(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Men of progress; one thousand biographical sketches and portraits of leaders in business and professional life in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts;"









&f;a:;;>;;l';'^,y;;;;:::|iv;;;::;r: 









;!<:;■,(■; 






i 


.;.'X'^^- 






/.;■'.'' - ■■ 


;:,ry.' 


^■^^'^' 


''y ■■■:/..' 'J 


" c ;;,' 


iM^- 


',;J !>■;■-■■'. 


' ;■ i'. 



'■'' •'. 'i^'" 







Class _ 
Book__ 



COPYRIGHT DEPOSIT 



I' 



Men of Progress 



ONE THOUSAND 



Biographical Sketches and Portraits 



OF 



i Leaders in Business and Professional Life 



IN THE 



J 



CommontDcaltl) of ^ajsjsacliujscttjsi 



COMPILED UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF 

RICHARD IIERNDON 



EDITED BY^ 

EDWIN M.'^'bACON 




BOSTON 

NEW ENGLAND MAGAZINE 

1896 



■ A» 






Copyright, 1893 

BV 

RICHARD HERNDON 



PRESS OF CEO. H ELIIS, 141 FRANKLIN STI 



REET, BOSTON. 



P 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



PART I. 



ABBOTT, Samuel Appletox Browne, presi- 
dent of the Trustees of the PubHc Library of 
the City of Boston, was born in Lowell, March 6, 
1846, son of Josiah Gardner and Caroline (Liver- 
more) Abbott. On both sides he is of early New 




S. A. B. ABBOTT. 

England ancestry. He is a descendant in the 
eighth generation of George Abbott, an English 
Puritan, who came from Yorkshire in 1640, and 
was one of the settlers of Andover in 1643; 
and, through his paternal grandmother, of the 
Fletchers, also English Puritans, who came from 
Devonshire and settled in Concord, and in 1653 
in Chelmsford. Both of his paternal great-grand- 
fathers were in the battle of Bunker Hill, and 
held commissions in the Continental army. On 
the maternal side he descends from John Liver- 
more, who came from England in 1634, settled 



first in Watertown, thirty years later removed to 
Connecticut, and was one of the signers of the 
fundamental agreement of the colony of New 
Haven, and, returning to Watertown, died there 
in 1685. His maternal great-grandfather, Samuel 
Livermore, was attorney-general for the province 
of New Hampshire, after the Revolution chief 
justice of the State (appointed in 1782), a mem- 
ber of the convocation for the adoption of the 
Federal Constitution, a representative in the first 
Congress, and later a senator and president 
of the Senate pro tan. for nine years ; and his 
maternal grandfather, Edward St. Loe Liver- 
more, was United States district attorney (ap- 
pointed by Washington), a justice of the Supreme 
Court of New Hampshire (appointed in 1798), 
and a member of Congress for three terms. 
His father. Judge Josiah G. Abbott, one of the 
foremost members of the Massachusetts bar, 
served in the General Court, was a member of 
the Constitutional Convention of 1853, justice of 
the Superior Court for the county of Suffolk from 
1S55 to 1858, when he resigned (and two years 
later declined a place on the bench of the Su- 
preme Judicial Court), a representative in Con- 
gress in 1876-77, and a member of the Electoral 
Commission of 1877, the leader of the minority of 
that commission, preparing the address of the 
minority to the people of the LTnited States, 
which, though approved, was not issued. Samuel 
A. B. Abbott was educated in the public schools 
and at Harvard. His early education was ac- 
quired in the Lowell public schools and in the 
Boston Latin School ; and he was fitted for col- 
lege by Professor Lane, of Harvard. He entered 
Harvard as a sophomore, and graduated in 1866, 
in 1869 receiving the degree of A.M. In college 
he was president of the Hasty Pudding Club 
and of the Med. Fac, also a member of the 
Porcellian Club, the D. K. E. and the A. D. 
clubs; and he rowed in the university crews in 
1864. After graduating he studied law in the 



lO 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



office of his father, and was admitted to the 
Suffolk bar in 1868. Subsequently, in 1876, he 
was admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of 
the United States. He has practised in Boston 
since his admission to the bar, and also in the 
United States courts, circuit, district, and su- 
preme. He has twice conducted successfully con- 
tested election cases before Congress, — that of 
Josiah G. Abbott in 1867 and that of Benjamin 
Dean against the present Chief Justice Field in 
1878. He is president of the Hill Manufacturing 
Company of Lewiston, Me., succeeding his father 
in that position, and a director of the Atlantic 
Cotton Mills at Lawrence, of the Franklin Com- 
pany of Lewiston, of the Union Water Power 
Ctjmpany of Lewiston, of which his father was 
the principal promoter, and of the Peterborough 
Railroad. His public service, with the exception 
of a term on the Board of License Commissioners 
in Boston in 1877, has been as a trustee of the 
Boston Public Library, which position he has 
held since 1879, president of the board since 
May, 1888. For several years he was acting 
librarian of the library. He is identified with the 
construction and embellishment of the new Public 
Library Building on Copley Square, the whole 
control of the erection of this monumental edifice 
having been placed, at the beginning of the work 
in 1887, in the hands of the trustees. In politics 
Mr. Abbott is a Democrat. In 1883, when Gen- 
eral Butler was nominated by the Democratic 
party the second time for governor of the State, 
he was nominated for lieutenant governor ; but he 
declined to run on the same ticket with Butler. 
In 1862 he was a member of the New England 
Guards. He is a member of the Suffolk Bar 
Association, of the Somerset, St. Botolph, and 
Athletic clubs of Boston, and of the Century, 
University, and Players' clubs of New York. He 
was married first, April 21, 1869, to Miss Mary 
Goddard, of Boston, of which union there were 
no children; and second, October 15, 1873, to 
Miss Abby Frances Woods, of Providence. R.I. 
They have four children : Helen Francis, Mad- 
eleine Livermore, Ann Francis and Caroline 
Livermore Abbott. Mr. Abbott's country resi- 
dence is at Wellesley Hills, and his town house 
on the Back Bay, Boston. 



boys, under the long familiar iiom df pliimt of 
" Oliver Optic," is a native of Medway, born July 
30, 1822, son of Laban and Catharine (Johnson) 
Adams. His father was also a native of Medway ; 
and his mother was a Vermonter, born in Chester. 
His pedigree is traced back to Thomas Ap Adam, 
who came out of " The Marches of Wales " in 
the eighth century : from him descended Henry 




ADAMS, William T.avlor, author and editor, 
the most prolific writer of the age of stories for 



W. T. ADAMS. 

Adams, who, escaping from the "Green Dragon 
Persecution," came from Devonshire, England, 
to this country in 1630, with several sons, from 
one of whom, settled in that part of Braintree 
now Quincy, came the two Presidents, Samuel 
Adams, and other worthies, and from another, 
settled in Medfield (part of which became Med- 
way), came Laban, " Oliver Optic's " father. 
Laban Adams was first a farmer, then an inn- 
keeper, and again a farmer. He was some time 
landlord of the " \'illage Hotel " in Medway and 
of the "Washington Coffee House" in Boston, 
near where the Transcript newspaper office now 
stands, and the year of the birth of William T. 
he kept the famous old '• Lamb Tavern '' of Bos- 
ton, dating from 1745, which stood on the site 
of the present Adams House. Here the boy 
lived until well into his teens, helping his father 
about the tavern and attending school, part of the 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



I I 



time the Adams Grammar School,-- tlie school- 
house then on Mason Street, where the lioston 
School Board's building now is, — and later the 
private school of Amos Baker, at the head of Har- 
vard Place, famous in its da)-. In 183S the elder 
Adams leased the " Lamb," which he had pur- 
chased about the year 1834, and moved his fam- 
ily to a farm in West Roxbury. \^■illialn '['. went 
to work on the farm and to public school in the 
winter, applying himself to both occupations with 
such enthusiasm and zeal that he soon became 
an e.xcellent farmer and a fine scholar. In school 
he led his class in various studies, but especially 
excelled in composition. His first effort covered 
eight letter pages, and the schoolmaster pro- 
nounced it the best composition he had ever 
looked over ; the second covered twenty-five 
pages ; the third, eighty. He frequently sat up 
all night in his room, when his parents supposed 
he was a-bed, with his overcoat and gloves on, 
writing compositions. In this same school, when 
he was about eighteen years of age, he was made 
an assistant teacher, without pay. Subsequently 
he continued his studies under a private in- 
structor till he reached twenty. Then he taught 
a month as a substitute in the school in Dorches- 
ter now known as the Harris Grammar School, 
and the following year, 1843, was appointed prin- 
cipal of the school. In this capacity he served 
for three years with marked success, the commit- 
tee in its report commending his school as " one 
of the best, if not the very best, at present in 
town." From school-teaching, after a somewhat 
extensive trip in Northern and Southern States, 
he re-entered the hotel business, Joining his father, 
under the firm name of L. & W. T. Adams, in the 
conduct of the first Adams House, which I^aban 
Adams had built in 1844-46 in place of the old 
Lamb Tavern. But as a hotel-keeper he was not 
successful, and two years later found him again 
a school-teacher, — usher in the Boylston Gram- 
mar School, Fort Hill, Boston. Subsequently he 
became submaster and in i860 master of this 
school. Then he was transferred to the Bowditch 
School for Girls, and continued at its head till 
1865, when he resigned, at the urgent request of 
Messrs. Lee &: Shepard, his publishers, to devote 
his time entirely to story-writing. Mr. Adams 
published his first article at nineteen, — an extract 
from one of his school compositions, printed in 
the Social Monitor; and before he retired from 
school-teaching he had written and published 



over eight hundred stories, varying in length from 
one newspaper column to a serial of seventy col- 
umns. His first story, a temperance tale, was 
written while he was a teacher in Dorchester, and 
quickly followed by a second, both of which ap- 
peared in the \Vashiii«;toniiui in 1845. His first 
"pay-matter" was a story entitled "The Marriage 
Contract," written in six hours, and published in 
the True Flag in 1852, for which he received $6. 
His first book was a story called " Hatchie, the 
Guardian Slave," its scenes laid in New Orleans 
and on the Mississippi from notes taken during 
a trip South in 1848, published in 1854, for which 
he was paid $37.50; and the first of his series of 
books for boys was written in 1854, when he was 
teaching in the Fort Hill school. His earlier 
stories, most of which were published in the 
True Flag, appeared over a variety of signatures, 
— "Irving Brown," appended to the love stories, 
"Clingman Hunter, M.D.," to sketches of travel, 
" Oliver Optic " to domestic stories, and " Old 
Stager," "A Retired Attorney." "Man of the 
World," and others used indiscriminately, never 
using his real name. The nom dc pliiDtc of 
"Oliver Optic" first appeared in 185 1 with an 
M.D. and "Member of the Mutual .Admiration 
Society" attached, signed to a doggerel poem 
which he wrote for the Bromfield Lyceum, and 
subsequently published in the Flag of Our Union. 
It was suggested by a character under the name 
of "Dr. Optic," in a new play, "written by a 
gentleman of Boston," then running at the Boston 
Museum, which took Mr. Adams's fancy. He 
added to it the alliterative prefix of "Oliver," and 
appended it to his short domestic stories, which 
were produced with great rapidity, and were 
copied by story papers all over the country. It 
soon became too popular to drop. The " Oliver 
Optic " juvenile works, from which Mr. Adams's 
wide reputation has come, were indirectly the 
result of the success of his first book, " Hatchie." 
In 1852 F. Ormond O. J. Bazin, who had been 
a clerk in the bookstore of B. B. Muzzy & Co., 
the publishers of " Hatchie," having become a 
member of the firm of Brown, Bazin & Co., sent 
a mutual friend to him to say that the writer of 
that book could furnish the book with which the 
new firm would be willing to begin business. He 
suggested a collection of his "Optic" domestic 
stories, with a few new ones added ; and, this 
being accepted, in due time " In Doors and Out " 
appeared, and was a success. Then the firm 



12 



MEN OP' PROGRESS. 



called for a juvenile Ixxik. Mr. Adams at first 
declared that he could not produce it, hn\ing 
never attempted such work ; but he finally yielded 
to the pressure of the publishers, and "The Boat 
Club " was the result. The first half of the story 
went to the type-setters before the last half had 
been begun by the author, but -copy" was fur- 
nished as rapidly as it was required. The book 
was an emphatic success. The next year " All 
Abroad," the sequel to it, appeared ; and others 
followed in rapid succession. Frequently Mr. 
Adams had several series under way at the same 
time; and during the ten years following the 
publication of his first juvenile, when he was 
engaged in his regular duties as a school-teacher 
and doing his share as a public-spirited citizen, 
he produced from two to six volumes a year. 
From the firm of Brown, Bazin & Co., which was 
not successful, Mr. .\dams's books passed to the 
house of Phillips, Sampson & Co.; and soon after 
the foundation of the house of Lee & .Shepard, 
in 1S62, the latter became his publishers, its first 
publishing investment being the purchase of the 
stereotype plates of the " Boat Club " stories 
(six volumes of them) and the " Riverdale " 
series, which it reissued in new editions. From 
that time to the present Lee & Shepard have 
been the sole publishers of Mr. Adams's volumes. 
They were also the projectors of OUtci- Optic's 
Magazine, Our Boys and Girls, started in 1867, 
and continued for nine years under the editorial 
supervision of Mr. Adams, — his second experi- 
ence as an editor, having previously, for nearly 
ten years, had charge of the Student and Sclund- 
matc. In 1880 he became editor of Oar Little 
Ones, that year started, now Our Little Ones and 
the Nursery : and since the establishment of the 
JVkole Family, in 1893, he has been juvenile 
editor of that periodical. Including the bound 
volumes of the magazines which he has edited, 
the name of "Oliver Optic" now stands (1894) 
on the title-pages of one hundred and twenty-five 
books, and more are under way. The list em- 
braces the following : 1852, Hatchie and In Doors 
and Out, domestic stories for adult readers; 1855- 
60, The Boat Club Stories, 6 vols.; 1854-66, 
Student and ScJuwl mate (magazine), 9 vols.; i86o. 
The Riverdale Stories, 12 vols.; 1865, A Spell- 
ing-book for Advanced Classes; 1863-66, The 
Woodville Stories, 6 vols.; 1864-66, The Army 
and Navy Stories, 6 vols. ; 1866, The Way of the 
World, a novel for adults; 1866-69, Young 



America Abroad, first series, 6 vols.; 1867-75, 
Oliver Optic's Magazine, 9 vols.; 1867-68, The 
Starry Flag Series, 6 vols.; 1869, Our Standard 
Bearer, i vol. ; 1869-70, The Lake Shore Series, 
6 vols.; 1870-72, The Onward and Upward 
Series, 6 vols.; 1871-77, Young America Abroad, 
second series, 6 vols.; 1872-75, The Yacht Club 
Series, 6 vols.; 1875-81, The Great Western 
Series, 6 vols. ; 1876, Living Too Fast (for adult 
readers), i vol.; 1877, History of Union Lodge, 
Dorchester, i vol.; 1880-92, Our Utile Ones, 13 
vols.; 1882-85, The Boat Builder Series, 6 vols.; 
1889-93, The Blue and Gray Series, Navy; new 
series. The Blue and Gray, Army, begun 1893, 
2 vols, written, but not published ; The All-over- 
the-World Series, 8 vols., 2 not yet published. 
For all of his books Mr. Adams's preparation 
has been most thorough. The voyage of the 
" Young America " in the " Young America 
Abroad " series, for instance, was properly drawn 
out in red ink on the chart of the North .\tlantic 
before the writing of the story was begun ; and, 
to insure accuracy of description in the twelve 
books of this series, he made two trips to Europe, 
visiting every country, and sailing the seas and 
rivers within its boundaries. Before he wrote 
the " Lake Shore " series he made a special trip 
to the lake and surrounding country. For the 
" Army and Navy " series he consulted old sailors 
and soldiers. He has been to Evirope nine times, 
twice to Nassau and the south side of Cuba, has 
visited nearly every State in the United States 
and the British Provinces, and sailed on the large 
rivers and great lakes. In the library of his 
house in the Dorchester District of Boston he 
has, besides about three thousand books, mostly 
consulted in his work, large numbers of maps, 
charts, diagrams, and plans ; and, adjoining his 
house, he has a workshop well stocked with tools 
and machinery, in which he has himself worked 
out many of the things described in the " Boat 
Builder " series and other books. Mr. Adams 
served one year (1868) in the General Court as a 
representative for Dorchester, declining a re-elec- 
tion, and for fourteen years was a member of the 
school committees, four years of that of Dorches- 
ter immediately preceding the annexation of the 
town to Boston (1870), and ten years immediately 
following, of the Boston board. For about twenty 
years he was either teacher or superintendent of 
the Sunday-school of the Dorchester First Church. 
He belongs to the Masonic order, and for three 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



13 



years was master of the Union Lodge ; and he 
is a member of the ( )ld Dorchester Club, of the 
Massachusetts Yacht Club (honorary member, an 
original member of the Dorchester Yacht Club, 
which became the Massachusetts Yacht Club), 
and of the Boston Press Club. In politics he has 
been a Republican from the origin of the party, 
with Independent tendencies. His first vote was 
for Henry Clay, and he was a Whig as long as 
the party existed. In 1884 he was a "Mug- 
wump," and supported Cleveland's first term ; 
but in 1892 he voted the national Republican 
ticket, and also the Republican ticket in State 
elections. Mr. Adams was married in October, 
1846, to Miss Sarah Jenkins, of Dorchester. She 
died March 7, 1885. Their children were : Ellen 
Frances (died at the age of eighteen months), 
Alice (now the wife of Sol Smith Russell, the 
comedian), and Emma (wife of George W. White, 
of the Suffolk bar, died May 25, 1884). With 
the exception of about six months in Minneapolis 
(1887 ), where his daughter, Mrs. Sol Smith Russell, 
made her home, he has resided in Dorchester 
since 1843. 



he was a leader, and served on the important 
committees on tiie judiciary, on public service, 
mercantile affairs (chairman), liquor laws, rules, 
and bills in the third reading ; and as mayor of 
Cambridge he was re-elected for his second term 
unanimously, on the record of his first. From 
1884 to 1892 he was a member of the Democratic 
State Committee, its secretary for four years, 
and on the finance and executive committees ; he 
served also for some time on the Democratic Con- 
gressional and county committees: and in 188S 
he was a delegate to the National Democratic 




.'XLGER, Alpheus Brown, member of the bar, 
mayor of the city of Cambridge for two years, 
was born in Lowell, October 8, 1854, son of 
Edwin A. and Amanda (Busw-ell) Alger. On the 
paternal side he is descended from Thomas .\lger 
who settled in Bridgewater in 1665. He attended 
the public schools of Lowell, and was there 
prepared for college, entering Harvard in 187 1, 
from which he graduated in 1875. The same 
year he entered the Harvard Law School, and a 
year later continued his law studies in the office 
of Judge Josiah G. Abbott, of Boston. He was 
admitted to the bar in 1877, and began practice 
in Boston, in association with his father's firm. 
Brown & Alger, continuing his residence in Cam- 
bridge, to which city the family had moved during 
his first year in college. He early took an in- 
terest in politics. In 1878 he became a member 
of the Democratic city committee of Cambridge, 
was made its secretary, and subsequently its 
chairman ; and his connection with the organiza- 
tion was continued unbroken until 1891, his first 
year in the maj'oralty. In 1884 he was a member 
of the Cambridge Board of .Vldermen ; in 1886 
and 1887 a State senator; and in 1S91 and 1892 
mayor of the city of Cambridge. In the Senate 




A. B. ALGER. 

Convention at St. Louis. He belongs to a num- 
ber of fraternal orders, — is a member of the Ami- 
cable Lodge, Free Masons, Boston Commandery ; 
of the Ponemah Tribe Improved Order of Red 
Men (of which order he was a great sachem in 
1891, and a great representative to the council 
held in Atlanta, Ga., in 1892); of St. Omer 
Lodge, Knights of Pythias ; of Aleppo Temple, 
Order of Mystic Shrine ; and of the Haymakers. 
Among the social organizations with which he is 
connected are the Central Club, of Somerville, the 
Arlington Boat Club, and the Bay State of Mas- 
sachusetts (Democratic dining club), of which he 
is secretary and treasurer. From 189 1 to 1892 
he was chairman of the Board of Harvard Bridge 



H 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Commissioners, and was a member of the Charles 
River Improvement Commission, estabhshed by 
act of the Legishiture of 1891. He is unmarried. 



AMES, Frederick Lothrop, capitaHst, dis- 
tinguished especially in American railroad enter- 
prises, was born in Easton, June 8, 1835, son of 
Oliver, 2d, and Sarah (Lothrop) Ames; died Sep- 
tember 16, 1893. He was a lineal descendant of 
William Ames, who came to Massachusetts from 
Bruton, in the shire of Somerset, England, about 
the year 1635, and settled in Braintree ; was 
great-grandson of Captain John Ames, who began 
the making of shovels in West Bridgewater about 
1773 ; and grandson of Captain John's son Oliver, 
who learned his trade at his father's forge, and in 
1803 established in North Easton the works and 
firm which in later years attained wide reputation 
under the name of Oliver Ames & Sons. Of 
these sons, Oliver, 2d, the father of Frederick L., 
and Oakes Ames were the best known from their 
prominence in railroad development and in the 
building of the Union Pacific. The mother of 
Frederick L. was the daughter of Hon. Howard 
Lothrop, of Easton, who had served in the Massa- 
chusetts Senate, and in various other official posi- 
tions, and sister of the Hon. George Van Ness 
Lothrop, United States minister to Russia during 
the first administration of President Cleveland. 
Frederick L. Ames received his early education 
at Concord, was fitted for college at Phillips 
(Exeter) Academy, and graduated at Harvard in 
the class of 1854. In his youth he had a strong 
inclination towards the law, but, in accordance 
with his father's wishes, soon after graduation he 
entered the family business at North Easton. 
Beginning as a clerk in the office, he secured pro- 
motions from grade to grade, according to the 
rules which prevailed in the establishment, and 
after several years' service as a subordinate was 
placed in charge of the accountant's department, 
where he displayed marked business ability. In 
his twenty-eighth year, by the death of his grand- 
father ( 1863), he became a member of the firm. 
In 1876, when the firm was reorganized under the 
title of the Oliver Ames & Sons Corporation, he 
was made treasurer, and soon after succeeded his 
father as the official and actual head of that great 
manufacturing concern. Before the death of his 
father, which occurred in 1877, he had invested 
extensively in Western railroads; and, while he 



was still comparatively a young man. he was 
a director in the Union Pacific, the Chicago & 
Northwestern, the Missouri Pacific, and the 
Texas Pacific, and had gradually diverted his in- 
terest from manufacturing to railroads. Subse- 
quently, while retaining his interest in the factory 
of his ancestors and continuing as treasurer of the 
corporation, he extended and enlarged his rail- 




FRED. L. AMES. 

road operations, and became conspicuous among 
the foremost men of the railroad world. He was 
universally conceded to be one of the best in- 
formed men in .\merican railroad business, and 
one of the best judges of the value, quality, re- 
sources, and possibilities of railway property. At 
the time of his death he was vice-president of the 
Old Colony Railroad, a director in the Old Col- 
ony Steamboat Company, and director in a great 
number of other railroad companies in various 
parts of the country, including the following : the 
Atchison, Colorado &: Pacific; Atchison, Jewell 
County & \\'estern ; Boulder Valley & Central 
City \\'agon Road ; Carbon Cut-off Company ; 
Central Branch Union Pacific ; Chicago & North- 
western ; Colorado Western ; Denver, Leadville 
& Gunnison ; Denver Union & Terminal ; Echo & 
Park City; Fall River, \\'arren & Providence ; the 
Fitchburg system ; Fort Worth &: Denver City ; 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



15 



Gray's Peak, Snake River .S; Leadvillc ; Golden, 
Boulder & Caribou ; Junction City eS: Fort Kear- 
ney ; Kansas Central ; Kansas City iS; Omaha ; 
Laramie, North Park & Pacific Railroad & Tele- 
graph Company; Lawrence & Emporia ; Leaven- 
worth, Topeka & Southwestern ; Loveland Pass 
Mining &: Railroad Tunnel Company ; Manhattan, 
Alma & Burlingame ; Montana Union ; Montana 
Railway ; North Park & Grand River Valley Rail- 
road & Telegraph ; Omaha & Elkhorn Valley ; 
Omaha & Republican Valley ; Oregon Railway & 
Navigation Company; Oregon Railway Extensions 
Company ; Oregon Short Line & Utah Northern ; 
Providence, Warren & Bristol ; St. Joseph & 
Grand Island ; Salina & Southwestern ; Solomon ; 
Union Pacific ; Union Pacific, Lincoln & Colo- 
rado ; Union Pacific, Denver & Gulf ; Washington 
& Idaho ; Walla Walla & Columbia River. He 
was also largely interested in other important en- 
terprises and in numerous financial institutions. 
He was a director of the Western Union Tele- 
graph Company, the General Electric Company, 
the New England Trust Company, the Old Colony 
Trust Company, the Bay State Trust Company, 
the American Loan & Trust Company, and the 
Mercantile Trust Company of New York; and 
president of the Hoosac Tunnel Dock & Elevator 
Company, of the First National Bank of North 
Easton, and of the North Easton Savings Bank. 
He was the largest owner of real estate in Boston, 
and as a client of the late H. H. Richardson exer- 
cised a marked influence for improvement upon 
the business architecture of the city. The most 
substantial monument of his work in this direc- 
tion is the lofty tower-like Ames Building, on 
the corner of Court and Washington Streets, de- 
signed by Richardson's successors, a rich and 
original example of the great office structures that 
now characterize the leading American cities. In 
his various business operations and great under- 
takings he neglected no details which ought to 
occupy his attention, his business habits were 
most methodical, his judgment was clear, cool, 
and sound, and his probity unquestioned. Mr. 
Ames was a liberal patron of the arts as well as 
an eminent business man, and possessed decided 
literary and intellectual tastes. In his winter 
home in Boston he had a superb collection of 
paintings, including two fine portraits by Rem- 
brandt, dated 1632, and valuable examples of 
Millet, Rousseau, Troyon, Diaz, Daubigny, Corot, 
and others ; rich tapestries, jades, and crystals, 



among the latter the largest known. From early 
life he was deeply interested in horticulture, and 
for nearly thirty years was an active member of 
the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, long one 
of its vice-presidents and a member of its finance 
committee. His collection of orchids, at his 
country home in North Easton, one of the most 
e-xtensive and beautiful estates in New England, 
surpasses all other collections of these plants in 
the country, and in number, variety, and condition 
has no superior. His love of nature was real and 
profound ; and his exact and comprehensive knowl- 
edge of the plants in which he was particularly 
interested gave him an international reputation 
among orchidologists, and many rare orchids have 
been named for him. His large greenhouses, 
with their wealth of horticultural beauty, were 
freely opened by him, not only to the residents of 
North Easton, but to visitors from far and near. 
His interest in rural economy was active, and for 
many years he was a trustee of the Massachusetts 
Society for Promoting Agriculture. In politics 
Mr. Ames was originally a Whig, but later be- 
came a Republican. He never cherished polit- 
ical aspirations, and was disinclined to enter 
public life. In 1872, during his absence from the 
State and without his knowledge, he was nomi- 
nated for the State Senate, and much against his 
will was elected. During his term he served on 
the committees on manufactures and on agricult- 
ure, and was influential in legislation. In relig- 
ion he was a LInitarian, taking an active part in 
the affairs of the church at North Easton and of 
the First Church in Boston ; and he was one 
of the most generous givers to denominational 
work and institutions. He was, too, a liberal con- 
tributor to charitable enterprises, and personally 
devoted much time and money to benevolent 
undertakings. He was president of the Home 
for Incurables, and a trustee of the New England 
Children's Hospital, of the Massachusetts General 
Hospital, and of the McLean Insane Asylum. 
He was also much concerned in the work of the 
Kindergarten for the Blind, connected with the 
Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for 
the Blind. He was warmly devoted to the wel- 
fare of Harvard University, especially interested 
in the Arnold Arboretum and the Botanical De- 
partment, the usefulness of which was greatly ex- 
tended through his liberality. At the time of his 
death he was one of the Fellows and trustee 
of Harvard College. His devotion to his native 



i6 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



town is displaced in the beautiful arcliitectural 
additions wliich lie made to it. With his ni'ither 
and sister he largely increased the bequest left by 
his father to build, equip, and endow a public 
library there, and, employing Richardson as archi- 
tect, built the present structure, one of the most 
beautiful library buildings in the country; and the 
railroad station, also of Richardson's design, was 
erected at his expense for the adornment of the 
village. Mr. Ames was married June 7, i860, 
to Miss Rebecca Caroline Jilair, only child of 
James Blair, of St. Louis, Mo. They had si.x 
children, of whom five are now living : Helen 
.\ngier (now the wife of Robert C. Hooper, of 
Boston), Oliver (married to Elise A. West, of 
Boston), Mary Shreve, Lothrop, and John Stanley 
Ames. 



financially and otherwise to its support and suc- 
cess. In his fourteenth j-ear, the one in which 
he w'as to be graduated from the grammar school, 
he was obliged, by the severe illness of his father, 






^ 



ARMSTRONG, George Washington, founder 
of the Armstrong Transfer Company, Boston, and 
proprietor of the consolidated news and restau- 
rant business on New England railroad systems, 
is a native of Boston, born August 11, 1836, son 
of David and Mahalia (Lovering) Armstrong. 
He is of Scotch and Pilgrim blood. On the pa- 
ternal side he is an offshoot of the Scotch clan of 
Armstrong, who dwelt near Gilnockie, Cannobie, 
Castleton, and adjacent parishes in the Lowlands 
of Scotland known as the " Debateable Country," 
and near the English border. His ancestors emi- 
grated from Scotland to the north of Ireland, and 
from thence to the Londonderry Settlement in 
New Hampshire. He is a direct descendant of 
Charter Robert Armstrong, one of the original 
settlers in the Londonderry Settlement, and one 
of its proprietors June 21, 1722. On the maternal 
side he is a descendant of a brother of the Puri- 
tan, Governor Edward Winslow. The home of 
his paternal ancestors has been for several gen- 
erations in that portion of the original township 
of Londonderry, N.H., known as Windham since 
1742 ; and of that place his father was a native. 
His father came to Boston in 1825, and worked at 
ship-building. In 1S50 he fell seriously ill, and 
died in the autumn of 1851, leaving a small es- 
tate. George W. Armstrong was educated in the 
public schools of Boston, and was one of the boys 
of the "Old Hawes Grammar School." Of this 
school he entertains many pleasant recollections ; 
and in the deliberations and proceedings of its 
"Association," of which he is a member, he has 
always taken an active part, and has contributed 




GEO. W. ARMSTRONG. 

to leave his studies, and was thrown largely upon 
his own resources. He first began his work as a 
"penny postman," the forerunner of the letter 
carrier of to-day, his district being the whole of 
South Boston. Next he was office boy for the 
South Boston Gazette and the Sunday News, local 
journals then existing; and then he was newsboy 
on State Street. In March of 1852 he became 
a newsboy on the old Boston & Worcester Rail- 
road, now of the Boston & Albany line, where he 
continued about nine years. The last year and a 
half of that time he was in the employ of the com- 
pany in various capacities, principally as baggage 
master, sleeping-car conductor, and as conductor 
on the regular trains. Then he became manager 
of the news business on the line. In 1863 he 
had become half-owner of the news-room in the 
Boston station of the Boston & Albany Railroad, 
and also of the restaurant there. In eight years 
he was sole proprietor, and was extending his 
interest in this branch along the line of the road ; 
and his newsboys were upon every train. In 
1869 he purchased the news business of the 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



17 



Fitchburg Railroad. His work broadened out, 
and enlarged so that in 1875 his operations ex- 
tended over the old Eastern Railroad, and he 
had become proprietor of the restaurants and 
news-rooms in the Boston station, at Portsmouth, 
Wolfeboro, N.H., and Portland, Me. His busi- 
ness on the lioston & Albany Road then included 
the restaurants and news-rooms of the stations at 
South Franiingham, Palmer, and Pittsfield. Sub- 
sequently his control was extended over the entire 
restaurant and news business of the Boston & 
Albany, of the Eastern Division of the Boston & 
Maine, and of the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn, 
part of the dining business on the Old Colony, 
and all of the news business on the Fitchburg 
Railroad ; and to his system has recently been 
added the news business on the Western Division 
of the Boston & Maine Railroad. While the 
business interests of Mr. Armstrong have been 
large and widely extended, as has been shown, 
they have not been confnied to one department. 
Indeed, his life has been full of activities. He 
developed the enterprise now represented by the 
well-known "Armstrong Transfer Company'' of 
Boston, which dates from iiS65, when he pur- 
chased " icing's Baggage F>xpress," and organ- 
ized the business on a systematic and substan- 
tial basis. The plan of checking baggage from 
one station to another to accommodate railway 
passengers was introduced with other features, 
and a line of passenger carriages and transfer 
coaches was added as part of the system. This 
company was incorporated in 1882, with Mr. 
Armstrong as its president, and Charles W. Sher- 
burne treasurer. He is also a member of the 
Board of Directors of the Worcester, Nashua & 
Rochester Railroad, and of that of the Manches- 
ter & Lawrence Railroad ; and he is a large 
shareholder in each. Though he cannot be 
called a club man, Mr. Armstrong is a member of 
several associations, among them being the Bos- 
tonian Society, of which he is a life member, the 
Scotch-Irish Society of America, the Beacon So- 
ciety of Boston, and other associations. He mar- 
ried December 10, 1868, Miss Louise Marston, of 
Bridgewater, N.H., who died February 17, 1880. 
Their children were Mabelle, born February 21, 
1870, and Louise, born October 22, 187 1, died 
December 22, 1876. He married secondly, De- 
cember 12, 1882, Miss Flora E., daughter of Dr. 
Reuben Greene, of Boston. Their children are : 
Ethel, born June 7, 1884, and George Robert. 



born December 10, 1888. His home was in 
Boston from his birth until 1875. when he pur- 
chased an attractive estate in lirookline, where he 
has since lived. 



B.\ILEY, Andrew Jackson, city solicitor of 
Boston, is a native of Charlestown, born July 18, 
1840, son of Barker and Alice (.Ayers) Bailey. 
He was educated in the Charlestown public 
schools, and at Harvard in the class of 1863. 
Upon the breaking out of the Civil War he en- 
listed, April 16, 1 86 1, in the Charlestown City 
Guards, then Company K, Fifth Regiment Massa- 
chusetts Volunteers, and was in the first battle of 
Bull Run. At the close of this term of service 
he returned to college. Enlisting again in 1864, 
he was commissioned second lieutenant, Com- 
pany H, Fifth Regiment. At the close of the 
war he studied law with Hutchins & Wheeler of 
Boston, and afterwards with John W. Pettingill 
of Charlestown ; and was admitted to the bar in 
1867. From 1866 to 1871 he was clerk of the 




A. J. BAILEY. 



police court in Charlestown; in 1868 and 1869 
a member of the Charlestown Connnon Council, 
president of that body the latter year ; from 1869 
to 1872 a member of the Charlestown School 



i8 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Board: in 1871-72-73 a representative from 
Charlestown in the lower house of the Legislat- 
ure; in 1874 a member of the Senate ; after the 
annexation of Charlestown to Boston a member 
of the Boston Common Council nearly two terms 
(1880-81), its president the second term until 
November, 1881, when he resigned and was 
elected city solicitor, which office he has since 
held continuously by election or appointment. 
When a member of the House of Representatives, 
he served on the committees on probate and 
chancery, elections, and mercantile affairs (chair- 
man of the last two) ; and, when in the Senate, 
he was a member of the committees on Hoosac 
Tunnel, prominently identified in the legislation 
which resulted in the acquisition of the tunnel 
by the Fitchburg Railroad, and chairman of the 
committee on labor matters, reporting the first 
bill passed by the Legislature regulating the em- 
ployment of women and children in manufactur- 
ing establishments. He is the author of a large 
amount of important Massachusetts statute law. 
Mr. Bailey is prominently connected with the 
Masonic order and a number of associations and 
clubs. He is a member of the Massachusetts 
Commandery of the Loyal Legion ; a member of 
the Grand Army, for two years judge advocate 
of the department of Massachusetts ; a charter 
member of Faith Lodge of Free Masons, a mem- 
ber of the Hugh de Payen Commandery; a mem- 
ber of the Bunker Hill Monument Association; 
and of the Art, Athletic, and Suffolk clubs of 
Boston. He was one of the promoters of the 
Soldiers' Home in Massachusetts, and has been 
on the Board of Trustees since its incorpora- 
tion. Mr. Bailey married in January iS6g, 
Miss Abby V. Getchell, daughter of John and 
Hannah Getchell, of Charlestown. 



the brokerage business in Boston, establishing the 
firm of Ballou tV- Mifflin, which, during the Civil 
War period and subsequently, did a large and 
profitable trade. In i86g he was elected vice- 



BALLOU, MuRR.^v Rdukkts, chairman of 
the Boston Stock Exchange, was born in Boston, 
July 21, 1840, only son of Maturin M. and Mary 
Ann (Robert.s) Ballou. He comes of Huguenot 
stock. His grandfather was the eminent Univer- 
salist minister, Hosea Ballou, who was called the 
"father of modern Universalism " ; and his father 
is the well-known author of numerous books of 
travel, and founder of several successful periodi- 
cals. He was educated in Boston, in the iJixwell 
schools, and at Harvard College, graduating from 
the latter in 1862. After graduation he entered 




M. R. BALLOU. 

president of the Stock Exchange, and the next 
year president ; and since that time he has been 
the presiding officer, having been annually re- 
elected president until 188S, when that office was 
made honorar}-, as it is in New \ork, and there- 
after chairman, the office at the same time created. 
Mr. Ballou was married December, 1863, to Miss 
Lucretia B. Howland, daughter of James How- 
land, of New Bedford. They have four children : 
Maturin Howland, Elise Murray, Franklin Bur- 
gess, and Mabel Ballou. 



BARRE'lT, William Emerson, manager of 
the Boston Daily Advertiser and the ETeiiiiii^ 
Reeon/, and for five consecutive years speaker of 
the House of Representatives, is a native of Mel- 
rose, born December 29, 1858, son of .\ugustus 
and Sarah (P^merson) Barrett. He was educated 
in Melrose public schools, the High School of 
Claremont, N.H., where his father was engaged in 
manufacturing and the family lived for some 
years, and at Dartmouth College, graduating from 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



19 



the latter in 1880. Choosing as his profession 
journalism, at which he had tried his hand on the 
college paper and in other directions while an 
undergraduate, he found a place in the editorial 
office of the Alesscngcr of St. .Mbans, \'t., soon 
after graduation, and there worked in various ca- 
pacities for two years, occasionally contributing 
news-letters, and despatches to New York papers. 
In r882 he was given a position as correspond- 
ent on the staff of the Daily Advertiser in Bos- 
ton, and, after a preliminary trial as the Ad- 
vertiser " special " in the early autumn campaign 
in Maine, was assigned to the Washington office of 
the paper, where he was established as its regular 
correspondent. In this line of journalistic work 
he rapidly developed, early taking rank among 
the most active men of " Newspaper Row." As 
a news-gatherer, he was alert, prompt, enterpris- 
ing; and his frequent note and comment on men 
and things in and about Congress were always 
bright and often brilliant. During the national 
campaign of 1884, when the Advertiser had be- 
come an independent journal, and was opposing 
the election of Mr. Blaine, he was assigned to 
special service in certain " doubtful " States in 
the West ; and his letters and despatches then 
published were among the most important and 
interesting contributions to the literature of that 
memorable canvass. Although himself a stanch 
Republican, he was given a free hand, his instruc- 
tions being to state the situation as he found it, 
regardless of the editorial attitude of the paper ; 
and this he did with remarkable frankness and 
accuracy. .At another time, while holding his 
position at Washington, he served as clerk of the 
special congressional committee to investigate the 
so-called Copiah, Mississippi, outrages. In Jan- 
uary, 1886, the ownership of the Advertiser 
changed, and it again became a Republican party 
paper, the managers who had conducted it as 
an independent journal withdrawing ; and in June 
of that year, the paper then being without a head, 
Mr. Barrett was recalled from Washington to the 
home office, and placed in editorial charge. 
Within a year he became the publisher as well as 
the editor of the paper, and the leading owner of 
the property. Subsequently he was made presi- 
dent of the " Advertiser Newspaper Company," 
which succeeded the '• Boston Advertiser Corpora- 
tion," and publisher of the Advertiser and Evening 
Record, the latter a penny paper, established in 
September, 18S4. In 1887 Mr. Barrett was first 



elected to the lower house of the Legislature 
from his native town of Melrose, and with his 
service in the session of 1888 began a remarkable 
political career. Returned the next year, he was 
made speaker of the House by a vote of two hun- 
dred and thirteen to one scattering ; and by re- 
peated re-election he held this position through the 
sessions of 1890-91-92-93, in every case receiving 
a practically unanimous vote after his renomina- 
tion in caucus, and in 1892 being complimented, 
without preliminary caucus of either party, by an 
absolutely unanimous vote of the whole House. 
In the preliminary canvass of 1891 for the Repub- 
lican nomination for governor he was conspicuous 
among several mentioned for that position; and 
in 1893 he was the Republican candidate for Con- 
gress in the Seventh District, in the by-election 
of .\pril, to fill the vacancy caused by the election 
of its representative, Henry Cabot Lodge, to be 
senator. In this contest, after a spirited canvass, 
he met his first defeat, his Democratic competitor. 
Dr. William Everett, carrying the district by the 
narrow margin of thirty-four votes. Declining to 




WM. E. BARRETT. 



stand for a sixth term in the Legislature, he 
closed his career as speaker with the session of 
1893. Mr. Barrett is a member of many social 
and fraternal organizations. He was married on 



20 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



December 28, 1887, in Claremont, N.H., to Miss 
Annie L. Bailey, daughter of Herbert and Alice 
(Sulloway) Bailey. They have three children: 
William E., Jr.. Florence, and Ruth Barrett. 



BARTOL, Rev. Cyrus Augustus, upwards of 
fifty years minister of the West Church of Boston 
(Unitarian), quarter of a century colleague of the 
Rev. Charles Lowell, is a native of Maine, born 
in the little seaport town of Freeport, April 30, 
1813, son of George and Ann (Given) Bartol. 
He is of English, Irish, and Italian descent. 





CYRUS A. BARTOL. 

Bartolo, Bartolozzi, IJarthokli, and BerthoUet are 
Italian and French synonymes of his father's 
name. His mother's grandsire left the Romish 
Church to marry a wife : he had been a priest. 
Attaining his early education in the common 
schools, Cyrus A. was fitted for college in the 
High School of Portland, where his father was 
at that time a merchant, and entered Bowdoin 
in the class of 1828. At the close of his junior 
)'ear he was elected president of his college lit- 
erary society, having, as one of his classmates in 
after years testified, '• no peer that could for a 
moment contest that honor, bestowed by the 
votes of students upon character and scholarship, 



with him at that time." After graduation from 
the college he came to the Harvard Divinity 
School, and took the regular three years' course, 
graduating in 1835. He had been preaching but 
a little over a year, first in Cincinnati, Ohio, where 
he was settled in 1835-36, and six months as 
minister-at-large in Boston, when he was called to 
the West Church as Dr. Lowell's colleague, or- 
dained on the first day of March, 1837. This re- 
lation " in all love and harmony " held till the 
death of Dr. Lowell in 1861, when he became sole 
pastor. On the first of March, 1887, the fiftieth 
anniversary of his ministry here, and the one hun- 
dred and fiftieth anniversary of the foundation of 
the West Church, were observed by a memorable 
service in the old meeting-house on Cambridge 
and Lynde Streets, in which the minister. Rev. 
Drs. Frederic H. Hedge, George E. Ellis, Alonzo 
A. Miner, George A. Gordon of the Old South 
Church, Robert Colh'er, Cyrus Hamlin, president 
of Roberts College, Constantinople (a college 
mate of Dr. Bartol), and Phillips Brooks, the 
Brahmin Babu Mohini M. Chatterji, then visiting 
Boston, James Russell Lowell, and Governor 
Ames took part. He retired in 1889, resigning 
the office of pastor September 30, that year; and 
on May 5 the last service in the church was held. 
He has been identified with many progressive 
clubs ; was frequently host of the celebrated Rad- 
ical Club which flourished in Boston in the late 
sixties and seventies ; and he has been called the 
last of the Transcendentalists. His church, al- 
though classed as Unitarian, has steadfastly held 
an independent attitude from Dr. Lowell's pastor- 
ate through his own, known as the " Independent 
Congregational Society." He has been described 
as a " reverent radical, an acute and way- 
ward conservative, standing aloof with his church 
from all ecclesiastical entanglements,'' and " by 
the flag of individual freedom in matters of re- 
ligion." The degree of doctor of divinity was con- 
ferred upon him by Harvard Llniversity in 1859. 
Dr. Bartol's publications constitute a notable list, 
including many sermons in pamphlet form and sev- 
eral volumes of sermons and essays. The latter 
embrace " Discourses on the Christian Spirit and 
Life" (first published in 1850, second edition re- 
vised 1854); "Discourses on the Christian Body 
and Form" (1854); " Pictures of Europe framed 
in Ideas," essays suggested by a European tour 
(185s); "History of the West Church and its 
Ministers" (1858) ; "Church and Congregation " 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



21 



(1858): "Word of the Spirit to the Church" 
(1859); "Radical Problems" (1872); "The 
Rising Faith " (1874) ; and "Principles and Por- 
traits" (1880). He has also published a number 
of occasional essays, portrait eulogies on William 
Ellery Channing, John Weiss, \\'illiam Lloyd Gar- 
rison, " Father "' Taylor, and William M. Hunt, 
the artist, and some poetry ; and a miniature book 
of selections from his writings, under the title 
of "Grains of Gold," was brought out by the Uni- 
tarian Association in 1854. Dr. Partol was mar- 
ried in Boston, February 7, 1838, to Elizabeth 
Howard, daughter of Dr. John Clarke and Hepzi- 
bah (Swan) Howard. They had one child. Eliza- 
beth Howard Bartol, who has become well known 
as a painter. He has lived during most of his 
life in Boston, at No. 17 Chestnut Street, West 
End, one of the quaintest and oldest houses in the 
street ; and his sunnner residence has been for 
many years at Manchester-by-the-sea. 



BENNETT, Joseph, member of the Suffolk 
bar, long identified with the interests of the 
Brighton District of Boston, is a native of Maine, 
born in Piridgton, May 26, 1840, son of William 
and Charlotte Bennett. His early education was 
attained at the district school in Sweden, Me., 
and at the Bridgton Academy. Then, moving 
with his parents to Massachusetts, he completed 
his preparation for college in the lioston Latin 
School, and entered Bowdoin College with the 
class of 1864. He was obliged to withdraw in 
the Junior year, but subsequently he received 
from the college the degree of A.B. out of course. 
He began the study of law soon after leaving col- 
lege in the office of Asa Cottrell, Boston, and 
was admitted to the Suffolk bar in 1866. Two 
years later he was admitted to the bar of the 
United States Circuit Court, and in 1882 to prac- 
tice before the United States Supreme Court. 
He was trial justice in Middlesex County at the 
time of the annexation of Brighton to Boston (in 
1874), and for some years after annexation was 
special justice of the Municipal Court of the 
Brighton District. He has served in both 
branches of the Legislature, — member of the 
House of Representatives in 1880, and of the 
Senate in 1881-82, and again in 1891. In the 
latter body he was a leader, the first two terms 
chairman of the committee on taxation and of 
that on election laws, and twice chairman of the 



committee on redistricting the State into Congres- 
sional districts, — in 1882 and in 1891, — the only 
instance of the kind. In the Senate of 1891 
also he was chairman of the committee on rail- 
roads, on rules and orders, and on constitution 
amendments. Other committees on which he 
served when a senator were those on the judi- 
ciary and on probate and chancery. For several 
years before annexation he was a member of the 
Brighton School Committee, and was one of the 
early trustees of the Holton Library, now ab- 
sorbed in the Brighton Branch of the Boston Pub- 
lic Library, .\fter annexation he served some 




JOSEPH BENNETT. 

time on the Boston School Committee. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican, and has been active with 
the leaders of his party in his section of the State. 
In the campaign of 1893 he was prominent 
among those mentioned for the Republican nomi- 
nation for attorney-general. Mr. Bennett was 
married in Boston, April 26, 1866, to Miss Eliza- 
beth R. Lafavour, daughter of John and Mary 
(Harding) Lafavour. They have three children: 
Joseph I., F"rederick S., and Mary E. Bennett. 



BIGELOW, JoN.ATHAN, ex-president of the 
Boston Fruit and Produce Exchange, is a native 



22 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



of Conway, born January i, 1825, son of Jona B. 
and Relief (Newhall) Bigelow, the eldest of a 
family of ten children. He traces his lineage 
from John Bigelow, who settled in Watertown in 
1632, and now lives in the town of his ancestors. 
He left home when a lad of nine years to live 
with an uncle, then a butcher in Charlestown ; and. 




JONATHAN BIGELOW. 

the latter soon moving to a farm in Brighton, he 
worked there at farming, attending school during 
the winter months. He took advantage of every 
opportunity for the acquisition of knowledge, and 
at nineteen was well equipped for school-teaching. 
He found a position in the South, as teacher in 
the town school, in Screven County, Georgia, 
sixty miles from Savannah ; and here he remained 
about a year, obtaining a good idea of the man- 
ners and customs of the South before the war. 
Returning North some time in 1846, he estab- 
lished himself in a general boot and shoe busi- 
ness in Roxbury. This was continued success- 
fully for ten years ; and then he entered the 
produce commission trade, to which he had al- 
ready given much practical study. He first 
formed a partnership with Z. C. Perry, under the 
firm name of Perry \: Bigelow, and was estab- 
lished at No. 3 North Market Street. They re- 
mained there in company about a year, when he 



bought his partner's interest. Soon after he moved 
to No. 25 North Market Street, and in 1859 to 
No. 23, the site he has since occupied. In 1859 
the firm name first became Jonathan Bigelow & 
Co. Subsequently it was changed to Bigelow, 
Maynard & Magee, then to Bigelow & Magee, and 
then, in 1865, again to Jonathan Bigelow & Co., by 
which it has since been known. It is one of the 
oldest produce commission houses in Boston, re- 
ceiving consignments from more than thirty of the 
difterent States and Territories, besides the Brit- 
ish Provinces. Since 1888 Mr. Bigelow has been 
president of the National Butter, Cheese, and Egg 
Association. In 1887 he was a member of the 
lower house of the Legislature from the Sixteenth 
Middlesex representative district, and in that 
session was earnest in support of various reform 
measures, and took a pronounced position on the 
butterine and oleomargarine question. He in- 
troduced a bill for registration in dentistry, 
another giving women who are entitled to vote 
on candidates for school committee the right to 
vote on the liquor license question, and a third 
for tlie removal of obstructions to the entrances 
of gambling-rooms. The first and last of these 
bills became laws : the second was carried in the 
Mouse, but defeated in the Senate. Mr. ISigelow 
was one of the earliest members of the Boston 
Produce Exchange, and president of the Fruit 
and Produce Exchange. He is also a member 
of the Boston Chamber of Commerce, of the 
Boston Associated Board of Trade, of the Boston 
Merchants' Association, of "The Market Men's 
Republican Club," of the Massachusetts Republi- 
can Club, and of the Middlesex (political dining) 
Club, of the Colonial Club of Cambridge, of the 
South Middlesex Unitarian Club, and of the 
" Old School Boys' Association of Boston." He 
belongs to the Masonic order, a member of 
Mount Olivet Lodge, of Cambridge Royal Arch 
Chapter, and of the DeMolay Commandery 
Knights Templar; is a past district deputy 
grand master, and a member of the Past District 
Deputy Grand Masters' Association. In religion 
he is a Unitarian, and has been active in the 
Unitarian church and Sunday-schools where he has 
resided. He was married in 1847 to Miss Sarah 
Brooks, of Brighton. Their children are : Sam- 
uel Brooks, Lizzie Jane, Henry J., and Louis 
H. Bigelow. The daughter Lizzie died when 
three and one-half years old. His two eldest 
sons are in business with him. 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



23 



RIGELOW, Melville Madison, author and 
lecturer on law in the Boston University and other 
institutions, is a native of Michigan, born near 
Eaton Rapids, August 2, 1846, son of the Rev. 
William Enos and Daphne (Mattison) Bigelow. 
He is a grandson of J. Gardner and Thankful 
(Enos) Higelow, great-grandson of Jabez, Jr., and 
.'Mmy (CJardner) Bigelow, great-great-grandson of 
Jabez and Susanna (Elderkin) Bigelow, great- 
great - great - grandson of Gershom and Rachel 
(Gale) Bigelow, great -great -great -great -grandson 
of Joshua and Elizabeth (Flagg) Bigelow, great- 
great-great-great-great-grandson of John and Mary 
(Warren) Bigelow, or, rather, Begeley or Bageley, 
the form of the name until about the middle of 
the 17th century, when at Watertown, Mass., an- 
cestral home of all the Bigelows, it gradually 
began to take its present form. Mr. Bigelow is 
of Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, 
Vermont, and New York, but in the main of Mas- 
sachusetts ancestry. John, first of the foregoing 
line, served in the war against the Pequots and 
also in King Philip's War ; Joshua, second of the 
line, served in King Philip's War; Jabez, Jr., 
fifth of the line, served as a private soldier in 
the Revolution ; the father, Joseph Enos, of 
Thankful (Enos), si.xth of the line, served as a 
lieutenant in the Revolution ; while through Su- 
sanna (Elderkin), fourth of the line, Mr. Bigelow 
is descended from John Elderkin (1616-87), 'he 
famous church-builder, millwright, and shipwright 
of Massachusetts and Connecticut, who built the 
first churches and the first mills in New London 
and Norwich, Conn., and in other places, and also 
the first merchant vessel ever owned or built in 
New London, the " New London Trj-all,'' in 
1 66 1. His early education was attained in the 
public schools, ending with the high school, in 
Michigan. Then he entered the University of 
Michigan, and, graduating in 1866, was admitted 
to the bar two years afterwards. Some years 
later he came to Harvard University, where he 
received the degree of Ph.D. in 1879. After 
leaving college he devoted himself to unremit- 
ting work in legal and historical pursuits, in 
connection with professional duties, giving much 
time to historical studies relating to law. He 
has been mainly engaged in legal authorship, 
and in lecturing in the law schools of Boston 
University, the University of Michigan, and the 
Northwestern University. His law books have 
been fax'orably received in England as well as in 



this country. One of them (on Torts) has been 
published by the I'niversity of Cambridge, Eng- 
land, and is used in its Law School as a te,xt- 
book. Besides this work (English ed. 1889 ; 4th 
American ed. 1891), the following are Mr. Bige- 
low's more important works: I, aw of Estoppel, 
(1872 ; 5th. ed. i8go); Law of Fraud on its Civil 
Side, two volumes (vol. i, 1888; vol. 2, 1890); 
Elements of the Law of Bills, Notes, and Cheques 
(1893) ; History of Procedure in England, Nor- 
man Period (London, 1880). He has also edited 
the last editions of Story on Conflict of Laws, 
Story on Equity Jurisprudence, Story on the Con- 
stitution, and Jarman on Wills. He has a large 
acquaintance among people of distinction through- 
out the LTnited States and in England, and is a 
member of a number of learned societies at home 
and abroad. He is a Fellow of the Society of 
Science, Letters, and Arts, London ; member of 
the Council, Selden Society, London ; associate. 




MELVILLE M. BIGELOW. 

Victoria Society, London ; was made an honorary 
member of the Athenaeum Club, London, in and 
for the summer of 1889 ; is a member of the Mas- 
sachusetts Society of Sons of American Revolu- 
tion, and of the American Historical Association ; 
honorary member of the Texas Historical Society ; 
and honorary member of the New Vork State Bar 



24 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Association. In politics he is an Independent 
witli Republican proclivities, favoring low tariff. 
Mr. Bigelow was first married, in i86g, to Miss 
Elizabeth Bragg. By this union were three chil- 
dren : Ada Hawthorne and Charlotte Gray, both of 
whom died in 1876, and Leslie Melville Bigelow. 
His first wife died in 1881. His second wife, to 
whom he was married in 1883, was Miss Cornelia 
Frothingham Read. She died in 1892, leaving no 
children. 



BRACKETT, Jt)HN Quincv Adams, governor 
of Massachusetts in 1890, is a native of New 
Hampshire, born in Bradford, June 8, 1842, son 



f 


A. ' 


-ifif r^, "MIHIfe^ . 


^ r 



J. Q. A. BRACKETT. 

of Ambrose S. and Nancy Brackett. There his 
boyhood was spent, and his early education at- 
tained ; but since his college days he has been a 
resident of Massachusetts. He was fitted for col- 
lege at Colby Academy, New London, N.H., and 
entered Harvard in the class of 1865. He ranked 
well with his classmates, and was class orator ; 
and his graduation was with honors. Then he 
took the Harvard Law School course, graduating 
in 1868. The same year he was admitted to the 
Suffolk bar, and early entered upon a lucrative 
practice. He subsequently formed a partnership 
with the late Hon. Levi C. \\'ade, and is now the 



senior member of the law firm of Brackett & Rob- 
erts. He began his public career as a member 
of the Boston Common Council, where he served 
four terms (1873-76), the last one as president. 
Then he was elected to the lower house of the 
Legislature ; and here, through repeated re-elec- 
tions, his service covered eight years (1877-81 
and 1884-86). During this period he served on 
many important committees, among others those 
on taxation, labor, and the judiciary, being chair- 
man of each, and the special committee of 1881 
on the revision of the Statutes ; and was identi- 
fied with much important legislation. The last 
two terms he occupied the Speaker's chair, each 
time elected to the speakership by a large ma- 
jority. In 1886 he was nominated by his party 
for lieutenant governor, with Oliver Ames at the 
head of the ticket, and was elected in the Novem- 
ber election. This position he held for three 
years (1887-88-89), and then, nominated for the 
governorship to succeed Governor Ames, was 
elected for the term of 1890. Renominated for a 
second term, he was defeated, after a close can- 
vass, by William E. Russell, the Democratic can- 
didate. While serving as lieutenant governor, 
Mr. Brackett performed the duties of governor 
on several occasions, and always with credit to 
the Commonwealth. In the capacity of acting 
governor he represented Massachusetts at Co- 
lumbus on the occasion of the celebration of the 
centennial of the settlement of Ohio, in the sum- 
mer of 1888 ; and a year later he repre.sented the 
State at the dedication of the Pilgrim Monument 
at Plymouth. He was one of the delegates at 
large from Massachusetts to the Republican Na- 
tional Convention at Minneapolis in 1892. Since 
his retirement from public station he has devoted 
himself sedulously to the practice of his profes- 
sion, and has been concerned in noteworthy 
causes. During his long association with Boston 
interests he has been connected with a number 
of local institutions. He was for many years a 
member of the Mercantile Library Association, 
its president in 1871, and again in 1882, and is 
now one of its life members. He is a member 
of the University Club, of the Boston Art Club, 
of the Arlington Boat Club, of the Massachusetts 
and Middlesex dinner clubs, of the Republican 
Club of Massachusetts, and of other organizations. 
He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity. 
From 1874 to 1876 he was judge advocate on the 
staff of General I. S. Burrell, of the First Brig- 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



ade, Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. Governor 
Krackett was married June 20, 1878, to Miss 
Angle M. Peck, daughter of .Abel G. I'eck, of 
Arlington, where he now resides. They have had 
four children, of whom two are living : John 
Gaylord and Beatrice Krackett. 



BRAGG, Henry \\'ili..\rii, member of the Suf- 
ff)lk bar, is a native of Holliston, born December 
II, 1841, son of VMllard and Mary Matilda 
(Claflin) Bragg. His paternal grandfather was 
Colonel Arial Bragg, of Milford, and his mater- 
nal grandfather, Martin Claflin, also of Milford. 




HENRY W. BRAGG. 

His early education was acquired in the Milford 
High and the Pittsfield High schools ; and his 
collegiate training was in the llniversity of the 
City of New York and in Tufts College, this 
State, the freshman and sophomore years at the 
former, and the junior and senior years at the 
latter, from which he was graduated in 1861. He 
studied law in Natick in the office of the Hon. 
John W. Bacon (afterwards Judge Bacon, of the 
Superior Court) and the Hon. George L. Sawin, 
from January. 1863 to November, 1864, when he 
was admitted to the bar in Middlesex County. 
He began practice in Charlestown in January, 



1865, and in November, 1868, also opened an 
office in Boston, where he has practised since in 
State and United States courts. For the last ten 
years he has acted as master in equity cases, and 
as auditor and referee in a large number of cases 
arising in Suffolk, Middlesex, and Norfolk coun- 
ties. He has quite an extensive practice, also, 
in the probate courts in Suffolk and Middlesex 
counties, and is trustee of several estates and 
trust funds. He was city solicitor of Charles- 
town in 1867, 1868, 1869, 1870; special justice 
of the municipal court of Charlestown from 1870 
to 1886 ; master in chancery, Middlesex County, 
from i86g to 1874; and has been master in 
chancery, Suffolk County, from 1874 to the pres- 
ent time ; justice of the municipal court of the 
Charlestown District from the first of December, 
1886, to the present time ; and solicitor of the 
Warren Institution of Savings of Charlestown 
since 1867. He has long been connected with 
the Masonic order : member of the Meridian 
Lodge of Natick, in 1863 ; a charter member of 
Faith Lodge, Charlestown, and master of the 
same ; and a member of Signet Chapter. He is 
a member also of numerous clubs, — of the Uni- 
versity, Curtis, Taylor, and Abstract clubs of 
Boston, of the 99gth Artillery of Charlestown, 
and of the college societies Zeta Psi and the 
Order of the Coffee Pot. In politics he is a Re- 
publican. Judge Bragg was married January 11, 

1866, in Milford, to Miss Fallen Francis Haven. 
They have no children living. 



BROOKS, Fr.ancis Au(;ustus, member of the 
Suft'olk bar since 1848, prominent for twenty 
years in corporation and railroad cases, was born 
in Petersham, May 23, 1824. His father, Aaron 
Brooks, was a graduate of Brown University in 
18 1 7, a leading lawyer in Worcester County, and 
a representative in the General Court in 1834-35. 
He received his early training at Leicester Acad- 
emy, and was there fitted for college. He entered 
Harvard in 1838, the youngest member of his 
class, and graduated in 1842. After graduation 
he studied at the Harvard Law School and in 
the law offices of his father in Petersham and 
of Aylwin & Paine in Boston, and in 1845 w^as 
admitted to the bar in Worcester County. He 
began the practice of his profession in Petersham, 
but in 1848 removed to Boston, where he has 
since been established. Until 1875 his practice 



26 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



was chiefly in patent cases ; but since that time tions to the literature of the suljjects treated, 
he has devoted himself to corporation and raih'oad For some time Mr. BrooVis was president of the 
cases, in the conduct of which he has gained Vermont & Canada Railroad, and he is now 

president of the old Nashua & Lowell. Mr. 
Brooks was married at Groton, September 1 4, 
1847, to Miss Frances Butler, daughter of Caleb 
and Clarissa (Varnum) Butler. Mr. Butler, his 
wife's father, was a graduate of Dartmouth in 
1800, a lawyer by profession, principal of the 
^^■. Groton Academy eleven years, postmaster thir- 

teen years, and the author of a History of Gro- 
ton. Of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Brooks 
there are now living three sons : F'rederick and 
Charles Butler, of Boston, and Morgan Brooks, 
of Minneapolis. 




FRANCIS A. BROOKS. 

distinction. One of these most notable cases was 
between the Vermont Central and the Vermont 
& Canada railroads, two corporations of Ver- 
mont. This was one of the early cases in which 
the courts of this country assumed the exercise of 
powers of legislation by authorizing receivers, 
placed by them in the possession and manage- 
ment of railroad property, to incur debts having 
precedence of right over prior existing mortgages. 
While pursuing his profession, Mr. Brooks has 
given much study to public questions, notably the 
Force bill and currency problems, and has pub- 
lished his views in numerous contributions to the 
press and in pamphlet form. In 1891 and 1893 
he published pamphlets relating to the legislation 
of Congress in the acts known as the National 
Currency Act of 1864, the Bland-.Allison Act of 
1878, and the Sherman Act of 1890, in which he 
took ground that, as measures for furnishing a 
currency or circulating medium in times of peace, 
these acts of legislation were not within the legiti- 
mate power of Congress under the Constitution. 
These publications have attracted much atten- 
tion, and are recognized as valuable contribu- 



BUNTING, William Morton, of Plymp- 
ton ..V Bunting, general managers of the Penn 
.Mutual Life Insurance Company for New Eng- 
land, was born in Philadelphia. Penna., March 
24, 1855, son of John and Elvira (Andrews) 
Hunting. His father was a native of England, 




WM. M. BUNTING. 



born in Manchester ; and his mother was of 
Rhode Island, born in Providence. He was 
educated in the public schools of Philadelphia, 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



27 



and in that city began business life as clerk in 
a broker's office. Subsequently he went to New 
York, and there was engaged for many years in 
the fire-arms business. He entered the insurance 
business in 1882, when he was made general 
agent of the Penn Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany for Massachusetts, with headquarters in 
Boston. Two years later he formed a copart- 
nersliip with Noah A. Plympton, under the firm 
name of Plympton & Punting ; and they then 
became the general managers of the New Eng- 
land department of the same company. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican, and in 1894 served 
on the military staff of Governor Greenhalge, an 
aide-de-camp, with the rank of colonel. He 
is a member of the Algonquin, Art, Athletic, 
Suffolk, Country, and New England clubs of 
Boston, and president of the Bunting Club. He 
is also a thirty-second degree Mason. He was 
married December 19, 1881, to Miss Mary 
Alexander, of Philadelphia. They have two 
children : Morton Ale.xander and Florence Bunt- 
ing. Colonel Bunting resides in the Back Bay 
District of Boston. 



BUTTERWORTH, Hezekiah, author, and an 
assistant editor of the Youth's Companion, Boston, 
is a native of Rhode Island, born in Warren, 
December 22, 1839, son of Gardner and Susan 
(Ritchie) Butterworth. His ancestry is traced 
to the first settlers of Rhode Island and to 
founders of the first Baptist ciiurch in Massa- 
chusetts. He was educated in the local schools, 
fitted for college in the Warren High School, and 
pursued a private course in Brown University. 
Subsequently he received the degree of B.A. from 
Madison l^niversity. He lived on the farm in 
Warren until he was twenty-eight years of age, 
early engaging in literary work, — editing a local 
paper, and contributing to the New \'ork In- 
dcpiiiiliut, the then existing Appliton's Jonrnal, 
the Boston Congrcgationalist, the Yont/i' s Com- 
panion, and other periodical publications. He 
became an assistant editor of the Youth's Com- 
panion, taking a desk in the Boston office, early 
in 1870 ; and he has continued in this position 
ever since. He has written thirty books. "The 
Story of the Hymns," w-hich he wrote for the 
American Tract Society, received the " George 
Wood" gold medal in 1875. ^"f' '''•''s passed 
through many editions. His "Zigzag Journey- 



ings " (Boston : Estes iS: Lauriat) number sixteen 
volumes, of which nearly four hundred thousand 
copies have been sold. .Among his other books 
are four volumes of historical tales, published by 
the Appletons, New \"ork ; and two volumes of 
poems, — " Poems for Christmas, Easter, and 
: Estes & Lauriat), and 
(Boston : New England 
He has also been a con- 
tributor of late years to the Atlantic Monthly, 
Harper's, and the Century. He wrote the poem 
for the opening of the Peace and Arbitration 
Congress at the Columbian Exposition of 1893, 



New Year's " (Boston 
" Songs of History " 
Publishing Company). 




HEZEKIAH BUTTERWORTH. 

which gave a picture of the march of the Arvan 
race and of the white-bordered fiag as the new 
emblem and leader of that race ; and it was sub- 
sequently issued in pamphlet form by the Peace 
Society. He is now (18941 preparing a series of 
books to be called " New England Wonder Tales," 
and is about to issue a volume of poems on 
Florida. Mr. Butterworth has visited Europe, 
Cuba, Mexico, and Venezuela, and most places 
in the United States and Canada. In politics 
he is a " Mugwump." He belongs to the Re- 
ality Club, Boston, the Authors' Guild, New 
York, and other literary societies. He is un- 
married. 



28 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



CLEMENT, Edward Henry, editor-in-chief of 
the Boston Evening Transcript, is a native of 
Chelsea, born April 19, 1843, son of Cyrus and 
Rebecca Fiske (Shortridge) Clement. He is a 
descendant of Robert Clement who came to 
Massachusetts Bay Colony from Coventry, Eng- 
land, in 1643, was chosen to buy and survey the 
territory of Haverhill, set up the first mill in tiie 
town, represented Haverhill in the General Court, 
and whose son's marriage was the first marriage 
in the town; and on the maternal side he de- 
scends from Alnjaii Gage, an Essex County 




E. H. CLEMENT. 

worthy. His mother was a graduate of Bradford 
Academy. He was educated in the Chelsea pub- 
lic schools and at Tufts College, where he was 
graduated in 1864 at the head of his class. He 
began his professional life as a reporter and as- 
sistant editor of an army post newspaper, started 
in 1865, with the deserted plant of the Savannah 
Netc's, by Oscar G. Sawyer and Samuel W. Mason, 
army correspondents of the New York Herald, 
stationed at Hilton Head, S.C. The dislike of 
the Southern community for a Northern editor 
necessitated his retirement from this paper soon 
after the close of the war. Returning to Boston 
in 1867, he was for a few weeks chief proof-reader 



on the Daily Aihrrtiser. Resigning this position, 
he went to New York to take a place in the 
proof-room of the Tribune, but instead of that he 
was assigned by John Russell Young, at that time 
the managing editor of the paper, to the city 
editor's department as a reporter. He was soon 
after promoted to the position of " exchange edi- 
tor," then advanced to the telegraph editor's desk, 
and then was made night editor. Leaving the 
Tribune in 1869, he was for a short time manag- 
ing editor of the Newark (N.J.) Daily Advertiser, 
and in 187 1 became one of the editors and 
proprietors of the Elizabeth (N.J.) Journal. His 
connection with the Boston Transcript began in 
1875, when he was called to the position of as- 
sistant editor by William A. Hovey, at that time 
its chief editor. After an active service as leader 
writer, and critic of art, music, and the drama, he 
became chief editor upon Mr. Hovey's retirement 
in 1 88 I. Under his management the high stand- 
ard established by his distinguished predecessors 
in the editorial chair of the Transcript has been 
sustained, and its reputation and business success 
as a favorite Boston mstitution strengthened. 
Mr. Clement is in its columns generous in his 
hospitality to all charitable enterprises, and, in 
general, befriends liberal and progressive social 
ideas and political independence. The close at- 
tention paid to the details of his newspaper work 
has prevented his cultivation of general literature, 
but he has written at odd times a number of short 
stories for Harper's Weekly and other periodicals, 
occasional letters of art criticism to the Art Ama- 
teur of New York, poetry for the Century and the 
Atlantic Monthly : and at the Norumbega celebra- 
tion at Watertown, November 21, 1889, he deliv- 
ered a long poem on Vinland, which has been 
commented upon in the New York Critic and else- 
where as an important contribution to literature. 
Mr. Clement has been a member of the Papyrus 
Club and of several benevolent societies of Boston. 
He was one of the founders of the St. Botolph Club, 
and proposed the name it adopted, since which 
American revival of the name of the old English 
Boston's patron saint it has been attached to a 
street here, and been perpetuated in many other 
connections. In 1870 he received the honorary 
degree of A.M. from Tufts. He was married 
December 23, 1869, in New York City, to Miss 
Gertrude Pound, daughter of the church organist, 
John Pound. They have three children : two 
sons, educated at Harvard, and a daughter. In 



MEN OF I'ROCRESS. 



1893 jNIr. Clement establiblied his home at Corey 
Hill, Brookline. 



CODMAN, Colonel Charles Russell, eldest 
son of Charles Russell and Anne (Macmaster) 
Codman, was born in Paris, France, October 28, 
1829, while his parents were passing a season 
abroad. On his father's side he is of early New 
England stock, the Codman family having been 
identified with Charlestown and Boston since 1640, 
and descended from Edward and Mary Winslow of 
the ''Mayflower" company; and, on his mother's 
side, he is of Scotch origin through her father, and 
of New York Dutch descent through her mother, 
from the Dey and Van Buskirk families. His 
father was a Boston merchant; and his grand- 
father, the Hon. John Codman, laid the founda- 
tion of the family fortune. His paternal grand- 
mother was a daughter of the Hon. James Russell, 
of Charlestown. He was educated in Boston pri- 
vate schools, in the late Rev. William A. Muhlen- 
berg's school near Flushing, L.I., where he spent 
three years, and at Harvard College, graduating 
from the latter in the class of 1849. Subse- 
quently he studied law in the Boston oflfice of the 
late Charles G. Loring, and in 1852 was admitted 
to the Suffolk bar. He practised, however, but 
a short time, early engaging in general business. 
During the Civil War he served as colonel of the 
Forty-fifth Massachusetts Regiment, having previ- 
ously been lieutenant and captain in the Boston 
Cadets. He served in North Carolina with the 
Eighteenth Army Corps, and was in several 
battles, including those of Kinston and White 
Hall, N.C., December 14 and 16, 1862, and in a 
number of skirmishes. He began public life as 
a member of the Boston School Committee in 
1861 and 1862. Then in 1864, after his return 
from service in the field, he was sent to the State 
Senate from a Boston district, and the following 
year returned ; and later on he served four terms 
(from 1872 to 1875) in the lower house of the 
Legislature, taking a leading hand in legislation, 
and acting on important committees, the last two 
terms as chairman of the committee on the judi- 
ciary. In 1878 he was the Republican candidate 
for mayor of Boston, and, although defeated, gave 
his Democratic competitor (Mayor Prince) a close 
run. In 1890 he stood for Congress as an Inde- 
pendent Democrat in the First District, a Repub- 
lican stronghold, making a spirited and earnest 



canvass on tariff and other reform issues, which 
resulted in a marked decrease in the Republican 
plurality. In his political convictions he has 
always been independent. Beginning active life 
as a \\'hig, he gave his support to the Republican 
party in its early days, joining it in 1856, when 
resistance to the slave power seemed to him a 
duty. In 1884, in common with others who had 
been conspicuous as Republican leaders, he re- 
fused to support Mr. Blaine for the presidency, 
and, withdrawing from the organization, took a 
leading part in the Independent, or so-called 




CHARLES R. CODMAN. 

" Mugwump," movement in support of Mr. Cleve- 
land. Subsequently, when the Democratic party 
took position for liberal tariff legislation, and the 
Republican party adopted the high protection 
policy, he entered into full fellowship with the 
former organization, advocating its principles with 
his able pen and eloquent voice. He has also 
long been identified with the cause of civil service 
reform, and was among its earliest advocates. In 
1880 and 1881, and again from 1887 to 1890, 
Colonel Codman was president of the Board of 
Overseers of Harvard University, to which he was 
first elected in 1S78. He is president of the 
Massachusetts State Homoeopathic Hospital and 
of the Boston Provident Association, and trustee 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



of the State Insane Asylum in Westborough. He 
is a member of the Massachusetts Historical So- 
ciety and of the Union and Massachusetts Reform 
clubs, president of the latter. He was married 
at Walton-on-Thames, England, February 28, 
1856, to Miss Lucy Lyman Paine Sturgis, daugh- 
ter of the late Russell Sturgis of Boston, and 
afterwards of the firm of Baring Brothers & Co., 
London. They have three sons and two daugh- 
ters living : Russell Sturgis, Anne Macmaster, 
Susan NN'elles, John Sturgis, and Julian Codman. 
Since 1855 Colonel Codman's principal residence 
has been in Cotuit, Barnstable ; his winter resi- 
dence, in Boston. 



CORCORAN, John William, member of the 
Suffolk bar and ex-justice of the Superior Court, 
is a native of New York State, born in Batavia, 
June 14, 1853,' son of James and Catherine (Don- 
nelly) Corcoran. His parents had moved to 
Batavia from Clinton, this State, not long before 
his birth ; but, when he was a child three months 
old, the family returned to Clinton, and that town 




JOHN W. CORCORAN. 

has since been his home. He attended the Clin- 
ton public schools and pursued his collegiate 
studies at Holy Cross College, Worcester, and at 
St. John University, Fordham, N.Y., which con- 



ferred the degree of LL.D. upon him June 21, 
1893. Subsequently he entered the Boston U^ni- 
versity Law School, and, graduating therefrom in 
187^, was at once admitted to the bar. He began 
practice in Clinton at first alone, but soon formed 
a copartnership with Herbert Parker, under the 
firm name of Corcoran &: Parker, which relation 
continued a number of years. In 1883 he was 
made town solicitor, the office that year created, 
which he occupied until June, 1892, then resigning 
it to go upon the bench. The same year (1883) 
and again in 1884 he was candidate for district 
attorney of ^^'orcester County, but failed of elec- 
tion. In 1 886 he was nominated for attorney- 
general on the Democratic State ticket, and re- 
nominated in 1887 ; in 1888, 1889, 1890, and 
1 89 1 was Democratic candidate for lieutenant 
governor, in the three years last named running 
ahead of all the other candidates except the head 
of the ticket ; in 1891 and part of 1892 was judge 
advocate-general on Governor Russell's staff; 
and in May, 1892, was made associate justice of 
the Superior Court by appointment of Governor 
Russell. The latter position he occupied, alily 
meeting its requirements, until November 22, 
1893, when he resigned to return to practice, re- 
tiring with the esteem of his associates on the 
bench and a heightened reputation. Since 1889 
he has had an office in Boston as well as in Clin- 
ton, and upon his retirement from the bench he 
took up the business left by the Hon. P. A. Col- 
lins, made consul-general at London by President 
Cleveland in the spring of 1893. In his practice 
he has given especial attention to corporation and 
business matters. In January, 1886, he was ap- 
pointed by the Comptroller of the United States 
receiver of the Lancaster National Bank in Clin- 
ton, whose president had absconded, leaving the 
concern burdened with worthless paper ; and he 
so managed the trust that the creditors received 
one hundred and nine per cent., in full of their 
claims, including interest, the first dividend, of 
fifty per cent., being declared si.x months after 
it came into his hands. Mr. Corcoran became 
active in State politics early in his career. In 
1880 he was a candidate for State senator from 
his district ; he was a member of the Democratic 
State Committee from 1883 until his appointment 
to the bench in 1892, when he resigned; in 
1891-92 was chairman of that body : and he was 
delegate to the National Democratic conventions 
of 1884, 1888, and 1892, in that of 1888 acting 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



as chairman of the Massachusetts delegation, and that successful and useful institution. In 1873 
in that of 1892 a delegate at large for Massachu- and 1874 he was a member of the Massachusetts 
setts, receiving the largest vote. In his town of House of Representatives, serving both years as 
Clinton he has been for eighteen years a mem- chairman of the connnittee on bills in the third 
ber of the School Board, for the last ten years its 
chairman ; a member of the Board of Water Com- 
missioners since its organization in 1881, some 
time its secretary and treasurer and chairman ; 
and president of the Board of Trade two terms 
(1886-87). He is a member of the Algonquin. 
Papyrus, and Clover clubs of Boston (president 
of the latter) ; a member and vice-president of the 
Young Men's Democratic Club of Massachusetts: 
and he was chairman of the Massachusetts Board 
of Managers of the ^\'ork^s Columbian Exposi- 
tion in 1893. Judge Corcoran was married in 
Boston, April 28, 1881, to Miss Margaret J. 
McDonald, daughter of Patrick and Mary Mc- 
Donald. They have two daughters and one son : 
Mary Gertrude, Alice, and John Corcoran. 



CROCKKR, Georoe Glover, president of the 
State Senate in 1883, and subsequently chairman 
of the Board of Railroad Commissioners, is a na- 
tive of Boston, born December 15, 1843, son of 
Uriel and Sarah Kidder (Haskell) Crocker. On 
the paternal side his direct ancestor in the seventh 
generation was William Crocker, who about the 
year 1634 came to this country from Devonshire, 
England, and who married in Scituate in 1636, 
and with his wife, Alice, moved to Barnstable in 
1639. His father's mother's mother was daugh- 
ter of Colonel Jonathan Glover of Marblehead, of 
Revolutionary fame, the brother of General John 
Glover, whose statue is in Commonwealth Avenue, 
Boston. On his mother's side his ancestry is 
traced also in the seventh generation to \\'illiam 
Haskell, who came from England to Beverly in 
1632. G. G. Crocker was educated in Boston 
private schools, the public Latin School, where 
he took a Franklin medal, and at Harvard, gradu- 
ating therefrom in the class of 1864. He studied 
law in the Harvard Law School, receiving the 
degree of LL.B. in 1866. In 1867 he received 
the degree of A.M. Admitted to the Suffolk bar 
in July of that year, he began the practice of his 
profession in association with his brother, Uriel 
H. Crocker, devoting his attention principally to 
conveyancing. In 1868 he joined with others in 
re-establishing the Boston Young Men's Christian 
Union, and for nine years served as a director of 




GEO. G. CROCKER. 

reading. In 1S74 he was also chairman on the 
part of the House of the joint committee on the 
liquor law, and a member of the committee on 
rules and orders. In the autumn of 1874 he 
was the Republican candidate for senator in the 
Third Suffolk District, but was defeated by his 
Democratic competitor. In the summer of 1877 
he was chosen secretary of the Republican State 
Committee ; and this position he held two years, 
in the second of which was carried on one of 
the hottest of Massachusett's campaigns. General 
Butler, as the candidate of the Democrats and 
Greenbackers, made a most determined and confi- 
dent fight for the governorship ; but the Repub- 
lican candidate, Thomas Talbot, was elected by a 
plurality of over twenty-five thousand. In 1877, 
Mr. Crocker helped to promote the organization 
of the "Young Republicans," and two years later 
was made its chairman. In 1879 he was elected 
to the Senate. His service there, through re- 
peated elections, covered four terms (1880-83). 
The first year he was chairman of the committee 
on railroads and a member of the committees on 
the judiciary and on rules and orders. The 



32 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



second year he was chairman of the committees 
on railroads and on rules and orders ; and he 
was a member of the committee on the judiciarj-, 
and of the joint special committee on the revi- 
sion of the Statutes. He prepared the rules 
which the latter committee adopted to govern its 
sessions. The third year he was chairman of 
the committees on the judiciary and on rules 
and orders, and a member of the bills in the 
third reading and State House committees. 
The fourth year he was president of the Senate. 
During his third term he prepared a " Digest of 
the Rulings of the Presiding Officers of the 
Senate and House," covering a period of fifty 
years, which has since formed a part of the " An- 
nual Manual for the General Court." The ses- 
sion of 1883, when he was president, was the 
longest on record, the Legislature sitting two hun- 
dred and six days. It was the year when General 
Butler was governor, and the Tewksbury Alms- 
house investigation was the chief cause of the 
length of the session. In 1887 Mr. Crocker was 
appointed by Governor .Ames a member of the 
Board of Railroad Commissioners, to fill the 
vacancy caused by the death of the Hon. Thomas 
Russell ; and his associates elected him chairman 
of the board. In 1888 he was reappointed for 
the term of three years. At the expiration of this 
term, in July, 189 1, the Hon. Chauncey Smith 
was nominated for the position by Governor Rus- 
sell; but the Executive Council, by a vote of 
seven to one (seven Republicans to one Demo- 
crat), refused to confirm the nomination, and, as 
the governor made no other, Mr. Crocker contin- 
ued in office until January, 1892, when, the an- 
nual report of the board for the previous year 
having been completed, he resigned. In 1889 he 
was appointed by Mayor Hart chairman of a 
commission of three to examine the tax system 
in force in Boston, and report a more equitable 
one, if such could be devised. In March, 1891, 
this commission reported at length, recommend- 
ing, among other changes, that municipal bonds 
should be released from taxation, and that the 
many forms of double taxation should be abol- 
ished. Mr. Crocker published in 1889 (New- 
York: G. P. Putnam's Sons) a parliamentary 
manual, entitled "Principles of Procedure in De- 
liberative Bodies." In conjunction with his 
brother, I'riel H. Crocker, he also prepared the 
"Notes on the General Statutes," the first edition 
of which was published in 1869. A second edi- 



tion was published in 1875, and an enlarged edi- 
tion, " Notes on the Public Statutes," was brought 
out simultaneously with the publication of the 
revision of the Statutes in 1882. He is an 
officer of various business corporations, and is 
connected with a number of philanthropic organ- 
izations, — a life member of the Boston Young 
Men's Christian Union, of the Massachusetts 
Charitable Fire Society (president 1890, 1891), 
of the Massachusetts Charitable Society (treas- 
urer 188 1-), trustee of the Boston Lying-in Hos- 
pital (1881-), and a member of the Young 
Men's Benevolent Society. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Republican Club of Massachusetts 
(president 1894), of the Citizens' Association of 
Boston, the Boston Civil Service Reform Associa- 
tion, the Society for Political Education, the Bos- 
ton Memorial Association, the Bostonian Society, 
the Bar Association of Boston, the Harvard Law- 
School Association, the Boston Athletic Associa- 
tion, the Beacon Society; and of the LTnion, St. 
Botolph, Algonquin, Country, New Riding, Union 
Boat, and Papyrus clubs. Mr. Crocker was mar- 
ried on June 19, 1875, in Boston, to Miss Annie 
Bliss Keep, daughter of Dr. Nathan Cooley and 
Susan Prentiss (Haskell) Keep. They have five 
children : (leorge Glover, Jr., Margaret, Courte- 
nay, Muriel, and Lyneham Crocker. 



CROCKER, Uriel, was the head of the old 
established Boston printing and publishing house 
of Crocker & Brewster during its long and honor- 
able career, covering a period of fifty-eight years 
(1818-1876); and he was prominent in early rail- 
road and other enterprises. He was born in 
Marblehead, September 13, 1796, and died at 
Cohasset, at the summer residence of his son 
George G., on July 19, 1887, in his ninety-first 
year. His partner, Osmyn Brewster, died about 
two years later, at the age of nearly ninety-two. 
In 1868 the firm celebrated the fiftieth anniversary 
of the formation of their partnership, and in 1886 
the seventy-fifth anniversary of their first meeting 
as apprentices in 181 1. Mr. Crocker's father, 
also Uriel (born in 1768;, his grandfather, Josiah 
Crocker (born 1744), and his great-grandfather, 
Cornelius Crocker (born 1704), were all natives of 
Barnstable, the latter being the great-grandson of 
William and .Mice Crocker, who were married in 
Scituate in 1636, and moved to Barnstable in 
1639, and were the ancestors of the numerous 



MEN OF I'KOGRESS. 



C'rockers who, originating on Cape Cod, have 
scattered throughout the country. Cornelius 
Crocker was a man of importance, and the 
owner of considerable property in Barnstable. 
Josiah, his son, was a graduate of Harvard Col- 
lege (1765) and a schoolmaster in liarnstable. 
Uriel, Josiah"s son, came up to Boston, when a 
young man, to learn the trade of a hatter, and 
went to Marblehead to live, where he married his 
first wife, who died within a year after marriage. 
The subject of this sketch was one of eight chil- 




URIEL CROCKER. 

dren by Uriel Crocker's second wife, Mary James, 
daughter and only child of Captain Richard James 
of Marblehead, and Mary, his wife, daughter of 
Colonel Jonathan Glover, a colonel in the State 
militia, and brother of General John Glover. 
Uriel Crocker, 2d, graduated from the academy at 
Marblehead in August, 181 1, as first scholar: and 
in the month following, on the day after he was 
fifteen years old. he began work in Boston as an 
apprentice in the printing-office of Samuel T. 
Armstrong (afterwards mayor of Boston and act- 
ing governor of the Commonwealth), who also 
carried on a bookselling business. At nineteen 
he was made foreman of the printing-office, and 
at twenty-two was, with his fellow-apprentice. 



O.smyn Brewster, taken into partnership, the agree- 
ment being that the bookstore was to be con- 
dut:ted in the name of Mr. .\rmstrong, and the 
printing-office in that of Crocker & Brewster. 
After 1825 the entire business was carried on 
under the name of Crocker iS: Brewster ( Mr. .Arm- 
strong, however, continuing a member of the firm 
until 1840), the printing-oftice being in Mr. 
Crocker's especial charge, and the bookstore in 
that of Mr. Brewster. In 182 1 a branch of the 
business was established in New York, which five 
and a half years later, being sold to Daniel Apple- 
ton and Jonathan Leavitt, became the foundation 
of the present house of I). Appleton & Sons. The 
business of Crocker & Brewster in Boston was for 
nearly half a century established in the building 
to which Mr. Crocker first went as an apprentice 
(the estate now numbered 173 and 175 Washing- 
ton Street). In 1864 it was moved to the adjoining 
building, where it remained until 1876, when the 
firm relinquished active business, selling their 
stereotype plates, copyrights, and book stock to 
H. O. Houghton iV' Co. The partnership, how- 
ever, continued until it was dissolved by the 
death of Mr. Crocker. The books published 
by the firm were many and important, largely 
standard and educational works. One of the 
principal of them was Scott's Family Bible in si,x 
royal octavo volumes, which was the first large 
work that was stereotyped in this country, and of 
which from twenty to thirty thousand copies — 
a large number for those days — were sold. In 
speaking of the publications of the firm at the 
fiftieth anniversary of its formation, Mr. Crocker 
said. "It is pleasant for an old printer, when 
thinking of the many millions of pages which have 
issued from his press, to know that there is 

' Not one immoral, one corrupting tliouglit, 
No line which, dying, he would wish to blot ! '" 

The firm introduced in Boston the first iron lever 
printing-press, and they printed from the first 
power press in Boston. Mr. Crocker was one of 
the organizers of the Old Colony Railroad Com- 
pany, a director from 1844 to 1850, and again 
from 1863 till his death. He was a director of the 
Northern (N.H.) Railroad Company from 1854 till 
his death ; director of the Concord Railroad from 
1S46 to 1866; director of the Atlantic & Pacific 
Railroad from 1868 to 1874, vice-president from 
1870 to 1873, and president in 1874; director of 
the South Pacific Railroad in 1870; and director 



34 



MEN OF I'ROGRESS. 



of the St. Louis iS: San Francisco Railroad in 
1877. He was president and director of the 
" Proprietors of the Revere House," Boston, from 
1855 till his death; director of the United States 
Hotel Company from 1848 till his death, and 
president from 1863 till his death; director of the 
South Cove Corporation from 1840, and president 
from 1849 till his death ; president and director 
of the South Hay Improvement Company from 
1877 till his death; and director of the Tremont 
Nail Company from 1858 to 1879, and president 
from 1872 to 1879. He was a leader in the 
movement for the erection of the Bunker Hill 
Monument, and throui;h his efforts the sum of 
forty thousand dollars was raised for the fund. 
He was director of the Monument Association 
from 1833 till 1869, and vice-president from 1869 
till his death, declining to accept the position of 
president. He was a member of the Massachu- 
setts Charitable Mechanic Association for sixty- 
three years, having been treasurer from 1S33 to 
1841 ; a member of the Massachusetts Charitable 
Fire Society for thirtj'-seven years, having been 
vice-president in 1874 and 1S75. and president in 
1876 and 1877 ; of the Massachusetts Charitable 
Society for sixty-three years, having been presi- 
dent in 1858 and treasurer from 1859 to 188 1 ; of 
a "Republican Institution" for thirty-nine years, 
having been director, vice-president, and presi- 
dent; of the Board of Managers of the Boston 
Dispensary from 1838 till his death; a trustee of 
Mount Auburn Cemetery from 1856 to 1S65; a 
member of the standing committee of the Old 
South Society from 1836 to 1857, and chairman 
of the committee from 1848 to 1856. He was 
also one of the original corporators of the Frank- 
lin Savings Bank of the City of Boston ; an over- 
seer of the Boston House of Correction; a trustee 
of the Boston Lying-in Hospital; and a member 
of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, of the 
New England Historic Genealogical Society, and 
of the Bostonian Society. The honorary degree 
of A.M. was conferred upon him by Dartmouth 
College in 1866. He was married in 1829 to 
Miss Sarah Kidder Haskell, a daughter of Elias 
Haskell of Boston, known during the later years 
of his life as " Deacon Haskell," having been for 
nearly forty years a deacon of the West Church. 
Mrs. Crocker died January 16, 1856, at the age 
of fifty years. Their children were Uriel Haskell 
Crocker, Sarah Haskell Crocker, and George 
Glover Crocker. 



CROCKER, L'kiKL Haskell, member of the 
Suffolk bar, was born in Boston, December 24. 
1832, son of Uriel and Sarah Kidder (Haskellj 
Crocker. [For ancestry, see Crocker, George G., 




URIEL H. CROCKER. 

and Crocker, Uriel.] His early education was 
acquired in the private schools of Miss Jennison 
and of Thompson Kidder. Then he attended the 
Boston Public Latin School, where he was fitted 
for college, and, entering Harvard, graduated in 
the class of 1853. After graduation he studied 
law in the Dane (Harvard) Law School for two 
years, then for one year in the office of Sidney 
Bartlett in Boston. He was admitted to the bar 
of Suffolk County in 1856, and since then has 
been engaged in practice as a lawyer, chiefly as 
a conveyancer. He is the author of two legal 
books, "Notes on Common F'orms " and "Notes 
on the Public Statutes of Massachusetts." He 
has also published several pamphlets on subjects 
connected with political economy, their chief 
object having been to refute the doctrine of 
the impossibility of general overproduction, as 
taught by John Stuart Mill, and maintained by 
economists since his time, and to show that 
saving, though it has in the past been productive 
of great benefit to mankind, may, when carried 
to an extreme, be productive of disastrous re- 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



35 



suits. The principal of these pamphlets are 
entitled " Excessive Saving a Cause of Commer- 
cial Distress," published in 1884, and "Overpro- 
duction and Commercial Distress," published in 
1887. In the early years of the agitation for the 
establishment of a public park for Boston (1869 
to 1875) Mr. Crocker was very active and prom- 
inent in advocating that measure. He was a mem- 
ber of the Boston Common Council in 1874-75- 
76-77 and 78, and was one of the commissioners 
to revise the Statutes of Massachusetts in 188 1. 
He is a member of the Massachusetts Historical 
Society, the Bunker Hill Monument Association, 
the Massachusetts Charitable Society, the Massa- 
chusetts Charitable Fire Society, " A Republican 
Institution," and of the Union, St. Botolph, 
Country, New Riding, and L'nitarian clubs. He 
has been clerk, treasurer, and director of the 
South Cove Company, director and president of 
the United States Hotel Company, clerk, treas- 
urer, and director of the " Proprietors of the 
Revere House," director of the Northern (N.H.) 
Railroad, chairman of the standing committee of 
the West Church, treasurer of the Boston Civil 
Service Reform Association, member of the gen- 
eral committee of the Citizens' Association of 
Boston, president of the Boston I.ying-In Hos- 
pital, and member of the board of managers of 
the Home for Aged Women. He was first mar- 
ried, January 15, 1861, to Miss Clara G. Ballard, 
daughter of Joseph Ballard of Boston, by whom 
were three sons : George Uriel, Joseph Ballard, 
and Edgar. She died May 14, 1891. On 
April 29, T893, he was married to Miss Annie J. 
Fitz, his present wife. 



made the first clearing in Sunnier, Me., taking 
up bounty lands assigned to him and his father. 
Prentiss Cummings's early education was acquired 
in the common schools, and he fitted for col- 
lege at Phillips (Exeter) Academy. He entered 
Harvard in the class of 1864. Immediately after 
graduation he became master of the High School 
of Portland, Me. Here he remained but a few 
months, however, soon entering the oflice of 
Nathan Webb, afterward Judge Webb of the 
United States District Court, and beginning the 
study of law. The next year he attended the 
Harvard Law School, holding also, after Thanks- 
giving, the ofiice of proctor in the college. In 
October, 18G6, he received the appointment of 
tutor in Latin in Harvard Lhiiversity ; and this 
position he held until March, 1870. Then, re- 
signing, he resumed his law studies ; and on the 
3d of May, the following year, he was admitted 
to the bar. He established himself in Boston, 
and began at once the practice of his profession. 
In September, 1874, he was appointed first as- 
sistant LTnited States attorney, which post he 



CIM. MINGS, Prkn'tiss, member of the Suf- 
folk bar, is a native of Maine, born in Sumner, 
September 10, 1840, son of Whitney and Mary 
Hart (Prentiss) Cummings. This branch of the 
Cummings family was of Scotch origin, and de- 
scended from Isaac Cummings, who settled in 
Topsfield about 1632. Captain Oliver Cummings, 
of Dunstable, Mass., was grandfather, and his 
son Oliver, the father of Whitney. Mary Hart 
Prentiss was grand-daughter of the Rev. Caleb 
Prentiss and of Dr. John Hart, of South Read- 
ing (now Wakefield). Every male ancestor of occupied seven years, finally resigning it to 
the subject of this sketch, of such age as to ren- resume general practice. In 1881, 1882, and 
der it possible, took an active part in the war of 18S3 he was member of the Boston Common 
the Revolution; and Prentiss's grandfather Oliver Council, and in 18S4 and 1885 he represented a 




PRENTISS CUMMINGS. 



36 



MEN OF I'KOGRESS. 



Eoston district in tlic lower iiouse of tiie Legisla- 
ture, being a member of the committees on the 
judiciary, on taxation, and on woman suffrage. 
In 1885 he became president of the Cambridge 
Railroad Company, and held that position until 
all the Boston street railways were consolidated 
under the name of the \\'est End Company in 
November, 1887, when he was made vice-presi- 
dent of the latter company, which position he still 
holds. He is a member of the Society of the 
Cincinnati, succeeding his great-grandfather. Dr. 
John Hart, who was surgeon (rank lieutenant 
colonel) of Prescott's regiment, and afterwards of 
the Second Massachusetts ; is president of the 
fioston Chess Club, and has been a member of 
the Union and other clubs. Mr. Cummings was 
married February 25, 1880, at ISuckfiekl, Me., 
to Miss Annie Delena Snow, daughter of Alonzo 
and Priscilla (Weeks) Snow, of Cambridge. They 
have no children. 



1).\MRELL, John Sianhope. inspector of 
buildings of tlie citv of Boston, was liorn in the 




JOHN S. DAMRELL. 



North End of Boston, June 29, 1828, son of 
Samuel and Ann (Stanhope) Damrell. He was 
educated in Boston and Cambridge public 



schools, working during the summers on a farm 
in Haverhill. Obliged to leave school early, he 
was apprenticed at fourteen years of age to Isaac 
Melvin, of Cambridge, to learn the carpenter's 
trade. After serving four years as a "prentice, he 
came to Boston, and hired out as a journeyman, 
but was soon made foreman for U. P. Gross, car- 
penter and builder in the city. In 1S56 he began 
work as a master-builder. Ten years later he 
formed a partnership with James Long, under the 
tirm name of Damrell Ov Long, which continued 
until 1874. For twenty-eight years he was con- 
nected with the Boston fire department, follow- 
ing in the footsteps of his father, first as a mem- 
ber of " Hero Engine Company No. 6," then 
established on Derne Street, at the corner of Tem- 
ple .Street. When, upon the demolition of the 
engine-house to make way for the great granite 
Beacon Hill Reservoir in 1849 (which occupied 
the site now covered by the State House Ex- 
tension till 1885) the company disbanded, he be- 
came a member of " City Hose," then on Treniont 
Street. In i860 he joined "Cataract Engine 
Company No. 4," at that time housed on River 
Street, passing in this company through all tlie 
grades of official position. When serving in the 
capacity of foreman, he was elected to the Com- 
mon Council from Ward 6. The following year 
he was chosen assistant engineer. He served in 
this position until 1866, when he became chief 
engineer : and he continued at the head from that 
time to 1874, when the department was reorgan- 
ized, and placed under a commission. He has 
held his present position as chief of the city de- 
partment of inspection of buildings since 1877. 
During his long and conspicuous service as an en- 
gineer in the fire department he was connected 
officially with numerous organizations. He w'as 
the first president of the Massachusetts State 
Firemen's Association ; has served long terms as 
president of the Firemen's Charitable Associa- 
tion, of the Boston Firemen's Mutual Relief Asso- 
ciation, of the Boston Veteran Firemen's Associa- 
tion, and of the Boston Firemen's Cemetery Asso- 
ciation ; and is to-day actively connected with 
these and kindred organizations. While at the 
head of the Boston fire department, he was a close 
student of the science of the e.xtinguishment of 
fires, and was an earnest advocate of advanced 
theories and methods, which the city was slow to 
adopt until after the experience of the " Great 
Fire" of 1872. At the convention of chief engi- 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



37 



neers in Baltimore in 1874, called in consequence 
of the sweeping and disastrous conflagrations in 
the cities of Portland, Chicago, and lioston, he 
was unanimously elected president of that body, 
and took a leading part in its proceedings. Mr. 
Damrell was also for many years connected with 
the State militia, serving as lieutenant of the old 
Mechanic RiHes of Boston. He has been a 
member of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery 
Company for more than twenty years, and is now 
an honorary member of tlie National Lancers. 
He was also a member of the Fusiliers. During 
the Civil War he performed substantial service, 
under Governor Andrew and Mayor Lincoln, in 
tilling the quota of men allotted to Boston. At 
that time he was chairman of the committee of 
twenty of Ward Six. He is a Mason of the thirty- 
second degree, a member of the Knights of 
Honor, member of the Royal Arcanum, of the 
( )dd Fellows, and of the Good Templars ; and 
he has been president of the supreme parliament 
of the Golden Rule Alliance since its organiza- 
tion. For the past seventeen years he has been 
trustee of the Massachusetts School for the 
Feeble-Minded. His church connections are with 
the Methodist Episcopal denomination, and he has 
served for twenty-five consecutive years as super- 
intendent of a Sunday-school. In 1891 he was 
elected president of the National Association of 
Commissioners and Inspectors of Public Build- 
ings, and re-elected at the convention of the asso- 
ciation held in Boston in 1894. Mr. Damrell 
was married April 11, 1850, at Cambridge, to Miss 
.Susan Emily Hill, daughter of John and .Susan 
(^Snelling) Hill. They ha\e had fi\e children : 
Eliza Ann, John E. S., Carrie M., Charles S., and 
Susan Emily Damrell, of whom only the two sons 
are now living. 



two years on probation at l''rederick City, Md. 
Thereafter he devoted some time to a further 
study of the classics; and from 1863 to 1869 he 



DEVll T, Rkv. Edward I(;N..\Trtrs, S. J., presi- 
dent of Boston College, is a native of Boston, 
born December 13, 1841, son of George Devitt, 
of County Tipperary, Ireland, who emigrated to 
America in 1830. His education was begun in 
Boston public schools, and completed in Catholic 
colleges. He was a Franklin medal scholar of 
the Eliot Grammar School in 1854, and graduated 
from the English High in 1857. After a course 
of Latin and Greek in the College of the Holy 
Cross at Worcester, he entered the Society- of 
Jesus early in 1859, and then spent tiie customary 




E. I. DEVITT. 

taught in Gonzaga College, Washington, D.C. 
Tile following seven years were spent at the Col- 
lege of the Sacred Heart, Woodstock, Md., three 
of which he gave to the study of philosophy and 
four to theology. He was ordained in 1875 by 
the Most Rev. James R. Bayley, archbishop of 
Baltimore. Having completed the regular course 
of studies required by the Institute of the Society, 
he returned to Holy Cross, Worcester, as pro- 
fessor of rhetoric. The following year he was 
also a lecturer on philosophy in the same institu- 
tion. In 1879 he was appointed to the chair of 
philosophy in the College of the Sacred Heart, 
where he had made his principal study (jf this 
branch. After four years in this professorship 
he went to Georgetown University, and there also 
lectured on philosophy. Two years later he re- 
turned to Woodstock College, being appointed to 
the chair of theology, which had been held by 
Father Camillus Mazzella, afterward elevated to 
the rank of cardinal. In 1888 he again returned 
to Holy Cross, this time as professor of jihiloso- 
phy ; and in 1891 he was appointed to his present 
position at the head of Boston College. The 



38 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



president of Boston College is also, by virtue of 
his office, rector of the adjoining Church of the 
Immaculate Conception and president of the 
Young; Men's Catholic Association. 



DICKINSON, M.XKi^iuis Favette, Jr., member 
of the Suffolk bar, is a native of Amherst, born 
January i6, 1840, son of Marquis F. and Hannah 
(\Mlliams) Dickinson. His paternal ancestor in 
the eighth generation was Nathaniel Dickinson, 
one of the early settlers of Wethersfield, Conn., 
who twenty-three years later became one of the 
original " adventurers " who settled the town of 




M. F. DICKINSON. Jr. 

Hadley in 1658. Two of his sons were killed in 
King Philip's War, and a third was carried into 
captivity. The great-grandfather of Mr. Dickin- 
son was Nathaniel Dickinson, Jr., of Amherst, 
who was graduated from Harvard in 177 1, being 
the first boy from Amherst who went to college. 
He studied law at Northampton under Major 
Joseph Hawley, the distinguished Revolutionary 
leader, was admitted to the bar in 1774, and prac- 
tised at Amherst until his death in iSoo. He 
was prominent in Revolutionary politics, chairman 
of the Amherst Committee of Correspondence, 
and a member of several of the Provincial Con- 



gresses. Three of Mr. Dickinson's ancestors 
served in the Revolutionary army. His early 
education was obtained in the common schools of 
his native town and in Amherst and Monson 
academies. He was fitted for college in the 
famous \\'illiston Seminary at Easthampton. 
Craduating from Williston in the class of 1858, 
he entered Amherst College the same year, and 
graduated therefrom in 1862, having one of the 
three highest of the Commencement appoint- 
ments. Three years were next spent as a teacher 
of classics at Williston .(1862-65) ; and then he 
took up the study of law, first in the office of 
Wells & Soule in Springfield, and afterwards at 
the Harvard Law School (1866-67) and with the 
late Ceorge S. Hillard, of Boston. Admitted to 
the bar in 186S, he began practice in Boston. In 
1869 he was appointed assistant United States 
attorney, which position he held for two years. 
In 1S71 he formed a law partnership with Mr. 
Hillard and Henry D. Hyde, his college mate, 
under the firm name of Hillard, Hyde & Dick- 
inson, whicii continued till the death of Mr. Hil- 
lard, when it became Hyde, Dickinson & Howe 
(Mr. Howe having been admitted in 1879). In 
1871 he became a lecturer on law as applied to 
rural affairs, in the State Agricultural College at 
Amherst, puljlished a pamphlet on "Legislation 
cm the Hours of Labor," became a member of 
the lioston Common Council, and by appoint- 
ment of Mayor Ciaston a trustee of the Boston 
I'ulilic Lil)rary. The ne.xt year, returned to the 
Common Council, he was made president of that 
body. Then he retired from public service, and, 
with the exception of his law lectures at the Am- 
lierst Agricultural, which continued until 1877, he 
has devoted himself exclusively to his profession, 
early entering upon an important and lucrative 
practice. He has had charge of an unusually 
large number of important assignments made by 
merchants for the benefit of creditors, and in this 
line of practice is recognized as one of the most 
successful men at the Boston bar. .\t present he 
is almost constantly engaged in the trial of tort 
cases, particularly for the West End Street Rail- 
way Company. Since 1872 Mr. Dickinson has 
been a trustee of \\'illiston Seminary, and since 
1877 one of the overseers of the charity fund of 
.Amherst College. In 1876, by invitation of the 
town of Amherst, he delivered the " Amherst 
Centennial Address," which was afterwards pub- 
lished in pamphlet form. Mr. Dickinson was 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



39 



married November 23, 1864, at Easthampton. to 
Miss Cecilia R. Williston, adopted daughter of 
Samuel and Emily (Graves) Williston. They 
have had three children : Williston, Charles, and 
Florence Dickinson, — but one of whom, Charles, 
is now living. They have an adopted daughter, 
Jennie Couden Dickinson, daughter of a deceased 
sister of Mr. Dickinson. Mr. Dickinson's winter 
residence is Brookline. In summer he lives on 
the Jerusalem Road, North Cohasset. 



DODGE, James H.-^le, city auditor, Boston, 
was born in South Boston, September 22, 1845. 




JAMES H. DODGE. 

son of the late William Bradford and Mary Smith 
(Leavitt) Dodge. He was educated in the public 
schools, graduating from the Latin School in 
1862. He entered the service of the city, in the 
department of which he is now the head, at the 
age of twenty-two, after an experience of three or 
four years in general business, most of that time 
in the house of Hodges & Silsbee, manufacturers 
of chemicals, and has remained in that depart- 
ment ever since. Beginning in 1867 as junior 
clerk to the city auditor, in 1873 he was made 
chief clerk of the office, and in 18S1 became audi- 
tor, succeeding Alfred T. Turner, tiial \ear made 



city treasurer. Since 1881, also, he has been 
secretary of the board of commissioners of the 
sinking funds for the payment or redemption of 
the city debt. It is the lot of but few in public 
life to witness the growth of public business and 
at the same time to be intimately connected with 
it for so long a period as he has served. The 
census of 1865 of the city of Boston, comprising 
only what was known as the city proper. East Bos- 
ton, and South Boston, showed a population of 
only 192,318: in 1890 the Boston of 1865, with 
its additions of Roxbury, Dorchester, West Rox- 
bury, Brighton, and Charlestown, showed a popu- 
lation of 448,477, of which 59r'o per cent, were in 
the city of 1865. In the financial year of 1866-67 
the payments through the auditor's office were 
$4,660,533.62: in 1893-94 they were $34,712,- 
018.23. The valuation of 1865 was $415,362,- 
345 : the valuation of 1893, $924,093,751. Mr. 
Dodge is a member of the New England Historic 
Genealogical Society, and of the American So- 
ciety of Biblical Literature and Exegesis. For 
several years he has been clerk of the Central 
Congregational Church of Jamaica Plain, West 
Roxbury District. He was married October 8, 
1867, to Julia M. Read, daughter of the late 
Nelson S. and Hannah (Heals) Read. There 
have been born to them se\-en children, of whom 
but three boys survive : \\'illiam B., J. Herbert, 
and Edgar R. Dodge. 



DODGE, Colonel Theodore Avrault, of the 
United States army, was born in Pittsfield, 
May 28, 1842, of old New England stock, tracing 
his descent to several ancestors who came over 
with the first settlers. His father was N. S. 
Dodge, the well-known writer, and his mother 
Emily Pomeroy. Sent abroad at ten years old, 
he was at school in Belgium, received a thorough 
military education in Berlin, studied at Heidel- 
berg, and was graduated at the University of 
London in i860. He is also an LL.B. of Colum- 
bian University. On the outbreak of the Ci\il 
War young Dodge returned home, enlisted, and 
served in every rank from private to the command 
of a regiment. \\"ith the Third and Eleventh 
Corps he went through all the battles of the Army 
of the Potomac from Fair Oaks on, and was 
wounded at Manassas and at Chantilly, and lost a 
leg at Gettysburg. At Manassas his regiment, 
the One Hundred and First New York Volun- 



40 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



teers, lost the third highest percentage in killed, 
wounded, and missing in one engagement of any 
regiment during the war, — seventy-four per cent. 
Being ordered to duty in the war department on 
recovery from his last wound, t'olonel Dodge was 
given a commission in the regular army, received 
four brevets for gallant service, and was finally 
placed on the retired list for wounds received in 
the line of duty. Colonel Dodge has devoted the 
leisure thus earned to literature. He has lectured 
at the Lowell Institute, Boston, and at Harvard. 
He has been a constant contributor to magazine 
literature for many years, and has, up to 1894, pub- 
lished the following eleven volumes, not counting 
parts of several others, all of which have been 
received at home and abroad with e.xceptional 
fa\-or, namely : " The Campaign of Chancellors- 
ville," '"A Bird's-eye Mew of Our Civil War," 
" I'atroclus and Penelope : a Chat in the Saddle," 
"Creat Captains," '-Alexander" (two volumes), 
"Hannibal" (two volumes), " Ca-sar " (two vol- 
umes, and " Riders of Many Lands." It has 
fallen to Colonel Dodge's lot to travel extensively. 



the Great Captains, it has been his haljit to pass 
over the ground covered bv their campaigns, and 
to make his own sketches of battlefields. In 
writing " Hannibal," he crossed and recrossed the 
.\lps a score of times, with Polybius in hand, to 
determine the route of the great Carthaginian : 
in writing "C.x-sar," he journeyed around the 
entire basin of the Mediterranean ; and he has 
been able to correct many errors which, from 
unfamiliarity with the topography, have crept into 
history. Colonel Dodge is now occupied with 
Gustavus, Frederick, and Napoleon, whose biogra- 
phies will complete his "History of the .Art of 
\\'ar." He is a member of many military and 
historical societies, of the St. Botolph, Country, 
and Papyrus clubs of Boston, and has been presi- 
dent of the last. He has been a noted expert in 
horsemanship, but is perhaps better known as a 
military critic and historian. Colonel Dodge mar- 
ried in 1865 Miss Jane Marshall Neil, who died in 
1 88 1, and by whom he had five children. Three 
now survive : Robert Elkin Neil, Theodora, and 
Jane Marshall Dodge. In 1892 he married Miss 
Clara Isabel Bow'den, who has been his collabora- 
tor in most of his books. He resided for many 
years in lirookline. 




ELDER, S-AMUEL James, member of the Suf- 
folk bar, is a native of Rhode Island and a gradu- 
ate of Yale ; but his early education and prepara- 
tion for college were obtained in Massachusetts, 
and here he has practised his profession. He 
was born in the village of Hope, R.I., January 4, 
1850, son of James and Deborah Dunbar (Keene) 
Elder. He is a lineal descendant of Robert Elder, 
eldest son of Robert Elder, of Cameronian de- 
scent, who emigrated from Scotland, and settled at 
Pa.xtang (now Harrisburg, Penna.,) in 1730, and 
brother of the Rev. John Elder, minister at Pa.x- 
tang for fift\'-six years, who in the French and 
Indian War commanded the defences from the 
Easton to the Susquehanna, with rank of colonel 
from the Provincial authorities, and, when up- 
wards of seventy years of age, raised a company 
one Sunday morning in church which joined 
Washington during the disastrous retreat through 
New Jersey. On his mother's side he is de- 
He has crossed the .Atlantic over thirty times, is scended from Jacob Keene, who settled at Thom- 
familiar with every part of Europe, has repeatedly aston, Me., about 1780. His father was a native 
gone through the ( )rient, and has once circum- of Baltimore, Md. He attended the pulilic 
navigated the globe. In wri'ting his histories of schools of Lawrence, Mass., and there fitted for 



THEO. A. DODGE. 



MEN OF PROCRKSS. 



41 



collet^e. He ijraduatL'd from Vale in the class of tions), Papyrus, ("urtis (prcsiduut), Middlesex, 
1873, and afterwards studied law in ISoston with and Taylor clubs of Boston, and Calumet of 
fohn H. Hardy, now associate justice of the \\'inchester (vice-president); and of the William 
municipal court of Boston. Admitted to the Suf- Parkman Lodge. Free Masons, of Winchester. 

He has done much after-dinner speaking, and has 
the reputation of being always ready and graceful 
in these efforts. His interest in college ath- 
letics is unflagging. Mr. Klder was married at 
Hastings-upon- Hudson, N.N'., May 10, 1876, to 
Miss Lilla Thomas, daughter of Cornelius W. and 
Margaret J. ( WyckolT) Thomas. They have two 
children: Margaret Munroe and Fanny Adele 
<>^,- .- - ^ ^^^ Elder. He has resided in Winchester since 1877. 




SAMUEL J. ELDER. 

folk bar in 1S75, he at once engaged actively in 
professional work. He is now associated with 
William C. Wait and Edmund A. \\'hitnian. under 
the Arm name of Elder, Wait, iv: \\'hitman. in the 
.Ames I'luilding. To copyriglit law he has given 
special attention, and he was selected to act with 
the International Copyright League before the 
United States Senate on the international copy- 
riglit bill. His principal work, however, is in jury 
trials in Suffolk and Middlesex Counties. In poli- 
tics Mr. Elder is Republican. He served one term 
in the lower house of the Legislature (1885), de- 
clining a re-election, as a representative of the 
Fourteenth Middlese.x; District (Winchester and 
.\rlington), being chairman of the committee on 
bills in the third reading and member of the com- 
mittee on ta.xation. He also declined a position 
on the Superior Court bench. Since 1891 he has 
been State commissioner on portraits of governors. 
He is a member of the Boston Bar Association 
(member of the council): of the \'ale Alumni 
Association (president in 1893); of the I'nion. 
University (member of the committee on elec- 



ERNST, George Alexander Otis, member 
of the Suffolk bar, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio. 
November 8, 1850. His father, Andrew H. 
Ernst, was a native of (Jermany; and his mother, 
Sarah (Otis) Ernst, was daughter of George Alex- 
ander Otis, well known in the early literary world 
of Boston. His education was begun in the 
Cincinnati private schools, and continued in the 
Mount Pleasant Military Academy. Sing-Sing. 
N.Y., and the Eliot High School in Jamaica 
Plain, where he was fitted for college. He en- 
tered Harvard, and graduated w'ith the class of 
187 I. His law studies were pursued in the office 
of Ropes & Gray, Boston, for two years, then in 
the Harvard Law School, and later in the office of 
lames 1!. Richardson, now a justice of the Supe- 
rior Court. In his practice he has given much 
attention to corporation matters and to the laws 
relating to women. He was prominently men- 
tioned for the new judgeship of the Probate Court 
established by the Legislature in 1893. In this 
connection the Boston Transcript in an editorial 
note spoke of him as follows : '' Mr. Ernst is a 
man of high legal attainments, conservative, yet 
kindly, honorable, high-minded, and independent. 
He has made a special study of Massachusetts 
law in its bearing on the property rights of 
women, and his appointment would give great 
satisfaction both to the profession and the public. 
No nomination could be made which would cause 
more general satisfaction than that of Mr. Ernst, 
or confer more credit on the executive of the 
Commonwealth. It would be an ideal appoint- 
ment." In 1883 and 1884 he was a member of 
the lower house of the Legislature, serving on im- 
portant committees, — as those on elections (of 
which he was chairman), street raihvaxs and rail- 



42 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



roads, — and having an influential part in the 
legislation of the sessions, helping to frame the 
first civil service law passed in Massacluisetts. 
In 1880 he was at the Republican Xational Con- 
vention in Chicago as one of the committee repre- 
senting the Massachusetts \'oung Republicans to 
secure a civil service reform plank in the party 
platform. An ardent Republican, but with an 
independent spirit, he has been active in various 
reforms, notably that of woman suffrage, in which 
he is a warm belie\er. \\hile devoted to his pro- 




GEO. A. 0. ERNST. 

fession, he has given some time to literature, con- 
tributing to periodical publications and translating 
from the French. In 1879 he wrote for and won 
the first prize offered by the Boston Christian 
Union for an essay upon the "True Political In- 
terests of the Laboring Classes." He has pub- 
lished translations of two novels "The Widow 
Lerouge " (Boston, James R. Osgood & Co.) and 
"The Clique of Gold" (published as a serial in 
the Boston Courier). Three plays, " A Christmas 
Supper," "The Double \^'edding," and "Our 
Friends," have been produced at the Boston Mu- 
seum, in all of which the great comedian, William 
Warren, had leading parts. Mr. Ernst was mar- 
ried in Brooklyn, N.Y., on December 11, 1879, to 
Miss Jeanie C. Bvnner, sister of the late Edwin 



Lassetter Bynner, the novelist. They have two 
children : Roger and Sarah Otis Ernst. Their 
home is in Jamaica Plain, where Mr, Ernst has 
been for several years chairman of the standing 
committee of the l^nitarian church of which Rev. 
Charles F. Dole is pastor. 



FAXON, Henrv H.ardwick, of <,)uincy. emi- 
nent as an independent leader in the cause of 
Prohibition, is a native of Quincy, born Septem- 
ber 28, 1823, son of Job and Judith B. (Hardwick) 
Faxon. He is of an old New England family, a 
descendant in the eighth generation of 'i'homas 
Faxon, a man of substance, who came from Eng- 
land, with his wife, daughter, and two sons, some 
time previous to 1647, and settled in that part of 
Braintree now (,)uincy, where the familv has ever 
since lived. His father. Job Faxon, was an exten- 
sive farmer, and for many years owned and man- 
aged a stall in (Quincy Market, Boston, in connec- 
tion with his farm in (Quincy. He lived ninet)-- 
two years and ten months ; and it is related that 
ten days before he died he was in the field haying. 
Henry H. P'axon was the fourth of a family of 
seven children, six of whom reached adult estate. 
His boyhood was spent on the farm and in the 
country school ; and at sixteen he was appren- 
ticed to learn the shoemaker's trade. After five 
3'ears as an apprentice he engaged in the manu- 
facture of boots and shoes on his own account, 
with his brother John as a partner. The goods 
of the firm found market in Boston and Baltimore 
principally, and he prospered ; but in less than 
three years he withdrew from this enterprise, and 
opened a retail grocery and provision store in 
Quincy, subsequently adding a bakery. In this 
business he continued about seven years, the 
latter part of the time engaging also in that of a 
real estate and merchandise auctioneer. Then 
he transferred his operations to Boston, where he 
opened a retail grocery store at the corner of 
South and Beach Streets, with two partners, under 
the firm name of P'axon, Wood, & Co. Two j'ears 
later, reorganizing the firm under the name of 
Faxon Brothers, & Co., and changing the business 
from retail to wholesale, he moved into Commer- 
cial Street, where he remained till 1S61, when he 
retired from the partnership with a modest fortune 
made in these enterprises and also in real estate 
operations, which he had begun while keeping 
store in (Juincy. l^pon his witlidrawal from the 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



43 



grocery trade he began a system of shrewd specu- 
lation, from which his profits were quick and 
large. First he went to \ew Orleans, just before 
the outbreak of the Civil War, and there made 
hirge purchases of molasses, which he shipped to 
his former partners in Boston, profiting by the 
transaction. Then the following year returning to 
Jioston and establishing himself in Chatham Street, 
but soon after moving to India Wharf, he engaged 
during the remainder of the war period in specu- 
lation in merchandise, operating extensively in 
chiccory, raisins, and various spices, in sago, kero- 
sene oil, and fire-crackers, thereby clearing nearly 
$50,000. At one time, anticipating a rise in the 
price of liquors from the increased customs duty 
about to be laid, he purchased several hundred 
barrels of whiskey and rum, which he finally dis- 
posed of at a handsome profit. It was upon this 
transaction that, when he became an ardent Pro- 
hibitionist, his opponents based their assertion 
that he had "made his money out of rum." His 
next field of operation was the stock market, where 
he was not successful ; and before his losses had 
become heavy he drew out, and turned his atten- 
tion again to real estate dealings, through which 
he made the larger part of his fortune. He is 
now the largest real estate owner in ()uincy, and 
owns much property also in lioston and Chelsea. 
He has in all more than two hundred tenants ; 
and among his holdings is the estate in (,>uincy 
on which his early grocery store and bakery stood. 
Mr. Faxon's public life began in 1864, when he 
represented his native town in the lower house of 
the Legislature : and his active temperance work 
dates from his second term in the House of Repre- 
sentatives in 1871. As a rule, Mr. Faxon has af- 
filiated with the Republican party ; but he always 
exercised the right of bolting bad nominations, 
and in consequence received the severe censure 
of the party leaders. In 1884 he was induced to 
run for lieutenant governor on the Prohibitory 
ticket, and has often contributed generously to the 
party treasury. He has prepared and circulated 
many campaign documents, and for three years 
he issued ingenious "ratings " of the Legislature, 
showing the position of each member on the ques- 
tion of Prohibition as disclosed by yea and nay 
votes on anti-liquor measures, the trustworthy 
Prohibitionists being indicated by three stars, the 
unreliable by one star, and the enemies of temper- 
ance by a dash (-); and this record was used 
with effect in the legislative canvasses. For more 



than twenty years he has maintained an inde- 
pendent political bureau, known as the "Temper- 
ance Republican Headquarters," at No. 36 Hrom- 
field Street, Boston, the active management of 
which now devolves upon Miss F.va M. Brown, who 
has been his private secretary for fourteen years. 
His office is a perfect arsenal of information for 
opponents of the saloon, being fully supplied with 
facts and figures with which to demolish the rum 
power. In his anti-liquor labors Mr. F'a.xon has 
expended upwards of $100,000. In his own city 



^ 






.J 


L 


^ 


'M* 


1^ 

/ 


'1 


' 




H 



HENRY H. FAXON. 

of Quincy he has served as constable since 1881, 
with the exception of three years (1886-89). ap- 
pointed at his own request, in order that he might 
personally conduct the crusade against violations 
of the liquor law. He has faithfully performed all 
the duties of the office, declining the salary appro- 
priated, and turning over to his brother officers all 
the fees attending the service of warrants. Up- 
wards of five hundred cases of prosecution of 
illegal liquor sales brought about by his vigorous 
constabulary work are on record. In several in- 
stances he has suppressed the liquor traffic in 
Quincy through the purchase of property devoted 
to it. He bought the Hancock House, leased it 
for a term of years as a boarding-house for Adams 
Academy students, and has recently built a block 



44 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



of stores around it ; purchased the building now 
known as the Quincy Hotel, and, the deed being 
withheld, sued the owner for a violation of tlie 
agreement. He also secured an estate locally 
known as the " Sax'ille Place," where it was in- 
tended to sell liquor. Faxon Hall, erected in 1S76 
for the Reform Club of Quinc)', is a permanent 
memorial to his name. Toward its cost, $11,000, 
he contributed four-fifths. He is a member of 
the Massachusetts Total Abstinence Society, of 
the Norfolk Republican Club, of the Norfolk Uni- 
tarian Club, and of the New England Tariff 
Reform League. Mr. Faxon was married Novem- 
ber 18, 1852, to Miss Mary B. Munroe, daughter 
of Israel W. and Priscilla L. (Burbank) Munroe. 
She died September 6, 1885, leaving one son, 
Henry Munroe Faxon, born May 22, 1864. 



FESSENDRN, Fr.anklin Guodridcr, of 
Greenfield, justice of the .Superior Court of the 
Commonwealth, is a native of Fitchburtj. born 




FRANKLIN G. FESSENDEN. 

June 20, 1849, son of Charles and Martha E. 
(Newton) Fessenden. He is a descendant of the 
Lexington branch of the Fessenden family, whose 
first ancestor in this country settled in Cam- 
bridge about the middle of the seventeenth cen- 



tury. His great-grandfather, Nathan Fessenden, 
of Lexington, was in Captain Parker's company at 
Lexington, April 19, 1775. His early education 
was acquired in the Fitchburg grammar and high 
schools, and subsequently he studied abroad in 
Paris. He entered the Harvard Law Schnol in 
-September, 1S70, received the degree of LL. li. 
therefrom in 1872, and remained in the school, 
taking a post-graduate course, during the follow- 
ing year. He was admitted to the bar of Massa- 
chusetts in June, 1873, and ten years later (in 
December, 1883) to practice in the L'nited States 
courts. After practising a year in Fitchburg, he 
established himself in Greenfield, where he con- 
tinued until his elevation to the Superior bench 
in .Vugust, 1 89 1, by appointment of Governor 
Russell. \\'hile engaged in general practice, he 
was especially concerned in corporation matters, 
as counsel for various railroads as well as for pri- 
vate corporations. He was also some time coun- 
sel for the first National Bank of Greenfield and 
for the town of Greenfield. He was twice (in 
1884 and 1889) district attorney //v Icinporc for 
the north-western district of Massachusetts, and 
for many years was a master in chancery. For 
a year after his graduation from the Law School 
( 1872-73) he was an instructor in Harvard Col- 
lege, and later, also for a year (1882-83), "^ 
lecturer in the Law School. Since 188 1 he has 
been a trustee of the Prospect Hill School, Green- 
field, and clerk of the board. He has served in 
the State militia as captain of Company L, Sec- 
ond Regiment, and as assistant inspector-gen- 
eral. Since 1884 he has been a trustee of the 
Franklin Savings Institution of Greenfield. In 
politics Judge Fessenden is a Democrat. He is 
a member of the Greenfield Club of Greenfield ; 
of the University Club, Boston ; and of the Co- 
lonial Club of Cambridge. He was married 
( )etober 3, 1878, to Miss Mary J. Rowley, daugh- 
ter of James \\ . and Anne Rowley. 



FIELD, W'Ai.nuini-.E Ah.n'er, chief justice of 
the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, is 
a native of Vermont, born in Springfield, Windsor 
County, April 26, 1833, son of Abner and Louisa 
(Griswold) Field. He is of old New England 
stock, — on his father's side a descendant of the 
Fields of Rhode Island, and on his mother's 
side of the Griswolds of Connecticut. He was 
educated in |3rivate schools and academies and 



MEN OF rKO(;RESS. 



45 



at Dartmouth College, whcie he graduated in Long, in February, 1881. He became chief jus- 
the class of 1855. Immediately after graduating tice in 1890, appointed by Covernor I'.rackett 

upon the resignation of Chief Justice Morton. 



he spent two years in the college as tutor, and 
then began the study of law, in I'.oston, with 
the late Harvey Jewell. In the spring of 1S59 




WALBRIDGE A. FIELD. 

he took charge of the professorship of mathe- 
matics at Dartmouth for the spring and summer 
terms, and then entered the Harvard Law School. 
In i860 he was admitted to the bar. He began 
practice at once with Mr. Jewell. Five years 
after (in 1865) he was appointed assistant United 
States attorney for Massachusetts, under Richard 
H. Dana ; and he remained with Mr. Dana and 
George S. Hillard until 1869, when he was ap- 
pointed by President Grant assistant attorne)'- 
general of the United States, under E. Rockwood 
Hoar. In the latter relation he continued until 
August, 1870, and then, returning to IJoston, 
formed a law partnership with Mr. Jewell and 
\\'illiam Gaston, under the firm name of Jewell, 
Gaston & Field. When Mr. Gaston became gov- 
ernor of Massachusetts, in 1S75, he retired from 
the firm, and Edward ( ). Shepard was admitted 
into the partnership and the firm name changed 
to Jewell, Field &• Shepard. And so it remained 
until the appointment of Mr. I'ield to the Su- 
preme liench, as associate justice, by Governor 



In 1876 Mr. Field was a Republican candidate 
for Congress in the Third District, and was de- 
clared elected. l!ut the election was contested, 
and after about a year's service he was unseated. 
In the next election he was again a candidate 
from the same district, and, being elected, took 
his seat, and served his term without a contest. 
During the early years of his residence in Bos- 
ton he served two terms on the School Board 
(1863-64); and subsequently he was a member 
of the Common Council three terms, from 186:; 
to 1867. He received the degree of LL.D. from 
Harvard College in 1886, and from Dartmouth 
College in 1888. Mr. Field was first married in 
1869 to Miss Eliza E. McLoon, of Rockland, 
Me. She died in March, 1877, leaving two 
daughters : Eleanor Louise and Elizabeth Len- 
thal Field. He was again married in October, 
1882, to Miss Frances E. Farwell, daughter of the 
Hon. Nathan A. Farwell, of Rockland, Me. 



FITCH, RiiiiERT Ger.sikim, chairman of the 
Board of Fire Commissioners, Boston, is a native 
of Sheffield, a Berkshire hill town, born May 19, 
1846, son of Gershom M. and Almeda L. (Rood) 
Fitch. Lentil nearly twenty years of age he 
worked on his father's farm, getting what educa- 
tion he could through instruction at home during 
the winter months. Then he went to the South 
Berkshire Institute, New Marlborough, and fitted 
for college, and, entering Williams, graduated 
therefrom, in due course, with the class of 1870, 
taking an honorary oration at commencement. 
His bent was early toward journalism, and while 
at college he was editor of the W'illiatns Qmir- 
h-iiy, the college magazine. After graduation he 
at once found employment in the editorial depart- 
ment of the Springfield Rt-piihlicati, where he re- 
mained about two years, serving in various capaci- 
ties. From that office he went to the Boston 
Post, becoming a member of the staff of the latter 
paper early in 1872, under Nathaniel G. Greene, 
then the managing editor. Here he rose through 
the different editorial departments to the position 
of editor-in-chief, which he ably filled from 1881 
to 1885. Then, retiring upon the incoming of a 
new business management, he engaged in general 
journalistic work as a contributor to several jour- 



46 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



nals till his appointment by Mayor O'Brien to the 
Fire Commission in May. 1886, for the term of 
three years. In this position he has continued 




ROBERT G. FITCH. 

since through successive reappointments by 
Mayors Hart and Matthews. He has been chair- 
man of the board since August, 1886. He is a 
member of the Papyrus, Press, and University 
clubs of Boston ; of the Chief Engineers' Club ; 
and of the Young Men's Democratic Club of 
Massachusetts. Mr. Fitch was married in Detroit, 
Mich., September 26, 1878, to Miss Emma H. 
Emmons, daughter of Burton and Minerva Emmons 
of that city. She died in 1888, leaving two chil- 
dren, Helen M. and Emma M. Fitch. 



F(3WLE, Arthur Adams, managing editor of 
the Boston Globe, is a native of Woburn, born 
December 3, 1847, son of James Leonard and 
Luthera (Tay) Fowle. ( )n his father's side he is 
of English stock, and on his mother's of Scotch. 
He was educated in the public schools of Wo- 
burn ; and his training for active life was in actual 
work in store and shop, begun at the age of nine. 
He first learned the trade of a currier, and worked 
at this for several years. His first newspaper 
work was as a "district reporter" for the Globe, 



covering his town. This was in 1873, when he 
was twenty-si.x years old. The next year he was 
taken on to the city staff, and assigned to the 
work of a general reporter. In this capacity he 
developed rapidly, displaying such ability as a 
quick, intelligent, and enterprising news-gatherer 
that he early won a leading place in this depart- 
ment of the paper. In 1878 he was made city 
editor, and since that time he has successfully 
occupied every position on the editorial floor 
with the exception of those of musical critic and 
financial editor. He became managing editor 
in September, 1884, holding the position during 
the period of the greatest development of the 
Globe, when it grew from a small undertaking 
to a great journal of many departments and 
metropolitan size. Jn politics he is Democratic, 
fie is a member of the Boston Press Club and 
of several other newspaper organizations, and 
of the Corinthian \'acht Club. He has never 
lield public office, devoting himself entirely to 
his professional work. Mr. Fowle was married 
on June 12, 1877, to Miss Kate Wallace Munn, 
of Woburn, daughter of Charles Munn and Eliza- 




A. A, FOWLE. 



beth Minerva (Kane) Munn. They have two 
children: Leonard Munn and Donald Adams 
Fowle. 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



47 



FC^XCROFT, Frank, associate editor of tiie 
Boston Joiinuil, is a native of Boston, born Janu- 
ary 2 1, 1850, son of George A. and Harriet Eliza- 
beth (Goodrich) Foxcroft. His father was well 
known as a newspaper writer, and especially as 
the originator of "Job Sass," whose phonetic 
hiiinor antedated " Artemas Ward," "Josh Bill- 
ings," and the rest. His mother was a daughter 
of Levi Goodrich, a prosperous farmer and con- 
tractor of Pittsfield. He was educated first in the 
public schools of Boston and Pittsfield, and after- 
wards at Williams ("ollegc. where he was gradu- 




FRANK FOXCROFT. 

ated in the class of 187 1. His inherited liking 
for newspaper work showed itself early : when a 
boy he spent much of his vacation time in news- 
paper offices, and was editor of the Vidcttc xwA the 
QuarttT/y at college. In his Freshman year, also, 
he collected certain bits of verse which he had 
contributed to the Boston Transcript and other 
journals, and published them under the title of 
"Transcript Pieces." In September, 187 1, two 
months after his graduation from college, he be- 
came connected with the Boston Journal, and has 
been identified with that paper since, at first as 
literary editor, then as leading editorial writer, 
and more recently as associate editor. He has 
been a contributor to the Atlantic Monthly, the 



A/iiloTcr A'cTic7C'. and to the weekly literary and 
religious press, and he edited a collection of 
Easter poems which was published by Lee & 
Shepard (1879) under the title of " Resurgit," 
with an introduction by the late Andrew P. Pea- 
body, D.I).; but his writing has been mainly for 
the columns of ihe /or/rnal. Since 187 1 his home 
has been in Cambridge, which has rarely been 
without a Fo.xcroft among its citizens for the past 
two hundred years. He has held no political 
office, unless two terms of service upon the School 
Board of Cambridge (1875-78) are to be thus de- 
scribed. He is a member of the Cambridge, 
Congregational, and Appalachian clubs. Mr. 
Foxcroft was first married in September, 1872, 
to Miss PLlizabeth True Howard, of Columbus, 
Ohio. She died in October, 1888. In Septem- 
ber, i8gi, he married Miss Lily Sherman Rice, 
daughter of the Rev. Charles B. Rice, of Dan- 
vers. He has four daughters living : Faith, Ruth 
Darling, Esther Margaret, and Mary Goodrich 
Foxcroft, the last-named by the second marriage. 



G.VUGENGKiL, Icnaz MARCK.t,, painter of 
Xcnrc pictures, is a native of Bavaria, born in 
Passau, January 16, 1855, son of Ignaz Marcel 
and Barbara V. Minuzy (Hauser) Gaugengigl. 
His father was professor of Oriental languages in 
the Bavarian capital. He was educated in Mu- 
nich, graduating from the gymnasium in 1873, and 
afterwards bec.ime a student in the Academy of 
Fine .\rts under Professor Raab and Professor 
William Diez. After leaving the Acadeni)', he 
studied the old masters, and received orders from 
the King of Bavaria, painting for him "The 
Hanging Gardens of Semiranius." Subsequently 
he went to Italy, and there further pursued his 
studies, and in 1879 travelled in France, sketch- 
ing by the way, and visiting the Paris Exhibition. 
The next year he came to the United States to 
visit his sister, intending to remain a few months ; 
but he soon concluded to establish himself here. 
Since that time he has followed his profession in 
Boston, early achieving a reputation for the deli- 
cacy and finish of his work, its richness of color 
and refinement of technique. Among his best 
known paintings are : " An .Affair of Honor," a 
duel on the seashore, the victim lying on the sand 
with two men bending anxiously over iiiin, the 
victor standing apart, sheathing his blade, all the 
characters attired in rich old Spanish costumes ; 



48 



MEN OF I'ROCRESS. 



"The Duel," the scene in a paved court-yard, en- 
closed by high stone walls and lofty buildiuiis, 
the victor in the act of delivering a fatal sword- 
thrust ; '-rhe Refugee," a young Huguenot, just 
escaped the violence of a mob, knocking for shel- 
ter at a friend's door, an expression of anxious 
suspense in the listening attitude ; " Adagio," 
representing a monk clad in a pale brown robe, 
playing on a violoncello ; " After the Storm," the 
prostrate form of a man in evening dress, who has 
evidently shot himself with the revolver still held 
in his hand, lying on the ground at daw-n, under a 




1. M. CAUGENGIGL. 

tempestuous sky ; " The Revenge " ; " The First 
Hearing"; "The Amateur"; " Incredulity," two 
stubborn men in the high-colored costume of 
the time of the Directory, engaged in a debate; 
and " The Surprise." Mr. Gaugengigl is a mem- 
ber of the St. Botolph, Tavern, and Paint and 
Clay clubs, of various art societies, and of the 
permanent art committee of the Boston Museum 
of Fine Arts. 



GASTO.X, Wii.i.iAM, goxernor of the Common- 
wealth in 1875, was liorn in Killingly, Conn., 
October 3, 1820; died in Boston, January 19, 
1894. The family moving to Roxbury in 1838, 
he was a resident of Massachusetts during his 



active life, identified with Roxbury and Boston 
interests, and for upwards of a quarter of a cen- 
turv was a leading member of the Suffolk bar. 
He was of French and English ancestry, — on the 
paternal side from Jean (iaston, a Huguenot, and 
on the maternal side from Thomas Arnold, who, 
with a brother William, came to New England in 
1636, and joined Roger Williams in Rhode Island 
in 1654. His father and grandfather both served 
in the Connecticut Legislature, and the former was 
a merchant well known in his day. William Ga.s- 
ton was educated in the Brooklyn (Conn.) and 
I'laintield academies, and at Brown I'niversity, 
entering at the a^e of sixteen and srraduating with 
high honors. He began the study of law in Ro.\- 
hurv. in the office of Judge Francis Hilliard, sub- 
sequently reading with Charles P. and Benjamin 
R. Curtis in lioston ; and he was admitted to the 
bar in 1.S44. Two years later he opened an office 
in Roxbury. and there practised for nineteen 
vears. earlv ranking among the leaders of the 
.Norfolk bar. I'or many years he was city solici- 
tor of Roxbury. In 1865 he extended his prac- 
tice, forming with the late Harvey Jewell and 
Walhridge A. Field, now chief justice of the Su- 
preme judicial Court, the law firm of Jewell, Gas- 
Ion \' field, with olifices in Boston. This relation 
continued till his election to the governorship, 
when he withdrew from the firm and relinquished 
his practice. Upon his return to private life and 
resumption of business he practised a few years 
alone, and then, in 1879, formed a partnership 
with ('. I.. B. Whitney, subsequently admitting his 
son William .\. (iaston to the firm. His distin- 
guished professional record, both as a jury law- 
yer, skilful in the examination of witnesses and 
convincing in argument, and as a counsellor, 
possessed of a profound knowledge of the law 
and extreme conservatism, closed with his retire- 
ment from active practice in 1S91. Mr, Gaston's 
public career began with his election in 1853 
to the Massachusetts Legislature as a Whig. He 
was returned the next year, and in 1856 was re- 
elected by a fusion of Whigs and Democrats in 
opposititm to the Know-Nothing candidate. In 
1861 and 1862 he was mayor of Roxbury. and 
during his service w-as active in raising troops for 
the war and earnest in the support of war meas- 
ures. In 1 868 he was elected to the State Senate 
as a Democrat. In 1870 he was a candidate for 
Congress, but failed of an election. In 1S71 and 
1872, after the annexation of Roxbury to Boston 



MliN OF PROGRESS. 



49 



(1868), he was mayor of lioston. He was candi- by this union were one daughter and two sons: 
date for a third term, l)ut in one of the most Sarah Howard, William Alexander, and Theodore 
closely contested elections ever held in P.oston, lieecher (iaston. (Theodore, born February, 186 1, 

died July, 1869.) 




(iASTON, William Alexandek, member of 
the Suftolk bar, is a native of Roxbury, born May 
I, 1859, son of William and Louisa Augusta 
(lieecher) (laston. On the paternal side he is of 
Huguenot descent, from Jean (Jaston, born in 
France about the year 1600, who, banished late 
in life, settled in Scotland, and whose descend- 
ants were early in America, settling in Connecti- 
cut ; and on the maternal side he is connected 
with the distinguished Beecher family. His pa- 
ternal grandfather was a leading merchant in 
Connecticut, for many years in the Legislature ; 
and his father, William (iaston, was a foremost 
member of the Massachusetts bar, and served as 
mayor of Ro.xbury, mayor of Boston, member of 
the General Court, and governor of the Common- 
wealth. [See Gaston, William.] William .\. 
(iaston was educated in private schools, in the 



WILLIAM GASTON. 

was defeated by Henry L. Tierce, the Republican 
candidate on a ncm-partisan platfonn, by seventy- 
nine votes. 'I'wo years later he was elected to 
the governorship for the term of 1875 as the Dem- 
ocratic candidate, over 'i'homas Talbot, the regu- 
lar Republican candidate, by a plurality of up- 
wards of seven thousand votes, running many 
thousand votes ahead of his ticket. His admin- 
istration was conservative and dignified ; and he 
well represented the State on public occasions, 
notably at the centennial celebrations of Lexing- 
ton and Hunker Hill. .Vmong his appointments 
while governor were those of Otis P. Lord to the 
Supreme liench, and of Waldo Colbuni and Will- 
iam S. Gardner to the Superior Jiench. He was 
not again a candidate, but gave his heartv support 
to Charles Francis Adams, who was nominated 
by his party for the term of 1876, and was de- 
feated at the election by .Alexander H. Rice. 
While occu|)ving the governor's chair, Mr. (ias- 
ton received the honorary degree of LL.D. from 

Harvard and from P.rown. He was married May Roxbury Latin School, and at Harvard College, 
27. 1852, to Miss Louisa A. Beecher, daughter of graduating in the class of 1880. His law studies 
Laban S. and iM'ances A. (Lines) Beecher, and were pursued in the Harvard Law School and in 




WILLIAM A. GASTON, 



5° 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



the PSoston office of his father. Admitted to the 
bar in 1883, he began practice as a member of 
the firm of Gaston & Whitney, the senior partners 
of which were his father and Charles L. B. \\'hit- 
ne}-. Subsequently Mr. Whitney retired, and 
Frederick E. Snow was taken into partnership, 
the firm name being changed to that of Gaston & 
Snow. In 1S91 William Gaston, senior, retired 
from active practice ; and since that time the firm 
has been making a specialty of corporation law, 
and has acted as corporation counsel for several 
of the largest corporations having headquarters in 
Boston. Mr. Gaston is a director of the Manu- 
facturers' National Bank of Boston, a trustee of 
the Proprietors of Forest Hills Cemetery, and a 
director in several large Massachusetts corpora- 
tions. He is a member of the Boston Bar Asso- 
ciation (of the council), of the Somerset, Univer- 
sity, and Curtis clubs of Boston, the Country 
Club of Brookline, and the Commodore Club of 
Maine. During the three terms of Governor 
Russell (1891-92-93) he was assistant adjutant- 
general on the governor's stafi^. He was married 
in April, 1892, to Miss May I). Lockwood, daugh- 
ter of the late Hamilton D. and Annie L. Lock- 
wood. 



GEIGER, Albert, extensive operator in real 
estate in Boston, is a native of Switzerland, born 
in Ziirich, October 23, 1850, son of Jaques and 
Elizabeth (Zimmer) Geiger. His father was a 
shoe manufacturer in Zurich. His early educa- 
tion was attained in the schools of his native city ; 
and, after his graduation from the high school 
in 1865, he received a thorough business training 
in Marseilles, France, where he spent the years 
1866-67-68. Early in 1869 he came to Boston, 
and entered the services of Naylor & Co., long 
prominent iron and steel merchants. Subse- 
quently, when this firm was succeeded by the Nor- 
way Steel and Iron Company, he was made sec- 
retary and treasurer of that corporation, which 
position he held for many years. It was after the 
iron industry had ceased to be profitable in New 
P'.ngland that he entered the real estate business. 
In this his transactions have been large from the 
beginning, and his investments have been of an 
important character. He has built a number of 
apartment houses in the Back Bay district of 
Boston, which are prominent among the finer 
structures of that quarter, such as the "Ilkley," 



the "Windermere," the " Chesterfield," on the 
corner of Exeter and Marlboro Streets, and the 
houses Nos. 290 and 293-295 Commonwealth 
Avenue ; and the building of the Copley Square 
Hotel was his enterprise. He is a member of the 
.•\lgonquin, the Athletic, and the Megantic Fish 
and Game clubs, of the DeMolay Commandery, 
and other fraternal organizations. Mr. Geiger 




ALBERT GEIGER. 



was married September 8, 1872, to Miss Emma 
PfeitTer, of Boston. They have three children : 
Albert, Emily, and Arthur Geiger. 



GEORGE, Elijah, register of probate and in- 
solvency, Suffolk County, is a native of New York, 
born in New Rochelle, September 6, 1850, son of 
William E. and Elizabeth ( I )eveau) George. He 
was educated in New York City, receiving a high- 
school and academic training, and there began 
the study of law. Then, coming to Boston, he 
continued his studies in the law office of Uriel H. 
and George G. Crocker and in the Boston Univer- 
sity Law .School, graduating therefrom in 1873. 
He was admitted to the Suffolk bar in 1874 and 
to the bar of the Supreme Court of the United 
States in 1889. In 1875 he was appointed assist- 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



51 



ant register of probate and insolvency for the 
county of Suffolk, and two years later was elected 
to the position of register for the term of five 




Illinois Supreme Court. His grandfather, Allen 
Oilman, a lawyer, w'as the first mayor of Bangor, 
Me. He belongs to the Exeter branch of the 
family, descended from Edward Oilman, who came 
from Hingham, England, to Hingham, Mass., in 
1638. (Nicholas Oilman — it is a favorite name in 
the family — was a signer of the United States Con- 
stitution from New Hampshire. ) He was educated 
in the East, at academies in Parsonsfield, Me., and 
Effingham, N.H. ; and here he has spent the most 
of his active life. He was prepared for the minis- 
try at the Harvard Divinity School, graduating in 
187 I, and the following year was settled over the 
Unitarian church in Scituate. Three years later 
he took charge of the First Parish in Bolton. In 
1878 he was appointed professor of English 
literature and Oerman in Antioch College, Yel- 
low Springs, Ohio, and remained there three 
years, preaching Sundays in the college chapel. 
Returning in 1881 to New England, he took 
charge of the Unitarian churches in Waj-land and 
Sudbury. In 1884, after a tour in England, he 
established his residence in West Newton, and 
engaged in literary pursuits. His connection 



ELIJAH GEORGE. 

years, which he has since held by repeated re- 
elections. He has been for a number of years 
prominent in military affairs, and was for some 
time a member of the First Corps of Cadets. In 
1881-82 he was judge advocate, with the rank of 
captain, of the First Brigade, State militia ; and 
since 1882 he has been judge advocate of the 
Second Brigade. He is a member of the Boston 
Bar Association, of the Curtis Law, the Union, 
the Algonquin, the Athletic, the Massachusetts 
Yacht, the Roxbury, and the Abstract clubs ; 
and of the Beacon Society of Boston. Mr. 
Oeorge was married May 25, 1876, to Miss Susan 
Virginia Howard, of Baltimore, Md. They have 
three sons : Elijah Howard, William Leigh, and 
Ernest Oeorge. 




NICHOLAS p. OILMAN. 



OILMAN, Nicholas Paine, editor of the 
I.ihTary IVorld and managing editor of the Ne2U 
H'lir/i/, Boston, is a native of Illinois, born in 

Quincy, December 21, 1849, son of Charles and with the Literaiy World as a regular contributor 
Annette Maria (Dearborn) Oilman. His father to its columns began in 1878, during the editor- 
was a member of the bar and reporter to the ship of the Rev. Edward .\bbott. He became the 



52 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



editor in October, 1888, on Mr. Abbott's retire- 
ment. From 1885 to 1891 he was an assistant 
editor of the Unitarian Rei'iew. With the N^nv 
World, the Uberal quarterly review of religion, 
ethics, and theology, the publication of which was 
begun in March, 1892, he has been connected 
from its inception. He has given much study 
to social questions, and is the author of publica- 
tions which are counted among the most impor- 
tant contributions of the day to economic litera- 
ture, and have been widely circulated. In i88g 
he brought out '■ Profit Sharing between Em- 
ployer and Employee" (Boston, Houghton, Mif- 
flin & Co. ; London, Macmillan & Co.), recording 
and discussing the various experiments in profit 
sharing made in Europe and America. The work 
has passed through several editions, and been 
translated into German. Four years later his 
"Socialism and the American Spirit" (same pub- 
lishers), a volume on the present standing and 
probable future of socialism and social reform in 
the United States, appeared, and speedily reached 
a second edition. Another publication is a small 
book published in 1891, "The Laws of Daily Con- 
duct," designed to aid public school teachers in 
teaching morals without inculcating religious doc- 
trine. He has also contributed papers to the 
Fornni, the Arena, the A'lVi' England Magazine, 
the Christian Register, and other periodicals. In 
1892, as secretary and treasurer of the Association 
for the Promotion of Profit Sharing, Mr. Gilman 
established a little quarterly periodical called Em- 
ployer and Employed as a medium for the prac- 
tical discussion of profit sharing. He is chairman 
of the executive committee of the Boston Brown- 
ing Society, a member of the executive commit- 
tee of the Massachusetts Reform Club, in politics 
an Independent, and unmarried. 



GREENHALGE, Frederic Thomas, governor 
of the Commonwealth 1894, is a native of Eng- 
land, born in Clitheroe, a parliamentary borough 
in the county of Lancaster, July 19, 1842, only 
son of William and Jane (Slater) Greenhalge. 
His father was for some years an engraver in the 
Primrose Print Works of Clitheroe, and in 1855 
brought the family to this country, and, settling 
in Lowell, was employed in the Merrimack Print 
Works, in charge of the copper roller engraving. 
His education, begun in Clitheroe, was contmued 
in the Lowell public schools, and finished at Har- 



vard College. Upon graduation from the High 
School, where he ranked as the first scholar in 
his class, he received the first Carney medal ever 
given. He entered Harvard in the class of 1863 ; 
but, his father dying, he w'as obliged to leave col- 
lege in his junior year, and earn his support. He 
soon found a position as a teacher ; and, while 
pursuing this vocation, he began the study of law. 
Subsequently he entered the law office of Brown 
& Alger. In October, 1863, he joined the Union 
army, and was connected with the commissary 
department at Newbern, N.C. While engaged in 
this service, in April, 1864, he was seized with 
malarial fever, and after several weeks of sick- 
ness was sent home. Upon his recovery he re- 
sumed his legal studies, and in 1865 was admitted 
to the Middlesex bar. From that time until 1870 
he was associated with Charles F. Howe, and 
since the latter date has practised law alone. In 
1874 he was made a special justice of the police 
court of Lowell, and served ten years. In 1888 
he was made city solicitor. His public life began 
with service in the Lowell Common Council in 




F. T. GREENHALGE. 
(From a copyrighteil photo^'raph by Kliner Cliickering.) 

1868 and 1869. From 187 1 to 1873 he was a 
member of the School Board; in 1880 and 1881 
mayor of the city; in 1885 a representative of 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



OJ 



Lowell in the lower house of the Legislature ; and 
in 1889-90 a member of the Fifty-first Congress, 
representing the Eighth Massachusetts District. 
At Washmgton he ranked with the leaders in the 
New England delegation, and, a ready debater, 
was frequently heard on the floor of the House. 
In 1890 he was renominated by the Kepublicans 
of his district, but, after a hot canvass, lost the 
election by about four hundred and fifty votes. 
He was delegate to the National Republican Con- 
vention of 1884, and in 1890 was chairman of the 
Republican State Convention. In the autumn 
campaign of 1893, which ended with his election 
to the governorship as the successor of William E. 
Russell, the successful Democratic candidate in 
three elections, he was constantly on the stump 
from the day of his nomination, visiting all parts 
of the State. In Lowell he is a member of a 
nvunber of societies and clubs, is president of the 
Humane Society, past president of the Unitarian 
and the History clubs, and is now president of 
the People's Club; and he belongs to several po- 
litical dining clubs meeting in Boston. He has 
been a trustee of the City Institution for Savings 
of Lowell since 1876, and is now president of the 
Institution. He was married in Lowell, October 
I, 1872, to Miss Isabel Nesmith, daughter of 
John Nesmith, lieutenant governor of the State in 
1862 with Governor Andrew. They have had 
four children: Nesmith (deceased), Frederic 
Hrandlesome, Harriet Nesmith, and Richard 
Spalding Greenhalge. 



GREENLEAF, Lvmax KLANCH.-\kr), vice-presi- 
dent of the PSoston Stock Exchange 1891-93, is a 
native of Boston, born September 19. 185 1. young- 
est son of the late Gardner Greenleaf, 3d, and Re- 
becca J. (Caldwell) Greenleaf. He was educated 
in Boston public schools, — the Phillips Grammar 
and the English High, graduating from the latter 
in July, 1869. He began his business career in 
i86g as a boy in the Boston banking house of 
Tower, Giddings & Co. ; and seven years after 
(on January i, 1876) he was made a partner in 
the firm. The same year (January 31 he became 
a member of the Stock Exchange. In January, 
1884, he withdrew from the house of Tower, Gid- 
dings i& Co., and since that time has been in 
business alone. He was made a member of the 
first governing committee of the Exchange April 
I, 1886, and held this position for two years, when 



he resigned. He was first elected vice-president in 
1891 ; and upon the establishment of the clearing 
house, in January, 1892, he w^as made chairman 




LYMAN B. GREENLEAF. 

of the clearing-house committee, from both of 
which offices he resigned in 1893. Mr. Green- 
leaf is a member of the Somerset, Athletic, and 
Country clubs of Boston. He was married April 
20, 1892, to Miss Ellen M. Browning, daughter of 
Charles A. Browning, of Boston, head of the well- 
known wholesale millinery house of Charles A. 
Browning &: Co. They have one son : Browning 
Greenleaf. 

HAM, Albtdx Paris, of Sargent & Ham, car- 
riage-builders, Boston, is a native of Maine, born 
in Shapleigh, York County, April 7, 1828, eldest 
son of John M. and Mary (Abbott) Ham. He is 
of Scotch ancestry. His education was acquired 
in the public schools of Limerick, Me. Until 
nineteen years of age he worked on his father's 
farm, and then apprenticed himself to the car- 
riage-making trade. His father desiring that, as 
the eldest son, he should succeed to the farm, and 
refusing to consent to his leaving home before 
he was twenty-one, he offered to pay for his free- 
dom one hundred dollars from the first money 
earned after he had finished his apprenticeship. 



54 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Through the influence of his niotiier, his fatlier 
finally yielded ; and the young man faithfully 
kept his part of the bargain. At twenty-one he 
came to Boston, and obtained employment in 
John Rayner's carriage manufactory, Nos. 57 to 
63 Sudbury Street, at that time the largest works 




ALBION P. HAM. 

of the kind in New England, manufacturing a 
high grade of vehicles. In 1854 Mr. Rayner 
being ready to retire, Mr. Ham, with a plenty of 
ambition and a large supply of courage, but very 
little money, formed a copartnership with Haydn 
Sargent, under the firm name of Sargent & Ham, 
and bought out his employer's extensive busi- 
ness. The new firm continued the manufacture 
of fine custom carriages at the old stand for six- 
teen years, and was fairly prosperous. Then, in 
1870, Mr. Ham bought of the city of Boston a 
lot of land, Nos. 26, 28, and 30 Bowker Street, 
just around the corner from the Sudbury Street 
factory, and erected thereon a substantial brick 
and stone, six- story- and -basement building, 
equipped with all the modern improvements, into 
which the business was moved early in the spring 
of 187 1. In July, 1S91, the concern was incor- 
porated, with a capital of $150,000, under the 
name of the Sargent & Ham Company, Mr. Ham 
being the president and managing director. Mr. 



Ham was one of the original members of the Na- 
tional Carriage Builders' Association, and was 
elected its first vice-president. In politics he is 
a steadfast Republican ; but he has never allowed 
his name to be used for any office, preferring to 
attend strictly to his own business affairs. He 
attends the Park Street Congregational Church, 
Boston, where he owns a pev; ; and he has been 
a member of the prudential committee of the so- 
ciety for many years. He has travelled exten- 
sively in this country and in Europe. He was 
married, in 1854, to Miss Augusta C. Blenn, of 
Dresden, Me. They have no children. 



HART, Tho.mas Norton, president of the 
Mount Vernon National Bank, mayor of Boston 
1889 and 1890, is a native of North Reading, 
born January 20. 1829, son of Daniel and Mar- 
garet (Norton) Hart. His father's ancestors 
settled in Lynnfield, and his maternal grandfather 
was of Royalston. The latter was Major John 
Norton, a soldier of the Revolution. Thomas N. 
obtained his education in the schools of his native 
town, and, when a lad of thirteen, made his way 
to Boston to earn his living. Here he first found 
employment in a dry-goods store conducted by 
W'heelock, Pratt &: Co. Two years later, in 1844, 
he entered a hat store; and in this business his 
progress was steady and substantial. In course 
of time he became a partner in the firm of Philip 
A. Locke i\: Co., and subsequently founded the 
prosperous house of Hart, Taylor & Co. About 
the year 1879 he retired from this business with 
a competency, and soon after was made president 
of the Mount Vernon National Bank, of which he 
is still the head. From the beginning an earnest 
Republican, he early took an infiuential part in 
local politics as a citizen. At length he was in- 
duced to serve in the city council, and he was first 
elected to the Common Council for the term of 
1S79. In this body he at once ranked among the 
leaders. He was twice returned, serving in 1S80 
and 1 88 1, and then was made a member of the 
Board of Aldermen. Here he served three terms 
(1882, 1885, and 1886), prominent on important 
committees and influential on the floor. In 1886 
he was first nominated for the mayoralty, but was 
defeated in the election by Mayor O'Brien, the 
Democratic candidate. The following year, again 
a candidate, and again against Mayor O'Brien, he 
succeeded in cutting the latter's majority to a 



MEN OF PROGRKSS. 



55 



slender margin ; and the next year, for the third 
time in nomination and against Mayor O'Brien, 
he carried the election by a majority over his 
competitor of nearly two thousand. Returned the 
next year, he served the two terms of 1SS9 and 
1890. In 1 89 1 he was appointed by President 
Harrison postmaster of Boston, which position he 
held through the remainder of Mr. Harrison's 
administration, and after the incoming of Presi- 
dent Cleveland until June, 1893. In the State 
campaign of the latter year he was prominently 
mentioned for the Republican nomination for gov- 
ernor ; and in the municipal campaign following 
he was for the fifth time a candidate for mayor, 
nominated by the Republican convention, but was 
unsuccessful, Mayor Matthews being returned. 
Mr. Hart is identified with a number of local 
societies and organizations ; is treasurer of the 
American Unitarian Association, an officer of the 
Church of the Unity, and a member of the Uni- 
tarian, the Algonquin, and the Hull \'acht clubs. 



<~r 



^' 








THOMAS N. HART. 

He was married in 1850, in Boston, to Miss Eliza- 
beth Snow, of Bowdoin, Me. They have one 
child, a daughter (now Mrs. C. W. Ernst). Mr. 
Hart's town house is on Commonwealth Avenue, 
Boston, and his country place at Galloupe's Point, 
Swampscott. 



HOLMES, Oliver Wkntikll, Jr., justice of 
the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, son 
of Dr. Oliver Wendell and Amelia Lee (Jackson) 
Holmes, was born in Boston, March 8, 1841. 
He attended V. R. Sullivan's, afterward E. S. 
Dixwell's school, and was graduated from Har- 
vard College in the class of 1861. In April that 
year he joined the Fourth Battalion of Infantry, 
Major Thomas G. Stevenson, then at Fort Inde- 
pendence, Boston Harbor, where he wrote the 
poem which he delivered on Class Day. July 10 
he was commissioned first lieutenant, Company 
A, Tw-entieth Massachusetts. In the battle of 
Ball's Bluft'. October 21, he was wounded in the 
breast, and was also struck in the abdomen by a 
spent ball. March 23, 1862, he was commissioned 
captain, Company G. He received a wound in the 
neck at Antietani, September 17. In Februar)-, 
1863, he was provost-marshal of Falmouth, Va. 
At Marye's Hill, near Fredericksburg, on May 3, 
he received a third wound, this time in the heel. 
On July s following he was commissioned lieuten- 
ant - colonel. Twentieth Massachusetts, but was 
not mustered in, the regiment being too much re- 
duced. January 29, 1864, he was appointed 
aide-de-camp on the staff of Brigadier -General 
H. G. Wright, commanding the First Division, 
Sixth Corps, afterward major-general commanding 
the Sixth Corps, and served with General Wright 
during General Grant's campaign, down to 
Petersburg, returning to Washington with the 
Sixth Corps when the capital was threatened, 
Jul)-, 1S64. On the 17th of that month he was 
mustered out of service, it being the end of his 
term of enlistment. Returning to Boston, in 
September he entered the Harvard Law School, 
and in 1866 received his LL.B. In December, 
1865, he entered the law office of Robert M. 
Morse, Barristers' Hall, Boston. Spending the 
summer of 1866 in Europe, he became a member 
of the English Alpine Club. On his return he 
entered the law office of Chandler, Shattuck & 
Thayer. Then, on March 4, 1867, he was ad- 
mitted to the Suffolk bar, and subsequently was 
admitted to practice before the United States 
Supreme Court. He practised his profession first 
in partnership with his brother, and afterward in 
the firm of Shattuck, Holmes & Munroe, formed 
in 1873. In 1870-71 he taught constitutional 
law in Harvard College, and in 1871-72 w-as uni- 
versity lecturer on jurisprudence. In 1873 he 



pub 



ished in four volumes the twelfth edition of 



56 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Kent's Commentaries, adding elaborate notes. 
From 1870 to 1873 he liad editorial charge of the 
American Laic Jii'Ticiv, volumes V., VI., \'II., 
and wrote for this review a number of articles. 
An essay by him on "Early English Equity" may 
be foiMid in the Eiii^lish Law Quarterly RevieTO, 
April, 1885, and two articles on "Agency" in the 
Harvard Law Revieiv, March and April, 1891. 
In 1 89 1, also, a volume of his speeches was pub- 
lished by Little, Brown, & Co. In the winter of 
1880 he delivered a series of lectures on the 
Common Law, in Boston, — one of the Lowell 




■ow liPBR* 




O. W. HOLMES, Jr. 

Institute courses, — and the following year pub- 
lished a volume on the same subject (" The Com- 
mon Law," by O. W. Holmes, Jr., Boston: Little, 
Brown & Co.), which greatly widened his reputa- 
tion. The work was highly commended by the 
reviewers at home and abroad, and it was subse- 
quently translated into Italian by Sig. Francesco 
Lambertenghi, now the Italian consul-general at 
Zurich. In 1882 Mr. Holmes was appointed to a 
new professorship in the Harvard Law School; 
but he had hardly entered upon his duties there 
when ( December 8 ) Governor Long appointed 
him an associate justice of the Supreme Court, in 
place of Judge Otis P. Lord, resigned. Justice 
Holmes is a member of the Massachusetts Histor- 



ical Society, and was a fellow of the American 
Academy, but resigned : and at the same time 
that his father was receiving the degree of LL.I). 
from O.xford (in 1886) he was receiving it from 
Yale. He married, June 17, 1872, Miss Fannie 
Dixwell, daughter of E. S. Di.xwell, of Cambridge. 
Thev have no children. 



HORTON, Rev. Edward Auou.stus (Unita- 
rian), president of the Benevolent Fraternity of 
Churches in Boston, and of the Unitarian Sunday- 
School Society covering the whole country, is a 
native of Springfield, born September 28, 1843, 
son of William Marshall and Ann (Leonard) Hor- 
ton. The branch of the Horton family to which 
he belongs have had their home for many years 
in picturesque Ponkapoag, a part of Canton ; 
ills father and mother lie buried there. His 
early education was begun in the public schools 
of Springfield, and continued in Chicago, whither 
his parents moved when he was a lad of thirteen, 
and where he lived six years. During that period 
the' Ci\il War broke out ; and soon after its out- 
break, when scarcely eighteen, he abandoned his 
books, and, going to Brooklyn, N.Y., enlisted in 
the navy. He served as landsman in the South 
Atlantic squadron, under Commodores Dupont 
and Dahlgren, a little more than a year, and was 
in several sharp engagements. His sliip, tiie 
steam gunboat "Seneca," assisted in X\\i blockade 
of Charleston, and had a part in the attacks on 
Forts Wagner and Sumter, and in the destruc- 
tion of the Confederate pri\-ateer "Nashville." 
I'pon his return to civil life he hurried prepara- 
tions for college, and so crowded studies that 
he was enabled to enter the University of Michi- 
gan without conditions in the class of 1869. 
After a short time in college, however, he con- 
cluded that, with his slender resources, he could 
not afford to give the necessary time to com- 
plete the course and properly to fit himself for 
the ministry, the profession of his choice. Ac- 
cordingly, he withdrew, and went at once to the 
Theological School at Meadville. Penna. There 
he took the regular three years' course, and pur- 
sued other studies, graduating in 1868. Upon 
graduation having two calls, one from Flint, 
Mich., and one from a larger parish in Leomin- 
ster, this State, he accepted the latter. This pas- 
torate he held for seven years, during that period, 
in 187 1, visiting England, Switzerland, and Ger- 



MEN OF PROGRKSS. 



57 



many, and spending a year in study at lirunswick 
and at Heidelberg, his ciiurch generously grant- 
ing him leave of absence for this purpose. In 
the summer of 1875 he accepted a call from the 
First Unitarian Church of New Orleans ; but a 
severe illness, largely the result of overwork, fell 
upon him. and he was unable to take the charge. 
His physician ordering rest for two years, on 
the ist of December, his wedding-day, he started 
South on a vacation trip. A year later, improved 
in healtii, but not yet fully recovered, he was 
again at work, ii.wing accepted a call to Hingham 
as minister of the Old Church, famous for its 
quaint meeting-house, then upwards of two hun- 
dred years old. Here he remained, enjoying the 
pleasantest of relations witii his parish and the 
town, for three years, when he resigned to take 
the pastorate of the Second Church in Boston, 
Copley Square, founded in 1649, and distin- 
guished as the pulpit of the three Mathers, — In- 
crease, Cotton, and Samuel, — John Lathrop. 
Henry Ware, Jr., Ralph Waldo Emerson, and 
Chandler Robbins. This charge he entered 
upon in May, 1880; and, under his leadership, 
the parish was brought to a high degree of pros- 
perity, and into connection with many good works 
in the community. During his ministry a debt of 
$45,000 was removed, and he made the church 
emphatically a working organization. In the 
spring of 1892, his health again impaired, he was 
compelled to resign, and relinquish for a time 
parish work. He had his choice between a long 
vacation abroad or some new work. Choosing the 
latter, he undertook the direction and development 
of the two organizations of which he is presi- 
dent. He is now at the head of tlie missionary 
work of the Unitarian denomination and of 
church extension in the city of Boston, as pres- 
ident of the Benevolent Fraternity of Churches 
having the oversight of some si.x churches in the 
city, which stand for the ministry at large of the 
Unitarian body in Boston. As president of the 
Unitarian Sunday-School Society, he edits a paper 
for the young people, Ei-crv Other Sum/ay, super- 
vises the publication of te.\t-books, confers with 
Sunday-school workers, makes addresses in be- 
half of this cause, and directs all the affairs 
which relate to the Unitarian Sunday-school work. 
The extent of this supervision is measured only 
by the breadth of the land from Boston to San 
Francisco. Mr. Horton is also chairman of tiie 
Committee on Settlement of .Ministers and N'acant 



Pastorates for the Unitarian denomination ; is 
superintendent of the Westford Academy in West- 
ford, this State ; a trustee of Derby .Academy, 
Hingham; visitor to the Howard Collegiate In- 
stitute ; and a manager of the Home for Int^i- 
perate Women, of the Washington Home, of the 
North End Mission, and of other philanthropic 
institutions. He is closely connected with the 
Grand .■\rmy of the Republic, having served as 
chaplain of the State, is chaplain of E. W. Kinsley 
Post 113 of Boston, and past chaplain of the 
Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company. He 




EDWARD A. HORTON. 

is also grand chaplain of the State for the Masons. 
He has been a frequent contributor of literary 
reviews of books to the denominational periodi- 
cals and the Boston press, and has published 
in pamphlet form discourses on Emerson and 
Garfield, delivered at the time of their death: 
three sermons on Unitarianism ; an historical dis- 
course commemorative of the two hundred and 
fiftieth anniversary of tiic building of the old 
meeting-house in Hingham ; an address to the 
graduating class of 1888 at the Boston College of 
Pharmacy ; and a book, " Noble Lives and 
Noble Deeds." In 1880 the University of 
Michigan conferred upon him the honorary 
degree of .A.M. Mr. Morton was married at 



58 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Lancaster, December :, 1875, to Miss Josephine 
Adelaide Rand, daughter of Nathaniel and Ruth 
(Miles) Rand. They have one child: Kuth 
Horton, born February 24, 1877. 




H. O. HOUGHTON. 

HOUGHTON, Henry Oscar, head of the 
publishing house of Houghton, Mifflin, & Co., 
and projector of the Riverside Press in Cam- 
bridge, is a native of Vermont, born in the little 
town of Sutton, April 30. 1823, son of William 
and Morilla (Clay) Houghton. His ancestors 
were among the early New England colonists, 
the Houghtons first coming to the country about 
the year 1630, and settling in Lancaster. His 
mother was a daughter of Captain James Clay, 
who took an important part in the controversy be- 
tween New Ham]ishire and New York over the 
question of jurisdiction in tlie region now em- 
braced in the State of Vermont, prior to the out- 
break of the Revolution. When he was about 
ten years old, the family moved from Sutton to 
the town of Bradford, on the Connecticut River. 
After a few terms in the Bradford Academy, at 
the age of thirteen he became an apprentice in 
the office of the Burlington Free Press, and there 
took his first lessons in the printer's trade. Sub- 
sequently he worked at the trade awhile in 



Nunda, N.Y. Determined to acquire a thorough 
education, his evenings and other spare moments 
were devoted to study. At the age of nineteen 
he was prepared for college, and entered the Uni- 
versity of Vermont with twelve and a half cents 
in his pocket, but with dauntless resolution. Soon 
after his graduation, in 1846, he came to Boston, 
and here spent a year or two in the work of proof- 
reading and reporting for the Evening Tra'eeller 
before he found his life-work as a master printer. 
This was begun in Cambridge, where in January, 
1849, he joined Mr. Bolles, of the firm of Free- 
man &: Bolles, in establishing a printing-office. 
Its first location w'as on Remington Street, near 
Harvard College. Three years later the business 
was removed to the site on the banks of the 
Charles, when the name of the Riverside Press 
was assumed. And from the modest establish- 
ment first set up here has grown the present 
imposing group of buildings, with extensive com- 
position, electrotyping, printing, binding, and lith- 
ographic departments, in which the work of fine 
book-making is carried through the several stages 
from the manuscript to the bound volume. The 
original Riverside Press, which was sixty by forty 
feet in size, forms the nucleus of the present 
buildings, and still contains a part of the compos- 
ing and press rooms. In 1864 Mr. Houghton en- 
tered the publishing business, forming a partner- 
ship with Melancthon M. Hurd, of New \'ork, 
under the firm name of Hurd & Houghton, to 
provide an outlet for the publication of the works 
of Dickens, Bacon, and other writers, stereotype 
plates of which he had become the owner. Ele- 
gant library editions of Bacon, Carlyle, Macaulay, 
and Cooper, were issued ; and the catalogue of 
the house showed a large proportion of standard 
works. This firm existed under the same name, 
but with additions to the membership, until 1878, 
when it was succeeded by that of Houghton, 
Osgood, & Co., which came into possession of 
literary franchises, privileges covering the works 
of Emerson, Lowell, Hawthorne, Longfellow, 
Holmes, Whittier, and other leaders in Ameri- 
can literature, collected during a long period by 
the firms of Allen & Ticknor ; Ticknor, Reed, & 
Fields ; Ticknor & Fields ; Fields, Osgood, & 
Co. ; and James R. Osgood, & Co. In 1880, 
when Mr. ( )sgood retired, and was succeeded by 
Lawson Valentine, of New York, the house took 
its present title of Houghton, Mifflin, & Co. (Mr. 
Mifllin first admitted to partnership in 1872, when 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



59 



the firm was Hurd & Houghton). Referring to 
the date of birth of the oldest of the concerns 
to which the present partnership is successor, the 
house of Houghton, Mifflin, & Co. is traced back 
to 1811, through its successorship to the business 
of Crocker & Brewster. Besides the merging 
of the business of the several houses above enu- 
merated into that of the present house, important 
accessories to its plant and franchises have been 
attained through successorship to the busmess 
of J. Ci. Ciregory, &: Co., and of Albert Mason, of 
New \'ork, and of Brown, Taggart, & Chase, of 
Boston. IJesides the manufacture and publica- 
tion of valuable books, Mr. Houghton's firm pub- 
lishes the Atlantic Monthly, which was purchased 
by Hurd & Houghton in 1873, the Aiiil<>','ci- 
RcTicKi, the Journal of American Folk-Lore (quar- 
terly), and the A'cw World (cjuarterly). The 
firm as now composed consists of Henry (). 
Houghton, L. H. Valentine, George H. Mifflin, 
James Murray Kay, Henry O. Houghton, Jr., 
Oscar R. Houghton, and Albert F. Houghton, 
the last two nephews of Mr. Houghton. The 
premises of the Riverside Press at present occupy 
a piece of ground about 450 feet in length by 360 
feet in breadth, attractively laid out, a well-kept 
lawn spreading over the north-east corner, with a 
handsome fountain in the middle, which was ded- 
icated on Mr. Houghton's fiftieth birthday, April 
30, 1873. The main building, four stories high, 
with a tower, has a frontage on the east of 170 
feet, and on the north by nearly as much, with 
an extensive wing. That devoted to lithographic 
work is 200 feet long by 75 feet in width for half 
its length, and 45 feet for the remainder, with a 
high basement and one lofty story lighted by mon- 
itor roof. The employees of the Press number 
about six hundred. The old-time custom of ap- 
prenticeship is still in vogue here, with some mod- 
ifications ; and long service is the rule. Some of 
the members of the force were with Mr. Hough- 
ton when the Press was founded. Those con- 
nected with the establishment enjoy the use of 
the Riverside library, which contains a large num- 
ber of excellent books. As printers, binders, and 
electrotypers, Houghton, Mifflin, &: Co. conduct 
business under the title of H. (). Houghton, & 
Co. From the first Mr. Houghton has been the 
controlling spirit of the Press. His purpose 
in its development, as has been shown by re- 
sults, was to do here the very best work in book- 
makins;, — to make books that should satisfv the 



artistic feeling as well as the literary sense. Many 
warm tributes to the excellence of Riverside work- 
manship have been received from those most 
competent to pass judgment, and it has won high 
compliment abroad as well as at home. Since 
the establishment of his printing business, Mr. 
Houghton has made his residence in Cambridge : 
and in 1872 he was mayor of the university city. 
The Boston office of the house is at No. 4 Park 
Street, in the old-time mansion house of Josiah 
Quincy, Jr., mayor of Boston from 1845 to 1849 : 
and in Mr. Houghton's office here the regular 
weekly consultations of the members of the firm 
and heads of departments are held. Mr. Hough- 
ton was married in 1854 to Miss Nanna W. Man- 
ing, daughter of William Maning, of Cambridge. 
They had four children: Henry ().. Elizabeth H., 
Alberta M., and lusline F. Houghton. 



JACKSON, ^^'ILLIA^I, city engineer of Boston, 
is a native of Brighton (now the Brighton District 
of Boston), born March 13, 1848, son of Samuel 




WM. JACKSON. 



and Mary Wright ( Field) Jackson. His father 
was of Brighton, and his mother of Conway. His 
first ancestor in this country was Edward Jackson, 
who settled in Newton in 1639. His early educa- 



6o 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



tion was obtained in the public schools; and he 
was fitted for his profession as a civil engineer 
at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
which he entered in 1865. From the Institute 
he went directly to a position at the Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir, where he was employed from 
1868 to 1870. Then he was assigned to the 
Water- Works survey and the extension of the sys- 
tem in Brighton and West Roxbury. With this 
work, and with the private practice of engineer- 
ing, he was occupied until 1876, when he was 
appointed assistant engineer on the Boston Main 
Drainage Works, the most formidable piece of 
engineering construction ever undertaken in the 
city. He continued in this department until 
April, 1885, and then was elected city engineer 
in place of Henry M. ^^'ightman, deceased, which 
position he has held since. During the construc- 
tion of the Harvard Bridge over the Charles 
River, from 1887 to iSgi, he was engineer for 
the bridge commissioners ; and he was a member 
of the Boston Rapid Transit Commission in 
1891-92. He is a member of the American So- 
ciety of Civil Engineers, of the Boston Society 
of Civil Engineers, of the New England Water 
Works .Association, and of the Union, Exchange, 
and .\rt clubs of ISoston. Mr. Jackson was mar- 
ried .\pril 27, 1886, to Miss Mary Stuart Mac- 
Corry, of Boston. They have one child : William 
Stuart Jackson. 



JEFFERSON, Joseph, of Buzzard's Bay, 
player, the third Joseph Jefferson known to the 
American stage, was born in Philadelphia, Penna., 
February 20, 1829, son of Joseph and Cornelia 
Francis (Burke) Jefferson. He comes of sterling 
dramatic stock. His great-grandfather, Thomas 
Jefferson, was an eminent English actor, long con- 
nected as comedian with Drury Lane, London, 
and sometime manager of the playhouse at Rich- 
mond. His grandfather, the first Joseph Jeffer- 
son (born in Plymouth, England, in 1774, died 
in Harrisburg, Penna., in 1832), was also a distin- 
guished comedian, called in his day " one of the 
brightest ornaments of the stage," who made his 
American debut in Boston at the Federal Street 
Theatre in 1795, was afterwards a favorite player 
in New York, and for twenty-seven years was 
permanently engaged in Philadelphia ; and his 
father, the second Joseph (born in New \'ork, 
1814, died in Mobile in 1842), trained for a 



scene painter, early became an actor, especially 
excellent in "old men" parts, and manager of 
playhouses. His mother was a native of New 
York, of French descent, in the twenties a popu- 
lar comic actress and stage vocalist, with an ex- 
quisite voice, "which," savs Ireland, in his 
"Records of the New York Stage," "in power, 
purity, and sweetness was unapproached by any 
contemporary." His earliest recollections are 
of the theatre, and " behind the scenes " was 
his first playhouse. "The door from our back 
entry," he says in his Autobiographv, "opened 
upon the stage, and, as a toddling little chap 




JOSEPH JEFFERSON 

in a short frock, I was allowed full run of 
the place." This was in the theatre in Washing- 
ton, which his father took soon after his birth ; 
and here he made his first appearance, taken on 
to do duty in long clothes, a babe in arms. .\t 
the age of three he appeared as the child in 
" Pizarro, or the Death of Rolla," and the same 
season in " Living Statues," a series of tableaux. 
From Washiiogton the family moved to Baltimore, 
and thence to New York, where during the 
years 1S35-37 the father was connected with the 
Franklin and Niblo's Theatres. In that city he 
attended the public schools ; and there, also, 
he made his first appearance out of the juvenile 



MEN OF PKO(;kESS. 



6i 



supernuinerary i;inks (at the Franklin Theatre in 
1837), taking part in a "celebrated eonibat " 
witii " Master Titus," dressed to represent a 
(ireek pirate, '■ Master Titus " representing an 
American sailor. In 1839 his father took the 
management of the theatre in Chicago, then a 
bustling village, and thither the family went with 
a little company, acting along the way. After a 
short season here, with varying success, the com- 
pany, under his father's lead, went •' on the 
road," going first to Galena, travelling in open 
wagon over the jjrairie. Thence they jonrneyed 
on the frozen river in sleighs to Dubuque ; and, 
after taking in several of the towns then spring- 
ing up along the river, they tarried a full season in 
Springfield, 111., the management building a tem- 
porary theatre there. Had business closed the 
house, and the Jeffersons next found themselves 
in Memphis in straitened circumstances. For a 
while the father •■ turned from scene-painter to 
sign-painter " for a livelihood. Then they moved 
on to Mobile, where an engagement had been se- 
cured at the local theatre, taking a steerage pas- 
sage by one of the river steamboats. Upon their 
arrival, October, 1842, the yellow fever was raging 
in the town ; and two weeks later the elder Jef- 
ferson was stricken with the malady, and died, 
leaving the family without resources. Voung 
Jefferson and his sister found employment at the 
theatre in children's parts, appearing in fancy 
dances and comic duets; and he also worked in 
the paint-room, grinding colors. After a time he 
was given subordinate parts, and during his en- 
gagement here acted with Macready and the 
elder Booth. .\t about the age of si.xteen he left 
Mobile and travelled in various parts of tlie 
South with companies of strolling players. Tlie 
ne.xt year or so he was "barn-storming" in Mis- 
sissippi, playing small parts in Galveston and 
Houston ; in a band of comedians, following up 
the American army in the war with Mexico ; and 
stranded in Matamoras with his mother and sis- 
ter, the manager having disappeared with the 
cash and back salaries, running a pie and coffee 
stand in the "Grand Spanish Saloon." catering 
to the gamblers and camp-followers, who then 
largely constituted the population of the place. 
Subsequently getting back to civilization, he came 
North, and for several seasons was in W. E. 
liurton's company at the Arch Street, Philadel- 
phia, acting second and then first comedy. In 
1847 he had a brief experience as a country man- 



ager, and that year also played his first "star" en- 
gagement in Cumberland, I'enna. The next sea- 
son he was low comedian of a melodramatic 
theatre in Philadelphia, the .Amphitheatre. In 
1849 he was a member of the Chatham Theatre 
(New York) company. Part of 1850 he managed 
a company in the South, playing in Macon, Savan- 
nah, and Wilmington, N.C. : and again the ne.xt 
season in Wilmington and Charleston, S.C. In 
1852 he was first comedy, under the stage man- 
agement of John Gilbert, at the Chestnut Street, 
Philadelphia. In 1853 he was stage manager 
at the Baltimore Museum for Henry C. Jar- 
rett ; the next year manager of the Richmond 
Theatre for John T. Ford : and the next at 
Ford's Washington Theatre. In 1856 he made 
his first trip to Europe, visiting London and 
Paris. In 1857 he was installed as comedian of 
Laura Keene's Theatre, New York, opening in 
September as Dr. Pangloss in "The Heir-at-law." 
On October 8, 1858, "Our .American Cousin" 
was first produced, and its success, he writes in 
his Autobiography, "proved the turning-point 
in the career of three persons, — Laura Keene, 
Sothern, and myself."' In the character of Asa 
Trciichaici he won wide fame, and became a 
star performer. .After a season at the Winter 
Garden Theatre, New A'ork, in 1859, ■^^'lieii he 
acted A'civman Noggs, Caleb Plummcr, and Salem 
Scicddcr, he appeared in his first version of " Rip 
Van \A'inkle," playing a short season in Wash- 
ington. Then in 1861 he struck across the con- 
tinent, and, after a short and unsatisfactory 
engagement in San Francisco, sailed in Septem- 
ber for .Australia. There he spent four profit- 
able years, presenting "Rip \'an Winkle," "Our 
.American Cousin,'' and "The Octoroon." Pro- 
ceeding next to England by way of South .Amer- 
ica, he made his first appearance before a 
London audience in September, 1865, bringing 
out " Rip A'an \\'inkle," reconstructed and re- 
written by Boucicault ; and the success of the 
play with his matchless delineation of the hero 
secured for it a brilliant run of one hundred and 
seventy nights. From London he took it to 
Manchester and to Liverpool, playing successful 
engagements in both cities. Then he returned to 
-America by clipper ship. For nearly a quarter of 
a century " Rip Van Winkle " only was produced 
by him, played throughout the country, and again 
abroad (in 1875) in London, Glasgow, Dublin, 
and Belfast, never losing its freshness or its charm. 



62 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Later in the eighties he revised "The Rivals," 
reconstructed by himself, — condensed from five 
acts into three, several characters cut out, and 
an epilogue added, — making of Boh Acres his 
star part, which had a brilliant run through sev- 
eral seasons. In private life he is distinguished 
as a devoted angler and as a painter of notable 
landscapes in oil. He was one of the original 
members of the Plaj-ers' Club, New York, of 
which he is now the president. For many 
seasons he spent the mid-winters on his sugar 
plantation on the Bayou Teche, La., and the mid- 
summers on his farm in New Jersey ; but his 
principal residence is now his country place at 
Marion on Buzzard's Bay, a near neighbor of 
President Cleveland's summer home. Mr. Jeffer- 
son was first married in 1849 ^'^ Miss Margret 
Lockyer, an actress. She died in March, 1861. 
His second wife was Miss Sarah Warren, whom 
he married in Chicago, December 20, 1S67. Mr. 
Jefferson has seven children living : Charles, 
Margret, Thomas, Josephine, Joseph, William, 
and Frank Jefferson. 



Boston and of the Massachusetts Loan & Trust 
Company, and vice-president of the Home Sav- 
ings Bank. He has long been prominent in num- 



JONES, Jerome, merchant, Boston, is a native 
of Athol, Worcester County, born October 13, 
1837, youngest son of Theodore and Marcia (Es- 
tabrook) Jones. His maternal grandfather, the 
Rev. Joseph Estabrook, was the second minister 
of Athol, a graduate of Harvard College, and 
a noted clergyman there for forty years. He was 
educated in the common schools of Athol, and 
when yet a boy was at work as a clerk in a coun- 
try store and post-office in the adjoining town 
of Orange. At sixteen he came to Boston, and 
entered the establishment of Otis Norcross, & 
Co., then the leading importers of crockery 
in the United States, as an apprentice, and there 
received a thorough commercial training, and 
early rose to positions of responsibility. At 
twenty-four he was admitted to partnership in 
the firm, and at twenty-seven he became its Eu- 
ropean buyer. His name first appeared in the 
firm of Otis Norcross, & Co., in 1861, then in 
1868 in the firm of Howland & Jones, Mr. Nor- 
cross (that year elected mayor of Boston) retiring 
from the business ; and it was placed at the head, 
after the death of Ichabod Howland, in 187 1, the 
firm name then becoming Jones, McDuffee, & 
Stratton, as it has been known since. Mr. Jones 
is also a director of the Third National Bank of 




JEROME JONES. 

erous local commercial organizations of influence 
in the community, — president of the Boston 
Earthenware Association, president of the Boston 
Associated Board of Trade, a member of the Bos- 
ton Merchants' Association, and of the Commer- 
cial Club. In politics he is a Democrat, influen- 
tial in his party. He was one of the original 
members of the New England Tariff Reform 
League, and has served on its executive commit- 
tee since its organization. Among other posi- 
tions which he has held is that of president of 
the \\'orcester North-west Agricultural Society at 
Athol. He is a trustee of Mount Auburn Ceme- 
tery, and commissioner of the sinking fund of 
the town of Brookline wliere he resides ; and is 
a member of the National Association of Whole- 
salers in Crockery and Glass Ware. He belongs 
to the Union and the Unitarian clubs of Boston, 
and the Thursday Club of Brookline. Mr. Jones 
was first married February 11, 1864, to Miss Eliza- 
beth R. Wait, by whom were four children : 
Theodore, Elizabeth W., Marcia E., and Helen 
R. Jones. His first wife died July 10, 1878. 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



63 



He was married again Februar)- 16, 1881, to 
Mrs. Maria E. Dutton, of Boston. 



KEMBLE, Edward, president of the Boston 
Chamber of Commerce, is a native of Wenham, 
born October 12, 1S36, son of Edmund and Mary 
W. (Beckford) Kimball. It having been found by 
his father that tlie true spelling of the family 
name was Kemble, he and his brothers and sis- 
ters were brought up to spell it that way. He 
is descended from the Campbells of Scotland. 
Early and well prepared for college, he entered 
Amherst at si.xteen, and was graduated there 
at the age of twenty. His father, a graduate 
of Harvard and a lawyer, — who studied law with 
Daniel Webster, was afterwards junior counsel 
with Webster in some cases, and prominent also 
in public life, at one time a State senator, — in- 
tended him for the legal profession, and accord- 
ingly he read law for a short time, but very soon 
he determined upon a mercantile life, and en- 
tered a counting-room to learn business. In 1862 




EDWARD KEMBLE. 



The firm made business connections in Europe 
in 187 1, and in the fall of that year loaded the 
first grain ever loaded in bulk at the port of Bos- 
ton for Europe. This was shipped by the Cu- 
nard steamship " Samaria." The firm also loaded 
the first sailing vessel ever loaded at this port 
with grain in bulk, — a bark with a full cargo of 
w-heat which was cleared for St. .Malo, France ; 
and about that time it loaded the largest cargo 
of grain in bulk ever loaded at this port even to 
this day, — a full cargo of Indian corn cleared 
hence for London. Mr. Kemble was vice-presi- 
dent of the Boston Board of Trade in 1877, a 
director of the old Boston Insurance Company 
which was carried down by the great Boston fire 
of 1872, a vice-president of the old Boston Corn 
Exchange, and president of the Boston Commer- 
cial Exchange ; and he was made president of 
the Boston Chamber of Commerce (in which the 
Commercial Exchange was merged) in 1892. He 
is now a director of the Cape Cod and Interior 
Canal Company, which was chartered by the Leg- 
islature of 1892, and is concerned in other im- 
portant interests. He has been connected with 
several clubs, but is now a member only of the 
Boston Commercial and the Eastern Yacht clubs. 
For two terms (1878-79 and 1879-80) he served 
in the Board of Aldermen of the city of Salem, 
and was then nominated for mayor by a citizens' 
caucus by about six hundred voters, called with- 
out distinction of party ; but he declined to stand 
for the office. Mr. Kemble was married Septem- 
ber 5, i860, to Elizabeth Tilton .Abbott, only 
daughter of the Rev. Dr. Abbott and Margaret, 
his wife, of Beverly. They had three children : 
Laurence Grafton (now a physician in Salem), 
Abbott Spraston (deceased), and Margaret Kem- 
ble. Mrs. Kemble died in 1878. 



he established in Boston the firm of Kemble & 
Hastings, for the purpose of carrying on a com- 
mission business in the products of the country. 



KIMBALL, GENER.^iL John \\'hitk. State 
auditor, is a native of Fitchburg, born Februar\- 
27, 1828, son of Alpheus and Harriet (Stonej 
Kimball. He is a lineal descendant, on the pater- 
nal side, of Peregrine White, the first child born 
in New England of English parents, born on board 
the " Mayrtower " about December 10 (O. S.), 
1620. He was educated in the Fitchburg public 
schools, and learned his trade of scythe-making 
in his father's shop. He began business life in 
1857 as a partner with his father and brother 
in the manufacture of agricultural implements. 



64 



MEN OF J'ROGI^ESS. 



and he was engaged in this occupation until the 
outbreak of the Civil War. At that time he was 
captain of the Fitchljurg FusiHers, having been a 
member of the State miHtia since his eighteenth 
year. He was adjutant of the Ninth Regiment 
from 1858 to i860, when he was for the second 
time elected captain of the Fusiliers (Company B) 
of this regiment. His com]3any volunteered, and 
went into camp at Worcester on the 28th of June, 
1 86 1. The Ninth Regiment being broken up. 
Companies A, B, and C became the nucleus of the 
Fifteenth Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteers, 
of which General, then Major, Charles Devens 




JOHN W. KIMBALL. 

was made colonel, and Captain Kimball major, 
commissioned on the ist of August. After ser- 
vice a part of 1861-62 in the Corps of Observa- 
tion at Poolesville, Md., the regiment became a 
part of the Army of the Potomac ; and on April 
29, 1862, Major Kimball was promoted to the 
rank of lieutenant colonel. His colonel being 
absent, having been wounded in the battle of 
Ball's Bluff, he commanded the Fifteenth in all 
of the battles of the Peninsula Campaign, Second 
Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, and down 
to Fredericksburg. In November, 1862, he was 
commissioned colonel of the Fifty-third Regiment, 
Massachusetts \'olunteers, and ordered to Massa- 



chusetts to take the command. Attached to the 
Department of the Gulf, the Fifty-third was in 
the siege of Port Hudson in 1863 ; and during 
the assault, on June 14, Colonel Kimball was 
dangerously wounded in the left thigh. The term 
of enlistment of this regiment e.xpiring September 
2, that year, it returned to Massachusetts. Sub- 
sequently, on May :3. 1865, Colonel Kimball was 
brevetted brigadier-general for " gallant and dis- 
tinguished services in the field during the war." 
Before his assignment to the command of the 
Fifty-third, while with the Fifteenth in the Penin- 
sula Campaign, he was appointed by Governor 
Andrew colonel of the Thirty-sixth Regiment ; 
but the request for his return to the State to take 
that command was denied in accordance with a 
general order to the effect that no officer should 
be permitted to leave the Army of the Potomac 
for purpose of promotion. After the close of the 
war he reorganized the Fitchliurg Fusiliers, and 
again became its captain; and ten years later (in 
.Vugust, 1876) he was commissioned colonel of 
the Tenth Regiment, Massachusetts Militia. In 
1 878 he retired, being honorably discharged on 
September 21, having had thirty - two years 
of almost continual military service. General 
Kimball's record in the civil service has also 
covered an exceptionally long period. From 1865 
to 1873 he was tax collector of the city of F'itch- 
burg, and at the same time a member of the State 
police force, three years one of the State police 
commissioners. In 1873 he was appointed United 
States pension agent for the western district of 
Massachusetts, and held this position until the 1st 
of Tuly, 1877, when the office was merged into 
that at Boston. Later that year he was custodian 
at the United States Treasury Department in 
Washington of the rolls, dies, and plates of the 
bureau of engraving and printing. This place he 
held until 1879, when he was appointed post- 
master at Fitchburg. Here he remained through 
two administrations, until March 12, 1887. He 
was first elected to the State auditorship in 1891 
for the term of 1892, and was returned in the 
elections of 1892 and 1893. He has also served 
seven terms in the lower house of the Legislature 
(1864-65, 1872, 1888-91), there acting on leading 
committees, in 1890-91 chairman of the railroad 
committee. He is a member of the Loyal 
Legion, Grand Armv of the Republic (in 1874 
department commander of .Massachusetts), and 
of the Masonic order, with which he has been 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



65 



connected since 1861, during 1877-78 eminent 
commander of Jerusalem Commandery Knights 
Templar of Fitchburg. He has also been long 
connected with the Fitchburg Board of Trade, 
and a trustee of the Fitchburg Savings Bank. 
General Kimball was married July 15, 185 1. to 
Miss Almira M. Lesure, daughter of Newell Mer- 
rifield and Almira Lesure. They have three chil- 
dren : Fmnia Frances, Mary Flizabeth, and Kd- 
ward Franklin Kimball. 



LANE, Jonathan' Arp.ott, merchant, I'.oston, 



was born in Bedford, May 



1 82 2. son of 



Jonathan and Ruhamah (Page) Lane. His father 
was a descendant of the sixth generation, in 
direct line, from Job Lane, who came to this 
country in 1635 ; ^"'^' '^'^ mother was one of the 
large Page family descended from Nathaniel 
Page, who came over in 1680. His father, who 
was a farmer and fish merchant in comfortable 
circumstances, moved from Bedford to Boston in 
1824, which enabled the son, Jonathan A., to 
attend the old Boylston Grammar .School, from 
which he graduated in 1834 at the age of twelve, 
and the English High, where he graduated in 
1837. Entering the employ of the dry-goods job- 
bing house of Calvin, Washburn, ilv: Co. as boy, on 
fifty dollars a year, he slowly worked his way up. 
and in 1849 obtained control of the business, with 
Charles .\. Whiting as special partner, and con- 
ducted it in his own name. The firm has since 
been through several changes of membership and 
title, having been known as Lane & Washburn, 
then Allen, Lane, & Washburn, then for forty 
years, from 1854 to 1S94, as Allen. Lane, & ("0., 
and now incorporated as the Allen-Lane Com- 
pany, but is still carrying on a drj'-goods busi- 
ness, and is said to be the oldest woollen commis- 
sion house in Boston. Although not a member 
of any secret societies, Afr. Lane has been active 
in many social and philanthropic organizations. 
In war times he was president of the old \\'ard 
Two branch of the Union League and a private 
in the Home Guards. In 1S75 he was induced 
to accept the presidency of the old Mercantile 
Library .\ssociation, founded originally to afford 
educational facilities for young business men, and 
which had done good work in that direction until 
the growth of the Boston Public Library had 
caused it largely to outlive its usefulness. Dur- 
ing the four years of Mr. Lane's management 



the library was transferred to the Boston I'ublic 
Library, forming the nucleus of the present South 
End Branch, and the institution reorganized and 
put on its present firm footing as the leading 
social club of the South End. Mr. Lane is a life 
member, and keeps up his interest in the organ- 
ization, and is also an active member of the Bos- 
ton Art Club ; but he is too fond of home life to 
be much of a club man. Since 1887 he has been 
president of the Boston Merchants' Association 
for the longest term yet served, and his adminis- 
tration has made the annual dinners of that body 
notable for the character of their discussions and 



A 




JONA. A. LANE. 

their array of eminent speakers from all parts of 
the country. In politics Mr. Lane was originally 
a Whig, but joined the Republican party in its 
infancy, and has found no cause to leave it. He 
served as member of the Massachusetts House of 
Representatives in 1863 and 1864, and in the 
Senate in 1874 and 1S75, being elected the 
former year as an independent over a competitor 
who had the regular nominations of both parties. 
In 1878 he was appointed by Governor Rice to 
serve in the Executive Council for the remainder 
of the term of a member who resigned, and in 
1892 he represented the Ninth Congressional Dis- 
trict as one of the .Massachusetts presidential 



66 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



electors. Of late years Mr. Lane has especially 
identified himself with the cause of tax reform, 
strongly advocating the total abandonment of the 
present methods of attempting to tax personal 
property and the substitution of a system whereby 
the local assessor shall be limited in his jurisdic- 
tion to real estate, and personal property be 
taxed in its corporate form, or through inheri- 
tance or succession taxes, by the State alone. .Vs 
chairman of various committees on the matter, he 
has prepared reports which rank among the lit- 
erature of the subject. In religion Mr. Lane 
walks in the footsteps of his fathers. From boy- 
iiood he has been a member of the I'uion Con- 
gregational Church of P.oston. He is president 
of the Congregational Club and a life member of 
the Boston Young Men's Christian Association 
and of the Boston Young Men's Christian Union. 
He is also one of the advisory board of the Bos- 
ton Children's Friend Society, a director of the 
Old Men's Home, a State trustee of the Baldwin- 
ville Cottage Hospital, and is interested oflicially 
or otherwise in many other benevolent organiza- 
tions. Mr. Lane married on November 13, 185 1, 
Miss Sarah Delia Clarke, the second child of the 
Rev. Benjamin F. Clarke, and a graduate of Mt. 
Holyoke Seminary in 1845. The first few years 
of their married life were spent in a little house 
on Tyler Street, Boston; but in 1S56 they moved 
to their present residence on Tremont Street, 
where they have now lived thirty-seven years. 
Of six children born to them, a daughter died in 
infancy, and five sons — John C, Frederic H., 
Alfred C, Benjamin C, and Lucius P. — are liv- 
ing. The eldest. Judge John C. Lane, is a lawyer 
and politician of prominence in the town of Nor- 
wood. 



LATH ROB, John, justice of the Supreme Ju- 
dicial Court of Massachusetts, was born in Bos- 
ton, February 8, 1835, son of the Rev. John P. 
and Maria Margaretta (Long) Lathrop. He is a 
lineal descendant in the eighth generation of the 
Rev. John Lothrop who came out in the " Grif- 
fin " in 1634, and was the first minister at Scitu- 
ate and at Barnstable. His father was a clerg)-- 
man of the Episcopal church, and at the time of 
his death, in 1843, was chaplain in the Lhiited 
States Navy, attached to the " Princeton " ; his 
grandfather, John, graduate of Harvard in 1789, 
was a man of letters ; and his great-grandfather. 



the Rev. John, graduate of Princeton, 1763, was 
minister of the Second Ciiurch in P.oston from 
1768 to 1816, and was a Fellow of Harvard Col- 
lege from 1778 to 1816. His early education 
was attained in the Boston public schools ; and 
his advanced studies were pursued in New Jersey, 




JOHN LATHROP. 

where he entered Burlington College in the class 
of 1853, and graduated in due course. Three 
years after graduation he received the honorary 
degree of A.M. from his Alma Mater. From Bur- 
lington he came directly to the Harvard Law 
School. Graduating therefrom in 1855, he com- 
pleted his preparation for the legal profession in 
the office of Francis C. Loring. In 1856 he was 
admitted to the Suffolk bar, and at once opened 
an office in Boston. His practice, although in all 
branches of the law, was largely in admiralty ; 
and in 1872 he was admitted to the bar of the 
United States Supreme Court, where he practised 
extensively. From 1874 to 1888 he was reporter 
of decisions in the Massachusetts Supreme Court, 
and from this position was first raised to the 
bench by Governor Ames, who in 1888 appointed 
him a justice of the Superior Court. He was 
promoted to his present position on the bench of 
the higher court by Governor Russell in 1891, 
upon the death of Judge Charles Devens. Judge 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



67 



Lathrop was a lecturer at the Harvard Law 
School in 187 1 and 1873, and at the Boston Uni- 
versity Law School in the years 1873-80-83. 
During the Civil War he served a year in the field, 
going out in 1862 as first lieutenant in the Thirty- 
fifth Regiment, and subsequently promoted to a 
captaincy, when he was obliged to resign on ac- 
count of disability, the result of illness contracted 
in the service. He is a member of the Union 
and St. Botolph clubs of Boston, and of the Co- 
lonial Society of Massachusetts. He was married 
in Boston, June 24, 1875, to Miss Eliza D., daugh- 
ter of Richard G. and Mary Ann (Davis) Parker. 



LEE, William, senior partner of the book pub- 
lishing firm of Lee &: Shepard, from its earliest 
days to the present, was born in the North End 
district of Boston, April 17, 1826, eldest son of 
John and Laura (Jones) Lee. He claims from 
his ancestry sturdy independence and an honest 
strain through English, Scotch, and \^'elsh com- 
minglings. His father died in 1837, leaving the 
mother and her si.x children in such poor circum- 
stances as to necessitate William's removal from 
school, and apprenticeship to Samuel G. Drake, 
anticpiarian and bookseller of Cornhill. Two 
years later he was enabled to resume his school 
work, and in two more he had prepared for col- 
lege ; but at this time he made a final decision 
in favor of the book trade, and found employment 
with a bookseller. At eighteen he secured a po- 
sition in the prosperous house of Phillips tS: Samp- 
son, where ability and attention to business pro- 
cured him rapid promotion. He became expert 
as a salesman, both at the evening auctions, then 
a marked feature of the business, and in dealing 
with " the trade." He received a share in the 
profits of the house from his twenty-first birthday, 
and at twenty-four he was made an equal partner. 
In 1857, having acquired what he regarded as a 
competencv, he sold his interest back to the firm, 
taking their notes therefor to the amount of 
$66,000 with the intention of indulging himself 
in five years of rest and travel. He spent some 
months visiting points of interest in his own coun- 
try, and in June, 1S58, sailed for Europe in com- 
pany with Willard Small, the accomplished scholar 
and publisher. Naturally a quick and acute ob- 
server of men and things and broadly interested 
in all social questions affecting the destiny of 



peoples, it was in this kind of study that he pro- 
posed to find amusement and rest. He journeyed 
therefore in a very leisurely way through Great 
Britain, Germany, France, and Spain. Unsatis- 
fied with his first tour in the latter country, he 
was just on the point of taking a second, when 
he received news of the death of both I'hillips 
and Sampson, and of the financial embarrassment 
of the concern, which made it imperative for him 
to be in Boston at the earliest possible moment. 
He reached Liverpool short of funds after the 
steamer he wished to catch had hauled into the 
stream, but managed by stratagem and "bluff" 
to have his belongings and himself put on board 
by the mail tug. He arrived in Boston to find 
his claim against the new firm of Phillips, Samp- 
son, & Co. disallowed by the assignees, and to 
be advised by the lawyers that his remedy was 
against the private property of his dead partners, 
the sole support and dependence of their families. 
His claims were allowed by the widows, but Mr. 




WILLIAM LEE, 

Lee promptly gave them a release, antl instituted 
legal proceedings against the assignees, under 
which, through his intimate knowledge of ever)'- 
thing in the late business, he was able to force a 
compromise with tiiem. and to secure about half 
his due under the notes. With this sum, and cash 



68 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



already in hand, he purchased an interest with 
Crosby, Nichols, lV' Co., and the style of this firm 
was changed to Crosby, Nichols, Lee, & Co. -\r- 
rangements were immediately made to enlarge 
the business, and large ventures were pushed 
West and South. But secession and war caused 
so heavy losses and such depression in the book- 
trade that this move proved unsuccessful ; and in 
the autumn of 1861 Mr. Lee chose to go out of 
the concern rather than pursue the effort, and did 
so to the loss of his entire investment. Literally 
without a dollar in the world, he now for some 
months passed through e.xperiences of which he 
relates little, even to his best friends. But he 
had not lost courage, and he watched attentively 
the signs of the times. One day he met Charles 
,\. B. Shepard, for some years manager for 
lohn P. Jewett. the publisher of " Uncle Tom's 
Cabin," and later head of the firm of Shepard, 
Clark, iV Brown. Like \\illiam Lee, he had lost 
his last dollar in the crash of 1861. .^11 that 
these two now had to go upon was brains, experi- 
ence, and the confidence and sympathy of the 
trade. On that they decided to launch the new- 
firm of Lee & Shepard. And, whatever has ac- 
crued to it, that original capital yet remains a 
distinct asset of the firm. At first they thought 
only of bookselling. They secured at a low 
rental half of an ancient, two-story wooden build- 
ing, nearly opposite the Old South Meeting-house, 
known as the "Chelsea Dye House," shrewdly 
replacing that sign with one reading " The Oldest 
House in Boston." This name created the de- 
sired comment, and, being true in one sense, no 
little amusement. Trade came their way. At 
first they had no bank account, no clerks, no 
porter. Each was everybody, from office boy 
to book-keeper, salesman, buyer, proprietor, and 
packer. But in time all these individualized. 
.\nd then, one day, the owner of some of the 
Phillips, Sampson, &: Co. stereotype plates offered 
to sell them and take notes in payment. The 
new firm took the oft'er. These plates included 
the earliest juveniles of \V. T. .-Vdams (Oliver 
Optic), then a Boston schoolmaster, — the " Boat 
Series " in six volumes, and the " Riverdale 
Stories," twelve volumes. New editions of these 
were the first books issued bearing the imprint 
of Lee & Shepard. Returns from this venture 
were so satisfactory that Mr. Adams was immedi- 
ately commissioned to write some stories for 
girls ; and then followed the long series of Oliver 



( )ptic books, already over a hundred in number, 
so well known wherever the English language is 
spoken. After occupying the quarters in "the 
old dye house" for three years, Lee & Shepard 
transferred their business to No. 307 Washing- 
ton Street, where increasing trade, sales reaching 
some years to upwards of a million dollars, com- 
pelled extensive improvements and enlargements 
in the rear until 1873. Then, after losing nearly 
$200,000 by the "Great Fire" of 1872, they 
moved into a new building on Franklin Street, 
w'here they remained till 1885, when they changed 
to their present quarters. No. 10 Milk Street. 
The concern now owns over two thousand sets 
of valuable plates and copyrights, including high 
school, grammar school, and kindergarten books, 
juveniles, art books, travels, poetry, fiction, history, 
and philosophy, by popular writers. The house 
originated and still continues the issue of illus- 
trated editions of popular songs and poems. 
Even a partial list of authors whose works it 
has given to the public would be impracticable 
within the limits of this article. But the names 
of " Oliver Optic," " Sophie May," Curtis Guild, 
Mary A. Denison, Mary A. Livermore, Julia Ward 
Howe, Julia C. R. Dorr, Irene Jerome, Ednah 
D. Cheney, James Freeman Clarke, Amanda M. 
Douglas, Virginia F. Townsend, the Rev. Elijah 
Kellogg, J. T. Trowbridge, "Petroleum V. 
Nasby," Charles Sumner, Francis H. Underwood, 
T. W. Higginson, Wendell Phillips, Robert CoU- 
yer, Samuel Adams Drake, and Horace Mann, 
will be sufficient to indicate the estimation of 
the firm with authors and the enterprise which 
has characterized its business. Mr. Shepard died 
in January, 1889 ; and since that time Mr. Lee 
has, single-handed, directed the affairs of the 
concern, attending personally to every important 
detail, and directing every interest of the busi- 
ness, but is rarely too busy for a social chat with 
his authors or colaborers who may drop in upon 
him. Mr. Lee is also a charter member of the 
Boston Art Club : a member of the Algonquin 
and Twentieth Century clubs of Boston, and of 
the Aldine Club, New York. Politically, he is an 
Independent, with Republican proclivities. Ex- 
cept as a justice of the peace and notary public 
he has never aspired to, or filled, any public 
office. He has been twice married. His first 
wife was Miss Anna Leavitt, daughter of Thomas 
Leavitt, of Hampton, N.H. She died in 1883. 
He married second, in 1888, Miss Sarah Louise 



MEN OF PK0C;RESS. 



69 



White, daughter of J. Welles White, of New York 
City. He has one daughter, Alice Lee. 



1,()RI), Eliot, editor-in-chief of the lioslon 
Evening TravelliT, tiiough a native of the West, is 
of sterling New England stock, descended from 
two of the oldest New England families. He was 
born in Milwaukee, Wis., November g, 1852, son 
of the Rev. William Henry Lord and Persis 
(Kendall) Lord. ( 'n his father's side his ances- 
tors were among the first settlers of Maine, while 
from his mother he inherited the blood of the 




ELIOT LORD. 

earliest Massachusetts colonists. His great-uncle 
was Nathan Lord, long president of Dartmouth 
College (from 1828 to 1863); and one of the 
brothers of his father is Dr. John Lord, of Stam- 
ford, Conn,, the historian and lecturer. His ma- 
ternal grandfather was the Rev. James Kendall, 
who for more than fifty years was pastor of the 
old First Church in Plymouth. Eliot Lord was 
educated in the East, in the public schools of 
Plymouth and at Harvard ('ollege. which he en- 
tered in the class of 1873. During his college 
course he won the Lee, Boylston, and Bowdoin 
prizes ; and he graduated with high lienors, de- 
livering one of the eight commencement parts. 



Upon leaving college, he was made instructor in 
Latin and mathematics at the Adams .Xcademy 
of Quincy, Here lie remained until the close of 
the academic year, when he resigned to accept an 
assistant professorship of history and English 
at the United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, 
under Professor James Russell Soley, afterwards 
assistant secretary of state in the Harrison ad- 
ministration. His services here covered a period 
of three years, during which time he also pursued 
a special course in modern history and interna- 
tional law, and received from Harvard (in 1876) 
the degree of A.M. for proficiency in these de- 
partments. Resigning from the Naval Academy, 
he entered the profession of journalism, for which 
his studies and training had well prepared him, 
beginning on the staff of the New York Ifcrald. 
An offer from the World, then under the editorial 
direction of \\'illiam Henry Hurlbert, early drew 
him to that paper ; and here he was employed 
until 1879, when he accepted an offer from Clar- 
ence King, director of the United States Geolog- 
ical Survey, to write the history of the develop- 
ment of the mining industry of the L'nited States. 
The preparation of this work, published in 1882, 
by the Geological Survey, under the title of " The 
Comstock Lode," occupied the ne.xt few years, 
which Mr. Lord spent in large part in the Western 
mining districts ; and upon its completion he was 
selected by Mr. King to assist in collecting the 
social statistics of the mining districts west of the 
Rocky Mountains for the Tenth Census. Remov- 
ing to Washington, in 1885-86 he edited the 
Washington Weekly Post during the Congressional 
session ; and in the autumn of 1886 he came to 
Boston, joining the editorial staff" of the Daily 
Advertiser. Two years later he resigned this posi- 
tion to take the editorship of the Duluth (Minn.) 
Herald. Returning to Boston in 1891, he was 
engaged upon the Boston Herald as political news 
writer during the State campaign of that year. 
Subsequently he was some time Boston corre- 
spondent of the Springfield Union. Worcester Tele- 
gram, and other newspapers, and in the spring of 
1893 was appointed to his present position. He 
is a member of the Ihiiversity, Papyrus, and Press 
clubs of Boston. 



LOWELL, John, ex United States circuit 
judge, son of John .\mory and Susan Cabot 
(Lowell) Lowell, was born in Boston, October 18, 



70 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



1824. His father was a prominent ISoston nicr- 
chant, connected as treasurer and director with 
several of the mills at Lowell; and his mother was 
a daughter of Francis C Lowell, for whom the 
city of Lowell was named. His paternal grand- 
father was an eminent lawyer ; and his great- 
grandfather was the first Judge John Lowell, — the 
first judge of the District Court for the Massachu- 
setts district, appointed by President Washington 
September 26, 1789, and then in 1801 made by 
President John Adams chief judge of the Circuit 
Court as then existing for the first circuit (estab- 
lished under act of Congress in 1801, repealed in 




JOHN LOWELL. 

1802). This first Judge Lowell was a member of 
the convention which framed the constitution of 
Massachusetts in 17S0, and procured the inser- 
tion of the first article of the Bill of Rights, for 
the purpose, as he declared, "of preventing slavery 
from being thereafter possible in the State." 
John Lowell, the present, was educated in the 
private school of Daniel G. Ingraham, a noted 
Boston school in its day, and at Harvard College, 
from which he graduated in the class of 1843. 
He studied law in the Harvard Law School, grad- 
uating therefrom in 1845, and in the office of 
Charles (i., F. C., and C. VV. Loring, and in 1846 
was admitted to the Suffolk bar. He began the 



practice of his profession in P.oston, and for a 
number of years was associated with William 
Sohier. In March, 1865, he was made judge of 
the District Court of the United States by Presi- 
dent Lincoln, in place of Judge Sprague, re- 
signed; and thirteen years later (December 16, 
1878) he was appointed by President Hayes jus- 
tice of the Circuit Court for the first circuit, to fill 
the vacancy caused by the death of Judge Shep- 
ley. In May, 1884, he resigned, and returned to 
general practice, with ofiices in Boston. ()n the 
bench he was eminent as a jurist, especially dis- 
tinguished in the department of law relating to 
bankruptcy. Since his retirement and return to 
practice his services have been much sought as 
referee and special master in important cases, his 
judicial impartiality and ability being widely 
recognized. Judge Lowell married May 19, 
1853, Miss Lucy IS. Fmerson, daughter of George 
B. Emerson, LL.D., and Olivia ( Buckniinster) Em- 
erson. They have two sons and two daugiiters : 
John Lowell, Jr., now a member of the Suffolk 
bar, and associated with his father in practice ; 
James Arnold (graduate of H. C. 1S94); Lucy 
Buckniinster ; and Susan (^now Mrs. William H. 
Aspinwall ) Lowell. 



MASON, Albert, chief justice of the Superior 
Court, is a native of Middleborough, born Novem- 
ber 7, 1836, son of Albert T. and Arlina (Orcutt) 
Mason. He was educated in the common 
schools, and in Pierce Academy, Middleborough, 
and studied law in the office of Edward L. Sher- 
man in Plymouth. There, admitted to the bar in 
i860, he began practice. Two years later he 
entered the Union army as second lieutenant of 
the Thirty-eighth Regiment, Massachusetts Vol- 
unteers ; and he remained in the service until the 
close of the Civil War. Early in his career as a 
soldier he was detailed for staff duty, and served 
as regimental and brigade quartermaster ; and 
subsequently, he was commissioned captain and 
assistant quartermaster. Returning to Plymouth 
in 1865, he resumed the practice of his profes- 
sion. The next year he was made chairman of 
the board of selectmen of the town, which posi- 
tion he retained eight years: and in 1873 and 
1S74 he was a member of the lower house of the 
Legislature, ranking with the leading members, 
and serving on numerous important committees. 
In January, 1874, he opened an office in Boston 



MEN OF FROGRKSS. 



71 



with Charles H. Drew, still retainintj his Plym- 
outh office, and a few months later formed a part- 
nership with Arthur Lord, of I'lxinouth, now 



«*' 



t 




public schools of Wilbraham and of Springfield, 
to which city his father early removed : and he 
was prepared for college by the Hon. Marcus 
P. Knowlton, now of the Supreme Judicial Court 
of Massachusetts. P^ntering Dartmouth, he grad- 
uated therefrom in the class of 1867 with honors. 
He read law at Springfield in the office of the Hon. 
George M. Stearns and Hon. Marcus P. Knowl- 
ton, then constituting the law firm of Stearns & 
Knowlton, and was admitted to the Hampden 
county bar in 1868. He spent a year in travel 
in his own country, and then began practice in 
Springfield, where he remained till his appoint- 
ment to the bench. In 1S71, 1872, 1875, and 
1882, he was city solicitor of Springfield. Dur- 
ing that period, and later, he was also promi- 
nent in municipal affairs, serving two terms 
(1872-73) as a member of the Common Council; 
as mayor of the city in 1887 and 1888; and 
as member at large of the School Committee in 
1892-93-94. In 1879 he was a member of the 
General Court from Springfield ; and in 1889 and 
1890 he was the Democratic candidate for attor- 
ney-general of the State. He was appointed 



ALBERT MASON. 



member of the State Civil Service Commission. 
The same year, in Jul)', he removed from Plym- 
outh to Brookline, where he has since resided ; 
and in December was appointed by acting Gov- 
ernor Talbot to the Board of Harbor Commis- 
sioners. He continued practice in Boston and 
Plymouth, and as a harbor commissioner until his 
elevation to the bench in February, 1882, by Gov- 
ernor Long, as a justice of the Superior Court. 
He became chief justice by appointment of Gov- 
ernor Brackett in September, 1890, succeeding 
Judge Brigham, resigned. Judge Mason was 
married November 25, 1S57, to Miss Lydia F. 
Whiting, daughter of Nathan and Experience 
(Finney) Whiting. They have six children: 
John \\'„ ^Llry A., Alice, Charles N., Martha, 
and Grace W. Mason. 




I 



MAYNARD, Elisha Burr, of Springfield, elisha b. maynard. 
justice of the Superior Court of the Common- 
wealth, is a native of Wilbraham, born November associate justice of the Superior Court by Gov- 
21, 1842, .son of Walter and Hannah (Burr) May- ernor Russell in June, 1S91. Judge Maynard has 
nard. His earlv education was acquired in the served in the militia of the State, having been at 



72 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



one lime a member of the City Guards, Company 
B of the Second Regiment. He has long been 
connected with the Springfield Commandery 
Knights Templar, and is a member of the Win- 
throp Club of Springfield, of the Mayors" Club of 
Massachusetts, and of the University and Dart- 
mouth clubs of Boston. He was a corporate 
member of the Springfield Hospital, of the ITnion 
Relief Association, and of the Christian Indus- 
trial and Technical School of Springfield. He 
married August 25, 1870, Miss Kate Doty, of 
Springfield. Penna., who died April 4, 1889; and 
second, July 19, 1893, Miss Luella E. Fay, of 
Springfield, Mass. His children living are : 
Robert Doty, Ruth, and \\'illiam Doty Maynard. 



M'GLENEN, Henry Aloysius, late business 
manager of the Boston Theatre, was born in Bal- 
timore, Md., November 28, 1826, son of Patrick 
and Sarali (Carrigan) M'Clenen; died in Boston, 




pk « 




V 



\ 



H. A. M'GLENEN. 

March 24, 1S94. His early education was at- 
tained in the Baltimore public schools ; and at 
twelve years of age he began work, entering a 
printing-office as an apprentice. Subsequently he 
attended St. Mary"s College, Baltimore, and there 
also worked in a printing-oftice established by the 



faculty. At the age of nineteen (in 1S54) he 
started for Boston by way of Philadelphia and 
Norfolk, and arrived in the city with scanty bag- 
gage and a cash capital of si.x cents. He immedi- 
ately sought work at his trade, and the first job 
secured was in the composition-room of the Daily 
Bee. Then he worked at odd times as a composi- 
tor in the offices of the Times and the Journal, 
and later on obtained a regular position on the 
Aih'crtiscr. In 1846 he resigned this position to 
enlist as a private in the army, off for the con- 
quest of Me.xico. He joined the company which 
was commanded by Captain Edward Webster, son 
of Daniel Webster, and remained in the service 
until 1S48, when he returned to Boston, and re- 
sumed work at his trade in newspaper otfices. 
In 1850 he became a reporter for the Ilcrahl. and 
subsequently went to the Daily Mail. A \-ear or 
two later he was given charge of the TIiiils job- 
office, where he formed the acquaintance of a 
number of railroad men and theatrical folk. 
\Miile in this position, he took charge of Dan 
Rice's circus in Boston, and several other enter- 
prises, in all of which he was most successful. 
For two years he managed the business of the 
Marsh children at the Howard Athenajum, after 
which he was connected with several companies. 
When Wyzeman Marshall had leases of the 
Howard and the Boston Theatre, he looked after 
Mr. Marshall's interests : and for the two years 
during which Harry C. Jarrett managed the Bos- 
ton Theatre he gave much of his time in behalf of 
that manager. In 1866 he relinquished the print- 
ing business entirely, and took charge of the con- 
cert tour of Parepa Rosa, the great cantatrice. 
The following year he took the Mendelssohn 
(Quintette Club on an e.xtended tour West ; and in 
the spring of 1868 the Hanlons secured his ser- 
vices as manager for their season at Selwyn's 
Theatre, and the three following years he was re- 
tained in a similar capacity by John .Selwyn and 
Arthur Cheney. In 1871 he became business 
agent of the Boston Theatre ; and this position he 
held until his death. He was one of the best 
known theatrical men in the country, of wide ac- 
quaintance and many strong friendships, possess- 
ing the confidence and respect of all with whom 
he was brought into business relations. Mr. 
M'Glenen was also identified with many matters 
of public concern. He was president of the Mas- 
sachusetts N'olunteers in Mexico, vice-president 
of the National Association of Mexico Veterans, 



MKN OF PROGRKSS. 



73 



and a member of the Boston Press and Athletic ple"s " candidate for mayor. He was one of the 
cUibs. He was married in Boston, November 29, special committee which framed the new city 
1849, to Miss Caroline M. Bruce, daughter of Cyrus charter of Cambridge in 189 1, and, after the new 
and Matilda (Cashing) Bruce. 'I'hey had two charter was granted, revised the city ordinances 
children: Edward W. and Harry J. M"Glenen. to conform thereto. In 1869 and 1870 he was 

a Cambridge representative in the lower house 



iMclXriRE, Charlks Jhhn, of Camliridge. 
judge of the Probate Court of Middlesex County, 
was born in Cambridge, March 26, 1842, son of 
P'.benezer and Amelia Augustine (I,andais) Mc- 
Intire. His ancestors on the paternal side came 
to Salem from Argyll, Scotland, about 1650. and 
those of a later generation, nio\ing to ( ).\ford 
(now Charlton), Worcester County, in 1733, were 
among the first officers of the latter town when 
it was incorporated in 1755 : and on the maternal 
side he is a lineal descendant of John Read, a 
distinguished lawyer of Boston in Provincial days, 
and of the latter's son-in-law, Charles Morris, a 
native of Boston, who was for many years chief 
justice of Nova Scotia. His mother's father was 
an e.xiled French officer of engineers commis- 
sioned in the United States army ; and she was 
born in Fort Moultrie, Charleston, S.C., when 
her father was in command there. Charles J. 
entered the Harvard Law School, and also read in 
the law office of ex-Mayor Dana, of Charlestown ; 
but before he had completed his student course 
the Civil War bioke out, and in 1862 he enlisted 
as a private in the Fort)--fourth Massachusetts 
Regiment. He served with his regiment in all 
its engagements, including the famous defence 
of the besieged town of Washington, N.C., and. 
when his term of service expired, returned to his 
studies. He was admitted to the bar in 1865, 
and began practice in Boston. From 187 1 to 
1874 he was assistant district attorney of Middle- 
sex County ; and he was city solicitor of Cam- 
bridge continuously from March, 1886, till October 
26, 1893, when he was appointed by Governor 
Russell judge of probate and insolvency for 
Middlesex County, to fill the vacancy caused by 
the death of Judge George M. Brooks. In 1893, 
also, he was a member of the State commission, 
appointed by Governor Russell under an act of 
the Legislature, to revise and codify the election 
laws. He was early prominent in Cambridge 
municipal affairs, serving in 1866 and 1867 in 
the Common Council, in 1877 on the Board of 
Aldermen, and was three years (1868-70) on the 
School Board: and in 1883 he was the " Peo- 




CHARLES J. McINTlRE. 

of the Legislature, where he served as chairman 
of the committee on insurance and secretary of 
the committee on the judiciary. Mr. Mclntire is 
vice-president of the Colonial Club of Cambridge, 
of which President Eliot, of Harvard University, 
is the president, a member of the Forty-fourth 
Massachusetts Regiment Association (elected 
president in 1883), and a member of the Cam- 
bridge Club. At the time of his elevation to the 
bench, through his legal ability and by diligent de- 
votion to his profession, he had become one of the 
leading members of the justly celebrated Middle- 
sex bar, and a most successful practitioner and 
advocate in the courts of the Commonwealth. 
His appointment as successor to Judge Brooks 
was almost universally urged by the bar of his 
county and by leading members of the bar of 
Suffolk. He was married in 1865 to Miss Maria 
Therese Finegan. They have five children : 
Mary Amelia (Cornell University), Henrietta 
Elizabeth (Harvard Annex), Charles Ebenezer, 
Frederic, and Blanche Eugenie Mclntire. 



74 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



MINER, Rkv. Alonvo Ames, senior pastor of 
the Second [Iniversalist Society of Boston (Co- 
lumbus Avenue), and distinguished in reform and 
educational work, is a native of New Hampshire, 
born in Lempster, August 17, 181 4, son of Bena- 
jah Ames and Amanda (Carey) Miner. He is a 
descendant of Thomas Miner, who came to Bos- 
ton with the elder \\'inthrop in 1630, and who 
was a descendant of Henry Bullman, Somerset- 
shire, England, distinguished by Edward HI. for 
loyal service, who changed his name in honor of 
his profession as a miner. On the maternal side 
his ancestry is traced to English stock, which lo- 




A. A. MINER. 



cated in this country a century and a half ago. 
He was educated in public schools and acade- 
mies, and prepared for active life by private study 
and school-teaching. From his sixteenth to his 
twentieth year he taught in public schools, and 
the following four years in academies, from 1834 
to 1835 being associated with James Garvin, a 
graduate of Dartmouth College, in the conduct of 
the Cavendish (Vt.) Academy, and from 1S35 to 
1839 at the head of the Unity (N.H.) Scientific 
and Military Academy. In 1838 he was received 
into the fellowship of the Universalist church, and 
the following year ordained to its ministry. He 
was first settled in Methuen, where he remained 



three years. Thereafter he was for six years pas- 
tor of a Universalist church in Lowell, and then 
(in 1848) came to Boston, called to the Second 
Universalist Society as colleague of the eminent 
Hosea Ballou, one of the fathers of Universal- 
ism, succeeding in this position the Rev. Edwin 
H. Chapin, who afterwards became famous as 
preacher and lecturer. Upon the death of 
"Father" Ballou in 1852, Dr. Miner became sole 
pastor of the society: and he so remained till 
1867, when, on account of his college connection, 
he was given a colleague who was continued but 
a few months. Since that time he has had but 
two other colleagues ; and between the withdrawal 
of the second and the coming of the third, a pe- 
riod of seventeen years, he performed without 
assistance all the duties of the pastorate, while 
engaged in much educational work and a leader 
in numerous reform movements. From 1862 to 
1875 hs ^^'^s president of Tufts College, preach- 
ing regularly during that time to his Boston parish 
at each Sunday morning service, and in the col- 
lege chapel on College Hill in the afternoon. 
From 1869 to 1893 he was a member of the 
Massachusetts State Board of Education, and for 
nearly twenty years chairman of the Board of Vis- 
itors of the State Normal Art School in Boston, 
which he was largely influential in establishing. 
In 1863 he was elected by the Legislature an over- 
seer of Harvard College. He has had long expe- 
rience on school committees, having served on 
the boards of Methuen, Lowell, and Boston. In 
1864 he was chaplain of the State Senate; in 
1855 he was the Fourth of July municipal orator; 
and in 1884 he was the preacher of the last elec- 
tion sermon before the governor and the General 
Court, the custom which had prevailed since 
17 I 2, broken only by the Revolution, being abol- 
ished by the next Legislature. He has been pres- 
ident of the Universalist Publishing House in 
Boston since its foundation, of which he was the 
originator ; is president of the Board of Trus- 
tees of Dean Academy at Franklin and of tlie 
Bromfield School at Harvard; chairman of the 
executive committee of Tufts College ; member of 
the executive committee of the American Peace 
Society; and chairman of the Connnittee of One 
Hundred of Boston. He is also a member of the 
American .Academy of Political and Social Sci- 
ence, of the National Reform Association, and 
of the Universalist Club of Boston. Dr. Miner's 
work as a temperance reformer and his advocacy 



MEN OF l^ROGKESS. 



75 



of I'lohibition have brought him into national 
prominence. I'o this cause he lias devoted a 
large share of his active life, speaking, writing, 
and working for it with great vigor and persist- 
ence. He was the Prohibition candidate for gov- 
ernor of the State in 1878, and for mayor of Bos- 
ton in 1893 ; and he has been long the most 
conspicuous leader of his party in New England. 
For twenty years he was president of the Massa- 
chusetts Temperance Alliance. He has been a 
frequent contributor to the denominational and 
secular press, and was at one time editor of The 
Stiv of Bcthlcliciii, a weekly paper published in 
tlie cit\' of Lowell. His publications in book 
and pamphlet form include "Old Forts Taken,'" 
" Bible Exercises," election, baccalaureate, con- 
vention, dedication, and various occasional ser- 
mons, " Right and Duty of Prohibition," and nu- 
merous others. Dr. Miner received the degree 
of A.M. from Tufts in 1861, that of S.T.D. from 
Harvard in 1863, and that of LL.D. from Tufts 
in 1875. His interest in Tufts College began 
with the beginning of the institution in 1854. He 
delivered the address at the laying of the corner- 
stone of the first college building. He has been 
a generous contributor to its funds, giving among 
other gifts forty thousand dollars for a theological 
hall. Dr. Miner married, August 24, 1836, Miss 
Maria S. Perley, daughter of Captain Edmund and 
Sarah Perley. They have no children. 



MORSE, Robert McNeil, member of the Suf- 
folk bar, is a native of Boston, born .August 11, 
1837, son of the late Robert M. Morse, for many 
years a respected merchant in that city, and of 
his wife, Sarah M. (Clark). He was educated in 
private schools, at the Eliot High School, Jamaica 
Plain, and at Har\ard. where he graduated in the 
class of 1857. This class, though small, was dis- 
tinguished for the number of men who afterwards 
attained prominence in various walks, among 
them bemg John C. Ropes, John I). Long, J. 
Lewis Stackpole, Robert D. Smith, General 
Charles F. W'olcott. and the Rev. Joseph May, of 
Philadelphia. Mr. Morse studied law in the Har- 
vard Law School, and was admitted to the bar in 
i860. Since that time he has been in practice in 
Boston, and has long held a foremost position as 
a general counsellor and advocate. He has been 
engaged in many notable causes before the courts 
of the State, and also in the United States courts. 



such as the famous Moen case, and the Arm- 
strong and Codman will contests, and has been 
retained in much important litigation relating to 
the water-supply of cities and towns, insurance, 
and other contracts, and in a great variety of tort 
cases, including actions of libel and claims for 
personal injury. His pul)lic service has been 
confined to two terms in the State Senate 
(1866-67), ^"cl on*^ in the lower house of the Leg- 
islature (1880). \\'hen in the Senate, he drafted 
and introduced the bill for the repeal of the usury 
laws, and passed it through in the face of strong 
opposition ; served on important standing commit- 




ROBERT M. MORSE. 

tees : was chairman of the special committee on 
the subject of the proiiibitory law then on the 
statute book, before which John A. Andrew, then 
e.x-governor. made his famous argument in behalf 
of the license system : and subsequently he drew 
the report of the committee in favor of the repeal 
of the prohibitory law. In tlie House he was 
chairman of the committee on the judiciary, and 
was prominent in securing the enactment of the 
laws authorizing the last revision of the general 
laws known as the Public Statutes, the grant to 
the city of Boston of the land on which the Pub- 
lic Library is now in process of erection, and the 
capitalization of the .American P.ell Telephone 



76 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Company. Mr. Xforse is a member of the lioard of office more official defalcation.s were broiu'ht to 
of Overseers of Harvard College, of the Union, light than in the united terms of all the other 
University, and Country clubs, and of other social. national bank e.xaminers for the Commonwealth. 



professional, and business organizations. He was 
married in 1863 to Miss Anna E. Gorham, daugh- 
ter of James L. Gorham, and has had seven chil- 
dren, of whom five are living, the eldest, Mabel, 
being the wife of Dr. Daniel D. Lee. 



Colonel .\eedham has long been devoted to agri- 
culture, and connected with organizations to pro- 



NEEDHAM, D.^^niel, of Groton, member of 
the bar for nearly half a century, and long active 
in various public interests, was born in Salem, 
May 24, 1822, son of James and Lydia (Breed) 
Xeedham. The branch of the Needham family 
to which he belongs settled in Lynn, in 1836. and 
adhered to the doctrine and usages of the Society 
of Friends. In this atmosphere his bovhood 
developed. After a few years spent in local 
schools and graduating from the Salem High 
School, he entered the Friends' Boarding-school 
of Providence, R.L. and there his academic edu- 
cation was acquired. He studied law in Salem 
with David Roberts, and was admitted to the 
Middlese.x bar in 1847. Forming a law partner- 
ship with Mr. Roberts and Edmund Burke, under 
the firm name of Burke, Needham & Roberts, he 
began practice in Boston. Early taking an active 
part in politics, he had an inlfuential hand in 
shaping political moves. He organized the coali- 
tion movement which resulted in the election of 
(ieorge S. Boutwell to the governorship in 185 i, and 
in 1853-54 was chairman of the Massachusetts 
Democratic State Committee. During Governor 
I'.outwell's two terms he was a member of the 
governor's staff. Removing to Vermont in the 
fifties, he was elected to the Legislature of that 
State, first to the lower house, where he served 
two terms (1857-58), and then to the Senate, 
serving in the latter body five terms (1859-63); 
and in 1863 was Vermont commissioner to the 
Hamburg International E.\position. Returning to 
Massachusetts, and re-establishing his home in 
Groton, he was elected to tlie lower house of the 
Legislature of this State in 1867 and to the Sen- 
ate in 1868-69. ^" '871 he was appointed na- 
tional bank e.xaminer for Massachusetts, and held 
that office until 1876, performing its important 
and often arduous duties with thoroughness and 
promptitude. There were in his charge one hun- 
dred and eighty-five banks, all of them, with few 
exceptions, in Massachusetts ; and during his term 




DANIEL NEEDHAM, 

mote farming interests. He was secretary of the 
Xew England Agricultural Society for twenty- 
seven years, and is now its president ; and his 
zeal and abilities have been among the principal 
factors of its success. It has held agricultural 
fairs in all of the New England States, with full 
share of public patronage and e.xceptional pecun- 
iary success : and, at times responsible for the 
expenses incurred, Mr. Needham has so skill- 
fully conducted afl:"airs as to escape financial loss. 
He has been president of many county and town 
organizations, and trustee of the Massachusetts 
.Agricultural College from its organization. In the 
early railroad days he was some time managing 
director of the Peterborough & Shirley Railroad, 
and in 1847, in connection with the associate 
directors, made himself liable for the debts of the 
corporation, turning over all his property to the 
banks holding the indorsed paper. Ultimately, 
he paid every obligation, and perfected arrange- 
ments whereby he was in time reimbursed by the 
corporation. At a later period he was for ten 



MEN OF PKOGRKSS. 



77 



years owner and manager of the Monlello Woollen 
and drain Mills, Montello, Wis., the woollen mill 
having been built originally by him. He has been 
for eleven years a director of the Boston Safe 
Deposit and Trust Company and of the John 
Hancock Life Insurance Company. ( )ther organi- 
zations in which he holds official positions are : the 
Institute of Heredit)' (president since its organi- 
zation), the Middlese.x ( North ) L'nitarian Associa- 
tion (president), the Middlese.x political dining 
tlub ( president and founder), and the Society for 
the Prevention of Cruelty to .Animals (trustee). 
( )f his town of Groton he has been town treasurer 
for many years, and a member of the School 
iioard. He has been a Republican since soon 
after the formation of that party. Colonel Need- 
ham was commissioned by Governor Russell to 
represent the State of Massachusetts at the Na- 
tional Agricultural Congress at Sedalia, Mo., in 
1S91, also at Lincohi, Neb., in 1892, and at 
Savannah, Ga., in 1893. At each of these con- 
gresses he delivered addresses which were exten- 
sively published, and received much attention at 
home and elsewhere. His reports are published 
in the volumes of the State Board of Agri- 
culture of the years 1S92-93-94. By invita- 
tion of the Legislature of Ohio he delivered an 
address in the Senate Chamber, at Columbus, 
upon his Hamburg mission in January, 1864; by 
invitation of the Legislature of Wisconsin he de- 
livered an address upon deepening and improv- 
ing the navigation of the Mississippi River at 
Madison, U'is., in 1865 ; and by invitation of the 
Board of Agriculture of the State of Kansas, an 
address on the " Relation of the East to the West 
in its Trade Connections,'' in the Senate Cham- 
ber at Topeka in January, 1894. These addresses 
were published by the several State governments. 
He was sent a commissioner to Mexico by the 
New England Society, and in 1890 was received 
by President Diaz with great hospitality. A 
large number of Colonel Needham's addresses 
have been published in pamphlet form ; and the 
one delivered at Saratoga, before the National 
Bankers' Association, in the early days of the 
national banks, was regarded as a text-book upon 
the subject, and had a wide-.spread circulation, 
more than twenty-five thousand copies having 
been sent out. Colonel Needham was first mar- 
ried in Groton, July 15, 1842, to Miss Caroline A. 
Hall, daughter of Benjamin and Caroline Hall, 
of Boston ; and bv this union were four children : 



Eleanor M., William C. II., James Ernest, and 
Effie Marion Needham. His first wife died June 
30, 1878. His second marriage was on Octo- 
ber 6, 1880, w-ith Miss Ellen M. Brigham, daughter 
of George D. and Mary J. Brigham, of Groton. 
l!y this union have been three children : .ALarion 
Brigham, .Mice Emily, and Daniel Needham, Jr. 
The son William C. H. died while a member of 
the Senate of Ohio in 1881. 



O'ME-ARA, Stephen, editor and general man- 
ager of the Boston Journal, was born in Charlotte- 
town. Prince Edward Island, July 26, 1854. His 
parents moved to the United States when he was 
about ten years old ; and, after a short residence 
in Ijraintree. the home was established in Charles- 
town. Here he obtained his general education in 
the local schools, graduating from the Harvard 
Granunar School in 1868 and from the Charles- 
town High School in 1872. The day after his 
graduation from the High School he became the 




STEPHEN O'MEARA. 

Charlestown reporter for the Boston Globe, that 
year started ; and in October following he was 
given a position as reporter on the regular staff. 
He was an expert shorthand writer, a quick news- 
gatherer, and early distinguished himself by the 



78 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



excellence of his work. In. December, :874, he 
resigned his position on the Globe to take that 
of shorthand reporter for the Joiinial. This was 
the beginning of his service on that paper, and 
his advance to the chief place has been through 
various grades of service. In May, 1879, after 
an experience of five years in legislative, city hall, 
news, law, and political reporting, he was pro- 
moted to the office of city editor : two years later, 
upon the death of the veteran journalist, .Stephen 
N. Stockwell, he became news editor, — a position 
corresponding to that of managing editor in most 
newspaper offices ; and in June, iSgi, upon the 
retirement of the late William W. Clapp, who had 
been long the manager and responsible head of 
the paper, the chief direction of afifairs was placed 
in his hands, his title being editor and general 
manager. Under Mr. O'Meara's management 
the Journal has been transformed from the folio 
to the quarto form, and its facilities have been 
extended and improved. Mr. O'Meara was long 
the auditor of the New England Associated Press, 
and is now its treasurer and a member of the ex- 
ecutive committee. He is also secretary and 
treasurer of the Boston Daily Newspaper Asso- 
ciation, a business organization of the Boston 
daily newspapers. He is a member of the .St. 
Botolph, Algonciuin, and Press clubs of Boston 
(president of the latter from 1886 to 1888, his 
election each year being unanimous.) He was 
the first instructor in phonography in the Boston 
Evening High School, occupying that position 
for four years from 1880. Since 1890 he has 
served as trustee of the Massachusetts State Li- 
brary. In 1888 the honorary degree of Master of 
Arts was conferred upon him by Dartmouth Col- 
lege. Mr. O'Meara was married August 5, 1878, 
to Miss Isabella M. Squire, of Charlestown. They 
have three children : Frances Isabel, Alice, and 
Lucy O'Meara. 

PAINE, General Charles Jackson, yachts- 
man, projector of the "Puritan," the " Mayflower," 
and the " Volunteer," is a native of Boston, born 
August 26, 1833, son of Charles Cushing and 
Fannie Cabot (Jackson) Paine, and great-grand- 
son of Robert Treat Paine, signer of the Declara- 
tion of Independence. His mother, Fanny Cabot 
Jackson, was a daughter of Judge Charles Jack- 
son, of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts. He 
was educated in the Boston Latin School and at 
Harvard with Charles W. Eliot, Justin Winsor, 



Robert S. Rantoul. and others whose names have 
become widely known, as classmates, graduating 
in 1853. He studied law with Rufus Choate, and 
was admitted to the Suffolk bar in 1856. He 
practised, how-ever, but a comparatively short time, 
becoming interested in large railroad enterprises. 




CHARLES J. PAINE. 

He has been a director at different times of the 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Mexican Cen- 
tral, and the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe rail- 
roads. He served in the Union army during 
nearly the entire period of the Civil War, entering 
the service on October 8, 1861, as captain of 
Company I, Twenty-second Regiment, Massachu- 
setts Volunteers. On January 14, 1862, he was 
commissioned major of the Thirtieth Massachu- 
setts. On the 2d of October of the same year he 
was promoted to the colonelcy of the Second 
Louisiana (white) Regiment and in the summer 
of 1863, during the siege of Port Hudson, com- 
manded a brigade. On March 4, 1864, he re- 
signed the latter command, and joined General 
Butler in Virginia, the following month taking 
part in the battle of Drury's Bluff. Three months 
later, on July 4, he was appointed brigadier-gen- 
eral of volunteers, and in September, on the 29th, 
led a division of colored troops in the attack of 
New Market, Va. In January, 1865, he partici- 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



79 



pated in the capture of Fort Fisher, and for his 
service here was subsequently brevetted major- 
n;eneral of volunteers. In the early part of 1864 
he served under .Sherman in North Carolina, and 
after the surrender of Lee commanded the dis- 
trict of Newbern until November, 1865. On 
Januarv i S. 1S66, he was mustered out of the 
service. General Paine's interest in yachting 
began with his boyhood, and long before the ap- 
pearance of the famous "crack" boats he had 
become a master in yacht designing and sailing. 
In 1877 he purchased the "Halcyon," and so 
improved her that she ranked among the fastest 
vachts then on the water. The " Puritan " was 
built in 1885 by a syndicate formed by him, and 
he was at the head of the committee which had 
charge of her during the races of that season. 
Later he became sole owner, but soon sold her to 
Commodore Forbes. The next year he brought 
out the " Mayflower," which defeated the '• Gala- 
tea " ; and the ne.xt, 1887, the " Volunteer," which 
outsailed the " Thistle." These yachts were all 
designed by the late Edward fUirgess, General 
Paine following their construction with great care. 
He is a member of the New York Yacht Club, 
which in February, 1888, presented him a silver 
cup in recognition of his triple successful defence 
of the America's cup, member of the Eastern 
Yacht Club, the Somerset, Union, and Country 
clubs. General Paine was married on March 26, 
1867, to Miss Julia Bryant, daughter of John, Jr., 
and Mary Anna Lee Bryant. They have seven 
children : Sumner, John Bryant, Mary Anna Lee, 
Charles Jackson, Helen, Georgina, and Frank 
Cabot Paine. Their town house is an old colonial 
mansion house on Beacon Hill, Boston, and their 
country place is in Weston. Their midsummer 
residence is at Nahant. 



PAINE. Ror.KRT Treat, distinguished as a 
philanthropist, was born in Boston, October 28, 
1835, son of Charles Cushing and Fanny Cabot 
(Jackson) Paine, and grandson of the Robert Treat 
Paine whose signature was among those appended 
to the Declaration of Independence. His educa- 
tion was acquired in Boston private and public 
schools, and at Harvard. He entered the Latin 
School at ten years of age, and graduated at 
fifteen : and at twenty he graduated from the col- 
lege with honors. Among his college classmates 
(class of 1855) were Phillips Brooks, Alexander 



.Xgassiz, Francis C. Barlow, Theodore Lyman, 
and Frank 15. Sanborn. After a year's study 
in the Harvard Law School he devoted two years 
to travel in Europe. Then, returning to Boston, 
he further pursued his law studies in the offices 
of Richard H. Dana and Francis E. Parker, and 
in 1859 was admitted to the Suffolk bar. Eleven 
years after (in 1870), having invested his earnings 
from the practice of his profession in profitable 
real estate, railroad, and mining enterprises, he 
retired with a competence, and since that time he 
has devoted himself mainly to humanitarian work. 
From 1872 to 1876 much of his time was given 
to the building of Trinity Church, he being one 
of the sub-committee of three who had charge 
of the work. In 1878 he was prominent in the or- 
ganization of the .\ssociated Charities of Boston, 
and was made its president, which position he 
still holds. The next year he organized the 
Wells Memorial Institute (in memory of the Rev. 
E. M. P. Wells, who served for thirty years. 




ROBERT TREAT PAINE. 

till his death in 1875, at the age of eighty- 
five, as the missionary of the Episcopal City 
Mission), the largest workingmen's club in the 
country, embracing a loan association, two co-oper- 
ative banks, and a building association ; and sub- 
sequentlv he raised the various subscriptions. 



8o 



MEN OF I'ROGRESS. 



amnuntinL; to S90.000, for tlie iiieiiiorial building 
of the Institute, completed in 1883. In 1887 he 
gave $10,000 to Harvard College to endow a 
fellowship for " the study of the ethical problems 
of society, the effects of legislation, governmental 
administration, and private philanthropy, to ameli- 
orate the lot of the mass of mankind " ; and in 
1890, in connection with Mrs. Paine, he created 
and endowed a trust of about $200,000, called 
the Robert Treat Paine Association, the trust 
deeds providing that the charities established are 
always to be carried on by the founders and their 
children. He is a member of the vestry of Trin- 
itv Church, of the e.vecutive committee of the 
Episcopal City Mission, and of the Watch and 
Ward Society; is one of the trustees of donations 
to the Protestant Episcopal Church ; is vice-presi- 
dent of the Children's Aid Society, of which his 
mother was one of the founders and a director 
as long as she lived ; president of the Wells Me- 
morial Institute, the Workingmen's Co-operative 
Bank, the \\'orkingmen's Pudding Association, 
and the Congress of Workingmen's Clubs. He 
has built two hundred or more small houses for 
workingmen, which are sold to them on easy 
terms ; published many pamphlets and addresses 
dealing with social problems ; and striven in vari- 
ous ways to raise the unfortunate, and especially 
to improve the condition of the working classes. 
In 1884 Mr. Paine represented W'altham. where 
his country seat is, in the lower house of the 
Legislature; and the same ^ear w'as Democratic 
and Independent candidate for Congress in the 
old Eifth District. He had been a Republican 
(and Eree Soiler) until the nomination of Mr. 
PJlaine for the Presidency. Mr. Paine was mar- 
ried in Boston, April 24, 1862, to Lydia Will- 
iams Lyman, daughter of George Williams and 
Anne (Pratt) Lyman. Her father was the son 
of Theodore Lyman, a distinguished Boston mer- 
chant at the beginning of this century. They 
have five children: Edith (now Mrs. John H. 
Storer), Robert Treat, ]t., Ethel Lyman, George 
Lyman, and Lydia Lyman Paine. Mr. Paine's 
town house is at No. 6 |ov Street, Beacon Hill. 



PHILLIPS, Henry Moses, of Springfield, 
treasurer and receiver-general of the Common- 
wealth, 1894, was born in Athol, August 11, 1845, 
son of Alonzo D. and Mary A. ( Robinson) Phil- 
lips. He is descended from the Rev. George 



l-'hillips, who c;ime to America in 1630, at the 
same time with Governor Winthrop and Sir Rich- 
ard Saltonstall. 'I'he Rev. George Phillips was 
a graduate of Cambridge College, England, and 
became the first minister at Watertown, Mass. 
Among his numerous descendants were John Phil- 
lips, the first mayor of P5oston, \\'endell Phillips, 
and the Rev. Phillips Brooks. Henry M. Phillips 
was educated in the public schools of Athol and 
Fitchburg, at the Deerfield Academy, and at the 
Military University of Xorwich. \'t. At the age 
of sixteen, when at Norwich, he enlisted in the 
volunteer service, joining the Seventh Squadron, 



•.^ 




H. M. PHILLlPS^ 

Rhode Island Cavalry, and later the Fourth Mas- 
sachusetts Cavalry, and served through the Civil 
War till the spring of 1865, when he was mu.s- 
tered out. As lieutenant of the Fourth Massa- 
chusetts Cavalry, he served on the Tenth Army 
Corps staff, under Generals (lilmore, Birney, and 
Terry, also on the Twenty-fifth Army Corps staff, 
under General Weitzel, — principally in the Army 
of the James, in its operations south of Richmond. 
He began business life as private secretary to the 
Hon. Henry Alexander, Jr.. then mayor of Spring- 
field, taking his position immediately after his 
discharge from the army. In 1.S71 he was ap- 
pointed deputy collector in the L nited States in- 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



8i 



ternal revenue service, and assistant assessor of 
the Tenth Massachusetts District. The same 
year he organized the firm of PhilHps, Mowry, & 
Co., for the manufacture of steam-heating appa- 
ratus, in which he has been engaged since, his 
firm being succeeded in 1876 by a corporation 
under the title of the Phillips Manufacturing Com- 
pany, of which he is the president. He is also a 
director of the Second National IJank of Spring- 
field, of the Springfield Five Cents Savings Bank, 
and of the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance 
Company, — on the finance committee of each of 
the three institutions. He has also been a direc- 
tor of the Springfield Board of Trade since its 
organization. His public career began as a mem- 
ber of the Springfield City Council, in which he 
served for two years. In 1880 and 1881 he was 
a representative of Springfield in the lower house 
of the Legislature; in 1883-84-85 was maj-or of 
Springfield; in 1886-87 ^ member of the State 
Senate for the First Hampden District; and in 
1894, as treasurer and receiver-general elected to 
that ofiice by a large vote, he became a member 
of the executive department of the State. In the 
Legislature he served, when a representative, on 
the committee on railroads in 188 1, and again 
when a senator, in 1886-87; '" 1886 he was 
also chairman of the committee on towns, and in 
1887 chairman of the committees on insurance 
and on the treasury. From 1890 to 1894 he was 
postmaster of Springfield (appointed January 23, 
1890), resigning the position November 30, 1893, 
(resignation not accepted till January 6, 1894), to 
assume the duties of State treasurer. Mr. Phil- 
lips is a member of the Massachusetts Comman- 
dery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, a 
member of the Grand Army, — for two years com- 
mander of Wilcox Post, Springfield, and one year 
senior vice-department commander, — a Knight 
Templar, and a Mason of the thirty-second de- 
gree. He was married in Springfield, December 
29, 1S74, to Miss Julia (Bowles) Alexander. They 
have one son: Henry Alexander Phillips, a mem- 
ber of the class of 1897, Harvard. 



PLYMPTON, Noah Allen, of the firm of 
Plympton & Bunting, general managers of the 
New England department of the I'enn Mutual 
Insurance Company of Philadelphia, is a native 
of Massachusetts, born in Shrewsbury, September 
7, 1841, son of John B. and Hannah E. (Allen) 



Plympton. He is of .American descent in the 
ninth generation on both sides. .Vt si.xteen, 
having already worked some time in his father's 
shoe factory, he was apprenticed to learn the 
trade of watchmaker and jeweller, and served 
till he reached his majority. Thereafter he fol- 
lowed this trade, the greater part of the time en- 
gaged in the watch and jewelry business for 
himself, in Worcester, until 1878, when he en- 
tered the insurance business. He first became 
associated with the Penn Mutual Life in 1880, 
acting as local agent at Worcester. Two years 
later he was made general agent of the company 




NOAH A. PLYMPTON. 

at Boston. This position he held until May, 
1883, when he resigned to take the office of ex- 
aminer for the State Insurance Department, to 
which he was appointed by Insurance Commis- 
sioner Tarbox. After a year's service here he 
resigned (_May, 1884), and returned to the Bos- 
ton office of the Penn Mutual Life as general 
agent; and shortly after he was appointed to his 
present position of general manager of the com- 
pany's New England department. In 18S5 he 
was elected to the Board of Trustees of the com- 
pany, and has since been re-elected from year to 
year; and he is chairman of the committees on 
medical department and on accounts, in poll- 



82 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



tics he was a Democrat, voting the "straight" 
Democratic ticket up to 1884, when he differed 
with the Democratic party on the tariff question, 
and since that time he has voted for protection 
whenever and wherever he could find a candidate 
who was for it. He was a member of the Demo- 
cratic State Committee from 1880 until June, 
1884, when he resigned, during the "Butler 
years " of 1882 and 1883 being chairman of the 
executive committee and having entire charge of 
the campaigns of those years. In 1883 he was 
nominated for insurance commissioner of the 
Commonwealth by Governor Butler, but was not 
confirmed by the Republican Executive Council. 
He was never an applicant for public office nor a 
candidate except when nominated for insurance 
commissioner, and his candidacy then was only 
at the request of Governor Butler. He is presi- 
dent of the Boston Life Underwriters' Associa- 
tion, a member of the Algonquin Club, of the 
Butler Club (president since its organization in 
May, 1887), and of the New England Club (vice- 
president) ; and he is connected with the Masonic 
order, member of the Athelstan Lodge of Worces- 
ter, and the Worcester Chapter R. A. M. He 
was married at Kewanee, 111., September 17, 
1862, to Miss Helen M. Flint. They have five 
children : Herbert F. (now in business with his 
father), Harry A. (now a student of law), Alice 
L., Lucy A., and Frederick K. Flympton. He 
resides at Wellesley Hills. 



POPE, Albert Augustus, founder of the bi- 
cycle industries in the LTnited States, was born in 
Boston, May 20, 1843, son of Charles and Eliza- 
beth (Bogman) Pope. He received his education 
in the public schools of Brookline, to which town 
the family moved early in his childhood. \Mien 
he was nine years of age, his father met with busi- 
ness reverses ; and young Albert at once began 
to earn something towards his support. At the 
early age of twelve he started as a successful 
trader in fruits and vegetables among his neigh- 
bors. At fifteen he was employed in the Quincy 
Market, Boston, and later became a clerk in a 
shoe-finding store on Blackstone Street. At nine- 
teen he joined the volunteer forces of the Union 
army, going to the front as second lieutenant 
in the Thirty-fifth Massachusetts Regiment. He 
was promoted to the rank of first lieutenant, 
March 23, 1863; to captain, April i, 1864: was 



brevetted major for "gallant conduct at the battle 
of Fredericksburg, Va.," and then lieutenant 
colonel for " gallant conduct in the battles of 
Knoxville, Poplar Springs Church, and front of 
Petersburg." He served in the principal Vir- 
ginia campaigns, was with Burnside in Tennessee, 
with Grant at Vicksburg, and with Sherman at 
Jackson, Miss. He commanded Fort Nell before 
Petersburg, and in the last attack led his regi- 
ment into the city. After the war he entered 
business for himself, dealing in shoe manufact- 
urers" supplies. In 1877, having already founded 
the Pope Manufacturing Company and become 
an enthusiastic bicyclist, he started out in the 
industry which has grown to such extraordinary 
proportions. At that time the demand for the 
wheel was limited, and in many quarters there 
was marked opposition to its use in the public 
thoroughfares. Accordingly, it was Colonel Pope's 
mission, at the outset, to overcome the prejudice 
against it. and to foster a popular interest in hi- 



/ 




ALBERT A. POPE. 

cycling. These ends were accomplished in vari- 
ous ways, and with them sundry public benefits 
were secured. Opposition, wherever it showed 
itself, was promptly met and ably checked and 
dispelled ; the amendment or repeal of adverse 
city ordinances was secured, and the rights of 



MEN OF PKOGRKSS. 



«3 



wheelmen in the public ways were defended and 
established in the courts; trained tongues and 
pens were brought to champion the bicycle and to 
promote the public good will towards it ; the liter- 
ature of the subject was widely distributed, and 
the best foreign publications were imported and 
circulated gratuitously ; local periodical publica- 
tions were encouraged and sustained ; Colonel 
Pope's company published " The American iJi- 
cycler," which did much to awaken popular inter- 
est in intelligent bicycling, and to correct popu- 
lar misconception regarding it. The first journal 
devoted exclusively to bicycling, the BiixcHiig 

Worlds started in the autumn of 1879, was sub- 
stantially advanced by the patronage of the com- 
pany ; and it founded, at an expense of several 
thousand dollars, the illustrated magazine, The 

Wheelman, which subsequently became the Oitt- 
iii,i^. Colonel Pope is also pioneer in the move- 
ment for highway improvement in town and coun- 
try. Besides his interest in the bicycle industry, 
he is concerned in several other lines of business. 
He is a director of the American Loan iV Trust 
Company and of the W'inthrop Bank, and is con- 
nected with a number of other corporations and 
companies. He is a member of the Algonquin, 
Country, Athletic, and Art clubs of PSoston ; is 
president of the Beacon Society : commander of 
the Massachusetts Commandery of the Military 
Order of the Loyal Legion ; prominent in the 
Grand Army, and a life member of several chari- 
table organizations. For two years he was a 
member of the Newton city government. Colonel 
Pope was married September 20, 187 1, to Miss 
Abby Linder. They have five children : Albert 
Linder, Margaret Roberts, Harold Linder, 
Charles Linder, and Ralph Linder Pope. 



PRATT, Isaac, Jr., president of the Atlantic 
National Bank of Boston, is a native of North 
Middleborough, born June 27, 18 14, son of Isaac 
and Naomi (Keith) Pratt. He is a descendant 
in the eighth generation of Phineas Pratt, who 
came from England to Massachusetts Bay in the 
third ship, " Ann," and died in Charlestown, April 
9, 1680, at the age of eighty-six years. He was 
educated ip the town school of North Middle- 
borough and at Bridgewater Academy. At the 
age of sixteen he entered his father's counting- 
room in Wareham, where he remained till 1834. 
Then he came to Boston ; and after a year with 



Warren Murdock, in the commission hardware 
business, he joined B. L. Thompson on Long 
Wharf, becoming a partner in the lirm in 1836, 
the business being chiefly the manufacture of cut 
nails and dealing in hops. He continued in this 
business till 1843, when he connected himself with 




ISAAC PRATT, Jr. 

the Weymoutli Iron Company. Here he was 
engaged for forty-three years, for a considerable 
part of the time president of the company. He 
was also some time president of the Bridgewater 
Iron Company. His official connection with the 
Atlantic National Bank began in 1866, when he 
was elected a director ; and he has held the office 
of president since 1869. He is also a director of 
the National Bank of Wareham. In 1875 he was 
a member of the lower house of the Legislature, 
representing the Brighton District of Boston. In 
politics Mr. Pratt is a Republican, always voting 
the regular ticket of the party ; but he has not 
had much time to give to the organization as a 
member. He is active in local enterprises, and 
has served as president of the Charles River 
Embankment Company, and as treasurer of the 
East Boston Company. He was married June g, 
1840, to Miss Hannah Thompson, daughter of 
B. L. Thompson, his early partner in business. 
They have had five children : Ellen Jane Oakes, 



84 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Isaac Lowell, David Gurney, Edmund Thompson, 
and Marland Langdon Pratt. 



PRINCE, Frederick Octavius, mayor of Bos- 
ton 1877, 79-81, was born in Boston, January 18, 
1818, son of Thomas and Caroline (Prince) Prince. 
He comes of English stock on one side and Scotch 
on the other, and his ancestors were among the 
earliest settlers in New England. The first to 
come to this country was Elder John Prince, son 
of John Prince who was rector of East Sheffield 
as far back as 1584, when the Prince family was 
living in Shrewsbury upon their estate known as 
" Abbey P"oregate." Elder John Prince came here 
in 1633, and settled in Hull. His grandson, 
Thomas Prince, graduated from Harvard in 1707, 
and in 1718 was ordained as colleague of Dr. 
Samuel Sewall (minister of the Old South Church 
of Boston for fifty-six years), which position he 




F. O. PRINCE. 

held for forty years, until his death. J.ames 
Prince, the grandfather of Frederick O., was well 
known in his day and generation as a prominent 
merchant in Boston. He was appointed by Presi- 
dent Jefferson as naval officer at the port of Bos- 
ton, and afterward United States marshal for the 



district of Massachusetts. He held the latter 
office under the administrations of Madison and 
Monroe. Frederick O. Prince was educated at 
the Boston Latin School and Harvard College, 
entering the former in 1827 and graduating in 
1832 (receiving the Franklin medal and two other 
medals for scholarship), and graduating from the 
college in 1836. He was the secretary of his col- 
lege class, and the class poet. A year after his 
graduation he began the study of law in the office 
of Franklin Dexter and William H. Gardiner, and 
in 1840 was admitted to the Suffolk bar, when he 
began the practice of his profession in Boston. 
He was an ardent Whig, and early in his career 
took an active part in politics. Maintaining his 
law office in Boston, in 1848 he made his resi- 
dence in Winchester, Middlesex County, and rep- 
resented that town in the lower house of the State 
Legislature in 1851, 1852, and 1853. The latter 
year he was a member of the Constitutional Con- 
vention, taking a leading part in its proceedings. 
In 1855 he was elected to the State Senate, and 
in this body at once became prominent and influ- 
ential. In i860, upon the disruption of the Whig 
party, he allied himself with the Democratic party ; 
and he has since been a conspicuous member of 
that organization. He w-as a delegate from Mas- 
sachusetts to the memorable National Democratic 
Convention at Charleston, S.C., in i860, and, ad- 
hering to the Douglas wing of the party, was 
made secretary of the National Democratic Com- 
mittee for the presidential campaign of that year. 
This position he held through the succeeding 
campaigns until 1888, being unanimously elected 
each time. That j-ear, although again elected 
unanimously, he resigned the office ; and upon his 
retirement he received from the National Dem- 
ocratic Convention a resolution of thanks for the 
" unflagging zeal and distinguished ability " which 
had characterized his twenty-eight years of ser- 
vice. Meanwhile Mr. Prince had become again a 
citizen of Boston; and in 1877 he entered upon 
his first term as mayor of the city, having been 
elected by a large vote in the December election 
of 1876, although his party was at the time of his 
nomination in the minority. Renominated for a 
second term, he was defeated after one of the 
most hotly contested elections in the city, his 
competitor being Henry L. Pierce. The next 
year, however, when he was again put in the field, 
he was returned by a handsome majority, and 
thereafter was twice re-elected (for the terms of 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



85 



1880 and 188 1). For 1882, though earnestly 
pressed, he declined renomination. His adminis- 
tration was especially marked by the adoption of 
the scheme of public parks embraced in the 
"public parks system," the development of 
which is seen in the chain of beautiful pleas- 
ure grounds now almost encircling the city ; and 
by the measure providing for the " improved 
sewerage system," — that fine piece of engineering 
known as the great intercepting sewer, which 
takes to Moon Island, outside the harbor of Bos- 
ton, the sewage of the city proper and the district 
lying south of Charles River. The great building 
for the Latin and English High schools, the 
largest structure in the country for the use of pub- 
lic schools, was also erected during his administra- 
tion, and largely through his efforts. In 1885 Mr. 
Prince was named as the Democratic candidate 
for governor of the State, and was defeated upon 
a strictly party vote. In 1888 he was made a 
member of the Board of Trustees of the Boston 
Public Library, under whose supervision the 
classic and richly embellished new Library Build- 
ing in Copley Square has been constructed ; and 
in 1893 he was reappointed for a second term of 
five years. During his mayoralty Mr. Prince was 
often called to make orations and addresses on 
occasions of municipal interest, which were highly 
commended by the press and the citizens gener- 
ally. Among these may be mentioned the ora- 
tions on the dedication of the statue of Josiah 
Quincy in front of City Hall ; on the dedication of 
the statue of President Lincoln in Park Square : 
and on the celebration on the 17th of September, 
1880, of the two hundred and fiftieth anniversary 
of the settlement of Boston. He made also 
eloquent addresses at the dedication of the public 
Latin and English High school-house, at the dedi- 
cation of the Soldiers' Monument on Boston Com- 
mon, and at the laying of the corner-stone of the 
new Public Library Building on Copley Square. 
Mr. Prince was first married, in 1848, to Miss 
Helen Henry, daughter of Barnard Henry, of 
Philadelphia, for many years United States consul 
at Gibraltar, where Mrs. Prince was born. Their 
children were: Gordon and Bernard (deceased), 
twins, Charles Albert, Morton Prince (M.D.), 
Helen Susan (deceased), and Frederick Henry 
I'rince. Mrs. Prince died in 1885; and in 1889 
Mr. Prince married again, his second wife being 
the widow of Mr. Samuel P. Blanc, a distin- 
guished member of the bar of New Orleans. 



PROCTOR, Tuo.MAS William, city solicitor 
of Boston 1891-94, is a native of New Hampshire, 
born in Hollis, November 20, 1858, son of Thomas 
and Susan R. (Pool) Proctor. He is a direct de- 
scendant of Robert Proctor, who came from Eng- 
land and settled in Concord in 1635. He was 





^ 



Lj^aJKe 



T. W. PROCTOR. 



V 



educated in the public schools of his native town, 
in the Lawrence Academy of Groton, Mass., 
where he was fitted for college and graduated 
in 1875, and at Dartmouth, graduating therefrom 
in the class of 1879. The next year he came to 
Boston, and began the study of law, reading in 
the office of the Hon. John H. Hardy and attend- 
ing the Boston tfniversity Law School one year 
(1882-83); and in October, 1883, was admitted 
to the Suffolk bar. In 1S84 he was clerk to the 
district attorney for Suffolk from July to October, 
and then entered general practice as a member 
of the law firm of Hardy, Elder, & Proctor, which 
was soon after changed, Mr. Hardy being ap- 
pointed to the municipal bench, to Elder & Proc- 
tor. In this relation he continued till 1886, when 
he was appointed second assistant district attor- 
ney for the Suffolk District. In December of the 
following year he was promoted to the first assist- 
ant district attorneyship ; and this position he 
held until May, 1891, when he was appointed 



86 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



assistant solicitor in the law department of the 
city of Boston. On the first of February, 1894, he 
resigned from the city law department to take the 
law practice of the old Boston firm of Blackmar 
& Sheldon, upon the appointment of Mr. Sheldon 
to the Superior Bench. Mr. Proctor is a member 
of the Boston Bar Association, and of the Uni- 
versity and Curtis clubs. He is unmarried. 



RANNEY, Ambrose Arnold, member of the 
Suffolk bar since 1848, and representative in 
Congress three terms, is a native of Vermont. 




A. A. RANNEY. 

He was born in Townshend, Windham County, 
April 16, 1821, son of Waitstill R. and Phttbe 
(.\twood) Ranney. His father was the leading 
physician of the town, and for two terms the 
lieutenant governor of the State. He attended 
the Townshend Academy, where he was fitted for 
college, and, entering Dartmouth, was graduated 
in the class of 1844. Then he took up the study 
of law in the office of Andrew Tracy in Wood- 
stock, Vt., and in 1847 was admitted to the Ver- 
mont bar. He immediately removed to Boston, 
where the following year he was admitted to the 
Suffolk bar ; and there he has since practised with 
marked success. Seven years after he opened 



his Boston office he was made city solicitor, which 
position he held for two terms. In 1857 he 
was member of the lower house of the Legis- 
lature, and again in 1863 and 1864; and in 1880 
he was first elected to Congress. He served in 
the Forty-seventh, Forty-eighth, and Forty-ninth 
Congresses, and was one of the most prominent 
members of the Massachusetts delegation. Dur- 
ing his first two terms he was a member of the 
committee on elections ; and his third, of the 
committee on the judiciary and of the special 
committee to investigate the Pan Electric scheme. 
He has been a Republican since the organization 
of that party. In his professional work Mr. 
Ranney has been eminently successful as a jury 
lawyer. He was married in Cavendish, Vt., De- 
cember 4, 1850, to Miss Maria D. Fletcher, 
daughter of Addison and Maria (Ingals) Fletcher. 
They have had one son and three daughters : 
Fletcher (now a partner in the law firm of Clark 
& Ranney), Maria F., Helen M., and .Vlice Ran- 
ney (now Mrs. Thomas Allen). 



R.'WMOND, Walter, of the firm of Ray- 
mond & Whitcomb, continental excursion pro- 
jectors and managers, is a native of Boston, born 
October 13, 185 1. son of Emmons and Mehitable 
Converse (Munroe) Raymond. His paternal 
grandparents, Asa and Hulda (Rice) Raymond, 
were long residents of the town of Shutesbury, 
I'ranklin County, and celebrated that rare occa- 
sion, a diamond wedding, in .April, 1862. His 
education was begun in the old Phillips School in 
Boston, and, the family removing to Cambridge, 
continued in the Harvard Grammar and the Cam- 
bridge High and Latin schools, where he was 
fitted for college. He entered Harvard, and grad- 
uated in the class of 1873. In college he was a 
member of the Pierian Sodality, the Signet, and 
the .Alpha Chapter, Psi Upsilon Fraternity ; and 
among his classmates were Robert Grant, now 
probate judge, J. M. Laughlin, Charles T. Rus- 
sell, Jr., J. Cheever Goodwin, and Eliot Lord, 
editor of the Boston Traveller. He began busi- 
ness life as a book-keeper for his brother, Charles 
.\. Raymond, then established on Hanover Street, 
Boston. In June, 1875, he entered the railroad 
business as cashier in the Boston office of the 
Montreal & Boston .\ir Line & Passumpsic 
Railroad, and two years later became the general 
agent of the line, in charge of the several New 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



87 



England agencies. In 1879 he formed the part- 
nership with I. A. Whitcomb, of Somerville, now 
so widely known under the firm name of Raymond 
& Whitcomb; and their first vacation excursion, 
organized that year, was from Manchester, N.H.. 
to Montreal. Their system was rapidly devel- 
oped, and within a few years covered a wide terri- 
tory. They were the first railroad men to send 
a vestibuled train to California, to establish the 
system of transcontinental dining cars, and to 
despatch dining cars to Mexico. Within a single 
year (1892) Mr. Raymond, as manager, personally 
planned and managed one hundred trips through 
the New England and Middle States, to California, 
Mexico, Alaska, the Sandwich Islands, and to 
various points in Europe. He owns or leases a 
number of hotels in various parts of the country, 
among them 'Ihe Raymond, at East Pasadena, 
Cal., and The Colorado, Glenwood Springs, Col. : 
and he has held the position of postmaster at 
East Pasadena (the post-office of the Raymond 
Hotel) since 1887, appointed by President Cleve- 
land. He is much interested in music, and from 
1870 to 1S78 was leader of the Cambridge Ania- 



bridge. Mr. Raymond was married April 5, 1893, 
to Miss Hattie Sisson Lewis, of Denver, Col. 





WALTER RAYMOND. 



teur Orchestra, a band of twelve members. In 
politics he is a Democrat, and in religion a Uni- 
tarian, attending the First Parish Cliurch of Cam- 



S. H. RHODES. 

RHODES, Stephen Holiirouk, president of 
the John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany, is a native of Franklin, born November 7, 
1825, son of Stephen and ISetsey (Bird) Rhodes. 
He was educated in the public schools and in the 
Bristol Academy, Taunton. He began business 
life in Taunton in manufacturing and mercantile 
branches, and subsequently engaged in life in- 
surance. He was deputy insurance commissioner 
of the State from 1872 to 1874, and for five years 
thereafter, first by appointment of acting Governor 
Talbot, was chief of the department as insurance 
commissioner. This position he resigned in the 
spring of 1879 to accept the presidency of the 
John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company 
(chartered in 1861), at the head of which he has 
remained since. During the latter part of liis 
residence in Taunton he was identified with nu- 
merous local interests, and for two and a half years 
(1867-68-69) was mayor of the city. Previous 
to his election to the mayoralty he served half a 
term on the Board of Aldermen (1867). In 1870- 
7 1 he was a member of the State Senate, repre- 
senting the First Bristol District, where he served 



88 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



on important committees and was instrumental in 
shaping legislation bearing on insurance matters. 
Since 1873 he has resided in Boston. He is a 
member of the Exchange Club, of the Boston 
Society of Natural History, and of the Roxbury 
Charitable Society. He was married in Taunton, 
November 27, 1847. ^° Miss Elizabeth M. God- 
frey, daughter of Charles and Hannah (Shaw) 
Godfrey. They have had two children : Henry 
Holbrook, born November 6, 1848, died Septem- 
ber 20, 1854; and Annie Elizabeth, born April 
30, 185 1, now wife of Lieutenant James M. 
Grimes, of the United States Navv. 



RICE, Alexander Hamilton, mayor of Bos- 
ton 1856-57, Congressman 1859-67, and gover- 
nor of the Commonwealth 1876-78, is a native of 
Newton, born August 30, 1818, son of 'I'homas 
and I.ydia (Smith) Rice. His father was a paper 
manufacturer, having mills at Newton Lower 
Falls. He was educated in public and private 
schools in and near Newton, finishing at Union 
College, Schenectady, N.Y., then under the presi- 
dency of the celebrated Dr. Nott, where he grad- 
uated in 1844, commencement orator of his class. 
Three years later he received from his (7/»in mater 
the degree of A.M. ; and in 1876, the first year of 
his service in the governorship. Harvard College 
conferred upon him the honorary degree of LL.D. 
He began business life the year of his graduation, 
entering the Boston house of \Mlkins & Carter, 
paper dealers and manufacturers ; and he has con- 
tinued in the paper trade ever since. Joining with 
him some years later Mr. Charles S. Kendall, he 
established the house of Rice, Kendall & Co., 
paper dealers and manufacturers, with warehouse 
in Boston and mills in Newton and elsewhere, 
which firm early took rank among the foremost con- 
cerns in the business. In i88g, after a prosperous 
career of nearly half a century, this firm was suc- 
ceeded by the present corporation under the style 
of the Rice-Kendall Company, with Mr. Rice as 
president. He is also president of the Keith 
Paper Company at Turner's Falls, Mass. He has 
been a director of the American Loan & Trust 
Company since its organization; since about 1870 
a director of the Massachusetts National Bank; 
and since 187 i a trustee of the Mutual Life Insur- 
ance Company of New York, the largest financial 
institution in the world. His public life began as a 
member of the Boston School Committee early in 



the fifties, and as a member of the lioard of Public 
Institutions, and afterwards of the Common Coun- 
cil, becoming president of the latter body in 1854. 
During his first term in the mayoralty (1856), to 
which he was elected as a " Citizens '" candidate, 
defeating the " Know Nothing party," the " tripar- 




ALEXANDER H. RICE- 

tite agreement " between the city, the Common- 
wealth, and the Boston Water Power Company, 
was consummated, under which the dexelopment 
of the territory now known as the Back Bay Dis- 
trict was begun; and in his second term the ex- 
tension of Devonshire Street from Milk Street to 
Franklin Street, through the narrow foot-path 
called Theatre Alley, and the opening of Win- 
throp Square from Franklin Street to Summer 
.Street were begun. This improvement first 
brought Franklin Street, Hawley, Arch. Summer, 
and neighboring streets into business localities, 
they having been previously purely residential 
quarters. During the same term the movement 
for the establishment of the City Hospital was 
started, and the Public Library Building on Boyl- 
ston Street was finished. On the occasion of the 
dedication of the latter, January i, 1858, Mr. 
Rice delivered a dedicatory address, the other 
addresses being delivered by Robert C. Winthrop 
and Edward Everett, respectively. In Congress 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



89 



he was a leading member on the Republican side 
from the beginning of his long service, and for 
the greater part of the war period he was chair- 
man of the committee on naval affairs. As gov- 
ernor, he represented the State on numerous pub- 
lic occasions beyond its borders : and his admin- 
istrations were marked by the enactment and 
administration of liquor laws which greatly abated 
drunkenness and assuaged the bitterness of dis- 
cussion. Also during his gubernatorial terms the 
settlement of the controversy about the State 
administration of the Hoosac Tunnel was ad- 
vanced, the militia was reorganized and invig- 
orated, and an efficient and aspiring tone was 
given to all departments of the government, es- 
pecially to the schools and the humane institu- 
tions. Among his many formal addresses, besides 
those above mentioned, a few only of which have 
been preserved in pamphlet form, are : an address 
at the opening of the great Peace Jubilee in 
i86g; address as chancellor of Union Univer- 
sity in 1 881; address on the occasion of the un- 
veiling of the equestrian statue of Washington 
in the Boston Public Garden, July 3, 1869; at the 
unveiling of the Sumner statue, Public Garden. 
December 2t,, 1878; one of the course of the 
Butterfield lectures at Ihiion College in 1892; 
and the address at the inauguration of the Farra- 
gut statue, Marine Park, South Boston, June 28, 
1893. He has several times been abroad, and in 
England enjoyed an intimate friendship with the 
late Dean Stanley and with other eminent men 
there and on the continent. Mr. Rice is a mem- 
ber of the American Archa;ological Society ; a 
fellow of the American Geographical Society (New- 
York) ; member of the American Historical Asso- 
ciation ; of the ^^'ebster Historical Association 
(vice-president): of the Bunker Hill Monument 
Association (a director) ; and of the Massachusetts 
Commandery of the Loyal Legion : honorary life 
member of the Farragut Naval Veteran Associa- 
tion ; a trustee of the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, 
and of the Episcopal Theological School at Cam- 
bridge ; president of the National Soldiers' Home; 
and past honorary chancellor of Union Univer- 
sity. He also belongs to the St. Botolph, the 
Algonquin, the Art (president of the latter in 
1880), the Commercial, and the Thursday clubs 
of Boston. He was first married in 1S44 to 
Miss Augusta E. McKim, a sister of Judge 
McKim. of the Suffolk Countv Probate Court ; 



and a second marriage was to Mrs. iVngie Erick- 
son Powell, of Rochester, N.Y. 



RICKER, James Wii.i.iam, collector of the 
city of Boston, is a native of New Hampshire, 
born in Portsmouth, January 31, 1829, son of 
Charles and Eliza B. (Perkins) Ricker. On the 
paternal side he is a direct descendant of George 
Ricker, who came from England in 1760, and 
settled in Somersworth, then a part of Dover, 
N.H. He was educated in the Portsmouth public 
schools, and began active life when yet a lad, as 
an apprentice in a printing-office in (Jreat Falls, 
N.H., where he learned the printer's trade. 
Then, coming to Boston, he was for several years 
engaged in newspaper work, and in 1859 was one 
of the publishers of the Boston Liu^^er, an even- 
ing paper published that year. In 1862 he 
entered the service of the city, and has remained 
in it without break ever since. For the first thir- 





^^^ 




JAMES W. RICKER. 

teen years he was in the office of the city treas- 
urer, from the second year a deputy collector, the 
collection of taxes then being one of the duties of 
the treasurer. When in 1875 the separate office 
of collector was established, he was a candidate 
for the new position : and being defeated by his 



90 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



competitor. General Thomas Sherwin, he was im- 
mediately appointed by the latter chief clerk. 
This position he held until 1883, when, General 
Sherwin resigning, he was placed at the head of 
the department, where he has been retained since 
by repeated reappointments, through both Dem- 
ocratic and Republican administrations. JMr. 
Ricker was married December 28, 1852, in Chel- 
sea, to Miss Sarah F. Fenno, daughter of Henry 
W. and Rebecca H. Fenno. They have two 
children: Julia Marland (now Mrs. Frederick 
M. Stearns) and Everett \\'ilder Ricker. 



ROBINSON, Albert Alonzo, of Boston, pres- 
ident of the Mexican Central Railway, is a native 
of Vermont, born in South Reading, Windsor 




A. A. ROBINSON. 

County, October 21, 1844, son of Ebenezer, Jr., 
and Adaline (Williams) Robinson. He is a lineal 
descendant of Jonathan Robinson, born in Cam- 
bridge, Mass., in 1682, a son of \\'illiam Rob- 
inson, one of the early settlers there. His 
grandfather, Ebenezer Robinson, Sr., born in 
Lexington in February, 1765, and died October 
31, 1857, at the ripe age of ninety-two, served in 
the Revolutionary War for two years, part of the 
time in the navy as privateer and part as a soldier 



in the land forces, and for about six months was 
a prisoner on the prison ship " Old Jersey." His 
father, Ebenezer, Jr., was also a native of South 
Reading, Vt., born September 30, 1S09, died July 
5, 1848. Albert A. was educated in the public 
schools, in Milton (Wis.) Academy, and in the 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., where 
he graduated in i86g, taking the degree of C.E. 
and B.S., and in 1871 M.S. From childhood until 
he reached his majority he was engaged at farm 
labor out of school hours, excepting during the 
years 1856-59, when he worked as a clerk in dry- 
goods or grocery stores. From 1866 to 1868 he 
was employed for about five months each year as 
assistant on the United States lake surveys in 
astronomical field work and on triangulation of 
the great lakes. His work on railroads began in 
1869, when on May 27 he entered the service 
of the St. Joseph & Denver City Railroad as 
axeman in the engineering corps, and thereafter 
served successively as chain-man, level-man, tran- 
sit-man, office engineer, locating engineer, and as- 
sistant engineer until the first of .Kpril, 187 1. 
Then he became assistant engineer of the Atchi- 
son, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad, in charge 
of location and construction, and two years later, 
on the first of April, 1873, was made chief engi- 
neer, which position he held till August, 1890. 
From June i, 1883, to September i, 1883, he also 
served as assistant general superintendent of the 
Santa Fe system ; from September i, 18S3, to 
March i, 1884, he was general superintendent; 
from March i, 1884, to February i, 1886, he was 
general manager; from February i, 1886, to May, 
1888, second vice-president; and second vice- 
president and general manager from May, 1888, 
till April 3, 1893, when he left this system to ac- 
cept the presidency of the Mexican Central Rail- 
way Company. During his engineering expe- 
rience he has had direct charge of the construction 
of over forty-five hundred miles of railroad, in- 
cluding the building of the Pueblo and Denver 
line, one hundred and sixteen miles in seven 
months, and the extending of the company's line 
from Kansas City to Chicago, four hundred and 
fifty-eight miles, from April to December 3 1 of the 
same year. As president of the Mexican Central, 
he is in charge of the general business and affairs 
of the road, with headquarters in Boston. Mr. 
Robinson is a member of the .American Societ)- 
of Civil Engineers. In politics he is Republican. 
He was married December 9, 1869, to Miss Julia 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



91 



Caroline Uurdick, of Edgerton, Wis. She died 
August 3, 188 1, leaving a daughter, Metta Burdick 
Robinson, born July 17, 1876. He married sec- 
ond, September 3, 1885, Mrs. Ellen Francis 
Williams, a sister of his first wife. 



ROCHE, James Jeffrey, editor of the Pilot, 
Boston, is a native of Queen's County, Ireland, 
born at Mountmellick, May 31, 1847. That same 




J. J ROCHE. 

year his parents emigrated to Prince Edward Isl- 
and, and there he spent his boyhood and youth. 
His education was acquired from his father, Ed- 
ward Roche, an accomplished scholar, and at St. 
Dunstan's College, Charlottetown. Among his 
college classmates were the present Chief Justice 
Sullivan, of Prince Edward Island, and Arch- 
bishop O'Brien, of Halifa.x, N.S. In May, 1866, 
soon after leaving college, he came to the United 
States, and engaged in mercantile pursuits. These 
he followed for seventeen years, at the same time 
dipping into literature, contributing to various 
newspapers and magazines, notably the Pilot, 
when under the editorial direction of his brilliant 
friend, the late John Boyle O'Reilly. In June, 
1883, he joined the regular staff of the Pilot. Mr. 
O'Reilly offering him the position of assistant 



editor. This he held until the death of his chief, 
in August, 1890, when he was advanced to the 
first place. Early in his professional career he 
made a reputation as a poet, and as a writer of 
picturesque and virile prose. His published 
works are the "Life of John Boyle O'Reilly," pub- 
lished in 1891; "The Story of the Filibusters," 
published in London the same year; and a vol- 
ume of poems, " Songs and Satires," issued in 
Boston in 1886. He was the poet of the occasion 
when the " high-water mark monument " was un- 
veiled at _the national dedication on the held of 
Gettysburg, June 2, 1892, and also at the celebra- 
tion of the two hundred and fiftieth anniversary of 
the founding of the town of Woburn, October 6, 
the same year. That year the University of 
Notre Dame, Indiana, conferred upon him the 
honorary degree of LL.I). In 1893 he was ap- 
pointed by Governor Russell a member of the 
Metropolitan Park Commission, that year created, 
but soon after resigned on account of the pressure 
of editorial and literary work. He is a member of 
the St. Botolph and Papyrus clubs, and of other 
organizations. For five consecutive years (from 
1884) he was secretary of the Papyrus, and its 
president in 1890. He is a brother of the late 
John Roche, pay-clerk in the United States Navy, 
who perished heroically in the Samoan disaster of 
March, 1889. 



RUSSELL, William Eustis, governor of Mas- 
sachusetts three terms, 1891-92-93, and the 
youngest candidate but one ever elected to the 
office, is a native of Cambridge, of sterling stock. 
He was born January 6, 1857, youngest son of 
Charles Theodore and Sarah Elizabeth (Ballister) 
Russell. Of his ancestors, those on the paternal 
side were among the Puritan immigrants to Bos- 
ton about the year 1640, and one of them, a Will- 
iam Russell, was living in Cambridge in 1645; 
and his paternal grandmother, a Hastings, de- 
scended through both her parents from the earliest 
settlers in Princeton. His mother's father was 
Joseph Ballister, an old-time Boston merchant. 
His early education was attained in the public 
schools of Cambridge, and there he was prepared 
for college. At si.\teen he entered Harvard, 
where he made a good record as a student, and 
displayed a hearty interest in athletics. Graduat- 
ing in 1877, he entered the Boston University 
Law School with three ambitions, — to graduate at 
the head of his class, to win the William Beach 



92 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Lawrence prize for the best essay, and to deliver 
the class oration at commencement. All three he 
attained, and he received the first siimma ciim 
hunk ever given by this school. His successful 
essay for the Lawrence prize was on " Foreign 
Judgments : Their Hxtra-territorial Force and 
Effect." After a year's additional study under 
the direction of his father, he was admitted to the 
-Suffolk bar (1880), and began practice in Boston 
in his father's law firm, — that of C. T. and T. H. 
Russell. The following year he was elected to 
the Cambridge city council on an independent 
ticket by a majority of two votes, one of which 




WM. E. RUSSELL. 
(From 11 copyri^'hteil photograph by KImer (_'hickering.l 

was lost in a recount ; and, with his work in this 
body, his remarkable career in the public service 
began. The next year he was sent to the Cam- 
bridge Board of Aldermen, nominated by both the 
regular parties, with a practically united constit- 
uency behind him. Here, as in the council, he 
took a leading part, displaying ability as a ready 
and skilful debater, and boldness in the advocacy 
of local reforms. After two terms in this board 
he was nominated to the mayoralty at the head of 
a municipal reform ticket, and in the hot cam- 
paign following he spoke on the stump in every 
section of the city. His ticket was elected by an 
emphatic majority, and he entered the office the 



youngest man ever chosen to it. This was in 
1884, when he was but twenty-seven. He was 
mayor of Cambridge, through repeated elections, 
for four successive terms : and his administration 
was marked by important financial and other re- 
forms, and the successful accomplishment of a 
number of great public improvements. Early in 
this service his fame was spread beyond the limits 
of his city, and he was frequently "mentioned" for 
higher offices. During his first term as mayor he 
was seriously considered for the second place on 
the Democratic State ticket, and the next year for 
the first place. He, however, withdrew in favor 
of John Y. Andrew, and in the convention made 
the nominating speech, which was followed by the 
nomination of the war governor's son by acclama- 
tion. The same year he was pressed to stand for 
Congress in his district, but he declined. In 
1888, when closing his fourth term as mayor, he 
was again named for the head of the Democratic 
.State ticket, and in the convention of that year 
was nominated by acclamation. -Soon after his 
nomination he began a stumping tour of the State, 
and spoke night after night for seven weeks, dis- 
cussing tariff reform and other questions involved 
in the presidential campaign, with State issues. 
,\lthough failing of election, he polled a greatly 
increased Democratic vote. In October, 1889, he 
was renominated, and, as before, made a tour of 
the State, discussing on the stump .State issues, 
with tariff reform as the leading national one. 
The result of this canvass was a decrease in the 
Republican plurality to a narrow margin, .\gain, 
in 1890, renominated, and making a third tour of 
the State, this time he carried the election by 
a strong plurality, although the Republican can- 
didates for the other ofiices were, with one ex- 
ception (that of auditor), elected. In the two 
succeeding elections he was re-elected, with Re- 
publicans on the remainder of the ticket, each 
year, after a spirited canvass, in which his 
speeches on the stump were among the most 
notable features. Then, declining to stand for a 
fourth term, he retired at the close of his third 
with a brilliant record and a national reputation. 
Returning to the practice of his profession, he be- 
came a member of the law firm of Russell & Rus- 
sell, in association with Charles Theodore Russell, 
Jr., and Arthur H. Russell, the senior partners 
of the old firm of C. T. and T. H. Russell 
occupying adjoining offices, giving their attention 
especially to consultation and advice. He has 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



93 



delivered a number of orations and occasional 
addresses besides his many campaign speeches 
within and without the State, the most notable of 
which were published in a volume issued in 1894 
(Speeches and Addresses of William E. Russell, 
selected and edited b)- Charles Theodore Russell, 
Jr., with an introduction by Thomas Wentworth 
Higginson, Boston, Little, Brown & Co.). On 
the 4th of July, 1888, the year of his first nomina- 
tion to the governorship, Mr. Russell was the 
presiding officer at the national Convention of 
Democratic clubs held in Baltimore. In June, 
1884, he was chosen president of the Alumni of 
the Law School of Boston University, which posi- 
tion he has since held. In 189 1 he received the 
honorary degree of LL.D. from Williams College. 
He is a member of the Union Club of Boston 
and of the Colonial Club of Cambridge. He was 
married June 3, 1885, to Miss Margaret Manning 
Swan, daughter of the late Rev. Joshua and Sarah 
A. (Hodges) Swan, of Cambridge. They have two 
children : \Mlliam Eustis and Richard Manning 
Russell. 

RUSSELL, WiLLi.^M Goodwin, member of 
the SufTolk bar for nearly half a century, and the 
successor of Sidney Bartlett as its leader, is a 
native of Plymouth, born November 18, 182 i, son 
of Thomas and Mary Ann (Goodwin) Russell. 
He is of English and Scotch ancestry, a descend- 
ant of Miles Standish, John Alden, and Richard 
Warren of the "Mayflower" passengers. His 
great-grandfather on the paternal side, John Rus- 
sell, was a merchant of Greenock, Scotland, who 
came to New England about the year 1745, and 
settled in Plymouth ; and his great-grandfather, 
Samuel Jackson, of Plymouth, was the grandfather 
of Sidney Bartlett. He was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Plymouth and at Harvard, for which 
he was fitted under the tuition of the Hon. John 
Angier Shaw, of Bridgewater, graduating in the 
class of 1840. After leaving college, he taught a 
young ladies' private school in Plymouth for some 
months, and for a year was preceptor of the 
academy at Dracut, succeeding General Benjamin 
F. Butler in that position. His law studies were 
begun in the office of his brother-in-law, W'illiani 
Whiting, of Boston, and completed at the Harvard 
Law School, from which he graduated in 1845. 
Admitted to the Suffolk bar on the 25th of July 
that year, he became at once associated with Mr. 
Whiting under the firm name of Whiting & Rus- 



sell. This partnership held until the death of 
Mr. Whiting in 1873, the firm occupying for a 
quarter of a century a leading position at the 
bar. From 1862 to 1865, while Mr. Whiting was 
serving as solicitor of the War Department at 
Washington, Mr. Russell conducted the business 
of the firm alone with brilliant success, and at 
that early period in his career was classed with 
the leaders in his profession. After the death of 
Mr. Whiting he formed a partnership with George 
Putnam, son of the late Rev. Dr. George Putnam 
(minister of the First Church of Ro-xbury for 
nearly fifty years), under the firm name of Russell 




WM. C. RUSSELL. 

& Putnam, which association still e.\ists. Al- 
though repeatedly importuned to accept appoint- 
ment to the Supreme Bench, he has steadfastly 
declined ; and he has unhesitatingly refused to 
stand for any elective office, preferring to devote 
himself exclusively to the practice of his profes- 
sion. He has, however, performed all the duties 
of a public-spirited private citizen, and lent his aid 
and influence to movements for the public welfare. 
From 1882 to 1884 he was president of the Bar 
Association of the city of Boston: and he has 
been for several years president of the Social Law- 
Library. He is a member of the Pilgrim Society 
(vice-president'), of the l^nion Club (president 



94 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



1882-84), of the St. Botolph Club, and of the 
University Ckib, Boston; an overseer of Harvard 
College, a director of the Massachusetts Hospital 
Life Insurance Company and of the Mt. Vernon 
National Bank of Boston. He received the de- 
gree of LL.I). from Harvard in 1878. Mr. Rus- 
sell was married October 6, 1847, to Miss Mary 
Ellen Hedge, daughter of Thomas and Lydia (Cof- 
fin) Hedge of Plymouth. They have one son and 
two daughters: Thomas (H. C. 1879, a member 
of the -Suffolk bar, and at present (1894) a repre- 
sentative in the Massachusetts Legislature for 
Ward Two, Boston), Lydia G. Ellen (wife of 
Roger N. Allen, of Boston), and Marion Russell. 
Mr. Russell's summer residence is in Plvmouth. 



SHEPARD, John, senior partner of the Boston 
dry-goods house of Shepard, Norwell & Co., is a 
native of Canton, son of Joim and Lucy (Hunt) 
Shepard, born March 26, 1834. He was edu- 




JOHN SHEPARD. 

cated in the public schools of Pawtucket, R.L, 
finishing in an evening school in Boston. When 
a lad of eleven, he began work here. His first 
place was in a drug store kept by J. W. Snow. 
Two years later he was employed in the dry- 
goods store of J. .'\. Jones, and at nineteen years 



of age was in business for himself. He first es- 
tablished the firm of John Shepard & Co. (in 
1853). Then in 1861, having bought out Bell, 
Thing & Co., at that time established on Tre- 
mont Row, the firm name was changed to Farley 
& Shepard. Under this title the business was 
continued until 1865, when the house of Shepard, 
Norwell & Co., on Winter Street, was founded. 
Its business rapidly developed and extended until 
it became one of the largest and most important 
of the retail dry-goods houses of the city. Mr. 
Shepard is also a director of the Lincoln Bank, of 
the Lamson Store Service Company, and of the 
Connecticut River Paper Company, and president 
of the Burnstein Electric Company. He is a 
member of the Boston Merchants' Association. 
He is an ardent lover of fast trotting horses, and 
has owned some of the most valuable equine 
stock in the country, in raising and driving fine 
horses finding relaxation from the exacting de- 
mands of the business of his house which he has 
brought to such a high standard of honorable 
prosperity. He was married in Boston on the 
ist of January, 1856, to Miss Susan A. Bagley, 
daughter of Perkins H. and Charlotte (White) 
Bagley. They have had a son and a daughter : 
John, Jr. (married Flora E., daughter of General 
A. P. Martin, mayor of Boston in 1884), and 
Jessie Watson (now the wife of William G. Tit- 
comb, son of ex-Mayor Titcomb, of Newburyportj. 
Mr. Shepard's winter residence is on Beacon 
Street, Boston ; and his summer seat is a pictur- 
esque estate known as " Edgewater," on Phillips 
Beach, Swampscott. 



STEVENS, Benj.amin Fr.^nklin, president of 
the New England Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany of Boston, is a native of Boston, born 
March 6, 1824, son of Benjamin and Matilda 
(Sprague) Stevens. He is a descendant on the 
maternal side of Samuel Sprague, one of the 
" Boston Tea Party," and through Joanna Thayer 
Sprague is directly descended from Peregrine 
White, the first white child born in the Massachu- 
setts Bay Colony. He was educated in the Bos- 
ton public schools, graduating from the English 
High School in 1838. From school he at once 
entered business life, and received a thorough 
mercantile training, covering a period of five 
years. Then he became attached to the United 
States frigate "Constitution," the famous "Old 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



95 



Ironsides," as clerk to her commander. Captain 
John Percival, well known in the old navy as 
"Mad lack," — a most fearless seaman and a 




old Boston At/(jx, when that paper was under 
the control of William Schouler and Thomas M. 
Brewer. Mr. Stevens was married in 1850 to 
Miss Catherine, daughter of Ezra Lincoln, sister 
of the late Colonel Ezra Lincoln. He has one 
daughter (now Mrs. H. L. Jordan). 



SWIFT, HE>fRY Walton, chairman of the 
.State Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners, 
was born in New Bedford, December 17, 1849, son 
of William C. N. and Eliza N. (Perry) Swift. He 
is descended from William Swift, who came over 
from England in 1630, was in Watertown in 1634, 
and in 1637 moved to Sandwich; and, on his 
mother's side, from Edward Perry, of Sandwich, 
who married Mary Freeman, and died in 1695. 
r)ther ancestors on his mother's side were William 
Spooner, who died in 1684, and Walter Spooner, 
who was appointed chief justice of the Court of 
Common Pleas by Governor Hancock in 1781; 
Francis Sprague, who came over in the " Ann " 
in 1623; Samuel Sprague, who was born in 1665, 
and married Ruth Alden, grand-daughter of John 



BENJ. F. STEVENS. 



brave officer, — in which he made a cruise around 
the world from 1S43 to 1846. Retiring from this 
service and returning to Boston in April, 1847, 
he was elected secretary of the New England 
Mutual Life Insurance Company of Boston. 
Subsequently, in June, 1864, he was made vice- 
president of the company ; and upon the resigna- 
tion of the Hon. \\'illard Phillips, its president, 
in November, 1S65, was elected to that office, 
which position he has since held. His connec- 
tion with the insurance business has extended 
through forty-seven years ; and he is probably the 
oldest person holding office in that business 
to-day. He is a member of numerous local busi- 
ness organizations, and also of the Algonquin, the 
Union, the Boston Art, and the Athletic clubs. 
In politics he is Republican. He has served 
three terms in the Common Council of Boston, 
and has twice been unanimously elected president 
of the Merchants' Club. He has always taken 
great interest in colonial matters, and has wTitten 
much on old Boston topics for the Saturday Even- 
ing Gazette. In 1847, and for a long time after, 
he was the literary and dramatic writer for the 




H. W. SWIFT. 



Alden and Priscilla Mullens; and Arthur Hath- 
away, who was born in 1627, and married Sarah 
Cooke, grand-daughter of Francis Cooke, who came 



96 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



over in the " Mayflower." Henry W. attained his 
education at the Friends' Academy in New Bed- 
ford, Phillips E.xeter Academy, and Harvard Col- 
lege. He was at Exeter two years, graduating in 
1867; and he graduated from Harvard in 187 1. 
Then he took the Harvard Law School course, 
graduating in 1874, and was admitted to the Suf- 
folk bar the same year. He has since practised 
his profession in Boston, his principal practice 
dealing with the law of corporations. He has 
been associated in a portion of his practice with 
Mr. Russell Gray. In politics Mr. Swift is a 
Democrat, and has taken a leading part in the 
Young Men's Democratic movements in the State. 
In 1882 he served in the lower house of the Leg- 
islature, and before that (in 1879 and i88o) was 
a member of the Boston Common Council, elected 
as a Democrat from the Republican Ward 9 ; and 
he has also been a member of the Boston School 
Board. He was appointed to the Board of Har- 
bor and Land Commissioners by Governor Rus- 
sell in 1 89 1, and was soon after elected its chair- 
man. He is a member of the Union, Somerset, 
and Country clubs, and of the Young Men's 
Democratic Club of Massachusetts. Mr. Swift is 
unmarried. 

TAYLOR, Charles Henry, general manager 
and editor-in-chief of the Boston Globe, was born 
in Charlestown, July 14, 1846, son of John I. and 
Abigail R. (Hapgood) Taylor. He was edu- 
cated in Charlestown public schools, and at the 
age of fifteen went to work, beginning in a Bos- 
ton general printing-oflnce, where he -learned the 
trade of a compositor on the Massachusetts 
Ploughman and the Christian Register, at that 
time "set up"' in the establishment. A year 
later, when employed in the Traveller office, making 
himself useful in the press and mailing rooms, as 
well as the composition-room, he joined the Union 
army for the Civil War, enlisting in the Thirty- 
eighth Massachusetts Regiment, one of the young- 
est recruits in the army. He served in the field 
about a year and a half with General Banks's com- 
mand, until severely wounded in the memorable 
assault on Port Hudson, June 14, 1863. After 
three months in the army hospital at New Orleans, 
he was honorably discharged, and sent home ; and, 
as soon as able, he returned to work. Re-enter- 
ing the Traveller office, after some time spent in 
the composition-room, he was given a position as 
reporter for the paper ; and this was the starting- 



point of his journalistic career. He soon made 
his mark as a quick and intelligent news-gatherer, 
and, mastering the art of shorthand writing, did 
much notable work as a stenographer. While 
connected with the Traveller, he also earned con- 
siderable reputation as a correspondent for out- 
of-town papers, his letters to the New York 
Tribune and the Cincinnati Times especially at- 
tracting attention. He remained with the Trav- 
eller till the opening of 1869, when he was made 
private secretary to Governor William Claflin and 
a member of the governor's military staff with 
the rank of colonel, by which title he has since 
been popularly called, although he is properly 
" general " by virtue of appointment to the 
military staff of Governor William E. Russell in 
i8gi. The position of governor's secretary he 
held for three years, and during this time he con- 
tinued work as a newspaper correspondent. In 
1 87 2 he made a little excursion into politics, and 
was that year elected to the lower house of the 




CHARLES H. TAYLOR. 

Legislature as a representative from Somerville, 
where he had established his residence. The 
following year he was re-elected, receiving, as on 
the first occasion, the unusual honor of being the 
unanimous choice of his fellow-citizens, regard- 
less of party lines. At the opening of the session 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



97 



of 1873 he was made clerk of the house, elected 
by a large majority over William S. Robinson, 
then the widely known IJoston correspondent of 
the Springfield Rcpiihliian over the signature of 
" Warrington," who had held the position for 
many years. In August the same year he was 
offered the position of manager of the Globe, then 
about seventeen months old, and struggling to 
obtain a foothold among the established ISoston 
dailies. Accepting the offer, he relinquished his 
place at the State House, and devoted all his 
energies to the upbuilding of the enterprise. For 
some time it was conducted as a high-class inde- 
pendent paper, with a limited circulation : but, 
upon the reorganization of the enterprise, in the 
spring of 1878, Colonel Taylor, then in full con- 
trol, took a bold new departure, bringing out the 
paper as a two-cent Democratic daily, with the 
higher priced Sunday issue, conducted on popular 
lines, appealing to the many instead of the few. 
Before very long prosperity came to the under- 
taking; and its development in many directions, 
under General Taylor's skilful conduct, was rapid. 
Among the novelties in IJoston journalism which 
General Taylor has grafted to some extent upon 
it, through his paper, are to be reckoned the reg- 
ular illustration of news articles, political cartoons, 
serial stories, and "signed editorials." General 
Taylor belongs to a number of social organizations, 
among them the Algonquin and Press clubs of 
Boston. He 'was married February 7, 1866, to 
Miss Georgiana O. Davis, daughter of George W. 
Davis, of Charlestown. They have five children : 
Charles H., Jr. (now business manager of the 
Globe), William O., John I., Elizabeth, and Grace 
Lincoln Taylor. Since 1880 General Taylor has 
resided in Boston. 



THORNDIKE, Samuel Lothrop, member of 
the Suffolk bar, was born in Beverly, December 
28, 1829, son of .Vlbert and Joanna Batchelder 
(Lovett) Thorndike. His earliest ancestor in 
America was John Thorndike, of a Lincolnshire 
family, who came to New England in 1633, and 
in 1636 settled in that part of Salem which is 
now Beverly. His early education was ac- 
quired in the Beverly Academy and the Boston 
Latin School, where he was fitted for college. 
He entered Harvard in the class of 1852, gradu- 
ating in due course, and then attended the Har- 
vard Law School, from which he graduated in 



1854. His law study was completed in the Bos- 
ton office of the late Sidney Bartlett, and he was 
admitted to the Suffolk bar in 1855. For a while 
he was an assistant in the office of Rufus t'hoate ; 
and later, in 1861, he became a business associ- 
ate of William II. Gardiner, which relation con- 



% '-• 


^■- ^k 


^Hr 


, ^^ 


■ '^ 



S. LOTHROP THORNDIKE. 

tinned until Mr. Gardiner's death, in 1882. He 
has been engaged mainly in trust and probate 
business, and the management of estates and 
corporations. He was register in bankruptcy 
under the United States law of 1867. He has 
been a director in many railroad and manufactur- 
ing companies and other corporations. He has 
always been much interested in musical matters, 
and has at various times been an officer of the 
Handel and Haydn Society, the Harvard Musi- 
cal Association, the Boston Music Hall, the New 
England Conservatory of Music, and the Cecilia. 
He is one of the vice-presidents of the L'nion 
Club, a member also of the St. Botolph, Tavern, 
and Examiner clubs, a member of the Colonial 
Society of Massachusetts, president of the Old 
Cambridge Shakspere Association, trustee of the 
Perkins Institution for the Blind, and is connected 
with various Masonic bodies. In politics he is 
a Republican. His first vote was for the Whig 
partv. but since 1856 he has regularly voted the 



98 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Republican ticket. Mr. Thorndike was manied 
November 2, i<S59, to Miss Anna Lamb Wells, 
daughter of Chief Justice Daniel Wells, of the old 
Court of Common Pleas. They have two sons 
and one daughter: Albert (H.U. 1881), Sturgis 
Hooper (H.U. 1890), and Mary Duncan I'horn- 
dike. 



TOPPAN, Roland Wor rumcruN-, president 
of the Arkwright Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, was born in Newburyport, November 9, 
1 84 1, son of Edward and Susin L. (.Smith) 'I'op- 
pan. He is a lineal descendant of Abraham Top- 




R. W. TOPPAN. 

pan, the first of the name in America, who came 
from England, and settled in Newburyport in 
1638. The Smiths from whom his mother de- 
scended settled ni West Newbury about the same 
time. His education was acquired in the public 
schools of Newburyport. With the exception of 
about a year spent in the ice business in Havana, 
Cuba, his active business life has been devoted 
to the insurance business, both stock and mutual. 
He spent about six years in two of the largest 
agencies of stock insurance companies, and later 
was connected with the lioston Manufactures 
Mutual Eire Insurance Company for about fifteen 
years. In 1S89 he was elected president of the 



Mill Owners' Mutual Eire Insurance Company, 
and president of the .Arkwright Mutual Eire In- 
surance Company in June, i8gi, when the busi- 
ness of the Mill Owners' Company was consoli- 
dated with that of the Arkwright, the name of the 
latter being retained. The Mill Owners' Com- 
pany ceased to do business, and was dissolved by 
the court. He has also been president of the 
Paper Mill Insurance Company since June. 1889. 
In politics he is an Independent. He has held no 
offices, civil, political, or social, and is not con- 
nected with any society or club, preferring to 
devote himself entirely to his business pursuits. 
He was married in October, 1870, to Miss Eliza- 
beth Lesley, daughter of Edward and Sarah 
( Frothingham) Lesley. They have one child : 
Roland Lesley Toppan. Mr. Toppan's present 
residence is in Maiden. 



UNDERWOOD, Herbert Shapleigh, manag- 
ing editor of the Boston Evening Record and the 
Daily Advertiser, is a native of New York, born 
in Eort Edward, June 5, 1861, son of Jarvis A. 
and Eunice K. (Shapleigh) Underwood. He is 
of the New York branch of Underwoods, which 
reach back to the second of the three brothers 
who came to America from England about the 
year 1650. On his mother's side he is also of 
English stock, both through the Shapleighs and 
Wentworths. He was prepared for college in the 
academy at Glens Falls, N.Y., to which place his 
father removed when he was ten years old, and 
was graduated from Williams in the class of 1883 
with Phi Beta Kappa honors. In college he was 
first associate editor, then editor-in-chief, of the 
Argo, a bi-weekly, which stood in the first rank of 
college journalism when this form of literary 
effort was in what is generally termed its most 
brilliant period, writing much light verse and a 
number of satires on college life for that paper. 
Immediately after graduation, in July, 1883, he 
began work for the Amsterdam (N.\'.) Demoeraf 
(Republican) in all the various directions that 
occupy a subordinate on a small local paper, and 
later became city editor. In December, 1884, he 
joined the staff of the Springfield Republican, and 
in that o.lice did successively New England news 
editing, writing of special articles and of minor 
editorial comment. In January, 1886, he was sent 
to Boston, where he wrote the Republican's legisla- 
tive reports and Boston notes on State politics 



MEN OF I'R()(;KESS. 



99 



until tlic end of that year's session of tlie Legis- 
lature in July. At that time lie was selected by 
Hon. William E. Barrett, who had become the 
managing editor of the Boston Ailvcrtiser and the 
Record, to cover the political news for those 
papers ; and with this work his service on them 
began. In December of the same year he was 
made Washington correspondent of the two 
papers ; and at the capital he was admitted to 
confidential relations by many leading men, espe- 
cially the New England senators and representa- 
tives. During the recess of Congress in 1887 
he did a large range of special writing for both 



March 



^^il^ w;^s the third son of .Mather 




HERBERT S. UNDERWOOD. 

papers, in the home office originating and carry- 
ing out for several months the ''Seen and Heard'' 
column, which became a leading feature of the 
Record. In August, 1888, just after his return 
from the two national conventions, he was recalled 
to Boston (Mr. Barrett having become publisher), 
and was made managing editor of both papers, 
which position he has held since. He is a mem- 
ber of the Republican, Episcopalian, and Univer- 
sity clubs, and was one of the " committee of 
eighteen " which organized the last named. 



WARREN, \\'iLLi.Aii Fairfield, president of 
Boston University, Boston, born in Williamsburg 



and .\nne Miller (Fairfield) Warren. As a direct 
descendant of the original immigrant, William 
Warren, of Ro.xbury, whose son married Su- 
sannah Mather, his genealogical line goes back 
to the beginning of New England history. 
Through his father's mother he is directly de- 
scended from Elder John White, the associate 
of Hooker, and through his own mother from 
Captain Samuel Fairfield, of Connecticut. His 
father's father was Cotton Mather Warren. 
Bishop Henry White Warren is an older brother. 
William F. was graduated from Wesleyan Univer- 
sity in 1853. In 1855 '^"'^' ■''^5''' 'i^-' ^^■'^■'* i" charge 
of a church in Andover. and from 1856 to 1858 
studied in Berlin, Halle, and Rome. He trav- 
elled in Greece, Egypt, Palestine, and other parts, 
residing in all over seven years abroad. In 
1859-60 he was pastor of the Bromfieid Street 
Methodist Episcopal Church, Boston: from 1861 
to 1866 was professor of syste)iiatic theology in 
the Missions-anstalt, Bremen, Cermany ; from 
186G to 1873 professor of systematic theology 
in the Boston Theological Seminary, and acting 
president of the institution; and in 1873, upon 
the foundation of Boston University, he was made 
its president, and professor of comparative his- 
tory of religion, comparative theology, and the 
philosophy of religion, which positions he has 
held from that time to the present. Among the 
more significant features of Dr. Warren's life- 
work thus far may be named : a new presentation 
of confessional theology to the theologians of 
Germany ; the reorganization of the oldest theo- 
logical seminary of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church ; the organization of Boston University ; 
a reconstruction of ancient cosmology and mythi- 
cal geography, particularly the Homeric ; the dis- 
covery, as many believe, of the cradle of the 
human race; and the promotion of international 
university co-operation in advancing the highest 
as well as the broadest educational ideals. Presi- 
dent \^■arren has been a copious writer, the titles 
of his publications filling nearly four octavo pages 
of the •' .Vlumni Record " of his Alma Mater. In 
his earlier years he published miscellaneous trans- 
lations, poetic and other, from the Spanish, (Ger- 
man, Dutch, and Latin languages. The last 
twenty-five years he has annually published one 
or more educational reports, in wiiicli the living 
issues of the day are more or less fully discussed. 
In the successive volumes of the " Boston Uni- 



lOO 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



versity ^'ear ]!ook" he h;^s also printed not a few 
educational, scientific, and professional essays. 
At the same time he has contributed annually, 
more or less freely, to the scholarly periodical 
press. Six of his publications were written and 
printed in the German language. Of these the 
more important were : Anfangsgrundc der I.ogik 
(1863); Ein/citiiiig in die sysfemafisc/ic Tlicidogic 
(1865); and Vcrsiic/i ciner iwticn cncyklopaedisiiicn 
Einrichtiing mid Darstcllimg dcr thcidogischcn IVis- 
scnschaftcn (1867). The followmg are some of 
his essays and addresses, with the year of their 
issue: " De Reprobatione " (1867); "Systems of 




WM. F. WARREN. 

Ministerial Education" (1872); '• 'I'he Christian 
Consciousness" (1872); "American Infidelity" 
(1874); "The Taxation of Colleges, Churches, and 
Hospitals : Tax Exemption the Road to Tax Abo- 
lition " (1876); "The Gateways to the Learned 
Professions" (1877); "Review of Twenty Argu- 
ments employed in Opposition to the Opening of 
the Boston Latin School to Girls " (1877); "The 
Liberation of Learning in England" (1878); 
"Joint and Disjoint Education in the Public 
Schools" (1879); "Hopeful Symptoms in Medical 
Education" (1880); "New England Theology" 
(188 1); "True Key to Ancient Cosmology and 
Mythical Geography" (1882); "Homer's Abode 



of the Dead" (1883); "All Roads lead to 
Thule" (1886); "The Quest of the Perfect Re- 
ligion" (1887): "The True Celebration of the 
Four Hundredtli Anniversary of the Discovery of 
America by Columbus" (1888); "The Cry of 
the Soul: a Baccalaureate Address" (1888); "The 
Gates of Sunrise in Babylonian and P^gyptian 
Mythology" (1889); "Phillips Brooks and Edu- 
cation" (1893); "Origin and Progress of Bo.s- 
ton L'niversity" (1893). His elaborate study of 
the pre-historic world, entitled " Paradise Found : 
the Cradle of the Human Race at the North 
Pole," published in 18S5, quickly reached its 
eighth edition. A smaller book, entitled " In the 
Footsteps of Arminius, — a Delightsome Pilgrim- 
age," was issued in 1888 ; another, "The Story of 
Gottlieb," a study of ideals, in 1891. President 
\\'arren married Miss Harriet C. Merrick, daughter 
of John M. and Mary J. Merrick, .\pril 14, 1861. 
Their children are four: Mary Christine, Will- 
iam Marshall, Annie Merrick, and Winifred War- 
ren. For twenty years, until her widely lamented 
death, January 7, 1893, Mrs. Warren edited the 
Heathen JVcnieii't Friend, a missionary magazine 
for women, which had a wider circulation than 
any other of its class in the world. A part of the 
time she edited a German issue under the same 
name. In the founding and management of the 
Massachusetts Society for the L^niversity Educa- 
tion of Women she also bore a prominent part. 



WELLS, Samuel, member of the Suffolk bar, 
and connected with scientific and philanthropic 
societies, is a native of Hallowell, Me., born Sep- 
tember 9, 1836. His father, Samuel Wells, was 
judge of the Supreme Judicial Court of Maine 
from 1848 to 1852, and governor of that State in 
1855 ; and his mother, Louisa Ann (Appleton) 
Wells, was a daughter of Dr, Moses Appleton, of 
Waterville, Me. He received his early education 
and training for college in a private school in Port- 
land, Me., kept by Mr. Forbush, and entered Har- 
vard College in the class of 1857, which included 
a number of young men who in after years became 
leading members of the bar. After graduating he 
studied law in his father's office in Boston, and on 
the i8th of December, 1858, was admitted to the 
Suffolk bar. For about ten years he was associ- 
ated with his father in the practice of his profes- 
sion ; and then in 187 1 he formed a partnership 
with the late Edward Bangs, under the name of 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



lOI 



Bangs & Wells, for tiic transaction of general law 
business. In liis professional work in later years 
Mr. Wells has given more attention to the man- 
agement of trusts and corporations and office 
practice than to litigation. For many years also 
he has been connected as director and officer 
with various corporations, and is now second vice- 
president, counsel, and a director of the John 
Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company, presi- 
dent of the State Street Exchange, and one of the 
trustees of the Boston Real Estate Trust. He 
has long been concerned in philanthropic work, 
and interested in reform movements, social and 




SAMUEL WELLS. 

political. He is a member of the general com- 
mittee of the Citizens' Association of Boston, a 
member of the Civil Service Reform Associa- 
tion and of the Tariff Reform League ; a vice- 
president of the Boston Society of Natural His- 
tory ; one of the trustees of the Boston Young 
Men's Christian Union, and of the Women's 
Educational and Industrial Union : member of 
the American Association for the Advancement 
of Science, of the Bunker Hill Monument Asso- 
ciation, of the Boston Memorial Association, 
of the Massachusetts Charitable Fire Society, 
of the New England Historic Genealogical So- 
ciety, of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 



and of the Bostonian Society. Among otiier or- 
ganizations to which he belongs are the Union, St. 
Botolph, Boston An, E.\change, L'nitarian, and 
Papyrus clubs of lioston, and the University Club 
of New York. He is prominent also in the Ma- 
sonic order, and from 1889 to 1892 was grand 
master of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts. 
He has made a special study of the use of the mi- 
croscope, and was one of the first in tiiis country 
to use that instrument in photography. He has 
made a large collection of the Diatomacea; and 
the literature concerning that interesting grou|) to 
which he has contributed occasional papers. Mr. 
Wells was married on June 11, 1863, to .Miss 
Catherine Boott (iannett, daughter of Ezra Stiles 
Gannett, D.D., long pastor of the .Arlington Street 
Church, formerly the Federal Street Church. 
They have three children : Stiles Gannett, now 
associated with his father in law practice ; Sam- 
uel, Jr., now with the John Hancock Mutual Life 
Insurance Company; and Louisa .\ppleton Wells. 



WHITING, Fred Erwin, assistant business 
manager of the Boston Herald, is a native of 
Brookline, born December 21, 1857, son of 
George Frederick and Harriet Louisa (Learned) 
Whiting. He is a lineal descendant of Nathan- 
iel Whiting, of Dedham, who married Hannah 
White, daughter of John White, in 1643. Na- 
thaniel and Hannah Whiting had twelve chil- 
dren. The youngest, Jonathan, married Rachel 
Thorp in 1689; and they had ten children. One 
of the sons, Ithamar, married Mary Day in 1765. 
Their son, Ezek, married Lydia Goodridge in 
1797; Ezek and Lydia's son, Charles Horace, 
married Plooma S. Barnard in 1825 ; and their 
son, George F., one of seven children, was the 
father of Fred E. Mr. Whiting received his 
early educational training in private schools and 
the Cambridge High School, and, entering Har- 
vard, graduated in the class of 1880. For a 
year after graduation he was connected with the 
Boston Knob Company, of which his father was 
president. He then became the private secretary 
of the late R. M. Pulsifer, at that time the busi- 
ness manager of the Herald. \\'hile serving in 
this capacity he was called to the oversight of a 
number of outside interests in which Mr. Pulsifer 
was concerned, especially when the latter was 
abroad, in which he displayed marked ability. 
Subsequently, in .March, 1888, he was admitted- 



I02 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



to a partnership in the lirm of R. M. Pulsifer & (Andrews) \MUard. His father was some time 
Co., which then owned and published the Herald : librarian, and professor of Oriental languages and 
and in May the same year, when the Herald prop- Latin in Harvard College ; his grandfather, Jo- 
seph W'illard, was president of the college from 
1 78 1 to 1804; and his great-great-grandfather, 
Samuel Willard, was "vice-president," acting as 
president from 1701 to 1707, at the same time 
minister of the Old South Church in Boston. On 
the maternal side his great-great-grandmother was 
Anne (Dudley) Bradstreet, wife of (Governor 
Simcin Bradstreet. His early education was ac- 
quired in the \\'estford Academy and tiie Cam- 
bridge Latin School, and he was prepared for 
college under the tuition at different times of 
James Freeman Clarke and Ralph Waldo Emer- 
son. He did not, however, enter college, but 
instead went to sea. Returning in 1S38, after 
eight years' absence, he resumed his studies under 
his father, who had resigned his professorship at 
Harvard. In 1846 he entered the office of the 
clerk of the Courts of Common Pleas, then exist- 
ing; and two years later to his duties as an assist- 
ant to the clerk here were added those of a 
deputy sheriti: under Sheriff Joseph Eveleth. 




FRED E. WHITING. 



erty was transferred to the Boston Herald Com- 
pany, he became a member of the new organiza- 
tion. He was made clerk of the corporation and 
a director, and also assistant business manager 
of the paper, which position he has since held. 
He is also a director of the Hotel & Railroad 
News Company and of the 'I'uxpan Oil Company. 
He is a life member of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Union ; a member of the order of Free 
Masons ; member of the Press Club (president 
1893-94), the University Club, and the Athletic 
Club of Boston, of the Newton Club of Newton, 
and of several of the leading yacht clubs. Mr. 
Whiting was married in Cambridge, October lo, 
1883, to Miss Amy Estelle Ferguson, daughter of 
Thomas T. and Clara ( )phelia ( Rolfe) Ferguson, 
a lineal descendant of Captain Rolfe who married 
Pocahontas. They have two children : Royal 
Goodridge and Philip l''.rwin \\'hiting. 




JOSEPH A. WILLARD. 



WILL.ARD, Joseph Augustu.s, clerk of the In 1854 he was admitted to the Suffolk bar, and 
Superior Court, was born in Cambridge, Septem- the following year was made assistant clerk of the 
ber 29, 1816, son of Sidney and Elizabeth court then known as the Superior Court of the 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



lO' 



County of Suffolk, the Court of Common Pleas 
for Suffolk being abolished. Four jx-ars later, 
upon the establishment of the present Superior 
Court of the Commonwealth, he was appointed 
assistant clerk of that court; and in 1865 he was 
appointed clerk by the court to fill a vacancy 
caused by the death of the clerk. At the next 
regular election he was elected to the position 
for tlie full term of five years, and has been re- 
elected every term since. Mr. W'illard is a promi- 
nent member of the Masonic order, and of the 
Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company. He 
was married .September 5. 1841, in Cambridge, to 
Miss Penelope Cochran, a great-grand-daughter of 
Mary Faneuil, a sister of Peter Faneuil. They 
have had six children : Flizabeth Anne, Kdward 
Augustus, Mary Mitchell, Penelope Frances, Sid- 
ney Faneuil, and Fdith (iertrude W'illard. His 
term expires in January, 1S97 ; and, should he live 
until March, 1896, he will then have been con- 
nected with the courts in his several capacities 
for fifty years. 



WOLCOTT, Roger, lieutenant governor of the 
State, 1893-94, was born in Boston, July 13, 1847, 
son of J. Huntington and Cornelia (Frothingham) 
Wolcott. He is a descendant of the Roger Wol- 
cott who was second in conunand in the expedi- 
tion of Sir William Pepperrell against Cape Bre- 
ton in 1745, which resulted in the capture of 
Loui.sburg. Another ancestor was Oliver Wolcott, 
one of the signers of the Declaration of Indepen- 
dence, who fought in the Revolutionary army 
against Burgoyne, and was brigadier-general on 
the battlefield of Saratoga. Both of these W'ol- 
cotts were governors of Connecticut. One of 
his ancestors, on his mother's side, was active 
and prominent during the Revolutionary period 
as a member of the Charlestown Committee of 
Safety, and another took part in the Boston Tea 
Party. Roger Wolcott was educated in Boston 
private schools and at Harvard College, from 
which he graduated in the class of 1870. In col- 
lege he ranked well, and was the choice of his 
classmates for class orator. During 1871-72 he 
was a tutor at Harvard, while taking the course 
of the Law School. (Graduating therefrom in 
1874, he was admitted to the Suffolk bar in the 
same year. He has, however, practised his pro- 
fession but little, his time having been largely 
occupied by his duties as trustee of \-arious es- 



tates and in the management of financial matters. 
Mr. Wolcott's public career began as a member 
of the Boston Common Council, in which he 
served three terms ( 1877-78-79). Then in 1882 
he was elected to the lower house of the Legisla- 
liu'e. Here also, througii repeated re-elections, he 
serx'ed three terms (1882-83-84), early taking a 
position among the leaders and w'inning distinc- 
tion as a hard and trustworthy worker. In 189 1 
he was made president of the Young Men's Re- 
publican ('lub, that year organized. The following 
year he was nominated to the lieutenant governor- 
ship on the Re]3ublican State ticket, and in the 




ROGER WOLCOTT. 

November election was elected with the Demo- 
cratic candidate for the governorship, William F. 
Russell. In 1893 he was renominated, and this 
time returned with the election of the entire Re- 
publican ticket. Mr. Wolcott has always been a 
Republican ; but in the campaign of 1884 he 
opposed his party's candidate for the presidency, 
and voted for Grover Cleveland. On other occa- 
sions he has displayed an independent spirit, both 
in public speech and action. He belongs to a 
number of reform organizations, among others the 
Boston Citizens' .Association and the Civil Ser- 
vice Reform Association : is a trustee of the Mas- 
sachusetts General Hospital, and an overseer of 



104 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Harvard University. He is also a member of the 
St. Botolph, Somerset, Union, Athletic, and New 
Riding clubs of Boston. Mr. Wolcott was married 
in Boston, September 2, 1874,10 Miss Edith Pres- 
cott, grand-daughter of William H. Prescott, the 
historian, and great-grand-daughter of Colonel 
William Prescott, who commanded the provin- 
cials at the Battle of Bunker Hill. The)' have 
foiu' sons and one daughter now living. 



WOODBURY, Charles Levi, member of the 
Suffolk bar for nearl}- half a century, is a native 
of Portsmouth, N.H., descendant of the earliest 




y^*^^- 



CHARLES LEVI WOODBURY. 

settlers of Cape Ann. He was born on May 22, 
1820, son of Levi and Elizabeth Williams (Clapp) 
Woodbury. His father was an eminent practi- 
tioner at the New Hampshire bar, contemporary 
of Mason, Webster, Bartlett, and Fletcher, also 
judge, governor, senator, Secretary of the Navy, 
Secretary of the Treasury, and justice of the Su- 
preme Court ; and his mother was daughter of the 
Hon. Asa and Eliza Wendell iQuincy) Clapp, of 
Portland, Me. In the direct line Mr. Woodbury 
traces to John Woodbury, an old planter who set- 
tled at Cape Ann 1623-24, and at Nahunikeik, 
now Salem, 1626-27. His other ancestral lines 
all trace to settlers of Massachusetts, Plymouth, 



and New York before 1650. He was educated in 
Washington, D.C., the family moving to that city 
when he was a lad of eleven, and studied law 
there in the offices of the Attorney-General of the 
United States, the Hon. Benjamin F. Butler, of 
New York, and in that of Richard S. Coxe. He 
was admitted to the bar in the District, and there 
began practice. Moving in 1840 to Alabama, he 
practised in that State for about four years from 
the following May, 184T, and came to Boston in 
1845, where he has ever since been established. 
For years his practice has chiefly been in the 
Circuit Courts of the United States and the Su- 
preme Court at Washington, where, as in Boston, 
he has long been a familiar figure. He is recog- 
nized as one of the ablest expounders of constitu- 
tional law and an authorit\' on international law, 
and his contributions to legal literature have been 
important. He was one of the compilers of 
"Woodbury and Minot's Reports," three volumes, 
editor of the second and third volumes of " Ijcvi 
Woodbury's Writings." and author of pamphlets 
on the fisheries question, and treating other ques- 
tions involving the diplomatic relations between 
the United States and (jreat Britain. He also 
has delivered several orations on subjects of 
Masonic liistory. In politics he has been a life- 
long Democrat, devoted to the principles of Jeffer- 
son and Jackson, with the latter of whom he was 
personally acquainted, from early manhood a 
leader in his party, holding foremost positions in 
Democratic organizations, national and State. 
But he has never aspired to office, and has held 
few public stations. In 1853 the mission to 
Bolivia was tendered to him by President Pierce 
(who had been a law student in his father's office), 
but this he declined. In 1857 he was elected to 
the lower house of the New Hampshire Legislat- 
ure, as a member from Portsmouth. The same 
year he was appointed I'nited States district attor- 
ney for Massachusetts; and in 1870 and 1871 he 
was a member of the lower house of the Legislat- 
ure of this State, from Boston. Mr. Woodbury is 
an authority on antiquarian, historical, and Ma- 
sonic, as well as legal subjects. He is a member 
of the New England Historic Genealogical So- 
ciety, an honorary member of the Historical 
societies of New Hampshire and Maine, and 
prominent in Masonic organizations. He has 
held high office in the York and Scottish Rites, 
and is now second officer in the Supreme Coun- 
cil of the latter body. He is also a member of 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



105 



the Board of Trustees for the Grand Lod<;e of 
Massachusetts, and of the board for the Supreme 
Council. Mr. \\'oodl)ur\- never married. 



WOODS, Edwin Hutton, business manager 
of the lioston Hcfahi and president of the corpo- 
ration, is a native of Boston, born October 6, 
1843, son of John and Aliby Ann (Fessenden) 
Woods. He received a common-school educa- 
tion, supplemented by a course in Comer's Com- 
mercial College, and at fourteen was at work. He 
began active life as clerk in a hardware store, — 
that of Allen & Noble, then well known in Boston ; 
and here he remained until 1862, when he enlisted 
in the Fortieth Regiment, Massachusetts Volun- 
teers, and, as sergeant of Company B, went to the 
front. On September 11, the same year, while on 
the march to Miner's Hill, Va., he received a se- 
vere sun-stroke, which caused a partial paralysis 
of the lower limbs, and so disabled him that in the 
following spring of 1863 he was discharged from 
the army. Then, returning to Boston in Septem- 
ber of that year, he found a place in the count- 
ing-room of the Herald as book-keeper in the 
circulating department ; and since that time he 
has been closely identified with the business in- 
terests of the paper. To his energy and genius 
the development and expansion of the Hcrahl's 
circulation are in no small degree due. When he 
began his work in this department, it was the cus- 
tom of the office to sell the Sunday edition of the 
Herald to three wholesale dealers m Boston, who 
supplied the retail dealers. This, at his sugges- 
tion, was soon changed, and the retailers served 
direct from the office for cash over the counter, to 
the profit and advantage of all concerned. Sub- 
sequently he introduced the ticket plan, under 
which dealers are sold tickets in small or large 
quantities, which they exchange for papers in the 
delivery room, no cash there being received. Mr. 
Woods was the first in Boston to adopt this sys- 
tem : and it worked so well in the Herald office, 
effecting a saving of time, trouble, and expense, 
that its use soon became general in lioston news- 
paper offices. He was also the first to estab- 
lish the system of running special Sunday trains 
throughout New England for the prompt and thor- 
ough distribution of the Sunday Herald. In 1888 
Mr. Woods became a partner of the firm of R. M. 
I'ulsifer & Co., then proprietors of the Herald. 
admitted on tlie ist of March; and on Mav ist, 



the same year, when the firm was changed to a 
corporation, under the title of the " Boston Herald 
Company," he became one of tlie principal holders 
of stock, and was elected vice-president and liusi- 
ness manager. Four months later he was made 
president and business manager, the position he 
still holds. He is now president of the Boston 
Publishers' Association, vice-president of the 
American Newspaper Publishers' Association, and 
director of the Boston Hotel and Railroad News 
Company, of which he was vice-president for sev- 
eral years, and one of the original promoters. He 
is a member of Joseph Warren Lodge of Free 
Masons ; is a charter member of Post 7, Grand 




E. H. WOODS. 

Armv, in which he has held all the offices in suc- 
cession to that of commander ; and a member of 
the Algonquin and Press clubs in Boston, and of 
the Hull Yacht Club. For three years he was 
first lieutenant of Company E. Seventh Regiment, 
Massachusetts Volunteer Militia; and in 1889 he 
was appointed assistant adjutant-general, with the 
rank of colonel, on the staff of Governor Ames. 
For three terms (1873-75) he represented \\'ard 
8 in the lioston Common Council. Colonel 
Woods was married in Boston, August 20, 1868, 
to Miss Mary Francis Smith, daughter of Pardon 
and Mary (Parkinson I Smitli, They have two 
children : Walter Hutton and Fred Lester Woods. 



io6 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



WOOLF, Benjamin Edward, editor of the 
Boston Scititn/ay Evening Gazette, was born in 
London, England, February i6, 1836. He is of 
Jewisli ancestry. His father, Edward Woolf, was 
a musician, artist, and litte'rateur of repute in Lon- 
don before his removal to this country in 1839, 
when the son was but three years old, and here 
became one of the best known orchestra leaders 
of his time, conductor for many years of the or- 
chestra at Barton's theatres and Mitchell's ( )lym- 
pic in New York, and the author of a large num- 
ber of musical compositions. The elder Woolf 
was also one of the founders of Jud\\ which was 




BENJ^ E. WOOLF. 

among the earliest of the comic weeklies in New 
\'ork, making most of the sketches for it himself, 
and writing a large portion of the letter-press. It 
was a clever venture, but ahead of the times, and 
unprofitable. Benjamin E). was the eldest of a re- 
markable family of brothers, among them M. A. 
Woolf, the widely known caricaturist and painter, 
Professor Solomon Woolf, instructor of mathe- 
matics in the College of the City of New York, 
also an artist and critic, and .Albert Woolf, an ar- 
tist and a well-known electrician. He was edu- 
cated in the New York public schools, and early 
trained in music, especially orchestral, by his 
father. He was also well instructed in the art of 



wood engraving. Coming to Boston as a young 
man in 1S59, he shortly after joined the orchestra 
at the Boston Museum under the late Julius Eich- 
berg, and while here made his first notable venture 
in dramatic writing in the te.xt of the operetta 
"The Doctor of Alcantara," the music of which 
was composed by Mr. Eichberg. This was suc- 
cessfully produced on the Museum stage, and sub- 
sequently became a favorite feature in the reper- 
tories of travelling companies. A long series of 
plays and adaptations from Mr. Woolf's pen fol- 
lowed this first production, the most popular 
among the number being "The Mighty Dollar," 
for many seasons the leading card of the Flor- 
ences, through whom "the Honorable Bradwell 
Slote " and " Mrs. Gilfiory " became intimate 
friends of countless theatre-goers. His operetta 
of " Pounce & Co.," of which he wrote both te.xt 
and music, was another notable composition ; and 
its first production at the Bijou Theatre, during 
the season of 1882-83, o" which occasion the au- 
thor led the orchestra, was a brilliant afTair. Al- 
together he has written over sixty plays and six 
operas. In 1864 Mr. Woolf left Boston to 
assume the leadership of the orchestra of the 
Chestnut .Street Theatre, Philadelphia. After 
two seasons there he went to New Orleans to 
lead the Gravier Street Theatre. He returned 
North in 1871, and received a call from the late 
Colonel Henry J. Parker, then the conductor of 
the Satiinhiy Evoiiiig Gazette, to join its staff. 
Accepting, he returned to Boston, and then began 
his long service as a leading critical writer, deal- 
ing especially with music and the drama. With 
tile exception of a brief connection with the Bos- 
ton Globe, covering its first eighteen months 
(1872-73), as musical and dramatic critic, Mr. 
Woolf's entire journalistic career has been spent 
in the service of the Gazette : and his critical work 
early gave that paper a high standing in this par- 
ticular field. He became the chief editor upon 
the death of Colonel Parker, which occurred on 
May 13, 1892. Besides his work as a playwright 
and musical composer, he has published a series 
of parodies of leading poets, under the name of 
" Our Prize Album,'' written numerous sketches, 
and has been a frequent contributor to various 
magazines. Mr. Woolf was married .April 15, 
1867, to Miss Josephine Orton, a favorite mem- 
ber of the Museum stock company from i860 to 
the time of her marriage, when she retired from 
the stage. They have no children. 



PART II. 



ABBO'l'T, JosiAH ("jArdner, lawyer, jurist, ;ind 
statesman, was born in Chelmsford, November i, 
1814, son of Caleb and Mercy (Fletcher) Abbott; 
died at his country seat, Wellesley Hills, June 2, 
189 [. He was a descendant on both sides of 
English Puritans : in the seventh generation from 
George Abbott, of Yorkshire, who migrated to 
Massachusetts in 1640. and was a first settler of 
Andover ; and from \\'il!iam Fletcher, of Devon- 
shire, a first settler of Chelmsford in 1653, who 
owned a large part of the territory which in 1826 
was incorporated as the town of Lowell. Both of 
his grandfathers fought under Prescott at Bunker 
Hill, and were in the War of Independence. His 
father was a country merchant at Chelmsford 
Centre. He attended a classical school at 
Chelmsford, where lie was fitted for college, his 
excellent teachers being Ralph Waldo Emerson, 
the Rev. Abiel Abbott, D.I)., and Cranmore Wal- 
lace successively. He entered Harvard in 1828, 
and graduated with distinction in 1832, the young- 
est of his class. For a time thereafter he taught 
the Fitchburg Academy. He studied law first 
with Joel Adams of Chelmsford, and then under 
Nathaniel Wright of Lowell, and, admitted to the 
bar in January, 1837, began practice at Lowell in 
partnership with Amos Spaulding. The same 
year he served in the House of Representatives, 
the youngest member of that body. In 1840 he 
edited the Lowell Aih'crtiscr, a Democratic tri- 
weekly journal, with ability and vigor, giving it 
a decided literary as well as political fiavor ; and 
at the same time delivered occasional lyceum 
lectures. In 1842, having some time previously 
dissolved the connection with Mr. Spaulding, he 
formed a copartnership with Samuel A. Brown, 
which continued till his elevation to the bench in 
1855. In 1842 and 1843 he was a State senator 
for Middlesex, in his second term serving as chair- 
man of the committees on the judiciary and on rail- 
roads. In 1843, also, he was attached to Governor 
Morton's staff as senior aide-de-camp. In 1850 



he was aiipoinled master in chancery, and served 
as such for five years. In 1853 he was a delegate 
from Lowell in the Constitutional Convention, in 
which he advocated an elective judiciary, and 
making the jury judges of law as well as of fact 
in criminal cases. In 1855 he was appointed a 
justice of the Superior Court for the county of 
Suffolk, that year established. This position he- 
held till the first of January, 1858, when he re- 
signed to re-enter practice and enjoy its profits. 
In 1859 he was chosen one of the overseers of 
Harvard College, and in this office continued six 
years, when he was dropped from the board be- 
cause of being a Democrat. In i860 he was 
offered a place on the Supreme Bench, but de- 
clined it, unwilling to relinquish his profitable and 
important practice. In 186 1 he removed from 
Lowell to Boston, and from that time till his death 
he was among the leaders of the Suftolk bar. 
During the Civil War, from the first shot to the 
last, he gave his voice, purse, and pen to the Union 
cause. Three of his sons rendered distinguished 
services as officers in the Union army, and two 
of them perished in the struggle. Captain and 
Brevet-major Edward G. Abbott, the eldest son. fell 
at Cedar Mountain, August 9, 1862; Major and 
Brevet-brigadier General Henry L. Abbott, in the 
Wilderness, while gallantly leading his regiment. 
In 1874 Judge Abbott was elected a representa- 
tive in Congress ; but, his seat being contested, he 
was not admitted till near the close of the first 
session in the early part of 1877. He was made 
a member of the special committee sent to South 
Carolina to inquire into the alleged irregularities 
attending the presidential election of 1876 in that 
State, and prepared the committee's report. He 
opposed the bill creating the Electoral Commission, 
which was introduced during his absence from 
Washington and without his knowledge : but 
after it had been proposed by the Democrats, 
accepted by the Republicans, and enacted, he felt 
it to be his duty to see that its provisions were 



io8 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



carried out. As originally planned, one place on 
the commission was to be filled by one of the 
Democratic representatives from New York who 
had been longest in Congressional life. But New 
York had two candidates for this place, Fernando 
Wood and Samuel S. Cox ; and, neither being 
altogether satisfactory, friends of Judge Abbott, 
without his knowledge, resolved to propose his 
name to the Democratic Congressional caucus. 
This was done with the warm approval of Speaker 
Randall, and he was selected. He was accorded 
the leadership of the Democratic minority of the 
commission, and opposed the decisions of the 




J. G. ABBOTT. 

majority in the four contested States, — Florida, 
Louisiana, Oregon, and South Carolina. He wrote 
by request the address to the country on behalf of 
the minority, protesting against the decisions of the 
majority, which was approved, put in type, and 
one copy printed for signatures, but never signed, 
some of the members doubting the wisdom of its 
publication .at the time. The original manuscript 
of this address was destroyed; but the proof- 
sheets, with Judge Abbott's corrections, were pre- 
served, and were subsequently placed on private 
deposit in the Boston Public Library. Judge 
Abbott was a delegate to seven national Demo- 
cratic conventions, and in six of them was chair- 



man of the Massachusetts delegation. Outside 
of the law and politics Judge Abbott participated 
in many large enterprises, and was president or 
director of numerous manufacturing, railroad, 
water-power, and other companies. He was for 
fifteen years president of the Atlantic Cotton Mills 
at Lawrence ; for thirty-five years a director of 
the Hill Manufacturing Company of Lewiston, 
Me., and from 1874 till his death its president ; 
for three years president of the Hamilton Manu- 
facturing Company at Lowell ; for twenty-eight 
years a director of the Boston & Lowell Rail- 
road, and president for five years ; a director of 
the North American Insurance Company of 
Boston from its organization in 1872 till his 
death ; and president of the Water Power Com- 
pany at Lewiston, of which he was the principal 
promoter, from 1870 till his death. In 1862 
Williams College conferred upon him the honorary 
degree of LL.D. Judge Abbott was married, July 
21, 1838, to Miss Caroline Livermore, daughter of 
Judge Fdward St. Loe Livermore, of Lowell. She 
died in 18S7. Five sons and one daughter of their 
family of eight children survive them : Fletcher 
Morton, Samuel A. B., Franklin P., Grafton St. 
L., Holker \\'. Abbott, and Mrs. Sarah Abbott 
Fa)', widow uf William P. Fay. 



ALDRICH, Samuel Nelson, president of the 
State National Bank, Boston, and member of the 
Suffolk bar, is a native of Upton, born I'"ebruary 
3, 1838, son of Sylvanus Bucklin and Lucv Jane 
(Stoddard) Aldrich. He was educated in the 
Worcester and Southington (Conn.) academies 
and at Brown University. After teaching school 
for a while in his native town and in Holliston 
and Worcester, he took up the study of law in the 
latter city, in the offices of Isaac Davis and E. B. 
Stoddard, finishing at the Harvard Law School. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1863, and at once 
began practice, opening an office in Marlborough. 
There he remained for eleven years, becoming 
prominently identified with local and other in- 
terests, and then removed his business to Boston, 
retaining, however, his legal residence in Marl- 
borough and his connection with its affairs. He 
was chairman of the Marlborough School Commit- 
tee for nine years, chairman of the Board of Se- 
lectmen four years, and several years president of 
the Marlborough Board of Trade and director 
of the People's National Bank. He represented 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



109 



his district, the Fourth Middlesex, in the State daughter of J. T. and Eliza A. Macfarland. They 
Senate m 1879 and 18S0, serving on the commit- have one child, Harry M. Aldrich, a graduate of 
tees on taxation (chairman), on the judiciary, on Harvard University and of the Harvard Law 

School, now a lawyer in Boston. Mr. Aldrich's 
winter residence has been in lioston since he es- 
talilisiied his law office there. 




APPLETON, Samuel, of Boston, general 
agent of the Emplo)-ers' Liability Assurance Cor- 
poration of London, Eng., was born in New York 
City in 1846, son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Gard- 
ner Smith) Appleton. He was educated in Bos- 
ton, in the public schools. His training for active 
life was as clerk in a prominent commercial house 
in Boston, begun immediately after leaving school, 
when a youth of sixteen years. Here he re- 
mained till 1868, when he entered the tire insur- 
ance business, with which he has ever since been 
connected. Beginning as a clerk in the insurance 
agency of Burge & Lane, he was early advanced 
to positions of responsibility. In 1870 he was 
made secretary of the Exchange Insurance Com- 
pany of Boston; in 1875 h*^ became secretary 



S. N. ALDRICH. 



constitutional amendments, and on bills m the 
third reading; and, three years later (in 1883), 
was a member of the lower house of the Legislat- 
ure, where he served on the judiciary, and sev- 
eral other committees, and was instrumental in 
shaping important legislation. In the campaign 
of 1880 he was the Democratic candidate for 
Congress in what was then the Seventh District, 
a Republican stronghold, making an earnest 
though unsuccessful canvass. In March, 1887, 
he became assistant treasurer of the United 
States in Boston, by appointment of President 
Cleveland, which position he held until January, 
i8gi, when his successor was appointed by Presi- 
dent Harrison, having the month before filed his 
resignation to accept the presidency of the State 
National Bank to which he was then elected. He 
was president of the Eramingham & Lowell Rail- 
road for several years before its absorption by the 
Old Colony, and is now president of the Central 
Massachusetts Railroad. His club associations 
are with the Algonquin, Athletic, and Art clubs 
of Boston. Mr. Aldrich was married September 
15, 1865, at Upton, to Miss Mary J. Macfarland, 




SAMUEL APPLETON. 



of the Commonwealth Insurance Company of 
Boston ; three years later president of the latter 
com]5any ; and in 1882 president of the Manu- 



I lO 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



facturers' Fire and Marine Insurance Company of 
Boston. He was established in liis present po- 
sition as general agent of the Employers' Liabil- 
ity Assurance Corporation, Limited, of London, 
the leading liability insurance company in the 
world, in iS86. His field covers Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, New Hampshire, and Vermont : 
and his office in Boston is the chief office of the 
company this side of the Atlantic. Mr. Appleton 
is also a general broker in lire, life, marine, and 
accident insurance. He is a member of the Al- 
gonquin, Suffolk, Athletic, and Kxchange clubs 
of Boston. In politics he is a Democrat. He 
was married June 14, 1S69, to Miss Julia H. 
Kimball. They have one daughter : Maud Eliza- 
beth Appleton. 



I'.ABCOCK, John Brazer, merchant, senior 
member of the house of John B. Babcock & Co., 
Boston, is a native of Milton, born June 10, 1827, 
son of Samuel H. and Eliza (Brazer) Babcock. 
His father was a large woollen manufacturer and 
a well-known Boston merchant ; and his mother 
w-as a daughter of John Brazer, for whom the 
Brazer Building on State Street was named. His 
education was acquired in Boston public schools, — 
the old Boylston Grammar and the English High, 
from which he graduated in 1842 : and he was 
well trained for business life. Soon after gradua- 
tion from school he entered the commission house 
of Read & Chadwick ; and under the tuition of 
their gifted book-keeper, the late Captain Joseph 
Murdock, he received a thorough knowledge of 
accounts and of ofifice w'ork in general. After- 
wards he engaged himself to the importing house 
of Smith, Sumner, & Co., with which he remained 
as partner, and of which he became successor, 
until 1S60, when he founded the house of John 
B. Babcock & Co., commission merchants and 
manufacturers of ladies' straw and felt hats. (.)f 
this house his two sons, Samuel H. and John H 
Babcock, Jr., who entered the business after grad- 
uating from the English High School, are now the 
junior partners. Mr. Babcock has also been for 
many years a director of the Mount Vernon 
National Bank of Boston ; was formerly a trustee 
of the Penny Savings Bank ; is now a trustee of 
several private estates ; and is a justice of the 
peace and notary public. He has had the settle- 
ment of many estates, — few other than profes- 
sional e.xperts have had more, — both insolvent 
and deceased, and at present is administrator of 



several, and holds a number of assigneeships. 
He was at one time president of the Mercantile 
Library Association, but the only local organiza- 
tion with which he is now connected is the Ancient 
and Honorable Artillery Company. He is not a 




J, B. BABCOCK. 

member of any of the numerous Boston clubs. 
In politics he is a conservative Democrat; and, 
never having had any desire for office, he takes a 
deeper interest in the general welfare of the 
country than in party affiliations. Mr. Babcock 
was married July 26, 1849, to Miss Jane E. PJrock- 
way. They have two daughters and two sons : 
Eliza, Samuel Howe, Ellen Sumner, and John 
Brazer Babcock, |r. 



BABSON, Thom.\s McCr.^te, corporation 
counsel for the city of Boston, is a native of 
Maine, born in W'iscasset, Maj' 28, 1847, son of 
John and Sarah (McCrate) Babson. His pater- 
nal grandfather, John Babson, was a native of 
Gloucester, Mass., from which place he moved to 
^^'iscasset about the year 1800, where he estab- 
lished a newspaper and a bookstore, afterwards 
engaging largely in building and owning vessels. 
His maternal grandfather, Thomas McCrate, emi- 
grated from Ireland some time in the latter part 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



1 I I 



of the eighteenth century, was a weaUhy merchant 
in W'iscasset prior to the war of 1812, serv-ed as 
colonel of militia, guarding the coast of Maine in 
that war, and was collector of the port of Wis- 
casset under Andrew Jackson : Thomas Mc- 
C'rate's son, John 1)., was a leading lawyer and a 
member of Congress from Maine. His father, 
[ohn liahson, was prominent in business and 
politics, both in Maine and Massachusetts, having 
been collector of the jjort of Wiscasset, United 
States treasury agent on the frontier of the 
United .States and Canada, and I'nited States 
shipping commissioner for the port of Boston 
from 1872 to his death in 1887. Thomas M. 
Babson was educated in the public schools of 
Wiscasset, at the Highland Military School of 
Worcester, Mass., and at Chauncy Hall, Boston ; 
and prepared for the law at the Harvard Law- 
School, from w-hich he graduated in 1868. He 
was admitted to the bar in 1870, and began 
practice in Boston. Soon after he went to St. 
Louis, Mo., where he was engaged two years in 




T. M. BABSON. 

the practice of his profession. Returning to 
Boston, he resumed practice here, devoting him- 
self especially to the trial of causes. He had at 
this time considerable practice in the admiralty 
branch of the I'nited Slates courts, having been 



admitted to the United States Circuit Court in 
1S73. He first became connected with the law 
department of the city of Boston in 1S79, when 
he was appointed by Mayor Prince fourth assist- 
ant city solicitor under the late John 1*. Healy, 
then city solicitor. Two years later he was made 
second assistant, in 1885 first assistant, and in 
189 1 corporation counsel by appointment of 
Mayor Matthews. In 1876 and 1S77 he was 
a member of the lower house of the Legislature, 
representing Ward i6 of Boston. As a member 
of the committee on elections in the session 
of 1877, he prepared many of the reports of that 
committee wiiich have been published in Russell's 
Election Cases. He has also compiled the 
statutes affecting the city of Bo.ston. Mr. Bab.son 
has probably tried more jury cases than any 
lawyer of his age at the Suffolk bar. He 
belongs to the Curtis and University clubs of 
Boston. He married June 30, 1890, Miss Helen 
Stevens, daughter of Joseph L. Stevens, of 
Gloucester. They have one child : a daughter, 
lilenor Babson, born September 4, 189 1. 



BIGELOW, S.\MUEL AuousTus, merchant, pres- 
ident of the Bigelow- & Dowse Company, Boston, 
is a native of Boston, born November 26, 1838, 
son of Samuel and .Anne Jane (Brooks) Bigelow. 
He is a descendant in direct line of John Biglo, 
one of the early settlers of Watertown, whose mar- 
riage, in the year 1642, was the first recorded in 
that town : and on the maternal side a descend- 
ant of Joshua Brooks, of Concord, the ancestor of 
I'eter C. Brooks and Governor John Brooks ; con- 
nected also with the Lawrence and I'rescott fami- 
lies of Groton. He was educated in the Boston 
public schools. He entered business when a lad 
of seventeen (in 1855), beginning with Eaton & 
I'almer, an old-time lioston firm in the hardware 
trade, and has remained in this trade ever since. 
In 1864 he became a member of the firm of 
Homer. Bishop, & Co., which continued until after 
the '-Great Fire" of 1872, and was the nucleus 
of the present concern, of which he is the 
head. In 1873 the firm name was changed to 
Macomber, Bigelow, & Dowse, and so remained 
till the retirement of Mr. Macomber in 1886, 
when it became Bigelow & Dow.se. The present 
corporation, under the name of the Bigelow & 
Dowse Company, was formed in 1.S94. Mr. I'.ige- 
low is president of the New l-'.ngland iron and 



I 12 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Hardware Association (first elected in 1S93); a 
delegate to the Boston Associated Board of Trade 
(1894); and past president of the An\il Club, an 






:^^^fci. o^ 



^ 



187 I. While in college, he made a special study 
of chemistry. He also did much journalistic 
work, and immediately after graduation engaged 
in journalism as a reporter on city and coun- 
try press. Subsequently he taught school for 
a while, and then entered the employ of his 
brother, of the firm of H. L. Bowker iX: Co. of 
Boston, manufacturers of drugs and medicines. 
In January, 1873, he formed a partnership with 
L. A. Sparrow, a college classmate, under the 
firm name of Bowker & Sparrow, and engaged in 
the manufacture and sale of chemical manures. 
This was the fotnidation of the present business. 
J'he firm afterwards became W. H. Bowker & C'o., 
and in 1879 ^^'''■* succeeded by the Bowker Fer- 
tilizer Company, incorporated under the laws of 
Massachusetts with a capital of $125,000. It now 
has a capital of S6oo,ooo, and two factories with 
a capacity of fifty thousand tons annually, the 
business haying grown from an output of one 
hundred tons a year to an output of one hun- 
dred tons a day. His success he attributes to 
the thorough and practical training which he re- 
ceiyed at the State College, especially in chem- 



S. A. BIGELOW. 

association representing the leading hardware 
merchants of the principal cities in the United 
States. He is connected with the Masonic fra- 
ternity, master of the Lodge of Elusis (having 
passed through all the dilTerent offices in the 
lodge); is a member of the IJostonian Society, 
and of the Algonquin, Art, Athletic, Exchange, 
and Massachusetts Reform clubs of Boston. He 
was married Noyember 7, 1867, to Miss Ella Har- 
riet Brown, daughter of Seth E. and Harriet 
(Eyans) Brown. They haye one child: Samuel 
Lawrence Bigelow. 



BOWKER, Wii, 1,1AM Henry, of Boston, presi- 
dent of the Bowker Fertilizer Company, was born 
in Natick, July 3, 1850, son of Horace and Anna 
Maynard (Smith) Bowker. His ancestors on the 
father's side were farmers, and on the mother's 
side sea-captains. His early education was at- 
tained in the district and high schools of Phillip- 
ston and Templeton. and his collegiate training 
at the Massachusetts .\gricultural College, Am- 
herst, where he was graduated in the class of 




WM. H. BOWKER. 

istry, and also to his training in journalism, which 
has been a great assistance to him in presenting 
intelligently and concisely the need and yalue of 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



"3 



chemical manures. His house was the pioneer 
in placing the fertilizer business on a scientific 
basis ; the first to introduce in this country fer- 
tilizers adapted to different crops or classes of 
crops known as special manures ; the first to urge 
the use of potash in mi.xed fertilizers ; the first to 
publish an agricultural chemical price list which 
listed many chemicals new to agriculture; and 
first among the manufacturers to urge the adop- 
tion of the fertilizer inspection law as a protection 
to farmers and a safeguard to reputable manu- 
facturers. The Massachusetts law has since been 
made the basis of similar legislation throughout 
the United States. Mr. Whitaker, editor of the 
New England Farmer, in writing of the advance- 
ment of the fertilizer business and of the men 
who have been instrumental in bringing it about, 
said of Mr. Bowker that " he can claim the honor 
of having been one of the prime factors in the 
great change that has taken place both in public 
sentiment and in the uniformity and reliability of 
chemical fertilizer." And Herbert Myrick, edi- 
tor of the New England Homestead, wrote of him, 
" He has been a power in elevating the fertilizer 
liusiness to the high plane of respectability and 
reliability that it now enjoys." He is much con- 
sulted by experiment stations, and supplies many 
chemicals for experimental purposes. Mr. Bow- 
ker is a trustee of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, appointed in 1885 by Governor Robin- 
son, and reappointed in 1893 by Governor Rus- 
sell ; has been a member of the Massachusetts 
Board of Agriculture since 1890; member of the 
Board of Control Massachusetts Experiment Sta- 
tion since 1891 ; and member of the Gypsy Moth 
Commission since 1893. He is a frequent writer 
and speaker on agricultural topics. He has held 
no political or military offices. In politics he is 
Republican. He is a member of the University, 
the Exchange, and the Commercial clubs of Bos- 
ton. He was married September 7, 1875, to Char- 
lotte J. Ryder, of Barre. They have two children : 
Horace and Alice Bowker. 



BRADSTREET, Charles William, of Bos- 
ton, manager of the Ferd F. French & Co. 
(Limited), carriage-builders, is a native of New- 
buryport, born June 9, 1833, son of Charles 
and Sarah A. (Noyes) Bradstreet. His paternal 
grandfather was William Bradstreet, of Glouces- 
ter, sliip-huikler, and his maternal grandfather. 



Samuel Noyes, of Newburyport, also a ship- 
builder. He was educated in the public schools 
of Newburyport, and began business life there, 
being first employed by C. W. Davenport, dry- 
goods merchant, in 1849, when a lad of sixteen. 
In September, 1850, he came to Boston, with 
E. T. Hardy, w'ho opened a dry-goods store on 
Hanover Street. Here he remained till May, 
185 1, when he entered the employ of Sargent, 
Gunnison & Co., carriage-builders. No. 14 Sud- 
l)ury Street, with which concern and its suc- 
cessors he has since been identified. In January, 




CHARLES W. BRADSTREET. 

1862, he formed a copartnership with the late 
William P. Sargent, which succeeded Sargent, 
Gunnison & Co., and held for nearly a quarter 
of a century. Then, in July, 1885, Mr. Sargent 
retiring, and being succeeded by the Ferd F. 
French & Co. (Limited), he continued with that 
company, subsequently becoming its manager. 
He has long been prominent in the trade. He is 
connected with the Masonic order, a member of 
the Joseph Warren Lodge, St. Andrew's Chapter, 
and of the De Molay Commandery of Knights 
Templar, Boston. He is a member of the Cal- 
umet Club of Winchester, where he now resides. 
In politics he is classed as Independent. He 
was married March 6, 1S67, to Miss Alprusia \. 



114 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Walker, daughter of Colonel Benjamin 1'. Walker, 
of Claremont, N.H. 



BRYANT, Ralph Waldo, business manager 
of the Boston Post, is a native of Lowell, born 
February 29, 1852, son of Daniel and Ruth 
Levering (Gale) Bryant. His father was of 
Maine, and his mother of the (jale family of New 
Hampshire. He was educated in the Lowell 
public schools, graduating from the High .School 
and McCoy's Business College. His parents in- 
tended him for the legal profession : Init, after 




W. BRYANT. 



reading law two years, he entered the field of 
journalism in 1873. In 1877 he took up his resi- 
dence in New York, and for thirteen years was 
an active and successful metropolitan newspaper 
man. For several years he was on the staff of 
the New York World, and in the capacity of a 
special correspondent for that paper he visited 
nearly every State and Territory in the Union. 
During the late eighties, in an extensive Western 
trip, he described in his letters the commercial 
and industrial development of Western cities, as 
well as the picturesque features of the country 
through which he journeyed, including the entire 
Pacific Coast from Vancouver Island to Mexico. 
In several instances his attractive descriptions 



diverted the tide of Eastern travel to the places 
and sections described, and his matter was fre- 
quently reproduced in .\merican and foreign 
papers. One of his Western trips, originally 
planned to cover six months, was extended over 
two years. Upon his return to New York, after 
a tour of the Southern States, overtures were 
made to him by the controllers of the Philadel- 
phia Daily News, and in 1890 he became the 
proprietor of that paper. The first year of his 
management was that in which Senator ()uay ran 
Delamater for governor in opposition to Pattison, 
and he placed his paper squarely in opposition to 
this movement, fighting it day by day with the 
publication of a series of articles on the career 
and policy of Senator Quay in Pennsylvania poli- 
tics, which attracted wide attention. In the 
autumn of 1891, when the controlling interest of 
the Boston Post was purchased by Edwin A. 
Grozier, he came to Boston as business manager 
of that paper, and has since been identified with 
its conduct. He was married in October, 1S74, 
to Miss Callie E. Simpson, of Lowell. They 
have one child: Fred K. Bryant. 



BURDETT, Everett Watson, member of the 
Suffolk bar, was born in northern Mississippi, 
April 5, 1854, son of Augustus P. and Mariann 
(Newman) Burdett. His parents were both 
Massachusetts folk who went South in 1852, 
and returned to Massachusetts in 1873. He was 
educated in private schools, and for a short time 
at Washington University, -St. Louis, Mo. As 
boy and man, he has been a resident of Massa- 
chusetts almost continuously since 1867. He en- 
tered the Law School of Boston University in 
1875, and was graduated in the class of 1877. 
The following year he was admitted to the Suf- 
folk bar, and has since been actively engaged in 
business in Boston. He began practice with the 
Hon. Charles Allen, now senior associate justice 
of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, in 
whose office he had studied. Soon after, however, 
he was appointed assistant United States attorney 
for the district of Massachusetts, and served with 
success in that capacity for nearly three years, 
trying substantially all of the cases for the govern- 
ment during the latter part of his incumbency. 
He then resigned, and entered upon tlie general 
practice of the law, to which he has since devoted 
himself exclusively. He is now (1894) a member 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



I'5 



of the law firm of Burdett &: Snow, with offices in 
the Ames Building. Though he has tried a large 
variety of cases, his present practice relates 



Miss Maud Warner, of Boston. They 
children: Marion and Paul Burdett. 



lave two 



i 




BURDETT, Joseph Oi.ivek, of Hingham, for 
three years chairman of the Republican State 
Committee, is a native of Middlesex County, and 
there began his professional career. He was 
born in Wakefield (then South Reading), October 
30, 1848, son of Joseph and Sally (Mansfield) 
Burdett. He was educated in the public schools 
of his native town and at Tufts College, where he 
was graduated (in 187 1) second in his class, not- 
withstanding that he was absent nearly half of his 
senior year, earning money to meet his college 
expenses. Immediately after his graduation he 
took up the study of law in the office of Judge 
John W. Hammond, then city solicitor of Cam- 
bridge, and the same year entered the Harvard 
Law School. Admitted to the bar .\pril 19, 
1873, he began practice in association with Judge 
Hammond. In 1875 he opened an office in Bos- 
ton, where he has since practised. The year be- 
fore he established iiis residence in Hintrham, 



E. W. BURDETT. 

chiefiy to corporation matters. He became coun- 
sel for electric lighting interests almost as soon as 
the industry was established in this State, and has 
been the attorney of various lighting companies 
since that time. He has also been the general 
attorney of the Massachusetts association of elec- 
tric lighting companies, composed of more than 
thirty of the leading gas and electric light com- 
panies of the State, since its establishment in 
1889. He is the lecturer on medical jurispru- 
dence in the Medical School of Boston University; 
and is a joint author of the Massachusetts section 
of an elaborate work on the " Law of Incorpo- 
rated Companies operating under Municipal Fran- 
chises." He was for two years president of the 
Mercantile Library Association. He is now a 
trustee of the Massachusetts Homceopathic Hos- 
pital, and a director in several business corpora- 
tions. In politics he is Republican. For the 
year 1893 he was president of the Republican 
City Committee of Boston, declining re-election 
for 1894. He is a member of the Exchange, 
Curtis, and Athletic clubs of Boston. Mr. Bur- 
dett was married in Boston, April 15, 1885, to 




J. O. BURDETT. 

and there early became prominent in local mat- 
ters. He has been a member of the Hingham 
School Board for more than eighteen years, its 



ii6 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



chairman fifteen years, and for some time con- 
cerned in a number of town improvements. He 
is now a director of the Rockland Hotel Com- 
pany, which owns the Nantasket and Rockland 
Houses at Nantasket Iteach, and of the Wey- 
mouth Light and Power Company, which fur- 
nishes light to the towns of Weymouth and Hing- 
ham ; and is also a large owner in and president 
of the Hull Electric Light and Power Com- 
pany, and the Hull and Nantasket Street Railway 
Company. In 1S84 and 1885 he represented 
Hingham and Hull in the lower house of the 
Legislature, serving both sessions as chairman of 
the committee on public service, from which came 
the civil service bill now in the statutes, and tak- 
ing a leading part in the important debates on 
the floor of the house. In his second term he 
was also a member of the committee on the judi- 
ciary. He was first elected chairman of the Re- 
publican State Committee in 1889, after having 
served three years in the body, and was con- 
tinued in office the two succeeding years. Mr. 
Burdett was married in 1874, upon his removal to 
Hingham, to Miss Ella, daughter of John K. 
Corthell, of that town. They have three children : 
Harold Corthell, Edith Mansfield, and Helen 
Ripley Burdett. 



BUTLF^R, John Ha.sk.ell, member of the bar 
for a quarter of a century, is a native of Essex 
County, born in Middleton, August 31, 1841, son 
of John and Mary J. (Barker) Butler. His early 
training was in the district schools, and he fitted 
for college in the Shirley High School and the 
Lawrence Academy of Groton. Entering Yale, 
he graduated therefrom in the class of 1863 with 
honors. After service in the United States Navy, 
he entered the law office of the late John Q. A. 
Griffin and William S. Stearns, of Charlestown, 
and in October, 1868, was admitted to the 
Middlese.x bar. The same year and month he 
formed a copartnership with Mr. Stearns under 
the firm name of Stearns & Butler, which associa- 
tion continued to the first day of January, 1892, 
when Mr. Stearns retired from practice. In 1870 
he established his residence in Somerville, and 
early became identified with the interest of that 
city. For twelve years (1876-88) he served on 
the Somerville School Board, in 1880 and 1881 
represented his city in the lower house of the 
Legislature, and in 1884-85-86 was a member of 



the executive council for tlie Third Councillor 
District, first elected to fill a vacancy caused by 
the death of the Hon. Charles R. McLean. He 
has been prominent in charitable and fraternal 
organizations, and high in their councils. From 
1883 to 1885 he held the post of supreme regent 
of the Royal Arcanum, and is now (1894) chair- 
man of the committee on laws of that order. 
In 1887-88 he filled the office of supreme repre- 
sentative of the Knights of Honor. He was 
president of the National Fraternal Congress for 




JOHN HASKELL BUTLER. 

two 3'ears, and three years the executive officer of 
the Eastern Association, and is now the supreme 
treasurer of the Home Circle, and chairnran of 
the committee on laws and advisory counsel 
of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, Ancient 
Order of United Workmen. He also holds mem- 
bership in the following organizations : the Soley 
Lodge, Masons; Boston Lodge, Odd Fellows; 
Bay State Council, American Legion of Honor; 
Excelsior Council, Royal Arcanum ; Mt. Benedict 
Lodge, Knights of Honor; Beacon Lodge, An- 
cient Order of United Workmen ; and Somerville 
Council, Home Circle. He is a member of the 
University Club of Boston and of the New Eng- 
land Commercial Travellers' Association, and is 
general counsel of the latter, Mr, Butler was 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



117 



marriud in I'iltston, I'enii., on tlic llrst of lanuary, 
1S70, to Miss Laura L. Hull, dauy;lUcr of Jahez li. 
and Mary (Ford) Bull. They have one child : 
John Lawton Butler. 



CHARLES, SALE^r Dakius, member of the 
Suffolk bar, is a native of Brimfield, born March 
19, 1850, son of Abraham and Esther Lorene 
(Wallis) Charles. His ancestors were among the 
early settlers of New England. His early life 




SALEM D. CHARLES. 

was spent on his father's farm, and his education 
was begun in the district school. Subsequently 
he attended the Hitchcock Free High School in 
Brimfield, where he was fitted for college, and, en- 
tering Amherst, was graduated therefrom in the 
class of 1874. The first si.x months after his 
graduation were occupied in travelling in Europe. 
Then he devoted a year to teaching, as principal 
of the Shelburne Falls High School, and towards 
the close of that term began the study of law. 
He spent the next year in the Boston University 
Law School, and in 1878 was admitted to the bar. 
He has since practised in Boston. In politics he 
is a Democrat, and for some years has taken a 
prominent part in State campaigns, speaking in 
nearly every large place in the Coinmonwealth. 



He was a member of the lower house of the 
Legislature in 1891-92-93, the first and only 
Democrat elected from Ward 23 of Boston 
(Jamaica Plain), a strong Republican quarter. 
In the Legislature he served on the committees 
on the judiciary, rules, rapid transit, and consti- 
tutional amendments, and was chairman of the 
Democratic side of the House. He has also 
served as trustee of Mount Hope Cemetery 
(which belongs to the city of Boston) for three 
years. He is a member of the Jamaica Club, of 
the Eliot Club, and of the Young Men's Demo- 
cratic Club of Massachusetts. In college he be- 
longed to the Delta L'psilon. .Mr. Charles is 
unmarried. 

CLARKE, Colonel .Vlukui', of JSoston, secre- 
tary of the Home Market Club, is a native of 
Vermont, born in Granville, October 13, 1840, 
son of Jedediah and Mary (Woodbury) Clarke. 
He is of an old Connecticut family on his father's 
side, and a Beverly, Mass., family on his mother's 
side. Both were of English descent. His ances- 
tors participated in the .American Revolution, also 
in Cromwell's. He was educated in the public 
schools and at West Randolph and Barre acad- 
emies ; and his training for active life consisted of 
hard work on a farm, school teaching, law studies, 
and military discipline. He was admitted to the 
bar in 1S61, but the Civil War interrupted his 
practice. Enlisting as a private in the Thirteenth 
\'ermont Infantry, his twin-brother also joining 
the army as assistant surgeon of the Tenth \'er- 
mont, he served the term of his enlistment, which 
expired in 1863. He was soon promoted to a 
first lieutenancy, and at Gettysburg commanded 
his company in the fierce assaults upon the 
enemy's lines. I^pon his return to civil life he re- 
sumed the practice of his profession, and early 
entered public life. He was colonel on Governor 
Paul Dillingham's staft", first assistant clerk of the 
Vermont House of Representatives four years, 
member of the Vermont Senate in 1874, commis- 
sioner of the State to build a house of correction 
in 1878, and commissioner of the State to build 
monuments at Gettysburg, 1887 89. He was 
president of the Vermont & Canada Railroad 
Company at the time of its consolidation with the 
Central Vermont. In 186S he entered journal- 
ism. He published the St. .\lbans Messenger 
until 1880; then for five years was connected 
with Boston papers, the latter part of that period 



ii8 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



with the Advertiser: and. returning to Vermont, 
was for about three years editor and manager of 
the Rutland Herald. When in Rutland, he was 




ALBERT CLARKE. 

president of the Rutland ISoard of Trade. He 
was chosen secretar)* of the Home Market Club 
in July, 1889, and has been annually re-elected 
since. In politics he is a steadfast Republican. 
He has been a frequent delegate to conventions, 
among them the Republican National Convention 
at Minneapolis in 1892, where he earnestly sup- 
ported Rresident Harrison ; has spoken in cam- 
paigns in several States, and has been manager 
for several candidates, but has never sought office 
for himself. In 1888, when editor of the Rut- 
land Herald, he was prominently mentioned for 
lieutenant governor of Vermont, but declined 
to be a candidate, e.xpecting to return to Massa- 
chusetts the next year. In Vermont he made 
much mark in opposition to railroad politics, and 
in later years he has been recognized as an au- 
thority among those who advocate protection in 
this country. He belongs to the Grand Army, 
and has held the positions of commander of the 
post at St. Albans, junior vice-commander of the 
department of Vermont, and judge advocate of 
the department of Massachusetts (1894); and he 
is a member of the Massachusetts Comniandery, 



Military CJrder of Loyal Legion of the L'nited 
States. He resides at Wellesley Hills, where he 
takes an interest in town affairs. He is fre- 
quently moderator at Wellesley town meetings, as 
he was earlier in his career of St. Albans meet- 
ings ; is chairman of the standing committee of 
the LTnitarian Society at Wellesley Hills, and is 
now (1894) serving his fifth year as president 
of the Wellesley Club. Colonel Clarke was mar- 
ried January 21, 1864, to Miss Josephine Briggs, 
youngest daughter of the Hon. E. D. Briggs, of 
Rochester, Vt. They have had three children : 
.\lbert Briggs (died in infancy), Josie Caroline 
(died at ten), and Mary Elizabeth Clarke. 



COBB, John Storer, member of the Suffolk 
bar, is a native of England, born in the city of 
Rochester, county of Kent, January 7, 1842, son 
of John Sa.xelby and Harriott (Winch) Cobb. 
His early education was acquired in the Cathe- 
dral Grammar School, Rochester, and King's 
College School, London ; also in Paris and Ber- 
lin schools. His collegiate training was in Lon- 




J. STORER COBB. 

don, Cambridge, and Heidelberg universities. 
He was educated for the Church of England, but 
afterwards turned to the law, as he found that he 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



119 



could not engage in the duties of the clerical pro- 
fession. \\'hen a student in college, he wrote 
"Eason" and " pAelyn," two historical novelettes, 
which were published in London in 1865 and 
1866, and subse(|uently the " History of Hun- 
stanton, Norfolk: with which is Incorporated the 
Life of St. Kdnunul, King and Martyr," pub- 
lished in London in 1868. He came to tiie 
United States in 1869, but has returned to Ku- 
rope several times, and spent altogether about 
ten years there since his first arrival in this coun- 
try. He was first settled in New \'ork, where lie 
was some time editor of the New Era (beginning 
this work in :873), and for two years a student 
in the Columbia College Law School, graduating 
in 1875. That year he was naturalized, and ad- 
mitted to the bar. He came to Boston in 1882, 
and returned to Europe early in 1886, remain- 
ing there nearly four years. While here he has 
devoted much of his time to literary pursuits 
and lecturing, and in 1S91 he began the active 
practice of his profession. He has written much 
for the periodical press upon the English lan- 
guage and literature, and has delivered lectures 
on this and other subjects in Boston, New York, 
and Brooklyn, London, Berlin, Paris, Heidelberg, 
and Geneva. In 1886-87 '""^ edited the National- 
ist, the monthly magazine some time published in 
Boston by the Nationalist Educational Associa- 
tion. For several years he was engaged on a 
volume upon "The History and Structure of the 
English Language," the completed manuscript of 
which was unfortunately lost in the mails, and 
never recovered ; and he has now in preparation 
"The Elements of Social Economy." He has 
been long an advocate of the incineration of the 
dead, has written many magazine and newspaper 
articles on the subject, was one of the founders of 
the New York and the New England cremation 
societies, of the latter of which he is president. 
He is also a director of tlie ^L^ssachusetts Cre- 
mation Society, a life member of the New York 
society, and an honorary member of the Berlin 
and Milan societies. He is a life member of the 
American Institute, a fellow and one of the 
founders of the Theosophical Society, and a 
member of the International Hygienic Commis- 
sion. In .\merican politics he is a "Mugwump"; 
in English politics, a Liberal, an advocate and sup- 
porter of Home Rule for Ireland, a member of 
the parent branch of the Irish National League 
and of the Home Rule I'nion of London. He 



was married June 20, 1893, to Miss Mary S. 
Fuller, a daughter of the Hon. Benjamin \. (i. 
Fuller and a cousin of the present chief justice 
of the L^nited States. 



COE, Henry Fr.\ncis, of Boston, treasurer of 
the liowker Fertilizer ("ompany, is a native of 
Rhode Island, born in fJttle Compton, July 27, 
1835, SO" of Joseph and Julia .Ann TFaylor) Coe. 
He is a descendant, on the paternal side, of 
.Matthew Coe, who came from Suffolk, England, 




HENRY F. COE. 

in 1645, ^"'l '^'^0 of John Alden and Priscilla of 
" Mayflower" fame, Matthew Coe's son John hav- 
ing married Sarah Pabodie, daughter of their eld- 
est daughter Elizabeth and her husband William 
Pabodie. He was educated in the country dis- 
trict school. As a boy, from 1849 to 1856, he 
was with Richmond & Wood of New Bedford, 
who were engaged in the whaling and outfitting 
business. Then he entered the employ of Law- 
rence Stone & Co. and the Bay State Mills, and 
upon the reorganization of that company as the 
Washington Mills, in 1859, he took charge of 
the accounts. Subsequently, in 1870, he be- 
came treasurer of the company, and remained 
in that position for si.\teen years. He became 
treasurer of the Bowker Fertilizer Company in 



I20 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



1886, and has held this position ever since. Mr. 
Coe has served prominently in the Boston City 
Council, five terms (1877-80 and 1885) member 
of the Common Council, and one (1886) of the 
Board of Aldermen. He has also served as a 
trustee of the Public Library (1879), and is now 
(1894) one of the trustees of the Eliot School 
funds. For several years he has been a trustee 
of the Boston Five Cents Savings Bank. He is a 
member of the Arkwright Club and was some time 
its secretary, of the Eliot Club of Jamaica Plain, 
and of the Bostonian Society. In politics he is a 
Republican. He was married March 14, 1865, to 
Miss P'anny W. Holmes, of Boston. They have 
four children. 



COFFIN, ARR.-iH.^M BuRBANK, member of the 
Suffolk bar, is a native of Maine, born in Gilead, 




A. B. COFFIN. 

March 31, 1831, son of Warren and Hannah 
(liurbank) Coffin. His early education was ac- 
quired in academies at Bedford and Nashua, 
N.H. He was fitted for college at Phillips (An- 
dover) Academy, and graduated from Dartmouth 
in 1856. Subsequently he studied law in \'ir- 
ginia, and in 1858 was admitted to the bar in 
Richmond. Then coming to Boston, after an- 
other year's study in the office of the late John 



P. Healy, he was admitted to the Suffolk bar. 
From that time he has been engaged in the gen- 
eral practice of the law in the building now num- 
bered 27 School Street. He has also for many 
years been prominent in State affairs. He was 
a member of the lower house of the Legislature 
in 1875, when he held the chairmanship of the 
committee on elections; a State senator in 1S77 
and 1878, serving each year as chairman of the 
committee on taxation and on the committee on 
the judiciary ; a member of Governor Robinson's 
council in 1885 and 1886: and chairman of the 
board of Gas and Electric Light Commissioners 
from 1887 to 1891. In the town of Winchester, 
where he resides, he was for several terms a mem- 
ber of the School Committee and on the town 
Board of Health. In politics he is Republican. 
He is a member of the William Parkman Lodge 
of Masons, of the Calumet Club of Winchester, 
and of the Middlesex (political dining) Club of 
Boston. He was married .\ugust 16, 1888, to 
Miss Mary E. Stevens. 



CORDLEY, Frank Rogers, head of the 
banking house of F. R. Cordley & Co., Boston, 
was born in Randolph, March 19, 1854, son of 
Christopher Minta and Lydia (Bailey) Cordley, 
of English descent. He was educated in the 
public schools ; and his training for active life, 
begun in general business, was mostly acquired 
in railroading and banking. In 1869 he went 
West, where he spent about ten years in Kansas, 
Colorado, and Minnesota, much of the time on 
the frontier. P'or a number of years he was as- 
sistant cashier of the National Exchange Bank of 
Boston ; and he has been engaged in private bank- 
ing and stock brokerage since 1885, having been 
connected with the firms of Cordley & Young, 
Cordley, Young, & Fuller, Cordley & Co., and the 
present house. The different partners of the 
present firm are members of the Boston, New 
York, and Chicago Stock exchanges ; and the 
house has private wires between Boston, New 
York, and Chicago, and New England connec- 
tions, with branch offices in Lowell and Spring- 
field, and in Hartford, Conn. Its market letter, 
issued weekly, the regular publication of which 
was begun in 1886, is recognized in financial 
circles as one of the best and most carefully pre- 
pared prints of its class. Mr. Cordley is a mem- 
ber of the Art and of the Massachusetts Reform 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



1 21 



clubs in Boston, and of the New \'ork and the 
Reform clubs in New York. In politics he is 
an Independent of the "Mugwump" order, a 




»f* 



,/ 




F. R. CORDLEY. 

Steadfast supporter of the principles for which 
the Reform clubs to which he belongs stand. He 
was married April i8, 1874, to Miss Jenny Dean 
Clark. They have one child, a daughter: Agnes 
Minta Cordley. 



COTTER, James Edward, member of the 
Norfolk and Suffolk County Bar Associations and 
the American Bar Association, was born in Ire- 
land in 1848. Left motherless in childhood, at 
the age of seven years he came to Marlborough, 
where his father became the owner of a small 
farm, upon which, and other farms, the boy worked 
during the summer months, attending school in 
the winter. Having received his education in the 
public schools of that town and at the Normal 
School at Bridgewater, he studied law in the office 
of William B. Gale, of Marlborough, and in Jan- 
uary, 1874, was admitted to the bar in Middlesex 
County. Removing to Hyde Park immediately 
thereafter, he has since practised in the State and 
Federal courts, his Boston office for years being 
in the Sears Building. In 1892 he was admitted 
to the Supreme Judicial Court of the United 



States. During the last ten years he has taken 
part in the trial of many important cases, being 
counsel in suits over the water supply of cities 
and towns, involving the value of franchise, and 
the property and rights of water companies ; al.so 
in land damage suits, in a variety of actions of 
tort for personal injuries, in several noted will 
cases, and in suits against insurance companies. 
He was senior counsel for, and successfully de- 
fended, the section-master of the Old Colony Rail- 
road who was charged with the immediate respon- 
siljility for the railroad accident of August 19, 
1890, known as the Quincy disaster; was assigned 
by the court as leading counsel in defence of 
Anna M. Makepeace, who was indicted for shoot- 
ing and killing her husband at Avon in Septem- 
ber, i8gi, and after two trials was finally dis- 
charged ; and he was senior counsel for the city of 
Quincy in the controversy between that city and 
Dartmouth College decided by the Supreme Court 
of Massachusetts in 1892, to determine whether 
the $300,000 involved in the suit should be held 
by the city or forfeited to Dartmouth College, 
under the provisions of the will of Dr. Ebenezer 




JAMES E. COTTER. 



Woodward. Mr. Cotter has held numerous public 
positions in Hyde Park. He was chairman of the 
Registrars of Voters two years, member of the 



122 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



School Committee for three years, the last year 
(1888) chairman; has been town counsel since 
1878 with the exception of 1888; was chairman 
of the general committee in charge of the celebra- 
tion of the twentieth anniversary of the incorpora- 
tion of Hyde Park ; is vice-president of the Histor- 
ical Society, and charter member and director of 
the Hyde Park Social Club. In 1874 and in 
1877 he was the Democratic candidate for district 
attorney for the district comprising Norfolk and 
Plymouth counties, and was the candidate of that 
party for presidential elector in 1884. He has 
declined nominations to other political offices, and 
is now devoting his whole attention to the practice 
of his profession. In March, 1892, he was unan- 
imously elected president of the Charitable Irish 
Society of Massachusetts. Mr. Cotter was mar- 
ried October 29, 1874, to Miss Mary .\. Walsh. 
They have had si.\ children, five of whom are liv- 
ing. His residence is in Sunnyside, Hyde Park. 



CUNNINGHAM, Colonel John Henrv, 
president and treasurer of the J. H. Cunningham 
Company of Boston, is a native of Boston, born 
March 9, 1851, son of Thomas and Sarah W. 
(Millerj Cunningham. He was educated in the 
public schools of Boston and Charlestown, finisli- 
ing at a commercial college in Boston in 187 1. 
Immediately after graduation he entered his 
father's iron works, founded in 1852, and three 
years later became superintendent of the works. 
In 1876 he was admitted to partnership, the firm 
name becoming Thomas Cunningham & Son. 
Upon the death of his father, July g, 1882, the 
firm name was changed to J. H. & T. Cunning- 
ham, his brother having joined it ; and it so re- 
mained till the business was incorporated under 
the title of the Cunningham Iron Works Company, 
with Colonel Cunningham as treasurer. Colonel 
Cunningham continued in this position till Feb- 
ruary, 1887, when he moved to No. 109 Milk 
Street, Boston, and established the J. H. Cunning- 
ham Company, wholesale dealers in wrought-iron 
pipe and fittings for steam, gas, and water, which 
he has since conducted as president and treas- 
urer. While developing his iron business, he be- 
came concerned in numerous other important in- 
terests. In Chelsea, to which city he moved from 
Charlestown in 1874, he founded the Winnisim- 
met National Bank, of which he is now president ; 
was one of the incorporators of the County Sav- 



ings Bank, now a member of its committee on 
investments ; and he is a large owner in and a 
director of the Winnisimmet Ferry Company. He 
is also largely interested in New England street 
railways. He is president of the Plymouth & 
Kingston Street Railway Company, Plymouth ; 
vice-president of the Gloucester Street Railway 
Company, Gloucester ; and a large owner in and 
director of the following street railway companies : 
the Worcester, Leicester & Spencer, the Worcester 
& Millbury, the Lynn & Boston, and the Haver- 
hill & Amesbury. He is president of the Massa- 
chusetts Street Railway Association, and of the 
Boston Construction Company. In Boston he is a 
director of the Beacon Trust Company. Colonel 
Cunningham's military career extends over twelve 
years, nine years of this period in the Fifth Regi- 
ment, Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, and three 
years on the staff of Governor William E. Russell, 
as assistant adjutant-general with the rank of 
colonel. He is prominent in the Masonic order, 
past master of Robert Lash Lodge of Chelsea, a 
Knight Templar, a thirty^second degree Mason, 
and a life member of the Massachusetts Consis- 




J. H. CUNNINGHAM. 

tory. In politics lie is a Democrat, president of 
the Chelsea Democratic Club, and member of the 
Young Men's Democratic Club of Massachusetts. 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



12- 



Other clubs to which he belongs are the Review 
Club of Chelsea and the Boston Athletic Associa- 
tion. He has served in the city government of 
Chelsea, and has long been inlluential in its 
afifairs. He was married April lo, 1873. to Miss 
Frances E. Prouty, of Cohasset. They have had 
three children, two of whom. John H., Jr., and 
Sara M. Cunningham, are now living. 



CUSHlNCr, SinNKV. merchant, iioston, head 
of the firm of Cushing, t )hn>trd, & Snow, was 
born in Hingham, March 2, iHjy, son of David 




SIDNEY GUSHING. 

and Mary (Laphami Cushing. He is a descend- 
ant in the eighth generation of Matthew Cushing, 
who came from Hingham, P^ngland, and settled in 
Hingham on this side in 163S. He was educated 
in the village school and at the famous Derby 
Academy of Hingham, where he graduated in 
May, 1855. The same year and month he began 
mercantile life in a grocery store on Commercial 
Street, Boston. The liquor feature of the busi- 
ness being distasteful to him, he determined to 
quit it at the first opportunity, and accordingly on 
the 1 8th of March, 1856, he entered the employ 
of Whiting, Kehoe, & Galloupe, then the largest 
wholesale clothing firm in Boston. Beginning at 



the bottom round of the ladder, he steadily ad- 
vanced through his own exertions — for he had no 
moneyed or influential friends to assist him — 
until he reached the highest position. Since 1879 
he has been at the head of one of the leading and 
most influential houses in the clothing trade. He 
was largely instrumental in the formation of the 
'■ Clothing Manufacturers' Association," and was 
its first president (1893, and re-elected in 1894). 
Mr. Cushing was a member of the Boston Com- 
mon Council in 1888-89, and of the Board of 
Aldermen in 1890 ; and his efforts in exposing 
jobbery in certain contracts were the means of his 
defeat for renomination. In politics he has 
always been a Republican, and of late years has 
been active in the party organization. He was a 
delegate to the National Republican Convention 
at Minneapolis in 1892. He is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity, of the Royal Arcanum, and 
of the Eliot Club, Jamaica Plain, Boston. He 
was married September 26, 1861, to Miss Sarah 
E. Corbett, of Hingham. They have two .sons : 
Albert Lewis and Waldo Cushing. 



D,\RLIN(i, EnwiN Hakkis, member of the 
Suffolk bar, is a native of Calais, Me., born Jan- 
uary 28, 1838, son of Timothy and Lucy (Sargent) 
Darling, both also of Calais. On the maternal 
side he is a descendant of (rovernors John Dudley 
and John Winthrop. His mother's grandfather, 
Paul Dudley Sargent, whose mother was Governor 
[ohn Dudley's grand-daughter, was a colonel in 
the Revolution, head of a regiment raised by him- 
self, served throughout the war, and was an inti- 
mate friend of Washington and of Lafayette. 
His father, the late Hon. Timothy Darling, was 
for many years the United States consul at Nas- 
sau, N.P., Bahama Islands, and subsequently for 
forty years a banker in that place. His grand- 
father, having large landed interests in New Bruns- 
wick, just prior to the war of 18 12 crossed the 
river to St. Stephens, N.B., in order to protect his 
interests, and Timothy Darling was born there in 
181 1. L'nder the old English law one born upon 
]5ritish soil remains an Englishman. Immediately 
after the close of the war the elder Darling re- 
turned to Calais. Timothy Darling after retiring 
from the consulship, declining a renomination, be- 
came the leading .\merican merchant in the Baha- 
mas; and during his long residence there he was 
an elder in the Presbyterian church, and superin- 



124 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



tcndent of its Sunday-school. After twenty-five 
years' service as a member of the governor's 
council in the Bahamas, the Queen of England 
made him a knight of the order of St. Michael 
and St. George, — an honor rarely conferred upon 
any one residing in a British colony. During the 
Civil War his services and unselfish patriotism 
were most notable. He had a large and extensive 
business with all of the Southern cities. Nassau 
was the great depot for blockade runners, and 
there were but two merchants, he being one of 
them, who had facilities for shipping and storing 




EDWIN H. DARLING. 

cotton. The first steamers which ran the block- 
ade were consigned to him ; but he resolutely re- 
fused to have anything to do with them. He was 
with one exception tile only Union man at Nassau 
of any prominence, and had occasion several 
times to aid the United States gun-boats in pro- 
curing coal and to assist them in various ways. 
Almost any one else would have found it difficult, 
if not impossible, to do this, so strong was the feel- 
ing tliere. At his death Secretary Evarts wrote 
a most complimentary letter to his widow, acknowl- 
edging his patriotic service during the struggle. 
He was a man of the strictest integrity, great be- 
nevolence, and throughout the English West In- 
dies was respected and beloved. Edwin Harris 



Darling was fitted for college at Nassau, and at 
Hudson, N.Y., and attended \\'illiams College, 
where he was graduated in the class of 1859. He 
studied law with the late Hon. George F. Shepley, 
who at his death was judge of the L'nited States 
Circuit Court for this District, and also with Doo- 
little, Davis, & Crittenden, of New York. He was 
admitted to the bar in New York City in April, 
1 86 1. He has practised in ]3oston for twenty-five 
years. He has been bail commissioner for Suffolk 
County for twenty years, and master in chancery 
for the same county eleven years. He has been 
repeatedly nominated for the Common Council 
and for the Legislature ; but, being a Democrat in 
a strong Republican ward, he has failed of elec- 
tion. He has, however, been elected to the 
School Committee, in which body he served 
twelve years through repeated elections, resigning 
in December, 1893, having still a year to serve. 
The only societies to which he belongs are the 
Kappa Alpha and the Phi Beta Kappa. Mr. 
Darling was married February 2, 1882, to Miss 
Georgie A. Smith, of Newmarket, N.H. They 
have had three children: Lucy, (born September 
10, 1883, died May 24, 1889), Edwin A\'oodbridge, 
(born September 7, 1887), and Amy Elizabeth 
Darling (born March 9, 1889). 



DEAN, JosiAH Stevens, member of the Suf- 
folk bar, was born in Boston, May 11, i860, son 
of Benjamin and Mary .\nn (French) Dean. His 
father is a prominent Boston lawyer, and was 
a member of the State Senate for three terms, 
and representative in the Forty-fifth Congress 
from a Boston district ; and his mother was a 
daughter of the late Josiah B. French, mayor of 
Lowell, and president of the old Northern Rail- 
road of New Hampshire. He was educated in 
the Boston public schools and at the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology ; and his legal 
studies were pursued at the Boston University 
Law School, the Harvard Law School, and in his 
father's office. He was admitted to the bar in 
1885, and has since been engaged in general and 
nfiscellaneous practice in Boston. He was coun- 
sel with L. S. Dabney for the South Boston Rail- 
way Company previous to its consolidation with 
the West End Company. In 1893 he was nomi- 
nated by Democrats for register of probate and 
insolvency for Suffolk County, and carried Bos- 
ton, which has never been done before in a 



MEN OF i'ro(;ki:ss. 



12 = 



county contest against the incumbent, his defeat 
resulting through the votes of Chelsea, Revere, 
and W'inthrop. The previous year, and in i8gi, 
he was a nieiul)er of the Boston Common C'ouncil. 
He is no\v('icS94) associate justice of the South 
Boston municipal court, appointed by (governor 
Russell in 1S93. He is connected with a number 
of Soutli lioston institutions, among them the 
South Boston Savings Bank, of which he was an 
incorporator, and the South Boston Citizen's As- 
sociation ; is a director of the Kastern Electric 
Light and Storage Battery Company, and of the 





% 


■% 


f 


4 \^ 


^A. 
^^B^ 

1^^^^^^^^^ 

[^(■■■■■■m^ 


Wh^ ■ ^ 


■ ^m^^ \ 


/ , 


/0^ 


I-' y 





JOSIAH S. DEAN. 

D. S. Quirk Company ; and a member of the Bos- 
ton Athletic Association, the Puritan Canoe Club, 
the Boston Bicycle Club (secretary of the latter), 
and of various other organizations. He was the 
first president of the Associated Cycling Clubs of 
Boston and vicinity. Mr. Dean was married 
August 2, 1888, at Bradford, England, to Miss 
May Lillian Smith, daughter of the late Professor 
Walter Smith, some time director of drawing in 
the Boston public schools, and the first director of 
the State Normal Art School. They have one 
child : Benjamin Dean. 



DONAHOE, P.A.TRICK, of Boston, founder and 
present owner of T/u- Pilot, the earliest permanent 



Catiiolic organ in New England, and founder of 
Donahoc's Magazine, is a native of Ireland, born 
in Munnery, parish of Kilmore, County Cavan, 
March 17, 1815. His father, Terence Donahoe, 
was a linen hand-weaver and farmer. His mother, 
Jane (Christy) Donahoe, was a native of the same 
place. He came to Boston in 1825, and after at- 
tending the old Adams School two or three years, 
supplementing the little schooling he had had in 
Ireland, at the age of fourteen was at work for 
himself, having obtained employment in the print- 
ing-office of the Coliimbiiin Ccntiiicl. He was the 
only Irish boy in a band of six in the office, — in 
fact, there were at that time but two Irish boys in 
all the printing-offices of the town; and he had a 
hard struggle and some battles, the feeling against 
his religion and race being strong in those days. 
Ikit he managed thoroughly to learn the printer's 
trade, and to acquire much general knowledge. 
When the Cciiti?icl was united with another paper 
and issued daily, he left it, disliking night and 
Sunday work, and obtained work in the office of 
The Jesuit, a little publication which had been 
started by PUshop Fen wick in 1832. The Jesuit 
was not a paying enterprise, and finally the bishop 
gave it to Mr. Donahoe and H. L. Devereux, a 
fellow-workman. They changed the name to The 
Literary ami Catholic Sentinel, and worked dili- 
gently to advance it, but without profit. Then, in 
1836, they began the publication of The Pilot in a 
small way, with a force, in addition to themselves, 
of two girls and a boy, Mr. Donahoe taking the 
entire responsibility. Mr. Devereux soon with- 
drew, and Mr. Donahoe bent all his energies to 
establish the paper on a firm foundation. He 
made a personal canvass, not only of the New 
England and the Middle States, but of the then 
Far West and the South. Before very long he had 
secured a national circulation, and had expanded 
his paper from a small four-page aft'air to a large 
and handsomely printed eight-page weekly. For 
many years it had the field almost to itself; and it 
became not only a household word in the Irisii 
Catholic homes scattered over the country, but an 
influential institution, being almost the only me- 
dium of Catholic news and instruction in the hun- 
dreds of new settlements where the visits of 
priests were necessarily infrequent. One of its 
most effective features was the department of 
new-s from Ireland, each week covering many 
columns. With 'The Pilot Mr. Donahoe prospered, 
and became the foremost man of his race in New 



126 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



England. About the year 1850 he established, in 
addition to his newspaper, a large bookselling and 
publishing house, whence the works of many no- 
table Irish and Irish-American authors were is- 
sued. Later he added a great emporium of church 
furniture, organs, etc., and still further enlarged 
his business with the establishment of a bank and 
a passenger and foreign exchange agency. From 
the wealth which he acquired he gave generously 
to Catholic charities, advanced Catholic institu. 
tions, aided Catholic churches, and helped many 
causes abroad as well as in his adopted country. 




PATRICK DONAHOE. 

In Boston he was one of the most efficient promo- 
ters of the House of the Angel Guardian and of 
the Working Boy's Home, was the founder of the 
Home for Destitute Catholic Children on Harri- 
son Avenue, and its first president; was one of 
the most prompt and generous of the contributors 
to the fund for the erection of the Cathedral of 
the Holy Cross, and a liberal benefactor of the 
Carney Hospital; and among the foreign institu- 
tions which he generously aided were the Amer- 
ican College at Rome, and the Seminary at Mill 
Hill, England, for the training of priests for the col- 
ored missions. During the Civil \\'ar. he actively 
interested himself in the organization of the Irish 
regiments ; was treasurer of the fund for the 



equipment of the Irish Ninth, and when the regi- 
ment was starting for the front gave Colonel Cass 
$1,000 in gold pieces, one for each man in the 
ranks ; he assisted in the formation of the Twenty- 
eighth Massachusetts Regiment called the Fag-an- 
Bealagh (clear the way) ; in numerous practical 
ways aided the soldiers at Camp Cameron, Cam- 
bridge, during the early days of the war; contrib- 
uted liberally to sending supplies and voluntary 
nurses to the field hospitals of the Union army ; 
and gave one of his sons, Benedict J. Donahoe, to 
the naval service under Commodore Porter in the 
Mississippi fleet. A son-in-law and two nephews 
also joined the army, all of whom were killed in 
the struggle. He was also a member of a com- 
pany of fifty gentlemen who met on the Common 
to aid in supplying means to assist the Massachu- 
setts men in the field ; and at another tune he 
presided at a great mass meeting of many thou- 
sands on the Common to receive General Cor- 
coran of the New York Sixty-ninth Regiment. 
Early in life he had a short military career as a 
member of the "Mechanics' Rifle Company," and 
was in the ranks when his company with others 
performed guard and escort duty on the occasion 
of President Jackson's visit to Boston in June, 
1833. I" 1S72, before the "Great Fire" in Bos- 
ton, Mr. Donahoe was counted the riciiest Cath- 
olic in New England, and in the first rank, both in 
means and influence, among the Catholics in 
.\merica. The granite block on Franklin Street, 
in which T//i' Pilot and his great publishing and 
other business were housed, was one of the fine 
business buildings of Boston. This went down in 
the "Great Fire " ; and with it were destroyed The 
Pilot plant, stereotype plates, book stock, and 
other property, causing a total loss of $350,000. 
Owing to the failure of insurance companies as 
the result of the heavy losses by this fire, he lost 
the greater part of his insurance. He at once, 
however, resumed business, establishing himself 
on U'ashington Street, near Essex. Here he was 
burned out again in the destructive fire of May 
30, 1873, in that neighborhood. After this fire he 
went to Cornhill to get out his paper, and here 
was for the third time burned out. 'i'hen he built 
a large building on Boylston Street, at a cost of 
over Sioo,ooo, In addition to these losses he 
lost fully $250,000 through indorsements for 
friends. The panic and depression following, the 
friends who had advanced money to him to sus- 
tain his business felt constrained to withdraw their 



II 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



127 



assistance ; and then, in 1876, the climax was 
reached when his banlc was obliged to suspend 
|)a\inent, the indebtedness to depositors being 
573,000. '{'hereupon he placed everything he 
possessed at the disposal of his creditors ; but 
property having teniporarih' shrunk in \alue, and 
liiat which he held having been heavily mortgaged 
in the interest of his business, the estate could 
not be made to realize its real value. .\t this 
juncture Archbishop Williams came to his relief, 
purchasing three-fourths interest in The Pilot. 
John Boyle O'Reilly, whom Mr. Donahoe had 
some time before placed in editorial charge, pur- 
chased the remaining fourth, and took charge also 
of the entire business management of the paper ; 
and the bank depositors were ultimately paid off 
in yearly dividends. Mr. Donahoe, at the time of 
his embarrassment, sixty-three years of age, cheer- 
fully and hopefully took up the only part of his 
great business left to him, — the passenger and 
foreign exchange agency, — and set about rebuild- 
ing his fortunes. In 1878 he began the publication 
of his monthly periodical, under the name of Don- 
ahoe' s Magazine, and with his old-time energy per- 
sonally established its circulation, going over the 
same ground that he traversed in his young man- 
hood for The J'i/oi forty years before. Gradually 
his business developed, his magazine attained 
wide circulation and popularity, and within a com- 
paratively few years he found himself again in the 
enjoyment of a competence. In 1891, a few 
months after the death of Mr. O'Reilly, he was 
enabled to repurchase The Pilot, and at the age 
of seventy-six he resumed its conduct with all the 
ardor of youth. He at once enlarged the sheet, 
mtroduced new features, and his card to his pa- 
trons announced his policy to be " to keep The 
Ti/ot equal to the demands of its readers, and to 
maintain in the future the place which it has held 
for over half a century as the leading Irish-.Vmer- 
ican Catholic publication." Soon after his return 
to The Pilot he sold his magazine to a new com- 
pany. In 1893 Mr. Donahoe received from the 
University of Notre Dame, Indiana, the distin- 
guished honor of the La_-tare medal of solid gold, 
conferred annually upon a layman who has ren- 
dered signal service to the American Catholic 
public, and it was formally presented to him on 
St. Patrick's Day, that year, immediately after the 
meeting of the Charitable Irish Society in Boston, 
in the presence of a notable company. On this 
occasion the Very Rev. William liyrne, D.D., 



V.G., who had been deputed by Archbishop Will- 
iams to confer the medal, and the Rev. J. .\. 
Zahm, C.S.C., vice-president of the L'niversity of 
Notre Dame, made highly complimentary ad- 
dresses, recalling Mr. Donahoe's conspicuous ser- 
vices in many fields, his liberal acts and charitable 
deeds, and pronouncing the honor most worthily 
bestowed, the vicar-general characterizing it as 
"the crowning honor of a well-spent life." Mr. 
Donahoe is the oldest living member of the Ciiari- 
table Irish Society, with which he has been identi- 
fied for upwards of half a century, and is con- 
nected with other benevolent organizations. For 
nine years he served as a member of the board of 
directors of city institutions, and was instrumental 
in securing the admittance of Catholic clergymen 
to these institutions, only Protestant chaplains 
before his appointment to the board being ap- 
pointed. Mr. Donahoe was first married Novem- 
ber 23, 1836, to Kate Griffin. By this union were 
four children: Mary E., Benedict J., Jerome, and 
Chrysostom P. The last-named only is now liv- 
ing. The eldest, Mary E., married Patrick 
Hughes, of Toronto, and had six children, one of 
whom is now married, living in Seattle, Wash., 
and has one child, making Mr. Donahoe a great- 
grandfather. His first wife died November 15, 
1852, aged thirty-six years. He married secondly 
at Littlestown, Penna., April 17, 1853, Annie E. 
Davis, daughter of Dr. and Mary E. Davis, of that 
town. Of this marriage were also four children: 
John Francis, Patrick M., Joseph V., and Gene- 
vieve E. Donahoe. All are still living ; and all are 
married except the first, and have families. Three 
of his sons are with him in The Pi/ot office and in 
his other enterprises: and the other, J. Frank Don- 
ahoe, is organist of the Cathedral of the Holy 
Cross, and prominent in Boston music circles. 



DONOVAN, Edward Jamks, collector of inter- 
nal revenue for the district of Massachusetts, 
1894, is a native of Boston, born March 15, 1864, 
son of Lawrence and Nancy Donovan. His 
father was for a quarter of a century one of the 
leading tobacconists of the city. He was edu- 
cated in the Boston public schools, graduating 
from the Phillips Grammar School in 1878, and 
afterwards attending the English High School. 
He began business life immediately after leaving 
school as a clerk in the wholesale millinery house 
of William H. Horton i\: Co., and afterwards was 



128 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



with the house of iJrown, Durrell, >\: Co., with 
whom he remained till 1889. Political life early 
attracted him, and before he had reached his ma- 
jority he had become active in local politics. 
When twenty-two years of age, he was elected to 
the lower house of the Legislature, and the follow- 
ing year re-elected ; and then twice sent to the 
Senate (for 18S9 and i8go) for the Third Suffolk 
District. In the years of his service in the House 
(1887 and 1888) he was the youngest member of 
that body ; and he has the distinction of being the 
youngest man ever elected to the Senate, being 




EDWARD J. DONOVAN. 

but twenty-four years of age when he entered it. 
In both branches he took a prominent part, serv- 
ing on important committees, among the number 
those on street railways, water supply, cities, mili- 
tary affairs, and liquor law, and had no superior 
as a ready debater. In 1892 he was appointed to 
the Boston Board of Health by Mayor Matthews 
for the term of three years, and was occupying 
this position when he received the appointment of 
internal revenue collector from President Cleve- 
land in January, 1894. Before he became a city 
official, he served on the Democratic State and 
City Committees, for three years first vice-presi- 
dent of the latter. At the State Democratic con- 
ventions of 1890 and 1891 he was selected for- 



mally to second the nomination of (iovernor Rus- 
sell; and at the municipal convention in 1891 he 
placed Nathan Matthews, Jr., in nomination for 
mayor of Boston ; and in every campaign since 
1888 he has been one of the Democratic party's 
most effective speakers on the stump. In the 
National Democratic Convention at Chicago, in 
1892, he was delegate from Massachusetts. He 
is a member of the Young Men's Democratic Club 
of Massachusetts, and of the Hendricks Club of 
Boston, the presidency of which he has held since 
its formation in 1S85. From the time of leaving 
the house of Brown, Durrell, & Co. till his ap- 
pointment to the Board of Health he was in the 
newspaper business, being manager and half- 
owner of the Boston Democrat. He was married 
June I, 1 89 1, to Miss Margaret McGivney. They 
have two children : Frances and Edward J. Dono- 
van, Jr. 

DYER, MiCAH, Jr., member of the Suffolk bar, 
is a native of Boston, born September 27, 1829, 
son of Micah and Sally (Holbrook) Dyer. He is 
of English descent. He was educated in the 
Eliot School in Boston, where he received the 
Franklin medal, at Wilbraham Academy and 
Tilton Seminary, and graduated from the Harvard 
Law School in 1850. He entered the law office 
of Stephen G. Nash, judge of the Superior Court 
of Suffolk County, and soon after was admitted to 
the bar, and began practice. He early won a 
large clientage. In 1861 he was admitted to 
[iractice in the Supreme Court of the United 
States. He has had the management or been 
executor and trustee of a large number of estates, 
and the integrity of his administration has gained 
him high esteem. He was elected from Boston 
to the Massachusetts House of Representatives 
in 1854, and served two terms (1855 and 1856), 
the youngest member of the body. He was for 
several years a member of the Boston School 
Board and chairman of the Eliot School commit- 
tee. During the latter service he was hastily 
summoned one morning to quell a disturbance in 
the school occasioned by the refusal of four hun- 
dred Catholic boys to obey the rule which re- 
quired the recitation of the Lord's Prayer and the 
Decalogue. Not considering what church they 
might represent, but taking his stand on the ques- 
tion, " Is it a rule, and have they refused to obey 
it.'" and finding the charge true, he promptly ex- 
pelled the whole four hundred. He left the de- 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



129 



cision as to the injustice of the law or rule to 
those who had the power to annul it ; yet he was 
severely criticised, and was made to suffer for this 




MICAH DYER, Jr. 

performance of his duty. The parents of the 
children, however, soon understood the situation ; 
and within two weeks almost every boy had ap- 
plied for readmission, promised to obey the rules, 
and had been received. Mr. Uyer was the first 
president of the Female Medical College in Bos- 
ton (established in 1855). That was in the days 
when the medical faculty did not approve of 
" women doctors," and explains why the di- 
plomas of the early graduates bore the signature 
of an LL.K. instead of an M.l). fie is a member 
of the Boston Women's Charity Club, and one of 
the advisory board of the organization in the care 
of the Gifford fund donation to its hospital. 
Other organizations to which he belongs are the 
American Bible Society, of which he is a life 
member, the Massachusetts Temperance .\lliance, 
the New England Conference Missionary .Society, 
the Bostonian Society, Post 68 of the Grand Army 
of the Republic, the Eliot School Association 
(president), and the Old School Boys' .Associa- 
tion (president); and he was a member of the 
old Mercantile Library Association of Boston 
from 1849. He has been a Free Mason for forty 



years, now belonging to the Boston Commandery, 
and has taken thirty-two degrees. He was also 
for many years an Odd Fellow in good standing. 
In politics he is a liberal Republican. He has 
done much benevolent work in a quiet way, and 
unostentatiously has expended thousands of dol- 
lars in rendering life easier to the poor, the sick, 
and the unfortunate. Mr. Dyer was married in 
May, 1851, to Miss Julia A. Knowlton, of Man- 
chester, N.H. They have had two sons and one 
daughter. The daughter died in infancy. The 
sons are both residents of Boston: Dr. Willard 
K. Dyer, of P)oylston Street, and Walter R. Dyer, 
who is associated with his father in business. 



EMERY, Thom.^s Jefferson, member of the 
Suffolk bar, is a native of Maine, born in i'oland, 
December 26, 1845, son of Hiram and Margaret 
(Young) Emery. He is of English ancestry, a 
direct descendant on the paternal side of An- 
thony and Frances Emery, who came to Boston 
June 3, 1635, from Romsey, England, and subse- 
quently settled in Kittery, Me. His early educa- 




THOMAS J. EMERY. 



tion was acquired in the public schools of North 
Falmouth, Me., and at Westbrook Seminary, 
Deering, Me., where he was fitted for college ; 



I30 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



and his collegiate training was at Bowdoin, from 
which he was graduated in the class of 1868. 
For the first six or eight years after graduation 
he was engaged in school-teaching, beginning in 
public schools in Maine, and then becoming the 
first principal of the Greely Institute of Cumber- 
land, Me. From 1870-71 he was principal of 
the famous Derby Academy of Hingham, Mass., 
and later taught several years in the English 
High School of Boston. He studied law in the 
Boston University Law School, and upon his 
graduation therefrom, in 1877, was admitted to 
the bar of Suffolk County. He has since prac- 
tised in Boston, giving attention especially to 
probate and commercial law. In politics he is 
Republican. He has served three terms in the 
Boston Common Council (1881-82-83) ^s a repre- 
sentative of Ward Eighteen, and four years in 
the School Committee (1889-90-91 and 1893). 
During his service in the latter board he was 
chairman of the committees on high schools, rules 
and regulations, and evening schools, besides 
serving on other committees. He was especially 
interested in the high and evening school work. 
He is a member of the Boston Bar Association, of 
the Boston Commandery, of Knights Templar, 
and of Massachusetts Consistory. He is un- 
married. 

FALLON, Joseph Daniel, justice of the Mu- 
nicipal Court, South Boston District, is a native 
of Ireland, born in the village of Doniry, County 
Galway, December 25, 1837, son of Daniel and 
Julia (Coen) Fallon. He was reared on a farm, 
and attended the national and private schools in 
the neighborhood of his home. At the age of 
fourteen he came to this country, most of the 
family having preceded him ; and shortly after his 
arrival (in 1852) he entered the college of the 
Holy Cross at Worcester. He was graduated 
with distinction in the class of 1858, and received 
his degree of A.B. from Georgetown College, 
Holy Cross not then being a chartered institu- 
tion. After leaving college he taught school for 
awhile, first in Woonsocket, R.I., and subse- 
quently in Salem and in Boston. While in Salem 
he began the study of law in the office of the late 
Judge Perkins, and in 1865 was admitted to the 
bar. Opening his office in Boston, in course of 
time he entered upon a large and lucrative prac- 
tice, and, as e-xecutor and trustee, undertook the 
care of numerous important interests. For many 



years he has been the legal adviser of clerg^-men 
and corporations in various parts of the Common- 
wealth. When the South Boston court was es- 




JOSEPH D. FALLON. 

tablished, in 1874. he was appointed by Governor 
Talbot the first special justice ; and upon the 
death of Judge Burbank, in 1893, he was made 
justice of the court. While serving as special 
justice, he held court for long periods during the 
absences of Judge Burbank, occasioned, in large 
part, by failing health, and upon him, in fact, de- 
volved the most difficult part of the work of the 
court since its establishment ; for every important 
new law went into operation when he was occupy- 
ing the bench. F'or nearly twenty years he was 
a member of the Boston School Committee, first 
elected to the board in 1864. During this long 
service he was in accord with the broadest men 
among his associates, supporting and advocating 
every advance made or proposed in the adminis- 
tration of the schools and for the improvement of 
the system, notably prominent in the movements 
for the addition, to the system, of manual training, 
sewing, and the kindergarten. Judge Fallon has 
for several years been one of the examiners for 
the State Civil Service Commission. Since 1877 
he has been vice-president of the Union .Savings 
Bank, and its counsel for the past four years. 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



In politics he is a Democrat. He was married 
August 9, 1S72, to Miss Sarah E. Daley. They 
have four children : Euphemia M., Catherine M., 
Josephine S., and Joseph D. Fallon. 



FLOWER, Benjamin Orange, of Boston, ed- 
itor of the Arena, is a native of Illinois, born in 
Albion, October 19, 1859, son of Alfred and 
Elizabeth (Orange) Flower. He was educated by 
private tutors at his home, in the public schools 
of Evansville, Ind., the family having moved to 
this place when he was a boy, and at the Ken- 
tucky University. It was his first intention to fol- 
low the profession of his father and eldest brother, 
the Rev. George E. Flower, and enter the minis- 
try: but, experiencing a change of religious views, 
he resolved to pursue the profession of journal- 
ism. Thereupon he undertook the editorship of 
the American Sentinel, a weekly society and liter- 
ary journal published in his native town. In this 
work, however, he was engaged but a short time, 
in 188 1 removing to Philadelphia, where he be- 
came associated with his brother. Dr. Richard (_'. 




B. 0. FLOWER. 



a monthly literary journal, under the name of the 
American Spectator. In 1889 this journal, which 
had reached a circulation of over ten thousand, 
was merged in the Arena, the first number of 
which appeared in the December issue that year. 
Subsequently the Arena Publishing Company, for 
the publication of the magazine and of books, 
was established, with Mr. Flower as treasurer. 
His idea in founding the Arena was to provide 
a popular tribune for a fair hearing to radical and 
progressive thinkers. While conducting his mag- 
azine, Mr. Flower has also contributed frequently 
to other periodicals and to the newspaper press; 
and he has published a number of volumes. 
Most notable among the latter are " Civilization's 
Inferno," " Lessons Learned from Other Lives," 
and "The New Time," published June, 1894. 
The first-mentioned work is a critical study of 
life in the social cellar, and has proved very popu- 
lar, three editions having been exhausted within 
twelve months from the date of its publication. 
Mr. Flower's religious views are pronounced and 
liberal, in accord with those of the so-called evolu- 
tionary school of Unitarians. He is a firm be- 
liever in a future life, and is greatly interested in 
psychical research, being vice-president of the 
American Psychical Society. He believes that 
through critical and scientific investigations of 
psychical phenomena immortality or, at least, the 
reality of a future life will some day be demon- 
strated to the satisfaction of the thinking world. 
He has for several years occupied a pew in Rev. 
M. J. Savage's church. He was married Septem- 
ber 10, 1886, to Miss Hattie Cloud, of Evansville, 
Ind. They have no children. 



Flower, taking charge of the latter's extensive 
professional correspondence. A few years later 
he came to Boston, and began the publication of 



GAGE, RoscoE Witherlie, president of the 
Boston Loan Company, is a native of Maine, born 
in Castine, September 3, 1835, son of Charles C. 
and Eliza (Harriman) Gage. His education was 
acquired in the Bangor public schools. He 
began business life in 1850, as a clerk with 
David Bugbee & Co., booksellers and stationers 
of Bangor. In 1857 he removed to Portland, and 
engaged in the Hour and grain business on his 
own account. In i860 he was admitted to the 
old established firm of Blake & Jones, as a part- 
ner, under the style of Blake, Jones, & Co., 
which was subsequently changed to Blake, Jones, 
& Gage, and became the largest and most promi- 
nent concern in that trade in the State. Ten 



132 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



years later he retired from this firm and went to 
Chicago, 111., where he entered the grain commis- 
sion business in partnership with Charles F. 




Harbor (the houses of industry and reformation), 
was born in Chelsea, March 25, 1841, son of 
Richard and Sarah Ann (Ellison) Gerrish, of Exe- 
ter, N.H. He is a descendant of Captain Will- 
iam Gerrish, born in England, August 17, 1620, 
who came to this country in 1638, and died in 
Boston, November 9, 1687. His great-great-great 
grand uncle, Richard Gerrish, was one of the 
council of Governor \\"entworth before the Revo- 
lution ; and Colonel Timothy, Richard's brother, 
settled Gerrish Island, Portsmouth Harbor. His 
father was born in 1807 at Lebanon, Me., one of 
thirteen children, twelve boys and a girl, and died 
of consumption in 1843 at Nashua, N.H., where 
he went from Chelsea for his health ; and his 
mother, born in Exeter, N.H., died at eighty-four, 
of old age. He was the youngest of four children. 
He was educated in the Chelsea public schools. 
Early apprenticed to a carpenter and builder, he 
began work at that trade when in his teens, and 
pursued it till the outbreak of the Civil War. 
Then he enlisted in the First Regiment Massachu- 
setts Volunteers, and served in the field for twenty 
months, when he was discharged for disability. 
After his recovery he became a clerk in a Boston 



R. W. GAGE. 

Davis, under the firm name of Gage & Davis. In 
1875 he removed to Washington, having accepted 
a position in the United States Treasury Depart- 
ment. This office he held for nearly eight years, 
and resigned in 1883 to take the position of 
cashier in the Boston Loan Company, incor- 
porated in 1878, with a capital of one hundred and 
fifty thousand dollars, and now having among its 
directors N. B. Bryant and Charles W. Bartlett. 
well-known members of the Suffolk bar, and Hor- 
ace E. Bartlett, of Haverhill, attorney at law. He 
has since remained with this corporation, becom- 
ing its president on the first of January, i8go. 
Mr. Gage was married in 1855, at Portland, Me., 
to Miss Mary J. Blake, daughter of Charles Blake, 
with whom he subsequently became associated in 
business, as above stated. He married secondly, 
in 1874, Miss Nancy M. Howe, of Boston, daugh- 
ter of Leonard Howe. He has three sons : 
Edwin, Clinton, and William A. Gage. He re- 
sides in the suburb of AUston. 




JAMES R. GERRISH. 



dry-goods store, where he remained seven years. 

GERRISH, James Richard, superintendent Next he engaged in the real estate and building 

of the city institutions at Deer Island, Boston business for himself, and from this entered the 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



employment of the city as receiver at the Deer 
Island institutions. Three years after, in i88i, 
he was appointed superintendent of the Charles- 
town District almshouse. His services covered 
eight years. Then, in 1889, he was appointed to 
the superintendency of the Deer Island institu- 
tions, which he has held from that date. He is 
connected with the Masonic order and the Grand 
Army of the Republic: a member of the Blue 
Lodge, Chapter, Council, and Knights Templar, 
and of Abraham Lincoln Post 1 1 . He is also a 
member of the Union Veterans' Union, Camp No. 
I, General Hancock, and of the United Order of 
Workmen. He was married in Chelsea, Septem- 
ber 23, 1863, to Miss Amelia M. Getchell, of Wis- 
casset. Me. They have had four children : Emma 
Louise, Fred Leander, Amelia Annette, and Mabel 
Florence Gerrish, the last-mentioned the only one 
now livinsr. 



GINN, Edwin, publisher of school and college 
te.xt-books, Boston, is a native of Maine, born in 
Orland, February 14, 1838, son of James and 
Sarah (Blood) Ginn. His early boyhood was 
spent on the farm, with plenty of outdoor life, 
picking up rocks, milking cows, and doing the or- 
dinary work of a farmer's boy, attending the dis- 
trict school four months in the year. At the age 
of twelve he was in a logging swamp, and cook- 
ing for a crew of men. At fourteen he was fishing 
on the Grand Banks. From the Grand Banks he 
went to the seminary at Westbrook, Me. At this 
period he walked back and forth four miles from 
the farm to the seminary daily, and did all the 
farm "chores." At seventeen he began teaching 
the district school to obtain funds to continue his 
education at Westbrook. At twenty he graduated 
from the seminary (1858), and entered Tufts Col- 
lege. While in college, his eyes failed him, and 
he was obliged thereafter to depend upon class- 
mates for reading his lessons to him. He gradu- 
ated in regular course in 1862. During his col- 
lege life he taught winters, and part of the time 
boarded himself because of lack of funds. His 
business career has been wholly in the book trade. 
Six months after leaving college he went upon the 
road, tra\-elling as a commission agent, and about 
the year 1867 engaged in publishing on his own 
account. A little later Fred B. Ginn was ad- 
mitted to the business, and the firm became Ginn 
Brothers. In 1876 D. C. Heath, now of D. C. 
Heath & Co., entered the house ; and in 1881 the 



firm name was made Ginn, Heath, & Co. This 
partnership was dissolved in 1885, when Mr. 
Heath went into business for himself ; and since 
that time the firm has been Ginn & Co. Among 
the earlier publications of the house are the Rev. 
Henry N. Hudson's editions of Shakspere, Good- 
win's Greek Grammar, and the National Music 
Course by Luther Whiting Mason, which have 
been followed by a series of mathematics by Pro- 
fessor G. A. Wentworth, for many years professor 
of mathematics at Phillips (Exeter) Academy ; 
Allen and Greenough's Latin Grammar, Cx-sar 




EDWIN GINN. 

and Cicero ; Greenough"s Virgil ; " Essentials of 
English," by Professor W. D. Whitney, of Yale 
College ; college series of " Latin and Greek Au- 
thors," edited, respectively, by Clement L. Smith, 
professor of Latin in Harvard University, and 
Tracy Peck, professor of the Latin language and 
literature in Yale L^niversity, and Professor John 
Williams White, professor of Greek in Harvard 
University, and Thomas D. Seymour, Hillhouse 
professor of the Greek language and literature in 
Yale University; Goodwin and White's .\nabasis 
and White's " Beginner's Greek Book " ; Mont- 
gomery's English, French, and American His- 
tories; General and Mediaeval and Modern His- 
tories, by P. V. N. Meyers, professor of history, 



134 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



University of Cincinnati ; " Elements of Pliysics," 
by Professor A. P. Gage, of the English High 
School, Boston ; " P>eginner's Latin Book," by 
W. C Collar, head-master of the Roxbury Latin 
School, and M. Grant Daniell, of Chauncy Hall 
School ; Eysenbach's German Lessons edited by 
W. C. Collar ; Lessons in Astronomy, " Elements 
of Astronomy and College Astronomy," by Pro- 
fessor C. A. Voimg, of Princeton College : a 
full line of Sanskrit and Old English books ; 
the Athena-um Press Series of English Litera- 
ture ; Political Science Quarterly, Classical Review, 
Journal of Morphology, Philosopltical Revic70, etc. 
In politics Mr. Ginn is Independent. He is a 
member of the University, Twentieth Century, 
and Unitarian clubs, and of the Municipal 
League, all of Boston ; and of the Calumet Club, 
of Winchester, where he resides. He was mar- 
ried in 1869 to Miss Clara Glover, who died in 
1890, leaving three children: Jessie, Maurice, 
and Clara Ginn. He married in 1893 Miss 
Francesca Grebe. 



mittee from 1862 to 1865, and in the latter served 
several terms on the School Board, chairman of 
the board in 1868 and 1869. He also repre- 



GOODRICH, John Benton, member of the 
Suffolk bar, was born in Fitchburg. January 7, 
1836, son of John and Mary Ann (Blake) Good- 
rich. His ancestry is traced to \Mlliam Goodrich, 
settled in Watertown in 1634, a member of Sir 
Richard Saltonstall's colony, whose descendants 
were the earliest settlers in Fitchburg and Lunen- 
burg. One of them, Deacon David Goodrich, was 
a member of the Provincial Congress at Water- 
town, and commanded a company in the battle of 
Bunker Hill. His son John was engaged in the 
same battle, and from him the name of John con- 
tinued in direct line to the present. John B. was 
educated in the public schools of Fitchburg, fitting 
for college in the High School, and at Dartmouth, 
from which he was graduated in the class of 1857. 
He studied law, beginning immediately after his 
graduation from college, with Norcross & Snow, of 
Fitchburg, and was admitted to the bar in 1859. 
That year he opened his office in Boston, and has 
been engaged there since in general practice. 
He has met with peculiar success in jury trials, 
and has gained distinction in several notable 
capital cases. From the time of his admission to 
the bar to 1865 he was a resident of Watertown, 
and since then he has resided in Newton, in both 
places taking an active part in local afl^airs. In 
the former he was a member of the School Com- 




JOHN B. GOODRICH. 

sented Newton in the lower house of the Legis- 
lature two terms (1869-70), serving both years 
on the committee on the judiciary. From 1872 
to 1875 he was district attorney for Middlesex 
County. In politics he is a strong Republican ; 
has always taken an active part in political mat- 
ters, and is an effective political speaker. He 
is a past master of Pequossette Lodge, Masons, 
of Watertown, and prominent in various Masonic 
organizations. Mr. Goodrich was married April 
25, 1865, to Miss Anna Louisa Woodward, daugh- 
ter of Ebenezer Woodward, of Newton. They 
have one son, their only child : John A\'allace 
Goodrich, well known in musical circles as an 
accomplished organist and musical scholar. 



GOODSPEED, Joseph Horace, treasurer of 
the West End Street Railway Company of Boston, 
is a native of Connecticut, born in East Haddam, 
January 14, 1845, son of George E. and Nancy 
Green (Hayden) Goodspeed. He is a direct de- 
scendant of Roger Goodspeed, who came to Barn- 
stable in 1639 ; and on his mother's side of fames 
Green, of Barnstable (died in 1731, aged ninety), 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



135 



who was the son of James Green of Charlestown. 
The families of Nathaniel Goodspeed and James 
Green, son of James Green of Harnstable, moved 
from the Cape to East Haddam, Conn., about the 
year 1758. His early education was acquired in 
the Bacon Academy, Colchester, Conn., the Chesh- 
ire Academy, Cheshire, Conn., and the Hartford 
High School, and in 1862 he entered Trinity Col- 
lege, Hartford. He was obliged, however, to leave 
college before graduating on account of the death 
of his father, and turn his attention directly to busi- 
ness matters. His father's business was that of 
ship-building and country store, and having as a 
youth, when not in school, acted as clerk and 
assistant in the store, he had already acquired 
a knowledge of business methods. .After closing 
up the estate of his father, he went to Denver, 
Col., in 1865, to take a position in a banking 
house there of Kountze Brothers ; and for eleven 
years he lived west of the Mississippi River. In 
1866 he was vice-president of the Colorado Na- 
tional Bank of Denver, in 1867-68 cashier of the 
Rocky Mountain National Bank of Central City ; 
and in 1869-70 treasurer of Gilpin County, Colo- 




the Kansas City, St. Joseph & Council Bluffs 
Railroad Company. This position he held until 
1874, when he wms appointed general auditor of 
the Kansas City, St. Joseph & Council Bluffs, 
the Leavenworth, Lawrence & Galveston the 
Atchison & Nebraska, Kansas City, Fort Scott 
& Gulf, Chicago & West Michigan, and De- 
troit, Lansing & Michigan Railroad companies, 
which companies were then known as the "Joy 
Roads of the West," and was established at Kan- 
sas City, Mo. Two years later, in 1876, he re- 
turned to the East, having received, through 
Charles P'rancis Adams, then chairman of the 
Massachusetts Railroad Commissioners, the ap- 
pointment of " supervisor of railroad accounts '' 
for the State of Massachusetts. He was con- 
nected with the board in that position until i88i, 
and then retired to take the position of general 
auditor of the Mexican Central, Atlantic & Paci- 
fic, and California Southern railroads, under Mr. 
Thomas Nickerson. Here he remained until No- 
vember, 1887, when he was appointed treasurer of 
the West End Street Railroad Company, which 
position he has held since. Mr. Goodspeed is a 
member of the A. *. Fraternity (college society) , 
also a Knights Templar Mason ; and he belongs 
to the following societies and clubs of Boston : 
the Algonquin, Suffolk, and Boston Whist clubs, 
the Society of .\rts, and the Beacon Society, of 
which he is secretary. In politics he is Repub- 
lican. He was married January 27, 1S87, to Miss 
Arabel Morton, daughter of John 1). .Morton. 
They have no children. 



J. H. GOODSPEED. 

rado. Then in 1870 he went to St. Joseph, Mo., 
to engage in the railroad business, having ac- 
cepted the position of cashier and paymaster of 



(iR.\Y, Orin Tinkham, member of the Suf- 
folk bar, is a native of Norridgwock, Me., born 
June 2, 1839, SO" o^ Robert D. and Lurana (Tink- 
ham) Gray. He comes of Puritan stock. His 
paternal grandfather. Captain Joshua Gray, was a 
prominent and influential citizen of his town and 
county; and his maternal grandfather. Deacon 
Orin Tinkliam, after whom he was named, e.xer- 
cised, during a residence of forty years in Nor- 
ridgewock, an influence in town and church affairs 
second to that of no man in the township. Both 
of his grandfathers were officers in the war 
of 1812. His great-grandfather, the Hon. John 
Tinkham, was born and lived in Middleboro, 
this State, in a house which had been consecu- 
tively occupied by four generations of his family. 
He held town and county ofifices for many years. 



136 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



and served in both branches of the General Court. 
Mr. Gray's father was a thrifty farmer and hnnber- 




ORIN T. CRAY. 

man, who managed the farm during the summer 
months, and in the winter conducted an extensive 
lumbering business on the Kennebec and Dead 
Rivers ; and his mother won more than a local 
reputation as a writer. His education was begun 
in private schools and under private instructors, 
and he was fitted for college in the Anson and 
Bloomfield academies. At seventeen he success- 
fully passed his examination for admission to the 
sophomore class. After pursuing his collegiate 
studies for two years, during part of the time 
also engaged in teaching, he was prostrated by 
a serious illness brought on by overwork. Upon 
recovering, he took up the study of law in the 
office of Josiah H. Drummond, of Waterville, then 
the attorney-general of Maine; and, in i860, when 
he had completed his twenty-first year, he was ad- 
mitted to the bar at Augusta. He began practice 
in Waterville, but in the autumn of 1862 removed 
to Boston, where he has since been established. 
He early took an interest in politics, affiliating 
with the Republican party. He has been a mem- 
ber of several national conventions, and was chair- 
man of the committee on resolutions in that of 
the National League in 1889; and he has fre- 



quently spoken on the stump. He has also ac- 
ceptably delivered many lyceum lectures. Long 
a supporter of the temperance cause, he has made 
many addresses on this topic ; and he has re- 
peatedly served as candidate of the Prohibition 
party for attorney-general. In Hyde Park, where 
he resides, he has held a number of local official 
positions, among them that of chairman of the 
School Committee for several years, and has been 
moderator of nearly all the town meetings for 
more than twenty years. He is connected with 
the management of several corporations, and is the 
president and managing director of one of the 
largest and most successful business enterprises 
in the Southern States. He has been one of the 
trustees of the Hyde Park Savings Bank since its 
incorporation, and its attorney. Mr. Gray was 
married in i860 to Miss Louise Bradford Holmes, 
a direct descendant of Governor Bradford. 



GROZIER, Edwin Atkins, editor and pub- 
lisher of the Boston Post, is a native of California, 
born in San Francisco, September 12, 1859, son 
of Joshua F. and Mary L. (Given) Grozier. On 




E. A. GROZIER. 



both sides he is of New England ancestry, his 
father a native of Provincetown, and his mother 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



137 



of Bovvdoinham, Maine. His education was ac- 
quired in the High School of Provincetown, at 
C'hauncy Hall, Boston, at Brown l^niversity, and 
at Boston University, graduating from the latter 
in 1 88 1. His journalistic work was begun in the 
capacity of " press agent '" for the New England 
1 nstitute Fair held in Boston during the autumn 
of 1 88 1. The next two years he was a general 
reporter, first on the staff of the Boston Globe, and 
then on that of the /Tew/;/. From 1884 to 1885 
he was private secretary to Governor George D. 
Robinson, and resigned that position to take the 
place of private secretary to Joseph Pulitzer of 
the New York World. He remained with the 
World from 1885 to i8gi, occupying numerous 
positions of responsibility, including those of city 
editor of the daily, Sunday editor, managing edi- 
tor of the Evening World, and business manager 
of the Evening World. In October, iSgi, he 
purchased the controlling interest in the Boston 
I'ost, and since that time he has conducted that 
paper as chief editor and publisher. He early in- 
troduced new and novel features, reduced the 
price and increased the circulation. In 1893 he 
added a Sunday edition. In politics he was orig- 
inally a Republican, but since 1886 has been a 
i)L-mocrat. He is a member of the Algonquin 
( 'lub of Boston, the Fellowcraft of New York, the 
Belfry of Lexington, and numerous other organi- 
zations. Mr. Grozier was married November 26, 
1885, to Alice G. Goodell, of an old Salem family. 
They have two children : Richard, born in 1887 ; 
and Helen Grozier, born in 1889. 



HADLOCK, Harvey Dp:ming, of Boston, ju- 
rist and advocate, is a native of Maine, born at 
Cranberry Isles, October 7, 1843, youngest son of 
Kdwin and Mary Ann (Stanwood) Hadlock. He 
is descended in the seventh generation from Na- 
thaniel Hadlock, who came from Wapping, Eng- 
land, in 1638, settled first in Charlestown, Massa- 
chusetts Colony, and subsequently was one of the 
founders of Lancaster, whose son, Nathaniel of 
Gloucester, married a Quakeress, and who is men- 
tioned in Felt's History of Salem as having 
been fined and punished for declaring "that he 
could receive no profit from Mr. Higginson's 
preaching, and that in persecuting the Quakers 
the government was guilty of innocent blood " ; 
and through his paternal grandmother he is de- 
scended from Thomas Manchester, one of the 



earliest settlers (1642) of Portsmouth, R.I. On 
his mother's side he is a descendant of I'liilip 
Stanwood, one of the earliest settlers (1653) of 
Gloucester, and, in the fifth generation, of Job 
Stanwood, the soldier mentioned in histor\-, and 
Martha Bradstreet, his second wife ; and, through 
his maternal grandmother, of Captain John Gilley, 
an eminent shipmaster of his time, son of Will- 
iam Gilley, who came to America in 1763. Two 
of the sons of the first Nathaniel Hadlock were in 
King Phillip's War ; three Hadlocks were in the 
battle of Lexington ; others of the family name, 
including the great-grandfaliier of Harvey !).. 




iHiii^ 



HARVEY D. HADLOCK. 

were soldiers of the Revolution ; his uncle. Cap- 
tain Samuel Hadlock, Jr., was in the War of 1812, 
and his brother. Colonel William E. Hadlock, 
was in the Civil War. His grandfather, Captain 
Samuel Hadlock, acquired by purchase the 
greater part of "Little Cranberry Island " early in 
the present century, and, settling there, engaged 
in shipping and merchandise, to which business 
his father, a master mariner in early life, suc- 
ceeded. Harvey D. received his early education 
under the supervision of his mother, a woman of 
superior culture, and in the schools of his native 
town. At thirteen, the family having removed to 
Bucksport, Me., he became a student in the East 



1^,8 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Maine Conference Seminary, in which institution 
and under private instructors, he pursued an ad- 
vanced course of classical studies, which he sup- 
plemented by a partial course in the scientific 
department of Dartmouth. His legal studies 
were pursued in the law office of the Hon. 
Samuel V. Humphrey at Bangor, Me., under the 
friendly supervision of ex-Governor Edward Kent, 
then one of the justices of the Maine Supreme 
Court. At the age of twenty-one he was admitted 
to the bar of that court, and later to the Federal 
courts of the district ; and he began practice in 
Bucksport. Business drawing him to New Or- 
leans, La., he spent the winter of 1865-66 there, 
devoting much of the time to the study of civil 
and maritime law, under the direction of the emi- 
nent jurist. Christian Roselius. Within the next 
three years he was admitted to practice in the 
courts. State and P'ederal, of Nebraska, Massa- 
chusetts, and New York, establishing his main of- 
fice in Boston in the autumn of 1S68. He was 
there engaged largely in criminal cases, in the de- 
fence of which he met with marked success. In 
187 1 he returned to Bucksport to engage in pro- 
moting the railroad from Bangor to eastern points 
by way of Bucksport; and in the spring of 1873, 
the construction of the road being assured, he re- 
sumed general practice at Bucksport. He be- 
came one of the directors of the Bucksport & 
Bangor Railroad, and counsel for the corporation ; 
and his practice extended to nearly every county 
of the State, embracing some of the most impor- 
tant cases tried in Maine, in the conduct of which 
his reputation as an able advocate and jurist was 
firmly established. In 188 1 he removed from 
Bucksport to Portland, and there during a resi- 
dence of six years maintained a leading place 
among the ablest lawyers of the Cumberland bar, 
as a successful practitioner in causes involving 
important interests of railroad corporations, valu- 
able patents, and maritime affairs, besides notable 
criminal cases. It has been said that during this 
period he tried more causes than any other lawyer 
in Portland, and performed a prodigious amount 
of work. Returning to Boston in 1887, he has 
since resided and practised there, maintaining an 
office also in New York City, the range of his 
practice extending beyond the limits of the State 
and Federal courts of New England and New 
York, and embracing cases of great im|3ortance 
before the United States Supreme Court. Among 
the large number of notable cases which he has 



successfully conducted is that of Campbell <>. 
the mayor, aldermen, and commonality of the 
city of New York, involving the validity of the 
steam fire-engine patent, for many years before 
the courts, and of national importance, affecting 
every city which used steam fire-engines from 
1864 to 1 88 1. Other cases of note were the Pe- 
tition of Frederic Spofford for Certiorari t. The 
Railroad Commissioners of Maine and the Bucks- 
port & Bangor Railroad ; the Treat & Co. bank- 
rupt case, pending in the United States District 
Court of Maine from 1868 to 1889 ; that of Cod- 
man T. Brooks, involving the construction of acts 
of Congress in relation to French Spoliation 
Claims now pending in the Supreme Court of the 
United States ; numerous great trade-mark cases ; 
maritime, railroad, consular, conspiracy, and will 
cases, conspicuous among the latter the Jenness 
will case. Concord, N.H., in 1892. He was mar- 
ried January 26, 1865, to Miss Alexene L. Good- 
ell, eldest daughter of Captain Daniel S. Goodell, 
of Searsport, a prominent shipmaster, and later 
in life a successful ship-builder. They have two 
children living; Inez and \\'ebster Hadlock. 
Their eldest son, Harvey D. Hadlock, Jr., born 
December 4, 1870, died January 22, 1886, from 
accidental shooting while handling a revolver. 
Mr. Hadlock's summer residence is in Bucksport, 
occupying a picturesque site on the banks of the 
Penobscot. 

HASS.VM, John Tvi.kk, member of the Suf- 
folk bar, and a contributor to historical literature, 
is a native of Boston, born September 20, 1841, 
son of John and .\bby (Hilton) Hassam. He 
is a lineal descendant of William Hassam who 
settled in Manchester (now Manchester-by-the- 
Sea) about the year 1684, and on the maternal 
side of William Hilton who came from London 
to Plymouth in New England in the " Fortune," 
November ii, 162 1. He was educated in the 
Boston public schools, — fitted for college in the 
Latin School, — and at Harvard, where he was 
graduated in the class of 1863. In December 
following his graduation he joined the Lfnion 
Army as first lieutenant of the Seventy-fifth 
Ignited States Colored Infantry, and served until 
the first of August, 1864, taking part in the Red 
River campaign. He began his legal studies at 
the opening of 1865, reading with the Hon. .Am- 
brose A. Ranney in Boston, and was admitted to 
the bar on the 13th of December, 1867. Since 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



139 



that time he has practised in Boston, devoting 
himself principally to conveyancing. He has 
been concerned in much important and valuable 
work on the records and documents of Suffolk 
County, and their improved condition is largely 
due to his efforts. As one of the commissioners 
appointed by the Superior Court, in 1884, under 
whose authority the indices in the Suffolk Regis- 
try of Deeds are made, he brought about tile rein- 
(le.xing of the entire mass of records there on the 
present plan : and the printing of the early vol- 
umes of the .Suffolk deeds is due to him. He 
also succeeded in rescuing from threatened de- 




r»ii«»>esii..-;*iiBB!jBt!iC«»kS»75 -;-. 



JOHN T. HASSAM. 



struction a large part of the original court files of 
the county, and in securing their proper arrange- 
ment ; and through his exertions the records, files, 
papers, and documents in the State department, at 
one time in great confusion, have been systemati- 
cally arranged and made accessible for reference. 
He was one of the earliest advocates of land 
transfer reform in the newspaper and periodical 
press and before legislative committees, and he 
was the first member of the Suffolk bar to call 
public attention to the Australian or Torrens sys- 
tem of registration of title. He is now (1894) 
cliairmau of the executive committee of the Land 
Transfer Reform League of Boston. His interest 



in historical and genealogical matters dates from 
his college days. He has been a member of the 
New England Historic Genealogical Society since 
February, 1867, of the Massachusetts Historical 
Society since 1881, of the .American Historical 
Association since 1884, and a corresponding 
member of the Weymouth Historical Society for 
many years. He was one of the original mem- 
bers of the Boston .Antiquarian Club organized in 
1879, subsequently, in 1881, merged in the Bos- 
tonian Society, and a corporate member of the 
latter society, for nine years a member of its 
board of directors. In the Historic Genealogical 
Society, of which he was long a director and be- 
came a councillor when the council was substi- 
tuted for the board of directors by a change in 
the by-laws in 1889, he first set on foot the ex- 
haustive researches in England, undertaken by 
the society through Henry F. Waters, and was 
for eight years chairman of the committee under 
whose direction the work has been carried on. 
He has been a frequent contributor to the so- 
ciety's quarterly publication, the A^cw England 
Historical and Genealogical Register^ and among 
his antiquarian and genealogical papers which 
have been printed in pamphlet form are : " 'I'he 
Hassam Family" (1870, and Additional Notes, 
1889); "Some of the Descendants of William 
fiilton " (1877); '• Ezekiel Cheever, and Some of 
his Descendants" (1879, Part Second, 1884, and 
Additional Notes, 1887); "Boston Taverns, with 
Some Suggestions on the l^roper Mode of Index- 
ing the Public Records " (1880) ; " Early Suffolk 
Deeds" {1881I; "The Dover Settlement and the 
Hiltons" (1882); "Bartholomew and Richard 
Cheever, and Some of their Descendants" (1882); 
" The Facilities for Genealogical Research in the 
Registries of Probate in Boston and London " 
(1884); "Land Transfer Reform" (1891 : second 
edition, with additional papers I ; and " Land 
Transfer Reform a Practical Point of View (1893). 
Mr. Hassam is also a member of the Bunker Hill 
Monument Association and of the Boston Bar 
.Association. He was married in Salem, February 
T4, 1878, to Miss Nelly .Alden Batchelder, daugh- 
ter of Dr. John Henry Batchelder, of Salem. 
They have one child : Eleanor Hassam. 



HEMENWAV, Alfred, member of the Suffolk 
bar, is a native of Hopkinton. born .August 17, 
1839, son of Fisher and Elizabeth Jones (Fitch) 



140 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Hemenway. He was born in the house of his 
great-grandfather, Ehjah Fitch, who was gradu- 
ated at Vale College in 1765, and was the second 




ernor Ames he was offered a seat on the Superior 
Court bench, but declined the honor. Mr. Hem- 
enway was married October 14, 1871, to Miss 
Myra Leland McLanathan. 



HILL, Edwin Newei.i,, member of the .Suffolk 
bar, is a native of Xew Hampshire, born in 
Nashua, March 12, 1849, son of Edwin P. and 
Sophia D. (Newell) Hill. He is of English ances- 
try, and of early New England stock on both 
sides. The Hills — as the family was formerly 
called — settled soon after coming from England 
in Nottingham west, now Hudson, N.H. Elijah 
Hills, his great-great-grandfather, took an active 
part in the Revolutionary struggle, marched to 
Lexington, to Ticonderoga, and was at Saratoga. 
On his mother's side his great-grandparents were 
the Rev. Edmund Foster, of Littleton, and his 
wife, Phebe (Lawrence) Foster. Edmund Foster 
was at Le.xington among the minute men while a 
theological student, and afterwards was actively 
interested in the early history of the State. He 
was known as the "lighting parson." Edwin N. 



ALFRED HEMENWAY. 

pastor of the Congregational church in Hopkin- 
ton : he was descended from the Rev. James 
Fitch, the first minister of Harwich, Conn., who 
was a brother of Thomas Fitch, governor of Con- 
necticut 1754-76. Alfred Hemenway was pre- 
pared for college at the Hopkinton High School, 
and was graduated at Yale in the class of 1861. 
His legal studies were pursued at the Harvard 
Law School, and he was admitted to the bar in 
Boston on July 13, 1863. He has since been 
engaged in general civil practice in Boston, from 
1S79 ''"' partnership with John 1). Long (first 
under the name of Allen, Long, & Hemenway, 
since 1891 Long & Hemenway), and retained in 
many important causes. For some years he was 
one of the bar examiners for Suffolk County. 
He is one of the executive committee of the 
American Bar Association, one of the general 
council of the Boston Bar Association, a member 
of the Yale Alumni Association of Boston (some 
time its president), of the University Club (now a 

vice-president), of the Union Club, and of the Hill was educated in the public schools of Haver- 
Boston Art Club. In politics he is a steadfast hill, Mass., and at Harvard College, graduating in 
Republican. During the administration of Gov- the class of 1872. After graduation he depended 




E. N. HILL. 



MEN OK PROGRESS. 



141 



cntircl)' oil his own efforts. The succeeding year 
was spent in Washington in the pubHc service ; 
and then he entered the office of the late Richard 
H. Dana, Jr., the distinguished lawyer, in Boston, 
where he fitted for the bar. He was admitted to 
practice on the 24th of .Vpril, 1876. With the ex- 
ception of a short time in Haverhill soon after his 
admission, he has practised in Boston. He has 
not followed any special line of business, but has 
had a general and responsible practice. Although 
giving close attention to his professional work, he 
keeps abreast of all public political questions, in 
which he is greatly interested, and has shown 
aptitude in advising and directing political move- 
ments. }Ie was elected to the Legislature from 
Haverhill in 1881-82 and 1882-83, as a Repub- 
lican, and served on the committees on education, 
.Slate Library, and railroads, on the special com- 
mittee for the investigation of the veto of the 
I'nion Safety Deposit Vaults bill by Governor 
I Sutler, and as house chairman on the removal of 
Joseph M. Day, judge of probate and insolvency 
of Barnstable County. Mr. Hill is now in politics 
a Democrat, believing in tariff reform and a per- 
manent civil service. He is a member of the 
University Club of Boston, of the Jamaica Club of 
Jamaica Plain, West Roxbury District, and of the 
Voung Men's Democratic Club of Massachusetts. 
For several years he has been an active member 
of the First Corps of Cadets, Boston, in which he 
takes great interest. Mr. Hill was married June 
10, 1880, to Miss Lizzie W. Briggs, of Cambridge. 
They have two children : Walter Newell, born 
September 29, 1881, and Doris Hill, born August 
31, 1S87. 

HILL, Henry Bozvol, long identified with 
East Boston interests, is a native of Salem, born 
November 16, 1823, son of Benjamin and Anstiss 
Pearce (Lane) Hill. His ancestors on both sides 
were English, the Hills coming: to America in 
1727. His father, grandfather, and great-grand- 
father were all ship-masters. He was educated 
in the common schools in Salem. At the age of 
fifteen he made a voyage in the brig " Chili," 
Captain Frederick G. Ward, father of General 
\\'ard of Chinese fame, and upon his return 
learned the cooper's trade in the same building in 
which many years before the great Salem mer- 
chant, William Gray, as a boy, began his mercan- 
tile career. He began business for himself in a 
small way in Salem, but in 1848 moved to East 



Boston, where he has resided since, with the 
exception of eighteen months spent in Cuba. 
While in Cuba, he was offered the position of 





1 



HENRY B. HILL. 

commercial agent, but declined it. as he did not 
intend to remain on the island. In 1853, soon 
after his return from Cuba, he became connected 
in business with John K. Carlton, and later 
founded the firm of Hill & Wright, which thirty 
years afterward became the New England Steam 
Cooperage Company, with Mr. Hill as president. 
He has also been president and director of other 
corporations, was one of the founders of the 
First Ward National Bank, for some time one of 
its directors, and was one of the early presidents 
of the East Boston Trade Association. He has 
served several terms in the Legislature, three 
years in the House of Representatives (1872-73- 
76) and two years in the Senate (1877-78), his 
first term a member of the committee on State 
House, his second chairman of the committee on 
printing, his third chairman of the committee on 
claims ; his first in the Senate, again chairman 
of the committee on claims and member of that 
on harbors, and his second in the Senate chair- 
man of both of these committees. Two years' ex- 
perience on the committee on claims caused him 
to put an order into the Senate requesting the 



142 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



committee of the judiciary to consider the expedi- 
ency of estabHshing some tribunal other than a 
legislative committee before which claims against 
the Commonwealth could be adjusted. Owing to 
the pressure of business, the committee made no 
report, although they gave him a hearing ; but 
Governor Talbot, in his message of 1879, recom- 
mended a change, and, acting on the message, 
the Legislature then passed the act giving the Su- 
perior Court jurisdiction of such claims. Accord- 
ingly, the legislative committee on claims has now 
become a thing of the past. When the subject of 
establishing a municipal court in East Boston 
first came before the Legislature, in 1873, Mr. 
Hill took great interest in it; and, although the 
project was then defeated, it was subsequently 
again brought forward, when all the evidence on 
which the committee on the judiciary acted in re- 
porting it was collected and presented by him, 
and it successfully passed. When he was elected 
to the Legislature, he intended to do his whole 
duty as he understood it, which, he believed, in- 
cluded his presence every second of every session. 
In this respect his record was remarkable. With 
two exceptions, — one occasion in 1873, when he 
was absent a short time on a duty of importance 
to his constituents, and the otiier in 1878, wlien 
he was summoned to court as a witness, and was 
absent an hour or two, — he never lost a minute. 
He was in the House or Senate when they were 
called to order, and remained until adjournment 
was reached. In politics he was an early Repub- 
lican, one of the first to become a member of that 
party on its birth ; but, believing that " loyalty is 
due to the country and its best niterests rather 
than to party," he is now an Independent. He 
was a warm friend of the late Rev. Warren H. 
Cudworth, long pastor of the "Church of Our 
Father" in East Boston (Unitarian), and was for 
many )'ears teacher and superintendent in the 
Sunday-school, taking charge of the school as su- 
perintendent in Mr. Cudworth's absence during 
his journey around the world and at his death ; 
and he is now honorary superintendent of the 
school. He was also for many years moderator 
of the church society, and held other positions 
there. He is at present (1894) a councillor of 
the American Institute of Civics, a director and 
vice-president of the Massachusetts Society for 
the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, and di- 
rector and vice-president also of the American 
Humane Education Society. He practically re- 



tired from active business in 1888; but he still 
retains an interest in business matters, being a 
member of the board of directors of the Standard 
Stave and Cooperage Company and a trustee of 
the East Boston Savings Bank. He was married 
on January i, 1846, to Miss Mary Louise Saul, 
daughter of Captain John and Martha (Foye) 
Saul. They have had three children: Henrietta 
Louise, John Henry (who died in childhood), and 
Benjamin Dudley Hill. 




C. D. HOLMES. 

HOLMES, Charles Denison, of Boston, man- 
ager for Massachusetts of the Covenant Mutual 
Benefit Association of Illinois, is a native of Ver- 
mont, born in Derby, July 15, 1849, only living 
son of Orange Simon and Laura (McGaffee) 
Holmes. He is a descendant of Jeremiah Holmes, 
an officer in the Revolution, also of Colonel 
George Denison and Major-General Daniel Deni- 
son, of English landed nobility. He was educated 
in the common schools, and at Stanstead Academy 
in the Province of Quebec, Canada. His first ex- 
perience in business was with his uncle, George 
R. Holmes, and his father, in a general country 
store, which he entered at the age of fourteen. 
1 )uring the period of his service here he fre- 
quently came to Boston with his uncle to buy 



MKN OF PROGRESS. 



143 



goods, and his ambition was to make this city his 
future home. After his uncle died he became in- 
terested in life insurance, and, devotins; himself 
earnestly to this business, was soon prominent 
and successful. He settled in lioston in icScS4, 
making this city his headquarters for a variety of 
efficient work, finally becoming the manager for 
Massachusetts of the Covenant Mutual Benefit 
Association of Illinois, one of the oldest, largest, 
and most successfid natural premium companies 
in the country. In the year 1893 he accomplished 
for Ills company, as the records show, the greatest 
amount of business of any in the State. Mr. 
Holmes was married by Rev. Krooke Herford, 
August 28, 1889, to Miss Carrie Addie Smith, com- 
poser of music, one of her songs, "The Prophet," 
being of twenty years' standing. Mrs. Holmes is 
a native of Boston, and descendant of the families 
of Sir Montague and Sir Montacute of England. 
They reside at the Charlesgate. 



HOPEWELL, John, Jk., treasurer of Sanford 
Mills, with offices in Boston, New York, and Chi- 
cago, and mills at Sanford, Me., is a native of 
Greenfield, born February 2, 1845, son of John 
and Catherine Hopewell. When he was a year 
old, his parents moved to Shelburne Falls ; and 
there his early education was attained. He at- 
tended the public schools till he was fourteen, 
when he went into the establishment of Lamson, 
(loodwin, & Co., to learn the cutlery trade. A 
part of the time while here he attended night 
school at the academy. Subsequently he studied 
sometime in a private school. In 1861 he went 
to Springfield. During the Civil War he was em- 
ployed in the United States Armory there, being 
dropped at the close of the war in accordance with 
an order directing the discharge of all single men. 
Attending night school while at the armory, he 
mastered book-keeping, and then secured a posi- 
tion as an accountant ; but this was not to his liking, 
and he soon relinquished it to engage in a more 
active occupation. For a while he carried on a 
publishing business in Albany, N.Y. Next, as a 
new venture, he engaged in the sale of the prod- 
ucts of L. C. Chase &: Co., manufacturers of 
plushes, robes, and blankets, for Josiah Cum- 
mings, of Springfield. Subsequently he handled 
the Chases' goods on the road, and then in i868 
came to Boston as their representative. At that 
time tlic\- had. in partnership with Thomas Cood- 



all, just erected the Sanford Mills at Sanford, Me. 
After Mr. Hopewell's connection with the concern 
the business rapidly increased; and in 1888 he 
succeeded the Chases, becoming head of the 
house of L. C (^hase iV Co. and treasurer of San- 
ford Mills. Though much interested in public 
matters and often urged to accept political office, 
he took no active part in political aft'airs until 
1887. In 1889 he was elected president of the 
Cambridge Republican Club, which office he held 
until he went abroad in 1892. In 1891 he was 




JOHN HOPEWELL, Jr. 

elected to the Legislature, and in the spring of 
1892 was repeatedly solicited to stand as a candi- 
date for Congress as a representative business 
man ; but, owing to ill-health following a severe 
attack of the grip, he declined the use of his name 
for any public office, and, going abroad, spent a 
year in Europe. Politically he is an ardent Re- 
publican and Protectionist, and has been a direc- 
tor of the Home Market Club since its organiza- 
tion. Through his efforts in 1888 the statutes 
were so changed that old established houses can 
continue the old firm name with special partners, 
with the consent of retiring partners, — a much 
needed reform in this State. He is a director of 
the North National Bank of Boston, and of sev- 
eral other corporations. Of late years he has been 



144 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



largely engaged, in connection with his brothers 
Frank and Alfred, under the firm name of Hope- 
well Brothers, in raising Guernsey cattle on their 
Maple Ranch Stock Farm at Natick. They im- 
ported direct from Guernsey a valuable herd, 
carefully selected with the aid of an expert, for 
their butter-producing qualities ; and they have 
supplied some of the finest farms in the country 
with high-grade stock, among them that of ex- 
Vice-President Morton on the Hudson. Mr. 
Hopewell is a member of the Boston Merchants' 
Association (a director in 1892), of the Colonial, 
Cambridge, and Union clubs of Cambridge, 
and of the Boston Art Club. In .\pril. 1S94, 
his father and mother celebrated their golden 
wedding at his home in Cambridge, upon which 
occasion there were gathered at the anniversary 
dinner the three sons of the venerable couple, 
with their wives, and seven grandchildren. Mr. 
Hopewell was married in 1870 to Miss Sarah \\'. 
Blake, daughter of Charles and Betsey (Pease) 
Blake, of Springfield ; and his family now con- 
sists of three boys and two girls. Mrs. Hope- 
well's great-grandfather was in the Revolutionary 
war, and her grandfather in the War of 1812. 



HORR, Rev. Georce Edwin, Jr., of Boston, 
editor-in-chief of the Watchman, was born in Bos- 
ton, January 19, 1856, son of George E. and Elsie 
Matilda (Ellis) Horr. His father, the son of the 
late Luther Horr, of Wellesley, is a clergyman 
who has held several prominent pastorates in the 
Baptist Church. He was educated at the Newark 
(N.J.) public High School and at Brown Univer- 
sity, where he graduated in the class of 1876, and 
received his theological training at the Union 
Theological Seminary, New York City, 1S76-77, 
and at the Newton Theological Institution, gradu- 
ating therefrom in the class of 1879. His first 
settlement was at Tarrytown, N.Y., as pastor of 
the First Baptist Church, his service here cover- 
ing four and a half years, from October, 1879, to 
April, 1884. Then he became pastor of the 
First Baptist Church in the Charlestown District 
of Boston, where he remained till the summer of 
1 89 1 (from April, 1884, to July, 1891), resigning 
to take the chief editorship of the Watchman. A 
few months later he purchased a controlling inter- 
est in the paper. Before assuming the editorial 
chair (June, 1891), he had done much work for 
denominational papers, both as correspondent and 



as assistant editor. While pastor of the church 
at Tarrytown, he wrote editorially for the Chris- 
tian at Jl'arh, and subsequently for two years was 
a correspondent of the New York Examiner. He 
also served the Watchman as correspondent seven 
years, and as associate editor two and a lialf 
years. While in charge of the parish at Charles- 
town, in addition to his work on the Watchman, 
he contributed to the Baptist Quarterly and the 
Chicago Standard, and wrote a " History of the 
Baptists " and several monographs on historical 
and theological subjects. He has been for five 




GEO. E. HORR. Jr. 

years on the board of examiners of Newton The- 
ological Institution, and is one of its trustees. 
He is also a director of the Massachusetts Bap- 
tist Education Society. He was married March 
16, 1886, to (Mrs.) Evelyn Sacchi, daughter of 
the late Charles ( )lmsted, of Tarrytown, N.Y. 
They have no children. Their home is at Brook- 
line. 



HOWE, El.mer P.^rker, member of the Suf- 
folk bar, is a native of Westborough, born Novem- 
ber I, 185 1, son of Archelaus M. and H. Janette 
(Brigham) Howe. His education was acquired 
in the Worcester public schools, in tlie Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute from which he graduated in 



MKN (M" PROGRESS. 



145 



187 1, and at Yale College, graduating therefrom 
in the class of 1876. He studied law in Uoston 
with Hillard, Hyde, & Dickinson, and for one 




ELMER P. HOWE. 

year attended lectures at the law school of 
Boston University. In 1878 he was admitted to 
the bar at Worcester. In January following he 
became a member of the firm of Hillard, Hyde, 
& Dickinson, the firm name becoming Hyde, 
Dickinson, & Howe, after the death of George S. 
Hillard early in 1879. This partnership contin- 
ued until 1889, when it was dissolved by mutual 
consent. Mr. Howe has made a specialty of 
patent and corporation law. He is a member 
of the Union, University, and Country clubs of 
Boston. In politics he is an Independent Re- 
publican. He is unmarried. 



HOWLANl), Wii.LARD, member of the Suffolk 
bar, was born in Pembroke, December 3, 1852, 
son of Jairus and Deborah L. (Fish) Howland. 
He is of the original Howland family of the " May- 
flower" stock, descending from John Howland, 
settled with the earliest in Plymouth. His edu- 
cation was acquired in the public schools of 
Kingston and Woburn, the family moving to the 



school, he spent some years in active business life 
before beginning the study of law. When at 
length able to pursue legal studies, he entered 
the Boston University Law School, and further 
perfected himself by reading in the office of 
Josiah W. Hubbard. Admitted to the bar in 
November, 1878, he began active practice in Bos- 
ton, where he has been established since, occupy- 
ing from the start offices at No. 23 Court Street. 
In politics he is Republican, and early became 
prominent in his party in the State, taking in 
each campaign an influential part and speaking 
on the stump. In 1889-90 he was a member of 
the lower house of the Legislature for the Twenty- 
seventh Suffolk District, where he ranked with 
the leaders. During his first term he was a mem- 
ber of the committee on the judiciary, and the 
second year served again on this committee, and 
was chairman of the committees on street rail- 
ways. He introduced the first bill which became 
a law to allow cities and towns to manufacture 
and sell gas. He has occupied the office of 
judge advocate for the State, in the military order 
of Sons of Veterans, and holds official position in 




WILLARD HOWLAND. 



several secret and benevolent societies. He is a 
mendjer also of the local clubs of Chelsea, where 



latter place when he was a child. After leaving he resides, a vice-president of the Middlesex (po- 



146 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



litical diningj Club, and a member of the Massa- 
chusetts Young Men's Republican Club. He was 
married in 1873 to Miss Lottie A. S. Barry, of 
Boston. They have two children : Fred C. (born 
in 1876) and Lizzie A. Rowland (born in 1880). 



HUNT, Freeman, member of the Suffolk and 
Middlese.x bars, is a native of Brooklyn, N.V., 
born September 4, 1855, son of Freeman and 
Elizabeth T. (Parmenter) Hunt. His father was 
the founder and editor of Hiiiif s Mcirhants' Afair- 




FREEMAN HUNT. 



tinned till the close of 1886, when he became as- 
sociated with Charles J. Mclntire, now judge of 
the Probate Court of Middlesex County, the part- 
nership still holding, Mr. Hunt taking charge of 
all the active work. He has been connected with 
a number of important cases involving novel 
points, among them that of the City of Cambridge 
V. The Railroad Commissioners in writ of certio- 
rari, where the commissioners attempted to enforce 
upon the city an overhead crossing at the P'ront 
Street crossing, Cambridge ; and that of the Bos- 
ton & Albany Railroad v. The City of Cambridge, 
where he raised the point that the making a rail- 
road pay for cattle-guards, gates, and other addi- 
tional safeguards when a new crossing was laid 
over the railroad was not such damage as the 
railroad could recover against the city or town 
laying the new crossing, as it was not a taking 
by eminent domain. He has also been prominent 
in the litigation against the Iron Hall, and drafted 
the bill in equity which wound up the order. He 
has served several terms on the School Commit- 
tee of Cambridge (1883-87), and one term in the 
Cambridge Common Council (1888), and in 1890 
he was a member of the State Senate. In the 
latter body he served on the committees on the 
judiciary, elections, contested election cases, and 
bills in the third reading (chairman); and he was 
principally instrumental in getting the Harvard 
bridge project through. He held the seat in the 
Senate which his uncle, the late 1 )r. Ezra Par- 
menter, of Cambridge, and his grandfather had 
occupied before him. Mr. Hunt was married 
on June 8, 1887, in Cambridge, to Miss Abbie 
Brooks, daughter of Sumner J. Brooks. They 
have one child : Edith Brooks Hunt. 



irzi/ic, and his mother was a daughter of the Hon. 
William Parmenter, of Cambridge (son of Ezra 
Parmenter), who represented the Cambridge Dis- 
trict in Congress for four terms, and sister of the 
Hon. W. E. Parmenter, present chief justice of 
the municipal court of Boston. He was edu- 
cated in the Cambridge public schools and at 
Harvard, graduating from the latter in the class 
of 1877. His law studies were pursued in the 
Harvard Law School, from which he graduated in 

188 1, and in the Boston office of the Hon. George 
S. Hale ; and he was admitted to the bar in 

1882. He began practice in partnership with 
H. Eugene Bowles, but was soon after in associa- 
tion with William C. Tarbell, which relation con- 



HUNTRESS, George Lewi.s, member of the 
Suffolk bar, is a native of Lowell, born April 4, 
1848, son of James Lewis and Harriett Stinson 
(Paige) Huntress. He is descended on the pa- 
ternal side from the Huntress and Chesley fami- 
lies of New Hampshire, and on the maternal from 
the Stinson, Stark, and Paige families, also of 
New Hampshire. His early education was at- 
tained in the public schools, and he was fitted for 
college at Phillips (Andover) Academy. Entering 
Yale, he graduated therefrom in the class of 1870 
with honors. He began his law studies in the 
Harvard Law School in 187 1, and subsequently 
read in the Boston law office of Stephen B. Ives, 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



14; 



Jr., and Solomon Lincoln, .\dinilted to the Suf- 
folk bur in May, 1872, he joined Messrs. Ives & 

Lincoln, and in 1876 was admitted to partnership, 




GEO. L. HUNTRESS. 

the firm name becoming Ives, Lincoln, \: Hun- 
tress. This relation continued till 18S1, since 
which time he has practised alone. In politics 
he is Republican, and in 1881-82 was an influ- 
ential member of the Hoston Common Council, on 
the Republican side, representing Ward Eleven. 
His present residence is in Winchester. He was 
married September 30, 1875, to Miss Julia .\. 
Poole, of Metuchen, N.J. They have two chil- 
dren : Harold Poole and George L. Huntress, Jr. 



JOHNSON, Bexj.amix Xkwhai.i,, member of 
the Suffolk bar, is a native of Lynn, born June 19, 
1856, son of Rufus and Ellen M. (Xewhall) John- 
son. He is a descendant of Richard Johnson, 
one of the earliest settlers in Lynn, and on the 
maternal side of Thomas Newhall, the first white 
child born in Lynn. His maternal grandfather, 
Benjamin E. Newhall, was for years prominent in 
Esse.x County as county commissioner and other- 
wise. He spent his early boyhood in the town of 
Saugus, was fitted for college in Chauncy Hal! 
School, Boston, and at Phillips (E.xeter) .Vcademy, 



and graduated from Harvard in the class of 187S. 
Subsecjuently he took the full course at the Law 
School of Boston University, and read two years 
in the office of the late eminent lawyer, Stephen 
B. Ives. Admitted to the bar on the 3i.st of 
March, 1880, he opened an office in Boston, where 
he has since continued, engaged in a considerable 
and increasing general practice. His aims and 
ambitions being mostly in the line of his profes- 
sion, the work of which he has followed closely, 
he has held no public office except that of mem- 
licr of the School Committee of Lynn for three 
terms (1890-93). In politics he has always been 
a Republican. He is a member of the University 
and Exchange clubs of Boston, and of the Oxford 
and Park clubs of Lynn. He was president of 
the Oxford, the largest social club in Lynn, in 
1890-93, the years of his service on tlie School 




BENJAMIN N. JOHNSON. 

Board. Mr. Johnson was married June 15, 1881, 
to Miss Ida M. Oliver, of Saugus. They have 
two children : Romilly and Marian Johnson. 



J(WES, LEON.-\Rr) Auia'siLs. member of the 
Sufl'olk bar since 1858, one of the editors of the 
Amcr'u-ait Law Review since 1884, and author of 
a number of important legal works, is a native of 



148 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Teinpleton, born January 13, 1832, son of Au- 
gustus Appleton and Mary (Partridge) Jones. 
He is of the seventh generation in descent from 
his earliest ancestor in this country, who came 
from England, and settled in Roxbury about 1640. 
His great-grandfather was one of the original 
proprietors and earliest settlers of Templeton. 
His mother's family was formerly of Walpole and 
Medfield. In the last-named town the earliest of 
the family in America settled about 1650. He 
was educated at the Lawrence Academy, Groton, 
and at Harvard College, graduating from the 




LEONARD A. JONES. 

latter in the class of 1855. In his senior year at 
Harvard he was awarded the prize for the best 
Bowdoin dissertation. Directly after graduation 
he obtained the position of teacher of the classics 
in the High School of St. Louis, Mo. There he 
remained until the summer of 1856, when, after 
declining an appointment as tutor in Washington 
University, he returned to Massachusetts, and 
entered the Harvard Law School. While here, he 
obtained the prize open to resident graduates of 
the university, and a law school prize for an essay. 
Graduating in 1858, he continued his law studies 
for a few months in the Boston law office of 
C. W. Loring, and then was admitted to the bar. 
He began the practice of his profession by him- 



self, occupying an office at No. 5 Court Street 
with Wilder Dwight. Shortly after he moved to 
No. 4, the same street, sharing an office with 
George Putnam. In 1866 he formed a partner- 
ship with his classmate, Edwin Hale Abbot, 
which a year or two later was joined by John 
Lathrop, now Judge Lathrop of the Supreme 
Court of the Commonwealth, the firm name be- 
coming Lathrop, Abbot, & Jones. After an ex- 
istence of several years this firm was dissolved, 
and since 1876 Mr. Jones has practised alone. 
His literary work began early in his career with 
contributions to the literary periodicals, among 
them the Atlaiilii Moiif/ih-, the A'orth Amciiian 
Review, and the Old niid Nnv, — the magazine 
which Edward Everett Hale founded in i86g, 
and conducted for some years. Subsequentlv he 
became a frequent contributor to the law periodi- 
cals. His legal publications in book form in- 
clude " Mortgage of Real Property " (two volumes, 
editions 1878, 1879, 1882, 1889, 1894), "Mort- 
gages of Personal Property" (1881, 1883, 1888, 
1894), "Corporate Bonds and Mortgages" (1879, 
i8go), " Pledges including Collateral Securities " 
(1883), " Liens, Common Law, Statutory, Equi- 
table, and Maritime" (two volumes, 1888, 1894), 
"Forms in Conveyancing" (1886, 1891, 1892, 
1894), and •• Index to Legal Periodical Literature" 
( 1 888 ). These works are used everywhere in Amer- 
ica, and many of these have passed through several 
revised editions. In 1891 Mr. Jones was appointed 
by Governor Russell commissioner for Massachu- 
setts for the promotion of uniformity of legislation 
in the United States. He was married December 
14, 1867, to Miss Josephine Lee, daughter of Colo- 
nel A. Lee, of Templeton. Thev have no children 
living. 



KEELER, CoRXELius Peaslev, merchant, Bos- 
ton, head of the furniture house of Keeler & Co., 
is a native of Vermont, born in Hyde Park, Sep- 
tember 20, 1825, son of Anson and Mary Keeler. 
He was educated in the public schools. At the 
age of eighteen he was in business, engaged in 
buying furs in Canada, which he shipped to Bos- 
ton, and for some time was one of the largest sup- 
pliers to the old fur house of Martin L. Bates & 
Co. At the age of twenty-one, he went into the 
retail dry goods and grocery business with his 
brother. Colonel N. P. Keeler. They did the 
buying of butter and cheese for the large house 
of Delano & Co., of Boston, and also the buying 



MEN OK PROGRESS. 



'49 



of hops lor l!t;unclt. 'I'his kept him busy till K ITTRED(}K, Charles Franklin, nic-mhcr 

1852, when he sold out. The next year he came of the Suffolk bar, is a native of New Hampshire, 
to Boston, and entered the hotel business, takinji born in Mount Vernon, February 24, 1841, son of 

Franklin Otis and Mary Ann (Button) Kittredge. 
He is of English descent, from the Kittredges of 
Suffolk County, England, the first of the family 
coming to this country in 1632. A long line of 
his ancestors on the paternal side were physi- 
cians, but his father was a merchant. His early 
training was in the common schools and at Apple- 
ton Academy in his native town, where he was 
fitted for college ; and, entering Dartmouth in 
1859, he graduated therefrom with the class of 
1863. During his college course and a part of 
the time at the academy he taught school. From 
August, 1863, the year of his graduation, to 
.August, 1864, he was in the ordnance bureau of the 
War Department in Washington, and at the same 
time served in the regiment of the War Depart- 
ment Rifles as a private. Then, returning East in 
October, 1864, he began his law studies in the 
office of the Hon. John T. Healy, corporation 
counsel (or city solicitor, as the office was then 
known) of Boston. Three vears later, in October, 




C. P. KEELER. 



what was then the Massachusetts House, a well- 
known resort for Vermonters, and terminus of the 
Concord, N.H., stage line, which he carried on 
successfully till i85o, when he started a w-holesale 
grocery and wine business in Blackstone Street. 
In 1872, after closing out the latter business, he 
became a trustee for the Geldowsky Furniture 
Company, and eleven years later purchased the 
entire plant and business, which has since been 
widely known to New Englanders under the firm 
name of Keeler & Co. This concern was the first 
one in America to ship hard wood furniture to 
Great Britain in large quantities. Mr. Keeler has 
always taken a hearty interest in sports ; has been 
a well-known shot; and between 1855 and 1870 
raised and was interested in several of America's 
finest trotters. He is a member of the Suffolk 
Club of Boston. In politics he is a Democrat. 
He was married July 1 1, 1848, to Miss Lucy Jane 
Nye, daughter of Judge George Nye, of Irasburg, 
Vt. She died in 1876. Of their children, two 
daughters died in early youth, and one son is liv- 
ing. Colonel George A. Keeler, the present pro- 
prietor of the American House, Boston. 




CHARLES F. KITTREDGE. 



1867, he was admitted to the Suffolk bar 
has practised in Boston ever since. I 

1868, he was made second assistant city 



, and he 
n .\pril, 
solicitor 



'50 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



in the law department of the city of lioston, and 
was soon promoted to first assistant, in which posi- 
tion he continued liy yearly reappointment eleven 
years. Early in his professional career he was 
engaged in the trial of important causes involving 
questions of taxation, public betterments, land 
damages, and municipal powers, rights, and duties ; 
and since his retirement from the law department 
of the city, in pursuing a general practice, he has 
given special attention to municipal, banking, and 
other branches of law. Just previous to his ad- 
mission to the bar, when holding his legal resi- 
dence in New Hampshire, he served a term in the 
Legislature there, being elected to the House of 
Representatives from Mount Vernon in March, 
1867 ; and from June to October, that year, when 
he removed to Boston, he was on the military 
staff of Governor Walter Harriman as aide-de- 
camp with rank of colonel. In national and State 
politics he is Republican, and non-partisan in 
municipal politics. He is interested in all ques- 
tions affecting public improvements, as a citizen 
and an owner of real estate in Boston. He is not 
a club man, and belongs to few societies. He 
was married September 24, 1872, in Groton, to 
Miss Adelaide L. Lee, daughter of George Hunt- 
ington and Mary J. (King) Lee. They have four 
children : INLabel Lee, Florence Parmenter, Louise 
Pierce, and Charles Lee Kittredge. 



LINCOLN, Joseph B.ates, of Boston, sole 
proprietor of the shoe jobbing house of Batch- 
elder & Lincoln, was born in North Cohasset, 
July 3, 1836, son of Ephraim and Betsey (Bates) 
Lincoln. He was reared on a farm, and educated 
in the public schools, graduating from the Cohas- 
set High School at the age of seventeen. After 
leaving school, he spent three months at Comer's 
Commercial College in Boston, and then began 
his business career as a clerk in a Boston retail 
boot and shoe store. After a few years here he 
entered the employ of A. Esterbrook, also a retail 
shoe dealer, on Merchants' Row, and in 1S59, 
forming a partnership with George C. Richards, 
under the firm name of Richards & Lincoln, ac- 
quired Mr. Esterbrook's business. About three 
years later he purchased his partner's interest, 
and conducted the business alone till 1866, when 
he formed a copartnership with George A. Mans- 
field and Edward E. Batchelder, under the name 
of George A. Mansfield & Co., and entered the 



shoe jobbing trade. In 1869, Mr. Mansfield re- 
tiring, the firm name was changed to the present 
style of Batchelder & Lincoln. Messrs. Batch- 
elder and Lincoln continued together till the 
death of the former, in 1878, when his interest 
was purchased from the heirs by Mr. Lincoln. 
Since that time Mr. Lincoln has been the sole 
proprietor and manager of the business, which has 
grown to great proportions, e.xtending to all parts 
of the country. Until 1874 the house was es- 
tablished in Faneuil Hall Square. That year 
removal was made to the present quarters on 
Federal Street, where six floors of one large build- 
ing and two of an adjoining building are occu- 
pied, and a force of nearly one hundred and fifty 
persons is employed. Mr. Lincoln was one of 
the earliest to adopt in the conduct of his busi- 
ness the principle known among shoe jobbers as 
the New England method, and his house has long 
been recognized as a distinctive New England 
house. He personally supervises the several de- 
partments of the business, which are thoroughly 
systematized, and follows every detail. He has 
few outside interests, the only one of magnitude 




J. B. LINCOLN. 



being the Dennison Land and Investment Com- 
pany, of which he has been a director since its 
organization. In politics he has always been a 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



15' 



Democrat, but lins been reluctant to enter public 
life. In 189 1, however, upon the urgent solicita- 
tion of his friends, he accepted the Democratic 
nomination for representative in the Legislature 
for the Fourth Plymouth District, a strong Re- 
publican quarter. Although defeated, he received 
a flattering vote ; and, renominated the next year, 
he was elected, the first Democrat ever sent to 
the house from this district. In the Legislature 
lie served on the important committee on mercan- 
tile affairs. He was one of the founders of the 
Boot and Shoe Club of IJoston, and since its or- 
ganization has served as chairman of the execu- 
tive committee, declining the position of president 
of the club. He is a past president and now 
vice-president of the Narragansett Boot and Shoe 
Club, and is a member of the executive board of 
the New England Shoe and Leather Association. 



time, and is now its president ; and he has been 
most influential in securing legislation in Massa- 
chusetts favorable to natural premium insiuance. 



LITCHFIELD, George Allen, one of the 
founders of the Massachusetts Benefit Life Asso- 
ciation, is a native of Scituate, born August 21, 
1838, son of Richard and Xoa (Clapp) Litchfield. 
His early education was attained in the local pub- 
lic schools, and he was fitted for college in the 
Hanover Academy. He entered Brown Univer- 
sity, but through stress of circumstances was able 
to complete but part of the college course. Upon 
leaving college, he studied for the ministry, and in 
1861 began regular preaching, settled as pastor 
over the Baptist church in Winchendon. Here 
he remained for five years; and then, on account 
of ill health, he was obliged to relinquish his pro- 
fessional work. Subsequently, turning his atten- 
tion to the insurance business, he successfully en- 
gaged in the conduct of a large life insurance 
agency for Western Massachusetts. Then from 
1874 to 1879 he was engaged in the tack and nail 
manufacture under the firm name of Brigham, 
Litchfield &: \'ining, having purchased a half-in- 
terest in the manufactory in South Abington, es- 
tablished by Brigham, Whitman, & Co. Again 
interesting himself in insurance matters, in the 
autumn of 1879 he joined in the organization of 
the Massachusetts Benefit Life Association, the 
leading company in New England engaged in the 
natural premium insurance business, having on its 
books the names of thousands of business men in 
Boston and other great cities in the country. He 
has continued in the active management of this 
company from its establishment to the present 



«;^ 




GEORGE A. LITCHFIELD. 

He is also a director of the Lincoln National 
Bank of Boston. During his residence in Win- 
chendon he was chairman of the school board ; 
and in Quincy, where he now resides, he was 
for some time chairman of the Republican city 
committee, and has occupied various other offices. 
Mr. Litchfield was married November 21, 1861, 
in South Abington, to Miss Sarah M. Gurney, 
daughter of David and Eliza (Blanchard) Gurney. 
They have three children : Cannie Zetta, Everett 
Starr, and Frederick Ellsworth Litchfield. 



LIVERMORE, Joseph Perkins, of Boston, 
patent solicitor and expert in patent cases, is a 
native of Clinton, born F'ebruary 19, 1855, son 
of Leonard Jarvis and Mary Ann Catherine (Per- 
kins) Livermore. He is a descendant of Jonathan 
Livermore, of Wilton, N.H., who lived in the 
eighteenth and nineteenth centuries (born 1700, 
died 1801); and on the maternal side, descend- 
ant in the third generation, of Joseph Perkins, of 
Essex, Mass. His father, paternal grandfather, 
and great-grandfather were all graduates of Har- 



152 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



vard College, — the father in 1S42, the grand- 
father in 1802, and the great-grandfather in 1760. 
He also graduated from Harvard, in the class 




Goodyear Shoe Machinery C'ompan)', General 
Electric Company, Municipal Signal Company, 
and Gamewell Fire Alarm Telegraph Company. 
In politics Mr. Livermore is classed as a " Demo- 
cratic Mugwump." He is a member of the New- 
England Tariff Reform League, of the Massachu- 
setts Reform Club, and of the University, Ath- 
letic, and Colonial (Cambridge) clubs. He was 
married in 1880, and has three children. 



LOWELL, John, Jr., member of the Suffolk 
bar, eldest son of John and Lucy B. Lowell [see 
Lowell, John], was born in Boston, May 23, 1856. 
He was fitted for college at William N. Eayr's 
private school, and was graduated from Harvard 
in the class of 1877. His law studies were pur- 
sued at the Harvard Law School two years, and 
afterward in the Boston offices of Thornton K. 
Lothrop and Robert R. Bishop, now a justice of 
the Superior Court of Massachusetts; and he was 
admitted to the Suffolk bar in the spring of 1880. 
He practised alone until 1884. when he went into 
partnership with his father, the Hon. John Lowell. 
For upwards of ten years he has had a large ac- 



JOSEPH P. LIVERMORE. 

of 1875. His early education was acquired in 
the primary and grammar schools of Lexington 
(1860-67) and the High School of Cambridge 
(1867-71), where he was fitted for college. After 
graduation from college he entered the Lawrence 
Scientific School, and graduated as civil engineer 
in 1877. He was employed a few months that 
year, without pay, on the Newton Water-works : 
then during the autumn and winter of 1877-78 
he taught in the Lexington High School ; in 
November and December, 1878, he was in the ex- 
amining corps in the United States Patent Office 
at Washington ; and on the first of January the 
following year he entered the office of Crosby & 
Gregory, Boston, and began practice as a patent 
solicitor. Here he remained until 1885, when 
on the first of March he opened an office of his 
own. Since that time he has been largely em- 
ployed as an expert witness in patent cases. He 
has acted in that capacity in litigation of the 
McKay &: Copeland Lasting Machine Company, 
of the Simonds Counter Machinery Company, 
the Reece Button-hole Machine Company, the 
Wheeler & Wilson Manufacturing Company, 




JOHN LOWELL. Jr. 



tive practice in the courts and in connection 
witli business corporations and firms. In politics 
he is an Independent. He is a member of the 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



153 



ITnioii and Tavern clubs of Boston. Mr. Lowell 
was married October 24, 1883, to Miss Mary 
I'liiliii Hale, of Philadelphia. 'I'hey have four 
children : Mary P^nilen, John, Ralph, and James 
Hale Lowell. 



McCLINTOCK, William Edward, Boston, 
civil engineer, who has been engaged in numer- 
ous important engineering works, is a native of 
Maine. He was born in Hallowell, July 29, 1848, 
son of Captain John and Mary liailey (Shaw) 
iMcClintock. On his father's side he is of .Scotch- 
Irish ancestry, his ancestor William McClintock, 
one of the defenders in the memorable siege of 
Londonderry. i68g, coming to this country from 
Londonderry in 1730, and settling in Medford, 
Mass. ; and on his mother's side he is descendant 
of that early Puritan divine, the Rev. John 
Bailey. He inherited his taste for engineering 
from both his father's and mother's family. His 
father was a well-known navigator, familiar with 
every ocean, who crossed the Pacific with a school 
atlas for a chart and a watch for chronometer. 
His grandfather, William .McClintock, after re- 
tiring from the sea, was an e.\pert land surveyor ; 
and some fine samples of his work are now on 
file in the State archives. William K. McClin- 
tock's early education was acquired in the Hallo- 
well graded schools. Afterward he took a four 
years' course at the Hallowell Academy, and 
spent one year at Kent's Hill Seminary. He was 
trained for his profession in office and field work, 
and received instruction under a private tutor. 
While a student, he taught a district school 
for one term. His first field work, as civil engi- 
neer, was with the I'nited States Coast Survey, 
with which department he was engaged, from 
1867 to 1876, on work in Maine, Massachusetts, 
New York, North Carolina, South Carolina, 
Georgia, Florida, Mississippi, and Louisiana. In 
1876-79 he was employed in the survey of the 
city of Portland; in 1877-79, '" ^he survey of 
Boston Harbor. From 1880 to 1890 he was city 
engineer of Chelsea. His special engineering 
works have included surveys for the South Pass 
jetties at the mouth of the Mississippi River, 
sewer systems for Chelsea, Revere, (lardner, 
Westfield, Easthampton, Andover, and Natick, 
Bennington, Vt., Bath, i\Ie., Calais, Me., St. Ste- 
phens, N.B., and Milltown, N.B. He has also 
been in consultation on sewer or water-works with 
the city of Holyoke and tiie towns of Spencer, 



North Brookfield, North Attleborough, and sev- 
eral smaller places. He has been a member of 
the Massachusetts Highway Commission since 

1892, and was the first president of the Massachu- 
setts Highway Association. He is instructor of 
highway engineering in the Lawrence Scientific 
School, to which position he was appointed in 

1893. He is a member of the American Society 
of Civil Engineers, of the Boston .Society of Civil 
Engineers, of the League of .American Wheelmen, 
and of the Chelsea Review Club, and is con- 
nected with the Masonic order, a member of 
Robert Lash Lodge of Chelsea, where he resides. 




WILLIAM E. McCLINTOCK. 

He is associated with the Church of the Re- 
deemer, of which he was treasurer from 1889-93. 
In politics he is a Republican on national ques- 
tions, and an Independent on State and city 
issues. He was married June 17, 1873, to Miss 
Mary Estelle Currier. They have five children : 
William James, Francis Blake, Samuel, Paul, and 
Dorothv McClintock. 



^LVRDEN, Oscar Averv, member of the 
Suffolk bar, is a native of Maine, born in Palermo, 
Waldo County, August 20, 1853, son of Stephen 
P. and Julia A. (Avery) Marden. His earliest 



154 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



known ancestors on the paternal side were of 
southern New Hampshire, and on the maternal 
side of Ipswich, Mass. He was educated in dis- 
trict schools, with an occasional term at the Hisrh 




OSCAR A. MARDEN. 

School, and in Westbrook Seminary. Born on 
a farm, he lived the life of a farmer's boy till 
seventeen years of age, beginning at fifteen to 
teach school in the winter months. In 187 1 and 
1872 he had charge of the English department of 
Dirigo Business College at Augusta, Me. In the 
spring of 1872 he came to Boston, and took the 
position of book-keeper for the New England 
office of the Victor Sewing Machine Company of 
Middletown, Conn. Here he remained till the au- 
tumn of 1874, when he entered the law office of 
Samuel K. Hamilton in the old Barristers' Hall, 
Court Square, as a student, and at the same time 
entered the Boston University Law School. He 
received his degree of LL.B. in June, 1876, 
and the following autumn was admitted to the 
bar. He began practice in Boston, and in 
September, 1877, removed to Stoughton, where 
he has since lived. From 1877 to i8gi he held 
a commission as trial justice there. In the latter 
year he was appointed judge of the District 
Court of Southern Norfolk, having jurisdiction 
in Stoughton, Canton, Sharon, and Avon, which 



position he still holds. In 1880 he again estab- 
lished an office in Boston. He has been a lead- 
ing member of the Norfolk County Bar Asso- 
ciation for a number of years, from 1886 to 1892 
holding the position of secretary. In Stoughton 
he was for seven years (1886-89, 92-94) a mem- 
ber of the School Committee, and he has been 
president of the Stoughton Grenadier Association 
since 1880. He is prominent in the order of 
Odd Fellows ; was grand patriarch of the Grand 
Encampment of Massachusetts in 1893, and 
president of the Encampment Deputies Associa- 
tion in 1894. He belongs to but one club, the 
Pine Tree State, composed of natives of Maine 
resident in Boston and vicinity. In politics he is 
a Democrat. Mr. Marden was married October 
19, 1882, at Stoughton, to Miss May Theresa 
Ball, daughter of Francis M. and Rosetta A. 
Ball. She died .\pril 4, 1890, leaving two chil- 
dren, one of whom, Edgar Avery Marden, only 
survives her. 



MARSHALL, Wvzeman, of Boston, player of 
the " old school," manager, dramatic reader, and 
teacher, is a native of New Hampshire, born in 
the town of Hudson, September 26, 1816. When 
he was eight years old, his parents came to 
Boston ; and this city has since been his home. 
The family being poor, his schooling was meagre, 
consisting of a few years in public schools ; but 
what he lacked in regular training he more than 
made up by self-teaching and extensive reading, 
becoming a man of much culture. In his early 
youth he embarked in various pursuits, but his 
inclination was decidedly for the stage ; and in 
February, 1836, when but nineteen years of age, 
he succeeded in making a first appearance on the 
boards. This was at the Lion Theatre, Boston, 
then where Keith's Theatre now stands, and 
under the management of William Barrymore, in 
the small part of Vihulanus in " Virginius." For 
the remainder of that season he was a regular 
member of the company, playing in a variety of 
small parts. During the following summer he was 
with a company performing in Providence and 
in Newport, R.I., taking more ambitious parts, 
such as Pizzaro, Angcrstoff in " The Floating 
Beacon," and Duke of Bitikiiigham in Richard 
III.; and in the autumn he became attached to 
the stock company of the old National Theatre, 
Boston, then under the management of William 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



155 



Pelby. Here lie rem;\ined tlirovigh a number of 
seasons, steadily advancing in iiis profession. On 
the 27tli of February, 1838, he was given his first 
benefit, appearing on this occasion as Pizzaro to 
the Elvira of Mrs. Pelby and the Cora of Mrs. 
Anderson (Ophelia Pelby); and also as Litluii 
in the ballet " L'Amour," displaying his talent 
as a dancer. During the next regular season, 
1S38-1839, he had two benefits, at the latter, 
given June 27, 1839, playing Damon with Miss 
Eaton, afterward the popular Mrs. Woodward, as 
Calanthc, her first appearance. On this occasion, 
also, Mr. Marshall's brother Otis made his first 
appearance on the stage. In the summer of 1839 
Mr. Marshall had his first experience as a man- 
ager, taking a small company through country 
towns, and doing a fair business. Again at the 
National for the season 1839-1840, he played 
numerous important parts ; and at his benefit 
that season, when he gave " Virginius," Henry 
Wallack, the eldest of the VVallack family, acted 
Dciitatns. The next summer he opened a theatre 
of his own in Boston, the •■ Vaudeville Saloon," 




WYZEMAN MARSHALL. 



in the old ISoylston Hall over P.oylston .Market, 
which then occupied the south corner of Washing- 
ton and P>oylston Streets. This also was a suc- 
cessful venture. Back to the National for 1840- 



184 1, that season was marked l)y his introduc- 
tion to the stage (on the [8th of June) of the 
tragedian James H. Stark, who afterward be- 
came celebrated, and a great favorite in San 
I'Vancisco. The following sunnner lie took an- 
other company on the road, and as before met 
with success. The next regular season, 184 1- 

1842, he was at the National, cast in the leading 
" heavies," and also the ballet-master. At the 
close of that season he brought his connection 
with this theatre to an entl. and on the 2 7lh of 
June following opened the .\mphithealre, on the 
corner of Haverhill and Travers Streets, which 
had l)een used largely for circus performances, and 
which he liad reconstructed as " Marshall's Eagle 
Theatre." He brought together here a strong 
company, with William If. Sedley Smith as stage 
manager, and gave such e-xcellent performances 
at popular prices that the house soon became a 
serious rival to its near neighbor, the National. 
Mr. Pelby of the latter thereupon conceived a 
ph\n to crush it. l^urchasing a quarter interest 
in the property, he proceeded, under cover of im- 
proving his portion of the building, to render the 
whole useless. On the night of March 22, 1843, 
immediately after the close of the performance, 
he gained the roof with a number of his car- 
penters, and cut out that part of it directly over 
the stage, removing the lumber. This high- 
handed proceeding was effectual, and the Eagle's 
career abruptly closed. But Mr. Marshall, un- 
daunted, took his company to the Providence 
Theatre, which he had leased earlier in the season, 
and opened there on the night of the 3d of April. 
At the close of the Providence season he went to 
New \'ork. where he played a short engagement 
at the Chatham Theatre, then under the manage- 
ment of Charles R. Thorne, the elder. Returning 
to Boston, he became a member of the company 
which supported Macready during his short sea- 
son here in the autumn of 1844. This ended, he 
made a starring tour in Maine and the provinces, 
covering a few months, and then returned to the 
Chatham. New York, where he became a pro- 
nounced favorite, and remained till the close of 
the season of 1847. The summer of that year 
he played '■ Damon on Horseback," a spectacular 
drama, at the Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, then 
a great amphitheatre : and star engagements in 
Utica, Syracuse, and Albany. For the regular 
season of 1847-48 he was at the Bowery Theatre, 
New York; and later in 1848 back in Boston, at 



156 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



the Federal Street Theatre. At the close of the 
latter engagement he starred in the British 
provinces ; played a brief engagement at the 
Beach Street, Boston, then under the manage- 
ment of Joseph Proctor ; was for the next two 
regular seasons at the Arch Street, Philadelphia, 
as acting and stage manager as well as player, 
performing in Baltimore and Providence during 
the summer months ; after the close of his Phila- 
delphia engagement starred in Baltimore, \^'ash- 
ington, Albany, and New York, meeting with great 
success ; then took the Portland (Me.) Theatre 
as manager for a short season ; subsequently went 
South for a few months ; and in the autumn of 
1851 returned to Boston, and assumed the man- 
agement of the Howard Athenajum for the season 
of 1851-52. During this season he introduced 
to the Boston public Mme. Anna Thillon, the 
singer ; Mrs. .A.nna Cora Mowatt, who became a 
great favorite here and all over the country (her 
first appearance as Parthcnia to Mr. Marshall's 
Ingomar) ; Laura Addison, who had been brought 
to this country from England by Charlotte Cush- 
man ; the famous English actress, Mrs. Warner, 
with whom he played such parts as Macbeth, 
Canlitial Wolscy, Lcoiifcs : and Lola Montez. 
This season closed, he starred throughout the 
country, and played in various theatres in Bos- 
ton, up to 1857, when in February he opened 
the new theatre in Worcester, which he managed 
successfully through to October 2, closing brill- 
iantly with a performance of '• ALicbeth." The 
year before, while playing at the Boston Theatre, 
he added to his fame by his successful produc- 
tion of "Zafari," an adaptation of " Ruy Bias" by 
Dr. Joseph H. Jones, of Boston, which was the 
forerunner of Fechter's appearance years after 
as " Ruy Bias," Mr. Marshall himself playing the 
hero, Zafari. After the close of the Worcester 
season Mr. Marshall made another starring tour, 
and in the spring of 1862 again assumed the man- 
agement of the Howard Athenaeum in Boston, con- 
tinuing here through the remainder of that and the 
regular season of 1862-63. ^"^ February, 1863, 
while still conducting the Howard, he took the 
Boston Theatre, then in a bad way financially, and 
carried it through the remainder of that season, 
playing Max Maretzek's Italian Opera, with other 
attractions. His losses were heavy, but, feeling 
sure of ultimate success, he went on with the next 
regular season, devoting himself to this house ex- 
clusively ; and the result fully justified his con- 



fidence. Opening with " Henry IV.." with James 
H. Hackett as the Sir John Falsfaff and himself 
as Harry Hotspur, he followed this with a run 
of brilliant attractions, — among them the great 
Spanish dancer, Isabella Cubas, Edwin Booth, 
Maretzek's Italian Opera, Edwin Forrest, Maggie 
Mitchell, Mrs. D. P. Bowers, playing Lady 
Auiilcy for the first time here, the Hernandez 
troupe, and the Barrow combination. — and at the 
end of the season found his losses of the pre- 
liminary season covered, and a handsome balance 
of several thousand dollars in hand. The season 
closed on the 13th of June, 1S64, with a compli- 
mentary benefit to Mr. Marshall. Then he re- 
tired from the theatre, and his notable career 
as a manager terminated. Since that time he 
has been engaged mainly in teaching elocution 
and fitting pupils for the stage. For several 
years, in conjunction with Miss Lucette Webster, 
he also gave dramatic readings and recitations 
before lyceums of New England. Mr. Marshall 
is prominent in the Masonic fraternity, having 
been connected with it since 1853, a large part 
of the time holding offices of trust and responsi- 
bility. He has been master of his lodge ( St. 
John's), high priest of St. Paul's Royal Arch 
Chapter, and eminent commander of Boston Com- 
mandery, grand warden of the Grand Lodge of 
Massachusetts, deputy high priest of the Grand 
Chapter of Massachusetts, and grand generalis- 
simo of the Grand Encampment of Massachusetts 
and Rhode Island ; and he is a thirty-third degree 
in the ancient and accepted Scottish rite. In 
politics he is a Democrat. On two occasions he 
was nominated for alderman, but failed of elec- 
tion, in one contest lacking but four votes of a 
plurality. At this time he received the distinction 
of a unanimous vote of the ward in which he re- 
sides. He lives on Beacon Hill, in Pinckney 
Street, one of the older ways of the old West End 
of Boston. 



MASON, EnwARD Palmer, of Boston, presi- 
dent of the Mason & Hamlin Organ and Piano 
Company, was born in Cambridge, June 13, 1859, 
son of Henry and Helen Augusta (Palmer) 
Mason. His father built the first American cabi- 
net or parlor organ, in 1854 founded the widely 
famed house of Mason & Hamlin which intro- 
duced the cabinet organ in its present general 
form in 1861, and was the first president of the 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



'57 



Orijan and Piano Company, whicli succeeded the 
firni in 1868. His grandfather, the eminent Dr. 
Lowell ^[ason, distinguished as the "father of 
American church music," introduced musical edu- 
cation into the Boston public schools, was one of 
the original members and one of the early presi- 
dents of the Handel and Haydn Society of ]5os- 
ton (founded in 18 15), and compiled its first col- 
lection of anthems, masses, and choruses ; and 
his uncle, Dr. William Mason, is a well-known 
musician and composer of New York. On the 
maternal side he is descended from Asher Pal- 
mer, whose father was Judge Thomas Palmer, of 




EDW. P. MASON. 

Rhode Island. Edward P. was educated in the 
Brookline public and Chauncy Hall (Boston) pri- 
vate schools, and at Harvard College, graduating 
in the class of 188 1, with honorable mention in 
music and philosophy and the degree of " cum 
/(iii(/c." Among other men of note in his college 
class were the Rev. Dr. George A. Gordon, now 
pastor of the Old South Church in Boston, and 
Charles MacVeagh, son of Wayne MacVeagh. 
After graduating from college, he entered the em- 
ploy of the Mason & Hamlin Organ and Piano 
Company, beginning as errand boy and clerk in 
the Boston house, and, working his way through 
the various departments, obtained a thorough ac- 



quaintance with all the details of the great busi- 
ness. In September, 1884, he was placed in a 
responsible position in the New Vork branch, and 
in 1S85 became its manager, which position he 
held till January, 1890, when he was elected 
treasurer of the company, and returned to the 
Boston house. In May following his father died ; 
and he was then elected president, and placed at 
the head of the business. .About the time that 
he entered the establishment, in the early eighties, 
Mason & Hamlin invented and patented a new 
mode of stringing pianofortes, recognized as a 
great improvement in piano construction, and 
began to manufacture these instruments in addi- 
tion to their extensive organ business ; and under 
his management the yearly sales of the Mason & 
Hamlin pianoforte have steadily increased. Mr. 
Mason is also a director of the Central National 
Bank, and trustee of the Home Savings Bank of 
Boston. He is a member of the Union Club, 
Boston. He was married April 26, 1886, to Miss 
Mary Lord Taintor, of South Orange, N.J. They 
have had four children : Henry (died in infancy), 
Gregorv, Lowell, and Ellen Mason. 



MILLER, Henry Fr.anki.in', manufacturer, 
Boston, president of the Henry F. Miller & Sons' 
Piano Company, was born in Providence, R.I., 
September 10, 1848, son of Henry F. and Fran- 
ces V. (Child) Miller. He is descended on both 
sides from the oldest families of Rhode Island. 
On the paternal side he is a lineal descendant of 
Roger Williams ; also a descendant of Joseph 
Jenks, who came from England to this country 
about 1636, settling in Lynn, Mass., and was the 
first founder w'ho worked in brass and iron on 
the Western continent : one of the several sons of 
Josejah Jenks, who settled in Rhode Island, was 
one of its colonial governors. On the maternal 
side his great-grandmother, Margaret Ogden, came 
from England when quite young, marrying George 
Beverl)-, of Providence, R.I., the third of his name 
in succession, and a descendant of the first Bev- 
erlys who came to this country from England, 
and settled in Massachusetts in what is now the 
town of Beverl)-. Margaret Ogden, whose mother 
was an Ingham, w'as the daughter of James Ogden 
of England, who, with a Captain Brooks, went to 
Prosperous, in the county of Kildare, Ireland, and 
established the first cotton manufactory in the 
kingdom. It is noteworthy, also, that, on the 



158 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



paternal side, Kphraini Miller, as a machinist, 
with five others, built for Samuel Slater, in Rhode 
Island, the first cotton mill in this country for 
spinning cotton yarn. Henry F. came with his 
parents from Providence to Boston when he was 
seven years old, and here was educated. Gradu- 
ating from the Brimmer School, he went to the 
Boston Latin School ; and, urged by Francis Gard- 
ner, then head - master, he took the advanced 
course, fitting for college in three years instead of 
the usual six years' course, it being his intention 
to enter Harvard. After two years, however. 




HENRY F. MILLER. 

feeling that his services would early be needed in 
his father's pianoforte business, which was estab- 
lished about that time (1863), he decided to enter 
the English High School, and take the course 
which he deemed more practical for a business 
life. His class was one of the last under Boston's 
great teacher, Thomas Sherwin. He graduated 
in 1867 with high honors, receiving the Franklin 
medal and three Lawrence prizes. A pleasant 
episode of his school-boy life was the military 
drill, he being captain of the company which, at 
the first prize drill ever given by the Boston 
School Regiment, won the prize, a small silk flag 
which is still in his possession. At the celebra- 
tion of the semi-centennial of the school in 187 1 



he was marshal of his class, which turned out fifty 
members in line. Upon leaving school, he en- 
tered his father's business. The senior Henr\" F. 
Miller was not only a musical genius, but also an 
e.xpert mechanician, having had many years' prac- 
tical experience in pianoforte manufacturing be- 
fore establishing the business which has since 
assumed such large proportions. Henry F., Jr., 
however, long before leaving school had become 
more or less interested in the various departments 
of pianoforte manufacturing, and was thoroughly 
conversant with the early traditions of this indus- 
try in Boston and elsewhere. He gradually as- 
sumed the financial management of the business, 
together with correspondence and other depart- 
ments ; and, on the death of his father in 1884, 
he, with his brothers, organized the present cor- 
poration, — the Henry F. Miller iS: Sons' I'iano 
Company. As president of the company, he has 
the general management of its wide-spread inter- 
ests. In the manufacture of the piano he has 
been instrumental in removing the bo.x-like ap- 
pearance of piano cases, and in developing their 
architectural and artistic features. An especially 
important factor has been his interest in concerts 
and in artists who have used the Miller pianos, 
himself managing the different tours of such great 
pianists as William H. Sherwood, Dr. Louis Maas, 
Fdnuind Neupert, Calixa Lavallee, and many 
others. Always deeply interested in the growth of 
music in this country, he took an active part in se- 
curing for the American composers the popular re- 
cognition which they have had in late years. He 
was one of the few active members of the Music 
Teachers' National Association, outside of pro- 
fessional musicians, and gave his heartiest support 
to Calixa Lavallee, with whom he co-operated in 
the production of the first programme entirely of 
.\merican composers at the meeting of the Music 
Teachers' National Association in 1884, at Cleve- 
land, Ohio. He is interested also in art, and 
fond of everything that appertains to it, including 
painting and the drama, as well as music. He is 
much concerned in philanthropic work, and has 
held offices connected with such work rather than 
civil or political positions. For more than twenty 
years he has been a life member of the Young 
Men's Christian Union. He is a director of the 
Boys' Institute of Industry, of which the Rev. 
Edward Everett Hale is president, and under 
w-hose leadership it has done much to awaken a 
favorable public sentiment in regard to giving 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



'59 



l)i)ys better opportunities for obtaining education 
ill mechanical arts. For some years past he has 
been a director of the Industrial Aid Society of 
ISoslon, and is at present one of its executive 
conunittee. He is connected witli various other 
philanthropic and charitable societies, and he has 
been prominent in the movement for tlie introduc- 
tion of manual training into the public school sys- 
tem. In religious faith he is Unitarian, and is a 
lirominent member and worker in the Church of 
the Linity, Boston, of which the Rev. Minot J. Sav- 
age is minister. .\t present (1S94) he is one of 
the standing committee of the church, chairman 
of the Board of Charities, and represents the 
society on several other connnittees. He is a 
member of the Minot J. Savage Club, a life mem- 
ber of the American Unitarian Association, and 
member of the Channing Club of Boston, estab- 
lished in 1887, of which he was one of the 
founders and the first president. In politics he 
has been a Republican up to within a few years, 
])ut is now an Independent. He is a fine mem- 
ber of the First Corps of Cadets. Mr. Miller 
was married ( )ctober 29. 1874, to Miss Mary .\. 
(iavette, of Boston. They have an only daughter: 
Marsraret Ogden Miller. 



MILLETT, JosHU.\ HowARn, member of the 
Suffolk bar, is a native of Maine, born in Cherry- 
field, Washington County, March 17, 1842, son of 
the Rev. Joshua and Sophronia (Howard) Millet. 
Mis father was a clergyman of the Baptist denom- 
ination, and author of the "History of the Bap- 
tists of Maine." He is a lineal descendant on 
the paternal side of Thomas Millet, who settled 
in Dorchester, Mass., in 1630, and on the mater- 
nal side of John Howard of the Plymouth Colony, 
afterwards one of the original settlers of Bridge- 
water in 1645, '^'^'^ of Mary Chilton, Plymouth, 
1620. \Mien he was two years old, his parents 
removed to Wayne, Me. ; and there he attended 
the public schools. He was fitted for college at 
Hebron Academy, Hebron, .Me., entered Water- 
ville College, now Colby Lfniversity, and gradu- 
ated with the class of 1867. In 1878 he received 
the degree of A.M. He studied law with the 
lion. Isaac F. Redfield, late chief justice of the 
Supreme Court of Vermont, and W. .\. Herrick, 
of Boston, and was admitted to the Suffolk bar 
in 1870. He began practice in partnership with 
Messrs. Redfield and Herrick, under the firm 



name of Redfield, Herrick, iS: Millett, which rela- 
tion continued until the death of Judge Redfield 
in 1876. Thereafter he continued with Mr. Her- 
rick until the latter's death, in 1885. Then he 
formed a partnership with Ralph W. Foster, son 
of ISishop R. S. Foster, of Boston, under the firm 
name of Millett &: Foster, which still exists. He 
was admitted to the Supreme Court of the United 
States in 1884. For a number of years Mr. Mil- 
lett has been associated with several business en- 
terprises outside of his profession, notably as 
counsel and president of the C'rosby .Steam Gauge 




JOSHUA H. MILLETT. 

and \'alve Company since its organization in 
1875. He has resided in Maiden since 1869, 
and has held numerous important oflices there. 
From 1875 to 188 1 he was a member of the 
Maiden School Committee, 1878 79 a trustee of 
the Public Library, in 1880 chairman of the sub- 
committee for framing the city charter, and in 
1892 member of the Board of Park Commis- 
sioners. In 1884 and 1885 he was a member of 
the lower house of the Legislature, and served on 
the house committees on mercantile affairs, the 
judiciary, and metropolitan police. He has been 
president of the Maiden Home for .Aged Persons 
since its organization in 1892. He is a member 
of the following Masonic societies : Converse 



i6o 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Lodge, Royal Arch Chapter of the Taljeniacle, 
Melrose Council, and Beauseant Commandery of 
Knights Templars ; is a member of the South Mid- 
dlesex ITnitarian Association, of the Massachu- 
setts Society of Sons of American Revolution, 
of the Middlesex (political dining) Club of Bos- 
ton, and of several Maiden organizations. In 
politics he is Republican. Mr. Millett was mar- 
ried June 19, 1867, to Miss Rosa Maria Tredick, 
daughter of Charles and Hannah (Giles) Tredick. 
They have two children: Charles Howard and 
Mabel Rosa Millett. 



MOODY, William H., Boston, boot and shoe 
manufacturer, head of the house of Moody, Ester- 
brooke, & .Anderson, is a native of New Hamp- 
shire, born in Claremont, May 10, 1842, son of 
Jonathan and Mary Moody. He was educated in 
the public schools of Claremont, and at the age 
of sixteen entered the shop of George N. Farewell 
& Co. in that place, where he learned the trade 
of manufacturing all classes of boots and shoes. 




but a short time, however, obtaining a position at 
a better salary and with larger opportunities in 
the boot and shoe house of Tenny, Ballerston, tS: 
Co. At the end of two years' service with this 
concern he became buyer for Sewall, Raddin, & 
Son ; and three years later, when the firm of 
Sewall, Raddin, &: Son was succeeded by Sewall, 
Raddin, & Co., he was admitted to partnership. 
Soon after the firm was reor<ranized, takinir the 
name of McGibbon, Moody, & Raddin. When 
this partnership expired, Mr. Moody formed a co- 
partnership with Messrs. Crane & Leland, under 
the firm name of Crane, Leland, & Moody, which 
subsequently became Crane, Moody. (.V* Rising. 
Not long after, unremitting labor having impaired 
his health, he withdrew, and temporarily retired 
from active business, devoting himself to rest and 
travel. When fully restored, he organized the 
present house of Moody, Esterbrooke, & Ander- 
son. His manufactory is in Nashua, N.H., where 
he has established the largest shoe industry under 
one roof in the world. His only outside business 
connection is with the National .Shoe (Si; Leather 
Bank of Boston, of which he is a director. He is 
a member of the New England Shoe and Leather 
Exchange. In politics he is Republican. His 
winter residence is in Boston, and his country 
seat in Claremont, his native place. The latter, 
fittingly named " Highland View," is one of the 
finest estates in New Hampshire, embracing six 
hundred acres of broken upland, a beautiful 
dwelling, and well-appointed barns. Mr. Moody 
was married in October, 1864, to Miss Marv .A. 
Maynard. Thay have no children. 



MORSE, Georce W.ashincton, member of the 
Suffolk bar, is a native of Ohio, whither his par- 
ents, Peter and Mary E. (Randall) Morse, iiad 
emigrated from New Hampshire in 1833. He 
was born in Lodi in the Ohio Valley, August 24, 
1845. He is a descendant on the paternal side 
of Anthony Morse, who came from Marlborough, 
England, and settled in Newbury Old Town, about 
the year 1635, — ''^*^ ^^'^ ^^ ''^^ o'*^' .Morse home- 
stead, adjacent to the farm of Michael Little, still 
called the " Morse Eield." It appears by Coffin's 
History of Newbury that the Morse family fig- 
and mastered every detail of the business. At ured somewhat conspicuously in the " witchcraft " 
nineteen he came to Boston, and fu'st engaged as trials, particularly William, a brother of .Vnthony. 
a salesman in the store of John Wallace, retailer. The Rev. Jedediah Morse, the geographer, and 
then on Washington Street. Here he remained his distinguished son, Professor Samuel Finley 



W. H. MOODY. 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



i6i 



Morse, were cousins respectively in the second 
and third degree of Peter Morse, the father of 
Oeorge W. Peter Morse was a native of (Chester, 
N.H., born in the year 1800, and for nearly tiiirty 




GEO. W. MORSE. 

years was a follower of the seas, — captain for a 
long time of a Mediterranean trading-vessel and 
later of an East Indiaman owned by Robert G. 
Shaw of Boston. On the maternal side Mr. Morse 
is a lineal descendant of Nathaniel Page, wlio set- 
tled at Bedford, Mass. ; and the original residence 
known as the " Page Place " is still owned by the 
family. Ensign Page of this family carried tlie 
colors at Lexington and Concord. Later Captain 
Page commanded one of the companies which 
fought at Bunker Hill ; and the Pages, like the 
Morses, were well represented on the Continental 
side in most of the important battles of the Revo- 
lution. George \\'. Morse passed his childhood 
on the paternal farm, and at ten years of age 
was placed under the charge of President Finley 
at the preparatory school of Oberlin College. 
Here he remained something less than two years. 
Then, his parents in the mean time having moved 
to Massachusetts, he came East, and here at- 
tended school in Haverhill, at Andover, and at 
Chester (N.H.) .\cademy, till the spring of 1861. 
On the Tith of May following, in his sixteenth 



year, he enlisted as a private in the Second 
Massachusetts Infantry, a regiment which became 
historic, and which is one of the two especially 
connncmorated in the new Boston Public Library. 
He served till 1865 continuously in this regiment ; 
and, of the original thousand men who left the 
State in it in 1861 (being the lirst three years' 
regiment in the field from Massachusetts), he was 
one of less than one hundred who returned with it 
in 1865. A majority of the regiment, including 
Mr. Morse, re-enlisted upon the field, at the end 
of their three years' term, for the remainder of 
the war. In the Shenandoah campaign of 1862 
the Second covered the celebrated retreat known 
as '• Banks Retreat" ; and what remained of the 
rear-guard or skirmish lines, in which Mr. Morse 
was stationed, was captured. He was prisoner of 
war four months at Belle Isle and other prisons, 
when he was discharged, and was one of the few 
who were able to return immediately to service. 
With the exception of that carried on during his 
absence as prisoner of war, he was in every cam- 
paign and battle participated in by his regiment. 
He early became sergeant and first sergeant of 
his company, and at the close of the war was first 
lieutenant, commanding Company 1 of the regi- 
ment, at the age of nineteen. This was the com- 
pany which General A. B. Underwood went out 
in command of ; and the story of its defence of a 
bridge against Stonewall Jackson's army in the 
Banks Retreat is one of the most thrilling remi- 
niscences of the war. Mr. Morse was the only 
original member of Company H that ever received 
a commission, although the youngest in the ranks 
by some two years. The Second served in all 
the important campaigns with the Army of the 
Potomac till September, 1863. A third of its 
members fell at Cedar Mountain, together with 
more than half of the officers. Again at Antie- 
tam it passed through a severe ordeal. Its losses 
at Chancellorsville were large; and at Gettysburg 
half of a regiment fell in less than ten minutes of 
contest in carrying the Confederate works at the 
base of Gulp's Hill on the right, near Spangler's 
Spring, over which the regiment charged. The 
officers subsequently erected at their own expense 
the first regimental monument on the field of 
(Gettysburg, Mr. Morse being an active member of 
the committee carrying out the work. In Sep- 
tember, 1863, the Second, as a part of the Twelfth 
Corps, sent with the Eleventh Corps, under the 
command of General Hooker, to the South-west 



l62 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



to relieve Rosecrans, was in the celebrated battle 
of Lookout Mountain ; and, later as part of 
" Hooker's Corps," participated in all the cam- 
paigns of Sherman. At the fall of Atlanta, in the 
battles about which the regiment took a conspicu- 
ous part, it was assigned to be the first to enter 
the city, and to act as the provost-guard during 
the occupation. It had charge of the destruction 
of the public buildings previous to the evacuation 
and the " March to the Sea," and was the last regi- 
ment to leave the city. Mustered out of the ser- 
vice in July, 1865, young Morse resumed his stud- 
ies. He spent nearly a year at Phillips (Andover) 
Academy, and in the autumn of 1866 entered 
the Chandler Scientific Department of Dartmouth 
College in the junior year, where he remained two 
years. Then, leaving college before graduation, 
he began the study of law in the office of Charles 
G. Stevens of Clinton, Mass., and finished in that 
of Chandler, Shattuck, &: Thayer in Boston, from 
which he was admitted to the bar in 1869, not 
long after his class graduated. (Later Dartmouth 
conferred upon him the degrees of Master of 
Science and Master of Arts.) Taking the Boston 
office of George Bemis, who was counsel for the 
government in the matter of the "Alabama " claims, 
and opening an evening office in Ashland, where 
he was then living, he began practice ; but, this 
not being at once remunerative, he started a local 
newspaper, the Ashland Advertiser, and subse- 
quently a printing-office. Both of these enterprises 
were successful, and a year or so later he sold 
them out at a profit. For the first few years of his 
practice the most important part was bankruptcy. 
He took up the Boston, Hartford & Erie litiga- 
tion ; later was the counsel of N. C. Munson, the 
great railroad contractor, whose failure involved 
several millions; and among other important liti- 
gation he had charge of that of F. Shaw & 
Brothers, which with other failures in its wake (in 
all of which he was counsel upon one side or the 
other) involved ten millions of dollars. The years 
1887-88 and 1889 he spent in travel with his 
family, mostly in Europe ; and upon his return 
and resumption of practice he also took much 
corporation work. He organized the several 
street railways now operating in Newton, Wal- 
thani, and Watertown, and reaching out toward 
Boston, of which he was president during the 
legal stages. He is also one of the special coun- 
sel of the Thomson-Houston Electric Company. 
In politics he is an acti\'e Republican ; and for 



two terms, 1881 and 1882, represented Newton in 
the lower house of the Legislature. He is a 
member of the Charles Ward Post, G. A. R., of 
Newton ; member of the Massachusetts Com- 
mandery of the Loyal Legion ; is a Thirty-second 
degree Mason ; and member of the Newton Club, 
Boston Art Club, several minor clubs organized to 
encourage special work, and the Clover Club of 
New York. He was married October 20, 1870, 
to Miss Clara R. Boit, of Newton Lower Falls. 
They have six children : Harriet C, Gertrude E., 
Rosalind, Henry B., Samuel M. B., and Genevieve 
Morse. 



MORTON, Marcus, member of the Suffolk 
bar, was born in Andover, April 27, 1862, son of 
Marcus and Abby Bowler (Hoppin) Morton. He 
is the third of this distinguished Massachusetts 
name. His grandfather, Marcus Morton, was a 
member of Congress from 1817 to 1821, lieuten- 
ant governor of the State in 1824, associate jus- 
tice of the Supreme Court 1825-39, governor in 
1840 and again in 1843, first elected by one vote 




MARCUS MORTON. 



over Edward Everett, collector of the port of 
Boston 1845-48, and, originally a Democrat, a 
Free Soiler from 1848. His father, Marcus Mor- 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



163 



t(in, 2d, was on the bench of the Superior 
Coinl from 1S59 to 1869, and on the Supreme 
bench from 1S69 to 1890, chief justice from 1882 ; 
and both father and grandfather were members 
of the State Constitutional Convention of 1853. 
He is descended on both paternal and maternal 
sides from early New England colonists, his 
father's first ancestor in America, George Morton, 
having come from England to Plymouth in 1623, 
and his mother's ancestry being traced to Will- 
iam Bradford, governor of Plymouth Colony. He 
was educated in private schools, at Phillips (An- 
dover) Academy, and at Vale, where he graduated 
in the class of 1883 ; and his law studies were 
pursued in the Harvard Law School and in the 
office of the Hon. Robert M. Morse, of Boston. 
Admitted to the bar in 1885, he began practice 
in Boston, where he has been established since. 
His business has been largely in filling the duties 
of auditor, receiver, and special administrator of 
estates. He was one of the special administra- 
tors of T. O. H. P. Burnham, the old Boston 
bookseller. He is a member of the Boston Bar 
Association, of the Young Men's Democratic 
Club of Massachusetts (secretary of the elections 
committee), of the Union, the University (on the 
e,Kecutive committee), and the Episcopalian (a 
member of the council) clubs of Boston, and of 
the Reform Club of New York. He was married 
October 26, 1892, to Miss Maria Eldridge Welch, 
daughter of Wilson Jarvis and Elizabeth Fearing 
(Thatcher) Welch. They have one child : Mar- 
cus Morton, Jr. 



Chandler, Shattuck, & Thayer, which had been 
dissolved). Judge Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., 
was a partner from 1873 "J"*'' his appointment to 



MUNROE, William Ad.4MS, member of the 
Suffolk bar, is a native of Cambridge, born No- 
vember 9, 1843, son of William W. and Hannah F. 
(.\dams) Munroe. His parents were also natives 
of Cambridge, the mother of old West Cambridge, 
now the town of Arlington. He was educated in 
the Cambridge schools and at Harvard College, 
from which he was graduated in the class of 
1864 ; and studied law in the Harvard Law 
School (1866 and 1867), and afterwards in the 
office of Chandler, Shattuck, ^: Thayer, Boston. 
He was admitted to the Suffolk bar in 1868, and 
subsequently became a member of the bar of the 
Supreme Court of the LInited States. He began 
practice in the autumn of i86g, and in February, 
1870, formed a partnership, still existing, with 
George O. Shattuck (originally of the firm of 




WM. A. MUNROE. 

the bench in 1882, the firm name during this 
period being Shattuck, Holmes, & Munroe. Mr. 
Munroe is a member of the }5oston Bar .\ssocia- 
tion and of the American Bar Association. In 
politics he is Republican. He resides in Cam- 
bridge, and is prominent in its affairs. Since 
1869 he has been five times elected a member of 
its School Committee ; he was one of the commis- 
sioners to revise the Cambridge city charter in 
1890 ; is now (1894) a member of the Cambridge 
Club, and was its president in 1890; a member 
and one of the incorporators of the Colonial Club 
of Cambridge ; and a trustee of the Avon Home 
in Cambridge. In religion he is Baptist, — a mem- 
ber of the First Baptist Church of Cambridge, a 
trustee of the Newton Theological Institution, and 
a member of the Boston Baptist Social I'nion, 
president of the latter in 1882. Mr. Munroe was 
married November 22, 187 1, to Miss Sarah 1). 
Whiting, a native of Salem. They have one 
daughter : Helen W. Munroe. 



NOYES, Charles Johnson, speaker of the 
House of Representatives in 1880-81-82 and 



164 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



1887-88, is a native of Haverliill. He was born 
August 7, 1841, son of Johnson and Sally 
(Brickett) Noyes, who came from Canaan, Grafton 
County, N.H. His ancestors on his father's side 
emigrated from England, and were among the 
earliest settlers of New England, landing in 1634, 
near the site of Newburyport ; and his ancestry 
on his mother's side extends back to the mother 
country in direct line. His early education was 
attained in the public schools of his native town ; 
and he was fitted for college in the old Haverhill 
Academy, the predecessor of the Haverhill High 
School, from which he graduated in i860, the 




CHAS. J. NOYES. 

valedictorian on graduation day. He first en- 
tered Antioch College at Yellow Springs, Ohio, 
and there spent the freshman and sophomore 
years. Then, with a large number of his class, 
he entered Union College as a junior, and took 
the regular course, graduating in the class of 
1864. While at Union, he was orator on several 
occasions. He began his legal studies during his 
second year in college in the office of Judge John- 
son, of Schenectady ; and these were so far ad- 
vanced when he graduated that a few months 
after he was practising his profession. He was 
admitted to the bar in Providence, R.I., where he 
completed his studies in the office of John E. 



Risley, Jr. ; but his practice was begun in Haver- 
hill and Boston, in both of which cities he opened 
offices. At the age of twenty-four he entered 
public life, being elected from Haverhill to the 
lower house of the Legislature, session of 1866. 
Here he took rank with older and more experi- 
enced members, and was given place on important 
committees. Declining a re-election, he became 
a successful candidate for the Senate in the Third 
Essex District. In that body he was the youngest 
member ; but, as in the house the year before, he 
took leading parts. He was chairman of the 
committee on library and member of sundry other 
committees, and he was not infrequently heard in 
debate on the floor. Declining to serve a second 
term, the next few years were devoted entirely to 
the pursuit of his profession. Then, in 1876, he 
was again elected to the Legislature, this time 
sent to the lower house from the Fourteenth Suf- 
folk District, having in 1872 removed from 
Haverhill, and become a citizen of South Boston; 
and, through repeated re-elections, he served here 
six consecutive terms (1877--82). L)uring the 
session of 1877 he was on the committees on 
mercantile aftairs (chairman), and the Hoosac 
Tunnel, Troy &: Greenfield Railway ; in that of 
1878 he was chairman of the Hoosac Tunnel 
committee, and prominent in the committee on 
harbors; in that of 1879 he was chairman of 
the committee on constitutional amendment ; and 
in 1880 he was first made speaker, elected on the 
fourth ballot by a vote of one hundred and twenty- 
five. The next year he was unanimously re-elected 
to the speakership, and again in 1882. Also in 
1887 and 1888, returned for the seventh and 
eighth times, he was re-elected to the chair with 
no opposing votes. Mr. Noyes has long been an 
active member of the Masonic fraternity, and 
prominent also in the order of Odd Fellows. He 
is past master of Adelphi Lodge and past com- 
mander of St. Omer Commandery of Knights 
Templars. He has taken all the Scottish rites 
up to the thirty-second degree, and is a member 
of the Lafayette Lodge of Perfection, of the Giles 
F. Yates Council of Princes of Jerusalem, of the 
Mount Olivet Chapter of Rose Croix, and the 
Massachusetts Consistory. In the Odd Fellows 
he has passed all the chairs of the lodge and en- 
campment ; is past grand and past chief patriarch, 
and has served on the grand board of tlie Grand 
Encampment of Massachusetts. He is a mem- 
ber of the New England, Norfolk, and Middlesex 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



165 



(dining) clubs, and a prominent member of tlie 
Zeta Psi, college fraternity. Mr. Noyes was mar- 
ried in Providence, R.I., March 9, 1864, to Miss 
Emily Wells, daughter of Colonel Jacob C. and 
Fannie C. Wells, of Cincinnati, (3hio. They have 
three children: Fannie C., Harry R., and Grace 
L. Noyes. 



OSBORNE, William Henry, member of the 
Plymouth bar. United States pension agent 1890- 
93, is a native of Scituate, born September 16, 
1840, son of Ebenezer and Mary (Woodman) 
Osborne. On the paternal side he is a descend- 
ant of George Osborne, early of that part of 
Pembroke now Hanson, and on the maternal 
side of Richard Mann, of Scituate, who was one 
of the proprietors of the " Conihasset Grant " in 
1633. His great-grandfathers, George Osborne 
and John Mann, were soldiers of the Revolution, 
the former on the alarm-list at Lexington, April 
'9> '775 ; ''"^1 '^^^'o of his great-uncles were on 
board ship with Captain Luther Little in the 
Revolution. He was educated in the public 
schools of Scituate and of East Piridgewater, to 
which his parents moved when he was a lad of 
ten, at the East Bridgewater Academy and the 
Bridgewater State Normal School. Graduating 
from the latter in July, i860, he taught school 
during the autumn of that year and the following 
winter, and was prepared to enter Bowdoin Col- 
lege when the Civil War broke out, and he joined 
the Union army. He enlisted May 18, 1861, at 
East Bridgewater, as a private in Company C 
of the Twenty-ninth Regiment, Massachusetts 
Volunteers, which was assigned to the depart- 
ment of South-eastern Virginia. He was in the 
engagement of the 8th and 9th of March, 1862, 
at Newport News, and the e.xpedition at Norfolk 
and Portsmouth ; and in the following June and 
early July, his regiment having joined the Army 
of the Potomac as part of the Irish Brigade 
under General Thomas Francis Meagher, was 
at the front nearly every day for several weeks, 
and constantly under fire. On June 15 he was 
in a sharp skirmish, when his company suffered 
its first loss. On the 27th he was in the battle 
of Gaines' Mill ; on the 29th in that of Peace 
Orchard and Savage Station ; the next day at 
White Oak Swamp Creek and Charles City 
Court-house; and on the ist of July at Malvern 
Hill. In the last-named battle he was struck by 



a musket-ball in the chest, and, rendered uncon- 
scious, was carried by some of his comrades a 
short distance to the rear, and left, as they sup- 
posed, to die. Restored, however, to conscious- 
ness an hour later by the efTorts of the surgeons, 
he took the gun and cartridge box from a dead 
soldier lying near him, and in the darkness found 
his way to the front, and rejoined his brigade. 
He had been in the ranks but a short time when 
an exploding shell shattered his left leg. Crawl- 
ing on his hands and knees to the edge of a forest, 
he there lay, bleeding and unattended, until near 
midnight, when a party of stretcher-bearers dis- 




WILLIAM H. OSBORNE. 

covered him, and carried him to the field hospital 
at the famous old Malvern House. By early 
morning the army had fallen back to Harrison's 
Landing on the James River ; and, with many 
others of the wounded, he fell into the hands 
of the enemy. Three weeks later, released on 
parole of exchange, he was conveyed to St. Luke's 
Hospital, New York City, from which he was 
finallv discharged in Januar)', 1863, unfit for fur- 
ther service. For his bravery and heroism at 
Malvern Hill, Lieutenant Colonel Joseph H. 
Barnes of his regiment caused his name, with 
others, to be sent to Governor .\ndrew with 
commendatory remarks, and subsequently recom- 



1 66 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



mended him to the Secretary of War as a proper 
person to receive a medal of honor. After his 
return home Mr. Osborne engaged again in 
teaching in the village of Elmwood, East Bridge- 
water, and began the study of law with the Hon. 
B. W. Harris. He was admitted to the Plym- 
outh bar at the October term of the Superior 
Court in 1864, and has been in active practice 
ever since in all the courts of the State, largely 
as a jury lawyer. From 1865 to 1876 he was 
trial justice, and for several years commissioner 
of insolvency for Plymouth County. He is now 
one of the three examiners for Plymouth to 
pass upon tlie qualifications of applicants for 
admission to the bar, appointed by the justices of 
the Supreme and Superior courts. He has held 
the position of town treasurer, town clerk, and 
member of the School Committee of East Bridge- 
water, and was representative in the lower house 
of the Legislature two terms (1872 and 1884), 
serving his first term on the committee on 
probate and chancery, and his second term on 
the judiciary committee. He was appointed 
United States pension agent for the Massachu- 
setts district by President Harrison, May 28, 
1890. He is a member of the Grand Army, for 
many years commander of the post of East 
Bridgewater. He has published a " History of 
the Twenty-ninth Regiment." Mr. Osborne is 
unmarried. 



1 88 1, as clerk in the Norfolk House, Roxbury 
District; and he opened the Langham Hotel, for- 



PAGE, George Herbert, proprietor of the 
Langham Hotel, Boston, was born in Constanti- 
nople, Turkey, June 15, 1863, where his parents, 
William R. and Juliette (Churchill) Page, were at 
the time residing. His father was a native of 
Hallowell, Me., and was engaged in the ice busi- 
ness ; and his mother was born in England. His 
early education was acquired in French schools 
in Constantinople and Port Said, Egypt, and at a 
German school at Jaffa, Palestine. Then, com- 
ing to America with his parents, he attended 
the Wiscasset (Me.) public schools, and finished 
at the Hallowell (Me.) Classical School. He 
began active life in Boston, in the summer of 
1879, as errand boy in the wholesale hardware 
house of B. Callendar & Co. After a short time 
here he went into the employ of Pierce, Tripp, & 
Co., mill supplies, and subsequently became book- 
keeper for the Tucum Manufacturing Company, 
Boston. He first entered the hotel business, in 




GEO. H. PAGE. 



merly the Commonwealth, as proprietor in Decem- 
ber, 1888. Mr. Page is unmarried. 



PAUL, Isaac Farnsworth, member of the 
Suffolk bar, is a native of Dedham, born Novem- 
ber 26, 1856, son of Ebenezer and Susan 
(Dresser) Paul. He is of English descent. He 
was educated in the Dedham public schools and 
at Dartmouth College, graduating in the class of 
1878. He studied law in Boston in the office of 
Farmer & Williams, and one year in the Boston 
University Law School ; and he was admitted to 



the bar in i5 



The following year he became 



associate editor of the United States Digest, and 
so served through 1885 ; then he was made sole 
editor, serving through 1886, 18S7, and 18S8. 
P"rom 1886 to 1892 he was head-master of the 
Boston Evening High School, and in 1893-94 a 
member of the Boston School Board. In politics 
he is Republican. He has been engaged in gene- 
ral practice in Boston since his admission to the 
bar, and attorney for the Board of Police of the 
city of Boston from 1889 to 1894. He is a mem- 
ber of the Dartmouth Club of Boston (president 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



167 



in 1893 and 1894), of the University and of the 
lioston Art clubs. He was married March 22, 




ISAAC F. PAUL. 

1883, to Miss Ida Louise Batcheller, daughter of 
Philip Batcheller of Fitzwilliam, N.H. They 
have three children : Philip Batcheller, Richard 
{■'arnsworth, and Katherine Paul. 



PERKINS, George Arthur, member of the 
Middlesex bar, is a native of Cambridge, born 
September 4, 1856, son of Levi and Elizabeth 
(Sands) Perkins. His father and mother were 
both natives of Maine, of old families, his 
father's family going from New Hampshire to 
Maine in the eighteenth century. He was edu- 
cated in the Cambridge schools, and fitted for 
his profession at the Boston University Law 
School, entering the latter in the autumn of 
1874 and graduating in May, 1876. After gradu- 
ation he kept books for a large brewery for ten 
months, having charge of the banking and ship- 
ping, till of sufficient age to be admitted to the 
bar. Admitted in 1878, he has been in active 
practice in Boston ever since, having till the au- 
tumn of 1893 been associated with Charles J. 
Mclntire, now judge of Probate Court for Mid- 
dlesex County. He has been connected with 



numerous large and important cases, and has 
practised before all the court.s, both State and 
LTnited States, having for some years been a 
member of bar of the United States Court. He 
has served three terms in the lower house of 
the Legislature (1886-87-89), member of the 
committees on the judiciary and on probate and 
insolvency, acting as clerk of each. He is con- 
nected with the Masonic and Odd Fellows 
orders, member of the Mount Olivet Lodge, the 
Cambridge Royal Arch Chapter, and the Cam- 
bridge Lodge, No. 13, Odd Fellows. He has 
been president of the Alumni Association of the 
Boston University Law School; has held offices 
in a number of clubs of a social nature, and in 
several bicycle clubs ; and has been a member 
of the League of American Wheelmen for ten 
years. He has held the several offices in the 
last-mentioned organization, at present being 
chief consul of the Massachusetts Division, and 
second vice-president of the national body. He 
has been a strong advocate of good roads, and in 
1892 was appointed chairman of the Massachu- 
setts Highway Commission, which position he 
still holds. In politics he is a Democrat. He 




CEO. A. PERKINS. 



has for many years been actively identified with 
his party, and lias been a member of nearly all 



1 68 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



the committees. He is unmarried. He has al- 
ways resided in Cambridge. 



PERRY, Baxter Edward, member of the Suf- 
folk bar, is a native of New Hampshire, born in 
Lyme, April 26, 1826, son of the Rev. Baxter E. 
and Lydia (Gray) Perry. On both sides he is 
connected with early Worcester (Mass.) families. 
The Perry family migrated from Watertown to 
Worcester in 1751 ; and the (]ray family settled 
there soon after their arrival in the country, in 
17 18. His great-great-grandfather on the ma- 




BAXTER E. PERRY. 

ternal side, Matthew Gray, and his great-grand- 
father, Matthew Gray, 2d, were Scotch-Irish Pres- 
byterians, of the large company who came out 
that year. His father, a graduate of Harvard in 
1817, and of Andover in 1820, was pastor of the 
church at Lyme from 182 i till his death in 1830 ; 
and his mother previous to her marriage was a 
notable school-teacher in Worcester, later con- 
ducting a select school in Cambridge, under the 
shadow of the college. He was educated in the 
country schools, at Thetford (Vt.) Academy, and 
at Middlebury (Vt.) College, from which he grad- 
uated in 1S49. He began active life as a 
teacher, and was engaged in this occupation for 
several years, mainly as principal of the Chester 



(Vt.) Academy. While teaching, he studied law, 
and later, coming to Boston, read in the law of- 
fice of Ranney & Morse. Admitted to the bar 
on the first of May, 1855, he at once began prac- 
tice in Boston; and he has confined himself exclu- 
sively to his profession since, without interruption 
and with success. Beyond one term in the Gen- 
eral Court (1876) as a representative from Med- 
ford, he has held no public place, having declined 
all offices, positions, and work not in the line of 
professional pursuits. He has, however, occa- 
sionally written for magazines and the newspaper 
press, and delivered a few public addresses on 
literary and educational themes. In politics he is 
a Republican. He is a member of the Boston 
Bar Association, of the Masonic order, and of 
the Medford Club ; and he has been a trustee of 
Middlebury College since 1882. He was married 
August 26, 185 I, to Miss Charlotte H. Hough, of 
Lebanon, N.H. They have had four children : 
P^dward Baxter (now a pianist in Boston), Cora G. 
(now the wife of Charles A. Hamilton, of New 
York), George H. (now partner in the firm with 
his father), and Edith C. Perry. 



PETTENGILL, John Ward, member of the 
Suffolk bar, was born in Salisbury, N.H., Novem- 
ber 12, 1836, son of Benjamin and Betsey (Petten- 
gill) Pettengill. He is of Puritan ancestry, a de- 
scendant of Richard Pettengill who came from 
Staffordshire, England, to Salem, in 162S, and 
there married Joanna, daughter of Richard Inger- 
soll. He was educated in the public schools, and 
in the Franklin, Salisbury, Northfield, and Hop- 
kinton academies. He was fitted for college by 
that eminent teacher. Professor Dyer H. Sanborn, 
and in 1854 was about to enter the sophomore 
class of Dartmouth when he was prevented by a 
severe bronchial trouble, which for a long time 
impaired his voice to such a degree that he was 
unable to speak. For the next two years, how- 
ever, he pursued the college studies at home 
under the direction of his father and a private 
tutor. In 1856 he became connected with the 
editorial department of the Indcpciulcnt Dcmonat 
at Concord, and while there began the study of 
law, reading in the office of Judge Asa Fowler. 
Early in 1858 he came to Massachusetts, and 
entered the office of John Q. A. Griffin and 
Alonzo W. Boardman, in Charlestown, as a stu- 
dent, and in March, 1859, was admitted to the 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



l6g 



Middlesex bar, on examination, by the Hon. 
(ieorge P. Sanger, judge. He practised in 
Charlestown till the annexation of that city to 
Boston, in 1S74, when he moved his office to the 
city proper, where he has since been established. 
lie was a special justice of the Police Court of 
Charlestown for several years immediately preced- 
ing annexation, and in August following was ap- 
pointed justice of the Pirst District Court of 
Kastern Middlesex, with jurisdiction in Maiden, 
Melrose, Medford, Everett, Wakefield, Reading, 
and North Reading, which position he still holds. 




JOHN W. PETTENGILL. 

In his practice he has been especially successful 
in criminal cases. During the administration of 
the late Charles R. Train as attorney-general he 
secured verdicts of acquittal for his clients in 
three capital cases ; and in the case of the Com- 
monwealth 7'. Orne, indicted for burning a school- 
house in Charlestown, in which he was counsel for 
the defendant, four trials were necessary before 
the government could secure a conviction. He 
has also been successful in the conduct of civil 
suits involving important questions of law. For 
many years he has resided in Maiden, and has 
been prominent in the affairs of that city. He 
was elected a trustee of the Maiden Public 
Library Fund in 187S for the term of three years, 



and declined a re-election in 1881, after the library 
was established and in satisfactory condition. He 
was a member of the Board of .Mdermen for 1891, 
but declined a re-election in 1892. He was 
elected again in 1893, but positively declined a 
nomination for 1894. in politics he has usually 
been a Republican, and at one time was active in 
party work, frequently speaking on the stump ; but 
of late years he has devoted himself almost wholly 
to his professional work, with occasional addresses 
on some social science topic. He is president of 
the Maiden Board of Trade, an association which 
is interested in matters pertaining to the encour- 
agement of all legitimate business enterprises, and 
organized to collect and disseminate information 
respecting Maiden as a manufacturing city and a 
place of residence. He is also a member of the 
Middlesex, the New Hampshire, and the Kernwood 
clubs, and of the Deliberative Association, a liter- 
ary club of Maiden. Mr. Pettengill was married 
April 25, 1866, in Watertown, by the Rev. John 
Weiss, to Miss Margaret Maria Dennett, daugh- 
ter of John Richard and Mary Dennett, of Lan- 
caster, England. They have one child : Margaret 
Betsey Pettengill, born September 29, 1S67. 



POWERS, Wilbur Howard, member of the 
Suffolk bar, is a native of New Hampshire, born 
in Croydon, January 22, 1849, son of Elias and 
F.meline (White) Powers. He comes of an ancient 
family which bore originally the Norman name of 
Le Poer. The first ancestor known was an officer 
under \\'illiam the Conqueror, whose name appears 
in Battle Abbey as one of the survivors of the 
battle of Hastings ; and the first ancestor in this 
country was Walter Power, who settled on a tract 
of land near Concord, now in the town of Little- 
ton, Mass. His sons added the letter " s " to the 
name. Elias Powers, the father of Wilbur H., w-as 
a farmer, widely known in the conununity for in- 
tegrity and hospitality. ( )n the maternal side he 
is of Saxon descent, from Elder John White, set- 
tled in 1632 in New Towne, now Cambridge, the 
site of whose farm is in part covered by Gore 
Hall, Harvard. His early education was attained 
in the district schools. Then he entered (Mean 
Academy at Olean, N.V., and subsequently Kim- 
ball Union Academy at Meriden, N.H. Graduat- 
ing from the latter in 187 1, he entered Dart- 
mouth, and there was graduated in the class of 
1875, taking prizes in oratory and in English com- 



170 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



position, and liaving as his part for commence- 
ment a philosophical discussion wliich won for 
him the highest commendation of the Faculty. 
His legal studies were pursued in the liioston Ihii- 
versity Law School; and, graduating therefrom in 

1878, he was soon after admitted to the bar. The 
expenses of both his collegiate and law school 
education were defrayed by his own efforts. He 
began professional work in Boston on January 22, 

1879, and has Ijeen established there since, en- 
gaged in an extensive practice. He has been 
counsel in many important cases in the courts and 




WILBUR H. POWERS. 

before committees of the Legislature. He was 
receiver of the Guardian Endowment Society, ap- 
pointed by the court in 1893, and succeeded in 
closing up its affairs promptly and satisfactorily. 
He served three terms in the General Court 
(1890-91-92) as a representative from Hyde 
Park, from the first among the leaders, and dur- 
ing his third term the official and acknowledged 
leader, on the Republican side, upon the floor of 
the House. He was in large measure the author 
of and responsible for the passage of the bill of 
1892, redividing the .State into Congressional Dis- 
tricts, on a plan which he maintained was non- 
partisan. The bill passed a Republican House, a 
Senate equally divided between the two parties, 



and was signed by a Democratic governor. He 
made an effective speech in its defence, which 
gained the commendation of those who were bit- 
terly opposed to him. He was also the author of 
a bill in the interest of education, aiding more 
particularly the poorer municipalities, and endeav- 
oring to make a more equitable distribution of the 
corporation tax. He was elected a member of 
the first Board of Park Commissioners for Hyde 
I'ark for 1893-94, and was active in advocating 
the taking of Stony Brook Reservation for park 
]3urposes, which was accomplished, the board join- 
ing the Metropolitan I-'ark Commission in the 
transaction. He has been for many years a mem- 
ber of the Republican town committee for Hyde 
Park, holding successively the positions of secre- 
tary, treasurer, and chairman; and since 1893 a 
member of the Republican State Committee. He 
is connected with the Masonic order, which he 
joined before graduating from college ; also with 
the Royal Society of Good Fellows ; and has been 
a prominent member of the Golden Cross, and 
counsel for the order at large for twelve years. 
He belongs to both the social clubs of Hyde Park, 
the Waverly and the Hyde Park clubs, — president 
of the Waverly in 1S94. In college he was a mem- 
ber of the D. K. E. Society. He was married May 
I, 1880, to Miss Emily Owen, of Lebanon, N.H. 
They have two children: \\'alter (born August 3, 
1885), and Myra Powers (born May 22, 1889). 



PRRRLE, William Henrv, member of the 
Suffolk bar, is a native of Charlestown, born 
August II, 1856, son of Jeremiah and Elizabeth 
(Freeman) Preble. His parents were both natives 
of Maine, the father of York and the mother of 
Mt. Desert ; and he is of English descent. His 
education was acquired in the Charlestown public 
schools. After his graduation from the High 
School in 1874 he went to work as a clerk in a law 
office, devoting his evenings to study. He read 
law in the offices of George E. Smith and F. 
Hutchinson, and in 1880 was admitted to the 
I\Lrssachusetts bar. Four years later he was ad- 
mitted to the bar of the United -States Circuit 
Court. He began the practice of his profession 
in Boston, where he has been established since, 
his present offices in the Sears Building. His 
practice has been confined to the ci\il side of the 
court, consisting mainly of commercial litigation 
and probate and insolvency cases. In politics he 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



171 



is a Republican, active in his party. For eight 
years he was prominent on the Republican city 
committee of Boston, and he is now a member of 




tury, is a native of Marlboro, born May 7, 1816, 
son of Nicholson Broughton and Lucy (Bond) 
Proctor. He received his early education in the 
local schools, and graduated from the Gates 
Academy in Marlboro. His parents intended him 
for the ministry, but his bent was strongly towards 
the stage ; and at the early age of seventeen, hav- 
ing found his way to Boston and enlisted the sym- 
pathies of William Pelby, then the manager of the 
Warren Theatre, he made his first bow before a 
theatrical audience. This was on the evening of 
November 29, 1833; and the part he essayed was 
Ba/iion in " Damon and Pythias," the Pythias being 
Edmond Connor, recently deceased (1894). His 
success was so marked that he was called upon to 
repeat the performance three times, one of the 
three at a benefit of Mrs. Anderson (Ophelia 
Pelby). Shortly after he appeared at the Tre- 
mont Theatre as Rolla in " Pizarro," and as Car- 
wiii in John Howard Payne's drama " Therese, 
the Orphan of Geneva," once a great favorite with 
Edwin Forrest ; and his next attempt was as 
Macbeth. This ambitious selection was made to 
meet the wishes of his parents, who had given 



WILLIAM H. PREBLE. 



the Republican State Committee. He was a mem- 
ber of the lower house of the Legislature in 1888 
and 1889, serving both terms on the committees 
on elections (chairman) and on probate and insol- 
vency (clerk) ; and he had a hand in shaping some 
of the most important legislation of the session. 
He is connected with the Masonic and Odd F'el- 
lows orders, — a member of the Henry Price Lodge, 
Masons, of Scottish Rites bodies, and of the Mas- 
sachusetts Consistory ; is a past grand of the 
Bunker Hill Lodge ( )dd Fellows, and member of 
the committee on the judiciary of the Grand 
Lodge. He is also a member of the order of 
Red Men, and of the Nme Hundred and Ninety- 
ninth Artillery Association of Charlestown. He 
was married December 8, 1880, to Miss .Amy 
Bertha Nash, of the Charlestown District. They 
have five children : Florence L., F.lsie May, Grace 
A., Winnifred L., and Gladys Preble. Mr. Preble 
still resides in the Charlestown District. 




JOSEPH PROCTOR. 



their reluctant consent to his adoption of the pro- 

PROCTOR, Joseph, tragedian, whose profes- fession of an actor on condition that he should 

sional career has covered upwards of half a cen- appear in some prominent character, " they, good 



172 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



souls that they were," as he has said, " trusting 
from the bottom of their hearts that failure would 
prove the result, and my aspirations for a stage 
life be fully satisfied." His success was so great 
that he took a stock engagement with Pelby, and 
applied himself to a careful study of the rudiments 
of the profession. At the close of his season in 
Pelby's company he moved westward, and for the 
next three years appeared at various theatres in 
general characters, from "utility" to leading busi- 
ness. His first engagement of this period was at 
Albany, where he spent a year, playing with many 
of the dramatic notables of the time, James Sher- 
idan Knowles and Thomas Apthorpe Cooper 
among the number. Then he joined a company 
which Charles R. Thorne and wife brought to 
Albany on their way West, and went with it to 
Buffalo, Toronto, and a number of Western cities. 
At Columbus, hearing from home that his mother 
was dangerously ill, he left the company and 
started East, travelling by stage over the .Allegha- 
nies, as there were then no railroads. At Phila- 
delphia, having received word of his mother's 
recovery, he rested, and, finding E. S. Connor, (who 
had played J'ythias at his first appearance in Bos- 
ton, ) at the \\'alnut .Street Theatre, he made an 
engagement there for the remainder of the season. 
This was the winter of 1836-37. The season was 
divided between Philadelphia and Pittsburg, in 
both of which cities he became a great favorite. 
After this he starred some time, in the west, and 
then, engaged by Thomas Hamblin for the Bowery 
Theatre, New York, appeared in the " Nick of 
the Woods," presented for the first time on the 
evening of the 6th of May, 1839, playing the 
Jihhenainosay, the part he subsequently made 
famous abroad as well as in his own country. 
This performance was received with great favor, 
and the play had a long and profitable run. The 
following season it was brought out in Boston, at 
the National Theatre, and the New York success 
was repeated. The ne.xt year Mr. Proctor spent 
mostly in starring tours. He travelled South and 
West, visited the Bahamas and other parts of the 
\\'est Indies. Again coming East, he filled engage- 
ments in Philadelphia, New York, Boston, Port- 
land, and Bangor, and made repeated successful 
trips in various directions. In 1848 he returned 
to Boston, and took the management of the then 
unprosperous Beach Street Museum, which he 
conducted for about a year with a fair measure of 
success. Thence he went to Portland, opening 



there the new theatre built for him by the Hon. 
F. O. J. Smith, in the early autumn of 1849. 
Here he continued as manager for a couple of 
years, during this time also playing frequent star 
engagements in the more prominent cities of the 
country. In the autumn of 1851 he left for a 
professional tour in California, where he remained 
till March, 1854. His return to Boston was fol- 
lowed by a succession of starring engagements in 
the principal cities. Then in May, 1859, accom- 
panied by his wife, he sailed for Europe, and after 
a summer holiday trip on the continent made his 
first appearance before a London audience at the 
Royal Standard Theatre. This was an immediate 
and pronounced success ; and the prosperous en- 
gagement continued through ten successive weeks, 
terminating only with the holiday season. An ex- 
tended tour of leading cities in the north of Eng- 
land, Ireland, and Scotland followed, with similar 
success, after which he returned to London for 
a series of farewell performances, the opening of 
which was thus announced in the local press : 
" Reappearance of the pre-eminent tragedian, Mr. 
Joseph Proctor, whose great success in his pro- 
longed engagement of seventy nights in London, 
and recent triumphs in the north of England, in 
Scotland, and Ireland, have won for him the 
golden opinion of the press and public. He will 
appear as Macbeth. Locke's celebrated music 
will be sung by the English Opera Company." 
His stay abroad covered about two and a half 
years, during which he played in various roles of 
the Shakspearian and standard range, and fre- 
quently in the Jibbenainosa}\ winning warm praise 
from the English critics. During this period, 
when playing a star engagement at the Theatre 
Royal in Glasgow, he first met Henry Irving, 
then a member of the supporting company, and 
was so impressed by his work and his evident de- 
termination to master every detail of the man- 
ager's as well as the actor's art, that he felt assured 
of the young actor's future, and told him so. 
Years after his words were most agreeably re- 
called by Irving when in Boston, who, at a little 
supper after the play, referred to Proctor as the 
kindest man he ever knew, — " a man enveloped 
in a kind and gentle spirit, whose encouraging 
words spoken to me when many years younger 
than I am to-night were more hopeful than this 
good man supposed they would be when, impelled 
by his inherent goodness of heart, he uttered them 
to a young actor struggling to reach his ideal in 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



•73 



his profession." Upon returning to America, Mr. 
Proctor repeated his starring trips over the coun- 
try. While filling an engagement at the Howard 
Athena-um in Boston in 1865, he played Mad)cth 
to Charlotte Cushman's Lady Mmiieth at the P)OS- 
ton Theatre in a performance for the benefit of 
the Sanitary Commission. Late in the seventies 
he played a series of successful engagements in 
Colorado. In 1885 he practically retired from the 
stage, and established a school of dramatic art in 
Boston, which he has since directed during tiie 
winter months, resting summers at his country 
place at Manchester-by-the-sea. He has occa- 
sionally given performances with his pupils in 
New England towns, before lyceums, and once 
since his retirement has appeared at a benefit 
performance in Boston, — at the Globe Theatre, 
April 8, 1890, in aid of the fund for the Mrs. J. R. 
Vincent Hospital, when he played Macbeth. Mr. 
Proctor was first married in 1837, to Miss Hester 
\\'illis ^^'arre^, daughter of William Warren, and 
sister of William Warren, the long-time favorite 
Boston comedian. She died in Boston, IJecember 
7, 1841. He married second Miss Elizabeth R. 
Wakeman, daughter of Bradley Wakeman, of Bal- 
timore, in February, 1851. His wife and daughter. 
Miss Anna E. Proctor, and self are the surviving 
unities of his last alliance. 



RENO, Conrad, member of the Suffolk bar, is 
a native of Alabama, born in Mount Vernon, 
December 28, 1859, son of Jesse Lee and Mary 
B. B. (Cross) Reno. He is of French descent on 
the paternal side, and of English on the maternal 
side. His father, a graduate of West Point in 
1846, served through the Mexican War, and in 
the Civil War was a major-general of United 
States Volunteers, in command of the Ninth 
Army Corps, when he was killed in the battle 
of South Mountain, Md., on the 14th of Sep- 
tember, 1862. Conrad Reno was educated in 
the schools of Baltimore, in Shortlidge"s Media 
Academy of Media-, Penna., and at Lehigh Univer- 
sity, where he spent two years. Then he came 
East, and studied law two years in the Harvard 
Law School and one year in the Boston University 
Law School, graduating in 1883. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar in September of that year, and, 
after three or four months in the law office of the 
Hon. Henry W. Paine, began practice on his own 
account in Pioston, where he has since been 



established. Among important cases in which 
he has been engaged was that of Eliot v. McCor- 
mick, Mass. Reports, vols. 141 and 144, now 
regarded as a leading case in Massachusetts and 
in other States, in which it was decided that a 
judgment against a non-resident defendant, with- 
out personal service of process or voluntary 
appearance, was null and void, and that certain 
State statutes which purported to authorize the 
rendition of a judgment upon notice by publica- 
tion were unconstitutional : this decision over- 
ruling a long line of Massachusetts cases and 




CONRAD RENO. 

reversing the practice of the preceding hundred 
years. And another was Eustis v. BoUes, Mass. 
Reports, vol. 146, and United States Supreme 
Court Reports, vol. 150, in which it was decided 
that the Composition Acts of Massachusetts were 
unconstitutional as applied to pre-existing con- 
tracts, and that a creditor waived his right to 
object to their unconstitutionality by accepting a 
dividend under the composition proceedings. The 
Supreme Court of the United States held that it 
had no jurisdiction to review this decision of the 
Massachusetts court. He has spent a large part 
of ten years in the study of constitutional law, 
and of the law of " non-residents and foreign cor- 
porations," and has published a number of w^orks 



174 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



on these subjects. He has also written much 
upon economic and labor questions, ills publica- 
tions include: two papers on "Judgments by 
Default against Non-resident Defendants " {Atiicr- 
iam Laiv Jievicic, 1887 and 1888); papers 
entitled "Ogden ?■. Sanders Reviewed" {.American 
Law Register, 1888), " Impairment of Contracts 
by Change of Judicial Opinion" {Amcricaii Law 
Review, 1889), "Extra Territorial Effect of Limita- 
tion Bar" {American Law Review, 1890), "The 
Wage Contract and Personal Liberty" {Popular 
Science Monthly, 1892), "Arbitration and the Wage 
Contract" (American L^aw Review, 1892), "Pro- 
tective Tariff I-aws and the Commerce Clause " 
{American Law Review, 1893), "Individual Liabil- 
ity of Non-resident Stockholders " {American Law 
Revie7i', 1894): a pamphlet entitled "State Regula- 
tion of Wages" (Boston: B. Wilkins & Co., 1891,): 
and an elaborate work on " Non-residents and 
Eoreign Corporations," treating of the fundamental, 
rights, remedies, and liabilities of such residents 
and corporations, both under State law and Federal 
law, the first and only work covering these sub- 
jects (one volume; Chicago; T. H. Flood & Co., 
1892). Since January, 1893, Mr. Reno has been 
an instructor in the Boston University Law School, 
on the subject of theses. He is a member of the 
Loyal Legion of the United States, in November, 
1892, elected secretary of the committee on his- 
tory of the Massachusetts Conimandery ; a mem- 
ber of the Aztec Club ; of the Sons of Veterans, 
and other military organizations ; and of the An- 
cient Order of United Workmen. In politics he 
is of the People's Party. He attended the first 
national convention of the party in July, 1892, as 
a delegate from Massachusetts, and on September 
6, 1893, was nominated for attorney-general of 
Massachusetts on the People's Party State ticket. 
He was married April 13, 1887, to Miss Susan 
Moore Eustis, daughter of the Rev. William T. 
Eustis, D.D., of Springfield. They have no chil- 
dren. 



1660. His father. James Rollins, was born on 
the memorable July 4, ly?^- James W. was 
fitted for college at the South Berwick (Me.) 
Academy, and graduated at Dartmouth in 1845, 
at the age of eighteen years. His law studies 
were pursued with the Hon. John Hubbard and 



ROLLINS, James Wino.'vte, member of the 
SutTolk bar, is a native of New Hampshire, born 
in Rollinsford (formerly Somersworth), April 19, 
1827, son of James and Sally (Wingate) Rollins. 
He is a descendant in the seventh generation of 
James Rollins, who came from England with the 
Ipswich settlers in 1632, and a few years after 
removed to Dover, N.H. ; and, on the maternal 
side, of John Wingate, w-ho came to Dover in 




JAMES W. ROLLINS. 

William A. Hayes, of South Berwick ; and he was 
admitted to the bar in York County, Maine, 
early in 1850. In May of the same year he was 
admitted to the bar of Massachusetts, and has 
practised his profession in Boston since that time. 
He had a large practice in the courts till about 
1880, when, on account of increasing deafness, he 
was obliged to devote himself almost entirely to 
office practice. The only civil or political offices 
he has ever held were those of chairman of the 
School Committee of the town of West Ro.xbury 
(now part of the city of Boston) from 1868 to 
1870, and member of the Board of Selectmen of 
the town. He has been a director of the Mas- 
sachusetts Central Railroad Company, and was 
for some years president of the Boston, Halifax, 
and Prince Edward Island Steamship Line. In 
politics he has always been a Republican, but he 
has not engaged actively in political work, having 
attended strictly to his professional business. 
He w-as married November 22, 1845, '^ Sophia 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



175 



Atwill (born Sophia Webb Hutchings), and has 
living four children : Mary H. ; James W., Jr., now 
a well-known civil engineer of Boston ; Alice S., 
wife of Edwin T. ISrewster, of Cambridge ; and 
Edward A. Rollins, engaged in manufacture. 



SAUNDERS, Ch.vrles Hicks, of Cambridge, 
largely identified with the progress and develop- 
ment of the university city during the past forty 
years, was born in Old Cambridge, November 10, 
182 1, second son of William and Sarah (Flagg) 
Saunders. His ancestors came to New England 
from ( )ld England as early as 1635, and on his 
maternal side some have always resided in Cam- 
bridge since that date. One of these, John 
Hicks, the great-grandfather of Mr. Saunders, was 
killed in Cambridge by the British troops retreat- 
ing from Lexington on the memorable 19th of 
April, 1775, while he was busily engaged, musket 
in hand, with a company of his friends, in picking 
off the redcoats. The city of Cambridge, in 1870, 
erected a monument to their memory in the old 
burial-ground in Old Cambridge. Charles H. 
Saunders received his education in the public 
schools of Cambridge, and was partially fitted for 
college in the Hopkins Classical School ; but, 
preferring a business career to a professional one, 
he early engaged in mercantile pursuits. After 
occupying a position in the Suffolk Bank of Bos- 
ton for a short time, he entered the hardware 
business in that city, and continued in it until the 
year 1863, when, at the age of forty-two, he re- 
tired. \\'hile in business, he made considerable 
investments in real estate in Cambridge, which he 
developed by the opening of streets and the erec- 
tion of houses ; and, since relinquishing the ac- 
tive care of business, his time has been largely 
occupied in interests of that character. He has 
always stood in the foremost rank of those advo- 
cating the carrying out of all improvements that 
should increase the attractiveness of his native 
city. In politics Mr. Saunders was first a Whig, 
and upon the disintegration of that party allied 
himself with the Republican party, of which he 
has always been an active and zealous adherent. 
He was early called to fill the various offices of the 
city. He was elected a member of the Common 
Council for the years 1853 and 1854, and of the 
Board of Aldermen for 1861 and 1862. In all the 
events of the Civil War he took the deepest inter- 
est, and aided all measures for its active prosecu- 



tion, especially the enlistment of men for the quota 
of the city. As one of the committee of the City 
('ouncil on Soldiers and their Families, he had 
the disbursement of aid to nearly seventy soldiers' 
families intrusted to him. In the years 1864-65- 
66-67 he served as one of the principal assessors 
of the city, and in the fall of 1867 was elected 
mayor for the year 1868, without opposition, hav- 
ing received the nomination of four distinct 
parties; and he was re-elected for the year i86g. 
His administration was remarkably successful, 
giving general satisfaction, and showing a large 
amount of permanent improvements, all carried 
out without the creation of any new debt. 
Among the improvements recommended by him 
and completed during his term of office were the 
establishment of a fire alarm telegraph system, 
the uniforming of the police, the erecting of mar- 
ble tablets to mark the graves of the soldiers in 
the Cambridge Cemetery, the grading and beauti- 
fying of the Broadway l^ark, the widening of Main 




CHAS. H. SAUNDERS. 

Street (now Massachusetts .\venue), the con- 
struction of a brick sidewalk from Harvard 
Square to Boston, and the laying out of walks and 
planting of trees in all the public squares and 
commons of the city. Lfpon his urgent appeal, 
made in both of his inaugural addresses, the City 



176 



MEN OF I'ROGRESS. 



Council decided to erect a monument upon Cam- 
bridge Common, the first camping-ground of the 
Revolution, in honor of the soldiers and sailors of 
Cambridge who fell in the Civil War. The cor- 
ner-stone of the structure was laid on June 17, 
1869, with appropriate ceremonies, the mayor 
making the principal address. In 1876 Mr. 
Saunders was elected one of the commissioners 
of the sinking funds of the city, and has served as 
chairman of the board from that time to the pres- 
ent, during which period more than $2,500,000 of 
the city debt has been paid. He was also se- 
lected, in 1877, one of the commissioners on be- 
half of the city to settle a large number of estates 
which had been surrendered on account of the 
filling of the low districts by the city. He served 
for several years as one of the trustees of the 
Cambridge Savings Bank, and for eleven years as 
a director of the Cambridge Gas Light Company, 
in which corporation, being a large stockholder, 
he was instrumental in effecting important re- 
forms. H e served for many years as president of 
the Cambridge Lyceum Corporation, and is now 
its treasurer. In 1889, at the organization of the 
Massachusetts Society of the Sons of the .Ameri- 
can Revolution, he was unanimously elected its 
first president, and served for 1889 and 1890, 
declining a re-election in 1891. He is also a 
member of the Bunker Hill Monument Associa- 
tion, of the New England Historic Genealogical 
Society, of the Shepard Historical Society, and of 
the Cambridge Club. Mr. Saunders was married 
on September 18, 1849, to Miss Mary B. Ball, of 
Concord, by whom he had four children : Annie B., 
Carrie H., Mary L. (now Mrs. Clapp, of Lexing- 
ton), and Charles R. Saunders (now of Boston). 



for two years to the cost of finishing his education. 
In April, 1846, he came to Boston, working his 
passage on a sailing-vessel, and apprenticed him- 
self to Aaron E. Whittemore, of Ro.\;bury (whose 
shop was on the corner of Warren and Dudley 
Street, where the Hotel Dartmouth now stands), to 
learn the carriage-smith's trade and spring-making. 
Here he remained for two years, employing his 
evenings in the study of book-keeping, arithmetic, 
and writing. His employer failing in business, 
he spent the next two years working as a journey- 
man in Roxbury and Dorchester. Then in C)c- 



SCOTT, John Adams, of John A. Scott & Son, 
carriage builders, Boston, is a native of Nova 
Scotia, born in Windsor, Hauts County, October, 
20, 1827, son of John and Elizabeth (Dill) Scott. 
His father was a native of Halifax, and his mother 
of Windsor ; and his grandparents on both sides 
were of Edinburgh, Scotland. He was reared 
on farms, and educated for the most part in the 
district school. His mother dying when he was 
eight years old, and the family being broken up, 
he lived till his fifteenth year on the farm of his 
father's only sister, attending school during the 
winter months ; and upon her death he went to 
work upon another farm, employing his earnings 




JOHN ADAMS SCOTT. 

tober, 185 1, he entered business for himself in 
the same shop in which he learned his trade ; and 
he has continued on the same street and near the 
site of the old shop ever since. His works have 
been repeatedly enlarged, and he has for some 
time been a leading member of the trade. He 
was president of the National Carriage Builders' 
Association in 1891, and is now (1894) president 
of the National Carriage Exchange. Before the 
annexation of Roxbury to Boston he was for three 
years a member of the Roxbury city government 
(1865-66-67), closing his service in its last Board 
of Aldermen ; and after annexation he was for 
three years a member of the Board of Overseers 
of the Poor of Boston. For a long period he was 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



177 



connected with the mihtia, joining it in 1849. 
He was for seven years in the infantry ; and later, 
during the Civil War, joined the cavalry, in which 
he continued for twelve years, passing through 
all the grades up to captain, which position he 
held for three years. He was active during the 
war in assisting to fill Roxbury's quota. In the 
latter part of the war period he was a member of 
the military committee of the City Council, and he 
was one of the reception committee upon the re- 
turn of the soldiers at the close of the war. In 
politics Captain Scott is an ardent Republican. 
He is president of the Boston Market Men's Re- 
publican Club, and is connected with other organ- 
izations. He was married September 17, 1848, 
to Miss Sarah Sargent Long, of Chester, N.H. 
They have had three daughters and two sons : 
Mary Elizabeth, Mildred Orn, Jessie Fremont, 
John Franklin, and William Jackson Scott. The 
eldest daughter, Mary, died in September, 1S74; 
and Mrs. Scott died December 24, 1889. 



SERGEANT, Charles Spencer, general man- 
ager of the West End Street Railway, Boston, is 
a native of Northampton, born April 30, 1852, 
son of George and Lydia (Clark) Sergeant. His 
father was born in Stockbridge, where the family 
had made its home ever since the Rev. John Ser- 
geant, his direct ancestor, went there as a mis- 
sionary to the Stockbridge Indians in 17,35. 
Other branches settled in New Jersey and Penn- 
sylvania, the first of the family coming to America 
in 1640. On his mother's side he is a descendant 
of an old Northampton family which contributed 
its share to the Revolutionary militia. He was 
educated in the public schools of Northampton, 
graduating from the High School in 1868. His 
business career began that year, when he entered 
the employ of the First National Bank of East- 
hampton as boy. Subsequently he became teller 
of the bank, which position he held for four years. 
Then he went to Lake Superior, and, after spend- 
ing some time in the office of the Hon. S. P. Ely, 
in Marquette, Mich, (who was then secretary and 
treasurer and managing director of the Marquette, 
Houghton & Ontonagon Railroad Company, the 
Lake Superior Iron Company, the Morgan, Re- 
public, Humboldt, and Champion Iron com- 
panies), was made cashier and paymaster of the 
Marc|uette, Houghton & Ontonagon Railroad 
Company. Later he was engaged in the iron 



smelting business in Morgan, Mich. Returning 
East in 1876 to take the position of chief clerk of 
the old Eastern Railroad ("ompany, he became 
auditor of the company at the time of its reorgan- 
ization. After several years' service here he re- 
signed, to take position w-ith Charles Merriam, 
treasurer of many Western railroads, land com- 
panies, and kindred enterprises. When, in De- 
cember, 1887, the \\'est End Raihvay Company 
came into possession of the several street rail- 
ways centring in Boston, he was offered and ac- 
cepted the position of general auditor of the com- 




CHAS. S. SERGEANT. 

pany. Subsequently he was made second vice- 
president, and in November, 1892, was appointed 
to the position of general manager, which he now 
holds. He is a member of the new Exchange 
Club of Boston, the Calumet Club of Winchester, 
and of the Young Men's Democratic Club of 
Massachusetts. He is fond of canoeing, fishing, 
shooting, and outdoor sports generally ; but, being 
a very busy man in a most responsible position, 
he rarely finds time to devote himself to their pur- 
suit. In politics Mr. Sergeant is classed as an 
Independent Democrat. He was married June 3, 
1880, to Miss Elizabeth Blake Shepley. They have 
three children : Elizabeth Sheplev, Rosamond, 
and Katharine Sergeant. 



178 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



SLOCUM, WiNKiELD Scott, member of the Suf- 
folk bar, and city solicitor of Newton, was born 
in Grafton, May i, 1841, son of William F. and 



/ 



^m 



^ ^ 





and of the Newton Club : and he is a Free 
Mason and Knight Templar. In politics he is 
Republican, and in religion a Congregationalist, 
member of the Central Congregational Church of 
Newtonville. Mr. Slocum was married in 1873 to 
Miss Annie A. Pulsifer, daughter of Charles S. 
I'ulsifer, of Newton. They have iiad four chil- 
dren : Frederick Pulsifer (deceased), .\gnes Eliza- 
beth, Charles Pulsifer, and W'infield Scott Slo- 
cum, Jr. 

SOHIER, William Davies, member of the 
Suffolk bar, was born in Boston, October 22, 1858, 
son of William and Susan Cabot (Lowell) Sohier. 
He is descended on both sides from early Essex 
families — the Higginson, Cabot, Jackson, and 
Lowell families — which were closely connected 
w'ith the early history of the county. His ances- 
tor, Francis Higginson, was one of the founders of 
Salem ; and the Higginsons and Cabots were long 
prominent in Salem and Beverly. Another ances- 
tor, Jonathan Jackson, represented Essex on the 
committee which drafted the Massachusetts Con- 
stitution ; and another, John Lowell, was also a 



WINFIELD S. SLOCUM. 

Margaret (Tinker) Slocum. His paternal grand- 
father was Oliver E. Slocum, of Tolland, and 
grandmother Mary (Mills) Slocum. He was edu- 
cated in the Grafton schools and at Amherst 
College, graduating from the latter in the class 
of 1869; and studied for his profession in Bos- 
ton, in the office of Slocum & Staples, composed 
of his father and the late Judge Hamilton E. 
Staples of the Superior bench. Admitted to the 
bar in 187 1, he became a partner with his father 
in general practice, under the firm name of W. ¥. 
& W. S. Slocum, with offices in Boston and 
Newton. In 1881 he was made city solicitor of 
Newton, which position he has since held. He 
was a member of the first School Board of the city 
of Newton, and served in that body four terms 
(1874-77) ; and in 1888 and 1889 he represented 
his district in the lower house of the Legislature, 
serving both terms on the important committee on 
cities, the second term as its chairman. He is 
a member of the Boston Bar Association, of the 
Boston Congregational Club, of the Newton Con- 
gregational Club, of the Boston Athletic Associa- 
tion, of the Massachusetts (political dining) Club, 




WM. D. SOHIER, 



member on behalf of Suffolk, although a native of 
Essex. An earlier John Lowell was town clerk 
of Newbury, and deputy to the General Court 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



179 



in 1643. Mr. Sohicr's father, grandfather, and 
uncle were each prominent members of the bar ; 
and on his mother's side lie is descended from 
Judge John Lowell, distinguished as the first 
United States district judge of the northern dis- 
trict, appointed by Washington, and is a nephew 
of the present John Lowell, who has recently held 
the same position. His mother was a daughter of 
John Amory Lowell. His early education was at- 
tained in Boston private schools and in the public 
schools of Beverly. Then he attended the Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology in the class of 
1875, and in 1876 entered the Harvard Law 
School. He completed his legal studies in the 
offices of Henry \V. Paine and Robert 1). Smith 
in Boston, and in 1881 was admitted to the bar. 
He began practice in Boston, and since 1884 has 
been associated with his uncle, ex-Judge John 
Lowell, of the United States Circuit Court. In 
the famous contests in the Legislature over the 
division of the town of Beverly, covering the years 
1S86-90, he represented the opponents of division, 
first as a member of the committee appointed by 
the town to oppose the movement, serving as 
counsel, without pay, for the first two years of the 
struggle, and then as representative from the town 
in the lower house of the Legislatures of 1888, 
1889, 1890, and 1 89 1, where he was again success- 
ful in defeating each attempt for division. In 
189 1 the petitioners were discouraged; and, al- 
though a petition was presented, it was not pressed. 
The danger then being practically over, he de- 
clined to be a candidate for re-election for a fifth 
term. During his four terms he served on a num- 
ber of important committees, and was counted 
among the most influential leaders. He is a 
member of the Republican Club of Massachusetts, 
and at the time of its formation was chairman of 
the e.xecutive committee. He is also a member 
of the Union and Puritan clubs of Boston, of the 
Country Club, and of tire Essex County Club. 
Mr. Sohier was married in Boston, December 13, 
1880, to Miss Edith F. Alden, daughter of Walter 
B. and Julia E. ( White 1 Alden, a lineal descendant 
of John Alden, of Plymouth. They have three 
children : Eleanor, Alice, and William Davies 
Sohier. 



the public schools of Rockland, and at Bowdoin 
College, from which he graduated in the class of 
1870. He was first prepared for the ministry, 
taking the regular course of the Bangor Theologi- 
cal Seminary, and soon after his graduation there- 
from, in 1873, began preaching. For three years 
he was pastor of the Congregational church in 
Dunbarton, N.H. Retiring from the pulpit, he 
spent two years in European travel, and then ap- 
plied himself to the study of law, reading with Al- 
bert P. Gould, of Thomaston, Me. Admitted to 
the bnr in 1878, he has since practised in Boston. 




SPEAR, Wiii.iA.M Edward, member of the 
Suffolk bar, is a native of Maine, born in Rock- 
land, January 2, 1849, son of Archibald G. and 
Angelica (Branton) Spear. He was educated in 



WILLIAM E. SPEAR. 

He was assistant counsel for the United States in 
the court of commissioners of Alabama claims 
from 1882 to 1885 inclusive, and subsequently 
assistant counsel for the government in the 
French spoliation claims. In January, 1893, he 
was appointed a L'uited States commissioner to 
take the place made vacant by the death of Henry 
L. Hallett. He has been a member of the board 
of overseers of Bowdoin College since 1888. In 
politics Mr. Spear is a Republican. He is an 
earnest bimetallist, and in the discussion of the 
sil\-er question has taken a prominent part, 
delivering addresses before boards of trade in 
the vicinity of Boston, and publishing numerous 
articles in advocacy of the free coinage of the 



I So 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



whitu nifUil. He was married in October, 1878, 
to Mrs. Marie Josephine (kaiix. 'J'liey have had 
two children, Ma.x Branton and Louis Rene 
Spear, both deceased. He is a brother-in-law of 
Senator Frye and of ex-Governor Garcelon of 
Maine. 



SPENCER, Aaron Warner, of Boston, presi- 
dent of the Stock E.xchange 1860-62 and 1888- 
90, is a native of Vermont, born in Springfield, 
Windsor County, son of Guy and Mary (Warner) 
Spencer. His ancestors on the paternal side 




A. W. SPENCER. 

were among the early settlers of this part of 
Vermont, and his mother's family was of Ac- 
worth, N.H. He was educated in the com- 
mon schools of his native town, and at Chester 
(Vt.) Academy, from which he was graduated. 
In 1842 he came to Boston, and has since 
resided there, during his active business life oc- 
cupying a conspicuous position among bankers 
and brokers of the city. He began as a clerk 
in the banking and brokerage house of J. W. 
Clark & Co., and in 1850 he was admitted to the 
firm. That year he also became a member of 
the Stock Exchange then known as the Boston 
Brokers' Board, in the transactions of which he 
at once assumed a prominent position. In 1S56 



he retired from the firm of J. W. Clark &: Co., and 
established the banking house of Spencer, Vila, & 
Co., of which he was the head through an eventful 
decade of years. During tlie Civil War the firm 
were for a considerable period the sole agents of 
the Treasury Department for the sale of govern- 
ment securities in the New England States, and 
their sales aggregated hundreds of millions of 
dollars. At that time Mr. Spencer was one of 
the largest operators connected with the Stock 
Exchange, and classed among the shrewdest. 
He was first elected president of the Exchange in 
September, i860, and served through re-elections 
till September, 1862. His second term, for the 
years t 888-90, was twenty years after his retire- 
ment from the firm of Spencer, Vila, & Co. and 
from active business (1867). He was among the 
earliest members of the board to take an active 
interest in the copper mining districts of Lake 
Superior, then undeveloped ; and, when a partner 
in the house of J. W. Clark & Co., he made 
frequent visits to this region, passing over the 
very sections where are now the rich Calumet 
and Hecla, the Tamarack, and the Osceola mines, 
at that period covered by an utterly unexplored 
wilderness. From that time he has been con- 
nected with Lake Superior mining interests, and 
has retained large holdings in the leading produc- 
ing mines. Since his retirement from business 
he has taken no prominent part in the trans- 
actions of the Exchange, although he continues 
his connection with it, and is a daily attendant at 
its sessions. He is a member of the Temple, 
Algonquin, Suffolk, Art, and Country clubs. He 
was married in June, 1853, to Miss Josephine 
Vila, of Roxbury. His only surviving child is 
Josephine (now Mrs. Frederick Lewis Gay). 
His only son, Alfred Warner Spencer, a graduate 
of Harvard College, died in 1887. Mr. Spencer 
has resided since 1853 in Dorchester, now the 
Dorchester District of Boston, owning there, on 
Columbia Street, a large, old-fashioned, most 
attractive rural estate, comprising nearly twenty 
acres, with oaks of more than a century's growth, 
and stone walls built a hundred years ago. 



SPOFFORD, John Calvin, architect, Boston, 
is a native of Maine, born in Webster, Andros- 
coggin County, November 25, 1854, son of 
Phineas M. and Mary E. (Wentworth) Spofford. 
His ancestry is traced to John and Elizabeth 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



l8l 



(Scott) Spofford, who came from Yorkshire, Eng., 
to this country in 1638, and settled in tiiat part 
of Rowley, Mass., now the town of (Jreorgetown. 
He is a lineal descendant of John Went worth, 
lieutenant governor of the province of New 
Hampshire from 17 17 to T730. His great-great- 
great-grandfather. Captain John Wentworth, 
fought on the " Plains of Abraham " at the battle 
of Quebec, and was one of the men who carried 
\\'olfe to the rock beside which he died. His 
father, IMiineas M. Spofford, was a ship-carpenter 
and farmer in Webster. John C. spent his early 
boyhood on the farm of his grandfather, Foster I). 
Wentwdith, attending the district school during 
the winter months. Later he enjoyed several 
terms at the Monmouth Academy, Monmouth, Me., 
and at the Maine Wesleyan Seminary, Kent's 
Hill. While attending these academies he taught 
some time in his old district school, using the pro- 
ceeds from this service to defray the expenses of 
his education. Subsequently he became principal 
of .Smith's Ilusiness College in Lewiston, where he 
remained for a year or more (1876-77). When a 
pupil in the district school, he excelled in drawing ; 
and he early evinced a liking for architecture, 
which was stimulated by work at the carpenter's 
and mason's trade after leaving the school-room. 
Finally, he determined to adopt architecture as a 
profession, and in 1879 came to Boston to prepare 
for it. He first entered the office of H. J. 
Preston, where he worked and studied for about a 
year. Then in February, 1881, he engaged as a 
draughtsman with Sturgis & Brigham, one of Bos- 
ton's leading firms of architects, and continued 
in their employ until 1886. During this period 
he had charge of the construction of a number of 
noteworthy public and private structures of the 
firm's design, among them the building of the 
Massachusetts Life Insurance Company on State 
Street in Boston, and the residence of H. H. Rogers 
of the Standard Oil Company in New York, hi 
1887 he engaged in professional work on his own 
account, and in March of that year formed a 
copartnership with Willard M. Bacon, under the 
firm name of Spofford & Bacon. At the expira- 
tion of a year this partnership was dissolved, and 
he united with Charles Brigham, formerly of 
Sturgis & Brigham, under the name of Brigham & 
Spofford. He obtained for the new firm, among 
other large and valuable contracts, those for the 
alteration and enlargement of the Maine State 
House and for the construction of the new City 



Hall of Lewiston, Me. The work of designing 
and building the Massachusetts State House 
Flxtension was also begun under the firm of 
lirigham & Spofford, and its other notable work 
included the Asylum for Liebriates and Dipso- 
maniacs in Foxborough ; the Presbyterian church 
in the Roxbury District, Boston ; the passen- 
ger stations on the Old Colony division of the 
New "S'ork, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 
at Roxbury and Stoughton ; the Town Hall and 
Public Library in Fairhaven ; the Memorial Hall 
in Belfast, Me. ; the residence of J. Manchester 




JOHN C. SPOFFORD. 

Haynes in Augusta, Me., pronounced the finest 
residence in the Kennebec Valley (burned in 
1893); and extensive residences in the l-lo.xbury 
and West Roxbury Districts of Boston. Li 
February, 1892, the firm was dissolved; and after 
a trip abroad Mr. Spofford opened his present 
offices in the John Hancock Building, Boston, and 
resumed work upon several important com- 
missions. Of his later designs are the new- City 
Hall of Bangor, Me., the Methodist church 
and the Hapgood Building in Everett, and numer- 
ous residences, among them the elegant house of 
Charles E. Jennings, of Everett. Mr. Spoft'ord 
is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows 
orders ; has been grand protector of Massachusetts 



l82 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



in the Knights and Ladies of Honor, and is a 
member of a number of other fraternal associa- 
tions. He was elected president of the " Spofford 
Family Association" in 1888, on the occasion of 
the gathering of seven hundred members of the 
family from all parts of the country, to celebrate 
the 250th anniversary of the arrival from England 
in this country of John Spofford and Elizabeth 
Scott, his wife, the founders of the family in 
America. Mr. Spofford was married July 6, 1881, 
to Miss Ella M. Fuller, of Turner, Me. They 
have one child : Mabel Euller Spofford. 



affairs for a number of years. He was a mem- 
ber of the Common Council in 1887-88, and 
he has been an alderman three terms (1892, 
1893-94), serving on the important committees on 
finance, ordinances, claims, and accounts, and 
chairman of the board in 1894. He was for two 
years a member of the Republican ward and city 
committee, and member of the county committee 
for 1893 and 1S94. He belongs to the Masonic 
order and to the Knights of Pythias : chancellor 
commander of the latter in i886. In religion he 
is Unitarian, clerk of the First Unitarian So- 
ciety of Chelsea, and member of the standing 
committee. He was married February 14, 1882, 
to Miss Idella E. Wilkinson. They have two chil- 
dren : Ralph A\'. and Ethel L. Stearns. 




CEO. M. STEARNS. 

STEARNS, Gilorge Mvron, of Chelsea, mem- 
ber of the Suffolk bar, is a native of Spencer, born 
April 27, 1856, son of Isaac N. and Mary (Wood) 
Stearns. He is descended from Isaac Sterne 
(afterwards spelled Stearns) who came from Eng- 
land in 1630, and was one of the early settlers of 
Watertown, a selectman of the town in 1659, and 
again in 1670 and 167 1. He was educated in the 
common schools and at Wilbraham Academy, and 
fitted for his profession in the Boston University 
Law School, from which he graduated in the class 
of 1879. He was admitted to the bar in 1880, 
and has since practised his profession in Boston. 
In Chelsea he has been prominent in municipal 



SLIGHRUE, Michael Joseph, assistant dis- 
trict attorney for Suffolk, is a native of New 
Hampshire, born in NasJiua, August 27, 1857, son 
of John and Julia (Sullivan) Sughrue. He is of 
Irish ancestry. His general education was ac- 
quired in public schools of Boston — the family 
moving to that city when he was a child — and at 



\ 




M. J. SUGHRUE. 

the Crosby Academy of Nashua. Obliged early to 
earn his living, he engaged in various occupations 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



183 



in Boston, some time in the dry-goods business, 
then in tiie post-office, then as assistant in the 
Social Law Liljrary. meanwhile studying law at 
home. At length he entered the Boston Univer- 
sity Law School, and, graduating therefrom in 
1888, was admitted to the Suffolk bar. After 
about three years spent in general practice, asso- 
ciated with George L. Huntress, Homer Albers, 
and J. Porter Crosby, having offices in the Sears 
Building, he was appointed (in June, 1891) assist- 
ant district attorney for the Suffolk District by 
the Hon. Oliver Stevens. He is a member of the 
University Club, District Attorneys' Club, the 
Young Men's Catholic Association, the Catholic 
Union, Clover Club, the Young Men's Democratic 
Club, the Charitable Irish Society, Savin Hill 
Yacht Club, and the Knights of Honor. Mr. 
Sughrue was married in Boston on June 22, 1892. 
to Miss Elizabeth Frances Quinn. 



S\\'IFT, GENER.A.L John Linds.-w, some time 
naval officer at the port of Boston, and for eigh- 
teen years a deputy collector of the Boston 
custom-house, is a native of Falmouth, Barn- 
stable County, born May 28, 1828, son of Joseph 
Pease and Priscilla (Dimmock-Chadwick) Swift, 
both also natives of Falmouth. When he was 
nine years of age his parents removed to Utica, 
N.V., where he was educated at the academy of 
that city. At the age of seventeen he came with 
his family to Boston, and here began active life in 
mercantile business. From 1848 to 1852 he was 
a prominent member of the Mercantile Library 
Association, at that time including among its 
members many of the foremost of the younger 
business men of the city. Deciding to become 
a lawyer, he entered the Harvard Law School in 
1854, where he remained two terms, leaving be- 
fore graduation, however, to accept a clerical 
position in the city government of Boston. In 
1855 and 1857 he was a member of the lower 
house of the Legislature, and was an active sup- 
porter of Henry Wilson for his first term 
and of Charles Sumner for his second term as 
United States Senator. He became pilot com- 
missioner in 1858, by appointment of Governor 
Banks. This office he resigned at the opening of 
the Civil War, at which time he was acting 
as lieutenant of the " Boston Tigers," a battal- 
ion of the local militia then occupying Fort War- 
ren under orders of Governor Andrew. In June, 



186 1, he was appointed United States storekeeper 
at the custom-house ; and here he remained 
nearly a year, resigning in .Vugust, 1862, to enlist 
as a private in the Thirty-fifth Regiment, Massa- 
chusetts Volunteers. He was early promoted to 
the rank of sergeant, and in August, 1862, while 
his regiment was embarking on a train for An- 
tietam, was detached as lieutenant to recruit a 
company in Roxbury. Subsequently, as captain 
of Company C, Forty-first Regiment, he joined 
General Banks's expedition to the Department of 
the Gulf. Early in 1863 he was appointed pro- 



■.^^ 




JOHN L. SWIFT. 

vost judge of Baton Rouge, La. He was re- 
lieved from this position at his own request, and 
in 1863 was detached from his regiment, and 
made captain and judge advocate on the staff of 
General Grover, commanding a brigade of the 
Nineteenth Army Corps then under orders for 
active service in the Department of the Gulf. He 
was one of the volunteers of the " Forlorn Hope " 
for the assault on Port Hudson in June, 1S63. In 
1864 he was honorably discharged from the army 
to become adjutant-general of the State of Louisi- 
ana, which position he held till some time in 1865, 
when he resigned, and returned North. In Sep- 
tember, 1866, he became naval officer at the port 
of Boston, appointed to that position by President 
Johnson, and holding it till the following March, 



1 84 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



when he was succeeded by General Francis A. 
Osborn. The next month Collector Thomas 
Russell appointed him deputy collector. This 
was the beginning of his long service in that office, 
broken only by two excursions into business and 
professional undertakings. His first withdrawal 
was in 1869, when he resigned to engage in busi- 
ness in New York City. In 1874 he was again 
appointed deputy collector by Collector Simmons, 
and served from that date through the administra- 
tions of Collectors Simmons, Beard, and Wortli- 
ington. He resigned his office in November, 
1885, when the Hon. Leverett Saltonstall was 
commissioned collector. His next term of ser- 
vice was from March, 1890, to March, 1894, 
under Collector Beard. Early a sympathizer with 
the anti-slavery cause, he became a member of the 
Republican party at its inception. He took a 
somewhat prominent part in the Anthony Burns 
"riot" in 1854. Aside from politics, his natural 
capacities as a public speaker have found practice 
in the cause of religion and temperance. He has 
taken an active part as a speaker on the stump 
in every presidential campaign since 1852. He 
is a member of the Loyal Legion and of the 
Grand Army of the Republic (a comrade of Post 
68) and of the Massachusetts and Congregational 
clubs. His published works are : " Speech on 
the Removal of E. G. Loring from the office of 
Judge of Probate," April, 1855; "About Grant," 
Boston, 1880: the oration at the bicentenni.d 
celebration of Stow, May, 1883 ; the oration at 
the celebration of the two hundredth anniver- 
sary of the incorporation of Falmouth, June 15, 
1886 ; and the "Oration before the City Council 
and Citizens of Boston, July 4, 1889." He was 
editor of a weekly paper. After Dinner, during 
1873 and 1874; and of the State, a weekly poHti- 
cal and general newspaper, from 1885 to 1887 ; 
from 1887 to 1890 he served on the editorial stafT 
of the Evening Traveller ; in his earlier years he 
did editorial work on the National Republican in 
Washington, and on the Commercial Advertiser in 
New York. General Swift was married in 1854 
to Miss Sarah E. Allen, of Boston. Three sons 
were born to them, the eldest dying in infancy. 
The two now living are residents of Boston. He 
has been a resident of Roxbury since 1857. 



25, 1838, .son of William F. Temple, a son of 
Samuel Temple, a graduate of Dartmouth College, 
author of many musical works, and of " Temple's 
Arithmetic." His mother was Milla H. (French) 
Temple, daughter of the Hon. Thomas French, 
of Canton, a noted man in Norfolk County from 
1830 to 1850, having been in the Senate and in 
Governor Briggs's Council. When he was a child, 
his parents moved to Dorchester, and he was edu- 
cated there in the public schools. In 1855 he 
entered the service of the Dorchester Insurance 
Company ; and he has held all the positions in the 




TEMPLE, Thomas French, register of deeds, 
Suffolk County, is a native of Canton, born May 



THOMAS F. TEMPLE. 

gift of the company, being now its president. He 
served as town clerk and treasurer of Dorchester 
from 1864 to 1870, when the town was annexed 
to Boston ; was a trial justice for Norfolk County 
previous to annexation, and became the first judge 
of the Dorchester District Municipal Court estab- 
lished with annexation. In 1870, also, he was 
one of the representatives of the new district in 
the Boston Common Council. The next year he 
was first elected to his present position as register 
of deeds, and has held it continuously through 
re-elections from that date. Mr. Temple is con- 
nected with a number of business corporations 
and numerous philanthropic organizations. He 
is a director of the International Trust Company, 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



185 



of the John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance 
Company, of the Dorchester Hygeia Ice Com- 
pany, and of the Boston Lead Company ; presi- 
dent, as above stated, of the Dorchester Mutual 
Fire Insurance Company: and trustee of the 
Home Savings Bank. He served for twenty 
years on the Board of Overseers of the Poor in 
Boston, several terms as chairman, finally resign- 
ing in 1890; and he has been for a long period 
trustee of the Perkins Institution for the Blind, 
trustee of the Boston Farm School on Thomp- 
son's Island, and president of the trustees of 
Cedar Grove Cemetery. He is a leading Mason, 
past master of the Union Lodge, member of 
the Boston Commandery Knights Templars, and 
treasurer of the Massachusetts Consistory; and 
is quite prominent in other fraternal societies, be- 
longing to the United Workmen, the Knights of 
Honor, the Royal Arcanum, and similar orders. 
He has held the position of grand receiver of the 
Grand Lodge of United Workmen of Massachu- 
setts since 1885 ; is also senior grand master 
workman of that body ; has been a member of 
the Supreme Lodge of United Workmen and 
Knights of Honor, and has served on the finance 
committee of both organizations. He has long 
been a member of the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery Company, commander of the organiza- 
tion in 1886, and now chairman of its finance 
committee; is a member and \ice-president of 
the Old Dorchester and Minot clubs : member 
of the Codman Club, Hale Club, and National 
Lancers. He was formerly connected with the 
Dorchester and Boston fire departments, and was 
fireman of Engine 20 at the time of the Great 
Fire in 1872. Mr. Temple was married in July, 
1863, to Miss S. Emma Spear, a daughter of Cap- 
tain John Spear, of Neponset, Dorchester, form- 
erly of Quincy. He has four daughters and 
a son. 



THOMPSON, Newell Aldrich, of Boston, 
merchant, is a native of Boston, born March 6, 
1853, son of Newell A. and Susan Saunderson 
(Wyman) Thompson. He is a lineal descendant of 
David Thompson, a Scottish gentleman, scholar, 
and traveller, who first came to .America in 1622, 
sent out by Gorges and Mason to superintend their 
settlement in Piscataqua, and for whom Thomp- 
son's Island, in Boston Harbor, which was owned 
and later occupied by him as an Indian trading- 
post in 1623. was named; and on the maternal 



side he descends from I'rancis Wyman, one of 
W'inthrop's company, who settled in 1642 in what 
is now the city of Woburn. His father, Newell 
A., was of the old Boston firm of N. A. Thomp- 
son & Co., real estate auctioneers ; was several 
terms in the city government, served in the State 
Legislature, was a member of the governor's coun- 
cil, and was especially active in the State militia, 
his military career covering many years, including 
service in the Independent Company of Cadets, 
the Boston City (iuards of which he w-as long the 
captain, as lieutenant colonel of the First Kegi- 




N. A. THOMPSON. 

ment, major and inspector-general of the F"irst 
Brigade on the staff of Major-General Edwards, 
and on the military staff of Governor Banks. 
Newell A. Thompson was educated in Boston 
public schools, — spending five years in the Brim- 
mer School and fitting for college in the Latin 
School, where lie graduated in 1872, — and at 
Harvard graduating in the class of 1876. Among 
his college classmates were the Rev. Charles F. 
Thwing, Francis L. W'ellman, now assistant dis- 
trict attorney of New York, William F. Moody, 
assistant district attorney of Massachusetts, Will- 
iam L. Chase, merchant, Fred J. Stimson, lawyer 
and author, John 1". Wheelwright, and Professor 
liarrett Wendell of Harvard College. He engaged 



i86 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



in the coal business first as a salesman for 
Berwind, White, & Co., Philadelphia, dealers in 
soft coal. Then he became salesman for Coxe 
Brothers & Co., of New York, hard coal, and 
subsequently was New England sales-agent for 
the Lehigh Valley Coal Company till 1S89, when 
he left it to enter business for himself, estab- 
lishing the firm of N. .\. 'I'hompson & Co. in the 
wholesale and retail coal trade. Following in 
the foot.steps of his father, he has been active in 
military affairs all his life, making his first appear- 
ance on Boston Common in July, 1861, as cor- 
poral of Company A, Second Battalion Infantry, 
known as the Boston Light Infantry. He was 
appointed sergeant-major of the First Regiment 
of Infantry, June 27, 1879, under Colonel Wales; 
was next commissioned first lieutenant and ad- 
jutant of the Fifth Regiment, December 29, 1879, 
under Colonel Trull, holding this position till De- 
cember 29, 1881, when he resigned; was ap- 
pointed sergeant-major on the staft" of the Second 
Brigade, June 27, 1885 ; and on May 25, 1886, 
was commissioned aide-de-camp with the rank of 
captain on the staff of the Second ISrigade under 
General Peach, which position he resigned July 8, 
1894. During the administration of Governor 
Ames (three years) he was detailed on the staff 
of the commander-in-chief as acting assistant in- 
spector-general. He joined the Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery Company, May 12, 1879, ^"'^l 
was elected adjutant of the company in 1886-87. 
In politics Mr. Thompson is a Republican, in- 
clined toward Independence. He has never held 
civil or political office, and is not active in polit- 
ical organizations. He is connected with the Ma- 
sonic order, and is a member of the University 
Club of Boston, of the Bostonian Society, and of 
the New England Historic Genealogical Society. 
He has been an extensive traveller in European 
countries, having made several trips abroad, using 
the time allotted to recreation in this manner. He 
was married April 11, i88g, to Miss Florence G. 
Peck. She died January 8, 1891, leaving one 
child : Newell A. I'hompson, Jr., born February 3, 
1890. 

TOWLE, George Henrv, member of the Suf- 
folk bar, was born in Boston, April 9, 185 1, son 
of Henry and Mary Ann (McCrillis) Towle. He 
is of Scotch-Irish ancestry, a descendant of Philip 
Towle, who came to Portsmouth, N.H., in 1635. 
His mother's ancestors were pure Scotch. He 



was educated in Boston public schools, — the 
Dwight Grammar and the Boston Latin, — and at 
Wesleyan University, Middletown, Conn., in the 
class of 1873. After graduation from college a 
year before his class, he studied law with Messrs. 
Perry & Creech, and was admitted to the bar of 
Suffolk County in September, 1873. He has 




GEO. H. TOWLE. 

practised since in Boston, devoting particular at- 
tention to corporations. He has also been en- 
gaged in railroad building and mining in the 
South and West. He is a member of the Massa- 
chusetts lodge. Masons, St. Paul's Chapter, Hugh 
de Payens Commandery; and of the Scottish 
bodies in Boston. In politics he is Republican. 
Mr. Towle was married October 25, 1875, to 
Miss Sarah Dorset Hamblin. They have two 
children : Mary Rutter, born in 1877 ; and Sarah 
Isabel Towle, born in 1879. 



VOSHELL, Samuel Shaw, of Boston, super- 
intendent of the John Hancock Mutual Life In- 
surance Company, is a native of Delaware, born 
near Dover, Kent County, January 14, 1855, son 
of Joseph and Levenia (Hobbs) Voshell. His pa- 
ternal grandparents were Samuel and Elizabeth 
(Shaw) Voshell, and his maternal grandparents, 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



187 



Joliii and Patience (Hinsley) Hobbs, all of Dela- 
ware. He was educated in the country public 
schools. He began business life at seventeen as 
salesman for his uncle, Amos H. Hobbs, in a 
general country store at Odessa, Del., where lie 
remained till April, 1876. Then he started in the 
same business on his own account, establishing 




S. S. VOSHELL. 

himself at Smyrna, and continued here till Decem- 
ber, 1879. About a month later, January 27, 
1880, he entered the employment of the John 
Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company at 
Philadelphia as agent, and has since that time 
been engaged with this company. In September, 
1882, he was promoted to the position of superin- 
tendent at New Haven, Conn. ; and on the 5th 
of February, 1884, came to Boston in the same 
capacity. In politics he is a Republican, but is 
not active in political work. He is a member of 
the Old Dorchester Club, of the Dorchester Dis- 
trict, where he resides. He was married on the 
28th of December, 1882, to Miss Christianna L. 
Lentz, of Philadelphia. They have two children : 
Walter L. and S. Howard Voshell. 



WAIT, William Cushing, member of the Suf- 
folk bar, is a native of Charlestown, born Decem- 
ber 18, i860, son of Elijah Smith and Eliza Ann 



Hadley) Wait. He is a descendant of Captain 
John Wayte, who came to Maiden some time 
about 1638 ; and his immediate ancestors were 
residents of Medford. His early instruction was 
received from his mother, who had been at one 
time a school-teacher. Afterward he attended 
school in Charlestown, and after his tenth year 
the public school in Medford, the family moving 
there in 1870. He was prepared for college at 
the Medford High School under L. L. Dame, and 
was graduated from Harvard in the class of 1882, 
being made a member of the Phi Beta Kappa So- 
ciety, receiving the siimma cum laitdc degree, with 
highest honors in history. He studied law in the 
Harvard Law School, graduating in the class of 
18S5, with the degrees of LL.]!. and A.M., and 
was admitted to the bar of Suffolk County July 
21, 1885. Three years later, on May 15, i888, 
he was admitted to the bar of the United States 
Circuit Court, and in 1891 to the bar of the Cir- 
cuit Court of .Appeals. He began practice in the 
office of Nathan Matthews, Jr., later mayor of 
Boston, and in 1886 opened his own office. In 
1890 he formed with Samuel J. Elder the law 
firm of Elder tS: Wait, now, by the admission of 
Edmund A. Whitman, under the name of Elder, 
Wait &: Whitman, with offices in the .Ames Build- 
ing. He has resided in West Medford or Med- 
ford since his boyhood, although, owing to the re- 
moval of his father and family to Chicago in 1877, 
he is registered at Harvard as from Chicago ; and 
in late years has been prominent in municipal 
affairs. He was a member of the special commit- 
tee on securing a charter for the city of Medford 
in 1892 ; an alderman of Medford the following 
year, declining a renomination ; and for three 
years (1892-94) a sinking fund commissioner. 
For several years also he served on the Demo- 
cratic town and city committee. He was twice a 
candidate for the lower house of the Legislature 
from Medford (1890 and 1S91), and twice de- 
feated by the Hon. William B. Lawrence. In 
politics he is a Democrat, with decided Indepen- 
dent leanings. With the Hon. Sherman Hoar he 
was of the original Cleveland men of Harvard, 
and he was early an advocate of tariff reform. 
He is a member of the New England Tariff Re- 
form League, of the Medford Tariff Reform 
League, and the Young Men's Democratic Club 
of Massachusetts. Other organizations to which 
he belongs are the Suft'olk Bar .Association, the 
Royal -Arcanum, the Medford No License League, 



1 88 



.MEN OF PROGRESS. 



the Medford Club, the Medford Comedy Club. 
He is also a secretary of the Harvard Law School, 
class of 1885 ; and is a member of the class corn- 




ton, Conn., in 1693, and was the progenitor of 
nearly all of the name in the United States. He 
was educated in the public schools of Canaan, 
and in the academies at Thetford, Vt., and Salis- 
bury, N.H., while a student at the latter teaching 
school during the winter months. At the age of 
twenty he came to Boston, and was engaged for 
ten years in the hardware business, first as ap- 
prentice with Alexander H. Twombly & Co., sub- 
sequently as partner in the firm of Scudder, Park, 
& Co., and later as agent of the Canton Hard- 
ware Manufacturing Company. Then in 1841 
entering into partnership with Joseph Nason, 
under the firm name of Walworth & Nason, he 
organized the business of wanning and ventilating 
buildings by means of steam and hot water appa- 
ratus, upon methods not before in use, thus first 
introducing the system now almost universally 
adopted. The business was started in New York, 
and a plant established in Boston a year later ; 
and, under Mr. Walworth's personal direction, the 
new system was applied to numerous cotton and 
woollen manufactories and other large buildings 
in all the New England States several years be- 



WILLIAM GUSHING WAIT. 

mittee of his college class (1882 ). In 1S82 he was 
at Newport, R.I., in the office of Colonel George 
E. Waring, engaged upon the Social Statistics of 
Cities for the Tenth United States Census, and 
contributed numerous sketches of places to the 
work. He is the author of several articles on law 
topics published in the .American and English 
P^ncyclopa-dia of Law, on Statute of Frauds, Jet- 
tison, Marine Insurance, Representations as to 
Character. Mr. Wait was married January i, 
1889, to Miss Edith Foote \\'right, daughter of 
John S. and Mary Clark (Green) Wright of Med- 
ford, and granddaughter of Klizur Wright and the 
Rev. Beriah Green, two of the anti-slavery leaders. 
'J'hey have no children. 




WALWORTH, Jamks Jones, founder of the 
modern system of steam heating, is a native of 
New Hampshire, born in Canaan, November 18, 
1808, son of George and Philura (Jones) Wal- 
worth ; but his business career was begun in 
Boston. His father was a descendant in the fore any other concern entered the field. The 
sixth generation from William Walworth who firm also introduced into this country the steam 
came from England to Fisher's Island and Gro- "fan-blower" system of ventilating, first applying 



J. J. WALWORTH. 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



1S9 



it in 1846 in ihc Hoslon customhouse. As an 
engineer, in the practice of steam heating and 
ventilating, Mr. Walworth has designed and con- 
structed many important works in hospitals, 
theatres, and public buildings in several of the 
States. In the year 1852 the firm of Walworth 
& Nason was dissolved, Mr. Nason assuming the 
business in New York and Mr. Walworth continu- 
ing in Boston in his own name. At a later pe- 
riod he associated with himself as partners Mar- 
shall S. Scudder and his brother C". Clark A\'al- 
worth, making the firm name James J. Walworth 
& Co., under which the business was conducted 
for nearly twenty years. In 1872 the corporation 
of the "Walworth Manufacturing Company" was 
organized, with Mr. Walworth as president and 
manager of the business department. He con- 
tinued at the head of the great establishment till 
189 1, when he declined a Te-election as president, 
and has since partially withdrawn from active 
duties. During his conduct of the business the 
plant established in the early forties in a small 
building in Devonshire Street had grown to ex- 
tensive manufacturing works, employing upwards 
of eight hundred men, its products finding a 
market in all parts of the Ignited States and in 
several South American and European countries. 
Among other interests with which he has been 
connected are the Malleable Iron Fittings Com- 
pany at Bradford, Conn., of which he has been 
president for twenty-eight years, the Wanalancet 
Iron and Tube Compan}-, the Massachusetts 
Steam Heating Company, the Union Flax Mills 
Company, and the Consolidated Gas Company, 
president of each. In 1870 and 187 1 he repre- 
sented the city of Newton in the lower house of 
the Legislature. He was one of the founders of 
the Lasell Female Seminary at Auburndale, has 
served as president of the Educational Society of 
Auburndale, and been prominent in numerous 
other societies, literary, charitable, and philan- 
thropic. Mr. Walworth was first married in 1837 
to Miss Elizabeth C. Nason, daughter of Leavitt 
Nason, and sister of Joseph Nason, his early 
partner. They had one son : Arthur Clarence 
Walworth. He married secondly, in 1888, Mrs. 
Lydia Sawyer, widow of Stephen L. Sawyer, a 
former partner of his. They have no children. 



ton, is a native of New York, born in New York 
City, December ig, 1846, son of John and Ann 
Warnock. He was educated in the public schools, 
and began business life in 1857. During the 
Civil War he served in the United States Navy. 
He became interested in fraternal societies when 
a youth, at the age of eighteen joining the Sons of 
Temperance and the Good Templars, and at 
twenty-one entering the Masonic order. His as- 
sociation with the American Legion of Honor 
dates from 1879, when he became a member of 
the Stella Council of Krooklvn, N.V., and at once 



^ 



^^^^^k w^^^^^ 




WARNOCK, An.\M, supreme secretary of the 
American Legion of Honor, headquarters in Bos- 



ADAM WARNOCK. 

took an active part in the development of the 
organization. In 1880 he organized Independent 
Council in New York City. Upon the organiza- 
tion of the Grand Council in New York, he was 
elected supreme representative ; and at the ses- 
sion of 1882 he was elected to the supreme secre- 
taryship, which position he has held continuously 
since, making his headquarters in Boston and de- 
voting his entire time to the duties of his office. 
During his administration the society erected its 
main building, No. 200 Huntington Avenue, Back 
Bay, Boston (first occupied in 1892), and estab- 
lished branches in, every State a'nd Territory in the 
Union. Mr. Warnock has also held positions of 
prominence and trust in numerous other organiza- 



igo 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



tions. He was for a luiniber of years representa- 
tive from the State of New York to the Supreme 
Lodge Knights of Honor, president of the Knights 
of Honor \eteran Association, president of the 
National Fraternal Congress, and grand secretary 
of the Royal Arcanum of New York State. In 
the Masonic order he was long a member of the 
Atlas Lodge of New York City, and is now a 
member of the Columbian Lodge of Boston. He 
is also a member of the Corinthian Royal .Vrch 
Chapter, and Ivanhoe Commandery Knights 
Templars, New York ; of the Commonwealth 
Lodge, Odd Fellows, Boston ; of Howard Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias, New York; of the Yononto 
Tribe, Improved Order of Red Men, Boston (a 
charter member) ; of the Knights and Ladies of 
Honor; and of the United Workmen, Pilgrim 
Fathers, Home Circle, and Equitable Aid Union. 
He was an early member of the Grand Army of 
the Republic, and is now comrade of Post 30, 
Department of Massachusetts. His association 
with clubs is confined to the Union Boat and 
Athletic clubs of Boston, to which he has belonged 
during the greater part of his residence in Massa- 
chusetts, being much interested in athletic sports, 
a good oarsman, and a fine amateur tennis-player. 
Mr. Warnock was married in May, 1872, to Miss 
Elizabeth Atkinson. They have five children. 
His home is in Cambridge. 



of Reading, Penna., and then began his profes- 
sional studies, entering the Yale Law School in 
1882. Here he received his degree of LL.B. 



WHIPPLE, Sherman Leland, of Boston, 
lawyer, member of the bar in Massachusetts, New 
Hampshire, and Connecticut, and admitted in the 
United States courts, is a native of New Hamp- 
shire, born in New London, March 4, 1862, son 
of Dr. Solomon M. and Henrietta Kimball (Her- 
sey) Whipple. His father was a leading physician, 
a man of scholarly attainments. His ancestry 
is traced on the paternal side from Matthew 
Whipple, who settled in Ipswich, Mass., in 1635, 
and on the maternal side from the Herseys of 
Hingham and the Sheafes of Portsmouth, N.H. 
He was educated in the district school, the Colby 
Academy of New London, and at Yale, graduat- 
ing in 1881. .At the academy he entered upon 
the regular college preparatory course w'hen a lad 
of eleven ; and he graduated from college at the 
age of nineteen and three months, the youngest 
member of his diss. For a year, beginning in 
the autumn following his graduation, he taught 
mathematics and Latin in tiie Hoys" High School 







SHERMAN L. WHIPPLE. 

in 1884, and on Commencement day was one of 
the Townsend orators. In the autumn of 1884 
he was admitted to the New Hampshire bar, and, 
after a brief stay in the office of Train & Teele in 
Boston, began professional work associated with 
Judge David Cross at Manchester, N.H. While 
a student in the law school, he taught for two 
terms special branches in the old Colby Academy, 
where he had been a pupil. Returning to Boston 
in May, 1886, he was admitted to the Suffolk bar, 
and immediately began practice here, taking a 
desk in Messrs. Train & Teele's office. In the 
autumn of 1887 he moved into his present offices 
at No. 5 Tremont Street. He has built up a large 
jury and equity practice witliin a few years, and 
has handled especially insolvency cases involving 
large sums. In iSgi he was appointed receiver 
of the Mutual one-year Benefit Association. He 
is a trustee of the County Savings Bank of Chel- 
sea, and a director of the lona Manufacturing 
Company. In politics he is a Democrat, of the 
progressive wing of his party : but he has never 
held office or taken an active part in political 
work, devoting himself entirely to the practice of 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



191 



his profession. He is a member of the Historic 
Cienealogical Society, of the University and Whist 
clubs of Boston, of the Country Club, of the 
I.ongwood and the Longwood Cricket clubs, and 
the Tiuirsday Club of Brookline. He also belongs 
t(i the First Corps of Cadets. In 1892 he was 
elected a trustee of Colby Academy. He was 
married December 27, 1893, to Miss Louise 
Clough, daughter of Judge L. B. Clough, of Man- 
chester, N.H. He resides in Brookline, occupy- 
ing the estate of the late George M. Towle, which 
he ]3urc]insed in the autumn of 1893. 



W'lLLl.VMS, Henry Webb, member of the 
Massachusetts and United .States bars and solici- 
tor of patents, was born in Taunton, June 6, 1847, 
son of Benjamin Webb Williams (son of Rev. Na- 
thaniel W. Williams and Priscilla Webb Will- 
iams) and Clarissa W. (Reed) ^\'illiams (daughter 
of Hodges Reed). His paternal ancestors are of 
the Roger Williams stock on the grandfather's 
side, and the Webb family of Salem on the grand- 
mother's side ; and his maternal ancestry is of 
the Reed family of Bristol County, said to be de- 
scendants of the Huguenots. When he was at the 
age of about four 3'ears, his father and mother re- 
moved to Boston ; and he has resided in Boston 
and its suburbs ever since that time. He was 
educated in Boston public schools, graduating from 
the Dwight Grammar School under Master Page, 
and tiien entering the Boston Latin School. As a 
scjiolar, he was quick and intelligent ; and it was 
the intention of his parents to send him to Har- 
\ard ( 'ollege. Much against their desires, how- 
ever, he left the Latin School before graduation, 
and determined to earn his own livelihood. At 
the age of about seventeen, therefore, he entered 
a large wholesale dry- goods establishment to 
"learn the trade," at the salary of seventy-tive 
dollars a year. He remained there a little over 
a year, and then connected himself with a pub- 
lishing house, where his salary quickly rose from 
$3 50 a year to $8 00, and was, at the age of 
twenty, sent out "on the road" as a drummer. 
He made an extensive trip through the Middle 
States and the West, and succeeded in taking the 
largest amount of orders in the history of the 
house. Upon his return he found that he was in 
the future e.xpected to travel six months in the 
year, and seriously considered whether he desired 
to devote himself to such an occupation or not. 



On concluding that the life of a "drummer'' was 
not to his taste, he accepted a position in another 
publishing house where "drumming on the road " 
was not expected of him. Seeing no prospect of 
increasing remuneration here, he entered, at the 
age of twenty-one, into a copartnership with iiis 
father, who was then engaged in promoting some 
business schemes founded on patents for inven- 
tions, his own part of the business relating more 
particularly to the securing of letters patents from 
the Patent Office. This was in January, 1869. 
He studied the law and practice relating to pat- 
ents with great interest, and in January, 1870, 
separated from his father, and devoted himself 
exclusively to patent practice. Feeling the need 
of a thorough legal education, he afterw-ard en- 
gaged a tutor, and without giving up his regular 
business, by dint of hard night work and much 
perseverance, prepared himself for admission to 
the bar, and was admitted successively to the 
Massachusetts and United States bars. Mr. Will- 
iams's specialty has always been patent practice, 
although corporation practice has naturally fol- 
lowed, as his clients have numbered man)' manu- 




HENRY W. WILLIAMS. 

facturing corporations whose business is based 
largely on patent property. His practice, accord- 
ingly, is largely an office practice, except so far 



igi 



MEN OK PROGRESS. 



as it takes him to the I'atL'iU Office and into the 
United States courts, 'i'lic l)ulk of it lias always 
been in the Patent Office, and it is an interesting 
fact that he has made the trip from Boston to 
Washington for the purpose of arguing difficult 
and contested cases in the Patent Office some 
two hundred and fifty times. He has now (1894) 
been in continuous practice in patent cases for 
more than a quarter of a century, and stands with 
the foremost of that portion of the bar making a 
specialty of patent office practice. He has been 
an indefatigable worker, has paid much attention 
to promptness, and probably dislikes nothing more 
than to let his cases get ahead of him. He was 
never known to accept a retainer for a case which 
he did not believe was just, nor to encourage a 
client to believe more in the ultimate success of 
his cause than the facts seemed to warrant. In 
religious matters Mr. Williams was brought up in 
the strict Trinitarian Congregational belief ; but 
after the age of twenty-five or so his views be- 
came liberalized somewhat, although he has never 
formally renounced his allegiance to the ortho- 
dox church. He is a gentleman of quiet tastes, 
has never taken any active part in politics, and 
is inclined to be tenacious of his opinions, 
not, however without being able to defend them 
logically. Although not what is usually termed a 
club man, he is a member of one or two of tlie 
best clubs in Boston and Washington. He is a 
ready writer, and has a strong poetic vein, which 
he indulges only occasionally and very rarely in 
public print. Among his intimates he is known 
as possessing a keen wit and strong sense of 
humor. Mr. Williams was married at the age of 
twenty-two, and three children have been the 
product of the union, one only, a daughter, now 
living;. 



WINSHIP, ALiiKur Edward, lecturer and 
author, and editor of the Journal of Education, 
Boston, is a native of West Bridgewater, born 
February 24, 1845, son of Isaac and Drusilla 
(Lothrop) Winship. He is a descendant of 
Lieutenant Edward Winship, who came from 
England to Cambridge in 1634. After his pre- 
liminary education he prepared for teaching at 
the Bridgewater (Mass.) State Normal School and 
for the ministry at Andover Theological Semi- 
nary. The last year of the Civil War he was a 
private in the Sixtieth Massachusetts Regiment. 
His professional career began as principal of a 



rural school in Maine, from which he became prin- 
cipal of a grammar school in Newton, Mass., 
where he remained three years, going from there 
to the Normal School at Bridgewater where he was 
a teacher for four years. He was for nine years 
pastor of the Prospect Hill Church in Somerville, 
which he left for the secretaryship of the New- 
West Education Commission. His connection 
with the Journal of Education dates from 1885, 
since which time he has been both editor and 
publisher of tlie paper. In 1S90-91 he was also 
editor-in-chief of the Boston Dailx TrarJ/cr. He 




^^ 




A. E. WINSHIP. 

is most widely known as a lecturer in the Red- 
path Lyceum Bureau, having lectured in all the 
States from Maine to California, going to the Pa- 
cific coast regularly every other year. His suc- 
cess in this field, and as a general platform cam- 
paign speaker, has been marked. At the same 
time he has achieved reputation as a many-sided 
writer. Among his publications in book form are 
" Methods and Principles," " Essentials of Ps)'- 
chology," and "The Shop." Mr. Winship is a 
member of many orders, clubs, and associations. 
In politics he is a Republican, a member of the 
executive committee of the Republican State Com- 
mittee. He was married August 24, 1872, to 
Miss Ella R. Parker, daughter of Stillman E. 



MEN OF I'ROGRESS. 



193 



and Lavinia I'arkcr, of Reading. Tliuy havx' six- 
children : George Parker, Editii A., Luella 1'., 
Kdna E., Lawrence L., and Mildred L. W'inship. 
Mr. W'inship has resided in Sonierville for up- 
wards of twenty years, where he is closely identi- 
fied with public affairs. 



\\()()1), Frank, printer, Boston, active in the 
Indian rights movement, is a native of Ireland, 
horn in Cavan, May 3, 1842, son of James and 
])()r()thy ( Rountree) Wood. He is of Scotch and 




FRANK WOOD. 

English ancestry on both sides, descended from 
Scotch Presbyterians and Puritans who went to 
Ireland in the time of Cromwell. He came to 
lioston with his parents when he was four years 
old, and has lived here ever since. He was edu- 
cated in the Boston public schools. At the age of 
fourteen he was apprenticed to Fred Rogers, at 
that time one of the most skilful printers in the 
city, to learn the printer's trade, and served till 
his majority. Then he was foreman of the office 
for seven years, and at the age of twenty-eight 
entered business on his own account. For about 
four years he was a member of the firm of Batch- 
elder &: Wood, and since 1875 he has conducted 
his lariie establishment alone. His methods are 



in some respects unusual, and liave brought him 
gratifying success. He is not confined to any 
special branch of the printer's art, but engages in 
all kinds, — book, job, railroad, illustrated and col- 
ored work. He does a strictly cash business so far 
as buying is concerned, never having given a note 
in his life. He employs no solicitors, yet in 
twenty years he has not seen a dull week. Mr. 
Wood is also connected with several manufacturing 
and business corporations as president, treasurer, 
and director. He has long been actively inter- 
ested in public affairs, church affairs, reform move- 
ments ; and a working member of numerous or- 
ganizations for the advancement of philanthropic 
and benevolent undertakings. He has been con- 
nected with the Boston Indian Citizenship Associa- 
tion since its foundation, and has for some years 
been treasurer of the Lake Mohonk Indian Confer- 
ence which meets annually at Lake Mohonk, N.Y. 
He is treasurer also of the Delft Haven Memorial 
Committee ; is a trustee of the Northfield Semi- 
nary ; a trustee of the New England Conservatory 
of Music ; a director in a number of religious and 
charitable societies ; was president of the Old 
Boston Congregational Ckib in 1893 ; is a mem- 
ber of the Municipal League, of the Pilgrim Asso- 
ciation, and of the Boston Art Club. In poli- 
tics he is Republican, with Independent lean- 
ings. He was married November i, 1870, to 
Miss Annie M. Smith, of Boston. They have no 
children. Mr. Wood resides in the Dorchester 
District of Boston, where he is largely inter- 
ested in real estate. He possesses a fine library 
and a choice collection of paintings and rare 
engravings. 



WOODS, Solomon Adams, president of the 
S. A. Woods Machine Company, Boston, is a 
native of Maine, born in Farmington, October 7, 
1827, son of Colonel Nathaniel and Hannah 
(Adams) Woods. He descends from Samuel 
Woods, an original landed proprietor of Groton, 
Mass., where the family long lived : and on the 
maternal side is in the sixth generation from 
Captain Samuel Adams, magistrate and repre- 
sentative of Chelmsford in the General Court in 
the first half-century of that town. His paternal 
grandfather was a pioneer in Farmington, and his 
father a leading townsman there. Solomon A. 
was reared on a good farm, and was educated in 
the district school and at the Farmington Acad- 



194 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



emy. At the age of twenty he went to work with 
a local carpenter to learn the use of tools and the 
trade of house-building. Four years later he de- 
termined to build a mill in Farmington, and in 
partnership with his employer engage in the 
manufacture of doors, sashes, and blinds ; but, 
after a trip to Boston to purchase machinery for 




S. A. WOODS. 

this purpose, he concluded to establish himself in 
that city. Thereupon he entered the employ of 
Solomon S. Gray, door, sash, and blind manu- 
facturer, as a journeyman. Within the first year 
(185 1) of this connection he purchased Mr. 
Gray's plant, and engaged in the manufacture 
on his own account. This he continued until 
1864. In the mean time, 1854, he formed a part- 
nership with Mr. Gray, under the firm name of 
Gray & Woods, for the manufacture and sale of a 



wood-planing machine of Mr. CJray's invention, 
but rendered more practical by iiis own inven- 
tions. This partnership held for five years, 
during which period additional improvements 
were patented. Thereafter the business was con- 
ducted under Mr. Woods's name alone until 1873, 
when the S. A. Woods Machine Company was 
organized, with Mr. Woods as president. In 
1865 the business was considerably enlarged by 
the addition of the manufacture of the \\'oodbury 
planer, with the Woodbury patented improve- 
ments, of which Mr. Woods was the sole licensee; 
and extensive works were then erected in South 
Boston, and branch houses opened in New York 
and Chicago. Since the establishment of the firm 
of Gray & Woods, more than fifty patents for de- 
vices and improvements in machines for planing 
wood and making mouldings have been issued 
to the successive firms ; and they have received 
nearly a hundred gold, silver, and bronze medals 
awarded at industrial exhibitions. Mr. Woods 
has been a trustee of the South Boston Savings 
Bank since 1870, and for many years a member 
of its board of investment. He has served as a 
member of the Boston Common Council three 
terms (1869-70-71), and as a director of the East 
Boston ferries two years (1870-71). In 1878 a 
nomination to the Board of Aldermen on the Re- 
publican and " Citizens " tickets was urged upon 
him, but he declined to stand. He is a member 
of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Asso- 
ciation, of the Boston Art Club, and of St. Omer 
Commandery, Knights Templar. Mr. Woods 
w^as married in Boston, August 21, 1854, to Miss 
Sarah E. \\'eathern, of Vienna, Me. She died in 
1862. He married secondly, in 1867, Miss Sarah 
C. Watts, of Boston. He has two sons and a 
daughter : Frank Forrest (now vice-president and 
general manager of the S. A. Woods Machine 
Company), Florence, and Frederick Adams 
Woods. 



PART III. 



AYERS, George David, member of the Suf- 
folk bar, was born in Boston, August 26, 1857, 
son of David and Martha Elizabeth (Huckins) 
Ayers. He was educated in the public schools of 
Maiden, including the High School, and at Har- 




CEORGE D. AYERS. 

vard, where he graduated in the class of 1879. 
He studied law in the Harvard Law School three 
years, graduating in 1882, and about six months 
(from October, 1882, to March, 1883) in the office 
of Gaston & Whitney, Boston ; and was admitted 
to the Suffolk bar in February, 1883. He began 
practice alone, but two years later formed an as- 
sociation with George Clarendon Hodges, and 
later on with Mr. Hodges and Stanton Day. He 
is now associated with John Storer Cobb. He is 
an ardent supporter of the principles laid down by 
the Nationalist party, and was one of the earliest 



members of the Nationalist Club of Boston, serv- 
ing as its president in 1889-90. He is, outside of 
his practice, mainly interested in the Theosophical 
movement, and has been prominent in several or- 
ganizations for its advancement, — the New Eng- 
land Theosophical Corporation, of which he has 
been president since November, 1893; the Mai- 
den Theosophical Society, its president from 
April, 1890, to October, 189 1 ; and the Boston 
Theosophical Society, its president from October, 
1891 to January, 1894. He is now president 
again of the Maiden Theosophical Society. In 
politics Mr. Ayers is a Democrat, with " Mug- 
wump " tendencies. Theoretically, he is a free 
trader, who believes that it would have been 
better for the United States if it never had had 
a " protective " tariff, and yet recognizes that, as 
a practical matter, a free-trade basis should now 
be reached by gradual legislation. In Maiden he 
has taken an active interest in local affairs, but 
has repeatedly declined political preferment. He 
is a member of the Young Men"s Democratic Club 
of Massachusetts (on its executive committee in 
1888-89), the Maiden Historical Society, and of 
the New England Historic Genealogical Society. 
He belongs to the Masonic order, and is a mem- 
ber of Converse Lodge of Maiden. He was 
married January 7, 1885, to Miss Charlotte Eliza- 
beth Carder, of Milford, Conn., daughter of the 
Rev. James Dixon Carder and Charlotte (Pond) 
Carder. 

BACON, Charles Newcomb, of Winchester 
and Arlington, manufacturer, is a native of Med- 
ford, born December 2, 1838, son of John Hudson 
and Sarah Ann (Tyrell) Bacon. On the paternal 
side he is of Cape Cod stock, his ancestors early 
settled in Barnstable ; and his maternal grand- 
father was of Georgia. He was educated in the 
public schools of Medford, and at Chauncy Hall, 
Boston, where he was a silver medal scholar. At 
the age of eighteen he entered the felting works 



196 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



of his fatlicr in thiit part of Medford now Win- 
chester, originally established by his grandfather, 
Robert Bacon, in 1825, for the manufacture of hat 
bodies, wadding, and felting. He passed through 
every grade, becoming thoroughly familiar with all 
the details of the manufacture, and before many 
years was at the head of the works. He also 
early invented new processes, and subsequently 
improvements in the machinery, by which a greater 
variety and higher grade of goods were produced. 
When he was but nineteen, he brought out the first 
heavy fellings manufactured in the country. In 
1876 he patented a solid felt buffer for burnishing 
wheels and for emery wheels, and in 1888, a 
wood-centred felt polishing wheel. Among his 
other inventions are blackboard and dry slate 
erasers, a felt saddle for horses, felt handles 
for bicycles, felt base balls, and numerous small 
articles of utility. In 1875 Mr. Bacon succeeded 
his father in the factory, and the firm name has 
since been Charles N. Bacon. The Boston office 
was for manv vears on the round corner of Union 




CHAS. N. BACON. 

and North Streets, a landmark, where Robert 
Bacon had his hat and cap store in the early 
twenties before he built his factory in the country ; 
and near by on North, then Ann, Street, near the 
present Oak Hall, Ivdward n. 'rvrell. the father of 



Mr. Bacon's mother, was at the same time estab- 
lished in the shoe and leather business. The 
office is now on Federal Street. Mr. Bacon is a 
member of the Charitable Mechanic Association, 
as was his father, and also his father's father, the 
latter a life member, joining the association in 
1824, and serving some time on its board of gov- 
ernment. He was married in Winchester, Octo- 
ber 10, i860, to Miss Florence Louise Holbrook, 
daughter of Ridgeway E. Holbrook, of Dorchester, 
and grand-daughter of Samuel B. Doane, of Boston, 
through whom she is connected with the Shaws, 
Wadsworths, Cunninghams, and other old Boston 
families. They have had seven children : Flor- 
ence Allena, born March 12, 1862 (now Mrs. 
Edward W. Hall); Lillian Louise, born January 
14, 1864 (now Mrs. Frederick S. Smith) ; Charles 
Francis, born August 12, 1866 ; Louis Alfred, born 
July 27, 1868 ; Cyrus Clark, born September 23, 
1870, died July 26, 187 i ; Robert, born March 31, 
1873 ; and Mabel Grace Bacon. The sons, Charles 
Francis and Louis .\., are engaged in the factory 
at Winchester. Robert graduated from Harvard 
College in 1894. Mr. Bacon resides in Arlington. 



BAILEV, DunLEV Perkins, of Everett, mem- 
ber of the Suffolk bar, is a native of Maine, born 
in Cornville, October 24, 1843, son of the Rev. 
I )udley 1'. and Hannah B. (Cushman ) Bailey. 
( )n the paternal side he is descended from John 
.Mden, and on the maternal side from Robert 
Cushman, who came out in the " Fortune," in 
162 1. He was educated in the district school, 
the Monson (Me.) Academy, and at Waterville 
College, now Colby University, in the class of 
1867. He left college at the end of the junior 
year, but subsequently (in 1877) received his de- 
gree in course as a member of his class. For a 
year before entering college he taught school in 
St. Albans, Me. He studied law in Portland, 
Me., in the office of the Hon. William L. I^utnam, 
now Justice Putnam of tlie United States Circuit 
Court, and on April 28, 1870, was admitted to the 
bar. Two years later he removed to Massachu- 
setts, and has practised here since with offices in 
Boston, and in Everett, where he has resided. 
He has an extensive real estate, probate, and 
general practice, and is especially conversant with 
Everett real estate titles, which he has made a 
specialty. He has been identified with the de- 
velopment of Everett, and with its varied inter- 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



'97 



ests, being An earnest advocate of local improve- 
ments. He was a member of the School 
Committee for fourteen years, five years (1886- 
91) its chairman : was one of the founders of the 
Everett Public IJbrarv, a director or trustee of 




DUDLEY P. BAILEY. 

that institution from its establishment in 1S78, 
.secretary of the board for fourteen years, and in 
1892-93 its chairman; is a trustee of the Everett 
Savings Bank ; during the last six years of 
the existence of Everett as a town was twelve 
times elected moderator of its town meetings, pre- 
siding at the final meeting, November 10, 1892 ; 
in 1886 and 1887 represented the town in the 
Massachusetts House of Representatives, serving 
in that body on the committees on taxation (house 
chairman), in 1887 also on the committee on 
probate and insolvenc)', and instrumental in se- 
curing the legislation providing for the revision 
and codification of the laws for the collection of 
taxes ; was a member of the committee to frame 
the city charter, and in 1893 of the first Common 
Council of the city of Everett (incorporated June 
II, 1892); was re-elected a member of the Com- 
mon Council for 1894, and became its president. 
Since his college days Mr. Bailey has been a fre- 
quent contributor to various periodicals, and for 
many years was a special writer for the Banker s 



Mag<Tzi>h'. Among his publications in pamphlet 
form are papers on "The Clearing-house Sys- 
tem," embracing much valuable statistical infor- 
mation, " An Historical Sketch of Banking in 
Massachusetts," "Austrian Paper Money in the 
Panic of 1873," and "The Credit In.stitutions of 
Italy." He is the author of the chapters relating 
to clearing houses in the work on •■ Practical 
Banking " by A. S. Bolles, and of the historical 
sketch of the Boston Clearing House for the 
" Commercial History of Boston." He prepared 
the sketches of the town of Everett in Drake's 
"History of Middlesex County" (1879), in 
Lewis's "History of Middlesex County" (1890), 
and in the illustrated history of Everett, known 
as the "Everett Souvenir" (1893). While at col- 
lege, he was especially interested in the study of 
political economy, and in 1886 won a prize offered 
by the American Free Trade League to under- 
graduates in American colleges for the best essay 
on free trade. He is prominent in the Baptist de- 
nomination, — a life member of the Massachusetts 
Baptist Convention, a director since 1887, mem- 
ber of the finance committee since 1889, made 
chairman in 1892, and attorney for the corpora- 
tion in i88g ; has been treasurer of the First Bap- 
tist Church of Everett upwards of fifteen years, 
and was one of the founders of the Glendale Bap- 
tist Church, Everett, in 1890. " He was the first 
president of the Pine Tree State Club of Everett, 
is a member of the American Statistical Society, 
and belongs to the Masonic order, a member of 
the l^alestine Lodge of Everett, and of the Royal 
Arch Chapter of the Tabernacle of Maiden. Mr. 
Bailev is unmarried. 



BANGS, Edward Api'Leton, of Boston, mem- 
ber of the Suffolk bar, was born in W'atertown, 
June 27, i860, son of Edward and Anne Outram 
(Hodgkinson) Bangs. He is a descendant of 
Edward Bangs, who came from England to Plym- 
outh in the ship " Ann " in 1623, and on the 
maternal side of Governor Thomas Hinckley of 
the Plymouth Colony. He was educated in Bo.s- 
ton private schools (Miss Adams's school, some 
time on Brinnner Street, and George \\". C". Noble's 
school, then on Winter Street) and at Harvard 
College, graduating in the class of 1884. He 
read law in the office of Bangs & Wells (composed 
of his father and Samuel Wells, son of ex-Gov- 
ernor Samuel Wells of ^L^ine), and was admitted 



igS 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



to the Suffolk bar in January, 1887. Ik- has 
practised since that date in connection with the 
firm of Bangs & Wells, a member of the firm since 




ration of the old family traditions, and the re- 
peated recital of the achievements of a long line 
of noted ancestors. He read law in the offices 
of G. C. Bartlett, of Derry, N.H., and of Moody 
& Bartlett, of Haverhill, and was admitted to the 
bar in September, 1882. He has practised in 
Haverhill ever since. He began practice at a 
time when the field there seemed to be fully oc- 
cupied : but by his zeal and talent he has built 
up a lucrative business by the side of men older 
in the profession. In 1890 and 189 1 he was a 
member of the Haverhill City Council, and in 
1893 represented his city in the State legislature, 
where he served on the committees on roads and 
bridges and on election laws. In politics always 
a Republican, he has for a number of years been 
an active worker for his party. For about a 
dozen years he has served as a member of the 
Republican city committee of Haverhill, its secre- 
tary for two years. He has been a frequent dele- 
gate to State and county conventions, and in 
1892 was an alternate delegate to the Republican 
National Convention at Minneapolis. He is a 
member of the Wachusett Club of Haverhill, and 



E. A. BANGS. 

the first of January, 1893, devoting himself largely 
to the care of property of others. He is a mem- 
ber of the Puritan Club of Boston, of the Eastern. 
Massachusetts, and Beverly Yacht clubs, and of 
the Nuttall Ornithological Club of Cambridge. 
In politics he is a Democrat. He is unmarried. 



BARTLETT, Nath.\niel Cillev, of Haver- 
hill, member of the bar, is a native of New Hamp- 
shire, born in Nottingham, June 22, 1858, son of 
Thomas Bradbury and Victoria E. W. (Cilley) 
Bartlett. He is a grandson of the late Hon. 
Joseph Cilley, United States senator and officer 
in the war of 18 12, also a descendant of Gen- 
eral Joseph Cilley, an officer in the war of the 
Revolution ; grandson of the late Judge Brad- 
bury Bartlett of the New Hampshire courts, and 
great-grandson of General Thomas Bartlett, an 
officer in the Revolution and an eminent civil- 
ian. His early education was acquired in the 
primary, grammar, and high schools of Haverhill; 
and he was graduated from Harvard in the class 
of 1880. During school life his vacations were 
spent on a New Hampshire farm under the inspi- 




NATHANIEL C. BARTLETT. 



is connected with numerous secret orders : mem- 
ber of the Odd Fellows, past chancellor of Pales- 
tine Lodge, Knights of Pythias, past sachem of 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



199 



I'assaquoi Tribe ut llie Improved Order of Red 
Men, past chief of Winnikenni Castle of tiie 
KniglUs of the (iolden Eagle, and member of the 
Haverhill Lodge of the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks. While a law student at Derry, 
N.H., he founded the Derry A^nos, a weekly paper 
still flourishing, and successfully conducted it for 
a year. Of late years he has given some atten- 
tion to real estate in Haverhill as an investment. 
Mr. Bartlett is unmarried. 



JBEAL, Colonel Melvin, of Lawrence, chief 
engineer of the fire department, was born in Maine, 
in the town of Guilford, October 31, 1832, son of 
Samuel and Esther (Herring) Heal. He is of early 
New England ancestry. He was educated in the 
common schools of his native town. When he 
was thirteen years old, his father died, and he was 
obliged early to get to work. Until he reached 
eighteen, he worked on a farm. Then he went to 
Pelham, N.H., and learned carding and spinning 
in a woollen mill. Two years later, in 1852, he 
came to Lawrence, and was employed in the Bay 
State Mills as a jack-spinner. He was soon 
promoted to second hand in the same department, 
which place he held till 1857, when the mills 
closed, and he was thrown out of employment. 
Then he took up the trade of a painter, and 
followed this till 1861, when, upon the Presi- 
dent's call for troops, he went to Washington 
with the famous Sixth Regiment, Massachusetts 
Volunteers, — the regiment which was attacked 
in Baltimore. He had enlisted as a private of 
Company F of this regiment in 1853, and at the 
time of the call was second lieutenant of his 
company. In May he was chosen captain of the 
company. At the close of this service, covering 
one hundred days, he returned to Lawrence, and 
was put in charge of the painting department of 
the Atlantic Mills. In May, 1862, he was made 
lieutenant colonel of the Sixth Regiment, and in 
September following re-entered the United States 
service for nine months. At the expiration of 
this term he came home, and returned to his old 
occupation; but very soon after, in August, 1863, 
he was again in the army, this time for one 
hundred days. This service completed, he came 
back as before, and resumed his regular work. 
Subsequently he was in the Pennsylvania oil 
region for a while as superintendent of oil wells. 
In June, 1866, he was appointed a member of the 



Massachusetts Stale c(jnslabuhiry force, and in 
this capacity served till March, 1875, ^vhen the 
law was repealed. Then he worked two years for 
the Boston & Lowell Railroad, and for the next 
nine years was again in ciiarge of the painting 




MELVIN BEAL. 

department of the Atlantic Cotton Mills. On 
May I, 1875, he was first made chief engineer of 
the fire department, and served till 1877. He 
became permanent chief on June 22, 1891, 
appointed for the term of three years ; and at its 
close, in 1894, he was reappointed for another 
three years. His service in the department has 
covered thirty-seven years, and he has held nearly 
every position from hoseman to chief. He has 
been foreman of three different companies. 
Colonel Beal has also served in the municipal 
government, — a member of the Common Council 
for 1866, — and has represented Lawrence in the 
Legislature, a member of the lower house in 1878. 
His military service was continued for nearly 
twenty years after the close of the war. He was 
elected colonel of the Sixth in June, 1866, and 
held a colonel's commission in the same regiment 
until January, 1882. He is a member of the Gre- 
cian Lodge of Masons, Royal Arch Chapter, Law- 
rence Council, and of Bethany Commandery, 
Knights Templar. He is also president of the 
Lawrence Mutual Relief Association of Masons; 



200 



iMEN OF PROGRESS. 



prcsiclunt of tin- Mutu.il Relief Association of tlic 
Lawrence Fire Department; vice-commander of 
Star Council, American Legion of Honor; member 
of the Tnited Order of American Mechanics; and 
member of the Lawrence RiHe Club. In politics 
he is a Republican. He was married November 
9, 1853. to Miss Emily M. Goodhue of Salem, 
X.ll. They have had two children : Emeretta A. 
(deceased) and Forrest V,. Beal. 




J. C. BENNETT. 

JilvWETT, JosiAH Chase, of Lynn, shoe man- 
ufacturer, is a native of New Hampshire, born in 
Sandwich, May 6, 1835, ^o" o^ Simon and Mary 
Fogg (Chase) Bennett. He comes of an early 
Lynn family, members of which moved to New 
Hampshire at an early period. It is believed 
that he is a descendant of Samuel Bennett, who 
came to Lynn in 1636, was a substantial and pub- 
lic-spirited citizen, and a member of the Ancient 
and Honorable .Artillery Company. His great- 
grandfather, Stephen llennett, served as drum- 
major throughout the Revolutionary War. On 
the maternal side he is of the New Hampshire 
Chase family, of which were two bishops of the 
Episcopal church. Philander Chase, bishop of 
Ohio, and Carlton Chase, bishop of New Hamp- 
shire, who discharged the episcopal duties of the 



diocese of New York after the fall of Bishop On- 
derdonk, and Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase. 
His parents were poor, and when yet a boy he 
was thrown upon his own resources for support. 
.\t the age of si.xteen he left the farm, and, coming 
to Massachusetts, went to work at a shoemaker's 
bench in Danvers. From Danvers he made his 
way to Boston, where he engaged in the manufact- 
ure of silk hats. This business and that of pho- 
tography occupied him till 1S65. when he became 
connected with the American Shoe Tip Company 
of Boston. This connection continued about five 
years, during which period he travelled in difTer- 
ent parts of the country, making wide acquaint- 
ance with the shoe trade. Largely by his efforts 
the business of the company, which was in an 
embarrassed condition when he entered it, was 
brought to a prosperous stage. In 1870 he took 
Lip his residence permanently in Lynn, having for 
some years made it his summer home, and form- 
ing a partnership with George F. Barnard, under 
the firm name of J. C. Bennett & Co., began the 
manufacture of shoes of the first grade. Two 
years later the business was moved to a new 
building in Central Square, where it was contin- 
ued under the firm name of J. C. Bennett &: Bar- 
nard till the disastrous fire of November, 1889, 
when this structure, with many others, was burned 
to the ground. He continued in the shoe busi- 
ness for some time after under the firm name of 
]. C. Bennett. At the present time (1894), how- 
ever, he is not manufacturing but is confining 
himself more particularly to his real estate. He 
was a member of the State Senate for one term 
(1884-85), giving his salary for this service to 
the Lynn Hospital. In politics he is a Republi- 
can, and in religion an Episcopalian, parish ves- 
tryman of St. Stephen's Church, Lynn. Mr. 
Bennett was married in February, 1865, to Miss 
Nancy Louisa Richardson, of Rochester, N.H. 



BLANC HARD, Samuel Stillman, of Boston, 
merchant and manufacturer, is a native of Cam- 
bridge, born June 23, 1835, son of Simon Tenney 
and Roxanna (Armsby) Blanchard. He is of 
Huguenot ancestry ; and his grandfather Samuel 
Blanchard's farm was at O.xford, Mass., near the 
Huguenot settlement of two hundred years ago. 
Thomas Blanchard, the inventor of the eccentric 
lathe applied to gun-stocks, gun-barrels, lasts, 
etc., was his father's brother. He was educated 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



20I 



in the public schools of Boston, notably the May- 
hew and Phillips schools. His training for busi- 
ness life was as a merchant's clerk ; and he early 
became a partner in the boot and shoe manufact- 
uring firm of Chase, Merritt, & Blanchard. Dur- 
ing the year 1882 he opened a wheat farm at 
Blanchard, No. Dak., a town named for him by 
the Great Northern Railroad, situated in the Red 
River valley, the great wheat belt of the North- 
west. Among his other interests is the Mercan- 




S. S. BLANCHARD. 

tile Loan and Trust Company of Boston, of which 
he is a director. He has served in both branches 
of the Massachusetts Legislature, a member of 
the House in 1S91 and 1892, and a senator in 
1S94. For these three terms he was a member of 
the committee on public charitable institutions. 
House chairman of the committee in 1892, for 
which he was exceptionally fitted by experience in 
the administration of charities, having been for 
some years a director of the PJoston Industrial 
Home and auditor of the Children's Friend Soci- 
ety. In 1894, his first term in the Senate, he was 
also chairman of the famous and important joint 
special committee on transit, and chairman of the 
committee on State House. He formulated and 
reported the State House Park bill, providing for 
the taking of land on the east side of the State 



House ; was the author of the bill regulating the 
height of buildings, making the extreme height 
one hundred and twenty-five feet, which has been 
adopted by many other cities in the country; and 
in the beginning he had much to do with the new 
State Medfield Asylum for Chronic Insane, and 
received the thanks of Governor Russell for his 
useful work in connection therewith. He also had 
charge of the bill to prevent " baby farming," 
conferring upon the State Board of Lunacy and 
Charity the sole authority to grant licenses to 
board infants, and was instrumental in securing 
the passage of this important measure. He is a 
life member of the \eteran organization of the 
First Corps of Cadets, believing firmly in the citi- 
zen soldiery, and as an active member of the 
corps served under Governor Andrew, during the 
busy days of the Civil ^^'ar, in the so-called gov- 
ernor's body-guard. Other organizations to which 
he belongs are the Bostonian Society (a life mem- 
ber), the Mercantile Library Association (a trustee 
and ex-president), the Old Boston School Boys' 
Association, the Columbian Lodge, the Massachu- 
setts Republican Club, the Massachusetts Club, 
and the Middlesex Club. Mr. Blanchard was 
married New Year's Eve, 1863, to Miss Susie E. 
Crockett, daughter of the late Colonel Seldon 
Crockett, of the old Bromfield House. Boston. 
They have had three children: one son, Judson, 
who died in 1S73 ; one daughter, Grace, died in 
1868; and a second daughter, Mabel Blanchard, 
now living. 

BOGAN, Colonel Frederick Benedict, 
superintendent of public buildings, Boston, is a 
native of Boston, born February 10, 185 1, son of 
Frederick and Anne (De Voy) Bogan. He was 
educated in the public schools, graduating from 
the old W'inthrop School in Charlestown. After 
leaving school, he entered the employ of Miller 
Brothers, general builders, where he remained, 
serving the greater part of the time as foreman, 
till 1878, when he entered the city architect's 
office. During his service here he superintended 
the construction of several school-houses, the hos- 
pital on Long Island, the pumping station at 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir, the gate-house at Fisher 
Hill, and other structures. In 1885 he became 
assistant superintendent of public buildings, and 
in 1894 was promoted to the head of the depart- 
ment as superintendent by appointment of Mayor 
Matthews. His military career began in 1868 



202 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



with his enlistment, on July 7, in Company D, 
Fifth Infantry, as a private. He was commis- 
sioned second lieutenant on the 30th of March, 




FRED. B. BOGAN. 

187 1, and captain on the 4th of March, 1872. 
Ten years later, on January 19, 1882, he was com- 
missioned major in the Ninth Regiment, which 
position he held till his appointment on the staff 
of Governor Russell, in January, 1892, as an 
assistant inspector-general with the rank of colo- 
nel. After a service on the staff for about two 
years he resigned upon the death of Colonel 
Strachan to accept the colonelcy of his old regi- 
ment. During the reconstruction period in the 
militia Colonel Bogan, as senior captain in the 
Fifth Infantry, was for a time in command of that 
regiment. Later he was on two different oc- 
casions elected major of the regiment, but de- 
clined to accept ; and he was twice elected major 
of the Ninth before he accepted that commission. 
During his long and faithful service he has been 
recognized as an excellent tactician, and held in 
high esteem by his brother officers. He has fre- 
quently officiated as chief marshal of large pro- 
cessions in Boston, and for several years has been 
selected to act as judge at the competitive drills 
of the school regiment and of military organiza- 
tions in Massachusetts and other States. He is 



an active member of the Irish Charitable Society, 
of the Montgomery Light Guards Veteran Asso- 
ciation, of the Franklin Literary Association. 
Colonel Bogan was married May 7, 1878, to Miss 
M. E. Carney. They have two sons : Charles F. 
and Frederick L. Bogan. 



BRIDGHAM, Robert Choate, of Boston, 
manager for the Union Mutual Life Insurance 
Company of Portland, Me., was born in Dor- 
chester, December 4, 1850, son of Prescott C. 
and Lucy A. (Foster) Bridgham. The family re- 
moved two years later to Newton, where they 
still reside. He was educated in the public 
schools, the Mayhew Grammar of Boston, and 
the Newton Grammar and High Schools, finish- 
ing in Allen's Classical and English High School 
of West Newton. He then started in business, at 
the age of seventeen, as a boy with Ewing, Wise, 
lV Fuller, of Boston, importers of linens and white 
goods. The following year he took a position in 
the Boston office of the Mutual Life Insurance 
Company of New York, under Henry H. Hyde, 




ROBT. C. BRIDGHAM. 

general agent, subsequently of Hyde & Smith 
(Amos D. Smith, 3d, of Providence, R.I.). He 
remained here till 1872, when, owing to the ill- 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



203 



health of his father, he resigned his position to be- 
come a member of the firm of Hridgham, Jones 
& C"o., jobbers of foreign and domestic woollens. 
Soon afterward, upon the death of Mr. Jones, the 
name was changed to ]5ridgham & Co., the firm 
composed of his father and himself. This asso- 
ciation continued till 1882. For the succeeding 
three years he was a partner in the firm of Hurt, 
Bridgham, & Snow, of Providence, R. I., impor- 
ters of woollens. In 1885, this partnership having 
been dissolved, he returned to the firm of Bridg- 
ham & Co., remaining four years. From i88g to 
1 89 1 he represented the firm of Hitchcock, Biggs, 
& Willett, of London, England, woollen ware- 
housemen; and in March, T891, he accepted the 
position of manager for the Eastern Massachusetts 
department of the Union Mutual Life Lisurance 
Company of Portland, Me., with offices at No. 4 
Post-office Square, Boston, which position he still 
holds. He is a member of Dalhousie Lodge of 
Freemasons, of Newton Royal Arch Chapter and 
Gethsemane Commandery, Knights Templar; a 
member of Newton Lodge No. 92, Order of Odd 
Fellows, and present regent of Mount Ida Coun- 
cil No. 1247, Royal Arcanum, of Newtonville. 
He is also a member of the Boston Life Under- 
writers' Association, of the New England Com- 
mercial Travellers' Association, and of the Massa- 
chusetts Poultry Association. He has been 
prominent for many years in the social and politi- 
cal life of Newton. As an active member of the 
Newton Club (serving for three years on the ex- 
ecutive committee), he has been a leading factor 
in connection with the success of this organiza- 
tion ; and his genial disposition and integrity have 
won for him a large circle of friends. He has 
taken an active part in the organization and suc- 
cess of the Republican party in his section, serv- 
ing as chairman of the e-xecutive committee of the 
Republican Club of Ward 2, and for several years 
a member of the Republican ward and city com- 
mittee of Newton. He is a member also of the 
Republican Club of Massachusetts. Mr. Bridg- 
ham was married January 18, 1872, to Miss Ade- 
laide Luella Swallow, of Boston, by the Rev. 
Henry M. Parsons, of Union Church, Columbus 
Avenue. 

BRO\\'NE, Andrew Jackson, of Boston, first 
assistant assessor, is a native of New Hampshire, 
born in the town of Brentwood, March 25, 183 1, 
son of Colonel Josiah and Anna (Tuck) Browne. 



His mother was a daughter of Deacon Edward 
Tuck, of Brentwood, long identified with the inter- 
ests of the town. He was educated in the public 




A. J. BROWNE. 

schools, and at the age of eighteen came to Boston 
to begin business life. For fourteen years, from 
1854 to 1868, he was engaged in the hack and 
boarding stable business ; and since 1870 he has 
been in the real estate business, handling city and 
suburban property. He has occupied the posi- 
tion of first assistant assessor since 187 1, with the 
exception of the year 1885. He has served two 
terms in the lower house of the Legislature (1882- 
83) as a representative from the Roxbury District, 
where he has resided since 1849, when he started 
in business. He is a member of the Knights of 
Honor and of the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. In politics he is a Republican. Mr. 
Browne was married in February, 1855, to Miss 
Miranda J. Shaw, daughter of Abram and Fannie 
Shaw, of Kensington, N.H. 



BURNHAM, Albert Stanwood, of Revere, 
superintendent of the Revere Water Company, 
was born in East Boston, September 25, 1850, son 
of Andrew and Anna B. (Duncan) Burnham. He 
is of American ancestry on the paternal side, from 



204 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



about 1700, and Scotch on the maternal side. 
The family moved to Revere in 1853, where his 
father was long active and influential in town 
affairs, for many years a selectinan, moderator of 
town meetings, and prominent in the work of es- 
tablishing the water service which the town now 
enjoys. He was educated in the public schools 
of Revere, which he attended until he reached 
the age of seventeen years. Then he learned the 
house carpenter's trade, and followed this occupa- 
tion till 1874, when he engaged in the retail drug 
business on liroadwav. In 1882 he became one 





ALBERT S. BURNHAM. 

of the incorporators of the Revere Water Com- 
pany, and entered its employ in 1S84 as superin- 
tendent and registrar, and clerk of the corporation, 
which positions he still holds. The system which 
he directs is now about forty-five miles in length, 
and supplies the towns of Revere and Winthrop. 
Following in the footsteps of his father, he has 
held the principal executive positions in the town 
government, — auditor from 1S78 to 1887; col- 
lector of ta.xes in 1881 ; member of the board of 
health, 1881; selectman, chairman of the board 
and clerk, 1889, 1890, 1891, 1892; trustee of the 
Public Library, 1884, 1885, 1886; member of the 
School Committee, chairman and clerk, 1886, 
1887, 1888; justice of the peace, 1884 to 1891 ; 



and bail commissioner from 188 1 to the present 
time. Like his father, also, he has been fre- 
quently moderator of the annual town meetings, 
and of very many special meetings. In 1884 and 
1885 he represented the Twenty-sixth Suffolk Dis- 
trict in the lower branch of the Legislature ; and in 
1893 and 1894 he was a member of the Senate 
from the First Suffolk Senatorial District, which 
district embraces Ward One, East Boston (his 
birthplace), the city of Chelsea, and the towns 
of Revere and Winthrop. In the House of 1884 
he was a member of the committee on federal re- 
lations; and in 1885 house chairman of the com- 
mittee on library, and member of the committee 
on water supply. In the Senate of 1893 he was 
chairman of the committee on drainage, and was 
also on the committees on insurance and labor; 
and in 1894 chairman of the committee on manu- 
factures, and on the committees on drainage and 
on constitutional amendments. He advocated 
and voted for municipal suft'rage for women, and 
for the so-called " Norwegian system " of selling 
into.xicating liquors. In the matter of the 
"Meigs Elevated Railway Bill," before the 
Legislature of 1894, he secured amendments to 
the measure, providing for a route to Revere, with 
a terminus at or near the proposed " Metropolitan 
Park" in the Crescent Beach District, and an im- 
portant provision requiring the payment by the 
railroad corporation of an annual franchise tax 
on its gross earnings, the same to be divided be- 
tween the cities and towns wherein its tracks may 
be laid. This legislation is in the nature of an 
inno\ation in respect to Massachusetts railroads. 
He also successfully opposed the repeal of the 
present law compelling cities and towns to pur- 
chase existing " gas or electric light plants " be- 
fore engaging in the business of "municipal or 
commercial lighting." He was the first resident 
of the town of North Chelsea (now Revere) ever 
honored by an election to the Senate, and he was 
the youngest member of the Senate of 1893 and 
1894. In his legislative service he has earned a 
reputation for conservatism and a strict loyalty to 
the Republican party, to which he has been at- 
tached from youth up, always giving unswerving 
support to its platforms and candidates. He has 
been prominent in the party organization for a 
long period, and has held the position of chair- 
man of the Republican town committee of Revere 
for eighteen years. He was also on the State 
committee in 1891. He is a member of the New 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



205 



England Water Works Association, of the Massa- 
chusetts Republican Club, of tiie United Order of 
the Golden Cross, and of the New England Order 
of Protection. He was married April 29, 1874, 
to Miss Eudora M. Phelps. They have five chil- 
dren : Clara Estelle (aged eighteen years), Flor- 
ence Edwina (twelve years), Helen Louise (nine 
years), Marion Augusta (^six years), and Dora 
P.in'nham (born in 1894). 



CAPEN, Samuel Billings, of Boston, mer- 
chant, is a native of Boston, born December 12, 
1842, son of Samuel Childs and Ann (Billings) 
Capen. He is in the eighth generation from Ber- 
nard and Jane Capen, the progenitors of all the 
Capens in New England, who came to Dorchester 
in the ship " Mary and John," May 30, 1630. 
The oldest gravestone in New England bears the 
name of Bernard Capen, died in 1638. He is in 
the eighth generation also from John Alden of 
the Plymouth Colony and of Roger Billings, who 
came to Dorchester in 1640. His grandfather, 
Samuel Capen, of Dorchester, served in seven 
campaigns in the war of the American Revolu- 
tion ; and his only brother, Joseph Henry Capen, 
was in the Forty-fourth Regiment, Massachusetts 
Volunteers, Company F, in the war of the Re- 
bellion. He was educated in the old Quincy 
Grammar and the English High -Schools, both of 
Boston, graduating from the latter in 1858. After 
leaving school, he entered the carpet store of 
Wentworth & Bright, and in 1864 became a part- 
ner in the business, with which he has been con- 
nected ever since under the firm names succes- 
sively of William E. Bright & Co., William E. 
Bright & Capen, and Torrey, Bright, & Capen. 
He has been a director of the Howard National 
Bank for a number of years, and is at present 
vice-president of the institution. He has for 
many years been identified with the public school 
system of Boston, having as a member of the 
School Committee, during a long period (1889- 
93), served on important committees, — chairman 
of the committees on school-houses, on manual 
training schools, on legislative matters, and on 
annual report, and member of that on accounts. 
The last year of his service, 1893, he was president 
of the board. He has also been prominent in va- 
rious reform movements, national and local, and in 
associations of the Congregational denomination. 
He has been a member of the Boston Indian 



Citizenship Committee for more than ten years, 
president of the Congregational Sunday School 
and Publishing Society since 1882, some time 
chairman of the finance committee of the Massa- 
chusetts Home Missionary Society, a director of 
the American Congregational Association, a mem- 
ber of the Pilgrim .Vssociation, of which he is now 
(1894) president, and of the Congregational Club, 
of which he was president in 1882. His most 
notable work of late years has been in connection 
with the establishment of the Boston Municipal 
League in 1893-94, an organization to advance 




SAMUEL B. CAPEN. 

municipal reform in various ways, having its be- 
ginnings in the Pilgrim Association, of which he 
was the chief promoter and is the present presi- 
dent. The objects of the league, as stated in its 
constitution, are " to keep before citizens the ne- 
cessity of their interest in public affairs, to discuss 
and shape public opinion upon all questions which 
relate to the proper government of the city, to 
separate municipal politics from State and na- 
tional politics, to secure the nomination and elec- 
tion of municipal officers solely on account of their 
fitness for the ofiice, to federate for these pur- 
poses the various moral forces of the city," repre- 
sented in the denominational and other clubs, 
and "to encourage every wise project for the pro- 



206 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



motion of the good order, prosperity, and honor 
of Boston."' It is in line with movements in 
other cities in the interest of municipal reform, 
though differing from them in detail. Upon the 
occasion of his election as president at the per- 
manent organization in February, 1894, Mr. 
Capen delivered a practical address, which was 
printed as tract No. i in the Publications of the 
League. Two years before, in April, 1892, the 
project of the Municipal League was outlined 
in a more general manner in his address before 
the Congregaticmal Club, which also has been 
published in part under the title of " A Revival of 
C'lood (Mtizenship." Mr. Capen is second vice- 
president also of the National Municipal League 
organized in the spring of 1894, of which James 
C. Carter, of New York, is president. He is a 
member of the Sons of the Revolution. The de- 
gree of A.M. was given him by Dartmouth Col- 
lege in 1893. He was married December 8, 
1869, to Miss Helen Maria Warren, daughter of 
the late Dr. John \V. Warren, of Boston. They 
have two children : Edward Warren and Mary 
Warren Capen. 

CHAMBERLAIN, Loved Ellis, of Brockton, 
justice of the Police Court, was born in Plympton, 
January 30, 1857, son of Robert M. and Eliza A. 
(Wright) Chamberlain. His paternal ancestors 
first settled in Hanson, and subsequently moved 
to Maine, where his father was born, in Auburn. 
His mother was a native of Plympton, and a de- 
scendant, through the Coopers and the Sampsons, 
from the Bradfords who came over in the " May- 
flower." His education was acquired in the com- 
mon and high schools of North Bridgewater, now 
Brockton, from which he graduated in 1875. He 
studied law in the ofiice of White & Sumner, 
Brockton, and in the Boston University Law 
School, graduating in 1879. \\'hile a student 
with White & Sumner, he also pursued general 
studies beyond the High School course for two 
years, and later took the Chautauqua four years' 
course. He was admitted to the bar in 1877, and 
began practice in 1881. From 1882 to Novem- 
ber, 1884, he was a member of the law firm of 
Packard & Chamberlain, after which he practised 
alone. He was appointed to the justiceship of 
the Police Court upon its establishment in 1885, 
and he has been city solicitor of Brockton since 
1 89 1 through repeated elections. In politics he 
is a Republican, and performs fully the duties of 



the citizen, believing that politics are to be puri- 
fied at the caucus; but he has had no time to de- 
vote to public life. He is especially interested in 
municipal affairs and in movements for good 
government for cities and towns. He has been 
president of the Brockton High School Alumni 




L. E. CHAMBERLAIN. 



Association for several years, president of the 
Alpha Bicycle Club of Brockton since its organi- 
zation in 1892, some time president of the Young 
Men's Christian Association Congress, president 
of the Young Men's Republican Club for many 
years, and is secretary of the Plymouth County 
Club (a Republican and social organization). He 
is connected also with the Masons, the Odd Fel- 
lows, and the Good Templars. In the latter 
society he has represented Massachusetts at 
sessions in Toronto, Can., Saratoga, Richmond, 
and Fxlinburgh, Scotland (189 1); and he was 
treasurer for four years up to 1894. Judge 
Chamberlain was married August 26, 1890, to 
Miss Mina C. Miller, of Camden, Me. They 
have one child : Leslie C. Chamberlain (born 
July II, 1 891). 



CHOATE, Charles Francis, Jr., of Boston, 
member of the Suffolk bar, is a native of Cam- 
bridge, born October 23, 1866, youngest son of 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



207 



Charles F. and Elizabeth W. (Carlisle) Choate. 
[For ancestry see Choate, Charles F.] His early 
education was obtained in private schools in Cam- 
bridge ; and in 1879 I't; went to St. Mark's School 
at Southborough, where he was fitted for college. 
Entering Harvard, he was graduated there in due 




CHAS. F. CHOATE, Jr. 

course in the class of 1888. After graduation he 
attended the Harvard Law School for two years, 
and in the spring of 1890 was admitted to the bar 
of Suffolk County. The following autumn he en- 
tered the office of Josiah H. Benton, Jr., and has 
since been there engaged in the practice of his 
profession. He is a member of the Union C'lub. 
He was married June 15, 1892, to Miss Louise 
Burnett, daughter of Joseph Burnett, of Boston. 
They have two children : Joseph ]?. and Charles 
F. Choate, 3d, twins, born May 3, 1893. 



CLIFFORD, Ch.\rles W.\rren, of New Bed- 
ford, member of the Bristol county bar, and iden- 
tified with numerous important interests, was born 
in New Bedford, August 19, 1844. He is the 
eldest son of John H. Clifford and Sarah Parker 
(Allen) Clifford, daughter of William Howland 
Allen. On the paternal side he is a direct de- 
scendant of Governor Mayhew, of Martha's Vine- 



yard, and, on the maternal side, of Captain Myles 
Standish, of Plymouth. His father was one of the 
foremost lawyers of Eastern Massachusetts, from 
1840 to 1849 district attorney for the southern 
district of the State, attorney-general from 1849 ^o 
1853 and 1854 to 1858, and governor of the 
Commonwealth in 1853. Charles Warren Clifford 
was fitted for college at T. Prentiss Allen's pri- 
vate school in New Bedford, — the old Friends' 
Academy, — entered Harvard at the age of seven- 
teen, and graduated with full honors in the class 
of 1865. His law studies, begun immediately 
after his graduation from the college, were pur- 
sued under the Hon. Edmund H. Bennett, of 
Taunton, the Hon. John C. Dodge, of Boston, and 
at the Harvard Law School. He was admitted to 
the bar in New Bedford at the June term, 1868, 
and began practice there in the office formerly oc- 
cupied by his father. He was alone until Febru- 
ary, 1869, when he became a member of the firm 
of Marston c.^: Crapo (Hon. George Marston and 
Hon. William W. Crapo). This relation contin- 
ued till the dissolution of the firm of Marston 
iS: Crapo in 1878; and since that time he has 
been associated with Mr. Crapo and his brother, 
the Hon. Walter Clifford, under tlie firm name 
of Crapo, Clift'ord, & Clifford. While in asso- 
ciation with Mr. Marston, he acted as junior 
counsel in many important cases, the prepara- 
tion of which was intrusted to him, and subse- 
quently became largely employed as attorney for 
leading business men and numerous corpora- 
tions. In 1876 he was appointed one of the 
commissioners to revise the judiciary system of 
the Commonwealth. In 1891 he received the 
almost unanimous support of the bar of Massa- 
chusetts for appointment as a justice of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the United States. In 1893 he was 
appointed by the Supreme Judicial Court a com- 
missioner to determine the value of the Quincy 
Water-works, and in 1894 he was appointed by 
the same court a commissioner to distribute the 
expense of the Metropolitan Park Sj'stem. He 
has been a commissioner of the United States 
Circuit Court since 1867, and for many years one 
of the standing examiners of applicants for admis- 
sion to the bar of Bristol County. In politics a 
steadfast Republican, Mr. Clifford has for many 
years been foremost among the active supporters 
and advocates of the principles of that party. He 
has repeatedly served as chairman of the Repub- 
lican city committee of New Bedford ; has served 



2o8 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



as a member of the State Committee and chair- 
man of its executive committee ; was a delegate to 
the Republican National Convention at Chicago 
in 1880 and assistant secretary of that body; was 
prominent as the manager of the campaign of the 
Hon. William W. Crapo for the gubernatorial nom- 
ination in 1882, which, though unsuccessful, was 
conducted with ability, good judgment, and dig- 
nity : and in later years has rendered his party 
good service in various ways. He was one of the 
original board of civil service commissioners of 
Massachusetts which devised and established the 




CHARLES W. CLIFFORD. 

present system, his term covering about four years, 
from November, 1884, to July, 1888. In New- 
Bedford he holds many positions of trust, and is 
officially connected with numerous financial and 
manufacturing concerns. He is president of the 
Southern Massachusetts Telephone Company, pres- 
ident of the Masonic Building Association, chair- 
man of the Board of Assessors, of the First Con- 
gregational Society; vice-president of St. Luke's 
Hospital and the National Bank of Commerce ; 
trustee of the Swain Free School, of the New 
Bedford Institution for Savings, and of several es- 
tates ; director of the New Bedford Manufacturing 
Company, of the Howland Mills, the New Bedford 
Copper Company, the Rotch Spinning Company, 



the Potomeka Mills, the Oneko Woollen Mills, the 
Davis Coast Wrecking Company; and one of 
the advisory committee of the Association for the 
Relief of Aged Women, and of the Ladies' Branch 
of the New Bedford Port Society. He was in- 
strumental in the establishment of the New Bed- 
ford Opera House, and the first president of the 
Opera House Association. The professional and 
social organizations to which he belongs include 
the American Bar Association, in which he is a 
member of the standing committee on commercial 
law : the New Bedford Bar Association, of which 
he is vice-president ; the Colonial Society of 
Massachusetts ; the \^'amsutta, Dartmouth, Unity, 
Snark, and Harvard clubs of New Bedford (being 
a trustee of the Wamsutta and vice-president of 
the Harvard) ; the Union, University, and Algon- 
quin clubs, Boston, the University Club, New 
York, and the Eastern and New Bedford Yacht 
clubs. He was the orator at New Bedford on 
the occasion of the celebration of the centennial 
of the inauguration of Washington as President 
of the United States, April 30, 1889 ; and among 
other notable discourses which he has delivered 
should be mentioned an eloquent address at the 
meeting of the Bristol County bar on the death 
of the Hon. George Marston, Sept. 7, 1883. He 
has also read papers before the Unity Club of 
New Bedford on the " McKinley Tariff " and on 
" Reciprocity," and before the National Civil Ser- 
vice League on " Registration of Laborers." Mr. 
Clifford married, first. May 5, 1869, Miss Frances 
Lothrop Wood, daughter of Charles L. and Eliza- 
beth T. W'ood, of New Bedford. She died April 
28, 1872. He married, second, March 15, 1876, 
Welhelmina Helena Crapo, daughter of the late 
Governor Crapo, of Michigan, and a sister of 
his partner, the Hon. William W. Crapo. They 
have no children. 



COLLINS, Lewis Peter, of Lawrence, manu- 
facturer, mayor of the city in 1 891, is a native of 
New Brunswick, born in the town of Sheffield, 
June 14, 1850, son of Peter and Sarah (Gallaway) 
Collins. He is of English and Irish ancestry. 
He was educated in the common and grammar 
schools of his native town. After leaving school, 
he served an apprenticeship to a carpenter and 
builder, and, finishing at the age of nineteen, 
then went into a factory to learn the ways of man- 
ufacturing door sashes and blinds, in which busi- 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



209 



ness he has continued from that time to the pres- 
ent. He came to Lawrence in i86g, and entered 
the employ of Briggs & Allyn. makers of all kinds 



Hawes, of Belfast, Me. They have one child liv- 
ing, Fred Lewis Collins, twelve years old. 




COOK, Chari.es Emf.rso.m, editor-in-chief of 
the Boston Budget, is a native of Maine, born in 
Parsonsfield, July 22, 1869, son of James VV. and 
Sarah (Emerson) Cook. His paternal grandpar- 
ents were Nathaniel and Frances (Chamberlain) 
Cook ; and his maternal grandparents, Joseph 
Parsons Emerson and Sarah (Dunfield) Emerson. 
He is descended directly from the F2nglish branch 
of the Kochs of Germany, begun by barons of the 
family driven to England during the Thirty Years' 
War, and is closely connected with the Parsons 
family, of which Thomas Parsons, who settled the 
town of Parsonsfield, was prominent in the early 
history of Maine. He was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Boston, graduated from the Dwight 
Grammar in 1884, and the English High in 1887, 
and at Harvard, where he was graduated in the 
class of 1893. For a year after graduating from 
the English High and before entering college he 
was in the office of his father, where he received 



LEWIS p. COLLINS. 



of house finish, as general workman. Subse- 
quently he was made foreman ; and in 1885, when 
the corporation known as the Briggs & Allyn 
ALinufacturing Company was formed to carry on 
the business of the old firm, he was elected super- 
intendent of the works. In 1892 he was made 
treasurer and manager, the position he now holds. 
He is also a director of the Lawrence National 
Bank and trustee of the Broadway Savings Bank. 
He has served in both branches of the city gov- 
ernment, member of the Common Council in 
1889, and of the Board of Aldermen in 1890; 
and was mayor in 1891, elected by a majority of 
six hundred and fifty-two over his opponent. He 
is now a member of the Lawrence Water Board, 
which has purified the Merrimac River water by 
filtering. He belongs to a number of fraternal or- 
ganizations, — the Knights of Honor, the Knights 
and Ladies of Honor, and the United Friends, 
and is a member of the Lawrence Canoe Club. 
He is prominent in the Lawrence Board of Trade, 
and is the present vice-president of that organiza- 
tion. In politics he is a Republican. Mr. Col- 
lins married December 26, 1869, Miss Lovina E. 




iiiii 



CHARLES EMERSON COOK. 

a careful business training. While in college, he 
wrote two plays, — a Spanish comedy, " The War- 
path of Love," and "The 'i"ie that Binds" (the 



2IO 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



latter in collaboration with David D. Wells), 
which were successfully produced by the Harvard 
Delta Upsilon ; and later he wrote a new college 
play, "A Sorry Spectre," which was given in the 
spring of 1894, also by Delta Upsilon. Disliking 
business, Mr. Cook turned toward literature and 
newspaper work while yet an undergraduate, pub- 
lishing several short stories, poems, clever humor- 
ous verse, and serving the Budget as a reporter. 
In f)ctober, 1889, he became the Harvard reporter 
for that paper; in January, 1892, its dramatic 
editor; in June, 1892, president of the reorgan- 
ized Budget Company ; in September following, 
writer of "The Saunterer" humorous paragraphs ; 
and in August, 1893, editor-in-chief of the jour- 
nal. His specialty is dramatic work, notably 
dramatic criticism. He is a member of the Delta 
Upsilon Fraternity and the Pi Eta Society of 
Harvard; of the Gridiron Club (elected a director 
in 1894) and the Press Club of Boston : and of 
the Republican Club of Massachusetts. He was 
married October 17, 1893, to Miss Margaret 
Quincy Greene, daughter of the late James Lloyd 
Greene, of Norwich, Conn. 




(^hio, born in Chillicothe, July 11, 1818, son of 
Leander and Ester (Smith) Cook. He is a de- 
scendant of Captain Joel Cook, of Revolutionary 
fame. His grandfather was the Captain Cook 
who saved the life of General William Henry 
Harrison from the Indians at the battle of Tippe- 
canoe. He was educated in the district school, 
and when a youth came East to begin active life. 
After learning the carriage trimming trade in the 
factory of Isaac Mi.x & Son, New Haven, Conn., 
he established the iirm of G. & D. Cook & Co. 
of New Haven, carriage-makers, and followed this 
business for eighteen years (from 1847 'o 1865). 
Afterwards he was engaged a number of years in 
the manufacture of musical instruments in New 
Haven, and in 1880 became connected with the 
Hallet & Davis Piano Company of Boston. He 
has been president of that corporation since 1880. 
He is connected with the Masonic order, a mem- 
ber of Hiram Lodge, New Haven, and belongs to 
numerous other organizations, business and so- 
cial. He was married January 8, 1837, to Miss 
Phtebe Merwin, of Milford, Conn. They have 
had eight children : George L., Mary E.. Wilber 
D., Emma T., James B., Hattie M., Minnie, and 
Lucy Cook. 



CEO. COOK. 



COOK, George, of Boston, president of the 
Hallet & Davis Piano Company, is a native of 



CRAIG, William Fairfield, of Lynn, phar- 
macist, is a native of Nova Scotia, born September 
15, 1865, son of Leslie M. and Amanda (Aymar) 
Craig. His father's parents, Alexander and Eliz- 
abeth (Harding) Craig, were born in Scotland ; 
and his mother's parents, William and Kaziah 
(Warne) Aymar, were natives of France. He was 
educated in the public schools of Nova Scotia, 
and fitted for his profession at the Massachusetts 
College of Pharmacy, taking the four years' 
course, and graduating in 1890. After leaving 
school, in the spring of 1884, he came to Lynn, 
and entered the employ of F. H. Broad & Co., 
pharmacists, with whom he remained as a clerk 
until 1892. Then he purchased the interest of 
Mr. Broad, and, forming a partnership with the 
junior partner, the Hon. Eugene A. Bessom, con- 
tinued and developed the business under the 
firm name of Wm. Craig & Co. Since 1890 he 
has been instructor in chemistry and pharmacy 
in the Lynn Hospital, and chemist for the Lynn 
Board of Health since 1892. He is an active 
member of various professional organizations, — 
the American Chemical Society, the Massachu- 



MEN OP^ PROGRESS. 



21 I 



setts State Pliarmaceutical Association, the Lynn 
Druggists' Association (secretary and treasurer of 




WILLIAM F. CRAIG. 

the latter), — a trustee of the College of Pharmacy 
(elected in 1893 for four years), and president of 
the Association of the Alumni of the College of 
Pharmacy (elected in 1894). He belongs also to 
the order of Odd Fellows, a member of Richard 
W. Drawn Lodge and of the Lynn Encampment. 
In politics he is a Republican, and is enrolled as 
a member of the Ward Three Lynn Republican 
Club. He is unmarried. 



CRAPO, William Wallace, of New Bedford, 
member of the Bristol bar, concerned in large 
manufacturing and railroad interests, and long 
prominent in public life, was born in Dartmouth, 
May 16, 1830, son of Henry Howland and Mary A. 
(Slocum) Crapo. His father, also a native of 
Dartmouth, born in 1804, moving to Michigan in 
1857, became one of the largest owners of wood- 
lands and most extensive manufacturers of lumber 
there, served as mayor of the city of Flint in 
1862, as a State senator for two years, and as 
governor of the State four, — 1864-65-66-67. He 
was the only son in a family of ten children. His 
education was acc|uired in the public schools of 
New Bedford, at the Friends' Academy, at PhiUips 



(Andover) Academy, and at Vale College, where 
he graduated in the class of 1852. He began his 
law studies immediately after leaving college in 
the office of the Hon., afterward Covernor John H. 
Clifford, of New Bedford, and subsequently at- 
tended the Harvard Law School ; and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in Februar}', 1855. P'.ntering 
upon practice in New Bedford, he almost immedi- 
ately took a position of prominence. In less than 
three months after his admission to the bar — 
in April — he was appointed city solicitor, which 
office he held for ten years. The following year, 
1856, his public career was begun with speeches 
on the stump for John C. Fremont, the first candi- 
date of the Republican party for President, and 
with his election in November to the lower house 
of the Legislature. He was then but twenty-si.x 
years of age, one of the»youngest members of that 
body. The next year he was urged to take the 
Republican nomination for State senator for his 
district ; but he declined, his professional work, 
which had become important and was steadily 
increasing, demanding his undivided attention. 
I >uring the Civil War period he was among the 
most active and zealous supporters of the govern- 
ment, and gave freely from his time and means to 
the cause. Subsequently he was elected to fill a 
vacancy in the Forty-fourth Congress, and then 
began a notable career, which covered the Forty- 
fifth, Forty-sixth, and Forty-seventh Congresses, 
to each of which he was returned by large votes. 
From the first his place was with the leading 
members of the House. In the Forty-fifth Con- 
gress he was a member of the committee on 
foreign affairs ; in the Forty-sixth, a member of 
the committee on banking and currency ; in the 
Forty-seventh, chairman of the banking and cur- 
rency committee. Under his admirable leader- 
ship, and against strong opposition, the bill ex- 
tending the charters of the national banks was 
carried through ; and he took an infiuential part 
in advancing to enactment other important legis- 
lation. He early won the reputation of an able 
and trustworthy legislator of high standard and 
purity of motives. With the close of the Forty- 
seventh Congress, having declined a renomination 
for a fifth term, he returned to the practice of his 
profession. Soon, however, his name was brought 
before the Republican party in the State in con- 
nection with the governorship ; but refusing to 
enter a contest, being firm in his belief that the 
office should seek the man, or to allow the em- 



212 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



ploymcnt in behalf of his candidacy of what are 
known in politics as machine methods, he failed 
to receive the nomination. In professional and 
business life Mr. Crapo has long held numerous 
responsible positions. He has been guardian or 
trustee for the management of large estates ; pres- 
ident of the Mechanics' National Bank of New 
Bedford since 1870; president of the Wamsutta 
Mills for many years ; director of the Potomska 
Mills, of the Acushnet Mills, and of a number of 
other industrial corporations; and president of 
the Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad since 1883. 




WM. W. CRAPO. 

He is pre-eminently a business lawyer ; and, in 
causes where the exercise of business sagacity 
and good judgment are demanded, he has been 
especially successful. In his practice he was 
long associated with the Hon. George Marston, 
under the firm name of Marston & Crapo ; and 
since 1878 he has been in association with 
Charles W. and Walter Clifford, under the firm 
name of Crapo, Clifford & Clifford. In the affairs 
of his city he has always taken a warm interest, 
and has advanced many local improvements. He 
was actively concerned in the establishment of 
the New Bedford Water Works, and from 1865 to 
1875 held the chairmanship of the Board of Water 
Commissioners. In 1882 the honorarv degree of 



LL.D. was conferred upon him by Yale College. 
Mr. Crapo was married January 22, 1857, to Miss 
Sarah A. Tappan, daughter of George and Serena 
(Davis) Tappan, of New Bedford. They have 
two sons : Henry Howland (now in the office of 
Crapo, Clifford & Clifford) and Stanford Tappan 
Crapo (Y.C., 1886). 



DAME, Charles Chase, of Newburyport, 
member of the bar, was born June 5, 18 19, 
in Kittery, then the district of Maine, Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, son of Joseph and 
Statira (Chase) Dame. He is of English ances- 
try, and descends from first settlers in New Eng- 
land. The Dames settled in what is now Dover, 
N.H., in 1633, and the Chases about the same 
period in Newbury. He is in the eighth genera- 
tion from John Dame, one of the first deacons of 
the First Church of Dover and prominent in pub- 
lic affairs, and on the maternal side from Aquilla 
Chase, master mariner, the first pilot of the '■ Mer- 
rimack." His maternal grandfather, Joshua T. 
Chase, of Kittery Point, was a man of note. For 
seven years before the separation of Maine from 
Massachusetts he was a member of the General 
Court, and nine years ne.xt after the separation, a 
member of the Maine House of Representatives. 
His father, born in Wakefield, N.H., was the first 
man in that town to enlist in the War of 1812, and 
was stationed at Fort McCleary, Kittery Point. 
After this service he settled there, marrying 
Statira Chase. He was a schoolmaster by pro- 
fession, and taught several years at Newcastle, 
N.H. Charles C. first attended the common 
schools, and at the age of eleven began work. 
Before he had reached seventeen, he was teaching 
school at Kittery " Foreside." At eighteen he 
entered the academy at South Newmarket, N.H., 
where he received a good academic training. 
Upon graduation he returned to school-teaching, 
and pursued this profession upwards of twenty 
years. Beginning at Brentwood Hill, in June, 
1839, he was called to Newbury to take charge of 
a school at " Upper Green," where he remained 
two years. Then he became principal of a gram- 
mar school in Lynn, afterward of the South Male 
Grammar School of Newburyport, and next of the 
Brown High School there. In February, 1849, 
he temporarily retired, and made a voyage to the 
Pacific coast, stopping some time in South Amer- 
ica. Returning in 185 1, he took charge of the 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



213 



English department in C'iiauncy Hall School, L!os- 
ton, where he remained nine years, at the same 
time reading law. He was admitted to the Suf- 
folk bar September 8, 1859, and to practice in 
the United States Circuit Court October 17, fol- 
lowing. He retired permanently from school- 
teaching early in i860, and opened a law office 
in Boston. In September, 1868, he was ap- 
pointed by President Johnson collector of internal 
revenue for the Fifth District, Massachusetts, and 
held this position continuously through the ad- 
ministrations of Presidents Grant, Hayes, Gar- 




CHARLES C. DAME. 

field, and Arthur, till August, 1883. That year 
he opened a law office in Newburyport, and has 
since practised there. In March, 1876, he was 
admitted to practice in the United States Su- 
preme Court at Washington. He has lived in 
Newburyport since the late thirties, maintaining 
his residence there while teaching in Lynn and in 
Boston and practising law in the latter city, and 
has held numerous local positions, besides repre- 
senting his district in the State Senate (1868). 
In 1856 he was a member of the School Board, 
in 1859-60 member of the Common Council, in 
1862 an alderman, and in 1886 mayor of the city. 
He has been a director of the Merchants' Na- 
tional Bank of Newburyport since January, 1886, 



ami a trustee of the Institution for Savings in 
Newburyport and its Vicinity since January, 1884. 
He is a prominent Mason, and has held numerous 
high offices in the order. He was for three years 
(1866-67-68) grand master of the Grand Lodge 
of Massachusetts, A. F. & A. M. He was wor- 
shipful master of Revere Lodge, Boston ; high 
priest of St. Andrews R. A. Chapter, Boston ; 
eminent commander of Hugh de Payen Com- 
mandery, Melrose, and of Boston Commandery, 
Boston ; and is an honorary member of the Su- 
preme Council, A. A. S. R. of the Northern 
Masonic Jurisdiction, for the thirty-third, or last, 
degree. He has been a member of the Masonic 
Education and Charity Trust in Massachusetts 
from its commencement, in 1884, and a member 
of the Board of Directors of the Grand Lodge of 
Massachusetts since 1881. Mr. Dame was for 
many years an active member of the Veteran 
.Vrtillery Company of Newburyport and of the 
.Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of 
Boston, commander of the former in 1870 and 
judge advocate in later years. In politics he was 
originally a ^^'hig, and upon the dissolution of 
that party became a Republican. He was mar- 
ried September i, 1842, to Miss Frances Amelia 
Little, of Newbury. They have had four chil- 
dren : Frances Chase (deceased), Charles Little 
(deceased), P'rances Maria, and Charles W'allis 
Dame. 

DANIELS, John Herbert, of Fitchburg, 
dealer in real estate, was born in Worcester, 
January 27, 1845, son of Thomas E. and Lucy 
(Sherwin) Daniels. His grandfather, Verin Dan- 
iels, was a pioneer builder and contractor of 
Fitchburg: and his father was an inventor of note, 
originator of the Daniels planer, a machine which 
has been in constant use since its invention in 
1834. He was educated in the public schools of 
Fitchburg, and graduated from a business college. 
His active career was begun at nineteen years of 
age as clerk in the provost marshal's office in 
Greenfield. Here he was employed in 1864 
-65. For the ne.xt twenty years, from 1865 to 
1885, he was connected with the Fitchburg Rail- 
road, first as clerk in the freight ofiice, then 
freight cashier, and the latter part of this period 
as ticket and freight agent. In 1884 a fine tract 
of high land, embracing one hundred and fifty 
acres, and including what had been known as the 
Daniels farm, lying by the side of the Fitchburg 



214 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Railroad, between Fitchburg and West Fitchburg, Mutual Fire Insurance Company. Mr. Daniels 
came into his possession; and he proceeded to was married first, in 1872, to Miss Abby F. Lane, 
develop it as a manufacturing centre, subse- She died in 1879, leaving two children : Herbert 

L. and Ernest T. Daniels. He married secondly, 
in 1892, Miss Florence R. Dwinnell. They have 
a daughter, Ellen S. L)aniels. 




JOHN H. DANIELS. 

quently devoting much of his time to this enter- 
prise. He induced manufacturers to build upon 
it by giving them suitable land, opened streets 
through and across it, encouraged the building of 
dwellings, schools, and stores ; and, as a result 
of his efforts and public spirit, w'ithin a few years 
a thriving community was here established. 
Where there was not a single dwelling in 1885, 
there are now (1894) four extensive manufactories, 
employing a large number of hands, many dwell- 
ing-houses, a public and a parochial school, a 
French Catholic church, and a dozen stores. Mr. 
Daniels is especially concerned in the growth and 
welfare of Fitchburg, and in educational and re- 
ligious interests. He has been secretary of the 
Board of Trade from its reorganization in 1891, 
a trustee of the Fitchburg Savings Bank, vice- 
president of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion, and treasurer of the First Baptist Church of 
Fitchburg. He served in the Common Council 
in 1884-85, and has been a member of the 
School Board since 1888. He is a director of 
the Fidelity Co-operative Bank, the Brown Bag- 
filling Machine Company, and of the W'achusett 



DILLON, David Martin, of Fitchburg, man- 
ufacturer, was born in St. John, N.B., April 
15, 1843, son of William and Isabella (Dillon) 
Dillon. He was educated in the public schools 
of his native place. He came to the LTnited 
States when about seventeen years of age ; and 
soon after, the Civil War breaking out, he en- 
listed in the government service, and for two 
years was a most trusted workman in it. At the 
close of the war he settled in Worcester, and 
there started a steam-boiler business. After five 
prosperous years in Worcester he moved his busi- 
ness to Fitchburg, where he has since built up one 
of the most flourishing boiler manufacturing con- 
cerns in New England. To him belongs the 
credit for making the first steel boilers, which 




DAVID M. DILLON. 



placed him among the foremost of those who 
have revolutionized mechanical processes. His 
shops are models of convenience, being amply 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



'5 



equipped with the most improved tools ; and his 
manufactured goods find market in all parts of 
the United States, in South and Central America, 
Mexico, Japan, and other countries. Besides his 
extensive boiler business, he is connected with 
various other enterprises, and is concerned as 
a leader in every movement for the growth, im- 
provement, and general well-being of his city. 
He is president of the Fitchburg Real Estate As- 
sociation, which has done much to advance and 
develop suburban property ; is a director of the 
Parkhill Manufacturing Company, a director of 
the Fitchburg Co-operative Bank ; and was presi- 
dent of the Board of Trade during the year 1893. 
In fraternal societies he is prominent as a mem- 
ber of Mount RoUstone Lodge and King David 
Encampment, Order of Odd Fellows, and of Al- 
pine Lodge, Knights of Pythias. He is an hon- 
orary member of the Fitchburg Athletic Club. 
In politics he is a Republican, and is frequently 
selected to attend conventions. He has served 
two terms in the Fitchburg Board of Aldermen, 
where he was known, as in private life, as an un- 
flinching supporter of measures wliich he con- 
ceived to be right. Mr. Dillon was married June 
17, i86g, to Miss Margaret Grace Kavener. 
They have seven children : Benjamin H., Freder- 
ick N., D. Frank, Katherine Louise, Isabella 
Mary, Walter Sidney, and Herbert L. Dillon. 



alderman. In 1S94 he represented the city in 
the lower house of the Legislature, serving there 
on the committees on bills in the third readins: 



DOWD, James Joseph, of Brockton, member 
of the bar, is a native of Worcester, born July 4, 
1857, son of Charles and Mary (Reynolds) Dowd. 
His parents were born in Ireland. He attended 
the Worcester public schools, and after graduat- 
ing from the High School, class of 1877, took a 
thorough collegiate course, studying some time at 
the St. Charles College, Elicott City, Md., then 
at Holy Cross, Worcester, and finishing at St. 
Michael's College, Toronto, Can., where he grad- 
uated in the class of 1880. He studied law in 
Worcester, and was admitted to the bar there 
September 20, 1882. While engaged in practice, 
he had a brief experience as an editor of a weekly 
paper, the Saturday Democrat of Worcester, 
which flourished for a few short months, from 
February to May, 1884. He remained in Worces- 
ter until September 25, i886, when he moved 
his law business to Brockton, where he has since 
been established. He early took an interest in 
affairs in Brockton, and in 1893 was made an 




JAMES J. DOWD. 

and on revision of corporation laws. In politics 
he has always been a Democrat. He was chair- 
man of the Brockton Democratic city committee 
in 1889, and member of the Democratic State 
central committee in 1890 and 1891. He was 
married October 14, 1885, to Miss Nellie F. 
Degan. They have one child : Agnes Dowd. 



DRAKE, Luther J., member of the Suffolk 
bar, is a native of Maine, born in the town of 
Union, October 27, 1847, son of Luther H. and 
Abigail (Davis) Drake. He is of English ances- 
try, and his great-great-grandparents were among 
the early settlers of the colonies. He was pre- 
pared for college at the Maine Wesleyan Semi- 
nary, and graduated from Bowdoin College in the 
class of 187 I. After leaving college, he engaged 
in teaching, in which he spent about two years, 
first in the Warren (Me.) .Academy, and after- 
ward in the Bridgewater (Mass.) High School, 
meantime reading law. He was admitted to the 
Massachusetts bar at New Bedford, January 12, 
1874, and began the practice of his profession in 



2l6 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Fall River, where he continued till 1880, when he 
came to Boston. Since that date he has been 
engaged in general practice at the Suffolk bar. 




L. J. DRAKE. 

During the closing period of the Civil War Mr. 
Drake was first lieutenant Company F, Twelfth 
Maine Volunteers, and served from February, 
1865, to March, 1866, commanding his company 
the last ten months of that time till the mustering 
out of the regiment. He is a Royal Arch Mason. 
In politics he is a Republican. He was married 
in October, 1876, at Fall River to Miss Ellen 
Hibbard. Thev have no children. 



DUDLEY, S.i^NFORD Harrison-, member of 
the Suffolk bar, is a native of Maine, born in 
China, January 14, 1842, son of Harrison and 
Elizabeth (Prentiss) Dudley. He is a lineal de- 
scendant of Thomas Dudley, second governor of 
the colonies of Massachusetts Bay, through his 
eldest son Samuel, who settled at Exeter, N.H. 
He lived with his parents at St. Albans, Auburn, 
and Richmond, Me., and finally came w-ith them 
to Massachusetts at the age of fifteen. He began 
his studies preparatory for college in the High 
School of Fairhaven, and afterward completed 
them under the direction of a well-known classical 



teacher in New Bedford, meanwhile teaching 
school in the country. He graduated from Har- 
vard in 1867, and from the Harvard Law School 
in 187 1, taking the several degrees of A.B., A.M., 
and LL.B. For three years after graduation from 
college he taught the classics and mathematics in 
the New Bedford High School, meanwhile read- 
ing law in the office of Eliot & Stetson, of New- 
Bedford. He was admitted to the bar immedi- 
ately after receiving his degree from the law 
school, and opened an office in Boston, also an 
office in Cambridge, where he has always resided. 
After a few years, however, he confined himself 
wholl)' to his Boston office, where he has been 
engaged in general practice ever since. He has 
never sought political office or preferment, though 
serving a single year in the city government 
where he resides, preferring to give his whole 
attention to his chosen profession. In politics 
he was originally a Republican, and is preferably 
such still, and was for many years a member of 
the local party committees, but lately has acted 
independently. In religion Mr. Dudley is a Uni- 
versalist, a member of the Universalist church at 




SANFORD H. DUDLEY. 



North Cambridge, and active in religious matters, 
both in church and Sunday-school. He has been 
president of the Uni\-ersalist Club, the representa- 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



217 



live lay organization in the State. He is also a 
member of the Cambridge CUii), the [irincipal 
social organization of his city ; is or has been 
president of the Universalist Sunday School 
Union, an organization representing all the Sun- 
day-schools of his denomination in and around 
Boston and vicinity ; has been president of the 
Sons of Maine Association in Cambridge, a social 
organization composed of natives of Maine in his 
city; is a member of the New England Historic 
Genealogical Society, and president of the Gover- 
nor Thomas Dudley Family Association, a cor- 
poration established not only for social purposes, 
but also as one of its objects for the elucidation 
of early New England history, especially as af- 
fected by the life and career of Governor Dudley 
and the lives and careers of his descendants. 
Mr. Dudley has written occasionally for the press, 
and also from time to time has made addresses 
upon historical and other topics. He was married 
April 2, 1869, at Fairhaven, to Miss Laura Nye 
Rowland, daughter of John M. Howland, of Fair- 
haven. They have three children : Laura How- 
land, Howland, and Elizabeth Prentiss Dudley. 
The son, Howland, is destined for his father's pro- 
fession. 



1888. In politics he is a Democrat. He was 
married June 8, 1S64, to Miss Kate R. Adams, 
of ISrighton, daughter of [oel C. and Lucinda O. 



DUNCKLEE, Joshua Sears, of Boston, chair- 
man of the Board of Assessors, is a native of 
Brighton, born September 4, 1840, son of John 
and Harriet (Gilmore) Duncklee. He was edu- 
cated in the Brighton public schools. At the age 
of seventeen he entered the employ of Otis Nor- 
cross & Co., Boston, to learn the crockery ware 
business, and was engaged here till September, 
1 86 1, when he enlisted in the United States 
naval service as paymaster's clerk on board the 
United States ship " Ino," with which he served 
during her first cruise. On retiring from the 
navy, he returned to Boston, and engaged in the 
wholesale grocery business, which he pursued for 
several years. He first became an assessor of 
taxes in Brighton, serving the last two years of 
its existence as an independent town (1872-73). 
After its annexation to Boston (1874) he was 
made an assistant assessor of Boston, in which 
capacity he served two years (1874-75). He was 
appointed a principal assessor in 1877, and has 
served continuously from that time, chairman of 
the board since 1893. Mr. Duncklee is a Free- 
mason, a member of the Bethesda Lodge, of 
which he was worshipful master in 1887 and 





JOSHUA S. DUNCKLEE. 



(Fuller) Adams. They have three children : 
Kate A., Helen L., and Howard S. Duncklee. 



ELDREDGE, Clarence Freeman, member of 
the SufTolk bar, was born in Dennisport, Cape 
Cod, November 14, 1862, son of James F. and 
Susan ( Wixon) Eldredge. His ancestors on both 
the paternal and maternal sides came from Eng- 
land and settled on Cape Cod, at Yarmouth. 
Thence the Eldredges went to Chatham, where 
his father was born. From Chatham his father 
early moved to Dennisport. He was educated in 
the public schools at Dennisport and at the Com- 
mercial College in Providence, R.L, from which 
he graduated in i88i. He studied law in Boston, 
beginning about September, 1881, and was ad- 
mitted to the Suffolk bar January 10, 1885. He 
began practice with his preceptor, and continued 
with him till November, 1891, when he opened 
his own office. He has since practised alone, en- 
gaged in both civil and criminal business, in 
State and United States courts, having been ad- 
mitted to the latter in May 31, 1893. Although 



2l8 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



an ardent Republican, he has held no office other Jefferson's cabinet in 1806, but declined, prefer- 
than member of the Republican ward and city ring to remain in Congress, and died suddenly in 
committee of Boston (for Ward Twenty-four) for Washington in 1808. He was educated in the 

Salem Latin School and at Harvard, where he 
was graduated in the class of 1847 ; and his law 
studies were pursued under Nathaniel J. Lord, 
then the leader of the Essex bar, and at the Har- 
vard Law School. Admitted to the bar in 1850, 
he began practice the following year in Salem. 
In 1852 he entered into partnership with J. W. 
Perry under the firm name of Perry & Endicott, 
which association continued till 1873. In 18^7 
he was made city solicitor of Salem, and served 
in this office till 1864, when his practice had be- 
come large and important, and he ranked with 
the leaders at the bar. Li 1870 he was nomi- 
nated for Congress by the Democrats of the 
Essex District, and in the State campaigns of 
1871, 1872, and 1873 he was candidate for attor- 
ney-general on the Democratic ticket. In 1873 
he was appointed to the Supreme Bench by 
(Jovernor William B. Washburn in place of Mr. 
Justice Horace Gray, then elevated to the chief 
justiceship made vacant by the death of Chief 



CLARENCE F. ELDREDGE. 

one year. He declined longer to serve, preferring 
to give his best time and attention to his varied 
and increasing professional work. He is a mem- 
ber of the Royal Arcanum, Dorchester Council, 
and of the Chickatawbut Club. He was married 
September 13, 1885, to Miss Lucie W. Nickerson. 
They have one child : Marian ^^'allace Eldredge, 
born October 29, 1887. 




F.NDICOTT, Wii.i.iAM Crowninshield, of 
Salem, member of the Esse.x bar, some time jus- 
tice of the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth 
and member of the first cabinet of President 
Cleveland, was born in Salem, November ig, 
1826, son of William Putnam and Mary (Crownin- 
shield) Endicott. On the paternal side he is a 
direct descendant of John Endicott, the first gov- 
ernor of "The Plantation in New England," and 
on the maternal side is of one of the older Mas- 
sachusetts families. His maternal grandfather, 
Jacob C-rowninshield, was a merchant of Salem, Justice Chapman. His services here covered a 
member of Congress from t8o2 to 1808, was ap- period of nearly ten vears, and were highly es- 
pointed and confirmed Secretary of the Navy in teemed. Resigning in 1882, he returned to'-en- 




WM. C. ENDICOTT. 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



219 



eral practice. In 1S84 he was the Democratic 
candidate for governor of the State, and the fol- 
lowing vear was named for Secretary of War by 
President Cleveland, in which position he served 
through the four years of Mr. Cleveland's first 
administration. Originally a Whig, he has been 
a Democrat since the dissolution of the Whig 
party. Judge Endicott has been president of the 
I'eabody Academy of Science in Salem since 
1.S67 ; was president of the Esse.x Har A.ssocia- 
lion from i86g to 1873, and president of the 
Salem Bank from 1857 to 1873. In 1852 he was 
a member of the Salem Common Council and its 
president. He was the orator on the occasion of 
the celebration in 1878 of the two hundred and 
fiftieth anniversary of the landing of John Endi- 
cott ; and he has delivered numerous other occa- 
sional addresses, the list including an address on 
John Hampden and his relation to the Puritan 
movement here and in England, an address be- 
fore the Young Men's Union in Salem on patri- 
otism as bearing on the duties of a citizen, an 
address at Sterling, Mass., on the Relation of 
Agriculture to the Stability and Permanence of 
the State, and a lecture on Chivalry. Judge 
Endicott was married December 13, 1859, to 
Miss Ellen Peabody, daughter of George Pea- 
body, of Salem. They have one son and one 
daughter : William C, Jr., and Mary C. Endicott 
(now Mrs. Joseph Chamberlain, of P)irmingham, 
England). 

EVANS, Edmond Amos, of Clinton, special 
justice of the Second District Court of Eastern 
\\'orcester, is a native of Clinton, born March 2, 
1865, eldest son of Amos and Lydia G. (Bab- 
cock) Evans. His paternal grandparents were 
Amos and Catherine (Richardson) Evans, of 
Reading; and his maternal grandparents, David 
and Elizabeth (Walcott) Babcock, of Bolton. 
Amos Evans, senior, was son of Thomas, son of 
Jonathan, son of Nathaniel, son of Nathaniel, 
senior, who, with his father, Henry Evans, settled 
in Reading, where he married, previous to 1680. 
The Evans family have been well known in Read- 
ing and vicinity for over two hundred years. The 
Babcock family have lived in and have been 
identified with the history of the old town of 
Bolton for nearly as long. His education was 
attained in the public schools of Clinton, from 
which he graduated in 1882, leader in his class 
and valedictorian. Shortlv after leaving school 



he became book-keeper and confidential clerk for 
large manufacturing corporations in Clinton, and 
was afterward for five years managing clerk for 




EDMOND A. EVANS. 

Corcoran & Parker, of Clinton, one of the fore- 
most law firms of that section. Here he studied 
law, and shortly after the dissolution, by removal 
of the firm, was admitted to the bar (May 12, 
1892), and succeeded to their office and practice. 
While with Messrs. Corcoran & Parker, Mr. 
Evans assisted Judge Corcoran in liis very suc- 
cessful management as receiver of the affairs of 
the wrecked Lancaster National Bank. Subse- 
quently, in 1894, he successfully closed up the 
affairs of the Fraternal Accident Association, Im- 
proved Order of Red Men, formerly numbering 
several thousand members, having been appointed 
receiver by the Supreme Court in 1890. He has 
held and holds numerous positions of trust, while 
conducting the usual and varied practice of a 
busy lawyer. He was appointed a justice of the 
peace in 1888, notary public in 1890, master of 
chancery in 1892, and resigned the latter office to 
accept the appointment as special justice of the 
local district court in 1894. He has found little 
time to devote to politics, and has uniformly de- 
clined public olfice ; but he is interested and 
prominent in various local organizations, and is 



220 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



now treasurer of the Prescott t'lub, tlie leading 
social club of his town. Mr. Evans was married 
August 8, 1888, to Miss May L. Lyons, daughter 
of Edwin and Anne Lyons, of Ellenburgh, N.Y. 
They have three children : Mildred L. (born Jan- 
uary 17, 1890), Ralph A. (born February 16, 
1891), and Marjorie A. Evans (born September 
28, 1893). 




W. D. EWING. 

EWING, William David, of Boston, general 
superintendent of the Fitchburg Railroad system, 
is a native of Pennsylvania, born in the town of 
Indiana, January i6, 1846, son of John and Eliza- 
beth (Anthony) Ewing. He is of Scotch-Irish 
ancestry. He was educated in the common 
school and academy, and at the age of fifteen was 
a soldier in the Civil War. He enlisted first in 
the Eleventh Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Reserve Corps, served for one year, and subse- 
quently re-enlisted in other organizations, serving 
as private and first sergeant in infantry, and also 
as first lieutenant in cavalry, a total service of 
almost three years. After the war he went West, 
soon engaging in railroading in Illinois. He ad- 
vanced gradually through the lower grades on the 
Illinois Central and the Ohio and Mississippi 
Railroads, and to the position of general manager 



on the Evansville & Terre Haute Railroad. His 
service with the Fitchburg began in 1891, as as- 
sistant general superintendent; and in 1893 he 
succeeded to the position of general superintend- 
ent, which he has since held. For several years, 
and until taking position with the Fitchburg Rail- 
road, he commanded the First Regiment Infantry, 
Indiana Legion (State Militia). He is a member 
of the military orders of the Grand Army of the 
Republic and of the Loyal Legion. Mr. Ewing 
was married March 11, 1866, to Miss Emma 
Watt, of Pennsylvania. They have one son : 
John W. Ewing. 



FRENCH, Alfred Joseph, M.D., of Law- 
rence, is a native of New Hampshire, born in 
Bedford, January 16, 1823, son of Eben C. and 
Sally (Holbrookj French. Both his paternal and 
maternal grandfathers were also of l!edford. The 
former, Eben C. French, served as selectman of 
the town ; and the latter, Deacon John Holbrook, 
was in the Re\olutionary War. He was educated 
in the public schools and at the Hancock Literary 
Scientific Institution, where he spent two years. 




A. J. FRENCH. 

His medical studies were pursued in the Vermont 
Medical College, from which he graduated in 
1848. Until eighteen years of age he worked on 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



221 



the farm, and from thai time till his twenty-ninth 
year he was engaged in general study. Then he 
began the practice of his profession, first estab- 
lished in the town of Methuen, Mass. After 
seven years there he came to Lawrence, where he 
has practised continuously for thirty-five years. 
He has been interested also for a number of 
years in banking and manufacture. He started 
the Lawrence National Bank in 1873, and was 
its president for five years ; and subsequently he 
organized the Wright Manufacturing Company 
for manufacturing mohair braid, with a capital of 
si.xty thousand dollars, of which lie was president 
eight years, and one of the three owners. In pol- 
itics he is a Republican. He was a member of 
the Massachusetts Legislature in 1859, and in 
1864 filled the office of mayor of Lawrence. He 
has been for many years a member of the Massa- 
chusetts Homceopathic Society, and was its presi- 
dent in 1890. He is not a member of any secret 
society. He has been long a trustee of the First 
Baptist Church of Lawrence, and superintendent 
of the Sunday-school. He married in November 
II, 1852, Miss Sarah A. Hardy, of Antrim, N.H. 
They have had one daughter, who died at the age 
of eight. 

FULLER, Granville Austin, of Boston, lum- 
ber merchant, was born in Brighton (now Brighton 
District, Boston), March 13, 1837, son of Gran- 
ville and Rebecca (BuUard) Fuller, both originally 
of W'ellesley. He is a direct descendant of 
Thomas Fuller, who came from England and set- 
tled in Salem in 1633. He was educated in the 
Brighton public schools, and at the age of fifteen 
entered into the lumber business with his father, 
in which lie has ever since been successfully en- 
gaged, from i860 a member of the firm of G. 
Fuller & Son. He was early attached to the 
fire department, at twenty-one entering the old 
Brighton organization. He served as engineer, 
captain and member of the ''board of engineers" 
before the town was annexed to Boston, and after 
annexation as captain of Ladder No. 11, and as 
district chief, holding the latter position till 1890, 
when he resigned, his entire service having cov- 
ered a period of thirty-two years. In Brighton 
District affairs he has long been prominent, and 
he is identified with several of its institutions. 
He is a director of the National Market Bank, of 
the Citizens' Mutual Insurance Company, a trus- 
tee of the Brighton Five Cents Savings Bank, and 



member of its investment committee, and a large 
holder of Brighton real estate. He is also presi- 
dent of the New England Investment Company of 
Denver, Col. In'politics he is an earnest Repub- 
lican, always upholding the principles of his 
party; and in State and municipal affairs it is his 
custom to consider questions as they arise from 
a business man's point of view. In the autumn 
campaign of 1892 he was nominated by the Re- 
publicans of the Twenty-fifth Suffolk District for 
the House of Representatives, and was elected 
by a good vote, although the district is strongly 




GRANVILLE A. FULLER. 

Democratic. In his first term (Legislature of 
1893) he served on the committees on finance 
and on expenditures, and won a reputation as a 
working member. Returned to the Legislature 
of 1894 by a largely increased vote, the Speaker 
complimented him with the same assignments 
that he had had the previous year, — on the 
finance and expenditures committees, — and made 
him also a member of the important committee on 
taxation. Not a debater, his service w-as most 
valuable and infiuential in the committee rooms, 
where much of the most important work is done 
and measures are formulated. In the agitation 
for rapid transit between Boston and its surround- 
ing suburbs he has been untiring in his efforts 



222 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



to obtain recognition for the Brighton District in 
the several schemes before the Legislature ; and 
solely through his exertion provision for a line to 
this district was inserted in the so-called Meigs 
Elevated Railroad bill which passed the Legisla- 
ture in 1894. In the Masonic fraternity Mr. 
Fuller is prominent in connection with Kethesda 
Lodge of the Brighton District: and in religious 
matters he is identified with the Brighton Con- 
gregational church. He was married on the ist 
of January, i860, to Miss Roselle S. Henderson, 
of St. George, Me. They have had five children, 
four of whom are now living : Herbert A., Will 
S., Ethel L., and Granville Norton Fuller. 



(iAUSS, John Dennis Hammond, of Salem, 
editor of the Ol>sen<cr, is a native of Salem, born 
January 4, 1S61, son of Stephen and Rebecca 
Gray (Cross) Gauss. He was educated in the 
Salem public schools. When fourteen years of 
age, in November, 1875, he entered tiie ofiice of 
the Salem Ohscnrr (founded in 1823) as boy; 
and he has since spent every day of his working 




J. D. H. GAUSS. 



life there, advancing through the several grades 
to editor and proprietor of the paper. He is now 
a member of the firm of Newcomb & Gauss, pub- 



lishers of the Ohsenri; and conductors of the 
largest job printing-office in Essex County. He 
is president of the Salem Press Club. In politics 
Mr. Gauss is a Republican, treasurer of the Re- 
publican city committee of Salem, and president 
of the Young Men's Republican Club. He was 
a member for Salem in the lower house of the 
Legislature in 1894, and member of the Salem 
School Committee in 1892, 1893, and 1894. He 
is connected with the Masonic and Odd Fellows 
orders, member of the Starr King Lodge of the 
former, and a past grand of Fraternity Lodge and 
past high priest of Salem Encampment of the 
latter. He is a member also of Naumkeag Tribe, 
Improved Order of Red Men. Mr. Gauss has 
been twice married : first, October 28, 1886, to 
Miss Jennie I. Sinclair, of Marblehead ; and 
second, September 3, 1888, to Miss Nellie Grace 
Whitcher, of Bath, N.H. He has four children : 
Stephen S., John W., Katherine F., and Grace J. 
Gauss. 

GODDARD, Warren, of Brockton, member of 
the bar, was born in North Bridgewater (now 
Brockton), October 10. 1849, son of Warren and 
Sarah (Eldridge) Goddard. His father was a 
clergyman settled in Brockton fifty years as pas- 
tor of the New Church (Swedenborgian, so called ) ; 
and his grandfather was Dr. John Goddard, of 
Portsmouth, N.H., who was elected United States 
senator before the nomination was tendered to 
Daniel Webster, but declined the honor. His 
mother's father and brothers were all master 
mariners, and one of them was for many years 
agent of the Pacific Mail Steamship Line. His 
early education was acquired in the private and 
public schools of his native place, and he gradu- 
ated from the first class ever graduating from its 
High School, as valedictorian. He was in the 
class of 1871 at Darmouth College, but, owing to 
illness, did not there complete his course. In 
consequence of private studies, however, he was 
accorded the degree of A.M. at or soon after the 
time his class graduated. Subsequently he grad- 
uated from the New Church Theological School, 
and preached acceptably in Brookline and in 
Providence, R.I. ; but, having always preferred 
the law as a vocation and being only temporarily 
turned aside therefrom by prejudices of friends, 
he soon took up legal studies with city solicitor 
Nicholas Van Slyck, of Providence, and thereby 
returned to the profession of his first love. While 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



223 



a student in the law office of Colonel Van Slyck, Brockton, of the Knights Templar in Free 
he prepared the material for a complete Index- Masonry, and of various social and religious 
digest of the Rhode Island Reports, which he clubs. He was married October 9, 1873, in 

Brookline, to Miss Alice Clark Wellington. 

Their children are : Langdon, Edith, Arthur E., 

Mary E., Margaret, Warren, Alice W., and 

Miriam L. Goddard. 




WARREN GODDARD. 

left with Colonel Van Slyck on his removal to 
Massachusetts, which took place on the death of 
his father, he being executor of the latter's will. 
He was admitted to the Rhode Island bar March 
9, 1889, and to the Plymouth County bar in May, 
1890. In the latter year he formed a law copart- 
nership with the Hon. Jonathan White, of Brock- 
ton, and has since enjoyed a good and steadily 
increasing business. For two years and a half he 
served as clerk of the Police Court of Brockton, 
and then resigned the office to devote his whole 
time to his law business. During his term as 
clerk the controller of accounts pronounced his 
office one of the best in the Commonwealth. Mr. 
Goddard was a member of the School Committee 
in Brookline from 1874 to 1882, and during that 
time was secretary of the board and chairman 
of the committees on evening school and on 
teachers. In Brockton he is now a member of the 
School Committee and chairman of its commit- 
tee on salaries. In politics he is a Republican. 
He was the Republican candidate for mayor of 
Brockton in December, 1893, but was defeated. 
He is a member of the Commercial Club of 



GOODRICH, Henry Auc.ustu.s, of Fitch- 
burg, merchant, is a native of Fitchburg, born 
November 22, 1830, son of John and Mary .\. 
(Blake) Goodrich. He is a descendant of Will- 
iam Goodrich, who came from England and 
settled in Watertown in 1634. He was educated 
in the public schools of Fitchburg, including the 
High School, and at the Fitchburg Academy. In 
1855 he started in business for himself, opening 
a men's furnishing store in the Fitchburg Hotel 
Block. Some years after he established a large 
clothing store in Belding & Dickinson's Block, 
and another in Brattleboro, Vt. ; and in 1886 
leased the extensive store in Dickinson's Block 
which he has since occupied, now one of the 
largest and best equipped establishments of the 
kind in New England. He has been interested 
also in numerous other enterprises, and has been 
prominent in movements for the benefit of his 
native city. At one time he owned a half-interest 
in the fine block Nos. 150 to 156 Main Street. 
In 1886 he purchased the American House prop- 
erty, which he owned for about six years, and sub- 
sequently erected two large business blocks on 
Day Street, one of which is known as the •' Good- 
rich Block." He afterwards became interested 
in the Haskins Steam Engine Company, which 
proved an unfortunate investment. He was 
prominent in the establishment of the Fitchburg 
Board of Trade, and is still one of its vice-presi- 
dents ; was at one time president of the Mer- 
chants' Association ; has been president of the 
Wachusett Mutual Fire Insurance Company since 
its incorporation ; was president of the American 
Printing Company ; and is now a trustee of the 
Worcester North Savings Institution. He has 
been president also of the Massachusetts Mutual 
Aid Society, and many years a trustee of the 
P"itchburg Public Library. During the Civil War 
he was treasurer of the Fitchburg bounty fund, 
and was subsequently sent by the town to look 
after the disabled soldiers in the hospitals at 
Washington and Fredericksburg. In 1870 and 



224 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



187 I lie represented Fitchburg in the Legislature, 
an active and influential member in both sessions. 
In politics he is an ardent Republican, but al\va\-s 




HENRY A. GOODRICH. 

courteous to those differing from him politically. 
He was chosen elector for the Fourth District in 
the presidential election of 1892. running largely 
ahead of the party ticket : and was the Republican 
candidate for mayor of Fitchburg at the municipal 
election of 1893, but was defeated through a di- 
vision in the party. In addition to his active 
business career Mr. Goodrich has given consider- 
able attention to literary pursuits. He is a clear 
and forcible writer and an entertaining after- 
dinner speaker. He was married in December, 
1856, to Miss Harriet Stebbins, of Vernon, Vt. 
They have a daughter living, now Mrs. VV. L. 
Humes. Their only son, William Henry, a young 
man of great promise, died on the 24th of March, 
1894. He was in his senior year at Tufts, where 
he was greatly esteemed by his college associates. 
In its notice of his death the college paper, the 
Tufhmian, referred to him as " in the forefront of 
leaders . . . directing the activities of college life " 
at many points, adding that "he held many im- 
portant offices with honor," and "his conduct was 
always true to the highest ideals of college gov- 
ernment." 



GRAY, Robert Smith, of W'alpole, manufact- 
urer, is a native of Walpole, born September 28, 
1847, son of Smith and Eleanor MacKay (Kearns) 
Gray. His father was born in Beverly, Yorkshire, 
England, and his mother in Walpole. He was 
educated in the common schools of Walpole, at 
the West Newton English and Classical School, 
and at the Friends' Academy in New Bedford, 
with a special course in laboratory at the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology in chemistry. 
Soon after leaving school, he entered the bleach- 
ery and dye-works of his father in \N'alpole, then, 
as now, under the firm name of S. Gray & Co. 
Subsequently he became a partner, and is now 
owner of the business, which has been established 
over fifty years. He has for a long period been 
prominent in town affairs, and has served in 
numerous offices. He is the present chairman of 
the School Board, of which he has been an effi- 
cient member for ten years. He has been a trus- 
tee of the Walpole Public Library for ten years, 
identified with its development, and has repre- 
sented the town in the lower house of the Legis- 
lature two terms (1889-90). In 1894 he was a 




ROBT. S. GRAY. 



member of the Senate for the Second Norfolk 
District, which includes U'alpole. When a mem- 
ber of the House of Representatives, he served 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



225 



both terms on the committee on ni;Tnuf;ictures: at Branford, in iSSi, he was elected principal of 
and in the Senate of 1894 he was chairman of the the High School in Leavenworth, Kan., but de- 
committee on woman suffrage and member of the clined the place. In September, 1882, he became 
committees on manufactures, taxation, and expen- 
ditures. He was also a member of tiie special 
committee on the unemployed. In politics he 
has always been a Republican. He has served 
for many years as chairman of the Republican 
town committee of Walpole, and was some time 
a member of the executive committee of the 
Home Market L'Uib, of which he has been a 
member from its establishment. He is a Mason, 
member of the Lodge of Eleusis, Boston, and 
belongs to various social clubs : and he has been 
an active member of the .\ncient and Honorable 
Artillery Company, Boston, since 1878, some time 
an officer in that organization. Mr. Gray was 
married June 23, 1880, to Miss Harriet Frances 
Robinson, of Walpole. They have three chil- 
dren : John Merrick, Eleanor, and Barbara Gray. 



HATCH, William Edwin, of New Bedford, 
superintendent of the public schools, is a native 
of Georgia, born in Jeffersonville, Twiggs County, 
June 8, 1852, son of Samuel W. and Melinda M. 
(Decker) Hatch. He is of English-Scotch de- 
scent. On the paternal side he is descended 
from the Hatches of Cape Cod, among the early 
settlers of that region who came from England, 
and on the maternal side from the Maxwells of 
Scotland, a branch of which settled in Maine. 
His father's ancestors emigrated from Cape Cod 
to Maine, purchasing large tracts of land there, 
at a very early period in the history of Maine. 
He was educated until thirteen years of age in 
academies in Georgia. Then, coming North in 
1865, he attended the High School at Brunswick, 
Me., and fitted for college there. He graduated 
from Bowdoin in the class of 1875, and took his 
degree of A.M. at the same institution in 1878. 
Before entering college, he attended a commercial 
school ; and during the whole of his college course 
he was connected with the civil engineering de- 
partment of the Maine Central Railroad. He 
began teaching the year of his graduation. After 
an e.xperience of one term as a teacher in the 
Milton Mills High School, he was made principal 
of the High School at Branford, Conn., and super- 
intendent of the elementary schools. Here he 
remained from 1876 to 1882, two years of this 
time also reading law in New Haven. A\'hile 




WM. E. HATCH. 

superintendent of the public schools of Milford, 
Mass., and served in that office till July, 1885, 
when he was called to Haverhill in the same 
capacity. He was called from Haverhill to New 
Bedford in 1888, beginning his service as super- 
intendent of its public schools in February of that 
year. Mr. Hatch was president of the New Eng- 
land Association of School Superintendents in 
1887 and chairman of the executive committee in 
1894; has been vice-president of the American 
Institute of Instruction since 1885 ; and was as- 
sistant secretary of the Massachusetts Teachers' 
Association in 1894. He is a member of the 
Dartmouth and \\'amsutta clubs of New Bedford, 
of the University Club, Boston, and of numerous 
literary, professional, and charitable organiza- 
tions, in many of which he is also an officer. He 
was married December 28, 1882, to Mrs. Emily 
N. Mabbatt. They have one child : Frank Norton 
Hatch. 

HAYES, Norman Paris, of New Bedford, 
hardware merchant, is a native of New Hamp- 
shire, born in Rochester, July 9, 1849, son of 



226 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Watson and Joanna ( W'inckley) Hayes. His par- 
ents were also natives of New Hampshire, his 
father born in Rochester, and his mother in Bar- 




and addresses, which was described in the local 
press as " the most successful patriotic demon- 
stration of a public character ever made under 
private auspices " in the city. This was the first 
raising in the country of a flag on private property 
for a private citizen by the Grand Army of the 
Republic. In politics Mr. Hayes is an Indepen- 
dent Republican. He is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity, and of the Wamsutta and Dartmouth 
clubs of New Bedford. He was married in 187 i 
to Miss Rebecca I. Thompson, of Boston, and 
their children are: Grenville H., Orrill H., Bessie, 
and Clinton N. Hayes. 



HOLDKN, Joshua Bennett, of Boston, is a 
native of W'oburn, born March 5, 1850, son of 
George and Ellen (Bennett) Holden. He is a 
grandson of Joshua ISennett, formerly an active, 
energetic, and influential business man of Middle- 
sex County, well known in financial and real es- 
tate circles, and an extensive real estate owner in 
Boston and Lowell. He was educated in the 
Chauncy Hall .School, Boston, the Pierce Acad- 



NORMAN p. HAYES. 

rington. His education was acquired in the 
Rochester public schools and at Phillips (An- 
dover) Academy ; and his business training was 
begun in his father's country and general mer- 
chandise store in Rochester. After some time 
spent here as clerk, he was employed in a whole- 
sale house in Boston, and from there went to 
Dover, N.H., where he was for seven years en- 
gaged in the general hardware business. He 
came to New Bedford in 1880, and bought out an 
old established hardware, iron, and cutlery busi- 
ness, which was the foundation of his present ex- 
tensive establislunent, now the leading one of its 
kind in New Bedford, fully occupying the large, 
three-story brick structure known as the .\ndrews 
Building, on the corner of \\'illiam Street and 
.■Vcushnet Avenue, and carrying a large and me- 
thodically arranged stock of general hardware, cut- 
lery, iron, steel, mill supplies, and farm tools. In 
May, 1894, Mr. Hayes caused the United States 
flag formally to be raised as a permanent fixture 
over his building by the local Grand Army posts, emy, Middieborough, and Tufts College ; and 
with fitting ceremonies, including a street parade studied law at the Harvard Law School, from 
of veterans, and public meetings, with an oration which he graduated in 1S70. After graduation 




JOSHUA B. HOLDEN. 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



227 



he was some time in tlie law office of Judge Will- 
iam A. Richardson and Judge George White, and 
subsequently entered the office of his father as an 
associate with him in the care of his real estate 
and that belonging to the estate of Joshua Ben- 
nett. He is now attorney for the estates of 
Joshua Dennett and of George Holden, and a 
member of the Boston Real Estate Exchange. In 
politics he is a Republican, and has represented 
the Back Bay ward in the Boston Common Coun- 
cil two terms (1893-94). He is a fine member 
of the First Corps of Cadets, a member of the 
Art, Athletic, Middlesex, and Episcopalian clubs 
of lioston, of the Beacon Society, and of the Bos- 
ton Young Men's Christian Union. He was mar- 
ried November 2, 1870, to Miss Ida L. Moulton. 
They have six children : Joshua Bennett, Jr., 
Annie E., Mary B., Natalie F., Gladys E., and 
Gwendolyn M. Holden. Mr. Holden resides on 
the Back Bay, Boston, and has an extensive place 
in Billerica, — the Joshua Bennett homestead, — 
which he has recently improved, remodelling and 
enlarging the house, adding new outbuildings and 
beautifying the grounds. In Billerica he is trus- 
tee of the Bennett Library and of the Unitarian 
church fund. 

HtK)D, Gilbert Edwin, of Lawrence, mem- 
ber of the bar, is a native of Vermont, born in the 
town of Chelsea, November 21, 1824, son of Har- 
vey and Rebecca (Smith) Hood. His education 
was acquired in the district and private schools of 
his native town, at Randolph Academy (one 
term), Thetford Academy (one year), and Dart- 
mouth College, graduating from the latter in the 
class of 1 85 1. From his eighteenth year till his 
graduation from college he taught school winters. 
For three years he was associate principal at 
Thetford Academy, and principal for four years. 
He was admitted to the bar at Boston in 1855, 
and began practice in Lawrence in 1859. From 
that time Lawrence has been his home, and he 
has been identified during his entire residence 
there with its best interests. For twelve years, 
from 1865 to 1877, he was superintendent of the 
public schools. From 188 1 to 1891 he was presi- 
dent of the Lawrence Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation ; and he has been president of the Law- 
rence City Mission since 1866. He is also a 
member of the executive committee of the Massa- 
chusetts Home Missionary Society. He belongs 
to the Congregational church, and has been one 



of the deacons of the church since he first came 
to Lawrence. He has been treasurer of the 
Broadway Savings Bank of Lawrence since 1877. 




G. E. HOOD. 

He has held various other offices for short pe- 
riods, but has never sought place. His object in 
life has been to render service, not to seek ser- 
vice from others. Mr. Hood was married May 
13, 1852, to Miss Frances ElizalDeth Herrick, of 
Peabody. They have no children. 



HUTCHINSON, George, of Boston, boot and 
shoe merchant, is a native of Worcester, born 
September 16, 1852, son of .Andrew and Harriet 
W. (Fales) Hutchinson. He attended the public 
schools of Worcester and Groton only until he was 
thirteen years old ; but he has acquired a liberal 
education through observ'ation, commercial study, 
and hard work. His entrance into business life 
was in September, 1865, as a cash boy in the 
store of Jordan, Marsh & Co., Boston. He re- 
mained in that establishment four years, working 
up to the position of salesman. In 1869 he en- 
tered the shoe business, and began travelling on 
the road as a shoe salesman. In this occupation 
he was engaged very successfully for eleven years, 
representing during this period the Boston firms 



228 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



of E. L. Spragiie iV Co. and 15. N. Jiradt ^r Co.. (Fuller) Janes. His parents were \\"estern Mas- 
and T:iines I'helan of Lynn. From 1891 to 1892 sachusetts folk, his father born in Hrimfield, and 
he was salesman and l)uyer in the e.xtensive shoe his mother in Wales. The first Janes (as the 

name was originally spelled) known in America 
came in 1647 in the ship "Hector," landing in 
Boston, and afterwards joined the colonists who 
first settled New Haven, Conn. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools, graduatfng from the 
Eaton School, the first public school in New 
Haven. He first entered the drug business in 
New Haven, serving an apprenticeship of two 
years, from i860, with Alfred Daggett, Jr. Then 
he was a year with C. B. Whittlesy, also of New 
Haven, and another year in the wholesale trade 
in New York with James S. .\spinwall. After 
this training in both retail and wholesale 
branches, he took up travelling, and for twenty- 
one years was engaged in selling to the drug 
trade all over the country. For two years previ- 
ous to leaving the road he was also in business 
for himself, having purchased a drug store in 
Boston in 1882, at the corner of Washington and 
Warrenton Streets. After his retirement from 
travelling he increased this business, and pur- 




GEO. HUTCHINSON. 



jobbing house of Batchelder & Lincoln, Boston ; 
and in 1892 he joined in the establishment of the 
new and highly successful wholesale boot, shoe, 
and rubber house of the Clark-Hutchinson Com- 
pany, Nos. Ill to 1 1 s Federal Street, Boston, of 
which he has since been treasurer. At the 
World's Fair of 1893 in Chicago he was the only 
judge in the department of rubber boots and 
shoes. Mr. Hutchinson is a member of the Bos- 
ton Boot and Shoe Club, and is always active in 
movements for the benefit of the trade in which 
he is engaged. In religious faith he is a Unita- 
rian, and is connected with local Unitarian organ- 
izations. He is a director of the Boston Young 
Men's Christian Union, a member and past treas- 
urer of the Channing Club, and member of the 
Unitarian Club. He was married in Boston 
July s, 1881, to Miss Eliza Maynard Clark, of 
Boston. They have one child : Mavnard Clark 
Hutchinson. 




'Cy 



C. p. JAYNES. 



JAYNES, Charle,s Porter, of Boston, drug- chased the store on the corner of Harrison Ave- 
gist, is a native of Connecticut, born Novem- nue and Beach Street. Subsequentlv, in July, 
ber 13, 1845, son of William C. and Adelpha 1S87, he bought out the store on the corner of 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



229 



Washington and lianover Streets, and added 
that to his business. In March, 1892, he bought 
out the store of I. Bartlett Patten at the corner of 
Beach Street and Harrison Avenue, and merged it 
into his Beach Street store. He still continues 
his interest in the three establishments, conduct- 
ing one of the most extensive businesses in his 
line in this country. He is a member of the Ma- 
sonic and Odd Fellows orders, of the Knights of 
Honor, of the Boston Athletic Club, and of the 
( )ld Dorchester Club, Dorchester District, where 
he resides. In politics he is a Republican. He 
was married November 27, 1867, to Miss Ella F. 
Janes, of Boston. They have had four children, 
of whom two only are now living: H. Amy and 
Charles W. Jaynes. 




E. M. JOHNSON. 

JOHNSON. EucENK Malcom, member of the 
Suffolk bar, was born in Boston, June 4, 1845, 
son of George L. and Sarah (Osgood) Johnson. 
He was educated in the public schools of Lynn 
and at Harvard, where he graduated in the class 
of i86g. His law studies were pursued in the 
Albany Law School, and in March, 187 1, he was 
admitted to the bar. He began practice in Bos- 
ton in association with Everett C. Bumpus. This 
relation continued until 1885, since which time he 



has been alone, engaged in general law practice. 
In politics he is Independent. He was married 
December 25, 1872, to Miss Norah J. Brown, 
daughter of Dexter and Jane W. (Shaw) Brown. 
She died on the ist of August, 1891. He has 
no children. 



JONES, BRAnroRD Eijot, of Brockton, mer- 
chant, was born in North Bridgewater (now 
Brockton), September 22, 1840, son of Rosseter 
and Hannah (Marshall) Jones. He was educated 
in the public schools of his native town and at the 
North Bridgewater Academy. He entered the 
dry-goods store of Charles Curtis when a lad of 
seventeen, and has been in that business ever 
since. After nearly four years" experience in Mr. 
Curtis's store he started in the business for him- 
self, opening a store in Provincetown in 1864. 
He remained there till 1867, when he returned to 
North Bridgewater, and organized the house of 
Jones, Lovell &: Sanford, buying out the business 
of Brett Brothers, which had been long estab- 
lished. This copartnership held about three 
years, when Mr. Sanford retired, after which the 
remaining partners continued the business under 




BRADFORD E. JONES. 



the firm name of Jones & Lovell till May, 1875. 
I'hen Mr. Jones retired, and purchased the dry- 



2 30 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



goods business of H. H. Packard, which he is 
now operating with Robert Cook, under the firm 
name of li. E. Jones & Co. He is also connected 
with local banking institutions, serving as presi- 
dent of the Security Co-operative Bank, vice- 
president and one of the investment committee of 
the Hrockton Savings Bank, and director of the 
Home National Bank. In 1882 he was elected 
an alderman in the first city government of Brock- 
ton, and he also served in that board in 1890 and 
189 1. He was commissioned a justice of the 
peace by Governor Ames in 1889. Mr. Jones 
has uniformly been a large holder in real estate in 
Brockton, and a firm believer in the future pros- 
perity of the city. He is a member of the Paul 
Revere Lodge of Masons, and has been the treas- 
urer of the lodge since 1875, a member of Sa- 
tucket Royal Arch Chapter, and treasurer of the 
Brockton Masonic Benefit Association. He was 
married in Provincetown, September 21, 1862, to 
Miss Kate Maria Paine, daughter of Dr. Stephen 
Atkins and Catherine M. \V. (Brackett) Paine. 
They have had two children : Kitty Paine and 
Stephen Rosseter Jones. 



England agent in the New York Associated Press 
office. After an experience there of about a year 
and a half, he returned to the Repiiblkan office as 
assistant night editor, which position he retained 
from October, 187 i, to May, 1872. The succeed- 
ing six months he was with the Taunton Gazette, 
and then in February, 1873, he purchased a half- 
interest in the Fitchburg Sentinel, and became the 
editor of the paper, in May, that year, bringing 
out the daily edition, which he has since con- 
ducted. In politics he is Republican. He has 
repeatedly been sought for public place, but until 



KELLOGG, John Edw.^rp, of Fitchburg. edi- 
tor of the Sentinel, daily and weekly, is a native 
of Amherst, born July 2, 1845, son of Eleazer 
and Sally McCloud (Roberts) Kellogg. He is a 
lineal descendant of Joseph Kellogg, of Hadley, 
as early as 1662, who died there in 1707. His 
father, Eleazer, was son of John, who was son of 
Ephraim, who was son of Ephraim, who was son 
of Nathaniel (died in Amherst, October 30, 1750, 
aged eighty), who was son of Joseph. The latter 
had twenty children. John E. was educated in 
the public schools and the academy at Amherst, 
at Williston Seminary, Easthampton (graduated 
there in 1865), and at Amherst College, where 
he was graduated in 1869. In college he was 
devoted to athletics, and was catcher of the col- 
lege base-ball club in every game played during 
his four years' course. He began journalistic 
work while a student as correspondent and re- 
porter for several newspapers ; and the day follow- 
ing his class day, in June, 1869, he entered the 
office of the Springfield Republican, where he re- 
ceived an excellent training for his profession. 
Starting as " copy-holder," he soon became a 
regular reporter, in which capacity he continued 
until May, 1870, when he became assistant New 




J. E. KELLOGG. 

1893 refused to be considered as candidate for 
any office, devoting all his time to his paper. 
That year he accepted a nomination to the Legis- 
lature, — the second offered, the first, which he 
declined, having been oft^ered in 1885, — and 
served in the house of 1894. He was a member 
of the committee on manufactures, and was es- 
pecially interested in the establishment of addi- 
tional State normal schools. He was clerk of 
the Fitchburg Common Council for nine years 
(1880-89) ^f'd a member of the School Commit- 
tee for three years (1887-89). He has been a di- 
rector of the Fidelity Co-operative Bank of Fitch- 
burg since its organization. He is connected with 
the order of Odd I'"ello\vs, belonging to the local 



MKN OF PROGRESS. 



23' 



Apollo Lodge, and is a member of the Park and 
Athletic clubs of Fitchburg, of the Middlesex and 
the Home Market clubs of Boston, and of the 
Republican Club of Massachusetts. He is un- 
married. 



KEMPTON, David B.^tchelder, of New Bed- 
ford, merchant, is a native of New Bedford, born 
April 25, i8i8, son of David Kempton, 2d, and 
Joanna (Maxfield) Kempton. He is a direct de- 
scendant of Mannasses Kempton, one of the first 
settlers of the township of Dartmouth. His 
father was a farmer. He attended the New Bed- 
ford public schools until he reached the age of 
twelve years, at which time, his parents having 
died, he went to live with his father's brother, 
Kphraim Kempton, and to learn from him the 
house carpenter's trade. He remained with his 
uncle from that time until he attained his major- 
ity, after which he worked at his trade for 
twelve years, ten years of this time doing busi- 
ness on his own account. He then became 
an agent or managing owner of whaling ves- 
sels, and continued in this business until 1877, 
a period of more than a quarter of a century. 
That year he visited the countries of the Old 
World, travelling extensively over Europe as far 
East as Constantinople, and visiting the Holy 
Land. Previously, he was connected with the 
New Bedford Flour Mill as director and presi- 
dent until the destruction of the mill by fire, 
September 13, 1870. He is now president of the 
Pope's Island Manufacturing Corporation, a di- 
rector of the Citizens' National Bank, a director 
of the New Bedford Gas and Edison Light Com- 
pany, and active in other business ventures. He 
has served his city in various positions long and 
well. He was a member of the City Council in 
1864-65-66, and the latter year, at the beginning 
of the construction of the New Bedford Water 
Works, was elected to the Water Board, with 
William W. Crapo and Warren Ladd as associate 
members. In this capacity he has served for 
about twenty-one years, and is still a member of 
the board. He was warden of Ward Five, New 
Bedford, in 1875-76-77. In 1889 and 1890 he 
represented the city in the Legislature. Mr. 
Kempton was first married, in 1842, to Miss 
Sarah Bates Lindsey, daughter of the late Benja- 
min Lindsey, senior, editor of the New Bedford 
Mcreiir\\ by whom he had one son, Frank H. 



Kempton, now living. He married again, in 
1879, Miss Susan H. Jennings, daughter of Dr. 
J. H. Jennings. His residence on the corner of 
County and North Streets, New Bedford, is on 
the spot which has been occupied by the Kemp- 
tons for a period of two hundred and forty years. 
The land was originally bought of the Indians, as 
appears by a deed dated New Plymouth, Novem- 
ber 29, 1652, when the whole township of Dart- 
mouth was sold by \\'esamequen and his son, 
\\'amsutta, to John Cook and others. The name 
of Mr. Kempton's ancestor, Mannasses Kempton, 



*#5fe 




DAVID B. KEMPTON. 

there appears as one of the purchasers. It was 
bought in "34 whole parts and no more," in the 
language of the deed ; and parts of this property 
have remained in the family ever since, trans- 
mitted to the heirs by the division of the probate 
courts. There are several pieces of property in 
Mr. Kempton's possession which, up to this time, 
have never been deeded. His grandmother, 
Elizabeth Kempton, lived on the old place which 
he now occupies about eighty years, and died 
there in 1848, at the advanced age of ninety- 
seven. His grandfather, Ephraim Kempton, 2d, 
died January 25, 1802, aged fifty-five. They were 
buried at the old burial-ground near the head of 
the river. 



232 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



KIMBALL, Orrin Ahnf.r, of Boston, piano 
manufacturer, is a native of New Hampshire, 
born in Hanover, March 25, 1844, son of Jere- 




tion witli the Emerson works their output has 
steadily increased. In 1891 the present factory, 
on tiie corner of Harrison Avenue and Waltham 
Street, covering twenty-three thousand square feet, 
and rising six and seven stories, was erected, Mr. 
Kimball having full charge of the building and 
equipping of the entire plant, which is one of the 
finest and most thoroughly equipped in the world. 
It has a capacity of about one hundred and fifty 
pianos a week. In politics Mr. Kimball is a 
steadfast Republican. He was married May 11, 
1864, to Miss Helen M. Butler, of Brattleboro, 
Vt. They have had two children : William S. 
(aged twenty-two years), Mabel .\. Kimball (aged 
twenty), both living. Mr. Kimball has a pretty 
city residence at No. 476 Warren Street, Boston, 
and a farm at North Hinsdale, N.H., where 
his family spend their summers. 



KNOWLES, Morris, of Lawrence, builder of 
famous Lawrence mills, was born in New Hamp- 
shire, in the town of Northwood, Eebruary 6, 
18 10, son of Morris and Polly (C'averlyj Knowles. 



O. A. KIMBALL. 

miah and Elsie (Judkins) Kimball. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Hanover. At 
seventeen he enlisted — October 10, 1861 — in 
Company B, Si.xth Vermont Volunteers, and 
served three years in the old Vermont Brigade. 
He began business life in his native town, in the 
furniture trade, and from 1864 to 1866 was of the 
firm of Nichols & Kimball. Leaving this busi- 
ness the latter year, he went to Brattleboro, Vt., 
to work for the Estey Organ Company. From 
Brattleboro he came to Boston in ICS72, and en- 
gaged with the Emerson Piano Company. Soon 
after he was placed in full charge of the finishing 
department of the works, and this position he 
held until the purchase of the plant in 1879 by 
the present Emerson Piano Company, which con- 
sists of himself, P. H. Powers, and Joseph 
(jramer. Since the reorganization in 1879 he has 
held the position of treasurer and general super- 
intendent of the factor)', purchasing all the mate- 
rials, besides doing much of the travelling, estab- 
lishing, and looking after the agents, etc., of the 
company. He is thoroughly familiar with all the 
details of piamvmaking ; and during his connec- 




MORRIS KNOWLES. 



He is of English ancestry on both sides. His 
maternal grandfather and grandmother came to 
North Hill, now North Hampton, N.H., and 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



233 



from thcrtj went to Xortliwood, wlicrc his mother 
was born. His father was also a native of North- 
wood. Both spent their lives in Northwood, the 
father dying in 1834, at the age of fifty-five, and 
the mother in 1859, at the age of seventy-nine 
vears. His school training was limited to the 
district school. At the age of seventeen he was 
apprenticed to learn the carpenter's trade, and he 
served until he attained his majority. Then, in 
.\pril, 1 83 1, he came to Lowell, Mass., where he 
engaged himself to Joseph M. Dodge, who had 
just begun the building of the Tremont and Suf- 
folk Mills. In a few years he became foreman, 
and in 1843 a partner in the business. This as- 
sociation continued until 1847, when, in April, he 
went to the " New City," so called, now the city 
of Lawrence, under an engagement with Charles 
S. Storrow. then of the Esse,\ Company, to build 
the Atlantic Mills and Machine Shop, now the 
Everett Mills, by contract. These buildings were 
finished in 1849, and in 1850 he built No. 3 Mill 
for the Atlantic Company. In 1852 he took the 
contract to build the Pacific Mills and Print 
Works and other buildings connected with them. 
These were completed in 1854. From that time 
till 1870 he was engaged in building other mills 
in Lawrence, churches, and various other build- 
ings, and in contracting. In 1870 he was elected 
one of the three commissioners to build the Law- 
rence Water Works for a term of three years, and 
during that period devoted much time to this 
work. In 1875 he began building mills for the 
Arlington Company. He continued in business 
until 1885, when he retired with a competence 
and an honorable record. He has spent most of 
his time since in travelling. Mr. Knowles has 
served his city in the State Legislature, and in 
the municipal government of Lawrence, and has 
long been counted among its influential citizens. 
He was a member of the House of Representa- 
tives in 1850-51, and of the Lawrence Board of 
Aldermen in 1861 and 1863. In politics he is, 
and always has been since the formation of the 
party, a Republican. He was married in January, 
1836, at Pittsfield, N.H., to Miss Sarah Green. 
They have had four children: Emily A. (now 
Mrs. C. W. Hanson), Charles E., George A., and 
Clara B. Knowles (now Mrs. C. H. Smith). 



born in .\lfred, York County, September 19, 1861, 
son of George Henry and Mary Abby (Pilsbury) 
Knowlton. He is of Scotch-English descent. 
His ancestors on the paternal side were early 
shipmasters at Portsmouth, N.H., and ancestors 
on his mother's side figured in the Revolution. 
His father was editor of the Portland Press in 
1870-71. His early education was acquired in 
Biddeford, Me., schools, where he graduated from 
the High School in 1878. He was fitted for col- 
lege at Phillips ( Andover) .\cademy in the class 
of 1879; and his collegiate training was at Yale, 
where he graduated in the class of 1883. He 




KNOWLTON, D.A.NIEL Stimson, president of 
the Boston Times Company, is a native of Maine. 



D. S. KNOWLTON^ 

was engaged in fugitive newspaper work while a 
student in college, and soon after graduation ob- 
tained employment on the New Haven Register, 
where he remained about a year (1884-85), doing 
general editorial and "desk" work. In June, 
1885, he came to Boston, and took charge of the 
Sunday Times, having purchased the property. 
Three years later the Times was made a corpora- 
tion under Massachusetts laws, with Mr. Knowl- 
ton as president ; and he has continued since as 
the head of the " Boston Times Company,'' as well 
as editor and manager of the paper. In March, 
1894, he became private secretary to the Hon. 
Winslow Warren, collector of the port of Boston, 



2 34 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



resigning the editorship of tiie Tiiiirs, but retaining 
the controlling interest in the property. He is 
a member of the Psi Upsilon college fraternity, of 
the Boston Press Club (at one time its treasurer), 
and of the Newspaper Club. He is also con- 
nected with the Masonic order, being a member 
of St. Paul's Royal .'\rch Chapter, Boston. In 
politics he is Independent. Mr. Knowlton was 
married January 19, 1887, to Miss Alice Maria 
Joyce, of New Haven, Conn. They have had 
three children : George Kempton (born October 
21, 1887, died April 2, 1888), Joyce (born Feb- 
ruary 19, 1889), and Hugh Knowlton (born July 
27, 1893). He resides in Brookline. 



ests in Fitchburg^ and elsewhere, among tliem 
being the Champion Card and Paper Company of 
Pepperell. the Fitchburg and Leominster Street 



LOWE, Arthur HotioHTON, of Fitchburg, 
manufacturer, is a native of New Hampshire, born 
in Rindge, .\ugust 20, 1853, son of John and 
Sarah (Mead) Lowe. He is of English ancestry, 
descendant on the paternal side of a family early 
settled in Essex County, Mass. He was edu- 
cated in the common schools of Fitchburg, and 
trained for active life by hard work in helping his 
father support a family of seventeen children, all 
of whom are living to-day. At the age of twenty 
he became a partner of the firm of Lowe Brothers 
in the provision business, having previously had 
some e.xperience in trade with his father, who car- 
ried on a wholesale business of the same kind. 
Six years later, in 1879, in conjunction with John 
Parkhill and Thomas R. B. Dole, he established 
the Parkhill Manufacturing Company, of which he 
has since been manager and treasurer. In 1885 
he organized the Cleghorn Mills Company, acting 
as its treasurer till 1889, when it was absorbed 
with the Fitchburg Woollen Mill Company by 
the Parkhill Manufacturing Company, and sub- 
sequently became interested in the Grant Yarn 
Mills, the Fitchburg Steam Engine Company, and 
the Gas and Electric Light Company. The estab- 
lishment and rapid cjevelopment of his mills, the 
Parkhill alone early increasing from thirty looms 
at the start to many hundreds, and now the third 
largest of its kind in the country, added much to 
the prosperity of the city ; and, together with the 
location of the car shops of the Fitchburg Rail- 
road, the Orswell Mills, and the Mitchell Manufac- 
turing Company here, which Mr. Lowe was largely 
instrumental in securing, were the chief causes of 
its marked growth between the years 1880 and 
1893. Mr. Lowe has also numerous other inter- 




ARTHUR H. LOWE. 

Railway Company, and the Fitchburg National 
Bank. Of all of these corporations he is a di- 
rector, and he is a trustee of the Fitchburg Sav- 
ings Bank. He has been prominent and influen- 
tial in municipal affairs for many years, serving as 
an alderman in 1888, and as mayor in 1893, a 
year of great progress and activity. For the two 
years immediately preceding his election to the 
mayoralty, the period during which the growth of 
the city was most rapid, he was president of the 
Board of Trade. His administration as mayor 
was marked by the establishment of a new high 
school, two new fire stations, the building of five 
miles of sewers, the building of the Clarendon 
Btreet school-house, the abolition of railroad cross- 
ing at River Street, one of the main thorough- 
fares, the purchase of a site for a police station, 
and the purchase of about four hundred and fifty 
acres of land (known as the Nichols farm) for the 
Burbank Hospital site. He declined a re-election 
for a second term on account of the pressure of 
his private business. In politics Mr. Lowe is an 
active Republican, and has been a delegate to 
many conventions. He is a member and director 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



235 



of the Park Club, unci member of the Fitchburg 
Athletic Club. He was married December 11, 
1878, to Miss -Annie K. I'arkhill. They have 
three children : Russell B., Margaret, and Rachel 
P. Lowe. 

MONK, HiRA.M Ai.icxANHER, of Canipello, 
manufacturer, was born in .Stoughton, July 16, 
1829, son of Nathan and Sally (Linfield) Monk. 
He descends on both paternal and maternal sides 
from Puritan stock. His father, Nathan Monk, 
was the son of Jacob and Milly (Randall) Monk, 
and was born in Stoughton, April 6, 1797. Jacob 
Monk was the son of George and Sarah (Hixon) 
Monk, born March 9, 1773. George Monk was 
the son of Elias and Susanna (Blackman) Monk, 
born in Stoughton, February 10, 1734. The date 
of the birth of Elias Monk is not known, but he 
was taxed in Roxbury in 17 14. He was doubtless 
the son of Elias Monk, who enlisted as one of the 
quota of Dorchester for the Canada war in 1690, 
and who was contemporary with George Monk 
who was taxed in Boston in 1674, and kept the 
" Blue Anchor Tavern " near where the Traiisiript 




HIRAM A. MONK. 



Monk, the subject of this sketch, was educated in 
the public schools, and at the age of sixteen was 
actively at work in a boot and shoe shop, to 
learn the trade. Early made a foreman, he was 
engaged in this capacity for upwards of thirty. 
years, about two-thirds of this period in shoe-shops 
in Stoughton, and the remainder in Brockton, and 
tiien (in 1882) went into business for himself as a 
manufacturer of shoe heels, in which he has been 
most successful. During the latter part of the 
Civil War, from February, 1864, to July, 1865, he 
served in the Fifty-eighth Regiment, Massachu- 
setts Volunteers. He was for six years connected 
with the Brockton city council, member of the 
Common Council three terms (1882-83-84), and 
an alderman three terms (1885-86-87); and was 
four years in the State Legislature, a member of 
the lower house in 1890-91, and a senator \\\ 
1893-94, in both branches serving on important 
committees. He has also been one of the sewer- 
age commissioners of Brockton for three years. 
He belongs to a number of fraternal organiza- 
tions, and has held official position in nearly all of 
them. He was master of the St. George Lodge of 
Masons, Brockton, in 1879-80, is now commander 
in Council No. 16 American Legion of Honor, 
president of the Patriotic Order Sons of America, 
Brockton, and member of the order of Odd Fel- 
lows, the Grand Army of the Republic, the Good 
Templars, and the Brockton Educational League 
(an American order). He was married April 8, 
1853, in Stoughton, to Miss Lucinda F. Cole. 
Their children are : Mary L., Charles H., Jacob F., 
John H., Cora E., Sarah A., Nathan A., George A., 
Hattie A., and Wesley E. Monk. 



Building now stands. George Monk came from 
Essex County, England, as indicated by his will 
in the probate office, Suffolk County. Hiram \. 



MORRISON, Thom.^s Jefferson, member of 
the Suffolk bar, is a native of Connecticut, born 
in Enfield, March 15, 1841, son of John and 
Susan C. (Fowler) Morrison, of Manchester, 
N.H.; and his home was in Manchester until 
1874, when he established himself in practice at 
Boston. He was educated in the Manchester 
schools, and read law in the office of Judge Joseph 
W. Fellows of that city. Subsequently admitted 
to the bar of Hillsborough County at Amherst, 
N.H., he began the practice of his profession at 
Manchester. Soon after he was admitted to the 
United States District and Circuit Court of New 
Hampshire, and later to the Supreme Court of 
Massachusetls, the United States District Court, 



236 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



and Circuit Court of Appeals in M;issiicluisetts. 
His practice is a general one in all the courts, 
State and Federal, both at common law and in 




THOMAS J. MORRISON. 



admiralty; and he has .an extensive clientage. 
He was married in Manchester to Miss Helen E. 
Taylor, of that city. They have no children. 
His home is in Chelsea. 



MUNYAN, Jonathan, of Koston, president of 
the Goodyear Shoe Machinery Company, is a 
native of Connecticut, born in Thompson, Wind- 
ham County, March 4, 1823, son of Ezra and 
Sarah (Knap) Munyan. He is a descendant of 
Edward Munyan, who, with his wife and family 
of sons and daughters, emigrated from Leicester- 
shire, England, to Salem, Mass., in 1721, and. 
after remaining there a short time, moved up 
across the country to Connecticut, where he took 
up a section of land located on the five-mile river 
in the town now called Thompson, and spent his 
life as a farmer. Jonathan Munyan was reared on 
a farm, and educated in the common schools. At 
the age of twelve years he left home, and was 
apprenticed to learn the shoemaker's trade. He 
worked at this trade as a journeyman till he was 
twenty-three years old, and then, in 1847, began 
to manufacture boots and shoes in a small way on 



his own account at Worcester. In 1850 he gave 
up business, and spent 1851 and 1852 in Califor- 
nia. Returning to Worcester in 1853 he re-engaged 
in manufacturing boots and shoes there. In 1855 
he moved his business to Milwaukee, Wis., and 
was there engaged in the manufacturing, job- 
bing, and retailing trade till 1862. He then 
again returned to Worcester, and entered into the 
manufacture of shoes on joint account with C. D. 
and W. B. Bigelow, of New York. In 1863 the 
firm built a large factory in Worcester, into which 
his joint business went; and in 1866 the corpora- 
tion known as the Bay State Shoe & Leather 
Company was formed from this business. Mr. 
Munyan was one of the original stockholders, and 
from its organization till 1890 spent his time in a 
great measure in the management and interest of 
the company as its agent at the Worcester fac- 
tory, and as a director and vice-president. He 
was also a stockholder and director in the Com- 
monwealth Boot &: Shoe Company, established at 
Whitman, from its organization till 1892. He 
began to use the Goodyear sewing-machines at 
the Worcester factory in 1879. ihey were at 
that time far from perfected, but he became satis- 
fied in his own mind that they could be so im- 
proved that boots and shoes in large quantities 
would be made by that process in the near future ; 
and the Bay State Company was the first to make 
a success of them. In 1882 he became a stock- 
holder and a director in the Goodyear Company, 
then the Goodyear & McKay Sewing Machine 
Company, afterwards changed to the present 
name of the Goodyear Shoe Machinery Company ; 
and in 1888 was chosen to the office of president, 
which he still holds. During his connection with 
this company it has made remarkable progress, its 
machines having been brought to a high degree 
of perfection, and now stands at the head of the 
shoe machinery business in the country. In 
1887 patents for the Goodyear machinery having 
been secured in England and on the continent, 
the International Shoe Machinery Company was 
formed, with Mr. Munyan as president, to prose- 
cute the business in those countries. Its intro- 
duction being placed in his hands, he first went 
to Europe on this mission that year, and he has 
since spent from two to four months of each year 
in looking after this business. He found at the 
outset that the successful introduction of the ma- 
chines abroad would require a great change in 
the foreign method of making boots and shoes, 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



237 



and that the stroni;' prejudice against royalty ma- 
chines nuist be overcome. These and other ob- 
stacles were in time surmounted, and the nia- 




24, 1.S50, son of Isaac and Sarah ((iraves) New- 
hall. He was educated in the Lynn public 
schools and at Wesleyan .Academy, \\'ilbraham. 
After leaving the academy, he learned the shoe 
business, and from 1871 to 1882 w-as engaged in 
shoe manufacturing. .Subsequently he entered 
the real estate and insurance business, which he 
has since successfully pursued. He was also at 
one time president of the Lynn City Street Rail- 
way Company. In 1886 he became a member 
of the Lynn city government, and from that time 
has been prominent in public affairs. He was 
a member of the Common Council two terms, 
(1886-87), '"id president of the body during his 
second term ; was an alderman in 1889 and 1890 ; 
and a member of the House of Representatives 
for the city of Lynn in 1894, serving on the com- 
mittees on cities and on constitutional amendment. 
He is also prominently connected with numer- 
ous fraternal organizations, — the Odd Fellows, 
Knights of Pythias, the Royal Arcanum, and the 
order of Red Men. He is a trustee of the East 
Lynn Lodge of Odd Fellows, and has held other 
offices in the lodge ; a past regent of the Glen 



JONA, MUNYAN. 

chines put in operation to a large e.xtent. By his 
connection with this matter he has become e.\ten- 
sively and favorably known to the trade in Eng- 
land and on the continent. Mr. Munyan is also 
connected with the Worcester Royal Corset Com- 
pany at Worcester ; with the Copeland Rapid 
Lasting Company of Boston, of which he is presi- 
dent; and with the Langwood Park Land & Trust 
Company of Stoneham. He has been identified 
with the leather market of Boston since his return 
from California in the fifties. In politics he is a 
Democrat. He has held no political office, hav- 
ing no desire for public station, and being ab- 
sorbed in his business. He was married in the 
month of November, 1847, at West Millbury, to 
Miss Mary G. Griggs, daughter of Captain Joseph 
Griggs, who for many years carried on the tanning 
and currying business in that town. They have 
had four children, one only now living, Jennie G. 
M. Lothrop. Each of the others, three boys, died 
in infancy. 

NEWHALL, George H., of Lynn, real estate 
and insurance agent, was born in Lynn, October 




GEO. H. NEWHALL. 



Lewis Council of Royal Arcanum, al 
of the Grand Lodge ; a member of 
land Lodge of Knights of Pythias, 



so a member 

Peter Wood- 

and of the 



238 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



W'inneparkit Tribe of Red Men. He is in poli- 
tics a Republican, active in the party organiza- 
tion, at present (1894) president of the Ward 
Three Republican Club. He is interested in 
horticulture, and has been some time a member of 
the Houghton Horticultural Society. For many 
years he has been a justice of the peace. Mr. 
Newhall was married January 17, 1872, to Miss 
Martha L. Nourse, of Cambridge. They have had 
five children, two of whom are now living : Loella 
and Lizzie G. Newhall. 



NEWHALL, John Breed, of Lynn, member 
of the Suffolk bar, is a native of Lynn, born 




JOHN B. NEWHALL. 

October i, 1862, son of Charles and Hester C. 
( Moulton) Newhall. He is descended from first 
settlers of Lynn, chief among them Thomas New- 
hall, the first white child born in the settlement, 
and Allen Breed. He was educated in the Lynn 
grammar and high schools, graduating from the 
latter in 1880, and at Harvard, where he gradu- 
ated in the class of 1885. He studied law in 
the Harvard Law School, graduating therefrom 
in 1888. After a year in a prominent law office 
in Boston he began practice on his own ac- 
count. He early took an interest in politics and 



in municipal and State afiiairs. He was for three 
vears, 1890-92. a member of the Lynn Com- 
mon Council, president of that body the last two 
terms; was also in 1891 and 1892 a member of 
the Lynn School Committee ; and the ne.\t two 
years a representative from Lynn in the lower 
house of the Legislature, serving during his first 
term on the rapid transit committee, and his 
second on the committees on election laws and 
on transit. He is president of the Young Men's 
Republican Club of Ward Four, Lynn, and a 
member of the Republican Club of Massachusetts. 
He is a member also of the leading social club 
of Lynn, the Oxford, of the University Club of 
Boston, and of the Pi Eta Society of Harvard. 
He was secretary of the Lynn Board of Trade 
in 1 89 1, and a trustee of the Lynn Public Library 
in 1 89 1 and 1892. He was married December 6, 
1893, to Miss Gertrude J. Cutter, of San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 



NILES, William Henry, of Lynn, member of 
the Essex bar, is a native of New Hampshire, 
born in Orford, December 22. 1839, son of 
Samuel W. and Eunice C. (Newell) Niles. His 
paternal grandparents, John and Olive (Wales) 
Niles, and his maternal grandparents, John and 
Eunice (^Collis) Newell, were all four also natives 
of New Hampshire, and spent their lives on New 
Hampshire farms. His early education was ob- 
tained in the common schools, after which he 
was for three years a private pupil of the Rev. 
Richard W. Smith, of East Bridgewater, Mass., 
and three years in the Providence Conference 
Seminary, East Greenwich, R.L He read law 
under the direction of Caleb Blodgett, now jus- 
tice of the Superior Court, and was admitted to 
the bar in 1870, in the March term of the Supe- 
rior Court, at Lowell. He immediately began 
practice in Lynn, where he has remained ever 
since, from March, 1878 associated with George 
J. Carr, under the firm name of Niles & Carr. 
Though in former years he was retained in sev- 
eral important criminal cases, of late years he has 
applied his energies exclusively to civil practice, 
and has established an extensive legal business, 
becoming widely and favorably known in his pro- 
fession. For three years he was a member of the 
Lynn Board of Education. With this exception 
he has never held nor sought public place, giving 
his undivided attention to his professional work. 
He is now a director of the ^h^nufacturers' Na- 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



239 



lican. Mr. Niles was married September ig, 
1865. to Miss Harriet A. Day, daughter of 




tional liank of L)nn. In politics he is a Repiib- \- Hamilton, No. iSo West Street. Then he en- 
tered the insurance business, in which he has since 
continued, established in Boston. From 1869 to 
1874 he was agent of the Mutual Life Insurance 
Company of New York, under general agent 
Henry H. Hyde, of the Boston office; from 1874 
to 1879, general agent of the Mutual Benefit Life 
Insurance Company of Newark, N.J., with office at 
No. 15 State Street; from 1879 to 1882, general 
agent of the New York Life, in the Rialto Build- 
ing; and since 1882 he has been connected with 
the Equitable Life, Equitable Building, as agent, 
general agent, and manager. Mr. Niver has for 
years been prominent among the field workers in 
life insurance in this country, and is known as 
one of the most active and successful agents in 
the business. He has been a warm advocate of 
local underwriters' associations, and has been a 
delegate to the National Life Underwriters' Asso- 
ciation at several of its annual conventions. He 
is a studious man and interested in books ; and 
his wide reading is not limited to subjects relat- 
ing to insurance, but his taste has been cultivated 
hv his acquaintance with the best authors. He is 



W. H. NILES. 

Lorenzo D. Day, of Bristol, N.H. They have 
three children: Florence N. (wife of George \V. 
Moulton, a young lawyer associated with the law 
firm of Niles & Carr ), Grace, and Mary Ethel 
Niles. 

NIVER, James B.\rton, general agent and 
manager of the Boston office of the Equitable 
Life Assurance Society of New York, is a native 
of New York, born in Kinderliook, Columbia 
County, April 7, 1840, son of John M. and 
Hannah (Barton) Niver. His father was of 
Dutch ancestry, and his mother of English, a 
(Quaker. He was educated in the Troy Academy 
of Poultney, Vt., the Hudson River Institute of 
Claverack, N.Y., and the Bryant & Stratton Com- 
mercial College in Albany. He was reared on 
his father's farm, where he remained until the 
age of nineteen. His first business engagement 
was as cashier of the National Hotel in Wash- 
ington, D.C., which position he held from i860, 
through the war, to 1865. From 1865 to 1869 
he was in New York City as cashier in the import- 
ing and wholesale grocery house of Quackenbush 




JAS. B. NIVER. 

a member of the Boston Life I'nderwriters' .Asso- 
ciation, of the Home Market Club, of the Mid- 
dlese.v Club, of the Republican Club of Massa- 



240 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



chusetls, and of the Lawyers" Club of New York. 
In politics he has always been a Republican. 
He was married October 12, 1870, to Miss Caro- 
line Smith Turner, of Providence, R.I. They 
have six children: Helen T., Edwin T., Isabelle. 
James B., Jr., Francis S.. and Miriam Niver. 



NORTHEND, William Dummer, of Salem, 
member of the Esse.x bar for nearly half a cen- 




WM. D. NORTHEND. 

tury, is a native of Newbury, born February 26, 
1823, son of John and Anna (Titcomb) Northend. 
He is a lineal descendant of John Northend, Lord 
of the Manor of Hunsley in Yorkshire, England, 
who died October, 1625 ; also of the Sewalls, 
Dunimers, and Longfellows of Colony days. He 
was educated at Dummer Academy and at Bowdoin 
College, graduating in 1843 ; studied law with the 
Hon. Asahel Huntington in Salem, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in September, 1845. He was for 
many years in partnership with the Hon. George F. 
Choate, who was afterwards judge of probate and 
insolvency for the county of Essex. He was 
assigned by the Supreme Court as counsel for 
the defendant in every capital case but one in the 
county for more than twenty-five vears, and tried 



eight. He served in the Massachusetts Senate in 
1 86 1 and 1862. In politics he was conservative, 
and was largely instrumental in procuring the 
substantial repeal of the Personal Liberty bill, so 
called. He was chairman of the committee on 
the Rhode Island boundary, which was settled 
in accordance with the report of the committee. 
He took great interest in public matters at the 
breaking out of the Civil War, and prepared the 
Camp Bill, and other bills which were adopted 
by the Legislature. He has published elaborate 
papers on the Essex Bar and the Puritans, and is 
the author also of " Speeches and Essays on Polit- 
ical Subjects," of various printed addresses, and 
numerous magazine articles. He has been an 
overseer of Bowdoin College, and is vice-presi- 
dent of the trustees of Dummer Academy, and 
w'as for many years president of the Essex Bar 
Association. Mr. Northend was married Novem- 
ber 2, 1845, to Miss Susan Stedman Harrod. 



NOYES, David William, of Boston, merchant, 
is a native of Maine, born in Norway, April 18, 
1848, son of Claudius A. Noyes. He was edu- 
cated in the town school. Leaving his home in 
1866 with his brother, Charles C, and coming 
to Boston, both entered the wholesale house of 
Jordan, Marsh, & Co., where they spent seven 
years, and gained a thorough knowledge of the 
wholesale, retail, and importing business. In 
March, 1873, they entered partnership under the 
firm name of Noyes Brothers, and opened a small 
retail gentlemen's outfitting store at No. 51 West 
Street, Boston. This soon becoming too small for 
their rapidly increasing business, they established 
a branch in Cambridge, another in Providence, 
R. I., and in Boston secured the entire buildnig at 
the corner of ^^'ashington and Summer Streets, 
their present quarters. They manufacture their 
own goods largely ; and each season the principal 
foreign markets are visited for novelties in their 
line, for ladies", men"s, and children's wear. In 
February, 1883, Mr. Noyes's brother, Charles C, 
died, and since that time he has been alone in the 
management of the extensive business. In 1891 he 
completed a new factory in Watertown, where one 
hundred hands are employed in the different 
branches of the manufacturing and laundry works 
of the house. He has for some time owned a con- 
trolling interest in the Elm City Shirt Company 
of New Haven, t?onn.. and has been its president 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



241 



for eight years. He is also president of the country store of Hector Orr in East Bridgewater. 
Elm City Manufacturing C'omp.my of W'atertown. Later the business was purchased by his father, 
The name of Noyes Brothers is prominent among Isaac Nutter. In 1863 he succeeded his father, 

and carried on the store successfully until 1884, 
when he sold it to a younger brother. He then 
took charge of the East Bridgewater Savings 
Bank, of which he had been treasurer since its 
organization in 187 1. He took a leading part 
in organizing the Plymouth County Safe Deposit 
and Trust Company, and assumed the position of 
treasurer upon its establishment in 1893 ; and he. 
has since devoted himself mainly to the interests 
of this latest financial institution of Brockton. 
Mr. Nutter has held numerous positions of trust 
and responsibility in his town. He is a trustee 
of the Public Library ; was for six years town 
clerk of East Bridgewater (1860-66); town treas- 
urer for a quarter of a century, — from 1865 to 
1S93, with the e.xception of tw-o years; a mem- 
ber of the lower house of the Legislature for the 
district composed of North Bridgewater and East 
Bridgewater two years (1875-76) ; and senator for 
the Second District of Plymouth County two 
years (1891-92), serving both years as chairman 



DAVID W. NOYES^ 




those who contribute to the interests and charities 
of Boston. 



NUTTER, Isaac Newton, of East Bridge- 
water, treasurer of the Plymouth County Safe 
Deposit and Trust Company of Brockton, was 
born in East Bridgewater. June 23, 1836, son of 
Isaac and Margaret Orr (Keen) Nutter. His 
paternal ancestors were of the early New Hamp- 
shire colonists, one of whom, Hatevil Nutter, was 
the first elder of the first church founded in New 
Hampshire, at Dover. His father was born 
in Rochester, N.H. His mother was the eld- 
est daughter of Deacon Samuel Keen, and a 
descendant of the Winslows, one of whom married 
a daughter of John Alden. He is a great-grand- 
son of Lieutenant Adna Winslow Clift, who served 
in the Continental Army, and whose wife was a 
daughter of the Hon. Hugh Orr. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools of his native town, 
and at the East Bridgewater Academy when 
William .Mien was principal. His business career 
was begun at the age of si.xteen, as clerk in the 




ISAAC NEWTON NUTTER. 



of the committee on banks and banking. He 
was selected by the donor, Cyrus \\'ashburn, of 
W'ellesley, as one of the four gentlemen to be 



242 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



associated with tlie Hon. B. \V. Harris in the care 
of the fund for the erection of the " Washburn 
Memorial Library," and is at present secretary 
and treasurer of the board. In politics he is an 
earnest Republican, active in the party organiza- 
tion. He served for a number of years as a 
member of the Republican town committee of 
East Uridgewater, has been a frequent delegate 
to party conventions, and is now a member of 
the Massachusetts Republican and Plymouth 
County Republican clubs. He is connected 
with the Odd Fellows' order, a member of Colfax 
Lodge of East Bridgewater ; is a past noble com- 
mander of the Old Colony Commandery of the 
Golden Cross ; vice-president of the Plymouth 
County Agricultural Society ; and member of the 
New England Historic Genealogical Society. He 
was married July 5, 1865, to Miss Anna Maria 
Latham, daughter of Charles A. Latham, of East 
Bridgewater. They have had three children : 
Maria Latham (born in 1866), Richard Winslow 
(born i86g), and Charles Latham Nutter (born 
1871). 

OSGOOD, Ch.^rles Edw.ard, of Boston, mer- 
chant, was born in Roxbury, May 21, 1855, son 
of Freeman and Annah F. (Perry) Osgood. He 
is of early New England ancestry. His first 
paternal ancestor in the Massachusetts Colony was 
David S. Osgood, one of four brothers who came 
from England, three — Christopher, John, and 
James — preceding David ; and his maternal 
grand-father was Colonel Elbridge Gerry Perry, of 
Ro.\bury, a popular citizen, who died prematurely 
at the early age of thirty-six. He was educated 
in the Roxbury public schools, finishing in the 
Roxbury Latin School, and prepared for Harvard 
College. Instead of entering college, however, 
he entered business, starting with his father in 
the furniture auction and commission trade, then 
at No. 176 Tremont Street. He was here en- 
gaged from 1874 to 1880, when removal was 
made to the building Nos. 198-200 'Fremont 
Street. Two years later, the business having 
considerably expanded, the firm moved into the 
old Pine Street Church building on Washington, 
corner of Pine Street. In 1888, the elder Os- 
good that year retiring, the present quarters in 
the building Nos. 744 to 756 Washington Street 
were occupied, and the business further enlarged, 
embracing complete house furnishings as well as 
furniture, carpets, and draperies. In January, 



1894, the firm was succeeded by the C. E. Osgood 
Company, a Massachusetts corporation, with Mr. 
Osgood as president and general manager. It 
now employs about one hundred and fifty hands. 
Mr. Osgood is also president of the Boston Couch 
Bed Company. He is a member of the Roxbury 
.\rtillery Veteran Association, and of the Mt. 
Sinai Encampment, Odd Fellows : and associate 
member of Post 26, Grand Army. In politics he 
is a Republican. He was married July 10, 1876, 
to Miss Sarah W. Dole, of Newburyport. They 




C. E. OSGOOD. 



have two children : Kate M. and Lillian M. 
Osgood. He resides at Elm Hill, Roxbury Dis- 
trict, Boston. 



OSGOOD, Ch.\rles Stuart, of Salem, was 
born in Salem, March 13, 1839. He is closely 
identified with Salem, as his ancestors on both 
sides have lived there for considerably more than 
a hundred years. His grandfather, Nathaniel 
Osgood, was a shipmaster of Salem ; and his 
father, Charles Osgood, was an artist, having great 
success as a portrait painter, whose portraits now 
hang upon the walls of the Memorial Hall at 
Cambridge, the historical societies of Boston and 
Worcester, and the local societies of Salem. His 
mother, Susan (Ward) Osgood, was the grand- 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



243 



daughter of Dr. Edward A. Holyoke, the cele- 
brated physician and centenarian of Salem, whose 
father, the Rev. Edward Holyoke, was the presi- 




CHAS. S. 6SG00D. 

dent of Harvard College for thirty years. Mr. 
Osgood was educated in the public schools, and 
studied law in the oflfice of the Hon. J. C. Perkins. 
He was admitted to the bar at Salem in 1863. 
In 1863-64 he was attached to the Commissary 
Department, and was stationed in Virginia. He 
was appointed deputy collector of customs for the 
District of Salem and Beverly in 1864, and held 
that otifice until 1873. He was elected a member 
of the Massachusetts House of Representatives 
for si.\ consecutive years, from 1874 to 1879 inclu- 
sive, serving as chairman of the committee on 
railroads, and on the committee on rules. While a 
member of the House, he was appointed in April, 
1879, to be register of deeds for the Southern 
District of Essex County, which oflfice he has held 
by successive elections ever since that date. Mr. 
Osgood has taken an active part in the city gov- 
ernment of Salem, serving seven years in the 
Common Council, and being president of that 
body from 1866 to 1869, covering the period of 
the introduction of Wenham water. He was a 
member of the Board of Aldermen in 1870 and 
187 I, and a member of the School Committee for 



six years. He has always been interested in 
literary work, and on the establishment of a Pub- 
lic Library in Salem, in 1888, was chosen by the 
city council a trustee for life of that institution. 
He is also one of the trustees of the Salem Athe- 
nx'um, and of the Salem Lyceum, and has for a 
number of years been the librarian of the Essex 
Institute. He is the author of the commercial 
history of Salem as published in Hurd's Essex 
County History, and one of the authors of the 
Historical Sketch of Salem published by the 
Essex Institute in 1879. He married May 23, 
1867, Miss Elizabeth White Batchelder, daughter 
of Dr. John H. and Jane R. (Smith) Batchelder, 
and has had six children : Elizabeth Stuart, Robert 
Ward, Charles Stuart, Henry, Philip Holyoke, 
and Edward Holyoke Osgood. 



PARKER, James O., of Methuen, real es- 
tate and insurance broker, was born in New 
Hampshire, in the town of Pembroke, November 
22, 1827, son of Asa and Relief (Brown) Parker. 
He was educated in the common schools and an 




JAMES O. PARKER. 



academy at Concord, N.H. His business life was 
begun as clerk in the Concord post-office, where he 
spent four years. Afterwards he was for a similar 



244 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



period mail agent on the Nortliern Railroad be- 
tween Boston and Burlington, Vt., and for twenty 
years thereafter railroad station agent at Alethuen. 
Then he entered the real estate and insurance 
business, which he has since pursued, now en- 
gaged in both Methuen and Lawrence. He has 
long been prominent and inHuential in Methuen 
affairs ; has filled nearly all the town offices, and 
has represented his district in both branches of 
the Legislature. He was a member of the School 
Committee of Methuen in i860 to 1864; selectman 
in 1873 ; member of the House of Representatives, 
representing Methuen and the city of Lawrence, in 
1874; member of the Senate for the Sixth Esse.x 
District (then consisting of Lawrence, North and 
South .Vndover, and Methuen) in 1883 and 1884; 
and in the House again in 189 1 and 1892 for the 
Third Essex District, comprising Methuen. Brad- 
ford, and Wards 3 and 5 of Haverhill. In his 
first term in the House he served on the com- 
mittee on insurance, and took an active part in ad- 
vancing labor measures. In the Senate he served 
as chairman of the committee on insurance, and 
also on the committees on manufactures and 
public health ; and he was an earnest advocate 
of the weekly payment bill, the employers" liabil- 
ity bill, the free te.xt-books bill, the bill abolishing 
the contract system of labor in the penal institu- 
tions of the State, the abolition of the poll-tax as 
a prerequisite for voting, and the continuance of 
the payment of State aid to soldiers and their 
families. During his second and third terms in 
the House he served on the committee on rail- 
roads. At the time of his election to the Senate 
his senatorial district was strongly Republican, 
but he carried it each year by a majority of 
over twelve hundred votes. In 18S9 he received 
the Democratic nomination for sheriff of Essex 
County, and, though not elected, ran ahead of his 
party ticket, and carried the city of Lawrence by 
a handsome majority. Mr. Parker is a member 
of the John Hancock Lodge of Masons, of Hope 
Lodge of Odd Fellows, and of the Methuen Club. 
He was married November 12, 1849, to Miss 
Frances C. Billings, of Lebanon, N.H. They 
have one daughter, Helen Parker (now Mrs. 
Spooner). 

PARKER, Walter Edw.ard, of Lawrence, 
agent of the Pacific Mills, is a native of Princeton, 
born September 27, 1847, son of George and Eniilv 
R. (Coller) Parker. His first American ancestor 



was Thomas Parker, born in England in 1609, 
who sailed from London, March, 11, 1635, in a 
vessel fitted out by Sir Richard Saltonstall, with 
whose family, tradition says, he was connected by 
marriage. In direct line were Lieutenant Hana- 
niah Parker, of Reading, 1638-1724, John Parker, 
of Reading and Lexington, 1664-1741, Andrew, of 
Lexington, 1693-1776, Thomas, of Lexington and 
Princeton, 1727-1799, Ebenezer, of Lexington and 
Princeton, 1 750-1839, Ebenezer, Jr., of Princeton, 
1784-1S69, George, of Woonsocket, R.I., 1818- 
1893, and Walter E. Parker. Captain John Parker, 
of Lexington, and the Rev. Theodore Parker 




W. E. PARKER. 

came from the same ancestors. Walter E. was 
educated in the public schools and at a tech- 
nical school in Boston, where he spent a few- 
months. His training for active life was begun 
on an Illinois farm, in Urbana, where he lived 
four years, — from 1856 to i860. In 1861 the 
family returned to New England, and settled in 
Woonsocket, R.I. ; and in 1863 he had his first 
experience in a factory, entering the employment 
of the Social Mill. At the same time he con- 
tinued his studies at the public school. Two 
years later he left school, and devoted his whole 
time to mill work. He also made all the plans for 
and assisted in the work of enlarging the Social 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



245 



Mills. In October, 1876, he became superin- 
tendent of the Globe Mills, Woonsocket, and con- 
tinued in this position till the first of April, 188 1, 
when he came to Lawrence to take charge of the 
cotton department of the extensive Pacific Mills. 
After from five to six years in this department he 
was made agent of the mills (January i, 1887), the 
position he still holds. While a resident of Woon- 
socket, he was for fourteen years (from January S, 
1878, to January 12, 1892) a director of the Pro- 
ducers' National Bank; and in Lawrence, when 
the Merchants' National Bank was organized, in 
1889, he was made vice-president and one of the 
board of directors of that institution. For several 
years also he was a member of the board of 
trustees of the Essex Savings Bank, and he is at 
present one of its vice-presidents. In addition to 
these interests he is a director of the Lawrence 
Gas Company. In \\'oonsocket he was influen- 
tial in municipal affairs, and was for one year 
(1877) president of the Town Council. He is 
now a leading member of the New England Cot- 
ton Manufacturers' Association (president of the 
organization in 1889-90-91); one of the vice- 
presidents of the Home Market Club ; a member 
of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 
with which he has been connected since 1881 ; 
one of the trustees of Tufts College, and a mem- 
ber of the executive board : and member of the 
Boston Athletic Association. He has been con- 
nected with the Masonic order since 1869, and was 
master of the Morning Star Lodge of Woonsocket 
in 1877, and commander of the Woonsocket Com- 
mandery of Knights Templar for two years. In 
politics he is a Republican. He married first, 
October 12, 1870, Miss Anna Augusta Elliott, 
who died February 24, 1875 ; second, May 2, 1877, 
Miss Alida Charlotte Willis (died September 9, 
1885); and third, January i, 1888, Miss Mary 
Bradley Beetle. He has one son, Herbert Sum- 
ner, and one daughter, Helen Willis Parker. 



PARKHURST, Wellington Evarts, of Clin- 
ton, editor of the Clinton Couraiit and the Clinton 
Daily Item, was born in Framingham, January 19, 
1835, so"^ °^ Charles F. W. and Mary (Goodale) 
Parkhurst. He is eighth in descent from George 
Parkhurst, who was an early resident of A\'ater- 
town, and seventh in descent from Robert Good- 
ale, who came to this country from Ipswich, 
England, in 1634. He was educated in the pub- 



lic schools and the Framingham .Academy. After 
a short experience as paymaster for the Lancaster 
Quilt Company in C'linton, he entered the edi- 
torial office of the Worcester Spy, and since that 
time he has been steadily engaged in newspaper 
work. He became editor of the Clinton Courant 
in 1865, and during his service of nearly thirty 
years in the editorial chair he has kept his journal 
in line with the best county newspapers in the 
State. He has been editor also of the Daily Item 
since July, 1893. In Clinton iie has served in 
various offices, — town clerk six years, town 
treasurer, assessor, member of the School Board 




W. E. PARKHURST. 

fifteen years, and director of the Public Library 
six years; and he has represented his district, 
the Thirteenth Worcester, in the lower house 
of the Legislature four terms (1890-91-92-93). 
During the greater part of his legislative service 
he was house chairman of the committees on edu- 
cation and on public charitable institutions. In 
politics he is a steadfast Republican, and has 
long been prominently connected with the party 
organization in his section of the State. For 
several years he has been chairman of the Repub- 
lican town committee of Clinton. He was one of 
the original members of the Massachusetts Press 
Association, and is also a member of the Subur- 



246 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



ban I'ress Association, of the Massachusetts Re- 
publican Club, and of the Masonic and Odd Fel- 
lows orders. He was married first, September 
13, 1866, to Harriet F. Fairbank, of West Boylston 
(died December 13, 1885); and second, August 9, 
1887, to Georgiana B. Warren, of Framingham. 
They have no children. 



PEARSON, Gardner Whitman, of Lowell, 
postmaster, was born in Lowell, September 4, 
1869, son of George H. and Laura W. (Hildreth) 
Pearson. He is a grandson of John H. Pearson, 
formerly the largest ship-owner in Boston, and of 
Dr. Israel Hildreth, of Dracut ; and a nephew of 
the late General Benjamin F. Butler, whose wife 
was his mother's sister. He was educated in the 




GARDNER W. PEARSON. 

public schools of Dracut and of Lowell, at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and at 
Harvard College, spending a year at each of 
the last-mentioned institutions. Subsequently he 
studied law two years at the Harvard Law 
School. He was admitted to the bar in January, 
1 89 1, and began practice in association with his 
brother, Fisher H. Pearson. Later he became 
associated with General Butler, and so remained 
until the latter's death, in 1893. He is at pres- 
ent in partnership with John A. Gately in the 



patent business. In politics he is a Democrat, 
and has for a number of years been an active 
worker in his party, but has never held an elective 
office. He was chairman of the Democratic city 
committee of Lowell in 1891-92-93, and mem- 
ber of the State Committee in 1893. He was 
appointed to his present position as postmaster 
of Lowell, in April, 1894. In 1892-93 he was 
a member of the State commission to revise the 
election laws. He belongs to a number of 
clubs, — the Lowell Country, the Vesper Boat, 
the Lowell Cricket and Athletic, the Yorick, Big 
Twelve, — and is a member of Court General 
l^utler. Ancient Order of Foresters. He is an 
enthusiastic lover of athletic sports, and has taken 
a number of prizes in running, jumping, and boat- 
ing, both when in college and after leaving. He 
is unmarried. 



PEMBERTON, Henry Augustus, of Boston, 
merchant and manufacturer, was born in South 
Danvers, now Peabody (named for George Pea- 
body), October 26, 1845, -^O" of Francis Bain- 
bridge and Adeline (Buswell) Pemberton. His 
father was a native of Portsmouth, N.H., and his 
mother of Haverhill. He comes of an early, hon- 
orable New England family, founded by James 
Pemberton, originally of Wales, who settled in 
Massachusetts in 1646, and for whom Pember- 
ton Hill, now marked by Pemberton Square, 
Boston, was named. Samuel Pemberton, de- 
scendant of James, was one of the second com- 
mittee, representing the people in town meeting 
assembled, who in 1770 successfully demanded 
of Lieutenant Governor Hutchinson the removal 
of the British troops from Boston, his colleagues 
being Adams, Hancock, Warren, Phillips, Hen- 
shaw, and Molineaux. The Rev. Ebenezer Pem- 
berton, another descendant, who graduated at 
Harvard in 167 1, and became a fellow of the 
college, was a great scholar and divine, a contem- 
porary of and beloved by such men as Judge 
Sewell, Dr. Cotton Mather, Dr. Increase Mather, 
Major-General Winthrop ; and Thomas Pember- 
ton, the antiquar)-, was also of this highly 
respected family. Henry A. Pemberton was edu- 
cated in the schools of Peabody ; and the prizes 
awarded him upon graduation from the High 
School — gifts of George Peabody, of London — 
indicate that his deportment and scholarship 
while there were excellent. He left Peabody in 
1862 to receive a business training in Boston, 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



247 



where his business headquarters ha\e siuce been 
established. He is now one of the leather firm 
of Pemberton Brothers, High Street, Boston, 




H. A. PEMBERTON. 

carrying on a business inherited from their father, 
by whom it was founded in 1845, — a firm which 
has since become widely known as conservatively 
progressive, thoroughly equipped by its factories 
at Peabody and at Bridgton for its purposes of 
finishing sheep and other skins. Mr. Pemberton 
is a member of the Associated Board of Trade, 
of the Shoe and Leather Association, the Athletic 
Association, the Ancient and Honorable Artillery, 
the Beacon Society, and the Masonic Fraternity 
of Boston. In politics and religion he votes and 
worships according to his honest convictions. 
He is not a politician nor an office-seeker, but 
one who performs conscientiously all the duties 
of a private public-spirited citizen. He was mar- 
ried December 17, 1878, to Miss Louise Baldwin, 
daughter of the late George P. Baldwin, of Bos- 
ton, a descendant of the New Hampshire Bald- 
wins, one of whom fought for two sharp winters 
under Ethan Allen. They have three children : 
Henry Augustus, Jr, Frank Arthur, 2d., and 
Gladys Pemberton. Their residence is a charm- 
ing estate in the Boston suburb of Auburndale, 
and its hospitality is proverbial. 



PEVEY, Gii.niiRT AiuKi, AiiixrrT, member of 
the Suffolk bar, was born in Lowell, August 22, 
185 1, son of Abiel and Louisa (Stone) Pevey. 
He was educated in the Lowell public schools, 
graduating from the High School a Carney medal 
scholar, and at Harvard College, where he gradu- 
ated in the class of 1873. He studied law with 
the firm of Sweetser & Gardner (Theodore H. 
Sweetser and William S. Gardner, the latter after- 
wards justice of the Superior and Supreme 
Courts), and was admitted to the Suffolk bar in 
June, 1876. Upon the appointment of Mr. Gard- 
ner to the Superior Bench he became a partner 
of Mr. Sweetser, and remained in this association 
till the latter's death in 1882. Then he became 
assistant attorney of the Boston & Lowell Rail- 
road Company under Colonel John H. George. 
Subsequently, after his retirement from this posi- 
tion, he was for three years partner in practice 
with the Hon. Charles S. Lilley, now justice of 
the Superior Court. During the years 1890-91-92 
he was assistant district attorney for Middlese.x 
County ; and he has been master in chancery for 
the same county for about nine years. Since his 




GILBERT A. A. PEVEY. 

admission to the bar he has been established in 
Boston and Cambridge, with his principal office 
in Boston. In Cambridge he has been a director 



248 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



of the Cambridge Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, and its attorney for seven or eight years. 
He is a director also of the Cambridge Young 
Men's Christian Association, ex-vice-president of 
the Baptist Social Union, and has been vice-presi- 
dent and president of the North Baptist Sunday- 
school Convention. He is a member of the United 
Order of the Golden Cross, of the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen, of the Northern Mutual Re- 
lief Association, in all of which he has held official 
positions ; also of the Masonic order (Amicable 
Lodge), of the order of Odd Fellows ( Dunster 
Lodge), of the Colonial Club of Cambridge, and 
of the Cambridge Baptist Union. In politics he 
has always been a Republican ; but he has never 
sought political office, his aspirations not being 
in that direction. He was married November 27, 
1876, and has two children : Emma L. and 
Elva .M. Pevey. 



I'RICE, Ch.arles Henry, of Salem, druggist, 
and president of the Salem F^lectric Lighting 
Company, is a native of Salem, born on the first 
of January 1831, son of Eben N. and Hannah 




CHAS. H. PRICE. 



began work as a boy in the store where he 
still does business as druggist and pharmacist. 
During his long career here he has graduated 
and put into business more than a dozen young 
men who are all now engaged in prosperous 
trade. He has been president of the Salem 
Electric Lighting Company from its formation in 
1 88 1, and for two years president of the Pettingell 
Andrews Electric Supply Company of Boston. 
Since 1884 he has also been president of the 
Holyoke Mutual Fire Insurance Company of 
Salem, one of the leading companies of its kind 
in New England. His only club is his church, 
in which he has long been prominent. He has 
been treasurer of the First Baptist Church of 
Salem since 1856, and for many years super- 
intendent of the Sunday-school ; and he was 
president of the Salem Young Men's Christian 
-Association for a number of years. He married 
first, March 2, 1853, Miss Anna F.. Carlton, who 
died April 26, 1864, leaving one child, Jeannie C. 
Price; and second, January 8, 1868, Miss Fannie 
S. Pettingell. They have two children : Charles 
Brown (born October 22, i86g), and Frank 
Shreve Price (born November 8, 1875). 



(Shreve) Price. He is of English ancestry. He 
was educated in the Salem grammar and high 
schools, and at the age of thirteen, in July, 1844, 



PUFFER, LoRiNG William, D.D.S., of Brock- 
ton, fire underwriter, was born in Stoughton, 
September 17, 1828, son of Loring and Lucy 
Hewett (Southworth) Puft'er. He is of the seventh 
generation from George Puft'er who settled in 
Braintree, now Quincy, in 1639, in the direct line 
from his son James (his other son Matthias was 
the great-great-grandfather of the late Senator 
Sumner) ; a grandson of Nathan Puft'er, who 
served under General Scott in all of the battles 
op the frontier in iS 12-15 ^ '^'''d great-grandson of 
Captain Jedediah Southworth, of Stoughton, who 
served through the whole of the Revolution, and 
was a member of the first constitutional con\-en- 
tion of Massachusetts. On the maternal side he 
is in the seventh generation from Constant South- 
worth, of Plymouth, deputy governor, and an orig- 
inal proprietor of and one of the three persons 
appointed to buy the town of Bridgewater. He 
is a descendant also in the seventh generation 
of the Rev. James Keith, the first minister of 
Bridgewater; in the si.xth generation of the Rev. 
Ebenezer Stearns, the first Baptist minister of 
Easton ; in the seventh of the Rev. Thomas 
Carter, the first minister of Woburn ; in the si.xth 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



249 



of Judge Joseph Wilder, from 1742 to his death in 
1757 chief justice of Massachusetts; and in the 
eighth of Major-General Humphrey Atherton, of 




LORING W. PUFFER. 

Dorchester. His general education was acquired 
in common and private schools which he attended 
until he reached the age of eighteen years, and he 
graduated from the Boston Dental College March 
17, 1870. From eighteen to twenty-five years of 
age he was engaged in mechanical trades and 
manufacturing, which were all then relinquished 
on account of failing health. The three years 
following were devoted to the study of medicine 
and dentistry. He began the practice of den- 
tistry in 1854, and for thirty-five years followed 
the profession actively, from 1856 established 
in North Bridgewater, which afterwards became 
Brockton. His connection with the fire insurance 
business began a few years after his removal to 
North Bridgewater ; and this vocation, with real 
estate, has now almost entirely displaced his pro- 
fession. Quite early in life Mr. Puffer became 
a copious correspondent for various newspapers, 
and later had experience in the editorial chair, 
being editor of the Brockton Advance for one year, 
and editor of the Brockton Eagle during the years 
1884 and 1885. He has done other literary 
work, especially in historical and biographical 



lields, which has widened his reputation. In 
1871-72 he was adjunct professor of operative 
and clinical dentistry in the Boston Dental Col- 
lege, and professor of the institute of dentistry 
and dental therapeutics in 1872-73. Previous to 
1880 he had been secretary, treasurer, and presi- 
dent of the Old Colony Dental Association, and 
was a frequent essayist at its meetings. He has 
at two periods during his residence in North 
J^ridgewater, or Brockton, been a member of the 
School Committee (1875-1885); and for more 
than twenty years he has been one of the trustees 
to the Public Library. He is now chairman of 
the latter board. He was one of a number of 
citizens who originally purchased the library, and 
some years later gave it to the town. He was 
appointed a justice of the peace in [855, and is 
now holding a commission ; and in 1883 received 
the appointment of notary public. Dr. Puffer 
became interested in politics soon after he at- 
tained his majority, and his interest has never 
flagged. Originally an anti-slavery man, he was 
among the first to help form and sustain the 
Republican party, and has been steadfastly de- 
\oted to it since. Outspoken and frank with 
tongue and pen, he is counted one of the most ef- 
ficient, honorable, and successful political workers 
in Eastern Massachusetts. He has been on the 
Republican city committee of Brockton for manv 
years, and was its chairman in 1854-55. In 1856 
he became an active member of the Plymouth 
County Agricultural Society ; was a trustee for 
many years, and has been vice-president. In 
i860 he built the first greenhouse ever con- 
structed in North Bridgewater ; and from that 
date to the present he has been an ardent horti- 
culturalist, florist, and a frequent contributor to 
agricultural, horticultural, and floricultural publi- 
cations. He was one of the most active origina- 
tors of the Brockton Agricultural Society founded 
in 1 87 4, which was a success from the first. Its 
opening exhibition, held in ten days under a tent, 
received an income of §7,400; and by 1893 its 
annual income had reached 529,500. Dr. Puffer 
is also a member of the New England Historic 
Genealogical Society, of the Natural History 
Society of Boston, of the Massachusetts and 
Suburban Press Association, and of the Norfolk 
Club ; and he is a charter member of Paul Revere 
Lodge and Satucket Royal Arch C"hapter, Free 
Masons, of Brockton. He was married Septem- 
ber 16, 1856, to Miss Martha Mary Crane Worces- 



250 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



ter, niece and adopted daughter of the Hon. 
Samuel Thomas Worcester and Mary t'enno 
Crane (Wales) Worcester of Norwalk, Ohio. 
'I'hey have four children : Loring Worcester, born 
February 7, 1857, died July 30, 1858 ; Mary 
Crane, born April 1 i, 1859 ; \\'illiam Loring, born 
May 27, 1863 ; and Clarence Carter Puffer, born 
June 29, 1874. 

RAYM(>\I). JdHX Mak.shall, of -Salem, mem- 
ber of the Essex bar, is a native of Salem, born 
June 16, 1852, son of Alfred A and Sarah (Buf- 
fum) Raymond. His ancestors on both sides were 
among the early settlers of New England. On the 
paternal side he is descended from Captain Will- 
iam Raymond, who settled in Beverly about 1652, 
was appointed by tile (ienerai Court in 1683 lieu- 
tenant commander of Beverly and Wenham troop, 
and was deputy for Beverly in 1685 and 1686, and 
commanded a company in the Canada expedition 
in 1690. On his mother's side he is of Quaker 
descent, his maternal ancestor being Robert 
Buffum. who settled in Salem in 1638. The 
first settlers of the family became Quakers, the 
mother of Mr. Raymond was a life-long member 
of the Society of Friends, and each generation 
has had influential members of that Society among 
its number. His general education was acquired 
in the Salem public schools and at the Friends' 
Boarding-school of Providence, R.I. ; and he was 
prepared for his profession at the Boston Univer- 
sity Law School, from which he was graduated in 
1878, receiving the Hilliard prize for the best 
essay on " Insanity as a Defence in Criminal 
Cases." While pursuing his law studies and for 
some time before, he was at work in various occu- 
pations, first as a clerk in a grocery store, then in 
the freight department of the old Eastern and the 
Boston & Lowell railroads at Salem, and after- 
ward as station agent at Peabody. Admitted to 
the bar in October, 1878, he immediately began 
practice in Salem, and has since pursued his pro- 
fession there. In the November election of 1879, 
a year after his election to the bar, he was elected 
a member of the Executive Council for 1880, and 
served through the first term of Governor John 
D. Long. The ne.xt two years, 1881 and 1882, 
he was president of the Salem Common Council. 
and from 1886 to 1889, inclusive, was mayor of 
the city. During his four terms in the latter 
office numerous important reforms were accom- 
plished, and the interests of the city advanced in 



various ways. He was especially instrumental in 
establishing the free public library and fire alarm 
system. One of the most notable reforms, how- 
ever, was the establishing of " liquor limits '' for 
the city, and a system of high license, by which 
he freed the residential sections from the saloon 
almost entirely, largely reduced the number of 
saloons, and brought increased re\enue to the 
city. At the close of his second term he decided 
to retire, but was induced to stand again by peti- 
tions addressed to him, signed by more than fif- 
teen hundred of the leading citizens of Salem ; and 
he was returned by a largely increased majority. 




JNO. M. RAYMOND. 

During his fourth term, the public library was 
opened to the citizens, and on the occasion of 
its opening he delivered the address. He was 
the first chairman of the Board of Trustees of the 
library, holding that position for two years. Mr. 
Raymond is a thirty-second degree Mason, and a 
prominent member of the Scottish rite bodies, 
being thrice potent grand master of Sutton Lodge 
of Perfection, of Salem, grand high priest of 
Ciles F. Yates Council of Princes of Jerusalem, 
Boston, and has held the office of second lieu- 
tenant commander of Massachusetts Consistory; 
he is worshipful master of Essex Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons, and a member of Winslow 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



!5I 



Lewis Commander)- of Knights 'I'emplar, and of 
Sutton Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, and of 
Salem Council of Royal and Select Masters. 
Also past noble grand of Fraternity Lodge, 
and past chief patriarch of Salem Encampment, 
Independent Order of ( )dd Fellows. He has 
been president of the Salem Mutual Benefit Asso- 
ciation for fourteen years, and of the Salem Co- 
operative Bank since its organization, in uS88. 
For four years he was a member of the Second 
Corps of Cadets, and is now a member of the 
Veteran Association. He was married in June, 
1879, in Salem, to Miss Anna Belle Jackson. 
They have had three children: Eva S., Helen J., 
and Grace Raymond (deceased). Mrs. Raymond 
died in 1885, a few months after the death of the 
daughter Grace. Li December, 1893, he was 
married to Miss Jennie Abbott Ward, of Salem. 



RAYMOND, Robert Fulton, of New Bed- 
ford, member of the bar, is a native of Fairfield 
County, Connecticut, born at High Ridge, in the 
town of Stamford, June 15, 1858, son of Lewis 
and Sarah .-V. (Jones) Raymond. Public records 
show that his ancestors were in America as early 
as 1630-31, in Little Harbor, now Portsmouth, 
N.H., and in 1634 at Salem, Mass., whence a son 
removed to Norwalk, Fairfield County, Conn., as 
is shown by the records of that town in 1668. 
The Raymond genealogy shows two branches of 
the family growing up in Salem and Norwalk re- 
spectively, and from the latter branch came the 
subject of this sketch. Up to sixteen years of age 
he attended the district schools at High Ridge 
and Long Ridge, Conn. In 1874, stimulated by 
the example of his brother (now President Ray- 
mond of Wesleyan University) in getting an edu- 
cation, he came to New Bedford to prepare for 
college at the New Bedford High School. After 
completing his preparatory work, he entered Wes- 
leyan University in 1877, took a partial course 
there, and subsequently studied in Harvard Col- 
lege and Law School. The cost of his prepara- 
tory school and college training was met by his 
earnings as a school-teacher, which work he began 
at the age of seventeen while a student in the 
High School, — teaching two winters in Dartmouth 
public schools. After a year at Wesleyan he 
taught two years in the town of Marion, at the 
same time reading Greek and Latin classics ex- 
tensively, intending to re-enter Wesleyan with his 



old class. At the end of his successful work 
there, however, having an opportunity to teach 
mornings in a private Latin school in Boston and 
to work in Harvard College afternoons, he ac- 
cepted that course instead, and for a year pursued 
it, — teaching regularly every morning, taking lect- 
ures at Harvard in history and Roman law after- 
noons, and doing private tutoring evenings through 
the college season. In this way he prepared a 
young man for Harvard within the year, and in 
the summer months took a private pupil to his 
home in Connecticut, and prepared him in Greek 
and Latin for Yale in the autumn. He entered 




ROBERT F. RAYMOND. 

the Harvard Law School in the autumn of 1881, 
and remained two yeans, and then, coming to New 
Bedford, was admitted to the bar at the June term, 
1883, of the Superior Court. It was his intention 
to return to the Law School at the end of the third 
year and take his degree, but he was so busy in 
his practice that he was unable to do so. Later, 
however, in 1894, he took the examinations, and 
received from the college on commencement day 
his LL.B. He has practised at New Bedford 
steadily since his admission to the bar with a good 
degree of success, latterly doing much corporation 
business. He is at present trustee of large corpo- 
ration interests in Kansas and Colorado, and en- 



252 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



gaged in an extensive general practice in eastern 
Massachusetts. For two years after he began 
practice he was principal of a large evening school 
in New Bedford, with from ten to twenty assistant 
teachers ; and at the close of this service he re- 
ceived a testimonial from his pupils which he 
holds as one of his choicest possessions. During 
his first year in New Bedford he was also elected 
president of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion there ; and he continued in this position for 
nine years, within which period the institution 
built one of the finest Christian Association build- 
ings in the country. In politics he was originally 
a Republican of the radical stripe, and did cam- 
paign speaking for the Republican party in Con- 
necticut from the (larfield campaign to 1891. 
Then he became a Prohibitionist, and each year 
since he has served as candidate of that party for 
attorney-general of Massachusetts. He was a 
delegate to the National Prohibitory Convention 
at Cincinnati in 1892, in which he served as a 
member of the committee on platform. He has 
been a member of the Massachusetts Prohibitory 
State Committee since 1892, and has taken the 
stump in every campaign since he joined the 
party. He is a frequent speaker also on occa- 
sions of public meeting to advocate movements of 
moral reform ; before temperance societies and 
conventions of young people, Sunday-schools, the 
Epworth League, Christian Endeavor, and similar 
organizations ; in movements for the elevation of 
the laboring man; and on Memorial Day. In re- 
ligious faith he is a Methodist Episcopalian, and 
active in denominational work. He is a member 
of the Boston Wesleyan Association, having charge 
of Ziitns Herald and the general property of the 
denomination in New England ; a director of East 
Greenwich Academy ; a member of various busi- 
ness boards of laymen of the New F2ngland South- 
ern Conference ; and a member of the Methodist 
Social Union of New Bedford and vicinity, the 
largest in the country, which he was instrumental 
in starting, and of which he was the first president. 
He is vice-president for the State of Massachu- 
setts of the .\merican Sabbath Union. He is a 
member of Acushnet Lodge, No. 41, L (). (). F., 
and also of the Knights of Honor. Physically, 
he is something of an athlete, with a taste espe- 
cially for rowing. He usually has a shell on the 
river and a boat at his summer home on Lake 
W'innipesaukee, N.H., where he organized the 
i'ine Island Outing Club in 1892, of which he has 



since been clerk. He is a collector of books, and 
possesses one of the best law libraries and one 
of the choicest general libraries in New Bedford, 
the latter specially rich in the lines of history 
and economics, and in English, French, and Ger- 
man literature. Mr. Raymond was first married, 
September 12, 1883, to Miss Annie E. Booth, of 
New Bedford, who died December 10, 1884. He 
married second, October 20, 1886, Miss Mary F". 
Walker, daughter of Captain David Walker, of 
Groton, Conn. Their children are : Annie Almy. 
Mary Lois, and Allen Simmons Raymond. 



ROBER'I'S, JiiHN Hemenwav, of the Boston 
office of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of 
New York, is a native of Maine, born in Alfred, 
York County, October 8, 1831, son of Nahum and 
Sally B. (Hemenway) Roberts. He is of English 
ancestry. He was educated in the common 
schools and at Alfred Academy. Until he was 
eighteen years of age he lived and worked on his 
father's farm. Then, in 1850, he came to Charles- 
town, and was engaged in the West India goods 
and foreign fruit business till the outbreak of the 
Civil War. Enlisting in July, 186 1, as a private 
for three years, he was mustered into the I'nited 
States service as second lieutenant, Company F, 
FLighth Regiment, Maine Volunteers, in August ; 
was promoted to first lieutenant in .May, 1862, and 
to captain the following August. His regiment 
was immediately ordered to the front in the de- 
fences of Washington. In October, 1861, it was 
assigned to the First Brigade (General Viely), 
Sherman's expeditionary corps (afterwards the 
Tenth Army Corps) to the South Atlantic coast, 
striking first at Port Royal, S.C. It participated 
in all the operations from that engagement to the 
capture of Fort Sumter, including the siege and 
capture of Fort Pulaski, at the mouth of the 
Savannah River, and the capture and occupation 
of Jacksonville, Fla. On the first of January, 
1864, by order of the Secretary of War, at the 
request of the governor of Maine, he was trans- 
ferred to the Second Maine Cavalry, then organiz- 
ing at .\ugusta. Me., as captain of Company M. 
In February the regiment was ordered to New 
Orleans, La., and participated in the Red River 
campaign, after which it was engaged in the ex- 
termination of guerillas in La Fourche and Tesche 
counties, Louisiana. In July. 1S64, it was ordered 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



253 



to West Florida, witli headquarters at Barrancas, 
to assist in tiie siege and operations against 
Mobile, Ala., and assigned to the First Brigade 
Cavalry, Nineteenth Army Corps. From this time 
till the close of the war it was constantly engaged 
in scouting and raiding throughout western Flor- 
ida and southern Alabama, destroying an immense 
amount of Confederate army stores, cutting rail- 
road and telegraph communications between 
Mobile and Montgomery, capturing large quanti- 
ties of cattle, horses, and mules; and it was the 
first to carry the Emancipation Proclamation to 




JOHN H. ROBERTS. 

the negroes throughout that section of the coun- 
try. In the course of these raids the regiment 
had many engagements : at Milton, Euchee Anna, 
Marianna, Fla., and at Pollard, Big and Little 
Escambia Rivers, Pine Barren Creek, and other 
places in Alabama. In May, 1864, Captain 
Roberts was inspector-general of the forces of 
New Orleans, and later judge advocate-general 
of the department. In January, 1865, he was 
detailed judge advocate of an important military 
commission at Barrancas, Fla., for the trial of 
several capital cases (civilians), there being then 
no State government, and consequently no courts 
of justice, .\fter the close of the war he returned 



to Massachusetts, and entered the State militia. 
He was made adjutant of the First Battalion of 
Cavalry in 1869, and afterwards (in 1873) pro- 
moted to lieutenant colonel commanding (serving 
in that capacity until 1876); and he brought this 
corps to so high a state of efficiency that he was 
complimented by General Sherman, when general 
of the United States .Army, as having the finest 
command in the country outside of the regular 
army. Upon his return to civil life after his four 
years of service in the war, during which time he 
was never off duty a day e.xcept for a short time 
when w'ounded, he re-entered his former business 
in the employ of J. C. Tyler & Co., foreign fruit 
merchants, with whom he remained seven years. 
Then he entered the firm of J. F. Conant & CJo., 
Chatham Street, of which, by the death of the 
senior partners, he soon became the head. For 
some years afterwards he was engaged in the 
merchandise brokerage business in India Street ; 
and in 1888 he became connected with the Boston 
office of the Mutual Life of New York. Since 
the war Colonel Roberts has resided in Chelsea, 
where he has taken an active interest in affairs, 
civil, political, and social. He served in the 
Board of Aldermen one term (1876), represented 
the city in the lower house of the Legislature two 
terms (1870-71), and has been at the head of 
many of its social organizations. He is a mem- 
ber of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, 
Massachusetts Commandery ; of the Union Vet- 
erans' Union, W. S. Hancock command, Chelsea ; 
of the Grand Army of the Republic, Theodore 
Winthrop Post, Chelsea ; of the Robert Lash 
Lodge, Free Masons, the Shekinah Chapter Royal, 
Arch Masons, the Napthali Council, and the 
Palestine Commandery, Knights Templar, all of 
Chelsea ; a member of the Chelsea Review Club, 
and of the Grand Army Club, Boston. He was 
for three successive years (1890-91-92) elected 
department commander of the Union Veterans' 
Union, when it included all the New England 
States, and in 1893 was elected commander-in- 
chief of that organization. He w-as master of 
Robert Lash Lodge in 1874-75, and high priest of 
Shekinah Chapter in 1877-78. Colonel Roberts 
was married in May, 1859, at Charlestown, to 
Miss Louisa Southward. They had three chil- 
dren : Lillian Louise (now Mrs. Alfred J. Hay- 
man), Gertrude Abbie, Mattie Emma B. (now 
Mrs. Henry W. .\sbrand). He married second, 
in 1868, Miss H. Edwina Phelps, of Chelsea. 



254 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



ROBERTS, William Warrkx, of Haverhill, 
city clerk, is a native of Haverhill, born August 
31, 1S66, son of Joseph W. and Medora A. 




WILLIAM W. ROBERTS. 

(Felch) Roberts. He is a direct descendant of 
Governor Thomas Roberts, the emigrant, who 
settled at Dover Xeck, N.H., about the year 
1632. He was educated in the public schools of 
Haverhill and at Bryant & Stratton's Commercial 
College in Boston. After his graduation in June, 
1884, he entered the office of David B. Tenney, 
then city clerk of Haverhill, with whom he re- 
mained until the latter retired from that office in 
January, 1893. In January, 1892, he was elected 
auditor and assistant city clerk ; and upon the re- 
tirement of Mr. Tenney he was elected to the city 
clerkship, which position he has since held. He 
is a member of the Masonic fraternity ; of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks ; of the 
Independent Order of Red Men, of which he is 
a past sachem ; and of the Wachusett Club of 
Haverhill. In politics he is a Republican. He 
was married April 17, 1889, to Miss Alice M. 
Day, of Haverhill. 



1851, the eldest son of Charles Theodore Russell 
and Sarah Elizabeth ( Ballister) Russell. He re- 
moved to Cambridge in 1876, and has since 
resided there. He was educated in the public 
schools of Cambridge, and graduated at Harvard 
College in 1873. He studied law with the firm of 
C. T. iS: T. H. Russell, in Boston, and graduated 
from the Law School of Boston University in 
1875. He was admitted to the Boston bar May 
15, 1875, and became a partner in the firm of 
C. T. l\: T. H. Russell, at No. 27 State Street, 
and continued to practise law as a member of 
that firm until January i, 1894, when the firm dis- 
solved, and he formed with his brother, William 
E. Russell, the law firm of Russell & Russell, 
E.xchange Building. In 1884 he was appointed 
one of the civil service commissioners of Massa- 
chusetts, and has continued under successive re- 
appointment to hold that office, and since 1889 has 
been the chairman of the commission. In 1885 
he was appointed by the Legislature editor of 
" Contested Election Cases before the Legisla- 
ture," and still occupies that position. In 1889 
he was appointed by the court one of the exam- 




C. T. RUSSELL, Jr. 



iners of applicants for admission to the SuiYolk 

RUSSELL, Charles Theodore, Jr., member bar, and for three years has been chairman of 

of the SutTolk bar, was born in Boston, April 20, the board. He is a Democrat in politics, and 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



255 



has never been nianied. He is a member of the 
Union, University, and St. Botolph clubs in 
Boston, and several other social, literary, and 
yachting associations. 



SANDERS, WiLLi.\M, of New Bedford, mer- 
chant, is a native of Rhode Island, born in the 
town of Warren, December 10, 1843, son of 
Henry and Martha B. (Viall) Sanders. He is of 
English ancestry, and is the owner of a coat-of- 
arms granted to one of his ancestors, dated 1522. 




WM. SANDERS. 

His great-grandfather, on the maternal side, 
served as a captain in the war of the Re\-olution ; 
and the latter's commission is now in his hands. 
The family moved to New Bedford when William 
Sanders was a boy of fourteen years ; and he was 
educated there in the public schools, graduating 
from the High School. He began business life 
as a clerk in the post-office of Quincy, where he 
spent two years. Then he went to Boston, and had 
several years' experience in the wholesale clothing 
business. In February, 1866, he started out for 
himself, opening a retail clothing store in New 
Bedford. After conducting this successfully for 
twelve years alone, he admitted his brother, H. V. 
Sanders, to partnership, under the firm name 
of Sanders Brothers. This firm was dissolved 



in 1 88 1, and was succeeded by that of .Sanders & 
Barrows, which in time gave place to a corpora- 
tion, formed in 1894, under the name of the 
Sanders & Barrows Clothing Company, with Mr. 
Sanders as treasurer and general manager. The 
business has steadily grown from the modest start 
in 1866, and it is now the largest clothing busi- 
ness in the State south of Boston. Mr. Sanders 
has served in the Legislature as a member of the 
lower house two terms (1879-80), and he has been 
Bristol County commissioner since i88g. He has 
served also in the State militia, captain of Com- 
pany E, First Regiment, for nine years, — from 
1876 to 1881, and from 1886 to 1891. He be- 
longs to the order of Odd Fellows, a member of 
the Acushnet Lodge, New Bedford ; to the Royal 
Arcanum (regent of Omega Council) ; the Grand 
Army of the Republic, member of Post I ; and the 
\\"amsutta and Dartmouth clubs, New Bedford. 
He has for some years been connected with the 
New Bedford Board of Trade, and is now (1894) 
one of the directors of the organization. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican. He has long been active 
in municipal affairs, and has been asked many 
times to stand as candidate for mayor, but always 
declined on account of business interests. He 
is well known all over Bristol County, his duties 
as county commissioner taking him to nearly 
every town in the county. Mr. Sanders was 
married November 6, 1866, to Miss Lucretia C. 
Cannon, of New Bedford. They have no chil- 
dren. 

SANFORI), Ai.i'HKi's, member of the Suffolk 
bar, was born in North Attleborough, July 5, 
1 85 6, son of Joseph B. and Mary C. (Tripp) 
Sanford. His early education was acquired in 
tlie public schools of his native town and of Mel- 
rose, to which his father moved when he was a 
small boy ; and he was fitted for college at the 
Boston Latin School. His collegiate training was 
at Bowdoin, from which he graduated in the class 
of 1876. In college he was president of his 
class, a member of the Kappa Chapter of Psi 
Upsilon, and captain of the college base-ball 
nine. He read law in the office of Joseph Nick- 
erson, Boston, and was admitted to the bar in 
1879, when he established himself in Boston, 
where he has since remained engaged in gen- 
eral practice. In politics Mr. Sanford is Repub- 
lican, and early in his career became active in the 
party organization. He entered public life as a 



256 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



member of the Boston Common Council of 1886. 
The next year he was elected to the lower house 
of the Legislature (session of 1888), where he 




ALPHEUS SANFORD. 

served as house chairman of the committee on 
election laws. Returned for the session of 1890, 
he served that term on the committee on the 
judiciary, and ranked with the leaders on the 
Republican side of the House. He was first 
elected to the Boston Board of Aldermen for the 
municipal year of 1893 ; and, returned in 1894, 
was then elected chairman of the board. He 
was secretary of the Republican ward and city 
committee of Boston from 1889 to 1892 ; was 
in 1 89 1 a member of the executive committee 
of the Republican Club of Massachusetts, and 
in 1892 secretary of that organization. He is 
a member also of the Mercantile Library Asso- 
ciation. Mr. Sanford was married September 20, 
1883, in Acushnet, to Miss Mary C. V. Gardiner, 
daughter of William H. and Charlotte (Read) Gar- 
diner. 'I'hey have two children: Gardiner (born 
October 27, 1888) and Hazel Sanford (^born 
August 18, 1892). 



Boston, is a native of New Hampshire, born in 
New Durham, May 9, 183 1, son of Isaac B. and 
Mary (Garlandj Shaw. His early training was 
in the country school during the winter months, 
and in the open seasons on the farm or in assist- 
ing his father, who was a builder. Subsequently 
he spent three terms at the Wolfeborough Acad- 
emy, on the shore of Lake Winnepesaukee, 
graduating in 1849. The winter following he 
taught two district schools in the neighborhood 
of his home. .At the age of twenty he came to 
Boston to follow his trade of a carpenter and 
builder. Here he early became noted for origi- 
nality and advanced ideas in mechanical con- 
struction, and built up a substantial business. In 
1865 he formed a partnership with John W. 
Morrison, under the firm name of Shaw & Mor- 
rison, which during an existence of many years 
ranked with the leading carpenters and builders 
of the city. For twenty years Captain Shaw was 
also an active and efficient member of the Boston 
Fire Department, joining it in 1852, under Chief 
William Barnicoat. He rose rapidly in rank 
through the various grades to foreman, and in 




LEVI W. SHAW. 



1871 was elected by the city council an assist- 

SHAW, Captain Levi Woodkurv, of the De- ant engineer under Chief John S. Damrell, which 

partment for the Inspection of Buildings, city of position he held until the department was placed 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



257 



under the board of fire commissioners fin Octo- 
ber, 1873), and reorganized. Then, declining the 
position of district chief engineer offered liiiii by 
the new commissioners, he withdrew from the 
service. In the " (Jreat Fire" of 1872 he was 
one of thief I )anirell's most trusted lieutenants. 
He has been connected with the Department for 
the Inspection of Buildings since January, 1878, 
when, at the solicitation of his former chief, who 
had been placed at the head of the department, 
he accepted the position of assistant inspector. 
In 1886 he was promoted to the charge of the 
sub-department known as the " egress depart- 
ment," as " supervisor of egress, " which is 
charged with the inspection of apartment houses, 
hotels, theatres, manufactories, and other build- 
ings, in which numbers of persons are congre- 
gated, and the enforcement of the laws and 
regulations for the protection of life. Captain 
Shaw is prominent in the order of Odd Fellows, 
is a Knight of Honor, past grand warden of the 
New England Order of Protection, of which he 
was one of the founders, and prominent in other 
orders. He was married in Boston, March 12, 
1853, to Miss Margarette T. Keating. They 
have had three daughters, all of whom have won 
distinction in their special fields of professional 
work : the eldest, Mary Shaw, is the talented 
actress ; the second, Helen A., is a popular writer 
of prose and poetry in leading journals: and the 
third, Margarette Evelyn (now Mrs. Ingersoll), is 
also a frequent contributor to the magazines and 
newspapers of the day. 



SHEDD, William Elliot, of Boston, leather 
merchant, was born in Bridgewater, .\pril 12, 
1850, son of Joel and Eliza (Edson) Shedd. He 
is a descendant of the historical family of Edsons, 
of Bridgew-ater. His education was acquired in 
public schools in Bridgewater and Boston, and 
in private schools in Brockton and Waltham. 
His training for active life was begun in the ma- 
chine shop of his brother, George F. Shedd, in 
Waltham, which he entered at seventeen years 
of age. After one year of practical work here he 
went into the office of another brother, J. Herbert 
Shedd, civil engineer, Boston, where he was em- 
ployed another year. Then his connection with 
the leather business began as a clerk with Field, 
Converse, & Co., Boston. A year later he be- 
came a salesman and book-keeper for Otis 



Doyle iS; Co., Boston, with whom he remained 
for three or four years. For the next two years 
he was in charge of the finished leather depart- 



^W^ 




WM. E. SHEDD. 

ment of the Boston house of Coon, Crocker, 
& Co. ; and thereafter was with the house of 
Dewson, Williams, & Co. till 1888, when he 
established the present successful house of Shedd 
& Crane, commission merchants in sole and upper 
leather. For twenty-one years he was a justice 
of the peace. He has been long connected with 
the Masonic order, and is now a member of 
Monitor Lodge, Waltham. He is an active mem- 
ber of the Piety Corner Club of Waltham, and 
also a member of the New England Shoe and 
Leather Association of Boston. Mr. Shedd was 
married in January, 1875, to Miss Ellen A. Fiske, 
of Waltham. They have two sons : Irving Elliot 
and William Chester Shedd. 



SHELDON, Joseph Henry, of Haverhill, real 
estate interests, is a native of Haverhill, born 
February 12, 1843, son of Samuel and Emily B. 
(Sleeper) Sheldon. He descends in the direct 
line from Isaac Sheldon, one of three brothers, 
who came from England to this country about 
1630. One of his ancestors was General Israel 



258 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Putnam who led at I'unker Hill, and his maternal 
ffreat-grandfather was a lieutenant in the Revolu- 
tion. His father was born in Danvers in 1S19, 
and his mother in Alton, N.H., in 1818. He 
was educated in the common schools of Haver- 
hill, and was early at work, being but twelve years 
of age when his father died and the care of the 
family fell largely upon him, with the advice and 
assistance of his admirable mother. His first 
employment was in a shoe manufactory in Haver- 
hill, where he remained a short time. Then he 
became a clerk in a dry-goods store, and in 1857 
a clerk in the rcad\-made clothing business, in 




JOSEPH H. SHELDON. 

which he continued for thirteen years. In 187 1 
he began business in the same line on his own 
account, and prospered. In 1890 he retired, and 
engaged in real estate operations and the manage- 
ment of estates. He was a member of the Board 
of Aldermen in 1882 and 1883, and subsequently 
chairman of the first board of registration, resign- 
ing the latter position before his term was com- 
pleted, to accept the office of mayor of the city, 
to which he was elected for 1885. He was re- 
elected to the mayoralty in 1887. His first year 
as mayor was marked by the construction of 
sewers and the inauguration of permanent street 
and road improvements ; and the most note- 



worthy achievements of his second term were the 
laying out of Washington Square Park, and fol- 
low^ing up the same line of work as in 1885. 
In 1893 he was elected a member of the board 
of Overseers of the Poor, which position he still 
retains. On the occasion of the celebration of 
the 250th anniversary of the incorporation of 
Haverhill as a town, in 1893, he served as secre- 
tary of the reception committee. In State and 
national politics Mr. Sheldon is a Democrat ; and, 
in religious faith, a Universalist : he attends the 
First Universalist Church of Haverhill, and is 
chairman of the parish committee. He is con- 
nected with the Free Masons, the Odd Fellows, 
the order of Red Men, and has passed through 
the official chairs of the latter, and also of the 
encampment of the order of Odd P"eIlows. He 
is a trustee of Odd Fellows' Hall Association. 
He was an original member of the Mayors' Club 
of Massachusetts, and was a member of its first 
executive committee in association with ex-Gov- 
ernor Russell and ex-Mayor Rotch, of New Bed- 
ford. He was married December 27, 1866, in 
Haverhill, to Miss Emily E. Jaques, daughter 
of Addison B. Jaques, late treasurer of the 
Haverhill Savings Bank. 



SHERMAN, William Frederick, of Law- 
rence, agent of the Atlantic Cotton Mills, is a 
native of Rhode Island, born in Hopkinton, May 
28, 1S48, son of William A. and Mary Collins 
(Kenyon) Sherman. He received a thorough 
common-school education in district schools, the 
Union High School of Central Falls, R.I., and 
the Lonsdale High of Lonsdale, R.I., finishing 
with a special private technical course under Pro- 
fessor Joseph M. Ross, a graduate of Amherst Col- 
lege. His first work was as a clerk in a country 
savings-bank before he had finished his school- 
ing. The long summer vacations were afterward 
devoted to work of various sorts, — in jewelry 
shops, on a farm, in machine-shops, assisting 
surveyors. At the age of seventeen he taught 
a large country school for four months. At 
eighteen he practised surveying while attending 
school, and at all favorable opportunities ob- 
tained practical information on mill problems and 
work, from his father, who was a '•mill man." 
At nineteen he entered the employ of the Lons- 
dale Company, Lonsdale, R.I., engaging to do 
their draughting and surveying and to learn the 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



259 



cotton manufacturing business. He was with 
this company for nearly four years. From Janu- 
ary to August, 187 1, he was making (h'awings 




W. F. SHERMAN. 

for the Granite Mills of Fall River. Then he 
established himself in Fall River, opening an 
office for mill engineering and civil engineering, 
and soon had a very large practice within and 
without the city. From 1875 to 1887 he was in 
the employ of the Boston Manufacturers' Mutual 
Fire Insurance Company, as an expert engineer, 
making descriptions and valuations of manufact- 
uring property; and in 1887 he came to Law- 
rence as agent of the widely known Atlantic 
Cotton Mills, which position lie has since held. 
He is a member of the Lawrence Board of Trade, 
president of the organization in 1890. Mr. 
Sherman is not a club man, nor a member of 
anv of the secret fraternal organizations ; and he 
has neither held nor sought public place. He is 
in politics a Republican. He was married May 
8, 1872, to Miss Martha Gertrude Greene, of 
Rhode Island. They have three children : Alice 
L., Charles G., and Harold F. Sherman. 



1851, son of Perez and Adeline (Jones) Simmons. 
He is a lineal descendant of Moses Simmons 
(originally spelled Moyses Symonzon), who came 
to Duxbury in the first ship to arrive after the 
" Mayflower " from Leyden, and, through his pater- 
nal grandmother, of Colonel Benjamin Church 
who captured King Philip ; and on the maternal 
side his descent is from John Jones and Sarah 
(Lapham) Jones, of Welsh stock. His father, 
Perez Simmons, was for thirty years a prominent 
lawyer in Plymouth County; one of the leaders 
of the Dorr Rebellion in Rhode Island ; a mem- 
ber of the Massachusetts Legislature, first in the 
House and afterwards in the Senate, where he 
served on the committee on revision of the stat- 
utes, of whose work the General Statutes of i860 
was the result ; and a member of the State Consti- 
tutional Convention of 1853. John F. Simmons 
was educated in the public schools, in the Assi- 
nippi Institute, Phillips (Exeter) Academy, and 
Harvard College, from which he graduated in the 
class of 1873. He was class orator, and president 
of his society in college. He studied law in the 
Harvard Law School until February, 1875, when he 




JOHN F. SIMMONS. 



was admitted to the bar before Judge Aldrich. He 

SIMMONS, John Franklix, member of the began practice in Abington, in association with 

Plymouth bar, was born in Hanover, June 26, the late Judge J. E. Keith, under the firm name of 



26o 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Keith & Simmons. 'I'liis relation continued until 
1885, when the firm was dissolved ; and he became 
a partner of Harvey H. Pratt, under the name of 
Simmons & Pratt. In 1890 the firm established 
its Boston office, and has since practised in that 
city. One of his most notable cases was the 
McNulty will case, which took him to Europe in 
1888. He was receiver of the Abington National 
Bank (appointed in August. 1886), and closed up 
his work in six months, the quickest settlement 
on record, it is the only case in which a national 
bank went on, after being in receivers' hands, 
with the same charter and number. He is now 
a director of this bank. For eight years he was 
president of the South Scituate Savings Bank. 
He was a prominent candidate for the Superior 
Court judgeship wlien Judge Corcoran was ap- 
pointed in 1893, having, it is said, as strong a 
petition as was ever presented. While a resident 
of Hanover, he was a member of the School Com- 
mittee for fifteen years. In politics he is a Demo- 
crat. He is a Knight Templar of the Old Colony 
Commandery, Abington ; and is a member of the 
Old Colony Club of Plymouth. Mr. Simmons 
was married January 10, 1S77, to Miss Fanny 
Florence Allen (a descendant of Tristram Coflin, 
who came from England to Nantucket, and of 
the family to which Benjamin Franklin's mother 
belonged, of Professor Maria Mitchell's family, 
and of the Folgers and Coffins of Nantucket). 
They have three children : Henry Franklin, Mary 
Folger, and Perez Simmons. 



SIMPSON, James Rae, of Lawrence, merchant, 
was born in Stanstead, Canada, January 4, 1832, 
son of Donald and Helen (Rae) Simpson. His 
early years were spent on a farm, the winter 
months at school, which was several miles distant 
from his home, and reached not infrequently by a 
hard trudge over unbroken roads. His education 
was finished at the Stanstead Academy, from 
which he graduated at the age of fifteen. After 
teaching a country school for four winters, he 
came to the United States in pursuit of em- 
ployment. He was some time employed in a 
furniture store in Boston, next worked awhile in 
a Lowell mill, for a longer period in the print 
works at Manchester, N.H., where he became an 
overseer, and in the spring of 1853 came to Law- 
rence, which has since been his home. Here, 
after working a few seasons in the Pacific and the 



Atlantic mills, he entered the grocery business in 
the employ of Shattuck Brothers, and in 1858 
engaged in this branch of trade with Alfred A. 
Lamprey, under the firm name of A. A. Lamprey 
& Co., which continued for twenty years. Then 
he purchased his partner's interest; and he has 
since conducted the business alone, of late years 
with his son, a graduate of the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, as assistant. His profits 
were early invested in real estate, and he now 
owns much valuable property in the city. He 
was one of the promoters of the Merchants' Na- 
tional Bank building and of the building erected 




JAMES R. SIMPSON. 

for the United Order of Pilgrim Fathers, two fine 
structures on the main business street of Law- 
rence. He is president and director of the Mer- 
chants' National Bank, an active member of the 
Lawrence Board of Trade, and president of the 
Pilgrim Fathers' Hall Association. He was a 
member of the Lawrence Common Council in 
1863, and mayor of the city in 1878-79-80-85, 
the only person who has held the office for four 
terms. At the close of his fourth term he de- 
clined a renomination, and retired with an ad- 
mirable record and undiminished popularity. He 
is identified with many societies of a social and 
benevolent nature ; is a past master of the Gre- 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



261 



cian Lodge of Masons, and has been its treasurer 
since 1867 ; a member of the Mt. Sinai Royal 
Arch Chapter, member of Bethany C'ommand- 
ery, Knights Templar ; and member of the Home 
Club. Mr. Simpson was married April, 1859, 
to Miss Julia H. Coan, of Exeter, Me. They 
have two children now living : Nellie M. and 
James E. Simpson. 



SMITH, (William) Dexter, (Jr.), of Boston, 
journalist, writer of popular lyrics, and playwright, 
is a native of Salem, born November 14, 1839, 
son of William D. and Lucy Ann (White) Smith. 
He is of Scotch-English ancestry. At the time of 
his birth his father was an inn-keeper and farmer. 
His education was acquired at the Epes Gram- 
mar and the English High Schools of Salem ; and 
at the age of twenty he came to Boston, where 
he attended Comer's Commercial College, receiv- 
ing at the close of his course a book-keeper's 
diploma. For a year or two he was book-keeper 
in the store of his father, then established at 
No. 18 Faneuil Hall Square, under the firm name 
of William D. Smith & Co., at the same time 
teaching evenings in the Pitts Street free evening 
school ; and in i860 he entered the service of 
the United States as clerk in the Boston post- 
office (1860-64), still continuing his work at 
the evening school, which covered four years 
(1859-63). At about this time he began con- 
tributing to local periodicals, among them Glca- 
soh's ricforial, the Saturday Evening Gazette, and 
the Evening Transcript, furnishing both prose 
and poetry ; and also to write songs. His first 
song, " She is \\'aiting for Us There," was pub- 
lished by Russell & Patee in 1862, while he was 
connected with the post-office ; and it was immedi- 
ately added to the repertory of " Buckley's Sere- 
naders," who sang it thousands of times. Next 
came " Follow the Drum " (1863) and other 
stirring war-songs, — " Hurrah for the Old Flag," 
" Stand by the Banner of Columbia," " Union and 
Liberty," and many others, which at once became 
popular in the army, on the march, and by the 
camp-hre. With the close of the war appeared 
"Columbia is Free" (1865), originally sung at the 
Boston Museum by T. ISL Hunter, and " Our 
Victorious Banner." Then followed numerous 
ballads, several of which became household words. 
Among these " Ring the Bell Softly, there's 
Crape on the Door" (1866: set by E. N. Catlin\ 



" Cross and Crown " (also 1866), sung at scores 
of funeral services by Joseph L. White, the famil- 
iar cradle song, " Put me in my Little Bed " 
(1870), so well known by the children a genera- 
tion ago, "Singing Baby to Sleep," " Where the 
Little Feet are Waiting," and " Darling Minnie 
Lee," have enjoyed the widest popularity, reach- 
ing sales of thousands of copies. His " Ring the 
Bell Softly, there's Crape on the Door," was 
recited at the memorial services in commemora- 
tion of the late Hon. Thaddeus Stevens in Con- 
gress, December 17, 1868, by Congressman 
Ashley. These and other songs appeared in 




DEXTER SMITH. 

rapid succession ; and in a comparatively few 
years the number of Mr. Smith's lyrics had 
reached five hundred, the list of titles alone 
filling twelve pages of the catalogue of the 
library of the British Museum. Several of them 
have been reproduced in England, and " Ring 
the Bell Softly " has been translated into foreign 
languages. His success in this field is due to 
his faculty of reaching the heart of the general 
public. " His songs have won their way," 
W. S. B. Mathews, the eminent critic and musi- 
cal writer, has said, " because they possess the 
qualities of simplicity and graceful sentiment, 
which appeal strongly to the average .\merican." 



262 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Many of Mr. Smith's lyrics have found their way 
to England, and have been set to music and pub- 
lished in that country. Among his song-poems 
thus complimented have been : " Do not \\ound 
the Heart that Loves Thee," and "Baby's gone to 
Sleep'" (set by Sir Julius Benedict, and published 
in London); "Our Victorious Banner"' (set by 
Sir Robert Prescott Stewart, of Dublin): "On 
Rosy \\'ings the Summer comes '" (set by Franz 
Abt, of Germany, composer of " When the Swal- 
lows Homeward fly"); "Tell me not that I'll 
Forget thee" (set by Carl Rosa, London); and 
others. In 1865 Mr. Smith became clerk in the 
music store of G. 1 ). Russell & Co., then at 
No. 126 Tremont Street, and soon after took up 
the work of editor of musical publications, his 
first editorial duties being in connection with 
The Orpheus (1867). Since that time he has 
been continuously engaged as editor and in other 
departments of journalism. Among these periodi- 
cals have been The Folio (1869-71), Dexter 
Smith's Paper (1872-77), and The Musical Record 
(1878-1894) ; and his editorial services have been 
employed, largely as musical and dramatic critic, 
on The Commonwealth, The Beacon, and other 
Boston journals during long periods. He has 
also served as correspondent of the London Or- 
chestra, and of numerous musical journals in this 
country. His first dramatic work was upon a 
version of " Cinderella," which was brought out 
at the Continental Theatre, Boston (1866). Later 
he wrote upon " Revels " (produced by Willie 
Edouin); then " Zanita," produced at the Boston 
Theatre (1884), where it had a long run, and was 
subsequently brought out Ln the other large cities 
of the country. He has also made a successful 
libretto for " Uncle Tom's Cabin," which has 
been performed in various New England cities, 
as well as adaptations of " Boccaccio," first pro- 
duced by the Boston Ideal Opera Company at the 
Boston Theatre (1880), "The Musketeers," and 
others. He has written numerous odes for no- 
table occasions, — the Dedication Ode sung at the 
opening of Selwyn's Theatre, Boston (1867), the 
Dedication Ode sung at the opening of the Cen- 
tennial Exhibition at Philadelphia (1876), that 
sung at the unveiling of the Army and Navy 
Monument, Boston Common (1877), and the ode 
for the centennial celebration of the Stoughton 
Musical Society (1886), the oldest musical society 
in the country : and he has published several 
books, among them " De.xter Smith's Poems " 



(Boston: G. D. Russell & Co., 1868), "Blanks 
and Prizes," comedietta (Boston: Spencer & Co., 
1869). and "Cyclopaedia of Boston" (Boston: 
Cashin & Smith, 1886). He has in preparation 
a small vohnne of graceful sonnets of late years 
contributed by him to the periodical press, mostly 
to the columns of the Boston Transcript and Jour- 
nal. Mr. Smith was a member of the musical 
committee of the World's Peace Jubilee, Boston ; 
serv^ed on the committee on Poor Children's E.\- 
cursions 1875-82 ; and has taken part in other 
popular movements. He has been identified with 
Boston since he moved here from Salem, his fre- 
quent trips abroad only increasing his fondness 
for the former city, adding largely also to his 
original patriotic and genuine Americanism of 
thought and feeling. He has been connected with 
the Masonic order since 1873, a member of the 
Revere Lodge, Boston. In politics he was a 
Republican in early life, latterly becoming an 
Independent. He has never held public or other 
office, always declining to serve in such stations, 
which have no attraction for him. He is un- 
married. 



SOULE, RuFUS Albertson, of New Bedford, 
manufacturer, was born in Mattapoisett, Plymouth 
County, March 16, 1839, son of Thomas Howard 
and Margaret Albertson (Dunham) Soule. He is 
a direct descendant of George Soule, who came 
over in the "Mayflower," and, through his mother, 
of the -Albertsons and Dunhams, who were among 
the earliest families in Plymouth. His maternal 
great-grandfather, George Dunham, was an officer 
in the Revolutionary War, and his grandfather, 
George Dunham, an officer in the War of 181 2. 
Thomas Howard, for whom his father was named, 
was the originator of the Howard family in this 
country, and came over in 1634. Rufus .■\. Soule 
received a good education in the public schools in 
New Bedford, and an excellent training for busi- 
ness life. He began upon leaving school as a 
clerk in a boot and shoe store, and for eight years 
he was a salesman with the LTnion Boot and Shoe 
Company of New Bedford. When the Civil War 
broke out, he enlisted in Company E, Third Regi- 
ment, Massachusetts "Volunteers, and contributed 
his share to a remarkable family war record, — 
each of his three brothers also serving in the war, 
one in the cavalry, one in the artillery, and one in 
the navy. All passed through unscathed save 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



263 



one, — Henry Warren Soule, who was killed in 
action at Gettysburg. In October. 1865, Mr. 
Soule entered business on his own account, form- 
ing a copartnership with Savory C. Hathaway for 
the manufacture of shoes, Mr. Hathaway having 
started the business about two months earlier, 
under the style of S. C. Hathaway & Co. At the 




RUFUS A. SOULE. 

beginning the business was small, emplo\ing but 
tive or si.\ hands. In 1866 the style of the firm 
became Hathaway & Soule, and it so continued 
till 1876, when Herbert A. Harrington, of Boston, 
was admitted, and it was changed to Hathaw-ay, 
Soule, & Harrington. In June, 1890, the firm 
became a stock company, under the title of Hatha- 
way, Soule, & Harrington Incorporated, with Mr. 
Hathaway as president, Mr. Soule vice-president, 
and Mr. Harrington treasurer, and the three con- 
stituting the board of directors. The business 
has gradually grown until for the year ending 
June I, 1893, the sales of the corporation had 
reached nearly a million and a half. Its factories 
are now in New Bedford and Middleborough, the 
main office in Boston, and salesroom also in New 
York ; and it is interested in retail stores in New- 
York City, Washington, Chicago, St. Louis, and in 
several New England cities, — Boston, Springfield, 
New London, Conn., and Bridgeport, Conn. In 



addition to this extensive business Mr. Soule is 
interested in the City and the Bristol manufactur- 
ing corporations (a director of each), is vice-presi- 
dent of the New Bedford Safe Deposit and Trust 
Company, president of the Acushnet Co-operative 
Bank, director of the New Bedford Co-operative 
Bank, president of the New Bedford Board of 
Trade. He has served in the New Itedford city 
government, member of the Common Council in 
1869-70-71-74-75, and president of the body in 
1874; was a member for New Bedford in the 
Legislature of 1878 and 1879, serving both terms 
on the committee on railroads ; and is now chair- 
man of the Board of License Commissioners 
of New Bedford, appointed for the term of si.x 
years from the first Monday in June, 1894. Upon 
his appointment to the latter office the New Bed- 
ford Mercury remarked that he is of " the right 
stamp of man to hold public office. . . . He is 
honest and courageous, devoted to what he be- 
lieves to be right, and fearless in his words and 
acts." He is a member of the Loyal Legion ; 
is past commander of the R. A. Peirce Post, 
190, Grand Army of the Republic (a delegate 
from the Massachusetts Encampment to the Na- 
tional Encampment in Pittsburg, Penn., Septem- 
ber, 1894); member of the Sutton Commandery, 
Knights Templar, the Adoniram Royal Arch 
Chapter, and Star in the East Lodge of Masons 
of the Wamsutta and Dartmouth clubs of New- 
Bedford, and the Saturday Night Club of Hyannis. 
Mr. Soule was married August 28, i860, to Miss 
Susan Nesmith, of Bucksport, Me. They have 
had three children: Margaret Howard (now- wife 
of Dr. Garry de N. Hough), Lois M. (wife of 
Alexander T. Smith), and Rufus A. Soule, Jr. 



STETSON, George Ripley, of New Bedford, 
president of the New Bedford Gas and Edison 
Light Company, is a native of Connecticut, born 
in Brooklyn, Windham County, May n, 1837, son 
of James A. and Dolly (Witter) Stetson. On his 
father's side he is descended from Robert Stetson, 
who was commissioned as cornet in 1658 or 1659 
of the first Horse Company raised in Plymouth 
Colony; and on his mother's side the famil\- 
descent is from the first settlers in the north- 
eastern part of Connecticut, and commissions from 
George III. to his grandfathers Witter are now- 
among the family possessions. The present home- 
stead of the family has been in their possession 



264 



MEN OF I'ROGRESS. 



from aljout the time of the original grants of land 
by the English government. His father moved 
from Brooklyn, Conn., to Northampton, Mass., in 
1843, and, returning to Brooklyn in 1847, occu- 
pied the homestead farm, where, between farm 
work and school, the boy's time was spent till his 
eighteenth year. His education was attained in the 
common schools and in an academy at Hampton, 
Conn. He began work for his trade as a ma- 
chinist on the first of January, 1856, under Hiram 
Wells at Florence, Mass., and completed his 




GEO. R. STETSON. 

apprenticeship at the works of the American 
Machine Company in Springfield, in February, 
1859. The spring of 1861 found him at work 
as a journeyman mechanic in Wallingford, Conn., 
having been thrown out of employment as a ma- 
chinist by the general depression that preceded 
the Civil War. Subsequently lie returned to 
Northampton, and during the war carried through 
contracts in gun-work there, and also in New 
Haven and in Trenton, N.J. In the autumn of 
1863 he entered the employment of O. F. Win- 
chester, of the \\'inchester Arms Company, where 
he remained ten years approximately, including 
a trip to Brazil in 1868 during the war with Para- 
guay, at which time he was in charge of arms and 
ammunition consigned to the Brazilian govern- 



ment. I'hese arms were probably the first consid- 
erable number of breech-loading guns introduced 
into South America. For most of the time spent 
with the Winchester Arms Company he had 
charge of the ammunition department. This was 
a comparatively new industry, and during his con- 
nection with it new machines and processes were 
frequently developed. Many of the methods in 
present use were of his invention. In May, 1873, 
Mr. Stetson came to New Bedford, and assumed 
mechanical charge of the Morse Twist Drill and 
Machine Company, with which he continued as 
superintendent till July, 1890. During this time 
the industry grew from one of comparatively small 
consequence to one of the largest in its line of 
manufacture. On the last-mentioned date he re- 
signed, to take his present ofhce of president and 
general manager of the New Bedford Gas and 
Edison Light Company. In addition to the duties 
of this office he is president of the New Bedford 
Co-operative Bank, president of the Union Boot 
and Shoe Association, and director of the Board 
of Trade. He served as alderman during the 
administration of the Hon. Abram Howland as 
mayor in 1875 ^^'^ 1876 ; and was a member of 
the Water Board for five years, declining a re-elec- 
tion at the close of the second term. He is a 
member of the several Masonic orders, and served 
as treasurer of the Royal Arch Chapter for a term 
of years. He was also president of the Republi- 
can Club of New Bedford during the Harrison 
campaign of 1888. Mr. Stetson married in No- 
\ember, 1859, Miss Ellen M. Stall, of Hadley. 
They have had seven children, five of whom are 
now living : George A., Ellen M., May E., James 
A., and Jane ^^'. Stetson. 



STEVENS. Ch.^rles Godfrey, of Clinton, 
member of the bar and ex-judge of the district 
court, is a native of New Hampshire, born in 
Claremont, September 16, 182 1, son of Godfrey 
and Hannah (Pool) Stevens. His father was 
also a native of Claremont, born there September 
10, 1796, and died there September 18, 1842, a 
merchant and manufacturer, member of the New 
Hampshire Legislature, moderator of town meet- 
ings for many years, and a delegate to the con- 
vention at Harrisburg, Penn., which nominated 
A\'illiam Henry Harrison for president. His 
mother was a daughter of Captain William W. 
Poole, of Hollis, N.H., a farmer, trader, and 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



265 



manufaLiuiLT. He attended a preparatory school 
and Kimball Union Academy, Merulen, N.H. ; 
and graduated from Dartmouth College 



in 



the 




(.'linton. The onl\- society to which he belongs 
is that of the Sons of the American Revolution. 
He was married .September 29, US46, to Miss 
Laura A. Russell, daughter of F.li and Hepzibeth 
(Floyd) Russell, a descendant on her father's side 
of James Russell (born 17 10, died 1784), origi- 
nally of Wellington, Conn., later of Walpole, N.H.; 
and on her mother's side of Benjamin Floyd, 
born in Boston in 1738, and died in Walpole, 
N.H., in 1812. Their children living are: Edward 
Godfrev and Ellen Kate Stevens. 



STRATTON, Charles Carroll, of Fitchburg, 
of the Sentinel Printing Company, is a native of 
\'ermont, born in the town of Fairlee, August 22, 
1829, son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Sturtevant) 
Stratton. His father was a farmer, and a leading 
citizen of the town, representing it in the Legisla- 
ture and holding various positions of trust. He 
was educated in the district school and at the 
Thetford Academy. At the age wf-seventeen he 
left home to learn the printer's trade. After 
serving his apprenticeship in the office of the 



CHAS. G. STEVENS 

class of 1840. He read law with ITpham lS: 
Snow, Claremont, N.H., and was admitted to the 
bar in 1843, ^^ Claremont. In 1845 he moved to 
Massachusetts, and began practice in Clinton. In 
1853 he was a member of the Massachusetts 
Constitutional Convention ; in 1862 a member of 
the State Senate ; and in 1862-63 a draft com- 
missioner for Worcester County by appointment 
of Governor Andrew. He was appointed judge 
of the Second Eastern Worcester District Court 
in 1874, and held this position till 1882. Judge 
Stevens has also been long identified with banking 
interests in Clinton. He assisted in organizing 
the Clinton Savings Bank, in 185 1, and has been 
for many years solicitor and secretary and trustee 
of the institution. He was also one of the or- 
ganizers of the First National Bank in 1864, and 
has been its president from its establishment ; 
and he has been a director of the Merchants' and 
Farmers' Mutual Fire Insurance Company since 
1876. In politics he was a Daniel Webster 
Whig, and afterward became a Republican ; and 
in religious faith he is an Episcopalian, senior 
warden of the Church of the Good Shepherd, in 




C. C. STRATTON. 



Democratic Republican at Haverhill, N.H., he 
went to Newbury, Vt., wliere he worked some 
time at his trade in the office of the Aurora of the 



266 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Valley. Subsequently he went to Boston, and 
worked several months there in the old Franklin 
Printing-office, and thence to New York, where he 
was employed in the Methodist Book Concern. 
Then in September, 1854, he came to Fitchburg, 
and entered the printing-office of the Sentinel, at 
that time a small weekly paper, with which he 
has been connected ever since, with the e.xception 
of a few months when he was serving in the 
Civil War, attached to the Second Massachusetts 
Cavalry, and in the Christian Commission at City 
Point, Va. In March, 1867, he purchased a half- 
interest in the establishment, and si.x years later, 
entering into partnership with John E. Kellogg, 
began the publication of the Daily Sentinel, the 
first number bearing date of May 6, 1873. The 
venture proved a success, and the business of the 
partners steadily increased and expanded. In 
1 88 1 the daily and the weekly were both en- 
larged ; another increase in the size of the sheets 
was made in 1885, a third in 1886, a fourth in 
1890, when the change from the folio to the quarto 
was made, and a fifth in 1892, the Sentinel \\\&n 
becoming an eight-page paper of seven columns 
each, printed on a perfecting press. The Sentinel 
has been an important factor in the development 
of Fitchburg, and devoted to the interests of 
Central Massachusetts. Mr. Stratton is a mem- 
ber of the order of Odd Fellows and of the 
Knights of Honor, and belongs to the Fitchburg 
Board of Trade and the Fitchburg Historical 
Society. In politics he is Republican. He was 
married June 11, 1873, to Miss Maria S. Putnam, 
daughter of John and Sophronia C. Putnam, of 
Fitchburg. 'I'hey have one child: Louise S. 
Stratton. 



Ebenezer Webster, and established a grocery busi- 
ness of his own, which flourished for several years. 
After the dissolution of this partnership he en- 



TAYLOR, Oliver, of Haverhill, merchant, 
mayor of the city 1893-94, is a native of New 
Hampshire, born in the town of Atkinson, in 
1827, son of Oliver and Lettice (Page) Taylor. 
His education was acquired in the public schools 
and at the Atkinson Academy. He began active 
life as a farmer, which occupation he pursued till 
the year 1852, when he moved to Haverhill to 
engage in business. Selecting the grocery trade, 
he entered the store of Currier & Taylor as a 
clerk, with the intention thoroughly to learn its 
details. After spending some time here, and a 
longer period in a similar capacity in the store 
of John Davis, he entered into partnership with 




OLIVER TAYLOR. 

tered the clothing trade, in partnership with his 
brother, Levi Taylor (mayor of Haverhill in 1872, 
re-elected 1873, but declined on account of ill- 
health), under the firm name of Le\-i & Oliver 
Taylor. Subsequently Martin Taylor was ad- 
mitted to the partnership, and the unique style 
of "The Three Taylors," by which the firm 
has since been known, was then adopted. The 
establishment was rapidly developed, and it is 
now one of the largest houses in its line of busi- 
ness in Essex County. In 1878 Mr. Taylor also 
became a member of the firm of Taylor, Goodv^'in, 
& Co., now the largest coal and lumber dealers 
in Haverhill. Besides these interests he is con- 
cerned in the Amesbury Carriage Company, of 
which he is a director, in the Merrimac Valley 
Steamboat Company, a director ; he is president 
and director of the Essex National Bank, di- 
rector of the Citizens' Co-operative Bank, and 
of the Pentucket Savings Bank ; and a large 
owner of Haverhill real estate. For a long period 
he has been prominent in town affairs. He has 
been a member of the local Board of Overseers 
of the Poor for upwards of thirty years; was an 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



267 



alderman in 1S73 ; was first elected mayor for 
1893, nominated in mass caucus, by a good 
majority after a sharp contest, and was returned 
for 1894 by a majority of 1,205. In 1876 and 1877 
he represented his district in the lower house of 
the Legislature, serving the first term as chairman 
of the State House committee, and as a member 
of important committees during his second term. 
Mr. Taylor was married November 12, 1857, to 
Miss Mary E. Fellows, daughter of Samuel Fel- 
lows, of Haverhill. They have one daughter : 
Edith Taylor. 

TRL^ELL, BvRON, of Lawrence, merchant, is 
a native of Vermont, born in St. Johnsbury, No- 
vember 23, 1834, son of George \V. and Fanny 
(Whitcomb) Truell. He received his early educa- 
cation in public schools at Barnston, P.Q., and 
graduated from Stanstead Academy, P.Q., in 
1854. At the age of nineteen he came to Law- 
rence, and entered the dry-goods store of A. \\'. 
Stearns & Co. as merchant's clerk. Here he re- 
mained till 1858, when he formed a partnership 
with George H. Eailev, under the firm name of 



the firm of Byron Truell cS: Co., which still con- 
tinues. His success in business has been 
marked. In 1867 he remodelled and enlarged 
his store, and added the carpet department. 
In 1 88 1 he made an extensive tour in Europe, 
inspecting thoroughly the foreign market, and 
making connections that have proved very lucra- 
tive. In 1883 he again enlarged his quarters 
by taking down the old store and rebuilding in 
the most modern style of business architecture, 
and his present establishment is in e.xtent and 
richness one of the finest in his section of the 
State. He is a director of the Pacific National 
Bank, and president of the Lawrence Board of 
Trade. His public life began in the Lawrence 
city government as member of the Common Coun- 
cil of 1865. In 1875 and 1876 he represented his 
city in the lower house of the Legislature, where 
he served on the important committees on labor 
statistics (chairman) and on mercantile affairs. 
In 1877 and 1878 he was a State senator, serving 
both terms as chairman of the joint committee on 
prisons, and in 1878 as chairman of the committee 
on mercantile affairs. In 1888 he was alternate 
delegate to the National Republican Convention 
at Chicago. In 1890 and 1891 he was a member 
of the E.x'ecutive Council, elected from the Sixth 
Councillor District. He is prominently connected 
with the Masonic order, a member of the Grecian 
Lodge, Lawrence, of Mount Sinai Royal Arch 
Chapter, and of Bethany Commandery of Knights 
Templar ; and he also belongs to the Royal Ar- 
canum. The only club with which he is con- 
nected is the Home Club of Lawrence. Mr. 
Truell was married September 5, 1859, to Miss 
Mary E. Armstrong, daughter of William H. and 
Marv (Hannaford) .\rmstrong, of Lawrence. 
They have two daughters : (iertrude E. (now Mrs. 
Albert E. Butler) and Grace L. (now Mrs. George 
H. Eaton). 



VOSE, James Whitini;, of Boston, founder and 
president of the Vose & Sons Pianoforte Com- 
pany, is a native of Milton, suburb of Boston, 
the birthplace and working-place of Benjamin 
Crehore, the builder of the first American piano, 
in 1798. He was born October 21, 1818, son of 
Whiting and Mary (Gooch) Vose. His ancestors 
came from England, and settled originally in 
Bailey & Truell, and engaged in the same business Milton. He was educated in the public schools 
on his own account. In 1863 the connection and the Milton Academy, from which he gradu- 
with Mr. Bailey was dissolved; and he established ated with honors in the spring of 1834. Immedi- 



^#t 



*-t^ 




BYRON TRUELL. 



268 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



ately after leaving school, on the yth of April, he 
was apprenticed to learn the cabinet-maker's 
trade. He worked at this trade till the autumn 
of 1839, when on his twenty-first birthday he 
entered a piano factory as a workman. He soon 
acquired skill in various departments, and in 1846 
began making piano and organ keys on his own 
account. In this branch of the manufacture he 
was remarkably successful, and his work was 
sought by the best manufacturers. But his am- 
bition was to make the finished piano ; and in 
185 1 he started in a small way, completing his 
first instrument before the close of that year. In 




JAS. W. VOSE. 

1855, in order to devote his attention exclusively 
to his piano interests, he sold out his key busi- 
ness, and since that time has been engaged wholly 
in the development and manufacture of the Vose 
piano. ' From the first he has followed closely 
every detail of the work, overseeing each process, 
constantly experimenting, carefully studying each 
new principle as it has appeared, and, if satisfied 
of its worth, promptly adopting it. Under his 
conduct the manufacture has grown from an out- 
put of two pianos a week in 1855, from a small 
factory, to an average of eighty per week in 1892, 
from one of the largest establishments of its kind 
in the country, comprising four great buildings, 



on Waltham and A\'ashington Streets at the .South 
End, Boston, two of five stories each, one of 
seven, and one of four stories, with a total floor- 
age of 129,000 square feet, and an aggregate area 
under plant of 138,000 square feet. Mr. Vose 
is a member of the Massachusetts Charitable 
Mechanic Association, of the Ancient and Honor- 
able Artillery Company, and of the Bostonian 
Society. In politics he is a Republican, a mem- 
ber of the Republican Club of Massachusetts, 
of the Brookline Republican Club, and of the 
Boston Marketmen's Republican Club ; and in 
religion he is a Baptist, connected with the Brook- 
line Baptist Society, and a member of the Baptist 
Social Union. He was married September 16, 
1847, to Miss .\lmira Howe. They have had 
five children : Francis Childs (deceased), Irving 
Bond, Willard Atherton, Julien Wallenstein, and 
Frances Howe Vose. His three sons, Irving, 
Willard, and Julien, are associated with him in 
his piano business, the former first entering the 
factory in 1869, and now in charge of the factory 
warerooms ; Willard, after serving his apprentice- 
ship, becoming general superintendent of the fac- 
tory, and since 1874 the treasurer of the company ; 
and Julien entering the factory in 1882, and be- 
coming superintendent of the works in 1889, the 
year of the incorporation of the company. 



WALLACE, RonNEv, of Fitchburg, manufact- 
urer, was born in New Hampshire, in the town 
of New Ipswich, December 21, 1823, son of 
David and Roxanna (Gowen) Wallace. He is a 
lineal descendant of Benoni Wallis, who lived in 
Lunenberg, Mass., in 1755. He was educated in 
the common schools, and began business life 
at the age of sixteen, driving freight teams be- 
tween Rindge, N.H., and Boston. He continued 
in this occupation till he was twenty years old, 
and for the succeeding ten years had the entire 
charge of selling the then celebrated medicines 
of Dr. Stephen Jewett throughout New England. 
Then in 1853 he came to Fitchburg, and entering 
into partnership with the late Stephen Shepley, 
under the firm name of Shepley & Wallace, en- 
gaged in dealing at wholesale in books and 
stationery, and in paper and cotton waste. This 
was the beginning of a business which grew to 
large proportions, and made the firm one of the 
best known in its trade in New England. In 
1865 the firm was dissolved, and the business 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



269 



divided, Mr. Wallace taking the cotton waste 
department, which he speedily greatly developed. 
The same year, 1865, with three associates, he 
founded the Fitchburg Paper Company. Four 
years later he became the sole owner of the busi- 
ness, and so remained until 1879, when he ad- 
mitted his sons, Herbert I. and George R. Wal- 
lace, to partnership. Since that time new mills 
have been built, large additions made to the 
original plant, and comfortable dwellings erected 
near by for the operatives. Mr. Wallace has also 
for many years been interested in other corpora- 
tions. Since 1864, with the exception of one 




RODNEY WALLACE. 

year, he has been a director of the Putnam 
Machine Company ; he has been president and 
director of the Fitchburg Gas Company for thirty 
years ; one of the proprietors of the F"itchburg 
Woollen Mills for seventeen years ; and for a long 
period a director of the P'itchburg Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company, of the Fitchburg Railroad 
Company, of the Parkhill Manufacturing Com- 
pany, of the Fitchburg National Bank, and a 
trustee of the Fitchburg Savings Bank. He has 
held numerous public offices, but in each case the 
office has sought the man. In 1S64, 1S65, and 
1867 he was a selectman of his town ; in 1873 he 
represented Pitchburg in the General Court, and, 



although unanimously renominated, declined a re- 
election on account of ill-health; in 1880-81-82 
he was a member of the governor's council ; in 
1884 a delegate to the National Republican 
Convention at Chicago; and in 1889-90 a rep- 
resentative in Congress of his C'ongressional 
district. He has liberally aided numerous under- 
takings for the benefit of the city; and a monu- 
ment to his munificence and public spirit is the 
Wallace Library and Art Building, which was 
erected by him in 1885, at a cost of $84,000, and 
presented to the city of Fitchburg for a free pub- 
lic library, reading-room, and art gallery. Since 
1878 he has been a trustee of Smith College, 
Northampton. Mr. Wallace was married Decem- 
ber I, 1853, to Miss Sophia Ingalls, of Rindge, 
N.H. She died June 20, 1871, leaving two sons : 
Herbert I. and George R. Wallace. He married 
second, December 28, 1S76, Mrs. Sophia P. 
(Billings) Bailey, of Woodstock, Vt. 



WARDWELL, Jacob Otis, member of the 
Suffolk bar, is a native of Lowell, born March 14, 
1857, son of Zenas C. and Adriana S. (Pillsbury) 
Wardwell. Whtn he was four years old, his par- 
ents moved to Groveland, and there his boyhood 
was passed. He was educated in the local 
schools, the Georgetown High School, and the 
New London Academy. He studied law in the 
offices of J. P. & B. B. Jones, of Haverhill, and 
Samuel J. Elder, of Boston, and in the Boston 
Plniversity, from which he graduated in the class 
of 1879. That year he was admitted to the Essex 
bar, and, taking up his residence in Haverhill, 
began practice there, forming a partnership with 
Henry N. Merrill, under the firm name of Merrill 
& Wardwell. This relation continued till the first 
of December, 1S91, when Mr. Wardwell withdrew, 
and established his oflice in Boston, where he has 
since practised. His specialty is corporation law. 
He is general counsel for the Edison Electric Illu- 
minating Company of Boston, and other large 
corporations, mostly in the electrical business. 
Early taking an active interest in politics on the 
Republican side, he became prominent among the 
younger leaders of his party soon after his estab- 
lishment in Haverhill. His first service was in 
the Haverhill Common Council, to which he was 
elected in 1882. In 1887 he was elected to the 
lower house of the Legislature, and through re- 
elections served five consecutive terms. In his 



270 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



first year he was conspicuous in committee work 
and prominent in debates : and at tlie beginning 
of his second term lie was recognized as tlie Re- 
publican leader on the Hoor, which position he 
maintained through the remainder of his legisla- 
tive work. He was twice a candidate for speaker 
of the House and in the second contest, one of 
the hardest in the history of the Commonwealth, 
he was defeated by only two votes. Among the 
committees on wliicii he ser\ed during his several 
terms were those on elections (chairman), pro- 
bate and insolvency, mercantile aflfairs (chairman), 
the judiciary, and rules (chairman). He was also 



Knight Templar of Ha\erhill Commandery. Mr. 
Ward well was married on the 25 th of Decem- 
ber, US77, to Miss Ella M. Eaton, of Bristol, Vt. 
Thev have two children : Sheldon E, and Chester 
.Man U'ardwell. 




J. OTIS WARDWELL. 

a member of the special committee to investigate 
charges of corrupt use of money in the passage of 
the bill to incorporate the town of Beverly Farms, 
and chairman of the committee to investigate sim- 
ilar charges as to the bill for granting franchises 
for elevated railroads in Boston. He has been 
a member of the Republican State Committee 
since 1885, and served as secretary of the com- 
mittee in 1889, 1890, and 1891, having formerly 
been assistant secretary for two years. He is 
president of the Essex Club, president of the Pen- 
tucket Club of Haverhill, and member of the 
Wachusett Club ; and he belongs to the Masonic 
order, past master of the Saggahaw Lodge and 



WETHERBEE, Is.\.ac Josiah, D.D.S., presi- 
dent of the Boston Dental College, is a native of 
Vermont, born in South Reading, March 9, 1817, 
son of the Rev. Josiah and Abigail (Jones) W'eth- 
erbee. His father served with distinction in the 
War of 1812. He was a leading clergyman in the 
Free Baptist denomination, and died in his ninety- 
third year, having lived to see the abolition of 
slavery, for which he labored for fifty years. 
When a boy, Isaac J. Wetherbee gave marked evi- 
dence of a genius for mechanical pursuits, in sev- 
eral feats displaying a large intelligence in the 
methods of execution. At the age of fifteen he 
made a verge to a bull's-eye watch from a darning- 
needle with two common files as tools, and re- 
ceived a dollar and fifty cents for the job. Then 
he constructed a cylinder escapement for a Lepine 
watch without the aid of a watchmaker's lathe, for 
which he was paid four dollars. He was also suc- 
cessful in making pistols, and in altering over old 
riint-locks into percussion-locks. He obtained a 
fair education in the country schools, and, arriving 
at manhood, studied for the ministry under his 
father. He was set apart by ordination to the 
gospel ministry at North Hampton, N.H., June 2, 
1841, and at once began preaching. He held 
pastorates first at North Hampton, N.H., Kittery, 
Me., and afterwards in Charlestown, Mass., where 
he resided in 1845. In 1846 he was obliged by 
ill-health to relinquish this profession ; and he 
turned his attention wholly to dentistry, which he 
had for some years studied and practised among 
his friends in a private way. He further pursued 
his studies with the limited text-books then extant, 
and in 1850 graduated from the Baltimore Dental 
College, tlie first and the then only dental college 
in the world, receiving his degree of Doctor of 
Dental Surgery in February. Establishing liim- 
self in Boston, he early became prominent in the 
profession. In 1865 the Boston Dental Insti- 
tute was organized with seventy members, and 
he w'as elected its president. This society held 
meetings monthly, and gave lectures on dental 
science and allied subjects, till it was superseded 
by a charter for the Boston Dental College, 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



271 



granted June 3, 186S, when upon tlie foinuil or- 
ganization of the institution in July following he 
was made president, with B. B. Perry as secre- 
tary. This position he has since held, with the 
exception of four years, from 1869 to 1873 inclu- 
sive, the first fifteen years also occupying the 
chair of dental science and operative dentistry. 
He is now professor of operative dentistry, emeritus. 
The college was founded for the purpose of giving 
students a thorough education in dental science, 
art, and mechanism, which could not be obtained 
in dental offices, and for the general elevation of 
dentistry to the rank of a recognized profession. 



ization of which he opened the way, and a mem- 
ber of kindred associations. He was j)resident of 
the New England Dental Society for one year ; 
treasurer of the American Dental Association for 
two years ; and president of the American Dental 
Convention one year. He has been long con- 
nected with the Washingtonian Home, an incor- 
porated institution in Boston for the care and cure 
of inebriates, and is now first vice-president of the 
corporation. Dr. Wetherbee was married at Pitts- 
ford, Vt., January 3, 1837, to Miss Sarah Abigail 
Sheldon, the second daughter of Jacob Sheldon, 
by whom he had one son, who died in infancy. 
.-Vfter the demise of his wife in 1870, who was a 
graduate in medicine, he married again February 
I, 1872, Miss Myra Woods, of Nashua, N.H., by 
whom he has had two children : Helen Frances 
and Irving Josiah Wetherbue, wlio are now living. 




ISAAC J. WETHERBEE. 

During its existence of over a quarter of a century, 
twenty-three years of this long period under Dr. 
Wetherbee's administration, it has graduated four 
hundred and ninety-three students with the degree 
of Doctor of Dental Surgery. Its faculty now 
(1894) numbers eight professors, and there are 
fifteen additional instructors. It requires the 
faithful attendance of students for nine months of 
the year. Dr. W'etherbee was the first in his pro- 
fession in Boston to require his office students to 
remain with him for three years, and to promise 
to attend subsequently a dental college and grad- 
uate therefrom. He is an honorary member of 
the Massachusetts Dental Society, for the organ- 



\\'KYMOUTH, Geurck Warkkn, of Fitchburg, 
manufacturer, was born in West Amesbury (now 
Merrimac), Essex County, August 25, 1850, son 
of \\'arren and Charity (Fenno) Weymouth. He 
is of English ancestry, his ancestors first in 
America coming from Portsmouth, England. He 
was educated in the public schools of his native 
town, graduating from the High School. He 
began active life in the carriage-making trade, 
and at the early age of twenty- one engaged in 
the business on his own account. He moved to 
Fitchburg in 1882, where he established an ex- 
tensive carriage repository, which he has since 
successfully carried on. In 1890 he also became 
general manager of the Simonds Rolling-machine 
Company, manufacturing bicycle balls, pedal pins, 
crank axles, and pins for the Westinghouse and 
other car brakes on a large scale, in which he 
had been a stockholder since its formation in 
1886, and rapidly developed its work, within two 
years greatly increasing the output of the mill, 
and quadrupling its business. Besides these in- 
terests he is actively concerned in numerous 
other enterprises of more or less magnitude. He 
is a director and was one of the founders of the 
Orswell Mills, and of the Nockege Mills, director 
of the Worcester Society of the .F^tna Life Insur- 
ance Company, director and one of the promoters 
of the Fitchburg and Leominster Street Railway 
Company, director of the Fitchburg National 
Bank, and trustee of the Fitchburg Savings Bank. 
During his residence in Fitchburg he has been 



272 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



devoted to its interests, and forwarded various 
movements which have quickened its develop- 
ment, especially as a manufacturing centre. He 



1 




C. W. WEYMOUTH. 

served one year in the Common Council, and was 
nominated for alderman, but declined to stand. 
He has been for some years a leading member of 
the Fitchburg Board of Trade, and is now (1894) 
its president, and as such took a prominent part 
in securing the location of a Normal School in 
Fitchburg; is a member of the Merchants' Asso- 
ciation, and of the Park and Athletic clubs of 
Fitchburg. In politics he is a stanch Republi- 
can. He was married July 19, 1882, to Miss 
Emma Josephine Poyen, of Merrimac, Mass. 
Thev have no children. 



WHITE, J0NATH.4N, of Brockton, member of 
the Plymouth bar for nearly half a century, was 
born in East Randolph (now Holbrook), August 
22, 1 8 19, son of Jonathan and Abigail (Holbrook) 
White. He was educated in the common schools, 
at several academies, fitting for college at Phillips 
(Andover) Acadeni)-, being the valedictorian of 
his class, and at Yale, where he graduated in the 
class of 1844. which numbered over one hundred, 
as second in rank. His law studies were pursued 



at the Harvard Law School, where he spent two 
years, and in the Boston law office of Richard H. 
Dana one year. Admitted to the bar in August, 
1847, he has practised at Brockton (the town 
of North Bridge water till 1874) continuously since 
1849. As a lawyer, he has enjoyed a large gen- 
eral practice, was frequently counsel for the town 
of North Bridgewater, and later was the first city 
solicitor of Brockton. In important matters he 
has been frequently consulted by neighboring 
towns and by corporations and individuals to 
obtain his legal opinion, which everywhere is 
recognized as entitled to great weight ; and by 
both bench and bar he is regarded as a sound 
and logical thinker and terse and effective writer 
and speaker. He was a prominent and useful 
member of the General Court during the sixties 
and seventies, representing North Bridgewater in 
the House of Representatives in 1864 and 1866, 
and a senator for the years 1869, 1877-78-79, 
and for three years a member of the judiciary 
committee of the Senate, and 'for the last year 
was its chairman. He has an active interest 
in educational matters ; and, as a member of the 




JONATHAN WHITE. 

School Committee and of the Committee on 
the Public Library, he has done much to forward 
intellectual cultivation in the community. His 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



273 



integrity in professional and private life is un- 
questioned. He holds a leading position in the 
First Congregational Church, of which he is a 
member. Mr. White married May 4, 1849, M'ss 
Nancy M. Adams, of Holbrook. They have had 
four daughters : Alice A., Mary, .\nnie F., and 
Winnifred H. White. 



has always been a Republican. He was married 
first, in Exeter, N.H., July, 186S, to Miss Mary A. 
Warren. She died in July, 1S73. By this mar- 



WIGGIN, George Win.slow, of Franklin, 
member of the Norfolk County bar, was born 
in Sandwich, N.H., March 10, 1841, son of 
Richard and Mehitable (Beede), the former of 
whom was descended from Governor Thomas 
Wigrsin, of Stratham, N.H., and the latter from 
Governor Winslow, of Plymouth, Mass. His 
early life was spent upon his father's farm in New 
Hampshire. His education, obtained almost 
wholly by his own industry, was begun in the 
common schools of his native town, and continued 
in the local academy of the town, the Friends' 
Boarding School at Providence, R.I., and Phillips 
(Exeter) Academy, where he completed the four 
years' course, graduating in 1867. Previous to 
entering Phillips Academy, he taught school three 
winters, two in F'almouth and one in Barnstable, 
Mass. After graduating from that academy, he 
continued teaching for five years, one as in- 
structor in mathematics in the Friends' Boarding 
School, and four as principal of the high school 
at Wrentham, Mass. He began his law studies 
while in \\'rentham, reading with the Hon. Samuel 
Warner, and was admitted to the Norfolk bar in 
1872. His first office was in Franklin, where 
he soon entered upon a good practice. Subse- 
quently he opened a Boston office, and has since 
conducted a general law practice there. He was 
county commissioner for Norfolk County from 
1879 to 1894, and chairman of the board from 
1885 to 1894. He has served as selectman, 
assessor, and on the School Board of the town of 
Franklin. He is also vice-president of the Ben- 
jamin Franklin Savings Bank and of the Dean 
Co-operative Bank of Franklin ; and a director 
and clerk of the Milford, Franklin, & Provi- 
dence, and the Rhode Island i.'v; Massachusetts 
Railroad Companies. He has been president of 
the Massachusetts Fish and Game Protective 
Association since 1891. He is a prominent 
member of Masonic fraternities, has been master 
of his lodge, high priest in the Chapter, and dis- 
trict deputy in the Grand Lodge. In politics he 




GEORGE W. WlGGiN. 

riage were two children, both deceased. He 
married second, in Stoneham, November, 1878, 
Miss Mary A. Bryant, formerly preceptress in 
Goddard Seminary at Barre, Vt., and also of 
Dean Academy at Franklin. They have one 
child : Alice \A'iggin. 



WILBAR, Joseph Edwards, of Taunton, reg- 
ister of deeds, was born in Taunton, July 9, 1832, 
son of Joseph and Fanny M. (Lincoln) Wilbar. He 
is in the eighth generation from Samuel Wilbore, 
the line of descent running : (2) Shadrach \Mlbor, 
Sr., (3) Shadrach Wilbor, Jr., (4) Meshach Wil- 
bor, Sr., (5) George Wilbor, (6) George ^^'ilbar, 
Jr., (7) Joseph Wilbar, and (8) Joseph E. Wilbar. 
He was educated in the schools of his native toAvn. 
At the age of seventeen he entered the office of 
register of deeds as clerk for his father, for the 
northern district of Bristol County. He served in 
that capacity until December, i86i, when he was 
appointed postmaster of Taunton, which position 
he held for more than four years. Tlien he re- 
turned to the register of deeds office as clerk and 
assistant register, and continued in that relation 



74 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



uiUil Jamuiry, 1874, when lie was elected register this office covering forty years); and his appren- 
of deeds to take his father's place. He has held ticeship was thorough. Subsequently he rose 
the position since that time. He has been a trus- through the various stages to the position of as- 
sistant foreman which he held for a long period. 
In 1889, after twenty-five years' continuous ser- 
vice, he came into possession of the Winchester 
S/d/-. through purchase, and had the distinction of 
printing the first newspaper printed in the town. 
Through perseverance and hard work he has suc- 
ceeded in placing the S/nr in the front ranks of 
suburban journals. He was for twelve years con- 
nected with .the State militia, a member of Com- 
pany K., First Regiment, first lieutenant for three 
years (1873-74-75). He is a Freemason, mem- 
ber of the Royal Arch Chapter, Woburn, and the 
William Parkman Lodge, \\inchester ; an Odd 
Fellow, belonging to the Waterfield Lodge ; a 
member of the Royal Arcanum, of the Mystic 
\'alley Club, the Suburban Press Association, and 
the Village Improvement Society of Winchester. 
In politics he is a Republican, but not active per- 
sonally in or out of his editorial work. He was 
married November 29, 1876, to Miss Ella Kath- 
arine Tupper, of Cambridge, who was among the 
first of " women reporters " in Boston to report 




JOSEPH E. WILBAR. 

tee of the Bristol County Savings Bank since 1874, 
and president of the institution since January, 
1882. He is also a director of the Bristol County 
National Bank. In politics he is a Republican. 
Mr. Wilbar was married December 26, 1861, to 
Miss Emma Barrows, daughter of Albert and Har- 
riet (Ide) Barrows, of Norton. They have five 
children : Albert E., Arthur L., Charles B., 
Helen M., and Louise R. Wilbar. 



WILSON, Theodore Price, of Winchester, 
editor and publisher of the Winchester Star, was 
born in Boston, August 14, 185 1, son of Alexan- 
der W. and Samulina (Monroe) Wilson. His 
parents were both natives of Paisley, Scotland. 
His general education was acquired in the public 
schools of South Boston, which he attended until 
he reached the age of fourteen, when he went 
into the composition-room of the Boston Evening 
Tra~i'cllcr to learn the printer's trade. Here he 
worked under the eye of his father, an experienced 
printer, who Iiad been long connected with the 
Traveller office (the entire service of the latter in 




THEODORE P. WILSON. 

public meetings, and who has had a large experi- 
ence in newspaper work. They have one child : 
Theodore Price Wilson. Jr. 



PART IV. 



ADAMS, William Frf.hkrilk., of Springfield, 
of the " Old Corner Bookstore," was born in 
Springfield, March 13, 1848, son of David A. and 
Harriet (Swift) Adams. He is a descendant of 
Crovernor William Bradford, eighth in direct line. 




w. F. ADAMS. 

He was educated in the Springfield puljlic schools. 
His business career was begun in the Second Na- 
tional Bank of Springfield, with which he was con- 
nected for five years. Subsequently he entered 
the " Old Corner Bookstore," — one of the land- 
marks of Springfield, dating from 1834, — and 
became a partner of James L. \\'hitney, who had 
been for many years connected with the business, 
under the firm name of Whitney & Adams. In 
July, 1887, the business was incorporated under 
the title of the W. F. Adams Company, with Mr. 
Adams as president and treasurer, and has so con- 



tinued since. Mr. Adams has served three terms 
in the Springfield City Council (1891-931. In 
politics he is a Republican. He is a member of 
the local Winthrop and Nyasset clubs. He was 
married May 30, 1888, to Miss E. Jennie Strong, 
of Springfield, and has two children : Dorothy S. 
and William Bradford Adams. 



AKARMAN, John Nel.^o.x, of Worcester, gen- 
eral manager of the Consolidated Street Railway, 
is a native of Brooklyn, N.^'., born March 4, 1854. 
He was educated in the public schools of Bergen, 
N.J., and of Brooklyn, graduating from the supple- 
mentary grade of Public School No. 26, Brooklyn, 
in the summer of 1871. After leaving school, he 
entered the ofifice of George H. Day, civil engineer 
and surveyor, and assisted in the building of the 
large piers on the Brooklyn side of the East River 
adjoining Fulton Ferry. In the summer of 1872 
he moved to Boston, where he began street rail- 
roading in the service of the South Boston Street 
Railroad Company. Here he worked till the 
spring of 1876, when he entered the employ of the 
Middlesex Railway Company. He remained with 
the latter company for seven years, filling the sub- 
ordinate positions of starter, supervisor, and assist- 
ant superintendent under John H. Studley, the 
veteran Boston street railroad superintendent, to 
whose guidance he attributes whatever success he 
has attained in the business. In April, 1883, he 
became superintendent of the Charles River Street 
Railroad, a new line then opened in Cambridge, 
and continued in tliis position till the purchase of 
the road bv the Cambridge Railroad Company on 
the first of July, 1886. Then he went to Worces- 
ter, and served as superintendent of the Worcester 
Horse Railroad and the Citizens" Street Railway 
until the consolidation of the two roads, when he 
was elected superintendent of the consolidated 
company. In the spring of 1888 he resigned to 
build the Biddeford & Saco Railroad, running from 



276 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Biddeford to Old Orchard I'.each, Me., in which 
enterprise he was associated with Charles B. Pratt, 
the president, and H. S. Seeley, the treasurer, of 





1 








wh 


w^ 


m ' 



JNO. N. AKARMAN. 

the Worcester Consolidated Street Railway Com- 
pany. On the first of January, 1889, he sold out 
his interest in the Biddeford road, and on the first 
of June following became general manager of the 
Elizabeth & Newark Railroad, N.J. Subsequently 
he brought about the consolidation of that road 
with the Essex and Irvington roads, under the cor- 
porate title of the Newark Passenger Street Rail- 
way Company, at the same time becoming the 
general superintendent of the united lines. In 
1892 he obtained an option on the full amount of 
the capital stock of the Worcester Consolidated 
Company (7,000 shares), which he disposed of to 
a syndicate ; and on the first of December, that 
year, when the purchase was completed, he re- 
turned to Worcester, and as superintendent and 
general manager proceeded at once rapidly to de- 
velop the property. Under his supervision the 
road w-as electrically equipped throughout, and its 
value greatly enhanced. Mr. Akarman is a thirty- 
second degree Mason, a member of the Montacute 
Lodge, Eureka Chapter, Hiram Council, and the 
Worcester County Commandery of Worcester, and 
of the Massachusetts Consistory and the Aleppo 



Shrine of Boston. He belongs also to the Worces- 
ter and Commonwealth clubs of Worcester, the 
Washington Association of New Jersey, and the 
Megantic Fish and Game Corporation of Maine. 
During his residence in New Jersey he was fish 
warden of Esse.x County. 



ALLEN, Ch.arles Albert, of ^^'orcester, civil 
engineer, city engineer for fifteen years, is a na- 
tive of Worcester, born January 27, 1852, son of 
Albert S. and Eliza A. (Cole) Allen. He is 
of the Sturbridge branch of the Allen family. 
His grandfather Allen moved from that town to 
Worcester about the year 1834, and until railroads 
entered Worcester was part owner of and oper- 
ated the stage lines centring there. He was edu- 
cated in the Worcester public schools, and at the 
Worcester Academy, graduating in 1869. He 
began preparation for his profession immediately 
after graduation, and in 1870 was engaged on 
preliminary surveys for the Massachusetts Central 
Railroad. From 187 1 to 1873 he was assistant 
engineer of the Worcester & Nashua Railroad 




CHARLES A. ALLEN. 



Company; from 1873 to 1875 chief engineer, and 
also engineer of the Worcester Viaduct then being 
constructed; in 1875-76-77 was engaged in pri- 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



277 



vate engineering practice, and in contracting, as 
a member of the firm of Allen & Chase, during 
this period constructing the foundations and out- 
side walls of the new Worcester Lunatic Hospital, 
" Section A " of the Boston \\'ater Works (Sud- 
bury supply), the Southbridge street railroad 
bridge, and various other engineering works of 
more or less importance; from 1878 to November, 
1892, was city engineer, finally resigning this posi- 
tion in order to give his entire attention to his 
growing private business ; and since has been 
engaged in the construction of water-works, sew- 
ers, and dams in various sections of New England. 
During his term of service as city engineer he 
constructed a large part of the sewerage system 
of Worcester, and the additional (Holden) water 
supply. In 1883 he was sent to Europe by the 
city to study the question of sewerage disposal ; and, 
as the result of his investigations, he constructed 
tiie Worcester sewerage disposal plant, one of the 
largest and most successful chemical disposal 
plants in the world. In late years he has served 
on many important commissions appointed by the 
courts. Mr. Allen is a member of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers, of the Boston Society 
of Civil Engineers, and of the U'orcester County 
Society of Civil Engineers, also of the Worcester 
Club, and of several Masonic orders. In politics 
he is a Republican ; in religion, an Episcopalian, 
junior warden of St. Mark's Episcopal Church, 
Worcester. He was married April 29, 1875, to 
Miss Grace T. Chase. They have four children 
living : Robert C, Chester S., Mary H., and Grace 
W. Allen. 



of early New England, notably those of John 
Howland and John Tilley, of "Mayflower" 
fame, Cotfin, Chipman, Cady, Cook, Burt, Bart- 



ALLEN, Orrin Peer, of Palmer, pharmacist, 
was born in Wallingford, Vt., September 30, 1833. 
He is descended in the si.xth generation from the 
emigrant Edward Allen, who came from London 
about 1690, and settled on the island of Nan- 
tucket, through Nathaniel-, Joseph', Robert*, and 
Robert"'. His mother, Eliza Paine (Doolittle) -Vllen, 
claims her descent from Abraham Doolittle, son 
of Sir Archibald Clark (Laird of Doolittle, County 
Midlothian, Scotland, traced to Sir .\lamus Clark, 
of Comrie Castle, County Perth, Scotland, 1349, 
and assistant secretary to James I., who came 
to this country, probably from London, about 
1638, and settled in New Haven, Conn., where 
he was a leading citizen), through Jolin-, Rev. 
Benjamin"', Amzi^ and RoswelF. He numbers 
among his ancestors many of the worthy names 




ORRIN P, ALLEN. 

lett, Barnard, Gardner, Knapp, Lee, I'hilbrick, 
Skiff, Strong, Todd, Winler, and Westwood, sev- 
eral of whom deserved well of their country by 
their service in the Colonial and Revolutionary 
wars. Mr. Allen was educated at Chester Acad- 
emy, Vt., where he held a high position as a stu- 
dent. He taught school at intervals to pay his 
way, and on the completion of the course was 
elected superintendent of schools in Vernon, Vt., 
which office he held until he accepted the position 
of a teacher in the Taanach Institute, Hacken- 
sack, N.J. He came to Palmer October 5, 1859, 
where he established a pharmacy, which he still 
continues with success. When a child, he became 
interested in literary pursuits which he has never 
relinquished, and has, by extensive study, fitted 
himself for a ready writer in many fields of effort. 
He began writing for the press in early life, and 
has been a frequent contributor to various publi- 
cations ever since. He has recently become quite 
a student of genealogy, to which he has devoted 
much research, having published the genealogies 
of the Lee and Doolittle families, and nearly com- 
pleted the history of the branch of the Allen 



278 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



family to wliich he belongs, including that of Gen- 
eral Kthan Allen. He has also the Cady and 
Scott families well under way. He is a member 
of the New England Historic Genealogical Society 
of Boston, of the Potumtuck Memorial Association 
of Deerfield, and local secretary of the Con- 
necticut Valley Historical Society of Springfield. 
For eighteen years he has been secretary and 
treasurer of the Eastern Hampden Agricultural 
Society. He was for a long period a trustee of 
the Palmer Savings Bank ; was one of the foun- 
ders of the V'oung Men's Library Association of 
J'almer, of which he was for many \ears a trustee 
and the librarian ; was the prime mover in the 
matter of preparing a history of the town of 
Palmer, and chairman of the committee which had 
the matter in charge, until its completion in 
1889. He is a Freemason, belonging to several of 
the Masonic bodies of Palmer. As a member of 
the Second Congregational Church, he has held the 
office of superintendent of the Sunday-school, 
and has been for years clerk of both the church 
and parish. He is also an active member of the 
(^uaboag Literary Society, which was organized in 
1893. Mr. Allen was married June 14, 1863, to 
Miss Lucinda E. Scott, of Vernon, Vt., a de- 
scendant of Revolutionary ancestors. Their chil- 
dren are : Walter Scott, who was educated at 
Mitchell's Boys' School of Billerica ; Julia A. and 
Lily M. Allen, who were both educated at the State 
Normal School at Westfield. 



BALDWIN, John Sianion, of Worcester, 
manager of the S/>_y, is a native of Connecticut, 
born in New Haven, January 6, 1834, son of John 
D. and Lemira (Hathaway) Baldwin. His father 
was an anti-slavery pioneer, some time editor of a 
free-soil paper in Hartford, Conn., in the late 
fifties editor of the Bn/fy Covimonwealth in Bos- 
ton, also an anti-slavery paper, and from 1859 till 
his death, in 1883, editor of the Worcester ^i.- 
and from 1863 to 1869 representative of the 
Worcester district in Congress. John S. was edu- 
cated in the public schools of North Killingly, 
North Branford, and Hartford, Conn., and was 
fitted for Yale College. Unable however, to enter 
college, the cost of the course being beyond his 
means, he became a student in the State Normal 
School, where he was prepared for the profession 
of a teacher. He graduated with honors, and ac- 
cepted an offer to take charge of a large school ; but 



an urgent call to take the direction of the business 
department of the Boston Daily Commomvcalth, 
which his father was then editing, caused him 
to cancel this engagement. He was already a 
printer, having learned the trade in Hartford while 
attending school. From that time he has been 
continuously engaged in newspaper work. From 
Boston he would have gone to Minneapolis, Minn., 
as proprietor of a weekly paper there, but for his 
father's desire to have iiim remain in business 
with him. Accordingly, the Worcester Spy was pur- 
chased ; and in March, 1858, they removed to 
Worcester, and began the publication of that his- 




JOHN S. BALDWIN. 

toric journal, under the firm name of John 1). Bald- 
win lV- Co., the firm including his brother Charles C. 
This association held till the father's death in 
1883, soon after which the business was incorpo- 
rated under the laws of Massachusetts as the Spy 
Publishing Company, with John S. Baldwin as 
president and treasurer. The Spy is one of the 
oldest newspapers in the country, started in Bos- 
ton in 1770 by Isaiah Thomas as the organ of 
the Patriots, and hurriedly moved to Worcester in 
1775, on the eve of the battle of Lexington, where 
it has since remained. The original title of the 
Massiuiiiisctts Spy is still retained in the weekly 
issue of the present day. A\'hen the Baldwins 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



279 



purchased tlie property, the daily issue had been 
pubHshed fourteen years, having been started in 
1845. Under their conduct it has been a strong, 
dignified, and inHuential sheet. Its change to a 
quarto form was made in 1888 (July 16), at which 
time the Sunday issue was begun. Mr. Baldwin 
served in the Civil War as captain, commissioned 
by Governor Andrew, of a company of infantry 
which he raised for the Fifty-first Regiment Massa- 
chusetts Volunteers. His first service was in the 
Eighteenth Corps, and he participated in all its 
marches and battles in North Carolina. After- 
ward he served with the Army of the Potomac. 
In politics he is a Republican. He has been a 
member of the Common Council and of the 
School Board of Worcester, and represented 
Worcester two terms in the lower house of the 
Legislature ( 1870-7 i ), where he served on the com- 
mittees on education and on finance. He belongs 
to the Grand Army of tiie Republic, the Society 
of the Army of the Potomac, the Military ( )rder 
of the Loyal Legion ; and is a member of the 
Massachusetts Club, Boston, and of the Worces- 
ter Club, and the Quinsigamond Boat Club of 
Worcester. He was married October 19, 1863, to 
Miss Emily Brown, of Worcester. They have six- 
children : Eleanor, Robert S., Alice H., John 1)., 
Henrv B., and Emilv C. Baldwin. 



BASSETT, Joseph Massa, of \^'orcester, manu- 
facturer, is a native of Vermont, born in the 
farming town of Eden, August 31, 1834, eldest 
son of George and Achsa A. (Adams) Bassett. 
His great-grandfather, Samuel Bassett (born 1754), 
was a volunteer soldier of the Revolution, wounded 
by a musket-shot in the battle of Bunker Hill. 
His grandfather, Massa Bassett, was a native of 
K.eene, N.H. (born January 24, 1783); and his 
paternal grandmother, Catharine Bassett, daughter 
of Solomon and Ruth Kingsbury, was a native of 
Walpole, Mass., (born October 20, 1783). They 
were among the earliest settlers of Eden, where 
they lived afterward to the end of life. His mater- 
nal grandparents were about the same age of Massa 
and Catharine Bassett, and, it is believed, also emi- 
grated to Vermont in the early settlement of the 
northern part of that State. Joseph M. was reared 
on the farm, early taking his share of the farm-work, 
attending the district school twelve weeks each 
winter. At the age of si.xteen he came to Worces- 
ter to make a start in business life. He found 



employment in the manufactory then known as 
Court Mills ; but after about six months here he 
was obliged, by failing health, to return to the 
farm. A few months later, having recovered his 
strength, he went to work in a country store, where 
he spent two years full of experience ; and in 
March, 1854, he returned to Worcester to remain 
permanently. For a year he was employed in a 
lumber-yard there. Then he became book-keeper 
and business assistant for the firm of Willard, 
Williams, & Co., manufacturers of woollen machin- 
ery ; and after service with this firm and its suc- 
cessors, F. Willard Ov Co., and Bickford \' 




J. M. BASSETT. 

Lombard, for a period of eight years, he entered 
the firm of E. C. Cleveland & Co., also engaged 
in the manufacture of woollen machinery, as a 
partner. This association continued for four 
years, when he withdrew, and forming a partner- 
nership with W. I). Hobbs, under the firm name 
of Bassett &: Hobbs, entered the wool business. 
A year later he returned to his old business, form- 
ing a new partnership with Mr. Cleveland, under 
the name of Cleveland \r Bassett. The venture, 
however, was not prosperous, the firm meeting 
with losses and difficulties ; and in about two years 
it was dissolved through failure. Subsequently, 
on the first of Julv, 1870, joining R. A. M. Johnson, 



28o 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



who had been for some time manufacturing hand 
spinning-machines called jacks, he formed the 
firm of Johnson & Bassett for the development 
and manufacture of automatic machinery for wool 
spinning, in which he has since been profitably 
concerned. The firm first introduced self-operat- 
ing heads for jacks, and a few years later put on 
the market the self-operating woollen mule, adding 
from time to time valuable improvements in the 
mechanism of both machines. Upon the death of 
Mr. Johnson in March, 1880, Mr. Bassett pur- 
chased the interest of the former from the admin- 
istrators of his estate, and continued the business 
alone until the first of January, 1892, when he 
admitted his son, George M. Bassett, to partner- 
ship, retaining throughout the original firm name of 
Johnson & Bassett, without change. The present 
building, occupying the corner of Foster and Bridge 
Streets, was built expressly for the business in 
1886, and was first occupied in September that 
year. Mr. Bassett has been long a member of 
the National Association of Wool Manufacturers, 
and of the Home Market Club since its organiza- 
tion. He belongs also to the Commonwealth 
Club of Worcester. In politics he is an earnest 
Republican for the reasons that the principles and 
economic policy of that party have been more in 
accord with his own views than those of any other 
party. He is in no sense a politician ; and with 
the exception of six years' service on the Worces- 
ter School Board, which he gave in the interest of 
popular education, he has held no public place, 
devoting his time and energies chiefly to his busi- 
ness. He has been an extensive traveller, in his 
own country and abroad, visiting nearly all the 
leading American cities, journeying in Mexico and 
in the principal European countries. Mr. Bassett 
was married April 16, 1857, to Miss Elizabeth 
Kennan. daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth Kennan, 
born June 8, 1833, in Hyde Park, Vt. Thev have 
had five children, three sons and two daughters, of 
whom only two are now living : George M. (now 
associated with Mr. Bassett in business, born in 
Worcester, November 3, 1864) and Arthur J. 
Bassett (musician, born in Worcester, June 29, 
1868). 

BATES, Edward Cr.aig, of \Vestborough, jus- 
tice of the First District Court of Eastern Worces- 
ter, is a native of Westborough, born March 6, 
1866, son of Lucius R. and Martha (Matthews) 
Bates. His early education was acquired in the 



public schools of Westborough. After graduating 
from the High School in 1883, he fitted for college 
at Phillips (Exeter) Academy, spending two years 
there, entered Harvard, and graduated in the class 
of 1889. He prepared for his profession at the 
Boston University Law School, and was admitted 
to the bar in 1891. Opening his office in West- 
borough the first of November that year, he prac- 
tised there exclusively until 1894, when in Feb- 
ruary he established an office in Boston also. He 
was appointed to his present position of justice of 
the First District Court of Eastern Worcester in 
1890. While pursuing his profession, he has given 




EDWARD C. BATES. 

some attention also to historical matters. In con- 
nection with the Rev. Heman P. DeForest, he 
wrote the " History of Westborough," published 
by the town in 1891 ; and he was the author of 
the paper on " Eli Whitney and the Cotton Gin " 
m the A^eic Enghimi Afagaziiic oi yiixy, 1890. He 
is a trustee of the Westborough Public Library ; 
has been president of the Village Improvement 
Society since April, 1892 ; and is connected with 
various social, literary, and business clubs. Judge 
Bates was married January 2 i, 1892, to Miss Grace 
Belknap \\'inch, daughter of the late Hon. Calvin 
M. Winch, of Boston. They have one child : 
Edward Munroe Bates, born February 23, 1894. 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



281 



BEEBE, Henry Jared, of Springfield, manu- 
facturer, is a native of Monson, born July 3, 1843, 
son of Jared and Mary (Stacy) Reebe. He was 




HENRY J. BEEBE. 

educated in the public schools and at Wilbrahani 
Academy. After graduating from the academy, he 
was for two years in mercantile business as a 
clerk, first in Holyoke, and later in C'hicopee. In 
186 1 he entered the office of his father, and there 
remained three years. The next three years he 
was in the dry-goods commission house of O. H. 
Sampson & Co., New York City. Then, having 
been elected treasurer of the Springfield Plate 
Company, he removed to Springfield, where he 
spent two years. At the end of that time, in 1870, 
he joined his father in the purchase of the woollen 
mill at North Monson, and engaged in its conduct 
under the firm name of J. Beebe & Son. In 1876 
his father died, and the same year he bought the 
woollen mill of Webber & Beebe in Holyoke. The 
two mills were run together till 18S0, when the 
Monson mill was sold ; and since that time the 
Holyoke mill has been continued under the firm 
name of Beebe, Webber, & Co., owned entirely by 
Mr. Beebe and his brother-in-law, J. S. Webber. 
Mr. Beebe is interested in numerous other man- 
ufacturing concerns. After his father's death 
in 1876 he was elected a director of the Farr 



Alpaca Company of Holyoke ; and he is now a 
director of the Beebe & Holbrook Paper Company 
of Holyoke, the Indian Orchard Company of 
Springfield, and the United Electric Light Com- 
pany of Springfield : and a trustee of the National 
Automatic Weighing Machine Company of New 
York. He is also a director of the Eirst National 
Bank of Springfield. In politics he is a steadfast 
Republican. He has served two years (1880-81) 
in the Springfield city government. He is a mem- 
ber of the Nyasset and the Winthrop clubs of 
Springfield. He has been twice married, first, Oc- 
tober 20, 1864, to Miss Othalia Vaughan, by whom 
were three children : Henry J., Jr., Arthur Y., and 
Albert A. Beebe; and second. May 20, 1880, to 
Mrs. Kate E. Glover, daughter of John Olmsted, 
of Springfield. 

BENT, Charles McIlvaink, of Worcester, 
banker, was born in New Bedford, October 5, 
1835, son of Nathaniel Tucker and Catherine 
Eliza Donaldson (Metcalf) Bent. He was edu- 
cated in the common schools. He has been in the 
banking business from the beginning of his active 




CHARLES M BENT. 



life. In the summer of 1852 he entered the 
Worcester Bank, then the principal bank in the 
city, as boy. Here he came under the guidance 



282 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



and direction of William Cross, an accomplished 
banker, then cashier and holding tlie foremost 
position among financiers of the city, and was 
thoroughly fitted for the banking business. In 
December. 1864, he was elected treasurer of the 
People's Savings Bank, then recently incorporated, 
which has now become one of the large and suc- 
cessful financial institutions of the city. This 
office he still holds, being its only treasurer. Mr. 
Bent has been for many years prominent in musi- 
cal matters in Worcester, sometime occupying the 
presidency of the Worcester Choral Union, one of 
the first board of directors of the Worcester County 
Musical Association, elected when it was incorpo- 
rated, and now its vice-president. In politics he 
has always been a consistent Republican. In re- 
ligion he is an Episcopalian, and is identified with 
different societies of the Church in this diocese. 
For upwards of thirty years he has held different 
offices in All Saints' Church, Worcester, and is at 
present (1894) warden. Among other positions 
which he holds is that of president of the Worces- 
ter Homceopathic Hospital and Dispensary Asso- 
ciation. Mr. Bent was married October 10, 1867, 
to Miss Helen Maria Kennedy, daughter of James 
L. and Helen Maria (Clark) Kennedy. They 
have had two children: Robert Metcalf (died in 
infancy) and Catherine Metcalf Bent. 



Michigan, and ^^'isconsin, from 1845 to 1849. In 
1854 he and his brother Henry entered into part- 
nership at Norwich, Conn., in the subscription pub- 
lishing business. A year later Gurdon Bill removed 
to Springfield, which has since been his home, and 
carried on the same business there for si.xteen 
years. In the course of this active career he 
published many books of importance, among them 
Headley's " Life of Washington," Dr. J. G. Hol- 
land's "Life of Abraham Lincoln," and J. S. C. 
Abbott's " History of the Civil War in .America." 
Mr. Rill has taken no prominent part in politics, 
and seldom accepts public office, although he 
might easily have had such honors. He has 
served in the City Council of Springfield, and was 
in 187 1 a member of the Massachusetts House 
of Representatives. In business, since he closed 
his connection with publishing, he has held many 
important positions. He has been president of the 
Springfield & New London Railroad, is now 
president of the Second National Bank of Spring- 
field, and president and director of various manu- 
facturing companies. He is a man of positive 
and tenacious character, persistent and successful 



BILL, Gurdon, of Springfield, a leading busi- 
ness man and prominent citizen for forty years 
past, was born in Groton, Conn., in that part now 
Ledyard, June 7, 1827, son of Gurdon and Lucy 
(Yerrington) Bill. His ancestry dates definitely 
from the early Puritan emigration from England 
in the first half of the seventeenth century, the 
Bills who came over about 1635 and landed at 
Boston being of a numerous family of Norman 
origin. In this country the family has had many 
representatives in places of trust, and been promi- 
nent in the law, the ministry, and other profe.s- 
sions, — a typical New England family. His 
mother's family also dates from the beginnings of 
New England. His education was that of the 
common schools of his native town. In his boy- 
hood he worked upon his father's farm, and at 
eighteen years of age "bought his time" of his 
father at $12 a month until he was twenty-one, and 
went out into what was then the Far West, canvass- 
ing for the subscription publications of Thomas 
Cowperthwait & Co., in Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana, 




GURDON BILL. 



in his undertakings. He does the duty of a citizen 
with no personal ambitions to serve, and his ser- 
vices to the public are performed without ostenta- 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



28- 



tion. He gave to the city of Springfield in 1885 
its soldiers' monument, — a granite shaft bearing 
the names of battles on its sides, and surmounted 
by the figure of a private soldier at parade rest, — 
which stands in Court Square in the heart of the 
city. In 1893 he joined with his brothers, Henry 
and Frederick, in giving to Ledyard, Conn., the 
beautiful library building on the common. Mr. 
Bill was married in 1852 to Miss Emily A. Deni- 
son, of Groton. They have had five children : 
Nathan I)., Harriet E., Mary A., fkhvard E., and 
Charles G. Bill. Nathan D. and Edward E. are 
now established in business life in Springfield. 



field Knitting Company (1892). He is now presi- 
dent of the Plainer and Porter Paper Company, 
president of the National Envelope Company, 



BILL, Nathan Denison, of Springfield, manu- 
facturer, is a native of Springfield, born October 
12, 1855, son of Gurdon and Emily Avery (Deni- 
son) Bill. His earliest ancestors in America 
were John and Dorothie Bill, who appeared in 
Boston in 1638. Among his early English ances- 
tors was Dr. Thomas Bill, who was physician to 
Henry VIII. and Edward VI., and also to Prin- 
cess Elizabeth ; and \\'illiam Bill, LL.D., who was 
the first Dean of Westminster Abbey, 1560. He 
was educated in Springfield private and public 
schools. At the age of twelve he worked on a 
farm for two summer months, receiving as wages 
$2.50 a month ; at the age of fifteen he was at sim- 
ilar w^ork three months, receiving Jio a month ; the 
following winter and spring, when he was sixteen, he 
taught school in Ledyard, Conn., for §25 a month ; 
and at the end of the school term, which co\ ered 
four and a half months, he engaged in canvassing 
in Maine and on Prince Edward Island, devoting 
three months to this business, — all of this being 
part of his education as outlined and planned by 
his father. When he reached the age of eighteen 
years, he went into a wholesale paper and sta- 
tionery concern, where he served an apprenticeship 
of two years, and then, at twenty, entered busi- 
ness on his own account under the style of the Union 
Envelope and Paper Company. Two years later 
he consolidated with P. 1^. Kellogg and George A. 
Russell under the name of the National Papeterie 
Company ; and this partnership continued for 
eleven years, when he retired from detail manage- 
ment of business. Meanwhile in 1887 he organ- 
ized with others the Springfield Envelope Com- 
pany ; and subsequently the Platner and Porter 
Paper Manufacturing Company (in 1889), the Na- 
tional Envelope Company (1892), and the Spring- 




NATHAN D. BILL. 

vice-president of the Springfield Envelope Com- 
pany, treasurer of the Springfield Knitting Com- 
pany, treasurer and director of the Union Water 
Power Company, director of the Warwick Cycle 
Company and of other companies, and trustee of 
the Mutual Fire Insurance Company of New York. 
He is a director also of the City Library Associa- 
tion of Springfield. His public service other than 
that in connection with the City Library has been 
confined to one term as a member of the Springfield 
Board of Aldermen (1893). He is very fond of 
hunting and fishing, and with all his business inter- 
ests finds time each season to indulge more or less 
in these alluring pastimes. He is a member of the 
Union League, the New York Yacht, and the Al- 
dine clubs of New York, and of the several Spring- 
field clubs. He was married April 22, 1885, to 
Miss Ruth Elizabeth Wight, daughter of ex-Mayor 
Emerson Wight, of Springfield. They have one 
daughter : Beatrice Bill. 



BLACKMER, John, M.D., of Springfield, long 
a Temperance and Prohibitory party leader, was 



284 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



born in Plymouth, July 18, 1828, eldest son of 
John and Esther (Bartlett) Blackmer. His early 
education was acquired in the common schools, 
and, after fourteen years of age, through private 
tuition under the Rev. John Dwight. He was 
fitted for college at Phillips ( Andover) Academy, 
and took a select course at Brown University. 
Subsequently he studied medicine in the Harvard 
Medical School, and graduated March 4, 1854. 
The course of education which he pursued was of 
his own choice, in accordance with an agreement 
made with his father, who told him, when he 
reached the age of fourteen, that the money to 




JOHN BLACKMER. 

meet the cost of an\' educational course that he 
might select would be forthcoming, with the under- 
standing that it should be returned as soon as cir- 
cumstances would allow, — his father adding that 
it was his purpose to give all his boys an equal 
chance, and that he should make the same offer 
to each of the other two upon arriving at the age 
of fourteen years. \Mien he was about eighteen 
years old he began teaching, and continued in 
this occupation during vacations and as circum- 
stances would allow until his graduation from the 
medical college, taking common schools at first, 
and afterward select schools. He began the prac- 
tice of medicine in the autumn of 1854, in the 



town of Effingham, X.H. He remained there five 
years, and then, receiving the appointment of 
assistant physician in the Maine Insane Hospital 
at Augusta, removed to that city. After an expe- 
rience of a year in that institution he accepted a 
similar position in the McLean Asylum in Somer- 
ville, Mass., where he served two years. In 
October, 1862, he was commissioned assistant 
surgeon of the Forty-first Regiment, Massachu- 
setts Volunteers, and began a service which 
continued through the Civil War. He first went 
into camp at Bo.xford to e.xamine recruits, and 
just before the regiment was filled he was or- 
dered to Boston for e.xamination for promotion. 
On November 4 he was made surgeon of the 
Forty-seventh Regiment, which speedily reported 
for duty to General Banks at New Orleans, having 
received marching orders on the 29th of that 
month. After the close of his army service he 
received an appointment for medical and surgical 
service in the navy, and continued there till the 
close of the war. Upon his retirement from this 
service he was called to take charge of the New 
Hampshire Asylum for the Insane during the 
absence of its superintendent, Ur. laancroft, in 
England. This work finished, he entered general 
practice in the town of Sandwich, N.H., where he 
remained seven years. He came to Springfield in 
1877, and has since continued in general practice 
there. In politics he has been a radical Prohibi- 
tionist for more than a quarter of a century. 
When in New Hampshire, he was chairman of 
the Prohibition State Committee, editor of the 
Proliihition Herald, and for three years candidate 
of the party for governor. In Massachusetts he 
has also been chairman of the Prohibitory State 
Committee, editor of T/ic FiibHc Good, then the 
organ of the party, five times candidate for lieu- 
tenant governor, and twice candidate for governor, 
for the latter office receiving the highest vote with 
one exception that a "straight" Prohibitionist 
candidate has ever received in the State. He is 
now, and has been since 1884, editor of the 
Domestic yoiinial, an unsectarian family news- 
paper published in Springfield, devoted to tem- 
perance and religion. He has written extensively 
for papers and periodicals for many years, enough 
probably to fill a large octavo volume. He has lect- 
ured somewhat extensively, both in New Hamp- 
shire and in Massachusetts, on temperance, pro- 
hibition, and other themes. He was some time 
superintendent of schools in New Hampshire, and 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



285 



giive courses of lectures at teachers' institutes 
and before other educational bodies. He was for 
two years and now is (1892-94) chairman of the 
temperance committee of the Association of Con- 
gregational Churches of Massachusetts, of which 
he has long been a member. In Springfield he be- 
longs to the North Congregational Church, and since 
1879 has been leader of a large Bible class in the 
church. Dr. Blackmer was married October 22, 
1863, to Miss Ellen S. Dearborn, of Efifingham, 
N.H., a graduate of Bradford Academy, Mass. 
They have one daughter and one son : the daugh- 
ter, Helen D., now wife of Dr. George F. Poole, 
who occupies the chair of physical director in the 
School for Christian Workers, Springfield ; and 
the son, John A. Blackmer, now connected with 
the Boston Post. 



BOWLES, Samuel, of Springfield, editor-in- 
chief and publisher of the Springfield Republican, 
was born in Springfield, October 15, 185 1, eldest 
son of Samuel Bowles, the founder of the daily 
Republican, and Mary S. Dwight (Shermerhorn) 
Bowles. He is of early Massachusetts and New 
York stock. On the paternal side he comes of 
the English family of Bowles or Bolles mentioned 
in the records of the Genealogist Burke, and of a 
line of notable New Englanders. His first ances- 
tor in America was John Bowles, an elder in the 
Roxbury First Church in 1640, one of the foun- 
ders of the Roxbury Free School, and a member 
of the Artillery Company. The next in line, 
John, 2d, married the grand-daughter of John 
Eliot, the apostle to the Indians, was a Harvard 
graduate in 167 1, subsequently a ruling elder in 
the church, a representative in the General Court, 
and speaker of the House. John, 3d, was also 
graduated from Harvard (1703), was long a lead- 
ing man in Roxbury town affairs, was a major in 
the militia, and for ten successive years sat in 
the General Court for Roxbury. John, 3d's, son, 
Joshua, was a carver of furniture in Boston, de- 
scribed as a very benevolent, pious man. Two of 
Joshua's sons served in the Revolution, as ser- 
geant and captain respectively : the third, Samuel, 
a boy of thirteen, when the war broke out, first 
worked at the pewterer's trade in Boston, then 
moved to Hartford, Conn., where he kept a 
grocery store some time, and prospered moderately. 
His son, Samuel, was early apprenticed to a 
printer, worked some years as a journeyman and 



foreman in Hartford and New Haven, and in 
1824 came to Springfield, and started the weekly 
Springfield Republican : and his son was Samuel, 
3d, the eminent editor, "the pioneer and leader 
of independent journalism in the United States," 
as he has been pronounced, who brought the 
Republican into national prominence, and fixed it 
there. On the maternal side Mr. Bowles is a 
descendant of (ieneral Henry K. Van Rensselaer, 
a distinguished soldier of the Revolution. His 
maternal grandfather, Henry Van Rensselaer 
Schermerhorn, was a prominent lawyer and farmer 
of Geneva, N.Y.; and his maternal grandmother 




SAML BOWLES. 

was a native of Springfield, daughter of James 
Scutt Dwight. Mr. Bowles was educated in pub- 
lic and private schools in Springfield, through 
extensive travel in the United States and abroad, 
and at college. To travel, supplementing the 
school training, two years and a half were de- 
voted. Two years, from 187 1 to 1873, were spent 
in special study at Yale, and half a year, or one 
term, at Berlin (Germany) University. After 
leaving college, he wrote letters of travel for the 
Republican for a few months ; and then, entering 
the Republican office, he was for two years con- 
nected with the editorial department under his 
father, getting some training also in the business 



286 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



end. Ill 1875 he became business manager of 
the Republican; and in 1878, upon tlie death of 
the elder Bowles, editor-in-chief and publisher, ■ 
which position he has held from that time. Under 
his administration the paper has continued along 
the lines marked by his distinguished father, and 
developed new features which have held it in the 
front rank of the best journalism of the day. In 
1878 the Sunday Republican was started, and 
early became a strong addition to the establish- 
ment. It is wholly different from other Sunday 
papers, and has marked literary and local qualities 
of its own. The several editions of the paper 
have, of late, been repeatedly enlarged to meet 
the demands of its steadily growing and prosper- 
ous business. The mechanical plant has been 
twice renewed within the last dozen years. In 
1888 the Republican took possession of an admi- 
rably arranged and equipped new building of its 
own, located in the centre of Springfield's busi- 
ness section. Since 1878 Mr. Bowles has been a 
director in the City Library Association of Spring- 
field. He was married June 12, 1884, to Miss 
Elizabeth Hoar, daughter of Judge E. Rockwood 
Hoar, of Concord. They have two children : 
Samuel and Sherman Hoar Bowles. 



BRICK, Francis, M.D., of Worcester, was 
born in Gardner, Mass., March 16, 1838, son of 
Alfred Harrison and Lucy (Scollay) Brick. He 
is of English ancestry, his earliest ancestor in this 
country on the paternal side coming about the year 
1640 and settling in Dorchester, and the Scollavs 
appearing early in Boston. His great-grand- 
father, Jonas Brick, served throughout the Revolu- 
tionary war on the patriot side ; and his great- 
grandfather, David Comee, was in tlie Lexington 
and Concord fight. The family name was Breck, 
the older English being " Brecke," Brick being a 
perversion in spelling. He was educated in the 
common schools of his native town, at the Cas- 
tleton (Vt.) Seminary, and the Appleton (N.H.i 
Academy ; and was fitted for his profession at the 
Homceopathic Hospital College, Cleveland, Ohio, 
where he graduated in February, 1861. He had 
as preceptors E. J. Sawyer, M.D., of Gardner, and 
James C. Freeland, M.D., of Fitchburg. Settling 
in the town of Winchester, N.H., he began prac- 
tice there in the autumn of 1861. Subsequently, 
in the spring of 1864, he moved to Kecne, N.H., 
and in January. 1875, came to Worcester, where he 



has since been established. While in New Hamp- 
shire, he was a member of the State Homceopathic 
Society, and of the American Institute of Homce- 
opathy : and after his removal to Worcester he be- 
came a member of the \\'orcester County Homoeo- 
pathic Society, later becoming its president. He 
has also been vice-president of the Massachusetts 
Surgical and Gyna;cological Society, president of 
the Worcester Dispensary and Hospital Associa- 
tion, and is now \ice-president of that organiza- 
tion. He is prominent in the Masonic order, 
receiving his first three degrees in 1863 ; later 
he became a charter member, and past master of 




FRANCIS BRICK. 

Lodge of the Temple of Keene, N.H., and is now 
an honorary member. He is a life member of the 
Cheshire Royal Arch Chapter ; a Knight Templar. 
Of the Scottish rite : past most wise and perfect 
master of Lawrence Chapter ; a life member of the 
Massachusetts Consistory, thirty-second degree ; 
a member of Aleppo Temple, A. A. O. Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine ; and past e.xalted ruler of the 
Worcester Lodge of Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, No. 243. He is also a member of 
the Worcester Society of Antiquity, and of numer- 
ous other literary associations. He is medical 
director of the Boston Mutual Life Association. 
Dr. ISrick was married June 3, 1862, to Helen F. 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



.87 



Guild, of Attleboro, i\Iass. They have one son : 
Lu Guild Brack (spelling his name according to 
the form used in colonial times). 



BROOKS, William Henry Seward, of Hol- 
yoke, member of the Hampden County bar, is a 
native of New ^'ork, born at Schuyler's Lake, 
a part of Richfield Springs, Otsego County, Jan- 
uary 5, 1855, son of Reuben Palmer and Margaret 
(Eliot) Brooks. He was fitted for college at the 
Clinton Liberal Institute, Clinton, N.Y., and, en- 
tering Dartmouth, graduated there in 1876. His 




WILLIAM H. BROOKS. 

law studies were pursued in the office of Warren 
C. French at Woonsocket, Vt. Admitted to the 
bar in 1878, he established himself in Holyoke, 
forming a law partnership with Edward W. Cha- 
pin. This association continued till 1S82, when 
he withdrew, and has since practised alone, with 
offices in both Holyoke and Springfield, the county 
seat, in which much of his legal work centres. 
His practice is general, civil and criminal, in both 
of which branches he excels. In recent years he 
has been counsel in a number of capital cases, 
and has also successfuly conducted numerous civil 
suits of note. He is now counsel for many of the 
principal corporations in Western Massachusetts, 



among them the Boston & Maine, the Boston & 
Albany, and the Connecticut River Railroad Com- 
panies. In 1881-82-83 he was city solicitor of 
Holyoke, and in 1889 was nominated for the dis- 
trict attorneyship, but failed of election, falling 
short a few votes only. For the past three years 
he has been senior counsel of Holyoke. In poli- 
tics he is a steadfast Republican, and has done 
effective campaign work, especially in his Congres- 
sional district. In 1884 he was the Republican 
candidate for mayor of Holyoke. and was defeated 
by a small majority, although the city is in general 
elections strongly Democratic. In 1892 he w^as 
nominated for Congress, but declined to stand. 
He is a member of the Holyoke Masonic Lodge, 
of the Springfield and Nyasset clubs of Spring- 
field, and of the University Club of Boston. 
He has been twice married: first, in 1887, to 
;\Iiss Mary French, daughter of Warren C. 
French, of Woodstock, Vt., who died in 188 1 ; 
and second, in 1884, to Miss Jennie Chase, 
daughter of the late Edwin Chase, of Holyoke. 
He has five children : three by the first union : 
William Steele, Eliot Palmer, and Mary Brooks : 
and two by the second, Chase Reuben and 
Rachel Margaret Brooks. 



BULLOCK, Augustus George, of Worcester, 
president of the State Mutual Life Assurance 
Company, was born in Connecticut, in the towm 
of Enfield, June 2, 1847, son of Alexander Hamil- 
ton and Elvira (Hazard) Bullock. His grand- 
father was Rufus Bullock, of Royalston ; and his 
father, the late Governor Bullock, who immediately 
succeeded Governor Andrew, serving through the 
years 1866-69, was member of the Legislature, 
speaker of the House, and mayor of Worces- 
ter. He was educated at the Highland Mili- 
tary .\cademy, Worcester, the Leicester Acad- 
emy, and Harvard College, where he was grad- 
uated in the class of 1868. .\fter graduation 
he travelled some time in Europe, and upon his 
return began the study of law in the office of the 
Hon. George F. Hoar, and subsequently with the 
Hon. Thomas L. Nelson, now judge of the United 
States District Court, at Worcester. He was 
admitted to the bar of \\'orce.ster County in 1876, 
and practised for seven years, retiring in January, 
1883, when he became president and treasurer of 
the State Mutual Life .Vssurance Company of 
Worcester, which office he has since held. He 



288 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



has also been for some years president of the 
State Safe Deposit Company ; a director of the 
Worcester National Hank, and of the Worces- 




A. G. BULLOCK. 

ter County Institution for Savings ; a director 
of the Norwich & Worcester Railroad, of the 
Providence & Worcester Railroad, of the Worces- 
ter Traction Company, of the Worcester Consoli- 
dated Street Railway Company, and of other cor- 
porations. He is connected with numerous his- 
torical societies, a member of the American Anti- 
quarian Society, of the New England Historic 
Genealogical Society, and of the Archjeological 
Institute of America ; is a member of the Ameri- 
can Bar Association, of the Worcester Club, the 
University and Exchange clubs of Boston, and the 
Democratic, Reform, and University clubs of New 
York. He was one of the eight commissioners at 
large to the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893, 
chairman of the committee of the exposition on 
fine arts, and a member of the committee on edu- 
cation. In 1S68 he was private and military sec- 
retary to his father. Governor Bullock, with rank 
of lieutenant colonel. In \A'orcester he has served 
as a director of the Public Library, and a trustee 
of the Worcester Lunatic Hospital. Colonel Bul- 
lock was married October 4, 187 1, to Miss Mary 
Chandler, daughter of George and Josephine R. 



Chandler, of Worcester. They have had four 
children : Chandler, Alexander Hamilton, Augus- 
tus George (deceased), and Rockwood Hoar Bul- 
lock. 

CARPENTER, Frank Eaton, of Springfield, 
member of the bar, was born in Monson, August 
29, 1851, son of Daniel and Elizabeth Colton 
(Grout) Carpenter. He was educated in the Mon- 
son Academy. He studied law in Hartford, Conn., 
in the ofiice of Francis Fellowes &: Son. and was 
admitted to the Hartford County bar on the first of 
July, 1873. The same year, in October, he came 
to Springfield, and opened his law office. He 
practised at first alone, but early became a partner 
of the late Mayor John M. Stebbins, under the 
firm name of Stebbins & Carpenter, which relation 
held till 1877. His practice has been of a mer- 
cantile character in courts of probate and insol- 
vency. Soon after his establishment in Spring- 
field he became prominent in politics as a Demo- 
crat ; and in the municipal election of 1882 he was 
elected to the Common Council. He served in 
this body two terms (1883-84), and was then 




FRANK E. CARPENTER. 



elected to the lower house of the Legislature for 
1885. In 1 89 1 he was a State senator for the 
First Hampden District, ordinarily Republican, 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



289 



which he carried by a good vote ; and in 1892 a 
member of the Springfield Board of Aldermen. 
During his term in the House he served on the 
committee on railroads ; and in the Senate he was 
chairman of the committee on bills in the third 
reading, and a member of the committees on elec- 
tion laws and on constitutional amendments. He 
is a member of the Springfield Commandery, 
Knights Templar, and of the \\'inthrop and Ny- 
asset clubs. Mr. Carpenter was married March i, 
1875, to Miss Elizabeth M. Lombard, of Hrimfield. 
She died in November, 1880. 



and retired from the service. Before his appoint- 
ment as superintendent of sewers he served two 
terms (1869-70) in the City Council. General 



CHAMBERLAIN, General Rohf.rt Horace, 
sheriff of \^'orcester County, is a native of Worces- 
ter, born June i6, 1838, son of General Thomas 
and Hannah (Blair) Chamberlain. On both sides 
he is of old \\'orcester County stock. His ances- 
tors on the paternal side first came to Worcester 
from Newtowne, now Cambridge, in 1740 ; and the 
Blairs were early settled in the county. His pater- 
nal grandfather was a selectman of the town, and 
so was his father at a later period ; and both were 
substantial citizens in their day. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools and at the Worcester 
and Westfield academies, and at the age of eigh- 
teen was at work, apprenticed to a firm of ma- 
chinists. Having mastered his trade, he worked 
at it till the Civil War broke out. Then he en- 
listed as a private in Company A, Fifty-first Regi- 
ment, Massachusetts Volunteers. Soon after he 
was made sergeant i and later, re-enlisting in the 
Sixtieth Regiment, he was commissioned captain 
of Company F. After the war and his return to 
Worcester he resumed his trade, and followed it till 
1870, when he was appointed by Maj-or Blake 
superintendent of sewers. This position he held 
for eighteen years, during which period the system 
was developed and widely e.xtended. In 188S he 
was made master of the House of Correction, and 
in 1892 was elected to his present position of 
sheriff by a large majority. For twelve years suc- 
ceeding the war he was active in the State militia, 
and in this service received his commission as gen- 
eral. He reorganized the Worcester City Guards, 
and was the first captain of the company ; also 
organized a battery of artillery in Worcester, which 
still bears the name of Chamberlain Light Battery ; 
w-as major and afterward colonel of the Tenth 
Regiment, anti was made brigadier-general of the 
militia in December, 1869. In 1876 he resigned. 




R. H. CHAMBERLAIN. 

Chamberlain is an Odd Fellow and a Mason of 
high degree, — a past commander of ^^'orcester 
County Commandery of Knights Templar, and 
past grand commander of the Grand Commandery 
of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. He is con- 
nected with the Grand Army, a charter member of 
Post ID. He is a member of the Worcester Board 
of Trade, of the Worcester County Mechanics' 
Association (president for tin-ee years), and of the 
Hancock Club. In politics he has always been a 
Republican, but not a politician. He was married 
January 10, 1865, to Miss Esther Browning, of 
Hubbardston. They have two daughters : Flora 
Browning and Mabel Susan Chamberlain. 



CHAPIN, EnwARn Whit.man, of Holyoke, 
member of the bar, is a native of Chicopee, born 
August 23, 1840, son of Whitman and Theodocia 
(McKinstry) Chapin. He was educated at Willis- 
ton Seminary, Easthampton, and at .\mherst, grad- 
uating from the former in the class of 1859, and 
from the latter in the class of 1863. He studied 



290 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



law with Beach & Stearns in Springfield and at 
the Harvard Law School. He was admitted to the 
bar in December. 1865 : and from that time to the 




EDWARD W. CHAPIN. 

present he has practised in Holyoke, attaining a 
foremost position in his profession. He was the 
first city solicitor of Holyoke ( 1S75 ) ; was for nine 
years a member of the School Committee, and in 
1873 was chosen as representative in the State 
Legislature. He is a director of the City National 
]5ank, of the Holyoke & W'estfield Railroad, and 
of two manufacturing corporations; namely, the 
Beebe and Holbrook Paper Company and the Farr 
Alpaca Company. He has been the secretary and 
attorney of the Mechanics' Savings Bank since its 
organization in 1872. Having had charge of the 
settlement of manv important estates, his legal prac- 
tice has been largely confined to probate business. 
He is now the senior special justice of the Hol- 
yoke Police Cmut. which office he has held for 
several years. In politics Mr. Chapin is a Repub- 
lican ; and in religion, a Congregationalist, deacon 
in the Second Congregational Society of Holyoke. 
He was married May 16, 1866, to Miss Mary L. 
Beebe, daughter of fared Beebe, of Springfield. 
They have had four children : Arthur R., Anne C. 
(now Mrs. William F. \\'hiting), Alice M.. and 
Clara M. Chapin. 



CLARK, Colonel Embury P., of Springfield, 
high sheriff of Hampden County, is a native of 
Buckland. Franklin County, born March 31, 1845, 
.son of Chandler and Joanna (Woodward) Clark. 
He was educated in the public schools of Charle- 
mont and in those of Holyoke, to which his par- 
ents removed when he was a boy of thirteen. 
After leaving school, he worked in a store till 1862, 
when at the age of seventeen, he enlisted in Com- 
pany B, Forty-sixth Regiment, Massachusetts Vol- 
unteers, and served in North Carolina and with 
the Army of the Potomac. At the expiration of 
his service he returned to Holyoke, and was suc- 
cessively a drug clerk, shipping clerk, book-keeper, 
and paymaster till 1876, when he was elected 
water registrar of the city of Holyoke. In this 
office he was retained by repeated elections for 
si.xteen years, finally retiring to accept his present 
position of sheritT of Hampden County, to which 
he was elected in 1892. He has been prominent 
in the State militia since the close of the war. 
Starting in 1868 as sergeant of Company K, Sec- 
ond Regiment, he was elected captain a year later, 
commissioned major August 14, 187 1, and lieu- 




EMBURY p. CLARK. 

tenant colonel August 31, 1875. ^or the purpose 
of reorganizing the militia, in 1876, he was honor- 
ably discharged with all other officers ranking 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



291 



above captain ; he then re-entered the service De- 
cember 23, icSyS, as captain of Company ]), Second 
Regiment ; was the next year ( August 2 ) promoted 
to the lieutenant colonelcy, and on the 2d of Feb- 
ruary, 1889, made colonel of the regiment, which 
position he still holds. He is a member of the 
Military Service Institution of the United States, 
and a charter member of Kilpatrick Post, No. 71, 
Grand Army of the Republic, of which he was for 
eight years commander. He has always taken 
great interest in educational matters, and was a 
continuous member of the School Hoard of Hol- 
yoke for fifteen years, up to the time of his re- 
moval to Springfield. Colonel Clark was married 
.Vugust 23, 1866, to Miss Eliza A. Seaver, daugh- 
ter of Perley and Julia M. (Field) Seaver, of 
Holyoke. They have four children : Kate E., 
Edward S., Frederick B., and Alice M. Clark. 



March, he moved to Springfield : but, his health 
failing, he returned to Huntington in September, 
1865. In January, 1872, he re-established him- 



COPELAND, Alfred Minott, of Springfield, 
member of the bar, is a native of Connecticut, born 
in Hartford, July 3, 1830, son of Alfred and 
Emma A. (Howd) Copeland. He is descended in 
the direct line from Lawrence Copeland through 
his son William, born in Kraintree, November 15, 
1656, and married April 13, 1694, to a grand- 
daughter of John Alden of the " Mayflower." 
Their son Jonathan married Betty Snell, daughter 
of Thomas Snell, of Bridgewater ; their son Uaniel, 
born in 1741, married Susannah Ames, daughter 
of Joseph Ames, of West Bridgewater ; their son 
Daniel, born in 1767, married Abigail Shaw, 
daughter of Gideon Shaw, of Raynham, April 28, 
1791 ; and their son Alfred, born April 17, 180 1, 
married Emma Augusta Howd, daughter of W'hite- 
head Howd, of New Hartford, Conn., September 
S, 1829. Alfred M. was educated in the public 
schools and in academies in part, and in part by 
private tuition. He attended public and some- 
times private schools until the age of twelve. At 
the age of thirteen he was at work at wood-turning 
and other wood-working, which he continued, with 
schooling winters, until he reached eighteen. 
After that he spent several terms, with interrup- 
tions, at academies, taught school some time, and 
at the age of twenty-two began reading law. He 
was admitted to the bar in December, 1855, and 
in January following began practice, established 
in the town of Huntington, Hampshire County, 
Mass. He remained there until June, 1863, when 
he moved to Chicopee. The following year, in 




ALFRED M. COPELAND. 

self in Springfield, and the following spring formed 
a copartnership with Judge Henry Morris, which 
continued for ten years. Since its dissolution he 
has practised alone. He was a special justice of 
the Police Court of Springfield for about twenty 
years, and during his residence in Huntington he 
was some time a trial justice. In Huntington also 
he was for one year town clerk, and served several 
terms on the School Committee. He also served 
one term on the School Committee in Springfield. 
In 1875 he was a representative for Springfield in 
the lower house of the Legislature. In politics he 
has usually acted with the Democratic party ; but he 
revolted against General Butler in 1883, and went 
over to the Republican party, where he remained 
until Blaine was nominated for the Presidency. 
That year, and in the two Presidential campaigns 
following, he voted for Cleveland. He has served 
in political conventions, and made political speeches 
in national and State campaigns. In religious 
faith he is a Unitarian, and has served on the 
parish committee in the Unitarian society in 
Springfield eleven years. He is a member of the 
Masonic order, four years master of the local 



292 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Masonic lodge ; and mcniber of the Connecticut 
Valley Historical Society. He is the author of 
the history of the former town of Murrayfield, 
which included the present towns of Chester and 
Huntington in Western Massachusetts. Mr. Cope- 
land was married at Huntington, December 31, 
1857, to Miss Emyra A. Bigelow. They have two 
children : Alfred B. and Mary E. Copeland. 



CRANK, Kli.kry Bicknell, of Worcester, 
lumber merchant, is a native of New Hampshire, 
born in Colebrook, Coos County, November 12, 
1836, son of Robert Pruden and Almira Paine 
(Bicknell) Crane. He is in the seventh genera- 
tion among the descendants of Henry Crane, 
of Wethersfield and Guilford, Conn., and in the 
eighth generation in descent from Zachary liick- 
nell, of Weymouth, Mass. Both ancestors came 
from Old England to the New, the former about 
the year 1640, and the latter 1636. His father 
was one of the original settlers of Beloit, Rock 
County, Wis., arriving there in the winter of 
1836-37 ; and his mother followed with him, a 
babe of nine months, in August, 1837. He was 
educated in the common schools of Beloit, at the 
Beloit Seminary, and in the Preparatory Depart- 
ment of Beloit College. After leaving this depart- 
ment, not entering the college, he took a position 
as book-keeper in the office of a lumber merchant 
in the town. Not long after his employment here, 
however, as a result of the financial depression 
beginning in 1857, which was severely felt in the 
West even into and through the year 1859, the 
credit system was abandoned by his employer; and 
in i860 he took a trip overland to California. 
That fall he cast his first presidential vote for 
Abraham Lincoln while crossing the Sierra Moun- 
tains, at a station called Strawberry Valley. After 
spending about two years in California and 
Oregon, he returned by way of the isthmus, to 
New York, and was soon re-established in the 
lumber trade as book-keeper and salesman for a 
lumber merchant in Boston, He continued in 
this capacity for several years, when the business 
was sold out. Then in April, 1867, he estab- 
lished himself in Worcester as a lumber merchant 
on his own account, where he has since remained, 
steadily successful, having met no interruptions or 
disturbances in his business from the start. Al- 
though this has demanded much the larger part 
of his time, he has found opportunities to devote 



some spare moments to literary work in the line 
of local history and genealogy, having compiled 
and published the " Revised Rawson Family 
Memorial" in 1875, and in 1887 "The Ancestry 
of Edward Rawson, Secretary of the Colony of 
Massachusetts Bay." He is now, and for a 
number of years has been, engaged in collecting 
materials for and compiling a history of his own 
family, " The Cranes in America and in Old 
England." He was among the early members of 
the Worcester Society of Antiquity, one of its 
corporate members in 1877, was at the first 
meeting after incorporation, on March 6, that year, 
elected second vice-president, and was president 
for twelve years from January, 1881, declining the 
annual election given him for 1893. He has 
served in the Worcester Common Council two 
terms, from January, 1876, to January, 1880, and 
on the Board of Aldermen two years, 1886 
and 1887, declining to be a candidate for further 
service on account of the demands of his busi- 
ness. During the entire time of his service in the 
City Council he was an active worker on impor- 
tant standing and special committees. He is a 




B. CRANE. 



prominent member of the \\'orcester County 
Mechanics' Association, elected to the board of 
directors in 1884, vice-president 1887-89, presi- 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



293 



dent in 1890 91 and liu dLdi\eicd the historical and trustee of several large estates. He is a 
address at tlie tiftieth anni\ersary of the asso- member of the American Antiquarian Society and 
ciation. on the sth of February. ICS92. He was of the Worcester Fire .Society, and belongs to the 
also for three years president of the Worcester 
Builders' Exchange, and for the same length of 
time was president of the Sons and Daughters 
of New Hampshire. He is the compiler of the 
"Memoirs, Sons and Daughters of New Hamp- 
shire, Worcester, 1880 to 1885," giving the history 
of this association, with its transactions during 
the period covered by the above dates. In 
politics he has been a steadfast Republican from 
the time of his first vote, and has voted reg- 
ularly at e\ery election. Mr. Crane was married 
May 13, 1859, to Miss Salona Aldrich Rawson, 
a descendant in the eighth generation of Edward 
Rawson, secretary of the Massachusetts Bay Col- 
ony from 1650 to 1686. They have had but one 
child : Morton Rawson Crane. 



DEWE\', Francis Henshaw, of Worcester, 
member of the bar, is a native of Worcester, born 
March 23, 1856, son of Francis H. and Sarah 
B. (Tufts) Dewey. He comes of a family distin- 
guished in the annals of the Massachusetts judici- 
ary, his father having been a judge of the Supe- 
rior Court for twelve years, and his grandfather, 
Charles A. Dewey, a judge of the Supreme Judi- 
cial Court for twenty-nine years, — from 1837 until 
his death in 1866. Francis H. was educated in 
private schools, fitting for college at St. Mark's 
School, Southboro. He graduated at Williams 
College in the class of 1876, receiving the degree 
of A.M. three years later. His preparation for 
his profession was made at the Harvard Law 
School, from which he graduated in 1878, and in 
the law office of Staples & Goulding, of Worcester ; 
and he was admitted to the bar in February, 1879. 
He has practised at \\'orcester since that time, 
and engaged also in financial, railroad, and other 
interests. He has been solicitor of the Worcester 
Mechanics' Savings Bank since 1880, clerk of the 
bank since 1882, and trustee since 1888 ; has 
been president of the Mechanics' National Bank 
since April, 1888 ; for several years a director of 
the Norwich & Worcester Railroad Company, of 
the Worcester Gas Light Company, of the Worces- 
ter Traction Company, of the Worcester Con- 
solidated Street Railway Company ; director and 
treasurer of the Proprietors of the Bay State 
House, and of the Worcester Theatre Association ; 




FRANCIS H. DEWEY. 

leading clubs of Worcester, — the Worcester, the 
Hancock, and the Quinsigamond Boat clubs. In 
politics he is Republican, but is not active, having 
no time or inclination for political work. He was 
married December 12, 1878, to Miss Lizzie D. 
Bliss, daughter of Harrison and Sarah Howe Bliss. 
They have one daughter, Elizabeth Bliss, and one 
son, Francis Henshaw Dewey, Jr. 



DODGE, Thomas Hutchins, of Worcester, 
law3'er, inventor, and manufacturer, is a native of 
Vermont, born in Eden, Lamoille County, Septem- 
ber 27. 1823, fourth son of Malachi F. and Jane 
(Hutchins) Dodge. His ancestors were Malachi 
F.", Enoch'', Elisha^ Joseph-, and Richard', who 
settled in Salem, Mass., in 1638, from England. 
His father was a substantial farmer, first in Eden, 
and afterwards in Lowell, Vt., moving to the latter 
place when Thomas H. was a child. Here the 
boy lived, until about fourteen years of age, a free 
farm life, attending the district school during the 
winters. 'I'hen, his eldest brother having secured 
a position with the Nashua (N.H.) Manufacturing 



294 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



Company, the family moved to Xasluia, where his 
schooling was continued in the public schools. 
While yet in his teens, determining to become a 
lawyer and a manufacturer, and desiring to act for 
himself, he agreed with his father upon a simi to 
be paid for his time during the remainder of his 
minority ; and, when the papers were duly executed 
and signed, he set out to prepare himself for his 
chosen vocations. His first aim was to master the 
business of manufacturing cotton cloth ; and to this 
end he began at the beginning, finding a place in 
one of the carding-rooms of a mill as a roll carrier. 
Meanwhile he read many books and papers bear- 
ing on the subject. When he had earned sufficient 
funds, he left Nashua, and entered the Gymna- 
sium Institute at Pembroke, N.H., where he made 
rapid progress, ranking among the foremost in his 
class. After leaving Pembroke, he returned to 
Nashua, and secured a place in the spinning and 
weaving departments of the Nashua Manufacturing 
Company. Remaining in this position till he had 
acquired a full knowledge of the processes, and 
again had a small capital in hand saved from his 
earnings, he took up a course of study in the 
Nashua Literary Institute. This completed, he 
returned to the mills, and was soon made second 
in charge of the warping, dressing, and drawing-in 
departments. Subsequently he was promoted to 
the full charge of these departments, the youngest 
person who had ever held this position. In the 
mean time he had been pursuing a course of study 
in elementary law, and continuing his studies in 
Latin under a private tutor. He also compiled a 
" Review of the Rise, Progress, and Present Im- 
portance of Cotton Manufactures of the United 
States : together with Statistics, showing the Com- 
parative and Relative Remuneration of English 
and American Operatives," which he published in 
the year 1850. While in charge of departments of 
the Nashua Manufacturing Company's business he 
was enabled, through his e.xact knowledge of de- 
tails, considerably to reduce expenses, and by his 
ingenious inventions to impro\e the character of 
the work. He made numerous other experiments 
and improvements; and in 1851 a patent was ob- 
tained for a printing-press of his inxention. to 
print from a roll of cloth or paper, and cut the 
material into the desired lengths after the impres- 
sion was made and while in motion, which was the 
beginning of the revolution in machinery for print- 
ing paper, culminating in the lightning presses of 
the present day. In 185 i he turned his attention 



directly to preparation for the law. entering the 
office of the Hon. George Y. Saw-yer and Colonel 
A. F. Stevens, of Nashua ; and on the 5 th of 
December, 1854, he was admitted to the New- 
Hampshire bar. He immediately began practice 
in Nashua; but soon after, in March, 1855, being 
offered by the Hon. Charles Mason, then United 
States commissioner of patents, a position in the 
examining corps of the patent office, he moved to 
Washington. He remained in the patent office 
nearly four years, the greater portion of the time 
serving as examiner-in-chief, having been early 
appointed to that position, and the last year as 




THOMAS H. DODGE. 

chairman of the permanent board of appeals estab- 
lished in December. 1857. While in the patent 
office, he invented the important improvement in 
the mowing machine, by which the finger bar and 
cutting apparatus are controlled by the driver 
from his seat, now in almost universal use, and 
estimated to save the labor of over one million 
of laborers during the harvesting season in this 
and foreign countries. Resigning from the patent 
office in November, 1858. to resume the practice 
of law. he was admitted to the Supreme Court of 
the United States, and opened an office in Wash- 
ington ; and for twenty-five years thereafter he 
enjoyed a large and lucrative practice in patent 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



295 



cases, both in the East and West, ranking among 
the first in that branch of tiie profession. It is 
due to the efforts of Mr. Uodge, while a resident 
of Washington, that letters, uncalled for, are re- 
turned to the writers, he having in 1S56 fully 
elaborated the plan and details thereof, and pre- 
sented them in writing to the then Postmaster- 
General, Judge Cambell. Early in the si.xties Mr. 
Dodge became one of the active managers of the 
Union Mowing Machine Company, established in 
Worcester, and also opened a branch law office 
here; and in 1864 he took up his residence in 
this citv. In 1 881, while still engaged in his ex- 
tensi\'e law practice, he joined Charles G. Wash- 
burn in the organization of the Worcester Barb 
Eence Company, with himself as president and 
Mr. Washburn as secretary and manager, and 
began the manufacture of the four-pointed cable 
barbed fence wire of their invention, now made 
by the \^'ashburn & Moen Manufacturing Com- 
pany, which subsequently purchased their entire 
plant and patents. In 1884 Mr. Dodge retired 
from active professional work, and has since given 
much of his time to his extensive farm interests in 
Worcester and Western Iowa, where he owns one 
of the largest farms west of the Mississippi, and 
to his extensive grounds about his town residence. 
During his residence in Worcester he has been 
a public-spirited and generous citizen, having given 
to the city a tract of thirteen acres for a public 
park; presented to the trustees of the Odd Fel- 
lows' State Home the tract of land covering thir- 
teen acres on which the Home stands, and land 
for Odd Fellows' Park, though himself not a mem- 
ber of the order ; materially aided the Worcester 
Natural History Society in its efforts to maintain 
summer schools for the young ; and assisted lib- 
erally in building Union, Piedmont, and other 
churches in Worcester. With the exception of 
service on the first city council of Nashua, when 
a law student in the early fifties, he has held no 
elective office. He was married June 29, 1843, 
to Miss Eliza Daniels, of Brookline, N.H. They 
have no children. 



DOL'GLASS, Fraxklix Pikrce, of \\"orcester. 
proprietor of the Hay State House, is a native of 
Lynn, born February 7, 1853, son of Franklin J. 
and Semantha A. (Stiles) Douglass. His father 
was a well-known citizen of Lynn, at one time 
a member of the citv government ; and his mother 



was of Bethel, Maine, daughter of .\ndrew J. 
Stiles. His grandfather, Samuel Douglass, was 
a native of York, Me., was a merchant, also a 
hotel-keeper there, and was largely interested in 
the Southern coastwise trade, running schooners 
and other craft sailing north and south. His edu- 
cation was attained in the Lynn common schools, 
at the Littleton (N.H.) High School, and at Thet- 
ford Academy, at Thetford Hill, Vt. His first 
experience in hotel life was obtained when yet 
a boy, at the old Union House, Littleton, X.H. 
He was next employed at the Profile House, 
White Mountains. Thence he went to the office 




F. p. DOUGLASS. 

of the United States Hotel, Boston, when but 
seventeen years of age. He remained there till 
1875, when he leased the Mettakesett Lodge at 
Katama, Martha's Vineyard, which he conducted 
one season. In the autumn of the same year he 
came to the Bay State as its chief clerk, and from 
that time has been connected with this house. 
He continued as chief clerk until 1888, when, in 
connection with a partner, he bought the lease 
and furniture, and became proprietor, .\fter four 
years of partnership he bought the interest of his 
partner, and has since conducted the house alone, 
making it a prosperous one. He has spent many 
thousand dollars in modern furnishings and re- 



296 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



pairs, and pul the large house in tiiorougli condi- 
tion. Mr. Douglass is connected with the Ma- 
sonic order, a member of the Quinsigamond Lodge, 
Eureka Chapter, Hiram Council, \\'orcester Lodge 
of Perfection, Lawrence Chapter Rose Croix, 
and the Worcester C"ounty Commandery Knights 
Templar, all of Worcester ; of the Boston Con- 
sistory of Boston, thirty-second degree, and of 
Aleppo Temple, Mystic Shrine of Boston. He is 
also a member of the Gesang Verein Frohsinn, 
of the Elks, of the Worcester Council No. 12, 
Royal Arcanum, and of the Hancock Club. He 
was married in 1880 to Miss L. Etta \\"ilco.x, 
a daughter of Alfred \\'. Wilcox, of Worcester. 
They have one child : Grace W. Douglass, born in 
1882. 

EARLE, Stephen Carpenter, of Worcester, 
architect, was born in Leicester, January 4, 1839, 
son of .Amos .S. and Hannah (Carpenter) Earle. 
He is a lineal descendant of Ralph Earle, born 
near Exeter, England, who came to New England 
about the )'ear 1630, and soon after settled in 
Rhode Island. His great-great-great-grandfather 
Ralph, grandson of the first Ralph, was one of the 
original settlers of Leicester ; and Steward South- 
gate and Nathaniel Potter, also original settlers of 
Leicester, were ancestors of his father's mother. 
On the maternal side he descends from the Car- 
penters and Tafts, early settlers in the southern 
part of Worcester County. He was educated in 
the Leicester district school, the Friends' Boarding 
School, Providence, R.L, and the High School, 
Worcester. He subsequently took a short course 
in architectural design in the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology. After leaving school, he was 
for five years a book-keeper. Then he pursued 
the study of architecture in various architects' 
offices in New York and A\"orcester, broken by 
eleven months' service in the l^nion army (1862, 
1863). For one year he was draughtsman at the 
Hoosac Tunnel, and in 1865-66 seven months 
were devoted to the tour of Europe, with study 
along the way. Upon his return from Europe he 
began work as an architect, opening his office in 
Worcester in February, 1S66. In March of the 
same year he was joined by James E. Fuller, and 
the firm of Earle & Fuller was established. This 
continued for ten years. Afterwards Mr. Earle 
was alone till 1891, when on the first of July he 
entered into partnership with Clellan W. Fisher, 
under the firm name of Earle ^; J-'isher, which re- 



lation still continues. From 1872 to 1885 he had 
a Boston office as well as a Worcester one. His 
work has been of a general character, public and 
private, including many fine churches, among 
them All Saints', Saint Matthew's, Saint Mark's, 
Central, Pilgrim, .South Unitarian, and others of 
less importance in \\'orcester ; the new building 
for the Worcester Free Public Library and many 
fine libraries elsewhere ; the buildings for the 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute ; the Slater Memo- 
rial, Norwich, Conn., Iowa College Library, Good- 
now Hall, for the Huguenot Seminary, in South 
Africa, and numerous other school and college 
buildings in various parts. He is a member 
of the American Institute of .Vrchitects, of the 
Worcester Chapter of the American Institute of 
Architects, and of the Boston Society of Archi- 
tects. In addition to his professional work he 
is interested in the Worcester Co-operative Bank, 
of which he has been a director from its foun- 
dation, was vice-president from 1885 to 1888, 
and has been president since 1888. In politics 
he is an ardent Republican, but without ambition 
for office, and in religious faith an Episcopalian. 




STEPHEN C. EARLE. 



He has been senior warden of Saint John's 
Church, Worcester, since 1889, was junior warden 
from 1887 to 1889, and vestryman from 1884 to 



MEN OF PROGRESS. 



297 



1887 : ;iiicl vestryman in All Saints" Church from 
1S79 to 1885. He has also been on the board 
of directors of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation since i88g. Other organizations to which 
he belongs are the Episcopal Church Club, the 
(^uinsigamond Boat Club, the Hancock Club, and 
the Art Society, all of Worcester ; and the Grand 
Army of the Republic. He was married October 
19, 1869, to Miss Mary L. Brown, of Worcester, 
who is descended from the first white child born 
in Worcester. Their children are: Charles B. 
(horn July 18, 1S71, graduated at Harvard Col- 
lege 1894), Ralph (born May 3, 1874, now a 
cadet in the United States Naval Academy, 
Annapolis), Richard B. (born May 29, 1876, now 
a student at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute), 
Ruth