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Full text of "Men who are making Kansas City; a biographical directory"

Men Who Are Makin 
Kansas City. 



A Biographical Directory. 



Compiled by 
GEORGE CREEL and JOHN SLAVENS, 
* " 1902. 



HUDSON-KIMBF.RLY PUBLISHING CO. 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 



10591 1 A 












Prefatory Note. 



This book was compiled to supply the demand for a 
standard volume of facts concerning men of prominence in 
Kansas City. No such book has appeared since Col. Theo- 
dore Case issued his ''History of Kansas City," twenty years 
ago. The need of a reliable work of this kind has long been 
felt, especially by the newspapers, whose only resource in case 
of an emergency is to a book which contains few of the pres- 
ent generation. 

Necessarily the names of many desirous of appearing in 
the compilation have been omitted because not deemed by the 
editors of sufficient prominence. The effort has been to in- 
clude, so far as possible, all those in whom the general public 
is interested. It was the idea of the cjinpilers to make a 
book that would be a standard volume to be used by news- 
papers and libraries. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




WASHINGTON ADAMS 
was born in Boonville, Missouri, April 16, 
1849. It was there he lived until the 
attainment of his majority, receiving his 
primary education in the Kemper School 
for boys. From there he went to the 
University of Virginia, and taking a spe- 
cial law course, had a degree conferred 
upon him in 1869. 

It was in 1870, the year after receiving 
his diploma, that Mr. Adams came to 
Kansas City, and he has ever since been a 
conspicuous figure in the professional and 
public life of the town. In 1874 he was 
elected City Attorney, and his record won 
him re-election in the following year. 

In 1880 Mayor Chase appointed him 
City Counselor, and Mayor Lee Talbot, 
Chase's successor, re-appointed him be- 
cause of his ability and energy. 

In 1894 Mr. Adams was tendered the 

position of County Counselor, and there 
he made the same good record as in the 
office of City Counselor, and so the usual 
re-appointment was given him in 1896. 

vSince 1898 Mr. Adams has devoted 
himself entirely to his private practice 
He was married June 5, 1877, to Miss Ella 
Lincoln, daughter of John K. Lincoln, of 
Plattsburg, and they have one son, 
John W., now in his sophomore year at 
Harvard. 

















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Hsp 


Jjm ^jH[ 







Photo hi/ Strauss. 

ETHELBERT FORRESTER ALLEN 
was born in Hartford County, Connec- 
ticut, in 1855. He received his early ed- 
ucation in Johns Hopkins Grammar 
School and the Hartford High School, 
from which he was graduated in 1875. 

He first came to Kansas City in 1876, 
where he remained but a short time, pass- 
ing on to the Northwestern country, 
where he afterwards became general in- 
spector of a company that had Govern- 
ment contracts to furnish supplies for 
four Indian agencies. 

In 1880 he came to Kansas City for a 
permanent residence, engaging in the 
real estate business, in which he has ever 

since remained, now being the president 
of the Allen Investment Company. 

In 1889 he married Miss Virginia Rid- 
dle, of Nashville, Tenn. 

In Masonic circles the name of Mr. Al- 
len is widely known. He entered Ma- 
sonry in 1884, and has received all the 
degrees of Vork and Scottish Masonry 
including the thirty-third degree. He 
was grand master of Missouri in 1888-89, 
and in 1887 organized Ararat Temple A. 
O. N. M. S. In 1898 he was elected Im- 
perial Potentate for North America. He- 
has served a term as president of the Kan- 
sas City Real Estate Exchange, and in 
1900 was the Republican nominee for 
Lieutenant-Governor of Missouri, actu- 
ated purely by party loyalty, and made 
a splendid race. 



MUX H7/0 ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




I'lmtn by Strauss. 

HARRY HERRICK ALLEN 

was born June 21, 1850, in Sparta, White 
County, Tennessee. His early education 
was received in the public schools in 
Washington, Ky., and in the High School 
at Chillicothe, and finished with a course 
in Antioch College, Yellow Springs, Ky. 
In 187 1 he engaged in the lumber business 
in Michigan, where he remained for six 
years, coming to Missouri in 1877. He 
secured a position in the Auditor's ofhce 
of the "Katy" Railroad in Sedalia, and 
tilled a similar position in St. Louis, when 
the Missouri Pacific absorbed part of 
the "Katy," and moved the offices to 
Mound City. Mr. Allen resigned in 1881, 
however, and started in the lumber busi- 
ness in Sedalia. In 1889 he came to Kan- 
sas City and engaged in the loan and real 
estate business. 

He is at present Secretary of the Con- 
vention Bureau, and Secretary of the 
Karnival Krewe, and is a prominent 
figure in every public enterprise. In 
1896-97 Mr. Allen served as Grand Chan- 
cellor of the Knights of Pythias, was for 
ten years Quartermaster of the Missouri 
Brigade, and this is his eighth year as 
Supreme Representative. 

He is also a Knight Templar, a thirty- 
second degree Scottish Rite Mason, and 
for six years has been Recorder of Ararat 
Temple, Mystic Shrine. 

Mr. Allen married Miss Dollie Evans 
in Sedalia December 16, 1880, and they 
have two sons, Edwin and Harry Jr. 




Photo hji Strauss. 

HARRY T. ABERNATHY 

was born in Leavenworth, Kansas, May 

2 3, 1865, the son of J. L. Abernathy, the 

pioneer furniture manufacturer of the 

West. He went to the public and high 
schools of Leavenworth, and then entered 
Hamilton College, Clinton, N. Y., from 
which institution he was graduated in 
1887. 

He came at once to Kansas City, the 
Abernathy Furniture Company having 
been removed to this town in that year, 
and became cashier of the company. He 
held the position for eight years, and in 
1895 was given the place of assistant 
cashier of the First National Bank. In 
1899 he was made cashier, the position he 
still holds. 

Mr. Abernathy is a member of the 
Commercial Club, the Missouri Bankers' 
Association, the Knife and Fork Club, 
and is a Mason. Fo. two years he has 
been treasurer of the Provident Associa- 
tion, an unremunerated position, to which 
he has cheerfully given time and thought. 
He has also been treasurer of Park Col- 
lege for four years. 

He was married in 1890 to Miss Steven- 
son, of Leavenworth, and they have there 
children, two boys and a girl. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

HAVELOCK H. ANDERSON 

was born in Hanover County, Virginia • 
March 14, 1858. His boyhood days were 
spent on a farm, and his education received 
at a private school on the Anderson plan- 
tation. After attaining manhood, he 
entered the mercantile business in Nor- 
folk, and later went into the real estate 
and insurance business in Charlottesville- 
In 1887 he came to Kansas City, and soon 
became identified with the old Merchants' 
Exchange, holding the position of chief 
clerk to Ryerson Richie, its founder. 
His next position was that of traveling 
salesman for Peet Bros., and from there 
he went to the Barber Asphalt Company. 
He remained with the paving people until 
1897, and then accepted the office of Jury 
Commissioner, filling it in a manner to 
give nothing but satisfaction. 

For some time interested with the Kan- 
sas City Transfer Company, in 1900 Cap- 
tain Anderson decided to give all his 
time to it. He is now secretary and man- 
ager of that large concern, and has done 
much to increase its operations. 

Captain Anderson married Miss Phoebe 
Brent, of Lexington, Ky., in 1891, and 
they have one boy four years old. A 
member of the Commercial Club, few men 
have given more time to public move- 
ments than Captain Anderson. 




Photo by Strauss. 

WILLIAM WARDER AVERY 
was born in Clinton, Missouri, May 28, 
1873. Hi s father was one of the early 
Missouri pioneers, having been born and 
reared in Henry County. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
public and high schools in Clinton, and 
then spent three years at William Jewell 
College in Liberty. After leaving college, 
he accepted employment with the Bur- 
lington Railroad in Kansas City, entering 
the office as clerk, and rising to the posi- 
tion of assistant ticket agent. 

With the launching of the Kansas City, 
Pittsburg & Gulf Railroad, Mr. Avery 
went into its service as ticket agent and 
chief clerk, and was afterwards made as- 
sitant general passenger agent. When 
the road became the Kansas City South- 
ern, Mr. Avery was made general passen- 
ger agent at Texarkana, but resigned the 
position to return to Kansas City as chief 
clerk of the general passenger agent, the 
position he now holds with the Kansas 
City Southern. 

Mr. Avery is a member of the Phi 
Gamma Delta Fraternity, and also be- 
longs to the Railway Club of Kansas City. 
He was married December 25, 1899, to 
Miss Margaret Kelly. They have one 
son, Frank. 



MH N WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Phalli by Strauss. 

WILLIAM WHITING ATWILL 

was born in Burlington, Vermont, Sep- 
tember 6, 1 87 1. He lived in that town 
until ten years of age, when his parents 
moved to Toledo, Ohio. His early edu- 
cation was acquired in the public schools 
of Burlington, and he entered the public 
schools at Toledo soon after arriving there. 
At the conclusion of his public schooling, 
Mr. Atwill went to the De Veaux Military 
Academy at Niagara Falls, N. Y., where 
he took a classical course. He graduated 
from this institution in 1891. His fath- 
er, Bishop E. R. Atwill, had been elected 

Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church for this diocese while he was in 
the senior class at the De Veaux Acade- 
my, and after his graduation from there 
he came to Kansas City to live. Soon 
after taking up residence here, he found 
employment with the Kansas City, Ft. 
Scott & Gulf Railroad in the general of- 
fices here, and remained with the railroad 
fur a number of years. In January, 1896, 
he left his place there and went with the 
Emery, Bird, Thayer Dry Goods Com- 
pany, where he has been ever since. He 
had marked ability to write, and from the 
offices of that company he rose to be the 
advertising manager of the concern, a posi- 
tion lie now holds. While at school, Mr. 
Atwill became a member of the Sigma Psi 
Fraternity. He was married October 
29, 1898, lo Miss Ellen Talbot, of this 
city. 




HENRY D. ASHLEY 
was born September 19, 1856, in Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. His parents soon removed 
to Milwaukee, Wis., and there Mr. Ashley 
gathered his earlier education. After 
some years in the public schools of Mil- 
waukee, Mr. Ashley took up a course of 
study at Racine College. After being 
graduated from there, he crossed over to 
England, and enrolled as a student in 
King's College, Somerset House, London. 
When he had passed through the courses 
selected at King's College, Mr. Ashley 
returned to this country and taught school 
for a year in Racine. He then went to 
Milwaukee and entered the offices of 
Chief Justice Dixon, studying law and 
gaining insight into the practical working 
of the law. He came to Kansas City in 
1880, and was admitted to the bar during 
the following year. His position at the 
local -bar is one of the highest among the 
practitioners, with whom he has prac- 
ticed law now for twenty years. As an 
evidence of this, might be pointed out 
that he has served a term as President of 

the Kansas City Bar Association, an hon- 
or conferred only upon those of spotless 
reputations and of absolute business in- 
tegrity. 

Mr. Ashley was married to Miss Caro- 
line Schuyler Mann, of Watkins, N. Y,. 
August 1, 1896. Mr. and Mrs. Ashley 
have two children, Schuyler and Anne. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 





Photo hn Cornish. 

CARL BUSCH 

was born in Jutland, Denmark, March, 
29, 1862. At an early age he showed 
great musical talent, so that along with 
his regular education he was given mu- 
sical instruction. After studying under 
private teachers, he entered the University 
of Copenhagen, where he remained for 
three years under the tutelage of masters 
like Niels Gade, Tofte, and Hartman. 
He played in the Philharmonic Orchestra 
under Johann Svendson, and in the Music 
Vereirt under Gade's baton. It was after 
this that he won a scholarship in the 
Brussels Conservatory, and so greatly 
was his art broadened there that he 
journeyed to Paris, and played under the 
direction of the great Gounod and God- 
ard. From Paris he returned to Den- 
mark; but in 1887 he came to America, 
locating finally in Kansas City. In this 
country he has attained favor as an or- 
chestral composer and writer of songs. 
His compositions have been played at 
the Music Teachers' National Association 
concerts in Berlin, Hamburg, Leipsic, 
Dresden, and Weimar. Among his best 
known works are "The Lady of Shalott," 
"King Olaf's War Horns," "The League 
of the Alps," and an opera, "The Grey 
Nun." He is director of the Oratorio 
Society and of the Philharmonic Orches- 
tra, and has done much to cultivate and 
elevate local musical taste. 



WILLIAM BAILEY CLARKE BROWN 
was born in Sibley, Missouri, in 1861. 
His father, Dr. James T. Brown, came 
out to Missouri from Virginia in 1837, 
and played a prominent part in the devel- 
opment of the State. The subject of 
this sketch was reared in Independence, 
and received his early education in the 
public schools. From there he entered 
Westminister College, from which he was 
graduated in 1883 with the degree of A.B. 
He then took a three years' course in the 
Harvard Law School, and, returning to 
Missouri in 1888, located in Kansas City, 
and commenced the practice of law with 
Judge J. K. Cravens. 

Mr. Brown has played a prominent 
part in Republican politics, and carried 
his party's standard in the Congressional 
campaign of 1890, failing, however, to 
overcome the large Democratic majority 
in Jackson and Lafayette Counties. 

He was married in 1888 to Miss Anna 
Jones, of Seward, Neb., and they have 
two children, Mercedes and Irene, born 
respectively in 1890 and 1892. 

At present, and for some time past, 
Mr. Brown has been practicing law by him- 
self. He belongs to the Bar Association. 
and is prominent in other public organ- 
izations. 



IO 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




WILLIAM P. BORLAND, 

Dean of the Kansas City School of Law, 
was born in Leavenworth, Kansas, Oc- 
tober 14, 1S67. He lived there until 
1SS0, when he came to Kansas City. 
After graduating from the High School, 
Mr. Borland entered the law office of 
Pratt, McCrary & Ferry. Then he en- 
tered the law department of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, from which he was 
graduated in 1892 with the degree of 
L.L.B. 

Mr. Borland was one of the founders of 
the Kansas City School of Law in 1895. 
He was elected Dean in that year, and 
has been re-elected every year since then. 

For one term Mr. Borland was vice- 
president of the Kansas City Bar Associ- 
ation and a member of its examining 
board. He was a charter member of the 
University Club. 

The lectures of Mr. Borland before the 
classes of the Kansas City School of Law 
on contracts, wills, and Blackstone's 
Commentaries have made for him a rep- 
utation as an expounder of the intricate 
problems of the law. 

For a while Mr. Borland was in partner- 
ship with Chas. E. Pratt, but since 1896 
he has practiced alone. His duties as 
Dean of the School of Law are not al- 
lowed to interfere with his practice. 




Photo by Strauss. 

KELLY BRENT 

was born in Paris, Bourbon County, Ken- 
tucky, March 8, 1859. His early educa- 
tion was supplemented by a course at 
Center College, Danville, Ky., from where 
hew as graduated in 1878, and then he en- 
tered the Cincinnati Law School, taking 
his degree in 1880. He began the prac- 
tice of law in Paris, and in 1882 was elect- 
ed Prosecuting Attorney of Bourbon 
County by the Democrats. In 1886 he 
resigned the office and removed to Kan- 
sas City, where he went in-to the real es- 
tate business under the firm name of 
Baird, Brent & Co., representing a very 
large Eastern clientage composed of 
Charles Francis Adams and others. For 
this syndicate Mr. Brent promoted and de- 
veloped the town of Armourdale, the larg- 
est deal ever projected in this vicinity. 
In 1890 he was chosen cashier of the Dol- 
lar Savings Bank. In 1895 the directors 
concluded to liquidate the bank, owing 
to the fact that five other saving banks 
had failed in the panic of 1893, and it 
seemed impossible to restore confidence 
in such concerns. The depositors were 
paid in full, and the assets turned over to 
Mr. Brent for the benefit of the stock- 
holders. He again engaged in the real 
estate business, and has fully re-estab- 
lished himself. A strong Democrat, Mr. 
Brent has served on the County Commit- 
tee, and has given freely of his time for 
the good of the party. He is president of 
the local Alumni Chapter of B. O. P., but 
belongs to no other societies. He is mar- 
ried, and has a large family. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



i i 




Photo by St ran xx. 

FRANCOIS BOUCHER 

was born in Montreal, Canada, June 4, 
1861. His family is of French descent. 
He spent his boyhood in Montreal, and re- 
ceived his education at the city's public 
and high schools. He was always pas- 
sionately devoted to music, and in 1876 
went to the Royal Conservatory, Liege, 
Belgium, where he remained two years 
studying music and harmonics. 

After that time he returned to Canada, 
and studied with Jehan Prume. He was 
head violin teacher at the Toronto Con- 
servatory of Music for three years, leav- 
ing that place to tour with Carreno and 
Albani. Mr. Boucher was identified with 
many of the musical ventures held in the 

capitals of the various Provinces of Can- 
ada, in which his training and experience 
were given full play. He was conductor 
of the great Ottawa Musical Festival giv- 
en under the patronage of the Marquis of 
Lome and Lady Lansdowne, and in a 
number of other affairs of national sig- 
nificance. 

His local residence dates from 1892, 
since which time he has devoted himself 
to teaching the violin. He is the author 
of several instrumental compositions 
that have won high praise from musicians. 
Mr. Boucher was married in 1883 in 
Ottawa. His wife was Miss Noel De 
Tilly. They have two children, both 
daughters. 




Photo by Strauss. 

WILLIAM H. BLOOD 

was born at Victor, New York, May 17, 

1864. He lived in Victor until early 

manhood. His education was secured 

at the public schools of the town with an 

aftercourse at Canandaigua Academy. 

He came to this town direct from Victor 

in 1884. His earlier life was spent in the 
employ of various mercantile firms, his 
career in the hotel business having begun 
but twelve years ago. He drifted into it 
from his place as collector on Santa Fe 
trains to the employ of Fred Harvey, 
who controls eating-houses along that 
railroad. Mr. Blood's first venture in a 
responsible place in the hotel business 
was as the manager of the Hotel Bruns- 
wick in this city. Then a series of local 
hotels were placed in his care: the Henri- 
etta, the Auditorium, the Richelieu, all 
having been managed by him for varying 
intervals. Then for a year each he was 
given charge of the Sweet Springs Hotel, 
at Sweet Springs, Mo., and of the Cres- 
cent Hotel, the Frisco system's magnifi- 
cent hostelry at Eureka Springs, Ark. 
After that he managed the Elms at Ex- 
celsior Springs, Mo., for two years, re- 
turning at the expiration of that time to 
this city to become the steward of the 
Midland Hotel. He remained there two 
years, too, and then took charge of the 
Washington, the place he now holds. 
Mr. Blood was married in 1891 to Miss 
Constantia A. Clark, of this city. They 
have but one child, a girl, Kathleen C. 
C. Blood, who is nine years of age. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




LOUIS C. BOYLE 
was born February 26, 1866, at Port Col- 
born, Canada, and is of Irish descent. 
He spent his childhood in the town of his 
birth, his family removing, when he was 
eight years of age, to Watford, Canada. 
He acquired the rudiments of an educa- 
tion there, and left home when fifteen 
years of age, going to Colorado to work 
in the mines. He saved his money and 
studied at night with a determination of 
taking an academic course at Ann Arbor. 
Before he had completed the course he 
found that the sum he had saved was in- 
sufficient to take him through the aca- 
demic course, so changed to law and 
graduated from the school in 1889, being 
afterwards admitted to the bar in Michi- 
gan. Mr. Boyle went to Kansas and set- 
tled at Ft. Scott. He was always a Dem- 
ocrat, and the members of his party elect- 
ed him Prosecuting Attorney of Bourbon 
County, an office he held for four years. 
After his terms in this office he returned 
to general practice in Ft. Scott, but was 
afterwards the nominee of his party for 
Attorney-General of Kansas in 1896. 
He was elected, and at the conclusion of 
his term in 1899 came to this city, where 
he has resided since. Mr. Boyle is a 
member of many fraternal and social or- 
ders, among them the Elks, Masons, K. 
of P., and is a Scottish Rite Mason and 
Shriner. He married Miss Gertrude 
Burson, of Garnett, Kas., in 1890. They 
have three children, George, Katherine, 
and Clara I.ouise. 




Photo by Strauss. 

CHARLES CLINTON BYERS 
was born in Hagerstown, Maryland, July 
7, 1843. He w r ent to school there in the 
place of his birth, but at the outbreak of 
the civil war joined the Seventh Mary- 
land, and was made first sergeant of 
Company A. 

He fought through the war, and was 
there to witness the surrender of Lee at 
Appomattox. He went back to Hagers- 
town for a while, but soon went out to 
Santa Fe, N. M., where he engaged in 
mercantile pursuits. 

He came to Kansas City in 1871, and 
accepted a position with Tootle, Hanna 
& Leach, and remained in the wholesale 
dry goods business until 1890. In 1S95 
he was appointed a Deputy Circuit 
Clerk, and upon the resignation of S. H. 
Raglajid in 1900, was appointed Clerk of 
Division 3. 

He married Miss Lucy Stonestreet in 
1874 at Kansas City, and is the father of 
one child, C. C, Jr. 

While in New Mexico, Mr. Byers or- 
ganized the first Grand Army Post in that 

State, and was elected Senior Vice-Com- 
mander. 

He has ever been a consistent Demo- 
crat, and has contributed materially to 
his party's success by his enthusiasm 
and energy. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY 



i.3 




Photo by Thomson. 

FRED S. BULLENE 
was born in Kansas City August 23, 1864, 
the son of the late T. B. Bullene, one of 
Kansas City's early Mayors, and a pion- 
eer merchant, who did as much as any 
one man to make this town what it is 
to-day. 

The subject of this sketch went to the 
local schools, and later entered Phillips' 
Academy at Andover, Mass., where he 
prepared for Yale. He was graduated 
from Yale in 18S5, and at once returned 
to Kansas City. His first position was 
with the National Bank of Kansas City, 
and, commencing in a rather humble 
capacity, he was made receiving tel- 
ler after three years. He was with the 
bank for seven years, all told, and then 
Mr. Bullene, tired of commercial life, 
entered the newspaper field, for which 
he had always held a fondness. 

His first position was on the repertorial 

staff of the Times, where he remained for 

two years. He then went over to the 

Journal, where he stayed for one year, 

and then he accepted a position with the 

Star in 1897, and has remained with that 

paper ever since. 

He was nominated by the Republicans 
for County Clerk in 1902, and, while de- 
feated by the Democratic landslide, ran 
ahead of his ticket. 




Photo by Strauss. 

JOSEPH B. BRACKEN 

was born in Johnstown, Pa., in 1863 — be- 
fore the flood. When he was eleven 
years old his parents removed to Oil City, 
Pa. .where the youthful Joseph acquired the 
oleaginous manner which has contrbuted 
so largely to his success in life. He was 
educated at St. Francis' College, Loret- 
to, and had as a schoolmate Charles M. 
Schwab, the steel king. When seven- 
teen years old, Mr. Bracken came West, 
and worked for three years in Texas as a 
telegraph operator. He came to Kansas 
City in 1883, and started in the grain 

business eight years ago. 

He has been local manager for Bald- 
win & Gurney, then for Schwartz & Du- 
pee, and is now local manager for Ware 
& Eeland, three of the largest private 
wire commission firms in the country. 
The first two firms quit business because 
the members wished to retire on their 
incomes. 

Mr. Bracken is a member of the Board 
of Trade, and is a writer for local and St. 
Louis papers on crop topics, and is con- 
sidered an authority on crop conditions. 
He married Miss Olive Gilmore, and is 
the father of two children. Walter and 
Pauline. 

Mr. Bracken is a prominent member of 
the Marquette Club, the Knights of Co- 
lumbus, and several other social organi- 
zations, and has always identified himself 
with public movements. 



M 



l//;\ WHO .1 /.'/•; MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Thomson. 

JOHN A. BROWN 

was born in Janesville, Wisconsin, Sep- 
tember 1 8, 1858. His boyhood days 
were spent in Green Bay, Wis., however, 
where he attended the public schools. 
Mr. Brown commenced to earn his own 
living at the age of fifteen, securing a 
position as telegraph operator with 
the Wisconsin Central Railroad. He was 
transferred to a more important post in 
Chicago when eighteen, and remained 
there until twenty-one, when he removed 
to Nebraska, and engaged in the grain 
business. 

After four years of Nebraska life, Mr. 
Brown accepted a position with the 
Rock Island Railroad at Davenport, la., 
and when he resigned after eight years 
of service, was chief clerk to the general 
superintendent. In 1891 he went into 
the employ of the Equitable Life Insur- 
ance Company at St. Louis, and in 1893 
came to Kansas City as manager for the 
local office, the position he now holds. 

From his advent, Mr. Brown has helped 
to "make Kansas City a good place to 
live in." A.S a member of the Commer- 
cial Club, he lias served continuously on 
important commit lees, and he is now- 
serving his fourth term as a director of 
Convention Hall. He is a member of 
the Kansas City Club, the Driving Club, 
the Country Club, and the local lodge of 
Flks, and also belongs to the New York 
Athletic Club. 




Photo by Thomson. 

CHARLES MARSHALL BALDWIN 
was born in Winchester, Frederick Coun- 
ty, Virginia, February 15, 1867, the son 
of Dr. Cornelius Baldwin, who served 
thoughout the Civil War as a surgeon on 
the staff of "Stonewall" Jackson. 

His education was received at the 
Shenandoah Valley Academy in Win- 
chester, and after completing his course 
there he came to Kansas City in 1885. 
His first position was with the Robert 

Keith Furniture Company, and he has 
been with that firm ever since. Begin- 
ning at the very bottom of the ladder, 
he worked his way up, and is now vice- 
president of the company. 

Mr. Baldwin has always been active 
and- enthusiastic in public and political 
matters. He is high in the councils of the 
Democratic party, but has always refused 
office. In 1 901 he was elected a mem- 
ber of the Board of Directors of Conven- 
tion Hall, and in 1902 was re-elected. 
He is a member of the Commercial Club, 
and also belongs to the Kansas City Club. 

Mr. Baldwin was married in 1S95 to 
Miss Lady Belle Hammett, and they 
have two children, Cornelius Hammett 
and Fannv Belle. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY 



15 




HUGH CHARLES BRADY 
was born February 19, 1870, in Kansas 
City, Missouri, and while he has wan- 
dered far and wide, has always made this 
town his home. He learned the trade of 
compositor when only twelve, and by its 
aid managed to secure himself an educa- 
tion. He attended the public schools, 
and also took a course in St. Francis In- 
stitute, Osage Mission, Kas. 

His work as a compositor took him all 
over the country, but in 1885 he returned 
to Kansas City for a permanent residence. 
He worked at his trade here until 1894, 
when he entered the law office of Frank 
P. Walsh, and there he completed the 
studies begun a year before. In 1896 he 
was admitted to the bar, and has always 
been more or less connected with Mr. 
Walsh's office ever since. He was ap- 
pointed Assistant Prosecuting Attorney 
in 1807, and served with honor and credit 
for two years. 

In the spring of 1902 Mr. Brady was 
nominated by the Democrats for Police 
Judge, and led his ticket by a large ma- 
jority. Mr. Brady is an honorary mem- 
ber of the local Typographical Union, 
and has always been a staunch advocate 
of organized labor. He was married in 
1898. 




Photo by Cornish. 

JAMES E. BRADY 

is a splendid type of Kansas Cityan. He 
was born in this town, received his educa- 
tion in its schools, and all his interests are 
centered here. 

After leaving school in 1890, he entered 
into the Brady-Meriden Creamery Com- 
pany, controlled by his father, and is now 
president of the concern, which, by his 
efforts and ability, is now the largest in 
the West. 

In passing, it may be remarked that 
the Brady-Meriden butter took forty-six 
premiums on forty-six entries at the Pan- 
American Exposition, wining over several 
thousand competitors. 

Mr. Brady has been a director in the 
Kansas City Produce Exchange and is 
now its president, the youngest and most 
progressive in the history of the organi- 
zation. 

He is also vice-president of the State 
Dairy Association, and a member of many 
local organizations. 



i6 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




SHBBBHHH 

Photo by Cornish. 



THOMAS J. BEATTIE 

was born in Cass County, Missouri, July 
27, 1863. He spent his boyhood in the 
little town, and received his early educa- 
tion in the public schools. He then en- 
tered the University of Missouri, where 
he took the classical course, and in 1881 
came to Kansas City, where he has lived 
ever since. 

Deciding upon the study of medicine, 
Dr. Beattie entered the Kansas City Med- 
ical College, and was graduated in 1881. 
He then took a course in the University 
of New York city, from where he was 
graduated in 1S85. Returning to Kan- 
sas City, Dr. Beattie commenced the 
practice of medicine. His hobby is pel- 
vic surgery, and he holds the professor- 
ship on the diseases of women in the Kan- 
sas City Medical College. While he has 
not absolutely specialized along these 

lines, he has taken post-graduate courses 
in the Kast. 

Dr. Beattie is a member of the Acad- 
emy of Medicine, the Jackson County 
Medical Society, the Missouri State Med- 
ical Association, and the American Med- 
ical Association. He was one of the ear- 
ly members of the University Club, be- 
longs to the Driving Club, and' is a thirty- 
second degree Mason, Scottish Rite. He 
married Miss Clara Chouteau in 1889, a 
member of the old St. Louis family. 




Photo by 'Thomson. 

JOHN BEHR 

was born in Boston, Mass., December 22, 
1855. His was always of a musical tem- 
perament, and at an early age he manifest- 
ed a devoted love for harmony. At the age 
of twelve years he began seriously to study 
music under the direction of Henry 
Heindl, and progressed rapidly. Later 
he studied with Bernhard Listeman. His 
first professional appearance was as a 
member of Gilmore's Band. When four- 
teen years old he took part in the great 
World's Peace Jubilee in Boston, and was 
the youngest by many years of the thou- 
sand musicians composing the organiza- 
tions appearing in the programs. He 
was a prominent figure in Boston mu- 
sical circles, his membership in the Har- 
vard Symphony Orchestra and his ef- 
forts in helping organize the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, in which he also 
held membership, placing him in touch 
with those in sympathy with the plan of 
bettering Boston's musical standards. 
Mr. Behr came to Kansas City in 1885, 
and first gained local prominence by con- 
ducting the festival held in the Exposi- 
tion building, in which the five hundred 
voices under his direction were assisted by 
Gilmore's Band. He has labored consist- 
ently since living here to develop the lo- 
cal musical standards, and has accom- 
plished much with the Kansas Citv Sym- 
phony Orchestra, of which he is director. 
He is also director of the Willis Wood 
Theatre orchestra, numbered as the best 
of the local theater orchestras. His wife 
was formerly Miss EHa Backus. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



17 




Photo by Strauss. 

RUDOLPH A. BRUNS 

was born in Chicago, 111., June 29, 1858. 
He remained in Chicago until his eight- 
eenth year, and acquired an education in 
the public schools of that city. Later he 
took a course in the Bryant & Stratton 
Business College, from which institution 
he graduated. His first employment was 
as a commercial traveler for a billiard 
supply company, at which he remained 
for several years, after which he returned 
to Chicago, where he took charge of the 
braid and trimmings department for 
Field, Leiter & Company. After a year 
with the dry goods firm he went into the 
ivory-turning business with F. W. Voje, 
giving it up in 1880 to travel for the 
Brunswick-Balke Company, the manu- 
facturers of billiard and pool supplies. 
He remained with that firm for three 
years, and then went into business for 
himself in Fon du Lac, Wis., as the pro- 
prietor of a billiard-room. After six 
months in Fon du Lac, he removed the 
business to Janesville, Wis., where he ran 
a billiard-room for four years. Mr. Bruns 
came to Kansas City April 1, 1887, and 
went immediately into business with his 
brother, Oscar R. Bruns, the two having 
been together since, and have conducted 
billiard-rooms at various places in the 
city. Mr. Bruns is affiliated with the 
Masons and holds a membership in the 
North American Union, and was a charter 
member of the local Billiard-Room Keep- 
ers' Association. He was married in 
Chicago 'to Miss Frankie A. Christie in 
June, 1 88 1. 




Photo by Strauss. 

OSCAR R. BRUNS 
was born in Chicago, 111., April 26, 1864. 
While very young his family removed to 
Lowden, la., and there Mr. Bruns attend- 
ed the public schools. After leaving 
school he ran a hotel for some years, and 
then went back to Chicago, where he and 
an elder brother established a retail hat 
business. He sold his interests there to 
his brother in 1887, and came to Kansas 
City with another brother, Rudolph A. 
Bruns, with whom, under the firm title of 
Bruns Bros., he has been associated in the 
billiard-room business here since. They 
first engaged in business at 528 Delaware 
Street, having bought out Chapin & 
Gore's billiard-rooms, and remained at 
that point for two and one-half years. 
The business was removed to 607 Main 
Street, where it was conducted for three 
years and then to 700 Main Street. In 
connection with the Main Street place, 
Bruns Bros, opened the Royal Billiard 
Parlors at 108 West Ninth Street. The 
business at 700 Main Street was removed 
to 1 1 14 Walnut Street, where it still is. 
The West Ninth Street place was given 
up and a new place, the Royal, was start- 
ed at Eighth Street and Grand Avenue, 
and is said to be the finest billiard-rooms 
in the West. In connection with the bil- 
liard-rooms there are seven bowling al- 
leys, an odd feature of which is the special 
appointments for women. Mr. Bruns 
belongs to the Masons and Knights of 
Pythias. He was married in Lowden, 
la., January 10, 1882, to Miss Anne R. 
Hottendorf. Thev have two children, 
Stella H. and Walter O. 



[8 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo hu Strauss. 

WILBUR L. BELL 

was born October 28, 1858, in the State 
of Indiana. He received his early educa- 
tion in the public schools, and later at- 
tended Central College in Danville, Indi- 
ana where he took a classical course. 

It was in 1890 that Mr. Bell came 
to Kansas City. For some years prior 
to locating here he had been traveling 
for the American Book Company, the 
largest institution of its kind in the 
world. He learned the business thor- 
oughly, settling in Kansas City, started 
the firm \Y. L. Bell & Co., school fur- 
niture and supplies. 

From a comparatively small beginning, 
the company now controls the busiiness 
in several surrounding States and Terri- 
tories, and has done much to increase the 
commercial importance of Kansas City. 

While he has devoted the majority of 
his time to his business, Mr. Bell has 
been interested in several outside ven- 
tures. He was president of the Flint 
Advertising Company for several years, 
and is nowfinacial backer of the Gertrude 
Berkiey Players. He is a member of the 
Commercial Club, and a helper in all 
movements. 

He married Miss Agnes Taylor, of Con- 
nersville, Ind. 




Photo by Thomson. 

WILLIAM EDGAR BENSON, 
secretary of the Board of Education, was 
born in Chicago June 27, 1851, and came 
to Kansas City with his parents in 1869. 
The following year he was a general de- 
livery clerk in the post office, a position 
which ill health forced him to relinquish. 

After some time in Colorado, Mr. Ben- 
son returned to Kansas City, and was in 
the insurance and real estate business 
with his father and brother until 1S77, 
when he was appointed City Clerk by 
Mayor Slavens. Not only the term un- 
der Mayor Slavens, but two terms under 
Mayor Shelley were served by Mr. Ben- 
son, and with such efficiency and capac- 
ity for the public business that Mayor 
Shelley secured an endorsement signed 
by fourteen ex-Mayors demanding Mr. 
Benson's retention in office. This en- 
dorsement was all the more extraordin- 
ary from the fact that it was non-parti- 
san, Mayor Shelley being a Democrat and 
Mr. Benson a Republican. The Mayors 
also, were of both political parties. 

The city's first were originated by 
Mr. Benson, including all ordinances 
and proceedings from 1857. 

But it was as secretary of the Board of 
Education that Mr. Benson has chiefly 
distinguished himself, the system origin- 
ated by him having been widely copied 
in other cities, and having made him 
known to educators and educational 
boards everywhere. By his system any 
action of the board or document filed can 
be instantly referred to. 

Mr. Benson was married in Colorado in 
1875 to Miss Sallie Stephens. They have 
two sons. 



MEN WHO AUE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



i9 




Photo by Strauss. 

WILLIAM BINGHAM CLARKE 

was born in Cleveland, Ohio, April 15, 
1848. He was educated in the public 
and private schools, and then studied law 
but after gaining admission to the bar de- 
cided upon banking. After an appren- 
ticeship in the Cleveland banks, he start- 
ed one of his own in Abilene, Kas., and 
when the boom died there organized the 
First National Bank in Junction City, 
Kas., also the Kansas Bond Bureau. In 
1886 he came to Kansas City as president 
of the Mechants' National Bank. In 
1881 he bought heavily of Missouri & 
Kansas Telephone stock, and became 
president. In 1888 he organized the 
United States Trust Company, of which he 
is still president. Among his other inter- 
ests are salt manufacturing in Salt Lake 
City, mining in Colorado, and railroad 
building. Mr. Clarke has twice served as 
president of the Kansas City Club, once 
as president of the Country Club, was 
third, second, and first vice-president of 
the Commercial Club and in 1891 its pres- 
ident, although compelled to decline the 
honor because of business duties. He is 
prominent in Episcopal Church circles, 
and is treasurer of the diocese of Western 
Missouri ; belongs to the Sons of the Rev- 
olution; is a thirty-second degree Mason, 
and in 1896 was head of the local Sound 
Money League, which played so large a 
part in that campaign. 

Mr. Clarke married Miss Kate E. Rock- 
well in Junction City in 1876, and they 
have two sons, William Rockwell Clarke, 
Yale, 1900; and Bertrand Rockwell 
Clarke, Williams, 1904. 




EDWIN RUTHVEX CRUTCHER, 

one of the leading real estate men of Kan- 
sas City, was born August 29, 1853, near 
Xashville, Tenn., of a family that moved 
from Wales to Virginia in 1675. Mr. 
Crutcher lived in Louisville, Ky., during 
his childhood, and attended the public 
schools there. He took a course in civil 
engineering, and when only seventeen 
was one of the official engineers of Louis- 
ville. After several years in the corn, 
milling, and grain business, Mr. Crut- 
cher moved in 1887 to. Kansas City, 
but had been here but a few days when 
he became cashier of the Bank of 
Columbus at Columbus, Kas. ; then he 
became manager of the New York office 
of the Jarvis-Conklin Mortgage Trust 
Company; then cashier of the Chatta- 
nooga Savings Bank; and in 1891 back to 
Kansas City, where he has since remained. 
He and James B. Welsh organized the 
real estate firm of Crutcher & Welsh, the 
best known firm of its kind in the city. 

Mr. Crutcher was married in 1875 to 
Miss Laura Loving, daughter of Judge 
Wm. Y. Loving, of Kentucky. They 
have three children. 



20 



HEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 





EDWARD McKAIG CLENDENING, 

the secretary of the Kansas City Com- 
mercial Club, may safely be alluded to as a 
most widely known and popular man in 
Kansas City, possessing the maximum of 
friends and the minimum of enemies. 
Mr. Clendening was born in the little 
town of Frankfort Springs, Va., in 1852. 
His father was a physician, and soon re- 
moved to New Philadelphia, (). 

After the death of Dr. Clendening the 
family returned to Virginia, taking up 
their residence in Wheeling, where the 
young Edward went through the public 
schools and took an academic course 

He came to Kansas City in 1882, and 
until his election as secretary of the Com- 
mercial Club in 1892, was in the mercan- 
tile business. 

He has been steadily re-elected, and it 
is not too much to say that the present 
power and prosperity [of the Commercial 
Club is largely due to Mr. Clendening. 
He is a fountain of originality and the 
soul of energy. 

In 1878 he was married to Miss Lide 
Logan in Wheeling. The union has been 
blessed with one son, Logan, born in 
Kansas City in 18S4. 



GEORGE R. COLLINS 

was born in Troy, New York. On the 
paternal side he is descended from six of 
the original Puritans, and the genealog- 
ical record on both sides traces back to 
the foundations of England and Hol- 
land. The paternal ancestor who came 
to America was Lieutenant Benjamin 
Collins, who located in Salisbury, Mass., 
in 1628, and from whom George R. is a 
descendant in the ninth generation. 
The other five original Puritans whose 
descendants married into the Collins 
family were the first Hugh Mosher, the 
first Samuel Hubbard, the first John 
Greenman, the first Joseph Clark, and 
the first Richard Maxon. 

George R. Collins was educated in the 
public schools of Troy, and was gradu- 
ated -from the Troy Military Academy. 
After a business career in the East, he 
came to Kansas City in 1887. He was 

book-keeper and afterwards credit man 
for the old firm of G. Y. Smith, and later 
cashier of the Westport Bank, and then 
the German Savings Bank of this city. 
In 1892 he formed a partnership in the 
financial and fire insurance business, 
and in 1895 assumed the management 
of the National Benevolent Society. 

He was married July 2, 1900, to Miss 
Blanche Hastings 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY 



21 




Photo by Strauss. 

GEORGE LEE CHRISMAN 
was born in Independence, Missouri, in 
1 85 1. His father, William Chrisman, 
was one of this county's pioneers, and was 
firmly established as a commercial factor 
in the community at the time of the young 
Chrisman 's birth. The boy was sent to 
the public schools of Independence, and 
after passing through the allotted courses 
of these schools went to William Jewell 
College at Liberty, Mo., to the Kemper 
Military Academy at Booneville, Mo., 
and later to Forest Hill Academy in Jef- 
ferson County, Kentucky. After grad- 
uating from the latter institution, Mr. 
Chrisman returned to Independence, 
where he entered his father's office to 
begin the study of law. Failing health 
caused him to give up the study, however, 
and he went into the Chrisman-Sawyer 
Bank, which his father had organized, 
in a clerical position. This, too, was too 
confining for him, and he settled on a 
farm near Lee's Summit, Mo. In 1896 
he was elected Judge of the Eastern Dis- 
trict of Jackson County, and at the con- 
clusion of his first term was nominated 
and elected Presiding Judge of the Coun- 
ty Court by the Democratic party. This 
place he filled with distinction, and was 
again placed in nomination in 1902, and 
elected. While all of his life has been 
passed in the communities suburban to 
this city, his business interests have not 
been confined to his places of residence, 
and he has been an important factor in 
the commercial life of this city. The 
most important of these was his connec- 
tion with the Kansas City Times as presi- 
dent and majority stock-holder at the 
time of its absorption by the Star in 1902. 




Photo by Strauss. 

STUART CARKENER 

was born December 13, 1837, at Tecum- 
seh, Mich., and was graduated from the 
Ann Arbor Law School in i860. In the 
same year he located in Montgomery Coun- 
ty, Missouri, and the following year was 
admitted to the bar. He entered the 
army in 1862 and served until August 10, 
1865, as Captain of Company G, Thirty, 
third Missouri Infantry Volunteers. He 
resumed the practice of law at Danville, 
Mo., in 1865, where he remained until 
1877, moving thence to Louisiana, Mo., 
and in 1887 coming to Kansas City. 

In 1868 he was Circuit Attorney of the 
Third Judicial Circuit of Missouri, and in 
1880 was a delegate to the National Re- 
publican Convention at Chicago. In 1882 
he was Chief Deputy Internal Rev- 
enue Collector of the Fourth District of 
Missouri. He was nominated for Con- 
gress. From 1888 to 1898 he was presi- 
dent of the Mercantile National Bank of 
Louisiana, Mo. He was married No- 
vember 14, 1866, to Mary Ellen Drury at 
Danville, Mo. They have five children. 



22 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo bil Straus*. 

A. L. CHAPMAN 
was horn in Washington County, Penn- 
sylvania, June 4, 1825. His father, a 
large land -owner and wool-grower, was a 
pioneer Pennsylvanian, tracing his de- 
scent from the Chapmans and Loudons 
of Ireland, while his mother was a daugh- 
ter of the immortal Thomas Campbell, 
and a sister of Alexander Campbell, foun- 
der of the Christian Church. 

The subject of this sketch received his 
early education in a select school at home, 
but in 1844 entered Bethany College, 
graduating in 1849, having spent a year 
in the study of Hebrew in addition to the 
regular classical course. He then made 
a tour of the Southern States, and in 1S51 
was made president of the Rockford Ma- 
sonic College in Alabama, where he re- 
mained two years, resigning in 1853 to 
enter a medical school in Charleston, S. 
C. Returning home, in company with 
his brother, Campbell Chapman, also a 
physician, lie came to Missouri, locating 
in St. Louis, where he completed his med- 
ical studies. He practiced for ten years 
in Clay County, and in 1868 he removed 
to Kansas City, where he has ever since 
been. In 1882 he retired from active 
practice, and commenced the publication 
of the New Medical Era and Sanitar- 
ian. His vigorous pen made it famous 
the world over, but ill health compelled 
its cessation. Dr. Chapman then jour- 
neyed to Europe, and put himself under 
the care of the late Rudolph Yirchow. 

Dr. Chapman was married to Miss Fran- 
ces Mosby while practicing in Clay 
County and they have reared a family of 
four boys. 




ARTHUR CHAPMAN 

was born in Clay County, Missouri, De- 
cember 30, 1863. His parents removed 
to Kansas City in 1866, at that time lit- 
tle more than a village. Mr. Chapman 
went to the public schools and finished at 
the Central High School. In the even- 
ings he carried papers — the first pub- 
lished in Kansas City — and after he was 
graduated entered the employ of the tel- 
ephone company as a "hello girl." 

After that he went into the employ of 
the Kansas City, Fort Scott & Memphis 
Railroad, and it was not long before he 
was holding the position of chief clerk in 
the paymaster's office of the Southern 
Kansas Railroad. 

Quitting the railroad business, Mr. 
Chapman was appointed Deputy Record- 
er of Deeds, and served a term as Secre- 
tary of the Board of Health. He also 
worked for a while in the City Engineer's 
office. 

In 1899 he entered the mercantile bus- 
iness, in which he is now engaged. Mr. 
Chapman has always been a Democrat, 
and receiving the Democratic nomination 
for Representative from the Seventh Dis- 
trict in 1902, was elected by a large ma- 
jority. He married Miss Jessie Wallace 
in 1886, and has four children, Wallace, 
Josephine, Ella, and Clifford. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



23 




Photo by Strauss. 

JOHN M. CLEARY 

was born on a farm near Odell, Illinois, 
August 21, 1869. He was reared on a 
farm, and received his early education in 
the district schools and in the Odell High 
School. He later attended the Illinois 
State Normal School at Dixon, and then 
took a literary course at St. Victeur Col- 
lege in Kankakee, Illinois. 

Deciding upon law as a profession, Mr. 
Cleary entered the famous law school at 
Bloomington, and took his degree in 1893. 
After a year of practice in Bloomington, 
he came out to Kansas City in 1894, an d 
has ever since been an interesting figure in 
the public and professional life of the 
town. 

A strong Democrat, he quickly allied 
himself with the local organization, and in 
1898 was elected a representative to the 
General Assembly. He made a good 
record at Jefferson City, and could have 
been re-elected had he chosen to make a 
race. Instead he resumed the practice of 
law, and has risen rapidly in his pro- 
fession. 

Mr. Cleary is a member of the Phi 
Delta Theta Fraternity, and he also be- 
longs to the Marquette Club and the Or- 
der of Elks. He married Miss Mollie 
O'Rourke, June 30, 1902. 




Photo by Strauss. 

CHARLES S. CURRY 

was born November 1, 1864, in Jefferson 
City, Missouri, the son of Dr. W. A. Curry, 
who came out to Missouri from Yirginia in 
1S37, and did much to upbuild Jefferson 
City and develop Cole County. 

The subject of this sketch went to the 
public schools, and then learned the print- 
er's trade, but after a time went down 
into Texas, where he remained in the cat- 
tle business for three years. 

His next business venture was with a 
hotel in Caldwell, Kas., but in 1S85 he 
came to Kansas City, where he has since 
remained. In 1887 the real estate firm 
of Curry & Truitt was formed, and con- 
tinued until 1894, when Mr. Curry was 
appointed City Clerk by Mayor Davis. 
He also served in this position through 
the two administrations of Mayor Jones. 
In 1902 a change of administration retired 
him, and he is now head of the real estate 
firm of C. S. Curry & Co. 

Mr. Curry has always been active in Re- 
publican politics, and has been secretary 
of the Congressional and City Committees 
at times. He belongs to the Kansas City 
Club, the Driving Club, and is an Elk. 
He married Miss Lulu Gordon, of Jeffer- 
son City, in 18S7, and they have live chil- 
dren, three boys and two girls. 



24 



Mi:\ WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Cornish. 

ARTHUR BENTON CORNISH, 

the photographer, is a typical Westerner, 
and a man who lias done much to raise 
the standard of his profession. Born at 
Oneida, 111., in 1873, OI a family of artists, 
and educated in the schools of Chicago 
and vSt. Louis, he is purely a product of the 
West. While still in the High School at 
( >neida, Mr. Cornish, with the enthusiasm 
worthy of a man twice his age, took up 
the study of art. After leaving school, 
he spent some time under well-known 
artists of Chicago and St. Louis. He 
achieved especial success in portraiture, 
and essayed his first venture in business 
at Arkansas City, Kas. There he soon 
outgrew the town and moved to Kansas 
City, associating himself with D. P. 
Thomson, the veteran photographer. 
Here he spent nine years, broadening out 
in his work, and making a notable suc- 
cess. That his artistic instincts might 
have opportunity for greater play, Mr. 
Cornish went into business for himself 
again two years ago, surrounding himself 
with all the up-to-date mechanical dev- 
vices of the photograph business, and pro- 
viding for his patrons one of the most ar- 
tistic galleries in the southwest. From 
the start his new venture proved a success, 
and to-day lie stands, though but twenty- 
nine years old, as one of the foremost men 
in his line in the country. Mr. Cornish 
has in his time given sittings to many 
persons of note, and has produced some 
of the largest and finest group work ever 
attempted. 




Photo by Strauss. 

CALDWELL C. COURTNEY 

was born in Richmond, Virginia, June 24, 
1852, of good old revolutionary stock. 
He was educated in private schools, and 
then, entering Richmond College, was 
graduated in 1870. He then went into 
the dry goods business in Richmond with 
his father and brother, and made a bril- 
liant reputation for energy and ability, 
so much so that he was secured by the 
firm of Bullene, Moore & Emery. Mr. 
Courtney came to Kansas City in 1878, 
and for four years was with the firm, 
when he resigned to take a position with 
the Midland National Bank. Quitting 
the bank after a time, he became a mem- 
ber of the real estate and insurance firm 
of Whipple, Courtney & Co., which con- 
tinued until 1888, when he decided to 
make -life insurance his future work. 

For three years he served as district 
manager of a New York company, and in 
1892 he became State agent of the Mutual 
Benefit Life Insurance Company of New- 
ark, headquarters in Kansas City, and ter- 
ritory including Jackson County, Kansas, 
and Oklahoma Territory. 

Mr. Courtney was one of the organizers 
of the Kansas City Life Underwriters' 
Association, and has been president twice. 
He also helped organize a similar body 
in Kansas. He is a Scottish Rite Mason 
and a Shriner. He married Miss Flora 
Dougherty, of Liberty, Mo., and they 
have one daughter, Leah Bell. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 





Photo by Strauss. 

THOMAS T. CRITTENDEN, JR., 

was born in Sangamon County, Illinois, 
December 23, 1863, his family moving 
some few years later to Warrensburg, 
Mo., where his boyhood was spent. He 
graduated from the public schools of that 
city and from the State University in 
1883. He came to Kansas City in 1884, 
going into the real estate business soon 
after his arrival, and worked at the busi- 
ness three years, when he was appointed 
Deputy Clerk of the Court of Appeals. 
He was the Democratic nominee for 
County Clerk in 1894, was elected, and 
was again nominated and elected to the 
same office at the close of his first term 
in 1898, each time carrying both city and 
county by handsome majorities. He is 
now being mentioned as Democracy's 
candidate for Secretary of State. Aside 
from politics, Mr. Crittenden is interested 
in a number of business enterprises, all of 
which are successful. He is purely of the 
fighting temperament when personal in- 
terests or those of his friends are assailed, 
yet it is all tempered by a fine quality of 
justice that renders enmities scarce. 

Mr. Crittenden was married January 5, 
1888, to Miss Jennie Mason Rogers, whose 
father was a former president of Christian 
College, Columbia, Mo. They have two 
children, a son, Joseph R., and a daughter, 
Mason A., their ages being five and two 
years respectfully. 



ARMWELL L. COOPER 
was born at Willow Grove, Delaware, 
November 15, 1870. He began acquiring 
his education at an early age, and was a 
pupil at the Wilmington Conference 
Academy in Dover. His family came 
West when he was rather young, and Mr. 
Cooper finished his education at the Kan- 
sas State Normal, Ft. Scott. 

He came to Kansas City in 1890, and 
soon afterwards entered a local law office. 
He was admitted to the bar July 15, 1895, 
after which he entered the law office of 
Mr. Henry Wollman. Mr. Wollman left 
the city for New York, and after his de- 
parture the firm of Wollman, Solomon & 
Cooper was formed, the individual mem- 
bers being Benjamin Wollman, brother 
to Henry Wollman, Henry C. Solomon, 
and Mr. Cooper. During the few years 
that have elapsed since Mr. Cooper's ad- 
mittance to the bar, he has taken rapid 
strides toward making a place for himself 

among the leading members of the local 
bar. 

He is a Democrat in politics, and is an 
officer in the leading Democratic club of 
the city, the Jackson County Democratic 
Club. He belongs to the Knights of Pyth- 
ias. 

Mr. Cooper is married, his wife being 
formerly Miss Caroline Ley, of this city. 
Mr. and Mrs. Cooper have one child, a 
girl, named Dorothy Emily. 



26 



l//;\ Wlin MADE KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

S. E. CHAMBERLAIN 
was born in Seneca County, Ohio, Janu- 
ary 22, 1842. He went to the public 
schools there, and his first trade was that 
of carpenter. Thirty years ago Mr. 
Chamberlain started as an architect at 
Chicago, from which place he came to 
Kansas City in October, 1878. He was 
the architect of the City Hall, and from 
1889 to 1 891 was superintendent of Build- 
ings in Kansas City under Mayor Holmes. 
Many of the handsomest residences of the 
city, as well as business structures, were 
planned by Mr. Chamberlain. 

Mr. Chamberlain is a Socialist and proud 
of it. He was married to Miss Susan A. 
Correll at Niles, Mich,. September 25, 
1867, and has six children. 




Photo by Strauss. 

THE REV. WM. CARTER 
was born at Pittington, England, May 22, 
1868. At the age of fifteen he came from 
England to Illinois, and for three years 
worked in a store. He then went to Par- 
sons College, Fairfield, Iowa, from which 
he was graduated at the age of twenty- 
two. Three years later he received a di- 
ploma from McCormick Theological Sem- 
inary. His first pastoral work was at 
Sterling, 111. He was there five years, 
went to Frankfort, Ind., for brief supply 
work, and was called thence to the pastor- 
ate of the First Presbyterian Church at 
Kansas City in 1899. Park College con- 
ferred the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
upon Dr. Carter in 1900. He is well 
known through his lectures on literary 
subjects, especially his lecture on Milton. 
He enjoys the distinction of being able to 
repeat "Paradise Dost" from memory. 
Dr. Carter was married to Miss Alice 
Kellogg at Des Moines, la. They have 
two children. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



27 





Photo by Strauss. 

JOSEPH S. CHICK, 

founder of the first banking house in Kan- 
sas City, was born August 3, 1828, in 
Howard County, Missouri. In 1836 his 
parents located in Jackson County, and 
at the age of eighteen Joseph S. Chick be- 
gan his business career as a clerk in the 
general store of H. M. Northrup in Kan- 
sas City, whose partner he became in 
1852. Later he and his partner went to 
New York and engaged in the banking 
business, but returned to Kansas City in 
1874, when Mr. Chick bought a controll- 
ing interest in the Kansas City National 
Bank. Since that time he has been iden- 
tified as a leading spirit with all the most 
important commercial enterprises of Kan- 
sas City. 

Mr. Chick was married August 31, 1858, 
to Miss Julia Sexton. Six children have 
been born to them. Joseph S. Chick, Jr., 
is associated with his father in the man- 
agement of real estate and financial af- 
fairs. One daughter, living, is the wife 
of Edward E. Porterfield, a well-known 
lawyer of Kansas City. No name is more 
familiar to the early residents of Western 
Missouri than that of Joseph S. Chick. 



GEORGE OLIVER COFFIN, 
one of the most successful physicians of 
Kansas City, was born at Danielsville, 
Pa., August 4, 1858. Dr. Coffin's early 
education was in the common schools of 
his native town and at Williamsburg 
Academy. He was graduated from Penn 
Medical College at Philadelphia in 1879. 
He practiced at Frankfort, Kas., El Paso, 
Tex., and Silver Cliff, Colo., locating in 
Kansas City in the fall of 1887. 

In May, 1894, he was appointed house 
surgeon at the City Hospital, and in 1895 
became City Physician, remaining in that 
office until 1901. Dr. Coffin was elected 
to the chair of surgery in the Medico-Chi- 
rurgical College, and was Dean of the 
Faculty. He is also Professor of Clinical 
Surgery in the Woman's Medical College 
of Kansas City. He is on the medical 
staff of half a dozen railroads and hospi- 
tals, is a member of the Kansas City Acad- 
emy of Medicine, the Jackson County 
Medical Society, the Missouri State Med- 
ical Society, and the American Medical 
Association. He is a thirty-second de- 
gree Mason, a noble of the Mystic Shrine, 
a K. P., and an Elk. In 1883 Dr. Coffin 
married Miss Minnie A. Deane, of Frank- 
fort, Kas. Their children are Deane Oli- 
ver and Bertha M. Coffin. Edward Carl 
Coffin is a son by a former marriage. 



28 



,l//-;.\ WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 





Pholo by Strauss. 

EDWARD JOSEPH CURTIN 

was born in Independence, Missouri, 
August 9, 1875. He spent his boyhood 
on a farm, and his early education was 
secured in the district school. 

It was in 1889 that he came to Kansas 
City, and his education was completed by 
graduation from the ward schools. His 
circumstances were such that he was com- 
pelled to go to work at an early age, but 
his ambition was not to be denied. He 
studied at night, and finally deciding 
upon the law as his profession, became a 
pupil of the Kansas City School of Law. 
He attended at night after his work for 
the day was over, and will be graduated 
the coming spring, when he expects to 
apply for admission to the bar. 

In 1902 City Counselor R. J. Ingraham 
recognizing his ability, and eager to fur- 
ther his progress, appointed Mr. Curtin 
claim agent in his department, which po- 
sition he now holds. 

Mr. Curtin has always been active in 
Democratic politics, and is recognized as 
a young man with a future. He is a mem- 
ber of the Kansas City Athletic Club, and 
several other organizations. 



Pholo by Strauss. 

CHARLES J. CARTER 
was born in Keokuk, Iowa, January 9, 
1862. After completing his education 
in 1876 he went to work for a lumber firm, 
and has been in the lumber business ever 
since. He came to Kansas City in 1886, 
and went into business for himself, and in 
1896 incorporated under the name of the 
C. J. Carter Company. His other interests 
include the presidency of the Doniphan 
Lumber Company, with mills at Don- 
phan, Mo., to which he was elected in 
1894; the presidency of the Saline River 
Lumber Company, of Straughan, Ark., 
formed in 1898; the presidency of the Sa- 
line River Railway Company ;and the vice- 
presidency of the Straughan Stave Com- 
pany. Mr. Carter is also treasurer of the 
Missouri Tie and Lumber Compnay, and 
from 1896 to 1902, when he sold out his 
interests, was president of the Louisiana 
& Gulf Lumber Company. 

Notwithstanding his many and impor- 
tant business interersts, Mr. Carter is a 
leading figure in all movements tending 
to the public good. He is a prominent 
member of the Commercial Club, belongs 
to the Country Club, and is a Hoo-Hoo. 
He was married to Miss Cora Bridges in 
Keokuk in 1885, and they have one daugh- 
ter, Margaret. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



29 




Photo by Thomson. 

ARTHUR CHANDLER COATES 
was born August 17, 1S64, in Kennett 
Square, Pennsylvania. He is a Kansas 
Cityan born and bred to all intents and 
purposes, however, for his father, Kersey 
Coates, came to Kansas City, then West- 
port Landing, in 1854, and few names are 
more indissolubly linked with the growth 
and greatness of the town. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
local schools, and then prepared for col- 
lege at Phillips 'Academy, Andover, Mass., 
and then entered Yale. 

He was graduated in 18X5, and studied 

law, but never practiced his profession, 

as the management of the Coates House 

devolved upon him. From 1889 to 1900 

he managed the house established by his 

father, and in the latter year accepted 

the general agency of the Prudential Life 

Insurance Company at this point. 

Mr. Coates was one of the founders of 
the University Club. He was married in 
June, 1888, to Miss Isabel Doggett, and 
is the father of two children, Gladys and 
May. 




/'// 



by htrau8s 



D P. COLLUM 

was born at Mauch Chunk, Pa., August 
10, 1867. His parents moved to a farm 
near Brooklyn, Iowa, while he was very 
young, and Mr. Collum lived there until 
early manhood. His education was se- 
cured at the district schools in the county 
where he was raised and at the Indiana 
State Normal School, where he afterwards 
went for a term of four years. Three of 
these years were devoted to the classical 
course, and the last year Mr. Collum stud- 
ied law. Later he studied law in a law 
school at Des Moines, la. Mr. Collum 
came to Kansas City in 1885, and engaged 
in Mercantile pursuits, also studying law 
at night at the Kansas City School of Law. 
He graduated from this institution while 
in the employ of the American Wringer 
Company. He remained in its employ 
for a number of years, and finally bought 
out the Western interests of the company. 
This business he has conducted since un- 
der the firm name of the Collum Com- 
merce Company, its line of merchandise 
having been extended to include every 
article of household furnishings. The 
company has eleven branch stores scat- 
tered through Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, 
and Oklahoma. Mr. Collum, since taking 
up local residence, has been prominent in 
the social and benevolent movements of 
local Catholic societies and is affiliated 
with several of them. 

He was married July 13, 1885, to Miss 
Bee Anne Healy in Brooklyn, Iowa. 
They have one child, James Emmett, 
who is thirteen vears of age. 



3° 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Thomson. 

WILLIAM JAMES DALTON, 

a pioneer Catholic priest of Kansas City 
for thirty years rector of the Church of the 
Annunciation, was born in St. Louis, 
Missouri, August 12, 1S4S. His par- 
rents were Richard and Bridget Dal- 
tou, of Ireland. The father was a 
merchant in St. Louis from 1839 to 1864. 
In the parochial and public schools of 
that city Father Dalton began his edu- 
cation, which was completed at the 
Catholic seminaries at Milwaukee, Wis., 
and Cape Girardeau, Mo. Two and one- 
half years before reaching his major- 
ity, by special dispensation, he was or- 
dained to the priesthood, and came to 
Kansas Cjty June 19, 1872, by appoint- 
ment of Archbishop Kenrick. In 1889 
he was one of the thirteen freeholders to 
draft the present city charter. From 
[879 t<i 1SS4 he was editor of the Western 
Banner, the first Catholic journal pub- 
lished in Kansas City. The twenty-fifth 
anniversary of his ordination to the min- 
istry was celebrated by a great mass-meet- 
ing, presided over by J. V. C. Karnes, 
at the Auditorium Theater, in 1804. The 
encroachments of commerce and manu- 
facturing crowded Father Dalton 's par- 
ishioners out of the West Bottoms, and 
in 1902 he moved to a new parish in the 
southeastern part of the city, where he is 
erecting a new church building. 




Photo by Strauss. 

SHANNON CLAY DOUGLASS 
was born at Columbia, Mo., December 29, 
1852. He attended Christian College at 
Columbia and then the Missouri State 
University, from which he was graduated 
completing the course in the law depart- 
ment there in 1873. At nineteen years of 
age he was City Attorney of Columbia, 
and was the Prosecuting Attorney of 
Boone County for three terms. He prac- 
ticed at Columbia until 1883, when he 
came to Kansas City and formed a part- 
nership with C. L. Dobson. Then the 
firm of Dobson, Douglass & Trimble was' 
formed, continuing until 1890. Since 
that time Judge Douglass has practiced 
alone, and has served as special Master in 
Chancery in the Federal Court, in a num- 
ber of big cases. 

Judge Douglass was married Septem- 
ber 8, 1880, to Miss Hallie H. Burr, daugh- 
ter of Wm. E. Burr, formerly president of 
the St. Louis National Bank. There are 
three children, Wm. Burr, Shannon Clay, 
Jr., and Henriette Brand Douglass. 

In December, 1902, the subject of this 
sketch was appointed to the circuit bench, 
filling the vacan:y left by the death of 
Judge John W. Henry, an appointment 
indorsed by the local bar. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



3i 




Photo hy Strauss. 

JAMES ROBERT DOMINICK 
was born at Houston, Miss., December 
9, 1S63, and lived in that State until he 
grew to young manhood. He was grad- 
uated from the University of Mississippi 
in 1884, and was employed in a general 
store until August, 1886, when he moved 
to Kansas City. The third day after his 
arrival he went to work for the American 
National Bank, where he rapidly rose to 
the positions of assistant cashier and 
cashier. In October, 1900, Mr. Dom- 
inick organized the Traders' Bank of 
Kansas City and became its president. 
This institution started with a capital of 
$50,000, and has already doubled it. Mr. 
Dominick was married to Miss Gertrude 
Mastin October 28, 1891. He belongs to 
the Commercial Club and the Manufact- 
urers' Association. 




Photo by Strauss. 

DENTON DUNN 

was born May 1, 1868, at Marshall, Mich. 
During his boyhood he lived in Kansas 
and Maryland. He was graduated from 
the University of Kansas in 1887, where 
he was class day valedictorian. He 
studied law at the St. Louis Law School, 
from which he was graduated in 1891. 
taking the Jhesis prize. In that year he 
located at Kansas City. He became a 
member of the law firm of Ashley, Gil- 
bert & Dunn in 1897. Mr. Dunn was 
treasurer of the Bar Association 1898-99. 
Among his other positions of honor was 
the presidency of the Knife and Fork 
Club, of which he was one of the founders. 
He was also president of the Kansas Uni- 
versity Alumni Association. 

Mr. Dunn has written a number of legal 
articles that have attracted attention. 

He is a member of the Commercial and 
Universitv Clubs. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 





Photo Inj Strauss. 



Photo In/ Strauss. 



CHARLES P. DUFF 

was born in Baltimore, Maryland, April 
6, 1864. He spent his boyhood in Spring- 
field, 111., however, his parents removing 
to that town when the young Charles was 

still a babe in arms 

He received his education in the Spring- 
field public schools, but had to quit books 
for work when only fourteen. He se- 
cured employment in a furniture store, in 
which business he has ever since been. 

In his twenty-third year Mr. Duff moved 
to Arkansas City, Kas., where he went 
into the furniture business for himself. He 
did very well, and it was while in Arkan- 
sas City that he associated himself with 
Mr. Repp, his present partner. 

In 1896 Mr. Duff came to Kansas City. 
He became a stockholder in the time-hon- 
ored J. H. North Furniture Company, 
and was elected vice-president 

In 1900 the J. H. North Furniture Com- 
pany ceased to be, and in its place sprang 
up the firm of Duff & Rep]), which has 
ever since been a leader in its line. 

Mr. Duff is a married man, the father of 
two children, a son and a daughter. He 
js a member of the Commercial Club, and 
director in the Kansas City Athletic Club. 



JOHN F. DOWNING 

was born August 24, 1854, in Virginia, 
Illinois, and lived there until the attain- 
ment of his majority. He attended the 
public and high schools, and also took the 
classical course at Illinois College, Jack- 
sonville, from which institution he was 
graduated in 1879. 

Returning to Virginia, he entered the 
local bank, but after three years came to 
Kansas City. His first position was with 
the old Armour Bank, where he worked as 
a teller for four years. In 1885, when the 
"boom" possessed Kansas City, Mr. Down- 
ing went into the real estate business, and 
after the "boom's" collapse in 1889 he 
organized the New England Safe Deposit 
Trust Company, with A. W. Armour as 
president and himself as vice-president. 
After a year he was elected president, 
which position he still holds. In 1898 the 
New England Safe Deposit Trust Com- 
pany was converted into a National Bank. 

Mr. Downing is a member of the Kan- 
sas City Club and the Country Club. He 
has been twice married, his first wife hav- 
ing died in 1889. His present wife was 
Miss Jessie Burnham, whom he married 
March 30, 1889. He is the father of three 
children, two boys and a girl. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



33 




Photo hij Strauss. 

JAMES DONOHUE 

was born in Canada, April 12, i860. He 
went to the common schools until the age 
of thirteen years, when his school life 
ceased abruptly through employment he 
secured with the Great Western Railroad 
of Canada. ' Since that time Mr. Donohue 
has continued in the railroad business. He 
has run the full gamut of the business, 
messenger boy, telegraph operator, stenog- 
rapher, ticket agent, station agent. He re- 
mained in the employ of Canadian roads 
until he was twenty-one years of age, when 
he went to Des Moines, la., where he re- 
mained for six years, coming to Kansas 
City from there in 1886. 

He was for three and one-half years gen- 
eral freight and passenger agent of the 
Kansas City, Pittsburg & Gulf Railroad, 
and went from that road to the Kansas 
City, Fort Scott & Gulf Railroad in 1896. 
In 1 90 1, when the Kansas City, Fort 
Scott & Gulf Railroad was amalgamated 
with the St. Louis & San Francisco Rail- 
road, under the name of the Frisco System 
Mr. Donohue was made assistant general 
passenger agent of the system, which place 
he now holds. 

Mr. Donohue was married June 9, 1SS0, 
to Miss Mary Ellen Martin, of Ingersoll 
Canada. They have three children, Stew- 
art, sixteen years of age; Adah, fourteen 
years of age; and James, Jr., aged eleven 
years. 




EDWARD MAITLAND DART 

was born in Susquehanna County, Penn- 
sylvania, April 20, 1859. His boyhood 
was spent in toil, for until he entered his 
teens he was engaged in farm work or em- 
ployed in the lumber camps. He only 
went to school long enough to acquire the 
rudiments of an education, and after that 
he educated himself, studying at night. 

He went to Chicago in 1881, where his 
brother was in the live-stock business, 
and remained there for three years. At 
the end of that time he came to Kansas 
City, and soon after his arrival went to 
work for the Western Newspaper Union, 
with which company he is still identified. 

He went to work as an assistant press- 
man, was promoted first to the position of 
shipping clerk, and was then taken into 
the office as correspondent and book- 
keeper. In 1900 he was made manager 
of the local office, the position he now 
holds. The Western Newspaper Union 
supplies plate matter for country news- 
papers, and also does general publication 
work. Under Mr. Dart's management 
the territory has been doubled, and the 
capacity of the plant enlarged time after 
time. Aside from his managerial duties, 
Mr. Dart's hobby is blooded stock, and he 
owns several farms in Missouri, Kansas, 
and Florida, where he indulges his fond- 
ness. 



34 



MEX WHO M.U)E KANSAS CITY 




Photo by Thomson. 

WALTER S. DICKEY, 
president of the W. S. Dickey Clay Man- 
ufacturing Company, is in the forefront 
of both business and politics in Kansas 
City. He was reared in Toronto, Can- 
ada, where his first instruction was in the 
provincial "Model" school. It was in 
January, 1885, that he came to Kansas 
City. The very next year he served on 
the Republican City Committee. From 
1887 to 1898 he resided at Independence 
Mo. 

In 1900, having again established re- 
sidence in Kansas City, he was elected 
as a delegate from the Eifth Congressional 
District to the Republican National Con 
vention at Philadelphia, and was also hon- 
ored by being selected as Missouri's mem- 
ber on the Vice-Presidential Notification 
Committee. In July, 1900, in company 
with that committee, he visited Mr. Roose- 
velt at his home in Oyster Bay, on Long 
Island, New York State. 

In July of 1902 he was elected a mem- 
ber-at-large of the State Republican 
Committee, and was appointed as a mem- 
ber of the Executive and Finance Com- 
mittee. 

Although Mr. Dickey has constantly 
taken active part in politics, he has at 
the same time conducted one of the larg- 
est commercial enterprises carried on in 
the West. 

He is a charter member of the Com- 
mercial Club, and is one of the founders of 
the Manufacturers' Association. 




WEBSTER DAVIS 
was born June 1, 1861, in Ebensburg, 
Pennsylvania. In 1868 the family set- 
tled on a farm in Daviess County, Missouri, 
but after six years moved to Chillicothe, 
and later to Gallatin, all in the same coun- 
ty. The young Webster worked on the 
farm, clerked in a store, and in Gallatin 
took up shoemaking under his father's 
instruction. In 1881 he determined to 
to have an education, and so went to Lake 
Forest, near Chicago. He became town 
lamplighter, and not only paid his school- 
ing, but sent money home. It was not suf- 
ficient, however, and returning to Gallatin, 
he resumed shoemaking, and later clerked 
again. In 18S2 he became a copyist in the 
law office of Shanklin, Low & McDougal 
and studied while he worked. In 1884 he 
contrived to take a two years' course in 
the Kansas University, and securing ad- 
mittance to the bar began to practice law 
in Garden City, Kas. He later attended 
the Ann Arbor Law School, after which 
he located in Kansas City. He soon made 
a reputation for brilliance and ability, 
and became prominent in Republican pol- 
itics. His splendid, but unsuccessful, 
race for Congress in 1892 was followed by 
his election as Mayor in 1894. In 1897 
he was appointed Assistant Secretary of 
the Interior, which place he held until a 
trip to South Africa in 1899 made him a 
Boer sympathizer. He resigned, and 
failing to have the Republicans adopt a 
resolution of sympathy with the Boers, 
secured such a plank in the Democratic 
platform, and so joined that party. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



35 




Photo by Thomson. 
FREDERICK STERLING DOGGETT 

was born in Chicago March i, 1856. He 
received his early education in the public 
schools, and later attended the Chicago 
University. After emerging from the lat- 
ter institution at the age of seventeen, 
he entered the laboratory of the Chicago 
Sheffield Steel Company, where he re- 
mained for three years. He then migrated 
to Colorado, and for four years was en- 
gaged in mining and kindred industries. 

In 1878 Mr. Doggett came to Kansas 
City, and secured employment in the 
Union Pacific offices, and a year later 
went over to the Chicago & Alton road, 
just built. When he left the C. & A.'s 
employ in 1 886 he had risen to the position 
of general western freight agent. 

Since 1886 Mr. Doggett has devoted 
himself to his own business affairs, prin- 
cipally the management of the Blossom 
House, having married a daughter of the 
late G. H. Blossom. 

A very busy man, Mr. Doggett has al- 
ways given freely of his time to public 
movements. He was one of the first 
members of the Commercial Club, and 
has served as vice-president of that or- 
ganization. He was also a moving spirit 
in the organization of the Kansas City 
Club, and was its president for a term. 
He was elected a director of Convention 
Hall in 1900 and re-elected in 1901, and 
is a leader in the Priests of Pallas Associa- 
tion. He is a thirty-second degree Ma- 
son, a Knight Templar, and a Shriner. 




Photo by Strauss. 

ALLEN J. DEAN 

was born in Sherman, New York, January 
11, 1854. He went to school until thir- 
teen, when he begun to earn his own liv- 
ing. A year in a drug store, and then he 
took up the trade of carriage trimming, 
and when nineteen started in the harness- 
making and carriage-trimming business 
for himself. 

\\ 'hen twenty-four he succeeded his 
father in the hotel business, but sold out 
to his brothers after a time. Later he 
bought them out in turn, and remained 
in the hotel business until 1894, when he 
became president of a bank. In 1895, 
however, he came out to Pittsburg, Kas., 
where, in company with his brothers, he 
operated the Hotel Stilwell. In 1897 the 
Ewins-Dean Hotel Company was formed 
in Kansas City by Frank Ewins, A. J. 
Dean and D. J. Dean, and commencing 
with the Savoy, the Baltimore was 
launched in June, 1899. In December the 
Deans bought out Ewins, and formed the 
Baltimore Hotel Company, of which A. J. 
,Dean is secretary and treasurer. In addit- 
tion to the enlarged Baltimore, the com- 
pany controls and operates the Hotel Met- 
ropole at St. Joseph and the Midland in 
this city 

Mr. Dean married Miss Francis Relf, of 
Sherman, and they have one daughter. 
He belongs to the Driving Club, is a thir- 
ty-second degree Mason, and a Shriner. 
Although still retaining his banking and 
other interests in Sherman, Mr. Dean is 
indissolubly attached to Kansas City. 



10 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo hij Strauss. 

JAMES DAVIS EUBANK 

was born in Clarke County, Kentucky 
February 21, 1867, and lived on the par- 
ental farm until twelve years old, when the 
family moved to Pleasant Hill, Mo. He 
went to the district school in Kentucky 
and later to the public schools in Pleasant 
Hill, and at the age of seventeen accepted 
a position with the Citizens' National 
Bank. He remained there for two years 
and was then appointed assistant post- 
master of Pleasant Hill, but resigned at 
the end of a year to accept a position as 
bookkeeper with the First National Bank 
in Independence, Mo. 

He remained there about three years and 
a half, at the end of which time he was ap- 
pointed a deputy in the office of County 
Collector E. W. Hayes, and so fine a record 
did he make that he was retained under 
tin- administration of Collector McCurdy. 

Retiring from the County Collector's 
office, Mr. Eubank went with the land de- 
partment of the Kansas City Southern 
Railroad as tax commissioner, the position 
he now holds. 

An enthusiastic Democrat, Mr.Eubank 
has served as secretary of the County Com- 
mittee and was treasurer in the last cam- 
paign. He is a Mason and a Woodman. 

Mr. Eubank married Miss Brent Forbis 
May 26, 1896, and they have one boy. 




Photo by Strauss. 

ORA DARNALL 

was born on a farm in Indiana July 17, 

1865. His education was received in the 

district and ward schools, what there was, 

for Mr. Darnall picked up the most of it by 

contact with the world. He traveled 

through Montana and the West while still 

in his teens, and came to Kansas City for 
a permanent location in 1883. 

His first employment was as a clerk in 
the Missouri Pacific offices, and he re- 
mained with the road until 1887, by which 
time he had risen to the position of local 
claim agent. 

From there Mr. Darnall accepted the 
general management of the Kansas City 
Switch & Frog Company, but soon re- 
signed to take a place with the Bolen 
Coal Company. His unique advertising 
soon brought the company a really na- 
tional fame and largely increased its busi- 
ness. The company was reorganized in 
November, 1901 as the Bolen-Darnall Coal 
Company and with Mr. Darnall as general 
manager. 

He belongs to the Kansas City Club, 
the Elks, the Kansas City Driving Club, 
the Warwick Club, and is a Mason, a Hoo- 
Hoo, and an active worker in the Com- 
mercial Club. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



37 




Photo by Thomson. 

ANDREW F. EVANS 

was born in -Kentucky in 1863. His boy- 
hood was passed on a farm, and his educa- 
tion was confined to such schooling as dis- 
trict schools afforded. He afterwards at- 
tended St. Mary's College and later he took 
a classical course at Centre College, Dan- 
ville, Ky., from where he graduated in 
1882. Then he took up school-teaching 
reading law meanwhile, and was admitted 
to the bar in 1884. Not satisfied with 
this, however, he determined to equip 
himself more thoroughly for the practice 
of the profession, and entered Harvard 
University for a year's course, and at its 
termination he went to the University of 
Virginia for one year more. He engaged 
in practice in earnest in his home State 
for a year, but feeling that wider fields of- 
fered themselves in the West, he came to 
this town in 1887 and has remained here 
at his profession since. He practiced 
alone for years, but later went in with 
N. B. Carskadon, the partnership being 
terminated only on the death of Mr. Cars- 
kadon. Soon after this Mr. Evans tcok 
B. P. Finley into partnership with him, 
the firm name being Evans & Finley. 

Mr. Evans is a member of a number of 
fraternal and social organizations, among 
them being the Bar Association, the Be- 
nevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
the Knights of Pythias, and the Knife 
and Fork Club. He was nominated by 
the Democratic party for Judge of the 
Circuit Court in 1902, and easily elected. 



- M J 







Photo hii Thomson. 

EDGAR CLARENCE ELLIS 
was born in Eaton County, Michigan, 
October 2, 1854. He was educated in the 
country schools and at Olivet College, in 
his native county, being graduated from 
the latter institution in 1880 with a B. A. 
degree. 

He was immediately offered a position 
as instructor of Latin in Carleton Col- 
lege, Northfield, Minnesota, and after a 
year there, was tendered the office of 
superintendent of the city schools at Fer- 
gus Falls, Minn. During the three years 
in that place, he studied law at night, and 
in 1 884 was admitted to the bar. He first 
practiced in Beloit, Kansas, but in 1887 
came to Kansas City, where he has ever 
since remained. In 1893 l ie associated 
himself with Hale C. Cook under the firm 
name of Ellis & Cook, and later James A. 
Reed and Ernest Ellis were admitted. 
The firm is now Ellis, Cook & Ellis, Mr. 
Reed having been elected mayor. 

Mr. Ellis has been very prominent in 
Republican politics, along high lines, and 
has been frequently mentioned for mayor, 
and in connection with the office of pros- 
ecuting attorney. 

He is a married man, having wedded 
Miss Emily H. Roy, daughter of the Rev. 
Dr. Joseph E. Roy, of Chicago. They 
have three sons. 



33 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Thomson. 

URIAH SPRAY EPPERSON 
was born in Marion County, Indiana, De- 
cember 22, 1 86 1. His parents came to 
Kansas City in 1S69, however, so he is 
virtually a Kansas City product. He 
went through the ward schools, and soon 
after went to work in a railroad office, and 
has never known an idle day since. In 
1880 he accepted a position with the Fow- 
ler Packing Company, where he remained 
until the purchase of the plant by the 
Swifts in September, 1902. Beginning at 
the very bottom, he worked up to the of- 
fice of general manager, and in bettering 
himself he bettered the company. 

-Mr. Epperson is perhaps the best known 
man in Kansas City, for he has played a 
prominent part in all movements tending 
to the public good. For years a member 
and director in the Commercial Club, he 
served as president of the organization for 
a term, and a notable term it was. From 
the very outset an enthusiastic supporter 
of the Convention Hall idea, he served as 
director in those first and trying days of 
the idea's launching, and did as much as 
any man to make success possible. As 
Kansas City stands, the famous Epper- 
son's Megaphone Minstrels will be re- 
membered, not only because they dedi- 
cated the hall, but because they earned 
the greater portion of the monev for the 
erection of the Public Bath. Mr. Epper- 
son was elected vice-president of Conven- 
tion Hall in 1900, elected president in 
1901 and re-elected in 1902. 

He married Miss Mary Elizabeth Weav- 
er December 11, 18S9. "He is an Elk. 




EDWARD DAVID ELLISON 

was born in Kansas City, December 5, 
1869. He first went to school at the 
Franklin ward school and then to the 
High School. He was graduated from 
Princeton in 1892, and studied law in the 
office of C. O. Tichenor. In September, 
1893, he was admitted to the bar, and in 
May, 1895, the law firm of Ellison & Tur- 
pin was formed. 

Mr. Ellison was one of the founders of 
the Kansas City School of Law, which was 
started in 1895. Under the supervision 
of Mr. Ellison and the other officers of the 
school it has made a remarkably rapid 
growth. 

Mr. Ellison was married December 5, 
1 894,' to Miss Mary W. Stone, of Lawrence, 
Kas. They have one child, Elizabeth, 
four years old. David Ellison, father of 
Mr. Ellison, came to Kansas City from 
New York in 1866, and has made a notable 
success of the real estate business. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



39 




Photo by Thomson. 

JUDGE JAMES ELLISON 
was born at Monticello, Mo., July 12, 
1850, the sixth child and third son of 
Judge James Ellison of the Northeast 
Circuit Court of the State. He went to 
school first at Christian University, Can- 
ton, Mo., and later to Christian Brothers' 
College in St. Louis. He began the prac- 
tice of law at Kirksville, Mo., at eighteen 
years of age with his father, Andrew El- 
lison, afterwards judge of that circuit for 
twenty-two years. In 1884 Judge Ellison 
was a Cleveland elector, and in the fall of 
that year was appointed Judge of the Kan- 
sas City Court of Appeals for four years. 
He was elected in 1888 for a term of eight 
years, and in 1896 was again elected for a 
term of twelve years. 

Judge Ellison has rendered decisions in 
many of the most important cases in the 
State. 




Photo by Strauss. 
GEORGE HARRISON ENGLISH, Sr., 

was born at Newark, Ohio, January 21, 
1836. In 1854 his father, moved from 
the Ohio farm to Illinois, and Colonel 
English attended the Illinois College at 
Jacksonville, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1857. 

The young barrister read law with 
Judge Cyrus Epler, of Jacksonville, and 
was admitted to the bar in i860. He be- 
gan to practice at Greenfield, 111., and 
when the war broke out he became cap- 
tain of the Thirty-second Illinois Infan- 
try, serving four years and rising to the 
ranks of major, lieutenant-colonel and 
colonel. After the war he located at 
Leavenworth, Kas., practiced there eight 
years, then in Wichita four years, and to 
Kansas City in 1878. 

Colonel English was married in Kansas 
City in 1873 to Maggie S. Stonestreet. 
They have one son, George H. English. 



4° 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




THOMAS PHILIP FLAHIVE 
was born December 16, 1861, in the County 
Kerry, Ireland. He received his educa- 
tion in the public schools, and in 1S78 came 
to America, locating in Kansas City. 

He was a poor boy, without capital or 
influence, but he did not lack for energy 
and pluck. His first position was with a 
railroad in the offices, but in 1882 he se- 
cured a position on the police force, where 
he has ever since remained. 

Honest, willing, and brave, he showed 
capability from the start, and in 1887 he 
was promoted to be sergeant. In that 
position he also showed efficiency, and in 
1889 he was made a captain, the office 
he now holds. 

Captain Flahive belongs to no lodges or 
clubs, for his whole life is given over 
to his work. In the time he has been on 
the force he has made himself a splendid 
reputation both at home and abroad, and 
although he has gone far, will go farther. 

Captain Flahive married Miss Lizzie 
Burns in < >ctober, 1888, and they have one 
son, John Joseph. 




Photo by Strauss. 

HARRY FRIEDBERG 

was born in Kansas City, Kansas, July 14, 
1873. He attended the grammar and 
high schools of the town until his gradua- 
tion, when he went to Phillips Exeter 
Academy, Exeter, N. H., to take the pre- 
paratory course for Harvard. He gradu- 
ated from Harvard in 1896, and on his re- 
turn entered the employ of the Consolidated 
Electric Company, for which company he 
had worked odd months during all his 
school life, as assistant general manager. 
In 1900 the Consolidated Electric Com- 
pany and the Standard Electric Company 
merged interests, and ^Mx^Frfeclberg as- 
sumed charge of all the business of the 
companies west of the bluffs in this city. 
May 25, 1902, the two companies went in 
with the Kansas City Electric Light Com- 
pany, and Mr. Friedberg was made man- 
ager of the consumers' department of the 
consolidated companies. While in one 
( if his earlier positions with the minor com- 
panies, Mr. Friedberg decided on law as a 
profession, and entered the Kansas City 
School of Law, from where he graduated 
in 1889, but he never undertook practice. 
He is a member of numerous social and se- 
cret societies, among them the Masons, 
the Elks, the Progress Club, the Young 
Men's Club, and the newly organized Har- 
vard Club. Among the business organiza- 
tions in which he holds membership are 
the Commercial Club and its kindred asso- 
ciation in Kansas City, Kas., the Mercan- 
tile Club, in which he is chairman of the 
entertainment Committee. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



4i 




Photo by Thomson. 

FRANK A. FAXON 

was born May 29, 1848, in Scituate, Mas- 
sachusetts, coming of good old Revolu- 
tionary stock, his grandfather serving di- 
rectly under Washington. His father, 
Asaph A. Faxon, immigrated to Law- 
rence, Kas., in 1855, and two years later 
his wife and children joined him. The 
subject of this sketch was educated in 
the public schools, and then went to work 
in the drug store of B. W. Woodward & 
Co. He rose step by step until he was 
finallv admitted to the firm, which, by 
reason of tremendous increase in i.usiness 
was compelled to remove to Kansas City 
in 1878. In 1897 the firm of Woodward, 
Faxon & Co. gave way to to the present 
one of Faxon, Horton & Gallagher. De- 
spite the cares and demands of the largest 
drug business in the West, Mr. Faxon has 
never failed to give freely of his time to 
the public good, and few men have done 
more for Kansas City. He has served as 
president of the Humane Society, has also 
been vice-president of the Bureau of As- 
sociated Charities, and was the third pres- 
ident of the Commercial Club. He has 
also served in the City Council, and has 
been a member of the Board of Education 
since 1894, and has been a valuable aid in 
building up the splendid library and great 
public school system. 

He was married in 187 1 to Miss Kate 
Darlington, of Chester County, Pennsyl- 
vania and she died in 1S84, leaving three 
children two sons and a daughter. In 
1892 he married Miss Francis Darlington, 
and thev have one daughter, born in 1902. 




Photo by Strauss. 

WILLIAM J. FRICK 

was born in Montgomery City, Missouri, 
November 3, 1867, but his youth was 
spent in Oak Grove, Lafayette County. 
He attended the public schools in Oak 
Grove, then went to an academy in Lex- 
ington, and from there entered William 
Jewell College at Liberty. 

Deciding upon medicine as a profession 
he enrolled himself as a student in the 
Kansas City Medical College, from which 
institution he as graduated in [888. 

Dr. Frick has always practiced here, and 
few young men stand higher in their pro- 
fession. He has been connected with 
every hospital in the city at one time or 
another and is now surgeon of St. Joseph's 
Hospital. He is also Professor of Anato- 
my in the Kansas City Medical College. 

He belongs to the local medical or- 
ganizations and also the state and na- 
tional bodies. 

Dr. Frick has taken post-graduate cours- 
es in the hospitals of Chicago and New 
York, and is an eager and never-ceasing 
student. He is unmarried, and makes his 
home with his aged mother. 



42 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

SAMUEL THEODORE FULTON 
was born in Topeka, Kansas, January n, 
1866. He received his education in that 
town, residing there until 1887, when he 
went to Chicago to take a position with 
the Santa Fe system. His next move was 
to Cincinnati, where he occupied a posi- 
tion with the "Big Four," and then in 
1 89 1 he came to Kansas City to take the 
place of secretary to E. S. Washburn, at 
that time traffic manager of the Kansas 
City, Fort Scott & Memphis Railroad. 
He was afterwards promoted to be assist- 
ant to President Netteton, and in turn 
was assistant to President Washburn 
and President Winchell. When the Fris- 
co absorbed the Memphis, and the gen- 
eral offices were removed from Kansas 
City, Mr. Fulton went to St. Louis as Mr. 
Winchell 's chief clerk, but only remained 
there a few months. 

In January, 1902, he accepted the gen- 
eral management of the J. R. Crowe Coal 
and Mining Company, the position he 
now holds. 

Mr. Fulton is a married man, having 
wedded Miss Alice Lee Payne, of Topeka, 
November 26, 1890, and is the father of a 
son, Darrow Bruce Fulton, born in 1895. 
He is a member of the Commercial Club 
and several other organizations. 




Photo by Stranss. 

JOHN P. FONTRON 

was born March 22, 1873, in Castleton, Ill- 
inois. His parents removed to Kansas 
when he was three years old, and the 
subject of this sketch spent his boyhood 
on a farm in Reno County. 

He attended the district schools, and in 
1890 the family moved to Hutchison, Kas. 

Mr.Fontron 's education was supplement- 
ed by a three years' course in the Kansas 
State Normal School, after which he taught 
school for a time. 

Deciding to adopt law as a profession, 
he entered an office, and in 1 897 was admit- 
ted to practice. He then entered Columbia 
University, Washington, D. C, and by 
virtue of his previous study and experi- 
ence, was enabled to take the degree of 
L.L.B. in one year. He came to Kansas 
City in 1898, and was admitted to the local 
bar shortly after his arrival. 

Mr. Fontron is a strong Republican 
and has identified himself with local poli- 
tics to some extent. He is now secretary 
of the Missouri Republican Club, and at 
the recent election was the Republican 
nominee for the Legislature from the 
Seventh District. A Democratic landslide 
brought him defeat, but he ran far in ad- 
vance of his ticket. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

JOHN J. FOSTER 
was born on a farm in Ray County, Mis- 
souri, April 5, 1858. He remained on the 
farm until 1875, doing the work the life 
calls for and attending at odd months 
the district school of the county. After 
attending school at Richmond, Mo., for 
one year, Mr. Foster came to Kansas 
City and entered the public schools. 
Three years previous to this Mr. Foster's 
father had died, leaving him an interest 
in coal mines situated on the homestead, 
and it was with the income from this that 
he was securing an education. The ad- 
ministrator, in leasing the mines, failed 
to provide for non-usance, and the les- 
see shut down the mines in order to work 
others with shorter lessees. Mr. Foster, 
at the age of eighteen years, was conse- 
quently forced to leave school. He de- 
termined to learn harness-making, and 
entered upon a three years' apprentice- 
ship. Soon after serving his time he 
went into partnership with A. J. De 
Berry, the firm name being De Berry 
& Foster. They purchased a business at 
306 Main Street that had been operated 
by Smith & McDonald since the early 
forties. After a partnership of a year 
and a half Mr. Foster bought De Berry's 
interests, and conducted the business 
at that location for ten years, moving 
after that time to 511 Main Street, his 
present location. Mr. Foster is a mem- 
ber of the Manufacturers' Association, 
the Horse Show Association, the Coo- 
ley Lake Hunting Club, and the local 
Driving Club. He was married June 30, 

1879, to Miss Elizabeth Mintun, of this 
city. 




Photo by Strauss. 

CHARLES E. FINLAY 

was born in Illinois in 1861. His early 
education was procured at the public 
schools of his native state, followed by 
a course in the law department of the 
University of Notre Dame in South Bend, 
Ind. He graduated from this institution 
in 1885, and came that year to Kansas 
City. He started into business in this city 
immediately after his arrival here, and de- 
veloped from a small beginning one of the 
largest real estate and building companies 
in the city. As organizer and president 
of the Chas. E. Finlay Real Estate Com- 
pany, Mr. Finlay platted over forty sub- 
divisions to this city, and built for sale in 
the neighborhood of 350 homes. His in- 
terests and business were steadily broad- 
ened, and Mr. Finlay went into the pro- 
ducing oil business. He is secretary and 
general Manager of the Apex Oil Com- 
pany, which is one of the largest oil com- 
panies in Texas, and secretary and treas- 
urer of the Southwestern Oil and Steam- 
ship Company, a transportation company 
formed to carry refined and crude oil from 
Texas to the North Atlantic and Gulf ports 
The latter company has the largest line 
of American ships in the oil business in 
the world. Mr. Finlay is at present offi- 
cingin NewYork City, but retains his busi- 
ness interests in this city. 

He was married in 1887 to Miss Annie 
E. Redfield. They have three children, 
Julia Esther, Neva Estelle, and Redfield E. 



44 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Thomson. 

RICHARD H. FIELD 
was born in Cherokee County, Georgia 
December 27, 1853. He lived in the 
South until the attainment of his major- 
ity, attending private schools and ac- 
quiring a thorough classical education 

Deciding upon the profession of law 
he began its study, and in 1875 was ad- 
mitted to the bar. He only practiced a 
year in his native State, however, com- 
ing out to Missouri in 1876, and locating 
in Kansas City, where he has ever since 
' been. 

In 1888 we was appointed by Govern- 
or Moorhouse to fill a vacancy on the cir- 
cuit bench, and the appointment was in- 
dorsed by a nomination from the Demo 
crats at the next election thereafter 
Judge Field was elected by a large major- 
ity, and served for four years with dis- 
tinguisned honor. 

At the conclusion of his term he re 
commenced the practice of law, and ranks 
high in the Missouri bar. 

He belongs to no societies, no clubs, no 
organizations. 

Judge Field married Miss Annie Camp, 
of Marietta, Ga., and they have five chil- 
dren, one boy and four girls. 




Photo by Strauss. 

WALLACE CAMPBELL GOFFE 
was born in New York City December 26, 
1865. He spent his boyhood in that city, 
attending the public and high schools. 

At an early age he secured a position 
with the Wall Street firm of Goffe and 
Randle, and for ten years remained in 
that wonderful thoroughfare, learning and 
rising. In 1S91, while identified with the 
firm of Jones, French & Maury, he met 
the late H. F. Peavey, and was induced by 
the capitalist to leave New York for Kansas 
City. His position out here was chief 
clerk of the Midland Elevator Company, 
but he only remained there for two years. 

In 1893 the grain commission firm of 
Goffe, Lucas & Carkener was organized — 
all three fellow-employes — and success 
has crowned its efforts from the start. The 
chief business of the firm is receiving and 
shipping, and progressive, yet conserva- 
tive, methods have established it strongly. 

Mr. Goffe is a director in the Grain Ex- 
change, and has ever been identified with 
those movements tending to the develop- 
ment of Kansas Citv. 

He married Miss Bevie Gill in 1893. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



45 




Photo by Strauss. 

JAMES C. GREENMAN 
was born at Washington, 111., May 15, 
1845. He lived on a farm until sixteen, 
when he ran away from home and enlisted 
at Chicago in the Forty-second Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, serving two years 
and re-enlisting in the Fourth Illinois Cav- 
alry in 1S64 at Natchez, Miss. He was 
mustered out June 5, 1S65, at Memphis, 
returned to Joliet, and engaged in mer- 
cantile business two years. In 1S67 he 
entered the train service of the C. & A. as 
brakeman. Then he became a successful 
freight and passenger conductor, and was 
for sixteen years in the passenger service. 

Mr. Greenman came to Kansas Citv in 
1880, continued in the railroad service 
until 1884, and went into the real estate 
business with W. B. Lippincott for nine 
years, and was postmaster at Bristol for a 
term prior to 1893. In 1895 he became 
the agent of the Humane Society, a posi- 
tion in which he has made himself known 
to everyone. 

He was married to Phoebe L. Dickinson 
at Cleveland, N. Y., June 29, 1870. They 
have two children, Charles H. and H. D., 
thirty and twenty-eight. 




Photo bij Strauss. 

MARTIN R. GOSSETT 
was born on a farm in the State of Ken- 
Kentucky April 11, 1S58. He remained 
there until he was nineteen years of age, 
when his family removed to Jackson Coun- 
ty, settling on a farm near Independence. 
He attended the district schools of the 
county in the winter and worked on the 
farm in summer until he had reached his 
early manhood. He then went to a pri- 
vate school in Independence, taking a clas- 
sical course. After leaving school Mr. Gos- 
sett came to Kansas City to live, and ob- 
tained employment in a local clothing 
store. He worked there for years, and as 
a feature of his efforts for the betterment 
of those working in the same business, 
was instrumental in helping organize the 
local branch of the Retail Clerks' Union. 

Mr. Gossett from then on became a 
prominent figure in union labor circles, 
and was deemed suitable timber for the 
Democratic nomination for County Re- 
corder of Deeds. He was nominated and 
elected to this office in 1898. Four vears 
later, at the termination of his term, he was 
renominated by acclamation and again 
elected. 

Mr. Gossett holds membership in a 
number of secret and benevolent societies, 
among them the Masons, the Knights 
Templars, the Elks, the Woodmen, and 
also remans affiliated with the Retail 
Clerks' Union. 

He was married in 1881 to Miss May 
Carter, of Independence, at her home city. 



46 



i/.'Y WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Thomson. 

HENRY N. GARLAND 
was born in Oswego, New York, February 
21, 1850. He was educated in the public 
and high schools of that town, and after 
leaving school at the age of seventeen, 
came to Kansas City, where he has lived 
ever since. 

His first position was with the Hannibal 
& St. Joseph, and until his retirement 
from active business life in 1902 he remain- 
ed in the railroad business. He was also 
with the Burlington for awhile in the ear- 
ly days, but finally accepted employment 
with the Wabash, and changed no more. 
Commencing as ticket agent, he worked 
up rung by rung until he was appointed 
western passenger agent. It was from 
this position that he resigned in 1902, hav- 
ing decided that "all work and no play 
makes Jack a dull bov." 

Few men have done more to "make 
Kansas City a good place to live in" than 
Mr. Garland. He was a prominent figure 
in real estate circles in "boom days," and 
the Garland Block is still a monument to 
his faith in Kansas City. 

Mr. Garland has long been a leading 
figure in the local lodge of Elks, and was 
one of the organizers of the Passenger 
Agents' Association. 




Photo by Thomson. 

JOHN CUTLER GAGE, 
a prominent member of the Kansas City 
bar, was born April 20, 1835, at Pelham, 
New Hampshire. His childhood days 
were spent upon a farm, and he was edu- 
cated at Phillips Academy, Dartmouth 
College, and Harvard College, from which 
he was graduated in 1856. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar in Boston, and in 1858 
came to Kansas City, becoming one of the 
pioneers in the legal profession here. 

In 1870 Sanford B. Ladd became his 
partner, and in 1878 Chas. E. Small, form- 
ing the firm of Gage, Ladd & Small. 
These men are all noted lawyers. 

John C. Gage was the first president of 
the Kansas City Bar Association and like- 
wise of the Law Library Association. He 
was for a while president of the State Bar 
Association. 

Mr. Gage was married April 26, 1886, 
to Miss Ida Bailey. They have two chil- 
dren. 









MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



47 




"Photo by Strauss. 

THOMAS J. GREEN 

was born in County Cavan, Ireland, Feb- 
ruary 4, 1856. He was educated in the 
public schools, and came to this country in 
1874, locating in New York, where he 
worked for four years in the store of A. T. 
Stewart. 

He came to Kansas City in 187S, and 
for a while was with the T. Green Grocery 
Company, but the possibilities of the real 
estate business in the booming town ap- 
pealed to him, and he opened an office in 
1880, and has been in the real estate busi- 
ness ever since. 

Some years later his brother, John J. 
Green, joined him, and the firm played an 
important part in the development of Kan- 
sas City from a steamboat landing into a 
metropolis. 

Mr. Green platted upwards of forty 
additions, among the most prominent 
being Greenview, Phoenix Park, Finsbury 
Park, Prospect Heights, Mount Prospect, 
etc. He was one of the early members of 
the Real Estate Exchange, and as much 
as any man is responsible for Kansas City's 
present greatness. 

Mr. Green w T as married in 1897 to Miss 
Mary Hartley, in County Cavan, Ireland, 
and they have one daughter, May Gwen- 
dolin. 




Photo by Strauss. 

JOHN J. GREEX 
was born in Ireland March 5, 1857. He 
was educated in the schools of Armagh, 
and came to this country in 1879. He lo- 
cated in New York, and was in the mer- 
cantile business until 1882, when he came 
out to Kansas City, where he has ever 
since been. 

Upon his arrival here he associated him- 
self in the real estate business with his 
brother, T. J. Green, and that firm played 

no small part in the development of Kan- 
sas City. 

A Republican in politics, he soon made 
himself a prominent figure in the partv 
locally, and in 1888 was elected Alderman 
from the Seventh Ward. His record in 
the Council was such as to inspire confi- 
dence, and in 1894 he was elected City 
Treasurer by a flattering majority. In 
1896 he was renominated and re-elected, 
and his record in that office has been a 
standard of efficiency and trustworthiness. 

Mr. Green married Miss Ida Fuller, 
daughter of George W. Fuller, April 21, 
1886, and they have two children, George 
Fuller Green and Elsie Green. 

He is a Mason, Scottish Rite and York, 
a Shriner, and a Knight Templar. 



4 8 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Thomson. 

ALFRED N. GOSSETT, 
one of the most substantial members of 
the bar, was born at Sharpsburgh, Ky., 
November i ,3, 1 86 1 . His father and moth- 
er came to Jackson County in 1S57, and it 
was in the schools near Independence that 
Mr. Gossett first became familiar with 
books. He was graduated from Wood- 
land College in 1880, and then went to 
Washington University, St. Louis, grad- 
uating with first honors from the law de- 
partment there in 1883. The same year 
he began to practice law at Kansas City, 
forming with J. D. S. Cook what has the 
distinction of being the oldest law firm of 
unchanged name in the city. 

Mr. Gossett was married in Kansas City 
November 23, 1887, to Miss Daisy Vera 
Galbaugh, now deceased. One child, 
Gale Galbaugh Gossett, is living. 

Mr. Gossett is a prominent member of 
the Bar Association and of the Kansas 
City Club. He is a son of the Rev. Jacob 
D. Gossett, late of Independence, Mo., 
and a brother of Martin R. Gossett, Re- 
corder of Deeds. 




Photo by Strauss. 

ROBERT PERNELL GREENLEE 
was born on a farm in Johnson County, 
Missouri, October 12, 1868. He led the 
life of the usual farmer boy, working in 
summer and going to the district school 
in the winter. His father, however, who, 
by the way, represented his county in the 
Legislature, sent his son to the High School 
in Warrensburg, and then gave him a 
course at the State Normal, from which 
institution he was graduated in 1886. He 
came to Kansas City the same year, and 
after taking a course at Spalding's Com- 
mercial College entered the Western 
Dental College. He took his degree in 
1 89 1, and at once began the practice of his 
profession here in Kansas Citv. 

Dr. Greenlee is a member of the Mis- 
souri Dental Association, and stands high 
in his profession. 

In the spring of 1902 he was nominated 
for the Lower House by the Democrats 
of the Eighth Ward, a Republican ward, 
and triumphantly elected. 

He was married to Miss Margaret Gano 
May 10, 1892, and is the father of one son, 
six vears old. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



49 




JOHN P. GILDAY 
was born November 3, 1S61, in Pleasant 
Hill, Missouri, but his parents removed to 
Independence when he was a year old, 
and in 1868 came to Kansas City, where 
the family has ever since remained. He 
was educated in the public and high 
• schools of this city, and while attending 
the High School worked as a messenger 
boy during his leisure hours. 

After his graduation he entered mer- 
cantile life, but soon turned his attention 
to stenography. Having become an ex- 
pert court stenographer, he was given that 
position in Division No. 3 in 1896, and still 
holds it. 

Mr. Gilday has studied law, but never 
asked for admittance to the bar. 

A close student of public matters and a 
wide reader, he has a library such as few 
men possess. 

Mr. Gilday has always been interested 
in politics as a Democrat, having at various 
times in the last fifteen years been a mem- 
ber of the City, County, and Congressional 
Committees, serving as secretary of each 
through many hard-fought campaigns. 
As a reward for these distinguished ser- 
vices, he has been given the Democratic 
nomination for Sheriff this year, and tri- 
umphantly elected. 

Mr. Gilday married Mrs. Maude Dean 
in 1902. 




Photo by Strauss. 

OVERTON H. GENTRY, Jr., 
the present treasurer of Jackson County, 
was born on a farm near Independence, 
Missouri, May 9, 1859. His father died 
when he was only four years old, and from 
that day to this he has never lacked care, 
work, and responsibility. 

Mr. Gentry went to the district schools 
in his youth, and later in life took a chem- 
ical course at the Missouri University, 
working all day to pay his way, and study- 
ing at night. He did the same thing in 
Philadelphia, where he attended the 
School of Pharmacy. Returning to Mis- 
souri, he formed a partnership with J. C. 
Pendleton, under the firm name of Pendle- 
ton & Gentry, which firm still continues, 
although Mr. Fleming Pendleton has suc- 
ceeded his brother. 

Mr. Gentry has always been a Demo- 
crat, and has contributed largely to his 
party's success by his work on campaign 
committees and personal prestige. 

The nomination for Treasurer came to 
him without opposition and by acclama- 
tion, and he justified the confidence placed 
in him by securing a triumphant majority. 

Mr. Gentry was married in 1884 to Miss 
Emma Robertson, of Saline County, and 
they have three children. He is an Elk, 
a member of the Knights of Pythias, and 
is a Woodman. 



50 



men who are making Kansas city. 




Photo by Strauss. 

FREDERICK C. GUNN 
was born in Atchison, Kansas in 1865. 
His parents came of old New England 
stock, and his father, Maj. 0. B. Gunn, 
was active in the early railroad develop- 
ment of the West. The family removed 
to this city when Mr. Gunn was fourteen 
years of age, and his interrupted studies in 
the public schools of Atchison Mr. Gunn 
then took up in the public schools here. 
After finishing at the high school, he went 
to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute at 
Troy, N. Y., and graduated in 1873. He 
worked in New York for over two years, 
and then returned to Kansas City, and 
took up his practice of architecture. He 
organized the firm of Gunn & Curtiss. 
The partnership existed for ten vears, 
after which time Mr. Gunn practiced alone. 
He has designed several of the finer build- 
ings in this city and a countless number of 
public buildings throughout the West, 
notably the court houses at Lawrence, 
Emporia, and Salina, Kas. 

Mr. Gunn is a Democrat, and represent- 
ed that party in the Council from the 
Third Ward from 1892 to 1894. During 
his term of office he was chairman of the 
Finance and Park Committees. 

Under President Cleveland's administra- 
tion he was appointed local architect for 
the new Postoffice, a position he held for 
six years, being relieved during the Mc- 
Kinley administration. 

Mr. Gunn is a member of the Masonic 
order, the University Club, and the Kan- 
sas City Chapter of the American Insti- 
tute of Architects. 

He was married in 1892 to Miss Wini- 
fred Burt, of Michigan. 




Photo by Thomson. 

JULES EDGAR GUINOTTE 
was born on the old Guinotte homestead 
at Fourth Street and Troost Avenue in 
this city in August, 1855. His parents 
were among the earlier settlers of this sec- 
tion of the country, and all his life has 
been passed in this city. His education 
was secured at the local common and high 
schools. After leaving them he went to 
vSt. Louis University to take a classical 
course. On his return here he engaged 
bn clerical work for a while, but determined 
on law as a profession. He entered the 
law office of Tichener & Warner, and after 
some years of study was admitted to the 
bar. He then engaged in general practice, 
and was busy with the duties of his prac- 
tice until nominated and elected Probate 
Judge by the Democratic party in 1886. 
This position he has since held," being re- 
turned each four years with increased ma- 
jorities. He was renominated again in 
in the spring of 1902, and re-elected. 

Probably no man in the community is 
better fitted for the arduous responsibili- 
ties of the place than Judge Guinotte, for 
temperamentally he is gifted with the gen- 
erous sympathy that makes for ideal super- 
vision over the affairs of the widow and or- 
phan, and the honesty and force of char- 
acter to carry out the plans best suited to 
each circumstance. 

Judge Guinotte married in 1883 the 
only daughter of the late Dr. John K. 
Stark. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



5i 




Photo by Strauss. 

ANDREW E. GALLAGHER 
was born March 24, i860, on a farm near 
Oswego, New York. He attended the 
district school, and later on went to the 
State Normal School. After his gradua" 
tion he taught school for a couple of years, 
but in 18X2 gave up pedagogy, and came 
to Kansas City, where he engaged in the 
real estate business. He is now a member 
of the firm of Hicks & Gallagher. 

Always a Democrat, Mr. Gallagher has 
taken a leading part in politics ever since 

coming to Kansas City, having served for 
ten years as a member of the Democratic 
County Committee. He is now chairman 
of the County Committee, and his con- 
duct of the recent campaign was largely 
responsible for the brilliant Democratic 
victory. 

In 1902 he was appointed City Comp- 
troller by Mayor Reed, the place being the 
first political office ever held by him. 

He was married June 12, 1887, to Miss 
Kittie Burns, of Oswego, N. Y. They 
have five children, Burns, Grace, Harry, 
Laura, and Louise. 

Mr. Gallagher is a Modern Woodman, 
and a prominent figure in the public life 
of the town. 




Photo by Thomson. 

ROBERT LEE GREGORY 

was born in Kansas City, Missouri, March 
24, 1863, and has lived his whole life here. 
His father, William S. Gregory, came to 
Kansas City from Kentucky in 1844, and 
when the city was organized in 1853, was 
elected Mayor — the first Mayor of Kansas 
City. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
old Washington School and then the Cen- 
tral High .School, being graduated from 
there in 1876. He then went to the Kemp- 
er Military School in Booneville until 1878, 
when he accepted a position in Texas in 
the cattle business, and later embarked 
in the industry on his own hook. He re- 
turned to Kansas City in 1884, and went 
into the employ of the Gregory Grocery 
Company, founded by his father. He 
purchased a fourth interest in 1887, and 
in iSgo bought a controlling interest. 

Mr. Gregory is a Democrat, and was ap- 
pointed a member of the Board of Police 
Commissioners by Governor Stone, serv- 
ing until 1902. 

He married Miss Nellie Weston Novem- 
ber 6, 1885, and they have three children, 
Katherine, Robert Lee, Jr., and William 
Simpson. 



52 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 





Photo by Strauss. 

EDWARD P. GATES, 

lawyer and jurist, was born March 5, 1845, 
at Lunnenburgh, Vermont. When he was 
the years old his parents moved to Illi- 
nois, where he received his early educa- 
tion. He was graduated with the highest 
honors from Knox College, Galesburg, in 
1867. Meanwhile his parents had moved 
to Independence, Mo., and he came West 
to join them. For a year he read law in 
the office of Comingo & Skiver, and in 1868 
was admitted to the bar. In 1S77 he 
formed a partnership with William H. 
Wallace, enduring for twenty years. 

In 1SS6 Judge Gates was County Coun- - 
selor. He was once pitted against Ros- 
coe Conkling in the trial of a case. At the 
election in 1896 Judge Gates was elevated 
to the Circuit bench. The demands of a 
large and important law practice have not 
prevented Judge Gates from becoming 
well versed in literature. His private 
library is one of the most complete in the 
city. 

Judge Gates was married November 4, 
1886, to Miss Pattie Field Embrey, of 
Richmond, Ky. 



Photo by Strauss. 

J. K. GRIFFITH 

was born near Cynthiana, Harrison Coun- 
ty, Kentucky, February 22, 1863. He 
spent his boyhood there on the Kentucky 
farm, and received his early education at 
a private school in Cynthiana. He after- 
wards went to Chickering Institute, Cin- 
cinnati, and then entered Yale, gradu- 
ating with the degree of A. B. in 1886. 
After his graduation there, he attended 
the Cincinnati Law School, taking his de- 
gree of L.L.B. in 1888. He was admitted 
to the bar in Ohio, then in Kentucky, and 
came to Kansas City for a permanent res- 
idence in the fall of 1S8S. He was ad- 
mitted to practice here early in 1889, and 
entered the office of Scarritt & Scarritt. 
In 1895 the firm of Scarritt, Griffith, & 
Jones was formed. 

Mr. Griffith is a member of the Com- 
mercial Club, a Mason, having been Mas- 
ter of Temple Lodge in 1902. He was 
married June 21, 1893, in Kansas City, to 
Miss Georgie Moore, and the union has 
been blessed with two children, Kerfoot 
M., and Margaret F. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



53 




Photo by Strauss. 

HENRY A. GUETTEL 

was born in Davenport, Iowa, March t, 
1866. His boyhood, however, was passed 
in Chicago, where he went to the public 
schools and grew to manhood. 

His first employment was as office boy 
in a wholesale house, where he remained 
for nine years, working up to the position 
of traveling salesman. 

In 1887 the firm of Auerbach & Guettel 
was formed, and the young men started 
out for themselves with a retail store in 
Topeka, Kas. The business grew, their 
capital increased, and in 1893 another Pal- 
ace Clothing Store was started in Kansas 
City, where Mr. Guettel has ever since 
been located. 

A third store was started in Emporia 
in 1899, and in 1901 the fourth store was 
added to the chain at St. Joseph. 

All are partnerships save the Plymouth 
Clothing Company at St. Joseph, which is 
a corporation of which Mr. Guettel is pres- 
ident. 

Mr. Guettel belongs to the Commercial 
Club, the Progress Club, and is an Elk. 

He married Miss Martha Auerbach in 
1896, and they have three children, two 
bovs and a s;irl. 




Photo by Strauss. 

PORTER BEACH GODARD 
was born at Granby, Connecticut, June 6, 
1 86 1, and spent his boyhood days on a 
farm. He prepared for college at Wesley- 
an Academy, Wilbraham, Mass., entered 
Yale in 1885, and was graduated in 1889. 
His study of the law began in the office of 
Judge Elisha Johnson and Samuel 0. 
Prentice in Hartford, Conn. In 1891 he 
was graduated from the Yale Law School, 
and came to Kansas City July 31 of the 
same year, to accept an offer from Gardi- 
ner Lathrop. He continued with Mr. 
Lathrop until March 1, 1892, when he en- 
tered the law office of Gage, Ladd & Small 

and has ever since remained there. 

Mr. Godard was secretary of the Bai 
Association 1899-01, and was one of those 
who started the local Yale Alumni Asso- 
ciation, of which he is secretary and treas- 
urer. 

Mr. Godard and Miss Eleanor M. Howd 
were married at New Haven, Conn., June 
30, 1S97. 



51 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

WARREN NOBLE GROFF 
was born in Tiffin, Ohio, in 1874. His ed- 
ucation was received at the public schools, 
followed by a course at Notre Dame, after 
which he entered the Ohio State Univer- 
sity. He was graduated from the latter 
institution in 1896 with the degree of A.B. 
He then entered the law department, tak- 
ing his degree in 1899. 

Mr. Groff comes of a family of lawyers, 
his forebears having been eminent in the 
legal profession in Ohio for many vears, 
and it was in his native town that he first 
commenced to practice. 

The great [Middle West called him, 
however, and it was not long before he 
came to Kansas City, and let the local 
winds dally with his shingle. Mr. Groff 
is alone in the practice of the law. 

He is unmarried, and belongs to the Chi 
Phi Fraternity, the Kansas City Athletic 
Club, and the University Club. 

In politics he is a Democrat, and since 
coming to Kansas City has identified him- 
self with the local organization. 




JAMES M. GREENWOOD 
was born in Sangamon County, Illinois, 
November 15, 1837, his parents being 
Edmund Greenwood and Jeanette Fos- 
ter. He spent his boyhood on the farm, 
attending the district school. In 1852 
the Greenwoods removed to Adair Coun- 
ty, Missouri, where the father still lives. 
It was here that Professor Greenwood 
taught his first school, being barely six- 
teen. In 1857 he completed his educa- 
tion at the Methodist Seminary in Can- 
ton, Mo. He taught school in Lima and 
Quincy, and in 1862 enlisted in the Union 
army, serving throughout the war. He 
taught in the Kirksville Normal School 
from 1867 to 1874, when he became Su- 
perintendent of the Public Schools in 
Kansas City, then a town of 28,000. 
Professor Greenwood has been president 
of the Missouri State Teachers' Associa- 
tion, and in 1884 became a member of 
the council of the National Educational 
Association. He has also served as 
treasurer of the National Association, and 
in 1897 was elected a life director in the 
association. In that year the Missouri 
University conferred upon him the de- 
gree of LL.D. 

Professor Greenwood was married No- 
vember 1, 1859, to Miss Amanda Mc- 
Daniel, a teacher in Kirksville. 

He has written and revised many text- 
books, and contributed copiously to 
mathematical journals. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



55 




Photo by Strauss. 

WILLIAM P. HAYDE 
was born in Keokuk, Iowa, November 6, 
1863, but his father, a civil engineer and 
contractor, removed to Missouri when the 
subject of this sketch was only a year old. 
His early boyhood was spent in the towns 
of Edina and Kirksville, where his father 
built the State Normal .School, and in 
1879 the family came to Kansas City. 

Mr. Hayde took a course in a local com- 
mercial college, and then learned the trade 
of brick-laying. Of a nomadic tempera- 
ment, he worked all over the country — 
Washington, Chicago, New York, Ogden, 
Salt Lake City, etc. — sometimes working 
at his trade, but more often superintend- 
ing jobs. In 1 89 1 he was sent to Toronto, 
Canada, as a delegate to the bricklayers' 
National Convention from Utah. 

Returning to Kansas City in the early 
'90's, Mr. Hayde went into the office of 
Inspector of Buildings during Mayor Cow- 
herd's first administration, and from 
there went over to the office of the Circuit 
Clerk to serve as deputy. He worked 
there for three years, making a record for 
efficiency, and in 1898 was appointed 
County License Inspector. 

Always a Democrat, Mr. Hayde has 
served as a member of the City Committee 
from the Eighth Ward for eight years. 
He is a life member of the Elks, a Knight 
of Columbus, and a Woodman. 

He married Miss Ida Welch in 1893, 
and they have three children, one girl and 
two boys. 




Photo lyy Strauss. 

JACOB ALBERT HARZFELD 
was born in Chicago, Illinois, January 30, 
1877. He lived in that city until his 
twentieth year, and his education had its 
beginning in the ward schools of the city. 
He entered the city high schools at the 
conclusion of his ward schooling, and after 
his graduation took the classical course at 
the University of Chicago. When this 
course had been finished, Mr. Harzfeld 
became a student at the Northwestern 
University Law School, and pursued his 
studies until he had graduated from the 
institution. 

He came to Kansas City in 1S97, and 
almost immediately entered the law office 
of Mr. I.J. Ringolski. He remained with 
Mr. Ringolski for over three years, being 
engaged almost exclusively on the brief 
work of the office. 

He had been admitted to the bar in 
January, 1898, and during the two years 
following was given much opportunity 
for the practice of his profession in follow- 
ing the general practice of Mr. Ringolski 's 
office. In 1900 Mr. Harzfeld left Mr. 

Ringolski 's office and engaged in general 
practice for himself, officing in the New 
York Life building, and making a specialty 
of commercial law. He is a member of 
the Progress Club and of the Young Men's 
Club. 






MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

FRANK HAGERMAN, 
who has achieved a success that few other 
lawyers have attained, was born in Clark 
County, Missouri, April 27, 1857. His 
boyhood was spent at Keokuk, la., where 
he attended the public schools. He stud- 
ied law in the office of Hon. P. T. Loraax 
at Keokuk, and was admitted to practice 
there in 1876. 

M. Hagerman came to Kansas City De- 
cember 1, 1887, when he was thirty years 
old, and became a member of the law firm 
of Pratt, McCrary, Ferry & Hagerman. 
In 1896 the firm was dissolved, and Mr. 
Hagerman has since practiced alone. 

Mr. Hagerman is attorney for the Met- 
ropolitan Street Railway Company, the 
Milwaukee & Great Western, the packing 
houses and other large concerns. 

He was married February 22, 1887, to 
Miss Ella Comstock, of St. Louis. There 
are two children, Haywood and Abbie 
Stanton, thirteen and nine years of age. 

Mr. Hagerman's brother, James H. Ha- 
german, is general solicitor of the M., 
K. & T. at St. Louis. 




Photo by Strauss. 
HERBERT SPENCER HADLEY 
was born in Olathe, Kansas, February 20, 
1872. After attending the public schools 
he entered the Kansas University in 1887, 
and was graduated from there in 1898. 
He then attended the Northwestern Law 
School in Chicago, and took his degree in 

1894. He came to Kansas City in the 
same year, and was admitted to practice 
here. 

Mr. Hadley took an active interest in 
local politics from the commencement of 
his residence, and in 1898 was appointed 
Assistant City Counselor. In January, 
1901, he resigned in order to make the 
race for Prosecuting Attorney, and was 
elected by a handsome majority, being the 
first Republican to fill that office for a 

quarter of a century. 

Mr. Hadley gave promise of oratorical 
ability in his school days. He won first 
prize for Kansas University in the State 
oratorical contest in 1891, and in 1894, 
while attending Northwestern, repeated 
the performance. 

Mr. Hadley wedded Miss Agnes Lee Oc- 
tober 8, 1 901, and they have a daughter. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING- KANSAS CITY. 



57 






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■ l s ^ k > fwjl 






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p 


■ 






'* ''JBK S "^ 13* 


M ' 








Kl»,/. ; - 







Photo by Thomson. 

FRANK MAYNARD HOWE 
was born in Arlington, Mass., July 20, 
1849. He was educated in the public 
schools and in Cotting Academy, and after- 
wards took a special course in architecture 
at the Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy in Boston. In 1868 he entered the 
office of Ware & Van Brunt, architects, in 
Boston, and upon the retirement of Mr. 
W. R. Ware in 1832, became a partner in 
the concern under the name of Van Brunt 
& Howe, which partnership still exists. 
Prior to this he spent some time in travel 
and, study abroad, and in 1880 formed a 
partnership with the late Arthur H. Dodd, 
of Boston, but in 1882 this was dissolved, 
and that of Van Brunt & Howe formed. 
In 1885 the firm was established in Kan- 
sas City. 

The present firm enjoys a large practice 
in all parts of the country, and has always 
retained its eastern office in Boston. 
They were on the Commission of Archi- 
tects at the World's Columbian Exposi- 
tion in 1893, and enjoy a similar honor on 
the same commission at the Louisiana 
Purchase Exposition. In their practice 
in Kansas City they have built many of 
the largest and most important buildings 
here. 

Mr. Howe was married in 187 1 to Miss 
Mary E. Wyman, of Arlington, and they 
have two daughters, Katherine and Dor- 
othy. He belongs to the Papyrus Club, 
of Boston, the Kansas City Club, the Com- 
mercial Club, is president of the Knife and 
Fork Club, president of the Symphony 
Orchestra, and is a thirty-second degree 
Mason, and Shriner. 



Photo by Thomson. 

HORATIO LOOMIS HARMON 

was born in Chicago, Illinois, July 5, 1855. 
He was educated in the public and high 
schools, and after his school days selected 
a railroad career. For six years he was 
in the freight office of the Chicago and 
Northwestern, and then went to Southern 
Illinois as agent of a constructing com- 
pany. 

After two years he accepted a position 
as chief clerk in the motive department 
of the Burlington at Aurora, 111., and after 
a year went to Chicago as contracting 
freight agent of the C, B. & O. He served 
in that capacity for six years, and came to 
Kansas City in 1889 as general agent of 
the freight department. In 1895 he was 
made general agent of the freight and pas- 
senger departments, and in 189S general 
southwestern agent. 

Mr. Harmon has served as secretary of 
the Country Club since its organization, 
is president of the Railway Club, and is a 
a director in the Commercial Club, in the 
Kansas City Club, and in the Board of 
Trade. He is also vice-president of the 
Symphony Orchestra, and is a leading 
figure in every public movement. 

He married Miss Jeannette Dodson in 
Chicago January 16, 1889. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

GEORGE B. HARRISON, Jr., 
was born at Glasgow, Mo., October 23, 
1870. His is a pioneer family, his grand- 
father, John Harrison, who was a native 
of Kentucky, having settled in Howard 
County in 1814. There Mr. Harrison's 
father, George B. Harrison, Jr., was born 
and reared. Mr. Harrison spent all his 
earlier life in Glasgow, going to the public 
schools there and afterwards to Pritchett 
College, where the degree of A.B. was con- 
ferred upon him in 1887. Mr. Harrison 
went into the banking business soon after 
his graduation from college in the employ 
iif the Glasgow Savings Bank, rising from 
a clerkship until he was the bank's cashier. 
This place he held for ten years. He came 
to Kansas City in July, 1901, and became 
assistant cashier of the New England Na- 
tional Bank. January 1, 1902, he was 
made cashier of the bank. 

Since his local residence began, Mr. Har- 
rison has become identified with many in- 
stitutions of the town, notably the Kansas 
City Athletic Club, the Kansas City Club, 
and he also holds membership in the 
Knights of Pythias. His affiliations in 
banking and business circles are extensive, 
being a member of the Missouri Bankers' 
Association, of which he has been first as- 
sistant secretary-treasurer and president 
(1900 to 1 901.) He is also treasurer of 
the Trans-Mississippi Commercial Con- 
gress, and treasurer of the Commercial 
Club. 

Mr. Harrison was married in 1891 to 
Miss Ligon, of Texas. They have two 
children, a boy and a girl. 




Photo by Strauss. 

JOHN THOMAS HARDING 

was born in St. Louis, Missouri, Novem- 
ber 15, 1 866. His boyhood days, howev- 
er, were passed in Nevada, Missouri, where 
he grew to manhood. He attended the 
public schools, and then took a course at 
the Southwest Normal School in Port 
Scott, Kansas, after which he entered the 
University of Missouri's law department. 
He was graduated in 1888, and being ad- 
mitted to the bar at once began the prac- 
tice of his profession in Nevada. 

Always an enthusiastic Democrat and a 
public spirited man, Mr. Harding served 
terms as Prosecuting Attorney of Vernon 
County and City Counselor of Nevada 
during his residence there. 

In 1900 he came to Kansas City, where 
he has since lived. He is a member of the 
local Bar Association, is a Mason, a Knight 
Templar, a Shriner, and a member of the 
Beta Theta Pi Fraternity. 

He was married in 1S91 to Miss Joel 
Atkinson, and they have one child, Patti, 
born in 1893. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



59 




Photo hy Thomson. 

FRANKLIN HOUSTON 
was born on a farm near Huntsville, 
Alabama, December 18, 1849. He is 
practically a Missourian, however, as his 
parents removed to this State when he was 
less than a year old. They first resided 
nar Booneville, but in 1852 his father en- 
tered a large tract of land in Pettis County 
and they located permanently there. His 
father was one of the largest farmers and 
most widely known man in Central Mis- 
souri. 

Mr. Houston attended the public and 
private schools in Missouri until 1864, 
when he entered Bethany College in West 
Virginia, from which he graduated in 1867 
as valedictorian of his class. In 1868 he 
entered the law department of Michigan 
University. Returning to Sedalia in 1869, 
he entered the law offices of Phillips & Vast, 
then the most widely known lawyers in 
Central Missouri, and remained with them 
for two years. 

In 1872 he was elected Prosecuting At- 
torney of Pettis County, and re-elected in 
1874, an d continued to practice law at Se- 
dalia and adjoining circuits until 1892, 
when he removed to Kansas City. In 
1900 he was appointed General Attorney 
of the Chicago & Alton Railway for Mis- 
souri, which position he still holds. He is 
a member of the local and State Bar As- 
sociations. 

Mr. Houston was married to Miss Har- 
iet S. Brown of Sedalia, in 187 1. 




CARL HOFFMAN 
was born at Brensbach, Hesse Darmstad, 
December 24, 1847. He acquired the ru- 
diments of an education at the gymna- 
sium of his birthplace, and finished later 
with a course at the University of Giessen. 
He had inherent taste for music, and took 
organ, piano, and harmony under Man- 
gold and Niederhoff. He came to this 
country in 1867 and located at Pittsburg, 
Pa., where he devoted his energy and abil- 
ity to musical instruction. He was suc- 
cessful, and was offered and accepted the 
chair of music in Beaver Seminary, near 
Pittsburg, then the largest educational 
place for women in America. Tiring of 
this, he came farther West, and in Leaven- 
worth, Kas., started into the business of 
selling musical instruments, gradually de- 
veloping the business into a retail store for 
sheet music and musical sundries. He 
left Leavenworth in 1894, moving his 
stock and business offices. While in Leav- 
enworth Mr. Hoffman made much progress 
in perfecting the musical taste of the town, 
his position as organist of the Catholic 
Cathedral for ten years giving him the op- 
portunity his tastes inclined to. A year 
ago his business was incorporated under 
the firm name of the Carl Hoffman Music 
Company, with his two sons as partial 
stockholders. 

Mr. Hoffman was married while living 
in Leavenworth, his wife being Miss Ida 
Schmelzer. They have four children, 
John, Ernest, Josephine, and Margaret. 



6o 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

HARRY HENLEY, 
elected Circuit Clerk of Jackson County 
at the recent election, was born in the 
town of Independence a little over thirty 
years ago. The story of his life is one of 
struggle against adverse circumstances, 
adversity cheerfully borne, obstacles over- 
come, and duty done. Before he had 
even had the advantages of a public school 
education, he commenced to earn his 
livelihood, and ease, as a friend, has never 
known him from that day. There were 
few things that the boy did not do — he 
sold papers in the street and carried them 
from house to house, worked in a woolen 
mill from dawn till dark, served as helper 
in a painter's shop, and finally learned the 
painter's trade — and every change he 
made was one of advancement. 

Knowing everybody, and making a 
friend of every acquaintance, it came 
around that influence secured him a place 
in the Circuit Clerk's office at Independ- 
ence. Commencing as an office assistant, 
he worked himself up to the position of 
deputy, and finally came to have sole con- 
trol of the Independence office. 

Mr. Henley studied law at night, and 
has been admitted to the bar. He lives 
with his parents, and belongs to the 
Knights of Pythias and the Woodmen. 




Photo by Strauss. 

EDWARD EYERETT HOLMES 

was born in West Winstead, Connecticut, 
December 29, 1849. He attended the 
public and high schools of his native town, 
and also studied civil engineering. His 
first occupation was as axeman in a rail- 
road surveying crew, and he rose steadily 
until made division superintendent. In 
1873, when the panic stopped all building, 
he found himself in Muscatine, la. He 
located there, and for two years worked 
as a book-keeper. From that he worked 
into the real estate and mortgage business, 
in which he has continued ever since. In 
1879 he moved from Muscatine to Em- 
poria, Kas., and in 1S82 came to Kansas 
City. 

Mr. Holmes is second vice-president of 
the United States and Mexican Trust Com- 
pany, which is engaged in securing the 
right of way for the Orient line, and is also 
director in several mining companies. He 
is a man of intensest energy and applica- 
tion, and has been an important factor in 
the upbuilding of the town. 

Mr. Holmes is a member of the Evans- 
ton Golf Club. He was married in 1873 
to Miss Martha J. Hawley, of Muscatine 
la., and they have one son, Albert. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



6 1 




»-•»■**■• *=-' 



.I ■ I, 






J 



NUMA FLETCHER HEITMAN 

was born September 1 1 , 1 860, in David- 
son County, North Carolina. He was the 
oldest in a family of nine, and his struggle 
for the education he so much desired was 
a long and hard one. He had two uncles, 
one a Methodist preacher, and they helped 
him in the furtherance of his ambitions. 
By borrowing from the Charles F. Deem's 
fund, he entered the University of North 
Carolina, and was graduated in 1882 with 
the degree of A.B. While at school he 
made the highest average grade in his 
class, won the prize in moral philosophy, 
and also carried away the gold medal of- 
fered in oratorical competition. 

He decided to study law, and entered 
the law department of the University of 
Virginia, taking his degree in 18S5. He 
came to Kansas City at once and hung out 
his shingle, and has been engaged in gen- 
eral practice ever since. 

He married Miss Emma Coleman Octo- 
ber 8, 1888, and is the father of two chil- 
dren, John Hood Heitman, twelve years 
old, and Numa F., Jr., twenty months old. 




C. LESTER HALL 
was born in Arrow Rock, Saline County, 
Missouri, March 10, 184s, the son of a 
prominent physician and pioneer Missou- 
rian. His boyhood, however, was spent 
on a farm south of Marshall, and his early 
education was received at the district 
schools. In 1 86 1, although only 16, he 
entered the Confederate army as a mem- 
ber of Dill's famous regiment, but was 
captured at the battle of Milford and put 
in prison, first at Alton and then in St. 
Louis. After a few months he took the 
oath and returned home, soon after enter- 
ing the Kemper School at Booneville. 
He commenced the study of medicine in 
1864, and attended the St. Louis Medical 
College, and then for four years he studied 
with his father, after which he entered the 
Jefferson Medical College at Philadelphia, 
where he took the degree in 1867. He 
first practiced with his father, but after 
six years removed to Marshall, where he 
remained until 1890, when he came to 
Kansas City. 

Dr. Hall has served terms as president 
of the local Academy of Medicine, the Mis- 
souri State Medical Association, and sec- 
retary of the section of diseases of women 
in the American Medical Association. 
He is president of the board of directors 
of the Medico-Chirurgical College, and pro- 
fessor of diseases of women and abdominal 
surgery in that institution. 

He married Miss Katherine Sappington, 
of Saline County, in 1867, and they have 
four children, Walton, C. Lester, J., Kath- 
erine May, and Mrs. Leon Smith. 



62 



I//..V WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

ROLAND HUGHES 

was born in Plattsburg, Missouri, March 
20, 1855, the son of Colonel John F. 
Hughes, who was killed at the battle of 
Independence shortly after being brevet- 
ted brigadier-general. The boy Roland 
was just eight years old at the time, and 
with his mother and brothers began the 
work of making a living on the farm. He 
worked early and late, but managed to se- 
cure some schooling, and later in his teens 
contrived a course in William Jewell Col- 
lege at Liberty. He then taught school 
For a while in Clinton County, and with the 
money thus saved read law in the office of 
Governor Ingles in Plattsburg, and was 
admitted to the bar in 1S76. His first act 
was to sell the reversion in his mother's 
dower interest in the farm, buying it in for 
her. Lawyers denied that it could be 
done, but the Supreme Court upheld the 
youthful Roland in his generosity. He 
began the practice of law' in Plattsburg, 
and his ability soon brought him into po- 
litical prominence. He was elected twice 
to the office of Prosecuting Attorney, and 
the nature of the man was admirably 
shown by his disposition of the salary. 
The first term's pay went to build a house 
on the farm for his mother, and the second 
to educate his two younger brothers. 

Mr. Hughes came to Kansas City in 
iNS;, and formed a partnership with Gen- 
eral Byron Sherry, which continued until 
the latter 's removal from the citv. 

The firm of Witten & Hughes was then 
formed, which continued until the election 
of Mr. Hughes to the office of Prosecuting 
Attorney in 1902. 




JAMES WILLIAM HULL 
was born May 10, 1873, in Weston, Mis- 
souri. His father, Walter S. Hull, is one 
of the pioneer residents of Platte County, 
having emigrated from Kentucky in 1840. 
His mother, Susan A. Lowe, was the 
daughter of the Rev. Shelton Lowe, a Bap- 
tist minister, and who, by the way, enjoyed 
the distinction of cousinship with Jeffer- 
son Davis. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
public schools, and then entered Washing- 
ton LTni versify in St. Louis. He was 
graduated from the dental department in 
1897, and in 1898 came to Kansas City, 
where he commenced the practice of his 
profession. 

Mr. Hull is a member of the Missouri 
Dental Association, and was vice-presi- 
dent of the body in 1901. He has also 
occupied the position of demonstrator of 
operative dentistry in the Western Den- 
tal College, and is a member of the Kan- 
sas State Dental Association. 

Dr. Hull is a Mason, having taken all 
the degrees in the York rite, being a mem- 
ber of Temple 299, A. F. & A. M., Orient 
Chapter, 102 Royal Arch Masons, Oriental 
Commandery 128, Knights Templar, She- 
kinah Council, Royal and Select Masters, 
and is also a Shriner. He belongs to the 
University Club, the Knife and Fork Club, 
and the Evanston Golf Club. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



63 




Photo by Thomson. 

HALE HOLDEN 
was born in Kansas City August 11, 1869, 
and laid the foundation for his later learn- 
ing in the public schools of this city. He 
was graduated from the High School in 
1886, and in 1890 received the degree of 
A.B. from Williams College. Two years 
later he was graduated from the Harvard - 
Law School, and entered the law office of 
Warner, Dean, Hagerman. He became a 
member of the firm of Warner, Dean, Gib- 
son & McLeod January 1, 1S95. Subse- 
quently James Hagerman went to St. 
Louis, and Judge Gibson went on the Cir- 
cuit bench in 1898, when the firm became 
Warner, Dean, McLeod & Holden. 

Mr. Holden was married September 
iS, 1895, to Miss Ellen M. Weston, daugh- 
ter of ex-Lieutenant-Governor Weston, 
of Massachusetts, at Dalton, Mass. They 
have two children, Eleanor Weston and 
Hale Holdan, Jr. 




Photo by SI runs*. 

CHARLES MORGAN HOWELL 
was born at Sholes, Indiana, in 1872. His 
family moved to Fairfax, Mo., when he 
was eight years old, and it was there Mr. 
Howell received his early education. He 
graduated from the public schools of the 
town and then took a course at the Uni- 
versity of Missouri, from where he grad- 
uated in 1890. After his graduation he 
took a course in political economy and 
kindred subjects at William Jewell 
College in Liberty, Mo. He studied law 
for a time in the office of Congressman 
Dougherty, and then went to Ann Arbor 
for a special law course, graduating from 
there in 1893. After being admitted to 
the bar at Liberty, Mo., he came to Kan- 
sas City. He was appointed by former 
Prosecuting Attorney James A. Reed an 
assistant prosecutor, and served through- 
out Mr. Reed's term of office from 1899 to 
1900. He is now an Assistant City Coun- 
selor. 

He has always been active in politics, 
and is a member of the Jackson County 
Club. Aside from this, he holds member- 
ship in the Modern Woodmen of America, 
the Knights of Pythias and the Greek let- 
ter society, Kappa Alpha. Mr. Howell 
enlisted at the outbreak of the Spanish 
war and was elected first lieutenant of 
Company F, Third Missouri Volunteers, 
and was afterwards commissioned captain 
of Company A, Missouri Volunteers. Mr. 
Howell is unmarried. 



64 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Thomson. 

ARCHIBALD DAVID L. HAMILTON 

was born at Brampton, Ontario, Novem- 
ber 16, i860, and is of Irish descent. His 
family moved to Toronto when he was 
twelve years of age, and his education was 
secured in the public schools of Brampton 
and Toronto. At the end of his school 
life Mr. Hamilton went into the paper 
business, and has remained in it ever since. 

He came to the United States in 1S85, 
when he went with the American Roll 
Paper Company and afterwards with the 
Graham Paper Company. He came to 
this town in 1S91 for the latter company 
to take charge of the local branch. Aside 
from his position as manager of the place, 
Mr. Hamilton has aided in many ways the 
plans tending to the upbuilding of Kansas 
City, and is affiliated with various associa- 
tions having that end in view. 

He was one of the organizers of the or- 
iginal Karnival Krewe, and has been its 
secretary for a number of years, and was 
a director in the Krewe. He is also a 
member of the Commercial and Kansas 
City Driving Clubs, and a member and di- 
rector of the Manufacturers' Association. 
Among the secret societies he is affiliated 
witli are the Elks and the Masons, he being 
;i Scottish Rite and a Shriner. 

Mr. Hamilton was married in Toronto 
in [886 to Miss C.ammie. 




Photo by Strauss. 

BEN T. HARDIN 

was born in Randolph County, Missouri, 
October 8, 1852, and lived there until he 
was nineteen years old. His first work was 
on the farm, splitting rails and hewing ties 
for the C. & A. railroad. He taught school 
two years, and went to the State Normal 
at Kirksville, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1875. The two following years he 
was Principal of the Public Schools at 
New London, and then entered the law- 
office of Martin & Priest, and was admit- 
ted to the bar in 1877, and came to Kansas 
City May 17, 18S9. 

Mr. Hardin was Prosecuting Attorney 
of Randolph County four years. In Kan- 
sas City he has acted as special judge fre- 
quently on the Circuit bench, and is well 
known as a Republican campaign speaker. 

He was married October 8, 1S79, to Miss 
Clara Phillips. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



6.5 




Photo by Strauss. 

SIGMUND HARZFELD 
was born in Buffalo, New York, October 2, 
1867, but his parents moved to Chicago 
,when he was still a mere child. In the 
Lake Front city he spent his boyhood, 
and received his education in the schools 
there. He was a pupil in the first man- 
ual training school in the State of Illinois, 
by the way. 

After getting out of school, he went to 
work as office boy in a mercantile house, 
and by dint of "hustling" worked up to 
the position of manager of the business. 
In 1S90 he came to Kansas City, and start- 
ed the Parisian Cloak Company. 

In those days the company occupied 
one store-room, and employed only fif- 
teen people. To-day the Parisian Cloak 
Company has its four-story building, and 
has over a hundred people on its pay-roll. 

Mr. Harzfeld is a member of the Com- 
mercial Club, and has been active in every 
movement tending to make Kansas City 
greater. He is also president of the 
Progress Club, and an Elk. 

He married Miss Florence Stern in 1894. 



Photo by Strauss. 

EDMUND ALEXANDER HUPPERT 

was born near Alton, Illinois, November 
22, 1863, but was reared to manhood in 
St. Louis, Mo. He went to the public 
schools there and then to Washington 
University, after which his parents de- 
cided to give him an art education, as he 
had shown artistic talent ever since child- 
hood. A course at the St. Louis School 
of Fine Arts was followed by a three years' 
stay in Europe, where he worked early 
and late under the tutelage of masters. 
He studied for a while in the Royal Acad- 
emy at Munich, but soon entered the Ju- 
lian Academy in Paris, where he sat under 
the teachings of Lefebvre and Boulanger. 
After some months spent in travel, he re- 
turned to St. Louis in 1887, and in 1S89 
came to Kansas City, where he established 
the Kansas City School of Fine Arts, with 
only energy and talent for capital. He 
has made the venture a success, and the 
school now ranks with the best in the coun- 
try. 

Professor Huppert was appointed su- 
pervisor of drawings in the public schools 
in 1902, a position that does not interfere 
with his own school work. His canvases 
are in many galleries of note throughout 
the country, and hang in many public 
buildings, notably the Missouri State 
University. 

He married Miss Tessie Withers in 189 1. 
He is a Woodman, and a charter member 
of the Knife and Fork Club. 



66 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

DANIEL B. HOLMES 
was born in Lexington, Kentucky, March 

I3i 1850. He received his early educa- 
tion in the public schools, then attended 
the Transylvania High School, and in 1870 
graduated from Kentucky University at 
Lexington with the degree of A.B. He 
then entered the Harvard Law School, 
and was graduated from there in 1872 
with the degree of L.L.D. He came to 
Kansas City in the same year, and soon 
formed a law partnership with ex-Senator 
T. V. Bryant, which continued for thirteen 
years. For two years he was alone, and 
then the firm of Karnes, Holmes & Kraut- 
hoff was formed in 1 889 and continued for 
ten years. He is now senior member of 
the firm of Holmes & Perry. 

It was February 6, 177, that Mr. Holmes 
married Miss Lyda A. Massey, of Jeffer- 
son City, daughter of Hon. James F. Mas- 
sey, Secretary of State at the commence- 
ment of the civil war, and also a member 
of the Constitutional Convention. Mr. 
Holmes is the father of four children, 
Massey B., now practicing law in New 
York; Mrs. George B. Langford, Miss 
Mignon, and Gilbert. 

Mr. Holmes has served a term as presi- 
dent of the Kansas City Bar Association. 




Photo by Thomson. 

FREDERICK HUTTIG, Sr., 

was born in Isserstedt, Germany, June 10, 
18.32. His education was secured in the 
schools of his native place. Mr. Huttig 
came to this country and located in in 
Muscatine, Iowa, in 1852. He engaged 
in the grocery business after a time, and 
remained in the business for five years. 
He then went into the sash and door bus- 
iness, being a pioneer in that line of work 
in the West. In conjunction with the 
sash and door business at Muscatine, Mr. 
Huttig engaged in selling lumber at Kel- 
logg, la. He remained in the sash and 
door business in Muscatine for nineteen 
years, and was twice honored with public 
office by the citizens of the town, first as 
a member of the City Council and then as 
a member of the Board of Supervisors. 

Mr. Huttig came to Kansas City in 1895. 
His two sons, Frederick, Jr., and William, 
had preceded him to this city, and had or- 
ganized and were running the Western 
Sash and Door Company. Mr. Huttig 
went into the business with them, and is 
the company's vice-president. It is by 
far the biggest company in that line of 
business in the West, and shows a most 
marvelous growth within recent years. 

Mr. Huttig holds membership in a num- 
ber of secret societies, among them the 
Masons and the Knights of Honor. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



67 




Photo hy Thomson. 

WILLIAM HUTTIG 

was born in Muscatine, Iowa, November 

26, 1859. His education was received in 

the public schools, and at the age of ten 

he went to work for his father, a pioneer 
in the sash and door business. The young 
William was started in at the very bottom, 
his daily wage being twenty cents, but he 
worked up. 

The business was moved to Kansas City, 
in 1S82. At that time the Western Sash 
and Door Company was capitalized for 
$30,000, but to-day its capitalization is 
$800,000. Mr. Huttig is president of the 
company. 

He is also vice-president of the Fidelity 
Trust Company, a director in the Eagle 
Manufacturing Company, the Sonora De- 
velopment Company, and the Kansas City 
and Arkansas Development Company. 
He is also one of the executive members 
of the Mexico & Orient Railroad. 

Mr. Huttig is a very public spirited man, 
and has played a prominent part in the 
upbuilding of the town. He belongs to 
the Commercial Club and the Kansas City 
Club. He was married June 16, 1896, to 
Miss Nannie Holmes, daughter of J. T. 
Holmes. They have one daughter. Mr. 
Huttig has three sons by a former wife. 




Photo hii Thomson. 

FREDERICK HUTTIG, Jr., 

was born in Muscatine, Iowa, August 14, 
187 1, son of the pioneer sash and door 
manufacturer of the West. He received 
his early education in the public schools, 
and also had the advantage of a high school 
course. At the age of sixteen he com- 
menced to work, accepting employment 
with his father's house, and it was not 
long until he reached a stage of efficiency 
that recommended him for promotion, 
and he was given charge of the firm's 
branch house at Wichita, Kas. He suc- 
ceeded so admirably that he was trans- 
ferred to the more important branch at 
St. Joseph, Mo., Here he remained until 
1890, when he came to Kansas City to ac- 
cept the position of treasurer of the West- 
ern Sash and Door Company. 

This position he still holds, and he has 
played no small part in developing the 
Western Sash and Door Company from 
an average concern to perhaps the great- 
est of its kind in the world. 

Mr. Huttig married, April 17, 1S96 
Miss Catherine Holmes, daughter of J. T. 
Holmes, one of Kansas City's pioneer cit- 
izens, and they have one boy. 

Mr. Huttig belongs to the Kansas City 
Club, to the Commercial Club, the Driving 
Club, and is an Elk and a Mason. 



6S 



\I1-X WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Thomson. 

WALTON H. HOLMES, 
one of the best known men in Kansas 
City, was the second child of Nehemiah 
and Mary Holmes and was born in 
1 86 1 in Independence, Missouri. His 
father was the founder, of the street 
railway system of Kansas City, and dur- 
ing his vacations from the local high 
school and the Christian Brothers' Col- 
lege in St. Louis, the young Walton 
learned the business," beginning at the 
bottom. 

At the age of sixteen he engaged in 
the business of contractor and builder 
on a large scale and when seventeen years 
old was elected vice-president of the 
Kansas City and Westport Horse Rail- 
wav Company, and upon attaining his 
majority was elected president. In 1886 
he introduced the cable system, and was 
the first president in the L'nited States 
to introduce the overhead trolley elec- 
tric system. It was chiefly through his 
instrumentality that the street car line 
of the city were consolidated, after which 
he was made vice president and general 
manager, and in 1 898 was elected pres- 
ident. In 1902 Mr. Holmes severed 
his connection with the Metropolitan, 
and is now engaged in looking after his 
own personal interests. 

In 1884 he was married to Miss Flee- 
cie Phillips daughter of Dr. Phillips, 
an eminent surgeon of Austin, Tex., 
and a niece of U. S. District Judge John 
F. Phillips. They have one son, Wal- 
ton H., Jr. 




1'lioto hy Thomson. 

CONWAY F. HOLMES 
youngest child of Nehemiah and Mary 
Holmes, was born in 1864 in Kansas City, 
Missouri, and received his education in 
the local schools and the business col- 
lege at Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Like his 
brother, Walton, he entered the street 
railway service while yet a lad, and in 
1886 became superintendent of the Grand 
Avenue Cable Company. With his broth- 
er he brought about the first street railway 
consolidation and the subsequent merg- 
ing of all the Kansas City lines into the 
Metropolitan Street Railway system, of 
which he became general superintendent 
and later general manager. In addition 
to his duties with the Metropolitan, he 
was president of the Kansas City Electric 
Light Company, a director in the Kansas 
City State Bank, and a vice-president 
and member of the Executive Committee 
of the American Street Railway Associa- 
tion. 

In 1885 he married Miss Maud Gregory, 
daughter of Kansas City's first mayor, 
and has one son, named William Gregory. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY 



69 




Photo by Cornish. 

ELIHU WATTS HAYES 
was born in West Lebanon, Maine, Octo- 
ber 23, 1857. His early education was se- 
cured in the public schools, and he after- 
wards took a classical course in the West 
Lebanon Academy. 

After graduation, he entered the mer- 
cantile life in North Lebanon, remaining 
in that town until 1882, when the larger 
West called him. 

He located in Kansas City in 1882, and 
has been a steady resident ever since, be- 
ing continuously engaged in the real estate 

and building business. 

Always a Democrat and an active work- 
er for the party's success, Mr. Hayes was 
given the nomination for County Collector 
in 1890, and elected by a handsome ma- 
jority. He served the four years' term, 
and then returned to his private business. 
He has served at different times on the 
City, County, and Congressional Com- 
mittees, and is a strong man politically. 

Mr. Hayes is a thirty-second degree Ma- 
son. He was married in 1882 to Miss An- 
nie E. Jones, of North Lebanon, and is the 
father of three children, Bessie C, Victor 
E., and Mabel A. 




MATTHEW SIMPSON HUGHES, 

pastor of the Independence Avenue 
Methodist Church, was born at Dod- 
dridge, Virginia, February 2, 1863. He 
was educated at Linsley Institute and 
at the West Virginia University, in 
whose faculty at that tihie was Wm. L 
Wilson, afterwards famous as the auth- 
or of the Wilson Bill in Congress. Dr. 
Hughes lived in Virginia until he was 
twenty-four years old He was or- 
dained for the ministry in 1888 and his 
first pastoral work was in Iowa. He 
rose rapidly, and was soon called to the 
Methodist Church in Portland, the larg- 
est Protestant Church in the State of 
Maine. He next went to the Wesley 
Church in Minneapolis from which he 
was called to the Kansas City church in 

1898. 

Dr. Hughes studied law, and was of- 
fered a partnership with one of the lead- 
ing attorneys of Pennsylvania. He was 
city editor of a newspaper at Morgans- 
town and one at Parkersburg. 

Newspaper work gave him facility 
and a deep knowledge of human nature, 
while the law imparted a certain judicial 
dispassionate tinge to his mind. He is 
a brilliant pulpit orator, whose oratory, 
however, is of ideas, not mere words. 

Dr. Hughes was married to Miss Har- 
riet F. Wheeler at Grinned, la., in 1888 
They have two children, Blakely and 
Esther 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




LEE HANEV 
was born in Carroll County, Missouri, 
April 2,5, 1869, but spent his boyhood in 
Leavenworth County, Kansas, where he 
attended the district schools. When 
eleven he ran away from home and went 
to Xew York city. He sold papers for 
three years, when he went with the Fifth 
Avenue Hotel as bell-boy, leaving three 
years later as night clerk. He joined 
Sells Bros.' Circus, and made the Austra- 
lian tour with the company in 1885. On 
his return he went into the newspaper bus- 
iness at Cheyenne, Wyo., and after a year 
or so there drifted to the Santa Fe ma- 
chine shops at Argentine, where he re- 
mained three years, leaving to become a 
foreman on the road for a year. He then 
went to Topeka as day clerk in the Ches- 
terfield Hotel, owned by Allen Sells, and 
came to Kansas City as night clerk at the 
Midland in 1892. He then toured a sea- 
son with the "Alabama" Company, play- 
ing a part, and returned to Kansas City in 
189S, going to work for the World as Kan- 
sas City, kas., editor. He went with the 
Joiirnal in 1902, and later in the year was 
made press agent of the Orpheum Theater, 
which place he now holds. He was mar- 
ried August 28, 1898, to Miss Edith Davis, 
of Kingston, Mo., a lineal descendant of 
Jefferson Davis. They have one child, 
Lee Haney Jr. 



1 . 


^ 




V 











Photo hy Thomson. 

■ 

ROBERT JAY INGRAHAM 

was born in 1864 in Coshocton, Ohio, 
but has nobly lived it down. 

After going through the public and 
high schools of Coshocton, he came to 
Kansas City in 1884, and went into the 
office of C. 0. Tichenor, where he read 
law for two years under the tutelage of 
that able jurist. 

He was admitted to the bar in 1886, 
and remained with Mr. Tichenor until 
1889, when the law firm of Teasdale, 
Ingraham & Cowherd was organized. 
Mr. Cowherd was first elected Mayor, 
then Congressman. In 1901 Mr Teas- 
dale was made Circuit Judge, and in 
1902 Mr. Ingraham was appointed City 
Counselor by Mayor Reed. It is really 
his first political office, unless one counts 
his terms as Mayor and City Counselor 
of Westport before its consolidation with 
Kansas City. 

He has been a life-long Democrat, 
and plays an important part in every 
political campaign, although never put- 
ting party above public welfare. 

He was married to Miss Margaret 
Nelon, of Lawrence, Kas., and the mar- 
riage has been blessed with two children 
Margaret and Robert James. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



7i 




LAWRENCE MONROE JONES 

president and treasurer of the Jones 
Bros. Dry Goods Co., was born in Frank- 
lin County, Illinois, December 28, 1856. 
His early education was received in the 
public schools, but he earned money 
enough to take himself through Ham- 
ilton College. After graduating he 
taught school for six years, but his bent 
was commercial rather than pedagogic. 
In 1879, in the hamlet of Parrish, 111., 
he started a general store in company 
with his brother, Logan and another 
partner. After the first year they 
bought out the third man, and the sec- 
ond year did a business of $30,000. 
Spreading their wings, the Jones broth- 
ers removed to the county seat, Benton, 
and then the family journeyed to Kan- 
sas. In a general store in Winchester, 
then in Stratford, and then in Kansas 
City, Kas., was their record, in each 
place adding to their capital and ex- 
tending their operations. After five 
years in the latter place, the firm of 
Jones Bros moved to Kansas City, Mo., 
and from that time until now has been 

a time of progress and improvement. 

In 1 88 1 Mr. Jones married Miss Emma 
Williams, of Du Quoin, 111., and has four 
children, Junia, Jessica, Chester L., and 
Abbie. 

Mr. Jones is a forceful writer and an 
attractive speaker, as well as an able 
business man. 




J. LOGAN JONES, 
vice-president and secretary of the Jones 
Bros. Dry Goods Company, had a ro- 
mantic birth. He first saw the light of 
day in an Indian hut where Ottawa, 
Kas., now stands. 

That was in 1859, when the Jones 
family was journeying westward. The 
father soon returned to Illinois, and there 
young Logan received his education at 
the public schools and at Hamilton Col- 
lege. Like his brother, he taught 
school after graduation, and it was with 
the monetary rewards of pedagogy that 
they secured the capital of $400 apiece 
with which to lay the corner-stone of their 
present enormous business. 

In 1883 he married Miss Jennie Charl- 
ton, and now has three children, Charles 
Vernon, Ernest Charlton, and Vivian 

From the time of coming to Kansas 
City Mr. Jones and his brother, despite 
their tremendous responsibilities, have 
never failed to take an active part in all 
movements tending to the public good. 
He is in every respect a useful citizen. 
With his brother, Lawrence, Mr. Jones 
is a general manager of the great store 
and also has charge of the advertising 
department, so important a branch of 
the modern mercantile business. He 
has a pretty taste for literature, and is 
always in demand for addresses. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




CHARLES S. JOBES, 
the president of the American National 
Bank, was reared in Northeastern Ohio, 
from where he moved south in 1 871, at the 
age of seventeen, and engaged in civil en- 
gineering, railroad, and levee construction 
in the States of Texas and Mississippi. 

Later he engaged in banking, and in 
1886 located in Southern Kansas, where 
he continued in banking until 1897, when 
he was appointed National Bank Ex- 
aminer, and was thus employed until 
October 8, igoi, when he resigned as Bank 
Examiner to accept the presidency of the 
Vmerican National Bank of Kansas City, 
Mo. During his term of service as Na- 
tional Hank Examiner his territory cov- 
ered all the States of Kansas, Missouri, 
south of the Platte River in Nebraska and 
the Indian Territory, and included over 
two hundred and fifty National Banks. 
His work as Bank Examiner also gave 
him high standing with the Comptroller 
of the Currency, and he was made receiver 
of three National Banks during his period 
of service. 




Photo by Strauss. 

SAMUEL W. JURDEN, 
president of the City National Bank, was 
born in North Adams, Massachusetts, May 
7, 1848. At the age of twelve years his par- 
ents removed to St. Albans, Vt., where the 
subject of this sketch went to the public 
and high schools. 

When eighteen years old, he and the 
family came out to Missouri and located at 
Holden, Johnson Countv. 

For a while he was engaged in the lumber 
business, and then accepted a position as 
cashier of the Bank of Holden. 

In 1895 he was made president of the 
bank, in which position he remained until 
August 1, 1900, when he came to Kansas 
City to take the presidency of the City 
National Bank. 

Since coming here, Mr. Jurden has iden- 
tified himself with the Commercial Club, 
and has shared in the work of many pub- 
lic movements. 

He is a Mason, and has been a prominent 
figure in Republican politics in Missouri 
for many years. 

Mr. Jurden married Miss Ellen Red- 
ford at Fayetteville, Mo., in 1874, an d 
they have three children, two boys and a 
erirl. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



73 




Photo by Strait**. 

HENRY SAINT JULIAN 
was born July 23, 1862, in Franklin 
Kentucky. He received his education in 
the public schools and in the Kentucky 
Military Institute. 

Deciding upon the legal profession, he 
entered the law department of the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, and immediately after 
his graduation in 1885 came to Kansas 
City, where he commenced to practice. 

He was elected to the Legislature in 
1 89 1, and served as a member of the As- 
sembly until 1895. While at Jefferson 
City he introduced the bill to tax fran- 
chises, which, while it failed of passage by 
a narrow margin, paved the way for later 
legislation. Mr. Julian was also one of 
the first men to agitate the question of 
municipal ownership of the waterworks, 
and in 1898 secured the insertion of the 
municipal ownership plank in the Demo- 
cratic platform. 

He was appointed Chief of Police in 
1897, and during his tenure of office put a 
stop to the foot-pad reign of terror by is- 
suing orders to "shoot to kill." 

At the outbreak of the late war with 
Spain he was commissioned Major of the 
Fifth Missouri, and served until peace was 
declared. 

A Democrat all his life, he has served in 
every campaign on the City or County 
Committees, and is high in the councils of 
his party. 




HENRY WESTFALL JACQUES 
was born January 30, 1870, in Hannibal, 
Missouri, where he resided until his par- 
ents removed to Kansas City in 1881. 
He attended the Kansas City public and 
high schools, and completed his education 
at Kansas University. 

After his school days he entered the em- 
ploy of the Memphis Route, where he re- 
mained for two years. He then went 
with the South Missouri Land and Lum- 
ber Company as book-keeper, and then 
for a while with the Sunny South Lumber 
Company. 

In 1 89 1 he accepted a position as trav- 
eling salesman for the Kansas City Car 
and Foundry Company, afterwards ac- 
quired by the Armour interests, and re_ 
mained with it for three years. 

In 1893 he organized the Mercantile 
Lumber & Supply Company, and was 
elected president. Under his direction the 
business has grown from the original cap- 
italization of $5,000 to $50,000, and a rail- 
road supply house is also operated by it 
now. 

Mr. Jacques married Miss Bessie Hib- 
ler in 1897, and has one child, Henry P., 
fourth of that name in the family, which 
traces back to 1630. 

Mr. Jacques belongs to the Commercial 
Club and the Kansas City Club. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 





Photo by Strauss. 

THOMAS JONES 

\v;is horn in Wales, October 7, 1857, and 
was the son of a minister. He came to 
New York when fifteen years old, and 
was educated at Oberlin College, gradu- 
ating there in 1885, and from the Cincin- 
nati Law School in 18S7. He came to 
Kansas City July 4, 1887. Senator Ly- 
man was his partner two years, then it 
was Jones & Kirshner. For several years 
he has practiced alone. Mr. Jones is sec- 
retary and attorney for the Florence Crit- 
tenden Home; lie is in close touch with 
the National Municipal League; is a mem- 
ber of the board of directors of the Asso- 
ciated Charities, and is vice-president of 
the Missouri Republican Club. He was 
a candidate for police Judge in 1896. He 
is president of the local Christian Endeav- 
or Union, and was State president for two 
years. He is now the world's vice-pres- 
ident for Missouri of this society. He 
was prominently identified with the West 
Side Law and Order League from 1894 to 
1900. 



Photo by Strauss. 

KITTREDGE JENNEY 
was born in Norwalk, Ohio, April 26, 1871. 
His family moved to Kansas City when 
Mr. Jenney was but a year old, and he has 
lived in this city ever since. He gradu- 
ated from the public schools, and took a 
course of study at the Lehigh University, 
graduating from that institution im893. 
After his return to the city from the uni- 
versity he entered the law office of Pratt, 
Ferry & Hagerman two years, after being 
admitted to the bar in 1 894. He remained 
with Pratt, Ferry & Hagerman two years 
after being admitted to the bar, when he 
entered into partnership with Herman 
Brumback under the firm name of Brum- 
back & Jenney. 

Mr. Jenney has been a life-long Demo- 
crat, and was nominated for Justice of the 
Peace on that party's ticket in 1897. He 
was elected, and on the expiration of his 
term in 1902, was re-elected. 

In his school days he developed a pro- 
pensity for joining societies, holding mem- 
bership in the Psi Epsilon and the Univer- 
sity Club. He is now a member of the 
Bar Association, the Eagles, and the Elks. 

Hr. Jenney is unmarried, and lives in 
the Third Ward. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



75 




Photo by Strauss. 

GARLAND MORDECAI JONES 
was born June 14, 1873, i n Abingdon, Vir- 
ginia. He was taken by his father to Mis- 
sissippi while young, and entered the pub- 
lic schools of that State as a pupil. After 
his graduation from the common schools 
he was sent to University of Mississippi, 
and the degree of A.B. was conferred upon 
him in 1893 and a year later that of L.L.B. 
Soon after he enrolled as a student of 
Washington and Lee University, taking 
the law course. Even before taking the 
law course he was reading law at home 
and under the supervision of local attor- 
neys, devoting odd hours and vacations to 
the task. He graduated from Washing- 
ton and Lee, and was admitted to the bar 
of Mississippi soon after. After his ad- 
mittance to the bar, Mr. Jones took up 
practice of his profession at West Point, 
Miss. He met with a fair degree of suc- 
cess, but the more strenuous and wider 
fields of the West appealed to him, and he 
decided to come to Kansas City. He did 
so in 1898, following the footsteps of his 
brother, R. W. Jones, Jr., and entered into 
practice here on his arrival. 

While at school, Mr. Jones became af- 
filiated with the Greek Letter Society, Del- 
ta Kappa Epsilon, and he is also a mem- 
ber of the University Club and the Jack- 
son County Democratic Club. 

Mr. Jones is unmarried. Ja 




HORATIO SEYMOUR JONES 
was born August 26, 1867, in Liberty, 
Clay County, Missouri. His family re- 
moved to Kansas City three years after 
his birth, and his education was secured 

in the public schools of this city. After 
his term of school here he attended Wil- 
liam Jewell College in Liberty, Mo., tak- 
ing the classical course, and was gradu- 
asanA.B. in 1884. His father, Dr. L. J. 
Jones, was one of the pioneer physicians 
of this city, and helped organize the first 
medical society the town ever had. He 
was also one of the organizers of the Kan- 
sas City Medical College, and was in many 
respects among the foremost of local phy- 
sicians. From him young James inherit- 
ed a liking for medicine, and soon after his 
graduation from William Jewell College 
he took up the study of the profession at 
the University Medical College. He grad- 
uated from that institution in 1888, and 
entered immediately on professional prac- 
tice. He was stationed at the Wabash 
Railroad Company's hospital in this city 
and Springfield, 111., as house surgeon, 
and afterwards held the same post at the 
Memphis Railroad Company's hospital in 
Kansas City and Memphis, Tenn. He 
then took up regular practice. 

Dr. Jones is a member and physician of 
Mayflower Camp, Royal Neighbors of 
America, holds membership in the Modern 
Woodmen of America, and the Masons, 
the Missouri State Medical Association, 
the American Medical Association, Clay 
County Medical Association, and Tri 
County Medical Association, composed of 
Clav, Platte, and Clinton counties. 



76 



1//;V 117/0 MADE KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

ARTHUR L. JELLEY 

was born in Windsor, Canada, May 25, 
1876, the son of a railroad man. His boy- 
hood days, therefore, were spent in vari- 
ous parts of the country, but for the most 
part in Des Moines, la., where he received 
a thorough public school education. He 
served as a page in the Iowa Legislature 
during the assemblies of 1890 and 1892, 
and in 1S91 worked in a wholesale grocery 
store. In 1893 he came to Kansas City, 
and his first employment was with the J. 

C. Dold Packing Company in a rather 
humble way. He soon went out as ad- 
vance agent for Mabel Jenness Venter, 
but quitting that after six months se- 
cured a position in the office of the 
Schwar/schild & Sulzberger Packing Com- 
pany. In 1896 he bought out Wolf, of 
the firm of Wolf & Schull, tailors, and 
the firm of Schull & Jelley was started 
with a capital of S47. The business in- 
creased steadily, until soon three stores 
were being operated, but in March, 1902, 
they were consolidated into one large 
Main Street store, and the business incor- 
porated with a capital stock of $25,000, 
all paid in. 

Mr. Jelley and Mr. Schull also do a lot 
of building on the side, many a house in 
Kansas City having been put up by them. 

Mr. Jelley is an Elk, an Eagle, a Mason, 
a Knight Templar, a Shriner, and a mem- 
ber of the Commercial Club. 

He is unmarried, and lives at the Elks' 
Club. 




WILLIAM T. JAMISON 
was born in Washington County, Penn, 
sylvania, November 16, 1858, living on a 
farm in his boyhood and attending dis- 
trict school. He went to Washington 
and Jefferson College, and was graduated 
from the University of Michigan Law 
School in 1884. Following graduation, 
he taught school five years, and then be- 
gan the practice of law at Wheeling, W. 
Va. 

It was April 6, 1886, that he came to 
Kansas City and entered the law office of 
L. C. Slavens, four years later becoming a 
member of the firm of Slavens, Spotts- 
wood & Jamison. This partnership con- 
tinued until January, 1895, when Mr. 
Jamison was elected Prosecuting Attor- 
ney of Jackson County by the Republi- 
cans. In 1894 he represented the Seventh 
Ward in the lower house of the Council, 
was Speaker of the House, resigning that 
position to become Prosecuting Attorney. 

Mr. Jamison was married February 17, 
1886, to Miss Anna M. Whitely. They 
have one son, Howard L., fourteen years 
old. 



MEN WHO ABE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



77 




Photo by Thomson. 

ELLIOTT H. JONES, 
a young lawyer who has risen rapidly, 
was born at Camden, Alabama, July 18, 
1870. He resided there until he was fif- 
teen years old, when he went to Cam- 
bridge, Mass., and prepared for college in 
the Latin School. For two years suc- 
ceeding this he was in the employ of 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 0. H. Houghton 
of that company being his uncle. He en- 
tered Vanderbilt University at Nashville, 
Tenn., in 1887, took the degree of A.B. in 
1891 and the degree of L.L.B. in 1893. 
August i, 1893, he came to Kansas City, 
and entered the law office of W. C. Scar- 
ritt. The firm of Scarritt, Griffith & 
Jones was organized January 1, 1896. 

Mr. Jones was married December 27, 
1894, to Miss Mattie Scarritt. They 
have three children, Elliott Scarritt, Rus- 
sell Houghton, and Paul, aged seven, 
five, and two. 

Mr. Jones is a member of the Bar Asso- 
ciation, and takes a lively interest in 
athletics. 




JOSEPH VAN CLIEF KARNES 
was born on a farm in Boone County, Mis- 
souri, in February, 1841. From the dis- 
trict schools he entered the State Univer- 
sity in 1877, and was graduated with high 
honors in 1862. Immediately thereafter 
he enrolled himself in the Harvard Law 
School, but left it in his first year to ac- 
cept a Greek and Latin tutorship in the 
Missouri University. In 1865, upon re- 
signing, he was given an A.M. degree. 
During his tutorship he had studied law 
and been admitted to the bar, and in Au- 
gust, 1865, he came to Kansas City in com- 
pany with Henry N. Ess, and formed the 
law firm of Karnes & Ess, which continued 
for twenty-one years. He is now head of 
the firm of Karnes, New & Krauthoff. 

Few men have done more for Kansas 
City than Mr. Karnes. As a member of 
the" school Board, he stood for progress 
and non-partisanship, and worked early 
and late in the development of Kansas 
City's magnificent educational system, 
and the upbuilding of the great Public Li- 
brary. As chairman of the Commercial 
Club Committee on Municipal Legislation, 
he has also labored, and he was also one of 
the organizers of the Provident Associa- 
tion. He helped to found the Kansas City 
Bar Association, and was its president for 
three terms, and was also one of the foun- 
ders of the Kansas City Law Library. 

Mr. Karnes married Miss Mary Crum- 
baugh, of Columbia, and they have three 
children, a son and two daughters. 



I 



7« 



MBA 7 WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Thomson. 

GEORGE E. KESSLER 
was born in Frankenhausen, Thueringen, 
Germany, July 16, 1862. His family re- 
moved to New York City when he was in 
his infancy, and he secured his education 
in the public schools of Gotham. He af- 
terwards went to the University of Jena, 
Germany, where he took a partial classic- 
al course, going from there to Weimar and 
Potsdam colleges for a four years' course 
in gardening, botany, and engineering, 
preparatory to taking up landscape engin- 
eering. He returned to New York after 
graduating in 1SS2, and took charge of 
some special work in Central Park, leav- 
ing after several months' residence for 
this city. Soon after arriving he was 
placed in charge of Merriam Park by the 
Ft. Scott & Gulf Railroad. 

As engineer of the Board of Public 
Works, he planned Kansas City's magnifi- 
cent park and boulevard system, having 
been engineer of the board since its incep- 
tion in 1892. He also planned the park 
systems of Topeka, and Memphis, Tenn., 
and the landscape work at Mt. Washington 
and originated and remodeled features of 
Elm wood and Forest Hill cemeteries, be- 
sides doing a raft of local and out-of-town 
lawn work. 

At present he is superintendent of parks 
for the Frisco System; landscape engineer 
of the World's Fair in St. Louis, in charge 
of the work; and is taking care of the Fris- 
co System's forestry experiment at Farm- 
ington, Kas. 

Mr. Kessler is a Mason and an Elk. He 
was married May 14, 1900, to Miss Ida G. 
Fields, of St. Louis, Mo. 




Photo bij Strauss. 

WILLIAM THORNTON KEMPER 
was born in Gallatin, Missouri, November 
2, 1867, and lived there until seventeen 
years old, when his parents moved to St. 
Joseph. 

He was educated in the public and high 

schools, and began his business career 
as salesman for a boot and shoe house- 
After four years on the road, he started a 
bank and general store in Valley Falls 
Kas., where he remained until 1893, when 
he came to Kansas City and formed the 
Kemper Grain Company. 

Mr. Kemper was president of the Grain 
Exchange in 1900, and in February, 1902, 
was appointed a member of the Board of 
Police Commissioners by Governor Dock- 
ery. 

He is also a director in the National 
Bank of Commerce, president of the Kem- 
per Investment Company, and operates 
department stores in Leavenworth, To- 
peka, and Valley Falls. 

In 1890 he married Miss Lottie Crosby, 
of Valley Falls, Kas., and is the father of 
two children, James M. and Rufus Crosby. 

Mr. Kemper is a member of the Com- 
mercial Club, and is prominently identified 
with the political and business organiza- 
tions of Kansas City. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



79 




Photo by Thomson. 

WILLIAM FREDERICK KUHN 
was born in Lyons, New York, April 15, 
1S49. When he was eight years old his 
parents removed to a farm in Kalamazoo 
County, Michigan, where he remained un- 
til his majority. He was graduated in 
1875 from Wittenburg College, receiving 
the degree of A.B., and later had the de- 
gree of A. M. conferred upon him. He 
taught school in Ohio until 1S62, when he 
entered the Jefferson Medical College in 
Philadelphia, receiving his diploma in 
1864. He first practiced in Eldorado, 
Kas., but came to Kansas City in 1S88, 
where he has since been engaged in the 
practice of medicine. For several years 
prior to 1893 Dr. Kuhn occupied the chair 
of materia medica and therapeutics in the 
University Medical College, and from 1 893 
to 1899 he held the chair of neurology in 
the Medico-Chirurgical College and the 
Women's Medical College. He is presi- 
dent of the Kansas City School of Medi- 
cine and a member of the faculty of the 
Western Dental College. 

He has been honored with more offices 
and degrees in Masonry, perhaps, than any 
other man in Kansas City. 

Dr. Kuhn was twice married. His first 
wife was Elizabeth C. Wilson, of Belle 
Centre, Ohio, who bore him two children, 
Elizabeth and Harold. She died in 1887, 
and October 21, 1891, he married Miss 
Jessie O. Wilson. 




Photo by Strauss. 



I. B. KIMBRELL 

was born in Irving, Kentucky, September 
8, 1862. He first went to school at Avers' 
Academy, College Hill, Ky., and in 1872 
his father, a farmer, removed to Galloway 
County, Missouri. 

The subject of this sketch finished his 
education at Central College, Fayette, 
Mo., completing his course with unusual 
credit. 

Mr. Kimbrell began the practice of law 
when he was twenty-four years old, locat- 
ing in Aurora, Mo., and from there went to 
Webb City, where he practiced for a while. 
In 1 89 1 he came to Kansas City, where 
he has ever since remained. 

Mr. Kimbrell has always been an active 
worker for the success of the Republican 
party, and in 1901 his party loyalty was 
rewarded and his ability recognized by 
appointment to the position of Assistant 
Prosecuting Attorney. 

He married Miss Lillian Lease in 1888 
at Centralia, Mo., and is the father of four 
children, Kate, Lorna, Marian, James 



H 



8o 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

FREDERICK W. KELLOGG 
was born in Norwalk, Ohio, December ;, 
1866. He lived in that city until seven- 
teen years of age, acquiring meanwhile an 
education in the public schools of the town. 
After a course in the High School he went 
to work for one of the Scripps papers, the 
Cleveland Press, and has been continu- 
ously in the newspaper business since that 
time. He worked for the various papers 
in the Scripps League in different depart- 
ments, and acquired an intimate knowl- 
edge of the business from the ground up. 
He is an advertising expert, and has been 
an unqualified success as a solicitor and 
designer of "catchy" advertising. 

He became a joint proprietor of the 
Omaha News in connection with M. L. V. 
Ashbaugh in 1899, and in the same year 
the two assumed proprietorship of the St. 
Paul News. The following year they ab- 
sorbed the Kansas City World, and this 
year, 1902, they became the proprietors 
of the Des Moines News. Mr. Kellogg 
is president of the various corporations, 
and is besides a stockholder in the Scripps- 
McRea Association. 

He is a Scottish Rite Mason and a Shri- 
ner. He was married in 1S90 to Miss 
Florence Scripps in Detroit, and has three 
children. 




HENRY G. KYLE 

was born September 20, 1872, in Bates 
County, Missouri. His first years were 
spent on a farm. He attended William 
Jewell College for six years, graduating in 
1897. Then he took a two-year law course 
at the University of Kansas, from which 
he was graduated in 1899. That same 
year he was admitted to the bar, and came 
to Kansas City. His connection with sev- 
eral important murder trials as counsel 
for the defense has given him a reputation 
as a criminal lawyer. 

Mr. Kyle represented the Kansas Law 
School at the State Bar Association meet- 
ing at Topeka in 1899. 

Since coming to Kansas City he has 
identified himself actively with the workers 
in the Republican party. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY 




Photo by Strauss. 

DR. J. PHILIP KNOCHE 

was born in Jackson County, Missouri, 
July 25, 1859. He was educated in the 
Kansas City public schools and at Spald" 
ing's Business College. His first course 
in medicine was taken at the Kansas City 
Medical College. Afterwards he attended 
the Belleview Hospital Medical College 
of Xew York, and in 1883 went to the 
University of Vienna in Austria, where he 
took a post-graduate course of three years. 

Meanwhile he had begun practicing med- 
icine in 1881, first in partnership with Wal- 
ter R. Fisher and later with Dr. J. D. Grif- 
fith. 

Dr. Knoche makes a specialty of skin 
diseases, and is serving his third term as 
professor of Dermatology in the University 
Medical College. He is a member of the 
Jackson County Medical Society, the 
Academy of Medicine, and the Missouri 
State Medical Association. 




Photo by St muss. 

LUCIUS KNIGHT 
was born July 5, 1850, in Washtenaw 
County, Michigan. His boyhood was 
spent on a farm, and his early education 
received in a country school. When he 
was seventeen years old his parents re- 
moved to Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he 
entered the high school, and was gradu- 
ated. 

In 1S71 he enrolled himself as a student 
in the law school of the University of Mich- 
igan, and was graduated in the spring of 
1873. For four years he practiced his 
profession in Central and Northern Mich- 
igan, at the end of which time he removed 
to Arkansas City, Kas. While studying 
law he also studied stenography, and nev- 
er allowed himself to forget his proficiency. 
In Arkansas City he was appointed court 
stenographer by Judge W. P. Campbell, 
of the Thirteenth Judicial District Court, 
and was later re-appointed by Judge Ed- 
win Torrance. 

In 1 88 1 he resigned his position and 
came to Kansas City, where he engaged 
in general short-hand work until 1882, 
when he was appointed Court Stenogra- 
pher of Division No. 1 by Judge Turner A. 
Gill. He held the same position under 
Judge R. H. Field, Judge E. L. Scarritt, 
and now holds it under Judge James Gib- 
son. 

Mr. Knight married Miss Mary A. Clark, 
of St. Louis, June 29, 1S92, and they have 
three children living, Stewart C, Ralph 
A., and Helen J. 



82 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Thomson. 

LATHROP KARNES 

was born in Kansas City, Missouri, July, 
31, 1868, and has lived his whole life in 
the town. He attended the local public 
schools, and then entered Central High 
School, from where he was graduated in 
1873. He then attended the Kemper 
School in Booneville, receiving his diplo- 
ma from that institution in 1S86. 

He at once went to work, securing em- 
ployment with the Kansas City, Pitts- 
burg & Gulf road as a member of the en- 
gineering corps. He remained with that 
corporation for five years, rising steadily 
until at the time of his resignation in 1894 
he occupied the position of assistant gen- 
eral claim agent. 

In 1S04 lie went with the Grand Av- 
enue Cable Railway as assistant claim 
agent, and when the consolidation of the 
street-car lines was brought about in 1896 
he remained with the Metropolitan Street 
Railway Company as general claim agent. 

In 1000 he was appointed assistant gen- 
eral manager of the Kansas City Electric 
Light Company, and in 1902 was made 
assistant to the secretary and treasurer 
of the Metropolitan. 

Mr. Karnes is an Elk, a thirty-second 
degree Mason, a Knight Templar, and a 
member of the Shrine. 




JAMES KETNER 
was born in Leavenworth, Kansas, Feb- 
ruary 5, 1869. While still in his infancy 
his family removed to Junction City, Kas., 
where his father, Major Ketner, early 
gained fame as one of the leading practi- 
tioners at the bar of central Kansas. Mr. 
Ketner passed his life up to early man- 
hood there, meanwhile acquiring an educa- 
tion in the public schools of the town, and 
finally graduating from the High School. 
Soon after his graduation he went into the 
banking business, going afterwards to 
Minneapolis, Kas., to engage in the same 
business, holding the position of cashier 
of the First National Bank of Minneapolis. 
In January, 1S94, Mr. Ketner came to 
Kansas City to become the auditor of the 
Midland Hotel, and three years later was 
made its secretary. He retained this po- 
sition through a number of changes of man- 
agement, and in August, 1902, formed a 
partnership with Gnstave Beraud, and as- 
sumed management of the hotel. In a 
few months the business had increased to 
a point where the Baltimore Hotel Com- 
pany found it expedient to absorb the Mid- 
land. Mr. Ketner, however, is still re- 
tained by the owners to look after their 
interests under the lease. 

He is a Mason, a Shriner, and a member 
of the local lodge of Elks. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



«3 




CHARLES H. KIRSHXER 
was born in Fostoria. Ohio, June 25, 1863. 
He attended the public schools in that 

town, also the local academy, and later 
on took a classical course at Oberlin Col- 
lege. From this institution he went to 
the Cincinnati Law School, receiving his 
degree in 1888. 

Mr. Kirshner first practiced his profes- 
sion in Salina, Kansas, remaining in that 
town from 1888 to 1890, coming to Kan- 
sas City in the latter year. For twelve 
months he was connected in practice with 
the late Thomas Jones, and then officed 
alone until igoo, when he became junior 
member of the firm of Beardsley, Gregory 
& Kirshner, an affiliation that still con- 
tinues. 

Mr. Kirshner belongs to the University 
Club, is a Mason, and also belongs to the 
Knights of Pythias. In addition, the 
various public movements have always 
elicited his energy and received his sup- 
port. 

He was married in 1889 to Miss Agnes 
Fairchild, eldest daughter of Dr. George 
Fairchild, president of the Kansas State 
Agri-cultural College. They have two 
children — Charlotte, six years old, and 
Robert, aged two. 




JACOB L. LORTE 
was born in Xatchez, Mississippi, Febru- 
ary 18, 1 87 2. He is practically a Kansas 
City product, however, as his father, Xath- 
an Lorie, came here in 1880. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
public schools and then the Central High 
School, from which institution he was 
graduated with high honors in 1891. 

Mr. Lorie went from Central to Ann Ar- 
bor, where he completed the six years' 
course in five years. He received his B.L. 
degree in 1895, and in 1S96 had his law de- 
gree conferred upon him. 

He returned to Kansas City, where he at 
once commenced the practice of his pro- 
fession. Mr. Lorie 's specialty is com- 
mercial law, and he has already established 
himself firmly. He is a member of the lo- 
cal Bar Association, and also belongs to 
the Knife and Fork Club. 

While at Ann Arbor Mr. Lorie served as 
managing editor of the University of Mich- 
igan daily paper, and made it powerful 
and profitable. 






MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 





J'hoto by Strauss. 

GARDINER LATHROP 
was born at Waukesha, Wisconsin, Feb- 
uary 16, 1850. His father, John W. La- 
throp, was the first president of the State 
University of Missouri, and the first chan- 
cellor of the State University of Wiscon- 
sin. Mr. Lathrop is one of the most wide- 
ly known lawyers in the State. His boy- 
hood was spent at Madison, Wis. He is a 
graduate of Yale, '69; the Missouri State 
University, '67 ; and received a law de- 
gree at Harvard in '73. 

Mr. Lathrop opened his office in Kan- 
sas City September 1, 1873, his various 
firms having been Lathrop & Smith; Lath- 
rop, Smith & Morrow; Lathrop, Morrow 
& Fox; Lathrop, Morrow, Fox & Moore. 

He was president of the Bar Association 
in 1S95, is president of the Yale Alumni 
Association of the Southwest, a member 
of the Commercial Club and Board of Ed- 
ucation, and is vice-president of the Board 
of Curators of the Missouri State Uni- 
versity. 

Mr. Lathrop was married to Miss Eva 
Grant, of Kansas City, January 16, 1879. 
They have five children. He has been so- 
licitor for the A., T. & S. F. Railroad for 
Missouri and Iowa many years. His firm 
is counsel for the Kansas City Southern 
also. Mr. Lathrop also represents the 
Pullman and Wells-Fargo companies. 




Photo by Thomson. 

SANFORD BURRITT LADD, 
one of the foremost members of the bar 
and a lawyer of rare ability, was born at 
Milford, Michigan, September 11, 1844. 
He was educated at the University of 
Michigan, and began the study of law 
under the Hon. G. V. N. Lothrop, of De- 
troit, afterwards Minister to Russia. 

Mr. Ladd was admitted to the bar in 
Michigan in 1868, and in the same year lo- 
cated at Kansas City. The following year 
he formed a partnership with John C. 

Gage, into which Chas. E. Small was ad- 
mitted in 1882, composing the well-known 
firm of Gage, Ladd & Small. 

Mr. Ladd was president of the Kansas 
City Bar Association from 1892 to 1893, 
and his friends have urged him to make 
the raee for the Supreme Bench on the Re- 
publican ticket. 

In 1870 Mr. Ladd was married to Miss 
Clara L. Fuller, the sweetheart of his col- 
lege days, at Ann Arbor. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ladd reside in one of the handsomest res- 
idences in Hyde Park. 

Mr. Ladd is noted at the bar for his 
clear, concise presentation of a case, dem- 
onstrating the possession of an analytical 
mind. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



85 




Pltoto bij Strauss. 

JOHN H. LUCAS 
was born in Danville, Kentucky, February 
8, 1852. He attended the public schools 
and then took a course in Center College 
Deciding upon the profession of law, he 
entered an office in Harrodsburg, Ky., 
and was admitted to the bar in Kentucky 
in 1 87 1. The same year he came out to 
Missouri, and located in Osceola, and was 
admitted to the bar in this State in 1872. 

It was in 1879 that Mr. Lucas establi- 
lished an office in Kansas City in partner- 
ship with W. T.. Johnson, and the firm of 
Johnson & Lucas has continued ever since. 
While the majority of his time is spent in 
Kansas City, Mr. Lucas still retains his 
residence in Osceola. 

He is general attorney for the Metropol- 
itan Street Railway, and attorney for the 
Frisco System, and has long been regard- 
ed as one of the leaders at the Missouri 
bar. 

Mr. Lucas married Miss Nannie Cardwell 
in Harrodsburg, Ky., in 1869, and they 
have four children, one boy and three 
girls. 

He belongs to the Knife and Fork Club, 
the Kansas City Bar Association, and is a 
Mason, a Knight Templar, and a Shriner. 




Photo by Strauss. 

WILLIAM EDWARD LYONS 
was born November 21, 187 1, in Emporia, 
Kansas. His early boyhood days, how- 
ever, were spent in Niles, Mich., where his 
family removed in his infancy. 

From Niles the family returned to Em- 
poria, and from there went to Osage City, 
in the same State. In 1887 they came to 
Kansas City, where the subject of this 
sketch has ever since lived. His education 
was received in the public schools, and it 
was in his early teens that he commenced 
to earn his own living. 

His first employment was with the Al- 
len Investment Company. Entering as an 
office boy, he worked up place by place 
until in 1 898 he was made secretary of the 

company, the place he now holds. 

Mr. Lyons is a member of the Commer- 
cial Club, and also belongs to the Knife 
and Fork Club, and the Knights of Co- 
lumbus. One of the moving spirits in the 
organization of the Kansas City Athletic 
Club, he has held office after office in that 
club, and islargely responsible for its 
growth and prosperity. 

He is unmarried, and lives with his 
parents. 






A'/:.V WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Thomson. 

HERMAN F. LANG 

was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, July 2, 1858. 
He spent his youth there, and received 
his education in the public and high 
schools. In 1876, when eighteen year 
old, he came out to Leavenworth, Kas., 
where he engaged in business. In 1886 
he removed to Kansas City, and estab- 
lished the saddlery business of H. F. 
Lang & Co. In 1894 he beccame sec- 
retary and treasurer of the Morrill-Keitz 
Furnishing Goods Company, which does 
business not only in Kansas City, but 

tributary territory. 

Since his advent, Mr. Lang has alway 
been active in movements tending to 
make for Kansas City's growth and 
prosperity. He was one of the organ- 
izers of the Kansas City Karnival Krewe, 
and in 1902 was elected a member of 
the board of directors of Convention 
Hall, and is now serving on the Exec- 
tive Committee. Mr. Lang is also a 
member of the Commercial Club, the 
United Commercial Travelers, and the 
Manufacturers' Association. 

He was married to Miss Kate Dickson 
in Leavenworth Ka., December 1, 1891, 
and they have three children, two boys 
and one girl. 




Photo by Strauss. 

CHARLES W. LUCAS 
was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
January 2, 1870. He attended the public 
schools and also the High School in De- 
troit, to which town his parents had re- 
moved. Later he enrolled himself as a 
student in the Northwestern University 
and from there entered the Chicago Col- 
lege of Law. He took his degree in 1895 
and after two years of practice associated 
himself with Mr. Max Pam. He remained 
with Mr. Pam for three years, and in 1900 
came to Kansas City to accept the position 
of assistant general attorney of the Kan- 
sas City Southern Railroad, the office he 
now holds. 

Mr. Lucas belongs to the Phi Delta Phi 
Fraternity, and since coming to Kansas 
City has identified himself with several of 
the local organizations. 

Mr. Lucas married Miss Eva Lane, of 
Minneapolis, and they have one boy. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



87 




Photo by Strauss. 

JOHN MARION LANGSDALE 
was born June 17, 1856, on a farm in 
Monroe County, Missouri. His early ed- 
ucation was received in the district school 
during the winter months, and when fif- 
teen he entered a private school in Macon. 
From there he went to the State Univer- 
sity at Columbia, and after completing his 
course entered the Missouri Medical Col- 
lege at St. Louis, now a part of Washing- 
ton University. He was graduated in 
1878, and first practiced in Independence, 
Mo., coming to Kansas City in 1888. 

Dr. Langsdale was elected Coroner of 
Jackson County in 1890, and served two 
terms. He is now City Physician, hav- 
ing been appointed in February, 1902. 

He is also vice-president of the Missouri 
Medical Association, and during the years 
°f '95. '96, '97, published and edited the 
Lancet. 

He is a thirty-second degree Scottish 
Rite Mason, and a Shriner. 
- Dr. Langsdale was married in 1878 to 
Miss Kate Gibson, of Paris, Mo., and is the 
father of five children, Byron, Clifton, 
John M., Jr., ("dbson, and Margaret. 




Photo by Strauss. 

LOUIS AUGUSTINE LAUGHLIN "7 
was born September n, 1857, at Medina, 
Ohio. After six years in Putnam County, 
Illinois, he went to Racine, Wis., one year, 
and moved to Normal, 111., in 1866, where 
he attended the State University. He 
was graduated from the Princeton High 
School in 1877, and for a few years was a 
telegraph operator and station agent. 
He was graduated from the Columbia 
Law School in New York in 1882, Presi- 
dent Roosevelt being his classmate. He 
was admitted to the bar at Saginaw, Mich., 
in August, 1882, and practiced there five 
years, coming to Kansas City in 1887. 
Webster Davis became his law partner in 
1893. In 1895 Mr. Laughlin became As- 
sistant Counselor under Judge McDougal. 
He was again appointed to the office in 
January 1, 1901. 

Mr. Laughlin was married to Emma A. 
Kendall at Lamville, 111., February 10, 
1887. They have one child, Kendall, 
twelve years old. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




I'hnto by Strauss. 

JOSEPH MACAULEY LOWE 
was horn in Pendleton County, Kentucky, 
December 13, 1844, both father and moth- 
er before him having been born in Ken- 
tucky. His common school education 
was interrupted by the call to arms, and 
he enlisted in the Confederate army. 

As a teacher in the school at Greenfield, 
Ind., he advanced his own education, and 
read law during every leisure moment, 
finally gaining admission to the bar in 
1865. In 1868 he moved to Plattsburg, 
Mo., where he practiced his profession un- 
til 1883, winning so high a place in 
the esteem of the community that he was 
elected four times to the office of Prose- 
cuting Attorney of Clinton County. In 
1883 he came to Kansas City, where he has 
ever since lived. In 1889 Judge Lowe 
was appointed receiver of the National 
Exchange Bank, and paid depositors in 
full and stockholder as handsome divi- 
dend. He has not been engaged in the 
active practice of his profession for some 
years, devoting most of his time to the 
management of his own affairs. He is a 
staunch, but progressive, Democrat, and 
a remarkably strong speaker and vigorous 
writer, his addresses and articles having 
won him wide recognition for ability. 

He was married in 1876 to Miss Mary E. 
McWilliams, of Madison County, Ken- 
tucky, and they have two children, John 
Roger and Florence Marion, the latter 
now Mrs. Hughes Bryant. 




GEORGE BAKER LONGAN 
was born February 26, 1848, in Palestine, 
Cooper County, Missouri. When five 
years old his parents removed to a farm 
in Benton County, where he spent his boy- 
hood. His instruction, received at the 
district schools, was supplemented by a 
two years' course in Allen Institute, Far- 
mer City, Missouri, and a term at the Pra- 
rie Home Academy. He then attended 
Kentucky University, at Lexington, where 
he remained until 1870. Returning to Mis- 
souri, he began to teach school, and has 
been following that profession ever since, 
with the exception of two years, during 
which he acted as chief clerk in the Adju- 
tant General's office in Jefferson City.and 
later private secretary for Governor Silas 
Woodson. 

Professor Longan taught school in vari- 
ous Missouri towns, and had charge of the 
schools at Holden just prior to his coming 
to Kansas City. His local career com 
menced as principal of the Washington 
School in 1880. He remained there for 
seven years, then was made principal of 
the Humboldt School, and in 1899 was ap- 
pointed to the positton of Assistant Super- 
intendent of Schools. Professor Longa is 
not only widely known as an educator, but 
is a valued contributor to educational 
journals, and has read many papers be- 
fore the educational associations. His 
"First Lessons in Arithmetic" has also had 
a wide sale. 

He married Miss Emma Lard in 1870 
and they have three sons, Roy, Wood, and 
George. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



8y 




Photo by Strauss. 

CHRISTOPHER B. LEAVEI, 
was born in Newmarket, Platte County, 
Missouri, March 18, 1871. His boyhood 
was spent in Platte County, his early ed- 
cation being secured in the public schools 
of Newmarket, with a later course in the 
Daughters' College in Platte City, from 
which he was graduated in 18S8. 

Deciding upon dentistry as a profes- 
sion, he came to Kansas City, and entered 
the Western Dental College, taking the de- 
gree in 1892. He located here, and has 
risen to a position of enviable prominence 
in his profession. 

In addition to his practice, Mr. Leavel 
is secretary of the Leavenworth Construc- 
tion Company, and also secretary of the 
Winner Real Estate Company. 

A life-long Democrat, Dr. Leavel has 

identified himself prominently with the 

local organization, and in 1901 served as 

a member of the County Central Com- 
mittee. 

Dr. Leavel was married June 26, 1895, 
to Miss Ida Winner, daughter of Willard 
E. Winner, and they have two children, 
a girl and a boy. 




Plioto ly Strauss. 

JOHN F. LUMPKIN 
was born in Baltimore, Maryland, Decem- 
23, 1858. He spent his boyhood there, 
absorbing knowledge through attend- 
ance at the common and high schools of 
the town, and afterwards went to Stewart 
Hall in Baltimore to complete the classic- 
al course. He engaged in the hat busi- 
ness in Baltimore after leaving school, and 
remained at it for some time. In 1885 he 
went to Xew York city, and took employ- 
ment with George H. Clark, the wholesale 
hatter, with whom he remained for four 
years. He came to this city in 1889, and 
traveled the following year for Turner & 
Jay, but left them to engage in business 
for himself. This business he gave up 
after a short time to take the management 
of the local branch of Xicoll, the large New 
York tailoring company. He has re- 
mained with them since. 

Mr. Lumpkin was not particularly in- 
terested in politics, but finding himself 
with a few grievances which he thought he 
could remedy as a member of the Council, 
he sought and was given the Democratic 
nomination for Alderman of his home 
ward, the Third. After a vigorous cam- 
paign he was elected for the term begin- 
ning in April 1902. 

Mr. Lumpkin belongs to a number of 
clubs whose ends are devoted to business 
and social features, among them the Com- 
mercial Club, the Jackson County Demo- 
cratic Club, the Advertising Men's Club, 
the Knife and Fork Club, and the Evans- 
ton Golf Club. He is also an Elk. 



9o 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

FRANCIS A. LEACH 
was born at Belfast, New York, April 8, 
1854. His father was for years in business 
at Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mr. Leach prepared for College at the 
Hopkins Grammar School at New Haven, 

and was graduated from Yale in 1876 in 
the same class with President Arthur T. 
Hadley. 

For three years he was in the milling 
business in New York, and then went to 
the Columbia Law School. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar in Buffalo, June, 1881. 

It was at Lyons, N. Y.,that Mr. Leach 
first hung out his shingle, and it was there 
that he married Miss Marian Tinsley. 
After live years there, Mr. Leach moved to 
Kansas City in 1886, where he has been a 
member of the bar ever since. In 1897 
the present firm of Leach, Day & Sparks 
was organized. 

Mr. Leach is secretary of the Congres- 
sional Committee, is a prominent Mason, 
and is an able and ardent advocate of mu- 
nicipal ownership, a subject upon which he 
has delivered numerous addresses from 
time to time. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leach have two children, 
Marian and Helen, aged sixteen and fif- 
teen. 




CHARLES W. LAKE 

was born in Butler, Mo., December 3, 
1866, and has lived in Missouri all his life, 
with the exception of the years from 1867 
to 1672, when his parents resided in 
Springfield, Illinois. He spent his boy- 
hood in Carthage, Mo., where he received 
his education. 

In 18S7 he came to Kansas City, and 
accepted the position of assistant cashier 
with the old firm of G. Y. Smith & Co., 
where he remained until the dissolution 
of the company in 1892. In November, 
1893, Mr. Lake entered the employment 
of the Kansas City Times, then under the 
management of Witten McDonald, and 
during his eight years of service with that 
paper worked under six different man- 
agers and six different managements. 

In October, 1901, Mr. Lake became in- 
terested in trade-journalism, and in com- 
pany with Mr. Will Stricklette and Mr. 
Frank Markward incorporated the Kansas 
City Manufacturer, owned by them, under 
the title of the Manufacturing Publishing 

Company. He is secretary and treasurer 
of the company. 

Mr. Lake is also interested in mining, 
and has been singularly successful, both 
in the zinc fields of Missouri and the gold 
fields of Boulder, Colo. He has lately 
become interested in the Oronogo dis- 
district, also in the Fortuna district, near 
Tipton. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



9' 





Photo hy Thomson. 



Photo by Thomson. 

FELIX LA FORCE 
was born in Boone County, Missouri, Au- 
gust 21, 1847, his parents, natives of Ken- 
tucky, being pioneer settlers in that sec- 
tion. His education was received in the 
district schools, and at the age of fifteen 
he commenced to earn his own living, ac- 
cepting a position as clerk in a dry goods 
store in Columbia. He remained there 
for twenty years, working up to a junior 
partnership. 

In February, 1881, Mr. La Force came 
to Kansas City, and in partnership with 

W. B. Grimes, \V. S. Woods, and James 
H. Dayton founded the wholesale dry 
goods company of Grimes, Woods, La 
Force & Co., and became its buyer and 
general manager. In 1863 Mr. Grimes 
bought out his partners, but Mr. La Force 
remained as buyer until 1885, when he 
joined with his brother, Mr. W. B. La 
Force, in the banking and general broker- 
age business. He is now in the general 
brokerage business by himself. 

Mr. La Force was one of the early mem- 
bers of the Kansas City Club, and has ev- 
er given freely of his time to public move- 
ments. He was elected a member of the 
Convention Hall Directorate in 1901 and 
re-elected in 1902. He is also a charter 
member and director in the Union Na- 
tional Bank. 

Mr. La Force married Miss Ella Estill, 
of Howard County, Missouri, in February, 
1S81. 



JOHN E. LACH 

was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
April 2, 1858. All his schooling was se- 
cured in the public schools of Philadelphia. 
He graduated from the High School of that 
city, and went to work immediately there- 
after for his father, who at that time con- 
ducted a large carpet manufacturing bus- 
iness. He remained with his father for 
years, learning the carpet business thor- 
oughly and acquiring knowledge of its com- 
mercial side He came to this city in 1882, 
and started a retail carpet store, the busi- 
ness being devoted exclusively to the sale 
of floor coverings, at the corner of Tenth 
and Walnut streets. The store at that 
time was on the southern edge of the city 
business limits, and as the city grew south- 
ward Mr. Leach gradually extended the 
business until he had for sale everything 
in the household goods line. After some 
years at his first location he moved the 
business over on Grand Avenue, where it 
has remained since. 

Mr. Lach is a Republican in politics, 
and as a reward for his zeal in the party's 
welfare was nominated and elected to the 
upper house of the City Council, serving 
the term from 1898 to 1900. 

His business interests are not confined 
to his store, for Mr. Lach is a director in 
the German-American Bank, the German- 
American Building and Loan Association 
and the German Hospital Association. 

He is married, having wedded Miss Pris- 
cilla Tally. They have one child, Mar- 
guerite. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 





Photo by Thomson. 

HUGH J. McGOWAN 

was born in 1856 on a farm near Liberty, 
in Clay County, Missouri. He was edu- 
cated in the district schools, and worked 
in the fields until he reached the age of 
nineteen. In 1895 there came the plague 
of grasshoppers, and young Hugh grew dis- 
gusted with farming and came to Kansas 
City. His first job was raking cinders 
from under a Wabash engine, and then he 
worked as a section hand on that road, and 
after that he secured employment from the 
Corrigans, who ran the mule car lines. He 
curried mules first, then drove a car, and 
then after a term in a commercial college 
acted as driver for a furniture wagon, fur- 
niture packer, car accountant, and finally 
won a place on the police force. In five 
months he was made sergeant, and for six 
years served the city. 

In 1886 he was elected County Marshal 
by the Democrats, and refused a second 
term. 

In 1890 Mr. McGowan became Kansas 
City Agent for the Barber Asphalt Com- 
pany, and from that time his career has 
been meteoric. He is now general agent 
for the Barber Company for all the West 
and Mexico, president of the Indianapolis 
car lines, president of the company that 
controls the street car lines of Cincinnati 
and Covington, and the general executive 
man of the Widener-Elkins Syndicate, 
president of the Kansas City Gas Company, 
and a director and officer in many huge 
corporations. 

Mr. McGowan was married in 1887 to 
Miss Katie Burnett, and they have four 
daughters. 



Photo by Strauss. 

EDWARD J. McGOVERN 

was born in South Chicago on November 
18, 1875. He lived there until 1888, when 
his parents came to Kansas City, where he 
has ever since resided. 

His education was received in the public 
schools of Chicago and in a private school 
here in Kansas City. At the age of eigh- 
teen he commenced to work for his living 
first receiving employment as a copyist in 
the office of Probate Judge J. E. Guinotte. 

He has been retained in that office ever 
since, and by his energy and application 
has risen from place to place until he was 
chief deputy clerk. 

A strong Democrat since the attainment 
of his majority, Mr. McGovern has been 
prominently identified with the local or- 
ganization for some years. He has served 
as a member of the County Committee, 
and has always been president or secretary 
of the Fifth Ward Democratic clubs during 
campaigns. 

At the last county convention in Inde- 
pendence, Mr. McGovern received the 
nomination for Justice of the Peace for 
the Fourth District, which comprises the 
Fourth and Fifth Wards, and was elected 
by a large majority. 

He has been reading law at night for 
several years, and although he has never 
applied for admission to the bar, is well 
able to pass the examination. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



93 




Photo by Strauss. 

JOHN \V. McKECKNIE 

was born in Clarksville, Ohio, October 3, 
1862. He remained in his birthplace un- 
til he had reached the age of eighteen years. 
His education had its beginning in the pub- 
lic schools of Clarksville, and later he at- 
tended Wilmington College at Wilmington, 
O. He then took a classical course at 
Princeton, and graduated in 1SS6. After- 
wards he went to the Columbia School of 
Mines in New York city, taking the archi- 
tectural course, and graduated after two 
years of study. Mr. McKecknie remained 
in New York city after his graduation, and 
was employed in various architects' offices 
for five years. He then opened an office 
of his own, and did the business of general 
architecture for three years. Meanwhile 
he was studying painting at art schools 
and various galleries with an eye to adopt- 
ing that as a profession, but finally gave it 
up to resume architecture. 

Mr. McKecknie came to this city in 1 898, 
and went into the architectural business 
immediately, at which he has been very 
successful. He is a member of the Com- 
mercial Club, the University Club, the 
Kansas City Art Club, the local chapter of 
the American Institute of Architects, and 
the Kansas City Architectural Club. 

Mr. McKecknie is married, having wed- 
ed Miss Lucille Jordan, of New York city, 
in 1 899. They have one child. 




Photo by Strauss. 

HENRY L. McCUNE 
was born in Fulton Countv, Illinois, June 
28, 1862. His education was received in 

Illinois College at Jacksonville, where he 
went from 1877 to 1870, and afterwards at 
the University of Illinois, at Champagne, 
where he was graduated in 1S83. 

Deciding upon the profession of law, 
he entered the Columbia Law School, and 
received his degree in 1886. His shingle 
was first flung to the breeze in Oswego, 
Kas., but after four years of successful 
practice there he came to Kansas City in 
i8qo, and has since occupied a prominent 
place in the town. Until the death of 
Judge C. L. Dobson in 1002 he was junior 
member of the firm of Dobson & McCune, 
but is now alone. 

Mr. McCune has always been active in 
the public life of Kansas City along broad 
lines, and is now president of the Civic 
League, just commencing to be a power 
in municipal politics. He belongs to the 
Commercial Club, the University Club, 
and the Sigma Ki Fraternity. He has 
also served a term as president of the Kan- 
sas City Bar Association. 

Mr. McCune married Miss Helen Mc- 
Crary, daughter of United States Judge 
McCrary, in Colorado Springs September 
6, 1888, and they have one son, Joseph. 



94 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

HENRY CLAY McDOUGAL 

was born December 9, 1844, in Marion 
County, West Yirginia. His boyhood 
days were spent on a farm, and his educa- 
tion received in the district schools. In 
1 86 1, at the outbreak of the civil war, he 
enlisted in the Sixth West Yirginia, and 
served throughout the bloody conflict. 
After the surrender at Appomattox he 
came out to Missouri, settling in Davies 
County. He studied law in Gallatin, and 
was admitted to practice in 1868. 

He served two terms as Mayor of Gal- 
latin, and was also Judge of the Probate 
and Chancery Court, the youngest in the 
history of the State, by the way. 

In 1885 he came to Kansas City, where 
he has lived ever since. 

Judge McDougal has served a term as 
City Counselor, and as a Republican has 
been conspicuously honored by Demo- 
cratic governors. He has been a member 
of the board of managers of the Asylum 
for the Feeble Minded and Epileptic, a 
member of the Missouri World's Fair 
Commission, and is now a member of the 
Board of Election Commissioners. He 
has also served as president of the Mis- 
souri Bar Association, and is vice-presi- 
dent of the local Bar Association. Out- 
side of his profession he is president of the 
Gallinas Mining and Smelting Company of 
New Mexico . 

He married Miss Emma Chapdu, of Gal- 
lipolis, O., in 1S69, and they have five 
children, only three of whom are living;. 




Photo by Strauss. 

LOUIS S. McCLELLAN 
was born June 5, 1861, in Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania. He received his education in 
the public and high schools of that town, 
and at an early age began to earn his own 
living. His first employment was with a 
civil engineering corps on the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad, but in 1881 he secured a 
position with the Wabash Railroad, and 
has been with that corporation ever since. 

He started in as a clerk in the New York 
office, and in 1884 was made southwestern 
passenger agent, which position he held 
until 1895, when he was removed to Louis- 
ville, where he held the office of district 
passenger agent. In 1899 he was trans- 
ferred to St. Louis in a similar capacity, 
and upon the resignation of Henry N. Gar- 
land as western passenger agent in 1902, 
Mr. McClellan came to Kansas City to 
succeed him. 

He has already taken his place in the 
public life of the town, and has identified 
himself with many of the public organiza- 
tions. 

Mr. McClellan is a Scottish Rite Mason, 
a Knight Templar, and a member of the 
Shrine. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



95 




/ 



Photo by Strauss. 

WALTER GALLATIN MELLIER 
was born in St. Louis January 12, 1859. 
His father, A. A. Mellier, was one of the 
early merchants of St. Louis, and shipped 
goods to Westport Landing before Kansas 
City had an existence. Mr. Mellier pre- 
pared for college at Phillips Academy, 
Andover. Mass., and finished his education 
at Princeton. In 1S79 he removed to 
Kansas City, where he engaged in the cat- 
tle industry with his father-in-law, Major 
Seth Mabry, but finding the real estate 
business more congenial concentrated all 
his energy and interest in Kansas City 
property. 

The following additions have been laid 
out by Mr. Mellier: Llewellyn Park, 127 
acres, 1886; Kenwood & Kenwood Annex , 
60 acres, 1886; Murray Hill, 10 acres, 
1886; Mellier Place, 66 acres, 1887; Dick- 
inson Place, 10 acres, 1887; Mellier Place 
Annex, 22 acres, 1880; Bonfils Place, 10 
acres, 1887 Bonfils Heights, 10 acres, 
1897; Mellier Park, 10 acres, 1900; Cor- 
bin Place, 27 acres, 1902, etc., etc 

Mr. Mellier projected and built the Mel- 
lier Place electric line to develop the 
southwestern part of the city, and has ac- 
complished the promotion of many great 
establishments in the city. 

Mr. Mellier was the first president of the 
Princeton Alumni Association of the 
west, and has also been connected in an 
official capacity with the Kansas City Club, 
Sons of the Revolution, and the Univer- 
sity Club. 




Photo by Strauss. 

WILLIAM CLOPTON MICHAELS 
was born January 25, i87i,at Alton, Illi- 
nois. His boyhood was spent at Ft. 
Dodge, Iowa. When sixteen years old he 
left the High School at Fort Dodge, and 
railroaded for several years. In 1892 he 
entered the University of Virginia. The 
next year he went to the Lniversity of 
Michigan at Ann Arbor, and was gradu- 
ated from the law school there in 1895. 

Mr. Michaels came to Kansas City, and 
was admitted to the liar November 25, 
1895, entering the law office of Haff & Van 
Valkenburgh. Mr. Van Valkenburgh was 
subsequently appointed Assistant United 
States District Attorney, and the firm lie- 
came, January 1, 1902, Haff & Michaels. 

Mr. Michaels was married April 19, 
1899, to Miss Nannie Stone Wilson, of In- 
dependence, Mo. They have one child. 
William Wilson Michaels. 



9 6 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

ROBERT McCLINTOCK 
was born in Westchester, Chester County, 
Pennsylvania, January 31, 1849. His fam- 
l ly took up residence in Philadelphia, Pa., 
when he was three years of age, and two 
years later moved to Catassaqua, Lehigh 
County, Pa. The family moved later to 
( )hio and finally to California, Mo. Mr. 
McClintock managed to secure an educa- 
tion amid all these changes among the 
common schools of his various places of 
residence. 

He came to this town in 1865 by steamer 
from St. Louis. For eleven years he w r as 
employed by a local mercantile firm, and 
in 1876 he started in the restaurant busi- 
ness. He has been engaged in that busi- 
ness continuously since that time in vari- 
ous parts of the city, and is now located 
near the intersection of Walnut and 
Twelfth Streets. 

Mr. McClintock was married in Warrens- 
burg, Mo., in 1875, his wife being Miss Mary 
H. Sharp, of Warrensburg. They have 
two children, Robert S. and Mary Agnes, 
the former having been established in the 
restaurant business by his father on Wal- 
nut Near Ninth. 

Despite the demands of his large busi- 
ness, Mr. McClintock has always taken an 
active interest in all movements tending 
to the city's welfare and advancement, 
and has done much to make the town. 




Photo by Strauss. 

JAMES McKINNEY 
was born in Farmington, Illinois, Febru- 
ary 14, 1864. When he was eight years 

old, however, his parents removed to Kan- 
sas, where the subject of this sketch 
worked on a farm and attended the dis- 
trict school. His later education was ob- 
tained in the High School of Girard, Kas. 

After leaving school he entered the mer- 
cantile business in Parsons, where he re- 
mained for six years. From Parsons he 
removed to Walnut, Kas., engaging in the 
same business, and adding rapidly to his 
original capital. 

In 1887 he came to Kansas City, and in 
company with his brother formed the pro- 
duce commission firm of McKinney Bros. 
& Co. His originality of conception and 
boldness of execution have made him a 
power in his line, and at different times he 
has "cornered" the market in potatoes, 
onions, and water-melons. 

Mr. McKinney is a prominent member 
of the Produce Exchange, and is also vice- 
president of the Kansas City Potato Com- 
pany. 

The only order to which he belongs is 
the Elks. 

He was married in 1880 to Miss Lily 
Ramage, of Kansas City. 



MEN ^YHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

HOMER B. MANN 
was born at Chester, Illinois, June 16, 
1869. His father was a Presbyterian mis- 
sionary, and the family came to Missouri. 
Mr. Mann was a pupil at the public schools 
and afterwads attended the academy at 
Parkville, Mo. Mr. Mann went up to 
North Dakota and settled. He became 
the editor of the Minot Journal. 

His residence in this city began in 1894, 
at which time he became connected with 
the Drovers' Telegram. Two years later 
Mayor James M. Jones made him Super- 
intendent of Sidewalks and Curbing, be- 
cause of his activity in local politics. Dur- 
ing his term of office he became the Re- 
publican nominee for Representative. 
He was elected, and occupied a seat in the 
Fortieth General Assembly. After the 
expiration of his term as Representative 
in 1898, he was re-appointed Superintend- 
ent of Sidewalks and Curbing. In the 
spring of 1900 he became connected with 
the \Y. S. Dickey Clay Company, and a 
year later helped organize and became a 
member of the firm of Trout & Mann in 
the fire and accident insurance business. 

Mr. Mann is secretary of the Republican 
City Committee, is affiliated with the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, and Ven- 
erable Counsel of the Modern Woodmen 
of Ameiica. 

Mr. Mann married Miss Sallie Campbell 
October 15, 1892. They have two chil- 
dern, Fred and Robert Mann. 




Photo by Strauss. 

JOHN S. MOTT 
was born in St. Mary's, Ohio, May 2, 1846, 
and spent his boyhood there, receiving his 
early education in the local academy. He 
then secured admission to West Point, 
but the civil war intervened, and in 1863 
he went out of the military school as a 
first lieutenant, and until Lee's surrender 
fought for the Union. 

After the war he resigned from the army, 
and commenced the study of medicine in 
the University of Michigan, and was grad- 
uated in 1867. He came straightway to 
Kansas City, where he remained until 
1878, when he removed to Independence. 
Few men were more prominently connect- 
ed with the building of Independence 
than Mr. Mott, who played a prominent 
part in the mercantile as well as the pro- 
fessional life of the town. He practically 
built the Trinity Episcopal Church of In- 
dependence, and put it on its feet. 

In 1894 Dr. Mott came to Kansas City, 
where he has ever since been. He has 
specialized on the eye, nose, and throat 
jn New York, London, and Paris, and de- 
votes his time exclusively to that work. 
He belongs to the local medical bodies, 

and the American Academy 1 >f Medicine. 
He is a Mason and a Knight Templar, 
and also belongs to the Loyal Legion and 
theG. A. R. 



98 



< WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Straws*. 

COLONEL MILTON MOORE 
was born on a farm in Jackson County, 
January 22, 1846. His early education 
was acquired at Chapel Hill College and 
Wellington Academy. He studied law 
with Judge John S. Blackwell. When he 
came to Kansas City in March, 1872, he 
began the practice of law with Blake L. 
Woodson. This partnership was dissolved 
in 1S77, and in 1881 he formed a partner- 
ship with R. O. Boggess until January, 
1S90. E. O. Vaughan was a member of 
the firm, 1S96-97, and in 1899 Colonel 
Moore took in George H. Kelly. 

Colonel Moore was president of the Bar 
Association 1898-99. 

He was colonel of the Fifth Missouri 
Regiment in the Spanish-American war, 
and as such commanded the Second Brig- 
ade, Second Division, Third Army Corps. 
He organized the First Battalion of the Na- 
tional Guard in 1886, and was appointed 
major. In the same year he organized 
the Third Regiment, National Guard, and 
March 24, 1S91, was appointed brigadier- 
general in command of the National Guard 
of the State. He resigned in February, 
1S99. 

.He married Mary E. Burns, of St. Jo- 
seph, February 25, 18S0, and has four 
children. 




Photo by Strauss. 

CLIFFORD REID MURRAY 
was born in South Charleston, Ohio, Au- 
gust 7, 1867. He lived there until nine 

years old, when his parents removed to 
Chicago. In that town Mr. Murray spent 
his boyhood, and received his early educa- 
tion in the public schools. 

In 18S0 his family came to Kansas City, 
and shortly after their arrival Mr. Mur- 
ray entered the Central High School, 
and took a three years' course, quitting 
before graduation, however, to enter upon 
a business career. 

In 18S6 the firm of Guernsey & Murray 
was formed, succeeding the firm of Guern- 
sey & Murray, and by virtue of energy, 
ability, and progressiveness, the partner- 
ship to-day enjoys one of the largest high- 
class grocery businesses in the West. 

In addition to his regular business, Mr. 
Murray is interested in several other ven- 
tures. He is president of the Tobasco 
Planters' Company, a corporation con- 
trolling a large amount of land in Mexico, 
on which rubber, vanilla, and kindred pro- 
ducts are raised. 

He is a member of the Commercial Club, 
and active in the public movements that 
make Kansas City famous the world over. 

He married Miss Nannie Washburn, of 
Chicago, in 1896. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAH CITY 




Photo by Strauss. 

SAMUEL WALLACE MOORE 
was horn January 24, 1662, in Geauga 
County, Ohio. His parents removed to 
Cleveland O., when he was nine years 
old, and after going through the ward 
schools he entered the High School, from 
which lie was graduated in 1S79. He 
then went to Mexico and Arizona, and by 
clerical and other work earned money 
enough to take himself through college. 
He attended Adelbert College in Cleveland, 

and was graduated in 1884. He completed 
the three-year course in two years by 
means of taking extra studies. 

He studied law at the Kansas Univer- 
sity, taking his degree in 1877, and imme- 
diately afterwards came to Kansas City, 
and entered the law office of Lathrop & 
Smith. In 1S92 the firm of Lathrop, 
Morrow, Fox & Moore was organized, and 
continues still. 

Mr. Moore has served as president of 
the Knife and Fork Club, and was elected 
president of the Kansas City Bar Associa- 
tion in 1 901. He is a member of the Com- 
mercial Club, Country Club and Kansas 
City Club. 

He married Miss Harriet Cooke in Kan- 
sas City September 30, 1S96. 




Photo by Strauss. 

GUY BATEMAN MITCHELL, 
the well-known young physician, was born 
in Baltimore, Maryland. His father, 
John T Mitchell, was the head of the larg- 
est fruit-packing and canning company in 
the country at that time. 

The senior Mitchell died when the sub- 
ject of this sketch was still in his infancy. 
A few years later the family removed to 
Abilene, Kansas, where the young Guy 
went to the public schools, and later had 
the advantage of a high school course. 
After quitting the High School, he de- 
cided upon the profession of medicine, and, 
coming to Kansas City, entered the Uni- 
versity Medical College. He was gradu- 
ated with high honors, and received his de- 
gree, and has ever since practiced here. 

Dr. Mitchell's success has been due to 
ability more than anything else, but also 
to high-mindedness, honesty, and loyaltv 
to the highest standards of his profession. 
Dr. Mitchell is examining physician for 
a number of secret societies, and is also a 
member of the Jackson County Medical 
Society and the Missouri Medical Associa- 
tion. His one hobby is athletics, and for 
a year or so now he has been a star member 
of the Kansas City Athletic Club. 



10591 1 



IOO 



MEN MHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

GEORGE MATHEWS 
was horn in Brunswick, Maine, May 24, 
i860. He received his education in the 
puhlic schools, and then entered an archi- 
tect 's office in Levviston, Me. He then 
spent five years in various offices in Bos- 
ton, perfecting himself in his profession, 
and came to Kansas City in 1887. He 
accepted a position with Adriance Van 
Brunt, where he remained for three years, 
and then went with the M., K. & T. Trust 
Company as superintendent of its building 
department. He held that place until 
[898, and under his supervision all build- 
ings for the trust company and along the 
line of the Pittsburg & Gulf Railroad be- 
tween Siloam Springs and the Gulf of Mex- 
ico were erected. 

Since 1 888 he has practiced architecture 
in Kansas City. Some of Mr. Mathews' 
principal work has been the Christian 
Science Church at Ninth and Forest, the 
Burnham, Hanna & Munger building, 
the Union Station at Shreveport, and the 
depot and hotel at Port Arthur. 

He has served terms as president of the 
Evanston Golf Club, and Secretary of Kan- 
sas City Chapter American Institute of 
Architects, and is president of the Kansas 
City Athletic Club. 

He married Miss Eunice E. Stanwood 
at Brunswick, Maine, in 1889. 




Photo by Strauss. 

STEPHEN A. MITCHELL, 
a civil engineer who has been connected 
with most of Kansas City's recent public 
works of importance, was born at Point 
Pleasant, Ohio, April 30, 1863. He was 
still a small boy when his parents came 
with him to Kansas City, in whose excel- 
lent public schools he laid the foundation 
of his learning. In 1878 he was gradua- 
ted from the High School, and in 1883 re- 
ceived his diploma from the Missouri Uni- 
versity. 

His first important piece of work after 
graduation was in the construction of 
the Kansas City Belt Line. He was in 
the City Engineer's office from 1884 to 
1885, when he resumed private practice 
until 1892, again accepting the position 
of Assistant City Engineer. In 1900 he 
resigned and went into private business. 

He was one of the experts who exam- 
ined the waterworks plant for Kansas City, 
and has supervised the construction of 
twenty different plants. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



101 




Photo by Strauss. 

PATRICK H. MADDEN 
was born in Ireland February 24, 1843. 
He came to this country in 1851, locating 
at Madison, Indiana, where he received 
his education in the public schools, and 
later, when his parents removed to a farm 
in Wisconsin, he attended the district 
schools. 

His first employment was as a clerk in 
Keokuk, la., and then in 1859 he located 

in Leavenworth, Kas. He served two 
terms as City Clerk, one term as City 
Treasurer, and a term as Deputy County 
Clerk. 

In 1878 he came to Kansas City. For 
a while he was in the Auditor's office of 
the Kansas Pacific Railroad, but in 1880 
he engaged in the real estate business, in 
which he still remains. He was in part- 
nership with Colonel Charles R. Kearney 
for nine years, and has done much to de- 
velop the resources of Kansas City. 

He has served terms as president and 
vice-president of the Kansas City Real Es- 
tate Exchange, and has been a director 
continuously. 

He married Miss Annie Bannon in Leav- 
enworth in 1875, and is the father of two 
children. 




Photo by Strauss. 

G. VAN MILLETT 
was born April 5, 1864, in Kansas City, 
Missouri, and has lived his whole life in 
the town. He went to the public schools, 
and after working a year in his father's 
printing establishment entered Kansas 
University. Returning, he again worked 
in his father's office, but all his ambitions 
were centered upon art. He went to St. 
Louis, where he began to draw for litho- 
graphers and engravers, setting type in be- 
tween times, and this courage and deter- 
mination at last decided the Elder Millet 
to give him his wish. The young man 
was sent to Europe in i88fi, and studied 
in the Royal Academy at Munich under 
masters like Carl Raupp, Nikolas Gysis, 
and Ludwig Von Lceffts. He remained 
there five years, and his pictures secured 
honorable mention in the Royal Academy 
exhibitions. 

After a short stav in Paris, he returned 
to Kansas City in 1S91, and established a 
studio here. He spent the year of 1893 in 
Holland, and returning to Kansas City ac- 
cepted a professorship with the Kansas 
City Art Association. He soon resigned, 
however, preferring to work for himself 
and in his own way. Mr. Millet exhibits 
at all the great exhibitions in this country, 
and in 1896 helped to organize the Kansas 
City Art Club. He has served three terms 
as its president, and has done much to 
make the annual exhibitions successful. 

He married Miss Mary McKee, of Kan- 
sas City, in 1899, and they have one child, 
Elizabeth. 



102 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 





Photo by Strauss. 

GEORGE J. MILLER 
was born in Pleasant Mill, Missouri, Octo- 
ber 21, 1868. The son of a Presbyterian 
divine, compelled by his calling to often 
change his place of residence, the subject 
of this sketch divided his boyhood among 
the towns of Pleasant Hill, Oregon, St. 
Joseph, and Nevada. 

After being graduated from the High 
School in Nevada he entered Westminster 
College at Fulton, from where he was grad- 
uated in 1800. During his course there 
Mr. Miller won the oratorical prize, and 
had the honor of representing his college 
in the State oratorical contest. 

After leaving college Mr. Miller came to 
Kansas City, and entered the office of 
Gates & Wallace, where he studied law. 
In 1893 he was admitted to the bar, and at 
once commenced the practice of his f>ro- 
fession. 

In 1899 Mr. Miller decided to quit the 
law, and became a financial agent, and has 
built himself up a large general brokerage 
business. 

He is a Democrat in politics, and while 
never a seeker after office has taken the 
stump in several campaigns. 

He is unmarried, and belongs to the 
Kansas City Athletic Club and the Phi 
Delta Theta Fraternitv. 



CHAS. H. MOORE, 

assistant cashier of the National Bank of 
Commerce, was born at Bloomington, Ill- 
inois, on July 7, 1857. His boyhood days 
were spent in El Paso, 111. At the age of 
seventeen he began his banking career 
with the First National Bank of Athens, O. 

In 1887 he became associated with the 
National Bank of Kansas City and in 1890 
with the National Bank of Commerce, 
being appointed assistant cashier in 1896, 
which position he now holds. 

His twenty-eight years' experience with 
city and country banking has made him 
familiar with all the details of banking, 
and especially qualified him for the impor- 
tant position he now holds with this great 
banking house. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



103 




Phoio by Strauss. 

WILLIAM MOORE 
was born in Bloomington, Illinois, April 3, 
1867. He received his early education 
in the public and high schools of his native 
town, and after completing the latter 
course entered St. Vincent's College at 
Cape Girardeau, Missouri. 

Deciding upon the profession of law, Mr. 
Moore entered the law department of the 
Illinois Western University at Blooming- 
ton in 1 89 1, and was given his degree in 
1894. 

Soon after receiving his sheepskin, Mr. 
Moore came to Kansas City, where he was 
admitted to the bar, and where he has ev- 
er since remained. Unlike the majority 
of young lawyers, Mr. Moore has never 
made himself part of a firm, or identified 
himself with any corporation or large office, 
but has practiced his profession alone. 

He has had a very successful career, 
and has thoroughly identified himself with 
the public life of Kansas City. He is ac- 
tive in all movements tending to the gen- 
eral good, and has likewise interested him- 
self actively in Democratic politics, al- 
though he has never been a seeker after 
office. 

Mr. Moore is a member of the Knights 
of Columbus, one of the organizers of the 
local body, in fact. He is also a leading 
spirit in the Marquette Club, and belongs 
to the Kansas City Bar Association. 




i'lioto by Strauss-. 

EDWARD P. MORI ARTY 
was born March 17, 1868, on a farm in 
Olmstead County, Minnesota, but is prac- 
tically a Kansas City product, as his par. 
ents removed to this town in 1871. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
public schools, and then entered Central 
High School, after which he secured a po- ! 
sition with the old Citizens' National Bank. 
In 1895 Mr - Moriarty left the bank and 
went with the Whipple Loan and Trust 
Company. His first place was in a mere 
clerical capacity, but he gave evidence of 
ability straightway, so that when he finally 
resigned it was from the office of treasurer. 
After leaving that company he organ- 
ized the firm of E. P. Moriarty & Co., asso- 
ciating his brother, James F., with him, 
and doing a business in sporting goods. 

Mr. Moriarty is an enthusiast over auto- 
mobiles, and has done more than any other 
man to popularize the •'horseless carriages" 
in Kansas City. He was one of the «>r- 
sanizers of the Automobile Club, and is a 
director. He was the winner, by the way, 
of the blue ribbon in the 100-mile endur- 
ance contest, given under the club's di- 
rection. 



104 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY 




JEAN ROBERT MOEXHEL 
was born in Dresden, Germany, March 2, 
1856. He secured his education in the 
local gymnasiums through private tutor- 
ing and later by a course in the Dresden 
Polytechnic School in natural sciences, 
graduating in 1872. He was then appren- 
ticed, being a German custom, for two 
years in a laboratory, after which he was 
for a half year each in the establishments 
of Weppen and Leuders, manufacturing 
chemists, of Dresden. He then went to 
Hcrlin, and worked at the chemical man- 
ufacturing plant of Schering. In 1875 
he entered the I niversity of Leipsig, 
taking the courses of chemistry and nat- 
ural sciences, and graduating in 1878. 
After his graduation he worked in various 
towns in Switzerland, and in Paris, and in 
London at his profession for five years, 
coining to America in 1883. He located 
in New York City, where he remained for 
seven months, and then went to Philadel- 
phia, opening in that city a commercial 
laboratory. In 1881 he entered another 
commercial laboratory in New York city, 
which he operated in conjunction with the 
one in Philadelphia. In 1894 he assumed 
charge of the chemical laboratory of the 
New York Post-Graduate College, Med- 
ical School and hospital, where he re- 
mained two years. 

He came to this city in 1896, and has 
been here since, conducting the Kansas 
City Chemic-Technie laboratories. 

He is a member of the German Chemical 
Society, of Berlin, the American Chemical 
Society, and other bodies devoted to nat- 
ural sciences. 




CLAUDE C. MAY, 
the assistant business manager of the Jones 
Dry Goods Company, was born at Whalley 
Range, Manchester, England, on April 10, 
1864. 

Mr. Mav received his education in the 
grammar schools of Manchester and round- 
ed out his education in Owen's College, a 
branch of Victoria University. 

After completing his studies, Mr. May 
entered upon his successful mercantile ca- 
reer, starting in business with his father. 
A few years later his father died, but not 
before Mr. May had learned those rigid 
lmsiness principles which have unfalter- 
ingly forced him to the front. After his 
father's death, he decided to come to 
America, where he hoped to attain the 
high pinnacle of success to which his bud- 
ding ambition pointed. 

Mr. May came to America, and finally, 
in 1890, settled in Chicago, where for a 
number of years he was connected with 
the Fair in the role of assistant superin- 
tendent, to the duties of which office he 
rose from the ranks of subordinates. 

While with the Fair, Mr. May married, 
and when in January, 1901, he came to 
Kansas City, he brought his wife and one 
child, a boy, with him. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



10.5 




FRANK MARKWARD 

was born in Mechanicshurg, Pennsylvania 
October 19, 1869, but as his parents moved 
to Warrensburg, Mo., in 1S70, he is really 
a Missouri product. Mr. Markwood re- 
ceived his education in the schools of War- 
rensburg, and at the age of sixteen came 
to Kansas City. 

Always fond of literary work, his fancy 
turned inevitably to journalism, and in 
1888 he secured a position with the Kansas 
City Times, where he remained until 1898, 
when, in company with Will T. Stricklette, 
he founded the Kansas City Manufacturer, 
a paper devoted to the manufacturing in- 
terests of Kansas City. Mr. Stricklette 
took charge of the business end, and Mr. 
Markward assumed the editorship, and 
his work has not only been responsible for 
the paper's success, but has also given im- 
petus to local manufacturing interests. 

In 1901 the business was incorporated, 

and the name of the paper changed to the 
Manufacturer and Merchant, with a con- 
sequent broadening of its field of work. 

Mr. Markward belongs to the Manufac- 
turers' Association, and has been a prom- 
inent figure in the movement tending to 
the erection of a club-house. 




Photo by Strauss. 
EDWIN CLEMENT MESERVEY 
was born in Hallowell, Maine, March 4, 
1861. He stayed there until the age of 
fifteen, when his parents removed to Kan- 
sas. He received his early education in 
the public schools,and entered Kansas Uni- 
versity in 1 S77, and was graduated in [882 
He spent a year as a surveyor in the em- 
ploy of the Kansas City, Fort Scott & Mem- 
phis Railroad, and in 1883 decided to study 
law. He entered the St. Louis Law School 
and was graduated in 1885. He came to 
Kansas City in the same year, and was a- 
mitted to the bar shortly after his arrival 
Mr. Mescrvey is now senior member of the 
firm of Meservey, Pearce & German. 

He married Miss Besie McDonald Har- 
ris August 1?, 1 89 1, at Independence, and 
is now the father of three children, Frances, 
H., Edwin C, Jr., and Mary Re- 
He is a member of the Commercial Club 
and the Phi Psi Fraternitv. 



io6 



MEN ^YHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




JAMES HENRY MANNING 
was born in Fall River, Wisconsin, March 
i, 1862. He lived in that town until the 
attainment of his majority, attended the 
public and high schools, and afterwards 
took a course at the Massachusetts College 
of Pharmacy in Boston. 

Always interested in athletic sports, he 
early showed marvelous skill in base ball. 
He began to play professional ball in the 
summer of 1883, working as a pharmacist 
during the winter, and in iSSS became a 
manager as well as a player. 

Some time afterwards he became the 
owner of the Savannah, Ga., franchise in 
the Southern League, and then became 
owner of the Kansas City franchise. 

He has ever since been identified with 
local base ball, with the exception of the 
season of 1901, spent in Washington, and 
is now interested with Charles Nichols in 
the local team of the Western League. 

Mr. Manning married Miss Mayme Den- 
nis, of this city, in 1896. He is an Elk, 
and has always identified himself with pub- 
lic movements. 




Photo by Thomson. 

HUNTER M. MERIWETHER 

was born in Crittenden County, Arkansas, 

July 21, 1 86 1. His early education was 

in Kentucky, but he was graduated from 

Yanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn., 

both literary and law departments, in 18S3 
and 1885. 

He came to Kansas City in 1885, and 
was admitted to the bar in the same year. 
Mr. Meriwether is perhaps best known as 
the man who reclaimed the river front 
land in the West Bottoms. 

He is president of the Federal Invest- 
ment Company, which has this work in 
hand. 

Mr. Meriwether was appointed by the 
County Court, attorney for the Collector 
of Revenue, serving from 1890- 1900. 

In 1887, in Bowling Green, Ky., he was 
married to Lucy Underwood Western. 
Thev have two children. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



10: 




Photo by Thomson. 

ALEXANDER NEW 
was born in Wabash, Indiana, his parents 
having been natives of Germany. As a 
boy he leared the saddler's trade, and 
saved up enough money to pay his expen- 
ses at Washington and Jefferson College, 
at Washington, Penn., where he took 
a thorough literary course. Returning 
home, he read law in Wabash and then in 
Indianapolis, and was admitted to the bar 
before the late Walter Q. Gresham. 

He came to Kansas City in 1888, and for 
nine vears was associated with Henry 
Wollman. He then formed the firm of 
New & Palmer, and later the firm of New 
& Krauthoff, but in 1899 the existing firm 
of Karnes, New & Krauthoff was formed. 

Until recently, Mr. New was widely 
famed for his activity and ability as a trial 
lawyer, but of late years his work has been 
chiefly confined to the office, his corpora- 
tion clientele being very large. 

Mr. New's one dissipation is the mani- 
festation of public spirit. He is chairman 
of the Commercial Club's Committee on 
Municipal Legislation, and has given free- 
ly of his time to that important work. He 
is also attorney for the board of directors 
of Convention Hall. He is a member of 
the Kansas City Club, the local Bar Asso- 
ciation, a member of the State Council of 
the vState Bar Association, and a member 
of the American Bar Association. 




STEPHEN A. NORTHROP 
the distinguished divine, was born in Gran- 
ville, Ohio, April 7, 1852, a son of the Rev. 
W. R. Northrop, a Baptist clergyman. 
When he was ten years old his parents 
removed to Michigan, where he received 
his preliminary education. When twenty 
years old he returned to Granville, taking 
a three years' classical course in Denison 
University, and then went to Colgate Uni- 
versity, Hazilton, N. Y., where he gradu- 
ated with the degree of A.B. in 1876. In 
the same year he entered the Rochester 
Theological Seminary, meanwhile supply- 
ing the pulpit of the First Baptist Church 
at Fenton, Mich., and in 1882 he went to 

the First Baptist Church in Fort Wayne, 
Ind. In 1885 he was called 1o Cincinnati, 
and in i8g6 came to Kansas City, and has 
ever since been the pastor of the First 
Baptist Church. The congregation called 
him on the strength of his record alone. 

Dr. Northrop had the degree of A.M. 
conferred upon him by Hazilton College, 
and the degree of D.D. by Franklin Col- 
lege. 

Dr. Northrup is a splendid speaker, and 
has twice offered prayer at Republican 
National Conventions. He has also been 
a tireless contributor to both secular and 
religious magazines, and his book, ' ' A 
Cloud of Witnesses," is now in its fifth edi- 
tion. 

He was married to Miss Celestine Joslin 
August 16, 1877, and they have one child, 
Laura May. 



jo8 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

JAMES R. NOLAND 

was born on the farm of his illustrious 
grandfather, the late Judge James K. 
Sheley, near Independence, Missouri, Feb- 
ruary 18, 1873, the second son of Elizabeth 
and H. H. Noland. He was educated at 
the ward and high schools at Independ- 
ence, and took a special English course at 
Woodland College and at Westminster 
College, Fulton, Mo., where he became a 
Phi Delta Theta.. In 1880 his schooling 
was interrupted for six months, during 
which period he acted as a Senate page at 
Jefferson City, there gaining an acquaint- 
anceship with public men and public af- 
fairs which has since been invaluable to 
him. 

During a year's residence in New York 
as a protege of the late author and poet, 
Arthur Orissom, Mr. Noland developed 
his latent literary talent, and since then 
has met with no little success as a news- 
paper writer, versifier, song-writer, short- 
story writer, and authority on things the- 
atrical, his specialty, however, being short 
stories for children and for boys and girls. 

September 28, 1897, he and Miss Ida B. 
Matthews, the well-known vocalist, were 
united in what has proved to be a pe- 
culiarly happy marriage, they being insep- 
arable companions. They have one child, 
Jim, Jr., two and a half years old. 

Mr. Noland was appointed Marshal of 
the Kansas City Court of Appeals, a State 
office, January 1, 1897, which position he 
now holds. 




Photo by Strauss. 

GEORGE B. NORBERG 
was born at Galva, Illinois, July 11, 1872. 
Mr. Norberg's family left Illinois when he 
was thirteen years old and located in Smith 
Centre, Kas. He went to the public 
schools of both Illinois and Kansas during 
his residence in those States, and went to 
work in a drug store in Smith Centre while 
a pupil in the High School of the town" 
He started to the Kansas University in 
1889, and left that institution with the 
title of Ph. G. in 1893. He came to Kan- 
sas City immediately upon his graduation, 
and returned to work in the drug business. 
While employed at this business he took 
up the study of medicine at the University- 
Medical College. He graduated from the 
medical college March 20, 1897, and at once 
entered into practice as a physician. 

He was appointed Assistant Police Sur- 
geon for a term of one year, and at its ex- 
piration Was made House Surgeon at the 
Missouri Pacific Hospital. He held the 

place two years, and then returned to gen- 
eral practice. 

Dr. Norberg is a fellow of the Kansas 
City Academy of Medicine, and adjunct 
to chair of gynecology at the University 
Medical College. He is also affiiliated 
with the Maccabees, and holds member- 
ship in the Evanston Golf Club. 

Dr. Norberg was married December 11, 
1 901, to Miss Jeanette Lockwood. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



iocj- 




Photo by Strauss. 

MILTON JACKSON OLDHAM 
was born in Keytesville, Missouri. Much 
of his early life was spent upon his father's 
farm, and after attendance at the district 
school he entered the high school at 
Keytesville. He completed the course 
there, and then finished his education in 
the college at Stansbury, Mo. 

Upon the completion of his academic 
studies, he came to Kansas City, and com- 
menced the study of law in the offices of 
Gates & Wallace. In 1892 he was admit- 
ted to the bar, and shortly after his ad- 
mission he accepted a position in the 
City Counselor's office, where he remained 
until a change in the administration. In 
1896 Mr. Oldham became connected with 
the legal department of the Metropolitan 
Street Railway, which position he still 
holds. 

Mr. Oldham was attorney for the Retail 
Grocers' Association for many years, and 
is now attorney for the Depot Carriage and 
Raggage Company, and several other cor- 
porations. 

He is a member of the Bar Association 
and of the Knife and Fork Club. As might 
be guessed from his name, Mr. Oldham is 
closely related to the great "Stonewall" 
Jackson, a family connection of which any 
man might be justly proud. 




CHARLES CLEMMENS ORTHWEIN 
was born in St. Louis, Missouri, February 
13, 1869. His father, Charles F. Orth- 
wein, was a pioneer of St. Louis, and the 
first grain exporter in that city. 

The subject of this sketch received his 
early education in the public schools, and 
later entered Washington University,. 
from which institution he was graduated in 
1 89 1 . 

After leaving school he went into busi- 
ness with his father, and in 1893 was ad- 
mitted to partnership, the firm name 
changing to C. F. Orthwein & Sons. 

In 1897 Mr. Orthwein came to Kansas 
City, and took charge of the local manage- 
ment and the business, under his manage- 
ment, has grown and trebled. The oper- 
ations are principally confined to grain ex- 
porting, exclusively via the Gulf of Mexico,. 

Mr. Orthwein is a member of the Kan- 
sas City Cluh, the Driving Club, and since 
coming to Kansas City has identified him- 
self actively with all the organizations 
and movements tending to aid the city's 
growth and progress. He is a Mason. 

He married Miss Edith Hall, of St. Louis, 
in 1897, and the permanency of his loca- 
tion in Kansas City is attested by the 
erection of one of the finest homes in the 
city. 



no 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 





Photo by Strauss. 

DANIEL O' FLAHERTY, 
one of the city's pioneer civil engineers, 
was born at Martinsburg, West Virginia, 
July 24, 1841. As a boy, he lived in Cin- 
cinnati, and went to the public schools 
there. He came to Kansas City in 1857, 
and studied civil engineering with Edmond 
O'Flaherty. In 1886 he was Assistant 
City Engineer, having then formed a part- 
nership with John Donnelly, and in 1868 
was elected County Surveyor, and filled 
both places until 1872. From 1872 to 
r88o he practiced his profession, when he 
was re-elected County Surveyor for four 
years. 

Mr. O'Flaherty made the first map of 
Ft. Worth, Tex., and superintended the 
building of the court-house there in 1877. 

He had charge of the construction of the 
East Fifth Street road in 1874 and was 
chief engineer of the Kansas City & 
Eastern. 

He married Miss Ella A. Ward, of Clin- 
ton County, Missouri, in 1869. They have 
three children, Dr. E. A. O'Flaherty, 
Joseph O'Flaherty, and Leo. J. O'Flah- 
erty, all of Kansas City. 



Photo by Strauss. 

CHARLES J. O'MALLEV 
was born at Newport, County Mayo, Ire- 
land, in 1859. He derived his education 
at his native place and at Glasgow, Scot- 
land. He ran away from college at the 
age of fourteen, and came to this country. 
After a short time in New York city, he 
went to Manistee, Mich., where a brother 
was running a weekly paper, and learned 
the business in all its branches. In 1885 
he became a reporter on the Milwaukee 
Evening Wisconsin and later on the Chi- 
cago Times. He then started a weekly 
paper in Scranton, Pa. Afterwards he re- 
turned to Manistee, and ran the Advocate 
there for a year; then went to work for 
the Rocky Mountain News at Denver. In 
1890 he went to Europe for the News, and 
on his return became traveling corre- 
spondent for the Detroit Evening News, 
and three years later was made business 
manager of the Free Press. In 1895 he 
left to take charge of a department in the 
New Orage Industrial association, which 
built an industrial town in New Jersey. 

In February, 1897, Mr. O'Malley came 
to Kansas City for the Scripps-McRea 
League, and had charge of the Pure Food 
Exposition, afterwards devoting his en- 
ergy to building up the Kansas City World 
and other papers owned by the League. 

In 1899 ne started the Land Owner's 
Security Company. 

He is prominent in local Catholic and 
Irish affairs, being a charter member and 
recorder of the Kansas City Council of the 
Knights of Columbus, and is also a direc- 
tor of the Karnival Krewe. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



m 




Photo by Thomson. 

JOHN O'GRADY 

was born in County Wexford, Ireland, 
October 14, 1850, and was educated in the 
city of Wexford, where he subsequently 
studied law and was admitted to the bar. 

In 1870 he came to this country, and 
after a brief stay in New York located in 
Osage Mission, Kas., where he practiced 
law for four years. Soon after his arrival 
there the boy of twenty was elected May- 
or of the town, and what is more he made 
a good mayor. From Osage Mission he 
went to St. Louis, where he was engaged 
in practice with Joseph Robinson. 

In 1888 he came to Kansas City, and has 
ever since been a prominent figure in the 
public and professional life of the town. 

Upon his arrival here he became a mem- 
ber of the firm of Robinson, O' Grady & 
Harkless, but is now and has been for 
some time a member of the firm of Hark- 
less, O 'Grady & Crysler. 

He was for several years captain and 
judge advocate of the Third Regiment, 
and has long been a prominent member of 
the Commercial Club. He is also a mem- 
ber of various other organizations, and 
while never an office-seeker has always 
been a staunch Democrat. 




Photo by Strauss. 

VINCENT J. O'FLAHERTY 

was born in Yicksburg, Mississippi, Au- 
gust 28, 1873, hut as his parents removed 
to Kansas City when he was only five years 
old he may be considered a Kansas City 
product. 

His early education was received in the 
public schools of the town, and later he 
entered St. Mary's Academy at St. Mary's 
Kas., where he remained for four years. 

Returning from school, he entered the 
employ of the M., K. & T. Railroad, where 
he stayed until 1896, when the position of 
deputy was offered him by Sheriff Robert 
S. Stone. Mr. O' Flaherty was in the Sher- 
iff's office until 1900, when he was made a 
deputy circuit clerk, which position he 
now holds. 

He has always been prominently iden- 
tified with the local Democracy, and has 
played no small part in its victories. 

Mr. O' Flaherty is a member of the 
Knights of Columbus, is Treasurer of the 
Marquette Club, and is a director in the 
Kansas City Athletic Club. 

He married Miss Emily Marie r,erard 
in 1S97, and they have one son, Vincent, 
Jr. 



I 1 2 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

FREEMAN E. OVIATT 

was born in Cleveland, Ohio, November 
2, 1858. He spent his entire boyhood 
there. He entered the public schools of 
the city, and after acquiring the rudi- 
ments of an education left to enter the 
Spencerian Business College, from which 
institution he graduated. 

He went into the retail shoe business 
soon after his graduation from the busi-t 
ness College, and has remined in that 
business ever since, except for a few years 
spent in the general railroad contracting 
business with an elder brother in New 
spent in the general railroad contracting 
business with an elder brother in New 

York State. 

Mr. Oviatt came to this city in 1895, 
and engaged in retailing shoes soon after 
he arrived at the place he still occupies at 
1 105 Main Street. His long experience 
in the business, united with an aptitude 
for mercantile affairs, have placed him in 
the front rank among the local dealerrs, 
many of whom have passed half their 
lives in the business in this city. 

Mr. Oviatt is a member of a numberof 
secret and benevolent societies, among 
them the Royal Aranum and the Mod- 
ern Woodmen, and also holds memb 
ship in the load Retail Merchants' Asso 
ciation. 

He was married in 1880 to Miss Ada R. 
Fish, in Cleveland, ()., They have fiv 
children. 




Plwlo by Strauss. 

EDWARD C. OREAR 
was born in Mount Sterling, Kentucky, 
February 14, 1856. His parents came to 
Missouri in 1872, and settled on a farm in 
Bates County. Here the young Orear 
passed all his boyhood alternately work- 
ing on his parent's furm, and taking ad- 
vantage of the scant schooling afforded in 
the district schools of the county. It was 
in 1890 that Mr. Orear came to Kansas 
City. He went to work by the day as a 
painter, and he remained in the business 
as an employe until 1897, when he en- 
tered into partnership with E. E. Agin as 
the junior member, the firm style being 
Agin & Orear. While an employe, Mr. 
Orear joined the Painters' Union No. 4, 
the members of which elected him record- 
ing secretary soon after his admission, and 
later he was sent to the Industrial Council 
by the union, as its representative in that 
body. This place he held for two years. 

Mr. Orear, while not at any time con- 
nected with political parties in an official 
capacity, took more than a passing inter- 
est in the welfare of the Democratic party, 
and as a reward for his zeal and earnest- 
ness was placed in nomination by that 
party for the position of Judge of the 
Western District in 1902. 

He is a member of a number of secret 
and benevolent societies, among them the 
Knights of Pythias, the Pyramids, and 
the A. O. U. W., being treasurer of No. 
303 of the latter organization. 

He was married in 1895 to Miss Sloan, 
of this city. 



MEN ^YHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



H3 




Photo by Strauss. 

WILLIAM H. OTTO 
began his strenuous career at Harmony, 
Pennsylvania, September 10, 1862, where 
his father was engaged in a general mer- 
chandise business. When the young man 
grew up he entered the Harmony Collegi- 
ate Institute, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1882. 

Mr. Otto first ventured into business 
for himself at Junction City, Kas., coming 
from that place to Kansas City in 1885. 
He first associated himself with the Kan- 
sas City Elevator Manufacturing Com- 
pany, and in 1894 organized the Moline 
Elevator Company and started into busi- 
ness for himself. 

The rapid growth of the city, and the 
erection of many large buildings since 
then have helped to make Mr. Otto pros- 
perous. 

He was a member of the examining 

board of engineers under Mayor Davis 
three years, and served six years in the 
lower house of the Council, beginning in 
1898. 

He was married to Miss Kittie Shaefer, 
of Buffalo, X. V., January 1, 1891. 




Photo by Thomson 

FRANK PHILLIPS 

was born near Independence, Missouri, 
May 2, 1862. He lived in that town un- 
til he had reached early manhood, passing 
his school days as a pupil in the public 
schools there. At the age of eighteen he 
came to this town, and went to work for 
the street railway company as a conduct- 
or. At that time the railways were under 
the owership of the Corrigans, mules being 
the motive power used. In 1888 he was 
made superintendent of the Tenth Street 
and Brooklyn Avenue line, the motive 
power of which was by cable. The line 
at that time was an independent one, and 
was operated through a sparsely settled 
neighborhood. Its service, however, was 
maintained at a high standard of efficien- 
cv, and encouraged by this, homes were 
built along it, with the result that when 
the line was sold by its owners it had 
reached the stage of a valuable property. 

Mr. Phillips was always a Democrat, 
and was honored three times with nom- 
inations to elective offices. He was nom- 
inated and elected to the City Council for 
two consecutive terms, and was afterwards 
nominated by the party as a Represent- 
ative. He was elected, and sat as a mem- 
ber of the Fortieth General Assembly. 
vSince that time he has always been identi- 
fied as an active worker for the party's 
welfare. 

He is at present engaged in the mining 
business. 

He is a member of the Jackson County 
Club and also of the Order of Elks. 

Mr. Phillips is married, and has one 
child. 



H4 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

ARCHIBALD ALLEN PEARSON 
was born in Lincoln County, Tennessee, 
October 21, 1847, and spent his boyhood 
days on a farm. In 1856 his parents 
moved to Florida, but in the early 60 's 
returned to the Lincoln County farm. 
There the young Archibald resumed his 
studies, but not for very long. 

In 1864, when the armies of the South 
showed great gaps and the end was com- 
ing into sight, the seventeen-year-old boy 
dropped his books and joined General 
Forest's Cavalry. He saw much service 
with that celebrated company, and fought 
on many a bloody field, for Forest was nev- 
er the man to avoid trouble. 

In May, 1865, Mr. Pearson was paroled 
at Greenville, Illinois, General Canby, 
U. S. A., signing his parole. After that 
he clerked for eight years in a store in Bed- 
ford, Ind., and then ran a store of his own 
in Mitchell, Ind. From there he went to 
New York, where he went into the cloak 
business, and it was in 1883 that he came 
to Kansas City, where he has ever since 
been engaged in the. millinery business. 

He is a prominent member of the Com- 
mercial Club, a thirty-second degree Ma- 
son, a Shriner, and a Knight Templar. 

Mr. Pearson married Miss Anna Stillson, 
in Bedford, Ind., in 1869. They have 
three children. 




Photo by Strauss. 
EDWARD EVERETT PORTERFIELD 

was born March 28, 1861, in Berkeley 
County, Virginia, and spent his boyhood 
days on a farm. He attended a country 
school, and was graduated from Franklyn 
and Marshall College in 1883, having the 
degree of A.B. conferred upon him. After 
leaving college, he decided upon the law 
for his profession, and entered the office of. 
Henry Clay Douglas in Hagerstown, Md. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1885, but 
did not hang out his shingle just then.first 
accepting a position as principal of the 
public schools in Hancock, Md. He 
taught here for a year, and then came 
to Kansas City, where he began the prac- 
tice of law. 

Mr. Porterfield married Miss Julia 
Chick, daughter of Joseph S. Chick, a pi- 
oneer citizen of Kansas City, and is the 
father of two children, Edward E., Jr., 
and Joseph Chick Porterfield. 

He is a Mason, an Odd-fellow, and be- 
longs to the Legion of Honor and the 
Modern Woodmen of America. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



"5 




Photo Inj Thomson. 

WILLIAM COULLING PERRY 
was born in Essex County, England, Oc- 
tober 28, 1854. He grew to manhood on 
the farm where he was born, receiving his 

education in the country schools. 

In 1873 he came to America and located 
in Ft. Scott, Kas. Deciding upon the pro- 
fession of law, he entered the offices of 
General Charles W. Blair, and after two 
years of study was admitted to the bar in 
1875. He was afterwards admitted to 
partnership with General Blair. 

Mr. Perry took an active interest in 
Kansas politics from the commencement 
of his residence in Ft. Scott, and 
identified himself prominently with the 
Democratic party, and was chairman of 
the Democratic State Committee during 
several important campaigns. 

In 1884 he was appointed United States 
District Attorney by President Cleveland, 
and in 1892, when Mr. Cleveland was 
elected again, he appointed Mr. Perry a 
second time to that important office. 

Mr. Perry came to Kansas City in 1899, 
and is now a member of the law firm of 
Holmes & Perry. 

He married Miss Massey, of Washing- 
ton, D. C, in 1887, and they have two 
children, W. C, Jr., and Katherine. 




Photo by Strauss. 

JOHN PUNTON 
was born in London, England, July 12, 
1855. He came to this country in 1S72, 
and received his early education in the 
schools of Jacksonville, 111., His first 
employment was in the druggist's depart- 
ment in the asylum there, in which place 
he remained for ten years. He studied 
medicine every spare moment, and saved 
enough to take a year's course in the Uni- 
versity of Michigan and also a course in 
the Miami Medical College in Cincinnati. 
Returning to Jacksonville, he only re- 
mained for a short time, and then moved 
to Lawrence, Kas., where he was soon ap- 
pointed City Physician. During the sec- 
ond year his ability recommended him to 
the president of the State Board of Chari- 
ties, and he was appointed Assistant Su- 
perintendent of the Kansas State Insane 
Asylum at Topeka, where he remained for 
three years. Resigning in 18S7, he took 
a course in neurology at the Northwestern 
Medical College, and in 1S88 came to Kan- 
sas City. 

Dr. Punton has served as president of 
the Academy of Medicine, and as vice- 
president of the State Association, and is 
a member of the American Neurological 
Association. He has also been a member 
of the board of trustees and secretary of 
the University Medical College, and oc- 
cupies the chair of nervous and mental 
diseases. 

Dr. Punton is a member of the Com- 
mercial Club, is a thirty-second degree 
Mason, a Shriner, and is editor of the In- 
dex-Lancet. 



no 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

THOMAS J. PENDERGAST 
was born in St. Joseph, Missouri, July 22, 
1872. He attened the public schools of 
his birthplace until his graduation in 1886, 
after which he entered the employ of 
the Burlington Railroad in a clerical posi- 
tion. He came to Kansas City in 1888, 
while in the employ of the Burlington, 
and remained with the road for eight 
years, advancing meanwhile to better po- 
sitions. 

In 1896 Marshal Chiles tendered him 
the position of Deputy County Marshal, 
which he accepted. He held the place 
until the conclusion of County Marshal 
Chiles' term of office in 1900, when he was 
appointed Superintendent of City Streets 
by Mayor James A. Reed, which place he 
now holds. 

All during his residence in this city he 
has been actively identified with the Dem- 
ocratic party, and has been a prominent 
figure in the party councils. As a mem- 
ber of various City, County, and Congres- 
sional Commisional committees, he has 
forwarded the interests of the partv, where 
shrewdness and intelligence, combined 
with a broad grasp of political affairs, 
could be used to advantage. These qual- 
ities, combined with the experience gained 
in the office of the County Marshal while 
a deputy, made him the ideal candidate 
for the office. His name was presented 
for consideration before a convention of 
the delegates of his party in 1002, and he 
was nominated for the office by acclama- 
tion. 

Mr. Pendergast is an Elk. 




Photo by Strauss. 

JAMES L. PHELPS 
was born in Ottawa, Illinois, January i, 
1865. He attended the public schools of 
Ottawa, where he gained the rudiments 
of an education, which had been destined 
to be complete, but the failure of his. 
father in business necessitated his quit- 
ting school and taking employment. He 
taught school for a time, reading law at 
night, and qualified for the bar, being ad- 
mitted in Illinois in 1878. He took up its 
practice in Newport, Ark., first, but poor 
health compelled him to seek another cli- 
mate, so Mr.. Phelps came north and set- 
tled in Atchison, Kas., where he resumed 
the practice of his profession, and became 
rather prominent in the Democratic pol- 
itics of the district. 

In 1 88 1 he removed to Independence, 
this county, where he first became en- 
gaged in the abstract business, giving it up 
after a time to take a place with the Kan- 
sas City Times, remaining with the paper 
for several years. After his newspaper 
experience, Mr. Phelps was appointed 
Deputy County Clerk, and given charge 
of the Independence office. His careful- 
ness of the responsibility entrusted to his 
hands, together with the experience and 
friendships gained while in the office, made 
him available timber for the nomination 
for the office, and he was nominated by 
the Democratic party in 1902. 

Mr. Phelps is a Knight of Pythias, a 
Woodman, a Heptosaph, and is identified 
with the Christian Church. 

He was married in 1883 to Miss Nellie 
Gregg. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



"7 




Photo by Strauss. 

WALTER ANDERSON POWELL 
was born June 16, 1855, near Farmington, 
Delaware. His early life was spent there, 
and he attended the Wilmington Confer- 
ence Academy at Dover, Del. He was 
graduated from Dickinson College, Car- 
lisle, Penn., in 1878, and went to Denton, 
Md., to read law. He came to Kansas 
City in October, 1879, an d was admitted to 
the bar here in 1S81. C. W. Chase was 
his first partner. With him he continued 
ten years, was alone for a few years, and 
then Elmer X. Powell, a younger brother, 
was admitted to the firm of Powell & Pow- 
ell in 1894. 

Mr. Powell was married September 4, 
[888, to Miss Jennie Knowles, of Roches- 
ter, N. Y. 

He was nominated for Circuit Judge in 
1898, and ran at the head of his ticket. 
His father was James B. R. Powell, a well- 
known eastern merchant. 





Photo by Strauss. 

ELMER NATHANIEL POWELL, 

a prominent figure among the vounger 
members of the bar, was born at Farming- 
ton, Delaware, September 19, 1869. His 
parents moved to Dover, Del., when he 
was seven years old. He was graduated 
from Wilmington Academy at Dover in 
1886, and then took a post-graduate 
course of three years at Johns Hopkins 
University. After leaving the univer- 
sity he took up educational work, and was 
principal of an Academv at Hillsboro, 
Md. 

In 1890 he came to Kansas City, where 
his elder brother was a well-established 
lawyer. He took the law course at the 
University of Kansas, graduating in 1895 
with the highest honors of the class. Re- 
turning to Kansas City, he began the prac- 
tice of law with his brother, under the 
present firm name of Powell & Powell. 

Mr. Powell was married October ig, 
1879, to Miss Illga Herbel, of Jacksonville, 
111. They have one child, Dorothy, three 
years old. 

In iSq5 Mr. Powell was made secretary 
of the Kansas City Law School, which he 
helped to found, and served in that ca- 
pacity until 1 901. He was treasurer of 
the Bar Association one term. At the 
university Mr. Powell was a member of 
the Beta Theta Psi Fraternitv. 



nS 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

JOSEPH M. PATTERSON 
was born June 15, 1865, in Cynthiana, 
Harrison County, Kentucky. He spent 
his boyhood there, receiving his education 
in the public schools and in Georgetown 
Academv, after which he entered the Ohio 
Medical College in 18S4. He took his de- 
gree in 1886, and then spent a year in the 
Pulte Medical College, after which he be- 
gan practice in Augusta, Ga., remaining 
there for three years. 

After four years in Champagne, 111., 
where he removed from Augusta, Dr. Pat- 
terson decided to specialize, and in 1894 
entered the Illinois Eye and Ear Infirm- 
ary at Chicago, after which he took courses 
in the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, 
the Manhattan Eye and Ear Infirmary, 
the Knapp Opthalmic and Aural Insti- 
tute, and the New York Opthalmic Hos- 
pital College. It was from the latter in- 
stitution that he received the degree of 
Eye and Ear Surgeon. 

In 1898 he came to Kansas City. 

Dr. Patterson is a member of the Kan- 
sas City Club, the Evanston Golf Club, 
the Kansas City Driving Club, is vice- 
president of the October Ball Association, 
and is a thirty-second degree Mason, a 
Knight Templar, and a Shriner. 

He married Miss Bowman, of Kentucky, 
in 1887, and they have one boy. 




WIN FRED S. PONTIUS 
was born in Fulton, Indiana, December 
15, 1859, of a family that has been rooted 
in American soil for one hundred and fifty 
years. 

He received a good education, but went 
to work at a comparatively early age, as 
American boys have a habit of doing. 

He came to Kansas City in 1886, attract- 
ed by the possibilities of the growing 
town, and has remained here ever since. 

Soon after his arrival here he embarked 
in the grain business, in which he achieved 
a most substantial success. He later went 
into the coal and ice business, and was so 
e ngaged when honored with the nomina- 
tion for Sheriff in 1900. 

Mr. Pontius has always been a staunch 

and active Republican, "but was never 
anything of an office-seeker, and the nom- 
ination came to him as a surprise. He 
was elected — the first Republican Sheriff 
in Jackson County for thirty years — and 
made an admirable officer. 

Without any effort on his part, Mr. 
Pontius was given a re-nomination in 1902, 
but went down with the rest of his ticket 
in the Democratic landslide. 

He is a married man, and a member of 
several secret societies. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



119 





Photo hij Strauss. 

CLARENCE STEUBEN PALMER 
the well-known lawyer, was born in Sted- 
man, Chautauqua county, New York, 
January, 27, 1857. He went to the dis- 
trict schools, and then attended the high 
schools in Mayville and Westfield, two 
New York towns in which he subse- 
quently lived. 

He was graduated from Hamilton col- 
lege in 1879 with high honors, after which 
he read law under Hon. W. L. Sessions, 
of Panama, New York. He was admitted 
to the bar in 1881, and immediately 
formed a partnership with his distin- 
guished teacher, which continued until 
1885, when Mr. Palmer came to Kansas 
City, winning recognition from the start. 

Mr. Palmer was appointed assistant 
city counselor in 1894 by Frank Rozzelle, 
and continued in office by Judge H. C. 
McDougal, Rozelle's Republican suc- 
cessor. During his two terms he played 
an important part in the park and boule- 
vard litigation, helping to win for the city 
in both circuit and supreme courts. 

Mr. Palmer is a prominent member of 
the local Bar Association, a Mason, a 
member of the local chapter of the Sons 
of the Revolution, and belongs to the 
Theta Delta and Phi Beta Kappa frater- 
nities. 

He married Miss Julia St. John, of Sa- 
lem, Indiana, in 1886. Their living chil- 
dren are Clarence and Edward. 



ISAAC M. RIDGE, 
the pioneer physician, was born July 9, 
1825, in Adair county, Kentucky, but 
transferred his residence to Lafayette 
county, Mo., in 1833. He was educated 
in a private school and in an academy at 
Dover, and also read medicine in that 
town. 

He afterwards entered the Transylvania 
University, Lexington, Ky., and was 
graduated in 1S4S. He returned to Kan- 
sas City, then YVestport landing, and 
opened an office on the levee. He was 
the only physician then, and for some 
time afterwards, and his journeys covered 
deep into Missouri and out into Kansas. 
The cholera epidemic in 1849 found a 
worthy foe in Dr. Ridge, although his her- 
culean labors finally led to an attack of 
the disease. He recovered by a miracle 
almost. 

In 1875, Dr. Ridge retired from active 
practice, and has sinee devoted his time 
to his immense property interests. The 
Ridge building and Masonic building, 
built and owned by him are monuments 
that will endure. Public-spirited to the 
last degree he has given freely of land and 
money to the city, with no other hope 
than to see it grow in greatness. Dr. 
Ridge was made a Master Mason in 1849, 
the first in Kansas City, and is a Shriner. 
He was martied in 1850 to Miss Eliza 
Smart, long since deceased. Five children 
were born of this marriage, three of wh< mi 
are living. In 1882, he married Miss May 
D. Campbell, noted for her charm, beauty 
and wonderful musical talent. 



120 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 





JOHN M. ROOD 
was born on a farm near Quincy, Illinois, 
May 14, 1858. All of his earlier life was 
passed at his birthplace, and he acquired 
an education in the district schools of his 
home county. He taught school three 
years at Pavson, 111., after leaving school, 
after which he took the commercial course 
at the Gem City Business College in Quin- 
cy. When he had completed his course 
of study he'went into the lumber business 
as a book-keeper. He left Quincy in 1880, 
going to Carrollton, Mo., where he engaged 
in geneial merchandizing in the employ of 

a firm there. He came to Kansas City in 
the spring of 1S67, and soon after his ar- 
rival here helped organize and became 
secretary of the Midland Lumber Com- 
pany. He sold his stock, but retained his 
employment with the linn for several 
years, when he went with the Deardorff 
Lumber Company in 1893 in charge of the 
linn's local business. In April, 1902, Mr 
Rood left the Deardorff company to be- 
come the vice-president and local man- 
ager of the Current River Lumber Com- 
pany, in which he is a large stockholder. 

Mr. Rood is active in politics, having 
been elected a member of the upper house 
of the Council in 1900 for a term of four 
years, and in 1902 was the unanimous 
choice of the Jackson County Democratic 
Club for its president. 

Mr. Rood married Miss Sarah Atwood of 
Carrollton. They have four childreen, 
Mary L., Wilhelmina, Florence, and Jo- 
sephine. 



Photo by Thomson. 

JOHN EMERSON ROBERTS 

was born in 1853 in Fredonia, Ohio, the 
son of a Baptist minister. His principal 
and most important education was re- 
ceived at Shurtleff College in LTpper Alton, 
111 , from which institution he was gradu- 
ated in 1878 with the degree of D.D. His 
reputation for eloquence and ability, al- 
ready won, soon secured him a position 
with the Baptist Church in Carrollton, 
111., where he remained until 1881. He 
then accepted a call from the First Bap- 
tist Church of Kansas City, and here he 
gained new laurels by his eloquence. In 
1884 he found that he could no longer 
reconcile himself to orthodox teachings, 
and resigning his pastorate, accepted a 
call from a Unitarian Church in Grand 
Rapids, Mich. 

In 1887 he returned to Kansas City to 
take charge of All Souls' Unitarian 
Church,' and in this position it seemed that 
he had reached the zenith of his fame. 

But even the Unitarian Church was too 
narrow for his soaring thought, and in 1897 
he resigned, and, launching forth on bold 
new lines, organized the Church of This 
World. It has been said "there is no 
other church like it in this world. " It has 
no organization, no officers, and he lec- 
tures, rather than sermonizes. 

Dr. Roberts married Miss Edith Wilson 
and thev have two children. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



121 





irZ 




11 

B 







Photo by Strauss. 

WILLIAM ASHLRY RULE 
was born in St. Louis September 3, 1859. 




Photo by Strauss. 



He received his education at the St. Louis 
public and high schools, and after his grad- 
uation took a position with the St. Louis 
Transfer Company, of which R. P. Tansey 
was president. Mr. Tansey was interested 
in the old Hibernian Bank, and soon placed 
Mr. Rule there. He afterwards went to 
the Third National Bank, and in 1S87 
came to Kansas City. 

He accepted a position with the National 
Bank of Commerce, then at Sixth and 
Delaware streets, and from a clerkship 
rose to the position of assistant cashier. 
In 1895 he was made cashier, which posi- 
tion he now holds. 

He was married in 1880 to Miss Lizzie 
Harrison, of St. Louis, and is the father 
of three children, Bernard, Ashley, and 
Katherine. 

A domestic man and a very busy man, 
Mr. Rule has never failed to identify him- 
self with public movements, and has been 
a power in the development of the town. 
He is president of the Kansas City Horse 
Show Association, treasurer of the United 
States and Mexican Trust Company, one 
of the vice-presidents of the Orient Rail- 
way, and a director in many other com- 
panies. 

He belongs to the Commercial Club and 
the Driving Club, and is associated with C. 
C. Christie in the promotion of a race- 
track south of the citv 



LOUIS R. RIDDLE 
was born in Porestville, Minnesota, Sep- 
tember 29, 1S70, but spent his boyhood 
in the neighboring town of Rxcelsior, where 
he received his early education in the pub- 
lic schools. 

When it came time for him to decide 
upon a career, Mr. Riddle journeyed to 
Chicago, and entered the steam-heatim; 
business. He began at the very bottom, 
working in the shops, and secured a thor- 
ough knowledge of heating mechanics. 

His firm finally sent him to New Orleans 
as an agent, and in 1898 he came to Kan- 
sas City as western agent for the Western 
Paul Steam Heating Company. His suc- 
cess was such that he decided to go into 
business for himself, and in 1901 he did so. 
He handles a line of steam specialties, and 
has worked up a splendid business 

Mr. Riddle is an enthusiastic member 
of the Kansas City Athletic Club, ami is 
one of the Blue Diamond's crack athlete- 
He is also a Mason, and belongs to the 
k Commercial Club. 



122 



MEN WHO MADE KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Thomson. 
ROBERT EATON RICHARDSON 
was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
July 28, 1 86 1. While still a child his 
parents moved to Concord, Mass., where 
he spent his boyhood. At fifteen he 
took a position in Pittsburg, but re- 
turned to Concord after three years 
and entered the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology. After graduating 
from there in 1885, he accepted a pro- 
fessorship in a military school in Mor- 
gan Park, 111., where he taught mathe- 
matics and mechanical drawing. 

Quitting pedagogy, he resumed en- 
gineering, and went with the Western 
Electrical Company for five years, and 
then formed an engineering company in 
Chicago with R. H. Pierce. In 1891 
Mr. Pierce was made chief engineer of 
the World's Fair, and Mr. Richardson 
was appointed assistant. He laid out 
the lighting of the grounds and had 
charge of the underground work. When 
his work was finished, he accepted the 
position of assistant manager of the An- 
sonia Electric Company, of Chicago, and 
when the World's Fair was over re- 
sumed partnership with Mr. Pierce. The 
firm is now Pierce, Richardson & Neiler. 

In 1899 Mr. Richardson came to Kan- 
sas City to report upon the Kansas City 
Electric Light Company for the Armour 
interests, and was induced to remain as 
genneral manager. 

He was married January 9, 1894, to 
Miss Maude A. Richardson (no relation.) 



FRANK FINLEY ROZZELLE, 
the sixth son of Wesley and Maria Roz- 
velle, was born near Georgetown, Ken- 
tucky. Three months later the family 
removed to Caldwell County, Missouri. 
His father died when he was about eight 
years old, leaving him to the care of his 
mother and oldest brother. He spent 
his boyhood on the farm, attending 
school in the winter, and at fifteen en- 
tered Missouri University. After grad- 
uation, he went through the law school 
at Ann Arbor, and then located in Kan- 
sas City. 

Mr. Rozzelle has always been deeply 
interested in matters pertaining to mu- 
nicipal government. In 1890 he was 
appointed Police Commissioner by Gov- 
ernor Francis, resigning the position 
after a year to accept the office of City 
Counselor under Mayor Holmes. He 
held this office four years, having been re- 
appointed by Mayor Cowherd. During 
Mr. Rozzelle 's tenure of office, the most 
important litigation in which the city 
has ever been engaged devolved upon 
that office. The greater part of the wa- 
terworks litigation, resulting in city own- 
ership, was waged by him. Another 
victory he won for the city was in the 
fight against the gas company, which had 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



123 




Pholo by Strauss. 

JUDGE ELIJAH ROBINSON 
was born in Lincoln County, Missouri, 
February 9, i860. Like most other well- 
known lawyers, he spent his boyhood on a 
farm and attended district school His 
later education was gained at Watson 
Seminary, which he left in 1S69. He 
studied law at Troy, Mo., and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1870, practicing first 
at Bowling Green and then at Louisiana, 
Mo. 

It was in 1889 that he left the latter 
place to come to Kansas City. In that 
year the firm of McDougal & Robinson 
was formed, the partnership continuing 
until July, 1891. Since then Judge Rob- 
inson has been associated with Stuart 
Carkener. 

January 1, 1891, he became attorney 
for the Missouri Pacific Railroad at Kansas 
City. 

He was married to Miss Lelia Harris at 
BowlingGreen, Missouri, in October, 1876, 
and has one son, Harris Robinson, a grad- 
uate of Princeton, now in his father's law 
office. 

Before coming to Kansas City, Judge 
Robinson figured extensively in politics. 
He was appointed County Attorney of 
Pike County in February, 1871, was elect- 
ed Prosecuting Attorney in November, 
1S72, re-elected in 1874 and then was elect- 
ed Judge of the Third Judicial Circuit, 
serving six years, from 1880 to 1886. He 
was a member of the Democratic State 
Central Committee from 1874 to 1876. 
Since July, 1891, Judge Robinson has been 
attorney for the National Bank of Com- 
merce, and stands in the front rank of 
corporation lawyers in the State. 




Photo by Strauss. 

EMMETT MONTGOMERY REILY 
was born in Sedalia, Mo., October 21, 1S66. 
Until the age of fifteen he lived in Callo- 
way County, when he moved to Ft. Worth, 
Tex. 

He was engaged in Ft. Worth in the 
newspaper and real estate business, and 
was prominent in the political affairs of 
the State as a Republican, being chairman 
of that party's City and County Commit- 
tees in Ft. Worth, besides being twice 
nominated by his party for County Clerk. 
He served as a member of the City Com- 
mittee for eight years. 

Mr. Reily came to this city in 1892. 
Former Mayor James A. Jones made him 
his secretary in 1896, which place he held 
through two terms. He went into the 
printing business after Mr. Jones' term of 
office expired, and remained there until ap- 
pointed Chief Deputy by County Assessor 
Nofsinger. 

Mr. Reily holds the distinction of being 
the man who organized the first Roose- 
velt Club. The club came into being 
Tuly 18, 1 90 1, and the membership made 
such prodigious strides that it soon 
reached 3,000. The death of President 
McKinley soon after made the club use- 
less for the purpose of its organization 
that of making President Roosevelt the 
Republican nominee for President in 
1904 — and it dissolved. 

Mr. Reily was made Assistant Postmas- 
ter by Postmaster J. H. Harris soon after 
his appointment in 1902. 

Mr. Reily married Miss Minnie Mount - 
fortt at Ft. Worth in 1902. They have 
one child, Gilliam, born in 1896. 



324 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

WILLIAM A. REPP 
was born in Kunkstown, Washington Coun- 
ty, Maryland, August 8, 1856. In 1S62 
the family moved to Indianapolis, Ind., 
for a while, returning East at the close of 
the civil war, and located in Washington, 
D. C. Here Mr. Repp lived until he had 
attained his majority, meanwhile acquir- 
ing an education in the public schools of 
the city. In 1877 he went to Indianap- 
olis, and engaged in the baking business 
with a brother, the firm name being the 
Repp Bros. Vienna Baking Company. 
Mr. Repp remained three years in Indian- 
apolis, and then went out in Kansas, en- 
gaging in the cattle business at Spring- 
vale as a member of the Goodrich Cattle 
Company. Immigration was heavy to 
this section, and the consequent increase 
in land values made ranging too costly 
to yield a profit, so in 1884 Mr. Repp 
went to Pratt, Kas., and opened a furni- 
ture store. He stayed there six years, 
then went to Arkansas City, where he and 
his brother conducted a business. In all, 
Mr. Repp lived in Arkansas City ten 
years, the latter portion of his business life 
there beint;" in connection with Mr. Charles 
P. Duff, who is now associated with him 
in the Duff & Repp Company here. 

Mr. Repp came to Kansas City two years 
ago to become secretary and treasurer of 
the J. H. North Furniture and Carpet 
Company, which, in a reorganization, was 
merged into and swallowed up by the 
Duff & Repp Furniture Companv. Mr. 
Repp is secretary and treasurer of this 
firm. 




Photo by Thomson. 

WALTER CLARKE ROOT 
was born in Atlanta, Ga., December 8, 1859 
but his parents removed to New York city 
when he was six years old. He went to the 
New York public schools, and finished his 
education in the College of the City of 
Xew York. He then went to Chicago, 
and entered the office of Burnham & Root, 
architects, where he remained for six years, 
working and studying. In 1886 he came 
to Kansas City, started the practice of his 
profession alone, and is now ranked as one 
of the great architects of the country. 

In 1896 the present firm of Root & Sie- 
mens was formed. 

In addition to many fine residences, 

warehouses, and business buildings, Mr. 

Root designed Science Hall at Central 

College, Fayette, Mo., the Scarritt Bible 
and Training School, the W. J. Smith 

warehouse, and the Thayer building. 
The firm of Root & Siemens is responsible 
for the Museum at Kansas LTniversity, 
the Cupples Dormitory, Central College, 
the Fowler shops, the Postal Telegraph 
building, the W. J. Smith plant, the River 
side power-house, and many other large 
structures. 

Mr. Root married Miss Lora Bullene in 
1 89 1, and they have three children, two 
boys and a girl. 

He belongs to the Country Club, the 
Commercial Club, the American Institute 
of Architects and is a Mason. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



125 




Photo by Strauss. 

MOSES THURSTON RUNNELS 
a physician who has acquired a large prac- 
tice in Kansas City, and a man of more 
than ordinary attainments, was born De- 
cember 26, 1S49, in Licking County, Ohio. 
He was reared on a farm, and was edu- 
cated at Oberlin, where he attended four 
years. 

He began the study of medicine under 
his brother, Dr. O. S. Runnels, of Indian- 
apolis, Ind., and in 1S74 completed a 
course in the Cleveland Homeopathic 
Hospital College, which distinguished him 
with several prizes and positions of honor. 
His practice of medicine was begun at 
Franklin, Ind. After eighteen months 
he took post-graduate courses in New- 
York city, and returned to become the 
partner of his brother at Indianapolis, 
with whom he was associated until 1884. 

In June, 1885, he came to Kansas City, 
where, besides attending to his practice, 
he occupies chairs in several medical col- 
leges, and has contributed largely to the 
literature of medicine. 

Dr. Runnels was married in Indianapo- 
lis, to Miss Emily Lamb Johnson. Three 
children were born to them, two of whom 
are living. 




Photo by Strauss. 

ISAAC PALMER RYLAND 
was born October 6, 1861, in Lexington, 
Missouri. He went through the public 
schools of Lexington, and then attended 
Central College at Fayette, Mo., from 
which he was graduated in 1 88 1 . 

Returning to Lexington, he read law in 
the office of his father, Judge John E. Ry- 
land, and after gaining admittance to the 
bar began the practice of his profession 
there in Lexington. 

He came to Kansas City in 1888. 

The law firm of Ryland & Taylor was 
formed, and after the dissolution of this 
partnership Mr. Ryland allied himself with 
Mr. Lyon. For some years, however, he 
has been practicing alone. 

Mr. Ryland is a member of the Bar As- 
sociation and a member of the Commer- 
cial Club. He is also a Mason of high de- 
gree. 

Mr. Ryland married Miss Bessie Knick 
erbocker April 14, 1886, in Fayette, Mo., 
and is the father of four children, John, 
Louise, Jeannette, and Robert. 



126 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

JULES C. ROSENBERGER 
was born in Davenport, Iowa, December 
14, 1873. His parents removed to Kan- 
sas City when he was but six years old, 
and his early education was received here 
at the public and high schools . He 
was graduated from the Central High 
School in 1891, and then entered the law 
department at Ann Arbor. He was grad- 
uated from there in 1893, but, in view of his 
youth, decided to defer the practice of law. 
He accepted a position as court reporter 
for the Kansas City Star, and remained in 
that capacity for two years. He then en- 
tered the law office of C. O. Tichenor, 
where he resumed his legal studies. He 
was admitted to the bar in 1895, and soon 
afterwards formed an association with the 
late Francis M. Black, former Chief Jus- 
tice of the Supreme Court. 

Mr. Rosenberger is general attorney for 
the United States Casualty Company of 
New York, and has specialized on the 
company's side of insurance litigation. 

He also represented the wholesale liquor 
dealers in a test case involving the consti- 
tutionality of that feature of the prohibi- 
tion act in Kansas which prevents sales- 
men from taking orders for liquor, and suc- 
ceeded in having the section declared un- 
constitutional. 

He married Miss Blanche J. Hess, of 
New York city, March 19, 1902. 




Photo by Strauss. 

GRANT I. ROSENZWEIG 
was born September 15, 1856, in Erie, 
Pennsylvania. He lived there through 
the days of his boyhood, attending the 
public and high schools, and afterwards 
prepared for Yale. He was graduated 
from the great New Haven institution in 
1887, and soon afterwards came out to 
Kansas City. 

While in Yale, Mr. Rosenzweig took a 
partial law course, and completed this by 
study in a local office. He was admitted 
to practice in 1889, and refusing to ally 
himself with anyone, the young lawyer 
flung his shingle to the breeze. 

He continued to practice alone until 
1892, when he formed a partnership with 
Fred Doggett under the firm name of 
Doggett' & Rosenzweig, which continued 
until 1894, when it was dissolved by the 
death of Mr. Doggett. Since that time 
Mr. Rosenzweig has been practicing alone. 

He married Miss Mathilde Rosenberger 
October 19, 1S93. 

Mr. Rosenzweig is a member of the 
Progress Club, is a Mason, and also belongs 
to the A. O. U. W. He was also one of 
the leading spirits in the organization of 
the Yale Alumni Association. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



127 




Photo by Strauss. 

FRANKLIN EVERETT REED, 
of the well-known law firm of Reed & 
Reed, was born in Beaver County 
Pennsylvania, January 8, 1S67. From 
1869 to 1878 his family resided at Ot- 
tawa, Kas., and from 1879 to 1890 Mr. 
Reed made his home at Newton, Kas. 
Since 1890 he has practiced law in Kan- 
sas City. 

Mr. Reed was graduated from the 
Newton, Kas., High School in 1882, 
and entered the Kansas State Univers- 
sity in 1884, where he was graduat- 
with the class of 1889, and had the hon- 
or to be elected valedictorian. 

Until he was sixteen years old, Mr. 
Reed taught school in Harvey County, 
Kansas. At the University he was a 
member of the Beta Theta Pi Frater- 
nity. He represented the University 
in the State oratorical contest in 1889. 
Mr. Reed's success in college presaged 
the success he should have in later life, 
his firm being among the most eagerly 
sought by clients. 

Mr. Reed was married in Kansas City 
in 1896 to Miss Pearlena Kroh. They 
have one son, Cameron K., five years 
old. 




Photo hy Strauss. 

WILLIAM T. REED, 
senior member of the law firm of Reed 
& Reed, was born near Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, April 4, 1864. When he was 
still a child of four his father went to 
Kansas, living first at Ottawa and then 
at Newton. 

Mr. Reed was graduated from the 
State University of Kansas with the 
class of '88, was admitted to the bar the 
following year, and practiced first at 
Newton. But this was too small a town 
to hold a man of Mr. Reed's abilities. 
In January, 1890, seeking a wider field, 
he moved to Kansas City Kas., where, 
with his brother, he built up a splendid 
reputation for the firm of Reed & Reed. 
After five years across the river the firm 
was moved to Kansas City, Mo. 

Mr. Reed was married in April, 1S92, 
to Miss Grace Peterson, of Akron, 0. 
There are two children, Marian and 
Grace. 

Mr. Reed recently attracted atten- 
tion to his firm by an attack upon the 
packers' combine, a case that is still 
pending in the court. 



128 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

LOUIS P. ROTHSCHILD 

was born in Leavenworth, Kansas, July 8, 
1864, and lived there until his removal to 
Kansas City in 1901. He received his ed- 
ucation in the public and high schools, 
and after completing the latter course en- 
tered the store of his father, Philip Roth- 
schild, the pioneer merchant of the West. 

In 1901 the business was removed to Kan- 
sas City, and the subject of this sketch 
and his brother, Alfred, at once began a 
campaign of energy and idea, which has re- 
sulted in victorv and success. 

In Leavenworth, Mr. Rothschild built 
the first independent telephone in that 
town, and was also the moving spirit in the 
organization of the Merchants' Electric 
Light Company. 

Since coming to Kansas City he has 
identified himself with the public life of 
the town, and is a member of the Com- 
mercial Club, and has also actively parti- 
cipated in the Priests of Pallas movement 
and the Flower Show. 

He is a thirty-second degree Mason, 
Scottish Rite, a Shriner, an Klk, and a 
Knight of Pythias. 

Mr. Rothschild was married in 1899 to 
Miss Westheimer, of Si. Joseph, and they 
have one son. 




Photo by Strauss. 

ALFRED P. ROTHSCHILD 

was born in Leavenworth, Kansas, April 

24, 186S, the son of Philip Rothschild, 

who, as early as 1853, opened a store on 

on the present site of Kansas City, and 

then in 1 855 moved to Leavenworth, then a 
town six months old. He opened a store 
there, and the business is still in existence, 
tin mgh now carried on by his sons. 

The subject of this sketch went through 
the public and high schools of Leaven- 
worth, and after completing his education 
entered the store of his father, as his broth- 
er, Louis, had done before him. 

As the father grew older, the business 
more and more devolved upon the sons, 
and un.Ier their management it grew and 
grew. In 1901 a removal to Kansas City 
was decided upon. 

Like . his brother, Mr. Rothschild was 
prominent in the civic affairs of Leaven- 
worth, and has also actively interested 
himself in local affairs and public move- 
ments. He belongs to the Commercial 
Club, and is identified with the other kin- 
dred public institutions. 

Mr. Rothschild was married in 1902 to 
Miss Alice Gumbel, of Kansas City. 

He belongs to no societies with the ex- 
ception of the Elks. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



12<) 




Photo by Strauss. 

CHARLES RENICK 
was born out in Sni-a-bar Township in this 
County (Jackson), May 5, 1867. He conies 
from a line of Jackson Countyans. 
His grandfather first settled here in 1828, 
and both his father and mother were born 
in this county, the former in 1832 and the 
latter in 1839. His father, John T. Ren- 
ick, is one of the most prominent citizens 
of the county, and it was on his farm that 
Charles was born. Mr. Renick received 
his first schooling in the district schools 
of the county, and finished a course at the 
College at Odessa. He left school life at 
twenty-one years of age, and entered mer- 
cantile life in Independence. He re- 
mained in the store for three years, leaving 
it to go on the road as a commercial trav- 
eler for Burnham, Hanna, Munger & Co., 
and later for Swofford Bros. In 1895 he 
went into mercantile business for himself 
down in Oak Grove, and achieved a suc- 
cess. 

In 189S he was given the nomination for 
Clerk of the Criminal Court by the Demo- 
cratic party, and was elected by a flatter- 
ing majority. His ability and integrity 
in" office, together with native energy, 
made him the logical nominee of the party 
to succeed himself, and in 1902 he was nom- 
inated by acclamation. 

He was married Christmas day, 1900, 
to Mrs. Almeda K. Humphrey, daughter 
of Dr. Willis P. King. 

He is an enthusiastic Elk, and holds 
membership in several other secret organi- 
zations. 




Photo by Strauss. 

I. J. RINGOLSKY, 
lawyer, was born September 24, 1S64, in 
Leavenworth, Kas., son of Joseph and 
Rachael Ringolsky. He was graduated 
from the Leavenworth High .School in 
18S2 and from the Ann Arbor Law School 
in 1884. Two years later he was gradu- 
ated from the department of political 
science in the University of Michigan. 

In 1884 Mr. Ringolsky came to Kansas 
City, where he has since achieved promi- 
nence at the bar. 

He is a Mason, an Elk, a K. of P., and a 
member of the Phi Delta Phi College Fra- 
ternity. 

He is a Democrat in politics, but has 
never sought political preferment. 

Mr. Ringolsky was married December 
18, 1889, to Miss Josie Loewen, daughter 
of David Loewen, of St, Louis. Mrs. 
Ringolsky died October 24, 1896, after 
having been an invalid for five years 
She left one son, Sidney I., now eight years 
old. 



i3° 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

JAMES CHADWICK RIEGER, 
the well known lawyer, was horn Septem- 
ber 30, 1855, in Beaufort, North Carolina. 
His parents moved to Kansas City in 1 87 1 . 
In the Kansas City High School and the 
University of Michigan Mr. Rieger derived 
his education. He began the study of 
law in the office of Brumback & Traber, 
and was admitted to the bar in 1876. 

For several years he was attorney for 
the Bank of Commerce and for the Chica- 
go, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Com- 
pany. 

From 1 89 1 to 1894 he was Mayor of 
Westport, having been elected to that 
place of honor during his absence in Flor- 
ida and without his knowledge. As May- 
or of Westport, he was instrumental in en- 
gineering a great part of the public im- 
provements of that aristocratic suburb. 

Mr. Rieger was married August 27, 
1876, to Miss Lillian A. Nierly. They 
have four children. 

Both Mr. Rieger and his wife are of Ger- 
man extraction,. 




Photo by Strauss. 

BOWMAN D. RANSON 

was born in Kansas City August 18, 1874, 
and with the exception ot a year, has 
lived his whole life here. His father, 
Joseph C. Ranson, came here in 1845, 
and his mother in 1844, an< ^ played im- 
portant parts in the upbuilding of the 
community. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
public and high schools, and then entered 
the Wentworth Military College in Lex- 
ington, Missouri. After completing his 
course there, Mr. Ranson entered the 
office of Probate Judge Guinotte, then in 
the old court-house at Second and Main 
streets, and remained there for a couple 
of years. 

He then went down into Texas, and 

for a year was engaged in the insurance 

business in Denison, but soon tired of 

Texas, and returned to Kansas City. He 

worked as a clerk for awhile, embarked in 
the brokerage business, and in 1899 was 
offered a position in the office of County 
Clerk Crittenden, where he stayed until 
1900. 

In that year he was the moving spirit 
in the formation of a company to buy 
out the Faultless Laundry, and operate 
it on a large scale. Mr. Ranson is vice- 
president and general manager. 

He married Miss Blanche Edgecomb 
October 23, 1901. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



'131 




Photo by Strauss. 

JAMES J. SWOFFORD 
was born in Franklin County, Illinois, 
August 25, 1S52. His boyhood days 
were spent on a farm, and what educa- 
tion he received was in the district 
schools and in the public schools of Ben- 
ton, 111., where the family moved from 
the country. His father died when 
the boy was only eight years old, 
leaving a wife and four children. The 
young John went to work in a dry goods 
store when thirteen, and has been en- 
gaged in that business ever since. At 
the age of twenty-three, having saved 
up what money he could, he and his 
brother, B. S. Swofford, went into busi- 
ness for themselves in Shawneetown, 
111., $1,600 being the amount of their 
capital. Ten years they remained there, 
and then thev came to Kansas City. 
In 1897 the Swofford Bros. Dry Goods 
Company was incorporated, and to-day 
the capitalization is for $1,000,000, 

Mr. Swofford was appointed a mem- 
ber of the Park Board in April, 1901, 
is chairman of the Finance Committee to 
erect a home for the Manufacturers' 
Association, and was chairman of the 
committee that secured the Democrat 
ic National Convention. He is a di- 
rector in the Commercial Club, belongs 
to the Evanston Golf Club, is a direc- 
tor in the Bank .of Commerce, and is also 
a Mason, a Knight Templar, and a Shri- 
ner. 

He married Miss Fay R. Powell in 
Shawneetown October 2, 1S77. They 
have three children, Ralph P., Helen, 
and J. J. Jr. 




Photo by Strauss. 

ROBERT T. SWOFFORD 
was born in Benton, Illinois, August 2, 
i860. He lived in his native place until 
he was thirteen years of age, and gained 
an education in the public schools of the 
town. He took a clerical situation in a 
commercial establishment soon after leav- 
ing school, where he remained until he re- 
moved to Shawneetown, 111. 

There he was also employed by a mer- 
cantile firm, and gained the experience 
which fitted him for better things. Tir- 
ing of the East, Mr. Swofford came to Kan- 
sas City in 1887, and entered into the em- 
ploy of the old W. B. Grimes Dry Goods 
Co., with which he remained until 1891, 
when the Swofford Bros Dry Goods Com- 
pany was incorporated with him as its vice- 
president. 

The company's first place of business 
was at 707, 709, 711 Wyandotte Street. 
In 1900 the business was removed to the 
block facing Eighth Street between Broad- 
wav and May Streets, its present location. 

Mr. Swofford, among other organiza- 
tions, belongs to the Masons, is a Shriner, 
and holds membership in the Commercial 

Club. 

He married Miss Bertrees in Illinois in 
1SS6, and they have two children, a boy 
and a girl. 



132 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




GEORGE MADISON SHELLEY 
was born in Calloway County, Ken- 
tucky, in 1850. His parents removed 
to Keokuk, la., shortly after his birth, 
and it was there he spent his boyhood. 
After going through the schools of Keo- 
kuk he attended a business college in 
Chicago, and then entered Princeton. 

After leaving the university, Mr. 
Shelley spent two years in foreign trav- 
el, visiting China, Japan, Central Amer- 
ica, the West Indies, and toher places. 

He came to Kansas City in 1870, and 
after a short experience with the gro- 
cery business, changed his faith to 
wholesale dry goods. He went into the 
wholesale dry goods business in 1870, 
and has been so engaged ever since. 

Mr. Shelley is a Democrat, and has al- 
ways taken an active and leading part 
in politics. During his residence here 
in Kansas City he has been nominated 
for Mayor five times. In 1878 he was 
elected Mayor, and then re-elected. 
He has served three terms as Police 
Commissioner, having been succesively 
appointed by Crittenden, Marmaduke, 
and Stone, and was postmaster of Kan- 
sas City during Cleveland's first term. 
In 1 90 1 he was elected president of the 
Uppper House and Board of Public 
Works, which position he now holds. 

Mr. Shelley was married in 1872, and 
has one son, James. 




Photo by Thomson. 

FRANK PAYNE SEBREE 
was born in Fayette, Missouri, October 
25, 1854. His education was received 
first at Central College in Fayette, then at 
Pritchett College in Glasgow, Mo., and 
then he entered the law department of 
the Missouri State University. After 
being graduated and duly admitted to the 
bar he located in Marshall, where he prac- 
ticed law until 1889, when he came to 
Kansas City for a permanent residence. 
The year prior to his removal to Kansas 
City he was elected to the Legislature from 
Saline County, and during his term served 
with conspicuous ability as chairman of 
the Judiciary Committee. 

Mr. Sebree is a life-long Democrat, and 
has always taken an active interest in pol- 
itics. He served as chairman of the 
County Committee in the campaign of 
1898., In 1902 Mr. Sebree was appoint- 
ed Police Commissioner by Governor 
Dockery, and in August resigned that po- 
sition to accept the more important place 
of chairman of the Election Board. Mr. 
Sebree has also served as County Coun- 
selor, in fact, resigned that well-salaried 
office to accept the appointment of Po- 
lice Commissioner, which pays practically 
nothing. 

In 1883 Mr. Sebree married Miss Russie 
Boyd, daughter of Colonel Sam Boyd, of 
Marshall. They have one son, Sam, born 
in 1887. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY 



i * ? 




Photo by Strauss. 

HENRY P. STEWART 
was born in Hartford, Connecticut, 
September 25, 1858. He received his 
education at the public schools and the 
Christian Brothers' College. He came 
to Kansas City at the age of nineteen, 
and his first commercial venture was in 
the coal and wood business on the levee. 
He remained in it for five years, but at 
the end of that time engaged exclusive- 
ly in the sand business, in which he had 
become interested some years before. 
A pioneer in the industry, he brought 
new ideas into vogue, so that pontoon 
bridges gave way to the more modern 
plan of bucket dredges, invented by the 
late Robert Gilham, and the bucket 
dredges to steam dredges and centrifu- 
gal pumps. 

In 1897 he formed a partnership with 
Frank Peck under the name of the 
Stewart-Peck Sand Company, and they 
now own their own cars, switch prop- 
erties, steamboats, and dredges, and 
yards. 

Mr. Stewart has always been a Dem- 
ocrat and active politically. He was 
elected to the Council from the Seventh 
Ward in 1888, and in 1890 resigned to 
make the race for Marshall. He was 
elected, and his record was such as to 
secure his re-election in 1892. 

Since 1892 he has devoted himself 
to his business, and it was only at the 
solicitation of friends that he accepted 
the office of Police Commissioner in Au- 
gust, 1902. 

He married Miss Minnie Duke in 1880 
and is the father of five children, three 
boys and two girls 




Photo by Thomson. 

B. HOWARD SMITH 
was l)i >rn near Vienna, Scott County, Ohio, 
February 5, 1848. The family removed 
in 1 86 1 to Seymour, Ind., and four years 
later again, locating on a farm in Hamil- 
ton County, Ohio, near Cincinnati. Mr. 
Smith received a common school educa- 
tion in the schoools of the three towns 
mentioned. He removed later to Miami, 
O., where he was married to Miss Mary E. 
Stellie. In 1873 Mr. Smith left Miami 
for Indianapolis, Ind., where he went into 
the baking business three years later. 
After fourteen years' residence in Indian- 
apolis, he came West, starting a cracker 
and sweet goods factory in Springfield, 
Mo. The factory was the most complete 
of any among the interior cities of the 
State, but burned down a trifle over a year 
after it was started with complete loss. 
Mr. Smith then came to Kansas City. 
He went into the baking business at Ninth 
and Oak Streets, where he remained five 
years. His growing business necessitated 
more room after that time, so he was com- 
pelled to seek larger quarters. He re- 
moved to 911 East Twelfth Street. 
There he remained for five years more, 
when lack of space again caused him to find 
a new location. His business was moved 
306-08-10 East Sixteenth, where it 1 
since been. The bakery is much the larg 
est in the city, and is continuously growing 
Mr. and Mrs. Smith had five children, 
Walter L., Earl H, Lillian M.. Harry E., 
and Rice B. 



U4 



MEN WHO ABE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo oy Thomson. 

EDWARD FLETCHER SWINNEY, 
president of the First National Bank, 
was born near Lynchburg, Pennsylvania, 
August i, 1857. He received his edu- 
cation in the public schools and in the 
State school at Blacksburg. In 1S75 he 
came to Missouri, accepting a position 
as cashier of a bank at Fayette. In 1882 
he accepted a similar position in Color- 
ado City, Tex. ,and in January, 1887 
came to Kansas City to be cashier of 
the First National Bank. He was elect- 
ed its president in 1890, and has made 
a brilliant reputation for himself in the 
financial world. He is a member of the 
Chicago & Alton Railroad directorate, 
a director of the Fidelity Trust Com- 
pany and of the Missouri Savings As- 
sociation, and is a member of the exec- 
utive council of the American Bankers' 
Association. 

Something that speaks volumes for 
Mr. Swinney is that he has served as 
treasurer of the Kansas City School 
Board since 1894, having just been re- 
elected for another term. He is also 
serving his third term as director and 
treasurer of the Commercial Club, a long- 
er time than any man has ever retained 
the position before. 

Mr. Swinney is an enthusiastic sports- 
man and a crack wing-shot. He is also 
a member of the Country Club. 

In 1892 he married Miss Ida Lee, of 
Old Franklin, Howard County, Mo. 




Photo oy Strauss. 

CHESTER ALLYN SNIDER 
was born August 9, i860, on a farm in 
Platte County, Missouri. His father was 
a Government contractor, and took his 
family with him from Missouri to Colorado 
and then to Montana, and back again to 
Missouri, locating in Kansas City in 1870. 
The boy Chester went to the public school 
and to the Central High School, and then 
entered Bethany College in West Virginia. 
Returning home, he embarked in the cat- 
tle business, helping to form the firm of 
Evans, Snider, Buell, in which he was for 
many years vice-president and manager 
of the Kansas City office. He is now 
treasurer of the company, and is also a 
director in the Fidelity Trust Company 
and in the Bolen-Darnall Coal Company. 
He is rapidly closing up his business affairs, 
it being his intention to spend some time 
in foreign travel. 

Mr. Snider belongs to the Commercial 
Club, the Kansas City Club, and the Uni- 
versity Club. 

He was married to Miss Lillian Hyatt in 
1882, and they had one daughter. Mrs. 
Snider died in 1883, and in 1888 he mar- 
ried Miss Olive Oglesby. 

Few men have played a more prominent 
part in the upbuilding of Kansas City 
than Mr. Snider, for he has been an active 
figure in all public movements. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



'35 




Photo by Thomson. 

EDWARD LUCKY SCARRITT, 
eldest son of the late Dr. Nathan Scarritt, 
was born August 30, 1853, near his pres- 
ent residence in Kansas City. As a boy, 
he went to the Kansas City public schools 
and to Pritchett Institute, Glasgow, Mo. 
For a year, he was a student in the Har- 
vard Law School, and was admitted to 
the bar at Kansas City in September, 1873. 
Two years later he began the practice of 
law at Glasgow, Mo., as junior member of 
the firm of Caples & Scarritt, and in Janu- 
ary, 1778 opened an office in Kansas 
City. In" 1S82 he formed a partnership 
with his brother, William C. Scarritt, El- 
liott H. Jones and Colonel J. K. Griffith 
being added to the firm later. 

He was made City Counselor in 1885, 
and in 1892, when only thirty-eight years 
old, was elected to the circuit bench. 

Judge Scarritt is one of the wealthiest 

and most erudite of the members of the 
Missouri bar. 

Together with his father, he founded 
the Scarritt Bible and Training School, 
one of the city's chief institutions. He 
was one of the founders also of the Kan- 
sas City Law School. 

Judge Scarritt was married to Miss Mar- 
garet Morris, daughter of Dr. Joel T. Mor- 
ris, a pioneer physician of Westport. A 
daughter, Berenice, is the wife of W. E. 
Royster. 




Photo by Thomson. 

WILLIAM CHICK SCARRITT 
was born March 31, 1867, in Kansas City, 
Missouri, his being a pioneer family. He 
went to the public schools of the town, 
for it was not then a city, and then en- 
tered Central College at Fayette, Mo., 
from which he was graduated in 18S1. 
He decided upon law as a profession, and 
accordingly enrolled as a student in Bos- 
ton University, and took his degree there 

in 1883. He also studied law for a while 
in the office of his brother, Judge Edward 
L. Scarritt, with whom he was afterwards 
associated in the practice of his profession. 
He is now a member of the law firm of 
Scarritt, Griffith & Jones. 

Mr. Scarritt has always been interested 
in public matters, and in 1897 was appoint- 
ed a member of the Board of Police Com- 
missioners by Governor Stephens, hut re- 
signed before the expiration of his term. 
He is a member of the Commercial Club, 
the local Bar Association, and also be- 
longs to the Evanston Golf Club. 

He was married to Miss Francis Davis, 
of Hannibal, Mo., in 1S84, and they 
have five children, William H., Frances 
M., Arthur Davis, Dorothy Anne, and 
Virginia. 



136 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

SETH SWIFT SERAT 

was born in the town of Dunkirk, New 
York, November 14, 1863. His parents 
removed to Elmira, N. Y., during his 
youth, and there he grew to manhood. 
His education was received in the public 
and high schools of Elmira, and the finish- 
ing touch was provided by a course in 
Cornell University. 

In 1882 he returned to Elmira and en- 
gaged in the coal business, in which he 
has continuously been ever since. 

Mr. Serat left Elmira in 1888 and came 
to Kansas City, where he established him- 
self in the wholesale coal business, and has 
been a prominent figure in the commer- 
cial, social, and club life of the town. 

He is now president of the Star Coal 
Company, which owns and operates mines 
near Lexington, Mo. 

Mr. Serat is a member of the Kansas 
City Club, the University Club, the Kan- 
sas City Driving Club, and also belongs to 
the Psi Ipsilon Fraternity. 

He married Miss Marion Hall, of Loek- 
port, N. Y., in rqoi. 




Photo by Strauss. 

EDWARD HOLCOMB STILES, 
lawyer and legal author, was born October 
8, 1836, in Granby, Connecticut, of an 
Anglo-Saxon ancestry that has been 
traced back to the time of the Conquest. 

Before the war Judge Stiles, a young 
man just beginning his career, located at 
Ottumwa, la. He was twenty years old 
when he landed there by stage in 1856. 
The following year he was admitted to 
the bar, and formed a partnership with 
his preceptor, Colonel S. W. Summers, of 
Ottumwa. In 1864 he was elected to the 
Iowa Legislature and the following year to 
the State Senate, resigning his seat there 
to accept the position of reporter of de- 
cisions of the Iowa Supreme Court. In 
[883 Mr. Stiles was the Republican can- 
didate for Congress in his district. As a 
law-writer and compiler, Mr. Stiles has an 
established reputation. 

In 1886 Mr. Stiles moved to Kansas 
City, and in 1892 was appointed Master 
in Chancery of the United States Circuit 
Court for the Western District of Missouri, 
a position he still holds. 

Mr. Stiles was married September 19, 
i86i,toMiss Emma M. Vernon, of Ches- 
ter County, Pennsylvania. Six children 
were born to them, four of whom are liv- 
ing. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



137 




BAYLIS STEELE 
was born December 4, 1862, in Henry 
County, Missouri. He was reared on a 
farm, and received his education in the 
district schools and afterwadrs in the High 
School at Sedalia, where his parents 
moved. He traveled for a book and sta- 
tionary house after leaving school, but 
came to Kansas City in 1884, and engaged 
in the real estate business, in which he has 
ever since been continuously engaged. 

Mr. Steele was elected to the Upper 
House in the spring election of 1902, and 
is making a splendid official record. 

He is a member of the Kansas City Club, 
and an Elk. 

Few men have more right to be proud of^ 
their ancestry than Mr. Steele. His great 
grandmother was George Washington's sis- 
ter, and his great grandfather, William 
Baylis, was a captain in the Revolutionary 
war, and was on General Washington's staff 
at Yoktown when Cornwallis surrendered 




LUTHER CLAY SLAVENS 
was born August 13, 1836, in Putnam 
County, Indiana. His parents were 
Hiram B. and Sarah Holland Slavens, 
of Scotch-Irish descent. Mr. Slavens' 
boyhood was spent upon a farm in Put- 
nam County. He was educated at De 
Pauw University, Greencastle, Ind., 
from which he was graduated in 1858, 
completing: both the law and classical 
courses. January 8, 1861, he married 
Miss Sallie Boggs Shelby and began the 
practice of law in Covington, Ind., mov- 
ing thence to Kansas City in 1865, where " 
he has ever since remained. 

As City Counselor and member of the 
Board of Public Works, he served the 
city with great efficiency, one of the most 
distinguished services being in connection 
with the transfer of the waterworks s\ - 
tern from private to municipal owner- 
ship. He is one of the ablest members 
of an able bar unswerving in his devo- 
tion to principle. 

The exacting demands of a busy pro- 
fessional career have not engrossed Mr. 
Slavens' attention to the exclusion oi 
matters of public and political moment. 
In 1880 he was a delegate to the Nation- 
al Republican Convention winch nom- 
inated Garfield, and he lias actively 
identified himself with the politics 
movements of more recent year- 
Mr and Mrs. Slavens have tnre 
daughters, Lulu, Mat tie. and Dade, all 
married. 



>38 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

JOHN BESTER STONE, 

one of the city's best -known men, was 
born December 5, 1842, in Marion, Ala- 
bama. When but nineteen years old he 
enlisted in the Fourth Alabama Infantry, 
and was in some of the fiercest engage- 
ments of the civil war, having been wound- 
ed four times. At the close of the war Mr. 
Stone settled at Selma, Ala., and was 
elected City Clerk and Tax Collector. 
In 1878 he went to Dallas, Tex., and en- 
gaged in the real estate business. There 
he erected a Government building and 
gave the United States the free use of it 
for ten years. 

For several years he was engaged in 
mining at Leadville, Colo. 

In 1885 he came to Kansas City and 
invested largely in acre property on Pros- 
pect Avenue. It was through his efforts 
chiefly that the Prospect Avenue and 
Brooklyn Avenue car lines were estab- 
lished. 

In 1894 he was elected Presiding Judge 
of the County Court. During his term he 
was put forward by his friends as a can- 
didate for the Governorship. 

Judge Stone was married June 18, 18S1, 
at Boulder, Colo., to Miss Mary M. Kester. 
They have one daughter, Calla G. Stone. 




Photo by Strauss. 

WALTER SANFORD 
was born January 21, 1873, in Chicago, 
Illinois. He attended the public schools 
there, and upon coming to Kansas City 
in 1888 entered the Central High School 
He fairly earned his education, for dur- 
ing his vacations and even through the 
school year he held positions, and ranked 

as a wage-earner early in life. He was 
with the Midland National Bank for a 
while, and then with the old Northeast 
line, but after completing his school 
course he went back to the bank. After 
some time, however, he accepted a po- 
sition with the Great Western Type 
Foundry, where he remained for three 
years. Having accumulated a small 
printing office by this time, he started 
in the publishing business for himself. 
A bright weekly, The Passing Show, 
was the first output, and then Poster 
Lore, but he decided to take a course in 
the Kansas University, and so quietly 
and sadly extinguished the two publica- 
tions. Entered in the University, he 
started the Lotus, which had a brilliant 
career, and it was this success that de- 
cided Mr. Sanford upon journalism as 
a profession. Quitting Kansas Univer- 
sity in 1893, he accepted a position with 
the Star, where he remained until of- 
fered the position of assistant manager 
of the Orpheum in 1901. In 1902 he 
was offered the management of the new 
Willis Wood, where he now is. 

Mr. Sanford was married to Miss Nel- 
lie Crandall October 30, 1901. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



*39 




JAMES FRANKLIN SPALDING 
was born at Ypsilanti, Michigan, July 28, 
1835. When he was six years old his par- 
ents moved to Ann Arbor, where he was 
reared. In i860 he was graduated from 
the University of Michigan, and three 
years later received the degree of A.M. 
After graduation he taught one year in 
the Union High .School of Ann Arbor, and 
then three years in Bryant & Strat ton's 
Detroit Business College. 

Professor Spalding came to Kansas 
City in 1865, and on October 25 of that 
year he and his father, E. H. Spalding 
founded Spalding's Commercial College, 
now one of the largest institutions of the 
kind in the West. 

Professor Spalding is the author of sev- 
eral works on book-keeping, and is recog- 
nized as one of the most thorough and 
painstaking instructors in the country. 




Photo by Strauss. 

FRANK CARR SPALDING 
was born in Kansas City, Missouri, Novem- 
ber 2, 1869, and has lived his whole life here 
in the place of his birth. His early edu- 
cation was received in the ward schools, 
after which he attended the Central High 
School, and from there entered the Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 

Returning to Kansas City, he identified 
himself with Spalding's Commercial Col- 
lege, conducted by his father, where he 
has ever since remained. Commencing 
at the bottom, he taught in all the vari- 
ouurious commercial departments, and is 
now assistant superintendent, and is in 
charge of the office. He is also manager 
of the printing and publishing establish- 
ment operated in connection with the col- 
lege. 

Mr. .Spalding married Miss Clara Salis- 
bury October 19, 1895. 

He belongs to the Knights of Pythias 
and the Modern Woodmen, having served 
as Venerable Consul in the latter organi- 
zation for three years. He is aslo secre- 
tary of the Kansas City Chapter, Sons of 
the American Revolution, being the great- 
great-grandson of Oliver Spalding, who 
fought with Washington, and was a dele- 
gate to the National Convention in New 
York in 1900. 



140 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON SEEHORN 
was born April 19, 1863, in Fall Creek 
Illinois. He spent his boyhood on the 
farm, attending the district schools in 
wintei, and finished his academic educa- 
tion at Chaddock College, Ouincy, 111. 

He then accepted a position as teacher 
in the college, then being but twenty-two 
years old. For two years he studied law, 
and after his admittance to the bar, first 
practiced in Ouincy. 

He came to Kansas City in 1887, and 
allied himself with the late Blake Wood- 
son, the partnership continuing until 1897. 

In 1892 Mr. Seehorn was elected Pub- 
lic Administrator, and re-elected in 
1896. His record stands as a marvel of 
honesty and efficiency. 

He has always been an active worker 
in the Democratic ranks, and has at 
various times served as secretary of the 
County and City Committees. 

Hejs an Elk and a Knight of Pythias. 




Photo by Strauss. 
WILLIAM 



THOMAS STARK 



was born in Independence, Missouri 
September 18, 1857. The family re- 
moved to this city while Mr. Stark was 
a bov, and he became a student at the 
local public schools. He afterwards at- 
tended the Jesuit's school at St. Mary's 
Kansas. After leaving there he took a 
course in medicine at the Kansas City 
Medical School with a post-graduate 
course in the medical department of 
Washington University, St. Louis. Mr. 
Stark engaged in the practice of medi- 
cine in this city in 1879, since which time 
he has been continuously engaged at his 
profession. 

He had been identified with the State 
Militia before the outbreak of the Spanish 
American war, and at the time of the war 
helped raise the Fifth Regiment of Mis- 
souri Volunteers, afterwards being elect- 
ed one of its majors. 

He is a member of the State Dental 
Association, and is also president of the 
Odontographic Association, a local or- 
ganization. He is besides an associ- 
ate member of the Association of Mili- 
tary Surgeons, and was connected with 
the experiments the United States Gov- 
ernment made in 1896 and the follow- 
ing years with the Krag-Jorgensen and 
the Mauser service rifles. 

Mr. Stark married Miss Alice Vincil, 
daughter of the Rev. John D. Vincil, of 
St. Louis, in 1886, and has one child, a 
boy, John Vincil Stark. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



1 l' 




Photo by Strauss. 

JAMES RAY SAMUEL 
was born March 21, 1861, in Jefferson 
City, Missouri. He spent his boyhood 
in Calloway County, however, attend- 
ing the district school, and in 1880 en- 
tered Chaddock College at Quincy, 111., 
where he remained for a couple of years. 

After coming out of college, he en- 
tered the mercantile business. In 1889, 
he was appointed to the position of 
chief clerk in the street department of 
the City Hall, where his efficiency was 
such as to earn his retention until 1895. 
In that year he was offered a deputy 
ship in the County Clerk's office and ac- 
cepted it, which place he still holds. 

Mr. Samuel has attended to business in 
the County Clerk's office with snch fidel- 
ity and with so much courtesy to the 
public, that he has become one of the 
most popular officials at the Court House. 
He will in all probability be the next 
County Clerk of Jackson County. 

Mr. Samuel married Miss May Small, 
daughter of Dr. Andrew V. Small, 
surgeon in the Confederate army, in 
Sedalia in 1902. 




Jm$., 




Photo by Strauss. 

BENJAMIN* STRAUSS 

was born January 27, 1871, in Cleve- 
land, Ohio. He spent his boyhood there, 
attending the public and high schools, 
and after securing his education went 
to work in the photographic studio of 
his brother, J. C. Strauss, in St. Louis. 

He began to learn the photographic 
art at the bottom, performing the hum- 
blest duties at first, but finally rose to 
the position of understudy to his fam- 
ous brother. 

In 1900 he decided to launch in busi- 
ness for himself, and coming to Kan- 
sas City bought a share in the business 
of George Curtiss. A year later he 
bought Mr. Curtiss out, and is now sole 
owner. 

He has come to be in Kansas City 
what his brother has been for thirty 
years in St. Louis, and by example and 
with the spur of competition has done 
much to establish a higher standard of 
photographic art in Kansas City. 

At the recent convention of the Mis- 
souri photographers' Association in 
Pertle Springs, Mr. Strauss was given 
the highest award for portraitures. 

He is an Elk and also belongs to the 
Knisrhts of Pythias 



142 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 





GUSTAV SCHOETTLE 

was born in Stuttgart, Germany, March 

2, 1873. He remained in his native 

land F until he had reached the age of 
twenty years, when he came to this 
country, and after living in various East- 
ern cities for a short time came to Kan- 
sas City. His education was secured at 
the gymnasiums of Stuttgart, and after 
a thorough classical training in those 
schoois took up the study of music, for 
which he had shown a passionate love 
and great talent since infancy. He 
studied at the conservatory of Stutt- 
gart for ten years, about half of the 
course being devoted to the study of 
harmonics and composition, with a most 
thorough drill in instrumental work. 

Mr. Schoettle came to this city in 
1893, but did not take up a permanent 
residence here until two years later, 
the time intervening being given up to 
concert tours. He has met with con- 
siderable success in that short time 
having placed himself in the front rank 
of local musicians. He was selected as 
accompanist of the Orotorio Society at 
its organization in 1896, and has been 
retained in the position since. He is 
also conductor of the Schubert Club, a 
male chorus of thirty-five voices, which 
he organized in 1899. The club has won 
two prizes under his direction. 

Mr. Schoettle was married in 1898 to 
Miss May Stearns, the well-known elo- 
cutionist. They have one child, a boy. 



CLARENCE I. SPELLMAN 
was born in Jacksonville, Illinois, Febru- 
ary 25, 1874, and lived there until the re- 
moval of his parents to Kansas City in 
1886. His father was a Yankee, and his 
mother a Tenneseean, and to use his own 
happy phrasing he combines "the warmth 
and aggressiveness of the South, with the 
conservatism of the North." Mr. Spell- 
man was a pupil at the Woodland school, 
and from there went to the Central high 
school. He was graduated from the latter 
institution in 1893, an d then entered the 
University of Kansas. He first took the 
classical course, and then switched to the 
law department, taking his degree in 1897. 
He cam eto Kansas City, and after some 
further preparation, was admitted to the 
bar in 1898. 

Mr. Spellman is generally regarded as 
one of the best of the younger lawyers, 
and has made himself a well-known figure 
by his activity in Republican politics. In 
every campaign he has taken the stump, 
and is an attractive and forceful public 
speaker. Until recently he has been alone 
in the practice of law, but is now officing 
witli Mr. Edward Wright Taylor. He is 
unmarried, and lives with his" mother. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



M3 




Photo by Thomson. 

SAM B. STROTHER 
was born June 16, 1871, and was reared 
near Lee's Summit. He attended th e 
schools there and the Kansas City High 
School, afterwards going to the Missouri 
State University, from which he was grad- 
uated in 1893 m the law department. 
When he finished school, Congressman W. 
S. Cowherd was Mayor of Kansas City, 
and Mr. Strother became his private sec- 
retary in place of James Black, who en- 
tered the law firm of Pratt, Dana & Black 
at that time. At the close of Mayor Cow- 
herd 's term of office, Mr. Strother went 
into the law office of Teasdale, Ingraham 
& Cowherd, where he remained until his 
present firm was formed. 

Mr. Strother was married to Miss Maud 
Davenport at Lee's Summit. They have 
one child, Isabelle, two years old. 




Photo by Thomson. 

JOHN M. SURFACE 
was born on a farm in Indiana in 1847, he 
resided there until the advent of the civil 
war, when at the age of 16 he enlisted in 
the 7th Indiana Regiment and served un- 
til hostilities ceased. He took part in 
many notable engagements, among them 
being the Battle of the Wilderness, at 
which he was severely wounded, and Ap- 
pomattox, where Lee surrendered to 
Grant. Mr. Surface located in Eastern 
Jackson county in 1878 and practiced 
medicine there until 20 years ago. He 
has since engaged in the drug business, 
having stores at 18th and Lydia ave. and 
19th and Grand ave. Mr. Surface became 
the Republican candidate for Judge of the 
Western District in 1900 and was elected 
by over 3500 majority. As a judge of the 
County Court he has always stood for the 
interests of the taxpayers he represents. 
His defeat for re-election was due to the 
Democratic landslide. 



144 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Thomson. 



CHARLES J. SCHMELZER 
was born in Hartford, Connecticut, 
[uly 23, 1856. His parents removed 
to Leavenworth, Kas., in 1857, howev- 
er, where his father started the pioneer 
sporting goods house of the West. 

After going through the public schools, 
Charles went into his father's store, and 
has been connected with the business 
ever since. In 1887 the house was 
moved to Kansas City, where it has 
grown to be the largest of its kind in the 
world. Mr. Schmelzer is president and 
treasurer of the company. 

As a public man, Mr. Schmelzer 's ca- 
reer is worthy of emulation. He has 
served as director, second vice-president 
first vice-president, and president of the 
Commercial Club, and in these capaci- 
ties launched many movements of mo- 
ment. He has been a director in the 
Provident Association since 1S87, and 
was one of the directors of the Karnival 
Krewe. During his term as president 
of the Krewe, the first great flower par- 
ade was given. He was appointed a 
member of the Park Board in 1901, and 
has given largely of his time and thought 
to the work. He is a director in the 
Union National Bank, and a member 
of the Kansas City Athletic Club, the 
Driving Club, the Waterloo Hunting 
and Fishing Club, the Minnezoura Ang- 
ling Club, and the Evanston Golf Club. 

He married Miss Alice Ide, daughter 
of Judge H. W. Ide, of Leavenworth, 
January 12, 1887, and they have a son, 
Harvey, born in 1891, and a daughter, 
Alice, born in 1900. 




Photo by Strauss. 

HERMAN F. SCHMELZER 
was born in Leavenworth, Kansas, in 
January 22, 1866. His life, until he at- 
tained his majority was spent in that 
town, then a great commercial center, 
and where his father had established a 
sporting goods business in 1857. It 
was the pioneer venture of its kind in 
the West. 

The boy Herman went to the public 
schools in Leavenworth, and then en- 
tered a local business college, where he 
prepared himself for entering his fath- 
er's store, and assuming a share in its 
management. 

In 1886 the business was removed to 
Kansas City, where it thrived on com- 
petition to such an extent that the 
Schmelzer Arms Company is now the 
greatest exclusive sporting goods house 
in the whole world, and a standing ad- 
vertisement for Kansas City. 

Mr. Schmelzer is vice-president and 
secretary of the company. His busi- 
ness interests have never prevented him 
from taking an active part in all public 
movements. 

He is a prominent member of the 
Commercial Club, and is also a member 
of the Knife and Fork Club, and the 
Kansas City Athletic Club. 

It was in 1892 that he married Miss 
Emma Stubinger, of Leavenworth. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



'45 




Pholo by Strauss. 

HENRY C. SOLOMON 
was born in Georgia in 1857, but spen this 
boyhood in Kansas, his parents having 
removed to that State when he was still an 
infant. 

After completing courses in the public 
and high schools, he attended college at 
Milwaukee, Wis., where he took a thorough 
four years' course. He then entered 
Washington University at St. Louis, and 
was graduated from the law and literary de 
partment in 1877. 

He was admitted to the bar in Missouri 
but first swung his shingle to the breeze in 
Atchison, Kas. 

Carrying his Democracy with him from 
Georgia, Mr. Solomon flew his colors boldly 
in Republican Kansas, and served terms 
as City Attorney of Atchison and then 
Prosecuting Attorney. 

In 1894 he was nominated for Congress 
by the Democrats of that District, and 
came within a few votes of overcoming 
the large Republican majority. 

Mr. Solomon came to Kansas City in 
1898, and became a member of the law 
firm of Wollman, Solomon & Cooper 




Photo by Strauss. 

JOHN SULLIVAN, 
lawyer, Woodman, and Democrat, was 
born February 10, 1864, at Louisville, 
Kas. His father, who was of Irish birth, 
was a prominent farmer and stock-raisei 
in Central Kansas, removing to that State 
from Connecticut in 1S57. His mother, 
a native of Wisconsin, was of German par- 
entage. His education was obtained in 
the common schools of Potawatomie 
County, Kansas, and later at the 
State University at Lawrence, where he 
graduated in law in June, 1887. He i- a 
member of the alumni of the Kansas State 
University. 

In 1887 Mr. Sullivan came to Kansas 
City to practice law, and he has occupied 
the same office for fourteen years, ten 
years of that period having been associ- 
ated with Thomas M. Spofford. Mr. Sul- 
livan has always taken a great interest in 
politics, having campaigned the State 
several times, but lie has never been a can 
didate for any political office. He was 
appointed as a representative of tin United 
States Treasury Department in the con 
struction of the Kansas City Federal 
building, and he is proud of the distinction 
of having been the first man to be removed 
on the day following the election of Wil- 
liam McKinlev in 1896. His offense in 
the eves of the Cleveland administration 
was too great activity in campaigning in 
behalf of William Jennings Bryan 



146 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

JOHN HENRY SMITH 
was born in the town of Hayworth, Mc- 
Lean County, Illinois. He grew to man- 
hood, however, in Nevada, la., where his 
parents removed when he was still a mere 
child. 

The subject of this sketch received his 
education in the public and high schools 
of Nevada, and after completing his edu- 
cation he went into the offices of his father, 
who was engaged in the abstract business 
That was in 1885, and in 1889 Mr. Smith 
came to Kansas City. 

He accepted employment with the ab- 
stract firm of A. O. L. Schueler, where he 
worked for ten years. In 1889, in com- 
pany with his brother Charles E. Smith, 
he bought the controlling interest in the 
Union Abstract Company, at that time 
a concern of comparatively small impor- 
tance. 

Energy and ability, however, has so 
built up the business that its present cap- 
italization is for $75,000. Mr. Smith is 
vice-president of the company. 

He is unmarried. 




Photo by Thomson. 

WILLIAM EDMUND SULLIVAN 
was born in St. Louis, Missouri, May 14, 
1869. His parents removed to Kansas 
City when he was still a child in arms, 
so that he is a born and bred Kansas 
Cityan to all intents and purposes. 

He attended the public schools of 
this city, and after attending the high 
school entered the Notre Dame Univer- 
sity, from which institution he was gradu- 
ated in 1887. 

Upon his return to Kansas City he 
was appointed to a deputyship in the 
City Clerk's office. Such was his effi- 
ciency that he retained his political po- 
sition from 1883 to 1896, watching May- 
ors come and go. 

In 1896 he formed the Globe Storage 
and Transfer Company, of which he is 
the president and general manager. 

So greatly has the firm prospered 
under his management that it has been 
found necessary to erect, a large brick 
building at the corner of Seventeenth 
and Main Streets. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



'47 




Photo by Strauss. 

ROBERT S. STONE 
was born in Independence, Missouri, Au- 
gust 12, 1857. His father was the village 
blacksmith, and the young Stone's boy- 
hood was passed going to school and assist- 
ing at odd hours in the heavy duties of 
the shop. When, at the age of fourteen, 
his father's health failed and hewasforced 
to cease work, the maintenance of the fam- 
ily fell on the boy's young shoulders. 
They moved out on a farm and for ten 
years they lived there, moving back to 
Independence in 1SS1. 

Mr. Stone started a grocery store, which 
he ran for some time, finally giving it up 
in order to accept the tender of a deputy- 
ship from Sheriff W . S. Sitlington. He re- 
mained in the office for some years, hav- 
ing received a reappointment by the suc- 
eeding Sheriff, John P. O'Neill. 

In 1896 he was placed in nomination 
and elected tothe office of Sheriff by the 
Democratic party, and led his ticket. 
Two years later he was again nominated 
and elected, his majority being added to. 
After leaving the office in 1900 he engaged 
in the real estate business for two years, 
and was nominated and elected County 
Collector in 1902. 

Mr. Stone is affiliated with the Knight 
Templar, the Elks, the Modern Woodmen, 
the A. O. U. W., the Knights of Pythias, 
and holds membership with the Scottish 
Rite Masons and the Shriners. 

He married Miss Mary Cooper, of Lee's 
Summit, Mo., June 11, 1879. 




WILL T. STRICKLETTE 
was born January 22, 1867, in Vance- 
burg, Kentucky, where he spent his 
boyhood. After attending the public 
and high schools of his native town, Mr. 
Stricklette entered the college at Au- 
gusta, where he took the classical course. 

In 1886 he removed to Burlingame, 
Kas., where he lived for two years, 
coming to Kansas City in 1888, and liv- 
ing here ever since. From the time of 
his arrival until 1894, Mr. Stricklette 
worked in the various large dry goods 
houses of Kansas City, but in 1894 de- 
cided upon the newspaper business as 
better fitted to his tastes and temper- 
ments. His first work was on the ad- 
vertising staff of the Kansas City Tinu r, 
and there he remained until 1898, when, 
in company with Frank Markward, he 
launched the Kansas City Manufactur- 
er. In 1901 the business was incor- 
porated under the name of the Manu- 
facturing Publishing Company, of which 
he is president. 

Mr. Stricklette 's work has always 
been in the advertising department, 
and his energy and popularity have been 
potent factors in the paper's phenom- 
enal success. He has also been a mov- 
ing force in the Manufacturers' Associ- 
ation and other public movements 



ij.8 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo hi/ Thomson. 

EDWARD STINE, 

the well-known undertaker and early resi- 
dent of Kansas City, was born injonestown 
Pennsylvania, January 2, 1833. Between 
the ages of six and sixteen he lived on a 
farm, and acquired a common school edu" 
ucatio nin the district school. He was ap- 
prenticed, when six-teen years old, to a 
cabinet-maker at Harrisburg, Pa. After 
serving four years, he accumulated his 
first capital, and was married October 2, 
1856, to Emma L. Coleman. 

In March, 1858, Mr. Stine came to Kan- 
sas City. For thirty-three years he was 
with Henning & Co., furniture dealers. 
He began business for himself in December, 
ber, 1 86 1, doing cabinet-work and under- 
taking. In 1878 his son William F. Stine, 
was admitted as a partner under the name 
of E. Stine & Son. For the last twelve 
years they have been located at 408 East 
Ninth vStreet. 




Photo lij Strauss. 

CHARLES N. SEIDLITZ 

was born February 10, i860, in Port Gib- 
son, Mississippi, but his boyhood was spent 
in Keokuk, la., where his parents removed 
when he was five years old. After going 
through the public and high schools of 
Keokuk he sailed for Europe, and con- 
tinued his studies in Berlin. He later 
entered the great mining school at Claus- 
thal, and studied mining engineering. 
For five years he remained abroad, study- 
ing in Germany, and spending his vaca- 
tions in touring the other European coun- 
tries, and then returned to Keokuk in 
1880. He at once left for Colorado, 
where he engaged in mining for three years, 
at the end of which time he came to Kansas 
City, where he has ever since lived. He 
was for some time connected with the Na- 
tional Bank of Commerce as a teller, 
then with the First National in a similar 
capacity, and from there went into the 
City Treasurer's office as chief deputy. 
He was also appointed City Treasurer to 
fill put an unexpired term. From 1892 
to 1806, under the Cleveland administra- 
tion, Mr. Seidlitz filled the position of 
Assistant Postmaster, and at the expira- 
tion of his term he went into the the insur- 
ance business. He has held several im- 
portant positions, but is now with the Mu- 
tual Life Insurance Company of New York 
as manager for Northwestern Missouri 
and Eastern Kansas. 

Mr. Seidlit/. married Miss Cora Riggs, 
of Covington, Ky., in 1884, and they have 
one bov. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



< [9 




Photo by Strauss. 

JOHN G. SCHAICH, Jr., 
was born in Fort Wayne, Indiana, May 23, 
1874. His parents removed to Kansas 
when he was but five years old, however, 
and it was in that State that he grew to 
manhood. His education was not very ex- 
tensive, for he had to work for his living, 
but what he lacked in opportunity he made 
up in ambition. He attended the public 
schools in Lawrence, Kas., and worked as 
a messenger boy. 

He also worked on a farm, but always 
he kept the idea of an education and a 
profession belore him. In 1895 he had 
saved up enough to enter a law office in 
Kansas City, Kas., where he studied early 
and late for two years, and at the end of 
that time passed a splendid examination, 
and was admitted to the bar. 

He crossed the river and identified him- 
self with the late John W. Beebe, and re- 
mained with him until that celebrated 
lawyer's death in 1899. 

He is now senior member of the law 
firm of Schaich & Fairman. 

Mr. Schaich is a member of the local 
Bar Association, and also belongs to the 
Modern Woodmen. 

He married Miss Smallwood, of Kan- 
sas City, Kas., in 1895. 




Photo by Strauss. 

FRANK J. SHINNICK 
was born in Cincinnati, ( Ihio, fuly 1 j, 
1859. He went to the public schools, 
and received a good elementary edu< 
tion, but at the age of fifteen circum- 
stances compelled him to earn his own 
living. 

He commenced to learn the brick- 
making trade, and completed his ap- 
prensiceship in St. Louis. He came to 
Kansas City in 1878, and by exercise of 
energy and ability soon quit the plying 
of his trade and went into the contract- 
ing and manufacturing business, in 
which he has ever since been engaged. 
Since 1894 he has been senior member 
of the firm of Shinnick & Massman, 
which does one of the largest contract- 
ing and brick manufacturing busine-- 
se in the West. 

Mr. Shinnick is now serving a term as 
president of the Master Builders' Ex- 
change, and is a member of the Manu- 
facturers' Association. He has served 
as a member of the Upper House, and 
might have gone farther had he chosen 
to give more time to politic- 
Mr. Shinnick married Miss Anna 
Buske in 1886, and they have three 
children, one boy and two ^irls. 



15° 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

JAMES CARROLL SWIFT 
was born February 7, 1869, in Litchfield 
County, Connecticut. His early boyhood 
was spent on a farm, but his parents later 
removed to the town of Binghampton, 
N. Y. He attended the public and high 
schools, and then, deciding upon law as 
professsion, entered the law department of 
Cornell University. 

He came to Kansas City in 1S93, and 
for two years was identified with various 
law firms. In 1895 he commenced the 
practice of law alone. It was in 1899 that 
the Chicago Live Stock Commission Com- 
pany, for which he had long been attorney, 
made him a flattering offer for his sole 
services, which he accepted. 

Mr. Swift is now vice-president and as- 
sistant general manager of the company, 
and also occupies a similar position with the 
Lee Live Stock Company of Chicago and 
St. Louis. 

The only society to which Mr. Swift be 
longs is the Knights of Columbus. 

He was married in October, 1898, to 
Miss Laura Laing. They have one child, 
J. C, Jr., born in 1901. 




Photo by Thomson. 

JOHN W. SPEAS 
was born on a farm in Jackson County 
October 18, 1862. His parents removed 
to Kansas City in 1872, and Mr. Speas, 
despite his age, is therefore something of a 
pioneer. He went to the local schools, 
and at an early age began to earn his own 
living, and at the same time advance the 
interests of Kansas City. 

Few men have been more indefatigable 
in working for the good of the town than 
Mr. Speas. Every public movement has 
enlisted his best efforts — Commercial Club, 
Priests of Pallas, Convention Hall in 
everything he has spared neither time nor 
trouble. One of the first to realize the 
importance of a great public building, Mr. 
Speas is now serving his third term as a 
director of Convention Hall, and also 
served as a member of the Building Com- 
mittee in that trying time of reconstruc- 
tion. 

He is also a director in the Priests of 
Pallas, and is now and has been for some 
time vice-chairman of the Commercial 
Club's Entertainment Committee, in ad- 
dition to being a director in the Club. 

Mr. Speas is an Elk, a Mason and a 
Shriner, and is president of the Monarch 
Vinegar Company, besides representing 
other interests. 

He is married, and is the father of a boy. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



LSI 




Photo by Strauss. 

WILLIAM MARSHALL SLOAN 
was born in Keokuk, Iowa, January 29, 
1859. His parents, however, soon re- 
moved to Woodford County, Kentucky, 
where he received his early education in 
the public schools. After a course in 
Chickering Institute in Cincinnati he re- 
turned to the farm in Woodford County, 
but deciding upon law as a profession en- 
tered the Cincinnati Law School. He did 
not complete the prescribed course,how- 
ever, but journeyed to Santa Fe, N. M., 
where he gained admission to the office of 
the Attorney-General, and there it was he 
finished his legal studies, and gained ad- 
mission to the bar. 

Mr. Sloan came to Kansas City in 1885, 
a time when the town was in the throes of 
its great "boom." Quitting the law,he 
entered the real estate business, and has 
continued in it ever since. 

Always a strong Republican and an ac- 
ive party worker, Mr. Sloan soon began to 
play a prominent part in local politics. 
Mayor Webster Davis appointed him 
Commissioner of Streets, and his record 
in office was so good that the Republicans 
nominated him for County Marshal in 
1894. He was elected fairly, but the 
famous election frauds of 1894 kept him 
out of office. In 1901, upon the death of 
W. A. Kelly, Mr. Sloan was elected to the 
Upper House. 

He is a married man, having wedded 
Miss Lulu Waldo, of Independence, in 
1885. They have four children, two boys 
and two girls. 




Photo by Strauss. 

WILLIAM P. TRICKKTT 

was born in this city Jauary 9, [873 
He passed all his life here with the ex- 
ception of three years, and accmired his 
education in the public schoools of this 
city. Immediately after leaving 
school he went into railroad wurk out 
of town for various roads in theSouth, 
and returned here in the employ of the 
Kansas City, Ft. Scott & Memphis Rail- 
road. After he had worked there for a 
time, he went with the Kansas City 
Transportation Bureau in 1892, being 
its chief clerk. He has remained with 
the Bureau since. In April, 1897, he 
was made secretary of the Bureau, and 
in the following July was made com- 
missioner. Probably no other person in 
the city was situated so well as he to gain 
intimate knowledge of railroad affairs of 
the city. This knowledge Mr. Trickett 
gathered together and published as a 
"Railroad History of Kansas City," 
which is recognized as the standard au- 
thentic story of the railroad and com- 
mercial development of the town. 
Aside from this, his position at the head 
of the Bureau has given him opportu- 
nity to become a considerable factor in 
forwarding the intercrsts of the city 
and that he has done so is testified to by 
the esteem in which he is held by t lie- 
business men of the town generally. 

Mr. Trickett is an ative member of 
the Commercial Club and is affiliated 
with the Elks. 

He was married June 26, 1895, te 
Miss Lillian May Miller. They havo 
one child. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




iVwto by Strauss. 

BRUNO L. SULZBACHER 
was born in Las Vegas, New Mexico. His 
father, Judge Louis Sulzbacher, was then a 
prominent lawyer of the Territory, and is 
now Associate Justice of the Supreme Court 
of Porto Rico. Mr. Sulzbacher was forced 
to content himself with instruction at a 
Presbyterian mission school there, though 
this was supplemented by a classical course 
at the Jesuit College in Las Vegas. He 
went to Philadelphia, where he entered 
Swarthmore College and later Rugby Acad- 
emy, from which he graduated. His fam- 
ily had moved to Kansas City during his 
collegiate life, so Mr. Sulzbacher took up 
residence here on graduating. He took a 
preparatory medical course in the Kansas 
State University and at the University 
Medical College in this city. He gradu- 
ated in 1894, receiving second prize in 
the class. Mr. Sulzbacher went to Eu- 
rope, and for two years studied in the 
great universities at Berlin, Goettingen, 
and Vienna. He returned to Kansas City 
in 1898, and has practiced here since. 

Dr. Sulzbacher has occupied chairs in 
the University Medical College, in the 
Womens' Medical College, and is a lec- 
turer at Agnew Hospital. He belongs to 
the New Mexico Territorial Medical So- 
ciety, the American Medical Association, 
and a number of other kindred societies. 
He is a thirty-second degree Mason, a 
Shriner, and an Elk. He also has mem- 
bership in the Kansas City Athletic and 
Kansas City Driving Clubs. 




Photo by Thomson. 

LOUIS W. SHOUSE 
has practically been an inmate of Kan- 
sas City all his life. He was born here 
in 1867, attended the local public 
schools, and then entered William Jew- 
ell College at Liberty, quitting that in- 
stitution with an M.A. degree tucked 
under his arm. He worked for a while 
in the bank of H. S. Mills, then served 
for two years with the National Bank 
of Kansas City, after which he set sail 
for Old Mexico, where he engaged in the 
arduous pastimes of coffee and sugar 
planting. While in that country he 
also filled the position of U. S. Vice- 
Consul at Vera Cruz, and might have 
gone higher in the consular service had 
he chosen to remain in it. 

In 1896 he returned to Kansas City, 
and accepted a position with the Times 
where his brilliant pen advanced him 
steadily. In 1900 he resigned to ac- 
cept the assistant managership of the 
Orpheum. So finely did he perform 
his duties that upon the death of John 
Loomas in 1901 he was unanimously 
chosen secretary and manager of Con- 
vention Hall. 

Mr. Shouse is a Phi Gamma Delta 
and a Mason. 

He married Miss Nora Petty, of Lib- 
erty, in 1SS7, and has two children. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



"53 




WILLIAM B. TEASDALE 
was born in Potosi, Missouri, Septem- 
ber 12, 1856. His education was se- 
cured at the public schools in Potosi, 
and afterwards he attended the St 
Louis University, from which institu- 
tion he was graduated. He took up the 
study of law, and obtained a degree from 
the St. Louis Law School in 1887. He 
returned to Potosi after being admitted 
to the bar, and practiced there for two 
years, coming to this town in 1879, 
Two years later, William H. Wallace, 
then "Prosecuting Attorney, made him 
Assistant Prosecutor, and he served 
throughout Mr. Wallace's terms of of- 
fice. Mr. Teasedale is a Democrat, yet 
when he was made the nominee of his 
party for Justice of the Peace in a stong- 
hold of Republicanism, because of his 
work as Assistant Prosecutor he was 
elected by a flattering majority. 

He was elected to the State Senate 
in 1888, and served throughout his term 
as a member of the Judiciary Commit- 
tee. 

In 1889 Mr. Teasdale, R. J.Ingraham 
and William S. Cowherd formed a law 
partnership under the firm name of 
Teasdale, Ingraham & Cowherd, which 
continued for ten years. 

In March, 1901, a fifth division was 
added to the Jackson County Circuit 
Court, and Mr. Teasdale, who was al- 
most the unanimous choice of the Bar 
Association, was appointed to the bench. 
He was nominated for the place by the 
Democratic party in 1902. 

Mr. Teasdale was married to Mis 
Lydia Guinotte in 1883. 




Photo by Strauss. 

FREDERICK K. TURNER. 
was born in London, England, April 1, 
1866, but as he came to this country 
when only six years old he ispractic- 
ally an American product. His boy 
hood was spent in Chicago, where he at- 
tended the public and parochial schools, 
after which he went to work for his lath 
er, who was engaged in the elevator 
business. 

The elder Turner came to Kansas City 
in 1887, and formed the Kansas City 
Elevator and Construction Company 
of which his son became secretary. He- 
was also elevator inspector during 1888 
and 1889. 

In 1902, upon the death of his father. 
Mr. Turner became president and man- 
ager of the company, now one of the 
largest of local institutions. 

Mr. Turner is a member of the Man 
ufacturers' Association, and was oneof 
the organizers of the Kansas City Ath- 
letic Club, a thirty-second degree Ma 
son, he is Illustrious Potentate of Arar- 
at Temple, A A 0. X. M. S., and had 
charge of the convention of the Shrine 
temples of North America and Hono 
lulu, which met in Kansas City in 1901. 
He was also representative to the Im- 
perial Council in 1902. 

Mr. Turner was graduated from the 
Kansas City School of Law in [897, and 
has been admitted to the l>ar, and is a 
member of the Bar Association, but de- 
votes himself to the elevator business 

He is unmarried, and lives with hi> 
widowed mother. 



154 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Thomson. 

WILLIAM B. THAYER 
was born in Louisville, Kentucky, Sep- 
tember ii, 1852, but spent his boyhood 
in Danville, where he went to the pub- 
lic schools, and later took the academic 
course at Centre College. 

In 1 87 1 he came to Kansas City, land- 
ing here with fifty cents in his pocket, 
but a heart full of courage. He imme- 
diately secured a position in the office of 
Bullene, Moore & Emery, and from the 
very start made himself indispensable. 
The business increased, and there were 
changes in the firm, but Mr. Thayer's 
ability and fidelity retained him in his 
position as general office man, and in 
1884 earned him admission to the firm. 
On November 1, 1895, the style of the 
firm was changed from Bullene, Moore 
Emery & Co. to Emery, Bird, Thayer 
Dry Goods Company, and the store is 
now the greatest in the West. 

Mr. Thayer has always been an active 
public man, despite his business cares, 
and has served as second and first vice- 
president of the Commercial Club, and 
as its president during 1901-02. He is 
also a Convention Hall Director and its 
treasurer, this during the rebuilding of 
the great edifice. 

Mr. Thayer is a thirty-second degree 
Mason, Scottish Rite, and is president 
of the Kansas City Club. 

He married Miss Sally Casey, daugh- 
ter of Hon. James B. Casey, of Coving- 
ton, Ky., November 23, 1880, and they 
have one son, W. B., Jr., aged 21. 




Photo by Thomson. 

FRANK J. TAGGART 

was born in Detroit, Michigan, but 
spent his boyhood in the town of Jones- 
ville, Mich. After leaving school at an 
age when more favored youths begin to 
think of college, he began clerking in a 
dry goods store. 

From Jacksonville he progressed to 
Hudson, then to Jackson, then to Adri- 
an, each time getting something better. 
He finally turned his face to the East, 
traveling out of New York for three 
years, and then in 1890 he came out 
West, locating in Omaha as manager for 
the Nebraska Clothing Company. 

In 1893 he came to Kansas City to 
take charge of the local store as man- 
ager and partner, and soon made the 
Nebraska famous the world over by his 
clever advertisements. In 1902 Mr. 
Taggart sold out his interest in the Ne- 
braska, rather than return to Omaha, 
and bought out R. H. Williams and 
Emory Street, the wholesale and retail 
grocers. 

From the time of his coming here 
Mr. Taggart has played an important 
part in the public life of Kansas City. 
He served as a member of the Conven- 
tion Hall directorate, was the originator 
and director-general of the first flower 
show, and is prominently identified 
with every public movement. 

Mr Taggart was married in August, 
1 90 1, to Miss Jennie Murphy, of Pine- 
ville, Ky. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



155 




Photo by Strauss. 

EDWARD WRIGHT TAYLOR 

was born in St. Cloud, Minnesota, June 
4, 1863. After attendance in the pub- 
lic schools in St. Cloud, his parents sent 
him to a Catholic seminary at Three 
Rivers, Canada, where he remained dur- 
ing the years of 1877 and 1878. 

In the latter part of 1878 he went to 
Germany, entering the gymnasium at 
Stuttgart, where he stayed until 1881. 
He then studied at Leipsic, Goettingen, 
and Berlin, taking the degree of J.U.D. 
at Leipsic in 1894. He then spent a 
year at the University of Paris, and re- 
turned to this country in 1885. 

He was admitted to the bar in St. 
Cloud in 1885, but did not remain there 
for any length of time, coming to Kan- 
sas City in 1886. He was first in the of- 
fice of Warner, Dean, Gibson & McLeod, 
but later formed a partnership with I. 
P. Ryland. He is now, however, prac- 
ticing alone. 

An active Democrat, he has ever taken 
an interest in political affairs, and de- 
spite his youth has been prominently 
mentioned in connection with the high 
office of Circuit Judge. 




Photo by Strauss. 

JOHN HAMILTON THACHKR 
was born in Kansas City October 12, 
1872. His early education was de- 
rived from the Kansas City public 
schools, and he was gradtiated from 
Princeton in 1895. For two years In- 
studied law in the office of Karnes, 
Holmes & Krauthoff, and was admit- 
ted to the bar in 1897. Two years later 
he took the M.A. degree at Harvard for 
law work, and in 1899 formed a part- 
nership with J. J. Vineyard. 

Mr. Thacher has devoted some at 
tentionto litreature as well as to law. In 
1898 he was correspondent for the 
Washington Post in Cuba, and wrote 
several magazine articles about the 
Spanish-American war there. 

Mr. Thacher is vice-president of the 
University Club and secretary of the 
Country Club. 



156 



MEW WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

DUDLEY THOMAS 
was born on a farm in Carroll County, 
Missouri, September 12, 1867. He 
worked in the fields in summer, and in 
winter attended the district school. 

In 1890 he left the farm and moved 
into Carrollton. Engaging in the loan 
and real estate business, he scored a 
success from the very first. In 1890 he 
closed up his affairs in Calrrollton, and, 
coming to Kansas City,' accepted apo- 
sjtion with a prominent life insurance 
company. 

His energy and address made his rec- 
ord something to be proud of. He is 
the only life insurance agent in the his- 
tory of the town to write two $100,000 
policies. 

It was not long until Mr. Thomas was 
offered the general agency of the John 
Hancock Life Insurance Company at 
this point, and, accepting the place, he 
procedeeded to run their business up 
from almost nothing to a decidedly 
large amount. 

Finally deciding to work for himself 
rather than for others, he resigned his 
position in the summer of 1902 and 
formed the Security Trust ^Company, 
of which he is the president. 




Photo by Strauss. 

A. S. VAN YALKENBURGH 
Assistant L T nited States Attorney for 
the Western District of Missouri, was 
born August 22, 1862, at Syracuse, Xew 
York. When he was seven years old 
his parents moved to Illinois for four 
years and then to Michigan, where Mr. 
Van Yalkenburgh was graduated from 
the State University in 1884 with the 
degree of B.A. 

Mr. Van Yalkenburgh came to Kan- 
sas City October 25, 1885, and studied 
law in the office of Dobson & Douglass. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1888, and 
soon afterward formed a law partner- 
ship with D. J. Haff. He continued in 
the firm of Haff & Yan Yalkenburgh 
until June, 1898, when he was appointed 
to the place of Assistant in the U"nited 
States Attorney's office. 

Mr. Yan Yalkenburgh is a leading 
member of the Bar Association, a char- 
ter member of the LTniverstity Club, 
and an active Republican. 

He was married to Miss Grace Ingold, 
of Kansas City, noted as a singer, Sep- 
tember 25, 1889. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



•57 




WALTER VROOMAN 

was born at Macon, Missouri. January S, 
1869, one of the six sons of Judge H. P. 
Vrooman. When Walter was five years 
of age the family moved to Topeka 
Kas., where he attended the public 
schools. At thirteen he ran away from 
home and travelled extensively over the 
Western States, keeping up his studies, 
however, so that he entered Harvard 
University in 1888. 

In 1895 he married Mary L. Grafnin, 
of Baltimore, Md., and came to settle in 
Missouri. 

In 1898 he went to England, remain- 
ing there two years, and founding Rus- 
kin Hall in Oxford. 

He returned to Missouri, selected 
Trenton as the point to estabilsh Ruskin 
College, the American counterpart of the 
English institution; and in Trenton or- 
ganized the first stores of the Western 
Cooperative Association. 

1902 saw the headquarters of the 
movement in Kansas City, whence the 
branches were organized in the various 
States. In 1902, also, he presented and 
expounded his Purposive Philosophy, 
an application of the thought-power of 
the past to the conditions of the present, 
and the evolution of the race. In a series 
of free lectures in Athenaeum Hall he ex- 
plained the social standpoint, a new 
system of ethics, whereby the determin- 
ation of right and wrong is dependent 
on the promotion or hindrance of the at- 
tainment of the Hierarchy of Life for 
this planet. 




JESSE J. VINEYARD 
was born in Platte County, Missouri, 
March 13, 1870. His early days were 
spent in Weston, Mo., and in 1883 his 
parents removed to Kansas City, where 
the subject of this sketch has ever since 
resided. 

He attended the pubic and high 
schools of Kansas City, and after com- 
pleting his courses entered Washington 
and Lee University in Lexington, Va., 
from which institution he was gradu- 
ated in 1 89 1. 

Upon his return to Kansas City he 
taught in the Central High School, oc 
cupying the chair of mat hematic-, and 
in his leisure hours studied law. He 
finally gave up teaching, and entered 
the law offices of Warner, Dean. Gibson 
& McLeod. 

He was admitted to practice, and be 
came senior member of the firm oi Vine- 
yard & Thacher, but in 1902 the firm of 
Rozzelle, Vineyard & Thacher was formed. 



158 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 





FRANK P. WALSH 
was born in St. Louis, Missouri, July 20, 
1864, and came to Kansas City to re- 
side upon attaining his majority. 

He left school at the age of ten years, 
beginning the struggle for existence as 
a telegraph messenger boy in his native 
city. He educated himself as a stenog- 
rapher, and was an expert in that line 
when admitted to the bar in 1889. 

His study of law, by the way, was car- 
ried on in the office of Gardiner Lathrop 
and as a lawyer he sprang at once into 
prominence, and now ranks at the very 
head of the Missouri bar. He is an at- 
tracitve and forcible public speaker. 

Mr. Walsh was married in 1891 to 
Miss Katherine O 'Flaherty, of Kansas 
City. They have five children, Kathe- 
erine Marie, Sarah Louise, Cecelia, Frank 
P., Jr., and John Frederick. 

Mr. Walsh is a member of the Com- 
mercial Club, and has always been act- 
ive in every movement for the advance- 
ment of municipal interests. 



JOHN W. WOFFORD, 
Tudge of the Criminal Court of Jackson 
County, was born August 14, 1837, in 
the State of Georgia. He served in the 
House and Senate of Georgia, and was 
presidential elector in 1876. He fought 
in the Confederate army from the begin- 
ning to the end of the war. He was ap- 
pointed Judge of the Jackson County 
Criminal Court in July, 1892, by Gov- 
ernor Francis, and was elected to that 
position in November, 1892, and re- 
elected in 1898. 

Judge Wofford is one of the unique 
figures in Kansas City He is like no 
one else. A just and inflexible judge, 
strict in his construction and enforce- 
ment of the law, feared and respected 
by attorneys, he is yet as tender-heart- 
ed as a child in his treatment of crim- 
inals. He has inaugurated a system of 
paroling convicted criminals, which puts 
them -on their honor, releasing them 
during good behavior, which has done 
more to reform them than all the pris- 
ons in Christendom could do. 

Some of the most celebrated murder 
cases in the history of Missouri have been 
tried by Judge Wofford. 

So j"us"t and careful are his rulings 
that it is seldom, indeed, the Supreme 
Court has found occasion to reverse 
them. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



159 




Photo by Thomson. 

WILLIAM H. WALLACE 
was born in Clark County, Kentucky, 
October 11, 1848. His parents were 
farmers, and it was on their place Mr. 
Wallace was born. The family removed 
to a farm near Lee's Summit, Mo., and 
Mr. Wallace attended the district schools. 
After his schooling in his home county, 
Mr. Wallace went to Westminster Col- 
lege in Fulton, Mo., where he took the 
classical course. He graduated from the 
college in 1871 with the title of A.B. af- 
fixed to his name, and soon after took up 
school-teaching as an occupation in Jack- 
son County. He afterwards w-ent into 
the newspaper business, working on the 
Sentinel at Independence, Mo., and as 
correspondent for the Kansas City Times. 

He studied law in the office of former 
Attorney-General lohn A. Hockaday at 
Fulton Mo., and 'was admitted to the 
bar in' 1873. He practiced the profes- 
sion in Independence for five years after 
being admitted to the bar, then came to 
this city to continue it. 

He was elected Prosecuting Attorney 
of this county in 1880 and was re-elected 
at the expiration of his first term. 

He gained national fame through his 
fearless prosecution of the James boys, 
and at all times during the strenuous 
period carried his life in his hands. 

Mr. Wallace is a Mason and a member 
of the Knights of Pythias. 

He was married in 1887 to Miss Eliz- 
abeth Chiles, daughter of Mr. C. C. 
Chiles, of Independence. They have two 
children, W. H., Jr., aged fourteen, and 
May, aged twelve. 




Photo by Strauss. 

THEODORIC BOULWARE WALLACE 
was born in Jackson County, Missouri 
April 1 6, i860, the son of the Rev. J. \V. 
Wallace, a Presbyterian minister. He 
spent his boyhood days on a farm, and 
received his early education in the district 
schools, later entering Westminster Col- 
lege, Fulton, Mo. He was graduated 
from there in 1880, and deciding upon 
law as a profession enrolled himselt as a 
student in the St. Louis Law School, re- 
ceiving his degree in 1883. He taught 
school for a while in the St. Louis Univer- 
sity, and then went to Madison, Wis., to 
take a place as digester in a legal pub- 
lishing house. 

Mr. Wallace came to Kansas City in 
1886, where he has ever since practiced 
his profession. He is a member of the 
firm of Wallace, Wallace & Culbertson. 
In 1896 he was appointed receiver of 
the Missouri National Bank, a very com- 
plete failure. Within five years Ins en- 
ergy and ability brought order out oi 
chaos, and where nothing was expected 
at the outset, dollar for dollar was paid 

back. 

Mr Wallace belongs to no clubs or or- 
ders but is a member of the Beta 1 hi 1 1 
and Phi Delta Thi Fraternities 

He was married in [893 to Miss Myra 
Gates, of Independence, and they have 
two children, John and Helen. 



i6o 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

WILLIAM STONE WOODS, 
president of the National Bank of Com- 
merce, and one of the wealthiest finan- 
ciers of Missouri, was born November i, 
1S40, in Columbia, Missouri. 

After a common school education, 
the young man entered the Missouri 
State University, and was graduated in 
1 86 1. He at once became a student at 
the St. Louis Medical College, and after 
completing a course located as a physi- 
cian in Middle Grove, Mo. He prac- 
ticed medicine until 1867, when he lo- 
cated at Paris, Mo., and entered upon a 
mercantile business. Two years later 
he went to Rocheport, Mo., and estab- 
lished the Rocheport Savings Bank. 
From that time on is but the record of 
the constant ascent of one of the most 
powerful financiers of the State. 

Dr. W T oods came to Kansas City in 
1SS0, and became a member of the 
wholesale dry goods firm of Grimes, 
Woods, La Force & Co. 

A controlling interest in the Kansas 
Citv Savings Association was purchased 
by Dr. Woods, which he reorganized 
into the bank of which he is now the 
head. With a capital of Si, 000,0000 
and stock worth $350 a share, it is the 
second largest financial concern west of 
the Mississippi. 

Dr. Woods was married July 10, 1866, 
to Miss Albina M. McBride. They have 
one daghter, Julia. 




Photo by Thomson. 

WILLIAM HARVEY WINANTS 
was born October 16, 1845, in Penn Van 
New York. When thirteen years old 
his parents moved to Cincinnati, where 
he received his education. At the out- 
break of the war in 1861 he entered the 
Second Ohio, and served throughout the 
war. 

In 1865 he came to Kansas City and 
engaged in the mercantile business, but 
sold out in 1867, and entered the employ 
of the old First National Bank as a clerk. 
He has been continuously engaged in 
the banking business ever since. In 1878 
he had risen to the position of assistant 
cashier, and when the Armour Bros. 
Banking Company was organized he 
went to it as teller. When it changed to 
the Midland National he became cashier 
and afterwards vice-president. In 1897 
he became vice-president of the National 
Bank of Commerce, which position he 
now holds. 

Few men give more time and energy 
to public movements than Mr. Winants. 
He has been treasurer of the Board of 
Trade for seventeen years, president of 
the Kansas City Clearing-house for nine 
years, director and treasurer of Conven- 
tion Hall, and vice-president of the 
Priests of Pallas Association. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



[61 




Photo by Strauss. 

JAMES CLARENCE WILLIAMS 
was born February 12, 1867, in Ray 
Couty, Missouri, and spent his boyhood 
days on a farm. He went to school in 
the winter and worked the rest of the 
time. 

After eight years spent in Richmond, 
Mo., he came to Kansas City in 1888, and 
started in to prepare himself for ad- 
admission to the bar, having commenced 
the study of law some time before. He 
was admitted to practice in 1889, and for 
a while was connected with the office of 
Young & Lewis, the junior member of 
the firm, Alfred Henry Lewis, having 
since attained fame as an author and pol- 
ished political writer. 

Mr. Williams' specialty is commercial 
and corporation law. 

He is chairman of the board of trus- 
tees for the Church of This World, and is 
a leading thinker along economical and re- 
ligious lines. 

He is a Democrat, and stands high in 
the councils of his party, but has never 
asked for office. 

He is a Mason, Elk, Knight of Pythias, 
and a Woodman. 




I. N. WATSON 
was born in Clark County, Missouri 
September 24, 1857. His boyhood v 
spent there on a farm, and he attended 
Craddock College at Quincy, 111. Sub- 
sequently he took a two years' course 
at the Kirksville, Mo., Normal School, 
frow which he was graduated in [881. 
He went to a law school in Keokuk, la., 
and was admitted to the bar there in 
1883. Mr. Watson then went to Em- 
poria, Kas., as a stenographer, and be- 
came court reporter for Judge Graves. 

In September, 1885, Mr. Watson came 
to Kansas City, and two years later 
formed a partnership with the late John 
W. Beebe, which was dissolved in 1898. 

He was married January 1, 1885, to 
Miss Frances B. Etheridge in Clark 
County, Missouri They have two chil- 
dren. 



l62 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




SAMUEL JACKSON WHITTEMORE 
was born October 29, 1865, in the beau- 
tiful Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. 
He received his early education in the 
public schools of Martinsburg, W. V., 
and later took an academic course. 
After graduation he taught school for 
three years, but came to see that the 
"West was the place for the young man. 
He left the Virginias in 1886, and lo- 
cated in Lincoln, Neb., accepting a po- 
sition with the leading hotel of that city, 
and has been in the hotel business ever 
since. 

From Lincoln he went out to Los 
Angeles, Cal., to accept a similar but 
more lucrative position. In 1896 the 
Midland Hotel, of this city, made him 
an attractive offer, and he came here 
to accept it. He was prominently iden- 
tified with the Midland for six years 
making largely for its success by reason 
of his widespread popularity. 

In 1902 he resigned his position at the 
Midland, and became one of the vice- 
presidents and general managers of the 
Baltimore Hotel Company, the place he 
now fills. He has been largely instru- 
mental in elevating the Baltimore to 
its high rank as the peer of any hotel in 
the country. 

In 1S84, in Jackson, Mich., Mr. Whit- 
temore was married to Miss Evelyn 
Madden. 




Photo by Strauss. 

JOHN LEE WHEELER 

was born at Parkville, Missouri, October 
8, 1862, and his boyhood was spent in 
Platte and Jackson Counties. He at- 
tended the Kansas City public schools, 
a boarding school at Platte City, and 
then Central College at Fayette. 

Judge Wheeler came to Kansas City 
in 18S4, and went into the law office of 
D. B. Holmes. He was admitted to the 
bar in- 1886, and began the practice of 
his profession alone. 

He was Police Judge from 1890 to 
1892. 

Judge Wheeler is a Mason, a Forester, 
and a Woodman, and is one of the lead- 
ing Democrats of the city. 

He was married to Miss Anna M. 
Henson, of Emporia, Kas., January 1, 
1899. 



/ 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



l6 3 




HUGH CAMPBELL WARD 
was born March io, 1864, at Westport, 
Missouri, and has resided here all his 
life. He has attained prominence in 
both law and politics. 

A graduate of Harvard University, 
he started in life with the best advant- 
ages. 

Mr. Ward was a member of the Leg- 
islature in 1893, and was Police Com- 
missioner from 1898 to 1902. 

He was appointed receiver of the Mas- 
tin estate in 1894 by the United States 
Circuit Court, and was also receiver of 
the Metropolitan National Bank from 
1897 to 1899, managing these large in- 
terests in a most satisfactory manner. 

Mr. Ward was married to Miss Yassie 
James October 26, 1898, and has two 
sons, Hugh C. Ward, Jr., and James 
Crawford Ward, four and two years old. 
Mrs. Ward was graduated from Vassar 
in the class of 1879. 




Photo by Strauss. 

JOHN DAVID WENDORF 
was born in Jefferson County, Kansas, 
September 27, 1864. His boyhood was 
spent upon the farm, where he laid the 
foundation for the physical and intel- 
lectual vigor that place him easily in a 
class with the best of the younger law- 
yers of Kansas City. 

Mr. Wendorff was educated at the 
State University of Kansas at Law- 
rence. He left there in 1886, and taught 
school for three years in Leavenworth 
County. During the years 1889 and 
1890 he attended the law school at Ann 
Arbor, Mich., and in February, 1891, 
he came to Kansas City, and entered the 
law office of McDougal & Robinson. 
Later he became associated with the 
firm of McDougal & Sebree, where he 
now is. 

For two years Mr. Wendorff was an 
Assistant Prosecuting Attorney under 
Frank M. Lowe. 

He is a Mason, and a member of the 
Bar Association. 



164 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 





Pholo by Slrauss. 

THOMAS ADAMS WITTEN 
was born in Beckly, West Virginia, July 
4, 1858, but is practically a Missourian 
as his parents removed to this State 
when he was eight years of age. His 
boyhood days were spent in Trenton, and 
his early education was received in the 
public schools of that town. 

After the public schools, Mr. Witten 
entered the Grand River College at Ed- 
inburgh, Mo., from which institution he 
was graduated in 1879. After gradua- 
tion he went back to Guyandotte, W. 
Va., where he studied law in the office of 
his uncle, Judge Evermont Ward, and 
was admitted to the bar in 1881. He 
first commenced practice in Trenton, but 
in 1887 came to Kansas City, where he 
has ever since remained. For some years 
he was alone, but in 1893 formed the 
firm of Witten & Hughes, which contin- 
ued until 1902, the occasion of dissolu- 
tion being Mr. Hughe' candidacy for of- 
fice. 

Mr. Witten is a member of the local 
Bar Association, and has always occu- 
pied a prominent place in the public life 
of the city. 

He married Miss Carrie Bailey in 1888 
in Delavan, 111., and they had two chil- 
dren, Francis Donald and Hazel C. B. 
His wife died in 1892, and in October 
1 90 1, he married Miss Belle G. Steele, of 
Marshall, Mo. 



GEORGE LOGAN WALLS 

was born in Warsaw, Missouri, Decem- 
ber 29, 1858. He was educated at the 
public schools of Warsaw and at the 
Ohio University. He then took a course 
in the Cincinnati Law School, and close 
application to his studies brought on a 
pulmonary complaint. He went out 
to California, where he remained for 
four years, returning to Warsaw with 
his old-time health and vigor. 

He hung out his shingle, and practiced 
law there in Warsaw until 1888, when 
he came to Kansas City. He practiced 
here until 1894, when he was nomin- 
ated for Justice of the Peace by the Re- 
publicans, and triumphantly elected. 

Such has been his record that Demo- 
crats and Republicans have united to 
continue him in office ever since. 

One of his best deeds has been to 
straighten out the tough North End el- 
ement, and bring law and order into that 
portion of the community where be- 
fore was chaos. 

Mr. Walls has always been a strong 
Republican, and has been prominently 
mentioned in connection with the party 
nomination for Mayor. 

He married Miss Annetta Jones, of Kan- 
sas City, in 1887, and is the father of two 
children, Katherine and Hildegrade. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



16 = 




Photo by Strauss. 

HARRY HOWARD WATTS 
was born May 9, 1871, in Ann Arbor, 
Michigan, where he remained until he at- 
tained his majority. He attended the 
public schools in Ann Arbor, and was grad 
uated from the Ann Arbor High School) 
after which he entered the University of 
Michigan. 

He spent a year in the literary depart- 
ment, and a year and a half in the med- 
ical department under the tutelage of Dr. 
Fleming Carrow, who occupies the chair 
of opthalmology in the university. 

After emerging from the university, he 
identified himself with a prominent op- 
tical firm in Minneapolis, where he re- 
mined for four years. 

He came to Kansas City in 1896, and 
was for four years with a local optical 
firm. In 1900 he started in business for 
himself, and has done more than well. 

Mr. Watts is a Mason, and has also 
been honored with the members of his 
profession with an election to the pos- 
ition of vice-president of the Missouri 
Optical Association. 




Photo by Strauss. 

MORTON WOLLMAN 

was born in Leavenworth, Kansas, Jan- 
uary 1, 1863, the son of Jonas Wollman, 
a pioneer merchant of that ancient town. 
He went to the public and high schools 
of Leavenworth, and deciding against 
a college education entered the employ 
of his father. 

He remained in business in Leaven- 
worth for five years, and then, antici- 
pating the exodus to Kansas City, the 
Wollmans came to this place in 1888, 
where the family has ever since played 
a prominent part in the professional and 
business life of the town. 

Mr. Wollman went into business for 
himself soon after coming to Kansas 
City, dealing in wholesale general mer. 
chandise, and from a small beginning 
has built up a large and profitable busi- 
ness. 

Mr. Wollman is unmarried, and lives 
with his parents in a stately old house 
on the West Side. 

He is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias and is also an Elk and a Mason. 

He has ever been a believer in the fu- 
ture of Kansas City, and has denied 
neither time nor trouble in bringing 
about the growth and greatness of the 
town. 



1 66 



zien who are making Kansas city. 




Photo by Strauss. 

HENRY WOLLMAN 
was born in Leavenworth, Kansas, and 
his early education was received in the 
public and high schools of that town. 
He then studied the classics under tu- 
tors, and, entering the law department 
at Ann Arbor, was graduated with high 
honors. Returning to Leavenworth, he 
served as First Assistant City Counselor 
for nearly a year before attaining his ma- 
jority. 

In 1 88 1 he came to Kansas City, and 
at once took his place in the first rank in 
his profession. He was appointed U. S. 
Commissioner, and for a short time act- 
ed as Circuit Judge under a temporary 
election of the bar. 

In 1899 Mr. Wollman removed to New- 
York, where he has won fame and for- 
tune, but he still retains a home interest 
in Kansas City, where his parents still 
live. 

Mr. Wollman not only enjoys repute 
as a lawyer, but as a writer and lecturer 
He has contributed articles on economic 
questions to all the leading reviews and 
New York papers, and while in Kansas 
City lectured before the universities of 
Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska. 

For three years Mr. Wollman was pres- 
ident of the Southwestern Alumni Asso- 
ciation of the University of Michigan, 
and is a prominent member of the Phi 
Delta Phi Fraternity. He also belongs 
to the Missouri Club in New York, the 
American Bar Association, the Lawyers' 
Club, the Medico-Legal Society, and the 
Society of Medical Jurisprudence. 




Photo oy Strauss. 

BENJAMIN F. WOLLMAN 
was born January 20, 1872, in Leaven- 
worth, Kansas, and lived there until his 
parents moved to Kansas City in 1888. 
He went to the public schools of Leav- 
enworth, was graduated from the Cen- 
tral High School, in 1890, and then en- 
tered Ann Arbor. He took a classical 
course, and was graduated from the law 
department in 1894. He returned to 
Kansas City, and was junior member of 
the firm of Wollman & Wollman until 
the departure of his brother Henry to 
New York, when the firm of 'Wollman,. 
Solomon & Cooper was formed in 1899. 

Few young men lead busier lives, and 
have greater and more diversified inter- 
ests than Mr. Wollman. 

He is a Mason, and holds the record 
for quick work in that organization, hav- 
ing gone from the first to the thirty-sec- 
ond degree in six weeks. He is an officer 
in the Shrine, an Elk, a trustee in the 
Progress Club, a member of the Com- 
mercial Club, president of the Royal 
Brewing Company of Weston, Mo., and 
of the Egbert Tobacco Company, direc- 
tor and general attorney of the Manufac- 
turers' Coal and Coke Co., director of Ar- 
kansas, Springfield & Northwestern Rail- 
road, general attorney of Iowa & St, 
Louis Railroad, the Iowa & Dakota Cen- 
tral, and the Iowa & Missouri Railroad. 

Mr. Wollman is unmarried, and makes 
his home with his parents. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



167 




Photo by Strauss. 

CASSIMER JOSEPH WELCH 
was born in Jackson, Michigan, March 4, 
1866. When three years old his family 
removed to Sedalia, Mo., and after three 
years of residence there they came to 
Kansas City. 

Mr. Welch had his schooling in the pub- 
lic schools of this city, and after his 
school-life went to work as a messenger 
boy. He afterwards became a plumb- 
er's apprentice and, after serving the re- 
quired time, became a journeyman 
plumber. He worked at the trade for 
eight years, and through his sympathy 
with trade-unionism was made secretary 
of the local plumbers' union. After his 
term of office there had expired he was 
elected by the union to represent it in 
the Industrial Council for a term of two 
years. 

He was appointed desk sergeant-at- 
arms of the Thirty-ninth General As- 
sembly, and held the place for four years, 
from 1892 to 1896. He was appointed a 
Deputy County Marshal by former 
County Marshal Chiles, serving through- 
out that officer's term. Soon after leav- 
ing this political place, Mr. Welch start- 
ed a messenger business, in which he is 
still engaged, being half-owner of the 
Hurry Messenger Company. 

He has always been very active in pol- 
itics, and has been a life-long Demo- 
crat. He is now a member of the Demo- 
cratic County Committee from his home 
ward, the ninth. 

Mr. Welch's affiliations with secret so- 
cieties is limited to membership in the 
Ragles. 




EDWARD WINSTANLEY 
was born in London, England, April 14, 
1849. He went to the public schools of 
London, but received his later and finish- 
ing education at Nutgrove College in 
Dublin. When only sixteen years old 
he emigrated to Canada, locating in Mon- 
treal, where he remained until 1874. 

In the spring of that year he came to 
Jackson County, where he has ever since 
resided. 

Settling in Independence, Mr. Winstan- 
ley was for some time engaged in the 
mercanntile business. 

In 1896 he was appointed superintend- 
ent of the Court-house, which position 
he now holds. The court-houses here 
and at Independence and the jail build- 
ings are all under his care, and to his en- 
ergy is due their splendid maintenance. 

Mr. Winstanley was married in 1879 to 
Miss Sallie Dunn, of Independence. 
They have four children, William, Ed- 
ward, Edith, and Emma. 

Mr. Winstanley has always been iden- 
tified with the Democratic party, and is 
r ecognized as one of the most active and 
ablest workers in Jackson County. 

He is an Elk, holding a life member- 
ship in that organization. 



i68 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Thomson. 

WILLARD E. WINNER 
was born in Fairfield, Iowa, May 4, 1849. 
In 1852 his parents moved to Kansas 
City, Kas., and in 1863 crossed the river 
nto Kansas City, Mo. 

Mr. Winner was robbed of an educa- 
tion by early responsibilities, for at the 
age of eleven he was compelled to seek 
employment. He worked as a clerk 
until 1866, when he was given a posi- 
tion in the postofhce, where he remained 
for eleven years, and working up to the 
position of assistant postmaster. He 
resigned in 1877 to open a real estate 
office, and in 1883 organized the Winner 
Investment Company, and then com- 
menced to write with virile hand some 
of the most splendid chapters in the his- 
tory of Kansas City's growth and great- 
ness. He did a business of millions, 
turned barren tracts into residence dis- 
tricts, and originated the plan of selling 
houses on the installment plan. He 
built the Kansas City, Independence 
Park Railway, the Vine Street line, and 
started to build a bridge at the foot of 
Cherry Street, which should connect his 
immense properties in Clay County with 
this city, making that the Brooklyn to 
Kansas City's New York. The great 
"boom" burst in 1882. The immensity 
of Mr. Winner's enterprises made them 
hard to carry, yet so well were they 
planned that not until four years later, 
at the height of the depression, was it 
found impossible to secure money for 
their completion. 

He is now president of the Industrial 
Development Company and the Leaven- 
worth Construction Company. 




Photo by Thomson. 

JAMES B. WELSH, 
one of the most successful real estate 
men of the city, was born March 15, 
1852, at Danville, Kentucky, where, in 
1872, he was graduated from Centre 
College. For ten years after gradua- 
tion, Mr. Welsh was engaged in mercan- 
tile business in Danville. In 1882 he 
moved to Kansas City, and engaged in 
the wholesale notion and millinery busi- 
ness, but after four years of it he en 
tered the real estate business, which has 
engaged his attention ever since. Mr. 
Wesh formed his present partnership 
with E. R. Crutcher in 1892, and to 
gether they have transacted much of 
the most important real estate business 
of the city. To their own business they 
have added by purchase the real estate 
and rental business of A. A. Whipple in 
1897, of Harrison & Jones in 1898, and 
of Tribble & Pratt in 1899. 
' Mr. Welsh was married in 1878 to 
Miss Mary McKee, daughter of Prof- 
James Lapsley McKee, vice-president 
of Centre College. They have two sons, 
McKee and George Winston Welsh. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



169 




Photo by Thomson. 

JOHN W. WAGNER 
was born in Hamilton, Ohio, August iS, 
1861. His parents came to Kansas City 
in 1869, so that he was really reared in 
Kansas City. He went through the 
public schools, and at the conclusion of 

his school days embarked in the uphol- 
stering trade. 

In 1883 Mr. Wagner moved to Cen- 
tral City, Colorado, where he went into 
the undertaking business, and has ever 
since followed the profession of under- 
taker. 

In 1 887 he returned to Kansas City, 
and has always played a prominent 
part in the life of the town. In recog- 
nition of Mr. Wagner's popularity and 
high standing, he was appointed presi- 
dent of the State Board of Embalming 
ing by Governor Stephens, and has also 
served a term as president of the Mis- 
souri State Funeral Directors' Associa- 
tion. 

He is prominent in Democratic poli- 
tics, belongs to the Elks, and is presi- 
dent of the German-American Bank, 
and a director of the German Hospital. 

Mr. Wagner was married in 1888 to 
Miss Ella Doyle, of Cheyenne, Wyo. 
and they have one daughter, Mildred. 




Photo by Thomson. 

MARSHAL VICTOR WATSON 
was born in Delaware County, Ohio, on 
a farm, but his early boyhood was di- 
vided between the towns of Richwood 
O., and Monticello, Ind., where he went 
to the public schools. 

At the age of fourteen he went into the 
photographic business, and later em 
barked in the mercantile business. 

He came to Kansas City in 1891, and 
for a term of the Legislature was journal 
clerk at Jefferson City, where he earned 
a wide reputation for speed and efficien- 
cy. In 1 891 he became secretary of the 
Kansas City Paper House, where he re- 
mained until 1902, when he sold out his 
interests, and soon after accepted the po- 
sition of third vice-president of the Uni- 
ted States and Mexican Trust Company. 

Mr. Watson's career has always been 
marked by public spirit. He was a di- 
rector in the Commercial Club, then vice- 
president and was president in 1896-97, 
and during his term the Convention Hall 
idea was given form. He is now chair- 
man of the Transportation Committee of 
the Club. 

From 1898 to 1900 Mr. Watson served 
as a member of the Board of Public 
Works, making a fine record. He has 
also been connected with the Priests of 
Pallas in an executive capacity, and with 
every other notable public movement. 

He was married in.1891 to Miss Mary 
E. Hutchinson, of Indianapolis. 

Mr. Watson is a thirty-second degree 
Mason, a Knight Templar, a Shriner, and 
a member of the Kansas Citv Club. 



170 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 




Photo by Strauss. 

ELISHA WINTER 
was born in Brooklyn, New York, Oc- 
tober 13, 1849. At an early age he en- 
tered journalism in 1884, starting a pub- 
lication for the New York retail grocers. 
Mr. Winter was secretary of the first 
and second national conventions held 
by the retail merchants in 1886 and 
1887 in Washington, and was the first 
State Secretary in New York of the Na- 
tional Association. He continued in 
this capacity until 1891, when he went 
to Boston and organized the first Food 
Fair. From that time on his efforts 
have been to federate merchant dom, to 
secure harmonious action among all re- 
tail merchants, to obtain better laws, 
improve bankruptcy laws, oppose trad- 
ing stamps, and all similar devices that 
violate the code of commercial ethics. 

Mr. Winter started the international 
congress that will meet at the World's 
Fair in 1904, and has probably organized 
more associations than any other man. 

Mr. Winter was married to Estella 
Ralph at Brooklyn May 28, 1879, and 
has one daughter, twenty-one years old. 




Photo by Strauss. 

SAMUEL SUMNER WINN 
was born in Liberty County, Georgia, 
July 25, 1858. His father, a Presby- 
terian minister, moved from Georgia to 
Illinois early in the career of Mr. Winn 
in order to escape the evil surroundings 
of slavery. 

At Knox and Lake Forest Academies 
and at Boston University Mr. Winn ac- 
quired his education. 

He was admitted to the bar in Chi- 
cago in in 1877, and began the practice 
of his profession in Peoria. From Peoria 
he came to Kansa City in 1881. 

As Assistant City Counselor under 
Slavens and Middlebrook, Mr. Winn 
made an enviable record for himself 
gaining a knowledge of municipal law 
which few possess. 

Mr. Winn was married to Miss Helen 
O'Hara, of Cincinnati. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



171 




ROBERT L. YEAGER 
was born in Shelby County, Kentucky, 
August 26, 1843. When he was nine 
years old his parents moved to to Pal- 
myra, Mo., and shortly afterwards both 
of them died within ten days of each oth- 
er, leaving the boy to fight his way alone 
in the world. 

He worked his way through St. Paul's 
College, graduating in i860, and serving 
under General Price in the civil war. 

It was in April, 1868, that Mr.Yeager 
came to Kansas City, after studying law 
at Louisville, Ky., and having been ad- 
mitted to the bar at Palmyra, Mo. 

The young man was elected County 
Attorney in 1871, Prosecuting Attorney 
from 1872-76, City Counselor under May- 
or Holmes; a member of the School 
Board twenty- two years and its presi- 
dent twenty-one years. 

The firms he formed were Yeager & 
Campbell, Peak & Yeager, Peak, Yeager 
& Ball, and Yeager, Strother & Yeager. 

He was married in May, 1870, to Miss 
Leonora Forbis, of Independence, Mo. 
There are five children living. 



FRANK TITUS, 
for many years a prominent figure among 
the lawyers of Kansas City, was born in 
Philadelphia in 1844. He received a good 
classical education, and then selected the 
law as a profession. 

His studies were interrupted by the 
trumpet call, and enlisting as a soldier of 
the North, he fought for three years in the 
Army of the Potomac 

Continuing his studies after his return 
from the battle field and camping ground, 
he soon qualified for admission to the bar. 
Soon after his admission, Mr. Titus came 
out to Missouri, and located in St. Louis, 
for at that time St. Louis was "the" city 
of the State. 

He soon perceived the error of his ways, 
and moved to Kansas City, where he has 
ever since lived, a helpful figure in the 
public life of the town, and a popular one 
personally. He belongs to both the local 
and State Bar Associations, and also to 
several clubs and public organizations. 

He is affiliated with one or two secret 
societies, and is a married man with a 
family. 



IJ2 



MEN WHO MADE KANSAS CITY. 



Biographical Sketches. 



HENRY S. BURGIN 

was born in Lee County, Va., March 31, 
1845. When he was eight years old 
his father moved to Harrison County, 
Missouri, where the lad attended school. 
In 1870 the lad was graduated from 
Grand River College, Edinburg, Mo. For 
awhile he was interested in short-horn cat- 
tle, but soon went to teaching. He es- 
tablished the High School at Ridgeway 
and Lorraine, Mo., and was Principal of 
several High Schools. 

In 1886 he moved his family to Inde- 
pendence, Mo., for educational advan- 
tages, and was offered the Principalship 
of the Independence High Schools, but 
that same year he engaged in the real es- 
tate business in Kansas City, and has 
been at it ever since. 

Mr. Burgin was married July 2, 1871, 
at Knoxville, Tenn., to Miss Ettie Mc- 
Cannon, and has three children, all mar- 
ried: the Rev. S. H. C. Burgin, Eliza Bur- 
gin, and Willa L. Burgin. 



JAMES S. CHASE, 

in point of service the oldest, and in his 
knowledge of court records the most accu- 
rate, of the clerks of the Superior Court, 
was born November 15,1 847, in Starkboro, 
Vermont. He spent his boyhood days 
on a farm, attending district school in the 
winter. His education was completed 
by a course at the Upper Iowa University 
at Fayette, from which he was graduated 
in 1866. He came to Kansas City at once 
and went into the insurance business. 
He also taught school for a while in Clay 
County. Mr. Chase became connected 
with the Circuit Clerk's office in 1S71, be- 
ing appointed first deputy. He served 
as Division Clerk under Judges Jenkins, 
Woodson, Sawyer, Gill, and Henry. 
When the intricate park condemnation 
proceedings were begun Mr. Chase was 
given charge of the park land records, 
with the title of Condemnation Clerk. 
He was never known to make an errone- 
ous entry. Mr. Chase often saved the 
judges themselves from mistakes. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



173 



THOMAS F. CALLAHAN 
was born in Kansas City, Missouri, April 
11, 1868. His father, John P. Callahan, 
came here in 1845, and was a pioneer 
merchant and the first secretary of the 
old Merchants' Exchange. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
public and high schools, and then studied 
surveying under the late Robert Gilham 
and under John Donnelly. 

Always an active Democrat and an 
earnest party worker, he was appointed 
Superintendent of Streets in 1889, an d 
served two years with great credit. 

In 1896 he was nominated for County 
Surveyor by the Democrats, and elected 
by a large majority. On the strength of 
his fine record, Mr. Callahan was renom- 
inated in 1900, but the unfortunate split 
in the party defeated him of election. 

During his term as Surveyor he attend- 
ed the Kansas City School of Law at 
night, and was graduated in 1898. After 
quitting the office of Surveyor he formed 
the law firm of Jameson & Callahan. 

Mr. Callahan is a Woodman, and be- 
longs to the Knights of Pythias, the A. O. 
U. W., and the Hetasophs. He was mar- 
ried to Miss Effie Winram in 1894. 



LOUIS F. DAVISON, 
junior member of the law firm of Williams 
& Davison, was born at Grand Rapids, 
Mich., May 29, 1S73. His first schooling 
was in the public schools of Grand Rapids. 
In 1886 he went with his parents to St. 
Louis, where he continued to live until 
1S99, completing his education in that 
city. 

Soon after arriving in Kansas City he 
was admitted to the bar, and formed a 
partnership with J. C. Williams. 

Mr. Davison is a Mason and a Wood- 
man. His father is Samuel Davison, a 
banker at Colorado Springs. 



i?4 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



SAMUEL EPPSTEIN 

was born at New York City July 6, 1862. 
At the age of seven he went to Milwaukee, 
where he was educated. At the Spen- 
cerian College at Milwaukee he became an 
accountant. In 1S79 he came to Kansas 
City and worked for a wholesale clothing 
company, finally becoming its credit and 
confidential man. Fourteen years ago 
he started as an accountant, and was coun- 
ty accountant in 1895-96. The law firm 
of Neal & Eppstein was organized in 1898. 
Mr. Eppstein was one of the founders 
of the Home Cooperative Company, 
which was started at Kansas City, May 
11, 1 90 1, and was the first successful com- 
pany of its kind in the West. In 1887 
Mr. Eppstein was married to Miss Isabel 
V. Goldsmith at Lexington, Ky. 



ROBERT BRINSMADE MIDDLE- 
BROOK 

was born at Trumbull, Connecticut, Sep- 
tember 3, 1855. He went to school at 
Brookfield, Connecticut, and was gradu- 
ated from the Yale law department in 
1878. It was in that year that Mr. Mid- 
dlebrook came to Kansas City and formed 
the law partnership of Strong & Middle- 
brook. Strong was elected City Attorney, 
and the firm then became Hatch & Mid- 
dlebrbok. In 1888 Mr. Middlebrook was 
appointed Assistant City Attorney and 
served one term. In April, 1897, he was 
appointed City Counselor, and served two 
terms. 

Mr. Middlebrook 's Republicanism dates 
far back, his ancestors having allied them- 
selves successively with Federalist, Whig, 
and Republican parties. 

Mr. Middlebrook was married to Miss 
Louise Rutter at Toledo, Ohio, in 1884, 
They have five children. 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSA& CITY. 



175 



GEORGE A. NEAL, 
a leading member of the Kansas City bar, 
was born December 17, 1856, at Louis- 
ville, Kentucky. He was educated at 
Smithfield College, Ky., and was admit- 
ted to the bar in March, 1S81. He began 
practicing law at Osceola, Mo., and after 
nine years there moved to Kansas City. 

In 1894 Mr. Neal was chairman of the 
committee that prosecuted election frauds. 
He was a delegate to the National Repub- 
lican Convention in Chicago in 1888 and 
to the Minneapolis convention in 1892, 
serving on the same committee with Sen- 
ator Depew. 

At Osceola in 1889 he was appointed 
United States District Attorney. 

Mr. Neal is a Mason, a member of the 
A. 0. U. W., and a member of the Metho- 
dist Church. 

He was married in December, 1881, to 
Miss Lily B. High, of Louisville, Ky. 
They have three children. 



JAMES B. McGOWAN 
was born in Clay County, Missouri, June 
8, 1864. He lived on a farm until he was 
nineteen, attending the district school in 
winter, and working all the rest of the 
time. 

When nineteen years old he came to 
Kansas City, and after attending the High 
School here accepted employment with 
the Abernathy Furniture Company. He 
remained there for a year, then went to 
another clerical position. 

In 1888 he was appointed to a position 
on the police force, and in 1888 was made 
a deputy in the office of the County Mar- 
shal. In 1890 he was made Jury Com- 
missioner, and in that office, as in all other 
employments, he won success by ability 
and industry. 

After leaving the office of Jury Com- 
missioner, he accepted a position as clerk 
in the office of his brother, Hugh McGow- 
an, then western agent for the Barber As- 
phalt Company. When Mr. Hugh McGow- 
an removed to Indianapolis the subject of 
this sketch succeeded him, and has car- 
ried on the work in the same successful 
manner. 

Mr. McGowan is an active Democrat, a 
member of the County Committee, belongs 
to the Jackson County Democratic Club, 
the Kansas City Club, the Elks, and the 
Knights of Columbus. 

He is unmarried. 



i 7 6 



MEN WHO ARE MAKING KANSAS CITY. 



PERRY A. SCHULL 
was born in Cedarville, Ohio, March 16, 
1867, and spent his boyhood in that town. 
His early education was secured in the 
public and high schools, and he also had 
the advantage of a classical course in An- 
tioch College. 

At the age of eighteen he commenced 
to work for a living, and his first employ- 
ment was in a clothing store in Xenia, O. 

In 1886 he came to Kansas City, where 
he has ever since remained. For ten years 
he was identified with prominent mercan- 
tile establishments, and built up a wide ac- 
quaintance. 

In 1896 the firm of Wolf & Schull was or- 
ganized, and a tailoring business carried 
on. In 1898 Mr. Wolf sold out to Arthur 
Jelley, and the present firm of Schull & 
Jelley was organized. The business has 
since been incorporated with a capital 
stock of $35, 00, all paid in. 

In addition to their mercantile business, 
Mr. Schull and Mr. Jelley are also largely 
interested in local realty and building, 
and have prospered amazingly, besides 
doing much to aid in Kansas City's growth. 

Mr. Schull belongs to the Commercial 
Club, and is an Elk a Mason, and an Odd 
Fellow. He is a married man. 



CLYDE TAYLOR 
was born at Wichita, Kansas, October 
11, 1S77, where he resided until 1888, 
when he came with his father's family 
to Kansas City. At once, on his ar- 
rival at the age of eleven years, he be- 
gan going to the public schools, attend- 
ing first the Jefferson School and 
later graduating from the Central 
High School. In 1900 his education 
was completed by his graduation from 
the University of Michigan. The same 
year of his graduation he returned to 
Kansas City and entered the law office 
of Ben T. Hardin. A year later, or in 
January, 1901, Mr. Taylor formed a 
partnership with Mr. Hardin. 

He is a Republican in politics, and 
made several speeches in the recent 
campaign. 



h 



NDEX. 



A 

Page. 

kbernathy. F. T 6 

Adams, Washington 5 

Allen, Ethelbert F 5 

Allen. H. H 6 

Anderson, H. II 7 

Ashley, Henry D 8 

Atwill, W. W S 

Avery, Walter W 7 

B 

Baldwin, C. Marshall 11 

Beattie, T. J 16 

Bohr, John 16 

Bell, W. L 18 

Benson, W. E IS 

Blood, W. H 11 

Borland, W. P 10 

Boucher, Francois 11 

Boyle, L. C 12 

Bracken, J. B 13 

Brady, H. C 15 

Brady, J. E 15 

Brent, Kelly 10 

Brown, John A 11 

Brown, W. B. C 9 

Brims, Oscar 17 

Brims, Rudolph 17 

Bullene, Fred S 13 

Burgin, H. S 172 

Busch, Carl 9 

Byers. C. C 12 

C 

Callahan. Thomas 173 

Carkener. Stuart 21 

Carter, C. J 28 

Carter, Rev. William 26 

Chamberlain, S. E 26 

Chapman, A. 1 22 

Chapman, Arthur 22 

Chase, James 172 

Chick, J. S 27 

Chrisman, G. 1 21 

Clarke, W. B 19 

Cleary, John M 2S 

Clendening, E. M 20 

Coates. A. C 29 

Coffin. Dr. CO 27 

Collins, George R 20 

Collum, D. P 29 

Cooper. A. D 25 



Page. 

Cornish, Arthur 24 

Courtney, C. C 24 

Crittenden, T. T., Jr 25 

Crutcher, E. R 19 

Curry, C. S 23 

Curtin, E. J 28 

D 

Balton. Rev. W.J 30 

Darnall, Ora 36 

Dart, E. M 33 

Dayis, Webster 34 

Davison, L. F 173 

Dean, A. J 35 

Dickey, W. S 31 

Boggett, Fred S 35 

Dominick, J. R 31 

Donohue, James 33 

Douglass, S. C 30 

Downing, J. F 32 

Buff, C. P 32 

Dunn, Denton 31 

E 

Ellis, E. C 37 

Ellison, E. D 38 

Ellison, James Zd 

English, George H 30 

Epperson; U. S 3S 

Eppstein, Samuel 174 

Eubank, J. D 3ft 

Evans, A. F 37 

F 

Faxon, F. A 41 

Field, R. H 44 

Finlay, C. E 43 

Flahive, Captain Philip 10 

Fontron, Joseph P 42 

Foster, J. J 43 

Frick, Dr. W. J 41 

Friedberg, Harry 40 

Fulton, S. T 42 

G 

Gage, J. C !•> 

Gallagher, A. E 51 

Garland, H. N • 4ft 

Gates, E. P 52 

Gentry. O. H., Jr 49 

Gilday, John P 49 



i78 



Index. 



Page. 

Godard, Porter 53 

Goffe, W. C 44 

Gossett, A. N 48 

Gossett, M. R 45 

Green, John J 47 

Green, T. J 47 

Greenlee, R. P 18 

Greenman, J. C 45 

Greenwood, J. M . . 54 

Gregory, R. L 51 

Griffith, .1. K 52 

Groff, W. N 54 

Gnettel, Henry 53 

Cuinotte, J. E 50 

Gunn, F. C 50 



H 

Hadley, H. S 56 

Hagerman. Frank 56 

Hall, Dr. C. Lester 61 

Hamilton, A. D. L 61 

Haney, Lee 70 

Hardin, B. T 64 

Harding, John T 58 

Harmon. H. L 57 

Harrison, G. B., Jr 58 

Harzfeld, J. A 55 

Harzfeld, Sigmund 65 

Hayde. W..P 55 

Hayes, E. W 69 

Heitman, N. F 61 

Henley, Harry 60 

Hoffman, Carl 50 

Holden, Hale 63 

Holmes, E. E f>0 

Holmes, D. B 66 

Holmes, Walton 68 

Holmes, C. F 68 

Houston, Francis 5? 

Howe, F. M 57 

Howell, CM 63 

Hughes, Roland 62 

Hull, J. W 62 

Huppert, A. E 65 

Huttig, Frederick, Sr 66 

Huttig, William 67 

Huttig, Frederick, Jr 67 

Hughes. Rev. Matt. S 69 

I 

Ingraham. R. J 70 



Pagp. 

Jones, Elliott H 77 

Jones, Garland 75 

Jones, Dr. H. S 75 

Jones, J. Logan 71 

Jones, L. M 71 

Jones, Thomas 74 

Julian, H. S 73 

Jurden, S. W 7.2 

K 

Karnes, J. V. C 77 

Karnes, Lathrop 82 

Kellogg, F. W 80 

Kemper, W. T ■ .... 78 

Kessler, George 7S 

Ketner, James 82 

Kimbrell. I. B 79 

Kirshner, Charles H. . 83 

Knight, Lucius 81 

Knoche, Dr. J. P SI 

Kuhn, W. F 79 

Kyle. H. G 80 



T ach, John E 91 

Ladd, S. B 84 

La Force, Felix 91 

Lake, C. W 90 

Lang, LI. F 86 

Langsdale. Dr. J. M 87 

T athrop, Gardiner S4 

L aughlin, I . A . Q ~ 

Leach, Francis A 90 

Leavel, C. B 89 

T ongan, G. B 88 

Lorie, J. L 83 

Lowe, J. M 88 

Lucas, Charles W S6 

Lucas, W. H 85 

I umpkin, John L 89 

Lyons, W. E 85 

Me 

McClellan. I. S 94 

McClintock, Robert 96 

McCune, H. 1 93 

McDougal, H. C 91 

McGowan, James B 175 

McGowan. Hugh 92 

McGovern, E. J 92 

McKecknie, J. W 93 

McKinnev. James 96 



Jacques, H. W 73 

Jamison, W. T 76 

Jelley, Arthur 76 

Jenney, Kittredge 74 

Jobes, C. S 72 



M 

Madden. P. H 101 

Mann, Homer B 97 

Manning, J. H 106 

Markward. Frank 105 



Index. 



179 



Page. 

Mathews, George lftO 

May, C. C 1"! 

Mellier, W. G 95 

Meriwether, H. M 106. 

Meservey, E. C 105 

Middlebrook, R. B 174 

Michaels, W. C 95 

Millett, G. Van 101 

Miller, George J 102 

Mitchell S. A 100 

Mitchell, Dr. G. B 99 

Moechel, Jean 104 

Moriarty, E. P 103 

Mott, Dr. J. S 97 

Moore. C. H 102 

Moore, Milton 98 

Moore, S. W 99 

Moore, William 103 

Murray, Reid 98 



Page. 

Reed, F. E 127 

Reed, W. T 127 

Richardson, R. E 122 

Ridge, Dr. I. M . . ..119 

Riddle, L. E 121 

Rieger, J. C 130 

Ringolsky, I. J 129 

Roberts, Dr. J. E 120 

Robinson, Elijah 123 

Rosenberger, J. C 126 

Rosenzweig, Grant 126 

Rothschild, L. P 128 

Rothschild, A. P 128 

Rozzelle, F. F 122 

Root, Walter 124 

Rood, J. M 120 

Rule. W. A 121 

Runnels, Dr. M. T 125 

Ryland, LP 125 



N 

Neale. George A 175 

New. Alexander 107 

Xoland, J. R 108 

Norberg, Dr. G. B 108 

Northrop, S. A 107 



O 

O'Flaherty, Daniel 110 

O'Flaherty, V. J Ill 

O'Grady, John Ill 

Oldham, M. J 109 

O'Malley, Charles 110 

Orear, E. C * 112 

Orthwein, C. C 109 

Otto. W. H 113 

Oviatt, F. E 112 



Palmer, C. S 119 

Patterson, Dr. J. M 118 

Pearson, A A 114 

Pendergast, Thomas 116 

Perry, W. C 115 

Phelps, James L 116 

Phillips, Frank 113 

Pontius, W. S 118 

Porterfield, E. E 114 

Powell. W. A 117 

Powell, E. N 117 

Pur.ton, Dr. John 115 

R 

Ranson, B. D 130 

Reily, E. M 123 

Renick, Charles 129 

Repp, W. A 124 



Samuel, J. Ray 141 

Sanford, Walter 138 

Scarritt, E. L 135 

Scarritt, W. C 135 

Schaich, J. G. Jr 149 

Schmelzer, C. J 144 

Schmelzer, H. F 144 

Schoettle. Gustav 142 

Schull, Perry 176 

Sebree, Frank P 132 

Seidlitz, Charles N 148 

Seehorn, T. J 140 

Serat. Seth 136 

Shelley, George M 132 

Shinnick, F. J 149 

Shouse, Louis 152 

Slavens, L. C 137 

Sloan, W. M 151 

Smith, B. H 133 

Smith, John H 146 

Snider, C. A 134 

Solomon, H. C 145 

Spalding, F. C 139 

Spalding, J. F 139 

Spellman, Clarence 142 

Speas, John W 150 

Stark, W. T 140 

Steele, Baylis 137 

Stewart, H. P 133 

Stiles. E. H 136 

Stine, Edward 14S 

Stone, R. S 147 

Stone, J. B 138 

Strauss, B. J HI 

Stricklette, W. T .147 

Strother, Sam B 113 

Swofford, J. J 131 

Swofford, R T 131 

Swinney, E. F 1 



i8o 



Index. 



Page. 

Swift, J. C 150 

Sullivan, John 14-5 

Sullivan, W. E 146 

Surface, John M 143 

Snlzbacher, Dr. B. L 152 

T 

Taggart, F. J 1-4 

Taylor, Clyde 176 

Tavlor, E. W 155 

Teasdale, W. B 153 

Thacher, John H 155 

Thomas, Dudley 156 

Thayer, W. B 15* 

Titus, Frank 171 

Trickett, W. P 151 

Turner, F. E 153 

V 

Van Valkenburgh, A. S 156 

Vineyard, J. J 157 

Vrooman, Walter 157 

W 

Wagner, J. W 169 

Wallace, T. B 159 



Page. 

Wallace, W. H 159 

Walls, George L 16-1 

Walsh, F. P 158 

Ward, H. C 163 

Watson, I. N 161 

Watson, M V 169 

Watts, H. H 165 

Welch, C J 167 

Welsh, J. B 16S 

Wendorf, John 163 

Wheeler, J. L 162 

Whittemore, S. J 162 

Williams, J. C 161 

Winants, W. H 160 

Winn, S. S 170 

Winner, W. E 168 

Winstanley, Edward 167 

Winter, Elisha 170 

Witten, Thomas 164 

Woods, W. S 1 60 

Wofford, John W 158 

Wollman, B. F 166 

Wollman, Henry 166 

Wollman, Morton 165 

Y 

Yeager, R. 1 171