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NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES 



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Men of Mark in South Carolina 



Ideals of American Life 



A Collection of Biographies of Leading Men 

of the State 



J. G. HEMPHILL 

Editor of "The News and Courier" 
Editor-in-Chief 



VOLUME II 



Illustrated with Many 
Full Page Photo-Steel Engraved Portraits 



MEN OF MARK PUBLISHING COMPANY 

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Washington, D. C. 



1908 

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JAMES ALLAN 

AJjAN, JAMES, of Charleston, South Carolina, business 
man, bank director, and for five years school commis- 
sioner of Charleston, is a native of Scotland who by his 
long identification with the interests of Charleston, South Caro- 
lina, has come to be a type of that large body of Scotch- American 
citizens whose sound Biblical principles, honesty and industry, 
have had a marked influence upon the history and the develop- 
ment of the state of South Carolina in all its political, business 
and social interests. 

He was born at Caithness, Scotland, October 6, 1832. His 
father, Alexander Allan, was a cabinet maker who prided himself 
upon the thoroughness of his work and the honesty of all his 
transactions. He came to the United States in 1837, when his 
son, James, was but five years old. 

Passing his boyhood after that time in the city schools of 
Charleston, James Allan had as his teachers Mr. Blum and Dr. 
Faber, who are gratefully remembered by many men who were 
Charleston school boys sixty years ago. His fondness for fine 
mechanical work of all kinds inclined him to watchmaking, 
especially for the delight he took in exact machinery and the use 
of instruments of precision. He studied watchmaking under a 
German, Francis Stein, for four years from the time he was 
seventeen; and gradually he made his way to the management 
of an important business in jewelry and watchmaking. 

During the War between the States he served as a lieutenant 
of volunteers at Charleston. 

He feels that he owes the steadying influences of his life in 
no small degree to the example and the teaching of faithful 
parents who had strong religious convictions. Contact with other 
business men also contributed much, he feels, to confirming his 
integrity of life and his desire to be of use to others in the 
community in which he lives. While he is a most loyal American, 
and a South Carolinian in all things, he is proud of his Scotch 
ancestry. He served for five years as president of the St. 
Andrew society of Charleston. He is also a master Mason, and 
a Knight Templar, and was master of Orange lodge for six years. 



JAMES ALLAN 



Early a member of the Presbyterian church, he has been for many 
years an elder in that denomination. He is a Democrat, and 
has never varied in his allegiance to the platform and candidates 
of the party. He has found his chief amusement and recreation 
in travel. 

He was school commissioner in Charleston for five years, and 
was chairman of the commission for repairs and improvements 
of the school buildings after the great earthquake in 1886. He 
is also director of the Exchange Bank and Trust company. 

On August 13, 1856, he married Miss Amy Sarah Hobcraft. 
Of their eleven children, eight are living in 1907. 

In the advice which he gives to young Americans, Mr. Allan 
shows himself to be one of that great body of American citizens 
who hold to the old standards which have given worth and 
dignity to generations of family life in Scotland and in the 
United States : "First, take the Bible as your guide ; and practice 
sobriety, industry and honesty, so that men may trust your word 
as they would your bond." 

Mr. Allan's address is Charleston, South Carolina. 



HARTWELL MOORE AVER 

A~ER, HARTWELL MOORE, was born at Beauford's 
Bridge, Barnwell county, South Carolina, January 7, 
1868. His father, Lewis Malone Ayer, was a man of 
versatile talent. At one time actively engaged in farming, he 
attained prominence in professional and public life. He taught, 
preached, and practiced law, and just at the breaking out of the 
War between the States he was elected to the Confederate con- 
gress, and served as a representative throughout the four years 
of storm and stress that followed. After the war he conducted a 
seminary in Anderson, and also served as a member of the South 
Carolina legislature. His marked characteristics were, in the 
words of his son, "intellectuality and unswerving devotion to 
duty, together with public spirit, and old-fashioned high tone." 

The Ayer family settled in South Carolina in colonial times. 
Thomas Ayer, of Scotch-Irish descent, had come to Marlboro 
before 1776, and when the war for independence broke out he 
became a leader of the patriots in the struggle. Another member 
of the family was Lewis Malone Ayer, Senior, who acted as 
courier for General Francis Marion. His son, Lewis Malone 
Ayer, Junior, many years afterward was one of the leaders in 
the Kansas-Nebraska troubles in 1854. 

Hartwell Ayer's early life was passed, for the most part, in 
Anderson, South Carolina. He owes much to the training of an 
excellent mother, who not only managed her household efficiently, 
but gave her children the elements of a sound education. From 
his early youth, Mr. Ayer has been fond of reading. As a boy 
he devoted much time to history and romance. After some years 
of study in W. J. Ligon's school in Anderson, he entered South 
Carolina college, from which he was graduated in 1887. After 
his graduation, Mr. Ayer taught for a time in his father's semi- 
nary at Anderson and in the Bamberg county schools. Meanwhile 
he was studying law, and was beginning to make his way in 
journalism. Starting as reporter for the "Charleston World," he 
became successively city editor of that journal, telegraph editor of 
the "Columbus (Georgia) Enquirer-Sun," and of the "Savannah 



HARTWELL, MOORE AYER 



Morning News," editor and proprietor of the "Charleston Post," 
and finally editor and proprietor of the "Florence Daily Times." 

Mr. Ayer was admitted by the supreme court to the practice 
of law in 1897. In 1904 he was appointed a member of the state 
board of education, and served in the state legislature. He has 
served in the state militia for four years, and is a member of 
the Masonic order and of the Knights of Pythias, having held 
the offices of chancellor commander and district deputy grand 
chancellor in the latter organization. He is a Democrat. He is 
connected with the Episcopal church. Mr. Ayer finds rest and 
relaxation from his journalistic duties in such out-of-door sports 
as swimming, walking and hunting, together with the healthful 
open-air life and discipline of the state militia encampments. 

On June 25, 1890, he married Cornelia W. Smith. They have 
had six children, four of whom are now (1907) living. 

The following, in Mr. Ayer's judgment, are among the 
guiding principles for the attainment of true success in life: 
"High ideals; strict attention to details; honesty and courage, 
coupled with the desire and the willingness to learn from anybody 
or from any source anything that will contribute to thorough 
knowledge of the particular subject in question." 

His address is Florence, South Carolina. 



THOMAS WRIGHT BAGOT 

BACOT, THOMAS WRIGHT, is a native of Charleston, as 
his ancestors were for several generations. His father, 
Robert Dewar Bacot, was a cotton merchant and rice 
planter, a man of integrity, strength of character and modesty. 
The earliest member of the family to come to this country was 
Pierre Bacot, who was born in Tours, France, and emigrated to 
Carolina in the latter part of the seventeenth century. At about 
the same time, soon after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, 
Mr. Bacot's maternal ancestor, Daniel Huger, emigrated from 
France and settled in Carolina, where his descendants from that 
day to this have been well-known citizens and men of prominence 
in public affairs, especially in the city of Charleston. 

Thomas W. Bacot was born April 14, 1849. His youth was 
passed for the most part in Charleston, though with intervals of 
residence in the country. Endowed with good health, he entered 
with zest into the various outdoor sports afield and on the water ; 
and through most of his life he has continued to take delight in 
such manly exercises as riding, hunting and shooting. Among 
his youthful studies, languages and mathematics appealed to him 
particularly, but the book that influenced him most of all, he 
says, was the Bible. 

After some years of study in the private and public schools 
of Charleston, and in the country, Mr. Bacot entered the College 
of Charleston, from which he was graduated in 1870, with the 
degree of B. A., taking the second honor in his class. After 
spending some time in the study of law in the office of McCrady 
& Son, in Charleston, in 1871 he was admitted to the bar. He 
began practice January 1, 1872. He soon won for himself a high 
position in his profession, and in 1899 he was admitted to prac- 
tice before the United States supreme court. Among the many 
important duties which Mr. Bacot has discharged in the course 
of his practice have been those of counsel for the Coosaw com- 
pany, and in the litigation over the South Carolina railroad and 
the South Carolina railway. He is solicitor of St. Philip's parish, 
Charleston. 



10 



THOMAS WRIGHT BACOT 



Mr. Bacot, in addition to the regular duties incident to his 
professional practice, has taken a prominent part in the affairs of 
his state. From 1892 to 1902 he served as member of the South 
Carolina house of representatives, during the last four years of 
that time holding the very responsible position of chairman of 
the judiciary committee. He has also served as delegate to the 
political conventions of his county and state. He is now the first 
assistant United States attorney for the two districts of South 
Carolina, at Charleston. 

Educational and religious interests claim a large part of his 
attention. He has served as a trustee of South Carolina college. 
He was a lay-delegate from the diocese of South Carolina in the 
general convention of the Protestant Episcopal church, which 
met in Boston, Massachusetts, in October, 1904. He is a vestry- 
man of St. Philip's church, Charleston, and has represented his 
parish in the convention of the diocese of South Carolina. 

Mr. Bacot is president of St. George's society of Charleston, 
and one of the vice-presidents of the Huguenot society. He is a 
member of the Commercial club of Charleston, and of the South 
Carolina Historical society, and a member of the committee on 
charity of the South Carolina society. 

A man of strong religious convictions, Mr. Bacot has ever 
striven to regulate his life by the principles laid down in the 
Bible. He is profoundly convinced that the welfare of society 
depends upon the maintenance and defence of the sanctity of the 
home, and is a pronounced enemy, not only of divorce, but of 
the remarriage of divorced persons. He does not advocate the 
abolition of the liquor traffic, but prefers that it be so regulated 
as to minimize the "profit- feature" in the sale of intoxicating 
beverages. Any advice which he might give to the youth of the 
country would be summed up in the Christian rule of love to 
God and to man, together with temperance, or self-mastery, in 
all things. 

On April 18, 1877, Mr. Bacot married Miss Louisa de Ber- 
niere McCrady. They have had seven children, of whom all but 
one are now (1907) living. 

His address is Charleston, South Carolina. 



WILLIAM WATTS BALL 

BALL, WILLIAM WATTS, since 1904 assistant editor of 
the Charleston "News and Courier," and for the last 
seventeen years connected with editorial and newspaper 
work in the South, was born in Laurens county, South Carolina, 
on the 9th of December, 1868. His father, Beaufort Watts Ball, 
was a lawyer, who incidentally edited a country newspaper and 
conducted a farm. He was a member of the state legislature, and 
was a state prosecuting attorney. He married his third cousin, 
Miss Eliza Watts. During the War between the States he was 
a private in Hampton's legion, and later he was made captain 
and assistant adjutant-general of General Gary's brigade in the 
Confederate States army. 

The ancestors of the family were chiefly English, who had 
settled in Virginia before the War of the Eevolution. His great 
great-grandfather, William Ball, removed from Virginia to South 
Carolina in the eighteenth century, as did also his great great- 
grandfather Watts, both on his father's and his mother's side. 
As a rule, the members of his family have been well-to-do 
farmers. 

In his boyhood he had good health, and he was blessed with 
a father who early put into his hands the best books and taught 
him to love good literature. He attended the village schools of 
Laurens, South Carolina, and later a preparatory school at Wal- 
halla, South Carolina. He was graduated from South Carolina 
college (now the University of South Carolina) in 1887; and 
after his graduation, in 1888 and 1889 he pursued post-graduate 
courses in English and ethics for a year. He was admitted to 
practice law by the supreme court of South Carolina, in May, 
1890, after studying in his father's office. In the summer of 1890 
he took a summer course in law at the University of Virginia. 
While studying at Columbia he taught in the public schools of 
that city. 

Admitted to the bar in May, 1890, he became soon afterward 
the proprietor of the "Laurens Advertiser," a weekly paper. He 
bought the paper with the intention of practicing law and at the 
same time doing editorial work. But after eighteen months of 



12 WILLIAM WATTS BAT,!. 

practice, with fair success, he definitely chose the profession of 
newspaper work as his life work, following in this choice his own 
personal preference, and acting against the advice of his family 
and friends. His "only ambition has been to learn thoroughly 
newspaper making." The taste for this work showed itself early 
in his college course, and determined his vocation. In 1894 he 
was editor of the Columbia "Journal" ; from 1895 to 1897 he was 
editor of the Charleston "Evening Post"; from 1897 to 1898 he 
edited the "Greenville Daily News," at Greenville, South Caro- 
lina; for some months in 1898 he was a reporter for the "Phila- 
delphia Press"; from 1900 to 1902 he was city editor of the 
Jacksonville, Florida, "Times-Union"; in 1904 he was news 
editor of the Columbia "State"; and since September, 1904, he 
has been assistant editor of the Charleston "News and Courier," 
engaged chiefly in editorial writing. He has also acted as corre- 
spondent for various newspapers throughout the country. 

On the 21st of April, 1897, Mr. Ball married Miss Fay Witte, 
daughter of Charles Otto Witte, of Charleston, South Carolina. 
They have had five children, four of whom are living in 1907, 

He is identified with the Protestant Episcopal church. In 
politics an independent Democrat, he voted for Palmer and 
Buckner in 1896, having attended the Indianapolis convention, 
which nominated them, and served as one of the members of the 
committee to draft a platform for that convention. 

Mr. Ball was a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity 
at college. He is a Mason. He is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias. 

He is president of the Laurens Publishing company, and still 
contributes the editorials to the publications of that company. 

Mr. Ball writes of himself: "I have been simply a fairly 
hard-working newspaper man." He was graduated from college 
when but a few months over eighteen years of age the youngest 
member of his class. He began newspaper work in 1890, only 
two months before Governor Tillman was elected. State politics 
were at white heat. He was opposed to "Tillmanism" ; his father 
was a political supporter of Wade Hampton, and Mr. Ball feels 
that an "aggressive and constant opposition to the Tillman school 
of politics has been the feature of his work." 

Mr. Ball has always advocated in all his newspaper work the 
public-spirited effort to develop the industries of his state. He 
is now a director in two cotton mill corporations. 



JOHN A. BARKSDALE 

BARKSDALE, JOHN A., physician and banker, of Laurens, 
South Carolina, was born within two miles of the town 
where he still (1907) resides, October 1, 1826. His father, 
Allen Barksdale, at one time sheriff of Laurens county, twice 
elected to the state legislature, was a man of striking integrity 
and strong religious character, prominent in every effort to influ- 
ence his community for good. His mother was Nancy Downs 
Barksdale. Among his ancestors distinguished for patriotism and 
public service, he numbers Abram Alexander (his great-grand- 
father), who was president of the Mecklenburg convention, held 
at Charlotte, North Carolina, in May, 1775, which adopted the 
first famous declaration of independence, known as the "Meck- 
lenburg resolutions." 

He refers with especial tenderness to the influence upon his 
life of his mother, and he feels that the devotion to parents and 
the love of family, which were uniformly felt and inculcated in 
his home-life, early formed standards of life for which he has 
always been grateful. While he was not occupied in any regular 
tasks of manual labor, he often worked upon the farm and in 
the garden, Saturdays, when he was not at school. He was fitted 
for college at the classical school at Laurens, South Carolina, and 
was a student at Transylvania university, in Kentucky, in 1845. 
His course in medicine he took at the medical college in Charles- 
ton, South Carolina, in 1846 and 1847, in which latter year he 
was graduated from that institution. In March, 1847, following 
his own early choice of a profession, he took up the practice of 
medicine in his native town, and he continued that practice until 
1886. For the last twenty years he has given his time and 
attention to his duties as president of the National Bank of 
Laurens, South Carolina. 

On October 7, 1852, he was married at Newberry, to Martha 
Amelia Nance; and of their seven children, five are living in 1907. 

Doctor Barksdale served for two terms in the legislature of 
South Carolina. He was vice-president of the Greenville and 
Laurens railroad when it was organized. He is a Mason. 



14 JOHN A. BARKSDALE 

A member of the Baptist church, he has all his life been 
deeply interested in the development of the Sunday school work 
of his church and his state. The health, of which he has had 
so good a measure for four score years, he attributes in part 
to his fondness for exercise on horseback, his favorite form of 
relaxation. 

In his kindly devotion for forty years to the health and the 
physical welfare of the community in which he resides; in his 
later influence in developing the business interests of the com- 
munity through the administration of the affairs of the bank of 
which he has been president for the last twenty years; and in 
his lifelong interest in bringing the best of influence to bear upon 
the children of the state through Sunday schools and Christian 
training at home, that they may be fitted for good citizenship, 
Doctor Barksdale has shown himself a man of mark, and a true 
son of South Carolina. 

His address is Laurens, South Carolina. 




t 




GEORGE HOLLAND BATES 

BATES, GEORGE HOLLAND, lawyer, state senator, was 
born at Upper Three Buns, in Barnwell (now Aiken) 
county, South Carolina, July 27, 1853. His father, Wil- 
liam T. Bates, was a farmer and a country magistrate, loyal to 
his own conceptions of duty and devoted to the interests of the 
Baptist church, in which he was a deacon. He died at Goldsboro, 
North Carolina, May 13, 1865, a soldier in the Confederate army. 
The earliest known ancestor in America was Michael Bates, who 
came from Germany and before the Revolution settled in what 
is now the lower part of Newberry county. 

His mother died when George Holland Bates was but eight 
years old. As the oldest of the five children, he remained on the 
old homestead with his father, the younger children going to the 
home of their grandmother. As a boy on his father's farm, he 
had daily tasks to do in hoeing cotton, corn, etc., and he says: 
"I always went to work as early as possible, to gain time for 
reading." He attended a number of common schools in the 
country a few months at a time, and later had two years at 
Richland academy. But upon the death of his father, in 1865, 
he also went to reside with his grandmother; and when his only 
surviving uncle was married, in 1872, he was left, at eighteen 
years of age, the oldest male member of a family of ten, charged 
with the responsibility of managing the farm, and, by its man- 
agement, of supporting the family. The disastrous effects of the 
War between the States made it difficult to procure the necessaries 
of life, and the money for a college course he could not command. 
He worked on a farm until he was thirty-one years old, with 
the exception of five months in 1882, when he taught school, and 
a short time in 1883, when he kept a country store, which allowed 
him more time for reading and preparing himself for admission 
to the bar. While he was working on the farm, and before his 
marriage, he had begun to read law under the direction of Major 
John W. Holmes, afterward editor of the "Barnwell People." 
He says that he began reading law against the protest of all his 
relatives; and after his marriage he determined to abandon his 
legal studies, but his wife prevailed upon him to continue them, 



18 GEORGE HOLLAND BATES 

and to the wishes and the steady encouragement of his wife he 
feels that he owes his professional career. He was married at 
Aiken, South Carolina, on February 28, 1878, to Miss Elizabeth 
O. Burckhalter. He feels that he owes his initial impulse to 
begin the study of law to his early school teacher, Major Holmes; 
while the success he has attained he feels is in large measure due 
to his coming into relations with the Honorable Isaac M. Hutson 
and Judge John J. Maher. That other lawyers may be reminded 
afresh of opportunities to help the young, Mr. Bates recalls 
gratefully the fact that "when I opened my law office I had but 
three books in my library; these two gentlemen opened to me 
their law libraries, and rendered me all the help they could." 
In 1886, Mr. Isaac M. Hutson, having recognized the ability of 
Mr. Bates, invited him into a partnership; they practiced law 
together under the firm name of Hutson & Bates until the death 
of Mr. Hutson. In 1889, Mr. Bates formed a partnership with 
Mr. Charles Carroll Simms. 

He has allowed himself to be a candidate for office but twice. 
He was elected a member of the State Constitutional convention 
in 1895, and took an active and helpful part in the work of that 
convention. In 1886 he was elected one of the trustees of the 
Barnwell graded schools; in November, 1890, he was made chair- 
man of the board, and in that position he was continued, not- 
withstanding repeated requests to be excused from further duty, 
until he resigned in January, 1905, to enter upon his duties in 
the state senate. He was also a member of the county board of 
education from December, 1893, until he resigned in 1895. 

In his boyhood he became a member of the Methodist church. 
He was a delegate to the general conference of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, which met at Dallas, Texas, in May, 
1902, and also to its next meeting, held at Birmingham, Alabama, 
in May, 1906. In 1901 he was made a member of the board of 
trustees of the South Carolina college, at Columbia. He is 
president of the Barnwell County Building and Loan association. 
Among social fraternities, he is a Mason, a Knight of Pythias, 
and a Woodman of the World. 

Senator Bates has always had the confidence and the cordial 
esteem of the communities in which he has lived. His devotion 
to his profession has left him little time for sport or amusement, 
but he finds helpful exercise in working in his garden and his 



GEORGE HOLLAND BATES 19 

fruit orchard. He has always been a member of the Democratic 
party, and he holds that it is the duty of every citizen to be 
thoughtful for the welfare of his own community and of his state, 
and to hold himself ready to bear the burdens and discharge 
the duties of good citizenship, even at material cost to his own 
business and his own purely selfish interests. The patriotic spirit 
of devotion to his state which carried his father and four of his 
uncles into the War between the States has always been strong 
in his life, and leads him to public service for the commonwealth 
and the country. 

His address is Barnwell, South Carolina. 



WILLIAM TERTIUS GAPERS BATES 

BATES, WILLIAM TERTIUS CAPEES, physician, 
planter, and state treasurer of South Carolina for three 
terms, was born at Orangeburg, South Carolina, July 16, 
1848. His father, Dr. Rezin W. Bates, a physician and planter, 
had shown his public spirit by service in the legislature of the 
state and as chairman of the committee on roads, bridges and 
ferries. His father's ancestors were originally from England; 
his mother's (Elizabeth Evans) from Wales. 

Doctor Bates passed his boyhood, in which he did not have 
robust health, upon a farm in the country. He was "fond of 
farming and of country scenes and sports." In answer to the 
question, "Did you have in your early life regular tasks which 
involved manual labor?" Doctor Bates replies in a few sentences 
which are sure to commend themselves as truthful to very many 
men who have realized in later life the happy results of such an 
intimate knowledge of plants and animal life as can only be 
gained by a boyhood passed in the country, on a farm, with eyes 
open to the meaning of the daily tasks that keep one close to 
nature. He says: "I was required to assist in tending the farm 
animals, and also in field work. My physical health was benefited 
thereby, and I acquired a practical knowledge of the business of 
farming. I learned the value of money, the use and wisdom of 
economy, self-denial and energy. I learned to love plants and 
flowers and animals; and I learned how to care for them. As 
I am now growing old, I find that this knowledge is useful, 
pleasurable and profitable to me." The strong influence of his 
mother's example and teaching has always been felt in his life. 
While he was a boy, Shakespeare and the Bible became his 
favorite books. 

In 1864, while he was but sixteen, he entered the Confederate 
army. Later he attended the Pine Grove academy, preparing 
there for the South Carolina college; and in 1868 he was grad- 
uated from that college with the degree of M. D. He took post- 
graduate courses at the Bellevue Medical college, New York city, 
1868 to 1869, and again in New York city hospitals in 1883. 
While he continued in active practice he was not satisfied unless 








9 



WILLIAM TERTIUS CAPERS BATES 23 

he made a constant effort to keep abreast of the later discoveries 
and literature in his profession. 

He began the practice of medicine, in May, 1869, at St. 
Matthews, South Carolina. In his choice of this life work he 
was largely influenced by the wishes of his parents. He con- 
tinued the practice of medicine until 1886. In 1881 he located 
in Columbia, South Carolina, and made a specialty of diseases 
of the mind and nervous system. He was unanimously elected 
president of the Richland County Medical society. His health 
failing, he gave up practice, returned to his old home in 1886, 
and the following year became president of the Bank of St. 
Matthews. He was the state treasurer of South Carolina for 
three terms, from November, 1890, to February, 1897 the most 
critical and difficult period in the history of this office. He has 
long been a trustee of the South Carolina college. Three times 
he has served as intendant of St. Matthews. On December 23, 
1872, he married Miss Mary B. Wannamaker. 

At college he was a member of the Chi Psi fraternity. He 
is a Knight of Pythias. In politics he is a Democrat. Doctor 
Bates has always had at heart the improvement of the physical 
condition, the business enterprises and the moral tone of his town. 
He attends the Methodist church. Throughout his life his health 
has been far from robust, and his early retirement from the active 
practice of his profession was due in large part to his health. 
Many of his fellow-citizens of South Carolina would say of 
Doctor Bates as Doctor Bates has written of his own father, that 
he was a man of "strong will-power, uncompromising and deter- 
mined in his stand for principles of righteousness and justice, 
and of untiring energy." 

The address of Dr. Bates is St. Matthews, South Carolina. 



Vol. II. S. C. 2. 



GEORGE DUNCAN BELLINGER 

BELLINGEE, GEOEGE DUNCAN, son of John A. and 
Ann P. Duncan Bellinger, was born November 4, 1856, 
at Barnwell, South Carolina. His father was a lawyer, 
a man of amiability and courage ; he was lieutenant in Lancaster's 
company, Brown's regiment, and, in 1863, was killed at James 
Island, South Carolina, being but thirty years of age. 

The Bellingers are descended from the Bellinghams, of 
Bellingham, in Northumberland, and have kept their identity 
separate and distinct since 1475, when Walter Bellinger was 
created Ireland King at Arms, and granted the coat-of-arms 
"Argent, a Saltire engrailed sable, entre four roses, Gules." The 
earliest known ancestor in America of the family, Edmund 
Bellinger, of Westmoreland county, England, settled on James 
Island in 1674. He was commander of the ship Blake, Royal 
navy, in 1697; April 1, 1698, he became surveyor-general of the 
Carolinas; and on May 7, 1698, he was created landgrave. 

Mr. Bellinger's grandfather, Edmund Bellinger, Jr., lawyer 
and legislator, was, by order of the legislature, author of 
"Bellinger on Elections" ; he was also a member of the celebrated 
Nullification convention of 1832. 

George Duncan Bellinger's early life was passed in a village; 
as a boy he was not robust. No regular duties were required 
of him; but he was allowed to spend his time practically in 
accordance with his own wishes. He early developed a taste 
for scientific subjects, especially those pertaining to physics and 
psychology. 

At the age of four years he suffered an irreparable loss in 
the death of his mother, and, as stated, at six that of his father. 
The chief influences in molding his life have been the school and 
contact with the active world of work. He was fortunate in the 
possession of educational advantages, the means to complete a 
college course being furnished him by a distant relative. On the 
14th of June, 1879, he was graduated from Furman university 
with the degree of A. B. The subjects which most interested 
him during his student life were mental philosophy, biology and 
sociology. Following his college course, Mr. Bellinger entered 




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HEW 

PUBLIC LI 







GEORGE DUNCAN BELLINGER 27 

upon the study of law under the direction of Judge J. J. Maher, 
finishing in 1880. His active life work began in December, 1880, 
when he began the practice of law in Barnwell, South Carolina. 
Here he continued until January, 1903, when he removed to 
Columbia. 

In 1882, Mr. Bellinger became a member of the legislature 
of South Carolina; from 1883 to 1892 he was master for Barn- 
well county; from 1892 to 1898 he was solicitor of the second 
circuit ; from 1898 to 1902, attorney-general of the state ; in 1903 
he was made special circuit judge; in 1904 he became trustee of 
Clemson college; in 1895 he was a member of the Constitutional 
convention of the state; from 1883 to 1890 he was mayor of 
Barnwell; from 1890 to 1892, secretary of the State Democratic 
executive committee, and, until recently, chairman of the execu- 
tive committee of the Democratic party of Barnwell county. 

Mr. Bellinger may, with justice, be styled one of the makers 
of the state of South Carolina; in the Constitutional convention 
of 1895 he was chairman of the committee on jurisprudence, and 
was the author of the entire article VI, sections 2, 4, 5 and 6 
being without precedent. In the convention he introduced an 
ordinance to prevent lynching and to punish by removal and 
disfranchisement sheriffs, constables and other officers who per- 
mitted lynching to occur. This ordinance was emasculated and 
changed to what now appears as section 6 of article VI. During 
the last twelve years Mr. Bellinger has also participated in some 
of the most important criminal prosecutions in his state. He 
conducted the prosecution of the Broxton Bridge lynchers at 
Walterboro and Aiken in 1896 ; was leading counsel in the prose- 
cution, in 1904, of James H. Tillman for the murder of Editor 
Gonzales, and also in the prosecution and conviction, in 1901, of 
W. A. Neal, superintendent of the South Carolina penitentiary. 
He is now practicing his profession at Columbia, South Carolina, 
with R. H. Welch, the firm being Bellinger & Welch. 

Mr. Bellinger is a chapter Mason, a member of the Knights 
of Pythias, of the Odd Fellows, the Elks, and the Commercial 
club at Charleston. He has also held the position of first chan- 
cellor commander of Lodge No. 16 of the Knights of Pythias. 
As indicated, Mr. Bellinger is a Democrat, this party having, 
from the beginning of his voting, claimed his allegiance and 



28 GEORGE DUNCAN BELLINGER 

suffrage. In religion he is a Baptist. His rest and recreation 
he finds in reading, gardening and the raising of chickens. 

A sketch of Mr. Bellinger appears in "Eminent Men of 
South Carolina," and also in the book published by J. C. Gar- 
lington. Further data regarding his life and work may be found 
in the files of "The News and Courier" and "The State" and 
"Register," and in the proceedings of the Constitutional conven- 
tion of 1895, the records of the Broxton Bridge trial in the 
spring of 1896, the history of the memorable campaign of 1896, 
and in the records of the second trial of the Broxton Bridge 
case, at Aiken, in November, 1896. 

On June 7, 1881, Mr. Bellinger married Miss Fannie J. 
O'Bannon. They have had seven children, five of whom are now 
(1907) living. 

Mr. Bellinger's address is "Shandon," Columbia, South Caro- 
lina. 



JOSEPH HUIET BOUKNIGHT 

BOUKNIGHT, JOSEPH HUIET, since 1891 president of 
the Bank of Johnston, was born on Mt. Willing planta- 
tion, Edgefield county, South Carolina, November 25, 
1840. His father, William Bouknight, was a planter, a man of 
fine public spirit, "punctual and energetic, patient and amiable, 
and generous to a fault," who held no public offices, but in the 
conduct of his own affairs showed marked executive ability. His 
mother, Nancy Huiet, died while he was very young; and he has 
always felt keenly the loss which left his boyhood without a 
mother's influence. The ancestry of his father and mother was 
German. John Bouknight and Jacob Huiet emigrated from 
Germany, and before 1775 settled in Lexington county, South 
Carolina. 

He knew a healthy and vigorous boyhood; and his interest 
in all out-of-door sports, and especially in hunting, was keen. 
His early life was passed on his father's plantation, where he 
was not charged with any special cares or responsibilities save in 
his studies and in the full development of all his physical powers. 
He was a student at the Lutheran college at Newberry, and at 
the Arsenal in Columbia, and he "was graduated at the Citadel 
in Charleston, South Carolina, with the class of 1864." He has 
served in the battalion of Citadel cadets for one year. At the 
close of the War between the States, in 1865, he became the 
manager of his father's plantation in Edgefield county, his own 
personal preference as well as the wishes of his father leading 
him to this choice of a life work. 

While Mr. Bouknight has devoted himself steadily to the 
duties of business life, he has taken a broad interest in the public 
affairs of his community, and not only in the conduct of his own 
business, but in his relations to the business of other men, through 
his position as president of the Bank of Johnston since 1891, 
and as a director of the Bank of Edgefield since 1890, he has 
contributed in many ways to the advancement and prosperity of 
his county and state. 

On October 23, 1889, he married Miss Emma Bettis, daughter 
of Benjamin and Elizabeth Bettis, of Edgefield county. They 



30 JOSEPH HUIET BOUKNIGHT 

have four children three sons and one daughter. In tracing the 
influences which have contributed to his own usefulness in life, 
Mr. Bouknight places first "the home, and especially the influence 
of my father" ; then he mentions the acquaintance and the influ- 
ence of "The Citadel" at Charleston, and contact with men in 
active life, as inspiring and determining influences in his career. 
His life as a planter and farmer led him to take an early interest 
in the development of the agriculture of his state. He is a life 
member of the South Carolina Agricultural society. His political 
affiliations have always been with the Democratic party. In 
religious convictions he is with the Methodist church. He has 
been fond of exercise on horseback; and he also finds relaxation 
and amusement in driving, and in reading current literature. 

If he were asked to suggest to the boys and young men of 
his state the two qualities which would most certainly contribute 
to their success in life, he would name "honesty and punctuality." 

The address of Mr. Bouknight is Johnston, South Carolina. 




ic: 




/ & 




DAVID FRANKLIN BRADLEY 

BRADLEY, DAVID FRANKLIN, editor of the "Pickens 
Sentinel," member of the house of representatives of 
South Carolina from 1874 to 1878, and of the senate of 
South Carolina from 1878 to 1882, has been actively identified 
with the development of the material interests and the social and 
political welfare of his county and state for the last forty years. 
He was born at Pickens, on the 5th of September, 1842, the son 
of Joel Bradley, a farmer, captain and major in the state militia, 
a man remembered as "scrupulously honest, and charitable." His 
great-grandfather, Asa Bradley, was of English descent and had 
settled in Virginia before the Revolutionary war. 

Reared on a farm, early learning to do all kinds of work 
usually required of a farmer's boy, in his boyhood he had good 
health, and he found his strongest interests (apart from farm 
work) in reading and hunting. His mother, whose influence on 
his moral and spiritual life has always been strong, early imparted 
to him a love for the Bible and an interest in reading history. 
His opportunities for study in school were few, and his education 
he acquired chiefly through private reading, and later by himself 
teaching school; but he feels that the most valuable part of his 
education has come to him through his experience as an editor in 
publishing a newspaper. His work as a man he began as school 
commissioner of Pickens county, and a little later as the founder 
and subsequently the editor of the "Pickens Sentinel." He 
entered the Southern army soon after the outbreak of the War 
between the States, and served from 1861 to 1864, as private, 
orderly sergeant, and lieutenant. He was in many engagements, 
and he was wounded three times. He lost his left arm in the 
battle of the Wilderness. 

After the war, the breadth of his interest in all that con- 
cerned his community and his county is shown in the fact that 
he was not only farmer, school commissioner, and publisher and 
editor of a newspaper, but he also represented his county in the 
South Carolina house of representatives from 1874 to 1878, and 
in the state senate from 1878 to 1882. He was for six years a 
director of the penitentiary of the state; he was collector of 



34 DAVID FRANKLIN BRADLEY 

internal revenue during Cleveland's first administration; he has 
long served as school trustee; he is a director in the Easley cotton 
mill, and was formerly president of a cotton and oil mill, as well 
as director in other corporations. He is a member of the Pres- 
byterian church, and a ruling elder in that body. He finds his 
amusement and relaxation in reading and in social intercourse 
with his neighbors. From his earliest manhood he has been 
identified with the Democratic party, as citizen and editor. He 
has felt it his duty to "contribute what influence and ability he 
possessed in helping to rid the state of carpet-bag and negro 
domination, and in shaping legislation for the upbuilding of the 
state after the white people had gained the ascendancy again." 

On November 3, 1865, he married Miss Mary Barbara 
Breazeale. 

His life illustrates the wide reach of influence for good which 
is possible for the editor of a newspaper who will devote himself 
in all right ways to the public service. 




- 





PETER LINDSY BREEDEN 

BREEDEN, PETER LINDSY, merchant and planter, of 
Bennettsville, Marlboro county, South Carolina, was born 
in that county on November 24, 1832, the son of a planter, 
Linclsy Breeden, who was county commissioner, school trustee, 
etc., and in his private business had uniformly shown himself 
public-spirited, energetic and practical. His ancestors had come 
from England and settled in Maryland and Virginia in ante- 
Revolutionary times. 

Of delicate health in his boyhood, he felt from his earliest 
years an interest in "trade and all things that pertain to trade." 
He says that his early life was passed "in the country, working 
on a farm, where I did any and everything that came to hand 
except ditch and split rails, and I guess it was the making of me." 
His schooling was limited to two or three months in each year, 
in a poorly taught country school. But he qualified himself to 
become (in 1853) the teacher of a country school. He feels that 
home, industry, and contact with energetic, successful and honor- 
able business men, have been the strongest influences in his life. 

In 1855 he became clerk in a general merchandise business 
at Bennettsville. At the outbreak of the War between the States 
he entered the Southern army and served for four years. He 
was captain of Company E, Fourth South Carolina volunteers, 
cavalry, and was wounded at Hawes Shop, Virginia, May 28, 
1864. Returning to Bennettsville, he engaged again in trade; 
and he has been identified with many of the most important 
business enterprises of his town and county. 

With others he contributed money to organize and start what 
is now the graded school of Bennettsville. In 1883 he was elected 
president of the South Carolina Pacific railroad. The ground 
had not been broken. Nothing had been done. He conducted 
negotiations with the Cape Fear and Yadkin Valley railroad; 
closed contracts and went to work; and by the end of 1884 he 
had the road ready for business. He was a stockholder and 
director of the first oil mill in Bennettsville. He contributed to 
the capital of the first cotton mill, assisted in its organization, 
and was a director from the time it was started until the merger 



38 PETER LINDSY BREEDEN 

of cotton mill interests in 1903. For the last twenty years, and 
since its organization, he has been a director and stockholder in 
the Bank of Marlboro, and he is now vice-president of that bank. 
He has also served as county commissioner; he has been mayor 
and alderman of his town in past years, and has declined to serve 
again in these positions, believing that it is wiser to "make 
way for younger and more active men." He has never been a 
candidate for a place in the state legislature, but has declined 
repeatedly when solicited to accept a nomination, and once, when 
without his consent he had been nominated for the legislature, 
he refused to run. 

He believes in "doing his part in a quiet way" for the public 
welfare and the political interests of his town and county. 

Connected with the Democratic party; a Mason for forty- 
three years ; and inclined by religious conviction to the Methodist 
church; he has found his exercise and relaxation in riding, 
driving and "looking after his business and his surroundings." 

The degree of success which he has attained as a business 
man and a public-spirited citizen should command attention to 
this advice which he offers to young Carolinians : "Be honest and 
truthful; keep sober; be ambitious to excel; practice economy; 
cultivate energy; and give your entire time and thoughts and 
strength to your undertakings ; if you do this, and are helped by 
a little common sense, I guarantee success in whatever line you 
choose. Always keep good company." 

His address is Bennettsville, Marlboro county, South Caro- 
lina. 



ASHBEL GREEN BRIGE 

BRICE, ASHBEL GREEN, lawyer, was born in Chester 
county, South Carolina, April 7, 1854. His parents were 
Robert Wilson and Anna M. (Steele) Brice. His father 
was a minister of the Associate Reformed Presbyterian church, 
a man of strong mind, excellent judgment and high character, a 
leading minister of the section and highly esteemed not only by 
his congregation but also by all who knew him. His mother, a 
graduate of the Female seminary, Washington, Pennsylvania, 
was a woman of excellent qualities of mind and heart, who 
exerted a strong influence for good in the community in which 
she lived. The earlier ancestors of Mr. Brice were of Scotch- 
Irish blood. Several of them settled in the upper part of South 
Carolina, and were influential in the early days of the state. 
His paternal great-grandfather emigrated from County Antrim, 
Ireland, and settled in Fairfield county about 1780. He was a 
tailor by trade and became a large land owner. He married 
Jane, a daughter of Robert Wilson, who was then living in the 
vicinity and was said to belong to the family of Wilsons who 
came from Ireland in 1733 and settled in Williamsburg county. 
Robert Wilson was an earnest patriot. He was so severely tor- 
tured by the Tories that the scars which resulted from his injuries 
remained until his death. 

The grandfather of the subject of this sketch was born in 
1791 ; married Margaret Simonton, whose father came to South 
Carolina from Pennsylvania, during the Revolutionary war, 
intending to join the Continental army under General Greene, 
but instead he joined the command of General Sumter, and took 
part in the battle of Brattonsville and other engagements in the 
state. He had twelve children, all of whom lived to maturity 
and left descendants. The father of Ashbel Brice was born July 
2, 1826, was graduated from Erskine college and studied theology 
at Erskine seminary and at Allegheny, Pennsylvania. He was 
married, March 4, 1850, to Anna M. Steele, whose father, the 
Reverend John Steele, was a noted minister of the Associate 
Reformed Presbyterian church. 



42 ASHBEL GREEN BRICE 

Ashbel Brice spent his childhood and youth in the country 
and on a farm. In accordance with the custom of the time, his 
father, though a minister, was also a farmer, as the meager salary 
paid in those days was not sufficient to enable the preacher to 
support a family. Ashbel was one of ten children and from very 
early years was engaged in the work that falls to a boy on a farm. 
In his eleventh year the war closed, and as the negroes had been 
made free, he was obliged to take up a regular course of farm 
work. He paid special attention to the care of live stock, and 
worked in the garden, but in his sixteenth year he took his place 
as a full plough hand in the field. He had little time for social 
enjoyment, and, as the neighborhood was sparsely settled, he had 
very few companions of his own age. He was taught by his 
mother and did not attend school until after his sixteenth year, 
when he began to prepare for college. The particular pleasures 
of his boyhood he mentions as going to singing school after the 
summer crops were laid by, attending an occasional wedding, and 
the infrequent gatherings of the younger people of the com- 
munity. At this time he read but few books, but was deeply 
interested in the daily papers. He studied for awhile in the 
neighborhood schools, and in the autumn of 1872 he entered the 
sophomore class of Erskine college. In the sophomore and junior 
years he stood first in his class, and in the senior year he won 
three of the five medals that had been offered to the class. After 
he was graduated he taught school one year in Newberry county. 
In December, 1876, he began the study of law in the office of 
Colonel James H. Eion, at Winnsboro, South Carolina. The 
following year he was admitted to practice and opened an office 
in Winnsboro, but his father's health having failed, he soon 
returned to the old home, where he remained until his father's 
death, in March, 1878. He managed the farm during most of 
that year, but in November he commenced law practice in Chester, 
and in January, 1879, he permanently located in that town. 

Mr. Brice never sought practice in the criminal courts and 
has appeared in only a few cases in the court of sessions, pre- 
ferring to give his time and attention to civil cases. He was 
of a quiet and somewhat retiring disposition, but he soon gained 
the confidence of the community and there was only a brief period 
of waiting for clients. During the last twenty-five years he has 
appeared in a large proportion of the most important civil cases 



ASHBEL GREEN BRICE 43 

tried at the Chester bar, and, either alone or in connection with 
local counsel, he has taken part in the trial of many cases in 
the courts of neighboring counties. From December, 1893, to 
January, 1900, he was general counsel of the Carolina and North- 
western railway. During this time he planned and secured the 
reorganization of the old Chester and Lenoir railroad, now the 
Carolina and Northwestern railway, and thereby enabled the 
home people who had built the road to save most of the money 
which they had invested therein. He was counsel in matters 
pertaining both to the reorganization of the company and to the 
operation of the road, and, with the assistance of local counsel, 
had charge of all the litigation for and against the company in 
South and North Carolina. He was one of the original directors 
of the Exchange bank, of Chester, and for most of the time from 
its organization to December, 1899, was its legal adviser. On the 
date last named he was elected president of the Commercial bank, 
of Chester, which had just been organized, and he retains this 
position at the present time (1907). He has been a director in 
several other business and manufacturing corporations in or near 
Chester, and has also maintained his legal practice. 

In December, 1883, Mr. Brice was married to Miss Sallie L. 
Miller, youngest daughter of the Reverend Doctor John and Mrs. 
Sarah (Pressly) Miller, of Camden, Alabama. She is a woman 
of highly cultured intellect, varied accomplishments and untiring 
energy. Adding to these a happy disposition, she has proven a 
true helpmeet to her husband, and is the center of a circle of 
helpful services in the social and church life of her adopted city 
and state. 

By nature and disposition Mr. Brice has never been an active 
politician, but he has always voted and acted with the Democratic 
party. In 1892, without solicitation on his part, he was elected 
to the legislature from his county. He served in the regular 
sessions of 1892 and 1893, and then in January, 1894, resigned his 
office, for the reason that holding it interfered with his privileges 
as general counsel of a railway company, which position he had 
recently accepted. In the fall of 1894 he was strongly solicited 
to stand for reelection, but declined to be a candidate. In Novem- 
ber, 1906, he was again elected a member of the state legislature. 

Mr. Brice has always been an active advocate of free common 
school education. He has served for many years on the board 



44 ASHBEL GREEN BRICE 

of school trustees in his city, and for the most of the time as its 
chairman. He has shown a sincere interest in the elevation and 
education of the colored race. Without solicitation or suggestion 
from himself, he was elected by the legislature one of the trustees 
of the Industrial and Mechanical college for negroes when it was 
organized in 1896, and has by reelection since served on this 
board. 

Like many people of Scotch-Irish descent, Mr. Brice was 
reared in the Associate Reformed Presbyterian church. He has 
long been a member and officer of that body, and after the death 
of his father, in 1878, he was elected to succeed him as treasurer 
of the synod, and up to the present time he has managed the 
general and home mission funds of that body with marked 
success. While loyal to his church and her institutions, he has 
always recognized the full equality and fraternity of all other 
evangelical churches, and is catholic and conservative in his views 
of religion. He has a clear and logical mind and a sound and 
discriminating judgment; is conscientious, careful and pains- 
taking in all his work; and is recognized by the bar as a safe 
and strong lawyer. He is a man of decided character, and he 
stands for law and order in all things. In disposition he is 
retiring and modest, but he is firm and courageous in the perform- 
ance of every duty. Strict morals, plodding industry, practical 
economy and an abiding faith are the elements that lie at the 
foundation of the success he has made of life. 

The address of Mr. Brice is Chester, South Carolina. 



JAMES ALBERT BROCK 

BROCK, JAMES ALBERT, son of Andrew J. and Eliza- 
beth Ann Brock, was born in Anderson county, South 
Carolina, February 11, 1847. His father was a merchant, 
characterized by generosity, fair dealing, and a disposition to 
oblige. 

Mr. Brock's paternal great-grandfather, Reuben Brock, 
migrated from Scotland to Virginia in the seventeenth century, 
moving later to South Carolina. Mr. Brock's maternal grand- 
parents also came from Virginia. 

Albert enjoyed a normal boyhood, the first seven years of 
his life being spent on a farm, the next ten in a village. He was 
healthy and strong. His reading was directed by his mother, by 
whom his attention was early turned to the Bible. Her influence 
on his life, intellectual, moral and spiritual, and especially on the 
latter, was strong and helpful. 

Young Brock obtained an education only through difficulties. 
The war came at the time when the youth should have been in 
school; and the absence of the father and older brother in the 
army required that Albert should help support the family. His 
active life work began in 1860, when he became clerk to a mer- 
chant in Honea Path, South Carolina. In entering upon this 
work he was not following a special bent, but simply accepting 
what offered. In 1866 he began bookkeeping in Anderson. In 
1869 he accepted the position of auditor and paymaster of the 
Greenville and Columbia railroad, removing to Columbia. He 
was elected cashier of the bank in Anderson in 1872; eighteen 
years later he was made president of the bank. In 1889 the 
Anderson Cotton mills were organized, and he was elected presi- 
dent. In 1903 he was elected president of the Brogon mills, and 
in 1904 was made president of the Anderson Traction company, 
organized at that time. He was also president of the Anderson 
Oil and Fertilizer company for sixteen years until its absorption, 
in 1901, by the Anderson Phosphate and Oil company. 

Mr. Brock is also a director of the Bank of Anderson, the 
Citizens bank of Honea Path, the Anderson Cotton mills, the 
Brogon mills, the Toxaway mills, the Charleston and Western 



48 JAMES ALBERT BROCK 

Carolina railroad, the Baltimore Mutual Fire Insurance company, 
the Anderson Phosphate and Oil company, the Anderson Traction 
company, the Anderson Real Estate and Improvement company, 
the Anderson Real Estate and Investment company, the Acme 
Drug company, the Anderson Water, Light and Power company, 
and the Standard Warehouse company. 

Eor years Mr. Brock has been prominent in business circles 
of his state. Under his able management the National Bank of 
Anderson enjoyed remarkable success, attaining third rank among 
the banks of the South and seventh in the United States as to 
the book value of its stock. His business career has been marked 
by unusual activity and success, and his life characterized by 
integrity and usefulness in every sphere of duty, his church, the 
Baptist, of which he is an active and official member, not excepted. 
In politics he is a Democrat. He is also a member of the Masonic 
fraternity. His advice to the young is: "Be religious; acquire 
good habits, and deal uprightly always, as the merited good 
opinion and confidence of leading men in a community is most 
helpful to young men in life's battle." 

Mr. Brock has been twice married: first, in 1873, to Miss 
Copeland, who died eighteen months later; second, in 1881, to 
Mrs. Davis, nee Reed. One child was born of each marriage; 
both are now (1907) living. 

Mr. Brock's address is 708 McDuffie street, Anderson, Ander- 
son county, South Carolina. 



PAUL THOMAS BRODIE 

BRODIE, PAUL THOMAS, A. B., B. S., educator, and 
civil engineer, was born near Leesville, Lexington county, 
South Carolina, January 11, 1866, the son of T. F. Brodie 
and Claudia Quattlebaum. His father was an enterprising and 
successful business man, and at the time of his death, in 1871, 
was senior member of the firms of T. F. Brodie & Company, 
lumber manufacturers and dealers, and Brodie & Company, cotton 
factors, in the city of Charleston, South Carolina. His marked 
characteristics were gentleness and a retiring manner, coupled 
with soundness of judgment, steadiness of purpose, and a personal 
integrity that gained him recognition, wherever known, as the 
"soul of honor." Before his death, however, he was led to make 
business connections so unfortunate that, after his demise, his 
family suffered the loss of almost all of the estate he had formed. 
The paternal ancestors were Scotch, of the Brodie clan; the 
maternal, German. The paternal great-grandfather left his home 
in Scotland about 1780 and settled in Charleston, South Carolina. 
The maternal great great-grandfather settled in North Carolina 
before the Revolution. The maternal grandfather of the subject 
of this sketch, General Paul Quattlebaum, was an officer in the 
Florida war, was a signer of the ordinance of secession, and was 
for many years prominent in state affairs. He died in 1890. 
Owing to the losses referred to, young Brodie suffered embar- 
rassments in acquiring an education and establishing himself in 
life. But his love of knowledge was decided; and the influence 
of a noble mother, glad to make every sacrifice for the good of 
her children, was an unfailing source of inspiration and encour- 
agement. After the death of the father the family made their 
home with the grandfather Quattlebaum at his country residence 
near Leesville, South Carolina. Here young Brodie gained much 
practical information. He learned to do mending in the black- 
smith shop at pleasure, acquired skill in working machinery in 
the flouring and saw mills, and early became interested in elemen- 
tary hydraulics and other engineering, all of which were to his 
taste. His grandfather, though self-educated, was a practical 
engineer in good standing, and before going to college young 

Vol. II. S. C. 3. 



50 PAUL THOMAS BRODIE 

Brodie acquired considerable technical knowledge by association 
with him, both in the field and in the office. His uncle, Colonel 
P. J. Quattlebaum, of the United States corps of engineers, also 
favored him with aid and encouragement. 

After studying at home for some years he won, by competi- 
tive examination, a cadetship in the South Carolina Military 
academy. But lacking the advantages of good health and ade- 
quate preparation, he soon left the military academy and entered 
with zeal upon a course of systematic study in Stuart's Classical 
academy, at Charleston. Later he entered Furman university, 
at Greenville, South Carolina, and in 1887 was graduated with 
the degrees of A. B. and B. S., having devoted special attention 
to the study of mathematics under the noted Dr. C. H. Judson. 
Choosing teaching as a profession, he first accepted the principal- 
ship of the Lewiedale high school. After a year's service there 
he was elected superintendent of the Lexington graded schools, 
serving in that capacity for four years. In June, 1891, he became 
superintendent of the Spartanburg city schools, remaining there 
from 1891 to 1895. While engaged in school work he devoted 
himself earnestly to the study of higher mathematics and civil 
engineering, spending the vacations in post-graduate work in the 
higher universities. In December, 1895, he was elected assistant 
professor of mathematics in Clemson college; in 1897 he was 
placed in charge of the civil engineering course; and in 1899 he 
became professor of mathematics and civil engineering, which 
position he now (1907) holds. His success he modestly ascribes 
in a considerable measure to the generous help accorded him by 
his grandfather Quattlebaum ; by Doctor C. H. Judson, who was 
to him an unfailing source of inspiration while a student at 
Furman university, not forgetting the skilful instruction afforded 
him by Dr. W. M. Thornton, of the University of Virginia, and 
others, while devoting his energies to the work of a preparation 
for his chosen profession. 

Though engaged principally in teaching, Professor Brodie 
has done considerable engineering work of merit. He has also 
served as a member of boards of education, as instructor in 
teachers' institutes, as professor of mathematics in the state sum- 
mer school, and as state director for the National Educational 
association. His writings have been chiefly in the form of brief 
articles on mathematical and engineering subjects. He is a 



PAUL THOMAS BRODIE 51 

member of the Kappa Alpha fraternity, and of the American 
Association for the Advancement of Science, engineering section. 
He was president of Clemson College Science club, and of the 
South Carolina State Teachers' association, in 1905. He is a 
member of the Baptist church. In politics he is a Democrat. 

He was married, June 30, 1891, to Miss Isabel Bradford. 
They have one son, Oren B. Brodie, aged fifteen, and an infant 
daughter, Isabel, living in 1907. 

The address of Professor Brodie is Clemson College, South 
Carolina. 



GEORGE WASHINGTON BROWN 

BROWN, GEORGE WASHINGTON, of Darlington, South 
Carolina, was born in Lancaster, July 22, 1857. His 
father, Daniel W. Brown, was a planter, a man of gen- 
erous and sympathetic nature, and open, frank disposition, quick 
to resent, and quick to forgive. The earliest one of Mr. Brown's 
known paternal ancestors in this country was Michael Hamilton, 
of the Scottish clan of the McDonalds of Glencoe, who settled 
in Massachusetts in 1712. Daniel McDonald removed from 
Massachusetts to South Carolina in 1720, and took land on both 
sides of the Catawba river, at a place which has been known for 
generations as Brown's Ferry. One of his sons, William, was a 
sergeant in the Colonial army in the War of the Revolution. 
From another son, Middleton, George W. Brown is descended; 
his family being thus of Scotch- Irish extraction. 

On his mother's side, Mr. Brown is descended from English 
ancestry through the Barnes family which settled in Massachu- 
setts in 1630, just ten years after the landing of the Pilgrims. 
The Southern branch of the family settled in Maryland in 1700, 
and furnished names which were conspicuous on the rolls of honor 
in the Revolutionary and the Mexican wars. Mr. Brown's uncle, 
Honorable Dixon Barnes, represented Lancaster county in the 
state senate, was colonel of the Twelfth South Carolina regiment 
in the War between the States, and was killed in the battle of 
Sharpsburg in 1862. 

Enjoying fairly robust health in his youth, George W. Brown 
entered heartily into such outdoor sports as hunting, riding and 
fishing, and had the healthy boy's love of books of adventure. 
Most of his time during these years was spent at his home in 
Lancaster, until in 1872 he entered Wofford college, from which 
he was graduated four years later with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. 

Mr. Brown feels that he owes much of the best inspiration 
of his life's achievement to the professors under whom he studied 
in Wofford college, and especially to the two college presidents 
there, Dr. A. M. Shipp and Dr. James H. Carlisle. The influence 
of men like these deeply influenced his life and character, while 
contact with men of prominence in active business and profes- 



GEORGE WASHINGTON BROWN 53 

sional pursuits since his youth has acted as a stimulus to personal 
ambition. But back of the influences of college days was the 
enduring power of the pure and wholesome surroundings of his 
home and his early school. In Mr. Brown's view, it is ultimately 
the influence of home which is predominant and ineradicable. 

After graduating from college, Mr. Brown studied law at 
intervals, as he had opportunity, under W. A. Moore, of Lan- 
caster, and A. C. Spain, of Darlington. While studying law, 
he was at the same time acting as principal of the school at 
Timmonsville (1877-78). In September, 1878, he removed to 
Darlington, and for a year acted as deputy clerk of court, in the 
meantime pursuing his legal studies. After September, 1879, he 
devoted his entire time to the study of law until his admission 
to the bar in May, 1880. Four years previously, when he was 
nineteen years of age, though at the time neither a candidate nor 
an aspirant for public office, he had spoken upon every political 
platform in the county of Lancaster in furtherance of the great 
movement for good government in 1876. After his removal to 
Darlington, in 1878, Mr. Brown for many years was secretary 
and treasurer of the county executive committee of the Demo- 
cratic party, until, on the retirement of Mr. John W. Williamson 
as chairman of the executive committee, Mr. Brown succeeded 
him in that office, which he held until 1886. 

He was a member of the South Carolina house of represen- 
tatives from 1884 to 1886. He served as state senator for two 
terms, from 1898 to 1902, and again from 1902 to 1906. In 
connection with his senatorial duties he was a member of such 
important committees as the judiciary committee, and the com- 
mittee on education, of which latter he was chairman. While 
in the senate he was an ex officio trustee of South Carolina college 
and of the Winthrop Normal and Industrial college. He was 
elected major (line officer) of the Fourth regiment of South 
Carolina militia, and later was lieutenant-colonel of the same 
regiment, until his resignation in 1890. 

Mr. Brown has always retained his interest in such active, 
outdoor sports as hunting and fishing. His genial disposition 
and social qualities have led to his membership in many fraternal 
organizations, including the Free Masons. He has been twice 
married: in 1881, to Minnie Caldwell Lawrence, of Tuscaloosa, 
Alabama; and September 14, 1892, to Harriet Mclver Ervin. 

His address is Darlington, South Carolina. 



RANDOLPH RIDGELY BROWN 

BROWN, RANDOLPH RIDGELY, manufacturer, and 
man of affairs, was born April 14, 1847, near the site of 
Pacolet mills, in the county that has always been his 
home; the son of William P. and Milbry (Jones) Brown, and 
grandson of John Brown, who came from England to Virginia 
and removed to Spartanburg county at the age of fourteen. 
William P. Brown was a man of strong Christian character, a 
close student of the Bible, a hard and constant worker, and it 
was natural that the son should be trained in habits of faithful 
industry. At the same time, the mother's influence was most 
marked in his intellectual as well as moral and religious develop- 
ment. To these home influences, which have remained with him 
through his later life, he attributes his success, especially as 
manifested in his repeated appointment to positions of honor and 
responsibility. 

As the War between the States called for renewed sacrifices 
by the citizens of the state, he joined a number of other young 
men and gave a year of service in the army, first as private, then 
as corporal. When mustered out, in common with others, he faced 
the general destitution; but, with high ambition, he set himself 
to contribute his share to the solution of the hard problems with 
which his people had to deal. He had always had a taste for 
mercantile life, and entered upon it in Union county in 1868. 
He now began to reap the advantage of his reading on agriculture 
and manufacturing. Turning his attention to the manufacture 
of cotton goods, he occupied successive positions, of increasing 
responsibility, successfully, and since 1890 he has been president 
and treasurer of the Cowpens Manufacturing company. He is 
also vice-president of the Merchants and Planters bank, Gaffney, 
South Carolina, and director of the First National and American 
National banks, Spartanburg, South Carolina. 

Broadened by contact with men in active life, he has taken 
a deep interest in public matters, and has been repeatedly called 
to the mayoralty of his native city, furnishing a notable illus- 
tration of the type of man to whom South Carolina owes much. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 






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RANDOLPH RIDGELY BROWN 57 

He is a member of the Baptist church. In politics he is a 
Democrat. 

He was married April 14, 1874, to Louisa H. Wood. They 
have had six children, of whom four are living in 1907. 

The secret of his own success is found in his counsel to young 
men, "to seize every opportunity by the forelock; closely apply 
themselves to duty; lead Christian lives, and use every moment 
to some benefit." 

His address is Cowpens, Spartanburg county, South Carolina. 



WILLIAM ALEXANDER BROWN 

BROWN, WILLIAM ALEXANDER, planter, legislator, 
and member of the state board of education, was born in 
Marion, South Carolina, the son of Travis Foster Brown, 
a farmer, "public-spirited, religious, very successful, and a lover 
of education." His mother, Martha Baker Brown, died while 
he was an infant. Her ancestors, coming from England, were 
among the early settlers in Marion county. His great-grand- 
father, William Baker, served as colonel in the Revolutionary 
war. 

Since Mr. Brown is best known throughout his native state 
as an advocate of the best attainable public schools for all the 
children, and has done much to influence the public sentiment of 
his state in favor of compulsory education, and of the provision 
of uniform text-books (free to needy children) in all the public 
schools, and in favor of centralizing country schools and trans- 
porting children to such schools in wagonettes it is interesting 
to see how important was the part played in his own boyhood by 
determined effort to secure an education, and how steadily his 
father and the boy himself made the attainment of an education 
for the young a consideration of the first importance in all their 
plans. 

Mr. Brown says of himself : "There has been nothing striking 
or unusual in my life. It has been one of constant labor. Early 
in life my father taught me to employ all my time in doing some- 
thing." "I was about fourteen years old when my father went 
into the army. A younger brother and myself were the only 
members of the family at home. With a trusty old negro, whom 
my father had employed, I managed the large farm and about 
fifty negroes. When my father was not in the war it was my 
almost daily occupation to take an old gray mule and buggy and 
carry a part of their journey soldiers who were on their way 
home or who were returning to the army. At the close of the 
war we were almost broken up; but my father never became 
discouraged. He went to work, and we helped him. My father 
and I worked and denied ourselves that I might attend college. 
He was anxious and determined, above all else, to educate his 



WILLIAM ALEXANDER BROWN 59 

children. I went to the Marion high school for a few months, 
and then to Wofford preparatory school for one year, and then 
to Wofford college, from which I was graduated in June, 1874, 
receiving from my class the honor of delivering the valedictory. 
During the entire four years at college I did not miss a single 
roll call or chapel service." 

After leaving college, Mr. Brown taught for two years, 
intending to take up the study and practice of medicine. Health 
failed him. He began farming, "with the poorest sort of a 
prospect of success." He says: "I bought an old mule for forty- 
five dollars, did my own ploughing, made eight bales of cotton. 
From this I began to enlarge my farm, and every year made 
something clear." In 1880 he was elected to the legislature, 
serving two years; and he was elected again in 1884. In 1892 
he was elected to the state senate, and in 1896 he was reflected 
senator. 

He married Miss Eliza Clark, November 27, 1889. They 
have four children living in 1907. 

He served for four years on the state board of education. 
While in the state senate he was for six years chairman of the 
senate committee upon education. 

He is a member of the Methodist church. He is identified 
with the Democratic party. He attributes his early determina- 
tion to succeed in life more to the example of his father and to 
close intercourse with him than to any other source. 

Among the citizens of South Carolina who have seen most 
distinctly that the best interests of the state they love require a 
thorough system of public schools with the best facilities, sup- 
ported by a law enforcing compulsory education, Mr. Brown has 
taken a most honorable place. 

Asked to suggest to his young fellow- citizens of his state 
methods and habits which in his belief will contribute to the 
strengthening of sound ideals in American life, he says: "Have 
a purpose in life, and work up to it. Industry and temperance 
are essential. Be patient in working and waiting for results. 
Do the right always, and never compromise with wrong or evil." 

His address is Marion, South Carolina. 



JOHN GENDRON GAPERS 

GAPERS, JOHN GENDRON, United States commissioner 
of internal revenue, was born at Anderson, South Caro- 
lina, April 17, 1866. His father, the Right Reverend 
Ellison Capers, is the Protestant Episcopal bishop of South 
Carolina, who served as major, lieutenant-colonel, colonel, and 
brigadier-general in the Confederate States army, and was 
severely wounded in several engagements, was secretary of the 
state of South Carolina from 1867 to 1868, and entered the 
Protestant Episcopal ministry in 1867. His mother, Charlotte 
Rebecca (Palmer) Capers, was a collateral descendant of General 
Francis Marion. On his father's side he numbers Captain Wil- 
liam Capers and Bishop William Capers of the Methodist Church, 
South, among his ancestors and kinsmen. 

His boyhood was passed in the town of Greenville, South 
Carolina. Under the strong and loving influence of a mother 
whose touch upon his moral and spiritual life he has always felt, 
and a father who seemed to his son, as he expresses it, "a man of 
great wisdom and loving kindness in dealing with his fellowmen, 
of the highest integrity of character and of patriotism and 
courage, both moral and personal," the years of his boyhood were 
passed in study, with a great fondness from the first for history 
and particularly for biography; while a genuine boy's interest 
in the green things growing in the garden, and in the horses and 
the life of the place generally, at home, prevented studies from 
filling the whole horizon of his life, and early taught him to 
do some things with his own hands. He studied at Professor 
Mazyck's school, at Greenville; at Captain Patrick's military 
school, and at Doctor Porter's school (the Holy Communion 
Church institute), and the Citadel academy, in Charleston. He 
was graduated in law at Columbia, South Carolina, and was 
admitted to the bar before the supreme court in 1887. He was 
superintendent of education for Greenville county from 1887 
to 1889. In 1893 he acted as editor of the Columbia "Daily 
Journal." For seven years, from 1894 to 1901, he was assistant 
United States attorney at Washington, District of Columbia, and 
in 1901 he was appointed United States district attorney for 




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JOHN GENDRON CAPERS 63 

South Carolina, with his office at Charleston, in which office he 
served for one term. 

When his successor as United States district attorney assumed 
the duties of that office, Mr. Capers' law office was at Greenville, 
South Carolina, and he in addition opened a law office in Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia, devoting his time to the practice 
of law in both places. 

He was engaged in the practice of law in this way, when, 
in June, 1907, President Roosevelt appointed him United States 
commissioner of internal revenue, upon the resignation of 
Honorable J. W. Yerkes, of Kentucky. Mr. Capers accepted the 
office for the short term, with the statement and understanding 
that he preferred the practice of law to government service, even 
in so high a position. 

At first identified with the Democratic party, upon the 
nomination of Bryan in 1896 he became a supporter of McKinley 
and joined the Republican party. He shared in the campaign 
for McKinley and Roosevelt in 1900. He was delegate at large 
from South Carolina to the National Republican convention at 
Chicago in 1904, and he has been a member of the Republican 
national committee since 1904. 

In 1889, Mr. Capers was married to Miss Sue Keels, sister 
of his brother Frank's wife, and daughter of John M. and Susan 
Maxwell Keels, of South Carolina. Always frail of health, she 
lived little more than a year. Six years after her death, Mr. 
Capers married Miss Lilla Trenholm, daughter of Frank H. and 
Mary E. Trenholm, of Charleston, South Carolina, and a grand- 
daughter of George A. Trenholm, who was secretary of the 
Confederate States treasury in President Davis' cabinet. 

There are no living children by the first marriage. By the 
second marriage there are two daughters, Charlotte Palmer, 
eleven years of age, and Frances Trenholm, eight years of age, 
at this time (1907). 

Mr. Capers is a Master Mason, and a Knight of Pythias. 
He is a member of the college fraternity of Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 
and has been president of the fraternity and editor of its journal, 
"The Record." His church relations are with the Protestant 
Episcopal Church of America. He has found his exercise and 
relaxation, he says, "in the general out-of-door work about my 



64 JOHN GENDRON CAPERS 

little country summer home at Cedar Mountain, North Carolina." 
He declines to offer to his young fellow-citizens advice based 
upon his own experience in life, in these words: "As I am not 
yet forty years of age, I am myself trying to grow older and 
wiser in the light of other men's examples." 



MARK LEE CARLISLE 

CARLISLE, MARK LEE, D. D., preacher and pastor, 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, now of Marion, 
South Carolina, was born at Pendleton, Anderson county, 
South Carolina, October 13, 1863. He is the son of the Reverend 
John Mason Carlisle, "a quiet man, of few words, a clear thinker 
and a strong preacher." His mother was Elizabeth Catherine 
(Sharp) Carlisle, and her son declares of her: "My mother has 
been the largest factor in my life." When he speaks of his "first 
ambition to be a man 'worth while,' " he mentions the inspiring 
influence of two of his former teachers, John S. Moore, of Ben- 
nettsville, South Carolina, and Doctor Charles Forster Smith, 
now of the University of Wisconsin; but he adds, "first and 
chiefest, was always my mother." His father's ancestors came 
from Ireland about a hundred years ago. 

His boyhood was passed "mainly in towns," and he early 
showed a marked taste for reading and study; and in boyhood, 
as well as through his youth and manhood, his favorite reading 
has been "history, biographies, travel, and, above all, the Bible." 
After studying in the common schools and at home, he entered 
Wofford college, and was graduated (A. B.) in 1883. In Sep- 
tember of that year he took up the work of a school teacher in 
Orangeburg county; and he continued to teach there, and at 
Marion, South Carolina, and in Union county, until December, 
1886, at which time he was received into the ministry of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, a member of the South Car- 
olina conference. During the twenty years since his ordination 
as preacher of the Gospel, Doctor Carlisle has filled the following 
pastorates: Clifton circuit, 1887; Walhalla circuit, 1888-1890; 
Camden, 1891-1894; Chester, 1895-1896; Central church, Spar- 
tanburg, 1897-1900; Washington Street church, Columbia, 1901- 
1904; Bethel church, Charleston, 1905-1906, and the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, Marion, South Carolina, at the present 
(1907) time. 

In June, 1901, Wofford college conferred upon him the 
honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity. He has been a member 
of the board of missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 



66 MARK LEE CARLISLE 

South, since 1902. He has been chairman of the South Carolina 
conference board of missions since 1903. He is a member of 
the Chi Phi college fraternity. His convictions have led to his 
identification with the Democratic party. He has given some 
attention to physical culture, believing that it is every man's duty 
to keep his body in good condition, that it may be the efficient 
servant of his mind and will; but he has never been a devotee 
of athletics. He finds his favorite exercise and relaxation in 
gardening, and, when opportunity offers, in mountain climbing. 
To the youth of South Carolina he commends: "Truth, purity, 
sincerity, modesty, and a determination to be and to do the best, 
with a moral and genuinely religious life." 



ROBERT THURLOW GASTON 

G ASTON, ROBERT THURLOW, lawyer and banker, like 
many another successful practitioner of the law, began 
his active work in life as a school teacher. While he 
is a native of South Carolina, he taught school for some years, 
first in Kentucky and then in Texas. But through all these six 
years of teaching he was steadfast in his purpose ultimately to 
follow the profession of the law. He says: "I expected to prac- 
tice law from my earliest recollection." In answer to the request 
to estimate the relative strength upon his life of the influences 
of home, school, early companionships, private study, and contact 
with men in active life, he writes that with him the influence of 
home was strongest; next he would rank the effect upon his life 
of his intercourse with active and successful men; private study 
ranks third with him, and his course of study in school he places 
fourth in order of importance. 

He is the son of W. Thurlow Caston, a lawyer, and of Sarah 
A. (Bryce) Caston. His father's ancestors emigrated from Wales 
to the United States before the Revolutionary period; and soon 
after the War of the Revolution the earliest known American 
ancestor of his mother settled in South Carolina, coming from 
Scotland. 

In his efforts to acquire an education he had to depend in 
no small degree upon his own efforts. 

He was born at Camden, South Carolina. Attendance at the 
schools of Spartanburg preceded his entrance to Wofford college, 
from which he was graduated with the degree of A. B. in 1871, 
receiving the degree of A. M. three years later. 

When he had completed a course of law studies preparatory 
to admission to the bar, he began the practice of law as partner 
of the late Chief Justice Mclver, in December, 1876, at Cheraw. 

In addition to the duties which have devolved upon him in 
the care of his professional business and in safeguarding the 
interests of his clients, Mr. Caston has served as president of 
the Bank of Cheraw since November, 1889. 



68 ROBERT THTJRLOW CASTON 

While he has not held political office, he declares himself to 
be a "Democrat, straight out," and he has "never changed his 
party allegiance, though tempted so to do." 

He is identified with the Methodist church. 

The address of Mr. Caston is Cheraw, South Carolina. 





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WILLIAM ERNEST GHESWELL 

CHESWELL, WILLIAM EKNEST, president of the 
Cheswell Cotton mill, of Westminster, South Carolina, 
is a type of the adopted sons of South Carolina who, 
coming into the state with the development of manufactures in 
recent years, have added so largely to the business enterprise and 
prosperity of the commonwealth. He was born at Newmarket, 
Rockingham county, New Hampshire, on November 11, 1858, the 
only son of his parents, Charles Allen and Sarah Rogers Cheswell. 
His great-grandfather, Wentworth Cheswell, served in the Con- 
tinental army. The Cheswell ancestry in America dates back to 
Paul Cheswell, a native of New Hampshire in 1720. 

After studying at Newmarket high school he began work in 
his chosen line of life (that of the manufacture of cotton goods) 
in the number four mill of the Newmarket Manufacturing com- 
pany, as oiler and band boy of the ring spinning room. From 
the first he was a critical observer of all the processes of the mill, 
and he interested himself in visiting as many as possible of the 
mills of New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Maine, while he was 
still a very young man. After a few years of mill work, he 
took a position with the Saco Water Power company, in erecting 
cotton machinery, that he might fit himself more fully to become 
a manager of mills and a manufacturer. In 1885 he was engaged 
as overseer of spinning and dressing in the Gibson Cotton mills, 
at Marysville, New Brunswick, remaining there until July, 1888, 
when he went to the St. Croix Cotton mills, at Milltown, New 
Brunswick, a mill with a very large range of pattern work. 
Attracted by the opportunities offered in the South for young 
men of ability in the line of cotton manufacturing, Mr. Cheswell 
accepted the position of superintendent of the Georgia Manu- 
facturing company, at Whitehall, Georgia, in January, 1890, and 
remained with them until November, 1892. He was superin- 
tendent of the Laboratory mills, at Lincolnton, North Carolina, 
from November, 1892, until January 1, 1894, at which time he 
accepted the position of general manager of the Courtenay Manu- 
facturing company, Newry, South Carolina, of which William 
A. Courtenay was president and promoter. He took charge of 

Vol. II. S. C. 4. 



72 WILLIAM ERNEST CHESWELL 

the work at Newry before the mill buildings and the dam were 
completed. He superintended the completion of the buildings 
and the installation of machinery, and started the mill on print 
cloths. Those who have watched the development of cotton 
manufacture in the South will remember that the Courtenay 
Manufacturing company was one of the first mills in the South 
to start manufacturing on number 28 warp, number 36 filling. 
On December 12, 1899, the Cheswell Cotton Mill company, at 
Westminster, South Carolina, was organized by Mr. Cheswell, 
who was elected president and general manager of the new mill 
and company, while he still retained the superintendency of the 
Courtenay Manufacturing company, but fourteen miles distant. 
In July, 1900, as the result of overwork and exposure, from his 
double duties while he was completing the Cheswell mill and 
installing its machinery, Mr. Cheswell was taken seriously ill, 
and was compelled to resign his connection with the Courtenay 
company. 

September, 1900, saw the Cheswell mill ready for its equip- 
ment. Few, if any, of the cotton mills in the South, of anything 
like its size, have been built so quickly. Mr. Cheswell designed 
the entire plant, and has equipped it with all the known modern 
appliances for producing the best goods at a minimum cost. He 
personally superintended the construction, equipment and starting 
of the mill; and although it began to turn out goods at a time 
when old-fashioned firms found it difficult to sell their goods in 
an overstocked market, the Cheswell mill soon secured a ready 
market for its entire production, and at remunerative prices. 

Mr. Cheswell is still (1907) president and general manager 
of the mill which bears his name. He devotes himself with 
singleness of purpose to the business enterprise he has in hand. 
And he conducts that enterprise by methods and upon principles 
which he believes will inure to the economic profit and the social 
welfare of the state and of the community in which the mill is 
situated. 

Identified with the Democratic party, in his religious con- 
victions he is affiliated with the Baptist church. He is a Mason, 
an Odd Fellow, a Knight of Pythias. 



WILLIAM ERNEST CHESWELL 73 

Those who are interested in the prosperity of his community 
and his county regard Mr. Cheswell as a strong addition to the 
citizenship of his adopted state, since he is one of the best 
equipped, strongest and most practically successful of the man- 
agers of the new cotton mills in the South. 

His address is Westminster, South Carolina. 



WILLIAM FORGE CLAYTON 

CLAYTON, WILLIAM FORCE, teacher, farmer, lawyer, 
member of the state board of education, was born at 
Athens, Georgia, August 17, 1843. His ancestors of 
the Clayton family in Virginia, Delaware, North Carolina and 
Georgia came from England and settled in these colonies; the 
branch of the family from which he is descended settled in 
Culpeper county, Virginia. The Harpers, with whom his grand- 
father's family intermarried, were from Abbeville, South Caro- 
lina. Through his father's mother he is descended from the 
Carnes and the Armours, who came from Ireland. His great- 
grandfather Carnes was a circuit judge; his grandfather, Augus- 
tin S. Clayton, was a judge and a member of congress, and was 
chairman of the first nullification meeting held in Georgia in 
1832. An uncle, Judge George R. Clayton, was a candidate for 
governor of Mississippi on the platform against repudiation when 
that was the issue; but the opposing party won the election. 

He is the son of Philip Clayton and Leonora Harper. Philip 
Clayton was for some years second auditor and assistant secretary 
of the United States treasury, residing at Washington, District 
of Columbia, where most of the boyhood of William Force 
Clayton was passed. His father was afterward consul at Callao, 
Peru, where William Force Clayton acted as vice-consul. Philip 
Clayton, his father, was also assistant secretary of the treasury 
department of the Confederate States of America, during the 
short existence of that government. He is remembered by his 
son as a man "jovial in disposition, but strong in his affections, 
with a high sense of honor, and very firm in his religious belief 
a member of the Episcopal church." 

William Force Clayton spent most of his boyhood at Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia, attending the Union academy, the 
Rugby academy, and other preparatory schools at Washington; 
but the War between the States prevented his acquiring a colle- 
giate education. As a boy he had had an especial interest in 
matters connected with the navy ; and on the outbreak of the war 
he entered the Confederate navy as midshipman, and as passed- 
midshipman he served four years during the war. After the 



WILLIAM FORCE CLAYTON 75 

war he had some experience in the service of an express company 
at Atlanta, Georgia; and after the failure of that company he 
moved to Marion county, South Carolina, and taught school 
during the years 1868 and 1869. From 1870 to 1892 he was a 
farmer and planter. Having studied law, he was admitted to 
the bar when nearly fifty years old; and after some experience 
in the service of a railroad at Macon, Georgia, he began the 
practice of law at Florence, South Carolina, in 1893. In 1895 he 
was chosen a member of the Constitutional convention of South 
Carolina. He has been magistrate, school trustee, clerk of the 
board of county commissioners, member of the county board of 
control; and for four years he has acted as member of the state 
board of education of South Carolina. 

In his political convictions he is a Democrat. He has all 
his life been exceptionally fond of reading. His mother, whose 
influence on his moral and spiritual life was strong, early made 
the Bible, Shakespeare and some of the best English prose writers 
his favorite reading; and as he grew older he became a constant 
reader of the best English poetry. He has occasionally contrib- 
uted articles to newspapers and to magazines. The exercise on 
which he has depended to keep his health good he has taken "in 
the care of a good garden." He reckons the influence of his early 
home as the strongest power for good in his life. In his boyhood 
and youth he saw much of the "statesmen of ante-bellum times," 
and from his acquaintance with these men he received an impulse 
to make the most of his life. He says it has been the chief 
ambition of his life "to do my duty in the sphere of life in which 
I might be placed." "My ambition to be a naval officer was 
ended with the fall of the Confederacy ; and as an humble citizen 
I have made a living, have accumulated little, but having had 
food and raiment, I have always been content." His family have 
always been affiliated with the Episcopal church; and while his 
convictions upon certain ideas and forms which are adhered to 
by Christians of certain denominations have kept him from 
becoming a member of any church, he says : "I recognize the fact 
that the church is doing much good. I seldom go to church, but 
I have all my children go, as they cannot contemplate the matter 
as I do, and they might be led astray. I remain at home on 
Sunday, read the Bible and other books and papers, and observe 



76 WILLIAM FORCE CLAYTON 

the day as a day of rest, and grieve to see it desecrated by 
railroads and others while the church keeps silent." 

His advice to the young people of his state is: "Fear God 
and keep his commandments; be guided by principle; keep good 
company; avoid liquor, cards and impurity; do unto others as 
you would have them do unto you." 

On December 22, 1869, Mr. Clayton married Miss Elizabeth 
Brown. She died November 10, 1898. Of their eleven children, 
eight are living in 1907. 

His address is Florence, South Carolina. 



ZEGHARIAH THORNTON CODY 

CODY, REVEREND ZECHARIAH THORNTON, D. D., 
pastor of the First Baptist church of Greenville, South 
Carolina, was born near Franklin, Henry county, Ala- 
bama, on the 21st of May, 1858. His father, Reverend Edmund 
Cod} 7 , was a minister of the Gospel and a planter, whose life was 
marked by sanity, integrity and piety. His mother, Mrs. Sarah 
(Henderson) Cody, was a true helpmeet to her husband. His 
earliest ancestor in America was James Cody, who emigrated 
from Ireland about 1740 and settled in Virginia. 

Attending the country and village schools which were within 
his reach in early boyhood, he fitted himself for college and 
entered Mercer university at Macon, Georgia. After a year at 
that institution he studied at Carson-Newman college, in Ten- 
nessee ; but his college course was cut short by lack of funds, and 
he did not take a degree. From 1883 to 1887 he was a student 
in the Southern Baptist Theological seminary, at Louisville, 
Kentucky, from which institution he received, in 1887, the degree 
of Master of Theology. Looking back over his life from the 
mature years of pastoral service, he feels that the books and the 
lines of reading to which he owes most are the Bible, the writings 
of Frederick Denison Maurice, and (in later years) Jonathan 
Edwards, and Charles Darwin. He has received the honorary 
degree of Doctor of Divinity from colleges in Missouri and 
Georgia. 

In 1887 he took up the work of the pastorate, preaching for 
the Baptist church at Mays Lick, Kentucky. After 1885 he 
served as pastor in Louisville, Kentucky, Mays Lick, Kentucky, 
and Georgetown, Kentucky, where he had been a useful pastor 
for twelve years when he accepted the call of the Baptist church 
of Greenville, South Carolina, on November 1, 1901, the pastorate 
which he now (1907) fills with the cordial support of his church 
and the esteem of the community. 

Doctor Cody has always been allied with the Democratic 
party. He is a member of the Thirty-nine club, of Greenville, 
South Carolina. His favorite form of out-of-door sport for exer- 
cise has been baseball. He has contributed articles to newspapers 



78 ZECHARIAH THORNTON CODY 

and periodicals, some of which, with certain of his sermons, have 
been published in pamphlet form. 

On the 9th of November, 1887, he married Miss Susan 
Isabella Anderson, daughter of Henry David Anderson, of Ken- 
tucky. They have had two children, both of whom are living 
in 1907. 

To the young he says : "Above everything, a sound religious 
and moral character is the chief element in success. Next to 
this, habits of industry, wise economy, and true liberality. The 
highest success is hardly possible without a thorough education; 
and no young man is worthy of citizenship who does not take 
an interest in all that pertains to the economic welfare and the 
civic righteousness of our people." 

Doctor Cody's address is McBee avenue, Greenville, South 
Carolina. 



HENRY KEMPER GOVINGTON 

GOVINGTON, HENRY KEMPER, farmer and dairyman, 
of Bennettsville, Marlboro county, South Carolina, was 
born on the 28th of September, 1861, in the town where 
he still resides. His father, Tristram Covington, was a planter, 
"pensive and unobtrusive by temperament." He served for years 
as county commissioner. His mother was Jane Covington, daugh- 
ter of Thomas S. and Sarah Covington, of Marlboro county. 
The family trace their descent from the Covingtons and Cooks, 
who immigrated to the American colonies in the seventeenth 
century. 

His boyhood was passed in the country. He had excellent 
health. His taste, even in boyhood, was strongly for the study 
of mathematics. While he was taught to have regular tasks 
involving manual labor, he was fond of reading, particularly in 
those branches of natural science which bear upon practical 
agriculture. He attended the schools within reach of his home 
and fitted himself for Wofford college, from which institution he 
was graduated with the degree of B. S. in 1882, having given 
especial attention to courses in chemistry, physics, analytical 
geometry, and trigonometry. 

His early home training was perhaps the influence which 
was decisive with him in choosing farming as his life work. He 
has given some especial attention to the work of dairy-farming; 
but his principal work has been that of a farmer and planter. 
He has invented a pea-huller which has had considerable sale. 

On the 19th of November, 1883, Mr. Covington married Miss 
Mary J. Fletcher; and some time after her death he married, on 
the 20th of January, 1904, Miss N. O. Wells. He had three sons 
by his first marriage, all of whom are living in 1907. 

While at college he was a member of the Delta chapter of 
the Kappa Alpha fraternity. In political relations he is identi- 
fied with the Democratic party. 

He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 



82 HENRY KEMPER COVINGTON 

His favorite amusement and recreation is music, and he has 
always been fond of playing the piano, finding in this devotion 
to music delight, recreation and relief from the cares of business. 

His advice to young South Carolinians who would succeed 
is : "Select carefully your vocation ; pursue it assiduously. Shun 
the common vices. Have confidence in God and your fellow-men. 
Success will follow." 



THEODORE GAILLARD CROFT 

CEOFT, THEODORE GAILLARD, son of Theodore 
Gaillard and Eliza Webb B'Oley Croft, was born at 
Greenville, South Carolina, July 10, 1845. His father, 
a physician and planter, was characterized by determination, 
firmness and fearlessness, combined with great courtesy and kind- 
ness of manner. Edward and John Croft, the earliest known 
ancestors of T. G. Croft, migrated from the West Indies, or 
direct from England, to Charleston, South Carolina, about 1700. 
John Gaillard, uncle of Doctor Theodore Gaillard Croft, was 
United States senator from South Carolina for twenty- four years. 
Theodore Gaillard was judge in South Carolina for many years. 

The subject of this sketch was in childhood healthy and 
strong, fond of reading, but devoted to outdoor sports; his early 
life was passed in the country. His duties were light, involving 
nothing more than at times helping on the farm. The influence 
of his mother upon his moral and spiritual life was strong and 
helpful. His education was interrupted by the war; his pro- 
fessional education he won only as a result of his own labor, no 
pecuniary assistance coming to him from others. For reading 
he was fond of biography, especially of the men who have 
impressed themselves upon the world's history. The influences 
which have affected him have chiefly been the teachings of home 
life, supplemented by contact with men in the world outside. 

He attended Pierce's school and also Furman university in 
Greenville, South Carolina; these courses were supplemented by 
study in the Citadel academy, Charleston, and in the University 
of Virginia. 

Mr. Croft began the active work of life at Rome, Georgia, 
in 1869, as superintendent of a draying outfit and of hauling 
trucks. He continued in this work until 1871; from 1872 to 
1873 he was outdoor superintendent of the Aetna Iron Works, 
Georgia. From childhood, however, he had a strong desire to 
be a physician. To fulfil this purpose he attended the Medical 
College of South Carolina, at Charleston, and completed the 
course, graduating March 5, 1875, valedictorian of his class. 
Doctor Croft then became a general practitioner of medicine and 



86 THEODORE GAILLARD CROFT 

later was appointed surgeon for the Southern railway, a position 
he still (1907) holds. He is examiner for all the principal life 
insurance companies, and referee for two of them. He was 
surgeon of the First regiment of South Carolina state troops for 
eight or ten years. In 1902 he was made a member of the South 
Carolina state board of medical examiners; from 1879 to date 
(1907) he has been vestryman and warden of St. Thaddeus's 
Episcopal church. He served in the Sixteenth regiment, Con- 
federate States volunteers, and in the battalion of Citadel cadets 
during the War between the States; about 1878 he became chair- 
man of the Aiken Central Democratic club. For one year, from 
1861 to 1862, he served as sergeant of the Sixteenth Confederate 
States volunteers; and from 1862 to 1865 he was connected with 
the South Carolina Military academy. 

Doctor Croft is a member of the American Medical associa- 
tion, of the Medical Association of South Carolina, of the Tri- 
State Medical association, the Association of Surgeons of the 
Southern railway, and of the Aiken County Medical association. 
From 1901 to 1902 he was president of the South Carolina 
Medical association, and in 1904 he became one of its councilors, 
an office he still holds; in 1904 he was chosen vice-president of 
the Aiken County Medical association. Doctor Croft is a Demo- 
crat in politics. He finds recreation in fishing and hunting. 
To the young he commends untiring devotion to the work of 
their choice, allowing nothing to come before it; punctuality in 
all business appointments, and fair and honest dealing with all. 

Doctor Croft has been twice married: First, on April 5, 
1877, to Miss Mary Ella Chafee; and second, in July, 1904, to 
Miss Estelle Allison. Of his six children, four are now (1907) 
living. 

His address is Aiken, South Carolina. 





' 




GEORGE BENEDICT GROMER 

CKOMEK, GEORGE BENEDICT, LL. D., ex-president 
of Newberry college, South Carolina, lawyer, and three 
times mayor of Newberry, was born in Newberry county, 
South Carolina, October 3, 1857. His father, Thomas H. Cromer, 
was a farmer and merchant, whose ancestors several generations 
ago came from Germany. 

His boyhood was passed in the country, and when not busied 
in school he did such kinds of daily work as are usually required 
of a boy on a farm. After several years of study at the school 
of Thomas H. Duckett, he entered Newberry college, and was 
graduated in 1877, receiving the degree of A. M. in 1879. In 
October, 1877, he became a teacher in the preparatory department 
of Newberry college; and although he continued to teach in 
connection with the college for four years, he was also studying 
law; and he was admitted to the bar and began the practice of 
law in December, 1881. For fourteen years he gave himself 
to the practice of law. Identified with the Democratic party, 
although never an active politician, he was chosen mayor of 
Newberry in 1886, serving until 1890. In 1896 he was elected 
president of the Newberry college, and his administration of that 
institution covered a period of eight and a half years, until 1904. 
In 1905 he was again elected mayor of Newberry. 

President Cromer has received the degree of LL. D. from 
Wittenberg college, Ohio, and from Muhlenberg college, Penn- 
sylvania. 

He was married, on October 11, 1883, to Miss Carolyn J. 
Motte, who died in 1888. On November 27, 1890, he married 
Harriet S. Bittle. He has four children living in 1907. 

An especial interest attaches to the life history of a man who 
immediately upon graduation becomes a teacher in the institution 
from which he was graduated, and who proceeds from the pro- 
fession of teaching to the practice of law, and so fully gains and 
keeps the respect and regard of his fellow-citizens, among whom 
his entire life has been passed, that he comes to be in turn the 
mayor of the city for six years, again a trusted practitioner of 
the law, and then president of his alma mater in the same city, 



88 GEORGE BENEDICT CROMER 

and at once, upon his resignation from the presidency of the 
college, is again chosen to fill the office of mayor of the city, to 
the service of whose people and institutions his whole life has 
been given. Even to those who are not familiar with the insti- 
tution over which he has presided, or the community in which he 
dwells, it would seem that the life work of President Cromer 
marks him as "a favorite son" of Newberry. 



JAMES WALTER DANIEL 

DANIEL, JAMES WALTEE, D. D., minister in the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and now pastor of 
the Washington Street Methodist Episcopal church, at 
Columbia, South Carolina, is the author of several books and of 
a volume of poetry, and has all his life been strongly drawn to 
authorship, and, rather against his convictions, has been deeply 
interested in the study of the history and the science of warfare, 
although his example and his preaching make for peace and 
righteousness. 

He was born in Laurens, South Carolina, August 27, 1857. 
His father, James Wright Daniel, was a merchant and farmer, 
a justice of the peace, and, in the words of his son, was charac- 
terized by "integrity, independence of thought and action, perfect 
memory, good judgment, quick perception, a fine sense of humor, 
and by public spirit, liberality and piety." His mother, Eliza 
(Anderson) Daniel, was a woman of great common sense, of 
soundest principles, of thorough education, and of sincere piety 
of spirit and life; and her influence on her son was strong. Mr. 
Daniel's family is of Huguenot descent, having come to Virginia 
from France, immediately after the revocation of the Edict 
of Nantes (1685), John Daniel, his great-grandfather, was 
a soldier of the American Eevolution. He married Priscilla 
Harrison, a daughter of Benjamin Harrison, the signer of 
the Declaration of Independence. His mother's grandfather, 
William Anderson, came from County Antrim, was a staunch 
Presbyterian, a psalm-singer, and landed at Charleston, South 
Carolina, on Christmas eve, 1792, with his wife and five 
children, one of whom, Thomas Anderson, was the grand- 
father of the Reverend Doctor James W. Daniel. With his 
family, William Anderson proceeded at once to the upper 
part of Abbeville county and bought a plantation which 
included within its boundary lines the present town of Due West, 
"the mecca of the denomination to which he belonged." Accord- 
ing to the traditions of his family, immediately after coming 
into possession of the place he gave land for a school house, and 
that school later developed into Erskine college, where Eliza 



90 JAMES WALTER DANIEL 

Anderson, Doctor Daniel's mother, was educated. The history 
of the Harrison family with whom the Daniels intermarried is 
well known, from their earliest settlement in Virginia, through 
successive generations, with two presidents of the United States 
among its sons. Peter Daniel, a judge of the supreme court of 
Virginia, was a direct progenitor of Doctor Daniel. 

Where the family line is clearly traced and the family spirit 
and family traditions are strong, it is sometimes interesting to 
note the ideals and the estimate of themselves which are cherished 
in such a family connection. Doctor Daniel writes: "The 
tradition of my family is that no Daniel was ever tried or 
convicted of any crime in any court of justice. Another tradition 
is that our branch of the family, coming from France, were 
originally Jews. A Jewess and her five sons were converted to 
Christianity about the tenth century. Thus the name is accounted 
for. And it is a little remarkable that the Jewish physiognomy 
still makes its appearance in the family. John Moncure Daniel, 
the prominent Confederate editor, was frequently taken for a 
Jew. Driven out of France by the revocation of the Edict of 
Nantes, a part of the family came to Virginia, and have been 
permanently connected with all the interests of that state from 
its early colonial history." 

Perfectly healthy in childhood and youth, James Walter 
Daniel was a country boy, fond of boyish sports, but reading 
much, especially history and biography. Until he was seventeen 
his life was spent upon a farm, and he says : "My father required 
of us work on the farm when we were not in school. He taught 
us never to be ashamed of any legitimate work, and this early 
training has been helpful to me all through my life." After 
studying at the ordinary country schools near him in his boyhood,, 
at seventeen he entered the preparatory department of Newberry 
college. He was graduated in 1879 with the degree of A. B. 
The college gave him the degree of A. M. three years later. 

In the early winter of the year of his graduation from college 
he was ordained as a junior preacher on the Pickens circuit, 
Pickens county. His choice of a life work was due to "no influ- 
ence other than the impression of duty to God; I was converted 
and felt deeply impressed that it was my duty to preach the 
Gospel." 



JAMES WALTER DANIEL 91 

In his boyhood he had written several stories, some of the 
earliest of which were published in the "Home Circle," of 
Charleston, when he was eighteen. From his earliest recollection 
he has been fond of writing fiction. He says: "I have striven 
against the desire, yielding three times and publishing three 
novels. Composition has always been a recreation, especially 
composition of fiction. I have never cultivated it." 

His early home had been one where the great Methodist 
preachers of the days of his childhood were frequently enter- 
tained. He ranks as the strongest influence in his life, after the 
ideals of his family and the training of his early home, the 
frequent contact and the kindly and familiar intercourse with 
these prominent ministers. 

As a veteran soldier is entitled in his biography to the record 
of the successive engagements and promotions which have marked 
his life, so even a brief biography of a minister of the Methodist 
Episcopal church cannot be written to the satisfaction of his 
friends and former parishioners unless it mentions his successive 
stations and pastorates. Beginning with his ordination, in 
December, 1879, he served on the Pickens circuit until December, 
1880; then on the West Anderson circuit, December, 1880, to 
December, 1881; on the Fork Shoals circuit, Greenville county, 
December, 1881, to 1883; the Pendleton circuit, December, 1883- 
1886; Bennettsville station, Marlboro county, December, 1886, to 
December, 1890 ; Chester station, from December, 1890, to Decem- 
ber, 1893; Sumter station, from 1893 to 1897; Abbeville station, 
from December, 1897, to 1900; as pastor of Trinity church, at 
Charleston, South Carolina, from December, 1900, to December, 
1903; at the Bethel church, Charleston, for the next year; and 
since December, 1904, he has been pastor of the Washington 
Street Methodist Episcopal church, at Columbia, South Carolina. 

From his colleagues in the ministry he has received recog- 
nition repeatedly. At the session of the South Carolina confer- 
ence in December, 1897, he was elected a delegate to the general 
conference, held at Baltimore, Maryland, in May, 1898. In 
December, 1901, he was again elected to the general conference 
held at Dallas, Texas ; and he acted as secretary of the publishing 
committee of that body in May, 1902. 

In June, 1899, his alma mater, Newberry college, conferred 
upon him the honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity. 

Vol. II. S. C. 5. 



92 JAMES WALTER DANIEL 

His published books are: "The Girl in Checks" (1891); 
"Out from Under Caesar's Frown" (1892) ; "A Eamble Among 
Surnames" (1893); "A Maid of the Foothills" (1905); and 
"Cateechee" (1898), a short poem which gives the meaning of 
the Indian names in upper Carolina. He has written two poems 
not yet published, of the same order, designed to give in popular 
and poetic form the meaning of the Indian names in lower and 
middle Carolina. 

Doctor Daniel has received many letters in acknowledgment 
of the service he has done in reclaiming from oblivion the 
meaning of the Indian place names of his state. 

A Democrat by conviction, he has always been identified with 
that party. He is a Mason. From his boyhood he has found 
the study of bird life especially interesting, and he gets his 
out-of-door exercise chiefly in long walks, in which he observes 
the phenomena of nature, and particularly the life and habits 
of birds. 

He was married to Miss Emma Hunt, at Greenville, South 
Carolina, December 8, 1880; of their nine children, seven are 
living in 1907. 

To the young Americans of his state he offers these sugges- 
tions: "Without patriotism no man can be a truly great man. 
Cultivate it. Christianity, pure and simple, must be the founda- 
tion of every truly successful life. Avoid association with people 
of loose morals. Master some one thing in life. Never let any 
habit master you. Be yourself, never making any man your 
model, save the perfect man, Jesus Christ." 

The address of Doctor Daniel is Columbia, South Carolina. 




i^5. 




CHARLES MCQUEEN DAVIS 

DAVIS, CHAKLES McQUEEN, farmer, merchant, state 
senator, was born in Clarendon county, South Carolina, 
December 6, 1848. His father, T. J. M. Davis, was a 
farmer, a captain of militia, stern and positive in his convictions 
and his character. Through both his father and his mother he 
is of Irish descent. 

He had a sturdy and vigorous boyhood, which was passed 
in the country; and he says that he very early felt a strong 
desire "to make and to have property of my own." He writes: 
"I performed manual labor on the farm and was taught to rise 
early and get at work. At the age of sixteen I was made a full 
hand on the farm; and for the benefit of others who have to 
work I will say that work always agreed with my health." His 
opportunities for attending school were limited to "about three 
years of old-field schooling." When but sixteen he served for a 
time during the War between the States in the militia of his state. 

He began his active business life in Richland county. 

On February 9, 1869, he married Miss Mary T. Bynum. 
They have had ten children, nine of whom are living in 1907. 

Two years after his marriage he returned to his native 
county, Clarendon, where he has since resided. He was president 
of the Davis Station Cotton mill, after consolidation. He was 
one of the directors of the Independent Cotton Oil company, and 
resident manager of the Davis Station Cotton mill. He says: 
"From as early a date as I can remember I have had the belief 
that push, energy, econ^m^ u 1 ' ^ ^sty would 'win out' ; and 
these principles I have striven to put into my life work." 

In 1894 he was elected a member of the house of representa- 
tives of his state; and he was reflected in 1896, serving until 
1898. He was a candidate for the state senat r , but was defeated 
by Louis Appelt. In 1901 he was again a can^ ~te, and he 
defeated his former opponent. Senator Davis's term expired in 
1906. He is identified with the Democratic party. He is a 
member of the Methodist church. He is also a Mason. He has 
found his favorite exercise and amusement in bird and duck 
shooting, and in hunting deer. 



96 CHARLES M'QUEEN DAVIS 

To young South Carolinians, Senator Davis offers these 
suggestions for success in life: "Honesty; careful observance of 
promises; faithfulness in the discharge of duty; regularity of 
habits; economy, and 'push'." 

His address is Summerton, South Carolina. 



JAMES EVANS DAVIS 

DAVIS, JAMES EVANS, lawyer, was born in Barnwell, 
South Carolina, September 17, 1856. His parents were 
James L. and Alpha (Evans) Davis. His father was 
noted for his public spirit and for his noble and generous 
impulses. He was of a social and kindly nature, given to hos- 
pitality, and in all respects a worthy type of the old-fashioned 
Southern gentleman. Although largely engaged in planting, he 
had a fine literary taste and was a close student of books and 
of men. He held the office of court clerk of Barnwell district, 
and was a gallant soldier in the Confederate army, in which he 
won the rank of major, though by his friends he was usually 
called colonel. The mother of the subject of this sketch was a 
woman of rare sweetness and purity of character, and she exerted 
a powerful and an enduring influence for good on the intellectual 
and moral life of her son. 

Until James Davis was thirteen years of age he lived in the 
country upon his father's farm. His tastes and interests were 
those of the average boy of his time and place, but the war, 
which began before he was five years old, and the absence of his 
father during the conflict, interfered greatly with his home life 
and his educational advantages. When his father returned from 
the army he found that a large part of his property had been 
swept away and that what remained had greatly depreciated in 
value. He undertook, however, the task of restoring his fortunes 
as far as possible, and, as a means to this end, he began the 
cultivation of his plantation. When James was thirteen years 
of age he also went to the plantation and commenced active 
work in the fields. He was strong and well and cheerfully and 
resolutely gave himself to the performance of all kinds of labor 
required of an ordinary field hand. While thus engaged, he 
improved every possible opportunity for study and reading. 
Fortunately, his taste was for books of standard excellence, and 
he was able to obtain Gibbon's Rome, Macaulay's England, and 
many other historical works, including a number which were 
devoted especially to the history of his own country. In this 



51 




100 JAMES EVANS DAVIS 

reading and study he not only obtained a great deal of valu- 
able information, but he also disciplined and developed his mind 
along other lines of thought. He remained on the plantation 
until he was nineteen years of age. The outdoor life and the 
active labor in which he had been engaged had developed his 
physical powers and given him a large measure of strength and 
endurance. 

From early childhood James Davis had desired to become a 
lawyer. Through all the changes he had passed and the diffi- 
culties in securing an education, and knowing that because of the 
disasters of the war his father could not help him, his ambition 
never left him. Although there was no hope that he could obtain 
a college education, he resolved in opening manhood that he 
would carry into effect the purpose of his early life. In order 
to secure the necessary means for doing this, he taught school 
in the fall and winter months and during the remainder of the 
year studied law in the office of the Honorable James Aldrich, 
who was then a prominent lawyer and afterwards elevated to 
the bench, becoming one of the most eminent jurists in the 
state. By close application to study he was, in a comparatively 
short time, sufficiently advanced to take the examination, and on 
December 13, 1880, he appeared before the supreme court of 
South Carolina, and, after passing a most creditable examination 
was admitted to the bar. On March 31, 1881, he began the 
practice of his profession in his native town of Barnwell. He 
was successful from the first and his energy and ability, industry 
and integrity, during the intervening years, have given him a 
lucrative practice, both in the nisi prius and the appellate courts, 
and given him a high rank among the lawyers of the state. In 
the examination of witnesses he shows a remarkable degree of 
skill, and when pleading his causes he is an eloquent and impres- 
sive speaker. In 1900 he was elected solicitor of the second 
circuit. He filled this position so acceptably that in 1904 he was 
reflected for a term of four years. In this office he has shown 
absolute fearlessness in the prosecution of evil-doers, and has 
won high rank among the prosecutors in the state. Many of his 
friends predict that Mr. Davis will contiue to advance, both in 
politics and as a lawyer, and that higher honors than he has yet 
received will crown his efforts to win a place in the first rank 
of the distinguished men of South Carolina. 



JAMES EVANS DAVIS 101 

In politics Mr. Davis is a Democrat. In religion his denomi- 
national preference is for the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Davis was married January 28, 1886, to Miss Mary Ella 
Bronson. They have one child living in 1907. 

The postoffice address of Mr. Davis is Barnwell, South Caro- 
lina. 



ALVIN H. DEAN 

DEAN, ALVIN H., lawyer and state senator, was born 
near Duncan's, in Spartanburg county, South Carolina, 
March 22, 1863. His father, Captain A. H. Dean, was 
a farmer who served for two terms, 1898 to 1902, as a member 
of the house of representatives of the state, and during the War 
between the States was captain of Company E of the Sixteenth 
South Carolina cavalry. His mother was Mrs. Eugenia (Miller) 
Dean. 

In his boyhood he lived on a farm in the country, and 
attended the country schools. He was sturdy, strong and fond 
of study; and he worked willingly on the farm in his boyhood 
and youth. He attended the high schools in Spartanburg county, 
and later took a course of study at Furman university. His 
professional course of study in the law was taken at Vanderbilt 
university, by which institution he was "licensed to practice" in 
1884. In the same year he began the practice of the law at 
Greenville, South Carolina, where he has since resided. A natural 
inclination to this profession he felt even in his boyhood; and 
this inclination was strengthened by what his friends regarded 
as a natural talent for oratory. He has always been ready to 
express clearly, forcibly and with a good degree of rhetorical 
finish, his convictions upon all public questions, and his influence 
with his fellow-citizens has been in large part due to his power 
of clear and convincing expression. 

He was chosen alderman of Greenville in 1892, serving until 
1896. In 1895 he was elected state senator, and he was reflected 
in 1899, serving until 1904. 

The newspapers of his district at the time of his candidacy 
for the senate spoke of him as "a lawyer of rare qualification and 
superior ability, recognized as one of the strongest advocates in 
the state ; in speech, eloquent and magnetic, graceful in delivery, 
and especially forceful in the presentation of facts." 

He is a Knight of Pythias and an Odd Fellow. He belonged 
to the college fraternity of Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

Early identified with the Democratic party, he has uniformly 
voted for its candidates and has supported its party measures. 



ALVIN H. DEAN 103 

By religious conviction he is a Presbyterian, and has been a 
deacon in that church for the last ten years. For exercise and 
amusement he has always delighted in the use of good horses, 
riding and driving a great deal. 

In March, 1886, he married Miss Lida Byrd, who died in 
1894. In August, 1898, he was married a second time to Miss 
Sally Preston, of Seven Mile Ford, Virginia. 

Among the active and outspoken legislators of South Caro- 
lina of the younger generation, Senator Dean has already made 
for himself a prominent place in the esteem and confidence of 
his fellow-citizens. 

His address is Greenville, South Carolina. 



HENRY MONTGOMERY DIBBLE 

DIBBLE, HENRY MONTGOMERY, was born October 
12, 1859, in Marshall, Calhoun county, Michigan. His 
father was Charles P. and his mother H. J. Dibble. 
His father was a merchant and a banker, and, for a time, held 
the office of mayor of Marshall. He was noted for his public 
spirit and his active interest in the schools and industries of 
his city. 

Henry Dibble's early life was passed in Marshall; his early 
health was excellent ; he was always a great reader and especially 
fond of history and biography. He studied in the Marshall 
public schools, graduating in 1879 from the high school. The 
years of 1879 to 1882 he spent in Cornell university, graduating 
in 1882 with the degree of Lit. B., his course having been liter- 
ary. In the choice of his work he was largely influenced by the 
wish of a relative. 

After leaving the university, Mr. Dibble studied law for 
one year at Grand Rapids, Michigan. The confinement of office 
work, however, caused a breakdown in his health, and he was 
ordered south by his physician. In the fall of 1883 he went to 
Aiken, South Carolina, and, finding that the climate agreed with 
him, soon bought the property known as the "Vale of Mont- 
morenci," lying seven miles southeast of Aiken, where he has 
since made his home. Soon after, he started the dairy farm, 
which is now among the largest in the state, having about one 
hundred and fifty thoroughbred Jersey cows. In 1884 he built 
what was probably the first silo ever erected in South Carolina. 

Mr. Dibble's farm is famous for its beautiful scenery, its 
large masses of rock, which are a curiosity in that section of the 
state, and for its beautiful artificial lake. 

Since 1895 Mr. Dibble has been president of the Bank of 
Aiken, and since 1898 president and treasurer of the Carolina 
Light and Power company. Mr. Dibble also assisted in organ- 
izing the Aiken Library association and is its president; he is 
also treasurer of the Aiken Cottages, a charitable organization 
for the treatment of young men with pulmonary troubles, which 
institution has in ten years accumulated an endowment fund of 



HENRY MONTGOMERY DIBBLE 105 

nearly $50,000. He is a member of the Psi Upsilon fraternity, 
and also of the Phi Beta Kappa society. In Michigan he was a 
Republican, but when he became a citizen of South Carolina he 
became convinced of the necessity for the supremacy of the white 
race, and on that issue has since supported the Democratic party. 
In religion he is an Episcopalian. His relaxation is found in 
farming and landscape gardening. He has never been married. 
His address is Aiken, South Carolina. 



JAMES W. DILLON 

DILLON, JAMES W., of Marion county, South Carolina, 
merchant, president of J. W. Dillon & Son Company, 
a mercantile corporation, was born near Little Rock, 
Marion county, November 25, 1826. His father, William Dillon, 
was a farmer. His grandfather, Joshua Dillon, came from Ire- 
land about 1775, settling in Virginia and afterward removing to 
South Carolina and settling in upper Marion county. 

Born on a farm, he was early trained to do farm work, and 
he learned with some thoroughness the use of carpenters' tools. 
From boyhood he was accustomed to regular tasks of useful 
labor. From 1834 to 1844 he attended the country schools which 
were within his reach. He had to provide the means to pay for 
his board and tuition by working upon the farm in vacation 
time. Like thousands of Americans who were boys in school in 
the first half of the last century, he feels that he owes a debt to 
Webster's spelling book, with its practical maxims of life, and 
such brief lessons of morality as "no man may put off the law 
of God." 

In 1853, at the age of twenty-seven, he began business for 
himself, keeping a store at Little Rock, South Carolina. His 
business at Little Rock increased slowly but steadily, and in 
1882 his son, T. A. Dillon, was taken in as copartner and J. W. 
Dillon & Son succeeded. For several years Mr. Dillon was post- 
master of Little Rock. 

In 1891 he removed from Little Rock to Dillon, South 
Carolina. This town had been established upon land owned by 
Mr. Dillon and his son, T. A., and from the beginning he was 
actively interested in promoting the welfare and the business 
prosperity of the town. The postoffice and town were named 
after him. In 1889 he and his son, T. A., had established there 
a branch store; by 1891 the business of this branch had become 
so important that he made Dillon his permanent residence. In 
January, 1903, the business was incorporated under the name of 
J. W. Dillon & Son Company. Beside the capital which is 
invested in the mercantile business, Mr. Dillon and his son, 
T. A., are owners of valuable real estate in this part of the state. 



HEW 703U 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



FOUND A7ir.W 



JAMES W. DILLON 109 

* 

Mr. Dillon had capital invested in other interests when he came 
to reside in the town which bears his name. The settlement then 
might fairly have been described as "in the woods." Within the 
last twelve years it has grown to be a flourishing town with a 
population of about two thousand. At every point in its progress 
Mr. Dillon has been prominent in assisting and guiding the 
growth of the community by liberal advances for agricultural 
purposes and otherwise. 

In April, 1851, he married Miss Harriett Jones; they had 
four children, one of whom is living in 1907. Some time after 
his first wife died, Mr. Dillon married Miss Sallie McLaurin; 
they had two children, both of whom survive their mother, and 
are now living in 1907. In April, 1889, Mr. Dillon married Miss 
Sallie I. Townsend. 

Mr. Dillon is a Mason. In his political relations he is 
identified with the Democratic party. By religious conviction and 
training he is identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, of which he has long been a member. 

Mr. Dillon's business record as a merchant affords another 
noteworthy instance of the fine enterprise and energy with which 
men of business in South Carolina, who were already past middle 
life when the new manufacturing interests in South Carolina 
began to be developed, interested themselves in new lines of 
manufacturing interests which have done much to create the new 
era of business which characterizes the history of the last fifteen 
years in South Carolina. 



JAMES THOMAS DOUGLASS 

DOUGLASS, JAMES THOMAS, farmer and state 
senator, is a native of Goshen Hill, Union county, where 
he was born, April 23, 1838, the son of a physician, 
George Douglass, M. D., and of Frances (Jeter) Douglass, of 
Scotch descent. 

His boyhood was passed on a farm in the country, and from 
his earliest years he delighted in the life and the business of a 
farm, and was fond of hunting as an amusement. He feels that 
agricultural labor, with which he early became familiar, helped 
to give him the strong physical development which has served 
him well in later life. 

He studied at Mt. Zion academy, under Professor J. W. 
Hudson, and afterward studied at the University of North Caro- 
lina, from which institution he was graduated in the class of 1860 
with the degree of B. S. 

He began the active work of life for himself as an agricul- 
turist, in Union county, South Carolina, in 1865. He had a 
strong wish to study medicine, but he was compelled by circum- 
stances to take up the business of farming, which he has pursued 
for forty-five years. He entered the Confederate army as a 
private in 1864, and was later elected captain, serving in that 
capacity until the surrender at Appomattox. He was in all the 
principal battles of the Virginia and East Tennessee campaigns, 
and was three times severely wounded. 

He has served as county commissioner of his county for three 
terms. He was a member of the South Carolina Constitutional 
convention in 1895. Elected a member of the senate of South 
Carolina in 1894, he has been repeatedly reflected, and he still 
(1907) serves as state senator. 

In college he belonged to the Chi Psi fraternity. His party 
relations are with the Democrats. In church relations he "is 
inclined to the Presbyterian denomination." He has found exer- 
cise and relaxation in hunting, in its various forms. 

Senator Douglass is one of the large number of South 
Carolina farmers and planters who, while managing their own 
business affairs successfully, have found time and inclination to 



JAMES THOMAS DOUGLASS 113 

serve with acceptance and fidelity as representatives of their 
fellow-citizens in the senate of their state. 

He married Miss Mary Jane Jeter on December 5, 1866, and 
their only child is living (1907). 

To his young fellow-citizens he commends: "Dogged perse- 
verance" as a winning virtue. " 'Be sure you are right, then go 
ahead,' and keep steadily at it." 

The address of Mr. Douglass is Union, South Carolina. 



MAREEN WALKER DUVALL 

DUVALL, MAREEN WALKER, merchant, was born near 
Cheraw, Chesterfield county, South Carolina, May 26, 
1856. His parents were Gideon Walker and Sarah 
Rebecca (Powe) Duvall. His father was a planter who was 
highly respected in the section in which he lived and who was of 
sufficient importance to be elected a member of the state senate. 
The first ancestor of the family to come to America was Mareen 
Duvall, a French Huguenot, who in the summer of 1659 settled 
in Anne Arundel county, Maryland. 

In childhood and youth Mareen Duvall lived in the country. 
His health was good and he took part in and enjoyed the sports 
and pastimes in which his youthful companions participated. 
After obtaining the rudiments of education at the neighboring 
schools he studied at Cheraw academy and later at the Porter 
Military academy, and the high school, at Charleston, South 
Carolina. He began the active work of life as a bookkeeper for 
a firm in his native town. He thoroughly learned the details 
of mercantile business, in which he has long been successfully 
engaged. In politics he has always been a Democrat. His relig- 
ious affiliation is with the Protestant Episcopal church. 

On October 17, 1877, he married Margaret D. Evans. Of 
their six children, five are living in 1907. 

The postoffice address of Mr. Duvall and his family is 
Cheraw, Chesterfield county, South Carolina. 



JULIUS RICHARD EARLE 

EARLE, JULIUS RICHARD, lawyer, from 1894 to 189G 
member of the state house of representatives, and since 
1904 member of the state senate of South Carolina, was 
born in Anderson county, South Carolina, November 4, 1863. His 
father, Rev. Julius Richard Earle, was a Baptist minister, who 
served in the Confederate army throughout the War between the 
States with the rank of major, and represented Franklin county, 
Georgia, in the legislature of his state from 1890 to 1892. 

His mother was Lucy A. M. (Brockman) Earle. His earliest 
ancestors in America were John and Mary Earle, who emigrated 
from England and settled in Westmoreland county, Virginia, in 
1652. This John Earle traced his descent through Earles and 
Newtons to the Earle of Newton, afterwards Earle of Shrews- 
berry, who came to England with William the Conqueror. Three 
separate families of Earles in America trace back to the same 
English stock. One of these groups of families is descended 
from Ralph Earle and his wife, Joan, who settled in Rhode 
Island in 1638. The second group trace their descent from John 
and Mary Earle, the ancestors of the subject of this sketch. The 
third group are descended from James and Rhody Earle, who 
settled at Easton, Maryland, in 1683. John Earle, of Westmore- 
land county, Virginia, received a grant of sixteen hundred acres 
for the transportation of a colony of thirty-two persons in 1652. 
Through the subsequent colonial and revolutionary periods, as 
well as during the three or four generations since the Govern- 
ment of the United States was established, members of this 
family have been prominent and useful citizens, residing chiefly 
in Virginia, Kentucky, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mis- 
sissippi and Texas. 

Farm work learned in boyhood helped to develop in the sub- 
ject of this sketch a strong physical constitution and good health. 
From his earliest recollection he felt a strong desire for learning, 
which helped him to overcome the difficulties he encountered in 
acquiring an education. After studying in country schools and 
at home he entered South Carolina college, but he did not com- 
plete the undergraduate course. He was thirty years old when he 

Vol. II. S. C. 6. 



118 JULIUS RICHARD EARLE 

began the practice of law at Walhalla in 1893. In 1894 he was 
magistrate at Walhalla. In the autumn of that year he was 
elected to the South Carolina house of representatives, serving 
until 1896. In the autumn of 1904 he was elected to represent 
his county in the state senate of South Carolina for the term 
1904 to 1908. 

Mr. Earle has published a compilation of business and law 
forms designed to be of practical use to business men and farmers 
as well as to lawyers. In 1894 he served as captain of the Blue 
Ridge Rifles in the state militia. He is a Mason. He is identified 
with the Democratic party in his political affiliations. He is a 
member of the Baptist church, in which his father was a useful 
minister. 

Pie has been twice married: First, to Miss Lula Perry Hix, 
of Fair Play, South Carolina, who died August 10, 1891, leaving 
one child. He was married a second time to Eva Merritt, of 
White county, Georgia, October 26, 1892, and they have five 
children living in 1907. 

His suggestions to young Americans are brief, and are given 
in these words: "Truthfulness is the greatest lack of the day. 
Abhor commercialism." 

The address of Mr. Earle is Walhalla, South Carolina. 



SAMUEL HENRY EDMUNDS 

EDMUNDS, SAMUEL HENRY, superintendent of the 
city schools of Sumter, South Carolina, was born at 
Mill Grove, Richland county, May 28, 1870. His father, 
Reverend Nicholas William Edmunds, D. D., was for twenty-five 
years pastor of the First Presbyterian church of Sumter; and 
his son remembers him and many of his former parishioners 
describe him as "a man of deep consecration and high intellec- 
tuality." His mother was Mary Claudia (Leland) Edmunds. 
Her family were from Massachusetts and trace their descent from 
John Leland, of the time of Henry VIII., in England. To her, 
her son ascribes a deep and strong moral and spiritual influence 
upon his entire life. His earliest known ancestor in America 
was Martin Marshall, who came from England to South Carolina 
in 1785. 

His boyhood was passed in the country or in a village. He 
was fond of "all the sports of the field, the water and the woods." 
His parents, by their own sacrifices, made the way to a liberal 
education easy for him, so far as pecuniary matters were con- 
cerned. After studying in the common schools of Sumter, he 
was admitted to Davidson college, and was graduated in 1890 
with the degree of A. B. Since his graduation he has followed 
some post-graduate courses in literature under Professor Currell, 
now of Washington and Lee university. 

He began the work of teaching, his chosen profession, as 
principal of the city schools of Sumter, in 1890, holding that 
position until 1893. He was principal of the high school at Rock 
Hill, South Carolina, from 1893 to 1895. From 1895 until the 
present time (1907) he has been superintendent of the Sumter 
city schools. He is also a member of the Sumter county board 
of education. 

On December 24, 1896, he married Miss Eliza Champion 
Davis; and they have had five children, all of whom are now 
(1907) living. 

He is affiliated with the Democratic party. He is connected 
with the Presbyterian church. Throughout his professional life 



120 SAMUEL HENRY EDMUNDS 

he has found his favorite relaxation, exercise and sport in 
hunting. He is a Knight of Pythias. 

Superintendent Edmunds feels, as do many others who study 
the tendencies of the last two decades in American life, that a 
great danger threatens the oncoming generation of our young 
people in the prominence now given in public thought to "prac- 
tical commercialism." His advice to young Carolinians is that 
they make business life and money making "a means and not an 
end"; and that "consecration to a lofty idealism is needed; and 
realization of the truth a deep-seated and positive realization 
that our life here is but a school of discipline to fit us for some- 
thing higher and better." 

His address is Sumter, South Carolina. 




" 
D C 




CYPRIAN MELANGHTHON EFIRD 

EFIRD, CYPRIAN MELANCHTHON, lawyer, state 
senator, state reporter, and author of Efird's "Digest of 
South Carolina Reports," is a type of the lawyer of 
high purpose and sound character to whom his fellow-citizens 
intrust not only legal business, but the responsibility of acting 
upon boards of trust for their colleges and seminaries, and of 
representing them in the legislature of their state. He was born 
in Lexington county, South Carolina, December 18, 1856. His 
father, the Reverend Daniel Efird, was a minister of the Gospel 
and a forceful preacher in the Lutheran church, whose ancestors, 
coming from Germany, settled in central North Carolina; his 
mother, Henrietta M. Dreher, was the granddaughter of Godfrey 
Dreher, who was also a Lutheran preacher, well remembered still 
in Lexington county, South Carolina. His early life was passed 
in the country; and as a boy he was "required to do regular 
work about the house and the farm," and was thus "aided in 
forming habits of industry." 

Preparing for college at the Pine Ridge academy, in Lex- 
ington county, he pursued his college studies at Newberry college, 
taking the degree of A. B. in 1877, and receiving the degree of 
A. M. four years later. He taught school in Newberry and 
Lexington counties after his graduation from college. Drawn by 
his own personal preference to the practice of law, he completed 
a course of law studies by private reading, and was admitted to 
the bar in June, 1882. At once he began the practice of his 
profession at Lexington, where he has ever since resided, and 
from whose citizens he has received many evidences of confidence 
and esteem. In 1892, but ten years after he began the practice 
of his profession, he was elected upon the Democratic ticket as 
state senator, serving for four years. When the Constitutional 
convention of 1895 was called, Mr. Efird was chosen a member 
of the convention. In 1896 he was appointed state reporter, a 
position which he still (1907) holds. 

Connected with the Lutheran church, of which his father 
and his grandfather were ministers, he has for some years been 
a member of the board of trustees of Newberry college. He is 



124: CYPRIAN MELANCHTHON EFIRD 

also a member of the board of directors of the Theological 
seminary of the United Synod of the South; and he acts as 
treasurer of the endowment fund of that institution. 

In 1904 he published Efird's "Digest of South Carolina 
Reports," covering Volumes XLIII-LX. 

On December 28, 1882, he married Miss Carrie Boozer, 
daughter of Doctor Jacob and Eva C. Boozer, of Lexington 
county, South Carolina. They have had four children, all of 
whom are living in 1907. 

He advises the boys of South Carolina, in planning for 
success in life, to "make it their steadfast purpose, first, to adhere 
to correct moral and religious standards; second, to acquire a 
thorough preparation for their chosen life work; and third, to 
give assiduous attention to business." 

The address of Mr. Efird is Lexington, South Carolina. 



JAMES EDWIN ELLERBE 

ELLERBE, JAMES EDWIN, member of congress from 
South Carolina, was born on the 12th day of January, 
1867, in Marion county, South Carolina, from the mar- 
riage of William S. Ellerbe and Sarah E. Haselden. His father 
was a farmer by occupation and never held a public office. He 
was a man of absolute honesty and marked devotion to his 
chosen occupation. Mr. Ellerbe's earliest ancestor in America 
was Thomas Elerby, who emigrated from England to Virginia 
in 1737. Another Thomas Ellerbe, of Revolutionary fame, was 
also a member of the family. The subject of this sketch grew 
up in the country in the enjoyment of perfect health. While 
the necessity therefor did not exist, he nevertheless passed much 
of his time in hard work upon his father's farm. His education 
was easily acquired. Morally and spiritually his mother's influ- 
ence upon his life was very marked. He attended a preparatory 
school at Pine Hill, South Carolina, and in June, 1887, was 
graduated from Wofford college, South Carolina, with the degree 
of A. B. On the 23d of November, 1887, he married Nellie 
Converse Elford, by whom he has had five children, three of 
whom are living in 1907. He began the business of farming and 
merchandising in Marion county in July, 1887, continuing the 
same until December, 1891, when he discontinued the merchandise 
business and devoted himself wholly to farming. He served in 
the state legislature from 1894 to 1896, in the state Constitutional 
convention in 1895, was elected a member of congress in 1904, 
and is still (1907) a member of that body. 

His success in life has been largely due to home influences 
and to private study, as well as to his contact in public life with 
eminent men. Mr. Ellerbe is an active Mason, having taken the 
Shriner degree, and is a member of the Chi Phi fraternity. 
He is a member of the Democratic party, and of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. 

His postoffice address is Sellers, Marion county, South Caro- 
lina. 



WILLIAM ELLIOTT, JR. 

ELLIOTT, WILLIAM, JR., attorney at law, lieutenant 
in the navy during the period of the war with Spain, 
special commissioner to codify the laws of South Caro- 
lina, general manager of the Street Railway, Light and Power 
company of Columbia, South Carolina, at which city he resides, 
was born at Beaufort, South Carolina, on the 30th of March, 
1872. He follows the profession of his father, William Elliott, 
Esquire, a lawyer, and a member of congress, who represented 
the Seventh and the First South Carolina districts (the latter 
including Charleston) for fourteen years. His mother was Mrs. 
Sarah (Stuart) Elliott. A sketch of his ancestors' life is found 
in the biography of his father, Honorable William Elliott, in 
these volumes. 

As a boy he had excellent health, was fond of hunting and 
of all athletic sports, and developed into a young manhood 
physically robust and vigorous. His family circumstances were 
such as to open the way to courses at preparatory schools and at 
the university without need of effort on his part to provide for 
self-support. In securing an education he says that he had "no 
difficulties to overcome except an excessive enthusiasm for foot- 
ball!" He studied for several years at the Episcopal high school 
at Alexandria, Virginia. In 1891 he entered the University of 
Virginia, and was graduated in 1893, having found his chief 
interest in the study of law. Admitted to the bar, he began to 
practice at once in his father's law office, at Beaufort, South 
Carolina, in 1893. In 1898 he was commissioned a lieutenant of 
the navy, and he served until October, 1898, throughout the 
period of the war with Spain. In 1901 he was appointed code 
commissioner of the state of South Carolina, charged with the 
duty of codifying the laws of the state. Since 1901 he has 
published the acts of the legislature of South Carolina. 

Mr. Elliott is attorney for the Capital City mills, for the 
Richland Cotton mills, the Granby Cotton mills, the Olympia 
Cotton mills, and for several other corporations. He is also 
general manager of the Street Railway, Light and Power com- 
pany of Columbia, South Carolina. 



WILLIAM ELLIOTT, JR. 127 

At college he was a member of the Delta Psi fraternity. 
He is a Mason. He is identified with the Protestant Episcopal 
Church. In his party relations he is a Democrat; and he has 
never swerved in his allegiance to the principles and the nominees 
of that party. In addition to his youthful enthusiasm for foot- 
ball, to which reference has been made, Mr. Elliott has found, 
and still finds, a favorite form of exercise and amusement in 
hunting. 

On the 15th of November, 1900, he was married to Miss 
Leila G. Sams, daughter of Barnwell S. Sams, of Beaufort, South 
Carolina. They have had three children, all of whom are living 
in 1907. 

Mr. Elliott does not yet feel that he has reached a time of 
life which would justify him in offering formal advice to the 
young people of South Carolina who hope to attain true success 
in life; and he declines to go upon record as a giver of such 
advice. But it is not too much to say that in his devotion to 
his professional work and in the measure of success which he has 
already attained at the age of thirty-four, his younger fellow- 
citizens may find certain suggestions as to the conditions and the 
secret of success. 



BARNETT ABRAHAM ELZAS 

ELZAS, BARNETT ABRAHAM, scholar, author, critic, 
editor, historian, and rabbi, was born at Eydkuhnen, 
Germany, December 7, 1867. He is the son of Abraham 
and Hinda Lewinthal Elzas. His father was a clergyman and 
author, a minister of the Jewish congregation and master of the 
Hebrew school at Leeds, England. Abraham Elzas was born 
and educated in Holland, and went to England from Russia about 
1867. He traveled extensively, visiting for purposes of study 
many parts of the world. In 1871 he removed from Leeds to 
Hull, where he became master of the Hebrew school, and for 
some years rilled the post of minister to the congregation. Failing 
health led him to resign in 1877. For some years previous to his 
death, in 1880, he was occupied in literary as well as scholastic 
pursuits, and he published translations of several books of the 
Bible, including "Proverbs" (1871), "The Book of Job" (1872), 
"The Minor Prophets" (1873-1880), with critical notes. The 
early life of Barnett Elzas was passed in England; he enjoyed 
the best of health; in youth he developed a taste for the study 
of natural science and history; he was an omniverous reader, his 
reading including the Bible, Shakespeare, Macaulay's works, the 
latter being cultivated for English style. Schooling was his for 
the taking. He was educated for the Jewish ministry at Jews' 
college, London, of which he is an "Associate." He held several 
scholarships while a student in that institution. His secular 
education he received at University college, London, where he 
was the "Hollier Scholar," in 1886. He is a first B. A. of the 
University of London. 

From London Mr. Elzas went to Toronto, Canada, to take 
charge of a synagogue. While in Toronto he studied Semitic 
languages under Professor McCurdy, and graduated with first 
class honors from the University of Toronto in 1893. From the 
South Carolina college he received, in 1905, the honorary degree 
of LL. D. In Charleston, South Carolina, he studied medicine 
and pharmacy at the Medical college, receiving the degree of 
M. D. and Phar. G. in 1900 and 1901 respectively. 



te 



IBRARY 



BARNETT ABRAHAM ELZAS 131 

Doctor Elzas is by profession a rabbi. His first charge was 
the "Holy Blossom" congregation at Toronto, to which he 
was appointed by Doctor H. Adler, chief rabbi of the United 
Hebrew congregations of the British Empire. Here he remained 
for three years, 1890-93. From here he received a call to Sacra- 
mento, California, in 1893, and remained one year, when called 
to the pulpit of the historic congregation of Beth Elohim, of 
Charleston, South Carolina, which he still occupies. 

Doctor Elzas has been chaplain of the Actors' Church alli- 
ance, having its headquarters in New York city. He is a Mason, 
a member of the Mystic Shrine, and of the Independent Order 
of B'nai Brith. He has held the position of thrice illustrious 
master of Enoch Council, No. 1, A. F. and A. M., and also that 
of deputy president for South Carolina of the Independent Order 
of B'nai Brith. 

Doctor Elzas has for the past twelve years been a prolific 
and valued contributor to Jewish publications. His historical 
researches in unexplored fields, notably the early history of the 
Jews in South Carolina, have given him an honored place among 
contemporary Jewish historians. Among his many publications 
the following may be mentioned: "Judaism an Exposition"; 
"The Jews of South Carolina from the Earliest Times to the 
Present Day"; "Documents Relative to a Proposed Settlement 
of Jews in South Carolina in 1748"; "Old Jewish Cemeteries"; 
"A Review of the Article 'Charleston' in Volume III of the 
Jewish Encyclopedia"; "The Elzas-Huhner Controversy"; "A 
History of the Congregation of Beth Elohim, of Charleston, 
South Carolina, 1800-1810"; "A Century of Judaism in South 
Carolina"; and "Leaves from My Historical Scrap Book." 

Doctor Elzas is particularly interested in all matters relating 
to higher education in South Carolina. He believes the trend of 
events to point clearly to the restoration of political leadership 
to that state. This, in his judgment, can be brought about only 
by the citizens of South Carolina doing their duty in the matter 
of higher education in the state. His views on this subject he 
has embodied in an address made at the Centennial celebration 
of South Carolina college, and highly commended by the press. 
He believes the material prosperity of the state in the future will 
largely depend upon the attitude of the citizens of South Caro- 
lina on this question. He is likewise very much interested in 



132 BARNETT ABRAHAM ELZA8 

the questions of the upbuilding of an industrial Charleston. His 
thought on this subject was brought out (January 18, 1905,) in 
an address in response to the toast, "The City of Charleston," 
before the German Friendly society. 

Doctor Elzas's relaxation is literature and gardening. His 
motto is: 

"Men say I've failed; I have not failed. 
If I've brought truth to men they'd not receive, 
'Tis they have failed, not /." 

To the young he says: "Work for work's sake, irrespective 
of material gain or success. True success comes not as the result 
of ambition to grasp it. Material success may never come, but 
faithful effort is in itself its own ample reward. The greatest 
blight on the American character today is the inordinate grasping 
after immediate results." Doctor Elzas's biography has been 
published in the American Jewish Year Book (1903, page 52,) 
and in the Jewish Encyclopedia (Volume V). 

On June 25, 1890, he was married to Miss Annie Samuel, 
daughter of Reverend Isaac Samuel, of London, England. They 
have had three children, one of whom is now (1907) living. 

His address is Charleston, South Carolina. 




I 

- 




WILLIAM DEWITT EVANS 

EVANS, WILLIAM D E WITT, planter, member of the 
legislature from 1886 to 1890, state senator from 1890 to 
1894, and chairman of the board of railroad commis- 
sioners of South Carolina from 1895 to 1901, was born at Society 
Hill, South Carolina, July 31, 1849. His father, Samuel Wilds 
Evans, was a planter, a member of the legislature from Chester- 
field county, who is described by his son as "candid, positive, a 
man of strong convictions, but kindly and gentle in his nature." 
His mother, Mrs. Alexina (Wallace) Evans, was the daughter of 
Andrew Wallace, of Columbia, South Carolina, who came from 
Scotland to South Carolina, about 1790, and married Sarah 
Patrick, of Virginia. His father's family is of Welsh descent, 
and Thomas Evans, who came from Wales to Pennsylvania in 
1700, and removed to Welsh Neck, South Carolina, in 1736, is 
his earliest known ancestor in America. Through his paternal 
grandmother William DeWitt Evans is descended from William 
DeWitt, who was a son of Martin DeWitt, who came from 
Holland to Fredericksburg, Virginia, and settled in Darlington 
county, South Carolina, in 1760. William DeWitt served in the 
Revolutionary war as captain under General Marion. Judge 
Josiah James Evans, his grandfather, lawyer and jurist, elected 
United States senator from South Carolina in 1852, is one of the 
distinguished members of this family. 

Born in the country, passing a healthy boyhood in country 
life, William DeWitt Evans says of himself that he w T as "fond 
of the society of his mother, his sisters and other girls" ; and that 
he found delight through his boyhood in horseback riding and 
hunting. He adds : "I made my own money after I was eleven 
years old by working at odd times on a little farm which was 
set aside for me by my father." 

After a few years of study at St. David's academy at Society 
Hill, in Darlington county, he was compelled to quit school when 
but sixteen to engage in the active work of life. In 1867, when 
but eighteen years old, he became the manager of his father's 
plantation in Marlboro county. The wishes of his parents and 
his own personal preference inclined him to the life of a planter, 



136 WILLIAM DEWITT EVANS 

while love of country and family pride impelled him to the service 
of his state and his country. By conviction a member of the Demo- 
cratic party, in 1878 he was chosen president of the Bennettsville 
Democratic club, and he was reflected to that office for twenty 
years until 1898, when he declined reelection. From 1890 to 1902 
he was chairman of the Democratic executive committee of Marl- 
boro county; and from 1890 to the present time (1907) he has 
been a member of the State Democratic executive committee. 
He was chosen a member of the house of representatives from 
Marlboro county for two terms, serving from 1886 to 1889. In 
1889 he was chosen state senator, serving for four years until 
1894. In 1895 he was elected a member of the railroad commis- 
sion of South Carolina ; and he served as chairman of that board 
from 1895 to 1901. As a member of the constitutional convention 
of South Carolina in 1895 he was chairman of the committee on 
finance and taxation. 

Many friends who admired the character and the public 
services of Mr. Evans, and who had felt the power of his forceful 
speeches, urged that he make a canvass of the state as a candidate 
for governor, but this he declined to do. He says : "I have never 
desired high political honors; and I have taken the positions 
which I have accepted only with the hope of making the com- 
munity better for my having lived in it. I do not consider life a 
failure because a fortune has not been made in money, or because 
high political honors have not been won." 

Besides the political positions and offices already referred to, 
Mr. Evans has received proof of the esteem and confidence of his 
fellow-citizens in his choice to other positions of prominence and 
trust. He was president of the Farmers' Alliance of South Caro- 
lina from 1891 to 1892. He was president of the Agricultural 
and Mechanical Society of South Carolina from 1901 to 1902. 
From 1893 to 1896 he was a trustee of the Methodist Female 
college ; from 1890 to 1895 he served as trustee of the South Caro- 
lina college ; and since 1898 he has been a trustee of the Clemson 
Agricultural and Mechanical college. 

He is affiliated with the Episcopal church. His favorite 
form of exercise is horseback riding. 

He was married to Miss Mary Elizabeth Pegues, daughter 
of Colonel B. F. Pegues, of Marlboro county, December 17, 1873. 
Of their twelve children, ten are living in 1907. 

Mr. Evans' address is Cheraw, South Carolina. 



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JOHN ALEXANDER FANT 

FANT, JOHN ALEXANDER, merchant and mill president, 
was born in Union, Union county, South Carolina, April 
22, 1857. His parents were David J. and Nancy A. 
(McJunkin) Fant. His father, a planter, was noted for his 
honesty, sobriety and industry. His mother was descended from 
Joseph McJunkin, a major in the War of 1812. 

In his boyhood and youth John Fant was well and strong. 
His home was in the village in which he was born, and he had 
no tasks to perform which involved manual labor. He attended 
the common schools in Union until he was fifteen years of age, 
when he became a clerk in a country store. He retained this 
position for ten years, and then became a merchant. In this 
business, which he followed for twenty-five years, and in which 
he is still engaged, he has been quite successful. During the last 
five years he has been president and treasurer of the Monarch 
mills at Union. His good judgment and executive ability have 
made the mills a great success and won for Mr. Fant a prominent 
position among the cotton manufacturers of this state. 

He has never sought public office, but for six terms he served 
as mayor of the town of Union, and for some years was chairman 
of its board of school trustees. He is also a trustee of Furman 
university. He is a Mason, a Knight of Pythias, and a member 
of the Commercial club of Charleston. His religious affiliation 
is with the Baptist church. 

In the choice of an occupation Mr. Fant was governed by the 
wishes of his parents. The first strong impulse to strive for the 
prizes of life seems to have come from a desire which manifested 
itself in his early years to make a name for himself and accom- 
plish something for the good of mankind. Among the various 
influences which have greatly aided him in his efforts to succeed, 
he names that of home as the most important. In response to a 
request that he would offer suggestions which he thinks would 
help ambitious young people in their efforts to become known 
and useful in the world, he advises them to choose "honesty, 
punctuality, truthfulness, sobriety and industry," as the guiding 
principles of their lives. 



14:0 JOHN ALEXANDER FANT 

Mr. Fant was married to Ora Wilkes, April 27, 1881. Of 
their four children, all are now (1907) living. 

Since the above sketch was prepared for the printer Mr. Fant 
died suddenly at his home in Union on September 24, 1907. 



PUBLIC UBS AS v I 



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FRANCIS MARION FARR 

FARE, FRANCIS MARION, as merchant, manufacturer 
and banker, is connected with most of the leading cor- 
porations and business enterprises of Union county, South 
Carolina. He was born in that county, January 17, 1843, the 
son of a planter, James Farr, who had been county treasurer 
of Union county, and was a man "of great energy and good 
judgment, and very popular in his county." His mother, Mrs. 
Parmelia (Sharp) Farr, laid deep and strong the foundations of 
her son's intellectual and moral life; and the influence of her 
memory has been strong through all these years. His ancestors 
have been for several generations residents of Virginia and 
Maryland, and several of the Farrs were in the army of the 
united colonies in the Revolutionary war. 

Born in the country, having good health throughout his 
boyhood, he was early taught to labor on a farm, and he says: 
"It gave me good health and activity and energy." 

At the Male academy, at Union, South Carolina, he pursued 
studies preparatory to a more advanced course to be taken at 
Charleston, and entering the South Carolina Military academy, 
of that city, he was graduated in April, 1863. 

But one course seemed natural to the boys and young men 
who were studying at the Charleston Military institute in 1863; 
and as was to be expected, immediately upon his graduation he 
entered the Confederate service. First as a private, and later 
as captain of Company H of the Fifteenth South Carolina 
volunteers, he served until the close of the war. He then engaged 
in the work of teaching school and of farming for four years. 
On January 1, 1869, he began his business career as a merchant 
at Union, South Carolina. He says that his first strong deter- 
mination to strive for success in life came from "seeing what 
men had accomplished by persistent effort; and this determined 
me to try myself to accomplish something in life. I felt a great 
desire, too, to do some good for my fellow-men." 

His business career began as a member of the firm of John 
Rodger & Company. His later connections have been with the 
firms of Harris & Farr, F. M. Farr & Company, and Farr & 

Vol. II. S. C. 7. 



144 FRANCIS MARION FARR 

Thomson. He has been a director in the Merchants and Planters 
National bank, of Union, since its organization, in 1872, and for 
the last fifteen years he has been the president of that bank. 
He is a director of the Monarch, the Buffalo and the Jonesville 
Cotton mills. He is also a director in the following corporations 
and enterprises: The Rice Drug company; the Lipscomb com- 
pany, wholesale grocers; the Hames Grocery company; the 
People's Supply company ; and he is president of the Union Times 
(newspaper) company, and of the Cotton Growers' association. 
For many years he was one of the public trustees of the Union 
school district, and he was active in building up the graded 
school system in Union, in erecting brick school-houses, etc. He 
has been chairman of the board of commissioners of public works 
in Union since that office was created, in 1896. 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church. He is a member 
of the Democratic party, and uniformly supports its principles, 
its measures and its candidates. He is a member of the Knights 
of Honor. Necessary relaxation and change from business he 
finds in visiting the mountains during the summer. 

In November, 1872, he married Miss Mary D. Winebrenner. 
In September, 1885, he was a second time married to Miss Julia 
Rainey. He has one child, a son, living in 1907. 

As a business man, Mr. Farr commends to the boys and young 
men of South Carolina "energy, application, and loyalty to their 
employers," and "charity in all relations with their fellow-men." 

His address is Union, South Carolina. 



f U SUC LIBRARY 



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WILLIAM WALLACE FENNELL 

FENNELL, WILLIAM WALLACE, M. D., was born in 
Chester county, South Carolina, August 29, 1868. His 
parents were James F. and Alethia (Beckham) Fennell. 
His father was a machinist by occupation, though he had com- 
menced the study of medicine in Cincinnati before the opening 
of the War between the States, which prevented his graduation. 
He never held office, but was a man of kindly disposition and 
highly respected by his acquaintances. His mother was a woman 
of excellent qualities of mind and heart. The earliest ancestor 
of the family in this country was a Huguenot from France. 

In childhood and youth William Fennell lived in the small 
village of Richburg, South Carolina. His interests were those 
of the average boy of his time. He was especially fond of horses. 
His preparatory and literary education was limited. As clerk in 
a country store at Lando, South Carolina, he began work at an 
early age and saved a little money each year to be used for school 
purposes. His inclination at this time was for business pursuits, 
and though his means were wholly inadequate to meet the expense 
of the education which he desired to obtain, he entered the busi- 
ness department of the Kentucky university, from which he was 
graduated in 1887. He then became manager of the mercantile 
department of the Fishing Creek Manufacturing company, in 
Lando, where he remained until 1892, when, having concluded 
that he would rather be a physician than a business man, he 
resigned his position and entered the South Carolina Medical 
college, from which he was graduated in 1895. At the time of 
his graduation he was offered a hospital position by Dr. Manning 
Simons, who was authorized to choose one man from each class. 
The appointment was regarded a great honor, but the financial 
condition of Doctor Fennell was such that he was obliged to 
decline. In fact, he was compelled to borrow money with which 
to pay his railroad fare home. Very soon after his graduation 
he began the practice of medicine at Rock Hill, where he soon 
won popular regard and where he is still in active service as a 
physician. Doctor Fennell has taken repeated post-graduate 
courses at the New York Polyclinic hospital, and has studied in 



148 WILLIAM WALLACE FENNELL 

the private hospital of Dr. W. Gill Wylie, and at Bellevue several 
times. In the summer of 1895 he visited some of the principal 
hospitals in Europe and saw many operations performed by noted 
surgeons. 

In estimating the relative strength of certain specified influ- 
ences which have been helpful to him in the work of life, he 
places in the first rank those of private study and of contact with 
men in active life. Next he places that of home. His mother 
died when he was young, but she left a strong impress for good 
upon his intellectual and moral life. In the third and last rank 
he places school and early companionship as equal in their effect 
upon his success. He also feels that the hard work of early life 
was very useful, as it caused him to form habits of industry and 
perseverance and tended to make him self-reliant. He has never 
taken any course of physical culture, but finds both exercise and 
relaxation in hunting. He is a Mason and a Knight of Pythias. 
In politics he is a life-long Democrat. His religious affiliation is 
with the Associate Reformed Presbyterian church, of which he 
is an active and influential member. 

In reply to a request that in case there had been any partial 
failure to accomplish what he had hoped to do he would, for the 
sake of helping young people who may read his biography, state 
what useful lessons can be drawn therefrom, Doctor Fennell said 
that he feels that he has so far succeeded reasonably well rather 
better than he expected. But he greatly regrets that he did not 
spend more time in acquiring a literary education. And when 
asked to make suggestions as to the principles and methods which 
will contribute to the strengthening of sound ideals and help 
young people to attain true success in life, he said : "I believe for 
any young man to gain a large success in a profession he should 
decide early what he wants to do and work steadily and earnestly 
to that end. Failure, in my mind, is often the result of not being 
decided on what you want to do. My advice to a young man is 
to select an honorable career and 'stick to his last.' The secret 
of success is concentration." 

On January 11, 1899, Doctor Fennell was married to Mary 
Lyle. Of their three children, all were living in 1907. 

His postoffice address is Rock Hill, South Carolina. 



JOHN W. FERGUSON 

FEEGUSON, JOHN W., of Laurens, South Carolina, 
colonel of the Fourth infantry, in his early life a teacher, 
since 1874 a lawyer and an editor who early championed 
the "straight-out movement," for two terms a state senator for 
South Carolina, was born in Newberry county on the 29th of 
November, 1834. His father, Dr. George Ferguson, was a prac- 
ticing physician, of Scottish descent, his ancestors having come 
from Dumfries, Scotland, to settle in the Carolinas. Through 
his mother, Mrs. Mary (Peterson) Ferguson, he inherits a strain 
of Danish blood. His father died when he was two years old; 
and after she had cared for her orphan son until he was eight 
years old, his mother died. 

As a boy of eight he was thus left upon his own resources, 
his entire inheritance being only about one thousand dollars. He 
writes: "By spending all that I had, with the help of relatives 
I obtained a good education." 

In 1850 he was sent to Greenwood, South Carolina, then an 
educational center, to prepare for college. Entering the Pres- 
byterian school at Greenwood, he studied there for four years 
under Dr. Isaac Auld, of Charleston, South Carolina, whose first 
assistant was Dr. John Henry Logan. From the Greenwood 
school he entered Oglethorpe university, an institution located at 
Midway, about a mile from Milledgeville, Georgia. This college 
perished from lack of support in the troubled years which imme- 
diately followed the War between the States. 

After graduation from Oglethorpe, in 1856, Mr. Ferguson 
was elected principal of the Male academy at Cross Hill, South 
Carolina. He continued in charge of this academy for four 
years, meanwhile reading law under Colonel B. W. Ball and 
passing his examination for appointment to the bar in 1859. 

Upon the first call for volunteers in 1861, he enlisted in 
Company F, Third regiment, Kershaw's brigade. After some 
months of active service, he was discharged because of physical 
disability. Reentering the service as soon as his health permitted, 
for the last eight months of the war he served as colonel of the 
Fourth regiment of South Carolina troops, having all the time 



150 JOHN W. FERGUSON 

a discharge in his pocket for physical disability. At the close 
of the war, he says, "I found myself a pauper, and returned to 
the school room." In 1868 he became principal of the Male 
academy at Laurens, South Carolina. After six years in this 
position, he began the practice of law at Laurens in 1874. In 
1876 the owners of the Laurensville "Herald" placed Mr. Fer- 
guson in charge of that paper during the Wade Hampton 
campaign. Under his management the paper became a strenuous 
advocate of the "straight-out movement." Upon the election of 
Wade Hampton, he left the editorial chair to resume his practice 
of the law. In 1880 he was elected to the state senate, declining 
a reelection. In 1888 he was again chosen state senator and after 
serving his term was a candidate for reelection in 1892; but he 
"went down before the tide of Tillmanism." Since 1892 Colonel 
Ferguson has devoted himself strictly to the practice of the law. 
While he has no personal taste for politics, and no definite 
political ambition, he has always held it to be the duty of every 
good citizen to study public affairs and to express his choice and 
will by his vote on every election day; and he never fails to go 
to the polls. He has marked literary taste and finds his chief 
relaxation and delight among his books. In 1891 he was elected 
a trustee of South Carolina college, and he served for six years. 

In December, 1869, Colonel Ferguson married Miss Mary 
Dorroh, a daughter of Dr. William Dorroh, of Newberry, South 
Carolina. 

Mr. Ferguson is an elder in the Presbyterian church. He is 
a Mason and has taken the Council degrees. 

His address is Laurens, South Carolina. 



RICHARD THOMAS FEWELL 

FEWELL, RICHARD THOMAS, banker and mill presi- 
dent, residing at Rock Hill, York county, South Carolina, 
was born in that county, October 13, 1855. His father, 
Alexander F. Fewell, was a merchant and farmer after the war 
exclusively a farmer; and, in the language of his son, "a self- 
made man, stern of character, of excellent judgment, whose 
opinions were always sought and valued one who sought no 
offices or titles and lost no friends liberal, public-spirited." 

In boyhood Richard Fewell's health was not vigorous. He 
passed his early years in the country on a farm. He says 
significantly that his earliest interest in his childhood was "the 
wish to do my duty." On account of limitations of health, and 
trouble with his eyes, he worked for two years upon a farm. 
Overcoming very serious difficulties in his determination to give 
himself some educational advantages, he was able to attend the 
Ebenezer academy, and, after acting as clerk for two years, to 
spend one year at the King's Mountain Military school, and later 
(in 1875) to take a course of study at Eastman's Business college, 
at Poughkeepsie, New York. 

He began business for himself, June 1, 1876, in the firm of 
Ivy & Fewell ; but after ten years this partnership was dissolved 
and the firm became R. T. Fewell & Company, the name under 
which as partner and manager he conducted a large business until 
"after the fire" in 1898. The firm then discontinued their general 
merchandise business, but Mr. Fewell has continued a business 
in fertilizers, lumber and coal. In 1895 he organized the Arcade 
Cotton mill, with a capital of $100,000, and he is still (1907) 
president of that corporation. He is also president of the Bank 
of Rock Hill, which he organized in 1903. With J. M. Cherry, 
he built and owned the Rock Hill Water Works and the Electric 
Street Railroad System of Rock Hill. Besides the corporations 
and institutions of which he has been president or a large owner, 
he was a charter member and a mover in organizing the Savings 
Bank of Rock Hill, the Globe Cotton mill, the Standard Cotton 
mill, the Rock Hill Oil mill, and the Rock Hill Construction 
company. Indeed, he has been a director in every considerable 



152 RICHARD THOMAS FEWELL 

business enterprise which has been started at Rock Hill since his 
own business life began in that community. He was connected 
with the local militia from 1875 to 1891, having served as 
lieutenant. 

He belongs to the orders of Masons, Knights of Pythias, 
and the Woodmen of the World. He is a member of the board of 
governors of the Commercial club, and of the Piedmont club, of 
Rock Hill. 

By religious convictions he is identified with the Presbyte- 
rian church. His political affiliations are with the Democratic 
party. He finds amusement and exercise in bowling. 

Young Americans who are hoping for a success in life that 
shall make them more useful to others as they increase in influ- 
ence will be interested in the very practical suggestions which 
Mr. Fewell offers to his younger fellow-citizens, as the results 
of his own observation and experience in the life of a business 
man who has been prominently identified with all the business 
interests of his part of the state. He writes: "Be invariably 
prompt in keeping every engagement. Try to excel in anything 
you may undertake, and concentrate your mind upon it, making 
a study of your business. Be broad and liberal toward others, 
but just. Grant every one a right to an opinion. Remember 
that when you lose your temper you lose your point." And if 
these paragraphs fall under the eye of any South Carolina boy 
who feels that his lot in life is hard because he does not inherit 
wealth, let him note especially the opinion which Mr. Fewell 
gives in his last sentence to young Carolinians: "It is a curse 
for a boy to have too much money to spend. If you are working 
for money, save it, and work rather to excel than merely to make 
money for the time, and you will have more money as the result 
later." 



RUFUS FORD 

FORD, RUFUS, pastor of the Baptist church at Marion, 
South Carolina, was born in Marion county, South Caro- 
lina, August 22, 1852. His father, E. B. Ford, was a 
farmer and "magistrate," "a man of deep sympathy always a 
friend of the poor, and especially a friend of the wives and 
widows of soldiers during the War between the States a peace- 
maker, who for the twenty-five years while he was an officer of 
the law always used his office rather to settle differences than to 
favor litigation." His mother was Anna Jane Herring. On 
both sides he is descended from English ancestry who came to 
America in the colonial period. 

A healthy boy, he early learned something of work on the 
farm ; and the regular tasks of physical toil prescribed to him in 
his boyhood and youth, and varied by such amusements in fishing, 
hunting and bathing, as come to boys in country life, he regards 
as upon the whole "a discipline which was morally and physically 
good." His mother died when he was but three years old; but 
she made a strong impression upon her son, of whom she said 
even at that early age, "If he lives, he will yet preach." 

The disorders of the War between the States, beginning when 
he was but nine years old, interfered with his schooling and his 
systematic preparation for college. But after the war he studied 
at Marion academy and at Wake Forest college, North Carolina, 
from which he was graduated with the degree of A. B. in 1878. 
Two years of professional study followed, at the Southern Bap- 
tist Theological seminary. He had supported himself for several 
years, from the time he was eighteen, by work as a clerk and 
bookkeeper at Nicols, South Carolina. His own personal pref- 
erence drew him to the work of the Christian ministry. From 
1879 until 1890 he was pastor of country churches in Marlboro 
county. From 1890 to 1895 he was pastor of the Baptist church 
at Newbern, North Carolina, and from 1895 to December, 1905, 
he was pastor of the Baptist church in Bennettsville, South 
Carolina. On the date last named he became pastor of a Baptist 
church in Marion, South Carolina, where he still (1907) remains. 



154 RUFUS FORD 

In addition to his regular pastoral work, he has served on 
several different boards of church work, and for the past nine 
years he has been chairman of the board of trustees of the 
Marlboro graded school. During the period of his pastorate at 
Bennettsville, the congregation to which he ministers has erected 
and paid for an enlarged and handsome brick church. They 
have also built and paid for a new parsonage. 

The Reverend Mr. Ford has always shown a disposition to 
identify himself sympathetically, actively and most usefully with 
the moral, educational and religious interests not only of his 
parish but of the town and the county in which he has labored. 

He married Miss Hattie Temple, April 6, 1880. Of their 
seven children, six are now (1907) living. 

To others who are thinking of preparing themselves for the 
ministry of the Gospel he wishes to express his conviction that 
his own work would have been in several respects more effective 
if he had taken time to complete the full course of study at the 
theological seminary, and had done some post-graduate study at 
a university, before he settled in a pastorate. 

Asked for a word of suggestion for the young people of 
South Carolina, based upon his own observation and experience, 
he writes : "Our young people need to guard against superficiality. 
Making a good living ought not to satisfy. The Great Teacher 
said that 'a man's life consisteth not in the abundance of the 
things which he possesseth.' Making a good life is far more than 
making a good living." 

His address is Marion, Marion county, South Carolina. 



THOMAS BOONE ERASER 

FRASER, THOMAS BOONE, lawyer, and since 1900 a 
member of the house of representatives of South Carolina, 
was born at Sumter, South Carolina, June 21, 1860. He 
has chosen for himself, and has steadily followed, the profession 
of his father, Thomas Boone Fraser, who was a lawyer, a member 
of the South Carolina house of representatives, state senator, 
and judge of the third circuit. His mother, Sarah Margaret 
(Mclver) Fraser, died when he was but three years old. The 
family trace their descent from John Fraser, who emigrated from 
Scotland and settled near Georgetown, South Carolina. 

In his boyhood Thomas B. Fraser was delicate; and he has 
never had vigorous health. At a private school in Sumter he 
pursued his preparatory studies, and entering Davidson college, 
North Carolina, he was graduated in 1881 with the degree of 
A. B. 

From his earliest recollection, he says, "My ambition was to 
be a lawyer of integrity and ability." He pursued the study of 
law at home under the guidance of his father, Judge Fraser, 
and in December, 1883, he commenced practice. 

He has always voted and acted with the Democratic party 
of his state, not being drawn aside from party allegiance into 
independent action, nor "bolting" on a temporary issue. His 
fellow-citizens elected him one of the aldermen of his town. In 
1900 he was chosen a member of the house of representatives and 
has been three times reflected to that office. He was a member 
of the dispensary investigating committee, appointed in 1905, 
and is now (1907) chairman of the judiciary committee of the 
house. 

On December 16, 1886, he married Miss Emma M. Edmunds. 
They have had one child, who is living in 1907. 

He says: "I have been more influenced by the Bible than 
by any other book." A member of the Presbyterian church, he 
was made a deacon in 1882, and he has been a ruling elder in 
that church since 1901. He was also a member of the Birming- 
ham assembly (Southern Presbyterian Church), and opposed the 



156 THOMAS BOONE PHASER 

"Articles of Agreement" on the ground that their adoption would 
be a surrender of autonomy and unconstitutional. 

As a lawyer who has been in practice for more than twenty 
years, and as a South Carolinian who has been a lawmaker for his 
state since 1900, the opinion of Mr. Fraser should have weight 
with his fellow-citizens when he writes by way of suggestion to 
boys and young men the principles which will contribute most 
helpfully to their success in life : "The greatest need of our people 
today is reverence for law as law. Disregard of law is well-nigh 
universal. In the citizen this shows itself conspicuously in 'lynch 
law,' so-called. If a measure is deemed for the public good, the 
legislature will enact a law which is clearly forbidden by the 
constitution. The executive department does not try to enforce, 
or enforces only in part, laws which do not meet with the execu- 
tive approval (the dispensary law, for instance). Even the 
courts overrule long-established principles in order that 'justice' 
may be done in a particular case." 

The address of Mr. Fraser is Sumter, South Carolina. 



FRANK RAVENEL FROST 

FROST, FRANK RAVENEL, a lawyer, and in the Spanish- 
American war a captain in the Third United States 
volunteer infantry, was born at Society Hill, Darlington 
county, South Carolina, October 17, 1863. His father was Elias 
Horry Frost, a merchant. His mother was Fanny (Ravenel) 
Frost. He traces his descent from the Reverend Thomas Frost, 
M. A., a fellow of Cains college, Cambridge university, England, 
who came to this country after the Revolutionary war, and who 
became rector of St. Philip's church, Charleston, South Carolina. 
His grandfather was the Honorable Edward Frost, judge of the 
court of appeals and court of errors of South Carolina. 

His boyhood and early youth were spent in his native state. 
After fitting for college, he matriculated at Harvard university, 
and was graduated with the degree of B. A. in 1886. 

Soon after graduation he took up the study of law and began 
to practice in Charleston, South Carolina. He is now a member 
of the law firm of Smythe, Lee & Frost. 

In his political convictions he is identified with the Demo- 
cratic party, but he has acted independently of the party, and 
in 1896 voted for McKinley. By religious belief he is affiliated 
with the Episcopal church, and has been a director of the Young 
Men's Christian association for many years. 

Mr. Frost is a member of most of the prominent clubs and 
societies in Charleston. He has been a member of several public 
boards. He is a trustee of the Porter Military academy. He has 
been friendly to the cause of educating the negro, so long as the 
negro remains in this country, along lines which will make him as 
useful and capable as he can be made, and as worthy of respect 
of all persons as his nature will permit. 

He married Miss Celestine H. Preston, April 18, 1900; and 
they have had two children, both of whom are living in 1907. 

The address of Mr. Frost is Charleston, South Carolina. 



PHILIP HENRY GADSDEN 

GADSDEN, PHILIP HENKY, lawyer, and president of 
the Charleston Consolidated Kailway, Gas and Electric 
company, was born in Charleston, South Carolina, on 
the 4th of October, 1867, son of Christopher S. Gadsden and 
Florida I. Gadsden. His father was a civil engineer by profes- 
sion and held the position of second vice-president of the Atlantic 
Coast Line railway. He was characterized by great firmness and 
determination of purpose. Among the earliest known ancestors 
of Philip H. Gadsden was Thomas Gadsden, of England, a lieu- 
tenant in the Royal navy and collector of the port of Charleston 
in 1722; while among his distinguished ancestors were Christo- 
pher Gadsden, general in the Revolutionary army, and Paul 
Hamilton, secretary of the United States navy. 

In youth Philip H. Gadsden's physical condition was good. 
His special tastes were literary. His life was passed chiefly in the 
city of Charleston, and his preparatory education was obtained 
at the Holy Communion Church institute, in Charleston. He 
was graduated at the South Carolina college in 1888 with first 
honor and with the degree of B. A. He studied law at the South 
Carolina college and was admitted to practice in 1889. He began 
active life as a clerk in the office of T. M. Mordecai, Esquire, of 
Charleston, South Carolina, with whom, in 1900, he formed a law 
partnership under the firm name of Mordecai & Gadsden. The 
influence and example of Mr. Gadsden's parents have had a 
marked effect upon his career, but the choice of a profession was 
determined by his own personal preference. 

Up to the year 1899, Mr. Gadsden devoted himself wholly 
to the practice of law. In August, 1899, he was elected vice- 
president of the Charleston Consolidated Railway, Gas and Elec- 
tric company. In February, 1903, he rose to the presidency of 
the same company. In October, 1903, he was made president of 
the Roanoke Navigation and Water Power company, of Weldon, 
North Carolina, and in February, 1905, vice-president of the 
Charleston Light and Water company. He was thrice elected 
member of the legislature from Charleston county, South Caro- 
lina, serving from 1893 to 1898. In February, 1907, he was 



PHILIP HENRY GADSDEN 161 

elected vice-president of the Charleston chamber of commerce, 
and in the following month he was appointed by the mayor of 
Charleston, under resolution of city council, to go to Germany 
as a representative of the city of Charleston to investigate the 
matter of immigration to the South, and on his return he made 
to the mayor of Charleston a very full report, which has been 
published by direction of the chamber of commerce. 

Mr. Gadsden is a prominent member of the Masons and the 
Knights of Pythias; has been master of a Masonic lodge and 
chancellor commander of the Knights of Pythias. He has always 
been a Democrat, and is a member of the Protestant Episcopal 
church. His life has been so busy that he has found little time 
for relaxation, and has given no special attention to athletics or 
any special system of physical culture. He is in the prime of life, 
with great mental and physical vigor, and occupies an important 
position in his native city. 

In April, 1895, he married Sallie Pelzer Inglesby. She died 
July 22, 1900, leaving two children, both of whom are now (1907) 
living. 

His address is Number 64 Hasell street, Charleston, South 
Carolina. 



JOSEPH AUGUSTUS GAMEWELL 

GAMEWELL, JOSEPH AUGUSTUS, professor of Latin 
at Wofford college, Spartanburg, South Carolina, was 
born in Rutherfordton, North Carolina, on the 3d of 
January, 1850. 

His father, Reverend W. A. Gamewell, was a Methodist 
preacher of the South Carolina conference, filling several promi- 
nent pastorates in the state and serving as presiding elder for a 
number of terms, and as a member of the board of trustees of the 
Columbia Female college and president of the board of trustees of 
Wofford college until the time of his death, he was prominently 
identified with all the ecclesiastical and educational interests of 
the Methodist church in his state. Not only Professor Gamewell's 
father, but his grandfather as well, was a member of the South 
Carolina conference and a minister of the Gospel. His father 
married a Miss McDowell, a granddaughter of Colonel Joseph 
McDowell, who took a prominent part in the battle of King's 
Mountain. His father's brother was the inventor of the Game- 
well fire-alarm, extensively used throughout the country, while 
another uncle, Frank Gamewell, made a most brilliant record at 
the South Carolina college, but died in early youth. 

In his boyhood he attended private schools at Columbia and 
Darlington. At the age of fifteen he enlisted in the Confederate 
army and served in the Inglis light battery. He was prepared 
for college chiefly at Darlington. Entering Wofford college, he 
was graduated with the class of 1871. He was a member of the 
Kappa Alpha fraternity. After graduation he taught for four 
years the Boys' high school at Mt. Sterling, Kentucky. In 1875 
he was invited to a position in the corps of instructors at Wofford 
college. 

Professor Gamewell has not only discharged faithfully and 
acceptably the duties of his professorship, but he has also been 
active in all that concerns the welfare of the college, and he has 
been particularly useful to the life of the college through his 
interest in the work of the Young Men's Christian association. 
He was president of the first association established in Spartan- 
burg, and he is still a member of its board of managers. For 



JOSEPH AUGUSTUS GAMEWELL 163 

nine years he acted as president of the Wofford College lyceum. 

On the 17th of September, 1879, Professor Gamewell mar- 
ried Miss Julia McDowell, of Asheville, daughter of Dr. Joseph 
McDowell. They have had two children, a son and a daughter, 
both of whom have married and are living in 1907. 

Professor Gamewell has for some years acted as steward of 
the Central Methodist church, of Spartanburg. 



Vol. II. S. C. 8. 



ARTHUR LEE GASTON 

G ASTON, ARTHUR LEE, lawyer, legislator, was born in 
Chester, South Carolina, August 14, 1876, son of Thomas 
Chalmers and Adelaide (Lee) Gaston. He is descended 
from a long line of distinguished ancestors, both American and 
European, the first known of whom was John Gaston, Grand 
Duke of Tuscany, cousin to Louis the XII of France, who, on 
account of his Huguenot affiliations, was banished from his 
country, and subsequently took up his residence in Scotland. 

The first member of this family who came to America was 
likewise named John Gaston, one of the first settlers of Penn- 
sylvania. His father was William of Cloughwater, of Ireland, 
whose brother John, who died in America in 1783, was the great- 
grandfather of Honorable William Gaston, late governor of 
Massachusetts. John Gaston married Esther Waugh, in Ireland, 
sometime prior to his coming to the colonies, and held the office 
of justice of the peace under the crown. He removed to South 
Carolina about 1751 or 1752, and was the father of twelve chil- 
dren, nine of whom were soldiers in the War of the Revolution. 

One of the sons, Joseph, was wounded at the battle of 
Hanging Rock, later was a magistrate for nearly half a century, 
and was for many years an elder in the Presbyterian church. 
In 1830 he was elected to a seat in the legislature of South Caro- 
lina, and died October 10, 1836. His wife, nee Jane Brown, has 
passed into literature as one of the characters in "Women of the 
Revolution." 

His oldest son, Dr. John Brown Gaston (born January 22, 
1791, and died January 24, 1864), was a physician of note, and 
married Polly Buford McFadden, who bore him eleven children. 
Of these, two sons, James McFadden Gaston and John B. Gaston, 
served as field surgeons throughout the War between the States; 
two sons, Joseph Lucius Gaston and William H. Gaston, fell 
within elbow touch at Seven Pines, on May 31, 1862; and still 
another son, Isaac N., died in the military hospital at Fairfax 
court-house. 

Thomas Chalmers Gaston, another son of Dr. John B. and 
father of Arthur Lee Gaston, took no active part in the war. 







- 







TOBUC LIBHAH 



ARTHUR LEE GASTON 167 

He was born October 4, 1847, and died August 15, 1885. He was 
graduated at the University of South Carolina in 1869; was 
admitted to the bar in 1870, and early in 1871 formed a partner- 
ship with Giles J. Patterson, Esq., which lasted until his death. 
He was a member of the Democratic state convention, 1876, at 
which General Wade Hampton was nominated for governor, and 
was temporary secretary of that convention. In 1876 he was 
elected solicitor of the sixth judicial circuit, and held that office 
for eight years. Judge Gage, in writing of him at the time of 
his death, said : "As a man, Mr. Gaston was of the highest moral 
type. He entertained the strictest notions of integrity and lived 
squarely up to them. His nature, while reserved and apparently 
somewhat austere, was as sympathetic as a child's; he was kind, 
courteous and generous to the high and low alike. As state's 
attorney, he was firm and zealous and withal prudent. As a 
lawyer, no man of his age in the state held higher rank, and with 
his acknowledged ability and force of character none had fairer 
promise of still greater distinguishments." The lamented Daw- 
son, editor of "The News and Courier," said of him : "Mr. Gaston 
was a man of high character, large ability and varied attainments. 
In public life, and in the line of his profession, he was most 
encouragingly successful, and, indeed, he was looked upon as one 
of the younger men in the state who, having risen considerably, 
was destined to rise still higher." 

Arthur Lee Gaston received his preparatory education in the 
graded schools of Chester, and was graduated from Davidson 
college, North Carolina, with the degree of A. B. in 1896. He 
took up the study of law at the University of Virginia in the 
following academic year, pursuing simultaneously advanced 
courses in logic, philosophy, history and English literature. He 
completed his legal studies in the office of Judge George W. Gage, 
was admitted to the bar in December, 1897, and rose rapidly to 
conspicuous rank in his profession. In 1900 he was elected a 
member of the South Carolina house of representatives, and was 
reflected in 1902, and again in 1904, and served continuously 
as a member of the judiciary committee of that body. He was 
also chairman of the dispensary committee, and member of the 
dispensary investigating committee. He is vice-president and 
one of the incorporators of the Commercial bank, of Chester; 
solicitor and one of the incorporators of the Chester Building and 



168 ARTHUR LEE GASTON 

Loan association ; vice-president of the Patterson Public Library 
association; and first secretary and treasurer of the Commercial 
and Manufacturers' club. During the Spanish- American war he 
served from May to November, 1898, as first lieutenant of Com- 
pany D, First South Carolina volunteer infantry. 

On December 3, 1902, Mr. Gaston married Virginia Aiken, 
daughter of the late David Aiken, of Greenwood, South Carolina, 
and granddaughter of Congressman Aiken, deceased. They have 
one child, David Aiken Gaston, now (1907) living. 



WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER GERATY 

GEKATY, WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER, of Yonge's 
Island, South Carolina, the originator of a great indus- 
try in early vegetables grown on the sea islands off 
South Carolina coast, and for his very remarkable business of 
growing hardy, open-air plants on these islands for transplanting 
and shipping to many other cities, where they reach maturity 
some weeks earlier than do hothouse plants transplanted to the 
open air, known and corresponded with as "The Cabbage Plant 
Man," has attained business success and general recognition by 
an altogether exceptional line of enterprising activity, which has 
benefited multitudes of people in many states. 

He was born in the city of Charleston, South Carolina, on the 
6th of February, 1850. His father, C. Geraty, was a merchant 
and storekeeper, who never held public office, but was possessed 
of an active intelligence and a ready and energetic will, as well 
as of sound principle. His mother, Mrs. Ann (Walker) Geraty, 
her son describes as "a most practical business woman, who taught 
me to consider all agreements and verbal contracts as binding as 
if they had been written, and on every point to make my word 
my bond in all transactions." Her son ascribes to her influence 
much of his business success in life. She was a native of Athlone, 
Ireland. His father was from county West Meath, Ireland, and 
they were married after they came to Charleston. 

From the age of eight until he was twelve he attended the 
public schools of Charleston in the morning, while in the after- 
noon and evening he waited upon customers in his father's store. 
"The most that I have learned," he writes, "has been learned by 
reading the newspapers and magazines, and especially agricul- 
tural bulletins issued by the department of agriculture and by 
various state colleges." He has been strongly attracted all his 
life to the reading of history and biography. 

When he was twelve years old, in 1862, he left home to take 
the place of mess-boy on the steamer "Syrine," which was engaged 
in running the blockade, carrying freight from Charleston to 
Nassau, in the Bahama Islands. He continued in this service on 



170 WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER GERATY 

the "Syrine," making two trips each month, from 1862 until the 
evacuation of Charleston by the Confederate forces. 

He had been led to undertake this service not because of any 
love for the sea, but simply from the wish to earn his own support 
and save some money. From his earliest boyhood he had felt a 
strong desire to live in the country, and service on the sea was only 
a means to that end. In 1867 he started in business for himself, 
and in 1868 he formed a partnership in a general merchandise 
and cotton-ginning business with F. W. Towles at Martin's Point, 
Wadmalaw Island, Charleston county. Mr. Geraty was eighteen 
years old and his partner twenty. With their store and cotton 
gin they bought and took charge of a farm as part of their gen- 
eral business. Acquaintance with his father's customers secured 
credit for Mr. Geraty with all the merchants of Charleston with 
whom he wished to deal; and while their joint capital was only 
about five hundred dollars, they were soon doing a successful 
business on sea island cotton crops, while at the same time they 
started the growing of early plants, cabbage and Irish potatoes 
for shipment to Eastern markets. 

Geraty & Towles were the first firm on the sea islands to 
grow early vegetables for the Northern markets ; and the present 
enormous trucking interests on those islands are a direct out- 
growth of this original undertaking, some four or five of the 
largest truck-gardeners having learned their business by acting 
as overseers while working on the farm of Geraty & Towles. 
Their first shipments were to Charleston by river steamer, and 
thence by the "Adger Line" of steamers to New York. Much of 
the green truck thus shipped was overheated on the long voyage, 
and reached the New York market so damaged that Mr. Geraty 
determined more than twenty years ago to secure increased facili- 
ties for rapid transportation. 

In 1885, Geraty & Towles bought the Yonge's Island planta- 
tion just across the Wadmalaw river from the Martin's Point 
plantation. Mr. Geraty then devoted himself at once to the effort 
to have built a branch railroad line to the wharf, to secure quick 
railroad transportation for fresh vegetables to New York city. 
This was accomplished in the spring of 1886 ; and from that time 
dates the rapid growth of the industry of raising vegetables on 
the sea islands for shipment to the New York market. For 
twenty-five years, until 1893, Geraty & Towles continued partners,. 



WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER GERATY 171 

and they dissolved partnership without any breach in their kindly 
relations, only because each now had grown sons to join him in an 
independent business along the lines they had together developed. 

The industry which Mr. Geraty began to develop in 1892 
is in line with the great discoveries made in recent years by 
the traveling agents and explorers sent out by the agricultural 
department of the United States to secure for introduction into 
American agriculture plants and fruits which by many years of 
growth under peculiar conditions of soil, climate and moisture 
have developed through successive generations a hardiness which 
so influences them that they give remarkable results in early and 
abundant fruitfulness when transplanted to or sown in new soil 
similar in climate and conditions of moisture to that in which 
their plant-ancestors have been growing for decades. All who 
follow the more recent developments of agriculture know some- 
thing of the marvelous results which have been produced in our 
arid lands of the West by planting there wheat which had grown 
for centuries in other continents under similar climatic condi- 
tions; and the still more wonderful hardiness and productivity 
of the cereals, wheat, barley and oats, which have been imported 
from the cold uplands of Russia and Siberia and are sown and 
raised in the newly developed Northwestern lands of the United 
States and Alaska. 

Mr. Geraty made similar discoveries with reference to the 
development of singularly hardy and early young plants of cab- 
bage. He writes: "In 1892 relatives of my wife from Orange- 
burg, South Carolina, visited my place in February, and were 
much surprised to see cabbage growing thriftily in the open field 
at that season of the year. When they were to return to their 
home I requested them to take some of these hardy sea island 
plants and set them out in their own garden. The result was 
cabbage well headed three weeks earlier than it could be grown 
from hothouse plants raised there for an early transplanting." 
Mr. Geraty then sent out plants for tests in nearly all the states 
east of the Mississippi river; and it proved that cabbage plants 
grown on the sea islands in the open air were exceptionally tough 
and hardy, resisting the late freezes and the spring frosts in the 
states at the North when hothouse or coldbed grown plants raised 
there were killed. 



172 WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER GERATY 

Since the price of early vegetables grown for market is so 
much higher for those which reach the market two or three weeks 
before the average crop, the advantage in growing these hardy 
sea island plants is at once evident. A rapidly developing and 
very prosperous business has resulted for Mr. Geraty. "Ten 
years ago," he writes, "sixty pounds of cabbage seed sowed on 
two acres of land supplied the demand for these early plants. 
In 1906 I have sowed two tons and a half of cabbage seed on one 
hundred and twenty-five acres of land, and orders are already 
booked for more plants than I can possibly supply this coming 
spring." In 1907 three tons of seed was used and the demand 
for plants could not be fully supplied. Plants are shipped by 
the full carload to all states east of the Mississippi river, and in 
some cases to points west of the river. Until the last five years 
Mr. Geraty was the only man who dealt in these sea island plants. 
There are now about forty other dealers. 

On the 8th of February, 1872, Mr. Geraty married Miss 
Sarah Ann Kay, daughter of John D. Ray and Maria Smoak 
Ray. They have had one daughter and seven sons, and three of 
their sons are living in 1907. 

Mr. Geraty is a communicant of the Roman Catholic church. 
He is a member of the Calhoun lodge of the Knights of Pythias, 
connection with which he retains by special dispensation from 
Leo XIII. In politics he is a Democrat. His favorite sport, 
.amusement and mode of relaxation, he writes, has always been 
'"reading." "I spend all my spare time reading, and besides 
scientific agricultural reading, I find my keenest pleasure in 
history." 

In order to perpetuate the business, the William C. Geraty 
company has been formed. Of the stock of this company, which 
is held entirely by the family, the eldest sons, John W. Geraty 
and Charles Walker Geraty, own a majority, and after the death 
of their father, which occurred on Tuesday morning, December 
17, 1907, they assumed absolute control of the business. 

The blessing pronounced upon the man who "makes two 
blades of grass grow where one grew before" is evidently deserved 
by one whose life-work has developed so peaceful and beneficent 
an agricultural industry as Mr. Geraty has developed in vegetable 
growing on the sea islands of South Carolina. 



WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER GERATY 173 

To the young people of his state he offers this advice: "Devote 
your time and energy to some one line of work which you find 
congenial; then make a specialty for yourself in that line, and 
do your best to produce an article well above the average. Do 
not let the gaining of money be the greatest consideration; but 
work for the general good of your community and your race." 



THOMAS BENTON GIBSON 

GIBSON, THOMAS BENTON, banker, and vice-president 
of the Marlboro Cotton mills, is a type of what deter- 
mination and patient perseverance can accomplish in 
these years when the rapidly developing manufacturing interests 
of South Carolina offer rich rewards for business enterprises and 
good judgment. 

He was born in Eichmond county, North Carolina, January 
17, 1851. His father, Nelson M. Gibson, was a farmer and served 
as captain in the Confederate army during the War between the 
States, descended from a sturdy line of Scotch ancestry; and 
while a devout Methodist, not narrowly sectarian in his religious 
views. Thomas and Nelson Gibson, brothers, who came from 
Virginia about 1760 with their widowed mother, settled ten miles 
northeast of Rockingham, in Richmond county. Their family 
was originally from Scotland. 

One of the brothers of Mr. Thomas Benton Gibson's father 
was an able and conscientious Methodist minister. Another 
brother, Nathan Gibson, about 1830 moved to Ohio; but before 
he left North Carolina he had represented Richmond county for 
several terms in the state legislature. 

Born in the country and living as a boy upon a farm, T. B. 
Gibson nevertheless had a mechanical turn of mind, and "was 
never satisfied at spare moments unless he could be in his father's 
shop tinkering on something." He feels that the systematic life 
to which his father trained him on the farm had much to do 
with the development of traits of persistent, systematic toil which 
have given him success in his business undertakings. He had 
great difficulties to overcome in acquiring even a common school 
education. The "old-field schools are all I ever attended, and 
these I attended very little after I was fifteen years old," he says. 

He was but ten years old when the war broke out. His 
father and his older brother were both in the Confederate army. 
He was the support of the family the only one to whom his 
mother could look; and he took care of a family of six girls 
and a younger brother, besides the negro women and children, 
"When General Sherman passed through, in 1865, the Seven- 



, 



WBUC LIBRA 



nuosN 

9k' 



THOMAS BENTON GIBSON 



177 



teenth army corps, under General Blair, camped on my father's 
plantation. They destroyed everything above ground, and took 
off all the able-bodied negro slaves, leaving only the negro women 
to be taken care of." 

The War between the States and its consequences thus made 
it impossible for Mr. Gibson, who was but fourteen when the 
war closed, to secure a college or even an academic education. 
He worked on his father's farm until he was of age. The next 
year, he writes, "I hired to my father for eight dollars per month, 
furnishing my own clothes, and I saved out of that year's earn- 
ings about seventy-five dollars. The next year he gave me a 
one-horse farm of poor land, which he valued at a thousand 
dollars, and I made the crop that year, hiring the crop gathered." 

For the six years immediately succeeding he was a clerk in 
the store of R. J. Tatum (where the town of Tatum is now 
situated). In 1879 failing health led Mr. Gibson to return to his 
farm, and two years of farm work restored his health. He began 
the mercantile business with his cousin, F. B. Gibson, at Laurel 
Hill, North Carolina, where he remained four years, returning 
in 1885 to his old homestead, which is now in the center of the 
village of McColl. In 1884 the South Carolina Pacific railway, 
the first railroad built in that county, was constructed from the 
state line to Bennettsville ; and the town of McColl was located 
on Mr. Gibson's plantation. The village grew slowly until 1891, 
when the ground was broken for the first cotton mill. This 
modest venture in manufacturing, which started with a capital 
of about fifty thousand dollars, was the beginning of a company 
which today keeps forty-five thousand spindles whirling and is 
capitalized at one million dollars, "chiefly home capital, very few 
shares being owned north of the Mason and Dixon line." 

Mr. Gibson has been president of the Bank of McColl since 
it was organized in 1897. He is now vice-president, has been 
president, and president and treasurer, and secretary and treas- 
urer, of the cotton mills at McColl since their organization ; and 
since the five cotton mills were consolidated into the Marlboro 
Cotton Mills company, he has been president of the company. 

He is identified with the Democratic party. He is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and has served as a steward 
in that church for over ten years. He has been a director of the 
South Carolina Pacific Eailway company continually since the 



178 THOMAS BENTON GIBSON 

road was built in 1884. He is chairman of the board of trustees 
of the public schools of McColl, and was one of the principal 
contributors to the erection, recently, of a central graded school 
building, erected by public subscription at a cost of over twelve 
thousand dollars. While Mr. Gibson's spirit of enterprise, hope- 
fulness, and ambition for the town has had a strong effect for 
good upon the development of McColl, the gradual cutting up 
of what he styled his "one-horse farm" into village lots has given 
to Mr. Gibson a large part of the benefit of that "unearned 
increment" which comes from the massing of population upon 
small areas of land. A population of over twenty-five hundred 
people, with one bank, three churches, a good school building, 
has grown up rapidly upon Mr. Gibson's old cotton field; and 
the prosperity which has come to Mr. Gibson as a consequence 
his fellow-citizens rejoice in, because he has shown from the first 
a disposition to inaugurate and administer important business 
enterprises with a public spirit which has brought a degree of 
prosperity to all the inhabitants of the place, and not to himself 
alone. 

In his own childhood, and since he established a home of his 
own by marriage, Mr. Gibson has enjoyed deeply and steadily 
the influences of home; and he does all that lies in his power to 
promote the erection of comfortable and commodious dwellings 
and buildings of all kinds, and to encourage the beautifying of 
the grounds and houses of the community. 

He was married May 12, 1886, to Miss Sallie Belle Tatum ; 
and of their seven children, six are now (1907) living. 

To the boys of South Carolina who are planning to make 
their lives not only successful for themselves, but useful to the 
community, he offers this advice : "First, get an education at any 
cost (except at the cost of health) ; let tobacco, cigarettes and 
whiskey alone; learn to depend upon your own careful judgment, 
knowing that without well-wrought plans, thoroughly studied, 
there can be no permanent success; and when you have decided 
upon the work in life for which you are best suited, stick to it. 
There is nothing like perseverance." 

His address is McColl, Marlboro county, South Carolina. 



WILLIAM GODFREY 

GODFREY, WILLIAM, of Cheraw, Chesterfield county, 
South Carolina, vice-president of the Cheraw and Lan- 
caster railroad, and senior member of William Godfrey 
& Company, lumber manufacturers, was born near Cheraw, in 
Chesterfield county, on the 2d of November, 1870. His father, 
Samuel G. Godfrey, was engaged in railroading. His mother 
was Mrs. Harriett E. (Powe) Godfrey, the great-granddaughter 
of Thomas Powe, who in 1740 removed from Virginia to Cheraw , 
South Carolina. His father's great-grandfather was also of 
Virginia birth, and removed to Cheraw, South Carolina, in 1750. 
His boyhood was passed in the country, and from early years 
he worked systematically upon a farm; but during four years of 
his youth, from sixteen to tw y enty, he was a student at the South 
Carolina Military academy, from which institution he was grad- 
uated in 1890. In January, 1891, he took the position of agent 
for the Seaboard Air Line railway at Hoffman, North Carolina, 
thus beginning the work of life in the occupation which had been 
that of his father. In 1894 he began business for himself at 
Cheraw, organizing and rapidly building up a large business for 
the manufacture and sale of lumber. He organized the Cheraw 
and Lancaster railroad, in 1900, of which he is now a vice- 
president. As his business grew he took in partners for its 
further development; and he is now the senior member of the 
firm of William Godfrey & Company, lumber manufacturers. 
This company has seven plants in Chesterfield county, two in 
Kershaw county, and one in Cumberland county, North Carolina, 
and employs from three hundred to four hundred men. He 
has recently become interested in establishing a line of steamers 
between Cheraw and Georgetown. Mr. Godfrey has been promi- 
nent among the large lumber manufacturers of the South, and 
has served as president of the South Carolina Lumber association. 
He was one of the originators of the rules of inspection of yellow 
pine lumber, and he compiled the collection of rules known as 
"Rules of 1905," under which all yellow pine lumber in the 
United States is now bought and sold. Mr. Godfrey is allied 
with the Democratic party, and whatever the issues in his state, 



180 WILLIAM GODFREY 

he has uniformly supported the principles and the nominees of 
that political organization. 

In religious belief he is identified with the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church. 

On the 29th of December, 1897, Mr. Godfrey married Miss 
Cora H. Page, daughter of A. H. Page, of North Carolina. They 
have had three children, all of whom are living in 1907. 



WILLIAM JAMES GOODING 

G CODING, WILLIAM JAMES, of Crocketville, Hamp- 
ton county, South Carolina, member of the state legis- 
lature from 1858 to 1861 ; sheriff of Beaufort district, 
1866 to 1868 ; county treasurer of Beaufort county, 1877 to 1878 ; 
treasurer of Hampton county, 1878 to 1880, and a member of the 
Constitutional convention in 1895, was born near the Savannah 
river in Barnwell county, South Carolina, on the 9th of Novem- 
ber, 1835. 

His father, James Alexander Gooding, was a planter who 
had served from 1840 to 1848 as tax collector for Prince William 
parish in the Beaufort district, and is remembered throughout 
that region for his fair dealing and his industrious, upright life. 
He traced his descent from Thomas Gooding, who came from 
England about the middle of the seventeenth century and settled 
at Dighton, Massachusetts. His mother was Mrs. Mahala (Gray) 
Gooding. 

A sturdy and vigorous boy, passing his early years in the 
country, he was fond of study and equally fond of out-of-door 
sports. While still a small boy he was taught all kinds of farm 
work which he had the strength to undertake ; and while he was 
not constantly engaged in this work, he grew through boyhood 
to manhood, developed and trained by working with his hands, 
until he was familiar with all kinds of labor on the farm and 
knew something about managing other laborers. Meanwhile he 
had attended the home schools and Ligon's academy, at Sandy 
Run, Lexington district, South Carolina. He passed one year in 
the South Carolina Military academy, at Columbia, South Caro- 
lina; but his father's death made it necessary for him to return 
to his home in order to help his mother in the management of 
the plantation. His opportunities for regular attendance at school 
were thus shortened, but he had acquired a taste for study and 
for reading ancient as well as modern history; and throughout 
his life he has shown an interest not merely in the current news, 
but also in the current literature of the land. 

In 1857 he established himself as an independent farmer in 
Beaufort (now Hampton) county. He took an active interest in 



184 WILLIAM JAMES GOODING 

the discussions which preceded the outbreak of the War between 
the States. In speaking of his life, he says that he was "drawn 
to choose planting and farming as a profession, because the 
country offered at that time few occupations outside of agricul- 
ture ; and love of country life, with the independence assured the 
farmer, together with the examples of men who, while they lived 
by managing farms and plantations, had risen to eminence in 
various walks of life, led him to make it his constant hope and 
endeavor to be a useful citizen of his state as well as a farmer.'' 
Two years after he established himself in Beaufort county he was 
elected by his fellow-citizens to represent Prince "William parish 
in the state legislature, filling this position from 1858 to the 
outbreak of the war in 1861. In the militia of South Carolina 
he had served as adjutant of the Twelfth regiment of infantry 
from 1856 to 1858, and as major and lieutenant-colonel of the 
same regiment from 1858 to 1861. Becoming a volunteer in the 
Confederate army, he served as captain of Compan}^ D of the 
Twenty-fourth infantry, South Carolina volunteers, resigning in 
1862. From 1863 to 1865 he served as lieutenant in Company D, 
Eleventh South Carolina infantry. He was severely wounded 
in the head on the 9th of May, 1864, in the engagement of Swift 
Creek, between Petersburg and Richmond, Virginia; and as a 
consequence he was detailed for duty in the war tax department 
as assessor of war taxes for Beaufort district, South Carolina, in 
the winter of 1864, and he served there until the close of the war. 

In 1866 he was elected sheriff of the Beaufort district, serving 
until 1868. Nine years later he was chosen treasurer of Beaufort 
county, filling that position from 1877 to 1878, and he was treas- 
urer of Hampton county from 1878 to 1880. 

A Democrat in politics, he was county chairman of the 
Democratic party from 1882 to 1886; and he was a member of 
the Democratic state committee during the same years. In 1895 
he was elected a member of the Constitutional convention of 
South Carolina, taking an active part in the work of that con- 
vention. During the forty years from 1856 to 1895 he served on 
many local boards in various capacities, evincing a public spirit 
and an interest in the public welfare which led to his choice by 
his fellow -citizens repeatedly for such positions. 



WILLIAM JAMES GOODING 185 

Of his religious convictions he says : "In my youth I favored 
the Baptists, but I now prefer the Presbyterians, although I am 
not affiliated with either." 

On the 4th of September, 1856, he married Miss Elizabeth 
Annie Terry, daughter of Michael and Elizabeth Terry, of Beau- 
fort district. She died on the 22d of May, 1894. Of their four 
children, two sons and two daughters, all are living in 1907. 

He is a Mason and has beeu master of his lodge, and he was 
at one time a Dictator in the Knights of Honor, although he is 
not now affiliated with either of these orders. His favorite forms 
of exercise and recreation have been fishing, shooting, "and a 
little work and study." 

To the young he commends "a definite object set before one 
for attainment; truthfulness; honesty; and healthful physical 
exercise in congenial work." 



Vol. II. S. C. 9. 



ROBERT PICKET HAMER, JR. 

HAMER, ROBERT PICKET, JR., was born in Darling- 
ton county, April 10, 1863. His father is a planter and 
manufacturer. On the father's side descent is traced 
to English immigrants who settled in Maryland about 1750. 
The mother, Mrs. Sallie McCall Hamer, who has exerted a most 
powerful and beneficent influence upon the life of her son in 
every way, is of Scotch-Irish descent, and her first ancestor in 
America was William McCall, who came from Ireland to the 
colonies in 1770. 

From his earliest boyhood his ambition was "to make of 
himself a good farmer." He lived in the country, twenty-two 
miles from a railroad and the county-seat. He had excellent 
health and high spirits. Daily duties were assigned him about 
the home, and he was also required to work on the farm as a 
training for later life. When a boy he was given a small piece 
of land that he might work it for his own profit. He was 
required to keep a strict account of the outlay upon that land and 
the income from the crops. He had to pay for all the fertilizers 
used on it and for all labor done on it other than what he himself 
chose to do ; and his father gave the son his note, bearing interest 
for whatever was due him from the crop above the expenses 
incurred in making it. 

He attended the Little Rock high school and the Bingham 
school, in North Carolina, and was graduated from South Caro- 
lina college with the degree of A. B. in June, 1885. On Feb- 
ruary 4, following, he entered formally upon the active business 
of life by engaging in farming at Little Rock. His own decided 
preference led to the choice of this life work. That he has made 
it a decided success is evidenced by the fact that he is now the 
most extensive planter in South Carolina. He cultivates land in 
four counties in this state and in two counties in North Carolina, 
and runs, in the aggregate, one hundred and sixty plows. Soon 
after commencing planting on a large scale he became interested 
in the manufacture of cotton. He became a director of the Dillon 
Cotton mill, and president and treasurer of the Hamer Cotton 
mill. He has been postmaster at Hamer for the last fifteen years, 





,, J7 f- 



V 




ROBERT PICKET HAMER, JR. 189 

general manager of the South Atlantic Cotton Oil mill at Hamer, 
and agent for the Atlantic Coast Line railway at Hamer for 
fourteen years. Indeed, the town of Hamer was named for him 
in 1891. While he has interested himself primarily in agriculture 
and in manufacturing, and has not devoted himself to politics, 
he is identified with the Democratic party and has never changed 
his party allegiance, except that he was not a "sixteen to one" 
Democrat. He has been for twenty years the chairman of his 
township Democratic committee, and, for the same period, a 
member of the county executive committee. He is now (1907) 
commissary-general, with the rank of colonel, on the staff of 
Governor Ansel. 

His own liberal education, and the breadth of his outlook 
upon the educational life and the social tendencies of his state, 
have led him to take an active interest in the higher education of 
South Carolina. He has been a member of the board of trustees of 
the South Carolina college since January, 1904. Since February, 
1905, he has been a member of the board of trustees of Clemson 
college, and was made chairman of the board in April, 1906. He 
has also been for ten years a member of the executive committee 
of the South Carolina Agricultural and Mechanical society (the 
state fair) ; and he was president of that society for the year 
1903, and again for the year 1904. During his administration 
the state fair grounds were moved from the west to the east side 
of the city of Columbia, and the change, effected in less than six 
months, was followed by the largest and best fair ever held in 
the history of the society. There have not been lacking frequent 
newspaper paragraphs from admirers of Mr. Hamer, suggesting 
that he is the logical candidate for governor of the state at an 
early date. 

In college he was a member of the Alpha Tau Omega college 
fraternity. He is also a Mason and a Knight of Pythias. While 
he is not a member of a church, his associations through his 
family are with the Presbyterian and Methodist churches, and 
he is interested in the support of churches of all denominations. 
While he finds his amusement and relaxation "in attention to his 
business," he has all his life been fond of the exercise of walking, 
driving and horseback riding; and he is especially fond of exer- 
cise in the saddle. To help young people who ask for suggestions 
that will lead to success in life, he recommends: "Thorough 



190 ROBERT PICKET HAMER, JR. 

preparation, systematic methods, careful use of opportunities and 
of time. Always be sure before you take your stand; but when 
you have once taken it, stand firm and go forward. Be on the 
side of right and justice, and not on the side of policy." 
His address is Hamer, Marion county, South Carolina 



JAMES DAVID HAMMETT 

HAMMETT, JAMES DAVID, by reason of his executive 
ability and his familiarity with the details of all the 
business connected with a cotton mill, has been pro- 
moted within the last fifteen years from clerk in a mill office 
through the entire range of offices connected with the business 
management of a mill, until in 1902, at the age of thirty-four, 
he became president and treasurer of the Chiquola Cotton mill. 

He was born in Greenville, South Carolina, on March 16, 
1868. His father, Henry Pinckney Hammett, was a cotton 
manufacturer, a member of the state legislature, and mayor of 
Greenville a man of sterling integrity, indomitable energy and 
great loyalty to his state and people. He believed that devotion 
to his own business was the best means of helping those who 
at the close of the War between the States were left poor and 
fatherless; and this conviction led him to withdraw from the 
management of railroads to engage again in cotton manufactur- 
ing, that he might furnish employment for as large a number as 
possible of his fellow-citizens who needed it. His mother, Mrs. 
Deborah Jane Hammett, influenced her son "for good in all 
things," and he says, "I owe more to her than to all others." 
Jesse Hammett, the first ancestor in America, from whom the 
family trace their descent, came to this country from England 
just before the Revolutionary war and settled in Maryland. The 
family have been planters in successive generations, until Mr. 
Henry Pinckney Hammett, with his father-in-law, William Bates, 
began the manufacturing of cotton. 

Born in Greenville, "which at that time was no more than 
a village," J. D. Hammett had a healthy and happy boyhood, 
greatly enjoying out-of-door sports and hunting. With reference 
to the good influence upon a boy with regular engagements and 
occupations when not busy in school, he writes: "In my youth 
it was my business to drive my father to his office and to remain 
there with him when not engaged in school ; and although I then 
regarded this as a hardship, I now see the wisdom which my 
father displayed in carrying out this policy and giving me an 
insight into his business." 



JAMES DAVID HAMMETT 

He attended the Patrick school, of Greenville, South Caro- 
lina, and the Bingham school, in North Carolina; and for the 
college course he was matriculated a student at Furman univer- 
sity; but he did not complete the course of study which leads to 
a degree. Instead, he became a clerk in a wholesale and retail 
grocery store in Greenville. After serving as a clerk in 1888, he 
became collector in a bank in 1889. In 1890 he served as a clerk 
in a mill office for a year. From 1892 to 1899 he was paymaster 
of the cotton mill. He became secretary and assistant treasurer 
of the mill in 1900; and two years later he was made president 
and treasurer of the institution. 

His only military service has been as a private in the militia 
of his state. He is a Mason, a Knight of Pythias, an Odd Fellow 
and a member of the order of Eed Men. In his political relations 
he is identified with the Democratic party. He is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. His favorite reading 
has been history. 

On April 20, 1902, he married Miss Lula Scott. They have 
had three children, all of whom are living in 1907. 

Mr. Hammett is still a comparatively young man; but this 
makes none the less interesting the suggestions which he offers 
to young Americans : "Do not be afraid to work, and do not try 
to pick out for yourself the easy positions too early in life. Show 
that you are willing to do the work, and let the pay take care 
of itself. I worked for two years as a clerk in a wholesale and 
retail grocery, did the hardest manual labor of my life, and did 
not know what salary I was getting until I was about to leave 
my employer." 

Mr. Hammett's address is Honea Path, South Carolina. 



GODFREY MICHAEL HARMAN 

HARMAN, GODFREY MICHAEL, of Lexington, South 
Carolina, since 1870 editor and proprietor of the "Lex- 
ington Dispatch," for many successive years mayor of 
Lexington and a member of the city council, was born in the city 
where he still resides, on the 4th of June, 1845. His father, 
Reuben Harman, was postmaster, sheriff, magistrate and assistant 
clerk of the court "a fine business man, generous and popular." 
The ancestors of the family came from Germany and settled in 
Lexington county, about four miles from the court-house. 

A sturdy boy, passing his youth in the village of Lexington, 
he was taught as a boy to be industrious and regularly employed. 
The War between the States broke out when he was but fourteen. 
He volunteered for service in the Confederate army in April, 
1861, and continued in the volunteer service until 1865. He 
joined the First South Carolina regiment (Gregg's), then entered 
the Thirteenth South Carolina regiment (from which he was 
discharged because he was under age), but he later reenlisted in 
the Twentieth South Carolina regiment, with which he remained 
until the close of the war. 

In 1870 he entered the newspaper business at Lexington, 
convinced that here was a good opening for a newspaper which 
would grow to be influential in that section of the state. He has 
given his time and confined his attention almost entirely to the 
publishing and editing of the "Lexington Dispatch" for the last 
thirty-seven years. This has given him a wide acquaintance with 
all classes of people in his county and throughout the state; and 
his influence as a writer and publisher has had much to do with 
shaping the life of the community in which he has lived for the 
last generation. The confidence and esteem of his fellow-citizens 
has been shown in his election and his repeated reelection to the 
office of mayor of Lexington. 

On the 24th of November, 1864, he married Miss Pauline 
Lavinia Boozer, youngest daughter of Judge Lemuel Boozer, of 
Lexington, South Carolina. 



196 GODFREY MICHAEL HARMAN 

Mr. Harman is a Mason. He is an Odd Fellow, and for 
twenty-six years he has served as a secretary of his lodge. He 
is a member of the Eoyal Fraternal union. 

Fully identified with the Democratic party, for forty years 
he has advocated its principles and supported its nominees. He 
is a member of the Lutheran church. He professes himself a 
follower of Izaak Walton in his devotion to the piscatorial art. 
Throughout his life he has abstained from the use of intoxicants 
and tobacco; and he suggests to young South Carolinians who 
wish to attain true success in life, first of all, "abstinence from 
drink and tobacco." He adds this advice: "Never be idle for 
idleness is the source of many crimes." 



WALTER HAZARD 

HAZARD, WALTER, lawyer and legislator, was born in 
Georgetown, South Carolina, December 25, 1859. His 
parents were Benjamin Ingall and Sarah Freeborn 
(Ingall) Hazard. His father was a merchant who was noted 
for his integrity, energy, firmness of will and business sagacity. 
He held the office of city and county tax assessor, and also served 
as assistant chief of the fire department of Georgetown. The 
earliest ancestors of the family in this country were Thomas 
Hassard (or Hazard), who came from England, in 1639, and 
settled in Aquidneck, Rhode Island. None of the immediate 
family were specially distinguished, but Rowland G. Hazard, a 
collateral kinsman, was a well-known woolen manufacturer and 
an eminent writer. 

In childhood and youth Walter Hazard lived in the small 
town in which he was born. His health was good and he was 
interested in outdoor sports, though he was especially fond of 
reading and the study of languages. He had no regular tasks to 
perform and no difficulties to overcome in acquiring an education. 
His preparatory studies were taken at Winyah Indigo Society 
academy, Georgetown, after which he attended Princeton univer- 
sity, from which institution he was graduated with the degree 
of A. B. in 1877. Three years later he received from the same 
institution the degree of A. M. The active work of life was 
commenced in 1878 in the office of Congdon, Hazard & Company, 
merchants, in Georgetown, South Carolina. In 1880 he founded 
the "Georgetown Enquirer" and edited the same until 1889, when 
he retired from journalism. He had studied law and was admitted 
to the bar in 1882. He entered the political field in 1882, as a 
member of the state house of representatives, in which he served 
for two yars. He was again elected for a like term in 1888, and 
was reflected in 1890. At the close of this term, in 1892, he was 
elected to the state senate, in which he served until 1894, when, 
on account of ill health, he resigned. In 1890 he was a delegate 
to the famous anti-Tillman convention. He was appointed orator 
of the day for "South Carolina Day," June 28, 1907, at the 
Jamestown exposition and delivered the address on that occasion. 



198 WALTER HAZARD 

Of the books which he has found most useful in preparing 
him for and carrying on the work of life, Mr. Hazard mentions 
the Bible, English literature, works on sociology, and the sermons 
of Frederick D. Maurice, Arthur Cleveland Coxe, and Charles 
Kingsley. When asked to name the source of the first strong 
impulse to strive for the prizes of life, he said that it could not 
be definitely stated, but was the outgrowth of school-day influ- 
ences and of sermons preached by the late Reverend W. T. Capers 
and Reverend John A. Porter, members of the South Carolina 
conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. In the 
choice of his life work he was left entirely free, but his inclina- 

/ / 

tions coincided with the wishes of his parents. In estimating the 
relative strength of certain specified influences upon his success, 
he places, first, school ; second, home in which the example and 
precepts of his mother had a beneficent and enduring effect upon 
his intellectual, moral and spiritual life; third, private study; 
fourth, contact with men in active life; and fifth, early compan- 
ionship. His favorite means of amusement and relaxation are 
boating, hunting and fishing. He is a member of various societies 
and fraternities, including the Winyah Indigo society, of which 
he was secretary for five or six years and afterward president and 
is now its attorney and escheator; the Palmetto club; the South 
Carolina Bar association; and the Red Cross society. Among 
other services to his home city may be named that of chairman 
of the board of trustees of the Winyah Indigo school district, 
and president of the Georgetown board of trade. He is greatly 
interested in popular education, and hopes to secure the erection 
of a new graded school building and the establishment of a public 
library and a high school. In politics he has been a lifelong 
Democrat. His religious affiliation is with the Protestant Epis- 
copal church, of which he has long been an honored member. 
He has several times been a delegate to the diocesan conventions, 
and in 1903 and 1905 he was a delegate to the general convention 
of the Episcopal Church in the United States. 

On October 17, 1882, Mr. Hazard was married to Jessie 
Minnie Tamplet. After her death he was married, December 7, 
1897, to Florence Adele Tamplet. Of his four children, two are 
living in 1907. 

When asked for advice and suggestions to help young people 
to attain success in life, he says that "concentration of purpose 



WALTER HAZARD 199 

and self-denial, undeviating adherence to conviction, absolute 
truthfulness, unselfish devotion to duties, high ideals and will- 
ingness to accept God's will in all things," are essential to the 
highest success. 

The address of Mr. Hazard is Number 117J/2 Screven street, 
Georgetown, South Carolina. 



EDWARD PALMER HENDERSON 

HENDERSON, EDWARD PALMER, son of Daniel S. 
and Charlotte Eraser Henderson, was born at Walter- 
boro, South Carolina, January 31, 1854. His father 
was a lawyer, who represented the Colleton district in the state 
legislature several terms before the War between the States. 
Daniel Henderson was a man of gentle, kind, serene spirit, fond 
of his children and most sincerely devoted to his state, for which 
he gave up all his property and, finally, life itself. 

The earliest known ancestors of the family were Daniel 
Henderson, who in 1790 emigrated from the north of Ireland to 
Charleston, South Carolina; and John Eraser, who about 1700 
came from Scotland and settled near Coosawhatchie. 

Edward Henderson's early life was passed in a village; as 
a boy he was healthy and robust, fond of reading, of hunting, of 
work in the garden and of active games. He was early inured 
to toil. When the war ended he was but eleven years of age, 
and he at once found it necessary to do hard manual work, and 
plenty of it. He attended to the chores at home, worked some 
two years as a laborer in the fields, cared for the family garden, 
clerked in stores, etc., when opportunity offered, and learned to 
feel that all manual labor is honorable. This feeling was of great 
benefit to him, enabling him to work better for the benefit of those 
he loved, and also to improve his own opportunities of acquiring 
an education. 

The influence of the boy's mother was strong upon all the 
aspects of his life, but especially upon the ethical and spiritual 
sides. For reading he turned to history, but more especially to 
biography. The lives of men of energy and character, for exam- 
ple, William of Orange, and George Washington, interested him 
greatly and helped him. He was also interested in Walter Scott's 
novels and poems, Hugo's Les Miserables, some of Stevenson's 
works, some of Dumas's, which, like "The Three Guardsmen," are 
marked by snap and energy. Tennyson's poems, especially "In 
Memoriam," the poems of Longfellow, and of Henry Timrod, 
were also helpful. Education came to young Henderson with 
difficulty. He was able, however, to take the course in the high 



EDWARD PALMER HENDERSON 201 

school of Charleston, from which he was graduated. This course 
he followed with a post-graduate course of one year under Mr. 
William Kingman, principal of the Charleston high school. 

Mr. Henderson began the actual work of life when, in 1874, 
he became clerk on a wharf in Charleston; this he followed up 
with the work of wharfinger, and later that of bookkeeper. He 
had, however, from his earliest years, felt a strong drawing 
toward the law, the profession of his father and of his two elder 
brothers. As opportunity afforded, he pursued the study of law, 
and in 1880 was admitted to practice. He now formed a copart- 
nership, at Aiken, South Carolina, with his brother, D. S. Hen- 
derson, and has since that date constantly practiced his profession 
at that place. From January 1, 1880, the Henderson law firm 
was entitled "Henderson Brothers," and was composed of D. S. 
and E. P. Henderson. On January 1, 1899, P. F. Henderson, 
son of D. S. Henderson, was admitted, and the firm name was 
changed to "Hendersons," and so continues. 

Edward P. Henderson has never sought nor held political 
office. From 1876 to 1883 he served in a rifle company. In 1882 
he was appointed by Governor Johnson Hagood as judge advo- 
cate of the Second brigade, first division of the volunteer state 
troops, and served two years. Since 1884 he has been a deacon 
in the Presbyterian church, and since 1886 treasurer of his church 
in Aiken. 

Mr. Henderson commends to young Americans the observance 
of the Sabbath, the cultivation and preservation of the home as 
one of the chief foundations of American liberty, the maintenance 
of strict integrity in business relations, the care of the body and 
physical health, observance of regular hours of work and rest, 
respect for the laws of the land, trust in God, and earnest effort 
to win the approval of the Divine Presence. 

Mr. Henderson's life for twenty-eight years has been largely 
absorbed in the work of the law. His firms have been engaged 
in all of the important cases in and near Aiken county. The 
published reports of the supreme court of South Carolina, and 
records of the United States court for that state, show the number 
and nature of the cases engaged in. Mr. E. P. Henderson has 
given personal attention to nearly every case his firm has man- 
aged in that period, and he has appeared in the trials of a large 
majority of them. His special talent is in the preparation of 



202 EDWARD PALMER HENDERSON 

cases, and in the management of the lucrative practice of the 
business of his firm. He has taken part in many of the business 
enterprises in his locality and is adviser for many corporations 
in his county. He was elected one of the vice-presidents of the 
State Bar association for the year 1906. 

The community in which he lives respects him as a man and 
trusts him in every way. His record with all the judges of 
the courts of his state is that he is competent, careful, always 
prepared, and fair. By his own efforts he has acquired a com- 
petency in his life work, and his financial credit is excellent. 
He is a responsible officer in the Presbyterian church and values 
highly this position. He is very happy in his family relations 
and feels that God has been good to him indeed. 

On October 11, 1883, Mr. Henderson married Miss Harriett 
Lee Johnson. They have had five children, three of whom are 
living in 1907. 

His address is Aiken, South Carolina. 



CHARLES HAMMETT HENRY 

HENRY, CHARLES HAMMETT, son of J. B. and Mary 
E. Henry, was born at Greenville, South Carolina, Sep- 
tember 19, 1871. His father was engaged in the cotton 
business. 

Charles Henry as a boy enjoyed excellent health and was 
fond of outdoor exercise. His youth was passed in Greenville, 
South Carolina. He attended Furman university two years, but 
did not graduate, withdrawing on account of temporary trouble 
with his eyesight. The lines of reading w r hich most appealed to 
him were history, political economy and psychology. 

Among the influences which have most affected the life and 
character of Mr. Henry may be named: home, school, and asso- 
ciation in early life with able business men. His choice of 
occupation was determined by circumstances. His active life 
work began in 1890. He accepted a position as bookkeeper at 
the Camperdown Cotton mills in Greenville. After two years 
spent at this work, he went into the newspaper business in 1891, 
and, with the exception of two years, he has followed this work 
continuously ever since. In 1900 he established the "Spartanburg 
Journal," a daily newspaper which has achieved great success. 
Of this paper he is sole owner, editor and manager. 

Mr. Henry is a member of the Chi Psi fraternity and of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. In politics he is a 
Democrat. He is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church. 
His views are liberal and tolerant on all subjects. To the young 
he commends, above all things, the development of character, 
supplemented by habits of energy, system, persistence and deter- 
mination, and the cultivation of resourcefulness and self-reliance. 

On September 29, 1897, he married Ruth Petty, daughter of 
Captain and Mrs. Charles Petty, of Spartanburg. Two children 
are still (1907) living. 

His address is Spartanburg, South Carolina. 



WILLIAM GODBER HINSON 

HINSON, WILLIAM GODBER, planter, and a pioneer 
in practical agricultural drainage and in the use of 
commercial fertilizers in South Carolina, was born on 
James Island, Charleston county, December 23, 1838. His father, 
Joseph Benjamin Hinson, was a planter "whose keen sense of jus- 
tice and the judicial fairness of whose mind" strongly impressed 
those who knew him. His mother was Mrs. Juliana (Rivers) 
Hinson, and through her he is descended from Captain Robert 
Rivers, who came from England about 1710 and settled on James 
Island. Benjamin Stiles, who came from England a little later 
and settled on James Island, as well as Captain Joseph Hinson, 
who came from Bermuda in 1797 to make a home for himself on 
James Island, are among the more prominent of his kinspeople 
in earlier generations. To his mother he feels that he is greatly 
indebted for the elements of moral and spiritual training. 

Born in the country, he had for the most part good health 
in his childhood, and he knew the interests and occupation of 
boys who grew up upon a farm or plantation in the second half 
of the last century. The circumstances of his father's family 
were such as to relieve him from the need of working to secure 
the means for an education. He attended the schools of James 
Island, Bluffton and Greenwood; and, later, he was for a time 
at Mount Zion academy, at Winnsboro. 

The outbreak of the War between the States found him 
promptly enlisted under the banner of his state, and as lieutenant 
of Company G in the Seventh South Carolina cavalry he served 
throughout the war, from 1861 to 1865, and surrendered at Appo- 
mattox with the Army of Northern Virginia. During the war 
he was wounded three times. In the year after the close of 
hostilities he took up his father's business, that of a planter, at 
James Island. His own personal preference and circumstances, 
and the interests of his family, led him to follow his father in 
this line of life. 

In enumerating the influences which have been strongest in 
his life he places first the home of his childhood and the influence 
of his family circle, and second, contact with men in active life. 




.r-- 

- 




WILLIAM GODBER HINSON 207 

He has interested himself especially in the drainage of agri- 
cultural land. Not only has he studied this for himself, and for 
the management of his own property, but he has disseminated 
information among the farmers and planters of his state upon 
this subject, and he has used his influence in the different agri- 
cultural societies with which he is connected to promote scientific 
drainage and the use of commercial fertilizers. When he began 
to agitate in favor of these forms of scientific agriculture, imme- 
diately after the war, there was great need of public enlighten- 
ment upon these matters, which are now much more thoroughly 
understood by all farmers and planters through the influence of 
the state agricultural colleges and the agricultural experiment 
stations, and the literature which these institutions prepare and 
circulate. Mr. Hinson deserves much credit for his early and 
prolonged advocacy of drainage and scientifically selected ferti- 
lizers. 

As a planter he has found that most of his interests, and 
many of his strongest personal friendships, led him toward mem- 
bership in agricultural societies. He is a member and director 
of the Commercial club, but with that exception the organizations 
to which he belongs are the State Agricultural and Mechanical 
society (the oldest agricultural organization in the United States, 
though not chartered until a year after a society in Massachu- 
setts), of which he has been an officer more than thirty years; 
the South Carolina Agricultural society, in which he has held 
office nearly as long; and various other organizations which have 
for their end the advancement of the agricultural interests. For 
some time, when it was a large and influential body, he was 
president of the Farmers' Alliance, which, in recent years, has 
been largely superseded by other organizations. 

His religious associations and convictions identify him with 
the Protestant Episcopal church. He is a Democrat, and has 
never acted with any other political party or organization. He 
has never married. 

While Mr. Hinson speaks with great modesty of his own life 
as "simple and retired," those who have watched the development 
of the agricultural interests of South Carolina give him credit 
for example and achievement which have been of very material 
advantage to his neighborhood and to the state. 

His address is Charleston, South Carolina. 

Vol. II. S. C. 10. 



GEORGE JUDSON HOLLIDAY 

HOLLIDAY, GEORGE JUDSON, farmer, merchant and 
dealer in real estate, a lawyer by professional study, 
although he has never practiced his profession, and a 
state senator, was born June 10, 1875, at Galivant's Ferry, South 
Carolina, where he still (1907) resides. His father, Joseph 
William Holliday, a farmer and merchant, had been county 
commissioner of Horry county, and left a considerable estate. 
He had refused several political honors; and he is described by 
one who knew him as "a man of great strength of character, 
possessed of a wonderful amount of energy and determination, 
and of a great store of common sense a man whose pungent and 
practical sayings are still quoted in Horry county." His mother, 
Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Grissette Holliday, strongly influenced his 
moral and spiritual life, although she died on his fourteenth 
birthday. 

His father's ancestors were of English and Welsh descent, 
while his mother's family, Huguenots, came from France and 
settled on the southern coast of South Carolina. Among his 
father's kinspeople several have been prominent in the history of 
Virginia as statesmen and educators. Governor Holliday was 
known as "the governor with a conscience." His mother's father, 
R. G. W. Grissette, was a state senator from Horry county. 

Born in the country, having frail health as a boy, George 
Holliday grew stronger by indulging in out-of-door sports, hunt- 
ing, fishing and horseback riding. While the circumstances of 
his family were such that he did no work from motives of self- 
support, he was required by his father to work on the farm, "to 
hoe and to plough," and he was charged with the especial duty 
of looking after the cattle, to see that they were properly fed 
and housed. Entirely apart from reasons of economy, his father 
required all his children to work, "the daughters to learn to cook 
and sew and do housework," the sons "to do thoroughly well any 
work that came to hand, if their assistance were needed, in farm 
or store." 

The family removed to Marion when he was twelve years 
old, especially to secure better school facilities for the children. 



GEORGE JUDSON HOLLIDAY 211 

His father purchased the old Planters hotel; and as a boy he 
served as clerk there, and among the guests and traveling men 
from various states and counties he formed many interesting 
acquaintances; and he believes that his acquaintance with trade 
and business interests of all kinds, and whatever facility he has 
in meeting men for the transaction of business, is in large part 
due to the early experience and the wide acquaintance which he 
acquired in hotel life there. 

He first attended the public county schools of Horry county, 
then the Marion graded school, the Bethel Military academy, 
Bethel, Virginia; and he took the last two years of the college 
course at Center college, Danville, Kentucky, from which insti- 
tution he was graduated with the degree of B. L. in 1897. 

He had already been for two years a member of the faculty 
of the Hogsett Military academy, of Danville, Kentucky, and he 
was admitted to the bar of Kentucky at the age of twenty-one, 
before his graduation from college, and proceeding to Harvard 
university, he did post-graduate work in law and English from 
1897 to 1899. In 1899 he became a clerk and assistant in his 
father's business of farming and merchandising and real estate 
at Galivant's Ferry. He had expected to practice law, but his 
father's health was already undermined, and feeling that he 
ought to relieve his father as much as possible from business cares 
and feeling always that strong desire to succeed in whatever he 
undertook, which had won for him prizes, medals and distinction 
in his course of study, he soon became deeply interested in busi- 
ness, and after his father's death he purchased from the other 
heirs the business of his father at Galivant's Ferry. 

Mr. Holliday is still a comparatively young man, and the 
care of his father's estate (of which he is an executor), and his 
service as guardian of the younger children, together with the 
prosecution of his own business, has engrossed most of his time. 
From 1900 to 1902 he was a member of the county board of 
education in Horry county. He has been a delegate to several 
of the state Democratic conventions. He is also state senator 
from Horry county. He has been zealous in the upbuilding and 
development of the schools of his county, and worked for the 
interests of the county and state at large. 

He is connected with the Baptist church. He is a Mason 
and a Knight of Pythias. While at school and college he was 



212 



GEORGE JTJDSON HOLLIDAY 



much interested in athletics, and took several medals and prizes, 
having represented Center college at the amateur athletic asso- 
ciation at Chicago, where he won two medals in the sprinting 
race, and equaled the world's record for the hundred-yard dash. 
At Harvard he won several athletic distinctions. He is very fond 
of hunting and fishing, but of late years he declines to take time 
from business and professional duties to indulge his fondness for 
these amusements. 

On June 19, 1901, Mr. Holliday married Miss Flora Johnson, 
daughter of Solicitor John Monroe Johnson, of Marion, South 
Carolina. Of their four children, two daughters are living in 
1907. 

His address is Galivant's Ferry, South Carolina. 



DANIEL EDWARD HYDRIGK 

HYDRICK, DANIEL EDWARD, was born August 6, 
1860, in Orangeburg, South Carolina. He was the son 
of Jacob H. Hydrick and Margaret Hildebrand Hydrick. 
His father was a farmer, a man of marked character, noted for 
honesty, truthfulness and tenacity of purpose. His mother, who 
was possessed of more than ordinary intellectual attainments, 
devoted herself to the education and moral training of her 
children. To her influence, and to the inspiration derived from 
her high ideals of life and character, more than to anything 
else, Daniel Hydrick attributes what measure of success he has 
achieved. 

Daniel Hydrick's maternal grandfather was Jacob Hilde- 
brand, whose wife was Jemima Leonard. His paternal grand- 
mother was an Evans. 

Daniel Hydrick's early life was uneventful but pleasant. 
He enjoyed good health, was fond of reading, but never took 
much interest in boyish or outdoor sports. His youth was passed 
in the country on his father's farm. He did all sorts of farm 
work, and was clerk in a grocery store, and later in a drug store, 
seeking always to do as well as he could whatever he undertook. 

Daniel Hydrick's opportunities for schooling were meager, 
the terms being short and irregular, but he was determined to 
obtain a collegiate education and so made the most of the limited 
opportunities afforded by these schools. He attended Captain 
Hugh S. Thompson's Columbia Male academy about one-half 
session. In October, 1876, when sixteen years of age, he entered 
the preparatory department of Wofford college at Spartanburg, 
South Carolina. 

Early in the spring of the next year he went home on account 
of his mother's last sickness. He kept up his studies at home, 
however, without the aid of a teacher, returned to Wofford in 
the fall of 1877 and entered the freshman class. In Wofford he 
continued until the completion of the junior year, when he was 
awarded the medal offered by the alumni association for the 
highest proficiency in general scholarship. Leaving Wofford, 



214 DANIEL EDWARD HYDRICK 

Daniel Hydrick went to Vanderbilt university, Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, and pursued a classical and literary course. At the end of 
his first year he was given a scholarship for proficiency in Greek. 
He was graduated in May, 1882, with the degree of A. B. He 
took with him, also, certificates showing that he lacked but two 
branches of having completed the course leading to the degree 
of A. M. He was offered a post-graduate fellowship in the 
department of English language and literature, but declined it. 

The studies which have done most for Mr. Hydrick are 
the classics, the English language, literature and history. The 
masterpieces of thought and expression are, in his judgment, of 
inestimable value, and, at the head of the list, he unhesitatingly 
places the Bible and Shakespeare. The influences of his mother, 
private study, school, contact with men, and early companionship, 
may be noted as the forces which have most affected his life. 

In October, 1882, he accepted the principalship of the Dar- 
lington Male academy, where he taught for three years. At the 
end of this time he gave up the school, studied law, and in 1886, 
at the spring term of the supreme court, was admitted by that 
body to the bar. He practiced in Spartanburg until elected 
circuit judge. For about eight years he practiced with Captain 
John W. Carlisle, as Carlisle & Hydrick. From 1894 until 1905 
he practiced at Union, South Carolina, with J. A. Sawyer, as 
Hydrick & Sawyer, and from the fall of 1895 to January, 1900, 
he practiced with Honorable Stanyarne Wilson, at Spartanburg, 
South Carolina, as Hydrick & Wilson. From 1895 to 1900, Mr. 
Hydrick served as county attorney. In 1897 he was elected to 
fill the unexpired term in the South Carolina house of represen- 
tatives; in 1898 he was reflected for a full term; in 1900 he was 
elected state senator, and in 1904 was reflected. 

As an able, scholarly and conscientious lawyer, Mr. Hydrick 
won a commanding position at the bar and in the councils of his 
state. In 1905, by an act almost unprecedented in the legislative 
annals of South Carolina, a judge whose term was expiring was 
set aside; and on the first ballot Mr. Hydrick was elected judge 
of the seventh judicial circuit. 

Judge Hydrick is a member of the Masonic order, of the 
Knights of Pythias, Red Men, and the State Bar association. 
Since 1902 he has been eminent commander of Spartanburg 
Commandery, Number 3, Knights Templar. He is a member of 



DANIEL EDWARD HYDRICK 215 

Oasis Temple of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He was also 
a member of the Kappa Alpha fraternity at Wofford college. 

Judge Hydrick is a lifelong Democrat, and a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He enjoys horseback riding 
and is fond of bird shooting, but he has not devoted much time 
to outdoor sports. Upon every young American he would impress 
the conviction that there is no royal road to success, and the 
necessity of being honest, sober and industrious. These virtues, 
he believes, coupled with even a moderate degree of ability, with 
high ideals of the duties and responsibilities of life and a tena- 
cious purpose to do something worth while, will not only insure 
success, but peace, happiness and wealth. 

On October 24, 1882, Judge Hydrick married Rosa Lee, 
daughter of Major John A. Lee, of Spartanburg. Four children 
have been born of this marriage, two girls and two boys. All 
are now (1907) living. 

His address is 47 Lee street, Spartanburg, South Carolina. 



JOHN MURGHISON JACKSON 

JACKSON, JOHN MURCHISON, merchant and farmer, 
residing at Bennettsville, Marlboro county, South Caro- 
lina, was born at Clio, in that county, on the 23d of May, 
1853, the son of Owen Jackson. 

His mother's family trace their descent from Philip Murchi- 
son, who married Miss Margaret McRae, and emigrated from 
Inverness, Scotland, about 1775, settling first at Wilmington, 
North Carolina, shortly afterward removing to Fayetteville, 
North Carolina, and subsequently to Selkirk, Marion county, 
South Carolina. His father's grandfather, Edward Jackson, 
came from Virginia just at the close of the Revolutionary war 
and settled on Cat Fish creek, in Marion county, South Carolina. 
The history of Marion county, by W. W. Sellers, contains sketches 
of several members of the Jackson family. 

In his early years slender of physique and frail in health, 
he feels that he owes his later good health to the out-of-door 
country life he knew in his boyhood. Fishing and shooting were 
his favorite sports; and to the work which he did on the farm, 
in assisting his father and brothers in the support of the family, 
he attributes his good health, while it gave him business-like 
habits which have been of value to him in later life. His oppor- 
tunities for attending school were limited, and the facilities 
offered by the country schools within his reach were meager. 

When he was nineteen he left home to take the position of 
salesman in a country store near Marion, South Carolina. In 
the fall of 1873 he entered a store at Bennettsville, which was 
owned by his uncle, John D. Murchison, whom he succeeded in 
business, January 1, 1884. His attention to business and his 
integrity and public spirit led his fellow -townsmen to choose him 
an alderman of the town ; and he served as chairman of the first 
board of public works, which installed the electric light plant of 
the town. He has also been a trustee of the graded schools of 
Bennettsville for the last eleven years, and is now chairman of 
the board. 

On the 10th of November, 1887, he married Miss Elizabeth 
Walker Duval. daughter of Mareen H. H. Duval, who came from 



PUBLIC LIBR1R1 



JOHN MURCHISON JACKSON 219 

Maryland and settled in Cheraw, Chesterfield county. They have 
had seven children, all of whom are living in 1907. A member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, Mr. Jackson has 
served as a steward (and recently chairman of the board) of the 
Methodist church at Bennettsville for the last twenty years. 

Having acquired a competence, Mr. Jackson now exercises 
only a general supervision of his large business, leaving the 
details to his employees. He is a Democrat in politics and has 
uniformly supported the principles and nominees of his party. 
Horseback riding has been his favorite form of exercise, and 

o 

the raising of poultry his diversion from regular business. He 
suggests to the young people of his state, as a key to success in 
life : "Be perfectly honest in small things as well as great ; finish 
every undertaking which you begin ; and never play any game of 
chance." 



JOSEPH TRAVIS JOHNSON 

JOHNSON, JOSEPH TEA VIS, lawyer, and member of 
congress from the fourth district of South Carolina, was 
born in Brewerton, Laurens county, South Carolina, Feb- 
ruary 28, 1858. His parents were Benjamin and Mary (Medlock) 
Johnson. His father was a farmer by occupation, and was a 
highly respected citizen, but never sought or held a public office. 
The grandfather of the subject of this sketch removed from 
Virginia to South Carolina about the year 1820. 

In childhood and youth Joseph T. Johnson lived in the 
country. His father died in 1860, and the War between the 
States swept away nearly all of the property he had accumulated. 
A little land was left, however, and as soon as he was able to 
work, the youth was required to assist regularly in its cultivation. 
His health was good, and the outdoor work, though it seemed 
hard at the time, promoted his bodily growth and mental devel- 
opment, and, as he was convinced later on, proved of great and 
permanent benefit. When he was fourteen years of age he sus- 
tained an irreparable loss in the death of his mother. From 
infancy she had exerted a powerful influence upon his moral and 
intellectual natures, and her last words to him were the expression 
of a strong desire that he should lead an irreproachable life. He 
was anxious to obtain a thorough education, but being left alone 
in the world at this early age, and with very limited means, it 
was exceedingly difficult for him to make satisfactory progress 
in his studies. He attended country schools for a while and then 
entered upon a course of study at Erskine college, from which 
institution he was graduated in 1879. Afterward he studied law 
and on June 1, 1883, he began the practice of his profession at 
Laurens, South Carolina. Here he was successful from the first 
and became well known as an able advocate. This, however, did 
not satisfy his ambition. From early years he had felt a strong 
desire to enter political life. Even when he was only a lad he 
told people with whom he came in contact that he intended 
sometime to go to congress, and perhaps to reach even a higher 
position. While he now feels that all of his early hopes cannot 
be fulfilled, he has the great satisfaction of having carried out 



JOSEPH TRAVIS JOHNSON 221 

his plan of becoming a member of congress. In this capacity he 
has served his constituents repeatedly and ably. He was elected 
to the fifty-seventh congress in 1900, and, by reelections, became 
a member of the fifty-eighth, fifty-ninth and sixtieth congresses. 
As he has always been a Democrat, he was a member of the 
minority party in congress and was thus prevented from taking 
an active part in shaping legislation. But in spite of this handi- 
cap he rendered excellent service to the country at large, and was 
especially helpful to the district which he more immediately 
represented. He has been a careful student of matters of current 
interest, and has paid special attention to financial affairs. The 
results of his studies in the last named line may be found in his 
book on "The Money Question," which was published in 1895, 
and which was well received. 

Mr. Johnson is a Royal Arch Mason, a Knight Templar, a 
Shriner, and a member of the Knights of Pythias. His religious 
affiliation is with the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Earlier 
in life he found his principal mode of relaxation in playing chess, 
but of late years he has had very little time for this or any other 
amusement. 

On July 30, 1890, he was married to Sarah Anderson, and 
of their six children, five are now (1907) living. 

The address of Mr. Johnson is 136 North Converse street, 
Spartanburg, South Carolina. 



ADAM CRANE JONES 

JONES, ADAM CRANE, merchant, was born in Laurens, 
Laurens county, South Carolina, June 2, 1855. His parents 
were Benjamin F. and Katharine F. Jones. His father was 
a farmer, honest and energetic, with decided convictions, who 
served in the Confederate States army throughout the war, and 
was severely wounded in the battle of the Wilderness. The 
earliest ancestors of the family in this country came from Wales, 
Scotland, and Ireland, and settled in the vicinity of the old 
Ninety- Six district. They bore the family names of Jones, Mac- 
beth, Wilks, and Blakeley. A. C. Jones, a great-grandfather on 
the paternal side of the subject of this sketch, was a soldier in the 
War of the Revolution. His grandfather on the maternal side 
was of Irish descent, who married a Wilks, settled in Laurens 
county, and was a Whig in politics. The Macbeth family came 
from Scotland before 1789. They were stanch Presbyterians, 
and brought with them their family Bible, which was printed in 
Scotland in 1642 and contains family records about as far back 
as 1600. This Bible is now in possession of Mrs. J. H. Oliver, 
of Cherokee Springs, South Carolina, who is a lineal descendant 
of John Macbeth, its first owner. 

In childhood and youth Adam Crane Jones lived in the 
country, but within a few miles of a thriving town. He was well 
and strong. His tastes and interests were divided between books, 
of which he was very fond; hunting and other outdoor sports, 
and work on the farm. He was religiously inclined and had a 
strong desire to obtain an education, but the circumstances of the 
family were such that he was obliged to spend a considerable part 
of his time in farm work. Even in boyhood he had to plough and 
do nearly all the various, and in some instances difficult, kinds of 
farm labor. The country schools of those days gave very meager 
educational advantages, but they were the best that were within 
his reach. Even these were closed to him more than half the 
time, for he was obliged to work on the farm one year and could 
attend school only a part of the next year. In 1869, when only 
fourteen years of age, he attended school in Union county, and 
there completed his public education. As he could take only a 



ADAM CRANE JONES 225 

part of the prescribed course of study, he was never graduated. 

After leaving school he returned to his father's farm in 
Laurens county. There he remained until September, 1871, when 
he became a clerk in a store. He chose this occupation in hope 
that he could support himself and could also have some time in 
the evenings which could be devoted to study. For two years 
from 1871 he was clerk in a dry goods store in Clinton; during 
the next four years he was a clerk in dry goods stores at New- 
berry. He then became a merchant in Newberry, which business 
he followed until 1882. In 1883 he was appointed clerk to 
Captain James N. Lipscomb, secretary of state of South Carolina, 
which position he held for four years and declined the offer of a 
reappointment by Major Leitner, who then succeeded Captain 
Lipscomb as secretary of state. In 1887 he became a salesman, 
and from that time until 1900 represented various firms, working 
mostly in South Carolina, but in some instances also in North 
Carolina. From November, 1900, to March 31, 1905, he was 
traveling salesman for Arnold, Constable & Company, for South 
Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia. At the 
end of his term of service for this company he again engaged in 
the mercantile business at Newberry, where he still remains. Of 
the books which have been most, helpful in preparing him for 
and in enabling him to carry on his work most successfully he 
names : the Bible ; history, especially that relating to the United 
States and to South Carolina ; newspapers and magazines, together 
with the current literature of the day. 

The first impulse to strive to secure the prizes of life came 
in early youth in the desire to pay his way and to increase his 
educational advantages. His choice of an occupation was due to 
his own personal preference. In estimating the relative value of 
certain specified influences upon his success in life he names, first, 
that of home, where he was taught to reverence the Bible and 
honor God; second, school; third, early companionship; fourth, 
private study ; fifth, contact with men of high principle and noble 
purpose. The sports which he finds most helpful for relaxation 
are hunting and driving, and he enjoys all kinds of innocent 
amusement, but he adds that his time has been so completely 
occupied with business affairs that he has for many years been 
able to give very little attention to any of them. Mr. Jones is 
affiliated with several fraternities and societies, including Amity 



226 ADAM CRANE JONES 

lodge, No. 87, of which he is past master ; member Signet Chapter, 
No. 18; member Columbia Council, No. 5; Oasis Temple, Char- 
lotte, North Carolina ; Columbia Commandery, No. 2 ; Knights of 
Pythias, No. 75, and member board of trustees; member United 
Commercial Travelers; the Travelers' Protective association; 
member Interstate Committee Young Men's Christian association, 
and has been connected with association work since 1877. His 
first active work in politics was during the Hampton movement 
in 1876. He was at this time vice-president of the first young 
men's Democratic club organized in his county, and strongly 
advocated the policy of nominating a "straight-out" Democratic 
party ticket, which policy finally prevailed. Except on the free 
silver issue, he has always adhered to the Democratic party, but 
from 1892 until the cause was successful he was earnestly engaged 
in efforts to secure a prohibitory law in place of the state dispen- 
sary. In order to further this interest he decided in April, 1905, 
to become a candidate for governor in the Democratic primary 
for 1906. His appeal to the Democrats of the state was "to vote 
the dispensaries out county by county, and at the same time to 
elect men to the legislature who will enforce the law and give 
the people a clean, economical, business administration." He thus 
represented all Democrats who were opposed to the dispensary 
system, and all Prohibitionists who would prevent the sale of 
intoxicating liquors as a beverage in any form. The election was 
held in November, 1906, and resulted in the overthrow of the 
dispensary system. His religious affiliation is with the Presby- 
terian church, in which he has held the office of deacon since 1877. 

Mr. Jones was married on November 15, 1877, to Lula M. 
Greneker. Of their four children, three are now (1907) living. 

In reply to a request for suggestions as to principles, methods 
and habits which will most help young people to attain true 
success in life, he says: "First, a due regard to health; second, 
the importance of a well-rounded Christian character; third, to 
learn to do everything in school and in business well; fourth, 
after learning to do well, learn to do quickly; fifth, to perform 
the smallest duty as carefully and as well as if much depended 
upon the manner it was done ; sixth, to let your word be as good 
as your bond in every transaction in life; seventh, to be loyal to 
your friends, yourself, and your country." 

The postoffice address of Mr. Jones is Calhoun street, New- 
berry, South Carolina. 



WILIE JONES 

JONES, WILIE, banker and brigadier-general of the South 
Carolina militia, was born at Hillsboro, Orange county, 
North Carolina, on the 17th of October, 1850. His father's 
name was Cadwallader Jones, and that of his mother, Anna 
Isabella Jones. His father was a farmer, a lawyer and a soldier. 
He held the office of solicitor in North Carolina for thirty years, 
and subsequently removed to South Carolina and became a mem- 
ber of the senate of that state, from York county. During the 
War between the States he was a colonel of the Twelfth South 
Carolina regiment, Confederate States army. The earliest ances- 
tors of Mr. Jones' family emigrated to America during the 
seventeenth century, from Wales, England, Scotland and Ireland. 
His great-grandfather, James Iredell, was associate justice of the 
supreme court of the United States, and his grandfather, James 
Iredell, Jr., was governor and United States senator from North 
Carolina. 

The 'early life of Mr. Jones was passed on his father's plan- 
tation near Kock Hill, in York county, South Carolina, where 
he ploughed cotton and corn when a youth. His health was good 
and his tastes and interests soon turned to business, political and 
military life. The whole course of his moral and intellectual 
life was shaped by his mother, who was a devout member of the 
Episcopal church. He received a common school education, but 
was never able to attend college. He began the active work of 
life as a clerk in a store at Rock Hill, but subsequently, at the 
age of nineteen, obtained a position in the Carolina National 
bank, in Columbia, South Carolina, and has remained in this 
bank ever since, being cashier for twenty-three years, and rising 
finally to the office of vice-president, which he now holds. Mr. 
Jones was the architect of his own fortune. He has been a great 
student of human nature, and much of his success is due to his 
knowledge of men. He was a member of the state Democratic 
committee of South Carolina, and has been secretary and treas- 
urer thereof, and its chairman for the past twenty-five years. 
He was a member of the Constitutional convention of South 
Carolina in 1895, and colonel of the Second South Carolina 



230 WTLIE JONES 

regiment in the Spanish war. He was a member of the board 
of directors of the South Carolina Interstate and West Indian 
exposition, held at Charleston, December 1, 1901, to June 1, 1902. 
Besides his last military service, he has had large experience as 
a militia officer, having been a captain of the Governor's guards 
of Columbia for fifteen years, colonel of the Second South Caro- 
lina militia regiment for twelve years. He is now (1907) brigade 
commander of the South Carolina troops, and is also president 
of the chamber of commerce of the city of Columbia. He is a 
prominent member of the Knights of Pythias, the Elks, and 
the Masonic fraternity. He has always been a member of the 
Democratic party and of the Episcopal church. The dominant 
traits of General Jones' character are pluck and energy, joined to 
a spirit of mildness and to bland and gentle manners, which have 
contributed greatly to his success in life. 

General Jones' postoffice address is Columbia, South Carolina. 







LIBRARY - 





Afftraf. 





G sK 




CHARLES HALLETTE JUDSON 

JUDSON, CHARLES HALLETTE, LL. D., professor of 
mathematics and astronomy in Furman university, Green- 
ville, South Carolina, was born in Monroe, Connecticut, 
April 20, 1820. His parents were both of pure English stock. 
His father, Charles Judson, was a man of sterling qualities and 
became one of the most prominent men in his community in 
business and social circles. He was noted for a high sense of 
honor, a strict adherence to principle and rare good judgment. 
While not having a collegiate education, he was by nature gifted 
with a fine mind, which was cultivated by reading, by keen 
observation and by association with men of education and culture. 
His grandfather, James Judson, lived and died in Connecticut, 
and was distinguished for his sterling worth, business habits and 
correct principles. The mother of Dr. Charles H. Judson, wife 
of Charles Judson, was Miss Abi Sherman, and a relative of the 
distinguished Roger Sherman. 

Professor Judson's earliest education was obtained at the 
public school in his own town. From this he was sent to a high 
school near his home, taught by a graduate of Yale. He was 
afterwards sent to New Haven to prepare himself for business. 
Not long after going to that city he became interested in meetings 
in one of the Baptist churches of the place. He professed faith 
and joined the Baptist church. At about the same time, Locke's 
"Essay on the Human Understanding" fell into his hands. These 
two circumstances combined to change the current of his life. 
As a result, he resolved upon leaving business and continuing 
studies. He entered Hamilton Literary and Theological institute, 
located at Hamilton, New York. He remained there two years 
and was then compelled to teach for awhile to obtain means with 
which to prosecute his studies. Ever since that day he has been 
able to sympathize with the poor boy struggling for an education. 
He went from Hamilton to Virginia, where he taught several 
years, and then entered the University of Virginia, where he 
remained two years. This course helped him to shape his work 
as a teacher for life. There he formed high ideals as to what a 
college ought to be, and these high ideals he has had before him 

Vol. II. S. C. 11. 



234 CHARLES HALLETTE JUDSON 

for fifty years and more, and this has largely made Furman 
university what it is. 

In 1847 he married Miss Emily Bosher, of Richmond, Vir- 
ginia. Together they walked life's journey, till May, 1903, when 
she entered her heavenly rest. Soon after their marriage he 
began teaching a boys' school in Loudon, Virginia. After two 
years here he went to Warrenton, Virginia, where he remained 
teaching one year. While at Warrenton he heard of a vacancy 
in an institution of learning at Ansonville, North Carolina, and 
without friends there, or special influence, or even acquaintance 
in the college or community, he journeyed thither and made 
application for the position. In 1851, while seeking pupils for 
this school, he heard of the proposed opening of Furman univer- 
sity, at Greenville, South Carolina, and that a faculty would soon 
be elected. He applied for the chair of mathematics and physics 
and was elected. That was a good day for Furman university, 
Greenville, and for South Carolina. He has filled the chair of 
mathematics ever since, and even now, in his eighty-sixth year, 
he still meets with his classes in astronomy, and is in close touch 
with the classes in mathematics, though the daily routine of that 
work is thrown upon the shoulders of another. When he became 
connected with Furman there was no building, no equipment, and 
only a small endowment. He selected the plans and superin- 
tended the erection of the first college building; he purchased 
the apparatus and equipments, and has led every movement since 
then for the growth, improvement, enlargement of the buildings, 
grounds and endowment, and has largely directed in fixing the 
course of study and the standard of the institution. Until 
recently he was the treasurer and managed the funds and prop- 
erty, and it was very largely due to his prudence, foresight, 
personal sacrifices, unremitting watchfulness, and faithfulness, 
that the college property, funds and equipment were not lost 
entirely during the War between the States and in the dark days 
of financial stringency since. The institution has grown up 
around two men, Doctor Judson and Doctor James C. Furman, 
the first president. Doctor Judson has for many years been the 
dean of the faculty, and was for a year or more acting president, 
and he refused the presidency of the institution. 

During the War between the States, Doctor Judson was 
president of the Greenville Female college, and for several years 



CHARLES HALLETTE JUDSON 235 

after the war. In this position he was instrumental in saving 
that institution also. He managed its affairs with great ability, 
saved its property, and contributed to its support during seasons 
of great depression and stringency. In the recent effort to 
increase the endowment of Furman university he contributed 
over twenty-six thousand dollars. He is not a rich man, but by 
frugality, economy and good management he accumulated some 
means, and he has always been generous, and a liberal contributor 
to benevolent, charitable and religious purposes. He is a Baptist, 
not a minister, but has been deacon in the First Baptist church, 
Greenville, for many years. He is devout, consistent in life, 
broad in his sympathies, and his fellow-men have the utmost 
confidence in his exalted character. 

Doctor Judson made Greenville his home in 1851, and the 
upbuilding of Furman university his life work, and nothing has 
changed his purpose. He has given his life and his property to 
that institution. He has had the opportunity, time and again, 
of changing his home and going elsewhere. Twice he was offered 
the presidency of the Judson institute, Marion, Alabama, and 
twice that of the Richmond Female institute, Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, and twice he was offered a professorship in Richmond 
college. After settling at Greenville he was never a place-seeker, 
his one aim and ambition being to make Furman university 
worthy of the people of the state- 
As a scholar and teacher he is preeminent. He is well 
known in the realm of letters and science. His papers have been 
copied into the leading scientific journals of the day. One of 
these, "An Investigation of the Mathematical Relations between 
Zero and Infinity," is noticed in full in the "Analyst" for 1881. 
He assisted in compiling Wentworth's Geometry. 1879, and pub- 
lished and assisted in revising many other text books on geometry 
and algebra. As a mathematician he has probably no superior 
in the South, and few superiors anywhere. More than that, no 
student ever sat under Professor Judson to learn mathematics 
and went away, either with or without a diploma in this school, 
in just the same ethical mood that he came. He was taught 
mathematics, he imbibed great moral ideas. His idea of life, of 
duty, of obligation, and manhood, underwent a change as inevi- 



236 CHARLES HALLETTE JUDSON 

table as that brought about by the science of mathematics in the 
domain of the pure intellect. 



Since the above sketch was written, and was revised by the 
editor, Professor Judson has been called away. He died at his 
home in Greenville on January 12, 1907. It is interesting to note 
that about two weeks before his death the Carnegie Foundation 
of New York city granted him an annuity of twelve hundred 
dollars because of his eminence as a mathematician and in recog- 
nition of his long term of service as a teacher in one institution. 




^ 






n 




JOHN ALEXANDER KELLEY 

KELLEY, JOHN ALEXANDER, son of Joseph J. and 
Ann J. Campbell Kelley, was born July 20, 1848, in 
Clarendon county, South Carolina. His father was a 
farmer, who died when the son was but three years old. 

Mr. Kelley's paternal grandfather, Daniel J. Kelley, came 
from Ireland to America just after the Revolutionary war. His 
maternal grandfather, Alexander Campbell, was a soldier in the 
Revolutionary war, and was said to have been a very active 
patriot. Alexander Campbell's parents came from Scotland to 
America prior to the Revolution. 

As a boy John Kelley was strong and vigorous, and mani- 
fested a great fondness for hunting and fishing, amusements 
which, however, did not result in the neglect of his studies. He 
was brought up in the town of Manning, Clarendon county, South 
Carolina. His mother was left a widow when quite young and 
in poor circumstances. This made it necessary for the boy to 
cultivate the vegetable garden and do work of every kind about 
the home until he went to college. To the habits of industry thus 
early formed he attributes his subsequent success in life, work 
having become with him a matter of fixed habit. 

Among the influences that affected the character and devel- 
opment of John Kelley, the greatest was that of his home, and 
especially of his mother, whose greatest desire was to see her son 
become a good and successful man. Education was possible for 
him only by the surmounting of great difficulties, poverty being 
the chief. As a mere boy, however, he attended the sessions of 
the court in his home town and listened to the eloquent speeches 
made by the attorneys at the bar. These inspired him with an 
ambition to become a lawyer. In addition, he read history and 
historical novels. He attended the academy at Manning, taught 
by John Witherspoon Ervin. As a sixteen-year-old boy, he 
entered the Confederate army, continuing there for one year. 
In 1866 he entered South Carolina university and took an elective 
course. Being poor, he taught school and studied law, receiving 
books and assistance from Johnson & Johnson, of Marion, South 
Carolina. 



240 JOHN ALEXANDER KELLEY 

In 1872 he was admitted to the bar. His active life-work 
began in 1869 as a teacher in Marion county. His chief business, 
however, has been that of a lawyer. In 1888 he served a term in 
the legislature of the state. He has always been deeply interested 
in everything tending to local improvement, and has done much 
to build up the town. It was through his influence that the new 
railroad depot was erected, and he organized a cotton seed oil 
mill which is an important industry. About three years ago he 
secured the erection of a handsome school academy building in 
the town, and he has since aroused sufficient interest to induce 
the voters of the district to provide for another building for the 
same purpose at a cost of several thousand dollars. He is vice- 
president of the Bank of Kingstree, in the organization of which 
he took a prominent part. Mr. Kelley took an active part in the 
redemption of Williamsburg county from Radical rule. He is a 
Mason and a Knight of Pythias. In the Masonic lodge he has 
held the office of master and district deputy grand master. In 
politics he has always been a Democrat, His religious affiliation 
is with the Methodist church, of which he is an active member 
and to which he is a most liberal contributor. The practice of 
law he varies with attention in summer to his farm and to bird 
hunting in winter. 

Captain Kelley feels that he has made serious failures ; these, 
however, having been due primarily to defective eyesight, which 
prevented proper application to his studies. To the young he 
suggests that the acquiring of the habit of early industry will 
contribute more than anything else to their success. 

Mr. Kelley married, October 29, 1872, Elizabeth B. Boyd, 
daughter of Dr. Robert J. Boyd, of the South Carolina Methodist 
conference, and Rachel B. Boyd. They have had three children, 
two of whom are now (1907) living. 

His address is Kingstree, Williamsburg county, South Caro- 
lina. 



JAMES PINGKNEY KINARD 

KINARD, JAMES PINCKNEY, son of John M. and 
Lavinia Rook Kinard, was born at Kinards, in Newberry 
county, South Carolina, July 17, 1864. His father was a 
planter, and, until his death on the field of battle, captain of 
Company F of the Twentieth regiment of South Carolina vol- 
unteers. 

Until seven years of age James Kinard lived in the country. 
He then moved with his mother to the town of Newberry. Unlike 
many town boys, however, he was trained to work. The influence 
of his mother was strong on his moral life. Educational oppor- 
tunities were available for him in youth only with difficulty; 
nevertheless, he was enabled to attend, first, the Newberry Male 
academy, and, later, Newberry college and the South Carolina 
Military acadenry. From the last named institution he was grad- 
uated in 1886 with the degree of B. S. Afterward he studied in 
Johns Hopkins university, from which institution he received in 
1895 the degree of Ph. D. 

Mr. Kinard began the active work of life as principal of the 
Male academy at Newberry, South Carolina. Through life he 
has been a teacher, serving as principal of the Newberry Male 
academy from 1886 to 1888, as assistant professor of English in 
the South Carolina Military academy from 1888 to 1891, and as 
professor of English in Winthrop college, Rock Hill, South Caro- 
lina, from 1895 to the present (1907) date. In 1902 he edited 
"Old English Ballads," and in 1906 he published an "English 
Grammar for Beginners." He is a Democrat in politics and a 
Baptist in religion. On June 20, 1899, he married Lee Wicker. 
Of this marriage have been born three children, all of whom are 
now (1907) living. 

His address is 339 Oakland avenue, Rock Hill, York county, 
South Carolina. 



JOHN KUKER 

KUKEE, JOHN, the son of Deiderich H. Kuker and Sophie 
Oestman Kuker, was born August 27, 1845, in Hamburg, 
Germany. His father was a civil service employee in the 
postoffice department, and was characterized by scrupulousness, 
punctualitjr and system. 

John Kuker in } 7 outh possessed rugged health and delighted 
in athletic sports, boating and sailing especially. His youth was 
passed in the city of Hamburg, Germany. No regular tasks were 
required of him. Early education offered him no difficulties. He 
was graduated in 1864 from the high school of Hamburg. His 
reading lay in the lines of current literature, political economy, 
statistics, and kindred subjects pertaining to practical business. 
The study of botany in school turned his attention to the study 
of drugs and led to his acceptance of a position in the drug firm 
of Hasche & Woge, in Hamburg. 

In early life Mr. Kuker was trained to habits of method and 
system. Being always affable and courteous, he enjoyed extensive 
friendship among people generally, and from these friends he 
gained much in ideas and knowledge. For a time Mr. Kuker was 
a pharmacist; later he became interested in general real estate, 
loans and securities. He has also been alderman and mayor of 
the city of Florence, serving nine years in the former and one 
year in the latter capacity. He is president of the Commercial 
and Savings bank of the city of Florence, vice-president of the 
Florence Loan and Investment company, and a member of the 
New York Cotton exchange. He is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity, a Democrat, and a Lutheran. Traveling during the 
summer months constitutes his chief relaxation. 

To the young, Mr. Kuker says: "Cultivate decision of char- 
acter, develop individuality, and avoid the listless, mechanical, 
imitative habits which so many people of good ability fall into. 
Don't constantly look to others, lest you become hopelessly 
dependent." 

Mr. Kuker was married on August 12, 1870, to Miss Louise 
Lay. Of this marriage six children have been born, five of 
whom are living in 1907. 

His address is Number 223 Evans street, Florence, South 
Carolina. 



JOHN ADGER LAW 

EW, JOHN ADGER, son of Thomas Hart Law and Anna 
Elizabeth Law, was born September 19, 1869, at Spar- 
tanburg, South Carolina. His father was a clergyman, 
the pastor of the First Presbyterian church of Spartanburg and 
district superintendent of the American Bible society. He was 
a consecrated Christian, and good business man as well. The 
earliest known paternal ancestors in America were French Hu- 
guenots; the maternal ancestors, Adger by name, were Scotch- 
Irish, from Antrim county, Ireland. Dr. John B. Adger, uncle 
of John A. Law, was a missionary to Armenia. 

As a boy John Law was active and robust, fond of athletics, 
of domestic work and horses. His early life was passed in the 
town of Spartanburg. He was taught to do all light forms of 
manual labor around the house, including carpentering, garden- 
ing, and caring for animals. The chief influence in molding the 
life and character of John Law were, first, the home, in which 
his mother was a most potent factor; then, in order, men in 
active life, early companionship, private study and school. For 
reading, he was especially fond of the historical novel. Educa- 
tion of both school and college grade was given him by his 
parents. He attended private schools and Wofford college, grad- 
uating from both. In 1887 he received the degree of A. B. from 
Wofford college. His active work was begun in the capacity of 
stenographer and typewriter. Into this, as into all subsequent 
work, he threw himself with all his might, having been taught 
from earliest childhood to strive for success in everything he 
might undertake. 

Mr. Law was from 1887 to 1889 private secretary to the 
superintendent of the Southern Express company at Charlotte 
and Wilmington, North Carolina; from 1889 to 1891 he was 
bookkeeper for the First National bank of Spartanburg; from 
1891 to 1901 he was cashier of the Spartanburg Savings bank; 
from 1901 to the present (1907) time he has been president of the 
Saxon mills; also, since 1903, president of the Central National 
bank of Spartanburg, and of the Spartanburg Savings bank. 
As a business man he has the confidence, esteem and best wishes 



244 JOHN ADGER LAW 

of all who know him; by nature, training, and associations, he 
has the promise of a brilliant career, and the members of his 
community are glad to entrust to him positions of responsibility. 

Mr. Law is an elder in the Presbyterian church; but has 
declined all political honors. He is a member of the National 
Association of Manufacturers, of the American Bankers associa- 
tion, and a member of the Converse College Choral club, and also 
of the executive committee of the latter organization. In politics 
he is a Democrat. He finds his relaxation in hunting, fishing, 
tennis, horseback riding, and driving. 

From the thwarted ambitions and shattered ideals of life 
Mr. Law draws one lesson, namely: that of unending persever- 
ance. To the young he commends a return to the simpler and 
more economical methods of living of our forefathers to old- 
fashioned honesty, energy, and sobriety. 

On November 14, 1895, Mr. Law married Pearl S. Sibley, 
daughter of William C. and Jane E. Sibley, of Augusta, Georgia. 
Of their five children, four are living in 1907. 

His address is Spartanburg, South Carolina. 



JACOB ADAM LIGHTSEY 

E'GHTSEY, JACOB ADAM, farmer, merchant, banker and 
dealer in live stock, of Crocketville, Hampton county, 
South Carolina, was born in Lexington county, South 
Carolina, on the 20th of December, 1848. He is a son of a farmer, 
John Frederick Lightsey, and Mrs. Teresa (Kinard) Lightsey. 
His mother's family were descended from a German family who 
settled near Newberry, South Carolina, in the last century. 

Born in the country, as a boy fond of hunting, fishing and 
riding horseback, he was early assigned regular tasks of farm 
work and learned to do a full day's work with the negroes on his 
father's farm. His opportunities for attending school were very 
limited. He says: "The school held in an old pine-log school- 
house near my early home gave me most of my education ; but I 
read many books in my boyhood." In the War between the 
States, young as he was, he served as a Confederate soldier in 
Company F, Third South Carolina cavalry, Colonel C. J. Colcock, 
from October, 1864, to April, 1865. He entered the Confederate 
army when only sixteen years of age, answering to the last call 
for troops, the "call for all from the cradle to the grave," as it 
was popularly denominated. Officially it asked for all from six- 
teen to sixty; and boys of sixteen and under entered the service, 
while men of sixty and upwards, who had before been exempt, 
were also called into the service. 

Immediately after the war he began to earn his living by 
working with his own hands on his own farm. His determined 
ambition to acquire an independent property led him, in 1880, to 
begin a general merchandising business. As he succeeded in this, 
he developed a varied business, dealing in live stock, the manu- 
facture and sale of lumber, and in horses and cattle. As his 
capital increased he established a private business. His business 
extended over two or three counties. At various times he has had 
men identified with him as partners, but only to a very limited 
extent until his sons became of age and were able to take an active 
part in conducting his business. His various business interests 
have grown into such proportions that it is divided into three 
main lines : His son Frederick has general charge of the mercan- 



248 JACOB ADAM LIGHTSEY 

tile business; another son, Henry W., has general charge of the 
saw mill and lumbering interests; while Mr. Lightsey gives his 
personal attention to business in live stock and horses, and to his 
extensive farming interests. In his business he has never asked 
for extension of time; nor has he ever offered to pay any of his 
large obligations at less than one hundred cents on the dollar. 
He has always taken an active part in politics, but he has refused 
time and again to run for office, his extensive business interests 
precluding the possibility of leaving them for any considerable 
length of time. He is one of the largest land-holders of that 
section of the country, holding three thousand acres of timber. 
Much of his progress in life he attributes to the influence and 
assistance of his wife. 

He was married, on December 14, 1873, to Miss Suzanna 
Elizabeth Cone, daughter of W. F. Cone, of Barnwell county. 
They have had six children, four of whom are living in 1907. 
He married a second time, in 1894, Miss Addie E. Kearse, daugh- 
ter of S. F. Kearse, of Hampton. 

He is a director in the Bank of Hampton County, South 
Carolina. He has been for years a commissioned officer in the 
State militia. He is a Mason. He is a member of the Presby- 
terian church, and for over twenty years he has been a deacon in 
that church. 

In politics he has always been a Democrat. 



LEE DAVIS LODGE 

E~>DGE, LEE DAVIS, president of Limestone college, 
Gaifney, South Carolina, was born in Montgomery county, 
in the state of Maryland, on the 24th day of November, 
1865. His father was James L. Lodge, D. D., a leading minister 
of the Baptist denomination; the name of his mother was Alice 
Virginia Lodge. His father was a man of great intensity of 
character, a finished writer and an eloquent speaker. The Lodge 
family in America derives its descent from the English poet, 
Thomas Lodge. Doctor Lodge's mother was a Warfield, related 
to many prominent families in Maryland. He was a healthy 
child, although his life was passed chiefly in cities. His tastes 
in childhood were literary, with a special turn towards history; 
his mother's character exerted a profound influence upon every 
phase of his life. He attended high schools in Jersey City and 
Newark, New Jersey, and obtained the degree of A. M. from 
Columbian university, Washington, District of Columbia, in 1885. 
After his graduation he pursued elaborate studies in French, 
political science and philosophy at the Columbian university and 
received from that institution the degree of Ph. D., for work 
done, in 1892. Doctor Lodge has been married twice; first, to 
Lelia Ella White, daughter of the Rev. S. R. White, of Rockville, 
Maryland; and after her death he married, on August 25, 1897, 
Mary Louise McClammy, daughter of the Hon. Charles W. 
McClammy, United States representative from North Carolina. 
He has had five children, of whom three are now (1907) living. 
He began the active work of his life as tutor in Greek at 
Columbian university, in September, 1884, a position offering an 
excellent opening in the line of his chosen profession. From 
earliest childhood his father and mother spared no pains to stir 
his ambition. Home and school influence and the influence of 
private study were very strong upon his intellectual development. 
The writings of the idealistic philosophers Greek, French and 
German greatly influenced his mind in the formative period of 
its development, a development which was wisely directed by the 
companionship of President Welling and Professor O. T. Mason, 
of the Columbian university. For fifteen years he held profes- 



250 LEE DAVIS LODGE 

sorships in Columbian university, at Washington, District of 
Columbia, resigning in 1899 to accept the presidency of Lime- 
stone college, Gaffney, South Carolina, which position he now 
holds. 

Doctor Lodge has written "A Study in Corneille," published 
in 1891, which has been highly commended by competent critics, 
both French, English and American. He has also written a 
number of occasional essays and reviews, and is now employed 
upon a "History of French Philosophy," which he hopes soon to 
publish. As a public speaker he has won considerable distinction. 
He is a member of Phi Kappa Psi fraternity and the Cosmos 
club of Washington, District of Columbia. In religion he is a 
Baptist, and in politics a Democrat. Biographical notices of 
Doctor Lodge have appeared in White's "Cyclopedia of Amer- 
ican Biography," volume II; in Herringshaw's "Nineteenth Cen- 
tury Biography," and in the various editions of "Who's Who in 
America." 

His address is Gaffney, Cherokee county, South Carolina. 



^ > lUC LIBRARY j 




( 






BENJAMIN LUGIOUS LOWERY 

E'lWERY, BENJAMIN LUCIOUS, lumber merchant, and 
until recently president of the Citizens bank at Seneca, 
was born near Fairplay village, Oconee county, South 
Carolina, May 4, 1844. His father, Andrew Jackson Lowery, 
was a farmer and a man of upright character, who had many 
friends in his community. His mother was Catherine Lowery. 
He is a direct descendant of the Harrisons and Gordons, who 
came to Virginia from Ireland about 1700. 

Mr. Lowery was brought up on a farm. Owing to the 
limited means of his father, his only school training was obtained 
at odd times in a little country school. Although he had slight 
opportunity for the study of books, his natural ambition enabled 
him to gather much information from his associates. In 1867 he 
started farming for himself in Oconee county. He had but one 
horse and no help. After several years' hard work he came to 
the conclusion that farming on so small a scale did not pay. In 
1875 he started a small lumber mill. Following the example of 
others who were successful, he went to work at this new under- 
taking with a determination that was bound to bring results. 
His business grew steadily, so that today the former owner of the 
little mill in Oconee county is head of a large lumber plant in 
Ellisville, Mississippi, president of the Farmers and Merchants 
bank in the same city, and has only recently sold out his interest 
in the Citizens bank of Seneca, of which he was also the president. 
As advice to young men how to be equally successful in life, he 
says: "If possible, take up your chosen profession with a deter- 
mination to succeed. Above all, be honest, sober and truthful." 

During the four years War between the States Mr. Lowery 
fought as a private in the Confederate ranks. His favorite 
amusement is driving. 

On May 4, 1871, he was married to Miss S. C. Hunnicutt. 
They have one child living in 1907. 

His address is Seneca, Oconee county, South Carolina. 



WILLIAM ERNEST LUCAS 

E'TCAS, WILLIAM ERNEST, cotton manufacturer, of 
Laurens, South Carolina, was born in Hartsville, Dar- 
lington county, South Carolina, November 16, 1863. 

He comes of distinguished ancestry, among his forebears 
being such men as Benjamin Simons, who came from France and 
settled in Charleston in 1685, and Jonathan Lucas, who came 
from England in 1785 and also settled in Charleston. Jonathan 
Lucas was the inventor of rice mills, and his son, Jonathan Lucas, 
Jr., was noted for improvements upon this invention. Benjamin 
Simons, third, his great great-grandfather, was a member of the 
Jacksonboro legislature, and his father, Benjamin Simons Lucas, 
Jr., is a physician and surgeon of considerable reputation, and a 
man of marked intelligence, as well as urbanity of manner. His 
mother, who was Miss Ellen S. King, was a woman of refinement 
and true piety whose influence upon her son's life and upon his 
mental and spiritual development has lasted him through life. 

Mr. Lucas was a typical country boy, of strong and healthy 
frame, which received added vigor from outdoor living and work 
on his father's farm, in which he engaged for about two years 
during his youth. His education was received at ordinary country 
schools and at Wofford college. 

His first entrance into business life was as a clerk in Harts- 
ville, South Carolina, in the early eighties. In 1890 he became 
president of the Morgan Iron Works at Spartanburg, South Caro- 
lina, and in 1895 he organized the Laurens Cotton mills. In 1900 
he was elected president of the Darlington Manufacturing com- 
pany, and in 1903 he organized the Watts mills, of Laurens, of 
which corporation he is president. His success as a manufacturer 
has brought him into prominence throughout his state and has 
also been the means of his acquisition of considerable wealth. 

He is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church, and in 
political affairs is identified with the Democratic party. His 
principal forms of relaxation are riding and driving, his fondness 
for horses and for outdoor life being a heritage from his boyhood 
days on the farm. December 18, 1890, he married Miss Cora Cox. 



WILLIAM ERNEST LUCAS 257 

They have had three children, two of whom are living in 1907. 
As a substantial type of the level-headed, enterprising busi- 
ness man, Mr. Lucas is among the foremost citizens of South 
Carolina, whose staple industry of cotton manufacturing he is 
doing no little to promote. 



VoL II. S. C. 12. 



E. PRESSLY McGLINTOCK 

McCLINTOCK, KEVEKEND E. PKESSLY, D. D., for 
more than a third of a century pastor of the Thompson 
Street Associate Reformed church, and a prominent 
figure in the history of Newberry, South Carolina, was born in 
Laurens county, South Carolina, on June 11, 1845. His ancestors 
were of the group of Protestant Irish immigrants, McClintocks, 
Laws, Aikans, and Martins, who came from the town of Bally- 
mena, County Antrim, Ireland, to Fairfield county, South Caro- 
lina, many of them as merchants, planters and professional men 
becoming prominent in the history of the communities where they 
settled and of the state. David Martin, his mother's father, was 
a member of that company of Colonel Winn's regiment, South 
Carolina, Continental troops, of which his brother, Edward Mar- 
tin, was captain in the Revolutionary war. 

His father, John McClintock, was a farmer, characterized, 
says his son, by religious-mindedness and a thirst for knowledge, 
and by those Scotch-Irish qualities of character which made him 
the successful owner of a hundred African slaves. By his mother, 
Mrs. Mary (Martin) McClintock, his life was strongly influenced 
for good, and he was early inclined to the life-work to which he 
has devoted himself. 

His boyhood was passed in the life of a typical plantation, 
where the patriarchal form of American slavery was to be seen in 
its least objectionable form. A hundred slaves lived and worked 
under the kindly supervision of a humane Christian master. The 
negroes who were willing to be taught to read were instructed by 
the white children of the family, especially on the Sabbath. Like 
the other children of his family, he was "subjected to no labor, 
but was served by the slaves belonging to his parents, and was 
himself required to be a faithful school-boy." Every encourage- 
ment and all assistance possible were given him in attaining a 
liberal education. After preparation at a classical school in the 
country near his home, he entered Erskine college, at Due West, 
where so much of his after life was to be spent; and was gradu- 
ated A. B. in 1861. 







-r 




E. PRESSLY M'CLINTOCK 261 

The outbreak of the War between the States interrupted his 
studies; and with the other eager and spirited young men of his 
state he enlisted, serving two years and six months in Company 
G, Second South Carolina cavalry, in Wade Hampton's original 
legion in the Army of Northern Virginia. 

After the war his early conviction that the church of which 
he was a member needed for its ministry men thoroughly trained 
by a college course, the desire to be useful to his fellow -men in 
such a ministry of the Word became definite. He took a course 
of theological study at Erskine Theological seminary, and was 
graduated B. D. in 1869. 

For six months he preached in Mississippi. In 1871 he was 
installed as pastor of the Thompson Street church at Newberry 
a place which he has filled most acceptably for thirty-five years. 
At the same time he was placed in charge of the church at King's 
Creek, in the same county; and for eight years he ministered to 
both these congregations. Since 1879 his time and efforts have 
been given entirely to the church and community of Newberry, 
and to those lines of church work for and with his denomination 
which this prominent pastorate and his own personality have 
devolved upon him. 

On May 17, 1870, he married Elizabeth J. Young, daughter 
of Prof. J. N. Young, LL. D., of Erskine college and Euphemia 
(Strong) Young. Of their five children, two are now (1907) 
living. 

To his choice of a life-work Doctor McClintock feels that he 
was first and most strongly impelled by the ideals and the life of 
an intelligent and pious home. The work of the ministry has 
seemed to him to be most interesting and rich in its rewards to 
one who cares for the highest values. "I have served the church 
at Newberry continuously and have found the field and its work 
sufficient to demand and employ all my powers and all my time," 
he writes; and he recounts as his public services "only those 
which grew out of the office of pastor in an energetic college 
town." How far-reaching is the influence of such a pastor upon 
the lives of those young people who, trained by a liberal course 
of study, are to be leaders of thought and life in their generation, 
those alone can estimate who remember how great is their own 
debt to the preachers who inspired them in their student years. 



262 E. PRESSLY M'CLINTOCK 

He was a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity in college. 
He is by conviction and by party relations a Democrat. The 
college of which he is an alumnus he has served in many ways, 
during the thirty-six years of his postorate, in the college town 
where he was graduated. 

Since 1900 he has been chairman of the board of trustees of 
Erskine college. In 1903 Newberry college conferred on him the 
honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity. 

Doctor McClintock has rendered an important service to his 
state and to the entire South by advocating strongly and most 
effectively the higher education for women. Not only in public 
addresses and sermons has he favored advanced courses of study 
for women, but by example, in the thorough education which he 
gave to his own daughters, he has done much toward that pro- 
nounced change in ideals of the possible and the desirable in 
women's education which has been wrought in the Southern states 
and throughout our land since 1865. One of his daughters, 
Euphemia McClintock, is president of the College for Women, 
at Columbia, South Carolina. Another daughter, Mary Law 
McClintock, is lady principal of the Mount Ida school, Newton, 
Massachusetts. 

To young men who intend to enter the ministry Doctor 
McClintock offers this advice, based on an experience of nearly 
two-score years in preaching in a college town: "Study the per- 
sonality of Jesus Christ. Imitate Him. Preach the duties of 
good citizenship, holding to the doctrine that civil government is 
an ordinance of God." 

And for all the young people of his state he writes : "I have 
always cherished a conviction that the youth of my time and my 
section inherited as splendid traditions and as high sentiments as 
the youth of any other period and section; and that loyalty to 
inheritance is of material help in the development of one's own 
powers in one's own day." 



CHARLES EDGAR McDONALD 

McDONALD, CHARLES EDGAR, since 1892 pastor 
of the Associate Reformed Presbyterian church at 
Winnsboro, South Carolina, in 1895 moderator of the 
Associate Reformed Presbyterian synod of the South, for eight 
years editor of the "Associate Reformed Presbyterian Quarterly" 
for Sunday schools, and for fifteen years associate editor of the 
"Associate Reformed Presbyterian," was born in Richburg, 
Chester county, South Carolina, November 23, 1859. The "blood 
of the Scotch Covenanters" is in his veins, through the ancestors 
of his mother and his father. 

His father, Reverend Laughlin McDonald, was an able and 
eloquent preacher, whose example and influence must have been 
a great stimulus to the son. His mother, Mrs. Malissa Lucinda 
(Stinson) McDonald, did much to inspire the ideals and form the 
character of her son. Her father's ancestors came from Ireland 
before the Revolutionary period, and settled on Rocky creek, 
Chester county, South Carolina, and they were by descent a blend 
of Scotch Covenanters and Irish Protestants. His father's earliest 
American ancestors came directly from Scotland, descendants of 
Covenanters, and settled in Georgia. Daniel Green Stinson, his 
mother's father, was a local historian of some repute who pre- 
pared sketches of twenty of the "Women of the Revolution" for 
the work so entitled, by Mrs. Ellet. He also assisted Doctor 
Lyman C. Draper in the preparation of his volume, "The Battle 
of Kings Mountain." 

Born in the country, he passed his boyhood on a farm, robust 
in health, strong in physique. He had regular duties in "doing 
chores" on the farm; and for two years he acted as "a hand" in 
farm work. 

But the way to a liberal education was made easy for him. 
His father's property was sufficient to provide a good education 
for all the children. Prepared for college at New Hope academy, 
he entered Erskine college, and was graduated A. B. with the 
class of 1877 when but eighteen years old. Two years of healthful 
work on the farm followed. But he felt himself unquestionably 



264 CHARLES EDGAR M 5 DONALD 

called to the work of the Christian ministry, and he soon began 
his especial studies for that work. 

In 1880 he entered Erskine Theological seminary, where he 

O */ 7 

studied theology for two years, and was graduated in 1881. 
Ordained to the ministry, he began the active work of the pasto- 
rate in charge of the Steele Creek Associate Reformed Pres- 
byterian church, in Mecklenburg county, North Carolina, in 
October, 1882. Here he continued to serve as pastor and preacher 
for ten years, until he was called, in April, 1892, to the pastorate 
at Winnsboro, South Carolina, which he has filled in a manner 
most acceptable to his church and to the community in which he 
has lived for the last fourteen years. 

As editor of the "Sunday School Quarterly," and as associate 
editor of the "Associate Reformed Presbyterian," he has served 
well and with scholarly and practical efficiency that branch of the 
Church of Christ with which he is denominationally connected. 
The cordial appreciation of his fellow-ministers and their confi- 
dence in him was shown by his choice as moderator of the 
Associate Reformed synod of the South, which met at Due West, 
South Carolina, in 1895. 

Mr. McDonald was married to Margaret Harris, daughter of 
Robert H. Harris, of York county, on December 23, 1886. She 
died on June 15, 1903. Of their five children, three are living 
in 1907. 

Since 1884 he has been a member of the South Carolina 
Historical society. In political relations he is a Democrat. He 
has identified himself with all the prohibition movements in his 
state for the last thirty years, opposing the liquor evil with pen 
and voice, attending conventions and conferences, and awakening 
the public conscience on this important question of practical 
morality. His interest in sound family life and civic healthful- 
ness, so alarmingly attacked by the curse of "drink," has made 
the advocacy of temperance, in his estimation, one of the foremost 
of Christian duties. 

He served as chairman of the executive committee in the 
interest of prohibition for Fairfield county, conducting the cam- 
paign of 1892. 

He has filled but two pastorates during the twenty-five years 
of his active ministry; and in each of these his people have been 
led, under his administrations, to build a new church and to build 



CHARLES EDGAR MCDONALD 265 

or acquire a manse. At Steele Creek a fine church was erected 
in 1883 and a manse in 1887. At Winnsboro a large and com- 
modious manse, of colonial architecture, was purchased in 1894, 
and a beautiful modern church was erected in 1903. In this new 
church building was celebrated the Centennial of the Associate 
Reformed Presbyterian synod of the South, in November, 1903. 
As a minister of the Gospel who believes that the life his 
state needs is found in the life of Christ freely imparted to those 
who will receive Him, he gives this brief advice to the young 
people of South Carolina who wish to succeed in life: "True 
success is to be found only in 'living the old-time religion.' " 



JAMES HASELDEN MANNING 

MANNING, JAMES HASELDEN, planter, banker, for 
six years a member of the State Phosphate commis- 
sion, was born in the country near Little Rock, Marion 
county, South Carolina, on the 16th of April, 1857. His father, 
Thomas J. Manning, descended from a family who had moved 
from Virginia to South Carolina during the progress of the 
Eevolutionary war, was a planter, who served as a major of 
militia during the War between the States, and was killed by 
deserters in 1864. He was impetuous, energetic, and, in the 
conduct of his business as a planter, remarkably successful. His 
wife, Mrs. Annie Maria (Haselden) Manning, devoted herself to 
the rearing and training of her children; and would have sent 
her son James to college had he not refused to go because he felt 
himself needed at home after his father's death. 

Born upon a farm and passing his boyhood in the country, 
he grew up with excellent health, strong and vigorous in his 
physical development, and exceptionally fond of the care of stock 
and of all forms of outdoor work. He attended the country 
schools near his home for a part of each year until he was fifteen. 
In that year, 1872, he took entire charge of his father's estate 
near Dillon, South Carolina, declining to continue study because 
he felt that he ought to act as the head of the family. 

Assuming thus early the responsibilities and the duties of 
manhood, it is natural that he should have found his associates 
among men older than himself ; and in speaking of the influences 
which have affected his life for good, he lays especial stress upon 
this fact. He says : "I have always associated with men who were 
my seniors, and I have profited by doing so." 

By his studious attention to the duties of an intelligent 
planter, and by his success in the management of his father's 
estate, Mr. Manning won the confidence and esteem of his fellow- 
citizens. While planting has been the chief business of his life, 
he has been interested in the Bank of Latta, and in 1904 he served 
for a time as president of that bank. He is also a director of the 
Bank of Marion, at Marion, South Carolina; and he continues 
to be a director of the Bank of Latta. As a member of the 



JAMES HASELDEN MANNING 269 

Phosphate commission for six years, he became officially identified 
with the study and the administration of the mineral deposits of 
South Carolina. In 1890 Governor Richardson appointed him a 
delegate to the Interstate Farmers' convention, which met at 
Montgomery, Alabama. In 1898 Governor Ellerbe appointed him 
a representative of South Carolina to attend the Farmers' con- 
vention at Galveston, Texas. 

On December 25, 1877, Mr. Manning married Miss Florence 
Ellerbe, daughter of Captain W. S. Ellerbe, of South Carolina. 
They have had eleven children, seven of whom are living in 1907. 

In his political relations Mr. Manning writes himself down 
as "Democratic and anti-Tillmanite." He is a member of the 
Methodist Church, South. He has always been fond of out-of- 
door exercise of all forms; and he finds relaxation and enjoyment 
in travel. 

To the young people of South Carolina he writes: "If a 
young man wishes to succeed he should live within his income, 
practice economy and industry, and learn to make money before 
he spends if" 



OSCAR BAKER MARTIN 

MARTIN, OSCAR BAKER, state superintendent of 
education, was born in Central, Pickens county, South 
Carolina, November 8, 1870. He is the son of T. C. 
Martin and Hattie Baker Martin. His father was a farmer, and 
at one time county commissioner for Pickens county, and chair- 
man of the school board. He is a man of energy, honesty and 
good judgment. His ancestors were Welsh-Irish and Scotch-Irish 
sturdy yeomanry who had an ardent love of home and country. 
They came first to Virginia and later to upper South Carolina. 

Brought up as a country lad on his father's farm, Oscar 
Baker Martin was a sturdy youth, fond of hunting, fishing and 
all outdoor sports, and full of curiosity and ambition. While yet 
a mere boy he was deeply interested in public events and read 
the newspapers with avidity. In one summer he read the thirty- 
seven plays of Shakespeare, and before he had left school he had 
read the Bible through several times. After attending the public 
and high schools, he entered the North Georgia Agricultural 
college, where he remained for one year. Later he took a course 
at Furman university, where in 1892 he was graduated with the 
degree of A. B. He has also attended summer schools at Glens 
Falls and Chautauqua, New York. He began teaching in Pickens 
county when he was sixteen years of age, and during the greater 
part of his college course he earned his own livelihood in this 
manner. After graduation he adopted teaching as a profession 
and became instructor in the Donalds high school, in Abbeville 
county. One year later he was appointed to the principalship of 
the Pendleton street graded school, in Greenville, and two years 
afterward he was promoted to the high school department in 
the same city. He held this position for seven years, until 1903, 
when he assumed his present duties as state superintendent of 
education. 

Professor Martin was for three years a deacon in the Baptist 
church, is a member of the Kappa Alpha college fraternity, of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and of the Woodmen of 
the World. In politics he is a Democrat. Gardening, hunting 
and fishing are his favorite forms of amusement. Speaking of 



OSCAR BAKER MARTIN 271 

the impulses which have brought him success in life, he says: 
"My first impulse was to please my parents, and my next was to 
accomplish the greatest amount of service with whatever talents 
had been given me. My failures have been the occasions of 
greater resolutions. I am a great believer in the power of pur- 
pose. Training of the will is the greatest education. Many fail 
from lack of perseverance in a good work." 

In 1897 Professor Martin was married to Dora Cook, daugh- 
ter of A. and Eliza Cook, of Laurens county. 

His address is Columbia, South Carolina. 



ALEXANDER JAMES MATHESON 

MATHESON, ALEXANDER JAMES, banker, financier, 
business administrator, was born on "Attadale" estate, 
Marlboro county, South Carolina, July 11, 1848, the 
son of Donald and Christiana MacLeod Matheson. 

His father was a lawyer and small planter, a scholarly man 
of high Christian character, and an elder in the Presbyterian 
church. He was born in Loch Carron, Scotland, and came to 
Charleston, South Carolina, in 1825. His brother, Sir James 
Matheson, of Stornoway Castle, the proprietor of the Island of 
Lewis, and another brother, Sir Alexander Matheson, of Ross 
Castle, were raised to the peerage of Scotland in recognition of 
their efforts to relieve the poor and distressed. Sir Kinneth 
Matheson, a cousin of Alexander J., of Duncrogie Castle, also 
rose to a place of prominence in his native country. 

On the maternal side, Mr. Matheson's ancestors, the Mac- 
Leods, were also Scotch, and descended from the well-known 
family in Scotch annals resident for many generations at Dun- 
vegan Castle, Skye. His grandfather MacLeod settled at Wil- 
mington, North Carolina, in 1T75. 

The childhood and youth of Alexander J. Matheson were 
spent on a small farm amid wholesome surroundings. He was 
early inured to the routine of farm work, and received a limited 
education in the common schools. In 1869 he worked on a farm 
in Marion county, South Carolina, for exceedingly small wages, 
saved his money, and in the following year began a small mer- 
cantile business. His first efforts at merchandising were not 
successful, and in 1872 he returned to farming. By persistent 
endeavor and hard work he acquired a modest capital and 
reengaged in the mercantile business, this time with much greater 
assurance of success. In 1879 he removed to Blenheim, South 
Carolina, and continued planting and merchandising on a larger 
scale. In 1895 he began a wholesale grocery business in Ben- 
nettsville, in the same state, which rapidly developed, and at the 
same time he invested largely in real estate. 

Mr. Matheson was elected president of the Planters National 
bank, of Bennettsville, in 1902 ; was made president of the Union 



ALEXANDER JAMES MATHESON 275 

Savings bank, in 1903; is president of the Marlboro Wholesale 
Grocery company; is vice-president and general manager of the 
Bennettsville and Cheraw railroad, in which he is a large stock- 
holder; and is directly or indirectly connected with a number of 
other minor interests. He has been active in the river and harbor 
improvements of the state, and placed before congress a plan to 
improve the channel of the Pee Dee river, which is now pending. 

From 1863 until the close of the war Mr. Matheson served 
in the Confederate army. He is an elder in the Presbyterian 
church, an ardent patron of education, and has devoted much 
time and energy to the promotion of local interests. Starting in 
life with many heavy handicaps, by close application, promptness 
in his business relations, unswerving integrity, and strict concen- 
tration of energy upon the immediate affairs in hand, he has 
reached a commendable degree of success. 

In 1903 he erected a sumptuous residence, surrounded by 
large grounds, near the center of Bennettsville, which he named 
"Shiness," in honor of his grandmother's home in Southerland- 
shire, Scotland. He has made a number of visits to Europe 
especially to Scotland and initiated a movement, in 1904, to 
induce Scotch immigrants to settle in South Carolina. 

On April 20, 1870, Mr. Matheson married Sarah Ellen Jar- 
nigan, daughter of B. W. Jarnigan and Mary Jarnigan, of 
Marion county. Nine children were born to this union, eight of 
whom are now (1907) living. 

His address is Bennettsville, Marlboro county, South Caro- 
lina. 



BENJAMIN FRANKLIN MAULDIN 

MAULDIN, BENJAMIN FKANKLIN, banker, for the 
year 1904 to 1905 president of the South Carolina 
Bankers association, is president of the Bank of An- 
derson, in which town he has resided since his early manhood. 
He was born in Anderson county on March 24, 1850. His father, 
whose name was also Benjamin Franklin Mauldin, was a mer- 
chant and a Baptist minister, and was a member of the Secession 
convention in 1861, a business man full of public spirit, and of 
the strictest integrity of character, he was well known throughout 
the county, and had a reputation in the state at large. His 
mother, Mrs. Adaline Tyrrel (Hamilton) Mauldin, had a marked 
influence upon the character of her son in early boyhood, and has 
always retained an altogether exceptional place in his memory. 
She was descended from Archibald Hamilton, who had emigrated 
from Scotland and married Frances Calhoun. His earliest known 
ancestor in America on his father's side was Joab Mauldin, who 
made swords for the Revolutionary soldiers. 

He was born in the country and lived for a large part of 
his boyhood in the village of Williamston. He did not have 
robust health in his boyhood ; but he won a reputation for energy 
and activity, even as a boy. His earliest inclination was toward 
the life of a farmer and the pursuit of scientific agriculture. 
He entered Furman university, at Greenville, South Carolina, 
but was not graduated, withdrawing at the end of the second 
year of the co.urse by reason of the lack of funds, the war having 
"swept away his father's property." 

In 1867 as a man he began to support himself, having a 
position in the internal revenue office at Anderson, South Caro- 
lina. He almost immediately developed a marked inclination to 
the study and practice of banking; and in 1872 he was made 
assistant cashier of the National Bank of Anderson. In 1891 he 
became cashier of that bank. He organized and became president 
of the following named banks : the Bank of Due West, the Bank 
of McCormick, Bank of Hodges, and the Lowndesville bank, as 
well as of the Bank of Mt. Carmel, the Bank of Trenton, and 
the Bank of Townville. Having been chosen to organize a state 




_ 7 




BENJAMIN FRANKLIN MAULDIN 279 

bank under the name of the Bank of Anderson, he became presi- 
dent of that bank in January, 1906, a position which he still 
holds. The State Bankers association of South Carolina chose 
Mr. Mauldin as its president for the year 1904 to 1905. 

On May 22, 1872, he was married to Miss Mary E. Eeed, 
and they have had three children, all of whom are living in 1907. 
He is a Democrat, "of the Grover Cleveland type," of conviction 
and principle. He finds his amusement and recreation in ama- 
teur farming, devoting his attention especially to the raising of 
poultry and of pet stock. 

He is a member of the Baptist church, and has for some 
years held the office of deacon in that church. 

His address is 603 North Main street, Anderson, South 
Carolina. 



WILLIAM McINTYRE MONROE 

MONROE, WILLIAM McINTYRE, of Marion, South 
Carolina, merchant, was born near the town where he 
still resides, in Marion county, South Carolina, Decem- 
ber 3, 1851. His father was a planter, David Monroe, whose 
Scotch ancestors had bequeathed to him habits of thrift and 
honesty. His mother was of English descent and made her influ- 
ence felt in the moral and spiritual life of her son. 

It was a healthy boy's life which he passed on his father's 
farm. "When not in school I worked on my father's farm for 
several years; and I am sure it was a great help to me. The 
effect on my character and habits was good," he writes. 

The War between the States, beginning when he was a boy 
of ten, interfered with his systematic education. The impover- 
ished condition of the country after the war made a college 
education seem to him impossible of attainment. Country schools, 
and later a few terms at the school in the town of Marion, com- 
pleted his education from books. 

He was eager to make his way in life; and the first business 
opening which was offered him, a clerkship in a general mer- 
chandise store at Marion, he at once accepted. Even in early 
boyhood he had felt a strong desire to be "independent" in means, 
but he has never known the ambition to be rich. 

From a clerkship he made his way, by faithful attention to 
duty and fair dealing, to an independent business of his own, and 
as a merchant of Marion for twenty-three years he has interested 
himself in all that concerns the welfare of his town and commu- 
nity. He is interested in the Marion bank, is a stockholder and 
director of the Marion Cotton mill, vice-president of the Farmers 
and Merchants bank, and has been a member of the board of 
directors from the date of its organization. 

He is a Democrat in his party politics. In religious convic- 
tions he is allied with the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 
For recreation and exercise he spends all the time he can take 
from his business in work upon his farm. 



WILLIAM M'INTYRE MONROE 281 

The advice which he offers young men is encouraging for 
those who feel themselves without exceptional endowments of any 
kind. He says : "Make up your mind to do something, and stick 
to it. Any healthy man will succeed if he attends closely to his 
business and saves what he makes. Do not spend a dollar until 
you have earned it and got it." 

On May 16, 1882, Mr. Monroe married Mary A. McMillan, 
daughter of Major S. E. and A. S. McMillan, of Marion. They 
have had nine children, of whom six are living in 1907. 



Vol. II. S. C. 13. 



THOMAS MOULTRIE MORDEGAI 

MORDECAI, THOMAS MOULTRIE, lawyer, was born 
in Charleston, South Carolina, March 12, 1855. His 
parents were Thomas Whitlock and Lucretia (Cohen) 
Mordecai. His father was a merchant, an excellent business man 
who never cared for public life, but whose mind was cultivated 
and who gave much of his leisure time to literary pursuits. The 
earliest ancestor of the family in this country was the great- 
grandfather of the subject of this sketch, Moses Mordecai, who 
was born at Bonn, Germany, and married Elizabeth Whitlock, 
of London, England, and came to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
in 1755. 

In childhood and youth Moultrie Mordecai lived in the city. 
His health was excellent. His tastes and interests centered largely 
in books, and he was especially fond of Greek and Latin works. 
He was the youngest of eighteen children, and, as he was only 
ten years of age when his father died, it was difficult for him to 
secure an education. But his mother devoted her life to him, and 
by her aid financial and other obstacles were overcome and he was 
enabled to pass through the usual collegiate course. He studied 
at the high school in Charleston, entered the College of Charles- 
ton, from which institution he was graduated with the degree of 
A. B. in 1873, and received the degree of M. A. in 1877. After 
graduating from college he studied law for eighteen months in 
the office of Rutledge & Young in Charleston, and on December 
3, 1873, when only eighteen years of age, he was admitted to the 
bar by the supreme court of South Carolina, a special act of the 
legislature, the first of the kind ever passed, having been obtained 
to permit him to practice law before attaining his legal majority. 
By his clear and forceful presentation of his cases, and close 
attention to business, he soon won the confidence of the court, 
the members of the bar, and his clients, and by the uprightness 
of his character he gained the confidence of the community at 
large. For thirty-three years he has been engaged in the active 
practice of the law and has been highly successful therein. In 
addition to a large general practice, he has done a great deal of 



THOMAS MOULTKIE MORDECAI 285 

work as a corporation lawyer. He is now the senior member of 
the firm of Mordecai, Gadsden, Rutledge & Hagood. 

The first impulse to strive for the prizes of life came from 
a desire to support his mother and five sisters and make a name 
for himself worthy of his ancestors and his people. The choice 
of his profession was determined by the wishes of his relatives 
and friends and his own inclination. 

In reply to a request that he state the relative strength of 
the influences of home, school, early companionship, private study 
and contact with men in active life, upon his own success, Mr. 
Mordecai says that each had its proper proportion of influence in 
due course. His principal relaxation, which he is glad to take at 
every opportunity, is found in reading ancient Greek authors. 
He is connected with several orders and fraternities, including 
the Masons, Knights of Pythias, Knights of Honor, Order of the 
United Workmen, and I. O. B. B. He has been president of 
District Grand Lodge, No. 5, I. O. B. B., and in the Masonic 
order he has been worshipful master of Friendship lodge, No. 9, 
and high priest of the Carolina chapter, Charleston. In politics 
he has always been a Democrat. His religious affiliation is with 
the Jews. 

In looking over his life he feels that he has been successful, 
and says that he has "no complaint to make" regarding the out- 
come of his efforts. He has never held or desired public office, 
but he has always been deeply interested in the welfare of his 
city and state. In reply to a request for suggestions as to prin- 
ciples and methods which in his opinion will help young people 
to attain true success in life, he says : "Bend every effort to secure 
a classical education ; never be afraid of work, mental or physical, 
and never be too proud to be seen doing anything honest." 

Mr. Mordecai was married, first, to Annie A. Brooks, who 
died in 1888 ; and second, on September 17, 1893, to Gertrude A. 
Dahl. Of his three children, all are living in 1907. 

His residence is Number 93 Rutledge avenue, Charleston, 
South Carolina. 



DANIEL GREEN MORTON 

MORTON, DANIEL GREEN, of Greenville, Greenville 
county, South Carolina, railroad engineer and railroad 
manager, was born in Richmond, Virginia, on the 5th 
of September, 1858. His father, Richard Morton, was a civil 
engineer in his early life; a man of clear mind, great gentleness 
of character, and exceptional integrity. His mother, Mrs. Mary 
Virginia (Green) Morton, was the daughter of Samuel Slaughter, 
of Culpeper, Virginia. 

His early life was passed in Baltimore, Maryland. He had 
good health and was fond of out-of-door tasks; and he attended 
with faithfulness, and with interest in his studies, the public 
schools of Baltimore, completing the course in June, 1887. He 
studied civil engineering; and he began his work as an engineer 
in 1888, as rodman on the engineering corps of the old Richmond 
and Danville railroad, in Western North Carolina. From 1889 
to 1891 he served as resident engineer of that railroad. From 
1893 to 1896 he was supervisor of the track of the Baltimore and 
Ohio railroad, at Wilmington, Delaware. From 1896 to 1898 he 
was engaged as engineer and contractor on public work in and 
around Baltimore. Since July, 1899, he has been president of 
the Carolina Supply company, Greenville, South Carolina, which 
deals in cotton mill and factory supplies of all descriptions. 

On the 17th of April, 1892, he married Miss Anne Louise 
Rose, daughter of Arthur Barnwell Rose, of Charleston, South 
Carolina. They have two children, both of whom are living in 
1907. 

Mr. Morton is a Democrat, on the tariff issue. 

By religious conviction and training he is identified with the 
Protestant Episcopal church. His favorite forms of recreation 
are "reading for indoors, and golf for out-of-doors." 



.14- -AT 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

AM'C-Jfl. 



JAMES LANE NAPIER 

NAPIEK, JAMES LANE, physician, was born at Mars 
Bluff, Florence county, South Carolina, January 2, 1845, 
son of Robert and Elizabeth (Lane) Napier. He belongs 
to an old American family of English extraction, which was 
founded in 1708 by Robert Napier, before the Revolutionary war. 
In the maternal line he is descended from James Lane, also of 
English descent, who settled in South Carolina about 1719. His 
father was a minister of the Baptist church, of pleasant and 
agreeable manners, good attainments and markedly energetic. 

Doctor Napier's childhood and youth were passed in the 
country, where he received his preliminary education. He was 
an active youth, healthy and vigorous, and took special delight 
in outdoor sports and amusements. The chief tragedy of his 
youth was the death of his mother while he was quite young, and 
the consequent loss of her influence on his early career. He con- 
tinued his studies at Mars Bluff academy, 1852-1861, and then 
entered the Medical College of South Carolina, at Charleston, 
where he was graduated in 1868 with the degree of M. D. From 
1861 to 1865 he served as a Confederate soldier in the Army of 
Northern Virginia, and participated in all the battles of its 
important campaigns. 

Doctor Napier began the practice of his profession at Blen- 
heim, Marlboro county, in 1871, and during the last quarter of a 
century has risen to the foremost rank of the medical profession 
in that county. In 1895 he was president of the South Carolina 
Medical association; in 1897 was made a member of the state 
board of medical examiners, and is at the present (1907) time 
president of the board. He is also examiner for the principal 
life insurance companies represented in Marlboro county, and has 
a wide and varied practice extending into adjacent counties. In 
politics he is a Democrat, and in religious affiliation a member of 
the Baptist church. Fraternally, he belongs to the Masons and 
the Knights of Pythias. 

On February 12, 1873, Doctor Napier married Marietta 
Donaldson, daughter of J. R. and M. A. Donaldson, of Marlboro 
county. They have had seven children, all of whom are now 
(1907) living two daughters and five sons. 

His address is Blenheim, Marlboro county, South Carolina. 



GOTTLOB AUGUSTUS NEUFFER 

NEUFFEK, GOTTLOB AUGUSTUS, M. D., physician 
and surgeon, was born in Orangeburg, Orangeburg 
county, March 14, 1861. His father, Gottlob Augustus 
Neuffer, a merchant, came to this country in 1838 from Basing- 
heim, Wurtemburg, Germany, and settled in Charleston. He was 
a man of marked energy and perseverance, social in disposition, 
of liberal heart, and a great reader. His mother, Maria Louisa 
Neuffer, was the daughter of Christian David Happoldt, who 
also came to this country from Wurtemburg. She exerted a 
strong influence upon the moral, spiritual and intellectual life of 
her son, who, in looking back over his life, names his mother as 
the source of his first strong impulse to strive for success. 

Under happy home influences Gottlob Neuffer grew up in a 
village and city to be a strong and healthy boy. He attended the 
primary schools in Orangeburg, and later the Bennet school in 
Charleston. When eleven years old as circumstances compelled 
him to earn his own livelihood he found employment in a drug 
store. Although his school training ceased early, his natural 
fondness for reading and study, under the direction of his mother, 
enabled him to become one of America's many self-educated men. 
In 1879, although one year under the required age, he passed the 
examination of the state board of pharmaceutical examiners and 
was granetd a license as pharmacist. Three years later he entered 
the Medical College of South Carolina, from which institution he 
was graduated in 1884 with the degree of M. D., ranking third 
in a class of twenty-two. 

After leaving college he served for one year as house surgeon 
in the city hospital of Charleston. In 1885 he began his profes- 
sional career as physician and surgeon in Abbeville. In 1901 he 
supplemented his course at the medical college by a post-graduate 
course in the New York Polyclinic. Apart from his professional 
career, Doctor Neuffer has taken an active interest in public 
affairs. He is an alderman of Abbeville, is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias, of the Knights of Honor, and of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. He has been grand chancellor 
and supreme representative for South Carolina in the Knights of 



GOTTLOB AUGUSTUS NEUFFER 291 

Pythias, and is now (1907) deputy grand master of the Grand 
Encampment, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He has also 
taken an active part in the state militia, and was surgeon-general 
on Governor Heyward's staff. In politics he is a Democrat, and 
in religion a Methodist. 

In reviewing his life, Doctor Neuffer declares that home, 
private study, early companionship, contact with men, and school 
training, each in the order named, have been of greatest impor- 
tance in shaping his career; and to all young men, whom the 
story of his success may inspire, he says: "Prompt discharge of 
duty, systematic study, and perseverance in purpose, will bring 
success." 

Doctor Neuffer has been married twice: First, in 1889, to 
Annie Arnett Hemphill, daughter of Senator R. R. Hemphill; 
and in 1902, to Florence Rebecca Henry, daughter of Francis 
Henry, of Abbeville. Gottlob Augustus Neuffer, third, is the 
son of his first wife, and his two daughters and one son are the 
children of his second marriage. 

His address is Abbeville, South Carolina. 



GEORGE WILLIAMS NICHOLS 

NICHOLLS, GEOKGE WILLIAMS, was born December 
5, 1849, on a farm on Tyger river, in Spartanburg county, 
South Carolina. His father was George Nicholls, farmer 
and surveyor, and sheriff of Spartanburg county in 1843 ; his 
mother, Catherine M. (Crook) Nicholls, died before he was five 
years old. His family is known to have been in South Carolina 
since 1760, when George Nicholls and James Crook, his grand- 
fathers, were farmers on Tyger river, in Spartanburg county; 
another grandfather, Captain Andrew Barry, commanded a com- 
pany in the American army in the War of the Revolution. 

He spent his time entirely in the country until he was of 
age, and was always robust and strong. He attended the country 
schools as frequently and as long as he could; later he went to 
Furman university. In 1870 he commenced teaching school in 
Spartanburg, and continued for three years. Having decided to 
become a lawyer, he read law in his spare time while teaching. 
He then entered the office of Evins & Boman, Spartanburg, and 
under them completed the study of law, was admitted to the bar 
in 1876, and at once began to practice. In the fall of the same 
year he was elected probate judge of Spartanburg county, a 
position in which he served for five terms (ten years) with credit 
to himself and satisfaction to the bar and to those having business 
before the court. His decisions are noted for common sense and 
a thorough knowledge of law. Since his admission to the bar he 
has practiced law with marked success. 

He is among the most public-spirited citizens of Spartanburg 
and is always ready to perform any duty of good citizenship. 
He has served as chairman of the board of stewards of Central 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South ; as chairman of the board of 
school trustees of Spartanburg; and he is a trustee of Converse 
college, Spartanburg. He is a Mason and has served as worship- 
ful master of Spartanburg lodge. In politics he is and has always 
been a Democrat. He is quiet and unassuming, always courteous 
and always ready to assist those in need, and is generally liked. 

On May 29, 1884, he was married to Minnie L. Jones, daugh- 
ter of Reverend Samuel B. Jones, D. D. Of their five children, 
all are living in 1907. 

His address is 249 East Main street, Spartanburg, South 
Carolina. 




I 










JOHN WILKINS NORWOOD 

NORWOOD, JOHN WILKINS, banker, was born in 
Hartsville, Darlington county, South Carolina, March 
18, 1865. His parents were George Alexander and Mary 
Louisa (Wilkins) Norwood. His father was a banker, a man of 
independent spirit, at once frank and modest, and an able financier. 
His mother was a woman of culture and refinement. Her father, 
Reverend Samuel B. Wilkins, was an able and honored Baptist 
minister in South Carolina. One of the paternal ancestors was 
John Norwood, who, about 1770, moved to Darlington district, 
South Carolina, from Warren county, North Carolina. He was a 
captain in the Revolutionary war and served in General Francis 
Marion's brigade. The North Carolina Norwoods claim descent 
from Colonel Henry Norwood, who settled in Virginia about 1660 
and who was appointed treasurer of Virginia by Charles the 
Second. 

In his early years John Norwood enjoyed good health. With 
the exception of two months each year he lived in a city. He had 
no regular tasks to perform, and the only difficulty he met in 
obtaining an education was a distaste for books until he was about 
seventeen years of age. He attended the schools of Charleston, 
to which city his parents removed in his early years, was a cadet 
for one year at the South Carolina Military academy, and later 
studied at Wake Forest college, North Carolina, and Richmond 
college, Virginia, but he did not graduate from either of these 
institutions. As his tastes were for a business rather than for a 
professional career, he entered, in December, 1884, the employ of 
G. A. Norwood & Company, cotton and naval stores commission 
merchants, where he remained until April, 1887, and thoroughly 
learned the details of business. During this period he carried on 
for himself a small note brokerage business. On the date last 
named he became cashier of the Peoples bank, of Greenville, 
South Carolina, and six months later was elected president of the 
Greenville Savings bank. He was then in his twenty-third year 
and was supposed to be the youngest bank president in the United 
States. His skill as a financier soon became apparent, and his 
reputation spread beyond the bounds of the state. In 1892 he 
resigned from the Savings bank and organized and became presi- 



296 JOHN WELKINS NORWOOD 

dent of the Atlantic National bank, of Wilmington, North Caro- 
lina, which position he held until 1902. He was president of the 
City National bank, of Greenville, South Carolina, from 1903 
to February, 1906, when he retired from office and disposed 
of his interest in the bank in order to organize the Greenville 
Savings and Trust company, of which he was president. On July 
1, 1907, this company was succeeded by the Norwood National 
bank, of Greenville, of which Mr. Norwood is president. Since 
1894 he has been president of the Wilmington Savings and Trust 
company, Wilmington, North Carolina, and since 1898 he has 
been president of the Blue Ridge National bank, of Asheville, 
North Carolina. He is also vice-president of the American Spin- 
ning company, Greenville, South Carolina, and is a director in 
various corporations. The institutions with which he has been 
closely identified have grown rapidly and been prosperous in 
every respect. 

In the choice of his life work Mr. Norwood followed his own 
inclination. Of the books that have helped him in fitting for 
and in carrying it on he names works on commercial law, such 
as contracts, and negotiable instruments, as of great importance. 
He keeps well informed not only regarding business affairs, but 
also concerning topics of general interest. He thinks and speaks 
rapidly, and when he has the facts he decides questions without 
hesitation. He has never taken up any form of physical culture, 
but believes in outdoor exercise and delights in driving and in 
horseback riding. He takes pleasure in reading history, biogra- 
phy, political economy, fiction and poetry. In politics he is a 
Democrat, but he refused to support the Chicago platform, and 
since 1896 he has voted for the Republican presidential nominees. 
In reply to a request for suggestions, drawn from his own expe- 
rience and observation, which will help young people, he says 
that integrity, industry and economy are essential to the attain- 
ment of true success in life. And these, it may be added, are the 
principles which he adopted and in following which he has won 
a brilliant success. 

Mr. Norwood married Miss Vina Patrick, of Greenville ; and 
after her decease, Miss Lida Goodlett, of Spartanburg. Some 
time after her death, in October, 1906, he married Miss Fannie 
Conyers. He has two children. 

His address is Greenville, South Carolina; and his very 
attractive home is near that city. 



WILLIE ROBERT OSBORNE 

OSBORNE, WILLIE ROBERT, of Anderson, South 
Carolina, merchant, director and president of several 
manufacturing companies and of other important cor- 
porations, was born at Anderson, on the 9th of June, 1864. His 
father, William Moultrie Osborne, merchant and farmer, whose 
ancestors were of English descent, is cordially remembered by a 
wide circle for his integrity and his kindly charitableness of 
feeling and action. 

Not robust as a boy, his tastes were for reading and study 
rather than for out-of-door sports. His educational opportunities 
were very limited were, in fact, confined to attendance in boy- 
hood at common country schools near his home, and to reading 
at home. But early in his boyhood he came under the influence 
of strong biographies of men of marked character ; and he writes 
that all his life he has been greatly influenced by biographical 
reading. In particular, he declares that biographies of successful 
men who began life in poverty influenced his thought and formed 
his ideals. "I believed that if other poor boys whose circum- 
stances were like my own could succeed in life and make their 
mark, 7 could." He was trained to hard manual work on a farm 
in his boyhood and youth. In October, 1880, he became clerk in 
a store at Anderson, and the rather exceptionally quick promotion 
and steady advancement which came to him in mercantile life 
convinced him that he had chosen the career in which he could 
make the most of his own powers and develop the widest influence. 
Of his mother, Mrs. Irene Jane (Clinkscales) Osborne, he writes, 
"the strongest influence ever brought to bear upon my life was 
my mother"; and to her high and earnest ambition for him he 
feels indebted for much of the inspiration of his life. 

A clerk from 1880 to 1888, in the latter year he became 
a member of The Sylvester-Bleckley Company, continuing a 
partner in that firm until 1893. From 1893 to 1901 he was a 
member of the firm of Brown, Osborne & Company. Since 1901 
he has been senior member of the firm of Osborne & Pearson, in 
the general mercantile business. 



298 WILLIE ROBERT OSBORNE 

Mr. Osborne is a director and the vice-president of the 
Anderson Telephone company; a director and the vice-president 
of the Corona Knitting mills; a director and the vice-president 
for some years and later the president of the Anderson Mattress 
and Spring Bed company ; he is a director of the Riverside Cotton 
mills and of the Toxawav Cotton mills, both of Anderson, South 

mj 

Carolina; a director and president of the Merchants' Grocery 
company, wholesale grocers; a director and president of the 
Domestic Manufacturing company ; a director of the Perpetual 
Building and Loan association of Anderson, South Carolina, and 
a director of the Bank of Starr, South Carolina. 

He has always taken an active interest in the social and civic 
life of Anderson. He is a director and the treasurer of the 
Anderson chamber of commerce, and the chairman of its com- 
mittee on education. He is an alderman of the city of Anderson, 
now serving his second term, and is chairman of the sanitary 
committee and a member of the following committees of the 
council: auditing, finance, civic improvement, streets, and police. 

A member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, Mr. 
Osborne has for the last twenty years been superintendent of the 
Sunday school and a member of the board of stewards of St. 
John's church at Anderson, South Carolina ; and he has served 
for seven years as treasurer and is at present chairman of the 
board of stewards. In 1905 he was a delegate from the Green- 
ville district to the South Carolina annual conference of his 
church. In 1906 he was a delegate from the Anderson district, 
and he served on several committees. He has acted as district 
steward of the Greenville district and of the Anderson district 
for the last three years. 

Mr. Osborne has never married. He is a Royal Arch Mason, 
a Knight of Pythias, and a Noble of Oasis Mystic Shrine. He is 
the fraternal master of Security lodge, No. 241, of the Fraternal 
Union of America. He is identified with the Travelers' Protec- 
tive Association of America. 

In politics he is a Democrat. 

To the young people of South Carolina he commends these 
three cardinal principles: "honesty, sobriety, industry." 



FRANCIS LE JAU PARKER 

PARKER, FRANCIS LE JAU, M. D., an eminent physician 
and surgeon of Charleston, was distinguished among the 
professional men contributed by South Carolina to the 
armies of the Confederacy. He was born in Abbeville district, 
September, 1836, a son of Captain Thomas Parker, who com- 
manded the Abbeville volunteers in the last Florida war, and 
Eleanor Legare Frost, and grandson of Thomas Parker, first 
United States district attorney of South Carolina after the Revo- 
lution. He is also a grandson of William Henry Drayton, chief 
justice of South Carolina, and is a lineal descendant, on the 
maternal side, of the Reverend Doctor Francis Le Jau, rector of 
Goose Creek church, 1707-1717. Doctor Parker's family has been 
identified with the history of his state from colonial times. In 
1855 he was graduated from the South Carolina Military academy, 
and in 1858 he was graduated in medicine from the Medical Col- 
lege of the State of South Carolina, at Charleston, having studied 
in the office of his uncle, the late Professor Henr} T R. Frost, M. D., 
one of the founders of the college. After his graduation from 
the Medical college he was elected one of the house physicians of 
the Roper hospital, April, 1858, and during the terrible epidemic 
of yellow fever which immediately followed he remained faithful 
at his post, himself suffering from the dread disease. Subse- 
quently he began the practice of medicine at Charleston, and was 
appointed assistant demonstrator and prosector of anatomy to 
Professors Holbrook and Miles of the Medical college at which 
he had studied. In March, 1861, after the secession of his state 
from the Union, Doctor Parker entered upon his first military 
service. He was commissioned assistant surgeon of South Caro- 
lina volunteers, and was assigned to the First regiment of artil- 
lery, Colonel Wilmot D. DeSaussure commanding, at Morris 
Island. In April, 1861, he participated in the bombardment of 
Fort Sumter and saw the first signal shell fired from the mortar 
battery at Fort Johnson, James Island, by Lieutenant James, 
formerly of the United States army, but at the time of the bom- 
bardment in the service of South Carolina. At the beginning of 
the War between the States, Doctor Parker was commissioned 



300 FRANCIS LE JAU PARKER 

assistant surgeon provisional army of the Confederate States and 
assigned to duty at Manassas Junction, where he served on the 
staff of Doctor Williams, medical director of General Johnston's 
army. Subsequently he was assigned to duty as assistant surgeon 
and afterward was surgeon in charge of the South Carolina 
hospital at Manchester, Virginia, until after the battles before 
Richmond, 1862, when he was commissioned surgeon and assigned 
to the staff of Commodore Page, Confederate States navy, at 
Chapins Bluff, James river, below Richmond. But desiring more 
active duty, he obtained a transfer, and was appointed surgeon 
of the Hampton Legion infantry, Colonel M. W. Gary command- 
ing, Jenkins's brigade, Longstreet's corps, Army of Northern 
Virginia, and was on duty with this command in the Suffolk and 
Blackwater campaign about Petersburg and Richmond in 1863; 
at Chickamauga, and during the investment of Chattanooga and 
through the campaign in East Tennessee, when the skill and 
endurance of medical officers were severely taxed. While in 
Tennessee, Doctor Parker was attached to the staff of Major- 
General S. B. Buckner, commanding Hood's old division, and 
later was appointed chief surgeon of this division, subsequently 
commanded by General Fields. On the return to Virginia, he 
shared the fortunes of the First corps in the battles of the Wil- 
derness, Spottsylvania court-house, North and South Anna rivers, 
Cold Harbor, and in the fighting before Richmond and Peters- 
burg, and finally the retreat to Appomattox. Then he returned 
to Charleston, resumed his practice and renewed his connection 
with the Medical college, of which he was elected demonstrator 
in 1866 and professor of anatomy in 1870. Afterward he served 
as clinical lecturer on diseases of the eye and ear, and in 1881 he 
became dean of the faculty. In 1892 he was elected provisional 
president of the Alumni association. In 1894 he effected the 
reestablishment of the College of Pharmacy. For many years he 
represented the Medical Society of South Carolina in the annual 
conventions of the South Carolina Medical association. On Jan- 
uary 1, 1903, he was elected an honorary member of the Medical 
Society of South Carolina, and, on April 16 of the same year, 
honorary member of the South Carolina Medical association. 
Doctor Parker was one of the surgeons of the City hospital. He 
served as one of the editors of the Charleston "Medical Journal," 
to the columns of which he contributed many valuable papers. 



FRANCIS LE JAU PARKER 301 

He has also written exhaustively and well for numerous other 
medical publications, including "The American Journal of Med- 
ical Sciences," "The Transactions of the South Carolina Medical 
Association," and "The Medical and Surgical History of the War 
of the Eebellion," his papers dealing with general surgery, par- 
ticularly with diseases of the eye, ear, throat and nose. 

Recently Doctor Parker resigned the deanship, and the pro- 
fessorship of anatomy, of the Medical college, and was elected 
emeritus professor of the branch last named. 

Doctor Parker's address is Charleston, South Carolina. 



THOMAS FLEMING PARKER 

PARKER, THOMAS FLEMING, cotton manufacturer, 
was born in Charleston, South Carolina, December 28, 
1860. His parents were Thomas and Margaretta Amelia 
Parker. His father resided in Charleston for many years and 
was one of the merchant princes of his day. He was a man of 
culture, and in his home the leading men and women of the South 
in his day were frequently entertained. Soon after the opening 
of the War between the States he enlisted in the Confederate 
States army, and he was killed in the battle of Secessionville 
when he was only twenty-nine years of age. The earliest known 
ancestor in this country was John Parker, who came from the 
Island of Jamaica to South Carolina, where he died in 1695. 

Thomas Fleming Parker passed the years of childhood and 
youth in the city of his birth. He completed the course of study 
at the preparatory school of A. Sachtleben, and subsequently 
entered the College of Charleston. Here his eyesight became 
impaired, and at the end of the sophomore year he was obliged 
to leave the institution and spend a large part of his time out of 
doors. He engaged in farming and out-of-door pursuits, and, 
though unable to continue the studies he had planned, he acquired 
much practical knowledge and training in affairs. He took a 
deep interest in the community in which he lived. For some time 
he was president of the Linville Improvement company, in North 
Carolina, which engaged in the improvement of land. Later, 
when he had regained his eyesight in a large degree, he became 
president of the Monaghan Cotton mills, at Greenville, South 
Carolina, and in this capacity he has become widely and favor- 
ably known. Although a decided innovation on the prevailing 
system of management, his methods proved a great success, and 
to a considerable extent they have been copied by many progres- 
sive mill owners in the South. These methods have solved the 
problem of how to permanently keep the operatives, which is by 
far the greatest difficulty which they have thus far encountered. 

The Monaghan mills were organized in 1900 with a capital 
of $700,000. The property is located just outside the limits of 
Greenville, and forms a village of eighteen hundred population. 




. 
->* 



!~L!BRAKir 

.uflfO*, UJWOX 




THOMAS FLEMING PARKER 305 

Mr. Parker employed a landscape architect to map out the prop- 
erty, locate the streets and grades, lay out a park and a cemetery, 
and make suggestions along sanitary and esthetic lines. Houses 
were provided for the operatives and land upon which domestic 
animals could be kept was provided free. Thus the surround- 
ings were made so pleasant and healthful that operatives with 
families, when once located, had no desire to drift away to other 
mills. The mill building itself was improved in appearance by 
the planting of vines around it, and many of the men and women 
adopted the same method of beautifying their own homes. 

Perhaps an even more important benefit was conferred upon 
the operatives by the formation of a branch of the Young Men's 
Christian association with excellent facilities for carrying on its 
work. It is said, in fact, that this establishment is superior in 
construction and equipment to any similar building in the state. 
Later the Young Women's Christian association was opened with 
a home of its own. The Young Men's Christian association, 
including club house and fixtures, cost approximately $18,000, and 
the stockholders admit that it was a most judicious expenditure. 
There is a secretary and assistant secretary for each association, 
men and women who work in the village and whose salaries are 
paid by the corporation. With institutions of this character, with 
delightful homes, and with all the modern facilities of a city for 
the operatives, the owners have no trouble in securing steady and 
efficient help, although the mill is located in a section where labor 
is at times alarmingly scarce. And it is due to the good judg- 
ment and wise management of Mr. Parker, seconded by the 
directors of the company, that such favorable conditions have 
been secured. 

Mainly as the results of Mr. Parker's efforts, a Municipal 
league was formed in Greenville two years ago. The object of 
this association, of which he was made and still is president, was 
to make the city more attractive to its residents and to strangers. 
The public soon became interested. The services of landscape 
architects were secured, an associate branch was organized by the 
women, and the work of improvement was soon well under way. 
The league is non-partisan and non-political. Its membership 
includes practically every public-spirited citizen, and more than 
one hundred women. Much has been done to beautify and adorn 

Vol. II. S. C. 14. 



306 THOMAS FLEMING PARKER 

the city and much more in the same line will be accomplished in 
the future. 

Mr. Parker has chosen the life which is free from political 
cares and trials, but he sympathizes and votes with the Demo- 
cratic party. The only order with which he is affiliated is the 
South Carolina Society Sons of the American Revolution. 

On April 6, 1887, he was married to Miss Lisa deV. Foulke, 
who died May, 1902. Of their two children, one is living in 1907. 
In June, 1906, Mr. Parker married Miss Harriet Horry Frost, of 
Charleston, South Carolina. 

The address of Mr. Parker is Greenville, South Carolina. 



JAMES E. PEURIFOY 

PEUKIFOY, JAMES E., of Colleton county, lawyer, state 
senator, was born in Edgefield (now Saluda) county, 
South Carolina, on May 9, 1872. His father, Daniel 
Byrd Peurifoy, was a merchant and farmer who represented his 
county (at first Edgefield, later Saluda county) for several years 
in the South Carolina house of representatives. The ancestors 
of his father came from England in colonial times and settled 
in North Carolina. 

His boyhood was passed in the country, and he was early 
trained to regular tasks on the farm. He was not very strong, 
although seldom ill. He became fond of books and reading while 
still a boy ; and he early determined to be a lawyer. But he had 
to support himself during his years of study; and he taught 
for some years after his college course was completed, meantime 
reading law, before he found himself in position to give his entire 
time to his chosen profession, the law. 

By his faithful work as a boy in preparatory schools he 
qualified himself for and won a beneficiary scholarship in the 
South Carolina Military academy, from which institution he was 
graduated in June, 1894, with the degree of B. S. 

In September of the same year he began to teach, as principal 
of the Walterboro graded school. He pursued law studies and 
was admitted to the bar (December, 1897,) while still teaching. 
In June, 1898, he gave up teaching to engage in the practice of 
the law. 

After four years of practice his townspeople and the voters 
of the county had come to know him so well and so favorably 
that they chose him state senator in 1902. He served Colleton 
county in the upper house of the state legislature of South Caro- 
lina until 1906, when he declined reelection, desiring to give his 
entire time to the practice of his profession. 

He is a Democrat in his political convictions, and he has 
always acted with his party. 

He is a Knight of Pythias and a Free Mason. He has served 
as captain of a company of South Carolina militia. 



308 JAMES E. PEURIFOY 

While still a teacher, in November, 1897, he married Carrie 
Hagood Witsell, daughter of Doctor Charles Witsell and Mrs. 
Emmeline Witsell. Of their three children, two are living in 
1907. 

Mr. Peurifoy is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. He has found his favorite form of exercise and recrea- 
tion in looking after his farm. Early following the example of 
his father in entering upon the career of a legislator for his 
county, Mr. Peurifoy has sought to qualify himself for his duties 
by special reading and by a broad-minded view of the possibilities 
for good which are within reach of the average American citizen. 
He is still very young. His friends look for much useful service 
of the state by him. 

To the young he commends as the surest and firmest stepping- 
stone to true success, "scrupulous honesty in all transactions, sobe? 
and correct habits, and hard work 'keeping always at it.' : 



F08L1C UBS 






W&yA 




JOSEPH CALVIN PLONK 

PLONK, JOSEPH CALVIN, cotton manufacturer, presi- 
dent of the Cherokee Falls Manufacturing company, of 
Cherokee Falls, Cherokee county, South Carolina, was 
born December 9, 1852, in Cleveland county, North Carolina. 
His parents were John Jonas Plonk (now, 1907, living at the age 
of eighty-four) and Ann Ellen (Oates) Plonk, who died in 1905 
in her seventy- fourth year. His mother had always been fond of 
reading, and was a woman of deep piety and exemplary life. 
The Bible was her constant companion, and its precepts and its 
spirit went into the training she gave her children. "If there 
is any good in me of any kind, I owe it to my mother," writes 
her son. 

His father's family were of German extraction ; his mother's 
were English and Scotch. His paternal great-grandfather, Jacob 
Plonk, came from Pennsylvania and settled in what is now Lin- 
coln county, North Carolina, before the Revolutionary war. His 
son, Joseph Plonk, was born in Lincoln county in 1788, and died 
in 1888, aged one hundred years and two months. He was a 
skilled workman, and made spinning-wheels, hand-looms, violins, 
and many other articles, without the use of machinery. Both 
of Mr. Plonk's maternal great-grandfathers, William Oates and 
Samuel Espey, came from Pennsylvania before the Revolution 
and settled in what is now Cleveland county, North Carolina. 
They were soldiers in the Revolutionary war, and were at the 
battle of King's Mountain, Espey serving as captain. William 
Oates, son of William Oates and grandfather of Joseph Calvin 
Plonk, built wagons and other vehicles. He was also a farmer, 
and a land surveyor. He died in 1857. John Jones Plonk, the 
father of Joseph Calvin, was born in Lincoln county, North Caro- 
lina, in 1823, and is still living at the age of eighty-four, having 
been an incessant worker himself and believing it a sin to be idle. 
Descended from sturdy forebears, Joseph Calvin Plonk was 
blessed with a strong physique, which his life on the farm helped 
to develop. At the age of six he began to engage in helpful tasks, 
following the example of his father, who taught him that he 
ought not to "eat the bread of idleness." 



312 JOSEPH CALVIN PLONK 

The War between the States began when he was eight years 
old. School facilities were very limited. In his twentieth year 
he attended a high school in Newton, North Carolina, for ten or 
twelve weeks, but Reconstruction troubles left the family without 
means, and he was forced to leave school to go to work. He 
found that unskilled labor hardly brought him a livelihood ; and 
realizing his deficiencies, he determined to overcome them. By 
hard work and close saving, he accumulated money enough to 
enable him to spend ten months at a country academy. At 
twenty-three he began five years of alternate school teaching and 
study. 

On April 13, 1880, he married Miss Laura Elmina Roberts. 
Three months of unsuccessful partnership "in a store," and two 
years as official surveyor of Cleveland county, were followed by 
his reelection as surveyor ; but in 1883 he resigned and went into 
the lumber business, again meeting with failure. 

About this time cotton manufacturing began to take on new 
life in the South. Several modern mills had been built in the 
vicinity of Charlotte, North Carolina, and Spartanburg, South 
Carolina. An accidental visit to one of these mills gave him the 
determination to learn the cotton manufacturing business. In 
September, 1883, he applied for work at McAdensville, and began 
by sweeping the floor of the mill. After about a week he was 
promoted, and as he made it a rule to do well whatever work was 
assigned to him, without asking questions, he began to find favor 
in the eyes of those above him. His wages at first were seventy- 
five cents a day. 

After he had been at McAdensville for nine months, his 
superintendent resigned and went to Cherokee Falls, taking 
Plonk with him. At his new location he was made overseer of 
the card room at one dollar and twenty-five cents a day. Sixteen 
months afterward the superintendent went to take another posi- 
tion, and Mr. Plonk was left in charge of the mill at Cherokee 
Falls. In six months more he was made superintendent, at a 
salary of a thousand dollars a year a position which he held 
until 1892, when he went to Georgia and built a new and more 
modern mill, and started work on printed cloths. This was the 
second mill in the South to make these goods, the first having 
been started in February, 1893, while this one did not begin 
operation until May of 1893. He stayed in Georgia two years, 



JOSEPH CALVIN PLONK 313 

and in November, 1894, he returned to Cherokee Falls. In the 
meanwhile, September, 1894, the old mill had been destroyed by 
fire. At the unanimous request of the stockholders, Mr. Plonk 
rebuilt the mill on modern lines and on a much larger scale. He 
was made superintendent and general manager, and he held these 
positions until, in 1900, he was elected president of the company, 
which office he still holds. 

Mr. Plonk is also a director of manufacturing corporations, 
a member of several important industrial associations, a vice- 
president of the National Association of Manufacturers, and 
president of the Cherokee Iron company, a South Carolina cor- 
poration dealing in mineral lands. 

When he went to McAdensville he had just one five-dollar 
gold piece between him and starvation. He now owns one-eighth 
of the stock of the Cherokee Falls Manufacturing company, whose 
plant cost the stockholders half a million dollars; and he is the 
owner of much other property. 

Mr. Plonk has necessarily had many opportunities to help 
others, and he has not neglected them. Remembering, doubtless, 
his own hard struggle to get a start in the world, he has been 
quick to extend a helping hand to others who have shown a dispo- 
sition to help themselves. He has done what he could for the 
interests of the employees of his mill. Religious services are 
maintained here, and there is a free school which is open seven 
months in the year and is w r ell patronized. Mr. and Mrs. Plonk 
have adopted a daughter, to whom they are warmly devoted. 

In religious preference Mr. Plonk is a Presbyterian; and he 
holds the office of deacon in his church. In politics he is a Dem- 
ocrat, though in 1896 and 1900 he voted for McKinley, differing 
with his party on the financial question. To young Carolinians 
he says: "My progress would have been swifter and my success 
more complete had I at the outset governed my life more closely 
by the golden rule. There are two sides to every debatable ques- 
tion, and at least two interests in every business transaction. To 
realize these facts, and to govern your actions accordingly, will 
inspire confidence in you; and that is worth more than money. 
'The world deals with you as you deal with it.' There are excep- 
tions to this rule, but if your dealings are honest, open and 
upright, you will find ninety-five per cent, of the people you come 
in contact with willing to meet you on the same plane." 

The address of Mr. Plonk is Cherokee Falls, South Carolina. 



NELSON GARTER POE 

POE, NELSON CAETEK, of Greenville, South Carolina, 
merchant, director in banks and cotton mills, and vice- 
president of the F. W. Poe Manufacturing company, was 
born in Montgomery county, Alabama, on the 7th of November, 
1851. His father, William Poe, was a bank president, a man of 
business integrity and executive ability. His mother was Mrs. 
Ellen Cannon (Taylor) Poe, daughter of Joseph Taylor, of 
Anderson county, South Carolina. The earliest known American 
ancestor of the family was John Poe, who came from Ireland 
about 1745 and settled in Baltimore. John Poe's son (General) 
David Poe, was the grandfather of Edgar Allen Poe, the poet 
and man of letters ; and William Poe, the youngest son of John, 
was the grandfather of Nelson Carter Poe. On his mother's side, 
a great-grandfather, Col. Samuel Taylor, served in the Colonial 
army during the Revolutionary war. 

His early life was passed in the village of Pendleton. He 
was trained in his boyhood to familiarize himself with "any kind 
of honest work" which needed to be done about the home; and 
the discipline which he received from early familiarity with 
manual labor he regards as of life-long value to him. He was 
especially fond of reading in his boyhood. To his mother he 
owes much for intellectual impulse and moral influence in his 
character-building. 

He attended the village academy of Pendleton, after some 
years in the village primary schools; but he did not undertake a 
course of study at college. When eighteen years old he took a 
place as clerk in a hardware store at Columbia, South Carolina. 
Becoming thoroughly familiar with the hardware business in all 
its branches, he removed to Greenville, South Carolina, in 1877, 
and soon became an active member of the hardware firm of 
Wilkins, Poe & Company. As director in several banks, cotton 
mills and various other business enterprises, he has done his full 
share in developing the commercial interests of the town; and 
he has not been lacking in public-spirited interest in all that 
concerns the welfare of the community. 



NELSON CARTER FOB 315 

He is a member of the Democratic party, and has always 
voted for the candidates and the principles of that party. 

By religious conviction he is identified with the Presbyterian 
Church, South. 

During the administration of Governor Ansel he was 
appointed one of the five commissioners "to wind up the dispen- 
sary system in the state"; but he declined to serve on this com- 
mission. 

On the 12th of May, 1880, he married Miss Nannie CraAvford, 
daughter of James W. Crawford, of Pendleton, South Carolina. 
Of their five children, three are living in 1907. 



STEWART WYLIE PRYOR 

PEYOR, STEWART WYLIE, M. D., was born in 
Spartanburg county, South Carolina, January 29, 1864. 
His parents were Stewart Love and Susan Catherine 
(Haynes) Pry or. They removed from North Carolina to Spar- 
tanburg county, South Carolina, about 1860, and some twenty 
years afterward settled in a section of Union county which is now 
a part of Cherokee county. The father was a skillful machinist 
and millwright. He held no public office except in connection 
with local schools, but he was a man of kindly disposition and 
was highly esteemed by those who knew him. The mother, now 
(1907) eighty-two years of age, is a woman of fine mind and 
most excellent character. The ancestors of the family in this 
country settled in Virginia and North Carolina. Some of the 
members on the maternal side were soldiers in the Revolutionary 
war, and their families, as well as themselves, suffered greatly 
at the hands of the British and Tories. 

The years of boyhood and early youth of Stewart Pryor 
were passed in the country. His health was good. He enjoyed 
outdoor sports and pastimes, but was especially fond of reading. 
The schools near his home were poor, but he attended them in 
term time and made good use of such opportunities as they 
afforded. When not in school he performed the tasks on the 
farm which usually fall to a boy of his age. In 1881 he became 
a clerk in a store in Gaffney, South Carolina. The following 
year he took a course of study in a business college in Baltimore, 
and 1883-85 he was employed as a bookkeeper in Gaffney. His 
professional education was completed at the Atlanta Medical 
college, from which he was graduated in 1887. Later he took 
fifteen post-graduate courses, one annually for fifteen years, at 
the New York Polyclinic. 

After graduation, Doctor Pryor practiced a few months at 
Cherokee Springs, near the paternal home. He then removed to 
Chester county, and after a few months at Lowryville, began his 
practice in the town of Chester. Here he had to "start at the 
bottom" and work for success in competition with physicians of 
more than ordinary skill. As he demonstrated his ability, the 



.. . 





P OTUCUiS 

1 as-Q*. u*o* . 



STEWART WYLIE PRYOR 319 

demand for his services rapidly increased. He developed special 
skill in surgery, and feeling the want of accommodations for his 
patients, who were coming from a widening circle, he built, about 
1884, a combined residence and hospital. This was designed to 
be of ample capacity, but as his reputation extended it proved to 
be inadequate, and in 1904 the Magdalene hospital was erected at 
Chester with modern equipment, including electrical and X-Ray 
apparatus. It was expected that this would for a long period 
meet all requirements, but it was crowded almost from the first, 
and in less than two years after its establishment it was materially 
enlarged. In this hospital a free bed is maintained for the poor 
by benevolent people in the city. 

In the choice of an occupation he felt free to follow his 
own inclination. This, from childhood, was very strong. He 
delighted to "play doctor," and for most of his reading he pre- 
ferred books relating to medicine and surgery. Occasionally he 
enjoyed a humorous work, but he never cared for novels. His 
home life was pleasant, and his mother exerted a remarkably 
strong influence upon him for good. 

Doctor Pryor was called upon at different times to prepare 
papers on special subjects for the associations of which he was a 
member, as also articles for prominent medical journals. He was 
president of the Chester County Medical society, vice-president of 
South Carolina Medical association, member of Tri-State Medical 
association, chief surgeon of the Lenoir and Chester and Chester 
and Northwestern railway companies, chief medical adviser of the 
Mutual Benefit association of South Carolina, and examiner for 
many other insurance companies. He is a member of the Chester 
Social Medical club and the Mercantile and Manufacturers' club. 
His religious affiliation is with the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. 

On February 14, 1888, Doctor Pryor was married to Miss 
Carrie Magdalene Tinsley, daughter of Rufus Waring and Sallie 
Rogers Tinsley, of Union, South Carolina. In the community, 
as in the home, her influence for good is strong and constant. 
She takes commendable pride in the success of her husband, and 
to her no small part of it is due. For her the Magdalene hospital 
was most appropriately named. They have six daughters living 
in 1907. 

The family residence is at Chester, South Carolina. 



HENRY EDMUND RAVENEL 

RAVEN EL, HENKY EDMUND, lawyer, business man, 
and author, was born September 3, 1856, on Seneca plan- 
tation, Oconee (then Pickens) county, near Seneca city, 
South Carolina. His father, Henry Edmund Ravenel, cotton 
exporter, was a fine business man and a cultivated gentleman of 
the old Southern type; his mother, Selina E. Ravenel, was a 
woman of marked culture and refinement. His descent on both 
sides is Huguenot. His first American ancestor, Rene Ravenel, 
came from Vitre, France, in 1686, and settled in South Carolina, 
near Charleston. Shortly afterward he married Charlotte de St. 
Julien, who, like himself, was driven from France by the religious 
persecution of the period. 

The subject of this sketch spent his childhood in the country 
and there received his primary education. Later he moved to 
Charleston and became a student at Charleston college, where he 
was graduated A. B. in 1876 and A. M. in 1878. While pursuing 
his post-graduate studies he also studied law with Simonton & 
Barker, a prominent Charleston firm, and immediately after his 
graduation he was admitted to the bar and began the practice 
of law in Charleston. A few years later he removed to Spar- 
tanburg. 

His practice was from the first largely along commercial lines 
was intentionally made so by him and it was not long before 
he was not only attorney for a number of prosperous business 
corporations, but a considerable owner of stock in them. He is 
a director of and attorney for the Saxon Cotton mills ; a director 
of the Tucapau Cotton mills; director of and attorney for the 
Spartanburg Home Building and Loan association ; a director of 
the Spartanburg Savings bank ; president of the Ravadson Trust 
company, and has other important business interests in the town 
and near by, and also has a large and lucrative law practice. 

He occupies a position in the front rank of the wide-awake, 
progressive, public-spirited citizens of his town, is a participant 
in every movement for the betterment of the people of town or 
state; has been for nearly twenty years a trustee of the Spar- 
tanburg public schools, and a deacon of the First Presbyterian 



HENRY EDMUND RAVENEL 321 

church for about the same length of time. He is president of the 
corporation of the French Protestant church in Charleston. 

He was joint author, with C. A. McHugh, of "Ravenel and 
McHugh's Digest of South Carolina Reports," published 1880, in 
Charleston, and author of "Ravenel Records," a history of the 
Ravenel family, published 1898. 

He is a member of the Knights of Pythias. In politics he 
is, and has always been, a Democrat. His favorite recreations 
are horseback riding and boating. As a man he is approachable, 
genial, courteous and well liked. His chart of life for the young 
is short and pointed: "First, do not mistake character-building 
for the religious life ; second, study the constitution of the United 
States; third, obey and uphold the law personally." 

On April 14, 1886, he married Agnes Moffett Adger, daugh- 
ter of William Adger and Margaret H. (Moffett) Adger. Of 
their four children, all are now (1907) living. 

His address is Spartanburg, South Carolina. 



RICHARD CLARK REED 

REED, KEY. RICHARD CLARK, D. D., was born in 
Harrison, Hamilton county, Tennessee, January 24, 1851. 
He is the son of Rev. James L. Reed, of the Presbyterian 
church, and his wife, nee Elizabeth Jane McRae. The marked 
characteristics of the father were a strong will, persistent energy, 
with an uncompromising fidelity to his convictions of right and 
duty. 

An early ancestor in America on the maternal side was the 
Rev. Thomas Craighead, who was born in Scotland and studied 
medicine there, but soon became a minister of the Gospel and was 
settled for ten or twelve years in Ireland. His name appears 
first in this country in 1715 among the ministers of New England. 
Mather, in instructing the people at Freetown, about forty miles 
south of Boston, to encourage Mr. Craighead in his work describes 
him as "a man of singular piety, meekness, humility and industry 
in the work of God." Removing to Pennsylvania in 1733, he 
became a member of Donegal Presbytery, which had a peculiar 
love and veneration for him and always spoke of him as "Father 
Craighead." He was very active in planting and building up 
churches in that region. On the 17th of November, 1737, he 
accepted a call from the people of Hopewell, whose place of 
meeting was at the "Big Spring" near Newville. His pastorate 
there was brief. He had become an aged man, though his earn- 
estness and power remained unabated. Under his impassioned 
discourses his hearers were often melted to tears Near the close 
of April, 1739, while pronouncing the benediction in the pulpit, 
he waved his hand, exclaimed "Farewell! Farewell!" sank down 
and expired. His remains are said to lie, without monument, 
under the cornerstone of the present house of worship at New- 
ville, Pennsylvania 

Rev Alexander Craighead, the fourth son of Rev. Thomas 
Craighead, removed from the Presbytery of Donegal to Augusta 
county, Virginia, from whence he was sent by Hanover Presby- 
tery to Rocky River, North Carolina, in 1757, to labor among the 
Cherokee Indians. A monument has recently been erected to his 
memory in Charlotte, North Carolina, on one face of which is 



RICHARD CLARK REED 323 

inscribed: "Inspirer of the Mecklenburg Declaration of Inde- 
pendence." Others of the family in blessed labors in the Pres- 
byterian ministry have been Rev. Thomas B. Craighead, son of 
Rev. Alexander Craighead; Rev. John Craighead, and Rev. 
James Geddes Craighead, D. D. 

In childhood and youth the physical condition of the subject 
of this sketch was always good. His early life was passed in the 
country, on the farm of his grandfather, in Tennessee on the 
Tennessee river. He records that he "kept the lead in the field" 
when a boy, and that he spent all his leisure hours in the river. 
He formed habits of industry and correct ideas of manual labor; 
developed his physical constitution, and, he says, learned how to 
wait on himself. His mother dying when he was only two years 
old, he was reared in the family of his maternal grandfather. 

The War between the States, coming when he was a lad, closed 
the country schools, and lack of means and poverty deprived him 
of a good preparation for college. He did not neglect books, 
however, and those which he found most helpful in fitting him 
for his work in life were the standard English poets, which exer- 
cised much influence on his early life in kindling the imagination 
and in stimulating worthy aspirations. Since then theology and 
history have been his principal studies. 

He attended King college, Bristol, Tennessee, and was grad- 
uated therefrom, in 1873, with the degree of A. B. He subse- 
quently took a course of professional study at Union Theological 
seminary in Hampden-Sidney, Virginia, and was graduated in 
1876. He married, October 19, 1876, Miss Mary Cantey Venable, 
daughter of Thomas F. and Mary P. Venable, of Virginia, of the 
highly distinguished family of the name. To this union have 
been born seven children, of whom six are living. 

He determined on the Gospel ministry as his life-work 
through personal preference. Innate ambition to excel made him 
the oratorical medalist and valedictorian in college. In the more 
serious contests of life a sense of duty has been the impelling 
motive to the success which he has attained, since directed always 
by the "sense of God in heart and conscience." 

He commenced the active work of his life as a minister in 
the Presbyterian church in Somerville, Tennessee, in 1876. He 
then served successively as pastor in Smithville, Virginia, 1877- 
85; in Franklin, Tennessee, 1885-89; in Charlotte, North Caro- 



324 RICHARD CLARK REED 

lina, 1889-92; in Nashville, Tennessee, 1892-98, and in 1898 was 
elected professor of church history in the Presbyterian Theologi- 
cal seminary, of Columbia, South Carolina, which chair he con- 
tinues to fill. For some years he was associate editor of the 
"Presbyterian Quarterly," the leading journal of the Presbyterian 
church in the United States. At present he is associate editor 
of the "Presbyterian Standard," published in Charlotte, North 
Carolina. 

The honorary degree of D. D., in recognition of his attain- 
ments, was conferred on him by King college in 1891, and that 
of LL. D. in 1906. In 1907 he was elected to membership in the 
American Society of Church History. His written and published 
works are held in high esteem. They are : "The Gospel as Taught 
by Calvin," 1897; "History of the Presbyterian Churches of the 
World," 1904; "John Knox An Address Before the General 
Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States," 
delivered at Fort Worth, Texas. 

He would commend as most helpful to young Americans as 
the principles and habits most highly contributive to the strength- 
ening of sound ideals of American life and which will most help 
young people to attain true success in life: "A definite aim, a 
worthy aim, and earnest consecration to that aim; temperate 
habits; methodical habits; industry; perseverance; pluck; put- 
ting supreme value on character; recognizing that true success is 
rather a condition of the inner than the outer life." 

His address is Columbia, Richland county, South Carolina. 



JOHN SGHREINER REYNOLDS 

REYNOLDS, JOHN SCHKEINER, son of George Norton 
Reynolds, Jr., and Susan Eliza (Schreiner) Reynolds, 
was born at Charleston, South Carolina, on September 
28, 1848. His father was by occupation a carriage maker and 
dealer. He represented the parishes of St. Philip and St. Michael 
in the house of representatives of his state; his character was 
marked by energy and vivacity, which accounted for his suc- 
cess in life. William Reynolds, great-grandfather of John S. 
Reynolds, came to Yorktown, Virginia, from England. He was 
distinguished only for energy, probity, and patriotism, yet this 
should be distinction enough for any man. George N. Reynolds, 
son of William Reynolds, born in Yorktown, Virginia, removed 
to Charleston, South Carolina, early in the nineteenth century, 
where he engaged successfully in the carriage business. His son, 
George N. Reynolds, Jr., was the father of the subject of this 
sketch. John Henry Schreiner, his maternal grandfather, was a 
native of Hamburg, Germany, and the son of a Lutheran clergy- 
man. He came to Charleston early in the nineteenth century and 
there successfully engaged in business as a merchant. He was a 
man of the highest integrity and considerable scholarship. 

In childhood John S. Reynolds was handicapped by frail 
health. Because of this, he took little interest in outdoor sports ; 
neither was he habituated to regular physical labor. Reading 
was his chief enjoyment, and the chimney-corner and his books 
occupied much of his time. Until fourteen years of age his life 
was spent in the city of Charleston ; from that time until he was 
twenty years of age he lived at Winnsboro. The influences which 
most affected his early career were private study, contact with 
men in active life, early companionship, and home. His mother 
was a woman of strong character, and her influence was in all 
respects excellent and most effective in shaping the tastes and 
directing the tendencies of her son. His first strong impulse to 
make his life something worth while he attributes to her counsels. 

Young Reynolds found no royal road to culture; various 
difficulties beset his pathway. Reading, however, filled what 
might otherwise have proved serious gaps in his early education. 

vol. ii. s. a IB. 



326 JOHN SCHREINER REYNOLDS 

He was devoted to history, political writings, and books of law; 
and he made the English language a subject of special study. 
His schooling was acquired in the common schools of Charleston 
until 1862. Next he studied at Mount Zion institute in the years 
1863 and 1864. He left school in November, 1864, to enter the 
Confederate army, and resumed his studies in September, 1865. 
In October, 1867, he entered the University of South Carolina, 
from which institution he was graduated in 1868. In the univer- 
sity he graduated with distinction in Latin and belles lettres, and 
received the junior certificate of distinction in French and in 
mental and moral philosophy. Though disappointing at the 
time, events have proved that the break in his college course was 
not an unmixed evil. 

Mr. Reynolds' active life-work began in a store in Winns- 
boro, South Carolina, on the 10th of September, 1868. From this 
date until January, 1869, he was a clerk in Winnsboro; in 1869 
he taught a country school in Marion county ; from 1870 to 1875 
he was instructor in history and belles lettres at King's Mountain 
Military school, Yorkville, South Carolina. He was admitted to 
the bar at Winnsboro, January, 1876, having acquired his legal 
knowledge while teaching. Until January, 1887, he occupied 
himself with the law and journalism, being connected with the 
Winnsboro "News and Herald." Removing to Columbia in Janu- 
ary, 1887, he was at different times connected with "The Record," 
"The Register" and "The State," meantime looking for an oppor- 
tunity to practice the profession of his choice. From the time 
that opportunity came he practiced law in Columbia until August, 
1902, when he was appointed supreme court librarian, a position 
which he still holds, and in connection with which he continues 
the practice of his profession. 

Mr. Reynolds' political activities have included, in addition 
to his newspaper work, attendance upon the Democratic state 
convention of May, 1876; county conventions in Fairfield; active 
participation in the campaign of 1876, and attendance upon the 
county conventions of Richland and the state Democratic con- 
vention in 1896. Mr. Reynolds was elected a member of the 
house of representatives of South Carolina, from Richland, in 
1896, and served one term. His principal service in this legis- 
lative session was the introduction of and successful fight made 
by him for the Reynolds printing bill, which provided that the 



JOHN SCHREINER REYNOLDS 327 

public printing be biennially let to the lowest responsible bidder. 
He has held office in local Democratic clubs for nearly thirty 
years. He served in the Confederate army, in the state troops, 
from November 30 to December 26, 1864, and was a member of 
the arsenal corps of the state cadets from December 26, 1864, to 
May 5, 1865. He has also given attention to literature, having 
written "Reconstruction in South Carolina," a work which was 
published in 1905, and which has been very favorably received. 

Mr. Reynolds attends the Protestant Episcopal church. In 
politics he is a life-long Democrat. 

In his own view, Mr. Reynolds' life has not been an unquali- 
fied success. His early and constant ambition has been to be a 
lawyer. Circumstances, however, over which he apparently had 
no control, hindered him from devoting himself closely and 
continuously to the practice of his profession. 

His advice to the young is to select the work of life early, 
and give persistent, unflagging attention thereto, and he regards 
as essential elements of success, honesty, sobriety, fidelity to 
friends, respect or veneration for parents, devotion to wife, and 
justice and tenderness to children. 

Mr. Reynolds was married on the 9th day of December, 1880, 
to Miss Susan Gadsden Edwards. Seven children have been born 
to them, of whom five are still (1907) living. 

His address is 1403 Pendleton street, Columbia, South Caro- 
lina. 



JOHN GARDINER RICHARDS, JR. 

RICHARDS, JOHN G., JR., of Liberty Hill, South Caro- 
lina, planter and stock-raiser, for five consecutive terms 
elected from Kershaw county a member of the South 
Carolina house of representatives, where he has served as chair- 
man of the committee on public schools and of the committee on 
ways and means ; the author of the law appropriating money to 
build and equip better school houses in the rural districts; of 
the law establishing a model school building in connection with 
Winthrop Normal and Industrial college for women, and of the 
law providing free scholarships at that institution; and of that 
part of the Clemson college scholarship law that provides schol- 
arships for boys who expect to make agriculture their life-work, 
is the name-sake and son of an honored father who has long 
preached the Gospel in South Carolina, and has made his father's 
name still better known by reason of the son's devotion to the 
educational and agricultural interests of the state. 

Born on Sunday, September 11, 1864, at Liberty Hill, he is 
the son of Eev. John Gardiner Richards and Sophia Edwards 
(Smith) Richards. His father, a graduate of Oglethorpe univer- 
sity and of the Theological seminary at Columbia, South Caro- 
lina, has been in the active ministry of the Presbyterian church 
for over fifty years; and, as moderator of the synod of South 
Carolina, for twenty years a member of the board of directors of 
the Theological seminary of Columbia, and a successful and 
beloved pastor and preacher, he has enjoyed the honor and loving 
esteem of his colleagues in the ministry and of a host of his 
fellow- citizens. He was chaplain of the Tenth South Carolina 
regiment, and served in the Confederate army throughout the 
War between the States; while two of his brothers were also 
officers in the Confederate army. 

Mr. Richards' maternal ancestors were English settlers in the 
colonies of Virginia and North Carolina, before the Revolution. 
John Fullerton, his great great-grandfather (born in Scotland, 
1734; died at Charleston, 1779; buried in Old Circular church- 
yard, Charleston), was commissioned captain of the Indian Field 
company by the council of safety of South Carolina, December 



JOHN GARDINER RICHARDS, JR. 331 

1, 1775. A nephew of David Hume, the great philosopher and 
historian, he was disinherited by his father and rebuked and 
reproached in a letter from his uncle, David Hume, for his "rebel- 
lious spirit and actions in vigorously supporting the cause of 
independence for the colonies." He died from the results of a 
severe cold taken while directing the work of his company in 
erecting Fort Johnson as a defence for Charleston against the 
anticipated attack of the British fleet and army. 

Joseph Bighton, his mother's grandfather, was born in the 
Bermuda Islands, September 9, 1762, and died at Charleston, 
January 7, 1847. He served in the Revolutionary army ; and he, 
also, is buried in the Old Circular churchyard at Charleston. 
He had been a prisoner on board the British prison-ship Forbay, 
of Charleston. 

His mother's brother, Gen. William Duncan Smith, was a 
graduate of West Point, served in the Mexican war, and, like so 
many other graduates of West Point, he was made a brigadier- 
general in the organization of the Confederate army. He died 
at Charleston early in the first year of the war. 

Born in the country, passing his early life in a village, fond 
of athletic sports, and particularly of baseball, tennis, and fox 
hunting, he early learned to work on a farm regularly. He 
writes: "I have worked on a farm the greater part of my life; 
in early years at set tasks, and in later life as the owner and 
manager of a farm; and the effect has been to teach me faith- 
fulness to duty and independence in thought and action." 

He feels himself most deeply indebted to his parents for a 
strong and enduring influence upon his intellectual, moral and 
spiritual life. He attended preparatory school at Liberty Hill, 
and entered Bingham's school at Mebane, North Carolina; but 
for family reasons his presence at home was needed, and he did 
not complete a course of a desired study. 

In 1884, at the age of nineteen, he began the "active work 
of life for himself by taking the management of a farming 
and stock-raising interest at White Oak, Kershaw county. The 
"desire to be of service to his state and county," which his home 
training had made a controlling desire in his life, led him to plan 
in his manhood to devote himself to advocating and enforcing 
measures which should advance the interests of education and of 
agriculture in South Carolina. 



332 JOHN GARDINER RICHARDS, JR. 

Farming has always been his chief occupation, and stock- 
raising in connection with farming. A Democrat by conviction, 
and wishing to secure legislation which should give better educa- 
tional facilities in the farming regions of the state and should 
result in a more thorough scientific training for farmers, he early 
began to give attention to party organization and to legislative 
measures which favor schools and agriculture. He was elected a 
magistrate of Kershaw county and served for eight years before 
his first election to the house of representatives. He has been a 
member of five Democratic state conventions; member of the 
state Democratic executive committee for six years, and in 1907 
he is vice-president of the Democratic party of the state. 

In 1898 he was the Democratic nominee for the house of 
representatives of his state, and he was triumphantly elected. 
Four times since he has been reflected, twice without opposition 
in his party. The nine years already passed in the legislature 
have been marked by the advocacy of many measures to improve 
the schools and to help the farmers of the state. 

The bill to exempt the graduates of the Medical college of 
Charleston from examination by the state board, he introduced, 
and, after a four years' struggle, carried through to enactment 
as a law. To the bill to give agricultural scholarships at Clemson 
college and at Winthrop Normal and Industrial college, and to 
the bill to build and equip better rural school houses, reference 
has been made. His determination to do what he can as a 
member of the house to help schools and farming has led him 
twice to decline honorable and lucrative positions in connection 
with the state government, in order that, as a legislator, he might 
continue to work for what he has most at heart. In 1905 he was 
elected a member of the board of visitors for Clemson college, 
and in 1907 he was reflected. 

In his church relations he is with the Presbyterian church 
the church of his fathers. He has served as a deacon and is now 
a ruling elder of the church at Liberty Hill. 

In 1893 a company of the South Carolina militia, known as 
the "Liberty Hill Rifles," was organized at Mr. Richards' resi- 
dence, and he was elected captain of the company. This position 
he filled until 1907. In 1907 he was unanimously elected by 
his fellow-officers major of the First regiment, infantry, of the 
National Guard. South Carolina. Governor Ansel named Mr. 



JOHN GARDINER RICHARDS, JR. 333 

Richards upon his military board and he still holds that position. 
Governor Heyward appointed him a member of the Jamestown 
Exposition Commission for South Carolina. 

On the 12th of June, 1888, Mr. Richards was married to 
Miss Bettie Coates Workman, daughter of W. H. Workman, Esq., 
a prominent lawyer of Camden. Of their nine children, eight 
are living in 1907. 

Mr. Richards attributes "to the influence of his early home, 
more than to all other causes," the success he has won in life; 
and it is interesting to see how the religious teaching and the 
Christian principles of the home of that faithful preacher and 
pastor, his father, have worked themselves out in the practical, 
public-spirited, useful and honorable life of the legislator who 
was trained in the Christian home. 



WILLIAM ANSON ROGERS 

ROGERS, REV. WILLIAM ANSON, A. B., was born in 
Bishop ville, Sumter county (now Lee county), South 
Carolina, September 29, 1849. He was the son of Wil- 
liam Rogers, a native of Connecticut, and his wife, Annie Jane 
McCollum, born of Scotch parentage in Robeson county, North 
Carolina. His father was a man of marked intelligence, of ster- 
ling character, diligent and practical in business affairs, gentle 
in manner and firm in his adherence to principle and duty. He 
came to the South in early life, and at once established himself 
in the regard of his neighbors, whose esteem grew yearly with 
increasing knowledge of the worth of the man, and his death was 
deplored as a public loss. He was a zealous Christian and filled 
many official positions in the Methodist Episcopal church. He 
was highly successful, both as a merchant and farmer. Mrs. 
Rogers, the mother, was a woman of great strength of mind, of 
broad views, liberal culture, and gentle and unassuming in 
manner. Her chief aim was to order her household aright and 
to train her children in all the attainable graces of Christian 
character. According to well-authenticated information trans- 
mitted in the family, they were of the descent of John Rogers, 
the martyr who was burned at the stake at Smithfield, England, 
February 4, 1555. 

The earliest ancestor in America was Hope Rogers, who 
settled in Connecticut about the year 1700. 

The subject of this sketch was the youngest of six children. 
His early life was spent in the quiet of a country village, and 
he grew up a healthy and vigorous lad, assisting his father in the 
store and having at times the oversight of some of the slaves on 
the farm contiguous. He was of studious habits and enjoyed a 
wide range of reading, including fiction, history, poetry, and 
works of a more serious character. He expressed the special 
delight which he took in boyhood in the books of DeFoe, Poe, 
and Augusta J. (Evans) Wilson. 

He reverently testified to the directive influence on his spir- 
itual life exercised by his excellent and deeply pious mother. 



WILLIAM ANSON ROGERS 335 

His preparatory education was in the village of his birth at 
Bishopville academy. The War between the States, 1861-65, 
interrupted his studies. In 1867 he went to Washington and Lee 
university, then under the presidency of General Robert E. Lee, 
and spent there one year. Whilst there he was initiated into the 
Alpha chapter of the Kappa Alpha fraternity. In October, 1868, 
he entered the freshman class in AVofford college, Spartanburg, 
South Carolina. Mr. Rogers was president of the Calhoun Lit- 
erary society, and was the founder and first G. M. of Delta 
chapter of the Kappa Alpha fraternity, the first secret order 
established at Wofford college. From this institution he was 
graduated A. B. in June, 1872, delivering the valedictory of his 
class. 

From personal preference and a conviction of duty he deter- 
mined upon the ministry as his life-work. In December, 1872, 
he was admitted on trial in the South Carolina conference of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, of which body he was ever 
a faithful and efficient member. His first charge in the ministry 
was Lynchburg, South Carolina. He afterward served as pastor 
at Greenwood, Marion; Trinity, Charleston; Central, Spartan- 
burg; Buncombe Street, Greenville; and Orangeburg, and for a 
short time as presiding elder of the Spartanburg district. He 
also served as the financial agent of his alma mater, Wofford 
college; as one of its trustees from 1886 until his death in 1906, 
and as assistant editor of the "Southern Christian Advocate." 

He married, March 22, 1876, Miss Annie Maria Anderson, 
daughter of the Rev. Edmund Anderson, of the Presbyterian 
church, and a native of Dallas county, Alabama. Her grand- 
father was Robert Anderson, a son of Colonel Robert Anderson, 
of the Revolutionary war, who was subsequently made general 
of the state troops, and after whom Anderson county, South 
Carolina, is named. Of their seven children, five are now (1907) 
living. 

Loyal to the state of his birth and the best interests of the 
South, Mr. Rogers was constant in his allegiance to the Demo- 
cratic party. As a pastor, Mr. Rogers was sympathetic, tender, 
faithful; as a friend, true to the core; as a man among men, a 
gentleman. As a preacher he was logical and direct, and being 
of a poetical temperament, this imparted a chaste glow to his 
periods; but he never sacrificed truth to rhetoric, nor the teach- 



336 WILLIAM ANSON ROGERS 

ings of the Gospel to the beauties of expression. Fidelity and 
modesty were his marked traits ; sympathetic and wise in counsel, 
his friendship was a boon. 

He enjoined upon all young Americans who would achieve 
true success in life to decide conscientiously upon some course of 
usefulness, to pursue it constantly and with the entire strength 
of their being, striving ever for higher and greater fullness of 
attainment. 

Owing to failing health, Mr. Rogers withdrew from active 
ministerial work in December, 1901, and located in Spartanburg. 
He died there on the 29th of September, 1906, the anniversary of 
his fifty-seventh year. 



EDWIN GRENVILLE SEIBELS 

SEIBELS, EDWIN GRENVILLE, son of Edwin Whipple 
Seibels and Marie J. (Smith) Seibels, was born at Colum- 
bia, South Carolina, in September, 1866. His father was 
a general insurance agent, noted for firmness of character and a 
practical temper. 

Mr. Seibels' great-grandfather, John Jacob Seibels, emigrated 
from Elberfeldt, Germany, to Charleston, South Carolina, about 
1760. His great-grandmother, Lady Sarah Temple, lived in 
Boston, Massachusetts ; she was the daughter of William Temple, 
brother of Sir John Temple, of England. Among his ancestral 
connections, Mr. Seibels counts Robert Emmett, the Irish patriot. 

Mr. Seibels' early years were passed chiefly in Columbia. 
Life was care- free. His college course cost him little struggle, 
although he paid his own way. He was fond of reading, and 
covered a wide range, including, first and last, almost all of the 
standard authors of ancient and modern times. His mother's 
influence upon his life was marked. Later forces that affected 
his character were the example and standing of others ahead of 
himself. 

Mr. Seibels' first schooling was obtained under Mrs. Frank 
Elmore; later he attended Thompson's academy; his course here 
he followed with a course in South Carolina university, from 
which institution he was graduated with the degree of B. E. in 
1885. The serious work of life began for him when in Septem- 
ber, 1886, he assumed charge of his father's insurance office. His 
original desire was to be an engineer. Work was offered him in 
connection with the Panama railway, but circumstances took him 
instead into insurance. Since that time he has been constantly 
identified with this business. From September, 1886, to January, 
1887, he was special agent for a fire insurance company; in the 
Southern field from 1887 to 1888 he was a member of the firm 
of E. W. Seibels & Son; from 1888 to 1892, special agent of 
various companies; from 1892 to 1898, general adjuster of fire 
losses; in 1898 he became Southern manager of the Glens Falls 
Insurance company; in 1900 he was appointed joint manager of 
the Rochester German and New Hampshire Insurance company, 



340 EDWIN GRENVILLE SEIBELS 

with the Glens Falls company. Since that date he has also had 
the management of the Milwaukee Mechanics, the American 
Insurance company, of New Jersey, and the Royal Exchange 
Assurance corporation; he also manages a large foreign marine 
insurance business. In addition, Mr. Seibels has held the office 
of president of the tree and park commission of the city of 
Columbia. He is president of South Carolina college alumni 
association and promoted the movement for the establishment of 
an endowment fund for the college by the alumni association, 
and is the president of the board of trustees of the alumni fund. 
He was elected president of the Clariosophic society of South 
Carolina college in his junior year. He has held various social 
positions, is president of the South Carolina club and of other 
clubs ; he is also a Mystic Shriner in the Masonic order, a member 
of the S. A. E. fraternity, the Columbia club, and the Metro- 
politan club, and was president of the general convention of the 
S. A. E. fraternity in 1884. 

Mr. Seibels is a Gold Democrat, and an Episcopalian. 

The fact that, though defeated in his original purpose to 
become an engineer, he nevertheless has succeeded in the business 
which circumstances thrust upon him, may be, he thinks, a source 
of encouragement to young people who, like himself, have been 
unable to follow their native bent into their chosen pursuit. His 
advice to young Americans is : "Be straightforward. Help others 
whenever an opportunity presents itself. Don't tell your business 
to people, but never do anything in business you could not tell." 

On February 25, 1892, Mr. Seibels was married to Miss 
Dorothy Newton, granddaughter of Commodore John Thomas 
Newton and of Commodore Eben Farrand, of the Confederate 
navy. 

The address of Mr. Seibels is Columbia, South Carolina. 



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JOHN GALHOUN SHEPPARD 

SHEPPARD, JOHN CALHOUN, lawyer, banker and 
statesman, was born in Edgefield county, South Carolina, 
July 5, 1850. His parents were James and Sarah Louisa 
(Mobley) Sheppard. His father was a farmer, a man of integ- 
rity, sobriety and industry, who was prominent in the community 
in which he lived and was a member of the state legislature for 
several terms. The mother of the subject of this sketch was a 
woman of fine character, and her influence upon the moral and 
intellectual life of her son was strong and permanent. 

In childhood and youth John C. Sheppard was strong and 
active. He had a marked taste for books, but after he was ten 
years of age, at which time he removed from the village to the 
country, he also took great pleasure in hunting, fishing and in 
outdoor life in general. His primary education was obtained in 
the schools of his neighborhood. Later he studied at Bethany 
academy under Professor George Galphin. When he became 
large enough to work he had regular tasks to perform after the 
hours of school, and for two years subsequent to leaving the 
academy he performed all kinds of labor incident to farm life 
in order that he might obtain means with which to attend a 
higher institution of learning. He spent three years at Furman 
university, and in 1871 he was admitted to the bar and immedi- 
ately entered upon the practice of his profession at Edgefield, 
where he has remained until the present time. His choice of the 
law as a profession was due to a strong inclination which he had 
cherished from very early days. He writes: "I can remember 
as well when I learned to walk as I do when I first entertained 
the purpose of devoting myself to the law." 

Had public affairs been in a settled condition, it is probable 
that he would have devoted his life entirely to the practice of 
his profession; but in 1876 the political conditions in his section 
had become so intolerable that he felt compelled to make an effort 
to help redeem the state from the condition which had been 
brought about under the regime which followed the War between 
the States. He had been a close student of public affairs from 
the beginning of the Reconstruction period and had not only 



344 JOHN CALHOUN SHEPPARD 

witnessed but had suffered from the wrongs perpetrated upon the 
people by the administrations of governors forced upon them, 
and he entered eagerly and actively into the organization which 
was then being formed for the purpose of securing a government 
of their own choice. From the date of the May convention to 
the day of election his whole time was given to the work of this 
campaign. During the same year he was nominated and elected 
a member of the South Carolina house of representatives, and 
participated actively in the organization of the "Wallace house." 
In December, 1877, Speaker Wallace having been elected judge 
of the seventh judicial circuit, Mr. Sheppard was elected speaker 
in his stead. In 1878 and also in 1880 he was reflected member 
and speaker of the house. In 1882 he was elected lieutenant- 
governor on the ticket on which Hugh S. Thompson was elected 
governor, and they were reflected in 1884. In July, 1886, Gov- 
ernor Thompson having been appointed by President Cleveland 
for service in the national government, Mr. Sheppard became 
his successor and discharged the duties of the office until the 
inauguration of Governor John Peter Richardson in December 
of the same year. Upon the expiration of his service as governor, 
Mr. Sheppard resumed the practice of law and devoted himself 
exclusively to the duties of his profession until 1892, in which 
year the conservative element of the Democratic party nominated 
him as their candidate for governor, in opposition to the reelec- 
tion of Governor Benjamin E. Tillman. The campaign which 
followed was one of the most memorable in the history of South 
Carolina, and while it resulted in the reelection of Tillman, the 
conduct and bearing of ex-Governor Sheppard was such as to 
win for him the respect and admiration of friends and foes alike. 
After the election of 1892 he again resumed the discharge of his 
professional and business duties, in which he continued until 
1895, when he became a candidate for the Constitutional conven- 
tion, which had been called to assemble in August, and although 
he conducted no campaign, and made only one speech before the 
people (which was made when the campaign party addressed the 
people of the village in which he lived), he was elected a member 
from Edgefield county of that great convention. Regarding the 
value of his services in the convention, the records afford ample 
evidence. Suffice it to say that he measured fully up to the lofty 



JOHN CALHOUN SHEPPARD 345 

standard of honor, patriotism and unselfish public service which 
he had set for himself in the early part of his career. 

In 1898 he was a candidate for an unexpired term of two 
years in the state senate, and after a canvass in which his 
opponent was the Honorable Thomas H. Rainsford, and in which 
every inch of the ground was hotly contested, he was elected by 
an overwhelming majority. In 1900 he was reflected to the 
senate for a full term without opposition. Upon the expiration 
of this term, in 1904, he was urged to again be a candidate, but 
he declined to do so in order that he might devote his entire time 
to his alt'airs as lawyer and banker, together with the onerous and 
important duties of supreme dictator of the Knights of Honor, 
a position to which he had been elected in 1903 and held until 
June, 1907, when he declined reelection. He is also a member of 
the Knights of Pythias, and has been connected with many other 
social, literary and fraternal societies, in some of which he has 
held important offices. In 1890 he became president of the Bank 
of Edgefield, a position which he still retains. 

He is a member of the Baptist church, and is prominent in 
all that makes for the social, educational and religious advance- 
ment of his community, contributing liberally of his means to 
charity and all public movements for the betterment of the town 
in which he lives, as well as assisting in the promotion of all its 
enterprises, and exhibiting in all the relations of life the public 
spirit and broad-minded generosity which ever characterize the 
man who endeavors to live up to the best that is in him and to 
discharge with fidelity all the obligations of good citizenship and 
right living. 

In response to a request that, from his own experience and 
observation, he would offer suggestions as to the means which 
will most help young people to attain success in life he says: 
"If a young man adopts the principles of integrity, veracity and 
sobriety, and adheres to the methods of industry and economy, 
and practices the habits of prudence, patience and politeness, he 
will succeed." 

On May 22, 1879, he was married to Miss Helen Wallace, 
daughter of Judge William H. Wallace, of Union, South Caro- 
lina. Of their eight children, seven are now (1907) living. These 
devoted parents have earnestly and conscientiously endeavored to 



346 JOHN CAL.HOUN SHEPPARD 

provide for the physical, moral and spiritual welfare of their 
children, who have not only been trained in the Christian virtues 
at home, but have also been given excellent advantages in schools 
of high grade. 

His address is Edgefield, South Carolina. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 




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CHARLES CARROLL SIMMS 

SIMMS, CHARLES CARROLL, was born at Woodlands, 
near the town of Midway, in Bamberg county, South 
Carolina, October 20, 1862. He was the son of William 
Gilmore Simms, LL. D., and Chevillette Eliza (Roach) Simms. 
Doctor Simms was an author, historian, poet, novelist, and biog- 
rapher. He represented Barnwell county in the legislature of 
South Carolina. He was intensely patriotic, entirely loveable in 
his domestic life, impulsive, courageous, true, generous to prodi- 
gality in all things, and in all things a man. Governor James 
H. Hammond testified of him that he had met all the great men 
of America, including her leading statesmen, but that Doctor 
Simms was intellectually the greatest man he ever met. 

The grandfather of Charles Carroll Simms was William 
Gilmore Simms. The great-grandfather bore the same name; he 
was Scotch- Irish, and was in the Coffee brigade under Jackson. 
He was a poet, and from him William Gilmore Simms inherited 
the poetic gift. 

As a child the subject of this sketch was in delicate health ; 
later, however, he developed a strong constitution. He was inter- 
ested in reading, and from this exercise derived much of his early 
education. His youth was passed in the country near Woodlands, 
in Barnwell county, near Midway, and in Charleston, where he 
went to school. 

Young Simms was early trained to work. He performed 
farm labor, of a more or less exacting character, and served as 
outdoor clerk, first for George W. Williams & Company, and 
afterward for Norwood & Coker; both firms doing business in 
Charleston. He also clerked in a country store in Barnwell, 
South Carolina. 

When but eleven months old, Charles Carroll Simms suffered 
a great loss in the death of his mother, and when but eight years 
old his father died, in 1870. His early educational advantages 
were slight. The war having left his father's family in an 
impoverished condition, he was compelled to leave school when 
less than fourteen years of age and go to work. Nevertheless, he 
continued his reading, confining this largely to standard works, 

Vol. II. S. C. 16. 



350 CHARLES CARROLL SIMMS 

and avoiding the sensational and inferior literature upon which 
the time of many young people is wasted, or worse. Such 
schooling as he received was obtained at the schools of the Misses 
Roach and Professor Sachtleben in Charleston. 

Mr. Simms's active life work began in December, 1883, when, 
at twenty-one years of age, he was admitted to the bar before 
the supreme court of South Carolina. The forces which have 
impelled him onward have been self-respect and determination. 
The success he has attained he attributes chiefly to private study, 
contact with men of prominence, and travel. He has held no 
offices of influential character, save that of chairman of the board 
of trustees of the graded schools of Barnwell. In his legal prac- 
tice he has been brought, in a limited measure, into contact with 
corporations for which he has at times served as counsel. Since 
1887 he has practiced law at Barnwell in copartnership with the 
Honorable George H. Bates. 

The chief public service rendered by Mr. Simms has, in his 
judgment, been the opposition which, in behalf of the conserva- 
tive wing of the Democratic party in his state, he has offered to 
the policies of Benjamin R. Tillman, first governor, and now 
United States senator. In this work he three times stumped his 
section of the state, the second district, and, though his wing of 
the party was in a hopeless minority, he was always treated with 
respect and consideration by his political opponents and voters, 
a fact largely due to his systematic effort to allay bitterness and 
establish harmonious relations between the two factions of the 
party. He congratulates himself that he has lived to see an end 
of factional strife and antagonism and the consolidation of all 
elements of the Democratic party in his district. For this happy 
condition he believes that his efforts and influence have been in 
some measure responsible. 

Mr. Simms is a member of the Masonic order blue lodge, 
chapter, commandery, and fourteenth degree Scottish rite; Im- 
proved Order of Red Men, Woodmen of the World, and Knights 
of Pythias. He has been worshipful master in the Masonic order 
as well as a D. D. G. M. thereof for years; and has filled all 
offices in the Knights of Pythias, including grand chancellor and 
supreme representative from his state. 

Mr. Simms is not a confirmed member of any religious 
denomination, but prefers to attend the Protestant Episcopal 



CHARLES CARROLL SIMMS 351 

church, wherein he was christened when an infant. His exercise 
he finds in walking and swimming, to which he is devoted ; he is 
also a member of fishing, social, business and agricultural clubs. 

Mr. Simms is deeply attached to his state. In 1882-83 he was 
in San Francisco and other parts of California, and would, 
no doubt, have remained there, to his own personal advantage, 
had not his love for South Carolina, its history, traditions, insti- 
tutions, and aspirations, recalled him, that he might devote his 
life and powers to the service of this great commonwealth. 

His advice to the young is to cultivate self-respect. He 
believes that where the home, associations with others, and even 
the church, have failed rightly to regulate and direct character, 
the inculcation of self-respect will hold the young in the right 
course and impel them to the highest attainments of which they 
are capable. 

Mr. Simms's successes have all been achieved within his pro- 
fession. He has been engaged in the most prominent litigation 
on all sides in his county and elsewhere, and has given his exclu- 
sive attention to his profession. He regards political life as a 
failure, and office-holding as more of a curse than an advantage. 
Above all things, he esteems the life of a private citizen as most 
independent, dignified and desirable. Such a life, he believes, 
will make a man respectable when public life oftentimes will 
destroy him. 

In January, 1886, Mr. Simms was married to Miss Emily 
M. Maher, daughter of the late Judge John J. Maher. She lived 
only a year after the marriage; and on April 18, 1894, Mr. 
Simms was married to her sister, Miss Fanny H. Maher. Of 
their six children, four are now (1907) living. 

The address of Mr. Simms is Barnwell, South Carolina. 



JOSEPH EMORY SIRRINE 

SIKRINE, JOSEPH EMORY, civil engineer and engineer 
for industrial plants and water power development, was 
born in Americus, Sumter county, Georgia, December 9, 
1872. His parents were George W. and Sarah E. Sirrine. His 
father was a carriage and wagon manufacturer, an energetic and 
public-spirited man, who was devoted to his family, and who, 
though never holding political office, was helpful in the commu- 
nity in which he lived. For many years he was president of the 
free public library of Greenville and also of the Hospital asso- 
ciation of that town. The earliest ancestor in this country whose 
name is known was John Sirrine, who was born January 4, 1769. 
His father, whose name is not remembered, came from France 
and settled in Louisiana. John Sirrine was the great great- 
grandfather of the subject of this sketch. He died February 4, 
1812. On the maternal side, the great-grandfather of Joseph 
Sirrine was John Rhinelander, the name afterward shortened to 
Rylander, who either settled or was born near Savannah, Georgia. 
His family came from the province of Salzburg, in Germany. 
His mother's maternal grandfather was Joseph Brown, who 
resided in the old Abbeville district, South Carolina. 

In childhood and youth Joseph Sirrine was strong and well. 
His home was in the village of Greenville, and he was fond of 
outdoor life and was also deeply interested in machinery. Except 
while at school he had regular tasks to perform, and he believes 
that this was of great benefit, because it taught him the value of 
close application to the work in hand. There were no difficulties 
to overcome in his efforts to secure an education. He was fond 
of reading and study, and his mother exerted a strong influence 
on his intellectual life. Until he was thirteen years of age he 
attended public and private schools in Greenville. He then 
entered Furman university, where he remained three years, but, 
as he omitted the last year of the course, he was not graduated. 
In his boyhood he was especially fond of books of travel, but 
while at the university his time was largely given to the study 
of mathematics. From very early years he had desired to become 




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tf BUC U3RA1Y 



'OUNDATIOJKS 



JOSEPH EMORY SIRRINE 355 

a civil engineer, and to this choice there was no opposition on the 
part of his relatives or friends. The active work of his life was 
commenced in June, 1890, as a rodman on a railroad survey. 
From this time to 1895 he was engaged in the general work of a 
civil and a mill engineer. In the year last named he became 
associated with the firm of Lockwood, Greene & Company, of 
Boston, Massachusetts, as constructing engineer. He remained 
with this firm until 1902. During the last three years of this 
connection, a period of great activity in the erection of cotton 
mills in that section, he was manager and chief engineer in their 
Southern department. Foreseeing a great development in the 
manufacture of cotton in the South which would bring a large 
amount of business to men in his profession, he severed his con- 
nection with the Boston firm, and in 1902 began business under 
his own name as a mill engineer. The success which had attended 
his work had given him an excellent reputation, and when he 
opened an office in Greenville, in which he employed several 
assistants, his services were in great demand, and from that time 
to the present he has carried on a large business in planning 
industrial plants and in water power developments. Many of 
the larger manufacturing plants now in operation in his section 
of the state were constructed according to his plans and under 
his supervision. It is safe to say that he is recognized as the 
foremost mill engineer in South Carolina, and his reputation has 
extended far beyond the bounds of the state. 

Of fraternal orders, Mr. Sirrine is a member of the York 
Rite Masons, and is a noble of the order of the Mystic Shrine; 
while of scientific bodies he is a member of the American Society 
of Civil Engineers and of the American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers. In politics he is a Democrat, although in 1896 and 
1900 he refused to vote the national ticket on account of its 
advocacy of the free coinage of silver. He is a close student 
and a hard worker, but occasionally secures recreation out of 
doors in the common sports, while for indoor amusement he 
enjoys card games, especially whist. 

In reply to a request for suggestions in regard to habits and 
principles which help young people to attain true success in life, 
he says : "Work without regard to purely temporary benefits will 



356 JOSEPH EMORY SIRRINE 

insure a fair degree of success to any man of average mind and 
good habits. Faithfulness and energy are the only things that 
can make success." 

On November 8, 1898, Mr. Sirrine was married to Jane 
Pinckney Henry. Their home is Number 326 North Main street, 
Greenville, South Carolina. 



7 . ) \ -s 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



AUGUSTUS WARDLAW SMITH 

SMITH, AUGUSTUS WAKDLAW, financier, merchant and 
manufacturer, was born April 29, 1862, in Abbeville, Abbe- 
ville county, South Carolina. His father, Major Augustus 
M. Smith, planter and member of the state legislature, a man of 
much public spirit and very popular, was killed in the battle of 
Gaines Mill, in the War between the States, while major of the 
First South Carolina regiment. His mother, Sarah (Wardlaw) 
Smith, was a cultured and pious woman and exercised a strong 
influence in the formation of his moral character. 

He is of Scotch blood. His paternal great-grandfather, 
William Smith, moved from Virginia to Stony Point, Abbeville 
county, South Carolina, and his grandfather, Joel Smith, of 
Abbeville county, was a noted financier of the last century, who 
amassed nearly a million dollars previous to the War between the 
States. On the maternal side, Robert Wardlaw, his fourth great- 
grandfather, originally from Scotland, was the founder of the 
American branch of the family. He came from Ireland to Penn- 
sylvania at the time that persecution at home was sending a 
steady stream of Scotch and Irish Presbyterians to this country, 
then to Virginia, and finally settled in Abbeville county, where 
the family has been prominent ever since. John Wardlaw, his 
great-grandfather, was clerk of the county court for thirty-eight 
years. Judge D. L. Wardlaw, his grandfather, was a member of 
the South Carolina state legislature from 1826 to 1841; speaker 
of the house in 1836; judge of the circuit court in 1841 ; a member 
of the state conventions of 1852, 1860-62, and 1865; one of the 
signers of the ordinance of secession, and was in 1865 elected 
associate justice of the state court of appeals. 

In childhood he was delicate, but soon grew more robust and 
in youth was active in such sports as horseback riding and fox 
hunting. He decided early from personal preference to make his 
life a commercial one, and his education, arranged in accordance 
with that decision, was obtained at Judge W. C. Benet's school, 
Cokesbury, South Carolina; the high school, Abbeville, and the 
University of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee. When he left the 
latter institution he went to work on a farm as a helper, at the 



360 AUGUSTUS WARDLAW SMITH 

age of seventeen, and remained there a year. This was a great 
help to him physically, besides teaching him how to apply him- 
self to work systematically. 

Mr. Smith began his business career in 1881 as a clerk in his 
uncle's store in Abbeville; in 1883 he started a store of his own, 
and from that time his rise in the commercial world was rapid. 
In 1900 the business, having outgrown the town, was removed to 
Spartanburg, and soon became one of the largest in that section. 
In the same year he organized and became president and treasurer 
of the Woodruff Cotton mills, Woodruff, South Carolina, which he 
built and has made to rank among the finest and most prosperous 
in the state. A year later, in 1901, he organized and became 
president of the Bank of Woodruff, which stands high among the 
financial institutions of the state, and since 1905 he has been a 
director of the Central National bank, of Spartanburg. In 
November, 1906, he was elected president of the Union-Buffalo 
Mills company, the Union Manufacturing Power company, and 
the Union Glenn Springs railroad, all situated at Union, South 
Carolina. 

In 1890-91 he was colonel of the Third South Carolina regi- 
ment state troops, and was mayor of Abbeville 1891-92. He says 
he has never had any ambition beyond being a good business man 
and a good citizen, both of which he is beyond question. He has 
devoted much time to mathematics and the study of books on the 
manufacture of cotton. This study, together with his natural 
ability and his untiring energy, enabled him to achieve a marked 
success before he reached middle age. His career has been a 
practical demonstration of the value of his advice to the young 
man starting in life in any line of endeavor : "Be strictly honest 
in all dealings; never procrastinate in what is to be done; always 
be polite and just; overcome all obstacles in business by attention 
and perseverance." 

Among the potent influences of his life he rates home first 
and contact with men next. He is a member, past chancellor 
commander and department grand commander of the Knights of 
Pythias, and he is a member of the Alpha Omega college frater- 
nity. His religious connection is with the Protestant Episcopal 
church, of which he is a member. In politics he is a Democrat. 
He finds his most enjoyable recreation in quiet rest at home. 



AUGUSTUS WARDLAW SMITH 361 

On January 5, 1887, he married Mary Noble, daughter of 
Edward Noble, of Abbeville, and on June 5, 1901, Belle Perrin, 
daughter of the late L. W. Perrin, of Abbeville; five children 
have been born to them, of whom four are now (1907) living. 

His address is Spartanburg, South Carolina. 



RUFUS FRANKLIN SMITH 

SMITH, KUFUS FEANKLIN, M. D., successful financier, 
was born in Equality, Anderson county, South Carolina, 
August 17, 1858. His father was James Monroe Smith, a 
Southern planter and merchant, who has been described as "a 
dignified gentleman of the old school." His mother was Hester 
Watkins Smith, and his maternal great-grandfather, David Wat- 
kins, whose father came to this country from Wales. 

Doctor Smith grew up on a plantation, where, as a well- 
developed, sturdy youth, he took a lively interest in farm life, 
and especially in horses. After attending Adger college in Wal- 
halla, South Carolina, he took a course in the medical department 
of the University of Virginia, where in 1881 he was graduated 
with the degree of M. D. He supplemented this training by 
special courses at the University of Pennsylvania, at Jefferson 
college in Philadelphia, and in New York. He then returned to 
the plantation and took up the practice of medicine, which he 
continued until 1900. In that year he relinquished his profession 
in order to devote his attention to his large financial interests. 
He is president of the Easley Oil mill, president of the Easley 
Loan and Trust company, and was identified with the establish- 
ment of the Easley graded school. He is an elder in the Presby- 
terian church ; an active member of the Masonic fraternity, of the 
Knights of Pythias, and of the Woodmen of the World. In his 
professional work he has been connected with county, state and 
national medical societies. 

Doctor Smith takes an active interest in political affairs. 
He was a member of the South Carolina constitutional convention 
of 1895, and was sent as a delegate to the national Democratic 
convention at St. Louis in 1904. Whether in politics, in the 
medical profession, or in the financial world, he has always been 
an earnest and persevering worker. 

He is interested in the study of evolution as it affects the 
human family, and retains his early love for fine horses and other 
blooded stock, as well as for all athletic sports. He owns exten- 
sive farming lands, is largely interested in agriculture and cotton 







1 

1 



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^ xo 





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RUFUS FRANKLIN SMITH 365 

manufacture, and he is a director in the Easley, Glenwood, Lib- 
erty, and Calumet Cotton mills. He is also president of the 
Easley Cotton Seed Oil mill, of the Liberty Cotton Seed Oil mill 
and of the Easley Loan and Trust company. 

On August 22, 1888, he married Ida J. Hollingsworth, of 
Pickens, South Carolina. They have had six children two 
daughters and four sons all of whom are now (1907) living. 

His address is Easley, Pickens county, South Carolina. 



THOMAS BASGOM STAGKHOUSE 

STACKHOUSE, THOMAS BASCOM, son of T. F. Stack- 
house and Mary A. (Bethea) Stackhouse, was born near 
Dillon, South Carolina, in Marion county, on November 
3, 1857. 

Mr. Stackhouse is a man of distinguished ancestry. Com- 
mencing with the year 1502, down for upwards of two centuries, 
may be found members of the Stackhouse family noted as col- 
legians and writers, most of them being in orders. At present 
several of the name are priests in the Church of England. Lead- 
ing the list of divines in the family was Thomas, at one time 
principal of St. Austin's hostel, Troters; vice-chancellor of 
Cambridge, and chaplain to Henry VIII, and rector of Kirby 
Sigiston, Yorkshire. Others are Hugh Stackhouse, collegian and 
naturalist; Thomas Stackhouse, Bible historian, and William 
Stackhouse, D. D., rector of St. Erme, Cornwall. Thomas Stack- 
house was a classical scholar, and John a botanist. Another 
Thomas Stackhouse was famous both as a Friend and antiquarian. 
From Yorkshire this family has spread over the world. Richard 
Stackhouse came to New England in the Puritan times; two 
Thomas Stackhouses and a John came to the Province of Penn- 
sylvania. The elder Thomas married twice; his first wife's 
family were of distinguished lineage, and the second has given to 
the Society of Friends some of its most illustrious writers. John, 
the brother of Thomas, Jr., left many descendants. Thomas, the 
elder brother, left no children. He was a prominent Friend in 
his day. 

Thomas Stackhouse, the younger, came to America when 
about twenty-one. He was wealthy, occupied many offices of 
trust, was one of the four collectors of money granted proprie- 
tary; represented Bucks county, Pennsylvania, in the Colonial 
assembly, 1711-13-15, and was reflected in 1716, but refused to 
serve. He built the first meeting house at Middletown, Bucks 
county, in 1690; was on various committees of the society, and 
was three times married. The coat-of-arms in this family is 
argent on a bend engrailed, sa, three bucks' heads of the field. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



AOTQX,, UBXOX 

/ OUNDATIOIH 



THOMAS BASCOM STACKHOU8E 369 

Crest: A buck's head, as in the arms. Motto: "Er cordiad y 
caera." (From foundation of the fortress.) 

William Stackhouse was born in Bucks county, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1736, and came to Marion county, South Carolina, about 
1760. He took part in the Revolutionary war, and was paroled 
at the surrender of Charleston to Cornwallis. He had two sons, 
William and John. 

John Stackhouse was born October 22, 1766. He had five 
sons: Herod, Isaac, John, Tristram, and Hugh, and died June 
22, 1819. Isaac Stackhouse was born October 10, 1790. He had 
six sons : Maston, Thomas, William, Tristram, Milton and Robert. 
All of these were successful farmers. 

Eli Thomas Stackhouse was the pioneer in intensive farming 
in South Carolina, a colonel in the Confederate army, and a 
member of congress. He died June 14, 1892, while a member of 
congress. 

Tristram F. Stackhouse was born the 23d of August, 1835. 
He inherited from his father the lands settled on by William 
Stackhouse about the year 1760, and cultivated these lands to the 
time of his death, June 6, 1905. He represented his county, 
Marion, in the legislature for tl^ree terms, and was noted for his 
fairness and honorable dealing. He had three sons, Thomas, 
Randolph and Lawrence. Randolph P. Stackhouse has devoted 
his life to agriculture, and now cultivates, in addition to other 
lands, the lands which belonged to the Stackhouse family for 
about a century and a half. He was a member of the Consti- 
tutional convention of South Carolina in 1895. 

Thomas B. Stackhouse was brought up in the country. He 
loved horses, worked on the farm when not in school, and fre- 
quently picked more cotton than any negro on the place. The 
forces which affected the life of young Stackhouse were the 
beneficent influence of his mother, reading, school, early com- 
panionship, private study, and contact with men. He taught 
school before going to college and during every vacation. He 
attended Wofford college, graduating in 1880 with the degree of 
A. B., and was for several years a trustee of that institution. 
He was a member of the Kappa Alpha fraternity. His active 
life began in 1881 as a merchant at Little Rock, South Carolina, 
in which business he was successfully engaged till 1885. From 
1882 to 1902 he farmed near Dillon, South Carolina. In 1897 



370 THOMAS BASCOM STACKHOUSE 

he organized the Bank of Dillon, and had the active management 
of same till 1903. In 1900 he was instrumental in building the 
Dillon Cotton mills, of which he was elected president. The 
latter part of 1902 he resigned his position in the Bank of Dillon 
and the Dillon Cotton mills and moved to Spartanburg, South 
Carolina, where he helped to organize the American National 
bank and the Southern Trust company, of which he was respect- 
ively cashier and treasurer during 1903 and 1904. In January, 
1905, he was elected vice-president of the National Loan and 
Exchange bank, of Columbia, and president of the Bank of 
Dillon, which positions he still (1907) retains. In addition to 
his official connection with these two banks he is a director in the 
American National bank and the Southern Trust company, of 
Spartanburg, the Security Savings and Investment company, of 
Newberry, the Cowpens Manufacturing company, the Hamer 
Cotton mills, and a trustee of the Epworth orphanage. 
His address is Columbia, South Carolina. 



WILLIAM FRANCIS STEVENSON 

STEVENSON, WILLIAM FEANCIS, lawyer, banker, and 
ex-speaker of the house of representatives of South Caro- 
lina, was born near Statesville, Iredell county, North Caro- 
lina, on the 23d of November, 1861. His parents were William 
Sidney Stevenson and Eliza (McFarland) Stevenson. His father 
was a farmer by occupation, but for some time was engaged in 
teaching. He was a man of tenacious memory and conspicuous 
piety, and was a leading elder of the Presbyterian church of his 
neighborhood for nearly fifty years. The earliest ancestor of the 
Stevenson family in America was William Stevenson, the great 
great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch, who came to 
Pennsylvania in 1748 and removed to Iredell county, North Caro- 
lina, in 1761, where the family has since lived. Among Mr. 
Stevenson's distinguished relatives were his second cousins, Adlai 
E. Stevenson, vice-president of the United States; J. H. Bell, an 
associate justice of the supreme court of Texas, and A. P. McCor- 
mick, United States circuit judge, of Dallas, Texas. 

Mr. Stevenson's physical condition in childhood and youth 
was strong and robust; he was very fond of active outdoor life 
and passed his early years in the country. From the time that 
he was ten years old until he was eighteen he labored on his 
father's farm, working regularly in the making and harvesting 
of every crop and doing all sorts of farm work. In winter he 
attended the public schools. He prepared for college in Taylors- 
ville, North Carolina, and was finally graduated at Davidson 
college, North Carolina, with the A. B. degree. His education 
was not acquired without difficulty, as he had to make his own 
way through college, but inspired by home influences, especially 
the influence of his mother, he attained his college degree with 
distinction. His chief reading was in the line of history and the 
works of D'Aubigne, Alex. H. Stephens, and Macaulay, were 
among his greatest favorites. Subsequently to his graduation he 
studied law in the office of General W. L. T. Prince, of Cheraw, 
South Carolina, and he began the practice of law at Chesterfield, 
South Carolina, in July, 1887. 



372 WILLIAM FRANCIS STEVENSON 

Mr. Stevenson has had a busy and successful career. In 
addition to his work as a lawyer, he has been president of the 
Merchants and Farmers bank, of Cheraw, South Carolina, since 
1900 ; president of the Chesterfield and Lancaster Railroad com- 
pany since 1901; director of the National Loan and Exchange 
bank, of Columbia, since 1903 ; district counsel of the Seaboard 
Air Line railway; vice-president of the Chesterfield County Oil 
company from its organization in 1901 until it was merged in the 
Independent Cotton Oil company, of which he is a director. He 
is now (1907) attorney for the state commission of South Carolina 
which was appointed to wind up the affairs of the late state dis- 
pensary, a concern which owed about a million dollars and had 
assets worth about the same sum when it was forced out of business 
by legislative enactment. He has also been conspicuous in political 
life, having been a member of the South Carolina house of repre- 
sentatives from 1896 to 1902, speaker of the house from 1900 to 
1902, and mayor of Cheraw from 1894 to 1896. Mr. Stevenson 
is a member of the Presbyterian church and has been an elder 
in that church since 1888. He was moderator of the synod 
of South Carolina in 1900, being the first lay moderator ever 
appointed. Mr. Stevenson was president of the Democratic state 
executive convention in 1900 and was chairman of the legislative 
committee that investigated the penitentiary of South Carolina 
in 1899, an investigation which resulted in the discovery and 
exposure of great abuses. He is a member of the Beta Theta Pi 
college fraternity. He has always been a Democrat, and all his 
public services have been given to the furtherance of his party 
principles. 

On November 13, 1888, Mr. Stevenson married Mary E. 
Prince. 

His address is Cheraw, Chesterfield county, South Carolina. 



flKW 73*** 

TOBLIC LIBRARY 



CHARLES WIGHTMAN STOLL 

STOLE, CHARLES WIGHTMAN, lawyer, since 1904 
mayor of Kingstree, Williamsburg county, South Carolina, 
was born near Kingstree, on the 4th of February, 1867. 
His father, James C. Stoll, was a minister of the Gospel, active 
in the work of the South Carolina conference of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, and for four years presiding elder of 
the Florence district, a man who is remembered for his "high 
sense of honor, his purity of purpose and character, the spiritu- 
ality of his life, and his marked and intense love of reading." 
His ancestors were English and Scotch immigrants, who settled 
in Charleston and in Williamsburg county in colonial days. The 
family is identified with the history of Old Bethel church, on 
Calhoun street, Charleston, South Carolina ; and one of the small 
streets of Charleston carried the family name. His mother was 
Mrs. Mary (McCollough) Stoll. Her ancestors came from Scot- 
land with the body of Scotch-Irish settlers of old Williamsburg. 
They are related to and intermarried with the Jameses, Pressleys, 
Witherspoons and other historic families of Williamsburg. They 
were planters and slaveholders, and were noted for their family 
sense of honor and their patriotism. 

Of his boyhood Mr. Stoll writes: "I was an ordinary South 
Carolina boy, hearty, vigorous, full of fun and fond of outdoor 
sports, fishing being my favorite sport. My boyhood days were 
spent in town and country, after the fashion of a preacher's son. 
I was the wood-cutter, the cow-milker, the horse-feeder, the 
garden-worker and the errand-boy. I was taught to work with 
my hands. Difficulties which beset me were an aid to my educa- 
tion. My father lived in the country until I was fourteen, and 
my school days were passed there. When I entered a good town 
school, and was made to feel my backwardness, I determined to 
improve my opportunities, and I studied hard. At eighteen I 
was ready for college, but I could not attend college for want of 
funds. After losing two years, I finally entered Wofford college 
in the spring of 1887. 

"My father's assistance, and rigid economy on my part, 
allowed me to complete the course, and I was graduated in the 

Vol. II. S. C. 17. 



376 CHARLES WIGHTMAN STOLL, 

class of 1890 with the degree of A. B., with a creditable standing 
and some honors, having been president of one of the literary 
societies and winning the alumni science medal in my senior year. 
After graduation I taught in the city schools of Orangeburg. 
I was principal of the Orangeburg graded schools, and later 
of the Kingstree academy, as it was then called, and at other 
places, for several years, in the meantime taking the degree of 
A. M. from Wofford college with the view of making teaching 

O O O 

my profession. The school room proved to be too confining for 
my health, and I gave up teaching and began the study of law." 
In 1902, with his brother, P. H. Stoll, Esquire, he opened an 
office in Kingstree for the practice of his profession, having been 
admitted to the bar in 1901. 

In reply to the question, "What particularly determined you 
in the choice of your profession?" he writes: "The desire to be a 
useful and respected citizen to be something and to do some- 
thing." Whatever moral force marks his character, Mr. Stoll 
attributes to the influence of his home and his parents; and 
private study has steadily contributed to such success as he has 
attained in his profession. Throughout his life he has "tried to 
understand and to avoid the mistakes of others." 

Mr. Stoll is a lawyer by profession ; but he is also a banker, 
and he is practically interested in farming. He helped to organ- 
ize the Bank of Williamsburg, the largest banking house in 
Williamsburg county, and since 1906 he has been president of this 
bank. His law firm, Stoll & Stoll, acts as solicitors for the bank. 

At college he was a member of the Kappa Alpha fraternity. 
In politics he is a Democrat and has never swerved in his allegi- 
ance to that organization. He is identified with the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. Mr. Stoll has never married. 

He does not rely upon any particular form of sport or exer- 
cise for relaxation from business; but he writes: "When I tire 
of office work I go to my farm, and the change and the exercise 
always prove beneficial." 

The confidence and esteem felt by his fellow-citizens for Mr. 
Stoll have found expression in his election as mayor of Kingstree 
in 1903 to fill out an unexpired term, and in his reelection by a 
large majority in 1905 for the full term, in which he is still 
serving. As mayor, his administration has been marked by a 



CHARLES WIGHTMAN STOLL 377 

progressive and liberal policy, encouraging all the sound enter- 
prises which have been established at Kingstree. 

To the young people of South Carolina he offers these sen- 
tences for consideration: "Our country has the possibilities of a 
paradise, if they are properly used. What we need is honest 
work and honest economy, with the purpose to make men and not 
to make dollars. Money should be subservient to man, not man 
to money." 



CHARLES EDWARD SUMMER 

SUMMER, CHARLES EDWARD, merchant, was born in 
Lexington county, South Carolina, November 18, 1858. 
His parents were George W. and Martha D. Summer. 
His father was a farmer, who served in the Confederate army 
and died in a hospital in Virginia, July 13, 1862. His mother 
was a woman of exemplary life, who exerted a strong and benefi- 
cent influence upon the intellectual and moral nature of her son. 
His earliest known ancestors in this country came from Germany 
and settled in that part of Lexington county, South Carolina, 
which is now known as Dutch Fork. 

As a boy, Charles Summer was strong and active. He took 
a lively interest in the outdoor sports common in the country, in 
which his childhood was passed. He early evinced both a liking 
and an aptitude for agriculture and the performance of helpful 
duties around the farm in boyhood taught him lessons of perse- 
verance and endurance which have been of great benefit to him 
in later years. There were many difficulties in the way of his 
securing an education. It is well known that in the poverty- 
stricken condition of his state immediately after the war the 
country schools, which were the only ones he could attend, were 
of but indifferent character. Then, too, even in early youth, his 
time was mainly spent at work on his father's farm. Conse- 
quently he had but little leisure for study or for general reading. 
The Bible constituted the greater part of his own library, and 
there were but comparatively few books which he could borrow 
from his friends. Much as he desired a college education, circum- 
stances placed it entirely beyond his reach. 

The active work of life was begun in 1877, when, although 
but nineteen years of age, he engaged in farming in Lexington 
county. Here he remained until 1888, when, in quest of a larger 
field and in hope of securing a higher degree of success, he 
became a merchant in Newberry. He began business in a small 
way, but it rapidly grew in extent and importance until it became 
a conspicuous success. Meanwhile Mr. Summer was rapidly rising 
in public esteem. He had identified himself with the interests 
of the town and become prominent in its affairs. He is now a 



FOBL1C LlBMK 




CHARLES EDWARD SUMMER 381 

director in several business enterprises, including the Mollohon 
Manufacturing company, the Newberry Warehouse company, and 
the Newberry Land and Security company. He is vice-president 
of the two companies last named, and is secretary and treasurer 
of the Newberry Warehouse company. He has served two terms 
as alderman of Newberry, and since 1901 he has been a commis- 
sioner of public works. 

Mr. Summer was married, first, on January 1, 1877, to 
Leonora Sease, who died in 1884; and second, on January 2, 
1886, to her sister, Mary Jane Sease. Of the three children by 
the first marriage and six by the second, all except one are living 
in 1907. 

Always fond of outdoor life, Mr. Summer finds his principal 
relaxation in hunting and fishing. In politics he is a Democrat. 
His religious affiliation is with the Lutheran church, of which he 
is a prominent member. He believes in the practical virtues of 
industry and economy and in doing with one's might the task 
which falls to his lot. Temperance and fidelity to principle and 
to duty have been essential elements in his own life and are 
heartily commended to others. And as an important aid to 
substantial success he notes the habit of saving, which many 
successful men have found to be one of the first requisites to 
business prosperity. 

His address is Newberry, South Carolina. 



GEORGE WALTER SUMMER 

SUMMER, GEORGE WALTER, the son of George W. 
Summer and Martha D. Summer, was born at Lexington, 
Lexington county, South Carolina, July 15, 1861. As 
noted in the biography of his older brother, Charles E. Summer, 
his father was a farmer, who served in the Confederate army in 
the War between the States and died in a hospital in Virginia 
when George was but one year old. The family ancestors emi- 
grated to America from Germany about 1775, on the eve of the 
American Revolution. 

Young Summer enjoyed robust physical health as a child; 
he lived in the country and early developed an interest in labor- 
ing and saving for the future. To this habit much of his later 
success is no doubt due. 

The influence of his mother was particularly strong on the 
development of his intellectual, moral and spiritual life. His 
early educational advantages were meager, being limited to those 
afforded by the country schools; the opportunities of college 
training were also denied him. At the age of twenty-three he 
determined to enter upon a mercantile career; and in November, 
1884, he began, on his own responsibility, the serious work of life 
as a merchant at Newberry city. 

Mr. Summer has since been active in the business circles of 
his community, and has held the following offices: President of 
the Mollohon Manufacturing company; president of the New- 
berry Warehouse company; director in the Commercial Bank of 
Newberry ; director in the Southern Trust company, in Spartan- 
burg; director in the Security Loan and Investment company, 
Newberry ; trustee of the Newberry graded school. In the latter 
position he served about five years. Mr. Summer is also a master 
Mason, and belongs to the Newberry lodge of the Knights of 
Pythias. 

Mr. Summer has through life been a member of the party 
of Jefferson and Jackson; in religion he is a Lutheran. His 
favorite relaxation is the companionship of his family after the 
close of the labors of the day. The degree of his success has been 
to him a source of gratification and surprise. His advice to 








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PUBLI 



GEORGE WALTER SUMMER 385 

young men is to resolve to be something and to do something; 
and do it. Determination, perseverance and persistency are, in 
his judgment, cardinal virtues, and he believes that "in the bright 
lexicon of youth" there should be no such word as "fail." 

On October 13, 1881, he was married to Miss Polly L. Long. 
Of their ten children, seven are now (1907) living. His mother, 
and his two brothers, C. E. and J. H. Summer, are living. 

His address is Newberry, South Carolina. 



ANDREW JACKSON SPEARS THOMAS 

THOMAS, ANDREW JACKSON SPEARS, D. D., was 
born near Bennettsville, South Carolina, December 14, 
1852. He is the son of Rev. J. A. W. Thomas and Mar- 
garet (Spears) Thomas. His father was a prominent and useful 
minister of the Gospel widely known and abundantly loved and 
honored not only in the Palmetto State but throughout the South. 
He was a gallant soldier in the Confederate army, serving as 
captain of Company F in the Twenty-first South Carolina regi- 
ment of volunteers. He was a man of notable physical vigor, 
mental strength and clearness, devoted to duty, public-spirited, 
and patriotic. His active ministry continued for nearly fifty 
years in the county in which he was born and reared. The 
earliest known American ancestor of this Thomas family was 
Tristram Thomas, who was born in Wales about 1674. 

The early life of the subject of this sketch was spent on his 
father's farm in Marlboro county, South Carolina. Here he 
engaged in such tasks and recreations as a wholesome boy would 
naturally be expected to enjoy. Ploughing, hoeing, driving the 
wagon, chopping wood, and like homely duties, aided in the 
development of his physical powers. 

At an early age he attended the local schools at Bennettsville, 
and later took a college course at Furman university. Having 
decided to give his life to the work of preaching, he took a full 
course in the Southern Baptist Theological seminary, graduating 
therefrom in 1879. 

Doctor Thomas began his active work as a minister in Bates- 
burg, South Carolina, January 1, 1880. Since then he has held 
the following pastorates in the state and for the periods men- 
tioned: Batesburg, 1880-1883; First Baptist church, Charleston, 
1883-July, 1887; Orangeburg, July, 1887-May, 1891. In May, 
1891, he became part owner and editor of the "Baptist Courier," 
the organ of the Baptists of the state, and in this responsible 
post he still (1907) serves. 

Doctor Thomas has held during his long and active life only 
one public office, that of supervisor of the census in 1900 for the 



ANDREW JACKSON SPEARS THOMAS 387 

counties of Oconee, Greenville, Pickens, Spartanburg, Cherokee, 
and Laurens. 

As a minister, Doctor Thomas was acceptable and effective 
in all the fields he occupied, but his main work has been done 
during his editorial career, which has already extended over quite 
fifteen years. 

Under his guidance the "Baptist Courier" has been a strong, 
clean, fearless paper. Loyal to the doctrines and practices of the 
denomination for which it stands, it has at the same time been 
free from all rancor and bitterness toward those of different 
communions. In the many controversies through which it has 
passed it has preserved an unbroken and dignified freedom from 
offensive personalities. Published in one of the most intensely 
Southern of the states of the South, it has been in line with all 
that was best in the olden life and traditions of its people, but it 
has never encouraged, either by its publications or by its silence 
on public issues, the spirit of sectional hate. Its spirit has been 
both conservative and progressive. The marked ability with 
which the paper has been edited, the force of its editorials, and 
the skill with which its news has been gathered and served to 
the public, have given it standing and influence far beyond the 
confines of the state in which it is published. Behind the paper 
is always, whether it is named prominently or not, the person- 
ality of the editor. There is no such thing as impersonal jour- 
nalism. An impersonal journal is a mere bulletin. From what 
has been said of his paper a fair estimate of Doctor Thomas may 
be obtained as a man of robust convictions, fearless temper, 
kindly heart, a strong sense of personal dignity, wide and gener- 
ous sympathies. As a writer he is simple, lucid, direct, plain 
almost to a fault. He cares little for the graces of writing, has 
few fancies, but usually knows just what he wishes to say and 
says it without parleying and without circumlocution. 

In private life Doctor Thomas is companionable and has a 
host of devoted friends who are ready to defend him from attack 
or support him in his honorable ambitions. These ambitions, 
however, do not include any rewards for himself. He is best 
content when he is serving others. 

He reckons as the most influential force in shaping his life 
the lovely Christian home in which he was reared and in which 
the example and spirit of a singularly noble mother, rich in 



388 ANDREW JACKSON SPEARS THOMAS 

intellectual, moral and spiritual gifts, combined with the ripe 
wisdom and seasoned grace of his father to impress indelibly his 
youthful heart. 

Next to this was his life at school, which brought him into 
close contact with some rare and admirable men, who have helped 
to mold thousands of young men in the South, and, indeed, 
throughout the land. He himself acknowledges a large debt also 
to the men with whom he has come into association in his active 
life. 

Doctor Thomas was married August 21, 1877, to Miss Isabelle 
Roempke, daughter of Alfred and Jessie Robertson, of Charles- 
ton, South Carolina. Five children have been born to them, three 
of whom are now (1907) living. 

Doctor Thomas' address is Greenville, South Carolina. 



IHK 

HJBUC LIBRARY 



H.DKN FOUND ATIOWi 



WASHINGTON HODGES TIMMERMAN 

TIMMERMAN, WASHINGTON HODGES, M. D., 
physician, farmer, banker, and legislator, was born in 
Edgefield district (now county), South Carolina, May 
29, 1832. His parents were Ransom and Lydia (Bledsoe) Tim- 
merman. His father was a successful farmer, a man of sober, 
industrious and frugal habits, who, though his own education was 
limited, gave his children, eight in number, such advantages as 
could be obtained in the local schools. He also trained his sons 
to perform the various forms of labor incident to farm life. To 
the habits of industry thus formed in early life Doctor Timmer- 
man justly attributes much of the success which has attended his 
career. His mother was a woman of great worth, whose influence 
on the moral and spiritual life of her son has been felt throughout 
his long and useful life. The earliest known paternal ancestor 
of the family in this country was Jacob Timmerman, who came 
from Germany and settled in Newberry county, South Carolina, 
soon after the Revolutionary war. 

As a boy, the subject of this sketch, though not strong, 
enjoyed good health. He was of a rather serious turn of mind, 
with a fondness for books and a thirst for knowledge, which the 
lack of a well-stocked library gave him but limited means of 
gratifying. However, he always took a high stand in his classes 
at the "old field" schools which he attended, and was marked for 
his quiet, studious habits. He completed his academic studies at 
Hodge's institute, Greenwood, Abbeville district, South Carolina, 
leaving that institution in 1851, after being prepared to enter the 
sophomore class at South Carolina college. The following year, 
in accordance with his own preference and his father's wishes, he 
began the study of medicine under the preceptorship of the late 
Dr. John G. Williams, in the meanwhile teaching a country school 
in Edgefield district for about eight months. In the spring of 
1854 he was graduated at the Medical College of the State of 
South Carolina, Charleston, and in November of the same year 
he began the practice of his chosen profession in what is known 
as the Philippi section of Edgefield county. Here he pursued 
his vocation with gratifying success until 1873, with the exception 



392 WASHINGTON HODGES TIMMERMAN 

of an interim, during which he was engaged, with most of his 
fellow-citizens of the South, in fighting the battles of the Con- 
federacy in the War between the States. As a soldier he served 
with conspicuous courage and gallantry, and won the rank of a 
commissioned officer of the line, becoming first lieutenant and 
afterwards captain in Company K, Nineteenth South Carolina 
regiment. In July, 1862, he was compelled to give up military 
service on account of ill health, but entered military service again 
in 1864 as captain of Company B, Second regiment of state 
troops. 

Along with the practice of medicine, Doctor Timmerman con- 
ducted successful farming operations, and in 1884 he gave up the 
professional practice of medicine altogether. In 1882, through 
the solicitation of his friends and neighbors, Doctor Timmerman 
allowed himself to be voted for as a member of the South Caro- 
lina house of representatives and was elected by a highly com- 
plimentary vote. He served for two years, and in 1890 he was 
again elected to the same office without being a candidate, the 
only incident of such a character in the history of Edgefield 
county. In 1891, the state senator from that county having died, 
Doctor Timmerman resigned as a member of the house of repre- 
sentatives and became a successful candidate for the unexpired 
term in the senate. He was reflected for a full term as senator 
in 1892, and at the reorganization of the senate in that year he 
was made president pro tempore. Lieutenant-Governor Eugene 
B. Gary, having been elevated to an associate justiceship of the 
supreme court, resigned his position as lieutenant-governor at the 
close of the legislative session of 1893, and Doctor Timmerman 
succeeded to the vacancy. He was elected lieutenant-governor 
in 1894, and served in that capacity for two years. In 1895 he 
was a member of the constitutional convention, and in 1896 and 
again in 1898 he was elected state treasurer without opposition, 
serving as such for four years. In 1902 he was an unsuccessful 
candidate for governor. 

As a financier, Doctor Timmerman has been called upon, not 
only to act in the public capacity of state treasurer, but as a 
private citizen he has been the chief executive officer of several 
banks. He has been identified with the Farmers bank, of Edge- 
field, ever since its organization, and was its first president, a 
position in which he served without salary. He was for several 



WASHINGTON HODGES TIMMERMAN 393 

years connected with the Farmers and Mechanics bank, of Colum- 
bia, and when what is now known as the State bank of Columbia 
was organized he was made its president. He resigned that 
position in 1900, when he accepted the presidency of the First 
National bank, of Batesburg, which he held until 1905, when he 
assisted in organizing the Citizens bank, of Batesburg, of which 
he is now president. In party affiliation Doctor Timmerman has 
always been a Democrat. By denominational preference he is a 
Baptist, and has been prominent in the councils of that church, 
having acted as treasurer and moderator of the Edgefield Baptist 
association. 

Doctor Timmerman was married, first, in 1856, to Pauline 
F. T. Asbill, who died in 1873; and second, in May, 1879, to 
Henrietta Bell. Six children by the first marriage, and two by 
the second, were living in 1907. Of these, two are physicians and 
one is a lawyer who is now solicitor of the fifth judicial district 
of South Carolina. The wife and all the children are members 
of the Baptist church. 

In all the relations of life, public and private, Doctor Tim- 
merman has been guided by a high sense of duty and honor. He 
has always been mindful of the rights of others, and by his kindly 
interest, faithful service and fine example he has commanded the 
respect and won the esteem of a large circle of acquaintances and 
friends. His prominence in the affairs of his state has not been 
due to self-seeking, or to a desire for position or notoriety, but 
has resulted from the recognition of his merit as a man and a 
citizen by those with whom he has long associated and among 
whom he has lived. 



ARTHUR SMYLY TOMPKINS 

TOMPKINS, ARTHUR SMYLY, farmer and lawyer, of 
Edgefield, South Carolina, was born at Meeting Street 
postoffice, Edgefield county, South Carolina, March 31, 
1854. His father, DeWitt Clinton Tompkins, was a physician 
who served as magistrate in his county, and in the War between 
the States was captain of Company K, Fourteenth South Caro- 
lina regiment, a man who is remembered for his amiability and 
his conversational powers. His mother, Mrs. Hannah Virginia 
(Smyly) Tompkins, was a woman of exceptionally strong mind, 
of good business ability, and a strong Christian character, whose 
influence over her son has continued strong throughout his life. 
Her earliest known American ancestor was Colonel James Smyly, 
born in Ireland, who came to South Carolina about 1785. His 
father is descended from Captain Stephen Tompkins, who raised 
and commanded a company of cavalry in the Revolutionary war. 
His boyhood was passed in the country. Until thirteen he was 
robust and vigorous; but after that age his health was delicate. 
Even in early boyhood he was required to do some regular work 
on the farm. He says: "It hardened my muscles and gave me 
a tough constitution." While still a boy he became passionately 
fond of three books: the Bible, Shakespeare, and Virgil. He 
attended the country schools of Edgefield, and entering the South 
Carolina university at Columbia, he was graduated in 1872. 

His father had made easy for him the way to a liberal edu- 
cation, providing him with ample funds. After completing the 
undergraduate course at the University of South Carolina, he 
took a two-years' course in law at the law school of Columbia 
university, at Washington, District of Columbia. He then read 
law for a year in the office of Frank H. Miller, Esq., at Augusta, 
Georgia, where he was admitted to the bar, June 15, 1875. He 
opened a law ofiice the same summer in Augusta, Georgia, where 
he resided until 1876. In 1879 he settled in Edgefield, Edgefield 
county, where he has since divided his time and attention between 
the practice of law and farming. Of the occupations and expe- 
rience of a South Carolina lawyer in the rural districts, Mr. 
Tompkins gives his impressions in these words: "A lawyer in a 



ARTHUR SMYLY TOMPKIN8 395 

country town is a sort of waste-basket for all the petty ills and 
quarrels of the country around him, and must be a man of all 
sorts of capacities, who will not mind interruption ; he must often 
undertake the hard task of trying to explain to his client how he 
lost his case. But a country lawyer has a heap of leisure and a 
lot of fun." 

Mr. Tompkins was married, June 15, 1880, to Lizzie D. Hoi- 
stein, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Moses N. Holstein, of Ridge 
Spring, both of whom are still living in the house into which 
they moved when they were married fifty-four years ago. They 
have had several children, but during all this long period the 
family circle has not been broken by death. The father of Mrs. 
Holstein was Allen Dozier, a wealthy planter who was noted for 
his piety and whose home was near Big Creek, in what is now 
Saluda county. They have had nine children, of whom eight 
are living in 1907. Mr. Tompkins has contented himself with 
attempting to discharge the duties of a private citizen, and he 
has never held or aspired to hold any official position. In college 
he was a member of the Chi Psi fraternity. He is a Knight of 
Pythias and a Knight of Honor. In his church relations he is 
affiliated with the Baptists. He finds his favorite exercise in 
walking, swimming and hunting. 

He has all his life been very strongly impressed with the 
conviction that children should pass their lives until they are 
nearly twenty in the healthful surroundings of the country ; and 
during their years of schooling should be taught gardening, farm 
work, and other useful out-of-door occupations. He holds it 
"self-evident that the city is no place for a boy." He advocates 
systematized efforts, on the part of parents who live in cities, to 
organize schools for their little ones in country places, and even 
at the cost of separating children from their parents, he advises 
the training of all city children in country schools. 



CHARLES PINGKNEY TOWNSEND 

TOWNSEND, CHARLES PINCKNEY, lawyer, legislator, 
jurist, was born in Bennettsville, Marlboro county, South 
Carolina, July 1, 1835, son of Mekin and Rachel J. 
(Pearson) Townsend. He is descended from a long line of 
American ancestors of English and Welsh blood on the paternal 
and maternal sides of his family, respectively. His paternal 
grandfather was Jabesh N. Townsend, who married Elizabeth 
Spears. His maternal grandfather, Lamb Pearson, married Miss 
Mary David. Moses Pearson, his great-grandfather, was an 
officer in the War of the Revolution, and subsequently served as 
county judge. 

Mekin Townsend, father of Charles P. Townsend, was a 
prosperous merchant, characterized by good judgment, great 
energy and commendable foresight. He was the owner of the 
Marlboro factory, located near Bennettsville, the first cotton fac- 
tory of consequence in the state of South Carolina, which unfor- 
tunately was burned about the time of his death and never rebuilt. 
It was operated by water power, and its output attained large 
proportions. In the year 1838 he was elected sheriff of Marlboro 
county, and died in December, 1852, at the early age of forty-five 
years. 

Charles P. Townsend inherited a robust constitution and was 
reared amid exceptionally wholesome surroundings. His mother 
wielded a strong influence on his moral and spiritual nature, and 
his father early inculcated habits of industry. Up to the age of 
sixteen his time was divided between going to school and clerking 
in his father's store. While still a clerk in his father's employ,, 
his desire for a more complete education was stirred by a Fourth 
of July address delivered by a graduate of South Carolina college 
in his native town, and he determined, if possible, to secure it. 
His father being at the time in far from affluent circumstances, 
approved his wish, but was unable to help him. He succeeded, 
however, in negotiating a loan from Colonel W. T. Ellerbe, an 
opulent and public-spirited citizen, to further his ends, which he 
paid back by teaching school. With the money thus secured he 
entered Bennettsville Male academy, and subsequently South 



CHARLES PINCKNEY TOWNSEND 397 

Carolina college, from which he received the degree of A. M. in 
1854. During this period, and, indeed, throughout his entire 
career, he read widely in general literature, and the works of 
Shakespeare, Plutarch, Rollin, Gibbon, Hume, and, above all, the 
Bible, became his companions and inspiration. 

Mr. Townsend read law in the office of C. A. Thornwell, 
Esquire, of Bennettsville, and was admitted to practice before 
the old court of appeals of South Carolina in 1858. In the same 
year he opened an office in Bennettsville, and for almost half a 
century he has been a prominent representative of the South 
Carolina bar and the recipient of many public honors. 

Previously, however, in 1856, after his graduation from col- 
lege, and while teaching school in Clarendon county, the South 
called for volunteers to go to Kansas in an endeavor to create a 
slave state out of that commonwealth. In companionship with 
Colonel Wilkes, John Buchanan and others, Mr. Townsend joined 
in the movement. After the futility of attempting this object 
had been demonstrated, he remained at Leavenworth, Kansas, 
and was admitted to the bar, but was soon after compelled to 
return home on account of sickness. 

In 1858, and following, Mr Townsend served three terms as 
a member of the general assembly of South Carolina ; from 1865 
to 1868 he was commissioner in equity for Marlboro county ; from 
1872 to 1878 he was circuit judge for South Carolina; from 1872 
to 1877, was assistant attorney-general of the state; and from 
1900 to 1904, was assistant United States district attorney for 
South Carolina. During the War between the States he served 
four years in the Confederate army, and was mustered out of 
the service as captain of Company G, Eighth South Carolina 
regiment. 

For more than forty years he has been a member of Marlboro 
lodge, A. F. M., Number 88. Politically he is a stanch Democrat 
and has taken an active and influential part in state politics. In 
religion he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Townsend's career is illustrative of the steady rise of a 
young man from comparative obscurity to a place of honor and 
distinction in the state. His ambition in early life was to become 
a good and successful lawyer, and the numerous recognitions that 
have come to him at the hands of the people attest in an emphatic 
way his ability and capabilities. In many respects he is a good 



Vol. II. S. C. 18. 



398 CHARLES PINCKNEY TOWNSEND 

living example of his own philosophy that "unflinching honesty, 
incessant work and study, sound ideals, and unvarying fidelity to 
moral and exemplary habits," will, if persevered in, lead to a 
higher order of success in life. 

He has been twice married: First, on October 1, 1860, to 
Amanda McConnel, daughter of Andrew and Mary McConnel, 
of Columbia, South Carolina; second, on October 16, 1887, to 
Nannie Henley, daughter of Stephen Henley and Eleanor Henley, 
of Chatham county, North Carolina. By his first marriage he had 
eight children ; by his second marriage three children, Charles P., 
William B., and Eleanor. 

His address is Bennettsville, South Carolina. 



WILLIAM HAY TOWNSEND 

TOWNSEND, WILLIAM HAY, lawyer, was born January 
9, 1868, in Barnwell, Barnwell county, South Carolina. 
His father, William Hutson Townsend, lawyer and insur- 
ance agent, who died at the early age of thirty-one, was a man 
of fine business capacity; his mother, Harriet Ford (Hay) Town- 
send, a woman of high intellectual attainments, was naturally 
everything in his life, she molded his character, nourished his 
budding intellect, and encouraged and spurred his ambition. His 
blood is English, Scotch and Irish ; one of his double great-grand- 
fathers, Reverend William Hutson, was pastor of the Circular 
church, in Charleston, South Carolina, prior to the War of the 
Revolution; another, Colonel Ami Hawks Hay, of Westchester 
county, New York, was commander of the Fourth regiment West- 
Chester militia in the War of the Revolution, and his grandfather, 
Colonel Frederick Hay, removed from New York to Barnwell 
county, South Carolina, soon after the Revolution. Other ances- 
tors, from England, Scotland and Ireland, were in New York, 
Virginia and South Carolina prior to the Revolution. 

His early life was passed in the village of Barnwell and the 
town of Aiken. As a boy he was studious, and especially fond 
of history. He received his academic education in the local 
schools and by private tutors. At the age of eighteen, lacking 
the means to go to college, he began to read law in the office of 
Hon. James Aldrich, a lawyer of high standing, and studied so 
faithfully that, in 1889, when he was admitted to the bar, not 
long after his twenty-first birthday, he was better qualified to 
practice than many men with diplomas from colleges and law 
schools. His whole heart was in his work, and, with confidence 
in his ability to do so, he determined to win success in the profes- 
sion he had chosen, solely because it was his personal preference. 
Immediately following his admission to the bar he formed a 
copartnership with Colonel William Elliott and began the prac- 
tice of law in Beaufort, South Carolina, remaining there and 
steadily growing in repute as a lawyer, until 1894, when he 
removed to Barnwell. He was solicitor of the second judicial 
circuit, 1898-1900; and code commissioner of South Carolina, 



400 WILLIAM HAT TOWNSEND 

1900-1903, during which period he compiled and edited the "Code 
of Laws of South Carolina," published 1902. Since 1903, when 
he accepted the position of assistant attorney-general of South 
Carolina, which was tendered him solely on his professional merit, 
he has resided in Columbia and has continued to gain in profes- 
sional reputation. 

His career is a striking illustration of what a young man 
with sufficient pluck and industry and fixedness of purpose can 
do for himself. He is a member of the Presbyterian church. 
In 1895 he was elected elder of the Barnwell church. In politics 
he is, and has always been, a Democrat. 

His address is 915 Barnwell street, Columbia, South Carolina. 



MILTON PYLES TRIBBLE 

T KIBBLE, MILTON PYLES, farmer and legislator, was 
born in Laurens county, South Carolina, August 27, 1840. 
His parents were John Allen and Susan Elizabeth (Pyles) 
Tribble. His father was a farmer, an energetic and industrious 
man, of stern appearance, but indulgent to his children. The first 
paternal ancestor to settle in this country was Ezekiel Tribble, 
of Scotch-Irish blood, who came from Ireland, located in Vir- 
ginia, and about 1790 removed to South Carolina. The mother 
of the subject of this sketch was descended from Doctor Abner 
Pyles, of French Huguenot extraction. 

In childhood and youth Milton Tribble lived in the country. 
He was healthy and strong and was fond of outdoor life and 
work. One of his special tastes was the care of domestic animals. 
He attended the "old field" schools for a while, but was not able 
to enter any higher institution of learning. At a comparatively 
early age he had to take his place as a regular farm hand. This 
work gave him physical vigor, and he improved his mind by 
observation of natural phenomena and by reading after the work 
of the day was done. He was especially interested in historical 
literature, and the information obtained therefrom, with the 
mental discipline which came with its acquirement, proved of 
great benefit to him in later years. In April, 1861, in response to 
the first call for volunteers in the War between the States, he 
enlisted in an infantry regiment. In the following year he was 
transferred to a cavalry regiment and served as a scout until the 
surrender at Appomattox. Soon after the close of the war he 
removed to Anderson county and commenced the active work of 
life as a farmer. This business he carried on without interruption 
until 1876, when the peaceful revolution, known as the "Hampton 
Movement," for the purpose of redeeming the state from carpet- 
bag and negro rule, was started. Mr. Tribble was so popular in 
the community in which he lived that he was elected colonel of a 
"red-shirt" regiment, a volunteer organization that extended over 
the state and contributed greatly to the success of the movement. 
His course in this matter was so efficient as to greatly increase his 
popularity, and in 1880 he was elected treasurer of the county. 



402 MILTON PYLES TRIBBLE 

At the end of his term of two years he was reflected and served 
until 1884, in which year he was elected clerk of the court of 
common pleas and general sessions for Anderson county. This 
office he held for two terms until 1892. Two years later he was 
appointed postmaster of the city of Anderson and served until 
1898. In 1902 he became a member of the state legislature, and 
was reflected in 1904. The editor of a prominent newspaper in 
the state, writing of "two stalwart members" of the legislature 
whom he describes as "a little gray with years creeping on, who 
belong to that fast disappearing generation that may never be 
equalled for noble virtues, perhaps, and who bring to mind the 
proudest days of South Carolina," said : "One of these is a Lau- 
rens man, native to the manner born, and though he represents 
Anderson now, Laurens has a right to be proud of him and is 
proud of him. His name is M. P. Tribble 'Mit' Tribble, his old 
friends call him. He was a soldier of gallantry, he was a Demo- 
crat when it cost most to be a Democrat, and he is and always 
has been a man every inch of him." 

Of the various influences which have helped him greatly in 
preparing for and carrying on the work of life, he names as most 
important the example and teaching of his mother and contact 
with men in active life. The occupation of his early manhood 
was determined by circumstances beyond his control. The first 
strong impulse to strive for the prizes of life came to him during 
the war, when he felt a desire to be "something more than a 
drone." After the close of the war this impulse was strengthened 
by the awakening of an ambition to win regard as an honorable 
man. He has never taken a course of physical culture, and from 
his observation that "boys who went to school and took life easy 
stood service in the army better than those who had to work 
regularly," he infers that such courses are unnecessary. In reply 
to a request that if any partial failure had been made he would,, 
for the benefit of his readers, state the cause of the same, he says 
that he had "too much confidence and trust in other people by 
which I lost all the accumulations of my labor in life." And in 
response to a request for suggestions which may help young 
people to attain true success in life, he says: "Guard against 
associations with such as will give you no credit and from whom 
you can secure no benefit." 



MILTON PTLES TRIBBLE 403 

On October 28, 1868, Mr. Tribble was married to Mary Eliza- 
beth Young. Of their six children, three are living in 1907. 

Mr. Tribble is a prominent member of the Baptist church, 
but is friendly toward other denominations, and is interested in 
every good work. He has served his country faithfully in war 
and peace and has richly deserved the honors which have been 
awarded him. In his quiet home he enjoys the society of his 
family and friends, and he has the esteem of a large number of 
acquaintances throughout the state. 

He resides at 321 Fant street, Anderson, South Carolina. 



JOHN DAVID VERNER 

VERNER, JOHN DAVID, was born July 12, 1844, at 
Retreat, Oconee county, South Carolina. He was the 
son of Samuel Johnson and Malinda Crawford Verner. 
His father was a farmer, and for a time served on the board of 
county commissioners. Samuel Johnson Verner was a man of 
strong will-power, yet at the same time marked by liberality. 
He was a great church worker, industrious, economical, and a 
man of unusual strength of character. 

His earliest known ancestor in America was John Verner, 
Sr., of Pennsylvania, who in the middle of the eighteenth century 
moved to Abbeville county, South Carolina. John Verner, Jr., 
was a soldier in the Revolutionary army, and, for the remarkably 
long period extending from 1787 to 1853, was a magistrate. 

John David Verner was strong and vigorous in youth; he 
was interested in stock raising, agriculture, and farm work in 
general. His early life was passed in the country and on a farm 
near Retreat, South Carolina. His life made it possible for him 
to receive effective instruction in business and training in the 
habits of industry and economy. The strongest of the influences 
affecting his early life was that of his mother, which, in things 
both of mind and heart, was potent. His education was inter- 
rupted when he was but seventeen years of age by his call to the 
army. Afterward he found it possible to attend Retreat academy. 
The end of the war, however, left him in such circumstances that 
it was necessary for him to put forth every effort to provide 
means to educate and support five brothers and sisters, and to 
support his mother. He first began work on the farm. His incli- 
nations, however, drew him toward merchandising, upon which 
he first entered in Walhalla, South Carolina, in 1871. Afterward 
he became connected with the banking business at the same place. 
In addition, he has been intendant, warden, and mayor of the 
town of Walhalla for a number of years ; president of the board 
of trustees of Adger college, Walhalla, South Carolina, for the 
five years from 1895 to 1900; president of the Walhalla Cotton 
mill, and, for a time, president of the Bank of Walhalla. 



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JOHN DAVID VERNER 407 

He is a member of the Knights of Honor, Walhalla lodge, 
in which order he has held the rank of dictator. He is a member 
of the Knights of Pythias, and of the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. He has also been a representative in the grand lodge 
of the Knights of Honor. 

Politically, he has through life been a Democrat. Relief 
from the confinement of his urban life he finds in looking after 
his farms. 

On January 2, 1872, he married Mary J. Lovinggood. Of 
this marriage seven children have been born, six of whom three 
sons and three daughters are now (1907) living. 

His address is Walhalla, Oconee county, South Carolina. 



JOSEPH GEORGE WARDLAW 

WARD LAW, JOSEPH GEORGE, financier, and 
manufacturer, was born April 4, 1859, in Abbeville, 
Abbeville county, South Carolina. His father, Joseph 
James Wardlaw, M. D., physician and surgeon, member of the 
state legislature, 1858-59, and of various state conventions, was 
noted for courtesy, intelligence and integrity; his mother, Mary 
Ann (Witherspoon) Wardlaw, a refined and highly cultured 
woman, was, jointly with his father, the most potent influence on 
all sides of his life. 

His blood is Scotch, and his ancestry carries many distin- 
guished names, among them, on the paternal side, Sir Henry 
Wardlaw, archbishop of St. Andrew's and founder of the Uni- 
versity of St. Andrew's, Scotland, and Reverend Ralph Wardlaw, 
D. D., a famous Scotch preacher; on the maternal side it can be 
traced back to King Robert, "The Bruce," and one of the family 
married a granddaughter of John Knox, the famous reformer 
and Presbyterian; the maternal great-grandfather, James With- 
erspoon, was a captain in the Revolutionary war. The founder 
of the American family, on the paternal side, Robert Wardlaw, 
born about 1675 in Scotland, came to America about 1725. His 
son William settled in Virginia, near Alexandria, and his son 
Hugh moved to Abbeville county, South Carolina, was captain in 
the War of the Revolution, judge of the county court of Abbe- 
ville, 1797-1800, and died in 1802. His son James (grandfather 
of the subject of this sketch) was for forty years clerk of the 
county court of Abbeville, and he and his son held one ecclesi- 
astical office for ninety-five years. On the maternal side, the 
American founder, John Witherspoon, born in 1670 in Scotland, 
moved to County Down, Ireland, 1695, came to South Carolina, 
1734, and settled in Kingstree, Williamsburg county, where he died 
in 1737. His double great-grandfather, Major Robert Crawford, 
of the Waxhaws, Lancaster county, South Carolina, equipped a 
company for service in the War of the Revolution at his own 
expense, commanded a brigade in the battle of Hanging Rock, and 
was especially commended by General Marion for gallantry and 
faithfulness ; his grandfather, Colonel James H. Witherspoon, of 





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JOSEPH GEORGE WARDLAW 411 

Lancaster county, was lieutenant-governor of South Carolina, 
1826, and in 1842, at the time of his death, candidate for congress 
and his election almost assured. 

Joseph G. Wardlaw spent his early life in the village in 
which he was born. He was robust, loved all kinds of athletic 
sports, and had a strong taste for biography and history. He 
had no home tasks involving manual labor, and regretted it later 
in life, when experience had caused him to believe that every boy 
should have them as a part of his training. He was educated 
in the excellent private schools in Abbeville, and in the King's 
Mountain Military school, Yorkville, South Carolina, where he 
completed the junior course in 1879. The death of his father and 
loss of means somewhat disarranged his educational plans. He 
read a course of medicine; also some law, but abandoned the idea 
of practicing either, and, partly from personal preference and 
partly from force of circumstances, entered upon a business 
career. He was bookkeeper for Hunter & Gates, Yorkville, July, 
1879, to October, 1883; head accountant and paymaster of the 
Clifton Manufacturing company, Clifton, South Carolina, Octo- 
ber, 1883, to December, 1894; secretary of the Gaffney Manu- 
facturing company, Gaffney, January, 1895, to September, 1904, 
and of the Orient Manufacturing company, Charlotte, North 
Carolina, January, 1900, to September, 1904, and was vice-presi- 
dent of the Cowpens Manufacturing company and of the Gaffney 
Building and Loan association for several years. Since 1897 he 
has been vice-president of the Gaffney National bank; from 
December, 1904, to October, 1905, president of the Orient Manu- 
facturing company, Charlotte, North Carolina, and since April, 
1905, president of the York Cotton mills, Yorkville, South Caro- 
lina. 

He modestly declares that he has "failed to accomplish 
much," but the dates in the record of his career show that there 
has been steady progress and accomplishment; there have been 
no spectacular bounds up the ladder of success, such as men are 
sometimes enabled to make by a combination of fortuitous circum- 
stances. From the bookkeeper's desk to the leading position he 
now holds in the highest financial and manufacturing circles of 
his own and the adjoining state he has gone step by step, and 
owes his rise to hard work and intelligent comprehension of all 
duties entrusted to him in other words, to personal merit. He 



412 JOSEPH GEORGE WARDLAW 

has only applied the principles of true success which he once 
suggested for the benefit of young men, "hard work, persistence, 
and reliability," and he has been duly rewarded. 

The taste for military affairs he acquired in school has always 
been retained. He has served in the state militia for about 
twenty-five years, filling every position from corporal to colonel, 
and still finds his most enjoyable recreation in military exercises. 
He commanded a regiment during the riots in Darlington in 1894, 
and was highly commended for the speedy manner in which he 
brought order out of the ugly situation that confronted him when 
he arrived with the troops. 

From 1888 to 1895, in addition to his private business duties, 
he was trial justice in Clifton; chairman of the board of school 
trustees, and for two years, 1890-92, chairman of a Democratic 
political club. Since 1900 he has been an elder in the Presby- 
terian church, and in 1902 was a commissioner to the general 
assembly. He was president of the Gaffney Library association, 
is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and has been chancellor 
commander and member of the grand lodge, and is a member and 
has been commandant of a camp of United Sons of Confederate 
veterans. 

He thinks the strong influences in his life have been, in the 
order named, home, early companionship and environment, and 
contact with noted good and prominent men and relatives in 
Abbeville; that natural aspiration and pride gave him his first 
strong impulse to strive for success, and that the books most 
helpful in fitting him for his career were histories and those per- 
taining to manufacturing, though his medical and legal reading 
was of service in broadening his mind and his outlook. 

On May 23, 1893, he married Sallie F. Carroll, of Aiken, 
South Carolina; and on December 20, 1900, Emmie D. Sams, 
daughter of Professor E. O. Sams, of Gaffney, South Carolina, 
who died in 1906. Of their two children, one, Joseph George, 
Jr., is now (1907) living. 

The address of Mr. Wardlaw is Yorkville, York county. 
South Carolina. 



HENRY HITT WATKINS 

W ATKINS, HENRY HITT, lawyer, was born in 
Waterloo township, Laurens county, South Carolina, 
June 24, 1866. His parents were Henry H. and Han- 
nah Elizabeth (Culbertson) Watkins. His father was a farmer 
who was noted for his liberality, hospitality, his enjoyment of 
argumentative discussions, and his pride in and self-sacrifice for 
his children. He was a man of powerful physique and great 
strength of character. He never held or sought a public office, 
but served as captain of a militia company before the war and 
was a lieutenant in the Confederate States army during the con- 
flict between the states. The earliest known paternal ancestor of 
the family in this country came from Wales and settled in Vir- 
ginia sometime prior to the Revolution. His descendants, with a 
company of Scotch-Irish settlers from that region, removed to 
Laurens county, South Carolina. On the maternal side, the first 
ancestor in America was Robert Culbertson, who came from 
Ireland and settled in Pennsylvania several years before the 
Revolution. His son, James Culbertson, removed to Caswell 
county, North Carolina, and thence to Laurens county, South 
Carolina, where he remained until his death. Neither these 
immigrants nor the majority of their descendants were specially 
prominent in public affairs, but they were well represented in the 
Revolution and in the War between the States. 

In childhood and youth Henry Watkins lived in the country. 
His health was fairly good. While he was fond of athletic sports 
and of youthful companionship, he was also deeply interested in 
reading and study. He did his share of the farm "chores," but 
was neither required nor allowed to perform any work that would 
interfere with his studies. From 1873 to 1879 he attended the 
"old field" school at Centerville, Laurens countv, South Carolina. 

*/ J 

In October of the year last named he entered Furman university, 
from which institution he was graduated with the degree of 
A. M. in June, 1883. He was then only seventeen years of age. 
His love of books led him to take the four-years' course of study 
marked out by the Chautauqua Literary and Scientific circle, 
which he completed in due time and from which he derived 



414 HENRY HITT WATKINS 

considerable benefit. In 1890 he took the summer law course in 
the University of Virginia, under Dr. John B. Minor. Long 
before he completed his public educational course Mr. Watkins 
entered upon the active work of life. At the early age of fifteen 
he took the county school teachers' examination and received a 
first grade certificate. For two summers prior to his graduation 
he was assistant teacher in a country school and afterward taught 
for several sessions as principal of such schools. In 1887 he was 
elected principal of the preparatory school of Furman university, 
which position he held for four sessions. He was admitted to 
the bar in May, 1892, and in June of the same year he began 
active practice at Anderson, South Carolina, where he had formed 
a law partnership with Major E. B. Murray. This partnership 
continued until the death of Major Murray, in July, 1894. In 
the following month Mr. Watkins formed a partnership with 
Gen. M. L. Bonham, under the firm name of Bonham & Watkins, 
which has continued until the present time and which is one of 
the leading law firms in the state. Mr. Watkins has always 
maintained his interest in education and has served as trustee of 
several institutions of learning, including Furman university, 
1894-98; Greenville Female college, 1893-98; Anderson graded 
schools, 1895-98; and he was a trustee of the Connie Maxwell 
orphanage, 1897-98. When in 1898 there was a call for troops 
to serve in the Spanish- American war, Mr. Watkins promptly 
enlisted in a company raised at Anderson, and was elected its 
captain. This company formed a part of the First regiment, 
South Carolina volunteer infantry. Its services were not required 
and it was mustered out in the November following its organiza- 
tion. In politics Mr. Watkins has always been a Democrat. He 
was chairman of the Anderson county executive committee of his 
party from 1902 to 1906, and is now (1907) a member of the 
state executive committee. He was presidential elector in 1904, 
and from 1903 to 1907 was quartermaster-general on the staff 
of Governor Heyward. He is one of the directors and vice- 
presidents of the chamber of commerce of Anderson, and is a 
member of the board of directors of several business and financial 
institutions. 

He is a Mason and a member of the Knights of Pythias. 
While friendly to all denominations, his religious connection is 
with the Baptist church. On December 27, 1892, he married 



HENRY HITT WATKINS 415 

Maude Wakefield, of Anderson county, South Carolina, and she 
has been the chief source of inspiration in his work. In esti- 
mating the relative strength of various means which have been 
specially helpful in his effort to win success, he places first that 
of home and states that both his father and mother exerted a 
powerful influence on his intellectual, moral and spiritual life. 
Next, in the order named, he places school, private study, contact 
with men in active life, and early companionship. Earnest pur- 
pose and diligent application have given him a high position at 
the bar. His wisdom and foresight give weight to his political 
counsel, while his unblemished character gives him the confidence 
and regard of the people among whom he lives. 
His address is Anderson, South Carolina. 



EBBIE JULIAN WATSON 

WATSON, EBBIE JULIAN, commissioner of agricul- 
ture, commerce and immigration of the state of South 
Carolina, was born at Ridge Spring, Edgefield (now 
Saluda) county, South Carolina, June 29, 1869. His parents were 
Tilman and Helen O'Neall (Mauldin) Watson. His father was 
an architect and builder, a resourceful, energetic, and public- 
spirited man, who gave most of his time to his business interests, 
but who served a number of terms as alderman of the city of 
Columbia, South Carolina. The paternal ancestors were Scotch- 
Irish and were among the earliest settlers in America. Several 
brothers came to Virginia, but one of them soon removed to 
South Carolina. Colonel Michael Watson, a great-grandfather 
of the subject of this sketch, distinguished himself and lost his 
life in the battle of Orangeburg, in the War of the Revolution. 
From early times the family has been identified with the history 
of Edgefield county. The maternal ancestry directly descended 
from the famous McHardy family, of Scotland and England, 
whose record is identified with the history of Great Britain since 
1346. Captain McHardy, who commanded the British ship "Vic- 
tory," and to whom Lord Nelson issued his oft-quoted dying 
message, was a direct ancestor of the grandmother of Ebbie J. 
Watson. 

Until he was six years of age the subject of this sketch lived 
in the country. His parents then moved to the city of Columbia, 
where the remainder of his early days were passed. His health 
was good, but in early childhood an accident caused a permanent 
lameness, which has been something of a handicap since. His 
special tastes were for reading, working with machinery, tilling 
the land and taking care of domestic animals. He was constantly 
searching for knowledge in various and diverse fields. His early 
education was obtained in schools at Columbia, the Columbia 
Military academy, and the Barnwell high school. In 1884 he 
entered the University of South Carolina and was graduated with 
the degree of A. B. in 1889. 

He commenced the active work of life in the field of jour- 
nalism, in which he made a marked success. Offered the position 




- 




EBBIE JULIAN WATSON 419 

of city editor of the Columbia, South Carolina, "Evening Record," 
he accepted at once. He remained with this paper until February 
18, 1891, when he resigned in order to take a similar position on 
the Columbia "State." In January, 1903, he became news editor 
of that paper a position which he filled during the Spanish- 
American war. 

In October, 1902, he was, without solicitation, elected secre- 
tary of the chamber of commerce of Columbia, which office, with 
his newspaper position, he held until March 15, 1904, when he 
resigned them both in order to accept an unsolicited appointment 
to the office of state commissioner of agriculture, commerce and 
immigration, which position he still holds. In January, 1906, he 
was offered the secretaryship of the chamber of commerce of 
Augusta, Georgia, with about double the salary he was receiving; 
but he declined the offer, preferring to work for the interests of 
his city and state. From 1899-1903 he served as lieutenant-colonel 
on the staff of the governor of South Carolina. For some years 
he has been a member of the Columbia city board of health, 
rendering efficient service. 

For several years there has been a growing demand for more 
factory hands and tillers of the soil in the rapidly developing 
Southern states, and much attention has been given to the problem 
of providing a proper distribution of immigration to prevent a 
congestion of the newly arriving immigrants at the great ports 
of entry. The South Atlantic states have called for a trans- 
Atlantic steamship service providing for direct export and import 
trade between the producing South Atlantic states and the mar- 
kets of the world. After carefully studying the problems 
involved, in all their phases, Commissioner Watson sailed for 
Europe in August, 1906, and immediately opened offices on behalf 
of the state of South Carolina in several foreign countries, begin- 
ning an active campaign to secure passengers enough to bring a 
standard-line steamship direct into Charleston harbor, the central 
harbor of the South Atlantic coast. He pursued the policy of 
carefully examining the prospective immigrants, at their own 
homes in Europe, to determine their fitness for the work for 
which they were wanted a policy several times hinted at as a 
possibility, but which no one had before dared to attempt to put 
into execution. In pursuance of this policy, it was necessary to 
get the sanction of foreign governments and the aid of the Fed- 

Vol. II. S. C. 19. 



420 EBBIE JULIAN WATSON 

eral consular service. He succeeded in getting the North German 
Lloyd Steamship company, of Bremen, interested in the plan; 
and on October 16, 1906, he sailed with five hundred immigrants 
from the continental countries direct to Charleston harbor on the 
steamship Wittekind. He had used the right granted the state 
under Federal laws to prepay passages; and when on November 
4th he sailed into Charleston harbor the United States Commis- 
sioner-General of Immigration Sargent, United States Labor 
Commissioner Neill, and many other United States officials, were 
on the dock to inspect the immigrants. Thousands of people 
were there to welcome them, committees and delegations coming 
from other Southern states. The United States authorities pro- 
nounced the people one of the best looking bodies of immigrants 
ever brought into this country on one ship. 

At once the question was raised whether the state had the 
right to prepay their passage, although the United States state 
department had already so construed the law. A case was made 
up, and it went to Secretary Straus, who decided in favor of 
the state. His decision was hailed as marking an epoch in the 
history of the United States the establishment of a movement 
that promised a solution of the problem that was hampering the 
South, and help in solving the general problem of congested 
immigration at Eastern ports. Certain interests, however, were 
not satisfied that the states should have this right, and a contest 
was started in congress, which ended, in the closing hours of the 
session, in the passage of the "1907 Immigration Act." 

In the meantime the country at large was kept continually 
astir over the matter, and a national commission was provided 
for, and was sent abroad, thoroughly to investigate the immigra- 
tion and labor problems, and to recommend to the next congress 
such changes as would relieve the situation by a better distribution 
of immigrants. There has been no attempt to test the prepaid- 
passage issue, under the new act. Immediately after congress 
adjourned (having provided, as a result of this agitation, an 
appropriation of seventy thousand dollars for the erection of an 
immigration station at the port of Charleston, making that port 
the port of entry for immigration for the South Atlantic states), 
Mr. Watson returned to Europe for the purpose of getting a 
permanent trans- Atlantic service inaugurated between European 



EBBIE JULIAN WATSON 421 

ports and Charleston, and organizing more effective work for 
selected immigration to the Southern states. 

In his determined efforts to draw desirable immigration to 
the South, Commissioner Watson has from the first held it abso- 
lute^ necessary that what he calls a "foundation" should be 
carefully established by selecting and building up in the Southern 
states the necessary nucleus of "satisfied people" immigrants 
who have found satisfactory labor and wages and comfortable 
homes in the Southern states, who will write to their relatives 
and friends in Europe letters which will bring a steady flow of 
interested immigrants into the Southern states. The body of 
immigrants which he himself carefully selected in Europe and 
brought to Charleston upon the "Wittekind," on November 4, 

1906, was designed to be the beginning of such a foundation ; and 
the same steamship brought into Charleston harbor, in February, 

1907, a second load of carefully selected immigrants. Commis- 
sioner Watson was the only American on the ship ; and the incep- 
tion and carrying out of the plan has been almost exclusively the 
result of his intelligent interest and determined energy. Soon 
after his return in 1906 he was unanimously elected president of 
the Southern States Association of Commissioners of Agriculture, 
and, by special invitation, addressed the American Manufacturers 
association, in May, 1907, at their annual meeting in Philadelphia, 
on the subject of immigration. Notwithstanding the difficulties 
which have been met in attempting to adjust congressional legis- 
lation to the plan for choosing and managing by a state commis- 
sioner direct immigration from Europe to one of the United 
States, it now looks as if the work begun in 1906 by Mr. Watson 
would result in the opening up of the South Atlantic states to 
lines of immigration and of freight and passenger service direct 
from European ports. While this tends to relieve congestion in 
the great centers of population, it will send desirable immigrants 
in considerable numbers to the agricultural districts of the coun- 
try, where they are so greatly needed. 

In much of his work for the state Mr. Watson has been a 
pioneer. He has been instrumental in bringing a large amount 
of industrial capital into the state, and in leading a large number 
of desirable immigrants to settle within its borders. It was 
largely owing to his efforts that the Congaree river was opened 
to navigation ; and he has done much to advance the agricultural, 



422 EBBIE JULIAN WATSON 

industrial and commercial interests of the state. He is vice- 
president and member of the executive committee of the Interstate 
Sugarcane Growers' association; vice-president of the Southern 
Industrial parliament and a member of the department of immi- 
gration of the National Civic federation. He is an honorary 
member of the historic South Carolina Agricultural society. 

His work, from the beginning of his journalistic career, has 
brought him into contact with successful men, many of them older 
than himself, and he has learned many useful lessons by study- 
ing their characteristics. The self-sacrifice and devotion of his 
mother in encouraging and aiding him to obtain an education has 
been a great help and inspiration in his life. He is author of a 
number of monographs, chiefly on agricultural and industrial 
topics, as follows: "The Garden Country of America" (1904); 
"South Carolina A Primer" (1904) ; "Climatology of South 
Carolina" (1904); "Zuid Carolina" (1905); "Sued Carolina" 

(1905) ; "Zuid Carolina" (2) (1905) ; "Official Map of South 
Carolina" (1904) ; "Isothermic Map of South Carolina" (1904) ; 
"Precipitation Map of South Carolina" (1906) ; "South Carolina, 
U. S. A.," (1906); "The Granite Industry of South Carolina" 

(1906) ; "South Carolina, U. S. A." (published in Scotland 1906) ; 
"South Carolina Statistics" (1906) ; "Kesources of South Caro- 
lina" (1906) ; and "Handbook of the Resources of South Caro- 
lina" (1906). 

Mr. "Watson has never sought a position, but preferment has 
come to him as a recognition of his ability and his character. 
To the young people of his state he says: "I would advise all 
young Americans to start out in life with the determination to 
succeed; to avoid waste of time; to secure an education at any 
sacrifice ; to be honest and sincere ; to use their brains to the best 
of their ability ; and to make absolute devotion to duty the key- 
stone of their life-work, no matter whether the task be great or 
small." 

In response to an inquiry for his views relating to important 
matters of public interest or public policy in the state, he says: 
"I believe the South Atlantic states are the coming section of our 
common country; and I consider it of vital importance to South 
Carolina that her patriotic men labor unceasingly to bring about 
that degree of industrial, commercial and agricultural develop- 
ment that should be hers by reason of her variety of resources. 



EBBIE JULIAN WATSON 423 

Energetically presented, the resources of this state should attract 
a splendid increase in population and wealth, and South Carolina 
should become one of the leading states of the Union. Carefully 
selected immigration is a vitally necessary means to this end." 

Mr. Watson belongs to the Elks, the Elks club, the Kidge- 
wood club, and the National Hoo Hoo organization. He has been 
one of the trustees of the Elks. In politics he has always been a 
Democrat, and he has served on the Kichland county Democratic 
committee. Although he is not an active member of any denomi- 
nation, his religious sympathy is with the Protestant Episcopal 
church. 

On December 17, 1896, Mr. Watson was married to Margaret 
Smith Miller. Their home is at Number 1402 Gervais street, 
Columbia, South Carolina. 



EMORY OLIN WATSON 

WATSON, REV. EMORY OLIN, presiding elder of the 
Marion district for the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, and for the last fourteen years secretary of the 
South Carolina conference of that church, was born at Newberry 
county, South Carolina, on the 5th of August, 1865. His father 
was the Reverend John Emory Watson, a minister of the Metho- 
dist church, a scholarly and sternly conscientious man, who made 
upon his son such an impression that the son writes, "my father's 
teaching and companionship have been the strongest influence in 
my life." His mother, Mrs. Lavinia (Ritchie) Watson, of New- 
berry county, was also helpful in her influence over her son. 

The years of his boyhood were divided about equally between 
life in the country and life in a village or city. He was a strong, 
sturdy boy, with a boy's love for horses, but with a fondness, too, 
for books and reading, Avhich early inclined him toward a liberal 
education and a literary life. Asked whether, when a boy, he had 
regular tasks set him which involved manual labor, he answers: 
"I always had a fair share of real w r ork to do, and I am as 
grateful to my father for this as for any other factor in my 
education." 

His father was his principal teacher, arranging his family 
life with a view to giving systematic and thorough instruction to 
his son. Occasionally he attended some school, when his father 
could not give to the son's studies the necessary attention. As a 
boy he read much biography and history, and in his youth he 
had a marked taste for philosophy, which was gratified to the 
full in the reading prescribed and the advice given by his father 
and in the discussions which were encouraged by his father. In 
1883, at the age of eighteen, he began to teach in Leesville college 
at Leesville, South Carolina; but his work as teacher, he feels, 
was merely incidental, while his work as a minister of the Gospel 
was undertaken in response to a sense of duty, and has been his 
life work, joyously and heartily done. 

In 1885 he entered upon his first pastorate. He has had 
charge of various churches of his denomination in South Caro- 
lina, among them the church at Orangeburg, the Bethel church 



EMORY OLIN WATSON 425 

of Charleston, and the Central church of Spartanburg. Since 
1906 he has been presiding elder of the Marion district of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 

Mr. Watson has been grand chief templar of the Independent 
Order of Good Templars. He has also been president of the 
State Epworth league of South Carolina. Since 1893 he has 
served as secretary of the South Carolina State conference of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 

On the 10th of March, 1886, he married Miss Mattie M. West, 
daughter of Captain A. P. and Martha M. West, of Edgefield 
county. They have had eight children, all of whom are living 
in 1907. 

Mr. Watson is a Mason. There is a large circle of South 
Carolina men and women in the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, who recall with gratitude and pleasure the relations which 
Mr. Watson has maintained with them while he has been pastor 
of the churches in which they are communicants. And not only 
these members of the Methodist church, but many others in South 
Carolina, recognize in this earnest son of a devoted minister of 
the Gospel of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, a strong 
and useful leader, whose present appointment to official leader- 
ship is but the beginning of an enlarged administrative career, 
which they trust will be of great use to his church and to the 
commonwealth. 



WILLIAM FRANKLIN WATSON 

WATSON, WILLIAM FRANKLIN, son of George 
Corey Watson and Isabella Byron Watson, was born 
May 11, 1861, in Jackson, Carlton county, New Bruns- 
wick, Canada. His paternal grandparents emigrated from Dur- 
ham, England; his maternal grandfather from Edinburg, Scot- 
land. His maternal grandmother was a Canadian. All of these 
lived in the province of New Brunswick, Canada. 

In his youth W. F. Watson lived in the country and in a 
village. He was interested in poetry and astronomy. The influ- 
ence of his mother was very strong and inspiring. He attended 
Houlton academy, in Maine, and was graduated in 1887 from 
Colby university with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. In 1892-93 
he studied at the University of Pennsylvania, and in 1898 in the 
University of Chicago. In the year 1890 Colby university con- 
ferred upon him the degree of Master of Arts. 

Professor Watson is a life long teacher. For several years 
before coming to the South he taught in the grammar and high 
schools of Maine. For twenty years he has held the chair of 
chemistry and biology in Furman university in Greenville, South 
Carolina. In addition, he is now (1907) secretary of the faculty 
and curator of the museum of that institution. 

Professor Watson is also a popular lecturer on scientific 
subjects, in which capacity he has won high encomiums. Among 
his subjects are the following: "The Microscope and Camera in 
Biology," illustrated with lantern slides and moving pictures of 
living specimens; "Freaks and Monsters of the Ancient World," 
with lantern slides of an extinct menagerie; "Genesis and Geol- 
ogy," a discourse on the harmony of the Bible and science, for 
Sunday appointments; and "Reproduction of Plants and Ani- 
mals," an untechnical discussion of nature's mysteries, for Young 
Men's Christian association courses. 

With the crystalline lens from the eye of a bullock, Professor 
Watson photographs objects which are too small for the common 
camera and yet too large for ordinary microscopic photography. 
His work in this line has been favorably commented upon by the 
press, not only of America, but of France and Spain. 



WILLIAM FRANKLIN WATSON 427 

Professor Watson is a writer as well as a teacher and lecturer. 
In 1887 he published "The Children of the Sun," a book of poems, 
and in 1901 he published a text book on "Experimental Chem- 
istry." He is a contributor for the "Scientific American," "Scien- 
tific American Supplement," "Collier's Weekly," "The New York 
Tribune," "The Youth's Companion," "The American Inventor," 
"The New York Journal and American," "Science, Arts, et Na- 
ture," of Paris, France, "La Illustracion espanola y Americana," 
of Madrid, Spain, and other publications. 

At the South Carolina Interstate and West Indian exposition, 
held at Charleston in 1901-02, Professor Watson was awarded the 
medal for inventing a process for the purification and concentra- 
tion of monazite sand. 

Professor Watson is a member of the Phi Delta Theta fra- 
ternity, the American Microscopical society, the American Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of Science, and of the National 
Geographic society. He is also vice-president of the American 
Microscopical society. He is a member of the Baptist church and 
also of the local Club of Thirty-nine. Professor Watson varies 
his scientific labors with an occasional resort to the hook and line. 
On June 24, 1889, he married Miss Clara Norwood, of 
Marion, South Carolina. They have two children. 

His address is University Ridge, Greenville, South Carolina. 



SAMUEL ADAMS WEBER 

WEBER, SAMUEL ADAMS, D. D., Methodist clergy- 
man, educator and editor, was born January 19, 1838, 
on a farm in Iredell county, North Carolina. His 
father, John Weber, farmer, justice of the peace and captain of 
militia, was a man of good common sense, original and striking 
in his language, of cheerful temperament, and disposed to be 
helpful to others, especially to aspiring youths; his mother, Ann 
Maria (Lander) Weber, a good woman, died when he was only 
seven years old. His blood is Dutch-Irish. His great-grand- 
father Weber, from Holland, settled in Virginia prior to the War 
of the Revolution; his maternal grandfather Lander, from Ire- 
land, settled in North Carolina early in the nineteenth century. 
Among his connections were Honorable William Lander, of 
North Carolina, prominent in law and politics from 1845 to 1865, 
and Reverend Samuel Lander, D. D., noted as an educator of 
girls in North and South Carolina from 1870 to 1894. 

Samuel A. Weber spent his early life mostly in a village; 
was rather delicate and fonder of books than of sport; did no 
manual labor, but assisted in doing the home chores; when quite 
young he felt a distinct call to preach the Gospel, and his per- 
sonal inclination led to his combining a literary occupation with 
his preaching. 

He was educated at Shelby (North Carolina) Male academy, 
Olin (North Carolina) high school, and at Wofford college, South 
Carolina, from which he was graduated A. B. in 1859, and which 
conferred the honorary degree of A. M. upon him in 1862. In 
1892, Emory college, Georgia, honored him with the degree of 
D. D. The session following his graduation he began to teach 
in Cokesbury institute, South Carolina. 

In 1862 he entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, and has been, altogether, a pastor for about 
twenty-five years. Since 1901 he has been assistant pastor of 
Trinity church, Yorkville, York county, South Carolina. From 
1866 to 1876 he was a professor in Davenport. North Carolina, 
and Williamston, South Carolina, female colleges, and from 1878 
to 1886 he was editor of the "Southern Christian Advocate," 



SAMUEL ADAMS WEBER 429 

the official journal of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 
published at that time in Charleston, South Carolina. In his 
tri-sided career he has always enjoyed the reputation of being an 
earnest, faithful, conscientious and successful worker, though he, 
in looking back over his life, has seemed inclined to the opinion 
that his success would have been greater had his efforts been more 
concentrated. He has modestly said: "I have done too many 
things to have done any one thing well"; but those who have 
known him and his work best do not accept that view of his 
career. 

He was delegate to the Ecumenical conference on the cen- 
tenary of Methodism, Baltimore, Maryland, 1884, and to the 
quadrennial general conferences of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, 1886, 1894 and 1898, and has been a voluminous 
contributor to periodicals, religious and secular. 

He has always been fond of history, especially as told in 
the biographies of the men who helped to make it; thinks the 
highest earthly factor in his career was his early married life; 
advises the young, as essentials to true success, to strive honestly 
to have a Christian conscience, a level head, a modest competency, 
to eat temperately and to abstain from tobacco and liquors that 
intoxicate. In politics he is and has always been a Democrat. 

On November 20, 1861, he married Sarah Alston Langdon; 
and on December 27, 1889, Mrs. Camilla Jefferys, widow of 
Captain T. S. Jefferys, of Yorkville, South Carolina; three chil- 
dren have been born to them, all of whom are now (1907) living. 

His address is Yorkville, York county, South Carolina. 



LEONARD WALLER WHITE 

WHITE, LEONARD WALLER, merchant, was born in 
Abbeville, South Carolina, July 7, 1843. His parents 
were John and Lucy White. His father was a mer- 
chant, a man who was noted for his honesty and fidelity, and who 
was held in high esteem by the people among whom he lived. 
His mother had fine qualities of mind and heart and she exerted 
a strong and an enduring influence upon the moral and intellec- 
tual life of her son. 

As a boy Leonard White was strong and well. He enjoyed 
the sports and pastimes which were favorites with his companions 
and he also had a marked fondness for books, to which much of 
his spare time was given. Surrounded by the influences of a 
good home and fond parents, he spent his childhood and youth in 
a normal manner, steadily developing the powers of mind and 
body as a genuine American boy should, and he grew into man- 
hood in the healthful, quiet way that is always conducive to the 
best development. 

His opportunities for education were such as the times and 
the established position of his family afforded. Pie did not have 
to struggle for an education; nor was he compelled to provide 
the means therefor himself. Up to the beginning of the War 
between the States he had as good opportunities for schooling, 
and improved them as well, as most boys of his age and social 
position. He was prepared for college at the schools in Abbeville, 
and more especially by the attention to his education received 
from his brother, Professor William Henry White, who was at 
that time principal of the Abbeville Male academy. In December, 
1860, he entered the sophomore class at South Carolina college, 
in Columbia, but about this time the war began, and prevented 
the completion of his collegiate course. At the age of seventeen 
he became a soldier in the Confederate army, and followed the 
fortunes of the "Bonnie Blue Flag" during those four fearful 
years of sacrifice and slaughter which saw the South devastated 
and well-nigh destroyed. As a soldier he was faithful to every 
call of duty, and while he never received a commission, was pro- 
moted to the rank of sergeant. He was severely wounded at the 




- 




LEONARD WALLER WHITE 433 

battle of Gaines Mill, having been shot through the body. When 
the war was over he returned to his home with the proud con- 
sciousness of having served his state and his country with sincere 
patriotism and unselfish devotion. 

He had long cherished the ambition to become a lawyer, but 
as his college career had been closed by the war, and he had 
attained his majority, he felt that he could not afford to give the 
time that would be required to qualify him for this profession 
and then wait, perhaps for years, for satisfactory returns. Soon 
after peace was restored a good business opportunity opened in 
Abbeville. This he accepted, and for more than forty years he 
has been a merchant in the town in which he was born. His 
success in business has often caused his advice to be sought by 
others. That he is a wise counsellor where financial matters are 
concerned is shown by the fact that for twenty years he has held 
the position of vice-president of the Abbeville National bank. 
Although he has never held or sought political office, Mr. White 
has been deeply interested in public affairs, and has cheerfully 
served his community in minor positions without reward. He 
has taken especial interest in the cause of education, and in the 
capacity of trustee he labored for many years to improve the 
school system of his town. 

In politics Mr. White has always been a Democrat. He is 
a Presbyterian. He is not a member of any secret society, but 
finds the center of attraction and the place for recreation in his 
own home. He was married, May 9, 1871, to Mary Helen Jones. 
Of their nine children, eight were living in 1907. 

Mr. White owes much to the influences of home, but to a 
great degree his success is due to a strong determination to be 
independent and an earnest desire to be useful in every relation 
of life. 

Since the above sketch was prepared for the printer, Mr. 
White died at his home in Abbeville on February 13, 1907. 



THOMAS HENRY WHITE 

WHITE, THOMAS HENRY, junior member of the 
banking firm of White Brothers, of Chester, South 
Carolina, and a director of the Spratt Building and 
Loan association and of the Carolina and North-Western railway, 
was born near Bullock's Creek, York county, South Carolina, on 
March 29, 1863. His father, Matthew White, was a merchant, 
who died (in 1864) while the son was still too young to be greatly 
influenced by the father's example. His mother, Mrs. Catherine 
(Westbrooks) White, watched over and guided his early boy- 
hood; but she, too, died while he was still a boy. His father's 
family trace their descent from John White, an emigrant from 
Ireland who settled near Chester in 1767. 

In his boyhood he says he was "kept too busy to develop any 
special tastes or interests." He lived and worked on a farm 
thirteen miles west of Yorkville. He learned how to labor, regu- 
larly and systematically, while still a boy. His father left barely 
property enough to enable the son to get an education. After 
studying in the common schools, he completed his preparation 
for Erskine college at Due West, South Carolina, from which 
institution he was graduated in 1884. 

In September of the same year he took a position as book- 
keeper for a mercantile establishment at Chester, retaining the 
place until 1890, when he became a bookkeeper in the Exchange 
bank, of Chester. From 1894 until 1902 he was cashier of the 
Exchange bank. Since January, 1902, he has been associated 
with his older brother in the banking firm of John G. and T. H. 
White, "White Brothers," of Chester, South Carolina. 

Mr. White's business experience is such as to make his fellow- 
citizens desirous of his cooperation in business plans in which 
many are united in interest. He is a director of the Spratt 
Building and Loan association. He is a director of the Carolina 
and North- Western railway, of Chester, South Carolina. He is 
interested in all that promotes the welfare of his town and county. 

Allied with the Democratic party, he has not swerved from 
allegiance to the men and measures advocated by that party. 



THOMAS HENRY WHITE 435 

He is a member of the Associate Keformed Presbyterian 
church. His favorite exercise and recreation he finds in horse- 
back riding. 

He was married June 25, 1889, to Lula Carlisle, of Spartan- 
burg, South Carolina. Of their four children, three are living 
in 1907. 

His address is Chester, South Carolina. 



GEORGE W. WILLIAMS 

WILLIAMS, GEORGE W., banker, was born in Charles- 
ton, South Carolina, January 20, 1860, and is a direct 
descendant of Richard Williams, who came to America 
in 1636 from Glamorganshire, Wales, and settled in Taunton y 
Massachusetts, having purchased land from the Indians. In early 
life Mr. Williams attended the well-known school kept by Doctor 
Bruns in the city of Charleston, and subsequently the academy 
in the same city, conducted by Professor A. Sachtleben. After 
some years spent at Adams academy, Quincy, Massachusetts, in 
preparation for college, he entered Harvard university as a mem- 
ber of the class of 1882, but after remaining there for a year the 
condition of his eyesight forced him to leave college. He then 
went abroad and spent a year taking lectures, including a course 
in the University at Bonn on the Rhine, in Germany. In the 
fall of 1880 he returned to Charleston and entered into active 
business in connection with various enterprises in which his 
father, the distinguished banker, George W. Williams, Sr., was 
interested. He was elected a director, then cashier, and subse- 
quently vice-president, of the Carolina Savings bank, of Charles- 
ton, and at the death of his father, in 1903, he was elected to 
the presidency of the bank, in succession to his father, which 
position he now (1907) holds. Mr. Williams served as alderman 
of the city of Charleston for one term during the administration 
of Mayor John F. Ficken, and for two terms during the admin- 
istration of Mayor J. Adger Smyth. He has been for many 
years a member of the board of trustees of the William Enston 
home and of the board of commissioners of the Charleston 
Orphan house. The work of caring for dependent orphans has 
interested Mr. Williams more deeply than any other duty in 
public life. 

In 1883 he married Margaret Adger. They have five chil- 
dren three girls (one of whom is married) and two boys. Mr, 
Williams' parents were Methodists and he has long been a mem- 
ber of that church. He divides his vacation periods as nearly 
as possible between the seashore and the mountains. His life 
work may be said to lie in Charleston, but he has a farm in 



GEORGE W. WILLIAMS 437 

Northeast Georgia, which affords him the rest most needful for 
a business man. He is also fond of travel, and has been three 
times to Europe, besides visiting various parts of this country 
and Canada. Mr. Williams is among the most enterprising and 
substantial citizens of Charleston and has never failed to respond 
to all public calls that have been made upon him in which the 
welfare of his native city and state are concerned. 

His postoffice address is 15 Meeting street, Charleston, South 
Carolina. 



Vol. II. S. C. 20. 



JOHN OWENS WILLSON 

WILLSON, JOHN OWENS, D. D., president of Lander 
college, in early manhood attorney-at-law, then min- 
ister of the Gospel in the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, was born at Cedar Grove plantation, Berkeley county, 
South Carolina, January 27, 1845. His father, Dr. John Willson, 
was a planter and physician and for many years representative 
and senator from St. James, Goose Creek parish, a man still 
remembered for his faithfulness in public and private trusts, his 
kindness to his slaves and his charity to all people. Dr. Willson 
married Miss Sarah Elizabeth Owens, whose influence on her 
children was deep and abiding. 

John Owens Willson was the second child and oldest son of 
his parents. His boyhood was spent on a cotton plantation, 
where he was encouraged to engage in outdoor exercises, but not 
to labor on the farm. His education began in the "good old 
neighborhood schools," continued at King's Mountain Military 
academy, the Arsenal, and Citadel academy. He left the last- 
named school to enter the Confederate army in June, 1862, and 
served first in Company F, Aiken's regiment of cavalry, and then 
in Company I of the Third South Carolina cavalry. In 1865 
and 1866 he studied law and was admitted to the bar, November, 
1866. After a year at Kingstree and a few months at Florence, 
he located at Marion, as partner first of Gen. W. W. Harllee, and 
then of Hon. C. D. Evans. 

In 1873 he was convinced that he had a call to preach, and 
in December he entered the South Carolina conference, Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. He was pastor of churches until 1889, 
when he was appointed presiding elder and so served five years. 
In December, 1894, he was elected editor of the "Southern Chris- 
tian Advocate," and was reflected in 1897 for a term of four years. 
In 1902 he labored at Abbeville; 1903-04, he was in Cokesbury 
district, and since July 26, 1904, he has been president of Lander 
college for women. Wofford college gave him the degree of 
Doctor of Divinity in 1896. He has been a delegate to the general 
conference of his church in 1890, 1894, 1898, 1902 and 1906; a 
member of the Sunday school board since 1895; a representative 



JOHN OWENS WILLSON 441 

to the Ecumenical Conference of Methodists, held in London, 
England, 1901 ; and a commissioner on joint commission of 
Northern and Southern Methodism to make a common order of 
worship and to prepare standard catechisms for both churches. 
He was a pastor in Charleston, South Carolina, and was sent 
North as collector for the injured church buildings of Southern 
and Northern Methodists. 

He has traveled in Europe, Africa and the Holy Land. He 
is a Royal Arch Mason, a Knight Templar, and a member of 
various fraternal organizations. In politics he is a Democrat. 

On April 27, 1871, he married Miss Mary Oriana Richardson, 
of Marion. They had one child, now the wife of Captain T. Q. 
Donaldson, Eighth United States cavalry. On August 27, 1896, 
he was married to Miss Kathleen McPherson Lander. 

To the young he commends "patient preparation for life, not 
so much in special lines as in what all vocations demand; fixed 
purpose to preserve personal integrity; cultivation of genuine 
interest in our fellow-men; and faith in God." 

His address is Greenwood, South Carolina. 



HUGH WILSON 

WILSON, HUGH, editor and publisher of the "Abbeville 
Press and Banner," was born in Laurens county, 
November 1, 1838. His father, Hugh Wilson, was a 
millwright of noted mechanical skill. His grandfather, also 
named Hugh Wilson, came to Charleston from Scotland in 1882. 
After living for a time in Newberry he finally settled in Laurens, 
where with two others he built a small cotton mill, which was 
burned in 1830. His mother was Mary Godfrey Wilson. 

Hugh Wilson was a sturdy boy. Though he lived in the 
country until he was twelve years old, he evinced a marked 
inclination for all things mechanical. When only thirteen he 
became an apprentice in the office of the "Due West Telescope," 
now the "Associate Reformed Presbyterian" at Due West, where, 
though having but a primary school education, he learned to set 
type, thus following his grandmother's wishes, for it was her 
desire that he become a printer. Hugh Wilson was ambitious, 
determined to become a successful printer. In 1859 he bought 
an interest in the Abbeville "Press and Banner," the paper that 
he now edits. In 1904 he sold the paper to W. W. and W. R. 
Bradley, but he takes the same interest in its success as he did 
while he was its owner. Journalism has been his life work. 
Though he has never held public office, he has always taken an 
active interest in the material development of the town in which 
he lives. For the last twenty years he has been identified with 
every enterprise having for its object the improvement of Abbe- 
ville. He has been director in the Abbeville Cotton mill and a 
director in the Abbeville warehouse. He takes stock in each 
worthy enterprise, and after it is well established sells out to 
reinvest his money in another new one. He has been a member 
of the Abbeville Literary club since its organization twenty- 
eight years ago. At one time he was a member of Clinton lodge, 
No. 3, F. A. A. M., but he has now demitted. As a young 
man he was an active member of several temperance societies. 
He is a contributary member of the State Press association, and 
for one year was elected its president, an honor he holds as the 



HUGH WILSON 443 

highest that was ever bestowed upon him. He is a Democrat, 
and although he has often criticised his own party and always 
regards it his public duty to vote for the best man available, he 
has ever maintained his party allegiance. He believes that the 
state should insure the lives and property of its citizens at the 
usual rates, and that by this means it would secure a revenue 
sufficient to meet the entire expense of the government. In the 
great trial of strength between the North and South, Private 
Hugh Wilson rendered faithful service in the Western army of 
the Confederacy. He was wounded at the battle of Chickamauga. 

In speaking of his relations to the social world, Mr. Wilson 
says: "My greatest social distinction is that I am no kin to John 
C. Calhoun or any other great Irishman." Asked to discuss the 
partial failures of his life, he declares: "I failed to win the 
affections of the first girl I courted as I did those of others. The 
greatest misfortune of my life is that I failed to marry. All 
men should marry. The man who marries may possibly make a 
mistake, but the man who stays single is sure to make a mistake. 
An old man without family ties is lonely indeed." As advice to 
young men who desire to lead useful and successful lives he says : 
"Honesty in men, like virtue in women, is more to be prized than 
all else. There is always a demand and a place for honest young 
men men who would not sacrifice principle or character for 
gain. More men fail because of lack of fidelity than for any 
other reason." 

Mr. Wilson is identified with the Associate Reformed Pres- 
byterian church. 

His address is Abbeville, South Carolina. 



WILLIAM BLACKBURN WILSON 

WILSON, WILLIAM BLACKBURN, lawyer and 
legislator, was born January 12, 1850, in Yorkville, 
York county, South Carolina. His father, William 
Blackburn Wilson, lawyer, member of state legislature before 
and after the War between the States, and of the South Carolina 
secession convention, was scholarly, cultured, confiding and reli- 
gious, a typical old-school gentleman ; his mother, Arrah Minerva 
(Lowry) Wilson, a refined and highly cultured woman of unusu- 
ally strong character, was a potent and lasting influence on all 
sides of his life. His blood is English, Irish and Scotch, repre- 
sented on the paternal side by the Wilson and Stanyarne families 
from England, who settled in lower South Carolina in colonial 
days, and on the maternal side by the Lowry, McLure and Gaston 
families from Scotland and Ireland, who settled in upper South 
Carolina long prior to the War of the Revolution; his great- 
grandfather, George Blackburn, descendant of generations of 
family lawyers in the old country, came to America from Dublin 
university, and was professor of mathematics and astronomy in 
William and Mary college, Williamsburg, Virginia, and in South 
Carolina college, Columbia. 

W. B. Wilson spent his early life in his birthplace; was 
healthy, strong and vigorous, and in school and college took an 
active and prominent part in all kinds of athletics. He was 
always ambitious, and stood high in his classes. His primary 
education was obtained in the Yorkville private schools of Doctor 
Robert Lathan and William Currell, and he prepared for college 
in the King's Mountain Military school, Colonel Asbury Coward 
principal. Thence he went to South Carolina college, where he 
was graduated A. B. in 1869. His own preference and the wishes 
of his parents coinciding, he took up the study of law in his 
father's office, and was admitted to the bar January 14, 1871. 
He at once began practice in Yorkville, in copartnership with his 
father, under the firm name of Wilson & Wilson, where he con- 
tinued successfully until 1876, with the exception of two years' 
absence in Texas on account of his connection with the Ku Klux 
and the Federal prosecution of the members of that patriotic 



WILLIAM BLACKBURN WILSON 447 

order in 1871-1873. In 1876 he removed to Rock Hill, in the 
same county, where he has enjoyed one of the largest practices in 
the state and acquired extensive business interests. 

He has been active in politics as an unchangeable Democrat ; 
was a member of the South Carolina house of representatives, 
1884-1888; of the state senate, 1888-1892, and of the Constitu- 
tional convention of 1895, and made a highly creditable record. 
As a business man he has been conspicuously progressive and a 
leading participant in all movements for the improvement of the 
town. He is president of the Rock Hill Land and Town Site 
company, of the Rock Hill Street Railway company, and of the 
Carolina- Cuba company ; also a life trustee of the graded schools. 
He is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church, the Knights 
of Pythias, the Piedmont club, Phi Kappa Psi college fraternity, 
and is a Mason. 

The potent influences in his life have been, in the order 
named: his wife, home, contact with men in active life, school, 
private study and early companionship. His most enjoyable and 
helpful recreations are driving and farming. As a man he is 
approachable, genial and popular. 

On December 29, 1875, he married Isabella Hinton Miller 
(daughter of Doctor William R. Miller, of Raleigh, North Caro- 
lina), a woman of unusual personal attraction and strength of 
character, a member of the Colonial Dames of her native state 
and an active force in church and society. Of their ten children, 
all are now (1907) living. The oldest son, W. B. Wilson, Jr., 
is in partnership with his father in the practice of law. 

The address of Mr. Wilson is Rock Hill, ^ork county, South 
Carolina. 



CHARLES ALBERT WOODS 

WOODS, CHAELES ALBEKT, LL. D., associate justice 
of the supreme court of his native state, was born in 
Darlington, Darlington county, South Carolina, July 
31, 1852. His father, Alexander Samuel Woods, merchant, was 
widely known and esteemed for his marked business and personal 
integrity; his mother, Martha Jane DuBose, a woman noted for 
her refinement and accomplishments, deeply impressed his early 
life. The family was founded on the paternal side, in America, 
by Frame Woods, from the north of Ireland, who settled in Dar- 
lington county, South Carolina, about 1770 ; on the maternal side 
by Isaac DuBose, from Dieppe, France, who settled in lower 
South Carolina a century earlier, about 1665. 

His early life was spent on a farm near Darlington. His 
early education was obtained at the village school in Darlington. 
In 1869 he went to Wofford college, from which he was graduated 
A. B. in 1872. In 1904, as a recognition of his eminent career, 
his alma mater honored him with the degree of LL. D. 

Like so many other distinguished Americans, he began his 
working career as a teacher. His first service in this direction 
was at Wesley Chapel school, in Darlington county, in 1873. 
While teaching he took up the study of law, which he pursued 
with all the natural enthusiasm of his Irish-French blood. He 
soon abandoned teaching for the law T , but he has never lost interest 
in educational work. With his qualifications, added to a pleasing 
personality, his law practice soon became large and lucrative. 
Incidentally his practice of law demonstrated in a marked degree 
his ability as a financier, and he was made president of the Bank 
of Marion, at Marion, South Carolina, a position he has filled for 
years with credit to himself and profit to the bank. 

Although not a politician, in the ordinary sense of the word, 
he has been actively identified with the Democratic party since 
he was old enough to cast his first vote, but the only official posi- 
tion he has ever held is that of associate justice of the supreme 
court of South Carolina, which he assumed January 28, 1903, and 
still (1907) holds. No member of the court has a higher standing 
with the bar and people of the state. He is and has long been a 



V ' 

CHARLES ALBERT WOODS 449 

consistent and active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. 

On December 20, 1884, he married Salley Jones Wannamaker, 
daughter of J. J. and Mary K. Wannamaker, of Orangeburg 
county. 

His address is Marion, South Carolina. 



'* < 



List of Full Page Portraits 

VOLUME II. 

FACING FACING 

PAGE PAGE 

ALLAN, JAMES 3 JONES, WILIE 229 

BACOT, THOMAS W 9 JUDSON, CHARLES H 233 

BATES, GEORGE H 17 KELLEY, JOHN A 239 

BATES, WILLIAM T. C 20 LIGHTSEY, JACOB A 247 

BELLINGER, GEORGE D 24 LOWERY, BENJAMIN L . . . . 253 

BRADLEY, DAVID F 33 LUCAS, WILLIAM E 254 

BREEDEN, PETER L 37 MCCLINTOCK, E. PRESSLY. . 258 

BRICE, ASHBEL G 41 MANNING, JAMES H 266 

BROCK, JAMES A 47 MATHESON, ALEXANDER J. . 272 

BROWN, RANDOLPH E 54 MAULDIN, BENJAMIN F . . . 276 

CAPERS, JOHN G 60 MORDECAI, THOMAS M 282 

CHESWELL, WILLIAM E 71 NAPIER, JAMES L 289 

COVINGTON, HENRY K 81 NORWOOD, JOHN W 295 

CROFT, THEODORE G 85 PARKER, THOMAS F 302 

DAVIS, CHARLES McQ 95 PLONK, JOSEPH C 311 

DAVIS, JAMES E 99 PRYOR, STEWART W 316 

DILLON, JAMES W 106 RICHARDS, JOHN G., JR. . . 328 

DOUGLASS, JAMES T 110 SEIBELS, EDWIN G 339 

DUVALL, MAREEN W 114 SHEPPARD, JOHN C 343 

EFIRD, CYPRIAN M 123 SIMMS, CHARLES C 349 

ELZAS, BARNETT A 128 SIRRINE, JOSEPH E 352 

EVANS, WILLIAM DEW. . . . 135 SMITH, AUGUSTUS W 359 

FANT, JOHN A 139 SMITH, RUFUS F 362 

FARR, FRANCIS N 143 STACKHOUSE, THOMAS B . . 366 

FENNELL, WILLIAM W. . . . 147 STOLL, CHARLES W 375 

GADSDEN, PHILIP H 158 SUMMER, CHARLES E 378 

GASTON, ARTHUR L 164 SUMMER, GEORGE W 382 

GIBSON, THOMAS B 174 TIMMERMAN, W. H 391 

GOODING, WILLIAM J 183 VERNER, JOHN D 404 

HAMER, ROBERT P., JR. ... 186 WARDLAW, JOSEPH G 408 

HAMMETT, JAMES D 193 WATSON, EBBIE J 416 

HINSON, WILLIAM G 204 WHITE, LEONARD W 430 

HOLLIDAY, GEORGE J 208 WILLSON, JOHN O 438 

JACKSON, JOHN M 216 WILSON, WILLIAM B 444 

JONES, ADAM C 222 



Index of Biographies 

VOLUME II. 

PAGE PAGE 

ALLAN, JAMES ............ 3 EDMUNDS, SAMUEL H ..... 119 

AYER, HARTWELL M ...... 5 EFIRD, CYPRIAN M ....... 123 

BACOT, THOMAS W ....... 9 ELLERBE, JAMES E ........ 125 

BALL, WILLIAM W ....... 11 ELLIOTT, WILLIAM, JR . . . . 126 

BARKSDALE, JOHN A ...... 13 ELZAS, BARNETT A ....... 128 

BATES, GEORGE H ......... 17 EVANS, WILLIAM DEW 135 

BATES, WILLIAM T. C. . . . 20 FANT, JOHN A ........... 139 

BELLINGER, GEORGE D ..... 24 FARR, FRANCIS N ......... 143 

BOUKNIGHT, JOSEPH H . . . . 29 FENNELL, WILLIAM W ---- 147 

BRADLEY, DAVID F ........ 33 FERGUSON, JOHN W ...... 149 

BREEDEN, PETER L ........ 37 FEWELL, RICHARD T ...... 151 

BRICE, ASHBEL G ......... 41 FORD, RUFUS ............. 153 

BROCK, JAMES A ......... 47 ERASER, THOMAS B ....... 155 

BRODIE, PAUL T .......... 49 FROST, FRANK R ......... 157 

BROWN, GEORGE W ....... 52 GADSDEN, PHILIP H ...... 158 

BROWN, RANDOLPH R ..... 54 GAMEWELL, JOSEPH A ..... 162 

BROWN, WILLIAM A ...... 58 GASTON, ARTHUR L ....... 164 

CAPERS, JOHN G .......... 60 GERATY, WILLIAM C ...... 169 

CARLISLE, MARK L ....... 65 GIBSON, THOMAS B ....... 174 

CASTON, ROBERT T ........ 67 GODFREY, WILLIAM ....... 179 

CHESWELL, WILLIAM E . . . 71 GOODING, WILLIAM J ..... 183 

CLAYTON, WILLIAM F ..... 74 HAMER, ROBERT P., JR ---- 186 

CODY, ZECHARIAH T ...... 77 HAMMETT, JAMES D ...... 193 

COVINGTON, HENRY K. . . . 81 HARMAN, GODFREY M ..... 195 

CROFT, THEODORE G ....... 85 HAZARD, WALTER ......... 197 

CROMER, GEORGE B ....... 87 HENDERSON, EDWARD P . . . . 200 

DANIEL, JAMES W ........ 89 HENRY, CHARLES H ....... 203 

DAVIS, CHARLES McQ ..... 95 HINSON, WILLIAM G ...... 204 

DAVIS, JAMES E .......... 99 HOLLIDAY, GEORGE J ...... 208 

DEAN, ALVIN H .......... 102 HYDRICK, DANIEL E ...... 213 

DIBBLE, HENRY M ........ 104 JACKSON, JOHN M ........ 216 

DILLON, JAMES W ........ 106 JOHNSON, JOSEPH T ...... 220 

DOUGLASS, JAMES T ....... 110 JONES, ADAM C .......... 222 

DUVALL, MAREEN W ...... 114 JONES, WILIE ............ 229 

EARLE, JULIUS R ......... 117 JUDSON, CHARLES H. . rrr7""233 






454 INDEX OF BIOGRAPHIES 

PAGE PAGE 

KELLEY, JOHN A 239 ROGERS, WILLIAM A 334 

KINARD, JAMES P 241 SEIBELS, EDWIN G 339 

KUKER, JOHN 242 SHEPPARD, JOHN C 343 

LAW, JOHN A 243 SIMMS, CHARLES C 349 

LIGHTSEY, JACOB A 247 SIRRINE, JOSEPH E 352 

LODGE, LEE D 249 SMITH, AUGUSTUS W 359 

LOWERY, BENJAMIN L. . . . 253 SMITH, KUFUS F 362 

LUCAS, WILLIAM E 254 STACKHOUSE, THOMAS B . . 366 

McCLiNTOCK, E. PRESSLY. . 258 STEVENSON, WILLIAM F . . . 371 

MCDONALD, CHARLES E . . . 263 STOLL, CHARLES W 375 

MANNING, JAMES H 266 SUMMER, CHARLES E 378 

MARTIN, OSCAR B 270 SUMMER, GEORGE W 382 

MATHESON, ALEXANDER J. 272 THOMAS, ANDREW J. S. . . . 386 

MAULDIN, BENJAMIN F. . . 276 TIMMERMAN, W. H. ...... 391 

MONROE, WILLIAM Mel . . . 280 TOMPKINS, ARTHUR S 394 

MORDECAI, THOMAS M . . . . 282 TOWNSEND, CHARLES 'P. . . . 396 

MORTON, DANIEL G 286 TOWNSEND, WILLIAM H. . . 399 

NAPIER, JAMES L 289 TRIBBLE, MILTON P 401 

NEUFFER, GOTTLOB A 290 VERNER, JOHN D 404 

NICHOLLS, GEORGE W 292 WARDLAW, JOSEPH G 408 

NORWOOD, JOHN W 295 WATKINS, HENRY H 413 

OSBORNE, WILLIE R 297 WATSON, EBBIE J 416 

PARKER, FRANCIS LsJ. . . . 299 WATSON, EMORY 424 

PARKER, THOMAS F 302 WATSON, WILLIAM F 426 

PEURIFOY, JAMES E 307 WEBER, SAMUEL A 428 

PLONK, JOSEPH C 311 WHITE, LEONARD W 430 

POE, NELSON C 314 WHITE, THOMAS H 434 

PRYOR, STEWART W 316 WILLIAMS, GEORGE W 436 

RAVENEL, HENRY E 320 WILLSON, JOHN 438 

REED, RICHARD C 322 WILSON, HUGH 442 

REYNOLDS, JOHN S 325 WILSON, WILLIAM B 444 

RICHARDS, JOHN G., JR . . . 328 WOODS, CHARLES A 448 



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