(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The merchant of Venice : and other stories"

-';;;■_■-.•■ 



^g^^Sl^SPEARE 



^3 



■S 



SSBG 






UNIVERSITY OF 
NORTH CAROLINA 

School o f Library 
Science 



UNIVERSITY OF N.C. AT CHAPEL HILL 



00022093949 



THE MERCHANT OF VENICE 

AND OTHER STORIES. 



^^ 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://www.archive.org/details/merchantofveniceOOnesb 



-"^ jj-ri. ; ft V 







CHOOSING THE CASKET 



JHE J^EflGHANT OF VENICE, 

AND OTHER STORIES, 



BY 

E. NESBIT 

AND 

HUGH CHESSON. 



ILLUSTRATED BY 

FRANCES BRUNDAGE, M. BOWLEY, 

Etc., etc. 



Pobli^e^ io Tkeir Tlaje^hej 

T>e rt'»">§ Cr Queen . 

£r TU-hOne. "Prints <T "Pnr.ce^ c£ W-ljj 



PRINTED IN ENGLAND. 



CONTENTS s 

The Merchant of Venice. 

Timon of Athens. 

The Comedy of Errors* 




^V^Ti 



THE MERCHANT OF VENICE. 

^NTONIO was a rich and prosperous 
merchant of Venice. His ships were 
^L on nearly every sea, and he traded with 
fl* Portugal, with Mexico, with England, 
ci, and with India. Although proud of 
®° his riches, he was very generous with 
them, and delighted to use them in 



6 THE MERCHANT OF TENICE. 

relieving the wants of his friends, 
among whom his relation, Bassanio, 
held the first place. 

Now Bassanio, like many another 
gay and gallant gentleman, was reck- 
less and extravagant, and finding that 
he had not only come to the end of his 
for time, but was also unable to pay his 
creditors, he went to Antonio for fur- 
ther help. 

" To you, Antonio," he said, " I owe 
the most in money and in love : and I 
have thought of a plan to pay every- 
thing I owe if you will but help me." 

u Say what I can do, and it shall be 
done," answered his friend. 

Then said Bassanio, u In Belmont is 
a lady richly left, and from all quarters 
of the globe renowned suitors come to 
woo her, not only because she is rich, 
but because she is beautiful and good as 
well. She looked on me with such 
favour when last we met, that I feel 



THE MERCHANT OF VENICE. 7 

sure that I should win her away from 
all rivals for her love had I but the 
means to go to Belmont, where she 
lives." 

" All my fortunes," said Antonio, 
ki are at sea, and so I have no ready 
money ; but luckily my credit is good 
in Venice, and I will borrow for you 
what you need." 

There was living in Venice at this 
time a rich money - lender, named 
Shylock. Antonio despised and dis- 
liked this man very much, and treated 
him with the greatest harshness and 
scorn. He would thrust him, like a 
cur, over his threshold, and would even 
spit on him. Shylock submitted to all 
these indignities with a patient shrug ; 
but deep in his heart he cherished a 
desire for revenge on the rich, smug 
merchant. For Antonio both hurt his 
pride and injured his business. " But 
for him," thought Shylock, " I should 



8 THE MERCHANT OF VENICE. 

be richer by half a million ducats. On 
the market place, and wherever he can, 
he denounces the rate of interest I 
charge, and — worse than that — he lends 
out money freely." 

So when Bassanio came to him to 
ask for a loan of three thousand 
ducats to Antonio for three months, 
Shylock hid his hatred, and turning to 
Antonio, said — " Harshly as you have 
treated me, I would be friends with 
you and have your love. So I will 
lend you the money and charge you no 
interest. But, just for fun, you shall 
sign a bond in which it shall be agreed 
that if you do not repay me in three 
months' time, then I shall have the 
right to a pound of your flesh, to be 
cut from what part of your body I 
choose." 

" No," cried Bassanio to his friend, 
" you shall run no such risk for me." 

" Why, fear not," said Antonio, " my 



THE MERCHANT OF VENICE. 







ships will be home a month before the 
time. I will sign the bond." 

Thus Bassanio was furnished with the 



10 THE MERCHANT OF VENICE. 

means to go to Belmont, there to woo 
the lovely Portia. The very night he 
started, the money - lender's pretty 
daughter, Jessica, ran away from her 
father's house with her lover, and she 
took with her from her father's hoards 
some bags of ducats and precious stones. 
Shylock's grief and anger were terrible 
to see. His love for her changed to 
hate. " I would she were dead at my 
feet and the jewels in her ear," he 
cried. His only comfort now was in 
hearing of the serious losses which had 
befallen Antonio, some of whose ships 
were wrecked. " Let him look to his 
bond," said Shylock, "let him look to 
his bond." 

Meanwhile Bassanio had reached Bel- 
mont, and had visited the fair Portia. 
He found, as he had told Antonio, that 
the rumour of her wealth and beauty 
had drawn to her suitors from far and 
near. But to all of them Portia had 



THE MERCHANT OF VENICE. 11 

but one reply. She would only accept 
that suitor who would pledge himself 
to abide by the terms of her father's 
will. These were conditions that 
frightened away many an ardent 
wooer. For he who would win Por- 
tia's heart and hand, had to guess 
which of three caskets held her por- 
trait. If he guessed aright, then Portia 
would be his bride ; if wrong, then he 
was bound by oath never to reveal 
which casket he chose, never to marry, 
and to go away at once. 

The caskets were of gold, silver, 
and lead. The gold one bore this in- 
scription : — " Who chooseth me shall 
gain what many men desire " ; the 
silver one had this : — " Who chooseth 
me shall get as much as he deserves " ; 
while on the lead one were these 
words : — " Who chooseth me must give 
and hazard all he hath." The Prince 
of Morocco, as brave as he was black, 



12 T2E MERCHANT OF VENICE. 

was among the first to submit to this 
test. He chose the gold casket, for he 
said neither base lead nor silver could 
contain her picture. So he chose the 
gold casket, and found inside the like- 
ness of what many men desire — death. 

After him came the haughty Prince 
of Arragon, and saying, IC Let me have 
what I deserve — surely I deserve the 
lady," he chose the silver one, and 
found inside a fool's head. " Did I 
deserve no more than a fool's head ? " 
he cried. 

Then at last came Bassanio, and 
Portia would have delayed him from 
making his choice from very fear of 
his choosing wrong. For she loved him 
dearly, even as he loved her. " But," 
said Bassanio, " let me choose at once, 
for, as I am, I live upon the rack." 

Then Portia bade her servants to bring 
music and play while her gallant lover 
made his choice. And Bassanio took 



THE MERCHANT OF TENICE. 



13 




the oath and walked up to the caskets — 
the musicians playing softly the while. 
" Mere outward show," he said, " is to 
be despised. The world is still deceived 
with ornament, and so no gaudy gold or 
shining silver for me. I choose the 
lead casket ; joy be the consequence ! " 



14 THE MERCHANT OF VENICE. 

And opening it, he found fair Portia's 
portrait inside, and he turned to her 
and asked if it were true that she was 
his. 

" Yes," said Portia, " I am yours, 
and this house is yours, and with .them 
I give you this ring, from which you 
must never part." 

And Bassanio, saying that he could 
hardly speak for joy, found words to 
swear that he would never part with 
the ring while he lived. 

Then suddenly all his happiness was 
dashed with sorrow, for messengers 
came from Venice to tell him that 
Antonio was ruined, and that Shylock 
demanded from the Duke the fulfilment 
of the bond, under which he was enti- 
tled to a pound of the merchant's flesh. 
Portia was as grieved as Bassanio to 
hear of the danger which threatened 
his friend. 

" First," she said, " take me to church 



TKE MERCHANT OF VENICE. 

and make me your wife, and then go to 
Venice at once to help your friend. 
You shall take with you money enough 
to pay his debt twenty times over." 

But when her newly -made husband 
had gone, Portia went after him, and 
arrived in Venice disguised as a lawyer, 
and with an introduction from a cele- 
brated lawyer Bellario, whom the Duke 
of Venice had called in to decide the 
legal questions raised by Shylock's 
claim to a pound of Antonio's flesh. 
When the Court met, Bassanio offered 
Shylock twice the money borrowed, if 
he would withdraw his claim. But the 
money-lender's only answer was — 

u If every ducat in six thousand ducats 
Were in six parts, and every part a ducat, 
I would not draw them, — I would have my bond." 

It was then that Portia arrived in her 
disguise, and not even her own husband 
knew her. The Duke gave her wel- 
come on account of the great Bellario's 



15 THE MERCHANT OF TENICE. 

introduction, and left the settlement of 
the case to her. Then in noble words 
she bade Shylock have mercy. But he 
was deaf to her entreaties. " I will 
have the pound of flesh," was his 
reply. 

" What have you to say ? " asked 
Portia of the merchant. 

" But little," he answered ; " I am 
armed and well prepared." 

" The Court awards you a pound of 
Antonio's flesh," said Portia to the 
money-lender. 

" Most righteous judge ! " cried 
Shylock. " A sentence ; come, pre- 
pare." 

" Tarry a little. This bond gives you 
no right to Antonio's blood, only to his 
flesh. If, then, you spill a drop of his 
blood, all your property will be for- 
feited to the State. Such is the Law." 

And Shylock, in his fear, said, " Then 
I will take Bassanio's offer." 



THE MERCHANT OF VENICE. 




Jessica Leaving Home. 



18 THE MERCHANT OP VENICE. 

"No," said Portia sternly, "you shall 
have nothing but your bond. Take 
your pound of flesh, but remember, 
that if you take more or less, even by 
the weight of a hair, you will lose 
your property and your life." 

Shylock now grew very much fright- 
ened. " Give me my three thousand 
ducats that I lent him, and let him go." 

Bassanio would have paid it to him, 
but said Portia, "No! He shall have 
nothing but his bond." 

" You, a foreigner," she added, 
" have sought to take the life of a 
Venetian citizen, and thus by the 
Venetian law, your life and goods are 
forfeited. Down, therefore, and beg 
mercy of the Duke.'' 

Thus were the tables turned, and no 
mercy would have been shown to Shy- 
lock, had it not been for Antonio. As it 
was, the money-lender forfeited half his 
fortune to the State, and he had to settle 



THE MERCHANT OF VENICE. 



19 



the other half on his daughter's hus- 
band, and with this he had to be 
content. 

Bassanio, in his gratitude to the 
clever lawyer, was induced to part with 
the ring his wife had given hira, and with 
which he had promised never to part, and 
when on his return to Belmont he con- 
fessed as much to Portia, she seemed 
very angry, and vowed she would not be 




c 2 



20 THE MERCHANT OF VENICE. 

friends with him until she had her ring 
again. But at last she told him that it 
was she who, in the disguise of the 
lawyer, had saved his friend's life, and 
got the ring from him. So Bassanio 
was forgiven, and made happier than 
ever, to know how rich a prize he had 
drawn in the lottery of the caskets. 





TIMON OF ATHENS- 



J 1 OUR hundred years before the 
birth of Christ, a man lived in 
Athens whose generosity was not only 
great, but absurd. He was very rich, 
but no worldly wealth was enough for 
a man who spent and gave like Timon. 
If anybody gave Timon jaj^horse, he 



22 TIM ON OF ATHEN3. 

received from Timon twenty better 
horses. If anybody borrowed money 
of Timon and offered to repay it, 
Timon was offended. If a poet had 
written a poem and* Timon had time to 
read it, he would be sure to buy it ; and 
a painter had only to hold up his canvas 
in front of Timon to receive double its 
market price. 

Flavius, his steward, looked with dis- 
may at his reckless mode of life. When 
Timon' s house was full of noisy lords 
drinking and spilling costly wine, 
Flavius would sit in a cellar and cry. 
He would say to himself, " There are 
ten thousand candles burning in this 
house, and each of those singers bray- 
ing in the concert-room costs a poor 
man's yearly income a night" ; and he 
would remember a terrible thing said 
by Apemantus, one of his master's 
friends, " what a number of men eat 
Timon, and Timon sees them not ! " 



TIMON OF ATHENS. } 23 



Of course, Timon was much praised. 

A jeweller who sold him a diamond 
pretended that it was not quite perfect 
till Timon wore it. " You mend the 
jewel by wearing it/' he said. Timon 
gave the diamond to a lord called Sem- 
pronius, and the lord exclaimed, ¥ O, 
he's the very soul of bounty." " Timon 
is infinitely dear to me," said another 
lord, called Lucullus, to whom he gave 
a beautiful horse ; and other Athenians 
paid him compliments as sweet. 

But when Apemantus had listened to 
some of them, he said, u I'm going to 
knock out an honest Athenian's brains." 

" You will die for that," said Timon. 

" Then I shall die for doing nothing," 
said Apemantus. And now you know 
what a joke was like four hundred years 
before Christ. 

This Apemantus was a frank despiser 
of mankind, but a healthy one, because 
he was not unhappy. In this mixed 



TIMON OF ATHENS 



world anyone with a number of ac- 
quaintances knows a person who talks 
bitterly of men, but does not shun them, 
and boasts that he is never deceived by 
their fine speeches, and is inwardly 
cheerful and proud. Apemantus was 
a man like that. 

Timon, you will be surprised to hear, 
became much worse than Apemantus, 
after the dawning of a day which we 
call Quarter Day. 

Quarter Day is the day when bills 
pour in. The grocer, the butcher, and 
the baker are all thinking of their 
debtors on that day, and the wise man 
has saved enough money to be ready 
for them. But Timon had not ; and he 
did not only owe money for food. He 
owed it for jewels and horses and fur- 
niture ; and, worst of all, he owed it to 
money-lenders, who expected him to 
pay twice as much as he had borrowed. 

Quarter Day is a day when promises 



TIMON OF ATHENS. 




to pay are scorned, and on that day 
Tinion was asked for a large sum of 
money. " Sell some land/' he said to 
his steward. " You have no land," was 
the reply. " Nonsense ! I had a hun- 
dred thousand acres," said Timon. 
" You could have spent the price of 
the world if you had possessed it," said 
Flavius. 



TIMON OF ATHENS. 



" Borrow some then," said Timon ; 
" try Ventidius." He thought of Ven- 
tidius because he had once got Ventidius 
out of prison by paying a creditor of 
this young man. Ventidius was now 
rich. Timon trusted in his gratitude. 
But not for all; so much did he owe! 
Servants were despatched with requests 
for loans of money to several friends. 

One servant (Flaminius) went to 
Lucullus. When he was announced 
Lucullus said, "A gift, I warrant. I 
dreamt of a silver jug and basin last 
night." Then, changing his tone, 
" How is that honourable, free-hearted, 
perfect gentleman, your master, eh?" 

"Well in health, sir," replied Fla- 
minius. 

' i And what have you got there under 
your cloak ? " asked Lucullus, jovially. 

"Faith, sir, nothing but an empty 
box, which, on my master's behalf, I 
beg you to fill with money, sir." 



TIMON OF ATHENS. 



7 "La! la! la!" said Lucullus, who 
could not pretend to mean, "Ha! ha! 
ha ! " " Your master's one fault is that 
he is too fond of giving parties. I've 
warned him that it was expensive. 
Now, look here, Flaminius, you know 
this is no time to lend money without 
security, so suppose you act like a good 
boy and tell him that I was not at 
home. Here's three solidares for your- 
self." 

"Back, wretched money," cried 
Flaminius, " to him who worships 
you! " 

Others of Timon's friends were tried 
and found stingy. Amongst them was 
Sempronius. 

" Hum," he said to Timon's servant, 
" has he asked Ventidius ? Ventidius 
is beholden to him." 

"He refused." 

" Well, have you asked Lucullus ? " 

" He refused." 



TIMOJi OF ATHENS. 



" A poor compliment to apply to me 
last of all," said Sempronius, in affected 
anger. u If he had sent to me at first, 
I would gladly have lent him money, 
but Fm not going to be such a fool as to 
lend him any now." 

" Your lordship makes a good 
villain," said the servant. 

When Timon found that his friends 
were so mean, he took advantage of a 
lull in his storm of creditors to invite 
Ventidius and Company to a banquet. 
Flavius was horrified, but Ventidius and 
Company were not in the least ashamed, 
and they assembled accordingly in 
Timon' s house, and said to one another 
that their princely host had been jesting 
with them. 

" 1 had to put off an important en- 
gagement in order to come here," 
said Lucullus; "but who could refuse 
Timon?" 

"It was a real grief to me to be 



TIMON OF ATHENS. 




without ready money when he asked 
for some," said Semproniiis. 

" The same here," chimed in a third 
lord. 

Timon now* appeared, and his guests 



3» TIM ON OF ATHENS. 

vied with one another in apologies and 
compliments. Inwardly sneering, Timon 
was gracious to them all. 

In the banqueting hall was a table 
resplendent with covered dishes. 
Mouths watered. These summer-friends 
loved good food. 

"Be seated, worthy friends," said 
Timon. He then prayed aloud to the 
gods of Greece. " Give each man 
enough," he said, "for if you, who are 
our gods, were to borrow of men they 
would cease to adore you. Let men 
love the joint more than the host. Let 
every score of guests contain twenty 
villains. Bless my friends as much as 
they have blessed me. Uncover the 
dishes, dogs, and lap ! " 

The hungry lords were too much sur- 
prised by this speech to resent it. They 
thought Timon was unwell, and, 
although he had called them dogs, they 
uncovered the dishes. 



TIMON OF ATHENS. 31 

There was nothing in them but warm 
water. 

" May you never see a better feast," 
wished Tim on. "I wash off the flat- 
teries with which you plastered me and 
sprinkle you with your villainy." With 
these words he threw the water into his 
guests' faces, and then he pelted them 
with the dishes. Having thus ended 
the banquet, he went into an outhouse, 
seized a spade, and quitted Athens for 
ever. 

His next dwelling was a cave near 
the sea. 

Of all his friends, the only one who 
had not refused him aid was a handsome 
soldier named Alcibiades, and he had 
not been asked because, having quar- 
relled with the Government of Athens, 
he had left that town. The thought 
that Alcibiades might have proved a 
true friend did not soften Timon's bitter 
feeling. He was too weak-minded to 



32 TIMON OF ATHENS. 

discern the fact that good cannot be far 
from evil in this mixed world. He 
determined to see nothing better in all 
mankind than the ingratitude of Ven- 
tidius and the meanness of Lucullus. 

He became a vegetarian, and talked 
pages to himself as he dug in the earth 
for food. 

One day, when he was digging for 
roots near the shore, his spade struck 
gold. If he had been a wise man he 
would have enriched himself quickly, 
and returned to Athens to live in com- 
fort. But the sight of the gold vein 
gave no joy but only scorn to Timon. 
"This yellow slave," he said, "will 
make and break religions. It will 
make black white and foul fair. It 
will buy murder and bless the 
accursed." 

He was still ranting when Alcibiades, 
now an enemy of Athens, approached 
with his soldiers and two beautiful 



TIMON OF ATHENS. 33 



women who cared for nothing but 
pleasure. 

Timon was so changed by his bad 
thoughts and rough life that Alcibiades 
did not recognise him at first. 

" Who are you?" he asked. 

" A beast, as you are," was the reply. 

Alcibiades knew his voice, and offered 
him help and money. But Timon 
would none of it, and began to insult 
the women. They, however, when 
they found he had discovered a gold 
mine, cared not a jot for his opinion of 
them, but said, " Give us some gold, 
good Timon. Have you more ? " 

With further insults, Timon filled 
their aprons with gold ore. 

" Farewell," said Alcibiades, who 
deemed that Timon' s wits were lost ; 
and then his disciplined soldiers left 
without profit the mine which could 
have paid their wages, and marched 
towards Athens. 

D 



34 TIMON OF ATHENS. 

Timon continued to dig and curse, 
and affected great delight when he dug 
up a root and discovered that it was 
not a grape. 

Just then Apemantus appeared. " I 
am told that you imitate me," said 
Apemantus. 

" Only," said Timon, " because you 
haven't a dog which I can imitate." 

" You are revenging yourself on your 
friends by punishing yourself," said 
Apemantus. "That is very silly, for 
they live just as comfortably as they 
ever did. I am sorry that a fool should 
imitate me," 

"HI were like you," said Timon, " I 
should throw myself away." 

" You have done so," sneered Ape- 
mantus. a Will the cold brook make you 
a good morning drink, or an east wind 
warm your clothes as a valet would ? '' 

"Off with you!" said Timon; but 
Apemantus stayed a while longer and 



TIMON OF ATHENS. 



35 




told him he had a passion for extremes, 

which was true. Apemantus even made 

a pun, but there was no good laughter 

to be got out of Timon. 

Finally, they lost their temper like 

two schoolboys, and Timon said he was 

d2 



T.IMON OF ATHENS. 



sorry to lose the stone which he flung 
at Apemantus, who left him with an 
evil wish. 

This was almost an "at-home" day 
for Timon, for when Apemantus had 
departed, he was visited by some rob- 
bers. They wanted gold. 

" You want too much," said Timon. 
" Here are water, roots and berries." 

"We are not birds and pigs," said 
a robber. 

"No, you are cannibals, " k said Timon. 
"Take the gold, then, and-may it poison 
you ! Henceforth rob/ one another." .. .. 3 

He spoke so frightfully to them that, 
though they went away withj[full 
pockets, they almost repented of their 
trade. 

His last visitor on that day of visits 
was his good steward Flavius. " My 
dearest master ! n cried he. 

u Away ! What are you ? " said 
Timon. 



TIMON OF ATHENS. 37 

" Have you forgotten me, sir ? " asked 
Flavius, mournfully. 

"I have forgotten all men," was 
the reply ; " and if you'll allow 
that you are a man, I have forgotten 
you." 

"I was your honest servant," said 
Flavius. 

"Nonsense! I never had an honest 
man about me," retorted Timon. 

Flavius began to cry. 

u What ! shedding tears ? " said 
Timon. u Come nearer, then. I will 
love you because you are a woman, and 
unlike men, who only weep when they 
laugh or beg." 

They talked awhile; then Timon 
said, " Yon gold is mine. I will make 
you rich, Flavius, if you promise me 
to live by yourself and hate mankind. 
I will make you very rich if you 
promise me that you will see the flesh 
slide off the beggar's bones before you 



TIMON OF ATHENS. 



feed him, and let the debtor die in gaol 
before you pay his debt." 

Flavins simply said, M Let me stay to 
comfort yon, my master." 

" If yon dislike cnrsing, leave me," 
replied Timon, and he turned his back 
on Flavius, who went sadly back to 
Athens, too much accustomed to obed- 
ience to force his services upon his 
ailing master. 

The steward had accepted nothing, 
but a report got about that a mighty 
nugget of gold had been given him by 
his former master, and Timon therefore 
received more visitors. They were a 
painter and a poet, whom he had 
patronised in his prosperity. 

" Hail, worthy Timon ! " said the 
poet. " We heard with astonishment 
how your friends deserted you. No 
whip's large enough for their backs ! " 

" We have come," put in the painter, 
"to offer 'our services." 



TIMON OF ATHENS. 



"You've heard that I have gold," 
said Tim on. 

a There was a report," said the 
painter, blushing; "but my friend and 
I did not come for that." 

" Good honest men ! " jeered Timon. 
(i All the same, you shall have plenty of 
gold if you will rid me of two 
villains." 

"Name them," said his two visitors 
in one breath. 

a Both of you ! " answered Timon. 
Giving the painter a whack with a big 
stick, he said, " Put that into your 
palette and make money out of it." 
Then he gave a whack to the poet, and 
said, " Make a poem out of that and 
get paid for it. There's gold for 
you." 

They hurriedly withdrew. 

Finally Timon was visited by two 
senators who, now that Athens was 
threatened by Alcibiades, desired to 



40 TIMON OF ATHENS. 

have on their side this bitter noble 
whose gold might help the foe. 

*t Forget your injuries," said the 
first senator. " Athens offers you dig- 
nities whereby you may honourably 
live." 

a Athens confesses that your merit 
was overlooked, and wishes to atone, 
and more than atone, for her forgetful- 
ness," said the second senator. 

" Worthy senators," replied Timon, in 
his grim way, a I am almost weeping ; 
you touch me so! All I need are the 
eyes of a woman and the heart of a 
fool." 

But the senators were patriots. They 
believed that this bitter man could save 
Athens, and they would not quarrel 
with him. "Be our captain," they 
said, "and lead Athens against Alci- 
biades, who threatens to destroy her." 

" Let him destroy the Athenians too, 
for all I care/' said Timon ; and seeing 



TIM ON OF ATHENS. 



^3D 




an evil despair in his face, they left 
him. 

The senators returned to Athens, 
and soon afterwards trumpets were 



42 TIM ON OF ATHENS. 

blown before its walls. Upon the walls 
they stood and listened to Alcibiades, 
who told them that wrong-doers should 
quake in their easy chairs. They 
looked at his confident army, and were 
convinced that Athens must yield if he 
assaulted it, therefore they used the 
voice that strikes deeper than arrows. 

" These walls of ours were built by 
the hands of men who never wronged 
you, Alcibiades," said the first senator. 

" Enter," said the second senator, 
" and slay every tenth man, if your 
revenge needs human flesh." 

16 Spare the cradle," said the first 
senator. 

" I ask only justice,'' said Alcibiades. 
" If you admit my army, I will inflict 
the penalty of your own laws upon any 
soldier who breaks them.'' 

At that moment a soldier approached 
Alcibiades, and said, " My noble general, 
Timon is dead." He handed Alcibiades 



TIMON OF ATHENS. 43 

a sheet of wax, saying, " He is buried 
by the sea, on the beach, and over his 
grave is a stone with letters on it 
which I cannot read, and therefore I 
have impressed them on wax." 

Alcibiades read from the sheet of wax 
this couplet — 

" Here lie I, Timon, who, alive, all living men 

did hate. 
Pass by and say your worst ; but pass, and 

stay not here your gait." 

tl Dead, then, is noble Timon," said 
Alcibiades; and he entered Athens 
with an olive branch instead of a 
sword. 

So it was one of Timon' s friends who 
was generous in a greater matter than 
Timon's need ; yet are the sorrow and 
rage of Timon remembered as a warn- 
ing lest another ingratitude should arise 
to turn love into hate. 




' -^- V^~v/ 



THE COMEDY OF ERRORS. 



/FGrEON was a merchant of Syracuse, 
which is a seaport in Sicily. His 
wife was iEmilia, and they were very 
happy until iEgeon's manager died, and 
he was obliged to go by himself to a 
place called Epidamnum on the Adriatic. 
As soon as she could iEmilia followed 
him, and after they had been together 
some time two baby boys were born to 
them. The babies were exactly alike ; 
even when they were dressed differently 
they lookedjthe^same. 



THE COMEDY OF ERRORS. 45 



And now yon must believe a very- 
strange thing. At the same inn where 
these children were born, and on the 
same day, two baby boys were born to 
a much poorer couple than iEmilia and 
iEgeon; so poor, indeed, were the 
parents of these twins that they sold 
them to the parents of the other twins. 
^Emilia was eager to show her 
children to her friends in Syracuse, and 
in treacherous weather she and iEgeon 
and the four babies sailed homewards. 
They were still far from Syracuse when 
their ship sprang a leak, and the crew 
left it in a body by the only boat, caring 
little what became of their passengers. 

iEmilia fastened one of her children 
to a mast and tied one of the slave- 
children to him ; iEgeon followed her 
example with the remaining children. 
Then the parents secured themselves to 
the same masts, and hoped for safety. 
The ship, however, suddenly struck a 



46 THE COMEDY OF ERRORS. 

rock and was split in two, and iEmilia, 
and the two children whom she had 
tied, floated away from iEgeon and the 
other children. iEmilia and her charges 
were picked up by some people of 
Epidamnum, but some fishermen of 
Corinth took the babies from her by 
force, and she returned to Epidamnum 
alone, and very miserable. Afterwards 
she settled in Ephesus, a famous town 
in Asia Minor. 

iEgeon and his charges were also 
saved ; and, more fortunate than 
iEmilia, he was able to return to 
Syracuse and keep them till they were 
eighteen. His own child he called 
Antipholus, and the slave-child he 
called Dromio ; and, strangely enough, 
these were the names given to the 
children who floated away from him. 

At the age of eighteen the son who 
was with iEgeon grew restless with a 
desire to find his brother. iEgeon let 



THE COMEDT OF ERRORS. 



47 




him depart with his servant, and the 
young men are henceforth known as 
Antipholus of Syracuse and Dromio of 
Syracuse. 

Left alone, iEgeon found his home 
too dreary to dwell in, and travelled for 
five years. He did not, during his 



48 THE OOMEDY OF ERRORS. 

absence, learn all the news of Syracuse, 
or he would never have gone to 
Ephesus. 

As it was, his melancholy wandering 
ceased in that town, where he was 
arrested almost as soon as he arrived. 
He then found that the Duke of 
Syracuse had been acting in so tyran- 
nical a manner to Ephesians unlucky 
enough to fall into his hands, that the 
Government of Ephesus had angrily 
passed a law which punished by death 
or a fine of a thousand pounds any 
Syracusan who should come to Ephesus. 
iEgeon was brought before Solinus, 
Duke of Ephesus, who told him that he 
must die or pay a thousand pounds 
before the end of the day. 

You will think there was fate in this 
when I tell you that the children who 
were kidnapped by the fishermen of 
Corinth were now citizens of Ephesus, 
whither they had been brought by 



THE OOMEDY OF ERRORS. 



Duke Menaphon, an uncle of Duke 
Solinus. They will henceforth be 
called Antipholus of Ephesus and 
Dromio of Ephesus. 

Moreover, on the very day when 
^Egeon was arrested, Antipholus of 
Syracuse landed in Ephesus and pre- 
tended that he came from Epidamnum 
in order to avoid a penalty. He handed 
his money to his servant Dromio of 
Syracuse, and bade him take it to the 
Centaur Inn and remain there till he 
came. 

In less than ten minutes he was met 
on the Mart by Dromio of Ephesus, his 
brother's slave, and immediately mis- 
took him for his own Dromio. "Why 
are you back so soon ? Where did you 
leave the money ? " asked Antipholus of 
Syracuse. 

This Dromio knew of no money 
except sixpence, which he had received 

©n the previous Wednesday and given 

£ 



60 m THE OOMEDT OF ERRORS. 

to the saddler ; but he did know that 
his mistress was annoyed because his 
master was not in to dinner, and he 
asked Antipholus of Syracuse to go to 
a ; house called The Phoenix without 
delay. His speech angered the hearer, 
who would have beaten him if he had 
not fled. Antipholus of Syracuse then 
went to The Centaur, found that his 
gold had been deposited there, and 
walked out of the inn. 

He was wandering about Ephesus 
when two beautiful ladies signalled to 
him with their hands. They were 
sisters, and their names were Adriana 
and Luciana. Adriana was the wife of 
his brother Antipholus of Ephesus, and 
she Lad made up her mind, from the 
strar. ge account given her by Dromio of 
Ephesus, that her husband preferred 
another woman to his wife. " Ay, you 
may look as if you did not know me,'' 
she said to the man who was really her 



THE OOME&Y Off ERRORS, 51 

brother-in-law, " but I can remember 
when no words were sweet unless I said 
them, no meat flavoursome unless I 
carved it." 

"Is it I you address?" said Anti- 
pholus of Syracuse stiffly. lt I do not 
know you." 

" Fie, brother," said Luciana. " You 
know perfectly well that she sent 
Dromio to you to bid you come to 
dinner " ; and Adriana said, " Come, 
come ; I have been made a fool of long 
enough. My truant husband shall dine 
with me and confess his silly pranks 
and be forgiven." 

They were determined ladies, and 
Antipholus of Syracuse grew weary of 
disputing with them, and followed them 
obediently to The Phoenix, where a very 
late " mid-day " dinner awaited them. 

They were at dinner when Anti- 
pholus of Ephesus and his slave Dromio 

demanded admittance. " Maud, Bridget, 

e 2 



THE COMEDY OF ERRORS. 



Marian, Cecily, Gillian, Ginn ! " shouted 
Dromio of Ephesus, who knew all his 
fellow- servants' names by heart. 

From within came the reply, u Fool, 
dray-horse, coxcomb, idiot I" It was 
Dromio of Syracuse unconsciously in- 
sulting his brother. 

Master and man did their best to get 
in, short of using a crowbar, and finally 
went away ; but Antipholus of Ephesus 
felt so annoyed with his wife that he 
decided to give a gold chain which he 
had promised her, to another woman. 

Inside The Phoenix, Luciana, who 
believed Antipholus of Syracuse to be 
her-^sister's husband, attempted, by a 
discourse in rhyme, when alone with 
him, to make him kinder to Adriana. 
In reply he told her that he was not 
married, but that he loved her so much 
that, if Luciana were a mermaid, he 
would gladly lie on the sea if he might 
feel beneath him her floating golden hair. 



THE COMEDY OF ERRORS. 




Luciana was shocked and left him, 
and reported his lovemaking to Adriana, 
who said that her husband was old and 
ugly, and not fit to be seen or heard, 
though secretly she was very fond of 
him. 

Antipholus of Syracuse soon received 



54 TKE COMEDY OF ERRORS. 

a visitor in the shape of Angelo the 
goldsmith, of whom Antipholus of 
Ephesus had ordered the chain which 
he had promised his wife and intended 
to give to another woman. 

The goldsmith handed the chain to 
Antipholus of Syracuse, and treated his 
" I bespoke it not " as mere fun, so that 
the puzzled merchant took the chain as 
good-humouredly as he had partaken of 
Adriana's dinner. He offered payment, 
but Angelo foolishly said he would call 
again. 

The consequence w^as that Angelo 
was without money when a creditor 
of the sort that stands no nonsense, 
threatened him with arrest unless he 
paid his debt immediately. This 
creditor had brought a police officer 
with him, and Angelo was relieved to 
see Antipholus of Ephesus coming out 
of the house where he had been dining 
because he had been locked out of The 



THE OOMEDY OF ERRORS. '55 

Phoenix. Bitter was Angelo's dismay 
when Antipholus denied receipt of the 
chain, x^ngelo could have sent his 
mother to prison if she had said that, 
and he gave Antipholus of Ephesus in 
charge. 

At this moment up came Dromio of 
Syracuse and told the wrong Antipholus 
that he had shipped his goods, and that 
a favourable wind was blowing. To 
the ears of Antipholus of Ephesus this 
talk was simple nonsense. He would 
gladly have beaten the slave, but con- 
tented himself with crossly telling him 
to hurry to Adriana and bid her send 
to her arrested husband a purse of 
money which she would find in his desk. 

Though Adriana was furious with her 
husband because she thought he had 
been making love to her sister, she did 
not prevent Luciana from getting the 
purse, and she bade Dromio of Syracuse 
bring home his master immediately. 



66 THE COMEDY OF ERRORS. 

Unfortunately, before Dromio could 
reach the police station he met his real 
master, who had never been arrested, 
and did not understand what he meant 
by offering him a purse. Antipholus of 
Syracuse was further surprised when a 
lady whom he did not know asked him 
for a chain that he had promised her. 
She was, of course, the lady with whom 
Antipholus of Ephesus had dined when 
his brother was occupying his place at 
table. " Avaunt, thou witch ! " was the 
answer which, to her astonishment, she 
received. 

Meanwhile Antipholus of Ephesus 
waited vainly for the money which was 
to have released him. Never a good- 
tempered man, he was crazy with anger 
when Dromio of Ephesus, who, of 
course, had not been instructed to fetch 
a purse, appeared with nothing more 
useful than a rope. He beat the slave 
in the street despite the remonstrance 



THE COMEDY OF ERRORS. 



57 




of the police officer ; and his temper did 
not mend when Adriana, Luciana, and 
a doctor arrived tinder the impression 
that he was mad and must have his 
pulse felt. He raged so much that 
men came forward to bind him. But 
the kindness of Adriana spared him this 
shame. She promised to pay the sum 



THE COMEDY OF ERRORS. 



demanded of him, and asked the doctor 
to lead him to The Phoenix. 

Angelo's merchant creditor being 
paid, the two were friendly again, and 
might soon have been seen chatting 
before an abbey about the odd be- 
haviour of Antipholus of Ephesus. 
" Softly," said the merchant at last, 
" that's he, I think." 

It was not ; it was Antipholus of 
Syracuse with his servant Dromio, and 
he wore Angelo's chain round his neck ! 
The reconciled pair fairly pounced upon 
him to know what he meant by denying 
the receipt of the chain he had the 
impudence to wear. Antipholus of 
Syracuse lost his temper, and drew his 
sword, and at that moment Adriana 
and several others appeared. u Hold ! " 
shouted the careful wife. "Hurt him 
not ; he is mad. Take his sword away. 
Bind him — and Dromio too." 

Dromio of Syracuse did not wish to 



THE COMEDY OF ERRORS. 



be bound, and he said to his master, 
" Run, master ! Into that abbey, quick, 
or we shall be robbed ! " 

They accordingly retreated into the 
abbey. 

Adriana, Luciana, and a crowd re- 
mained outside, and the Abbess came 
out, and said, st People, why do you 
gather here ? " 

"To fetch my poor distracted hus- 
band," replied Adriana. 

Angelo and the merchant remarked 
that they had not known that he was 
mad. 

Adriana then told the Abbess rather 
too much about her wifely worries, for 
the Abbess received the idea that 
Adriana was a shrew, and that if her 
husband was distracted he had better 
not return to her for the present. 

Adriana determined, therefore, to 
complain to Duke Solinus, and, lo and 
behold ! a minute afterwards the great 



THE 00M1SDY OF ERRORS. 



man appeared with officers and two 
others. The others were JEgeon and 
the headsman. The thousand marks 
had not been found, and ^Egeon's fate 
seemed sealed. 

Ere the Duke could pass the abbey 
Adriana knelt before him, and told a 
woeful tale of a mad husband rushing 
about stealing jewelry and drawing his 
sword, adding that the Abbess refused 
to allow her to lead him home. 

The Duke bade the Abbess be sum- 
moned, and no sooner had he given the 
order than a servant from The Phoenix 
ran to Adriana with the tale that his 
master had singed off the doctor's beard. 

" Nonsense ! " said Adriana, " he's in 
the abbey." 

si As sure as I live I speak the truth," 
said the servant. 

Antipholus of Syracuse had not come 
out of the abbey, before his brother of 
Ephesus prostrated|himself in front of the 



THE (XJHEDY OF SJaROES. 




iEMlLTA, 



THE COMEDY OF ERRORS. 



Duke, exclaiming, a Justice, most gra- 
cious Duke, against that woman." He 
pointed to Adriana. "She has treated 
another man like her husband in my 
own house." 

Even while he was speaking iEgeon 
said, " Unless I am delirious, I see my 
son Antipholus." 

No one noticed him, and Antipholus 
of Ephesus went on to say how the 
doctor, whom he called "a threadbare 
juggler," had been one of a gang who 
tied him to his slave Dromio, and 
thrust them into a vault, whence he 
had escaped by gnawing through his 
bonds. 

The Duke could not understand how 
the same man who spoke to him was 
seen to go into the abbey, and he was 
still wondering when iEgeon asked 
Antipholus of Ephesus if he was not 
his son. He replied, tl I never saw my 
father in my life ; '' but so deceived was 



THE COMEDY OF ERRORS. 



iEgeon by his likeness to the brother 
whom he had brought up, that he said, 
" Thou art ashamed to acknowledge me 
in misery." 

Soon, however, the Abbess advanced 
with Antipholus of Syracuse and Dromio 
of Syracuse. 

Then cried Adriana, " I see two hus- 
bands or mine eyes deceive me ; n and 
Antipholus, espying his father, said, 
" Thou art iEgeon or his ghost." 

It was a day of surprises, for the 
Abbess said, "I will free that man by 
paying his fine, and gain my husband 
whom I lost. Speak, iEgeon, for I am 
thy wife iEmilia." 

The Duke was touched. " He is free 
without a fine," he said. 

So iEgeon and iEmilia were reunited, 
and Adriana and her husband recon- 
ciled ; but no one was happier than An- 
tipholus of Syracuse, who, in the Duke's 
presence, went to Luciana and said, " I 



64 



THE OOMBDY OF ERRORS. 



told you I loved you. Will you be my 
wife?" 

Her answer was given by a look, 
and therefore is not written. 

The two Dromios were glad to think 
they would receive no more beatings. 




A SELECTION FROM 

RAPHAEL TUCK & SONS' 

Publications. 

THE CHILDREN'S GEM LIBRARY. 

A series of 18 cloth-bound Story Books by the most popular Writers 
for Children. Illustrated in colour and black and white. Sixty- 
four pages. 

25c. each, or Six Books complete in fancy case, 1.50. 

CHILDREN'S STORIES BY POPULAR AUTHORS. 

1. Effie's Little Mother, by Rosa Nouchette Carey. 

2. Tic-tac-too, by L. T. Meade. 

3. Betsy Brian's Needle, by M. A. Hoyer. 

4. The Seven Plaits of Nettles, by Edric Vredenburg. 

5. The Rainbow Queen, by E. Nesbit. ^ 

6. Mildred and Her Mills, by Nora Chesson. 

CHILDREN'S STORIES FROM DICKENS. 

Told by Mary A. Dickens, Edric Vredenburg, Nora Chesson, 
and others. 

7. Little David Copperfield and other Stories 



8. 


Tiny Tim 


do. 




do. 


9- 


Jenny Wren 


do. 




do. 


10. 


The Blind Toy-Maker 


do. 




do. 


11. 


Little Paul Dombey 


do. 




do. 


12. 


The Runaway Couple 


do. 




do. 




CHILDREN'S STORIES FROM SHAKESPEARE. 




Told by E. Nesbit, 


etc. 




13- 


The Winter's Tale 








14. 


Romeo and Juliet 








15. 


A Midsummer Night's Dream 






16. 


Cymbeline 








>7- 


The Taming of the Shrew 








18. 


The Merchant of Venice 









FATHER TUCK'S "GOLDEN GIFT" SERIES. 

Board Covers, 50c. each. Cloth Binding, 75c. each. 

An exceptional line of Juvenile Books, each consisting of seventy- 
two pages of good quality paper. Fifty-six pages are illustrated 
in Black and White, sixteen pages printed in Two Colours, and 
frontispiece in Full Colour. The illustrations are by well-known 
and favourite artists, the letterpress being interesting, amusing 
and instructive. The Books are bound in Strong Boards with 
an attractive illustration in Full Colour, and are also in Cloth 
binding in a variety of shades. 

Days of Delight. Tales told by E. Nesbit, M. A. Hoyer, etc., 
etc. With pictures by T. Noyes Lewis, Hilda Cowham, etc., 
etc. 

Granny's Stories. By Nora Chesson, Margery Williams, Grace 
C. Floyd, etc., etc. Pictured by M. A. Attwell, Frances 
Brundage, etc. etc. 

Our Favourites. With verses by Grace C. Floyd, Gladys 
Davidson, etc., illustrated by W. Foster, G. H. Thompson, 
M. F. Taylor, etc., etc. 

Picture Pages. Verses by Clifton Bingham, H. M. Burnside, 
Grace C. Floyd, etc., and illustrations by M. Bowley, Hilda 
Cowham, Frances Brundage, etc., etc. 

The Children's Hour. Stories and verses by E. Nesbit, Norman 
Gale, etc., etc. Pictured by E. M. and M. F. Taylor, A. Dixon, 
etc., etc. 

To Nursery Land with Louis Wain. Illustrations by Louis 
Wain. With verses by Clifton Bingham, S. K. Cowham, 
etc., etc. 

BOOKS BY T. E. DONNISON, etc. 

Picture boards, One Dollar each. 

Odds and Ends and Old Friends. Thirty-six pages of coloured 

and black and white pictures, rhymes, etc. 
Old Fairy Legends, in New Colours, with verses by Nora 

Chesson. Thirty-six pages of coloured and black and white 

pictures and verses. 
Rhymes without Reason. Pictured and penned by E. M. and 

M. F. Taylor. Thirty-six pages of coloured and black and white 

pictures and rhymes. 
Proverbs Old, Newly Told, by Clifton Bingham. Thirty-six 

pages of coloured and black and white pictures and verses. 



ILLUSTRATED BIBLE BOOKS. 

Picture boards, One Dollar each. Cloth, 1.50 each. 

Picture Stories from the Bible. By Lady Magnus. Many of 
the most interesting events in the Old Testament, told by Lady 
Magnus in simple language, and most beautifully illustrated. 
Twenty-four full-page coloured pictures and numerous 
illustrations in two colours, by John Lawson, etc. Thirty-six 
pages. Size 13| by 10. 

Pictures from "The Life of Christ." UNTEARABLE. 
Incidents in the New Testament, and Parables and Miracles, 
exquisitely illustrated and related briefly and simply. Twenty- 
four full-page coloured pictures and four pages of illustra- 
tions, in two colours. 28 pages. Sizes 13| by, 10. 



BY THE REV. CANON DUCKWORTH, D.D., C.V.O. 

Sub-Dean of Westminster ; Ohaplain-in-Ordinary to the King. 
The Holy Land. Illustrated with forty-nine pictures in colour 
and black and white, from original drawings, painted in 
Palestine, by W. J. Webb. Coloured map. Thirty-six pages. 

BY THE REV. H. R. HAWEIS, M.A. 

Author of " Music and Morals," " Arrows in the Air," " Christ and 
Christianity," eto. 

The Child's Life of Jesus. Illustrated with twenty full-page 
coloured and forty-three black and white pictures. One hundred 
pages. 

HUMOROUS BOOKS BY LOUIS WAIN. 

Big Dogs, Little Dogs, Cats and Kittens. Thirty-six pages 
of coloured and black and white pictures with letterpress. 

At the Pantomime with Louis Wain. Thirty-six pages of 
coloured and black and white pictures with verses. 

In Storyland with Louis Wain. Cats as Fairyland and Sport- 
ing Characters with verses. On strong untearable leaves. 
Twenty-four full-page coloured pictures, and four black and 
white. 

In Cat and Dog Land with Louis Wain. Thirty six pages 
of coloured and black and white pictures with verses. 



FATHER TUCK'S ANNUAL. 

TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY-SIX PAGES. 
Every Page Illustrated. 

Edited by Edric Vredenburg. 

A truly excellent production of enthralling interest and amusement, 
containing all sorts of pictures in colour and black and white 
by some of the leading artists, illustrating stories in prose and 
poetry, songs, etc. , by well-known contributors. Eight coloured 
illustrations. 256 pages. 

Picture boards 1.25 

Cloth, bevelled, gilt edges 2.00 



FATHER TUCK'S "MIGHTY MIDGET" SERIES. 

Illuminated Board Covers. 

The Jungle Baby. An attractive miniature volume, containing 
a charmingly told little story of the Jungle, illustrated with 
twenty-four coloured pictures. Ninety-six pages 25c. 

The Lad who Always did his Best. Thirty-six pages of 
coloured and black and white pictures and letterpress, all most 
quaint and original. Two stories. 

Picture boards 15c. 

The Boy, the Piano, and the Baby. Thirty-six pages of 
coloured and black and white pictures and letterpress, full of 
delightful humour. Two stories. 

Picture boards 15c. 

The Five Little Pigs. Thirty-six pages of black and white 
pictures and letterpress illustrating and detailing the further 
adventures of "The Five Little Pigs," so well known to 
nursery inmates. 

Picture boards 15c. 

The Boy and his Presence of Mind and Nurse is Always 
Right. Thirty-six pages of black and white pictures and 
letterpress by C. M. Fry. Very striking and amusing. 

Picture boards 15o. 



5 

FATHER TUCK'S PATENT PAINTBOX POST CARD 
PAINTING BOOKS. 

WITH PALETTE AND PAINTS. 

Each book contains enough paint to colour all the pictures with the 
tints used in the copies. All that the young artist will require 
will be a brush and a glass of water. Oval palettes are cut 
through the upper portion of the pages, with novel and most 
attractive effect, and the colours are thus handy for use. 
These books are patented. 

Each post card is perforated all around, so that it can be 
detached and sent through the post when painted. 

Father Tuck's Paintbox Post Card Painting Book 

Series, containing twenty -four post cards in colour and twenty- 
four post cards in outline, and water colours prepared for use. 

Father Tuck's Palette Post Card Painting Book. 

Pictures of various objects, such as ships, carriages, fruit, 
furniture, etc. Patented 25c. 

Father Tuck's Welcome Post Card Painting Book. 

Pictures of toys, articles used in sport, etc. Patented 25c. 



Father Tuck's Paintbox Post Card Painting Book 

Series, containing twelve post cards in colour and twelve p'.st 
cards in outline, and water colours prepared for use 

Father Tuck's Favourite Post Card Painting Book. 

Patented 15c. 

Father Tuck's Playtime Post Card Painting Book. 

Patented 15c. 

Father Tuck's Toyland Post Card Painting Book. 

Patented 15c. 

Father Tuck's Kindergarten Post Card Painting 

Book. Patented 15c. 



FAIRY TALES, etc. 

Untearable leaves, Picture boards, 1.50 each. 

With Father Tuck to Fairyland. Re-told by Edric Vreden- 
burg and others. One hundred pages of the old familiar Fairy 
Tales, illustrated with twenty pages in colour, and numerous 
black and white pictures. 

With Father Tuck to Nurseryland. Edited by Edric 
Vredenburg. One hundred pages of the old nursery favourites, 
illustrated with twenty pages in colour, and eighty pages in 
black and white. 

With Father Tuck to Animal Land. Edited by Edric 
Vredenburg. One hundred pages of pictures and stories. 
Twenty pages in full colour. 

Hans Andersen's Fairy Tales. Illustrated with sixty-nine 
pictures in colour and black and white, by E. J. Andrews and 
S. Jacobs. Edited by Edric Vredenburg. 

Picture boards 1.50 

Grimm's Fairy Tales. Illustrated with ninety-five pictures in 
colour and black and white, by E. J. Andrews and S. Jacobs. 
Edited by Edric Vredenburg. 

Bound in Cloth, bevelled, gilt edges 2.50 

FATHER TUCK'S INDESTRUCTIBLE BOARD SERIES. 

CARDBOARD LEAVES THROUGHOUT. 

Special attention must be called to this serviceable line of Books, 
which are practically everlasting wear. Picture boards. Card- 
board leaves throughout. Coloured throughout. 

Our Farm. " Domestic animals 75c. 

Father Tuck's Bird A B C. A large variety of birds 50c. 

From Story land. Cinderella, etc., with verses 25c. 

Pets and Playmates. Animals, with verses 25c. 

Farm Favourites. Pictures of horses, etc., with verses 25c. 

By Road and Rail. Full pages, with verses 25c. 

From Fairyland. Well-known fairy-tale characters 25c. 

Animal Friends. Pretty, full-page pictures of farm scenes 25c. 

Pictures from the Bible. Pictures with simple descriptions 25c. 

Bible Pictures. The histories of Joseph and Moses 25c. 



7 
FATHER TUCK'S PANORAMA BOARD SERIES. 

COLOURED THROUGHOUT. 

Twenty pages of beautiful coloured pictures folding into the form 
of a book, but opening out and standing firmly with a most 
attractive panoramic effect, and thus to be used as a plaything. 
Pictures on both sides and letterpress. 

To Nursery Land. Full-page pictures of The Three Bears, 

Three Kittens, etc., etc. 50c. 

Old Friends. Full-page pictures of Nursery Rhymes, etc. 50c. 
Pictureland. Full-page pictures of children, fairy tales, etc. 25c. 
Twice Ten Cats. Comical cats, by Louis Wain 25c. 

BABY BOOKS. 

Size 7£ by 5 inches. 32 pages, with 4 illustrations in colour. 



Baby. Moire Antique. 




Paper boards 


50c. 


„ Padded cloth 


75c. 


„ Padded silk 


1.00 


Size 10 by 1\. 




r, S Book. Cloth boards 


1.50 


,, Padded cloth 


2.00 


,, Padded silk 


2.50 



Size 12£ by 9£ inches. 

86 pages of text and illustrations and 8 full -sized 

coloured plates. 

Padded cloth 5.00 

Padded silk 7.50 



8 

FATHER TUCK'S INDESTRUCTIBLE CALICO BOOKS. 

Printed Direct on Tuck's Washable Calico. 

These books are practically unspoilable. The colours are fast, so 
that they may, with perfect safety, be given to the smallest 
baby that, attracted by the bright pictures, finds pleasure in 
appropriating them as playthings ; and, being made of wash- 
able material, they can always be kept in a wholesome condi- 
tion. Ten pages, coloured throughout. 

All My Dollies. Twenty-four full-page dolls of all descriptions 

1.00 

Field Friends. Full-page pictures of domestic animals 75c. 

Nursery Hours. Full-page pictures of favourite nursery 

characters, etc. ^ 75c. 

Ten Pages. Coloured Throughout. 

Dollyland. Twelve full-page dolls of various kinds 50c. 

Dolly Dear. Twelve full-page boy dolls and girl dolls 50c. 

Six Pages. Coloured Throughout. 

Each containing eight full-page dolls, all different. Twenty -four 

dolls in the four books. 

Little Fisherman 25c. 

Baby Dolly 25c. 

Happy Dollies 25c. 

FATHER TUCK'S INDESTRUCTIBLE NURSERY MATS, 
NURSERY CURTAINS AND BED-SPREADS. 

PRINTED DIRECT ON WASHABLE CALICO. 

These Washable Calico Nursery Mats, Curtains, and Bed- 
spreads are of a most durable and attractive character. With their 
brightly coloured yet artistic pictures, which when washed retain 
their brilliant hues, they will be popular both in day and night 
nurseries, where they may be utilised in many ways. 

FATHER TUCK'S INDESTRUCTIBLE NURSERY MATS. 

Forty cents each. Eyeletted at the four corners. 
THE ANIMAL ABC. Animals, Birds, and Large Letters. 
NURSERY RHYMES. Favourite Nursery Rhymes, illustrated. 
OUR DOLLIES. Dolls of various descriptions. 



mp 



Pi 

Biff 

liBlill 



"WW" 







1111111 

Haass 

gill 



g«BB» 



ms?