, A.B. 1873, and 
at Columbia College Law School, LL.B. 
1875. He was admitted to the bar in the 
last named year, and has had an exception 
ally successful practice*. Among his many 
important connections are those of solicitor 
for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company; 
counsel for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad 
Company, the Rapid Transit Commission, 
the Trust Company of America, the United 



States Express Company, the Fidelity & 
Deposit Company of Maryland, the Staten 
Island Rapid Transit Railroad Company, 
and the Rapid Transit Ferry Company; 
vice-president and counsel of the Thompson- 
Starrett Company and the Central Hudson 
Steamboat Company; and director of the 
Standard Cordage Company. He is a mem 
ber of the firm of O Brien, Boardman, Platt 
& Littleton. He married in New York 
City, Gertrude Bonner, and has one son. 
Residence: 40 W. 53d Street. Office: 35 
Wall Street, New York City. 

BOARDMAN, Alec: 

United States judge; born in Yazoo City, 
Miss., Dec. 10, 1839. He was educated at 
Kentucky Military College, and served in 
the Confederate Army, through the Civil 
War. In 1872 he was elected to the Na 
tional House of Representatives and for 
four years he was a State judge in Louisi 
ana. In 1881 he was appointed United 
States judge for the Western District of 
Louisiana, a position he now holds. He 
married in St. Louis, Mo., Frances I. 
Capen. Address : Shreveport, La. 

BOAS, Emil Leopold: 

Resident director and general manager 
of the Hamburg- American Line; born in 
Goerlitz, Germany, Nov. 15, 1854; son of 
Louis and Minna Boas. He was educated 
in the Royal Frederick William Gymna 
sium at Breslau, and the Sophia Gymna 
sium at Berlin, whence he was graduated 
in 1872. Becoming connected with the 
Hamburg-American Line in 1873, he came 
to the United States in the same year. He 
has been general manager of the Hamburg- 
American Line since 1892, and since 1900 
also resident director. He has been very 
prominent and active in all efforts to im 
prove the water-transportation facilities of 
New York,, was on the Committee for the 
Extension of the Pier-head Line; on the 
committee before Congress to secure an ap 
propriation for the new channel to the 
sea (Ambrose Channel) ; is treasurer and 
chairman of the Finance Committee of the 
Greater New York Canal Association, 



182 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



which was active in obtaining the improve 
ment of the Erie Canal. Mr. Boas has re 
ceived from the Emperor of Germany the 
decoration of the Order of the Royal Prus 
sian Crown of the 3rd class and also the 
Order of the Red Eagle of the 3rd class; 
was decorated by the Emperor of Austria, 
having been made an officer of the Order 
of Francis Joseph; by the King of Italy, 
Chevalier of the Order of S.S. Mauritius 
and Lazarus ; by the King of Sweden and 
Norway, Knight (first class) of the Order 
of St. Olaf; by the Sultan of Turkey, com 
mander of the Order of Osmanieh, and com 
mander of the Order of Medjiclie; by the 
King of Greece, officer of the Order of the 
Redeemer; by the President of Venezuela, 
commander of the Order of Bolivar. He 
is treasurer of the Germanistic Society of 
of America ; member of the Board of New 
York Civic Federation ; member of the 
Chamber of Commerce of the State of New 
York, the Board of Trade and Transporta 
tion (one of managing directors), the New 
York Produce Exchange, Maritime Associa 
tion, German Society and various charita 
ble societies. Mr. Boas is a member of 
various technical and scientific societies, 
including the Society of Naval Architects 
and Marine Engineers; the National Geo 
graphic Society; the New York Academy of 
Political Science; American Ethnological 
Society; American Academy of Political 
and Social Science; American Association 
for the Advancement of Science; New York 
Academy of Science; the New York Zoolog 
ical Society; the Metropolitan Museum of 
Art; American Museum of Natural His 
tory; Japan Society; the American Scenic 
and Historic Preservation Society, etc. 
Clubs: New York Yacht, Imperial Yacht 
Club, Kiel; Lotos, Fairfield County, Law 
yers, Railroad; Deutscher Verein, Unitar 
ian, Liederkranz, S. S. Maurice Fish and 
Game. Mr. Boas married in New York, 
March 20, 1888, Harriet B. Sternfeld, and 
they have one son. Residences: (city) 
128 West 74th Street, New York City; 
(country house) Bonniecrest, Greenwich, 
Conn. Office: 45 Broadway, New York 
City. 



BOAS, Franz: 

Anthropologist; born in Minden, West 
phalia, July 9, 1858. He was educated at 
the universities of Heidelberg, Bonn and 
Kiel. He became well known internation 
ally by his explorations in Baffin Land in 
1883 and 1884. He subsequently undertook 
anthropological investigations in British 
Columbia for the British Association for 
the Advancement of Science, and later for 
the American Museum of Natural History. 
He also directed explorations in the United 
States for the Smithsonian Institution, and 
directed the operations and publications of 
the Jesup North Pacific expedition. He 
has been at different times instructor in 
anthropology at leading universities and 
was chief assistant of the department of 
anthropology at the World s Columbian 
Exposition. In 1895 he was made lecturer 
and in 1898 professor of anthropology at 
Columbia University, and was curator of 
the department of anthropology of the 
American Museum of Natural History. 
1895-1905. He is honorary philologist of 
the Bureau of American Ethnology; mem 
ber of the National Academy of Sciences 
and the American Philosophical Society; 
fellow of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, the New York 
Academy of Sciences, and the American 
Anthropological societies of Berlin, Mos 
cow, Paris, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna and 
Washington, and of the Anthropological 
Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, and 
of the American Antiquarian and Numis 
matic Society. Editor of the Journal of 
American Folk-Lore., and of the publica 
tions of the American Ethnological Soci 
ety; author of: Baffin Land; The Central 
Eskimo; The Eskimos of Baffin Land and 
Hudson Bay; Chinook Texts; Kathlamet 
Texts; Indianische Sagen von der Nord- 
westkiiste Amerikas (Berlin) ; Social Or 
ganization and Secret Societies of the 
Kwakiutl Indians; Kwakiutl Texts; Eth 
nology of the Kwakiutl Indians; Tsirn- 
shian Texts; Mythology of the Bella Coola 
Indians; The Growth of Children; and 
Handbook of American Languages. Resi- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



183 



denee: Grantwood, Bergen County, N. J. 
Address: Columbia University, New York 
City. 

BOOKMAN, Marcus Olaus: 

Theologian; born in Lanofesund. Norway. 
Jan. 9, 1849. He was educated at Chris 
tiana University, Norway, and has received 
the honorary degree of D.D. from Muhlen- 
berg College in Pennsylvania. He was 
ordained to the ministry in Christiana in 
1875, and shortly after came to the United 
States, where he occupied pastorates of the 
Lutheran church until 1886. He was sub 
sequently professor of theology at various 
Lutheran seminaries until 1893, when he 
was appointed president and professor of 
theology of the Seminary of the United 
Norwegian Lutheran Church. He married, 
first in 1875, Leonharda Holby. and sec 
ond in 1896, Inga Holby. Address: St. 
Anthony Park, Minn. 

BOGART, John: 

Consulting engineer; born at Albany, N. 
Y., Feb. 8, 1837; son of John Henry and 
Eliza (Hermans) Bogart. Mr. Bogart was 
graduated from Albany Academy and from 
Rutgers College, receiving the degree of 
M.A. in 1853. He was engaged as engineer 
with the New York Central Railroad; also 
on construction of Central Park, at New 
York City; and from Dec., 1861. to July, 
1866, was in the engineer service with the 
LTnited States Army, stationed at Fort 
Monroe, and in charge of construction of 
the fort at the Rip Raps, Va., also in the 
service at other points. He was engineer- 
in-charge of construction, in 1886, and be 
came chief engineer of the Park .Commis 
sion of Brooklyn, in 1870; and was chief 
engineer, Department of Public Parks, New 
York City, from 1872-1877. He was 
treasurer, secretary and editor of publica 
tions, American Society of Civil Engineers, 
1876-1890. He designed the parks of Al 
bany, N. Y., the public State Grounds at 
Nashville, the west side parks of Chicago, 
the park system of Essex County, N. J. 
constructing engineer of the Washington 
Bridge, New York City; consulting engi 



neer of the Niagara Falls Power Company, 
the St. Lawrence Power Company, the 
Cascade (British Columbia) Power Com 
pany, the Atlanta Electric and Water 
Power Company, the Chattanooga and Ten 
nessee River Power Company, Knoxville 
Power Company, the Verde (Arizona) 
Power and Irrigation, the Susquehanna 
Power Company, the Southern Virginia De 
velopment Company, the Western Mary 
land Power Company, Harbor Works in 
Venezuela, State Board of Health, the 
Rapid Transit Commission, for many rail 
way constructions, and in various cases be 
fore the courts. He was deputy State 
engineer, 1886-1888. and State engineer of 
the State of New York, 1888-1892; Dele 
gate U. S. Government and member Per 
manent Board International Navigation 
Congresses. He is lieutenant-colonel -and 
chief engineer of the National Guard of 
New York. Mr. Bogart is a member of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers, and 
the Institution of Civil Engineers of Lon 
don. He married at West Chester, Pa., 
Nov. 2, 1870, Emma Cherington Jefferis. 
Residence: 30 Central Park South. Office: 
141 Broadway, New York City. 

BOGERT, Marston Taylor: 

Chemist and educator; born in Flushing, 
N. Y., April 18, 1868; son of Henry A. 
and Mary Bowne Lawrence. He was grad 
uated from Columbia University in 1890. 
and took the Columbia University School 
of Mines course of chemistry from 1890- 
1894. He has since been continuously on 
the teaching staff of Columbia University, 
was adjunct professor of organic chemistry 
at Columbia University from 1901-1904, 
and has been professor of same since 1904; 
and became a member of the University 
Council (Columbia) in 1908. He is a 
member of the American Chemical Society, 
having been president of the same from 
1907-1909; a fellow of the American 
Association for the Advancement of Sci 
ence; the Chemical Society of London; 
vice-president of the Society of Chemical 
Industry, of England, from 1902-1904; 
one of the founders, secretary from 1898- 



184 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



1902, ami president, 1008, of the Chem 
ists Club of New York, and a member of 
the Deutsche Chemische Gesellschaft, the 
Societe Chimique de Paris ; the Sigma Xi 
and Phi Beta Kappa honor societies, and 
Delta Phi fraternity. Professor Bogart is 
also a member of the board of supervisors 
of Rutgers Theological Seminary. He was, 
by invitation of President Roosevelt:, a 
member of the Conference on the Conserva 
tion of the Natural Resources, held at the 
White House, May 13-15, 1908; and was 
a member of the American Advisory Com 
mittee of Honor for the Seventh Interna 
tional Congress of Applied Chemistry, held 
in London, under the patronage of King 
Edward, May 27 to June 2, 1909. He 
married at Flushing, N. Y., Sept. 13, 1893, 
Charlotte E. Hoogland. Address: 422 W. 
154th Street, New York City. 

BOGGS, Carroll Curtis: 

Judge of the Supreme Court of Illinois; 
born in Fail-field, 111., Oct. 19, 1843; son of 
Richard L. and Sarah A. (Wright) Boggs. 
He was educated in the University of 
Michigan, and has since devoted his life 
to the law. He has held the offices of 
State s attorney, and county judge of 
Wayne County, 111; was circuit judge, 
1885-1897, and by assignment served six 
years on the appellate bench for the Third 
Appellate District. He was elected from 
the First Supreme Court District, judge 
of the Supreme Court in 1897. and pre 
sided as chief justice for the term begin 
ning June, 1900. In the contest for United 
States Senator from Illinois in 1907, Judge 
Boggs was the nominee of the Democratic 
party and received the votes of all the 
Democratic senators and representatives 
in the Legislature of Illinois. Address: 
Fairfield, 111. 

BOK, Edward William: 

Editor of The Ladies Home Journal; 
born in Helder, Holland, Oct. 9, 1863. He 
came to the United States at the age of 
six, became self-supporting during his boy 
hood, was a stenographer with the Western 
Union Telegraph Company, and while yet 



a lad organized a literary syndicate, which, 
among other notable undertakings, handled 
the sermons of Rev. Henry Ward Beecher. 
In 1884 he became connected with the pub 
lishing house of Henry Holt & Company, 
was subsequently with Scribner s, and in 
1888 was selected to be editor of The 
Ladies Home Journal. Prior to his con 
nection with the latter publication he was 
nationally known for his newspaper con 
tributions on writers and their works. He 
is author of: The Young Man in Business; 
Successward; and also of a large number of 
incidental articles and contributions. He 
received in 1907, from Villa Nova- College, 
the honorary degree of LL.D. He married 
Oct. 22, 1890, Mary Louise Curtis. Resi 
dence: Swastika, Merion, Pa. Address: 
The Ladies Home Journal, Philadelphia, 



BOLDT, George C.: 

Hotel proprietor and capitalist. He is 
president and director of the Waldorf-As 
toria Hotel Company, the Waldorf- Astoria 
S egar Company, and the Waldorf Impor 
tation Company; vice-president and direct 
or of the Apollinaris Agency Company, and 
trustee of Cornell University. He is presi 
dent of the Bellevue-Stratford hotels, Phila^ 
delphia ; director of the Commonwealth 
Trust Company of New York, and Lincoln 
Trust Company, and the New York Board 
of Trade and Transportation. He is a 
member of the American Fine Arts Society, 
the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and of 
the Suburban Riding and Driving Club of 
New York City. Address: (> W. 34th 
Street, New York City. 

BOLDT, Hermann J.: 

Physician, gynecologist; born near Ber 
lin, Germany, June 24, 1850; son of Her 
mann (prominent agriculturist) and Amalie 
Boldt. He came with his parents to the 
United States in childhood; was educated 
by private tutors and in public grammar 
and high schools; studied and practised 
pharmacy until he saved means for medic il 
education, and was graduated from the 
Medical School, University of New York, 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



185 



M. D., 1879. He served as assistant to | ing publications. He is a member of the 



Professor Fallen, of the University of New 
York, 1879; engaged in practice, 1879; and 
since 1891 has been exclusively in gyneco 
logical practice. Dr. Boldt is the inventor 
of numerous gynecological instruments, and 
an operating table for abdominal surgery, 
for which he received a medal at the Paris 
Expositioin, 1900. He is a contributor to 
the medical press, and author of various 
professional monographs, is professor of 
gynecology in the New York Post-Graduate 
School and Hospital; gynecologist of the 
German Poliklinik and St. Mark s Hospi 
tal; consulting gynecologist to Beth-Israel 
Hospital arid St. Vincent s Hospital. Dr. 
Boldt is ex-president of the New York Ob 
stetrical Society; ex-president of the Ger 
man Medical Society; member of the 
American Gynecological Society, Interna 
tional Gynecological Society, British Gyne 
cological Society, Southern Surgical and 
Gynecological Society, New York Patho 
logical Society, and New York Academy of 
Medicine (ex-president Gynecological Sec 
tion). He married in 1891, Hedwig Kru- 



ger, daughter of 
Address : 39 E. 
York City. 



a publisher of Berlin. 
Sixty-first Street, New 



BOILER, Alfred Pancoast: 

Civil engineer; born in Philadelphia, Pa., 
Fdi. 23, 1840. He was educated at the 
University of Pennsylvania and at Rensse- 
laer Polytechnic Institute. After receiving 
his degree of C.E. from the latter institu 
tion in 1861 he became connected with rail 
road corporations, and since 1885 has been 
contractor for bridge construction, now 
being of the firm of Boiler & Hodge, con 
sulting engineers. He was the engineer of 
the double-track bridge over the Hudson at 
Albany, N. Y., and the Central bridge and 
viaduct over the Harlem River, New York, 
: besides a considerable number of other im- 
i portant works. He has been consulting 
< engineer on important municipal woiks in 
N e\v York and on the extension of the Wa- 
bash lines into Pittsburg. He is the au 
thor of a Treatise on the Construction of 
Iron Highway Bridges, and other engineer- 



American Society of Civil Engineers and of 
the Institution of Civil Engineers of Lon 
don, England, and the Century Association 
of New York. He married in Philadelphia, 
in 1864, Katherinc Newbold, and they have 
five children. Residence: 35 Prospect 
Street, East Orange, N. J. Office: Singer 
Building, Broadway, New York City. 

BOLTON, Charles Knowles: 

Librarian of the Boston Athenaeum; born 
in Cleveland, Ohio, Nov. 14, 1867; son of 
Charles Edward Bolton, A.M., lecturer, and 
at one time Mayor of East Cleveland, and 
Sarah Knowles Bolton, the author. He 
was graduated as A.B. from Harvard Col 
lege in 1890. He was librarian of the 
Brookline, Mass., Public Library from 1894- 
. 897, and since 1898 has been librarian of 
the Boston Athenaeum. Mr. Bolton is chair 
man of the School Committee and a Trustee 
of the Public Library in Shirley; an hon 
orary member of the Harvard Chapter of 
Phi Beta Kappa; chairman of the Visit 
ing Committee to the Library of the Mu 
seum of Fine Arts, Boston; a member of 
the Bunker Hill Monument Association, the 
Massachusetts Historical Society, and the 
Colonial Society of Massachusetts. He is 
author of: The Private Soldier under Wash 
ington, and several other historical books 



papers, 



and editor of the Letters of 



Hugh, Earl Percy 1774-1776, etc. Mr. Bol 
ton married in Boston, June 23, 1897, Ethel 
Stanwood, daughter of Edward Stanwood, 
editor of the Youth s Companion, and they 
have two sons. Residence : Pound Hill 
Place, Shirley, Mass. Office: 10y 2 Beacon 
Street, Boston, Mass. 

BOLTON, Frederick Elmer: 

University professor; born at Tomah, 
Wis.. May 9, 1866; son of Edwin Latham 
and Rosaline (Cady) Bolton. He was grad 
uated from the Wisconsin State Normal 
School at Milwaukee, 1890, from the Uni 
versity of Wisconsin, B.S*, 1893, M.S., 1896, 
Honorary fellow, Clark University, 1897- 
1898, Ph.D., 1898. Professor Bolton was 
a teacher in the district schools of Wis- 



186 



AEN OF AMERICA. 



consin, 1885-1887; principal of the Tun 
nel City (Wis.) School, 1887-1888, .of the 
high school at Fairchild, Wis., 1890-1891; 
principal of schools at Kaukauna, Wis., 1893- 
1895 ; professor of psychology and education 
in the Wisconsin State Normal School at 
Milwaukee, 1898-1900, and was lecturer in 
the Summer Session of the University of 
Wisconsin, 1899. Since 1900 he has been 
in the State University of Iowa, where he 
was assistant professor for one year, and 
wince 1901 has been professor and head of 
the Department of Education in the Univer 
sity, and director of the Summer Sessions. 
He is author of: The Secondary School Sys 
tem of Germany, 1900. He was chairman 
of the Executive Committee of the Iowa 
State Teachers Association, 1908; secre 
tary of the National Society of College 
Teachers of Education; president of the 
Iowa Child Study Society; member of the 
National Educational Association, the Na 
tional Society for the Scientific Study of 
Education, was treasurer of the Iowa An 
thropological Society and is a member of 
the Western Philosophical Society. Pro 
fessor Bolton married at Fairchild, Wis., 
Aug. 23, 1893, Olive A. Foster. Address: 
Iowa City, Iowa. 

BOLTON, Herbert Eugene: 

Teacher and writer of history; born near 
Tomah, Wis., July 20, 1870; son of Edwin 
Latham and Rosaline (Cady) Bolton. He 
was graduated from the University of Wis 
consin, B.L., 1895, University of Pennsyl 
vania, Ph.D. 1899, and was Harrison fel 
low in history in that University, 1897- 
1899. He was professor of history and 
economics in the Wisconsin State Normal 
School at Milwaukee, 1899-1901, and was 
consecutively instructor, 1901-1905, adjunct 
professor, 1905-1908, and associate profes 
sor, 1908-1909, in the University of Texas, 
becoming in 1909, professor of American 
history in the Leland Stanford University. 
Professor Bolton is the leading authority 
on the historical archives of Mexico, a 
specialist in the Southwestern history, par 
ticularly for the Spanish period, and au 
thor of numerous papers on this subject in 



the American Historical Review ana other 
journals. He was investigator in Mexican 
archives in the summers from 1902-1906; 
spent fifteen months in these archives, 1907- 
1908, preparing a " Guide " to them in the 
interest of the Carnegie Institution of Wash 
ington; has been since 1907 special inves 
tigator in history of the native tribes and 
missions of Texas for the Bureau of Amer 
ican Ethnology, and contributed Texas arti 
cles to that Bureau s Handbook of the In 
dians; associate editor, of the "Quarterly" 
of the Texas State Historical Association; 
and editor (with E. C. Barker) of With 
the Makers of Texas, 1904 (American Book 
Co. ) . He is a fellow of the Texas Histori 
cal Association, and a member of American 
Historical Association, Archaeological In 
stitute of America, and Theta Delta Chi 
(Wisconsin), Phi Betta Kappa (honorary). 
Address: Stanford University, Calif. 

BOLTON, Sarah Knowles: 

Author; born in Farmington, Conn., Sept. 
15, 1841; daughter of John Segar and 
Elizabeth Mary (Miller) Knowles. Her 
father descended from Henry Knowles, one 
of the founders of Warwick, R. I., who 
came from England, 1635; her paternal 
grandmother, Mary Carpenter, from Eliza 
beth Jencks, sister of Joseph Jencks, gover 
nor of Rhode Island; and her mother de 
scended from Thomas Stanley (from Eng 
land 1634), one of the earliest and most 
prominent settlers of Hartford, Conn., and 
from Col. William Pynchon, one of the 26 
incorporators of Massachusetts Bay Colony, 
founder of Roxbury, 1630, and Springfield, 
Mass., 1636, also from Thomas Miller who 
came from England to Rowley, Mass., and 
helped to found Middletown, ^onn. in 1650. 
Her education was received in the Hartford 
(Conn.) Seminary, established by Catherine 
Beecher, sister of Henry Ward Beecher. 
Oct. 16, 1866, she married Charles E. Bol 
ton, who had been graduated from Am- 
herst the previous year, and they removed 
to Cleveland, where her husband pursued a 
successful career in business, philanthropy, 
lecturing and authorship until his death 
Oct. 23, 1901. From the age of 15, when 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



187 



her first poem was published in the Waverly 
Magazine to the present time, Mrs. Bolton 
has been occupied with literature, taking a 
place among the nation s foremost woman 
writers, and being particularly well known 
as a biographer and a writer upon humani 
tarian themes, her list of books including 
about twenty-five titles, of which some of 
the more recent are: Girls Who Became 
Famous; European Artists; Emerson; 
Raphael; Famous American Authors; So 
cial Studies in England; Famous Givers 
and their Gifts; Our Devoted Friend, the 
Dog; and a memorial sketch of her hus 
band, Charles Edward Bolton. Of her 
works many are biographical volumes 
about famous people in this country and 
abroad two are of short stories and two 
contain her poetical works, five poems from 
which have been set to music. She was the 
first secretary of the Cleveland Woman s 
Christian Association, and has been active 
in Christian and temperance work, assistant 
corresponding secretary of the Women s Na 
tional Christian Temperance Union, a vice- 
president of the American Humane Educa 
tion Society, and life member of various 
homes for dumb animals; and she was for 
three years one of the editors of the Bos 
ton Congregationalists. She spent two 
years abroad, chiefly studying what employ 
ers are doing for their employees, to ele 
vate them mentally and morally, and read 
a paper on this subject before the American 
Social Science Association at Saratoga, 
Mrs. Bolton s only child is Charles 
Knowles Bolton, librarian of the Boston 
Athenaeum and author of several books. 
Address: Cleveland, Ohio. 

BONACTTM, Thomas: 

Roman Catholic Bishop of Lincoln; born 
in County Tipperary, Ireland, Jan. 29, 



crated the first bishop of Lincoln, Neb. 
Bishop Bonacum was, theologian of the 
Third Plenary Council of the United States 
at Baltimore in 1884. Address: Lincoln, 



BONAPARTE, Charles Joseph: 

Former attorney-general of the United 
States; born at Baltimore, Md., June 9, 
1851; descendant of the most historically 
interesting of our international marriages, 
that of Jerome Bonaparte, brother of the 
first Napoleon, to Miss Patterson, of Balti 
more, and possessed in considerable degree 
the physical characteristics and tempera 
ment appropriate to that line of ancestry, 
his career has yet been one that, in the 
.hird generation, has revealed a devotion 
to the best ideals of American citizenship 
ind a sterling quality of American states 
manship. Graduating from Harvard in the 
class of 1871, and from Harvard Law 
School in 1874, he engaged in the practice 
of law in Baltimore, and built up for him 
self a high standing in the legal profession 
of Baltimore and the country at large, as 
the result of a close study of legal and for 
ensic principles and a thoroughly judicial 
and analytical mind. He became the legal 
representative and in many cases the trus 
tee of large property interests in Maryland, 
and counsel for important organizations 
and enterprises. While, in National affairs, 
the political affiliations of Mr. Bonaparte 
have always been with the Republican 
party, his political endeavors have been 
chiefly along lines removed from narrow 
partisanship. He early became a strong be 
liever in and advocate of civil service re 
form in Nation, State and municipality. 
In his native state and city, Mr. Bonaparte 
was the recognized leader of the forces of 
reform in administration, and in the Civil 

Na- 



7 ^ " i A. J 

1847. He came to the United States in his Service Reform movement he exer d 
infancy. He was educated at the College 



at Cape Girardeau, Mo., and also studied 
at the University of Wiirzburg, Bavaria. 
He was ordained as priest in 1870, and 
served as a missionary. In 1881 he was ap 
pointed pastor of the Church of the Holy 
Name in St. Louis, and in 1887 was conse- 



tional influence which was recognized by 
his election as chairman of the Council of 
the National Civil Service Reform League, 
which office he held until he entered the 
President s Cabinet in 1905. He was one of 
the organizers and is now president of the 
National Municipal League, and is a mem- 



188 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



ber of the Executive Committee of the Na 
tional Civic Federation. In 1904 he was 
elected a presidential elector from Maryland 
on the Republican ticket, the Democrats elect 
ing the other seven electors to which the 
State of Maryland was entitled. In 1902 
he was appointed by President Roosevelt 
a member of the Board of Indian Commis 
sioners and made a close study of the re 
lations of the Government with the In 
dians; and at the close of his service in 
1904, made a valuable and exhaustive in 
quiry into the details of registration for 
the purpose of protecting the Indians in 
the proprietorship of the lands allotted to 
them severally. He was one of the dis 
interested persons to whom were referred 
the conflicting charges and statements in 
reference to the administration of certain 
details in the Post Office Department in 
1904, and as the result of his investiga 
tion and report, the salutary steps taken 
toward the purification of the postal serv 
ice were inaugurated and successfully car 
ried out. At the earnest solicitation of 
President Roosevelt, Mr. Bonaparte en 
tered the Cabinet, July 1, 1905, as Secre 
tary of the Navy, filling its duties with 
marked ability and public approbation, and 
in the reorganization of the Cabinet in the 
beginning of 1907, became Attorney-General 
of the United States, serving until March 4, 
1909. Mr. Bonaparte was an overseer of 
Harvard from 1891-1903. He is one of the 
foremost Catholic laymen of the country; 
is a trustee of the Catholic University of 
America, and connected with the manage 
ment of other Catholic institutions. In 1903 
he was awarded the Laetare Medal of the 
University of Notre Dame, one of which is 
annually awarded to the most useful Cath 
olic layman. Mr. Bonaparte married, Sept. 
1, 1875, Ellen Channing Day, of Newport, 
R. 1., and besides his residence in Balti 
more has a country home at Bella Vista, 
Md. Address: Baltimore, Md. 

BOND, Stephen Norman: 

Banker and agriculturalist; bom in Ply- 
month, N. II., April 9, 1861. He was edu 
cated in the schools of Melrose and Boston, 



and by private tutors. He is senior part 
ner of the firm of Bond and Goodwin, 
bankers, of Boston and New York, and is also 
largely interested in agriculture and stock- 
raising. He is president of the Hereford 
Railway Company, a part of the Maine Cen 
tral Railroad System, and vice-president 
of the Colonial Securities Company of Bos 
ton, and the Rockingham Power Company of 
North Carolina. He has been prominent in 
the National Guard of the State of Mas 
sachusetts, in which he has been inspector 
of small arms practice and adjutant of the 
8th Massachusetts Infantry. He served in 
the Spanish-American War, holding commis 
sion as an officer of the 8th Massachusetts 
Infantry, United States Volunteers. He is a 
fellow of the American Geographical So 
ciety and the Massachusetts Military His 
torical Society, and is also a comrade of 
the Naval and Military Order of the Span 
ish-American War, and various Social 
Clubs. Residence: Brimmer Chambers, 
Brimmer Street, Boston, Mass. Office: 111 
Broadway, New York City. 

BONE, Scott Cardelle: 

Journalist; born in Shelby County, Ind., 
Feb. 15, I860. On leaving school he entered 
the newspaper business, being connected for 
seven years with Indianapolis papers, sub 
sequently removing to Washington, where 
he was for seventeen years managing editor 
of the Washington Post. On change of 
ownership in that paper he founded and is 
now principal owner of the Washington 
Daily and Sunday Herald. Mr. Bone is 
a prominent figure in the affairs of the 
National Capital, and one of the best known 
of American Journalists. Residence: 1537 
P Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. 

BONSAL, Stephen: 

Journalist; born in Baltimore, Md., 
March 29, 1865. He was educated in Heidel 
berg, Bonn and Vienna. On the breaking 
out of the Bulgarian-Servian War in 1885 
he was appointed special correspondent of 
the New York Herald, and has since seen 
ervice in the Macedonian uprising, the 
Chino-Japanese war, the Cuban insurrec- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



tion of 1897, the Spanish-American War, 
and the China relief expedition. He also 
saw service in connection with the opera 
tions of the Philippine Islands, and was in 
Venezuela during the revolution and block 
ade of 1903. Mr. Bonsai served as charge 
d affaires at Peking, Madrid, Tokio and in 
Korea from 1891-190G. He is the author 
of: Morocco as It Is; The Real Situation 
of Cuba; The Fight for Santiago; and The 
Golden Horse Shoe. He married in March. 
1900, Henrietta Fairfax Morris. Residence: 
Whitefields, Bedford, Westchester County, 
New York. Office: 7 W. 43d St., New 
York City. 

BONTECOTJ, Reed Brinsmade: 

Physician; born in Washington, D. C., 
Dec. 1, 1804; son of Reed Brockway and 
Susan (Northrup) Bontecou. He was edu 
cated in Williams College and Harvard Uni 
versity and at the College of Physicians 
i and Surgeons (Columbia University), 
whence he was graduated M.D., 1889. Dr. 
Bontecou was pension examiner for ten 
years ; physician and operating surgeon to 
the Marshall Sanitorium, Troy, N. Y., for 
ten years; deputy health officer of Troy, 
1893-1894; attending surgeon to the Water- 
i vliet Arsenal, three years, and attending 
physician to the Episcopal Church Home 
for eighteen years. He was for five years 
a member of the National Guard of New 
j York, serving during the strikes at Buffalo 
j and Albany. He is a member of the Amer- 
| ican Medical Association, the Medical So- 
ciety of the State of New York, the Rens- 
: selaer County Medical Society, and the Lau- 
, retta Boat and Island Golf Clubs of Troy. 
He married at Greenport, L. I., in 1890, 
Lula May Vail, and they have four daugh 
ters and one son. Address: 82 Fourth 
treet, Troy, N. Y. 



s 



BONYNGE, Robert W.: 

Lawyer and congressman; born in New 
J.York City, Sept. 8, 1803; son of Robert 
jBonynge and Susan Bonynge. He was 
graduated as A.B. from the College of the 
City of New York in 1882, and later re- 
Reived A,M, degree from that college, and 



189 

I he was graduated as LL.B. from Columbia 
College Law School in 1885. He was ad 
mitted to the New York bar in 1885; he 
removed to Denver, in 1888, and has been 
engaged in the practice of law in Denver, 
Colo, ever since. He is a member of the 
firm of Bonynge & Warner. He is a Repub 
lican in politics; was a member of the Colo 
rado State Legislature in 1893-1894; was 
elected to the Fifty-eighth Congress from 
the First District of Colorado in 1902, and 
was elected in 1904-1900 to the Fifty-ninth 
and Sixtieth Congresses, in which latter 
he is now serving. He is a member of the 
National Monetary Commission. He is a 
Mason. Knight Templar and member of 
Royal El Jebel Shrine, an Elk, and a mem 
ber of the Woodmen of the World. He 
married in New York City, Jan. 20, 1880, 
Mary Alida Riblet. Residence: Hotel Met- 
ropole. Office : Equitable Building, Den 
ver, Colo. 

BOOK, George Milton: 

Rear-Admiral U. S. Navy, retired; born 
in New Castle, Pa,, May 25, 1845. He was 
graduated from the U. S. Naval Academy, 
1805, was commissioned ensign Dec. 1, 1800, 
master March 12-, 1808, lieutenant, March 
20, 1809, commander, May 28, 1881, com 
mander. Dec. 10, 1891; Captain, March 29, 
1899, and retired with the rank of rear- 
admiral, March 8, 1900. He was in active 
service during the Civil War in the summer 
of 1804, on board of the Marblehead. in 
pursuit of the Confederate steamers Flori 
da and Tallahassee, and from that time 
until retirement served with an excellent 
record in many duties and commands. Ad 
dress: New Castle, Pa. 

BOOKWALTER, Lewis: 

President of Otterbein University; born 
in Hallsville, Ohio, Sept. 18, 1840. *He was 
graduated from the Western College of 
Iowa, and the Union Biblical Seminary at 
Dayton, Ohio. He has received the degrees 
of A.M., 1875, D.D., 1890 and LL.D., 1900. 
In 1872 he was licensed as a preacher of 
the United Brethren Church, and after sev 
eral years passed in professorships he be- 



191 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



came a missionary in Tennessee. In 1883 
he was appointed president of Westfield Col 
lege, 111., and from 1894-1904 was president 
of Western College at Toledo, Iowa, having 
also occupied pastorates during the inter 
vening years. Since 1904 he has held his 
present position as president of Otterbein 
University. He was a member of the Gen 
eral Conference in 1885; also secretary of 
the commission created by that conference 
to amend the church constitution; was 
again a member of the General Conference 
in 1901; and corresponding secretary of 
the Board of Education of the United Breth 
ren Church from 1885-1894. He is the 
author of several religious books and arti 
cles. He married in 1871, Miss E. M. 
Guitner. Address: Westerville, Ohio. 

BOOTH, Ballington: 

General-in-chief of the Volunteers of 
America; born in Brighouse, England, 
July 28, 1859; son of Rev. William Booth 
of the Salvation Army. He early became 
connected with the work of his father in 
connection with the Salvation Army, and 
was commander of the branch in Australia 
in 1887, when he came to the United States 
in command of the organization in Ameri 
ca. He served in the Salvation Army until 
1896, when he deemed it his duty to sepa 
rate from the Salvation Army organization, 
and formed a new religious philanthropic 
organization, the Volunteers of America, 
which was incorporated Nov. 6, 1896. He 
has since been the head of this organization 
and is internationally known as a writer, 
public speaker and philanthropist. He was 
married April 16, 1887, Maud Charles- 
worth. Address: 38 Cooper Square, New 
York City. 

BOOTH, Charles Edwin: 

Manufacturer; born at Springfield, Mass., 
July 24, 1849; son of Alfred and Fanny 
Woodbury (Abel) Booth. He was edu 
cated in public schools of Springfield, and 
Lowell, Mass., and by private tutors. He 
is president of the Seaboard Refrigeration 
Company. He visited Australia and New 
Zealand in a trip around the world in 1901. 



Mr. Booth i;- a Republican in politics and 
an Episcopalian in religion. He is a mem 
ber of the Society of Colonial Wars, His 
toric-Genealogical Society of Boston, Con 
necticut Historical Society, Hartford, Long 
Island Historical Society, Brooklyn. He 
is a member of the National Arts Club. 
Address: National Arts Club, New York 
City. 

BOOTH, Maud Ballington: 

Born in Limpfield, Surrey, England; 
daughter of Rev. Samuel Charlesworth. 
She was educated in Bellstead, Suffolk, 
and in Switzerland, and married in London. 
England, Sept. 16, 1887, Ballington Booth 
(second son of General Booth), and has a 
son and a daughter. She entered the Sal 
vation Army at 17, as an officer, serving in 
Paris, and in Geneva and other parts oi 
Switzerland, in which country, with com 
panions, she was subject to bitter police per 
secution, and was expelled from Geneva, 
although the work was later successfully 
established there; was later in Salvation 
Army work in Great Britain, and afterward 
in Sweden, where she had a special series 
of meetings for the students of Upsala Uni 
versity, attended by 1800 of the 2000 stu 
dents, with most successful results. With 
her husband, she commanded Salvation 
Army, 1887-1896, raising it from persecuted, 
unknown movement to one of success and 
recognition. The contention arising that 
they were Americanizing that institution, 
she started, with her husband, The Volun 
teers of America in 1896, and has ever since 
been connected with it. She started a spe 
cial work for the prisoners of the United 
States, which is now established in many 
prisons, from New York to San Francisco. 
Mrs. Booth is author of Sleepy Time Sto 
ries; Lights of Childland; Did the Pardon 
Come Too Late?; The Curse of Septic Soul 
Treatment; After Prison What?; and 
other books. Address: 34 West 28th 
Street, New York City. 

BOOTHBY, Frederic Eleazer: 

Railroad official; born at Norway, Me., 
Dec. 3, 1845; son of Levi Thompson and 
Sophia Packard (Brett) Boothby. He was 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



ini 



educated at the Waterville (Maine) Classi 
cal Institute. He began railroad service 
in 1864 as a boy with the Maine Central 
Railroad, with which he has ever since 
continued; and is now general passenger 
and ticket agent of the Maine Central Rail 
road, the Portland, Mount Desert and 
Machias Steamboat Company, the Washing 
ton County Railway and the Somerset Rail 
way. He is a director of the Portland and 
Ogdenburg Railroad, the Union Safe De 
posit and Trust Company of Portland, Me., 
and the New England Railway Publishing- 
Company. He served as a member of the 
military staff of Governor s Joseph R. Rod- 
well, Sebastian S. Marble, and Edwin C. 
Burleigh, of Maine, retiring as commissary 
general with the rank of colonel. He was 
president of the Portland Board of Trade 
from 1897-1901, and mayor of the City of 
Portland, Me., from 1901-1903 inclusive. 
He is a Republican in politics, and was 
chairman of the Maine delegation to the 
National Republican Convention of 1904. 
He is an Episcopalian and junior warden of 
St. Stephen s Church, at Portland, Me. He 
is a member of the Maine Historical Soci 
ety, and a trustee of the Coburn Classical 
Institute, of Waterville, Me.; trustee and 
treasurer of the Maine Eye and Ear Infirm 
ary; treasurer of the Portland Prison Com 
mittee, and treasurer of the State of Maine 
Branch of the National American Red Cross 
chairman of the executive committee of the 
railroad branch of the Young Men s Chris 
tian Association of Portland, Me., and di 
rector of the Maine Society for Protection 
of Cruelty to Animals. He is president of 
the Maine Society of Sons of the American 
Revolution, and deputy governor, of th< 
Maine Society of Mayflower Descendants 
Colonel Boothby married at Waterville, Me. 
Oct. 25, 1871, Adelaide Endora Smith. Res 
idence: Falmouth Hotel. Office: 238 St 
John Street, Portland, Me. 

BORAH, William Edgar: 

United States Senator; born in Fail-field 

111., June 29, 1865; son of William N 
ij and Eliza Borah. He was educated at th 
; University of Kansas, was admitted to th 



bar in 1889, and established himself in 
practice at Boise, Idaho. He became prom: 
nent in the Republican politics of that 
State, and especially in connection with the 
ft orts made for the maintenance of pub 
ic order as against the outbreaks incident 
o the labor troubles in Idaho. In 1903 
ie was one of the leading candidates for 
lection to the United States Senate, and 
n 1907 was elected for the term 1907-1913. 
Ie took a prominent part in the pre-conven- 
ion campaign which resulted in the elec- 
ion of President Taft, and in the national 
:ampaign of 1908. He married in Boise, 
Idaho, April 21, 1895, Mamie McConnell. 
Address: Boise, Idaho. 

BORDEN, William Alanson: 

Librarian; born in New Bedford, Mass., 
April 24, 1853; son of Alanson and Mary 
3. (Topham) Borden. He was graduated 
Jrom Cornell University, 1874, became a 
! armer in 1876, agricultural editor of the 
New England Homestead, 1879; assistan/t 
at the Boston Athenaeum, 1883; organized 
;he Reynolds Library at Rochester, N. Y M 
.n 1885, was appointed lecturer in the New 
York Library School, 1886, and in 1887 re 
organized the Young Men s Institute at 
New Haven, Conn., of which he has been 
in charge ever since. Mr. Borden is in 
ventor of the removal card catalogue drawer 
and of other minor library appliances and 
methods. He is a member of the American 
Library Association, and of the Connecti 
cut, New York and Massachusetts Library 
Associations, and the Edgewood Civic As 
sociation. Residence: 341 Alden Avenue. 
Office: 847 Chapel Street, New Haven, 
Conn. 

BORGLUM, Gutzon 

Sculptor and painter; born in Idaho, 
March 25, 1867; son of Dr. James de la 
Mothe and Ida (Michelson) Borglum. He 
was educated at St. Mary s College, Kan 
sas, and studied art in San Francisco and 
Paris, where he was a member of the 
Academic Julian and ficole des Beaux Arts, 
and he received the A.M. degree from 
Princeton, 1909. He exhibited paintings in 



102 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



the Paris Salon, in Spain MI id in London, 
and in 1902 he settled permanently in New 
York, where he was given the commission 
for the sculpture of the Cathedral of St. 
John the Divine. He was commissioned to 
make an equestrian statue of Gen. Philip 
H. Sheridan in Washington, D. C. and a he 
roic statue of John Mackay for the State 
of Nevada. His Mares of Diomedes are in 
the Metropolitan Museum and his colossal 
marble head of Lincoln in the Capitol at 
Washington. He has exhibited at all the 
leading sculpture exhibitions, and receivril 
the gold medal for sculpture at the Louis 
iana Purchase Exposition. Mr. Borglum 
is also a painter, his work, including por 
traits and murial painting, besides figures 
and animals. He is a member of the Royal 
Society of British Artists, the Societe Na- 
tionale des Beaux Arts, Paris; the Players 
and City Clubs, New York, and the Met 
ropolitan Club of Washington. Address: 
106 E. 38th St., New York City. 

BOROWSKI, Felix: 

Composer; born in Burton, England, 
March 10, 1872. He graduated at the Con 
servatoire, Cologne, Germany, in violin, 
piano and composition. He lived in London 
until 1897, when he came to the United 
States as an instructor, and is at present 
director of the department of composition 
and lecture on musical history at the Chi- 
cigo Musical College. Mr. Borowski has 
been the musical critic of the Chicago 
Evening Post since 1906, and is a com 
poser of international reputation, among 
his works being: " Marche triomph lie " 
and "Eugene Onegin " (Symphonic poem), 
for orchestra; Senate- russe," "Preludes," 
and " Concerto, with orchestra," for the 
piano; Premiere Mazur, Schoumka Ukrain- 
ienne, Aria " and Deuxieme Mazur, Adora 
tion," for the violin; Suite and two Sonatas 
for the organ; and songs for the voice. He 
married in Aberdeen, Scotland, Oct. 9, 1897, 
Edith Frances Grant. Address: 202 Mich 
igan Boulevard, Chicago. 

BOSS, Lewis: 

Astronomer; born in Providence, R. I., 
Oct. 26, 1846. He was educated at Dart 



mouth College, of which he is A.M., 1873, 
and has received the degree of LL.D., from 
Union University in 1902. He was as 
tronomer of the Northern Boundary Com 
mission from 1872-187G, and chief of the 
Transit of Venus Exposition Expedition, 
Santiago, Chile, in 1882. He was largely 
instrumental in the reconstrution and en 
largement of the endowment of Dudley Ob 
servatory, of which he has been director 
since 1876. He has also been superintend 
ent of the New York State Bureau of 
Weights and Measures since 1884, and di 
rector of the department of meridian as 
tronomy of Carnegie Institution since 1906. 
He is a foreign associate of the Royal As 
tronomical Society; member of the National 
Academy of Sciences; Astronornische Ge- 
sellschaft, Leipzig; corresponding member 
of the British Association for the Advance 
ment of Science ; and received a gold medal 
from the Royal Astronomical Society in 
London in 1905. He is the author of: * De- 
clinatioils of Fixed Stars; Catalogue of 
8,241 Stars; prize essay on the Physical 
Nature of Comets; Division Correction of 
the Olcott Meridian Circle; Southern Stars; 
Solar Motion and Related Researches and 
Positions and Motions of 627 Standard 
Stars. He married in Washington. Dec. 
30, 1871, Helen M. Hutchinson. Address: 
Dudley Observatory, Albany, N. Y. 

BOSTWICK, Arthur Elmore: 

Librarian; born at Litchfield, Conn., 
March 8, 1860; son of Dr. David Elmore 
and Adelaide (McKinley) Bostwick. He 
is the eighth in direct descent from Arthur 
Bostoek. or Bostwick (of the Bostocks of 
Bostok -Hall, near Northwik, Cheshire, 
England), who came to America in 1640. 
He was educated at Litchfield Institute and 
at Yale University, being graduated as 15. A. 
in the class of 1881, was the first incum 
bent of the Silliman fellowship in physicil 
science, from 1882-1884, receiving the de 
gree of Ph.D. in 1883; and he was substi 
tute instructor and proctor at Yale, from 
1883-1884. After leaving Yale, he was in 
structor in the high school at Montclair, 
N. J., until 1886, then was engaged in liter 
ary work in New York City } until 1895. 




ARTHUR ELMORE BOSTWICK 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



193 



He was chief librarian of the New York 
Free Circulating Library, 1895-1899; librar 
ian of the Brooklyn Public Library, 1899- 
1901, and since 1901 has been chief of the 
circulation department of New York Pub 
lic Library, including charge of all branch 
libraries, now numbering forty-one. He 
was on the staff of Appleton s Cyclopaedia 
of American Biography, from 1886-1888; 
assistant editor of the Forum 1890-1892; 
associate editor and office expert in physics 
of the Standard Dictionary, 1892-1895. He 
was joint author (with John D. Champlin) 
of the Young Folks Cyclopedia of Games 
and Sports; science editor Literary Digest 
since 1894; also a contributor to periodicals 
on scientific and literary topics. He was 
president of the American Library Associa 
tion from 1907-1908. He has been a mem 
ber of the advisory committee of the Pub 
lic Education Association and of the Library 
Council of the New York State University, 
from 1904, fellow of the American Library 
Institute since 1906; delegate to the Copy 
right Conference in 1905-1906, and is also 
a director of the People s University Ex 
tension Society. He is a member of the 
Authors and Delta Kappa Epsilon Clubs. 
Dr. Bostwick married, June 23, 1885, Lucy 
Sawyer. Residence: Clewellyn Park, West 
Orange, N. J. Address : 209 West Twenty- 
third Street, New York City. 

BOSWOKTH, Edward Increase: 

Theologian; born at Dundee, 111., Jan. 
10, 1861; son of Frank S. and Sarah 
(Hunt) Bosworth. He received his pre 
paratory education at Elgin (111.) Acad 
emy, and, entering Oberlin College in 1879, 
studied there for two years. Thence he 
continued his academic studies at Yale 
University, graduating in 1883 with the 
degree of A.B. This was followed by three 
years of study at the Oberlin Theological 
Seminary, where he received the degree of 

: D.B. in 1886. He also took graduate work 
at the University of Leipzig during the 

I year, 1890-1891, and at Athens, 1891-1892. 

I The degree of A.M. was conferred upon him 
by Oberlin in 1893, and D.D. in 1901. He 
entered the ministry of the Congregational 
13 



Church in 1886, becoming in that year pas 
tor of the church at Mount Vernon, Ohio. 
A year later he became professor of Eng 
lish Bible at Oberlin Theological Seminary 
and held that position until 1890. In 1891 " 
he was given the chair of NCAV Testament 
language and literature, which he has since 
filled, and since 1903 he has been dean of 
the seminary. Dr. Bosworth has traveled 
through Europe several times, as well as 
in Egypt, Palestine, Japan, China and 
Korea. He is a member of the Phi Beta 
Kappa Society. In politics he is affiliated 
with the Republican party. Besides var 
ious magazine articles, he is author of: 
Studies in the Acts and Epistles; Studies 
in the Teaching of Jesus and His Apostles; 
Eight Studies in the Life of Jesus Christ; 
and New Studies in Acts. Mr. Bosworth 
married at Elgin, 111., Oct. 1, 1891, Bertha 
McClure, and they have four children: 
Lawrence McClure, born in 1893; Edward 
Franklin, born in 1894; Richard Wilder, 
born in 1901; and Sarah Frances, born in 
1907. Address: Oberlin, Ohio. 

BOSWORTH, Edwin Mahlon: 

Mining and mechanical engineer; born 
in Pittsburgh, Pa., Dec. 8, 1880; son of 
Giles B. and Melzena A. (Reed) Bosworth. 
After receiving a grammar and high school 
education, he entered Shady Side Academy, 
where he was graduated in 1899. His min 
ing and mechanical engineering education 
was obtained at Cornell University. For a 
time he was mining engineer with the H. 
C. Frick Coke Company, and in 1903 was 
assistant engineer of construction with 
Jones and Laughlin Steel Company of 
Pittsburgh. From 1903-1905 he was en 
gaged in special work in the West, and in 
the latter year being elected vice-president 
and treasurer of The Amsler Engineering 
Company of Pittsburgh. In 1908 he be 
came affiliated with The Bosworth Invest 
ment Company of Denver, Colo., as treas 
urer, and The Union Realty and Investment 
Company of the same city, as secretary and 
treasurer. While in Pittsburgh he was sec 
retary and director of The Manufacturers 
Fuel and Light Company, and of The South- 



194 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



ern Real Estate Security Company, all of 
Pittsburgh. He was a member of the Pitts 
burgh Board of Trade and of The Union 
Club. In Denver he is a member of The 
Denver Athletic Club and the Denver Real 
Estate Exchange. He is a member of the 
Methodist Church, and in politics 4s affiili- 
ated with the Republican party; he belongs 
to the Chi Psi and Delta Phi Delta College 
fraternities. Mr. Bosworth married at 
Pittsburgh, Pa., April 17, 1906, Helen M. 
Richey. Residence: 1540 Grant Street. 
Address: 509 Continental Building, Den 
ver, Colo. 

BOTKIN, Theodosius: 

Consular official; born near Catawba, 
Clark County, Ohio, June 25, 1846, and was 
educated in the common schools. He en 
listed in the 44th Ohio Volunteers, Sept. 1, 
1861 and served until Aug. 5, 1865. He 
settled in Kansas, fed and herded cattle, 
broke prairie sod, farmed, drove freight 
team, clerked in a store and taught school, 
and read history and law by night. He was 
admitted to the bar, 1874; was police mag 
istrate of Pleasanton, Kan., 1875-1876; 
probate judge, 1877-1878, practised law 
1879-1899, was district judge, 1889-1892 
member of the Kansas Legislature and de 
partment commander, Grand Army of the 
Republic, 1897. He was commissioned cap 
tain assistant adjutant general of volun 
teers by President McKinley, 1898; was se 
lected by the Republican National Com 
mittee to open and lead the contest in Utah 
for the electoral ticket in 1900 and was 
successful; was appointed to the consu 
lar service as consul at Port Louis, June 10, 
1905, and March 30, 1907, was appointed 
to his present post as consul at Campbell- 
ton, N. B. Address: U. S. Consulate, 
Campbellton, New Brunswick. 

BOURN, Augustus Osborn: 

Manufacturer, ex-governor; born in Prov 
idence, R. I., Oct. 1, 1834; son of George 
0. Bourn. He entered Brown University 
from which he received the degree of A.M. 
in 1855. He engaged as a manufacturer of 
rubber goods at Providence, founded in 



1867 and became president of the National 
Rubber Company of Bristol, R. I., of which 
town he became a resident in 1873. He be 
came active in political matters as a Repub 
lican and was elected State senator, serv 
ing from 1876-1883, during which tifme he 
was chairman of the committee on Finance 
and a member of the Judiciary Committee. 
In 1883 he was elected governor of Rhode 
Island, serving until 1885. He again serv 
ed in the State Senate from 1886-1888, and 
while a member of, the Upper House of the 
Legislature he introduced the " Bourn 
Amendment" to the Constitution of the 
State of Rhode Island, extending to foreign- 
born citizens the same rights of voting as 
are enjoyed by the native-born citizens of 
the State. In 1889 he was appointed by 
President Harrison consul-general of the 
United States to Italy, in which capacity 
he served until 1893. Governor Bourn serv 
ed in the State Militia of Rhode Island in 
all grades from private to lieutenant-colonel 
of the Battalion of Cavalry. He was for 
merly president of the New England Rub 
ber Club of Boston. Governor Bourn mar 
ried, at Providence, R. L, Feb. 24, 1863, 
Elizabeth R., daughter of David C. and 
Mary (Wentworth) Merrill. Residence: 
Bristol, R. I. Office: Providence, R. I. 

BOURNE, Frederick Gilbert: 

Capitalist and manufacturer. He was 
formerly president and is now director of 
the Singer Manufacturing Company; also 
trustee of the New York Phonograph Com 
pany; director of the Liberty National 
Bank, the Knickerbocker Trust, Commer 
cial Trust Company, Manhattan Company, 
of New Jersey, Albany Trust Company, 
New York and Long Branch Railroad Com 
pany, Aeolian, Weber Piano and Pianola 
Company, Babcock and Wilcox Company, 
Babcock and Wilcox, Limited, (London) 
City and Suburban Homes Company, At 
las Cement Company, Diehl Manufactur 
ing Company, etc. He is a member of 
the New York Chamber of Commerce, 
the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the 
New England Society of New York, and of 
the Metropolitan, Racquet and Tennis, Law- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



195 



yers , New York Athletic, Automobile, 
Jekyl Island, New York Yacht, Seawan- 
haka-Corinthian Yacht, South Side Sports 
man s Lakewood Golf, Westwood Golf, 
Robin s Island, and Penaquit Corinthian 
Yacht Clubs. He married in 1875, Emma 
Keeler, and they have five children. Resi 
dence: Oakdale, Long Island. Address: 
149 Broadway, New York City. 

BOURNE, Jonathan, Jr.: 

United States senator; born in New Bed 
ford, Mass., Feb. 23, 1855. and a member 
of the well known family of that State. He 
was a member of the Harvard class of 1877, 
but left college in his junior year to go to 
sea. He was shipwrecked off the Island of 
Formosa, but was rescued by a vessel which 
landed him in Portland, Ore., where he set 
tled and studied law and was admitted to 
the bar. He became interested in mining, 
and acquired a large fortune in this busi 
ness. He is president of several Oregon 
corporations and of the Bourne Cotton 
Mills, at Fall River, Mass. He was a Re- 



degree of LL.D. from Northwestern Uni 
versity in 1904. He is a trustee of the 
Northwestern University. He was admit 
ted to the bar of Illinois in 1879, and to 
that of the Supreme Court of the United 
States in 1885, and has since practised in 
Chicago. He is a Republican in politics; 
was elected a member of the Illinois gen 
eral assembly in 1884, and was one of the 
" 103 " who elected General Logan to the 
United States Senate. He was elected to 
the Fifty-fifth Congress from the Sixth Illi 
nois District in 1897 to fill the unexpired 
term of Edward Dean Cooke; was re- 
elected from that district in 1898 and 1900, 
and after reapportionment was reflected 
from the Ninth Illinois District in 1902, 
1904, 1906 and 1908, and is now serving 
in the Sixty-first Congress. He is a mem 
ber of the Committee on Ways and Means. 
Mr. Boutell is a trustee of the Northwest 
ern University, has been president of the 
Phi Beta Kappa Society of Northwestern 
University; twice president of the Illinois 
Societv of Sons of the American Revolu- 



publican member of the Oregon Legislature tion twice president of the Harvard Club 
during the sessions of 1885, 1886 and 1897; of chica g> and twice president of the Uni- 



\vas a delegate to the Republican National 



versity Club of Chicago. Mr. Boutell mar- 



Conventions in 1888 and 1892, and was ried in Providence, R. I., Dec. 29, 1880, 

j a _ ! Eupnemia Lucia Gates, and they have three 
j n children. Residence: Virginia Hotel. Of- 



Oregon s member of the Republican 
tional Committee from 1888 to 1892. 



1906 he was elected United States senator 
from Oregon, and has since been one of the j * 
prominent figures of the upper house of thi 



fice address: 205 La Salle Street, Chicago, 



National Legislature. During the pre-con- 
vention campaign of 1908 he was an ardent 
advocate of a second elective term for Presi 
dent .Roosevelt. Residence: 331 7th Street. 
Office: Chamber of Commerce, Portland, 
Ore. 

BOUTELL, Henry Sherman: 

Lawyer and congressman; born in Bos 
ton, Mass., March 14, 1856; son of Louis 
Henry and Anna (Greene) Boutell. He 
removed to Chicago in 1863; was graduated 
from Northwestern University, Evanston. 
111., in 1874; and from Harvard University, 
as A.B. in 1876; and received the degree of 
A.M. from Harvard (constitutional history 
and international law) in 1877, and the 



BOUTON, Rosa: 

Professor of home economics ; born in 
Albany, Kan., Dec. 19, 1860; daughter of 
E. F. and Fannie (Waldo) Bouton. Miss 
Bouton was educated in the State Normal 
School at Peru, Neb., and the University of 
Nebraska, from which she was graduated 
as B.S., 1891, and A.M., 1893. She was 
for several years adjunct professor of chem 
istry in the University of Nebraska, but 
her connection with the Chemical Depart 
ment was severed in order that she mignt 
devote all her time to her present position 
as head of the Department of Home Eco 
nomics in the same university. Miss Bou 
ton has lectured before farmers and teach 
ers institutes and women s clubs, has made 



19G 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



numerous contributions to agricultural and 
educational journals, chiefly on, subjects 
related to homo economics, and is author 
of: Home Study Series No. 1, Convenient 
Kitchens; Xo. 2, Food a Factor in the 
Home; Cereals and How to Cook Them. 
She is a member of the Sigma Xi honor 
society, of the Lake Placid Conference for 
Home Economics, and of the Advisory 
Board of the Young Women s Christian 
Association of the University of Nebraska. 
Address: Lincoln, Neb. 

BOUVET, Marie Marguerite: 

Author and teacher of French; born in 
New Orleans, La., Feb. 14, 1865; daughter 
of Jean Francois and Adelphine (Ber- 
trand) Bouvet. Miss Bouvet is of distin 
guished ancestry on both sides, her father 
being, a direct descendant of Francois 
Comte de Bouvet d Asti in Piedmont, who 
was knighted in 1483 by Roi Rene, duke 
of Lorraine, for valiant deeds in wars 
against the Duke di Ferarre; and whose 
grandson, Michel de Bouvet, was minister 
of state under Duke Charles III, and her 
maternal grandfather, Victor Jules Ber- 
trand, was a cavalry officer in the service 
of Charles X. Her mother, who was edu 
cated in the Convent of the Sacred rfeart 
and after\vard took a degree at the Sor- 
bonne, married her father in New Orleans, 
and after his death in 1870, the fortune 
having suffered greatly by the Civil War, 
became instructor in French literature in 
the then well-known Loquet-Leroy Female 
Institute in New Orleans. In that institu 
tion Miss Bouvet was a pupil until the age 
of 14, and thereafter, for five years, a 
student of St. Mary s College, Knoxville, 
111., graduating in 1885. In early child 
hood she lived for seven years with her 
paternal grandparents in the environs of 
Lyons, France, and since her majority has 
made two extended visits to European 
countries. She is engaged as a teacher of 
French language and literature and is also 
occupied with authorships, having pub 
lished: Sweet William; Little Marjorie s 
Love Story; Prince Tip-Top; A Child of 
Tuscany; Pierrotte; A Little House in 



Pimlico; Bernardo and Laurette; Tales of 
an Old Chateau; My Lady; Clotilde; also 
si little book of daily French quotations, 
entitled " Fleurs des Poetes et des Prosa- 
teurs Francais," edited and compiled by 
Marguerite and Jeanne Bouvet. Miss Bou 
vet is an honorary member of the Woman s 
Club (Federated), of Reading, Pa. Ad 
dress: 120 S. Fifth Street, Reading, Pa. 

BOVARD, Freeman Daily: 

Editor of the California Christian Advo 
cate; born in Alpha, Ind., Jan. 9, 1851. 
He was educated at De Pauvv University, 
A.M. 1879, D.D. 1890, and received the de 
gree of Ph.D. from Illinois Wesleyan Col 
lege in 1891. He was ordained to the 
Methodist Episcopal ministry in 1875, was 
professor of mathematics in the University 
of Southern California, 1880 to 1885, mem 
ber of the National Geographical Society, 
and was presiding elder of the San Fran 
cisco district from 1887 to 1893. He was 
secretary of the movement for the exemp 
tion of churches in California from taxa 
tion, and a delegate to the General Con 
ference in 1900, 1904 and 1908. In 1900 
he became editor of the California Chris 
tian Advocate, a position he still holds. 
He married in Jeffersonville, Ind., June 
28, 1875, Sarah North. Address: 5 and 7 
City Hall Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 

BOWDITCH, Charles Pickering: 

Trustee, archaeologist; born in Boston, 
Sept. 30, 1842; son of Jonathan Ingersoll 
Bowditcli (A.M., LL.D., Harvard) and 
Lucy Orne (Nichols) Bowditch. He was 
graduated from Harvard University, re 
ceiving the degree of A.B. in 1863, and 
later A.M. He served as second lieutenant, 
first lieutenant and captain in the Fifth 
Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, May 1, 
1863, to Feb., 1864, and captain in the 
Fifth Massachusetts Cavalry from Feb. to 
Aug., 1864. Mr. Bowditch was a director 
of the American Bell Telephone Company 
and the American Telephone and Telegraph 
Company for many years, and was vice- 
president of the American Bell Telephone 
Company from 1883 to 1886. He is a direc- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



197 



tor and trustee in many corporations of 
New England,, including the Massachusetts 
Cotton Mills, the Pepperell Manufacturing 
Company, Saco Water Power Company, the 
Salmon Falls Manufacturing Company, the 
Massachusetts Mills in Georgia, Massachu 
setts Hospital Life Insurance Company. 
He is also greatly interested in archaeologi 
cal research, is a member of the faculty of 
the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and 
Ethnology of Harvard University, and has 
devoted much personal attention to arch 
aeological research, the results of which he 
has given in various pamphlets especially 
devoted to the archaeology of the Central 
American nations. He is a member of the 
American Anthropological Association, vice- 
president of the Archaeological Institute of 
America, fellow of the American Associa 
tion for the Advancement of Science, mem 
ber of the International Society of Ameri 
canists, of the Societe des Americanistes de 
Paris, the Department of Archaeology of 
the University of Pennsylvania, the Ameri 
can Geographical Society, fellow and the 
treasurer of American Academy of Arts 
and Sciences. He is also interested in 
historical matters, and has written on the 
History of the Trustees of the Charity of 
Edward Hopkins, and the Pickering Gene 
alogy. He is a member of the Massachu 
setts Historical Society, the American An 
tiquarian Society, the Bostonian Society, 
Colonial Society of Massachusetts, and the 
New England Historic-Genealogical Soci 
ety. He -married at Lenox, Mass., June 7, 
1S(;G, Cornelia Livingston Rockwell, and 
they have four children. Residence: Ja 
maica Plain, Mass. Office address: 28 
State Street, Boston, Mass. 

BOWDITCH, Henry Pickering: 

Physiologist; born in Boston, Mass., 
April 4, 1840. He was educated at Har 
vard and at Harvard Medical School. He 
was an officer in the United States Volun 
teer Cavalry during the Civil War, subse 
quently studied physiology in France and 
Germany, and from 1871 to 1900 was con 
nected with instruction in physiology at 



the Harvard Medical School, being profes 
sor from 187G to 190G. He is internation 
ally known as the result of his work at 
Harvard and of a large number of papers 
on physiological subjects published in the 
United States and Europe and translated 
into many foreign languages. His standing 
in the scientific world is evinced by his 
honorary degrees, of which he has received 
D.Sc., from the University of Cambridge, 
England, 1898; LL.D., Edinburgh, 1898; 
Toronto, 1903, and University of Pennsyl 
vania, 1904. He is a fellow of the Ameri 
can Association for the Advancement of 
Science and was vice-president of Section K, 
1904. He married in Leipzig, in 1871, Selma 
Knauth. Residence: Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

BO WEN, Herbert Wolcott: 

Diplomat and author; born in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., Feb. 29, 1856; son of Henry Chan- 
ller Bowen, founder of the Independent. 
He received his preparatory education in 
Paris and Berlin, and was graduated from 
Yale in 1878. He studied law at Columbia 
University, and was admitted to the bar. 
Mr. Bowen was appointed United States 
consul in 1890, and consul-general in 1894 
at Barcelona, Spain; American minister to 
Persia in 1899, and minister to Venezuela 
from 1901 to 1905, during which time he 
attracted international attention by his 
handling of difficult questions with Castro, 
then President of Venezuela, and during 
which his methods gave rise to the styling 
of the direct course of negotiations followed 
as "shirt-sleeve diplomacy." His separa 
tion from the diplomatic service followed a 
series of misunderstandings in which the 
official conduct of a predecessor was in 
volved. Mr. Bowen was counsel for Ven 
ezuela and the United States at The Hague 
in 1903, an;l his distinguished services in 
preventing complications between Venezuela 
and European nations under particularly 
difficult circumstances, constitute a bril 
liant chapter in the history of the diplo 
macy of the United States. Mr. Bowen is 
author of: Verses, Boston (1884) ; In 
Divers Tones, 1890; Losing Ground; In- 



198 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



ternational Law, New York, 1896. Address: 
Woodstock, Conn. 

BOWER, George Rosengarten: 

Manufacturing chemist; born in German- 
town, Philadelphia, Aug. 1, 1866; son of 
Henry and Lycretia K. (Elliott) Bower. 
He was graduated from the University of 
Pennsylvania, A.B., 1885, after which he 
became connected with various chemical 
concerns. In 1885 lie became clerk of 
Henry Bower & Son, and after two years 
became secretary and treasurer of the Am 
monia Company of Philadelphia. In 1896 
he was elected to similar offices in the 
Kalion Chemical Company, and in 1902 
president of the Baltimore Chrome Works 
Company. In 1906, the last named three 
companies were consolidated into the Henry 
Bower Chemical Manufacturing Company, 
of which he has since been president. In 
politics he is a member of the Republican 
party, and in religion is affiliated with the 
Protestant Episcopal church. He is a ves 
tryman of All Saints Church, Lower Dub 
lin, at Torresdale. Mr. Bower is a member 
of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 
the American Academy of Political and 
Social Science, and of the Alumni of the 
University of Pennsylvania, the Phi Kappa 
Psi fraternity, and the Athletic Association 
of the University of Pennsylvania. He 
spends his vacations in hunting and boat 
ing, and is a member of the Philadelphia 
Gun, Markham, Rittenhouse, Philadelphia 
and Union League of Philadelphia; the 
Maryland Club of Baltimore; and the 
Down Town Association of New York. Mr. 
Bower married at Philadelphia, Jan. 10, 
1893, Agnes Lee Fuller, and they have two 
sons. Residence: Torresdale, Philadelphia. 
Address: Gray s Ferry Road and 29th 
Street, Philadelphia. 

BOWERMAN, George Franklin: 

Librarian; born in Farmington, N. Y., 
Sept. 8, 1868; son of Jarvis R. and Anna 
M. (Ewer) Bowerman. He was graduated 
from the University of Rochester, A.B., 
1892, and entered the New York State Li 
brary School at Albany in 1893, graduating 



with the degree of B.L.S., in 1895. Mr. 
Bowerman was reference librarian at Rey 
nolds Library, Rochester, 1895-1896; served 
in the reference department of the New 
York State Library, 1897-1898; and was 
on the editorial staff of the New York 
Tribune, 1898-1900; and on the editorial 
staif of the New International Encyclo 
pedia, 1900-1901. He resumed library \vork 
as librarian of the Wilmington (Delaware) 
Institute Free Library, 1901-1904, and has 
been librarian of the Public Library of the 
District of Columbia since 1904. He is a 
member of the American Library Associa 
tion, and was its treasurer in 1906-1907, a 
member and president of the District of 
Columbia Library Association; was presi 
dent of the library department of the Re 
ligious Education Association in 1905; a 
member of the Delaware State Library 
Commission from 1901 to 1904; and is now 
a member of the National Educational As 
sociation, the National Geographic Society, 
the. American Economic Association, the 
National Society of Fine Arts, the Archae 
ological Institute of America, the Washing 
ton Board of Trade, the Washington Li 
brary Society,, and the Cosmos Club. He 
has contributed extensively to The Library 
Journal, Public Libraries and to newspa 
pers. Mr. Bowerman married at Albany 
in 1901^ Sarah N. Graham. Residence: 
The Ontario. Office: Public Library, Wash 
ington, D. C. 

BOWERS, Eaton Jackson: 

Lawyer and congressman; born at Can 
ton, Madison County, Miss., June 17, 1865; 
he was educated in local schools and at 
the Military Institute at Pass Christian, 
Miss. He was admitted to the bar at Can 
ton, Miss., at the age of seventeen, and 
afterward engaged in the practice of law. 
He is a Democrat in politics. He was a 
presidential elector on the Democratic tick 
et from the Sixth District of Mississippi 
in 1888, and from the State at large in 
1892, was elected to the State Senate of 
Mississippi in 1896, and in 1900 to the 
House of Representatives of Mississippi 
from Hancock County. He was a delegate 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



to the Democratic National Convention at 
Kansas City in 1900 and was a member of 
the State Democratic Executive Committee 
from 1886 to 1900. He was elected from 
the Sixth Mississippi to the Fifty-eighth 
Congress in 1902, and reflected in 1904 and 
1906 to the Fifty-ninth and Sixtieth Con 
gresses; and is now serving in the latter. 
He married Sept. 3, 1888, Lula G. Posey. 
Address : Bay Saint Louis, Miss. 

BOWERS, Edward Augustus: 

Lawyer; born at Hartford, Conn., Aug. 
2, 1857; son of Caleb Bailey and Fanny M. 
(Cutter) Bowers. He was graduated from 
the academic course of Yale University 
with the degree of A.B. in 1879 and re 
maining there as a law student for two 
years longer, received the degree of LL.B. 
at the end of that time. In 1882 he re 
moved to Groton, Dakota, then still a ter 
ritory, and began to practice his profession, 
while giving attention to other pursuits. 
In 1884 he was elected city judge of Groton, 
occupying the office for two years, becoming 
in 1887 Inspector of the Public Land Serv 
ice acting directly in the West for Mr. 
Lamar, Secretary of the Interior, and hav 
ing a general supervision of legal questions 
arising in the administration of the Public 
Lands. In 1889 lie removed to Washington, 
1). C., where he established himself in 
practice-. In 1893 he was appointed assist 
ant commissioner in the General Land Of 
fice at Washington, becoming in 1895 
assistant comptroller of the United States 
Treasury. After three years he returned 
to Connecticut, and has since practised at 
New Haven, at the same time lecturing at 
the University of Yale on forest law and 
administration, in which he is an authority. 
He is a member of the American Forestry 
Association and the American Geographi 
cal Society and of various clubs of Wash 
ington, New York City and New Haven. 
Pvesidence: 20!) Crown Street. Address: 
410 Exchange Building. New Haven, Conn. 

BOWERS, Georg-e Meade: 

United States Fish commissioner; born 
in Gerrardstown. \Y. Va., Sept. 13, 1863. 



199 

He was privately educated and undertook 
the scientific study of matters connected 
with the preservation and culture of fish, 
and in 1898 was appointed United States 
commissioner of fish and fisheries, in which 
position he has the direction of the exten 
sive work being carried on by the United 
States for the increase of the fish food sup 
ply of this country. He married in Hagers- 
town, Md., Nov. 18, 1884, Bessie C. Gray. 
He resides in Martinsburg, W. Va. Offi 
cial address: Cor. 6th and B Streets, S. 
W., Washington, D. C. 

BOWERS, Henry Francis: 

Founder of the American Protective As 
sociation; born in Baltimore, Md., Aug. 12, 
1837. He was educated at home and later 
removed to Iowa, wnere he began his legal 
career, rising from deputy clerk of courts 
in 1863 and deputy recorder in 1869 to 
county recorder in 1870, in which year he 
was admitted to the bar. Until 1874 he 
held the position of recorder and has since 
continued the practice of his profession, 
practising in the United States Courts. 
Mr. Bovvers served with distinction on the 
staff of Governor John H. Gear as special 
aide-de-camp from 1878-1882. The work by 
which he is best known to the world at 
large began in 1887 with the founding of 
the American Protective Association, popu 
larly known as the " A. P. A.," which he 
served in the capacity of president for six 
years. In connection with his various in 
terests, he has lectured extensively through 
out the United States. Address : Clinton, 
Iowa. 

BOWERSOCK, Justin DeWitt: 

Manufacturer, banker and ex-congress 
man; born in Columbiana County, Ohio, 
Sept. 19, 1842. He moved to Lawrence, 
Kan., in 1877, and built the dam across the 
Kansas River and entered upon the busi 
ness of manufacturing and banking. Mr. 
Bowersock is a Republican in politics, and 
lie was twice elected mayor of Lawrence, 
i and served in the Kansas House of Repre- 
| sentatives in 1887 and the State Senate in 
1895. He was elected in 1898 from the 



200 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Second Kansas District to the Fifty-sixtl 
Congress, and in 1900, 1902 and 1904 to th 
Fifty-seventh, and Fifty-eighth and Fifty 
ninth Congresses, but in 1906 he declined t( 
be a candidate for election in the Sixtietl 
Congress. Mr. Bowersock married in 1866 
Mary Gower of Iowa City, Iowa, and they 
have two sons and four daughters. Ad 
dress: Lawrence, Kan. 

BOWKER, Richard Rogers: 

Author and editor; born in Salem, Mass, 
in 1848. He was educated in the public 
schools of New York City and was gradu 
ated from the College of the City of New 
York as A.B. in 1868. His connection with 
Publishing and Editorial work began as 
Literary Editor of the New York Evening 
Mail, 1868. He was resident in London, 
1880 to 1882, as representative for Harper 
& Brothers. He was first vice-president 
and executive of the Edison Electric Illumi 
nating Company from 1890 to 1899, and is 
now vice-president of the De Laval Steam 
Turbine Co., and the De Laval Separator 
Co. He is editor of the Publishers Week 
ly, The Library Journal, American Catalog, 
and other publications. Mr. Bowker is 
author of: Work and Wealth, 1883; The 
Economic Fact Book and Free Traders 
Guide, 1885; Primer for Political Educa 
tion, 1886; Copyright Its Law and Its 
Literature, 1886; Economics for the People 
(5 editions) ; The Arts of Life, 1900; Of 
Business, 1901; Of Politics, 1901; Of Edu 
cation, 1903; Of Religion, 1903; Civil Serv 
ice Examination, and has edited: The Li 
brary List; The Reader s Guide in Eco 
nomic, Social and Political Science (in col 
laboration with George lies ) ; The Annual 
Literary Index, etc., besides writing many 
articles in magazines. He early became 
active in independent politics, and in 1879 
originated the independent Republican 
movement, and because of this fact became 
known as " the original Mugwump." He 
was active in promoting the passage of the 
first Civil Service Reform Bill in the New 
York Legislature, was a member of the 
New York Free Trade Club and one of the 
incorporators and on the original Board of 



Trustees of the Reform Club. When free 
coinage of silver became an issue, Mr. Bow 
ker became associated with the National 
(gold-standard) Democratic party and edi 
tor of The Campaign Text-Book of the Na 
tional Democratic party, 1896. He has 
also been very active in the movement for 
improvement in the law of copyrights, and 
is vice-president of the American Copy 
right League. He is a member of the Coun 
cil of the American Library Association, 
was formerly chairman of the Council of 
the City Club, and is a member of the 
Authors Club and other clubs of New York. 
He married at Brookline, Mass., Jan. 1, 
1902, Alice Mitchell. Residence: New York 
and " Glendale," Stockbridge, Mass. Office : 
298 Broadway, New York City. 

BOWLES, Francis Tiffany: 

Chief constructor United States Navy, 
th rank of rear-admiral, 1901-1903; born 
in Springfield, Mass., Oct. 7, 1858; son of 
Benjamin and Mary E. (Bailey) Bowles. 
He was graduated from the United States 
STaval Academy in 1879 and also received 
a post-graduate degree, Naval architect, 
from the Royal Naval College, Greenwich, 
ngland. Admiral Bowles has had an ac 
tive career and is identified with the begin 
ning and establishment of the so-called 
New Navy," having served on the Naval 
Advisory Board in 1882 and having been 
n charge of construction and repair in the 
navy yards at Norfolk and New York. He 
las also been identified with the introduc- 
ion of civil service reform in the employ- 
nent of labor at navy yards. He is presi 
dent of the Fore River Shipbuilding Co., of 
Quincy, Mass.; is a member of the Institute 
f Naval Architects, London; and president 
>f the Society of Naval Architects and 
Marine Engineers, New York. Admiral 
Bowles married Nov. 17, 1886, Adelaide 
lay Savage of Boston. Residence: 148 
larlborough Street, Boston. Office: Quincy, 
lass. 

BOWLES, Samuel: 

Editor; born in Springfield, Mass., Oct. 
15, 1851; son of Samuel Bowles, 3rd, editor 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



of the Spring-field Republican, and of Mary 
Dvvight ( Schermerhorn ) Bowles. He was 
educated in public and private schools in 
Springfield and spent two years in study 
and travel in Europe, afterward took a 
special course of two years at Yale, and 
later he received from Amherst College the 
honorary degree of A.M. He entered the 
service of the Springfield Republican as an 
editorial assistant in 1873, and two years 
later became the business manager of that 
paper, of which he has been, since 1878, the 
publisher and editor-in-chief, the third of 
his name and family to hold that position. 



201 

mem- 
since 



Choir and Temple Orchestra of 200 

bers, of Brooklyn, until May 1, 1906; 

then has been organist and music director 
of Calvary Baptist Church (Dr. MacArth- 
ur s in New York City, where he founded, 
on a similar plan, a vested quartet and 
chorus of 140 voices. He has also been 
engaged as teacher and conductor in New 
York City since 1887. He is a member of 
the Royal College of Organists, London; 
member and co-founder of the American 
Guild of Organists; founder and fellow 
(president eight terms) of the American 
College of Musicians; president (five 



^ wl ?!L a "! ed , ,l lt Concord > Mas_8., term s) of the Music Teachers National As 
sociation; professor and director of music 
at Vassar College, 1891-1895. He is a 
member of the Executive Board of the 
Brooklyn Young Men s Christian Associa 
tion, and ex-member of the Executive Board 
of the Department of Music, Brooklyn In 
stitute of Arts and Sciences, and member 
of the Board of Governors of Squirrel Is 
land Village Corporation. Mr. Bowman is 
president of the Virgil Practice Clavier 
Manufacturing Company of New York City. 
He is author of Bowman s Weitzmann s 
Manual of Harmony and Counterpoint, 
187G, and is a frequent contributor to musi 
cal journals. Residence: 1810 Avenue H, 
Fiuke Terrace, Brooklyn; (summer) Squir 
rel Island, Coast of Maine. Studio: Stein- 
way Hall, New York City. 

BOWNE, Borden Parker: 

Educator; born in Leonardville, N. J., 
Jan. 14, 1847. He was educated at the 
University of the City of New York, A.B. 
1871, A.M. 1876, and for two years studied 
at the universities of Halle, Paris and 
Gottingen. He became assistant professor 



June 12, 1884, Elizabeth, daughter of Eb- 
enezer Rockwood Hoar; they have two sons. 
Address: Springfield, Mass. 

BOWMAN, Edward Morris: 

Musician; born at Barnard, Vt., July 18, 
1848; son of Joseph and Asenath (Bur 
roughs) Bowman; descendant of Nathaniel 
Bo\vman, one of the founders and proprie 
tors of Watertown, Mass., who came from 
England with John Winthrop in 1630, and. 
on the maternal side, from Richard Warren 
and Sarah Tilley, Mayflower Pilgrims. He 
was graduated from St. Lawrence Univer 
sity, and afterward became a pupil in 
pianoforte of Dr. William Mason of New 
York City and of Franz Bendel of Berlin. 
He studied organ under John P. Morgan of 
New York City, Eduard Rohde and August 
Haupt, Berlin; Edouard Batiste and Alex 
ander Guilmant, Paris; and Sir Frederick 
Bridge, London; studied theory of music 
with Carl Friederich Weitzmann of Berlin, 
Sir George A. Macfarren and Dr. E. H. 
Turpin of London, and John P. Morgan of 
New York. He was organist of old Trinity 



Church, New York City, 1866-1867; teacher ! of modern languages at the University of 
and conductor, 1867-1887, at St. Louis, Mo., the City of New York in 1875, and the 
where he was organist and director of music same year joined the staff of the New York 
of the Union Methodist Episcopal Church, Independent. Since 1876 he has been pro- 



Second Presbyterian Church, and Second 
Baptist Church; then of Peddie Memorial 
Church (Newark, N. J.), 1887-1894, where 
he founded, on new and original lines, The 
Cecilian Choir. He was the founder in 
1895 and director of the Baptist Temple 



fessor of philosophy and dean of the Gradu 
ate School of Arts and Sciences of Boston 
University. In 1881 he received the degree 
of LL.D. from Ohio Wesleyan University. 
Dr. Bowne is an extensive contributor to 
philosophical and theological literature, and 



202 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



is the author of: The Philosophy of Her 
bert Spencer; Studies in Theism; Meta 
physics; Introduction 1o Psychological The 
ory; Philosophy of Theism; The Principles 
of Ethics; Theory of Thought and Knowl 
edge; The Christian Revelation; The Chris 
tian Life; The Atonement; The Immanence 
of God; Personalism, Studies in Christian 
ity; and contributions to reviews and mag 
azines. He is an honorary member of the 
Imperial Education Society of Japa,n. 
Traveled extensively in journey around 
world, 1900, and lectured before Imperial 
University at Tokyo, Japan, and at the 
other universities and schools of Japan. 
China and India. Address: 380 Longwood 
Avenue, Boston. 

BOWNE, Samuel W. : 

Manufacturer, chemist; born at Mont 
gomery, N. Y., Jan. 3, 1842; son of Cyrus 
H. and Hester (Wood) Bowne. He was 
educated at Montgomery Academy and 
commenced business in 1874 in the manu 
facture of Scott s Emulsion, which he made 
a great success. He is now of the firm of 
Scott and Bowne, chemists, is president 
and director of the Cold Process Company 
of New York, director of the Aetna Na 
tional Bank, the Independent Milk Product 
Company, R. H. Carter & Company, a!hd 
the Baldwin Steel Company of Charles- 
town, W. Va. Mr. Bowne is president of 
the Board of Trustees of the Drew Theo 
logical Seminary, and a trustee of the Syra 
cuse University, the Wesleyan University 
of Watertown, Conn., and of the New York 
City Church Extension and Missionary So 
ciety of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
He is a member of the Union League, Re 
publican, Knoll wood City and New York 
Athletic Clubs. Residence: 35 West 57th 
Street. Office: 411 Pearl Street, New 
York. 

BOYCE, William D.: 

Publisher, born in Allegheny County, Pa., 
June 16, 1858; son of David and Margaret 
J. Boyce. He was reared on a farm and 
received his early education in the public 
schools of his native county and taking a 



course at the University of Wooster, Ohio. 
He removed to Chicago in 1881. and be- 
came an advertising solicitor for a monthly 
magazine. In 1884 he organized a bureau 
of correspondents embracing twelve hun 
dred newspapers. He organized a patent 
inside publishing house, for which he se 
cured a large patronage, and was equally 
successful with a similar enterprise whicli 
he started in Winfield, Kansas. In co 
operation with two Eastern newspaper men 
he established the Chicago Blade, and after 
ward sold out his patent inside business 
and devoted his entire attention to building 
up the Blade, which proved a great success. 
Later he purchased the Chicago Ledger, 
which he also placed in -a prosperous condi 
tion and afterward established Boyce s 
Monthly Magazine, now the Woman s 
World, and other publications, all of which 
are published by W. D. Boyce & Company, 
of which he is the president and director. 
He is also president and director of the W. 
D. Boyce Paper Mills Company, and of the 
the Marseilles Land and Water Power Com 
pany, and is owner of a large office build 
ing at 112 Dearborn Street, Chicago. Mr. 
Boyce has been actively identified with poli 
tics as a Republican. He married in Pitts 
burgh, Pa., in 1883, Mary Jane Beacon, 
and they have three children. Address: 
112 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

BO YD, David Ross: 

Former president of the University of 
Oklahoma; born in Coshocton. Ohio, July 
31, 1853. He was graduated from Wooster 
University, Ohio, as A.B., 1878, later re 
ceiving the degrees of A.M. and Ph.D. He 
became principle of high schools at Bellevue, 
Ohio, on graduation, but resigned this po 
sition in 1879 to accept a similar one at 
Van Wert, Ohio. During the years from 
1880-1892 he was superintendent of schools 
at Van Wert, Ohio, and at Kansas City, 
Kan., and in the latter year was elected to 
the office of president of the University of 
Oklahoma. He organized that institution 
and remained at its head till July 1st, 1909, 
on which date he became special commis 
sioner of education for the Presbyterian 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



203 



Board of Home Missions. Ho lias been di- j been judge of the Uniled Slates District 
rector of the National Educational Associa- 1 Court for the western district of Nortli 
tion, and is president ex officio of the Okla- j Carolina. Judge Boyd is ;( member of the 
honia Board of Education. He married in | North Carolina Bar Association, and of 
Keene, Ohio,^ Sept. 6. J.882, Jennie Thompson, other professional organizations. He mar 
ried, Sept. 12. 1808. Sallie Hott, Address: 
Greensboro. N. C. 



Address: Norman, Oklahoma. 
BOYD, George Washington: 



General passenger agent of the Pennsyl 
vania Railroad; born in Indianapolis, Ind., 
Aug. 1. 1849. He was educated at the high 
school there, and in October, 1863. entered 
the freight office of the Cleveland, Columbus, 
Cincinnati and Indianapolis Railroad, where 
he served as clerk and chief clerk. Tn 
June, 1872, he was appointed cashier of the 
Passenger Department of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad at the general office in Philadel 
phia, and in 1874 he was promoted to the 
chief clerkship of the department. In 1882 
he became the first incumbent of the newly- 
created office of assistant general passenger 
agent. He discharged the duties of this of 
fice with conspicuous ability and success 
until May, 1903, when he was made general 
passenger agent. His work in favor of 
abolishing illegal ticket selling by scalpers, 
and his efforts toward developing the per 
sonally conducted system of travel under 
the direct supervision of railroad companies 
are universally acknowledged. Residence: 
125 S. 22d Street. Office: 401 Broad Street 
Station, Philadelphia. 

BOYD, James E.: 

Jurist; born in Alamance County, N. C., 
Feb. 14, 1845. He was educated at Gra 
ham Academy and Davidson College, in 
North Carolina. He enlisted in the Con 
federate Army during the Civil War, serv 
ing as private in the 13th North Carolina 
Infantry and the 1st North Carolina Caval 
ry. At the close of the war he was admit 
ted to the bar of Nortli Carolina, and was 
elected to the Legislature of that state in 
1874, serving for one year, when he became 
delegate to the State Constitutional Con 
vention. From 1880-1885 he was United 
States district attorney for the western dis 
trict of North Carolina, and from 1897- 
1900 was assistant attorney general of the 
United States. Since July 11, 1900, he has 



BOYD, John Covert: 

Medical director, U. S. Navy; born in and 
appointed from South Carolina. He en 
tered the service April 3, 1873 as assistant 
surgeon U. S. Navy, and has served in the 
various duties of the Medical Corps of the 
navy up to the rank of medical director, 
his present commission being dated June 
20, 1903, and his present duty being that 
of medical director in command of the Na 
val Medical School; also president of the 
Naval Examining Board at the Naval Medi 
cal School. Washington, D. C. Address: 
1836 16th Street, Washington, D. C. 

BOYNTON, Charles Augustus: 

Journalist; born in West Stockbridge, 
Mass. Sept. 30, 1836; son of Rev. Charles 
B. and Maria (Van Buskirk) Boynton. He 
was graduated from Woodward College, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and Knox College, Illi 
nois. His first newspaper work was for The 
Christian Nation, edited by his father. He 
became the New York agent for the Western 
Associated Press in 1870, and was appointed 
superintendent of the Southern Division in 
1894 with headquarters in Washington, a 
position he has filled with marked success, 
being responsible also for the news gather 
ing relative to national and international 
events arising in Washington and conduct 
ing the work of a large Washington bu 
reau in addition to directing and consolidat 
ing the news reports of the south. He is a 
charter member of the Gridiron Club and 
the dean of the newspaper corps in Washing 
ton. He married, Oct. 25, 1866, Maretta 
Hudson. Residence: 1357 Princeton Street. 
Office: Evening Star Building, Washing 
ton, D. C. 

BOYNTON, Nathan Smith: 

Founder of the Knights of the Maccabees; 
born at Port Huron, Mich., June 23, 1837. 



204 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



After receiving a high school education he 
engaged in mercantile business in his na 
tive city. He served as private in the Civil 
War. Was promoted to 1st Lieut., then 
captain and last major of his regiment. 
In 1868 he was elected to the Michigan 
legislature, served as mayor of Port Huron 
in 1874-1875 and again two terms from 
1894-1898. He was elected to the Consti 
tutional Convention 1907. He became 
owner and editor of the Port Huron Press 
in 1870. Having founded the Order of the 
Knights of the Maccabees, he has devoted 
his attention since 1881 to that organiza 
tion, and now fills the office of past great 
commander Modern Maccabees. He is the 
author of Boynton s Parliamentary Rules; 
The History of the Ancient and Modern 
Maccabees; The Dependency Plan; and Fra 
ternal Co-operation. He married in Cin 
cinnati, Ohio, June 29, 1859, Annie Fields. 
He is prominent in the affairs of Southern 
Florida and spends his winters in that sec 
tion on his large plantation and hotel in the 
town of Boynton on the Atlantic coast 
twelve miles south of Palm Beach. Ad 
dress: Port Huron, Mich. 

BRACKETT, John Quincy Adams: 

Lawyer and ex-governor; born at Brad 
ford, N. H., June 8, 1842; son of Ambrose 
S. and Nancy (Brown) Brack ett. He re 
ceived his academic education at Harvard 
University from which he was graduated 
as A. B. with honors in 1865, and in 1868 
he was graduated from the Harvard Law 
School with the degree of LL.B. He was 
admitted in 1868 to the bar of Massachu 
setts and has ever since practised law in 
Boston. In 1872 he was elected by the Re 
publican party, to the common council of 
Boston, holding that office for four succes 
sive terms and being president of it the 
last year. Upon the expiration of his 
fourth term in the council he was elected 
in 1876 to the lower house of the Massa 
chusetts Legislature, and with the exception 
of two years a member continuously until 
1887, and was elected speaker of the House 
of the last two years. Upon the expiration 
of the term ending 1887, Mr. Brackett took 



his oath of office as lieutenant-governor with 
Oliver Ames as governor, and was twice re- 
elected. In 1889 he was elected governor 
of Massachusetts and served till 1891. He 
was delegate at large to the National Repub 
lican Convention of 1892, and presidential 
elector at large in 1896-1900. He is presi 
dent of the Middlesex Club and member of 
several other clubs. He married, June 20, 
1878, Angie M. Peck, of Arlington, Mass. 
Residence: Arlington, Mass. Address: 
53 State Street, Boston. 

BRACKETT, Walter M.: 

Artist; born in Unity, Me., June 14, 1823. 
He was self-educated and began painting in 
1843, attaining considerable celebrity as a 
portrait painter, but later took up the 
painting of game fish, especially of salmon 
and trout. He was one of the founders and" 
is an ex-president of the Boston Art Club. 
For fifty years he has been an exhibitor in 
Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Vienna, 
London and other cities, receiving medals 
from the Universal Exposition at Vienna, 
Centennial Exposition at Philadelphia, 
medal and diploma at the Fishery Exposi 
tion at London. His works are in the Crys 
tal Palace, London, in Buckingham Palace, 
London, the War Department, Washington, 
and in the collections of Lord Dufferin, the 
Liverpool Art Association, and many oth 
ers. Address: 154 Boylston treet, Boston, 
Mass. 

BRADFORD, Edward G.: 

United States judge; born at Wilming 
ton, Del., March 12, 1848; son of Hon. Ed 
ward G. and Mary Alicia (Hey ward) Brad 
ford. He received his preparatory educa 
tion at the Delaware Military Academy, 
and then entered Yale, from which he was 
graduated with the degree of B.A. in 1868. 
He studied law and was admitted to the 
bar, May 9, 1870, practising at Wilmington, 
Del., until appointed May 11, 1897, as 
United States district judge for the Dis 
trict of Delaware. Judge Bradford mar 
ried at Wilmington, Del., Sept. 18, 1872, 
Eleuthera P. du Pont. Address: Wilming 
ton, Del. 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



BRADFORD, Gamaliel: 

Retired banker; born in Boston, Jan. 15 
1831; son of Gamaliel Bradford and Sophia 
Rice Bradford. He is the fifth of his name 
and is descendant in the eighth generation 
from William Bradford, governor of Ply 
mouth Colony. He was graduated from 
Harvard as A.B. in the Class of 1849. Mr. 
Bradford was a member of the banking 
firm of Blake Brothers and Company, Bos 
ton, from 1858-1868, and since the latter 
year he has been retired from active busi 
ness, devoting his attention largely to his 
torical and economic researches. He is au 
thor of a two volume work, The Lesson of 
Popular Government, published in 1898, as 
well as various monographs and contribu 
tions to reviews, etc. He is a member of 
the Massachusetts Historical Society, the 
Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati, 
and the Massachusetts Society of Mayflower 
Descendants (of which he was the first gov 
ernor). He is Independent in politics, and 
has taken an active interest in the improve 
ment of the government of the city, state 
and nation. Mr. Bradford married, at New- 
buryport, Mass., Oct. 30, 1861, Clara Crown- 
inshield Kinsman, who died in 1866. Ad 
dress: 502 Beacon Street, Boston. 

BRADFORD, Gamaliel, Jr.: 

Author; born in Boston, Oct. 9, 1863; 
son of Gamaliel Bradford and Clara (Kins 
man) Bradford. He attended the public 
schools of Wellesley, Mass., and was tutored 
privately for Harvard and entered the 
class of 1886. After a few monihs he was 
obliged to leave on account of ill-health, 
and was therefore not graduated. He has 
never engaged in any business or profes 
sion, and having some independent means 
has devoted himself to literature. He has 
published numerous magazine articles and 
the volumes, Types of American Character, 
1895; A Pageant of Life (Poems), 1904; and 
, the novels: The Private Tutor, 1904; Be 
tween Two Masters, 1906; Matthew Por 
ter, 1908. Mr. Bradford married at Welles- 
ley, Mass., Oct. 30, 1886, Helen Hubbard 
Ford, and they have two children. Ad 
dress: Wellesley Hills, Mass. 



205 

BRADLEY, Herbert E.: 

Lawyer; born at Brooklin, Ont., Canada, 
Dec. 20, 1874; son of Thomas and Margaret 
(Bradshaw) Bradley. His grandfather, 
John Bradley, was one of the earliest set 
tlers in York County, Ontario, where the 
City of Toronto is now located, at that time 
known as Muddy York, and later as York 
Center, and the present Bradley home 
stead in Ontario County has been in pos 
session of the family for more than one 
hundred years. Mr. Bradley was educated 
in the public schools of Ontario, Port Perry 
High School, and the Whitby Collegiate In 
stitute, Ontario. He has since been gradu 
ated LL.B. He afterward attended the 
law department of the University of Michi 
gan, and was a special student in North 
western Law School, 1901. Mr. Bradley 
taught in Canadian schools, 1893-1895; 
studied law in Toronto, Canada, and in 
1896 went to Chicago, where he was con 
nected with Morgan and Wright, rubber 
manufacturers, until 1898. He afterward 
engaged in the general practice of law, be 
coming associated in 1900, with Messrs. Na 
than William MacChesney and Frederick 
W. Becker, in Chicago, and being admitted 
to partnership in the firm of MacChesney, 
Becker and Bradley in 1903. He was elect 
ed in 1903, secretary of the Commercial 
Law League of America, and he is largely 
nterested, with his partner, Col. MacChes 
ney, in Chicago real estate. Mr. Bradley 
is a member of the Seventh Ward Republi 
can Organization in Chicago, is a Mason, 
is a Part regent of Fort Dearborn Council, 
Royal Arcanum, and a member of the Illi- 
lois, Hamilton and Twentieth Century 
Jlubs. Residence: 4526 Lake Avenue. Of 
fice: 108 La Salle Street, Chicago. 



BRADLEY, Milton: 

Manufacturer; born in Vienna, Me., Nov. 
8, 1838. He was educated in the Law- 

ence Scientific School of Harvard Univer 
sity and began life as civil and mechanical 
engineer. He became interested in lithogra- 
ihy and through that in the publishing of 
ionic amusements. He organized the Mil- 

on Bradley Company at Springfield, Mass., 



206 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



for the manufacture and publication of home 
amusements and kindergarten and school 
material and supplies, in 1863. In 1868 
he published Paradise of Childhood, by Pro 
fessor Edward Wiebe, then of Springfield, 
which was the first authentic presentation 
of the subject of kindergarten instruction 
in the United States. Soon afterward he 
undertook the preparation of the line of 
material necessary for the introduction of 
kindergartens in this country. The need for 
a newer and closer classification and im 
provement of colors in kindergarten mater 
ial became apparent, and from this has de 
veloped what is known as the Bradley sys 
tem of color instruction, based on spectrum 
standard colors with a complete and defi 
nite color nomenclature. At an early day 
he published Work and Play, a magazine 
for children. He is author and publisher of : 
Color in the School Room, a manual for 
teachers; Color in the Kindergarten; Ele 
mentary Color; and Water Colors in the 
Schoolroom. Address: Springfield, Mass. 

BEADLEY, Thomas W.: 

Member of Congress, and retired manu 
facturer; born April 6, 1844. He served 
in the Union Army as private to captain 
in the 124th New York Volunteers. He 
was aide-de-camp to Major-General Mott, 
Third Division, Second Army Corps, and 
was awarded a Congressional medal of 
honor for gallantry at Chancellorsville. He 
was brevetted major of U. S. Volunteers for 
meritorious service during the campaign 
terminating at Appomattox; was seriously 
wounded at Gettysburg, again wounded at 
the Wilderness, and again before Peters 
burg. He was elected a member of the 
General Assembly of New York, in 1876, 
and was chairman of the Committee on 
Military Affairs, and assistant inspector- 
general of the National Quard. He was a 
delegate to the National Republican conven 
tions, in 1892, 1896, and ,1900, voting at 
each convention for William McKinley. He 
was elected as a Republican from the 
Twentieth District of New York in 1902 
to the Fifty-eighth Congress, and reflected 
in 1904, 1906, and 1908, and is now serving 
in the Sixty-first Congress. He is a member 



of the Chattanooga and Gettysburg Battle 
fields Commission; is a companion of the 
first class in the military order of the Loyal 
Legion, and a member of the City Club 
of Newburg, N. Y. and the Army and 
Navy Club of New York City. Address: 
Walden, N. Y. 

BRADLEY, William O Connell: 

United States senator; born near Lancas 
ter, Garrard County, Ky., March 18, 1847. 
He was educated in the ordinary local 
schools, never having attended college, and 
leaving school at the age of fourteen be 
cause of the Civil War. He twice ran 
away from home and joined the Union 
Army, but on account of youthfulness was 
taken from the service by his father. He 
was licensed to practice law on examination 
by two judges, under special act of the 
Legislature, when only eighteen years old, 
and was afterward admitted to all the Fed 
eral Courts, including the Supreme Court 
of the United States and established a 
large practice at Louisville. He was elect 
ed prosecuting attorney of Garrard County 
in 1870, presidential elector and candidate 
for Congress, 1872, and again candidate for 
Congress on the Republican ticket, 1876. 
He was defeated for governor in 1887, 
but elected governor, 1895, serving until 
1899; was Republican nominee and four 
times voted for by his party prior to 1908, 
and in February, 1908, was elected United 
States Senator, in which office his term 
of service will expire March 3, 1915. Sen 
ator Bradley is the recognized Republican 
leader of his state, has been delegate-at- 
large to six Republican National Conven 
tions, and was three times elected member 
of the National Republican Committee. He 
received 105 votes for Vice-President in the 
National Convention of 1888, and was en 
dorsed for President by the Kentucky 
State Convention in 1896. Address: Beech- 
mont, Jefferson County, Ky. 

BRADY, Anthony Nicholas: 

Capitalist; born in Lille, France, Aug. 
22, 1843. He came to the United States 
with his parents in childhood, and attend 
ed school until thirteen years old. He 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



207 



opened a tea store in Albany, N. Y., in I 
1804, and afterward added other stores, j 
building up a business of large dimensions. 
He is also interested in granite quarries, 
and gas and electric lighting corporations 
in Albany, Troy, Chicago, New York, and 
other cities, and in traction lines in Al 
bany, Troy, New York City, and elsewhere. 
He is one of the organizers of the Metro 
politan Traction Company of New York, 
which put in operation the Columbus Ave 
nue and Lexington Avenue and Broadway 
Systems. The Providence, R. I., street rail 
ways were purchased by Mr. Brady s asso 
ciation on his advice and become extremely 
profitable. About ten years ago Mr. Brady 
became active in the work of reorganizing 
what is now known as the Brooklyn Rapid 
Transit Company, and is now chairman of 
the Board of Directors, and he has been 
the moving spirit in Washington, Philadel 
phia and other large cities in these lines of 
enterprise. He married Marcia A. Myer, 
and they have three children. Residence: 
411 State Street, Albany, N. Y.; summer 
address: Ocean Crest, West End, N. J. 
Address: 54 Wall Street, New York City. 

BRADY, Cyrus Townsend: 

Clergyman, author; born at Allegheny, 
Pa., Dec. 20, 1861; son of Jasper Ewing and 
Harriet Cora (Townsend) Brady. He was 
graduated at the United States Naval Acad 
emy at Annapolis in 1883, but did not en 
ter the Naval service, taking up work on 
various railroads, instead, and studying for 
the ministry. He studied theology under 
Bishop Worthington, of Nebraska. The de 
gree of LL.D. was conferred upon him by 
St. John s College Annapolis, in 1902. He 
was ordered deacon of the Episcopal Church 
in 1889, becoming a priest in 1890. Until 
1895 he occupied several missionary sta 
tions and rectorates in Nebraska, Missouri 
and Colorado, and was also archdeacon of 
Kansas. In that year he was made arch 
deacon of Pennsylvania, which position he 
filled for four years, until his appointment 
to St. Paul s Church, Overbrook, Pa. Here 
he officiated until 1902, resigning his pasto 
rate to give his time entirely to literary 
work. He resided in Brooklyn, N. Y., until 



early in 1905, when he was called to the 
rectorate of Trinity Church, Toledo, 0., and 
went West to accept that pulpit. In 1909 
he accepted the rectorate of St. George s 
Church, Kansas City, Mo. During the 
Spanish War, Dr. Brady was chaplin of 
the First Regiment of Pennsylvania In 
fantry, and is member of the Order of the 
Spanish War. He is also member of the 
Sons of the Revolution, Society of Colonial 
Wars, Society of Foreign Wars; of the 
American Academy of Political and Social 
Sciences. Dr. Brady is the author of a 
number of novels, historical and contempor- 
:iry, of sermons and devotional books and 
of juvenile books of historical interest, as 
well as of several histories of the pioneer 
days, numbering 43 volumes. He is a 
frequent contributor to the magazines. He 
is author of: For Love of Country, 1898; 
American Fights and Fighters, series, 1900; 
Commodore Paul Jones, 1901 ; When Blades 
are Out and Love s Afield, 1901; Stephen 
Decatur, 1902; The Southerners, 1903; 
Richard the Brazen, 1904; The Conquest of 
the Southwest, 1905; The True Andrew 
Jackson, 1906; The Lore Test, 1907; The 
Patriots, 1908; The Ring and the Man, 
1909; etc. He was married, first, to Sid 
ney Guthrie (deceased), and, second, to 
Mary Barrett. He has six children. Resi 
dence: Haddon Hall, Kansas City, Mo. 

BHADY, John: 

Roman Catholic bishop; born in County 
Caven, Ireland, in 1842. He studied at 
All Hallows College, Ireland, and was or 
dained priest in 1864. He became assistant 
pastor at Newburyport, Mass., remaining 
there from 1864-1868. Although since 1868 
he has been pastor of St. Joseph s Church 
at Amesbury, continuing his parochial 
work there, he was appointed, in 1891, aux 
iliary bishop of Boston and consecrated tit 
ular bishop of Alabama, in order to re 
lieve Archbishop Williams of many episco 
pal labors. Address: 55 Broadway, South 
Boston, Mass. 

BEADY, John Green: 

Former governor of Alaska; born in New 
York in 1849. He worked his way through 



208 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Yale College and Union Theological Semi 
nary, and was graduated from the latter. 
He then engaged 1700 acres of land in Tex 
as, proposing to establish an industrial re 
form colony for New York slum boys, but 
this project was abandoned owing to lack of 
funds to carry it on. In 1878 he went to 
Alaska as missionary and later became man 
ager of the Sitka Trading Company. He 
was appointed governor of Alaska, June 16, 
1897, and served until April 30, 1906. On 
retirement he engaged in commercial pur 
suits connected with the development of 
Alaska. Address : Boston, Mass. 

BRADY, John J.: 

Jurist; born in New York City, Aug. 30, 
1853. He was graduated from Fordham 
University, A.B., 1872, and received from 
that University the degree of LL.D., 1906. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1876, and en 
gaged in successful practice as a lawyer in 
New York City until elected on the Demo 
cratic ticket in November, 1906, judge of 
the Supreme Court of New Y r ork for the 
term expiring Dec. 31,, 1920. Residence: 
2395 Valentine Avenue, New York City. 

BRAIN, Belle Marvel: 

Author; born in Springfield, Ohio, Aug. 
4, 1859; daughter of William Grey and 
Mary (Dyer) Brain. Miss Brain was edu 
cated in the public schools of Cincinnati 
and Springfield, Ohio, and after graduation 
from the Springfield High School in 1878, 
served as supervisor of drawing in the pub 
lic schools of Springfield, Ohio, until June, 
1896, when she gave up the position on ac 
count of broken health, and then turned to 
literary work, as contributor to magazines 
and papers, principally religious, and is au 
thor of the following books: Fuel for 
Missionary Fires; Weapons for Temperance 
Warfare; Quaint Thoughts of an Old-Time 
Army Chaplain; The Morning Watch; The 
Transformation of Hawaii; Fifty Mission 
ary Programs; Fifty Missionary Stories; 
Missionary Headings for Missionary Pro 
grams; Holding the Ropes; Redemption of 
the Red man; All About Japan; Adventures 
with Four-footed Folk. Miss Brain is a 



Presbyterian in denominational connection. 
Address: 32 Rosedale Court, Detroit, Mich. 



BRAINARD, David Legge: 

Lieutenant-colonel, U. S. A.; born at Nor 
way, Herkimer County, N. Y., Dec. 21, 
1856. After attending the State Normal 
School at Courtland, N. Y., he entered the 
United States Army as a private, Sept. 18, 
1876, and later was promoted to corporal 
and sergeant, and participated in the Sioux, 
Bannock and Nez Perce Indian campaigns, 
1877-1878. He was wounded in the face and 
right hand in the fight with hostile Sioux 
Indians at Little Muddy Creek, Mont., May 
7, 1877; and was detailed for duty, with the 
Howgate Arctic Exploring Expedition, in 
1880. In 1881 he joined the Lady Frank 
lin Bay Artie Expedition, under Lieutenant 
(now general) A. W. Greely, serving with 
it three years; was associated with the late 
Lieutenant Lock wood in the exploration of 
the interior of Grinnell Land and the north 
west coast of Greenland; and on May 13, 
1882, reached the then highest point Nortli 
ever attained by any nation, namely, lati 
tude 83 24 30" N. He was one "of the 
seven survivors rescued at Cape Sabine 
by Lieutenant Commander (now Rear Ad 
miral) W. S. Schley, U. S. N., in June, 
1884. Upon his return to the United States 
lie was transferred as sergeant to the Sig 
nal Service; later commissioned second lieu 
tenant, Second U. S. Cavalry " for dis 
tinguished and meritorious services in con 
nection with the Arctic Expedition, 1881- 
1884." He was promoted first lieutenant, 
Aug., 1893; captain Subsistence Depart- 
I ment, Oct., 1896; and in Dec., 1897 was de- 
i tailed for duty on the Alaska Relief Expe 
dition for the destitute miners at Davvson 
City; promoted to lieutenant-colonel Sub 
sistence Department, U. S. Volunteers, May, 
1898; ordered to the Philippine Islands as 
chief commissary of the military forces, 
serving on the staffs of Major-General Mer- 
ritt and Major-General Otis; promoted col 
onel and chief commissary of U. S. Volun 
teers, Nov., 1898; promoted Major, Subsist 
ence Department, U. S. Army, Feb., 1900; 
promoted lieutenant-colonel U. S. A., Aug. 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



20!) 



28, 1905. Lieutenant-Colonel Brainard is 
a fellow of the American Geographical So 
ciety; member of the National Geographi 
cal Society, the Arctic Club, the Explorers 
Club, the New York Club, New York Ath 
letic Club and Army and Navy Club. etc. 
He was awarded the Back Grant of the Roy 
al Geographical Society for 1885, " for spe 
cial services in connection with his work of 
exploration in the Arctic Regions." Address : 
Care War Department, Washington, D. C. 

BRAINERD, Ezra: 

President of Middlebury College; born at 
St. Albans, Vt., Dec. 17, 1844. He was 
graduated from Middlebury College in 1864, 
and was tutor there from 1864-1866. He 
was graduated from Andover Theological 
Seminary in 1868, and became professor of 
rhetoric and English Literature from 1868- 
1889 and of physics and applied mathe 
matics from 1880-1885, at Middlebury Col 
lege, of which he was president twenty- 
three years, 1885-1908. He was one of 
three commissioners appointed in 1887 to 
revise the school laws of Vermont, and has 
made important contributions to the Botany 
and Geology of that State. The degree of 
LL.D. was conferred upon him in 1888 by 
Ripon College, Wisconsin, and the Univer 
sity of Vermont,, and that of D.D. by How 
ard University in 1900. Address: Mid 
dlebury, Vt. 

BRALEY, Henry King: 

Jurist; born at Rochester, Mass., March 
17, 1850; son of Samuel Tripp and Mary 
A. (King) Braley. He was educated at 
Rochester and Pierce Academies and receiv 
ed the honorary degree of A.M. from Dart 
mouth College in 1902. He was admitted to 
the Plymouth County bar in 1873, and prac 
tised law at Fall River, Mass., until 1891. 
He was elected city solicitor of Fall River 
in 1874 and mayor in 1882-1883, was ap 
pointed examiner for the bar of Bristol 
County in 1890 by the Supreme Judicial 
Court, and in 1891 became associate jus 
tice, of the Superior Court of Massachu 
setts by appointment of Governor Russell, 
holding that office until 1902, when he was 
appointed by Governor Crane to his present 



office as associate justice of the Supreme 
Judicial Court of Massachusetts. Judge 
Braley is a Democrat in his political views, 
and a Unitarian in his religious affiliation. 
He is a member of the American Academy 
of Political and Social Science, of the Uni 
versity and Union Clubs of Boston, and the 
Quequechan Club of Fall River. Judge Bra- 
ley married at Bridgewater, Mass., April 26, 
1875, Caroline Ward Leach. Address: Fall 
River, Mass. 

BRANCH, Mary Lydia Bolles: 

Author; born in New London, Conn., 
June 13, 1840; daughter of John Rogers 
and Mary (Hempstead) Bolles. She at 
tended the high school of her native town, 
1854-1858, and Mr. Emerson s School, Bos 
ton, 1859-1860. She was married in New 
London, April 21, 1870, to John Locke 
Branch, and has had two children, John 
Bolles Branch, who died in 1888, and Anna 
Hempstead Branch. After her marriage she 
lived in Painesville, Ohio, until 1875, then 
in New York City till 1882, and in Brook 
lyn, N. Y., 1882-1900; since then in New 
London, Conn. She began writing in girl 
hood, first, for a few years, under the pen- 
name of August Bell, and after that under 
her own name. She is author of: The 
Kanter Girls; The Manner of Life of Nan 
cy Hempstead; A Visit to Newfoundland; 
Aunt Patty s Schoolroom. Mrs. Branch is 
a member of the Lucretia Shaw Chapter, 
Daughters of the American Revolution, So 
ciety of Mayflower Descendants in Connecti 
cut, New London County Historical Society, 
Hempstead Family Association, the Froe- 
bel Society of Brooklyn, N. Y., and the 
Saturday Club of New London. Address: 
Hempstead House, New London, Conn. 

BRANDEGEE, Frank Bosworth: 

United States Senator; born in New Lon 
don, Conn., July 8, 1864; son of Augustus 
and Nancy Christina (Bosworth) Brande- 
gce. He was graduated from Yale as B.A. 
in 1885, studied law, and was admitted to 
the bar in 1888. He has since then contin 
ued in the practice of law at New London, 
Conn., where he is now a member of the law 
firm of Brandegee, Noyes and Brennan. He 



210 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



was a representative in the General Assem 
bly of Connecticut in 1888, and for ten 
years was corporation counsel of the City 
of New London. He was a delegate to the 
Republican National Conventions of 1888, 
1892, 1900 and 1904, speaker of the Con 
necticut House of Representatives in 1899, 
and in 1902 he was elected from the Third 
Connecticut District as a representative to 
the second session of the Fifty- seventh Con 
gress to fill a vacancy, and was reflected 
to the Fifty-eighth and Fifty-ninth Con 
gresses. On May 9, 1905, he was elected 
to the United States Senate to fill the unex- 
pired term of the late Orville H. Platt, ex 
piring in 1909 and was reflected in Janu 
ary, 1909, for a full term expiring March 
3, 1915.. Address: New London, Conn. 

BRANDEIS, Louis Dembitz: 

Lawyer; born in Louisville, Ky., Nov. 13, 
1856; son of Adolph and Fredericka (Dem 
bitz) Brandeis. He studied at the Annen 
Realschule at Dresden, Germany, from 
1873-1875. Returning to the United States 
in 1875, he became a law student at Har 
vard University where lie was graduated 
in 1877, with the degree of LL.B. and took 
a post-graduate course. The honorary de 
gree of A.M. was conferred upon him by 
Harvard in 1891, and he was, in 1895, made 
honorary member of the Harvard Chapter 
of the Phi Beta Kappa. From 1878-1879 he 
practised law in St. Louis. In 1879 formed 
a partnership with Samuel D. Warren, prac 
tising in Boston, Mass., under the firm 
name of Warren and Brandeis until 1897, 
when the firm of Brandeis, Dunbar and 
Nutter was formed. Mr. Brandeis devised 
and was instrumental in establishing the 
Massachusetts system of saving bank insur 
ance and pensions for wage earners. He 
took an active part in opposition to the pro 
posed merger by the New York, New Haven 
and Hartford Railroad, of steam railroad 
transportation, electric trolley roads and 
steamboat lines, east of New York. He 
married in New York City, March 23, 1891, 
Alice Goldmark, and they have two daugh 
ters. Residence: 6 Otis Place. Office: 161 
Devonshire Street, Boston, Mass. 



BRANNAN, John Winters: 

Physician; born in Cincinnati, Ohio, Feb. 
14, 1853. He was graduated from Harvard 
College in 1874, and at Harvard Medical 
School in 1878. He was physician at the 
Massachusetts General Hospital, from 1877 
to 1878. After studying in Paris, Vienna 
and Strasburg, he returned to America and 
practised medicine in Boston, Colorado 
Springs and, since 1884, in New York. He 
then became consulting physician at the 
Bellevue Hospital and attending physician 
at the hospitals of the Health Department. 
He is a member of the American Medical 
Association, the Association of American 
Physicians, the American Climatological 
Association, the New York Academy of 
Medicine, the New York County Medical 
Society, the Pathological Society, the Har 
vard Medical Society, the Society of Med 
ical Jurisprudence, the Practitioners Soci 
ety, the Medical and Surgical Society, the 
Neurological Society and the Bellevue Hos 
pital Alumni Society, and also of the Uni 
versity, Harvard, Garden City Golf and 
Century Clubs. He married in New York 
City, Nov. 9, 1882, Eunice Dana, and they 
have two children. Address: 11 W. 12th 
Street, New York. 

BRANTLEY, William Gordon: 

Lawyer and congressman; born at Black- 
shear, Pierce County, Ga., Sept. 18, 1860. 
He was educated in the common schools 
at his native place, and was two years at 
the L niversity of Georgia. He read law 
with ex-congressman John C. Nicholls, and 
was admitted to the bar in Oct., 1861, 
practising at Blackshear until 1889, when 
he removed to Brunswick, Ga. He repre 
sented Pierce County in the Georgia House 
of Representatives in 1884 and 1885, repre 
sented the Third Senatorial District in the 
Georgia Senate in 1886 and 1887, and was 
elected solicitor-general (prosecuting attor 
ney) of Brunswick Circuit in 1888 for a 
term of four years, and was reflected in 
1892. In 1896 he was elected from the 
Eleventh Georgia District to the Fifty- 
fifth Congress, and has since been bienni 
ally elected, and is now serving in the 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Sixty-first Congress, expiring March 3, 
1911. He is a Democrat in politics. Ad 
dress : Brunswick, Ga. 



BRATTON, Theodore Du Bose: 

Bishop of Mississippi ; born at Winns- 
boro, S. C., Nov. 11, 1862; son of John and! 
Elizabeth Porcher (Du Bose) Bratton. He 
was educated at the University of the 
South, graduating from the theological 
course in 1887 and receiving the degree of 
B.D. in 1889. He received the degree of 
D.D. from his Alma Mater in 1901. He 
took orders as deacon of the Episcopal 
church in 1887 and was ordained priest in 
1888 by Bishop Howe. He was missionary 
at York, Lancaster and Chester, S. C., be 
coming in 1888, rector of the Church of the 
Advent, Spartanburg, S. C. After eleven 
years of activity., he became rector of St. 
Mary s School at Raleigh, N. C., continuing 
until 1903, when he became Bishop of Mis 
sissippi. He was consecrated by Bishops j 
Dudley, Weed, Nelson, Gailor, Johnston and [ 
Beckwitli. He is author of: The Ministry 
of the Laity; Christian Education; The 
Church s Duty, and other published ad 
dresses. On July 17, 1888, he married at 
Tallahassee, Fla., Lucy Beverly Randolph, 
now deceased . In Aug., 1906, he married 
Mrs. Ivy Perrin Gass, of Abbeville, S. C. 
Address : Jackson, Miss. 

BRAWLEY, William H.: 

United States judge; born at Chester, 
S. C., May 13, 1841; son of H. C. and 
Harriet R. (Foote) Brawley. He was grad 
uated from South Carolina College in 1860, 
with the degree of A.B., and that college 
conferred upon him the degree of LL.D. 
in 1905. He studied law after the war 
between the States, in which he served on 
the Confederate side, and engaged in prac 
tice at Chester, S. C., practising there until 
his removal to Charleston in 1874. He be 
came prominent in the political activities 
of the State as a Democrat, was solicitor 
of the Sixth Judicial Circuit of South Caro 
lina from 1868 to 1874, was a member of 
the South Carolina Legislature from 1880 
to 1890, and in 1890 was elected as a Dem 
ocrat to the Fifty-second Congress. He was 



211 

reflected to the Fifty-third Congress in 
1892, serving until appointed by President 
Cleveland in Feb., 1894, as United States 
judge for the District of South Carolina. 
Address: Charleston, S. C. 

BRAXTON, Allen Caperton: 

Lawyer; born at Union, Monroe County, 
W. Va., Feb. 6, 1862; son of Dr. Tomlin 
and Mary (Caperton) Braxton. He studied 
law in a lawyer s office and at the University 
of Virginia and was admitted to the bar 
of Virginia in 1883, and began to practise 
law at Staunton, Va. He was for several 
years Commonwealth s attorney and city 
attorney of that city. During the year 
1901-1902, he was delegate to the Consti 
tutional Convention of Virginia, when the 
Constitution of that State was revised, and 
served as chairman of the Committee on 
Corporations and as a member of several 
others. Mr. Braxton is an authority on 
corporations, writing several articles on 
the subject and formulating the powers and 
laying the foundation of the Virginia Cor 
poration Commission for the purpose of 
regulating and controlling railways and all 
other public service corporations. He was 
a delegate at large from Virginia to the 
National Democratic Convention at St. 
Louis in 1904; and was president of the 
State Bar Association of Virginia and of 
the Business Men s Club of Richmond, Va. 
He is general counsel for the Richmond, 
Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad Co., 
and of the Washington Southern Railway 
Co., and is of the counsel for the receivers 
of the Seaboard Air Line Railway, and his 
firm are general advisory counsel for the 
Georgia and Florida Railway. He is a 
member of the Westmoreland, Common 
wealth and other clubs in Richmond. Ad 
dress: Richmond, Va. 

BRAY, Frank Chapin: 

Editor; born in Salineville, Ohio, May 7, 
1866; son of Rev. James Madison and Wil- 
helmina (Chapin) Bray. He was gradu 
ated from Wesleyan University, Conn., in 
1890. In 1891 he became city editor of the 
Middletown (Conn.) Herald, managing edi 
tor of the Erie (Pa.) Morning Dispatch 



212 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



from 1892 to 1894, served on the editorial 
staff of the Literary Digest from 1894 to 
1899, editing also in 1898 to 1899 the Phi 
Kappa Psi Shield, and departments in 
Werner s Magazine and The Chautauquan. 
In 1899 he became editor of The Chautau 
quan, and since June, 1902, has been editor- 
in-chief of the Chautauqua Literary and 
Scientific Circle Books, The Chautauquan 
Magazine, Chautauquan Weekly, Daily (in 
summer season ) , and quarterly, and the 
Chautauqua Special Courses for Home 
Reading. He is a member of the National 
Arts Club of New York, and the Literary 
Club of Chicago. He married at Washing 
ton, Pa., June 18, 1901, Gertrude McMil 
lan. Address: Chautauqua, N. Y. 

BRAY, John P.: 

American consul-general; born in Hen 
derson, Sibley County, Minn., Feb. 14, 1859. 
His parents migrated from the State of 
New York in the year 1855. He received a 
high school education and was graduated 
from the Commercial Department of St. 
Cloud College. He went to Grand Forks, 
N. Dak., in 1870, and was one of the pio 
neers of the Red River Valley. He engaged 
in the mercantile business, but was made 
the first county auditor of Grand Forks 
County. He served in this position for 
three terms (six years). When the State 
was taken into the Union he was elected its 
first State auditor in 1889 and reflected 
in 1891. Before the expiration of his term 
he was appointed postmaster at Grand 
Forks by President Harrison. In addition 
to these positions Mr. Bray was chairman 
of the commission appointed by the Legis 
lature to apportion and divide the public 
assets between the States of North and South 
Dakota. He was appointed by President 
McKinley consul-general at Melbourne, and 
re-appointed by President Roosevelt. Ad 
dress: American Consulate General, Mel 
bourne, Australia. 

BRAZER, Clarence Wilson: 

Architect; bom in Philadelphia, Pa., 
March 13, 1880; son of Christopher Brazer 
and Julia Wilson (Stackhouse) Brazer. He 
was educated at Asbury Park, N. J., High 



School, the Drexel Institute and Pennsyl 
vania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 
four years in various Philadelphia offices 
and four years in the office of Cass Gilbert 
and the Society of Beaux Arts Architects 
Ateliers, in New York City, and Europe, 
and has traveled and studied extensively in 
Europe. He has been engaged in practice 
as an architect in New York City since 
1902, Architect of Trinity P. E. Church, 
Seventh Avenue, New York City, the Pa 
vilion and other buildings on the board 
walk at Asbury Park, N. J., as well as 
many residences. In an open competition 
held in 1908 for the selection of an archi 
tect for the new Capitol of Porto Rico at 
San Juan, his design was recommended for 
second prize by the jury of architects from 
among 135 competitors. Mr. Brazer is a 
member of the T-Square Club of Philadel 
phia, and of the Architectural League of 
New York City. He married in Philadel 
phia April 25, 1905, Mary Ella Mendenhall. 
Address: 1133 Broadway, New York City. 

BRECKENRIDGE, Clifton Rhodes: 

Diplomatist; born in Lexington, Ky., 
Nov. 22, 1846. He was educated at schools 
in Kentucky and at the Washington Col 
lege, Va.; served as private in the Confed 
erate States Army, and as midshipman in 
the Confederate States Navy. In 1870 he 
moved to Arkansas, and engaged in cotton 
planting, and from 1883 to 1894 was a 
member of Congress, and served on the 
Ways and Means Committee during the 
greater part of his congressional service. 
He resigned from the 53d Congress and 
became United States Minister to Russia, 
from 1894 to 1897. On Nov. 21, 187G, he 
married in Memphis, Tenn., Catherine B. 
Carson. He is now president of the Arkan 
sas Valley Trust Company. Address: Fort 
Smith, Ark. 

BRECKENRIDGE, Ralph W. : 

Lawyer; born at Carlisle. Ohio, March 
14, I860; son of Charles F. and Mary Jane 
(Foster) Breckeiiridge. He is of old New 
England stock, his ancestor, James Breck 
eiiridge, having played a prominent part in 
founding the State of Vermont. His pa- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



213 



ternal grandmother was a Morton, having 
descended from Stephen Hopkins, who came 
over in the Mayflower, and from George 
Morton, who came over in the Ann. He 
was educated in the public schools of North 
ern Iowa, whither his father removed at the 
close of the Civil War. He began the study 
of law at Cresco, Iowa; was admitted to 
the bar in 1881, and located in Omaha that 
year. He was first associated with Wil 
liam R. Morris, now deceased, under the 
firm name of Morris and Breckenridge. For 
more than twenty years he has been associ 
ated with Mr. Charles J. Greene, and is now 
a member of the law firm of Greene, Breck 
enridge and Matters. Mr. Breckenridge is 
a prominent member of the Nebraska State 
Bar Association and was its president in 
the year 1905; he has been a member of 
the Executive Committee of the American 
Bar Association, and chairman of its stand 
ing Committee on Insurance since that 
committee was created. In 1904 he was 
a delegate from Nebraska to the Universal 
Congress of Lawyers and Jurists at St. 
Louis, Mo. He has made a special study 
of the legal problems related to insurance, 
upon which he has lectured at Yale, at the 
University of Nebraska, and at various 
other places. He is a member of the Sons 
of the American Revolution, the American 
Association for the Advancement of Science, 
and of the Connecticut Society of Mayflower 
descendants. He married Sept. 19, 1888, 
Harriet A. Allen, of Burlington, Vt., and 
lias two children. Residence: 3611 Jack 
son Street, Omaha. Address: 711 New 
York Building, Omaha, Neb. 

BRECKONS, Joseph Allison: 

Newspaper writer since 1884; born in 
St. Glair, Pa., Nov. 27, 1857. He was edu 
cated at Kewanee, 111., 18G4 to 1809; St. 
Glair, Pa., 1869 to 1871, and the academy 
at Millersville, Pa., 1871 to 1873. He 
published the Cheyenne (Wyo.) Daily Lead 
er, 1884 to 1893; was Wyoming correspond 
ent for the New York Sun, Chicago Record, 
! San Francisco Call, Omaha Bee, Salt Lake 
Tribune, Denver Republican, etc., 1894 to 
1900; established the Wyoming Industrial 
Journal in 1899, and has been the Wash 



ington correspondent for the Denver Repub 
lican, Salt Lake Herald, Hawaiian Star, 
and the Portland (Ore.) Telegram since 
1900; also acting as secretary to Senator 
Warren of Wyoming. He is a Republican, 
and is author of: Water Right Problems 
on Bear River ; also wrote : " The Carey 
Arid Act," in the Irrigation Age ; " Irri 
gated Colorado," in same ; and " Arid Land 
Legislation," in Illustrated West. In 1882 
he married in Philadelphia, Josephine 
Whit?. Address: 1814 G. Street, N. W. 
Office: 613 Fifteenth Street, N. W., Wash 
ington, D. C. 

BREHM, Marie Caroline: 

Lecturer; born in Sandusky, Ohio, June 
30, 1859; daughter of William Henry and 
Elizabeth (Rhode) Brehm. She was edu 
cated in the public schools of Sandusky, 
Ohio, and at home, with her father as in 
structor in civics and on public questions. 
She organized and taught a class of fifteen 
boys in Sunday school at 16 years, removed 
from Ohio to Illinois in 1882; was super 
intendent of a Sunday school in Claremont, 
111., 1887 ; principal of the Claremont 
schools, 1887-1888; district president and 
organizer of the Woman s Christian Tem 
perance Union, 1891-1896; State superin 
tendent of Institutes, 1895-1906, and State 
president, 1901-1906, vice-president since 
1907 of the Illinois Woman s Christian 
Temperance Union, and from 1895 to 1902 
superintendent of the National N. C. T. W. 
Franchise Department; elected in June, 
1906. special lecturer on scientific temper 
ance of the General Assembly s Permanent 
Committee of Temperance of the Presby 
terian Church in the U. S. A., of which 
she is now field secretary and lecturer. 
Miss Brehm was two years a trustee of the 
Frances E. Willard National Temperance 
Hospital, Chicago; was three times nomi 
nated by the Prohibition party for trustee 
of the State University (received 42,725 
votes in 1904 and ]ed the ticket in 1908): 
has lectured at Chautauqua assemblies 
since 1896; delivered one of the dedicatory 
sermons at the dedication of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church in Hillsboro. 111.; and 
she frequently addresses ministers meet- 



214 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



ings, synods, presbyteries, State, normal 
schools. Slate universities and student bod 
ies of various kinds on scientific temper 
ance, Christian citi/.enship and woman suf 
frage. Her publications include her five 
annual addresses while State president of 
the Illinois W. C. T. U., and various pam 
phlets, leaflets, tracts, etc., and she wrote 
the constitution under which the Illinois 
W. C. T. U. does its work, including some 
original features which have been copied by 
other State and local unions. She is a life 
member of the National W. C. T. U., and 
of the Loyal Temperance Legion of Illinois, 
and a member of the Chicago Peace Society 
and the South Side Equality Club of Chi 
cago. Address : 5464 Jefferson Avenue, 
Chicago. 

BRENNAN, James Francis: 

Lawyer; born in Peterborough. N. H.. 
March 31, 1853; son of Hubert Brennan 
and Mary (Mahoney) Brennan. He was 
educated in the academy at Peterborough, 
and graduated and received the degree of 
B.A. from the University of Maryland , Bal 
timore, in 1884 . Returning to his native 
town he engaged successfully in the prac 
tice of law and has had charge of very 
many important law suits. He is one of 
the three trustees of the New Hampshire 
State Library, and a member of the State 
Board of Charities and Correction. He has 
held many town and State offices, and is 
president and director of several of the 
local corporations. He is a Democrat in 
politics and a Catholic in religion. He is 
a member of the American-Irish Historical 
Society, New Hampshire Historical Society 
and Histriographer of the Peterborough 
Historical Society. Address: Peterbor 
ough. N. H. 

BRENNAN, Thomas Francis: 

Catholic bishop; born in Tipperary, Ire 
land, in 1853. He came to the United 
States in childhood, settling in Pennsyl 
vania. After his graduation from Alle 
gheny College, and studying the classics at 
Rouen, France, and theology at Innsbruck, 
Germany, he returned to this country, en 
gaging in mission work in Pennsylvania, 



and was instrumental in building three 
churches. He represented the diocese of 
Erie at the jubilee of Pope Leo XIII, and 
was made domestic prelate of the Pope s 
household with the title of Monsignore, re 
ceiving the degree of D.D. at Rome in 1880. 
He was consecrated bishop of Dallas, Texas, 
April 5, 1891, resigning two years later. 
In 1893 and 1894 he was vicar apostolic 
of Labrador, and in 1894 and 1895 became 
anxilliary bishop in New Foundland, re 
turning to Rome at the Pope s request. Ad 
dress: Via del Seminario. 112. Rome, Italy. 

BRENNER, Victor David: 

Medalist, sculptor; born in Shavly, Rus 
sia, June 12. 1871. He arrived in New 
York in May, 1890, and started in business 
as a die cutter in 1893. In 1898 he went 
to Paris and became a pupil of Louis 
Oscar Roty, and exhibited his works at the 
Paris Exposition and Salon, 1900, the Pan- 
American Exposition, Buffalo. 1901, and 
the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 1904. 
receiving awards from each. Mr. Brenner 
designed the William Muhlenberg medal on 
the opening of St. Luke s Hospital ; the 
25tli National Conference of Charities med 
al; souvenir plaquette of the American Sec 
tion of the Paris Exposition, 1900; the 
George W. Curtis medal; Columbia Univer 
sity; Volunteers medal, given by the State 
of Michigan to her soldiers and sailors; 
Prince Henry medal by the American Nu 
mismatic Society; Theodore L. D? Vinne 
medal by the Typotheta? of New York; 
John Fritz medal by the United Engineer 
ing Societies; the Wright Brothers medal, 
presented to them by the Aero Club of 
America; Lloyd McKim Garrison medal 
for Harvard University; Amerigo Vespucci 
and John Paul Jones plaques by the Amer 
ican Numismatic Society; James McNeill 
Whistler plaque; medal of the International 
Congress on Tuberculosis, Washington, 
1908; employees medal of the Panama Ca 
nal; the Lincoln cent adapted, Feb. 18, 
1909; seals of the New York Public Li 
brary, the Fine Arts Federation of New 
York; busts of Professor Charles Eliot and 
Simon Stern; portraits of William M. 
Evarts, Collis P. Huntington, ex-President 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



2ir> 



) n ; tic Society, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 
and Numismatic Society, New York, Art 
Institute of Chicago, the Luxembourg Mu 
seum in Paris, and the Museum of Fine 
Arts in Boston. Mr. Brenner is a member 
of the American Numismatic Society, Na 
tional Sculpture Society, the Architectural 
League and the Arts Club in New York. 
Residence: 107 Second Avenue. Office: 114 
E. 28th Street, New York City. 

BRENT, Charles Henry: 

Protestant Episcopal bishop of the Phil 
ippine Islands; born at New Castle, On 
tario, April 9, 1862; son of Rev. Canon 
Henry and Sophia Frances (Cummings) 
Brent. He studied at Trinity College, 
Toronto, graduating with the degree of B. 
A. in 1884 and receiving that of M.A. in 
1889 and D.D. in 1901." He was ordered 
deacon in the Church of England in 1886. 
and ordained in the Church of England in 
1880, and ordained to the priesthood the 
following year by Bishop Sweatnam of To 
ronto. He became assistant at St. Paul s 
Episcopal Church, Buffalo, N. Y., in 1887 
and of St. John the Evangelist, Boston, 
Mass., the following year. He was associ 
ate rector of St. Stephen s Church, Boston, 
1891 to 1901, in which latter year he be 
came rector of the same church. He was 
elected Bishop of the Philippine Islands 
and consecrated bishop in 1901. In 1908, 
on the death of Bishop Satterlee, Bishop 
Brent was elected Bishop of Washington, 
but declined in view 7 of the importance of 
his work in the Philippines. He was on 
the editorial staff of the Churchman (New 
York) from 1897 to 1900. Bishop Brent 
is author of: With God in the World; the 
Consolations of the Cross; The Splendor 
of the Human Body; Adventure for God; 
Liberty and Other Sermons ; The Mind of 
Christ Jesus; Leadership (Longmans) ; 
With God in Prayer (Jacobs). He was 
Paddock lecturer at the General Theological 
Seminary, N. Y., in 1904, and William 
Belden Noble lecturer at Harvard Univer 
sity in 1907. He was a member of the 



Shanghai and became its president. Ad 
dress 253 Calle Nozaleda, Manila, P. I. 

BRETT, Georg-e Platt: 

President of the Macmillan Company; 
jborn in London, England, in 1858; son of 
j George F. and Elizabeth (Platt) Brett. 
He was educated in schools in London and 
at the College of the City of New York. 
He became connected in 1879 with The 
Macmillan Company, of which he is now 
president, and is also a director of the 
Macmillan Publishing Company, of Canada. 
He is a director of the American Publish 
ers Association. Mr. Brett is an occa 
sional contributor to magazines, chiefly on 
professional topics. He is a member of the 
Xew York Chamber of Commerce, Ameri- 
I can Geographical Society, American Insti- 
tute Archeology, American Association for 
i the Advancement of Science, and is also a 
member of the Century Association, and the 
Players , Grolier, New York Athletic, Na 
tional Arts, and National Democratic Clubs 
of New York City, and the National Club 
of London, England. He married in New 
York City, in 1891, Marie Louise Tostevin. 
Residence: 267 West End Avenue. Office: 
66 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

BREWER, David Josiah: 

Associate justice of the U. S. Supreme 
Court; born in Smyrna, Asia Minor, June 
20, 1837; son of Rev. Josiah Brewer, one 
of the early missionaries of the American 
Board to Turkey, and of his wife, Emilia 
A. (Field) Brewer, who was a sister of 
David Dudley, Cyrus W., and Justice 
Stephen J. Field. He was graduated from 
Yale College in 1856, and from the Albany 
Law School in 1858, and the following year 
he established himself in the practice of 
law at Leavenworth, Kan., where he re 
sided until he removed to Washington to 
enter upon his present duties. He was ap 
pointed U. S. commissioner in 1861, served 
as judge of the probate and criminal courts 
of Leavenworth County, Kan., 1863-1864, 
judge of the District Court, 1865-1869; 



21G 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



county attorney of Leavenworth County, 
1870. In 1870 he was elected, and in 1870 
and 1882 was reflected a justice of the 
Supreme Court of the State of Kansas. He 
was appointed, in 1884, by President 
Arthur, to the office of judge of the Circuit 
Court of the United States for the Eighth 
District, which he ^filled until his appoint 
ment in 1889, to* his present office as 
associate justice of the Supreme Court of 
the United States in succession to Justice 
Stanley Matthews, deceased. Justice Brewer 
was appointed by President Cleveland to 
the office of president of the Venezuela 
Boundary Commission in 1896, and in 1899 
was appointed a member of the Arbitration 
Tribunal to settle the boundary dispute 
between British Guiana and Venezuela. 
Justice Brewer has delivered orations and 
addresses on many important occasions, 
was orator at the Bicentennial of Yale 
University in 1901, and was president of 
the International Congress of Lawyers and 
Jurists, held at St. Louis in 1904 in con 
nection with the Louisiana Purchase Ex 
position. Justice Brewer has had the de 
gree of LL.D. conferred upon him by Iowa 
College, Washburn Colleg e, Yale, Bowdoin, 
Wesleyan, and the Universities of Wiscon 
sin and Vermont. He is author of: The 
Pew to the Pulpit, 1897; The Twentieth 
Century from Another View Point, 1899; 
American Citizenship, 1902. He married at 
Burlington, Vt., Oct. 3, 1861, Louise R. 
Landon, who died April 3; 1898; and mar 
ried again, at Burlington, Vt., June 5, 1901, 
Emma Miner Mott, of Washington, D. C. 
Address: 1923 Sixteenth Street, Washing 
ton, D. C. 

BREWER, Leigh Richmond: 

Bishop of Montana; born at Berkshire, 
Vt., Jan. 20, 1839. He was graduated from 
the academic course of Hobart College, B.A., 
18(50, M.A., 1869, and received the degrees 
of S.T.D. and D.D. in 1881. He studied 
also at the General Theological Seminary 
in New York City. He was ordered deacon 
in the Episcopal church in 1866 by Bishop 
Horatio Potter, and ordained priest the fol 
lowing year by Bishop Coxe. Upon enter 
ing the ministry he became curate of Grace 



Church, Carthage, N. Y., later rector of 
Trinity Church., Watertown, N. Y. He was 
consecrated bishop in 1880 by Bishops 
Huntington, Tuttle, Bissell, B. H. Paddock 
and Morris, and became Bishop of Montana. 
He married, in 1866, Henrietta W. Foote. 
He is author of various addresses, appeals 
and reports. Address : Helena, Montana. 

BREWSTER, William: 

Ornithologist; born in Wakefield, Mass., 
July 5, 1851. He was graduated from the 
Cambridge High School in 1869 and is an 
honorary A.B. and A.M., receiving the first 
named degree at Amherst in 1880, and the 
other in 1899 at Harvard. He was the 
assistant in charge of the collection of 
birds and mammals, for the Boston So 
ciety of Natural History from 1880 to 
1887; in charge of the department of mam 
mals and birds at the Cambridge Museum 
of Comparitive Zoology from 1885 to 1900, 
and since then he has become assistant 
in charge of birds. Most of his time is 
devoted to the managing of a private mu 
seum of ornithology in Cambridge. He is 
one of the three trustees of an estate in 
Boston, and one of eleven trustees of the 
Brewster Free Academy at Wolfeboro, N. 
IT., which was endowed by his father; is 
ex-president of the American Ornitholo 
gists Union; and president of the Nuttall 
Ornithologist Club, and the Massachusetts 
Audubon Society. Mr. Brewster is a fellow 
of the American Association for the Ad 
vancement of Science, and is a member of 
various other scientific societies in this 
country and Europe. On Feb. 9, 1878, he 
married at Boston, Caroline F. Kettell. 
Address: 145 Brattle Street, Cambridge, 
Mass. 

BREWSTER, William: 

Manufacturer of carriages and automo 
biles; born in New York City, June 2, 1866; 
son of Henry and Charlotte (Draper) 
Brewster. He was educated at St. John s 
School, at Sing Sing, N. Y. He started in 
business with Brewster & Co., Oct. 1, 1883; 
studied designing in Paris in 1885, and 
visited the principal carriage concerns of 
Europe in 1886. He was admitted to the 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



21 



firm of Brewster & Co. July 1, 1888, and 
has been its president since its incorpora 
tion, Jan. 1, 1903. He is also a director 
of the Lincoln National Bank and of the 
Northern Insurance Co. of New York. Mr. 
Brewster is an independent in politics, a 
member of the Metropolitan Museum of 
Art and a life member of the Museum of 
Natural History, and a member of the 
Union League, City and Barnard Clubs of 
New York City. He is a widower and has 
a daughter, Barbara. Address: Broadway 
and 47th Street, New York City. 

BREYFOGEL, Sylvanus C.: 

Bishop of the Evangelical Association; 
born at Pleasantville, Pa., July 20, 1851; 
son of Seneca and Sarah (Ely) Breyfogle. 
He was educated in the Central Pennsyl 
vania College, Union Seminary of Pennsyl 
vania, arid was graduated from Illinois 
Wesleyan University, with the degree of 
Ph.B., and received the degree of D.D. from 
Otterbein University in 1901. He was or 
dained in the ministry of the Evangelical 
Association in 1873; filled five pastorates; 
was elected presiding elder in 1886, and has 
been bishop since 1891. He has preached 
in official episcopal tours throughout the 
United States, Canada and Europe; haa 
made tours of inspection of missionary 
fields of his church in China and Japan, 
and speaks frequently at the summer as 
semblies of the Ocean Grove School of The 
ology; Winona Assembly, etc. He is au 
thor of: Evangelical Landmarks; The Pol 
ity of the Evangelical Association; Great 
Sermons by Great Preachers. He was for 
merly editor of The Preachers Assistant, 
and is a member of the Publication Com 
mittee of his denomination. He married at 
Reading, Pa., May 8, 1877, Kate Boas. Ad 
dress : Reading, Pa. 

BRIDGES, Fidelia: 

Landscape painter; born in Salem, Mass., 
1 1834; daughter of Henry Gardner and Eliza 
l(Chadwick) Bridges, her ancestors being 
! unong the earliest settlers of Salem and 
kicinity since 1024. Her earlier work was 
! principally in oils, but more recently her 
>aintings have chiefly been water colors, 



and she has been represented in numerous 
important exhibitions. Miss Bridges is an 
associate academician of the National Acad 
emy of Design and a member of the Amer 
ican Water Color Society. Address: Can 
aan, Conn. 

BRIDGMAN, Frederic Arthur: 

Artist; born in Tuskegee, Ala., Nov. 10, 
1847. He was an apprentice in the engrav 
ing department of the American Bank Note 
Company in New York in 1864 and 1865, 
and in the meantime studied in the Brook 
lyn Art School and the National Academy 
of Design. He went to Paris, and from 
1866 to 1871 was a pupil under J. L. 
GerOme and at the ficole des Beaux Arts. 
His studio is in Paris, but he occasionally 
visits New York. Mr. Bridgman is a paint 
er of figure and of oriental and archaeologi- 4 
cal pictures, and has won medals at Paris 
and elsewhere. He was appointed chevalier 
in 1878 and officier, 1907, of the L6gion 
d Honneur of France, 1878, and is an officer 
of the Order of St. Michael of Bavaria. 
Mr. Bridgman is author of: Winters in 
Algeria; and also (in French) of: An 
archy in Art, and the Idol and the Ideal. 
He is also composer of orchestral music 
of much merit. He is a member of the Na 
tional Academy of Design; the Society of 
American Artists, and Parisian Society of 
American Artists. Address: 146 Boule 
vard Malesherbes, Paris. 

BRIDGMAN, George H.: 

President of Hamline University, Minne 
sota; born in Ontario, Canada, Aug. 2, 
1841. He was graduated from Victoria 
University, Canada, in 1864, and from 
Syracuse University he received the degrees 
of A.M. in 1867, D.D. in 1878 and LL.D. in 
1900. He was principal of Wesleyan Semi 
nary at Lima, N. Y., 1873-1883, and is a 
clergyman of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. In June, 1873, he married Mary 
B. Elliott, at Brantford, Ontario. Address: 
1495 Hewitt Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

BRIDGMAN, Herbert Lawrence; 

Traveller, and secretary-treasurer, Peary 
Arctic Club. He was born at Amherst, 



218 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Mass. , May 30., 1844 ; and is a graduate of 
Amherst College, receiving the degrees of 
A.B. in 1866, A.M. in 1809; and honorary 
M.A. in 1904, and was president of the 
general association of alumni, 1908-1909. 
Mr. Bridgman is by profession a journalist, 
having been connected with the Springfield 
Republican in his earlier life, and succes 
sively New York agent of the New England 
Associated Press, Washington correspondent 
of the Boston Advertiser, and subsequently 
connected with the N. Y. Tribune, Frank 
Leslie s Publishing House, the New York 
Press, and the Brooklyn Standard Union. 
He began his experience with Arctic affairs 
by a voyage in the Falcon, 1894. He was 
in command of the Diana expedition in 
1899, and of the Erik in 1901. He was 
with Prof. William Libbey in the Enchant 
ed Mesa expedition to New Mexico, in 1897, 
and in 1904 made an extensive journey in 
the Sudan. He is best known by his serv 
ices in connection with the efforts of Com 
mander Peary to discover the North Pole, 
being secretary-treasurer of the Peary Arc 
tic Club, which has raised the money neces 
sary for the great arctic explorer s expedi 
tions. Mr. Bridgman is a member of the 
International Polar Commission, the Amer 
ican, Philadelphia^ and National Geograph 
ic Societies, Psi Upsilon fraternity, Cham 
ber of Commerce of New York, and the Sons 
of the Revolution, and chevalier of the Or 
der of Leopold II (1909). He is also a 
member of the Explorers Club of New York, 
and the American Alpine Club of Philadel 
phia. Mr. Bridgman is at present the bus 
iness manager of the Brooklyn Standard 
Union, and is a director of the Brooklyn 
Warehouse and Storage Co. He is author 
of: Africa from Sea to Center, describing 
a journey to the Sudani and Uganda, 1905. 
He married in New York, Sept. 7, 1887, 
Helen Bartlett, and has one son. Resi 
dence: 604 Carlton Avenue. Office: 
Standard Union Office, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

BRIDGMAN, Lewis J.: 

Illustrator; born in Lawrence, Mass., 
Nov. 17, 1857. He was graduated from 
Harvard College with the class of 1881, and 
he is one of the most successful of modern 



illustrators, and has been equally success 
ful as a writer of short stories and of 
children s books illustrated by himself. He 
was formerly interested in the Nationalist 
movement, and was a delegate to the Peo 
ples Party convention at Omaha, Neb., in 
1892, but is now affiliated with the Republi 
can party. He is prominent in the civic 
affairs of Salem, Mass., where he now re 
sides. He is the author and illustrator of: 
Odd Business, 1893; Mother Wild Goose, 
1900; Guess, 1901; Gulliver s Bird Book, 
1902; Guess Again, 1902; Bridgman s 
Kewts, 1902 ; Lawsonized Lyrics, 1905 ; 
Seem-So s, 1906; The Santa Claus Club, 
1907. He married first at North Andover, 
Mass., Nov. 8, 1883, Lucy Stanwood Blan- 
chard; and second, at Plymouth, Mass., 
June 7, 1893, Annie Page Campbell, and 
has two sons and a daughter. Address: 
42 Summit Avenue, Salem, Mass. 

BRJESEN, Arthur von: 

Lawyer; born in Borkendorf, Germany, 
July 11, 1843; son of Richard and Adele 
(Brandtke) von Briesen. He was educated 
at the Prussian Gymnasium, Hohenstein; 
at Braunsberg; and by a private tutor be 
fore he came in 1858 to New York where 
he was graduated from the New York Uni 
versity lay school in 1868. He was Ser 
geant of Company B, 1st New York Volun 
teer Engineers from 1861-1864, and he was 
on the staff of the Scientific American from 
1864-1872, and of the American Artisan, 
1872-1874. He was with the 10th Army 
Corps in South Carolina and Georgia, at 
the battles of Hilton-Head, Ft. Pulaski, Se- 
cessionville, Pocotaligo, etc.; was president 
of the Citizens Union in 1896 and the Ger 
man-American McKinley and Roosevelt 
League in 1900, and chairman of the New 
York League in 1900, and of the Ellis Is 
land investigating committee in 1903. He 
was admitted to the bar in 1868 and since 
1888 has been senior member of the firm 
of Briesen and Knauth. He has been presi 
dent of the Legal Aid Society since 1890, 
and is director of the Stapleton National 
Bank. He is also a member of the New 
York Chamber of Commerce; the National 
Geographic Society; the Bar Association, 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



210 



etc. In 1904 Mr. Briesen was a delegate to 
the Universal Congress of Lawyers and 
Jurists at St. Louis, and the following year 
was decorated with the Cross of the Legion 
of Honor by the French Government, and 
in 1908 he received from the Emperor of 
Germany the Order of the Crown of Prus 
sia. He married Anna Goepel, in Brooklyn, 
Oct. 22, 1873, and he has five children. 
Residence: 1 East 47th Street. Office: 25 
Broad St., New York City. 

BRIGGS, Charles Augustus: 

Clergyman, theologian; born in New 
York City, Jan. 15, 1841; son of Alanson 
Tuthill and Sarah Mead (Berrian) Briggs. 
He was educated in the University of Vir 
ginia, 1857-1860; the Union Theological 
Seminary, 1861-1863, and the University of 
Berlin, 1866-1869, receiving the degree of 
D.D. from the Universities of Edinburgh, 
Princeton, Glasgow and Williams, and of 
D.Litt. from Oxford. From 1870-1874 he 
was pastor of a Presbyterian Church at 
Roselle, N. J.; was professor of Hebrew 
from 1874-1891, of Biblical theology, 189]- 
1904, and since then of Theological Encyclo 
paedia and Symbolics, at the Union The 
ological Seminary. He was editor of the 
Presbyterian Review from 1880-1890, and 
ill 1891 was tried for heresy, but acquitted 
by the Presbytery of New York, in 1803, 
however, he was suspended by the General 
Assembly. In 1899 he was made deacon, 
and in 1900 was ordained priest by the 
Protestant Episcopal bishop of New York. 
Dr. Briggs is a member of the American 
Oriental and German Oriental Societies, the 
Oxford Historical Society, the Society of 
Biblical Literature and Exegesis, and of the 
Century Club. He is the author of: Bib 
lical Study; American Presbyterianism ; 
Messianic Prophecy; Whither? A Theologi 
cal Question for the Times; The Authority 
of Holy Scripture (inaugural address upon 
which the charges of heresy were based) ; 
Bible, Church, and Reason; The Higher 
Criticism of the Hexateuch; The Message 
of the Gospels; The Messiah of the Apos 
tles; Case against and Defense of Dr. Briggs 
(3 parts); Study of Holy Scripture; In 
carnation of the Lord; New Light on the 



Life of Jesus; The Ethical Teachings of 
Jesus; Commentary on the Psalms; Church 
Unity (all Scribners). Dr. Briggs is also 
joint author (with F. Brown and S. R. 
Driver) of the New Hebrew Lexicon 
(Houghton Mifflin), and with von Hugel of 
The Papal Commission and the Pentateuch 

I (Longmans) ; is editor of the International 
Theological Library, 34 volumes, and The 

I International Critical Commentary, 42 
volumes (both Scribners), besides con 
tributing to leading periodicals in this coun 
try and in Europe. Dr. Briggs married 
in New York City, Oct. 19, 1865, Julie Val 
entine. Address: 700 Park Avenue, New 
York City. 

BRIGGS, Frank Obediah: 

United States senator; born in Concord, 
N. H., Aug. 12, 1851; son of James F. and 
Roseanna (Smith) Briggs. He was educat 
ed in Phillips Exeter Academy, New Hamp- 
sire, 1866-1868 and in the United States 
Military Academy, from which he was grad 
uated in the class of 1872. He served as 
second lieutenant in the Second U. S. In 
fantry as second lieutenant, 1872-1877, 
when he resigned and became associated 
with John A. Roebling s Sons Company, of 
| which he is assistant treasurer. He was 
elected mayor of Trenton, N. J., serving 
until Jan. 1, 1892; was appointed a mem 
ber of the State Board of Education by Gov 
ernor Voorhees, in 1901, but resigned in 
1902, when appointed State treasurer to 
fill a vacancy, afterward being twice elect 
ed to that office and serving until elected 
in 1907, United States senator from New 
Jersey, for the term expiring in 1903. Sen 
ator Briggs has always been an active Re 
publican, and in 1904 was elected chairman 
of the State Republican Committee, manag 
ing the successful campaign of that year. 
Besides his connection with John A. Roe 
bling s Sons and subsidiary corporations 
Senator Briggs is first vice-president of the 
Norfolk and Portsmouth Traction Company, 
a director of the Broad Street National 
Bank, the Trenton Savings Fund Society 
and the Metropolitan Surety Company. He 
j is a member of the Union League. Lawyers 
1 and Grolier Clubs of New York, the Lotus 



220 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Club of Trenton, Dofobo Club of Chicago, 
United Service Club of Philadelphia, and 
the Bibliophile Society of Boston. He mar 
ried in Trenton, N. J., Sept. 22, 1874, Emi 
ly A. Allison. Address: Trenton, N. J. 

BRIGHAM, Johnson: 

Author, librarian; born in Cherry Valley, 
N. Y., March 11, 1840. He graduated from 
Hamilton College and in 1870, at Cornell 
University. He was editor and half owner 
of the Cedar Eapid s (Iowa) Daily Republi 
can from 1882-1893; president of the Iowa 
State Republican League in 1892; United 
States Consul to Aix-la-Chapelle, Germany 
in 1893. and was editor and publisher of 
the Midland Monthly Magazine from 1894- 
1899. He has been the State Librarian of 
Iowa since 1898, and president of the Iowa 
Library Commission since 1900; was presi 
dent of the Iowa Library Association in 
1903 and of the National Association of 
State Libraries in 1904, and he is a mem 
ber of the Iowa State Historical Society; 
and the State Anthropological Society. Mr. 
Brigham is a contributor to magazines and 
reviews and has been designated by the 
State Historical Society to write the Life 
of James Harlan. He is the author of: 
An Old Man s Idyl. In 1892 he married 
Lucy Hitchcock Walker, at Ottumwa, Iowa. 
Address: Des Moines, la. 

BEIGHAM, William Tufts: 

Ethnologist; born in Boston, May 24, 
1841. He was graduated from Harvard 
University in 1862, receiving the degree 
of A.M.; and the honorary degree of Sc.D., 
was conferred upon him by Columbia Uni 
versity in 1905. He explored the botany 
of the Hawaiian Islands in 1864-1865; was 
admitted to the Massachusetts bar in 1867; 
and for part of the next two years was in 
structor of botany at Harvard. While ;i 
member of the Boston school board he in 
augurated a system of art instruction in 
the public schools, also the method of an- 
thropometry now in general use in colleges, 
etc. In 1888 he removed to Honolulu and 
has since had charge of the museum of 
Polynesian ethnology and natural history 



founded by Mr. C. R. Bishop. He is au 
thor of: Cast Catalogue of Antique Sculp 
ture; Guatemala, the Land of the Quetzal; 
Volcanic Manifestations in New England; 
Hawaiian Feather-work; Index to the Is 
lands of the Pacific Ocean; Stone Imple 
ments of Ancient Hawaiians; Mats and 
Baskets of Hawaiians; Ancient Hawaiian 
Houses and Eruptions of Hawaiian Vol 
canoes. Dr. Brigham is a fellow of the 
American Academy of Arts and Sciences 
and an honorary fellow of the Royal An 
thropological Institute of Great Britain and 
Ireland. Address: Bishop Museum of Eth 
nology, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands. 

BRINCKERHOFF, Henry Morton: 

Electrical engineer; born in Fishkill-on- 
Hudson, New York, April 20, 1868. He 
was graduated from Stevens Institute of 
Technology, in 1890 as mechanical engi 
neer and began electrical work in the em 
ploy of Thomson-Houston Company on con 
struction work on the West End Street Rail 
way, of Boston; was assistant engineer in 
the power house of the Utica Belt Line 
Street Railway in 1891-1892, and foreman 
in charge of car equipment of the General 
Electrical Company in Boston and on the 
Coney Island and Brooklyn Railway. He 
was assistant electrical engineer of the In 
tramural Railway at the World s Colum 
bian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, which 
was the first third-rail elevated road of the 
United States, and was joint patentee of 
the 3rd Rail System now so extensively 
used, and on Aug. 4, 1894, became electri 
cal engineer of the Metropolitan West Side 
Elevated Railway in Chicago, for which he 
equipped the first large elevated road for 
city transportation with electricity. From 
1898-1906 he was assistant general manager 
and general manager of the sama company, 
and since then has been the electrical asso 
ciate of Gen. William Barclay Parsons. He 
is a memh - of the American Society of- 
Electrical En^.i.ecrs, and the Western So 
ciety of Engineers. In 1903 he married 
Florence L. Fay at Chicago. Residence: 3 
West 8th Street. Office: 60 Wall Street, 
New York City. 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



221 



BRINKERHOFF, Roeliff: 

Banker; born at Owasco, Cayuga County, 
N. Y., June 28, 1828. He was educated in 
academies at Auburn and Homer, N. Y., and 
afterward engaged in teaching, beginning 
at the age of sixteen. He was a tutor at 
The Hermitage, the home of General Jack 
son in Tennessee, for three years, and in 
1849 went to Mansfield, Ohio, where ho 
studied law with Judge Jacob Brinkerhoff, 
a relative, and was admitted to the bar. 
He practised law in Mansfield, and was 
also from 1855-1859 editor and proprietor 
of the Mansfield Herald. At the beginning 
of the ^ar he became first lieutenant and 
quartermaster of the Sixty-fourth Regiment 
of Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served five 
years, attaining the rank of colonel in the 
Quartermaster s Department, and brevet 
Brigadier-general of United States Volun 
teers for meritorious services during the 
war. He resumed the practice of law until 
1878, and he is now president of the Mans 
field Savings Bank. General Brinkerhoff 
has taken high rank as a philanthropist 
and penologist, is a prominent member of 
the National Conference of Charities and 
Correction and w T as its president in 1880, 
was president of the American delegation to 
and vice-president of the International 
Prison Congress at Paris in 1895, and was 
formerly vice-president and succeeded Gen 
eral R. B. Hayes as president of the Amer 
ican National Prison Congress. He is also 
chairman of the Ohio Board of State Chari 
ties of which he has been a member for the 
past thirty years. He is also president of 
the Ohio Archeological and Historical So 
ciety which he organized in 1875. He mar 
ried Mary Bentley, granddaughter of Gen 
eral Eobert Bentley, of Ohio. Address: 
Mansfield, Ohio. 

BRINTON, Christian: 

Art critic; born in Thornbury, Chester 
County, Pa v Sept. 17, 1870; son of Joseph 
Hill and Mary A. (Herr) Brinton. He 
was educated at Haverford College of 
which he is a B.A. of 1892 and M.A. of 
1906. He completed his studies at the Uni 
versity of Heidelberg and the University of 
Paris, and was for a time a pupil of Felix 



Galipaux at the Vaudeville Theatre, Paria 
After a successful career as an actor in 
Paris, London and New York, lie became 
associate editor of The Critic, 1900-1903 
and art director of Everybody s Magazine, 
1903-1905. He lias been a frequent con 
tributor of articles on architecture, sculp 
ture and painting to the leading magazines 
of the United States and is author of: 
Modern Artists, 1908. He has travelled ex 
tensively throughout Europe and resided 
abroad for protracted periods. He is a 
member of the Leonardo da Vinci Society, 
and of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, of the 
Pennsylvania Society of New York, and of 
various clubs in New York and Philadel 
phia. Address: 16 Gramercy Park, New 
York City. 

BRISBANE, Arthur: 

Editor N. Y. Evening Journal; born in 
Buffalo, New York, Dec. 12, 1864; son of 
Albert and Sarah (White) Brisbane. He 
was educated in the public schools of New 
York State and five years in Germany and 
France. Mr. Brisbane began newspaper 
work in 1883, on the New York Sun, with 
which lie was connected seven years as re 
porter, London correspondent and editor 
of the Evening Sun; was managing editor 
of the different editions of the New York 
World, 1890-1897, and has been editor of 
the New York Evening Journal since 1897. 
Mr. Brisbane is one of the most prominent 
of American journalists, whose editorials 
reach a larger number of readers than those 
of any other man. Residence: Hempstead, 
L. I. Address: N. Y. Evening Journal, 
New York City. 

BRISTOL, Frank Milton: 

Methodist Episcopal bishop ; born in Or 
leans County, N. Y., Jan. 4, 1851. In 1877 
he was graduated as Ph.B. from Northwest 
ern University, which afterward conferred 
upon him the A.M. and D.D. degrees. Af 
ter completing the Conference course, he 
entered the ministry in Rock River Con 
ference, and served as pastor of leading 
churches in Chicago districts for example, 
Trinity, Grace, Wabash Avenue and First 
Church, Evanston, 111., afterward becoming 



222 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



pastor of the Metropolitan Methodist Epis 
copal Church, Washington, D. C., of which 
President McKinley was an attendant, 
remaining in that charge until elected by 
the General Conference held at Baltimore, 
Md., in May, 1908, to his present office as 
bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Churcli, 
and placed in charge of the South American 
Conference, with episcopal residence at 
Buenos Aires. He has five times been ap 
pointed a member of the General Confer 
ence, of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
Besides the distinction he has attained as 
a preacher and pastor, Bishop Bristol bears 
high repute as a bibliophile and litterateur, 
and is author of several books, including: 
Providential Epochs; The Ministry of Art; 
Shakespeare and America, etc. He married 
in 1878 Nellie Frisbie, of Morgan Park, 111. 
Address: Buenos Aires, Republica Argen 
tine, S. A. 

BRISTOW, Joseph Little: 

United States senator: born in Wolfe 
County, Ky., July 22, 1861. In 1886 he 
graduated from Baker University, Kansas. 
From 1887-1891 he served as clerk of the 
district court. Douglas County, Kansas; in 
1895-1897 was private secretary to Gov. 
Merrill (Kansas) ; in 1900 he had entire 
charge of the investigation of Cuban postal 
frauds and the reorganization of Cuban pos 
tal service. He owned and edited the Sa- 
lina (Kansas) Daily Republican in 1890- 
1895, and in 1895 purchased the Ottawa 
(Kansas) Herald. In 1897 he was ap 
pointed fourth assistant postmaster general 
serving until January 20, 1905. During 
the latter part of his term he rendered dis 
tinguished services in the investigation and 
remedying of abuses in the postal service 
and the punishment of persons guilty of 
offenses under the Federal laws. He was 
appointed by the President special Panama 
Railroad Commissioner in 1905, and made 
an exhaustive report on the Panama Rail 
road. He returned to newspaper publishing 
in Kansas, and in the summer of 1908 be 
came a candidate in the Republican pri 
maries for United States senator, defeating 
the incumbent, Hon. Chester I. Long for 
the nomination and being elected for the 



six years beginning March 4, 1909. He 
was married on Nov. 11, 1879, in Fleming 
County, Ky.,, to Margaret A. Hendrix. Ad 
dress : Salina,, Kan. 

BRITTAIN, Joseph I.: 

Consular officer ; appointed consul at 
Nantes, France, Oct. 15, 1897; at Kehl, 
Germany, June 6. 1902; consul at Prague, 
Bohemia, Austria, March 30, 1907. He was 
a member of the Ohio House of Representa 
tives from 1892-1890 and is a son of the 
American Revolution. Address: American 
Consulate, Prague, Bohemia, Austria. 

BRITTEN, Flora Phelps Harley (Mrs. E. E. 
Britten) : 

Lecturer and company promoter; born in 
Ann Arbor, Mich., Sept. 2, 1864; daughter 
of David Sower and Jennie (Phelps) Har 
ley. On her father s side she is descended 
from the English Harleys, who for con 
science sake left England and went to Ger 
many, changing their name to Sower, and 
from Christopher Sower, who came from 
Germany to Pennsylvania, and printed the 
first Bible in German in America; and on 
her mother s side she is descended, in the 
seventh generation, from William Phelps 
of England, who was one of the founders of 
Dorchester, Mass., in 1630, and great grand 
daughter of John Horace Phelps, Revolu 
tionary soldier from Northampton, Mass. 
She was graduated from the Mani.stee 
(Mich.) High School and from the Uni 
versity of Michigan as A.B.., was teacher 
in public schools and taught art, Greek and 
Latin in the Central University of Iowa, 
became a licensed preacher in the Baptist 
Church, and has held three pastorates in 
that denomination in Nebraska and Michi 
gan. She is a lecturer on popular themes, 
and also a temperance, and Prohibition 
Party lecturer. Mrs. Britten has long been 
active in the work of the Woman s Chris 
tian Temperance Union, has toured five 
Western States as a temperance lecturer, 
and especially prominent in the work in 
Massachusetts, where she is State superin 
tendent of Christian citizenship in the Mas 
sachusetts Woman s Christian Temperance 
Union, president for past five years of the 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



223 

anclT T n?on tr aU V r an ^ ChriStian Temp . er - i. f Science ; a mber "* the New York Hor- 
BoTrd oTthe State^^C^T !!* 11 f ^^7 I t i cultural Society and was chairman of its 
folk PmiTitv W P T T ; oi ^ Suf- j Council, 1901-1907; member of the Torrev 

folk County W. C. T. U. She has written Botanical Club, New York Academy Sci 
numerous small documents for circulation for 
Temperance purposes. Mrs. Britten has 



ences, and was its president in 1906-1907, 
and is also a member of the New York 

been a National lecturer of the Prohibition Microscopical Society and other scientific 
Party Was office manager of the Prohibi- I societies. Dr. Britton married. ^27 
ion Party of Michigan, 1898-1901. Mrs. j 1885, Elizabeth Gertrude Knight! Mrs 
Britten has also devoted much attention to Britton is herself a scientist. Residence 
the business of promotion and is vice-presi- j 2965 Decatur Avenue. Office- Bronx 
dent of the Boston Development Company I Park, New York City, 
and director and treasurer of the Cuba ! 
Fruit Company. She married at Manistee, 
Mich. April 29, 1886, Rev. Fred E. Britten, 



then pastor of the First Baptist Church of 
Fairbault, Minn., and has three sons. Res 
idence: 86 Ellory Street, Cambridge, Mass. 



Office: 700 Tremont Temple, Boston. 

BRITTON, Nathaniel Lord: 

Director on the New York Botanical Gar 
den; born at New Dorp, Staten Island, N. 



BRITTON, Wilton Everett: 

State entomologist of Connecticut; born 
in Marlboro, Mass., Sept. 18, 1868; son of 
Benjamin Howard and Emma Eliza 
(Wright) Britton. He was educated in the 



! public schools of Gilsum, N. H., and at the 
New Hampshire College of Agriculture and 
Mechanic Arts, whence he was graduated B. 
S., 1893; at Cornell University, 1893-1894, 
and at Yale University, 1899-1903, receiv- 



Y., Jan. 15, 1859. He worked on the Van- in . the de g ree f P h -D., 1903. He became 
derbilt farm in boyhood, and was educated j assistant in May, 1894, and horticulturist 



at the Staten Island Academy, and after 
ward at the Columbia School of Mines, from 
which he was graduated as Engineer of 
Mines in 1879, afterward receiving from 
Columbia University the degrees of Ph.D. 
in 1881 and the honorary degree of Sc.D. 
in 1904. He has been connected with geo 



in October, 1894, at the Connecticut Agri 
cultural Experiment Station, and since July, 
1901 has been entomologist of the same 
station and State Entomologist of Connecti 
cut. He was also lecturer in entomology 
in the Yale University Forest School, 1901- 
1906. Dr. Britton is a fellow of the Ameri- 



logical and botanical instruction in Colum- ! can Association for the Advancement of 
bia University since 1879, was professor f! Science is a memb er and was first vice- 
botany, 1891-1896, and since then emeritus ! P resident > 1906-1908, president 1909 of the 
professor of botany. He was appointed, in Amencan Association of Economic Ento- 
1896, director-in-chief of the New York Bo- mologists 1S a member of tne Connecticut 
tanical Garden, in which position he still i Acadein ^ of Arts and Sciences, Connecticut 
continues. Dr. Britton has been an exten- Botanical Society, Entomological Society of 
sivo contributor to the scientific press on America, the Patrons of Husbandry and the 
North and South American flora and is the Society o f Sigma Xi (Yale Chapter). He 



author of monographs on: The Flora of 
New Jersey; Illustrated Flora of the North- 



married at Surry, N. H., April 30, 1895, 
Bertha Madeline Perkins. Residence: 296 



era United States and Canada; Manual of McKinley Avenue. Office: Agricultural 

the Flora of the Northern States and Can- | Experiment Station, New Haven, Conn. 

ada; North American-West Indian Flora.! 

He was editor of the Bulletin of Torrey j BROADHURST, George: 

Botanical Club, 1888-1898. He is a member | Dramatist; born in Walsall, England. 



of the Botanical Society of North America, 
and was its president in 1898-1899; is a fel 
low and was vice-president in 1896 of the 



Author of the plays: The Man of the Hour; 
The Call of the North; An International 
Marriage; What Happened to Jones; Why 



American Association for the Advancement i Smith Left Home; The Wrong Mr. Wright; 



224 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



A Fool and His Money; The Crown Prince; 
etc. Co-author: Wildfire; The American 
Lord; Nancy Brown. He is a member of 
the Lambs, New York Athletic, American 
Dramatists, and Green Room Clubs of New 
York. Address: Lambs Club, 130 West 
44th Street, New York City. 

BROBSTON, Edwin: 

Real estate dealer; born at Madison, Ga., 
Nov. 17, 1863; son of Edwin L. and Hattie 
(Thomas) Brobston. His grandfather, Wil 
liam Brobston, was a noted Presbyterian 
preacher in Illinois, who died at the age 
of ninety in 1885, at Chicago. He was edu 
cated in the common schools of Morgan 
County, Ga. Mr. Brobston was owner and 
editor of the Madisonian in 1887, and edi 
tor and manager of the first morning daily 
at Brunswick, Ga, 1888-1900. He engaged 
in general real estate development, operat 
ing through the South, and made numerous 
industrial speeches at Southern Pines, N. 
C., Huntsville, Ala., Chattanooga, Tenn. 
He served on numerous industrial commis 
sions and made National notoriety by pass 
ing a ship subsidy resolution at the Mari 
time Congress at Brunswick, Ga., 1903. He 
was president of the board of education of 
Glynn County and Brunswick, Ga., for sev 
eral years, and reorganized the schools. He 
is now head of the firm of Brobston & Com 
pany, real estate; president of the Jackson 
ville Development Company; vice-president 
of the Murray Hill Land Company, and the 
Tampa Bay Land Company, and is director 
in about a dozen corporations, mostly land 
companies. He has been a member of sev 
eral Democratic State conventions in Geor 
gia, serving on the platform committee, and 
active in good government. He moved to 
Florida in 1904, and is chairman of the em 
igration committee of the Board of Trade 
of Jacksonville, Florida. He is a Baptist in 
religion. Mr. Brobston is a member of the 
Reform Club and the Georgia Society of 
New York City; the Phoenix Club of Bruns 
wick, Ga., and the Seminole Yacht, and 
Country Clubs of Jacksonville, Florida. He 
is an honorary member of the Florida Press 
Association. He married at Brunswick, 
Ga., April, 1890, Priscilla Littlefield, and 



they have five children. Address: 216 
West Forsythe Street, Jacksonville, Fla. 

BROCKWAY, Howard: 

Composer, pianist; born in Brooklyn, 
Nov. 22, 1870; son of Leverett E. and 
Clara (Kingsley) Brockway. He was ed 
ucated at the Brooklyn Polytechnic In 
stitute; studied music with H. v. C. Korthe- 
uer, Brooklyn, and 0. B. Boise and H. 
Barth, Berlin. Mr. Brockway gave con 
certs of his own works with Berlin Phil 
harmonic Orchestra, at Berlin, February^ 
1895; since October, 1903, member of fac 
ulty Peabody Conservatory, Peabody In 
stitute, Baltimore, Maryland. He is a com 
poser of Sylvan Suite, first produced by 
Boston Symphony Orchestra, 1901; also 
Symphony for Grand Orchestra, produced 
by Dr. Karl Muck and the Boston, Sym 
phony Orchestra in Boston, in April 5th 
and 6th, 1907 (chamber music), choral 
music, songs, pianoforte music, etc. He 
married, first, at Lakewood, N. J., Feb., 
1896, Anabel Boise (died in 1901); and 
they had one daughter; married, second in 
Washington, D. C., April, 1906, Katherine 
Engs Bradford, daughter of Rear-Admiral 
R. B. Bradford, U. S. N. Address: Pea- 
body Institute, Baltimore, Md. 

BROCKWAY, Zebulon Reed: 

Penologist; born at Lyme, Conn., April 
28, 1827; son of Zebulon and Caroline 
Brockway, and educated at East Haddam, 
Conn. After acting as clerk in the Con 
necticut State Prison, 1848-1851, he became 
deputy superintendent of the Albany Peni 
tentiary, 1851; superintendent of Monroe 
County Penitentiary, 1854, and in 1861 of 
the Detroit House of Correction, he became 
in 1876 the superintendent of the New York 
State Reformatory, Elmira, retiring in 1900. 
In 1873 he acted as special commissioner 
to establish a United States Military Pris 
on, later located at Leavenworth, Kan. In 
1901 he was non-resident special lecturer 
on penology at Cornell University. He is 
a chartermember of the National Prison 
Association, U. S. A.; member of Societe 
Generale of Prisons of France. During 
the incumbency of Superintendent Brock- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



way the Elmira system of reform treatment 
was fully developed becoming the basis of 
a permanent and advanced method of the 
treatment of criminals which has had an 
extensive application in all civilized coun 
tries. On April 13, 1853, he married at 
\\Ythersfield, Conn., Jane Woodhouse. Ad 
dress: Elmira, N. Y. 

BRODERICK, Bonadventure Finnbarr: 

Catholic bishop; born in Hartford, Conn., 
Dec. 25, 1868; son of John Harris and Mar 
garet (Healy) Broderick. He was educated 
in St. Charles College, Md., from which he 
received the degree of A.B., 1891; in Ur 
ban College, University of the Propaganda, 
! Rome, Ph.D., 1893, D.D., 1897; and was 
graduated from the American College in 
Rome, 1897. He was ordained priest in 
1890, and took post-graduate courses in 
history and archeology at Rome in 1897- 
1898. He was professor of history, English 
I grammar and Italian literature in the Dio- 
j cesan Seminary at Hartford, Conn., in 
1898, and at Westport, Conn.. 1900. In 
the latter year he was appointed American 
secretary to Monsignor Sbaretti, papal dele 
gate to Havana, Cuba, in which capacity he 
,, carried on negotiations between the church 
sand the Government which were success 
fully concluded in 1905. He was created 
private chamberlain by Pope Leo XIII. 
1901 ; was American secretary to the Apos 
tolic delegation to the Philippine Islands, 
1901, serving until the appointment of the 
Taft Commission in 1902; and was the rep- 
; resentative of the Catholic Church at the 
inauguration of the Cuban Republic, May 
-0, 1902. He was appointed titular bishop 
>f Juliopolis in September, 1903, was con- 
ecrated Oct. 28, 1903, and served as auxil 
iary bishop of Havana, from 1903-1905. 
ishop Broderick was appointed, in 1904, 
,.;eneral commissioner of the Pope for the 
jo! lection of Peter s Pence. He is a mem- 
her of the Arcadia, and of the Collegium 
ultorium Martyrum at Rome. Combining 
ith his thorough ecclesiastical training 
nd ripe scholarship exceptional executive 
bility and diplomatic insight, it has been 
ie good fortune of Bishop Broderick to 
ear an influential part in negotiations be- 
15 



225 

tween his church and his country. : ,t M 
point in American history when such serv 
ices and qualification as his were most 
needed, and to aid in bringing those ne 
gotiations, to a conclusion alike honorable 
and just, both to the Church and the Na 
tion. Address: Staatsburg-on-Hudson, N. 

BROMWELL, Charles S.: 

Military engineer, U. S. A.; born at New 
port, Ky., May 1, 1869. After a prelimi 
nary education at Cincinnati, 0., he was 
graduated from the United States Military 
Academy, June 12, 1890, and the United 
States Engineer School of Application, Wil- 
let s Point, N. Y., in 1893. After various 
appointments, he attained the rank of cap 
tain in February, 1901, in the United States 
Army, having been in charge of various en 
gineering public works throughout the coun 
try. He is at present superintendent of 
public grounds and buildings at Washing- 
ton and military aid to the President. 
with the temporary rank of colonel. He is 
a member of the Metropolitan, Army and 
Navy and Chevy Chase Clubs. He mar 
ried at Washington, June 11, 1896, Letitia 
G. Scott. Residence: 1008 New Hampshire 
Avenue. Address: War Department, 
Washington, D. C. 

BROOKE, Francis Key: 

Bishop of Oklahoma ; born at Gambier, 
Ohio, Nov. 2, 1852; son of Rev. John T. 
and Louisa (Hunter) Biooke. He studied 
at Kenyon College, gr-duating B. A. in 1874. 
and receiving the degree of M.A. in 1881. 
He received the degree of S.T.D. from Kan 
sas Theological School in 1893. He took or 
ders as deacon in the Episcopal Church in 
1875 and two years later was ordained 
priest by Bishop Jaggar. He was rector 
of Grace Church, College Hill, Ohio, 1875- 
1877, of Christ Church, Portsmouth, Ohio. 
1877-1880; of St. James Church, Piqua, 
Ohio, 1880-1884; Grace Church, Sandusky, 
Ohio, from 1884-1886. In 1880 he was call 
ed to the rectorship of St. Peter s Church, 
St. Louis, until 1888; and from 1888-1893, 
he was rector of Trinity Church, Atchison, 
Kansas. He became Bishop of Oklahoma 



226 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



and Indian Territory, being consecrated in 
1893, by Bishops Tuttle, Pierce, Spauhling, 
.Faggar, Thomas, Kendrick, Graves and At- 
\\ill. Bishop Brooke was married in 1881 
to Mildred R. Baldwin. He is t author of 
various addresses, missionary reports and 
appeals. Address: Oklahoma City, Okla. 

BROOKE, John Rutter: 

Major-general U. S. Army, retired; born 
in Philadelphia, July 21, 1838. In April, 
1861, he enlisted in the Fourth Pennsyl 
vania Infantry, and was promoted until 
he became brigadier-general of volunteers, 
May 12, 1864. On Aug. 1, 1864, he was 
made brevet major-general, and was com 
missioned lieutenant-colonel of the Thirty- 
seventh U. S. Infantry July 28, 1866. He 
was transferred to the Third Infantry, 
March 15, 1869, and March 20, 1870, was 
made colonel of the Thirteenth Infantry; 
was again transferred to the Third Infan 
try, June 14, 1879, and was commissioned 
brigadier-general April 6, 1888. He com 
manded the Departments of the Platte, Da 
kota and the Missouri, and on May 22, 

1897, was made major-general. In April, 

1898, he was sent to command troops at 
Chickamauga Park, and in July, 1898, was 
ordered to Porto Rico, as head of the Mili 
tary Commission, becoming governor-gen 
eral of Porto Rico. In December, 1898, he 
was appointed governor-general of Cuba, 
and commanded the Division of Cuba; and 
May, 1900, he was placed in command of 
the Department of the East. He was re 
tired July 21, 1902. Major-General Brooke 
is a companion of the Pennsylvania Com- 
rnandery of the Military Order of the Loyal 
Legion. Address: Rosemont, Pa. 

BROOKS, Amy: 

Artist, author and illustrator; born in 
Chelsea, Mass., daughter of Alfred Hub- 
bard and Hannah B. (Stebbins) Brooks. 
She was educated in the public schools of 
Hyde Park, Mass., and received her art ed^ 
ucation in the museum school of Drawing 
and Painting, where she won four scholar 
ships for meritorious work, and she also 
received a fine musical training, and is an 
accomplished pianist. Her first painting 



was exhibited in 1895, and her first book, 
Randy s Summer, was published in 1900. 
She has since written and illustrated twen 
ty more volumes, among which are: Doro 
thy Dainty; Dorothy s Playmates; Dorothy 
Dainty at School; Dorothy Dainty at the 
Shore; Dorothy in the City; Dorothy at 
Home; Dorothy Dainty s Gay Times; Doro 
thy Dainty in the Country; Dorothy Dain 
ty s Winter; Little Sister Prue; Prue at 
School; Prue s Little Friends; etc. Miss 
Brooks has illustrated and designed covers 
for all of her own books and has illustrated 
over seventy books for other authors. She 
has also published some songs of a high 
class for which she has written the words 
and composed the music. Address: Hyde 
Park, Mass. 

BROOKS, Bryant Butler: 

Governor of Wyoming; born in Bernard- 
ston, Mass., Feb. 5, 1861; son of Silas New 
ton and Melissa Minerva (Burrows) 
Brooks. He attended the Powers Institute 
in his native place and in high school in 
Chicago, 111. In 1882 he went to Wyoming 
and engaged in the live stock business in 
that state, in which he has continued most 
successfully, now being president of The 
B. B. Brooks Company and the Brooks-Hud 
son Company in that business; also presi 
dent of the Coal Creek Coal Company, and 
director of the Casper National Bank. He 
has long been active in the Republican 
politics of Wyoming, was a member of the 
Wyoming Legislature, 1892; presidential 
elector on the McKinley and Roosevelt 
ticket, 1900, and in 1904 was elected Gov 
ernor of Wyoming, and reflected in 1906 
for the term expiring in January, 1911. He 
married in Alexandria, Neb., March 10, 
1886, Mary Naomi Willard. Residence: 
Casper, Wyo. Office: Cheyenne, Wyo. 

BROOKS, Franklin E.: 

Lawyer and ex-congressman; born at 
Sturbridge, Worcester County, Mass., Nov. 
19, 1860; son of E. T. Brooks and Anna E. 
Brooks. He was graduated from Brown 
University with the degree of A.B. in 1883, 
and received the degree of A.M. from the 
same institution in 1886. He taught for 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



227 



several years after his graduation, ending 
as an instructor in the Boston Latin School. 
He studied law in an office in Boston and 
attended the Law School of Boston Univer 
sity in 1887 and 1888. He was admitted 
to the bar of Suffolk County, Mass., in 
1888, and practised law in Boston until 
1891 when, because of failing health, he 
removed to Colorado. He resumed the 
practise of law in 1892 and is now a mem 
ber of the law firm of Lunt, Brooks and 
Wilcox of Colorado Springs. He is a Re 
publican in politics and he was elected from 
the State of Colorado at large in 1902 to 
the Fifty-eighth Congress, and was reflected 
in 1904 to the Fifty-ninth Congress, his 
second term expiring in March, 1907. He 
married at Leicester, Mass., June 3, 1891, 
Sarah Brainerd Coolidge. Address: Colo 
rado Springs, Colo. 

BROOKS, Samuel Palmer: 

President of Baylor University; born in 
Milledgeville, Ga., Dec. 4, 1863; son of S. 
E. and Aurelia E. (Palmer) Brooks. He 
was graduated from Baylor University, 
Waco, Texas, as A.B., 1893, then went to 
Yale, where he received the degree of A.B., 
1894, A.M., in course, 1902, and from Rich 
mond College, Va., received the honorary 
degree of LL.D. in 1903. He has had a 
successful career as a teacher, and in 1902 
was elected to his present position as pres 
ident of Baylor University. He is a mem 
ber of the Texas Historical Society, and is 
a member and was the first president of 
the Texas State Peace Society; and he is 
prominent in the Masonic fraternities. He 
married in Cleburne, Texas, Dec. 24, 1895. 
Mattie Sims, and they have a son and a 
daughter. Address: *1024 Speight Street, 
Waco, Texas. 

BROOKS, William Penn: 

Agriculturist; born at Xorwell, Mass., 
Nov. 19, 1851; son of Nathaniel and Re 
becca P. (Gushing) Brooks. After attend 
ing common schools and academies in Mas 
sachusetts, he took a course in the Massa 
chusetts Agricultural College, from which 
he was graduated in 1875, with the de 
gree of B.S. He also studied at the Uni 



versity of Halle, Germany (Friedrichs 
Universitiit), where he took the degree of 
Ph.D. in 1897. From 1870 to 1872 he 
tii light in mixed and grammar schools. In 
1877 he accepted a professorship in agri 
culture in the Imperial College of Agricul 
ture, Japan, which position he held until 
1889, acting as president of the college, ad 
interim, for four years. Since 1889 he has 
been professor of agriculture in the Mas 
sachusetts Agricultural College, and has 
been president of this college, ad interim, 
at two different periods about two years 
in all. Since 1906 he has been director of 
the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment 
Station. His travels include Japan, Bel 
gium, Germany, Austria, Holland, England, 
and much of the United States. He is a 
member of the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science, the Massa 
chusetts Forestry Association, and the Phi 
Kappa Phi and Phi Sigma Kappa fraterni 
ties, and has received from the Emperor 
of Japan the decoration of the Fourth 
Order of the Rising Sun. He married at 
Revere, Mass., March 29, 1882, Eva B. 
Hall, and they have two children. Ad 
dress : Amherst, Mass. 

BROOKS, William Robert: 

Astronomer and lecturer; born in Maid- 
stone, Kent, England, June 11, 1844; son of 
Rev. William and Caroline (Wickings) 
Brooks. He was educated in Marion, N. 
Y., and received the honorary degrees of 
A.M. from Hobart and D.Sc. from Hamil 
ton College. Professor Brooks has the dis 
tinction of being the discoverer of 25 comets, 
more than any other living astronomer, 11 
of which were discovered at Red House 
Observatory at Phelps, N. Y., which he 
founded in 1874. Upon his removal to 
Geneva, N. Y v in 1888, he discovered 14 
comets, and since that time has been in 
charge of Smith Observatory in that place, 
and has been professor of astronomy in 
Hobart College. Many of his valuable dis 
coveries were made with telescopes of his 
own construction. He became early inter 
ested in photography, and later in its ap 
plication to astronomy. He has been the 
recipient of numerous medals and diplomas, 



228 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



principally for his astronomical discov 
eries, among which are the following: 
Over $1,000 in the Warner gold prizes; 8 
medals from the Astronomical Society of 
the Pacific^ Lalande medal from the Paris 
Academy of Sciences; special gold medal 
from the St. Louis Exposition in 1904; 
and gold medal and diploma from the As 
tronomical Society of Mexico. He is a fel 
low of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science; the Royal As 
tronomical Society, and a member of the 
British Astronomical Association and the 
Phi Beta Kappa Society. He was married 
in Edwardsburg, Mich., Oct. 15, 1868, to 
Mary E. Smith, and they have one daughter, 
Anna Caroline. Address: Geneva, N. Y. 

BROTJSSARD, Robert F.: 

Lawyer and congressman; born on the 
Marie Louise plantation, near New Iberia, 
La., Aug. 17, 1864, the Broussard family 
being of French descent, long settled in 
southwest Louisiana and southeast Texas, 
and prominent in farming, stock-raising 
and mercantile interests. After three years 
at Georgetown University he entered the 
Law School of Tulane University of Louis 
iana, at New Orleans, whence he was grad 
uated as LL.B. in 1889. Since then he has 
been engaged in practice at New Iberia, 
La. He took a prominent part in the move 
ment for the destruction of the Louisiana 
Lottery, and was elected by the Anti-Lot 
tery Democrats to the office of district 
attorney of the Nineteenth Judicial Dis 
trict of Louisiana, and was reflected for 
a second term. He was elected in 1896 to 
the fifty-fifth Congress, and has since been 
biennially elected; and he is now serving in 
the Sixty-first Congress, expiring 1911. 
Address: New Iberia, La. 

BROWARD, Napoleon Bonaparte: 

Governor of Florida; born on a farm in 
Duval County, Fla., April 19, 1857; son of 
Napoleon Bonaparte and Mary Dorcas 
(Parsons) Broward. He was left an 
orphan at twelve years of age; attended 
a country school and at the age of four 
teen went to work in a log camp for an 
uncle. He afterward worked as a farm 



hand, as an employee of steamboats, a sea 
man on sailing vessels, etc., then became 
a bar pilot on Saint Johns River in Flor 
ida, and later engaged in the steamboat 
business. Since 1902 he has been engaged 
in the towing and wrecking business at 
Jacksonville, Key West and Tampa, Fla. 
He has always been an active Democrat, 
and in 1887 he was appointed and in 1889 
elected sheriff of Duval County, Fla., which 
office he continued to hold, by successive 
reelections until 1900. He was elected a 
member of the Florida Legislature from 
Duval County in 1900, was a member of 
the State Board of Health of Florida from 
1900 to 1904, and in 1904 was elected Gov 
ernor of Florida for the term which ex 
pired in Jan., 1909. Address: Jackson 
ville, Fla. 

BROWN, Abbie Farwell: 

Author; born in Boston; daughter of 
Benjamin F. and Clara M. (Neal) Brown. 
She was educated in the Girls Latin School 
of Boston and in Radcliffe College. Since 
leaving college she has been continuously 
engaged in literary work, as a frequent 
contributor to magazines, chiefly of juvenile 
poems and stories. She is fond of music 
and a great lover of the drama, and has 
written many song texts and the librettos 
of two comic operas, and several dramatic 
sketches. Miss Brown was editor of the 
Young People s Library and is author of: 
Quits (a play) ; The Book of Saints and 
Friendly Beasts, 1900; The Lonesomest 
Doll, 1901; A Pocketful of Posies (poems), 
1902; In the Days of Giants, 1902; The 
Curious Book of Birds, 1903; The Flower 
Princess, 1904; The Star Jewels, 1905; 
Brothers and Sisters, 1906; Friends and 
Cousins, 1907; The Legend of St. Christo 
pher; Fresh Posies (poems), 1908; Tales 
of the Red Children, 1909. She is a mem 
ber of the American Folk Lore Association 
and of the Saturday Morning and Boston 
Authors Clubs. Address: 41 W. Cedar 
Street, Boston. 

BROWN, Addison: 

Jurist and botanist; born in W T est New- 
bury 3 Mass., Feb. 2L, 1830] son of Addison 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



229 



and Catharine Babson (Griffin) Brown. 
He was educated at Harvard College, of 
which he is A.B. 1852; LL.B. 1854; LL.D. 
1902. He was admitted to the bar at 
Brooklyn in 1855,, and practised law in 
New York City until 1891, when he was 
appointed United States judge for the 
Southern District of New York, resigning 
in Sept., 1901. His published decisions, 
mostly in admiralty and bankruptcy, num 
ber about 1,800, of which he published a 
digest in 1902. Judge Brown is a botanist 
of national reputation; is a member and 
was for ten years president of the Torrey 
Botanical Club, and was one of the orig 
inators and is a director of the New York 
Botanical Garden. He is the author, with 
Professor N. L. Britton, of Britton and 
Brown s Illustrated Flora of the Northern 
United States and Canada; and also author 
of: The Elgin Botanic Garden, its Rela 
tion to Columbia College, the New Hamp 
shire Grants and the Treaty with Vermont 
in 1790. He is a member of the American 
Geographical Society, the American Associ 
ation for the Advancement of Science, New 
York Historical and Horticultural Soci 
eties, and the Century Association. He 
married at Bradford, Mass., Jan. 1, 1856, 
Mary Chadwick Barrett, who died in 1887; 
and married second, in New York City, 
July 20, 1893, Helen Carpenter Gaskin, 
and he has three sons and one daughter. 
Address: 45 W. 89th Street, New York 
City. 

BROWN, Alice Van Vechten: 

Artist and educator ; born in Hanover, 
N. H., June 7, 1862; daughter of President 
Samuel Gilman and Sarah (Van Vechten) 
Brown. She was educated at home and in 
schools at Clinton and Utica, N. Y. ; stud 
ied at the Art .Students League in New 
York City, as well as in the studios of vari 
ous artists, and traveled abroad. In 1892 
she became assistant director and in 1894 
director of the Norwich Art School, at 
Norwich, Conn., holding that appointment 
until elected in 1897 to her present posi 
tion as professor of art at Wellesley Col 
lege. Professor Brown went abroad for 
two years, 1905-1907, traveling and study 



ing in Europe. She is a member of the 
American Fine Arts Society, the Archaeo 
logical Institute of America, Art Students 
League and the National Arts Club of New 
York. Address: Wellesley College, Wel 
lesley, Mass. 

BROWN, Arthur Lewis: 

United States judge; born in Providence, 
R. I., Nov. 28, 1854. He was graduated 
from Brown University in the class of 1876, 
receiving from that university the degrees 
of A.B. and A.M., and was graduated from 
Boston University Law School, LL.B., 1878. 
From graduation in law he practised the 
profession in Providence until appointed 
by President Cleveland, Oct. 24, 1896, Unit 
ed States judge for the District of Rhode 
Island, in which office he continues. Ad 
dress : United States Court, Providence, 
R. I. 

BROWN, Arthur Newton: 

Librarian; born in Terre Haute, Ind., 
1857; son of Robert Russell and Elvira 
(Jenks) Brown. His parents went in 1861 
to Springfield, Mass., where he was edu 
cated in the public schools. From 1876 to 
1878 he was in the Mass. Institute of Tech 
nology in Boston. In 1878, he was made- 
assistant librarian of the Springfield City 
Library, where he had previously done 
work. In Jan., 1883, he went to take a 
position in the auditor s office of the Mexi 
can Central Railroad in Mexico. Later he 
left that post to become Spanish translator 
for Mexican Financier, a trade journal pub 
lished in English and Spanish in Mexico 
City, but on account of serious illness, he 
returned to the United States in Aug., 1884. 
In Feb., 1885, Mr. Brown became executive 
assistant to the chief librarian of Columbia 
College Library, New York. He became a 
life member in 1885 of the American Li 
brary Association. In Oct., 1885 he was 
elected assistant manager of the Library 
Bureau at Boston. Subsequently, he was 
appointed librarian of the United States 
Naval Academy, in Aug., 1886, and in 
Sept., 1896, was made professor of English, 
in the same institution, and in Oct., 1900, 
he again became Librarian of the Naval 



230 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Academy, retaining the title of professor 
of English. Mr. Brown married at Boston, 
Mass., June 29, 1898, Annie L. D. Currier, 
daughter of Augustus N. Currier, of Wor 
cester, Mass. Address: United States Na 
val Academy, Annapolis, Md. 

BROWN, Benjamin West Bonney: 

Lawyer; born in New York City, Feb. 13, 
1870; son of Edward Flint and Eleanor 
(Bonney) Brown. He was educated in 
Williston Seminary, Easthampton, Mass., 
of 1887; Yale University, class of 1891, and 
was a student in Columbia Law School. He 
was admitted to the bar and has since been 
engaged in practice. He is a member of the 
Association of the Bar of the City of New 
York, is a trustee of the Northern Dispen 
sary, a member of the Board of Managers 
of the Northwestern Dispensary, a member 
of the Yale and Eepublican Clubs, the So 
ciety of Colonial Wars, New England Soci 
ety, the Sons of the Revolution, the Military 
Society of the War of 1812, Phi Gamma 
Delta, Saint Nicholas Society. He was 
elected in 1905 and reflected 1907 to the 
Board of Aldermen from the 28th Alder- 
manic (27th Assembly) District to the 
Board of Aldermen,, and is executive mem 
ber of the Republican County Committee of 
New York County for the 27th Assembly 
District, Residence: 44 W. 44th Street. 
Office: 18 Wall Street, New York City. 

BROWN, Calvin S.: 

Professor of Romance languages ; born in 
Obion County, Term., Feb. 13, 1866; son of 
Calvin S. and Margaret (Martin) Brown, 
and a descendant of Virginia stock. He 
was graduated from high school in Obion 
County, Tenn., from Vanderbilt University; 
studied at the University of Paris, France, 
and the University of Leipzig, Germany; 
and received the degree of Ph.D. from the 
University of Colorado. He has held chairs 
in Vanderbilt University, the University of 
Missouri, the University of Colorado, and 
the University of Mississippi ; and he has 
been professor of Romance languages in the 
University of Mississippi since* 1905. He 
has traveled extensively in the United 
States, England, France, Spain, Portugal, 



Madeira, the Azores, Italy, Greece, Asia, 
Russia, Germany, Holland, Belgium and 
anada. He is a member of the American 
Association for the Advancement of Sci 
ence, the Modern Language Association of 
America, and the Phi Beta Kappa Society. 
He is editor of the Later English Drama, 
and of Tennyson s Poems. He married at 
West Point, Ga., in 1905, Maud Morrow, 
formerly professor of Greek and Latin in 
the Agnes Scott College at Atlanta, and 
they have a daughter and a son. Residence 
and postoffice: University, Miss. Express 
address: Oxford, Miss. 

BROWN, Charles Carroll: 

Consulting civil engineer and editor; born 
in Austinburg, Ohio, Oct. 4, 1856; son of 
George P. Brown and Mary (Seymour) 
Brown. He was in Cornell University one 
year, and then went to the University of 
Michigan, whence he was graduated as C.E. 
in 1879. He served on the United States 
Lake Survey for three years, and on the 
New York State Survey one year; is in 
general practice as consulting engineer and 
has been for twenty years; professor of civil 
engineering for ten years (at Rose Poly 
technic Institute three years, and at Union 
College, Schenectady, N. Y., seven years) ; 
consulting engineer of the New York Stat? 
Board of Health six years; in the city 
engineers offices of Indianapolis two years. 
and of Omaha, Neb., one and a half years; 
associate editor of Municipal Engineering 
five years, and since 1900 its editor-in-chief. 
Mr. Brown has also been consulting engineer 
for many cities and towns in New York, 
Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, North Dakota, and 
other States. Mr. Brown is vice-president 
of the Municipal Engineering Company, 
treasurer of the Public School Publishing 
Company, secretary and .engineer of the 
Grand Valley Land and Mineral Company. 
He was also president of the Bridge and 
Stream Improvement Commission of Indian 
apolis, recently merged in the Municipal 
Art Association. He is a member of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers, found 
er and ex-secretary of the National Associa 
tion of Cement Users; member of the Amer 
ican Waterworks Association; past presi- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



dent of the American Society of Municipal 
Improvements ; past president of the Indian 
apolis Technical Club; vice-president of the 
Indiana Engineering Society; past president 
of the Illinois Society of Engineers and 
Surveyors; was first national president of 
the Society of the Sigma Xi; is member of 
the Phi Delta Theta fraternity; president 
of the Municipal Art Association of Indian 
apolis; member of the National Municipal 
League and of the Commercial Club of In 
dianapolis. Mr. Brown married in Dublin, 
Ind., Sept. 10, 1878, Cora Stanton, and they 
have a son and a daughter. Residence: 
2247 N. Pennsylvania Street. Office: 408 
Commercial Club Building, Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

BROWN, Charles H.: 

Lawyer; born at West VVinfield. N. Y., 
July 20, 1858; son of Hiram Clark and 
Alice Ann (Stuart) Brown. He was edu 
cated at West Winfield Academy, 1870-1875, 
and at Hungerford Collegiate Institute, 
Adams, N. Y., 1875-1877. He was admitted 
to the bar in 1880; district attorney of 
Allegheny County, N. Y., 1889-1897; assist 
ant U. S. attorney for the Northern Dis 
trict of New York, 1897-1899; U. S. attor 
ney of the same district, 1899-1900; U. S. 
attorney for the Western District of New 
York, 1900-1906. In 1906 he was elected 
justice of the Supreme Court of the State 
of Ne\v York, for the term expiring Dec. 31, 
1920. He is a Republican in politics. He 
is a Mason and a member of the Buffalo and 

Ellicott Clubs of Buffalo. Judge Brown 
married at Adams, N. Y., Nov. 16, 1881, 

! Alice C. Smith, and they have three children. 
Address : Belmont, Allegheny County, N. Y. 

BROWN, David Walter: 

Lawyer; born in Ogdensburg, N. Y., Aug. 
10, 1852; son of Henry J. and Cornelia J. 
(Allen) Brown. He was graduated from 
Yale, B.A., 1876, Ph.D., 1878. He studied 
law and was admitted to the bar of New 
York, and he is now senior member of the 
law firm of D. W. and H. V. Brown, and 

; counsel in the firm s patent causes. Mr. 

i Brown published A New Theory of Differ 
ential Calculus in the Journal of the Frank- 



23 1 

lin Institute, 1897, and numerous articles on 
the law of Inter-State Commerce in law 
periodicals from 1904 to 1907. He is a 
member of the Association of the Bar of the 
City of New York, the New York State Bar 
Association, and of the American Associa 
tion for the Advancement of Science. Res 
idence: 337 W. 34th Street. Office: 5 
Nassau Street, New York City. 

BROWN, Edward Osgood: 

Jurist; born at Salem, Mass., Aug. 5, 
1847; son of Edward and Eliza (Dalton) 
Brown. He was graduated from Brown 
University as A.B. in the class of 1867, and 
then, returning to Salem, became a student 
in the law offices there, and afterward in 
Dane School at Harvard University. He 
was admitted to the bar in 1870, became 
assistant clerk to the Supreme Court of 
Rhode Island in 1870-1871, and begun prac 
tice in the firm of Peckham and Brown at 
Chicago in 1872, continuing practice until 
his elevation to the bench. Judge Brown is 
classed politically as a Radical Democrat, 
and has for years been known throughout 
the country as one of the leaders in the 
Single-tax movement. In 1903 he was 
elected for a term of six years to his present 
position as one of the judges of the Circuit 
Court for Cook County, 111. He was desig 
nated by the Supreme Court of Illinois, in 
1904. as one of th^ judges of the Appellate 
Court for the First (Chicago) District. 
Judge Brown is author of numerous legal 
and economic papers and other contributions 
to the periodical press. He married at Chi 
cago, June 25, 1884, Helen Gertrude Eagle. 
Residence: 400 N. State Street. Office ad 
dress : 400 Ashland Block, Chicago. 

BROWN, Ernest. William: 

Professor of mathematics; born in Hull, 
Yorkshire, England, Nov. 29, 1866; oldest 
son of the late William Brown, and of Emma 
(Martin) Brown. He was educated at the 
Rev, J. D. Bell s School, at Totteridge Park, 
Hertfordshire, England, and at Hull and 
East Riding College, and at Christ s College, 
Cambridge, England, as scholar in 1884. 
He was fellow from 1889 to 1895, and he 
received the degree of B.A. in 1887 and that 



232 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



of Sc.D. in 1890. He was professor of 
mathematics at Haverford College, Pa., 1891- 
1907, and since 1907 has been professor of 
mathematics in Yale University. He is au 
thor of: Treatise on the Lunar Theory, 
New Theory of the Motion of the Moon; 
and editor of the transactions of the Amer 
ican Mathematical Society, 1900-1907; also 
author of various papers on the Lunar 
theory and on Celestial Mechanics during 
past sixteen years, chiefly in Memoirs and 
Proceedings of Royal Astronomical Society. 
London Mathematical Society, Americans 
Journal of Mathematics and American Math 
ematical Society; articles and lectures on 
popular subjects. He is a fellow of the 
Royal Society and a member of the Royal 
Astronomical Society, and was awarded the 
gold medal of the Royal Astronomical So 
ciety in 1907 and won the Adams Prize at 
Cambridge in 1907. He is a member of the 
American Philosophical Society; the Amer 
ican Mathematical Society, etc. He has 
frequently visited Switzerland, has traveled 
in Sweden, Denmark, Russia, Germany, 
and other European countries and visited 
South Africa in 1905. His favorite recrea 
tions are rowing, music, chess, climbing, and 
golf. He is a member of the Graduates 
Club and Country Club of New Haven. Conn. 
Address: Yale University, New Haven, 
Conn. 

BROWN, George Francis: 

Retired officer of The Pullman Company; 
born in Chicago, Oct. 1, 1843. He was chief 
clerk of the United States quartermaster 
department from 1861 to 1866. Entered 
railroad service, July, 1867, as secretary and 
treasurer for receiver on the Memphis, 
Clarksville and Louisville Railroad, and was 
agent in charge of w r ar claims and in the 
freight department of the Illinois Central 
Railroad in 1868 and 1869, and secretary of 
the Bloomington (111.) Fire Insurance Com 
pany, during the next two years. Mr. Brown 
has been with the Pullman Company since 
1871 successively as clerk; assistant to the 
general superintendent for seven years, act 
ing general superintendent; and general sup- 
eriiiU iident from 1880 to 1885; general man 
ager from 1885 to 1905; elected treasurer in 



May, 1905, and placed on the retired list 
in Nov., 1907. Address: Pullman Build 
ing, Chicago. 

BROWN, Glenn: 

Architect ; born in Fauquier County, Va., 
Sept. 13, 1854. He was educated at the 
Washington and Lee University, and took a 
special course in architecture at the Massa- 
husetts Institute of Technology. Since 1878 
he has practised his profession in Washing 
ton, D. C., and in Maryland and Virginia, 
and has written several books bearing on the 
subject in which he is most interested, 
among them being: Healthy Foundations 
for Houses ; Trap Syphonage ; History of the 
LTnited States Capitol ; and Papers on Im 
provement of Washington City. He is also 
editor of European and Japanese Gardens, 
and of the Proceedings of the American In 
stitute of Architects, and is a contributor 
to technical journals. Mr. Brown is a fel 
low and director of the American Institute 
of Architects; corresponding member of the 
Societe Centra le des Architectes Francais, of 
Paris; corresponding member of the Society 
of Architects, of Antwerp, Belgium ; secre 
tary of the Public Art League of the United 
States ; honorary corresponding member of 
the Royal Institute of British Architects and 
of the Societa degli Ingegneri e degli Arch- 
itetti Italiani, of Rome; life member of the 
American Academy in Rome; and a member 
of the executive committees of and delegate 
of the LTnited States Government to the 
International Congress of Architects at 
Madrid, London and Vienna; regent and 
secretary of the National Academy of Art; 
member of the Executive Committee, Council 
of the Fine Arts, appointed by President 
Roosevelt. He married in Staunton, Va., 
Feb. 1, 1876, Mary Ella Chapman. Resi 
dence: 195 I Street. Office: 806 17th 
Street, Washington. D. C. 

BROWN, Goodwin: 

Lawyer; born at Henderson, Jefferson 
County, N. Y., April 5, 1852; son of Thomas 
Goodwin and Josephine Cornelia (Keith) 
Brown. lit; was graduated from Cornell 
University, 1875; honorary A.M. Union Col 
lege, 1891. He was admitted to practice by 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



233 



the Supreme Court of New York, 1879, and 
to U. S. Courts, 1882; was secretary to 
Governors Cleveland and Hill, having charge 
of the extradition of fugitives from justice, 
and also of pardon matters, and resigned 
1889. He was appointed N. Y. State commis 
sioner in lunacy. 1889; reappointed, 1893, 
and retired, 1899; was delegate to and sec 
retary of the Extradition Conference, 1888, 
appointed to frame statute amending U. S. 
extradition laws. Mr. Brown is author of 
numerous statutes relating to criminals and 
criminal procedure. He served as president 
of the Board of Health, Yonkers, several 
terms; is author of the first general stat 
utes providing for free public baths, and 
with two associates recommended the act 
which passed the New York Legislature re 
moving the insane from county poorhouses 
in 1890; centralized the management of 
N. Y. State Hospital for Insane, 1893; was 
appointed commissioner to revise and con 
solidate the statutes of New York State, 
1906, and appointed receiver of the Inter 
national Trust Company, 1907. He is a 
Democrat and Unitarian; is a member of 
the Psi Upsilon and Phi Kappa Psi college 
societies, Sons of Revolution, Society of 
Colonial Wars,, Founders and Patriots, and 
Masonic Order. Mr. Brown is a manager of 
St. John s Riverside Hospital and Sprain 
Ridge Hospital, Yonkers, N. Y., and a mem 
ber of the Fort Orange Club of Albany, and 
the Psi Upsilon Club of New York City. 
Mr. Brown married in Hartford, Conn., 
1877, Lillian Spencer Woodhouse, and 
they have one son. Residence: 643 Pali 
sade Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. Office: 135 
Broadway, New York City. 



BROWN, Harry Fletcher: 

Chemist ; born in Natick, Mass., July 10, 
1867; son of William Henry and Maria 
Frances (Osgood) Brown. He was educated 
in Harvard University, from which he grad 
uated as A.B., 1890, followed by two and a 
! half years in residence in the Graduate 
. School, specializing in inorganic chemistry 
: and receiving the degree of A.M. in 1892. 
Mr. Brown was an assistant in elementary 
chemistry during the academic year, and an 
instructor in the Summer School at Har 



vard. during his post-graduate course. In . 
Nov., 1892, he was appointed chemist to the 
United States Naval Torpedo Station at 
Newport, R. ]., where he was engaged in 
the investigation and experimental manufac 
ture of smokeless powder and high explo 
sives until 1900, and while so engaged made 
many confidential reports to the Navy De 
partment. In 1900 he took his present posi 
tion as general superintendent of the Inter 
national Smokeless Powder and Chemical 
Co. He is also chemical director of the 
smokeless powder department of the E. I. 
du Pont de Nemours Powder Company, of 
Wilmington, Del. While at Harvard, Mr. 
Brown was president of the Boylston Chem 
ical Club, and secretary of the Pierian 
Sodality, and he is now a member of the 
Society of Chemical Industry and a director 
of the American Institute of Chemical Engi 
neers. He married at Newport, R. I., Oct. 
26, 1897, Florence M. Hammett. Address: 
Wilmington, Del. 

BROWN, Helen Dawes: 

Author and lecturer; born in Concord, 
Mass., in 1857; daughter of William Dawes 
and Martha (Swan) Brown. She was grad 
uated from Vassar College in 1878, receiv 
ing the degree of A.M. in 1890. She after 
wards taught four years at Vassar, and 
fifteen years in the Brearley School in New 
York City. Miss Brown has lectured in New 
York and vicinity for the past twenty-five 
years. She is author of: Two College 
Girls ; The Petrie Estate ; Little Miss Phoebe 
Gay; Her Sixteenth Year; A Book of Little 
Boys; Mr. Tuckerman s Nieces (all pub 
lished by Houghton, Mifflin & Co.), and A 
Civilian Attache (published y Scribner s). 
She was a trustee of Barnard College, 1887- 
1905, is a member of the Association of 
Collegiate Alumna?, the College Settlements 
Association, Vassar Students Aid Society, 
the Onteora Club (Catskill Mountains), and 
the Barnard Meridian, and Women s Univer 
sity Clubs of New York. Address: Mout- 
clair, N. J. 

BROWN, Henry Billings: 

Associate justice of the Supreme Court of 
the United States., retired; born at South 



234 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Lee, Mass., March 2. 1836. He was gradu 
ated from Yale College as B.A. in 1856, and 
attended the law schools of Yale and Har 
vard. He went to Detroit and engaged in 
practice until 1875, when he was appointed 
by President Grant, judge of the United 
States District Court for the Eastern Dis 
trict of Michigan, which office he held until 
appointed, in 1891, an associate justice of 
the Supreme Court of the L T nited States, in 
w T hich office he served until 1906, when he 
retired. The degree of LL.D. was conferred 
upon Judge Brown by the University of 
Michigan in 1887, and by Yale in 1891. He 
compiled Brown s Admiralty Reports. Jus 
tice Brown was lecturer upon Admiralty law 
in the University of Michigan and in George 
town University. He is a member of the 
Society of the Cincinnati, and the Society of 
Mayflower Descendants. He married first, at 
Detroit, Mich., in 1864, Caroline Pitts, who 
died in 1901. He married again, June 25, 
1904, Josephine E. Tyler. Address: 1720 
Sixteenth Street, Washington. D. C. 

BROWN, John A.: 

Lawyer; born at Tannersville, Greene 
County, N. Y., June 21, 1876; son of James 
Brown and Catharine (Goggin) Brown. He 
was educated by a private tutor, and at the 
Chicago High School. He studied at the 
Kent College of Law in Chicago, graduating 
as LL.B. in 1898, and took a post-graduate 
course at the Illinois College of Law, from 
which he received the degrees of LL.B., and 
LL.M., in 1899. He was admitted to the bar 
in Dec., 1898, and has been engaged in gen 
eral practice in the State and Federal courts. 
He handled the Tug Trust case, the Quota 
tion cases, involving the property rights of 
the boards of trade in quotations through 
the United States Supreme Court, the Marks 
murder case, and Frawley murder case, and 
many important civil and criminal cases. 
He has been associated with Jacob J. Kern, 
formerly city attorney of Chicago, and later 
States attorney of Cook County, 111., since 
his admission to the bar, the firm now being 
Kern & Brown. He is a director in many 
of Chicago s largest corporations, as well 
as attorney for many of its business enter 
prises. He is the owner of the addition 



bearing his name to Glen Ellyn, one of the 
city s most beautiful suburbs. He is Demo 
cratic in politics, though he has never held 
a public office. Mr. Brown is a member of 
the Illinois State Bar Association, and the 
Chicago Bar Association; trustee of the Illi 
nois College of Law, and director of the 
University Extension Law School. He is a 
member of the Phi Alpha Delta law fra 
ternity, and president of its Alumni associa 
tion; is past regent of the Illinois Council 
of the Royal Arcanum; sitting past regent 
of Aar Council, Royal Arcanum; member of 
the Banner Lodge, 219, Knights of Pythias; 
and he is a member of the Press Club of 
Chicago, and Birchwood Country Club. Res 
idence: 403 E. Ontario Street, Chicago. 
Office: 79 S. Clark Street, Chicago. 

BROWN, John Pinkney: 

Editor and civil engineer; born at Rising 
Sun, Ind., Jan. 19, 1842; son of Elbridge 
Gerry Brown, who was a descendant of 
General Brown, of the Massachusetts Mili 
tia during the Revolutionary War, and Ada- 
line (Style) Brown. He was educated in 
the schools of Indiana, and for a brief period 
at Hanover College, Hanover, Ind. He 
served as a member of the Sixteenth Indi 
ana Regiment, 1861-1865, and was with the 
U. S. Sanitary Commission of Indiana for 
service in the Mississippi River in 1863, 
and with General Logan s Division in 
Mississippi River Service in 1864 and 
1865. Mr. Brown was engaged as a civil 
engineer in the survey of the Pacific Rail 
way east from California in 1866, the sur 
vey of the State line between California 
and Nevada in 1866, and on various rail 
way engineering projects. He surveyed the 
boundary of the Crow Indian Reservation 
for the Government in 1890. He has made 
forestry studies in the field, in the Rocky 
Mountains, and all portions of North Amer 
ica. He originated the plan for extensive 
tree planting by railroads for timber pur 
poses, and twenty-five million trees have 
been planted as the result of his efforts 
in that direction. He is secretary and 
treasurer of the International Society of 
Arboriculture, and he has traveled over three 
hundred thousand miles in North and Cen- 



MEN 

tral America in the study of forests. Mr. 
Brown established, in 1902. the magazine 
Arboriculture, devoted to economic forestry, 
as an advocate of Governmental, State, 
corporation and individual tree planting 
for the benefit of the future Nation and the 
present generation, and he is author of : 
Practical Arboriculture, a book covering 
the problems of railway engineers, manu 
facturers, lumbermen and farmers in rela 
tion to tree planting and particularly the re 
forestation of denuded areas. He has been 
the leader in advocacy of the planting of 
the American tree Catalpa speciosa. a rapid 
maturing and valuable economic tree, form 
erly almost unknown but now through his 
advocacy growing by the mil-lions in this 
and many foreign countries. For the pur 
pose of demonstrating the methods and 
practicability of forest planting and man 
agement, he has established at his own ex 
pense an experimental forest plantation of 
200.000 trees, mostly Catalpa, upon which 
farm in Baldwin County, Ala., he spends 
most of his time. He is an honorary mem 
ber of many foreign societies of arboricul 
ture and forestry. He is an Independent 
Republican in politics, and is a Royal Arch 
Mason. He married at Baldwin, Kan., 
March 18, 1808, Mary Ellen Stephens, and 
they have ten children living, three son^. 
married, and seven daughters. Address : 
Connersville, Fayette County,. Ind. 

BROWN, Moreau Roberts: 

Physician; born in Galveston, Tex., 
July 26, 1853; son of James Moreau and 
Rebecca Ashton (Stoddart) Brown. He was 
educated in the private schools of his native 
place and at Chester (Pa.) Academy. He 
received his medical education at the Jeffer 
son Medical College, Philadelphia, and in 
the medical department of the University 
of Louisville, Ky., where he was gradu 
ated as M.D. in 1876. He also took post 
graduate courses in Austria and Germany, 

j then returned to Galveston, Texas, where 
he built up an extensive practice and was 
house physician of the Galveston City Hos- 

pital, county physician of Galveston Coun 
ty, quarantine physician and city physician 
of Galveston. He removed to Chicago, in 



AMERICA. 



23n 



188(>. where he became a specialist in the 
treatment of diseases of throat, ear and 
nose. For many years he was professor of 
laryngology, rhinology and otology in the 
Chicago College of Physicians and Sur 
geons, resigning that position in order to 
lessen the amount of work, in 1902; and he 
is now professor of laryngology and rhi- 
nology in the Chicago Polycliiiic, and med 
ical director of the National Union. He 
is a fellow of the American Laryngological 
Society; member of the Chicago Medical 
Society, the State Medical Society, the 
American Medical Association, the Medico- 
Legal Society, the Chicago Laryngological 
and the Medical Examiners Societies. He 
is a member of the Physicians Club of 
Chicago. Dr. Brown has been twice .mar 
ried, his second marriage being to Louise 
Grevemberg, at Jeanerette, La., July 18, 
1887; he has two children. Residence: 
Winnetka, 111. Office: 34 Washington, 
Street, Chicago. 

BROWN, Norris: 

United States senator; born at Maquo- 
keta, Iowa, May 2, 1863; son of William 
Henry and Eliza Ann (Phelps) Brown. He 
was educated in the Iowa State University, 
being graduated in 1883 and A.M., 1885. 
He studied law and was admitted to the 
Iowa Bar, Oct. 1883, and in April, 1888, 
located in the practice of law at Kearney, 
Neb. He served as county attorney of Buf 
falo County, Neb.. 1892-1896; was deputy 
attorney-general 1900-1904, and attorney- 
general^ 1904-1906. and in January, 1907, 
was elected as a Republican to the United 
States Senate for the term expiring March 
3, 1913. Address: Kearney, Neb. 

BROWN, Orvon Graff: 

President of Miami Military Institute; 
born in Greensburg, Westmoreland County. 
Pa., July 1, 1863. He was educated at 
Mount Union College, the University of 
Cincinnati and Denver University. He be 
came professor of science at Cincinnati Wes- 
leyan College in 1882, and three years 
later organized and procured a charter for 
the Twin Valley College, of which he is 
president. He has been president also of 



236 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



the Miami Military Institute since its or 
ganization in 1894, as the Military Depart 
ment of Twin Valley College. He married, 
April 5 7 1887, Lulu Reed. Address: Ger- 
mantown, Ohio. 

BROWN, Hollo Walter: 

Professor of rhetoric in Wabash College; 
born in Crooksville, Ohio, March 15, 1880; 
son of Alexander and Roselba (Search) 
Brown. He was educated in Ohio Northern 
University, 1898-1903, Litt.B. and A.M., and 
in the Graduate School of Harvard Uni 
versity, 1903-1905, receiving the degree 
of A.M. from the University. Immedi 
ately after he left Harvard he was elected 
to an instructorship in Wabash College, 
and at the end of that college year, 1905- 
1906, he was elected to a full professorship. 
Professor Brown is a member of the Mod 
ern Language Association of America and 
of the American Dialect Society, the Phi 
Beta Kappa Society and the Harvard Club 
of Indiana. Address: 607 South Water 
Street, Crawfordsville, Ind. 

BROWN, Roscoe C. E.: 

Editor; born in Scottsville, N. Y., Aug. 
23, 1867; son of the late D. D. S. Brown, 
who was for some time proprietor of The 
Rochester Democrat, now The Rochester 
Democrat and Chronicle, and vice-presi 
dent of the Rochester and State line, now 
the Buffalo, Rochester and Pittsburg Rail 
road. He attended the public school of his 
native town and was graduated from the 
University of Rochester in 1889. That in 
stitution conferred upon him the degree of 
M.A. in 1904. Immediately after gradua 
tion from college he joined the city staff 
of The New York Tribune, and became as 
sistant day editor in 1893. He was an edi 
torial writer for that journal, devoting 
himself especially to political, constitution 
al and sociological questions from 1895- 
1906, and in 1906 he became its managing 
editor. He was appointed State civil serv 
ice commissioner by Governor Higgins on 
Jan. 19, 1905, to succeed Cuthbert W. 
Pound, who resigned to become the Gov 
ernor s counsel. Mr. Brown was a mem 
ber of the Executive Committee of the New 



York Civil Service Reform Association, ana 
he is a director of the People s University 
Extension Society. He is a member of the 
Phi Beta Kappa Society and Alpha Delta 
Phi fraternity, and of the Union League, 
Alpha Delta Phi and City Clubs of New York, 
and the Hamilton Club of Brooklyn. Ad 
dress: New York Tribune, New York City. 

BROWN, W. Robinson: 

Manufacturer; born in Portland, Me., 
1875; son of William W. and Emily Hart 
(Jenkins) Brown. He was graduated from 
Phillips Andover Academy, 1893, William s. 
College, B.A., 1897. He is director and 
manager of the Woods Department of the 
Berlin Mills. Company, and Burgess Sul 
phite Fibre Company, manufacturers of 
newspaper sulphite and lumber, Portland, 
Me., and is managing director of the Quebec 
& St. Maurice Industrial Company of Que 
bec. He is president of the Brown Memor 
ial Library of Clinton, Me. ; colonel on staff 
of Governor Quimby of New Hampshire, 
1908, and member of the Forestry Com 
mission of New Hampshire, 1909. He is a 
member of the Kappa Alpha fraternity 
(Williams College). Address: Berlin, N. 
H. 

BROWN, William Adams: 

Clergyman and theologian; born in New 
York City, Dec. 29, 1865; son of John 
Crosby and Mary E. (Adams) Brown. 
He was educated in St. Paul s School, Con 
cord, N. H., and was graduated from Yale 
College, A.B., 1886, A.M., 1888, and Ph.D. 
in 1901. He was graduated from the Union 
Theological Seminary in 1890, and he spent 
the years 1890-1892 in study at Berlin as 
a fellow of the Union Theological Seminary. 
The honorary degree of D.D. was conferred 
upon him by Union College in 1902, and 
by Yale University in 1907. He has been 
a teacher in the Union Theological Semi 
nary from 1892, at first in the depart 
ment of Church History, afterwards in that 
of Systematic Theology, and since 1898 has 
been Roosevelt professor of systematic the 
ology in that institution. He is a mem 
ber of the Society of Biblical Exegesis, the 
American Geographical Association, the 






MEN OF AMERICA. 



237 



American Association for the Advancement 
of Science, and the American Philosophical 
Association. He is a patron of the Metro 
politan Museum of Art; a director of the 
Yale Alumni Fund; a member of the Board 
of Trustees of the New York Institution for 
the Instruction of the Deaf and Dumb, of 
the Governing Board of the Union Settle 
ment of New York City, and of the Execu 
tive Committee of the Grenfell Association. 
He is independent in politics and a Presby 
terian in his ecclesiastical connection. He 
is author of: Musical Instruments and 
.Their Homes, 1888; The Essence of Chris 
tianity, 1902; Christian Theology in Out 
line, 1907; as well as of the articles, Salva 
tion, Millennium, etc., in Hastings Diction 
ary of the Bible, and of numerous contri 
butions to reviews and magazines on the 
ological and historical subjects. He is a 
member of the American Editorial Board 
of the Hibbert Journal. Dr. Brown is a 
member of the Century Association, the 
University, Yale, American Alpine, Apa- 
wamis Golf and West Side Tennis Clubs. 
He married in St. Paul, Minn., in 1892, 
Helen Gilman Noyes, and they have three 
sons. Dr. Brown has a summer home, The 
Tree Tops, at Seal Harbor, Me., where he 
is president of the Harbor Cliffs Tennis Club, 
and a trustee of the Congregational Church. 
Residence: 114 East 30th Street. Ad 
dress : 700 Park Avenue, New York City. 

BROWN, William Maxwell: 

Civil engineer; born in Warwick, R. I., 
Aug. 13, 1853; son of Wililam M. and 
Susan A. (Clapp) Brown. He was grad 
uated from Brown University in 1873, with 
the degree of Ph.B., and immediately en 
gaged in the practice of civil engineering, 
first on public work for the city of Provi 
dence, R. I., afterward assistant engineer 
of the Massachusetts State Board of Health 
at Boston, chiefly on work of drainage, and 
since 1894 he has been chief engineer of the 
Massachusetts Metropolitan Sewerage Com 
mission at Boston. He has been a member 
since 1887, and was a director 1902-1904, 
of the Boston Society of Civil Engineers, 
member since 1895 of the American Soci 
ety of Civil Engineers, member of the Bos 



ton Chamber of Commerce, and from 1902- 
1905 was 9, member of the Chelsea (Mass.) 
School Committee. Mr. Brown is author of 
various reports relating to Metropolitan 
sewerage works. He married in Boston, in 
1884, Julia Ida Daniels. Residence: 1285 
Commonwealth Avenue. Office: 1 Ashbur- 
ton Place, Boston. 

BROWN, William Montgomery: 

Bishop of the Episcopal Church, Diocese 
of Arkansas; born near Orrville, Wayne 
County, Ohio, Nov. 6, 1855. He studied 
at Kenyon University and received the de 
gree of D.D. from Kenyon and the Univer 
sity of the South. He was ordered deacon 
in 1883 and was ordained to the priest 
hood by Bishop Bedell the following year. 
In 188G he became rector of Grace Church, 
Galion, Ohio, and organized seven missions 
in his district. He remained in this pas 
torate until 1891, when he became general 
missionary and archdeacon of the Diocese of 
Ohio. He was consecrated bishop coadjutor 
of Arkansas in 1898, becoming bishop of 
Arkansas in 1899. He is author of: The 
Protestant Episcopal Church Defended 
against Five Unjust Allegations, 1889; 
The Church for Americans, 1896; The Cru 
cial Race Question, 1907; and he has also 
published numerous sermons and addresses. 
Bishop Brown married, at Cleveland, Ohio, 
April 9, 1885, Ella Scranton Bradford. Ad 
dress: Little Rock, Ark. 

BROWN, William Wallace: 

Assistant attorney-general of the United 
States; born in Summer Hill, Cayuga 
County, N. Y., April 22, 1836. He was 
educated at Alfred College in New York, 
where he received the degree of LL.D. in 
1886. He enlisted as private in the 23d 
New York Volunteers during the Civil War, 
and later served in the 1st Pennsylvania 
Rifles. At the close of the war he was ad 
mitted to the bar, v and in 1867 was elected 
district attorney for McKean County, Pa., 
in which county, at a later date, he served 
as recorder of deeds and superintendent of 
common schools. In 1872 he was elected 
to the legislature of Pennsylvania, serving 
until 1876, and in 1883 became a member 



238 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



of the National House of Representatives 
serving for two terms. He was auditor 
for the War Department for two years, and 
from Aug. 10, 1899 to June 1, 1907 was 
auditor for the Navy Department. On the 
latter date he was appointed assistant at 
torney general for the defense of suits be 
fore the Spanish Claims Commission, hav 
ing charge of the interests of the United 
States in opposing claims for dovvages on 
account of the Spanish War, this govern 
ment having assumed the liability of the 
Spanish government to American citizens. 
This position includes the gathering of a 
vast amount of testimony for the United 
States especially in Cuba and is being di 
rected by Mr. Brown in such a manner as 
to successfully safeguard the interests of 
the United States against claims mount 
ing to many millions of dollars. Residence: 
The Dewey. Office: Munsey -Building, 
Washington, D. C. 

BROWNE, Charles Francis: 

Landscape painter; born at Natick, Mass., 
May 21, 1859; son of George Warren and 
Emeline (Wetherbee) Browne. After at 
tending the Art schools at Boston and Phil 
adelphia, he studied under Gerome and oth 
ers in Paris from 1879-1883, he was a de 
signer for the Forbes Lithographic Manu- 
facturering Company. He made three trips 
to Europe, in 1887 and in 1903 and 1908. He 
also traveled extensively in the Rocky 
Mountains in 1895. and spent one year in 
Scotland, painting. He was professor df Art 
at Beloit College, Wisconsin, now in 
structor and lecturer in painting at the 
Art Institute of Chicago. He belongs to the 
Society of Western Artists, the Chicago So 
ciety of Artists, the Chicago Water Color 
Club, the National Geographic Society, the 
Little Room, and the Cliff-dwellers Club, 
Chicago. He is a trustee of Sharon Church, 
Chicago, and is a member of the City 
Club, Chicago. His pictures were exhibited 
in the Exposition at Paris in 1889, Chicago, 
1903, at the International Exhibitions at 
Buffalo, in 1901, Omaha in 1903, at Paris in 
1900. and at current exhibitions in the 
United States since 1890. He has pictures 
in the Roger Williams Park, Museum, Provi 



dence, R. I., in the Union League Club, and 
in the Municipal Gallery, Chicago. He re 
ceived the Fine Arts Building Prize (of 
$500.00) in 1908. He married at Chicago, 
May 21, 1898, Turbie Taft. and they have 
one son. Address: The Art Institute of 
Chicago. Studio: 216 East 57th Street, 
Chicago. 

BROWNELL, George Francis: 

Lawyer and railroad official; born in 
Des Moines, Iowa, June 5, 1801; son of 
Samuel Clark and Catherine (Fox) Brow- 
nell. He was educated in the Medina (N. 
Y.) Academy, Lockport (N. Y.) High 
School, Albany Law School, LL.B., 1882, 
University of Michigan, LL.B., 1883. He 
began the study of law in the office of 
Childs and Pitts at Medina, N. Y., and 
later with Thomas M. Cooley. chief jus 
tice of the Supreme Court of Michigan and 
dean of the Law Department of the Uni 
versity of Michigan. He was admitted to 
the Bar in 1883; became member of the 
Buffalo law firm of Sprague, Morey, Sprague 
and Brownell in 1888, and since 1897 has 
>een a member of the law firm of Moot, 
Sprague, Brownell and Marcy. He became 
general solicitor of the Erie Railroad Com 
pany, June, 1897, with offices in New York 
Jity and since Jan. 1, 1904, has been vice- 
president and general solicitor of the Erie 
Railroad Company, vice-president, general 
solicitor and director of the New York, 
Susquehanna & Western Railroad Company, 
ind of the Chicago and Erie Railroad Com 
pany; vice-president and director of the 
>Vilkes-Barre and Eastern Railroad Compa- 
ly, Erie and Jersey Railroad Company, Cin- 
dnnati, Hamilton and Dayton Railroad Com- 
3any, Pennsylvania Coal Company, Hill- 
ide Coal and Iron Company and the Erie 
Terminals Railroad Company; director of 
he Cincinnati, New Orleans and Texas 
Railroad Company, Buffalo Creek Railroad 
Company, Southwestern Construction Com- 
>any, Cincinnati, Indiana and Western Rail- 
oad Company,, Blossburg Coal Company, 
-.ong Dock Company, Lake Keuka Navi- 
ation Company and the General Railroad 
Signal Company. He is a member of the 
Dhi Psi Fraternity and of the Lotos, Rail- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



road, Buffalo and Chi Psi Clubs, and the 
Lodge of Ancient Landmarks (Masonic). 
Mr. Brownell married in Buffalo, June 7, 
1897, Annie Kniseley Abbott, and they have 
two sons. Residence: 312 West 89th 
Street. Office: 50 Church Street, New 
York City. 

BROWNING, Eliza Gordon: 

Librarian; born in Fortville, Ind.; daugh 
ter of Woodville and Mary Anne (Brown) 
Browning. She received her education in 
public and private schools. Since 1892 she 
has been librarian of the Indianapolis Pub 
lic Library. Miss Browning is a member 
of the American Library Association, mem 
ber and ex-president of the Indiana Library 
Association; State historian of the Indiana 
Society of Daughters of the American Rev 
olution; only woman member of the Indi 
ana State Historical Society, member of the 
Indianapolis Art Association, Indianapolis 
Library Club, Fortnightly Literary Club 
and Y. W. C. A. She was joint editor, with 
Mrs. Harriet Mel. Foster, of the Lineage 
Book of the Indiana Society of Daughters 
of the American Revolution; and is author 
of numerous unsigned articles in newspa 
pers and magazines. She has traveled in 
all parts of the United States, and spent one 
summer in Europe. Address: Public Li 
brary, Indianapolis, Ind. 

BROWNING, William: 

Physician, neurologist; born in New Lon 
don County, Conn., July 7, 1855. He was 
educated in Norwich Free Academy, Shef 
field Scientific School, Yale, Ph.D*. 1876; 
University of Pennsylvania, from which he 
received a diploma in anatomy; and the 
universities of Leipzig and Wurzburg. 
Germany, receiving the degree of M.D. from 
the former in 1881. Dr. Browning was in 
structor in science at Media Academy for 
three years, but since 1883 has been engag 
ed in the practice of medicine in Brooklyn, 
N. Y. He has also been connected with 
several hospitals in and around New York, 
among them being the German Hospital, 
the Long Island State, Long Island Col 
lege, Norwegian, German, St. John s Jew 
ish, Eastern District, Bushwick, St. Chris 



topher s and St. Catherine s hospitals. He 
was also physician to Central Dispensary 
for two years; neurologist to Long Island 
College Dispensary nine years; on the edi 
torial staff of the Annals of Surgery, 1885- 
1891; lecturer on normal neurology at Long 
Island College Hospital Medical School, 
1887-1901; librarian of the Medical So 
ciety; and co-editor of the Brooklyn Medi 
cal Journal. He has been professor of dis 
eases of the mind and nervous system at 
Long Island College Hospital since 1901. 
Dr. Browning is a member of a large num 
ber of medical and scientific associations, 
and is author of: The Veins of the Brain 
and Its Envelopes; The Epileptic Interval; 
Circulation in the Central Nervous System; 
is editor of the Journal Neurographs, and 
an extensive contributor to medical litera 
ture. Address: 54 Lefferts Place, Brook 
lyn, N. Y. 

BROWNLOW, Walter Preston: 

Journalist and congressman; born at 
Abingdon, Va. He attended the common 
school for three years, but because of the 
death of his father (the celebrated " Par 
son " Brownlow, famous for his adherence 
to the Union Cause during the Civil War), 
lie earned his support from the age of 10. 
He entered the newspaper business as a re 
porter for the Knoxville Whig and Chron 
icle (edited by his uncle, the late Hon. 
VN illiam G. Brownlow United States Sen 
ator), in 1876. In the same year he pur 
chased the Herald and Tribune, a Republi 
can newspaper published at Jonesboro, of 
which he has since been the editor and 
proprietor. He was a delegate from his 
district to the Republican National Con 
vention of 1880, 1896 and 1900, and a dele- 
ate from the State at large to the National 
Conventions of 1884 and 1904. He was ap 
pointed postmaster at Jonesboro in March, 
1881, and resigned in December to accept 
the doorkeepership of the House of Repre 
sentatives of the Forty-seventh Congress. 
In 1884, 1896, 1900, and 1906, he was elect 
ed by the delegation from his State to the 
National Conventions as Tennessee s member 
>f the Republican National Committee, but 
failed of reelection in 1908. He was elect- 



240 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



ed by Congress as n member of the Board 
of Managers for the National Soldier s 
Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers. He 
was elected to the Fifty-fifth, Fifty-sixth, 
Fifty.-seventh. and Fifty-eighth and Fifty- 
ninth, and Sixtieth Congresses, and was re- 
elected in 1909 to the Sixty-first Congress, 
in which lie is now serving. He has twice 
been the Republican nominee for United 
States Senator from Tennessee, and in 190S 
was elected as Tennessee s member of the 
National Congressional Committee. Ad 
dress : Jonesboro, Term. 

BROWNSCOMBE, Jennie Augusta: 

Artist painter: horn in Honesdale, Pa., 
daughter of William and Elvira (Kenne 
dy) Brownscombe. She was educated in the 
high school at Honesdale, and afterward 
studied art in New York City, one year 
in the School of Design for Women (Coop 
er Union), receiving the trustees silver 
medal, and five years in the National 
Academy of Design, receiving silver med 
als in the Antique and Life schools. She 
also studied in Paris with Henry Mosler 
for one year; has been abroad four times 
on prolonged visits and has spent five win 
ters in Rome at different times. When she 
had been a student of art less than two 
years she began the making of drawings for 
illustrated periodicals Harper s and others, 
and three years later to exhibit. Four years 
afterward she went abroad for a year s 
study, and after her return her pictures 
began to be reproduced in etchings, engrav 
ing and photo-engraving, and about sixty of 
these, all figure pictures, and many of them 
of colonial and early American subjects, 
have been published as proofs and prints, 
some in monochrome and some in colors. 
She was at one time, for two years, a writer 
of art notes for a daily newspaper in New 
York. Miss Brownscombe has exhibited 
from time to time in the National Academy 
and American Water-Color Society Exhibi 
tions in Ne\y York, and also in Philadel 
phia, Chicago and Western exhibitions, and 
also with dealers in these and other cities, 
and she received a silver medal in 1907 
from the American Art Society of Phila 



delphia. Address : 96 Fifth Avenue, New 
York City. 

BROWNSON, Mary Wilson: 

Professor of modern European history; 
born in Washington, Pa., daughter of Rev. 
James Irwin Brownson, D.D., and Eleanor 
McCullough (Acheson) Brownson. She was 
educated Washington (Pa.) Seminary, the 
Pennsylvania College for Women at Pitts 
burgh* A.B., 1904, the Graduate School of 
Washington and Jefferson College, A.M. 
1905; she has pursued graduate study in 
summer sessions of the Chicago and Wis 
consin Universities, and in 1907 at Oxford 
University, England, and she has done re 
search work in French history in Harvard 
University. Miss Brownson holds the 
chairs of Modern European History and of 
Biblical Literature in the Pennsylvania Col 
lege for Women at Pittsburgh. She has 
given illustrated lectures on the Holy Land 
after an extended camping tour in that 
country in 1900. She is author of: The 
Old Testament Story, to be completed in 
four volumes, of which two have been is 
sued (W. A. Wilde Company) ; His Sister 
(Winona Publishing Co.). Miss Brownson 
is a member of the American Historical As 
sociation, and of the College Club of Pitts 
burgh. Address: Pennsylvania College for 
Women, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BROWNSON, Willard Herbert: 

Rear- Admiral, U. S. Navy., retired; born 
in Lyons, N. Y., July 8, 1845; son of Morton 
and Harriet (Taft) Brownson. Upon his 
graduation from the Naval Academy in 1805 
he served for three years in the flagship of 
the North Atlantic Squadron, when he was 
ordered to the Pacific station. After serv 
ice on the Coast Survey, in deep sea inves 
tigation and as inspector of hydrography, 
he was placed in command of various Unit 
ed States ships, among them being the 
Petrel, Dolphin, and the Detroit at Rio de 
Janeiro, Brazil, during the revolution. In 
1894 he was detailed as commandant of the 
cadets at the Naval Academy, and from 
1890-1898 was on the Board of Inspection 
and Survev. He was commander of the 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



241 



Yankee during the war with Spain, and of 
the Alabama from 1900-1902. For four 
years he was superintendent of the Naval 
Academy, and on May 6, 1906 was promoted 
to the rank of rear-admiral. He command 
ed the Fourth Division of the Atlantic fleet 
from July 8th to Aug. 15th, 1906; com 
manded a special service squadron for two 
months thereafter; and from Oct. 15, 1906, 
to April I, 1907, was Commander-in-chief of 
the Asiatic fleet. On May 20, 1907 he be 
came chief of the Bureau of Navigation, 
and although he was retired by operation of 
law two months later, was kept on active 
duty by order of the President until his 
resignation of the position of chief of bu 
reau. He married July 10, 1872, Isabella 
King Roberts and they have three children. 
Address 1751 N. Street, N. W., Washington, 
D. C. 

BRUCE, Matthew Linn: 

Jurist; born at Mercersburg, Pa., Oct. 1, 
I860; son of Rev. James Bruce, D.D., and 
Mary (Linn) Bruce. He received his pre 
paratory education at the Andes (New 
York) Academy, and then entered Rutgers 
College, from which he graduated as vale 
dictorian of his class, with the degree of A. 
B. in 1884 and A.M. in 1887.. After gradu 
ation he engaged in teaching and studied 
law in the office of Casius M. Shaw, of 
Andes, New York; and was admitted to the 
bar in September, 1*889. He removed to 
New York City and has practised law there 
ever since except during his service as a 
justice of the Supreme Court. . Judge Bruce 
has always been an active Republican. He 
was president of the Republican County 
Committee of New York, in 1903. He was 
elected lieutenant-governor of New York, in 
1904, and renominated in 1906, but failed 
of reelection, and was then appointed a 
justice of the Supreme Court for the First 
Judicial District of New York. He re 
sumed practice in 1908. He was reappoint- 
ed a justice of the Supreme Court in 1908 
by Gov. Hughes. Judge Bruce is a prom 
inent layman of the Presbyterian Church, 
and was a commissioner to the General As 
sembly of the Presbyterian Church at Buf 
falo, in 1904, and is president of the Pres- 
16 



byterian Union of New York. He is a mem 
ber of the Association of the Bar of the City 
of New York and of the St. Andrew s So 
ciety. Judge Bruce is also a member and 
vice-president of the Republican Club of 
Xew York. He married, in 1894, Mrs. Lil 
lian (Ballantine) Knapp, daughter of the 
late Duncan Ballantine, of Andes, N. Y., 
and of this union there are three children. 
Residence: 523 West One Hundred and 
Fiftieth Street. Address: 18 Wall Street, 
New York City. 

BRUCE, Wallace: 

Orator and author; born in Hillsdale, N. 
Y., Nov. 10, 1844. He was educated at 
Hudson River Institute and Yale, whence 
lie was graduated in 1867, and has been 
engaged in literary work since 1868. Mr. 
Bruce is a poet and orator of international 
reputation, having delivered addresses on 
numerous centennial and memorial occa 
sions, among them being the Burns anni 
versary addresses at Ayr, Edinburgh and 
Kilmarnock, Scotland, and at Boston, Hart 
ford and Chicago. He also delivered an ad 
dress on Washington Irving at the Strat 
ford Grammar School, Stratford on Avon, 
England. He was United States consul at 
Edinburg, Scotland, from 1889-1893. Mr. 
Bruce is honorary president of the Shakes 
peare Society of Edinburgh and president of 
the Florida Chautauqua at De Funiak 
Springs, Florida, and is the author of: 
The Land of Burns; The Yosemite; The 
Hudson; From the Hudson to the Yosemite; 
Old Homestead Poems; The Hudson Pano 
rama; In Clover and Heather; Here s a 
Hand; Wayside Poems; Scottish Poems; 
Leaves of Gold; and Wanderers. He mar 
ried at Schodack Depot, N. Y., June 29, 
1870, Annie Becker. Address: 267 Stuy- 
vesant Avenue, Brooklyn., N. Y. 

BRUNCKEN, Ernest: 

Lawyer; born in Feldhausen, Oldenburg, 
Germany, Feb. 16, 1865. He came to Amer 
ica with his parents at the age of 16, 
learned the printing trade, and worked on 
newspapers in Chicago and Milwaukee. He 
studied law in a private office, and in 1892 
was admitted to the Wisconsin bar, prac- 



242 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



tising in Milwaukee, where he was assist 
ant city attorney for four years, until 1902. 
He was State Forestry Commissioner from 
1897-1899, and the following year made 
campaign speeches through the western 
states for the Republican National Com 
mittee. He was assistant forester of the 
Biltmore estate from 1902-1904, and since 
December of the latter year has been legisla 
tive reference librarian of California. He is 
a member of the American Forestry Asso 
ciation, the American Historical Associa 
tion, the American Library Association : 
and the California State Library Associa 
tion; and the author of: North American 
Forests and Forestry; German Political Ex 
iles in the United States; and (jointly with 
W. Hense- Jensen) of Wisconsin s Deutsch- 
Amerikaner; also numerous articles on for- 
estal, legal and sociological subjects in var 
ious periodicals. He married in Milwaukee, 
Wis., Dec. 28, 1892, Erna Nohl. Address: 
State Library, Sacramento, California. 

BRUNDAGE, Albert Harrison: 

Physician, toxicologist, and author; born 
at Camdor, N. Y., March 3, 1862; son of 
Dr. Amos H. and Sarah Mervina (Dimnick) 
Brundage. He was graduated from the 
New York University Medical College as 
M.D. in 1885, and followed his graduation 
with post-graduate work there and at the 
Long Island College Hospital; and he 
was graduated also from the Brooklyn Col 
lege of Pharmacy as Ph.G., 1892, Phar.D., 
1897; and received the degree of A.M. from 
the University of Nashville, 1898, and of M. 
S. from the Science Department of the 
Rhode Island College of Pharmacy and Al 
lied Sciences in 1905. He engaged for over 
fifteen years in the practice of medicine in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., and was president in 1903, 
and board examiner in toxicology and 
posology from 1898-1905, of the Board of 
Pharmacy of the State of New York. He 
was professor of toxicology, physiology and 
hygiene in Brooklyn College of Pharmacy, 
1898-1904; professor of toxicology and 
physiology at the Rhode Island College of 
Pharmacy and Allied Sciences, 1903-1907; 
and was toxicologist to the Bushwick and 
other hospitals in Brooklyn. He removed in 



1900 to Milwaukee, Wis., where he is pro 
fessor of toxicology in Marquette Univer 
sity, in the Department of Medicine, Dentis 
try and Pharmacy. Dr. Brundage is a 
member of the American Medical Associa 
tion, the American Pharmaceutical Associ 
ation, American Microscopical Society, 
American Anthropological Association, 
American Association for the Advancement 
of Science, American Geographical Society, 
American National Red Cross, and many 
State and local societies, and was formerly 
president of the Brooklyn College of Pharm 
acy. He is author of Practical Points in 
Physiology and a manual of Toxicology 
and many contributions to professional 
journals on medical and pharmaceutical 
subjects. Dr. Brundage married, Sept. 26, 
1888, Sarah Alice, daughter of Rev. Kil- 
burn Holt, of Amherst, Mass., and has a 
daughter, and a son. Residence: 2404 
State Street, Milwaukee, Wis. New York 
address: 70 Linden Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Y. 

BRUNNER, Arnold William: 

Architect; born in New York City, Sept. 
25, 1857; son of William and Isabella 
(Solomon) Brunner. He was graduated in 
the special course in architecture from the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 
1879 and then entered the office of George 
B. Post. After extended travel in Europe 
he commenced practice in architecture. He 
was architect of the Cleveland (Ohio) 
postoffice, custom house and court house, 
the Mount Sinai Hospital Buildings, the 
School of Mines of Columbia University. 
New York, and many other public and pri 
vate buildings in New 7 York City; designed 
the pavilions in William H. Seward Park, 
Thomas Jefferson Park, the Public Baths, 
etc. He was appointed by Governor Nash 
of Ohio, one of the three supervising archi 
tects to prepare group plans of public build 
ings and grounds for the City of Cleveland; 
and was appointed a member of the Board 
of Education of New York in 1902. In 1907 
he was appointed by Mayor McClellan a 
member of the Arts Commission of the City 
of New York. Mr. Brunner is a member 
of the Architectural League of New York, 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



24:5 



and was elected its president in 1903-1904. 
He is a fellow of the American Institute of 
Architects and president of the New York 
Chapter and is a member of the National 
Sculpture Society, and was its vice-presi 
dent 1907. Mr. Brunner is a member of the 
National Council of Fine Arts, appointed 
January, 1909, by President Roosevelt. Mr. 
Brunner was a contributor to Russell Stur- 
gis Dictionary of Architecture, and has 
published numerous professional papers. 
Residence: 1748 Broadway. Address: 33 
Union Square, West, New York City. 

BRUSH, Charles Francis: 

Scientist; born in Euclid, Ohio, March 
17, 1849. He was educated in the Univer 
sity of Michigan, from which he received 
the degrees of M.E., 1869, and M.S., 1899; 
and Western Reserve University, of which 
he is Ph.D. 1880, and LL.D. 1900; and 
he received from Kenyon the degree of 
LL.D. 1903. Mr. Brush has been active 
in the electrical field for many years, and 
possesses the distinction of being the pio 
neer inventor of modern electric arc light 
ing. He was the founder of the Brush 
Electric Company, and is president and a 
director of many large corporations; also 
trustee of many educational institutions. 
He was decorated by the French Govern 
ment in 1881 for his achievements in elec 
trical science, and was awarded the Rum- 
ford medal in 1899. He is a fellow of 
the American Association for the Advance 
ment of Science; a life member of the 
British Association; and a member of num 
erous other engineering and scientific soci 
eties. He married, in 1875, Mary E. Mor 
ris. Address: 481 The Arcade, Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

BRUSH, George Jarvis: 

Mineralogist; born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Dec. 15, 1831. He was educated in pub 
lic schools until 1846, when he entered 
business in New York City; severe illness 
in 1848 decided him to become a farmer; 
he went to Yale for six months course 
in agriculture; remained two years study 
ing chemistry and mineralogy; was as 
sistant to Professor Benjamin Silliman, 



Jr., at the University of Louisville, in 1851, 
traveled in Europe with Professor Silliman, 
Sr., in 1851, and received the degrees of 
Ph.B. in 1852, and A.M. in 1857, from 
Yale, and LL.D. from Harvard in 1886. 
He was assistant in chemistry in the Uni 
versity of Virginia, 1852-1853; took post 
graduate studies at University of Munich, 
1853 and 1854; at Royal Saxon School of 
Mines, 1854-1855, and Government School 
of Mines, London, 1855-1856. He was pro 
fessor of metallurgy, 1855-1871, professor 
of mineralogy, 1864-1898 at the Sheffield 
Scientific School, Yale, and has been emer 
itus professor since 1898. Dr. Brush was 
director, 1872-1899, of the Sheffield Scientific 
School. He is a member of the National 
Academy of Sciences from 1868; fellow of 
the American Association of Science (pres 
ident in 1881), American Society of Natu 
ralists, American Academy of Sciences, 
American Philosophical Society, Connecti 
cut Academy of Sciences, New York Acad 
emy of Science, foreign member of the 
London Geological Society; corresponding 
member of the Edinburgh Geological So 
ciety, St. Petersburg Imperial Mineralogi- 
cal Society; Bavarian Royal Academy of 
Sciences. He is author of a Manual of 
Determinative Mineralogy ; and also many 
memoirs and articles chiefly on the chem 
ical composition of American minerals. 
Mr. Brush married Harriet Silliman Trum- 
bull. Address: 14 Trumbull Street, New 
Haven, Conn. 

BRYAN. Charles Page: 

Diplomat; born in Chicago, Oct. 2, 1856; 
son of Thomas Barbour Bryan (vice-pres 
ident of the World s Columbian Exposi 
tion), and of Jane Byrd (Page) Bryan. 
He is of an old Virginia family and re 
ceived his education at the University of 
Virginia, afterward entering the Law Col 
lege of Columbian (now George Washing 
ton) University of Washington", from which 
he was graduated LL.B. in 1878. He was 
admitted to the bar in 1878> and in 1879 
removed to Colorado, where he remained 
until 1883, becoming a member of the 
House of Representatives of that State, 
and a colonel on the staff of Governor 



244 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



Eaton, of Colorado. He has been a resident 
of Elmhurst, Du Page County, 111. (sixteen 
miles west of Chicago), since 1883, and 
was engaged in law practice in Chicago. 
He was for four consecutive terms a mem 
ber of the lower house of the General As 
sembly of Illinois; and was colonel on the 
staffs of Governors Oglesby, Fifer and 
Altgeld of that State; and is an active and 
influential member of the Republican 
party of Illinois. In 1897 he was appointed 
envoy extraordinary and minister plenipo 
tentiary of the United States to China, 
but was transferred to Brazil in 1898, re 
maining there until Sept., 1902, when he 
was transferred to Switzerland, continuing 
until Jan., 1903, when he was appointed 
to his present post as envoy extraordinary 
and minister plenipotentiary of the United 
States to Portugal. Address: Department 
of State, Washington, D. C.. 

BRYAN, Mary Edwards: 

Author and editor; born near Tallahas 
see, Fla.; daughter of Major John D. and 
Louisa Crutchfred (Houghton) Edwards. 
She attended the Fletcher Institute, Thom- 
asville, Ga., and married, while a school 
girl in her fifteenth year, I. E. Bryan, a 
planter of Louisiana, and was graduated 
four years later from College Temple, New- 
nan, Ga., with the degree of M.A. Mrs. 
Bryan began writing when only 15, and 
published poems, stories and two serials. 
She edited The Sunny Soutli at Atlanta, 
Ga., for nine years, then went to New York 
and edited the New York Bazar and The 
Half Hour, magazines published by George 
Munro, and she has published ten novels: 
Manch; Wild Work (a novel of the Recon 
struction Era ) ; Kildee ; Nan Haggard ; 
Uncle Ned s White Child; His Legal Wife; 
A Fugitive Bride; Ruth An Outcast; 
The Girl He Bought; My Own Sin; also 
Poems and Stories in Verse; Poems for 
Dramatic Readings. Her books were first 
published by the Appletons, but the copy 
rights of her novels were bought by George 
Munro, who issued them in cheaper form. 
Mrs. Bryan returned from New York in 
1899, and became associate editor of The 
Sunny South, and continued in the work 



until that publication was merged into 
the Remus Magazine (Joel Chandler Har 
ris, editor), when she became one of the 
editorial staff,, conducting a department, 
and writing stories. Mrs. Bryan is an 
accomplished reader and speaker, and oc 
casionally appears .on the platform to 
deliver commencement addresses, and reads 
dramatic poems at entertainments for char 
ity. Her favorite recreation is cultivating 
flowers and fruit trees, for which she has 
always had opportunity, her husband being 
a farmer. She is a member of United Char 
ities, and of the Woman s Home Mission of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church in Geor 
gia; and she has been a member of the 
Sorosis Club, New York, since 1886, mem 
ber and formerly vice-president of the New 
York Woman s Press Club, and was vice- 
president of a former Georgia Woman s 
Press Club. She has had five children, of 
whom a son and t\vo daughters are now 
living. Address: Uncle Remus Magazine, 
Atlanta, Ga. 

BRYAN, William Jennings: 

Editor, lecturer, political leader; born 
at Salem, 111., March 19, 1860; son of 
Judge Silas Lillard and Mariah Elizabeth 
(Jennings) Bryan. The Bryan family, of 
Irish extraction, were citizens of Virginia 
for at least three generations, Mr. Bryan s 
father being born near Sperryville, Va. 
Mr. Bryan s mother was born in Walnut 
Hill, Marion County, 111., of which place 
her grandfather, Israel Jennings, was one 
of the first settlers. Mr. Bryan was edu 
cated in the public school at his birth 
place, and at Jacksonville, 111., in Whipple 
Academy and Illinois College, whence he 
was graduated A.B. (valedictorian) 1881, 
A.M., 1884, and later received the degree of 
LL.D., and was graduated from Union 
College of Law, Chicago, LL.B., 1883. He 
practised law at Jacksonville, 111., 1883- 
1887, and afterward in Lincoln, Neb., was 
elected to the Fifty-second and Fifty-third 
Congresses in 1890 and 1892; received the 
Democratic votes in the Nebraska Legis 
lature for United States Senator in 1895, 
but was defeated in the Legislature by 
John M. Tlmrston, Republican, and was 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



245 



editor of the Omalia World-Herald, 1894- 
1800. He was a delegate from Nebraska 
to the National Democratic Convention at 
Chicago, 1896, and made a speech on the 
platform which is one of the most noted 
in the annals of American oratory, was 
nominated for the Presidency by that con 
vention, and after one of the most strenu 
ous and bitterly fought campaigns was 
defeated for -President by William McKin- 
ley. Mr. Bryan took the lecture platform 
in 1897; in 1898 raised the Third Regi 
ment of Nebraska Volunteers for the War 
with Spain; was again nominated for the 
Presidency in 1900, and again defeated by 
William McKinley. Immediately after the 
election he established at Lincoln, Neb., 
the Commoner, a political weekly paper, 
which he still conducts. Mr. Bryan head 
ed the Nebraska delegation to the National 
Democratic Convention at St. Louis, 1904, 
and took an active part in the subsequent 
campaign. In 1905 and 1900, with Mrs. 
Bryan, he went on a world-tour, during 
which he took an important part in the 
meeting of the Interparliamentary Union 
in London. In 1908 Mr. Bryan received for 
the third time the nomination of the Dem 
ocratic party for President, but after 
another remarkable campaign was defeated 
for the election by "William Howard Taft. 
Mr. Bryan has attained great prominence 
as a lecturer in lyceum and Chautauqua 
courses, his lectures being of a religious- 
ethical character, and those entitled "The 
Value of an Ideal," and "The Prince of 
Peace," and "The Price of a Soul" have 
attained wide celebrity. Mr. Bryan is 
author of: The First Battle, 1897; The 
Old World and Its Ways, 1907; and Let 
ters to a Chinese Official, 1907; as well a; 
many articles in magazines and newspa 
pers. He married in Perry, 111., Oct. 1, 
1884, Mary Elizabeth Baird, and they 
have three children: Ruth, William J., Jr 
and Grace D. Address: Lincoln, Neb. 

BRYANT, David E.: 

United States judge; born in LaRue 
County, Ky., Oct. 19, 1840, removing with 
his parents in 1853 to Grayson County 
which has ever since been his home. He 



studied in the schools at Sherman, Texas, 
intil entering Trinity College, N. C., from 
vhich he was graduated in June, 1871. He 
studied law in offices at Sherman, Texas, 
md was admitted to the bar there in 1873, 
and engaged in the general practice of the 
aw there until appointed, May 28, 1890, 
o the office of United States judge for the 
Eastern District of Texas, in which he is 
still serving. Address: Sherman, Texas. 

BRYANT, Henry Grier: 

Explorer; born in Allegheny, Pa., Nov. 
7, 1859. He was educated at Princeton 
University, from which he received the de 
gree of A.M. in 1886, and was graduated 
in law from the University of Pennsyl 
vania in 1880. His explorations began in 
1891 with that of the Grand Falls of Lab 
rador, and the following year he accom 
panied the Peary Relief Expedition as 
second in command. In 1894 he was placed 
in command of the Peary Auxiliary Ex 
pedition, and led an expedition to Mt. St. 
Elias, Alaska, in 1897. He is president of 
the Geographical Society of Philadelphia, 
a fellow of the Royal Geographical Soci 
ety of London; corresponding member of 
the Geographical Society of Stockholm and 
Geographical Society of Geneva; secretary 
since its formation of the American Alpine 
Club, and is an officer of the French Acad 
emy. He is a contributor to magazines 
and to the proceedings of various societies 
and geographical congresses. Residence: 
2013 Walnut Street. Office: 806 Land 
Title Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

BRYANT, Percy: 

Physician and alienist; born at Charles 
City, Iowa, April 19, 1862; son of Na 
thaniel Gushing Bryant, U. S. N. (com 
mander who served in the Mexican War as 
acling master of the "Dale" and through 
the American Civil War, commanding the 
gunboat Cairo, Mississippi Flotilla, and 
received prize money for capture of the 
Confederate gunboats, Sumpter, General 
Bragg and Hiawatha), and of Mary Eliza 
(Southall) Bryant. He was educated in 
the high school at Cedar Falls, Iowa, and 
Columbia College, New York City, being 



246 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



graduated as M.D. in 1887. He received 
his first degree in medicine at the Chicago 
Homeopathic Medical College in 1883, was 
appointed interne to Cook County Hospital 
in the June following, and served twenty- 
two months. He was ambulance surgeon 
to Chambers Street Hospital, New York 
City, in 1886. Dr. Bryant was assistant 
physician at Ward s Island Insane Asylum, 
New York City, 1888-1889; assistant phy 
sician at Buffalo State Hospital, 1889-1894, 
and was promoted to first assistant in 
1895. He was promoted to medical super 
intendent of Manhattan State Hospital, 
Ward s Island, New York City, in 1897, and 
resigned in 1901 on account of ill health. 
He entered into practice in Brooklyn, but 
ill health obliged him to retire. He pur 
chased the Bowdoin estate at Rahway, N. 
J., in 1906. Dr. Bryant served as assistant 
surgeon of the Seventy-fourth Regiment 
of New York National Guard. 1893-1898, 
and qualified every year as sharpshooter. 
He is Democratic in politics and an Episco 
palian in religion. He is a member of the 
New York State Medical Association and 
the American Medico-Psychological Associ 
ation; a life member of the Society of Co 
lonial Wars, and the Society of Mayflower 
Descendants; a Companion, by inheritance, 
of the Military Order of Loyal Legion; and 
a member of the Saturn and Liberal Clubs 
of Buffalo. He married in New York City, 
Feb. 21. 1900, Josephine Myrick Webb, and 
they have two sons. Residence: Wood- 
bridge, N. J. Address: Bowdoin Park, 
Rahway, N. J. 

BRYANT, W. Sohier: 

Physician; born at Boston, Mass., May 
15, 1861; son of Henry Bryant, distin 
guished physician and naturalist, who 
served in the Union Army as brigade sur 
geon in 1861, and surgeon of the 20th Mas 
sachusetts Volunteers, and Elizabeth Brim 
mer (Sohier) Bryant, of the senior branch 
of Sohier de Vermandois, the surviving 
branch of the ancient Counts of Verman 
dois, the junior branch from Emperor 
Charlemagne. Her family passed through 
the Island of Jersey from Cambrai to Bos 
ton. The Bryant family passed through 



Normandy, Devonshire and Barbados to 
Boston, descended from Rollo and John de 
Brienne, Christian King of Jerusalem and 
Emperor of the East. He received his pre 
paratory education at St. Paul s School. 
Concord, N. H., and from tutors. He was 
graduated from Harvard College as A.B. 
in 1884, and from Harvard Medical School 
as M.D. in 1888, in which year he also re 
ceived the A.M. degree for anatomical dis 
coveries from Harvard University. Dr. 
Bryant has been engaged in the practice 
of medicine from 1888, and is now prac 
ticing as a specialist in diseases of the 
ear, nose and throat. He was formerly 
aural surgeon at the Boston Dispensary; 
assistant in anatomy and otology at the 
Harvard Medical School; assistant aural 
surgeon to the Massachusetts Charitable 
Eye and Ear Infirmary; instructor in otol 
ogy, College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
N. Y. ; clinical assistant in the Department 
of Otology, Vanderbilt Clinic, N. Y. ; as- 
sistant surgeon, St. Bartholomew Clinic ; 
clinical instructor and attending surgeon, 
Otological Department, Cornell University 
Medical School; physician in class of nose, 
throat and ear diseases at the Presbyterian 
Hospital, N. Y. ; and adjunct professor in 
the Department of Diseases of the Ear, 
New York Post-Graduate Medical School 
and Hospital. He was a member of the 
Boston Society of the Medical Sciences, the 
Boylston Society of Medical Improvement, 
the International Congress of Arts and Sci 
ences in 1904, the Seventh and Eighth 
International Otological Congresses,, the 
Fourth and Fifth Pan-American Medical 
Congresses, the Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
International Medical Congresses, and the 
Sixth and Seventh Congresses of the Amer 
ican Physicians and Surgeons. He served 
in the Massachusetts National Guard from 
1883 to 1898, and also in the Spanish- 
American War as assistant surgeon of the 
First Massachusetts Regiment of Heavy 
Artillery, United States Volunteers, and 
was soon afterward commissioned by Pres 
ident McKinley as major and brigade sur 
geon of Volunteers. He served with Major- 
General Fitzhugh Lee in the Seventh Army 
Corps until May, 1899; then served two 




WILLIAM SOIIIEB BRYANT, M. D. 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



years as surgeon of Battery A, Massachu 
setts National Guard. He removed to New 
York and engaged in practice; is now con 
sulting otologist of the Manhattan State 
Hospital ; and senior assistant surgeon to 
the Aural Department of the New York Eye 
and Ear Infirmary. He is a member of 
the American Otological Society, the New 
York Academy of Medicine, chairman of 
the Section on Laryngology and Otology of 
the American Medical Association; member 
of the Medical Societies of the County and 
State of New York, the New York Otologi 
cal Society, the Association of Military 
Surgeons of the United States, the American 
Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological 
Society, the American Academy of Ophthal 
mology and Oto-Laryngology, Massachu 
setts Medical Society, American Society of 
Sanitary and Moral Prophylaxis, American 
Public Health Association, Boston Medical 
Library Association, Harvard Medical 
Alumni Association, president of the Har 
vard Medical Society of New York, the 
Medical Association of the Greater City of 
New York,, Association for the Promotion 
of Hygiene and Salubrity in Dwellings, 
East Side Physicians Association, American 
Therapeutic Association, Boston Society of 
Natural History, the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science, the Amer 
ican Academy of Medicine, and the National 
Geographic Society. Dr. Bryant is a Mug 
wump in politics, and an Episcopalian in 
religious affiliation. He is a member of the 
Spanish War Veterans, the Military Order 
of Foreigns Wars, the Naval and Military 
Order of the Spanish -American War, So 
ciety of the Seventh Army Corps, and is a 
veteran member of the First Corps Cadets, 
Massachusetts Volunteer Militia; a member 
of the Zeta Psi and Delta Kappa Epsilon 
fraternities, the Porcellian Club, the New 
England Society of New York, the Loyal 
Legion, the Harvard Club of New York, the 
Society of the Colonial Wars, the Society 
of Mayflower Descendants, the Sons of 
Veterans, and the Sons of the Revolution. 
Dr. Bryant is the author of the ear section 
of Knight and Bryant s " Nose, Throat and 
Ear" (Blakiston s Sons & Co., and also 
of 115 medical publications, anatomical 



247 

and Otological. He married at Orange, N. 
J., in 1887, Martha Lyman Cox, and they 
have six children. Address: 41 E. Thirtv- 
third Street, New York City. 

BRYCE, Lloyd: 

Editor, author; born in Flushing, Long 
Island. N. Y., Sept. 20, 1851 ; son of Major 
Joseph Smith Bryce, U. S. A., and Eliza 
beth (Stephens) Bryce. He was graduated 
from Oxford University, England, as B.A. 
and M.A. Mr. Bryce was editor and owner 
of (lie North American Review from 1889 
to 1896. He is author of: Paradise 
Friends in Exile; The Romance of an Alter 
Ego; A Dream of Conquest; Lady Blanche s 
Salon; The Literary Duet; After Chris 
tianity What?; and also of essays, etc., 
contributed to reviews. He was for a time 
paymaster-general of the State of New 
York. He was elected as a Democrat from 
the Seventh District of New York City, 
to the Fiftieth Congress, serving from 1887 
to 1889. He married, Edith, daughter of 
Mayor Cooper, of New York City, and they 
have three children. Address: Roslyn, 
Nassau County. N. Y. 

BUCHANAN, Charles Jay: 

Lawyer; born in New Berlin, N. Y., Dec. 
27, 1843. He was educated at the public 
schools and the United States Military 
Academy, and he served during the Civil 
War in the First Regiment of United 
States Sharpshooters (Berdan s) as a priv 
ate, non-commissioned officer, and first lieu 
tenant; and as adjutant of the regiment. 
Mr. Buchanan has been practising law in 
Albany, N. Y., since Jan., 1874, and is now 
a member of the law firm of Buchanan, 
Lawyer and Whalen. He is also a director 
of the Union Trust Company, trustee and 
secretary of the National Savings Bank of 
Albany, N. Y. He is a Republican in poli 
tics, and a member of the Episcopal Church. 
Mr. Buchanan is a member of the Military 
Order of the Loyal Legion, and of the 
Buchanan and St. Andrew s societies; the 
secretary and a trustee of the Albany Law 
School ; a trustee of the Albany Academy 
for Girls, and the Young Men s Associa 
tion of Albany, N. Y. He is also a member 



248 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



of the Fort Orange University, and Army 
and Navy Clubs^ and is active in various 
corporate interests. Has received the de 
gree of M.A. Address: 79 Chapel Street, 
Albany, N. Y. 

BUCHANAN, James Isaac: 

Banker; born in Hamilton, Ontario, Aug. 
3, 1853; son of the late Hon. Isaac Bu 
chanan, who was president of the Execu 
tive Council corresponding with the pres 
ent Privy Council, and a prominent Canad 
ian Government official, He was educated 
at Dr. Tassie s Collegiate Institute, of Gait, 
Ontario. He began his business training 
in 1868 in his father s wholesale dry-goods 
house, and in 1870 he visited South Africa, 
and afterwards, in 1871, returned to Can 
ada to the same business in which he 
received his early training. In Jan., 1877, 
he became a junior clerk with the Oil City 
Trust Company, at Oil City, Pa., and from 
that became private secretary and busi 
ness manager to the late Captain J. J. 
Vandergrift, financier, oil operator and 
manufacturer. On Captain Vandergrift s 
death, he was made by his will one of the 
trustees of his estate. He became vice- 
president of the Pittsburg Trust Company, 
later succeeding in 1904 to the presidency 
of the last named corporation. He has 
been a director of several corporations in 
Pennsylvania and now president of the 
Pittsburg Trust Co., Pittsburg Terminal 
Warehouse & Transfer Company and Ter 
minal Trust Company; secretary and treas 
urer of the Keystone Commercial Com 
pany; and he is a director of the Wash 
ington Oil Company; Unity Oil Co.; Tay- 
lorstown Natural Gas Co., The Natural 
Gas Co. of West Virginia, and of the 
Keystone National Bank of Pittsburg; and 
senior partner of J. I. Buchanan & Co., 
bankers. Mr. Buchanan was for eight 
years chairman of the Orchestra Commit 
tee of the Pittsburg Art Society, and is 
president of the Athalia Daly Home for 
Working Girls. He is an elder of the East 
Liberty Presbyterian Church of Pittsburg 
and a former president of the Presbyterian 
Union of Pittsburg. He is a past president 
of the Academy of Science and Art of Pitts 



burg; a member of the Botanical Society 
of Western Pennsylvania, and a member of 
the American Association for the Advance 
ment of Science; the American Geograph 
ical Society, and the National Geographical 
Society, and a life member of St. An 
drew s Society of New York and St. 
Andrew s Society of Pennsylvania. He is a 
member of the Masonic fraternity and since 
1890 an active member of the Supreme 
Council of the Scottish Rite, thirty-third 
degree, and deputy for Pennsylvania since 
1897. Mr. Buchanan married at Pittsburg, 
July 11, 1901, Eliza Macfarlane, of Pitts 
burg. Address: 6108 Walnut Street, Pitts 
burg. 

BUCHANAN, Roberdeau: 

Assistant, nautical almanac office ; born 
in Philadelphia, Nov. 22, 1839; son of Pay 
Director McKean Buchanan of the U. S. 
Navy, and F. Selina (Roberdeau) Bu 
chanan. He was educated at the Lawrence 
Scientific School of Harvard University, 
graduating as B.S. in the class of 1861. 
Mr. Buchanan engaged in practice as a 
civil engineer, and became connected with 
the Nautical Almanac in 1879, and he is 
now one of the assistants in the Nautical 
Almanac Office, at the United States Naval 
Observatory at Washington. He is author 
of various technical and biographical 
works, including: Mathematical Theory of 
Eclipses; Projection of the Sphere, and 
Introduction to the Differential Calculus 
by Means of Finite Differences ; also gen 
ealogies of the Roberdeau, Shippen and 
McKean families. He is a contributor 
to astronomical magazines. He married in 
Washington, D. C., Sept. 12, 1888, Eliza 
M. Peters., daughter of Thomas Peters of 
Maryland, and grandniece of Judge Rich 
ard Peters of Philadelphia. Address: 2015 
Q Street, Washington, D. C. 

BUCHANAN, William Insco: 

Diplomatist; born on a farm near Cov- 
ington, Miami County, Ohio, Sept. 10, 1853. 
In 1874 he was appointed engrossing clerk 
in the House of Representatives of Indi 
ana, in which position he remained for a 
year. In 1876 he removed to Piqua, Ohio, 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



249 



and from there in 1882, to Sioux City, 
Iowa. It was while he was a resident of 
the latter place that he took a prominent 
place in organizing and managing the first 
four corn palaces at Sioux City, a series 
of novel autumn exhibitions which became 
famous throughout the country. He was 
appointed in 1890 as the Democratic mem 
ber from Iowa of the National Commission 
charged with carrying out the World s 
Columbian Exposition at Chicago, of which 
he was chief of the Departments of Agri 
culture, Live Stock and Forestry. In 1894 
he was appointed by President Cleveland 
envoy extraordinary and minister plenipo 
tentiary to the Argentine Republic, which 
post lie resigned in 1900. While so en 
gaged he was designated in 1898 by the 
Congresses of both Argentina and Chile as 
the deciding member of the joint Commis 
sion created to settle the boundary contro 
versy between the two countries as to the 
line north of Latitude 23 degrees, and as 
such fixed the existing boundary between 
the two countries. He was Director Gen- 
, eral of the Pan-American Exposition at 
Buffalo, 1899-1901. He was appointed a 
delegate from the United States to the 
Second International Conference of Amer 
ican States, held in the City of Mexico, 
1901-1902. He was appointed by President 
Roosevelt in 1902 the first United States 
minister to the new Republic of Panama, 
during the organization of the Republic 
and the making of her constitution. He 
was appointed a delegate and chairman oi 
the United States delegation to the Third 
International Conference of American 
States, held at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. July 
to Sept., 1906; appointed a member of the 
United States delegation to the Second 
International Peace Conference at the 
Hague, held in 1907, and representative of 
the United States in the Central American 
Peace Conference at Washington, Nov. and 
Dec., 1907. He attended and took part in 
the inauguration of the International 
Court of Justice at Cortago, Costa Rica, 
in 1908, as High Commissioner representing 
the President of the United States; in 
1909 he was sent on special missions to 
Venezuela as High Commissioner repre 



senting the President to arrange the con 
ditions for the reestablishment of diplo 
matic relations between the United States 
and that country, resulting in the settlement 
of all claims of American citizens against 
Venezuela. Residence: 34 Gates Circle, 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

BTJCHTEL, Henry Augustus: 

Ex-governor of Colorado, -clergyman, 
educator; born near Akron, Ohio, Sept. 30, 
1847; son of Dr. Jonathan B. Buchtel. He 
was educated at Ashbury (now De Pauw) 
University, receiving the degrees of A.M. 
1875, D.D. 1884, and LL.D. 1900. In 1873 
lie was sent to Bulgaria as a missionary, 
and since his return to this country has 
held numerous pastorates, among them be 
ing Methodist Episcopal churches in Zions- 
ville. Greenscastle, Knightstown, Grace 
Church in Richmond, Trinity Church in 
La Fayette. and Central Avenue Church 
in Indianapolis, Ind. ; Evans Chapel and 
Trinity Church in Denver, Colo.; 1st Church 
in Mt. Vernon, N. Y. ; and Cavalry Church 
in East Orange, N. J. He" was appointed 
chancellor of the University of Denver in 
1900, and still holds that office. At the 
election in 1906 he was elected on the Re 
publican ticket as governor of Colorado, 
his term expiring in January, 1909. He 
married in Greencastle, Ind., Feb. 4, 1873, 
Mary N. Stevenson. Address: University 
Park, Colo. 

BUCK, Albert Henry: 

Physician; born in New York City, Oct. 
20, 1842; son of Dr. Gurdon and Henrietta 
E. (Wolff) Buck. He was graduated from 
Yale, A.B., 1864, and from the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia Uni 
versity, M.D., 1867. He was aural surgeon 
at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, 
1871-1883, and . professor of otology at Co 
lumbia University, 1887-1904. He is con 
sulting aural surgeon to the New York Eye 
and Ear Infirmary; is an honorary mem 
ber of the American Otological Society, and 
the Ne\v York Otological Society. Dr. 
Buck is author of: A Treatise on Diseases 
of the Ear; and editor of the following 
works; Strieker s Histology (translation), 



250 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



one volume; Ziemssen s Cyclopaedia of Med 
icine (translation), seventeen volumes; 
Hygiene and Public Health, two volumes; 
Reference Handbook of the Medical Sci 
ences, eight volumes, (two editions) ; and 
(in conjunction with Dr. Joseph D. Bry 
ant) American Practice of Surgery, eight 
volumes. Dr. Buck married at New Haven, 
Conn., Laura, (laughter of Rev. John S. C. 
Abbott. Address: care of H. W. Buck, 49 
Wall St., New York City. 

BUCK, Dudley: 

Composer, organist; born at Hartford, 
Conn., March 10, 1839; studied at Trini 
ty College, Hartford and later at the Leip 
zig Conservatory of Music under Haupt- 
inami, Richter, Reitz, Moschelles and Plaidy, 
being a classmate there of Sir Oliver Sulli 
van. He also studied under Schneider at 
Dresden, and in 1861-1862 at Paris. Mr. 
Buck was for three years organist of the 
Music Hall at Boston. He became assistant 
conductor of the Garden Concerts at New 
York City, on invitation of Theodore Thom 
as, in 1875; and he composed the cantata 
sung at the opening of the Centennial Ex 
hibition at Philadelphia, which was exe 
cuted by 800 voices and 150 instruments, 
conducted by Theodore Thomas. He was or 
ganist of the Church of Holy Trinity, 
Brooklyn, conductor of the Apollo Club 
twenty-five years and retired from all but 
theoretical work and composition in 1902. 
He is author of numerous compositions in 
various forms, but for the greater part vo 
cal, and both sacred and secular. Among 
the more prominent of his compositions are : 
The Legend of Don Munio, 1874; Mar- 
mion Overture, 1880; The Golden Legend 
( for the Cincinnati May Festival, winning 
the $1,000 prize) the music to Longfellow s 
and Edmund C. Stedman s Poems; Light 
of Asia, published and first performed in 
London, 1886-1887. Mr. Buck is also au 
thor of A Dictionary of Musical Terms; 
and of The Influence of the Organ in His* 
tory, 1882. Address: G. Schirmer & Co., 
35 Union Square, New York City. 

BUCK, Gertrude: 

Professor of English, Vassar College; 
born in Kalamazoo, Mich., July 14, 1871; 



daughter of George Machan and Anne 
(Bradford) Buck. She was graduated from 
the University of Michigan as B.S., 1894, 
M.S., 1895, Ph.D., 1898, and was fellow in 
English in the University of Chicago 
in 1895. She was assistant in English in 
the University of Michigan, 1896-1897; 
teacher of English in the Indianapolis 
High School, 1897, and since then has 
been in Vassar College as instructor, 
1897-1901, associate professor, 1901-1907, 
and professor since 1907. Professor Buck 
is author of: The Metaphor-A Study in 
the Psychology of Rhetoric, in the series 
of " Contributions to Rhetorical Theory," 
edited by Professor E. N. Scott, 1899; A 
Course in Argumentative Writing, 1899; 
A Course in Expository Writing (with 
Elizabeth Woodbridge), 1899; A Brief Eng 
lish Grammar (with F. N. Scott), 1905; 
Ruskin s " Sesame and Lilies," in the ser 
ies of Longman s English Classics, 1906; 
A Course in Narrative Writing (with E. 
W. Morris), 190(j; also magazine articles 
on educational subjects in The Forum, 
The Educational Review, The School Re 
view, Education, Modern Language Notes, 
The Elementary School Teacher, etc. She 
is a member of the Modern Language Asso 
ciation of America, the Association of Col 
legiate Alumnae, the Alpha Phi Sorority, 
Daughters of the American Revolution, 
Equal Suffrage League, and the Women s 
University Club of New York. Address: 
Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

BUCK, Lillie West ("Amy Leslie"): 

Critic of musi^ drama and art; born in 
Burlington, Iowa; daughter of Albert and 
Kate (Content) West. She Was graduated 
as valedictorian of the class of 1874 from 
St. Mary s Academy, at Notre Dame, Ind., 
receiving a gold medal in the academic 
course and a gold medal and special di 
ploma in the Conservatory course in vocai 
music. She went on the stage in Boston in 
1880, creating roles in Audran s " Plan- 
chette " and in Offenbach opera bouffe, and 
afterward made a great success in the 
Fifth Avenue Theatre as " Fiametta " in 
The Mascot, in Olivette and in other lead 
ing soprano roles. She married in Chicago, 
in 1884, Harry Brown, the popular corned- 



MEN OF AMERICA. 



ian, and she retired from the stage upon 
the death of her only son, Francis Albert 
Brown, in 1889. The same year she en 
tered upon the position of dramatic critic 
of the Chicago Daily News, which she still 
holds at one of the highest salaries ever 
paid a critic, her articles on matters dra 
matic, musical and artistic, signed " Amy 
Leslie." carrying the greatest weight of au 
thority with the Chicago public. In 1901 
she married, in Chicago, her present hus 
band, Franklin Howard Buck, now head of 
the publicity department of KlaAv & Er- 
langer. In addition to her newspaper she 
has published a pamphlet on sensational 
dress in public, " Amy Leslie at the Fair," 
an exhaustive story of the World s Colum 
bian Exposition, 1903; a book of European 
travels, and " Some Players," a book of per 
sonal reminiscences of celebrated actors, 
with personal autograph letters and pic 
tures; also biographies of Mansfield, Mod- 
jeska, Irving, Terry and others, and she 
has translated books from the French and 
Spanish. She lives, winter and summer, in 
a secluded country home called " The 
Roose " at Norwood Park, 111., where she 
raises Homing pigeons, Black Spanish 
chickens, rare flowers and small fruits. 
Residence address: 265 Crescent Avenue, 
Norwood Park, 111. Office: Chicago Daily 
News, Chicago. 

BUCKLEY, Ernest Robertson: 

Director of the Missouri Bureau of Geol 
ogy and Mines; born in Milbury, Mass., 
Sept. 3, 1872; son of Thomas M. and Grace 
(Robertson) Buckley. He was graduated 
from the University of Wisconsin as B.S. 
in 1885 and Ph.D. in 1898. He served four 
years in the Wisconsin National Guards 
and two years in the University of Wis 
consin Regiment, in charge of small arms 
firing; and was alderman of the city of 
Madison, Wis. He is a life member of the 
Geological Society of America, American 
Institute of Mining Engineers, American 
Association for the Advancement of Sci 
ence, American Mining Congress, and is a 
member of the Wisconsin Academy of Sci 
ences, Washington Academy of Science, 
Arts and Letters, Wisconsin Clay Workers 



251 

Association, the Wisco